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Full text of "Shorthorn"

NINETEEN PlflV TWO 



Piiii^. 



* UMASS/AMHERST * 



312066 0339 0537 4 




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THE SENIOR CLASS 



PRESENTS 






THE 1952 



SHOR THORN 





Editor-in-Chie/— Robert E. Hume 
Business Manager — Walter E. Morgan 



THE 1952 



SHORT 



THE STOCKBRIDGE SCHDDL 

DF 

AGRICULTURE 

University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Introduction pages 1 - 5 

President's and Director's Messages pages 6 - 7 

Graduates of Class of 1952 pages 9 - 32 

Majors and Activities pages 33 - 84 

Faculty pages 85 - 92 



BORN 



FDREWDRD 



The present questionable state of world affairs makes any plans for the future 
subject to the possibility of many radical changes. Yet, in the very shadow of this 
dark and ominous threat to all the ways of life that we hold dear, we are graduating 
and preparing to embark; each on his own path of life, to our future and whatever 
it holds for us. 

Much time has been spent in the preparation of this book, so that no matter 
where we may be, the memories of our two years at the Stockbridge School will 
always be at our fingertips. 

Schoolmates, faculty members, and all of the little incidents which make college 
life what it is, have all been trapped and implanted in these pages, to travel with 
us as we go forth, each to do his part and receive his just reward. 



[4} 



Professor Lindquist 




Professor Harry Gotfred Lindquist (known 
to most of us as "Lindy") came to the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College as a freshman in 
1916 from Holden, Massachusetts, where he had 
been reared on a farm — a sound foundation for 
his future profession in agricultural education. 

With the outbreak of World War I, he served 
in the famous 26th Infantry Division in Europe 
where he was wounded in action. 

After the war. Professor Lindquist returned 
to the Massachusetts Agricultural College, and was 
graduated in 1922. Two years later he received his 
Master of Science degree from the University of 
Maryland, where he had served as a graduate 
assistant in the dairy department. After teaching 
dairying for a year at Maryland, he spent two 
more years as a graduate assistant at Ohio State 
University. 

In 1927, Professor Lindquist was called back 
to his Alma Mater as instructor in dairying, to 
teach market milk, butter and cheese making. Dur- 
ing the twenty-five years that he has been on the 



faculty, he has given unsparingly of his time and 
energy to his students. Because of his interest in 
student activities and in high quality dairy products, 
he has been active in coaching our dairy products 
judging teams. In addition to his teaching respon- 
sibilities, he has found time to do research work, 
as is evidenced by his contribution of articles on 
food and dairy subjects in scientific journals and 
trade papers. 

Secretary of the Eastern Section of the Ameri- 
can Dairy Science Association, and past chairman 
and present vice-president of the Massachusetts 
Milk Inspectors' Association, Professor Lindquist is 
held in high esteem by the dairy industry through- 
out the State. 

In dedicating the 1952 Shorthorn to Professor 
Lindquist, the Stockbridge School is proud to honor 
one of its finest teachers — a man who has given 
enthusiastically of his best to Stockbridge men 
and women. 

William S. Mueller 



DEDICATION 



[5] 




PRESIDENT'S 
MESSAGE 



Ralph A. Van Meter 



To the Stockbridge Class of 1952 : 

As you leave this campus that has been your 
home for two years you will break many relation- 
ships that have meant much to you. In the rush 
of living your attention will turn more and more 
to other things and as the years pass you will prize 
more and more highly a volume such as this that 
recalls a time that you will recognize as days apart, 
days that marked turning points in your lives. 

This yearbook is a memorial to your Stock- 
bridge days. It is written by you fellows to preserve 
the memories of Stockbridge. Many of the things 
that have been brought together Jiere in print and 
picture are things of which each of you was a part. 
They will bring to mind countless other more 
intimate recollections of a very personal nature. 

We believe that it will make your lives more 
enjoyable if you make an effort to maintain the 
contacts you formed in Stockbridge in these days 
when you had so much in common. The Alumni 
Association is organized to help you and deserves 
your earnest support. You can become a life mem- 
ber of the Stockbridge family in which you will be 



associated with many of the leaders in Agriculture 
in the Northeastern states. 

You leave the campus to face a future full of 
uncertainties. This is not so unusual as it seems to 
you. Most of us have had that experience and we 
have seen many other classes graduated into com- 
plex and tangled situations. We know that some- 
where there is a place for each of you. Your 
services are needed and with a sound training to 
your credit you should look to the future with 
confidence in your ability to forge ahead just as 
long as you keep on learning and trying to meet 
situations fairly as they arise. Times of stress often 
afford the greatest opportunities to those who are 
able and who are willing to try. 

We who are to remain on the campus are still 
interested in you and in your progress. We hope 
you will keep your memories of Stockbridge green 
and that you will maintain your contacts with us 
and with your classmates. Remember that whatever 
you do and wherever you go you have our best 
wishes — always. 



[6] 



DIRECTDR'S 
MESSAGE 



Roland H. Verbeck 




With the publication of this yearbook of the 
class of 1952, you are adding your names to the 
long list of graduates of Stockbridge who have 
preceded you since the first class of 1920 completed 
its formal schooling here. That first graduating class 
numbered slightly more than a dozen students while 
the class you represent will add to the alumni body 
more than ten times that number. 

It is our sincere hope that this increasing man' 
power we are sending forth each year into the 
blood stream of the nation will prove its value. 
We are confident it will. 

But with all the training you have secured 
here, there must be one factor in each man's spiritual 
development without which no true success can 
ever be achieved in life. What this is can best be 
suggested in the simple prayerful words of Abraham 
Lincoln in his farewell to his neighbors in Spring' 
field, Illinois, upon his departure for Washington 
in 1861, as he was facing the problems of an 
impending civil war. 

"My friends: No one, not in my situation, can 



appreciate my feeling of sadness at this parting. 
To this place, and the kindness of these people, I 
owe everything. Here I have lived a quarter of a 
century, and have passed from a young to an old 
man. Here my children have been born, and one is 
buried. I now leave, not knowing when or whether 
ever I may return, with a task before me greater 
than that which rested upon Washington. Without 
the assistance of that Divine Being who ever 
attended him, I cannot succeed. With that assist" 
ance, I cannot fail. Trusting in Him who can go 
with me, and remain with you, and be everywhere 
for good, let us confidently hope that all will yet 
be well. To His care commending you, as I hope 
in your prayers you will commend me, I bid you 
an affectionate farewell." 

Such leaders as Washington and Lincoln have 
bequeathed to us the America we are privileged 
to hve in today. But they have always recognized 
that God's help alone could sustain them through 
their crises of danger and despair. 

More than ever men of such calibre are needed 
today. How will you face the challenge? 



[7] 




STDRY OF 

LEVI 

STDCKBRIDGE 



Levi Stockbridge 



Levi Stockbridge was born on a farm in Had-' 
ley, Massachusetts, March 13, 1820. After attend-* 
ing the district school and Hopkins Academy, his 
keen intellectual curiosity drove him to spend his 
evenings and rainy days in further study. For 
several winters he taught the district school and 
in the local Lyceum he trained himself as a speaker 
and writer. When the responsibilities of the home 
farm fell to him, he saw clearly the need of improved 
farming methods and of greater knowledge of 
underlying scientific principles. He studied all avail' 
able works on agriculture and early made a reputa- 
tion as a pioneer in agricultural experiments. 

For many years he served in the State Legisia' 
ture. As a member of the State Board of Agricul- 
ture he was among the first to work for the estab- 
lishment of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. 
When the college took form in 1867, he became 
farm superintendent and teacher of agriculture. His 



experience as a farmer and in business helped him 
in shaping courses for his students which combined 
classroom lectures with practical farm work. Friend 
and counselor of "his boys," he won the respect 
and affection of all students. 

He was Professor of Agriculture from 1869 
to 1880 and President of the College 1880-82. Dur' 
ing these years he investigated the value of soil 
mulch and the leaching of plant food. His experi- 
ments with fertilizers led him to develop the Stock' 
bridge Formulas which for the first time supplied 
crops with nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash in' 
one complete fertilizer. His first $1000 in royalties 
from the Stockbridge Formulas went into experi' 
mental work which laid the foundation for the 
Massachusetts Experiment Station. 

He resigned from the College in 1882 but 
was a firm advocate of cooperative enterprise and 
active in all town affairs until his death in 1904. 
— Charles H. Thayer. 



Editor's Note: 

The Stoc\hridge School of Agriculture, the two-year agricultural school at the University 
of Massachusetts, proudly hears the name of this great man and, since its establishment in 1918, 
continues to be a living memorial to a great personage in American agriculture. 



[8] 



GRA D UA TES 




Each of us has his own special way of trodding 
the road of Hfe. But whatever be the way and 
wherever it may lead, let us not fail to realize the 
value of our school days, the companionship of 
friends good and true, and above all the place and 
personalities through which we gained a wealth of 
knowledge to face the future. 



WILLIAM B. ALLENCHY 
"Bo'' 
Northampton 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture: Place- 
ment: H. A, Mathieu, North Am- 
herst; Activities: Horticulture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Future Plans: 
Horticulture is his business; hunting 
is his hobby. Let's hope he gets to 
enjoy both. 




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1 




\ 



PAUL AUCLAIR 

"Oogie" 

Somerset 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Reg-Rig Farm, New Braintree; Activi- 
ties: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2; Bowling; 
I.F.C. 1, 2; Future Plans: Oogie likes 
Holsteins and plans to have his own 
farm. 




'a^ 




RICHARD E. ABBOTT 
"Dick" 
Whitman 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Arnold Arboretum, Boston: Ac- 
tivities: Student Council 1, 2; Dance 
Committee 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Kap- 
pa Kappa 1, 2; Horticulture Club 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Dick enjoys outdoor 
water sports, and he hopes to own 
his own nursery business someday. 



CONRAD A. BASSETT 
"Connie" 
Pittsfield 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Coburn 
Poultry Farm, Tyngsboro; Actiuities: 
Poultry Club 1, 2; Future Plans: "Con- 
nie" is not very talkative, but we 
hope everyone will talk about the 
White Leghorns he plans to raise. 





DAVID W. ALLEN 
"Dave" 
Waban 
Major: Vegetable Growing; Placement: 
Lookout Farm, South Natick; Activi- 
ties: Hockey 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; 
Olericulture Club 1, 2; Future Plans: 
A market garden farm is the goal set 
by Dave. Good luck to you. 



HOWARD BATES 
"Hutch" 
Dudley 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
(Home farm in Dudley); Activities: 
Animal Husbandry Club 1; Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2; Future 
Plans: "Hutch" has decided to take a 
hitch in the Coast Guard, and after- 
wards operate his father's farm. 



[10} 





RICHARD CARTER BLAKE 
'•Dick" 
Wilmington 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
ment: Concord Country Club, Con- 
cord; Activities: Hort Show 1, 2. 



SUSAN JANE BEAR 
"Sue" 
Beverly 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: White 
and Johnson, Wakefield; Activities: 
Dance Committee 1, 2; Floriculture 
Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Future 
Plans: We doubt if a pretty girl like 
Sue will be single for very long, and 
unless she marries into the florist busi- 
ness, her floriculture knowledge will be 
put to use in beautifying the grounds 
around her home. 



RALPH BORGESON 
"Ralph" 
Newton Upper Falls 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Jenseii 
Gardens, Watertown; Activities: Flori- 
culture Club 2; Outing Club 1, 2; Fu- 
ture Plans: Ralph enjoys the out-of- 
doors and bike riding. We hope that 
the greenhouse he plans to own will 
not tie him down too much from his 
worthwhile hobby. 




KENTON ANDRE BEAUJEAN 
"Ken" 
South Lee 
Major: Forestry; Placement: Forest 
Service, Montana; Future Plans: Being 
a forester will give Ken a chance to 
partake in his interest of skiing. 





JOSEPH J. BOULET 
"Joe" 
Blackstone 
Ma;or: Dairy Industry; Piacemei.t: 
Hoods Milk Company, Providence, 
Rhode Island; Actiuities: Dairy Classic 
2; Dairy Club 1, 2; Future Plans: Joe 
is going to be a full-fledged dairyman 
and plans to be a producer-dealer in 
upper New York State. 





GILBERT A. BLISS 
"Gi!" 
Warren 
Major: Forestry; Placement: U. 
est Service, Shasta National 



S. For- 
Forest, 



California; 
1. 2. 



Activities : Forestry Club 



[11] 



JAMES E. BROWN 
"Jim" 
Melrose 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Joel 
Whitemore, Florist, Stoneham; Activi- 
ties: Glee Club 2; Floriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 
2; Shorthorn Board 2; Future Plans: 
Gay, but at the same time serious, Jim 
would like to start his own flower 
establishment. 




RICHARD BUSHNELL, JR. 

"DicV 
New Bedford 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
ment: Sankaty Head Golf Course, 
Nantucket; Activities: Hort Show 1, 
2; Future Plans: Golf is his hobby, 
and a fine fairway is his business. 




WALDO CARLTON BRAY 

"Walt" 
Amherst 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Dover, New Hampshire; Actiui- 
ties: Horticulture Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Future Plans: "Walt" 
wants to own a nursery and landscape 
business. Good luck, Walt. 



EDWARD BRITTAIN 
"Ed" 

Kenilworth, New Jersey 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
ment: Montclair Golf Club, New Jer- 
sey; Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; Fut- 
ture Plans: Ed is planning on super- 
intending a golf course near the ocean 
so that he can go deep sea fishing in 
his leisure. 



JAMES FRANCIS CAHILL 
"Jim" 
Cambridge 
Major: Horticulture; Placement: Mount 
Auburn, Cambridge; Activities: Horti- 
culture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2. 



HOWARD CLARK 
"Howie" 
Quincy 

Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Mainstone Farm, Wayland; Activities: 
Animal Husbandry Club 1; Basketball 
1, 2; Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2; Future Plans: Howie has got 
his farm all picked out and is going 
to start right off raising Ayrshires. 



[12] 





GERALD CLARK 
"Gerry" 
Pittsfield 
Major: Poultry; Placement: J, B. Ab- 
bott, Rockingham, Vermont; Activities: 
Poultry Club 1, 2; Square Dance Club 
1, 2; Folk Singers' Club 1; Future 
Plans: Gerry plans to gain more ex- 
perience in poultry, and gradually work 
into a business of his own. Guitar 
playing and singing hill-billy songs 
will be done on the side. 



ROBERT S. CLARK 
"Bob" 
South Weymouth 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Muse! 
Poultry Farm, Holbrook; Activities: 
Poultry Club 1,- 2; Future Plans: 
Work will be fun for Bob because 
agriculture is his hobby. He plans to 
operate his own egg farm. 



EVERARD CROSS 

"Ev" 
Agawam 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Adams Nursery, Westfield; Ac- 
tivities: Horticulture Club 2; Hort 
Show 1. 



WARREN G. DAVOLL 
Dartmouth 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Weikko Holopainen, Hubbardston; Ac- 
tivities: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Future Farmers of America 1, 2, (Vice- 
President 2); Kappa Kappa 1, 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2; Future 
Plans: Warren is a true New England 
Yankee, and we wish him the best in 
his desire to own a dairy farm. 




RALPH COOMBS, JR. 
"Ralph" 
Springfield 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
John Hamilton, Palmer; Activities: 
Little International 2; Dairy Classic 2; 
future Plans: Ralph hkes outdoor 
sports and hopes to own his own farm 
in the green hills of Vermont. 




JOHN WILLIAM COUGHLIN 

"Johnny" 

Medford 
Major: Forestry; Placement: Dodge 
Associates, Wenham; Activities: For- 
estry Club 1, 2; Hort Show 2. 



[13] 



MARTIN DELANO 

"Marty" 

Duxbury 
Major: Forestry; Placement: Archie 
T. DeMaranvflle, North Hanover: Ac- 
tivities: Cross Country 1; Hort Show 
1; Forestry Club 1, 2; Future Plans: 
"Marty" is going West and work for 
the U. S. Forest Service in California. 






RALPH W. DEAN 
"Tiny" 
Worcester 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Hix- 
on's Greenhouse, Worcester; Activities: 
Floriculture Club 1, 2; Alpha Tau 
Gamma 2; Glee Club 2; Hort Show 
1, 2; Future Plans: Happy-go-lucky 
"Tiny" wants to go into the flower 
design and florist business. 



WARREN DEAN 

"Deanie" 

Reading 

Major: Vegetable Growing; Placement: 

Hopkin's Farm, Reading: Activities: 

Hort Show 1, 2; Olericulture Club 1, 2. 




ROBERT FREDRICK DIMLICH 

"Bob" 
Andover 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Groton; Activities: Animal Husbandry 
Club 1; Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2; Future Plans: "Bob" will 
most likely work for some dairy farm 
concern with his eye on a farm of his 
own in the future. 



WILLIAM JOHN DION 
"Bill" 
Amherst 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Greenhouses, 
Amherst; Activities: Floriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Future Plans: 
A flower shop and greenhouse are what 
Bill is aiming for. Best of luck. 



[14} 




JOHN DOLAN 
■■Jack- 
Foxboro 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
ment: Charles River Country Club, 
Newton; Activities: Hort Show 1, 2. 





JOSEPH MICHEAL DRELICK 
"Joe" 
Haverhill 
Major: Dairy; Placement: Jersey Ice 
Cream Corp., Lawrence; ActiDtties: 
Dairy Classic 1; Dairy Club 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Joe has already secured 
a foreman's position at General Ice 
Cream, Poughkeepsie, New York. 



JAMES F. DWYER 
"Jim" 
Weymouth 
Major: Dairy; Placement: Producers' 
Dairy Company, Brockton; Activities: 
Dairy Classic 1; Dairy Club 1, 2; Fu- 
ture Plans: A position in dairy industry 
IS what this boy is after. Good luck 
for the future, Jim. 





DAVID TAYLOR DUGDALE 
"Red" 
Needhara 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Idlenot Dairy Farm, Inc., Springfield, 
Vermont; Activities: Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2, (Treasurer 2); Fu- 
ture Farms of America 1, 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2; Fu- 
ture Plans: "Red" is a hardworking, 
but easy going young man, who will 
probably go into dairy farming for 
himself. 



ALLEN EASTMAN 
"A!" 
Williamsburg 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Theo-Ken Farms, Ashfield, Mass; Ac- 
tivities: Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2; Futrure Pians: Allen is 
quiet, but will challenge anyone, and 
he stands up for what he thinks is 
right. He will be a good farm manager. 




HOWARD W. DUNNELLS 
"Howie" 
Melrose 
Major: Dairy; Placement: James H. 
McManus, Newton; ActiDities: Basket- 
ball 1; Dairy Club 2; Dairy Classic 1; 
Kappa Kappa 2; Future Plans: Howie 
is an energetic boy who likes peppy 
music and all sorts of sports. Best of 
luck in your future ice cream business, 
Howie. 




JOHN WILBUR DURFEE 
"Durf" 

Lexington 
Major: Vegetable Growing; Placement: 
Hadley; Activities: Alpha Tau Gamma 
1, 2; Dance Committee 2; Hockey 1; 
Hort Show 1, 2; Winter Carnival 
Committee 2; Future Plans: As Lex- 
ington excels in vegetable growing, we 
hope that "Durf" will excel in the 
same way. 



[15] 



LAWRENCE ANDREW 
FARRINGTON 
"Laurie" 
Lowell 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: F. L 
Carter and Son, Tewksbury; Activities: 
Alpha Tau Gamma 2; Dance Commit' 
tee 2; Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Newman Club 1, 2; Bowl- 
ing 2; Dancing; Driving. 




JOHN E. FAY 
"Buss" 
Dedham 
Major: Arboriculture; Placement: East- 
ern Tree and Landscape Corporation, 
Dedham; Actiuities: Arboriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Future Plans: 
To keep the shade trees of Dedham 
beautiful is a life time job, and John 
is the man for the job. 





DANA W. ELDRIDGE 
"The Caper" 
South Chatham 
Major: Forestry; Placement: Mount 
Shasta, CaHfornia; ActtDities: Baseball 
1; Cross Country 1; Forestry Club 1, 
2; Future Plans: "The Caper" wants 
to work for Weyerhauser while build- 
ing hot rods on the side. 



EDWARD T. FISKE 

"Red" 
Stoughton 
Major: Animal Husbandry: Placement: 
Blackbriar Farms, Dover Plains, New 
York; Activities: Animal Husbandry 
Club 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2 
(Secretary of ATG 2); Bowling 2; 
Newman Club 2; Future Plans: "Red" 
is going to employ his agricultural 
knowledge on an Aberdeen-Angus 
breeding farm. 



SANTINO FANTOZZI 
"Sam" 
Leominster 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Grahn Landscape Service, West- 
minster; Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Future Plans: That the "Grass is 
Greener on the other side of the 
fence" doesn't hold with Sam. He is 
going into the landscape gardening 
business at home. 



JOHN W. FLAHERTY 

"Suiede" 

Lexington 
Major: Arboriculture; Placement: Frost 
and Higgins Company, Arlington; Ac- 
tivities: Arboriculture Club 1, 2: Foot- 
ball 1; Hockey 1; Future Plans: To 
own a tree service company is quite 
an undertaking, and we wish you the 
best of luck in it. 



[16] 





DONALD H. GAGNE 
"Don" 
Holyoke 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Donald Hazen Farm, Hadley; Activi- 
ties: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Future Farmers of America 1, 2; Kap- 
pa Kappa 1, 2; Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2; Future Plans: A Hol- 
stein farm in the "valley" is in Don's 
plans. Best of Luck. 



DAVID FREEMAN 
"Stretch" 
Dorchester 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Medfield 
State Hospital; Activities: Basketball 
1; Future Plans: A converted Animal 
Husbandry major; and our tallest mem- 
ber — now wants to operate his own 
broiler plant. 



GILBERT JAMES GASTON 
"Gil" 
West Stockbridge 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
University of Mass. farm; Actit;ities: 
Class Vice-President 2; Glee Club 1, 
2; Animal Husbandry Club 2: Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2; Fu- 
ture Farmers of America I, 2; Square 
Dance Club 1, 2; Future Plans: Gil 
appreciates beautiful country when he 
sees it, and after getting married in 
June, he hopes to work on a dairy 
farm in the Connecticut River Valley. 




%*& 




FRANK PETER FREEMAN 
"Pete" 
Brookline 
Major; Poultry; Placement: Mayo's 
Duck Farm; Activities; Poultry Club 
1, 2 (President 2); Square Dance Club 
1; Future Plans: Like the other Free- 
man in the class, Frank hopes to man- 
age a broiler plant of his own. Good 
luck. 





HENRY GIERA 
"Han\" 
Chicopee Falls 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
ment: Springfield Country Club, West 
Springfield; Activities: Golf; Future 
Plans: Superintending a golf course 
is the goal that Hank has set for 
himself. 



".f^ 






ROBERT ANDREW GARIEPY 
"Bob" 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Capron Park, Attleboro; Activt- 
tives: Ornamental Horticulture Club 
1, 2, (President 2); Future Plans: To 
own a landscape business, and to keep 
the homes of his community beautiful. 



t„ 



[17] 



PAUL B. GRAY, JR. 
"Paul" 
Shelburne Falls 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Deerfield 
Valley Poultry Farm, Shelburne Falls; 
Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Future Plans: To work for 
some one else in poultry is Paul's 
ambition. Good luck to you, Paul. 




^^^^'^'^^f^Y" 




^ 



RICHARD GRAHAM 
-DicX' 

Arlington 
Maior: Dairy; Placement: Bushway 
Ice Cream, Somerville; Activities: 
Shorthorn Board 2; Glee Club 2; Dairy 
Club 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2, (Secre- 
tary 2); W.M.U.A. (Announcer); 
future Plans: Dick is very amiable 
and willing to lend a hand to anyone. 
He mentioned being a radio commenta- 
tor, and we are sure of his success. 



CHARLES GRAVES 
"Cliarlev" 
Shirley 
Ma;or: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
(home farm); Activities: Cross Coun- 
try 2; Glee Club 2; Animal Husbandry 
Club 1, 2; Little International 2; 
Kappa Kappa 2; Future Farmers of 
America 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2; Future 
Plans: Charley favors Holsteins, and he 
favors being his own boss. Best wishes 
for the future. Chuck. 




GEORGE H. GREGORY 

"Gregg" 

Newton 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
R. B. Simpson, Randolph, Vermont; 
Activities: Glee Club 2; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2; Little International 
2; Dairy Classic 2; Future Farmers of 
America 1, 2; Future Plans: George 
has decided that the only way to 
enjoy life is to stay in Vermont where 
life is simple, inexpensive, but ex- 
tremely full. 



DONALD GULBANKIAN 

"Don" 

"Gull" 
Marlborough 
Major: Vegetable Gardening; Place- 
ment: Charles Gulbankian, Marl- 
borough; Activities: Olericulture Club 
1, 2; Future Plans: To operate home 
farm and supply Worcester and Bos- 
ton with fresh green vegetables. 




GEORGE PARKER HADLEY 
"Par\er" 
Marston's Mills 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Clear Lake 
Duck Farm, Marston's Mills; Activities: 
Kappa Kappa 2; Poultry Club 1, 2; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2; Future Plans: 
Parker hkes the "Cape," and is going 
to stay there and operate his father's 
farm. 






ROBERT KENNETH HALL 
"Bob" 
Still River 
Major: Vegetable Gardening; Place- 
ment: John Coke's Vegetable Farm, 
Harvard, Mass.; Activitiej: Hort Show 
1; Olericulture Club 1, 2; Future 
Plans: Bob has decided to manage a 
farm and perhaps own one someday. 



ELMER H, HINE 
Palmer 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
ment: Amherst Golf Club, Amherst; 
Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; Future 
Plans: We wish the best of everything 
to Elmer in his plan to become a greens 
keeper. 




JOSEPH S. HAYDEN 
"]oe" 
Winthrop 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
University of Mass. farm; Activities: 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Basket- 
ball 1, 2, (Co-Captain 2); Football 2; 
Kappa Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2; 
Little International 2; Future Plans: 
Easy going Joe plans to work in some 
field of dairy farming. 



DONALD C. HARRIS 
"Don" 
Reading 
Major: Vegetable Gardening; Place- 
ment: R. W. Warner and- Sons; Ac- 
tivities: Hort Show 1, 2; Olericulture 
Club 1, 2. 



WALTER EDMOND HORGAN 
"Walt" 
Worcester 
Major: Dairy; Placement: H, P. Hood 
and Son's, Worcester; Activities: Short- 
horn Board 2, (Business Manager); 
Glee Club 2, (Secretary); Dairy Club 
1, 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 
2; (Disc Jockey for Station WMUA 2); 
Future Plans : "Walt" is another H. P. 
Hood and Sons booster, and plans one 
day to be a field research worker for 
this company. 







ROGER BROWN HENSHAW 
"Rog" 
Templeton 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Mainstone Farm, Wayland; Activities: 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Glee 
Club 2; Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2; Future Plans: Roger event- 
ually plans to own a dairy farm and 
a herd of purebred Brown Swiss cattle. 



[19] 



HOWARD W. HUNTER 
"Howie" "Ah" "Scottie" 
Waltham 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Lynbrook Farm, Southboro; Activities: 
Shorthorn Board 2; Animal Husbandry 
Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2; Alpha 
Tau Gamma 2; Square Dance Club 2: 
Intramural Basketball 1, 2; Judson Fel- 
lowship; Future Plans: Howie attended 
Lincoln Prep before coming to Stock- 
bridge. Upon graduating he intends to 
own his own Dairy-Beef farm in the 
hills of New Hampshire. 




JOHN R. JACOBSON 
"Me" 
Upton 
Major: Forestry; Placement: Trimmer, 
California; Activities: Forestry Club 
1, 2, (Vice-President); Future Plans: 
Jake will take to the New Hampshue 
hills to be employed as a forester by 
the Draper Corporation of Beebee 
River. 




COLIN COLGUHOUN HOUSTON 
"Chic\en" 
East Longmeadow 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Frank Ben- 
nett, Wilbraham; Actiuities: Shorthorn 
Board 2; Poultry Club 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Future Farmers of America 
1, 2; Future Plans: Colin is looking 
towards a very profitable future with 
the Eastern States Cooperative. 



KENNETH L. JOHNSON 
"Ken" "Spi\e" 
Southwick 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
F. A. Johnson and Sons, Southwick; 
Activities: Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2; Future Plans: Ken says he 
hkes the green open state of Connecti- 
cut, and he plans to operate a Holstein 
farm there. 



[20] 




ROBERT E. HUME 
"Bob" 
Greenfield 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Allard Dairy Farm, Hadley; Activi- 
ties: Class Treasurer 2; Shorthorn 
Board I, 2, Editor-in-Chief; Animal 
Husbandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2, 
(Executive Committee); Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; U. of Mass. Camera Club 
2; Square Dance Club 1, 2; University 
News Service 1, 2; Future Plans: A 
600 acre dairy farm with 250 head of 
cattle will almost be too small for 
him. Best of luck. Bob. 
KARL ELSAR JURENTKUFF, JR. 
"Joe" 
Upton 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Crooks 
Poultry Farm, North Brookfield; Ac- 
tivities: Poultry Club I, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Student 
Council 2 (Ex Officio); Future Plans: 
Joe's first venture out into the field of 
poultry will be to work on one of the 
successful poultry farms and then to 
step into the ownership of a breeding 
farm. 








CLIFFORD KNIGHT 
■■Chf 

Framingham 
Major: Animal Husbandry: Placement: 
Ben Wentworth Farm, White River 
Junction, Vermont; Activities: Animal 
Husbandry Club 1; Dance Committee 
1; Little International 2; Dairy Classic 
2: Future Plans: To own a dairy farm 
in the green hills of Vermont, and to 
have a home with a greenhouse 
attached. 



FREDERICK GEORGE KELLEY 
"Kel" 
Straford, Connecticut 
Major: Arboriculture: Placement: Jan- 
oska Tree Service, Straford, Connecti- 
cut; Activities: Class Officer 1, Secre- 
tary; Football 1, 2, Captain 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Arboriculture 1, 2; Future 
Plans: Kel will probably spend the 
next few years with Uncle Sam, and 
then return for employment with Jan- 
esko Tree Service Company. 



RAYMOND J. LANE 
"Bowser" 
Roslindale 
Major: Poultry Husbandry; Placement: 
Mayo's Duck Farm, East Orleans, 
Mass.; ActiDities: Poultry Club 1, 2, 
Vice-President; (Refreshment Commit- 
tee); Square Dance Club 2; Kappa 
Kappa 2; Future Plans: Obtain a good 
position upon graduating; then go into 
business for himself. 




WILLIAM KILEY 

"Bill 
South Boston 
Major: Horticulture; Placement: Mount 
Auburn Cemetary, Cambridge; Activi' 
ties: Hort Show 1, 2; Horticulture 
Club 1; Arboriculture Club 1, (Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 1); Future Plans: Bill 
has a business of his own in mind, and 
has decided to work at that. 



RALPH LANGILL 
"Tex" 
Auburndale 
Major: Vegetable Gardening; Place- 
ment: Lookout Farm, Natick; Activi- 
ties: Dance Committee 1; Hort Show 
1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; Oleri- 
culture Club 1, 2; Future Plans: "Tex" 
is going to have a diversified farm, 
raising vegetables, race horses, and 
small fur bearing animals. 



«^^Ms«x?:«i; 





LEIGHTON LANE 

East Northfield 
Major: Forestry; Placement: North- 
field Schools; Activities: Forestry Club 
1, 2. 



[21] 



JAMES L, MACKEY, JR. 

"Jimmie" 

Brookline 
Major: Poultry Husbandry; Placement: 
Stongate Chicks, Holliston; Activities: 
Shorthorn Board 2; Dance Committee 
2; Poultry Club, Assistant Secretary 
1, 2; K. K. Treasurer 2; F. F. A. 
Reporter 1, 2; Squara Dance Club 
1, 2; Collegian Reporter 1; I.F.C. 2, 
(Ex-officio); Future Plans; "Big things 
come in small packages." Jim is small 
but we certainly know he's around. 
He plans to be a salesman in the 
poultry industry and eventually have 
his own breeding farm. 



-^.-^ 




JOHN A. MACOMBER 
"Mac" 
New Bedford 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Taunton State Hospital Farm; Activi- 
ties: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; F.F.A. 1; Future 
Plans: John plans to own and operate 
his own Dairy farm in the future. 








WILLIAM DUDLEY LAUFMAN 
"Dud" 
Arlington 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Camp Timberlake, Plymouth, Vermont; 
Activities: Shorthorn Board 2, Personal 
Write-ups 2; Animal Husbandry Club, 
Social Committee 2; K.K. 1, 2, Social 
Chairman 2; Square Dance Club 1, 2, 
President 2; Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2; Future Plans: Dud 
wants to live in a small N. E. town 
and combine an agricultural enterprise 
with Square Dance calling. 

THOMAS J. MAHONEY 

"Tom" 

Sharon 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Brockton 
Poultry Producers, Inc.; Activities: 
Student Council 1, 2; Poultry Club 
1, 2; K. K. 1, 2, President; F.F.A. 
1, 2, Secretary; I.F.C. 2; Future Plans: 
Tom has a farm waiting for him in 
Sharon, and he plans to expand the 
family turkey business when he grad- 
uates. Best of luck to the South Shore's 
Turkey King. 



[22] 





RAYMOND WALTER LINDELL 
"Lindie" 
Greenfield 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: 
Wayside Farm Creamery, Greenfield, 
Mass.; Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; 
Dairy Classic; Future Plans: Lindie 
intends to own a small dairy plant so 
that he will have time for hunting and 
fishing. 



JOHN H. MARSHALL, JR. 
-Jack" 
Chelmsford 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
University of Massachusetts Farm; Ac- 
tivities: Football 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; Little 
International 2; A.T.G. 1, 2, House 
Manager; Dairy Classic 2; Future 
Plans: Jack's plan for the future is to 
own and operate a farm when he 
saves enough cash. 





ROLAND P. MENNELLA 
"Ron" 
Brightwaters, New York 
Major: Arboriculture; Placement: Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts; Activities: 
Hort Show 1, 2; Arboriculture 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Ronnie plans to work 
for the American Tree Co. 




JOSEPH H. MERCHANT 
"Joe" 
Methuen 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Mayo's 
Duck Farm; Activities: Class Officer 
1, 2, Treasurer; Student Council 2; 
Shorthorn Board 1, 2; Dance Com- 
mittee 1, 2; Poultry Club 1, 2; Future 
Plans: Joe's plans are to own a 
poultry farm in Florida where it's 
warm. 



HAROLD I. MITCHELL 
"Pun\y" 
Lynn 
Major: Animal Husbandry Placement: 
Rockingham Farm; Activities: Animal 
Husbandry 1, 2; Little International 
2; F.F.A. 1; Future Plans: One of the 
few Guernsey fanciers, Punky will 
probably set up dairying on the North 
Shore. 




DONALD C. MORSE 
"Don" 
Boxborough 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Uplook Farm, Fitchburg; Activities: 
Cross Country 2; Glee Club 2; Animal 
Husbandry Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2; K.K. 1, 2; F.F.A. 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Popular with everyone, 
Don plans to own and operate a dairy 
farm in Massachusetts. 




FRANK MOSKAL 

"Franf^y" 

Berkley 

Major; Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Medfield State Hospital; Activities: 
Animal Husbandry 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2; F.F.A. 1; Future Plans: 
Frank intends to be a manager after 
graduation. 






ROBERT E. MOOREHOUSE 

"Bob" 

Lowell 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Concord; Activities: Animal Husbandry 
1, 2; Little International 2; Future 
Plans: He plans to go out in the world 
and carry on with Dairy Farming. 



[23] 



RONALD MacLEOD 
"Mac" 
Wakefield 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Danvers State Hospital, Danvers; Ac 
tivities: Animal Husbandry Club 1; 
Little International 2; Future Plans: 
Mac hopes to own his own farm after 
his marriage to that cute nurse at 
Lawrence General. 




EDWARD W. NICHOLS 

"Hic\y" 

Ludlow 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: 
United Dairy System, Springfield; Ac- 
tivities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Dairy Classic 
1; Future Plans: Nicky intends to own 
his own dairy plant after gaining 
more experience. 




PAUL J. McCARRAN 
"Mac" 
North Dartmouth 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: H. 
P. Hood, Providence, Rhode Island; 
Activities: Vice-President 1, President 
2; Student Council 2; Dance Commit- 
tee I, 2; Dairy Club 2; A.T.G. 2; 
Dairy Classic 1, 2; Future Plans: 
Paul intends to work as a salesman 
for H. P. Hood Ice Cream Co. Good 
luck to our President. 



ROBERT F. NUGENT 
"Bob" 
Belmont 
Major: Poultry Husbandry; Placement: 
F. W. Putnam, Jr., Acton; Activities: 
Shorthorn Board 2, Sports Editor; 
Dance Committee 2; Cross Country, 
Captain 1, 2; Glee Club 2; Poultry 
Club, Entertainment Committee 1, 2; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2; Future Plans: 
Breed the best Leghorns you've ever 
seen. 



[24] 





KENNETH McCONVILLE 
"Ken" 
North Dartmouth 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: 
Gulf Hill Dairy, New Bedford; Activi- 
ties: Shorthorn 2; Hockey 1; Dairy 
Club 2; K.K. 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2; 
Glee Club 1; Future Plans: Ken is a 
natural salesman and we are sure he 
will be successful in starting his own 
dairy business. 



RICHARD G. NUTE 
"DicV 
North Hanover 
Major: Forestry; Placement: Shasta 
National Forest, Mt. Hebron, Cali- 
fornia; Activities: Forestry Club 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Dick hopes to further 
his education by going to the Uni- 
versity of Oregon. 






JOHN CONNORS O'BRIEN 
•■Jack" "OB" 
Pittsfield 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: 
Crescent Creamery; Activities: Dairy 
Club 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2; Future 
Plans: OB, who was recently married, 
plans to take over his father's business. 



DAVID P. PETERSON 
"Pete" 
Quincy 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Pkcement: 
Hillcrest Farm, Walpole; Activities: 
Basketball 2, Manager; Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2; Future 
Plans: Always laughing, Pete plans 
to own his farm someday with pure- 
bred Ayrshires. 





ROBERT CHANDLER OLDFIELD 

"Barney" 
Milton 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Medfield State Hospital, Medfield; Ac- 
tivities: Student Council 1, 2, Presi- 
dent 2; Dance Committee 1, 2; A.T.G. 
2; Newman Club 1, 2; Future Plans: 
Barney enjoys college life and plans 
to further his education in the four 
year course at the University of 
Massachusetts. 



THOMAS L. PIERCE 

"Tom" 

Salem 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Henderson and Herndon Land- 
scape; Activities: Hort Show 2; Horti- 
culture Club 2, Treasurer; K.K. 2; 
Future Plans: Tom has hopes of going 
into the field of landscape construction 
and the nursery field. 




JAMES O'NEILL 

"Jimmy" 

Millbury 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Worcester State Hospital, Worcester; 
Activities: Shorthorn Board 2; Animal 
Husbandry Club 1, 2, Program Com- 
mittee 2; Little International 2; Future 
Plans: Jimmy plans to own his own 
pure-bred Holstein farm. 




AMERICO PALATINO 
"Mac^o" 
Ludlow 
Major: Dairy Industry; Piacement: 
Daylight Dairy; Activities: Dairy Club 
2; Dairy Classic 2; Future Plans: 
Macko wants to work for himself in his 
own ice cream business. 



*Ht&V»'-,-r«fei J, f.*^'. «,-..! 



•J-J»t*^*»i.v 



[25] 



STANLEY P. PRIEST 
•■Red" 
Winchendon 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
merit: Indian Hill Country Club, New- 
ington, Connecticut; Activities: Student 
Council 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Foot- 
ball 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Future 
Plans: Best of luck in your plans for 
professional greenskeeping. 




JOHN S. RAYNOR 
"Lone Ranger" 
Sudbury 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Home 
Carnation Range, Sudbury; Activities; 
A.T.G. 2; Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2, Co-Chairman 2; Future 
Plans: Sudbury will be John's home 
as he plans to operate his father's 
greenhouse- 




RUSSELL I. POMEROY 
"Russ" 
Northampton 
Major: Forestry; Placement: C. A. 
Denison Lumber Company, Colrain; 
Activities: Forestry Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 2; Future Plans: Honest Russ 
plans to start a pulpwood and lumber 
yard in Northampton. 



DAVID MARSHALL POMFRET 
"Good Old Dave" 
Bedford, New York 
Major; Arboriculture; Placement; Sub- 
urban Tree Company, New Bedford, 
New York; Activities: Hort Show 
1, 2; Arboriculture Club 1, 2; Future 
Plans; Dave is going to start up his 
own tree surgery business and keep 
our shade trees healthy. 



ALBERT R. RETELLS 
"AI" 
Andover 
Major: Arboriculture; Placement: 
Dodge Associates, Wenham; Activities: 
Football 1, 2; 4-H Club 2; Hort Show 
1, 2, Chairman of Arboriculture dis- 
play; Arboriculture Club 1, 2, Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 2; Future Plans: Al is 
going on to the University of Mas- 
sachusetts. 



JOHN A. RICCA 

"Johnny" 

Medford 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Larson's 
Poultry Farm, Billerica; Activities: Foot- 
ball 1, 2; Poultry 1, 2; K.K. 2; F.F.A. 
1, 2; Future Plans: Johnny plans to 
enter some phase of the Poultry Busi- 
ness in the suburbs of Boston. 



[26} 





JOHN L. RIDER 

"Rider" 

Danvers 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: 
H. P. Hood and Sons, Springfield; Ac- 
tivities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Dairy Classic 
1, 2; Future Plans; Rider would like 
to own his own milk laboratory for 
testing dairy products in Essex County. 



WILLIAM WALTER RUDOLPH 
"Rudy" 
Holyoke 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Carey, 
The Florist, South Hadley; Activities: 
Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Rudy wants his own 
florist shop in or around Holyoke. 




ROY H. RICHARDS, JR. 

East Weymouth 
Major: Forestry; Placement: U. S. 
Forest Service, Stasia National Forest, 
California; Actiuities: Forestry Club 
1, 2; Future Plans: Eventually Roy 
wants to have his own business but 
will probably work for the government 
for a few years. 



JAMES KEITH RUMRILL 
"Jim" 
West Roxbury 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Ru- 
ane's, Newtonville; Activities: Student 
Council 2; Dance Committee 2; Glee 
Club 2, pianist; Floriculture Club 1, 2; 
Hort Show 1, 2, (First prize both 
years); Interfraternity Council 1; 
A.T.G. 1, 2, President 2; Winter 
Carnival 2; Future Plans: Jim's ability 
as a designer has made him decide to 
operate a retail florist establishment 
and possibly do some wholesale grow- 
ing. 




CHARLES F. ROBINSON 
Arlington 
Major: Fine Turf Management; Place- 
ment: University of Massachusetts. 




THOMAS R. RUCKLEDGE 

"Whitie" "Tommy" 
Lowell 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: 
Bushway Ice Cream, Somerville; Ac- 
tivities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Dairy Classic 
1; Future Pkns: Whitie wants to get 
into the dairy industry preferably in 
Franconia, New Hampshire. 



[27] 



RICHARD CAMPBELL SAWYER 
■'Dick" 
Littleton 
Major: Horticulture; Pldcement: Briggs 
Landscape Co., Falmouth; Activities: 
Class Officer, Secretary 2; Dance Com- 
mittee 2; Floriculture Club 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; A.T.G. 1; Horticulture 
Club 1, 2; Square Dance Club 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Dick hopes to support 
a family from a greenhouse and land- 
scape business. 





.< _,45=:i=3afeHi; 



JOSEPH A. SAMBADE 

"]oe" 
Falmouth 
Major: Fruit Growing; Placement 
J. M. Sambade, Falmouth; Activities 
Shorthorn Board 2; Football 1, 2 
Pomology Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2 
4-H Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2 
A.T.G. 2; F.F.A. 1; Future Plans 
Joe will go home to his wife and work 
for his father in the Fruit growing 
business. 



FORREST BAXTER SAUNDERS 
"Hun\y" 
Pembroke 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Anderson Flower Farm, Green- 
bush; Activities: Football 1, 2; Basket- 
ball 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Horticulture 
Club 1, 2; Square Dance Club 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Hunk will work for 
Anderson for a few years to get the 
experience for his own business. 




IRWIN M. SEVERANCE, JR. 
"Irwie" 
Northfield 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Oscar P. Stone, Tree Surgeon, 
Brattleboro, Vermont; Activities: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Horticulture Club 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Uncertain. 



JACK HOLT SHEEHY 

East Wareham 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: F. I. 
Carter and Sons; Activities: A.T.G. 
1, 2, Treasurer 2; Floriculture Club 
1, 2, Vice-President 2; Hort Show 1, 2, 
(First pri^e both years); Future Plans: 
A boy who can get two first prices in 
the Hort Show ought to be successful 
in the florist business. 



JAMES F. SHOUP 

"Ji"»" 
Amherst 
Major: Poultry; Placement: Mt. Nor- 
wottuck Poultry Farm, South Amherst; 
Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2, Treasurer 
2; Future Plans: A farm of his own, 
specializing in commercial egg pro- 
duction. 



[28] 





JEAN ANN SQUIRES 
Belchertown 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Allen 
St. Greenhouses, Springfield; Activi- 
ties: Shorthorn Board 2, Secretary; 
Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Jean and Sue, our only 
representatives of the fairer sex. Best 
of luck, Jean, in your Floriculture 
career. 



CLARK FRED SMITH 
"Smttty" 
East Longmeadow 
Major: Floriculture; Phcement: Staf- 
ford Conservatories, Stafford, Connec- 
ticut. Actiuities: Glee Club 1, 2; Flori- 
culture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2, 
Chairman of Corsage Committee 2; 
K.K. 1, 2; Future Plans: A whole- 
sale flower business is Smitty's ambi- 
tion, having his own greenhouse. 



GLENN ROSS SPOCK 
"Spoo\" 
Holyoke 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Granby Dairy Farm; Activities: Animal 
Husbandry Club 1; Little International 
2; Future Plans: Glenn is quiet, a 
good listener and bound to be a good 
dairy farmer. 



GEORGE T. STANDBRIDGE 
Reading 
Major: Arboriculture; Placement: Frost 
and Higgins Co., Arlington; Activi- 
ties: Arboriculture Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Future Plans: George 
wants to own his own tree and land- 
scape business. 



CHARLES H. SUNDIN 
"Charlie" 
Weymouth 
Major: Poultry Husbandry; Placement: 
Harco Orchard and Poultry Farm, 
South Easton; Activities: Poultry Club 
1, 2; Future Plans: Charlie is quite 
a trombone player. He wants to own 
a poultry farm of considerable size. 





ARTHUR STACY 
"Sylvester" 
South Vernon, Vermont 
Ma;or: Forestry; Placement: U. S. 
Forest Service, Mariposa, California; 
Activities: Forestry Club 1, 2; Future 
Plans: To keep Vermont forests green. 



[29] 



EDWARD E. TURNER 
"Ed- 
Windsor 
Major : Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Flintstone Farm, Dalton; Activities: 
Shorthorn Board 2: Animal Husbandry 
Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2; Little 
International 2; Future Plans: Ed wants 
to be a breeder of registered cattle. 




ALFRED P. UHLIG 
■■A!" 
Pittsfield 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: The 
Flower Shop, Inc., Pittsfield; Actiui- 
ties: Football 1, 2; Floriculture Club 
2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; Hort Show 
2; Future Plans: Al plans to make a 
success in flower growing. 




CHARLES TEBO 

"Charlie" 

Arlington 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Cum- 
mings the Florist, Woburn; Actit;ities: 
Shorthorn Board 2; Floriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gam- 
ma 2; Future Plans: To own a whole- 
sale and retail greenhouse range. 



ALLAN RICHARD TURNER 
"Al" 
Windsor 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
E. A. Wentworth, Amherst; Activi- 
ties: Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
4-H Club 1, 2; Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2: Future Plans: Al 
wants to breed Ayrshires and own his 
own farm. 



DAVID L. VARNUM 
"Dave" 
Southbridge 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Haskins Farm, Cushman; Activities: 
Little International; Kappa Kappa 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Dave plans to own and 
operate a dairy farm. 



RICHARD VIOLETTE 

■'DicK' 
Lunenburg 
Major: Fruit Growing; Placement: At 
home; Activities: University Marching 
Band 2; Pomology Club 2; Hort Show 
2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; Future 
Plans: He plans to be a fruit grower. 



[30] 






JAMES J. WALSH 

"Ji™" 

Dover 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Boggy Meadow Farm, Walpole, N. H.; 
Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 
2; Little International 2; Kappa Kappa 
1, 2; Future Plans: Jim plans to have 
his own dairy farm. 



JOHN WELSH 
"Bud" 
Taunton 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Devine's Mt. Hope Farm, Taunton; 
Activities: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; Little International 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2; Future 
Plans: The Judge's boy hopes to be 
a farm manager. 




ROBERT WATERS 
"Bob" 
Sterling 
Major: Dairy Industry; Placement: H. 
P. Hood 6? Sons, Worcester; Activities: 
Dairy Club 1, 2: Dairy Classic 2; 
Future Plans: Bob is undecided as to 
future plans. 



JAMES W. WENT WORTH 
"Jim" 
Amherst 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
Lippit Farm, Hope, R, I.; Activities: 
Dairy Classic 2: Little International 
2; Future Plans: Jim fancies Ayrshires 
and hopes to work with that breed of 
cattle. 




EDGAR ERNEST WEBBER 
"Ed- 
Worcester 
Major: Floriculture; Placement: Her- 
bert E. Berg, Florist, Inc.; Activities: 
Cross Country 1, 2; Floriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Future Plans: 
Ed would like to be a wholesale 
grower dealing in either roses or 
carnations. 




JAMES H. WEIGH 
'*]im'^ 
East Wareham 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Jewett Estate, Woods Hole; 
Activities: Hort Show 2; Horticulture 
Club 2; Future Plans: Jim plans to 
own a nursery or landscape business. 



[31] 






RICHARD D. WEST 
"Dic\" 
Westfield 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: Adam's Nursery, Inc., West- 
field; Actitiities: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Horticultural Club 1, 2; Future Plans: 
Dick wants to work at Stanley Park, 
Westfield. 



CABOT E. WIGGIN 
"Cab" 
Worcester 
Major: Fruit Growing; Placement: 
University of Mass.; Activities: Foot- 
ball 1, 2; Pomology Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; 
Future Plans: Cab hopes to own his 
own orchard. 



EUGENE F. WILDER 

"Gene" 

Sterling 
Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 
J. H. Chapman, So. Woodstock, Conn.; 
Activities: Shorthorn Board 1, 2; 
Animal Husbandry Club 2; Little In- 
ternational 2; Future Farmers of Ameri- 
ca 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 2; Future Plans: 
Gene plans to continue in partnership 
with his father. 



ANTHONY DeFELICE 

"Tony" 

Belmont 

Major: Animal Husbandry; Placement: 

Worcester State Hospital. 



DONALD NEWMAN 
Florence 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture; Place- 
ment: University of Massachusetts. 



As of the class of 1952 



Abbott, Raymond Clendening 
Anderson, Andrew Gustave 
Andrews, Miltiades George 
Antoine, Abraham Joseph, Jr. 
Bair, George Kissick 
Barney, David Edward 
Bates, James Michael 
Bissell, Verne Wellington 
Bridges, Robert Ward 
Burnett, Peter Charles 
Busa, Joseph Anthony 
Carson, David Lyman 
Cavanaugh, George Albert, Jr. 
Cepurneek, John Arthur 
Cobb, Gerald Edward 
Colombo, Louis Joseph 
Cote, Robert Ambrose 
Coveney, Laurence Edward 
Cox, William Townsend 
Crosby, Richard Arthur 
Cutter, Henry Huse, Jr. 
DeArruda, Alfred 
Densmore, Robert Frederick 
Dolan, William 
Donahue, Arthur 
Drelick, Joseph Michael 

[32] 



Drew, Robert Morgan 
Eddy, Thomas Lewis 
Evans, Robley Nutter 
Fay, Carrol Fraser 
Finelli, Vincent Constantino 
Fitch, Clinton Willis, Jr. 
Gilpin, Paul Wesley 
Gotham, James Edward, Jr. 
Gray, Wallace Daniel 
Gustafson, Allan Victor 
Harwood, Lawerence Everett 
Hawes, Henry Andrew, Jr. 
Hollingsworth, John 
Holmes, Quentin Stuart 
Homan, Henry John, Jr. 
Horn, Donald Eugene 
Huntley, Carolyn 
Hynes, David Alvin 
Kimball, Stanley Mottram 
Kirby, Ronald Paul 
Knight, Clifford John 
Larivee, Raymond Cyprian 
Leonard, Perley Ernest 
Lima, Leonard Joseph 
Lincoln, Robert Alan 
Lippard, Richard Lyman 



List, Albert, Jr. 
Lozeau, Roland Paul 
Malone, John MacKey 
Melanson, Joseph Rauchford 
Merrill, George Leslie 
Meskinis, Philip Matthew 
Metelica, Leo 
Moran, Richard Thomas 
Moran, Thomas William 
Munroe, Russell Felton, Jr. 
McAuslan, Floyd George 
McClellan, Francis Bernard 
McGinnis, Teresa Mary 
McKay James Joseph 
McLaughlin, John Henry, Jr. 
MacMunn, Henry Joseph 
McRae, Melvin Glynn 
Neizer, Donald Francis 
Noel, Irene Louise 
Norwood, James Lewis 
O'Brien, William Paul 
O'Doherty, John Leo 
O'Donnell, Robert Thomas 
Osterman, Troy Paul 
Packard, David Eugene 
Pandell, Lois Mae 



Pearson, Birger Paul 
Peltier, Raymond Hudson 
Pinard, Albert Everesta 
Prout, Robert Horton 
Rand, David Calvin 
Riccardo, Joseph Anthony 
Ringquist, Gordon Kenneth 
Roche, John William 
Rohrbacher, Irving, Jr. 
Ruf, Robert Henry, Jr. 
Shepard, Charles Edward, Jr. 
Smith, Frederict Walter 
Stockwell, Robert Allan 
Sweeney, David Richard 
Szymkowicz, Joseph Francis 
Tessier, Edmond Emile 
Thayer, Donald Ellsworth 
Tobin, William Francis 
Wakeman, Seth Freeman 
Walker, Ellis Preston 
Waskiewicz, Edmund Peter 
Wiezbicki, Gene Stanley 
Wilcox, Cabot Ellsworth 
Williams, Charles Robinson, 
Worby, Stewart Leroy 
Yacubian, Arthur Edward 



Jr. 



Majars and 



Activities 




pa 



en 




[34] 




- J__ 




SENIOR 
CLASS OFFICERS 
Front Row, left to right: Richard 
Sawyer (Secretary), Robert Hume 
(Treasurer), Gilbert Gaston (Vice- 
President), Paul McCarran (Presi- 
dent). 



On October 5, 1950, a fall windy day, 250 
students entered Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 
Classes began and we started off with a bang 
trying to find various buildings and classrooms. Our 
initial task was to elect our class officers. Director 
Roland Verbeck was our advisor and with his help 
we elected for President John Dohartery, Vice- 
President Paul McCarron, Secretary Fred . Kelly, ■ 
Treasurer Joe Merchant. With the excellent coach- 
ing of Steve Kosakowski we held our own in the 
field of sports. After choosing one of the fraterni- 
ties we really found out what college life was 
like with many dances and plenty of clean fun 
among our brothers. We now felt established and 
were starting to form our study habits. We 
returned a dance to the seniors in February which 
was enjoyed by all. 

Every major has its own club to create and 
arouse interest and on April 1st we went out on 
placement training. 



We started our last year feeling much more 
familiar with Stockbridge and its functions. With 
more and more responsibility coming our way and 
acquiring the knack of self expression. Our class 
clubs and fraternities again began to roll with many 
new faces and many different ideas. The election 
of class officers was held and elected for President 
was Paul McCarron; Vice-President, Gilbert Gas- 
ton; Secretary, Richard Sawyer; Treasurer, Robert 
Hume. 

With the help of some stout hearted freshmen 
our sports really picked up with a greater percentage 
of wins. After many eventful affairs such as the 
beautiful Horticultural Show, the colorful tradi- 
tional Little International and the educational value 
of . the - Dairy Classic we ended our studies at 
Stockbridge. Many of us realized that commence- 
ment day would separate us, each to go his own 
way but all knew in their hearts they would never 
forget our two years spent at the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. 



CLASS HISTORY 



[35] 






pa 




m 



[36] 




FRESHMAN 
CLASS OFFICERS 
Front Row. left to right: Donald 
Dearden (Secretary), Joseph Frei- 
tas (Vice-President), Lew Mason 
(President), Austin Smith (Treas- 
urer). 



On October 1, 1951, the Stockbridge class of 
1953 performed its first duties on campus — regis- 
tration. By the end of that memorable first week 
we were well underway with our studies. 

At our first convocation Director Verbeck 
explained to us the customs and duties of Stock- 
bridge students. 

Within the next few weeks we elected as 
temporary class officers : President : Lewis R. Mason, 
Jr.; Vice-President; Joseph A. Freitas; Secretary: 
Donald A. Dearden; Treasurer: Austin T. Smith. 

We are pleased to say that the football team 
had an excellent season, winning four out of five 
games. The team received considerable support from 
the freshmen members which should help to have 
a winning team next season also. 

The track team did well this season and also 
received good support from the freshmen with one 
of its top men a freshman. 



The basketball team also had a good season 
with several freshmen participating. So in the way 
of sports the freshmen seemed to hold their own 
very well. 

After a lapse of a year the Glee Club made 
a comeback with the presentation of the annual 
Christmas Concert in Bowker. The Glee Club 
had a high percentage of freshmen vocalists. 

On December 14th the Seniors sponsored a 
reception for the freshmen in Memorial Hall. We 
returned our appreciation with a Farewell dance 
to the Seniors on February 29th. 

With the nearing of spring we all realized 
that our second semester was almost over and 
that in a short time we would be leaving for our 
summer's work at placement training. So we bid 
the seniors farewell and set about our way, hoping 
to return next fall to help next year's freshmen as 
the seniors aided us this year. 



CLASS HISTORY 



[37] 



SENIOR ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 




Front Row, left to right: D. Varnam, J. Welch, ' D. 
Laufman, E. Fiske, J. Marshall, K. Johnson, R. Oldfield. 
Second Row: R. Moorehouse, H. Mitchell, R. MacClbud, 
R. Henshaw, J, Wentworth, J. Walsh, A. Turner, F. 
Moskal, C. Smith, J. O'Niel, C. Graves, E. Wilder. 



Third Row: C. Knight, G. Gregory, J. Hayden, W. 
Davoll, D. Gagne,. D. Morse, J. Macomber, H. Hunter. 
Fourth Row: R. Hume, D. Dugdale, R. Coombs, P. 
Auclair, G. Gaston, G. Eastman, E. Turner, R. Bates, R. 
Dimlich, G. Spock. 




Front Row, left to ri^ht: N. Carlson, K. McConnville, 
B. Benson, T. Porter, K, Bonney, C. Niethold, P. Jasmin, 
R. Lannon, J. Reynolds. Second Row: C. Doane, G. 
Andruk, F. Gummow, R. Gavin, H. Baldwin, D. Haley, 
T. Leahey. Third Row: P. Frederico, D, Gardener, W. 



Riley, C. Ovian. Fourth Row: R. Davies, A. Smith, D. 
Tokarsky, C. Dinsmore, E. Hempel, J. Anderson, A. 
Havens, D. Davenport, L. Werner. Fifth Row: G. 
Fletcher, J. Carlson, C. Lopez, C. Lindberg, C. Slein, L. 
Rogers. 



[38] 



FRESHMAN ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY CLUB 




President . . . John Libbey 
Vice-President . . . Howard Hunter 



Secretary . . . Myles Richmond 
Treasurer .' . . David Dugdale 



The Animal Husbandry Club is made up of 
Animal Husbandry students from both the Uni- 
versity and the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 
This club, due to the interest and activity of its 
members, has the distinction of being the largest 
club on campus. 

We were fortunate this year in being able to 
obtain some excellent speakers for our monthly 
meetings. Mr. MacFarlane of Boston talked on 
prevention of livestock injuries. Miss Helen Salu, 
4-H Club agent for Middlesex County, told us 
about 4-H Club work as a career. Mr. Ed Pierce, 
field man for the M.S.B.A,, showed us the new 
film called "Selective Breeding," and gave us the 
background behind it. Myron Fuerst told us about 
his operations at Fuerst Stock Farms in Pine Plains, 
New York. 

As the "Shorthorn" goes to press, plans are 
underway for the Little International Livestock 
Show being held March 22, and the judging con- 
test on March 15. This show is sponsored by the 
Animal Husbandry Club and is designed to give 
the students- an opportunity to gain knowledge 
and experience in fitting and showing livestock. 



This spring we are also planning on our 
annual barbeque which is . held on the College 
Farm. 

We wish to thank Murray Eliott for his able 
assistance as faculty advisor for this year. 







itl'M 



ii 






^ 






V 



V 



^" 4 





The twelfth Annual Little International Livestock Show was held 
Saturday, March 22, at Grinnell Arena with approximately 1000 spectators 
viewing the day-long program. The Show his year took on added significance 
for it was dedicated to Herdsman Bill Smith, who has spent the past thirty- 
two years giving all those interested a practical background in the care 
of livestock. 

Judges for the day were Professor Donald Kinsman of the University 

of Vermont, Mr. Donald Grant, Beef Herdsman and Shepherd at the 

University of Connecticut, and Mr.L. Frank Clark, Wirthmore fieldman. 

After the decisions of the day were completed, the winners in the 

four classes of livestock were as follows : 

Beef: (1) J. Marshall, (2) L. Peirce (Miss), (3) A. Perley 
Sheep: (1) R. Nickles, (2) J. Macomber, (3) W. Deacon 
Horses: (1) K. Alves, (2) M. Richmond, (3) H. Perry (Miss) 
Swine: (1) A. Gurwitz, (2) J. Hobart (Mrs.), (3) P. Auclair 
In the Premier Showmanship Contest, which was the program's finale, 
John Marshall, a Stockbridge senior, was chosen Premier Showman, with 
reserve honors going to Kenneth Alves, a University junior. 

In its embryonic stages, the Little International was a class project 
carried out as an integral part of the livestock production course. It was 
not until 1938 that the present-day show was envisioned by Professor 
M. E. Ensminger, now head of the Animal Husbandry Department at 
Washington State College. From its early beginnings, the Little Inter- 
national has gradually become one of the highlights of all student activities. 
In the show, each student is striving to become Premier Showman and 
thereby obtain the honor of having his or her name engraved on the 
Ensminger Trophy. 

Many days and years will sHp by before those participating in the 
Little International Livestock Show will forget the long hours of prepara- 
tion, aching backs, strained patience and exhilarating tension that are so 
much a part of being an entrant in the Little International Livestock Show. 





Front Row, left to right: R, Nugent, J. Ricca, T. kuff. Third Row: F. Freeman, R. Lane, C. Houston, C. 

Mahoney, J. Mackey, J. Merchant, C. Sundin. Second Bassett, D. Freeman, P. Hadley. 

Row: G. Clark, J. Shoup, R. Clark, P. Gray, K. Jurent- 



5ENIDR PDULTRY 




Front Row. left to right: Roland Ferguson, Barker Buck- 
ingham, Kenneth Gareri, Ransom Gerard, Joseph Di- 
Carlo, Stanley Brown, Henry Radomski. Second Rou<: 



George Pratt, Richard Carroll, Robert Korpinen, Joseph 
Freitas, Donald Smiaroski, Thomas Warren. Third Roui: 
Richard Jensen, Lee Chisholm, Everett Lord. 



[42] 



FRESHMAN PDULTRY 



POULTRY CLUB 



The first meeting of the Poultry Science Club 
was held October 23, 1951. The officers elected 
for the year 'SI-'St were: Frank Freeman — Presi- 
dent, Ray Lane — Vice-President, James Shoup — 
Treasurer, George Pratt — Secretary, James Mackey 
— Assistant Secretary, Joe Merchant — Sergeant-at- 
Arms, Professor Vondell — Advisor. 

The Club continued to be one of the best 
attended in the University due to the very effective 
program arranged by Prof. Vondell. Movies called 
"The Rainmaker" were shown, followed by talks 
by Prof. Jeffery, Mr. Spear and Prof. Vondell on 
the purpose of the Club. 

At our next meeting Dave Ferzoco, former 
president and graduate of Stockbridge, spoke to us 
about the broiler industry. 

The Poultry Science Club Christmas Party 



was held December 11, at Bowditch Lodge. A 
group of girls from the University helped make 
the party a success by showing slides, playing games 
and by leading the group in singing Christmas 
Carols. 

At our next regular meeting we were honored 
to have Dr. Sylstra from the University speak to 
us. He spoke on "Today's Poultry Disease Prob- 
lems." 

J. B. Randall, manager of the Springfield Egg 
Co-operative, was the speaker at our last regular 
meeting. He spoke about the history of the Co- 
operative and the purpose of it. 

Elections for next year's officers was held 
February 12 and February 19. The Annual Poultry 
Club Banquet was held February 26. Prof. Wil- 
liam L. Doran was principle speaker of the evening. 




[43] 




Front Row, left to right: Edward Nichols, Howard Dun- 
nels, Americo Palatino, James Dwyer, Walter Morgan. 
Second Row: Paul McCarran, John Rider, Robert Wa- 



ters, Thomas Ruckledge, John O'Brien. Third Roiu: 
Richard Graham, Kenneth McConville, Joseph Boulet, 
Raymond Lindell. 



DAIRY SENIORS 



DAIRY FRESHMAN 



Front Row, left to right: Richard Cliff, James Crowly, Gosslin, Leonard Baj, Howard Waterman. Third Row. 

John Waskiewicz, Frank Marlines. Second Row: Robert William Lamb, Morse Weatherbee, Richard Wilcox. 





DAIRY CLUB 





The Dairy Club, composed of students from 
the two and four year courses, provides a social 
and educational pastime for its members. The 
Club meets twice each month and at these meet- 
ings prominent men from the industry speak on 
subjects of interest to the members. Refreshments 
and a bull session bring the meetings to a close. 

Two of the excellent speakers who addressed 
the Club this year were Kenneth LeBeau, sales 
representative of Mojonnier Co. in New England, 
who spoke on "Bulk Transportation, from Farm 
to Dairy by Tank Trucks" and Harold P. Robin- 
son, a member of the United States Department of 
Health, whose topic was "The influence of the 
United States Department of Health on the Dairy 
Industry. 

As the Shorthorn goes to press, the Dairy 
Club is busy making preparations for the Dairy 
Classic which will be held in May. A committee 
consisting of Bob Bradey, Leonard Libbey, Paul 
McCarran, James Dwyer, John Rider, Walter Hor- 
gan and Robert Waters has been appointed and 
these men with the help of all the members of the 
Club plan to make this year's Classic the best of 
all times. They hope it will be outstanding and a 
goal of future Classics. 

It is diiScult to say how much knowledge the 
students will carry with them as they leave the 
campus and go out into the world, but it is safe 
to say that they will carry with them the fond 
memories of the many enjoyable moments spent 
with their friends at the Dairy Club. 

A word of thanks, again this year to Doctor 
Hankinson who was always willing to lend a 
helping hand and made it possible for the Club 
to hear many of the speakers. 



[45} 



SENIOR HORTICULTURE 



Front Row, left to right: Richard Sawyer, Richard West, 

James Weich, Forrest Saunders, Everard Cross. Second 

Row: Robert Wyman, Richard Abbott, Waldo Bray, 
WilHam Kiley. 




Front Row. left to right: R. Dorgan, P. Howard, J. 
Adams, B. Horte, F. Dorsey, E. Young, J. Smith, Second 
Row: G. Milligan, R. Horton, H. Kabat, D. Rhodes. 



[46] 



FRESHMAN HORTICULTURE 



ORNAMENTAL HORTICULTURE CLUR 




The Ornamental Horticulture Club is made 
up of men majoring in Ornamental Horticulture 
within the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. The 
purpose of the club is to obtain speakers who 
emphasize the practical aspects of the field and in 
general, broaden the students education. 

Two of the past season's speakers were Dr. 
Karl Sax, Director of the Arnold Arboretum, and 
Charles Godin, alumnus of Stockbridge class of 
1934, and Vice-President of Adams Nursery of 
Westfield. 

Dr. Sax spoke of the breeding and propaga- 
tion of various ornamental plants. His work has 
been outstanding in the field of Horticulture and 



his talk to the students was interesting and informa- 
tive. Many of the clubs in the School of Agricul- 
ture and Horticulture whose interests are similar, 
were invited to hear Dr. Sax. 

Mr. Godin showed movies of the methods 
used by Adams Nursery in raising their plants. He 
emphasized the advantages of mechanical equip- 
ment and showed how it can be adapted to 
nursery work. 

Other meetings consisted of short business 
sessions with slides or movies shown. 

The club had a very enjoyable year under 
the direction of their able officers and Assistant 
Professor Paul N. Procopio. 




r w^T^msMi 



[47} 





The 39th Annual Horticultural Show opened 
on Friday, November 2, 1951 for a three day stand 
during which 21,500 people viewed the exhibits 
and work done by Stockbridge and University 
students. 

The theme of the show was World Unity, this 
being carried out by the domineering presence of 
a 14 foot globe of the world in the northwest 
corner of the cage. Running from there to the 
southeast corner where the Queen's throne and 
garden were located were two rows of flags, one 
flag for each member country of the United Nations. 
At the base of each flagstaff was an outstanding 



HORTICULTURE 




product or plant of that country. 

Mary Granfield '52 was elected the Flower 
Queen and presided over the show with her court 
of two princesses, Jean Stringer '55 and Fredrica 
Dole '53. 

The exhibits included a United Nations Bakery, 
featuring pastry of different nations, and an exhibit 
of fruits from many lands by the pomology 
department. 

Much credit is due those from Stockbridge and 
the University who made the show the success it 
was. Stockbridge was well represented among the 
winning exhibits. 



SHOW 







SENIOR FORESTRY 




•*^^K»(K«-; 



Front Row, left to right: K. Beaujean, O. Stacey, C. Delano, J. Jacobson. Second Ron 
J. Coughlin, G. Bliss, R. Nute, R. Richards, L. Lane, B. Eldridge. 



department 
forKtry 




Front Ron;, left to right: K. Carlson, L. Jussaume, R. Beraudo. Second Row: R. Bruso, 
J. Gorman, D. Poland. Third Row: T. Gaylord, P. Bouchard, R. Carson. 



FRESHMAN FORESTRY 



FORESTRY CLUH 




The Forestry Club consists of members of the 
University Forestry and Wildlife majors and 
Stockbridge Forestry students. This Club meets 
twice a month for the purpose of creating a spirit 
of cooperation and friendship between the faculty 
and students and to provide educational and enter- 
taining programs dealing with the forestry industry. 

These programs consist of movies, speakers 
and discussions which ofFer the students material 
not available in their regular academic courses. 
This year we have been fortunate in securing as 
speakers men from the U. S. Forest Service, pro- 
fessors from other schools and former students 
who are now in the field. 

We are very thankful to our advisors, Wil- 
liam P. MacConnell and R. V. Ganley, for their 
help in arranging our programs and making the 
year's activities a success. 





V^o^.^'l'seco-^^""" 









h^^ 



U^t^ 







M *.^. '"" 



^l'^ 



W^t^ 



[52] 



ARBORICULTURE CLUB 



The Arboriculture Club serves as a link between 
the two classes, alumni, and all those interested in arbori' 
culture. By having speakers, members are given a chance 
to see and hear new and different ideas on arboriculture. 

This year we have heard Mr. Coffin of the Shade 
Tree Laboratories, Mr. Mathieu, a Stockbridge graduate, 
and attended the monthly meetings of the Massachusetts 
Tree Wardens' Association. 

All the work done by the Arboriculture students 
in the Hort Show is prepared at Club meetings. Club 
members draw up plans and committees are appointed. 

One of the year's highlights is the annual contest 
between classes. Events in rope climbing and throwing, 
shinnying, tree climbing, wood chopping, and cross-cut 
sawing are held. Competition is high and the winning 
class has its year engraved on a plaque in French Hall. 





Field trips to municipal tree departments, equip- 
ment companies, and meetings of tree men are taken by 
both classes. This year we attended the meetings of the 
Western Massachusetts Tree Wardens' Association in 
Pittsfield, and the Annual Convention of the Massachu- 
setts Tree Wardens' and Foresters' Association in Boston. 

To Mr. King, our Faculty Advisor, for all his 
interest and advice, go our thanks for a successful 
program. 




FLORICULTURE 



S 
E 
N 
I 
D 
R 




Front Row, left to right: James Brown, Jean Squires, Sue Bear, Edgar Web- 
ber, Clark Smith. Second Row: James Rumrill, Ralph Dean, Charles Tebo, 
Jack Sheehy. Third Row: John Raynor, Alfred Uhlig, Ralph Borgesen, 
William Rudolph, Lawrence Farrington. 




Front Row, left to right: T. Handley, D. Eaton, J. Elliott, P. Anderson, 
A. Karlson, R. Dix. Second Row: J. Ward, R. Shaw, G. Eld, D. Kirk, W. 
McAvoy. Third Row: R. Fuller, P. Sears, J. Henry. 




FLORICULTURE CLUH 



Membership in this Club is open to any stu- 
dent in the Stockbridge School and the University 
who is interested in the subject of Floriculture. 
Meetings are held monthly with occasional special 
meetings arranged for out-of-town speakers. 

Professor Alfred W. Boicourt of the Extension 
Service was the speaker at our first meeting. He 
described his project dealing with community im- 
provement in Stow Village by landscaping public 
and private grounds. At the November meeting a 
check for the money received at the Wishing Well 
at the Horticultural Show was presented to Pro- 
fessor Alfred A. Brown, Treasurer of the War 
Memorial Building Fund Committee. James Rum- 
rill, S.S.A. '52, gave an illustrated talk on his trip 
to Florida taken before he started in placement 
training. 

In December a combined meeting of all horti- 
cultural clubs was held in Goessmann Auditorium 
at which were shown numerous Kodachrome slides 
of scenes in the Horticultural Show. Plans for 
the formation of a Student Horticultural Council 
were proposed at this meeting. Also, in December 
we met with the Horticultural Club for a lecture 
by Dr. Karl Sax of the Arnold Arboretum. Dr. 
Sax described his breeding work with ornamental 
plants and also discussed unusual methods of plant 
propagation in use at the Arboretum. 

The Holyoke and Northampton Florists' and 
Gardners' Club held its annual Carnation Night 
in conjunction with our February meeting. Student, 
members of the Club judged the competitive carna- 
tion exhibits. J. T. Whittemore, Jr. '54, gave a 
report on the exhibition and meeting of the Ameri- 
can Carnation Society in New York City. On 



February 14, our Club and several others combined 
for a meeting sponsored by the Olericulture Club; 
the speaker, Mr. J. Duncan Rankin of the E. I. 
DuPont de Nemours Company discussed the sub- 
ject of prepackaging and marketing horticultural 
produce. 

Plans are being made for the remaining 
months with the hope that a picnic for all horti- 
cultural clubs will be the final event of the 
club year. 




i. 







c 





Cil ^ 



C55] 



PDMDLDGY CLUB 




Front Row, left to right: Joseph Sambade, Cabot Wiggin, Richard Violette. 



The Pomology Club is composed of University and Stockbridge students 
majoring in Pomology. It holds its own monthly meetings for which were engaged 
speakers affiliated in some phase of the pomology field. 

The club this year held a record-dance and fun was had by all. The club is 
also planning to hold a banquet for the coming spring. 

In preparation for the Horticultural Show, the Club decided to present to the 
public the place of origin of various species of apples, pears, grapes, and plums, with 
a map of the world as a background. 

Although the Club had a small enrollment this fact was annulled by the strong 
club spirit and backing of the faculty. 




GDDDELL LIBRARY 





-•«^I?D> 



MDODS DF THE EDITOR 



s 

E 
N 
I 
D 
R 
S 




Front Row, left to right: Donald Gulbankian, John Durfec, Robert Hall, David 
Allen. Second Row: Warren Dean, Donald Harris, Ralph Langill. 



VEGETABLE GROWING 



F 
R 
E 
S 
H 
M 
E 
N 




■At- M^^^'^'^" 



McVeigl^' 



Ad H°°P^'' 



Geot&e 



[58] 



The Olericulture Club is made up of Uni- 
versity and Stockbridge students. The club has 
twentyfive active members including students and 
faculty. It schedules monthly meetings open to the 
public as well as club members. 

The club fall organization meeting was held 
at the top of Mount Sugarloaf as a picnic and 
business session. A few of the highlighted speakers 
for the 1951-1952 season have been Mr. E. K. Wal- 
rath of the Eastern States Cooperative who spoke 
on "Soil Testing and Fertilizing Practice," and 
Professor Grant B. Snyder, head of the Department 
of Olericulture, who gave an excellent talk on 



hail, hail insurance, and hail injury to plants. 

One of the seasons largest meetings was in 
cooperation with the Food Technology, Floricul- 
ture, Home Economics, Pomology, and Poultry 
Clubs. The featured speaker was Mr. Duncan 
Rankin of the DuPont Company. Mr. Rankin 
spoke on "Plastic Films and Factors Related to 
the Packaging of Produce," a subject which is 
rapidly becoming of great importance to the pro- 
ducer, wholesaler, retailer and consumer. 

Another added feature of the club is the 
refreshments served at the end of each meeting and 
the banquet held at the end of the season. 




OLERICULTURE CLUB 



[59] 



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[60] 



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[61] 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION DANCE 




The Stockbridge freshmen were entertained by the Stockbridge 
seniors at the Freshmen Reception Dance held in Memorial Hall on 
the night of December 8. 

The dance was made a great success thru the efforts of our 
class president, Paul McCarran, and a group of volunteers from the 
senior class, It was through their efforts that the iine music of Allan 
Bond and his orchestra was secured for the dance. The orchestra 
started playing about 8 o'clock and most of the couples had arrived 
by 9:30 to find the hall gayly decorated for an enjoyable evening. 
Refreshments were served by the refreshment committee. 

Professors Paul Procopio and W. Bradford Johnson and wives 
served as chaperones with Dean and Mrs. Dale Seiling and Director 
and Mrs. Roland Verbeck as invited guests. 

Dancing continued until midnight, the hour which brought to 
a close a very enjoyable and memorable dance. 





'Ira i m< 




[62} 



SENIOR RECEPTION DANCE 



On the night of February 29, 1952, a reception for the seniors 
was given by the Freshman class. 

Allan Bond and his orchestra supplied the music for dancing 
in Memorial Hall, which was colorfully decorated with the school 
colors of Blue and White. 

It was a semi-formal affair, with a large number of couples 
attending. This was one of the biggest social events of the year put 
on by the Freshman class. 

The chaperones for the dance were Mr. and Mrs. Stephen 
Kosakowski, who also enjoyed the evening to the fullest extent. 

During intermission, soft drinks, ice cream and cookies were 
served for refreshments. This was handled by Jim Crowley, who did 
a splendid job. 

With all the comforts for ball room dancing, the affair ended as 
a great success. 







[63] 




Bac\ Row .left to right: Stanbridge, Retelle, Merchant, Mahoney. Front Row: 
Gaston, Rider. 



COMMENCEMENT 



General Chairman John Rider 

Chairman, Class Picnic Gilbert Gaston 

Chairman, Caps and Gowns .... Howard Hunter 

Chairman, Class Gift Joseph Sambade 

Co-Chairmen, Class Prom Susan Bear 

Albert Retelle 

Class Marshals Joseph Merchant 

Joseph Hayden 

Class Orator George Stanbridge 

Class Historian Thomas Mahoney 

Ex-Officio Members . . . Paul McCarran, President 

Robert Hume, Treasurer 

COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM 



Friday — May 23, 1952 
10:00 A.M. Class Picnic 
9:00 P.M. Commencement Promenade 

Saturday — May 24, 1952 
10:00 A.M. Class Day Exercises 
Class Oration 
Class History 
Student Activity Awards 
Presentation of Class Gift 
School Song — "Alma Mater Hail'' 
12:30 P.M. Alumni — Senior Luncheon 
3:15 P.M. Softball Game, 

Alumni vs. Stockbridge 



Sunday — May 25, 1952 
2:30 P.M. Graduation Exercises 

Processional 

Invocation 

Commencement Address 

School Song — "Men of Stockbridge" 

Presentation of Diplomas 

Song 

Stosag Awards 

Benediction 

Recessional 
4.30 P.M. President's Reception to members of 

the graduating class, their guests, 

alumni, alumnae, and the faculty 



[64] 



HONOR SCHOLASTIC SOCIETY 




*James Frederick Dwyer 
*James Francis Shoup 
*Edward Peter Brittain 
Ralph Roland Coombs, Jr. 
Leighton Ernest Lane 
David Marshall Pomfret 
*Richard Edward Abbott 
Conrad Alfred Bassett 
Roy Hugo Richards, Jr. 
*Charles Francis Robinson 
Frank Moskal 
James Edward O'Neill 
Allan Richard Turner 
Clark Fred Smith 
*Kenneth McConville 
David Lindsay Varnam 
Frederick George Kelly 
Roger Brown Henshaw 
John Shaw Raynor 
Warren Marshall Dean, Jr. 
Albert Richard Retelle 
William Walter Rudolph 
Gilbert Adams Bliss 
Robert Francis Nugent 



Dairy Industry 

Poultry Husbandry 

Turf Maintenance 

Animal Husbandry 

Forestry 

Turf Maintenance 

Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 

Animal Husbandry 

Floriculture 

Arboriculture 

Ornamental Horticulture 

Poultry Husbandry 

Forestry 

Dairy Industry 

Animal Husbandry 

Arboriculture 

Animal Husbandry 

Floriculture 

Commercial Vegetable Growing 

Arboriculture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Poultry Husbandry 



Weymouth 

Framingham 

Kenilworth, New Jersey 

Springfield 

East Northfield 

Bedford, New York 

Whitman 

Pittsfield 

East Weymouth 

Dorchester 

Berkley 

Millbury 

Windsor 

East Longmeadow 

Acushnet 

Southbridge 

Stratford, Connecticut 

Templeton 

Sudbury 

Reading 

Andover 

Holyoke 

Warren 

Belmont 



(Thirteenth annual election by Stockbridge Faculty Advisory Committee to encourage 
and recognize high scholastic ability and sound practical training. Average grade must 
be eightyfive per cent or better to qualify, with no grade less than seventy. Names 
placed in order of rank.) * — Veteran 



[65] 



STUDENT COIINCIL 




Kf Paul McCarran, ]ean Ca^^-; f^J'^.Hold, Karl Juren. 
p^nt Ro., Wt « r^ht P-^, j„,,,. Merchant. Charles 
der^t). Lew Mason- Seco 
kuff, RiAard Abbott. 



The Student Council has carried on this past year in its usual efficient manner 
in striving to maintain the high standards already set by previous councils and by the 
Stockbridge School itself. 

The council members, through their fine cooperation and school spirit, have 
given nothing but their best in discussing the various problems which have arisen 
during the year. 

Some of the more important problems discussed consisted of the following: the 
establishing of an Infirmary Committee, whose job it is to check on Stockbridge School 
students confined to the infirmary; the matter of the freshmen of the coming years 
to wear beanies during the first few weeks of school in the hopes of building a stronger 
school spirit; an amendment to the constitution which now permits girls to hold any 
class office except those of President and Vice-President; and many other important 
matters. 

Ed. 7<lote: In the light of the many functions it has carried on this year and 
by virtue of the great service rendered to the student body, the Student Council 
certainly deserves a "well-done" and the sincere than\s of the school. 



I 



The idea of the Stockbridge Glee Club is to 
gives interested students a chance to participate in 
organized glee club work. 

After a year of inactivity the Glee Club 
became reorganized. Under the able direction of 
James Chapman, U. M. class of 1953, a very 
enjoyable and successful season was had by all 
the members. 

The first appearance of the Glee Club was 
made at the Stockbridge Christmas Convocation. 
Christmas selections were sung with solos by Donald 
Davenport and Charles Dinsmore. The program 
was concluded by the student body singing carols. 

The club made its second appearance at a 
February convocation. This time the program had 
the singing centered around a college town tavern, 
the singing was done by the patrons of the tavern 
and Donald Davenport again sang a solo. 

Much support was given to the club by the 
piano playing of James Rumrill. 



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GLEE CLUB 



WINTER 
CARNIVAL 





Winter Carnival began on Saturday the 9th of 
February with a Kiddies' Party at Memorial Hall, 
which was followed in the evening with a Float 
Parade featuring the candidates for Winter Garni' 
val Queen. The candidates were: Barbara Brown, 
Sue Brosseau, Sue Moynahan, Jackie McCarthy, 
and Ginny Stewart. 

By no means an easy task, the Winter Carni- 
val Queen, Sue Moynahan, was selected the next 
day by a board of photographers from Boston and 
Springfield newspapers. 

Most of the athletic festivities were at a mini- 
mum due to the lack of snow, including the snow 
sculptures, which had to be postponed until old 
man snow could make his appearance. 

Highlight of Winter Carnival Week was the 
Snow Man Ball, which was held in the Cage. 
Music was furnished by Boyd Raeburn, with Ginnie 
Powell as songstress. President Van Meter pre- 
sented Queen Moynahan and her court of princesses 
with gifts symbolic of their reign. 

House dances were held at A T G and K K 
on the following evening as well as all other campus 
fraternities. 

Winter Carnival Week came to a close on 
Sunday the 17th with a swimming exhibition by 
the Naiads in the college pool. 




'«-4» "T'X 




in 1 1 





An educational program demonstrating vari- 
ous methods of manufacturing dairy products was 
featured at the fourth annual Dairy Classic. Held 
each year in early May under the sponsorship of 
the Dairy Club, this show is student organized and 
operated. All four year and Stockbridge students 
evincing interest in the various phases of dairy 
industry, voluntarily conduct the show. 

Supervised by a faculty member, this show has 
grown from an attendance of 400 in 1948 to over 
2,500 in 1951. At the same time the number and 
quahty of the display exhibits have improved 
markedly. Starting with relatively few participants 
in the early shows, we now have 30 students vicing 
for the trophies and prizes which have been made 
available by dairy plants and equipment people, 
to whom the students and school are deeply grateful. 

The main theme this year was the controversial 
subject — concentrated milk. The consumer view 
point was stressed and practically every person 



compared concentrated, reconstituted and normal 
whole milk samples in terms of his or her particular 
evaluation. 

The secondary themes consisted of the fol- 
owin^ 

What is yoglunt? How is it made and will it 
be an acceptable consumer product? 

Antibiotics employed in mastitis control pro- 
cedures — are they a future problem for the dairy 
industry? 

What is Vitamin D milk, how is it checked 
for vitamin content? 

Detergent-sanitizers, wetting agents, water 
softeners, detergents, quaternary ammonium com- 
pounds — what are they? 

In addition there were displays concerning: 
milking machines and their proper operation; farm 
coolers and their operational features; dairy farm 
sanitation; cheese and cheese products; ice cream 
products; and dairy plant equipment and its proper 
operation. 

The primary function of the show is two- 
fold: consumer education and student training in 
salesmanship. But the fellows who were in the 
show, will always remember it as work, work and 
more work. 




DAIRY 
CLASSIC 



■-"'•"'■'■••''•/S&i^?'/- 



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MEN'S 
PLACEMENT 



You are graduating at a time when there is 
a good demand, in fact a shortage of trained young 
men and women in your chosen fields. You should 
have little difficulty in finding satisfactory employ- 
ment and this office will he happy to be of all the 
assistance possible now or in the future. 

Permit me to close by preaching a little. Don't 
expect too much too soon, and remember that you 
get out of life what you put into it. The age old 
law that a man gets what he earns has not been 
repealed. And remember also that there is a spot 
where all of us can be happy no matter how 
lowly or how high, if we do the best we can at 
whatever we are doing. 

Best wishes to all, 

Emory E. Grayson 

Director of Placement Service 



[70] 



OCCUPATIONAL SURVEY — STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL 
Class of 1951 



AGRICULTURE 

Farm Manager 3 

Herdsman ' 

Assistant Herdsman 12 

Return to Home farm (dairy) 15 

D. H. I. Association 1 

Feed and Equipment, fertilizer sales 4 

General Dairy Farm Work 3 

Employed in milk plant 9 

Home dairy plant 3 

Employed on poultry farm 6 

Manager, poultry farm 3 

Own poultry farm 2 

Home farm (poultry) 5 

Research poultry farm 2 

Turkey farm 1 

Soil Conservation 1 

Employed in Ice Cream Plant 2 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Radio — "Down to Earth" 1 

Westfield State Teachers' College 1 

Maine Maritime Academy 1 

University of Massachusetts 1 

Construction 2 

Gas Station 1 

U.S.D.A. School — working for Ph.D 1 



HORTICULTURE 

Nursery and Landscape concern 7 

Estate Maintenance 5 

Own Horticulture Service 3 

Commercial Arborist 8 

City Park Dept 1 

Grounds foreman (school) 1 

Home Project (horticulture) 1 

Greenskeeping 6 

Fruit foreman 2 

Market gardener 2 

Home farm (fruit and vegetables) 4 

State Forest Supervisor 

U. S. Forest Service 

State Forest Service 

Retail Florist 1 

Home Retail Florist 

Wholesale Florist 

Hotel and Restaurant 

Steward 

Chef trainee 

Wholesale and Retail food store 



ARMED FORCES 

Unknown 

Women. 

Flower Store 

Married 

Entered University of Massachusetts 
Poultry Farm 






WOMEN'S 
PLACEMENT 




Not long ago I happened to pick up a note- 
book belonging to a successful Stockbridge graduate. 
I glanced through it and was amazed. I had ex- 
pected to find a jumble of rough notes. Instead 
I found a wealth of dates, carefully arranged in 
logical sequence in note form and presenting inter- 
esting reading as well as useful information. The 
notebook, prepared some years ago in class, had 
been kept up to date ever since. 

While a notebook in itself can never be the 
key to success, I now realize that sometimes it is 
one reason why a Stockbridge graduate succeeds, 
while another does not. In your two years on the 
campus you have taken courses of study from 
authorities in your chosen field. In preparing these 
courses your instructors have combined their experi- 
ence and knowledge with selected data from many 
texts. You have received the benefit of this com- 
bination, and one of the most readily available 
assets you now have is your notebook. Seldom will 
you find the answers to your life's problems in it, 
but frequently a clue will be there. 

Do not let me create the impression that your 
notebook is all that you got from your course. 
More important, by far, than this is the influence 
exerted on you through the personalities of your 
instructors, and their influence on you is much 



greater than you now realize. 

Although you are leaving the immediate in- 
fluence of these men and women, your education is 
by no means at an end. You have much to learn 
through experience. But don't wait for experience 
to find you. Make yourself known to other Stock- 
bridge graduates in your community and gain the 
benefit of their experience. Observe the work of 
others including both your colleagues and business 
rivals. Keep in touch with the University of Mas- 
sachusetts. In short, keep studying and reading 
everything that pertains to your field. 

To compile the information and knowledge 
you receive, continue to add to your notebook. 
If you decide to do nothing else to it, at least keep. 
an up-to-date list of professional organizations, 
corporations and articles in trade journals asso- 
ciated with your work. 

A biographical article written about one of 
our Stockbridge girls in a recent number of The 
'H.ew Tor\er magazine showed how this young 
lady had used the knowledge gained at school, 
added to it year by year, and in a relatively short 
time became the leading authority in her field. A 
success story like this can be repeated. 
Carol Burr Cornish 
Placement Officer for Women 









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PLACEMENT TRAINING 



Summary of Placements and Earnings — Class of 1952 

Average 

Earnings 

Per Student 



T^umher 7\[umber 
Major Placed Withdrawn 

Animal Husbandry .... 45 6 

Arboriculture 11 4 

Dairy 18 3 

Fine Turf 11 3 

Floriculture 21 8 

Food Management .... 4 1 

Forestry 12 1 

Fruit 5 2 

Horticulture 24 9 

Poultry 23 7 

Vegetable Gardening . . 9 2 

183 46 



J^umher 
Returning 

39 

7 

*16 

* 9 

13 

3 

11 

3 

*16 

*17 

7 



i 997.85 

1,290.87 

1,085.50 

1,068.50 

929.68 

640.00 

864.25 

957.81 

1,033.29 

1,137.72 

961.72 



Total 
Earnings 

$38,916.15 
9,036.09 

17,368.00 
9,616.50 

12,085.84 
1,920.00 
9,506.75 
2,873.43 

16,532.64 

19,337.50 
6,732.04 



141 



$1,020.74 



$143,924.94 



*1 man returned from a former class. 



In view of the fact that there were but 3 
seniors in Food Management the course for the 
second year was discontinued temporarily. These 
men withdrew and plan to return to complete the 
second year next fall. 

After college opened it developed that there 
were quite a number of withdrawals that were 
entirely unexpected. The students had completed 
the placement requirement and had said nothing 
about not returning for the senior year. The num- 
ber of withdrawals was in excess of any previous 
year and is largely attributable to the war situation, 
draft and enlistments. 

Reasons for the withdrawals 

Draft and enlistment 14 

Lack of interest and aptitude 7 

Lack of finances 6 

Change to different major 3 

Good employment opportunity 3 

Enter college or other school 3 

Defense plant 1 

Scholastic failure 2 

Failure in Placement 2 

Unknown 5 

TOTAL 46 



I feel confident that some of the five listed as 
unknown are in the military forces, but failed to 
answer our inquiries. 

The reasons for withdrawal given by students 
as listed above — lack of interest and aptitude 7, 
change to different major 3, enter other school or 
college 3, defense plant 1, failure in placement 2, 
16 in all are very indicative to me of one of the 
large values of required Placement Training, in that 
it gives the student a real opportunity to judge 
whether or not he has chosen the right vocation, 
and that is most important. No one will make a 
real success of, and be happy in work for which 
he has no real interest and aptitude. It is too bad 
these men could not have found out this fact 
sooner by some other method because it cost them 
a year in time and considerable money. Young 
people do not always put enough real thought into 
choosing a vocation. It would have been desir- 
able for these men to have worked at the various 
occupations before going to school, they should 
have read more about the field and talked with 
men already in the type of work they were thinking 
of pursuing. We learn by experience but seldom 
by the experience of others. Lowell said, "One 
thorn of experience is worth a whole wilderness 
of warnings." 



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GDLDEN 



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OPPORTUNITY 



For most young men it is much more difficult 
to get started in farming today than it was 50 
years ago. This is due to the large amount of 
capital necessary to purchase real estate, livestock 
and equipment. Graduates of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture and the University of Mas- 
sachusetts have a very unusual opportunity to 
borrow money without interest for the purpose of 
getting started in the type of farming of their 
choice. This has been made possible by what is 
known as the "Lotta Agricultural Fund." 

How did this fund originate? Who was the 
donor? Why are graduates of the School and the 
University the recipients of such generosity? 

In order to answer these questions it is neces' 
sary to go back more than 100 years when in 1847 
Charlotte Mignon Crabtree was born in New York 
City. Better known as Lotta Crabtree, she became 
one of the most famous American actresses of 
her time. 

Lotta was still an infant when her father, 
John Crabtree shut his book shop on Nassau 
Street in 1852 and joined the excited throng 
going west to the gold fields of California, leaving 
a vague promise of meeting his wife and daughter 
in San Francisco the following year. He, like many 
others, hoped to soon become a millionaire. Yet it 
was Lotta, not her father, who was destined to 
reap a harvest of gold in California — and not by 
digging for it. 

Mrs. Crabtree and her daughter Lotta arrived 
in San Francisco about a year later and John 
Crabtree was not immediately found. If the mother 
and daughter were to continue eating it was neces- 
sary that Mrs. Crabtree earn some money at once. 
With some misgivings she decided to make profit- 
able use of Lotta's precocious talents for dancing 
and singing. Accordingly, Lotta was started on the 
stage at the age of seven to provide entertainment 
for the miners. This was the beginning of a long 
and very successful financial career as an actress. 

Lotta Crabtree died in Boston in 1924 at the 




Lotta Crabtree 

age of 77. She left an estate of about four million 
dollars according to an article in the March 1948 
issue of Coronet. This fortune was left to charity. 
One section of her will set up a permanent fund 
to help graduates of Massachusetts Agricultural 
College get started in farming and this money to 
be loaned without interest. 

How this is working out for graduates ot 
this institution is best shown from the annual 
report of Professor F. H. Branch who investigated 
24 applications for loans durmg the period Novem- 
ber 1, 1950 to October 31, 1951. Nine of these 
applications were graduates of the University and 
15 from graduates of the Stockbridge School. The 
total amount requested in the 24 applications was 
$160,400. The individual amounts ranged from 
$1200 to $10,000. For various reasons all 24 
requests were not granted, however, 15 requests 
were granted for the amount of $88,900. 

While it is true that it is difficult to get 
started in farming today, graduates of the Stock- 
bridge School and the University have a golden 
opportunity to borrow money without interest 
for this purpose. 

Pop Barrett 



[73] 



in 
iiemoriam 




Charles N. DuBois 



In Memoriam 

When Charlie DuBois first came to Amherst Director Verbeck asked him 
how recently he had milked a cow. 

"Last night," he answered, "Seven." 

For his work on our campus he had a very unusual preparation. He had a 
liberal arts training and did his graduate work, for the most part, on a fellowship 
at the University of London. But he was also a business college graduate and had had 
actual experience in secretarial work. He was born and brought up on a Vermont 
farm. And he had taught. It was obvious that he was peculiarly fitted to assume 
charge of our Stockbridge School business English. 

He was also qualified to handle four-year work and Httle by little, as he was 
able to delegate Stockbridge teaching to other instructors, he increased his own four- 
year program. His course in American poetry has been one of the most popular on 
the campus. 

But he also had a natural gift for administrative work. He carried the load 
of sectioning fifteen hundred freshmen and sophomores into nearly seventy sections 
in schedules involving all kinds of conflicts. He was adviser for the college yearbook. 
The Index. He set up and for a while maintained the new campus calendar, in an 
effort to clear dates and rooms for our many student and faculty activities. And he 
had just been appointed, on part-time, director of University Extension. 

He never, however, lost interest in and contact with the Stockbridge men. 
Always he taught one section of them. He helped them with their campus news 
service. He like them, understood them, defended them. He was their friend. 

His untimely death leaves not one gap to fill, but many. But the greatest one 
is that in the hearts of us who knew him. 

Frank Prentice Rand 



[74] 




Front Row, left to right: Don- 
ald Morse, Kenneth Carlson, 
Lee Chisholm. Top Row. Robert 
Carson, Charles Graves, Robert 
Nugent (Captain), Llewellyn, 
Derby (Coach). 



CROSS COUNTRY 



This year saw the birth of a new team at Stockbridge — the cross country 
squad. Almost all the boys were new at the sport, which offers some explanation of 
the rather dismal record. The season opened with a loss to the Amherst Varsity 
over their rugged 41/2 mile course, which was followed by another loss to the Amherst 
Fresh over a course which was 1 mile shorter. 

During the ensuing two weeks, Stockbridge ran two practice meets with a 
mixed team composed of the University Frosh and Jr. Varsity and, though no 
times were kept, the boys were on the short end of the score. 

The following week they traveled to Mount Hermon to run against their 
Varsity team which had won the N. E. Prep School Championships the week before. 
Needless to say, Mount Hermon won, but by their own admission Stockbridge was 
the toughest team they had ever faced. 

After a 10 day layoff Deerfield Academy was next on the agenda. Stock- 
bridge put their best foot forward, and also the fastest, to beat Deerfield handily 
over our 31/2 rnile home course. After the meet, Lee Chisholm was elected Captain 
for next year. 

Letter winners were: Lee Chisholm, Charles Graves, Robert Nugent and 
Edgar Webber, Manager. 



i2^s7?^70ii3J**P^65^46^4^^, 



Front Row, left to right: A. Mudgett, F. Saunders, A. 
Retelle, A. Uhlig, S. Priest, F. Kelly (Captain), J. Sam- 
bade, W. Buckman, H. Heald, J. Hayden. Second Row: 
S. Kosakowski (Coach), J. Flaherty, R. Gosselin, J. Frei- 
tas, F. Martines, L. Mason, C. Wiggin, J. Ricca, J. 



Marshall, A. Smith, D. Dcarden. Third Row: G. Andruk, 
R. Bailey, D. Mead, P. McGrath, P. Elliott, K. Bonney, 
R. Durgin, R. Frederico, F. Gummow, P. Kelleher. Fourth 
Row: G. Michaels (Manager), R. Gariepy, R. CluiT, B. 
Benson, C. Niethold, D. Hawes, Wm. Land, M. Stephens. 




t^-^p^^ «? 






Stockbridge completed a most successful sea- 
son. Though the team was limited to short practice 
sessions, averaging aix)Ut one half an hour a night, 
they were still able to sport a four and one record. 
With only four letter men returning from last 
year's team, Coach Steve Kosakowski had a major 
rebuilding job to do. He attributes the team's 
success to the fine spirit and the desire of the boys 
to play the game. Many of the boys never played 
football but what they lacked in knowledge of 
the game they made up in intestinal fortitude. 

Stockbridge opened the season with a 14-7 
win over Vermont Academy, they took Suffield 
Academy 6-0. The following week they defeated 
Leicester Junior College 27-0. 

A week's layoff because of a postponed game 
with Monson put Stockbridge up against Williston 
Academy on a day on which they played their 
poorest game of the season. Williston took advantage 
of every break and ended up on the long end of a 
25-12 score. Two days later the boys wound up 
the season with a 27-0 win over Monson. 




STOCKBRIDGE 

FOOTBALL 

TEAM 




Paced by Co-Captains Joe Hayden and Jack 
Marshall and returning lettermen Forrest Saunders, 
Howie Clark, and Bob White, who just returned 
from action in Korea; Stockbridge posted a mediocre 
5 and 7 record. Lack of depth continually pre- 
sented itself as the main problem throughout the 
entire season. However, that department will be 
well taken care of as a goodly number of freshmen 
letter winners are expected back next season. 



BASKETBALL 



Freshman Moe LaVallee was high man for the 
season closely followed by Bob White. 

The boys displayed a marvelous team spirit 
and a fighting will to win which was certainly more 
than the record indicates. 



Stockbridge . . 58 

Stockbridge . . 40 

Stockbridge . . 74 

Stockbridge . . 53 

Stockbridge . . 67 



Stockbridge 
Stockbridge 
Stockbridge 
Stockbridge 
Stockbridge 
Stockbridge 
Stockbridge 



58 
70 
46 
68 
50 
49 
39 



Leicester Jr. College ... 56 

Suffield Academy 42 

Western Mass. School 

of Pharmacy 48 

Univ. of Mass. J.V. ... 64 
Western Mass. School 

of Pharmacy 46 

Vermont Academy .... 70 

Leicester Jr. College . . 63 

Monson Academy 58 

Vermont Academy .... 57 

Monson Academy 65 

Dean Academy 93 

Mount Hermon 66 



Letter Winners were: Bailey, Clark, Collins, 
Hayden, Elliott, Kasparson, Freitas, LaVallee, Mar- 
shall, Saunders, Stephens, and White. 



Front Row, left to right: Paul Kasprein, Paul Kelher, 
Robert Bailey, John Marshall (Co-Captain), Joseph Hay- 
den (Co-Captain), Robert White, Forrest Saunders, Joseph 
Freitas. Second Row: David Peterson (Manager), John 



Collins, Howard Clark, Robert Wilcox, John Elliott, 
Morris LaVallee, Melvin Stevens, John Bay, Steve Kosa- 
kowski (Coach). 






"PDF" BARRETT'S 
MESSAGE 



What would you do if you suddenly 
found yourself the possessor of one million 
dollars? 

Would you keep on doing the things 
you are now doing? Or would you change the 
whole course of your future life? Would 
you travel? Would you buy a farm and 
operate it for pleasure instead of for profit? 
Or would you use part of it to gamble on 
horse races? Perhaps you would be so flabber- 
gasted that it would take considerable time 
for you to decide just what you would do. 
Without any attempt at conducting a 
Gallup Poll on the subject I put the question 
to faculty members, secretaries and students, 
a grand total of 20 people. A great variety 
of answers were given. Many of the students 
would buy a farm and various luxuries to go 
along with it. While others would invest it 
in different kinds of securities and live off 
the income. Setting up an endowment for the family and giving to charity were 
also mentioned. 

"I would take an aspirin to revive me," one person replied, while another 
said, "I would probably drop dead." Two people out of the 20 said that they would 
keep right on doing the same thing as at present, while one even went so far as to 
say, "I would not want it, too much responsibility." One individual said, "I would 
go out on a toot," which reminded me of the story of the Prodigal Son. 

While I am not sure just what I would do I am more sure of what I would 
not do. I would not give up my present position and try to find happiness elsewhere 
for I have found teaching and associations with young people very satisfying and 
very stimulating. This has given me happiness that I could not buy with a million 
dollars. 

Perhaps my own thoughts in the matter are best expressed by the concluding 
lines of Robert Frosts', "Two Tramps in Mud Time," 

My object in living is to unite 

My avocation and my vocation 

As my two eyes make one in sight. 

Only where love and need are one, 

And the work is play for mortal stakes, 

Is the deed ever really done 

For Heaven and the future's sakes. 



[78] 




Front Row, left to right: Richard Graham, Dudley Lauf' 
man, Walter Horgan (Business Manager), Prof. Rollin 
Barrett (Advisor), Robert Hume (Editor), Jean Squires 
(Secretary). Second Row: Stanley Brown, CoHn Houston, 



James Brown, Kenneth Bonney, Wooster Buckingham, 
Joseph Merchant. Third Row: Eugene Wilder, Robert 
Nugent, Edward Turner, Charles Niethold, Kenneth 
McConville, James Mackey. 



The 1952 Shorthorn Board, though smaller than those in years past, represents 
the nucleus around which this book has been formed. 

The board itself is made up entirely of volunteer members who give freely 
and sometimes extensively of their time so that we might have a book of which 
we can be proud. 

Meetings were begun in December and every Monday night found the group 
wrestling with various problems, often with several conflicting opinions existing. Meet- 
ings were promptly adjourned at 9 P.M., if they lasted the full hour, even if business 
was not completed, so that studies would not be interfered with. 

Through our cooperative efforts, allied with those of Mr. Kelton Bush fox 
the publisher, we have created a book which we hope will be appreciated and 
treasured for years to come. 

As the finish of this book and also of our school career approaches, we 
Shorthorn Board members would like to extend a word of thanks to those who have 
helped us, convey our best wishes to our classmates, and leave in trust to those who 
follow us to carry on with pride the name of Stockbridge School. 

Editor 



SHDHTHDRN BOARD 




KAPPA 





The first function held by Kappa Kappa was 
a smoker to welcome the freshmen on Wednesday, 
October 10th. Movies were shown and refresh- 
ments were served. Another smoker for the fresh- 
men was held Wednesday, October 17th. 

The first dance of the year was held Novem- 
ber 17. It was a square and round dance preceeded 
by a hay-ride. The square dances were called by 
Dudley Laufman. Mr. and Mrs. Murray Eliott 
were the chaperones. 

A new inlaid linoleum floor was laid the 
week before the "Winter Carnival." Kappa Kappa 
held open house Saturday night, February 16th, 
the night after the "Winter Carnival Ball." There 
was dancing to records, and a buffet lunch was 
served. Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey Cornish were 
present as chaperones. 






KAPPA 



Because of the absence of snow, the snow 
scupltures were not constructed until the week 
after the "Carnival Ball." Kappa Kappa's sculpture 
was built in two scenes, one depicting a wounded 
American soldier receiving blood plasma on the 
battlefield in Korea. The other scene showed a man 
lying on a cot in a blood bank giving his blood. 
The theme of the sculpture was "Give Blood to 
the Red Cross." 

Kappa Kappa held its annual banquet 
Thursday night, February 28th, at the Hatfield 
Club. Sirloin steak was enjoyed by everybody 
present. 




Front Row, left to right: J. Freitas, F. Martines, 
T. Porter, J. Ricca, T. Walkinshaw, J. Mackey 
(Treasurer), K. McConville, W. Davoll, G. Corn- 
ish (Advisor), E. Market (Business Manager), 
W. Horgan, P. McCarran. Second Row: A. Smith, 
H. Dunnells, K. Bonney, J. Welch, P. Hadley. 
Third Row: C. Parsons, P. Gray, D. Varnam, J. 



Hansom, C. Houston, H. Lane, C. Smith, J. 
Brown, K. JurentkofF (Vice-President), R. Graham 
(Secretary). Fourth Row: R. Frederico, C. Niet- 
hold, K. Gareri, B. Benson, C. Brown (Guest), 
D. Laufman, G. Andruk, H. Saunders, D. Gagne, 
R. Hume, D. Morse. Fifth Row: E. Turner, C. 
Graves, E. Wilder. 





Front Row, ]eft to right: R. Barrett (Advisor), 
C. Tebo, R. Oldfield, P. Auclair, J. Rumrill (Presi- 
dent), E. Fiske, J. Sheehy. L. Farrington, J. Ward. 
Second Row. J, Jacobson, C. Dinsmore, R. Lang- 
hill, J. Marshall, T. Gaylord, H. Hunter, K. Carl- 
son, ]. Sambade, L. Jessum. Third Row: A, Uhlig, 
J. Gorman, J, Flaherty, C. Ovian, J. Durfee, J. 
Raynor, R. Dean, B. Bruso, R. Violette. 




ALPHA TAU 

GAMMA 



The fall of 1951 marked the beginning of 
a very successful year for the members of Alpha 
Tau Gamma. 

On November third, about 50 Freshmen at- 
tended the smoker and watched some exciting 
movies shown by "Pop" Barrett. 

The first dance of the season, "A Record 
Hop" was held on November ninth. It was well 
attended, and showed that the boys were working 
hard to make a success of the house's social 
activities. 

During the first week of December, the new 
Freshmen and Senior members were initiated. This 
year, a new approach was made toward the so 
called informal initiation. It was based on con- 
struction rather than destruction. The boys did a 
marvelous job of cleaning up and redecorating the 
house. Another addition was the reshingling of the 
outside walls with asbestos shingles. 

An open dance was held on November 30th. 

A closed house Christmas party in December 
ended our 1951 activities. Pop surprised us all 
very joyfully with his appearance in the role of 
Santa. 







The second semester started off with a bang 
as the brothers attended the Freshmen reception 
banquet at Rahah's on February 5 th. 

The A.T.G. arrangement of a "Sweater 
Dance" was well accepted, and jammed the house. 
Bill Rudolph and his partner took first honors. 
Brad Johnson was the judge, and was confronted 
with some close competition. 

"Come French" was the slogan, and our 
"Apache Dance" brought about more fun and 
merriment for the couples who attended. The game 
room we decorated in the French "Mode," the 
walls depicting anything that was French. Barrels 
for tables, candles for light, and everyone for a 
good time, made this one of the best of the year. 
Pete Elliot and Diane Kirk took the honors as the 
typical French Cafe couple. 

The formal banquet was again held at the 
Roger Smith Hotel in Holyoke, on March 22nd. 

The first week of April found the boys clean- 
ing up the grounds and making general repairs 
to the house. 

During the year, "Pop" Barrett presented the 
house with a handsome sign for the post at the 
end of the walk. The coat of arms of the 
fraternity is in gold paint and set in a green back- 
ground, these being the colors of the fraternity. It 
is lighted and hangs from a hand-made wrought 
iron bracket. 

We were unfortunate in losing two swell 
men to the armed services John Proctor and Richard 
Sharron both left during the first semester. 

There will be many memories passed down 
among families about that wonderful part of the 
Stockbridge School — life at A.T.G. 



Facutty 




DORIC ALVIANI 
Assistant Professor of Music 
Bpston University M.B.; Bos- 
ton University M.E.; Joined 
the Faculty 1938. 



OSCAR G. ANDERSON 
Assistant Professor 
of Pomology 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1919. 



i^^ |1 




JAMES W. CALLAHAN 

Instructor of Agricultural 

Economics 

University of Massachusetts 

B.S.; Joined the Faculty 1948. 



GEOFFREY CORNISH 
Instructor of Agrostology 
University of British Colum- 
bia B.S.; University of Mas- 
sachusetts M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 



[86] 




ROLLIN H. BARRETT 

Professor of Farm 

Management 

University of Connecticut 

B.S.; Cornell University M.S.; 

Joined the Faculty 1926. 

MATTHEW L. BLAISDELL 
Assistant Professor of Animal 
Husbandry and Superinten- 
dent of University Farm 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; Joined the Faculty 1946. 



LYLE L. BLUNDELL 
Professor of Horticulture 
Iowa State College B.S. 
Joined the Faculty 1931. 



KENNETH L. BULLIS 
Head of Veterinary Science 
Department 

Bradley University; Iowa 
State College D.V.M.; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts M.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1930. 




JAMES F. ANDERSON 
Instructor of Pomology 
West Virginia University 
B.S.; West Virginia Univer- 
sity M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1948. 



LUTHER BANTA 
Assistant Professor 
of Poultry Husbandry 
Cornell University B.S. 
ed the Faculty 1919. 



Join- 




CARROLL BURR 
CORNISH 

Placement Officer for Women 
Grinnell College A.B.; Syra- 
cuse University M.A.; Join- 
ed the Faculty 1948. 



HELEN CURTIS 

Dean of Women 

Iowa State Teachers' College 

A.B.; Columbia University 

A.M.; Joined the Faculty 

1945. 



LAWRENCE S. 

DICKINSON 

Associate Professor of 

Agrostology 

Massachusetts Agricultural 

College B.S.; Massachusetts 

State College M.S.; Joined 

the Faculty 1913. 



CHARLES W. DUNHAM 

Instructor of Floriculture 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Wiscon- 
sin M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1947. 




EMORY E. GRAYSON 
Director of Placement Service 
Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S.; Springfield Col- 
lege; Joined the Faculty 1919. 



DENZEL J. HANKINSON 
Head of Department 
of Dairy Industry 
Michigan State College B.S.; 
University of Connecticut 
M.S.; Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege Ph.D.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1948. 






JOHN N. EVERSON 
Assistant Professor 
of Agronomy 

University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1938. 

EUGENE J. FINNEGAN 
Instructor of Dairy Industry 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 



RICHARD C. FOLEY 

Professor of Animal 
Husbandry 

University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1932. 

ARTHUR P. FRENCH 
Head of Department 
of Pomology 

Ohio State University B.S.; 
University of Massachusetts 
M.S.; University of Minne- 
sota Ph.D.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1922. 








Mm 



MARRON S. DuBOIS 
Instructor in English 
St. Lawrence University B.A.; 
Joined the Faculty 1951. 



JOHN MURRAY ELLIOT 

Instructor of Animal 

Husbandry 

McGill University B.S.; 

(Agriculture) University of 

Vermont M.S.; Joined the 

Faculty 1950. 




NATHAN S. HALE 
Assistant Professor of 
Animal Husbandry 
University of Connecticut 
B.S.; University of Minne- 
sota M.S.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1946. 



JOHN F. HANSON 
Assistant Professor 
of Entomology 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; University of 
Massachusetts Ph.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1947. 



ROBERT P. 

HOLDSWORTH 

Head of Department 

of Forestry 

Michigan State College B.S.: 

Yale University M.F.: Joined 

the Faculty 1930. 





•«' «*> 



SAMUEL C. HUBBARD 

Assistant Professor 

of Floricuhure 

Joined the Faculty 1921. 



FRED P. JEFFREY 
Head of Department 
of Poultry Husbandry 
Rutgers University B.S.; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts M.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1944. 




EDWARD P. LARKIN 
Instructor of Bacteriology 
Massachusetts. State College 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 



HARRY G. LINDQUIST 
Assistant Professor 
of Dairy Industry 
Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S.; University of 
Maryland M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1927. 




GORDON S. KING 
Assistant Professor 
of Ahoricuhure 
North Carolina State; Mich- 
igan State College B.S., (For- 
estry); Joined the Faculty 
1950. 

STEPHEN R. 
KOSAKOWSKI 
Instructor of 
Physical Education 
University of Massachusetts 
Coaching School; University 

of Connecticut; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 




;l 



THEODORE T. 
KOZLOWSKI 

Associate Professor of Botany 
Syracuse University B.S.; 
Duke University M.A.; Duke 
University Ph.D.; Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology; 
University of Buffalo; Joined 
the Faculty 1947. 

OTTO G. KRANZ 

Assistant Professor of 
Food Management 
University of Lausanne, Swit- 
zerland B.S.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1945. 




W. BRADFORD 
JOHNSON 

Instructor of Olericulture 
Pennsylvania State College 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.;- Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 




ARTHUR S. LEVINE 
Associate Professor of 
Food Technology 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; University of 
Massachusetts Ph.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1936. 

ADRIAN H. LINDSEY 
Head of Department of 
Agriculturui Economics 
University of Illinois B.S.r 
Iowa State College M.S.; 
Iowa State College Ph.D.; 
Joined the Faculty 1929. 



WILLIAM P. 
MacCONNELL 
Instructor of Forestry 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; Yale School of Forestry 
M.F.; Joined the Faculty 
1948. 



RALPH G. MITCHELL 

Instructor of Animal 

Husbandry 

University of Massachusetts 

B.S.; Joined the Faculty 1951. 




ROBERT C. PERRIELLO 

Assistant Professor 

of Bacteriology 

University of Massachusetts 

B.S.; Joined the Faculty 1947. 



PAUL N. PROCOPIO 

Assistant Professor 

of Horticulture 

University of Massachusetts 

B.S.; Joined the Faculty 1947. 




D. HORACE NELSON 
Assistant Professor 
Dairy Industry 
University of New Hamp- 
shire B.S.; University of Mis- 
souri M.S.; Pennsylvania 
State College Ph.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1945. 

ARTHUR E. NEIDECK 
Assistant Professor of Speech 
Ithaca College B.S.; Cornell 
University M.A.; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 



y^W 





JOHN L. PARSONS 

Instructor of Agronomy 
Kansas State College B.S.: 
Kansas State College M.S.: 
Joined the Faculty 1949. 



ROBERT K. PATTERSON 
Instructor in 
Agricultural Engineering 
University of Maine B.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1948. 








. ;%ig^ 




m^ 



MINER J. MARKUSON 
Associate Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering 
University of Minnesota B.S. 
of ARCH; Joined the Faculty 
1926. 



EDWARD A. NEBESKY 
Instructor of 
Food Technology 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; University of 
Massachusetts Ph.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1949. 





IRVING J. PFLUG 
Assistant Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering 
Purdue University B.S.A.; 
Purdue University B.S.A.E.; 
University of Massachusetts 
M.A.; Joined the Faculty 
1948. 

GEORGE PUSHEE 
Assistant Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering 
University of Massachusetts; 
Contractors and Builders 
Course with I.C.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1918. 



ERNEST J. RADCLIFFE 
Head of Department 
of Student Health 
University of Toronto M.D.: 
Joined the Faculty 1930. 



BENJAMIN RICCI, JR. 

Instructor of Physica] Educa- 
tion, Athletic Injury Care 
Springfield College B.S. in 
Physical Education; Spring- 
field College M.Ed.; Joined 
the Faculty 1950. 




FRANK R. SHAW 
Associate Professor 
of Entomology 

Massachusetts State College 
B.S.; Cornell University 
Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 
1935. 



GRANT B. SNYDER 
Head of Department 
of Olericulture 
Ontario Agricultural College; 
Michigan State College; Join- 
ed the Faculty 1922. 




J. HARRY RICH 

Associate Professor 

of Forestry 

New York State College B.S.; 

New York State College 

M.F.; Joined the Faculty 

1933. 

OLIVER C. ROBERTS 

Associate Professor 
of Pomology 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S.; University of 
Illinois M.S.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1926. 



DONALD E. ROSS 

Assistant Professor 
of Floriculture 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1928. 

WILLIAM C. 
SANCTUARY 
Professor of Poultry 
Husbandry 

University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1921. 




*1 



[90] 



^^A 






1*- '^ 


1 


^ \ 


'■ 


W^ 




fjt 


■ 


m ^ 








ARNOLD D. RHODES 
Professor of Forestry 
University of New Hamp- 
shire B.S.; Yale University 
M.F.; Joined the Faculty 
1939. 



VICTOR RICE 
Head of Department 
of Animal Husbandry 
North Carolina State B.S.; 
University of Massachusetts 
M.A.; North Carolina State 
Dr. A.; Joined the Faculty 
1916. 




RUSSELL E. SMITH 
Associate Professor of 
Veterinary Science 
Massachusetts State College 
B.S.; University of Pennsyl- 
vania V.M.D.; Joined the 
Faculty 1948. 



HERBERT N. 

STAPLETON 

Head of Department of 

Agricultural Engineering 

Kansas State College B.S.; 

Kansas State College M.S.; 

Joined the Faculty 1947. 



PAUL W. STICKEL 

Assistant Professor 

of Forestry 

New York State College B.S.; 

Yale University M.F.; Joined 

Faculty 1945. 



WILLIAM H, TAGUE 
Assistant Professor of 
Agricultural Engineering 
Iowa State College B.S. 
Joined the Faculty 1929. 




JOHN H. VONDELL 

Assistant Professor of 
Poultry Husbandry 
Middlebury College; Massa- 
chusetts State College; Joined 
the Faculty 1923. 



ANTHONY W. ZAITZ 
Instructor of Speech 
Curry College B.S.O.; Boston 
University M.A.; Joined the 
Faculty 1946. 




CLARK L. THAYER 

Head of Department 
of Floriculture 
Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S.; Cornell Univer- 
sity; Joined the Faculty 1919. 



RUTH J. TOTMAN 
Professor of Physical 
Education for Women 
New Jersey College for Wo- 
men B.S.; University of Pitts- 
burgh M.Ed.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1943. 



REUBEN E. 

TRIPPENSEE 

Professor of Wildlife 

Management 

Michigan State College B.S.; 

University of Michigan M.S., 

Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 

1936. 

ALDEN P. TUTTLE 

Assistant Professor of 

Vegetable Gardening 

Massachusetts Agricultural 

College B.S.; Pennsylvania 

State College M.S.; Joined 

the Faculty 1929. 




HARVEY L. SWEETMAN 
Assistii7it Professor 
of Entomology 

Colorado A. 6? M. B.S.: Iowa 
State College M.S.; Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural College 
Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 
1930. 

CHARLES H. THAYER 
Assistant Professor 
of Agronomy 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College, Massachusetts State 
College; Cornell State College 
— (Summer School); Iowa 
State College — (Summer 
School); University of Massa- 
chusetts B.Agr. (Honorary) 
1950; Joined the Faculty 
1919. 




MARTHA B. WRIGHT 

Instructor of English 

Miami University B.S.; Joined 

the Faculty 1947. 



JOHN M. ZAK 
Instructor of Agronomy 
Massachusetts State College 
B.S.; Massachusetts State Col- 
lege M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1938. 

[91} 



NEW MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY 





JOHN L. FOLEY 
Teaching Fellow of 

Dairy Industry 
Iowa State College B.S.; 

Joined the Faculty 1950. 



GILBERT H. PORTER, 

M.S. 
Assistant Professor of 

Animal Husbandry 



DONALD E. MOSER, 

A.M. 
Instructor of Mathematics 



TOM S. HAMILTON, JR., 
B.F.A. 

Instructor of Landscape 
Architecture 



TORVALD A. BERTINUSON, M.S. 
Instructor of Agronomy 



WILLIAM G. COLBY, Ph.D. 
Head of Department of Agronomy 



THOMAS H. PARR, M.S. 
Instructor of Entomology 



ROBERT V. GANLEY, M.F. 
Instructor of Forestry 



HENRY B. PEIRCE 

Instructor of English 

Harvard University, University of Massa- 
chusetts B.A., Carnegie Institute of Tech- 
nology. Joined Faculty 1950. 



[92] 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 



The publishing of this book does not represent the efforts of just the two 
people whose names are printed on the title page. Instead, it is a composite result of 
the efforts of many, compiled and edited into what it is hoped to be a valuable and 
accurate record of the school year. 

It is, therefore, quite proper that a full page should be alloted to show our 
appreciation to certain people for their contributions and to the student body as 
a whole. 

Naturally, our faculty adviser, "Pop" Barrett, is the first one to be recognized 
as a contributing factor to the success of the Shorthorn year after year. This year, as 
in many past, he has given much time to coaching us staff members along, pushing 
when we needed it, and boosting our morale when all seemed to no avail. So, it is 
most sincerely meant when we say, "Thanks, Top,' for everything." 

President Van Meter and Director Verbeck have contributed liberally to the 
success of the book and we appreciate the message of each. 

Thanks are also in order for the Placement Directors, Mr. Grayson and Mrs. 
Cornish, for the especially good articles on placement. Another person whom very 
few of us know, but who has played a very important part in the creation of the 
book is Mr. Kelton Bush, representative for Progress Publishing Associates, Inc. Many 
thanks for your assistance and help, Mr. Bush. 

The class photographer, Mr. Koldy, of Kinsman's studio, is also deserving of 
our thanks for the tremendous job he has done taking the individual and group 
pictures for the book. 

A list of this sort would not be complete without mentioning the secretaries 
in the Short Course Office. Miss Martin and Miss Heffernan have been very coopera- 
tive and we want them to know we really appreciate their part in this publication. 

Finally, we want to thank all the students and faculty members who have 
helped in any way to make this book a success. 



[93] 



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Jll^^/^ Get in the Movies! 


1 


^^^^ 


^^^ Be a Film Star! 






Recapture the happy moments of Wed- 






dings, Family Outings, Funerals, Babies 






in action and Once in a lifetime events. 






Color Movies a specialty. 






"POP" BARRETT, Cinematographer 



Compliments of . . . 

KINSMAN'S STUDIO 

46 MAIN STREET - AMHERST 



Official Photographers for Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture 



Official photographers for Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture for 24 years. Also 
serving Amherst College, Univ. of Mass., 
Deerfield Academy, and others. 



^cae% 'PnmtM^ . . , 'Plu^ 



LAYOUT SERVICE 

PERSONAL ATTENTION 

EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS AIDS 

CONTROLLED PRODUCTION 

PLANNED BUDGET 

CLOSE COOPERATION WITH ADVISER AND STAFF 

POSITIVE DELIVERY DATE 



- t6,e 6'e4t m tfc^nji^o^ 



ElyEVEN COLVIN AVHfUE' • /ELEPHONE 2-4401 • ALBAJKY 5, NEW YORK 



DESIGNERS AND 
PUBLISHERS OF 
SCHOOL « COLLEGE 
ANNUALS 



Compliments of . 



THE UNIVERSITY STORE 



Texf Books — Supplies — Stationery 



0^=©^ 



Hot and Cold Drinks 



Snacks for all Seasons 



a^^ 



^^Cross-roads of the Campus 



V