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Ships of the United States Navy 
and Their Sponsors 

I 9 I 3— J 9 2 3 










Ships of the 
United States Navy 
and their Sponsors 

1913 — 1923 








Compiled by 

Anne Martin Hall 

Edith Wallace Benham 




Edited by 
Anne Martin Hall 




Privately Printed 









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COPYRIGHT, 1925 

BY 
THE SOCIETY OF SPONSORS 
OF THE 
UNITED STATES NAVY 



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FOREWORD 

HIS volume is supplementary to "Ships of the United 
States Navy and their Sponsors, 1797-1913," published 
in 1913 to bring together from widely separated and in- 
accessible sources all obtainable facts relating to the launch- 
ing and naming of the fighting craft of our Navy, old and 
new, and the bestowal of the names upon these vessels by 
sponsors. Records of Navy launchings and namings had 
been preserved nowhere in book form up to that time. La- 
borious research in many directions was necessary to col- 
lect and verify fragmentary data. 

The present volume has been prepared primarily for the 
Society of Sponsors of the United States Navy, and also 
in response to requests for an up-to-date book, from non- 
members and from libraries. Full accounts of all launchings 
would be repetition. Typical accounts only are given. 

Complete biographies of individuals, or complete histo- 
ries of vessels are manifestly impossible in this volume. 
Historical notes are not given as complete histories. Bi- 
ographical notes of patriots for whom Navy vessels have 
been named are not given as complete biographies. Con- 
spicuous facts of biographies and of histories are set forth 
for the purpose of interesting and unmistakable identifi- 
cation and for the inspiration of every reader with patriotic 
pride in the achievements of our Navy. Authorities for 
biographical notes of naval officers and civilians for whom 
naval vessels have been named are Navy Department 
Records and the family records of the patriots thus honored. 
Grateful acknowledgements are made to Mrs. Annie H. 
Eastman, of the Navy Department Library, for assistance 
in biographical research, and to many friends who have 
encouraged and assisted the work. 

Anne Martin Hall 

Editor 



[v] 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Custom of Bestowing the Name on U. S. Navy Vessels xi 

Nomenclature and U. S. Statute Laws Governing 
Names of Vessels xvi 

Ships of the U. S. Navy and Their Sponsors 1913-1923. 
Alphabetically Arranged 3 

Society of Sponsors of the U. S. Navy 273 

The Baptism of Ships — A History of the Custom 
among Various Nations 283 

Addenda to "Ships of the U. S. Navy and their Spon- 
sors 1797-1913" 293 

Index of Names of Sponsors of U. S. Navy Vessels . 301 



[vii] 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 

PAGE 

U. S. Battleship "Colorado" steaming full speed Frontispiece 

Launching Stand, U. S. Battleship "Arizona," arrival of the Sponsor ... 6 

Ready! Named! Launched! 8 

Launching Party, U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Badger" 12 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer " Bainbridge " taking the water 16 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer " Brooks " steaming full speed 24 

Launching Party, U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Broome" 28 

Bow of U.S. Scout Cruiser "Cincinnati" and launching party 32 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer " Cole, " speeding 40 

Launching Party, U. S. Battleship "Colorado" 48 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Converse" steaming full speed 56 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Du Pont" just off the ways 62 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer " Ellis " entering the water 76 

Launch of the Steam Frigate "Fulton the First" in 18 14 86 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Reuben James" going full speed 104 

A Good Luck Shower! n^ 

U. S. Cruiser "Marblehead" about to leave the ways . 12. 

U. S. Battleship "Maryland" launching stand 126 

U. S. Battleship "Maryland" sliding down the launching ways 130 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "McDermut" just leaving the ways .... 138 

U. S. Scout Cruiser "Milwaukee" under way , 148 

Ready to launch U. S. Battleship "New York" 156 

U.S. Battleship "Oklahoma" under way 160 

Launching Party, U. S. Scout Cruiser "Omaha" 168 

Naming the U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Peary" 172 

Launching Party, U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer " Pillsbury" 174 

Submarine coming to the surface 182 

U. S. Submarine " R-14" going full speed on the surface 186 

Launching of the U. S. Submarine "R-2" 190 

Naming the U. S. Submarine "R-26" 194 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Reid" going full speed 198 

U. S. Scout Cruiser "Richmond" making a record run 202 

Naming the U. S. Submarine "S-15" 206 

U.S. Submarine "S-42" launched 210 

Indian Princess Sponsor for the U. S. Submarine "S-48," with her party. . . 214 

[ix] 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS 



U. S. Airship "Shenandoah" moored to the mast of the U. S. S. "Patoka". . 218 

Sponsor of U. S. Airship "Shenandoah" pulling the cord to break the bottle 220 

Naming the U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Stewart 2nd" 230 

Sponsor and party of the U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Sturtevant" . . . 236 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Tatnall" taking the water 240 

U. S. Battleship "Tennessee" leaving the New York Navy Yard fully com- 
pleted 244 

Just before the U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Tracy" started down the ways 248 

U. S. Cruiser "Trenton 2nd," sponsor breaking the bottle 254 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Truxton 2nd," breaking the bottle on the bow 258 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer " Wainwright" leaving the ways 262 

U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Waters" camouflaged 266 

Launching Party, U. S. Torpedoboat Destroyer "Whipple 2nd" 270 

Sponsors present at organization meeting of Society of Sponsors of U. S. 

Navy 278 

Presidents of the Society of Sponsors of the U. S. Navy, 1908-1923 . . . 282 

Launching Party, U. S. S. "Chattanooga 1st," October 13th, 1865 .... 294 



[>] 



BESTOWING THE NAME 

HE launching of a Navy ship is an engineering feat of great 
magnitude, usually so successfully performed that the spectator 
thrills with enthusiasm entirely devoid of anxiety. Each suc- 
ceeding battleship becomes larger and heavier, and careful calcu- 
lation must be worked out bearing directly upon the launching 
even before a single rivet has been driven. 

It is the usual custom in launching naval vessels to send them 
into the water stern first, the fuller form of the hull aft tending 
to make the vessel rise more quickly from her first plunge than 
would be the case were she sent into the water bow first, and it 
also makes the pivotal strain less at that instant when the bow 
on entering the water and the stern upon rising throw the burden 
of weight upon the forward poppets or timber shores. 

In the earlier years of our Navy the name of a United States 
Navy ship was usually bestowed by an officer of the Navy. The 
naming party went on board to be launched with the ship, and 
the sponsor broke a bottle of wine or water over the bow of the 
vessel and pronounced the name at the moment that the bow 
struck the water. 

The ceremony of bestowing the name upon a United States 
Navy ship has always been a civil ceremony and without intent 
of religious significance. 

Examined records give only one instance of religious ceremony 
in connection with the launch of a United States Navy ship 
prior to 1914. Prayer, offered by a clergyman, preceded the 
civil ceremony of launching and naming "Princeton (1st)" in 1843. 

Just before the vessel was released Captain Stockton, U. S. 
Navy, who was in charge, assembled those on board and a prayer 
was offered by the Reverend Doctor Suddards: 

"Eternal God, Creator of the Universe, Governor of Nations. 
Humbly we prostrate ourselves before Thee and ask Thy blessing. 
Most humbly we beseech Thee with Thy favor to behold and 
bless Thy servant the President of the United States and all the 
officers of the Government. May the vessel about to be launched 
be guarded by Thy gracious Providence and care. May it not 
bear the sword in vain, but as the minister of God be a terror to 
those who do evil and a defense to those who do well. Graciously 

Cxi] 



BESTOWING THE NAME 



bless its officers and men. May love of country be engraven 
upon their hearts. Remember in mercy both arms of our National 
defense, and may virtue, honor and religion pervade all their ranks. 
Bless all nations and individuals on the earth and hasten the 
time when the benefits of holy religion shall have so prevailed 
that none shall wage war again for the purpose of aggression and 
none shall need it as a means of defense. All of which blessings 
we ask in the name of Him who taught us to say: 'Our Father 
who art in Heaven' . . ." — (U. S. Gazette) 

In 1914 the custom of prayer at launchings of our battleships 
was established through the efforts of the Society of Sponsors. 
A copy of the historic prayer offered in 1843 was forwarded to 
the Secretary of the Navy with a petition that an adapted form 
of the prayer be offered at launchings of our Navy battleships. 

Army and Navy Journal: 

"At the launching of the battleship "Oklahoma" at Camden, 
N. J., on March 23, 1914, there was observed the custom which 
has always prevailed in other Christian countries of prayer pre- 
ceding the civil ceremony of naming a battleship. This sugges- 
tion, made by Mrs. Reynold T. Hall, president of the Society 
of Sponsors, was most enthusiastically received by the Oklahoma 
delegation to the launching, and Bishop Hoss, of Oklahoma, was 
invited to offer the invocation. Prior to this occasion the United 
States had launched its battleships with civil ceremony only. In 
other countries this religious custom is always observed, and in 
England the special prayer at launchings is one of great beauty. 
This suggestion made by the Society of Sponsors was highly 
commended by the Secretary of the Navy and by the Oklahoma 
state officials. Secretary Daniels is so favorably impressed with 
the idea, that hereafter a prayer will be part of the exercises of 
launching a battleship." 

The prayer used at the launching of British battleships was 
prepared by the Archbishop of Canterbury for the launching of 
H. M. S. "Alexandra" in 1875. An admiralty circular gives the 
form of service to be observed at launchings and the prayer. 
The service commences with the 107th psalm, beginning with 
verse twenty-three: "They that go down to the sea in ships . . ." 
The prayer follows: 

"O Thou that sitteth above the water-floods and stilleth the 
raging of the sea, accept, we beseech Thee, the supplication of 
Thy servants for all who in this ship now and hereafter shall 
commit their lives unto the perils of the deep. In all their ways 
enable them truly and godly to serve Thee, and by their Christian 

[xii] 



BESTOWING THE NAME 



lives, to set forth Thy glory throughout the earth. Watch over 
them in their going forth and in their coming in that no evil 
befall them nor mischief come nigh to hurt their souls, and so 
through all the changes and chances of this mortal life bring 
them of Thy mercy to the sure haven of Thine everlasting king- 
dom, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen." The Lord's 
Prayer concludes the ceremonial. 

Early records of naming ceremonies are not complete owing to 
destruction of old records, and lack of newspaper space or 
enterprise, for the records discovered show that Navy launchings 
were occasions of great public interest and enthusiasm, and were 
attended by large numbers of people. Many prominent officials 
were present and were launched with the ship. Commodore 
John Paul Jones was aboard the "America," the first ship of the 
line launched in America, and in several instances the Secretary of 
the Navy has been launched with a Navy ship. The "America" 
built in 1782, was presented to the French Government. 

The first record of a United States Navy naming or " christen- 
ing" is that of the "Constitution," October 20, 1797, on which 
occasion Captain James Sever, U. S. Navy, " broke a bottle of 
wine over the bow of the frigate." When the frigate "Inde- 
pendence" was launched, June 20, 1814, "an officer of the 'Con- 
stitution' (Commodore Bainbridge) had the honor of christening 
her as she struck the water." The frigate "Brandywine," in 
1825, "smote the water in fine style and Captain Dove stationed 
on her bow christened her with the usual ceremony." 

In 1828 the first woman sponsor appears in print, but her 
identity may be forever shrouded in the mystery of the words: 
"The 'Concord' glided beautifully into her destined element and 
was christened by a young lady of Portsmouth." (Preble's His- 
tory of the Portsmouth Navy Yard.) In those days it was not 
the fashion to put the names of ladies in the papers. 

From that date up to the present time examined records give 
the names of few men who have participated in the naming of 
United States Navy ships. The ships were: the "Pennsylvania" 
in 1837; the "Dale" in 1839; the "Princeton (1st)" and the 
frigate "Raritan" in 1843; the "San Jacinto" and "Susquehanna" 
in 1850; the "New Ironsides" in 1862; the "Miantonomah" in 
1863; the "Quinnebaug" in 1866; the "Mackenzie" in 1901. 1 

A bottle of wine has been broken upon the bow of the majority 
of our Navy vessels at the time of naming. Some vessels have 
been sprinkled with water, the bottle of water usually having 

1 See Vol. i, 1797-1913. 

[ xiii ] 



BESTOWING THE NAME 



been brought from the river for which the ship was named, or 
from a spring in the state or near the city for which the ship was 
named. In a few instances two bottles have been broken — one 
of wine, the other water. 

There have been a few unique exceptions. A bottle of American 
whiskey was broken over the bow of "Princeton (ist)" and over 
the frigate "Raritan" in 1843; and a bottle of brandy upon 
"San Jacinto" in 1850, and "New Ironsides" in 1862, by the 
Naval officers who bestowed the names, — probably to stimulate 
their good luck as strongly as possible. A fair young woman 
sponsor broke a bottle of pure Irish whiskey over the bow of the 
"Shamrock" in 1863, bestowing the name. The "Germantown" 
and the "Pawtuxet" were sprinkled with wine and water com- 
mingled at the time of naming. 

At several of our Navy launchings, according to a Japanese 
custom, three doves or carrier pigeons have been let loose at the 
moment of launching, with red, white and blue ribbons attached 
to their necks. In Japan doves were originally believed to be 
messengers of Hachiman, the patron god of the warriors, and 
their use at launchings of their warships meant wishing success in 
arms. 

Some Navy ships have been launched without ceremony of any 
kind, notably the "Monitor" and the "Boston," and many of 
the submarine chasers launched during the World War. 

Of late years it has become the custom for the launching party 
to stand upon a platform beside the ship's stem, and at the 
instant that the vessel starts to move toward the water the 
sponsor breaks a bottle of champagne against the bow and pro- 
nouncing the name of the ship says: "I name thee in the name 
of the United States." 



I 



NOMINATING THE SPONSOR 



N the old Navy it was the custom for Navy Yard officials to 
invite a sponsor to break the bottle of wine or water and bestow 
the name upon the vessel. Sometimes contestants for the honor 
were allowed to draw lots. 

Of late years it has been the custom for the Navy Department 
to request the Governor of the State to nominate a sponsor for 
the vessel to be named for a State; or the Mayor or Council of a 
City to nominate a sponsor for the vessel to be named for a city. 

When vessels are named for individuals it is customary for the 
Navy Department to nominate as sponsor some member of the 

[ xiv ] 



BESTOWING THE NAME 



family of the officer, enlisted man, or distinguished civilian for 
whom the vessel is named. If no member of the family is avail- 
able, the Navy Department or the officials of the Shipbuilding 
Company designate a sponsor. 

Editor 



[xv] 



NOMENCLATURE OF VESSELS OF THE 

U. S. NAVY 

J. HE Continental Navy was a heterogeneous collection of 
vessels, partly vessels commissioned by the Continental Congress, 
partly vessels fitted out and commissioned by the Colonies, and 
many privateers. 

The first government vessels were purchased by a Marine 
Committee appointed by Congress, and were re-named by that 
Committee. Among the first names were: "Columbus," for 
Christopher Columbus; "Alfred," for Alfred the Great; "Cabot," 
for the early explorer of America; "Andrea Doria," for the famous 
Genoese sailor; "Lexington," for the Battle of Lexington, the 
first Revolutionary conflict. 

The thirteen ships authorized to be built December 13, 1775, 
were by resolution of Congress to be named: "Congress," "Ran- 
dolph," "Hancock," "Washington," "Trumbull," "Raleigh," 
"Effingham," "Montgomery," "Warren," "Boston," "Provi- 
dence," "Virginia" and "Delaware." Among the next names 
authorized were "Ranger," "Alliance," "Hornet," "America" 
and "Deane." 

In 1794 Congress authorized six frigates to be built, to be 
named: "United States," "Constitution," "Constellation," 
"President," "Chesapeake," "Congress." 

In 1798 the Navy Department was established, and Benjamin 
Stoddert was appointed the first Secretary of the Navy. 

March 3, 1819, Congress passed the first statute law governing 
the naming of vessels of the Navy. 

"Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America, in Congress assembled, That all the 
ships of the Navy of the United States, now building, or here- 
after to be built, shall be named by the Secretary of the Navy, 
under the direction of the President of the United States, accord- 
ing to the following rule: to wit: Those of the first class shall be 
called after the States of this Union, those of the second class 
after the rivers; and those of the third class after the principal 
cities and towns, taking care that no two vessels in the Navy 
shall bear the same name." 

[xvi] 



NOMENCLATURE 



June 12, 1858, the following Act was approved: 

"And be it further enacted, That all the steamships of the 
Navy of the United States now building, or hereafter to be built, 
shall be named by the Secretary of the Navy, under the direc- 
tion of the President of the United States, according to the follow- 
ing rule, namely, All those of forty guns or more shall be con- 
sidered of the first class, and shall be called after the States of 
the Union; those of twenty and under forty guns shall be con- 
sidered as of the second class, and be called after the rivers and 
principal towns or cities; and all those of less than twenty guns 
shall be of the third class, and named by the Secretary of the 
Navy as the President may direct, care being taken that no two 
vessels in the Navy shall bear the same name." 

At the commencement of the Civil War a large number of 
vessels were purchased for the Navy and an Act of Congress, 
August 5, 1 861, authorized the Secretary of the Navy to change 
the names of purchased vessels. 

A large number of vessels were hurriedly built for the Navy, 
and in some instances were somewhat indiscriminately named. 
The first vessels built were gunboats of the "Shawmut" class, to 
many of which were given Indian names, the name often being 
taken from an Indian-named town or village or creek near where the 
vessel was built. Next came sloops-of-war of the "Tuscarora" class, 
named after Indian-named rivers. Double-enders of the "Sass- 
acus" class were also given Indian names. Some vessels were 
named after places of Naval engagements, such as "Vicksburg." 

The "Harriet Lane" named for the niece of President Buchanan 
and transferred from the U. S. Treasury Department to the Navy, 
is the only fighting vessel on the Navy lists named for a woman. 

The " Monitor," an entirely new type of vessel, was named by 
Ericsson himself at the request of the Navy Department. Ericsson, 
in his letter to the Secretary of the Navy, says: 

"The impregnable and aggressive character of this structure 
will admonish the leaders of the Southern rebellion that the 
batteries on the banks of their rivers will no longer present barriers 
to the entrance of the Union's forces. But there are other leaders 
who will be admonished . . . 'Downing Street' will hardly view 
with indifference this last 'Yankee notion' — this Monitor . . . 
On this and many similar grounds, I propose the name of this 
battery — 'Monitor. ' " 

Ironclads of the "Monitor" type were classed as Monitors. 

[ xvii ] 



NOME NCL ATURE 



Many were given Indian names, such as "Canonicus," "Man- 
hattan," "Miantonomah." 

At the beginning of the Spanish War, Act of Congress, May 4, 
1898, was passed: 

"That hereafter all first-class battleships and monitors owned 
by the United States shall be named for the States and shall not 
be named for any city, place or person until the names of the 
States shall have been exhausted." 

May 13, 1908, the Act of May 4, 1898, was superseded by an 
Act providing that "Monitors may be named as the President 
may direct." 

The Act of March 3, 1901, provided 

"That the President of the United States be, and is hereby 
authorized to establish, and from time to time to modify, as the 
needs of the service may require, a classification of the vessels of 
the Navy." 

That was put into effect, and vessels of war were divided up 
as follows: 

"Torpedo boat destroyers, torpedo boats, tugs, sailing ships, 
and receiving ships shall not be rated. Other vessels shall be 
rated by tons of displacement, as follows: 

"First-rates, men-of-war only of 8,000 tons and above. 

"Second-rates, men-of-war of 4,000 tons and under 8,000 tons, 
and converted yachts and auxiliary vessels of 6,000 tons and 
above, except colliers, refrigerating ships, distilling ships, tank 
steamers, repair ships, hospital ships, and other ships constructed 
or equipped for special purposes. 

"Third-rates, men-of-war from 1,000 to 4,000 tons, and con- 
verted and auxiliary vessels from 1,000 to 6,000 tons." 

The above changes of statute laws will explain the seeming 
inconsistency of Navy namings at different periods. 

Under existing statute laws our battleships and armored 
cruisers are named for States of the Union; our cruisers for cities. 
Torpedo boat destroyers are named for distinguished Naval 
Officers, for heroic enlisted men, for Secretaries of the Navy, and 
in a few instances for U. S. Senators and Congressmen distin- 
guished in the Naval Committees, and for distinguished inven- 
tors. Mine sweepers are named for the various birds. Sub- 
marines are designated by letters and numerals. The first air- 
ship to be named and christened was the "Shenandoah," the 
Indian name meaning "Daughter of the Stars." 

[ xviii ] 



NOMENCLATURE 



At the present time, fuel ships, such as colliers, are given 
Greek mythological names. Oil carriers are being assigned Indian 
names of rivers of the country in which oil is produced, repair 
ships after distinguished engineers, and all ships that are not 
specified under the law are to be named according to their dis- 
tinctive purpose. 

In order that the names of the States, or the names of historic 
ships may be assigned to the new dreadnoughts, there have been 
changes in the names of some of our ships — notably: "North 
Carolina" renamed "Charlotte"; "Maryland" renamed "Fred- 
erick"; "West Virginia" renamed "Huntingdon"; "South 
Dakota" renamed "Huron"; "Montana" renamed "Missoula"; 
"Pennsylvania" renamed "Pittsburgh"; "Colorado" renamed 
"Pueblo"; "Washington" renamed "Seattle"; "New York the 
first," changed to "Saratoga," then to "Rochester." 

Of the German ships taken over during the World War and 
added to our Navy, were: "Kronprinz Wilhelm," renamed 
" Baron von Steuben," after the Prussian General who aided in 
the development and organization of Washington's army in the 
Revolution; "Prince Eitel Friederich," renamed "Baron de 
Kalb," after the Bavarian General who came to this country 
with Lafayette in 1777 and gave valuable services until 1780, 
when he was wounded and died; "Geier," renamed "Schurz," 
after Carl Schurz, German-American soldier and statesman. The 
names chosen for the other vessels were generally of coast towns 
which have some connection with our Navy. 

In 191 5 the suggestion was made by the Society of Sponsors 
that the battle cruisers just authorized to be built, a new type of 
U. S. Navy vessel for the naming of which existing statute laws 
made no provision, should be named for the famous old fighting 
ships of our early Navy: "Constitution," "Constellation," 
"Saratoga," "Lexington," "Ranger" and others. Later other 
organizations urged these names. 

The Navy had long urged the revival of these names of famous 
fighting ships of our early history. 

The names of famous fighting ships: "Constitution," "Con- 
stellation," "Saratoga," "Lexington," "Ranger," and "United 
States" were assigned to our new battle cruisers. The "Lexing- 
ton" and "Saratoga" were scheduled for conversion into aircraft 
carriers in 1922. 

The "Constitution," launched in 1797, was the famous "Old 
Ironsides," which, under command of Isaac Hull, captured the 
British man-of-war "Guerriere," August 19, 1812. 

C xix ] 



NOM E N C L ATU R E 



The "Constellation" of the old navy, called "The Lucky 
Ship" because of her long record of victories and captures, was 
launched in 1797 and continued in commission during the days 
of the Civil War. 

The "Ranger" was a ship of John Paul Jones, and received 
the first salute of a foreign war ship, from the French fleet in 
Quiberon Bay, February 14, 1778. 

The "Lexington" was the flagship of Commodore John Barry, 
which, sailing from Philadelphia, captured the British sloop 
"Edward" and brought back to the Marine Committee of the 
Continental Congress the first prize of the war. 

The "Saratoga" was the flagship of Commodore MacDonough 
at the battle of Lake Champlain, September 14, 1814, when an 
inferior American force decisively defeated a superior British force. 

The "United States'" principal exploit occurred under Com- 
modore Decatur's command, when the "Macedonian" was cap- 
tured after a hot fight in 18 12. The latter was taken into port 
and afterwards added to the American fleet. 

In commemoration of glorious records, and as reminders of 
worthy deeds of our history, such names, if continued in associa- 
tion with the current national life, would be a constant inspiration 
to the country and the Navy. 

Editor 



Ox] 



Ships of the United States Navy 
and Their Sponsors 

r 9 r 3 — r 9 2 3 



Ships of the United States Navy 
and Their Sponsors 

I 9 I 3— r 9 2 3 

ABBOT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 5 inches 

Named for Commodore Joel Abbot, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 191 8, at Newport News S. B. & D. D. 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Louise Abbot Cooke, great-granddaugh- 
ter of Commodore Joel Abbot, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore joel abbot, u. s. Navy, was bom in 

Westford, Massachusetts, 1793; died 1855. Appointed mid- 
shipman, 18 12; his first cruise was under Commodore 
Rodgers on the frigate "President," who recommended 
him to Commodore Macdonough, then in command of the 
naval forces of Lake Champlain; he was given a mission 
to penetrate the British lines and destroy a quantity of 
masts and spars; this he accomplished, having assumed 
the disguise of a British officer, for which service he was 
promoted lieutenant and voted a sword by Congress. He 
was commissioned captain in 1848; in 1852 he commanded 
the frigate "Macedonian" on the Japan expedition, suc- 
ceeding Commodore Perry as fleet officer of the squadron. 
During this critical period he often performed delicate 
diplomatic duties with complete satisfaction to our govern- 
ment. 

[3] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

ALAMEDA 

FUEL SHIP 
Length, 446 feet Beam, 58 feet Draft, 23 feet, 6 inches 

Named for Alameda, California 

Launched July 15, 1919, at William Cramp and Sons' 
S. and E. Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Richard G. Widdows (Ethel Mull), 
daughter of Mr. J. H. Mull, President of the Company. 

ALDEN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral James Alden, U. S. Navy 

Launched June 7, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Vernon M. Dorsey (Sarah Alden), great- 
niece of Rear Admiral James Alden, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral james alden, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Portland, Maine, 1810, died 1877. Appointed mid- 
shipman 1828, rear admiral 1871. During the Mexican 
War — 1847-48 — he was attached to the home squadron 
and participated in the capture of Vera Cruz; Civil War 
— 1861, commanded the U. S. S. "South Carolina," which 
reinforced Fort Pickens. April, 1862, was actively engaged 
in operations on the Mississippi River and at Mobile Bay 
with Admiral Farragut; 1869-1871, Chief of Bureau of 
Navigation. 

ALLEN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 313 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Commander William Henry Allen, 

U. S. Navy 

[4] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched December 5, 1916, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsors: Miss Harriet Allen Butler and Miss 
Dorthea Dix Allen, great-grandnieces of Commander 
William Henry Allen, U. S. Navy. 

Commander william henry allen, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, 1784; ap- 
pointed midshipman, U. S. Navy, 1800; lieutenant, 1807; 
master commandant (commander) 1813; died 18 13. Served 
on the "George Washington," "Philadelphia," "John 
Adams," and "Congress"; third lieutenant of the "Ches- 
apeake" 1807, when she struck her flag to H. B. M. S. 
"Leopard" and fired the only gun from the "Chesapeake"; 
first lieutenant on the "United States" in her engagement 
with the "Macedonian"; 1813 commanded the "Argus" 
and took U. S. Minister William Harris Crawford to France; 
after successful cruising was attacked and captured August 
14, 1813, by H. B.M. S. "Pelican"; Allen was severely 
wounded in the early part of the action, but remained on 
deck until he fainted, was carried below, and his leg ampu- 
tated; removed to Mill Prison Hospital, Plymouth, England, 
where he died August 18, 18 13. He was included in the 
thanks of Congress to the officers and men of the "United 
States" in recognition of gallant conduct in the capture of 
the "Macedonian" and awarded silver medal January 
29, 1813. 



ANTHONY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 2 inches 

Named for Sergeant Major William Anthony, U. S. 

Marine Corps 

Launched August 10, 191 8, at Bethelehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

[5] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Grace Heathcote, daughter of Mr. 
Bruce Heathcote, Manager, Canadian Bank of Commerce, 
San Francisco. 

Sergeant major william anthony, United 

States Marine Corps, was born in Albany, New York. 
Enlisted in Marine Corps 1875, ar, d with short intervals 
between re-enlistments served almost continuously therein, 
until June 26, 1899. Capt. C. D. Sigsbee, called the atten- 
tion of the Secretary of the Navy to the soldierly conduct 
of Private William Anthony on the occasion of the explo- 
sion of the "Maine," and stated as follows: "At the time 
of the explosion I was in the captain's cabin of the 
"Maine." The lights of the vessel were instantly ob- 
scured and the apartments were filled with smoke; there 
was immediate and intense darkness. On leaving my 
cabin through the usual passage forward, feeling my way 
along, I was met near the outer door of the superstruc- 
ture by Private Anthony who was coming into the cabin 
to fulfill, on that dangerous occasion, the precise duties 
of his position by notifying me of the explosion. He ran 
against me in the darkness, apologized hastily, and re- 
ported to me that the ship had been blown up and was 
sinking. On an occasion when a man's instinct would lead 
him to seek safety outside the ship, he started into the 
superstructure and toward the cabin, irrespective of the 
danger. The action was a noble one, and I feel it an 
honor to call his conduct to the attention of the Navy 
Department with the recommendation that he be made a 
sergeant." 

ARIZONA (3D.) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 608 feet Beam, 97 feet Draft, 28 feet, 10 inches 

Named for the State of Arizona 

{Admitted to the Union in 1912) 

Launched June 19, 191 5, at Navy Yard, New York, New 
York. 

[6] 




Arrival of The Sponsor 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Esther Ross, Prescott, Arizona, daugh- 
ter of Mr. W. W. Ross, a prominent pioneer citizen of 
Arizona. Miss Ross broke two bottles upon the ship, one 
containing American champagne and the other water pro- 
cured at the risk of a man's life from the famous Roosevelt 
Dam of the Arizona River. Maids of honor were Miss 
Eva Behn, Miss Sallie King, and Miss Marie Farrell. 

The Society of Sponsors' "Prayer for our Navy" was 
offered just before the launching by Bishop J. W. Atwood 
of Arizona. 

Among those on the stand were Secretary of the Navy 
Josephus Daniels, Governor Hunt of Arizona, Senator 
Ashurst of Arizona, Mayor Mitchel of New York, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. W. Ross, General Leonard Wood, Rear Admiral 
F. F. Fletcher, Rear Admiral R. T. Hall, Vice Admiral 
H. T. Mayo, a large number of officials, and members of 
the Society of Sponsors. 75,000 spectators witnessed the 
launching. 

After the launching and the banquet, Secretary and Mrs. 
Daniels entertained the visiting Arizonians, the Society of 
Sponsors, and prominent officials on board the U. S. S. 
"Dolphin," taking the party for a sail past the Statue of 
Liberty and down the bay. 

A HE battleship "Arizona" is the third Navy ship to 
bear the name. The second "Arizona" was a first-class 
screw frigate, launched in 1865 at Philadelphia Navy Yard. 
The first "Arizona" was an iron side-wheel steamer pur- 
chased by the Government in 1863. 



ASHEVILLE 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 241 feet Beam, 41 feet Draft, 11 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Asheville, North Carolina 

Launched July 4, 191 8, at Navy Yard, Charleston, South 
Carolina. 



[7] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Sponsor: Miss Alyne J. Reynolds, daughter of Carl 
Vernon Reynolds, M. D., a prominent citizen of Asheville. 

AUK 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Auk 

Launched September 28, 1918, at Todd Shipyard Corpo- 
ration, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Nan McArthur Beattie, daughter of 
one of the foremen of the company. 

AULICK 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore John H. Aulick, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 11, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Philip J. Willett (Elizabeth Sullivan), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander Willett, P. C, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore john h. aulick, u. s.Navy, was 

born in Winchester, Virginia, 1787; died 1873. Appointed 
midshipman, 1809, and was made commodore on the re- 
tired list 1867. Served on the "Enterprise" in her victory 
over the "Boxer" September 4, 1813, and brought the 
" Boxer " into port after the engagement. Received thanks 
and a silver medal from Congress. In 1851—1853 com- 
manded the East India Squadron and prepared the way 
for the treaty with Japan made by Commodore Perry. 

AUSBURN 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[8] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Charles L. Ausburn, Electrician 
ist Class, U. S. Navy 

Launched December 18, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Della E. Ausburn, sister-in-law of 
Charles L. Ausburn, U. S. N. 

CHARLES L. AUSBURN, electrician, first class, United 
States Navy, was born 1889, in New Orleans, Louisiana; 
lost at sea October 17, 1917. Entered the United States 
Navy February 25, 1908, as apprentice seaman; re-enlisted 
as seaman, 191 2; re-enlisted as quartermaster, third class 
1916. On October 15, 1917, the U. S. S. "Antilles" left 
Quiberon Bay, bound for America. Just after daylight 
on the morning of October 17 she was struck by a torpedo 
and went down in four and a half minutes. Radio Electri- 
cian Ausburn remained at his post in an effort to give warn- 
ing, regardless of his personal safety, and went down with 
the ship. 

AVOCET 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Avocet 

Launched March 9, 191 8, at Baltimore Drydock and 
Shipbuilding Company. 

Sponsor: Miss Frances Virginia Imbach, daughter of 
the superintendent of the upper plant of the company. 

BABBITT 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Fitz Henry Babbitt, 

U. S. Navy 

[9] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched September 30, 1918, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Lucille Burlin, niece of the Chief 
Engineer of the New York Shipbuilding Company. 

1 HE "BABBITT," named in memory of Lieutenant Fitz 
Henry Babbitt, U. S. Navy, who was killed in action between 
the British ships of war "Endymion" and "Pomona" and 
the U. S. S. "Adams" on January 15, 1815. He was ap- 
pointed a midshipman, 1804, and promoted to lieutenant 
1 8 10; served on the "Nautilus" from February 19, 18 12 
to November 29, 181 2, and on the "Adams" from Novem- 
ber 30, 1812 to April 6, 1813. 



BADGER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Oscar C. Badger, U. S. Navy 

Launched August 24, 1918, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry F. Bryan (Elizabeth Badger), 
granddaughter of Commodore Oscar C. Badger, U. S. N. 

Commodore oscar c. badger, u. s. Navy, was 

bom in Connecticut; died 1899. Appointed midshipman, 
1841; commissioned commodore, 1881. Cruised on the 
coast of Africa in the "Saratoga," 1843-44, and took part 
in the destruction of the Barbary villages. On the steam 
frigate "Mississippi," Gulf Squadron, Mexican War, and at 
first attack on Alvarado. Subsequently attached to the 
"Brazil," Pacific Squadron, until 1856. While attached to 
the "John Adams," 1856, commanded a party sent to at- 
tack and destroy the village of Vutia, Fiji Islands, and was 
engaged with these islanders on other occasions. 1858— 
i860 on the "Macedonian," Mediterranean Squadron. 
Civil" War: 1861-62 commanded the "Anacostia" and 

[10] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



other vessels of the Potomac Flotilla in attacks off Cock- 
pit Point battery and other points on the Potomac River 
for which he was mentioned in dispatches from the com- 
manding officer of the flotilla; took part also in the siege 
of Yorktown and defenses of Gloucester Point, Virginia, 1862 
-63. Ordnance officer in charge of arming gunboats of the 
western rivers. 1863-64 attached to the South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, commanded the ironclad "Patapsco" 
in attacks on forts in Charleston Harbor. Commanded 
the ironclad "Montauk" in a night attack on Fort Sumter, 
August 22, 1863. Flag captain South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron and was on the flagship "Weehawken," in attack 
of Fort Sumter, September 1, 1863, and was severely 
wounded in the right leg; mentioned by Rear Admiral 
Dahlgren in dispatches to the department for services dur- 
ing these operations. 



GEORGE E. BADGER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
George E. Badger 

Launched March 6, 1920, at Newport News Shipbuild- 
ing & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Badger Wilson, granddaughter 
of Secretary of the Navy George E. Badger. 

Secretary of the navy george e. badger 

was born in Newbern, North Carolina, 1795; died 1866. 
He was graduated from Yale University in 1813, and stud- 
ied law in Raleigh. In 1816 he was elected to the State 
Legislature; 1820-1825 judge of the North Carolina Supe- 
rior Court at Raleigh. He was appointed Secretary of the 
Navy in 1841 and subsequently served in the Senate for 
two terms. 

["] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

BAGLEY (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 3 inches 

Named for Ensign Worth Bagley, U. S. Navy 

Launched October 19, 191 8, at Newport News Ship- 
building & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Adelaide Worth Bagley, mother of 
Ensign Worth Bagley, U. S. Navy. Accompanying Mrs. 
Bagley were her daughter, Mrs. Josephus Daniels, her son- 
in-law, Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels, Miss 
Belle Bagley, and Miss Ethel Bagley. 

ENSIGN WORTH BAGLEY, U. S. Navy, was born in 
Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1874. Appointed naval cadet 
in 1891; ensign, 1897. Ensign Bagley was the first naval 
officer killed in action during the Spanish-American War 
of 1898. He served on the U. S. Torpedo Boat "Winslow" 
and lost his life in its attack on batteries at Cardenas, 
Cuba, May 11, 1898. 

BAILEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Theodorus Bailey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched February 5, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Rosalie Fellows Bailey, great-grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral Theodorus Bailey, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral theodorus bailey, u. s. Navy, 

was born at Chateaugay, New York, 1805; died 1877. Ap- 
pointed midshipman, 1818; rear admiral, 1866; commended 
for energy, enterprise, and gallantry in fitting out and 

[12] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



leading expedition against the enemy in the War with Mex- 
ico, 1847-48; 1 861-1865 second in command and led attack 
on the forts and the capture of New Orleans; was included 
in the thanks of Congress to officers for distinguished 
service and successful operations on the lower Mississippi 
River. He afterwards was in command of the East Gulf 
Blockading Squadron and captured a large number of 
vessels. 



BAINBRIDGE ( 3 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore William Bainbridge, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 12, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Juliet Edith Bertram Greene, great- 
great-granddaughter of Commodore William Bainbridge, 
U. S. Navy. Miss Greene was accompanied by her mother, 
Mrs. Louise Bainbridge HofF Greene, sponsor for the 
U. S. S. "Bainbridge (2d)," launched in 1901. 

Commodore william bainbridge, u. s. Nav y; 

born in Princeton, New Jersey, 1774; died 1833. Appointed 
lieutenant, United States Navy, August 3, 1798; promoted 
to captain May 20, 1800; distinguished service in War 
with France; March 7, 1803, ordered to command the 
frigate "Philadelphia," served in the Tripolitan War; 
captured on the "Philadelphia" in the harbor of Tripoli 
December 29, 1803; held prisoner by the Tripolitans un- 
til June 3, 1805; War of 1812, commanded the U. S. S. 
"Constitution," engaged and captured H. B. M. S. "Java" 
December 26, 18 12; severely wounded in this engagement; 
awarded gold medal by Congress for gallantry, and received 
thanks of Congress; held position of Navy Commissioner 
1824-1827. 

[13] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

BALLARD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Midshipman Edward J. Ballard, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 7, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Eloise Ballard, daughter of Mr. J. 
Edward Ballard, a descendant of Midshipman Edward J. 
Ballard, U. S. Navy. 

Midshipman edward j. ballard, United States 

Navy. Appointed a midshipman, 1809; lieutenant, 1813. 
Ordered to the "Chesapeake" with Capt. James Lawrence. 
Killed in the early part of the engagement between that 
ship and H. B. M. S. "Shannon," June 1, 1813. Commission 
as lieutenant was issued before news of the battle had been 
received by the Navy Department. 



BANCROFT ( 2 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for George Bancroft 

Launched March 22, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary W. Bancroft, great-granddaugh- 
ter of George Bancroft. 

L\AMED for George Bancroft, American historian and 
statesman and founder of the United States Naval Academy 
at Annapolis, who was born at Worcester, Massachusetts, 
October 3, 1800. In 1845 he entered President Polk's 
Cabinet as Secretary of the Navy, with the determination 
of founding a Naval Academy. Served until 1846, when 

[14] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



for a month he acted as Secretary of War. From 1846 to 
1849 he was minister to Great Britain; 1867 minister to 
Prussia; to the North German Confederation, 1868; and 
to the new German Empire in 1871. From this post he 
was recalled at his own request in 1874. While minister at 
Berlin he assisted in the settlement of the Northwest 
boundary dispute between the United States and Great 
Britain. 



BARKER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Albert S. Barker, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 11, 1919, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ellin Barker, widow of Rear Admiral 
Albert S. Barker, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral albert s. barker, United 

States Navy, was born in Hanson, Massachusetts, 1845; 
died 1916. Appointed midshipman 1859; commissioned 
rear admiral 1899. After graduating from the Naval 
Academy in 1 862 he was ordered to the U. S. S. "Mississippi " 
and took part in the bombardment and passage of forts 
below New Orleans and the capture of that city; was on the 
"Mississippi" when she got ashore and was set on fire to 
prevent her capture; transferred to the "Monongahela" 
and took part in operations of the West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron until August 9, 1863, when ordered to the "Ni- 
agara" for special service. After the close of the Civil War 
held various prominent positions ashore. During the 
Spanish-American War commanded the "Newark" and 
participated in the bombardment of Santiago July 1, 1898; 
commanded the "Oregon" August 2, 1898, to May 29, 1899, 
on special service in the Pacific. His last duty afloat was 
commander-in-chief of the Atlantic Fleet, 1903-1905. 

dsD 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



BARNEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Commodore Joshua Barney, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched September 5, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Nannie Dornin Barney, great-grand- 
daughter of Commodore Joshua Barney, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore joshua barney, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Baltimore, Maryland, 1759; died 1818. At an early 
age he went to sea in the merchant service, and at the com- 
mencement of the Revolutionary War served as a volunteer 
on the "Hornet"; was transferred to the "Wasp," where 
he saw his first sea fight, and for gallantry on that occasion 
was promoted to lieutenant; awarded a medal by Congress. 
Owing to disagreement as to precedence, he declined a 
commission in the United States Navy in 1794; and served 
in the French Navy 1797-1800. At the outbreak of the War 
of 1812 he again entered the United States Navy and had 
command of a fleet of gunboats built for the defense of 
Chesapeake Bay. 

BARRY ( 3 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore John Barry, U. S. Navy 

Launched October 28, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Shelton E. Martin (Charlotte Barnes), 
great-grandniece of Commodore John Barry, U. S. Navy. 
The sponsor was sponsor for U. S. S. "Barry (2d) " in 1902. 

Commodore john barry, United States Navy, 

was born in Ireland in 1745. Died in Philadelphia in 1803. 
[16] 




u . s 



TORPEDO BOAT 

TAKING THE WATER 



Photo by New York Shipbuilding Corporation 
DESTROYER "bAINBRIDGe" 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



He received one of the first commissions in the Navy. In 
1776 commanded the "Lexington," the first cruiser to sail, 
and captured the British schooner "Edward," the first 
Navy prize. In 1781, returning from conveying to France 
our Minister Laurens in the "Alliance," he captured the 
"Atalanta" and "Trepassa," and was severely wounded. 
He held many important commands and was one of the 
bravest and most daring of officers. He was the third 
commander-in-chief of the Navy. 



BELKNAP 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral George Eugene Belknap, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched January 14, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Frances Georgiana Belknap, grand- 
daughter and namesake of Rear Admiral George E. 
Belknap, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral george eugene belknap, 

U. S. Navy, was born in Newport, New Hampshire, 1832; 
died 1903. Appointed midshipman, 1847; commissioned 
rear admiral, 1889. 1 856-1 857, East India squadron. Took 
prominent part in engagements with the Barrier Forts, Can- 
ton River, China, November, 1856. Actively engaged in the 
Civil War, 1861-65. Commanded a division of boats from 
the U. S. S. "St. Louis," in reinforcement of Fort Picken, 
Florida, April, 1861. Participated in the operations in 
Charleston Harbor; commanded the ironclad "Canonicus" 
in attacks on Fort Fisher, North Carolina, December 24-25, 
1864, and January 13-15, 1865, resulting in their surrender. 
After this returned to Charleston, South Carolina, and 
fired the last gun against its defenses. In 1 867-1 868 com- 
manded the U. S. S. "Hartford," Asiatic Station, and was 
in command of the expedition against Formosa. 1873- 

[17] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

1874 performed important duty, surveying, in the Pacific. 
Held important positions at sea and ashore from 1875 until 
retired, 1894. 

BELL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Henry H. Bell, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 20, 1918,' at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Josephus Daniels (Adelaide Bagley), 
wife of Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels. 

Rear admiral henry h. bell, u. s. Navy, 

was born in North Carolina about 1808; died January 11, 
1868. Appointed midshipman, 1823; rear admiral, 1866; 
commanded a division in the West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron at the surrender of New Orleans and Forts Jackson 
and St. Philip, April, 1862 (Civil War). He was drowned 
by the capsizing of his barge while crossing the bar at the 
entrance to Osaka River, January 11, 1868. 

BERNADOU 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feel Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet 

Named for Commander John Baptiste Bernadou, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 7, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Cora Winslow Bernadou, sister of 
Commander John Baptiste Bernadou, U. S. Navy 

Commander john baptiste bernadou, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1858; died 
1908. Graduated from the Naval Academy in 1880; com- 

[18] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



missioned commander, 1906; 1884-1885 he was attached 
to the. Asiatic station and rendered most efficient service 
during the first uprising in Seoul, Korea. For this service 
he received the thanks of the Japanese Government. He 
was promoted ten numbers for his gallantry in action off 
Cardenas, Cuba, in 1898; in command of the torpedo boat 
"Winslow," he ran in under the guns of Cardenas in one of 
the first engagements of the Spanish-American War. Dur- 
ing this engagement the "Winslow's" steering gear was 
damaged by the enemy's fire, and five of her crew, in- 
cluding Ensign Worth Bagley, were killed. Bernadou, 
then Lieutenant, was himself severely wounded. The tor- 
pedo boat was under the raking fire of the Spanish guns 
for an hour, and was finally rescued by the revenue cutter 
"Hudson." He was an expert ordnance officer, especially 
in regard to explosives, and the discovery of the principles 
of smokeless powder is credited to him. His last sea duty 
was as executive officer of the "Kearsarge" and his last 
shore duty naval attache at Rome and Vienna. 

BIDDLE (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Lengthy 314 feet Beam, 50 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Captain Nicholas Biddle, U. S. Navy 

Launched October 3, 191 8, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennyslvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Elise Biddle Robinson, great-grand- 
daughter of Captain James S. Biddle, U. S. Navy, and 
great-great-grandniece of Captain Nicholas Biddle, U. S. 

Navy. 

Captain Nicholas biddle, United States Navy, 

was born in Philadelphia in 1750. He was in command of 
"Andrea Doria," 16 guns, in 1775, and captured so many 
prizes that he had but five of his original crew when he re- 
turned to the Delaware River. Sailed not long after from 
Charleston, South Carolina, and in a few days came back 

[19] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

with four prizes. In engagement with the "Yarmouth," 64 
guns, March 1778, his ship, the "Randolph," 32 guns, blew 
up and the gallant Biddle and three hundred men perished. 

BILLINGSLEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, finches 

Named for Ensign William D. Billingsley, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 10, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Irene Billingsley, sister of Ensign 
William D. Billingsley, U. S. Navy. 

Ensign william d. billingsley, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Winona, Mississippi, April 24, 1887; killed in an 
aeroplane accident 1913. Appointed midshipman 1905; 
graduated in 1909; ensign, 191 1. On June 20, 1913, star- 
ted from the aviation station near Annapolis in a Wright 
biplane which had been converted into a hydroplane. 
When about 10 miles down the bay a gust of wind struck 
the hydroaeroplane and caused it to dive. Ensign Bil- 
lingsley was thrown into the water. He was an officer of 
determination and fearless courage. 



BITTERN 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Bittern 

Launched February 15, 1919, at Alabama Drydock and 
Shipbuilding Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Chauncey R. Doll (Martha Braendlein), 
wife of Lieutenant C. R. Doll, U. S. Navy, Inspector of 
Machinery for the Navy at the works. 

[20] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



BLAKELEY (id) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Captain Johnston Blakeley, 

U. S. Navy 
Launched September 19, 191 8, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles A. Blakeley (Virginia Lyons), 
wife of Commander C. A. Blakeley, U. S. Navy, a great- 
great-nephew of Captain Johnston Blakeley, U. S. Navy. 

Captain johnston blakeley, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Ireland, in 1781. Appointed Midshipman in 1800. 
In 1813, in command of the "Enterprise," captured the 
privateer "Fly." In 1814, in the "Wasp," captured H. B. 
M. S. "Reindeer" by superior gunnery. Congress voted 
him a gold medal. He cut out the "Mary" with military 
stores from under the guns of the "Armada," 74 guns. 
Sank the "Avon." Captured the "Atlanta." He was 
lost at sea in the "Wasp" in 1814. 

BOBOLINK 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Bobolink 

Launched June 15, 1918, at Baltimore Drydock and Ship- 
building Company, Baltimore, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Elsie Jean Willis, daughter of Mr. 
J. M. Willis, Vice President and General Manager of the 



Company. 



BOGGS 



torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, n inches Draft, 9 feet 

[21] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Named for Rear Admiral Charles S. Boggs, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 25, 1918, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Ruth Hascal, niece of the late Lieu- 
tenant William C. Turner, U. S. Marine Corps. 

REAR ADMIRAL CHARLES S. BOGGS, United States 
Navy, was born in New Jersey, 181 1 ; died 1888. Appointed 
midshipman November 1, 1826; commissioned rear admiral 
July 1, 1870. Took part in the Mexican War, 1846-1847; 
present at the siege of Vera Cruz; commanded a boat ex- 
pedition against the Mexicans and re-took the brig "Trux- 
tun" which had been captured by the Mexicans. Civil War, 
1861-1865. Commanded the sloop-of-war "Varuna" of 
Admiral Farragut's squadron at the passage of Forts Jack- 
son and St. Philip April 24, 1862. She was attacked by two 
Confederate rams and badly damaged, was obliged to run 
into the bank, and ably fought to the last. 1863 commanded 
the "Juniata," and special duty New York 1864-1866. 
1 867-1 868 commanded the "De Soto" of the North At- 
lantic Squadron. 

BORIE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feel, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Adolph Edward Borie 

Launched October 4, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Patty Borie, great-great-niece of Secre- 
tary of the Navy Adolph Edward Borie. 

Secretary of the navy adolph edward 

BORIE was born in Philadelphia, 1809; died 1880. In 
1826 he was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania 
and went to Paris to complete his education. After spending 

[22] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



several years abroad, he returned to the United States and 
entered into mercantile pursuits. He gave large sums to- 
ward the enlistment and care of soldiers during the Civil 
War. On March 5, 1869, he became Secretary of the Navy. 



BRANCH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
John Branch 

Launched April 19, 1919, at Newport News Shipbuilding 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Laurie O'Brien Branch, grand-niece of 
Secretary of the Navy John Branch. 

Secretary of the navy john branch, was 

born in Halifax, North Carolina, 1782. After graduation 
at the University of North Carolina in 1801 he studied law, 
became judge of the superior court, and was a State senator 
from 181 1 to 1817, in 1822, and again in 1834. He was 
elected governor of his State in 18 17, and from 1823 to 
1829 was United States Senator, resigning in the latter 
year when he was appointed Secretary of the Navy, which 
office he held until 183 1. 1 844-1 845 was governor of the 
Territory of Florida. Died 1863. 



BRANT % 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feel Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feel, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Brant 

Launched May 30, 1918, at Sun Shipbuilding Company, 
Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Lois Graham, daughter of the Vice Pres- 
ident of the company. 

[23] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

BRAZOS 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 4.75 feet Beam, 56 feet Draft, 26 feet, 8 inches 

Named for Brazos River, Texas 

Launched May 1, 1919, at Navy Yard, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Catherine Rush, daughter of Captain 
William R. Rush, U. S. Navy, in command of the Boston 
Navy Yard. 



BRECK 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Acting Volunteer Lieutenant Commander 
Joseph B. Breck, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 5, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Forest MacNee (Ellen Breck), 
granddaughter of Lieutenant Commander Joseph B. Breck, 

U. S. Navy. 

Acting volunteer lieutenant com- 
mander JOSEPH B. BRECK, United States Navy, 
was born in Maine in 1830; died 1865. Appointed acting 
ensign, 1863; acting master, 1863; acting lieutenant, 1863; 
acting volunteer lieutenant commander, 1864; on U. S. S. 
"Niphon" in the North Atlantic blockading squadron took 
part in the capture of six of the largest blockade runners 
off the New Inlet and Masonboro Inlet, North Carolina. 
An officer of pluck and resource, and won a brilliant name 
for himself by his successes on the Wilmington blockade, 
although his health was much impaired by his devotion to 
duty. 

[24] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 

BRECKINRIDGE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Ensign Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 17, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Genevieve Dudley Breckinridge, 
niece of Ensign Joseph Cabell Breckinridge, U. S. Navy. 

Ensign joseph cabell Breckinridge, United 

States Navy, was born 1872; appointed midshipman 1887; 
ensign 1897. Made his first cruise on the battleship 
"Texas." He displayed remarkable coolness and ability 
in time of peril, in storms, and in controlling the turret 
machinery at the peril of his life, especially on the occa- 
sion when the ammunition hoist gave way and the shot 
was falling into the powder, he sprang to the rescue, and 
by his presence of mind, saved the ship from probable in- 
stant destruction. His rescues of persons from drowning 
were many; and while serving on the "Cushing" he was 
washed overboard and drowned. The vessel gave a sudden 
roll, the life lines parted, his feet slipped on the wet deck 
and without a cry he went overboard. 



BREESE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 3 inches 

Named for Captain Kidder Randolph Breese, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May n, 1918, at Newport News Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Gilbert McIlvaine (Elizabeth Breese), 
daughter of Captain Kidder Randolph Breese, U. S. Navy. 

05] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Captain kidder Randolph breese, u.s. 

Navy, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 183 1; died 
1881. Appointed midshipman, 1846; commissioned cap- 
tain, 1874. Commanded the second division in the opera- 
tions before Vicksburg in the summer of 1862. Com- 
manded the flagship "Black Hawk," Mississippi Squadron, 
at Arkansas Post, 1862, and at the siege of Vicksburg, 1863; 
in charge of mortars a short time during the siege. Com- 
manded the naval forces at feigned attacks on Haines 
Bluff" in co-operation with Gen. Sherman, 1863; Red River 
Expedition, 1864, fleet captain of North Atlantic Squadron 
in both attacks on Fort Fisher; commanded the naval 
forces in assault on Fort Fisher, and was present at subse- 
quent operations on Cape Fear River. Repeatedly re- 
ceived the thanks of Admiral Porter for his efficiency and 
zeal in the discharge of his important and responsible duties. 



BRIDGE 

SUPPLY SHIP 

Length, 422 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 20 feet, 8 inches 

Named for Commodore Horatio Bridge, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 18, 1916, at Navy Yard, Boston, Mass- 
achusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Granville Searcy Fleece (Pauline 
Bridge), grandniece of Commodore Horatio Bridge, U. S. 

Navy. 

Commodore horatio bridge, u. s. Navy, was 

born 1806, graduated from Bowdoin College in 1825. In 
1838 appointed a Paymaster in the Navy; served on 
board the "Cyane" until 1841; after an interval of shore 
duty, was ordered to the "Saratoga,"' and visited the 
African Coast. He published "The Journal of an African 
Cruiser," which was edited by Nathaniel Hawthorne from 
Bridge's notes. 

From 1846 to 1848 cruised in the frigate "United States. 

[26] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



From 1849 to 1 85 1, stationed at the Portsmouth Navy- 
Yard. In 1 85 1 was assigned to duty as Chief of the Bu- 
reau of Provisions and Clothing. 

In 1869 was assigned to duty as Chief Inspector of Pro- 
visions and Clothing until he retired with the rank of com- 
modore. 

He first employed in the American Navy the idea of 
comprehensive fleet supply, and under his direction the 
schedule for the systematic supply of the vessels of the 
Navy on the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts during the Civil 
War was established. 

BROOKS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for First Lieutenant John Brooks, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched April 24, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George S. Keyes (Emma Reed), great- 
niece of Lieutenant John Brooks, U. S. Navy. 

FlRST LIEUTENANT JOHN BROOKS, United States 
Marine Corps, was born in 1783. Appointed a second lieu- 
tenant October 1, 1807; promoted first lieutenant January 
30, 1809. He served at various stations of the Marine 
Corps and was commanding officer of the marine guard 
aboard the vessel "Lawrence" during the War of 1812, 
and was killed in the engagement between the American 
and British fleets on Lake Erie, September 10, 1813. 

BROOME 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Colonel John Lloyd Broome, 

U. S. Marine Corps 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched May 14, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Josephine Keyworth Broome, 
granddaughter of Lieutenant Colonel John Lloyd Broome, 
U. S. Marine Corps. 

Lieutenant colonel john llyod broome, 

U. S. Marine Corps, was born in New York in 1824; died 
1898, Commissioned second lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps, 
1848; was made brevet lieutenant colonel for gallant and 
meritorious services in operations against Vicksburg; lieu- 
tenant colonel 1879. Served in the Mexican War and was 
commended for gallantry. In 1861 took part in the relief 
of Fort Pickens; 1862 ordered as fleet marine officer of 
Admiral Farragut's squadron; brevetted major for gallant 
service at the capture of New Orleans. Took part in all 
prominent engagements on the Mississippi River of Far- 
ragut's squadron from 1862 to May, 1863. Held important 
posts on shore stations until he was retired. 



BRUCE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Frank Bruce, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 20, 1920, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Annie Bruce, widow of Lieutenant 
Frank Bruce, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant frank bruce, United states Navy, 

was born August 20, 1879, in Grand Island, Nebraska. 
Entered the Navy in 1896 as apprentice; appointed boat- 
swain 191 1 ; chief boatswain, 1917; ensign, 1917; lieu- 
tenant (j. g.), Feb. 1, 1918; lieutenant (T), July 1, 1918, 
in command of the mine sweeper "Bobolink." Killed 

[28] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



May 14, 1919, when a mine, which the "Bobolink" was 
heaving in, exploded. 

BUCHANAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Captain Franklin Buchanan, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched January 2, 1919, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles P. Wetherbee (Katherine 
Brown), wife of the Vice President of Bath Iron Works. 

Captain franklin Buchanan, United States 

Navy, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 1800; died 1874. 
Entered the Navy as midshipman 1815; commissioned 
lieutenant 1825; commander 1841; captain 1855. He 
was the organizer and first superintendent of the United 
States Naval Academy (1845-1847). He co-operated in the 
landing of the troops at Vera Cruz under Gen. Scott, and 
was one of the leading spirits of the Navy there at the 
capture of San Juan d'Ulloa; was the first officer to step 
on the soil of Japan in the expedition of Commodore Perry. 
Resigned at the outbreak of Civil War. (Later he com- 
manded the Confederate Squadron in the waters of Vir- 
ginia on board the "Merrimac" in the engagement in 
Hampton Roads, Virginia, March 8, 1862, during which 
he was severely wounded. After the war he was president 
of the Maryland Agricultural College.) 

BULMER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Roscoe C. Bulmer, 

U. S. Navy 

[29] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched January 22, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Anita Poor Bulmer, daughter of Cap- 
tain Roscoe C. Bulmer, U. S. Navy. 

CAPTAIN ROSCOE C. BULMER, United States Navy, 
was born in Virginia City, Nevada, 1874; died 1919, at 
Kirkwall, Scotland, from an automobile accident. Ap- 
pointed naval cadet, 1890; ensign, 1896; lieutenant, 
(j. g.), 1899; lieutenant, 1902; lieutenant commander, 
1908; commander, 1913 ; captain (T), 1918. In command 
of the U. S. S. "Black Hawk," December 18, 1917; was 
United States naval representative at a conference at the 
British Admiralty in London, October 31, 1918, which met 
to consider clearing the seas of mines after the war. As- 
sumed command of mining operations with title of com- 
mander, Mine Sweeping Detachment, on January 5, 1919. 



JOHN FRANCIS BURNES 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain John Francis Burnes, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched November 10, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Julius Kahn (Florence Prag), wife of 
Honorable Julius Kahn, Member of Congress from San 
Francisco. 

Captain john francis burnes, United states 

Marine Corps, was born in Binghamton, New York, 1883. 
Enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1904, served four enlist- 
ments, and shortly before the war was appointed a machine 
gunner, and was commissioned in June, 1917. Was sent to 
France, and while there was awarded the distinguished 
service cross posthumously for — "In the attack on the 

[30] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Bois de Belleau, June 12, 1918, he was badly wounded, but 
completed the disposition of his platoon under violent fire. 
The injuries which he sustained in the performance of this 
self-sacrificing duty later caused his death." 



BURNS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain Otway Burns, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 191 8, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice H. Palmer, daughter of Mr. W. F. 
Palmer, president of the Northwestern Pacific Railroad. 

CAPTAIN OTWAY BURNS, United States Navy, was 
born in Queen's Creek, North Carolina, 1775; died at 
Portsmouth, North Carolina, August 25, 1850. During the 
War of 18 1 2 he commanded the letter of marque "Snap 
Dragon," and had several encounters with British men-of- 
war, taking 15 prizes, one of which had a cargo valued at 
$350,000; from 1 82 1 to 1834 he served in the General As- 
sembly of North Carolina; in 1835 was appointed by Pres- 
ident Jackson as keeper of Brant Island Shoal light, and 
held the position until his death. 

BUSH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Lieutenant William S. Bush, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched October 27, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Josephine T. Bush, great-niece of Lieu- 
tenant William S. Bush, U. S. Navy. 

[31] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



t IRST LIEUTENANT WILLIAM S. BUSH, United 
States Marine Corps. Appointed United States Marine 
Corps, July 3, 1809; promoted first lieutenant, 181 1. He 
served during the War of 18 12, and lost his life, August 19, 
1812, while aboard the "Constitution" during its engage- 
ment with the British frigate "Guerriere." The vessels, 
after an engagement lasting for some time, were brought 
together, and Lieutenant Bush fell mortally wounded while 
attempting to board the British vessel. Capt. Hull, who 
commanded the "Constitution," said of him in his report 
to the Secretary of the Navy: "In him our country has 
lost a valuable and brave officer." 

BUSHNELL 

SUBMARINE TENDER 

Length, 350 feet Beam, 45 feet Draft, 19 feet, 5 inches 

Named for David Bushnell 

Launched February 9, 191 5, at Seattle Dry Dock and 
Construction Company, Seattle, Washington. 

Sponsor: Miss Esculine Warwick Bushnell, great- 
great-niece of David Bushnell. 

DAVID BUSHNELL, American Inventor. Born in Say- 
brook, Connecticut, in 1742; died 1824. Called the "Father 
of the Submarine." Graduated from Yale University in 1775. 
Made a study of submarine warfare. Constructed a diving 
boat and called it the "American Turtle." With it made 
a number of unsuccessful attempts to blow up the British 
ships of war, one of which was the "Eagle" lying in New 
York Harbor in 1776. Another attempt was on the "Cere- 
bus" anchored off New London, in 1777. A schooner lying 
astern of the frigate was blown to pieces and a number of 
lives lost. 

CALDWELL * 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 8 inches Draft, S feet 

[32] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Lieutenant James R. Caldwell, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 10, 1917, at Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Charlotte M. Caldwell, great-great- 
grandniece of Lieutenant James R. Caldwell, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant james r. caldwell, u. s. Navy, 

was appointed midshipman May 22, 1798, and commis- 
sioned lieutenant November 1, 1800. He was killed in ac- 
tion August 7, 1804, during the war with Tripoli. 



CALIFORNIA ( 3 d) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 624 feet Beam, 97 feet, j| inches Draft, 30 feet, 3 inches 

Named for the State of California 

{Admitted to the Union in 1850) 

Launched November 20, 1919, at Mare Island Navy 
Yard, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Barbara Stephens Zane, daughter of 
Governor William D. Stephens of California, and widow of 
Major Randolph Talbott Zane, U. S. M. C, for whom the 
torpedo boat destroyer "Zane" is named. 

Accompanying the sponsor were Governor W. D. Ste- 
phens, Mrs. W. D. Stephens, Captain Frank T. Clarke, 
U. S. N., Captain Edward L. Beach, U. S. N., Captain Mil- 
ton Reed, and others. 

The Society of Sponsors' Prayer for Our Navy was 
offered just before the launching by the Navy Yard Chap- 
lain. The day before the launching a telegram from the 
Secretary of the Navy directed that the prayer be offered. 
The launching interested the entire State of California, and 
an immense crowd witnessed the event. A bottle of na- 
tive California wine was broken upon the bow of the bat- 
tleship. 

The super dreadnaught "California" is the third to bear 

[33] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

the name. Her predecessor, the armored cruiser "Cali- 
fornia" launched in 1904, is now named "San Diego." The 
first "California" was a wooden screw sloop built in 1863. 

CARDINAL 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 fee t, Q inches 

Named for the bird Cardinal 

Launched March 29, 1918, at Staten Island Shipbuilding 
Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Isabella Nelson, daughter of the Super- 
intendent for the Company. 

CASE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Augustus Ludlow Case, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 21, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Helena de St. Pierre Case, grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral Augustus Ludlow Case, U. S. 

Navy. 

Rear admiral Augustus ludlow case, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Newburg, New York, 18 13; died 1893. 
Appointed midshipman 1828; rear admiral 1872. South 
Sea Exploring Expedition 1837-1842. 1846-1848 Mexican 
war; took part in the captures of Vera Cruz, Alvarado, and 
Tabasco. After the capture of Laguna sent with 25 men 
to the Palisada River and held town of that name for two 
weeks against Mexican cavalry. On the Paraguay Ex- 
pedition in 1859. Civil War, fleet captain of the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron at capture of Forts Clark 
and Hatteras, August 28, 29, 1861. Sp mentioned 

[34] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



by Flag Officers Stringham and Goldsborough. North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron until 1863; command of 
"Iroquois" in search of the C. S. S. "Alabama"; 1863, 
in charge of the blockade of New Inlet, North Carolina, 
and took part in the cutting out of the steamer "Kate" 
from under the batteries of Fort Fisher and New Inlet; 
1869-1873. Chief of Bureau of Ordnance; 1873-1875, 
commanded European Squadron and combined North and 
South Atlantic Fleets. 



CHAMPLIN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain Stephen Champlin, 
U.S. Navy 

Launched April 7, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Georgina Hine Rolph, daughter of 
Honorable James Rolph, Mayor of San Francisco. 

Captain Stephen champlin, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Kingston, Rhode Island, 1789; died 1870. Ap- 
pointed sailing master 1812; captain 1867. In command 
of the "Scorpion" he fired the first shot on the American 
side of the battle of Lake Erie, and in capturing the "Little 
Belt" fired the last shot of the battle. He was placed in 
command of the captured vessels "Queen Charlotte" and 
"Detroit." In 18 14 he commanded the "Tigress," and, 
with Captain Turner on the "Scorpion," blockaded Mack- 
inac. Surprised by a superior force sent out from Mackinac 
on the night of September 3, 18 14, he was dangerously 
wounded and taken prisoner and held at Mackinac for 
38 days. He was finally paroled and sent to Erie and later 
to his home in Connecticut. 



[35] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



CHANDLER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 31 4 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
William Eaton Chandler 

Launched March 19, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Lloyd H. Chandler (Agatha Edson), 
wife of Rear Admiral L. H. Chandler, U. S. Navy. 

HON. WILLIAM EATON CHANDLER, was born in 
Concord, New Hampshire, 1835; died 1917. He was 
graduated from the Harvard law school in 1855. Member 
of New Hampshire House of Representatives, 1862-63-64. 
Elected Speaker of New Hampshire House of Representa- 
tives in 1864, at age of 27. Solicitor and Judge Advocate 
of Navy Department on March 9, 1865, and held this office 
until June 17, 1865, when he was appointed First Assistant 
Secretary of the Treasury, which office he held until his 
resignation on Nov. 30, 1867. Secretary of the Navy 
April 12, 1882, until March 4, 1885. U. S. Senator from 
New Hampshire from June 4, 1887, until Jan. 10, 1901. 
President Spanish Treaty War Claims Commission from 
March 6, 1901, until he resigned on Sept. 23, 1907. 



CHASE 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Midshipman Reuben Chase, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 2, 1919, Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John Askett Annear (Ray Eitel), great- 
granddaughter of Midshipman Reuben Chase, U. S. Navy. 

[36] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



i Midshipman reuben chase, United states Navy, 

I was born in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Entered the 
Navy as seaman in 1777. Cruised on the "Ranger" in 
operations around the British Isles and the capture of 
H. B. M. S. "Drake" April 24, 1778. Transferred to the 
"Bonhomme Richard" March 18, 1779, as midshipman. 
His name is listed among those entitled to receive prize 
money for captures made by the "Bonhomme Richard" 
including the "Serapis." 



CHAUNCEY (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Isaac Chauncey, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched September 29, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Mae Todd, great-great-grand- 
daughter of Commodore Isaac Chauncey, U. S. Navy, and 
daughter of Mrs. Stanton W. Todd, sponsor for U. S. S. 
"Chauncey (ist)" in 1901. 

Commodore isaac chauncey, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Connecticut 1772; died 1840. Commissioned a 
lieutenant 1798; captain 1806; served on the "Constel- 
lation," War with France, 1798-18Q1; attacks on town and 
naval force of Tripolitans 1804; commanded the naval 
forces on Lake Ontario; rendered distinguished service in 
co-operating with Army defense of the Lakes, War of 18 12; 
served as Navy commissioner 1820-1824 and 1833-1840; 
was included in the thanks of Congress to officers for serv- 
ice in the War with Tripoli and awarded a sword for his 
gallantry. 



[37] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

CHEW 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain Samuel Chew, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 26, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Felix X. Gygax (Estelle Ise), wife of 
Commander Gygax, U. S. Navy, on duty in San Francisco. 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL CHEW, United States Navy, was 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Appointed by the ma- 
rine committee July 17, 1777, to command the Continen- 
tal brigantine "Resistance." The "Resistance," carrying 
10 four-pounders, on March 14, 1778, fell in with a British 
letter of marque of 20 guns, and in a hand-to-hand fight 
which ensued, Captain Chew fell gallantly fighting. 

CHEWINK 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Chewink 

Launched December 21, 1918, at Todd Shipyard Cor- 
poration, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Marion Sperrin, daughter of a foreman 
of the Company and selected by Mr. Todd. 

CHILDS 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Earle W. F. Childs, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 19, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

[38] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Gertrude B. Childs, widow of Lieu- 
tenant Earle W. F. Childs. 

Lieutenant earle w. f. childs, United states 

Navy, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1893; a P~ 
pointed midshipman 191 1; ensign 191 5; lieutenant (junior 
grade) 1917; lieutenant October 15, 1917. While attached 
to the U. S. S. "Al-2" he was selected from her officers for 
instructional patrol on board H. M. S. "H-5," which vessel 
was sunk in collision with the S. S. "Rutherglen" and all 
on board were lost March 7, 1918. 



CINCINNATI ( 3 d) 

LIGHT CRUISER 

Length, 555 feet, 6 inches Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet, 3 inches 

Named for the City of Cincinnati, Ohio 

Launched May 23, 192 1, at the Todd Dry Dock & Con- 
struction Corporation, Tacoma, Washington. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles Edgar Tudor (Lillie Fogg), 
wife of the Director of Public Safety of Cincinnati, Ohio, 
christened the ship with champagne and Ohio River water. 

The first "Cincinnati" was an iron clad gunboat, built in 
1861. Sunk at Vicksburg, 1863. 

The second "Cincinnati" was an unarmored protected 
cruiser launched in 1892. 



CLAXTON 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Midshipman Thomas Claxton, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched January 19, 1919, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

[39] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frederick William Kellogg (Florence 
Scripps), wife of Mr. F. W. Kellogg, Business Manager and 
Publisher of the San Francisco Call. 

Midshipman thomas claxton, United states 

Navy, was born in Baltimore, Maryland. Appointed a 
midshipman 1810; died of wounds received on board the 
"Lawrence" early in the Battle of Lake Erie. Congress 
awarded a sword to his nearest male relative and expressed 
deep regret for his loss and commended his name "to the 
recollection and affection of a grateful country and his 
conduct as an example to future generations." 

CLEMSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Passed Midshipman 
Henry A. Clemson, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 5, 1918, at Newport News S. B. & 
D. D. Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Cleaves Daniels, niece of Sec- 
retary of the Navy Josephus Daniels. 

Passed midshipman henry a. clemson, u. s. 

Navy, was born in New Jersey. Appointed midship- 
man 1836; passed midshipman 1846; ordered to the 
"St. Marys," Home Squadron; transferred to the brig 
"Somers," which capsized in a squall in the Gulf of Mex- 
ico off Vera Cruz; Midshipman Clemson insisted that the 
men should take the only available boat, and he clung to 
a spar, which he abandoned when he found it inadequate to 
support all who were hanging on it. 

COGHLAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

[40] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Rear Admiral Joseph B. Coghlan, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 16, 1920, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Graham Coghlan (Elizabeth B.), daugh- 
ter-in-law of Rear Admiral Joseph B. Coghlan, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral Joseph bulloch coghlan, 

United States Navy, was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, 
1844; died 1908. Appointed midshipman, i860; rear ad- 
miral, 1902; served Civil War, 1863-1865, on the U. S. S. 
"Sacramento"; 1865-1897, cruised on Brazil, European, 
Pacific, North Atlantic, and Asiatic Stations. Spanish 
American War, 1898, commanded U. S. S. "Raleigh"; took 
prominent part in the battle of Manila Bay, May 1, 1898; 
commanded expedition for capture of batteries at Manila, 
May 2, 1898, and capture of Isla Grande, July 7, 1898, 
Subig Bay. Recommended by Admiral Dewey for his gal- 
lantry and skill; included in thanks of Congress to 
Admiral Dewey, officers and men for victory of May 1, 
1898. Advanced six numbers by act of Congress for emi- 
nent and conspicuous conduct in battle. Commanded 
Caribbean squadron of North Atlantic fleet, 1902; held 
many important posts on shore. 



COLE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, II inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Major Edward B. Cole, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched January 11, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Mary Welsh Cole, widow of Major 
Edward B. Cole, U. S. M. C. Mrs. Cole was accompanied 
by her two small sons, Charles Cole and Edward Cole. 

[41] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Maj< 



fOR EDWARD B. COLE, U. S. Marine Corps, was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, 1879, and died June 18, 1918, 
from wounds received in action. Appointed from civil life, 
where he was regarded as one of the leading machine gun 
experts in the country. Major Cole was in the first contin- 
gent of marines to go to France during the world war. 
In the Bois de Belleau on June 10, 1918, he displayed such 
extraordinary heroism in organizing positions, rallying his 
men and disposing of his guns, that he was awarded the 
distinguished-service cross. During this battle he suffered 
the loss of his right hand and received wounds in the upper 
arm and both thighs, from which he died on June 18. 



COLHOUN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Edmund R. Colhoun, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched February 21, 1918, Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen A. Colhoun, daughter of Rear 
Admiral Edmund R. Colhoun, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral edmund r. colhoun, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, 1821; 
died 1897. Appointed midshipman 1839; rear admiral 1882; 
Mexican War, under Commodores Conner and Perry at 
Alvarado and Tobasco; Civil War, North Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron, took part in engagements at Roanoke Island, 
Blackwater River, 1862; commanded monitor "Weehaw- 
ken," South Atlantic Blockading Squadron; took part in 
bombardment and capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina, 
December, 1864-January, 1865; commander-in-chief of the 
South Pacific Station, 1874-1875; commanded Mare Is- 
land Navy Yard 1877-1881. Retired 1883. 

[42] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



COLORADO ( 3 d) 

Length, 624 feet Beam, Q7 feet, $\ inches Draft, 30 feet, 6 inches 

Named for the State of Colorado 

{Admitted to the Union in 1876) 

Launched March 22, 192 1, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ruth Nicholson Melville (Mrs. Max 
Melville), daughter of Senator Samuel D. Nicholson of 
Colorado. 

The sponsor broke a bottle of water from the Colorado 
River. The Society of Sponsors' Prayer for our Navy was 
offered by Chaplain C. H. Dickins just before the launching. 

Among those present on the stand were Assistant Sec- 
retary of the Navy Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., and Mrs. 
Roosevelt, Rear Admiral Reynold T. Hall and Mrs. Hall, 
Colonel Russell C. Langdon, U. S. A., and Mrs. Langdon, 
Rear Admiral L. M. Nulton and Mrs. Nulton, Captain 
Lloyd Bankson, U. S. Navy, Captain T. G. Roberts, 
U. S. Navy, delegation of members of the Society of Spon- 
sors. A vast concourse of spectators witnessed the launching. 

The battleship "Colorado" is the third of that name and 
second named for the State. 

"Colorado (2d)" launched in 1903, is an armored cruiser 
now re-named "Pueblo" for the Colorado City. 

"Colorado (ist)," a steam frigate, launched in 1856, was 
named for the Colorado River. 






CONCORD ( 3 d) 
light cruiser 

Length, 555 feet, 6 inches Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet, 3 inches 

Named for the city of Concord, 
Massachusetts 

{The scene of the Battle of Concord, in 1775) 

[43 ] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched December 15, 1921, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Shipbuilding Co., Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Bagley Buttrick, daughter of 
Mr. Stedman Buttrick, a descendant of Captain John 
Buttrick, who led the Continental troops in the Battle of 
Concord. 

The first "Concord" was a sloop of 700 tons, launched in 
1828. The first woman sponsor appears in the records of 
her launching ceremonies. 

The second "Concord" was a gunboat of 1700 tons, 
launched in 1890. 



CONNER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 30 feet, 8 inches Draft, 8 feet 

Named for Commodore David Conner, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched August 21, 1917, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Elsa Diederich, great-great-grand- 
daughter of Commodore David Conner, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore david Conner, u. s. Navy, was 

born at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, in 1792, and died 1856. 
He was appointed midshipman January 16, 1809; com- 
missioned captain 1835; was Navy commissioner 1841, to 
1842; served on "Hornet" in chase of British ship "Bel- 
videra" and on "Hornet" in action with British ship "Pea- 
cock" February 24, 18 13, and action with British ship 
"Penguin" March 23, 1815, being wounded during the 
latter action. Commander of Home Squadron during War 
with Mexico, 1 846-1 847. 



[44] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



CONVERSE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral George A. Converse, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss J. Edith Converse Colt, granddaughter 
of Rear Admiral George A. Converse, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral george a. converse, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Norwich, Vermont, 1844; died 1909. 
Appointed midshipman 1861; commissioned rear admiral 
1903. Rear Admiral Converse was one of the first officers 
connected with the introduction of electricity aboard men- 
of-war. He was probably the pioneer in the experi- 
mentation and introduction of smokeless powder in the 
Navy; was instrumental in obtaining the first torpedo 
boat called "Lightning," built for the United States Navy 
in 1876 by the HerreschofFs; was chief of Bureaus of Equip- 
ment, Ordnance, and Navigation in turn. He was well 
known as a naval expert on ordnance, especially in regard to 
torpedoes. 



CONYNGHAM 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Gustavus Conyngham, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 8, 191 5, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Conyngham Stevens, great-great- 
granddaughter of Captain Gustavus Conyngham, U. S. 

Navy. 

[45] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Captain gustavus conyngham, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Ireland, in 1747; died 1819. In 1775 commanded a 
privateer and sailed from Philadelphia for Dunkirk to 
obtain supplies "necessary for War for the Colonies." 
March 1, 1777, commissioned captain in the Continental 
Navy. Commanded the "Surprise," "Revenge," and 
"Experiment." Made a number of valuable prizes. Was 
himself taken prisoner on two or three occasions; had 
extraordinary escapes; became a terror to the British 
coasting vessels. During the Naval War with France 
commanded the armed brig "Maria." At the outbreak of 
the War of 18 12 he took part for a brief period. 

CORMORANT 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, Q inches 

Named for the bird Cormorant 

Launched February 5, 1919, at Todd Shipyard Corpo- 
ration, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Marie Eliza Villaire, daughter of one 
of the foremen of Robin's Dry Dock Company. 

CORRY 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet, 4 inches Beam, 31 feet Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Commander William 
Merrill Corry, Jr., U. S. Navy 

Launched March 28, 1921, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Merrill Corry (Sarah Wig- 
gins), mother of Lieutenant Commander William Merrill 
Corry, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant commander william merrill 

CORRY, U. S. Navy, was born in Quincy, Florida, 1889; 
[46] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



died October 7, 1920. Midshipman 1906; lieutenant 
commander 1918; served on U. S. S. "Kansas" 1911-1915; 
naval aviator with U. S. S. "North Carolina" and "Wash- 
ington" 1916; August 22, 1917, assigned to duty in 
Europe with U. S. Naval Aviation Forces; later was 
ordered to command naval air station at Le Croisic, 
Loire, France, the first United States operating unit 
of the World War; his success and skill as an air pilot 
won for him the cross of Chevalier of the Legion of Honor 
from France; June 7, 1918, until end of the demobilization 
was in command of naval air station, Brest, Finisterre; 
June 5, 1919, represented the United States in aeronautic 
Interallied Commission of Control; June 1, 1920-October 7, 
1920 was aid for aviation staff of Commander in Chief of 
the Atlantic Fleet. His death was caused by inhaling 
flame from a burning airplane after its crash, when though 
badly wounded he was endeavoring to rescue his com- 
panion from the burning flame. 

COWELL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, q feet, 2 inches 

Named for Master John G. Cowell, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched November 23, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Emily P. Garney, great-granddaughter 
of Master John G. Cowell, U. S. Navy. 

MASTER JOHN G. COWELL, U. S. Navy, was ap- 
pointed a master in the United States Navy January 21, 
1809; and died of wounds, April 18, 18 14, received near 
Valparaiso in the action between the United States frigate 
"Essex" and his British Majesty's frigate "Phoebe" and 
the sloop-of-war "Cherub," April 18, 1814. The conduct 
of this brave and heroic officer who lost a leg during the 
action, excited the admiration of every man on the ship. 

[47] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

After being wounded, he would not consent to be taken 
below until loss of blood rendered him insensible. He 
was at the time of the action an acting lieutenant. 

CRANE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain William M. Crane, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. May McGuire, wife of Mr. M. J. Mc- 
Guire, San Francisco, California, who was head of one of the 
Labor organizations and active in influencing maximum 
production during the World War. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM M. CRANE, United States Navy, 
was born in Elizabethtown, New Jersey, 1776; died 1846. 
Appointed midshipman 1799; captain 1814. As a lieu- 
tenant on the "Congress," he participated in the opera- 
tions and attacks on Tripoli, 1804, and was included in the 
thanks of Congress for his gallantry, and awarded a sword. 
July 16, 1812, commanding the "Nautilus," he was cap- 
tured by H. B. M. S. "Southampton" off New York. In 
1827 he commanded the Mediterranean squadron and 
acted as one of the commissioners in the negotiations with 
the Ottoman Empire. 1842-1846, he was the first chief 
of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrography of the Navy 
Department. 

T. A. M. CRAVEN ( 2 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 30 feet, 8 inches Draft, 8 feet 

Named for Captain Tunis Augustus Macdonough 

Craven, U. S. Navy 

[48] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched June 29, 1918, at Navy Yard, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frank Learned (Ellin Craven), daughter 
of Captain T. A. M. Craven, U. S. Navy. 

In naming the ship the sponsor said: 

"May God bless thee, God lead thee, and speed thee; 
and may all who sail on thee serve God and country with 
the same brave and faithful spirit as he did whose name is 
now given unto thee." 

Prayer was offered by the Rt. Rev. Arthur C. Thomson, 
Suffragan Bishop of Southern Virginia. 

Captain tunis Augustus macdonough 

CRAVEN, U. S. Navy, was born in Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire, 1813. Appointed midshipman 1829; commis- 
sioned Commander April 24, 1861. Served with distinct- 
ion in the Mexican War. From 1850 to 1857 in com- 
mand of the "Corwin" on Coast Survey duty. In 1857 in 
command of the Atrato Expedition, surveyed a route for a 
proposed ship canal through the Isthmus of Darien via the 
Atrato and Truando rivers. In 1861, in command of the 
"Crusader" performed conspicuous blockade service off the 
Florida Coast. In the "Tuscarora," 1861-1863, performed 
with distinction special blockade service in European waters. 
In command of the "Tecumseh," April, 1864, joined Ad- 
miral Lee's squadron in the James River. Joined Admiral 
Farragut's fleet August 4, 1864, at sunset for the attack on 
Mobile. On August 5, 1864, the fleet steamed up Mobile 
Bay, the "Tecumseh" leading the attack. The first gun 
was fired by the "Tecumseh" at 6:47. At 7:15 the "Te- 
cumseh" was struck by a torpedo and sank almost imme- 
diately, carrying down her gallant commander. 

CROSBY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Pierce Crosby, 

U. S. Navy 

[49] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched September 28, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles Tittman (Jean Crosby), daugh- 
ter of Rear Admiral Pierce Crosby, U. S. Navy. 

REAR ADMIRAL PIERCE CROSBY, United States 
Navy, was born in Delaware County, Pennsylvania. Was ap- 
pointed a midshipman in 1838; rear admiral in 1872. In the 
Mexican War he took part in the attack and capture of Tux- 
pan and Tobasco. At the outbreak of the Civil War his 
first duty was to keep open the communication between An- 
napolis, Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay and Havre de 
Grace. Prior to the battle of Big Bethel he volunteered to 
take a converted canal boat, the "Fannie," with her boilers 
held down to the decks by chains and proceeded with her to 
the attack on Forts Hatteras and Clarke in order to have a 
light draft vessel for landing troops. When the sea had 
swamped the troop boats, Lieutenant Crosby took a ship's 
heavy launch and continued the landing of 300 men. The 
following day the squadron closed in from sea and captured 
a garrison of 700 men, which by Crosby's picket line had 
been prevented from making a reconnoisance and learning 
the exact strength of the Federal troops. In 1863, while in 
command of the "Florida," he destroyed two blockade run- 
ners and in 1864 in command of the "Keystone State" cap- 
tured five more blockaders. In 1864-1865 in command of 
the "Metacomet" in attack in Mobile Bay, he planned and 
directed the construction of torpedo nets on the Blakely 
River and superintended the removal of 140 torpedoes, clear- 
ing the way so as to allow the squadron to pass safely to 
Mobile. 



CROWNINSHIELD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314. feet Beam, 50 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Benjamin Williams Crowninshield 

[50] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched July 24, 1919, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Emily Crowninshield Davis, great- 
great-granddaughter of Secretary of the Navy Benjamin 
Williams Crowninshield. 

Hon. benjamin Williams crowninshield, 

Secretary of the Navy, 1814-1818. Born in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, December 27, 1772; died 1851. He was State 
Senator in 181 1, and on December 17, 1814, was appointed 
Secretary of the Navy by President Madison. He held the 
same office in the Monroe Cabinet and resigned in Novem- 
ber, 1818. He was presidential elector in 1820; was again 
State senator in 1 822-1 823 and a member of Congress from 
1823 to 1831. 

CURLEW 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet, 6 inches Draft 9 feet, Q inches 

Named for the bird Curlew 

Launched August 29, 191 8, at Staten Island Shipbuilding 
Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Gertrude Carol Rhodes, who was 
serving as yeoman (F) 1st Class, U. S. N. R. F., in the 
office of the Inspector of Machinery of Mine Sweepers, 
Third Naval District during the World War. 



CUSHING (2d) 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 305 feet Beam, 30 feet, 4. inches Draft, 9 feet, $ inches 

Named for Commander William 
Barker Cushing, U. S. Navy 

Launched January 16, 191 5, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[51] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Marie L. Cushing, daughter of Com- 
mander W. B. Cushing, U. S. Navy. 

Commander william barker cushing, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Delafield, Wisconsin, in 1842. His 
career was filled with daring planning and clever execution. 
He was especially distinguished for the destruction of the 
Confederate ram "Albermarle." He undertook the attack 
with a steam launch carrying a spar torpedo and towing an 
armed cutter. When near the "Albermarle" he was de- 
tected but pushed forward under a shower of bullets and 
fire of howitzers. He had time to drive the steam launch 
over the baulks and to explode the torpedo against the 
"Albermarle," sinking her, before his launch was destroyed. 
Cushing and one other escaped, the rest were captured. 
For destroying the "Albermarle" he received the thanks of 
Congress and promotion to Lieutenant Commander. 

CUYAMA 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 475 feet Beam, 56 feet Draft, 26 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Cuyama Mountains 

Launched June 16, 1917, at Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Offley, daughter of Com- 
mander Cleland N. Ofrley, U. S. Navy, Engineer Officer 
of the Navy Yard. 

DAHLGREN ( 2 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 50 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 20, 191 8, at Newport News S. B. & 
D. D. Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

[50 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Josiah Pierce (Ulrica Dahlgren), daugh- 
ter of Rear Admiral John A. Dahlgren, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral john a. dahlgren, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Philadelphia in 1809. Died in 1870. Appointed 
midshipman in 1826. Rear admiral 1863. In 1847-1857 in- 
vented the famous Dahlgren gun, introduced howitzers afloat 
and ashore, and wrote important works on ordnance. In 
1 86 1 when ordnance officer at the Washington Navy Yard, 
Congress promoted him to command of the yard for con- 
spicuous services after all other officers had resigned and 
left him alone with Lieutenant Wainwright to defend the 
yard. In 1863, in command of South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron, he co-operated with General Gillmore in the 
occupation of Morris Island and destruction of Fort Sumter, 
South Carolina. In 1864 his squadron co-operated with 
General Sherman in the occupation of Savannah. In 
1865 his squadron occupied Charleston, South Carolina, 
after the evacuation, and Georgetown. He was twice 
Chief of Bureau of Ordnance. 

DALE ( 3 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Richard Dale, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 19, 1919, at Bethlehem Ship- 
building Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Andrew J. Peters (Martha Phillips), 
wife of Hon. A. J. Peters, Mayor of Boston, Massachusetts. 

CAPTAIN RICHARD DALE, United States Navy. 
Born near Norfolk, Virginia, 1756. Died 1826. Appointed 
midshipman, 1776; captured on the U. S. S. "Lexington," 
1777. Imprisoned in Mill Prison, England; escaped to 
France. Appointed master's mate under John Paul Jones, 
1778; first lieutenant, "Bonhomme Richard"; engagement 
and capture of the "Serapis," September 23, 1779; I 78 I_ 

[53] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

1782, commanded "Queen Of France"; made several 
captures. Commissioned Captain No. 4 on list June 4, 
1794. Commanded the Mediterranean squadron in oper- 
ations against Tripoli, 1801. Resigned, December 17, 1802. 
After the death of John Paul Jones, the sword presented 
to John Paul Jones by Louis XVI was conveyed to Com- 
modore Dale by request of Commodore Jones. 

DALLAS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, J 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Alexander J. Dallas, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 31, 1919, at Newport News S. B. & D. D. 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Wathen Dallas Strong, great-grand- 
daughter of Captain Alexander J. Dallas, U. S. Navy. 

Captain Alexander j. Dallas, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1791; died 1844. 
Appointed midshipman 1805; captain 1828. Fired the 
first shot of the War of 18 12 in the engagement between 
the "President" and the "Little Belt," June 23, 1812. 
Commanded the "Spitfire" in operations against Algiers, 
1815. Commanded the "John Adams" operating against 
pirates in the West Indies, 1824. From 1832-1834 was 
employed in laying out the Pensacola Navy Yard, and 
was commended for the good work accomplished. In 1835- 
1837 commanded the West Indian Squadron and co-operated 
with General Scott in suppressing the Seminole Indians. In 
recognition of this service, Fort Dallas was named for him. 
In 1843 was in command of the Pacific Squadron, and died 
on the "Savannah" in the harbor of Callao, Peru. 

DAVIS (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 315 feet Beam, 30 feet Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

[54] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Rear Admiral Charles H. Davis, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 15, 1916, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Davis, granddaughter of 
Rear Admiral Charles H. Davis, U. S. Navy. 

REAR ADMIRAL CHARLES H. DAVIS, U. S. Navy, 
was born in Boston, Massachusetts, January 16, 1807. 
Appointed midshipman 1823; passed midshipman 1829; 
lieutenant 183 1; commander 1854; captain 1861; com- 
modore 1862; rear admiral 1863; died 1877. He did 
valuable coast survey work and wrote valuable works 
on Tides and Currents of the Ocean; also translated 
many valuable works. In the Civil War he was fleet 
captain in du Pont's expedition against Port Royal, 
South Carolina. He was flag officer at naval engagements 
at Fort Pillow and at Memphis in 1862, which effected the 
destruction of the Confederate iron clad fleet. He was 
with Farragut at Vicksburg and successfully co-operated 
with General Curtis in the Yazoo in 1862. First chief of 
Bureau of Navigation in 1862. On February 7, 1863, 
Commander Davis received the thanks of. Congress for 
distinguished services at Fort Pillow, at Memphis, and for 
successful operations at other points on the Mississippi 
River and became a rear admiral on the date of the ap- 
proval of this vote of thanks. 



DECATUR ( 3 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet, 4 inches Beam, 31 feet Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Stephen Decatur, 

U.S. Navy 

Launched October 29, 1921, at Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
California. 

[55] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Josiah S. McKean (Julie McHawxhurst), 
wife of Rear Admiral J. S. McKean, U. S. Navy, Com- 
mandant of the Navy Yard. 

Commodore Stephen decatur was bom in 

Maryland, 1779; died in 1820. In 1803 was in command 
of the "Enterprise" in Commodore Preble's Mediterranean 
Squadron and in 1804 led a daring expedition into the 
harbor of Tripoli for the purpose of burning the U. S. 
frigate Philadelphia, which had fallen into Tripolitan hands. 
He succeeded and made his escape under the fire of the 
batteries. This brilliant exploit earned him a captain's 
commission and a sword of honor from Congress. During 
the War of 18 12 in the "United States" captured the "Mace- 
donian." In the "President" he fought a superior fleet 
until his own decks were covered with the dead and wounded. 



DE LONG (2d) 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Commander 
George W. DeLong, U. S. Navy 

Launched October 29, 1918, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma DeLong Mills, granddaughter of 
Lieutenant Commander George W. DeLong, U. S. Navy, 
and daughter of Mrs. Sylvie DeLong Mills, sponsor for the 
U. S. S. DeLong (1st) in 1900. 

Lieutenant commander george w. de- 
long, U. S. Navy, was born in New York in 1844. -Ap- 
pointed midshipman in 1861. He commanded the Arctic 
exploration steamer "Jeanette" in an expedition for the 
discovery of the North Pole 1879-1881. The "Jeanette" 
was crushed in the ice. Three months later after discovering 
three islands, and dragging boats and provisions over shift- 
ing ice and open water, he died from exposure and starva- 
tion when almost within reach of help. 

[56] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



DELPHY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4. inches 

Named for Midshipman Richard Delphy, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 18, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Sowden Sims (Anne Hitchcock), 
wife of Rear Admiral Sims, U. S. Navy, in command of 
U. S. Naval forces in European waters in the War with Ger- 
many. 

Midshipman richard delphy, u. s. Navy, was 

appointed a midshipman May 18, 1809. Served with abil- 
ity on the "United States" in the engagement with the 
"Macedonian" October 25, 1812. Killed in the fight between 
the U. S. S. "Argus" and H. B. M. S. "Pelican," August 
14, 1813. 

DENT 

torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Commodore John H. Dent, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched March 23, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Amy Whipple Collins, great granddaugh- 
ter of Commodore John H. Dent, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore john h. dent, u. s. Navy, was bom 

in Maryland in 1779. Entered the Navy in 1793. Died in 
1823. Appointed midshipman March 16, 1798; captain 
181 1. Served on board the "Constellation" when she captured 
the French frigate "Insurgente" 1799. He was first lieu- 
tenant of the frigate "Constitution" in the battle of Tripoli 

[57] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

under Commodore Edward Preble. After the battle he was 
placed in command of the U. S. brig "Enterprise," whose 
captain, James Decatur, had been killed in the battle. 
Congress presented all the officers engaged in the battle of 
Tripoli with a bronze medal. In the war of 1812, Commo- 
dore Dent commanded the U. S. S. "Alligator" on the 
southern coast. Was stationed at Newport, Rhode Island, 
in 1815. 

DETROIT ( 4 th) 

LIGHT CRUISER 

Length, 555 feet, 6 inches Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet, 3 inches 

Named for the city of Detroit, Michigan 

Launched June 29, 1922, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Madeleine Couzens, daughter of Hon- 
orable James Couzens, Mayor of Detroit. 

The first "Detroit" was a vessel of 400 tons, captured 
from the British at the Battle of Lake Erie, 1813. 

The second "Detroit" was a screw steamer of 1380 tons, 
built during the Civil War but never completed. 

The third "Detroit" was a protected cruiser, of 2072 
tons, launched in 1891. Named for the city of Detroit. 

DICKERSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Mahlon Dickerson 

Launched March 12, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John Stiles Dickerson (Amelia Wag- 
ner), wife of the nearest relative of Secretary of the Navy 
Mahlon Dickerson. 

[58] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Secretary of the navy mahlon dickerson 

was born in Hanover, New Jersey, 1770; died 1853. Grad- 
uated at Princeton in 1789, was admitted to the bar in 
1793. In 1805-1808 he was quartermaster general of Penn- 
sylvania. He returned to New Jersey, became judge of the 
Supreme court and chancellor, and was elected a member of 
the legislature, 1811-1813. In 1815 he was elected gover- 
nor of New Jersey, and at the close of his term was sent to 
the United States Senate. He was repeatedly re-elected, 
serving from December 1, 1817, till March 2, 1833. Presi- 
dent Jackson appointed him Secretary of the Navy June 30, 
1834, in which post he was continued by President Van 
Buren, serving till June 30, 1838. 

DOBBIN 

DESTROYER TENDER 

Length, 48$ feet Beam, 61 feet Draft, 21 feet 

Named for Honorable James 
Cochrane Dobbin 

Launched May 5, 1921, at Philadelphia Navy Yard 

Sponsor: Mrs. H. H. James (Louisa Dobbin), grand- 
daughter of Hon. James Cochrane Dobbin. 

HON. JAMES COCHRANE DOBBIN was Secretary 
of the Navy from 1853 to 1857. He was born in North 
Carolina in 18 14. In 1832 he was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, and practiced law. He was a 
member of Congress from 1845 to 1847, and also of the 
North Carolina Legislature from 1848 to 1852. In 1853 he 
became Secretary of the Navy, and during his administra- 
tion he set about reform in all its branches. He was a firm 
believer in a strong Navy, and regarded the increase of Na- 
val strength not as a war but as a peace measure, and during 
his administration there were built eighteen of the finest 
ships of their class that were in the world. He instituted 
the present apprentice system, the inauguration of a retired 
list for officers unable to perform active duty, the law for 

[59] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

increased pay to seamen, and honorable discharges for good 
conduct. Under his auspices the Perry Expedition was car- 
ried to a successful termination and the treaty with Japan 
made. He died in 1857. 

DORSEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Midshipman John Dorsey, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched April 9, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Agnes Means, first cousin, thrice re- 
moved, of Midshipman John Dorsey, U. S. Navy. 

Midshipman john dorsey, United states Navy, 

was born in Maryland. Killed in engagement with the en- 
emy August 7, 1804. Appointed midshipman April 28, 
1801. Ordered to the "Siren," Mediterranean Squadron, 
under Commodore Edward Preble operating against Tripoli. 
One of the officers of Gunboat No. 9 in attack on Tripolitan 
batteries August 7, 1804. Killed by explosion of a hot shot 
which struck her magazine. Commended in Commodore 
Preble's report to the Secretary of the Navy. 



DOWNES 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 305 feet Beam, 30 feet, 7 inches Draft, 9 feet, 7 inches 

Named for Captain John Downes, U. S. Navy 

Launched November 8, 1913, at New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Manley H. Simons (Katherine Nazro), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander Simons, U. S. Navy, and 
great-granddaughter of Captain John Downes, U. S. Navy. 

[60] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



LiAPTAIN JOHN DOWNES, United States Navy, was 
born 1784, in Massachusetts; died 1854. Appointed mid- 
shipman 1802; commissioned lieutenant 1807; master 
commandant (commander) 1813; captain 1817. Served: 
Distinguished service in the operations against Tripoli in 
1804; executive officer of the "Essex," War of 1812, in 
action with British ships "Cherub" and "Phoebe," March 
28, 1814; 1815 commanding U. S. S. "Epervier," Medi- 
terranean Squadron, captured an Algerine frigate and a 
brig, June 15-17, 1815; 1819-1821 commanded the "Mace- 
donian," Pacific Squadron; 1828-1829, "Java," Mediter- 
ranean Squadron, and 1832-1834 in the "Potomac," 
commanded the Pacific Squadron; last duty was com- 
manding Charlestown Navy Yard, 1850-1852. 

DOYEN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Brigadier General Charles A. 
Doyen, U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched July 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Fay Elizabeth Doyen, daughter of 
Brigadier General Charles A. Doyen, U. S. M. C. 

Brigadier general charles a. doyen, United 

States Marine Corps, was born in New Hampshire, 1859. 
Awarded the distinguished service medal posthumously for 
distinguished services rendered; commander of the Fifth 
Regiment of Marines from the time of its organization in 
the United States throughout its period of training in 
France until the arrival there of the Sixth Regiment of 
Marines, when he commanded the Fourth Brigade, which 
consisted of the Fifth and Sixth Regiments and the Sixth 
Machine Gun Battalion. By his ability and personal 
effort he brought this brigade to a very high state of efficiency 
which enabled it to successfully resist the German Army 

[61 ]~ 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

and be victorious in Chateau-Thierry sector and Belleau 
Woods. The strong efforts on his part undermined his 
health and necessitated his being invalided to the United 
States before having the opportunity to command the 
brigade in action; but his work was shown by the excellent 
service rendered by his brigade. He died October 6, 1918. 

DU PONT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, p feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Samuel Francis 
du Pont, U. S. Navy 

Launched October 22, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Constance Simons du Pont, great- 
grandniece of Rear Admiral Samuel Francis du Pont U. S. 

Navy. 

Rear admiral samuel francis du pont, 

U. S. Navy, was born at Bergen Point, New Jersey, 1803; 
died 1865. Appointed midshipman 181 5 ; rear admiral 
1862. Commanded U. S. S. "Cyane" 1846-1848, and 
rendered conspicuously gallant service at San Diego, 
Mazatlan, San Jose, and other ports, and was included in 
the thanks of Congress to officers for service in the war 
with Mexico. 

DYER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain N. Mayo Dyer, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 13, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Virginia Blackmur, daughter of Paul 
Rupert Blackmur of Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[62] 



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£££-© 



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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Captain n. mayo dyer, u. s. Navy, was bom in 

Massachusetts 1839; died 1910. Entered volunteer Navy 
as master's mate; promoted to acting ensign and acting 
master for gallant service; served in U. S. S. "Metacomet" 
at battle of Mobile Bay; entered Regular Navy as lieu- 
tenant commander December 18, 1868; captain, command- 
ing the "Baltimore" at the battle of Manila Bay. May 1, 
1898, in Commodore George Dewey's Squadron. 



EDSALL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Norman E Edsall, 
Seaman, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 29, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Bessie Edsall Bracey, sister of Nor- 
man E. Edsall, U. S. Navy. 

Norman e. edsall, seaman, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Kentucky in 1873; killed by hostile natives near 
Apia, Samoa, April 1, 1899, while attached to the U. S. S. 
"Philadelphia." Enlisted in the United States Navy as 
seaman 1898. On April 1, 1899, while attached to the 
U. S. S. "Philadelphia," he went ashore with a party under 
command of Lieut. Lansdale, U. S. Navy, to suppress the 
hostile natives near Apia, Samoa. The thicket was so dense 
that when the order to retreat was sounded it was not pos- 
sible for the different parts of the expedition to render each 
other mutual support. Lieut. Lansdale was wounded be- 
low the knee and was incapable of marching. Edsall was 
mortally wounded while assisting Lieut. Lansdale to a 
place of safety, showing a spirit of bravery and self-sacri- 
fice in keeping with the standards of the Navy. 



[63] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

EDWARDS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Midshipman William W. Edwards, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 10, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Julia Edwards Noyes, daughter of Mr. 
Edward A. Noyes. Midshipman William W. Edwards, 
U. S. Navy, was a nephew of the sponsor's great-grand- 
father, Thomas Edwards. 

Midshipman william w. edwards, United 

States Navy, was born in Petersburg, Virginia. Appointed 
a midshipman September 1, 181 1; 18 13 attached to the 
"Argus," on which ship he was killed in action with the 
"Pelican" August 14, 1813. 



JOHN D. EDWARDS 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 50 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant John Davis Edwards, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 18, 1919, at William Cramp and Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John D. Edwards (Mae Marshall), 
widow of Lieutenant John Davis Edwards, U. S. Navy. 
Mrs. Edwards was accompanied by her two small children. 

Lieutenant john davis edwards, United 

States Navy. Born in Isle of Wight County, Virginia, 1885; 
died at sea, October 9, 1918. Appointed warrant machin- 
ist, December 31, 1908; ensign, July 30, 1914; lieutenant, 
October 15, 1917. Attached to U. S. S. "Shaw," cruising 

[64] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



in British waters. Killed when the "Shaw" was rammed 
in collision with the British troopship "Aquitania." The 
"Shaw" had just sighted a German submarine and in going 
for her crossed the path of the giant transport. 



EIDER 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, Q inches 

Named for the bird Eider 

Launched May 26, 1918, at Pusey & Jones Company. 

Sponsor: Miss Maren Lysholm, daughter of Mr. Henry 
Lysholm, vice president of the Company. 

ELLIOT 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Lieutenant Commander 
Richard McCall Elliot 

Launched July 4, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Joan Packard Elliot, widow of Lieu- 
tenant Commander Richard McCall Elliot, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant commander richard McCall 

ELLIOT, U. S. Navy, was born in Philadelphia in 1888. 
Was killed on board the "Manley" March 20, 1918. The 
"Manley" while performing escort duty in the war zone, 
came in contact with one of the convoy. An explosion of 
depth charges located on the after end of the vessel occur- 
red causing serious damage and loss of life. Lieut. Com- 
mander Elliot, who was on the bridge, immediately started 
aft to take charge of the situation. He was killed by flying 
pieces of wreckage as he gained the deck. 

[65] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



ELLIS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Chief Yeoman George Henry Ellis, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 30, 191 8, at Wm. Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edward T. Stotesbury (Eva Roberts), 
wife of a prominent citizen of Philadelphia. 

Chief yeoman george henry ellis, u. s. 

Navy, was killed in the Battle of Santiago, July 3, 1898, 
while serving on board the flagship of Commodore Schley, the 
U. S. S. "Brooklyn." He was born in Peoria, Illinois, 1875, 
and enlisted in the Navy as an apprentice seaman 1892. 
He served on the "Minnesota," "Richmond," "Mononga- 
hela," "Chicago," "Vermont," "Dolphin," "Columbia," 
and "Brooklyn." During the battle he was stationed to 
give the ranges shown by the stadimeter to the captain, who 
communicated them from time to time to the different divi- 
sions. Ellis was struck in the face by a large shell, and in- 
stantly killed. 



ERICSSON (2D) 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 305 feet Beam, 30 feet, 7 inches Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for John Ericsson 

Launched August 22, 1914, at New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. J. Washington Logue (Mary Barry), 
wife of Representative in Congress J. W. Logue of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 



[66] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



JOHN ERICSSON, engineer and inventor, was born in 
Sweden, in 1812. After serving in the Swedish Army, he 
moved to England. In 1839 came to United States where 
he furnished designs for U. S. S. "Princeton" and brought 
out numerous inventions. In 1861, during the Civil War, he 
designed and finished in 100 days the Ironclad Monitor and 
built a number of similar vessels for our Navy. In 1883 he 
erected a "Sun Motor" in New York, for developing power 
from direct rays of the sun. He died in New York in 1889. 
Buried in the place of his birth, a U. S. Navy vessel con- 
veying his body in 1890. 



EVANS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 30, 1918, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Neville Sewall, granddaugh- 
ter of Rear Admiral Robley D. Evans, U. S. Navy. 

REAR ADMIRAL ROBLEY D. EVANS, U. S. Navy, 
was born in Floyd County, Virginia, in 1846; died 1912. 
Appointed midshipman i860; commissioned rear admiral 
1901; participated in Civil War and severely wounded twice 
in attack on Fort Fisher, January, 1865; in 1891-1892 com- 
manded the "Yorktown," Pacificstation, where he became 
known as "Fighting Bob" by his vigorous action in up- 
holding the honor of the United States during strained re- 
lations with Chile; commanded "Iowa" during War with 
Spain, taking prominent part in battle of Santiago; com- 
mander in chief of Atlantic Fleet from east to west coast 
on trip around world in 1907-1908. 



[67] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

FAIRFAX 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Donald McNeill Fairfax, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 15, 1917, at Navy Yard, Mare Is- 
land, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth George, daughter of Captain 
Harry George, U. S. Navy, Commandant of the Navy Yard. 

Rear admiral donald McNeill Fairfax, 

U. S. Navy. Born in Virginia, 1821; died 1894; appointed 
midshipman August 12, 1837; rear admiral, July 11, 1880; 
executive officer of the "San Jacinto," November 8, 1861, 
when the British steamer "Trent" was seized by Captain 
Charles Wilkes; boarded that vessel and took off the Con- 
federate commissioners; retired at own request, Septem- 
ber 30, 1881. 

FALCON 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Falcon 

Launched September 7, 1918, at Consolidated Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, New York City. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William J. Parslow (Cora Pendleton), 
wife of the vice president of the Consolidated S. B. Cor- 
poration. 

FARENHOLT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet, 4 inches Beam, 30 feet, II inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Oscar W. Farenholt, 

U. S. Navy 

[68] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched March 9, 1921, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. J. Stewart Fairweather (Rachael 
Hovey), whose father had been a close friend of Rear Ad- 
miral Farenholt, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral oscar w. farenholt, u. s. 

Navy, born in San Antonio, Texas, in 1843; died 1920. 
Entered the Navy as a seaman in 1861; served on the flag- 
ship Wabash under Admiral du Pont in engagements at 
Fort Hatteras, Port Royal, and Fort Pulaski 1861-1862. 
Discharged and re-enlisted in 1863; on board the monitor 
"Catskill" participated in engagements with the defenses at 
Charleston Harbor and the storming of Fort Sumter 1863- 
1864; appointed acting ensign 1864; took part in operations 
of the north Atlantic blockading squadron until after the 
surrender of Fort Fisher 1865; March 1868 commissioned 
ensign; rear admiral 1901. After being commissioned in 
the regular service he held important positions on shore; 
his last sea service was in command of the Monocacy, 
Asiatic Station. 

FARQUHAR 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Norman H. 
Farquhar, U. S. Navy 

Launched January 18, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. James Reed (Laura Maltby), wife of 
Commander James Reed, C. C, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral norman h. farquhar, u. s. 

Navy, was born at Pottsville, Pennsylvania, 1840; died 
1907. Appointed a midshipman 1859; commissioned rear 
admiral 1899. First cruise on the coast of Africa for the sup- 
pression of the slave trade, and brought to the United 

[69] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



States (while still a midshipman) the captured slaver "Tri- 
ton." During the Civil War served on the "Mahaska" and 
other vessels of the North Atlantic blockading squadron, 
and was executive officer of the "Santiago de Cuba" in both 
attacks on Fort Fisher, December, 1864, ar »d January, 
1865. Commanded the "Trenton," Pacific station, and re- 
ceived commendation for the manner in which he handled 
his ship during the memorable hurricane at Apia, Samoa, 
1889; served as Chief of the Bureau of Yards and Docks 
from 1890 to 1894. Held various important shore stations 
and commanded the North Atlantic squadron 1899-1901. 

FARRAGUT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, u inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Admiral David Glasgow Farragut 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Ship- 
building Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Templin M. Potts (Marie Charlier), 
wife of Captain T. M. Potts, U. S. Navy. 

Admiral david Glasgow farragut, United 

States Navy, was born at Campbells Station, Tennessee, 
1801; died 1870. Appointed midshipman 18 10; vice 
admiral 1864; admiral 1866. Ordered to the "Essex" in 
18 1 2, under the command of Captain David Porter, and 
was with him in his memorable cruise in the Pacific. When 
but twelve years of age was given command of a prize and 
took her safely into Valparaiso. In January, 1862, he was 
given command of the West Gulf Blockading Squadron. On 
the flagship "Hartford" he opened up the Mississippi River 
by taking the forts below New Orleans and receiving the 
surrender of the city April 24-25, 1862. On August 5, 1864, 
he attacked and passed the defenses of Mobile Bay and 
received, after a gallant fight, the surrender of the Con- 
federate fleet in those waters. He received the thanks 

[70] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



of Congress. The grade of vice admiral was created for him 
by President Lincoln and that of admiral by Congress. 

FINCH 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Finch 

Launched March 30, 1918, at Standard Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frederic G. Peabody (Gertrude Doug- 
las). 

FLAMINGO 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 1^7 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Flamingo 

Launched August 25, 1918, at New Jersey D. D. & T. 
Company. 

Sponsor: Miss Fanny Caroline Moritz, daughter of 
Commander Albert Moritz, U. S. Navy. 

FLUSSER (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Commander Charles 
W. Flusser, U. S. Navy 

Launched November 7, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry Williams (Maud Steers), wife of 
Captain H. Williams, C. C, U. S. Navy, Superintending 
Naval Constructor. 

C7i] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Lieutenant commander charles w. flus- 

SER, United States Navy, was born in Maryland, 1832; 
died 1864; appointed midshipman 1847; lieutenant com- 
mander, 1862; cruised on various stations; at the com- 
mencement of the Civil War was assigned to the command 
of the U. S. S. "Commodore Perry," and took part in the 
attack on Roanoke Island, February 7, 1862, and other 
operations in North Carolina waters. Served in the North 
Atlantic Blockading Squadron during 1862, 1863, and 1864. 
He commanded the U. S. S. "Miami," operating in the 
Sounds of North Carolina, and was killed in the battle 
with the Confederate States ironclad "Albemarle," Ply- 
mouth, North Carolina. 

FOOTE (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Andrew Hull Foote, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 14, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Francis E. Cady (Leila Foote), grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral Andrew Hull Foote, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral Andrew hull foote, u. s. 

Navy, was born at New Haven, Connecticut, 1806; died 
1863; distinguished himself in engagements with barrier 
forts, Canton River, China, finally carrying them by storm; 
Chief of Bureau of Equipment and Recruiting; received 
thanks of Congress for gallant service during the Civil 
War; appointed to command the South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron in 1863, but died en route. 

JOHN D. FORD 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[72] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Rear Admiral John Donaldson 
Ford, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 2, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Florence Faith Ford, daughter of 
Rear Admiral John Donaldson Ford, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral john Donaldson ford, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, 1840; died 1918. 
Appointed third assistant engineer 1863; first assistant 
engineer 1868; passed assistant engineer 1874; chief 
engineer 1890; commander 1899; captain 1902; rear 
admiral 1902. Served during the Civil War: 1862-1865 
West Gulf Blockading Squadron; recapture of Baton Rouge, 
passage of Port Hudson, and engagements at other points 
on the Mississippi River. Second assistant engineer of the 
U. S. S. "Richmond" at the battle of Mobile Bay. At- 
tached to the "Sacramento" when she was wrecked oft 7 the 
coast of India in June, 1867. Cruised on various stations 
and held important posts on shore. As fleet engineer took 
part in the Battle of Manila Bay, May, 1898, and operations 
at Cavite, Sangley Point, capture of forts at Corregidor and 
Manila. Advanced three numbers for "eminent and 
conspicuous service in battle." Retired in May, 1902, 
but retained on active duty as inspector of machinery and 
ordnance until 1908. 

FOX (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Assistant Secretary of the Navy 
Gustavus V. Fox 

Launched June 12, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Virginia Blair, grandniece of Assistant 
Secretary Gustavus V. Fox. 

[73 ] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

HON. GUSTAVUS V. FOX, Assistant Secretary of the 
Navy, was born in Saugus, Massachusetts, 1821; died 1883. 
Appointed midshipman, 1838; was given the rank of lieu- 
tenant and resigned July 10, 1852. During the Mexican 
War served on the brig "Washington" and took active 
part in the second expedition against Tabasco, in which the 
town was captured. At the commencement of the Civil 
War volunteered for service and was given a temporary 
appointment in the Navy. August 1, 1861, appointed 
Assistant Secretary of the Navy by President Lincoln; 
held the position until the close of the war. 

FULLER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Edward C. Fuller, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched December 5, 191 8, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Gladys Sullivan, niece of U. S. Senator 
Phelan, of San Francisco. 

Captain edward c. fuller, u. s. Marine Corps, 

was born in Hamilton, Virginia, 1893; was graduated from 
the Naval Academy in 1916, and immediately requested 
overseas duty in the Marine Corps. He was awarded the 
distinguished service cross posthumously for: "While fear- 
lessly exposing himself in an artillery barrage for the pur- 
pose of getting his men into a position of security in the at- 
tack on the Bois de Belleau, on June 12, where he was killed, 
and thereby gave his life in an effort to protect his men." 

FULTON (2D) 

SUBMARINE TENDER 
Length, 226 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 13 feet 

Named for Robert Fulton 

[74] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched June 6, 1914, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Arthur Taylor Sutcliffe (Alice Crary), 
great-granddaughter of Robert Fulton. 

JlCOBERT FULTON, artist and inventor, was born No- 
vember 14, 1765, in Little Britain, now "Fulton" Town- 
ship, Pennsylvania; died, 18 15. 

In 1782, went to Philadelphia and became a painter of 
miniatures. Four years later he sailed for England to study 
art, where he painted historical scenes and many portraits, 
exhibiting several in the Royal Academy. From 1794 to 
1799 he invented machines for cutting marble, spinning 
flax and twisting ropes; a double inclined plane for 
canal navigation and an earth scoop for aqueducts. He 
crossed to France in 1797, where he painted and patented 
an Historic Panorama, and continued his scientific studies. 
His chief inventions, the submarine torpedo and the steam- 
boat, although proved effective in France, were rejected by 
Napoleon as impracticable. In 1804, Fulton returned to 
England and offered his submarine to the British Govern- 
ment which desired its suppression but declined its use. 
Two years later Fulton returned to America and immediately 
set about to demonstrate his two inventions, blowing up a 
brig, July 20th, 1807, in the harbor of New York; and on 
August 17th of the same year, accomplishing the voyage 
from New York to Albany in his steamboat, the Clermont, 
a distance of 150 miles, in 32 hours. Thereafter Fulton built 
more than twenty steamboats, and established them upon 
the Hudson, Raritan, Mississippi and Potomac Rivers. He 
also built the first steam ferries and the first steam war 
frigate, "Demologus" (The Voice of the People) later named 
the "Fulton." His motto, frequently quoted in his nu- 
merous writings, was "The Liberty of the Seas will be the 
Happiness of the Earth." 

"Fulton 1st" (originally "Demologus") was the first 
steam frigate of the U. S. Navy, and was named for her 
inventor. 

[75] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

From New York Evening Post, Saturday, Oct. 29th, 
1814: 

"STEAM FRIGATE LAUNCH 

"This morning at a quarter before 9 o'clock, the Steam 
Frigate 'Fulton the First' was launched from the shipyards 
of Adam and Noah Brown, at Corlear's Hook, amidst the 
roar of cannon and the shouts and acclamations of upwards 
of twenty thousand people who had assembled to witness 
the event. The ground adjacent was crowded, as was also 
the wharves and housetops, and the river covered with gun 
boats and water craft of every description. She took leave 
of her bed a quarter of an hour earlier than was intended, 
owing to the jarring produced by the discharge of a 32 
pounder on deck to give warning to the spectators. She 
measures 145 feet on deck and 55 feet breadth of beam, draws 
only 8 feet of water and is to mount 32 pound carronades 
and 2 Columbiads, the latter to carry each a 100 pound red 
hot ball. She is to be commanded by Commodore Porter 
and from appearances she bids fair to become a formidable 
weapon in harbor warfare." 



GAMBLE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Lengthy 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Colonel John M. Gamble, 
U. S. M. C, and Lieutenant Peter Gamble, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May n, 1918, at Newport News Shipbuilding 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Evelyn H. Jackson, daughter of Mr. 
Herbert Worth Jackson, a relative of Secretary of the Navy 
Josephus Daniels. 

Lieutenant colonel john m. gamble, 

U. S. M. C, was appointed a second lieutenant in the Marine 

[76] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Corps, 1809; was promoted first lieutenant 181 1; captain 
18 14; and major 1834. He was promoted major, by brevet, 
1816, and lieutenant colonel, by brevet, 1827. Died 1836. 
He served during the War of 1812 and while in command of 
the marine guard of the "Essex" he was temporarily placed 
in command of three prize vessels, the "Seringapatam," 
"Sir Andrew Hammond," and the "Greenwich," also a 
fort at Nooaheevah, during the absence of the "Essex." 
Despairing of the return of the "Essex" he rigged up the 
prize vessels with the intention of quitting the Marquesas. 
During a fight with mutineers of his command, who took 
the "Seringapatam," Lieut. Gamble was badly wounded in 
the foot, and later in an engagement with the natives, one 
officer, and three men of his command were killed, and one 
other severely wounded. With but four men on board the 
"Sir Andrew Hammond" fit for duty Lieut. Gamble put to 
sea, and without a chart made his way to the Sandwich Is- 
lands, in 17 days, only to fall into the hands of the enemy, 
being later released. 

Lieutenant peter gamble, u. s. N avy , was 

appointed midshipman January 16, 1809; commissioned 
lieutenant 18 14. On duty at Providence, R. I., until Octo- 
ber 9, 1813, when transferred to the U. S. S. "Enterprise." 
Ordered to Lake Champlain May 4, 18 14, and killed in 
action September 11, 18 14. 



GANNET 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 18 j feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Gannet 

Launched March 19, 1919, at Todd Shipyard Corpora- 
tion, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Edna Mae Fry, daughter of a foreman 
of the Todd Shipyard Corporation. 

l77l 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

GILLIS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore John P. Gillis, U. S. Navy, 
and Rear Admiral James H. Gillis, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 29, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsors: Mrs. Josephine T. Smith, niece of Commodore 
John P. Gillis, U. S. Navy, and Miss Helen Irving Mur- 
ray, granddaughter of Rear Admiral James H. Gillis, U. S. 

Navy. 

Commodore john p. gillis, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Wilmington, Delaware, 1803; died 1873. Appointed 
midshipman, 1825; commodore, retired list, 1866. Served 
with distinction during the Mexican War. In 1853-1854 was 
on the Japan expedition under Commodore Perry. Com- 
manded the U. S. S. "Monticello" and the U. S. S. "Semi- 
nole" during the Civil War and took part in many attacks. 
Held positions of importance on shore. 

Rear admiral james h. gillis, u. s. Navy, 

was born at Ridgway, Pennsylvania, 183 1; died 1910. 
Appointed midshipman, 1848; rear admiral (acting) 1888- 
1890. While attached to the store ship "Supply," lying 
in the harbor of Montevideo rescued the crew of a foundered 
vessel and received the thanks of the Argentine minister 
and a valuable medal. Held a brilliant record during the 
Civil War. Served in the Pacific Squadron, 1866. Re- 
ceived thanks of the British subjects for services rendered 
at the time of the tidal wave at Arica. Subsequently 
served on various stations ashore and afloat until retired 
in 1893. 

GILMER 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

[78] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Thomas Walker Gilmer 

Launched May 24, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Alfred H. Miles (Elizabeth Gilmer), 
granddaughter of Secretary of the Navy Thomas Walker 
Gilmer, and wife of Commander A. H. Miles, U. S. Navy. 

SECRETARY OF THE NAVY Thomas Walker Gilmer was 
born in Virginia; died near Washington, D. C, February 28, 
1844. Served for many years in the Virginia State Legis- 
lature and for two sessions as speaker. In 1840-1841 he 
was governor of Virginia. On February 15, 1844, he was 
appointed Secretary of the Navy, and ten days later he was 
killed by the bursting of a gun on board the U. S. S. 
"Princeton." 

GOFF 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Nathan Goff 

Launched June 2, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Nathan Goff (Katherine Penney), widow 
of Secretary of the Navy Nathan Goff. 

Secretary of the navy Nathan Goff was bom 

in Clarksburg, West Virginia, 1843; died 1920. Educated 
at the Northwestern Virginia Academy, Georgetown College, 
and the University of New York. In 1861 he enlisted in 
the National Army in the 3d Regiment of Virginia Volunteer 
Infantry, served as lieutenant and then adjutant of this 
regiment, and in 1863 was promoted to major of the 4th 
Virginia Cavalry. In 1865 he was admitted to the bar 
and elected to the West Virginia Legislature. In 1868 
appointed district attorney, which office he resigned in 

[79] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



1880 to accept the Secretaryship of the Navy under President 
Hayes to fill out the unexpired term of Richard W. Thomp- 
son, who had vacated it. In March, 1881, he was re- 
appointed district attorney of West Virginia, which office 
he again resigned on July 1, 1882. He was elected to 
Congress in 1884 and re-elected in 1886. 

GOLDSBOROUGH ( 2 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Louis M. 

GOLDSBOROUGH, U. S. NaVY 

Launched November 20, 191 8, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Vir- 
ginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Lucetta Pennington Goldsborough, 
niece of Rear Admiral Louis M. Goldsborough, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral louis m. goldsborough, 

United States Navy, was born in Washington, D. C, 1805; 
died 1877; warranted midshipman when only a little more 
than seven years of age, June 18, 1812; was commissioned 
rear admiral 1862. In September, 1827, while convoying 
a fleet of merchant vessels, one of the convoy, an English 
vessel named "Comet," was attacked and carried off* by 
Greek pirates. After a fierce fight, in which 90 of the 
pirates were killed, the "Comet" was rescued, and he 
received the thanks of the British Government. He was 
appointed flag officer at the outbreak of the Civil War; and 
September, 1861, planned and took part in the joint Army 
and Navy expedition to the sounds of North Carolina, 
and participated in the capture of Roanoke Island February 
5, 1862. 

GRAHAM 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feel Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[SO] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Secretary of the Navy 
William A. Graham 

Launched March 22, 1919, at Newport News Ship- 
building Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Robert F. Smallwood (Annie Graham), 
granddaughter of Secretary of the Navy William A. Graham. 

Secretary of the navy william a. graham 

was born in Lincoln County, North Carolina, in 1804; died 
1875. He was graduated from the University of North 
Carolina in 1824, was admitted to the bar in 1826. From 
1833 he was repeatedly elected to the House of Commons, 
of which in 1839-1840 he was speaker. In 1840-1843 he 
was in the United States Senate, in 1844 and 1846 he was 
elected Whig governor of North Carolina, and declined a 
third term, and from 1850-1852 was Secretary of the 
Navy, in which capacity he organized Perry's expedition 
to Japan. 

GREBE 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, Q feet, g inches 

Named for the bird Grebe 

Launched December 17, 1918, at Staten Island S. B. Co., 
New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma Grace Youmans, who was serv- 
ing as Yeoman (F) 1st class, attached to the office of the 
Inspector of Machinery of Mine Sweepers, Third Naval 
District, during the World War. - 

GREENE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commander Samuel Dana Greene, 

U. S. Navy 

[81] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched November 2, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John Stevens Conover (Mary Greene), 
daughter of Commander Samuel Dana Greene, U. S. Navy. 

Commander samuel dana greene, United 

States Navy, was born in 1840 in Cumberland, Maryland; 
died 1884. Appointed acting midshipman 1855; midshipman 
1859; commander 1872; served 1859-1861 on the "Hart- 
ford" in the East Indies; served as executive officer of the 
"Monitor" during her fight with the Confederate steamship 
"Merrimac" March 9, 1862; took command after her com- 
mander, Worden, was wounded; was executive officer of the 
"Monitor" in the engagements in the James River, Vir- 
ginia, April-May, 1862, and when she foundered in a gale. 
Particularly commended by Commander Bankhead for 
his good conduct during the gale, and called to the atten- 
tion of the admiral commanding the squadron and to the 
Secretary of the Navy. 

GREER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral James A. Greer, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 1, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Evelina Porter Gleaves, daughter of 
Rear Admiral Albert Gleaves, U. S. Navy, was sponsor by 
request of the family of Rear Admiral Greer. The sponsor 
brought with her two flags formerly flown by Rear Admiral 
Greer, and the Destroyer was launched with these flags fly- 
ing. 

Rear admiral james a. greer, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Ohio in 1833. Died 1904. Appointed midshipman 
January 10, 1848; commissioned rear admiral April 3, 1892; 

[82] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



1848-1860 cruised on the home, Pacific, Paraguay expedi- 
tion and African Squadron; Civil War, 1 861-1865, on tr, e 
"San Jacinto" when the Confederate commissioners were 
taken off the English steamer "Trent" by direction of 
Capt. Wilkes; special service on the "St. Louis" 1862-1863; 
1863-1865 attached to the Mississippi Squadron; com- 
manded the ironclads "Carondelet" and "Benton" and a di- 
vision of the squadron at the passage of Vicksburg April 16, 
1863; fought the batteries at Grand Gulf for five hours 
April 29, 1863, took part in the Red River expedition May, 
1863; engaged in the combined attack on Vicksburg May 
19, 1863, and almost constantly under fire during the 45 
days' siege of Vicksburg; Red River expedition of March 
and April, 1864; commanded naval station at Mound City 
October and November, 1864; commanded the flagship 
"Black Hawk" until February, 1865; had charge of con- 
voying Army transports up the Tennessee River February, 
1865; 1866-1867 commanded the "Mohongo," North Pa- 
cific station; commended by State Department for course 
pursued in defending American interests in Mexico; 1873 
commanded "Tigress" on "Polaris" relief expedition; 1874- 
1877 cruised on the Pacific station; 1878 special service on 
the "Constitution" to Paris Exposition; 1887-1889 com- 
manding European station; held important shore stations 
until retired, 1895. 



GREGORY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Francis 
Hoyt Gregory, U. S. Navy 

Launched January 27, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George S. Trevor (Alice Haven), great- 
granddaughter of Rear Admiral Francis Hoyt Gregory, 
U. S. Navy. 

[83] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Rear admiral francis hoyt Gregory, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Norwalk, Connecticut, 1789; died 1866. 
Appointed midshipman 1808; commissioned rear admiral 
1862; attached to bomb brig "Vesuvius" in 1810, and while 
in charge of one of the boats of that vessel captured a Brit- 
ish slaver off Balize; 181 1, in command of gun-boat No. 
162; in her, between August 7 and September 7, 181 1, he 
captured five piratical vessels and put to flight a British 
privateer in the West Indies; served with distinction under 
Commodore Chauncey in the squadron on Lake Ontario. 



GRIDLEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 31 5 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain Charles Vernon 
Gridley, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Francis P. Thomas (Ruth Gridley), 
daughter of Captain Charles Vernon Gridley, U. S. Navy. 

Captain charles vernon gridley, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Logansport, Indiana, 1844; died 1898. 
Appointed midshipman i860; captain 1897; was especially 
commended for gallant and conspicuous service in the Bat- 
tle of Mobile Bay August 6, 1864; selected to command the 
U. S. S. "Olympia," flagship of the Asiatic Squadron; took 
command July 28, 1897; though ill at the time, refused to 
be relieved from duty and directed in person the movements 
of this vessel in the battle of Manila Bay, May 1, 1898; 
recommended to be advanced six numbers, for eminent 
and conspicuous conduct in battle. Died at Kobe, Japan, 
June 5, 1898, en route home after the battle. Death directly 
due to the strain of battle on his already depleted strength. 
Dewey's memorable command "You may fire when ready, 
Gridley" was addressed to him. 

[8 4 ] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



GWIN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 8 inches Draft, 8 feet 

Named for Lieutenant Commander 
William Gwin, U. S. Navy 

Launched December 22, 1917, at Seattle Construction 
& Dry Dock Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. James Sterrett Woods (Dorothy Day), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander J. S. Woods, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant commander william gwin, 

United States Navy, was born in Indiana, 1832; appointed 
midshipman 1847; commissioned lieutenant commander 
1862; was mortally wounded in attack on Haines Bluff 
December 27, 1862, while in command of division of vessels, 
and died January 3, 1863. Rendered distinguished service 
in western waters and in the Mississippi Squadron. 

Dimensions of Submarines H-3 to H-9, inclusive, are: 
Length, 150 feet Beam, 15 feet, 9 inches Draft, 12 feet, 4 inches 

H-3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched July 3, 1913, at Seattle D. D. & S. B. Com- 
pany, Seattle, Washington. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen McEwan, daughter of Mr. B. H. 
McEwan, of Seattle. 

H-4 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 9, 191 8, at Puget Sound Navy Yard. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ralph Otis Davis (Anita Cresap), wife 
of Lieutenant R. O. Davis, U. S. Navy, the prospective com- 
manding officer. 

ts 5 ] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

H-5 

SUBMARINE 

Launched' September 24, 1918, at Puget Sound Navy Yard. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Ingram Hoopes, daughter of Com- 
mander Edward T. Hoopes, U. S. Navy, Supply Corps. 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 26, 1918, at U. S. Navy Yard, Puget 
Sound. 

Sponsor: Miss Catherine Ely, daughter of Commander 
C. F. Ely, M. C, U. S. Navy. Medical Aide to the Com- 
mandant of the 13th Naval District. 

H-7 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 17, 1918, at Navy Yard, Puget Sound, 
Washington. 

Sponsor: Miss Julia Field, daughter of Captain Harry 
A. Field, U. S. Navy, in command of the Navy Yard. 

H-8 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 14, 1918, at Navy Yard, Puget 
Sound, Washington. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ralph W. Holt (Fay Sly), wife of 
Lieutenant R. W. Holt, U. S. Navy, prospective com- 
manding officer. 

H-9 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 23, 1918, at Navy Yard, Puget 
Sound, Washington. 

[86] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Vincendon L. Cottman (Elizabeth Klink), 
widow of Rear Admiral Cottman, U. S. Navy, formerly 
in command of the Navy Yard. 

HALE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for United States Senator 
Eugene Hale 

Launched May 29, 1919, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, Me. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Cameron Hale, granddaughter 
of United States Senator Eugene Hale. 

HON. EUGENE HALE, Member of the United States 
Senate, 1881-1911. Born in Turner, Maine, 1836; died 
1918. Admitted to the bar in 1857. For nine successive 
years was attorney for Hancock county. In 1867, 1868, 
and 1880 was member of the State (Maine) Legislature, 
and was elected to Congress from that State 1869, and 
served until 1879. Elected to the United States Senate 
March 4, 1881, and served in that body until March, 191 1. 
He declined the position of Postmaster General offered 
him by President Grant and also declined the portfolio of 
Secretary of the Navy offered him by President Hayes. 
He was greatly interested in naval affairs and served for a 
number of years on the Naval committee; for some time as 
its chairman. 

HAMILTON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Lieutenant Archibald Hamilton, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched January 19, 1919, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

[87] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Spo?isor: Miss Dollie Hamilton Hawkins, great- 
grandniece of Lieutenant Archibald Hamilton, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant Archibald Hamilton, u. s. Navy, 

appointed a midshipman, 1809; acting lieutenant, 1812; 
lieutenant, 1813. He was attached to the "United States" 
October 25, 18 12, and served gallantly in the engagement 
and capture of H. B. M. S. "Macedonian" by that vessel. 
Was chosen to bear the flags captured on that occasion to 
the Navy Department. Killed January 15, 1815, on board 
the "President," in the action between that vessel and the 
British ships of war "Endymion" and "Pomona." 

PAUL HAMILTON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Paul Hamilton 

Launched February 21, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Justine McGrath, daughter of Mr. 
Justin McGrath, editor of the "San Francisco Examiner." 

HON. PAUL HAMILTON, who was Secretary of the 
Navy during the years 1809-18 13, was born in St. Paul's 
Parish, South Carolina, 1762; died 1816. He rendered 
important services during the Revolution; was comptroller 
of South Carolina from 1799-1804, improving the financial 
system of the State; was governor of South Carolina 1804- 
1806, Secretary of the Navy 1 809-1813. 

HARADEN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, II inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 



Named for Captain Jonathan Haraden, 

U. S. Navy 



[88] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched July 4, 191 8, at Newport News Shipbuilding 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mabel Beatrice Stephens, nearest 
relative of Captain Jonathan Haraden, U. S. Navy. 

Captain Jonathan haraden, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Gloucester, Massachusetts, 1745; died in Salem, 
Massachusetts, 1803; was in command of the U. S. S. 
"General Pickering" in 1780, when he met and defeated 
the English privateer "Achilles," in an engagement lasting 
three hours. Farragut said of his fight with the "Achilles": 
"I would rather have fought that fight than any ever 
fought on the ocean." Captured 1000 guns during the 
war of 1812. 



HARDING 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain Seth Harding, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George A. Armes (Katherine M.), wife 
of Mr. George A. Armes, Engineer-in-Chief at Union Iron 
Works for fifteen years. 

CAPTAIN SETH HARDING, United States Navy, was 
born at Norwich, Connecticut. Appointed to command the 
Connecticut brigantine "Defence," February 3, 1776; cap- 
tured a number of British vessels while in command of this 
ship; September 25, 1778, commissioned captain by Con- 
tinental Congress, and given command of frigate "Confed- 
eracy"; 1779 convoyed the returning minister, M. Gerard, 
to France, and took Hon. John Jay, United States Minister, 
to Spain. 

[89] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

HART 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, u inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain Ezekiel B. Hart, U. S. Navy, and 
Lieutenant Commander John E. Hart, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Daniel C. Nutting (Priscilla Dew), wife 
of Captain D. C. Nutting, C. C, U. S. Navy, Superintend- 
ing Constructor at the shipyard at the time. 

CAPTAIN EZEKIEL B. HART, U. S. Navy, entered the 
Navy as a midshipman April 30, 18 14, and was killed in the 
action of Commodore Chauncey's squadron on Lake On- 
tario, August 26, 1814. 

Lieutenant commander john e. hart, u. s. 

Navy, was appointed a midshipman February 23, 1841; 
lieutenant commander July 16, 1862; distinguished himself 
in the engagements of the West Gulf blockading squadron, 
and died of fever contracted on duty in the Mississippi River 
while in command of the "Albatross," June II, 1863. 



HATFIELD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches ' 

Named for Midshipman John Hatfield, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched March 17, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. J. Edmond Haugh (Helen Brooks), who 
served for nearly two years as chief yeoman, U. S. N. R. F., 
during the World War. 

[90] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Midshipman john hatfield, u. s. Navy. Ap- 
pointed a midshipman, June 18, 1812. Volunteered for duty 
on Lake Ontario under Commodore Isaac Chauncey. Killed 
in the attack on York, Canada. He was in the detachment 
of officers and men from the U. S. S. "Lady of the Lake." 

HAZELWOOD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Commodore John Hazelwood, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 22, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Marion Louise Neitzel, daughter of 
the Superintendent of Construction at the Shipbuilding 
Company. 

Commodore john hazelwood, u. s. Navy, 

born in England about 1726; died 1800; appointed by the 
Pennsylvania Committee of Safety to superintend the build- 
ing of fire rafts for the protection of Philadelphia; 1777, 
placed by the Continental Congress in command of the Con- 
tinental vessels in the Delaware River, in conjunction with 
the vessels already under his command. He forced the 
British fleet below the American defenses in that river to 
retire, and drove H. B. M. S. "Augusta" and "Merlin" 
ashore, where they were burned. Congress voted him a 
handsome sword in recognition of his services in the Dela- 
ware River. 

HENSHAW 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
David Henshaw 

[91] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Launched June 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Ethel Hanley Dempsey, daughter of 
Mr. George C. Dempsey, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Secretary of the navy david henshaw was 

born in Leicester, Massachusetts, 1791; died 1852. He 
acquired note as a political writer and was elected to the 
State senate in 1826 and to the House of Representatives in 
1839, after holding the post of collector of customs at Bos- 
ton since 1830. He was very active in promoting the earl- 
ier railroad enterprises in Massachusetts. On July 24, 
1843, he was appointed Secretary of the Navy. 

HERBERT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, si 4 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Hilary Abner Herbert 

Launched May 8, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Benjamin Micou (Ella Herbert), daugh- 
ter of Secretary of the Navy Hilary Abner Herbert. 

Secretary of the navy Hilary abner Her- 
bert was born in Laurensville, South Carolina, 1834. 
Educated at the universities of Alabama and Virginia; was 
admitted to the bar, and practiced in Greenville, Alabama. 
Was elected to Congress in 1877 and re-elected seven times. 
He was chairman of the Naval Committee in three Con- 
gresses. Appointed Secretary of the Navy on March 6, 
1893, and held that office until 1897. Died 1919. 

HERNDON 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet, 4 inches 

[92] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Commander William Lewis Herndon, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 31, 1919, at Newport News S. B. & D. D. 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Lucy Taylor Herndon, niece of Com- 
mander William Lewis Herndon, U. S. Navy. 

Commander william lewis herndon, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Fredericksburg, Virginia, 1813. Ap- 
pointed midshipman 1828; in 1847-1848 commanded the 
"Iris" and was actively employed in the Gulf of Mexico 
during the war with Mexico. In 1855 he was granted leave 
by the Navy Department to take command of the Pacific 
Mail steamer "George Law," afterwards the "Central 
America," running between New York and Aspinwall. 
This line of steamers at the time was required to be com- 
manded by officers of the Navy. On September 7, 1857, 
when ofF Cape Hatteras, a heavy gale was encountered 
lasting almost a week. The steamer sprung a leak which 
extinguished the fires and left the vessel at the mercy of 
the waves. On September 12, the brig "Marine" of 
Boston was sighted; boats were lowered and Capt. Hern- 
don remained on board directing the rescue work until the 
vessel went down. The last order of this gallant officer was 
to an approaching boat to "Keep off"; to have gone 
nearer would have swamped her. 

HERON 
MINE sweeper 

Length, i8y feet Beam, 35 feet - Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Heron 

Launched May 18, 1918, at Standard Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Astrid Rundquist, daughter of Lieu- 
tenant K. Rundquist, U. S. Navy, prospective commanding 
officer. 

[93 ] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

HOGAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feel, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Seaman Daniel Hogan, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 12, IQIQ, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Magnus A. Anderson (Maude Lane), 
sister of Secretary of the Interior, Hon. Franklin K. Lane. 

SEAMAN DANIEL HOGAN, U. S. Navy, entered the 
United States Navy from Boston, Massachusetts, 181 1, on 
the United States schooner "Revenge," commanded by 
Lieut. O. H. Perry; transferred to the U. S. S. "Consti- 
tution" February 18, 181 1. On the "Constitution" during 
the engagement with the British frigate "Guerriere," and 
when the flag was shot away from the foretop-gallant 
masthead he climbed up and lashed it in place in the face 
of the firing. Remained on the "Constitution" and, in 
the fight between that ship and the "Java," January 3, 1813, 
was severely wounded, losing the fingers of both hands. 
He died September 1, 1818. 

HOPEWELL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Midshipman Pollard Hopewell, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 8, 191 8, Newport News Shipbuilding Co., 
Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Grote Hutcheson (Rosalie St. George), 
wife of General Grote Hutcheson, U. S. Army. 

Midshipman pollard hopewell, u. s. Navy, 

was appointed a midshipman, June 4, 18 12. Served on the 
"Chesapeake" from August 21, 1812, until killed in action 

[94] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



between that vessel and the British frigate "Shannon," 
June i, 1813. 

HOPKINS (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Esek Hopkins, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched June 26, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Sarah A. H. Babbitt, great-great-great 
granddaughter of Commodore Esek Hopkins, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore esek hopkins, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Scituate, Rhode Island, in 1718; died in 1802. 
He was the first commander-in-chief of the Continental 
Navy and the only officer in the Navy who has had that 
title, which is now borne by the president. He suc- 
cessfully harassed the British, although not strong enough 
to meet the enemy's fleets victoriously. Sailed with his 
fleet for the West Indies March 3, 1776, landed on the east 
end of the island of New Providence; captured the forts, 
secured cannon and supplies, captured the governor and 
lieutenant governor and took them as prisoners to the 
United States. 

HOVEY 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Ensign Charles Emerson Hovey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 26, 1919, at William Cramp & Son's 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Austin Kautz (Louise Hovey), sister 
of Ensign Charles Emerson Hovey, U. S. Navy. 

[95] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Ensign charles emerson hovey, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, January 10, 1885; 
died in the Philippines in 191 1. Graduated from the 
United States Naval academy in 1907. A detachment of 
men from the U. S. S. "Pampanga," of which Ensign 
Hovey was in charge, September 11, 191 1, was attacked 
by hostile natives on the Island of Basilan, Philippine 
Islands, and he was shot by one of the natives. 

HOWARD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Acting Ensign Charles W. 
Howard, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 26, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Marion Filmer, daughter of Mr. W. P. 
Filmer, and appointed at the suggestion of Congressman 
William Kettner of California. 

.CTING ENSIGN CHARLES W. HOWARD, U. S. 
Navy; appointed master's mate October 7, 1862; acting 
ensign, 1863; master, 1863. Died October 6, 1863, or " 
wounds received in action at Charleston, South Carolina. 
Served on the ironclad "New Ironsides," South Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron, and took part in operations against 
defenses of Charleston Harbor. Dangerously wounded by 
rifle shot from the "David" that attacked the "New Iron- 
sides," and attempted to blow her up in Charleston Harbor 
on the night of October 5, 1863. Promoted for his con- 
spicuously brave conduct while in charge of the deck when 
the "Ironsides" was attacked. 

HULBERT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[96] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for First Lieutenant Henry L. Hulbert, 

U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched June 28, 1919, at Navy Yard, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Victoria C. Hulbert (Victoria Ake- 
litys), widow of Lieutenant Henry L. Hulbert, U. S. Navy. 

First lieutenant henry l. hulbert, u. s. 

Marine Corps, was born 1867, in England; killed in action 
near Mount Blanc, October 5, 191 8. Served over 20 years 
in the Marine Corps; held congressional medal of honor for 
bravery and distinguished service in Samoa in 1899; awarded 
the distinguished service cross for extraordinary hero- 
ism displayed at Chateau-Thierry June 6, 1918, where he 
displayed coolness and courage in directing his platoon in 
attack during which he was badly wounded but refused as- 
sistance until wounded men near him had been treated. 

Awarded Croix de Guerre with palm, October 3, 1918, 
when he coolly and courageously led his men under enemy 
fire. Awarded decoration of Navy Cross posthumously. 

HULL (30) 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, $14 feet, 4 inches Beam, jo feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Isaac Hull 

U.S. Navy 

Launched February 18, 1921, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Hull, a direct descendant 
of Commodore Isaac Hull, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore isaac hull, u. s. Navy, was bom in 

Connecticut in 1775. His father was an officer in the 
revolutionary army and was captured and died aboard a 
British prison ship. Young Hull's first service of note was 
when he sailed in a small vessel "Sally" into the Harbor of 

r. 97: 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Port Platte, Haiti, in broad daylight, captured the fort, 
spiked the guns and succeeded in getting away with a French 
letter of marque. He served under Commodore Preble at 
Tripoli. His most noted command was the "Constitution" in 
1811. He displayed brilliant seamanship when he escaped 
the British Squadron under Admiral Blake in 1812. 

HUMPHREYS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYRE 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, n inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Naval Constructor Joshua Humphreys, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 28, 1919, New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Letitia A. Humphreys, great-grand- 
daughter of Naval Constructor Joshua Humphreys, U. S. 

Navy. 

Naval constructor joshua Humphreys was 

born in Haverford, Pennsylvania, 175 1; died 1838. In the 
Revolutionary War was commissioned by the Pennsylvania 
Committee of Safety to build a "galley," which is said to 
have been the first armed vessel built during that war. When 
the Navy was reorganized by act of Congress, March 27, 
1784, he was appointed to prepare plans for six ships to be 
built for the Government. Was commissioned naval con- 
structor June 28, 1794. He was constructor for the "Con- 
stitution," "Chesapeake," "Congress," "President," "Con- 
stellation," and "United States." 

HUNT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy, 
William Henry Hunt 

[98] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched February 14, 1920, Newport News S. B. & 
D. D. Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Virginia Livingston Hunt, grand- 
daughter of Secretary of the Navy William Henry Hunt. 

Secretary of the navy william henry 

HUNT was born in Charleston, South Carolina, in 1823; 
died 1884; was educated at Yale College and removed to 
New Orleans, where he was admitted to the bar. In 1876 
he was appointed attorney general of the State of Louisi- 
ana, 1878 judge of the Court of Claims, 188 1 Secretary of 
the Navy. In 1882 was U. S. Minister to Russia where he 
died at St. Petersburg on February 17, 1884. 

IDAHO (3D) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 624 feet Beam, 97 feet, 4% inches Draft, 30 feet 

Named for the State of Idaho 

(Admitted to the Union in 1890) 

Launched June 30, 1917, at New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Henrietta Amelia Simons, Boise, Idaho, 
granddaughter of Governor Moses Alexander of Idaho. At 
her side stood Miss Honora Dever. "I name thee 'Idaho,' 
said Miss Simons as she sent a bottle of champagne crash- 
ing against the side of the warship. 

As the champagne struck the vessel Miss Dever broke a 
bottle of water from the Snake River, Idaho, over the oppo- 
site side, and the "Idaho" had been formally christened with 
both wine and water. The Society of Sponsors' "Prayer 
for our Navy "was offered by Chaplain Dickins, U. S. Navy, 
just before the launching: "May they not bear the sword 
in vain, but as a minister of God be a terror to those who do 
evil and a defense to those who do good," sounded the sol- 
emn key note of this launching of a battle ship in war time. 

The greatest secrecy surrounded the launching. Only 
seven persons composed the governor's party. They were 

[99] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Governor Alexander; his granddaughter, the sponsor; 
Mrs. Simons; T. A. Walters, Attorney General of Idaho; 
Colonel Dolphin of the Governor's staff; Miss Honora 
Dever, and Mrs. Gerson L. Levi. 

The super dreadnaught ''Idaho" is the third vessel to 
bear the name. Her predecessor, the battleship "Idaho," 
launched in 1905, was the second ship to bear the name. 
The first "Idaho" was a wooden sloop of the first rate 
launched in 1864. 

INGRAHAM 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 1 inch 

Named for Captain Duncan N. Ingraham, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Alfred S. Gunn (Esther Roberts), wife 
of the Assistant General Manager of the Shipbuilding plant. 

Captain duncan n. ingraham, United States 

Navy, was born in Charlestown, South Carolina, 1802; 
died 1891. Appointed midshipman 1812; captain 1855. 
While in command of the sloop of war "St. Louis" in the 
Mediterranean in July, 1853, he interfered at Smyrna with 
the detention by the Austrian consul of Martin Koszta, a 
Hungarian, who had declared in New York his intention of 
becoming an American citizen, and who had been seized and 
confined on board the Austrian ship "Hussar." For his 
conduct in the matter, he was voted thanks and a medal by 
Congress. Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance and Hydrog- 
raphy of the Navy Department from 1856 to i860. 

INGRAM 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet, 2 inches 

[lOO] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Osmond Kelley Ingram, Gunner's Mate, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched February 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Betty Ingram (Mrs. N. E. Ingram), 
mother of Osmond Kelley Ingram. 

OSMOND KELLEY INGRAM, Gunner's Mate, First 
Class, U. S. Navy, was born in Pratt City, Alabama, 1887. 
Killed when the destroyer "Cassin" was torpedoed in Eu- 
ropean waters October 16, 1917. Ingram, who saw a tor- 
pedo coming from a German submarine toward the stern 
of the "Cassin," and realized that, if the torpedo struck 
that part of the vessel where certain high explosives were 
placed the vessel would be blown up, instead of saving him- 
self, deliberately went aft to throw these charges overboard 
before the torpedo struck, and while doing this was blown 
overboard and his body was not recovered. He sacrificed 
his life to save his ship and the lives of the officers and men 
on board. 

ISHERWOOD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet, 4. inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Benjamin Franklin 
Isherwood, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 10, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ralph G. Walling (Norma R.), wife of 
Commander Walling, U. S. Navy, Assistant Inspector of 
Machinery at Squantum Works. 

Rear admiral benjamin franklin isher- 
wood, U. S. Navy, was born in New York, 1822; died, 
191 5. Appointed a first assistant engineer in the Navy, 
1844; served during the Mexican War on the U. S. S. 

[101] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

"Princeton," and as senior engineer of the "Spitfire"; chief 
engineer of the "San Jacinto." Immediately after the 
outbreak of the Civil War was appointed engineer-in-chief 
of the Navy, and so important were his services consid- 
ered that the Bureau of Steam Engineering was created 
for him. In the production of fast cruisers he was a pio- 
neer, producing this class against most violent opposition. 
After leaving the Bureau of Steam Engineering, he became 
chief engineer of the Mare Island Navy Yard. President 
of the Experimental Board under the Bureau of Steam En- 
gineering, which position he held up to the time of his re- 
tirement on October 6, 1884. 

ISRAEL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 1 inch 

Named for Midshipman Joseph Israel 

Launched June 22, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Brown, daughter of Mr. Harry 
Brown of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Midshipman Joseph israel, United States Navy, 

was appointed midshipman January 15, 1801; blown up 
by explosion on the ketch "Intrepid," September 4, 1804, 
having volunteered his services for expedition against Tri- 
politan ships in the harbor of Tripoli. 

REUBEN JAMES 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Boatswain's Mate, Reuben James, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 4, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

[102] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Helen Livingston Strauss, daughter 
of Rear Admiral Joseph Strauss, U. S. Navy. 

JLVEUBEN JAMES, boatswain's mate, United States 
Navy, was born in Delaware about 1776; served under 
Commodore Truxtun on the "Constellation," 1779-1800, 
and took part in engagements with "LTnsurgente" and 
"La Vengeance;" saw active service in the operations 
against Tripoli, 1803-1805; volunteered and was one of 
the party that boarded the "Philadelphia," in the harbor 
of Tripoli, and assisted in her destruction after capture; 
was wounded in the fierce fight; took part in the engagement 
of August 3, 1804, between the Tripolitan boats and the 
gunboats of the United States; saved the life of Capt. 
Decatur when, in the hand-to-hand fight, he was knocked 
down by a Tripolitan and the scimiter of another was about 
to fall upon him, James interposed his own body and re- 
ceived the blow intended for his commander. He recovered 
from this and other wounds and followed Capt. Decatur 
to other ships. Took part in the battle with and capture 
of the " Macedonian "; was wounded on the " President " in 
her running fight of six hours with the British squadron 
January 15, 1^15; made prisoner until close of the war, 
then returned to the United States. 

JACOB JONES (ist) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 310 feet Beam, 30 feet Draft, 9 feet, 8 inches 

Named for Commodore Jacob Jones, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 29, 191 5, at the New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. " 

Sponsor: Mrs. Jerome Parker. Crittendon (Pauline 
Cazenove Jones), great-granddaughter of Commodore 
Jacob Jones, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore jacob jones, United States Navy, 

was born in Delaware in 1768; died 1850. Appointed 
midshipman, 1799; commissioned captain, 1813. His first 

[103] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

cruise was with Capt. John Barry in the "United States," 
carrying commissioners Ellsworth and Davies to France; 
1803 assigned to the "Philadelphia," commanded by Capt. 
William Bainbridge. This frigate struck on a rock in the 
harbor of Tripoli, could not get off, and was taken possession 
of by the Tripolitans, who held her officers prisoners for 20 
months. Upon his release, Jones returned to the United 
States. In 1810 in command of the "Wasp," and was in 
command of her when the war with England broke out. 
His first prize was the brig "Dolphin." The "Wasp" 
sailed from the capes of Delaware, and October 18, 1812, 
encountered the British ship of war "Frolic"; a severe 
engagement followed, lasting 43 minutes, when the "Frolic" 
surrendered. He was ordered to assist Commodore Chauncey 
on Lake Ontario, where he rendered valuable service until 
the close of the war. Commanded the "Macedonian," 
and joined the squadron under Commodore Decatur 
in the Mediterranean, operating against the Algerines. 
He captured an Algerine brig and took part in securing 
the permanent peace with the Barbary powers. In 1821- 
1824 he commanded the Mediterranean Squadron; 1824- 
1826 was one of the Board of Navy Commissioners; 
1826-1830 he commanded the Pacific station. 

JACOB JONES (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Jacob Jones, U. S. Navy 

Launched November 20, 191 8, New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Cazenove Doughten (Florence Cazenove 
Jones), great-granddaughter of Captain Jacob Jones. 
Note: See "Jacob Jones (ist)." 

PAUL JONES ( 4 th) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[104] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Commodore John Paul Jones, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 30, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Ethel Bagley, sister-in-law of Secretary 
of the Navy Josephus Daniels. 

Commodore john paul jones, United States 

Navy, was born in Scotland in 1747. In 1775 was appointed 
first lieutenant of the "Alfred," the first American flag- 
ship. He hoisted the first Continental flag afloat, the yellow 
flag with rattlesnake and pine tree. In 1776, in command 
of the "Alfred" and "Providence," captured many prizes. 

In command of the "Ranger," at Quiberon Bay, February 
14, 1778, he received from the French fleet the first salute 
to the Stars and Stripes. In the "Ranger," captured 
the British sloop-of-war, "Drake." Jones was the terror 
of British shipping and seaport towns. 

In 1779, in the "Bon Homme Richard," whipped the 
"Serapis," after his own ship was practically a wreck. 
He moved his men to the "Serapis" just before his own 
ship went down, saying, "I have not yet begun to fight." 

Commodore Jones was knighted by France, and presented 
with a sword by the king. Congress gave him a vote of 
thanks and command of the "America," then building. 
The "America" was the first ship-of-the-line launched in 
America and Paul Jones was aboard. 



WILLIAM JONES 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
William Jones 

Launched April 19, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

[io 5 ] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ernest P. McRitchie (Isabel R.), 
wife of Assistant Naval Architect E. P. McRitchie, of the 
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation. 

HON. WILLIAM JONES, Secretary of the Navy during 
the years 1813-1814, was born in Pennsylvania in 1760; 
died 183 1. He joined a volunteer company at the age of 16 
and was present at the battles of Trenton and Princeton. 
Afterwards he entered the Continental naval service and 
served gallantly under Commodore Truxtun on the James 
River when that officer encountered and beat off a British 
ship. He then entered the merchant service, but in 1790- 
1793 lived in Charleston, South Carolina. He returned to 
Philadelphia in the latter year and was elected to Congress, 
serving one term in 1801-1803. 

Dimensions of Submarines K-l to K-8, inclusive, are: 
Length, 153 feet, 6 inches Beam, 16 feet, 8 inches Draft, 13 feet, I inch 

K-i 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 3, 1913, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Albert Ware Marshall (Mabel Flinn), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander A. W. Marshall, U. S. Navy, 
on duty at the ship yard. 

K-2 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 4, 191 3, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Ruth Chamberlain McEntee, daughter 
of Naval Constructor William McEntee, U. S. Navy. 

K-3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 14, 1914, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

[106] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Clarence Meigs Oddie (Alice Treanor), 
sister-in-law of Governor Tasker L. Oddie of Nevada. 



K-4 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 19, 1914, at Seattle Construction 
Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. James P. Olding (Ethelyn Hofer), wife 
of Lieutenant J. P. Olding, U. S. Navy, on duty at the 
shipyard at the time. 

K-5 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 17, 1914, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quihcy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Warren G. Child (Julie McGuire), 
wife of Lieutenant W. G. Child, U. S. Navy, on duty at 
the shipyard at the time. 

K-6 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 26, 1914, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Thomas Gaines Roberts (Ethel Trow- 
bridge), wife of Naval Constructor T. G. Roberts, U. S. 
Navy, superintending constructor at the shipyard at the 
time. 

SUBMARINE 

Launched June 20, 1914, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Katie-bel McGregor, daughter of the 
president of the Union Iron Works. 

[107] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

K-8 

SUBMARINE 

Launched July n, 1914, at Union Iron Works, San 
Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John William Lewis (Lenore Musto), 
wife of Lieutenant J. W. Lewis, U. S. Navy. 

KALK 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, II inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Lieutenant Stanton F. Kalk, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frank G. Kalk (Flora Stanton), mother 
of Lieutenant Stanton F. Kalk, U. S. Navy. 

rIEUTENANT STANTON F. KALK, U.S. Navy, 
was born in Alabama, 1894. Appointed a midshipman, 191 2. 
Graduated 1916, and assigned to the battleship "Florida" 
as junior lieutenant. Died December 6, 1917, when the 
destroyer "Jacob Jones" was torpedoed by a German 
submarine, from exposure while endeavoring to save the 
lives of others. He was praised in the official report of the 
disaster to the "Jacob Jones" for his promptness in measures 
taken to avoid the enemy's weapon of destruction and 
for his general ability as an officer. 

KANAWHA 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 475 feet Beam, 56 feet Draft, 26 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Kanawha River 

Launched July n, 1914, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

[108] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Bennett, daughter of Captain 
Frank M. Bennett, U. S. Navy Commandant of the Navy 
Yard. 

KANE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Surgeon Elisha Kent Kane, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched August 12, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Florence Bayard Kane, niece of 
Surgeon Elisha Kent Kane, U. S. Navy. 

Surgeon elisha kent kane, u. s. Navy, was bom 

in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1820; died 1857. Appointed 
assistant surgeon, 1843. Served in the East India Squadron, 
African and Home Squadrons. Saw active service with 
the marines in the Mexican War and was wounded. On 
May 22, 1850, on the "Advance," went on Arctic expedition 
in search of Sir John Franklin and companions. In 1853 
sailed on the second Grinnell expedition to the Arctic regions; 
attained the highest latitude up to that period and made 
valuable discoveries; was highly honored by many scientific 
associations. The United States presented him with Arctic 
medals and the English Government gave him the Queen's 
medal. 

KENNEDY 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
John Pendleton Kennedy 

Launched February 15, 1919, Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

[109] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Eugene F. Essner (Dora T.), wife of 
the Superintendent of Machinery at the works. 

HON. JOHN PENDLETON KENNEDY, who was 

Secretary of the Navy 1 852-1 856, was born in Baltimore, 
Maryland, 1795; died in 1870. He was graduated at 
Baltimore College (now the University of Maryland) in 
1812. He was admitted to the bar in 1816. In 1820 and 
for two successive years he was elected to the Maryland 
House of Delegates. In 1838 he was elected to Congress 
and was a member of that body during practically all of 
the succeeding years until he was appointed Secretary of 
the Navy in 1852. It was under his administration that 
Commander Perry's expedition visited Japan and that 
Dr. Kane's second Arctic voyage was made. 



KENNISON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet 

Named for Acting Volunteer Lieutenant 
William W. Kennison, U. S. Navy 

Launched June 8, 1918, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Riner, sister of Major 
Clarence C. Riner, U. S. M. C. 

Acting volunteer lieutenant william 

W. KENNISON, U. S. Navy; appointed acting master's 
mate August 28, 1861; acting volunteer lieutenant March 
26, 1862. Honorably discharged May 4, 1866; reappointed 
acting master August 20, 1866; mustered out November 16, 
1868. Promoted for gallant conduct in action between the 
C. S. S. "Merrimac" and the U. S. S. "Cumberland" 
March 8, 1862. 

[110] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



KIDDER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Hugh P. Kidder, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched July 10, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Ethel Murray Johnstone, daughter 
of Mr. Robert M. Johnstone, of the Woodwork Depart- 
ment of the Shipbuilding Company. 

First lieutenant hugh p. kidder, u. s. 

Marine Corps, was born in Waukon, Iowa, 1897; awarded 
the croix de guerre with palm and star for courage and 
endurance displayed in carrying orders to advanced posi- 
tions for a period of nine days under violent machine gun 
and artillery fire. Awarded distinguished service cross for 
extraordinary heroism in action near Blanc Mont, France, 
October 2-3, 191 8, when he led a small patrol into enemy 
trenches and captured two strong machine gun positions; 
killed in action October 3, 1918, while attempting to better 
his position in the face of a heavy machine gun and artil- 
lery fire. 

KILTY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, II inches Draft, p feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Augustus H. Kilty, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 25, 1918, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Harrison Shapley, daughter 
of Commander Lloyd S. Shapley, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral Augustus h. kilty, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Maryland; died 1879. Appointed midship- 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

man, 1821; commissioned rear admiral, 1870. Served on 
the Pacific, Asiatic, Mediterranean, and African Stations. 
Took part in operations of the squadron under Commodore 
George Reid against Quallah Battoo, February, 1832, in 
defense of American merchantmen. During the Civil War 
was conspicuous for his activity and bravery on the western 
waters; at Island No. 10, and Fort Pillow; commanded 
an expedition to White River, Arkansas, and during an 
action of June 17, 1862, was severely wounded, causing 
the loss of his left arm. 

KIMBERLY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Lewis Ashfield 
Kimberly, U. S. Navy 

Launched December 4, 1917, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Elsie S. Kimberly, daughter of Rear 
Admiral Lewis Ashfield Kimberly, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral lewis ashfield kimberly 

was born in Troy, New York, 1830; died 1902. Appointed 
midshipman, 1846; commissioned rear admiral, 1887; 
1847 to i860 in the African, Pacific and East India squad- 
rons; Civil War, served on "Potomac" in west blockading 
squadron; took part in operations on Mississippi River 
at Port Hudson, Grand Gulf, Vicksburg, and other places; 
executive officer of "Hartford" at battle of Mobile Bay, 
and warmly commended for gallant and efficient service; 
1866 to 1889 cruised in European, Atlantic, Pacific, and 
East India Stations; commanded land forces in attack 
on Korean ports, June 10-11, 1871. 

KING 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 50 feet, 4 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[112] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Commander Frank R. King, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched October 14, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Allene A. King, widow of Commander 
Frank R. King, U. S. Navy. 

Commander frank r. king, United states 

Navy, was born at Montevallo, Alabama, 1884; died 1919, 
when the United States trawler "Richard Buckley" was 
sunk by an exploding mine. Appointed midshipman 1903; 
ensign 1909; lieutenant (j. g.) 191 2; lieutenant 191 5; lieu- 
tenant commander 1917; commander 1918; command of 
the trawler "Richard Buckley" July 7, 1919; lost at sea 
July 12, 1919, when that vessel struck a mine which ex- 
ploded near the stern, sinking the ship in seven minutes. 
Commander King exerted himself to see that all were 
saved, and remained on the bridge until the last, going 
down with the ship. 

KINGFISHER 

MINE sweeper 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, g feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Kingfisher 

Launched March 30, 1918, at Navy Yard, Puget Sound, 
Washington. 

Sponsor: Miss Nancy Griswold, daughter of Comman- 
der R. M. Griswold, U. S. Navy, on duty at the yard. 

Dimensions of Submarines L-i to L-4, inclusive, are: 
Length, 168 feet, 5 inches Beam, 17 feet, 5 inches Draft, 13 feet, 7 inches 

L-i 

submarine 

Launched January 20, 191 5, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

["3] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Freeland A. Daubin (Elizabeth Scott), 
wife of Lieutenant F. A. Daubin, U. S. Navy, first to 
command the L— I. 

L-2 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February n, 191 5, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Russell Gray (Amy Heard), mother 
of Lieutenant Commander Augustine H. Gray, U. S. Navy, 
first to command the L-2. 

L-3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 15, 191 5, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Lew Morton Atkins (Charlotte Steele), 
wife of Naval Constructor L. W. Atkins, U. S. Navy, 
Assistant Superintending Constructor at Fore River S. B. 
Corporation. 

L-4 

SUBMARINE 

Launched April 3, 191 5, at Fore River Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Stephen Ayrault Gardner (Florence 
Loomis), wife of the Quincy Manager of the Electric Boat 
Company. 

Dimensions of Submarines L-5 to L-8, inclusive, are: 
Length, 165 feet Beam, 14 feet, 9 inches Draft, 13 feet, 3 inches 

L-5 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May i, 1916, at Lake Torpedo Boat Company, 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

[114] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Rosalind Robinson, daughter of former 
Naval Constructor R. H. M. Robinson, the General Man- 
ager of the Lake Torpedo Boat Company. 

L-6 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 31, 1916, at California Shipping Com- 
pany, Long Beach, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Robert Munroe (Katherine 
Johnson), wife of Lieutenant W. R. Munroe, U. S. Navy, 
Inspector of Machinery for the Navy at Long Beach. 

L-7 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 28, 1916, at California Shipping 
Company, Long Beach, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William B. Fogarty (Sarah Lloyd), 
wife of Naval Constructor W. B. Fogarty, U. S. Navy, 
Superintending Constructor. 

L-8 

SUBMARINE 

Launched April 23, 1917, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Nancy Gill, daughter of Lieutenant 
Charles C. Gill, U. S. Navy, and granddaughter of Rear 
Admiral W. L. Howard, U. S. Navy. 

Dimensions of Submarines L-9 to L-11, inclusive, are: 
Length, 168 feet, 5 inches Beam, 17 feet, 5 inches Draft, 13 feet, 7 inches 

L-9 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 27, 191 5, at Fore River Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

["5] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Sponsor: Miss Heather Pattison Baxter, daughter 
of Naval Constructor W. J. Baxter, U. S. Navy, Chief 
Constructor at Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts. 

L-io 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 16, 1916, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Catherine Rush, daughter of Captain 
William R. Rush, U. S. Navy, in command of Navy Yard, 
Boston, Massachusetts. 

L-u 

submarine 

Launched May 16, 1916, at Fore River Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Richards Latimer, daughter of 
Commander J. L. Latimer, U. S. Navy. 

LAMBERTON 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Benjamin P. Lamberton, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 30, 1918, at Newport News Shipbuilding 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Isabel Stedman Lamberton, grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral Benjamin P. Lamberton, U. S. 

Navy. 

Rear admiral benjamin p. lamberton, 

U. S. Navy, was born in Pennsylvania, 1844; died, 191 2. 
Appointed a midshipman, 1861; commissioned rear ad- 
miral, 1903. Served, 1865-1898, on the "Brazil," South 
Atlantic, Pacific and North Atlantic stations, and held 

[116] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



important positions on shore. In 1898 he was ordered to 
the Asiatic Fleet to command the "Boston," but Captain 
Wilde who was in command did not wish to give up com- 
mand in the face of battle and Commander Lamberton 
was then made Chief of Staff to Admiral Dewey. After 
the battle of Manila Bay he went in and negotiated the 
terms of surrender of Cavite, and after the stars and stripes 
were hoisted he took the surrender flag which was later 
placed at the Naval Academy, Annapolis. When Captain 
Gridley was ordered to the hospital he was made com- 
mander of the "Olympia" bringing home Admiral Dewey. 
He was later advanced seven numbers for conspicuous 
gallantry during the battle of Manila Bay May 1, 1898. 

LAMSON (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Roswell H. Lamson, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 1, 1920, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Annette Reid Rolph, daughter of 
Hon. James Rolph, Mayor of San Francisco. 

Lieutenant roswell h. lamson, United States 

Navy, was appointed midshipman in 1858. He was com- 
mended by Admiral du Pont for conduct in the battle of 
Port Royal and captures of Forts Walker and Beauregard 
in 1861. Commanded the "Mount Washington" in joint 
Army and Navy operations in Nansemond River. Took 
prominent and leading part in capture of batteries at Hills 
Point. Congratulated by Admiral Lee for performance 
of this duty. Commanding the "Gettysburg," took promi- 
nent part in attack on Fort Fisher and gallantly piloted 
powder-boat "Louisiana" in under the fort. He resigned 
in 1866. In 1895 in recognition of splendid Civil War 
service he was reappointed lieutenant and placed on the 
retired list. 

C"7] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

LANGLEY (JUPITER) 

AIRCRAFT CARRIER 

Length, 54.2 feet Beam, 6$ feet Draft, 18 feet, 10 inches 

Named Originally "Jupiter" for Jupiter the 

Chief God of the Romans. Renamed Langley 

for Professor Samuel Pierpont Langley 

Launched August 24, 191 2, at Mare Island Navy Yard. 
Rebuilt at Norfolk Navy Yard in 1920. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Thomas F. Ruhm (Edana Collins), wife 
of Naval Constructor T. F. Ruhm, U. S. Navy. 

PROF. SAMUEL PIERPONT LANGLEY, born in Rox- 
bury, near Boston, Massachusetts, in August, 1834; died 
in Aiken, South Carolina, February 27, 1906. Distinguished 
American astronomer and physicist; received degrees from 
Oxford, Cambridge, England; Harvard, Princeton, Yale, 
and many other universities and colleges; 1865 assistant 
in Harvard Observatory; 1866 assistant professor of mathe- 
matics, United States Naval Academy; 1867 director 
Allegheny Observatory; founded the system of railway 
time service from observatories; devised the bolometer 
and other scientific apparatus; 1881 organized a successful 
scientific expedition to Mount Whitney, California; made 
extended experiments to solve mechanical flying. 

LANS DALE 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 2 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Philip Van Horne 
Lansdale, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Philip Van Horne Lansdale (Ethel 
Sidney Smith), widow of Lieutenant Philip Van Horne 
Lansdale, U. S. Navy. 

[118] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



rIEUTENANT PHILIP VAN HORNE LANSDALE, 
United States Navy, was born 1858; killed at Apia, Samoan 
Islands, April 1, 1899. Appointed cadet midshipman 
1873; lieutenant 1893. Served on the Asiatic, Mediter- 
ranean, North Atlantic, and Pacific stations, and held im- 
portant positions on shore from 1879 to 1898, and on June 
29, 1898, was ordered to the "Philadelphia," flagship of 
the Pacific station. He commanded the American detach- 
ment of joint American and British Expedition against 
hostile Samoans, and was killed in action with them at 
Apia, April 1, 1899. 

LAPWING 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Lapwing 
Launched March 14, 1918, at Todd Shipyard Cor- 
poration, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Agnes Forshew Schlegel, granddaughter 
of Commodore Robert Pierpont Forshew, New York 
Naval Militia. 

LARDNER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, n inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral James L. Lardner, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 29, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Lardner Large, grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral James L. Lardner, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral james l. lardner, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1802; died 1881. 
Appointed midshipman, 1820; rear admiral, 1866. Served 
1821-1824, Pacific Squadron; 1825-1826, Mediterranean 

[119] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Squadron; joined this squadron after escorting Gen. Lafay- 
ette in the "Brandywine" back to France after his last 
visit to the United States. Civil War, September, 1861, 
ordered to command the frigate "Susquehanna"; took 
prominent part in the battle of Port Royal and capture 
of Forts Walker and Beauregard. Commended for gal- 
lantry in action by Rear Admiral du Pont and his name 
sent to Congress for a vote of thanks by President Lincoln. 
May, 1862, assumed command of the East Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, with rank of acting rear admiral. May, 1863, 
to October, 1864, commanded the West India Squadron. 



LARK 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Lark 

Launched August 10, 1918, at Baltimore Dry Dock 
Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry A. Stanley (Gladys Curry), 
wife of Lieutenant H. A. Stanley, U. S. Navy, prospective 
commander of the "Lark." 



LAUB 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Midshipman Henry Laub, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched August 25, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum Works. 

Sponsor: Miss Marjorie Mohun, daughter of Mr. 
John Laub Mohun, grandnephew of Midshipman Henry 
Laub, U. S. Navy. The sword voted by Congress to the 
nearest male relative of Midshipman Laub is in the posses- 
sion of the sponsor's father. 

[120] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Midshipman henry laub, United states Navy, 

was born in York, Pennsylvania. Appointed a midship- 
man October I, 1809, under Commodore O. H. Perry. 
Wounded in the early part of the battle of Lake Erie, 
September 10, 1813, carried below and struck by a round 
shot that crashed through the cockpit, killing him in- 
stantly. Congress expressed deep regret at his loss, com- 
mended his gallantry, and ordered that a sword be presented 
to his nearest male relative. 

LA VALLETTE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral E. A. F. LaVallette, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 15, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Nancy Lane, daughter of Honorable 
Franklin K. Lane, Secretary of the Interior. 

REAR ADMIRAL ELIE A. F. LaVALLETTE, United 
States Navy, was born in Virginia in 1790; died 1862. 
Appointed acting lieutenant, 18 14, and detailed to the 
"Saratoga." While on that vessel he took a conspicuous 
part in the battle of Lake Champlain; was awarded a silver 
medal, included in the thanks of Congress October 20, 18 14, 
and promoted for his gallantry. 1821-1822 commanded 
the "Peacock" and the "Flag" and rendered efficient serv- 
ice in the suppression of piracy in the West Indies. Ap- 
pointed commander, 183 1 ; captain, 1840; rear admiral, 1862. 

"Don't give up the ship." — Lawrence 
LAWRENCE ( 4 th) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

1:121] 



ships of the united states navy 

Named for Captain James Lawrence, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 10, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Ruth Lawrence, daughter of Supreme 
Court Justice Abraham Lawrence, of New York. 

Captain james lawrence, u. s. Navy, was bom 

in New Jersey in 1787; appointed midshipman in 1798. 
In 1803, on the "Enterprise," he distinguished himself in an 
attack on boats in Tripoli harbor led by Admiral Porter. 
In 1804, while on the "Intrepid" he engaged in the de- 
struction of the "Philadelphia" in the harbor of Tripoli. 
While in command of the "Hornet" he captured the Brit- 
ish ship "Peacock," in 18 13. For this service he was pro- 
moted to captain and awarded a medal, and given the com- 
mand of the frigate, "Chesapeake." Died on board the 
"Chesapeake" after her memorable fight with the "Shan- 
non," June 1, 1813. His dying words were, "Don't give up 
the ship." 

LEA 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Commander Edward Lea, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched April 29, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Harry Ellis Collins (Hester Borden), 
wife of Commander H. E. Collins, P. C, U. S. Navy. 

Commander edward lea, u. s. Na Vy; bom in 

Maryland; appointed a midshipman, October, 185 1; lieu- 
tenant commander, July 16, 1862; participated in the Civil 
War, and as executive officer of the "Harriet Lane" was 
killed in an action with the Confederate batteries at Gal- 

[122] 




U.S. CRUISER 



"MARBLEHEAD 
THE WAY S 



ABOUT TO 



3 I 
LEAVE 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



veston, Texas, January I, 1863. The burial service was per- 
formed by his father, Major Lea, of the Confederate Army. 

LEARY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Clarence F. Leary, 

U. S. N. R. F. 

Launched December 18, 191 8, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. C. Frederick Leary (Mary Hocken), 
mother of Lieutenant Clarence F. Leary, U. S. N. R. F. 

Lieutenant clarence f. leary, u. s. n. r. f., 

was born in England, 1894; died on the "Charlton Hall" 
July 20, 1918. Commissioned a lieutenant in the Naval 
Reserve June 12, 1918, and ordered to the U. S. S. "Charl- 
ton Hall" as executive officer. On July 20, when that ves- 
sel caught fire, he entered the hold in an effort to save the 
vessel and crew, and died as a result of smoke inhalation. 

S. P. LEE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 22, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Thomas J. Wyche (Phillippa Ludwell), 
a relative of Rear Admiral Samuel Phillips Lee, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral samuel phillips lee, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Fairfax County, Virginia, 1812; died 
1897. In the Civil War he commanded the "Oneida" and 
took part in the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, 

[123] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

April 24, 1862. July 16, 1862, ordered to command the 
North Atlantic Squadron. He held various prominent 
positions ashore. He was retired in 1873. 

LITCHFIELD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for John Russell Litchfield, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched August 12, 1919, at Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William R. Litchfield (Martha D.), 
mother of John R. Litchfield, U. S. Navy. 

John russell Litchfield, pharmacist's mate, 

third class, United States Navy, who gave his life while 
serving as a member of the Hospital Corps of the Sixth 
Regiment, United States Marine Corps, in France. Born 
in Flanagan, Illinois, 1899; died September 15, 1918. He 
was awarded the distinguished service cross posthumously 
for extraordinary heroism in action. He displayed excep- 
tional bravery in giving first aid to the wounded under shell 
fire near Thiacourt, France, and was killed while taking a 
wounded soldier out of a trench to the rear. Received ci- 
tation from the French Government for bravery. 

LITTLE 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain George Little, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched November II, 1917, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Samuel W. Wakeman (Edith Vickery), 
wife of the General Manager of the Company at Quincy. 

[124] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



LiAPTAIN GEORGE LITTLE, U. S. Navy, was born in 
Marshfield, Massachusetts, 1754; died, 1809; appointed 
first lieutenant of the Massachusetts ship "Protector" in 
1779; in 1781, after a running fight of several hours, escaped 
from the British ship "Thames," but in a later engagement 
was captured by the same vessel; was made prisoner and 
escaped; returned to United States and was given command 
of Massachusetts ship "Winthrop," with which he captured 
two British privateers, the armed brig "Meriam," and a 
number of other vessels; commissioned captain, March 4, 
1799, and given command of the United States frigate 
"Boston"; during the war with France captured the French 
ship "Le Berceau" and a number of other vessels. 

LONG 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy John Davis Long 

Launched April 26, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs Julia James Long Knapp, a cousin of 
Secretary of the Navy John D. Long. 

Secretary of the navy john davis long 

was born in Buckfield, Oxford County, Maine, October 27, 
1838; died August 28, 1915. Graduated from Harvard in 
1857 and admitted to the bar in 1861. He was governor 
of Massachusetts in 1880-1882. In 1897 he became Sec- 
retary of the Navy. He ably administered the affairs of 
the Navy from 1897 to 1907, which included the period of 
the Spanish-American War. 

LUCE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Stephen B. Luce, 

U. S. Navy 

[125] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched June 29, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Boutelle Noyes (Charlotte Luce), 
daughter of Rear Admiral Stephen B. Luce, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral Stephen bleecker luce, 

U. S. Navy, was born in New York, 1827; died 1917. 
Appointed midshipman, 1841; commissioned rear admiral, 
1885. During the Civil War he took part in the engage- 
ments at Hatteras Inlet and Port Royal Ferry, 1861; in 
command of the monitor "Nantucket" he engaged the 
batteries in Charleston Harbor in 1863; 1864, in command of 
the "Canandaigua," North Atlantic Blockading Squadron; 
1865 in command of the "Pontiac," he co-operated with the 
Army in the Savannah River; 1865-1868, commandant of 
midshipman at the Naval Academy; 1868-1869, cruising 
in the Pacific and Mediterranean Squadrons; 1878-1881, 
in command of the United States naval training ship 
"Minnesota"; 1881-1884, in command of the training 
squadron; 1884-1885, president of the Naval War College; 
and from 1886-1889 he was in command of the naval 
forces of the North Atlantic Squadron. He was the 
founder of the Naval War College at Newport, Rhode 
Island, and was on special duty in connection with it from 
1901 to 1910. 



LUDLOW 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Augustus C. Ludlow, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 9, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Ludlow Chrystie, great- 
great-grandniece of Lieutenant Augustus C. Ludlow, U. S. 

Navy. 

[126] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Lieutenant Augustus c. ludlow, u. s. Navy, 

born in Newburgh, New York, 1792; appointed a mid- 
shipman, April 2, 1804; lieutenant, June 3, 1810; died of 
wounds received while directing the fighting in the engage- 
ment of the "Chesapeake" and the "Shannon." 

M-i 

SUBMARINE 

Length, 196 feet Beam, ig feet Draft, 11 feet 

Launched September 14, 191 5, at Fore River S. B. Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Sara Dean Roberts, daughter of Con- 
gressman Ernest W. Roberts of Massachusetts, member 
of the Naval Committee of the House of Representatives. 

MACDONOUGH ( 2 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet, 4 inches Beam, $0 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Thomas Macdonough, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 15, 1920, at Bethlehem S. B. Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles W. Dabney (Lucy Russell), 
great-granddaughter of Commodore Thomas Macdonough, 

U. S. Navy. 

Commodore thomas macdonough, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Middletown, Delaware, in 1783; died in 1825. 
Appointed midshipman 1800; captain 1814; first cruised 
in the Ganges in 1800 during the war with France; in 1803- 
1804 was actively engaged in operations before Tripoli; 
one of the midshipman selected by Decatur to go in the 
"Intrepid" for the recapture and destruction of the U. S. S. 
"Philadelphia" in Tripoli harbor 1804. During the war 
of 1812 commanded the United States squadron on Lake 

[127] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Champlain; September n, 1814, he gained a brilliant 
victory over the British squadron; received the thanks of 
Congress and a gold metal; 1818-1820 cruised in the 
Mediterranean and again in 1824 the same 1 squadron 
commanding the /'Constitution." Severe illness obliged him 
to give up his command and return home in the merchant 
brig "Edward." He died before reaching the United States. 



MACKENZIE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 2 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Commander Alexander 
Slidell Mackenzie, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 29, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Percy J. Cotton (Henrietta Macdonald), 
wife of the superintendent of Hull Construction of the 
Union Works. 



L 



rIEUTENANT COMMANDER ALEXANDER 
SLIDELL MACKENZIE was appointed midshipman in 
1855. Served in the "Kineo" and "New Ironsides" during 
the Civil War. Was killed in Formosa, June 13, 1867, 
while leading a party against the savages who had 
murdered the whole crew of the American bark "Rover" 
some time before. 



MACLEISH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Kenneth MacLeish, 
U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Launched December 18, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

[128] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Ishbel M. MacLeish, sister of Lieutenant 
Kenneth MacLeish, U. S. N. R. F. 

Lieutenant kenneth macleish, u. s. Naval 

Reserve Force, was born in Glencoe, Illinois, 1894. After 
serving in the United States Naval Reserve Force as an 
enlisted man since March 24, 1917, he was appointed en- 
sign in the Naval Reserve Flying Corps August 31, 1917. 
On October 13, 1917, he was ordered to aviation duty in 
France; commissioned lieutenant (junior grade) March 23, 
1918; lieutenant July 1, 1918. Detached from duty at 
Clermond Ferrand July 2, 1918, and ordered to Dunkerque; 
on August 18, 1918, ordered to duty with Northern Bomb- 
ing Group, Dunkerque, France, where he took part in 
many air raids over the enemy's lines. Early in Septem- 
ber he was ordered to Eastleigh, England, as Chief of the 
Assembly Department at the U. S. Naval Aviation Station. 
On October 13 he flew to Dunkerque with a convoy of 
planes. While on a raid there with the R. A. F. Squadron 
No. 213, October 14, 1918, the squadron was attacked by a 
large number of enemy planes. In the engagement which 
ensued MacLeish's plane was shot down and he was in- 
stantly killed. He was considered one of the best pilots of 
this group. On Armistice Day, 1920, was posthumously 
awarded the Navy Cross for "distinguished service and ex- 
traordinary heroism." 



MADDOX 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain William A. T. Maddox, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched October 27, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs . C. N. Hinkamp (Frances Miller), grand- 
daughter of Captain William A. T. Maddox, U. S. Navy. 

[129] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



L.APTAIN WILLIAM A. T. MADDOX, United States 
Marine Corps, was born in Maryland. Appointed sec- 
ond lieutenant in the Marine Corps 1837. The previous 
year he had served in the war with the Creeks and Semi- 
nole Indians as first lieutenant, commanding a company of 
volunteers under Gen. Jessup; 1 845-1 847, while serving 
on the sloop "Cyane," Pacific Squadron, he landed at 
Monterey July 7, 1846, when the American flag was hoisted, 
thereby assisting in taking possession of the country, and 
hoisted the American flag at San Diego July 29, 1846; 
August 15, 1846, was appointed by Commodore Stockton 
to take command of two companies of mounted riflemen 
to proceed against Gen. Alvarado; 1846, was appointed 
for services rendered, military commandant of the middle 
district of California, headquarters at Monterey; attached 
to the frigate "Columbus" 1 847-1 848; at headquarters, 
Washington, 1848-1850; brevetted captain, for gallant 
and meritorious conduct at the Battle of Santa Clara, and 
in suppressing an insurrection at Alonterey during the time 
he was commandant of the middle district of California; 
died 1889. 

MAHAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Alfred T. Mahan, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Ellen K. Mahan, daughter of Rear 
Admiral Alfred T. Mahan, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral Alfred t. mahan, u. s. Navy, 

was born in 1840, at West Point, New York; died 1914. 
Appointed midshipman, 1856; rear admiral, 1906; Civil 
War, participated in the operations of the South Atlantic 
and West Gulf blockading squadrons; president of the 

[130] 




U.S. BATTLESHIP MARYLAND SLIDING 
DOWN THE LAUNCHING WAYS 




AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Naval War College, 1886-1889; delegate to the Hague 
Convention, 1909. His treatises on naval matters are 
standard the world over and are translated into many 
foreign languages. 

MALLARD 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Mallard 

Launched December 17, 1918, at Staten Island Ship- 
building Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Anne Fales Brayton, wife of Lieu- 
tenant Harry R. Brayton, U. S. Navy, prospective command- 
ing officer. 

MANLEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 8 inches Draft, 8 feet 

Named for Captain John Manley, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 23, 1917, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy S. Sewall, daughter of Mr. 
William T. Sewall, a prominent citizen of Bath, Maine. 

CAPTAIN JOHN MANLEY, U. S. Navy, was born in 
Torquay, England, in 1733, and died February 12, 1793. 
He was appointed by Gen. Washington on October 24, 
1775, captain of the "Lee," the first continental ship to 
get to sea. On April 17, 1776, he was commissioned captain 
by the Continental Congress, in the Continental Navy; 
commanded the "Hancock" in 1776; was captured, im- 
prisoned in Old Mill Prison, and escaped; commanded a 
number of privateers, and made many prizes and captured 
a number of British transports. In January, 1783, he re- 

[131] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



ceived the surrender of the last transport captured during 
the Revolution. 

MARBLEHEAD ( 3 d) 

LIGHT CRUISER 

Length, 555 feet, 6 inches Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet, 3 inches 

Named for the city of Marblehead, 
Massachusetts 
Launched October 9, 1923, at the William Cramp & Sons' 
Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Joseph Evans (Hannah Martin), selected 
by the city of Marblehead, being the mother of the first 
man from Marblehead killed in the World War. Among 
those present were Rear Admiral Scales, U. S. Navy, Mr. 
Joseph Evans, Captain and Mrs. W. P. Robert, Rear 
Admiral R. T. Hall, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Russell Langdon, 
President of the Society of Sponsors, Captain Lloyd Bank- 
son, and others. 

The first "Marblehead" was a 570 ton gunboat, launched 
in 1861. The second "Marblehead" was a protected cruiser 
of 2072 tons, launched in 1892. 

MARCUS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Arnold Marcus, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 22, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Helen Cowles Marcus, widow of 
Lieutenant Arnold Marcus, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant (junior grade) Arnold 

MARCUS, U. S. Navy, was born in Atlantic City, New 
Jersey, 1892; appointed midshipman 1909; ensign 1913; 
lieutenant (junior grade) 1916; command of U. S. S. 

C132] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



"A-7" March 13, 1917; died July 27 from the effects of an 
explosion on the U. S. S. "A-7" while that vessel was en- 
gaged in patrol duty in Manila Bay, Philippine Islands. 
With one exception, all who were in the interior of the boat 
died from the explosion. Lieutenant Marcus upheld the 
best traditions of the service in that, although terribly 
burned and wounded, he did everything possible to save 
his ship and men. He remained at his post until ordered 
to a hospital by his Division Commander, where he died 
a few hours later. 



MARYLAND ( 3 d) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 624 feet Beam, 97 feet, j J inches Draft, 30 feet, 6 inches 

Named for the State of Maryland 

{Ratified the Constitution in 1788) 

Launched March 20, 1920, at Newport News Shipbuild- 
ing & Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Brooke Lee (Elizabeth Wilson), Silver 
Spring, Maryland, wife of Mr. Brooke Lee, Comptroller of 
the State, and daughter-in-law of former U. S. Senator 
Blair Lee, was appointed sponsor by Governor Ritchie of 
Maryland. 

JL HE official party were invited by Secretary of the Navy 
Josephus Daniels to go to Newport News on board the 
U. S. S. "Mayflower." After the launching a large party 
of Marylanders who had come down on other boats were 
invited to luncheon on board the "Mayflower." In the 
official party were Governor Ritchie, Adjutant General 
Milton Reckerd, Mrs. Henry L. Cabell, the Governor's 
aunt, Mr. Blair Lee, Doctor Hugh Young of Baltimore, 
and Major Brooke Lee. 

U. S. S. "Maryland 1st" was a 380 ton sailing ship 
purchased in 1799. 

"Maryland 2d" is an armored cruiser launched in 1903 
and now renamed "Frederick" for that city in Maryland. 

[133] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



MASON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
John Young Mason 

Launched March 8, 1919, at Newport News S. B. & D. D. 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Mason Williams, great-grand- 
daughter of Secretary of the Navy John Young Mason. 

Honorable john young mason, Secretary 

of the Navy, 1844-1845, 1846-1849, was born in Greene 
County, Virginia, 1799; died 1859. He was successively 
a member of the legislature of Virginia and of the State 
constitutional convention of 1829, a member of Congress 
from 183 1 to 1837, and chairman of Committee on Foreign 
Affairs, and judge of the United States District Court, and 
of the circuit court of Virginia. In 1844 he was appointed 
Secretary of the Navy by President Tyler, and in 1845 
President Polk made him Attorney General of the United 
States, but in the next year he was again placed at the 
head of the Navy Department. He was president of the 
Virginia constitutional convention of 1850. In 1853 he was 
appointed United States minister to France, and he was 
reappointed by President Buchanan, remaining in that post 
until his death. 

MAUMEE 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 475 feet Beam, 56 feet Draft, 26 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Maumee River 

Launched April 17, 191 5, at Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Janet Crose, daughter of Captain Wil- 
liam M. Crose, U. S. Navy, on duty at the Navy Yard. 

[134] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



MAURY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Commander Matthew F. Maury, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Hamlin, daughter of Honorable 
Charles S. Hamlin, member of the Federal Reserve Board. 

Commander matthew fontaine maury, 

United States Navy, astronomer and hydrographer, was 
born in Spottsylvania County, Virginia, 1806; died 1873. 
Appointed midshipman, 1825; commander, 1855. He 
was appointed superintendent of the department of charts 
and instruments in 1842, and upon the organization of the 
Naval Observatory in 1844 he was appointed its superintend- 
ent and held that position until his resignation, April, 1861. 
He published some of the best known scientific works, and 
his "Wind and Current Charts," "Sailing Directions," 
and "Physical Geography of the Sea," are the standard 
works on those subjects for nearly all nations. (At out- 
break of Civil War he resigned and joined the Confederate 
Navy, where he attained the rank of commodore. After- 
wards occupied the chair of Physics in Virginia Military 
Institute.) 



McCALLA , 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Bowman H. McCalla, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched February 18, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

[135] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Elizabeth McCalla Miller, daughter 
of Rear Admiral Bowman H. McCalla, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral bowman h. McCalla, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Camden, New Jersey, 1844; died 1910. 
Appointed midshipman, 1861; rear admiral, 1903; retired 
1906. He saw much sea duty from 1866-188 1. Assistant 
to Chief of Bureau of Navigation from 1882 until 1884, 
and from 1885 to 1887. In command of the U. S. S. "Enter- 
prise" 1887 to 1890; in command of the U. S. S. "Marble- 
head" September II, 1897 to September 16, 1898 (ad- 
vanced six numbers from August 10, 1898, for eminent and 
conspicuous conduct in battle); commanded the U. S. S. 
"Newark" from September 1st, 1899 to July 5, 1901, and 
while in command was advanced three numbers for eminent 
and conspicuous conduct in battle; engaged in the relief 
column under Vice Admiral Seymour, with meritorious 
mention for service in Cuban waters during the War with 
Spain. 

McCAWLEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4. inches 

Named for Colonel Charles Grymes McCawley, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched June 14, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Laurie McCawley, grand- 
daughter of Colonel Charles Grymes McCawley, U. S. M. C. 

Colonel charles grymes McCawley, United 

States Marine Corps, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1827; died 1891. Appointed second lieutenant in 
the Marine Corps, 1847; lieutenant colonel, 1867. Served 
with the Army in Mexico and was brevetted first lieu- 
tenant September 13, 1847, for gallantry in action during 
the capture of the city of Mexico. In 1862 was sent to 

[136] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



reoccupy the Norfolk Navy Yard with a force of 200 men, 
and hoisted the national flag. In July, 1863, was bre- 
vetted major for bravery in an attack on Fort Sumter. 
In 1876 became colonel in command of the Marine Corps 
with headquarters at Washington. 



McCOOK 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commander Roderick S. McCook, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched January 31, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry C. Dinger (Gertrude Mack), 
wife of Commander H. C. Dinger, U. S. Navy, Assistant 
to Inspector of Machinery for U. S. Navy. 

Commander Roderick s. Mccook, United States 

Navy, was born in New Lisbon, Ohio, in 1839; died 
1886. Appointed midshipman 1854; commander 1873. 
Civil War: On the "Minnesota" at capture of forts at 
Hatteras Inlet. On the "Stars and Stripes" at battle of 
Roanoke Island, February 7-8, 1862; commanded the 
naval howitzer battery on shore at the battle of Newbern, 
North Carolina; commanded the "Stars and Stripes" 
in sounds of North Carolina and Wilmington blockade. 
1863, executive officer of the ironclad "Canonicus"; De- 
cember 24-25, 1864, and January. 13-15, 1865, executive 
officer of the "Canonicus" at attacks on and surrender of 
Fort Fisher, and mentioned in reports for gallant service. 
Included in the thanks of Congress to Capt. L. M. Golds- 
borough, his officers and men, for victory at Roanoke 
Island, February 7, 8, 10, 1861; and thanks to Admiral 
Porter, officers and men for victory at Fort Fisher, Decem- 
ber 24, 25, and January 13, 15, 1865. 

[137] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

McCORMICK 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant (J. G.) Alexander A. 
McCormick, Jr., U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Launched February 14, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Katherine McCormick, sister of Lieu- 
tenant Alexander A. McCormick, Jr., U. S. N. R. F. 

Lieutenant q.g.) Alexander a. mcCor- 

MICK, U. S. Naval Reserve Force. Born in Chicago, 
Illinois, 1897; enrolled in the United States Naval Reserve 
Force as ensign, November 2, 191 7; detached from duty 
at the Naval Aviation Station, Pensacola, Florida, May 28, 
1918, to duty with aviation forces in France. Died Septem- 
ber 24, 1918, at Calais, France, from injuries received 
in battle when acting as an aerial gunner on Handley Page 
Plane with a British Squadron. He had been detailed to 
that squadron for training over the lines. Buried in Mili- 
tary Cemetery, Calais, France. Posthumously awarded the 
Navy Cross. 



McDERMUT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commander David A. McDermut, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 6, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Eugene G. Grace (Marion Brown), 
wife of the president of the shipbuilding corporation. As 
it started down the ways a shower of roses was dropped on 
the deck from aloft. 

[138] 







f 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Lieutenant commander david a. Mcder- 

MUT U. S. Navy, was born in New York. Appointed a 
midshipman, 1841; passed midshipman, 1847; master, 
1855; lieutenant, 1855; lieutenant commander, 1862. 
During the Civil War he served on the receiving ship at 
New York from January 18, 1861, until May 31, 1861; 
served on the U. S. S. "Potomac" until June 5, 1861; on 
the "Marion" until December 1, 1862; in command of the 
"Cayuga" from December 2, 1862, until killed, April 18, 
1863, in boat expedition in Sabine Pass, by the Confederates. 



McDOUGAL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 303 feet Beam, 30 feet, 7 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral David S. McDougal, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 22, 1914, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Marguerite S. LeBreton, grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral David S. McDougal. 

Rear admiral david s. McDougal, u. s. Navy, 

was born 1809, in Ohio. Died August 7, 1882. Appointed 
midshipman April 1, 1828; lieutenant, 1841; captain, 1864; 
rear admiral, 1873. Cruised on the various stations. Dur- 
ing the Mexican War was attached to the "Mississippi" 
and took part in capture of Vera Cruz and other places. 
Commanded the "Wyoming" at the battle of Shimonoseki 
Straits, Japan, July 16, 1863. 



McFARLAND 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Seaman John McFarland, U. S. Navy 

[i39] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched March 30, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Louisa Hughes, daughter of Rear Ad- 
miral Charles F. Hughes, U. S. N., in command at Navy 
Yard, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

SEAMAN JOHN McFARLAND, U. S. Navy. Entered 
the Navy as seaman December 24, 1861. Was attached to 
the West Gulf Blockading Squadron, on board the U. S. S. 
"Hartford." Was rated captain of the forecastle. Had 
the station at the wheel in every engagement in which 
the "Hartford" participated. Displayed great coolness 
and intelligence and was commended by his commanding 
officers. Was awarded the medal of honor for his gallant 
and meritorious service. 



McKEAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESRTOYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, II inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore William W 7 ister 
McKean, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen L. Ely, daughter of Mr. Joseph 
Ely, and great-granddaughter of Commodore William Wis- 
ter McKean, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore william wister Mckean, United 

States Navy, was born in Huntington County, Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1800; died 1865. Appointed midshipman 1814; 
appointed commodore 1862; rendered valuable service 
with Commodore David Porter's squadron in the West 
Indies in suppressing piracy; lieutenant on the "Dale" 
during Mexican War, and at the time of his death member 
of the naval board. 

[ 140 ] ' 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



McKEE (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Lieutenant Hugh W. McKee, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 23, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Joseph J. Tynan (Margaret McGinty), 
wife of the General Manager of the Shipbuilding Company. 

Lieutenant hugh w. McKee, u. s. Navy, bom 

in Lexington, Kentucky; died on board the "Colorado," in 
Korea, June n, 1871; appointed midshipman September 25, 
1861; commissioned lieutenant March 21, 1870; was 
mortally wounded while leading the attack on the Korean 
forts on Kango-Hoa Island, June 11, 1871. 

McLANAHAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Passed Midshipman Tenant 
McLanahan, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 22, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles M. Howe (Virginia N), wife 
of Lieutenant Commander C. M. Howe, U. S. N., Assistant 
Inspector of Machinery at Quincy. 

Passed midshipman tenant McLanahan, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Louisiana; appointed a midshipman 
December 12, 1839, passed midshipman 1845. Midship- 
man McLanahan served on the sloop of war "Preble" in 
the Mediterranean squadron and on various ships in the 
Brazil, African, and East Indian Squadrons, from 1840 to 
1845. While serving on the "Cyane," he was one of the 

[HO 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

party besieged with Lieut. Heywood. He was killed by a 
rifle shot in the neck. Capt. du Pont in his report men- 
tioned McLanahan as "gallant, unflinching and devoted." 

MEADE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4. inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Richard W. Meade, 

U. S. Navy, and for Brigadier General 

Robert L. Meade, U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched May 24, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Annie Paulding Meade, daughter of 
Rear Admiral Richard W. Meade, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral richard w. meade, u. s. 

Navy, was born in New York City 1837; died 1897. Ap- 
pointed midshipman, 1850; rear admiral, 1894. Civil War, 

1862, was commended by Admiral Porter in official dispatches 
for breaking up guerrilla warfare on the Mississippi River; 
1863-1864 commanded the "Marblehead" and co-operated 
with the Army in operations in Stono River and Johns 
Island; thanked by Admiral Dahlgren and recommended 
for promotion; January 22, 1865, destroyed the blockade 
runner "Delphina" in the face of a greatly superior force; 
was officially thanked by Commodore Palmer. From 1865 
to 1868 on duty at the Naval Academy. Held many im- 
portant shore stations. 

Brigadier general robert l. meade, u. s. 

Marine Corps, was born in the District of Columbia; 
died 1910. Commissioned second lieutenant June 14, 1862; 
brevetted first lieutenant for gallant and meritorious service, 

1863, during a night attack on Fort Sumter; commissioned 
first lieutenant, 1864; commissioned captain, 1876. Fleet 
marine officer South Atlantic Station 1877-1879. Took 
part in the expedition to Panama, 1885; commanded marine 

[142] 






AND THEIR SPONSORS 



barracks, navy yard, Washington, 1 890-1 892. Commis- 
sioned major September 6, 1892. Commissioned colonel 
March 3, 1899. Retired December 26, 1903. Brigadier 
general, 1905. Brother of Rear Admiral Meade. 

MEDUSA 

REPAIR SHIP 

Length, 4.83 feet, 10 inches Beam, 70 feet Draft, 18 feet, it inches 

Named for Medusa, one of the Gorgons in 
Ancient Greek Literature 

Launched April 16, 1923, at Navy Yard, Puget Sound, 
Washington. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Burns Poe (Elsie Grumbling), selected 
by United States Senator Miles Poindexter, of Washington. 

MELVILLE 

DESTROYER TENDER 

Length, 417 feet Beam, 54 feet Draft, 20 feet 

Named for Rear Admiral George W. Melville, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 2, 191 5, at New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Woolston Neel, granddaughter 
of Rear Admiral George W. Melville, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral george Wallace melville, 

U. S. Navy; born in New York City 1841; died 1912. Ap- 
pointed third assistant engineer July 19, 1861 ; commissioned 
chief engineer March 4, 1881; Chief of Bureau of Steam 
Engineering, with rank of rear admiral, 1887-1903; served 
throughout the Civil War, 1861-1865, in different squadrons 
and commended for his ability and zeal; cruised on various 
stations from 1866 to 1879, when he was selected as one of 
the officers to accompany the " Jeannette Arctic Expedition"; 
advanced fifteen numbers for his heroism in endeavoring to 

[143] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



rescue Lieutenant Commander De Long and his party, who 
were lost in the ice in the Lena Delta, Siberia; commanded 
the party which finally discovered the remains of the un- 
fortunate men; highly honored by scientific societies at 
home and abroad. 

MELVIN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet, 4 inches Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant (J. G.) John T. Melvin, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April n, 1921, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Laura Livingston McKinstrey, daugh- 
ter of Honorable Elisha W. McKinstrey, Judge of Supreme 
Court of California. 

Lieutenant q. g.) john t. melvin, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Selma, Alabama, in 1887; died November 5, 
1917. Appointed midshipman 1907; ensign 191 1; lieu- 
tenant (j. g) I9 J 5; resigned 191 5. Appointed lieutenant 
(j. g.) United States Naval Reserve Force, February 9, 
1917, and assigned to duty at New Haven, Connecticut; 
attached to the patrol boat "Alcedo" and lost his life when 
that vessel was sunk by a German submarine in the war 
zone. 

MEREDITH 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, u inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Sergeant Jonathan Meredith, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched September 22, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William F. Meredith (Julia D.) took 

[i44] 



d^ 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



1847 on the Pacific, and took prominent part in operations 
against the Mexicans on that side of the coast. Captured 
many vessels and aided the Army in taking possession of 
prominent Mexican towns. 



MOODY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
William Henry Moody 

Launched June 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary E. Moody, sister of Secretary of 
the Navy William Henry Moody. 

HON. WILLIAM HENRY MOODY, Secretary of the 
Navy 1902-1904. Born in Newberry, Massachusetts, 1853; 
died 1917. He was graduated from Phillips Academy, 
Andover, Massachusetts, in 1872, and from Harvard 
University in 1876. In 1895 he was elected to the House 
of Representatives, and during his three terms there made 
a reputation by his knowledge of parliamentary procedure 
and by his perseverance in debate. In 1902 he became 
Secretary of the Navy and continued in that capacity until 
1904, when he was made Attorney General. He subse- 
quently was appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme 
Court. 

MORRIS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Charles Morris, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 12, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[149] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. George Emlen Roosevelt (Julia Morris 
Addison), great-granddaughter of Commodore Charles 
Morris, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore charles morris, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Woodstock, Connecticut, 1784; died 1856. Ap- 
pointed midshipman 1799; captain 1813; as one of the 
officers of the "Intrepid" he took part in the recapture and 
destruction of the "Philadelphia" in the harbor of Tripoli 
February 17, 1804; took prominent part in the engagement 
between the "Constitution" and "Guerriere," being severely 
wounded while in the act of boarding the latter vessel; for 
his gallantry on this occasion he was advanced one grade 
by the President; in 1825 commanded the "Brandywine, " 
taking Gen. Lafayette back to France; 1851-1856 was 
Chief of Bureau of Ordnance. 



MUGFORD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, q feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain James Mugford, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 14, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George H. Fort (Edythe McQuade), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander G. H. Fort, U. S. Navy, 
prospective executive officer of the "Mugford." 

CAPTAIN JAMES MUGFORD, United States Navy. 
Commanding the continental schooner "Franklin," he 
captured the British ship "Hope" with a large cargo of 
military stores and powder, and took his prize into Boston, 
running past the British fleet lying in the harbor. The 
"Franklin" was attacked at night, however, by a greatly 
surperior force, in which action Captain Mugford was 
killed. 

[150] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



MULLANY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral J. R. Madison Mullany, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 9, 1919, Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Lee Hall, daughter of Lieutenant 
Colonel Dickinson P. Hall, U. S. Marine Corps. 

REAR ADMIRAL J. R. MADISON MULLANY, United 

States Navy, was born in New York City, 18 18; died 1887. 
Appointed midshipman 1832; rear admiral 1874. Served 
on various stations; 1 847-1 848 attached to the home squad- 
ron, and took part in the capture of Tobasco and other en- 
gagements of the Mexican War; 1861 commanded the 
"Wyandotte" at Pensacola; 1862-1864 attached to the 
"Bienville" in the North Atlantic and West Gulf Blockad- 
ing Squadrons; volunteered for service in Mobile Bay; 
was assigned to the "Oneida"; exposed to the most de- 
structive fire; displayed great heroism, and was wounded. 
He was obliged to have his arm amputated; received the 
thanks of Congress for his gallantry; 1874-1875 commanded 
the North Atlantic station and protected American interests 
on the Isthmus of Panama. 



MURRAY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feel, I inch 

Named for Captain Alexander Murray, U. S. Navy 

and 
Rear Admiral Alexander Murray, U. S. Navy 

Launched June 8, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[151] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Alice S. Guthrie, daughter of Mr. 
Robert Walker Guthrie, and grand-niece of Rear Admiral 
Alexander Murray, U. S. Navy. 

Captain Alexander Murray, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Chestertown, Maryland, July 12, 1755; commanded 
"Constellation," 1800-1802, in operations against the Bar- 
bary Powers; 1805, commanded the "John Adams." Last 
duty was in command of the Philadelphia Navy Yard. 

Rear admiral Alexander murray, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, January 2, 
1816; died November 10, 1884; served with distinction in 
the Mexican War; prominently engaged in the North At- 
lantic Blockading Squadron, 1861-1863; included in thanks 
of Congress for gallantry at Roanoke Island, 1862; special 
service to Russia, 1 866-1 867; member of Lighthouse Board, 
1873-1876. 

Dimensions of Submarines N-i to N-3 inclusive are: 
Length, 147 feet, 3 inches Beam, 15 feet, p inches Draft, 12 feet, s\ inches 

N-i 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 30, 1916, at Seattle C. & D. D. Com- 
pany. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Guy E. Davis (Mabel Matheson), wife 
of Lieutenant G. E. Davis, U. S. Navy, supervising construc- 
tion for the Government. 

"In the name of the United States I name thee. May 
you bring peace," were the words of the sponsor. 

N-2 
SUBMARINE 

Launched January 16, 1917, at Seattle C. & D. D. Com- 
pany. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Whitford Drake (Evelyn R.), wife of 
Naval Constructor W. Drake, U. S. Navy. 

[■52] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



N-3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 21, 1917, at Seattle C. & D. D. Com- 
pany. 

Sponsor: Miss Bertha Coontz, daughter of Captain 
Robert E. Coontz, U. S. Navy, in command of Puget Sound 
Navy Yard. 

Dimensions of Submarines N-4 to N-7 inclusive are: 
Length, 155 feet Beam, 14 feet, 7 inches Draft, 12 feet, 4 inches 

N-4 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 27, 1916, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Hastings Elliott, Reynolds- 
ville, Pennsylvania, appointed by request of Honorable 
W. B. Wilson, Secretary of Labor. 

N-5 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 22, 1917, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George E. Bevans (Ida Miller), niece of 
Mr. H. S. Miller, president of the shipbuilding company. 

N-6 

SUBMARINE 

Launched April 21, 1917, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John A. Kissick (Irene Gauthier), wife 
of an official of the shipbuilding company. 

N-7 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May 19, 1917, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

[153] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Sponsor: Mrs. Frank Miller (Anne Hallock), wife of the 
Treasurer of the Lake Torpedo Boat Company. 

NECHES 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 475 feet Beam, 56 feet Draft, 26 feet, 8 inches 

Named for Neches River, Texas 

Launched June 2, 1920, at Navy Yard, Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Griffin, daughter of Rear Ad- 
miral Robert S. Griffin, U. S. Navy, Chief of Bureau of 
Steam Engineering at the time. 

NEREUS 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 522 feet Beam, 62 feel Draft, 27 feet 

Named for the Greek Mythological Sea God 

Nereus 

Launched April 26, 191 3, at Newport News S. B. & D. D. 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Anne Seymour Jones, daughter of Con- 
gressman W. A. Jones, of Virginia. 

NEVADA ( 3 d) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 583 feet Beam, 95 feet, 2\ inches Draft, 28 feet, 6 inches 

Named for the State of Nevada 

(Admitted to the Union in 1864) 

Launched July n, 1914, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Anne Siebert, Reno, Nevada, 
niece of Governor Tasker L. Oddie of Nevada, and great- 
great-great-granddaughter of Benjamin Stoddert, the first 
Secretary of the Navy. 

[154] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



rxMONG those present on the stand were Assistant Secre- 
tary of the Navy, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Governor Oddie, 
and officers of the Army and Navy and also the Argentine 
Navy. 

Her predecessor, the Monitor ''Nevada," launched in 
1900, is now renamed "Tonopah." "Nevada (ist)," 
launched in 1865, bore successively the names "Neshaminy," 
"Nevada" and "Arizona 



>> 



NEW MEXICO 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 624 feet Beam, 97 feet, 4\ inches Draft, 30 feet 

Named for the State of New Mexico 

(Admitted to the Union in 1912) 

Launched April 23, 1917, at Navy Yard, New York, 
New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Mararet C. DeBaca, daughter of former 
Governor DeBaca of New Mexico, and chosen for the 
honor by Governor William C. McDonald. 

I UST before the launching the Sponsors' "Prayer for 
our Navy" was offered. 

After the sponsor had broken a bottle of champagne and 
named the ship, Miss Virginia M. Carr, maid of honor, 
broke against the bow a jug made by New Mexican In- 
dians and containing water from the Rio Grande and 
Pecos rivers. There were fifty residents of New Mexico 
on the stand. 

The launching was private because the United States 
was at war with Germany. From the small launching 
stand built near her bow, only the ship's bow could be seen. 
This was one of many war precautions. The Navy Yard was 
strictly guarded. 

NICHOLAS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[155] 



ships of the united states navy 

Named for Major Samuel Nicholas, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched May I, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Edith Barry, daughter of James H. 
Barry, Naval Officer of the Port, San Francisco, and editor 
of "The Star." 

Major samuel Nicholas, u. s. Marine Corps; 

appointed by the marine committee in 1775. June 6, 1776, 
appointed major by the Continental Congress and placed at 
the head of the Marines. Served with Commodore Esek 
Hopkins in the fleet that attacked New Providence, West 
Indies, March 3, 1776. Landed in command of 200 marines, 
and about 50 sailors at Fort Nassau. Captured 88 cannon, 
15 mortars, and the landing party captured the governor, 
lieutenant governor, and a number of other prominent 
persons and brought them to the United States. The 
officials were immediately returned. Major Nicholas re- 
mained in the service throughout the War of the Revolu- 
tion. 

NICHOLSON (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 300 feet Beam, 30 feet Draft, 9 feet, 5% inches 

Named for Captain Samuel Nicholson, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched August 19, 1914, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles T. Taylor (Sophie Davis), 
wife of the Treasurer of the Shipbuilding Company, and 
granddaughter of William Cramp, founder of the company. 

Captain samuel Nicholson, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Maryland 1743 ; died at Charlestown, Massachusetts, 
December 29, 181 1. Commissioned captain December 10, 

[156] 




READY TO LAUNCH THE U.S. BATTLESHIP 

"N E W YORK. 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



1776. Cruised in command of the "Deane" from 1777 to 
1782; made many valuable prizes. 

Upon the reorganization of the Navy commissioned 
captain June 10, 1794, and ordered to superintend the 
building of the "Constitution." Was the first to command 
this vessel in 1798. 

NITRO 

AMMUNITION SHIP 
Length, 482 feel Beam, 60 feet, 11 inches Draft, 20 feet, 11 inches 

Name "Nitro" indicates the presence of 
Nitrogen in Ammunition 

Launched December 16, 1919, at Puget Sound Navv 
Yard. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry Suzzalo (Edith Moore), wife of 
the president of the University of Washington. 

NOA 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Midshipman Loveman Noa, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 28, 1919, at Norfolk Navy Yard. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Albert Morehead (Bianca Noa), sister 
of Midshipman Loveman Noa, U. S. Navy. 

Midshipman loveman noa, u. s. Navy, was 

born in Chattanooga, Tennessee, October 5, 1878; killed 
by natives on the Island of Samar, Philippine Islands, 
October 26, 1901. Appointed cadet 1896; graduated in 
1900; sent to Asiatic Station on board the "Mariveles." 
On October 26, 1901, Midshipman Noa, with an armed 
crew of six men, put off* in a small boat from the "Mari- 
veles" to watch for boats engaged in smuggling contraband 

[157] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



of war from the Island of Leyte to Samar Island. The 
wind turning against them, they were obliged to land in a 
small cove on the Island of Samar, and while scouting the 
nearby woods Midshipman Noa was stabbed by Filipino 
insurgents and died before aid could reach him. 

Dimensions of Submarines O-i to O-io inclusive are: 
Length, 172 feet, 4 inches Beam, 18 feet Draft, 14 feet, 5 inches 

O-i 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 9, 1918, at U. S. Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Cora Isabel Adams, wife of Captain 
L. S. Adams, C. C, U. S. Navy, Industrial Manager of the 
Navy Yard. 

0-2 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May 24, 1918, at Navy Yard, Puget Sound, 
Washington. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Francis T. Chew (Mary Hoge), wife of 
Lieutenant Commander F. T. Chew, U. S. Navy. 

0-3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 29, 1917, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George L. Dickson (Alma Hodges), wife 
of Lieutenant G. L. Dickson, U. S. Navy, the prospective 
commanding officer. 

0-4 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 20, 1917, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[158] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Henry Williams (Maud Steers), wife of 
Naval Constructor Henry Williams, U. S. Navy, Superin- 
tending Construction. 

0-5 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November II, 1917, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frank T. Cable (Nettie Hungerford), 
wife of the vice president and general manager of the New 
London S. & E. Company. 

0-6 
submarine 

Launched November 25, 1917, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Carrol Q. Wright (Dessaline Shepard), 
wife of Lieutenant C. Q. Wright, U. S. Navy, prospective 
commanding officer of the vessel. 

0-7 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 16, 1917, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Constance Sears, daughter of Hon. Rus- 
sell A. Sears, formerly Mayor of Quincy. 

0-8 - 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 31, 1917, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Robert A. Burg (Alice Claire), wife of 
Lieutenant R. A. Burg, U. S. Navy, prospective command- 
ing officer. 

[159] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



0-9 

SUBMARINE 

Launched January 27, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frederick C. Sherman (Fanny Jessop), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander F. C. Sherman, first com- 
manding officer of the vessel. 

O-10 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John Eliot Bailey (Bertha Martin), 
wife of Captain J. E. Bailey, C. C, U. S. Navy, on duty 
at Boston Navy Yard. 



Dimensions of Submarines O-u to O-16, inclusive, are: 
Length, 17s feet Beam, 16 feet Draft, 13 feet, 10 inches 

O-ii 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 29, 1917, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Bernard M. Baruch (Anne GrifFen), 
wife of Mr. B. M. Baruch, Chairman of the War Industries 
Board during the World War. 

O-12 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 29, 1917, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Homer S. Cummings (Marguerite Ow- 
ings), wife of the Democratic National Chairman at the 
time. 

[160] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



0-13 
SUBMARINE 

Launched December 27, 1917, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Arletta Adams, niece of Mr. 
Simon Lake, submarine boat inventor, and daughter of Mr. 
Clement E. Adams, Secretary and Assistant Treasurer of 
the Company. 

O-14 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May 6, 1918, at California Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, Long Beach, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor N. Hatch, daughter of Mr. P. E. 
Hatch, President of the National Bank of Long Beach and 
Treasurer of the Company. 

0-.5 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 12, 1918, at California Shipbuilding 
Company, Long Beach, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. James J. Murphy, wife of Lieutenant 
(T) J. J. Murphy, C. C, U. S. Navy. 

O-16 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 9, 1918, at California Shipbuilding 
Company, Long Beach, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Irving Hall Mayfield (Juliet Borden), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander I. H. Mayfield, U. S. Navy, 
Inspector of Machinery for the Navy at the works. 

O'BANNON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, il inches Draft, p feet, 2 inches 

[161] 



ships of the united states navy 

Named for Lieutenant Presley Neville O'Bannon, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched February 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry O'Bannon Cooper (Katharine 
Low), wife of great-great-nephew of Lieutenant Presley Ne- 
ville O'Bannon, U. S. Navy. 

First lieutenant presley n. O'bannon, u. s. 

Marine Corps. Appointed second lieutenant, 1801; first 
lieutenant, 1802; resigned 1807. During the war with 
Tripoli, an expedition was started out from Alexandria, 
Egypt, to Derne. The force consisted of mercenaries, to- 
gether with Lieut. O'Bannon, one sergeant, and six privates 
of the Marine Corps. A march of 600 miles was made, and 
the force, which had been augmented by additional marines, 
arrived before Derne April 26, 1805. The works were shelled 
by the "Hornet," "Nautilus," and "Argus" on April 27, 
and the principal work was stormed by a force led by Lieut. 
O'Bannon and Midshipman Mann. The Tripolitan ensign 
was hauled down, and for the first time in the history of the 
country the flag of the Republic was hoisted on a fortress of 
the Old World. Gen. Eaton was wounded and Lieut. 
O'Bannon, with a detachment under his command, took 
possession of the battery, planted the American flag upon 
its ramparts, and turned its guns upon the enemy. 

O'BRIEN (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 305 feet Beam, 30 feet, 4 inches Draft, 9 feet, 55 inches 

Named for Captain Jeremiah O'Brien, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 20, 1914, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Marcia Bradbury Campbell, great- 
great-grandniece of Captain Jeremiah O'Brien, U. S. Navy. 

[162] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



LiAPTAIN JEREMIAH O'BRIEN, United States Navy, 
was born in Kittery, Maine, 1744; died 1818 at Machias, 
Maine. June 12, 1775, in a small sloop called the "Unity" 
manned by six volunteers, armed with a few muskets and 
some pitchforks, boarded and captured after a sharp fight 
the British schooner "Margaretta." O'Brien put the 
"Margaretta's" guns on the "Unity" which he renamed 
the "Machias Liberty" and with her captured the British 
coast-guard "Diligence" and her tender, which had been 
sent from Halifax to protect the "Margaretta," whose 
capture was the first of an enemy's vessel in the Revolution- 
ary War. He later commanded the privateer "Hannibal," 
in which he was captured, imprisoned on the Jersey prison 
ship in New York harbor, afterwards taken to Mill Prison, 
England, from which he escaped. 

OKLAHOMA 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 583 feet Beam, 95 feet, 2\ inches Draft, 28 feet, 6 inches 

Named for the State of Oklahoma 

it {Admitted to the Union in 1907) 

Launched March 23, 1914, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Lorena Jane Cruce, daughter of Gov- 
ernor Lee Cruce, of Oklahoma. 

A HE sponsor and maids of honor carried bouquets of 
mistletoe, the State flower of Oklahoma. A huge bunch 
of mistletoe was suspended over the bow of the vessel and 
the name of the ship was outlined in the same flowers. 

The launching party consisted of Secretary of the Navy 
Josephus Daniels, Mrs. Daniels, Assistant Secretary Frank- 
lin J. Roosevelt, Colonel Hunter Craycroft, Senators Owen 
and Gore of Oklahoma, Rear Admiral Reynold T. Hall, 
members of the Society of Sponsors, and some 600 invited 
guests. Vice President Marshall, as representative of Presi- 
dent Wilson, headed the government officials. Governor 

[163] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Tenner of Pennsylvania, Governor Glynn of New York, 
and Governor Baldwin of Connecticut were present. An 
enormous concourse of spectators witnessed the launching. 

"At the launching of the battleship 'Oklahoma' at 
Camden, New Jersey, on March 23, there was observed the 
custom which has always prevailed in other Christian 
countries of prayer preceding the civil ceremony of naming 
a battleship. This suggestion, made by Mrs. Reynold T. 
Hall, president of the Society of Sponsors, was most en- 
thusiastically received by the Oklahoma delegation to the 
launching, and Bishop Hoss of Oklahoma, was invited to 
offer the invocation. Prior to this occasion the United 
States has launched its battleships with civil ceremony 
only. In other countries this religious custom is always 
observed, and in England the special prayer at launchings 
is one of great beauty. This suggestion made by the So- 
ciety of Sponsors was highly commended by the Secretary 
of the Navy and by the Oklahoma state officials. Secre- 
tary Daniels is so favorably impressed with the idea, that 
hereafter a prayer will be part of the exercises of launchings 
of battleships." — Army and Navy Journal. 

OMAHA (2d) 

LIGHT CRUISER 

Length, 555 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 13 feet, 6 inches 

Named for Omaha, Nebraska 

Launched December 14, 1920, at Todd Dry Dock and 
C. Company, Tacoma, Washington. 

Sponsor: Miss Louise Bushnell White, daughter of 
the Mayor of Omaha, Victor White. 

The first "Omaha" was a sloop of war, launched in 1869 
and named for Omaha River. 

ORIOLE 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Oriole 
[164] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched July 3, 1918, at Staten Island Shipbuilding 
Corporation, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Leaverton, daughter of an 
employee of the Engineering Department of the Company. 

ORTOLAN 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 f eei Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Ortolan 

Launched January 30, 1919, at Staten Island Shipbuild- 
ing Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Theresa Marion Finn, telephone opera- 
tor at the contractor's plant. 

OSBORNE 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Weeden E. Osborne, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 29, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Harry Hutchins Fisher (Elizabeth 
Osborne), sister of Lieutenant Weeden Edward Osborne, 
U. S. Navy. Mrs. Fisher was assisted by Mrs. Channing 
H. Cox, wife of Lieutenant Governor Cox, of Massachusetts. 

Lieutenant weeden e. osborne, dental sur- 
geon, U. S. Navy, was born in Chicago, Illinois, 1892. 
Killed in action with the Sixth Regiment Marines, June 6, 
1918, at Chateau Thierry, France. Appointed dental sur- 
geon in the Navy with the rank of lieutenant (junior grade) 
May 8, 1917. Detailed to duty with the Sixth Regiment 
Marines March 26, 1918. Posthumously awarded the 
distinguished service cross and the Navy medal of honor 
for extraordinary heriosm under fire during the advance on 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Bouresches, France. The nature of his professional duties 
gave him every justification for remaining in the rear, but 
he threw himself into the general rescue work and performed 
heroic deeds in aiding the wounded. While carrying a 
wounded officer to a place of safety he was struck by a shell 
and instantly killed. He was the first commissioned officer 
of the United States Navy to meet death during the land 
fighting overseas. 

OSPREY 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Osprey 

Launched November 19, 1918, at Consolidated Ship- 
building Corporation, New York City. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John J. Amory (Mary S.), wife of the 
president of the corporation. 

OVERTON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Macon C. Overton, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched July 10, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Margaret C. Overton, mother of Cap- 
tain Macon C. Overton, U. S. M. C. 

CAPTAIN MACON C. OVERTON, U. S. Marine Corps, 
was born in Union Point, Georgia, 1890; died in France 
November 1, 1918. On June 13, 1918, he was recommended 
for reward by his regimental commander for success- 
fully carrying out an assault on a supposedly impregnable 
machine-gun nest in the Bois de Belleau. This assault was 

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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



made under heavy fire of machine guns and grenades, and 
its success against tremendous odds gave the enemy the 
severest single blow that it suffered throughout the opera- 
tions in the Bois de Belleau. Awarded croix de guerre with 
palm for remarkable bravery and tenacity in an engagement, 
July 19, 1918, near Vierzy. Awarded croix de guerre with 
silver star and palm for brilliantly leading his men on a 
machine-gun nest. Awarded distinguished-service cross for 
extraordinary heroism in action near Mount Blanc, Octo- 
ber 2-10, 1918, where his gallantry was an inspiration to his 
men. Awarded oak-leaf cluster for displaying remarkable 
courage at St. George, November 1, 191 8, where he was 
fatally wounded while guiding a tank forward against an 
enemy machine gun position. 

OWL 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Owl 

Launched May 4, 191 8, at Todd Shipyard Corporation, 
New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Ruth Rebecca Dodd, daughter of the 
foreman shipfitter of the company. 

PALMER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral James Shedden Palmer, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 18, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Robert B. Hilliard (Grace Powell), 
wife of Naval Constructor R. B. Hilliard, U. S. Navy, on 
duty at Fore River. 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Rear admiral james shedden palmer, u. s. 

Navy, was born in New Jersey, 1810; died 1867. Appointed 
a midshipman 1825; rear admiral 1866. Took part in the 
attack on Quallah Battoo and Mushie, island of Sumatra, 
and commanded the "Flirt" in the blockade of the Mexi- 
can ports during the war with Mexico. Commanded the 
U. S.S." Iroquois." May, 1862, joined the West Gulf Block- 
ading Squadron and took prominent part in engagements 
against Baton Rouge, Grand Gulf, Natchez, passage of 
Vicksburg batteries, June 28, 1862. Attack on the ram 
"Arkansas." Farragut's commander on the "Hartford" 
when he ran the batteries at Port Hudson March, 1863. 
1864 commanded the naval station at New Orleans. Com- 
manded the West Gulf Squadron, after the battle of Mobile 
Bay, until Feb. 21, 1865; commanded West India Squadron 
1866. 



PALOS (2d) 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 160 feet Beam, 24 feet Draft, 2 feet, 5 inches 

Named for Palos, Spain, the port from 
which Columbus sailed 

Launched April 23, 1914, at Shanghai Dock and Engineer- 
ing Company, Shanghai, China. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Lee Scott Border (Chetanna Nesbitt), 
wife of Naval Constructor L. S. Border, U. S. Navy, who 
superintended the construction of the vessel. 

L ALOS 1st" was a steam vessel which under Commodore 
Beardsley, was the first vessel to carry the flag through the 
Suez Canal in 1868, en route to China. 



PARROTT 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[168] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Lieutenant George Fountain Parrott, Jr., 

U. S. Navy 

Launched November 25, 1919, at William Cramp and 
[Sons' Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Julia Bizzell Parrott, sister of Lieu- 
tenant George Fountain Parrott, Jr. 

rIEUTENANT GEORGE FOUNTAIN PARROTT, Jr., 
United States Navy. Born in North Carolina, 1887; died 
at sea, October 9, 1918. Appointed midshipman, July 3, 
1906; lieutenant (j. g.), March 7, 191 5; attached to the 
U. S. S. "Shaw." The "Shaw" had just sighted a German 
submarine and was going for her when she crossed the bow 
of the British troopship "Squitania." Lieutenant Parrott 
died in the performance of duty. 

PARTRIDGE 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 55 feet, 6 inches Draft, p feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Partridge 

Launched October 15, 1918, at Sun Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Carolyn Hewes McCay, daughter of 
Commander H. K. McCay, U. S. Navy. 

JAMES K. PAULDING 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4. inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
James Kirke Paulding 

Launched April 20, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Hubbard Paulding, great-grand- 
daughter of Secretary of the Navy James Kirke Paulding. 

[169] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Secretary of the navy james kirke pauld- 

ING was born in Nine Partners, Dutchess County, New 
York, August 27, 1778; died i860. From 18 15 to 1823 
he was secretary of the first Board of Navy Commissioners. 
After having filled the office of Navy agent at the port of 
New York for twelve years, he resigned to become Secre- 
tary of the Navy, July 1, 1838. 

PEACOCK 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Peacock 

Launched April 8, 1919, at Staten Island Shipbuilding 
Company, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Marian Danner, daughter of 
Lieutenant John Danner, U. S. Navy, prospective com- 
manding officer. 

PEARY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Robert Edwin Peary, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 6, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edward Stafford (Marie Ahnighito 
Peary), daughter of Rear Admiral Robert Edwin Peary, 
U. S. Navy. 

The launching took place on the eleventh anniversary of 
Rear Admiral Peary's discovery of the North Pole. The 
sponsor carried a flag he had carried to the North Pole. 

Rear admiral robert edwin peary, United 

States Navy, C. E. Corps, was born in Cresson, Pennsyl- 
vania, 1856; died 1920; graduate of Bowdoin, Edinburgh, 

[170] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



and Tufts colleges; promoted to rear admiral and given 
the thanks of Congress by special act of March 30, 191 1. 
Assistant engineer of Nicaragua Ship Canal Company under 
Government orders, 1884— 1885 ; in charge of Nicaragua 
Canal survey, 1 887-1 888; invented rolling lock gates for 
the canal. His first Arctic expedition was in 1886; chief 
of the Arctic expedition sent by the Academy of Science, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1891; commanded Arctic ex- 
pedition, 1898-1902; named the most northerly land in the 
world Cape Morris Jessup; July, 1905, sailed on the S. S. 
"Roosevelt" for the Arctic regions; returned in October, 
1906, having reached "highest north." July, 1908, sailed 
on eighth Arctic expedition. In April, 1909, made his final 
dash of 130 miles to the North Pole in five days, reaching 
it April 6, 1909. Received honors from the scientific so- 
cieties of Europe and America for his distinguished serv- 
ices in Arctic explorations and discoveries; was the author 
of numerous books on the North Pole and polar travel. 

PECOS 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 475 feet Beam, 56 feet Draft, 26 feet, 8 inches 

Named for Pecos River, in New Mexico 

and Texas 

Launched May 1, 1921, at the Navy Yard, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna S. Hubbard, granddaughter of 
Commodore Thomas Laurens Swann, U. S. Navy. 

PELICAN 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Pelican 

Launched June 15, 1918, at Consolidated Shipbuilding 
Corporation, New York City. 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES ., T A V Y 

Spo?isor: Miss Elizabeth Bache Patterson, daughter 
of Mr. H. W. Patterson, chief designer for the corporation. 

PENGUIN 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Penguin 

Launched June 12, 1918, at New Jersey D. D. & T. Com- 
pany. 

Sponsor: Miss Lillian Rae, daughter of Mr. James 
Rae, foreman iron worker for the contractor. 



PENNSYLVANIA (sth) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 608 feet Beam, 97 feet Draft, 28 feet, 10 inches 

Named for the State of Pennsylvania 

(Ratified the Constitution in 1787) 

Launched March 16, 191 5, at Newport News Shipbuilding 
and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Kolb, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, daughter of Mr. Louis J. Kolb, a friend of Governor 
Brumbaugh of Pennsylvania. 

J UST before the launching, Bishop Joseph F. Berry offered 
the Society of Sponsors' "Prayer for our Navy," the Secre- 
tary of the Navy having directed that this prayer be offered. 
Prayer marked a Navy launching ceremony for the second 
time since 1843, the custom having been revived at the 
launching of the battleship "Oklahoma" in 1914 at the 
suggestion of the Society of Sponsors. 

An enormous concourse of people witnessed the launching. 
Among those on the sponsor's stand were Secretary of the 
Navy Josephus Daniels, Mrs. Daniels, Governor Brumbaugh, 
Governor Stuart of Virginia, Honorable Mitchell Palmer 

[172] 



w w 




AND THEIR SPONSORS 



of Pennsylvania, Senator Swanson of Virginia, Mr. John 
Gribbel, Attorney General Francis Shunk Brown, Senator 
George T. Oliver, Congressman Wm. E. Vare, Admiral 
F. E. Beatty, Commandant of Norfolk Navy Yard, 
Colonel Haines, Commandant of Fort Monroe, and a 
large party of Pennsylvanians. 

Mrs. Reynold T. Hall, President of the Society of Spon- 
sors, and Miss Edith Benham, Secretary, accompanied 
Mrs. Daniels from Washington on board the U. S. S. 
"Mayflower." 

After the launching the sponsor's party and invited 
guests boarded the U. S. S. "Mayflower," and landing 
at Fort Monroe, were entertained at a luncheon at the 
Hotel Chamberlin. Speeches were made by Governor 
Brumbaugh of Pennsylvania, Governor Stuart of Virginia, 
Secretary Daniels, and other officials. The sponsor re- 
sponded to the toast "The Sponsor" in a graceful speech. 

The super dreadnaught "Pennsylvania" is the fifth to 
bear the name of the State. Her predecessor, the armored 
cruiser "Pennsylvania," launched in 1903, is now renamed 
"Pittsburgh." 

"Pennsylvania (3d)" was a coast line battleship author- 
ized in 1899. For two years she bore the name "Pennsyl- 
vania" but in 1901 was renamed "Nebraska." 

"Pennsylvania (2d)' 1 ' was a screw sloop built in 1863, 
but never completed. 

The first "Pennsylvania" was a 120 gun ship of the 
line, launched in 1837. 



PERCIVAL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain John Percival, U. S. Navy 
Launched December 5, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Wurtsbaugh, daughter of 
Captain Daniel W. Wurtsbaugh, U. S. Navy. 

[173] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Captain john percival, u. s. Navy, was bom 

1779 in Barnstable, Massachusetts; died 1862. Appointed 
a master's mate in 1799, and a midshipman in 1800; dis- 
charged under the peace establishment act of 1801. Entered 
the Merchant Service. Was captured and impressed into the 
British Service but escaped. In 1809 was appointed a 
sailing master and ordered to duty in the New York flotilla 
under Capt. Jacob Lewis; July 4, 1813, he borrowed a 
fishing smack named the "Yankee," and manning her with 
36 volunteers, well armed, he concealed in the cabin all 
but 3 of the party, filled the deck with produce, and run- 
ning toward the "Eagle," tender for the 74 gun line of bat- 
tleship "Poictiers," at a given signal the concealed crew rose 
from their hiding, fired upon the "Eagle's" men, who were 
so taken by surprise that they took refuge below decks, not 
even waiting to haul down their colors; Percival took pos- 
session of the " Eagle " and carried her into New York, where 
he was received with great demonstrations of joy; April 29, 
1 8 14, he again distinguished himself in the action between 
the "Peacock" and the "Epervier," and was promoted by 
President Madison to lieutenant upon the recommendation 
of Capt. Warrington, his commanding officer in that en- 
gagement, and was also awarded a sword by Congress for 
his gallantry. 

PERRY ( 4 th) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet, 4 inches Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Oliver H. Perry, 
U. S. Navy, and Captain Matthew C. Perry, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 29, 1921, at the Navy Yard, Mare 
Island, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Anne Randolph Scudder, daughter 
of Commander R. P. Scudder, U. S. Navy, and great- 
great-granddaughter of Commodore Oliver H. Perry, U. S. 

Navy. 

[174] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Commodore Oliver hazard perry, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Rhode Island in 1785; appointed mid- 
shipman in 1799; served in the Tripolitan War and was 
promoted to acting lieutenant at the age of seventeen. His 
most conspicuous service was in the War of 18 12. He led 
the ships in Commodore Chauncey's attack on Fort George 
in 1813. Later he commanded the forces on Lake Erie, 
and defeated the British squadron in the Battle of Lake Erie. 
For this victory he was awarded a gold medal. 

Captain matthew c. perry, u. s. Navy, was 

born in 1795; appointed midshipman in 1809; served in 
the War of 18 12 and commanded the Gulf Fleet in the 
Mexican War; rendered distinguished service at Tobasco 
and Vera Cruz. In 1853, as commodore of the East India 
squadron he went to Japan and after many difficulties 
negotiated a treaty safeguarding the rights of American 
commerce in Japanese waters. 

Commodore Oliver H. Perry and Captain Matthew C. 
Perry were sons of Captain Christopher R. Perry, U. S. 
Navy, a distinguished officer of the Revolutionary War. 

PHILIP 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Rear Admiral John Woodward 
Philip, U. S. Navy 

Launched July 25, 1918, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Barrett Philip (Mazie F.), daughter- 
in-law of Rear Admiral John Woodward Philip, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral john woodward philip, 

United States Navy, was born in Kinderhook, Columbia 
County, New York, 1840; died in New York, June 30, 1900. 
Appointed midshipman September 20, 1856; commissioned 
rear admiral March 3, 1899; served in Civil War, and 
wounded in operations against Charleston, South Carolina; 

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SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

1 865-1 867 distinguished in defense of Americans against 
attacks of Chinese and capture of the rebel Hon; in the 
war with Spain, commanded "Texas" at battle of Santiago, 
and was advanced five numbers for distinguished service. 

PIGEON 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, p feet, p inches 

Named for the bird Pigeon 

Launched January 29, 1919, at Baltimore D. D. & S. B. 
Company. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Joseph B. Provance, wife of one of the 
supervisors of the shipbuilding company. 

PILLSBURY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral John E. Pillsbury, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 3, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Langdon Richardson, grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral John E. Pillsbury, U. S. Navy. 
The sponsor was accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Edward 
Bridge Richardson, sponsor for the U. S. S. "Smith" in 
1909. 

Rear admiral john e. pillsbury, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, 1846; died 1919. 
Appointed midshipman, 1862; ensign, 1868; master, 1870; 
lieutenant, 1872; lieutenant commander, 1892; commander, 
1898; captain, 1902; rear admiral, 1908. Served on vari- 
ous stations afloat and ashore. From 1884 to 1891 com- 
manded the coast steamer "Blake" and did excellent sci- 
entific work, using in some of his researches instruments 

[176] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



of his own invention. In the Spanish-American War com- 
manded the dynamite cruiser "Vesuvius" operating around 
the Island of Cuba and in the vicinity of Morro Castle. 
In 1905 he served as chief of staff of the North Atlantic 
Fleet; 1908-1909, was Chief of the Bureau of Navigation. 
Although Admiral Pillsbury's attainments as a sailor and 
fighting man were noteworthy, he was perhaps best known 
as being one of the foremost geographers of the world. 
He was actively identified with the National Geographic 
Society for many years, and was president of this society 
at the time of his death. His best known work was in 
connection with the investigation of the Gulf Stream, and 
his writings on that subject are accepted as the most author- 
itative in the world. 

POPE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore John Pope, U. S. Navy 

Launched March 23, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Shepherd Benson (Mary 
Wyse), wife of Rear Admiral Benson, U. S. Navy, and 
granddaughter of Commodore John Pope, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore john pope, u. s. Navy, was bom in 

Sandwich, Massachusetts, 1798; died 1876. Appointed 
midshipman, 18 16; commodore, 1862. Served in the Medi- 
terranean, West Indian, Brazil, African, and East India 
Squadrons. Civil War: Commanded the U. S. S. "Rich- 
mond," Gulf Squadron, from July 1, 1861, to October 24, 
1861. Assisted in the blockade of the Passes of the Missis- 
sippi. Took part in the engagement with Confederate 
States vessels at the head of the Passes, October 12, 1861. 
Held position of prize commissioner, Boston, Massachusetts, 
1864-1865, and lighthouse inspector, 1866. Detached 
from this duty in May, 1869, which terminated his active 
service at the age of seventy-one. 

[177] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

PORTER (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 5/5 feet Beam, 30 feet Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore David Porter, U. S. Navy, 

AND FOR HIS SON, 

Admiral David Dixon Porter, U. S. Navy 

Launched August 26, 191 5, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Georgiana Porter Cusachs, daughter 
of Lieutenant Carlos V. Cusachs, U. S. Navy, and great- 
granddaughter of Admiral David Dixon Porter, U. S. 

Navy. 

Commodore david porter, United states Navy, 

was born in Massachusetts, in 1780. Appointed midship- 
man in 1798. In 1799 took part in the fight between the 
"Constellation" and "L' Insurgente." In 1803 was cap- 
tured in the "Philadelphia" at Tripoli. In 1812, in com- 
mand of frigate "Essex," had a most adventurous career, 
making many captures of British packets and crippling 
British commerce. In 18 13 cruised in the Pacific and cap- 
tured many vessels. In 18 14, at Valparaiso, surrendered 
the "Essex" to superior force of British frigates "Phoebe" 
and "Cherub" only when his own ship was too disabled 
to offer resistance longer, the contest having been unequal 
in every way. 

Admiral david dixon porter, United States 

Navy, was born in 1813. Appointed midshipman in U. S. 
Navy in 1829. In the Mexican V/ar served with distinction 
in the "Spitfire." Engaged in every action on the coast. 
In the Civil War rose from Lieutenant to Admiral in two 
years. In 1862 Commander Porter commanded the mortar 
boat flotilla under Farragut at the passage of Forts Jackson 
and St. Philip. Bombarded forts at Vicksburg. Com- 
manded the Mississippi Squadron as Acting Rear Admiral. 
In 1863 co-operated with General Sherman in capture of 

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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Arkansas Port, for which he received a vote of thanks of 
Congress. Co-operated with General Grant in the capture 
of Vicksburg. Received thanks of Congress and promotion 
to Rear Admiral. In command of North Atlantic Blockad- 
ing Squadron bombarded forts at Cape Fear River. Com- 
manded Naval forces at Fort Fisher and for his brilliant 
work received thanks of Congress for the fourth time. 
In 1866 was made Vice Admiral. In 1870 was made Ad- 
miral of the Navy. 

PREBLE ( 4 th) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Edward Preble, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched March 8, 1920, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 

Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Sallie Macintosh Tucker, great- 
granddaughter of Commodore Edward Preble, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore edward preble, United states 

Navy. Born in Falmouth, Maine, 176.1. Died 1807. 
When about 16 years of age he shipped on a letter of marque 
and sailed for Europe. Upon his return to America in 
1779, he received an appointment in the Provincial Marine 
of Massachusetts and was attached to the "Protector." 
January 17, 1799, commissioned lieutenant in the United 
States Navy, and ordered to the "Constitution"; com- 
missioned captain, May 15, 1799; ordered to the "Pick- 
ering," June 7, 1799. In command of the "Essex" he 
sailed for the East Indies to convoy to the United States a 
large fleet of merchantmen and had the honor of being the 
first naval officer to fly the American flag east of the Cape 
of Good Hope. Ordered to the "Constitution" in 1803 
to command the squadron being fitted out to act against 
the Barbary powers. He established a treaty of peace with 
the Emperor of Morocco; had several engagements with 

[179] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

the Tripolitan gunboats and forts and endeavored to se- 
cure a treaty for the establishment of a permanent peace 
upon honorable terms with the Bashaw. 

PRESTON ( 2 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Samuel W. Preston, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 15, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Josephus Daniels (Adelaide Bagley), 
wife of Secretary of the Navy, Josephus Daniels. 

rIEUTENANT SAMUEL W. PRESTON, United States 
Navy, was born in Canada and appointed midshipman 
from the State of Illinois 1858. Graduated first in his class 
1861. From 1861 to 1865 served on various vessels of the 
South Atlantic blockading squadron. In an assault on Fort 
Sumter, September 8, 1863, he was made prisoner and sent 
to Libby Prison, where he was kept until exchanged in the 
fall of 1864. Took part in the attacks on Fort Fisher, 
December 24, 25, 1864, and January 15, 1865, when he 
was killed while leading his men. 

WILLIAM B. PRESTON 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy, 
William B. Preston 

Launched August 7, 1919, at U. S. Navy Yard, Norfolk, 
Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Radford Beale (Lucy Pres- 
ton), daughter of Secretary of the Navy William B. Pres- 
ton. 

[180] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Secretary of the navy william b. pres- 

TON was born in Smithfield, Virginia, November 25, 1805; 
died 1862; was educated at the University of Virginia; 
adopted law as a profession and achieved signal success in 
its practice; served several times in the Virginia House of 
Delegates and Senate; appointed Secretary of the Navy in 
1849; was subsequently sent by the Government on a 
mission to France, 1858-1859, the object of which was to 
establish a line of steamers between that country and 
Virginia and a more extended commercial relation between 
the two countries. 



PRUITT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Corporal John H. Pruitt, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched August 2, 1920, Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Belle Pruitt, mother of Corporal 
John H. Pruitt, U. S. M. C. 

CORPORAL JOHN H. PRUITT, United States Marine 
Corps, was born in Fadeville, Arkansas, 1896. Killed in 
action October 4, 1918. Posthumously awarded Navy 
medal of honor for conspicuous gallantry and courage above 
and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy at 
Blanc Mont Ridge, France, October 3, 1918. Single handed 
he attacked two machine guns, capturing them and killing 
two of the enemy. He later captured forty prisoners in 
a dugout nearby. This gallant soldier was killed soon 
afterwards by shell fire while he was sniping at the enemy. 



PUTNAM 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[I8l] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Named for Master Charles Flint Putnam, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 3, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Katherine Brown (Mrs. Andrew Irwin 
McKee), fiancee of Lieutenant McKee, C. C, U. S. Navy. 

Master charles flint putnam, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Illinois; died in the Arctic region in 1883. 
Appointed midshipman, 1869; master, 1880. 1881-1882, 
U. S. S. "Rodgers," Behring Sea, in search of the "Jean- 
nette." While in command of a shore depot at Cape Serdze, 
Master C. F. Putnam learned of the burning of the "Rod- 
gers." He set out for the relief of her officers and men in 
St. Lawrence Bay. Returning to Cape Serdze, missed his 
way in a blinding snowstorm, January 10, 1882, and drifted 
out to sea on an ice floe. Careful search was made for him 
by parties from the "Rodgers," officers and men, and at 
one time he was seen, but those trying to reach him were 
cut ofF by breaking ice. May 20, 1882, his body was seen 
by native hunters on a floating ice floe. 

PYRO 

AMMUNITION SHIP 

Length, 482 feet Beam, 60 feet, 11 inches Draft, 20 feet, II inches 

Named "Pyro," fire (Greek) 

Launched December 16, 1919, at Puget Sound Navy 
Yard. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Guy A. Bisset (Harriet Caperton), wife 
of Commander G. A. Bisset, C. C, U. S. Navy, Superin- 
tending Constructor. 



QUAIL 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

[182] 




w 
u 
< 

w 

H 

O 

H 

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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for the bird Quail 

Launched October 6, 191 8, at Chester Shipbuilding 
Company. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Cunningham Baxter, daugh- 
ter of Captain William J. Baxter, Construction Corps, 
U. S. Navy. 



Dimensions of Submarines R-i to R-20, inclusive, are: 
Length, 186 feet Beam, 18 feet Draft, 14 feet, 6 inches 

R-i 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 24, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George W. Dashiell (Margaret Rowe), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander G. W. Dashiell, U. S. Navy, 
prospective Commanding Officer. 

R-2 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 23, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles M. Cooke (Sarah Bleecker), 
mother of Lieutenant Commander Charles M. Cooke, U. S. 
Navy, in command of the vessel. 

R-j - 

SUBMARINE 

Launched January 18, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles G. McCord (Florence Christian), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander C. G. McCord, U. S. Navy, 
Inspector of Machinery for the Navy at the works. 

[183] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

R-4 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 26, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Albert W. Stahl (Blanche Vinton), 
wife of Captain Albert W. Stahl, Construction Corps, U. S. 

Navy. 

R-5 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 24, 191 8, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaretta Wood, daughter of Rear 
Admiral Spencer S. Wood, U. S. Navy, in command of 
the First Naval District. 

R-6 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 1, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Katharine Langdon Hill, daughter 
of former Governor John F. Hill, of Maine. 

R-7 

SUBMARINE 

Launched April 5, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ivan E. Bass (Florence Bouche), wife cf 
Commander I. E. Bass, U. S. Navy, the Engineer Officer 
of Boston Navy Yard. 

R-8 

SUBMARINE 

Launched April 17, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[184] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Penelope Potter, daughter of Mrs. 
Albert B. Potter of New London, Connecticut. 

R-9 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May 24, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Irving E. Stowe (Mary Ingalls), wife 
of Lieutenant I. E. Stowe, U. S. N. R. F., resident physician 
at the works. 

R-10 

SUBMARINE 

Launched June 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Philip C. Ransom (Mary Sheafe), wife 
of Lieutenant Commander P. C. Ransom, U. S. Navy, pro- 
spective commanding officer. 

R-11 

SUBMARINE 

Launched July 22, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Batchelder, daughter of 
Lieutenant George Batchelder, Supply Corps, U. S. N. 
Reserve. 

R-12 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 15, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Mack, sister-in-law of Commander 
H. S. Dinger, U. S. Navy, on duty at the works. 

[185] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



R-I3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 27, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Fannie Bemis Chandler, daughter of 
Dr. Norman F. Chandler, Medford, Massachusetts. 

R-14 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 10, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Florence Loomis Gardner, daughter 
of Mr. Stephen A. Gardner, the General Manager of the 
Electric Boat Company. 

R-15 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 10, 1917, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

' Sponsor: Mrs. Thales Stewart Boyd (Lillian Martin), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander T. S. Boyd, U. S. Navy, 
prospective commanding officer. 

R-16 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 15, 1917, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edward R. Wilson (Alice Baer), wife 
of Passed Assistant Paymaster E. R. Wilson, U. S. Navy. 

R-17 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 24, 1917, at Union Iron Works, 
San Francisco, California. 

[186] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Bertha Frances Dew, sister-in-law of 
Captain D. C. Nutting, C. C, U. S. Navy, Superintending 
Constructor at the works. 

R-18 

SUBMARINE 

Launched January 7, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Marion Soley Russell, daughter of 
Captain Robert L. Russell, U. S. Navy, Commandant Third 
Naval District. 

R-19 

SUBMARINE 

Launched January 28, 191 8, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Robert L. Irvine (Janet Klink), wife 
of Commander R. L. Irvine, U. S. Navy, Inspector of 
Machinery at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corporation. 

R-20 

SUBMARINE 

Launched January 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Arnold Foster (Maud Beatrice), wife 
of the Secretary and Treasurer of the Union Plant, Bethle- 
hem Shipbuilding Corporation. 

Dimensions of Submarines R-21 to R-27, inclusive, are: 
Length, 775 feet Beam, 16 feet, 7 inches Draft, 13 feet, 11 inches 

R-21 

SUBMARINE 

Launched July 10, 191 8, at Lake Torpedo Boat Company, 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

[187] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Dallas Charles Laizure (May Mor- 
gan), wife of Lieutenant Commander D. C. Laizure, U. S. 
Navy, Inspector of Machinery at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company. 

R-22 
SUBMARINE 

Launched September 23, 1918, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Erick A. Eklund (Agnes Simpson), 
wife of the General Superintendent of Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company. 

R-23 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 5, 1918, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Miss Ruth Jane Harris, daughter of Mr. 
James R. Harris, General Manager of the Diesel Engine Co., 
St. Louis, Missouri. 

R-24 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 21, 1918, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edmund R. Norton (Elizabeth Knowles), 
wife of Commander E. R. Norton, C. C, U. S. Navy, 
Superintending Constructor. 

R-25 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May 15, 1919, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Richard H. M. Robinson (Rosalind 
Smith), wife of the Managing Director of the Lake Tor- 
pedo Boat Company, and formerly of the U. S. Navy 
Construction Corps. 

[188] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



R-26 

SUBMARINE 

Launched June 28, 1919, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. J. Walter Barnett (Mary Serpell), 
wife of the Assistant General Manager of the Company. 

R-27 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 23, 1918, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Louise Foster, daughter of Judge 
Carl Foster, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

RADFORD 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 50 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral William Radford, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 5, 191 8, at Newport News S. B. & D. D. 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Lovell Radford, granddaughter 
of Rear Admiral William Radford, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral william radford was bom 

in Fincastle, Virginia, 1808; died 1890. Appointed mid- 
shipman 1825; rear admiral 1866. During the Mexican 
War he commanded the party from the U. S. S. "Warren" 
that cut out and captured the Mexican man-of-war "Malek 
Adhel" at Mazatlan, and took part in the operations at 
Mazatlan and other places in Lower California, 1846-1847. 
Commanded the U. S. S. "Cumberland" at the time she 
was sunk by the C. S. S. "Merrimack" in Hampton Roads, 
but was by order of the Secretary of the Navy on board the 
U. S. S. "Roanoke" in Hampton Roads, at a Naval Court 

[189] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



of Inquiry. He immediately rode to Newport News reach- 
ing there only in time to see the "Cumberland" sunk by 
being rammed by the "Merrimac." Commanded the "New 
Ironsides" in attacks on Fort Fisher December 24-25, 
1864, and January 13-15, 1865, and was highly praised 
for the high order of ability displayed on that occasion. 
He was included in the thanks of Congress to Admiral 
Porter, his officers and men, for their gallant conduct on 
those occasions. Commanded the European Squadron 
1 869-1 870. 

RAIL 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feel, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Rail 

Launched April 25, 1918, at Puget Sound Navy Yard, 
Washington. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Robert Morgan (Elizabeth Mahan), 
wife of Lieutenant R. Morgan, C. C, U. S. Navy. 

RALEIGH ( 3 d) 

LIGHT CRUISER 

Length, 553 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Raleigh, the capital of 
North Carolina 

Launched October 25, 1922, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Jennie M. Proctor, daughter of Mr. 
Ivan M. Proctor, selected by Honorable T. B. Eldridge, 
Mayor of Raleigh. 

1 HE first "Raleigh" was a frigate of 697 tons, authorized 
by the Continental Congress in 1775 and launched at 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire, May 21, 1775, and was 
actively engaged in the Revolutionary War. 

The second "Raleigh" was a protected cruiser of 3 183 tons, 

[190] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



launched March 31, 1892, at Navy Yard, Norfolk, Virginia; 
was one of Commodore George Dewey's squadron in the 
battle of Manila Bay, May 1, 1898. 

RAMSAY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 3 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Francis M. Ramsay, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 8, 1918, at Newport News S. B. & D. D. 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Virginia Ramsay, granddaughter 
of Rear Admiral Francis M. Ramsay, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral francis m. ramsay, United 

States Navy, was born 1835; died 1914. Appointed mid- 
shipman 1850; commissioned rear admiral 1894. Served 
on "Preble," " St. Lawrence," "Falmouth," "Merrimac," 
and on ordnance duty at Washington Navy Yard, 1850- 
1860. Commanded "Choctaw," Mississippi Squadron 1863— 
1864. Engagements at Haines Bluff, Yazoo River, 1863. 
Expedition up the Yazoo River to Yazoo City, destroying 
the Confederate navy yard and vessels, May, 1863. En- 
gagement at Liverpool Landing, Yazoo River, May, 1863. 
Engagement at Millikens Bend, Mississippi River, June 7, 
1863. Siege of Vicksburg, May, June, and July, 1863. 
Commanded a battery of three heavy guns, mounted on 
scows, in front of Vicksburg, from June 19 to July 4, 1863. 
Commanded the third division, Mississippi Squadron, 
July, 1863, to September, 1864.^ Commanded the ex- 
pedition up the Black and Ouachita Rivers, March, 1864. 
Engagement at Trinity, Louisiana, March, 1864. Engage- 
ment at Harrisonburg, Louisiana, Ouachita River, 1864. 
Red River Expedition, March, April, May, 1864. Ex- 
pedition up the Black and Ouachita Rivers, April, 1864. 
Commanded the third and fourth divisions, Mississippi 
Squadron, May to September, 1864. Commanded the 

[191] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



expeditions into the Atchafalaya River, June, 1864. Com- 
manded "Unadilla," North Atlantic Squadron, 1864-1865. 
Engagements with Fort Fisher, North Carolina, December 
24 and 25, 1864, January, 1865. Engagements with Fort 
Anderson and with other forts on the Cape Fear River, 
January, February, 1865. Promoted one grade by special 
Act of Congress for Civil War Service. Held important 
positions afloat and ashore 1 865-1 889. Chief of Bureau of 
Navigation 1 889-1 897. 

RATHBURNE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Captain John Peck Rathburne, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 27, 1917, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Malinda Bennett Mull, daughter of 
Mr. J. Harry Mull, Vice President and General Manager of 
the Shipbuilding Company. 

Captain john peck rathburne, u. s Na Vy; 

appointed captain in the Continental Navy; January 27, 
1778, commanding the "Providence," landed on the island 
of New Providence, West Indies, took possession of Fort 
Nassau, spiked the guns, removed a quantity of ammunition 
and small arms, beat off the British sloop of war "Grayton" 
and five other vessels, two of which he burned, and on the 
29th of January sailed away with the remainder of his prizes 
and 20 released American prisoners; July 15, 1779, in com- 
pany with two other Continental ships, captured 11 large 
vessels and valuable cargoes. 

RED WING 

MINE sweeper 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Red Wing 
[192] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched June 7, 1919, at Baltimore D. D. & S. B. Com- 
pany. 

Sponsor: Mrs Fred A. Plagemann (Nellie Cloak), 
wife of the prospective commanding officer, Lieutenant 
F. A. Plagemann, U. S. Navy. 

REID (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 50 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Samuel Chester Reid, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 15, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Joseph Wright Powell (Bertha 
Osterhout), wife of the president of the Bethlehem Ship- 
building Corporation. Mrs. Powell was sponsor for the 
U. S. S. "Aylwin" in 1912. 

Captain samuel Chester reid, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1783. He served as 
acting midshipman under Commodore Truxtun. In War 
of 18 1 2 commanded the privateer "General Armstrong." 
In September, 18 14, in the harbor of Fayal, was attacked 
by the boats of three British men of war. Reid defeated 
and scattered the enemy and scuttled his own ship to pre- 
vent capture. He received the commendation of Congress 
for this remarkable battle. Captain Reid was appointed 
a sailing master in the Navy and held the position until 
his death. He was the son of Lieutenant John Reid of the 
British Navy who while a prisoner resigned and espoused 
the American cause. 

RENO 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Commander Walter E. Reno, 

U. S. Navy 

[i93] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Launched January 22, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California 

Sponsor: Miss Kathryn Baldwin Anderson, daughter 
of Mr. Alden Anderson, Lieutenant Governor of California. 

Lieutenant commander Walter e. reno, 

United States Navy, was born in Iowa, 1881. Appointed 
midshipman, 1902; commissioned lieutenant commander, 
May 23, 1917. Drowned while commanding the U. S. S. 
"Chauncey" on November 19, 1917. The "Chauncey" 
was rammed by the British merchant ship "Rose," of 
Glasgow, while convoying a merchant fleet through the 
danger zone. 

RENSHAW 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 2 inches 

Named for Commander William B. Renshaw, 

U.S. Navy 

Launched September 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frank Johnson (Grace Coomer), wife 
of Lieutenant Frank Johnson, C. C, U. S. Navy, on duty 
at the shipbuilding plant. 

Commander william b. renshaw, u. s. N avy , 

born in Brooklyn, New York, 18 16; killed in battle January 
1, 1863. Appointed midshipman 183 1; commander 1861. 
Sea duty: 1847-1848 in the "Warren," Pacific Squadron. 
Took part in operations on the Pacific side in the War with 
Mexico. Civil War, commended by Admiral Farragut for 
"the handsome manner in which he managed his vessel," the 
"Westfield," in operations with the Mortar Fleet below 
New Orleans and on the Mississippi River, 1862-1863. 
Refused to surrender to the Confederate forces, Galveston 
Harbor, January 1, 1863, setting fire to his vessel to prevent 
her falling into their hands, and was killed in the explosion 
of the vessel which followed. 

[194] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



RICHMOND ( 3 d.) 

LIGHT CRUISER 

Length, 555 feet Beam, 55 feet' Draft, 14 feet, 3 inches 

Named for the city of Richmond, 
the capital of virginia 

Launched September 29, 1921, at William Cramp & 
Sons' Shipbuilding Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Strother Scott, daughter 
of Mr. Frederick W. Scott, a prominent citizen of Richmond, 
Virginia. 



Ti 



HE first "Richmond" was a frigate of 200 tons, 
purchased at Norfolk in 1798. 

The second "Richmond" was a steamer of 2700 tons, 
launched in i860. 

RINGGOLD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 3x4 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Cadwallader Ringgold, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 14, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. David W. Farquhar (Grace T.), mother 
of Lieutenant Francis P. Farquhar, U. S. N. R. F., on 
duty at the shipbuilding works. 

Rear admiral cadwallader ringgold, 

United States Navy, was bonr in Washington County, 
Maryland, 1802; died 1867. Appointed midshipman 1819; 
commissioned rear admiral 1866. Commanded Ringgold 
expedition in the Pacific; received the thanks of Congress 
for daring and skill displayed by him while in command of 
the sailing ship "Sabine" in the rescue of a battalion of 
marines at sea, in a steamer on the lee shore, and the search 
for and rescue of the line-of-battleship "Vermont." 

[195] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

RIZAL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Jose Rizal 

Launched September 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Ship- 
building Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Senora Jaime C. DeVeyra, wife of Senor 
DeVeyra, Filipino delegate to Congress. 



J 



OSE RIZAL was born 1861 in Luzon, Philippine Islands; 
executed December 30, 1896. Filipino doctor of medicine, 
author, patriot. Imprisoned by Spanish Government for 
"carrying on an antireligious and antipatriotic campaign 
education" in the Philippines; tried before a military court, 
denied the right of counsel, found guilty and ordered to be 
shot, as "the principal organizer and the soul of the insur- 
rection in the Philippines." The U. S. S. "Rizal" now on 
duty with the Asiatic fleet, has two distinct peculiarities. 
One is its foreign-sounding name, the "Rizal," and the 
other is the fact that it is manned by a crew of 96 Filipinos, 
only its officers and chief petty officers being American. 
The reason for this departure is that the new war craft is a 
present to the United States from the Philippine Islands. 

ROBIN 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Robin 

Launched June 17, 1918, at Todd Shipyard Corporation, 

New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Bessie Veronica Callahan, daughter of 
a foreman of the shipyard. 

ROBINSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

[196] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Captain Isaiah Robinson, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 27, 191 8, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Evelyn Tingey Selfridge, a great- 
granddaughter of Rear Admiral T. 0. Selfridge, U. S. Navy. 

CAPTAIN ISAIAH ROBINSON, United States Navy, 
commissioned captain by Continental Congress October 10, 
1776; in command of the "Andrea Doria" in December, 
1776; captured ofF Porto Rico the British ship "Race 
Horse" and one smaller vessel; November, 1777, took part 
in the defense of the Delaware River; burned his ship to 
prevent capture by the British. 

RODGERS (2d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore John Rodgers, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 26, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Theodosia Rodgers, grand- 
daughter of Commodore John Rodgers, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore john rodgers, United States Navy, 

was born in 1771. Entered the Navy as lieutenant in 1798. 
Was executive officer of the "Constellation" when she 
captured the French frigate "LTnsurgente" in 1799, for 
which he and the other officers received a silver medal and 
thanks of Congress. In the War with Tripoli, distinguished 
himself in command of the "John Adams" and the "Con- 
gress." In 1805 became commander of the squadron against 
Tripoli. In War of 1812 — service in command of a squad- 
ron in 1812 and 1813. 

In 1 8 14 he organized the defense of Baltimore against 

[197] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

the combined attack of army and navy, and the repulse 
of the enemy before Baltimore was acknowledged at the 
time as his deed. In 1815 he became President of the newly 
organized Board of Navy Commissioners, which office he 
held until his death in 1 837 except for two years, 1825- 
1827, when he was Commander-in-Chief in the Mediter- 
ranean. 

ROPER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Lieutenant Commander Jesse M. Roper, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 17, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Harriet H. Roper, widow of Lieuten- 
ant Commander Jesse M. Roper, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant commander jesse mims roper, 

United States Navy, was born in Glasgow, Missouri, 185 1; 
died at Cavite, Philippine Islands, March 31, 1901. Ap- 
pointed a midshipman 1868; commissioned a lieutenant 
commander 1899. In 1901, while on the "Petrel," lost his 
life in an heroic effort to save the life of one of his men. He 
was the first man to descend into the hold of the vessel 
when a fire was discovered; and, while endeavoring to res- 
cue seaman Patrick Tower, he was overcome by suffocation 
and lost his life. 

ROWAN (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 315 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 6 inches 

Named for Vice Admiral Stephen Clegg Rowan, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 23, 1916, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

[198] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Louise McLean Ayres, daughter of 
Doctor Stephen C. Ayres, and great-niece of Vice Admiral 
Stephen Clegg Rowan, U. S. Navy. 

Admiral Stephen c. rowan, United States 

Navy, was born in Ireland in 1805. Was appointed mid- 
shipman in the U. S. Navy in 1826. Took active part in the 
War with Mexico and in the acquisition of California. In 
1861, in command of the "Pawnee," took part in the cap- 
ture of forts at Hatteras Inlet. In 1862 performed con- 
spicuous services in command of a flotilla in Sounds of 
North Carolina, and in the attack of Army and Navy on 
Roanoke Island. For his brilliant achievements he was pro- 
moted to the rank of Commodore. Commanded Naval 
forces at the fall of Newbern and participated at Forts 
Wagner, Gregg and Moultrie. Commanded "New Iron- 
sides" off" Charleston. In 1870 was made Vice Admiral of 
the Navy in recognition of distinguished service, by special 
Act of Congress, being the first officer in our Navy to hold 
this rank. 

Dimensions of Submarines S-i to S-3 inclusive are: 
Length, 219 feet Beam, 20 feet, 8 inches Draft, ,15 feet, 10 inches 

s-i 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 26, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Emory S. Land (Elizabeth Stiles), wife 
of Commander E. S. Land, C. C, U. S. Navy. 

S-2 
SUBMARINE 

Launched February 15, 1919, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Philip B. Brill (Chrystie Knox), wife 
of the General Manager of the Company. 

[199] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

S-3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 21, 1918, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William L. Hill (Katherine Sweetser), 
wife of Lieutenant W. L. Hill, U. S. Navy, on duty at the 
Navy Yard. 

Dimensions of Submarines S-4 to S-17 inclusive are: 
Length, 231 feet Beam, 21 feet, 10 inches Draft, 13 feet 

S-4 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 27, 1919, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Herbert Seymour Howard (Mary 
Morris), wife of Commander H. S. Howard, C. C, U. S. 
Navy, constructor of the submarine. 

S-s 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 10, 1919, at Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Glenn S. Burrell (Geraldine Boush), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander G. S. Burrell, C. E. C, 
U. S. Navy, and daughter of Rear Admiral Clifford J. 
Boush, in command of the Navy Yard. 

S-6 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 23, 1919, at Navy Yard, Ports- 
mouth, New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Westcott, step-daughter of 
Captain L. S. Adams, C. C, U. S. Navy, Industrial Man- 
ager of the Navy Yard. 

[ 200] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



S-7 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 5, 1920, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry Lake Wyman (Margaret Myers), 
wife of Captain H. L. Wyman, U. S. Navy, on duty at the 
Yard. 

S-8 

SUBMARINE 

Launched April 21, 1920, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Roy W. Ryden (Garnett Rainey), wife 
of Commander R. W. Ryden, C. C, U. S. Navy, on duty 
at the Yard. 

S-9 

SUBMARINE 

Launched June 17, 1920, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. James Edward Palmer, (Anna Key) 
wife of Commander J. E. Palmer, U. S. Navy, Engineer 
Officer at the Navy Yard. 

S-10 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 9, 1920, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Marian Kingsbury Payne, step-daughter 
of Captain F. T. Arms, U. S. Navy, Supply Corps. 

S-11 ^ 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 7, 1921, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, daughter 
of Franklin D. Roosevelt, former Assistant Secretary of 

the Navy. 

[201] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 






S-I2 
SUBMARINE 

Launched August 4, 192 1, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Gordon Woodbury (Charlotte Wood- 
bury) wife of former Assistant Secretary of the Navy, 
Gordon Woodbury. 

S-13 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 20, 1921, at Navy Yard, Portsmouth, 
New Hampshire. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Howe, daughter of Mr. L. McH. 
Howe, Assistant to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy 
during the World War. 

S-14 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 22, 1919, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George T. Parker (Kathryn Randall), 
wife of Mr. G. T. Parker, President of the Federal Under- 
writers of Washington, D. C. 

s-15 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 8, 1920, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Simon Lake (Margaret Vogel), wife of 
the Inventor of the Lake type Submarine and the founder 
of the Company. 

S-16 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 23, 1919, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Archibald W. McNeil (Ann Orr), wife 
of Senator A. W. McNeil, Jr., of Bridgeport. 

[ 202 ] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Mrs. Carlos Bean (Mary Baldwin), wife 
of Commander Carlos Bean, U. S. Navy, on duty at the 

works. 

S-27 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 18, 1922, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frank Baldwin (Helen Golden), wife 
of Lieutenant Commander Frank Baldwin, U. S. Navy, 
Supply Corps, on duty at the works. 

S-28 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 20, 1922, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William R. Munroe (Katherine John- 
son), wife of Lieutenant Commander W. R. Munroe, U. S. 
Navy, Inspector of Machinery at the works. 

S-29 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 9, 1922, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Ronan C. Grady (Louise M.), wife of 
Commander R. C. Grady, U. S. Navy, Naval Inspector 
of Machinery at the works. 

S-30 

SUBMARINE 

Launched November 21, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edwards Stuart Stalnaker (Marion 
La Tourette), wife of Lieutenant Commander E. S. Stal- 
naker, Supply Corps, U. S. Navy. 

s-31 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 28, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

[205] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. George A. Walker (Maisie Genevra), 
wife of Mr. G. A. Walker, Chief Clerk in Navy Construction 
Department at the Works. 

S-32 

SUBMARINE 

Launched January 11, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Tynan, daughter of Mr. J. J. 
Tynan, General Manager of Union Plant. 

S-33 

SUBMARINE 

Launched December 5, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Thomas M. Searles (Clifford B.), wife 
of Lieutenant Commander T. M. Searles, C. C, U. S. Navy, 
in charge of submarine construction at the works. 

S-34 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 13, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Florence Hellman, daughter of Mr. I. 
W. Hellman, Jr., vice president of the Union Trust Com- 
pany and Nevada National Bank. 

s-35 

SUBMARINE 

Launched February 27, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Louise Carolyn Bailey, daughter of 
Mr. T. S. Bailey, Pacific Coast representative of the Electric 
Boat Company. 

S-36 

SUBMARINE 

Launched June 3, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

[206] 




I 

CO 



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CO 



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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Sponsor: Miss Helen M. Russell, daughter of Lieu- 
tenant George L. Russell, U. S. Navy, on duty at the works 
at the time. 

S-37 
submarine 

Launched June 20, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Mildred Bulger, daughter of Mr. John 
King Bulger, U. S. Shipping Board Inspector for the Pacific 
Coast at the time. 

S-38 

SUBMARINE 

Launched June 17, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Cornelius Collins (Grace Danills), 
wife of Lieutenant C. J. Collins, U. S. Navy, Assistant 
Inspector of Machinery for the Navy. 

S-39 

SUBMARINE 

Launched July 2, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Clara M. Huber, daughter of Lieutenant 
(T) Martin Huber, U. S. Navy, on duty at the works at 
the time. 

S-40 

SUBMARINE 

Launched January 5, 1921, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John H. Rosseter (Alice May), desig- 
nated by Senator Phelan of California. 

S-41 
submarine 

Launched February 21, 1921, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

[207] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. John F. Conners (Stella Standeford), 
wife of Mr. John F. Conners, Editor of the Oakland In- 
quirer, Oakland, California. 

Dimensions of Submarines S-42 to S-47 inclusive are: 
Length, 22s feet Beam, 20 feet, 8 inches Draft, 16 feet 

S-42 
SUBMARINE 

Launched April 30, 1923, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Henry A. Hutchins, Jr., (Barbara Ker- 
ley), wife of Lieutenant H. A. Hutchins, C. C, U. S. Navy, 
Assistant to the Superintending Constructor at the works. 

S-43 

SUBMARINE 

Launched March 31, 1923, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John H. Brown (Nellie Janvier), wife 
of Lieutenant J. H. Brown, U. S. Navy, Assistant Inspector 
of Machinery at the works. 

S-44 

SUBMARINE 

Launched October 27, 1923, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. H. E. Grieshaber (Eldora Corson), 
wife of Mr. H. E. Grieshaber, Naval Architect for the Electric 
Boat Company. 

S-45 

SUBMARINE 

Launched June 26, 1923, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Charles Hibbard (Mary McQuillan), 
wife of Lieutenant C. Hibbard, U. S. N. C. C, Assistant 
to Superintending Constructor. 

[208] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



S-46 
SUBMARINE 

Launched September n, 1923, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Grace Roosevelt, daughter of Honor- 
able Theodore Roosevelt, Assistant Secretary of the Navy. 

Dimensions of Submarines S-48 to S-51 inclusive are: 
Length, 240 feet Beam, 21 feet, 10 inches Draft x 13 feet, 6 inches 

S-48 
SUBMARINE 

Launched February 26, 192 1, at Lake Torpedo Boat 
Company, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. James O. Germaine (Princess Tocoom- 
was), daughter of Mr. Lemuel M. Occom Fielding, who is 
Chief of the Council of the Mohegan Tribe and a descendant 
of Uncas I. 

S-49 

SUBMARINE 

Launched April 23, 1921, at Lake Torpedo Boat Company, 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Joseph Eliot Austin (Mamie Wadman), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander J. E. Austin, U. S. Navy 
(Retired). 

S-50 
submarine 

Launched June 18, 1921, at Lake Torpedo Boat Company, 
Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William G. Esmond (Ella Sanger), wife 
of the Naval Architect of the Lake Torpedo Boat Company. 

s-51 

SUBMARINE 

Launched August 20, 1921, at Lake Torpedo Boat Com- 
pany, Bridgeport, Connecticut. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Roy Porter Mills (Edith Newton), 
wife of an official of the Lake Torpedo Boat Company. 

[209] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

SACRAMENTO ( 2 d) 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 226 feet Beam, 40 feet, 10 inches Draft, 11 feet, 6 inches 

Named for the City of Sacramento, the 
Capital of the State of California 

Launched February 21, 1914, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Phebe Briggs, daughter of Doctor Ellery 
Briggs, of Sacramento, baptized the ship with Sacramento 
Valley champagne. 

U. S. S. "Sacramento 1st" launched in 1862, was a gun- 
boat named for Sacramento River. 

SAMPSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 6 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral William T. Sampson, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 4, 1916, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Marjorie Smith, granddaughter of 
Rear Admiral Sampson, U. S. Navy, and daughter of 
Captain Roy C. Smith, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral william t. sampson, United 

States Navy, was born at Palmyra, New York, 1840; gradu- 
ated midshipman 1861; master 1861; lieutenant 1862; 
lieutenant commander 1866; commander 1874; captain 
1889; commodore July 3, 1898; rear admiral March 3, 1899; 
died 1902. 1861 ordered to U. S. S. "Potomac"; 1862- 
1863 on U. S. S. "John Adams"; 1864-1865 South Atlantic 
Squadron; on the ironclad "Patapsco" when she was 
blown up by a submarine mine in Charleston Harbor Janu- 
ary 15, 1865; cruised in the Mediterranean and China and 
on duty at the U. S. Naval Academy 1866-1882; 1882- 

[210] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



1884 naval observatory; 1885-1886 torpedo station and 
member of board on fortifications and defense; 1 886-1 890 
superintendent Naval Academy; 1893-1897 chief bureau 
of ordnance; commanding U. S. S. "Iowa," 1897; presi- 
dent of court of inquiry on the blowing up of the U. S. S. 
"Maine" in Havana Harbor February 15, 1898. 

April 21, 1898, ordered to command North Atlantic 
station with the rank of rear admiral; was commander in 
chief of U. S. naval forces operating against Spain in the 
West Indies, which blockaded ports of Cuba and porto Rico 
and destroyed the fleet of Admiral Cervera; September, 
1898, appointed one of the three commissioners to Cuba; 
resumed command of the North Atlantic station until de- 
tached October 1899, and ordered to the Boston Navy yard. 
Retired February 9, 1902. 

SANDERLING 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Sanderling 

Launched September 2, 191 8, at Todd Shipyard Cor- 
poration, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Baine, daughter of the General 
Superintendent of Tebo Yacht Basin when the vessel was 
built. 

SANDPIPER 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Sandp^er 

Launched April 28, 1919, at Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Edith V. Tawresey, daughter of Captain 
J. G. Tawresey, C. C, U. S. Navy, Construction Officer of 
the Navy Yard. 

[211] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



SANDS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Benjamin F. Sands, U. S. 
Navy, and Rear Admiral James H. Sands, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 28, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor.^ Miss Jane McCue Sands, granddaughter of 
Rear Admiral Benjamin F. Sands, U. S. Navy. 

REAR ADMIRAL BENJAMIN F. SANDS, United 
States Navy, was born 181 1; died 1883. Appointed mid- 
shipman 1828; rear admiral 1891; 1830-1846 cruised in 
the Brazil, West India, and Mediterranean squadrons; 
1847 attached to the home squadron, took part in the Mexi- 
can War at Tobasco and Tuxpan; 1863 commanded the 
"Dacotah," North Atlantic blockading squadron, and par- 
ticipated in the engagement with Fort Caswell; in command 
of the "Fort Jackson" 1864-1865 and took part in attacks 
on Fort Fisher December 24-25 and January 13-15, 1865. 
Commanded division on the blockade of Texas from Feb- 
ruary to June, 1865, and took formal possession of Galveston 
and hoisted the United States Flag over that city. Re- 
tired 1874. 

REAR ADMIRAL JAMES H. SANDS, United States 
Navy, son of Rear Admiral B. F. Sands, was born 1845; 
died 191 1. Appointed midshipman 1859; rear admiral 
1902. Civil War, served with North Atlantic blockading 
squadron on the U. S. S. "Tuscarora" and the U. S. S. 
"Shenandoah." Took part in both attacks on Fort Fisher, 
December, 1864, and January, 1865, and was recommended 
for distinguished gallantry. 1865-1868, attached to the 
"Hartford," East India Squadron; commended for gal- 
lantry in skirmishes with savages at Formosa. 1 869-1 870, 
European Station. 1871-1872, commanded "California," 

[212] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Pacific Station. 1898, commanded the U. S. ships "Colum- 
bia" and "Minneapolis." Superintendent of the Naval 
Academy 1905-1907. 

SATTERLEE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Charles Satterlee, 
U. S. Coast Guard 

Launched December 21, 191 8, at Newport News S. B. & 
D. D. Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Rebecca Eloise Satterlee, niece of 
Captain Charles Satterlee, U. S. Coast Guard. 

Captain charles satterlee, United States 

Coast Guard, was born in Connecticut, 1875. Appointed 
a cadet in the Revenue Service 1895; promoted to captain 
in the Coast Guard 191 5. In 1908 he was assigned as super- 
visor of anchorages at Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan, which 
duty included the command of the cutter "Mackinac." 
In 1909 he was ordered to the "Tahoma," for a cruise to 
the Pacific. From 1910 to 1913 he was assistant inspector 
of life-saving stations. On September 26,. 1918, while in 
command of the "Tampa," which was escorting a convoy 
of vessels in Bristol Channel, England, she was sunk by an 
enemy torpedo and all hands were lost. 

SCHENCK 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral James Findley Schenck, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 23, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Janet Earle, daughter of Rear 
Admiral Ralph Earle, U. S. Navy, and great-granddaughter 
of Rear Admiral James F. Schenck, U. S. Navy. 

[213] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Rear admiral james findley schenck, 

United States Navy, was born in Ohio, 1807. Appointed 
midshipman 1825; rear admiral 1868. He was highly com- 
mended for service during the Mexican War, under Com- 
modore Stockton, at Santa Barbara, San Pedro, Los Angeles, 
Guaymas, and Mazatlan. In 1846, with his own hands, he 
hoisted at Santa Barbara the first American flag in Califor- 
nia. He took command on the "Saginaw" July, 1859, and saw 
service in Cochin, China, silencing the forts at Quim-hon 
Bay, June 1861. At the outbreak of the Civil War was in 
command of the "Saginaw," which had been pronounced 
unseaworthy. Commander Schenck proceeded home with- 
out waiting for orders. He was at once given command of 
the "St. Lawrence," May 3, 1862, joining the West Gulf 
Blockading Squadron. He took a prominent part in the 
two attacks on Fort Fisher, and was mentioned for gal- 
lantry in action in the report of Rear Admiral Porter, then 
commanding the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron. 
He died 1882. 

SCHLEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, i inch 

Named for Rear Admiral Winfield Scott Schley, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 28, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor Martin, daughter of Mr. 
Walter S. Martin, a prominent citizen of San Francisco. 

Rear 'admiral winfield scott schley, 

United States Navy, was born at Frederick, Maryland, 
1839; died 191 1. Appointed midshipman, 1856; com- 
missioned lieutenant, 1862; commander, 1874; commo- 
dore, February 6, 1898; rear admiral, March 3, 1899. 
Served: 1860-1861, frigate "Niagara," East India Squad- 
ron; Civil War, 1861-1865. In the West Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1862, under Admiral Farragut, took part in en- 

[214] 




INDIAN 



PRINCESS SPONSOR 

l ( „ . o " 



S-4 8 WITH 



FOR THE 
HER PARTY 



SUBMARINE 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



gagements on the Mississippi River. Particularly mentioned 
for gallantry at the capture of Port Hudson. 1 864-1 865 
on duty in the Pacific Squadron. 1865 landed with U. S. 
Forces at LaUnion, San Salvador, to protect American in- 
terests. 1 869-1 872, Asiatic Station. Took part in cap- 
ture of Korean Forts on Salee River. 1 876-1 879 Brazil 
Station. 1884 commanded the expedition that rescued 
General Greely and survivors of his party near Cape Sabine, 
Grinnell Land, and brought them to the United States. Per- 
sonally thanked by President Arthur for this service. 1884- 
1889 Chief of Bureau of Equipment. In the war with Spain, 
with the "Brooklyn" as flagship, commanded the Flying 
Squadron until June 1, 1898, and from that date commanded 
the second Squadron of the North Atlantic Fleet which 
took a prominent part in the destruction of Cervera's fleet, 
on July 3, 1898; 1899-1901 commanded South Atlantic 
Squadron. 

SEA GULL 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Sea Gull 

Launched December 24, 191 8, at Consolidated Ship- 
building Corporation, New York City. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Clement Gould Amory (Louise 
Mathews), wife of the Treasurer of the Corporation. 

SELFRIDGE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Thomas O. Selfridge, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 25, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frederic G. Kellond (Katherine Sel- 
fridge), granddaughter of Rear Admiral Thomas O. Sel- 
fridge, U. S. Navy. 

[215] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

REAR ADMIRAL THOMAS O. SELFRIDGE, United 

States Navy, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, 1804; 
died 1902. Appointed midshipman 1818; rear admiral, 
retired, 1866; served on exploring expedition of 1829; com- 
manded the U. S. S. "Columbus," flagship of the East 
India Squadron. Early in 1847 the authorities of Mulje 
having refused to make an apology for an insult to the United 
States flag, he landed with a force of marines and seamen to 
enforce his demands. In November, 1847, he landed with 
about 70 men from the "Dale" and put a force of about 
400 Mexicans to flight. During the Civil War, 1861, 
in command of the "Mississippi, was actively engaged in 
blockading ofF Mobile Bay and Passes of the Mississippi. 
Subsequently held important positions ashore. 

SEMMES 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commander Raphael Semmes, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched December 21, 191 8, at Newport News S. B. & 
D. D. Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John H. Watkins (Anne Spencer), grand- 
daughter of Commander Raphael Semmes, U. S. Navy. 

Commander Raphael semmes, United States 

Navy, was born in Charles County, Maryland, 1809; died 
in 1877. Appointed a midshipman, 1826; commissioned 
commander, 1855. At the beginning of the war with Mexico, 
he was made flag lieutenant under Commodore David 
Conner, commanding the squadron in the Gulf, and in the 
siege of Vera Cruz was in charge of a naval battery on shore. 
April 28, 1847, ordered into the interior of Mexico on a 
special mission, and went to the city of Mexico with the 
Army as aid to Gen. Worth. He served for several years 
as inspector of lighthouses on the Gulf coast, and in 1858 
became secretary of the Lighthouse Board at Washington. 

[216] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



(At the outbreak of the Civil War resigned. He commanded 
the "Sumter" and "Alabama," Confederate States Navy, 
and commanded James River Squadron with rank of Rear 
Admiral. A brilliant and daring officer.) 

SHARKEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314. feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant William J. Sharkey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 12, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Company, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Mary E. Sharkey, widow of Lieutenant 
William J. Sharkey, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant william j. sharkey, United States 

Navy (junior grade) (T), was born in Auburn, New York, 
1885; appointed ensign (T) March 15, 191 8; detailed to 
the U. S. S. O-5; appointed lieutenant (junior grade) Sep- 
tember 21, 1918; killed by an explosion of the U. S. S. O-5, 
October 5, 191 8. He was promoted from the ranks, and at 
the time of the explosion was assisting his commanding officer 
in averting the danger of an explosion, the imminence of 
which had been discovered. 

SHAW 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 5 inches 

Named for Captain John Shaw, U. S. Navy 

Launched December 9, 1916, at Navy Yard, Mare Island, 
California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Lyman C. Millard (Virginia Lynch), 
great-great-granddaughter of Captain John Shaw, U. S. 

Navy. 

[217] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



CAPTAIN JOHN SHAW, United States Navy, was born 
in Ireland, 1773. Commissioned Lieutenant, U. S. Navy, 
August 3, 1798; promoted Master Commandant (Com- 
mander), 1804; Captain, 1807; died, 1823. 

Commanded U. S. S. "Enterprise" 1798-1800 and cap- 
tured 8 vessels from the French in the West Indies. Re- 
captured 1 1 American vessels. His engagement with "Le 
Flambeau" and "La Pauline," both of which he captured, 
was counted one of the most gallant actions of the Naval 
War with France. 

1 801 commanded the "George Washington," carried 
tribute from the United States to the Dey of Algiers and 
brought home many Americans that had been made pris- 
oners (from merchant vessels) by the Dey. 1804 com- 
manded the "John Adams," Mediterranean Squadron. 
During the years 1806 and 1807 superintended the con- 
struction of gunboats building at New Orleans. In 1808 
commanded Norfolk Navy Yard. 1810-1813 commanded 
New Orleans Naval Station. 18 14 transferred to the com- 
mands of the vessels lying in the Thames, above New Lon- 
don; was blockaded there by the British fleet. From 181 5 
to 1817 commanded the Mediterranean Squadron, and in 
1818-1823 commanded Boston Navy Yard and Naval 
Station at Charleston, South Carolina. 

SHENANDOAH 

RIGID AIRSHIP 

Length, 680 feet Height, 93 feet Diameter, 78 feet, 9 inches 

Volume, 2,100,000 cubic feet 

Named Shenandoah, an Indian Name meaning 
"Daughter of the Stars" 

Launched October 10th, 1923, at Lakehurst, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edwin Denby (Marion Thurber), wife 
of the Secretary of the Navy. 

1 HIS first American rigid airship christened and com- 
missioned in the naval service was afterwards piloted by 
the sponsor for an hour and a half. Among those present 

[218] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



at the ceremonies were Secretary of the Navy Edwin Denby, 
Rear Admiral Moffett, Rear Admiral Scales, and officers 
from the Philadelphia Navy Yard, and Mrs. Russell C. 
Langdon, President of the Society of Sponsors. 

Washington Herald: "With martial music, fluttering flags, 
blare of trumpets and impressive ceremony, the Navy's 
new "ZR-i" was christened "Shenandoah" this after- 
noon and formally commissioned in the service. At the 
christening Mrs. Denby, standing in front of the control 
car, pulled a line which released a flock of carrier pigeons 
which wheeled about and then flew out of the hangar. Two 
dozen pigeons were released to fly to Washington, Anacostia, 
Hampton Roads and Dahlgren, Virginia. Two pigeons 
bore messages to President Coolidge in aluminum cartridges 
announcing the commissioning of the ship. Mrs. Denby 
pronounced the words "I name thee 'Shenandoah'" as 
the ship, lightened of ballast, rose upward in the shed. Small 
balloons were also released by the party in the forward car. 
The national anthem was then played and the ship hauled 
down and secured. Secretary Denby and Rear Admiral 
Moffett, Chief of the Bureau of Aeronautics, then delivered 
addresses and placed the ship in commission. Acceptance 
was made by Commander McCrary, first commander of 
the "Shenandoah." The crew, following the exercises, 
shifted into flight uniforms and prepared the ship for her 
first commissioned flight." 

SHIRK 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feel, 4 inches 

Named for Commander James W. Shirk, 
U.S. Navy 

Launched June 20, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Ida Lawlor Dunnigan, daughter of 
Mr. John S. Dunnigan, clerk of the Board of Supervisors, 
San Francisco. 

[219] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Commander james w. shirk, United States 

Navy, was born in Pennsylvania 1832; died 1873. Ap- 
pointed midshipman 1849; commander 1866. During the 
Civil War he was especially distinguished for service in the 
Mississippi Squadron. At Shiloh, April 6, 1862, his vessel 
the "Lexington," in company with the "Tyler," pre- 
vented the enemy from crossing and saved the army from 
defeat. He was later thanked by the Secretary of the Navy 
for this service. During the siege of Vicksburg, while in 
command of the "Tuscumbia," he was constantly under 
fire from May 19 to the time of surrender July 4, 1863. 
Commander July 25, 1866. 

SHUBRICK (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral William Branford 
Shubrick, U. S. Navy 

Launched December 31, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Mass. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Thomas F. Bayard (Mary Clymer), 
granddaughter of Rear Admiral W. B. Shubrick, U. S. 
Navy, and widow of Honorable Thomas F. Bayard, Secre- 
tary of State, under President Cleveland. 

Rear admiral william branford shu- 
brick, United States Navy, was born in South Carolina 
1790; died 1874. Appointed midshipman in 1806. He 
was a lieutenant on the "Constitution" when she captured 
the "Cyane" and "Levant" in 181 5. Active in the War 
with Mexico and captured the town of Mazatlan and other 
Mexican ports. Rear admiral (retired) July 16, 1862; 
awarded medal for service in War of 1812; commanded 
Pacific Squadron in 1847 during the Mexican W T ar. 

SICARD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 4 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

" 220] 




SPONSOR PULLING 
BOTTLE WHEN 



THE CORD 
NAMING 



THE 
"SHENANDOAH" 



TO BREAK THE 
AI R S H I P 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Rear Admiral Montgomery Sicard, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 20, 1920, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Montgomery H. Sicard (Adelaide Ire- 
land), daughter-in-law of Rear Admiral Montgomery Si- 
card, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral Montgomery sicard, u. s. 

Navy. Born in New York 1836; died 1900. Appointed 
midshipman, 1857; rear admiral, 1897; retired 1898. 
Served in the Home and East India Squadrons, 1855-1861; 
Civil War, 1861-1865, in the West Gulf Blockading Squad- 
ron. Commanded the "Oneida," 1863; 1 864-1 865 com- 
manded the "Ticonderoga," South Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron. Took part in attacks on Fort Fisher, December 
24 and 25, 1864, and in the land and naval assault on Fort 
Fisher, January 15, 1865. Chief of Bureau of Ordnance, 
1881-1890; 1897-1898, in command of the North Atlantic 
Squadron. Placed in charge of Board of Strategy, and 
while on this board took an important part in the conduct 
of the war with Spain. He was considered a distinguished 
ordnance expert. 

SIGOURNEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Midshipman James Butler Sigourney, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched December 16, 1917, Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Granville W. Johnson (Jeannette Fal- 
lon), wife of Mr. Granville Johnson of Boston, Massachu- 
setts. 

Midshipman james butler sigourney, 

United States Navy, was born in Boston. Appointed 
midshipman, 1809; served on "Wasp" under Capt. T. 

[221] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Robinson and Capt. James Lawrence; was sailing master of 
"Nautilus" and was captured in her shortly after com- 
mencement of War of 1812; after his exchange was placed 
in command of the "Asp," a schooner fitted out for defense 
of Chesapeake Bay; July 14, 1813, was attacked by three 
British barges but succeeded in driving them ofF; on a 
second attack the "Asp" was boarded and Sigourney was 
killed at his post on deck. 

SIMPSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Edward Simpson, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 28, 1920, at William Cramp and Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Caroline Sterett Simpson, daughter of 
Rear Admiral Edward Simpson, U. S. Navy. 

REAR ADMIRAL EDWARD SIMPSON, U. S. Navy, 
was born in New York, 1824; died 1888. Appointed mid- 
shipman, 1840; rear admiral, 1884; 1840-1843 attached to 
line of battleship "Independence"; 1845 "Congress," 
Brazil Station. War with Mexico: 1845 attached to the 
"Vixen" and took part in the attack on forts of Alvarado, 
Tobasco, and Tuxpan. The "Vixen" covered the landing 
of our Army at the siege of Vera Cruz and took part with 
the mosquito fleet in the bombardment of that city; 1856- 
1857 lieutenant on the "Portsmouth," East India Station; 
took part in the bombardment of the Barrier Forts in the 
Canton River, China. Civil War: Commanded monitor 
"Passaic" 1 863-1 864 in attacks on Forts Wagner, Sumter, 
Moultrie, and Battery Bee in Charleston Harbor; 1864 com- 
manded "Isonomia," East Gulf Blockading Squadron; 
1865 fleet captain West Gulf Blockading Squadron and en- 
gaged in operations against Mobile from March 27 to April 
12, 1865, when the city capitulated; 1 867-1 868 commanded 

" 222 ] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



the "Mohican," North Pacific Squadron. He was sent 
on a special mission to Europe, and was later in charge of 
the Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, and Com- 
mandant at the Naval Station, New London. He was con- 
sidered an authority on naval ordnance. 

SINCLAIR 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Arthur Sinclair, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched June 2, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George Barnett (Lelia Sinclair Mon- 
tague), great-granddaughter of Captain Arthur Sinclair, 
U. S. Navy, and wife of Major General Barnett, U. S. M.C. 

Captain arthur Sinclair, United states Navy, 

was born in Virginia; died at Norfolk, Virginia, 183 1. Ap- 
pointed midshipman 1798. Served on the "Constellation" 
in 1799. Commissioned lieutenant 1804; master command- 
ant 18 12; captain 18 13. In 1 807-1 809 on duty at Norfolk; 
1809-1811 in command of the "Nautilus"; 1811-1813 in 
command of the "Argus"; 1813 Sackett's Harbor; 1814 
Erie, Pennsylvania; 1817 in command of the "Congress"; 
1818 ordered to Washington; 1819 to command Naval 
Station at Norfolk. Took part in many brilliant engage- 
ments of the War of 1812; commanded the "Niagara" on 
Lake Huron in 18 14 and captured a number of the enemy's 
vessels. Captain Sinclair exerted himself for some time to 
get a nautical school established for the instruction of mid- 
shipmen, and the first nautical school commenced on board 
the frigate "Guerriere" at Norfolk on December 3, 1821, 
under the direction of Captain Sinclair, by orders of Sec- 
retary of the Navy Smith Thompson. 

SLOAT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[223] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Named for Rear Admiral John Drake Sloat, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 14, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edwin A. Sherman (Adaline Dodd), 
wife of Major Sherman, biographer of Rear Admiral John 
Drake Sloat, U. S. Navy, and largely instrumental in 
planning the monument to Rear Admiral Sloat at Monterey, 
California. 

REAR ADMIRAL JOHN DRAKE SLOAT, United States 
Navy, was born in Sloatbury, New York, 1781; died 1867. 
Appointed midshipman 1800; rear admiral on the retired 
list 1866. Was sailing master of the "United States" under 
Commodore Decatur and was promoted to lieutenant for 
conspicuous gallantry in the engagement with H. B. M. S. 
"Macedonian" and her capture October 25, 1812; was 
wounded during the fight but remained on deck; was in- 
cluded in the thanks of Congress to officers who took part 
in the engagement and awarded a silver medal. Commanded 
the Pacific Squadron 1 844-1 846, during the Mexican War. 
Under his direction the American flag was hoisted July 7, 
1846, in Monterey, California, and possession of that part 
of California was taken by the United States. Many im- 
portant commands on shore and made the plans of Mare 
Island Navy Yard. 

ROBERT SMITH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4. inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Robert Smith 

Launched September 19, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Jane Cooper, daughter of Mr. Oscar 
Cooper, prominent citizen of San Francisco. 

[224] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



SECRETARY OF THE NAVY ROBERT SMITH was 
born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, November, 1757; died 
1842. He was graduated from Princeton University in 
1781; was admitted to the bar, and settled in Baltimore; 
1793 became State senator from Maryland and was a mem- 
ber of the House of Delegates from 1 796-1 800. On Janu- 
ary 26, 1802, he became Secretary of the Navy and held that 
office until he was appointed Secretary of State in 1809. 

SOMERS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Richard Somers, 
U. S. Navy 

Launched December 28, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna Maxwell Jayne, daughter of 
Rear Admiral Joseph L. Jayne, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant richard somers, United states 

Navy, was born at Somers Point, New Jersey, 1778; killed 
by an explosion on the ''Intrepid" in the harbor of Tripoli, 
September 4, 1804. Appointed midshipman April 30, 1798. 
On September 4, 1804, he took the bomb vessel "Intrepid" 
into the harbor of Tripoli to destroy the enemy's fleet. 
The vessel had a quantity of powder on it and when fired 
upon it exploded, blowing it to atoms and killing all on 
board. 

SOUTHARD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feel, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Samuel Lewis Southard 

Launched March 31, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

[225] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Miss Francesca Lewis Stewart, great- 
granddaughter of Secretary of the Navy Samuel Lewis 
Southard. 

Secretary of the navy samuel lewis 

SOUTHARD was born in Basking Ridge, New Jersey, 
1787; died 1842. He was graduated at Princeton in 1804; 
became associate justice of the State supreme court in 18 15, 
was a presidential elector in 1820, and was chosen to the 
United States Senate as a Whig in place of James J. Wil- 
son, who had resigned, serving from February 16, 1821, 
until March 3, 1823. In September, 1823, he became 
Secretary of the Navy and served until March 3, 1829, 
acting also as Secretary of the Treasury from March 7 until 
July 1, 1825, and taking charge of the portfolio of War for 
a time. In 1829, he became attorney general of New Jersey, 
and in 1832 was elected governor. United States Senator 
again in 1833, and served until his resignation on May 3, 
1842. In 1841, on the death of President Harrison and the 
consequent accession of John Tyler, he became President 
of the Senate. 

SPROSTON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Lieutenant John G. Sproston, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 10, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George J. Denis (Alberta Johnston), 
Los Angeles, California. 

Lieutenant john g. sproston, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Maryland, and was killed in action June 8, 1862. 
Appointed midshipman 1846. Pacific station during war 
with Mexico. On November 1, 1861, at the Battle of Port 
Royal, South Carolina, he fired nearly all the 11-inch shells 
with his own hand. He took active part in operations of the 
South Atlantic blockading squadron on the coast and up 

[226] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



the rivers of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Was 
killed while on a boat expedition in St. Johns River, Florida. 
Was commended in a letter from Rear Admiral S. F. du 
Pont as "an able, brave, and devoted officer from the State 
of Maryland." 

STANSBURY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Lieutenant John Stansbury, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 16, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Eleanor Trevorrow, daughter 
of Lieutenant William J. Trevorrow, U. S. Navy, (Retired), 
Assistant Inspector of Machinery at Union Works. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN STANSBURY, U. S. Navy, was 
born in Baltimore, Maryland; killed in action September 11, 
18 14. Midshipman with Decatur in the capture of the 
"Macedonian" by the "United States" October 25, 1812; 
lieutenant on the "Ticonderoga" at the battle of Lake 
Champlain, during which battle he was killed. 

STEVENS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain Thomas Holdup Stevens, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched January 13, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Marie Christie Stevens, great-grand- 
daughter of Captain Thomas Holdup Stevens, U. S. Navy. 

Captain thomas holdup stevens, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Charleston, South Carolina, 1795; died January 
22, 1841; appointed midshipman January 16, 1809; at 
beginning of War of 18 12 he volunteered for service on the 

[227] 






SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Great Lakes, and was assigned to the Niagara frontier, where 
he rendered splendid service and at the attack on Black 
Rock; commander of the "Trippe" in the battle of Lake 
Erie; 1 823-1 824 commanded vessels in the West Indies in 
the suppression of piracy. Died in command of the Washing- 
ton Navy Yard. 

STEWART ( 2D ) ! 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, 1 1 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Charles Stewart, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 4, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Robert MacGregor Stevens (Mar- 
garetta Parnell Stewart), granddaughter of Rear Admiral 
Charles Stewart, U. S. Navy, and sister of Miss Frances 
Rodney Stewart, sponsor for U. S. S. "Stewart 1st," in 
1902. 

Rear admiral charles stewart, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1778; died 1869. 
Lieutenant March 9, 1808; senior flag officer, 1859; rear 
admiral, retired list, 1862. Distinguished in Naval War with 
France, 1 798-1 801. Took part in operations against Tripoli, 
1802-1805. Commanded the U. S. S. "Constitution" 1813- 
181 5, War of 1812; captured "Pictou" and merchant ves- 
sels; February 20, 1815, captured H. B. M. S. "Cyane" and 
"Levant." 1820-1824, commanded Pacific squadron. 1830- 
1832, Navy commissioner, included in thanks of Congress 
for gallant conduct in the war with Tripoli, and awarded a 
sword. Thanks of Congress and gold medal for service in 
War of 18 1 2. By special act of Congress, in recognition of 
his distinguished service, commissioned senior flag officer of 
the United States Navy. 

STOCKTON (2D) 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 5/5 feet Beam, 30 feet, 8 inches Draft, 8 feet, 4 inches 

[228] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Commodore Robert F. Stockton, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 17, 1917, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Ellen Emelie deMartelly, cousin of 
Mrs. Harold M. Whiteway, a granddaughter of Commo- 
dore Stockton. 

Commodore Robert field stockton, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Princeton, New Jersey, 1795; died 1866. 
He was appointed midshipman 181 1; captain 1838. He 
took part in the defense of Alexandria, Virginia, and Bal- 
timore, Maryland, during the War of 1812; served in War 
with Algiers in 181 5; commanded Mexican Squadron 1846- 
1847, Mexican War, and established provisional govern- 
ment of California; designed and superintended the build- 
ing of the steam frigate "Princeton," and was wounded by 
the bursting of one of the large guns of that vessel; resigned 
from the Navy May 28, 1850; United States Senator from 
New Jersey 1851-1852; was engineer of the Delaware & 
Raritan Canal. 

STODDERT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, n inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy Benjamin Stoddert 

Launched January 8, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Gavin McNab (Wilma Davidson), wife 
of Mr. Gavin McNab, a prominent citizen of San Francisco, 
California. 

Honorable benjamin stoddert, Secretary of 

the Navy 1798-1801, was born in Charles County, Maryland, 
1751; died 1813. In 1776, as captain of Cavalry in the Con- 
tinental Army, he was so severely wounded as to unfit him 
for active service. In May, 1798, he was appointed Sec- 

[229] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

retary of the Navy, being the first to hold the post, and so 
remained till March 4, 1801. He was Acting Secretary of 
War after the resignation of James Henry until his succes- 
sor, Samuel Dexter, took charge. When the Navy De- 
partment was created in 1798, the frigates "Constitution," 
"Constellation," and "United States" constituted the bulk 
of the American Navy. By the latter part of 1799, five frig- 
ates and 23 sloops of war were in commission. Mr. Stod- 
dert's experience in the mercantile marine, coupled with his 
tact, industry, and judgment, were valuable in the formation 
of this naval force. 

STRIBLING ! 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Cornelius K. Stribling, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 29, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Calvert Stribling, daughter 
of Mr. Cornelius Stribling, and granddaughter of Rear 
Admiral Cornelius K. Stribling, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral Cornelius k. stribling, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Pendleton, South Carolina, 1795; died 
January 17, 1880. Appointed midshipman January 18, 1812; 
rear admiral July 25, 1866; served in War of 1812 on U. S. S. 
"Mohawk," squadron on Lake Ontario; 1848, commanding 
ship of the line "Ohio" during Mexican War; superintendent 
Naval Academy, 1851-1853; special examining board, 1861; 
Lighthouse Board, 1862; commanded Philadelphia Navy 
Yard, 1863-1864; commanding East Gulf Blockading 
Squadron, 1865 (Civil War); Lighthouse Board, 1866- 
1872. 

STRINGHAM ( 2 d) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

[230] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Rear Admiral Silas Horton Stringham, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 30, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edward B. Hill (Leslie Farwell), wife 
of Mr. Edward B. Hill, Treasurer of Fore River Shipbuilding 
Corporation. 

Rear admiral silas horton stringham, 

U. S. Navy, was born in Middletown, Connecticut, 1798; 
died 1876; appointed midshipman 1810; rear admiral 1862; 
War of 18 1 2, on U. S. S. "President" in engagements with 
H. B. M. S. "Little Belt" and "Belvidere"; war with Bar- 
bary States, attached to the "Spark," and took part in 
operations against Algiers and capture of Algerine vessels; 
captured pirate schooner "Moscow" in the West Indies 
while attached to "Hornet"; commanded "Ohio" in Mexi- 
can War, and took part in attack on Vera Cruz; Civil War, 
in command of Atlantic squadron. 

STURTEVANT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, n inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Ensign Albert D. Sturtevant, 
U. S. Naval Reserve Force 

Launched July 29, 1920, at New York Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Curtis Ripley Smith (Ruth Sturtevant), 
only sister of Ensign Albert D. Sturtevant, U. S. Navy. 

Ensign albert d. sturtevant, u. s. Naval 

Reserve Force, was born in Washington, D. C, May 2, 
1894; commissioned ensign in the United States Naval 
Reserve Force, March 26, 1917; naval aviator May 1, 1917; 
ordered overseas Sept. 10, 1917; detailed to duty at Felix- 
stowe, England, November 26, 1917; shot down February 
15, 1918, when attacked by a squadron of German air- 
planes. 

[231] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



SUMNER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Allen Sumner, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched November 24, 1920, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Sumner, daughter of Captain 
Allen Sumner, U. S. Navy. 

Captain allen m. sumner, u. s. Marine 

Corps; born in Boston, Massachusetts, 1882; died in action 
in France, July 19, 1918; appointed second lieutenant in the 
Marine Corps, March 15, 1907; served continuously until 
January 1, 1914, when he resigned; appointed first lieuten- 
ant March 22, 1917; sailed for duty in France August 5, 1917; 
killed in action by enemy shell fire during the advance on 
Tigny July 19, 1918; buried on the field; posthumously 
awarded croix de guerre with gilt star. During the advance 
from Viercy he accompanied one of his platoons to the 
front, keeping all his men under cover while he alone 
watched for signals for the advance. In so doing he saved 
the lives of many of his men without regard for his own 
safety. 

SWALLOW 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Swallow 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Todd Shipyard Corporation, 
New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Sara V. Brereton, daughter of a foreman 
of the company. 

SWAN 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

[232] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for the bird Swan 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Alabama D. D. & S. B. Co., 
Mobile, Alabama. 

Sponsor: Miss Hazel Donaldson, daughter of Mr. 
W. S. Donaldson, Hull Superintendent of the company. 

SWASEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, u inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Charles H. Swasey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 7, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Lovering Swasey, grandniece of 
Lieutenant Charles H. Swasey, U. S. Navy, and daughter of 
the vice president of the HerreshofF Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 

Lieutenant charles h. swasey, United states 

Navy, was born in Massachusetts. Appointed midshipman 
1854; lieutenant 1861. He served on the "Varuna" in the 
engagement with the steamer "Governor Moore" below 
New Orleans, April 24, 1862; and as executive officer of 
the "Sciota," West Gulf Blockading Squadron, he fell 
mortally wounded during an engagement with the Con- 
federates near Donaldsonville, Louisiana, October 4, 1862, 
and died the same day. 

T-i ^ 

SUBMARINE 

Launched July 25, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Alvin Hovey-King (Lilian Hovey-King), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander Hovey-King, P. C, U. S. N., 
on duty at the works. 

[233] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

T-2 

SUBMARINE 

Launched September 6, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Madeline Everett, fiancee of Lieuten- 
ant Commander Ames Loder, U. S. Navy, Assistant In- 
spector of Machinery, at the works. 

T-3 

SUBMARINE 

Launched May 24, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John N. Jordan (Lilian Terhune), wife 
of Commander J. N. Jordan, P. C, U. S. Navy, on duty at 
the works. 

TALBOT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Captain Silas Talbot, U. S. Navy 

Launched February 20, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Daly Major, daughter of 
Representative Major of Missouri, and a descendant of 
Captain Silas Talbot, U. S. Navy. 

CAPTAIN SILAS TALBOT, United States Navy, was 
born in Dighton, Massachusetts, 1751 ; died 1813. Com- 
missioned captain by the State of Rhode Island in 1776; 
assigned to duty in charge of the boats in the Hudson River, 
and for gallantry in an attempt to destroy vessels of the 
British fleet in New York Harbor was promoted by the Con- 
tinental Congress to major October 10, 1776, and received 
its thanks. September 17, 1779, he was appointed a captain 
in the Continental Navy and ordered to command an armed 
naval force for the protection of the coast of Long Island 
Sound. Later he was twice made prisoner. 

[234] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



J. FRED TALBOTT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet 

Named for Representative J. Fred C. Talbott 

Launched December 14, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Robert Lee Bates (Laura Talbott 
Bosley), niece of Honorable J. Fred C. Talbott. 

Representative j. fred c. talbott, was bom 

near Lutherville, Maryland, 1843. Admitted to the bar 
September 6, 1866. In 1871 he was made prosecuting at- 
torney for Baltimore County. In 1877 was first elected to 
Congress, and served in the Forty-sixth, Forty-seventh, 
Forty-eighth, Fifty-third, Fifty-eighth, Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, 
Sixty-first, Sixty-second, Sixty-third and Sixty-fourth Con- 
gresses. He served 25 years on the Naval Affairs Commit- 
tee, and worked untiringly in his efforts to secure a greater 
number of ships and increase in personnel. 

TANAGER 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, Q feet, Q inches 

Named for the bird Tanager 

Launched March 2, 1918, at Staten Island S. B. Company, 
New York. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George H. Bates (Elizabeth M.), wife 
of the Secretary Treasurer of the Staten Island S. B. Com- 
pany. 

TARBELL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet 

Named for Captain Joseph Tarbell, U. S. Navy 

C 235] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched May 28, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Virgie Tarbell, collateral descendant of 
Captain Joseph Tarbell, U. S. Navy. 

Captain joseph tarbell, u. s. Navy, was bom 

about 1780, and died 1815. He was appointed a midshipman 
1798; captain, 1813. Served on the "Constitution" and 
other vessels of the Mediterranean Squadron 1 800-1 804, 
in the operations against Tripoli. June 19-23, 1813, com- 
manded boat expedition against ships of the British squad- 
rons ofFCraney Island, and in the James River. Commanded 
a flotilla of 15 boats, which after an action of an hour and a 
half drove off the enemy, sunk three of his boats and took 
43 prisoners. Capt. Tarbell was highly commended by Com- 
modore Cassin and the officers of the Army commanding 
forces ashore for his gallantry and assistance in the defense 
of Craney Island. He was included in the thanks of Con- 
gress to the officers and men of Commodore Preble's Squad- 
ron before Tripoli, 1804, and presented with a sword in 
recognition of his services. 

TATTNALL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, Q feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Josiah Tattnall, U. S. Navy 

Launched September 5, 1918, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Sarah Campbell Kollock, cousin of 
Captain Josiah Tattnall, U. S. Navy, whose father and 
brother are named for Captain Tattnall, U. S. Navy. 

CAPTAIN JOSIAH TATTNALL, United States Navy, 
was born in Savannah, Georgia, 1795; died 1871. Appointed 
midshipman, 1812; commissioned captain, 1850. 1812 
ordered to the "Constellation." Served in the seamen's 
battery on Craney Island which drove ofF the boats of the 

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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



British squadron and captured several barges attempting to 
land June 22, 1813. Took part in the sinking of the barge 
"Centipede." Commanded a force of the employees of the 
Washington Navy Yard and took part in the Battle of Bla- 
densburg, August 24, 1814. In 1814, ordered to the "Eper- 
vier," fitting out for the Mediterranean Squadron, and took 
part in the operations against the Algerines. 1 822-1 824 
attached to the Mosquito Fleet, under Commodore David 
Porter, in the West Indies for the suppression of piracy. 
183 1 commanded the "Grampus," West India Squadron. 
Captured the Mexican war schooner "Montezuma," which 
had illegally boarded and robbed an American schooner on 
the high seas, and took his 6j prisoners into Pensacola, 
Florida. Took prominent part in the attacks on Vera Cruz, 
San Juan d'Ulloa, Tuxpan, and other Mexican fortresses. 
Was presented with a sword by the State of Georgia for gal- 
lantry at Vera Cruz; was wounded in the arm at Tuxpan 
while leading in a division of boats. (At the outbreak of the 
Civil War he resigned. Commanded the C. S. S. "Merri- 
mac" in Hampton Roads March 8, 1862, in battle with 
"Monitor.") 

TAYLOR 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Henry Clay Taylor, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched February 14, 1918, at Mare Island Navy 
Yard, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Gorgas, daughter of Lieutenant- 
Commander Miles Gorgas, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral henry clay taylor, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Washington, D. C, 1845; died 1904. 
Appointed midshipman, i860; rear admiral, 1901; advanced 
five numbers for eminent and conspicuous conduct in battle 
during the war with Spain; served in the North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron (Civil War), 1 863-1 865; president 

[237] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Naval War College, 1893-1896; commanded battleship 
"Indiana," Spanish-American War; chief of Bureau of 
Navigation from April 29, 1902, until his death, July 26, 
1904. 

TEAL 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Teal 

Launched May 25, 1918, at Sun Shipbuilding Company, 
Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Agnes M. Haig, daughter of the vice 
president of the Sun Shipbuilding Company. 

TENNESSEE (sth) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 624 feet Beam, 97 feet, j| inches Draft, 30 feet, 5 inches 

Named for the State of Tennessee 

(Admitted to the Union in 1796) 

Launched April 30, 1919, at Navy Yard, New York, N. Y. 

Sponsor: Miss Helen Lenore Roberts, daughter of 
Governor A. H. Roberts, of Tennessee. 

A HE maids of honor were: Miss Evelyn Todd, Murfrees- 
boro, daughter of Lieutenant Governor; Miss Grace Hum- 
phreys, Lebanon; Miss Lura Celeste Hale, Murfreesboro; 
Miss Cornelia Bratten, Watertown; Miss Geraldine Ford, 
Gallatin; Miss Mary Elizabeth Maxwell, Cookeville; Miss 
Christine Maxwell, Cookeville; Miss Alix Field, Knoxville; 
Miss Mildred Welch, Nashville; Miss Ruth W 7 elch, Nash- 
ville; Miss Clara Wrenne Sumpter, Nashville; Miss Vir- 
ginia Bryson, Fayetteville, and Miss Mamie D. Long, 
Springfield. 

The Sponsors' "Prayer for our Navy" was offered by 
Chaplain Isaacs, U. S. Navy. 

[238] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Governor Roberts of Tennessee and a large party of 
officials were on the launching stand, together with Lieu- 
tenant Governor Todd: 

General M. C. McGannon, Nashville; General L. D. 
Smith, Knoxville; Colonel L. B. Humphreys, Lebanon; 
Colonel Caeser Thomas, Watertown; Colonel M. M. Ford, 
Gallatin; Colonel T. W. Wrenne, Nashville; Colonel A. G. 
Maxwell, Cookeville; Colonel Eli Riddleshimer, Nashville; 
Colonel J. M. Bracken, Dyersburg; Colonel S. E. Cleage, 
Knoxville; Colonel G. C. Davis, Knoxville; Colonel F. L. 
Pittman, Union City; Major Walter Hale, Murfreesboro; 
Captain George Welch, Jr., Nashville, and Colonel C. H. 
Bacon, London. 

The delegation from the Society of Sponsors were Mrs. 
Reynold T. Hall, Miss Ruth Lawrence, Mrs. Julia Long 
Knapp, Mrs. Russell C. Langdon, Mrs. Arthur T. Sutcliffe, 
Mrs. Daniel T. Worden, Mrs. Albert Mathews, Mrs. Sylvie 
De Long Mills and Mrs. George H. Rock. 

The armistice having been signed, war time instructions 
were revoked and an enormous concourse of people joyfully 
cheered as the battleship went down the ways, many Navy 
and Army officers and men recently returned from the war 
being present. 

The battleship "Tennessee" is the 5th to bear the name. 

"Tennessee 4th" later renamed "Memphis" was an 
armored cruiser launched in 1904. 

"Tennessee 3rd" was a steam sloop of war launched in 
1865 as "Madawaska" and name changed to "Tennessee." 

"Tennessee 2d" was an ironclad ram built in 1864 and 
captured from the Confederates by Admiral Farragut's fleet. 

"Tennessee 1st" was a side-wheel steamer blockade run- 
ner built in 1853, captured from the Confederates by Ad- 
miral Farragut's fleet and converted into a vessel of war. 

TERN 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 9 feet, Q inches 

Named for the bird Tern 

[239] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched March 22, 1919, at Consolidated Shipbuilding 
Corporation, New York City. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Bruce Scrimgeour (Anastasia Miller), 
wife of the General Manager of the corporation. 

THATCHER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Henry Knox Thatcher, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched August 31, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Doris Bentley, grandniece of Rear 
Admiral Henry Knox Thatcher, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral henry knox thatcher, u. s. ! 

Navy, was born in Thomaston, Maine, 1806; died 1880. 
Appointed a midshipman 1823; rear admiral 1866. 1823- 
1862 cruised on the Pacific, Mediterranean, African, and 
Pacific stations and held important positions at various 
shore stations. 1862-1863, commanded the U. S. S. "Con- 
stellation." 1864-1865, commanded the U. S. S. "Colo- 
rado" and a division of the North Atlantic Blockading 
Squadron in the attacks on Fort Fisher, December 24-25, 
1864, and January 13-15, 1865. After the fall of Fort 
Fisher he was appointed to command the West Gulf squad- 
ron and co-operated with the Army against Mobile, which 
surrendered with the forts and batteries on the 12th of 
April, 1865. On May 10, 1865, the Confederate forces in 
the waters of Alabama surrendered to Admiral Thatcher; 
the only remaining fortified points on the Gulf coast, Sa- 
bine Pass and Galveston, capitulated on the 25th of May 
and 2nd of June, 1865. 

THOMAS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

[240] 





Photo by New York Shipbuilding Corporation 
U.S. TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER "TATTNALI." 
TAKING THE WATER 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Lieutenant Clarence Case Thomas, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 191 8, at Newport News Shipbuilding & 
Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Evelyn Martin Thomas, widow of Lieu- 
tenant Clarence Case Thomas, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant clarence case thomas, u. s. 

Navy, was born at Grass Valley, California, 1886; died at 
sea April 28, 1917. Appointed midshipman in 1904; com- 
missioned lieutenant August 29, 1916; lost his life while in 
command of the armed guard crew of the steamship "Vac- 
uum" when that vessel was torpedoed by a German sub- 
marine on April 28, 1917; was the first United States Naval 
officer to lose his life in the War with Germany. 

THOMPSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Richard W. Thompson 

Launched January 15, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Herbert H. Harris (Florence Knowles), 
wife of the Marine Superintendent of the Company. 

Honorable richard wigginton Thompson, 

Secretary of the Navy, 1 877-1 881. Born in Virginia 1809. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1834, began to practice in 
Bedford, Indiana, and served in the lower house of the legis- 
lature in 1834-1836, and in the upper house 1836-1838. He 
was for a short time president pro tempore of the State 
Senate, and acting lieutenant governor. Served in Congress 
from 1841-1843, and 1847-1849. In 1867-1869 he was 
judge of the eighteenth circuit court of the State. On March 
12, 1877, he became Secretary of the Navy, resigning in 1881 
to become chairman of the American committee of the Pan- 
ama Canal Company. 

[241] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

SMITH THOMPSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feel, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Smith Thompson 

Launched July 14, 1919, at William Cramp and Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Edward Lloyd (Kate Everett Thompson), 
granddaughter of Secretary of the Navy Smith Thompson. 

Secretary of the navy smith Thompson 

was born in Stanford, Dutchess County, New York, 1768; 
died 1843; was graduated from Princeton College in 1788; 
associate justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New 
York 1802-1814; chief justice 1814-1818, when he was 
made Secretary of the Navy. He was later appointed As- 
sociate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, 
which position he held at the time of his death. He was one 
of the earliest men to suggest and work for a Naval Academy. 

THORNTON 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain James Shepard Thornton, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 22, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Marcia T. Davis, great-niece of Captain 
James Shepard Thornton, U. S. Navy. 

Captain james shepard Thornton, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Merrimack, New Hampshire, 1826; 
died 1875. Appointed midshipman 1841; captain 1872; 
during the Civil War he served on the "Bainbridge"; 
was executive officer of the flagship "Hartford" at the pas- 

[242] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



sage of the forts and batteries below New Orleans and had 
charge of the steam gunboat "Winona" in engagements at 
Mobile, where a reconnaissance of Fort Gaines in sounding 
approaches under fire was made and several Confederate 
steamers were destroyed. 

THRUSH 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Thrush 

Launched September 15, 191 8, at Pusey and Jones Com- 
pany, Gloucester, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John Edward Snyder (Minnie Webb), 
daughter of Commander W. H. Webb, U. S. Navy. 

TILLMAN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 
Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for United States Senator 
Benjamin Ryan Tillman 

Launched July 7, 1919, at Navy Yard, Charleston, South 
Carolina. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Y. Tillman, granddaughter of 
Senator Benjamin Ryan Tillman. 

HON. BENJAMIN RYAN TILLMAN was born in 
Edgefield County, South Carolina, in 1847; died in Washing- 
ton, D. C, July 3, 191 8. Elected Governor of South Caro- 
lina by the Democratic party in 1890 and re-elected 1892. 
Was elected U. S. Senator for four terms 1895-1918. Chair- 
man of the Naval Committee since 1913, and a most ardent 
advocate and promoter of a "big Navy." 

TINGEY (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, II inches Draft, 9 feel, 4 inches 

[243] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Named for Captain Thomas Tingey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched April 24, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Velora Arringdale, daughter of 
Mr. Jere Arringdale, Inspector of Construction at Squan- 
tum Works. 

CAPTAIN THOMAS TINGEY, U. S. Navy, was born in 
London, England, 1750; died 1829. Upon the reorganiza- 
tion of the Navy in 1794 the President made him a captain, 
his commission being dated September 3, 1798, and was as- 
signed to the command of the "Ganges," which, with three 
other ships, formed a squadron to cruise in the West Indies 
during the War with France, 1798-1799; in 1800 he was 
called to Washington to establish the Washington Navy 
Yard, of which he became commandant, holding that posi- 
tion until his death. 

TOUCEY 

TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy Isaac Toucey 

Launched September 5, 1919, Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Alden Robinson, great-great- 
grandniece of Secretary of the Navy, Isaac Toucey. 

Secretary of the navy isaac toucey. Bom 

in Newton, Connecticut, 1796; died 1869. Was admitted 
to the bar in 18 18 at Hartford, where he afterwards prac- 
tised; appointed Attorney General of the United States, 
serving from June 21, 1848, to March 3, 1849. Was also for 
part of this time Acting Secretary of State. He was a mem- 
ber of the State Senate in 1850 and of the State house of 
representatives in 1852; was elected United States Senator 
from Connecticut on May 14, 1852, serving until 1857; be- 
ll 244 ] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



came Secretary of the Navy on March 6, 1857, and served 
until March 3, 1861. 

TRACY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Benjamin Franklin Tracy 

Launched August 12, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Frank Brodhead Tracy (Elizabeth 
Cornell), daughter-in-law of Secretary Benjamin Franklin 
Tracy. 

Secretary of the navy benjamin frank- 
lin TRACY was born in Oswego, New York, 1830; died 
in 1915. Was admitted to the bar in 1851. In 1861 he was 
a member of the State assembly; 1862 he recruited the One 
Hundred and Ninth and One Hundred and Thirty-seventh 
New York Volunteers and became colonel of the former. 
For his gallantry in the Battle of the Wilderness he received 
the congressional medal of honor in 1895. At the close of 
hostilities he was brevetted brigadier general of volunteers. 
From 1866 to 1873 he was United States district attorney 
of New York, and from 1881 to 1883 was associate judge 
of the State Court of appeals. Secretary of the Navy, 
1 889-1 893. 

TRENTON (2D) 

LIGHT CRUISER 

Length, 555 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, 14 feet, 3 inches 

Named for the City of Trenton, capital of New Jersey 

Launched April 16, 1923, at William Cramp & Sons' Ship- 
building Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John M. Haulenbeck (Katherine Don- 
nelly), daughter of Honorable Frederick W. Donnelly, 
Mayor of Trenton. 

[245] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



.MONG those on the launching stand were Mayor Don- 
nelly, Mrs. Donnelly, Mayor Moore, of Philadelphia, Rear 
Admiral and Mrs. Scales, Captain and Mrs. Robert, Mrs. 
Russell Langdon, President Society of Sponsors, and officers 
of the Naval Station. 

The first "Trenton" was a sloop of war of 2300 tons, 
launched in 1876. 

TREVER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Commander George A. Trever 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 15, 1920, at Navy Yard, Mare Is- 
land, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Bess McMillan Trever, widow of Lieu- 
tenant Commander George A. Trever, U. S. Navy. 

L/IEUTENANT COMMANDER GEORGE A. TREVER, 

United States Navy, was born in Waupun, Wisconsin, June 
11, 1885; appointed midshipman, 1905; ensign, 191 1; 
lieutenant (junior grade), 1914; lieutenant, 1917; lieu- 
tenant commander, 1918, in command of the U. S. S. O-5; 
died October 5, 191 8, while engaged in preventive measures 
to avert an explosion. 

TRUXTUN (30) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, II inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Commodore Thomas Truxtun, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 28, 1920, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Isabelle Truxtun Brumby, great- 
great-granddaughter of Commodore Truxtun. The spon- 
[246] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



sor's mother was the sponsor for U. S. S. "Truxton (2d) " 
in 1901. 

loMMODORE THOMAS TRUXTUN, United States 
Navy, was born on Long Island, 1755; died 1822. Entered 
the merchant service at the age of 12. Impressed on an 
English frigate. Offered a midshipman's appointment — 
declined it. Returned to America. Commanded several 
privateers during the War of the Revolution, was successful 
in making prizes. June 4, 1794, commissioned captain in 
the United States Navy. Ordered to the "Constellation"; 
cruised the West Indies in the War with France, 1798-1800. 
Engaged and captured the French frigate "LTnsurgente," 
of 50 guns, February 9, 1799, and captured two other 
vessels. February 2, 1800, fought to a surrender the French 
frigate "La Vengeance," also of 50 guns, but she escaped 
in the darkness during a heavy squall. The mainmast of 
the "Constellation" having fallen overboard she could not 
pursue her prize. For his distinguished service Truxtun 
was awarded a gold medal and received the thanks of 
Congress. 

TUCKER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 3/5 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4% inches 

Named for Captain Samuel Tucker, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 4, 191 5, at Fore River Shipbuilding 
Company, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Garty (Mary Hinds), great- 
great-granddaughter of Captain Samuel Tucker, U. S. Navy. 

CAPTAIN SAMUEL TUCKER, United States Navy, 
was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts, in 1747. At the 
outbreak of the Revolutionary War received his first com- 
mission from George Washington, placing him in command 
of the armed schooner "Franklyn." In 1777 commissioned 
captain in the Navy and given command of the U. S. frig- 
ate "Boston" in which he was commissioned by Congress 

[247] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



to convey John Quincy Adams as our envoy to France. 
His whole career was crowned by deeds of valor and courage, 
and as his biographer has said, "Samuel Tucker took more 
prizes, fought more sea fights and gained more victories, 
with a few exceptions, than any naval hero of the age," 
but it remained for a later day to honor his memory, the 
national government giving his name to the U. S. Destrover 
"Tucker." 

TULSA 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 241 feet Beam, 41 feet Draft, 11 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Tulsa, Oklahoma 

Launched August 25, 1922, at the Navy Yard, Charleston, 
South Carolina. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Vera McBirney, daughter 
of Mr. James H. McBirney, a leading citizen and banker of 
Tulsa and selected by the Mayor of Tulsa as being one- 
sixteenth Creek Indian. 

TURKEY 
mine sweeper 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Turkey 

Launched April 30, 1918, at Chester Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William T. Smith (Gertrude Hammond), 
wife of the first vice president of the Shipbuilding Company. 

TURNER 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Daniel Turner, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 17, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Leigh C. Palmer (Bessie Draper), wife 

[248] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



of Captain L. C. Palmer, U. S. Navy, Chief of Bureau of 

Navigation at the time. 

^APTAIN DANIEL TURNER, United States Navy, 
was born in New York; died 1850. Appointed midshipman 
1808. Captain, 1835. Commanded the "Caledonia" in 
the battle of Lake Erie, September 10, 1813, and was com- 
mended for the good management of his vessel. In 18 15 
was with Commodore Perry in the Mediterranean. Held 
various important positions ashore. Was included in the 
thanks of Congress to Commodore Perry, and was awarded 
a silver medal for distinguished service on the Lakes. 

TWIGGS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Major Levi Twiggs, U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched September 28, 1918, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Lillie S. Getchell, granddaughter of 
Major Levi Twiggs, U. S. M. C. 



Maj( 



OR LEVI TWIGGS, U. S. Marine Corps, was ap- 
pointed second lieutenant November 10, 1813. He was 
killed in battle September 13, 1847, at the storming of the 
castle of Chapultepec in the Mexican War. Major Twiggs 
served during the War of 1812, and commanded the Marines 
on the U. S. S. "President" during the engagement between 
that vessel and the British ships "Majestic," "Endymion," 
"Pomona" and "Tenedos" in January, 18 15. He served 
with the Marines, co-operating with the Army in the 
campaigns against the Indians in Georgia and Florida in 
1836 and 1837. Major Twiggs was in command of the volun- 
teer division of General Scott's Army, which with a pioneer 
party of seventy, under command of Capt. J. G. Reynolds, 
also of the Marines, were placed at the head of the column 
which stormed the castle of Chapultepec, Major Twiggs 
being killed while leading the assault. 

[249] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



UPSHUR 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Rear Admiral John H. Upshur, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched July 4, 1918, at William Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Alexander Gustavus Brown (Kate 
Upshur), granddaughter of Rear Admiral John Henry Up- 
shur, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral john henry upshur, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Northampton County, Virginia, 1823; 
died 1917. Appointed a midshipman 1841; rear admiral 
1884. From 1842 to 1847 on the "St. Mary's" in the Gulf 
of Mexico took part in the expedition against Tampico, 
and was with the naval battery at the bombardment of Vera 
Cruz March 10-25, l8 47> War with Mexico. He was ac- 
tively employed in the Mediterranean, East India, and Afri- 
can Squadrons; on ordnance duty Washington Navy Yard 
and United States Naval Academy from 1848 to 1861; was 
passed midshipman on the "Supply" with Commodore 
Perry's expedition to Japan, 1853— 1856; during the Civil 
War took part in the capture of the forts at Hatteras In- 
let and operations in the Sounds of North Carolina, 1861; 
served as executive officer of the frigate "Wabash" at the 
capture of Port Royal, South Carolina; served in the South 
Atlantic blockading squadron and took part in operations 
against Charleston, South Carolina, 1862-1863; participated 
in engagements of December, 1864, and January, 1865, re- 
sulting in the capture of Fort Fisher, North Carolina; com- 
manded the Pacific Squadron 1882-1884. 

ABEL P. UPSHUR 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feel, n inches Draft, 9 feet 

[250] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Abel P. Upshur 

Launched February 14, 1920, at Newport News S. B. & 
D. D. Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George J. Benson (Elizabeth Upshur), 
great-great-niece of Secretary Abel P. Upshur. 

Secretary of the navy abel p. upshur was 

born in Northampton County, Virginia, 1790; killed on the 
U. S. S. "Princeton" February 28, 1844. He was admitted 
to the bar in 18 10; elected to the State Legislature of Vir- 
ginia in 1826; judge of the general court in 1829. On Sep- 
tember 13, 1841, he was appointed Secretary of the Navy 
and held that position until July 23, 1843, when he became 
Secretary of State. On February 28, 1844, he accompanied 
a party of distinguished persons down the Potomac on the 
"U. S. S. "Princeton" to witness some experiments in firing 
a new iron gun of unusual size. On the return trip the gun 
was fired a third time and burst, killing six and wounding a 
number of those on board. 

VIREO 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feel Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Vireo 

Launched May 26, 1919, at Philadelphia Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Elizabeth Stark Robert, daughter of 
Captain William P. Robert, C. C, U. S. Navy, Construc- 
tion Officer of the Yard. 

WADSWORTH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 3 inches 

Named for Commodore Alexander S. Wadsworth, 

U. S. Navy 

[251] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched April 29, 191 5, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Juanita Doane Wells, granddaughter 
of Commodore Alexander S. Wadsworth, U. S. Navy. 

Commodore Alexander scammell wads- 
worth, United States Navy, was born in Portland, Maine, 
1790; died 1851. Appointed midshipman 1804; captain 
1825. Served as 2d lieutenant on the "Constitution" dur- 
ing her escape from the British fleet, and in the engagement 
with the "Guerriere," August 19, 1812. Received a silver 
medal and thanks of Congress. April 27, 1816, was promoted 
to Master Commandant (Commander) for gallant service 
during the War of 18 12. Served in the Mediterranean, 
West Indian and Pacific Squadrons. Navy Commissioner 
1837-1840. Inspector of Ordnance 1841-1850. 

WAINWRIGHT 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 5/5 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 8 inches 

Named for Commander Richard Wainwright, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June 12, 1915, at New York Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Evelyn Wainwright Turpin, great- 
granddaughter of Commander Richard Wainwright, U. S. 

Navy. 

Commander richard wainwright, United 

States Navy, was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, 18 17; 
died in New Orleans, Louisiana, August 16, 1862. Ap- 
pointed midshipman, May 11, 183 1; commissioned lieu- 
tenant, September 8, 1841; commander, April 24, 1861. 
Served: On the Coast Survey and Home Station from 1841 
to 1857. Cruised in the steam frigate "Merrimack," special 
service, 1 857-1 860. Civil W T ar: 1861, ordered to command 
the "Hartford," Admiral Farragut's flagship, West Gulf 

[252] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Blockading Squadron. April 24-25, 1862, during the pas- 
sage of the forts below New Orleans rendered conspicuous, 
gallant service in extinguishing the fire on the "Hartford," 
caused by a Confederate fire-raft, while continuing the bom- 
bardment of the forts. Wainwright participated in the 
operations of the fleet below Vicksburg until taken ill with 
fever. Highly commended by Admiral Farragut. 

WALKER 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 1 inch 

Named for Rear Admiral John Grimes Walker, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 14, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuild- 
ing Company, Fore River, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Mrs. John J. Thomas (Frances Walker), daugh- 
ter of Rear Admiral John Grimes Walker, U. S. Navy. 

Rear admiral john grimes walker, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Hillsborough, New Hampshire, 1835; 
died 1907. Appointed acting midshipman 1850; rear ad- 
miral 1894. During the Civil War served with distinction 
on board the U. S. S. "Connecticut," "Winona," "Baron 
De Kalb," and "Saco," which vessels were engaged in 
operations on the Mississippi River and along the Atlantic 
coast. In 1862 was present at engagements with Forts 
Jackson and St. Philip and Chalmette batteries at the cap- 
ture of New Orleans, and took part in the operations against 
Vicksburg, including the passage of the batteries both ways. 
In 1862-1863 participated in the operations against Haines 
Bluff", Arkansas Post; took part in the Yazoo Pass expedi- 
tion, the attack on Fort Pemberton, and the capture of 
Yazoo City. During the siege of Vicksburg was in com- 
mand of naval battery with Fifteenth Army Corps. 

WARBLER 
mine sweeper 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 55 feet Draft, Q feet, 9 inches 

[253] 



ships of the united states navy 

Named for the bird Warbler 

Launched July 30, 1919, at U. S. Navy Yard, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Kempff, daughter of Captain C. S. 
Kempff, U. S. Navy, Inspection Officer at the Navy Yard. 

AARON WARD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet 

Named for Rear Admiral Aaron Ward, U. S. Navy 

Launched April 10, 1919, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Washington Lee Capps (Edna Ward), 
daughter of Rear Admiral Aaron Ward, U. S. Navy, and 
wife of Rear Admiral W. L. Capps, C. C, U. S. Navy. 

REAR ADMIRAL AARON WARD, United States 
Navy, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1851; died 
July 5, 1918. Entered the Navy as midshipman in 1867; or- 
dered to the Pacific station, serving on the "California" from 
1871 to 1873. He then served on the "Brooklyn" in the West 
Indies until 1874 and on the " Franklin " on the European sta- 
tion from 1875 to 1876. Then followed a tour of duty at 
the Naval Academy from 1876 to 1879; service on the "Con- 
stitution," training squadron, from 1879 to 1882; and, 
from 1882 to 1885, professional duty of various kinds at the 
torpedo station at Newport and the New York Navy Yard. 
From 1885 to 1888 he served on the "Hartford" and "Mo- 
nongahela" on the Pacific station. In 1889-1892, attache 
at Paris, Berlin, and St. Petersburg; 1893-1894 he served 
on the "New York" in the West Indies and Brazil; and in 
1 894-1 896 on the "San Francisco" in the Mediterranean. 
During the Spanish-American War he commanded the 
"Wasp," and as a result of his gallantry he was recommended 
and received promotion for "eminent and conspicuous con- 
duct in battle." 

[254] 




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AND THEIR SPONSORS 



WARD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, II inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Commander James Harman Ward, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched June I, 1918, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Hall Ward, great-granddaugh- 
ter of Commodore James Harman Ward, U. S. Navy. 

Commander james harman ward, u. s. Navy, 

was born 1806 in Hartford, Connecticut; killed in action 
June 27, 1 86 1, the first officer of the United States Navy 
during the Civil War. Appointed midshipman 1823; com- 
mander 1853. On April 22, 1861, he proposed to the Navy 
Department the creation of a "flying flotilla" to operate 
in the opening of the Potomac River. He was appointed to 
fit out this flotilla and command it. On May 20, 1861, with 
the converted steamboat "Thomas Freeborn" and three 
other improvised gunboats, he attacked and silenced the 
Confederate batteries at Aquia Creek, Virginia, the first 
naval engagement of the Civil War. On June 27, 1861, he 
planned a landing expedition against Matthias Point, Vir- 
ginia, and was killed during the bombardment while in the 
act of sighting one of the guns. 

WASHINGTON (5™) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 624 feet Beam, 97 feet, 3 inches Draft, 30 feet, 6 inches 

Named for the State of Washington 

{Admitted to the Union in 1889) 

Launched Sept. I, 1921, at New York Shipbuilding 
Company, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Jean Summers, daughter of Representa- 
tive John W. Summers, member of Congress from Wash- 
ington. 

[255] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

A HE "Washington" was baptized with commingled water 
from the rivers of Washington State. 

The sponsors' "Prayer for our Navy" was offered just 
before the ship was launched. Among those on the launch- 
ing stand were Rear Admiral Thomas Washington, repre- 
senting the Navy Department; Rear Admiral Nulton, 
commandant of the Navy Yard; Rear Admiral T. R. Hall, 
and other officials. The Society of Sponsors was repre- 
sented by Mrs. Russell Langdon, president, Mrs. Henry 
Beates and others. 

The first "Washington," named for George Washington, 
was a galley with eight guns and eighty men. She was 
captured by the British in a fight on Lake Champlain in 
1776. 

The second "Washington" was a ship of 32 guns, built 
at Philadelphia in 1776. 

The third "Washington " was a ship of 2250 tons, launched 
in 1814. 

The fourth "Washington" was an armored cruiser named 
for the state of Washington and launched in 1905, renamed 
"Seattle" in 1916. 

WASMUTH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Henry Wasmuth, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched September 15, 1920, at Mare Island Navy 
Yard, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Gertrude Elizabeth Bennet, step- 
daughter of Major Russell H. Davis, U. S. M. C. 

HENRY WASMUTH, United States Marine Corps, 
saved the life of "Fighting Bob" Evans at the attack on 
Fort Fisher at the risk of his own and was killed during the 
engagement. 

[256] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



WATERS 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feel Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Captain Daniel Waters, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched March 9, 1918, at William Cramp and Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Borland Thayer, daughter of 
Captain George C. Thayer, Captain of the Philadelphia 
City Troop, and formerly an official of the Shipbuilding 
Company. 

CAPTAIN DANIEL WATERS, U. S. Navy; appointed 
January, 1776, to command the schooner "Lee," and cap- 
tured several valuable transports. In 1778, commanding 
the privateer "Thorn" he engaged the British ship "Gov- 
ernor Tryon" and the "Sir William Erskine," and after an 
engagement of two hours captured both, and a few days 
later captured the " Sparlin." He was appointed by Congress 
a captain of the Navy March 15, 1777, upon the recom- 
mendation of Gen. Washington, by whom he had been em- 
ployed, and who wrote of him in terms of high approbation. 

WELLES 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Gideon Welles 

Launched May 8, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, Quincy, Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss Alma Freeman Welles, granddaughter 
of Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles. 

HON. GIDEON WELLES, Secretary of the Navy, 1861 
to 1869. Born in Glastonbury, Connecticut, 1802; died 1878; 
1827-1835 was a member of the State legislature; 1835, 

[257] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

1842, and 1843 was State comptroller, serving as postmaster 
of Hartford in the intervening years. From 1846 until 1849 
he was Chief of the Bureau of Provisions and Clothing in the 
Navy Department. In his first report as Secretary of the 
Navy he announced the increase of the effective naval force 
from 42 to 82 vessels; this and the subsequent increase in a 
few months to more than 500 vessels was largely due to his 
energy. 

WEST VIRGINIA ( 2 d) 

BATTLESHIP 

Length, 624 feet Beam, 97 feet, $\ inches Draft, 30 feet, 6 inches 

Named for the State of West Virginia 

{Became a separate State in 1863) 

Launched November 19, 1921, at Newport News Ship- 
building and Drydock Co., Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Alice Wright Mann, daughter of Mr. 
Isaac T. Mann, prominent citizen of West Virginia. Maids 
of honor were Miss Eleanor Williams, and Miss Mary Hellen. 

.MONG those present on the launching stand were Gov- 
ernor E. F. Morgan of West Virginia, Congressman Goody- 
koontz, Mr. John Marshall, Brigadier General Hersey, 
U. S. A., Rear Admiral Philip Andrews and officers of the 
Norfolk Navy Yard, Mrs. Hall, President of the Society of 
Sponsors, Mr. Watters Martin, Mr. Homer Ferguson, Presi- 
dent of the Shipbuilding Company. Hampton Roads was 
filled with craft of every description, laden with people eager 
to view the impressive spectacle. The housetops and sur- 
rounding land were a mass of cheering humanity. 

The first "West Virginia" was an armored cruiser launched 
in 1903 and renamed "Huntingdon" for Huntingdon, West 
Virginia. 

WHIPPLE (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain Abraham Whipple, U. S. Navy 
[258] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched November 6, 1919, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Gladys V. Mulvey, great-great-great- 
granddaughter of Captain Abraham Whipple, U. S. Navy. 

Captain Abraham Whipple, u. s. Navy, was bom 

in Providence, Rhode Island, 1733; died 1819. In the 
French War, 1 759-1 760, he won distinction in command of 
the "Game Cock"; captured 23 prizes. June 18, 1772, he 
commanded the party of volunteers who captured and 
burned the British revenue schooner "Gaspee," which ran 
ashore while in chase of the Providence packet "Hannah." 
This was considered the first overt act of resistance against 
Great Britain by the colonies. June, 1775, Rhode Island 
sent out two vessels under Whipple, who captured and 
brought in the "Rose." December 22, 1775, Congress 
appointed Capt. Whipple third on the list of captains in the 
Continental Navy and gave him command of the "Colum- 
bus." August of this same year, off the northeast coast of 
America, Capt. Whipple captured the "Royal Exchange," 
with valuable cargoes. The "Columbus" was chased ashore 
on Point Judith and burned April 1, 1778. Upon the rear- 
rangement of the officers of the Continental Navy, October 
10, 1776, Whipple was placed No. 12 on the list and the 
"Providence" assigned to him. In her he made many 
prizes, and was captured on her at Charleston, South Caro- 
lina, May 12, 1780, and kept a prisoner until the close of the 
war. 

WHIPPOORWILL 

MINE SWEEPER 

Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Whippoorwill 

Launched January 28, 1919, at Alabama Dry Dock & 
Shipbuilding Company, Mobile, Alabama. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Inez Evans, daughter of 
Mr. W. M. Evans, vice president of the company. 

[259] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



WHITNEY 

DESTROYER TENDER 

Length, 483 feet Beam, 61 feet Draft, 21 feet 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
William C. Whitney 

Launched at Navy Yard, Boston, Massachusetts, October 
12, 1923. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Roderick Tower (Flora Whitney), grand- 
daughter of Secretary of the Navy William C. Whitney. 

HONORABLE WILLIAM C. WHITNEY was Secretary 
of the Navy, 1885-1889. Born in Conway, Massachusetts, 
in 1841; was educated at Yale and Harvard and settled in 
New York City, where he was admitted to the bar. As 
corporation counsel of the City of New York, 1875-1882, 
he completely reorganized and simplified the work of this 
office, thereby effecting great economy. In 1885 he became 
Secretary of the Navy and was a powerful advocate of naval 
expansion. He advocated that the ships of our Navy should 
equal the best in the world and under his administration 
great progress was made in the building of the new Navy. 
Two battleships, the "Maine" and "Texas" were author- 
ized; also one armored cruiser, four gunboats; one practice 
vessel, one ram, one torpedo boat and one dynamite cruiser. 
He changed the Washington Navy Yard to the Naval Gun 
Factory. He died in 1904. 

WICKES 
torpedo boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Captain Lambert Wickes, 
U.S. Navy 

Launched June 25, 1918, at Bath Iron Works, Bath, 
Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Ann Elizabeth Young Wickes, daugh- 
ter of Doctor Walter Wickes, a relative of Captain Lam- 
bert Wickes, U. S. Navy. 

[260] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



•APTAIN LAMBERT WICKES, United States Navy, 
was born in Kent County, Maryland, about 1735; lost at 
sea, off the coast of Newfoundland, October, 1777. Ap- 
pointed by Continental Congress December 22, 1775, and 
commissioned captain October 10, 1776; commanded "Re- 
prisal" in 1776, and being ordered to West Indies for arms 
and ammunition captured four merchant vessels on the 
voyage. In 1776 conveyed Benjamin Franklin to France, 
capturing two brigs on the voyage and was the first Man of 
War to appear in European waters. June to August, 1777, 
cruised around Ireland, capturing 15 vessels in five days; 
on return voyage to the United States the "Reprisal" 
foundered off the coast of Newfoundland. 

WIDGEON 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Widgeon 

Launched May 5, 191 8, at Sun Shipbuilding Corporation, 
Chester, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Mildred Moyer, selected by Lieutenant 
Raymond Bitzer, U. S. Navy, on duty at the works. 

WILKES (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 29 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, si inches 

Named for Rear Admiral Charles Wilkes, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched May 18, 1916, at Williams Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Carrie McIver Wilkes, great-grand- 
daughter of Rear Admiral Charles Wilkes, U. S. Navy. 

REAR ADMIRAL CHARLES WILKES, United States 
Navy, was born in New York in 1801. Appointed midship- 

[261] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



man in 1818. In 1838-1842 commanded the wonderfully 
successful exploring expedition that went around the world. 
Author of "Meteorology," "Western America" and "The- 
ory of the Winds." In 1861, in command of the "San 
Jacinto," took from the English passenger steamer "Trent" 
the Confederate commissioners to England, Mason and 
Slidell. Was complimented by the Secretary of the Navy, 
although the prisoners had to be given up. In 1862 com- 
manded the James River Flotilla. In 1863 commanded 
Special Blockade Squadron in the West Indies. 

WILLETT 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Willett 

Launched September 11, 1919, at U.S. Navy Yard, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Caroline Chantry, daughter of Com- 
mander A. J. Chantry, C. C, U. S. Navy, on duty at the 
Navy Yard. 

WILLIAMS 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 2 inches 

Named for Captain John Foster Williams 

Launched July 4, 1918, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Harry Gerard Leopold (Mary Downey), 
wife of Commander H. G. Leopold, U. S. Navy. 

Captain john foster williams, u. s. Navy, 

was born in Boston, Massachusetts, October 12, 1743; died 
June 24, 1814. Appointed a captain in the Massachusetts 
State Navy, commanding the "Hazard" in 1779 he captured 
the "Active"; 1780, commanding the "Protector," he 
fought the letter of marque "Admiral Duff," which blew 
up after a spirited engagement of an hour and a half. 

[262] 



4 



a 




P/;o/o iy jVw York Shipbuilding Corporation 
U.S. TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

LEAVING THE WAYS 



"WAI NWRIGHT" 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



WILLIAMSON 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Lieutenant Commander William Price 
Williamson, U. S. Navy 

Launched October 16, 1919, at New York Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Camden, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William Price Williamson (Florence 
Bean), widow of Lieutenant Commander William Price 
Williamson, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant commander william price 

WILLIAMSON, United States Navy, was born in Norfolk, 
Virginia, 1884; appointed midshipman, 1903; ensign, 1908; 
lieutenant (junior grade), 1910; lieutenant, 1914; lieuten- 
ant commander, 1917. Served, 1907-1909, battleship 
"Kansas," Atlantic Fleet;. 1910-1911, duty in the Bureau 
of Ordnance (instruction); 1912-1914, battleship "Utah," 
flagship, Atlantic Fleet; 1915-1916, inspection duty, Bu- 
reau of Ordnance; 1916-1917, ordnance duty, Olongapo; 
191 8, April 4, ordered to duty in connection with the fitting 
out of the "Orizaba," and when the vessel was commissioned 
became her executive officer. He was killed instantly by 
explosion of a depth charge on that vessel August 17, 1918. 

WINSLOW (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 303 feet Beam, 30 feet Draft, 9 feet, 5% inches 

Named for Rear Admiral John A. Winslow, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched February 11, 191 5, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Natalie Emelie Winslow, daughter of 
Rear Admiral C. McR. Winslow, U. S. Navy, a cousin of 
Rear Admiral John A. Winslow, U. S. Navy. 

[263] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

REAR ADMIRAL JOHN A. WINSLOW, United States 
Navy, was born in North Carolina in 1811. Appointed 
midshipman in 1827. Served gallantly in Mexican War. 
For gallantry at Tobasco was commended by Commodore 
Perry. In the Civil War was in command of the Mississippi 
Flotilla, 1861-1862. Commanded the "Kearsarge" when 
she sank the "Alabama," June 19, 1864, in the famous fight 
off* Cherbourg. For this action Captain Winslow was pro- 
moted to the rank of Commodore. 

WOOD 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Medical Director William Maxwell 

Wood, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. George Kirkham Smith (Lisa Wood), 
granddaughter of Medical Director William Maxwell Wood, 

U. S. Navy. 

Medical director william maxwell 

WOOD, U. S. Navy, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 
1809; died 1880. Appointed assistant surgeon 1829; medi- 
cal director 1871. Took active part in the Mexican War 
and received the commendation of Commodore Sloat for 
bringing him valuable information "at the risk of his life," 
which induced the commodore to take possession of Cali- 
fornia; was commended by the chairman of the Naval 
Commitee of the Senate for services rendered on this oc- 
casion. Civil War, 1861-1865, served in the North Atlantic 
Blockading Squadron. Held position of Chief of Bureau of 
Medicine and Surgery 1 870-1 871. 

WELBORN c wood 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

[264] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Ensign Welborn C. Wood, 
U. S. Navy 
Launched March 6, 1920, at Newport News S. B. & 
D. D. Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Virginia Mary Tate, daughter of Con- 
gressman Farish Carter Tate, was selected by the family of 
Ensign Welborn C. Wood to name the ship. 

ENSIGN WELBORN C. WOOD, U. S. Navy, was born 
in Georgia, 1876; killed in action September 17, 1899, at 
Orani, Philippine Islands. Appointed naval cadet 1895; 
graduated from the Naval Academy in January, 1899. On 
September 17, 1899, while commanding the gunboat "Ur- 
daneta," engaged in patrolling the Orani River, Manila 
Bay, for the purpose of preventing the introduction of sup- 
plies of food and materials of war to the insurgent Filipi- 
nos, the vessel went aground in the mud and was attacked 
by a band of insurgents. In the engagement which fol- 
lowed Ensign Wood was killed and all under his command 
were either killed or captured. 

WOODBURY 
TORPEDO boat destroyer 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Secretary of the Navy 
Levi Woodbury 

Launched February 6, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Catherine Muhlenberg Chapin, 
daughter of Mr. W. W. Chapin, publisher of the "Oak- 
land Enquirer." 

HON. LEVI WOODBURY was born in Francestown, 
New Hampshire, 1789; died 1851. After graduation with 
the highest honors at Dartmouth, entered the Litchfield, 
Connecticut, law school. Admitted to the bar in 181 2. In 
1817 he was appointed a judge of the supreme court of the 

[265] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



State and in 1819 removed to Portsmouth, where he prac- 
ticed law, after serving as governor of New Hampshire in 
1823-1.24. He was speaker of the State house of repre- 
$ itatives in 1825 and was elected to the United States 
Senate as a Democrat, serving from December 5, 1825, 
until March 3, 183 1, when he was appointed Secretary of 
the Navy and held that office until 1834, when he was 
made Secretary of the Treasury, serving until 1841. 

WOODCOCK 

MINE SWEEPER 
Length, 187 feet Beam, 35 feet Draft, 9 feet, 9 inches 

Named for the bird Woodcock 

Launched May 12, 1918, at Chester Shipbuilding Com- 
pany, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Lewis Thayer Kniskern (Vera Culver), 
wife of the General Manager of the Merchant Shipbuilding 
Company. 

WOOLSEY 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Captain Melancthon Taylor Woolsey, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched September 17, 1918, at Bath Iron Works, 
Bath, Maine. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Hewitt Wells (Elise Campau), great- 
granddaughter of Captain Melancthon Taylor Woolsey, 
U. S. Navy. 

Captain melancthon taylor woolsey, 

United States Navy, was born in New York 1782; died 
1838; appointed midshipman 1800; captain 1816; super- 
intended construction of vessels on Great Lakes in 1808; 
laid keel of "Oneida," first naval vessel built on the lakes; 
in 1809 made first display of American ensign in waters of 

[266] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Niagara River; served under Commodore Chauncey in 
War of 1812; July 19, 1812, landed part of his battery and 
repelled a British attack by five vessels; participated 
in attack on Kingston, November, 1813, and operations off 
False Rocks. 

WORDEN (2D) 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet 

Named for Rear Admiral John Lorimer Worden, 

U. S. Navy 

Launched October 24, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding 
Corporation, Squantum Works. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Daniel T. Worden (Emilie Neilson), 
daughter-in-law of Rear Admiral John Lorimer Worden, 
U. S. Navy. Mrs. Worden was sponsor for the first tor- 
pedo boat destroyer ''Worden," August 15, 1901. 

Rear admiral john lorimer worden, 

United States Navy, was born 18 18, Westchester County, 
New York; died 1897. Appointed midshipman 1834; 
promoted to lieutenant 1846, and served in Pacific, Medi- 
terranean, and Home Squadrons. At the outbreak of the 
Civil War ordered to Washington, D. C, for special duty. 
January 16, 1862, ordered to command the U. S. S. "Mon- 
itor," and on March 9, 1862, fought the battle with the Con- 
federate ironclad "Merrimac" in Hampton Roads; promoted 
to the rank of rear admiral November 20, 1872, and re- 
ceived the thanks of Congress for his skill and gallantry. 

WRIGHT % 

AIR CRAFT TENDER 

Length, 448 feet Beam, 58 feet Draft, 23 feet, 7 inches 

Named for Wilbur Wright, American Inventor 

Launched April 28, 1920, at Tietjen and Lang Dry Dock 
Company, Hoboken, New Jersey. 

[267] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. Roland M. Comfort, wife of Lieutenant 
Commander R. M. Comfort, U. S. Navy, a personal friend 
of the Wright brothers. 

WlLBUR WRIGHT, American Inventor; born in 
Millville, Indiana, 1867. Died May 30, 1913. Educated 
in the high schools of Richmond, Indiana, and Dayton, 
Ohio. From 1903, with his brother Orville, he devoted 
time to heavier than air flying machines, patented by the 
Wright brothers in the leading countries of the world. He 
made numerous flights in the United States and abroad. 
He was awarded a medal by the French Academy of 
Science in 1909, also many other medals. 



YAR BOROUGH 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, n inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for First Lieutenant George H. Yarborough, 

U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched June 20, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Miss Kate Burch, fiancee of the late Lieu- 
tenant George H. Yarborough, U. S. M. C, for whom the 
ship was named. 

First lieutenant george h. yarborough, 

JR., United States Marine Corps, was born in Roxboro, 
North Carolina, October 14, 1895; died in France from 
wounds received in action June 23, 191 8. Served in France 
with the Fifth Regiment and was posthumously awarded 
the distinguished-service cross for extraordinary heroism in 
the Bois de Belleau, France. After being wounded by an 
exploding shell he refused aid until he saw that the 
wounded men with him had been treated and removed to 
shelter. He died later from his wounds. 

[268] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



YARNALL 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, g feet 

Named for Lieutenant John Joliffe Yarnall, 

U. S. Navy ' 

Launched June 19, 1918, at Wm. Cramp & Sons' Com- 
pany, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. David Worth Bagley (Marie Harring- 
ton), wife of Commander D. W. Bagley, U. S. Navy. 

Lieutenant john joliffe yarnall, u. s. 

Navy, was born in Wheeling, West Virginia, in 1786. Ap- 
pointed midshipman January 11, 1809; lieutenant July 24, 
18 13. Cruised in the "Chesapeake" and "Revenge" 1809- 
18 1 2. He was first lieutenant of the "Lawrence" in the 
engagement on Lake Erie, September 10, 181 3; was 
wounded several times but refused to leave the deck. Left 
in command of the "Lawrence" when Perry went on board 
the "Niagara"; after the victory he was ordered to take 
the "Lawrence" with the wounded of Perry's Squadron 
to Erie. Commended by Commodore Perry for his ability 
and bravery, he was included in the thanks of Congress 
and awarded a medal for his gallantry at the Battle of 
Lake Erie. On the "Guerriere" June 17, 18 15, took part 
in capture of the Algerine cruiser "Mahouda"; wounded 
during the engagement. Commended by Commodore Ste- 
phen Decatur. He was transferred to the "Epervier" for 
return to the United States, being bearer of dispatches. 
The "Epervier" was lost with all on board. 

YOUNG 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Captain John Young, U. S. Navy 

Launched May 8, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

[269] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Sponsor: Mrs. John I. Nolan (Mae Hunt), wife of 
Congressman John I. Nolan, of San Francisco. 

Captain john young, u. s. Navy, was bom in 

Philadelphia; lost at sea 1781; commissioned captain 
October 10, 1776. July 5, 1777, ordered to proceed to 
Nantes in the "Independence." February 15, 1778, Cap- 
tain Young sailed the "Independence" through the French 
fleet (having on board John Paul Jones), saluted the 
French flag with 13 guns, received 9 guns in return. May 
20, 1781, Capt. Young sailed in the "Saratoga" with 
French and American ships from Cape Francois. Soon 
separated from her consorts and was never seen again; 
supposed to have foundered at sea. 



ZANE 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, 30 feet, 11 inches Draft, 9 feet, 4 inches 

Named for Major Randolph T. Zane, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched August 12, 1919, at Mare Island Navy Yard, 
California. 

Sponsor: Miss Marjorie Zane, daughter of Major Ran- 
dolph T. Zane, U. S. Marine Corps. 

Major Randolph t. zane, u. s. Marine Corps, 

was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, August 12, 1887; 
died from wounds he received in action with the Sixth 
Regiment in France. He was awarded the distinguished 
service cross for conspicuous bravery and coolness in holding 
the town of Bouresches, June 7, 191 8, where he successfully 
resisted a heavy attack by machine guns and infantry. He 
died later from wounds received in this engagement. He 
was also awarded the Navy Cross for the same engage- 
ment. 
[270] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



ZEILIN 

TORPEDO BOAT DESTROYER 

Length, 314 feet Beam, jo feet, 11 inches Draft, p feet, 4 inches 

Named for Brigadier General Jacob Zeilin, 
U. S. Marine Corps 

Launched May 28, 1919, at Bethlehem Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration, San Francisco, California. 

Sponsor: Mrs. William P. Lindley (Frances Smith), 
wife of Lieutenant Commander W. P. Lindley, U. S. 
N. R. F., Assistant Inspector of Machinery for the Navy 
at Union Works. 

Brigadier general jacob zeilin, u. s. Ma- 
rine Corps, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 
16, 1806; died in 1880. Commissioned second lieutenant 
183 1 ; first lieutenant 1836. Was brevetted major for gal- 
lantry in action at crossing San Gabriel River, January 9, 
1847. Was military commandant at San Diego in 1847. 
Was marine officer in the flagship "Mississippi" in Commo- 
dore Perry's expedition to Japan in 1852. In 1864 took 
command of marine barracks at Portsmouth, New Hamp- 
shire. Appointed colonel commandant of the Marine Corps 
in 1864. Commissioned brigadier general commandant, 
1867. 



[271] 



The Society of Sponsors 
of the 
United States Navy 



Organized 1908 
Incorporated 1920 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



INSIGNIUM 




The name of the ship is engraved on the bar. 

The insignium is fitted with a brooch pin, so that 
it can be worn separately from the ribbon when de- 
sired, in which case the ribbon ring is invisible. 



[274] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



BY-LAWS 



The name of the organization is Society of Sponsors of the 
United States Navy. 

II. 

the objects of the society are: 

1. The securing to its members of those benefits which would 
accrue from an acquaintance and association of women residing 
in different parts of the Union. 

2. The cultivation of a love of our country and its form of 
government. Remembering the occasion which gives member- 
ship in the Society, it is expected that the members will take 
pride in the achievements of the Navy, and will, within their 
proper spheres, be interested in the promotion of a healthy, popu- 
lar sentiment for the development and support of the United 
States Navy. 

3. The undertaking of such benevolent work as the Society 
may determine. 

III. 

Any woman who shall have bestowed the name, or been a 
sponsor for a man-of-war, or other vessel connected with the 
United States Navy, as one of its fighting craft, shall be eligible 
to membership in the Society; provided, however, that she shall 
file an application for membership with the Board of Trustees 
of the Society, and at least three-fourths of the Board vote to 
admit such applicant. 

IV. 

The management of the Society's affairs, except when it is in 
meeting assembled, shall be under the supervision of a Board of 
Trustees, to be composed of seven members, one of whom shall 
be the President of the Society, who shall be ex-officio Chairman 
of the Board. The officers, besides the Board of Trustees, shall 
consist of a President, a First Vice-President, a Second Vice- 
President, a Treasurer and a Secretary. The office of Secretary 

[275] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

and Treasurer may be combined and held by one person. The 
said officers shall be elected to serve until the next annual meet- 
ing following their election and until their successors are elected 
and qualified. 

V. 

i. There shall be an annual meeting of the Society held at 
Washington on some date to be named by the Board of Trustees 
or by the President at least thirty days before the meeting and 
in the month of January or February of each year. 

2. Special meetings of the Society may be held when called by 
the Board of Trustees or by the President. 

3. Special meetings of the Board of Trustees may be held 
when called by the President. A majority shall constitute a quo- 
rum. 

VI. 

If, from any cause, officers shall not be chosen at the annual 
meeting, such officers, including members of the Board of Trus- 
tees, may be chosen at a regularly called special meeting. 



VII. 

Vacancies in the Board of Trustees, or in any office, may be 
filled by the Board of Trustees until the next annual or special 
meeting of the Society. 

VIII. 

The board of Trustees shall consist of seven members, one of 
whom shall be the President of the Society, and such Board shall, 
except when the Society is in annual or special meeting, be vested 
with the management and control of the Society's affairs. 



IX. 

The President is ex-officio a member of the Board of Trustees, 
and Chairman thereof, and is entitled to vote on matters before 
the Board. 

X. 

In the absence of the President, a Vice-President shall dis- 
charge her duties, but in case of a vacancy in the office of Presi- 

[276] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



dent, it must be filled by the Board of Trustees, the member so 
elected to serve for the unexpired term. 

XL 

The Secretary shall keep a record of the proceedings of the 
Society and the Board of Trustees, and shall preserve in a well- 
bound book the names and addresses of the members. She shall 
mail notices of meetings to the several members at their ad- 
dresses shown on the record, and she shall perform such other 
duties as the Board of Trustees shall prescribe. 

XII. 

The Treasurer shall keep safely the funds of the Society, dis- 
burse the same as directed by the Society or the Board of Trus- 
tees, and take proper receipt therefor. She shall make a full re- 
port of receipts and disbursements at each annual meeting, and 
at such other times as the Board of Trustees may require, and it 
shall be a part of her duty to notify the members who are in ar- 
rears and to request payment. The Board of Trustees may re- 
move the Treasurer and designate another to discharge the duties 
of the office for the balance of the term. 

Thirty days prior to the annual meeting the accounts of the 
Treasurer shall be audited. 

XIII. 

The term of office of the several officers shall be one year, and 
until their successors are elected. 

XIV. 

Prior to each annual meeting the Board of Trustees shall desig- 
nate a committee of three to be known as an Entertainment 
Committee, who shall have charge of functions provided by the 
Society for the entertainment of the members. 

XV. 

The annual dues of membership are three dollars. 

XVI. 
If any member of the Society fails to pay dues within three 

[277] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

months after the Treasurer has sent notice that dues for the cur- 
rent year are now payable, a second notice shall be sent, saying 
that it repeats the notice previously given on such-and-such a 
date. At the expiration of two years members in arrears for 
dues, having received due and proper notice of such arrears, shall 
be notified that their names will be dropped from the rolls of the 
Society and printed unless they signify their intention to pay 
such dues. 

XVII. 

The Society shall have a seal which shall be in the custody of 
the Secretary. 

XVIII. 

'■ A certificate of membership in the Society, of such form as the 
Board of Trustees may prescribe, shall be furnished each mem- 
ber applying therefor, and the same shall be signed by the Presi- 
dent and countersigned by the Secretary, who shall affix the seal. 



XIX. 

A badge or other insignia of the Society may be adopted by 
the Board of Trustees, and when adopted shall not be changed. 

XX. 

The motto of our Society shall be: "Don't give up the ship." 

XXI. 

The insignium of a member who resigns or is dropped shall be 
returned by such member to the Treasurer and her rights therein 
are made void. The Treasurer shall refund to her the amount of 
value appraised by the maker of the insignium. 

XXII. 

Notice of voting upon any proposed amendment to a By-Law 
shall be sent to every member of the Society at least thirty days 
before the meeting, requesting a signed ballot. The adoption of 
amendment shall require the affirmative vote of two-thirds of 
those voting. 

[278] 




U,CQ 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



PRAYER FOR OUR NAVY 

O Eternal God, Creator of the Universe and Governor of Na- 
tions: Most heartily we beseech thee with thy favor to behold 
and bless thy servant, the President of the United States, and 
all the officers of our Government, and so replenish them with 
the grace of thy Holy Spirit that they may always incline to thy 
will and walk in thy way. Bless the Governors of the several 
States, and all who are in authority over us; give them Grace to 
execute justice and maintain truth that peace and happiness, re- 
ligion and piety, may be established among us for all generations. 

May the vessels of our navy be guarded by thy gracious Provi- 
dence and care. May they not bear the sword in vain, but as the 
minister of God, be a terror to those who do evil and a defense to 
those who do well. 

Graciously bless the officers and men of our navy. May love 
of country be engraven on their hearts and may their adventur- 
ous spirits and severe toils be duly appreciated by a grateful na- 
tion; may their lives be precious in thy sight, and if ever our 
ships of war should be engaged in battle, grant that their strug- 
gles may be only under an enforced necessity for the defense of 
what is right. 

Bless all nations and kindreds on the face of the earth and 
hasten the time when the principles of holy religion shall so pre- 
vail that none shall wage war any more for the purpose of ag- 
gression, and none shall need it as a means of defense. 

All of which blessings we ask through the merits of Jesus 
Christ our Lord. Amen. 

This prayer is offered at the launching of Navy battleships and at meetings of 
the Society of Sponsors of the U. S. Navy. It is an adaptation of a prayer offered 
by the Reverend Doctor Suddards at the launching of a Navy ship at the Phila- 
delphia Navy Yard in 1843, and is the only instance of prayer at a Navy launch- 
ing discovered in examined records 1798-1914.- 

The full text of the original prayer was discovered in research work for the 
book " Ships of the U. S. Navy and their Sponsors " and was sent to Washington 
by Mrs. Reynold T. Hall, President of the Society of Sponsors, with the sugges- 
tion that the adapted prayer be offered at future launchings of battleships. The 
suggestion was favorably received by Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels and 
was adopted at the launching of the battleship Oklahoma at Philadelphia March 
12, 1914, and thereafter at launchings of battleships. During the war with Ger- 
many the prayer was sent to ministers and was offered in churches as the prayer 
for Our Navy. 



[279] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Officers of the Society of Sponsors of the United 
States Navy since its Organization, 1908-1923 



HONORARY LIFE 
PRESIDENT 

Mrs. Mary Campbell Under- 
wood 

PRESIDENTS 

Miss Mary Campbell, 1908 
Miss Minnie D. Coates, 1909, 

1910 
Mrs. John G. South, 191 i 
Mrs. Reynold T. Hall, 191 2- 

1921 
Mrs. Russell C. Langdon, 

1922, 1923 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Miss Minnie Conrad, 1908 
Miss Keith Frazier, 1908 
Mrs. Roy Hearne, 1909 
Mrs. Lewis Nixon, 1909, 1923 
Mrs. Charles W. Mac Quoid, 

1910 
Mrs. Robert Toland, 1910 
Miss Anna Cahall, 191 i 
Miss Anna M. Yeiser, 191 i 
Mrs. John R. Pels, 1912 
Mrs. George Cameron, 191 2 
Miss Ruth Lawrence, 1913 
Mrs. John R. Burke, 1913 
Mrs. Josephus Daniels, 1914- 

1921 
Mrs. William R. Sands, 1914, 

1915 „ T 

Mrs. Russell C. Langdon, 

1916-1921 

Mrs. Larz Anderson, 1922, 

1923 

[280] 



Mrs. Frederick C. Hicks, 
1922 

SECRETARIES 

Mrs. John G. South, 1908 
Mrs. William W. Kitchen, 

1909, 1910 
Miss Edith Benham, 1911- 

1918 
Mrs. Goldsborough Adams, 

1919 
Miss Nannie D. Barney, 

1920 
Mrs. Louisa W. Turpin, 1921- 

1923 

TREASURERS 

Miss Ida May Schieren, 1908 
Miss Mira O'Brien, 1909 
Mrs. John R. Pels, 1910, 

1911 
Mrs. Charles W. Mac Quoid, 

1912 
Mrs. Goldsborough Adams, 

1913, 1919 
Miss Edith Benham, 1914- 

1918 
Miss Nannie D. Barney, 

1920 
Mrs. Louisa W. Turpin, 1921- 

1923 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

1913-1920 

Mrs. Lewis Louer, 1913 
Mrs. Helen W. Chapin, 1913 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Miss Elizabeth L. Fleming, 

1913 
Mrs. Josephus Daniels, 1913 

Mrs. DeWitt Coffman, 1913, 

1914 
Mrs. Russell C. Langdon, 

1913-1915 
Mrs. Henry Beates, 1914- 

1918 
Mrs. William B. Beekman, 

1914-1917 
Mrs. Frank W. Brooks, 1914 
Miss Ruth Lawrence, 1914, 

1915 

Mrs. Charles V. Ferguson, 

1915, 1916 

Mrs. E. Stuart Cottman, 

1915 
Mrs. Albert H. Mathews, 

1916, 1919 

Mrs. Goldsborough Adams, 

1916, 1917 
Mrs. William Garty, 1916, 

1917 
Miss Elsie Calder, 1916- 

1918 
Mrs. Elsie Calder Lee, 1919 
Miss Lorna Burrows, 1917, 

1918 
Mrs. John R. Pels, 1918 
Mrs. Bertram Greene, 1918, 

1919 
Miss Edith Benham, 1919, 

1920 
Mrs. Arthur T. Sutcliffe, 

1919 
Mrs. Sylvie de L. Mills, 

1919 

INCORPORATORS 1920 

Anne Martin Hall, 
Mary W. C. Bayard, 



Addie W. B. Daniels, 
Edith Wallace Benham, 
Helen A. Colhoun, 
Elizabeth Davis, 
Adria M. Semple Langdon. 

TRUSTEES 
1920-1923 

Miss Edith Benham, 1920 
Mrs. Edith Benham Helm, 

1921 
Mrs. Robert Corwin Lee, 

1920-1923 
Mrs. Arthur T. Sutcliffe, 

1920-1923 
Mrs. Goldsborough Adams, 

1920-1923 
Miss Helen A. Colhoun, 

1920 
Mrs. George Barnett, 1920 
Mrs. Reynold T. Hall, 1922, 

1923 
Mrs. Frederick C. Hicks, 

1921 
Mrs. Brooke Lee, 1921 
Mrs. Emory S. Land, 1922 
Miss Virginia L. Hunt, 1922, 

1923 
Mrs. Albert W. Stahl, 1923 

CHAIRMAN OF CHAPTERS 
1913-1923 

Northeastern Chapter 

Miss Minnie D. Coates, 1913 
Miss Agnes Herreshoff, 1914 
Mrs. Arthur T. Sutcliffe, 

1915-1918 
Mrs. Larz Anderson, 1919- 

1921 
Mrs. Albert H. Mathews, 

1922, 1923 

[281] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Southeastern Chapter 

Mrs. I. B. Beard, 1913 
Mrs. Robert N. Somerville, 

1914 
Mrs. William C. Bitting, 

1915-1918 
Mrs. Frank P. Hamilton, 

1919-1921 
Mrs. Josephus Daniels, 1922, 

1923 

Northwestern Chapter 
Mrs. Dean H. Lightner, 

1913 
Mrs. A. John Schubert, 1914, 
1915 



Mrs. Thomas Ruhm, 1916- 

1918 
Mrs. Wilbur B. Joyce, 1919- 

1923 

Southwestern Chapter 

Mrs. H. Clifford More, 

1913 
Miss Anna B. Dickie, 1914, 

1915 
Miss Esther Ross, 1916-1918 

Miss Lorena Cruce, 1919- 

1922 
Mrs. Lorena Cruce Norris, 

1923 



[282] 




MRS. RemOLD THOMAS HALL 
1912-1921 



\1\ MRS. RUSSELL CREAMER LANGOON 



1922-1923 



PRESIDENTS OF THE SOCIETY OF SPONSORS OF 

THE UNITED STATES NAVY SINCE ITS 

ORGANIZATION 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



[Copyrighted, 1909] 

U. S. NAVAL INSTITUTE, ANNAPOLIS, MD. 



THE BAPTISM OF SHIPS 
By Robert G. Skerrett 



Just once so often during the upbuilding of our modern navy 
there is agitation anent the particular form that the launching 
ceremony should take; and the special rock upon which there is 
a split is over the use of wine or water. There are some good 
souls intensely insistent, in the name of temperance, that water 
shall be spilled upon the vessel's bow at the time of naming, 
while there are others, probably unconsciously subscribing more 
closely to tradition, who urge with equal vim that wine shall be 
the element in the baptismal ceremony. Both of these parti- 
sans are more or less right, but all of them have commonly lost 
sight of the derivation and the real significance of the perform- 
ance. The whole question is primarily a religious one, while the 
popular attitude to-day is one of tolerance toward a surviving 
superstition. 

From the very beginning of primitive man's venture upon the 
water — perhaps because of the frail character of his craft, he 
recognized the risks he ran and in his superstitious awe sought 
the protection of the hidden powers that ruled the wind and the 
waves. Through all the devious paths of developing religions, 
early man strove to placate opposing deities and to propitiate the 
favoring gods who, to him, became more or less personal. As 
his religion became more concrete his gods took the material 
shape of idols, and that they might be always with him he first 
fashioned some part of his vessel more or less after the manner 
in which he pictured them, and never launched his craft until 
after he had made tribute by word or act to his protecting deity. 
Later on, his idols ceased to be the grotesque semblance of ani- 
mals and demons and became benignant and human-like, and 
for these he made a special place within his vessel and sanctified 
that place of keeping. 

It is quite impossible to follow chronologically the evolution 
of the launching ceremony, but enough can be found here and 

[283] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

there to point to a reasonable sequence, and for a probable sur- 
vival of the most ancient practices we must naturally turn to the 
customs still remaining among primitive peoples. Ellis, in his 
"Polynesian Researches," tells us that the Samoans and the 
Fijians used to make human sacrifices to their shark deities who 
ruled the waters. In Tahiti, it was the custom to shed human 
blood when a new canoe was built or launched. Again, Mariner, 
in "Tonga," tells us that men were sometimes sacrificed in order 
to wash a new canoe's deck with blood, and that it was likewise 
the practice to use men as living rollers on which to launch the 
craft. In this there is a strange likeness to the ancient Norse 
habit of attaching human victims to the rollers upon which they 
launched their ships; and in the Eddas this ceremony is referred 
to under the name of "hlun-rod" or roller-reddening. Among 
the Tonga islanders it is the custom to-day still to offer kava and 
oil to the sea gods, and in all of these ceremonies the native 
priest plays a conspicuous part if the ancient rites prevail. These 
votive offerings or oblations are still made among the primitive 
peoples of many parts of the world, and in this particular they 
show the persistent permanence with which such practices are 
handed down from the ages past. 

So far as actual records go, the earliest account of a votive 
offering to the gods upon the completion of a ship dates back 
twenty-one hundred years before Christ, and it seems that even 
then man dared not venture upon the sea until he had thus pro- 
pitiated the gods. On an Assyrian tablet, found some years ago 
by Professor Schiel, we have a Babylonian account of the Deluge 
and of the building of the Ark, and of the religious ceremony at 
its completion. Rendered into English, the story reads, in part, 
as follows: 

Eighthly, its interior I examined. 

Openings to the water I stopped; 

I searched for cracks and the wanting parts I fixed; 

Three sari of bitumen I poured over the outside; 

Three sari of bitumen I poured over the interior; 

Three sari of men bearers who carried chests on their heads. 

I kept a saros of chests for my people to eat. 

Two sari of chests I divided among the boatman. 

To the gods I caused oxen to be sacrificed. 

To the Chinese belongs the palm for pioneer work in breasting 
the tempestuous sea and in carrying their explorations into far 
lands — their commerce reaching at a very remote period as far 
west as the Persian Gulf. Probably no existing country has held 

[284] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



with more faithfulness of detail to its ancient religious practices 
in most of their forms. In "A Discourse of the Navigation of 
the Portuguese," translated into English in 1579, is found this 
fairly full account of the Chinese practices at the launching of 
their ships: "When they launched their ships into the sea at 
the first making, the priests go apparelled with long garments, 
being very rich of silk, to make their sacrifices in the poops of 
them, where the place of prayer is, and they offered painted 
figures, and they cut and burned them before their idols with 
certain ceremonies that they make, and sing songs with an 
unorderly tone, sounding certain little bells. They worship the 
devil, where they have him painted in the fore-part of the ship, 
because, as they say, he should do no hurt to the ships. In all 
this discourse they are eating and drinking at discretion." 

Among the Chinese these ceremonies have since undergone no 
substantial change, and in every large junk there is a shrine in 
honor of the goddess Tien-how, who is the tutelary deity of 
sailors. In addition to the goddess Tien-how, the Chinese sailors 
particularly engaged in the river traffic are devotees of the god- 
dess Loong-moo or the Dragon's Mother. In honor of this latter 
deity the master of every river junk makes tribute at the begin- 
ning of a voyage. Prior to weighing anchor, he takes his place 
at the bow, which, agreeably to Chinese tradition, is the most 
sacred part of the ship, and there proceeds to propitiate the 
Dragon's Mother. Before him on a small temporary altar are 
placed three cups containing Chinese wine or "saki." With a 
live fowl in one hand, the master performs the Kow-tow, and 
raising the cups one after the other from the altar he elevates 
them above his head before emptying them upon the deck by 
way of a libation. Next he cuts the throat of the fowl with a 
sharp knife and sprinkles the deck immediately about him with 
the blood of the sacrifice. One of the crew now presents the mas- 
ter with several pieces of silver paper, which in turn are sprinkled 
with the sacrificial blood and then fastened to the door-posts and 
lintels of the captain's cabin. This is suggestively like one of the 
rites of the Jewish Passover. 

The Bible tells us of the glories of the fleets of Tyre, and his- 
tory records as well much of the religious pomp and ceremony as- 
sociated with the ships of ancient Egypt. The mythology of an- 
cient Egypt is full of the part played by its deities in watching 
over its hardy mariners, and there can be no doubt whatever 
that some form of priestly ceremony and blessing was a part of 
the launching of the ships of the state at least, if the records of 

[285] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Du Sein and other historians are to be trusted. At the battle of 
Salamis, the Greeks went into the fight just after the conclusion 
of religious ceremonies, which consisted of sacrifices offered to all 
the gods and the pouring of a special libation to Zeus, the Pro- 
tector, and to Poseidon, Ruler of the Seas. In those days, it was 
the common custom among the Greeks to name their vessels after 
goddesses, and as a further propitiation the launching was made 
the occasion of a religious ceremony which Virgil described as 
follows: 

Ipse caput tonsae foliis evinctus olivae, 
Stans procul in prova, pateram extaque salsos 
Porricit in fluctus, ac vina liquentia fundit. — iEneid. 

Here we see the part that wine played in the early days. Appian 
also described the religious aspect of the blessing of the ancient 
ships: "On the shores of the sea altars were erected where their 
bases might be washed by the waves. In a semi-circle the ships 
of the fleet were drawn about near by, their crews the while 
maintaining a profound silence. The priests in boats rowed three 
times round the fleet . . . adding prayers to the gods that ill- 
luck should not befall the vessels. Then returning to the shore, 
they immolated bulls or calves, the blood of which reddened the 
sea and the shore." 

The use of water in the ancient ritual dates back to the Greek 
ceremony of lustration and to the later Roman practice of using 
water not only as a token of purification but also as an element 
in the act of priestly blessing. Here we have the pre-Christian 
practice of baptism. Like other pagan customs, wine and water 
were given place in Christian ceremonials, but not infrequently 
with a modified or deeper meaning. It was thus that wine and 
water became elements of the sacrament of the Christian Church, 
while water alone remained the token of purification and a part 
of the blessing at the time a person was brought into the church, 
named, and placed under the protection of a particular patron 
saint. 

During the Middle Ages, religious zeal and its derivative su- 
perstitions led to the custom of naming ships after saints, as the 
more ancient craft had been named after pagan gods and god- 
desses; and this practice was carried to the extremity of saintly 
image-worship — no craft being sent to sea without its shrine and 
an imposing array of attendant images. Thus began the practice 
that subsequently led to the evolution of the figurehead and the 
effigies placed in the niches about the stern galleries of more 

[286] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



modern vessels. Guerin, in his history of the French Navy, tells 
us that the ships of Louis IX, when he sailed for the Holy Land 
in 1248, were provided with every facility for conducting mass, 
each ship having an altar and priestly retinue. These altars were 
situated in the after part of the ships — just as the Greeks and 
Romans reared their shrines there in their own days, and the in- 
dex of the antiquity of the practice survives in the name of the 
"poop" deck — the highest aftermost deck of the older type of 
modern vessels. This name is derived from the Latin term "pup- 
pis," which was the name the ancients gave to the honored after 
deck where they kept their "pupi" or doll-like images of their 
tutelary deities and where they offered before them libations and 
sacrifices. 

As Taylor has told us in his "Primitive Customs," "Some 
religious ceremonies are marvels of permanence, holding substan- 
tially the same form and meaning through age after age, and far 
beyond the range of historic record." In proof of this, remem- 
bering what has been recorded of ancient Greece, it is instructive 
to know that at the launching of a modern Greek vessel her bow 
is decorated with flowers, and at the instant the ship takes the 
water her captain raises a jar of wine to his lips and then empties 
the rest of it upon the deck of his craft. Among the Turks, the 
launching of a vessel is of religious significance, and a priest at- 
tends asking the blessing of Allah and praying that the ship may 
have a prosperous and a successful career and ride safely over the 
waves in all weather. Sheep are sacrificed just as the vessel 
starts for the water, and the flesh is subsequently given to the 
poor. No wine is spilt upon the vessel's bow, but a feast is after- 
wards given to the participating officials and the invited guests. 

In Russia, when a naval vessel is launched, the Greek Church 
participates in a very imposing manner. The service includes the 
blessing of the ship in detail — the officiating priest and his at- 
tendant acolytes and choristers marching through all the decks, 
burning incense, carrying lighted candles, and sprinkling the craft 
everywhere with holy water — all the while prayers are read and 
chants are sung. When the ship has thus been blessed the crew 
are assembled before an altar especially reared for the occasion 
within the vessel, and, after the craft's colors are blessed, each 
member steps forward to the altar, kisses the priest's hands, and 
receives the benediction of the church. This carries us back 
directly to the practice among the Egyptians of purifying their 
ships by lighted torches, of burning sulphur, and of the breaking 
of eggs by the priests within their vessels, and later to the very 

[287] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

similar custom among the Greeks leading to what generally be- 
came known as "the purification of the ship." Combined with 
the subsequent libations, we see in the present ceremony of the 
Greek Church a survival of the ancient practice which had for 
its purpose the driving out of evil spirits, the purifying of the 
body, the propitiation of the deities, and the beginning of a new 
life. In Russia, to-day, wine does not enter into the ritual of the 
church at the launching of ships, the breaking of a bottle of wine 
at the actual naming of the vessel being a secular performance 
entirely apart from ecclesiastical participation. In this we see 
the reflex of the practice among other nations introduced into 
Russia only within the recent period of her advent upon the sea. 

During the days of Venetian dominance upon the Adriatic and 
the Mediterranean, the church took a conspicuous part in the 
launching functions of all official craft. It was then the custom 
to espouse the Adriatic at the time of the floating of the vessel, 
and this was done with much significant pomp, the ceremony 
closing by the Doge or some other high official throwing a bridal 
ring into the sea. In the Museum at Venice to-day there are a 
number of these rings, and in recognition of that old custom a 
pretty revival of it was practiced at the launching of the subma- 
rines recently built for the Italian Government. 

In 1488, when the "Sovereign" was launched at Humble — 
England's foremost dockyard of mediaeval times, in the presence 
of Henry VII, we are told the ship was formally renamed and the 
renovated vessel blessed with all the ceremonial display custom- 
ary in England in pre-Reformation times — "A mitred prelate 
with attendant train of priests and choristers, crosier in hand, 
with candle, book, and bell, and holy water stoup" performing 
the benediction. With the coming of the Reformation under 
Henry VIII, the official participation of the Church of Rome dis- 
appeared in England upon such occasions. The same, too, is 
true of Protestant Europe during the same period, although we 
are told the Lutherans practiced a baptismal ceremony at the 
launching of their vessels while they attach no importance to the 
observance. In the early part of the seventeenth century, in 
England, the launching of government vessels was entirely de- 
void of religious significance so far as the church was concerned, 
and what did survive of ancient custom was more strictly a rem- 
nant of the far-away pagan libation. The ship "Prince Royal" 
was launched at Woolwich in 1610, and the launching function 
was performed by Prince Henry in the manner described as fol- 
lows by Phineas Pette, one of the master shipwrights of James I: 

[288] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



"The noble Prince, himself, accompanied with the Lord Admi- 
ral and the great lords, were on the poop, where the standing 
great gilt cup was ready filled with wine to name the ship so soon 
as she had been afloat, according to ancient custom and cere- 
mony performed at such times, and heaving the standing cup 
overboard. His Highness then standing upon the poop with a 
selected company only, besides the trumpeters, with a great deal 
of expression of princely joy, and with the ceremony of drinking 
in the standing cup, threw all the wine forwards toward the half- 
deck, and solemnly calling her by the name of the 'Prince Royal,' 
the trumpets sounding the while, with many gracious words to 
me, gave the standing cup into my hands." 

During the same century, in the Catholic parts of Europe, the 
Church of Rome still participated. In 1675, Henry Teonge, 
Chaplain in the British Navy, visited Malta in His Majesty's 
Ship "Assistance," where he witnessed the launching of a Mal- 
tese craft, which he describes in this manner: "This day we saw 
a great deale of solemnity at the launching of a new bryganteen 
of 23 oares, built on the shoare, very neare the water. They 
hoysted 3 flaggs in her yesterday, and this day by 12 they had 
turned her head neare the water. When as a greate multitude of 
people gathered together, with severall of their knights and men 
of quality, and a clowd of fryars and churchmen. They were at 
least 2 howers in their benedictions, in the nature of hymns or 
anthems, and their other ceremonys; their trumpetts and other 
music playing often. At last 2 fryars and an attendant went into 
her, and kneeling downe prayed halfe an howre, and layd their 
hands on every mast, and other places of the vessell, and sprin- 
kled her all over with holy water. Then they came out and 
hoysted a pendent to signify she was a man of warr; and then at 
once thrust her into the water." Malta was given to the Knights 
Hospitalers by the Catholic Emperor Charles V in 1530, and 
being an island and under its own particular government, we see 
that the ceremony had escaped the immediate influence of the 
Reformation. 

In Catholic France in the eighteenth century and at the be- 
ginning of the nineteenth century, especially among the merchant 
craft and fishing vessels, the launching ceremony was closely 
analogous to the baptismal ritual at the time of christening an 
infant. The custom was one that lay close to the hearts of the 
common people, and the parish priest, a god-father and a god- 
mother chosen for the occasion were the principal participants — 
the god-parents not infrequently being children. The ceremony 

[289] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

was very simple and lovely. The god-father carried a bouquet 
which he duly presented to the god-mother, and with this done, 
both sponsors then pronounced the name chosen for the new 
vessel, and the priest repeating it so declared the vessel named — 
finishing the ceremony with the sprinkling of holy water upon the 
bow of the boat and with a benediction. To-day, the official 
ceremony at the launching of naval vessels carries out in spirit 
this older practice save that there is more pomp and churchly 
parade. There is a god-father and also a god-mother. Should 
the ship be named after a national hero or a famous officer, one 
of the sponsors is generally a descendant. A priest high in the 
dignity of the church leads in the formalities accompanied by 
acolytes and choristers. He blesses not only the ship, herself, but 
also, in accordance with ancient custom, sprinkles holy water 
upon the launching ways and gives them the benediction of the 
church. No wine is spilled upon the ship's bow, but the distin- 
guished guests are invited to what is termed a "vin d'honneur" 
where champagne flows freely and a bountiful repast is served. 
This is a very old custom that has existed for many centuries — 
especially among the fishermen of Europe, and to decline either 
the food or the drink then offered was formerly considered an 
omen of misfortune. 

It was not until the early part of the nineteenth century that 
either a layman or a woman took any part in the official cere- 
mony at the launching and naming of a British man-o'-war. 
Prior to that time, if the formalities were not conducted by a 
member of the royal family, the naming was done by some high 
functionary of the port or dockyard staff. The present Queen of 
England is said to have originated the religious service now a 
part of the launching of British ships of war; and the occasion 
when the practice was thus instituted was at the launching of 
the "Alexandria" — named after her — in 1875. Since then a 
full choral service has been prescribed, which includes extracts 
from the 107th Psalm — beginning with the twenty-third verse 
— together with a special prayer of great beauty. The benedic- 
tion is in accordance with the ritual of the Church of England 
and therefore does not include the use of holy water. The civil 
ceremony which follows consists of the usual naming of the ves- 
sel by a fair sponsor, after which a bottle of wine is smashed 
upon the vessel's bow. This blessing of a British ship carries us 
back by actual record of the fourteenth century, when in 1390, so 
the monk of St. Denys tells us, referring to the Duke of Bour- 
bon's expedition to Genoa under the Earl of Derby, that "Ac- 

[290] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



cording to ancient custom and to ensure success, the ships were 
blessed by the priests"; and again, in July of 1418, the Bishop of 
Bangor was sent to Southampton to give a benediction to the 
King's ship lately built there — called the "Grace Dieu," and 
was an occasion of much imposing ceremony: the worthy bishop 
being paid five pounds for his trouble. William Laird Clowes, in 
his history of "The Royal Navy," tells us that there is no trace 
in the British records of ship-baptism with wine in the fifteenth 
century. 

In the latter part of the eighteenth century and during a con- 
siderable period in the first half of the nineteenth century, it was 
the custom in France to remove all impediments to the launching 
of their ships but a single beam or heavy timber which is com- 
monly known among the shipwrights as the "dog-shore." This 
beam was canted against the stern post of the vessel in such a 
manner as to keep her from voluntarily sliding toward the water, 
and when everything was in readiness this shore was chopped 
through and knocked out of the way. This task was hazardous 
in the extreme and a volunteer for the work was commonly chosen 
from among the convicts in the galleys. Clothed in red, this 
man would take his place between the launching ways and under 
the shadow of the juggernaut-like craft that towered ponderously 
above him. At the proper signal, he would begin to chop with 
his axe into the dog-shore, and if alert and quick enough he was 
able to drop into the pit dug for him before either his timber fell 
or the ship rushed down upon him crushing out life or fearfully 
wounding him. Not infrequently the man was killed and very 
often he was wounded and blood flowed, thus seeming to per- 
petuate the sacrificial offerings of the ancient Norsemen and the 
similar primitive practices among some of the South Sea Island- 
ers. If the convict escaped with his life, freedom was the re- 
ward for his perilous undertaking. 

In our own country, tradition does not carry us very far back 
so far as we are immediately concerned — our ceremonies natu- 
rally following the customs prevailing in England at the time our 
forebears landed here; and so far 2s the records examined go 
to show, there was no religious significance given to this function 
by us. 

It has been said that water was used at the launching of the 
"Constitution," in 1797; but if this be so, it was broken upon 
the bow of that ship at one or the other of the two unsuccessful 
efforts first made to get that vessel overboard. When the "Con- 
stitution" was finally launched at the third effort, the late Rear- 

[291] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Admiral George H. Preble tells us in his manuscript history of 
the Boston Navy Yard, that "Commodore James Sever stood at 
the heel of the bowsprit, and, according to time-honored usage, 
baptized the ship with a bottle of choice old Madeira, from the 
cellar of the Honorable Thomas Russell, a leading Boston mer- 
chant." No one can question the fighting merits of the "Con- 
stitution," nor belittle that abundant glory that she reflected 
upon our flag in the days when every victory counted with es- 
pecial weight. Let those that attach a superstitious value to 
either wine or water bear this fact in mind. 

In 1858, the U. S. S. "Hartford" was launched at Boston, her 
launching sponsors being three in number. One was the daugh- 
ter of Commodore Downes, one the daughter of Commodore 
Stringham, and the other was then Lieutenant George H. Preble 
of the navy. As she touched the water, Miss Stringham broke a 
bottle of Connecticut River water across the ship's figurehead, 
Miss Downes smashed a bottle of Hartford Spring water, and 
Lieutenant Preble concluded the formalities by emptying a 
bottle of sea water upon the vessel's bow. The particular sig- 
nificance of each bottle of water is too plain to call for explana- 
tion; and, again, the performances of the "Hartford" are too 
fresh to need present point. In each case, however, it is quite 
evident that neither the wine nor the water had anything to do 
with the fighting efficiencies and the enduring good fortune of 
those famous vessels. . . . 






[292] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Addenda to Ships of the United States 
Navy and Their Sponsors, 1797-19 13 

ADIRONDACK 

STEAM SLOOP 
Length, 205 feet Beam, 38 feet 

Named for Adirondack Mountains 

Launched February 22, 1862, at Navy Yard, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Paulding, daughter of Rear Ad- 
miral Hiram Paulding, U. S. Navy, then commanding New 
York Naval Station. 

BROOKLYN (ist) 

steam sloop 

Named for City of Brooklyn, New York 

Launched July 27, 1858, at Brooklyn, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Emma Westervelt, daughter of Com- 
modore Jacob Westervelt, U. S. Navy. 

A ROMINENT among a bevy of young ladies out upon the 
forepeak was Miss Westervelt. By her side stood her 
friend, Miss McKay, who was to assist her in the ceremony. 
Miss Westervelt dashed the bottle of champagne over the 
head rail of the ship when settled into the water "from her 
working ways." 

CHATTANOOGA (ist) 

SCREW STEAMER 

Length, 315 feet Beam, 46 feet 

Named for Chattanooga River 

[293] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Launched October 13, 1865, at William Cramp & Sons' 
Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Miss Jessie Turner (Mrs. Henry W. Biddle), 
daughter of Rear Admiral Thomas Turner, U. S. Navy, 
commanding Philadelphia Navy Yard. 

AMONG those present was Gideon Welles, Secretary of 
the Navy, and William Cramp, founder of the shipbuilding 
company. 

CIMARRON 

WOODEN GUNBOAT 

Length, 205 feet Beam, 35 feet 10 guns 

Named for Cimarron, New Jersey 

Launched March 16, 1862, at Shipyard of D. S. Mershon, 
Bordentown, New Jersey. 

Sponsor: Miss Eleanor V. Newell, daughter of Con- 
gressman William A. Newell of New Jersey and former 
Governor of New Jersey, saying "I christen thee Cimarron 
— in honor of the State of New Jersey." 

CONGRESS 

WOODEN GUNBOAT 

Length, 290 feet Beam, 41 feet 

Name changed to "Congress" from Pushmataka, 

an Indian Name 

Launched July 3, 1867, at Philadelphia Navy Yard. 

Sponsor: Miss Anna P. Drake, daughter of Senator 
Charles D. Drake, of Missouri. 

CYCLOPS 

FUEL ship 

Length, 542 feet Beam, 65 feet Draft, 27 feet, 8 inches 

Named for "Cyclops," in Hesiodic legend 
a Titan who forged Zeus' thunderbolts 

[ 294 ] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Launched May 7, 1910, at William Cramp & Sons', 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Sponsor: Mrs. Walter H. Grove (Mabel Richardson), 
daughter-in-law of Mr. H. S. Grove, president of the ship- 
building company. 

MARCH 4, 1918, the "Cyclops" sailed from Barbados, 
West Indies, for Baltimore, Maryland, and was never 
heard from again. Her fate is one of the mysteries of miss- 
ing ships. 

INTREPID 

GUNBOAT 

Lengthy 170 feet Beam, 35 feet 

Named for the ketch "Intrepid," famous at Tripoli 

Launched March 5, 1874, at Navy Yard, Charlestown, 
Massachusetts. 

Sponsor: Miss H. Evelyn Frothingham Pooke, daugh- 
ter of Naval Constructor Pooke, U. S. Navy. 

JASON 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 536 feet Beam, 65 feet Draft, 27 feet 

Named for Jason, in Greek legend 
the leader of the argonauts 

Launched November 16, 191 2, at Maryland Steel Com- 
pany, Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Margaret Winans Waters, appointed 
at the suggestion of Senator John W. Smith of Maryland. 

KENOSHA 

GUNBOAT 

Length, 283 feet & ,. Beam, 38 feet 

Indian name afterwards changed to Plymouth 
for the city of plymouth 

[295] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 

Launched August 8, 1868, at the Navy Yard, New York. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary E. Wood (Mrs. Eugene de F. 
Heald), daughter of Engineer in Chief W. W. W. Wood, 
U. S. Navy, stationed at the Navy Yard. 

A HE sponsor and party were on board and launched with 
the vessel. The bottle of champagne was tied to the wrist 
of the sponsor to prevent dropping it when it was broken 
over the bow as the vessel touched the water. Among 
those on board were Admiral Sylvanus Gordon, commander 
of the Navy Yard, Captain Trenchard, Naval Constructor 
B. J. Delano, Engineer in Chief Wood, Captain Cushman 
and a large company of Naval officers and ladies. 



KINEO 

SCREW STEAMER 

Length, 138 feet Beam, 28 feet 

Named for Mount Kineo, Maine 

Launched October 9, 1861, at Shipyard of J. P. Dyer, 
Portland, Maine. 

Sponsor: Miss Eunice C. Dyer (Mrs. Henry Inman), 
daughter of the builder. 

MARS 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 403 feet Beam, 53 feet Draft, 24 feet, 8 inches 

Named for "Mars," in Roman Mythology 
the God of War 

Launched April 10, 1909, at Maryland Steel Company, 
Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Juliana Keyser, daughter of Mr. 
R. Brent Keyser, a prominent business man of Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

[296] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



NEPTUNE 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 542 feet Beam, 63 feet Draft, 27 feet, 8 inches 

Named for "Neptune," of Roman Mythology, 
the old Italic God of the Sea 

Launched January 21, 191 1, at Maryland Steel Company, 
Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Dorothy Loud, daughter of Congress- 
man George A. Loud from Michigan, Member of the Naval 
Committee of the House of Representatives. 

ORION 
fuel ship 

Length, 536 feet Beam, 65 feet Draft, 27 feet 

Named for Orion, Greek Mythological Hunter 
of gigantic size and strength 

Launched March 23, 1912, at Maryland Steel Company, 
Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Evelyn V. Taylor, daughter of Naval 
Constructor Charles V. Taylor, U. S. Navy, Superintend- 
ent of Construction at the works. 



PROTEUS 

FUEL SHIP 
Length, 522 feet Beam, 62 feet Draft, 27 feet 

Named for Proteus, in Greek Mythology, 
Old Man of the Sea 

Launched September 14, 191 2, at Newport News S. B 
Company, Newport News, Virginia. 

Sponsor: Miss Lucy Day Martin, daughter of United 
States Senator Thomas S. Martin of Virginia. 

[297] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



SUSQUEHANNA 

STEAM FRIGATE 

Length, 250 feet Beam, 45 feet 

Named for Susquehanna River 
Launched April 6, 1850. 

Sponsor: Morton Mc Michael, Mayor of Philadelphia 
and proprietor of the Philadelphia North American. 

± HE noble steamship "Susquehanna" made her entry 
into the world of waters with a grace and beauty that 
called forth the plaudits of the spectators thronging the 
adjacent wharves. Morton McMichael, Esq., was seated 
in the bow with the bottle of Susquehanna prepared to 
perform the christening ceremony. He failed, however, 
in breaking the bottle, and at last it went spinning over- 
board unbroken. The naming, however, was complete in 
all other respects, the following being the words made use 
of: "I name this good ship "Susquehanna" and predict 
that in time of peace she will be an ornament and in time 
of war a pride and honor to our naval service.'* 

VULCAN 

FUEL SHIP 

Length, 403 feet Beam, S3 /«< Draft, 24 feet, 8 inches 

Named "Vulcan," of Roman Mythology, the 
God of fire, of forging and smelting 

Launched May 15, 1909, at Maryland Steel Company, 
Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

Sponsor: Miss Mary Eleanor Dyson, daughter of 
Commander Charles W. Dyson, U. S. Navy. 

WORCESTER 

SCREW STEAMER 

Length, 290 feet Beam, 41 feet 

[298] 



AND THEIR SPONSORS 



Named for Worcester, Massachusetts 

Launched August 25, 1866, at Navy Yard, Charlestown, 
Massachusetts. 

Sponsors: Miss Mary Addison and Miss Rosa Sands. 

1/ OUR or five hundred ladies and gentlemen were aboard 
and the number of spectators estimated at 4000. The band 
of the Yard played 'Hail Columbia' as the vessel slipped 
down the ways. The christening ceremony was performed 
by Miss Mary Addison and Miss Rosa Sands, the former 
a niece and the latter a daughter of Commodore Benjamin 
Franklin Sands, U. S. Navy. Captain Clitz had charge of 
the operations." — Army and Navy Journal. 

In the sponsor's own words: 

"I think the only reason for the Admiral's choice of me 
as sponsor was the fact that I was a southerner and at that 
time a most rancourous hater of Admiral Farragut, who so 
short a time before had taken possession of my native city, 
New Orleans. It was a most graceful act of propitiation. 
That the propitiation was complete was shown by the fact 
that then and there I met for the first time my husband, 
Commander Gibson, U. S. Navy." 



[299] 



SHIPS OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY 



Errata Volume I 

Page xiii. Read 1908 instead of 1898. 

Page 27. Under "Brandywine," line 7, read 1825 for 1819. 

Page 93. Under "Kearsarge," for Miss Margaret Eastman, 
read Miss Mary Truxtun Eastman. 

Page 95. Under "Lamson," "was born in Missouri," read 
"was born in Iowa." 

Page 152. "Princeton," footnote, for "1884" read "1844" 

Page 174. "Stringham," Rear Adm. J. Blakeley Creighton, 
instead of J. Berkeley Creighton. 

Page 200. Under "Wyoming," paragraph beginning U. S. S. 
"Wyoming," read Sbimonoseki, Japan, in place of Manila. 



[3°o] 



Index of Sponsors 

Volume I 

1797-1913 

Note. — For convenient reference the known married names of maiden 
sponsors are also given, under their initial letters, with maiden name in brackets. 

SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Abercrombie, Mrs. B. T. (Waters) Maryland 

Adams, Mrs. Elizabeth Goldsborough Paul Jones 

Adams, Miss Norvelle Mayrant 

Addison, Miss Mary Worcester 

Agnus, Miss Elsie Rodgers 

Ainsworth, Miss Daisy Oregon 

Allen, Mrs. Charles F Marblehead 

Amidon, Mrs. Katherine Herreshoff Cushing 

Anderson, Mrs. Larz (Perkins) Perkins 

Anderson, Miss Mary Preble Maine 2d 

Andrews, Miss Ethel Ammen 

Andrews, Miss Lina Reid 

Ansel, Miss Frederica South Carolina 

Ashe, Miss Elizabeth Farragut 

Aston, Miss Anne Bennington 

Backus, Mrs. M. F F-3 and F-4 

Bailey, Miss Florence Beekman Bailey 

Bainbridge, Commodore William Independence 

Balch, Miss Grace Balcb 

Ballin, Miss Gertrude Goldsborough 

Barnes, Miss Charlotte Adams Barry 

Barney, Miss Esther Nicholson Barney 

Barney, Mrs. Joseph N. (Dornin) Colorado 1st 

Bassett, Mrs. F. B. (Thomas) Sangamon 

Battles, Mrs. Donald Raymond E-i 

Baury, Miss Pequot 

Beard, Mrs. I. B. (Adams) .- Mayrant 

Beates, Jr., Mrs. Henry (Agnes Barrington) Cummings 

Beckwith, Mrs. J. L. (Lincoln) . . .Atlanta 

Beekman, Mrs. William B. (Parker) Trenton 

Bell, Commander C. H San Jacinto 

Bell, Miss Jennie Vermont 

Belmont, Mrs. O. H. P Nicholson 

Benham, Miss Edith Wallace Benham and San Francisco 

Benson; Miss Nellie Amphitrite 

Benton, Miss Mary North Dakota 

Biddle, Miss Emily B Biddle 

Biddle, Commander James Pennsylvania 1st 

[301] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Bishop, Mrs. Henry (Mallory) Pensacola 

Bitting, Mrs. William C. (Smith) St. Louis 

Blalock, Mrs. William (Kiene) Ericsson 

Bleecker, Miss Mary Sonoma 

Boush, Miss Eulalie Alliance 

Boutelle, Miss Annie Newark 

Boutelle, Miss Grace Tonopah 

Bowles, Miss Catherine S. H D-2 

Bradford, Miss Elise Severn 

Bradford, Miss Minnie Mackinaw 

Bradley, Miss Christine Kentucky 

Breckinbridge, Miss Eleanor Vesuvius 

Brooks, Mrs. Frank W. (Newberry) Michigan 2d 

Brown, Mrs. Charles Edward (Deshler) Ohio 

Brown, Miss Lucie S Wheeling 

Brumby, Mrs. Frank H. (Truxtun) Truxtun 

Bryant, Miss Sallie Shamrock 

Burke, Mrs. John H. (Steele) Helena 

Burrows, Miss Lorna D Burrows 

Cahall, Miss Anna Delaware 

Calder, Miss Elsie New York 

Cameron, Mrs. George (de Young) Intrepid 

Cameron, Miss Mary Torktown 

Campbell, Mrs. Colin (Leiter) Illinois 

Campbell, Miss Mary Birmingham 

Carusi, Miss Helen Cassin Cassin 

Case, Miss Wampanoag 

Chalkley, Mrs. Lyman (Breckinbridge) Vesuvius 

Chambliss, Miss Lilian N Chattanooga 

Chandler, Mrs. William E Shawmut 

Chase, Mrs Housatonic 

Childs, Mrs. E. H Newport 

Churchman, Mrs. Charles West (Biddle) Biddle 

Clark, Miss Dorothy Duncan 

Clarke, Mrs. John Alexander (McLane) New Hampshire 

Cleborne, Miss Edith Chicago 

Coates, Miss Minnie D Concord 

Cocke, Mrs. Paul Lee Stewart 

Cockrell, Miss Marion Missouri 

Coffman, Mrs. De Witt (Boush) Alliance 

Colby, Miss Jane C Housatonic 

Colwell, Mrs. J. C Albany 

Comstock, Miss Nellie Weehawken 

Conrad, Miss Minnie Montana 

Converse, Miss Lilian Dupont 

Cooper, Miss Page Lackawanna 

Corson, Mrs. Allan (Updike) Princeton 

Coudert, Mrs. Frederic R. (Wilmerding) Maine 1st 

Craven, Miss Anna T Tingey 

Craven, Miss Amy T. A. M. Craven 



[302] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Creighton, Miss Edwina S Stringham 

Creighton, Mrs. James B. (Stringham) Hartford 

Cutting, Mrs. Walter (Mayo) Decatur 

Dahlgren, Mrs. John Vinton Dahlgren 

Daniels, Mrs. Josephus Bagley 

Davis, Miss Mary Thornton Thornton 

Davison, Mrs. Gregory C D-i 

Decatur, Miss Maria Algoma 

Delano, Miss Madazvaska 

De Lamater, Miss Dictator 

Deshler, Miss Helen Ohio 

De Young, Miss Helen Intrepid 

Dickie, Miss Anna Belle Olympia 

Dornin, Miss Nannie Seddon Colorado 1st 

Dorr, Miss Emily Genesee 

Dow, Mrs. J. B Canandaigua 

Downes, Miss Carrie Hartford 

Drake, Miss Anna P Congress 

Drake, Miss Mary Lord Iowa 

Drayton, Miss Emma Gadsden Drayton 

Drury, Miss Helen Boxer 

Dumaine, Mrs. F. C Rhode Island 

Dyer, Miss Eunice C. (Mrs. H. Inman) Kineo 

Dyson, Miss Mary Eleanor Vulcan 

Fales, Miss Puritan 

Ferguson, Mrs. Charles Vaughan (Rankin) Wilkes 

Fitzgerald, Miss D-$ 

Fleming, Miss Elizabeth L Florida 

Francis, Mrs. Arthur M. (Page) Saratoga 

Frazier, Miss Anna K Tennessee 

Frost, Mrs. E. B A-6 

Frothingham, Miss H. Evelyn Intrepid 

Frothingham, Miss Mary C Wachusett 

Gaither, Mrs. Walter T. (Brown) Wheeling 

Gallaudet, Mrs. Edson (Cockrell) Missouri 

Getes, Mrs. Roy (Patterson) Fox 

Gillis, Miss Carol » Galena 

Gittings, Miss Dorothy R Sterett 

Glenn, Miss Rebekah North Carolina 

Glover, Mrs. Henry W. B. (Cleborne) Chicago 

Gooding, Miss Louise Idaho 

Goodloe, Mrs. Green Clay (Wilson) Washington 

Gow, Miss Eleanor B-2 

Grace, Mrs. H. P Tioga 

Gray, Miss Anna B Wilmington 

Gregory, Miss Mary Manhattan and Montauk 

Greene, Mrs. Bertram (Hoff) Bainbridge 

Grice, Miss Mary Florida Wyoming ist 



[303] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Grice, Miss Pennsylvania Wabash 

Grove, Mrs. Henry S Lamson 

Grove, Mrs. Walter H Cyclops 

Guild, Miss Maria Nashville 

Gunn, Miss Kate C Monterey 

Hale, Miss Lucy H Shawmut 

Hall, Mrs. Reynold Thomas (Martin) Roe 

Hamilton, Mrs. Frank P. (Fleming) Florida 

Hand, Mrs. Henry W Parker 

Hanna, Miss Ruth Cleveland 

Harmony, Lieutenant Commander David B Quinnebaug 

Harris, Miss Julia M Tacoma 

Hartt, Miss Emma I Alaska Guerriere, 

yjSantasket, Uctorora 

Hatton, Mrs. Richard (Cottman) Warrington 

Hawes, Mrs. Alice Gould Hopkins 

Hay, Mrs. Marley F j-j 

Haywood, Mrs. Alfred W. (Holt) Raleigh 

Hazel, Miss E. H Winslow 

Hearne, Mrs. Roy W. (Williams) San Marcos 

Hebb, Mrs. Clement D. (Lambert) Sassacus 

Henriques, Mrs. (Scott) Nipsic 

Herbert, Miss Leila Massachusetts 

Herreid, Miss Grace South Dakota 

Herreshoff, Miss Agnes M Porter 

Herreshoff, Miss Katherine B Cushing 

Hichborn, Miss Martha Castine and Terror 

Hillman, Charles Mackenzie 

Hoch, Miss Anna Kansas 

Hoff, Miss Bainbridge Bainbridge 

Hoffman, Mrs. Daniel Engle (Glenn) North Carolina 

Hoover, Miss Emily V Monongahela 

Hopper, Mrs. A. M Indiana 

Hoy, Mrs. James (Downes) Hartford 

Hudson, Miss Sue Housatonic 

Hull, Miss Grace Alaska 

Hull, Miss Mabel Hull 

Humrichouse, Mrs. W. H. (Wardwell) McKee 

Hutchinson, Mrs. J. H. (Ingersoll) Miami 

Hyde, Miss Ethel Machias 

Hyde, Mrs. John Trippe 

Ingersoll, Miss Ann Miami 

Irwin, Miss Lulu Monadnock 

Jenkins, Miss Alice Thornton Jenkins 

Johnson, Mrs. Edward D. (Bradford) Severn 

Johnson, Miss Esther Swatara 

Johnson, Mrs. Harriet Lane (Lane) Lancaster 



[304] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Jones, Miss Anne Seymour Nereus 

Jones, Miss Bobbie Newton Ozark (Arkansas) 

Joyce, Mrs. Wilbur B. (Schaller) Minnesota 2d 

Kane, Miss Constance Henley Henley 

Keyser, Miss Juliana Mars 

Kiene, Miss Carrie Ericsson 

Kinney, Mrs. William B New Jersey 

Kitchen, Mrs. William W. (Money) Mississippi 

Knight, Miss Dorothy Eunice Wyoming 

Knowles, Miss Mary Y antic 

Knox, Miss Jean Jarvis 

La Faroe, Miss Frances Newport 

Lake, Miss Margaret V G-l 

La Lande, Miss Juanita Louisiana 

Lambert, Miss Wilhelmina Sassacus 

Lane, Miss Harriet Lancaster 

Langdon, Mrs. Russell Creamer (Moale) Rowan 

Lardner, Miss Margaret Tuscarora 

Lawrence, Mrs. Chester B. (Bailey) Bailey 

Lawrence, Miss Ruth Lawrence 

Lehr, Mrs. Harry Symes (Dahlgren) Dahlgren 

Leiter, Miss Nancy Illinois 

Lenthall, Miss Jennie Guerriere 

Lightner, Mrs. Dean (Herreid) South Dakota 

Lincoln, Miss Jessie '. Atlanta 

Little, Miss Margaret N E-2 

Loud, Miss Dorothy Neptune^ 

Louer, Mrs. Lewis (Macomber) Des Moines 

Lyon, Miss Claudia Texas 2d 

McAlpine, Mrs. Kenneth Fanning 

McClellan, Miss Annie Kansas 1st 

McCormick, Mrs. Medill (Hanna) Cleveland 

McFarland, Mrs Ossipee and Kearsarge 1st 

McLane, Miss Hazel E New Hampshire 2d 

McLean, Mrs. John R. (Beale) Beale 

Macdonough, Miss Lucy T Macdonough 

Macomber, Miss Elsie : Des Moines 

Macon, Miss Mary Louise Arkansas 

Mac Quoid, Mrs. Charles W. (Miller) Bancroft 

Magoun, Miss Katherine Preston 

Mallory, Miss Margaret Moreno Pensacola 

Malster, Miss Florence Detroit 

Mann, Miss Susan L Minnesota 

Marchand, Miss Kitty Omaha 

Martin, Miss Lucy Day Proteus 

Mathews, Mrs. Albert H. (Schieren) Brooklyn 

Mayo, Miss Maria Decatur Decatur 

Maynadier, Mrs. G. B. (Sleeper) Winooski 

[305] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

McMichael, Honorable Morton Susquehanna 

Meaktns, Miss Lesley Jean H-i 

Mickey, Miss Mary Nain Nebraska 

Miller, Miss Jessie Indiana 

Miller, Mrs. Josephus (Comstock) Weekawken 

Mills, Mrs. Sylvie DeLong DeLong 

Moale, Mrs. Edward Rowan 

Monaghan, Miss Ellen R Monaghan _ 

Money, Miss Mabel Clare Mississippi 

Montague, Miss Mathilde Gay Virginia 

Montgomery, Miss May Tallapoosa 

Moore, Miss Mary Frances Bancroft 

More, Mrs. H. Clifford Marietta 

Morgan, Mrs. John E. (Stephenson) Wisconsin 

Morgan, Miss Mary Alabama 

Morgan, Mrs. Percy T. (Ainsworth) Oregon 

Morton, Miss Helen Columbia 

Morton, Miss Pauline Cumberland 

Mosby, Miss Stella Cincinnati 

Murray, Mrs. David (Gillis) Galena 

Nally, Miss Marylee Jouett 

Newberry, Miss Carol B Michigan 

Newell, Miss Eleanor V Cimarron 

Newell, Mrs. Emerson Root Galveston 

Nelson, Mrs. Valentine Omaha 

Nicoll, Miss Alice C-5 

Nixon, Mrs. Lewis Tallahassee and Holland 

Oakley, Mrs. Owen H. (Craven) Tingey 

O'Brien, Miss Mira O'Brien 

O'Conner, Miss Maud Perry 

O'Donnell, Miss Annie C Niagara 

Offley, Miss Katherine H Ticonderoga 

O'Neil, Mrs. Charles (Frothingham) Wachusett 

Page, Miss Helen Saratoga 

Pardee, Miss Florence California 

Parker, Miss Katherine Trenton 

Pascoe, Miss Selina Shenandoah 

Patterson, Miss Georgeanne Pollock Patterson 

Patterson, Miss Vera Fox 

Paulding, Master Hiram Miantonomah 

Paulding, Miss Emma Nyack and Paulding 

Paulding, Miss Mary Adirondack 

Peabody, Miss Cora Colorado 2d 

Pearsall, Mrs. Paul (Hichborn) Castine and Terror 

Pels, Mrs. John R. (Wright) Denver 

Pershing, Mrs. John J. (Warren) Cheyenne 

Pinnock, Miss Lorna Salem 

Pope, Miss Elsie Whipple 



[306] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Porter, Miss Georgia Annapolis 

Powell, Mrs. Joseph Wight Aylwin 

Preble, Lieutenant G. H Hartford 

Preble, Miss Ethel Preble 

Price, Miss Laura Foote 

Quay, Miss Coral Pennsylvania 2d 

Radford, Mrs. George Stanley. 5-j 

Rambo, Mrs. Preston (Tate) Georgia 

Ramsey, Mrs. Edward P. (Smith) Montgomery 

Rankin, Miss Harriet E Wilkes 

Reade, Mrs. Charles (Macdonough) Macdonougb 

Reakirt, Mrs. Edwin R. (Lardner) Tuscarora 

Rhett, Miss Helen Charleston 2d 

Rice, Mrs A-4. 

Richardson, Mrs. Edward Bridge Smith 

Robb, Miss Richmond 

Rock, Mrs. George H Terry 

Rogers, Mrs. James G. (Peabody) Colorado 2d 

Rolph, Miss Annette Ried F-2 

Rugge, Mrs. George C. (Pope) Whipple 

Sands, Miss Rosa Worcester 

Sands, Mrs. William Ranney H-2 

Savage, Mrs. Eugene T. (Boutelle) Tonopah 

Schieren, Miss Ida May Brooklyn 

Schaller, Miss Rose Marie Minnesota 2d 

Schley, Miss Virginia Petrel 

Schubert, Mrs. Adam J. (Gooding) Idaho 

Scotia, Mrs. John B. (Tyler) Pawnee 

Scott, Miss Alice Charleston 1st 

Scott, Miss Rebecca Nipsic 

Sealey, Miss Ella Galveston 

Seaman, Miss Lilian Enterprise 

Sedgwick, Miss Sallie Onondaga 

Sever, James Captain Constitution 

Shubrick, Miss Caroline Shubrick 

Simons, Mrs. Theodore J. (Rhett) Charleston 2d 

Sleeper, Miss Mary R Winooski 

Smith, Mrs. Alice Scott % Charleston 1st 

Smith, Miss Gladys B St. Louis 

Smith, Mrs. J. Hopkins (Morton) Cumberland 

Smith, Miss Sophia Montgomery 

Soley, Miss Una Katabdin 

Somerville, Mrs. Robert N. (Frazier) Tennessee 

South, Mrs. John G. (Bradley) Kentucky 

Spear, Mrs. Lawrence Y. B-i 

Sproul, Miss Dorothy W. ; Chester 

Spry, Miss Alice Utah 

Steele, Miss Agnes Belle Helena 

Stephenson, Miss Elizabeth Wisconsin 



[307] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Stevens, Miss Elizabeth C-2 

Stewart, Commodore Charles New Ironsides 

Stockton, Miss Katherine Stockton 

Stone, Mrs. J. W Canandaigua 

Stringham, Miss Lizzie Hartford 

Sturdivant, Mrs. George W. (Drake) Iowa 

Tate, Miss Stella Georgia 

Taussig, Miss Grace Anna G-4 

Taylor, Miss Evelyn V Orion 

Theiss, Miss Katherine C-j 

Thomas, Miss Fannie Sangamon 

Tilton, Mrs Sacramento 

Todd, Mrs. Mae C. Stanton Cbauncey 

Toland, Mrs. George (Turner) Juniata 

Tomb, Mrs. James Harvey (Drury) Boxer 

Townsend, Mrs. Julius C C-4 

Tredway, Miss Margaret Dubuque 

Trowbridge, Miss Vicksburg 

Truxtun, Miss Isabella Truxtun 

Turner, Miss Angela Juniata 

Turner, Miss Jessie (Mrs. H. W. Biddle) Chattanooga 1st 

Turpin, Mrs. Walter S A-y 

Tyler, Miss Grace Pawnee 

Tynan, Miss Josephine F-i 

Underwood, Mrs. Lewis (Campbell) Birmingham 

Updike, Miss Margueretta Princeton 

Vanderbilt, Miss Anna M Pawtuxet 

Virden, Miss Genevieve Flusser 

Wainwright, Mrs A-2 

Walter, Miss Mildred W Walke 

Warburton, Mrs. Barclay (Wanamaker) Philadelphia 1st 

Wardwell, Miss McKee 

Wardwell, Miss Ernestine A-i 

Warren, Miss Hattie Cheyenne 

formerly Wyoming 

Washburn, Miss Elizabeth Minneapolis 

Waters, Miss Jennie Scott Maryland 

Waters, Miss Margaret Winans Jason 

Webster, Miss Frances C-i 

Wells, Miss Alice Connecticut 4th 

Westbrook, Mrs. John D. (Guild) Nashville 

Westervelt, Miss Emma Brooklyn 1st 

White, Miss Katherine V West Virginia 

White, Miss Nellie M .Blakeley 

Whitney, Mrs. C. W Keokuk 

Williams, Miss Madge H San Marcos 

formerly Texas 



[308] 



INDEX 

SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Willets, Miss Jessie McCall 

Wilmerding, Miss Alice Tracy Maine 1st 

Wilson, Miss Helen S Washington 

Wilson, Mrs. Joseph D. (Offley) Ticonderoga 

Wilson, Miss Mary H Dale 

Wilson, Mrs. Theodore D Baltimore 

Winslow, Mrs. Herbert Kearsarge 

Wolfe, Mrs. W. H. (White) West Virginia 

Wolff, Miss Helen Davis 

Wood, Miss Mary Kenosha 

Wood, Miss Sally Tallahassee 

Worden, Mrs. Daniel F Worden 

Wortley, Mrs. Ralph M. S. (Schley) Petrel 

Wright, Mrs. Hamilton Minneapolis 

WrigHt, Miss Roberta W Denver 

Yeiser, Miss Anna May Paducah 

Zahm, Mrs. Faank B A-5 



Index of Sponsors of U. S. Naval Vessels 

1913-1923 

sponsor warship 

Adams, Mrs. L. S. (Cora Isabel) O-i 

Adams, Miss Margaret Arletta O-13 

Allen, Miss Dorothea Dix Allen 

Amory, Mrs. Clement G. (Louise Mathews) Sea Gull 

Amory, Mrs. John J. (Mary S.) Osprey 

Anderson, Miss Kathryn Baldwin Reno 

Anderson, Mrs. Magnus A. (Maude Lane) Hogan 

Annear, Mrs. John A. (Ray Eitel) Chase 

Atkins, Mrs. Lew M. (Charlotte Steele) L-j 

Armes, Mrs. George A. (Katherine M.) < Harding 

Arringdale, Miss Mary V Tingey (2d) 

Ausburn, Mrs. Della E Ausburn 

Austin, Mrs. Joseph E. (Mamie Wadman) S-4Q 

Ayres, Miss Louise McLean Rowan (2d) 

Babbitt, Miss Sarah A Hopkins (2d) 

Bagley, Mrs. Adelaide Worth (Adelaide Worth) Bagley (2d) 

Bagley, Mrs. David Worth (Marie Harrington) Tarnall 

Bagley, Miss Ethel Paul Jones (4th) 

Bailey, Mrs. John E. (Bertha Martin) O-io 

Bailey, Miss Louise Carolyn S-35 

[309] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Bailey, Miss Rosalie Fellows Bailey (2d) 

Baine, Miss Dorothy Sanderling 

Baldwin, Mrs. Frank (Helen Golden) S-27 

Ballard, Miss Eloise Ballard 

Bancroft, Miss Mary W Bancroft (2d) 

Barker, Mrs. Albert S. (Ellin) Barker 

Barnett, Mrs. George (Lelia Montague) Sinclair 

Barnett, Mrs. J. Walter (Mary Serpell) R-26 

Barney, Miss Nannie Dornin Barney (2d) 

Barry, Miss Edith Nicholas 

Baruch, Mrs. Bernard M. (Anne Griffen) O-u 

Bass, Mrs. Ivan E. (Florence Bouche) R-? 

Batchelder, Miss Dorothy R-n 

Bates, Mrs. George H. (Elizabeth M.) Tanager 

Bates, Mrs. Robert L. (Laura Bosley) J. Fred Talbott 

Baxter, Miss Heather Patterson L-q 

Baxter, Miss Margaret Cunningham S^uail 

Baxter, Mrs. Thomas (Gladys Moffett) S-21 

Bayard, Mrs. Thomas F. (Mary Clymer) Sbubrick (2d) 

Beale, Mrs. William R. (Lucy Preston) Preston (2d) 

Bean, Mrs. Carlos (Mary Baldwin) S-26 

Beattie, Miss Nan McArthur Auk 

Belknap, Miss Frances Georgiana Belknap 

Bennett, Miss Dorothy Kanawha 

Bennet, Miss Gertrude Elizabeth Wasmuth 

Benson, Mrs. George J. (Elizabeth Upshur) Abel P. Upshur 

Benson, Mrs. William S. (Mary Wyse) Pope 

Bentley, Miss Doris Thatcher 

Bernadou, Miss Cora Winslow Bernadou 

Bevans, Mrs. George E. (Ida Miller) N-5 

Billingsley, Miss Irene Billingsley 

Bissett, Mrs. Guy A. (Helen Caperton) Pyro 

Blackmur, Miss Virginia Dyer 

Blair, Miss Virginia Fox (2d) 

Blakeley, Mrs. Charles A. (Virginia Lyons) Blakeley 

Border, Mrs. Lee S. (Chetanna Nesbitt) Polos (2d) 

Borie, Miss Patty Borie 

Bowman, Mrs. Mark C. (Nannie Rice) S-22 

Boyd, Mrs. Thales (Lillian Martin) R-15 

Bracey, Mrs. Bessie Edsall Edsall 

Branch, Miss Laurie O'Brien Branch 

Brayton, Mrs. Harry R. (Anne Fales) Mallard 

Breckinbridge, Miss Genevieve D Breckinbridge 

Brereton, Miss Sara V Swallow 

Briggs, Miss Phebe Sacramento (2d) 

Brill, Mrs. Philip B. (Chrystie Knox) S-2 

Broome, Miss Mary Josephine K Broome 

Brown, Mrs. Alexander G. (Kate Upshur) Upshur 

Brown, Miss Dorothy Israel 

Brown, Mrs. John H. (Nellie Janvier) S-43 

Brown, Miss Katherine Putnam 



[3IO] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Bruce, Mrs. Frank (Annie) . . Bruce 

Brumby, Miss Isabelle Truxtun Truxtun (3d) 

Bryan, Mrs. Henry F. (Elizabeth Badger) Badger 

Bulger, Miss Mildred S-57 

Bulmer, Miss Anita Poor Bulmer 

Burch, Miss Kate Tarborough 

Burg, Mrs. Robert A. (Alice Claire) 0-8 

Burlin, Miss Lucille Babbitt 

Burrell, Mrs. Glenn S. (Geraldine Boush) S-5 

Bush, Miss Josephine T Bush 

Bushnell, Miss Esculine W Bushnell 

Buttrick, Miss Helen Bagley Concord (3d) 

Cable, Mrs. Frank T. (Nettie Hungerford) O-5 

Cady, Mrs. Francis E. (Leila Foote) Foote (2d) 

Caldwell, Miss Charlotte M Caldwell 

Callahan, Miss Bessie V Robin 

Campbell, Miss Marcia Bradbury O'Brien (2d) 

Capps, Mrs. Washington L. (Edna Ward) Aaron Ward 

Carter, Mrs. Andrew F. (Augusta Heacock) Monocacy (2d) 

Case, Miss Helena de St. Pierre Case 

Chandler, Miss Fanny Bemis R-13 

Chandler, Mrs. Lloyd H. (Agatha Edson) Chandler 

Chapin, Miss Catherine M Woodbury 

Chew, Mrs. Francis T. (Mary Hoge) 0-2 

Childs, Mrs. Earle W. F. (Gertrude B.) Childs 

Child, Mrs. Warren G. (Julie McGuire) K-5 

Chrystie, Miss Elizabeth Ludlow Ludlow 

Coghlan, Mrs. Graham (Elizabeth B.) Coghlan 

Cole, Mrs. Edward B. (Mary Welsh) Cole 

Colhoun, Miss Helen A Colhoun 

Collins, Miss Amy Whipple Dent 

Collins, Mrs. Cornelius J. (Grace Danills) S-38 

Collins, Mrs Harry E. (Hester Borden) Lea 

Colt, Miss J. Edith Converse Converse 

Comfort, Mrs. Roland M Wright 

Conners, Mrs. John F. (Stella Standeford) S-41 

Conover, Mrs. John Stevens (Mary Greene) Greene 

Cooke, Mrs. Charles M. (Sarah Bleecker) R-2 

Cooke, Miss Louise Abbot Abbot 

Coontz, Miss Bertha N-3 

Cooper, Mrs. Henry O'B. (Kathrine Low) O'Bannon 

Cooper, Miss Jane Robert Smith 

Corry, Mrs. William M. (Sarah Wiggins) Corry 

Cottman, Mrs. Vincendon L. (Elizabeth Klink) H-q 

Cotton, Mrs. Percy J. (Henrietta Macdonald) Mackenzie (2d) 

Couzens, Miss Madeleine Detroit (4th) 

Crittendon, Mrs. Jerome P. (Pauline Jones) Jacob Jones 

Crose, Miss Janet Maumee 

Cruce, Miss Lorena Jane Oklahoma 

Cummings, Mrs. Homer S. (Marguerite Owings).... O-12 



HSU] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Cusachs, Miss Georgiana Porter Porter (2d) 

Cushing, Miss Marie L Cushing (2d) 

Dabney, Mrs. Charles W. (Lucy Russell) Macdonougb (3d) 

Daniels, Mrs. Josephus (Adelaide Bagley) I n 1 / \ ' 

{Bagley (1st) 

Daniels, Miss Mary Cleaves Clemson 

Danner,* Miss Anna M Peacock 

Dashiell, Mrs. George W. (Margaret Rowe) R-i 

Daubin, Mrs. Freeland A. (Elizabeth Scott) L-i 

Davis, Miss Elizabeth Davis (2d) 

Davis, Miss Emily Crowninshield Crowninshield 

Davis, Mrs. Guy E. (Mabel Matheson) N-i 

Davis, Miss Marcia T Thornton (2d) 

Davis, Mrs. Ralph O. (Anita Cresap) H-4 

DeBaca, Miss Margaret C New Mexico 

DeMartelly, Miss Ellen E Stockton (2d) 

Dempsey, Miss Ethel H Henshaw 

Denby, Mrs. Edwin (Marion Thurber) Shenandoah 

Denis, Mrs. George J. (Alberta Johnston) Sproston 

DeVeyra, Senora Jaime C Rizal 

Dew, Miss Bertha Francis R-17 

Dickson, Mrs. George L. (Alma Hodges) O-3 

Dickerson, Mrs. John S. (Amelia Wagner) Dickerson 

Diederich, Miss Elsa Conner 

Dinger, Mrs. Henry C. (Gertrude Mack) McCook 

Dodd, Miss Ruth Rebecca Owl 

Doll, Mrs. Chauncey R. (Martha Brandlein) Bittern 

Donaldson, Miss Hazel Swan 

Dorsey, Mrs. Vernon M. (Sarah Alden) Alden 

Doughten, Mrs. Cazenove (Florence Jones) Jacob Jones (2d) 

Doyen, Miss Fay Elizabeth Doyen 

Drake, Mrs. Whitford (Evelyn R.) N-2 

Dunnigan, Miss Ida L Shirk 

DuPont, Miss Constance Simons DuPont (2d) 

Earle, Miss Mary Janet Schenck 

Edwards, Mrs. John D. (Mae Marshall) John D. Edwards 

Eklund, Mrs. Erick A. (Agnes Simpson) R-22 

Elliott, Miss Dorothy Hastings N-4 

Elliot, Mrs. Richard McCall (Joan Packard) Elliot 

Ely, Miss Catherine H-(5 

Esmond, Mrs. William G. (Ella Sanger) S-50 

Essner, Mrs. Eugene F. (Dora T.) Kennedy 

Evans, Mrs. Joseph (Hannah Martin) Marblebead (3d) 

Evans, Miss Margaret Inez Whippoorwill 

Everett, Miss Madeline AA-i (T-2) 

Fairweather, Mrs. J. Stewart (Rachel Hovey) Farenholt 

Farquhar, Mrs. David W. (Grace T.) Ringgold 

Field, Miss Julia H-j 



[312] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Filmer, Miss Marion Howard 

Finn, Miss Teresa Marion Ortolan 

Fisher, Mrs. Harry H. (Elizabeth Osborne) Osborne 

Fleece, Mrs. Granville S. (Pauline Bridge) Bridge 

Fogerty, Mrs. William B. (Sarah Lloyd) L-y 

Ford, Miss Florence Faith John D. Ford 

Fort, Mrs. George H. (Edythe Nevins) Mugford 

Foster, Mrs. Arnold (Maud Beatrice) R-20 

Foster, Miss May Louise R-27 

Fry, Miss Edna Mae Gannet 

Gardner, Miss Florence Loomis R-14 

Gardner, Mrs. Stephen A. (Florence Loomis) L-4 

Garney, Miss Emily P Cowell 

Garty, Mrs. William (Mary Hinds) Tucker 

George, Miss Elizabeth Fairfax 

Germaine, Mrs. James Occom (Princess Tocoomwas).. .S-48 

Getchell, Miss Lillie S Twiggs 

Gill, Miss Nancy L-8 

Gleaves, Miss Evelina Porter Greer 

Goff, Mrs. Nathan (Kathrine Penney) Goff 

Goldsborough, Miss Lucetta Pennington Goldsborough (2d) 

Gorgas, Miss Mary Taylor 

Grace, Mrs. Eugene G. (Marion Brown) McDermut 

Grady, Mrs. Ronan C. (Louise M.) S-29 

Graham, Miss Lois Brant 

Gray, Mrs. Russell (Amy Heard) L-2 

Greene, Miss Juliet E. Bertram Bainbridge {3d) 

Grieshaber, Mrs. H. E. (Eldora Corson) S-44 

Griffin, Miss Helen Neches 

Gunn, Mrs. Alfred S. (Esther Roberts) Ingraham 

Guthrie, Miss Alice S Murray 

Gygax, Mrs. Felix X. (Estelle Ise) Chew 

Haig, Miss Agnes M Teal 

Hale, Miss Mary Cameron Hale 

Hall, Miss Alice Lee Mullany 

Hamlin, Miss Anna Maury 

Harris, Mrs. Herbert H. (Florence Knowles) Thompson 

Harris, Miss Ruth Jane R-23 

Hascal, Miss Ruth 1 Boggs 

Hatch, Miss Eleanor Norton O-14 

Haugh, Mrs. J. Edmond (Helen Brooks) Hatfield 

Haulenbeck, Mrs. John (Katherine Donnelly) Trenton (2d) 

Hawkins, Miss Dollie Hamilton Hamilton 

Heathcote, Miss Grace Anthony 

Hellman, Miss Florence S-34 

Herndon, Miss Lucy Taylor Herndon 

Hibbard, Mrs. Charles (Mary McQuillan) S-43 

Hill, Mrs. Edward B. (Leslie Farwell) Stnngham (2d) 

Hill, Miss Katharine Langdon R-6 



[313] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Hill, Mrs. William L. (Katherine Sweetser) S-j 

Hilliard, Mrs. Robert B. (Grace Powell) Palmer 

Hincamp, Mrs. C. N. (Frances Miller) Maddox 

Holt, Mrs. Ralph W. (Fay Sly) H-8 

Hoopes, Miss Mary H-§ 

Howard, Mrs. Herbert S. (Mary Morris) S-4 

Howe, Mrs. Charles M. (Virginia N.) McLanahan 

Howe, Miss Mary S-13 

Hubbard, Miss Anna S Pecos 

Huber, Miss Clara M S-jq 

Hughes, Miss Louisa McFarland 

Hulbert, Mrs. Henry L. (Victoria Akelytis) Hulbert 

Hull, Miss Elizabeth Hull (jd) 

Humphreys, Miss Letitia A Humphreys 

Hunt, Miss Virginia Livingstone Hunt 

Hutcheson, Mrs. Grote (Rosalie St. George) Hopewell 

Hutchins, Mrs. Henry A. (Barbara Kerley) S-42 

Imbach, Miss Frances Virginia Avocet 

Ingram, Mrs. N. E. (Betty) Ingram 

Irvine, Mrs. Robert L. (Janet Klink) R-19 

Jackson, Miss Evelyn H Gamble 

James, Mrs. H. H. (Louisa Dobbin) Dobbin 

Jayne, Miss Anna Maxwell Somers 

Johnson, Mrs. Frank. (Grace Coomer) Rensbazv 

Johnson, Mrs. Granville W. (Jeannette Fallon) Sigourney 

Johnson, Miss Virginia Belle S-18 

Johnstone, Miss Ethel Murray Kidder 

Jones, Mrs. Andrew (Julia Wood) Montgomery (2d) 

Jordan, Mrs. John N. (Lilian Terhune) AA-3 (T-j) 

Kahn, Mrs. Julius (Florence Prag) James Francis Burnes 

Kalk, Mrs. Frank G. (Flora Stanton) Kalk 

Kane, Miss Florence Bayard Kane 

Kautz, Mrs. Austin (Louise Hovey) Hovey 

Kellogg, Mrs. Frank W. (Florence Scripps) Claxton 

Kellond, Mrs. Frederic G. (Katherine Selfridge). . .Selfridge 

Kempff, Miss Alice Warbler 

Keyes, Mrs. George S. (Emma Reed) Brooks 

Kimberley, Miss Elsie S Kimberley 

King, Mrs. Frank R. (Allene A.) King 

King, Mrs. Alvin Hovey (Lilian) AA-i (T-i) 

Kissick, Mrs. John A. (Irene Gauthier) N-6 

Kittinger, Miss Genevieve S-19 

Knapp, Mrs. Julia Long Long 

Kniskern, Mrs. Lewis T. (Vera Culver) Woodcock 

Kolb, Miss Elizabeth Pennsylvania (jtb) 

Kollock, Miss Sarah Campbell Tattnall 

Laizure, Mrs. Dallas (May Morgan) R-21. 

Lake, Mrs. Simon (Margaret Vogel) S-75 



[314] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Lamberton, Miss Isabel Stedman Lamberton 

Land, Mrs. Emory S. (Elizabeth Stiles) S-i 

Lane, Miss Nancy La Vallette 

Lansdale, Mrs. Philip V. (Ethel Sidney Smith) Lansdale 

Large, Miss Margaret Lardner Lardner 

Latimer, Miss Mary Richards L-n 

T A/r r> \Laivrence (3d) and 

Lawrence, Miss Ruth \ L azvrence ( 4 th) 

Learned, Mrs. Frank (Ellin Craven) T. A.M. Craven (2d) 

Leary, Mrs. C. Frederic (Mary Hocken) Leary 

Leaverton, Miss Dorothy Oriole 

LeBreton, Miss Marguerite S McDougal 

Lee, Mrs. Brooke (Elizabeth Wilson) Maryland (3d) 

Leopold, Mrs. Harry (Mary Downey) Williams 

Lewis, Mrs. John W. (Leonore Musto) K-8 

Lindley, Mrs. William P. (Frances Smith) Zeilin 

Litchfield, Mrs. John R. (Martha D.) Litchfield 

Lloyd, Mrs. Edward (Kate Thompson) Smith Thompson 

Logue, Mrs. J. Washington (Mary Barry) Ericsson (2d) 

Loper, Mrs. Herbert B. (Eleanor Opie) S-24 

Loud, Miss Dorothy Neptune 

Lysolm, Miss Maren Eider 

Mack, Miss Helen R-12 

MacLeish, Miss Ishbel M MacLeish 

MacNee, Mrs. Forrest (Ellen Breck) Breck 

Mahan, Miss Ellen K Mahan 

Major, Miss Elizabeth Daly Talbot 

Mann, Miss Alice Wright West Virginia (2d) 

Marcus, Mrs. Arnold (Helen Cowles) Marcus 

Marshall, Mrs. Albert W. (Mabel Flinn) K-i 

Martin, Miss Eleanor Schley 

Martin, Mrs. Shelton E. (Charlotte Barnes) Barry (2d) and (3d) 

Mayfield, Mrs. Irving H. (Juliet Borden) O-16 

McBeath, Miss Camille Mississippi (3d) 

McBirney, Miss Dorothy Vera Tulsa 

McCarthy, Miss Eileen Dolores Mervine 

McCawley, Miss Eleanor Laurie McCawley 

McCay, Miss Caroline Hewes Partridge 

McCord, Mrs. Charles G. (Florence Christian) R-3 

McCormick, Miss Katherine "*. McCormick 

McEntee, Miss Ruth Chamberlain K-2 

McGrath, Miss Justine Paul Hamilton 

McGregor, Miss Katie-bel K-7 

McGuire, Mrs. M. J. (Mary M.) Crane 

McIlvaine, Mrs. Gilbert (Elizabeth Breese) Breese 

McKean, Mrs. Josiah S. (Julie McHawxhurst) Decatur (3d) 

McKinstrey, Miss Laura Livingston Melvin 

McMichael, Honorable Morton Susquehanna (1st) 

McNab, Mrs. Gavin (Wilma Davidson) Stoddert 

McNeil, Mrs. Archibald W. (Ann Orr) S-16 



[315] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

McRitchie, Mrs. Ernest P. (Isabel R.) William Jones 

Meade, Miss Annie Paulding Meade 

Means, Miss Agnes Dorsey 

Melville, Mrs. Max (Ruth Nicholson) Colorado (3d) 

Meredith, Mrs. William F. (Julia D.) Meredith 

Micou, Mrs. Benjamin (Ella Herbert) Herbert 

Miles, Mrs. Alfred H. (Elizabeth Gilmer) Gilmer 

Millard, Mrs. Lyman C. (Virginia Lynch) Shaw 

Miller, Mrs. Elizabeth McCalla McCalla 

Miller, Mrs. Frank (Anne Hallock) N-y 

Miller, Miss Marjorie Freeland G—2 

Mills, Miss Emma DeLong DeLong (2d) 

Mills, Mrs. Roy P. (Edith Newton) S-51 

Mohun, Miss Marjorie Laub 

Moody, Miss Mary E Moody 

Morehead, Mrs. Albert H. (Bianca Noa) Noa 

Morgan, Mrs. Robert (Elizabeth Mahan) Rail 

Moritz, Miss Fanny Chandler Flamingo 

Moyer, Miss Mildred Widgeon 

Mull, Miss Malinda Bennett Ratbburne 

Mulvey, Miss Gladys V Whipple (2d) 

Munroe, Mrs. William R. (Katherine Johnson) L-6, S-28 

Murphy, Mrs. J.J O-15 

Murray, Miss Helen Irving Gillis 

Neitzel, Miss Marian Louise Hazelwood 

Neel, Miss Helen Woolston Melville 

Nelson, Miss Isabella Cardinal 

Nolan, Mrs. John I. (Mae Hunt) Young 

Norton, Mrs. Edmund R. (Elizabeth Knowles) R-24 

Noyes, Mrs. Boutelle (Charlotte Luce) Luce 

Noyes, Miss Julia Edwards Edwards 

Nutting, Mrs. Daniel C. (Priscilla Dew) Hart 

Oddie, Mrs. Clarence M. (Alice Treanor) K-3 

Offley, Miss Margaret Cuyama 

Olding, Mrs. James P. (Ethelyn Hofer) K-4 

Overton, Mrs. Margaret C Overton 

Palmer, Miss Alice H Burns 

Palmer, Mrs. James E. (Anna Key) S-q 

Palmer, Mrs. Leigh C. (Bessie Draper) Turner 

Parker, Mrs. George T. (Kathryn Randall) S-14 

Parrott, Miss Julia Bizzell Parrott 

Parslow, Mrs. William J. (Cora Pendleton) Falcon 

Patterson, Miss Elizabeth Bache Pelican 

Paulding, Miss Mary Hubbard James K. Paulding 

Payne, Miss Marion Kingsbury S-10 

Peabody, Mrs. Frederick G. (Gertrude Douglas) Finch 

Peters, Mrs. Andrew J. (Martha Phillips) Dale (3d) 

Pfeil, Mrs. Rudolph (Josephine Schultz) Milwaukee (3d) 

[316] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Philip, Mrs. Barrett (Mazie F.) Philip 

Pierce, Mrs. Josiah (Ulrica Dahlgren) Dahlgren (2d) 

Plagemann, Mrs. Fred A. (Nellie Cloak) Red Wing 

Poe, Mrs. Burns (Elsie Grumbling) Medusa 

Pooke, Miss Evelyn Intrepid 

Potter, Miss Penelope R-8 

Potts, Mrs. Templin M. (Marie Charlier) Farragut (2d) 

Powell, Mrs. Joseph W. (Bertha Osterhout) Reid (2d) and Alwyn 

Proctor, Miss Jennie M Raleigh (3d) 

Provance, Mrs. Joseph B Pigeon 

Pruitt, Mrs. Belle Pruitt 

Radford, Miss Mary Lovell Radford 

Rae, Miss Lillian Penguin 

Ramsay, Miss Mary Virginia Ramsay 

Ransom, Mrs. Philip C. (Mary Sheafe) R-10 

Reed, Mrs. James (Laura Maltby) Farquhar 

Reynolds, Miss Alyne Asheville 

Rhodes, Mrs. Gertrude Carol Curlew 

Richardson, Miss Helen Langdon Pillsbury 

Riner, Miss Elizabeth Kennison 

Robert, Miss Elizabeth Stark Vireo 

Roberts, Miss Helen L Tennessee (5th) 

Roberts, Miss Sara Dean M-i 

Roberts, Mrs. Thomas G. (Ethel Trowbridge) K-6 

Robinson, Miss Elizabeth Alden Toucey 

Robinson, Miss Elise Biddle Biddle (2d) 

Robinson, Mrs. Richard H. M. (Rosalind Smith) R-25 

Robinson, Miss Rosalind ■> L-5 

Rodgers, Mrs. Christopher R. P. (Alice Meyer) Meyer 

Rodgers, Miss Helen Theodosia Rodgers (2d) 

Rolph, Miss Annette R Lamson (2d) 

Rolph, Miss Georgina H Champlin 

Roosevelt, Miss Anna Eleanor S-11 

Roosevelt, Mrs. George E. (Julia Addison) Morris 

Roosevelt, Miss Grace Green S-46 

Roper, Mrs. Jesse M. (Harriet H.) Roper 

Ross, Miss Esther Arizona (3d) 

Rosseter, Mrs. John H. (Alice May) S-40 

Ruhm, Mrs. Thomas (Edana Collins) Jupiter 

Rundquist, Miss Astrid v Heron 

Rush, Miss Catherine L-10 

Russell, Miss Helen M S-36 

Russell, Miss Marion Soley R-18 

Ryden, Mrs. Roy W. (Garnett Rainey) S-8 

Sands, Miss Jane McCue Sands 

Satterlee, Miss Rebecca Eloise Satterlee 

Schlabach, Mrs. Ross P. (Vera Hobart) S-25 

Schlegel, Miss Agnes Forshew Lapwing 

Scott, Miss Elizabeth Strother Richmond (3d) 



[317] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Scrimgeour, Mrs. Bruce (Anastasia Miller) Tern 

Scudder, Miss Anne Randolph Perry (4th) 

Searles, Mrs. Thomas M. (Clifford B.) S-33 

Sears, Miss Barbara S-23 

Sears, Miss Constance O-7 

Selfridge, Miss Evelyn Tingey Robinson 

Sewall, Miss Dorothy Neville Evans 

Sewall, Miss Dorothy S Manley 

Shapley, Miss Elizabeth Harrison Kilty 

Sharkey, Mrs. William J. (Mary E.) Sharkey 

Sherman, Mrs. Edwin A. (Adaline Dodd) Sloat 

Sherman, Mrs. Frederick C. (Fanny Jessop) O-g 

Sicard, Mrs. Montgomery H. (Adelaide Ireland) Sicard 

Siebert, Miss Eleanor Anne Nevada (3d) 

Simons, Miss Henrietta Amelia Idaho (3d) 

Simons, Mrs. Manley H. (Katherine Nazro) Dozvnes 

Simpson, Miss Caroline Sterett Simpson 

Sims, Mrs. William S. (Anne Hitchcock) Delphy 

Smallwood, Mrs. Robert F. (Annie Graham) Graham 

Smith, Mrs. Curtis R. (Ruth Sturtevant) Sturtevant 

Smith, Mrs. George K. (Lisa Wood) Wood 

Smith, Mrs. Josephine T Gillis 

Smith, Miss Marjorie Sampson 

Smith, Mrs. William T. (Gertrude Hammond) Turkey 

Snyder, Mrs. John E. (Minnie Webb) Thrush 

Sperrin, Miss Marion Chewink 

Stafford, Mrs. Edward (Ahnighito Peary) Peary 

Stahl, Mrs. Albert W. (Blanche Vinton) R-4 

Stalnaker, Mrs. Edwards S. (Marion La Tourette). .S-30 

Stanley, Mrs. Henry A. (Gladys Curry) Lark 

Stephens, Miss Mabel Beatrice Haraden 

Stevens, Miss Anna Conyngham Conyngham 

Stevens, Miss Marie Christie Stevens 

Stevens, Mrs. Robert M. (Margaretta Stewart) Stewart (2d) 

Stewart, Miss Francesca Lewis Southard 

Stotesbury, Mrs. Edward T. (Eva Roberts) Ellis 

Stowe, Mrs. Irving E. (Mary Ingalls) R-q 

Strauss, Miss Helen Livingston Reuben James 

Stribling, Miss Mary Calvert Stribling 

Strong, Miss Wathen Dallas Dallas 

Sullivan, Miss Gladys Fuller 

Summers, Miss Jean Washington (jth) 

Sumner, Miss Margaret Sumner 

Sutcliffe, Mrs. Arthur T. (Alice Crary) Fulton (2d) 

Suzzalo, Mrs. Henry (Edith Moore) Nitro 

Swasey, Miss Mary Lovering Swasey 

Tarbell, Miss Virgie Tarbell 

Tate, Miss Virginia Mary Welborn C. Wood 

Tawresey, Miss Edith V Sandpiper 

Taylor, Mrs. Charles T. (Sophie Davis) Nicholson (2d) 



[318] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Thayer, Miss Mary Borland Waters 

Thomas, Mrs. Clarence C. (Evelyn Martin) Thomas 

Thomas, Mrs. Francis P. (Ruth Gridley) Gridley 

Thomas, Mrs. John J. (Frances Walker) Walker 

Thomas, Mrs. Raymond G. (Louise Timanus) S-17 

Tillman, Miss Mary Y Tillman 

Tittman, Mrs. Charles (Jean Crosby) Crosby 

Todd, Miss Dorothy Mae Chauncey (2d) 

Tower, Mrs. Roderick (Flora Whitney) Whitney 

Tracy, Mrs. Frank B. (Elizabeth Cornell) Tracy 

Trever, Mrs. George A. (Bess McMillan) Trever 

Trevor, Mrs. George S. (Alice Haven) Gregory 

Trevorrow, Miss Mary Eleanor Stansbury 

Tucker, Miss Sallie Macintosh Preble (4th) 

Tudor, Mrs. Charles Edgar (Lillie Fogg) Cincinnati (3d) 

Turpin, Miss Evelyn Wainwright Wainwright 

Tynan, Mrs. Joseph J. (Margaret McGinty) McKee (2d) 

Tynan, Miss Margaret J S-32 

Villaire, Miss Marie Eliza Cormorant 

Wakeman, Mrs. Samuel W. (Edith Vickery) Little 

Walker, Mrs. George A. (Maisie Genevra) S-31 

Walling, Mrs. Ralph G. (Norma R.) Isherwood 

Ward, Miss Dorothy Hall Ward 

Watkins, Mrs. John H. (Anne Spencer) Semmes 

Welles, Miss Alma Freeman Welles 

Wells, Mrs. Hewitt (Elise Campau) Woolsey 

Wells, Miss Juanita Doane Wadsworth 

Westcott, Miss Eleanor Van Dyke S-6 

Wetherbee, Mrs. Charles P. ({Catherine Brown) ...Buchanan 

White, Miss Louise Bushnell Omaha (2d) 

Wickes, Miss Ann E. Young Wickes 

Widdows, Mrs. Richard G. (Ethel Mull) Alameda 

Wilkes, Miss Carrie McIver Wilkes (2d) 

Willett, Mrs. Philip J. (Elizabeth Sullivan) Aulick 

Williams, Mrs. Henry (Maud Steers) Flusser (2d), O-4 

Williams, Miss Mary Mason Mason 

Williamson, Mrs. William P. (Florence Bean) Williamson 

Willis, Miss Elsie Jean Bobolink 

Wilson, Mrs. Edward R. (Alice Baer) R-16 

Wilson, Miss Mary Badger George E. Badger 

Winslow, Miss Natalie Emelie Winslow (2d) 

Wood, Miss Margaretta R-5 

Woodbury, Mrs. Gordon (Charlotte Woodbury) S-12 

Woods, Mrs. James S. (Dorothy Day) Gwin 

Worden, Mrs. Daniel T. (Emilie Neilson) Worden (2d ) 

Wurtsbaugh, Miss Eleanor Percival 

Wright, Mrs. Carroll Q. (Dessaline Shepard) 0-6 

Wyche, Mrs. Thomas J. (Phillippa Ludwell) S. P. Lee 

Wyman, Mrs. Henry L. (Margaret Myers) S-7 

[319] 



INDEX 



SPONSOR WARSHIP 

Youmans, Miss Emma Grace Grebe 

Zane, Mrs. Randolph T. (Barbara Stephens) California (jd) 

Zane, Miss Marjorie Zane 

Zell, Miss Anne Claggett S-20 



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