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Full text of "Shorthorn"

U5/00/S8 






, UMASS/AMHERST * 

312066 0339 0539 2 




1 *■'■'''«! 







STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF 



AGRICULTURE 




University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 



Shorthorn Board 




SHORTHORN BOARD 
FRONT ROW, left to right: Jerry Thomas (Asst. Editor), Janet Smith (Secretary), Ed Bliss 
(Business Mgr.), Pop Barrett (Advisor), Russ Anderson (Editor-in-Chief), Priscilla Cahill 
(Typist), Tom CuHinane (Asst. Editor). SECOND ROW: Stu Ramsey, Jim Ober, Nate Flood, 
Norm Eykel, Al Drowne, Dick Barakian. THIRD ROW: Don Homer, Walt Sampson, Bob 
Porter, Floyd Hayden, Leo Sullivan. >iot Present: Turk Kelsey, Roger Chadwick, Bob Dostaler, 
Dick Bowen. 



FOREWORD 



At the start of the Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture at the University of Massachusetts, in 1918, 
it was the goal of every graduating class to edit a 
year book, but it was not until 1921 that — THE 
SHORTHOKH was born. 

Its board seeks to compile a brief summary of 
each student's two years on campus so that in the 



years that follow each can renew old memories of 
college activities. In its some thirty-three years 
THE SHORTHORN, has been published for ap- 
proximately 2800 students, and it is hoped by this 
class that this history will be carried for years to 

come. " for whatsoever a man soweth, that 

shall he also reap." Galatians, 6: 7. 



[4] 



ROLAND HALE VERBECK 

When one thinks of the Stockbridge School of 
Agricuhure, one also thinks of Roland H. Verbeck 
because he is its first and only Director and has been 
its ardent champion and guiding hand thest past 
26 years. Mr. Verbeck became Director of the 
"Two-Year Course" in 1924 and the name Stock- 
bridge School of Agriculture was adopted in 1928. 

The students and faculty alike will miss his 
booming laughter and boundless enthusiasm. Per- 
haps the greatest tribute that can be paid Director 
Verbeck is the fact that under his direction the 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture has become the 
outstanding two-year agricultural school in the 
country. 

May he enjoy many years of doing the things 
he wants to do. 



CHARLES HIRAM THAYER 

Charles Hiram Thayer — teacher extraordinary, 
friend and counselor to all of his students, master 
teller of stories and anecdotes, a man of broad 
cultural and scientiiic interests and a possessor of a 
large fund of information in many and widely 
separated fields of knowledge, ever a student of past 
accomplishments, current developments and things 
to come, hiker, camper, lover of nature, good citizen 
— this is Professor Thayer. Fortunate indeed, are 
the many students who have made his acquaintance. 




Roland H. Verbeck 
Director of Stocl(bridge 



Charles H. Thayer 
Asst. Professor of Agronomy 



Retiring Faculty 



[5] 



President 



MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDEHT 

Your senior year has come to a close. Your last 
examinations are over and you are ready to enter the 
great and challenging field of Agriculture. You have done 
what you came here to do, and I congratulate each of 
you on a job well done. 

Yet if your learning stops here, if you look at the 
last two years as a goal in itself and not as a stepping- 
stone to life-long learning, we have failed you. Only if 
you use the knowledge and abilities you now have to go 
on to greater achievement will Stockbridge have given 
you its greatest gift. 

We hope that you will cherish always the memory 
of the years that we have shared on the beloved campus, 
and that you will return often to renew the friendships 
you have made. May this yearbook keep these memories 
fresh and remind you that our best wishes are with 
you always. 

America and the world need trained agrciulturists 
as never before. Be proud of the calling you have chosen. 
Take greater pride in bringing to agriculture the best 
you have in you. 

R. A. Van Meter 
President 



Provost 

]. PAUL MATHER 





HIS MESSAGE: 

The Stockbridge School of the University of Mass- 
achusetts represents a very essential part of the whole 
process of American higher education. As a two-year 
vocational school, it gives worthy and able young people 
a chance to extend their education beyond high school 
for at least two years. Because many high school graduates 
have neither time nor money to complete a full four-year 
course, the vocational nature of the Stockbridge curriculum 
allows for early specialization. As you who graduate 
move out into the community to succeed at your respective 
plans and jobs, it is my sincere hope that you will look 
back to your Stockbridge experience as one of the richest 
in true worth and value. Godspeed and good luck. 



[6] 





D 



e a n 



DALE H. SIBLING 

DEAN OF AGRICULTURE AND 

HORTICULTURE 



Dale H. Sieling, born 1909 in McCracken, 
Kansas; attended public schools in Kansas and 
graduated from Kansas State College with a 
degree in Chemistry in 1931; M.S. degree in 
soil and plant chemistry in 1932; Ph.D., Iowa 
State College, soil chemistry in 1936. Assistant 
Professor, Agricultural Biochemistry, Purdue 
University 1937-40; Research Professor, Soil 
Chemistry, University of Massachusetts 1940-47; 
Head, Department of Agronomy, 1947-50; Dean 
of Agriculture and Horticulture and Director of 
Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 
1950. 



D 



i r e c t o r 



ROLAND H. VERBECK 

DIRECTOR OE STOCKBRIDGE 

SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 

Born 1886. B.S., University of Massachusetts, 
1908. Principal Petersham (Mass.) Agricultural 
High School, 1909-1910. Headmaster Parson- 
field (Maine) Seminary, 1910-1916. First Lieu- 
tenant, Air Service, Commanding 281st Aero 
Squadron, American Expeditionary Forces, 1917- 
1919. Service in France, 1918-1919. Director, 
New York State School of Agriculture at St. 
Lawrence University, Canton, New York, 1919- 
1924. Director of Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture since 1924. National Education Associa- 
tion, Harvard Teachers' Association, Phi Sigma 
Kappa. 




[7] 



LUTHER BANTA— Assistant Profes- 
sor of Poultry Husbandry — Cornell 
University B.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1919. 

ROLLIN H. BARRETT — Professor 
of Farm Management — University of 
Connecticut B.S.; Cornell University 
M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1926. 

MATTHEW L. BLAISDELL— Assist- 
ant Professor of Animal Husbandrv 
and Superintendent of University Farm 
— University of Massachusetts B.S,; 
Joined the Faculty 1946. 

LYLE L. BLUNDELL — Professor of 
Horticulture — Iowa State College B.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1931. 

KENNETH L. BULLIS— Head of De- 
partment of Veterinary Science — Brad- 
ley University; Iowa State College 
D.V.M.; University of Massachusetts 
M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1929. 

JAMES W. CALLAHAN — Instructor 
of Agricultural Economics — University 
of Massachusetts B.S., M.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1948. 




a c 



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y 




JAMES W. CHADWICK— Instructor 
in Animal Husbandry — University of 
Massachusetts B.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1952. 

CARROLL BURR CORNISH— Place- 
ment Officer for Women — Grinnell 
College A.B.; Syracuse University 
M.A.; Joined the Faculty 1948. 

THOMAS A. CULBERTSON — As- 
sistant Professor of Food Technology 

— University of Massachusetts B.S.: 
Joined the Faculty 1952. 

HELEN CURTIS — Dean of Women 

— Iowa State Teacher's College A.B.: 
Columbia University A.M.; Joined the 
Faculty 1945. 

LAWRENCE DICKINSON — Associ- 
ate Professor of Agrostology — Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College B.S.; 
Massachusetts State College M.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1913. 

MARRON S. DuBOIS— Instructor m 
English — St. Lawrence University B.A.; 
Joined the Faculty 1951. 




JOHN MURRAY ELLIOT— Instruc- 
tor of Animal Husbandry — McGill 
University B.S.: (Agriculture) Univer- 
sity of Vermont M.S.: Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1950. 

JOHN N. EVERSON— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Agronomy — University of 
Massachusetts B.S.; University of Mass- 
achusetts M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1938. 

RICHARD C. FOLEY— Professor of 
Animal Husbandry — University of 
Massachusetts B.S.; University of Mass- 
achusetts M.S.; Rutgers University 
Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1932. 

ARTHUR P. FRENCH — Heaci of 
Department of Pomology — Ohio State 
University B.S.; University of Mass- 
achusetts M.S.; University of Minne- 
sota Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1922. 

EMORY E. GRAYSON— Director of 
Placement Service — Massachusetts 
Agricultural College B.S.; Springfield 
College; Joined the Faculty 1919. 

TOM S. HAMILTON, JR., B.F.A.— 
Instructor of Landscape Architecture. 



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DENZEL J. HANKINSON— Head of 
Department of Dairy Industry — Mich- 
igan State College B.S.; University of 
Connecticut M.S.; Pennsylvania State 
College Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 
1948. 

JOHN F. HANSON— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Entomology — University of 
Massachusetts^B.S.; M.S.; Ph.D.; Joined 
the Faculty 1947. 

ROBERT HOLDSWORTH— Head of 
Department of Forestry — Michigan 
State College B.S.; Yale University 
M.F.; Joined the Faculty 1930. 

SAMUEL C. HUBBARD — Assistant 
Professor of Floriculture: Joined the 
Faculty 1921. 

FRED P. JEFFREY— Head of Depart- 
ment of Poultry Husbandry — Rutgers 
University B.S.; University of Mass- 
achusetts M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1944. 

GORDON S. KING — Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Arboriculture — North Caro- 
lina State; Michigan State College 
B.S.; (Forestry); Joined the Faculty 
1950. 




[9] 




STEPHEN KOSAKOWSKI— iTistT-uc- 
tor of Physical Education — Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture; University of 
Massachusetts Coaching School; Uni- 
versity of Connecticut; Joined the 
Faculty 1947. 

THEODORE KOZLOWSKI— Profes- 
sor of Botany and Head of Depart- 
ment — Syracuse University B.S.; Duke 
University M.A.; Ph.D.; Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology; University of 
Buffalo; Joined the Faculty 1947. 

EDWARD P. LARKIN — Instructor 
of Bacteriology — Massachusetts State 
College B.S.; University of Massachu- 
setts M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1947. 

ARTHUR S. LEVINE— Associate Pro- 
fessor of Food Technology — University 
of Massachusetts B.S.; M.S.; Ph.D.; 
Joined the Faculty 1936. 

ADRIAN H. LINDSEY — Head of 
Department of Agricultural Economics; 
University of Illinois B.S.; Iowa State 
College M.S.; Ph.D; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1929. 

HARRY G. LINDQUIST— Assistant 
Professor of Dairy Industry — Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College B.S.; 
University of Maryland M.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1927. 



a c u 



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WILLIAM P. MacCONNELL — Pro- 
fessor of Forestry — University of Mass- 
achusetts B.S.; Yale School of Forestry 
M.F.; Joined the Faculty 1948. 

MINER J. MARKUSON — Associate 
Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
— University of Minnesota B.S. of 
ARCH.; Joined the Faculty 1925, 

D. HORACE NELSON — Assistant 
Professor of Dairy Industry — Univer- 
sity of New Hampshire B.S.; Univer- 
sity of Missouri M.S.; Pennsylvania 
State College Ph.D.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1945. 

ROBERT K. PATTERSON-^Assist- 
ant Professor of Agricultural Engineer- 
ing — University of Maine B.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1948. 

PAUL N. PROCOPIO— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Horticulture — University of 
Massachusetts B.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1947. 

ERNEST J. RADCLIFFE — Head of 
Department of Student Health — Uni- 
versity of Toronto M.D.; Joined the 
Faculty 1930. 



[10] 



ARNOLD D. RHODES — Professor 
of Forestry — University of New Hamp- 
shire B.S.; Yale University M.F.; 
Joined the Faculty 1939. 

NATHAN S. KALE— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Animal Husbandry — Univer- 
sity of Connecticut B.S.; University of 
Minnesota M.S.; Joined Faculty 1946. 

VICTOR A. RICE— Head of Depart- 
ment of Animal Husbandry — North 
Caroh'na State B.S.; University of Mass- 
achusetts M.A.; North CaroHna State 
Dr. A.: Joined the Faculty 1916. 

J. HARRY RICH— As,sociate Professor 
of Forestry — New York State College 
B.S.; M.F.': Joined the Faculty 1933. 

DONALD E. ROSS— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Floriculture — Massachusetts 
Agricultural College B.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1928. 

WILLIAM C. SANCTUARY — Pro- 
fessor of Poultry Husbandry — Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts B.S.; M.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1921. 




a c u 



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FRANK R. SHAW— Associate Profes- 
sor of Entomology — Massachusetts State 
College B.S.: Corfiell University Ph.D.; 
Joined the Faculty 1935. 

RUSSELL E. SMITH — Professor of 
Veterinary Science — Massachusetts 
State College B.S.; University of Penn- 
sylvania V.M.D.; Joined the Faculty 
1948. 

GRANT B. SNYDER— Head of De- 
partment of Olericulture — Ontario 
Agricultural College; Michigan State 
College; Joined the Faculty 1922. 

HERBERT N. STAPLETON— Head 
of Department of Agricultural Engi- 
neering — Kansas State College B.S.; 
M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1947. 

WILLIAM H. TAGUE — Assistant 
Professor of Agricultural Engineering 
— Iowa State College B.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1929. 

HARVEY L. SWEETMAN — A,9sist- 
ant Professor of Entomology — Colo- 
rado A. a M. B.S.; Iowa State College 
M.S.; Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1930. 



[11] 





CHARLES H. THAYER — Assistant 
Professor of Af^ronomy — Massachusetts 
Agricultural College; Massachusetts 
State College; Cornell University 
(Summer School); Iowa State College 
(Summer School); University of Mass- 
achusetts B.Agr. (Honorary) 1950; 
Toined the Faculty 1919. 

CLARK L. THAYER— Heaa of De- 
partment of Floriculture — Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College B.S.; Cornell 
University; Joined the Faculty 1919. 

REUBEN E. TRIPPENSEE — Profes- 
sor of Wildlife Management — Mich- 
igan State College B.S.; University of 
Michigan M.S.; Ph.D.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1936. 

ALDEN P. TUTTLE— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Vegetable Gardening — Mass- 
achusetts Agricultural College B.S.; 
Pennsylvania State College M.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1930. 

JOHN H. VONDELL— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Poultry Husbandry — Middle- 
bury College; Massachusetts State Col- 
lege; Joined the Faculty 1923. 

JOHN M. ZAK— Instructor of Agro- 
nomy — Massachusetts State College 
B.S.; M.S.: Joined the Faculty 1938. 



a c u 



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ALFRED K. POWERS— Instructor of 
Welding and Carpentry — Fitchburg 
State Teacher's College B.S. in Ed.; 
Joined the Faculty 1953. 

EDWARD S. PIRA — Instructor m 
Agricultural Engineering — University 
of Connecticut B.S.; Joined the Fac- 
ulty 1953. 

PAUL S. SMITH — Teaching Fellow 
Department of Dairy Industry — Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts B.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1953. 

DONALD E. WESCOTT — Instruc- 
tor of Food Technology — University of 
Massachusetts M.S.; B.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1952. 



GLADYS M. COOK— Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Home Economics — Indiana 
University B.S.; University of Mass- 
achusetts M.S. 

ALMON S. FISH, ]R.— Instructor of 
Pomology — Bates College A.B.; Kansas 
State College M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1953. 




[12] 



HERSCHEL G. ABBOTT— Instructor 
of Forestry — University of Maine B.S.; 
Harvard University M.F.; Joined the 
Faculty 1953. 

WALTER M. BANFIELD— Assistant 
Professor of Botany — Rutgers Univer- 
sity B.S.; University of Wisconsin 
Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1946. 



WILLIAM G. COLBY, Ph.D.- 
of Department of Agronomy. 



-Head 



RICHARD K. CORNFOOT— Instruc- 
tor of Floriculture — University of Mass- 
achusetts B.S.; Joined the Faculty 1953. 

ALICE J. DA VE Y — Instructor of 
Home Economics — University of Mary- 
land B.S.; Cornell University M.S. 




ROBERT V. GANLEY— Instructor m 
Forestry — University of Massachusetts 
B.S.; Duke School of Forestry M.F.; 
Joined the Faculty 1951. 



s^n*^ 



T. ALBERT PERLEY— Instructor of 
Animal Husbandry — University of 
Massachusetts B.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1953. 




WILLIAM L. IVES, B.S.— Instructor 
of Floriculture — University of Massa- 
chusetts B.S.; Joined the Faculty 1951. 

W. BRADFORD JOHNSON — In- 
structor of Olericulture — Pennsylvania 
State College B.S.; University of 
Massachusetts M.S.; Joined the Faculty 
1947. 



TORVALD A. BERTINUSON, M.S. 
— Instructor of Agronomy. 



Faculty 



BENJAMIN RICCI, JR. — Assistant 
Professor of Physical Education — 
Springfield College B.S. in Physical 
Education; M.Ed; Joined the Faculty 
1950. 

JOHN A. WEIDHAAS, JR.— Instruc- 
tor of Entomology — University of 
Massachusetts B.S.; M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1953. 



[13] 



President 



Vice-President 







1 




STEPHEN MICHAEL GILMARTIN 

"Steve" 
Boston 



ROLFE GERHARDT HAYES 

"Chuc\" 
West Newton 



Secretary 










Senior 



Cla 



ss 



Officers 



Treasurer 




PAUL S. LEONARD 
Arlington 



DONALD J. BARBER 
"Don" 
Natick 



[15] 





RONALD GILBERT ALLENBY 
"Gib" 
Falmouth 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Highfield Estate, Inc., 
Falmouth. ACTIVITIES: Floriculture 
Club 1; Hort Show 1, 2; Alpha Tau 
Gamma 1; Hort Club 1, 2, Vice- 
President 2; Hockey 1; Veteran. 



WILLIAM F. AUSTIN 
"BiH" 
Palmer 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: University of Mass., Amherst. 
ACTIVITIES: Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2. 







h 


J^- 




1 


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. m 


1 



H. RUSSELL ANDERSON 
"Russ" 
Holbrook 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Appleton Farms, Ipswich. 
ACTIVITIES: Editor-in-Chief Short- 
horn Board 2; Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2; Veteran. 





WARREN ARCHAMBAULT 
"Archie" 
Northampton 
MAJOR: Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: Long Trail Lodge, Rutland, 
Vt. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1; Cup 
and Blade 2. 



DONALD J. BARBER 
"Don" 

Natick 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Waltham Field Station, Waltham. AC- 
TIVITIES: Football 1, 2, Co-Captain 
2: Basketball 1, 2; Floriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2. 



LLOYD RALPH BALDWIN 
"Pete" 
Swansea 
MAJOR: Foresty. PLACEMENT: 
New Haven Water Co., New Haven, 
Conn. ACTIVITIES: Forestry Club 2; 
Veteran. 

[16} 






THOMAS J. BEBBINGTON 
"Tom" 
Tewksbury 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT; Donald W. Hazen, Hadley. 
ACTIVITIES: An Hus Club 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2; 
F.F.A. 1. 



PETER JOHN BARDZIK 
"Pete" 
Chicopee Falls 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: White Star Farm, Deerfield. 
ACTIVITIES: An Hus Club 1; Kappa 
Kappa 2. 



EDWARD J. BLISS 
"Eddie" - "Biissie" 
Rehoboth 
MAJOR: Dairy Industry. PLACE- 
MENT: David Buttrick Co., Arling- 
ton. ACTIVITIES: Business Manager 
Shorthorn Board 2; Dairy Club 1, 2; 
Kappa Kappa 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Bowl- 
ing 1, 2. 






WARREN J. BIRCH 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Montgomery Roses, Inc., Hadley. AC- 
TIVITIES: Floriculture Club 1, 2, 
President 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Veteran. 



WILLIAM PAUL BRENCHICK, JR. 
"Bill" 
Lexington 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Norumbega Nurseries, 
Weston. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 
1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2, Presi- 
dent 2; Hort Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2. 



MAJOR 
MENT: 
Lowell. 
Board 2 
Kappa 2 



RICHARD N. BOWEN 
"Por\y" 
West Concord 
Dairy Industry. PLACE- 
William J. Burbeck Co., 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn 
Dairy Club 1, 2; Kappa 






ERNEST WILLIAM BROSSEAU 
"Biii" 
Springfield 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Grafton State Hospital, North 
Grafton. ACTIVITIES: Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2; Veteran. 



RICHARD SHIVELY BROWN 
"Brownie" 
Pottstown, Penna. 
MAJOR : Aboriculture. PLACEMENT : 
Chester Valley Tree Experts, Potts- 
town, Penna. ACTIVITIES: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Aboriculture Club 1, 2, 
Secretary-Treasurer 2. 





RICHARD MASON BURNSIDE 
"Dick" 
Swansea 
MAJOR: Dairy Industry. PLACE- 
MENT: Whiting Milk Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. ACTIVITIES: Dairy 
Club 1, 2; An Hus Club 1; Kappa 
Kappa 2; Hockey 1, 2. 



SANTO A. BUTERA 
"Hick" 
Brighton 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Santo Butera, Brigh- 
ton. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 2: 
Kappa Kappa 1, 2, House Marshal 2; 
Hort Club 1, 2; Veteran. 





PRISCILLA JEAN CAHILL 
Quincy 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Red Feather Farm, Randolph. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 1, 2; 
Poultry Club 1, 2, Secretary 2; 
Square Dance Club 2. 

[18] 



MAURICE CHARLES CAMERON 

Springfield 
MAJOR: Turf Maintenance. PLACE- 
MENT: Hollywood Golf Course, Deac, 
N. J. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2. 





MAUD GARY 
"Sunny" 
Newington, Conn. 
MAJOR: Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: White Elephant Hotel, Nan- 
tucket. ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn 
Board 1; Glee Club 1; Hort Show 
1, 2; Secretary Cup and Blade 1. 



WILLIAM W. GANNON 
"Bill" 
Brockton 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Waldeekers Greenhouses, Braintree. 
ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1, 2; Flori- 
culture Club 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2. 






PETER DAVID CAZALE 
"Pete" 
Waban 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Ruane The Florist, Newtonville. AC- 
TIVITIES: Floriculture Club 2: Hort 
Show 2. 



ROGER C. GHADWICK 

"Chuc\" 
West Boxford 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Alderbrook Farm, West 
Boxford. ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn 
Board 2; Basketball 2; An Hus Club 
2; Little International 2; Kappa Kappa 
1, 2; Dairy Classic 2. 





WILLIAM RAYMOND CLARK 

"Bill" 

Millis 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Hillcrest Farm, Framingham. 
ACTIVITIES: An Hus Club 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2. 



JOHN FREDERICK CONDON 
"]ac\" 
Dedham 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Simonis Florist, Norwood. ACTIV- 
ITIES: Floriculture Club 2; Hort 
Show 2; Hockey 1. 

[19] 




.ffHtH: 






ROBERT HOWE DAVIS 
"Bob" 
Billerica 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Charles' Nursery, Con- 
cord. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Hort Club 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 
1, 2, Secretary 2. 



THOMAS F. CULLINANE, JR. 

"Cuil" 
Walpole 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Mayo's Duck Farm, Inc., East 
Orleans. ACTIVITIES : Shorthorn 
Board 1, 2, Assistant Editor 2; Poultry 
Club 2; Square Dance Club 2. 





JOSEPH R. DELORENZO, JR. 
"Joe" 
Duxbury 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: LaGreca Bros., Turkey Farm, 
Kingston. ACTIVITIES: Poultry 
Club 1, 2. 



ROBERT B. DENNIS 
"Bob" 
Indian Orchard 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
McDonald's Greenhouses, Springfield. 
ACTIVITIES: Floriculture Club 1, 2; 
Hort Show 1, 2. 





WILFRED LOUIS DENNIS 
Otter River 
MAJOR: Vegetable Growing. PLACE- 
MENT; Worcester State Hospital, 
Worcester. ACtK^ITIES : Hort Show 
1, 2; Olericulture Club 1, 2. 



[20] 



AVIT ROBERT DOSTALER 
"Bob" 
Lowell 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT; Danvers State Hospital, Dan- 
vers. ACTIVITIES: Associate Editor 
Shorthorn Board 2; Football 2; An 
Hus Club 1; Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2; 
Bowling 1; Basketball 2. 





tf: 



ALFRED CHARLES DROWNE 
"Al" 
Rehoboth 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Lush Acres Farm, Rehoboth. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; 
Football 2; Basketball 1, 2; Glee Club 
1, 2; An Hus Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2: Dairy 
Classic 2; Square Dance Club 2; Bowl- 
ing 1. 



LYNWOOD HAROLD EATON 
"Lynn" 
Sutton 
MAJOR: Dairy Industry. PLACE- 
MENT: H. P. Hood and Son's, Wor- 
cester. ACTIVITIES: Treasurer Stu- 
dent Council 2; Glee Club 1, 2: 
Dairy Club 1, 2, President 2: Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2, Secretary 2; Inter- 
Fraternity Representative 1. 





STEPHEN EFSTRATIOU 
"Steve" 
Worcester 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Hixon's Greenhouses, Worcester. AC- 
TIVITIES: Glee Club 1, 2; Floricul- 
ture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; 
S.C.A. 1, 2; Chrysostom Club 1, 2; 
Chaplain's Council S.C.A. 1. 



RICHARD JAMES ELLIS 
"Dicl(' 
Woronoco 
MAJOR; Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: The Pines, Cotuit. ACTIV- 
ITIES: Glee Club 1; Cup and Blade 
2: Veteran. 




NORMAN PHILIP EYKEL 
"ike" 
Dedham 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Colbern Farm, Westwood. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 1; 
Outing Club 1; Treasurer An Hus 
Club 2; Little International 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1; Dairy Classic 2; F.F.A. 1; 
Square Dance Club 2. 




I 



t^ 





RICHARD WARREN EMERY 
"DicV 
Merrimac 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Christie Poultry Farms, Inc., 
Kingston, N. H. ACTIVITIES: Bas- 
ketball 1, 2; Poultry Club 1, 2. 

[21] 






HAROLD REYNOLDS FALL, JR. 

Lynn 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Ives Greenhouses, Salem. ACTIV- 
ITIES: Floriculture Club Vice-Presi- 
dent 2: President and General Chair- 
man Hort Show 2; Veteran. 



JAMES WARD FITZGERALD 
"Fitz" 
Clarks Summit, Penna. 
MAJOR: Dairy Industry. PLACE- 
MENT: Woodlawn Farm Dairy Co., 
Sornaton, Penna. ACTIVITIES: Foot- 
ball 1, 2; Dairy Club 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Inter-Fraternity Sports 2. 





NATHAN B. FLOOD 
"T<late" 
Bridgewater 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Harco Orchards and Poultry 
Farm, Inc., South Easton. ACTIV- 
ITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; Poultry 
Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 2; Square Dance 
Club 2. 



G. ERNEST FOURNIER 
"Ernie" 
East Hartford, Conn. 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT; The Brower Hutt 
Nurseries, Glastonbury, Conn. AC- 
TIVITIES: Football 1, 2, Co-Captain 
2; Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club 1, 2; 
Veteran. 







k 




ALDEN PAGE FRENCH 
"Oilie" 
Belmont 
MAJOR: Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: Smith House, Cambridge, 
Howard Johnson's, Cambridge. AC- 
TIVITIES: Football 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Cup and Blade 2; Indoor 
Track 1. ^22] 



PAUL G. GAYOSKI 
"Smilic" 
Rochester 
MAJOR: Vegetable Growing. PLACE- 
MENT: John Gayoski, Rochester. AC- 
TIVITIES: Manager Football 2; 
Manager Basketball 2; Hort Show 2; 
Olericulture Club 2; Square Dance 
Club 2; Kappa Kappa 2. 





<IMI X ■ 





DAVID GEELE 
"Dave" 
West Medway 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Clear Lake Duck Farm, Mars- 
ton Mills. ACTIVITIES: Poultry 
Club 1, 2; F.F.A. 2. 



SHERMAN BARRETT HALL 
"Sherm" 
North Haven, Conn, 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Bell Nurseries, North 
Haven, Conn. ACTIVITIES: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 1; Hort 
Club 2. 




""^ 



STEPHEN MICHAEL GILMARTIN 

"Steve" 

Boston 
MAJOR: Dairy Industry. PLACE- 
MENT: Hendries Ice Cream, Milton. 
ACTIVITIES: Class President 2: 
Student Council 2; Football 2; Dairy 
Club 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2; Presi- 
dent 2; Inter-Fraternity Sports 2: 
Veteran. 




ERNEST E. HARDY 
Madison, N. J. 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: J. H. Schmidt and 
Son, Inc., Millburn, N. J. ACTIV- 
ITIES: Hort Show 1, 2, Vice-President 
Hort Council 1; President Hort Club 
1; Veteran. 

[23} 




HOWARD CHARLES GORDON 
Watertown 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Medfield State Hospital, Hard- 
ing. ACTIVITIES: Cross Country 1; 
An Hus Club 1; Square Dance Club 
1; S.C.A. 1, 2; Massachusetts Bible 
Fellowship Treasurer 1, 2. 



FLOYD MILTON HAYDEN 
Granville 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Ledge View Farm, Granville. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; 
Basketball 2; Glee Club 1, 2; An Hus 
Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2. 




^_ .:>- 



% %i 





RICHARD BROWNING 
HOLBROOK 
-Dick" 
Westwood 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Harold Caldwell, Littleton. 
ACTIVITIES: Poultry Club 1,-2, 
Treasurer 2. 



ROLFE GERHARDT HAYES 
"Chuc\" 
West Newton 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Vinton Farm, Charlestown, 
W. Va. ACTIVITIES: Class Vice- 
Pre»dent 1, 2; Student Council 1, 2; 



Little International 
2; Veteran. 



2; Dairy Classic 



DONALD WEIRBACK JOHNSON 
"Don" 
Chester, Va. 
MAJOR: Vegetable Growing. PLACE- 
MENT: Donald Wilson, Lexington. 
ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 2; Vice- 
President Olericulture Club 2; Veteran. 






JOHN L. HOWARD 

Melrose 
MAJOR: Aboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Dodge Associates, Wenham. 
ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; Chair- 
,man Aboriculture Exhibit 2; Abori- 
culture Club 1, 2, President 2. 



Ill 



HENRY GEORGE KOEHLER^ 

"George" 

Westfield 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: G. Newell Galusha, Granby, 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2 
Glee Club 1, 2; An Hus Club 1, 2 
4-H Club 1; Little International 2 
Campus Chest 2; Dairy Classic 2. 



HARLAN PAGE KELSEY, III 

"Tur\" 
Sunderland 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Danvers State Hospital, Haw- 
thorne. ACTIVITIES: Student Coun- 
cil 1, 2, President 2; Shorthorn Board 
2; An Hus Club 2; Little International 
2; Campus Chest 2; Dairy Classic 2; 
Veteran. [24] 





RAYMOND F. LAN GILL 

"Ray" 

Canton 

MAJOR: Forestry. PLACEMENT: 

Stanislaus National Forest, Sonora, 

Calif. ACTIVITIES: Forestry Club 2. 



FRANK EDWIN LAMPHIER, JR. 
"Fran\" 
Williamstown 
MAJOR: Turf Maintenance. PLACE- 
MENT: Taconic Golf Course, Wil- 
liamstown. ACTIVITIES: Football 2: 
Basketball 1; Glee Club 1, 2; Hon 
Show 1, 2; Hockey 1, 2. 





^ <>.«.4 



PAUL S. LEONARD 
Arlington 
MAJOR: Aboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Frost and Higgins, Arlington. 
ACTIVITIES: Class Secretary 1, 2; 
Student Council 1, 2; Football 1; Bas- 
ketball 1; Cross Country 1; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Aboriculture Club 1, 2; 
Hockey 1. 



RICHARD DAY LITTLE 
"Lou" 
Watertown 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Winsor C. Brown, Ballard- 
vale, White River Junction, Vt. AC- 
TIVITIES: An Hus Club 2; Little 
International 2; Dairy Classic 2. 





ARTHUR F. LONG 
"Art" 
Canton 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Pine Gardens Nursery, 
Milton. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 
1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 2; Hort 
Oub 1, 2. 

[25] 



DAVID WARREN LUNDQUIST 
"Dave" 
Woburn 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Louis LaMontagne Greenhouses, Wo- 
burn. ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2; 
Floriculture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2. 





CHARLES E. MAGWIRE 
"Chuc\" 
Springfield, Vt. 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT; Aiken's Nursery, Put- 
ney, Vt. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 
1, 2, Co-Chairman Main Feature 2; 
Hort Club 1, 2; Veteran. 



THOMAS O. MARTIN 
"Tom" 
Northampton 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACEMENT: 
Gifford Pinchot National Forest, Wash- 
ington. ACTIVITIES: Forestry Club 
1, 2; Veteran. 






RICHARD E. MINER 
■•Dic\" 
Springfield 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Grafton State Hospital, North 
Grafton. ACTIVITIES: Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2; Veteran. 



...> 




BRUCE BARTON McQUAID 
Billerica 
MAJOR: Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: The Pines, Cotuit. ACTIV- 
ITIES: Cup and Blade 2. 





GERALD THOMAS O'NEIL 
"]erry" 
Amherst 
MAJOR : Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: University of Mass- 
achusetts, Amherst. ACTIVITIES: 
Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club 1, 2. 



THOMAS F. NIBLET 
"Tom" 
Dover, N. H. 
MAJOR: Turf Maintenance. PLACE- 
MENT: Weston Golf Club, Weston. 
ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 1: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Veteran. 




[26] 





MARVIN CHARLES PECK 
Shelburne 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Valley View Farm, Shel- 
burne. ACTIVITIES: Little Inter- 
national 2; Dairy Classic 2. 



MIKE OVIAN 
"MiJ(e" 
Whitinsville 
MAJOR: Turf Maintenance. PLACE- 
MENT: Pelham Country Club, Pel- 
ham Manor, N. Y. ACTIVITIES: 
Football 1; Basketball 1; Hort Show 1, 2. 



WILFRED J. PICOT, JR. 
"Picot" 
Dorchester 
MAJOR: Aboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Eastern Tree and Landscape 
Co., Dedham. ACTIVITIES: Hort 
Show 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1; Abori- 
culture Club 1, 2: Veteran. 






RICHARD J. PETERSON 
"Pete"' 
Williamstown 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACEMENT: 
Stanislaus National Forest, Sonora, 
Calif. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2: 
Campus Chest 1, 2. 



ROBERT J. PORTER 
"Bob" - "Rowboat" 
Somerset 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Lush Acres Farm, Rehoboth. 
ACTIVITIES: Vice-President Student 
Council 2; Shorthorn Board 1, 2; 
Football 2; Glee Club 1, 2: An Hus 
Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2, Vice- 
President 2; Dairy Classic 2: Bowl- 
ing 1. 



JEROME J. PUDDISTER 

"Putts" 
Arlington 
MAJOR: Turf Maintenance. PLACE- 
MENT: Belmont Country Club, Bel- 
mont. ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2; 
Hort Show 1, 2; Hockey 1, 2. 




[27] 





JOHN AUGUSTINE REDMOND 
"Tex" 
Belmont 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Norumbega Nurseries, 
Weston. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 
1, 2; Hort Club 2; Veteran. 




.^ 



^Q 



MATTHEW STEWART RAMSAY 
"Stew" 
Arlington 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Hans Van Leer, Lincoln. 
ACTIVITIES: Sports Editor Short- 
horn Board 2; Football 2; An Hus 
Club 2; Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2; Hockey 1, 2. 



ROBERT J. ROBSON 

"Bob" 

Upton 
MAJOR: Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: Marion Cillage Motel, Rock- 
port, Me. ACTIVITIES: Glee Club 
1; Cup and Blade 2; Veteran. 





ar- 



EDWARD WALTER RICHARDS 
"Eddie" 
South Easton 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Harco Orchards and Poultry 
Farms, Inc., South Easton. ACTIV- 
ITIES: Poultry Club 1, 2; Vice- 
President 2. 





WILLIAM F. SEAQUIST 
Greenwood Lake, N. Y. 
MAJOR: Aboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Arboreal Associates, Central 
Valley, N. Y. ACTIVITIES: Hort 
Show 2; Aboriculture Club 2. 



WALTER W. SAMPSON 
"Walt" 
Wilbraham 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: E. M. Parsons, Northampton. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; 
Little International 2: Kappa Kappa 2; 
Dairy Classic 2; F.F.A. I, 2. 

[28] 





ROBERT SEHER 

"Bob" 
Westfield 
MAJOR: Vegetable Growing. PLACE- 
MENT: Alfred R. Seher, Westfield. 
ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; Oleri- 
culture Club 1, 2; Veteran. 



JANET SEALE SMITH 
"]an" 
Dedham 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: High Acres, White River 
Junction, Vt. ACTIVITIES: Secretary 
Shorthorn Board 1, 2; Poultry Club 
1; Chairman Publicity An Hus Club 
2; Little International 2; Dairy Classic 
2; Square Dance Club 1, 2, President 
2; S.C.A. 1, 2, Chaplain's Council 1, 2. 




LAWRENCE G. SENA 
"Larry" 
Easthampton 
MAJOR: Vegetable Growing. PLACE- 
MENT: Clark Hill Orchards, East- 
hampton. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 
1, 2; Olericulture Club 1, 2. 




LEO THOMAS SULLIVAN, JR. 
••Sully' 
Pittsfield 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Hurlwood Holstein Farm, 
Ashley Falls. ACTIVITIES: Short- 
horn Board 2; An Hus Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Dairy Classic 2. 

[29] 




PETER B. SHUMWAY 

"Pete" 
Williamsburg 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Northend Farm, Williams- 
burg. ACTIVITIES: An Hus Club 
1, 2; Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2. 



ALLEN M. SWENSON 
Lexington 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Old Acres Farm, Concord. 
ACTIVITIES: An Hus Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Dairy Classic 2. 






JEREMY CARL THOMAS 

"Jerry" 

Norton 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry: PLACE- 
MENT: Lowland Farm, Monterey. 
ACTIVITIES: Associate Editor Short- 
horn Board 2; An Hus Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Dairy Classic 2. 



a^^lkct^- V 



TIMOTHY HENRY TAYLOR 

"Tiny Tim" - "Shamus" 
East Weymouth 
MAJOR: Dairy Industry, PLACE- 
MENT: Seymour Ice Cream Co., Dor- 
chester. ACTIVITIES: Football 1; 
Kappa Kappa 1; Secretary Dairy 
Club 2. 



JOHN HAROLD TRITES 
"lack" 
Holyoke 
MAJOR: Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: Yankee Pcdler Inn, Holyoke. 
ACTIVITIES: Cup and Blade; Vet- 



.^B&^(^ 





HERBERT R. WATERS, JR. 

"Herb" 

Sterling 
MAJOR: Food Management. PLACE- 
MENT: Marion Village Motel, Rock- 
port, Me. ACTIVITIES: Cup and 
BLADE 1; President 1; Veteran. 

[30] 




■'^^■'' 




DONALD J. TOOHEY 
"Too\ey" 
Waltham 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Doran's Greenhouses, Lexington. AC- 
TIVITIES: Glee Club 1, 2; Hort 
Show 1, 2, Chairman Corsage Com- 
mittee 2; Campus Chest 1, 2. 



STEPHEN L. WHITING 

"Steve" 

Gardner 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACEMENT: 
Stanislaus National Forest, Sonora, 
Calif. ACTIVITIES: Alpha Tau 
Gamma Treasurer 2; University March- 
ing Band 2; University Concert Band 
2; University Dance Band 1: Campus 
Musicals 2; Inter-Fraternity Sports 2, 




7'-* 



M 




WAYNE HARRIS WHITNEY 
"Whit'- 
Phillipston 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. PLACE- 
MENT: Medfield State Hospital, Hard- 
ing. ACTIVITIES: Football 1, 2; An 
Hus Club 1, 2; Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2; Massachusetts Bible 
Fellowship 1, 2. 





BETTY M. WOODS 
"Little One" 
Leicester 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACEMENT: 
Woods" Greenhouses, Leicester. AC- 
TIVITIES: Glee Club 1; Floriculture 
Club 1, 2, Secretary 2; Hort Show 
1, 2; Square Dance Club 1, 2. 



MURRAY H. ZACK 
"Murphy" 
Deep River, Conn. 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticulture. 
PLACEMENT: Zack's Nursery and 
Greenhouse, Deep River, Conn. AC- 
TIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2: Hort Club 1, 2, Secre- 
tary 2. 




[31] 





^^ 



STOSAG 




Front Row, left to right: D. Geele, R. Anderson, B. 
Woods, M. Gary, R. Allenby, E. Brosseau. Second Row: 
W. Birch, S. Hall, H. Fall, E. Hardy, R. Robson, S. 
Butera, W. Cannon. Third Row: E. Bliss, J. Puddister, 
L, Little, D. Johnson, N. Flood, R. Ellis, R. Seher, T. 
Cullinane. 



"Stosag" is one of the distinguished achieve- 
ments that a Stockbridge student may attain. It is 
a recognition given to those who strive, work and 
study to maintain a high level of scholarship 
during their two years of intensive training. 

The Stockbridge honorary scholastic society 
was started in 1937 at the suggestion of Professor 
Miner J. Markuson of .the Agricultural Engineer- 
ing Department. He felt that some public honor 
was in order for graduates who maintained a high 
scholastic record coupled with the attributes of 
good citizenship while at Stockbridge. 

To become a member of "Stosag" one must 
attain an average of 85 percent and have no marks 
below 70 percent in the first three semesters. 

To all of you who have been recognized by the 
society, we extend our sincere congratulations. 
May you always set high standards in all your 
future undertakings. 



Names placed in order of rank. 

Thomas Francis Cullinane, Jr., Poultry Husbandry 
*Harold Reynolds Fall, Jr., Floriculture 
** Warren Joseph Birch, Floriculture 

Wilfred Lewis Dennis, Commercial Vegetable Growing 

Edward John Bliss, Dairy Industry 
*Richard James Ellis, Food Management 

Sherman Barrett Hill, Ornamental Horticulture 
*Santo Anthony Butera, Ornamental Horticulture 

William Walter Cannon, Floriculture 

Jeremy Carl Thomas, Animal Husbandry 

Betty May Woods, Floriculture 
*Ernest William Brosseau, Animal Husbandry 

David Geele, Poultry Husbandry 
*Ernest Elwood Hardy, Ornamental Horticulture 
*Donald Weirbach Johnson, Commercial Vegetable 

Growing 
*Harold Russell Anderson, Animal Husbandry 

Richard Day Little, Animal Husbandry 

Jerome Joseph Puddister, Turf Maintenance 

Nathan Benson Flood, Poultry Husbandry 

Maud Gary, Food Management 
*Robert Seher, Commercial Vegetable Growing 
*Thomas Francis Niblet, Turf Maintenance 
*Robert Joseph Robson, Food Management 
*Roland Gilbert Allenby, Ornamental Horticulture 
*Korean Veteran **World War II Veteran 



[33] 





Animal 
Husbandry 



Front Row, left to right: H. Gordon, R. Porter, W. Whit- 
ney, H. Kelsey, J. Smith, R. Miner, L. SulHvan, W. 
Sampson, W. Clark. Second Row: H. Anderson, P. Bard- 
zik, W. Austin, E. Brosseau, R. Hayes, P. Shumway, 
F. Hayden, N. Eykel, H. Koehler. Third Row: J. 
Thomas, R. Little, A. Dostaler, T, Bebbington, A. Swen' 
son, M. Peck, M. Ramsey. 



SENIOR 




[34] 




Arboriculture 




Front Row, left to right: William F. Seaquist, Richard S. 
Brown, John L. Howard. Second Row: Wilfred J. Picot, 
Paul S. Leonard. 





Front Row, left to right: Stephen H. Gilmartin, Edward 
J. Bliss, J. Ward Fitzgerald, Richard M. Burnside. 
Second Row. Timothy H. Taylor, Lynwood H. Eaton, 
Richard N. Bowen. 



D 



air^ 




^•^ SENIOR 



Floriculture 



Front Row. left to right: Robert Dennis, Betty Woods, 
Stephen Efstratiou. Second Row: David Lundquist, Don- 
aid Toohey, Donald Barber, John Condon, Warren Birch, 
Peter Cazale, Harold Fall, William Cannon. 





[35] 




Food 



Management 



Front Row, left to right: Alden P. French, Maude R. 
Gary, Herbert R. Waters. Second Row. John H. Trites, 
Bruce B. McQuaid, Warren A. Archambault, Richard J. 
Ellis, Robert J. Robson. 




^-SENIOR 








Forestry 




Front Row, left to right: Lloyd R. Baldwin, Thomas O. 
Martin, Raymond F. Langill. Second Row: Steven L. 
Whiting, Richard J. Peterson. 



Horticu 



Front Row, left to right: George Fournier, Santo Butera, 
Roland Allenby, John Redmond, Murray Zack, Sherman 
Hall, Ernest Hardy. Second Row: Robert Davis, William 
Brenchick, Arthur Long, Charles Magwire, Gerald O'Neil. 



SENIOR 



Poultry 




Front Row. left to right: David Geele, Edward W. Rich 
ards, Joseph DeLorenzo, Nathan B. Flood. Second Row 
Thomas F. Cullinane, Richard W. Emery, Richard B 
Holbrook, Priscilla J. Cahr 




Olericulture 



Left to right: Robert Seher, Robert B. Dennis, Lawrence 
G. Sena, Donald W. Johnson. 



SENIOR 



Turf 
Maintenance 




Left to right: Frank E. Lamphier, Jerome J. Puddister, 
Mike Ovian, Thomas F. Niblet, Maurice C. Cameron. 




[38} 



Student Council 




Front Row, left to right: John Walker, Ronald H. Mitchell, 
Harlan P. Kelsey, Robert J. Porter, Deborah A. Sealey. 
Second Row: Eugene R. Brooks, Rolfe G. Hayes. 



The duties of the Student Council are handling student problems, running 
convocations for special events, and a representative for Stockbridge in the 
University Council meetings. 

The president of Student Council is a member of the Social Activities Club 
of the University whose object is to provide recreation for all students who do 
not belong to a fraternity or a sorority. 

A representative was sent to the University of Connecticut with the 
University members to see the outcome of their Student Union Building and to 
obtain ideas for the University of Massachussets for their new Student Union 
Building which is now being proposed. 



[39] 



Kappa Kappa 
Fraternity 



Modern Art'?? 





The Front Room Gang. 




Frat. Fun. 



As You Were. 




Chow Time. 




Down the Hatch. 




Time Out To Chat. 



[40} 




Our House. 



Dancing? 





Easy. Lynnwood! 



Despite a small number of returning seniors Kappa Kappa 
has had an active and prosperous year. Many pledges were accepted 
filling the house to capacity with many others living elsewhere. 

Several parties were successfully held by the house as a result 
of strong spirit and cooperation among the members. Much 
credit should be given to the officers and committees who planned 
these affairs. 

Initiation of pledges included improvements to the house as 
well as other activities. The freshmen have elected their officers 
and are prepared to take over the house after returning from 
placement. 

On the whole we sincerely believe that Kappa Kappa has had 
one of its best years and that the current high standards will be 
maintained in the future. 



Front Row, left to right: Kennedy, Bardzik, Bliss, Treas- 
urer; Eaton, Secretary; Gilmartin, President; Porter, Vice- 
President; Butera, House Marshal; Sampson, Baskin. Sec- 
ond Row: Sullivan, Austin, Hume, Zack, Gayoski, Taylor, 
Temple, Bosselman, French, Drowne, Bernard, Temple. 
Third Row: Parsons, Putnam, Fitzgerald, Soutter, Wal- 
ters, Dostaler, Locklin, Gundal, Harding, Mullens, Homer. 



Members. 



r^ r- s*^ <^ ^ 

■3 en 




[41] 



Kappa Kappa 
Dance 




Jim is pic\ing up 

a few words from 'Tur\. 




Kappa Kappa sponsors house dances and 
parties from time to time during the school year 
for the purpose of bringing the members together 
with their dates for a pleasant evening of dancing 
and party games. The parties are financed by mem- 
bership dues. We have a radio-phonograph con- 
sole, and a large selection of danceable records to 
supply the music. The food is prepared by the 
members, and served by them. 



Waltz me around again Willie! 




Baby it's cold outside! 




[43] 



Alpha Tau Gamma 
Fraternity 




[44] 




Don Cherry. 



Front Row. left to right: Arthur Long, Donald Green, Bob Davis, Secretary; 
Bill Brenchick, President; Steve Whiting, Treasurer; Bill Picot. Second Row: 
Don Cherry, Walter Kelly, Joe Gaunt, Charles Dailey, Robert Paddock, Bill 
Geoffroy, James Ober, Assistant Secretary; John Cannon. 



In spite of the fact that only three senior 
members of the Fraternity returned at the begin- 
ning of the school year ATG has had a very 
successful season. Several excellent parties have 
been held and the traditions of the Fraternity have 
been carried on. Twenty new members, eighteen 
freshmen and two seniors, were initiated on March 
4 with the assistance of three alumni who are 
now students at the University. 

Following the initiation the annual election 



of officers was held. Those elected were: President, 
Robert H. Davis; Vice-President, Richard W. 
Geoffroy; Secretary, James L. Ober; Treasurer, 
Robert L. Freeman; House Manager, Charles R. 
Dailey; Sergeant-at-Arms, Donald E. Randall; 
Social Chairman, Richard W. Geoffroy. 

Before the freshmen left for placement train- 
ing the annual initiation banquet was held on 
March 13 at the Chateau in Granby. 



[45] 



OFFICERS^/^- 





of the 

Freshman 



Class 



Left to right: Charles Dailey, President: Elaine Brandt, Secretary: Ken Stebbins, Treasurer. 



[46] 





FRESHMEN 



The Class of 1955 




[47} 




Front Row. left to right: Richardson, Hammond, Welsh, 
Turner, Homer, RoHins, Malan, Titcomb. Second Rovj: 
Bernard, SulHvan, E. Uhlman, Campbell, Duarte, Kuzia, 
Baskin, J. Uhlman, Collier, Carlson, Abbott, Souza. Third 
Row: Murray, Stohlmann, White, Barakian, Gundal, 
Harding, Martin, Sealey, Gage, Dunham. Fourth Row: 
Rennels, Corbett, J. Davis, Locklin, Baker, Curran, Waldo, 
Doherty, Donohue. Fifth Row: Sears, K. Walker, B. Davis, 
Kennedy, J. Walker, J. Temple, P. Temple. 



Animal Husbandry 





Freshman 



Front Row. left to right: Bradley G. Smith, 
John Stashenko, Jr., Howard E. Thurston. Sec- 
ond Row: Frederick L. Dustin, Robert L. Free- 
man, Robert H. Nepper. 



Arboriculture 



[48] 





Freshman 



Dai 



ir 



y 



Front Row. left to right: Alvan P. Gildersleeve, William 
H. Harnish. Second Row: Kenneth A. Cherry, Bernard 
Katz. 





Front Row. left to right: Mary Michalik, Elaine Brandt. 
Second Row: Francis Capone, Richard Harding, Harry 
Wald, Lloyd Sloat, Whitney Blood. Third Row: Richard 
Romano, Kenneth Briscoe, Richard Cannon, Clifford 
Bosselman. 



Floriculture 




,j2&i^^' 



rj^ 




[49] 





Front Row. left to right: J. Sullivan, David Sjostedt, 
George Franz, Frederick Frey, John Lipski, Robert Nord- 
berg. Second Rom: Ray Swanson, Peter Schwamh, John 
Hay, David Mason, Eugene Brooks, John Barnes, Howard 
Fiske. 



Freshman 





Food Management 



[50} 




Front Row. left to right: John Putnam, Robert Parsons, 
Charles Dailey, Richard Geoffroy, Joseph Farquehar, Carl 
Rozicki. Second Row: Kenneth Welch, James Hallett, 
David Soutter, William Hathaway, Henry Cusick, Donald 
Randall, Joseph Gaunt, Theodore Boyer. 




Front Row. left to right: Ramon R. Sears, Arthur S. 
Hovey, Ernest Washburn, Rodney L. Pervier, John E. 
Cannon, Richard P. Charrette. Second Row: Otto A. 
Gartman, Donald A. Cherry, Richard F. Walter, Robert 
E. Paddock, Dean W. Kimball, Walter P. Kelley, Donald 
B. Kenyon, John L. Undercoffler, 



Ornamental 
Horticulture 




[51] 



Freshman 



Olericulture 



Left to right: Lawrence S. Rura, Robert 
A. Alberghini, John G. Peterson. 





[52] 



Animal 
Husbandry 
Club 



n o ^ 




The Animal Husbandry Club was organized 
under the direction of Professor V. A. Rice to 

stimulate an interest in animal husbandry and to 
provide an opportunity for faculty and students to 
meet together informally. Both majors and non- 
majors interested in animals are welcomed. 

One of the larger department clubs, its annual 
membership stands at about a hundred. The pro- 
gram includes a series of monthly evening meet- 
ings to which specialists in the various branches 
of animal husbandry and closely related fields are 
invited as guest speakers. Movies and agricultural 
topics are frequently included in the program. 

One of the predominant activities of the Ani- 
mal Husbandry Club is its annual Little Inter- 
national Livestock Show, a fitting and showing 
contest organized and run by club members and 
competed in by animal husbandry majors. 



Dairy Club 



The Dairy Club is a gathering of under- 
graduates from Stockbridge and the University 
to hear and learn past, present, and future dairy 
industry developments. Its activities include busi- 
ness meetings, social gatherings, banquets, outings, 
and guest speakers. 

Business meetings, conducted once each month 
in Flint Laboratory, consist of business, a guest 
speaker, and a social hour following his talk. 
Two of this year's speakers have been Mr. Ken- 
neth D. LeBean, Mojonniers Bros., and Mr. Randy 
Dean, Oliver M. Dean &• Sons. 



Front Row, left to right: Kuzia, Dunham, Davis, Baskin, 
Locklin, J. Uhlman, E. Uhlman, Rollins, Temple, Stohl 
mann. Second Row: K. Walker, White, Collier, Porter, 
Sullivan, Kelsey, Smith, Whitney, Eykel, Curran, Ham 
mond. Turner, Kohler. Third Row: Carlson, Mullens. 
Russell, Kennedy, Little, Ramsey, Swenson, Clark, Shum 
way, Hayden, Hall, Davis, Martin. Fourth Row: Waldo, 
J. Walker, Homer, Sealey, Ferry, Campbell, Murray, Sousa, 
Mallen, Gundal, Cousins, Harding. 




Front Row. left to right: Edward J. Bliss, Steven M. 
Gilmartin, Bernard Katz, Linwood H. Eaton, James W. 
Fitzgerald, Richard M. Burnside. Second Row: William 
Harnish, Alvin P. Gildersleeve, Timonthy H. Taylor, 
Kenneth A. Cherry, Richard N. Bowen. 

The Annual Dairy Banquet usually is held 
during the first week of March in Flint Labora- 
tory. In May it is planned to hold an outing at 
one of the picnic spots around Amherst. Many 
other events are enjoyed during the year. 

The aim of the Dairy Club is to better its 
members through its meetings and the acquaint- 
ances members make so that they may achieve 
greater success through the years in the dairy 
industry. 



[53] 



Arboriculture Club 



The Arboriculture Club, consisting of fresh- 
men and senior classes in Arboriculture, meets on 
the fourth Thursday of each month in French 
Hall. The speakers at these meetings are people 
who are in the field of Arboriculture or its allied 
fields. 

Members of the club may attend meetings 
of the Western Massachusetts Tree Wardens' and 
Foresters' Association. 

One of the club's main events is an annual 
contest between the freshmen and the seniors in 
the arts of footlocking, climbing, and rope-throw- 
ing. The seniors were the victors again this year, 
and the victory will be inscribed on a plaque 
with previous years' winners. 

Members of the club meet many influential 
people. They wish to extend their gratitude to 
Mr. Gordon King, faculty advisor, for his help 
in preparing these meetings. 



FFA Club 




Front Row. ieft to right: Jack Kelliher, William Muridy, 
Edwin Styles, Arnold Kenniston, Stuart Wiles, Gilbert 
Leveille. Second Row: Thomas Cullinane, Donald Lambert, 
Ralph Hastings, George Johnson, Robert Tenney, Thomas 
Nix. 




Front Row. left to right: John Stachenko, William Sea- 
quest, Richard Brown, John Howard, Howard Thirstan', 
Frederick Dustin, Robert Freeman. Second Row: Birnie 
Bickford, Carl Asplundh, Paul Leonard, Robert Smith, 
Wilfred Picot. 



The Collegiate Chapter, local unit of the 
National Association of the Future Farmers of 
America, is composed of both Stockbridge and 
University students, former members of Future 
Farmers Chapters in their secondary schools or 
vocational agriculture teacher trainees. 

The primary aims of F.F.A. are devel- 
opment of agricultural leadership, cooperation, and 
citizenship. Some of the specific purposes of this 
organization are as follows: (1) To develop com- 
petent, aggressive, rural and agricultural leader- 
ship. (2) To create and nurture a love of country 
life. (3) To strengthen the confidence of farm boys 
and young men in themselves and their work. 
(4) To create more interest in the intelligent 
choice of farming occupations. 

Meetings, at which a guest speaker or a film 
pertaining to agriculture or the F.F.A. is pre- 
sented, usually are held once a month. Time is 
allowed for discussion of the subject, followed by 
refreshments and a general social gathering. 

Chapter members assist at the F.F.A. Judging 
Contest, the State F.F.A. Public Speaking Con- 
test, and the Annual State Convention of the 
Massachusetts Association of Future Farmers of 
America, all of which are held here on campus. 



[54} 



Floriculture Club 



The Floriculture Club is composed of Stock- 
bridge and University students majoring in or 
interested in Floriculture. 

This student organization, under faculty guid- 
ance, presents stimulating material and cultivates 
floricultural interest and appreciation. Club activ- 
ities include guest speakers, who have presented 
illustrated talks relative to current trends and 
practices within the industry. 

The Floriculture Club is indeed fortunate to 
have had the able administration of President 
Warren Birch, Vice-President Harold Fall, Treas- 
urer William Cannon, and Secretary .Betty Wood. 

Much of the credit for the club's success must 
go to our faculty advisor and Department head, 
Prof. Clark L. Thayer. 



Front Row. left to right: P. Cazale, D. Barber, R. Dennis, 
B. Woods, D. Toohey, S. Efstratiou, W. Cannon. Second 
Row: J. Condon, R. Romant, K. Briscoe, W. Blood, C. 
Basselman, H. Fall. Third Row: F. Capone, H. Ward, P. 
Harding, R. Cannon, R. Hallston, W. Birch. 




Horticulture Club 



The Horticulture Club is an organization of 
future nurserymen, Stockbridge horticulture majors. 

It brings together freshmen and seniors, 
enabling them to become better acquainted and to 
share horticultural experiences. 

Speakers at our monthly meetings, nursery 
owners, landscape designers, horticulturists, pre- 
sent us with a broader view of the many and 
varied problems we will face. 

Other meetings consist of movies of general 
interest, and business matters that confront the 
group. 

Each member, before leaving school, had the 
opportunity to attend the Education Day of the 
annual convention of the New England Nursery- 
men's Association. 




Front Row, left to right: D. Green, E. Fournier, A. 
Butera, R. Allenby, J. Redmond, M. Zack, S. Hall, E. 
Hardy, O. Gartman. Second Row: W. Kelly, R. Walters, 
R. Javis, W. Brenchick, A. Long, C. Magwire, J. O'Neil, 
D. Kimball. Third Row: D. Kenyon, R. Charrette, D. 
Cherry, J. Cannon, C. Smith, R. Pervier, A. Hovey, J. 
Undercoffer. 




[55} 



Poultry Club 




The Poultry Science Club is made up ot 
students from Stockbridge and the University. The 
activities of the club are social as well as educa' 
tional. 

Meetings held twice monthly at Stockbridge 
Hall, included such speakers as Dr. J. Robert 
Smyth (research being done at the University 
plant) ; Dr. VanRoekel (Veterinary Science De- 
ment) ; Mr. Charles F. Shelnut (success in raising 
poultry); Professor O. Oleson (talk and movie: 
Trip to Puerto Rico). 

One of the largest undertakings of the Club 
was to write and distribute a news letter which 
told of the functions and activities of the Poultry 
Science Club and the Poultry Department here 
at the University. 

We extend our thanks and appreciation to 
Professor John H. Vondell for his efforts in 
making the meetings such a success. 



Left to right: Wilfred L. Dennis, Robert Seher, Lawrence 
G. Sena, Donald W. Johnson. 




Front Row. left to right: Carter Hili, James Rankin, Uave 
Crowell, Terry Kinney. Second Row: Gordon Anderson, 
Richard FrankHn, Cohn Robin, Priscilla Cahill, Juhus Hay- 
ward, George Warren, Thomas Culhnane. Third Roui: 
Edward Richards, David Geele, Richard Holbrook, Rjchard 
Emery, Ralph Hall. 



Olericulture Club 



The Olericulture Club is made up of Stock- 
bridge and University students, graduate workers, 
and faculty. Our many activities consist of busi- 
ness meetings, social gatherings, and an annual 
banquet held here in Amherst. 

Everyone is welcome to attend the meetings 
held bi-monthly at French Hall. Meetings include 
speakers who present problems confronted in such 
a vocation. The meetings are not entirely all busi- 
ness, for at each meeting a talk or a movie of 
general interest is presented by men from various 
departments here on campus who have travelled 
and taken movies or color slides of their trips 
throughout the country. 

The officers and members of the club extend 
their thanks and appreciation to all members of 
the faculty who helped make our meetings and 
activities a success. 



[56] 



Food 



Management 
Club 



The Food Management Club is formally 
called "The Cup and The Blade." It was first 
organized in October of 1953 to serve the pur- 
pose of bringing the students together. 

Although the club does not hold meetings at 
specific times, the members participate in serving 
social functions on campus where food and fancy 
party decorations are required. They also attend 
the New York Hotel Show in November, and 
the New England Hotel and Restaurant Show 
held at the Statler Hotel in Boston every April. 

The student members hold discussions about 
various practices in hotel and restaurant work and 




Front Row. left to right: M. Gary, K. Welch, H. Waters, 
C. Kozicki. Second Row: J. Putnam, R. Geoffroy, D. 
Randall, W. Hathaway, D. Soutter, R. Ellis, R. Parsons, 
J. Farquehar. Third Ron;: J. Gaunt, J. Trites, R. McQuaid, 
J. Hallet, W. Archambault, H. Cusick R. Robson, C. 
Dailey, T. Boyer, A. French. 



also invite outside speakers in the field to talk on 
subjects pertinent to food operations. 

The last main function of the club is for the 
benefit of the freshmen members. Each senior 
advises one or more freshmen to help them with 
their courses or any general problems they 
might have. 




' *=:^SUi.£i&fiif»a<.^v^K&if^ 



[57] 




The Little 



INTERNATIONAL 



Awards and Trophies. 



Behhington brushing 
before big event. 




LIVESTOCK Show 



Each year the Animal Husbandry Club of 

the University of Massachusetts sponsors a Hve- 
stock show in which University and Stockbridge 
students enrolled in the fat stock production course 
prepare an animal as part of the course require- 
ment. 

The show is modeled after the International 
Livestock Exposition in Chicago, with students 
responsible for fitting and showing an animal. It 
has been an annual event since 1938. 

Highlighting the day was the selection of the 
Premier Showman, John Hobart of Littleton, 
Massachusetts; Provost J. Paul Mather, of the 
University, presented the rewards due John for 
his superior showmanship. 



Primming co-eds 



[58} 



Premier Showmen: Thomas, Anderson, 
Stengle, Hobart, Tenney, Drowne. 
Judges: Cowan (left), Tirrell (right). 





Top Man in Beef. 



Charles Stengle, a University junior from Arlington, 
Mass., was the runner-up to Hobart and was adjudged to 
be Reserve Premier Showman. 

The winners of the individual classes were as follows: 
In swine — 1. John Hobart, Littleton, Mass. 

2. Harlan Kelsey, Sunderland, Mass. 
In sheep — 1. Jeremy Thomas, Norton, Mass. 

2. Donald Cameron, Angelica, N. Y. 
In beef — 1. Russell Anderson, Holbrook, Mass. 

2. Robert Tenney, Medford, Mass. 

3. Alfred Drowne, Rehoboth, Mass. 
In horse — 1. Charles Stengle, Arhngton, Mass. 

2. Avit Dostaler, Lowell, Mass. 
Judges for the day were Mr. W. Allen Cowan, Head, 
Department of Animal Industries, University of Connect- 
icut, and Mr. Loring V. Tirrell, Head, Department of 
Animal Husbandry, University of New Hampshire. 



Herefords on Show. 



ChecJ^ing Fleece. 



Angus on Parade. 





A VXowtr for the Lady. 




Cool Wat 



Garden of Flowers. 




Horticulture 
Show 



^::^: 



A Pig Roast. 




The fortyfirst annual Horticulture Show was 
opened on Friday, October 30, 1953, for three 
days; during these three days over 26,000 square 
feet of floral, woodland, and harvest exhibits, 
prepared by Stockbridge and University students, 
were on display. 

On Friday evening, Jane Jackson, '57, was 
crowned Queen of the Flowers, and presided for 
the remainder of the show with two attendants, 
Eleonor Nelson, '55 and Mary Hunt, '56. 

Due to the good weather and the extensive 
publicity, the show drew 25,000 people, a 20% 
increase over last year, to mark an all-time high. 



[60] 




The Old Attic 



The Garden Gate 




A Talking Tree. 



Horticulture 
Show 





The Slueen and Her Court. 

Several outstanding exhibits by the various 
departments included an architectural exhibit, 
"Sanctuary for Peace," and a naturaHstic design, 
"Prelude to Winter." 

Credit for the show goes to those students 
from both Stockbridge and the University who 
made it such a success. We also wish to extend 
our thanks and appreciation to all the members of 
the faculty who helped make the show a success. 

Slueen ]ac\son. 



[61] 






Stockbridge Octette 









Left to right: Joanne Fisher, Accompanist; Richard Frank- 
lin, Donald Toohey, Richard Cannon, James Ober, Lyn- 
wood Eaton, George Koehler, Bernard Katz, William 
Cannon, Russell Falvey, Director. 




[62] 




SPORTS 



FOOTBALL 




Co-captains meet the opposition. 



Time out 




Just before the gun. 



Leaders of the team. 





Ten yards to ,0. "^t^ >^ " '^', Jl \' '^^^, 




[64} 






Front Row. left to right: Porter, Gilmartin, Whitney, 
Fitzgerald, Barber, Captain; Lundquist, Taylor, French. 
Second Row: Dostaler, Molta, Paddock, Thurston, Frye, 
Geoffrey, Nipper. Third Row: Puddister, Rhuer, Walters, 
Cherry, Carlson, Dekas, Mason. Fourth Roiv: Gayoski, 
Coach Kosakowski, Smiley, Daley. 

THE '53 STOCKBRIDGE AGGIES 

September 21 saw the Stockbrit^e Aggies, 
under "Steve" Kosakowski, getting ready for the 
hard schedule ahead of them. Let's take a trip with 
the team and see them, game for game. 

Thayer Academy, October 3 : Captains Don 
Barber and Ernie Fournier led the team on field. 
The boys were hitting hard as well as running 
hard. A close one. The final score: Thayer 7, 
Stockbridge 6. 

Monson came to Amherst, October 10. Our 
boys were ready. Our captains ran hard and passed 
well holding the final score to Monson 14, Stock- 
bridge 7. 

To Vermont — the sun was shining, and 
everyone felt confident and looked good. Unfortu- 
nately, this game started a long line of injuries. 
The first injury came in the 2nd quarter — the 
victim, Joe Puddister. Then Ernie Fournier was 
put out. The Green Mountains turned different 
colors that afternoon, and Stockbridge won 19 
to 13. 

Nichols came to Amherst on October 24. Our 
Aggies had suffered but were in there to win. 







Intercefjtion. 

They did, for the second year. Don Barber passed 
to Dave Lundquist, Thurston found his hole along 
with Frey, and Bickford called his plays like a 
pro. The outcome — Stockbridge 19, Nichols 6. 

October 30 — Off to Long Island to play 
their hardest game. Again the sun was shining, 
but not for long. Those New York farmers started 
to run wild and defeated the team. Score: Farm- 
ingdale 33, Stockbridge 8. 

Mount Hermon, November 14. Our Aggies 
were minus the great freshman quarterback, Bernie 
Bickford, but Ernie Fournier was back. The team 
looked pretty good at half time, but then it hap- 
pened — Mount Hermon woke up, to beat Stock- 
bridge 40 to 14. 

Thus ended the 1953 schedule, with our Stock- 
bridge Aggies winning 2 and losing 4. 



[65} 



BASKETBALL 



[66] 




Stealing th 


' rebound. 




i 


dfPi 


M 




Front Row. left to right: Robert Nepper, Donald Barber, 
Captain Alfred Drowne, Alden French, Peter Shumway. 
Second Row: Coach Steve Kosakowski, John Hay, Ed- 
ward Hall, Robert Platenik, Frederick Prey, Asst. Coach 
Red Hendrick. Third Row: Henry Cusick, Francis Capone, 
Manager Dave Carlson. 



The basketball team had little to show in the 
win column this season. They did a good job, 
however, in a league much stronger than the one 
in which they should be playing. 

The team had but one outstanding scorer, 
Henry Cusick, a freshman from Worcester. Not 
only did he break the cage record with 40 points, 
but also posted a 30 point per game average. 

The team's strength was weakened when some 
of the boys went home on week-ends. The Blue 
and White looked as good as any team they played 
against, turning in some outstanding passing. A 
lack of shooting ability marked the difference. 

Al Drowne was captain of the team and was 
the only scorer other than Henry Cusick. 



Han\ up with a jump shot 




S 
/ 



Get in there and ta\e 'en 




[67} 





True Collegian Spirit 
— Delta Sigma Chi. 



WINTER 



It was a cold winter's eve that marked the start 
of the 1954 Winter Carnival. Plenty of snow and 
freezing weather enable the University of Massa- 
chusetts fraternities and sororities — and let's not 
forget dorms — to build towering snow sculptures 
and elaborate scenes. 

There were several days of skating and other 
outdoor sports. The round of social activity reached 
its peak at the Carnival Ball, held on Friday, 
January IS, in the beautifully decorated Cage; 



A Sueen Is Crowned. 




[68] 



CARNIVAL 



here, about 400 couples danced to the music of 
Jesse Smith; the last dance, at one a.m., came all 
too soon. 

Saturday was a beautiful day for skiing, a 
hght snow having fallen overnight. In the eve- 
ning the fraternities and sororities held open 
house, with dancing and refreshments. 

The close of the festivities came on Sunday, 
with Miss Carol Handy, the new Carnival Queen, 
presiding on her throne in this Winter Wonder 
Land. 




The Gentleman Waits 
— Chi Omega. 



ilntl'ici 








Winter Carnival 



Alpha Gamma Rho. 



Phi Beta Phi. 




Through The Air 

— Lambda Chi Alpha. 



-'"' I'Jeni/er 






[70] 





The Shel!. 



First Prize. 





Dancing with ]esse Smith 

on a Winter Wonderland Ballroom 



Get up lazy. 



The Ballerina of the Shell 
— Theta Chi. 








X 

^ 



The Bird 

— Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



fc*"" 




[71] 




Call Golden Slippers. 



Promenade the hall!!! 





Anyone with a guitar — 

Square Dance 
Club 

Going to Square Dance Club? 

Thursday nights fiddle music surrounded Bow- 
ditch-Lodge, accompanied by, "Honor your corners, 
Do-si-do your own," and followed by bright 
shirted boys and wide-skirted girls. 

The purpose of Square Dance Club is to prO' 
vide an opportunity for learning and practicing 
square and folk dancing. Here, also, musicians and 
callers have a chance to review old favorites and 
stumble over new ones. 

Although not a "Major" club, the Square 
Dance Club meetings were well-attended by 
Stockbridge students. 

Toe-tappin music. 



[72] 



Pop Barrett's 

Message 



In my travels about the country last summer 
I called on a former student of mine. I had not 
seen Marvin Hinsdale since he was graduated from 
the Stockbridge School of Agriculture 16 years 
ago, and I was looking forward to having a nice 
visit with him. His wife informed me that I would 
find him harvesting alfalfa in the large field back 
of the barn. Marvin was overjoyed to see me and 
gave me a very cordial welcome. After a few 
preliminary remarks he said, "Let me finish this 
load of grass silage and then I will show you 
around the place." As he started the tractor he 
called out, "You are staying for dinner." I nodded 
my approval. 

I did not have long to wait until Marvin was 
ready to give me a personally conducted tour of 
his farm. As we went along I let my host do the 
talking because I wanted to look . and listen. 
Marvin explained that he had a carefully prepared 
soil map of the farm so that he knew the best 
use for each field in order to get the maximum 
returns in terms of high quality grass silage, second 
cutting alfalfa hay, and improved pasture for his 
livestock. In the years since his graduation he had 
lost none of his enthusiasm for the business of 
farming. Marvin went into details regarding his 
various practices; amount of lime and commercial 
fertihzer per acre, the pounds of seed, time of 
cutting, and yield. "Yes, I put up about 100 tons 
of grass silage, 50 tons second cutting alfalfa and 
clover hay, and have about 25 acres of improved 
pasture." 

As he mentioned improved pasture we had 
arrived at the field where his herd of 21 purebred 
Jersey cows were grazing on lush vegetation. As 
we leaned against the bars of the gate, Marvin 
told me all about his high producing herd and 
pointed out some of the excellent individuals. Last 
year the herd ranked first in the county Dairy 
Herd Improvement Association with an average 
production of over 9000 pounds of milk per cow 
and about 450 pounds of butterfat. It was not very 
hard to understand the main reasons for this high 




production; good animals, excellent pasture during 
the summer, high quality roughage during the 
winter and superior management. 

Marvin was equally proud of his eight head 
of young stock. All of these were daughters of 
of his cows and artificially bred. "When those 
come into milk," he remarked, "I expect to do 
even better on my average production." 

On the way back to the house for dinner we 
walked through his barn and I noticed that it was 
well laid out for efiicient operations in doing the 
chores. 

After a very enjoyable dinner with Marvin, his 
wife, and three boys, we adjourned to the porch 
for a smoke and a relaxing visit. It was then that 
I congratulated Marvin on the wonderful job he 
was doing in the operation of his farm business. 
"Since this is a one-man business," I told him, "it 
must keep you pretty well tied down and very 
busy the year around." Before answering, Marvin 
took time to light his pipe and then in his very 
characteristic way replied, "Yes, it does keep me 
busy but I take time out occasionally for a little 
recreation and by so doing I get a different view- 
point and am able to do a better job of planning 
and operating my farm business. 

I had to agree with his philosophy for he 
and his family seemed to be very happy and 
greatly enjoying the type of life they were lead- 
ing. As I arose to leave I told him again what a 
wonderful job he was doing and that my visit 
had been a great inspiration to me. Marvin's part- 
ing shot, was "After all. Pop, didn't you tell us 
in Farm Management that farming is not only a 
business but a way of life?" 



[73] 



WOMEN'S 




Carol Burr Cornish 



cl^ 



[74] 



PLACEMENT 



To man the farms in the United States of America almost a quarter of a 
million people must enter farming each year. The number of women who play a 
significant part as independent farmers is very small, but the part women play 
in the total picture of agriculture is great as it is great in any field of human 
endeavor. It may not show up in the census figures, but the Stockbridge girl can 
be certain there is a place for her. 

The message I want to leave with you was summed up many years ago by 
Ralph Waldo Emerson who wrote : 

"I trust a good deal to common fame, as we all must. If a man has good 
cows, or wood, or boards or pigs to sell, or can make better chairs or knives, 
crucibles or church organs than anybody else, you will find a broad hard- 
beaten road to his house, though it be in the woods." 

Whatever you do, or you and your husband do together, do it well. Not 
only will it bring you prosperity, but it will give you satisfaction that you are 
doing your duty to your family, your Nation and mankind in general. In studying 
biographies of great men the world over I cannot help but be impressed by the 
number of these men who realize that the greatest factor in their success is their 
wives, who have given them love, loyalty, inspiration and cooperation in their 
endeavors. 

At the same time there is a place today for women in our Nation who would 
do great things themselves independent of their husbands. We can, for example, see 
in almost every part of our economy a steadily increasing number of women execu- 
tives, married and single, who are making an indispensable contribution to the 
Nation's welfare. 

Before closing I would like to make one more quotation, this time by 
Charles Kingsley. 

"Thank God every morning when you get up that you have something to 
do that day which must be done, whether you like it or not. Being forced to 
work and forced to do your best will breed in you temperance and self- 
control, diligence and strength of will, cheerfulness and content, and a 
hundred virtues the idle man never knows." 

Goodbye for the present. Do keep in touch with the Placement Office. 
We will always be glad to see and hear from you. You may be able to help in 
placing future Stockbridge girls or we may be able to help you in placing your 
foot one step higher on the ladder of success. At the same time, we always enjoy 
a friendly call or letter from one of our graduates. 

Carol Burr Cornish 



[75} 



MEN'S 




Emory E. Grayson 



It is still a buyer's market as far as employment is concerned in Agriculture 
and Horticulture. There are many more employment opportunities available than 
there are graduates available. This situation is greatly influenced by the fact that 
many of our recent graduates are required to enter the Armed Forces. An increasing 
number of returning veterans are getting in touch with this office for assistance in 
securing employment and we are able to suggest openings to practically all of them. 

Wages and salaries are still going up slightly. 

In spite of the high cost of living, the problems of financing one's education, 
etc., five members of the class were married during the summer. There may be 
more that I do not know about, but these men asked for some time off for a 
honeymoon. 

Best of luck and this office will be happy to be of assistance to you at any 
time in the future. 

Emory E. Grayson 
Director of Placement Service 



[76] 



PLACEMENT 



STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 
PLACEMENT TRAINING — CLASS OF 1954 

At the beginning of the school year there were 178 men and 6 women 
enrolled as freshmen in the Stockbridge School of Agriculture, but by the time 
spring rolled around attrition in various forms had reduced that number to 134 
men and 4 women to be assigned to training jobs. The following chart shows the 
breakdown by majors. 

Placement Training 1953 — Class of 1954 

Placed 

Animal Husbandry 39 

Arboriculture 13 

Dairy 8 

Fine Turf 9 

Floriculture 15 

Horticulture 14 

Poultry 14 

Vegetable Gardening 7 

Forestry 11 

Food Management 8 

Totals 138 45 93 

There are four women students in the above group — 1 in Animal Hus- 
bandry; 1 in Poultry Husbandry; 1 in Floriculture and 1 in Food Management. All 
four completed placement and returned for their senior year. 

The loss in members between the two years is much greater this year than 
for several years. In 1952 there were 133 started placement and 107 returned as 
seniors, a loss of 26 or 19.5%. This past year the drop was 32.6%. 

Following is the geographical distribution of employers: 





Returned for 


Withdrew 


Second Year 


12 


27 


8 


5 


2 


6 


4 


5 


4 


11 


1 


13 


6 


8 


2 


5 


6 


5 





8 



Maine 2 Rhode Island 

New Hampshire . . 2 Massachusetts 

Vermont 4 New York . . 

Connecticut 7 New Jersey . 

Pennsylvania 



1 Montana 1 

102 West Virginia ... 1 

7 California 6 

3 Washington 1 

1 



Reasons for not returning for second year 

Wrong Vocation 4 Failed in Placement 3 

Injury 1 Married and lack" of finances 2 

Enter a degree college 3 Draft and Enlistments 24 

Failed Scholastically 3 Unknown 5 

The five unknown probably did not return for military reasons but did not 
inform us. 



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"POP" BARRETT 
Cinematographer 



Compliments of 

KINSMAN'S STUDIO 

46 MAIN STREET, AMHERST 

Official Photographers for 
Stockbridge School of Agriculture 



Official photographers for Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture for 25 years. Also 
serving Amherst College, University of 
Massachusetts, Deerfield Academy, and 
others. 



[78] 



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[79] 



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[80j