(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Shorthorn"

SmM 



/ — / 





^5/oo/s8 



/ (o^ />// I- 



r 



-J^il& 



STOCK 5Q/DGE SCHOOL 

GP AG-QlCULTIjkF 

MASS/^-CI~iU5EJD STATE COLLEGE 
-AMNE/<:S7: M4SS. 



DEDICATION 
To Boys of Stockbridge Killed in Action 



FOREWORD 

Aj you turn these pages wh^.le rs-iiniFjC^'ng cf 
school days spent here may you recall with pleasure 
the many memories of our classmates and our doings. 
In short, this book serves as a key to the treasure 
chest of Stockbridge memories. 



..-■>'^ 



, ^'■■* 



CLASS OFFICERS 



George B. Greaney, Jr. 
7/illiam R, Lawson 
Mary L. d'Este 
Charles L. Ciecko 



President 
Vice President 
Secretary 
Treasurer 



SHORTHORN BOARD 



George B, Greaney, Jr. 

Mary L. d'Este 

Charles A. Parker 

Edward T. Jazab 

Ruth E. Gibson and 
Barbara A. Summers 

Roll in H, Barrett 



Business Manager 
Secretary 
Editor-in-chief 
Assistant Editor 

Activities 

Faculty Adviser 



CLASS HISTORY 



The class of 'U5 entered the Stockbridge School with the same 
hopes and expectations as previous classes. Knowing our course of 
study to he hut six months, we started at the beginning to take full 
advantage of every opportunity which was within our resich. 

Upon enrollment we were found to be thirty-six strong, four of 
the members being of the fairer sex. We -were the second class to 
enter Stockbridge under the one year war program. The first few 
days were spent organizing our studies and getting accustomed to 
the campus. Amid bewilderment, surprise and delight, acauaintances 
with fellow students were made and life time friendships were formed. 

At the election of officers, the following were chosen to rep- 
resent the class J president, G-eorge G-reaney; vice president, Dick 
Lawson; secretary, Molly d'Este and treasurer, Charlie Ciecko, 

Dae to lack of students and time, athletics and other activ- 
ities were limited. However, in an intramural six-man football 
program, Stockbridge had a team. Also, in the way of athletics, we 
contributed three of our members to the varsity basketball squad. 
Many students accepted the cordial invitation extended by H.S.C, 
students to take part in their activities. The only Stockbridge 
event was the student- faculty farewell party, held at the Parley 
Club House on February 26, 19^5. 

At different times throughout the year, we lost some of our 
members, but we also gained some, so at the completion of our 
course we had a membership of twenty-six. 

Our term of study on the campus has now drawn to a close and 
we soon must start our placement work. The period of training will 
find Stockbridge students in almost every corner of New England. 

These six months have been filled with work and studies, but 
the fun we have had along the way balances the load, and in the 
future we can look back and recall our happy days as students. As 
we came so must we go, but in leaving we can carry with us the 
many unforgetable memories and friends which we have gained in 
this, OUT year, as Stockbridge students. 



The Class of I9U5 
Barbara Ann Summers 'U5 



WAYNE H. ALTHMS 
"Tarzan" 



Animal Husbandry 



AubMrndale 



The fresh air fiend. Frequent visitor of Sorority Houses. 
Hunting and fishing. 

"Spread it thin, we have ten acres" 




EVANGELOS D. ANGELO 
"Angie" 

Horticulture 

Quiet, Home life. 

**?fliat d'ya say there, boy?" 



Fabian, Conn, 




MERRILL H. AliJTES 
"Joe" 



Animal Husbandry 



Conway 



Wry sense of humor. Taciturn except vdth close friends. 
Square dancing. 

"Oh. ' We are?" 




Si\RAH E. BAKER 
"Sadie" 



Poultry 



Westwood 



The girl with "original ideas and questions." 
Antiques and bull- sessions » 

"I hope to manage a Holland turkey farm" 




DANIEL E. CERKAUSKAS 
"Danny" 



Horticulture 



north Adams 



Conscientious and thoughtful, 
Fishing. 




CHARLES L. CIECKO 
•Charlie" 

Horticulture Chicopee Falls 

Popular with the ■?*iole class, but still a family man. 




mLLim J. CRAWORD, JR. 
"Bill" 



Animal Husbandry 



Wiitensville 



Quiet and shy. Another frequent Tisitor of Sorority 

Houses. 

Poultry. 

"Wayne, Twait for mel" 




MARY LOCKE d'ESTE 
"Molly" 



Animal Husbandry 



North Sandwich, N. H, 



Active in school affairs. Free taxi service to and from 

the campus. 

Horses. Photography, 

"Aw, Gee -vriiizl" 



RUTH E. GIBSON 
"Ruthie" 



Horticulture 



Orleans 



Laughs. The center of attraction in all classes. 
Sports. 

"Ohl You make me so madl" 





GEORGE B. GREANEY, JR. 



Horticialture 



Holyoke 



Never a dull moment. Humorous natijre. 
Hunting and fishing, 

"Well?" 




DONALD A. HOUSTON 
"Don" "Shortie" 



Poultry 



Greenfield 



His main interest in life is sports. 
Football said basketball* 



"Oh.' to make the major leagues." 




EDWARD T. JAZAB 
"Ed" "Jazam" 



Animal Husbandry 



Willimansett 



Social asset. Keen sense of humor. 
Horticulture, Tropical fish. 

"200 acres and a herd of Holstein" 



WILLIAM R, LAWSON 
"Dick" 



Poultry 



KnoTOi as the gentleman of Stockbridge, 
Football and basketball, 

"Nat oh" 



Brockton 




ED7/ARD J. LEFEBVRE, JR. 
"Eddie" 



Horticulture 



Ballardvale 



Greaney's right hand man. L' amour I L'amourl 
Sports, 



PAUL W. MANNING 
"Baldy" 



Animal Husbandry 



Marlboro 



Usually shy and reserved, but loves a good argument. 
Riding horses, 

"Taters ain't much, but punkinsli" 




DON^D M. MOORE 
"Doo" 

Animal Husbandry 

Hears all, knows all and says nothing. 

Moody, 

Hockey, Softball and Square Dancing, 

"Ohl Wy aching baoki" 



Arlington 
d'Este's car. 




DAVID S. MDRRAT 
"Oscar*' 



Animal Husbandry 



Ifcpredictable. 
Cycling and Hiking, 



"Uh-hl" 



Dover 




CHARLES A. PARKER 
"Charlie" 



Fruit Growing 



Cambridge 



Likeable fellow with diversified interests. 
Books, stamps, and travel. 



"My aim is to settle in a small toim hardby a diversified 
fruit orchard," 



RICHARD E. PAYSON 
"Paysey" 



Animal Husbandry 



North Andover 



Ifejexcelled. Chef at "Benny* s Diner" 
Football, Guitar playing, 

"Course 't is, can't you see it is." 



, t^ "W 



^Uh&SftJ 





RICHARD D. PRATT 
"Dick" 



Poultry 



Interested in one particular strain of reds 

of course. 

Sports, 

"Say, boyl" 



Hoi yoke 
poultry 




JOHN W. STOBBAET. Ill 



Horticulture 



Egotist • 

Swinmdng, football. 



Wrentham 




BARBARA A. SUMJffiRS 
"Red" 



Horticulture 



Quietness. Stockbridge News , 
Sports, 

"Gee, thanks" 



WILLIAM W. lEBER 
"Bill" 



Fruit Growing 



Friendly, 
Sqioare dancing, 

"The lady goes round the lady and- 



Uptqn 



Fitchburg 




ROY A. IfKINCHENBAUGS JR. 
"Winch" 



Horticulture 



Quiet and shy. 
Music and bowling. 



Hjrde Park 



"I'll be seeing ya,' 



ROBERT W. WORffiOOD 
"Bob" 

Animal Husbandry 

Not to be discvissed. Blowing smoke rings. 
Bull sessions. 

" Aw-w-wl " 



Hingham 




REDEFLOmEKT and RECOHVERSION 



The Stockbridge class of 1945 will long remember the many 
happy experiences and close friendships of its college days. 
Hardly had you closed your text-books in llarch to begin iiie 
challenging jobs of placement training when the pealing bells 
and pirayers of thanksgiving announced the historic event of V-E 
day and the final victory on the battlefields of Europe, Then 
followed the next phase of World "War II in quick succession with 
the shattering explosions of atomic bombs on far-off Hiroshima, 
and V-J day had arrived. 3he vreirs vrere over; the job was finished; 
Hie men and, women of our armed forces could now return to homes 
and dear ones and life would go on just as it had in other years 
before the war. So most folks believed or seemed to think. 

Redeployment became a new word in the language of the 
military forces as vast plans -virent into effect to move the troops 
back home. Factories and great industries of every sort finished 
their vjar jobs as contracts terminated, and laid their plans 
sv/iftly to change to peace-time production. After all, people 
needed to purchase things long lacking due to war-imposed 
scarcities, and there must be continuing jobs for the war-workers, 
and new jobs available for the returning service-men,. Many of 
these problems are still facing us today, but we can all be proud 
of the amazing adaptability of our great country and its competent 
citizenry. 

You, the class of 1945, are now starting to build your life's 
work, each individual one of you, on the foundation of knowledge, 
skill, and vision which you may have secured here in some small 
part. You are now, perforce, your own best student and there is 
much to learn ahead. This is your period of reconversion in these 
challenging days of peace. There are dangers now just as in the 
days of war uriess you give your full heart, and faith, and strength 
to the new tasks which face you. This nation cannot drift into a 
peace worth while under the momentum only of past success, courage, 
sacrifice and achievement. The history of the present is still to 
be written and youth must vorite it, Ihis is your redeployment 
period, too, and we hope success and satisfaction will crown your 
efforts, 

Roland K, Verbeck 



THE FACULTY 



Doric Alriani, K.Ed, 
Luthe'r Bant-a, B.6. . 
Roll in H, Barrett, M.S» 
Lyle L. Blundell, B.S. , 
Lawrence S. Dickinson, M.S. 
Guy V. Glatfelter, M.S. 
Francis P. Griffiths, Ph,D. 

Margaret P. Hamlin, B.S. 
Marshall C. Heck, M.S. ' 
S. Chn.rch Hixtbard 
William H. Laclman, M.S« 
John B, Lentz, A,B. , Y.M.D, 

Harry G. Lindquist, M.S, 

John B. Newlon 

Raymond T. Parkharst, Ph.D. 

Clarence H, Parsons, M.S. 

George F. Pashee 
Victor A. Rice, M.Agr. 



Oliver C. Roherts, M.S, 
Donald E. Ross, B.S, 

William C. Sanctuary, M.S. 
Samuel P. Snow, B.L.A. 
Grant B. Snyder, M.S. 

Wiaiiam H. Tague, B.S. 

Charles H. Thayer 
Clark L. Thayer, B.S. 

Alden P. Tattle, M.S, 
John H. Vondell 
Lowell E. Walters* M.S. 
Karl W. Woodward, M.F. 



Instructor in Music 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Hushandry 

Professor of Farm Management 

Professor of Horticxxlture 

■A-ssistant Professor of Agrostology 

Acting Head of Placement Service 

Professor of Horticultural Manufactures 

and Acting Head of Department 
Placement Officer for Women 
Assistant .Professor of Animal Husbandry 
Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
Instructor in Vegetable Gardening 
Professor of Veterinary Science and 

Head of Department 
■A-ssistant Professor of Dair;ring 
Instructor in Agricultural Engineering 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry and 

Head of Department 
Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

and Superintendent of Farm 
Instructor in Agriciiltural Engineering 
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Head 

of D.epartment, Head of Division of 

Agriculture 
Assistant Professor of Pomology 
Instructor in floricTilture and Greenhouse 

Fo reman 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Instructor in Horticulture 
Professor of Vegetable Gardening and 

Head of Department 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 
Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Professor of Floriculture and Head of 

Department 
Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening 
Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Assistant Professor of Aaimal Husbandry 
Instructor in Ferestry 



SONGS 

ALM MTER HAIL 
(Tune - Cornell Alma Mater) 

'Neath the Elms of dear old Anherst, 

Stands our College fair, 

Hail to thee our Alma Mater 

Stockbridge men go there. 

VJorking ever, falter never, 

Orward toward our goal, 

Crrve your best to good old S-^oc''*brioge. 

Body, heart, and soul, 

Tho' the hours are qui ckly passi'.rg 

And we soon must part, 

Thy great halls will not be r.onel'/ 

They contain our hearts. 

In the future thoughts will wander 

Back, and we will see 

Scenes we knew at dear old Stockbricge; 

Always dear they'll be. 



(Charles F. Mandell , S'39 
Words by (Russell S, Shaw, S'39 

(Timothy C. Sullivan, S'UO 



MEN OF STOCKBRIDGE 
(Tune - Fair Harvard) 



Oh Stockbridge, thy sons this fair valley proclaim, 

As the years brinf us back into June, 

And our hearts ever quicken with pride for thy name, 

As we sing this familiar old tune. 

Tho' the days have been long, filled with work and with play. 

All thy precepts shall guide us afar. 

To the truth and the honor of honest work done, 

As we follow thy radiant star, 

■Oh, Spirit of Truth, be our guide thru the years, 
^ay our eyes ever lift to the hills, 

G-ive us strength for the tasks which the future shall bring, 
And peace by the murmuring rills. 
The ploughshare and reaper still call as of yore. 
Our sons to the lure of the land, 

And the lamps we are lighting in these hallowed halls, 
Are Grleams from the star in thy hand. 



ACKUOV/LEDGMMTS 



TO ALL THOSE u'HO HAVE HELPED I!I TO ~^1?AE.A.TI Oil 
OF THIS W1B.TIEE IS SITS OE THE 
— SHOETKOSl — 
WE EXPRESS OUR SINCERE iPPEECIATIOS, 



The Editors