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Full text of "Shorthorn"

* UMASS/AMHERST 



312066 0339 0532 9 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/shorthorn1947stoc 




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47 





STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL 

OF AGRICULTURE 

Massachusetts State College 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



DEDICATION 



The Class of 1947 is to be congratulated on its decision to dedicate the 1947 Shorthorn 
to Donald E. Ross. He has always taken such an active and personal interest in Stockbridge 
School students that he well deserves the honor which the class has conferred on him. 

Don, or "Red" as he is more frequently known in French Hall, was graduated from 
Massachusetts State College in 1925. He began his undergraduate work with the intention 
of majoring in Poultry Husbandry. However, for one reason or another he decided that he 
preferred plants to poultry and was graduated as a major in Floriculture. 

After one year of nursery work with A. N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Connecticut, and two 
years as superintendent of the Rose Farm Nursery, White Plains, N. Y., "Red" was 
appointed to our staff as Instructor and Greenhouse Foreman in 1928. It is hoped that his 
promotion to the rank of Assistant Professor will be granted this year, a promotion which 
in our opinion he has merited for many years. 

During World War I Don, saw service in France for two years, having enlisted in the 
101st Infantry of the 26th Division. In World War II he was assigned to the Department 
of Physical Education to assist in the Army physical training program. 

Mr. Ross has always been popular as an instructor in our floricultural courses. His 
personal and friendly interest in his students, tempered when necessary by his Scotch 
humor and his gentle sarcasm, has endeared him to the hundreds of Stockbridge students 
who have come under his influence. 

Clark L. Thayer 



FOREWORD 



Traditionally, each graduating class publishes a book in which pictures, 
stories, and other articles summarize the years the class has been together. 
Traditionally, each Shorthorn tries to surpass those edited in the past 
and every effort has been made to do just that with this edition. This 
book grew out of the need for some type of publication that will forever 
be a source of interest and information for those who will shortly separate 
from this school and from their Classmates. 

It will serve as a history, for us and for our school, of the novel condi- 
tions existing as a result of the war. Without such a reminder, we would 
soon forget that many of our students were married and lived right on 
Campus with their families, a thing unheard of until recently. 

In some future year, open up this 1947 Shorthorn, and upon perceiving 
the photograph of a chum, let your memory wander back to Stockbridge 
days. 



To the Students of Stockbridge School of Agriculture: 




World War II offered the School and the College a great opportunity 
to prove that the philosophy of education to which we are committed is 
a philosophy worthy of our best efforts as individuals and as a School 
and College. Stockbridge men and women went off to war thoroughly 
imbued with the idea of service to their fellowmen and to the State and 
Nation. The record they made was a glorious one. 

As you met the challenge of the war, you now have the opportunity of 
meeting the greater challenge of the oncoming peace. Perhaps this 
challenge of the peace will be more difficult to meet; yet I am confident 
that the training given in the School will prepare each of you as you go 
back onto the land or into rural communities to stand firmly for the 
philosophy of service. For, it is this philosophy that can gradually bring 
about the kind of a community, state and world that will insure a lasting 
and satisfying peace. 

This will be my last official greeting to Stockbridge students. My 
faith in you and your program of work has increased through the years. 
I shall leave this Campus knowing that my faith was justified by thought 
and deed. 



HUGH P. BAKER 



February 3, 1947 




"We Will Keep 
Faith With You 
Who Lie Asleep " 





OLD CHAPEL 




HORTICULTURAL SHOW 



GOODELL LIBRARY 





MEMORIAL BUILDING 




CORNUS FLORIDA 




FLINT LABORATORY 



STOCKBRIDGE HALL 






STOCKBRIDGE HOUSE 



MISTAKES 



Those little mistakes that we have made 

They'll haunt us every one; 
The little respect we might have paid, 

Or the icind deed left undone. 

The joy that might have thrilled a heart, 

By a timely, kindly phrase; 
Or the smile that could have been a part 

Of someone's saddest day. 

A cheery word or a friendly smile 

An occasional helping hand; 
To us they may not seem worthwhile 

To others — seem quite grand. 

Don't let them bother you today, 

Such errors should lie dead; 
But brighten up some lonely day 

In the countless days ahead. 

Peter Pfeijjer, 1948 



1918-1947 



'T'HE years 1918 - 1947 represent the boundaries of Stockbridge history — past and 
present. The class of 1947 has the distinction of beginning another chapter of this history, 
since a large majority of its members are veterans from World War II, and it is the first 
two-year graduating class since 1943. 

So it was back in 1918 when the first class enrolled with fewer than fifty members. Your 
class registered in 1945 with one hundred sixty. 1920 had veterans, too, but they served in 
World War I. From 1918 to 1923 the School trained nearly 600 veterans of that war sent 
here by the Federal Board for Vocational Rehabilitation. As that name implies only veterans 
who had wounds or disabilities resulting from war service were furnished such schooling at 
government expense then. This year the combined veteran group in both Stockbridge classes 
numbers 255 men and women out of 327 total enrollment or nearly eighty percent. And we 
note now that all honorably discharged ex-servicemen are entitled to schooling of some kind 
under provisions of the United States Veterans Administration. 

In 1918 we were known as "The Two- Year Course in Practical Agriculture." Somehow 
that name does not lend itself too well to a school song or cheer, and the student body of 
those days had their difficulties with it. They had other things to do — many of them — 
in developing the customs and procedures of the School, just as 1947 has had in re- 
establishing those same customs. The athlete of those days wore on his sweater "Aggie 2 yr," 
for lack of a better term, and was proud of it. 

Ten years later came the adoption of a distinctive name for the two-year course. Various 
suggestions had been presented to all two-year alumni for a mail vote in which the under- 
graduates also participated. The 1928 Class was the first to receive diplomas with the new 
title "The Stockbridge School of Agriculture at Massachusetts Agricultural College." This 
sounds strange enough now, but the College name, itself, had not been changed then, (it 
was still Mass. Aggie), and the students of that day were working just as hard to substitute 
"State" for "Agriculture" in the College title, as they are today to change "College" to 
"University." 

And they finally succeeded in 1931 in changing it, — hence our present appellation "The 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture at Massachusetts State College." 

In the space of twenty-five years, and more, a great many changes take place in the teach- 
ing personnel. Of the original faculty of fifty-one teachers listed in the first 1921 "Shorthorn" 
yearbook only eleven men and women are still active in the Stockbridge School of today. 
Through the pages of this 1947 Shorthorn may we pay respect and honor to these 
veteran teachers of a quarter century:- 





Luther Banta — 

Lawrence S. Dickinson 
Emory E. Grayson — 
Margaret P. Hamlin — 
Curry S. Hicks — 

John B. Lentz — 

John B. Newlon — 

George F. Pushee — 
Victor A. Rice — 

Charles H. Thayer — 
Clark L. Thayer — 



Poultry Husbandry 
Fine Turf Maintenance 
Director of Placement 
Placement for Women 
Physical Education 
Veterinary Science 
Agricultural Engineering 

Animal Husbandry 

Agronomy 

Floriculture 



As graduates and former students of The Stockbridge School of Agriculture you have re- 
ceived an education in your various courses which fits you for successful work in many 
different fields of agriculture. You have received valuable guidance from your instructors. 
In the years that lie ahead they will still willingly aid you in the new problems which 
may arise. Always remember your College and School are here to serve you in every 
possible way. 

Roland H. Verbeck 
Director of Short Courses 



OUR PROF. 



With gestures smooth and a fluent tongue. 

Our "prof" was illustrating; 
All the things that must be done, 

In speaking or debating. 

Each word he uttered with finesse, 

He then grew quite excited ; 
He tossed his head, we to impress; 

He did; we were delighted. 

For as a comedian he was fine. 

The class laughed as if mad; 
He smiled, waiting silence, thinking a line, 

I knew it would be sad. 

But the laughter kept progressin , 

He stamped his foot with rage; 
He felt he'd teach us a lesson 

And he started off the stage. 

He halted suddenly, he'd felt a chill. 

He began to clutch and dig; 
And though I grow old, I'll remember still 

How "prof" looked without his wig. 

Peter Pfeiffer, 1948 



DORIC J. ALVIANI, MUS. B., 

Instructor in Music 

Born 1913. Mus. B., Boston University, 1947. M. Ed. 1941. Supervisor of Music, Public 

Schools Somerville, Mass., 1936-37. Supervisor of Music, Public Schools, Amherst, Mass., 

1937-38. Assistant Professor of Music, Mass. State College, 1938 — . 

LORIN E. BALL, B.S., 
Instructor in Physical Education 

Born 1898. B.S., M.A.C., 1921. Coach of Freshman Basketball, 1921-25. Coach of Fresh- 
man Baseball, 1922-24. Attended Superior, Wisconsin Coaching School, 1924. Senior 
Leader, Camp Najerog for Boys, 1924. Treasurer, Western Massachusetts Board of 
Approved Basketball Officials, 1924-25. Coach of Varsity Baseball, 1925-31. Coach of 
Varsity Hockey, 1925 — . Attended University of Wisconsin Summer School, 1926. Director 
of Stockbridge School Athletics and Coach of Football and Basketball, 1925 — . Varsity 
Club, Q.T.V. 

LUTHER BANTA, B. S., 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

B. S., Cornell University, 1915. Head of the Department of Poultry Husbandry, New York 

State School of Agriculture, 1915-18, at Alfred University. Instructor of Poultry Husbandry, 

M.S.C., 1918-20. Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry, M.S.C., 1920 — . Sigma Pi, 

Lambda Gamma Delta, Poultry Science Association. 

HARVEY E. BARKE, M.S., 

Plant Pathology 

Bom 1917. B.S., M.S.C., 1939. M.S., M.S.C., 1943. Pi Alpha Xi, Alpha Sigma Phi. 

U. S. A. A. F. 2 years. 

ROLLIN H. BARRETT, M. S., 
Professor of Farm Management 

Born 1891. B.S., University of Connecticut, 1918. Assistant County Agricultural Agent, 
Hartford County, Conn., 1918-19. Instructor, Vermont State School of Agriculture, 1919-20. 
Principal, 1920-25. M.S., Cornell University, 1926. Assistant Professor of Farm Manage- 
ment, M.S.C., 1926-37. Professor of Farm Management, 1937 — . Phi Mu Delta. 

MATTHEW L. BLAISDELL, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry and Farm Superintendent 

Bom 1905. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1929. Assistant Head Farmer, Westborough 
State Hospital, 1929-1934. Head Farmer, State Prison Colony, 1934-1946. Assistant 
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Farm Superintendent, M.S.C., 1946 — . Q.T.V. 

LYLE L. BLUNDELL, B. S., 

Professor of Horticulture 

Born 1897. B.S., Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts, 1924. With Olmsted 
Brothers' Landscape Architects, 1924-31. Professor of Horticulture, M.S.C., 1931 — . 
Gamma Sigma Delta. 

RICHARD M. COLWELL, 

Instructor in Hotel Accounting 

B.S., Rhode Island State College, 1935. M.S., Rhode Island State College, 1937. Teaching 

Fellow in Economics, M.S.C., 1937-38. Instructor in Economics, M.S.C., 1938—. Phi 

Kappa Phi, Alpha Tau Gamma (R. I. State College), American Economics Association, 

American Accounting Association. 

GLADYS M. COOK, M.S., 
Instructor in Home Economics 

B.S., Battle Creek College, 1934. Internsnip in Nutrition, Indiana University Hospital, 
Indianapolis, 1935. M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1936. Research Fellow, 1936, 
M.S.C. Research Assistant Home Economic Research, 1937, M.S.C. Instructor in Home 
Economics, 1937 — . American Dietetics Association, American Home Economics Associ- 
ation, American Association of University Women. 




O'Donnell 
Simpson 
DuBois 
Lane 



Tuttle 

Lachman 

Snyder 



■■■•'Tir-r 




PARDON W. CORNELL, M.S.. 

Instructor in Floriculture 

Bom 1914. S.S.A., M.S.C., 1934-36. B.S., Cornell University, 1936-40. M.S., Iowa State, 

1943. Special Agent, Military Intelligence Division, 1943-46. Instructor in Floriculture, 

1946. Phi Kappa Phi, Pi Alpha Xi, Kappa Kappa. 

W. ALLEN COWAN, B. S., 
Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1942. Farm Foreman, Grafton State Hospital, 1942-43. 
Instructor and Farm Superintendent, Rhode Island State College, 1943-45. Graham Breed- 
ing School, University of Illinois Extension Dairy Production Course. Assistant Professor, 
M.S.C., 1946—. Alpha Gamma Rho. 

JOHN L. CREECH, B. S., 

Instructor in Horticulture 

Bom 1920. B.S., Rhode Island State College, 1941. Teaching Fellow, M.S.C., 1945-46. 

Instructor in Horticulture, M.S.C., 1946—. Captain in Infantry, 1941-45. Lambda Chi 

Alpha. Scobbad and Blade. 

HELEN CURTIS, M. A., 
Dean of Women 

B.S., Iowa State Teachers College. Summer Study at University of London. M A., 
Columbia University. S.C.A. Secretary, New York State College. Assistant Dean, New 
Jersey College for Women. Dean of Women, M.S.C., 1945 — . 

ELEANOR D. DAIUTE, M. D., 
Assistant Professor of Hygiene 
M.D., Middlesex University, 1936. 



Accepted to faculty, 1943, 



DOROTHY DAVIS, 

Bom in Brooklyn, New York, 1915. B.S., College of Home Economics, Syracuse University. 
M. A., Teachers College, Columbia, Ohio. Teacher of Home Economics, Northport and 
Huntington High Schools, Long Island, and Edgewood Park School, Briarcliff, New York. 

LLEWELLYN L. DERBY, 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

Born 1893. Unclassified Student, M.S.C., 1915-16. Assistant in Physical Education, 
1916-17. U. S. Army, 1917-19. Instructor in Physical Education, 1919-20. Varsity, Fresh- 
man and S.S.A. Coach of Track, 1921 — . Harvard Summer School of Physical Education, 
1921. Springfield Summer School of Physical Education, 1925 and 1930. University of 
Illinois Summer School of Physical Education, 1926. M.S.C., Summer School, 1931-37. 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 1927 — . Secretary and Treasurer, Eastern Inter- 
collegiate Athletic Association, 1926 — . Member, Advisory Committee, New England 
Inter-collegiate Amateur Athletic Association, 1922-23. Member of Association of College 
Track Coaches of America. Member of National Collegiate Track Coaches Association. 

LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

Born 1888. M.S., M.S.C., 1910. Superintendent of Grounds, M.S.C., 1911-30. Leave of 

Absence, 1919. Instructor in Horticulture and Superintendent of Greenhouses, Walter Reed 

Hospital, Washington, D.C., 1919-20. Assistant Professor, M.S.C., Horticulture, 1923-31. 

Agronomy, 1931-39. Agrostology, 1939-41. Associate Professor of Agrostology, 1941 — . 

Phi Sigma Kappa. 

CHARLES NELSON DuBOIS., A. M., 
Assistant Professor of English 

Born 1910. Bay Path Institute, Teachers' Diploma, 1929. Middlebury College, A.B., 1934, 
A.M., 1935. University of London. Diploma in English Language and Literature, 1935. 
Instructor in English, New Hampton School, 1935-37. Assistant to Dean, Bread Loaf 
School of English, Summers 1933-37. Instructor in English, M.S.C. 1937-46. Assistant 
Professor of English 1946—. Lt. Commander, U.S.N.R., 1942-46. Phi Beta Kappa, Kappa 
Delta Rho. 



JOHN N. EVERSON, M.S., 

Assistant Professor in Agronomy 

Born 1887. B.S., M.S.C., 1910. M.S., M.S.C., 1936. Chemist and Agronomist fertilizer 

companies, Missouri, Arkansas, Georgia, 7 years. Industrial and Agricultural Chemist, 20 

years. Soil Testing Specialist, M.S.C., 1934-36. Instructor in Agronomy, M.S.C., 1936-39. 

Assistant Professor in Agronomy, 1939 — . Instructor, University Training Command, War 

Dept., Florence, Italy, 1945. 




GORDON FIELD, B.S., 
Graduate Assistant in Entomology 
B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1943. 
Entomology, Oct. 1946. 



U.S. Army, 1943-46. Graduate Assistant in 



EUGENE J. FINNEGAN, 
Graduate Assistant in Dairy Department 

Born 1919. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1941. Graduate Assistant in Dairy Depart- 
ment, M.S.C. 

RICHARD C. FOLEY, M.S., 
Associate Professor in Animal Husbandry 

B.S., M.S.C, 1927. M.S., M.S.C, 1931. Herdsman, Stannox Farm, 1927-29. S.N.P.C. 
Fellowship in Pasture Management, M.S.C, 1929-30. Temporary Instructor m Animal 
Husbandry, M.S.C, 1929-30. Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry, 1936-46. Associ- 
ate Professor, 1946 — . Lt. Commander, U.S. Navy Supply Corps., 1943-45. Sigma Phi 
Epsilon, Phi Kappa Phi. 

RALPH L. FRANCE, 

Assistant Professor, Department of Bacteriology 

Born in Wilmington, Delaware, Feb. 10, 1902. B.S., University of Delaware, 1925. Lab- 
oratory technician, Maryland State Board of Health, 1925-26. M.S., Massachusetts State 
College, 1928. Assistant Research Professor, Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment 
Station, 1928-42. Sanitary Corps, A. U.S., 1942-46. Assistant Professor, Massachusetts 
State College, 1946—. Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Xi. 



Thies 
Roberts 
Van Meter 
French 



JULIUS H. FRANDSEN, M.S., 
Professor and Head of Department of Dairy Industry 

Born 1877. B.S., in Agriculture, Iowa State College, 1902. M.S., Iowa State College, 1904. 
Assistant in Agricultural Chemistry, Iowa State College, 1902-04. Dairy Chemist, Hazelwood 
Creamery Co., Portland, Oregon, 1904-07. Professor of Dairy Husbandry, University of 
Idaho, 1907-11. Professor of Dairy Husbandry, University of Nebraska, 1911-21. Dairy 
Editor and Counselor, Capper Farm Press, 1921-24. Head, Department of Dairy Industry, 
Massachusetts State College, 1926 — . Member of Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Gamma Sigma 
Delta, American Dairy Science Association, Society for the Promotion of Agricultural Science, 
American Association for the Advancement of Science. Author of ICE CREAM AND ICES 
with Markham, numerous bulletins and circulars. Chairman of Hoover's Dairy Food Com- 
mission for State of Nebraska during World War I. Traveled U.S., England, France, Sweden, 
Denmark, Holland, Germany. Founded and Editor for 11, years of Journal of Dairy Science. 
Hobbies are Photography and Dairy Exhibits. 

ARTHUR P. FRENCH, M.S., 
Professor of Pomology and Plant Breeding 

B.S., Ohio State University, 1921. M.S., M.S.C, 1923. Investigator in Pomology, M.S.C. 
Experiment Station, 1921-23. Instructor in Pomology, M.S.C, 1923-29. Assistant Professor 
in Pomology, 1929-36. Professor, 1936 — . Civilian Instructor at Biarritz American Univer- 
sity, July, 1945-March, 1946. Alpha Zeta, Sigma Xi, Alpa Tau Omega, Phi Kappa Phi. 



WINIFRED E. GASKILL, B. S., 
Instructor in Physical Education 
B. S., New Jersey College for 
M. S. C, 1943—. 



Women, 1943. Instructor in Physical Education, 



Vondell 
Banta 

Jeffrey 
Sanctuary 




^ f^ .' 




Barke 
Perriello 



EMORY E. GRAYSON, B.S., 
Director of Placement Service 

Born 1894. B.S., M.S.C., 1917. Farm Bureau Work at Gardner, Mass., 1917-18. Field 
Artillery, Camp Taylor, Louisville, Ky., O.T.C., 1918. Assistant Football Coach, M.S.C., 
1919. Coach of Two Year Athletics, M.S.C., 1919-24. Baseball Coach and Assistant 
Coach in Football and Basketball, Amherst College, 1924-26. Associate Professor of Phy- 
sical Education, Amherst College, and Coach of Baseball, Basketball, and Assistant Coach 
of Football, 1926-28. Supervisor of Placement Training, M.S.C., 1928-34. Director of Place- 
ment Service, 1934—. Lt. Commander, U.S.N. R., World War II, Aug., 1942-Jan., 1946. 
18 months in South Pacific. Alpha Sigma Phi,. Adelphia. E.C.P.O. 

NATHAN S. HALE, 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 

B.S., University of Connecticut, 1946. Attended the "Danforth Foundation Scholarship", 

Summer of 1945, St. Louis, Mo. Began teaching at M.S.C., 1946. Sigma Nu National 

Fraternity. 



MARGARET HAMLIN, B. A., 
Placement Officer for Women 

B.A., Smith College, 1904. Agricultural Counselor for Women, M.S.C., 
Officer for Women, 1934 — . 



1918-34. Placement 



CURRY S. HICKS, M. ED., 

Professor of Physical Education and Head of Division 

Born 1885. Michigan Agricultural College, 1902-03. B. Pd., Michigan State Normal College. 

1909. Assistant in Physical Education, Michigan State Normal College, 1908-09. Edward 

Hitchcock Fellow in Physical Education, Amherst College, 1909-10. Director of Athletics, 

Michigan State Normal College, 1910-11. Assistant Professor in Physical Education and 

Hygiene, M.S.C., 1911-14. Associate Professor, 1914-16, and Professor, 1916—. M. Ed., 

Michigan State Normal College, 1924. Head of Division of Physical Education, M.S.C., 

1936—. 



JOHN WILLIAM HICKS, B. S., 

Instructor in Agricultural Economics 

Born 1921, Sydney, Australia. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1943. 
1946. Army Air Force, 3 years, U.S. and Pacific. 



Vassar College, 



Eisenmenger 

Thayer 

Everson 

Dickinson 

Zak 

Russell 




ROBERT P. HOLDSWORTH, M. F., 

Professor of Forestry and Head of the Department 

Born 1890. B.S., Michigan State College, 1911. M.F., Yale, 1928. Royal College of Forest- 
ry, Stockholm, Sweden, 1928-29. Forest Assistant, U.S. Forest Service, 1912-13. Admin- 
istrative Assistant and Forest Examiner in charge of White Top Purchase Area, 1913-14. 
Professor of Forestry, M.S.C., 1930—. Captain in Infantry, 1917-19. Major, Air Corp, 
1942-44. Taught in U.S. Army U., Shrivenham, England, 1945. Senior Member, Society 
of American Foresters. Phi Kappa Phi. 

S. CHURCH HUBBARD, 
Assistant Professor of Floriculture 

1909-15 with A.N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn., as Propagator and Section Foreman of 
Roses. Superintendent and Salesman of Retail Department. Vice-President and Manager 
of F.W. Fletcher, Inc., of Auburndale, Mass., 1915-16. Superintendent in charge of Test 
Grounds of American Iris Society, American Rose Society, American Peony Society, Amer- 
ican Gladiolus Society, and American Sweet Pea Society at Cornell University, 1916-21. 
Greenhouse Foreman and Instructor in Floriculture, M.S.C, 1921-29. Assistant Professor 
of Floriculture, M.S.C, 1928—. 

VICKERY HUBBARD, 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Born in Carbondale, Pennsylvania. Graduated from University of Wisconsin. Taught in 

the University at Akron and Colorado. Worked with Red Cross, England. Accepted to 

faculty, Massachusetts State College, 1946. 



FRED PAINTER JEFFREY, 

Head of Poultry Dep't. and Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 1944 

B.S. Pennsylvania State College, 1932. M.S. Massachusetts State College, 1934. Rutgers 

University 1934-1944. Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 1944. 

WALTER O. JOHNSON, 

Manager of Draper Dining Hall 

Born 1912. B.SC, Massachusetts State College, 1935. Assistant to Manager of Dining Hall, 
1935-39. Manager of Dining Hall, 1939—. Instructor in Food Technology M.S.C., 1939. 

OTTO G. KRANZ, B. S. 
Assistant Professor of Food Technology 

Attended University of Lousanne, Switzerland, Hotel Administration Course 1909-1913. 
Assistant Manager Knickerbocker Hotel, New York City 1914-1916. Associated with 
William Penn Hotel, Pittsburg ^i916-1918. Four years with Freight Harvest System, Chicago 
and Los Angeles. Two years Catering Manager Ovington Hotel, Eversterson, 111. Four years 
with Sheraton Hotel, Chicago, 111. 1928-1930 Banquet Manager, Palmeo House. 1930-1942 
associated with Brother in Franklin and Pequent Hotels, Jamaca, N. Y. 1942-1945 Purchas- 
ing Steward, Whiting Hotel Newport, R. I. Sept. 1946 Assistant Prof. M.S.C. 




Newlon 
Pushee 
Markuson 
Tague 



WILLIAM HENRY LACHMAN, M. S., 

Assistant Professor of Olericulture 

Born 1912. B.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1934. M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 

1936. Instructor in Olericulture, 1936-45. Assistant Professor of Olericulture, 1945. Gamma 

Sigma Delta, Pi Alpha Zi. 



ROBERT P. LANE, M. A., 
Instructor in English 

Born 1915. A.B., Columbia University, 
Thayer Academy. U.S.A.A.F., 1942-45. 



1935. M.A., Harvard University. Teacher at 
Instructor in English, M.S.C, 1945. 



JOHN B. LENTZ, A.B., V.M.D., 

Professor of Veterinary Science and Head of the Department 

Born 1887. A.B., Franklin and Marshall College, 1908. V.M.D., School of Veterinary 
Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 1914. Teaching and Coaching at Franklin and Mar- 
shall Academy, 1908-11. Assistant Professor of Veterinary Science and College Veterinarian, 
M.S.C, 1922-27. Head of the Department, 1927—. Phi Kappa Phi, Phi Sigma Kappa. 

ARTHUR S. LEVINE, M S., Ph. D., 
Assistant Professor in Food Technology 

Born 1913. B.S., M.S.C, 1935. M.S., M.S.C, 1936. Ph. D., M.S.C, 1939. Research 
Fellow, M.S.C, 1936. Dairy Bacteriologist, 1936. Assistant Research Professor, Mass. 
Agricultural Experiment Station, 1941. Captain Sn. C and Q.M.C, U.S. Army, 1942-45. 
E.T.O. Technical Advisor in Subsistence. Assistant Professor, Food Technology Depart- 
ment, M.S.C, 1946—. Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi, Alpha Epsilon Pi. Charter Member, 
Institute of Food Technologists, American Public Health Ass'n., Society American Bacter- 
iologists. 



HARRY G. LINDQUIST, M. S., 
Assistant Professor in Dairying 

Born 1895. B.S., M.S.C, 1922. Graduate Assistant University of Maryland, 1922-24. M.S.. 
University of Maryland, 1924. Baltimore City Health Department, Summer, 1924. Instruc- 
tor, University of Maryland, 1924-25. Graduate Assistant, Ohio State University, 1925-27. 
Instructor in Dairying, M.S.C, 1927-36. Assistant Professor, 1936—. 



Cornell 
Ross 
Thayer 
Hubbard 



ADRIAN H. LINDSEY, Ph. D., 

Professor of Agricultural Economics and Head of the Department 

Born 1897. B.S., University of Illinois, 1922. M.S., Iowa State College, 1923. Ph. D., 

Iowa State College, 1929. Northwestern University, Summer of 1926. University of Chicago, 

Summer of 1927. Instructor at Alabama Polytechnical Institute, 1923-25. Fellow at Iowa 

State College, 1925-26. Assistant Professor at Iowa State College, 1926-29. Professor of 

Agricultural Economics, M.S.C, 1929 — . Pi Gamma Mu, Alpha Gamma Rho. 





Kranz 

Morse 

Levine 

Johnson 

Fellers 



ROBERT G. LOVE, 

Laboratory Assistant in Engineering 

Graduated from Ipswich High School, 1937. Post Graduate Ipswich High School, 1938. 

University of New Hampshire, 1942. Norwich University, 1943. Mass. State College, 1947. 

Service, 1942-45. E.T.O., 21 months overseas. 

MINER J. MARKUSON, B.S., 

Associate Professor of Engineering 

Born 1896. B.S., of Architecture, University of Minnesota, 1923. Assistant Professor of 

Engineering, Virginia Polytechnical Institute, 1923-25. Non-commissioned Officer, 210th 

Engineers, 10th Division, of the U.S. Army, 1918-19. Assistant Professor of Engineering. 

M.S.C., 1925-44. Associate Professor, 1944—. 

THEODORE F. MATHIEU, 
Assistant Professor of Arboriculture 

Graduate of N.Y. State College of Forestry, Syracuse University, 1942. Davey Tree Expert 
Co., 1928-32. C.C.C. Forestry Program, 1933-34. While attending Syracuse, he had varied 
experience including Dutch Elm Control, Extension Forestry at Park Demonstration Forest, 
Operating Training Program for a practicing arborist, Conducted his own Arborist and 
Landscape Maintenance Service. Secretary of City of E. Orange Shade Tree Commission, 
1943. Army, 1943-44. Bartlett Tree Expert Co., 1945-46. Assistant Professor, M.S.C., 
Arboriculture, 1946. 



ROY E. MORSE, M.S., 
Instructor in Food Technology 

Born 1916. B.S., Mass. State College, 1940. M.S., Mass., State College, 1941. Instructor, 
Oregon State College, 1942. Teaching Fellow, Mass. State College, 1943. Aerial Photo- 
graphic Officer, 9th Air Force, 1944-46. Instructor and Candidate for Ph. D., Mass. State 
College, 1946—. 

D. HORACE NELSON, 
Assistant Professor of Dairy Industry 

Instructor, Dairy Industry, University of California, 1924-37. Research Fellow, Pennsyl- 
vania State College, 1937-39. Assistant Professor, Dairy Husbandry, New Mexico College 
of Agriculture and Mech. Arts., 1941-45. Assistant Professor of Dairy Industry, 1945. 
Gamma Alpha, Gamma Sigma Delta. 

JOHN B. NEWLON, 

Instructor in Engineering 

Born 1884. Instructor in Forge Work, M.S.C., 1919. Special Student at Massachusetts 

Institute of Technology, 1921. Instructor in Engineering, M.S.C., 1921 — . M.I.T. Summer 

School, 1939. Machine Tool Practice Lab. 

WILLIAM A. O'DONNELL, Ph. D., 

Instructor in English 

Born 1916. B.S., Massachusetts State College, 1938. M.A., Yale University, 1940. Ph. D., 

Yale University, 1942. Instructor in English, M.S.C., 1942 — . Visiting Instructor in English 

Amherst College, 1946-47. Phi Kappa Phi. 



Mathieu 
Blundell 
Creech 



ROBERT C. PERRIELLO, 

Assistant Professor in Department of Bacteriology 

Born in Boston, Mass. B.S., Mass., State College. Health Officer, 

City of Attleboro, 1938-46. Assistant Professor, M.S.C., 1946—. Q.T.V. 



Bacteriologist, 




GEORGE F. PUSHEE, 
Instructor in Agricultural Engineering 

I.CS., 1906. State Teachers Training Class, Springfield Vocational College, 1914-15. 
Assistant Foreman and Millwright, Mt. Tom Sulfide Pulp Mill, 1915-16. Instructor in 
Agricultural Engineering, M.S.C., 1916 — . Summer School Dramatics and Teachers Train- 
ing, M.S.C., 1923-25. Counsellor at Camp Medomak, Summers, 1928 — . Special Course, 
M.S.C., 1924-25. 



ERNEST J. RADCLIFFE, M.D., 

Professor of Hygiene and Student Health Officer 

Born 1898. M.D., University of Toronto, 1923. Private and Clinic Practice. Canadian 

Field Artillery, 1916-19. Professor of Hygiene and Student Health Officer, M.S.C., 1930—. 

Massachusetts Medical Society, American Medical Association. Flight Surgeon, U.S.A. R.F., 

1941-45. 

ARNOLD D. RHODES, 
Instructor in Forestry 

Bom 1912. University of New Hampshire, B.S., 1934. School of Forestry, Yale University, 
M.F., 1937. U.S. Forest Service, 1934-36. Instructor, School of Forestry, Yale University, 
1937-39. Instructor, Mass. State College, 1939 — . Society of American Foresters, Eco- 
logical Society of America, Botanical Society of America, Phi Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma 
Xi. 

VICTOR A. RICE, B.S., M. AGR., D. AGR., 

Professor of Animal Husbandry, Head of the Department, and Head of the Division of 

Agriculture 

Bom 1890. B.S., North Carolina State College, 1917. M. Agr., M.S.C., 1923. Doctor of 

Agr., North Carolina State College, 1946. Farm Manager, 1910-12. Swine Specialist for 

State of Massachusetts, 1916-19. Professor of Animal Husbandry, M.S.C., 1919—. Phi 

Kappa Phi. 

J. HARRY RICH, M.F.. 
Assistant Professor of Forestry 

Bom 1888. B.S., New York State College of Forestry, 1913. M.F., 1937. Assistant Pro- 
fessor, M.S.C., 1933 — . Sigma Xi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Society of American Foresters, Tech- 
nical Association of Pulp and Paper Industry, Northeastern Wood Utilization Council, Pi 
Kappa Alpha. 




Cowan 

Blaisdell 

Rice 

Foley 

Hale 



OLIVER C. ROBERTS, M.S., 
Assistant Professor of Pomology 

Born 1895. B.S., M.S.C., 1919. M.S., University of Illinois, 1941. Teacher of Agriculture 
in West Lebanon Academy, West Lebanon, Maine, 1920-22. Foreman of Pomology De- 
partment, M.S.C., 1923-26. Instructor in Pomology, M.S.C., 1926-35. Assistant Professor 
of Pomology, 1935—. Theta Chi. 

JOSEPH R. ROGERS, JR., 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Born 1906. Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1930. Instrument Man, Metropolitan District 

Water Supply Commission, 1930-31. Instructor in Physical Education, M.S.C., 1931 — . 

Member American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

DONALD E. ROSS, B.S., 

Instructor in Floriculture and Greenhouse Foreman 

Born 1896. B.S., M.S.C., 1925. Nurseryman at A.N. Pierson, Inc., Cromwell, Conn., 1925- 

26. Nurseryman Superintendent at the Rose Farm, White Plains, N. Y., 1926-28. Attended 

Summer School, M.S.C., 1928. Instructor, 1928—. Served in France with 101th Invantry, 

26th Division, 1917-19. Alpha Gamma Rho. Assistant Professor of Physical Education, 

1943-46. Returned to Floriculture Department as Instructor and Greenhouse Foreman, 

1946. 



GLENN C. RUSSELL, 

Instructor in Agronomy 

Born 1921. B.Sc. Brigham Young University, 



1943. Accepted to Faculty, 1946. 



WILLIAM C. SANCTUARY, M.S., 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

Born 1888. B.S., M.S.C., 1912. New York State School of Agriculture, Morrisville, N. Y., 

1912-18. U.S. Army, 1917-18. Professor of Poultry Husbandry, M.S.C., 1921. Acting 

Director of New York State School of Agriculture, 1924-25. Professor of Poultry Husbandry, 

M.S.C., 1925—. Phi Delta Kappa, Theta Chi. 



Lindquist 
Frandsen 
Nelson 





Grayson 

Hamlin 

Colwell 



Rich 

Holdsworth 
Rhodes 
Stickel 




FRANK R. SHAW, Ph.D., 
Assistant Professor of Entomology and Beekeeping 

Born 1908, Belchertown, Mass. B.S., M.S.C., 1931. Graduate Assistant at Cornell Univ- 
ersity, 1931-35. Assistant Experiment Station Entomologist, Mass. Agric. Experiment 
Station, Summers, 1930-34. Assistant in Insect Morphology and Histology, Cornell Univer- 
sity, 1931-34. Instructor in Economic Entomology, Cornell University, 1934-Jan. 1935. 
Instructor in Entomology and Beekeeping, M.S.C., 1935-46. Assistant Professor, 1946 — . 
Member of American Association of Economic Entomologists, Entomological Society of 
America, Ph. D., Cornell, 1936. Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi. 

WILLIAM THORNTON SIMPSON, M.A., 
Speech Department 

Born New York City. Private Schools in New York. 2 years, City College. 4 years, 
Columbia School of Architecture and Engineering, American Academy of Dramatic Arts, 
New York. 10 years, Actor, Stage Manager, Director in Professional Theater. Connected 
with Brokerage Houses, New York, and Harftord. Member of New York Stock Exchange. 
Founded and Directed Little Theatres, Hartford, and Springfield. Director of Drama De- 
partment, Teaching Public Speaking and Courses in Dramatic Literature, Springfield 
College. M.A., Boston University. Speech Department, M.S.C.. 1945. 

GRANT B. SNYDER, M.S., 

Professor of Olericulture and Head of Department 

B.A.A., Ontario Agricultural College, Toronto University, 1922. Assistant Plant Hybridist 

at Ontario Agricultural College, 1919-21. Instructor in Vegetable Gardening, M.S.C., 1921- 

26. M.S., Michigan State College, 1931. Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening, M.S. 

C, 1926-35. Professor of Olericulture and Head of Department, 1935—. 

PAUL W. STICKEL, M.F., 

Instructor in Forestry 

Born 1899. B.S., New York State College of Forestry, 1923. M.F., Yale School of Forestry, 

1924. Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi, Sigma Nu. U.S. Forest Service, 1924-42. Accepted to 

Faculty, 1945. 

WILLIAM H. TAGUE, B.S.. 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
Born 1892. B.S., Agricultural Engineering Iowa 
Agricultural Engineering, M.S.C., 1929 — . 



State College. Assistant Professor of 



CHARLES HIRAM THAYER, 

Assistant Professor in Agronomy 

Bom 1884. Winter School, M.A.C., 1904. Manager, Brooke Farm, Amherst, 1908-13. 

Manager, Fillmore Farm, Weston, Massachusetts, 1913. Assistant in Agronomy, Winter 

School, M.A.C., 1915-18. Instructor in Agronomy, M.A.C., 1918-36. Assistant Professor 

in Agronomy, M.S.C., 1936 — . 

CLARK L. THAYER, B.S., 

Professor of Floriculture and Head of the Department 

Born 1890. B.S., M.S.C., 1913. Graduate Work in Floriculture and Plant Breeding, 

Cornell University, 1913-14. Instructor in Floriculture, Cornell University, 1914-19. As- 

socia'te Professor and Head of Department, M.S.C., 1919-20. Professor of Floriculture and 

Head of the Department, M.S.C., 1920—. U.S. Army, 1918. Alpha Gamma Rho, Phi 

Alpha Xi, Adelphia, Phi Pi. 

RUTH JANE TOTMAN, 

Head of Department of Physical Eduaction for Women 

Born, Conway, Mass. Graduated from Sargent School for Physical Education. B.S., 
New Jersey College for Women. M. Ed., University of Pittsburgh. Taught Rural School 
Conway, Mass. Supervisor of Physical Education, Rural Schools, Delaware County, New 
York. Instructor of Physical Education, State Normal School, Cortland, New York. Mem- 
ber of State Department of Physical Education, Albany, New York. Instructor at summer 
sessions, Albany Teachers College, Albany, New York. Instructor of Physical Education, 
East Stroudsburg, Normal School, East Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. Supervisor of Physical 
Education, New Castle. Instructor of Physical Education, Indiana State Teachers College, 
Indiana, Pennsylvania. Instructor of Physical Education, New Jersey College for Women. 
Accepted to M.S.C., Faculty 1943. 



REUBEN E. TRIPPENSEE, Ph.D.. 

Professor of Wildlife Management, Department of Forestry 

Born 1894. B.S., Michigan State College ,1920. M.S., University of Michigan, 1933. Ph. 
D., University of Michigan, 1934. L. W. Watkins Farms, Manchester, Michigan, 1920-24. 
Instructorof Science in Arthur Hill High Schools, Saginaw, Michigan, 1924-31. Junior Instruc- 
tor in Zoology, School of Forestry and Conservation, University of Michigan, 1931-34. In 
charge of Wildlife Management, U.S. Forest Service, R. 9, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 1934-36. 
Professor of Wildlife Management, M.S.C., 1936—. Alpha Zeta, Seminar Botaricus, Phi 
Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi, Sigma Xi. 

ALDEN P. TUTTLE, M. S., 

Assistant Professor in Vegetable Gardening 

Born 1906. B.S., M.S.C., 1928. M.S., Pennsylvania State College, 1930. Graduate Assistant 

in Vegetable Gardening, Pennsylvania State College, 1928-30. Instructor in Vegetable 

Gardening, M.S.C., 1930-36. Assistant Professor in Vegetable Gardening, 1936 — . Gamma 

Sigma Delta. 

RALPH A. VAN METER, Ph. D., 

Professor of Pomology, Head of Pomology Department and 

Head of the Division of Horticulture 

Born 1893. B.S., Ohio State University, 1917. Ph. D., Cornell University, 1935. Extension 

Specialist in Pomology, M.S.C., 1917. Served in France with the 317th Field Signal Battalion, 

1918-19. Assistant Extension Professor of Pomology, M.S.C., 1919-21. Extension Professor 

of Pomology, M.S.C., 1921-23. Professor of Pomology, M.S.C., 1923—. Cornell University, 

1924, 1930-31. Head of the Division of Horticulture, 1931—. Head of the Department of 

Pomology, 1936—. Delta Theta Sigma, Phi Kappa Phi. 

JOHN H. VONDELL 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry and Superintendent of Poultry Plant 
Born 1898. Assistant Professor, U. S. Veterans Bureau, Baltimore, Md., 1922-23. Super- 
intendent of Poultry Plant, M.S.C., 1923-29. Instructor in Poultry Husbandry, M.S.C., 
1929-43. Assistant Professor in Poultry Husbandry, 1943 — . 

HELEN L. WAGNER, B. S., 

Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S. in Education, Ohio State University, 1946. 

achusetts State College, 1946. 



m 


31- 






k^,jKmKKm ■" 




i 


hi 


1 



Instructor in Physical Education, Mass- 



JOHN WALKER, 

Laboratory Assistant in Engineering 

Born, Merrimac, Mass., 1913. Massachusetts State College, 1932-34, 1946—. U. S. Army, 

1943-45, E.T.O. 



JOHN M. ZAK, M.S., 

Instructor in Agronomy 

Born 1914. B.Sc, Massachusetts State College, 

M.S., Massachusetts State College, 1938. 



1936. Research Fellow in Agronomy, 1937, 



JOHN E. ROBERTS, 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
Graduated University of New Hampshire, 
Doctorate at Cornell, Summer of 1946. 
1946. 



B.S. 1942. M.S. 1944. Completed work for 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry, M.S.C., fall of 



Hicks 

Lindsey 

Barrett 



Ball 

Barrett 

Hicks 





Bateman, Treas; Healy, Pres; Spencer, Vice-Pres; Grigonis, Sec. 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 



STUDENT COUNCIL 



Eldredge, Roszko, D. Young, LaSalle. 




MR. KILROY — CLASS OF 1947 

With the ending of the second world war, the well-known Kilroy of the armed forces be- 
came Mr. Kilroy of the campus. He exchanged his G. I. uniform for civilian clothes and 
he was armed with books instead of guns. But he did not change his living quarters; his 
familiar army barracks were reconstructed on the campus. This unwelcome sight was com- 
pensated by the fact that Mrs. Kilroy accompanied her husband to their new home. Mr. 
Kilroy was now a freshman of the class of 1947 — with 177 other members of the class, 110 
of them veterans. Oh yes, there were girls, but only 15. Those freshmen were members of 
the first class in the reestablished two year program since the declaration of war, when the 
school was continued as a one year course. 

Mr. Kilroy enjoyed the regular pre-war activities — dances, club meetings, lectures, 
hikes, and informal smokers. He cheered for the Massachusetts State football team be- 
cause some of his Stockbridge classmates were on the first string, as was the same with 
the Massachusetts State basketball team. 

Classes in agronomy, farm management, floriculture, vegetable growing, meats, small 
fruits, poultry, hotel administration, dairy, forestry, and other courses, depending on 
Mr. Kilroy's major, ended the last of March. 

The First of April, Mr. Kilroy was sent into active duty for six months — placement 
training. Stored energy was released through pitching hay, planting trees, making ice cream, 
picking apples, setting out chrysanthemums, mashing potatoes, or weeding carrots. The 
eagerness for a release from the books wore off by the end of the six months, so Mr. Kilroy 
was ready to resume his studies as a senior with the other 109 returning classmates. 

There were a few changes for Mr. Kilroy as he started his senior year. He had more 
difficulty with his studying — balancing Kilroy, Jr., on one knee and his Bailey's Cyclopedia 
on the other. His senior courses were accelerated and more advanced than those of his 
freshman year. The horticulture show solicited for recruits to enable its construction, so 
Mr. Kilroy spent many hours assisting in converting the cage into a beautiful display of 
modernistic landscape design. But he had time to attend the freshman reception, winter 
carnival ball, fraternity informals, and club meetings. He also had his own Stockbridge 
football and basketball teams to root for. In fact, Mr. Kilroy was quite reluctant about 
leaving Stockbridge — its students, professors, and beautiful campus — when June 2, and 
graduation was turned up on the calender. 





EVERETT AHERN "Blackie" 

"Why Did I Kiss Thai Girl" 
Forestry Wellesley 

Hobby — Reading 
Placement Training — Vermont 



% 




BAXTER S. ALLEN 

"Three Lillle Fishes" 
Poultry 

Poultry Club (1,2) — President (2) 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training' — Shelton, Conn. 



"Pop" 
Pelham 




LOUIS AMELL 

"Fishing For The Moon" 
Food Management 

Football (1,2), Basketball (1), Dramatics (1) 
Fraternity — KK President 
Hobbies — Fishing, Hunting, Skiing • 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Future Plans — Food Tech. Course, State 



"Bud' 



North Adams 




BURTON R. ANDERSON "Burt" 

"I Love a Piano" 
Floriculture Wellesley 

Floriculture Club (2), Horticulture Show (2) — 10 x 10 Exhibit 
Hobbies — Golf, Fishing, Piano 

Placement Training — A. F. Capers, Wellesley, Mass. 
Future Plans — Mass. State College 



FREDERICK G. BASTIAN "Casey" 

" No Love, No Nothin' " 
Dairy Manufactures North Andover 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Editor-in-Chief 
Dairy Club (1,2) — Co-President (1,2) 
Hobby — Reading 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Chas. D. Glennie Co., North Andover, 

Mass. 
Pet Dislilie — Cold and Snowy weather 
Goal — To get a girl and get married 

Harry O. BATEMAN, JR. "Stubby" 

"Life and Love" 
Animal Husbandry Winchendon 

Class Officer (2) — Treasurer 
Dance Committee (2) — Tickets 
Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) — Vice President (2) 
Little International (2) 
Hobby — Traveling 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — M. S. C. Farm 
Pet Dislike — Silly Boys 
Goal — Farm owner 
Favorite Expression — "Class dismissed" 








RICHARD W. BEMIS 



"Dick" 



"Isn't a Kind of Fun" 
Ornamental Horticulture Spencer 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Activities 
4-H Club (1,2) — Executive Committee 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Horticulture Club (1,2) 
Hobby — Going to open houses 
Placement Training — Peter Pascio Nursery, West Hartford, 

Conn. 
Pet Dislike — Eating 
Goal — A nursery 





y 



WILLIAM E. BENSON 

"Make Way for Tomorrow" 
Ornamental Horticulture 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Lynn 
Pet Dislike — People 
Goal — Civil Service 



"Bill- 



Lynn 





HERBERT A BERTHEL 

"Wail and See" 
Dairy Manufactures 
Dairy Club (2) 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Hager's, Somerville 
Pet Dislike — You volunteer 
Goal — A good paying job 
Favorite Expression — "Oh, ya" 



'Herbie" 



Melrose 




ELSIE L. BISSONNETTE "Louise" 

"/ Keep Forgetting We're Through" 
Floriculture Indian Orchard 

Shorthorn Board (2), Dance Committee (2) 
Horticulture Show — 10 x 10 Exhibit 
Horticulture Club (1,2) — Secretary (2) 
Placement Training — Gate Hill Gardens 
Pet Dislike — Pickles and bananas 
Goal — Retail florist shop 
Favorite expression — "Heavens" 




WILLIAM R. CAFARELLA "Bill" 

"More Than You Know" 
Vegetable Gardening Medford 

Branch of Service ^ Marines 
Placement Training — So. Natick 




IP 



ROBERT H. CAPSTICK 

"Love on a Greyhound Bus' 
Horticulture 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Horticulture Club (1,2) 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Weston Golf Club 
Goal — Greenkeeper 



"Cappy" 

Framingham 



THOMAS F. CARLETON, JR. "Tom" 

"Get Out and Get Under" 
Ornamental Horticulture Medford 

Football (1), Hockey (1) — Captain elect '43 
Horticulture Show (1,2) 
Branch of Service — Army Air Force 
Placement Training — Adams Nursery Co., Westfield, Mass. 




WILLIAM A. CARTER 

"Im Putting All My Eggs in one Basket' 
Poultry 

Poultry Club (1,2) 

Branch of Service — Army Air Force 
Placement Training — Cape Cod 
Goal — Turkey breeder 



'Bill" 



Worcester 




FRANK R. CLAPP 

Sailing, Sailing, Over the Bounding Main' 



'Clipper" 




Food Management 
Hobby — Skiing 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Goal — Cornell University 



Northampton 



»»?- * 




LEO F. CLARK 

"The Farmer's Pride" 
Animal Husbandry 

Track (1), Animal Husbandry Club (1,2P) 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Waveney Farm 



"Frank" 
Framingham 




.^. 





ROBERT E. CLARK "Bob" 

"It's got to be This or That" 
Food Management Springfield 

Branch of Service — Navy 

Placement Training — Public House, Stockbridge, Mass. 
Pet Dislike — High cost of living 
Goal — To be in business for myself 
Favorite Expression — "Not too bad" 




JAMES T. COLLINGWOOD 

"Lover, Come Back to Me" 
Animal Husbandry 
Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Hobby — Skiing 

Placement Training — Deershorn Farm, Sterling 
Pet Dislike — Girls 
Goal — To have my own farm 



Greenfield 



JOHN F. CRUDDEN 

"Turkey in the Straw" 

Poultry 

Poultry Club (1,2) 

Branch of Service — Army 

Placement Training — Stow, Mass. 

Goal — R O P breeder 



Hartford, Conn. 




CHRISTINE G. CUMMINGS "Chris" 

"Because You're You" 
Dairy Manufactures Marshfield 

Shorthorn Board (2) 

Dairy Club — Secretary-Treasurer (1,2), Niads (1,2) 
Hobby — Sports 

Placement Training — Marshfield 
Pet Dislike — Modern dance 
Goal — It all depends 
Favorite Expression — "Jokah" 



CHESTER A. DAMON 

"The Farmer in the Dell" 
Animal Husbandry Kingston, R.I. 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 

Placement Training — Intervale Farms, New Hartford, Conn. 
Goal — Successful farmer 




ROBERT DELLA TORRE 

"A Heart That's Free" 
Floriculture Willimansett 

Horticulture Show (2) — First prize winner 
Placement Training — Ruane Flowers, Newtonville, Mass. 
Goal — Florist 




JOHN W. DENISON 

"Too Much in Love' 



"Jack" 
Stoughton 



Animal Husbandry 

Football (1,2), Animal Husbandry Club (1) 

Hobby — Guns 

Placement Training — Folly Farm, Plain St., Stoughton 

Goal — Farming 



ARTHUR W. DEXTER 

"Down on the Farm" 
Animal Husbandry Wakefield, R. I. 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Placement Training — New Braintree, Mass. 
Goal — Farming with meat market as a side line 






DAVID G. DIXON "Dave" 

"There'll Always be an England" 
Floriculture Bernardston 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Business Manager 
Dance Committee (2) — Publicity 

Floriculture Club (2), 4-H club (2), International Club (2) 
Horticulture Show (2) — Blue ribbon in flower arrangement 
Reporter Collegian (1,2) 
Hobby — Photography 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — Berkshire Garden Center, Stockbridge 

Mass. 
Pet Dislike — Trips to Florida 
Goal — Tropical conservatory 



HERBERT W. DODGE "Herb" 

"Little Brown Jug" 
Animal Husbandry Cambridge 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Hobby — Milking cows 

Placement Training — H. A. Howland, New Braintree 
Pet Dislike — Chickens 
Goal — Farm 




% 'W^ 




ir' 



THOMAS DUNLAVEY 

'Don't sit under the Apple Tree" 
Fruit 

Pomology Club(l) 
Horticulture Show(2) • 

Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Ray G. Smiley, Sterling 
Goal — To work at Drew Fruit Farms, Westford 



'Tom" 



Lowell 




ROBERT S. ELLSWORTH 

" Halleluja, I'm a Bum" 
Forestry 

Hobbies — Skiing, Hunting 
Vet. Club (2) 

Branch of Service — Army 
Pet Dislike — Spinach 
Goal — Bum 
Favorite Expression — "Nuts" 



"Bob" 

Chester 



^ 



CYNTHIA ANN FOOTE "Dinny" 

"/ Want What I Want When 1 Want It" 
Animal Husbandry Winchester 

Basketball (1,2) 
Outing Club (1,2), Dairy Club (1), Animal Husbandry Club 

(1,2) 
Little International (2) 
Hobby — Anything that's fun 
Placement Training — Westbrook, Maine 
Pet Dislike — Men 
Goal — A farm in a single state 
Favorite Expression — "What?" . 




HELEN FOOTE 
"Time Alone Will Tell" 
Floriculture 
4-H Club (1,2) 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Hobby — Sewing 

Placement Training — Shrewsbury 
Goal — Own a florist business 



Pelham 




THOMAS R. FOX "Tom" 

"Take a Little Tip from Father 
Forestry East Longmeadow 

Horticulture Club (1) 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Hobby — Hunting 
Goal — Lumber dealer 




EDWARD F. GARLAND "Eddie" 

"At Peace With the World" 
Dairy Manufactures Somerville 

Dairy Club (1,2) 

Branch of Service — 8th Air Force 

Placement Training — H. P. Hoods & Sons, Charlestown 
Goal — To work in a dairy plant 





NELLIE E. GARRETT 

"The Song of the Open Road" 

Floriculture West Springfield 

Shorthorn Board (2) 

Basketball (2) 

Outing Club (2), Horticulture Club (1) 

Horticulture Show (2) — 10x10 Exhibit 

Hobby — Record library 

Placement Training — Shelburne, Vermont 

Pet Dislike — Proctors 

Goal — To own a greenhouse 

Favorite Expression — "That's the spirit!" 




LAWRENCE J. GEOGHEGAN "Larry" 

"If 1 Had a Talking Picture of You" 
Dairy Manufactures Framingham 

Dairy Club (2), Animal Husbandry Club (2) 
Branch of Service — Army Air Force 
Placement Training — Framingham 
Pet Dislike — Cold weather 
Goal — Graduate 



SANFORD T. GOLDSTEIN * "Goldie" 

"Going My Way" 
Dairy Maunfactures New Bedford 

Dairy Club (1,2), Animal Husbandry Club (1,2), 4-H Club 

(1.2) 
Pre-Med. Club (1,2) 

Placement Training — H. P. Hood & Sons 
Goal — Open up my own ice cream plant 



PHILIP N. GOOD "Phil" 

"1 Don't Care Who Knows It" 
Vegetable Gardening Randolph 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Associate editor 
Dance Committee (2) — Vice chairman 
4-H Club (1,2) — Entertainment 
Horticulture Show (2) 

Future Farmers of America (2), Square Dance Class (2) 
Hobby — Square dancing 

Placement Training — Veg-Acre Farms, Forestdale 
Goal — Market gardener 



GEORGE W. GRANT "Grant" 

"When Day is Done" 
Poultry South Hadley 

Poultry Club (1,2) 
Branch of Service — C. B's. 




RICHARD W. GRAVES, JR. "Dick" 

"Sonny Boy" 
Vegetable Gardening Sunderland 

Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — Lookout Farm, South Natick 



GEORGE B. GREANEY, JR. 

"it's Been a Long Time" , ; 

Fruit Holyoke 

Horticulture Show (2) — Chairman of Pomology Exhibit 
Hobbies — Hunting, Fishing 
Branch of Service — Army 

Placement Training — Mass. State College Orchard 
Pet Dislike — Too much talk 
Goal — Salesman 

ANNE M. GRIGONIS 

"I Love Life" 
Floriculture Sunderland 

Class Officer — Secretary (1,2) 
Shorthorn Board (2) — Literary Editor 
Dance Committee (2) — Decorations 
Basketball (1,2) 
Floriculture Club (2), 4-H Club (2), Horticulture Club (1,2), 

Secretary (1) 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Hobby — Traveling 

Placement Training — Wenks Florist, Springfield 
Pet Dislike — Poor cooperation 
Goal — Floral designer 
Favorite Expression — "Oh, brother" 






WILLIAM R. HARGREAVES "Bill" 

" Poor Little Rhode Island 
Animal Husbandry Providence, R. I. 

Animal Husbandry Club (2), Little International (2) 
Fraternity — A, T. G. (1,2) 
Branch of Service — Air Corps 
Placement Training — Bliss Bros. Dairy Farm 
Goal — Farm ownership 




HONORA HAYNES 
"Red Sails in the Sunset" 
Animal Husbandry 
Hobby — Riding 
Goal — Horse farm 



Weston 




BOYD E. HAYWARD 

"Trail of the Lonesome Pine" 
Forestry 

Hobby — Hunting 
Branch of Service — Navy 



Manomet 



ROBERT E. HEALEY "Bob" 

"You Keep Coming Back Like a Song" 
Floriculture Springfield 

Class Officer (2) — President 

Dance Committee (2) — Co-Chairman of Freshamn Re- 
ception 
Glee Club — (2) 

Horticulture Show (2) — Exhibitor 
Horticulture Club (1) — Vice President 
Hobbies — Journalism, Design, Sports 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Aitken, Springfield 
Goal — Commercial florist 



JOHN S. HAMILTON 

"I'll Buy That Dream" 
Animal Husbandry 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Statistics Editor 
Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Hobbies — Dancing, Making model airplanes 
Placement Training — Elmcrest Farm, Palmer 
Pet Dislike — Poor cooperation among students 
Goal — To be a successful farmer 



"Johnny" 



Palmer 



"Pat' 



PATRICIA A. HAMILTON 

"Pennsylvania Polka" 

Floriculture Lake Placid Club, N. Y. 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Assistant Literary Editor 

Dance Committee (2) — Refreshment & Chairman of Dec- 
oration 

Basketball (1,2) 

Orchestra (1) 

Horticulture Club (1,2) 

Horticulture Show (2) — Table Decoration Committee 
Chairman 

Hobbies — Riding, rollercoasters 

Placement Training — Bristol Nurseries, Inc. 

Pet Dislike — Plaid slacks 

Goal — To own a retail greenhouse 

Favorite Expression — "Gee, that's swell!" 





LAWRENCE HOLDEN 

"Ain't No One in Here But us Chickens" 
Poultry 

Poultry Club (1,2) — Vice President 
Veterans' Association — (2) 
Hobby — Photography 
Branch of Service — Air Corps 
Pet Dislike — Exercise 
Goal — Poultry breeder 



"Larry" 



Holyoke 




HAROLD E. HOLM "Harry" 

"Home on the Range" 
Animal Husbandry Milton 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Placement Training — Gardner State Hospital 





CLAREMONT HOLMES 

"Chicken Gumboogie' 
Poultry 

Poultry Club (2) 
Branch of Service — Army 



East Bridgewater 




LAWRENCE W. HUSTON 

"Show Me The Way to go Home" 
Dairy Manufactures 
Hobby — Drinking beer 
Branch of Service — Army Air Force 
Placement Training — Fitchburg Hill Dairy 
Pet Dislike — O'Bey 
Goal — Own an ice cream parlor 
Favorite Expression — "It all depends" 



"Larry' 



Leominster 




ROGER L. IVES "Rog" 

"Fll Walk Alone" 
Animal Husbandry Tewksbury 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
4-H Club (1,2) 
Hobbies — Traveling, plants 
Placement Training — Hy-Crest Farm, Sterling 
Pet Dislike — Girls 
Favorite Expression — "A step at a time but always forward" 




"Dick' 



Farmington, Conn. 



RICHARD W. JOHNSON 

"Paper Doll" 
Poultry 

Poultry Club (L,2) 

Hobby — Photography 

Branch of Service — Navy 

Placement Training — Hilltop Farm, Suffield, Conn 

Pet Dislike — Women 



BENJAMIN S. KEYES, JR. "Bud" 

"Somewhere a Voice is Calling" 
Animal Husbandry Harvard 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) — Treasurer (2) 
Little International (1,2) — Second prize showing beef 
Fraternity (1,2) — A. T. G. President (2) 
Hobby — Photography 
Branch of Service — Coast Guard 
Placement Training — Hy- Crest Farm 
Pet Dislike — Professors who throw the bull 
Goal — To be a successful family man 
Favorite Expression — "Sad case" 




RICHARD D. KEYES 

"One Dozen Roses" 
Floriculture 
Hobby — Golf 
Branch of Service — Army 



"Dick" 
Florence 





''Stalin" 



JOSEPH K. KHARIBIAN 

"There Must be Someone For Me" 
Floriculture West Roxbury 

Class Officer (1) — Vice-President 
Shorthorn Board (2) 
Glee Club (2) 
Dramatics (1) 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Community Chest (2) 
Hobby — Traveling 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — Ruanes 
Pet Dislike — Oogats on toast 
Goal — Salesman and designer 
Favorite Expression — "Hey, Jackson" 



STEPHEN D. KRISTOF "Kris" 

"Lei's Have Another Cup of Coffee" 
Horticulture East Longmeadow 

Horticulture Show (2) 
Horticulture Club (1,2) 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — Bronxville, New York 







LAWRENCE E. LAMPRO 

"Trees" 
Forestry 
Branch of Service — Army 



Becket 



JAMES A. LASALLE, JR. "Jim" 

"Someone to Watch Over Me" 
Dairy Manufactures Whately 

Student Council (2), Collegian — Stockbridge sports editor (2) 
Shorthorn Board (2) — Sports Editor 
Dance Committee (2) 
Basketball (1,2) — Manager intramural 
Dairy Club (1,2) - - Chairman of refreshment committee 
4-H Club (1) 
Hobby — Women 

Placement Training — LaSalle Ice Cream Co. 
Pet Dislike — The broken windows in Huston's car. 
Favorite Expression — "Put your hood up, Scotty" 







THOMAS F. LEE 

"Through the Years" 
Animal Husbandry 
Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Little International (2) 
Hobby-Photography 



"Tom" 
Brookline 




RICHARD M. LOVE "Dick" 

"Oh, How I hate to get up in the Morning" 
Animal Husbandry Littleton 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Assistant Editor 
Baseball (1) 

Glee Club (1), Animal Husbandry Club (1) 
Hobbies — Skiing, Baseball 
Placement Training — Leominster 
Pet Dislike — 8 a.m. classes 
Goal — Cornell University 
Favorite Expression — "Check" 



ROBERT F. LUCEY "Bob" 

"Without a Song" 
Animal Husbandry Worcester 

Football (1) 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Placement Training — Worcester State Hospital 



ROY I. MARTIN "Roy" 

"II Doesn't Cost You Anything to Dream" 
Horticulture Foxboro 

Dance Committee (2) — Chairman of Freshman Reception 
Horticulture Show (2) — Chairman of Entrance Decorations, 

2nd prize winner on exhibit 
Horticulture Club (1,2) — President 
Hobbies — Reading, Sports 
Placement Training — Foxboro Nurseries 
Branch of Service — Army 
Pet Dislikes — Time wasters 
Goal — $1,000,000.00 
Favorite Expression — "Right" 




LEON J. MENARD, JR. 

"Who Are We to Say" 
Poultry Swansea 

Poultry Club (1,2) — President (1), Executive committee (2) 
Hobby — Swimming 
Branch of Service — Army 




ROBERT P. MC GOLDRICK 

" You Call it Madness" 
Floriculture 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Branch of Service — Air Corps 
Placement Training — Sunnyside Greenhouses 
Goal — Retail grower 



"Mac' 



Worcester 









THOMAS M. O'BRIEN "O'Bey"' 

"Beer Barrel Polka" 

Dairy Manufactures Fairfield, Conn. 

Dairy Club (1,2) 

Placement Training — Rider Dairy, Danbury, Conn. 




RAYMOND B. O'CONNELL "Okie" 

"I'd Rather Be Me" 
Forestry Framingham 

Hobby — Polo 
Branch of Service — Marines 

Placement Training — Dept. of Conservation, Mass. 
Favorite Expression — (Censored) 




WARNER R. OTT 

"When the Lights Go on Again all over the World" 
Forestry West Springfield 

Hobby — World affairs 

Placement Training — Vermont Forest Service 
Pet Dislike — Crowds 
Goal — Entering into a private business 
Favorite Expression — "Don't worry 'bout nothin'" 




VITO A. PATRISSI "Pat" 

"Little Curly Head in a High Chair" 
Floriculture West Hartford, Conn. 

Shorthorn Board (2) 
Football (2) 

Horticulture Show (2), Horticulture Club (1,2) 
Branch of Service — Army 

Placement Training — Sandelli, The Florist, New Britain, 
Conn. 



ERICK B. PEARSON "Bud" 

"SIrike up the Band, Here Comes a Sailor" 
Dairy Manufactures Worcester 

Dairy Club (1,2) 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — Smith & Fyfe Inc., Worcester 





WILLIAM H. PEARSON 

•'Don't be That Way" 
Animal Husbandry Belmont 

Shorthorn Board (2) 
Outing Club (2), Animal Husbandry Club (1,2), Newman 

Club (1,2) 
Stockbridge column in Collegian (2) 
Hobbies — Stamps, Photography 
Placement Training — Hospital Cottages Farm, Baldwinsville 




a**- 




WENTWORTH J. PECKHAM "Red" 

"The Ranger Song" 
Forestry Springfield 

Class officer — President (1) 
Dance Committee (1) — Winter Carnival Ball 
Branch of Service — Army 




EDWIN F. PELOSKY "Ski" 

"South American Take it Away" 
Forestry West Deerfield 

Football (1,2) 
Fraternity — A. T. G. 
Hobbies — Football, Bowling, Flying, Boxing, Swimming, 

Hunting 
Branch of Service — Air Corps 

Placement Training — Falls Ranger Sta., Priest Rive; . Idaho 
Pet Dislike - Pink elephants 
Goal — Own a lumber business in South America 
Favorite Expression — "Hit him again" 





LLOYD A. PICKARD 

"Go West, Young Man, Go West' 
Forestry 
Football (1) 

Fraternity — A. T. G. (1,2) 
Hobbies — Football, Hockey, Drinking milk 
Branch of Service — Marines 
Placement Training — Idaho 
Pet Dislike — Cats 
Goal — Going west 



"Chuck" 
Plymouth 




THOMAS W. RIDGWAY 

"Oh, Promise Me" 
Floriculture 

Shorthorn Board (2) —Art 
Horticulture Show (2) — 10 x 10 exhibit 
Horticulture Club (2) 
Hobby — Photography 
Branch of Service — Air force 
Goal — Mass. State College 



'Tom' 



West Springfield 




CONSTANTINE A. ROSZKO "Connie" 

"Give Me The Simple Life" 
Ornamental Horticulture Worcester 

Student Council (2) — Vice President 

Horticulture Show (2) — Chairman of Transportation Com- 
mittee 
Horticulture Club (1,2) — Treasurer (2) 
Branch of Service — Army 
Goal — To own a nursery 




ALBERT G. ROULEAU "Al" 

"The Old Apple Tree in the Orchard" 
Floriculture Lancaster 

Horticulture Show (2) — 10 x 10 Exhibit 
Hobby — My family 
Branch of Service — Army Air Corps 
Placement Training — Montgomery Roses, Inc., Hadley 
Pet Dislike — People who say, "When you get out on your 

own." 
Goal — Security 



RUDOLPH J. ROTONDI "Rudy" 

"Enough to Know" 
Poultry Stoneham 

Poultry Club (2) 
Hobby — Repairing gadgets 
Placement Training — Harrow's, Reading, Mass. 
Pet Dislike — Sugar 
Goal — Farmer 
Favorite Expression — "Rome wasn't built in a day" 




GEORGE E. SAARI "Yrjo" 

"Yes, We Have No Bananas" 
Pomology New Ipswich, N. H. 

Football (1), Basketball (1) 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Branch of Service — Air Corps 
Placement Training — Chedco Farm, Berlin, Mass. 
Goal — Orchard owner 
Favorite Expression — "Nuts" 




LOUIS B. SANBORN 

"A Friend of Yours 
Dairy Manufactures 

Dairy Club (1,2) — Program Committee (1) 
Hobbies — Hunting, Fishing 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Lawrence, Mass. 
Goal — ? 
Favorite Expression — "It all depends" 



"Luigie' 



Andover 




STANLEY W. SANSOM 

"Pass the Biscuits Marandy' 

Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 

Hobby — Eating 

Branch of Service — Coast Guard 

Placement Training — Attleboro, Mass. 



'Stan" 



Quincy 





MAURICE W. SCHINDLER 

" You'd be Surprised" 
Food Management 
Football (1,2) — Captain (2) 
Fraternity (1,2) — A. T. G. 
Hobby — Sports 
Branch of Service — Army 
Pet Dislike — Cats 
Goal — Have a new Buick 
Favorite Expression — "What Did I say?' 



"Amby" 

Monponsett 




ROBERT M. SCOTT, JR. 

"How Am I to Know" 
Dairy Manufactures 
Football (1), Track (1), Baseball (2) 
Dairy Club (2) 
Branch of Service — Army 



North Hadley 




RICHARD L. SEDGWICK, JR. 

" A^o More Women" 
Floriculture 

Shorthorn Board (2) — Typist 
Dance Committee (2) 

Horticulture Show (2) — Balcony decorations 
Placement Training — Englemann's, Pittsfield 
Goal — To work for myself 



"Slim' 



Dalton 



NATHAN G. SHERWOOD 

"Dream" 

Vegetable Gardening 

4-H Club (1) 

Hobbies — Radio, Radar 

Branch of Service — Army 

Placement Training — Veg. Acre Farms, Forestdale 

Goal — SCO acres of vegetables 



"Nate" 



Hadley 



THEODORE F. SIGDA 

"This is the Life" 
Floriculture 
Floriculture Club (1,2) 
Horticulture Show (2) 
Hobby — Golf 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Ruanes Flowers, Newton 



"Ted" 



Holyoke 




RALPH E. SMITH "Smitty" 

"When I Lost You" 
Ornamental Horticulture Merrimac 

Horticulture Club (1) 
Hobby — Baseball 

Placement Training — Cherry Hill Nurseries, West Newbury 
Goal — Landscape Work 




ABNER SOLIN 

"Biding my Time" 
Floriculture Holyoke 

Horticulture Show (2) — 10 x 10 exhibit, First pr'ze 
Hobbies — Fishing, Hunting, Skiing, Riding 
Placement Training — Charles Todt, Florist 
Goal — To own a greenhouse 




ROBERT L. SOMERS "Bob" 

"Chickory Chick" 
Poultry West Roxbury 

Poultry Club (1,2) 
Hobby — Hunting 
Branch of Service — Navy 

Placement Training — Spencer Brook Farm, Concord 
Goal — Poultry business 
Favorite Expression — "Egad" 





STANLEY M. SPENCER "Stan" 

"That's For Me" 
Forestry Pepperell 

Class Officer — Vice President (2) 
Hobbies — Fishing, Hunting, Badminton 
Branch of Service — Navy 

Placement Training — Montague State Fish Hatchery 
Goal — Expect to work for Dept. of Conservation 
Favorite Expression — "The road to Hades is paved with 
good intentions." 




EDWIN A. SPRINGER 

"Cow, Cow Boogie" 



Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry Club (2) 

Hobby — Pure bred guernseys 

Branch of Service — Navy 

Placement Training — Pharos Farm, Simsbury, Conn. 

Goal — More experience with guernseys 

Favorite Expression — "He can do it too". 



"Ed" 



E. Walpole 



CHARLES H. STONE 

"When You're Away" 
Animal Husbandry 
Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Hobby — Hunting 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — Bland ford 
Goal ■ — To roam the West 



Worcester 




ALEX W. SZYMANSKI "Siz" 

"In Love' in Vain" 
Animal Husbandry Pittsfield 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Hobby — Driving 

Placement Training — Fairfields Farm, Williamstown 
Pet Dislike — Girls 
Goal — Own a farm 



DAVID H. TAIT "Dave" 

"It's so Peaceful in the Country" 
Dairy Manufactures Shutesbury 

Dairy Club (1,2) — Chairman of program committee 
Hobby — Rural living 
Placement Training — F. B. Mallory, Springfield 




WALTER W. THIEM 

"I'm Unlucky at Gambling" 

Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) — Treasurer (1) 

4-H Club (1) — Radio Committee 

Hobbies — Hunting gun collecting 

Goal — Owner of a Golden Guernsey Farm 

Favorite Expression — "I wouldn't say that" 



"Wally" 



Lawrence 




FREDERICK I. TURNER "Fred" 

"I Wish I Knew" 
Animal Husbandry Great Barrington 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) — Vice President (1) 

4-H Club (1) 

Hobbies — Hunting, Women 

Goal — Do as little as possible and get rich 

Favorite Expression — "It all depends" 




FRANK R. TYLER. JR. 

"The Face on the Barroom Floor" 
Food Management 
Hobby — Bartender 
Placement Training — Orleans 
Pet Dislikes — Convocation 



'Bud' 



Amherst 



If 



m 




GORDON A. WADE "Swifty" 

"The Girl That 1 Marry" 
Horticulture Willimansett 

Horticulture Show (2) — 10 x 10 Exhibit, Clean up committee 
Horticulture Club (1,2) — Treasurer (1) 
Hobby — Hiking 






-'>!>ll^ 



JOHN L. WALLACE 

"Smoke Gels in Your Eyes' 
Floriculture 

Shorthorn (2) Co-Sports-Editor 
Horticulture Show (2) — 10 x 10 Exhibit 
Wesley Foundation (1,2) — Treasurer 
Hobbies — Fishing, Swimming, Skating 



'Johnny' 



North Grafton 




WALTER B WHITE 

"As Time Goes By" 
Dairy Manufactures 
Dairy Club (2) 
Fraternity (1,2) ~ A. T.G. Secretary (2) 



Braintree 




JOHN C. WILHELM "Johnny" 

"A Hunting We will Go" 
Animal Husbandry Mansfield 

Animal Husbandry Club (2) 
Hobby — Hunting 
Placement Training — Canaan, Conn. Aberdeen Angus Farm 



JOSEPH H. WITASZEK "Wit" 

"They Cut Down the Old Pine Tree" 
Forestry West Warren 

Branch of Service — Navy 




DONALD P. YOUNG 

"I'm an Old Cowhand" 
Animal Husbandry 
Football (1,2) 

Animal Husbandry Club (1,2) 
Fraternity (1,2) — A. T. G. Vice-President (2) 
Branch of Service — Navy 
Placement Training — M.S.C. College Farm 
Goal — Farmer 
Favorite Expression — "He can do it too" 



'Don" 



Boylston 




EDWARD J. YOUNG 

"Take me Out to the Ball Game" 

Poultry 

Basketball (1) 

Poultry Club (2) 

Hobby — Sports 

Goal — A self-supporting farm 



"Ed" 



Springfield 




WALLACE E. YOUNG "Wally" 

"Winter Wonderland" 
Food Management Rutland, Vermont 

Hobby — Skiing 
Branch of Service — Army 
Placement Training — Williams Inn, Williamstown 





^ 



.J'£. 



TOAST TO A SENIOR 



Let's rise and drink a toast, my boys, 
A toast to school, to college joys; 

To life, its loves, its happiness. 
To you, to me, to our success. 

Oh, tip the brimming goblet high, 

For from its nectar, your troubles fly; 

Drink to nature, that wondrous dame, 
To Father Time, we'll do the same. 

Then drink to all the ladies fair, 

With painted lips and hena'd hair; 

And let the thunderous echoes fall 
Upon yon hill and garden wall. 

Drink the toast to elate the senses, 

Kick out traces from unfriendly fences; 
Arm in arm, we'll serenade 

'Till morning lifts the darkness shade. 

Drink once more, while we're together. 
To future years and fairer weather; 

Then here's a toast to Stockbridge days 

Enshrined in our heart and mind — always. 



— Peter Pfeifler 





1st Row — Benson, Bastian, Garrett, Martin, Goldstein, Tait. 

2nd Row — Rouleau, Menard, Roszko, Bemis, Kristof, McGoldrick, Anderson. 



STOSAG 



Stockbridge School of Agriculture 
Honorary Scholastic Society 

For the eighth year, the editors of the Shorthorn are pleased to pay tribute to those students 
of the graduating class who, by virtue of their outstanding scholastic records have won for 
themselves places on the scroll of our honorary scholastic society, Stosag. 

To become a member of Stosag, an average of 85 or better for the first three semesters 
with no mark below 70, is required. 



This year's members are as follows: 

Stanley Warner Sansom 
David Hunter Tait 
Frederick George Bastian 
Albert Gerald Rouleau 
William Edwin Benson 
Burton Richard Anderson 
Const-antine Anthony Roszko 
Robert Philip McGoldrick, Jr. 
Leon Joseph Menard, Jr. 
Cynthia Ann Foote 
Roy Irving Martin 
Nellie Elvira Garrett 
Sanford Theodore Goldstein 
Stephen David Kristof 
Richard Whittemore Bemis 



Quincy 

Palmer 

North Andover 

Lancaster 

Lynn 

Wellesley 

Worcester 

Worcester 

Fall River 

Winchester 

Mansfield 

West Springfield 

New Bedford 

East Longmeadow 

Spencer 



Animal Husbandry 

Dairy Manufactures 

Dairy Manufactures 

Floriculture 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Poultry Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Dairy Manufactures 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Ornamental Horticulture 



AS OF THE CLASS OF 1943 



Alain Wiener deLeiris 
Gilles Wiener deLeiris 



Cambridge 
Cambridge 



Poultry Husbandry 
Animal Husbandry 




1st Row — Prof. Cowan, Prof. Foley, Hargreaves, Foote, Haynes, Springer, Prof. Hale. 
2nd Row — Lucey, Collingwood, Denison, Ives, Stone, Holm. 
3rd Row — Clark, Damon, Dodge, W. Pearson, D. Young, Bateman. 

4th Row — Sansom, Dexter, B. Keyes, Szymanski, Thiem, Love, Wilhelm, Jiamilton, Lee, 
Turner. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

1st Row — Scott, Tait, Berthel, Goldstein, Bastian. 

2nd Row — Prof. Nelson, White, Cummings, Garland, LaSalle, Huston. 

3rd Row — Prof. Lindquist, O'Brien, Geoghegan. 

4th Row — Mr. Canavan, Sanborn, E. Pearson, Prof. Frandsen. 





^ 4r 'J 




1st Row — Grant, Carter, Allen, Holden, Menard. 

2nd Row — E. Young, Crudden, Johnson, Holmes, Somers. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



FORESTRY 



1st Row — Ellsworth, Pelosky, Pickard, Hayward, Witaszek. 

2nd Row — O'Connell, Ott, Peckham, Spencer, Ahern, Lampro, Fox. 

3rd Row — Professors Rich, Holdsworth, Rhodes. 





Good, Sherwood, Prof. Tuttle, Graves. 

COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE GROWING 



FLORICULTURE 



1st Row — Walker, Bissonnette, Grigonis, Foote, Garrett, Hamilton, DeUa-Torre. 
2nd Row — Wallace, Kharibian, Anderson, Rouleau, Sigda. 
3rd Row — Sedgwick, Patrissi, Solin, R. Keyes, 
4th Row — McGoldrick, Prof. Thayer, Dixon. 





W. Young, Amell, Clark, Schindler, Clapp. 



FOOD MANAGEMENT 
FRUIT GROWING 



Dunlavey, Sarri, Greaney. 





1st Row — Wade, Benson, Martin, Prof. Blundell. 
2nd Row — Bemis, Capstick, Roszko, Kristof. 

ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 
STOCKBRIDGE DAYS 

(To: Light Triumphant) 
As Stockbridge sons we pledge our hearts 

To her forevermore; 
And hope Ufe's ideals cherished here 

Will follow us through every year. 

Those loyal "profs" whose days are spent 

In teaching with such zeal; 
Will e're be found deep in our hearts 

And blessed with mem'ry's seal. 

These Stockbridge days, such happy days at school 
Joy and pleasures, countless to be told; 

Days whose treasures never will grow old. 

When we must part, with sadness in our heart 

We'll pledge to thee our loyalty. 
From us it will ne'er depart. 

We've gained a learned mind. 

From all the teachers in her fold; 
Who helped us in obtaining 

All the ideals we now hold; 
We have the fondest of memories 

Of all the friends we've made while here; 
Friends we'll always honor 

When we meet again some distant year. 

Peter Pfeiffer, 1948 



FRESHMAN CLASS HISTORY 



Registration day, October 1, 1946, found Memorial Hall crowded with the largest freshman 
class ever to enter Stockbridge School of Agriculture. A predominately veteran class gave 
promise, at this early hour, to be one of the most progressive, loyal, and hardworking classes 
in the history of the school 

At this time, it was noted that groups of timid seniors were already in debate over the 
question of having a freshmen class twice their number. 

Our first social event was a colorful extravaganza in the form of the freshman reception, 
sponsored by the wealthy senior class. 

A heartening number of freshmen turned out for football in the fall. Although a not too 
successful season was experienced, we have their promise for a larger, more experienced team 
in column for 1947. 

Because of lack of organization, .we were forced to continue with temporary officers until 
February, when a class meeting was held. After a whirlwind campaign and election, class 
officers were elected as follows; Reuben Lebeaux, President; Donal Hennessy, Vice-president; 
Pauline Baker, Secretary; Gerard Beaulieu, Treasurer; Louis Benotti, William Burford, 
David Eldridge, and Anthony Fiorini, Student Council. 

It was at the first meeting that our class realized the dynamic personality and adminis- 
trative genius of our new president. His promise is that next year's freshman class will be 
guided out of the administrative fog before February. 

Out of the peacetime rehabilitation period of Stockbridge have come many new and reborn 
activities. The most noteworthy of these has been the organization of the Stockbridge 
Glee Club by Professor T. F. Mathieu. The students were pleasantly surprised with a 
Christmas concert by the new glee club and are looking forward to future appearances of 
this talented organization. 

Both Stockbridge fraternities were activated in February. Kappa Kappa and Alpha Tau 
Gamma expect to be back to normal before we leave on placement and be able to present 
active fraternities in the fall. 

Before us is a span of six months of training in our chosen fields. We hope and expect to 
return in the fall to carry on and surpass the work of previous classes. 

Daniel Towse 




Beaulieu, Treasurer; Miss Baker, Secretary; Lebeaux, President. 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 



FRESHMAN CLASS 





1st Row— Snow, G. Ross, Chase, Grandy, J. Ross, Prof. Foley, Temple, C. Smith, E. Smith, 

Curley. 
2nd Row— M. Smith, Watson, Lord, Clark, Rinehart, Wilson, Steenburn, Holdman, Schlicke, 

Anderson, Pease. 
3rd Row — Donovan, Black, Flint, Steins, Grimes, Bower, Ellsworth, Comaskey, Mitchell, 

Crawford, Lawrence. 
4th Row— Miller, Simpson, McGovern, Young, Scott, Tryon, Belden, C. Hall, Arnold, 

Suriner,. Jewett, L. Hall, Chapin, Delano, Crittendon. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
DAIRY MANUFACTURING 

1st Row — Curley, Postizzi, Atkinson, Bishop, Hamilton. 

2nd Row — Lukens, Sjolander, Adamo, Fuller, Anthony, Thompson. 

3rd Row — Desmond, Crane, Voughn, Glazier, Tripp. 

4th Row — Prof. Lindquist, Bacon, Flood, Heustis, Lurvey, Pratt, McManus. 





1st Row — Adriance, Colella, Elliot, Ferzoco, Black, Carlson, Simon. 

2nd Row — Lindquist, Barbas, Sarkisian, Gold, Childs, Chisholm, Mangan, French, J. Smith, 

Greenleaf. 
3rd Row — Ernst, Guidaboni, Reid, Wm. Smith, Johnson, Towle, Best. 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY 



ARBORICULTURE 



1st Row — Craffey, Corbut, Towse, Cauley, Davis, Mathieu. 
2nd Row — Chase, MacGray, Ziemba, Pae, Gagnier. 











M»«l«l«Mi«!!5 




Griffin, Leonard, Harnoise, Brown. 



COMMERCIAL VEGETABLE GROWING 



FINE TURF MAINTENANCE 

1st Row — O'Leary, Sullivan, Edwards, Smith, Rohan. 
2nd Row — Boyle, Thomas, Murphy, Sellers. 





1st Row — Nicholson, Torcoletti, Beaulien, Moore, Merlini, Stibolt. 

2nd Row — Martin, Bergstrom, Baker, Sullivan, Durant, Wentworth, Ahearn, Knowles, 

Dickson, Czelusniak, Shanley, Perkins. 
3rd Row — Prof. Thayer, Prof. Cornell, Crompton, Wilbur, Davern, Wilson, Dole, Flynn, 

Mr. Ross, Prof. Hubbard, Gillon. 



FLORICULTURE 



FOOD MANAGEMENT 



1st Row — Quinn, Burnette, Graveline, Rizos. 

2nd Row — Fellers, Hoftyzer, Maloney, Pfeiffer, Brown. 





1st Row — Leppaniemi, Eldredge, Poole, Glazier, Markey. 
2nd Row — Wass, Clark, Knaust, Niinimaki, MacDonough. 



FRUIT GROWING 



ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE 



1st Row — Seely, Thurston, Allen, Fiorini, DiCarlo, Lebeaux, Bowles, Cover. 
2nd Row — Thurston, Midgley, Billings, Cody, Upham, Burford. 
3rd Row — Desjarlais, Kristof, Carlson, Spencer, Enson, Rouleau. 





COACH 
LORIN E. BALL 



Coach Ball was a graduate of Massachusetts State College in the class of 1921. While 
in college he was outstanding as an athlete, a member of the varsity baseball and basket- 
ball teams, receiving a letter in each. He served as coach of the varsity hockey team after 
graduating. He served as assistant coach until, in 1924, he succeeded Mr. Emory E. Grayson 
as coach of Stockbridge sports. 

In the fall of 1945, Mr. Ball and Mr. Eck coached State's football squad which consisted 
of both State and Stockbridge members. 

The fall of 1946, Coach Ball resumed his duties with the Stockbridge team. Although 
the football team did not win any games, it showed considerable improvement in every 
game. This improvement can be credited to Coach Ball's thoroughness in the fundamentals 
of practice. Since many members of the team were veterans and had been absent from 
football for as many as four or five years, and other players were inexperienced in football, 
is further proof that Mr. Ball did an excellent job in training. Many members of this year's 
team, as they will have had considerable experience behind them. 

Mr. Alden Tuttle, a member of the faculty, gave his time as he has done for years past. 
Howard Rudge, a graduate student, also assisted Coach Ball. Both men deserved to be 
mentioned because of the good work they did. 





^ 







1st Row — Adams, Amell, Young, Schindler, Pickard, Peloskv, Denison. 

2nd Row — Coach Ball; Allen, Atkinson, Torcoletti, Crichton, Curley, Nicholson, Rudge, 

assistant coach. 
3rd Row — Chase, Lebeaux, Plante, Niinimaki, Fiorini, Bowles, Zalenski. 
4th Row — Tuttle, asst. coach; Smith, Beaulieu, Black, Prof. Hicks, Pease, Davis, Comaskey, 

Schlicke, manager. 



FOOTBALL 



The Stockbridge football team ended the 194b season with a record of six losses and no 
wins. The majority of the games were decided by a single touchdown. 

Stockbridge, 0; Mass. Maritime Academy, 27. 
In the first game of the season for Stockbridge, they ran up against a strong Mass. Maritime 
Academy team and lost by a score of 27-0. The game was played at Hyannis on October 12. 

The Maritime Academy team scored two touchdowns in the second period and two in 
the third. They added three out of their four tries for placement to make the score, 27-0. 

Stockbridge, 0; Nichols, 12. 
The Stockbridge football team sustained its second loss of the year on Friday, October 18, 
at the hands of the Nichols Junior College eleven by a score of 12-0. The game was 
played on Alumni Field in a heavy downpour of rain. 

Stockbridge battled on even terms all through the first half with neither team able to 
gain consistently. When the timekeeper's whistle blew to end the first half, the score was 
tied at 0-0. 

Nichols scored early in the second half on a sweep around right end. The try for the point 
after was blocked so the score stood 6-0 as the third period ended. The final tally came 
on a long pass to the Nichols left end. The kick was missed, so the game ended in a 12-0 
victory for Nichols. 

Adamo and Allen stood out on the offensive, while Young, Schindler, Torcoletti, and 
Pilosky were the best on the defensive. Torcoletti did a good job on the punting. 

Stockbridge, 0; New York Aggies, 3. 
The Stockbridge varsity football team went to Farmingdale, Long Island, on October 26, 
where it suffered its third defeat of the year at the hands of the New York State Agricultural 
School. A 35-yard field goal by the Aggies accounted for the only score made in the game. 

Stockbridge outrushed their opponents throughout the game but neither team was able 
to gain consistently enough to score via the touchdown route. The longest gain of the game 
came on a 20-yard pass from Cimaskey to Adamo which started a drive that carried deep 
into the Aggies' territory. Stockbridge, however, was unable to get the ball over. Stock- 
bridge was hampered by injuries to Pickard and Adamo in the second half. Chase was back 
in the lineup after being injured in the first game of the year. 

The defensive line play was excellent while the backfield defense showed improvement 
over the earlier games. Torcoletti, Schinder, and Young were again the bulwarks of the 
line, while Allen and Adamo carried most of the offensive punch. 





'^.Sf?^-«r 



Stockbridge, 6; Vermont Academy, 14. 
The Stockbridge Varsity football team lost a close, well-played game to Vermont Academy, 
14-6, on November 2. 

The teams battled on even terms most of the way with Vermont taking advantage of a 
blocked kick to score its first touchdown. The place kick was good, making the score 7-0. 

Stockbridge recovered a fumble in the first period to pave the way for its only score of 
the year. On the first play after the fumble, Allen carried the ball from the 35 to the 
1-yard line. On the next play he went over for the score. The try for pomt after was blocked. 

After the other Vermont score, Stockbridge put on a drive but lost the ball deep in 
Vermont territory. 

Torcoletti, Schindler, Pilosky, Bowles, and Young stood out in the line while Allen and 
"Hot Rock" Atkinson provided the best offense. 

Stockbridge, 0; Springfield "B", 6. 
The Springfield College "B" eleven handed Stockbridge its fifth straight loss by a score of 
6-0. The game was played November 8, on Alumni Field, following a steady rain that 
made the ground wet and the ball slippery. 

Finding that it could get nowhere through the Stockbridge line, the Springfield College 
team took the air to score the only touchdown made in the game. The try for point after 
was wide. Stockbridge threatened when Atkinson and Allen took turns and carried the ball 
down to the 1-yard line. 

The whole center of the line, Schindler, Torcoletti, Piloski, Young, and Lebeau played 
an excellent game. 

Stockbridge, 0; Williams, J. V., 6. 
The Williams College J.V. team made it six straight losses for Stockbridge in a game played 
on Alumni Field on November 16. The game was even all the way with Williams finally 
coming through with a hard fought 6-0 victory. 

The only score of the game was made on a 50-yard off-tackle smash. Several players 
had chances at the ball carrier but missed. The try for point after was blocked. 

Schindler, Torcoletti, Young, and Lebeau played their usual good game. 




1st Row— Atkinson, Wass; Black, Leppaniemi, Captain; Niinimaki, Scott, Arnold. 
2nd Row — Coach Ball, Prof. Hicks, LaSalle, Manager; Anderson, Boyle, Belding, 
Manager; Stead, Asst. Coach; Rudge, Asst. Coach. 



Asst. 



BASKETBALL 



The Stockbridge basketball season turned out better than the football season but not 
much better. The season ended with three games won and ten lost. 

The season got under way on the right foot with a 52-35 win over North Adams State 
Teachers College. The teams played on even terms all through the first half, and then 
Stockbridge started hitting, and they ran away with the game. Kristoff was high scorer for 
the game with 14 points, while Black and Leppaniemi starred defensively. 

In the next game they ran up against a strong Williston team and went down to defeat by 
a score of 57-22. The Williston team was too fast and held control of the game all the way. 

Stockbridge met up with a much too formidible opponent in the next game. This time it 
was Vermont Academy, winning by a score of 64-27. Holbrook and Staples, both of Vermont 
Academy, scored 22 and 18 points respectively, while Kristoff, with 12 points, was the only 
offense showed by Stockbridge. 

Nichols Junior College put on a last period spurt to take the measure of Stockbridge by 
a score of 51-40. Kristoff again led the scoring with 16 points, while Black, Wass, and 
Leppaniemi, who scored 11 points, played a good defensive game. 

Stockbridge finally got back in the winning column when they took the Rutland State 
Teachers College team into camp by a score of 37-35. The game was close all of the way. 
Kristoff, with 18 points, led the Stockbridge scoring, while Leppaniemi, Wass, and Black 
played a good defensive game. 



On February 8, Mt. Hermon beat Stockbridge 47-40 in a hard fought game. Hall of Mt. 
Hermon went on a scoring spree in the last period that decided the game. Scott with 16 
points and Leppaniemi with 11 points starred for Stockbridge. 

Stockbridge then lost two more in a row to the Mass. Maritime Academy by a score of 
41-35 and Springfield Tech, 56-29. 

The next game proved to be the best of the season. In this game Stockbridge edged 
Wentworth Institute, 51-50, in a game that saw the lead see-sawing back and forth all the 
way through. Leppaniemi, with 21 points, was the big gun for Stockbridge. 

Stockbridge then lost the remaining four games on its schedule. It lost to Rutland, 36-26; 
Collegiate Prep., 39-27; Nichols, 58-35; and Vermont Academy, 60-24. 





1st Row — Denison, Patrissi, Bastian, "Pop" Barrett, Dixon, Love, Pearson. 

2nd Row — Heustis, Grigonis, Garrett, Cummings, Hamilton, Bissonnette, Wallace 

3rd Row — Good, Bemis, Hamilton, LaSalle, Flood. 



SHORTHORN BOARD 



Editor-in-Chief 

Business Manager 

Associate Editor 

Assistant Editors 

Assistant Business Manager 

Secretary 

Sports Editors 

Art Editors 

Literary Editor 

Activities 

Statistics 

Typist 

Faculty Write-ups 

Faculty Adviser 



Frederick G. Bastian 

David G. Dixon 

Philip N. Good 

Richard M. Love, John W. Denison 

Richard T. Flood 

Gurna C. Cummings 

James H. LaSalle, Jr., John L. Wallace 

Thomas W. Ridgway, Vito Patrissi 

Anne M. Grigonis 

Richard W. Bemis 

Patricia Hamilton, Robert C. Heustis 

Nellie R. Garrett 

John S. Hamilton, Robert C. Heustis 

Rollin H. Barrett 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 

The Freshman reception was held by the seniors for the members of the entering class, 
November 20, 1946, at Drill Hall, with music by the Corliss Orchestra of Springfield. Th''i 
tradition of the school was resurrected under great difficulty by an active and spirited grjup. 
The committee's chairman was Roy Martin, with Robert Healy and Philip Good serving 
as co-chairmen. Through their efforts the semi-formal dance was a success for those who 
were able to attend. 

The decorations of various palms and pot plants were provided by the Floriculture majors. 

Sandwiches and cokes constituted the refreshments which were pleasantly enjoyed by all. 

In spite of the lack of interest on the part of the students, and difficulty in re-establishing 
an old custom, the dance committee proved that through hard work such a dance can be 
a success. 

It is hoped that this pioneering will result in a more glamorous and gayer event next year. 




MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
VETERANS ASSOCIATION 



The veterans' needs are slightly different than those of the average student. It is the 
purpose of this association to help veterans obtain all possible assistance under the G. I. 
Bill and all other veterans' legislation, and to be of assistance to each other in all problems 
common to the veterans attending this college. 

I Michael A. Simon, Commander 




THE HORTICULTURAL SHOW 



Much of the Stockbridge School spirit appeared in full glory at the 1946 Horticulture 
Show with hard working groups of students scattered over the various projects making 
rapid progress. 

The Arboriculture class displayed its abilities by creating a red pine screening and natu- 
ralistic planting around the outer perimeter of the cage. Their display of tools, giving the 
effect of being ready to to to work, caught a great deal of attention. 

The Pomology group worked hard at their attractive fruit booth; as did the Oelericulture 
students, assisting on "Grandfather's Cellar" which certainly was an outstanding feature 
of the show. The Forestry majors had a very interesting corner depicting the use of our 
commercial wood products. 

If I were to recommend something for the appetite, it would be "The Turkey Dinner" 
with all the fixings which was expertly done by the Food Management department. (I 
wonder what ever did happen to that beautiful turkey.) 

The spirit of competition entered strongly into the 10' x 10' student exhibits with seven 
out of ten being credited to Stockbridge. They included such themes as: "Stockbridge Golf 
Course," "Desert Dusk," "Home," "Inspiration Walk," "A Garden Terrace", and others. 

Stockbridge could surely hold their heads high for the outstanding part they played in 
making this show a great success. 



THE HORTICULTURE CLUB 



The Horticulture Club was newly organized in November, 1945 after being inactive since 
1942. It elected officers as follows: 

President: Roy Martin 

Vice President : Robert Healey 
Secretary: Anne Gregonis 

Treasurer: Gordon Wade 

It was decided that meetings were to be held on the second and fourth Tuesdays of every 
month. 

Activities of the year included bowling, dances and a hay ride. The last meeting was held 
with Homer Dodge representing the Landscape Service of the New England Nursery 
Association. 

The first meeting of the Horticulture Club this year was held October 22, 1946 with the 
election of the following officers: 

President: Roy Martin 

Vice President: Mario Di Carlo 
Secretary: Elsie Bissonnette 

Treasurer: Connie Roscoe 

Several meetings have been held up to the present time with interesting programs. 



THE CAMPUS 4-H CLUB 



The Campus Club experienced a very successful year beginning in 1945. Several dances, 
a sleigh ride, and the book sale constituted the larger events. This year the first meeting 
was held in October with a successful get-acquainted period and with Professor R. H. Barrett 
showing his films of campus activities. Again the club's sale of used text books this year 
was a great success with bigger plans for next year. A dance was held in the drill hall in 
November, this was one of the club's larger activities of the fall. Meetings are held monthly 
with very interesting programs open to all. 



THE GLEE CLUB 



The newly organized glee club, under the able direction of Professor Mathieu, has ex- 
perienced a very successful first season. Its eighteen members have not only found great 
enjoyment for themselves, but have provided pleasant listening to those who were able to 
hear their Christmas recital at Convocation. The organization's main purpose is to give 
harmony work and an appreciation of the light classics to its volunteer members. 

Rehearsals are held every Wednesday night. They are now working on such selections 
as "The Winter Song", "One Alone", and "The Wiffenpoof." This charter organization, 
consisting mostly of freshmen, will be the nucleus of a bigger and better choral group for 
next year. 

The officers of the club are: 

President: Joseph SuUivan 

Vice President: Louis Durant 



VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES 




DAIRY CLUB 



The Dairy Club was fortunate to have some very good speakers to entertain and to 
enlighten the future dairy men. Many of them talked on ice cream work in general; some 
talked on advertising. 

Doctor D. H. Nelson, "Employer and Employee Relationship." 

Mr. E. C. Greiner, Vice President of N. W. Ayre, "Advertising". 

Director Sievers of the Experiment Station, "Reconversion — Problems of the Dairy 
Industry." 

The above was one program for the year 1945-1946 and it was well enjoyed by every 
member. 

This year we are trying to get a bigger and better program for the Stockbridge School 
and the four year school. So far we have had very interesting talks and movies. 
Professor RoUin H. Barrett, movies on "Ecuador." 

Doctor O'Connell of Springfield gave a talk on "Work of a Milk Inspector." 
Doctor H. N. Click, "Psychology and Human Interest Values in Salesmanship." 



THE FLORICULTURE CLUB 



After a lapse of four years, the floriculture majors and other interested students were 
called together on December 11, 1946, to reorganize the long standing Floriculture Club 
into a working organization. The spirit and enthusiasm displayed by all present gave the 
club a good start toward a bright future. 

Guiding the club in his official capacity as President was Robert E. Bertram, with 
George E. Yetman as Vice President, Lillian Buczoki as Secretary, and Frank L. Howard 
as Treasurer. The program committee for the club was Edward J. Czelusniak, Chairman; 
Barbara Lee and Donald O. Shanley. Professor C. L. Thayer was chosen advisor of the club. 

At the first meeting of the club it was unanimously voted that Article III of the consti- 
tution be changed to read — "Membership is open to all students interested in Floriculture." 

The second meeting was held on January 21, 1947. At this time one of our own members, 
Robert Bertrum, gave an illustrated lecture, using kodachrome slides of his experiments 
in hydroponics. He also had many slides of the native flora of Hawaii. 

February 11 brought together a large group. The meeting was combined with the Holyoke 
and Northampton Florists and Gardeners Club on the occasion of its Annual Carnation 
Night. Exhibits were judged by members of the student club. 

Future plans call for monthly meetings of the club with interesting programs planned. 



THE ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 
CLUB 

The Animal Husbandry Club has completed a very active year boasting a record member- 
ship of 130 members representing both State and Stockbridge. The officers, who did a fine 
job of leading the, organization, were as follows: 

Dick Norton '48 - President 
Harry Bateman S'47 - Vice President 
Ben Keyes S'47 - Secretary 
John Schulze '48 - Treasurer 

The most noted of their achievements this season was the sponsoring of the "Little 
International Livestock Show" which received many fine compliments. 

Programs included interesting movies and several excellent speakers including Mr. Vernon 
Mudgett of Sterling who spoke on "The Problems of a Farm Owner." At another meeting 
the group was honored with a talk by Doctor John Malnati on "Sterility of Dairy Cattle." 
The members had one evening for demonstration and instruction on artificial insemination 
of dairy cattle. This was given by Mr. Stanley Gaunt who is Extension Dairyman at State 
College. 

A fine program is in the making for next year with a Harvest Dance in the fall to open 
the season. 



MABLE 



Mable is the beauty 

Of the early morning sun; 
Of all the lovely color 

At dusk, when day is done. 

Mable is the music 

Of the softly falling rain; 
Mable is the only one 

Who solaces my pain. 

Mable is my wondrous pal 

Who listens to my woes; 
And when some help I'm seeking 

It's Mable who knows. 

Yes she's nice because she's quiet 

As a wife she'd be a wow; 
It surely is a pity boys 
That Mable is a cow. 

To An. Hus. Students of '48. 
Peter Pfeiffer, 1948 



POULTRY CLUB 



The very active and spirited Poultry Club has completed a very successful year boast- 
ing of the largest membership of all the major clubs connected with Stockbridge. This 
year they had a membership of 60, an increase over last year of 47 members. Through 
their interesting programs presented at each meeting they drew much interest from all 
over the campus. 

Their programs included such speakers as follows: Dr. Gilbert Woodside of the Zoology 
Department; Dr. Henry Van Roekel of the Veterinary Science Department; Professor 
Rollin H. Barrett of the Agricultural Economics and Farm Management Department who 
showed a sound movie on the Atomic Bomb entitled "Operations Crossroads". All con- 
tributed to very fine programs. 

The club was headed by Baxter S. Allen. President; Gerald Derosier, Vice President; 
Virginia Bennett, Secretary and Charles Reed, Treasurer. 

Much credit is also due to the faculty of the Poultry Department who gave considerable 
time toward the Club's interest. 

The year closed with a very excellent banquet at the Drake Hotel. The speaker for the 
evening was Mr. Cleveland Gilcreast from the H. P. Hood Company who gave an interesting 
talk on "Marketing." 

The club is a member of the National Association of Poultry Science Clubs. 



COLLEGIAN REPORTERS 



Lasalle, Dixon, W. Pearson. 




1st Row — Voughn, Atkinson. Amell, Somers, Smith, Prof. Roberts. 

2nd Row- — Beaulieu, Schlicke, Desjarlais, Flint, Fuller, Ernst. 

3rd Row — Towse, Curley, Arnold, Anthony, Delano, Ensom, Benscm. 



KOLONY KLUB 



The Kolony Klub was organized in 1919 and has grown steadily. This year we had our 
annual smoker again as a function for the reorganization of the house. Many freshmen and 
a few seniors were pledged. We are looking forward to a big year in 1948. 

The members are: 



John S Adamo 
John Arnold 
Robert Anderson 
R. L. Atkinson 
Carl Bergstrom 
Paul Colella 
James D. Curley 
William Crompton 
Alexander Crichton 
Philip Delano 
Frank Desjarlais 
Guerdon Davis 
Philip Ernst 
John Elliot 



William Ensom 
Robert Fuller 
David Fenzoco 
Edmund McNulty 
Richard Markey 
James Postizzi 
William Smith 
Robert Schlicke 
Daniel Towse 
Joseph Vaughn 
Louis Amell 
Robert Somers 
William Benson 




1st Row — Fiorini, Tostizzi, Allen, Edwards, "Pop" Barrett, Schlinder, B. Keyes, P. Young, 

White, Springer. 
2nd Row — Good, Nicholson, Griffin, Ezekiel, Knowles, Pickard, DiFazio, Spencer, Wm. 

Pearson. 
3rd Row — Wallace, Lebeaux, DiCarlo, Temple, Tryon, Curley, Moore, Ziemba, Menard, W. 

Young. 
4th Row — Hargreaves, McGoldrick, Donovan, Denison, Stibolt, Holmes, Mitchell, Shanley, 

Merlini, Lee, Witaszek. 
5th Row — Roszko, Eldredge, Bowles, LaSalle, Mangan, Love, Pfeiffer, Hamilton. 



ALPHA TAU GAMMA 



President 
Vice President 
Treasurer 
Secretary 
House Manager 
Historian 
Sergeant at Arms 



1947 

Benjamin S. Keyes, Jr. 
Donald P. Young 
Maurice W. Schindler 
Walter B. White 
Lloyd A. Pickard 



1948 

Fred F. Griffin 
David W. Eldredge 
Donald L. Bowles 
Vincent J. DiFazio 
Malcolm M. Nicholson 
Donald O. Shanley 
Anthony T. Firoini 



MEMBERS 



Class 1947 

Benjamin S. Keyes, Jr. 
Donald P. Young 
Maurice W. Schindler 
Walter B. White 
William R. Hargreaves 
Edwin A. Springer 
Lloyd A. Pickard 
Robert S. Ellsworth 
Claremont Holmes 
Wallace E. Young 
John S. Hamilton 
Edwin F. Pelosky 
William H. Pearson 
Joseph H. Witaszek 
John Denison 
James H. LaSalle, Jr. 
Phihp N. Good 
Stanley M. Spencer 
Richard M. Love 
Warner R. Otto 
John L. Wallace 
Constantine A. Roszko 
Robert P. McGoldrick 



Class 1948 

Vincent J. DiFazio 
Charles P. Ziemba 
Kenneth D. LeBeau 
Reuben E. Lebeaux 
Malcolm M. Nicholson 
Anthony T. Fiorini 
Donald O. Shanley 
Donald L. Bowles 
Jemes C. Allen 
Urban T. Donovan 
Mario DiCarlo 
Robert W. Curley 
James J. Postizzi 
David W. Eldredge 
Aarne M. Leppaniemi 
Eino E. Niinimaki 
Richard D. Tryon 
James G. Temple 
Charles D. Reid 
Fred F. Griffin 



SEVENTH LITTLE INTERNATIONAL 
LIVE STOCK SHOW 



The Animal Husbandry Club presented its Seventh Little International Livestock Show, 
March, 14 and 15 at Grinnell Arena. Both the four year and Stockbridge students partici- 
pated. Hank Ritter, the show manager, was ably assisted by the show committee in making 
the show a complete success. 

A judging contest was staged Friday afternoon in which 65 students judged 8 classes of 
livestock. The following are the ten students who placed the highest in the judging contest: 



1. 


Kip Waugh 


6. 


Helen Sellew 


2. 


Fred Turner 


7. 


Lee Estes 


3. 


George Clark 


8. 


Chester Damon 


4. 


John Wilhelm 


9. 


Lois Rinehart 


5. 


Frank Clark 


10. 


Arthur Dexter 



The fitting and showing contest on Saturday afternoon completed many weeks of back- 
breaking work and patience on the part of the students who participated in the show in the 
various events. 

The show consisted of the showing of sheep, swine, horses and beef cattle. The judges 
for the show were Professor L. V. Tirrell of the University of New Hampshire for horses 
and beef. Professor F. C. Daugherty of the University of Connecticut judged swine and 
sheep. The results were as follows: 

Swine Sheep 



1. 


Harry Bateman 


1. 


Cynthia Foote 


2. 


Fred Turner 


2. 


Harry Holm 


3. 


Robert Lucey 


3. 


William Pearson 


4. 


Stanley Sansom 


4. 


Lee Estes 


Horses 


Beef 




1. 


Howard Stowe 


1. 


Charles Stone 


2. 


Jack Kosciousko 


2. 


John Wilhelm 


3. 


Honora Haynes 


3. 


Roger Ives 


4. 


Benjamin S. Keyes, Jr. 


4. 


Donald Young 


5. 


Frank Clark 


5. 


Herbert Dodge 



The program was augmented by a riding horse demonstration and a horse pulling contest. 



A feature attraction was the co-ed milking contest which caused much hilarity among the 
spectators which resulted in three nervous Guernsey Cows. The Golden Guernsey cream 
pitcher was won by Barbara Lee who filled a test tube in a record of 21 seconds. 

The main event was The Premier Showmanship contest. The four first place winners, 
Cynthia Foot, Harry Bateman, Howard Stowe and Charles Stone demonstrated their skills 
in showing swine, sheep, horses and beef cattle. 

The coveted Ensminger Trophy for the Premier Showman was won by Harry Bateman, 
S.S.A. '47 in a close contest. 




THE BELL 



It rings when we're starting 

It rings wlien we're through; 

It just keeps on ringing 

The whole day through. 

It rings at days end, 

It rings loud each morning; 
It rings when expected 

It rings without warning. 

It rings for assembly 

For fire drills too; 
It rings just for fun, 

It drives me cuckoo. 

The Bell of Old Stockbridge 

It's like a swing song. 
Though I'll leave it shortly 

I'll remember it long. 

Peter Pfeiffer, 1948 



MEMORIES 
OF 
STOCKBRIDGE 



(To: N. Y. U's Palisades) 
When evening shadows come astealing 

And breezes ripple in the dell; 
Our footsteps lead us from old Stockbridge 

And her halls we've come to know so well. 

Her campus painted with the twilight, 

Her elms so stately and so cool; 
Will forever be. a kind reminder 

Of our Stockbridge days at school. 

Peter Pfeiffer, 1948 



HUGH P. BAKER 



' I *HE history of a College is largely an account of the achievements of the men who 
administer it. Now as Dr. Baker is about to retire after fourteen years as President 
of the College, it is inspiring to review the events of this signilxant era and the qualities 
of the man who guided them. 

He came to office in that depressing year of 1933 and practically his entire administration 
has been against a background of economic depression and world war. However, his aggres- 
sive leadership and administrative genius has so guided the development of the College 
during these difficult years that its facilities and services have nearly doubled and yet its 
tradition of high academic standards and sound growth has been maintained. 

If we look back upon the College as President Baker found it in 1933, we find one of 
1,200 students, a plant valued at $3,200,000 and an annual budget of $1,168,000. Today 
the same view shows a student enrollment of 2,000, a plant valued at $5,500,000 and an 
annual budget of $2,698,000. The growth of the College represented by this appraisal is 
an indication of the increased demand for the services of the College by the citizens of the 
State and the steps taken by the administration to meet those demands. However, the 
provision of needed facilities did not follow automatically the demand for service. A great 
deal of careful planning and aggressive effort was required and this was chiefly and skill- 
fully supplied by the President. 

When the depression years of the mid-thirties brought forth their various federal work 
programs such as the CWA and the PWA, he was quick to take advantage of the oppor- 
tunities which they offered for the development of the College. As a result, the Old Stock- 
bridge House, then in shameful disrepair, was rebuilt as our comfortable Faculty Club. 
South College was reconstructed from part dormitory and part inconvenient office space to 
an effective administration building. The Old Chapel was given a new and remodeled 
interior to become our liberal arts building. 

Not only did the President secure these benefits of reconstruction, but by his aggressive 
effort he brought about also the construction of two splendid new buildings through the 
cooperation of State and Federal Public Works Agencies. These we now know as Goodell 
Library and Thatcher Dormitory. 

When the need for dormitories appeared to be a primary obstacle to further develop- 
ment, the self-liquidating plan was conceived, trustee and legislative authority secured and 
sponsorship undertaken by an able committee of the alumni. Under this program, more 
than a million dollars has been invested in campus housing. We have four splendid build- 
ings and the way is planned for others. 

The extensive and effective service of the College in the war through the Army Training 
Programs, and a variety of emergency programs for food production and service to agri- 
culture is another mark of foresighted and able leadership. There are other similar indicators 
in the transition of the college from its war to peacetime service in which such extensive 
provisions and broad plans have been made particularly for the important and pressing 
educational needs of our war veterans. 

Physical facilities and program plans are by no means the only concern of the President. 
The main job is the education of people and in this task the maintenance of understanding 
and cooperative relationship with students, faculty, trustees, alumni, state officials and 
the general public is very important. Here, also. President Baker has been unusually success- 
ful, often under trying circumstances. For example, during the mid-thirties when the 
stringent public financial situation resulted in reduced appropriations to the College and 
salary cuts for faculty and all other employees, the morale of the staff was maintained and 
the College continued to grow in number of students and in the services which it rendered. 



It is rare that any public institution escapes for long the fire of criticism inspired by 
political considerations. This College has not been neglected. At least twice during his 
administration the President has had to meet this kind of criticism. It is gratifying to 
realize how staunchly the many friends of the College rallied to its support and how the out- 
come in each instance appeared to place both President and College in stronger position and 
higher general esteem than before. 

The high regard in which President Baker is held not only on the campus but in the 
State and Nation is indicated in the correspondence of his office. Miss Alice Alley, who 
has been his faithful and competent secretary during the fourteen years of his adminis- 
tration, kindly permitted me to view some of these. The following paragraphs illustrate 
the friendship and esteem which others feel for him. 

"It has been a delight to me to be associated with a fellow educator like your- 
self. You have done an outstanding job as President of our Massachusetts State 
College. You have the confidence of the Trustees, the Student Body and the 
Alumni." 

Walter F. Downey 

Former Commissioner of Education 

"The work of land-grant colleges has always been one of my pet interests ana I 
have followed with interest the good work which you have been carrying on in 
Massachusetts. I might say, perhaps a little boastfully, that part of your success 

there is due to your New York State training! My warmest personal regards 

to you and the wish that under your leadership the Massachusetts State College 
will continue its splendid work." 

Franklin D. Roosevelt 

"The success of your leadership characterized by patience, industry and fertility 
of ideas will long be gratefully remembered and it constitutes a significant contri- 
bution in the long and honorable history of the institution." 

Ralph J. Watts, Business Manager 
Lawrence College, Alumnus 1907 

"It is with deep regret that I realize that your active services to MSC are going 
to terminate with the end of this school year. Your vigorous and progressive leader- 
ship based on sound principles has been responsible for great strides MSC has made 
since I was a freshman back in 1934. I am sure that your successor, whoever he 
may be, will find it very difficult to measure up to your fine record, both in length 
of service and in accomplishments." 

Mitchell Nejame, Alumnus 1938 
Former Editor of Index 

As eleventh president. Dr. Baker has presided over the destinies of the College in a sig- 
nificant and eventful era. The record is good. The conclusion is the same as that with which 
Professor Rand so beautifully closed his history "Yesterdays." 

"The story of the College is after all simply a story of men and women; audacious, 
imaginative, persistent in purpose, seeking a light. Their days have been great in 
themselves, but greater in promise. Their works have come down to us — a 
heritage, yes, but a challenge. Their story is ours." 

Robert D. Hawley 
Treasurer of the College 



Here's to the 

WOMEN 
of theS.S.A. 




''\X7'0MEN on placement trainingi" "They don't want to do farm work." "No, that's 
no sort of work for them." "I wouldn't hire one on my place." That was more or 
less the sort of encouragement received by the little group of women entering the Stock- 
bridge School in the fall of 1919. It was the general opinion that women would not wish 
to major in agriculture. But some women did wish to and where women WILL, they very 
often do\ Places were finally found for the group of young women of this first class so that 
they could fulfill the requirements of placement training. Some difficulty was encountered 
in placing an animal husbandry major. She was, however, finally employed by a doctor 
producing certified milk. Apparently his decision to try out this woman was strongly 
influenced because of his wife's earnest hope that "a woman would keep her room in better 
order than the men who have previously worked here." I wonder if that hope was justified. 
Anyway, other women worked happily afterwards on that same farm. 

The women of the New England Farm and Garden Association have always been friends 
and helpers of the cause of women in agricultural work. Through the earnest efforts of one 
of them, Mrs. Charlotte Barrell Ware, a woman's farm unit was established for a time on 
the Crane Estate in Ipswich. Experience was offered there in the fields of animal husbandry, 
poultry, fruit, flower, and vegetable growing. 

When the supervisor of placement training arrived for her first visit to this group, she 
was greeted by the poultry major who said that they had been eagerly awaiting her visit 
because a hen wouldn't eat and she, the supervisor, was expected to perform a cure. It was 
very evident that the hen was crop bound. The supervisor had had no previous acquaint- 
ance with such a difficulty, but the faith of the group in her ability to handle the situation 
was so complete that it could not be disappointed. The visual evidence indicated that an 
immediate operation was needed. A sharp knife, a needle, disinfectant and silk thread 
were called for. The operation was performed by the light of common sense. Nearly a 
pound (weighed) of grass and grain was removed from the poor biddy's crop. A diet of 
bread and milk was prescribed although the hen. apparently fully restored, at once began 
seeking normal hen food. The supervisor left very promptly before her patient could dis- 
prove her knowledge and skill by passing out. Hens are tough. By later report this one 
lived to an average hen's old age and fate. 

There was another animal husbandry major who was placed on the estate of a woman 
doctor whose hobby was Morgan horses. Their care was a part of Bessie's job. Bessie 
had a beautiful mass of red hair, so did the Morgan stallion, "Flyaway." It was con- 
sidered one of the sights of the neighborhood to see Bessie go dashing by leading "Flyaway" 
to and from the pasture — just two streaks of glorious red. 

There were many floriculture majors placed in greenhouses and in flower stores and 
sometimes, in summer, on estates. One Boston bred girl with no previous agricultural ex- 
perience was placed in a large retail greenhouse. Her work called for someone to wheel a 
barrow full of assorted' plants to another part of the greenhouse. She figured that 
a job was to be done and if men could do it, she could and would. She had never before 
met a wheelbarrow, but she knew the art of wheeling baby carriages. So she started out 
blithely. The matter of balance and of one wheel instead of four she had not considered in 
advance. Her progress was sideways by curves and bounces amid a crowd of gathering 
male employees who cheered. But she landed her load at last in the right place and right 
side up. Good for Boston spirit! Before she left this place she mastered the art of 
wheelbarrow trundling. 



For several years a group of girls was sent for their placement training to work on a 
hilltop orchard farm in northern Vermont. They learned fast many fruitgrowing pro- 
cedures and added potato rogueing to their skills. They were much in demand and were 
moved from tiny town to tiny town. They added much pleasurable excitement to the social 
life of these villages. One young woman at least returned after placement because a certain 
young man knew a good thing when he saw it. Today this Stockbridge School alumna is 
her husband's co-worker on a 600-acre Vermont farm. (Such things happen you know, you 
never can tell.) Incidentally, this young woman once stated that her two years' experience 
in the Stockbridge School was a definitely favorable factor in getting the loan which en- 
abled them to take on the place, plus, of course, the fact that her husband had been brought 
up on a farm and had worked for three years on that very farm. 

City suburbs occasionally offer good placement experience in the care of estate grounds. 
The owner of one such small estate had only one complaint to make of the girl placed with 
her as gardener. She was thoroughly disappointed in the girl's lack of horticultural knowl- 
edge. It seemed that she had commissioned her young helper to secure some young straw- 
berry plants. These were duly planted in April. But alas! in June and early July there were 
no luscious ripe strawberries sent in for the family table. In fact not even green ones had 
appeared on the plants. The supervisor had to give an on-the-spot thumbnail lesson in 
horticulture to the employer before confidence was restored in the young worker's skill. 

There is a great debt of gratitude owed by Stockbridge School girls to farm and estate 
owners for fine opportunities given for practical experience. Also these young women owe 
much to the interest of the women of the Farm and Garden Association, many of whom 
themselves have employed some of these girls or have suggested friends who could offer 
excellent opportunities for experience. From many of these women, themselves often skilled 
in horticulture, these younger women have given good service both in horticultural work 
and often in other ways not in the original agreement, sometimes as chauffeur or secretary- 
bookkeeper; even as baby tender, or by meeting some household emergency. 

While it is not always easy now to find just the right position, the difficulties of finding 
placement training opportunities for young women are not nearly so great as in the early 
days. The value of women's work on the land is much more widely recognized due to their 
war time services. Another factor that has helped much is the growing reputation of the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture through the fine training given its students. This has 
proved a real help in opening the way to finding more opportunities for Stockbridge School 
trained young women. Older Stockbridge alumni, now in business for themselves, have 
often been very helpful both in offering young women training opportunities and by giving 
suggestions as to other possible places for women. Some of the older women alumnae of 
the Stockbridge School who have stayed on in agricultural work, as managers, and some- 
times as owners, have been very helpful in providing employment for younger women of the 
Stockbridge School. So the good work goes on. 

The record of accomplishment of these young women of the Stockbridge School is good. 
Many have made a real contribution to agriculture and horticulture by their work. A 
goodly number now married and in farm homes of their own, through their knowledge and 
interest in the farm business, are playing an important part in the success of that business. 
Others are doing their bit in paid agricultural or horticultural positions. Others still main- 
tain an interest in agriculture and often it forms one of the hobbies which adds much to 
the pleasure of life. Placement training, while it has its ups and downs, is generally recog- 
nized by the young women graduates of the Stockbridge School as having been a very 
valuable if not interesting and pleasant part of their school work. 

Margaret Hamlin 
Placement Officer for Women 



PLACEMENT TRAINING l^'T! ^ 






A FTER a lapse of several years, due to war conditions, a full Placement Training pro- 
gram was again in operation in the Stockbridge School. The last class I assigned to 
training jobs prior to the class of 1947 was the class of 1943 which started placement in the 
spring of 1942. Many of these men did not complete the full six months requirement be- 
cause they left to enter the armed forces voluntarily or were drafted. 

Realizing that there would be but few students in the years ahead and desiring to con- 
tribute more to the war effort, I applied and was commissioned in the Naval Reserve on 
August 22, 1942. I left for active duty on September 10, 1942. I was released to inactive 
duty status on January 29, 1946 at which time I resumed my duties here at the college. 

I found 178 men enrolled as freshmen in Stockbridge for the full two-year program which 
was once again in operation. I was making a late start because I usually have had at least 
one preliminary interview with each student prior to the first of January. I also was out 
of touch with employers but found that our former regular employers, so to speak, were 
nearly all very willing and desirous of getting back to using our training students to take 
care of the required additional temporary labor for the summer months. In fact I found 
that agricultural labor had been and still was very scarce and of a poor quality. 

In writing about the various experiences of the class while on placement I think it will 
be best not to mention names of individuals as it might be embarrassing in some cases. 
The individuals will know to whom I am referring, and so will a few of their pals and close 
friends, which will be sufficient. As one might expect, about everything has happened to 
some of our training students over the years. Some have been funny, others have been sad, 
but a lesson can be learned from practically all of them. Here are some of the experiences 
of members of the class of 1947 while working on their various projects scattered through- 
out Massachusetts. 

Some of the younger men never did start work or were employed only a short time as 
they were caught by the draft or enlisted. One Animal Husbandry major gave me con- 
siderable trouble throughout the six months. Early, I received a letter stating he was not 
happy and wished to see me, so I drove out, talked with him and the employer and ap- 
parently had the situation well adjusted. In about three weeks came a second letter from 
the student saying things were bad and wanting to see me. Out I go again only to be told 
by him that he was sorry he wrote as everything was fine now. I did not feel fine however 
as it was an unnecessary trip and a waste of time and money caused by a student coming 
to conclusions too rapidly. He should have waited a day or two before writing. It was 
only a couple of months before I got another call for help from him so out I go but I am a bit 
mad by this time. He wants to be moved to a new job but I tell him he m.ust stay where 
he is for the full six months because he doesn't know- what he wants anyway and it will be 
good for him to do something that is not to his liking. He stayed on the full six months 
and finished. I was somewhat at fault as it was not a good assignment for that particular 
individual from a personality point of view. The student is moderate and a bit slow but 
steady whereas the employer is very energetic, a hustler, fast moving, etc. and each one 
grated on the other. The student felt that the employer was forever jumping him need- 
lessly and the employer was irritated at the student's slow pace. I knew the employer well 
but did not get to know the characteristics of the student well enough prior to placement. 



One Animal Husbandry major has not received his full pay at this writing. Has most of 
it now. Students should receive their full pay each week or month. 

One student was told by his employer, who wanted him to stay on permanently, that he 
could learn more at his farm than at Stockbridge School. It takes all kinds. 

At one farm, a student was busily engaged in repairing a mowing machine when I arrived, 
and for a time I was not certain he was the man I wished to see but after crawling out 
from under and wiping some of the dirt and grease from his face I recognized him. I hope 
he greased the machine after he was through because there couldn't have been any left on it. 

An Animal Husbandry student (little fellow) was critized for trying to do everything by 
the book. Students have to learn that the college teaches the ideal methods which have to 
be adjusted to meet conditions. 

Had a different criticism of another Animal Husbandry student. The employer stated he 
was a hard worker, put in long hours, etc. but did things too hurriedly. His speed and haste 
quite often resulted in loss of time as he broke the tractor and mowing machine, and had 
a bad habit of leaving tools right where he got through with them. He could not take time 
to put them away. 

I was badly oversold by one student. A good talker, pleasing, friendly, with a wife and 
three children. I spent much time and effort in getting him an excellent job, with a home 
for his family and good pay. Developments proved him to be untruthful and totally un- 
reliable so I failed him and he did not return. 

On a trip to Connecticut I found the farmer's daughter polishing the student's car. I did 
not ask any more questions so do not know what the set-up was. 

A Dairy major wrote me in August that he had been laid off due to cutting down in 
help at the plant. It did not sound just right so I made the trip and talked to the employer. 
It was true that a reduction in number of employees was necessary but the student's actions 
and grade of work were such that the employer believed he should be one of the first to be 
dropped and explained the reasons. I had a long talk with the student and just could not 
make him see wherein he had been wrong. Many of us do not analyze ourselves and our 
own actions as well as we do those of others. 

A couple of the dairy students were forced to join labor unions. They got their money 
back in extra pay. Either had to join the union or not work in that plant. Dairy Industry 
is the only agricultural occupation that is becoming unionized at present. 

A Dairy student dropped out of his own accord because as he states, "the boss hurt his 
feelings by speaking roughly to him". One cannot afford to be so sensitive. He has been 
in the armed forces too. I doubt if his superiors always said "please" to him. 

On visiting one dairy plant and on inquiring for the head of the laboratory was told he 
was on vacation, so asked for his assistant and who should that be but our student. The 
boss had enough confidence in him to take a couple of weeks off and leave him in charge 
of all laboratory work. A little side light here: This same student gave my hearing and 
sight tests when I was being examined for the Navy. 

Had quite a time with one floriculture major, a city boy that knows his way around and 
I believe tried to pull a fast one on me. He should have realized that I have had a long 
association with students. I gave him a break and am glad I did as he is doing well as a 
senior and I am sure benefited from the experience. About August he was laid off "due to 
a forced reduction in help". Really, I think he was let go because he was too prone to be 
blunt and say just what he thought, regardless. A little lacking in tact. He wanted to 
complete training and return for the second year and suggested a job he could get so I 
approved it. Thought I had better check and did not find him on the job. Visited the 
place twice more in the next two weeks with the same result. I wrote him an ultimatum 
and soon received letters from a doctor and a dentist in the Veterans Administration stating 



he had been treated on the days I had visited his place of employment. It did not loolc 
good to me and I so informed him. He immediately showed up with a job in a flower store 
in Boston which I checked and gave my approval, informing the student I would stand for 
no more nonsense, and that due to lost time he would have to work right to the last Saturday 
before school opened. He believed me this time as I always found him on the job when I 
checked. I made it a point to visit him on the last day. I got there during the noon hour 
and he showed up promptly at one o'clock. I gave him a passing grade. 

About June a Food Management student came to the office asking for a new assign- 
ment stating that he had been discharged. Further inquiry brought out the following 
story. It seems he and a friend had gone out with two of the waitresses and had imbibed 
a bit of beer to which he was not accustomed and as a result the party was a bit noisy on 
returning to the hotel. Someone complained to the manager who arrived shortly and pro- 
ceeded to "lot them out". The student, who is ordinarily a quiet and gentlemanly young 
man. bolstered by the beer took exception to the remarks and shouted right back at the 
manager. As a result he was told to leave and right then. A telephone call to the manager 
made it possible for the student to return, apologize and complete his placement. He re- 
ceived an excellent recommendation from the manager at the end of the season. A bit of 
foolishness nearly got a good man into serious difficulty. 

I certainly received a very novel excuse from a floriculture major for not handing in his 
reports on time. He said they were locked in his employer's safe (I did not know they were 
that valuable) and that he could not get them out because the combination had been lost 
and a safe-breaker was being engaged to open it. Sounded like a tall one to me but he handed 
them in about a week later. 

On visiting a large poultry farm I was informed the student was in a hospital with a 
broken leg. He had been knocked down by a hit-and-run driver. As far as I know the 
authorities never did learn who the driver was. The student had not planned to return for 
the second year. 

One of the older vets and a man we all thought was a confirmed bachelor greatly sur- 
prised me to say the least one day in the season by calmly asking if he might have a few 
days off for a honeymoon. The request was granted and I wished him every happiness. 
He found married life so good that he did not return for the second year, sorry to say as 
he was one of the best. 

Man run down by his own car — a fact. One of the Horticulture men wrote me late in 
the season that he was incapacitated and would be unable to work any more for the re- 
mainder of the season. He enclosed a doctor's statement as required. Naturally being 
interested I asked him how he was injured. He smiled, looked a little foolish, and said that 
he had parked his car on an incline and on walking away noticed it was starting to roll 
ahead so he tried to stop it by pushing, slipped and fell, and the car passed over his leg. 
He will probably use the brake next time. 

I wonder what will happen in the 1947 season! 

Emory E. Grayson 
Director of Placement Service 



n 



In 

Appreciation 

to 

Pop" 

Barrett 




The neucleus for next year's Shorthorn Staff has already been picked. 
Plans are being formed for the 1948 year book. We were not so fortunate 
to have such a long period in which to prepare this year's edition. Chances 
are we would never have been able to get a book together if it had not 
been for our faculty advisor, "Pop" Barrett. Helping to set up and to 
arrange the Shorthorn has become second nature to "Pop". This is his 
twentieth year of cooperation. So, we, the "Greenhorns" of the Short- 
horn Staff want to say thanks to our advisor for his many suggestions 
and the tremendous amount of help given to us in compiling this book. 



HEARD HERE AND THERE 



A freshman Dairy major works at the college cow barns on weekends. This job requires 
him to arise about 3:30 a.m. One morning some practical jokers set his alarm for 2::00 
a.m. ! ! When it went off, he staggered out of bed and started for the cow barns. As he 
was happily feeding the cows at about 2.-30 a.m., the night watchman noticed the light in 
the barn and went to see what was going on. He informed Gheogen that he hadn't seen 
him at work so early before and wondered what the occasion was that the cows deserved 
such an early breakfast. When Gheogen finally looked at his trusty Mickey Mouse watch, 
he noticed that he was a little early, and was the victim of some ruthless characters whose 
idea of a joke wasn't the least bit funny in his mind. 

Last fall while building their 10 x 10 for the Horticulture Show, four floriculture majors, 
Jim McDuffy, Bob McGoldrick, Ted Sigda, and Dick Keyes, became tired. Their exhibit 
consisted of a bridge with a pool below, plus a few evergreen shrubs placed here and there. 
In order to relax, the four gentlemen sat down in the pool and on the bridge and played a 
game of bridge. (Incidentally, the pool was empty!) 

Mr. Tuttle, of the Veg. Gard. dept., has suggested a new substitute for the customary 
mistletoe. Being prejudiced, he thinks that Hubbard squash should be hung up in the 
home at Christmas time. Then, when a fellow's mother-in-law steps under the squash, he 
could release the squash quite conveniently. 

Never thinking he would get into technicalities, Mr. Dubois called on Burt Anderson for 
the correct use of the word "set." He asked, "Which is correct, 'the hen sets or the hen 
sits'?" Anderson quickly replied, "Neither, it stands." The next twenty minutes of class 
was spent debating whether a hen sits, sets, or stands. By the way, no solution to the 
problem was reached. 




Bonbs Awft^ ~ KiJjKs 



vs@> 



We can't quite figure out Jack Denison's reasons for getting so frustrated one day when 
he was lighting a cigarette and lit the curtains to his room by mistake. (Or was it?) It 
messed up the room a bit and grew a few new gray hairs on his poor landlady's head. Out- 
side of that the damage was slight. Maybe Betty was the cause of it all, who knows? 




LFT -THE 80YS FRon flnHff?Sr 
•plCK UP THE SMITH GinUS — 



Dick Love and Johnny Hamilton, two animal husbandry seniors, seem to be quite the 
ladies' men. They are giving the Economy Cab service a little competition. Every day 
their route starts about 12:30 p.m. at Julius's hash house. Their best customers are five 
sophomore girls that are regular riders every day. They usually go into town after the 
newspaper and then back to Lewis Hall. From there they take their orders from the girls 
pertaining to their own destination. Then off they go to Old Chapel, Gessman, the Math, 
building, and at practically every building on campus, they drop off a pretty coed. About 
5:00 p.m. they go back to Lewis again and take them down to supper. The poor damsels 
don't get a ride back from supper because Johnny has to drive back and forth to Palmer 
every day. The next day and every day it's the same old routine. Surely, boys, there must 
be an easier way to win the hand of your lady fair. 




HE. AlNT SHAVfD siNce 
THHM SHOES. 



Kb Qor 



There are three Stockbridge seniors that seem to be inseparable. They are Herb Dodge, 
Wally Thieme^ and Fred Turner. Together constantly, rain or shine, they are often found 
in "Pop" Barrett's office shooting the well known breeze. They can be easily recognized 
at a distance by pipes protruding from their innocent faces. At a closer distance you can 
identify them by the odor of chewing tobacco and an air of words never to be found in 
Webster's dictionary. Nevertheless, Herb, Wally, and Fred are swell boys; and the class of 
'47 was more than happy to have the "Unsavory Three" m their midst through the two 
years at Stockbridge. 



This incident also took place in Mr. Creech's famous horticulture S-7 lab. The topic of 
the day was "Protex, when sprayed on evergreen trees will protect them from winter injury." 
Bob Healey and Mr. Creech manned the spray guns and made a perfect bull's eye. No, not 
on the blue spruce but on Pat Hamilton and Nellie Garrett ! ! The girls seem to have sur- 
vived the winter thus far, so the product must be a success. 




Khar'ibiaa, my Cadillac can. back up 

faiter thoa ^JOur'OLJ*, with a ■tai'L winj 

In Mr Creech's horticulture S-7 lab. the class was required to cover some plants with 
leaves. These leaves had to be gathered in large burlap bags. Dick Bemis and Bob Capstick 
thought that the work was much too dull so something had to be done. As quick as a flash, 
they took one of the extra large burlap bags and put it over Elsie Bissonnette's head; and 
it went straight down to her feet. Everyone in the class roared, but no one came to her 
rescue. She managed to struggle out of it by herself. Who said women are helpless? 




HI FKIEND 



EAGLE CREEK 



Did you ever see a mountain stream come tumbling cold and clear 
Rusliing over rocks witli such a din you scarce could hear? 
There's one across the Strait I know, I wish that you could see 
It's like going up nature's Wall Street when you enter it from sea. 

There's an army of great spruce trees on guard where ere you look 
Like a sort of great protectorate for that over-sized brook. 
There's a little old moss covered shack in the sun beneath the trees 
And lots of brambles round about with blossoms for the bees. 

There are tracks and trails of bear and deer, they're plentiful you know 

Seems almost like behind each tree there's a Redskin with his bow. 

The wind has played its power game in "soldiers" it's blown down 

And with their roots turned skyward there's bare earth a deep dark brown. 

Many "soldiers fell across the creek so nice and wide 
Beneath them is the perfect place in which the trout will hide. 
They act as bridges for the bears who come out on them to look 
To see if they can catch a meal in that, their private brook. 

The deer so cautiously come down to drink in early dawn 
And in the spring they bring along their gangly spotted fawn. 
A pair of ducks will nest beside the quiet pools so few 
And in about four weeks a train of little ones are in view. 

A river like an artery flows from the heart of things 
It is wonderful when you stop to think of all the life it brings. 
Eagle Creek is jusl the same as centuries before 

The white man hasn't been there quite enough to put welcome at its door. 
Great virgin timber everywhere undefiled and clean 
None of the filth so prominent where civilized men are seen. 

— Bud Keyes 
Foot note: These were written while Ben was on duty with the U. S. Coast 
Guard in Alaska. An excellent past time in our estimation. 



IN THE FUTURE 



{To: "Notre Dame Victory March") 
Someday when Fortune carries our name 

Upward to glory, honor and fame; 
We'll reminisce along Life's ways, 

And cherish the memory of Stockbridge days. 

Our Alma Mater, builder of men. 

We'll come back in spirit, again and again; 
We'll wander down her hallowed halls. 

And hasten our footsteps when her class bell calls. 

We'll linger with classmates, our campus pals. 

We'll date just once more, our cute campus gals; 

And then our place in Life will be, 
A pageant of memory. 

Peter Pfeijfer, 1948 




Bateman, Hamilton, Geoghean, Love. 



COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 



Friday, May 30 

10 :30 A. M.— Class Picnic 
9:00 P. M.— Promenade 



Look Park 



Saturday, May 31 

10:30 A. M.— Class Day Exercises 

12:15 P. M. — Alumni Meeting 
1.00 P. M. — Alumni Luncheon 
3:00 P. M.— Ball Game— Alumni vs SSA '47 
4:00 P. M.— Alumni— Faculty Tea 
9:00 P. M. — Fraternity House Dances 



Sunday June 1 

2:30 P. M.- 



-Graduation Exercises 



4:00 P. M. — President's Reception for Graduating Class Members and their Guests, 
the Faculty, and Alumni. 



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Stockbridge men who have majored in dairy manufactures were saddened to hear about 
the death of Ransom C. Packard, one of the well loved and highly respected instructors in 
Dairy Bacteriology. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

We wish to extend our thanks: 

To Mr. John E. Snow of the Valley Litho Co. for his helpful suggestions 
and friendly cooperation. 

To The Kinsman Studios for their excellent job of photography. 

To Mr. John H. Vondell and Professor Grant B. Snyder for their aid 
in special photography. 

To President Hugh Potter Baker for his farewell message. 

To Director Roland H. Verbeck and Mr. Robert D. Hawley for their 
interesting articles. 

To Mr. Emory E. Grayson and Miss Margaret Hamlin for their stories 
of our 1946 placement adventures. 

To Professor Clark L. Thayer for his well-written dedication story. 

And to all our classmates who have contributed articles, or who have 
helped in any way in arranging this yearbook. 

— The Editors 



Get in the Movies 



Be a Film Star 




Recapture the happy 
moments of 

Weddings, Family Outings, 

Funerals, Babies in action and 



Once-in-a lifetime events. 



Color Movies a specialty. 



"POP" BARRETT, Cimmatographer 



Qompliments of , . . 

KINSMAN'S STUDIO 

46 Main Street - - Amherst 



Official Photographers for 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture 



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PHOTO OFFSET LITHOGRAPHY 

FINE COLOR REPRODUCTION 



VALLEY LITHO COMPANY 

loo WATER STREET . HOLYOKE, MASSACHUSETTS • TELEPHONE 2-1839 



Good quality Printing 

rOr good results when planning printed advertising material ... we 

can help you with suggestions. We advise the best 
process — Offset, Letterpress or Silk Screen. 
Printed advertising material is a necessary supplement 
to any advertising you do — whether it be newspaper, 
general magazine, outdoor or radio advertising. It 
stimulates enthusiasm in your oganization, creates 
dealer interest and more completely informs users of 
your product. 



15 CHAPMAN AVE. 
HOLYOKE, MASS. 

TEL. 2-1341 SNOW PRINTING SERVICE 



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