(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Shorthorn"

* UMASS/AMHERST * 



312066 0339 0538 3 



W% 'W" 







iPJtMiBJdxiqe UM 



iPAoJuthoAti RcMAxL 




First Row, Left to Right: Janet Smith (Sec), Kenneth 
Carlson (Editor), Prof. Rollin Barrett (Adviser), Charles 
Niethold (Business Manager), Priscilla Cahill. Second 
Row: Stanley Brown, Wooster Buckingham, Kenneth 
Bonney, Robert Carson. Third Row: Paul Jasmin, Robert 
Porter, Thomas Porter. 



In the future when )'ou pick up this yearbook, 
it is hoped that it causes you to re-live those cher- 
ished memories of school friends, activities, and 
ideals. If it suceeds in doing this through our 
summary and outline of your activities while at 
Stockbridge, then we will have been rewarded for 
the hours spent in the preparation of this, your 
yearbook, our goal will have been reached. 

THE EDITORS 







QloM 




9M>iejni6 



The 1953 




' bU^'^^ 




Levi Stockbridge, the man for whom the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture is named, is honored 
here in order that we might cherish his memory 
as we travel down the road of life. 



SHORTHORN 



Editor-in-Chief 
KENNETH L. CARLSON 

Business Manager 
CHARLES R. NIETHOLD 





S)£dLcciUa4x 



Stephen R. Kosakowski 



Stephen R. Kosakowski "Steve" to all of us, 
was born and brought up in Amherst. With the 
community having more than its share of sports 
through the athletic programs generated by the 
University of Massachusetts and Amherst College, 
it was only natural that he should have some keen 
interests in this field. 

In the fall of 1938 "Steve" enrolled in Stock- 
bridge, and went out for the football team. Said 
the 1940 Shorthorn, commenting on the Stock- 
bridge victory over Deerfield Academy in the fall 
of 1939: "Unexcelled on the field was our own 
Steve "Murph" Kosakowski, who played an out- 
standing game at left end. "Murph", as well as 
blocking two Deerfield punts, which paved the way 
to both of our touchdowns, upset many of the 
Deerfield threats." 

Two important events in "Steve's" life occurred 
in 1947. He married Mary O'Rourke, an Amherst 
schoolteacher, and he came to the campus to take 
over Coach "Red" Ball's portfolio as director and 
coach of Stockbridge School athletics. He picked 
up where "Red" left off and has been turning out 
top-notch teams ever since. In addition to his 
Stockbridge School assignments, he is varsity ten- 
nis coach for the University and his 1950 team was 
the first University team to win a Yankee Confer- 
ence championship. 

Add another face to the many-sided and busy 
life of this man. He is co-director of the Amherst 
Boys Club. A feature of the Boys Club activities 
is "Steve's" basketball team that has played several 
request performances in the Boston Garden. 

A final word: Nice going up to this point, 
"Steve", and many more good seasons to come! 



[4] 



Theiident 



Ralph Albert Van Meter 



Dr. Ralph Van Meter, has been with the Uni- 
versity since 1917. After having held such ad- 
ministrative positions as Head of the Division of 
Horticulture, Head of the Department of Pomology, 
Dean of the School of Horticulture, and Acting 
President of the University, Dr. Van Meter took 
over the presidency in 1948 . 

To the Stockbridge Class of '53 

This "Shorthorn" is a memorial to your years 
in the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. Its 
greatest value to you will consist of what you read 
between the lines, for it will call to mind again and 
again those personal things related to what is writ- 
ten here that form a priceless heritage of campus 
days. 

For nearly a third of a century succeeding 
classes have proved that Stockbridge graduates can 
approach the problems of Agriculture in New Eng- 
land with the courage born of confidence in the 
start they have made. The Stockbridge School has 
set you ahead further than you think. You still 
have much to learn, but you have a solid grasp 
of fundamental things which is denied to most 
farmers. 

You must realize that what you have is an ex- 
cellent foundation but a foundation only. Agri- 
culture is a complex, many sided and fastmoving 
industry and the final word on things agricultural 
is never pronounced. You are joining the comp- 
any of the best farmers in the world and you must 
always keep learning to maintain the pace. 

You have our interest and best wishes — always. 



[5] 




Dale H. Sieling 

Ag>ucuituAe and UcK^ticuitwie 



Dale H. Sieling, born 1909 in McCracken, Kan- 
sas; attended public schools in Kansas and grad- 
uated from Kansas State College with a degree in 
Chemistry in 1931; M.S. degree in soil and plant 
chemistry in 1932; Ph.D., Iowa State College, soil 
chemistry in 1936. Assistant Professor, Agricult- 
ural Biochemistry, Purdue University 1937-40; Re- 
search Professor, Soil Chemistry, University of 
Massachusetts 1940-47; Head, Department of 
Agronomy, 1947-50; Dean of Agriculture and 
Horticulture and Director of Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station 1950 — 



Roland H. Verbeck 



Born 1886. B.S., University of Massachusetts, 
1908. Principal Petersham (Mass.) Agricultural 
High School. 1909-1910. Headmaster Parsonfield 
(Maine) Seminary, 1910-16. First Lieutenant, Air 
Service, Commanding 281st Aero Squadron, Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces, 1917-19. Service in 
France, 1918-19. Director, New York State School 
of Agriculture at St. Lawrence LIniversity, Canton, 
New York, 1919-24. Director of Stockbridge School 
of Agriculture since 1924. National Education As- 
sociation, Harvard Teachers' Association, Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa. 



'^-^. 



fr-S^ 



A 









[6] 



FACULTY 




'^%-*» 



DORIC ALVIANI 

Associate Professor of Music 

Boston University Mus. B. ; Boston 

University M. Ed.; Joined the Faculty 

1938. 



JAMES F. ANDERSON 

Instructor of Pomology 

West Virginia University B.S. ; West 

Virginia University M.S.; Joined the 

Faculty 1948. 



LUTHER BANTA 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry 

Cornell University B.S. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1919. 




ROLLIN H. BARRETT 

Professor of Farm Management 
University of Connecticut B.S.; Cornell 
University M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1926. 



MATTHEW L. BLAISDELL 
Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry and Superintendent of Uni- 
versity Farm 

University of Massachusetts B.S. ; 
Joined The Faculty 1946. 



LYLE L. BLUNDELL 

Professor of Horticulture 

Iowa State College B.S. ; Joined the 

Faculty 1931. 




•?*» #*- ^ 




KENNETH L. BULLIS 

Head of Department of Veterinary 

Science 

Bradley University; Iowa State College 

D. V. M. ; University of Massachusetts 

M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1929. 



JAMES W. CALLAHAN 
Instructor of Agricultural Economics 
University of Massachusetts B.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1948. 



JAMES W. CHADWICK, B.S. 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts; Joined 
Faculty, 1951. 



[7] 



JAMES CHAPMAN 
University of Massachusetts, 
Senior Director of Stock- 
bridge Glee Club. 



CARROLL BURR CORNISH 

Placement Officer for Women 
Grinnell College A.B. ; Syra- 
cuse University M.A.; Joined 
the Faculty 1948. 





HELEN CURTIS 

Dean of Women 

Iowa State Teacher's College 

A. B.; Columbia University 

A.M.; Joined the Faculty 

1945. 



LAWRENCE DICKINSON 
Associate Professor of Agros- 
tology 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S. ; Massachusetts 
State College M.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1913. 



MARRON S. DuBOIS 
Instructor in English 
St. Lawrence University B.- 
A.: Joined the Faculty 1951. 



JOHN N. EVERSON 
Assistant Professor of Agron- 
omy 

University of Massachusetts 
B.S. : University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.: Joined the 
Faculty 1938. 



JOHN MURRAY ELLIOT 
Instructor of Animal Hus- 
bandry 

McGill University B.S.; 
(Agriculture) University of 
Vermont M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1950. 

EUGENE J. FINNEGAN 
Instructor of Dairy Industry 
University of Massachusetts 
B.S. ; University of Massa- 
chusetts M. S. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 



RICHARD C. FOLEY 

Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry 

University of Massachusetts 
B.S. ; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; Rutgers Uni- 
versity Ph.D.; Joined the 
Faculty 1932. 

ARTHUR P. FRENCH 
Head of Department of Pom- 
ology 

Ohio State University B.S. ; 
University of Massachusetts 
M.S.; University of Minne- 
sota Ph.D.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1922. 





EMORY E. GRAYSON 

Director of Placement Ser- 
vice 

Massachusetts Agricultural 
College B.S.; Springfield Col- 
lege; Joined the Faculty 
1919. 



TOM S. HAMILTON, JR. 

B.F.A. 

Instructor of Landscape 

Architecture. 



[8] 



DENZEL J. HANKINSON 
Head, of Department of Dairy 
Industry 

Michigan State College B.S. : 
University of Connecticut M.- 
S. ; Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege Ph.D.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1948. 

JOHN F. HANSON 
Assistant Professor of Entom- 
ology 

University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; University of 
Massachusetts Ph.D. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1947. 




EDWARD P. LARKIN 
Instructor of Bacteriology 
Massachusetts State College 
B.S. ; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 



ARTHUR S. LEVINE 
Associate Professor of Food 
Technology 

University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; University of Massa- 
chusetts M.S.; University of 
Massachusetts Ph.D ; Joined 
the Faculty 1936. 




ROBERT HOLDSWORTH 
Head of Department of For- 
estry 

Michigan State College B.S. ; 
Yale University M.F. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1930. 



SAMUEL C. HUBBARD 
Assistant Professor of Flori- 
culture: Joined the Faculty 
1921. 



FRED P. JEFFREY 
Head of Department of 
Poultry Husbandry 
Rutgers University B.S. ; 
University of Massachusetts 
M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1944. 



STEPHEN KOSAKOWSKI 
Instructor of Physical Edu- 
cation 

Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture; University of Massa- 
chusetts Coaching School; 
University of Connecticut ; 
Joined the Faculty 1947. 



GORDON S. KING 
Assistant Professor of Arbori- 
culture 

North Carolina State; Michi- 
gan State College B.S. 
(Forestry) ; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1950. 

THEODORE KOZLOWSKI 

Professor of Botany and 
Head of Department 
Syracuse University B.S. ; 
Duke University M.A. ; Duke 
University Ph. D. ; Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy; University of Buffalo; 
Joined the Faculty 1947. 









j)^ m^ I 




ADRIAN H. LINDSEY 
Head of Department of Agri 
cultural Economics 
University of Illinois B.S. 
Iowa State College M.S. 
Iowa State College Ph.D. 
Joined the Faculty 1929. 



HARRY G. LINDQUIST 

Assistant Professor of Dairy 

Industry 

Massachusetts Agricultural 

College B.S.; University of 

Maryland M.S. ; Joined the 

Faculty 1927. 



[9] 



WILLIAM P. MacCONNELL 
Instructor of Forestry 
University of Massachusetts B.S. ; Yale 
School of Forestry M.F.: Joined the 
Faculty 1948. 

MINER J. MARKUSON 

Associate Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 

University of Minnesota B.S. of ARCH.; 

Joined the Faculty 1926. 




i 



//i^ J- 



RALPH G. MITCHELL 
Instructor of Animal Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts B.S. : 
Joined the Faculty 1951. 




EDWARD A. NEBESKY 
Instructor of Food Technology 
University of Massachusetts B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts M.S.; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Ph.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1949. 
D. HORACE NELSON 
Assistant Professor of Dairy Industry 
University of New Hampshire B.S. ; 
University of Missouri M.S.; Pennsyl- 
vania State College Ph.D.; Joined the 
Faculty 1945. 

ARTHUR E. NIEDECK 
Assistant Professor of Speech 
Ithaca College B.S. ; Cornell University 
M. A.; Joined the Faculty 1947. 

JOHN L. PARSONS 
Instructor of Agronomy 
Kansas State College B.S.; Kansas 
State College M.S. ; Joined the Faculty 
1949. 

ROBERT K. PATTERSON 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural En- 
gineering 

University of Maine B.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1948. 

ROBERT C. PERRIELLO 

Assistant Professor of Bacteriology 
University of Massachusetts B.S. ; 
Joined the Faculty 1947. 

PAUL N. PROCOPIO 
Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
University of Massachusetts B.S. ; 
Joined the Faculty 1947. 
GEORGE PUSHEE 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural En- 
gineering 

University of Massachusetts; Con- 
tractors and Builders Course with I. 
C. S.; Joined the Faculty 1918. 

ERNEST J. RADCLIFFE 
Head of Department of Student Health 
University of Toronto M.D. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1930. 



[10] 





\ 







J. HARRY RICH 

Associate Professor of Forestry 
New York State College B.S.; New 
York State College M.F.; Joined the 
Faculty 1933. 

DONALD E. ROSS 

Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B.- 
S. ; Joined the Faculty 1928. 

WILLIAM C. SANCTUARY 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts M.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1921. 

FRANK R. SHAW 
Associate Professor of Entomology 
Massachusetts State College B.S.; Cor- 
nell University Ph.D. ; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1935, 

RUSSELL E, SMITH 
Professor of Veterinary Science 
Massachusetts State College B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania V.M.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1948. 
GRANT B. SNYDER 
Head of Department of Olericulture 
Ontario Agricultural College; Michi- 
gan State College; Joined the Faculty 
1922. 

HERBERT N. STAPLETON 
Head of Department of Agricultural 
Engineering 

Kansas State College B.S. ; Kansas 
State College M.S. ; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1947. 

HARVEY L. SWEETMAN 
Assistant Professor of Entomology, 
Colorado A. & M.B.S.; Iowa State Col- 
lege M.S.; Massachusetts Agricultural 
College Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1930. 
WILLIAM H. TAGUE 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural En- 
gineering 

Iowa State College B.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1929. 



ARNOLD D. RHODES 

Professor of Forestry 
University of New Hampshire B.S. ; 
Yale University M.F. ; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1939. 

BENJAMIN RICCI, JR. 

Assistant Professor of Physical Edu- 
cation 

Springfield College B.S. in Physical 
Education; Springfield College M.Ed.; 
Joined the Faculty 1950. 

VICTOR A. RICE 

Head of Department of Animal Hus- 
bandry 

North Carolina State B.S. ; University 
of Massachusetts M.A.; North Carolina 
State Dr.A.; Joined the Faculty 1916. 




[11] 



CHARLES H. THAYER 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
Massachusetts Agricultural College; 
Massachusetts State College; Cornell 
University (Summer School) ; Iowa 
State College (Summer School) ; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts B.Agr. (Hon- 
orary) 1950; Joined the Faculty 1919. 

CLARK L. THAYER 
Head of Department of Floriculture 
Massachusetts Agricultural College B.- 
S. ; Cornell University; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1919. 

JAMES T. TIMBERLAKE 
Assistant Professor of Animal Hus- 
bandry 

University of Massachusetts B.S. ; 
Joined the Faculty 1949. 

RUTH J. TOTMAN 

Professor of Physical Education for 

Women 

New Jersey College for Women B.S.; 

University of Pittsburgh M.Ed.; Joined 

the Faculty 1943. 





REUBEN E. TRIPPENSEE 
Professor of Wildlife Management 
Michigan State College B.S. ; Univers- 
ity of Michigan M.S., Ph.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1936. 



ALDEN P. TUTTLE 
Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gard- 
ening 

Massachusetts Agricultural College B.- 
S. ; Pennsylvania State College M.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1930. 



JOHN H. VONDELL 
Assistant Professor of Poultry Hus- 
bandry 

Middlebury College ; Massachusetts 
State College ; Joined the Faculty 1923. 

JOHN M. ZAK 
Instructor of Agronomy 
Massachusetts State College B.S.; Mas- 
sachusetts State College M.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1938. 



[12} 



New Faculty Members 



TORVALD A. BERTINUSON, M.S. 
Instructor of Agronomy. 



ROBERT V. GANLEY 

Instructor in Forestry 

University of Massachusetts, B.S.; 

Duke School of Forestry M.F.; Joined 

the Faculty 1951. 



JOSEPH D. CAMPBELL, M.S. 
Instructor in Olericulture. 



WILLIAM L. IVES, B.S. 
Instructor of Floriculture 
University of Massachusetts 
Joined the Faculty 1951. 



B.S.; 



THOMAS A. CULBERTSON, B.S. 
Assistant Professor of Food Technology. 



ALBERT P. MADEIRA 

Instructor of English 

Bowdoin College, B.A. ; University of 

New Hampshire, M.A.; Joined the 

Faculty 1951. 



WILLIAM G. COLBY, Ph.D. 
Head of Department of Agronomy. 



HENRY B. PEIRCE 
Instructor of English 
Harvard University ; University of Mas- 
sachusetts B.A. ; Carnegie Institute of 
Technology; Joined the Faculty 1950. 



THOMAS H. FARR, M.S. 
Instructor of Entomology 
Michigan State College. 



VALDEMARS PUNGA, M.S. 
Instructor in Mathematics 



FREDERICK P. STEPHAN, B.S. 
Instructor in Agricultural Engineering. 



[13] 



ou SENIOR CLASS o^ 1953 




a 



^ ^ «!^ r> o ^ ^ 



O^^ j? 









[14] 




^EenLoA QtaU 0.^ic.eAi 



Left to Right: Lewis Mason (Pres.), Wilfred Lamb (V. 
Pres.), Edward Hample (Sec), Thomas Leahey (Treas.), 



Mudent Qouttcit 



First Row, Left to Right: Charles 
Niethold (Pres.), Wilfred Lamb. Sec- 
ond Row: Edward Hample. Robert 
Frederico. Third Row: Thomas Leahey, 
Lewis Mason. Fourth Row: John 
Hayes, Paul Leonard. Fifth Row: 
David Freeman, Jean Carlson (Sec), 
Harlan Kelsey. 



[151 



GEORGE PAUL ACHILLE 

"GigC 

Hingham 

Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 

Alger Farms, Brockton. Activities: 

Poultry Club 1, 2; Campus Chest 2. 



JOSEPH WALTER ADAMS 
"foe" 
Sudbury 
Major: Horticulture. Placement: 
Robert Ralston, Landscape Contractor, 
Brookline. Activities: Hort Show Chair- 
man 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club 
1, 2. 



ALAN CONRAD ANDERSON 
"Andy" 
Reading 
Major: Floricuhure. Placement: Eric 
Matson's Pleasant St. Exchange, Read- 
ing. Activities: Hort Show 1, 2. 




r«r** 





PAUL ROBERT ANDERSON 
"Andy" 
Fitchburg 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: Vin- 
cent's Greenhouses, Fitchburg. Activ- 
ities: Floriculture Club 1,2; Hort Show 
1, 2. 



[16} 





L 




GEORGE JOHN ANDRUK 

"Tiny" 
Bridgewater 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Medfield State Hospital, Harding. Ac- 
tivities: Dance Committee Chairman 
2; Football 1, 2; An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Campus Chest 
2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 
2; Longhorn Committee Co-chairman 
2. 



GUY WELLMAN BADGER 

Auburn 

Major: Turf Maintenance. Placement: 

Wachusett Country Club, West Boyl- 

ston. Activities: Hort Show 1, 2. 








LEONARD MICHAEL BAJ 
"Len" 
Amherst 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
Seal Test Ice Cream Corp., New 
Haven, Conn. Activities: Football 1; 
Basketball 1; Dairy Club 2; Kappa 
Kappa 2; Dairy Classic 1. 



HARRY WHITNEY BALDWIN 
"Baldie" 
Sudbury 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Hans VanLeer, Lincoln. Activities: 
Dance Committee 2; An. Hus. Club 
1, 2; Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2. 



BRUCE EDWIN BENSON 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Wibaux, Montana. Activities: Dance 
Committee 1; Football 1; An. Hus. 
Club 1, 2; Vice President An. Hus. 
Club; Executive Committee of 4-H; 
4-H Club 1, 2; Little International 1, 
2; Campus Chest 2; Kappa Kappa 
President 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2; Inter- 
fraternity Council 1, 2; Dairy Classic 
1; Square Dance 2; S. C. A. 




ROBERT JOSEPH BERAUDO 
Winthrop 
Major: Forestry. Placement: Sequoia 
National Forest, California. Activities: 
Alpha Tau Gamma 2; Forestry Club 
1, 2. 



KENNETH BRUCE BONNEY 
"Ken" 
Auburn dale 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Medfield State Hospital, Harding. Ac- 
tivities: Shorthorn Board 1, 2; Dance 
Committee 1, 2; Football 1; Glee Club 
1. 2: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little In- 
ternational 2; Campus Chest 2; Social 
Chairman Kappa Kappa 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2: Dairy Classic 2; F. F. A. 
Vice President 2; F. F. A. 1, 2; 
S. C. A. Chaplin's Council 2; Square 
Dance Club 2; Longhorn Committee 
2; Roister Doisters 2; Inter- fraternity 
Council 1, 2. 



PAUL HONORE BOUCHARD 
Springfield 
Major: Forestry. Placement: Fremont 
National Forest, Lakeview, Oregon. 
Activities: Hort Show 2; Alpha Tau 
Gamma 1, 2; Mt. Toby Recreation 
Project 2; Forestry Club 1, 2; Square 
Dance Club 2. 












[17] 



STANLEY LINCOLN BROWN 
"Farmer Brown" 
Florida 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
J. B. Abbott Farm, Bellows Falls, Ver- 
mont. Activities: Shorthorn Board 1, 
2: Shorthorn Photography Editor 2; 
Poultry Club President 2; Poultry 
Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Square 
Dance Club 1, 2. 



WOOSTER BARKER BUCKINGHAM 
"Buck" 
Sheffield 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Atkins Farm, So. Amherst and June- 
mont Poultry Farm, Sheffield. Activ- 
ities: Shorthorn Board 1. 2; Adver- 
tising Chairman Dance Committee 2; 
Social Chairman Poultry Club 2; 
Poultry Club 1, 2: University March- 
ing Band 2; University Concert Band 
2; Pioneer Valley Concert Band 2. 




>««r 











JEAN ELIZABETH CARLSON 

Scituate 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Albert C. Loring, Norwell. Activities: 
Student Council 1, 2; Secretary 2; 
Dance Committee, Co-chairman dec- 
orations, 2: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2. 




KENNETH LENNART CARLSON 
"Kurt" 
Worcester 
Major: Forestry. Placement: Shasta 
National Forest, Mt. Hebron, Cali- 
fornia. Activities: Shorthorn Editor 2; 
Cross Country 1; Alpha Tau Gamma 
1, 2; Treasurer Alpha Tau Gamma 2; 
Forestry Club 1, 2; Square Dance 
Club 2: S. C. A. 2: Chaplin's Council 
2. 




v 




N 



RICHARD LAWRENCE CARROLL 
"Dick" 
Belmont 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Mayo's Duck Farm, East Orleans. Ac- 
tivities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Longhorn 
Committee 2. 



ROBERT GORDON CARSON, JR. 
"Bob" 
Gardner 
Major: Forestry. Placement: Mt. Shasta 
National Forest, California. Activities: 
Shorthorn Board Asst. Editor 2; Cross 
Country 1: Alpha Tau Gamma; For- 
estry Club 1, 2; Secretary 2. 





RICHARD EARL CLUFF 
"F. F." 
Tewksbury 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
New England Milk Producers Associ- 
ation, Andover. Activities: Football 
team 1; Dairy Club 1, 2; Dairy Classic 
1, 2. 




EDGAR YVES CHABOT 
"Ed" 
Fitchburg 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Howard Atkins, Amherst. Activities: 
Glee Club 1, 2; An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Square Dance 
Club 1, 2. 



ROLAND ERNEST CHAPUT 
"Chappy" "Roly" 
Stoneham 
Major : Ornamental Horticulture. Place- 
ment: Lexington Nurseries, Lexington, 
and Landscape Clinic, Dover, N. H. 
Activities: Basketball 2; Hort Show 
Construction Chairman 1, 2; Hort. 
Club 1, 2; Vice President of Hort. 
Club 2. 




J 



JOHN ANTHONY COLLINS 

Syracuse, New York 
Major: Turf Maintenance. Placement: 
Bellevue Country Club, Syracuse, New 
York. Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Hort Club 1, 2. 



[19] 



JAMES JOSEPH CROWLEY 
"Jim" 
Springfield 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
Center State Milk Co., Springfield. 
Activities: Dance Committee 1, 2; 
Dairy Club Corresponding Secretary 
2; Dairy Club 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2. 



JOSEPH SEBASTIAN DICARLO 
"Buzzy" 
North Lakeville 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Caswell's Poultry Farm, Lakeville. Ac- 
tivities: Glee Club 2; Poultry Club 1, 
2; Asst. Secretary Poultry Club 2; 
Campus Chest 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 2; 
In-door Track 2. 





CHARLES EDWIN DINSMORE 
"Rusty" 
Berlin 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Appleton Farms, Ipswich. Activities: 
Glee Club 1, 2; An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Campus Chest 1, 
2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; House 
Manager 2; Square Dance Club 1, 2; 
S. C. A. Stockbridge Representative 
1, 2. 



ROBERT STANLEY DIX 
"Dixie" 
East Longmeadow 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: Staf- 
ford Conservatories, Stafford Springs, 
Conn. Activities: Floriculture Club 1, 
2; Hort Show 1, 2. 



CLARENCE EASTMAN DOANE, JR. 
"Foggy" 
Milton 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Medfield State Hospital, Harding. Ac- 
tivities: Dance Committee 2; An. Hus. 
Club 1, 2; Little International 2. 





'V^--'«7)i^ 



:l\ 







\ 



LEO FRANCIS DOBLE 
"Dub" 
Dorchester 
Major: Food Management. Placement: 
Howard D. Johnson's Restaurants, New 
Jersey Turnpike, New Brunswick, N. J. 
Activities: Newman Club 1, 2. 



FRANCIS WILLIAM DORSEY 

"Frank" 
Fall River 
Major: Horticulture. Placement: Dorsey 
Landscape Co., Fall River. Activities: 
Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club Secre- 
tary 2; Hort Club 1, 2. 



RICHARD WARREN EATON 
"Dick" 
Waltham 
Major : Floriculture. Placement: 
Doran's Greenhouses, Lexington. Ac- 
tivities: Floriculture Club 1, 2; Co- 
Chairman of Hott Show 2; Hort Show 
Council 1, 2; Hort Show Queen Com- 
mittee Chairman 2; Winter Carnival 
Snow Sculpturing Committee 2. 



^1 I 



[20] 




JOHN PETER ELLIOTT 
"Pete" 
Osterville 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: El- 
liott's Flower Shop, Centerville. Ac- 
tivities: Student Council Treasurer 1; 
Dance Committee 1; Football 2; Bas- 
ketball 2 ; Floriculture Club 1 ; Hort 
Show 2; Campus Chest 1; Sargent- 
at-Arms, Alpha Tau Gamma 2. 



RONALD JOHN FERGUSON 
"Oogie" 
Wareham 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Child's Poultry Farm, Manomet. Ac- 
tivities: Poultry Club Vice-President 
2; Poultry Club 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 
2; Square Dance Club 1. 



GEORGE SPENCER FLETCHER 

"Fletch" 

Westford 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Walter W. Fletcher, Westford. Activi- 
ties: Dance Committee Decoration Co- 
chairman 2; An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2 ; Campus Chest 
1, 2; Dairy Classic 2. 




JOSEPH ANTHONY FREITAS 
"Joe" "Butch" 
Plymouth 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Mayo's Duck Farm, East Orleans. Ac- 
tivities: Class Vice-President 1; Dance 
Committee 1 ; Football 1, 2 ; Basketball 
1, 2; Poultry Club 1, 2; Campus Chest 
2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2. 



RALPH MORRIS FULLER 

"Shute" 

Scituate 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: G. W. 
Perkins, Florist, Westwood. Activities: 
Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 
2. 





ROBERT JOSEPH FREDERICO 
"Bob" 
Grafton 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Grafton State Hospital, Grafton. Ac- 
tivities: Football 1, 2; An. Hus. Club 
1; Little International 2; Campus Chest 
1, 2; Kappa Kappa 2. 

[21] 




«C^ 





DONALD LEWIS GARDNER 
"Don" 
Amherst 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
F. Alfred Patterson, Shoreham, Ver- 
mont. Activities: An. Hus. Club 1; 
Little International 2; Dairy Classic 
2. 



KENNETH GLENN GARERI 
"Gary" 
Worcester 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Parkside Poultry Farm, Hopedale. Ac- 
tivities: Publicity Chairman of Dance 
Committee 1; Football 1, 2; Poultry 
Club Treasurer 2; Poultry Club 1, 2; 
Kappa Kappa 1, 2; In-door Track 2; 
Square Dance Club 2. 



LEO WILLIAM GAVIN 
"Gus" 
Boston 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Danvers State Hospital, Danvers. Ac- 
tivities: Animal Husbandry Club I, 2; 
Little International 2. 



..j j g ? KjUi!!& \ I -». 







h \ 




ROBERT CHARLES GOSSELIN 
"Boh" 
Chicopee 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
Gosselin's Dairy, Chicopee. Activities: 
Football I, 2; Basketball 1; Dairy 
Club 1, 2; Dairy Classic 1, 2; Long- 
horn Committee 1, 2; Track 2. 



[22] 



JOHN WILLIAM GRESH 

"Johnny" 
Unionville, Conn. 
Major: Turf Maintenance. Placement: 
Golf Club of Avon, Avon, Conn. Ac- 
tivities: Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Show 
Council 2. 



FREDERICK ALLEN GUMMOW 
"Freddy" 
West Bridgewater 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Last Chance Ranch, Lake Placid, New 
York. Activities: Football 1, 2; An. 
Hus. Club 1, 2; Treasurer 2; Little 
International 2. 




HERMAN CRASWELL HALEY 
"Crasie" 
East Weymouth 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Appleton Farms, Ipswich. Activities: 
An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little International 
2. 



GEORGE KENDALL HALLER 
West Boylston 
Major: Vegetable Growing. Placement: 
Worcester State Hospital, Worcester. 
Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; Student 
Council for Hort Show 2. 



HAROLD THURSTON HANDLEY 

"Thirsty" 

Lexington 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: 
Waltham Field Station, Waltham. Ac- 
tivities: Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Winter Carnival Committee 
2. 





DAVID EDSON HAWES 

Sudbury 

Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 

Fred E. Jones, Concord. Activities: 

Football 1; An. Hus. Club 1, 2. 



EDWARD CHARLES HEMPEL 
"Eddie" 
Westfield 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Lowland Farm, Monterey. Activities: 
Class Secretary 2; Student Council 2; 
Dance Committee 2 ; Glee Club 1 ; 
Football 2; An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2. 







ALAN JORDAN HAVENS 

"Ar 

Holden 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Cleighton Farms, Rutland. Activities: 
An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1; Little 
International 2; Campus Chest 2; 
Dairy Classic 2 ; Square Dance Club 
1. 

[23] 




■ m o"' " " ' - W ■ 



JAMES RUSSELL HENRY 
"Jim" 
Leominster 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: Don- 
ald Grahn, Westminster. Activities: 
Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 
2; Square Dance Club 1, 2; Chairman 
of Snow Sculptures for Winter Carn- 
ival 2; Chairman of Queen's Crown 
and Flowers for Hort Show 2. 



LAWRENCE DONALD HERRON 
"Larry" 
Greenfield 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Cricket Creek Farm, Williamstown. Ac- 
tivities: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2. 



ROGER DONALD HINES 
Bolton 
Major: Turf Maintenance. Placement: 
Concord Country Club, Concord. Ac- 
tivities: Hort Show 1, 2. 







DONALD LESLIE HOOPER 
Hoi den 
Major: Vegetable Growing. Placement: 
Arthur Hill, Worcester. Activities: 
Olericulture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 
2. 



[24] 



ROBERT EDWARD HORTE 
"Boh" 
Whitman 
Major: Ornamental Horticulture. Place- 
ment: Littlefield and Wyman Nurse- 
ries, Abington. Activities: Hort Show 
1, 2; Horticulture Club 1, 2. 



ALLAN MARSHALL HOWARD 
"AV 
Lexington 
Major : Ornamental Horticulture. Place- 
ment: Frost & Higgins Co., Arlington. 
Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; Orna- 
mental Hort Club 1, 2. 




LOUIS JOHN JUSSAME 
"Moose" 
East Douglas 
Major: Forestry. Placement: Mt. 
Shasta National Forest, Big Bend, Cali- 
fornia. Activities: Hort Show 2; Alpha 
Tau Gamma 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 
Pledge Chairman 2 ; Vice-President 
Forestry Club 1, 2; Forestry Club 1, 
2. 



PAUL GEORGE JASMIN 
"Reverend" 
Chelmsford 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Great Brook Farms, Carlisle. Activities: 
Shorthorn Board, Write Ups Editor 
2; An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2; Longhorn Committee Chair- 
man 2. 

RICHARD ALBERT JENSEN 
"Dick" 
Townsend 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Coburn's Poultry Farm, Tyngsboro. Ac- 
tivities: Poultry Club 2. 




ALBERT THEODORE KARLSON 
"AC 
Orange 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: Ly- 
man the Florist, Athol, Mass. Activ- 
ities: Glee Club 1, 2; Floriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; S. C. A. 2. 



PAUL ALBIN KASPARSON 
"Kasp" 
Worcester 
Major: Food Management. Placement: 
The Pines Inn, Cotuit. Activities: Bas- 
ketball 1, 2; Hort Show 2. 




HENRY FRANK RABAT 
Hatfield 
Major : Ornamental Horticulture. Place- 
ment: University of Mass., Amherst. 
Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club 
1, 2. 



[25] 




ROBERT GLENN KORPINEN 
"Bob" "Korp" 
Worcester 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Waino Mickelson, Foster Center, R. I. 
Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; Square 
Dance Club 1, 2. 



WILFRED DAVIS LAMB 
"Wil" 
Lancaster 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
Dari-Maid Ice Cream, Worcester. Ac- 
tivities: Football team 1; Dairy Club 
President 1, 2; Dairy Classic 1, 2; 
Longhorn Committee 2. 



ROGER WILLIAM LANNON, JR. 

"Bill" 

Athol 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Echo Farm, Barre. Activities: An. 
Hus. Club 1, 2; Little International 2; 
Longhorn Committee 2. 








% 



-H^&i^ 






ROGER NELSON LOPEZ 

Northfield 

Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 

M. F. Lopez, Northfield. Activities: 

An. Hus. Club 1, 2. 



JOHN STANLEY MALINOSKI 
Amherst 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
Bushway Ice Cream Div., Cambridge 
and United Dairy System, Springfield. 
Activities: Dairy Club 1, 2; Dairy 
Classic 1, 2. 



■"stisr 




THOMAS MICHAEL LEAHEY 
"Pat" 
Lee 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
University of Mass., Amherst. Activ- 
ities: Class Treasurer 2. 



[26] 





LEWIS RALPH MASON, JR. 
"Lew" 
South Easton 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Langwater Farm, North Easton. Activi- 
ties: Class President 1, 2; Student 
Council 1, 2; Football 1, 2; Football 
Co-Captain 2; An. Hus. Club 1; Little 
International 1; Kappa Kappa 2; Dairy 
Classic 1. 



-^ c 




EDWARD FRANCIS MANEY, JR. 

"Eddie" 

Peabody 
Major: Food Management. Placement: 
Salem Country Club, Peabody. Activ- 
ities : Dance Committee 1 ; Hort Show 
1, 2; Square Dance Club 2; Vice- 
President Hort Show Council 2. 



FRANK JAMES MARTINES 
Bedford 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
Blue Ribbon Dairy, Bedford. Activi- 
ties: Football 1, 2; Dairy Club 1, 2; 
Kappa Kappa 1, 2. 




alexander henry 
McVeighs, jr. 

"Alex" 

Ludlow 
Major: Vegetable Growing. Placement: 
University of Mass., Amherst. Activi- 
ties: Hort Club 1, 2; Olericulture 
Club 1, 2. 



GEORGE ROBERT MILLIGAN 
Newton 
Major : Ornamental Horticulture. Place- 
ment: K. C. Magnuson, Auburn dale. 
Activities: Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club 
1, 2. 



WARREN OLIVER McAVOY 
"Mack" 
Williamsburg 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: Uni- 
versity of Mass., Amherst. Activities: 
Hort Show 1, 2; Campus Chest 2. 



[27] 





ARTHUR MALCOLM MUDGETT 

Lancaster 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Deershorn Farm, Sterling Junction. Ac- 
tivities: Football 1; An. Hus. Club 1, 
2; Little International 2. 



CHARLES RALPH NIETHOLD 
"Chuck" 
Sharon 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Blackbriar Farm, Dover Plains, New 
York. Activities: President Student 
Council 2; Student Council 1, 2; 
Shorthorn Business Manager 2; 
Shorthorn Board 1, 2; Dance Commit- 
tee 1, 2; Football 1; An. Hus. Club 1, 
2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Little International 
1, 2; Campus Chest 2; Kappa 
Kappa Vice-President 2; Kappa Kappa 
1, 2; Student Life Committee 1; Dairy 
Classic 2; Square Dance Club 2; S. C. 
A. 2. 







m 








CHARLES OVIAN 
Whitinsville 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Castle Hill Farm, Whitinsville. Ac- 
tivities: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little 
International 2. 







EDWARD GORDON PARSONS 
"EdT 
Northfield 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
"The Maples", Northfield, Activities: 
An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2. 



[28] 



ROBERT CHARLES PARSONS 
Deerfield 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Grass Hill Dairy Farm, Conway. Ac- 
tivities: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little In- 
ternational 2. 



THOMAS KENNEY PORTER, JR. 
"Pom Pom" "Tommy" 
Somerset 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Lush Acres Farm, Rehoboth. Activities: 
Shorthorn Asst. Business Manager 2; 
Football Manager 2; An. Hus. Club 
1, 2; 4-H Executive Committee 2; 4- 
H Club 1, 2; Little International 1, 
2 ; Kappa Kappa Treasurer 2 ; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2. 




*^.;:;- 




LAWRENCE MARTIN ROGERS 
"Lany" 
Men don 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Danvers State Hospital, Danvers. Ac- 
tivities: Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2. 



HENRY FRANK RADOMSKI 
So. Portland, Maine 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Christy's Poultry Farm, Kingston, N. 
H. Activities: Poultry Club 1, 2; 
Square Dance Club 2; Longhorn Com- 
mittee 1. 



EDWIN BRYAN RHODES 
"Dusty" 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
Major : Ornamental Horticulture. Place- 
ment: Naulahka, Rudyard Kipling's 
Home, Brattleboro, Vt. Activities: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Hort Club 1, 2. 




DONALD ANTHONY SMIAROSKI 
"Little Mayor-No.9" 
Deerfield 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Adriance Poultry Farm, Pelham. Ac- 
tivities: Poultry Club 1, 2; An. Hus. 
Club 1; Campus Chest 2; Square 
Dance Club 1, 2. 



AUSTIN TENNEY SMITH 
Lexington 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Grafton State Hospital, North Grafton. 
Activities: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little 
International 2. 




/ 



ROLAND BARKER SHAW 
New Bedford 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: Shaw 
Greenhouses, No. Dartmouth. Activi- 
ties: Floriculture Club 1, 2; Pub- 
licity Chairman and Program Commit- 
tee 2; Hort. Show 1, 2; DeMolay Club 
2. 



[29] 





"^ 4ttK 



MELVIN ADAMS STEPHENS 
Somerville 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Allenholm Farm, South Hero, Vermont. 
Activities: Art Editor of Shorthorn 2; 
Football 1, 2: Basketball 1, 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 1. 



PHILIP JOHN STEVENS 
"Phir 
Charlton 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Lakeview Farms, Charlton. Activities: 
An. Hus. Club I, 2; Little Inter- 
national 1, 2 ; Dairy Classic 1. 



DANIEL TOKARSKY 

"Dan" 

Springfield 

Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 

Hurlwood Holstein Farm, Ashley Falls. 

Activities: An. Hus. Club 1, 2. 






.- % 





"^-i. ^ 



\ '^ 




HOWARD LESLIE WATERMAN, JR. 

Halifax 
Major: Dairy Industry. Placement: 
McCarthy Bros. Ice Cream Co., Whit- 
man. Activities: Dance Committee 2; 
Dairy Club 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 2. 



NEIL AMES WELCH 
"Chaunsay" 
Marthas Vineyard 
Major: Floriculture. Placement: H. V. 
Lawrence Inc., Florist, Falmouth. Ac- 
tivities: Floriculture Club 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2. 



THOMAS COLEMAN WARREN, JR. 
"Reb" "RebeV 
Melrose 
Major: Poultry Husbandry. Placement: 
Mayo's Duck Farm, East Orleans. Ac- 
tivities: Poultry Club 1, 2. 



[30] 





LAWRENCE WALTER WERNER 
Milton 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Worcester State Hospital, Worcester. 
Activities: Little International 2; An. 
Hus. Club 1, 2. 



RICHARD WELLS WILLIAMS 
"flerf" 
Sunderland 
Major: Turf Maintenance. Placement: 
Warwick Country Club, Warwick, 
Rhode Island. Activities: Hort Show 
1, 2. 



GEORGE DANA WOOD 

"JFoody" 

Needham 
Major: Animal Husbandry. Placement: 
Lone Oak Farm, Dover. Activities: 
Shorthorn Board, Features Editor 2; 
An. Hus. Club 1 ; Little International 
2; F. F. A. 1; Longhorn Committee 
1, 2. 





i 




DONALD ALLEN YOUNG 

"Spike" 

South Hadley 

Major: Turf Maintenance. Placement: 

Orchards Golf Course, South Hadley. 

Activities: Hort. Show 1, 2. 



[31} 



EDWIN RALPH YOUNG, JR. 

"Ju^' 

Worcester 

Major: Ornamental Horticulture. 

Placement: Adams Nursery, Westfield. 
Activities: Hort. Show 1, 2; Hort. Club 
1, 2, President 2; Hort. Show Council 
2. 



WILLARD HENRY YOUNG 

"BiW 

Belchertown 

Major: Forestry. Placement: Asphlund 

Tree Co., Jenkintown, Pa. Activities: 

Forestry Club 1, 2. 







[32] 



Old Chapel 




Senior Class History 



The big day was October 1, 1951, we entered 
Memorial Hall to register as freshmen of this 
strange new school. We were wondering what the 
future held in store for us. 

We became a part of the campus after a few 
days of getting lost in trying to find our right 
class rooms and standing in various lines at the 
book store. The first convocation was very im- 
pressive as Director Verbeck gave us information 
we would need to fulfill the traditions of the school. 

On December 14, the seniors sponsored a fresh- 
men reception dance and in return to show our 
appreciation we held a farewell dance for the sen- 
iors on February 29. 

Spring was coming fast and we knew we would 
all be leaving soon to go out on placement train- 
ing. 



Second semester ended on the 28th of March, as 
we bid the seniors goodbye. 

Back to school in October with some of our 
former classmates missing because of the large 
draft quotas that needed to be filled. 

Time went fast with the Freshmen reception 
dance in December, a most welcomed Christmas 
recess. The final examinations and the end of the 
first semester. 

The freshmen held a dance in February in honor 
of the seniors. This meant Spring was coming and 
they would soon be leaving for placement training. 

The finals occurred in the midst of fine spring 
weather. On May 31, the big day arrived, the one 
we were all looking forward to Commencement! 
and our journey through Stockbridge was ended. 



[33] 



STOSAG 

"Stosag" is one of the most distinguished achievements that a Stockbridge 
student may attain. It is a recognition given to those who strive, work and study to 
maintain a high level of scholarship during their two years of intensive training. 

To become a member of "Stosag" one must attain an average of 85 percent and 
have no mark IjcIow 70 for the first three semesters. 

This society was established in 19.35 to encourage high scholarshi]). Engraved 
certificates are awarded to members of the graduating class who have achieved this 
distinction. The name "Stosag" stands for "Stockbridge School of Agriculture," "Sto" 
from Stockbridge. "S" from School, and '"Ag" from Agriculture. "Stosag" is not an ab- 
breviation, but a distinguishing name selected for one purpose — the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture Honorary Society. 

To all of you who have been recognized bv the societv, we extend our sincere 
congratulations. May you always set such high standards in all your future under- 
takings. 



l\ames placed in order of rank. 
Edward Gordon Parsons 
Edwin Ralph Young, Jr. 
*Edgar Yves Chabot 
Stanley Lincoln Brown 
Robert Gordon Carson. Jr. 
Lewis Ralph Mason, Jr. 
Robert Edward Horte 
Richard Warren Eaton 
Kenneth Lennart Carlson 
Frederick Allen Gummow 
* Veteran 



Animal Husbandry 
Ornamental Horticulture 
Animal Husbandry- 
Poultry Husbandry 
Forestry 

Animal Husbandry 
Ornamental Horticulture 
Floriculture 
Forestry 
Animal Husbandry 



Northfleld 

Worcester 

Fitchburg 

Florida 

Gardner 

Easton 

Whitman 

Waltham 

Worcester 

West Brideewater 



il^^^i ^i^i- ^ > •-'." « • i V • .-. 



•"•<»* ,< » 



:-^^^:-Mx.M 



,^, 




jp*^ 




[34] 









:/u 




\f/^,; 




COMMENCEMENT 




Left to Right: Edwin R. Young, Edward G. Parsons, Kenneth L. Carlson, J. Peter Elliott. 



General Chairman — Kenneth L. Carlson 
Ex-Officio Members — Lewis R. Mason, Jr., 
Class President; Thomas M. Leahey, Class 
Treasurer. 



Chairman, Class Promenade 

Edwin R. Young. Jr. 
Co-Chairmen, Class Picnic 

Robert C. Gosselin 

George D. Wood 
Chairman, Class Gift 

Wilfred D. Lamb 
Co-Chairmen, Caps and Gowns 

J. Peter Elliott 

Paul G. Jasmin 



Class Orator 

Robert J. Frederico 
Class Historian 

Edward G. Parsons 
Class Marshals 

Howard Waterman 

George D. Wood 



PROGRAM 



Friday, May 29, 1953 
10:00 A.M. Class Picnic 
9:00 P.M. Commencement Promenade 
Saturday, May 30, 1953 
10:00 A.M. Class Day Exercises 
Class Oration 
Class History 
Student Activity Awards 
Presentation of Class Gift 
School Song— "Alma Mater Hail" 
12:30 P.M. Alumni - Senior Luncheon 
3:15 P.M. Softball Game. 

Alumni vs. Stockbridge 



Sunday, May 31, 1953 
2:30 P.M. Graduation Exercises 

Processional 

Invocation 

Commencement Address 

School Song — "Men of Stockbridge" 

Presentation of Diplomas 

Song 

Stosag Awards 

Benediction 

Recessional 
4:30 P.M. President's Reception to members of 

the graduating class, their guests. 

alumni, alumnae, and the faculty. 



[35] 



p IPIPI ,*> p 




First Row, Left to Right: Kenneth Carlson, Louis Jussaume, Robert Carson, Paul Bouchard, 
Charles Dinsmore, Peter Elliott. Second Row. Robert Beraudo, Herbert Harriman, Warren Baker, 
John Molden, Sherman Luden, Louis Cross. Third Row. Herbert Montcalm, Paul Larson, William 
Brenchick, George Russo, Frank Dorsey, Donald Hooper, Edward Loughlin, Robert Davis. 



Alpha Tau Gamma 





The school year, 1952 ■ 1953, marked what was 
probably one of the most successful years in the 
history of Alpha Tau Gamma. We, of course ran 
into a number of difficulties during the year, but 
each of these was dealt with harmoniously and 
cooperatively by everyone. This tremendous 
amount of cooperation was, no doubt, responsible 
for the business-like atmosphere encountered dur- 
ing our regular Monday night "get together". We 
must not stop here, but should also mention that 
cooperation was the basis for so many wonderful 
parties during the year. 

As we know, the Korean conflict is responsible 
for a smaller house membership this year. To cite 
an example: During the first semester, both our 
President and Vice-President were lost to the armed 
services. This is hardly a starter in numbering 
the members and pledges called by the draft. 



A great deal of credit is extended by the House 
to Ken Carlson as treasurer and later, President, 
for the grand way in which he conducted the meet- 
ings at the loss of the first two men in command. 
It was necessary for us to elect a new slate of of- 
ficers in January when it was learned that our Sec- 
retary was also to leave. 

In an attempt to conserve our financial resources 
and devote more attention to a bigger and better 
afEair, we, this year, inaugurated a combined Fresh- 
man Reception Banquet and Formal House Banquet 
held at the Roger Smith Hotel in Holyoke on 
March 21. This Banquet consisted of a wonderful 
meal after which dancing was enjoyed. 

In following our custom of the past, the initation 
consisted of construction rather than destruction. 
Almost all of the "sore spots" in the house were 
mended, patched or painted. The net result was a 
greatly improved living environment. 

Our greatest gratitude and thanks are extended 
"Pop" Barrett and Mr. Parkinson in their capacity 
as faculty advisor and corporation treasurer, re- 
spectively. It would not have been possible for us 
to achieve such a successful goal without their 
guidance. 

Many fond memories will remain with us, as we 
travel down life's road, of Alpha Tau Gamma and 
the wonderful time we had at Stockbridge. 




^ 





^ ^ 




'TMBi^'O^- 




jSll! 'JRS S^ 




Kappa Kappa 



'^-f^ ^ 





I 



I 



First Row, Left to Right: Kenneth Bonney (Soc. Chairman), George Andruk 
(House Marshall), Tomas Porter (Treas.), Robert Frederico (Sec), Charles 
Niethold (Vice Pres.), Bruce Benson (Pres.). Second Row: Edward Bliss, 
Howard Waterman, Fredric Gummow, Steven Gillmartin, Leonard Baj, Don- 
ald Dino, Stanley Piekoski, Robert Porter. Third Row: Alden French, Sher- 
man Hall, Robert Doty, Lynnwood Eaton, Murray Zack, Peter Bardzic, 
Kenneth Gareri, Joseph Decarlo, Santo Buteras, Robert Dostaler, David Han- 
cock, Frank Martines, Ronald Ferguson. 







^^- ^ t,^^mm fommsBiw^ ' 



j|R^^„ 




With graduation approaching, one of the most 
successful years in Kappa Kappa history is drawing 
to a close. The success was due to true fraternity 
spirit, unselfishness and cooperation. 

Although we faced the Korean conflict and the 
decrease in school enrollment, Kappa Kappa still 
received men of high caliber. We were fortunate 
that most of our members were deferred until the 
end of the academic year. 





A great improvement in appearance and comfort 
came to the fraternity this year. The house was 
redecorated and was furnished with new furniture. 

Although considerable funds were spent on the 
house, we ran many successful parties during the 
year. The formal Banquet was held at the Stockade 
in Old Deerfield on March 7. The annual Stag 
Banquet was held at the Hatfield Club on March 
26. 

Much was accomplished through initiation; the 
freshmen polished the house from top to bottom. 
The work didn't come in fading spurts but in an 
orderly efficient manner. Forethought and planning 
were responsible for this accomplishment. 

We extend our thanks and deepest gratitude to 
Mr. Zak, our faculty adviser and Mr. Markett, the 
corporation manager. It would have been impos- 
sible to reach our achievements without their guid- 
ance and forethought. 




1^9] 



i/tetuo-fi 



^Animal Hu8bandry< 




First Row, Left to Right: Frederic Gummow, Lawrence Herron, Roger Lopez, Robert Frederico, 
Lewis Mason, David Hawes, Kenneth Bonney, Paul Jasmin. Second Row: Charles Niethold, 
Robert Parsons, Edward Parsons, George Andruk, Harry Baldwin, Clarence Doane, Thomas 
Porter, Arthur Mudgett. Third Row: Thomas Leahey, Charles Dinsmore, Lawrence Werner, 
Phillip Stevens, Craswell Haley, Allen Havens, George Fletcher, Edward Hempel, George Wood. 
Fourth Row: Leo Gavin, Donald Gardner, Edgar Chabot, Jean Carlson. 



iEenioA 



<Arboriculture 



First Row, Left to Right: Richard Taylor, Paul 
MacGrath. Second Row: Donald Mead, Richard 
Abott, Donald Dearden. 




[40] 



iP^nla^ 




First Row, Left to Right: Frank 
Marlines, John Malinoski, Rich- 
ard Cluff, James Crowley. Sec- 
ond Row: Howard Waterman, 
Wilfred Lamb, Leonard Baj, 
Robert Gosselin. 




iPjenwfi 



^Floriculture; 



First Row, Left to Right: Don- 
ald Eaton, James Henry, Peter 
Elliott, Thomas Handley. Second 
Row: Robert Fuller, Neil Welch, 
William McAvoy, Robert Shaw, 
Paul Anderson, Arthur Karlson. 



[41] 







.Nt. 



iEetua^ 




Food Management 



Left to Right: Leo Doble, Paul Kasperson, Edward Maney. 



Forestry 



First Row, Left to Right: Paul Bouchard, Robert Carson, Louis Jussaume, 
Kenneth Carlson. Second Row: Robert Beraudo, Willard Young. 




[42] 



d^jtnioJi 




Horticulture 



First Row, Left to Right: Frank Dor- 
sey, Joseph Adams, Edwin Young. 
Second Row. John Horte, Allen How- 
ard, Henry Kabat, Ronald Chaput. 




First Row, Left to Right: Thomas Warren, Ronald Ferguson, Robert Korpinen, 
Kenneth Gareri, Joseph DiCarlo. Second Row: Stanley Brown, Richard Carroll, 
Wooster Buckingham, Donald Smiaroski, Richard Jensen, Henry Radomski. 



iPjenioA 



Poult 



T 




[43} 




Left to Right: George Badger, Robert Hines, Donald Young, John Collins, 
Joseph Gresh. 



iEeniai> 



Turf Maintenance 





Vegetable 
Growing 



Left to Right: Donald Hooper, George Haller, Alexander McVeigh. 



[44] 



OJh£. 



FRESHMAN qju^ 4 1954 





[45} 




Left to Right: David Freeman (Pres.), John Hayes (V. 
Pres.), Paul Leonard (Treas.), Harlan Kelsey (Sec). 








[46] 



Qjie^iAman 



Animal Husbandry 





First Row, Left to Right: John Hayes, Howard Gordon, 
Donald Crosby, Janet Smith, Edward Laughlin, Donald 
Dino, Howard Hunter, Walter Sampson, Charles Leverone, 
Clark Mason, Floyd Hayden, Bruce Ryder. Second Row: 
Peter Shumway, William Clark, Allen Swenson, Wayne 
Whitney, Richard Cohn, Camille Leduc, Sherman Ludden, 
Harold Anderson, Harlan Kelsey, Norman Eykel, Robert 



Dostaler, Roger Chadwick, Stanley Piatkowski, Robert 
Porter, Alfred Drowne, Edward Hart. Third Row: 
Jeremy Thomas, Leo Sullivan, Matthew Ramsay, Ernest 
Brousseau, Timothy Shea, Bruce Cole, Peter Bardzick, 
Paul Larson, Peter Card, Richard Little, Joseph Bigelow, 
William Austin, Marvin Peck, John Hobart, Thomas Beb- 
bington. 



Arboriculture 



First Row, Left to Right: Frank Townsend, 
Warren Baker, Earl Mason. Second Row: Wil- 
liam Seaquist, James Washburn, William How- 
ard, Carey Ashworth, Paul Leon. Third Row: 
Joseph Picot, Richard Brown, Robert Patch, 
John Urquhart, Paul Leonard, Roger Cole. 




[47] 



9:'ied(imati 



Dair 



First Row, Left to Right: Stephen Gil- 
martin, Edward Bliss, Timothy Taylor, 
Lynwood Eaton. Second Row. William 
Dziuba, David Hancock, Ward Fitz- 
gerald, Richard Bowen, Richard Burn- 
side, Lee Butterworth, 




QyieAAman 



Floriculture 



First Row, Lejt to Right: Warren 
Birch, Robert Denis, Betty Wood, 
Costas Philips, William Cannon, Steve 
Efstratiow. Second Row: Donald Too- 
hey, Harold Fall Jr., Donald Barber. 
Robert Doty, David Lindquist, Joseph 
Westcott, Peter Cazale. 




[48] 




S'Ae^&hnajei 



Food Management 



First Row, Left to Right: Alden French, Maud Gary, Joseph O'Neill, Richard 
Ellis. Second Row: Edward Kincus, Bruce McQuaid, Warren Archambault, 
John Trites, Herbert Waters, Robert Robson. 



First Row. Left to Right: Louis Cross, George Osborn, Pete Baldwin, Steven 
Giera, John Peterson, Raymond Langill. Second Row: Steven Whiting, John 
Molden, George Christenson, John Bradley, Donald Bingham, Edward Brodecki, 
William Hayes. 



0-Ae^5funan 

Forestry 





OMySJhjtruui 



Ornamental Horticulture 



First Row, Left to Right: Ernie Fournier, Robert Davis, Donald Greene, 
Sherman Hall, Murray Zack, Richard Bethel, Ernest Hardy. Second Row: 
Gerald O'Niel, John Redmond, William Brenchick, Arthur Long, Charles 
Magvvire, Nick Butera, Roland Allenby. 



O'Ae.iAtnan 



Poultry 



First Row, Left to Right: David Geele, Richard Hall, Richard Holbrook, 
Thomas Cullinane, Richard Emery, Francis Driscoll. Second Row: Nathan 
Flood, Joseph DeLorenzo, Kenneth Zaramba, David Freeman, Carl Hultman, 
Edward Richards, Priscilla Cahill. 



[50] 




O'Jve.iJhjmxui 



Turf Maintenance 



First Row, Left to Right: Robert Davis, Jerome Puddister, Maurice Cameron, 
William Burrett. Second Row: Mike Ovian, Thomas Niblet, Frank Lamphier, 
George Hauschel, Joseph Camberato. 



^•S-'*' 








Vegetable 
Growing 



First Row, Left to Right: 
Lawrence Sena, Robert Scher, 
Wilfred Dennis. Second Row: 
Donald Johnson, Charles Tur- 
giss, Paul Gayoski. Andrew 
Hamilton. 



[51] 





Animal 
Husbandry 

Club 



The members of the Club consist of Stockbridge 
and University Animal Husbandry majors. 

The club is run by its members, with J. Murray 
Elliot as our faculty advisor. Throughout the 
year at the club's meetings we have outside speakers 
and movies on different phases of agriculture with 
refreshments following the meetings. 

The main event put on by the club is the "Little 
International Livestock Show" which was held 
March 21st. In this show the Stockbridge seniors 
compete against the University juniors for awards 
given out by the club. 





OAe^Mite International Livestock 



iPAow^ 



Highlighting the day and terminating a series of lesser but all 
important events was the selection of the Premier Showman, Milford 
Davis of Berlin Massachusetts. Commissioner of Agriculture for the 
State of Massachusetts, Mr. Henry T. Broderick, presented to Mil 
the rewards due him for his superior showmanship. These included 
the most coveted prize of all, the Ensminger Trophy, donated by 
Mr. James Watson, Editor of the New England Homestead. A medal 
given by the State Department of Agriculture, and a set of Clip- 
master electric clippers. 

Charles Niethold, a Stockb ridge senior from Sharon, Mass., was 
the runner-up to Davis and was adjudged to be Reserve Premier 
Showman. 

A beautiful first day of Spring helped to make the day both in- 
teresting and successful. An overflow crowd estimated to be over 
1500 filled the Arena to witness "The Biggest Student Livestock Show 
In The World". 



"'•'"V, 




> 



% 





OKe. 



MtU 



International 
Livestock 



iPAm^ 



The winners of the individual classes were as follows : 
In beef — 1. Charles Niethold, Sharon, Mass. 

2. Lawrence Herron, Greenfield, Mass. 
In sheep — 1. Fred Gummow, West Bridgewater, Mass 

2. Francis Warren, Stowe, Mass. 
In swine — 1. William Johnson, West Roxbury, Mass. 

2. Paul "Saul" Jasmin, Hinsdale, New Hampshire. 
In horses — 1. Milford Davis, Berlin, Mass. 

2. Craswell Haley, Ipswich, Mass. 
Judges for the day were Mr. Edgar Wilcox, Manager of Powisset 
Farm, Dover, Mass., and Professor John A. Christian of the Dept. of 
Animal Husbandry, Univ. of Conn. 





Arboriculture Club 




The Arboriculture Club is made up of members 
of the freshmen and senior classes in Arboriculture. 
Meetings are held on the third Thursday of every 
month in French Hall. Speakers at these meetings 
are selected from people who are connected with 
Arboriculture but who may be specialists in one 
particular phase of Arboriculture. 

All members of the club are also able to attend 
meetings of the Western Massachusetts Tree 
Wardens and Foresters Association. 

One of the main events that the club holds is a 
contest between the Freshmen and the Seniors in 
the arts of climbing, rope-throwing, cross-cut saw- 
ing, foot locking and chopping. This year the 
seniors were the victors and their class year will 
be inscribed on a plaque with previous years win- 
ners. 

Members of the club meet many influential 
people and they wish to thank Mr. Gordon King, 
faculty advisor, for his help in arranging these 
meetings. 





[55] 




Dairy Club 



The Dairy Club is an organization of future 
dairy men, attending the University and Stock- 
bridge, combined to enjoy in activities which occur 
through-out the school year. Our many club ac- 
tivities consist of business meetings, social gather- 
ings, banquets, outings and guest speakers. 

Business meetings are conducted every third 
Thursday of the month in Flint Laboratory. Fol- 
lovkfing the meetings, a guest speaker is usually pre- 
sented and a talk is related on current affairs, per- 
taining to the dairy industry. The talk usually 
proves both interesting and appealing to us, the 



Dairy Majors. A social gathering is conducted 
after every business meeting, to show our appre- 
ciation and to promote a closer relationship be- 
tween student and instructor. 

An annual winter banquet is held in Flint Lab- 
oratory and a spring outing at Mount Toby Rec- 
reation Center, to add to our many enjoyable fes- 
tivities throughout the year. 

At this time the Dairy Club members wish to ex- 
press thanks and appreciation to the faculty mem- 
bers for their untiring efforts in contributing to 
the success of our activities. 




■^"%: 




[56] 



FIFTH ANNUAL 



DAIRY INDUSTRY 



SHOW 



An educational program demonstrating various 
methods of manufacturing dairy products was 
featured in the 1952 Dairy Industry Show. Held 
each year in early May under the sponsorship of 
the Dairy Club, this show is student organized and 
operated. All four year and Stockbridge students 
evincing interest in the various phases of dairy 
industry, voluntarily conduct the show. 

Supervised by a faculty member, this show has 
grown from an attendance of 400 in 1948 to over 
7,000 in 1952. At the same time, the number and 
quality of the display exhibits have improved 
markedly. Starting with relatively few participants 
in the early shows, we now have 30 students vieing 
for the trophies and prizes which have been made 
available by dairy plants and equipment people, 
to whom the students and the dairy department are 
deeply grateful. 

The main theme of this year's show was a 
"Cheese Festival" where nine major cheese comp- 
anies demonstrated their products in very attractive 
display booths. A "Queen of the Cheese Festival" 
reigned over the show and was the center of at- 
traction with her vivacious beauty and charming 
personality. An "Ice Cream Carnival" was an over- 
whelming success, from the viewpoints of the 
amount of product consumed and the variety and 
number of questions asked. 

The primary function of the show is two-fold; 
consumer education and student training in sales- 
manship. But the fellows who were in the show 
will always remember it as work. 




C57} 




Floriculture Club 




The Floriculture Club is made up of both University and Stock- 
bridge School students who are majoring in or are interested in 
Floriculture. 

This year the club is fortunate in having a fine group of of- 
icers. They are : President, Frank Hampson ; Vice President, Allen 
Botacchi ; Secretary, Marjorie Alden; Treasurer, Claire Magee. 

During the past season, program chairman Richard Cornfoot 
has provided the club with some excellent speakers for their meet- 
ings. Among others, Alex Montgomery of Hadley gave an interest- 
ing talk on the Rose industry; Mr. W. I. P. Campbell of the Smith 
College Conservatories spoke on the apprentice system for horti- 
culture in England and Scotland and Dr. John W. Mastalerz of the 
Floriculture department at the Waltham Field Station brought the 
latest information on long-term storage of cut flowers. 

The club is indebted to Prof. Clark I. Thayer, Floriculture 
department head, for his advice and guidance as faculty advisor for 
the club. 



[58] 





Forestry Club 




The Forestry Club is composed of both student and faculty 
members. Membership belongs to Stockbridge students as well as 
the University of Massachusetts four-year men. Forestry and Wild- 
life majors dominate club attendance, although our meetings are 
open to everyone. 

As has been the practice in past years, men from all types of 
forestry professions are chosen as speakers. Movies, in the past, 
constituted a great part of each meeting. This practice was done 
away with during the past year in order that we might acquire 
some of the top men in the field of forestry as speakers. Dean 
Garrett of the Yale School of Forestry was one of these, another 
was the Assistant Forester of the United States, Mr. Marsh. 

A great deal of credit goes to Mr. MacConnell and Mr. Ganley, 
who, as club advisors, arranged our program schedule and offered 
great assistance. 






Horticulture Club 



The Ornamental Horticulture Club is made up of 
men majoring in Ornamental Horticulture, within 
the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 

The purpose of the club is to obtain speakers 
who emphasize the practical aspects of the field, 
and in general, broaden the student's education. 

Some of the speakers during the past season 
included Professor Clarke L. Thayer, head of the 
Floriculture Department at the University who spoke 
on Spring Flowering Bulbs. He showed the dif- 
ferent varieties of Spring Flowering bulbs, and 
some of the ways they are used. 



A representative of Bay State Nurseries came up 
and gave an interesting report on the problems of 
Nursery salesmanship. 

Other meetings consisted of business matters 
which came before the group. 

Officers of the Hort. Club are as follows: 
President— EDWm R. YOUNG 
Vice-Pres.— ROLAND E. CHAPUT 
Secretory— FRANK W. DORSEY 
Treasurer— ROGER DURGIN 
Faculty advisor is Assistant Professor Paul N. 
Procopio. 




HORTICULTURE SHOW 







^ t^ 4t> 




The fortieth annual Horticultural Show was 
opened on Friday, November 7, 1952, for three 
days, during which exhibits prepared by Stock- 
bridge and University students were on display. 

The theme was Shoppers' World, Framingham, 
Massachusettes, complete with a center area of 
neat lawns, walks, and well planned gardens. The 
remainder of the exhibits were located at various 
places along the walls of "the Cage". 

Continued on Page 62 





?;^l 






% 



mumm 




[61] 



HORTICULTURE SHOW 








fr !£?!"••;- i nM | T^S 



X-^ &- 







PS 






Continued from Page 61 




On Friday evening, Shirley Stevens, '55, was 
crowned Queen of the Hort Show, and presided 
over the remainder of the show with two attendants, 
Fredrica Dole, '53, and Judy Laughton, Stock- 
bridge, '54. 

There were several outstanding exhibits by the 
various departments, including a model of the 
new dining hall now under construction, and a 
country store, "Then and Now". 

Credit for the show goes to those students from 
both Stockbridge and the University who made it 
such a success. 





Poultry Club 



The Poultry Science Club is made up of students 
from both the University and the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. The Club's activities are 
educational as well as social. 

The officers for '52-53 were: Stanley Brown, 
President; Ronald Ferguson, Vice-President; Julius 
Hayward, Secretary; Kenneth Gareri, Treasurer; 
Joseph Freitas, Sergeant-at-Arms; and Professor 
Vondell, Advisor. 

The club was very well attended as one could 
hardly afford to miss the excellent programs ar- 
ranged by Prof. Vondell. 

Some of the speakers which brought us helpful 
information at our bi-monthly meetings were: Dr. 



Arthur P. Homes of the Chemistry Department, 
Mr. Sydney Cole a successful poultryman. Dr. 
Snoeyenbos of the Veterinary Science Department, 
Dr. Fox of the Poultry Research, and Mr. G. T. 
Klien of the Poultry Department Extension Ser- 
vice. 

A Christmas Party was held December 16. An 
excellent evening of entertainment was presented 
by a group of girls from the University. 

Our thanks and appreciation are extended to 
Professor John H. Vondell for his untiring efforts 
in securing speakers and entertainers, which made 
the Club meetings a tremendous success. 



[63] 





Olericulture Club 



This club is organized for a better understand- 
ing between students and faculty. 

It consists of members of the Stockbridge 
School and the University interested in vegetable 
growing. The meetings present new ideas and de- 
velopments in the industry through various 
speakers. 

Among the activities this year was a talk on 
Agriculture Fifty Years Ago and Today by H. L. 



Thomson, How I Started from a Shoestring by A. 
Christopher, and Horticulture In Canada by Pro- 
fessor J. D. Campbell of our department. Some of 
these meetings were held with other Clubs on 
campus. Near the end of the year a banquet is held 
at some nearby restaurant for all members and 
friends. 

There are ten Stockbridge members and fifteen 
University members in the Club. 




m:mmi 






"^-'smi 






Glee Club 



For the second consecutive year, the Stockbridge Glee Club 
has been in existence as a student activity. It is the aim of the Glee 
Club to provide, through music, a social outlet for the enjoyment of 
the men. This year it was our great pleasure to welcome the Univer- 
sity Freshmen girls to our group. They added a great deal to the 
enjoyment of the program, both musically and socially. 

This year we were very fortunate in having as our accompany- 
ist. Miss Shirley Tuttle; Jim Chapman was our director for the sec- 
ond year. 




[66] 



Pop Barrett's 



WZed^i^ag^ 



While working on a farm survey last June I 
had a very interesting experience with a New York 
farmer. Shortly after dinner one day I stopped at 
the back door of a farm house and asked to see Mr. 
Kingman. The lady of the house said that he would 
be right out so I sat down in a chair under a beau- 
tiful ash tree. 

When he came out I said, "My, this is a beautiful 
tree and it is nice and cool here this afternoon." 
After a- few moments he replied, "Yes, and I do a 
lot of my farming under this tree." Pulling out a 
cigar he lighted it while I waited for him to con- 
tinue. Without turning towards me he went on 
after a few puffs on the cigar, "Yes, I do a lot of 
farming under this tree," waving his hand towards 
the fertile fields which sloped to the south and were 
plainly visible from where we sat. Pointing, he 
continued, "My land runs to the trees on the right, 
south to that stone wall and east to the road. Not 
a fence nor a stone in it, about 65 acres in all." 

Noticing that he seemed to be deep in thought 
I waited patiently while he puffed leisurely on the 
cigar. As if thinking out loud, "The Soil Conser- 
vation Service has mapped all that land for me 
and I am cropping it according to recommenda- 
tions." 




For the next half hour he monopolized the con- 
versation by telling me all about his fertilizing and 
seeding practices, yields, time of cutting and the 
efficient use of machinery on that beautiful field. 
He then talked about his purebred herd, his labor 
program, and his future plans for the farm. And 
then added, "And you know, I don't work on the 
average more than eight hours a day." The cigar 
had long since burned itself out. He turned towards 
me indicating that he had finished talking. 

After a moment I said, "Yes, I understand what 
you meant when you said that you do a lot of 
farming under this tree." 

Then we got down to the business of my visit and 
I filled out the survey blank. We shook hands and 
I bid him good bye. As I drove away I noticed that 
he was still sitting under the tree and I wondered if 
he was going to enjoy a short nap. 

Evidently, Mr. Kingman took time out often to 
relax and make definite plans for the successful 
operation of his farm business. Isn't that just good 
farm management? 




[67] 




Football 








First Row, Left to Right: George Andruk, Frank Marlines, Paul MacGrath, 
Joseph Freitas, Lewis Mason, Kenneth Gareri, Austin Smith, David Lundquist. 
Second Row. Leonard Baj, Edward Brodecki, Wayne Whitney, Charles Le- 
verone, David Hancock, Ward Fitzgerald, Thomas Porter. Third Row: Alden 
French, Mike Ovian, Donald Mead, John Urquhart, Steve Kosakowski. 

This year Stockbridge football enjoyed what was probably the 
best season in the history of the school. 

The "Blue and White", as a result of three days practice, lost 
their first game to Thayer Academy, 25-0. 

The following week with some practice and at full strength 
we defeated Vermont Academy, 20 - 0. 

The team exploded in its next game against Suffield Academy, 
as they won 58 ■ 26. 

The following week we evened an old score with Nichols Junior 
College, as we rocked them 38-6, in our best game of the year. 

We came into our big game with Monson Academy in top 
form with Paul McGrath leading us to a 24 - 14 win. 

We closed against the New York Aggies at Farmingdale, Long 
Island, as we beat our strongest opponent of the year 19 - 6. 

Ernie Fournier and Donald Barber were elected Co-Captains 
for next season. 







[68] 



rr 




iFjtacJ^&Aidq.e Ag.g.itd 



%Jisct/TL-<^ — 52.. 

















COA^CH ST£V£ 
K05AH0WSHI 




[69] 




Basketball 




First Row, left to right: Donald Hall, Joseph Freitas, 
Alfred Drowne, William Dziuba, Richard Emery. Second 
Row: Steve Kosakowski ( CoacA ) , Paul Kasperson iCapt.) , 
Donald Greene, David Freeman, Donald Barber, Paul 
Gayoski (Mgr.). 



The basketball season was not too successful. 
We started the year with a good first five and few 
replacements. As the season progressed we lost a 
couple of boys to the service, one transferred and 
one injury left the team with but one first stringer. 

Our first game was against Western Mass- 
achusetts Pharmacy which we lost 54-47. 

The next and most impressive showing that we 
made all season was against Worcester Junior Col- 
lege. We took over the lead right away and held on 
to it until the final buzzer sounded, at which time 
the score was 73-46. 

Much need not be said about the rest of the 
games that we participated in, as the Stockbridge 
ballhandlers always seemed to end up with the loos- 
ing half of the score. Out of thirteen games the 
Aggies were able to hold their own in three. 

Bob Lee was our high scorer for the season and 
our main standout on the hardwood. Also listed 
as Aggie standouts are Paul Kasperson and Joe 
Freitas. 




Ind 



oor 



Track 



Left to Right: Paul Leonard, Charles Leverone (Captain), Alden French. 



This winter, Stockbridge formed an informal 
track team, which consisted mainly of four men, 
Captain Charles Leverone, Paul Leonard, Alden 
French, and Joseph Pecos. 

The team competed in three meets, each of which 
were three-team affairs. The first meet on February 
11, consisted of the University Freshmen-Williston 
Academy and Stockbridge. Stockbridge's Charlie 
Leverone was "man of the day". He scored a total 
of eighteen points, and placed no lower than second 
in five of the six events he entered. He was a close 
second in the low and high hurdles and the 35 
yard dash. He won the high jump and tied for 



first in the 300 yard dash. Joe Picot threw the 
shot-put. Paul Leonard ran the 400 yard event 
along with the relays^ Alden French ran the 1000 
yard event and also the relay race. Stockbridge 
finished second, defeating Williston but lost to the 
freshmen. 

The second meet on February 17, consisted of 
Willbraham Academy the University Freshmen and 
Stockbridge. 

The boys practiced on their own time. The team 
was coached by the likable University coach, Mr. 
Derby. 

Steve Kosakowski 




Hockey 




First Row, Left to Right: Paul Leonard, Arthur Mudgett, John Bouthillette, 
Jerome Puddister, Robert Patch. Second Row: Donald Bingham, John Bradley, 
John Urquhart, Richard Burnside, Bruce Ryder, Donald Mead, Paul Kayoski. 



After a year's lay off Stockbridge hockey has 
been once more resumed because of popular de- 
mand and interest among many of the boys. So 
far this year ice has been rather limited due to the 
weather. In the early part of the season the team 
managed to get in a fair amount of practice under 
the lights at the college pond. 

Coach Steve Kosakowski after scouting around 
managed to secure a game with Vermont Academy 



to be played there. The boys played an excellent 
game, after getting off to a slow start tieing Ver- 
mont Academy 2-2 at the end of regular playing 
time only to lose 4-2 in a five minute over-time 
period. 

The boys played a game with the Amherst 
College Frosh in the Springfield Coliseum and 
lost 6-1, having very little chance to practice due 
to ice conditions. 




, .^^^ . 




Freshmen Reception Dance 



The Stockbridge freshmen were entertained by the seniors at 
the Freshmen Reception Dance held in Memorial Hall on the night 
of November 21, 1952. 

During intermission ice cream, cookies, and soft drinks were 
served. 



Senior Reception Dance 



A reception dance for the seniors was given by the freshman 
class on February 27, 1953. 

Music was supplied by the Star Dusters. The affair ended at 
midnight, a great success. 




OAe. Winter Carnival 



Though "Old Man Weather" was against us this 
year the Winter Carnival was a great success. 
The spring-like weather ruled out many of the 
winter sports. Ski joring. something new, had to 
be cancelled also. There were still many activities 
available: bowling, volleyball, faculty and co-ed 
hockey games were all on hand. On Monday 
evening an out door barbeque was held at the 
Pond followed by group singing around the fire 
places. 



Because of the lack of snow there were no snow 
sculptures, an event which had always added so 
much to the Winter Carnival. 

The "Snowflake Ball", with music provided by 
Elliot Lawrence, was the highlight of the weekend. 
Professional decorators transformed the Cage into 
a winter wonderland. The Naiads, a fashion show, 
and concert all helped to make it a memorable 
weekend. Jane Rex, queen of the Carnival, reigned 
over each event throughout the whole weekend. 




[74} 









[75] 




A Former Editor 



OMw-eZd 



The United States of America enjoys an unique 
position in today's world, it being the recognized 
leader of free nations, a position we must be care- 
ful neither to exploit for personal gain nor to shirk 
the responsibilities of that capacity. To represent 
that leading nation properly in foreign countries is 
a real challenge and also the experience of a life- 
time. 

Such was the honor that befell me in the sum- 
mer of 1952 after I had been selected by the Na- 
tional 4-H Foundation in Washington as one of 
90 young people from the United States and Alaska 
who would represent America by living and work- 
ing on farms in Europe, the Near East and North 
Africa. 

The International Farm Youth Exchange pro- 
gram is a two-way exchange of young agricultural 
people of our country and others for the purpose 
of creating an international understanding of each 



other's hopes, problems, fears, etc. By so doing we 
all become aware that although we live in different 
climates, speak different languages, and have dif- 
ferent standards, we are all basically the same. 
Thus we are all one big family and it seems in- 
credible that we should wage war on each other. 
In this approach IFYE hopes to add some im- 
petus to a world peace movement. 

My owh experiences as an IFYE delegate began 
just after the SSA '52 graduation and consisted 
of visits to Portugal, Gibraltar, Italy, and Switzer- 
land, plus four months of living and working on 
farms in France and Tunisia. I have made wine 
with Frenchmen and taught illiterate Arabs in 
North Africa how to operate modern American ma- 
chines. These things and many others are what 
I tell about as I travel around with slides and 
stories of my foreign friends. 

ROBERT E.HUME 














?^«c>-i„fs!:t c^Vf^jfivA - 





[77] 



L U 1 1 A AgAlcuituAat 9:und 




Lotta Crabtree loans are a definite help in get- 
ting started in farming to those graduates of the 
University and Stockbridge School of Agriculture 
who can qualify for their use. Following are some 
of the more common reasons why applicants for 
Crabtree loans have not been able to qualify: 

Lack of Security — Some applicants apparently 
think that they can borrow an amount equal to the 
full value of the property pledged for security. This 
is not so. Safe financing requires a considerable 
margin in the value of the pledged property over 
the amount that can be loaned on it. 

Lack of Equity — Equity means having enough 
cash savings or property to establish an unen- 
cumbered financial interest in the business but con- 
sists rather of the borrower's own money or prop- 
erty that is to become a part of the investment. 
Equity, or investment of an applicant's own funds, 
is an indication of the applicant's faith in the bus- 
iness to be started. It also means a lower debt load 
and a safer position financially. 

Too Much Debt — Total indebtedness is closely 
related to one's ability to establish equity in his 
investment. If a borrower has no savings of his 
own and has to go in debt for the full amount of his 



investment, chances are his total indebtedness will 
be beyond the limits of safety. Several requests for 
loans have been rejected because the potential earn- 
ing capacity of the farm and the business pro- 
posed on it, was not great enough to assure re- 
payment of debts after allowing for necessary 
farm operating expenses and family living. 

Other reasons why some applicants have not 
qualified for loans are : 

1. Apparent purpose to buy a home rather 
than to get started in a full-time business. 

2. Overvalued property planned for purchase 
and on which to engage in farming. 

3. Apparent intention to liquidate debts al- 
ready contracted rather than to get started in farm- 
ing. 

4. Unsound or incomplete plans for financing 
and getting established. 

5. Involvement in family financing and appar- 
ent use of funds for a person or persons not a grad- 
uate of the University or Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture. 

Crabtree loans are available to those who can 
qualify in amounts up to $10,000 and for a period 
up to 15 years and without interest. 



[78] 




WOMEN'S 



??£acefrteni 



You leave the University at a time of far-reach- 
ing changes in the world. These changes will create 
hitherto undreamed of opportunities for you and 
your husbands in agriculture and industry. 

It is natural for you to wonder how to fit into 
the changing world, and indeed the next few years 
are important for these are the years to carve out 
your future. Your education will help you to be- 
come established, but formal studies are not suf- 
ficient. Enthusiasm and energy must come from 
within yourself. A hundred years ago. Thomas 
Huxley said: 

"Perhaps the most valuable result of all 
education is the ability to make yourself 
do the thing you have to do, when it ought 
to be done, whether you like it or not; it is 
the first lesson that ought to be learned; 
and however early a mans training begins, 
it is probably the last lesson that he learns 
thoroughly." 
Graduation does not mark the end of your ed- 
ucation. Continue to broaden yourself and in 
your chosen field, keep abreast of changes by learn- 
ing from those with experience, by studying and 
seeking new truths. I would like to end with one 
more quotation from Huxley: 

'Wo rung of the ladder was ever built to 

rest upon, but only to hold a man's foot 

long enough to enable him to put the other 

somewhat higher." 

Goodbye for the present. Do keep in touch with 

the Placement Office. We will always be glad to 

see and hear from you. 

MRS. G. S. CORNISH 





MEN'S 



'PJiaeeJintnt 



With a large number of young men employed 
on placement under a variety of conditions, it is 
not to be wondered at that a wide variety of events 
or situations will develop, both humorous and 
otherwise. 

One such situation or series or events stands out. 
in that it offers a lesson from which all of us may 
gain. I do not wish to identify the young man in 
any way so I will say he was a Poultry major 
which he was not. 

He worked for two employers, three months for 
each, and both are good, reliable, proven employers 
of training students. He was talked to several times, 
warned, and finally discharged by the first man 
who, in his report to me used the following ad- 
jectives — lazy, indifferent, lacks interest in his 
work, always late, careless. 

The student had good grades, admitted it was all 
his fault, seemed deserving so was given a second 
job at a very low wage rate. At the end of the 
second three months the employer rated him ex- 
cellent, punctual, very interested, persevering, etc., 
and gave him a fine bonus to make up for the low 
hourly rate. 

A comparison of the earnings for 1952 as 
against those of 1951 shows a considerable in- 
crease in all major groups indicating a definite in- 
crease in wages all along the line. 

Nearly twenty per cent of the men who started 
placement did not return for the second year. This 
is larger than usual and is due to the draft and 
enlistments. 

A breakdown of the reasons why the 26 men did 
not return is indicated below. Probably 4 "un- 
knowns" did not return because of the draft but 
failed to notify me. The military is causing an in- 
creasing number of withdrawals and these will 
probably increase the next few years unless con- 
ditions change. 




.1 



Reasons for not returning for the second 
year 

Draft & Enlistments 16 

Enter University of Massachusetts 3 
Enter Syracuse School of Forestry 1 
Start own business 1 

Failed in Placement 1 

Unknown 4 



TOTAL 26 

There was likewise a very definite shrinkage 
of the class of 1952 which graduated 123 men in 
June. Below is a survey of their first jobs. 

Why the sudden change? What happened? The 
employers were both right. The change was in the 
student because I checked the case closely. The 
answer is in the simple statement — "It's up to you." 
"Our Lord has created us to achieve great things, 
but we can achieve them only by our own efforts". 
(St. Francis of Assisi) 

EMORY E. GRAYSON 
Director of Placement Service 



[80] 




Placement Training 



The number of freshmen placed for the required training period hit a new low since the war. 
The class started out with nearly 200 but there were numerous withdrawals principally due to 
the draft and enlistments. Formerly the Stockbridge students were given deferments similar to 
the University but such is no longer the case. 

There were but 133 men who started placement as indicated by majors on the following 
chart. This chart also shows the average earnings for students for the different majors as well 
as the total earnings for the group. 

Required Placement Training-Class oj 1953 
Summer of 1952 



Major 


Number 


Number 


Number 


Av. Earnings 


Total 




Placed 


Withdrawn 


Returning 


Per Student 


Earnings 


Animal Husbandry 


45 


8 


37 


$1135.67 


$42,020.00 


Arboriculture 


9 


1 


8 


1314.28 


10,514.25 


Dairy 


11 


3 


8- 


1348.59 


10,780.75 


Fine Turf 


8 


1 


7 


1367.50 


9,572.50 


Floriculture 


13 


1 


12 


1140.04 


13,680.50 


Food Management 


4 


1 


3 


810.66 


2,432.00 


Forestry 


9 


2 


7 


766.07 


5,362.50 


Horticulture 


11 


2 


9 


1332.75 


13,327.50 


Poultry 


18 


5 


13 


1249.39 


16,242.00 


Vegetable Gardening 


5 


2 


3 


1106.66 


3,320.00 




133 


26 


107 


$1185.22 


$127,252.00 



Occupational Survey - Stockbridge School 
Class of 1952 - Men 



griculture 




Ice Cream Plant work 


1 


Assistant Greenkeeper 


2 


Return to home farm 


8 


Father's Milk Plant 


2 


Golf Course Construction 


Assistant Mgr. Dairy F. 


1 


Tech. Assistant State 






1 


Herdsman 


5 


Agri. & Ind. School 


1 


Orchard Work 


1 


Assistant Herdsman 


4 


Horticulture 




Foreman - Tree Comp. 


3 


Farm Foreman 


3 


Landscape work 


6 


Climber & other Tree 




Farm Laborer (Dairy) 


4 


Third year Arboricult. 


3 


Work 


4 


Sales & Service work 


4 


Cemetery Maintenance 


1 


Flower Store 


3 


Fitting and Showing 




Nursery Work 


1 


Greenhouse Manager 


1 


cattle 


1 


Institution Grounds Main- 


General 




Farm Laborer (Poultry) 


tenance 


1 


Draft & Enlistments 


16 




6 


Rose Growing-Denmark 


1 


Enter University of Ma 


ss. 


Assistant Hatchery man 


1 


Forest Management 






3 


Poultry Experimental 




(Paper Co.) 


1 


Clothing Store 


1 


Farm 


1 


Commercial Forester 


1 


Unknown 


5 


Turkey Farm 


1 


U. S. Forest Service 


4 


Greenhouse Foreman 


3 


Mgr., Poultry Farm 


1 


Hardwood Grading 




Flower Shop & Green- 




Dairy Laboratory Work 




School 


1 


house Work 


2 




4 


Foreman - Vegetable 


3 


General Greenhouse 




Mgr. Ice Cream Dept. 


1 


Greenkeeper 


4 


Work 


1 


Milk Plant Work 


1 











The demand for agriculturally trained people continues 
to be very good. There is even beginning to be a shortage 
of farm help as there are many inquiries for men that we 
are unable to take care of because of lack of candidates. 




[81] 




The placement training program of the Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture has been, now is, and 
will continue to be an outstanding success from the 
employers point of view. It enables us to obtain 
the services of young men who are genuinely in- 
terested in our business and who are anxious to 
learn more about our business, at a time of year 
when they can be of real service to us. 

We welcome the opportunity to have them take 
their placement training with us, and we feel that 
this association is a real benefit to all concerned. 

The Director of Placement Training, Mr. Emory 
Grayson, has done a truly fine job in seeing that 
students are well qualified for the job he has se- 
lected for them. He has been most cooperative in 
fostering good relations between students and their 
employers. 




As Our 



During the period of nearly twenty years, it has 
been our good fortune to have in our employ a 
number of Stockbridge students. Without except- 
ion, they have been young men of good character 
and of more than average ability. 

Some of them have entered our employ as per- 
manent members of our organization after their 
graduation, and they have proved to be very fine 
associates of ours. 

Our association with these students has con- 
vinced us that the Stockbridge School of Agricul- 
ture is one of the outstanding schools of its kind 
and that the placement training program is a very 
valuable part of the student's education. 

In the years that lie head, we expect to continue 
to employ Stockbridge students who may wish 
to work with us during their placement training, 
and we hope that some of them may find a per- 
manent place in our Company. 

L. S. LONGLEY 




[82] 



Bosses See Us 



Once a year I look forward eagerly to the op- 
portunity of welcoming a Stockbridge student in- 
to our organization. I feel that here is an excel- 
lent chance to help a fellow, who has already ex- 
pressed his interest in Agriculture, along to a 
point of seriously choosing whether this is for him. 
At this point there is no use pulling any punches. 
No delusions allowed. It is serious preparation 
for an occupation that is vital to our economy. 

Up to now, classes have been the student's chief 
worries, and the occasional jobs have kept him in 
double Sunday and juke box money. He is on the 
verge of stepping into his own life and the farmer 
who agrees to accept a student for the Summer has 
a real responsibility in carving out a true and 
pleasant picture to inspire and enthuse the fellow 
on the greater agricultural accomplishments. 

As a plug for the School of Agriculture as a 
whole, I wish there were more graduates available 
to help us carry along efficiently the grave load of 




food production which is ours to bear. With only 
nine percent of the population gainfully employed 
in Agriculture, and the population increasing at a 
rate of two million a year, it's a foregone conclus- 
ion that farming is really the nation's number one 
challenge. Where would they be without us? 

I think the placement training program is excel- 
lent. It allows a diversity of horizons which home 
practical training might miss. It allows an adjust- 
ment of the technical to the practical without up- 
setting deep seated practices. It is a valuable step 
in the realization of the investments necessary in 
today's farming. It is another chance for farmers 
to improve productive capacity. 

FRED R. JONES 




'fK^i^:" 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 



The publishing of the Shorthorn is represented by the efforts of many people 
other than the members of the board. 



We of the Shorthorn board, hereby wish to express our appreciation to: "Pop" 
BARRETT, our faculty advisor. Without whose aid the publishing of this yearbook 
would have been next to impossible. 



To RALPH ALBERT VAN METER, for his kind co-operation in composing for 
us, his message. 

To MISS MARTIN and MISS HEFFERNAN, of the Short Course Office for 
their kind assistance. 



To COACH DERBY for writing the dedication. 

To MR. KELTON BLISH, representative for Progress Publishing Associates, 
Inc. 

To MRS. CORNISH and MR. GRAYSON for their articles on placement. 
To MR. KOLDY of Kinsman's Studio for serving as class photographer. 



To MR. F. H. BRANCH for his contribution about the Lotta Crabtree Agricult- 
ural Fund. 



To MR. L. LONGLEY, Stockbridge Class '24, of New Haven, Connecticut and 
MR. FRED R. JONES, and outstanding farmer from Concord, Massachusetts on their 
viewpoints of placement. 



Last but not least to the faculty members and students who helped to make this 
book a success. 



[84] 




Get in the Movies! 
Be a Film Star! 

Recapture the happy moments of Wed- 
dings, Family Outings, Funerals, Babies 
in action and Once in a lifetime events. 

Color Movies a specialty. 

"POP" BARRETT, Cinematographer 



Coinplhnents of . . . 

KINSMAN'S STUDIO 

46 MAIN STREET - AMHERST 



Official Photographers for Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture 



Official photographers for Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture for 25 years. Also 
serving Amherst College, Univ. of Mass.. 
Deerfield Academy, and others. 



[85] 



^Mcn. '^^chUh^ . . . 'PCu^ 



LAYOUT SERVICE 

PERSONAL ATTENTION 

EDITORIAL AND BUSINESS AIDS 

CONTROLLED PRODUCTION 

PLANNED BUDGET 

CLOSE COOPERATION WITH ADVISER AND STAFF 

POSITIVE DELIVERY DATE 



zi t^ 6c4t ut cfcanAwi^ 




''docoaA^, yUte{m2(n<z/jz^ 



DESIGNERS AND 


PUBLISHERS OF 


SCHOOL 8 COLLEGE 


ANNUALS 



PHONE 2-4401 • ALBANY 5, NEW YORK 



[86] 



Covers for the 1953 Shorthorn 



Designed and produced 



by 



The S. K. SMITH COMPANY 



[87] 



Compliments of 



THE UNIVERSITY STORE 



Text Books — Supplies — Stationery 



Ci^^ 



Hot and Cold Drinks 



Snacks for all Seasons 



Cx^^ 



^^Cross-roads of the Campus 



ff 



[88] 



I 





1^" 




}Ht^^ 








;>: 



'^■^i 



^^: 



V'< 



-y 



^^r 





'^. 



\H'