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Full text of "Shorthorn"

ii5/oo/s8 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/shorthorn1942stoc 




SloaWOGt SCHOOL 



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Ed/for: 

Peter Edw. van Alstyne 

Business Manager: 
Emery Thoren 





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The Director of the Stockbridge 
School came to his present post in 1924 
after a training and experience ^vhich 
admirably fitted him for its important 
duties and responsibilities. A graduate 
of this College in the Class of 1908, 
with a bachelor's degree also from Bos- 
ton University, he immediately entered 
upon his life's work of agricultural 
education as Principal of the Peter- 
sham Agricultural High School. The 
pathway of professional service which 
he followed from there led to Parsons- 
field Seminary in Maine where he was 
principal, to the New York State 
School of Agriculture at St. Lawrence 
University, of which he was director 
and thence to Amherst. There was an 
interruption of two years of war service 
in 1917 to 1919, during which he com- 
manded the 281st Aero Squadron as 
First Lieutenant Air Service. 

The sound development of the Stock- 
bridge School during the eighteen 
years of his administration and the 
splendid record of its graduates are 
ample testimony to the wisdom of his 
leadership. Stockbridge is a unique 
institution of whose record of service 
the College is very proud. 

The Director's keen interest in "his 
boys" whose histories he loves to relate 
with an eloquence beyond words is in 
no small measure responsible for his 
splendid success. 

— Robert D. Hawley 



T 



OKtVlOKD 



Within the covers of this 1942 Short- 
horn we can only hope to record a 
few of the highlights of the two happy 
years spent at Stockbridge. 

Our efforts will not have been in vain 
if in the future, while reminiscing 
through its pages, it serves as a key to 
many fond memories. 



The Editors 




SENIORS 



F R E 




■ACUITY 



ATHLETICS 



ACTIVITIES 





SHORTHORN STAFF FOR 1942 



Editor Peter Edward van Alstyne 

Assistant Editor Francis DeVos 

Business Manager Emery Thoren 

Secretary Edith Colgate 

Literary Editor J. Edward Craft 

Assistant Sally Gidley 

Statistics Editor Lina Dibble 

Assistant Sally Wells 

Assistant G . Gregory Sidelinger 



Activities Editor Peggy Strong 

Assistant Myrt Davis 

Photography Donald Lauder 

Malcolm Roberts Kenneth Coombs 

Sports Editor Robert Williams 

Assistant Reed M. Wade 

Assistant Walley Orcutt 

Art Editor Stu Gilmore 

Assistant Alain DeLeiris 

Faculty Advisor "Pop" Barrett 




ROLLIN HAYES BARRETT 



Thus ends "Pop" Barrett's eleventh 
year as faculty advisor to the Short- 
horn Board and it has been a pleasure 
to work with a man so popular with 
both the old and young. "Pop" has 
won a warm spot in the heart of every 
member of the board by his friendly 
and appropriate suggestions that he 
has given us. 

May we take this time and place 
to wish him the best of luck in years 
to come. 

The Editors 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 




Phelps, Strong, Mills, Johnson 

President HOMER O. MILLS 

Vice President HARRY F. JOHNSON 

Secretary PEGGY E. STRONG 

Treasurer DAVID L. PHELPS 



CLASS OF 1942 

Last year the senior class was only 
a group of green freshmen seeking 
knowledge in their chosen fields. They 
walked through the buildings, eyes 
wide with wonder. However it doesn't 
take a student long to become used 
to the routine. They are here such 
a short time that they have to imitate 
the chameleon which absorbs the colors 
of his environment, and most of them 
do this so successfully that in practi- 
cally no time at all it becomes difficult 



to tell a Fieri major from a clump of 
lavender cotton, a brown eyed An. 
Hus. adict from the gentle cow, a 
Vegetable Gardener from a bunch of 
carrots, a "Mayflower" descendant 
from the Plymouth Rock Hen, or a 
Hotel Stewarding major from a stuffed 
turkey. To say nothing of the "Dairy 
Maids" who begin to look Uke butter 
crunch sundaes. No sooner have they 
acquired these various colors than back 
they flash to their original green, as 
off they must go to make life miserable 
for their respective employers. 



12 



Breathing heavily from overwork 
and eager for any change — even for 
the class room, the Seniors came back 
from their summer placement training. 
Before they had time to catch their 
breaths, torrents of advice were 
showered upon them. You are needed 
more at home than in the army. Sit 
tight! Yes, war has been declared on 
Japan — but the class of '42 kept its 
head above water. After thinking it 
over, most of them decided to finish 
their studies. The boys are ready to 
take care of the problems in feeding 
the nation, and the girls are ready to 
take the places of the men called into 
service. 



The excitement of war was not ap- 
parent as far as the social activities of 
the class were concerned. The seniors 
had their usual round of formal dances, 

informal "vie" parties, and the class 
was well represented in the annual 
play. 

Except for a "slight" speed-up in the 
school program the year was normal. 
Yet, the senior class is probably a little 
more serious than those of previous 
years for sometime back. One thing is 
noticeably missing — fear of not finding 
one's niche when graduation comes. 
Everyone knows that trained young 
men and women are needed. 





13 







%m m 



BARTLETT 



"Gibbie" 



Poultry 



GILBERT GEORGE ALLEN 

Bernardston, Mass. 

Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Cross Country 1, 2; Track 1, 2. 
Diminutive, conservative, bashful, quiet form of a lad. 
Hobby: Sports. 

EVERETT EDWARD BARTLETT, JR. "Squash " Floriculture 

Berlin, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Varsity Football 2; Varsity 

Hockey 1, 2. 

Rarely smiles, but it is worth waiting for — "iron man" in footba'l 

and hockey — can apply what he knows, which is plenty — quiet at 

all times. Hobby: Sports. 



"Currie" 



Pomology 



MELVILLE CURRIE BEATON 

Wareham, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma, Vice-President. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Pomology Club 1; Shorthorn 

Board 2; Student Council 2. 

"The Cranberry Kid" — smooth looking — smartly dressed — good 

natured — intelligent — frank — good times centered about him. 

Hobby: Sports. 



"Ray" 



Dairy 



RENE EMILE BEAUDOIN 

South Hadley, Mass. 

Commuter — most serious of the class — library of notes — grind — 

practically married. Hobby: Sports. 

ARTHUR HENRY BEYER "Art" Horticulture 

Springfield, Mass. 

Activities: Orchestra 1, 2; Track 1; Horticultural Show 1, 2. 
Swarthy complexioned — always smiling — better than average 
intelligence — book-worm — swing fanatic and trumpet virtuoso. 
Hobby: Collecting swing records. 

BEAUDOIN 



STOCKBRIDGE 




14 





SHORTHORN 



^^l^^ll 
"'T^ 




BLANCHARD 



RALPH LYMAN BLANCHARD "Blanche" Horticulture 

Chester, Mass. 

Activities; Committee of Horticultural Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; 

Horticultural Show 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Dramatics 1, 2; Cross 

Country 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 2. 

Short and rugged, ruddy complexioned — jovial temperament — 

wrestler — ardent barn dancer — typical, corn-fed lad — ^lil' Atne.' 

of the Hort. class. Hobby: Photography. 

GEORGE THOMAS BRITT "Britty" Dairy 

Amherst, Mass. 

Activities: Dairy Club 2. 

Quiet local boy — devoted Bacteriology student — Tom and flivvers 

don't mix — shiek — keeps the town girls happy. Hobby: Bowling. 



Poultry 



LINCOLN AUGUSTUS BROGI "Link" 

Arlington Mass. 

Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Hockey 1, 2. 

Sportsman — friendly — good company — no vices — conscientious — 

plays hard, studies equally hard — a good listener with a ready 

smile. Hobby: Hunting and fishing. 

WILLIAM RAYMOND BROOKMAN, JR. "Bill" Animal Husbandry 

Williamstown, Mass. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Outing 

Club 1; Little International Committee 2. 

Mighty man for his size — loves his square dancing — conscientious 

worker — ambitious — a "Black and White' admirer. 

Hobby: Hunting and fishing. 

FRANK LEROY BROWN, JR. "Brownie" Poultry 

Adams, Mass. 

Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Intermural Basket- 
ball 2; Vice-President of Poultry Club. 

Tall — good looking — independent and dependable — romantically 
inclined — conscientious toward his studies. Hobby: Traveling. 

BROOKMAN BROWN 






Animal Husbandry 



EDITH COLGATE "Spud" 

Billerica, Mass. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma, Secretary. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1; Outing 

Club 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; Vice President of Outing Club; 

Board of Little International 2; Dramatics 1, 2. 

Full of fun and ideas — intelligent — one of the Chicago trio — 

interested in Thoroughbreds and Airedales. 

Hobbies: Horses and dogs. 

ROBERT EDWARD COLLINS "Tom" Poultry 

Orleans, Mass. 

Activities: Band 1; Poultry Club 1, 2. 

Barn dancer — Nick's shadow — undisturbable — retiring. 

Hobby: Sailboating. 

KENNETH MELZAR COOMBS "Ken" Floriculture 

Reading, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Chairman for Maintenance 

Committee for Horticultural Show; Assistant Photography Editor 

for Shorthorn 2; Student Council 2. 

Quick witted — pleasant personality — on deck for a good time. 

NORMAN GERARD COURNOYER "Norm" Hotel Stewarding 

Northampton, Mass. 

Activities: Pandocios Club 1, 2; Recreation Conference 1, 2; 
Co-chairman in Horticultural Show in the Hotel Stewarding Booth. 
Commuter — took the fatal step on placement (a wife) — life of the 
class — sure to succeed in his profession. Hobby: Music. 

ROBERT LEONARD COUSINS "Bob" Floriculture 

West Concord, Mass. Kappa Kappa, Historian. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1; 

Cross Country 1; Hockey 1. 

Quiet — small — one of the brains of the Flori. division — as fast on 

his feet as he is with his brain. 

COURNOYER 



STOCK BRIDGE 




16 




SHORTHORN 



JAMES EDWARD CRAFT "J. E." Horticulture 

Worcester, Mass. 
Alpha Tau Gamma, Historian. 

Activities: Dance Committee 1; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Newman 
Club 1, 2; Shoi-thorn Board 2; Literary Editor for the Shorthorn. 

Short — well-groomed — excellent English — well-liked by all — intel- 
lectual. Hobby: Classical music and bridge. 



AURELIO ROCCO DeLUCIA "Al" 

Methuen, Mass. 
Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2. 
Sarcastic — thorough — techn ically minded. 
Hobby: Mechanical drawing. 



FRANCIS DeVOS 

Bloomfield, Conn. 



"Frannie" 



Poultry 



Floriculture 



Activities: Dramatics 1, 2; Assistant Editor Shorthorn 2; Com- 
munity Chest Committee. 

Amiable — strong-minded — ambitious — well-liked by everyone — ■ 
tops in all studies — willing to do more than his half. 
Hobby: Photography. 

RAYMOND CHARLES DeYOUNG "Ray" Dairy 

Abington, Mass. 
Kappa Kappa, Vice-President. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2. 
Uncontested laugh — flunked assistant professorship — lucky 
Hendries. 



ing 



Animal Husbandry 



LINA ABIGAIL DIBBLE "D 

East Longmeadow, Mass. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

Activities: President of Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Dance 

Committee 2; Dramatics 1, 2; Shorthorn Board. 

Mistress of all trades — Longmeadow's contribution to the An. Hus. 

duet — student — scholar — good sport — member of the Chicago trio. 

Hobby: Horses. 



DeYOUNG 




17 




DOUGHERTY 



NICHOLAS DeLISIO "Nick" Dairy 

Swampscott, Mass. Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2, Co-President. 

Ice cream kid from North Shore— good things come in small 

packages — one of the intelligentsia of the class — quiet and likeable. 

Hobby: Photography and hunting. 



Horticulture 



BURNETT JOHN DOLEVA 

Amherst, Mass. 

Activities: Floriculture Club 

Basketball 1, 2. 

Athlete plus scholar — prankster — live wire of the Hort. class — 

Professor's prompter — a way with the women. Hobby; Sports. 



"Lefty" 

Horticultural Show 1, 2; 



1, 2 



"Will" 



Dairy 



WILSON HENRY DOUGHERTY, JR. 

Springfield, Mass. Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Varsity Football 1, 2; 
Pepsodent Kid — one of the midnite food-raiders at A. T. G. — 
perverted sense of humor — likeable — weekend reserved for Skippj-. 



"Jack" 



Animal Husbandry 



JOHN ELIOT DOWNEY 

Dudley, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa, President. 

Activities: Air Raid Warden, Kappa Kappa; Animal Husbandry 

Club 1; Outing Club 1; Student Council 1, 2; Varsity Football 

1, 2, Captain; Intermural Basketball 1, 2; Varsity Basketball 1. 

Triple threat on the gridiron — taxi driver for the gang — friend of 

all — willing worker and leader at all times. Hobby: Sports. 



"Howie" 



Horticulture 



HOWARD ALDEN FIFE 

West Springfield, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Secretary Horticultural Club 

2; Outing Club; 4-H Club 1. 

Short, husky — wirey-haired — housekeeper for Blanchard and E. 

Johnson — fiery temper— pipe smoker— traveler — studious — good 

worker. 

DOWNEY 



STOCKBRIDGE 




18 




SHORTHORN 



FRESCHi 

ALVAN FREDERICK FRANK "Brooklyn" 

Brooklyn, New York. 

Activities: Dramatics 1, 2; Poultry Club 1, 2; 
Basketball 2. 

Well-read — opinionated — dramatic — witty — intellectual. 
Hobby: Stamps. 

"Jersey" 



Poultry 

Intermural 

Horticulture 



SHELDON LEO FRESCHI 

New Milford, New Jersey. 
Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Floriculture Club 1, 2; Horticultural Show 1, 2; 
Christian Federation 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 2. 
Very short — Stockbridge's "Joisy" representative — excels at bowl- 
ing, ping-pong, pool, and cards. 



Animal Husbandry 



CHARLES BENJAMIN GARY "Chick" 

Westfield, Mass. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Vice-President 4-H Club 
1, 2; Varsity Football 2. 

Tall, dark and handsome — Rip van Winkle of the An. Hus. class — 
willing worker — friend — athlete. 

CHARLES BROMAGE GIBBS "Gabby" Dairy 

Saugus, Mass. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Varsity Football 1, 2; Intermural 
Basketball 1. 

Easy going — fast with the inuendo, slow otherwise — always starved 
Hobby: Baseball. 



-sociable — well-liked. 



SARAH GIDLEY "Sally" Floriculture 

East Freetowm, Mass. 
Sigma Sigma Sigma, Treasurer. 

Activities: Dance Committees 1, 2; Dramatics 1, 2; Horticultural 
Show 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; Freshman Class Secretary. 
East Freetown's glamor girl — vivacious — female lawyer — accommo- 
dating — known to some as "Ski-jump." 




19 




STUART GILMORE "Stu" Animal Husbandry 

Acushnet, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma, House Manager. 

Activities; Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; 

Little International Committee 2; Air Raid First Aid Warden of 

Alpha Tau Gamma; Shorthorn Art Editor. 

Scholar — cartoonist — satarist — poet (in a limited way — )snow 

sculptor — ready wit. Hobby: Cartooning and model farm. 

STEPHEN GILMORE "Steve" Horticulture 

Acushnet, Mass. Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Horticultural Club 1, 2; 

Manager of Hockey 2. 

Student and scholar — ready wit — dependable — well liked — "Lucky 

Teeter" cyclist — Forester. Hobby: Collecting Indian Relics. 



CHARLES WELLINGTON GLASS "Sentor" Horticulture 

Lexington, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Club 1, 2. 

Lanky, raw-boned colt of the Hort. class — unanimously elected 

Senator of Stockbridge — slow to catch on — victim of many pranks. 

ALAN EDWARD GREENHALGH, JR. "Moonglow" Dairy 

Lowell, Mass. Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Dah-y Club 1, 2; Football 1, 2; Track 2. 

A friend that is a friend — keen sense of humor — heaviest program 

in Stockbridge — likes Bacteriology. 

Hobbies: Swimming and Football. 

"Gris" 



CHARLES RIDER GRISWOLD "Gris" Dairy 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2. 

Conn, lad — good student — dry humor — irritating laugh — Syracuse 

minded. 

GREENHALGH GRISWOLD 



STOCKBRIDGE 




20 




SHORTHORN 



HIBBARD 



Poultry 



JOHN MANSFIELD GROTON, JR. "Johnny" 

Westerly, Rhode Island 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Cross Country 1, 2. 

Quiet and reserved — athletic — good looking — mixes study with 

pleasure and comes out on top. Hobby: Baseball. 



Vegetable Gardening 



LINWOOD SKERRY HIBBARD "Lin" 

North Hadley, Mass. 

Activities: 4-H Club 1; Intermural Basketball 1, 2; Cross Country 

1, 2. 

Track star — captain of cross country — likes arguments — very quiet. 

Hobby: Basketball. 



HENRY TYLER HOLIHAN "Snapper" Floriculture 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Activities: Floriculture Club 1; Horticultural Show 2; Outing 
Club 1. 

Optimistic — good natured — always willing to talk about orchids — 
Conn, delegate — nuts about color photography — believes in work- 
ing to music — a "barrel" of fun. Hobby: Photography. 



ill"' 



Dairy 



WILLIAM FRANCIS HOPE 

Springfield, Mass. 
Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1; Intermural Basketball 1, 2. 
Friendly — cooperative — never hears reveille — dislikes mother-in- 
laws. Hobby: Sports. 



JOHN ANDREW HUNTER "Jack" 

Gardner, Mass. 



Animal Husbandry 



Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Outing 
Club 1; Varsity Football and Hockey 1, 2; Intermural Baskttball 1. 
Quiet, studious — bicyclist — jack of all trades — master butcher — - 
square dancing fanatic — practical farmer. Hobby: Horses. 




7«% ^ / 






li^^ 



21 




A. JOHNSON 



Animal Husbandry 



JOHN BEAN HUSSEY "Bean" 

Mattapoisett, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Varsity Football 1, 2 . 

Small — big at heart— baby of the An. Hus. class — happy-go-lucky 

— never a worry — practical joker of A. T. G. — friend to have. 

Hobby: Looking for something to do. 

PAUL RANDOLPH JACKSON, JR. "Randy" Dairy 

Maplewood, New^ Jersey. 

Activities; Dairy Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2. 

Excellent student — popular — Charles Atlas has nothing on Randy. 



"Al" 



Floriculture 



ALLEN CLINTON JOHNSON 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Activities: Floriculture Club 1; Horticultural Show 1, 2. 
Always in good spirits — his life is his car — placement changed him 
for the better. Hobby; A bigger Buick. 

ELDON HJALMAR JOHNSON "Jackson" Horticulture 

Southwick, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Horticultural Club Treasurer 2 years: Dramatics 1; 

Glee Club 2; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1. 

The baby of the class — blonde and handsome — golden voice — dafty 

about Daphne (the plant) — prankster. Hobby: Archery. 

HARRY FREDERICK JOHNSON "Swede" Horticulture 

Centerville, Msss. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Vice-President Class 1, 2; Horticultural Show 1, 2; 

Intermural Basketball 2; Air Raid Fire Warden A. T. G. 

Cape Cod's local defender— A. T. G.'s Fire Chief— Ma Tokarz s 

heaviest eater — hearty sleeper — answers "yes" with a question 

mark — easy going — friend of all — hard worker. 

Hobbies; Hunting and Fishing. 



E. JOHNSON 



H. JOHNSON 



STOCKBRIDGE 




22 




SHORTHORN 



KUZMISKI 

LEO FRED KUNAN "Leo" Floriculture 

Holbrook, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Secretary Student Council — Dance Committee 1; 

Floriculture Club 1; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Varsity Track 1; 

Intermural Basketball 1, 2. 

Debonnaire — always at ease — handsome Hercules — never afraid 

to say what he thinks — sometimes gets sleepy in class. 

Hobby: Fishing. 

FRANCIS THOMAS KUZMISKI "Caesar" Horticulture 

Amherst, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Football 1, 2. 

Tall — immaculately groomed — athlete — constant Butterfield visitor 

— student and lawyer. Hobbies: Golf and Accordion. 



STANISLAW EDWARD LACHUT "Stan" Animal Husbandry 

Dracut, Mass. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Dairy Club 1; 4-H Club 
1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Cross Country 1; Track 1, 2— Captain 2. 
Glenn Cunningham of the "An. Husses" — good natured — the butt 
of many jokes — naturalist — Dracut's five gaited perambulator. 



""George" 



Hotel Stewarding 



GEORGE EDWIN LADD 

Wilbraham, Mass. 

Activities: Dramatics 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Pandocios Club 1, 2; 

Amherst DeMolay Club. 

Master musician of the class — good fellowship — sociable — hard 

worker. Hobby; Organ. e 



DONALD STUART LAUDER "Softie" Dairy 

Amherst. Mass. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; Intermural Bas- 
ketball 1; Dramatics 2. Good student — consistent sleeper — works 
between winks — ambitious. Hobby: Photography. 




23 




MERRIAM 



HAROLD JAMES LEHANE Hal Dairy 

Amherst, Mass. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 2; Intermural 
Baseball 1. , 

Quiet and friendly — conscientious— obliging— doesn t snore when 
he sleeps in class. Hobby: Basketball. 

WILFRED EMIL MEINKE Bud" Horticulture 

Springfield, Mass. 

Activities: President of the Horticultural Club; Horticultural 

Show 1, 2; Dramatics 1; Dance Committtee 1. 

Mustacheoed assistant prof, of Hort. division — official question 

asker — active in school affairs. 



"Arpie" 



ARTHUR ELMORE MERRIAM 

Westminster, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Football. 

Yodeling troubador — composer — industrious — always 

bright side of life— friendly— Li'l Abner in the spirit. 

Hobby: Boxing. 

"Bill" 



Animal Husbandry 



the 



WILLIAM ROBERTS MERRILL "Bill" Dairy 

Norwood, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma, Secretary. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 2; Cross Country 

2; Hockey 1, 2; Track 2; Vice-President of Dairy Club 1. 

Studious — impulsive — witty— full of fun — Lab. Technician. 

Hobby: Sports. 

HOMER OSSIAN MILLS, JR. "Ozzie" Vegetable Gardening 

Wellesley, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Band 1, 2; Dance Committee 

1, 2; Student Council 2; President of Senior Class; Hockey 1, 2; 

Monitor 2. , v, 

Short— dark haired— good-looking-excellent student— personality 
plus. Hobby: Saxophone. 

MERRILL 



STOCKBRIDGE 




24 




MOLITORIS 



SHORTHORN 



Floriculture 



MICHAEL EDWARD MOLITORIS "Mike" 

.Northampton, Mass. 

Northampton commuter — sociable — novel ideas in floral design — 
steadfast to his mannerisms. 



Animal Husbandry 



HOWARD RALPH MOREY "Stub" 

Sturbridge, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa, Secretary. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1; 4-H Club 1, 2; Outing Club 1. 

Tom Thumb of An. Hus. — reserved, yet commands a world of 

mirth — authority on Schicklgruber — one of the boys. 



VICTOR ANTHONY MUSHENSKI "Vic" Floriculture 

Hadley, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Cross Country 2; Track 1. 
Quietest member of "flori class" — says nothing — knows all — one 
of Stockbridge's "fleet-footed tracksters." Hobby: Photography. 



JOHN MARTIN McGUANE "Jack" Poultry 

Greenfield, Mass. 

Activities: Dramatics 1; Poultry Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 

1, 2. 

Witty — excitable — politically inclined. 



Animal Husbandry 



MUSHENSKI 



ROBERT NELS NELSON "Bob" 

Florence Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Commuting classmate — robust — well-groomed — bachelor on week 

days — vacationer after weekends in Springfield — jovial — and a 

great companion. Hobby: Golf. 



MCGUANE 




25 







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a- . 








/, < -t**-^ 




NICHOLS 



NICKERSON 



^m% ^ 



. k- 




OGONOWSKl 



HENRY ALFRED NICHOLS "Nick" Animal Husbandry 

Wllliamstown, Mass. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1; Outing 

Club 1. 

Short — black hair — studious — one of the Berkshire boys — walking 

questionnaire — loves his square dancing. Hobby: Square dancing. 



"Nick" 



Horticulture 



ROBERT CLASON NICKERSON 

Orleans, Mass. 

Activities: Chairman S. S. A. Hort. Dept. in Horticultural Show; 

Horticultural Club 1, 2. 

Short, red-headed wonder of the Hort. division — intellectual — 

witty — ^friendly — baseball player — hard worker. Hobby: Bowling. 

ALEXANDER FRANK OGONOWSKl "Alex" Animal Husbandry 

Dracut, Mass. Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Newman 

Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 2; Manager of the Cross Country 

1, 2; Manager of the Track 2. 

Reserved — quiet spoken — steady with his studies — one of th? 

Bungalow boys — easy going. Hobby: Sports. 



"Moe" 



Horticulture 



ELMER GEORGE ORINGER 

Dorchester. Mass. 

Activities: 4-H Club 1, 2; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Menorah 

Club 1, 2; Outing Club 1, 2. 

Diminutive — curly-headed — pipe smoker — lone wolf — student. 

Hobby: Reading. 



"Jack" 



Hotel Stewarding 



JOHN RAPHAEL PACE 

Watertown, Mass. 

Activities: Dramatics 1, 2; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Pandocios 
Club 1, 2; Recreation Conference 1, 2; Amherst DeMolay Club. 
Bom politician — ready for friendly argument — conscientious — very 
studious — emotions never interfere with his opinions — known as 
the "wolf" to his classmates. Hobby: Crossword puzzles. 



STOCKBRIDGE 




6;-,i . "^a , • I I , ^^^^iL'm. 



26 




SHORTHORN 



PARMOR 



CHARLES JOSEPH PARMOR "Pappy" Hotel Stewarding 

Northampton, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Pandocios Club 1, 2; Recrea- 
tion Conference 2; President of Pandocoios Club; Chairman of 
Recreational Conference — Prize from Boston Steward's Club, $50.00. 
Commutor. Hobby: Golf. 



Animal Husbandry 



GEORGE NORMAN PERRY "Fud" 

Sutton, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma, President. 

Activities: Varsity Football 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2; 
Student Council 2. 

Attractive athlete — never lets studies interfere with pleasure- 
individual laugh — well dressed — neat — enjoys a good time. 
Hobby: Blonds. 

DAVID LANE PHELPS "Baron" 

Rockland, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa, Treasurer. 

Activities: Class Treasurer 1, 2. 

Six topic conversationalist — money man of Stockbridge — Boston's 

best guide — Freshmen fatman — Senior thinman — publicity director 

for White Brothers. 



Dairy 



CHARLES WALTER PUCHALSKI "Puchie" Horticulture 

Northampton, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Basketball 2; Football 1, 2. 
Commuter — blonde — victim of "Barbara-itis" — bashful and blush- 
ful — dynamo of the grid-iron. 

EUGENE CHARLES PUTALA "Gene" Floriculture 

Turners Falls, Mass. 

Activities: Dance Committees 1; Horticultural Show 1 ,2. 

Intellectual — father conservative — has great literary talent — keeps 

marks high — should have taken up acting. 

Hobby: Classical music. 

PUCHALSKI PUTALA 




27 




ROBELLO 

"Manny" 



ROBERTS 

Poultry 



ROEHRICH 



MANUEL HARDING ROBELLO 

Cotuit, Mass. 

Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2; Football 

1, 2. 

A star of the grid-iron — quiet and friendly — a Cape Cod booster. 

Hobby: Sports. 

MALCOLM MacKAY ROBERTS "Mac" Animal Husbandry 

Winchester, Mass. Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 1, 2; 

Dramatics 1, 2; Collegian, Stockbridge column reporter. 

Stockbridge's "scoop" — Assistant Prof, on An. Hus. matters — 

Chicago traveller — stalwart Ayrshire, Angus and Clydesdale 

authority — keeps the Stockbridge girls happy. 

Hobby: Carpentry work, photography. 



"Henry" 



Floriculture 



CARL FREDERICK ROEHRICH 

Bridgeport, Conn. 

Activities: Band 1; Dramatics 1; Horticultural Show 1, 2; 
Orchestra 1; Basketball 1; Intermural Basketball 1, 2; Football 1. 
Full of play — handsome blonde — gets his marks without too much 
studying — likes sports. Hobby: Sports. 



'Bob" 



Pomology 



ROBERT JOSEPH ROSS 

Lawrence, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Outing Club 1. 
Conscientious — has many good points that will be good for most 
of us to have — quiet — shy. Hobbies: Fishing and Beekeeping. 

RONALD EMMERSON SCHOLZ "Ronnie" Animal Husbandry 

State Line, Mass. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1. 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Outing 
Club 1, 2. A Berkshire booster — Stockbridge's No. 1 rugged in- 
dividualist — bow-legged cyclist — worked hard and played harder — 
square dance bug. Hobby: Roller skating. 



STOCKBRIDGE 




28 




SHORTHORN 



DAVID MANLY SHUKER "Dave" 

Needham Heights, Mass. 

Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1. 
Unexcitable — good looking — scholastically inclined. 
Hobby: Stamps and coins. 



Poultry 



ROBERT FRANCIS SIMONI "Bob" Floriculture 

Norwood, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1. 
Business like — conscientious — rather quiet in class — apt to be 
pessimistic at times — knows his flowers. Hobby: Sports. 

LEONARD ROBERT SIMONS "Sim" Dairy 

Providence, Rhode Island. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2. 

First volunteer — waiter at the Lord Jeffery — picks his own friends 

— one of the rare, quiet boys of the Dairy Class. 



PHILIP HALE SMITH "Red" Animal Husbandry 

Stow, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa. 

Activities; Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Intermural 

Basketball 1. 

The kid with the Jersey smile — popular plus — busy going — knew 

what his books were for — conscientious. 



CLAYTON BARTLETT SOUTHARD "Clayt" Dairy 

Hingham, Mass. 

Activities: Varsity Football 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2. 
Member of Hingham Board of Commerce — Mike's shadow — well- 
seasoned by football. Hobby: Sports. 

ITH SOUTHARD 




29 




SULLIVAN 



"Peggy" 



Floriculture 



MARGUERITE ELEANOR STRONG 

South Hadley Falls, Mass. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; Class 

Secretary 2. Sparkling eyes — popular — cheerful — grand sense of 

humor — has talent in flori design — strawberry blonde. 

Hobby: Trumpet playing. 



"Sul 



Floriculture 



RICHARD WILLIAM SULLIVAN 

Dorchester, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma, Sergeant at Arms. 

Activities: Dance Committees 1, 2; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Ring 

Committee 1, 2; Student Council 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 2; 

Cross Country 1; President of Student Council (1/2 year). 

Tall, good looking member of the Flori. division — personality plus 

— a compelling way with people — handy with a paddle — social 

headliner at Stockbridge — of Craft and Sullivan bridge fame. 



"Taylor" 



Poultry 



JOHN ALBERT TAYLOR, JR. 

Haverhill, Mass. 

Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2. 

Small — friendly to all who knew him — very jolly— agile — knows 

his poultry. Hobbies: Hunting and Fishing. 



"Leo" 



Animal Husbondry 



LEO NIILOTEITTINEN 

East Templeton, Mass. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry 1, 2; Football 1, 2. 

A worker— an outstanding football player— active in winter sports 

— puts his work first; bull sessions, chores and movies second — 

has many friends. Hobby: Sports. 



RICHARD MUNROE THAYER 

South Hadley, Mass. 
Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2. 
Commuter — blond — quiet — bashful. 



"Dick" 



Poultry 



TEITTINEN 



STOCKBRIDGE 




30 




SHORTHORN 



TIERNEY 



EMERY FRANCIS TKOREN 

Worcester, Mass. 



"Hank" 



Dairy 



Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 1, 2; Athletic 
Council; Business Manager of the Shorthorn; Manager of Basket- 
ball 2; Statistician Football 2. 

Tall, blonde — excitable — sense of humor — plenty of initiative — 
what's the matter with Amherst on a weekend "Em"? 

"Dick" 



Dairy 



RICHARD VINCENT TIERNEY 

Cambridge, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma, Sergeant at Arms. 

Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Secretary of 

Athletic Council; Manager of Football 2. 

Good student — always willing to help — well liked by everyone — 

small but tough — never tired — Alpha Tau Gamma alarm clock. 



"Tonti" 



Horticulture 



EARL FELIX TONET 

Northampton, Mass. 

Activities: Horticulture Club 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; Cross Country 

1, 2; Track 1, 2. 

Commuter — tall, curly headed — serious — humorist. Hobby: Sports. 

ELMER RUSSELL TREADWELL, JR. "Russ" Dairy 

Lynn, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma, Treasurer. 

Activities: Varsity Hockey 1, 2; Dairy Club 1, 2. 

Baby of the class — short — curly headed — industrious — early to rise 

is his motto. Hobby: Sports. 



KARL RUDY UHLIG 

Florence, Mass. 



"Rudy" 



Horticulture 



Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Horticulture Club 1, 2; Cross 
Country 2; Vice-President of the Horticulture Club 1. 
Commuter — quiet — good looking — lawyer — the easiest man on 
campus to get along with. Hobby: Fishing and Sports. 



TREADWELL 




•\.- 






VAN ALSTYNE 



Vegetable Gardening 



EDWARD FRANK UPHAM "Ed" 

Sterling, Mass. 

Activities: Vice-President of Student Council; Dance Committees; 

Horticultural Show 1, 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2. 

Tall — dark — neat — good student — working classmate. 



PETER EDWARD van ALSTYNE "Van" Animal Husbandry 

Kinderhook, New York. Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Vice-President of Animal 
Husbandry Club 2; Editor-in-Chief of the Shorthorn; Air Raid 
Messenger for Alpha Tau Gamma; President of Student Council 
(1/2 year). Quiet — steady — student — a good friend to have — an 
organizer — put this book to bed — a busy bee in school affairs. 
Hobby: Raising Cocker Spaniels. 

REED MARSHALL WADE "Wadey ' Animal Husbandry 

Wilbraham, Mass. Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Dairy Club 1; 4-H Club 
1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; Intermural Basketball 1, 2; Football 1, 2; 
Hockey 2. 

The smooth man of "14 Allans" — lackadasical — puckster fan and 
player as well as sports writer — wise crack for every occasion. 
Hobby: Sports. 

JOHN PHILIP WATSON "Red" Pomology 

Worcester, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Horticulture Club 1. 

Tall and red headed — quiet — conscientious — interested in his work. 

SALLY FULLER WELLS "Sal" Floriculture 

Greenfield, Mass. Sigma Sigma Sigma. 

Activities: Dance Committees 2; Horticultural Show 1, 2; Short- 
horn Board 2; Dramatics 2. 

Perseverance personified — quietest Stockbridge coed — sincere 
friend — does excellent work. Hobby: Sports. 



STOCKBRIDGE 




32 





SHORTHORN 



V- 




K. Wli-LIAMS 

MORTON LAWRENCE WILCON "Mutt" Floriculture 

Revere, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Band 1, 2; Floriculture Club 1, 2; Horticultural Show 

1, 2; Track 1, 2. 

Life of the party — gets along with everyone — has an answer for 

everything — tall, lanky — recognizable when he shaves. 



R. WILLIAMS 



KENNETH SANDERSON WILLIAMS, JR. "Pinky" Veg. Gardening 

Sunderland, Mass. 

Activities: Intermural Basketball 2. 

Red-headed — playful and carefree — good personality — well-liked 

by by students and "profs." Hobby: Sports. 

ROBERT HUTCHISON WILLIAMS "Bob" Animal Husbandry 

Mill River, Mass. 

Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; 
Stockbridge Column 1, 2; Sports Editor of the Shorthorn 2; Inter- 
mural basketball 1, 2. 

The shepherd from the Berkshires — knows his dancing, round and 
square — strong man for cigars — a "super" sports writer. 
Hobby: Baseball. 

WALTER ROBERTS WILLIAMS, JR. "Walt" Animal Husbandry 

Sunderland, Mass. 

Alpha Tau Gamma. 

Activities: Intermural Basketball 1, 2; Football 2. 

Commuter — tall, red-headed fellow — stocky sportster — one of the 

"Mem. Hall" mob — popular with coeds and never took advantage 

of it — success to you on the home farm. 

MICHAEL WOYNAR "Mike" Dairy 

Amherst, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Basketball 2; Intermural 
Basketball 1; Football 1, 2. 

Local boy — athlete and scholar — one man gang. 
Hobby: Stamps and coins. 

W WILLIAMS WOYNAR 




33 




YARNELL HOUSE 

JOSEPH DAWSON YARNELL "Joe" Floriculture 

Springfield, Mass. 

Kappa Kappa. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Track 2. 

Professors, beware of his catchy questions in class — extensive 

knowledge in his major — blonde — smooth, may be said of him — 

keep your head above water, Joe. 

FORREST EDWIN HOUSE 'House' Horticulture 

Springfield, Mass. 

Activities: Horticultural Show 1, 2; Horticultural Club 1; Outing 

Club 1; Intermural Basketball 1. 

Tiny — powerful — wrestler and boxer — very neat dresser — outdoor 

man — suffers from claustrophobia — the name that suffered more 

abuse than any other in school — good natured. 





34 




STOSAG 

STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 
HONORARY SCHOLASTIC SOCIETY 



For the sixth year, the editors of the 
Shorthorn are pleased to pay tribute to 
those students of the graduating class, 
who by virtue of theiir outstanding 
scholastic records have won for them- 
selves places on the scroll of our honor- 
ary scholastic society, Stosag. 

HOMER OSSIAN MILLS, JR., 
Vegetable Gardening, 
Wellesley. 

FRANCIS DeVOS, 
Floriculture, 

Bloomfield, Conn. 

ROBERT CLASON NICKERSON, 
Ornamental Horticulture, 
Orleans. 

CHARLES JOSEPH PARMOR, 
Hotel Stewarding, 
Northampton. 

EUGENE CHARLES PUTALA, 
Floriculture, 
Turners Falls. 

NICHOLAS DiLISIO, 
Dairy Manufacture, 
Swampscott. 

STUART GILMORE, 
Animal Husbandry, 
Acushnet. 



ARTHUR HENRY BEYER, 
Ornamental Horticulture, 
Springfield. 

JOHN PHILLIP WATSON, 
Pomology, 
Worcester. 

ALVAN FREDERICK FRANK, 
Poultry Husbandry, 
Brooklyn, New York. 

STEPHEN GILMORE, 
Ornamental Horticulture, 
Acushnet. 

Stosag is a contraction taken from 
the name Stockridge School of Agri- 
culture and the society was founded in 
1937 at the suggestion of Professor 
Miner J. Markuson. 

An average of 85 or better for the 
first three semesters with no mark be- 
low 70 is required. Placement train- 
ing grades are used to guide the Fac- 
ulty Advisory Committee in making se- 
lections, but shall not be included in 
averages submitted. There shall be 
no dues and no future organization of 
members of this society. 

The award is an engraved certificate 
signed by the President of the college 
and the Director of Short Courses. 



35 



AN9MAL HUSBANDRY MAJORS — 1942 



First row: Ogonowski, Smith, Nichols, Dibble, Colgate, Hussey, Downey, Wade, Perry, 
van Alstyne 

Second row: Brookman, Teittinen, Morey, Lachut, Scholz, Gary, Roberts, Hunter, Merriam, 
W. Williams, R. Williams, Gilmore 




First row: Greenhalgh, Phelps, DeYoung, Hope, DiLisio, Britt 

Second row: Lindquist, Jackson, Tierney, Merrill 

Third row: Southard, Woynar, Lauder 

Fourth row: Lehane, Gibbs, Donovan, Thoren. Beaudoin, Treadwell, Grisv-^old 



DAIRY MANUFACTURES MAJORS — 1942 



36 



FLORICULTURE MAJORS — 1942 



First row: Strong, Wells, Gidley, Mushenski, Bartlett 
Second row: Molitoris, Johnson, Roehrich, Putala, Simoni 
Third row: Cousins, Holihan, Wilcon, DeVos 
Fourth row: Yarnell, Coombs, Kunan 




First row: Oringer, Blanchard, Fife, E. Johnson 

Second row: Beyer, House, Meinke, Gilmore 

Third row: Uhlig, Puchalski, Kuzmiski 

Fourth row: Glass, Freschi, Doleva, Nickerson, H. Johnson, Tonet 



HORTICULTURE MAJORS — 1942 



37 



HOTEL STEWARDING MAJORS — 1942 



Pace, Parmor, Cournoyer, Ladd 




Ross, Beaton, Watson 



POMOLOGY MAJORS — 1942 



38 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY MAJORS — 1942 



First row: Brogi, Allen, Thayer, Taylor, Robello, Collins 
Second row: McGuane, Brown, Shuker, Groton, Frank 




Mills, Upham, K. Williams, Hibbard 



VEGETABLE GARDENING MAJORS — 1942 



39 



FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS 




Danckert, Morgan, Connor, Tryon 

FRESHMEN CLASS OFFICERS 

President HERBERT MORGAN 

Vice President CHARLES TRYON 

Secretary DOROTHEA M. CONNOR 

Treasurer ........ RICHARD DANCKERT 



THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



There is always a great deal of curi- 
osity about the freshman class, and 
this year was no exception. Of course, 
we seniors pretended to be very calm, 
perhaps even a little bored at the open- 
ing Convocation, but you may be sure 
we were very much interested in every 
single freshman. And it was not long 
before freshmen were taking a ribbing 
as freshmen always have. 

They were good sports about it all 
and even took being thro'wn into the 
pond with a grin. (We secretly suspect 
they were looking forward to throwing 
someone else in next year) . They took 
part in the hat rush with good spirit, 



and there was a good turn-out for the 
dances. More than that they went out 
for sports in a big way, eight of their 
men earning football letters, thus estab- 
lishing a new high. Many of them 
joined a fraternity or sorority. They 
groaned through Business Law and 
sang through Convocations. Three- 
fourths of them firmly believed they 
would flunk out at Thanksgiving, and 
when they were convinced they would 
not, they began to worry about place- 
ment. "Where did you go on place- 
ment? What were your hours? Think 
I can get placement at home?" These 
were but a few of the questions asked 
on every side. 



42 



Their year was not all fun, though. 
They took their studies seriously and 
worked hard for good marks. The war 
came very close to them for they lost 
several of their members to the service 
and war industries. Since the freshman 
class was a small classs, anyway, (only 
112 registered) those who left were 
acutely missed. By February first, 
there were only 97 class members, one 
of the smallest groups in recent years. 
Although there was a decrease in quan- 
tity, quality in the freshman class did 
not suffer. All year round, up to the 
very day they went on placement, they 
maintained their high standards of 
work and play. 

We most fervently hope the fresh- 
men will think kindly of us as they 
return to campus as seniors in the fall. 
They will be much wiser after six months 
of placement training, but we hope they 
will remember the joys and sorrows of 
their freshman year. We feel confident 
that they will uphold the traditions of 
Stockbridge, by having a year of rol- 
licking good fun and hard work. Good 
luck to the class of 1943! 

FAREWELL ADDRESS TO THE 
FRESHMEN 

To the Class of 1943:— 

This school year has come and gone 
very quickly. It has, however, been 
filled with success and accomplishment, 
due largely to your initiative, cooper- 
ation, and good will. I am sure that 
I speak for the entire senior class 
when I say that we have enjoyed your 
friendship and company here at Stock- 
bridge this year, and we all wish to 
extend to you the most happiness, suc- 
cess, and good fortune out on your 
placement training. 

We, as Seniors, feel that Placement 
Training was one of the most important 
phases of our Stockbridge career. It 
deserves the maximum amount of con- 
centration, effort, and hard work. The 
record which you make will remain in 
the Placement office, and will serve 



as a source of reference and recom- 
mendation. Now is your chance to 
make this record an excellent one. 

You are going out to work this sum- 
mer at one of the most critical periods 
in the history of America. While you 
are increasing your knowledge along 
your particular line, you are also per- 
forming a very valuable service to your 
country — that of producing Agricul- 
tural and Horticultural products. This 
service is just as important as the 
manufacture of war materials, the 
training of men, and the actual fighting 
at the front. For this reason your work 
this summer should take on added 
significance. 

For the Senior and Freshman classes 
this is the end of the trail. We have 
reached the crossroads, and you are 
about to go your way and we our's. 
Many of us will never see each other 
again. Others will undoubtedly meet 
again, either on the farm, in the factory, 
or at the front. In the future as we 
look back upon our Stockbridge days, 
and as we look thru our Shorthorns, we 
shall remember each and everyone of 
you. Some will be remembered as 
football, basketball, track, and hockey 
players. Others of you will be remem- 
bered for your personality, character, 
student leadership, excellence in the 
class room, and as fraternity brothers. 

We sincerely hope that all of you 
will return to Stockbridge next fall 
and carry on the traditions and ideals 
in our places. We also hope that you 
will have the opportunity to work with 
as fine a freshman class as we did. 

In closing I wish to extend to you 
a cordial invitation to attend our senior 
prom and commencement exercises this 
spring. 

Until we meet again I say for the 
Senior class; "good luck and goodbye." 

Editor's Note: 

This speech was given at the last con- 
vocation for the freshmen by the Presi- 
dent of the Senior class, Homer O. 
Mills. 



43 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY MAJORS — 1943 



First row: DeLeiris, Pratt, Tryon, Shaw, Hawley. Hubbard, Dean, Havumaki, Tompkins, 
Taylor 

Second row; Keyes, Sansom, Sidelinger, Worrall, Fletcher, Ducharme, Barclay, Morey, 
Orcutt, Nelson, Hargreaves, Hall, Billings 




First row: FrohlofB, Brennan, McNau-, Danckert, Devine, Morgan, Berthel 
Second row: Wilczynski, White, Martinson, Desmond 
Third row: Going, Scott, Scarborough, Kaye 
Fourth row: Kucinski, Kentfield, Brox, Sharp 
Fifth row: Jagger, Crump, Donovan 



DAIRY MANUFACTURES MAJORS — 1943 



44 



FLORICULTURE MAJORS — 1943 



First row: Higgins, Ferris, Connors, Boluch, Fleming, Rafferty, Slack, Conlon 
Second row: Davis, Stevens, Truesdale, Martin, Capello 
Third row: Ridge way, Roak 




First row: Schmidt, Urquhart, Bartosik, Kempenaar, Carleton 
Second row: Raymond, Fairclough, Little, Belmont, Peak 



HORTICULTURE MAJORS — 1943 



45 



HOTEL STEWARDING MAJORS — 1943 



First row: Mellas, Clapp, Sacco, Ballou, Appleton 
Second row: Graham, Franklin, Knox, Hall 




First row: Whitcomb, DeLeiris, Heckbert, Monroe, Henry 
Second row: Luongo, Bundy, Staples, Sheer 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY MAJORS — 1943 



46 



VEGETABLE GARDENING MAJORS — 1943 



Swaim, Sterns, Boone, Marsoubian, Zaskey, Bak 






47 




S. C-.L^t^f-- ..^ 




HUGH POTTER BAKER 

D.Oec, LL.D. 
President of Massachusetts State College 

Born 1878. B.S., Michigan State 
College, 1901, M.F., Yale University, 
1904, D.Oec, University ofMunich, 1910, 
LL.D., Syracuse University, 1933. 
Spent several years with U. S. Forest 
Service examining public lands in Cen- 
tral Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska; field 
studies in New Mexico, Washington, 
Oregon. Assistant Professor of For- 
estry, Iowa State College, 1904-07; Pro- 
fessor of Forestry and Forester in the 
Experiment Station, Penn. State Col- 
lege, 1907-12. Dean and Professor of 
Silviculture, New York State College 
of Forestry, 1912-20. Executive Secre- 
tary, American Paper and Pulp Asso- 
ciation, 1920-28. Manager Trade Asso- 
ciation Department, Chamber of 
Commerce of the United States, 1928- 
30. Dean, New York State College of 
Forestry, Syracuse, 1930-33. Fellow, 
A. A. A. S., F. R. G. S. (London). With 
46th Infantry and member of General 
Staff, 1917-19. Major, O. R. C. Presi- 
dent of M. S. C, 1933—. 



TO STOCKBRIDGE 



To the Students of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture: — • 

As the Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture rounds out its twenty-third 
year, you must inevitably feel that you 
have been training for one of the most 
important jobs in our national war ef- 
fort. As America strains every sinew 
to keep the production lines rolling in 
its factories and shipyards and as mil- 
lions of young men are being mobilized 
in the armed forces, it is fitting that 
you should be preparing to dedicate 



yourselves to another production job 
which is basic to the success of every 
phase of the war effort. 

You have heard it said that food will 
win the war and write the peace. In 
so far as you can contribute to the ef- 
ficient and speedy production of food 
for mankind, you are contributing 
directly and intimately to the pre-em- 
inent place which this nation must 
reach on the day of victory. 

Hugh Potter Baker, President 



50 



DORIC J. ALVIANI, Mus.B., Ed.M. 

Instructor in Music 

Born 1913. Music B., Boston University, 1937. 

Supervisor of Music, Public School, Somer- 

ville, Mass., 1936-37. Supervisor of Music, 

Public Schools, Amherst, Mass., 1937-38. 

Instructor of Music, Mass. State College, 1938—. 



LORIN E. BALL, B.S., 
Instructor in Physical Education 
Born 1898. B.S., M. A. C, 1921. Coach of 
Freshman Basketball, 1921-25. Coach of 
Freshman Baseball, 1922-24. Wisconsin Coach- 
ing School, 1924. Coach of Varsity Baseball, 
1925-31. Coach of Varsity Hockey, 1925—. 
Director of Stockbridge School Athletics and 
Coach of Football and Basketball, 1925—. 
Varsity Club, Q.T.V. 



LUTHER BANTA, B.S., 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

B.S., Cornell University. 1915. Head of the 

Department of Poultry Husbandry, New York 

State School of Agriculture, 1915-18, at Alfred 

University. Instructor of Poultry Husbandry, 

M.S.C., 1918-20. Assistant Professor of Poultry 

Husbandry, M.S.C., 1920—. Sigma Pi, Lambda 

Gamma Delta, Poultry Science Association. 



ROLLIN H. BARRETT, M.S., 
Professor of Farm Management 
B.S., Connecticut State College, 1918. Assistant 
County Agricultural Agent, Hartford County, 
Conn., 1918-19. Instructor, Vermont State 
School of Agriculture, 1919-20. Principal, 
1920-25. M.S., Cornell University, 1926. 
Assistant Professor of Farm Management, 
M.S.C., 1926-37. Professor of Farm Manage- 
ment, 1937—. Phi Mu Delta. 



JOHN H. BLAIR, M.A., 

Instructor of Physiology and Hygiene 

Born 1915. B.A., Wesleyan University, 1937. 

M.A., Wesleyan University, 1939 — . Sigma Xi, 

Delta Kappa Epsilon. Accepted to faculty, 

1939. 



RICHARD M. COLWELL, M.S., 
Instructor in Hotel Accounting 
B.S., Rhode Island State College, 1935. M.S., 
Rhode Island State College, 1937. Teaching 
Fellow in Economics, M.S.C., 1937-38. Instruc- 
tor in Economics, M.S.C., 1938—. Cornell Uni- 
versity Summer Session, 1941. Phi Kappa Phi, 
Alpha Tau Gamma (R. I. State College), 
American Economics Association, American 
Accounting Association. 



GLADYS M. COOK, M.S., 
Instructor in Home Economics 
B.S., Battle Creek College, 1934. Internship 
in Nutrition, I. U. Hospital, 1935. M.S., M.S.C., 
1936. Research Fellow, 1936. M.S.C. Research 
Assistant Home Economic Research, 1937, 
M.S.C. Instructor in Home Economics, 1937 — . 
American Dietetics Association, American 
Home Economics Association, American Asso- 
ciation of University Women. 



WILLIAM H. DAVIS, P.D., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of Botany 
Pd.B., New York State Teachers College. 
A.B., Cornell University. M.A. and Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin, Assistant in Science, 
New York State Teachers College and Cornell. 
Professor of Botany, Nature Study and Agri- 
culture, Iowa State Teachers College. 
Assistant Professor of Botany, M.S.C, 1922—. 
Sigma Xi. 



LLEWELLYN L. DERBY, B.S., 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 
Bom 1893. B.S., Springfield College, 1940. 
Assistant in Physical Education, 1916-17. U. S. 
Army, 1917-19. Instructor in Physical Educa- 
tion, 1919-20. Varsity, Freshman and S.S.A. 
Coach of Track, 1921 — . Assistant Professor 
of Physical Education, 1927 — . Member of 
Association of College Track Coaches of 
America. Member of National Collegiate 
Track Coaches Association. Chairman, Track 
Committee, Association of New England Col- 
leges for Conference on Athletics. 



LYLE W. BLUNDELL, B.S., 

Professor of Horticulture 

Bom 1897. B.S., Iowa State College of 

Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1924. With 

Olmsted Brothers Landscape Architects, 

1924-31. Professor of Horticulture, M.S.C, 

1931—. Gamma Sigma Delta. Phi Kappa Phi. 



KATHLEEN CALLAHAN, A.B., 
Instructor of Physical Education 
A.B., West Virginia University, 1929; Certifi- 
cate of Hygiene and Physical Education, 
Wellesley College, 1931. Instructor of Physical 
Education, Florida State College for Women, 
1931-33. Instructor of Physical Education, 
Radclifie College, 1933-37. Instmctor of 
Physical Education, M.S.C, 1937—. Chi Omega, 
Swimming Committee, Boston Board of 
Officials. 



LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON, M.S., 
Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Bom 1888. M.S., M.S.C, 1910. Superintendent 
of Grounds, M.S.C, 1911-30. Leave of Absence, 
1919. Instructor in Horticulture and Super- 
intendent of Greenhouses, Walter Reed 
Hospital, Washington, D. C, 1919-20. Assist- 
ant Professor, M.S.C, Horticulture, 1923-31. 
Agronomy, 1931-39. Agrostology, 1939—. Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 



PARRY DODDS, M.S., 

Instructor in Agricultural Economics 

Bom 1917. B.S., Iowa State College, 1939. 

M.S., Iowa State College, 1940. Research 

Scholar in Agriculture, Iowa State College, 

1939-40. Member of American Farm Economic 

Association, Sigma Delta Chi, Alpha Zeta, 

Cardinal Key, Farmhouse. 



51 




(I) Banta, Blundell, Mrs. Baker, Pres. Baker, (2) DuBois (3) Dickinson (4) Lindquist 
(5) Rhodes (6) Pushee (7) Holdsworth (8) Newlon (9) Charles Thayer (10) Barrett 

(II) Roberts (12) Clark Thayer, Ross, Hubbard (13) Dodds (14) Snyder (15) Tuttle 



52 



CLYDE W. DOW, 
Instructor in English 

Bom September 18, 1907, Wakefield, Mass. 
B.L.I., Emerson College, 1931. M.S., Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1937. Summer 1939, 
University of Denver. 1940, University of 
Wisconsin. Member 0A.T., National Speech 
and Arts Fraternity, National Association of 
Speech and American Speech Correction 
Association. Associated Speakers Clubs. 

BERNARD J. DOYLE, M.D., 

Professor of Hygiene, and Director of Student Health 
Born 1913. B.S., M. S. C, 1935. M.D., Tufts 
Medical 1939. Member Massachusetts Medical 
Society, American Medical Association, Theta 
Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity. 

CHARLES NELSON DuBOIS, A.M., 
Instructor in English 

Bom 1910. Bay Path Institute, 1929. U. of 
London, 1934-35. Middlebury College, A.B., 
1934, A.M., 1935. Instructor in English, New 
Hampton School, 1935-37. Assistant to Dean, 
Bread Loaf School of EngHsh, Summers, 
1933-37. Instructor in English, M. S. C, 1937—. 
Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa Delta Rho, Kappa Phi 
Kappa, Pi Delta Epsilon. 

W. BARNET EASTON, F.C., 

Director of Religion, Assistant Professor of Religion 
Born 1905, Philadelphia, Pa. Ph.B., Yale 
College, 1929. B.D., Union Theological Sem- 
inary, 1933. Minister Congregational Church, 
Saxton River, Vermont, 1933-36. National 
Secretary to Pacific Southwest Area of the 
National Council of Student Christian Asso- 
ciations, 1933-39. S. T. M. Union Theological 
Seminary, 1940. Acting Director of Religion, 
Smith College, 1940-41. Appointed to Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1941. 

JOHN N. EVERSON, M.S., 
Assistant Professor in Agronomy 
Bom 1887. B.S., M.S.C., 1910. M.S., M.S.C., 
1936. Chemist and Agronomist fertilizer 
companies, Missouri, Arkansas, Georgia, 7 
years; Industrial and Agricultural Chemist, 
20 years. Soil Testing Specialist, M.S.C., 1934-36. 
Instructor in Agronomy, M.S.C., 1936-39. 
Assistant Professor in Agronomy, 1939 — . 

RICHARD C. FOLEY, M.S., 

Assistont Professor in Animal Husbandry 

Bom 1906. B.S., M.S.C., 1927. M.S., M.S.C., 

1931. Herdsman, Stannox Farm, 1927-29. 

S.N.P.C. Fellowship in Pasture Management, 

M.S.C., 1929-30. Temporary Instmctor in 

Animal Husbandry, M.S.C., 1929-30. Instmctor 

in Animal Husbandry, M.S.C., 1931-36. 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, 

1936—. Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Kappa Phi. 

JULIUS H. FRANDSEN, M.S., 
Professor of Doiry Industry and 
Head of the Department 

Born 1877. B.S.A., 1902. M.S., Iowa State 
College, 1904. Professor of Dairy Industry, 
University of Idaho, 1907-11. University of 
Nebraska, 1911-21. Dairy Editor and Coun- 
cillor, Capper Farm Publications, 1921-26. 
Founded and for 10 years Editor of Journal 
of Dairy Science. Professor and Head of the 
Department of Dairy Industry, M.S.C., 1926—. 
Gamma Sigma Delta, Phi Kappa Phi. 



ARTHUR P. FRENCH, M.S., 
Professor of Pomology and Plant Breeding 
B.S., Ohio State University, 1921. M.S., M.S.C., 
1923. Investigator in Pomology, M.S.C. Experi- 
ment Station, 1921-23. Instructor in Pomology, 
M.S.C, 1923-29. Assistant Professor in 
Pomology, 1929-36. Alpha Zeta, Sigma Xi, 
Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Kappa Phi. Professor. 
1936—. 

EMORY E. GRAYSON, B.S., 
Director of Placement Service 
Born 1894. B.S., M.S.C, 1917. Field Artillery, 
Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky., O. T. C, 1918. 
Assistant Football Coach, M.S.C, 1919. Coach 
of Two Year Athletics, M.S.C, 1919-24. 
Supervisor of Placement Training, M.S.C, 
1928-34. Director of Placement Service, 1934—. 
Alpha Sigma Phi, Adelphia. E.C.P.O. 

MARGARET HAMLIN, B.A., 
Placement Officer for Women 
B.A., Smith College, 1904. Agricultural Coun- 
selor for Women, M.S.C, 1918-34. Placement 
Officer for Women, 1934 — . 

MARSHALL C. HECK, 
Animal Husbandry 

B.S. in Agriculture, 1938, University of 
Missouri; M.S. in Agriculture, 1939, Oklahoma 
Agricultural and Mechanical College. Alpha 
Gamma Sigma Fraternity. Block and Brindle 
Club. Missouri Livestock Judging Team. 
Mississippi Frozen Food Locker Association. 
National Frozen Food Locker Association. 
Natchez Cold Storage Cooperative, Manager. 
Assistant Professor, Massachusetts State 
College, 1941—. 

CURRY S. HICKS, M.Ed., 

Professor of Physical Education and Head of Division 

Born 1885. Michigan Agricultural College, 
1902-03. B.Pd., Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege, 1909. Edvvfard Hitchcock Fellow in 
Physical Education, Amherst College, 1909-10. 
Director of Athletics, Michigan State Normal 
College, 1910-11. Massachusetts State College, 
Assistant Professor, 1911-14. Associate Pro- 
fessor, 1914-16, and Professor, 1916—. M.Ed., 
Michigan State Normal College, 1924. Head 
of Division of Physical Education, M.S.C, 
1936—. 

ROBERT P. HOLDSWORTH, M.F., 
Professor of Forestry and Head of the Department 
Bom 1890. B.S., Michigan State College, 1911. 
M.F., Yale, 1928. Royal College of Forestry, 
Stockholm, Sweden, 1928-29. Forest Assistant, 
U. S. Forest Service, 1912-13. Administrative 
Assistant and Forest Examiner in charge of 
White Top Purchase Area, 1913-14. Professor 
of Forestry, M.S.C, 1930—. Captain, Infantry, 
U. S. Army, 1917-19. Society of American 
Foresters. 

S. CHURCH HUBBARD, 
Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
1909-15 with A. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, 
Conn., as Propagator and Section Foreman of 
Roses. Superintendent and Salesman of Retail 
Department. At Cornell University, 1916-21. 
Greenhouse Foreman and Instructor in Flori- 
culture, M.S.C, 1921-29. Assistant Professor 
of Floriculture, M.S.C, 1928—. 



53 




(1) Zak (2) Tague (3) Smart (4) Markuson (5) Heck (6) Verbeck (7) Grayson (8) Blair 
(9) Parrott (10) Lentz (11) Alviani (12) Snow (13) Fitzpatrick (14) Schoonmaker 
(15) Frandsen (16) Parsons (17) Derby (18) French (19) Foley 



54 



WALTER 0. JOHNSON, 
Manager of Draper Dining Hall 
Born 1912. B.S.C., Massachusetts State Col- 
lege, 1935. Assistant to Manager of Dining 
Hall, 1935-39. Manager of Dining Hall, 1939—. 
Instructor in Food Technology, M.S.C., 1939. 

WILLIAM HENRY LACHMAN, M.S., 

Instructor in Olericulture 

Born 1912. B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 

1934. M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1936. 

Instructor in Olericulture, 1936 — . Gamma 

Sigma Delta, Pi Alpha Zi. 

JOHN B. LENTZ, A.B., V.M.D., 
Professor of Veterinary Science and 
Head of the Deportment 

Bom 1887. A.B., Franklin and Marshall 
College, 1908. V.M.D., School of Veterinary 
Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 1914. 
Teaching at Franklin and Marshall Academy, 
1908-11. Assistant Professor of Veterinary 
Science and College Veterinarian, M.S.C., 
1922-27. Head of the Department, 1927—. 
Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa. 

HARRY G. LINDQUIST, M.S., 
Assistant Professor in Dairying 
Born 1895. B.S., M.S.C., 1922. Graduate 
Assistant, University of Maryland, 1922-24. 
M.S., University of Maryland, 1924. Baltimore 
City Health Department, Summer, 1924. In- 
structor, University of Maryland, 1924-25. 
Graduate Assistant, Ohio State University, 
1925-27. Instructor in Dairying, M.S.C., 
1927-36. Assistant Professor, 1936—. 

ADRIAN H. LINDSEY, Ph.D., 
Professor of Agricultural Economics and 
Head of the Department 

Born 1897. B.S., University of Illinois, 1922. 
M.S., Iowa State College, 1923. Ph.D., Iowa 
State College, 1929. Instructor at Alabama 
Polytechnical Institute, 1923-25. Fellow at 
Iowa State College, 1925-26. Assistant Pro- 
fessor at Iowa State College, 1926-29. Pro- 
fessor of Agricultural Economics, M.S.C., 
1929 — . Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Gamma Rho. 

WALTER A. MACLINN, M.S., Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor in Horticultural Manufactures 
Bom 1911. B.S., M.S.C., 1933. Ph.D., M.S.C., 
1938. Research Fellow, M.S.C., 1934. Research 
Fellow, Oregon State College, 1935. M.S., 
M.S.C., 1935. Research Fellow, M.S.C., 1936. 
Industrial Chemist, 1936. Instructor in Horti- 
cultural Manufactures, M.S.C., 1936. Assistant 
Professor, 1940—. Sigma Xi, Theta Chi. 

MINER J. MARKUSON, B.S., 
Assistant Professor of Engineering 
Bom 1896. B.S. of Architecture, University 
of Minnesota, 1923. Assistant Professor of 
Engineering, Virginia Polytechnical Institute, 
1923-25. Non-commissioned Officer, 210th 
Engineers, 10th Division of the U. S. Army, 
1918-19. Assistant Professor of Engineering, 
M.S.C., 1925—. Member State Association of 
Architects. Member W. M. S. A. 

JOHN B. NEWLON, 
Instructor in Engineering 

Born 1884. Instmctor in Forge Work, M.S.C., 
1919. Special Student at Massachusetts In- 
stitute of Technology, 1921. Instructor in 
Engineering, M.S.C., 1921—. M. I. T. Summer 
School, 1939. Machine Tool Practice Lab. 



RANSOM C. PACKARD, M.S., 

Assistant Professor in Bacteriology 

Born 1886. B.S.A., University of Toronto, 1911. 

M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1933. 

.Instructor in Bacteriology, M.S.C., 1927-37. 

Assistant Professor, 1937 — . 

RAYMOND T. PARKHURST, Ph.D., 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry and 
Head of the Department 

Born 1898. B.S., M.S.C., 1919. M.Sc, Univer- 
sity of Idaho, 1927. Ph.D., University of 
Edinburgh, 1932. Iowa State College, 1919-21. 
University of Idaho, 1921-27. Director, National 
Institute of Poultry Husbandry, England, 
1927-32. National Oil Products Co., 1932-38. 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry, M.S.C., 1938 — . 
Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Kappa Sigma. 

ERNEST M. PARROTT, 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S., Union University, Jackson, Tennessee, 

1927. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1932. 

Ph.D., University of Missouri, 1938. 

CLARENCE H. PARSONS, M.S., 
Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and 
Superintendent of Farm 

Bom 1904. B.S., M.S.C., 1927. Manager of 
Farm, 1927-28. Instructor in Animal Hus- 
bandry, M.S.C., 1928-29. New England Field- 
man, Synthetic Nitrogen Products Corp., 
1929-30. Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry and Superintendent of College Farm, 
1931—. M.S., M.S.C., 1933. Member of 
American Society of Animal Production, 
Q. T. V. 

GEORGE F. PUSHEE, 
Instructor in Agricultural Engineering 
I.C.S., 1906. State Teachers' Training Class, 
Springfield Vocational College, 1914-15. Assist- 
ant Foreman and Millwright, Mt. Tom Sulfide 
Pulp Mill, 1915-16. Instmctor in Agricultural 
Engineering, M.S.C., 1916—. Counsellor at 
Camp Medomak Summers, 1928—. Special 
Course, M.S.C., 1924-25. 

ARNOLD D. RHODES, 
Instructor in Forestry 

Bom 1912. University of New Hampshire, 
B. S., 1934. School of Forestry, Yale University, 
M.F., 1937. U. S. Forest Service, 1934-36. 
Instructor, School of Forestry, Yale Univer- 
sity, 1937-39. Instmctor, Massachusetts State 
College, 1939—. Society of American Foresters. 
Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Phi Sigma. 

VICTOR A. RICE, M.Agr., 
Professor of Animal Husbandry, 
Head of the Department, end 
Heod of the Division of Agriculture 

Bom 1890. B.S., North Carolina State College, 
1917. M.Agr., M.S.C., 1923. Farm Manager, 
1910-12. Swine Specialist for State of Massa- 
chusetts, 1916-19. Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry, M.S.C., 1919—. Phi Kappa Phi. 

J. HARRY RICH, M.F., 
Assistant Professor of Forestry 
Bom 1888. B.S., New York State College of 
Forestry, 1913. M.F., 1937. Assistant Professor, 
M.S.C., 1933—. Sigma Xi, Society of Amer- 
ican Foresters, Pi Kappa Alpha. 



55 




(1) Mahar (2) Ballard (3) Heald (4) Doskotz (5) Dudley (3) Canavan(7) Hatch (8) Maud, 
Sarna (9) Martin, Heffernan (10) Shipley (11) Johnson (12) Hawley (13) Russell (14) Bishop 
(15) Koch (16) Smith 



56 



JOSEPH R. ROGERS, JR., 
Instructor in Physical Education 
Bom 1906. Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 
1930. Instrument Man, Metropolitan District 
Water Supply Commission, 1930-31. Instruc- 
tor in Physical Education, M.S.C., 1931—. 
Member American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers. 

DONALD E. ROSS, B.S., 

Instructor in Floriculture and Greenhouse Foreman 
Bom 1896. B.S., M.S.C., 1925. Nurseryman 
at A. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn., 1925-26. 
Nurseryman Superintendent at the Rose Farm. 
White Plains, N.Y., 1926-28. Attended Sum- 
mer School, M.A.C., 1928. Instructor, 1928—. 
Served in France with 101st Infantry, 26th 
Division, 1917-19. Alpha Gamma Rho. 

SARGENT RUSSELL, M.S., 
Instructor of Agricultural Economics 
Born 1915. B.S., University of Maine, 1937. 
M.S., Cornell University, 1939. Assistant in 
Public Relations Department of Sheffield 
Farms Company, New York City, 1939. In- 
structor of Agricultural Economics at Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1940 — . Research 
Assistant in Agricultural Economics, 1940 — . 
Alpha Zeta, Phi Kappa Phi. 

WILLIAM C. SANCTUARY, M.S., 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Born 1888. B.S., M.S.C., 1912. New York 
State School of Agriculture, Morrisville, N. Y., 
1912-18. U. S. Army, 1917-18. Professor of 
Poultry Husbandry, M.S.C., 1921. Acting 
Director of New York State School of Agri- 
culture, 1924-25. Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry. M.S.C., 1925—. Phi Delta Kappa, 
Theta Chi. 

ALBERT H. SAYER, 
Instructor in Horticulture 

B.S., Agriculture, Cornell, 1937. Pi Alpha 
Xi Honorary Floriculture Cornell, 1936. 
Graduate Study, Cornell, 1938-39. Appointed 
to Massachusetts State College Faculty, Sep- 
tember, 1940. 

N. JAMES SCHOONMAKER, B.S., 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Born 1918. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 

1940. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Beta Kappa Scholar, 

Kappa Sigma. Instructor in Mathematics, 

Orange Hi^h School, 1940-41. Accepted to 

Faculty, 1941, 

FRANK R. SHAW, Ph.D., 
Instructor in Entomology and Beekeeping 
Born 1908, Belchertown, Mass. B.S., M.S.C., 
1931. Assistant in Insect Morphology and 
Histology, Cornell University, 1931-34. In- 
structor in Economic Entomology, Cornell 
University, 1934-Jan. 1935. Instructor in 
Entomology and Beekeeping, M.S.C., 1935 — . 
Ph.D., Cornell, 1936. Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi. 

EDNA L. SKINNER, M.A., 

Professor of Home Economics, Head of the Division 
and Advisor of Women 

M.A., Columbia University; B.S., Columbia 
University; M.Ed., Michigan State Normal 
College. Instructor at Teachers' College, 
Columbia University. Head, Household 
Sciences, James Milikin University. Professor 
of Home Economics, Head of Division, Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1919—. 



HAROLD W. SMART, A.B., LL.B., 
Assistant Professor in Business Law, Accounting 
Bom 1895. LL.B., (Cum Laude) Boston Uni- 
versity, 1918. Boston University, 1919. Prac- 
ticed Law, 1919-20. Instructor in Business 
Law, M.S.C., 1921—. A.B., Amherst College, 
1924. Phi Delta Phi, Woolsack, Delta Sigma 
Rho, Adelphia. 

GRANT B. SNYDER, M.S., 
Professor of Olericulture and 
Head of the Department 

B.A.A., Ontario Agricultural College, Toronto 
University, 1922. Assistant Plant Hybridist at 
Ontario Agricultural College, 1919-21. 
Instructor in Vegetable Gardening, M.S.C., 
1921-26. M.S., Michigan State College, 1931. 
Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening, 
M.S.C., 1926-35. Professor of Olericulture and 
Head of Department, 1935 — . 

RUTH STEVENSON 

B.A., Wellesley College; M.S., Wellesley Col- 
lege. Taught in New Jersey College for 
Women, 1936-40. Summer Session New Jersey 
College for Women, June 1940. Assistant Dir- 
ector, Camp Cowasset, North Falmouth, Mass., 
1936-40. Director Physical Education for 
Women at M.S.C., 1940—. 

HARVEY L. SWEETMAN 

Bom 1896. B.S., Colorado State College, 1923. 
M.S., Iowa State College, 1925. Ph.D., Massa- 
chusetts State College, 1930. Studied at Uni- 
versity of Minnesota, 1925-27. Wyoming Agri- 
culture Station, 1927-29. Assistant Professor, 
Entomology and Ecology, 1930 — . Alpha 
Gamma Rho. Alpha Zeta. Gamma Sigma Delta, 
Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi. 

WILLIAM H. TAGUE, B.S., 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
Born 1892. B.S., Agricultural Engineering, 
Iowa State College. Assistant Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering, M.S.C., 1929—. 

CHARLES HIRAM THAYER, 
Assistant Professor in Agronomy 
Bom 1884. Winter School, M.A.C., 1904. 
Manager, Brooke Farm, Amherst, 1908-13. 
Manager, Fillmore Farm, Weston, Massachu- 
setts, 1913. Assistant in Agronomy, Winter 
School, M.A.C., 1915-18. Instructor in 
Agronomy, M.A.C., 1918-36. Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Agronomy, M.S.C., 1936 — . 

CLARK L THAYER, B.S., 
Professor of Floriculture and 
Head of the Department 

Born 1890. B.S., M.S.C., 1913. Graduate 
Work, Instructor in Floriculture, Cornell 
University, 1913-19. Associate Professor and 
Head of Department, M.S.C., 1919-20. Pro- 
fessor of Floriculture and Head of the Depart- 
ment, M.S.C., 1920—. U. S. Army, 1918. Alpha 
Gamma Rho, Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Alpha Xi, 
Adelphia. 

ALDEN P. TUTTLE, M.S., 
Assistant Professor in Vegetable Gardening 
Born 1906. B.S., M.S.C., 1928. M.S., Pennsyl- 
vania State College, 1930. Graduate Assistant 
in Vegetable Gardening, Pennsylvania State 
College, 1928-30. Instructor in Vegetable 
Gardening, M.S.C., 1930-36. Assistant Professor 
in Vegetable Gardening, 1936 — . Gamma 
Sigma Delta. 



57 



H. LELAND VARLEY, A.M., 

Instructor in Languages and Literature 

Born 1910. A.B., Wesleyan University, 1934. 

A.M., Wesleyan University, 1935. University 

of Wisconsin, 1935-36. Wesleyan University, 

1936-38. Accepted to Faculty, 1938—. 

RALPH A. VAN METER, Ph.D., 

Professor of Pomology, 

Head of Pomology Department and 

Head of the Division of Horticulture 

Born 1893. B.S., Ohio State University, 1917. 

Ph.D., Cornell University, 1935. Extension 

Specialist in Pomology, M.S.C., 1917. Served 

in France with the 317th Field Signal Battalion, 

1918-19. Head of the Division of Horticulture, 

1931 — . Head of the Department of Pomology, 

1936—. Delta Theta Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, 

Sigma Xi. 



JOHN H. VONDELL, 

Instructor in Poultry Husbandry and 

Superintendent of Poultry Plant 

Born 1898. Instructor, U. S. Veterans Bureau, 

Baltimore, Md., 1922-23. Superintendent of 

Poultry Plant, M.S.C., 1923-29. Instructor in 

Poultry Husbandry, M.S.C., 1929—. Member, 

Advisory Committee on Hiking, National Park 

Service, Department of the Interior. 

LOWELL WALTERS 

Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical Col- 
lege, Stillwater, Oklahoma, 1936-40. Teaching 
Fellow and Graduate Student at Massachusetts 
State College. 

JOHN M. ZAK, M.S., 

Instructor in Agronomy 

Bom 1914. B.Sc, Massachusetts State College, 

1936. Research Fellow in Agronomy, 1937. 

M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1938. 







<' 




HE 


jfl^wffft 




jh^f^ 


k 


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IKji£l 


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m 


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58 



IN MEMORY OF 

Merril J. Mack, M. S. 




Merril J. Mack, a professor in the 
department of dairy industry at M.S.C. 
and a friend to all students who came 
in contact with him, passed away sud- 
denly on February 9, 1942. 

Born May 1, 1902, in Flicksville, Pa., 
he was a graduate of Pennsylvania 
State College in 1923. He came to 
M.S.C. the same year as an instructor 
in dairying, advancing to full professor- 
ship in 1940. In 1925 he received a 
master's degree from the University 
of Wisconsin. During the past year he 
edited and revised a book on dairying 
with Professor Judkins of New York. 

In 1935 Professor Mack went to 
Sweden to assist in the establishment 
of an ice cream factory in Stockholm. 



Before returning to this country, he 
traveled in Norway and Sweden. 

He was a member of the American 
Dairy Science Association, the Ameri- 
can Public Health Association, and the 
Scientific Society of Sigma Xi and Phi 
Kappa Phi. 

Professor Mack has been a member 
of the M.S.C. Faculty for 18 years. He 
has served on many important college 
committees, found time for consider- 
able research work, and has taken an 
active part in many town affairs, not- 
ably in Boy Scout work. He was a 
tireless worker, good teacher, and he 
leaves a host of friends in the town 
and state to mourn his sudden passing. 



59 



IN MEMORY OF 
George Louis Farley 




GEORGE LOUIS FARLEY 

1873—1941 



Mr. Farley was born May 27, 1873, 
in Lynn, Massachusetts. He attended 
M. I. T. for one year after which he 
worked for one year, then transferred 
to Dartmouth College where he grad- 
uated in the class of 1898. He held 
both a Bachelor and Master of Science 
degree from this institution. He was 
a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Phi 
Kappa Phi. Mr. Farley taught school 
until he became State 4-H Club Leader 
in September 1916. He was a pioneer 
in Massachusetts 4-H Club work. As 
superintendent of schools in Brockton, 
Mass., he was associated in 4-H Club 



work with Professor W. R. Hart, head 
of the Department of Education and 
founder of Massachusetts 4-H Club 
work and Mr. O. A. Morton, first state 
club leader, whom he succeeded. 

Known as "Uncle George" to thous- 
ands of 4-H boys and girls, Mr. Farley 
headed the 4-H Club Department for 
twenty-five years, and was known 
throughout the nation for his outstand- 
ing work with rural youth. 

On the campus there are two 4-H 
Club houses — the first bulit in 1933 and 
named in his honor, and the second. 



60 



built in 1935. The Farley 4-H Club 
house was the first of its kind in the 
United States. It was built and fur- 
nished almost entirely by contributions 
from 4-H Club members, leaders and 
friends. It was during the construction 
of this building that Uncle George was 
stricken with blindness, but since that 
time he had carried on as State leader 
with his usual enthusiasm. 

It was through Mr. Farley's inspira- 
tion and encouragement that many 
young people attended the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. He was known 
to other Stockbridge students through 



frequent lectures to various Stock- 
bridge classes and talks at Stockbridge 
convocations. He was always delighted 
to learn of the successes of the Stock- 
bridge graduates. 

Mr. Farley died September 10, 1941 
and was buried in Lynn. He will live 
in the hearts of thousands of friends 
and admirers as a lover of youth, who 
refused to let a handicap weaken his 
vigor and enthusiasm for 4-H Club 
work. 

Corinne T. Petit, 
Secretary, 4-H Club Work 







« ^|i tM hU I! I i 







61 




LORIN E. BALL 



Just as smoothly and effortlessly as 
"Old Man River" Red Ball has been 
rolling along over the last 20 years 
to make a name for himself as a Stock- 
bridge School institution so far as ath- 
letics are concerned. 

He does say "somethin' " and his 
words must be to the point and carry 
the weight of his convictions for the 
friendly foes of Stockbridge on grid- 
iron, basketball court and baseball dia- 
mond all have a wholesome respect for 
the well-drilled teams Red turns out 
from season to season. His men are 
good sports too. They are instilled 
with the desire to win but if they lose 
they seldom grumble, but quietly res- 
olve to win the next time. 

A native of Amherst, Red can look 
back on his own athletic career in Am- 
herst High and at State. He was a 
three-sport performer, in football, bas- 
ketball, and baseball and his speed 
won him a place on his class relay 
team while at M. S. C. He is regarded 
as one of State's best baseball play- 
ers but it is hard to say which of the 



three sports he coaches now that holds 
the warmest spot in his heart. Inci- 
dentally, he has passed his majority 
several moons ago, but can still hold 
his own on field or court with many 
men considerably younger. 

Over the years Stockbridge School 
teams have made some brilliant rec- 
ords. The past school year was one 
of those occasions. The ten wins in 
12 games by the basketball quintet is 
the best ever in this sport, while last 
fall's football eleven in winning four 
games as against two losses did the best 
job of any team in the last dozen sea- 
sons. 

Besides sports. Red is interested in 
boys and men. Stockbridge men who 
have had the privilege to work under 
him know this as do the Boy Scouts 
he spends much patient time with. He 
was awarded the Silver Beaver for his 
outstanding service to scouting several 
years ago. 

To know Red Ball is to make a friend. 

Llewellyn Derby 



64 




65 




First row: Greenhalgh, Dougherty, Kuzmiski, Perry, Captain Downey, Woynar, Teittinen, 

Southard, Puchalski 
Second row: Coach Ball, Danckert, Little, Bak, Gibbs, Gary, Roehrich, Captain-elect 

Stevens, Brennan, Manager Tiemey 
Third row: Scott, Gorman, Carleton, Wade, Hussey, Bartosik, Worrall, Kentfield 
Fourth row: Assistant Coach Loomis, Robello, Mellas, Assistant Coach Tuttle, Assistant 

Manager Hardy, Statistician Thoren 



FOOTBALL 



Stockbridge's star studded 1941 foot- 
ball machine, with four victories in six 
starts, rolled to one of the most success- 
ful seasons yet obtained by a Blue and 
White eleven. The 'forty-one cam- 
paign was a year paralleled only by 
the history heralded 'twenty-nine club. 
The battling Blue and White's varied 
"sling and slam" offense brought back 
the bounty in four clashes, taking Ver- 
mont Academy 14-0, Monson Academy 
25-0, previously unbeaten Wentworth 
Institute 14-12, and Vermont Junior 
College 7-0, and dropped decisions on 
two successive Saturdays, losing to 
Gushing Academy 6-0, and the New 
York Aggies 21-7. 

October 11, 1941. 

Stockbridge 14 Vermont Academy 
Sparked by Mike Woynar, the one 
man gang. Coach Ball's football mach- 
ine rolled over Vermont Academy on 
the Saxtons River gridiron in the sea- 
son's opener. Stockbridge struck dra- 
matically in the first minutes of play 
after Georgie Perry smothered a Ver- 
mont fumble on the opposition's 28 
yard line. The boys made it sub-par 
for the course when Woynar fired a 



thirty-yard pass to Kuzmiski for the 
score on the second play of the game. 
Mike, who was the driving force in 
both touchdown thrusts converted the 
first of his two points after touchdown. 
Only minutes later the battling "Blue 
and Whites" swept down the field again 
to chalk up another touchdown on a 
Woynar to Robello pass from the fifteen 
yard line. 

October 18, 1941. 

Stockbridge Gushing 6 

In a thrill packed battle at Ashburn- 
ham, Gushing administered Stockbridge 
its first setback with a third quarter 
touchdown which followed their block- 
ing and retrieving of a punt on our 
twenty yard line. The "Blue and 
Whites" band of welded men in the 
forward wall, who had previously 
throttled Gushing's charges at the goal 
line, cracked before the blasting of the 
opponent's rugged operators and allow- 
ed Kolasinski to wheel through tackle 
for the games only score. 

October 25, 1941. 

Stockbridge 7 New York Aggies 21 
Our fight-fagged Foreign Legion, on 



66 



its third consecutive road trip, was out- 
manned and out-maneuvered 21 to 7 at 
Farmingdale in the only other defeat of 
the campaign. The "Blue and White" 
tallied their lone marker in the first 
minute of play when Woynar connected 
with a stinging spiral to Kusmiski for a 
seventy yard touchdown. Coach Ball's 
"sling and slam" tactics failed to pro- 
duce thereafter and the Long Islanders 
roared back to take the tussle away 
from the "adhesive bound" aggregation. 

October 31, 1941. 

Stockbridge 25 Monson 

The battHng "Blue and White" 
bounced back into the win column on 
the home turf by handing a 25 to de- 
feat on the mediocre Monson club. A 
large welcoming-home crowd saw 
Coach Ball unveil a husky victory- 
starved team that could not be denied 
win number two. Monson didn't have 
anyone to match big "Caesar" Kuzmis- 
ki or the diminutive freshman find, 
Bobby Brennan, who showed them the 
way to go home with brilliant individ- 
ual performances. 

November 7, 1941. 

Stockbridge 14, Wentworth Institute 12 

Stockbridge, who always opened fast, 
shredded Wentworth's line and pushed 
across a touchdown while the thud of 
the kickoff was still echoing in State's 
Stadium. Capitalizing on the Boston 
team's extremely poor punt to their 
twelve yard line, the Boys inBlue blast- 
ed a path a few yards at a time until 
Stevens burst through center for the 
initial score. Wentworth drew to with- 
in one point of the home forces before 
the quarter was over, by virtue of a 
blocked kick and a twenty yard pass 
from Delorey to Squires in the flat. 

The game was won in the second 
quarter when Woynar riflled Boogy 
wooky's pelt to Kuzmiski for a thirty 
yard, one way ticket to pay dirt. With 
the cause lost, Wentworth unfurled a 
baffling barrage of passes in the fourth 
quarter that carried them ninety-seven 
yards to a last minute tally. 



November 14, 1941. 
Stockbridge 7 Vt. Junior College 
The senior sod trodders shone in this 
gem of a game that drew the curtain 
on the 1941 football follies, but three 
freshmen got the curtain calls. Chuck 
Tryon, who personally contributed the 
third period touchdown, Ruddy Red 
Stevens, who continually bulldozed 
through the mound of linesmen, and 
Bobby Brennan, who slithered around 
the Vermont vigilance committee await- 
ing him across "no man's land" ran 
away with most of the honors and all 
the glory. 

The telling tally followed a thirty- 
three yard march in the third quarter. 
Tryon made the kill when he crashed 
through from the six and just managed 
to bend the zero stripe before the Ver- 
mont backfield sat on him. 



Stockbridge Athletic Awards 
Fall Season 1941 

FOOTBALL 

John E. Downey, '42, Captain 
Dean L. Stevens '43, Captain-elect 
Richard V. Tierney '42, Manager 
Joseph Edward Bak '43 
Everett Edward Bartlett, Jr. '42 
Robert E. Brennan '43 
Richard William Danckert '43 
Wilson H. Dougherty, Jr. '42 
Charles B. Gary '42 
Charles B. Gibbs '42 
John P. Gorman '43 
Alan Edward Greenhalgh, Jr. '42 
John Bean Hussey '42 
Francis Thomas Kuzmiski '42 
Robert E. Little, Jr. '43 
Frederick Langdon Nelson '43 
George Norman Perry '42 
Charles W. Puchalski '42 
Manuel Robello '42 
Carl Frederick Roehrich '42 
Clayton Bartlett Southard '42 
Leo Teittinen '42 
Charles H. Tryon '43 
Reed Marshall Wade '42 
Michael Woynar '42 



67 




First row: Mushenski, Allen, Uhlig, Hibbard, Tonet, Blanchard 
Second row: Manager Ogonowski, Alden, Bundy, Kramer, Coach Derby 



CROSS COUNTRY 



In a year when all Stockbridge teams 
were perched on the pinnacle of ath- 
letic prosperity, no better outfit carrier 
the colors for the school than the "hill 
and dalers". Such hardy harriers as 
John Alden, Gil Allen, Frank Bundy, 
Karl Uhlig, John Groton, and Earl Ton- 
et gave Captain Lin Hibbard sparkling 
support in a "so-so" season statistically 
but an unexcelled campaign actually. 
True, they outdistanced only half their 
opponents but it took the Amherst Col- 
lege Varsity, Mount Hermon, New 
England prep school champs, and Gard- 
ner, Massachusetts High School champs 
to balance up the record at 3-3. And 
even in defeat the "Derbymen" copped 
their share of the show. 

In a five mile spin with the Amherst 
college varsity on the "Lord Jeff's" cir- 
cuit, lean Lin Hibbard erased all pre- 
vious track marks by bolting across the 
finish line in 18:50.5 minutes, breaking 
the tape far ahead of the field. 



"Hep" Larkin, Gardner High star, 
shattered the Stockbridge course record 
by stopping the clock at 15:1 minutes 
in a meet early in the fall, but Hibbard 
again proved his individual brilliance 
by rocketing home in third place and 
also shaving seconds off the old time. 

The following is the summary of the 
Stockbridge placings: 

S. S. A. vs. Gushing Academy at 
Ashburnham, October 18, 1941 
1st Hibbard 
3rd Allen 
4th Alden 
6th Uhlig 
8th Bundy 
Winning time — 12:20. 

Stockbridge 22— Gushing 33 

S. S. A. vs. Gardner High School at 
M. S. C— October 22, 1941 
3rd Hibbard 
8th Alden 
11th Allen 
15th Bundy 
16th Groton 

Winning time — 15:01. 

Stockbridge 37— Gardner High 18 



68 



S. S. A. vs. Springfield College Frosh at 
M. S. C— October 30, 1941 
1st Hibbard 
2nd Alden 
Allen 
4th Tonet 
5th Bundy 
Uhlig 
Winning time — 16:16. 
Stockbridge 15, Springfield Frosh 49 

S. S. A. vs. Brattleboro Vt. at M. S. C. 
November 4, 1941 
2nd Alden 
4th Tonet 
Allen 
6th Mushenski 
7th Bundy 
Winning time — 16:21. 

Stockbridge 24— Brattleboro 34 

S. S. A. vs. Amherst College at Amherst 
November 7, 1941 
1st Hibbard 
6th Alden 
10th Tonet 
11th Allen 
16th Mushenski 

Winning time — 18:50 (Hibbard estab- 
lished new course record). 

Stockbridge 37, Amherst College 21 



S. S. A. vs. Mount Hermon School at 
M. S. C— November 13, 1941 

2nd Hibbard 

6th Alden 
10th Allen 
11th Tonet 
15th Bundy 

Winning time — 15:15. 

Stockbridge 35 — Mount Hermon 20 



LETTERMEN 
Captain Linwood S. Hibbard '42 
Captain-elect John L. Alden '43 
Gilbert G. Allen '42 
Frank H. Bundy '43 
John M. Groton '42 
Victor A. Mushenski '42 
Earl F. Tonet '42 
Karl R. Uhlig '42 
Alexander Ogonowski '42, Manager 

OFFICIALS 

Coach, Lle^vellyn Derby 
Manager, Alexander Ogonowski 
Captain, Linwood S. Hibbard 
Captain-elect, John L. Alden 





69 




First row: Woynar, Tonet, Co-Captain Kuzmiski, Co-Captain Doleva, Bak, Brennan 

Second row: Coach Ball, Assistant Manager Frohloff, Roehrich, Roak, Kempenaar, Manager 
Thoren 



STOCKBRIDGE BASKETBALL 



In piling up ten wins against two 
losses, the blazing Blue and White set 
a score of new marks for teams oi 
future years to shoot at. They sur- 
passed the record for the team's total 
in any one game by heaving in 66 points 
against Clark University Freshmen. 
They broke all previous highs for the 
season by amassing 452 points and es- 
tablished the best win-loss percentage 
in the school's basketball books. 

Stockbridge 41 — 

Vermont Junior College 35 

Riding on the flood of goals poured in 
by co-captain "Big Caesar" Kuzmiski 
and diminutive Lefty Doleva, who tal- 
lied the first 20 Stockbridge points and 
33 of the teams 41 total. Coach Ball's 
dazzling five surged to a 22-9 lead in 
the opening half. But by the end of 
the third quarter the seemingly 
supreme Stockbridge quintet was teet- 
ering on the brink of defeat as the 
visitors up with a rush, rattled 9 spec- 
tacular shots through the hoop to draw 
to within one point of a tie. In the 
fourth though, we went on to wrap the 
game in cellophane by dropping in 10 
more markers. 



Stockbridge 23— Williston Academy 20 

Employing everything but depth 
bombs and fifth column activities in 
their last quarter bid for victory, Stock- 
bridge's Basketball Brigade snatched 
a sure triumph from the "battling blue 
bloods" of Williston on the Easthamp- 
ton floor 23-20. The tide turned in 
our favor in Merriwell fashion when 
"Big Caesar" Kuzmiski, as cool as a 
.shot of liquid air, threaded the needle 
with a bank shot off the back board 
and lifted his mates into the lead with 
three minutes to play. 

Stockbridge 36 — 

Nichols Junior College 35 

In a drama-drenched free-for-all, for 
which words were not made to match, 
a fight fevered Stockbridge quintet 
brought down the house at Dudley by 
shading the rowdy Nichols five 36-35. 
Again paced by the fictional feats of 
the "tally twins" Kuzmiski and Doleva, 
who heaped in all but one of the team's 
36 total, the Blue and White won with 
a last desperate 10 minute drive that 
grayed the heads of the frenzied spec- 
tators. 



70 



Stockbridge 39 — Vermont Academy 25 
Co-leaders Kuzmiski and Doleva, 
who carted away most of the basket- 
ball copy to date, split the limelight 
monoply eight ways as the sterling men 
of Stockbridge whalloped Vermont 
Academy 39-25 at Saxtons River. The 
The makeshift lineup of Bak, Brennan, 
Roak, Woynar, and Tonet kept the 
Blue and White in the ball game, in 
a sensational manner after their two 
captains had taken the official full 
count, four personals. Doleva grabbed 
the scoring honors with fifteen points 
even though he was thumbed from the 
tilt. 

Stockbridge 58 — Monson Academy 27 
In a game, not a contest. Stock- 
bridge's super-hoopers added their 
fifth consecutive victory to an all-win 
record by mauling Monson 58-27. The 
cage cavaliers had a picnic; Jumping 
Joe Bak, scrappy Lefty Doleva, and 
"Big Caesar" Kuzmiski had field daj's 
with 21, 16, and 16 points respectively 
and the Monson five had a lot of exer- 
cise as the Blue and White kept the 
ball headed hoopward during most of 
the game. 

Stockbridge 29— 

Wilbraham Academy 28 

The baffling Blue and White, collect- 
ively, and brilliant Bobby Brennan, 
personally, crowded Wilbraham's fleet 
five into the lose column with a last 
minute 29-28 decision. Brennan, for 
thirty minutes, just one of the support- 
ing cast in the athletic act, sneaked out 
of the shadows of the foot lights with 
a minute and a half remaining, to push 
in the two pay-off shots that pulled his 
teammates out of the red. 
Stockbridge 21 — Deerfield Academy 39 

Deerfield's undefeated Dandies snuf- 
fed out Stockbridge's winning streak at 
six by applying a 39-21 shellacking to 
the game Blue and White invaders in 
their swanky sports palace. Deerfield 
dealt out double dynamite in Dibble 
and Rohrer and handcuffed our top 
scorers with a stingy zone defense. 

Stockbridge 47— 

Mai-ianapolis Academy 31 
A 24 point scoring by solo defeat- 
defying Lefty Doleva brought the soar- 
ing Stockbridge quintet a decisive 47-31 
win over the visitors. Doleva spot- 



lighted his spree by running 13 consec- 
utive points before another teammate, 
Joe Bak, split the strings. 

Stockbridge 66 — Clark U. Frosh 24 
The Blue and White's basketball bri- 
gade hit high C in a symphony of 
swish on the college Hemlock as they 
beat Clark freshmen "eight to the bar", 
66-24, to hang up win number eight. A 
conglamorate crew of regulars and subs 
shot the works for the easy victory 
with a panzer pace that rocketed them 
to a 28 point advantage after ten min- 
utes of massacre and to a 42 point gap 
between the teams totals at shower 
time. 

Stockbridge 33 — Cushing Academy 29 
After having played peek-a-boo with 
a cunning Cushing five for twenty- 
eight minutes, the erratic Stockbridge 
quintet caught and crushed the Ash- 
burnham team for their ninth "take" of 
the season 33-29 with a rollicking last- 
half rally. 

Dazzling "Lefty" Doleva topped off 
Kuzmiski's four bucket streak with two 
of his own to lift the lead from Cush- 
ing. A basket and a foul by Bak and a 
field goal by Tonet in the last minutes 
ballooned the home forces margin to 
33-27 and swung the session into Stock- 
bridge's win column. 

Stockbridge 30— 

Amherst College Freshmen 41 

The star-shorn cage cavaliers, out to 
stave in the college town's "upper 
crust", fell along the wayside as a sly 
Amherst Frosh Five breezed through to 
a 41-30 triumph on the Jefferymen's 
wood. Stripped of the services of our 
ailing co-captains Kuzmiski and Doleva, 
the Blue and White Brigade never hit 
a winning stride in dropping their sec- 
ond decision of the campaign. 

Stockbridge 29— 

Amherst College Jayvees 27 

A rehabilitated five closed its thrill- 
filled season by wringing out a 29-27 
win over the Amherst College Jayvees 
with a last period push. Aided by the 
return of Doleva and Kuzmiski, the 
Blue and White knotted the count at 27 
all in the fourth quarter and won in 
seconds later by Doleva's mid-court 
looper. 



71 




Coach Filmore, Manager Gilmore, Wade, Carleton, Merrill, Mills, Brogi, Cousins, Bartlett, 
Treadwell 



HOCKEY 



While foreign bombs were bursting 
where the Nipponese nipped, our pucks 
were bounding towards victory in bat- 
tles during the short but sweet 1942 
season. The Filmore coached Stock- 
bridge tribe were deferred temporarily 
when Mr. Winter played hookey to 
Captain Mills and company during the 
opening stages prior to their initial con- 
testwith Vermont Academy. This "June 
in January" weather, however, was is- 
sued its walking papers in time for 
the Vermont tussel. The ice brigade 
dropped their opening encounter to a 
Veteran Vermont squad 5-4. An ex- 
cellent balanced array from Nichols 
Junior College drubbed "the Aggies" 
for their second straight defeat, 7-4. 
Displaying the finest hockey of the cam- 
paign in the closing clash, Stockbridge 
subdued a determined Wilbraham sex- 
tet 5-0. In the post season matches 
with State College Varsity for the 
hockey championship of the college 
pond Stockbridge demonstrated definite 
superiority over the Maroon and 



White of State. An unacclaimed but 
spirited six unlashed a savage attack 
to whip the varsity in the first of the 
three game series 5-3. The Mills 
power makers portrayed perfect skat- 
ing coordination to pull this struggle 
in their favor. The following game 
brought victory to the "Bay Staters"' 
by a two goal margin to even the series 
at one all. This setback for our stride 
and check combination failed to darken 
the dressing room as our boys came 
back more determined than ever to 
sink an alert varsity playmaking team 
in the rubber game of the three game 
rendezvous by their favorite score of 
5-3. Thus ended a brief but success- 
ful hockey warfare for the six start- 
ing Stockbridge seniors, namely; Cap- 
tain Mills, Brogi, Bartlett, Hunter, 
Treadwell and Wade. 

Tommy Filmore, the diligent gentle- 
man from Springfield's war torn In- 
dians of the International American 
league, assumed his new duties as chief 



of our tribe on January first. The for- 
mer "paid for play" man came to us 
from the "city of homes" after estab- 
hshing an incomparable reputation dur- 
ing his truly brilliant career in the 
ranks of sport. By adding zest and 
fighting spirit to our aggregation he 
more than came up to all expectations 
through his professional teaching of 
this rugged winter sport. 

Stockbridge 4 — Vermont Academy 5 
Opening the season at Saxtons River, 
after postponment of the Monson con- 
test due to the inclement weather, the 
Filmore coached pucksters were 
downed by the "Green Mountain" lads 
5-4 in a stirring battle that saw the 
four Stockbridge tallies being racked 
up in the final stanza of play. This 
encounter was highlighted by the clever 
and brilliant playing of Mills and 
Bartlett. 

Stockbridge 4 — 

Nichols Junior College 7 

The Nichols Junior combine from 
Dudley were the first visitors for the 
first sruggle in our own back yard, 
the irresistible sextet were not to be 
denied, as they rode roughshod over 
our boys in Blue for a 7-4 triumph. 



Here our stars of the slippery surface 
Mills and Bartlett, Inc., twisted the 
twine at two apiece to monopolize the 
scoring honors. 

Stockbridge 5 — Wilbraham 

The third and final regularly sched- 
uled game was played with the pre- 
viously undefeated, untied Wilbraham 
six in the fastest game in the campaign 
on the Arctic plain. "Squash" Bartlett 
and "Whirlaway" Mills again combined 
the nucleus of hockey's best line to 
repeat their famous feat of sinking the 
disc four times and thus snowing Wil- 
braham into the ranks of the defeated. 

HOCKEY 

Coach Tom Filmore 

Manager Steve Gilmore 

Captain Homer O. Mills 

SQUAD 

Reed Wade '42 
Tom Carleton '43 
Bill Merrill '42 
Homer O. Mills '42 
Lincoln Brogi '42 
Bob Cousins '42 
Everett Bartlett '42 
Russ Treadwell '42 
Don McNair '43 




73 




First row: Gilmore, Bartosik, Captain Lachut, Taylor, Teittinen 
Second row: Manager Ogonowski, Coach Derby 



WINTER TRACK 



The hot house horde of Stockbridge 
competed in three similar triangle meets 
during their winter adventures in the 
college cage. 

The initial meet of the year saw Cap- 
tain Lachut's "men under glass' com- 
pile a sizable number of points against 
the Mass. State frosh, although they 
were unable to match the strides of the 
highly favored Kimball Union outfit 
from the Granite State. The Stock- 
bridge speedsters started strong in the 
broad jump, high jump, and pole vault 
events but faultered disastrously dur- 
ing the remainder of the meet. In the 
second "go" of the campaign our Blue 
and White, bent but not broken, fell 
by the wayside in favor of an experi- 
enced, veteran Wilbraham Tribe, who 
paced the entire field in "merry-go- 
round fashion"to show their superior- 
ity in an impressive manner. The 
"dark horse" combination, however, 
boasted sure-point men in Lachut, Kuc- 
inski, Kramer, and Gilmore. 

In the third and final fling of the ab- 
breviated schedule, the Lachut lads 



more than found their equal in the hot 
footed harriers of Easthampton, namely 
Williston Academy. A condensed 
squad entered this last meet in the hope 
of driving a disastrous season from the 
locker room door, but had to be satis- 
fied with the same typical record of last 
year's Derby array. The "band in 
blue" was impressive even in defeat 
because of its fighting spirit, enthusi- 
asm, and sportsmanship upon the mea- 
sured path this winter. Lachut, show- 
ing a definite improvement since the 
opening gun, managed to monopolize 
the majority of points to keep the Ag- 
gie score soaring skyward. The team 
proved to be especially handicapped 
because of the minority of athletes 
available for active duty. 

The following athletes received let- 
ters and sweaters: 

Captain Lachut '42 

Capt. -elect Kramer '43 

Kucinski '43 

Manager Ogonowski '42 



74 




75 




First row: Morgan, Kunan, van AJstyne, Upham, Mills 
Second row: Little, Crump, Perry, Downey, Beaton, Coombs 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL 

One of the most important phases in 
student life at Stockbridge is the Stu- 
dent Council. It is this group that 
makes the rules and sees to it that they 
are kept. During the past year, the 
Student Council members have shoul- 
dered their responsibilities well, and 
despite the loss of two of their original 
members, Carl Williams and Richard 
Sullivan, have managed to keep Stock- 
bridge affairs running smoothly. That 
they have managed to do so in times of 
such unrest speaks very well of their 
abilities as leaders. 

OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 

President Peter Edward van Alstyne 

Vice-President Edward Upham 

Secretary-Treasurer Leo Kunan 

Senior Class President Homer Mills 

Alpha Tau Gamma President, George N. Perry 

Kappa Kappa President John Downey 

Senior Representative M. Currie Beaton 

Senior Representative Kenneth Coombs 

Freshman Class President Herbert Morgan 

Freshman Representative Robert Little 

Freshman Representative Harold L. Crump 



78 




Front row: Dibble, van Alstyne, Gilmore, Roberts, Thoren, R. Williams, Colgate 
Second row: E. Johnson, Blanchard, Putala, Frank, DeVos, Roehrich 



"S" CHARM AWARDS 

GOLD 

STUART GILMORE — Shorthorn, 
Stockbridge News, Snow Sculpture. 

MALCOLM MacKAY ROBERTS — 
Collegian Reporter, Shorthorn, Two 
Plays. 

EMERY FRANCIS THOREN— Busi- 
ness Manager Shorthorn. 

PETER EDWARD vanALSTYNE — 
Editor Shorthorn, President of Student 
Council. 

ROBERT HUTCHISON WILLIAMS 
Collegian Reporter, Shorthorn, Chair- 
man Commencement Committee. 



FOR CLASS OF 1942 

SILVER 

RALPH LYMAN BLANCHARD — 
One Play 

EDITH COLGATE — Two Plays, 
Shorthorn. 

LINA ABIGAIL DIBBLE — Two 
Plays, Shorthorn. 

FRANCIS DeVOS — Two Plays, As- 
sistant Editor Shorthorn. 

ALVAN FREDERICK FRANK — 
Two Plays. 

ELDON HJALMAR JOHNSON — 
One Play, Glee Club. 

EUGENE CHARLES PUTALA — 
One Play. 

CARL FREDERICK ROEHRICH — 
One Play. 



79 




TRI SIGMA 



October— "Ho! Ho! Ha! Ha!" Look 
at those girls! One sock, one stocking, 
an apron, pigtails. Is it a masquerade? 
No, it is only the result of initiation 
week for the freshmen. Dottie Connor 
was seen strutting around campus with 
her telephone number, name, and ad- 
dress printed in large letters on her 
back. 

November — Dinner at Miss Hamlin's 
charming colonial home. It was pre- 
pared by Sally Gidley, Peggy Flem- 
ming, Eleanor Bullock, Lina Dibble, 
Edith Colgate, and Sally Welles. 

December — Professor and Mrs. Tuttle 
invited the whole club to a Christmas 
party with presents, carols, and an ex- 
cellent buffet supper. 

January — A dance at the Memorial 
Building proved such a success that 
the boys and girls wanted another gath- 
ering planned, and a hay ride was de- 
cided upon for February. 

The dance committee was Peg Flet- 
cher, Edith Colgate, and Lina Dibble. 

February — Arrangements for the 
hayride were made by D. Connor, E. 
Colgate, and A. Slack. The ride ended 



at the home of Alice Slack, where re- 
freshments were served. 

March — The sorority was asked to 
join the Student Council for tea at 
Director and Mrs. Verbeck's home. 

Finally, a banquet was held at Mount 
Pleasant Inn. Miss Hamlin and three 
alumnae joined the group for a pleasant 
meal and chat. Thus ended a very full 
and enjoyable year under the leader- 
ship of President Lina Dibble. 

OFFICERS 

President Lina A. Dibble 

Vice-President Mary Conlon 

Secretary Edith Colgate 

Treasurer Sally Gidley 



MEMBERS 


— SENIORS 


E. Colgate 


M. Strong 


L. Dibble 


S. Welles 


S. Gidley 




MEMBERS - 


- FRESHMEN 


E. Boluch 


M. Fletcher 


M. Conlon 


P. Mayo 


D. Connor 


B. Rafferty 


M. Ferris 


A. Slack 


M. Fleming 





80 




81 




ALPHA TAU GAMMA 



The year 1941-42 was one of the 
most successful since the organization 
of Alpha Tau Gamma. 

With the return to college last fall, 
the members made many improvements 
in the house and made ready for a busy 
season. A "smoker" was held to ac- 
quaint the freshmen with the house. 
A faculty whist party and several "vie" 
parties followed throughout the year. 

Under the able leadership of "Stu" 
Gilmore, we made a fine snow sculp- 
ture and captured second prize. 

The annual banquet and dance was 
held on March 7, at the Lord Jeffrey 
Inn. Many alumni were present and 
a good time was had by everyone. 

The members are sincerely grateful 
to "Pop" Barrett for his guidance and 
leadership which he so willingly 
offers. 

OFFICERS 1942 

President George Perry 

Vice-President Curry Beaton 

Secretary William Merrill 

Treasurer Russell Treadwell 

Sergeant-at-Arms Richard Tierney 

House Manager Stuart Gilmore 

Historian Edward Craft 



OFFICERS 1943 

President Duncan Urquhart 

Vice-President Talcott Hubbard 

Secretary Len Martinson 

Treasurer Robert Hall, Jr. 

Sergeant-at-Arms Charles Tryon 

House Manager Beniamin Keyes, Jr. 

Historian Whitney Appleton 



MEMBERS 1942 



Currie Beaton 
Kenneth Coombs 
Edward Craft 
Wilson Dougherty 
Steve Gilmore 
Stuart Gilmore 
John Groton 
William Hope 
John Hussey 
Harry Johnson 
Leo Kunan 
Francis Kuzmiski 



William Merrill 
Robert Nelson 
Alexander Ogonowski 
George Perry 
Russell Treadwell 
Richard Tierney 
Rudy Uhhg 
Peter van Alstyne 
Morton Wilson 
Walter Williams 
Carl Williams 
Richard Sullivan 



MEMBERS 1943 



Whitney Appleton 
Richard Ballou 
Vernon Bartosik 
Daniel Boone 
Robert Brennan 
Harold Crump, Jr. 
Richard Danckert 
Richard Going 
Robert Hall, Jr. 
William Hargreaves 
Malcolm Hawley 
Talcott Hubbard 
Walter White 
Myrt Davis 
Arthur Kaye 



Robert Kempenaar 
Benjamin Keyes, Jr. 
John Knox 
Leonard Martinson 
Robert Morgan 
Wallace Orcutt 
Dean Stevens 
Roland Taylor 
Rusell Tompkins 
Charles Tryon 
Richard Truesdale 
Duncan Urquhart 
Charles Jagger 
Donald Schmidt 



82 




83 




KAPPA KAPPA 



The year 1941-42 will remain dear in 
the hearts of Kappa Kappa men. The 
active chapter enjoyed a year of good 
fellowship under the able guidance of 
Mr. Howard Barnes and Professor 
Smart. 



OFFICERS 1942 



President John Downey 

Vice-President !.Rayinond DeYoung 

Secretary Howard Morey 

Treasurer David Phelps 

Marshal _ Sheldon Freschi 

Historian Robert Cousins 

Manager Malcolm Roberts 



The annual smoker was held with 
huge success on October 11. "Vic" par- 
ties studded our social season, and 
the climax was reached at the annual 
formal dinner dance, held on March 14, 
at the Lord Jeffrey Inn. 



OFFICERS 1943 



President. 



...Robert Raymond 



Vice-President Donald Morey 

Secretary Raymond Roak 

Treasurer John Devine 

Marshal , Thomas Wonall 

Historian John Steams 

Manager Paul Marsoubian 



Inter-fraternity competition was keen 
and great interest and success resulted 
from typical Kappa Kappa spirit and 
good will. This year has certainly 
proved to all members that cooperation 
can achieve great heights. 

We, the present chapter, believe that 
in the future the brothers of Kappa 
Kappa will enjoy this fine spirit of co- 
operation, as we did this year and as 
our predecessors did in the past. 



MEMBERS 1942 

Raymond C. DeYoung David L. Phelps 

John E. Downey " 

Robert L. Cousins 

Nicholas DiLisio 

Sheldon Freschi 

Howard Morey 

Arthur Merrian 

Homer O. Mills 



Eldon Johnson 
Reed M. Wade 
Alan E. Greenhalgh 
Malcolm M. Roberts 
Philip H. Smith 
J. Dawson Yamell 



MEMBERS 1943 



Robert Raymond 
Herbert Morgan 
John Steams 
Thomas Wonall 
Edmund Sharpe 



John Devine 
Raymond Roak 
Paul Marsoubian 
Donald Morey 
Roger Collins 



84 




85 



THE WEEKLY NEWS COLUMN 



The Stockbridge News Column, 
started its publication for the 1941-42 
scholastic year with the October 9th 
edition of the MASSACHUSETTS 
COLLEGIAN and appeared weekly 
thereafter, carrying all the news that 
was of general interest to the campus 
clan. 

The system of editing copy used dur- 
ing the previous year was scrapped in 
early November for a more efficient 
one. Each Monday Mr. Dubois, Bob 
Williams and Mac Roberts met at Old 
Chapel and went over the material for 
the coming week, correcting and ar- 
ranging it. 

The staff of voluntary reporters was 
larger than usual and was made up 
of the following: Bob Williams and 
Reed Wade, sports; Mac Roberts, edi- 
torials; Ray Roak, intramural sports; 
Edith Colgate, Tri Sigma and Animal 
Husbandry Club. Myrton Davis, Flori- 
culture Club; Bob Cousins, Kappa 
Kappa; Ed Craft, Alpha Tau Gamma; 
Alvan Frank, Poultry. John Knox, 
Hotel Stewarding; Ralph Blanchard, 
Horticulture Club; Don Lauder, Dairy; 
E. Charles Putala, Dramatics; Peg 
Strong, Lina Dibble and Alice Slack, 
special events and Charlie McMaster, 
Horticulture Club. 



While the column never had an of- 
ficial editor, the fellow that actually 
filled the post on Stockbridge's weekly 
spread was Mac Roberts. He was the 
man that ran down rumors, he saw 
that the literary efforts were turned 
in "when and where", and kept the 
journalistic junket on an even keel. 

This year the column was fortunate 
to have on its staff a man with experi- 
ence in writing sports. This was Bob 
Williams who brought the sports re- 
porting service up to a new high, never 
before seen in our school's print. Bob 
covered the major sports while Reed 
Wade kept the hockey news coming 
hot off the ice. 

The special feature on Chicago's inter- 
national, which scooped the column's 
big brother, the Collegian, the dramatic 
write-ups by E. Charles Putala, and the 
complete coverage of the numerous 
clubs and their activities helped to 
keep the general trend of copy at a 
high level. 

Stanley Polchlopek, Editor in chief, 
other members of the Collegian board 
and Mr. Charles N. Dubois, Faculty 
Advisor through their kind coopera- 
tion and constructive criticisms helped 
make this seasons Stockbridge News 
Column one of the best in recent years. 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB 



The Animal Husbandry Club, aggres- 
sive and creative, waded through the 
academic year to furnish one of the 
most educational and entertaining chap- 
ters in its history. 

The praiseworthy program was 
highlighted by movies, down-to-terra 
firma talks and cleverly presented ino- 
vations. 

Perhaps the stormiest but most suc- 
cessful session of the series was the 
quiz contest that pitted the two year 
men p gainst the supposedly class room 
gohaths of M. S. C. with "Buckey'' 
Walters, graduate student, serving up 
the questions and Professors Heck and 
Parsons umping this battle of brains, 
Stockbridge slowed State to a stutter 
and finally won 23-20. 

Two motion pictures by Professor 
"Roll 'em" Barrett — Taking a hitch in 



the hog belt" and "Spring comes to 
M. S. C." were shown during the year 
while another film, "Chilian Nitrate" 
was sandwiched into the crowded fall 
schedule. 

Among the interesting subjects cov- 
ered by the various speakers were: 
"Sheep in New England" by Cliff Clev- 
enger of Mount Hope Farm; "Agricul- 
ture in National Defense" by Joe 
Putnam, Franklin County Agent; "Sci- 
entific Feeding of Dairy Cattle" by Dr. 
Campbell of the Walker-Gordon Labor- 
atory; and "My Experiences in the 
West" by Professor Thayer of the Ag- 
ronomy department. 

A Harvest dance, the first of its kind 
sponsored by the Animal Husbandry 
Club, was held Saturday, November 8. 
The Drill Hall became a "barn" for 
the evening, and everyone who attend- 



86 



ed joined in the spirit of the affair 
by wearing old clothes and using bales 
of shavings for chairs. The money 
raised was used to buy prizes for the 
"Little International". 

OFFICERS 1942 

President Allen Cowan, M.S.C. 

Vice-President Peter van Alstyne, S.S.A, 



Secretary.... 
Treasurer... 



...James L. Ward, M.S.C. 
John Brotz, M.S.C, 



OFFICERS 1943 

President James Ward, M.S.C. 

Vice-President Charles Tryon, S.S.A. 

Secretary G. Gregory Sidelinger, S.S.A. 

Treasurer Ray Steeves, M.S.C. 



THE DAIRY CLUB 



The dairy club has been fairly active 
this year, but due to the noticeable 
lack of interest on the part of some 
Stockbridge dairymen, the club has not 
been as successful as in previous years. 

It has been the aim of the club this 
year, as it is every year, to obtain 
guest speakers who have endeavored 
to orient the student with everyday 
problems that confront the dairyman 
of today. 

A few of the guest speakers and their 
topics were as follows: 

Mr. Angus Shipley, graduate assist- 
ant at M. S. C, spoke on Sanitary 
Work in Michigan. 



Mr. Albert Smith, Manager of 
United Dairy, Springfield, spoke on 
Dairy Concessions. 

Mr. E. K. Davis from Hillcrest Dairy, 
Worcester, spoke on The Farm as Re- 
gards the Dairy Industry. 

The club activities are shared by both 
M. S. C. and Stockbridge students. The 
officers for this year are as follows: 

President Carl Werme, M.S.C, '42 

Co-President Nick DlLisio, S.S.A., '42 

Vice-President John Alden 

Secretary- Treasurer Saul Gick, M.S.C. 



THE HORT. CLUB 



The Hort. Club was underway early 
in the fall of 1941, and carried on a 
most successful season throughout the 
year. 

The officers for the past year were: 

President Wilfred Meinke 

Vice-President Rudy Uhlig 

Secretary Howard Fife 

Treasurer Eldon Johnson 

The program committee consisted of 
C. McMasters, H. Fairclough, and R. 
Blanchard. Professor Lyle Blundell 
acted in the capacity of faculty advisor. 

The club was very fortunate this 
year in obtaining speakers of high merit 
in their respective fields. In October Mr. 
Bagg, Tree Warden of South Hadley, 
spoke to the club on "Modern Street 
Planting and Maintenance." The talk 
was supplemented by some very fine 
movies. 

Professor Dickinson of the Agron- 
omy Department gave an illustrated 
talk on Fine Turf, at the November 
meeting. He also showed some Ko- 
dachrome slides on New England 
Landscapes. 



A discussion and constructive criti- 
cism of the Horticulture Show consti- 
tuted the main portion of the December 
meeting, while "Foundation Plantings" 
was the subject chosen by Professor 
Blundell for the January meeting. 

The February 3rd meeting was ex- 
pressly for the benefit of the freshmen 
members of the club. The values of 
placement training were cited in short 
talks by Professor Hubbard of the 
Floriculture Department, and by Pro- 
fessor Blundell of the Horticulture De- 
partment. Eugene Patula (Flori. '42) 
spoke from experience, and Ralph 
Blanchard showed Kodachromes which 
he took while on placement. 

On February 19, Dr. John Bailey, As- 
sistant Research Professor of Pomol- 
ogy at M. S. C. gave a talk on "Blue- 
berry Culture". Dr. Bailey is one of 
the outstanding authorities in this rela- 
tively new field. 

As usual, the members were a busy 
lot at the Horticultural Show last No- 
vember, and carried on a very active 
and enjoyable program. With the loss 



87 



of the freshmen in April, the member- 
ship of the club was seriously affected. 
Then, too, the war has caught up with 
the Hort Club, for Manuel Benton, 
former Vice President, is in the Mar- 
ines, and Charles McMasters is in the 
Army. By June, the Army will have 
three more members: F. House, W. 
Meinke, and R. Uhlig. 



Although prospects for the coming 
year are somewhat dubious, the follow- 
ing officers for 1942-43 have been 
elected: 



President 

Vice-President.. 
Secretary 



...H. Fairclough 

T. Carleton 

R. Little 



Treasurer T. Ridgeway 



FLORICULTURE CLUB 



After a year's lapse of time the flori- 
culture majors and others interested 
were called to a reorganization meet- 
ing on February 17. 

Henry Holihan who was instrumental 
in getting this meeting together was 
elected President; Francis DeVos, Vice- 
President; Peggy Strong, Secretary and 
Gil Satin, Treasurer. Professor C. L. 
Thayer was elected Advisor. 

The fact that the club was late in 
organizing it cannot boast of an exten- 
sive program during the past year. The 



second meeting was held on March 3. 
At this time the club was fortunate in 
getting Professor Barrett to show Ko- 
dachrome slides and motion pictures 
of the Rocky Mountains. As usual 
"Pop's " pictures were excellent and 
his informal remarks were enjoyed by 
everyone. 

Dr. Alexander, Head of the depart- 
ment of Entomology, was the speaker 
for the third meeting which was held 
on March 10. Dr. Alexander gave an 
illustrated lecture, using Kodachrome 
slides of the wild flowers of the south- 
ern Appalachians and Rocky Mountains. 



POULTRY SCIENCE CLUB 



The Poultry Science Club is another 
of those State-Stockbridge combinations. 
The purpose of this club is to get all 
poultry students together for good 
times and a chance to learn something 
about their major interest besides what 
is given in the text books. Officers this 
past year were George Yale, M. S. C, 
'42, President; Frank Brown, S.S.A., 
'42, Vice-President and Frank Hardy, 
M.S.C., '43, Secretary-Treasurer. The 
faculty advisor is Mr. Vondell, whose 
energy and ideas help greatly in mak- 
ing things click. Meetings held twice 
a month have included this year a 



movie by "Pop" Barrett, a three cor- 
nered debate, and talks by our exten- 
sion poultryman. Professor Klein, and 
Mr. John Westberg of the Eastern 
States Farm.ers' Exchange. Along in 
February the members sharpened up 
their pencils and took their turn in pub- 
lishing an edition of the "Intercollegiate 
Poultry Science Club Newsletter". The 
final and biggest event on the club's 
production record is a banquet. This 
year the feed was held at the Drake 
Hotel uptown, when thirty-odd poul- 
try clubbers lined their crops with a 
delicious turkey dinner. 



PANDOCIOS 



The Pandocios Society, made up of 
Hotel Stewarding Students, carried on 
its usual activity with a number of visi- 
tations, its annual conference for hotel 
men of greater New England, its crea- 
tion of a Special M.S.C. Salad Dress- 
ing and its monthly meetings. 

The first meetings of the society cul- 
minated in the election of its officers: 
those being President, Charles Parmor; 
Vice-President, Whitney Appleton; Sec- 
retary, J. R. Pace; Treasurer, R. Ballou 
and Collegian Reporter, John Knox. 



On November 7, 8, and 9, the class 
put in its first bid for attention when it 
cooked and set up for the Horticultural 
Show, an ideal Thanksgiving Dinner, 
and offering several new and unique 
dishes for the approval of the public. 
Over 15,000 people viewed the heavily 
laden table in its background of green 
hemlock boughs and over 5,000 recipes 
were handed out. 

The visitations to prominent food 
kitchens started October 30, with a 
trip to the Deerfield Academy for a 



88 



banquet and a lecture by Mr. Frank 
Novak, Chef Steward of that school. 

On November 26, the society, in a 
body joined the International Greeters 
Association and had the distinction of 
being the first of any Stewarding Stu- 
dents to join as a unit since this associa- 
tion was founded. Contacts were made 
with the students of the Hotel Course at 
New Hampshire University and to- 
gether all enjoyed a dinner dance held 
at the Hotel Richmond. 

On February 29 the class advisor Dr. 
Walter Maclinn left to report for duty 



with the army. We were fortunate that 
such men as Dr. Carl Fellers and 
Walter O. Johnson, of Draper Hall, 
could take his place. 

Our year of activity was climaxed 
on March 12 with the conference of 
hotel men of this section of the coun- 
try. A full day of classes was provid- 
ed for them and they left much im- 
pressed with the work being done by 
the students. It was at this time that 
the M. S. C. Salad Dressing made its 
first appearance at a meal planned, 
prepared and cooked by the students 
themselves. 



4-H COLLEGE CLUB 



The College 4-H Club was organized 
in 1930 for former 4-H members and 
any college student who wishes to 
join. This club offers a well-rounded 
program, social activities, and service 
club work for the four and two year 
students. The meetings are held 
monthly and include a speaker or a 
discussion of subjects of interest to 4- 
H'ers and a social hour of dancing, 
singing and games. The boys and girls 
prepare their own refeshments in the 
little kitchen in the Farley 4-H Club 
House. 

The purpose of the 4-H Club is to 
teach its members to help themselves 
and to cooperate and lead others. 

The years 1941 and '42 were very 
profitable and successful. 

A business meeting was conducted 
by Skip Holopainen on February 19, 
1941. The election of officers resulted 
in the following: 

President Betty Staples 

Treasurer Chick Gary 

Secretary Janet Milner 

Executive Board- 
Marion Foote and Jim Oilman 

The entertainment for that meeting 
was a comic opera "Solapillio" present- 
ed by the class of '41. 

On March 21, 22, 23, a Service Club 
Conference was held on the campus. 
Dr. Morris B. Storer from Washington 
led the discussions. There were eighty 
club members present representing 
service clubs in Massachusetts. 



Dr. Caldwell led an informal discus- 
sion on "What Happens if Nazi's are 
Victorious" and "Should the United 
States Convoy Ships". This was the 
meeting of April 23rd. 

The October 15th meeting was led 
by Director Munson who explained 
the growth of 4-H Club work in this 
state. There was also a reception for 
State and Stockbridge freshmen. 

The Christmas party with kids' 
games and the usual "loads of fun" 
and square dances was held on De- 
cember 18th. 

The Annual Service Club Conference 
took place of the regular meeting, the 
theme being "Looking Ahead" with 
group discussion on "4-H War Emer- 
gency Program". The Saturday after- 
noon discussions were on leadership, 
including points on publicity, conduct- 
ing a meeting, and program planning. 
Saturday night the Service Club Ban- 
quet was held and after this the party 
with the College Club as host took 
place. All this happened on Decem- 
ber 30-31, 1941. 

The meeting of February 18, 1942 
was reserved for election of officers for 
1942-43. 

President Jean Brown 

Vice-President Donald Morey 

Secretary Barbara Bemis 

Treasurer Elmer Clapp 



Executive Board 

Gordon Brady and Janet Milner 



89 



OUTING CLUB 



Hiking, skiing, biking, square danc- 
ing. What will you have? The Outing 
Club offers these and many more ac- 
tivities to every outdoor-minded State 
or Stockbridge student merely for the 
taking. 

Whatever interests you most makes 
little difference; they exchange ideas, 
and before you realize it, you want to 
do what the other Outing Clubbers 
are doing to see if it really is as much 
fun as it sounds. The club is an eye- 
opener to the fun and joy of living 
obtained from climbing a high moun- 
tain or from the many other forms of 
outdoor recreation. Everyone, from 
the veteran mountaineers to the meek 
little freshmen girls, can get thrills 
and enjoyment out of the wide variety 
of outdoor activities and recreation 
sponsored by the club, and chances are 
that even after graduation they will 
continue to get the same pleasures from 
their outdoor recreation. 

This year the club has been quite 
active under the able direction of Hal 
Mosher, our most capable president, 
despite the fact that activities have 
been cut to quite a degree due to the 
national defense and offense. Due to 
the fact that most of the long week-end 
trips had to be cancelled the club was 
forced to adopt the "stay at home" pol- 
icy and confine the trips to short hikes 



to nearby points. During the fall and 
early spring, many hikes were made 
to such places as Sky Pastures, Cas- 
cades, and the Holyoke Range. Two 
successful week-end trips were held: 
one an I. O. C. A. trip to Mt. Monad- 
nock in October and the other a ski 
trip to Wilmington, Vt, in connection 
with Amherst, Smith, Holyoke, and 
Springfield colleges. 

The Club has had two major projects 
to work on. The first, which is the 
scouting and rebuilding of the Rim 
Trail that has been impassable since 
the hurricane, has been fairly success- 
ful as far as the weather has permitted 
the work to be carried on. The second 
is the teaching of square dancing and 
the sponsoring of as many square 
dances as the club can work in. This 
has been a very popular idea if one 
can judge any by the numbers that 
attend the dances. Starting with a 
simple instruction dance in the fall, 
the club held five dances in the Drill 
Hall. 

To the hiker, the biker, the skier, and 
the square dancer, the days spent in 
the great outdoors and the evenings 
spent "shaking a leg" in Drill Hall with 
the always busy Outing Club will be- 
come one of his most cherished memor- 
ies of his college life. 



DRAMATICS 



In W'^hat A Life. Clifford Goldsmith had 
written a comedy with a made-to- 
order plot. The Stockbridge Drama 
Society mounted it agreeably with some 
authentic variety touches in the setting, 
and some excellent comic acting by 
Dottie Connor, Carl Roehrich, Paul 
Marsoubian, Eldon Johnson and Alvan 
Frank. On the opening night, Bowker 
Auditorium was filled with unaccus- 
tomed laughter, and most of the play- 
goers trudged home under the impres- 
sion that they had had a pleasant 
evening. 



What the playgoers had seen was a 
well-presented comedy — young, lively, 
fast on its feet, full of agonies a first 
kiss or even an ice-cream soda can 
drive away. They had taken an ex- 
cursion into the topsy-turvy excite-i 
ments of life in the elementary schools. 

W''ha/ A Life was not important to a 
world at war. It concerned only the 
struggles of a high school lad with 
limited mentality and more limited 
inventiveness. 

But it bounced across the boards — 
and everyone liked it. 



90 



THE PLAY 

Directed by H. Leland Varley 

WHAT A LIFE Clifford Goldsmith 

CAST 

Miss Shea ......... Marguerite Fleming 

Mr. Nelson .......... Francis DeVos 

Mr. Patterson .......... George Ladd 

A Student .......... Robert Simoni 

Miss Pike . Edith Colgate 

Bill ........... Eldon Johnson 

Miss Eggleston Lina Dibble 

Miss Johnson . . . . . . . ' . . . Sally Welles 

Mr. Vecchitto ......... Paul Marsoubian 

Henry Aldrich Carl Roehrich 

Barbara Pearson ........ Dorothea Connor 

Gertie Sally Gidley 

Mr. Bradley Ralph Blanchard 

Miss Wheeler Priscilla Mayo 

George Bigelow John Pace 

Mrs. Aldrich Mrs. Edna Powers 

Mr. Ferguson Alvan Frank 

Students ....... 

Robert Simoni, Mary Ferris, Morton Wilcon 
Mary Mary Conlin 

SCENERY 
Clayton Southard, George Sacco, Donald Lauder 



91 



THE FRESHMAN RECEPTION 



It is a tradition for Stockbridge to 
open its social season by giving the 
freshmen a reception. On Friday, No- 
vember 14, the Drill Hall was the scene 
of this event. The Hall was decorated 
with the names of the various clubs of 
the school, and Bob Miller and his 
Orchestra furnished the music. 

Professor and Mrs. Rollin H. Barrett 
and Mr. and Mrs. Donald Ross were 
chaperones for the evening, while 
Director and Mrs. Verbeck and Presi- 



dent and Mrs. Hugh Baker dropped in 
to extend to the freshmen a more for- 
mal welcome than they had hitherto 
received on campus. 

One of the highlights of the evening 
was a Paul Jones, which lent an added 
air of joviality to the affair, and gave 
the seniors and freshmen a chance to 
mingle. It was just enough to give 
that impetus that makes a dance a 
really successful success. 



FAREWELL DANCE 



The name "Bob" seems to spell 
success. Bob Little and Herb Morgan 
as dance committee and Bob Miller and 
his orchestra were responsible for a 
very successful affair. Both State and 
Stockbridge students turned out in 
goodly numbers on Saturday night, 
March 21. The Drill Hall had the 
best there was from the greenhouse for 
its party attire. We were fortunate 
to have Sergeant and Mrs. Russell, 
and Mr. and Mrs. John Blair as chap- 
erones. 



As this is called the "Freshman Fare- 
well" dance the reader might have 
visions of tearful Freshies wilting amid 
the palms, but the name is deceiving. 
The Seniors will be leaving all the 
Halls, including the Drill Hall — while 
the Freshmen will return next autumn 
to the agencies dealt out in Stockbridge, 
Wilder and French and the escapes 
from care in other gay flings at the 
Drill Hall. 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL DANCE 



"Wow. What a night for a dance!" 
"We need a row boat not a car!" "How 
I wish I hadn't lent the landlady my 
umbrella!" were some of the remarks 
heard as Stockbridgers splashed their 
way to the Student Council Dance, held 
December 14, 1941. The turn out for 
the dance was comparatively small (and 
no wonder!) but those who did come 
had a wonderful time. 

The dance came the night after the 
Military Ball, and the Drill Hall was 
really "dressed up"! The orchestra. 



Jack Ralsten's played extremely dance- 
able music from 8:00 to 11:30, and hair 
that "dripped" and shoes that "oozed" 
were soon forgotten. 

We were happy to have as chaper- 
ones for the evening. Professor and 
Mrs. Rolhn Barrett and Professor and 
Mrs. Alden Tuttle. 

The credit (and incidentally the 
school's gratitude) go to Eddie Upham 
and Ossie Mills who were in charge 
of all arrangements. 



92 



WINTER CARNIVAL 



"Gee, Bob, the whole week end was 
grand! I never thought I would get 
to go to a real ball, with an orchestra 
like Sam Donahue's. The carnival 
queen was cute, if you like the type. 
Anita Marshall was her name, wasn't 
it? Her hair is absolutely — well gor- 
geous is the only word. 

"Didn't everybody look different 
dressed up? You fellows should wear 
tux's all the time. What do you mean, 
I don't know how your neck feels? You 
didn't know how my feet feel, either. 

"Stockbridge sure came through this 
year, didn't it? The hockey team 
looked alright when it beat State, but 
eh gad, that wind was cold! I get 
chills whenever I think of it. 

"Carl Roehrich did his bit, too, when 
he came in third in the skating races 
and second in the obstacle race. It 



was a shame that there wasn't enough 
snow for the skiing events. I just 
know 'Pinky' Williams and Ken 
Coombs would have made good 
showings. 

"Do you know, I'd never been to 
anything where everybody had such 
a good time as at that ski boot infor- 
mal and the 'vie' parties at the frat- 
ernities were fun too. It gave you a 
chance to see all the snow sculptures 
and everybody you ever knew, besides! 
'Stu' Gilmore really did a super job 
on that A. T. G. entry. He deserved 
second place and more too! 

"Yes, thanks again for a wonderful 
weekend. Certainly I'd like to go to 
the 1943 Winter Carnival. That is, 
provided I can sleep for a month of 
Sundays between now and then!" 



HORTICULTURE SHOW 



Let us pretend that we are again at 
the Horticulture Show of 1941. We 
enter the Physical Education Cage 
through the south door, and a glow 
of colors greet us. We walk first 
through a garden where Queen Victoria 
herself might have strolled. Hundreds 
of Dusty Miller, coleus and other bed- 
ding plants form brilliant patterns 
against the green of the sod. No matter 
how we enter the garden, we always 
seem to end up admiring the marble 
fountain which stands in the center. (It 
was not real marble, but no one would 
have guessed that!) And for the first 
time in the history of Horticulture 
Shows at Mass. State the fountain 
bubbles honest-to-goodness water. 

At the very rear of the cage stands 
a huge shield with a cornucopia on 
either side. The stripes in the shield 
have been made from apples, some red, 
others painted white. On top of the 
shield thousands of ai-tificial flowers 
have been woven to form a solid mass 
of blue, with white stars in the fore- 
ground. The cornucopias are filled to 
overflow with vegetables and give one 
a feeling of confidence in America. 



On tables around the garden are dis- 
plays by florists from the Valley. Some 
of these displays are in the special Vic- 
torian classes, while others are entered 
in the regular competitions. They add 
a great deal of color to the scene. 

There have been some changes made 
in the show this year. We notice that 
all student exhibits of table arrange- 
ments are missing. In fact, students 
were allowed to make entries in only 
one class, exhibits covering one 
hundred square feet. Stockbridge men 
certainly got their share of the honors. 
First we see "Tropical Garden" en- 
tered in informal gardens by Henry 
Holihan and Victor Mushenski. For 
this outstanding piece of work, well- 
balanced and perfectly finished they 
have received first prize. Incidentally 
they broke a record by having two real 
orchids in a student exhibit-. 

Next we come to an exhibit put up 
by J. Edward Craft, Ken Coombs and 
Dean Stevens. They have won second 
prize with their miniature garden, 
while Francis DeVos, Morton Wilcon 
and Robert Simoni have taken third 
place in this class. 



93 



A window display of vegetables by 
Dawson Yarnell and Michael Molitoris 
gets a first, while Edward Upham and 
Ossie Mills get second. 

In informal gardens, Stockbridge men 
took two ribbons, too. Eldon Johnson, 
Ralph Blanchard and Howard Fife 
coming in second and Elmer Oringer 
placing third. 

We notice a crowd in one corner of 
the cage, and we wander over to see 
what the attraction is. Ah, yes, it is 
the store, selling gardenias, and chry- 
santhemums and corsages made to 
order. Many folks leave their orders 
and wander about the floor, while 
others patiently wait while the cor- 
sages are made. The part of the store 
selling pottery and novelties is doing a 
rushing business, too, and Professor 
Snyder is delighted. 

Next to this store is an old-fashioned 
store. With peppermint sticks, barrels 



of molasses and cider on display, we 
feel that the spirit of the Victorian Age 
has indeed been captured. 

We climb to the balcony to get a 
birds-eye view of the show, and as 
we gaze down at the maze of colors 
and designs, we think of all the work 
that has gone into the planning and 
building of this piece of work. We 
think of how proud Eugene Putala must 
be, for he was student chairman of the 
show. We think how relieved Profes- 
sors Blundell, Thayer, Snyder, Bayer, 
and Van Meter must be to have the 
thirty-second annual show go off so 
smoothly. We think, too, of the Stock- 
bridge students in the Division of Hor- 
ticulture, and realize how tired they 
must be, for it was they who did most 
of the work. But as we look down at 
the throng, moving about the Cage, we 
know that all the time, effort and 
money put into the Horticulture Show 
has been infinitely well worth-while. 



THE "LITTLE INTERNATIONAL" FOR 1942 



The Little International's parade of 
purebreds, glossed with glamour and 
shrouded in swing, saw Stockbridge's 
Edith Colgate invade a man's world 
Saturday, March 14, at the Grinnell 
Arena and sieze a sizeable share of 
the spotlight by copping the coveted 
"Ensminger Trophy" for premier 
showmanship. 

The two-year school's sweep of the 
fifth livestock show included wins by 
Bill Brookman, S '42, in sheep; Ronald 
Scholz, S'42 in beef; Miss Colgate S'42 
in horses and Lyman Orcutt, S '43, in 
the open beef class. Only Joe Kivlin, 
an ex-Stockbridge man who had trans- 
ferred to State, managed to pocket 
a first for M. S. C. when he took the 
top honors in the swine event. 

The show, draped with gaudy red, 
white, and blue decorations, was ably 
organized and run by Al Cowan, Jake 
Brotz and PhylHs Towers, State Sen- 
iors, who should be commended for the 
excellent taste and originality they dis- 
played in the planning of the contest. 
Besides Ufting the face of the arena 



with miles of bunting, installing a P. A. 
system for announcements and music, 
and adding such new features as an 
open class of beef, a co-ed milking con- 
test and a demonstration of horse pull- 
ing they had the showcase stocked with 
beautiful nev/ cups for the beef and 
swine classes, donated by the White 
Face Ranch of Shoreham, Vermont, and 
J. P. Squires and Sons of Boston, and 
a handsome trophy for sheep showing, 
given by Cliff Clevenger of Mount 
Hope Farm, Williamstown. 

On Friday afternoon, 66 State and 
Stockbridge students ran through eight 
classes of livestock in the Judging Con- 
test and gave oral reasons on four 
sets one each for horsemanship, beef, 
sheep and swine. Jim Ward, State 
junior and late of the Norfolk Aggie 
School, outpointed the whole "shoot- 
ing match" by registering 549 points out 
of a possible 600. He also walked away 
with the blue ribbon placing in beef. 
Stu Gilmore, Stockbridge senior, grab- 
bed himself two medals, getting firsts 
in both horses and sheep and was run- 



94 



ner up to Jim Ward in the contest 
totals. A 4-H graduate, Phil Smith, 
Stockbridge '42, completed the days 
winnings by topping the field in the 
swine class. 

In the colorful co-ed milking contest. 
Miss Gladys Scott, State '44, beat out 
eight other milkmaids to win the baby 
Giant Panda doll by scampering across 
the sawdust stage, drawing 50ccs. of 
"moo juice" from Bay State Julie, and 
scooting back in 17 seconds as the 
strains of the recording "Don't let 
Julia Fool Ya" reverberated through 
the Arena. 

Another novelty initiated before the 
crowd packed stands, was the demon- 
stration by the college teams on the 
dynamometer. M. C.'ed by Professor 
Fawcett, the event proved both educa- 
tional and entertaining. Four teams, 
two farm and two experiment, hooked 
onto the machine with the big roans 
from the Experiment Station ringing 
the bell at 161,4 tons. 

In becoming the first girl to ever 
have her name inscribed on the New 
England Homestead's "Ensminger Tro- 
phy", Miss Colgate outshone Bill 
Brookman, Ronnie Scholz and Joe Kiv- 
lin in the premier showmanship event. 
She proved that she was entitled to the 
cup and crown by handling horses, 
beef, sheep and swine with equal ease 
and ability. Joe Kivlin was given sec- 
ond by the judges while Ronnie Scholz 
and Bill Brookman split third. 



Thanks are due to the judges, Pro- 
fessors Young and Dougherty from the 
University of Connecticut and Mr. Clif- 
ford Clevenger of Mount Hope Farms; 
to Professor Heck, faculty advisor; to 
Professor Parsons, for his splendid co- 
operation; and to "Buckey" Walters, 
Dick Nelson, Bill Smith and Claude 
Koch who gave unselfishly of their 
time and knowledge. 

LITTLE INTERNATIONAL PLACINGS 

SWINE 

Joseph Kivlin 1st 

Peter van Alstyne 2nd 

Robert Anderson 3rd 

SHEEP 

William Brookman 1st 

Robert Williams 2nd 

Charles Gary 3rd 

BEEF 

Ronald Scholz 1st 

Raymond Steeves 2nd 

Miss Marion Thompson 3rd 

HORSES 

Miss Edith Colgate 1st 

Nicholas Caraganis 2nd 

Miss Lina Dibble 3rd 

OPEN BEEF 

Lyman Orcutt 1st 

Benjamin Keyes 2nd 



95 




96 



IMPRESSIONS OF STOCKBRIDGE '42 



The teacher who expected to find 
the Animal Husbandry students in 
Stockbridge '42 a uniformly moderate 
group was due for more than a surprise. 
For me, even after 20 years of teaching, 
this class provided an experience I 
shall not forget. 

Appproximately sixty men and two 
co-eds were present at the first class 
meeting, some quiet, some active, and 
some as wild as the wind on a mountain 
peak. 

Some studied, others made the grade 
without effort, and just a few made no 
evident attempt to even "get by"'. This 
is normal, but the noise, the confusion, 
the difficulty of presenting anything 
that would seem to create an interest 
together made each early hour 
seem long and almost useless. The 
teacher tends to blame difficulties such 
as these on the students, whereas he 
is too often the cause of inattention. 

But this was just at the beginning 
and then came a gradual change. A 
more serious attitude developed, per- 
haps because of a desire to obtain some- 
thing in return for each dollar and 
hour of time expended, perhaps a wish 
for a higher grade, but at least a change 
and for the better. Good work in ex- 
amination, in discussions, and in labora- 
tory periods followed. Attention in 
class, more questions from the students, 
and even arguments about the merits 
of the various breeds of light horses 
changed the picture entirely. 

For really being alive, I have never 
seen the equal of this class. Of pep — 
there was plenty, the spirit was top- 
notch, the seriousness was above aver- 
age, and the fairness just could not be 
surpassed. No instructor could ever 
ask for a more wide-awake or fair- 
minded group. 

Stockbridge is a school of opportun- 
ity and practically every student whom 
I met had a definite purpose in mind. 
Each seemed to realize that he or she 



had a relatively short period in which 
to obtain the information desired, and 
was determined to make maximum use 
of the time available. 

Types, temperaments, and the pre- 
vious experiences of Stockbridge stu- 
dents vary greatly, and the class of '42 
followed the general average. Some 
knew many of the practical problems 
of the farmer, while others were city 
bcrn and reared. For me, teaching a 
group of this kind was doubly inter- 
esting. 

In this class, friendliness was out- 
standing. Everyone was openminded, 
with no evident desire to be at all ob- 
stinate. Surely, some were more in- 
terested in the subject than others, per- 
sonal opinions were frankly given, but 
not once do I remember of a student 
in this class insisting that there was 
only one decision and that his was the 
only correct one. 

Excellent equipment in the form of 
buildings and livestock is available and 
the laboratory periods in Grinnell 
Arena with Stockbridge '42 Animal 
Husbandry students will be long re- 
membered. I am sure that some will 
never agree with me on the placings 
of some classes of animals, and the 
merits of Thoroughbreds might be 
argued for hours. These decisions were 
relatively unimportant. You will all 
have many more serious ones to make 
in the future, and I feel sure that you 
will finish with a high average. 

It was a real privilege to be with 
you in Stockbridge '42 for a year. 
Here's wishing each of you the very 
best of success and happiness. 

L. V. TIRRELL 

Editor's Note: 

Professor L. V. Tirrell was called to 
service on March 6 and at the time he 
wrote this article he was receiving his 
Army instructions at Washington, D.C. 



97 



HORTICULTURE IN THE WAR 



The six departments of the division 
of horticulture are all involved in work 
connected with the great war effort. A 
number of the younger staff members 
and some of the older ones have gone 
into direct service in the Army and 
Navy, and they are sorely missed as the 
departments are deluged with demands 
for increased service. 

The great emphasis on vegetables and 
fruits in the war diet, and the shortage 
of transportation that makes it impera- 
tive for New England to grow more of 
her own food, have led to a direct ex- 
pansion in commercial vegetable grow- 
ing and to a great increase in demands 
on the staff. Also, the Victory Gard- 
ens campaign has increased tremen- 
dously the calls for help in this field. 
Greatly increased interest in flower 
growing as an element of much-needed 
recreation has placed additional bur- 
dens on the staff. Our timber 
resources are subjected to an unprece- 
dented strain and problems in food 
preservation have expanded enor- 
mously. 

To meet these unusual demands, 
schools of gardening are being con- 
ducted in the larger cities and county 



schools of nutrition, gardening, and 
food preservation have been organized 
to train local leaders. Each trained 
leader will become a local center for 
information, answering questions, and 
distributing literature supplied by the 
College. 

Assistance is being given to wood in- 
dustries with war contracts or equally 
important civilian work, and the staff 
stands ready to assist any woodlot 
owner toward the most efficient select- 
ive cutting as an aid in meeting the 
fuel shortage or to keep wood-working 
industries moving at capactiy. The re- 
search staff in every department is 
reviewing its data with a view to mak- 
ing recommendations to increase pro- 
duction and conserve at the same time 
nitrogen needed for explosives and 
manpower needed for war industries. 

With the rest of the College, the 
Division of Horticulture is mobilized 
for war. Fortunately, it is in a position 
where it can make a substantial 
contribution. 

R. A. VAN METER, 
Head, Division of Horticulture 



98 



SONGS 



SONS OF MASSACHUSETTS 

Bay State's loyal sons are we, 
In her praise our songs shall be, 
'Til we make the welkin ring. 
With our chorus as we sing. 
With the tribute that we bring, 
Holyoke's hills prolong the strain 
Echoing to that glad refrain. 
And the gentle winds proclaim 
Far and near thy peerless frame; 
Praising e'er thy honored name 
M-a-a-a-a-sachusetts! 

CHORUS 

Loyal sons of old Massachusetts, 
Faithful, sturdy sons and true, 
To our grand old Alma Mater 
Let our song resound anew. 
Cheer, boys, cheer for old 

Massachusetts, 
Give our college three times three; 
Sons forever of the Old Bay State, 
Loyal sons, loyal sons are we. 

— H. L. Knight, M. S. C, '02 



WHEN TWILIGHT SHADOWS DEEPEN 

When twilight shadows deepen 
And the study hour draws nigh. 
When the shades of night are falling, 
And the evening breezes sigh, 
'Tis then we love to gather 
'Neath the pale moon's silvery spell. 
And lift up our hearts and voices 
In the song we love so well. 

CHORUS 
Sons of Old Massachusetts! 
Devoted sons and true, 
Bay State, my Bay State, 
We'll give our best to you. 
Thee, our Alma Mater, 

We'll cherish for all time 
Should all acquaintance be 'forgot 
Massachusetts — yours and mine. 

— F. D. Griggs, M.S.C., '03 



STOCKBRIDGE VICTORY SONG 

When Stockbridge School goes march- 
ing down the field 

We know our team will never, never, 
yield. 

Although the other teams have lots of 
Pep 

When they meet Stockbridge School 
they'll know they're out of step. 

And as this game goes down in history 

It's just another Stockbridge victory. 

So let the cheers ring for Stockbridge 
School, Stockbridge School 
Rah— Rah— Rah. 

— Ray Johnson, Stockbridge, '41 



ALMA MATER HAIL 

(Tune— Cornell Alma Mater) 

'Neath the Elms of dear old Amherst, 
Stands our College fair. 
Hail to thee our Alma Mater 
Stockbridge men go there. 
Working ever, falter never. 
Onward toward our goal. 
Give your best to good old Stockbridge, 
Body, heart, and soul. 
Words— Charles F. Mandell, S.S.A., '39 
—Russell S. Shaw, S.S.A., '39 



99 



BY THE HAND OF VIRTUE WE SHALL CONQUER 



At the brink of desperation 

Engulfed in midnight oil, 

A Stockbridge student scratched his head, 

And felt his brains recoil. 

That fateful eve before exams — • 
That last devoted stand 
Before the day of reck'ning comes 
And waves its wretched wand. 

He bit his lips and clasped his hands 
As if in solemn prayer, 
Next time he'd pay attention 
To one — Professor Thayer. 

In contrast to his naps in class 
The Monday morning stall 
He now was cramming all he knew 
To foil the mid-term fall. 

We all are sometimes gathered by 
Procrastination's net. 
But "putting off" is one thing sure 
A student will regret. 

Based on this old sad story 
An addage should be set. 
Results of lack of diligence 
Are not easy to forget 

Prepare your work — w^hat ere it be 
And turn it in on time 
To reap the glories Knowledge knows 
As success's easy climb. 

STUART GILMORE 



100 





COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE 

First Row: R. Williams, Strong, Mills. 
Second Row: Meinke, Upham, Phelps. 





COMMENCEMENT SPEAKERS 



MiUs 



Thoren 



101 



PROGRAM OF COMMENCEMENT WEEK 



FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1942 
9:00 p. m. Commencement Promenade 



Memorial Hall 



SATURDAY, MAY 9, 1942 

16:00 a. m. Class Day Exercises Memorial Hall 

Homer O. Mills, Jr., Class President, Presiding 

Class Oration Eugene C. Putala 

Class History James E. Craft 

Student Activity Awards Director Roland H. Verbeck 

Presentation of Class Gift . . . Homer O. Mills, Jr. 
School Song "Alma Mater Hail" .... The Class 
Dedication of Class Tree .... 



6:00 p. m. Buffet Supper and Senior Dance 



Memorial Hall 
Memorial Hall 



SUNDAY, MAY 10, 1942 — BOWKER AUDITORIUM 

2:30 p. m. Processional "Triumphal March" .... Greig 

The Class "Faith of Our Fathers" . . . Hemy-Walton 

Scripture Reading 

Prayer 

Vocal Solo "Children of Men" .... Russell 

Commencement Sermon — Reverend Jesse M. Trotter, 
Amherst, Mass. 

Vocal Solo "The Lord Is My Light" . . . Alviani 

Emery Francis Thoren — "Choosing A Career" 

The Class "America The Beautiful" .... Ward 

Homer Ossian Mills, Jr.— "The Growth of An Idea" 

The Class "Men of Stockbridge" 

Presentation of Diplomas . . President Hugh P. Baker 

Recessional "Grand March" (Aida) .... Verdi 

Music by Doric Alviani, Baritone 

Instructor in Music 

Wilfred Hathaway, Organist and Accompanist 

4:00 p. m. President's Reception to members and graduating class, 

their guests, alumni, and faculty . Stockbridge House 



102 



GRADUATES. 1942 



Gilbert George Allen 

Everett Edward Bartlett, Jr. 

Rene Emile Beaudoin 

Arthur Henry Beyer, Jr. 

Ralph Lyman Blanchard 

George Thomas Britt 

Lincoln Augustus Brogi 

William Raymond Brookman, 
Jr. 

Frank Leroy Brown, Jr. 

Edith Colgate 

Robert Edward Collins 

Kenneth Melzar Coombs 

Norman Gerard Coumoyer 

Robert Leonard Cousins 

James Edward Craft 

Aurelio Rocco DeLucia 

Francis DeVos 

Raymond Charles De Young 

Lina Abigail Dibble 

Nicholas DiLisio 

Burnett John Doleva 

Wilson Henry Dougherty, Jr. 

John Eliot Downey 

Howard Alden Fife 
Alvan Frederick Frank 
Sheldon Leo Freschi 
Charles Benjamin Gary 
Charles Bromage Gibbs 
Stephen Gilmore 
Stuart Gilmore 
Alan Edward Greenhalgh, Jr. 
Charles Rider Griswold 
John Mansfield Groton, Jr. 
Linwood Skerry Hibbard 
Henry Tyler Holihan 
William Francis Hope 
Forrest Edwin House 
John Andrew Hunter 
John Bean Hussey 
Paul Randolph Jackson 
Allan Clinton Johnson 
Eldon Hjalmar Johnson 
Harry Frederick Johnson 
Leo Fred Kunan 
Stanley Edward Lachut 
George Edwin Ladd 
Donald Stuart Lauder 



Harold James Lehane 
Wilfred Emil Meinke 
Arthur Elmore Merriam 
William Roberts Merrill 
Homer Ossian Mills, Jr. 
Michael Edward Molitoris 
Howard Ralph Morey 
Victor Anthony Mushenski 
John Martin McGuane 
Robert Nels Nelson 
Henry Alfred Nichols 
Robert Clason Nickerson 
Alexander Frank Ogonowski 
Elmer George Oringer 
John Raphael Pace 
Charles Joseph Parmor 
George Norman Perry 
David Lane Phelps 
Charles Walter Puchalski 
Eugene Charles Putala 
Manuel Harding Robello 
Malcolm MacKay Roberts 
Carl Frederick Roehrich 
Robert Joseph Ross 
Ronald Emmerson Scholz 
David Manly Shuker 
Robert Francis Simoni 
PhUip Hale Smith 
Clayton Bartlett Southard 
Marguerite Eleanor Strong 
John Albert Taylor, Jr. 
Leo Niilo Teittinen 
Richard Munroe Thayer 
Emery Francis Thoren 
Richard Vincent Tierney 
Earl Felix Tonet 
Elmer Russell Treadwell, Jr. 
Karl Rudy Uhlig 
Edward Frank Upham 
Peter Edward van Alstyne 
Reed Marshall Wade 
John Philip Watson 
Kenneth Sanderson Williams, 

Jr. 
Robert Hutchison Williams 
Walter Roberts Williams, Jr. 
Michael Woynar 
Joseph Dawson Yamell 



103 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The Editors of the Shorthorn are 
more than grateful to those who have 
given their time and cooperation to 
make this yearbook possible. We wish 
to express our sincere gratitude to: — 

Miss Dorothy Cooper of Howard 
Wesson Co., Mr. C. A. Nichols of the 
Burbank Printing Co., and Mr. H. E. 
Kinsman and their asistants for their 
timely advice and suggestions in re- 
gard to the arrangement of pictures 
and printed material. 

To R. D. Hawley, L. S. Derby, L. V. 
Terrill, R. A. Van Meter for their in- 
teresting and appropriate articles which 
they submitted. 

To Miss Corinne T. Petit and Profes- 
sor Julius H. Frandsen for the 
detailed information which they so 
kindly submitted. 

To the Misses Katherine M. Martin 
and Catherine F. Heffernan for their 
assistance in checking statistics and 
other information. 

To Mr. John H. Vondell and Joseph 
Bornstein for their special photographs. 

To the club presidents and the 
student body who willingly contribu- 
ted information regarding various 
activities on campus. 

And to one so well known as "Pop" 
Barrett, who by his excellent ideas 
and great "push" made this 1942 Short- 
horn possible. 

The Editors 



Aid Y IE IPT II S lEM lEN ir§ 



H. E. KINSMAN 

SPECIALIST IN . 
HIGHEST QUALITY 
COLLEGE AND SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY 



SERVING 
STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 

AMHERST COLLEGE 

DEERFIELD ACADEMY 



STUDIO ... 46 MAIN STREET AMHERST, MASS. 




ST. REGIS DINER 
Amherst, Mass. 



The 
COLLEGE STORE 

(ON CAMPUS) 

CARRIES A COMPLETE LINE OF STUDENT SUPPLIES 



\ / 

Toiletries Stationery 

\ / 

Jewelry Lunches 

\ / 

Gifts Sodas 

\ / 

Pens 







When#pur*fearl30ok Course 
HOWARD-WESSON COMPANY 

44 Portland Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 



Ne4AA Z*tXflcuMll!L £.GAXfe6i GoUefR ZnjCfn^s^ue^ 



r 



CHAS. W. BURBANK CO. 

Printers and Calendar Specialists 
44 Portland St. Worcester, Macs. 



1 



^ST=J 



Registered 
Livestock 



Guernseys 
Cocker Spaniels 



SUNNYSIDE FARM 
Kinderhook, New York 



Peter Edward van Alstyne 
Editor-in-Chief of Shorthorn