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Full text of "Shorthorn"

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SriORiriORN 

1949 



Issued by the Graduating Class of 

THE STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

University of Massachusetts 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



DEDICATION 

STOCKBRIDGE students have never had a more loyal 
and helpful friend than Professor Charles N. Du Bois. 
Although a graduate in English from Middlebury College, 
he has maintained a great interest in Agriculture which 
dates back to his boyhood on a farm in Newbury, Vermont. 
His knowledge and interest in his Stockbridge students have 
been shown by his enthusiasm and cooperation both in and 
out of class. He has made a very difficult subject interesting 
by directing it along the lines of our major interest and en- 
joyable by his friendly nature and sense of humor. He is a 
most understanding "prof" and, knowing our aims and de- 
sires, he directs the course to give us the most helpful and 
beneficial elements of Business English. A very energetic 
individual, he is always willing to aid any student in diffi- 
culty, freely giving his own time and effort. Always holding 
the interest of the students uppermost in his mind, and ever 
ready to support a just cause, he will listen to both sides of 
any dispute or "gripe" and attempt by diplomacy to iron 
out the difficulty to the satisfaction of all. Had it not been 
for his readily available counsel and his interest in the wel- 
fare of Stockbridge students, some of us would have dropped 
by the way. He has truly been an inspiration and guiding 
influence to us all. 




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OLD CHAPEIi 



FOREWORD 



XX/'E have in this book tried to gather all happenings and 
experiences that have occurred during your stay at 
Stockbridge. 

If, when you pick up this book in the future, it brings back 
pleasant memories of school life, we will have achieved our 
goal. 




President, Ralph A. Van Meter 



Director, Roland H. Verbeck 



PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 



This Yearbook is another milestone for the Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture and marks another turning point in the lives of you Seniors who are 
going out to see what you can do with what you have learned. 

Thirty classes of Stockbridge men and women have proved that you can 
approach the problems of farming in New England with the courage born 
of confidence in the start you have made. You have learned much more 
than you realize, for knowledge, once gained, seems to have been a part of 
you always. 

You must hold to the idea firmly that what you have accomplished is an 
excellent start but a start only. Agriculture is a complex, fast moving and 
many sided industry, and the final word on things agricultural is never 
pronounced. Examine every new idea and test it in every way you can, but 
never hesitate to adopt it when you are convinced of its soundness. 

Wherever you go and whatever you do you have our best wishes — always. 

Sincerely, 

Ralph A. Van Meter 
President 



TOMORROW 

The members of the Stockbridge Class of 1949 are approaching journey's 
end for their work in class room and laboratory on this University campus. 
With graduation completed a few short months from now, your names will be 
added to the long list of alumni and alumnae who have gone out from these 
"Hallowed Halls" of pleasant memory to do the world's work. Each of you 
has chosen some special field of service to which you will contribute your 
best endeavor of body, soul, and mind. 

We wish you God-speed and a full measure of success in your future tasks 
and responsibilities. May you face them with confidence in your God-given 
powers, and with the constant prayer you will be tolerant, fair, and honest 
in all your dealings with your fellow-man. 

Many of you as veterans in the late war have faced death and disaster 
with courageous hearts. Now you are challenged to face life and meet it 
with the finest ideals of American citizenship. 

We hope the lessons from your schooling here will serve you in the years 
ahead. 

Roland H. Verbeck 

Director 





STOCKBRIDGE HALL 



STOCKBRIDGE, PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE 



T have been refreshing my memory on the past history of Stockbridge as 

recorded twenty years ago in the Shorthorn yearbook of 1929. The late 
Roscoe W. Thatcher, President of Massachusetts Agricultural College, as 
it than was called, made several important statements about our School 
which are definitely worth repeating. 

He said: "We believe that now, after a period of some ten years of trial 
and experience, our collegiate non-degree vocational two-year course, under 
its new name of The Stockbridge School of Agriculture' meets a very speci- 
fic need in education and has a brilliant future before it. 

"This need is for technical vocational education which is beyond the trade 
school or high school grade but of shorter duration and of a more definitely 
vocational character than is supplied by the degree courses of the college or 
university. The need for this type of education in other industries than 
agriculture has been recognized by prominent educators in this country and 
commented upon as an apparent lack in the American school system." 

How well this School has supplied the need for "technical vocational 
education" in applied agriculture and horticulture to thousands of young 
men and women of this state and other states of the northeastern area of 
the country can best be expressed in exact figures, although too many make 
dull reading. I will be brief. 

From the first class graduating in 1920, numbering just fourteen stu- 
dents, to the class of 1929, for the ten-year beginning period of our history, 
682 students received the school diploma. In the next ten years to 1939 we 
graduated 892. And for this last ten-year period, including the class of 1949, 
if I can estimate correctly three months before final graduation, the number 
graduated will be 840. This represents a grand total of 2414 graduates in 
thirty years. 



If World War II had not intervened to reduce all class enrollments from 
1942 through 1945, with no graduating class whatever in 1946, and less than 
twenty in each of the one-year classes of 1945 and 1944, the number of 
graduates for this last decade would have easily reached 1000 or more. 

The future of our School has been most capably presented by no less an 
educational authority than President James B. Conant of Harvard Univer- 
sity who made these memorable comments in his recent inaugural speech at 
the time of President Van Meter's induction into office here last October. 
"These colleges should provide general education and vocational training 
of various types to accommodate a spread of interest and aptitudes among 
the students. There is no reason why the course thus offered — a combi- 
nation of job training and education for a full life of civic responsibility — 
might not be superior to that provided in many a liberal arts curriculum in 
a large and crowded university." 

"Those of us who believe the two-year community colleges are a signifi- 
cant step forward in the march toward our goal of equalizing educational 
opportunity have high hopes that they will prosper in every state. But we 
realize that such colleges first must be accepted by the leading citizens of 
each locality, particularly by managers of industry. The present emphasis 
by employers on the importance of a degree from a four-year college could 
be quite disastrous if continued — disastrous, that is, for the development 
of the new educational picture in which the two-year college plays so sig- 
nificant a role. Admittedly the adjustment of the community to the idea 
of the respectability of a two-year college will be a slow process; but if the 
case is put up squarely to the taxpayers, I believe the issue will be under- 
stood. Businessmen will then gradually come to judge applicants for "white 
collar" positions less in terms of the length of the college course; they will 
regard a two-year degree as adequate education for the first step on the 
competitive ladder. They will show their faith in these new institutions by 
enrolling their own sons and daughters, reserving the four-year college for 
those who have professional ambitions and the requisite capacity for "Book 
Learning." 

I may conclude, 

therefore, by pointing out that this institution has long since led the way in 
a successful development of a two-year terminal college of a most practical 
and useful sort. I refer to your Stockbridge School of Agriculture started 
thirty years ago to meet the demand for a shorter course in agriculture. It 
is a demonstration — one of all too few in this part of the country — of the 
value of a two-year college that focuses on the practical educational needs 
of its community." 

We should all view with pride the outstanding opportunities which are 
ours and the responsibility devolving upon each Stockbridge man or woman 
to demonstrate by his career the attributes of competent citizenship. 

Roland H. Verbeck 



The GRAYSON MESSAGE 

'Helpful Hints" from Experiences of Classmates on Placement Training 
No names — just numbers 

1. Misrepresented his abilities, skills and previous experience and could 
not deliver. He also refused to accept criticism and suggestions. None 
of us is perfect. We can always learn and improve. Don't tackle a job 
you are not qualified to handle. 

2. Withdrew and went to law school. He should have analyzed himself, 
his abilities, likes, dislikes, aptitude, etc., before wasting a year in Stock- 
bridge studying Animal Husbandry. Think things over well — not 
just try different things. Get advice — talk to people in various fields. 
Find out what is required for the career you have in mind and see if 
you qualify. 

3. Discharged because he did not tell the truth about the reason he 
could not work overtime. Be truthful — employers may be displeased 
but will give you credit for truthfulness, but will not put up with a man 
they cannot trust or depend upon. 

4. Poor in class work — very low grades but did very well on the job. 
The top students are not always the top in production on the job. Will- 
ingness to work, stick-to-it-tiveness and ability to get along with people 
are equally important. 

5. Chose the wrong companions and wrong girl. Girl kept him out too 
late nights, and companions and he demanded more money or would 
quit in two weeks. They were fired in two days. 

Be careful of your choice of associates. They will influence you for 
good or bad. 

If not satisfied with wages or working conditions, take your troubles 
direct to the boss. Do not resort to ultimatums or pressure. 

6. Changed jobs without permission and admitted he knew the rule for- 
bidding it. He was much surprised when told he was failed in Placement 
Training — rules are rules. Do not figure that they apply to others but 
an exception will be made in your case. 

7. Stuck to the job even though advised by several qualified people to 
change to some other vocation for which he would be more qualified 
by interest, physical ability and aptitude. One is foolish not to admit 
a mistake when it is quite definitely proven that a wrong choice of voca- 
tion has been made. Set out and make a fresh start. 



8. Had rather a tough assignment as far as work and work conditions 
concerned, but he stuck it out and kept doing his best. Result — he 
gained my admiration and that of the employer and was given a better 
job before the end of the season. Stay with it and give it a fair trial. 
Perhaps the employer is trying to see if you can take it. 

9. Had two jobs. Placement job with one company and worked Satur- 
day afternoons and Sundays for another concern. He needed the money 
to go back to school and was willing to work for it. He'll make it. 

10. Did not mix with the gang and had difificulties at first. Pointed at as 
a college snob. Your education gives you an advantage but you have 
got to prove it. The man who came up through the school of hard- 
knocks has learned some things that you know nothing about. 

11. Tried to get by on relatives drag but was let go. Drag or pull may 
be desirable to get you in, but you usually are on your own once you are 
in and must make the grade. 

12. Couldn't see the value of being a laborer. How can you be a good boss 
if you do not know the skills of the laborer or how he feels and reacts? 

13. Failed to follow instructions. Initiative is a good thing but can be 
overdone. If no instructions are given, then use your imagination and 
do it the best you know how. Do not volunteer advice unless asked 
for it. 

14. Quit with no notice at a very busy time. One has to be fair to an em- 
ployer and work out a reasonable notice to give employer a chance to 
replace you. 

15. Couldn't see how the work he was doing would lead to anything 
worthwhile. 

Ambition and desire to get ahead are admirable qualities but do not 
be impatient. It takes time to get a good start but once advance- 
ment starts it often comes rapidly. 

You envy people in certain positions and want a similar position 
which is fine, but they did not get where they are in a year, or even 
several years, after college. It took time and striving. Once you arrive, 
things are easier. 

There never was and is not now any substitute for hard work and 
there is just as much opportunity today as there ever was. 

If I have offered a suggestion that eventually helps a single man, the 
effort will have been worthwhile. Good luck. 

Emory E. Grayson 
Director of Placement Service 



LET'S LOOK AHEAD 



Tl-FERE I am feeling very much like a freshman because this is my first 
year at the University of Massachusetts. And not only do I feel like a 
freshman in the Stockbridge School of Agriculture but in the entire uni- 
versity as well. And unlike each of you who are enrolled in a single course of 
study, I find myself deeply concerned with the content of each program of 
study that accepts women for registration. And furthermore, I must even- 
tually acquire some familiarity with the individuals, companies, and organ- 
izations that are doing business in each area. What is their line? What do 
they produce? What specific jobs do they have to offer? And more impor- 
tant from your standpoint, are there opportunities for the employment of 
women? 

I need not tell you that you are competing with men. You have only to 
look about you in each classroom to know that you are in a minority not 
only while you are here but in the world of work. Is that significant? Yes, 
I think it is. You will eventually marry and leave the labor force. Employer 
know this and are reluctant to train a girl only to have her leave in a year or 
two. So you must either be very good, better than the average fellow with 
whcm you are competing, or else you must be keen enough and have imagi- 
nation enough to see what facets of work in your field are more suitable for 
women than for men. Are your fingers more nimble? Do you have a fiare 
for color and design? Can you handle customers more graciously than the 
husky lad beside you? What can you as an individual offer that will put 
you on a par or a cut above your masculine competitiors when you approach 
an employer? 

Do you know yourself? What kind of a person are you? Do you work 
with ideas or things? Work alone or with others? Are you energetic and 
ambitious or indifferent? Do you have the physical stamina to do what is 
required in your line of work? 

Do you know your field? While you are in school, study, talk about, and 
investigate all the phases of your major. Never again will you have access 
to so many books or be able to talk with so many men who are authorities. 

Do you know who's who in the business? Do you know the leaders in 
your field, the leagues, clubs, associations, local and national, that are work- 
ing for the improvement and advancements of those employed in dairying, 
poultry, or floriculture? If you want to grow roses, then you must know 
where the rose growing centers are, who the important growers are, the out- 
let and all the factors to be considered in going into the business. What do 
you read? Can you name the journals and newspapers that are concerned 
with dairying, poultry or floriculture? Only by reading these can you keep 
abreast with the trends, and new discoveries. They are the textbooks you 
will use when you leave the campus. "Next to knowing is knowing where to 
find out." Here and now is your opportunity to obtain the information you 
will need in the years ahead, whether you expect to succeed independently 
or perhaps best of all as a partner with one of the smiling young men pic- 
tured a few pages back. 

Carol Burr Gawthrop 
Placement Officer for Women 




Thatcher Hall 
Stockbridge Hall 

Goessmann Laboratory Goodell Library 





Stockbridge House 




Kra^l 




Old Chapel 



Fernald Hall 



Memorial Hall 



French Hall 





SENIORS 


CLASS OFFICERS 


F. Alfred Patterson, President 


C. Peter Frankenberg, Vice President 


Allan O. Leskinen, Treasurer 


Carolyn Miller, Secretary 




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Anthony Ackerman 



Henry Ainsworth, Jr. 



Patricia Aldrich-Anies 



Ellis Allen 




ANTHONY J. ACKERMAN LUDLOW 

Floriculture 

Placement Winks, 1058 Allen Street, Springfield 

Floriculture Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Veterans' 
Association 1 

HENRY P. AINSWORTH, JR. GRAFTON 

Fruit Growing 

Placement Fiske Farms, Grafton 

Football 1, Track 1, Pomology 1-2, President 2 

PATRICIA R. ALDRICH-AMES EVERETT 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Winson Brown. White River Junction, Vermont 
Shorthorn Board 1-2, Secretary 2, Glee Club 2. Secretary 
Treasurer, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 
2, Rifle Club 1, University Rifle Club (Women's), Scrolls 2 

ELLIS N. ALLEN MEDFIELD 

Arboriculture 

Placement R. D. Lowden, Needham 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Arborculture Club 2, Secretary 

Treasurer 

GEORGE W. APTT, JR. FRAMINGHAM CENTER 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Wyman's Framingham Nursery, Framingham 
Fraternity 1-2, Vice-President of Kappa Kappa 2, ' Horti- 
culture Club 1-2, President 2, Horticulture Show 1-2, 10x10 1 



PAUL E. BAMFORTH 

Vegetable Gardening 
Placement 



WAYLAND 



Lookout Farm Inc., South Natick 



ALLEN F. BALL PLYMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE 




ANTHONY J. ACKERMAN "Tony" "Ackerlunker" 

If a surrealist were to pamt a picture of Tony, he would have to devise 
some means of presenting the followmg factors which were certainly a part 
of Tony. The picture would have to include an all-night work-out in French 
Hall as Tony finishes a term paper for the next day; a session of cramming 
information before each hour exam; and, naturally, a length of ribbon, 
symbolic of Tony's mterest in floral designing. 

HENRY D. AINSWORTH, JR. "Hank" 

Hank, the handsome fellow with the cheerful personality, is always at 

ease and is never afraid to say what he thinks. He has the knack of arguing 

about almost anything; and no matter what it is, he always keeps at it 

until he wins. 

This young man was truly an inspiration to the other members of his 

class. His many friends feel he will have little trouble in making a place for 

himself in this world. 

PATRICIA ALDRICH-AMES "Pat" "Ruthie" 

Being the only girl in the Animal Husbandry class hasn't bothered Pat 

at all. On the contrary, she seems to have thrived on it. 

Her love for teasing and her sunny smile have brightened many a dull 

class. Changing from blue jeans to evening gowns transforms this farm 

girl into a charming young lady. 

Pat plans to work until she and the owner of the "Chevvie" truck can 

form a permanent partnership. 

ELLIS N. ALLEN "Al" 

A clean-cut, good-natured boy, with a ready smile and a quick answer, 
Al likes to ski, drive, dance (square and round) and bowl, and is a close 
follower of hometown basketball games. Although a real down-to-earth 
arborist, he carried a second yen for a certain soda jerk of the female species. 
The very best of luck is extended from all his classmates for a bright and 
happy future. 

GEORGE W. APTT, JR. 

George shows the finest of background proven by his character and repu- 
tation. George is vice-president, of Kappa Kappa where his cooperation and 
understanding have contributed much to building a happy and efficient 
fraternity. 

During his freshman year George constructed an outstanding exhibit in 
the horticulture show. 

Sound native ability, augmented by the knowledge and confidence 
gained at Stockbridge, will assure his success. 

PAUL E. BAMFORTH 

Paul comes with the Boston Market Gardener's scholarship, an award 
given to a worthy arboriculture student. Don't let this scholastic record fool 
you, though; "Uncle" Paul is always ready for a good time. 

Paul took his placement in '46 before entering the service. He hopes 
someday soon to own a farm, and with his initiative we know it will be soon. 



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Bruce Barter 



Phillip Bartlett 




JOSEPH W. BARNHILL WORCESTER 

Food Management 

Placement Camp Morgan, Washington, New Hampshire 



BRUCE M. BARTER 




BERLIN 


Placement 


H. E. 


Gamage, Westford 


PHILLIP W. BARTLETT BERLIN 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement C. Fiske Nursery, Northborough 
Football 1-2. Hockey 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Horti- 
culture Club 2 


DONALD R. BATCHELDER 

Arboriculture 

Placement 

Football 2, Outing Club 1, Horticulture 

Association 1 


WEYMOUTH 

South Weymouth 
Show 2. Veterans' 


HERBERT D. BATES 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement 

Shorthorn Board 2, Animal 

International 2. Ski Club 1-2 


CARLISLE 

Bates Farms, Carlisle 
Husbandry Club 1-2, Little 



JOSEPH E. BEATTY, JR. HUNTINGTON 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Northampton State Hospital, Northampton 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Treasurer 2, 4-H Club 1-2. 
Executive Committee 2 Little International 2, Rifle Club 1 



Joseph Beatty, Jr. 



JOSEPH W. BARNHILL "Joe" 

Although one of the quieter members of the Food Management Class, Joe 
is a genial fellow. We've never seen him without a smile on his face and a 
cheery word for one and all. When it comes class time, Joe is an inspiration 
for the rest of us;'and as for the practical side of his vocation, Joe is right up 
there with the best. 

Joe's favorite pastimes are tickling the "ivories" at Mem. Hall and batting 
around that "Lil ole ping pong ball." 

BRUCE M. BARTER 

Bruce's earnest work and sound ability have been well displayed in all 
his classes. He is a good man to have around in a pinch. 

You can guess his reason for going home every week, but Bruce's favorite 
avocation on campus is tinkering with his car. 

His ambition is to have a poultry farm of his own and enough of his own 
tribe to take care of the farm, so that he can retire. 

PHILLIP W. BARTLETT "Putt" 

Putt does not let things like exams worry him and always comes out with 

very good marks. We know his ability at math, but he has a physique that's 

got him stopped. 

He also has six standard jokes that practically everyone on and off campus 

has heard — and wants to hear only once. He is a stand-out on the gridiron 

as well as on the ice. 

Putt's pleasant smile has made him many friends in the two short years 

at Stockbridge. 

DONALD R. BATCHELDER "Batch" 

You couldn't help noticing "Batch" around campus, for he holds himself 

straight and proud. He never had too much to say, but was always ready 

with a sharp, witty answer. He is strictly the outdoor type, for his hobbies 

are hunting, fishing, and renovating old used cars. 

As an arborist he is tops, and his ambition in life is to own a good tree 

business. Lots of luck from us all. Batch, 

HERBERT D. BATES "Herb" 

A typical Yankee farmer. Herb is known for knowing a lot and saying 

little. When it comes to story telling, Herb can outdo the best of them with 

his yarns of the agricultural practices carried out at Bates's Farm. 

After graduation Herb will use his managerial ability in operating his 

father's farm. We know that Herb will do well, and we wish him plenty of 

good luck. 

JOSEPH E. BEATTY, JR. "Joe" 

"Joe" is one of the more quiet lads here at school, but his presence is al- 
ways known by his ability to pop up with the correct answers to questions 
asked in class. When it comes to talking practical farming, Joe is up there 
with the best of them. 

"Joe" is likewise well versed in the technical end of raising better live- 
stock. 

We are sure that his dream of owning his own farm will come true. 



A 






Harold Bigelow, Jr. 




Harold Blackie, Jr. Franklin Blacknnan, Jr. 



HAROLD F. BIGELOW, JR. NORTHFIELD 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Joslin Hill Farms, Inc. Leominster 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 1-2 

HAROLD M. BLACKIE, JR. CHELMSFORD 

Vegetable Growing 

Placement Blackie Farm, Parkhurst Road, Chelmsford 

Pomology Club 1, Dairy Club 1, Horticulture Show 1-2, 
Fraternity 1, Alpha Tau Gamma, Ski Club 1-2. Horticulture 
Club 1-2, Olericulture 1 

FRANKLIN H. BLACKMAN, JR. WORCESTER 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Hillcrest Farms, Auburn 

Shorthorn 2, Assistant Editor-in-Chief, Football 2, Animal 
Husbandry Club 1-2. Vice-President, 4-H Club 1-2. Little 
International 1-2, Veterans' Association 1 

HARRY M. BOISSONEAULT SANDUSKY, OHIO 

Floriculture 

Placement Cleveland Road Greenhouses, Sandusky, Ohio 

Horticulture Show 1-2 

WILLIAM A. BOWERS, JR. LYNN 

Poultry 

Placement Townsend Inc., Boxford 

Shorthorn Board 2, Concert Band 2, Poultry Club 1-2 

WILLIAM J. BOYD WHITINSVILLE 

Floriculture 

Placement Follwell Greenhouses, Pittsfield 

Floriculture Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2 



William Boyd 



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HAROLD F. BIGELOW, JR. 

Take an impish grin, two twinkling eyes, a long, lanky frame, and a 
world-wise look; combine them, and you have Harold. 

Everyone who knows Harold will remember him as a friend well worth 
keeping. He was a good student, and could be found almost anytime in 
Al Cowan's office obtaining more mformation about raising Herefords. 

The whole class joins m to wish him a very happy life with his "Tennessee 
gal" and lots of success with his Herefords. 

HAROLD M. BLACKIE, JR. 

A practical joker, he once showed Professor Markuson a new way to set 
up a transit, and, in similar vein, demonstrated talent at talking bees into 
stinging classmates while he makes off with the honey. 

Blackie laughs easily and truly appreciates the comradeship of his class- 
mates. He has a serious side, however, for he is a deep thinker, is sincere in 
his friendship, and is always willing to help others. 

Blackie is watching closely the advance of pre-packaging in the vegetable 
grower's field, considering its possible applications to his corn and potatoes 
in the home partnership. 

FRANKLIN H. BLACKMAN, JR. "Frank" 

There aren't many of Frank's profs or classmates who haven't heard that 
famous, "Drop dead. Boy!" at one time or another. 

On fair days he can be seen racing madly to class on his bike. 
Although some of his classmates may not like his "reason for everything" 
theory, Frank seems to get along very well with his professors, and the fel- 
lows agree that he is an easy-going and very likeable person to have around. 

HARRY M. BOISSONEAULT 

Harry came with many ideas regarding the greenhouse business and is 
leaving with an enviable grasp of the theory behind such work. Harry likes 
a good time and would join the party whenever possible. Weekends in 
Southbridge and classes in Amherst kept him pretty busy most of the time. 

Harry plans to return to Sandusky, Ohio, where his parents are living, 
with a view to promoting a retail growing business. 

Best to you! 

WILLIAM A. BOWERS, JR. "Bill" 

Bill is a quiet, studious type of fellow, who exhibits quite a bit of humor 

in an unobtrusive, off-hand sort of way. 

In his senior year Bill was an active member of the Poultry Science Club. 

During the year he had a trailer on campus and with Chad as a companion 

drew the envy of many fellows who lived quite a distance from campus. 
He hopes to be a success in the poultry business. 

WILLIAM J. BOYD "Hoppy" 

Tall and dark haired is Bill, with an amiable smile and a fun-loving glint 

in his eye. Musically inclined, he collects semi-classical records as a hobby 

which occupies a lot of his leisure hours. 

"Hoppy" was the creator of the Formal Miniature Garden exhibited at 

the 1948 Hort. Show. His artistry in floral arrangement was effectively 

demonstrated in the Fashion-Flower Show. 

His ambition to become a retail florist is well assured if he continues as 

he has done in his years here at Stockbndge. 





Richard Eroderick 



Vernon Brooks 



RALPH C. BREED LANCASTER 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Four Ponds Nursery, Clinton 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma, 
Horticulture Club 1-2 

RICHARD T. BRODERICK BOSTON 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement University of Massachusetts Farm, Amherst 

Little International 2 

VERNON L. BROOKS MIDDLEBORO 

Floriculture 

Placement H. A. Cook & Son, Shrewsbury 

Shorthorn Board 2, Basketball 1-2, Manager 2, Floriculture 
Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, 10x10 2, Fraternity 1-2, 
Alpha Tau Gamma, Co-Editor of Fraternity Newsletter, 
Winter Carnival Committee 1-2, Veterans' Association 2, 
Fashion Flower Show 1-2, Co-chairman of Publicity, Col- 
legian Staff 1-2 

STANLEY J. BUCZYNSKI SUNDERLAND 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Idlenot Farm Dairy, North Springfield, Vermont 
Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 1, Frater- 
nity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma, Veterans' Association 1 

ROBERT S. BURLEY LUNENBURG 

Poultry 

Placement Coleman Poultry Farm, Leominster 

Basketball 1-2, Captain 2 Poultry Club 1-2 

STANLEY B. BUSS CHICOPEE 

Floriculture 

Placement A. E. Dunlop, Chicopee 

Floriculture Club 1, 4-H Club 2, Horticulture Show 1-2 



Stanley Buss 



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RALPH C. BREED 

Ralph is a likeable, good natured fellow. Although he is a Horticulture 
major, his interests are broad, and he is always ready to discuss any topic 
that may arise. He is very much interested in his field, and with his interest 
and willingness to work he will surely succeed at the Four Ponds Nursery. 

RICHARD T. BRODERICK "Dick" 

Dick is one of the few men who can sleep through lecture, then pass in an 

"A" notebook and come up with all the answers to the final exams. 

Being a neighbor of Mayor Curley on Beacon Hill, he has had no prior 

experience with beef cattle, but feels there is a place for Aberdeen Angus 

in New England. 

VERNON L. BROOKS "Vern" 

Brooksy has proven himself to be the Bill Stern of Stockbridge. His 
accurate and impartial write-ups of all the Stockbridge games these last 
two years have proven an interesting and a widely-read feature of the 
Collegian. 

The second year he was Coach Steve Kosakowski's right-hand man, 
managing the football and basketball teams. Many's the night the lights 
burned late in Vern's room while the gang settled down for a session about 
Mum stunt disease, his newly developed carnation. 

Vern's aims seem to be to own a commercial retail range; and if he applies 
himself as well to that as he has done to his studies and his heavy extra- 
curricular program, he will undoubtedly be a leading florist in years to come. 

STANLEY J. BUCZYNSKI "Stan" 

Big Stan is one of the most jovial men in the class. He is invariably 

smiling and willing to help a buddy. He has been extremely interested in 

Agronomy while in school, but in his spare time and during vacations he 

has tested milk for the D. H. I. A. His marks have always been with the 

best in the Animal Husbandry class. 

Well, Stan, we hope you'll find the right one to help you in your future 

program. If you do, and with your training at Stockbridge behind you, we 

know you'll get everything that you want in this world. 

ROBERT S. BURLEY "Bob" "Feather Merchant" 

Bob was a prominent figure on the basketball court during his two years 

here. 

A member of the Poultry Science Club, Bob enjoyed its many activities 

in connection with broiler raising and incubation work. 

You were apt to see or hear Bob and Bill Holmes riding down to Draper 

for breakfast after waking up the immediate neighborhood of 198 Sunset 

Avenue. 

STANLEY B. BUSS "Bussy" 

Ah yes, Stanley Buss, a guy we will long remember or, better still, will 

never forget. We have yet to find a boy with a more even disposition, the 

type of personality that makes you smile no matter how bad things may 

look or be. 

His real interest without a doubt is floriculture, and we feel sure that with 

his determination he will get to the top. 



A 







George Cadiero 




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J' M 

Walter Campbell, Jr. 



Clarence Cash 




GEORGE A. CADIERO BEDFORD 

Poultry 

Placement Jasper Poultry Farms, Hudson, New Hampshire 
Hockey 2, Manager, Poultry Club 1-2, Fraternity 2, Alpha 
Tau Gamma, Ski Club 1 

WALTER D. CAMPBELL, JR. MIDDLEBORO 

Horticulture 

Placement University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Football 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Horticulture Club 1-2, 
Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma, House Manager 

CLARENCE D. CASH GREENFIELD 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement LaSalle Ice Cream Company, Northampton 

Dairy Club 1-2, Veterans' Association 1-2 

WALTER F. CHACE SWANSEA 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Laneway Farm, Taunton 

Shorthorn Board 2, Photographic Editor, Animal Husbandry 
Club 1-2, Little International 2 

FRANK R. CHADBOURNE BRAINTREE 

Poultry 

Placement Mayo's Duck Farm, East Orleans 

Shorthorn Board 2, Literary Editor, Poultry Club 1-2, 
Veterans' Association 1, Chaplin 

JAMES F. CHRETIEN ROXBURY 

Poultry 

Placement Coburn Poultry Farm, Tyngsboro 

Poultry Club 1-2, 4-H Club 1, Veterans' Association 1-2 



James Chretien 



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GEORGE A. CADIERO "George" 

The experience that George gained on placement brought him back for 

his senior year bursting with ideas and enthusiasm. Any time of the day, 

and with very Httle urging, he would discuss elificiency, management or any 

phase of poultry. 

To own or manage a modern poultry farm is George's next goal. With his 

knowledge, experience and determination we feel sure he will find success 

not far away. 

WALTER D. CAMPBELL, JR. "Wally" 

It isn't very often we find a fellow like this who takes everything as it 

comes with never a harsh word to anyone. It hasn't been all take and no 

give with Wally, for he proved to be a very capable football player. 

Wally holds the distinction of being the House Manager of A. T. G., 

where he sees that everything runs smoothly. 

It's been a swell acquaintance these last two years, Wally, and we all 

wish you the best of luck possible. 

CLARENCE D. CASH "Small Change" 

Known to the rest of the fellows in the Dairy Class as "Small Change," 
Clarence outranks the rest of his class in age; and this has given him time to 
gain some experience in the Dairy industry. We believe that in "Small 
Change" we have a student that will go far in the Dairy industry, and we 
wish him plenty of luck. 

WALTER F. CHACE "Walt" 

Walt's plans for the future are clear and simple. After graduating he is 

going home to work his father's one hundred and forty acre dairy farm in 

Swansea. Eventually he plans to settle down on a dairy farm in northern 

New York State. 

Walt has a wonderful personality and is a good mixer. He is well liked 

by all who have worked with him, and he has the qualifications needed to 

make a successful dairy farmer. 

FRANK R. CHADBOURNE "Chad" 

"Chad," the name his friends know him by, is a person who doesn't 
say very much, but thinks a lot. He is calm and collected and is able to 
pass his subjects with ease. Because he doesn't like to get along without 
recreation, "Chad" makes it a practice to go on all roller skating parties 
and organized hikes. He likes automobiles very much and has seldom had 
to get along without one. He grew a mustache when he was on placement 
training because he felt that he looked younger than he is. "Chad" has the 
friendship and good will of all his classmates. 

JAMES F. CHRETIEN "Jim" 

As a student Jim has been among the best in the class, always adding 

something constructive to class discussions. He is well liked and admired 

by all his classmates. 

His ambition is to own, manage, and operate his own farm after gaining 

several years of experience. Everyone wishes him Godspeed and the best of 

health and happiness. 



A 




William Crowell 







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Harold Colemar 



Edward Conley 



Edward Cotton 




HAROLD E. COLEMAN GLOUCESTER 

Poultry 

Placement Hardy's, Essex 

Poultry Club 1-2, 4-H Club, 1-2, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau 

Gamma 

EDWARD F. CONLEY CAMBRIDGE 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement H. P. Hood Company, Charleston 

Veterans' Association 1-2 

EDWARD H. COTTON NORTHAMPTON 

Arboriculture 

Placement Halverson Tree Service, Pittsfield 

Football 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Arborculture Club 1-2, 
President 2 

NELSON E. CRAFTS NORTHAMPTON 

Fruit Growing 

Placement Mount Hope Farm, Williamstown 

Pomology Club 2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Rifle Club 1 

WILLIAM H. CROWELL EAST DENNIS 

Floriculture 

Placement Joel T. Whittemore, Stoneham 

Shorthorn Board 2, Outing Club 2, Floriculture Club 1-2, 
4-H Club 1-2, Ring Committee 2, Horticulture Store 1-2, 

ROBERT R. CUNNNIGHAM GROTON 

Poultry 

Placement Roger Owen, Amherst 

Dance Committee 1, Poultry Club 1-2, Treasurer, Frater- 
nity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma 



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Robert Cunningham 




HAROLD E. COLEMAN 

For the past nine years Harold has raised turkeys and is now considered 
one of the best turkey men around Gloucester. He is also interested in 
dairy farming. 

Harold doesn't say much about girls, but we notice that he goes home 
every weekend and about Tuesday morning will always receive a letter. 

We feel sure he will succeed in his own field. 

EDWARD F. CONLEY "Ed" 

Active in Dairy Club affairs, "Ed" has a cheerful smile and a great per- 
sonality to go with it. 

He has made many new friends on and away from campus. His dry hu- 
mor will long be remembered, and we feel sure his future will be an ex- 
cellent one. 

A portrait of Ed is the portrait of a man who wouldn't take "no" for 
an answer. 

EDWARD H. COTTON 'Ed " 

Ed is an all-round outdoor man. He likes hunting, fishing, skiing, skating, 
and cherchez la femme. Ed speaks Spanish quite well, having learned when 
he was down in Puerto Rico. 

With his likeable personality, aggressiveness, and ability, Ed will go far 
in his field, and we all want to wish him the best of everything in the days 
to come. 

NELSON E. CRAFTS "Junior" 

We have with us a quiet sort of fellow, whose ability to get along with the 

fairer sex is amazmg. Quiet, please, there is a genius working in our rnidst. 

He sees all and knows all, for alas, his wisdom is inexhaustible. This is our 

good friend. Junior, without whom our days at Stockbridge would have been 

uneventful. 

He looks forward to the time when he can buy a place of his own, but 

until that time he can be content as manager of some good-sized farm. 



WILLIAM H. CROWELL "Bill" 

Bill can be best recognized by his amiable smile and wilhngness to work. 
His most distinguished trait while with his Floriculture Group was his 

flare for last-minute accomplishment in designing floral pieces. 

Bill comes from the Cape Cod area where he intends to return. With 

cranberries as his cultural hobby, he will attempt to set himself up growing 

cut flower crops. 

ROBERT R. CUNNINGHAM "Bob" 

Bob is really an energetic fellow at heart and takes great interest in any 
new development designed to lighten the work of the poultry farmer. It 
is his goal to invent machinery that will enable the farmer to spend only 
5% of his time on gainful employment and devote 95% to social activities. 
Until his inventions appear on the market. Bob will busy himself by raising 
chickens the hard way on his poultry farm at Groton. 

We all wish him the best of luck. 



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James Darling 



Gordon Davidson 



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Henry Davis III 




JAMES A. DARLING 

Floriculture 
Placement 
Horticulture Show 1-2 



FAIRHAVEN 



Darling's Flower Shop, Fairhaven 



WORCESTER 



GORDON H. DAVIDSON 

Floriculture 

Placement Hixon's Greenhouses, Worcester 

Shorthorn Board 2, Assistant Literary Editor, Glee Club l-r2, 
President 1-2. Floriculture Club 1, Horticulture Show 1-2, 
Main Feature Committee 1, Chairman of Maintenance Com- 
mittee 2, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma, Co-Editor of 
Fraternity paper 2, Collegian 1-2, Stockbridge Editor 1-2, 
Student Christian Association 1-2, Publicity Committee 1-2, 
Phillips Brooks Club 1-2, University of Massachusetts De- 
Molay Club 1-2, Publicity Chairman 1-2 

HENRY F. DAVIS III WESTWOOD 

Arboriculture 

Placement R. D. Lowden, 1274 Great Plain Avenue, Westwood 

Arborculture Club 1-2, Concert Association 2 

ROBERT M. DEGEN ADAMS 

Poultry 

Placement North Adams 

Poultry Club 2, Fraternity, Alpha Tau Gamma 

JOHN J. DESLAURIERS WARE 

Arboriculture 

Placement Hartney Tree Company, Boston 

Fraternity, Kappa Kappa 

JOSEPH DIRICO MARLBORO 

Arboriculture 

Placement Marlboro Forestry Department, Marlboro 



Joseph Dirico 



JAMES A. DARLING "Jim" 

Jim is a shy and quiet fellow who displays an entertaining wit among his 
intimate friends. 

After graduation Jim hopes to operate a retail grower's establishment of 
his own. At present he is gaining experience on weekends at his grand- 
father's greenhouses in Fairhaven. 

We certainly have enjoyed your friendship while at Stockbridge, Jim, 
and we wish you all the success and luck in the world 

GORDON H. DAVIDSON "G. H." "Editor" "Buttercup" 

The facts were such as to indicate that G. H. was always in at least two 
places at the same time, especially where extra-curricular work was con- 
cerned. 

But in addition to such interests, as the newspaper, floriculture, and all- 
night parties, G. H. found time for one more. He scraped up time and money 
for weekends in Manchester, New Hampshire. Judging by his conversation, 
this northern interest commanded much more of his attention than school, 
friends, or studies. 

Whatever field he chooses, failure for G. H. seems impossible. 

HENRY F. DAVIS III "Hank" "Sach" "Harvey" 

Harry has been well known about campus as one of the more energetic 
members of the class of "49." He studied hard, but studies have never pre- 
vented his seeing a very attractive blonde on weekends. 

His main interest is to make good both in school and in Needham. His 
infectious laugh, which has so much zest and volume to it, will long con- 
tinue to ecno in the halls about campus. 

ROBERT M. DEGEN "Bob" 

Bob has leased a 60-acre poultry, dairy and fruit farm for a seven year 
term. At the young age of 20 Bob has taken on the operation and manage- 
ment of what we all hope to be a successful enterprise. It means a lot of 
work and long hours, but Bob is a very ambitious and hard worker both in 
school and in the field. 
Good luck, Bob! 

JOHN J. DESLAURIERS 

A fast thinking lad from the "Little Town That Could Not Be Licked," 
and his spirit reflects the same stamina. His keen interest in all sports 
makes him the all-around sportsman that he is. He is a good "tree man," 
but one of his ambitions is to eliminate the use of fish oil or disguise it to 
smell like Chanel No. 5. 

We all wish him loads of luck and success. 

JOSEPH DIRICO "Joe" 

This quiet, well-dressed, clean-cut young man is the object of the envy 
of many a student on campus. Probably the most important thing in Joe's 
stay at Stockbridge was his becoming a proud poppa. We have often won- 
dered how a man could be married, be a father, study and still have time to 
do a little hunting and fishing. Maybe he has something a lot of us just 
"ain't" got. 

We all want to wish you, Joe, the best of luck and a prosperous and happy 
future. 



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Richard Dowley 



Charles Drake 



Everett Drumm 



Joseph Eggleston 




Donald Ellis 






RICHARD B. DOWLEY NEWFANE, VERMONT 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Kenolie Farm, Newfane, Vermont 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 1-2 

CHARLES E. DRAKE AMHERST 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Football 1-2, Basketball 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2. Horti- 
culture Club 2 

EVERETT F. DRUMM ALFORD 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Twin Oaks Farm, Alford, State Line 

Shorthorn Board 2, Art Editor, Dairy Club 1-2, Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1-2, 4-H Club 1-2, Little International 2 

JOSEPH L. EGGLESTON DANVERS 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Danvers State Hospital, Danvers 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 2 

DONALD R. ELLIS WINCHESTER 

Vegetable Growing 

Placement Lookout Farm, South Natick 

Hockey 2, Olericulture Club 1 

JAMES P. EMERSON CHELMSFORD 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement DeNormandie Farm, South Lincoln 

Student Council 1-2, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little 
International 1-2, Fraternity 1-2, Treasurer of Alpha Tau 
Gamma, Ski Club 1, Rifle Club 1, Vice President, Veterans' 
Association 1-2 



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les tmerson 




RICHARD B. DOWLEY "Dick" 

Dick is an Animal Husbandry major from the Maple Sugar State, Ver- 
mont. He is a firm believer in Fords, and we all hope, Dick, that you and 
Moe Fontanella will come to some agreement on the car of the future — 
Chewy or Ford. 

One of those Sea-going boys, Dick gave generously of his time to the U. S. 
Navy before coming to Stockbridge. 

Well, Dick, we wish you luck with your Holstein herd, and may there be 
many Fords in your future. 

CHARLES E. DRAKE "Red" 

Charlie is a likeable, happy-go-lucky fellow, but when there is a job to be 
done, he is Charlie-on-the-spot. Red has shown that he is a team man right 
from the time the game starts until the final whistle is blown. With 
those qualifications, he just can't help being a success. 

EVERETT F. DRUMM "Ev" 

He has lived and worked on his grandfather's farm for over nine years in 
his spare time. After graduation from high school, Ev worked on the farm 
for one year to get some experience; then he entered Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture. He majored in An. Hus. to learn the finer points of farming. 
He intends to become a farm manager and a homemaker in the very near 
future. 

JOSEPH L. EGGLESTON "Joe" 

Joe is a likeable guy, very popular with his classmates, and he and his 

buddy "Mo" Fontanella were an inseparable combination on the campus. 

When you saw "Joe," "Mo" would undoubtedly be close at hand, at least, 

until the beginning of the last semester, when the short course ofifice tried to 

"divorce" them by giving them different class schedules. 
Although "Joe" is a fairly serious lad, his fits of hardy and spontaneous 

laughter will long be remembered by all. 

DONALD R. ELLIS "Don" 

Don is a quiet fellow who doesn't say much; but when he does, his class- 
mates take heed. 

He has played on the S. S. A. Hockey team for the past two years and 
has done well scholastically at Stockbridge. He and his close friend "Black- 
ie" have shared a room in Sunderland, which is their second home. 

Upon graduation he intends to go into vegetable farming. We know that 
he will be a success. 

JAMES P. EMERSON "Jim" 

Big Jim, as Al Cowan would say, is the long, slender, speedy type. 
One of Jim's great delights is to wire up "Buck's" car so that "Buck" 
gets 10,000 volts in the you-know-what. 

In spite of what has just been said Jim is one of the best mannered and 
best liked students on campus. He is a good mixer and participates in many 
extra-curricular activities. We all wish him the best of luck in his father and 
son partnership with Holsteins and "Surge Milking Machines." 



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Harrison Fecteau 




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Harry Flood, Jr. 




Edward Fontanella 




HARRISON B. FECTEAU SOUTH HADLEY 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Baltzer Tree Service, Northampton 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Fraternity 1-2. Alpha Tau Gamma, 
Horticulture Club 1-2 



HARRY A. FLOOD, JR. 

Fruit Growing 

Placement Fruit Acres, 

Football 1-2, Hockey 1-2, Pomology Club 1 



HUDSON 



Gleasondale 



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EDWARD FONTANELLA 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Medfield State Hospital. Medfield 

Animal Husbandry Club 1, Little International 2 

C. PETER FRANKENBERG CONCORD 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Montebello Point Farm, Newbury, Vermont 

Class Officer 2, Vice-President, Shorthorn Board 1-2, Foot- 
ball 1-2, Basketball 1, Animal Husbandry Club 1, Fraternity 
1-2, President of Alpha Tau Gamma, Little International 2 

JOHN H. FRAZIER AMHERST 

Vegetable Growing 

Placement Lookout Farm, South Natick 

4-H Club 1-2, Fraternity 1-2, Kappa Kappa Historian 2 

PAUL J. FREDERICK WINTHROP 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Mount Auburn Cemetery, Cambridge 

Shorthorn Board 2, Football 1, Horticulture Show 1-2, 
Fraternity 2, Alpha Tau Gamma, Winter Carnival Commit- 
tee 1-2, Horticulture Club 1-2 



HARRISON B. FECTEAU "Harry" 

The thing that amazes us all is how he can keep warm by only wearing a 
sweater throughout the winter. Always confident, Harry claims that he 
can flunk any test, any time, given by any Professor. Every so often a dull 
lecture is brightened up with a touch of his wit. 

He plans to continue working at Balsa's Tree Service, and hopes even- 
tually to visit Oregon. 

HARRY A. FLOOD, JR. "Floody" 

Floody, one of our energetic Pomology members, is always willing to lend 
a helping hand or take someone somewhere. A more loyal buddy would be 
hard to find. Most of us remember his "corny" jokes --it seems as though 
we never could get the point, could we, Harry? But that never bothered his 
smile or easy disposition. 

We all wish Harry the best there is. 

EDWARD FONTENELLA "Mo" 

"Mo" is a very thrifty person. Even his smile is the large economy size; 
and this, linked with his magnetic personality and dexterity at squeezing 
music out of a chunk of ivory and chrome (known as an accordian), ex- 
plained "Mo's" ability to gather friends from every part of the campus. 
Although a confirmed bachelor, "Mo" is tolerant of the opposite sex, and 
respects their efforts. 

Though small in stature, "Mo" is supercharged with such drive and dy- 
namic determination that nothing could possibly check his efforts to attain 
a material ambition — that of owning his own grain business, or an aspira- 
tion of a more spiritual nature — happiness. 

C. PETER FRANKENBERG "Pete" 

The town of Concord is renowned not only for its historical background 
but for bemg the home of Peter Frankenberg. We have every reason to 
thank Concord for sending such a swell guy to us for two years. We can 
never forget his gentle humor and kind courteous ways. 

In the two years that he has been here, Pete has proved his ability on the 
gridiron as well as in the classroom. He was also accepted into Alpha Tau 
Gamma Fraternity and was elected President for the second year. Pete 
was never known to say an unkind word to anyone, and his big red Jeep has 
given aid to many a foot-weary student. 

We can safely predict that Pete will be a success in his chosen profession 
and an asset to his community. 

JOHN H. FRAZIER 

He is one of those ambitious young men who work evenings while going 
to school. Don't think that John lets his work interfere with studies though. 
More than once has John burned the midnight oil well into the early morn- 
ing at Kappa Kappa. 

John's sharp wits have convulsed his classmates for two years. We often 
wonder where he gets those jokes. 

When he graduates John intends to go into the vegetable growing business. 

PAUL J. FREDERICK 

From the stern and rockbound coast of Winthrop, Paul (self-titled 
"Winthrop's gift to women") came to Stockbridge in hopes of learning all 
there is to know about Horticulture. 

Two years on campus for Paul meant not only classwork, but also over 
night trips to New York, or midnight escapades to Boston. 

Paul is returning to Winthrop with a fair bit of Horticulture beneath his 
belt, an adaptness at ping-pong, and the addresses of a host of new friends 
he's made on campus. 

Good luck from all of us, Paul! 



A 







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James Geneva 




Charles Frost 



Alexander Galanis 



George Galusha, Jr. 




CHARLES A. FROST SUDBURY 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Briandale Farms, Concord 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 1, Ring 
Committee 2 

ALEXANDER GALANIS MARLBORO 

Fine Turf 

Placement Concord Country Club, Concord 

Horticulture Show 1-2 

GEORGE N. GALUSHA, JR. GRANBY 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement G. N. Galusha, Granby 

Shorthorn 2, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, 4-H Club 1, Little 
International 2, Student Christian Association 1 

JAMES C. GENEVA WEST BOYLSTON 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Surprenant Estate, West Boylston 

Horticulture Show 2, Fraternity 1, Kappa Kappa, Horti- 
culture Club 1 

CHARLES C. GIACOBBE REVERE 

Vegetable Gardening 

Placement National Perishable Inspection Service, Boston 

Horticulture Show 2, Olericulture Club 1 

AARON I. GOTLIB NEW BEDFORD 

Floriculture 

Placement Shaw Greenhouses, North Dartmouth 



Aaron Gotlib 



CHARLES A. FROST "Chuck" 

After graduation, Chuck plans to return to the family farm in Sudbury 

and establish a diversified business. The enterprises will include dairy and 

poultry. 

Chuck takes the best wishes from the class for success in his career. 

ALEXANDER GALANIS "Alex" 

Alex was quiet and conservative but a friend to all. It is one of Massa- 

chusett's misfortunes to lose such a good man to California, but with us he 

leaves a memory of "a regular guy." 

Here's hoping you have a pleasant trip, and may all your troubles be 

little ones. 

GEORGE N. GALUSHA, JR. 

With a cheery smile for everyone, George was up early every morning, 
raring to go. During the day his ambition never ran out. He plays musical 
instruments which number a dozen, including whistling. 

Having taken his placement on his father's Dairy Farm, he hopes to re- 
turn after graduation and take over the business with his father. We are 
all sure George will be a success in anything he does, and wish him best of 
luck in the future. 

JAMES C. GENEVA "Jim" 

With the close of the senior year coming we find Jim preparing to take an 

additional year of Arboriculture, which he feels will give him a stronger 

background and put him in a better position to adapt himself to any phase 

of Horticulture. 

A member of Kappa Kappa fraternity, he participated in most sports 

and did some fancy baseball tossing. We feel his activeness will carry him 

far in his field. 

CHARLES C. GIACOBBE "Charley" 

Charley, a Vegetable Gardener, talked a good game. Hard-working by 
nature, he took on a job at Draper Hall, where he not only secured meals, 
but enjoyed feminine companionship. When not otherwise occupied, he 
talked baseball — especially his favorite Red Sox — to anyone and every- 
one who would listen. 

Upon graduation Charley plans to move to Maryland, where he has se- 
cured a position with the Federal Perishable Foods Company. 

AARON L GOTLIB 

A sly wit and a broad smile revealed Aaron at his best. He has gained 
our respect for his theory regarding cultural practices and is looking for- 
ward to owning his own retail business after a few year's actual experience. 

He kept pretty busy around the campus, escorting his feminine friends 
home and on week ends putting his time in at the local First National Store. 

Your initiative will win! 



A 







Lawrence Graham 



Fred Grandy 



Francis Grinnell 



LAWRENCE E. GRAHAM ARLINGTON 

Fine Turf 

Placement Woodway Country Club, Springdale, Connecticut 

Student Council 2, Fraternity 2, President of Kappa Kappa 



Richard Hannum 




John Harbilas 



FRED R. GRANDY HUDSON 

Poultry 

Placement Manomet, R. F. D. Plymouth 

Outing Club 1-2, Poultry Club 1-2, President 2, Community 
Chest 1-2 

FRANCIS N. GRINNELL NORTH DARTMOUTH 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement High Hill Farm, North Dartmouth 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 2 

RICHARD S. HANNUM LUDLOW 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Norwich Lake Farm, Huntington 

Shorthorn Board 2, Business Manager, Animal Husbandry 
Club 1-2, Little International 2, Fraternity, Alpha Tau 
Gamma, Veterans' Association 1 

JOHN N. HARBILAS HOLYOKE 

Floriculture 

Placement Westover Greenhouses, Willimansett 

Orchestra 1, Glee Club 1, Floriculture 2, Horticulture Show 1-2 



DONALD M. HAWES 

Animal Husbandry 



SUDBURY 



1 


Placement Verrill's Farm, Concord 


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Shorthorn Board 2, Statistics Editor, Animal Husbandry 


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Club 1-2, Little International 2 


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LAWRENCE E. GRAHAM "Larry" 

Larry has proven himself in the field of Fine Turf, ranking near the top 
of his class, and has always been more than willing to cooperate in aiding 
others in their quest for knowledge. 

Elected president of Kappa Kappa Fraternity, he has done an out- 
standing job of arranging social affairs for the enjoyment of all. 

With the solid foundation gained from his Fine Turf Course, there is no 
doubt that Larry will become outstanding in his field. 

FRED R. GRANDY 

Congenial, fun loving, quiet when on a date, Fred takes quite a ribbing 
from the boys from 461 N. Pleasant Street and likes to play cards in his few 
spare minutes. Always smiling (well, most of the time), he is a good man to 
have around when some heavy work has to be done. AH he needs now is to 
find someone or something to tie him down and make him work off some of 
his excess weight. His thoughts run along with the rest of the young men 
in hoping to be his own boss someday. 

FRANCIS N. GRINNELL "Old Jock" 

Frank, the fellow who was told he was too old for a Stockbridge educa- 
tion, finished near the top of his class. 

Known as "Old Jock" by his classmates, he is an ardent Brown Swiss 
man. His quiet humor and ready wit are characteristics that make him 
well liked by all his classmates. 

RICHARD S. HANNUM "Dick' 

Dick came to Stockbridge to master the principles of scientific farming' 
which combine all the latest information and new inventions into a push 
button affair that can be controlled from a comfortable deep-cushioned 
chair. This was the setup he'd been dreaming about while doing duty for 
"Uncle Sam." 

Having sailed through his first year exams with flying colors, Dick went 
off to summer placement on a farm where the down to earth principles of 
farming were practiced. 

There was a noticeable change in our friend when he registered for his 
final year. He had lost his military manner and regained his New England 
birthright of independence in speech, action, and thought. 

JOHN N. HARBILAS "Harbie" 

When you ask "Harbie" a question and he replies. "Well, I tell ya," 
then you may as well pull up a chair and prepare yourself for a long story. 
Seriously though, John has proved to be an eager beaver about school. In 
spite of having had no previous experience in Fieri., he has always been 
willing to give a helping hand when and wherever he could. 

After John graduates, he intends to go to a designing school and hopes to 
become a retail grower. 

DONALD M. HAWES "Don" 

Don hails from Sudbury, where he has worked with a herd of beef ani- 
mals. Sometime in the future, the beef cows will give way to a herd of milk- 
ing cows. 

While at Stockbridge he has proved to be one of the leaders of the class, 
and everyone knows him for the enthusiasm he brings to all of his under- 
takings. 

Anyone seeing a black streak going down the road knew it was Don in 
his '36 Ford. 





Alice Howarth 



William Holmes 



EDWIN S. HAYES 

Fruit Growing 
Placement 
Pomology Club 1-2 



WESTHAMPTON 

Wolf Hill Orchards, Southampton 

HUBBARDSTON 



ELMER R. HILL 

Floriculture 

Placement Ledge Greenhouses, Athol 

Shorthorn Board 2, Floriculture Club 2, Horticulture Show 1-2 

WILLIAM S. HOLMES QUEBEC, CAN. 

Floriculture 

Placement Frank J. Baker & Sons, Utica, N. Y. 

Football 1-2, Hockey 1-2, Floriculture club 1-2, Treasurer 2, 
Horticulture Show 1-2, 10x10 2, Winter Carnival Committee 1 

ROBERT A. HOMANS SPRINGFIELD 

Vegetable Growing 

Placement Vegetable Acre Farm. Forestdale 

Horticulture Show 2 

ALICE L. HOWARTH UPTON 

Poultry 

Placement John W. Schoonmaker, Amherst 

Glee Club 2, Poultry Club 1-2, Assistant Secretary 1-2, Stu- 
dent Christian Association 1 



HUGH F. HUBBARD 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement 

Veterans' Association 1 



WHITMAN 



Millens Farms Dairy, Whitman 




EDWIN S. HAYES "Ed" 

Ed is the married veteran in the Pomology class. He is very popular with 

his classmates and can get along with anybody. He is a topnotcher in all 

his classes and in anything he undertakes. 

For a man with no experience in agriculture prior to Stockbridge, Ed 

showed us what hard work, aggressiveness, and stick-to-itivness will do in 

bringing a man to the top. 

ELMER R. HILL "Porky" "Baldy" "Ray" 

It has been said about Ray that there wasn't a greenhouse aisle large 

enough for him to pass through. But fat people are generally jolly people, 

and this, too, is true of Ray. 

Ray came from Hubbardston to take floriculture here at Stockbridge. 

His interests in flowers extended beyond the classroom to the window sills 

of his room, where geraniums and carnations were often seen. 

Ray was truly a member in good standing in the Green Thumb Class. 

WILLIAM S. HOLMES "Bill" 

Tall, blonde and sporting an effervescent personality. Bill comes from 
Canada where women are women and Bill knows it. It wasn't long after 
entering as a Flori major that his aptitude blossomed as that of an open- 
minded culturist. 

Promptness and accuracy are two of Bill's traits, and it should not be 
forgotten that he did a good job in connection with the Annual Hort. Show. 
Bill plans to receive additional experience here in the States and then re- 
turn to Canada to work with his father. 

ROBERT A. HOMANS "Bob" 

Bob is the ambitious looking young fellow you see about campus carrying 
a big, black briefcase. We have often wondered whether he carries his books 
in there or his lunch since Bob is a fellow who really enjoys eating. 

One of the brightest and most studious in his class. Bob spends many 
hours each night on his homework. His marks verify this. 

Upon graduation Bob intends to go into the seed industry Good luck to 
a swell fellow. 



ALICE L. HOWARTH 

Alice's cheerful smile will be remembered by her many friends in the 
Poultry class and on campus. Although she majored in Poultry, Alice finds 
real satisfaction in caring for all animals. 

Her ability to handle a ball bat or ping-pong paddle keeps her opponents 
on their toes one poultry major in particular. 

In a world that needs more smiling and helpful persons, we feel sure that 
Alice will have no trouble in finding a suitable niche. 

HUGH F. HUBBARD 

Hugh is one of the more prominent members of the Dairy class, and is 
well liked by all of his classmates 

Although a jokester who always keeps the class well supplied with all 
kinds of wit and satire, Hugh is a very industrious person, and we all know 
that he will go far in his chosen field. 



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Merrill Hussey 



Herbert Hutchings, Jr. 



Paul Jennings 



Warren Jermain 




MERRILL K. HUSSEY EAST LYNN 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement W. C. Woodruff & Son, Lunenburg 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 2, Kappa 
Kappa 1-2 

HERBERT C. HUTCHINGS, JR. AMHERST 

Poultry 

Placement W. C. Atkins, Amherst 

Football 1, Poultry Club 1-2, Winter Carnival Committee 1 

PAUL J. JENNINGS BRIGHTON 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Island Guernsey Farm, West Tisbury 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 2 

WARREN W. JERMAIN CLINTON 

Vegetable Growing 

Placement Whitmore & Richardson, Sunderland 

Olericulture Club 1 




GEORGE E, JONES, JR. BELMONT 

Vegetable Growing 

Placement Vegetable Acre Farm, Forestdale 

Hockey 2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Olericulture 2, Vice Presi- 
dent, Winter Carnival Committee 2 



WILLIAM H. KENNEDY 

Fine Turf 
Placement 
Horticulture Show 1-2 



LONGMEADOW 

Weston Golf Club. Weston 



MERRILL K. HUSSEY "Huz" 

"Huz" is an An. Hus. man from way back. His favorite breed is the 
Holstein-Friesian. 

Traffic officer of Kappa Kappa, his "Cruiser" is a big 1938 La Salle coupe 
well known to both the students and to the Agricultural Engineering in- 
structors. Huz plans to get married, buy a farm, and raise a big herd of 
Holsteins plus four sons. 

We all feel that Huz will make the best of his opportunities and be a suc- 
cess in his career. 

HERBERT C. HUTCHINGS, JR. "Herb" 

Herb invariably can be counted upon to arrive late to class. Commuting 

from South Amherst, he first stops to take care of some 2,000 chickens. 

He has his own business raising hatching eggs and is building his own house. 
Whether he will go on to more college or to raising bigger and better 

chicks, or both, we know his quick grin and abounding energy will carry 

him through. 

PAUL J. JENNINGS 

Paul Jennings is one of the most likeable fellows in his class. Easygoing 
and always ready with a laugh, he has made many strong friendships 
among classmates. 

He is a firm believer in "all study and no play makes Paul a dull boy" 
and guards against it accordingly. 

Many were the discussions in Agronomy in which he took part, although 
not infrequently he was the loser. 

We are sure Paul will make a good progressive farmer and one always 
ready to accept new developments and ideas. 

WARREN W. JERMAIN 

The "37" Oldsmobile that wheels into Commonwealth Circle every 
morning from Montague, laden down with students, belongs to none other 
than Warren W. Jermain. 

Being interested in farming from early youth it was little wonder that he 
enrolled at Stockbridge after his release from the service. 

He hopes someday to convert an apple orchard into a wholesale vegetable 
growing business. 

GEORGE E. JONES, JR. 

George, the handsome, energetic young man from Belmont, is an ambi- 
tious fellow whose mtelligent understanding and originality of thought has 
amazed many a prof. 

George can be seen cruising about campus with his inseparable buddy. 
Bud Swartz, in Bud's jeep between classes. 

If you want to know about the latest developments along the veg. grow- 
ing line, just ask George. He is an avid sports fan, too, and will argue with 
you about any subject under the sun. 

He hopes someday to be farming on his own farm in the Littleton vicinity. 

WILLIAM H. KENNEDY "Bill" 

Bill is keen of eye and fleet of foot. He has had quite a time commuting 

from East Longmeadow during the winter months because of icy roads, 

often unsanded, and slow-moving tralific and has had to have split-second 

timing to get under the wire for class. 

Bill is witty, and enjoys jokes on himself as well as on others. 

Soon he will transfer his activities to golf course maintenance, and take 

up the serious study of becoming a greenkeeper or park superintendent. 



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Andrew Ketchen, Jr. 




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Roy Kimball, Jr. 





ANDREW G. KETCHEN, JR. WAYLAND 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Weathersfield Farm, Danvers 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 2 

ROY W. KIMBALL, JR. HAVERHILL 

Poultry 

Placement Price's Poultry Farm, Boxford 

Shorthorn Board 2, Poultry Club 1-2 

LOREN M. KING, JR. HUDSON 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Northampton State Hospital, Northampton 

Shorthorn Board Assistant Art Editor 2. Animal Husbandry 
Club 2, Little International 2 

KENNETH B. KIRK WALPOLE 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Eastern Tree & Landscape Corporation. Dedham 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Kappa Kappa 1, Horticulture Club 2 

JACOB KUPELIAN NORTHBRIDGE 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Kupelian Farm, Northbridge 

Shorthorn 2, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, 4-H,Club 1-2, Little 
International 2, Kappa Kappa 2 

NORMAN B. LADD MILFORD, CONNECTICUT 

Fine Turf 

Placement Racebrook Country Club, New Haven, Conn. 

Horticulture Show 1-2 



ANDREW G. KETCHEN, JR. "Kelch" 

Ketch has spent a lot of time on the farm, learning the practical side of 

agriculture. Knowing the practical side quite well, he realized that to make 

a real success one needs technical knowledge; so he proceeded to enroll at 

Stockbridge. 

While at Stockbridge he owned a '34 Chev., which carried him many miles 

in many directions. 

His future plans are to own a farm of his own and produce a good strain 

of Jerseys 

ROY W. KIMBALL, JR. 

Roy is a lanky lad, always cooperative and m good spirits 

With farming in his blood it has been ne.xt to impossible for him to wait 

until he can get started on his own farm. He never took his eye off that 

final goal during his two years here at Stockbridge. 

Stockbridge teams will lose, without a doubt, their most loyal rooter 

when Roy graduates. 

LOREN M. KING, JR. 

A "city slicker" makes good. Consider this as the truth, for we have all 
watched "him obtain the highest grades in all the subjects he undertook. In 
his first year at Stockbridge he amazed us by his high grades, but in his 
second year his scholarship was taken as a matter of course. 

Loren, before starting his second year, assumed the responsibilities of 
married life. 

In his two years at Stockbridge he has been a good influence to all who 
have known him and we know that he will be a success in everything he 
undertakes. 

KENNETH B. KIRK "Ken" 

Ken is a good natured person with a fine sense of humor and a pleasant 

smile for everyone. If, after classes, you are in need of a ride, just pile into 

the back of Ken's truck along with the rest of the fellows. 

Ken is noted for his class-time "siestas" which, everyone realizes, are a 

result of his burning the midnight oil. 

Ken's ambition is shown by his interest in Saturday work with Eastern 

Tree & Landscape Service. 

JACOB KUPELIAN "Jake" 

Jake is well known around campus as a debater, as many a friend who 
has attempted to argue with him has found out. Jake has the rare ability 
of arguing a subject either known or unknown to him and usually winds up 
leaving his opponent breathless, stunned and wondering what made him 
decide to argue with Jake in the first place. 

Upon graduation Jake plans to return home and raise a profitable herd 
of Ayrshires. 

NORMAN B. LADD 

This tall, good-looking lad is one of the quieter members of the Fine Turf 
class, but is always in high spirits. Norman is very fortunate to possess these 
traits, for it has gained him many friends both on campus and in town. In 
fact you just enjoy having him around. 

In class he is very attentive and energetic, and earned a high average. 
Also when he wants to express himself, he speaks in a refined cultured voice. 
Norman's many outside activities include skiing. 

All in all he certainly has been an asset to the school and a pleasure to 
know. 







Lyndon Lafley 



Allan Leskinen 



Francis Lyman, Jr. 





LYNDON W. LAFLEY SPRINGFIELD 

Food Management 

Placement Severance Lodge, Center Lovell, Maine 

Glee Club 1, Pandocios Club Vice-President 1, Treasurer 2, 
Horticulture Show 1-2, Chairman Food Management Ex- 
hibit 1. Fraternity 1-2, Kappa Kappa 

ALLAN O. LESKINEN HUBBARDSTON 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Delmor Tryon Farm, Monterey 

Class Treasurer 2, Shorthorn Board 2 Assistant Photographic 
Editor, Football 2, Basketball 1, Little International 2, 
Alpha Tau Gamma 1-2 

FRANCIS B. LYMAN, JR. AMHERST 

Fruit Growing 

Placement Markert Fruit Farm, Amherst 

Pomology Club 1-2. Horticulture Show 1-2 

THOMAS P. LYONS WOBURN 

Vegetable Growing 

Placement Home Farm, Woburn 

Shorthorn- Board 2, Hockey 1, Horticulture Show 1-2, Oleri- 
culture Club 2 

DONALD MACKAY, JR. EAST HARTFORD, CONN. 

Fine Turf 

Placement Hartford Golf Club. West Hartford, Connecticut 

Hockey 1, Ski Club 1 



Donald Mackay, Jr. 








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HARRY L. MACKINNON, JR. 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Toll Gate Farm, Litchfield, 

Little International 2, Veterans' Association 1 


MELROSE 

Connecticut 




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DONALD C. MC CRAY 


MONSON 


















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Harry MacKinnon, Jr. 









LYNDON W. LAFLEY "Lindy" 

"Lindy" is gifted with a well of knowledge concerning Food Management. 
Whenever there are any questions about recipes or other problems, Lindy 
is the one to be consulted. 

One of the two married members of the Food Management Class, Lindy 
may be seen sporting in his well-known tan convertible. 

Lindy has the personality that makes friends wherever he goes, and any- 
one who knows him is proud to claim him as a friend. 

ALLAN O. LESKINEN "Dopey" "Al" 

Tall, lanky Al was a very familiar sight around campus; and whenever 
the "Big Finn" was absent from the picture, one could almost always find 
him at his home on Main Street with his pretty wife. 

On the football field and basketball court, "Big Al" could always be de- 
pended upon to come through m a pinch. 

A man with a definite goal in mind, Al is sure to go a long way. 

FRANCIS B. LYMAN, JR. 

Francis can be recognized by his stocky build and his farmer's walk. He 
is a good, all-around fellow ?nd a good friend indeed. Smiling and wearing a 
generous grin, he has a knack of mixing play with work and being the 
class tease. The pomology group would be lost without Francis. 

We are sure that his determination and good nature will carry him far in 
the field of fruit and poultry. 

THOMAS P. LYONS "Tom" 

Tom is a tall, dark-haired, blue-eyed fellow of whom it is reported that 
he is the young up-and-coming farmer of Woburn. Tom's dad owns and 
operates a fine greenhouse where Tom first received his inspiration to be- 
come another in the line of successful Lyons to till the soil. 

Tom is a hard-working student who has maintained a good lead both in 
school and extra-curricular activities on campus. 

DONALD MACKAY, JR. "Mac" 

Don is a friendly, energetic lad, who always has a good word to say about 

his friends. "Mac" has contributed his share of humor to the class by his 

Scotch sayings. 

A natural turf superintendent, Mac is already well on his way to success. 

HARRY L. MACKINNON, JR. 

While attending Stockbridge, Harry has become decidedly interested in 
Ayrshire cattle and has been involved in many heated arguments about 
their merits. If you ask if they are wild, he will say, "No, they aren't; just 
dehorn 'em and set all four feet in concrete." 

There is no doubt, however, that Harry is a good Ayrshire man, and we 
think that he is about right in choosing a good breed when he sees one. 



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Herbert Mague 



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Christopher Makrides 





HERBERT A. MAGUE LITTLETON 

Poultry 

Placement Larson's Windswept Farm, Billerica 

Shorthorn Board 2, Football 1-2, Manager 2, Basketball 1-2, 

Manager 1, Poultry Club 1-2, Newman Club 1-2 

CHRISTOPHER MAKRIDES SOMERVILLE 

Floriculture 

Placement G. O. Anderson & Son, Arlington 

Floriculture Club 1, Horticulture Show 2, Newman Club 1 

GEORGE C. MARGOSIS 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement 55 North Street, Pittsfield 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Horticulture Club 1 

DONALD O. MARTIN EAST LONGMEADOW 

Floriculture 

Placement Allen Street Greenhouses, Springfield 

Floriculture Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, 10x10 2, Winter 
Carnival Committee 2, Veterans' Association 1-2 

FRANK L. MERRILL, JR. SOMERSET 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Deershorn Farm, Sterling Junction 

Little International 2, Winter Carnival Committee 1, Veter- 
ans' Association 1 



FRANK R. MIANO 

Arboriculture 
Placement 
Horticulture Show 2 



HOLYOKE 

Dodge Associates, Wenham 



Frank Miano 




HERBERT A. MAGUE "Herb" 

An Irishman with a temper, even though he hasn't got red hair. He found 

enjoyment in the field of sports, in playing basketball, and in managing the 

football team which absorbed most of his extra-curricular time. 

Herb is an ardent poultryman who will discuss all phases of the subject 

thoroughly and accurately whenever given the chance. 

It is Herb's ambition to own and operate a poultry farm successfully. 

CHRISTOPHER MAKRIDES "Greek" 

Chris is a quiet, likeable person and a sincere friend to anyone who knows 
him. 

Chris' over-enthusiasm for keeping up with his studies has confined him 
pretty much to himself. Being a co-chairman of the clean-up committee 
in the Hoticulture Show, Chris showed his ability in carrying out a re- 
sponsibility. 

Chris' aggressiveness and determination will enable him to go far in the 
retail growers business. 

GEORGE C. MARGOSIS 

George, the quiet fellow who doesn't say much, has a pleasing personality, 
and a pleasant smile for everyone. 

George started as an Arboriculture major but transferred to Ornamental 
Horticulture in his senior year. 

George hopes to exhibit his talents in the field of work he really likes by 
establishing himself in the landscape business. 

DONALD O. MARTIN "Don" 

"Squeeky" is one of our smallest classmates, but once again the old say- 
ing, "Good things come in small packages." holds true. His impersonations 
of Al Jolson plus the witty remarks, have sent up many outbursts of laughter 
among his friends. 

He is one of the married veterans in our class and is almost always at 
home in "Martin's Manor" situated in Elhs Trailer Park with his sweet and 
charming wife, Ethel. 

His willingness to work, aptness of thought, and "personality plus" 
should certainly insure his chosen vocation as a florist. 

FRANK L. MERRILL, JR. "Frank" 

Known to the boys of Stockbridge as "Fatso, the II." For a fat man 

Frank is really fast on his feet. Ask him about the time he was loading logs 

in Vermont. 

One of the smarter men of the An. Hus. class, Frank can be seen during a 

day going back and forth to the Library with stacks of books under his arms. 

FRANK R. MIANO 

Frank who started out handicapped a trifle in his ability to be a "tree 
skinner", has turned out to be an expert in the profession. 

He is a hard, industrious worker and will go far in the field of Arboriculture. 
Since we have known him, he has been an inspiration to all. 



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Carolyn Miller 



Fredric Millett 



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Donald Mitchell 



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Raymond Morocco 



CAROLYN M. MILLER NORTHFIELD 

Floriculture 

Placement Lovells Flower Shop, Hingham 

Class Secretary 1-2. Floriculture Club 1. Horticulture Show 
1-2, Chairman of Corsage Committee 



John Moffatt 




William Moore 






FREDRIC L. MILLETT 

Dairy Manufactures 
Placement 



WHITMAN 



Millett Farms, Whitman 



LYNN 



DONALD L. MITCHELL 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Frank W. Kuhns, Mill River 

Dairy Club 1, Animal Husbandry Club 2, Little Interna- 
tional 2 

JOHN D. MOFFATT HOLYOKE 

Arboriculture 

Placement Frost & Higgins Arborists, Amherst 

Horticulture Show 2 

WILLIAM I. MOORE EASTHAMPTON 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement LaSalle Ice Cream Company, Northampton 



RAYMOND J. MOROCCO NORTH ADAMS 

Floriculture 

Placement Pine Street Greenhouses, Springfield 

Shorthorn Board 1, Floriculture Club 2, Horticulture Show 
1-2, Co-chairman of Show, Veterans' Association 1 



CAROLYN M. MILLER "Dusty" "Lynn" "Candy" 

Lynn is the only girl in the Floriculture class, and for the last two years 
has been surrounded by 30 howling wolves. This in itself should warrant 
her a medal for bravery. 

Lynn has proved to be at her best when engaged in some form of flori- 
culture arrangements or horticultural work. Our best wishes go with Lynn 
as she joins the ranks of up and coming florists. May she succeed in what- 
ever she does. 

FREDRIC L. MILLETT "Ted" 

Ted is a quiet and unassuming fellow, well-liked by all the members of '49. 
Ever popular, he has made up 50% of the Millet-Hubbard Duo, which has 
contributed much to the jovial atmosphere of our campus. 

Although not a commuter, Ted might as well have been one, for he cer- 
tainly spent a lot of time on the road between Amherst and Whitman. 

Ted possesses great potentialaties, and we know that he will be a suc- 
cessful dairyman. 

DONALD L. MITCHELL "Mitch" 

Mitch, a city boy with high ambitions, plans to own a high producing 

herd of Jerseys someday. 

Mitch, like so many other Stockbridge boys, enjoys the fine sport of 

sleeping in class. However, he is very considerate of his instructors and 

doesn't snore. It is rumored that he stays up all night pouring over his 

books. 

Mitch intends to own a large flock of sheep in addition to his Jerseys. 

It is believed that his love for sheep is a direct result of his participation in 

the Little International. 

JOHN D. MOFFATT 

A well groomed, clean-cut student, John is hked by all. He has a pleasant 
disposition, about the best there is. 

His main interest is sleek cars, his favorite expression, "I'll be ground 
man." 

His ambition in life is to make the most comfortable living possible with- 
out too much effort attached. John will achieve success. 

WILLIAM I. MOORE "Bill " 

We all know Bill for his quiet, easy-going manner. A finer buddy would 

be hard to find. His ambition and his eagerness to work and cooperate are 

hard to match. 

Ask Larry, who worked with him on placement. We sometimes wonder 

why Paige Laboratory held his interest so. Was it the chickens, and we don't 

mean those with wings? 

RAYMOND J. MOROCCO "Slug" 

The slogan "Good things come in small packages" is how everyone feels 
about Ray. He was co-chairman of the Hort. Show, and he did a splendid 
job. 

The only thing Ray put before his studies was going home weekends to 
his wife. 

Like all good-natured fellows Ray sometimes proved to be a problem 
child in class. His motto must have been, "I'm from Missouri," because 
when he didn't quite understand something he asked questions until he did. 

Ray's ambition is to be a successful retail grower. 



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Edward Morrison, Jr. 



Graydon Moses 



William Newhall 



Gilbert Nichols 




Emil Nilsson 






EDWARD T. MORRISON, JR. BILLERICA 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Hospital Cottage Farm, Baldwinville 

Animal Husbandry Club 2, Little International 2 

GRAYDON F. MOSES ATTLEBORO 

Poultry 

Placement Harco Orchard & Poultry Farms, South Easton 

Glee Club 1-2, Poultry Club 1-2, Veterans' Association 2 

WILLIAM S. NEWHALL NEWBURYPORT 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement The Newhall Farm, Newburyport 

Little International 2 

GILBERT W. NICHOLS GRAFTON 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement Smith & Fyfe, Incorporated, Worcester 

Dairy Club 1-2, Secretary 1, President 2 

EMIL O. NILSSON NORTH CHELMSFORD 

Poultry 

Placement Days Poultry Farm, Westford 

Poultry Club 1-2, Kappa Kappa 1 

ALVIN E. NIX FRAMINGHAM 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Weston Nurseries, Weston 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Kappa Kappa 1-2, Ski Club 1-2, 
Winter Carnival Committee 2, Horticulture Club 2 



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EDWARD T. MORRISON, JR. "Ed" 

An. Hus. not only appeals to Ed, but he eats, sleeps and lives it. 
In Ed's senior year he joined the Draper Club. His personality, his ability 

to listen, and an uncontrollable blush made him many friends. 

Ed's plans include his Pop and a dairy farm that is well and profitably 

managed. With the wealth of knowledge Ed has obtained here, we know he 

can't fail. 

GRAYDON F. MOSES "Moe" 

"Moe," so called by his fellow classmates, is a quiet and sincere friend 
to all who know him; yet he carries a bit of humor for odd moments. His 
willingness to help his less fortunate friends will be remembered by everyone. 
Wedding bells will soon be ringing. We wish him and his happy bride- 
to-be success and happiness. 

WILLIAM S. NEWHALL "Bill" 

Bill, although one of the quietest members of the class, caused many 
lively discussions among the fellows concerning the ownership of a big, 
green "Chevie" truck, and the reasons for its being up at Thatcher most of 
the time. 

With the knowledge he has gained here at Stockbridge, plus a certain 
Animal Husbandry major(ess). Bill should accomplish much toward making 
the home farm into a first class dairy farm. 

GILBERT W. NICHOLS "Gil" 

Back in '43 Gil came to Stockbridge to study Animal Husbandry; now 
he is back again as a Dairy major. Gil always has an answer. 

After two years at Stockbridge, Gil has made many friends who know him 
as a "regular fellow." His main interest outside of Stockbridge was going 
home every weekend. Seems that a cute female in the town of Dorchester 
was his main interest. 

EMIL O. NILSSON 

Emil is one of the few people the class has met who works very hard and 
still enjoys life to the fullest. While maintaining a high standard at the 
school he has always had time to help on any occasion. 

We firmly believe that Emil, being a man who is a go-getter and who is 
not easily swayed from a goal he has set, has the qualities and the ability of 
an executive. 

ALVIN E. NIX "AI" 

Al's first year on campus proved to be quite a hectic one during which 

his '36 Olds with yellow wheels saw service ranging from Springfield to 

Vermont. 

Upon completion of his placement training and return to school, Al was a 

different person. Instead of the woman's dream date of the past he was now 

a quiet, easy-going young fellow. 



A 





Lawrence Nixon 



.^ 







Justin Nutteln\an 



Victor Oliveira 




LAWRENCE M. NIXON WESTFORD 

Poultry 

Placement Paul Swanson, 1943, Carlisle 

Dance Committee Chairman 1, Basketball 1, Cross Country 1, 
Poultry Club 2, Kappa Kappa 1 

JUSTIN Y. NUTTELMAN FLORENCE 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Brakey's Farm, Easthampton 

Shorthorn Board 2, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little In- 
ternational 2 

VICTOR OLIVEIRA NEW BEDFORD 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement Braley's Creamery, State Road, North Dartmouth 
Class Vice-President 1, Student Council 2. Football 1-2, 
Track 1, Dairy Club 1-2, Secretary 2, Alpha Tau Gamma 1-2, 
Vice-President 2 

KAYEM OVIAN WHITINSVILLE 

Fine Turf 

Placement Baltrusol Golf Club, Springfield, New Jersey 

Football Captain 1-2, Basketball 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2 



GEOFFREY E. PAGE 

Poultry 
Placement 
Poultry Club 2 



AMHERST 

Sagamore Farm, Westfield 

AMHERST 



JOHN A. PAGE 

Food Management 

Placement Northfield Hotel, Northfield 

Football 2, Track 1, Glee Club 1, Pandocios Club, 2 Horti- 
culture Show 2 



John Page 



LAWRENCE M. NIXON "Nick" 

"Nick", a lucky classmate, has his own farm to work on after graduation. 

"Nick" is not only the tallest person in the poultry class, but also one of 
the most enterprising students. 

His ambition is to be a successful poultry breeder. 

He returned to school this year to complete a course interrupted by a hitch 
in the service. 

JUSTIN Y. NUTTELMAN 

Spending most of his time on the farm, Justin likes to put in practice 
what he learns. He has a keen interest in his work, and will undoubtedly 
be a success in anything he undertakes. 

Although Justin is a quiet fellow, he always has a twinkle in his eye and 
a good word for everyone. 

VICTOR OLIVEIRA "Vic" 

During his two years at Stockbridge, Vic has proved himself to be one of 

the top men in the dairy class. 

Vic possesses an outstandmg personality which has gained for him a great 

many friends, both on and off the campus. 

We were all pleased to hear that Vic's application for entrance to the 

University was accepted. 

KAYEM OVIAN "Kelly" 

Kelly has a pleasing personality and a joyful disposition. Everyone v/ill 

remember him for his outstanding work on the gridiron. His ability to 

make friends and retain them has already given him part of his goal in life. 

GEOFFREY E. PAGE "Jeff" 

"Jeff" is the fellow who is always ready to lend a helping hand to anyone 
on any job. You can always find him tuning up his Buick or working around 
his trailer in his spare time. 

His humorous remarks are exceeded only by his pleasant personality. 
There is never a dull moment when "Jeff" is with the crowd. 

He can be classified as a "Go-getter." His ambition is to own and oper- 
ate his own farm. 



JOHN A. PAGE 

A local yokel and the yeast that keeps the Food Management class in a 
ferment, John is not the quiet type. 

This last winter John signed on the first member of his new ball team 
when he became the father of a bouncing baby boy. 

With his personality plus and natural aggressiveness, he should go far. 



A 





1^,1 i 

Ernest Parsons, Jr. 



Alfred Patterson, Jr. 



Otis Peluso 



Arthur Prentiss, Jr. 



ERNEST J. PARSONS, JR. WOLLASTON 

Poultry 

Placement Forrest Jasper Farm, Milford, New Hampshire 
Dance Committee 1-2. Poultry Club 1, Animal Husbandry 1. 
Alpha Tau Gamma 1 

F. ALFRED PATTERSON, JR. FLORENCE 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Joseph E. Kivlin, Shoreham, Vermont 

Class President 1-2, Student Council 1-2, Dance Committee 
1-2, Shorthorn Board 1, Poultry Club 1, Dairy Club 1, 
Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 2. Commun- 
ity Chest 1, Winter Carnival Committee 1-2, Veterans' Asso- 
ciation 1 

OTIS H. PELUSO LYNN 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement Haines-CeBrook, Lynn 

Dairy Club 2, Veterans' Association 2, Commander, Fencing 
Club 2 



VINCENT PIETRASZKA, JR. 

Poultry 



GROVELAND 



Placement 
Poultry Club 1-2 



Maiden Hill Farm, Ward Hill 



CHICOPEE FALLS 



ARTHUR E. PLOURDE 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement The Haskins Farm, Amherst 

Football 1, Basketball 1, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little 
International 2 

ARTHUR P. PRENTISS, JR. DANVERS 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Home Farm, Danvers 

Outing Club, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, 4-H Club 1-2, 
Little International 2, DeMolay 1-2 



'fSgXL, 




ERNEST J. PARSONS, JR. "Ernie" 

During his first year, at the wee hour of 5 A.M., Ernie could be frequently 

seen traveling to the barns where he held a part-time position. His green 

Model A Ford was a mark of distinction in Commonwealth Circle. 

After seven months on placement, Ernie returned to school, together with 

a 1925 Buick which was. without doubt, the most outstanding car on campus. 
Ernie was a good student and a fellow with life long ambitions which 

should carry him to his ultimate goal of success. 

F. ALFRED PATTERSON, JR. "Bo" 

"Bo," as he is called by his many friends, is one of the oldest and best 
educated "gentlemen" in the senior class. If education makes a farmer, 
surely he will be a success, for he has been going to school for the past 25 
years, with only a two-year interruption for overseas duty with the U. S. 
Army. 

Just prior to Christmas recess, the "old bald eagle" was married Decem- 
ber 11, 1948. The Pattersons enjoyed a three and a half week honeymoon 
trip to California in their new convertible. 

"Bo" has been very active in extra-curricular activities, particularly 
during his freshman year, when he had more time to offer. He has conducted 
the affairs of state as president of the class throughout the two years. 

In spite of all his education and fine manners, he still gets along well with 
the rest of Stockbridge. 

OTIS H. PELUSO 

One of the many married veterans going to school under the G. I. Bill, 
Otis is very active in club affairs. 

You would often find him coming out of the Library with a copy of the 
Roman Empire which contained additional material on his favorite person. 

With his pleasing personality we know he will go far in his chosen field 
of Health and Sanitation. 

VINCENT PIETRASZKA, JR. 

Vincent hopes someday to get into the poultry breeding game by breeding 
New Hampshires. Vincent did not take part in the campus social life except 
for the poultry club; he was busy with being a high-ranking student, 

A quiet fellow, he was always anxious to leave for home as soon as possible 
after his Friday classes. Wonder why? 

ARTHUR E. PLOURDE "Art" 

While at Stockbridge, Art sported a well-groomed crew cut which made 
his already fine personality that much more compelling. 

Art always looked forward to meal time, because it was then that he met 
the fairer sex. 

Owning a dairy farm and raising a family are Art's plans for the future. 

Ability and aggressiveness are two traits which will take Art far in his 
chosen field. 

ARTHUR P. PRENTISS, JR. "Art" 

Art, the fair-haired, smiling lad with the perpetual blush, never misses a 

trick. He is always on hand and is one of the first to see the point of a joke. 
We have often wondered about those mysterious visits to Mount Holyoke 

each week end. When he returns to the home farm, we feel he will give it 

the same boost that he has given to Stockbridge. 





Victor Randolph 



A.. 



Roy Reinhold, Jr. 







Iieo Roberge, Jr. 



r^ -^ 



Robert Roehrich 




VICTOR H. RANDOLPH HOUSATONIC 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Duane S. Slater, Tyringham 

Glee Club 1, Outing Club 1-2, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, 
4-H Club 1-2, Little International 2 

ROY W. REINHOLD, JR. PITTSFIELD 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Berkshire Garden Center, Stockbridge 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Kappa Kappa Social Chairman 1, 
Horticulture Club Treasurer 2, Veterans' Association 1, 
Lutheran Club President 1 

LEO H. ROBERGE, JR. PALMER 

Floriculture 

Placement Allen Street Greenhouses, Springfield 

Shorthorn Assistant Business Manager 2, Floriculture Club 2, 
Horticulture Show 10x10 2, Flower Fashion Show 2, Co- 
chairman, Kappa Kappa 1-2 

ROBERT C. ROEHRICH BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 

Floriculture 

Placement City Line Florists, Bridgeport 

Student Council Vice-President 1, Football 1-2, Basketball 
2, Floriculture Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2 



ROBERT J. ROGERS DEDHAM 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Ashton Keynes Farm, Little Compton, Rhode Is. 

Little International 2, Veterans' Association 1-2 

DAVID P. RONEY, JR. SOMERVILLE 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement Bushway Ice Cream Company, Somerville 

Dairy Club 2, Veterans' Association 2 



David Roney, Jr. 



VICTOR H. RANDOLPH "Randy" 

Having studied agriculture in high school, Randy decided to pursue his 

interest further at Stockbridge where he became a student in September, 

1945. His schooling was interrupted in April, 1946 by a two-year hitch in 

the Marines. 

After his discharge, he came back to Stockbridge in the fall of 1948. 
Before settling down and buying his own farm Randy plans to work on a 

one-man farm for a few years. 

ROY W. REINHOLD, JR. "Prof" 

Roy's nickname is well suited, for he's a very conscientious and capable 
student. 

Roy fulfills admirably the social chairman's job at Kappa Fraternity. 

He has been the backbone of many successful fraternity dances. 

If Roy can't be found around campus making social arrangements, 
North Amherst holds a special attraction for him that is leading to a perma- 
nent arrangement. 

LEO H. ROBERGE, JR. "Skippy" 

His being quite an ambitious fellow during his years here resulted in many 
achievements for him. Leo's floral creations, which were used by the models 
in the Fashion-Flower Show during Winter Carnival Week, brought him 
well deserved praise. 

Upon completion of his Floriculture course at Stockbridge, Leo has in- 
tentions of establishing a business in his home town, Palmer. 

ROBERT C. ROEHRICH "Bob" 

Bob's vivacious character can be recognized anytime. He has shown his 

outstanding ability here at Stockbridge both m the classroom and on the 

gridiron. Bob has the distinction of being the best guard Stockbridge ever 

had. 

Bob is operating a retail growers shop with his father and, at the same 

time, is raising a family. 

ROBERT J. ROGERS "Fatso No. 1" 

This chubby, stocky little fellow, with a propensity to fatten easily, is one 
of the most refined men in the senior class. He is already slated for a dis- 
tinguished position in New England Agriculture. Mr. Rogers has taken 
over the position of manager of a purebred Jersey farm. 

He is known far and wide as a comedian and can be seen plying his trade 
at any meal in Draper Hall. 

The future outlook for this fine young man is excellent. 

DAVID P. RONEY, JR. "Dave" 

Dave was one of our easy going, good natured lads. His good natured 
disposition and winning personality won him many friends both on and off 
the campus. He is married and the proud father of a baby boy born in 
June, 1948. 



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Richard Royle 




I \ / 



Raymond Salvie 



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Sumner Schwartz 



Gordon Scotland, Jr. 




RICHARD S. ROYLE WEST SPRINGFIELD 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement Nempa, West Springfield 

Dairy Club 1, Veterans' Association 

RAYMOND A. SALVIE SEEKONK 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement H. P. Hood & Sons. Providence, Rhode Island 
Outing Club 2, Dairy Club 2, 4-H Club 1-2, Phillips Brooks 
Club 1-2 

SUMNER G. SCHWARTZ AGAWAM 

Vegetable Gardening 

Placement Vegetable Acres, Forrestdale, Cape Cod 

Student Council 1-2, Secretary 1, Dance Committee 2, Foot- 
ball 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma 1-2, 
Winter Carnival Committee Co-Chairman Ball Committee 1, 
Olericulture Club 1 

GORDON L. SCOTLAND, JR. ASHLAND 

Fruit 

Placement Meadow Brook Orchards, Sterling Junction 

Pomology Club Secretary 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Alpha 
Tau Garnma 1-2 

PETER O. SENEGAL, JR. FRAMINGHAM 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Wyman's Framingham Nurseries, Framingham 
Hockey 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Horticulture Vice-Presi- 
dent 2 

RICHARD E. SHELNUT NORTHAMPTON 

Poultry 

Placement Northampton 

Football 1, Poultry Club 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma 1-2 



Richard Shelnut 




RICHARD S. ROYLE "Dick" 

"Dick," a well-versed student, and a convincing conversationalist, was 

liked by all his classmates. His studies were easy for him. 

He plans to marry after graduation; we wish him the best of luck. We all 

know that whatever his job may be after graduation he will be capable of 

handling the position. 

RAYMOND A. SALVIE "Ray" 

We found Ray a fellow well-liked all over the campus. A lover of classical 

music, he certainly knows Tchaikovsky, Haydn, and other great musicians. 
Ray has amused us with countless stories of the Moose. 
When asked what he wants to do after graduation, he says, "Marry Lois; 

then go out West and get a job in inspection work " 

SUMNER C. SCHWARTZ "Bud" 

When you see the little black jeep come tearing into campus every morn- 
ing at 8:30, you know Sumner is arriving from Agawam. 

A member of A. T. G., Bud lived there until last Christmas. Since New 
Year's Eve, when he was married, he has been commuting. 

A work horse on the gridiron, Sumner has honored himself and Stock- 
bridge by playing an outstanding game at tackle for the past two years. 

When he graduates, Sumner intends to start farming in Agawam. 

GORDON L. SCOTLAND, JR. "Scotty" 

Scotty is the all-round boy of the fruit class. Because he is successful in 

his studies and a very serious student, he is well liked by all his classmates. 
If you go past his room late at night, you will see Scotty still toiling over 

his books. 

The interest he shows in apple growing indicates that he will be a success. 

PETER O. SENECAL, JR. "Pete" 

Pete holds the distinction of being not only the oldest fellow in Hort, but 

also the only married man. 

Although a small fellow, we will all admit he is pretty spunky; his being a 

member of the undefeated hockey team of '48 proves it. 

Pete is a pretty conscientious fellow, and we feel that with his friendly 

ways and go-ahead, he will be a success in his field. 

RICHARD E. SHELNUT "Dick" 

Dick comes from Northampton, where he plans to settle with his father 

on a large poultry farm after completing his studies. 

His interest in football was proved by his power and stature as a player. 

This could be accredited to his large appetite, as his "roomies" know. 
We hope Dick's future will be as bright as his jolly humor. 







^s^ 



A 




Winston Sherman 



Malcolm Shorey 



Frank Shufelt 




Charles Simnions 




WINSTON K. SHERMAN MIDDLEBORO 

Fruit Growing 

Placement Northford, Connecticut 

Pomology Club 1-2, Treasurer 2, Kappa Kappa 2 



MALCOLM E. SHOREY 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement 

Ski Club 1 

FRANK L. SHUFELT 

Food Management 
Placement 



MILTON 

Hendries Ice Cream, Milton 

WALPOLE 

Waterville Maine 



Football 1, Basketball 1, Pandocios Club 2,. President, 
Horticulture Show 2 

DANIEL R. SILVAR MARLBORO 

Fine Turf 

Placement Bellows Falls Country Club, Bellows Falls, Vt. 

Shorthorn Board 2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Kappa Kappa 1 

CHARLES G. SIMMONS FAIRHAVEN 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Dana Farm, Fairhaven 

Shorthorn Board 2, Dairy Club 1, Animal Husbandry Club 2, 
Little International 2 

BERNARD J. SIMONEAU AUBURN 

Fine Turf 

Placement Brae Burne Country Club, West Newton 

Horticulture Show 1-2 



Bernard Simoneau 



WINSTON K. SHERMAN "Win" 

Win's earnest work and ability has been well displayed in all his classwork. 

A naturally quiet fellow is Win, yet at times, we have seen his prankful 

nature at work. He is very conscientious, but at the same time is always 

ready to join in on a good time. 

Many of his classmates have admired him for his quiet attitude and ability 

to get things done. 

MALCOLM E. SHOREY "Mac" 

Mac is that tall, good looking fellow who always seems to be in high spirits. 

He is one of those lucky people who never gets riled. When he doesn't go 

home on a winter weekend, Mac usually takes off for the hills to go skiing. 
Mac is an asset to the Dairy class, a pleasure to know, and a friend who 

can be counted on to come through when the going gets tough. 

FRANK L. SHUFELT 

Frank is a swell guy, known to nearly everyone on campus, a mainstay 
of the Stockbridge eleven, and not unknown on the basketball court either. 
His climbing the hill to Butterfield for the past two years accounts for his 
athletic abilities. 

Frank is the youngest member of the Food Management class. 

A good student, a loyal friend, Frank has the qualities that should take 
him to the top of the ladder. 

DANIEL R. SILVAR 

His cooperation and patience in the aiding of fellow students with educa- 
tional problems has made him a person often sought in times of dire need, 
while his ideas and assistance have contributed much to the success of the 
Hort. Shows. 

On placement training, Dick was the only one in the class to go out as 
Greenskeeper of a nine hole course, and there is no question but that he will 
win distinction for himself when he graduates from Stockbridge. 

CHARLES G. SIMMONS "Chuck" 

Chuck, who comes from New Bedford, Mass., has been an Animal Hus- 
bandry major at Stockbridge. Married while on placement training, he has 
lived this past year in the tjniversity trailer camp and recently became the 
father of a bouncing baby boy. 

In connection with his plans to teach Vocational Agriculture, Chuck in- 
tends to go further with his own education before starting out. We wish him 
luck in his work with future agriculturists. 

BERNARD J. SIMONEAU "Bernie" 

Bernie is a likeable and good-natured little fellow who was always ready 

to help a person out when he could. Furthermore, we knew we could always 

depend on him to come through with the answers when the rest of the class 

was stuck. , 

Starting with his Amherst Golf Club job, he will climb high on the ladder 

of success. 



A 





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David Smarsh 



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Clarence Smith 



Lindsey Smith, Jr. 



DAVID SMARSH MIDDLEBORO 

Poultry 

Placement Russell Sturtenant, Halifax 

Football 1, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma 

CLARENCE B. SMITH NEW BRAINTREE 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement H. P. Hood Ice Cream, Boston 
Dairy Club 1-2, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma, Veterans' 
Association 1-2 



LINDSEY E. SMITH, JR. 

Floriculture 
Placement 
Horticulture Show 1-2 



WEST BROOKFIELD 

MacGuffog's, Westboro 

SOMERVILLE 



REMO G. SODANC 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Medfield State Farm, Medfield 

Football 2, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little International 2 

RALPH M. SOUZA, JR. FAIRHAVEN 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Lynbrook Farm. Southboro 

Dairy Club 1, Animal Husbandry Club 1-2, Little Inter- 
national 2 

JASON W. SQUIRES GREENFIELD 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Ladderlook Farm, Greenfield 

Animal Husbandry 1-2, Little International 2 



Jason Squires 



DAVID SMARSH "Slave" 

Slave was well known for his football prowess. He was also a familiar 

sight at the A. T. G. ping pong table, usually being the challenger. Slave is 

a hard man to beat once he gets his eye on the ball. 

With his humorous, yet sincere manner, Dave will succeed at his work. 

His classmates and brothers of A. T. G. sincerely wish him the best of 

everything. 

CLARENCE B. SMITH 'C. B." 

C. B. is one of the more quiet members of the dairy class; yet he carries a 
wealth of humor for any occasion. 

A good natured, "makes-no-never-mind" student, C. B. has worked hard 
at Stockbridge for two years. He has run A. T. G. from his room on the top 
floor, where he has a commanding view of all goings on, and is liked and 
respected by each and every one of us. 

LINDSEY E. SMITH, JR. "Smitty ' 

Smitty is a fellow with a natural sense of humor that brings sparkle into 
his conversations. It was while on placement that he really made up his 
mind to set himself up in the florist business. 

During his second year he took on a wife and also built himself a green- 
house, and he is sure to be successful with both. 

Smitty has determination and courage, which should enable him to ma- 
terialize his ideas, of which he has plenty. 

REMO G. SODANO "Roy" 

A graduate of Somerville High School and a veteran of the United States 

Seabees, Roy has combined Animal Husbandry and football to make a 

sound place for himself in the Stockbridge picture. 

Although his plans for the future have not been clearly indicated, there 

seems to be no question about some of his current interests — as, for example 

a certain faculty member in the Warren High School. 

RALPH M. SOUZA, JR. 

Ralph may lack in theory, but he makes up for it in practical experience. 
Give him calves, cows, tractors and farms and he is in his glory. 

Although not actively participating in sports, his knowledge of sports 
makes him a frequent middleman in sporting arguments. 

Ralph is one of the fortunate fellows who will step into a farm as soon as 
he leaves school. These two years at Stockbridge will greatly aid in his suc- 
cess. 

Good luck, Ralph! 

JASON W. SQUIRES 

Jason can be seen speeding daily in his trusty, rusty, country-styled Ford 
on the commuters' speedway to his wife and children in Greenfield. 

He had the ability as a student here to win a H. P. Hood scholarship 
and enough energy to establish a fine herd of Holsteins. 



w 



A 






William Stasinos 



Frank Stewart 



Arthur Stiles, Jr. 



YXX^-.v' ' 



WILLIAM STASINOS HOLYOKE 

Floriculture 

Placement Englemann Florist, Pittsfield 

Floriculture Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2 



John Stone 




FRANK STEWART NORTH ANDOVER 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement Charles D. Glennie Company, North Andover 
Student Council 1-2, Football 1, Dairy Club 1, Fraternity 
1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma Secretary 2 

ARTHUR F. STILES, JR. READING 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Worcester State Hospital, Worcester 

Animal Husbandry Club 1, Little International 2, Fraternity 
2, Kappa Kappa, House Marshal Rifle Club 1, Vice-President 

JOHN H. STONE ORANGE 

Floriculture 

Placement McGoffog's, Westboro 

Floriculture Club 1, Horticulture Show 1-2, Fraternity 
Kappa Kappa, Horticulture Club 1 

WALTER V. STRANGER GEORGETOWN 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Placement Cherry Hill Nursery, West Newbury 

Horticulture Club 1 

OSCAR O. ST. THOMAS, JR. WORCESTER 

Arboriculture 

Placement Brewer Tree Expert Company, Worcester 

Football 1-2, Basketball 1, Horticulture 1-2 



Oscar St. Thomas, Jr. 



WILLIAM STASINOS "Bill" 

Bill's very good nature and wit have been popular with all of us. His 

ambition is to own and operate a retail growers establishment. 

With all his enthusiasm and interest, we are sure he will succeed in the 

future. If he would only remember to carry a pencil with him, he could 

write his ticket for life. 

FRANK STEWART "Stew" 

Stew is what you might call the nonchalant type. His easy going way 
has won him friends at every turn. One can always remember Stew by such 
expressions as "Let's go to Mikes." A highly capable member of the Stu- 
dent Council and an officer at A. T. G., he has been a prominent social 
figure on campus. 

Although he has attended to his social obligations, they never seemed to 
interfere with his achieving worthwhile grades during his two years. Stew 
plans to spend a few years in Florida getting experience in the dairy field. 

ARTHUR F. STILES, JR. "Art" 

Art has a deep love for farming and hopes to settle in New Hampshire 

eventually. 

Many of the Animal Husbandry boys can recognize Art from quite a 

distance by his rolling "seaman's gait," acquired in the Navy, and his short, 

powerful build. 

He is an ardent Red Sox fan, and many of the quiet hours in the Kappa 

Kappa Fraternity house have been broken by the violent results of some 

jest made at the expense of the Red Sox. Art is also quite a photographer; 

he takes, develops, and prints his own pictures. With his happy-go-lucky 

manner, and unfailing confidence in himself, we are sure Art will go far in 

his work. 

JOHN H. STONE "Stony" 

A quiet, reserved, industrious nature combined with a lively interest in 
everything that surrounds him will insure John's success as a florist in 
Orange, Mass. 

Despite the first impression of seriousness that he gives, the mischievous 
twinkle in his eyes makes you realize that he is a jolly person. His frater- 
nity brothers at Kappa Kappa can well assure you of that. If anyone de- 
serves success, he does. 

WALTER V. STRANGER "Walt" 

When Tuesday morning comes around he's ready to start home "to see 
the girl." When you sit in a lecture room and suddenly your nose tells you 
something's wrong, you look around, see a bandaged thumb and you realize 
that your boy has been in the Sardine can again at lunch time. Whenever 
you need some "pertinent" information, especially on perennials, just see 
Walt But, most of all, whenever you want a good friend, see Walt. 

OSCAR O. ST. THOMAS, JR. "Buck" 

Buck is tall, lanky, erect, good natured and alert Known as the Joe E, 
Brown of Stockbridge, Buck, with his his whimsical phrases, has contribu- 
ted to many a side splitting laugh. 

Don't ever underestimate his abilities. Judging from overheard discus- 
sions, we know him to be well versed on sports reviews. 

We all wish him the success that he deserves, and are confident that his 
future will be bright. 




John Thibault 




JOHN F. SULLIVAN NORTH ANDOVER 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement Findeisen's Farms, Methuen 

Student Council 1-2, President, Dance Committee 1-2, Foot- 
ball 1-2, Hockey 1-2, Dairy Club 1-2, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha 
Tau Gamma, Veterans' Association 1, Stockbridge Athelete 
Board 

PAUL SULLIVAN ARLINGTON 

Ornamental Horticulture 
Placement Clark's Nursery, Concord 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Winter Carnival Committee 2, 
Horticulture Club 1-2 

WILLIAM N. SWAN WORCESTER 

Floriculture 

Placement Suimyside Greenhouse, Worcester 

Floriculture Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, University 
of Massachusetts DeMolay Club 1-2 

JOHN H. THIBAULT LAKE PLEASANT 

Poultry 

Placement Mayo's Duck Farm Inc., East Orlean 

Poultry Club 1-2 

DWIGHT L. TIFFANY EASTHAMPTON 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement New England Milk Products Association, W. Spfld 

Veterans' Association 1-2 

DONALD W. TOELKEN LONGMEADOW 

Arboriculture 

Placement City Tree Experts Company, Longmeadow 

Horticulture Show 1-2, Arboriculture Club 2, Fraternity 
Kappa Kappa 




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JOHN F. SULLIVAN "Sully" 

When roll call was taken, he was sure to be found in such conspicuous 
places as "Mike's" or "The Rendezvous," surrounded by the boys, listening 
to his rendition of some Irish lullabies; but his devil-may-care attitude in 
class and out did not distract one from his accomplishments at Stockbridge. 
His biggest worry seems to have been his slightly receding hairline, which 
many think is why he was frequently seen with Smith, who had a slight 
edge on him on that score. 

PAUL SULLIVAN 

Paul is a cheerful, good-natured fellow, who has a good time whether alone 
or in a crowd His ambition is to go into the landscaping business for him- 
self or to work for some large landscape construction outfit, as a landscape 
foreman. 

We wish all the luck in the world to a swell fellow, who we are sure will 
succeed in whatever phase of the business he decides to enter. 

WILLIAM N. SWAN "Bill" 

Bill's a quiet sort of guy; but after you get to know him, he'll keep you 
roaring with his numerous stories often tinged with that distinctive Swedish 
accent of his. 

Besides being adept at his studies, Bill proved his finesse in numerous 
At other times he was called upon to lend his harmonious (?) tones to a 
quartet . . but less said about Bill's singmg the better. 

Bill plans to return to Worcester to work this summer, with the future 
holding a possible business of his own. Best of luck from all of us, Bill. 

JOHN H. THIBAULT 

This individual is interested in finding an ideal location in which to settle 
permanently; maybe New England, maybe Missouri, or even Colorado. 

It must, however, be a place that will provide a good living, good fishing, 
and hunting. What more can a person ask for? Of course there will be some 
work involved, too, unfortunately. 

DWIGHT L. TIFFANY "Dewey" 

Dwight is well-liked and always willing to do his share of the work. 

He has shownreal interest in his course work here at Stockbridge, and turned 

in a creditable job. Incidentally, he owns one of the best Model A Fords 

in the country. 

We believe he will succeed in his work in the future. Best of luck, "Dewey," 

and may your wishes come true. 

DONALD W. TOELKEN "Don" 

Don could be found working on his trailer in the trailer camp or behind 

the counter at Noah Webster's. His marvelous ability to make friends has 

gained him genuine popularity among his classmates 

If you want to find Don this summer, just spend a little time around 

Springfield and look for a red-headed pipe smoker, behind the controls of a 

new Bean Roto-mist Sprayer. That is Don's biggest interest now. 

We do not need to wish Don any luck, for he has the qualities that assure 

success. 




A 





Ernest Verrill 



Albert Wark 




Edward Wasielewski 




Gilbert Wheeler 



ERNEST C. VERRILL CONCORD 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement David Buttrick Company, Arlington 

Dairy Club 1-2, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma. Ski 
Club 1-2 



Joseph Waters 



Chester Wedrychowski 




ALBERT T. WARK 

Poultry 
Placement 
Poultry Club 1 



DORCHESTER 

Harco Orchards, South Easton 

WEBSTER 



EDWARD A. WASIELEWSKI 

Floriculture 

Placement Herbert E. Berg Greenhouses, Worcester 

Floriculture Club 1-2, Horticulture Show 1-2, Fraternity 
Kappa Kappa Secretary. Winter Carnival Committee 1 

JOSEPH V. WATERS PEABODY 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Danvers State Hospital, Danvers 

Animal Husbandry Club 2, Veterans' Association 1, Little 
International 2 

CHESTER P. WEDRYCHOWSKI W. SPRINGFIELD 

Fine Turf 

Placement Mount Clair Golf Club, Mount Clair, New Jersey 

Hockey 1, Horticulture Show 1-2, Veterans' AssociatiorkJ 

GILBERT E. WHEELER WRENTHAM 

Dairy Manufactures 

Placement General Ice Cream, Providence, Rhode Island 

Veterans' Association 1 



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ERNEST C. VERRILL "Ernie" 

Ernie possesses that great asset of life which is the abihty to make friends 
No matter where he went, whether it was campus, town, or even so remote 
a place as Holyoke, one would always be certain to hear the warm greeting of 
"Hi Ernie." 

When it came to studying, Ernie didn't believe in cracking the books too 
heavily, but he always hit the hour and final exams with a better-than- 
average grade. Here again he displayed the unique characteristic of being 
able to apply his practical experience to theoretical study. 

ALBERT T. WARK "Ab" 

Al is a quiet fellow, but one who was always welcome to have around. 
Painstaking and conscientious, he was at the same time always ready to 
join in on a good time. A good natured student, Al has worked hard at 
Stockbridge for two years, and we know that the knowledge and experience 
he has acquired while here will insure his success and happiness. 

It's our wishes that you'll meet your goal of success and happiness in 
the future, Al. 

EDWARD A. WASIELEWSKI "Ed" 

Meet "Eddie," the top designer of our Floriculture class. He has shown 

a vast amount of ability and originality 

To prepare in advance has always been his policy. In adherence to this 

rule, Eddie has already started the construction of a retail florist shop in 

Webster, Mass. We know that the Florist business and Eddie will find 

the enterprise mutually profitable. 

JOSEPH V. WATERS "Joe" 

Although Joe considers himself as a "boy of eighteen summers," he has 
many years of practical farm experience under his belt as a result of working 
on various farms throughout Essex County. 

"Joe" is a married man, proud father of a baby girl, and a resident of 
one of the trailer camps here on campus. He will long be remembered as 
the "small boy with the big hat" among his friends. Joe has already ob- 
tained a job as manager of a dairy farm. 

CHESTER P. WEDRYCHOWSKI "Red" 

This popular redhead stands 6 feet, 3 inches and has been known at Mt. 

Holyoke College as "God's Gift to Women." 

With his skill in golf, he plans to give Ben Hogen some keen competition 

in the near future with a handicap of minus 3. He also swings a mean 

hockey stick. 

Red is sure to be a success with his friendly personality, his interest in 

golf, and his ability in his chosen field. May you find great happiness in the 

years ahead, and may success be yours in New Jersey. 

GILBERT E. WHEELER "Gil " 

Gil is known as the "hot sketch" of the Dairy Class, and is always good 

for a laugh. 

He is commonly referred to by his classmates as "suitcase Charlie," or 

the "grind." Gil is also well known for his tales of the Riviera in France. 

His main interest is ice cream, and he hopes to obtain a plant manager's 

position and then settle down to a domestic married life. 
Best of luck to you, Gil. 



A 







Donald Whelpley 



Frank Whisenant 



Earl Williams 




/ 



Joseph Witaszek 






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DONALD H. WHELPLEY WESTON 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Mainstone Farm, Wayland 

Glee Club 2, Animal Husbandry Club 2, Little International 
2, Veterans' Association 1 

FRANK J. WHISENANT STATE LINE No. 1 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Sunny Slope Farms, State Line No. 1 

Animal Husbandry Club 2, Little International 2 

EARL R. WILLIAMS SPRINGFIELD 

Food Management 

Placement Severance Lodge. Centre Lovell, Maine 

Shorthorn Board 1, Basketball 1, Pandocios Club 2, Frater- 
nity 1-2, Kappa Kappa, Veterans' Association 

JOSEPH H. WITASZEK WEST WARREN 

Fine Turf 

Placement Wampanoag Country Club, W. Hartford, Conn 
Shorthorn Board 2, Editor-in-Chief. Glee Club 2, 4-H Club 
1, Horticulture Club 1, 10x10 1, Fraternity, Alpha Tau Gam- 
ma, Co-founder of Fraternity News Letter 

GEORGE E. WOOD MIDDLEBORO 

Poultry 

Placement R. B. Caswell, Lakeville 

Football 1, Fraternity 1-2, Alpha Tau Gamma, Historian 

WILLIS C. WOODRUFF LUNENBURG 

Animal Husbandry 

Placement Woodruff Farm. Lunenburg 

Animal Husbandry Club 1-2 Little International 2, Frater- 
nity 1, Kappa Kappa Treasurer 



Willis Woodruff 



DONALD H. WHELPLEY "Don" 

Don has had a variety of interests, of which showing movies for classes 
and clubs ran first. He is known to be of the helpful type, always willing 
to lend a hand where ever needed. 

His frequent trips to Wayland gave indication that he was looking to the 
future and from all reports is considering a certain Miss. 

Don plans to establish himself a dairy farm after graduating. May your 
dreams come true, Don 

FRANK J. WHISENANT "Whiz" 

Everyone could easily tell when Frank was around, because a good joke 
would always be at hand During his Senior year it was hard to find Frank 
in his room on Wednesday nights, and there was some doubt in the minds 
of the highway authorities as to whether the College highway's road sur- 
face would keep up under such a great amount of traveling. 

We hope that you will find a good sale for your Angus, and the best of 
luck in the future, raising Holsteins. 

EARL R. WILLIAMS "Dick" 

Dick is a light-hearted, happy-go-lucky chap, but don't let it fool you. 
He's been out for a high average all through the course. We like to remem- 
ber some bread he baked in one class last year. It was solid stuff, all right, 
but he knows now what went wrong. 

He's steadying down a bit now, and we hear that a young lady from 
Springfield is responsible. 

All in all, Dick is a good fellow to have around. He can be serious and 
attack a problem with vigor when the time comes. Members of his class 
and fraternity wish him well in his career. 

JOSEPH H. WITASZEK "Joe" 

Joe is one of our competent students, having completed two Stockbridge 
courses — Forestry and Fine Turf. 

Joe is a serious young man who possesses a quiet and keen sense of hu- 
mor, which is appreciated by his friends. His seriousness may be due to 
the fact that he is married. 

Always willing to help, Joe has taken part in many extra curricular acti- 
vities and has often been sought for advice by his brothers of A. T. G. 

We know that Joe's future in golf course maintenance will be successful. 

GEORGE E. WOOD 

George came to us from Middleboro to increase his knowledge in the 
Poultry business. With his ambition and hard work he has built himself 
a strong foundation. 

He loves to get the last minute sleep in the mornings, but usually makes 
class if he doesn't stop at the diner for coffee. 

He can be distinguished any time by his unmistakable laugh and curly 
blond hair. 

WILLIS C. WOODRUFF "Willie" 

Aiming to raise a herd of Holsteins and Jerseys, Willie has taken a lively 

interest in the Holstein Friesian and Massachusetts Jersey Association. 
His good lucks have caused many hearts to beat faster, but "his heart 

belongs to a certain one." 

Willie has his future plans pretty well figured out. We know that he will 

be a success in the cattle raising industry because he is a "chip oft the old 

block." 



STOSAG 



& 



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First Row — Lefl In Right — Donald Martin. Leo Roberge, Loren King. Francis Patterson, Herbert 

Hutchings, Stanley Buczynski, Raymond Morocco 
Second Row — Same Ordi r — Robert Roehrich, Edwin Hayes, Vincent Pietraszka, Lawrence Graham, 

George Aptt, Earl Williams, Elmer Hill 

npHE Stockbridge honorary scholastic society was started in 1937, at the 
suggestion of Professor Miner J. Markuson of the Agricultural Engi- 
neering Department. He felt that some public honor was in order for gradu- 
ates who maintained a high scholastic record coupled with the attributes of 
good citizenship while at Stockbridge. 

The name "Stosag" was suggested by Professor Markuson. It comprises 
the first three letters of Stockbridge, the central "S" for School and the last 
two letters representing the first two letters in the word agriculture. 

Selection of honor students is made from those students of each gradu- 
ating class whose records show no grade below 70 per-cent in any subject 
and whose average for the first three semesters is 85 per-cent or better. 
Other students may be considered when they have maintained outstanding 
records in placement training or other studies may justify special considera- 
tion. 

A scroll designed by Harry L. Adriance S-48 is awarded at graduation. 
It is signed by the President of the University and Director of Short Courses. 



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<ami)trfit June J9 
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CLASS OF 1949 




Herbert Colby Hutchings, Jr. 


./Vmherst 


Poultry Husbandry 


Edwin Stevens Haves 


Milton. N. H. 


Fruit Growing 


George William Aptt. Jr. 


Framingham Center 


Ornamental Horticulture 


Raymond James Morocco 


North Adams 


Floriculture 


Francis Alfred Patterson, Jr. 


Arlington 


Animal Husbandrv 


Leo Hubert Roberge, Jr. 


Palmer 


Floriculture 


Winston Knight Sherman 


Dighton 


Fruit Growing 


Loren Marsh King. Jr. 


Hudson 


Animal Husbandry 


Robert Gustave Roehrich 


Bridgeport. Conn. 


Floriculture 


Donald Oliver Martin 


East Longmeadow 


Floriculture 


Elmer Raymond Hill 


Hubbardston 


Floriculture 


Vincent Pietraszka. Jr. 


Groveland 


Poultrv Husbandry 


Stanley Joseph Buczynski 


Sunderland 


Animal Husbandrv 


Lawrence Edward Graham 


Arlington 


Fine Turl Manitenance 


Frank Lewis Shufelt 


Walpole 


Food Management 


Earl Richard Williams 


Springfield 


Food Management 



"Veteran 



SENIOR ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — James Emerson, Francis Patterson, Richard Hannum, Patricia Ames, 
Donald Hawes, Herbert Bates, Jospeh Beatty, Ralph Souza 

Second Row — Same Order — Remo Sodano. Arthur Stiles, Edward Morrison, Charles Frost, Walter 
Chace, George Galusha, Charles Simmons 

Third Row — Same Order — Everett Drumm, Harry MacKinnon, Franklin Blackman, William New- 
hall, Arthur Plourde, Donald Mitchell, Peter Frankenberg, Allan Leskinen 

Fourth Row — Same Order — Victor Randolph, Harold Bigelow, Justin Nuttelman, Lorn King, Allen 
Ball, Francis Grinnell, Richard Broderick 

Fifth Row — Same Order — Jacob Kupelian, Joseph Waters, Jospeh Eggleston, Paul Jennings, Don- 
ald Whelpley 

Sixth Row — Same Order — Jason Squires. Robert Rogers, Richard Dowley, Andrew Ketchen. Ed- 
ward Fontanella, Stanley Buczynski 



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ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB 




First Row — Left to Right — Richard Hannum. Walter Chace, George Galusha, Charles Frost, Professor Swanson, Pro- 
fessor Hale, Eleanor Crowell Franklin Blackman, Professor Cowan- Faculty Advisor, Donald Kinsman - 
President, Joseph Beatty, Patricia Ames, Donald Hawes, Harold Bigelow, Shehata El-Sayed Shehata 

Second Row — Same Order — John Dubois, Gilbert Porter, John Manning, Alden Monroe, Judith Stoyle, Perry Lane, 
Robert Anderson. Victor Randolph, Henry Trimble, Theodore Sylvia, Joseph Eggleston, Herbert Bates, Justin 
Nuttelman, Herman Langevin, Ernest Vieira, Daniel Hurld 

Third Row — .Son?*' Order — David Anderson, Bruce Hobson. True Tower, James Chadwick, Arthur Prentiss, James 
Emerson, Andrew Ketchen, William Newhall, Stanley Buczynski, Allan Leskinen, Peter Frankenberg, Loren 
King, Donald Whelpley, Al Healev, Charles Conlin, Richard Stein, Kenneth Parsons 

Fourth Row — Same Order — Louis Michelson, Thomas Pitoniak, Ralph Mitchell, Chester Thompson, William Galamore, 
James Bodurtha, Rodney Hall. Francis Mentzer 

♦npHE Animal Husbandry Club is composed of a group of Stockbridge and 
University students who are interested in promoting better agriculture, 
student-faculty relationships, and in presenting extra-curricular activities 
such as the Little International Livestock Show, Dairy Classic, dances, and 
other outside functions. 

Outstanding men in various fields on animal husbandry and agriculture 
are invited to speak to the group on interesting and educational topics. 

The officers of the club are chosen from both the University and Stock- 
bridge schools. The president and secretary are four-year students, and the 
vice-president and treasurer are two-year students. 
Officers for the year 1948-1949 are: 

President — Donald Kinsman- U. of M. 
Vice-Pres. - Franklin Blackman - Stockbridge 
Secreiarii — Eleanor Crowell - U. of M. 
Treasurer — Joseph Beatty - Stockbridge 
Any Stockbridge student interested in Animal Husbandry is encouraged 
to join the club and to participate in its activities. 



LITTLE INTERNATIONAL 



TN 1938, Professor M. E. Ensminger, now head of the Animal Husbandry 

Department at Washington State, proposed a "httle" International 
livestock fitting and showing contest modelled after the famed International 
of Chicago. Ardently supported by Dean Victor A. Rice, Professors Parsons 
and Foley, The Herdsmen, and ambitious Animal Husbandry students, 
this practical exercise in livestock management materialized and grew in 
"wisdom and stature" until today it ranks as one of the foremost shows of 
its kind in the nation. 

Entirely student organized and run, under faculty supervision, this show 
is held annually in March under the auspices of the Animal Husbandry Club. 

All Stockbridge and four-year students pursuing the fat stock production 
course are required to fit and show an animal of their choice. Thus from a 
contest of some 20 participants we have developed to new high of 85 con- 
testants vieing for the many prizes and trophies which have been made 
available by the livestock enthusiasts of the Northeast, to whom the stu- 
dents are deeply grateful. 

Some of the events included in this year's Ninth Little International were 
a Homo Sapien-Drawing contest in which teams of five men apiece drew 
Co-eds loaded on a stone boat, and a Horse Drawing contest in which three 
teams and Teamsters battled with a loaded stone boat. The winner of the 
horse drawing contest was George Hawthorne, with Archie Goldwaithe 
placing a close second. This contest proved to be one of the most exciting 
parts of the show. 

A Co-ed milking contest was another highlight of the show. Eleven girls 
without previous milking experience squeezed milk out of a cow into a test 
tube and rushed to the finish line. The winner received a silver sugar and 
creamer donated by Golden Guernsey Inc. 

The winners in fitting and showing sheep were Albert Healey, first place, 
and Charles Curran, second place. The winners in swine showing and 
fitting were Andy Ketchen, first place, Ralph Mitchel, second place. ■ 

In the beef class Dave Anderson placed first, Dick Broderick second, 
Phil Lamoreaux third, and Ralph Souza fourth. 

In the fitting and showing of horses Art Stiles took first place, and Art 
Brown took second. 

These ten top men were elegible for competing in the Premier Showman 
Contest which was the main event of the day. The Premier Showman was 
Phil Lamoreaux and Ralph Mitchel took Reserve Premier Showman. 

Climaxing the day was a Little International dance held in the drill hall. 



•MirM*ruii.w*JiM1Iin.nTlfl¥tV«ll(jLUitUi1IJUVI*Kl'«Vt;«njl1 



SENIOR ARBORICULTURE CLASS 




First Row — Left lo Right — Professor Mathieu, William Benson, Joseph DiRico, Edward Cotton, 

Albert Cover 
Second Row — Same Order — John Deslauriers, John Moffat, Oscar St. Thomas, Kenneth Billings 



ijMMa%w»^Bnii 



ARBORICULTURE CLUB 




First Row — Left to Right — Professor Mathieu, Albert Cover, Donald Toelken, Ellis Allen, Edward 
Cotton, Clayton Smith. Robert Yokes 

Second Row — Same Order — John Moffatt, Joseph DiRico, Richard Robinson, George Wilson. Rob- 
ert Stelle, Aloysius Donahue 

Third Row — Same Order — Robert Jackson, Ronald Soper, Ira Wickes, Robert Huntley, John Des- 
lauriers, Charles Sawicki, Frank Miano 

Fourth Row — Same Order — Henry Davis HI, Oscar St. Thomas, Donald Batchelder 

' I * HE "tree doctors" you see about campus doing various sorts of surgical 
work on our trees are not mere amateurs, but experienced arborists, 
thoroughly trained in their field. The interest and ambition that has been 
shown by these strong, agile, sure footed men will lead them to a bright and 
prosperous future. 

The club has had many speakers from the field of Arboriculture, who gave 
talks on business ethics, business management, salesmanship, and many 
other interesting subjects. We have also had speakers from the U. S. D. A. 
and the experimental division. 

The field trips to leading arborists in Massachusetts and nearby states 
has proven very valuable. We have also attended the annual meetings of 
the Massachusetts Tree Wardens and the foresters organizations, held in 
Horticulture Hall, Boston. 

The club is an influential organization that is helping to mold many ambi- 
tious young men into respected, successful arborists. 



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SENIOR DAIRY CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — Clarence Cash, Gilbert Wheeler, Professor Lindquist, Gilbert Nichols, 
David Roney, William Moore 

Second Row — Same Order — Edward Conley, John Sullivan, Malcolm Shorey, Richard Royle, Ray- 
mond Salvia, Dwight Tiffany 

Third Row — Same Order — Ernest Verrill, Frank Stewart, Clarence Smith, Otis Peluso, Dr. Hankin- 

Fourth Row — Same Order — Professor Finnegan, Victor Oliveira, Frederic Millett, Hugh Hubbard, 
Dr. Nelson 



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DAIRY CLUB 



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Firsl Row — Left lo Right — Dean Hooker, Glenn Harvey, Harold Keith, Charles Kearney, John 

Sullivan 
Second Row — Same Order — Victor Oliveira, Frank Stewart 

'IP HE purpose of the Dairy Club is to further the interest of dairy stu- 
dents and other interested persons on the campus in the Dairy Indus- 
try. The club meets every second Wednesday of each month at Flint Labor- 
atory. 

The club's greatest achievement this year was the drawing up of the con- 
stitution for the club. 

The club was honored to have for its first speaker a member of the Dairy 
Industry Department, Dr. D. H. Nelson, who gave an account of the suc- 
cess of the Judging Team at the National Dairy Products Judging Contest 
which was held at Miami and also of the team's success at the recent Dairy 
Exposition at Altantic City. 

Other very interesting speakers and their topics were as follows: Mr. How- 
ard A. Putnam, Superintendent of F. B. Mallory Inc., whose topic was Flash 
Pasteurization; Mr. H. B. Robinson whose topic was W. S. Public Health, 
and Mr. W. D. Barrett, production manager for Whiting Milk Co. of Boston, 
who spoke on high temperature short time pasteurization. 

The Dairy Club also had the privilege of having two informal meetings 
with the Animal Husbandry Club. At the first of these meetings the club 
had the pleasure of seeing the excellent movie "Science of Milk Production" 
and at the second meeting of listening to Dr. Thomas Stitts, H. P. Hood & 
Sons Inc., speak on "Fluid Milk in New England." 

Two other outstanding events of the year were the election of Dr. Frans- 
den. Past Head of the Dairy Department, to an Honorary Membership in 
the Dairy Club and the invitation from Mr. Theodore J. Devine, President 
of the New England Milk Dealers Association. A representative of each 
school gave a two minute talk on any subject of his choice that pertained 
to the industry at the New England Milk Dealers Association meeting which 
was held at Springfield, Mass., on March 30 and 31. 

The activity and success of the club has been greatly due to the whole- 
hearted support given by Dr. D. J. Hankinson, Dr. D. H. Nelson, Profes- 
sor H. G. Linquist, and the student body. 



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SENIOR FINE TURF CLASS 




First Row — Left lo Right — Norman Ladd, Donald MacKay, Keyem Ovian, Bernard Simoneau, 

Alexander Galanis 
Second Row — Same Order — Daniel Silvar, Lawrence Graham, Chester Wedrychowski, Joseph Witas- 

zek, William Kennedy 



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FINE TURF CLUB 




First Row — Left to Right — Bernard Simoneau. Chester Wedrychowski. Alexander Galanis 
Second Row — Same Order — Joseph Witaszek, Lawrence Graham, Norman Ladd, Daniel Silvar 
Third Row — Same Order — William Kennedy, Keyem Ovian, Donald MacKay 



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SENIOR FLORICULTURE CLASS 




FirsI Row — Left to Right — John Stone, Donald Martin, Carolyn Miller, John Harbilas. Raymond 

Morocco 
Second Row — Same Order — Lindsey Smith, Vernon Brooks, Robert Roehrich, Leo Roberge, William 

Boyd, William Stasinos 
Third Row — Same Order — William Holmes. Stanley Buss, Edward Wasielewski, Aaron Gotlib 
Fourth Row — Same Order — William Crowell 



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FLORICULTURE CLUB 




First Row — Left to Right — Arnold Erickson, France, Ruth Shepard, William Holmes, Homer Miller, 

Professor Clark Thayer, Todd - President, Donahue, Barbara Davis, John Harbilas 
Second Row — Same Order — Vernon Brooks, Leo Roberge, John Stone, Donald Martin, Elmer Hill, 

George Yetman, Anthony Ackerman, William Stasinos, William Boyd, Raymond Morocco 
Third Row — Same Order — Quint, Edward Wasielewski, Russell Watson, William Walsh, John 

Houston, Walter Frost, Cowles, Robert Dewey 
Fourth Row — Same Order — George Doherty, Kendall Bennett. Salvatore Simeone, Lenhert, Charles 

Dill, John Smith, Robert Fahey, Professor Dunham, Carl Deame, Winterhollar 
Fifth Row — Same Order — Katsamos, Richard Anderson, Theodore Siok, Robert Roehrich 

44 A great and successful year!" That is what can be said about the acti- 
vities of the Floriculture Club for this year. The Floriculture Club 
was started in 1915 and has been one of the most active clubs on campus. 
Dean Clark Thayer is club adviser and is supported by the rest of the 
Floriculture professors and instructors, all of whom show an active interest 
in the club. Supported by both the Stockbridge and University students 
this year the club has an active membership of about forty. 

Officers are as follows: President, Len Todd; Treasurer, Bill Holmes; 
Secretary, Barbara Donahue. The Floriculture Club was organized to pro- 
mote and advance interest in Floriculture and to bring in outside speakers. 

Members, as in previous years, had a great deal to do with the success of 
the Horticulture Show, and as a group the Floriculture boys set up more 
individual displays than any other majors. A wishing well constructed by 
the club at the Horticulture Show collected a sizable sum which was turned 
over to the War Memorial Fund. The Flower and Fashion Show which was 
held during Winter Carnival week again proved to be a great success. The 
idea to produce a show of this type was originated by a Stockbridge 
student last year. This year almost all the designing of flowers was done by 
Stockbridge Floriculture Majors. 

Some of the speakers who addressed the group this past year were Dean 
Thayer, who gave the group an interesting and informative history of the 



!'» 



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Horticulture Show. Mr. Wesley Ball of S. S. Pennock Co. of Boston, 
a graduate of Stockbridge 1935, now manager of the shipping department, 
gave a very enlightening lecture of his type of work, the wholesaler's point 
of view and hints for future growers. Slides and a lecture on work being 
done by the Burpee Seed Co. were presented by Miss Helen Lintleman of 
the company. She explained how much work was required to develop new 
varieties and the enormous amount of acreage needed by a large company to 
produce seeds. Mr. Francis B. Gustin of North Amherst, a "State" gradu- 
ate, gave a wealth of information from his personal experience on how any 
new grower may start out on a small scale and build up. He also stressed the 
various specialties of Floriculture a gardener could work in. 

"Carnation Night" was the combined Holyoke-Northampton Florists 
and Gardeners Club and the Floriculture Club meeting. This indeed was 
the highlight of the year as the members were able to see what prize winning 
carnations looked like; and also to profit from the tremendous wealth of 
information the various growers gave as they discussed their crops and 
problems. 

Mr. Boicourt, the county agriculture extension officer, presented some 
revealing facts from a survey which he had compiled from a state question- 
naire sent to carnation growers. The meeting ended with the serving of 
refreshments which is not very uncommon at Floriculture Club meetings. 




SENIOR FOOD MANAGEMENT CLASS 




Lefl to Right — Frank Shufelt, Professor Kranz, Lyndon Lafley, Earl Williams 



PANDOCIOS SOCIETY 



f^ r^ 




Left to Right — Earl Williams, Lyndon Lafley, Frank Shufelt - President, John Page 



npHE Pandocios Society was formed in 1939, the year that the first class 
of Food Management graduated. The name Pandocios is the Greek 
word meaning Inn Keeper. 

The society was created for men in the Food Management course so both 
the Freshmen and the seniors could get together and plan trips to various 
hotels and restaurants, and could invite, as an organization, speakers who 
would discuss problems in Food Management. The club meets once a week. 
Some meetings have been held in the evening at the Lord Jeffery Amherst. 

During the war years the Food Management course was not offered to 
Stockbridge students. However, last year some members of the Freshman 
class reorganized the club, and adopted the name which had been used by 
the members of the class of '39. Officers were elected in the spring and plans 
for the coming year were made. Five of the freshmen returned from place- 
ment training to form the nucleus for the society. The five members of the 
freshman class were Joe Barnhill, Lyndon Lafley, John Page, Frank Shu- 
felt, and Dick Williams. The members of the club of the freshmen class 
that entered this fall were John Braginton, Ernest Grimard, Jack Gorman, 
Manuel Fernandez, Glover Howe, Richard Labonte, Gerald O'Connor, 
Albert Rossner, John Tanner, and Donald Whalen. 

The first plans made in the fall were for the Horticulture show. 

The officers that were elected for this year were Frank Shufelt, president; 
Glover Howe, vice president; Dick Labonte, secretary; and Lindy Lafley, 
Treasurer. 

The society is starting a second organization. That it will continue to 
grow and with it the course in Food Management is the aim of its members. 
With a good freshman class there is no reason that this society should not 
reach its goal. 



SENIOR FRUIT GROWING CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — Winston Sherman, Harry Flood, Professor Roberts, Henry Ainsworth, 

Gordon Scotland 
Second Row — Same Order — Francis Lyman, Edwin Hayes, Nelson Crafts 



POMOLOGY CLUB 




First Row — Left to Right — Professor James Anderson, Winston Sherman, Henry Ainsworth. Gordon 

Scotland, Professor Roberts. Professor Oscar Anderson 
Second Row — Same Order — Harry Flood, Francis Lyman, Edwin Hayes. Nelson Crafts, John Phe- 

lon, Donald Fay 



' I *HIS year Stockbridge Pomology students took an active part in the 
Pomology Club. At the beginning of the year the ofificers were as fol- 
lows: 

President - Henry D. Ainsworth, Jr. 
Vice President - William Haines 
Secretary - Clayton Smith 
Treasurer - Winston Sherman 
Faculty Adviser- Professor O. C. Roberts 
Programs for the year were presented by such speakers as Professor O. G. 
Anderson; Mr. Market, a local grower; an illustrated talk by Professor O. C. 
Roberts on various phases of the fruit industry. 

In the Horticulture Show, the Pomology Club took an active part in de- 
signing and constructing the display featuring Johnnie Appleseed. 

During the year, because of a change in his course, the elected club secre- 
tary was replaced by Gordon L. Scotland, Jr., who was elected to fulfill the 
secretary's duties for the remainder of the year. 



SENIOR HORTICULTURE CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — Peter Senecal, Charles Drake. Paul Frederick, Alvin Nix, Walter Camp- 
bell 
Second Row — Same Order — George Aptt, Kenneth Kirk, James Geneva, Ralph Breed 
Third Row — Same Order — Philip Bartlett, Roy Reinhold, Walter Stranger, Paul Sullivan 



HORTICULTURAL SHOW 



npHIS year saw the Horticultural Show in its thirty-sixth and greatest 
year from the point of view of attendance. Over nineteen thousand 
guests came to see the annual spectacle. What they saw was one of the best 
shows that has ever been presented. 

The main theme was the inspiration of and under the supervision of the 
Ornamental Horticulture Department. The main feature, a nursery with 
related greenhouse and salesroom, was the chief undertaking of the spon- 
soring department. The greenhouse, of the Orlyt type, was purchased ex- 
pressly for exhibition at the show, and was filled with various greenhouse 
plants. The salesroom served as a center for the sale of small corsages, the 
returns from which are used as a basis for the opening of the following year's 
show. The Horticulture Show Store profits are used for a similar purpose. 

"The V/ishing Well," and the Memorial Fund Drive which it helps to 
further, was generously contributed to by the spectators. 
The student ten by tens were as well presented as any in the past. 
The exhibits of the members of the Holyoke and Northampton Florists' 
and Gardeners' Club added to the University exhibits. 

The co-chairman, Ray Morrocco and Robert Winterhalter, were ably 
assisted by chairman of committees. 

R. Roehrick E. Wasielewski 

D. Toelken C. Drake 

J. Harbilas D. Martin 

C. Makrides G. Davidson 

W. Stasinos L. Roberge 

K. Ovian 
Without the assistance of all the members of the School of Horticulture 
both in the University and Stockbridge the Show could not have been a 
success. 

The Horticultural Show of 1948 can well be remembered by the Class of 
1949 as one of the brightest achievements of their careers in the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture. 



SENIOR POULTRY CLASS 




First Row — Left lo Rif/hl — George Cadiero. Robert Burley, Vincent Pietraszka, Alice Howarth, 

Graydon Moses, Fred Grandy, Emil Nilsson 
Second Row — Same Order — Albert Wark, Herbert Hutchings, David Smarsh, George Wood, William 

Bowers, Geoffrey Page, John Thibault 
Third Row — .Same Order — Robert Cunningham, Richard Shelnut, Frank Chadbourne, Roy Kimball, 

Lawrence Nixon, Herbert Mague 
Fourth Row — Same Order — Ernest Parsons, Harold Coleman, Robert Degen 



POULTRY CLUB 




First Row — Left to Right — Joseph Lamareau, Harold Vernell, Frank Chadbourne, William Bowers, 
George Cadiero 

Second Row — Same Order — Professor Banta, Professor Sanctuary, Virginia Bennett, Fred Grandy, 
Robert Cunningham, Alice Howarth, Graydon Moses, Lawrence Swift, Professor Vondell 

Third Row — Same Order — William Creed, Frank Rollins, Richard Shelnut, Vincent Pietraszka, 
Emil Nilsson, Herbert Mague, R. Epstein, Lawrence Nixon, John Thibault, Harold Cole- 
man, Thomas Fox 

Fourth Row — Same Order — George Wood, Roy Kimball, Geoffrey Page, James Chretian, James War- 
ren, Edgar Spears, Donald Anderson, Robert Burley, Robert Degen, David Smarsh 



/CONTINUING the fine example set by last year's members.the Poultry 
Science Club, under the leadership of President Fred Grandy, has ex- 
perienced one more successful year of keeping its recreational as well as its 
educational functions among the best attended activities on campus. 

In order that the members of the club, who are in reality the future lead- 
ers of this state in the field of poultry, might have an abundance of ideas 
and material from which to draw for practical application, several leading 
poultry men were selected and came to speak before the club. Last Novem- 
ber, J. J. Warren, an outstanding Massachusetts poultry breeder, empha- 
sized in his talk, the importance of establishing a good breeding program. 
Mr. Howard Whalen, who is manager of the Brockton Egg Auction, spoke 
during the December meeting on the development of co-operatives and 
their importance in the poultry world. Movies on breeding and brooding 
were shown in January to commence the new year of meetings, while Mr. 
Charles Shelnut, a leading broiler raiser, spoke on broiler confinement at 
the February meeting. A specialist in the field of biology, Mr. Charles 
Scott gave an interesting lecture on wild life preservation and the control 
of rodents on the farming area. 

During the Massachusetts Annual Breeders School, held on campus Nov. 
18th and 19th, the Poultry Science Club set up an exhibit demonstrating 
the progress in an improvement schedule for the U. of M. flock. 

The roller-skating parties held throughout the year and sponsored by 
the club, proved to be the success everyone expected. They were held at 
the Gables in South Deerfield and fun was had by both the beginners and 
the more experienced skaters. 

Held on February 23, the annual P. S. C. banquet featured as the speaker, 
Mr. Manor, who, as manager of the Beltsville branch of H. P. Hood and 
Sons, was well qualified to give advice to members on egg marketing. 

The P. S. C. has seen a busy and profitable year — busy in the pursuit 
of knowledge pertaining to the poultry field and profitable in the fellowship 
it provided. 



SENIOR VEGETABLE GROWING CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — John Frazier. Warren Jermain, Paul Bamforth. George Jones, Sumner 

Schwartz 
Second Row — Same Order — Harold Blackie, Professor Snyder, Professor Tuttle, Robert Homans, 

Thomas Lyons 



OLERICULTURE CLUB 



^ o 




First Row — Left to Right — Donald Ellis, Warren Jermain, George Jones, Paul Bamforth 
Second Row — Same Order — Harold Blackie, Thomas Lyons, Robert Homans 



TN September, after the business of school was underway, a small group of 

students interested in vegetable growing met in Professor Snyder's office. 
Their objective was to discuss and to consider the possibility of organizing 
a club for students interested in the advancement and opportnuities of the 
vegetable industry. At this meeting the Olericulture Club was organized. 

This group appointed an executive committee to draw up a constitution 
to present at the first meeting, which was well attended. A board of officers 
was elected. This original group developed into a successful organization of 
approximately 40 members. 

The club met about the 15th of every month at Bowditch Lodge. The 
members heard speakers in all phases of the vegetable industry. At the 
first meeting Professor Lachman of the University spoke on some of the 
technical angles of olericulture, discussing weed control and hybridization. 
He showed some interesting slides on his experimental work. 

The following month, Mr. George Moore, a member of the Public Relations 
Staff of the First National Stores, discussed the possibilities of public re- 
lations in the industry. He was well received by the members, and after 
his talk he discussed various problems of the business. Sandwiches and 
coffee were served by the refreshment committee. 

At the February meeting the program was a talk by Walter Hopkins, a 
successful grower and roadside stand operator, who spoke on the growing 
aspects. He also showed some interesting slides of his farm and stand. 

The following month, Dick Walsh of Newbury, another successful far- 
mer, who incidentally attended Stockbridge in 1941, spoke to the members. 
He emphasized the importance of consumer packaging. 

At the April meeting the members heard from John A. Andrews of the 
Eastern States Farmers Exchange. Mr. Andrews explained the various 
functions of the exchange. 



On April 24 the members of the club went to the Bloody Brook Inn in 
Deerfield for the First Annual Banquet. It was an evening that will be re- 
membered by all that attended it. The meal consisted of roast turkey with 
all the fixings. After the meal a program was presented by the members, in 
which all the Professors, who incidentally were guests of the club, were ac- 
knowledged. 

The club participated in various other activities throughout the year, in- 
cluding the annual Horticultural Show. The Olericulture department ex- 
hibit was done exceptionally well this year. It was composed of a book of 
time which depicted on one side a farm in 1849, showing the various crops 
grown at that time. On the opposite page was a show case of 1949 contain- 
ing the numerous types of vegetables grown today. The idea was effectively 
presented, and at no time during the show was the display unattended. 

Six members of the club attended the National Junior Vegetable Growers 
Convention in Detroit. 

At the March meeting the board of officers for next year was elected. If 
the Olericulture Club progresses next year as rapidly as it did this year, it 
will be one of the most active clubs on campus. 




STUDENT COUNCIL 




First Row — Left to Right — Francis Patterson, Frank Stewart, John Sullivan - President, Victor 

Oliveira, Peter Frankenberg 
Second Row — Same Order — Charles Wenk, James Emerson 



T"* HE council met on October 20 to usher in a new season of student govern- 
ment in the Stockbridge School. The next week, the following perma- 
nent ofificers were elected: President, John Sulhvan; Vice-President, Robert 
Roehrich; and Secretary-Treasurer, Sumner Schwartz. 

The Armistice Day Exercises were the first major function run by the 
council. This was well planned and well carried out by both the council 
and student body, despite poor weather conditions encountered in the walk 
from Stockbridge Hall to Memorial Hall. 

The next large function was the Senior Reception for Freshmen students. 
Under considerable difficulty the Drill Hall was obtained and decorated. 
The general concensus of over seventy-five couples attending was that the 
dance was the best that the school had presented. 

President John Sullivan was appointed to the Student Life Committee 
of the University, the duties of this organization being to govern all social 
events on campus. President Sullivan's duties were to attend all meetings 
and report on these to the Stockbridge Student Council. 

It was found that our school was entitled to one member in the National 
Student Association. This notice was received late in the year and was 
tabled until the start of the 1949-1950 season. 

There were few disciplinary measures brought before the council, but 
these were discussed and dealt with in a fair and just manner. 

A special committee on housing headed by Vice-President Roehrich was 
appointed to look into the housing situation on campus. It was found that 
most Stockbridge Students live off the campus and have done so for many 
years. There has been much discussion of this problem, and further action 
will be taken. 

It was decided that temporary ofificers be elected for next year. Frank 
Mackeiwicz was elected temporary President and Charles Wenk elected 
Vice-President, to start class elections next fall. 

Thanks goes to all those who have worked so diligently to uphold and 
foster the traditions of our school. 



THE STOCKBRIDGE GLEE CLUB 




First Row — Left In Right — Gladys Kimball, Patricia Ames. Gordon Davidson - President, Andrea 

Bruneau, Alice Howarth 
Second Row — Same Order — Victor Randolph, Graydon Moses 



npHE Stockbridge Glee Club was reorganized two years ago, under the 
leadership of Professor Theodore F. Mathieu, solely for the enjoyment 
of the students. 

On October 14, 1948, the following ofificers were elected: 
President — Gordon H. Davidson 
Librarian — Paul Weldin, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer — Patricia A. Ames 
On December 15, the Glee Club presented a very successful Christmas 
program at the Stockbridge Convocation, with Mrs. Robert Tucker as ac- 
companist. The student body participated in part of the program. For the 
first time in its new history, there were five female songbirds. According to 
many comments, the girls were a favored addition to the club. Miss Alice 
Howarth sang the verse of "Silent Night." 

With greatest sincerity, the club extends its gratitude to Professor Ma- 
thieu for his guidance, patience, and the unselfish giving of his time and 
"Irish Temper." 



THE STOCKBRIDGE COLUMN IN THE 
COLLEGIAN 



CPACE in the campus newspaper, the Collegian, has been regularly allotted 
to Stockbridge for news. These last two years, the column has been cap- 
ably handled by Gordon Davidson, as its Editor, and Vernon Brooks who 
covered the sports angle of the news. 

Weekly, Vern has covered all sports events in Stockbridge and presented 
summaries of the games in an interesting manner. At the end of each season, 
Vern would compile data on various games and members and submit a sea- 
son's summary that was indeed a credit to his literary talents. 

As Stockbridge Editor, Gordon "G. H." Davidson has presented news of 

a social and general nature. It may be noted here that G. H. wrote the first 
editorial ever presented as such in the Collegian by a Stockbridge student. 

Coverage of news with the thoroughness exhibited by these men meant 
many hours of chasing down leads, and many more in preparing copy for 
the press. Assisting with the final preparation of news for presentation. 
Prof. Charles DuBois has cut, trimmed and corrected the news as presented 
him by the Editor. Without his assistance, the column would have been in 
error many times. 

Through the efforts of Vern and G. H., Stockbridge has succeeded in ob- 
taining fair representation on the paper, and the school has been provide 
with a fair, accurate, and concise presentation of the news pertaining to the 
Stockbridge side of campus. As a result of their combined work, the Stock- 
bridge News has been built into a column that is looked forward to each 
week by Stockbridge students, faculty, and friends of the school. 







Vernon Brooks 



Gordon Davidson 



WINTER CARNIVAL 



"IV/fUCH to our delight, the 1949 Winter Carnival events went off as 
scheduled, with one of the largest student, faculty and guest parti- 
cipation devoting its spirit to the theme of Carnival Week. 

Two entire programs of events were planned as an alternative, in case of 
rain during the week of February eighth. Instead, the weatherman answered 
our prayers and rewarded us with nine inches of snow. 

With this setting, the University of Massachusetts introduced to all a 
program of events which included skating events for both the men and wo- 
men, skiing events for amateurs, and a slalom for experts, snow sculpture 
judging, chorale singing, inter-class plays, fashion flower show, basketball 
games, hockey games, a symphony orchestra presentation from Cleveland, 
fraternity round robin and a grand finale on Friday when Johnny Long 
brought his band here for a night of dancing. With the band was Janet 
Bruce, whose singing provided additional entertainment. 

The feature attraction of the evening was the crowning of the queen. 
This honor was given to Miss Virginia Reynolds, the "Queen of the 1949 
Winter Carnival." 

She was presented her floral crown by last year's queen. Miss Nancy 
Wallace. 

Mayor Daniel Brunton of Springfield, Massachusetts, presented her with 
the Winter Carnival cup. 

Stockbridge was well represented with Vernon Brooks, serving on the 
events committee, Sumner Schwartz and George Jones on the ball commit- 
tee, and Paul Fredericks on the refreshments committee. 

The snow sculptures that appeared for judging were really a tribute to the 
students' skill and originality. 

Alpha Tau Gamma presented an unusual, but very skillfully executed 
setting, with three huge books of snow and a throne upon the books signi- 
fying knowledge and its importance for reaching heights of wisdom. The 
theme was climaxed by coloring the books different shades and the lamp of 
knowledge a golden yellow. 

The Kappa Kappa fraternity presented one of the most interesting topics 
on the campus. It consisted of a title of "Operation Vittles" and was a 
large fifteen foot schmoo with foodstuffs surrounding its base. In the front, 
just to the side of the title, was made the fuselage and wing section of a 
plane, giving thought to the air lift presently bringing food to inside Ger- 
many. 

Another successful Winter Carnival week ended on Sunday with hun- 
dreds of spectators from all parts of the state viewing the snow sculptoring. 



ALPHA TAU GAMMA 



TN the fall of 1948 the Senior members returned from placement to carry on 
the old traditions of ATG and to make new ones. In November a smoker 
was held to get the freshmen acquainted with the house. In early December 
pledge cards were sent to prospective members. A week later a grueling 
initiation program was held. This culminated in an Initiation Banquet held 
at Wiggins Tavern in Northampton for the ones that passed the test. 
Several house dances were held and an Installation Banquet was given at 
the Roger Smith Hotel in Holyoke. 

During the year members completed the new game room in the basement, 
which now houses a ping-pong table and a new pool table. ATG can proudly 
boast that this game room is probably the best on the campus. Several 
additions of furniture have also added greatly to the house. 

1949 marks the thirty-year anniversary of ATG, and a homecoming for 
Alumni is being held in May. 
Officers for the current year were: 
President — C. Peter Frankenberg 
Vice-President — Victor Oliveira 
Treasurer — James Pitts Emerson 
Secretary — Frank Stewart 
Sergeant-at-arms — Stanley Buczynski 
Historian — George Wood 
House Manager — Walter Campbell 
Link Editors — Vernon Brooks and Gordon Davidson 
Social Chairman — Allan Leskinen 




First Row — Left to Right — John Cande, Howard Frost 

Second Row — Same Order — Walter Campbell, Henry Doody, Russell Fuller - President 1949-1950, 

Lawrence Damour, Paul Frederick, Stanley Buczynski, Peter Frankenberg - President 

1948-1949, Vernon Brooks, Frank Stewart, Ernest Verrill 
Third Row — Same Order — Harold Coleman, Robert Hendrickson, George Wood, Allan Leskinen, 

Richard Hannum, Gordon Davidson, David Smarsh, Robert Cunningham, Theodore 

Sick, George Priest, Richard Shelnut 



ALPHA TAU GAMMA MEMBERSHIP 



Class of 1949 



Class of 1950 



Sumner Schwartz 
John Sullivan 
Clarence Smith 
Allan Leskinen 
Walter Campbell 
Frank Stewart 
Peter Frankenberg 
Victor Oliveira 
James Emerson 
Ralph Carter Breed 
Robert Cunningham 
Harold Coleman 
Richard Hannum 
Ernest Verrill 



David Smarsh 
Ernest Parsons 
Clayton Smith 
Stanley Buczynski 
Vernon Brooks 
Gordon Davidson 
George Wood 
Richard Shelnut 
George Cadiero 
Paul Frederick 
Gordon Scotland 
Robert Degen 
Carlson Fecteau 
Harold Blackie, Jr. 



Robert Anderson 
Frederick Bangs 
John Cande 
Lawrence Damour 
Henry Doody 
Maurice Frost 
Russell Fuller 
George Gibovic 
Howard Gold 
Robert Henrickson 
Allen Jacques 
Ralph Johnson 
Germain LaRoche 



Frank Mackiewicz 
Raymond Olson 
Ernest Page 
George Priest 
Harold Richardson 
Charles Rogers 
Albert Rossner 
Theodore Siok 
Robert Smith 
Edward Valentine 
Charles Wenk 
Donald W. White 
Walter D. White 



KAPPA KAPPA 




TN 1949 Kappa Kappa Fraternity climbed ahead on another step of the 

ladder of success among the houses on Fraternity Row. 

The officers and members of K. K. this year have worked in such close 
unison that it has attained a social rating far exceeding the goal that had 
been set up by them. 

The addition of a ping pong table in the new basement of the house has 
provided many happy hours of relaxation for the members. 

Open invitations were given at convocation to all Stockbridge Freshmen 
to join K. K. 

On October 25 the smoker at the house proved that the invitation was 
well accepted, for this year Kappa Kappa pledged one of the largest groups 
in its history. 

At the first meeting after Rush Night the members proudly displayed a 
new flag, purchased this year. 

During the month of November, the Thanksgiving Dance was held. A 
capacity throng filled the house for an excellent evening of dancing. 

A similar dance to this was held in December, and, aided by the talent 
of the members of the Floriculture Class, the decorations and dance were a 
great success. 

Also during this month the Fraternity had the pleasure of accepting sev- 
eral faculty members as honorary members. 

A bowling team was organized which bowled on Thursday nights on the 
alleys at Memorial Hall. Keen competition among the teams set up brought 
out the feeling of good sportsmanship among the fellows. 

The Fraternity supported the intra-mural basketball league with a group 
of keen and earnest players. 





February saw a very busy group in K. K. preparing for the new semester 
and the sculpturing a giant "Shmoo," symbohc of "Operation Vittles" dur- 
ing Carnival Week. This endeavor gained Honorable Mention from the 
judges of the snow sculpturing. 

For the chmax of the Winter Carnival week Kappa Kappa held an open 
house dance with decorations appropriate to the snow sculpture outdoors. 
Fluttering Shmoos hung from the ceiling and walls and were claimed by the 
guests for souvenirs. 

As the final highlight before the Freshmen departed on their Placement 
Training a very successful banquet was held at the Bloody Brook Inn at 
South Deerfield. A stag party was given a few weeks later at the house. 

An annual alumni meeting was held at the house and former mem- 
bers were greeted with the addition of new living room furniture. 

Construction has started in the basement of the house to enlarge the al- 
ready improved reception room. This addition is necessary because of in- 
creased participation of the members interested in ping-pong. This new 
work should be completed and in operation when the Freshmen return as 
Seniors next year. 

A banquet was held in May in honor of the fellows who successfully 
completed two years at Stockbridge. The honorary members were invited 
to attend this most enjoyable evening. 

As the Seniors leave in the hands of the class of 1950 many responsibilities, 
we are sure they will carry them out according to the rules and tradition. 
At this time the Seniors wish to extend to their House Mother and Father 
their deepest gratitude for the wonderful work they have done for both the 
members and the house. 




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SPORTS SUMMARY— BASKETBALL 




First Row — Left to Right — Joseph Deary, Donald Long, Robert Burley, Charles Drake, Robert 

Roehrich, Gordon Williams 
Second Row — Same Order — Professor Kosakowski - Coach, Vernon Brooks - Manager, Robert 

Hendrickson, Melvin Small, John Houston 



AXT'ITH the opening of the 1948-49 basketball season, Coach Kosakowski 
welcomed all to routine practice drills with a showing of three of last 
year's students and a large group of freshman prospects. 

Breaks of the game were never on our side and on two occasions, we lost 
by only a 1 point margin. The first game of the season is an ideal example, 
when the strong Keene, New Hampshire Teachers romped by a 35-34 score. 

At the opening of the season, Coach Kosakowski was presented 'with a 
large squad of freshmen, from which emerged a trio that really combined 
with our seniors. These include newly elect Captain for next year, Donald 
Long, Joe Deary, and Bob Grant. 

Captain, Bob Burley, senior and star center for last year, came through 
even better than last year with his one handed hook shots and lay ups. He 
totaled 113 points for the ten games played. 

Kelly Ovian, the main cog to last year's squad both defensively and offen- 
sively, came up with another commendable offering this year to carry away 
the scoring laurels by netting 126 points for all 12 games. 

This being Kelly's last game, the gap he leaves will undoubtedly take 
everything the freshmen have to fill. 

Coach Kosakowski often remarks about ethics and the code of basketball 
and how a team built around one or two players will affect its morale. How 
ever, he goes on to say that the exception to that rule lies in the persons of 
Kelly Ovian and Bob Burley. 



Red Drake contributed much to the cause, often showing signs of his 
aggressive spirit of a year ago. 

Frank Shufelt was the regular guard, and it was his fighting way that en- 
abled us to gain control of the opposing backboard. 

Bob Roehrich came out this year and made the grade. We remember Bob 
mostly for his achievements on the gridiron, but also recognize his general 
athletic ability in a basketball suit. 

Herb Maque completes the senior members of the squad. He added that 
reserve punch when most needed. It was well appreciated, too. 

Freshmen reporting this year and on whose shoulders rests the burden of 
next year's team include: Don Long, captain, Joe Deary, who showed 
Kelly's winning spirit, Bob Grant, who will be filling in at one guard posi- 
tion, Al Jacques, Red Hendrickson, Dick Williams and Dave Small will 
complete the senior squad. 

Our season started off on the wrong foot with Keene, New Hampshire, 
Teachers edging us 35-34. Bob Burley chalked up 10 points for the game. 
Westfield was next, and ceded a 51-35 to us. Burley again hit the net for 
20 points. North Adams was too strong and beat us by a 64-50 score. Here, 
Kelly Ovian hit his usual stride and netted 15 points. The University Frosh 
romped 60-47 over us on January 5, with Kelly Ovian hustling 16 of the 
total points. 

Once again we met defeat by one point when Gushing Academy fought us 
to a 39-38 score. Joe Deary starred with a 14 points surge. 

Monson Academy fell twice to us, first by a 51-41 score and secondly by a 
38-27 advantage. They gave us a battle on both encounters with Ovian, 
Deary and Long pacing. 

Mount Hermon came next as our 3rd straight win by a 42-40 score. Don 
Long saved this for us with a basket in the closing seconds. 

Nichols Jr. Gollege out-classed us on both appearances. They took us 
56-37 on their court, and 62-45 on our home court. 

Westfield was again defeated on February 14th by a 49-40 score with Joe 
Deary romping in true fashion. This ended the season with a none too im- 
pressive, but satisfying season with a 6-6 average. 

Vernon Brooks was manager for the season and acted efficiently in full 
capacity as Goach Kosakowski's right hand man. 

Thus ended the 1948-49 season. All members would like to extend ap- 
preciation to Goach Kosakowski on a job well done. May next year's team 
be better. 



FOOTBALL 



npHE 1948 football season opened with one week's pre-season practice. 
There was a good turnout with thirty-five candidates. Two sessions 
were held each day. Most of the seniors did not practice more than three 
days before the opening game, as school opened the fourth and the first 
game was the eighth. We were fortunate to have the services of Jack Deady 
to assist us throughout the entire season. Jack helped out two weeks the 
previous season. 

At the close of the week, a two hour scrimmage which was most bene- 
ficial was held with Williston Academy. The squad looked very good in 
spite of its short practice session. 

The first game was played against Monson Academy, which had its best 
season since 1938. Monson Academy defeated Stockbridge School 7-0 in the 
opening game. That was played in a driving rain, on a rain soaked field. 
In spite of the weather the Aggies had the best of the contest throughout 
except for the final score. We had possession of the ball 'during most of this 
game but were unable to score, reaching the two and three yard lines on 
two different drives. Monson did not get beyond the fifty yard line by 
carrying the ball. A clipping penalty set Stockbridge back to its own 
thirty yard line. The next play, a blocked quick kick, was recovered by 
Monson on our fifteen, a point from which Monson scored its lone tally 
in the final quarter of the game. Stockbridge came back strong, bringing 
the ball to the Monson ten yard line when the game came to an end. The 
entire Stockbridge team played a good game, and did a great job consider- 
ing the time they had for practice. 

The second game was played against a strong Nichols Junior College 
team which the Aggies won 6-0 in a very rugged game which found injuries 
heavy on both sides. Captain "Kelly" Ovian of Whitinsville was the hero 
of this game. "Kelly" took a punt on his own twenty yard line and took off 
for an eighty yard touchdown. Vic Oliveira of New Bedford, Bob Ferestein 
of Foxboro and John Sullivan of North Andover did most of the ball carry- 
ing. The Stockbridge line that appeared sluggish the first half was able to ' 
hold on a couple of Nichols' drives and came back strong in the second half 
to outcharge a heavier Nichols' team and dominate the play throughout the 
entire last quarter. Nichols Junior College went through the season un- 
defeated except for this lone loss to Stockbridge. Among the Nichols' vic- 
tims were the Dartmouth Freshmen. This fact gives an idea how hard the 
boys played to win this one. 



FOOTBALL TEAM 




Firxl Row — Lefl to Right — Remo Sodano. Franklin Blackman, Frank Shufelt, John Sullivan, Keyem 

Ovian - Captain, Victor Oliveira. Charles Drake, Allan Leskinen, Peter Frankenberg, 

Philip Bartlett 
Si-rond Row — Same Order — Walter Campbell, Sumner Schwartz, Robert Roehrich, Allen Jacques, 

Carlton Stockbndge, Harry Flood, George Priest, Henry Doody, Charles Wenk 
Third Row — Same Order — Frederick Bangs, John Handrahan, Robert Smith, William Stauffer, 

Robert Ferestien, Robert Lauder, Charles Rogers 
Fourth Row — Same Order — Professor Kosakowski - Coach, Theodore Sick, Robert Hendrickson, 

John Cande, Robert Grant, Frank Mackiewicz, Herbert Mague - Manager, Jack Deady - 

Assistant Coarh 



Wentworth Institute was a pre-game favorite in the Boston papers to 
take the Stockbridge Aggies by three touchdowns. The final outcome was 
a scoreless tie. Bob Henrickson, a freshman from Worcester, and Harry 
Flood of Hudson did yeoman work at the end positions. The entire line was 
great and did a swell job of bottling up Ballino, who had been an All-State 
back, in check all afternoon. Captain "Kelly" Ovian, John Sullivan and 
Phil Bartlett of Berlin turned in a fine game in the backfield. "Kelly" was 
away once but spectators along the sidehnes hampered his run and he was 
brought down after a long run on the Wentworth fifteen as the game ended 
a few plays later with Stockbridge on the seven yard line. 

Vermont Academy was defeated 12-7 in one of the hardest fought games 
of the year. Without Captain Ovian and the team's punter Dave Smarsh of 
Middleboro who left the team to play semi-pro ball, the situation looked 
dark at game time. However, Ted Siok of Ludlow replaced Ovian and turned 
in some long runs during the afternoon. Pete Frankenberg, a guard from 
Concord, took over the punting duties, and his first kick went sixty-five 
yards in the air. This gave the team plenty of confidence and Pete went on 
the rest of the season, doing all the punting in which he excelled with the 
best. Bob Ferestein took a spinner play eighty-five yards for a touchdown. 
The second score was m.ade by Ted Siok on a twenty yard gallop. Four 
first string linemen were hurt in the first quarter and did not see any fur- 
ther action during the afternoon. The Vermonters tallied their touch- 
downs via the air route. Sumner Schwartz of Agawam, Allen Leskinen of 
Athol, Bob Grant of Northampton, George Priest and Henry Doody of 
Winchendon were outstanding. 



Collegiate School of New Haven, Connecticut, was defeated 27-0. The 
score could have been doubled had not the entire squad been used. The reg- 
ulars played but two touchdowns. Charles Drake of Amherst turned in a 
good game in the backfield. Red was used in every position wherever a man 
was needed almost all year and did a fine job. 

The last week we scrimmaged the Deerfield Academy varsity and the 
entire team looked great. We were able to score at will. 

The final game of the season found us in our best game, agaist A. I. C. 
Freshmen. We finished the season with a 13-7 win. We had possession of 
the ball throughout most of the game. A. I. C. scored its touchdown on two 
long passes with the aid of a penalty. Bob Ferestein was outstanding in the 
backfield, while "Kelly" Ovian played his usual good game. Thirteen sen- 
iors played their last game. These boys have set up a splendid record in 
their two years here, losing but two games for the two seasons of play. Men 
who played their last game for Stockbridge School of Agriculture are as 
follows: 

Capt. K. Ovian, Whitinsville V. Oliviera, New Bedford 

C. Drake, Amherst A. Leskinen, Athol 

P. Frankenberg, Concord P. Bartlett, Berlin 

W. Campbell, Bridgeport, Conn. S. Schwartz, Agawam 

R. Roehrich, Bridgeport, Conn. H. Flood, Hudson 

F. Shufelt, Walpole R. Sodano, Sommerville 

F. Blackman, Worcester 

Bob Roehrich was a standout lineman all year. Bob is the brother of 
Carl Roehrich class of 1942 who was killed in action in the war, and Phil 
Bartlett, a blocking back, had a brother Everett in the same class. 



HOCKEY 



In memoriam to our undefeated hockey team of two years, this is to 
acknowledge anticipated plans that never broke ice. 

Last year's hockey team was undefeated with five victories, and with all 
members returning except Captain Wally Smith, we were destined for an- 
other banner year. 

John Sullivan was newly elected Captain and did manage to assist Coach 
Steve Kosakowski with informal practice prior to the season's opening. 
There were seven seniors and nine freshmen comprising the squad. 

The New England weather man was not cooperative with favorable 
weather to permit a single playoff and the initial christening of a newly 
established rink. 

Coach Kosakowski sends out praise for seniors whose ability netted him 
the undefeated season a year ago and whose spirit kept the freshmen intact. 
They include: Captain John Sullivan, Harry Flood, Bill Holmes, Phil 
Bartlett, and Don Ellis. 



COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE 




First Row — Left to Right — Charles Simmons, Francis Patterson, Peter Frankenberg - General 

Chairman, Robert Rogers, Albert Cover 
Second Row — Same Order — Allan Leskinen, William Holmes, Roy Reinhold 



'T^HE Commencement Week program committee, with Peter Frankenberg 
as General Chairman, was elected by the senior class at class meetings 
on April 13 and 20, 1949. Assisting the general chairman are: 



Albert Cover 
Robert J. Rogers 
William Holmes 
Roy Reinhold 
Charles Simmons 

Ex officio members: 
F. Alfred Patterson, Jr. 
Allen Leskinen 

Faculty advisers: 
Prof. T. F. Mathieu 
Stephen Kosakowski 
Charles Dunham 



Chairman, Class Picnic Committee 
Chairman, Class Gift Committee 
Chairman, Cap & Gown Committee 
Co-chairman, Class Promenade 
Co-chairman, Class Promenade 

Class President 
Class Treasurer 

Finance 

Picnic 

Promenade 



COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 



Friday - 27 May, 1949 

10:00 a.m. — Class Picnic 

9:00 p.m. — Commencement Promenade 



Saturday -28 May, 1949 

10:00 a.m. — Class Day Exercises 

Class Oration 
Class History 
Student Activity Awards 
Presentation of Class Gift 
School Song "Alma Mater Hail" 

12:30 — Alumni-Senior Luncheon 

3:15 — Softball Game (Alumni vs. Stockbridge) 



Sunday - 29 May, 1949 

2:30 — Graduation Exercises 

Processional 

Invocation 

Commencement Address: 

Allister F. MacDougall, Director 
County Agri. Agent of Middlesex County 
Extension Service, Mass. 

Song "Men of Stockbridge" 

Presentation of Diplomas 

Song 

Stosag Awards 

Benediction 

Recessional 

4:30 — President's Reception to members of the gradua- 

ting class, their guests, alumni, alumnae, and faculty. 



SHORTHORN BOARD 




First Row — Left to Right — Vernon Brooks, Franklin Blackman, Joseph Witaszek - Editor, Patricia 
Ames, Richard Hannum - Business Manager, Donald Hawes, Frank Chadbourne 

Second Row — Same Order — Loren King, Walter Chace, Everett Drumm, Charles Simmons, William 
Bowers, Professor RoUin Barrett - Faculty Advisor, George Galusha, Herbert Bates, 
Herbert Mague, Peter Frankenberg 







O 

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FRESHMEN 



CLASS OFFICERS 



Jeremiah McCarthy 
Gladys Kimball 
Barbara Davis 



President 
'I'reasiirer 
Scerelari/ 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 




Left to Right — Gladys Kimball - Treasurer, Jeremiah McCarthy - President, Barbara Davis - 
Secretary 



'npHE Senior Class of the Stockbridge School of Agriculture held the an- 
nual Freshman Reception for the Freshman Class on November 19, 
1948. The event was held at the Drill Hall of the University of Mass. 
Music was furnished by the talented Carmen Ravasa and his orchestra. 
Among the honored guests were President and Mrs. Ralph VanMeter, of 
the U. of M., Director and Mrs. Roland Verbeck of Stockbridge, and Pro- 
fessor and Mrs. John Zak. 

Over a hundred and twenty people attended this gala occasion. The Drill 
Hall was decorated with the class colors. The members of the Student Coun- 
cil, headed by John Sullivan, made up the general committee responsible 
for putting on the dance. 



FRESHMAN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — Ernest Vieira, John Stockbridge, Jairus Burt, John Cande, Gladys Kim- 
ball, George Smith, John Copeland, Richard Crittenden, Stuart Johnson 

Second Row — Same Order — Donald DeWolf. Robert Longden, Herman Langevin, Howard Frost, 
Frederick Nilges, William Watson. James Fuller. George Robinson 

Third Row — Same Order — John Chambers, Donald Charles, Peter Hill, Harry Charles, John Homich, 
Paul Thayer, Francis John. William Reed, Roy Simmons, Ralph Conway, Francis La- 
Valle, Gordon Williams 

Fourth Row — Same Order — Walter White, Harold Hanks. Donald White. Albert Wood, Joseph 
Duarte, David Smith, John Washburn, Robert Loomis, Raymond Warnock 

Fifth Row — Same Order — John Libby, Norman Kenyon, John Mayo. Raymond Smith 



FRESHMAN ARBORICULTURE CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — Aloysius Donahue, Robert Stelle, Clayton Smith, George Wilson, Charles 

Sawicki 
Second Row — Same Order — Ira Wickes, Richard Robinson, Robert Yokes, Robert Jackson 
Third Row — Same Order — Robert Huntley, Ronald Soper 



FRESHMAN DAIRY CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — RoUin Perry, Robert Ferestien, Professor Lindquist, Charles Kearney, 

Leonard CoUis, Thomas Johnson 
Second Row — Same Order — Michael Wrabel, Leonard Libbey, George Thomas, Glenn Harvey, 

Edward Valentine 
Third Row — Same Order — Jeremiah McCarthy, Harry Johnson, Anthony Giardina, Harold Keith 
Fourth Row — Same Order — Walter Moynihan, Robert Lauder, Joseph Deary, Dean Hooker, Dr. 

Hankinson 
Fifth Row — Same Order — Professor Finnegan, William Thomas, Roger Bryant, Frederick Smith, 

Dr. Nelson 



FRESHMAN FINE TURF CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — Robert Grant, John Linnehan, Leo Haverty, Paul Makliney, Daniel 

Graham 
Second Row — Same Order — Harry Rahm, Paul Weldin, Joseph Bidwell, George Stumph 
Third Row ~ Howard Peatfield 



FRESHMAN FLORICULTURE CLASS 




First Row — Lefl to Right — Ernest Page, Florian Rogers, Barbara Davis, Andrea Bruneau, Carl 

Deame, Germain LaRoche 
Second Row — Same Order — William Ashe. Walter Frost, John Houston, Robert Dewey, Robert 

Fahey 
Third Row — Same Order — Robert Anderson, Richard Joseph, John Moodie, Charles Wenk 
Fourth Row — Same Order — John Barry, Stanley Moore, Raymond Olson 



FRESHMAN FOOD MANAGEMENT CLASS 







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First Row — Left to Right — Professor Kranz, Albert Rossner, Manuel Fernandez, Donald Whalen, 

Gerald O'Connor 
Second Row — Same Order — Richard LaBonte, Glover Howe, Jackie Braginton, Norris Allen 
Third Row — Same Order — Ernest Grimard, John Tanner, John Gorman 



FRESHMAN FORESTRY CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — James St. Amand, Gabriel Recos, Wilton Dale, George Priest, Allen 

Jacques, Robert Fuller 
Second Row — Same Order — Martin Onishuk, Harold Proctor, Edward Gorski, Henry Doody, 

Ralph Swedberg 
Third Row — Same Order — Eugene Dziza, Kenneth Peterson, John Reynolds 



FRESHMAN FRUIT GROWING CLASS 




Left to Right — Carl Haeseler, John Phelon, Donald Fay, Milton Hansen 



FRESHMAN HORTICULTURE CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — Alden Johnson, Roger Coggeshall, Frederick Heyliger 

Second Row — Same Order — Charles O'Halloran, Robert Szereyko, Donald Long, Allen Gelinas, 

Louis Bonitto, Paul Maynard 
Third Row — James Downing 



FRESHMAN POULTRY CLASS 




First Row — Left to Right — John Allen, Richard Anderson, Loring Alger, Eugene Lapine, George 
Fellows, Stanley Hollis, Wallace Dolloff 

Second Row — Same Order — Wilfred Worsman, David Mello, Robert Guild, John Handrahan, How- 
ard Gold, Donald Lambert, George Whiton 

Third Row — Same Order — Warren McKinstry, Ralph Johnson, Charles Parmelee, Paul Kenney, 
William Stauffer, Melvin Small 

Fourth Row — Same Order — Bruce Brown, Charles Rogers, Robert Rafferty, James Rush, Stewart 
Johnson 



FRESHMAN VEGETABLE 
GROWING CLASS 




First Row — Lefl to Right — Carlton Smith, Kachadore Berberian, Leonard Feddema, Robert Hunter 
Second Row — Same Order — Graydon Mundell, John Kulsea, Arthur Morgan 




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Stephen Allen 



Doric Alviani 



James Anderson 



Oscar Anderson 




Luther Banta 




Rollin Barrett 



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STEPHEN I. ALLEN 

Amherst College B. A. 

Harvard M. A. 

On faculty 1 year 



DORIC ALVIANI 

Boston University 
Boston University 
On faculty 11 years 



Instructor of Mathematics 



Assistant Professor of Music 



M. B. 

M. E. 



JAMES F. ANDERSON Instructor of Pomology 

West Virginia University B. S. 

West Virginia University M. S. 

On faculty 1 year 

OSCAR G. ANDERSON Assistant Professor of Pomology 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. S. 

On faculty 1 year 

LUTHER BANTA Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Cornell University B. S. 

On faculty 31 years 



Professor of Agricultural 
Economics 



ROLLIN H. BARRETT 

University of Connecticut B. S. 
Cornell University M. S. 

On faculty 23 years 



HAROLD F. BECK Assistant Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 
Illinois Institute of Technology B. S. 
On faculty 2 years 



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Harold Beck 







Matthew Blaisdell 



Lyle Blundell 



James Callahan 



MATTHEW L. BLAISDELL 



University of Massachusetts 
On faculty 3 years 

LYLE R. BLUNDELL 

Iowa State College B. S. 
On faculty 18 years 



Assistant Professor of 
Animal Husbandry and 
Superintendent of Uni- 
versity Farm 



B. Sc. 



Professor of Horticulture 



JAMES W. CALLAHAN 


Instructor of Agricultural 




Economics 


University of Massachusetts 


B. S. 


On faculty 1 year 




ALTON B. COLE 


Instructor of Forestry 


Massachusetts State College 


B. S. 


Yale University 


M. F. 


On faculty 1 year 




GLADYS M. COOK 


Assistant Professor of Home 




Economics 


Battle Creek College 


B. S. 


University of Massachusetts 


M. S. 


On faculty 13 years 





W. ALLEN COWAN Assistant Professor of Animal 

Husbandry 
Massachusetts State College B. S. 
University of Minnesota M. S. 

On faculty 3 years 

GEOFFREY CORNISH Instructor of Agrostology 

University of British Columbia B. S. 
On faculty 2 years 



Alton Cole 




Gladys Cook 




Allen Cowar 




Geoffrey Cornish 





Dorothy Davis 



Lawrence Dickinson 



HELEN CURTIS 

Iowa State Teachers College 
Columbia University 
On faculty 4 years 



Dean of Women 



B. A. 
M. A. 



ELEANOR D. DAIUTE Assistant Professor of Hygiene 
Middlesex University M. D. 
On faculty 6 years 

DOROTHY DAVIS Instructor of Home Economics 

Syracuse University B. S. 

Columbia University M. A. 
On faculty 3 years 

LAWRENCE S. DICKINSON Associate Professor of 

Agrostology 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. Sc. 
Massachusetts State College M. Sc. 

On faculty 36 years 



PETER J. DIFFLEY 

CHARLES N. DUBOIS 

Bay Path Institute 
Middlebury College A. B. 

Middlebury College M. A. 
University of London 
On faculty 11 years 

CHARLES W. DUNHAM 

University of Massachusetts 
University of Massachusetts 
On faculty 2 years 



Instructor of English 
Assistant Professor of English 



Instructor of Floriculture 
B. S. 
M. S. 



Charles Dunhanx 




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Robert Dunton 



John Everson 



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Eugene Finnegan 



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ROBERT D. DUNTON 

Ohio University B. S. 

On faculty 1 year 



Instructor of Botany 



DONALD DURRELL Instructor of Landscape Architecture 
Massachusetts State College B. S. 
Massachusetts State College M. L. A. 
On faculty 1 year 

JOHN N. EVERSON Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
University of Massachusetts B. S. 
University of Massachusetts M, S. 
On faculty 11 years 

EUGENE J. FINNEGAN Instructor of Dairy Manufactures 
University of Massachusetts B. S. 

On faculty 2 years 

RICHARD C. FOLEY Associate Professor of Animal 

Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts B. S. 

University of Massachusetts M. S. 

On faculty 17 years 

ARTHUR P. FRENCH Head of Department of Pomology 
Ohio State University B. S. 

University of Massachusetts M. S. 
On faculty 27 years 

CAROL B. GAWTHROP Placement Officer for Women 
Grinnell College A. B. 

Syracuse University M. A. 
On faculty 1 year 



Richard Foley 




Carol Gawthrop 



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Emory Grayson 



Nathan Hale 



Denzel Hankinson 



John Hanson 




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EMORY E. GRAYSON Director of Placement Service 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. S. 
Springfield College 
On faculty 27 years 

NATHAN S. HALE Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
University of Connecticut B. S. 

University of Minnesota M. S. 

On faculty 3 years 



Head of Department of 
Dairy Manufactures 



DENZEL J. HANKINSON 

Michigan State College B. S. 

University of Connecticut M. S. 

Pennsylvania State College Ph. D. 
On faculty 1 year 



JOHN F. HANSON Assistant Professor of Entomology 

University of Massachusetts M. S. 
University of Massachusetts B. S. 
University of Massachusetts Ph. D. 
On faculty 2 years 

ROBERT P. HOLDSWORTH Head of Department of 

Forestry 
Michigan State College B. S. 

Yale University M. F. 

On faculty 19 years 

SAMUEL 0. HUBBARD Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
On faculty 28 years 

FRED P. JEFFREY Head of Department of Poultry 

Husbandry 
Rutgers University B. S. 

University of Massachusetts M. S. 
On faculty 5 years 



Fred Jeffrey 






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Bradford Johnson 



Stephen Kosakowski Theodore Kozlowski 



Otto Kranz 



W. BRADFORD JOHNSON Instructor of Olericulture 
Pennsylvania State College B. S. 
On faculty 2 years 



STEPHEN R. KOSAKOWSKI 

University of Massachusetts 
On faculty 2 years 



Instructor of Physical 
Education 



THEODORE T. KOZLOWSKI Associate Professor of 
Botany 
B. S. 
Ph. D. 

M. A. 



Syracuse University 
Duke University 
Duke University 
On faculty 2 years 



OTTO G. KRANZ Assistant Professor of Food 

Management 
University of Lausanne, Switzerland B. S. 
On faculty 4 years 



EDWARD P. LiARKIN 

Massachusetts State College 
University of Massachusetts 
On faculty 2 years 



Instructor of Bacteriology 
B. S. 
M. S. 



JOHN B. LENTZ 



Head of Department of Veteri- 
nary Science 



Franklin and Marshall 
University of Pennsylvania 
On faculty 28 years 

ARTHUR S. LEVINE 

University of Massachusetts 
University of Massachusetts 
University of Massachusetts 
On faculty 13 years 



A. B. 
V. M. D. 



Assistant Professor of Food 
Technology 

B. S. 

M. S. 

Ph. D. 




Edward Larki 




Arthur Levine 




Harry Lindquist 



Adrian Lindsey 



William MacConnell 



Miner Markuson 




Horace Nelson 



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HARRY G. LINDQUIST Assistant Professor of 

Dairy Manufactures 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. S. 

University of Maryland M. S. 

On faculty 22 years 



ADRIAN H. LINDSEY Head of Department of Agri- 
cultural Economics 
B. S. 
M. S. 
Ph. D. 



University of Illinois 
Iowa State College 
Iowa State College 
On faculty 20 years 



WILLIAM P. MACCONNELL Instructor of Forestry 
University of Massachusetts B. S. 

Yale School of Forestry M. F. 

On faculty 1 year 

MINER J. MARKUSON Associate Professor of Agri- 
cultural Engineering 
University of Minnesota B. S. 
On faculty 23 years 

THEODORE F. MATHIEU Assistant Professor of 

Arboriculture ' 

New York State College B. S. 

On faculty 3 years 

D. H. NELSON Assistant Professor of Dairy Manufactures 
New Hampshire University B. S. 

University of Missouri M. S. 

Pennsylvania State College Ph. D. 

On faculty 4 years 

JOHN B. NEWLON Assistant Professor of Mechanical 

Engineering 
On faculty 30 years 



John Newlon 






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Arthur Niedeck 



Robert Perriello 



Paul Procopio 



George Pushee 



ARTHUR E. NIEDECK 

Ithaca College B. S. 

Cornell University M. A. 
On faculty 2 years 

ROBERT C. PERRIELLO 

University of Massachusetts 
On faculty 2 years 



Assistant Professor of Speech 



Assistant Professor of 

Bacteriology 

B. S. 



PAUL N. PROCOPIO Instructor of Horticulture 

University of Massachusetts B. S. 

On faculty 2 years 

GEORGE F. PUSHEE Assistant Professor of Agricult- 
ural Engineering 
University of Massachusetts 
Contractors and Builders course with I. C. S. 
On faculty 32 years 



ERNEST J. RADCLIFFE 



Head of Department of 
Student Health 



University of Toronto 
On faculty 19 years 



M. D. 



ARNOLD D. RHODES 

University of New Hampshire 
Yale University 
On faculty 10 years 



Professor of Forestry 
B. S. 
M. F. 



VICTOR A. RICE Dean of Agriculture, and Head of the 

Department of Animal Husbandry 
North Carolina State B. S. 

University of Massachusetts M. A. 
North Carohna State Dr. A. 

On faculty 33 years 




Victor Rice 



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Harry Rich 



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Glenn Russell 




William Sanctuary 




Bernard Rines 



Oliver Roberts 



Donald Ross 



HARRY J. RICH Associate Professor of Forestry 
New York State College B. S. 

New York State College M. F. 

On faculty 16 years 



BERNARD P. RINES 

University of Maine 
University of Maine 
On faculty 1 year 



B. S. 
B. S. 



Instructor of Agricultural 
Engineering 

(A. E.) 

(E. E.) 



OLIVER C. ROBERTS Associate Professor of Pomology 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. S. 

University of Illinois M. S. 

On faculty 23 years 

DONALD E. ROSS Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. S. 
On faculty 20 years 

GLENN C. RUSSELL Instructor of Agronomy 

Brigharn Young University B. S. 
On faculty 3 years 



Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry 



WILLIAM C. SANCTUARY 

University of Massachusetts B. S. 
University of Massachusetts M. S. 
On faculty 27 years 



FRANK R. SHAW Assistant Professor of Entomology 
Massachusetts State College B. S. 

Cornell University Ph. D. 

On faculty 14 years 



Frank Sha^v 




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Russell Smith 



Grant Snyder 



Herbert Stapleton 



RUSSELL E. SMITH 

Massachusetts State College 
University of Pennsylvania 
On faculty 1 year 



Associate Professor of 
Veterinary Science 
B. S. 
V. M. D. 



GRANT B. SNYDER Head of Department of Olericulture 
Ontario Agricultural College B. S. A. 

Michigan State College M. S. 

On faculty 27 years 



HERBERT N. STAPLETON 



Kansas State College 
Kansas State College 
On faculty 2 years 



Head of Agricultural 
Engineering 



B. S. 
M. S. 



PAUL W. STICKEL Assistant Professor of Forestry 

New York State College B. S. 

Yale University M. F. 
On faculty 4 years 



ROBERT G. SWANSON 

Massachusetts State College 
Pennsylvania State College 
On faculty 1 year 



Instructor of Animal Hus- 
bandry 

B. S. 

M. S. 



HARVEY L. SWEETMAN Assistant Professor of 

Entomology 
Colorado A & M B. S. 

Iowa State College M. S. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College Ph. D. 
On faculty 19 years 

WILLIAM H. TAGUE Assistant Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 
Iowa State College B. S. 
On faculty 20 years 





Paul Stickel 


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Robert Swanson 



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Harvey Sweetman 




William Tague 





Floriana Tarantino 



Charles Thayer 



Clark Thayer 



Ruth Totman 



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Alden Tuttle 




FLORIANA TARANTINO Instructor of English 

Boston University B. S. 
Boston University A. M. 
On faculty 2 years 

CHARLES H. THAYER Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Massachusetts State College 

Cornell Summer School 

Iowa State College 

On faculty 30 years 

CLARK L. THAYER Dean of Horticulture, and Head 

of Department of Floriculture 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. S. 
Cornell University 
On faculty 30 years 

RUTH J. TOTMAN Professor of Physical Education 

for Women 
New Jersey College for Women B. S. 
University of Pittsburgh M. Ed. 

On faculty 6 years 

ALDEN P. TUTTLE Assistant Professor of Vegetable 

Growing 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B. S. 



Pennsylvania State College 
On faculty 19 years 

JOHN H. VONDELL 

On faculty 26 years 

MARTHA B. WRIGHT 

Miami University B. S. 
On faculty 2 years 



M. S. 

Assistant Professor of 
Poultry Husbandry 

Instructor of English 



Martha Wright 




Anthony Zaitz 



John Zak 



Ralph Zalkan 



ANTHONY W. ZAITZ 

Curry College B. S. O. 

Boston University M. A. 

On faculty 3 years 



Instructor of English 



JOHN M. ZAK 

Massachusetts State College 
Massachusetts State College 
On faculty 11 years 

RALPH C. ZALKAN 

Purdue University 
University of Massachusetts 
On faculty 1 year 



Instructor of Agronomy 
B. S. 
M. S. 



Instructor of Food 
Technology 



B. S. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



'"pHE editors of the SHORTHORN are very grateful to all who have 
helped or assisted in the preparation of this year book. So, it is with 
great pleasure that we express our appreciation to: 

Professor RoUin H. Barrett, our Faculty Advisor, for his timely advice 
and untiring effort in compiling this year book. 

Mr. Charles N. Du Bois, Mr. Robert P. Lane and Miss Floriana Tarantino 
and others of the English Department for their assistance in preparing copy. 

Dr. Ralph A. Van Meter, Director Roland H. Verbeck, Emory E. Gray- 
son, Miss Carol B. Gawthrop for the interesting and appropriate feature 
articles which they submitted. 

Mr. John E. Snow of the Valley Litho Company for his kind cooperation. 

The Misses Katharine M. Martin and Catherine F. Heffernam for their 
kind assistance. 

To Club presidents and members of the student body who contributed 
photographs, information, time and efifort. 



1948 GRADUATING CLASS 





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John Adamo, Han / Adriance, Joseph Ahearn, James Allen, Robert Anderson. Richard Anthony. John Arnold. 
Ronald Atkinson, Jr., Pauline Baker. James Barbas, Russell Bass, Gerard Beaulieu, Richard Belden, Louis 
Benotti, William Benson, Carl Bergstrom, Robert Best, Kenton Billings, Robert Bishop, Harold Black, Jr., 
Donald Bower, Donald Bowles, Chester Boyle, Jr., Fred Bragg, Arthur Brown, William Burford. Roger Burnett, 
Robert Carlson, Ronald Carlson, Howard Carter, James Carter, Lawrence Chambers, Correll Chapin, Theodore 
Chase, Walter Childs, Donald Chisholm, George Clark, Jr., John Clark, Paul Colella, William Comaskey, John 
Coty, Albert Cover, Joseph Craffey, Francis Crane, William Crawford, Jr., Richard Crittendon, William Cromp- 
ton, James Curley, Robert Curley, William Cushman, Edmund Czelusniak, Jacqueline Day, Philip Delano, Jr., 
Francis Desjarlais, Edward Desmond, Mario DiCarlo, Fay Dickson, Philip Dole, Urban Donovan, Louis Dur- 
ant, Jr., Judson Edwards, David Eldredge, John Elliot, Jr., Richard Ellsworth, Jr., Philip Ernst, George Ezekiel, 
David Ferzoco, Anthony Fiorini, William Flint, Jr., Richard Flood, John Flynn, Wellington French, Robert 
Fuller, Leo Gagnier, Calvin Glazier, James Glazier, Irving Gold, David Grandy, Richard Greenleaf, Fred Grif- 
fin, Eva Grimes, Norman Guidaboni, Charles Hall, Robert Heustis, Joseph Hogan, Robert Hogg, William Hold- 
man, Jr., Robert Jacobs. Everett Jewett, Richard Johnson, Ralph Knaust, Frederick Knowles, Jr., Roger Law- 
rence, Kenneth LeBeau, Reuben Lebeaux, David Leonard, Aarne Leppaniemi, Charles Lindquist, Jr., George 
Lord, Jr., John Lukens, Mark Lurvey, Richard Markey, Henry Mathieu, Silvio Merlini, Malcolm Midgley, Jr., 
Donald Miller, Woodrow Miller, DeWitt Mitchell, George Moore, Jr., Paul Murphy, Robert MacDonough, 
William MacCray, Robert McGirr, Martin McManus, Malcolm Nicholson, Eino Niinimaki, Richard Nilsson, 
Harry Norwood, Paul O'Leary, Wesley Osborne, Jr., Robert Pease, John Perkins, William Poole, James Pos- 
tizzi, Herman Pratt, Jr., William Rae, Jr., Charles Reid, Betsey Richardson, Lois Rinehart, George Roaf, 
Thomas Rohan, George Ross, John Ross, Jr., John Rouleau, Willard Santowski, Sahag Sarkisian, Robert 
Schlicke, Roger Scott, Roy Seely, Donald Shanley, Michael Simon, Charles Sjolander, Carlyle Smith, Earle 
Smith, James Smith, Milton Smith, Walter Smith, William Smith, Donald Snow, Jr.. Albert Spencer, Jr., 
Edwin Springer, Kenneth Steenburn, John Sullivan, Joseph Sullivan, Wayne Suriner, Michael Thomas, Roger 
Thompson, Robert Thurston, Roy Tripp, Richard Tryon, Ray Upham, Jr., Joseph Vaughan, Joseph Walker, 
Jr., George Wallace, Edward Watson, Bernard Welch. Richard White, Ralph Wilbur, Paul Wilson. 



THE FARMER 

North and south through countless fields 
Our faithful soil her bounty yields, 
From California east to Maine, 
Abundantly of fruit and grain; 
While bees hum and cattle graze 
The farmer works and the farmer prays 
And uses each day's utmost worth 
In gathering manna from this earth 

Wise and kind in all His ways 
God watches o'er the farmer's days, 
Gives him strength to sow and reap, 
Crowns his day with dreamless sleep; 
Blesses all his thoughtful toil — 
Honest sweat on honest soil — 
Sends life-giving sun and shower 
To seed, to stem, to bud and flower. 

We pray the Lord to speed each son 
And guide him till his goal be won. 
Bless him. Lord, with sons and wife 
To help fulfill his way of life. 
Strong as the earth for which he yearns. 
Straight as the furrow that he turns. 
Let him in his venture be 
Humble in spirit; in thinking, free. 

Harold Blackie, Jr. 
S. S. A. '49 

THE TOWER 

As the chimes ring out the hour 

From yon ivy-covered tower 

We bid farewell to college days; 

Soon we shall go our different ways. 

Having reaped, now let us sow; 

Let Learning's seed take root and grow. 

As ivy scales the tower's height. 

May Learning's vine climb toward the light. 

There, underneath the ivy thick, 

Firm stands the wall of stone and brick; 

Like Truth and Wisdom and Good Will, 

Without which. Learning fares but ill. 

God, give our vines an ample wall — 

Firm and the base, well-mortared, tall. 

May it support our upward climb 

And fail not under stress of time. 

Harold Blackie, Jr. 
S. S. A. '49 



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