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Full text of "Shorthorn"

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PRESENTED BY THE 
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TODAY S 
STUDENT 



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LEVI STOCKBRIDSE 



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^^\ EDITOR \N CHIEF 

^' George S.W<?aver Jr. 

BUSINESS MAMAGER 

Kenne+h A.Cherry 



Dedication 



Fred P. Jeffrey 




This yearbook is dedicated to Fred P. Jeffrey 
whose ten years of activities in Amherst have had 
iew equals. 

After graduating from his State College in 
Pennsylvania, he came to the then Massachusetts 
State College and earned a Master's degree in 
Poultry Genetics. Later, in teaching and research 
at Rutgers University, he moved up to an Associate 
Professorship in less than ten years, becoming well 
known among the younger college workers in the 
poultry world. 

In 1944 he v/as unanimously selected to be- 
come the new Head of the Poultry Department 
at the University of Massachusetts. Since that time 
his activities have widened into many fields. 

As an administrator, he has the happy faculty 
of getting along well with people, and keeping an 
even pressure on things, instead of being absorbed 
in one thing while other matters lag. Punctuality 



and an absolute lack of procrastination are virtues 
that he embraces in a high degree. 

As a teacher, the students like him because he 
"knows his stuff", his lectures and assignments are 
clear, interesting and concise ; and are free of non- 
essential time fillers. These qualities, along with a 
good imagination and the analytical mind of a 
chess player, carry over into the field of research, 
where he has published many papers on genetic 
studies of eggs and poultry. 

Around the State, and in the East, he has been 
much in demand as a speaker at leading poultry 
events. As a community man he has taken a lead- 
ing part in his church, town administration, and 
many campus committees. 

Stockbridge men may rest assured that through 
their new Director Fred P. Jeffrey, their school 
will forge ahead in pace with the development of 
this expanding University. 

— John H. Vondell 




Front Row, left to right: D. Sealey, C. Bosselman, K. Walker, G. Weaver (Editor-in-Chief), 
Mr. Barrett (Advisor), K. Cherry (Business Manager), J. Welch, N. Gage, M. Stephens, E. 
Brant. Second Row. D. Davenport, D. Carlson, V. Shiraga, D. DeWolf, H. Sullivan, R. Houston, 
F. Campbell, P. Bernard. Third Row. J. Bigelow, A. Barakian, D. Homer, R. Alberghini, E. 
Hall, M. Duarte, L. Turner, E. Uhlman, J. Uhlman, R. Barakian. Not present: Dante L. Molta. 



Shorthorn Board 



Within the covers of this, the Shorthorn of 1955, is a brief history of your two 
years here at the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. The board hopes that it will 
bring pleasant old memories back to you in the many years ahead. 

Since 1921 every graduating class has edited a yearbook. In November, 1954, 
we met with our adviser to continue that long-established tradition. Little did we 
know then of the many hours of work that would be contributed by all on the board, 
or of how much time and effort Pop Barrett would so willingly devote. 

We have chosen a great field to master and during our stay at Stockbridge 
have reached a higher standing in our specialized field, and in so doing have attained 
the "weapon of success, knowledge". 

The board sincerely wishes you the best of luck and God's speed in whatever 
field you may pursue. 



President 



Math 



er s 



Message 




I recommend to the Stockbridge graduates of 1955, the serious consideration of 
a philosophy expressed by a former great president of this institution, Kenyon 
Butterfield. He pointed out to the country at large that agriculture offers a "way 
of life" and not just a "way of making a living." 

We hope that your stay here has given you a better understanding of the 
problems of the essential industry you represent, and the insight that will help you 
to solve those problems. 

Remember that every American farmer is now providing food and fiber for 
himself and at least fifteen other persons. We need you, and recognizing that need 
hold your heads high and be proud of your work and your opportunities. 



J. Paul Mather 
President 



Dean Sielings Message 




Director Jeffrey's 
Message 



The Class of 1955 should feel proud to become 
listed as Stockbridge alumni. Each year we hear 
more and more about solid achievements of Stock- 
bridge men and women. You have made good 
friends while you were on campus, and you should 
carry away fond memories of your days in Amherst. 
Don't forget that education must continue through- 
out life — you have only initiated the process 
here. As your new director I wish each one of 
you your share of health and happiness. 

Fred P. Jeffrey 



Each year employment in productive agriculture 
becomes more exclusive because of continued in- 
creases in the efficiency in this basic industry. 
Successful farming depends largely upon the ap- 
plication of most advanced methods by persons 
having the most highly developed skills. Education 
is essential for developing these skills and is, there- 
fore, a key to the progress of this important ac- 
tivity. 

The Stockbridge School of Agriculture presents 
training in a concentrated form involving the latest 
techinques and procedures in scientific agriculture. 
Graduates of this School get a fast start and have 
a definite advantage in developing their careers. As 
graduates, you should not be content with what you 
know now, but should continue your education for 
the future by studying constantly, attending the 
conferences, short courses, and taking part in ex- 
tension programs. 

Dale H. Sibling 





n Memoriam 



A cheerful smile, a kind word, a penetrating 
question and the force of fact were his teaching 
tools. All of us who knew him have borrowed 
something of his philosophy. In borrowing, we 
acknowledge our indebtedness. 

His educational training at the University of 
New Hampshire, University of Missouri and Penn- 
sylvania State University, together with his teach- 
ing experience at the University of California and 
New Mexico State College, amply qualified him 
for the teaching tasks here. He had the ability 
to translate the scientific into the practical, which 
endeared him to those students who were privileged 
to know him as a teacher. 

He delighted in retaining the provincialisms of 
speech and manner that were marks of his New 
Hampshire youth. We shall not soon forget his 
classic definition of an impasse, which for him was 
an uncomfortable position somewhere "between a 
rock and a hard place". 

He was never too busy to see anyone and his 
door was always open. He was constantly revising 
his courses to include currently important material. 
He leaves a host of friends — his colleagues ; his 
students, both those now on the campus and those 
who have gone out into the world ; and numerous 
business men, who, through the years, have been 
the beneficiaries of his sage advice. 

D. J. Hankinson 



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Front Rotu, left to right: Trippensee, Mary 
O'Brein, Rhodes, Parmenter. Second Row. Rich, 
Abbot, Holdsworth, MacConnell, Ganley. 



FORESTRY 
POMOLOGY 




Roberts, French, Fish. 



MATHEMATICS 



Naylor, Andersen. 





HERSCHEL G. ABBOTT 
Instructor of Forestry 

University of Maine, B.S. ; Harvard 
University, M.F. ; Joined the Faculty 1953. 
ALLEN E. ANDERSEN 
Head of Departinent of Mathematics 
University of Nebraska, A.B., M.A. ; Har- 
vard University, Ph.D. ; Joined the Faculty 
1937. 

ALMON S. FISH, JR. 
Instructor of Pomology 
Bates College, A.B. ; Kansas State College, 
M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1953. 
ARTHUR P. FRENCH 
Head of Department of Pomology 
Ohio State University, B.S. ; University of 
Massachusetts, M.S. ; University of Min- 
nesota, Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1922. 
ROBERT V. GANLEY 
Instructor in Forestry 

University of Massachusetts, B.S., Duke 
School of Forestry, M.F. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1951. 

ROBERT P. HOLDSWORTH 
Head of Department of Forestry 
Michigan State College, B.S. ; Yale Uni- 
versity, M.F. ; Joined the Faculty 1930. 
WILLIAM P. MacCONNELL 
Assistant Professor of Forestry 
University of Massachusetts, B.S. ; Yale 
School of Forestry, M.F. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1948. 
CLAIR NAYLOR 
Instructor of Mathematics 
Yale University, Ph.B., M.A. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1953. 
ARNOLD D. RHODES 
Professor of Forestry 

University of Nevv? Hampshire, B.S. ; Yale 
University, M.F. ; Joined the Faculty 
1939. 

J. HARRY RICH 
Associate Professor of Forestry 
New York State College, B.S., M.F. ; 
Joined the Faculty 1933. 
OLIVER COUSENS ROBERTS 
Associate Professor of Pomology 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, B.S. ; 
University of Illinois, M.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1926. 

REUBEN E. TRIPPENSEE 
Professor of Wildlife Management 
Michigan State College, B.S. ; University 
of Michigan, M.S., Ph.D.; Joined the 
Faculty 1936. 



LOUIS N. BAKER 

Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
University of New Hampshire, B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Kentucky, M.S.; University of 
Wisconsin, Ph.D.; Joined Faculty 1954. 
F. DANA BARTLETT, JR. 
Instructor of Animal Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts, B.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1954. 
JAMES W. CHADWICK 
Instructor in Animal Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts, B.S. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1952. 
JOHN MURRAY ELLIOT 
Instructor of Animal Husbandry 
McGill University, B.S. (Agriculture) ; 
University of Vermont, M.S.; Joined the 
Facultv 1950. 
RICHARD C. FOLEY 
Professor of Animal Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts, B.S. ; Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts, M.S. ; Rutgers Uni- 
versity, Ph.D.; Joined the Facultv 1932. 
SAMUEL C. HUBBARD 
Assistant Professor of Floriculture 

Joined the Facultv 1921. 
RANDOLPH A. JESTER 
Instructor of Floriculture 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute, B.S. ; Rut- 
gers University, M.S. ; Joined the Faculty 
1954. 

W. BRADFORD JOHNSON 
Instructor of Olericulture 
Pennsylvania State College, B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, M.S. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1947. 
VICTOR A. RICE 

Head of Department of Animal Husbandry 
North Carolina State, B.S. ; University of 
Massachusetts, M.A. ; North Carolina 
State, Dr.A. ; Joined the Faculty 1916. 
DONALD E. ROSS 
Assistant Professor of Floriculture 
Massachusetts Agriculture College, B.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1928. 
j. ROBERT SMYTH, JR. 
Asso. Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
University of Maine, B.S. ; Purdue Uni- 
versity, M.S., Ph.D.; Joined Facultv 1949. 
GRANT B. SNYDER 
Head of Department of Olericulture 
Ontario Agricultural College ; Michigan 
State Colleee ; Joined the Faculty 1922. 
CLARK U THAYER 
Head of Department of Floriculture 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. B.S.; 
Cornell Universitv ; Joined Facultv 1919. 
ALDEN P. TUTTLE 
Assistant Professor of Vegetable Gardening 
Massachusetts Agricultural College. B.S. ; 
Pennsvlvania State College, M.S. ; Joined 
the Facultv 1930. 




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Foley, Chadwick, Rice, Baker, Elliot, Bartlett. 



AN/MAl HUSBANDRY 



nOR\CUlJURE 




Thayer, Ross, Hubbard, Jester. 



OIERICUIJURE 



Johnson, Tuttle, Snyder. 




IMTCRIOfl QUALITV 01 '.Ij-ji 




Front Row, left to right: Banta, Fox, Sanctuary. 
Second Roiv: Vondell, Smyth. 



POULTRY 



HORTICULTURE 'ARBORICULTURE 




Front Rou; left to right : King, Winifred Had- 
dock, Blundell. Second Row. Procopio, Hamilton. 



DAIRY 



Lindquist, Nelson, Hankinson. 




LUTHER BANTA 

Assistant Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Cornell University, B.S. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1919. 
LYLE L. BLUNDELL 
Professor of Horticulture 
Iowa State College, B.S. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1931. 
THOMAS W. FOX 

Head of Department of Poultry Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts, B.S., M.S. ; 
Purdue University, Ph.D. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1952. 

WINIFRED HADDOCK 
Teaching Fellow of Land Architecture 
TOM S. HAMILTON, JR., B.F.A. 
Instructor of Landscape Architecture 
Joined the Faculty 1950. 
DENZEL J. HANKINSON 
Head of Department of Dairy Industry 
Michigan State College, B.S. ; University 
of Connecticut, M.S. ; Pennsylvania State 
College, Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1948. 
GORDON S. KING 
Assistant Professor of Arboriculture 
North Carolina State; Michigan State 
College, B.S. (Forestry) ; Joined the 
Faculty 1950. 

HARRY G. LINDQUIST 
Assistant Professor of Dairy Industry 
Massachusetts Agricultural College, B.S. ; 
University of Maryland, M.S. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1927. 
D. HORACE NELSON 
Assistant Professor of Dairy Industry 
University of New Hampshire, B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Missouri, M.S. ; Pennsylvania 
State College, Ph.D. ; Joined the Faculty 
1945. 

PAUL N. PROCOPIO 
Assistant Professor of Horticulture 
University of Massachusetts, B.S. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1947. 
WILLIAM C. SANCTUARY 
Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
University of Massachusetts, B.S., M.S. ; 
Joined the Faculty 1921. 
JOHN H. VONDELL 
Associate Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Middlebury College ; Massachusetts State 
College; Joined the Faculty 1923. 



JOHN H. BAKER 

Head of Food Management 

Assistant Professor of Food Technology 

Cornell University, B.S. ; Joined the 

Faculty 1954. 

KENNETH L. BULLIS 

Head of Department of Veterinary Science 

Bradley University; Iowa State College, 

D.V.M.; University of Massachusetts, 

M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1929. 

CARL R. FELLERS 

Head of Departments of Food Technology 

and Food Management 
Cornell University, A.B. ; Rutgers Uni- 
versity, M.S., Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 
1925. 

RAUNO A. LAMFI 
Instructor of Food Technology 
University of Massachusetts, B.S. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1954. 
ARTHUR S. LEVINE 
Associate Professor of Food Technology 
University of Massachusetts, B.S., M.S., 
Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1936. 
MINER J. MARKUSON 
Associate Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 
University of Minnesota, B.S. of Archi- 
tecture; Joined the Faculty 1925. 
ROBERT K. PATTERSON 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 
University of Maine, B.S. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1949. 
EDWARD S. PIRA 
Instructor in Agricultural Engineering 
University of Connecticut, B.S. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1953. 
ALFRED X. POWERS 
Instructor of Welding and Carpentry 
Fitchburg State Teachers' College, B.S. 
in Ed.; Joined the Faculty 1953. 
RUSSELL E. SMITH 
Professor of Veterinary Science 
Massachusetts State College, B.S.; Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, V.M.D. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1948. 
HERBERT N. STAPLETON 
Head of Department of Agricultural 

Engineering 
Kansas State College, B.S., M.S.; Joined 
the Faculty 1947. 
WILLIAM H. TAGUE 
Assistant Professor of Agricultural 

Engineering 
Iowa State College, B.S.; Joined the 
Faculty 1929. 




Front Row, left to right: Powers, Pira. Second 
Row. Patterson, Tague, Stapleton, Markuson. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



VETERINARY SCIENCE 








ff* 





Smith, Bullis. 



FOOD MANAGEMENT 



Levine, Baker, Lampi, Fellers. 





Shaw, Weidhaas, Alexander, Sweetman, Hanson. 



ENTOMOLOGY 



BACTERIOLOGY 




Wisnieski, France, Larkin. 



FARM MANAGEMENT 



Lindsay, Barrett, Callahan. 



11 




M.S., 



Uni- 
Ph.D.: 



CHARLES PAUL ALEXANDER 

Head of Department of Entomology 

Cornell University, B.S., Ph.D. ; Joined 

the Faculty 1922. 

ROLLIN H. BARRETT 

Professor of Farm Management 

University of Connecticut, B.S. ; Cornell 

University, M.S.; Joined the Faculty 1926. 

JAMES W. CALLAHAN 

Instructor of Agricultural Economics 

University of Massachusetts, B.S., M.S. ; 

Joined the Faculty 1948. 

RALPH C. FRANCE 

Head of Department of Bacteriology 

University of Delaware, B.S. ; University 

of Massachusetts, M.S. ; Joined the Faculty 

1928. 

JOHN F. HANSON 

Associate Professor of Entomology 

University of Massachusetts, B.S., 

Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1947. 

EDWARD P. LARKIN 

Instructor of Bacteriology 

Massachusetts State College, B.S. ; 

versity of Massachusetts, M.S., 

Joined the Faculty 1947. 

ADRIAN H. LINDSEY 

Head of Department of Agricultural 

Economics 
University of lUinois, B.S. ; lovi^a State 
College, M.S., Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 
1929. 

FRANK R. SHAW 
Associate Professor of Entomology 
Massachusetts State College, B.S. ; Cornell 
University, Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 
1935. 

HARVEY L. SWEETMAN 
Assistant Professor of Entomology 
Colorado A&M, B.S. ; Iowa State College, 
M.S. ; Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1930. 
JOHN A. WEIDHAAS, JR. 
Instructor of Entomology 
University of Massachusetts, B.S., M.S.; 
Joined the Faculty 1953. 
KAROL S. WISNIESKI 
Instructor of Bacteriology and Public 

Health 
Massachusetts State College, B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Michigan, M.P.H.; Joined the 
Faculty 1953. 



WALTER M. BANFIELD 

Assistant Professor of Botany 

Rutgers University, B.S. ; University of 

Wisconsin, Ph.D. ; Joined the Faculty 

1946. 

WILLIAM G. COLBY, Ph.D. 

Head of Department of Agrono?ny 

LAWRENCE DICKINSON 

Professor of Agrostology 

Massachusetts Agricultural College, B.S. ; 

Massachusetts State College, M.S. ; Joined 

the Faculty 1913. 

MARRON s. Dubois 

Instructor in English 

St. Lawrence University, B.A. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1951. 
JOHN N. EVERSON 
Assistant Professor of Agronomy 
University of Massachusetts, B.S. ; Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts, M.S. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1936. 
KAROL J. KUCINSKI 
Assistant Professor in Agronomy 
Massachusetts State College, B.S., M.S., 
Ph.D.; Joined the Faculty 1936. 
HENRY B. PEIRCE, JR. 
Instructor in Speech and Drama 
University of Massachusetts, B.A. ; Uni- 
versity of Michigan, M.A. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1951. 

FRANK PRENTICE RAND, M.A. 
Head of Department of English 
Joined the Faculty 1914. 
ELIOT C. ROBERTS 
Assistant Professor of Agrostology 
University of Rhode Island, B.S. ; Rutgers 
University, M.S. ; Joined the Faculty 
1954. 

HENRY H. SCARBOROUGH, JR. 
Instructor in Botany 

University of Texas, B.S. ; Joined the 
Faculty 1952. 

RICHARD A. SOUTHWICK 
Instuctor in Agronomy 
University of Vermont, B.S., M.S. ; Joined 
the Faculty 1954. 
JOHN M. ZAK 
Associate Professor of Agronomy 
Massachusetts State College, B.S., M.S. ; 
Joined the Faculty 1938. 




Dickinson, Roberts, Kucinski, Colby, Zak, Everson. 



AGRONOMY 



EHGllSH 




Peirce, Marron DuBois, Rand. 



BOTANY 



Banfield, Scarborough. 





Front Row, left to right: F. Wall, A. Smit {Secretary-Treasurer) , B. Katz {President), J. Sears 
{f ice-President), W. Rodenhizer. Second Row. P. Bernard, F. Campbell, D. Sealey, H. Ferry, 
K. Cherry, R. Davis. 



Student 



C 



ounc 



This year, under the helpful supervision of our new Director, Mr. Fred Jeffrey, 
the Stockbridge Student Council has started a trend toward more school activities 
and better student representation. It has begun progress on a new, solid constitution, 
organized and equipped a group of cheerleaders, and staged the Sno-Ball, Stock- 
bridge's contribution to the Winter Carnival. We hope to continue with such 
things in the future. 



16 




fuuittfS^ 









Bernard Katz, President 



Philip Bernard, Vice-President 



Class Officers 



Deborah Sealey, Secretary 




Kenneth Cherry, Treasurer 




i\ 



18 




RUSSELL KAYE ABBOTT 

"Rusty" 

Paxton 

MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 

PLACEMENT: HyCrest Farms, 

Sterling. ACTIVITIES: Little 

International 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; 

Square Dance Club 1, 2; Veteran. 

// doesn't matter what you're 

thought to be, it's what you 

are . . . I hope!. 

GEORGE M. BAKER 
Ueeno 
HoUiston 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT : Worcester State 
Hospital, Harding. ACTIVI- 
TIES: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little 
International 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 
Give me a round barn and a 
pile of sawdust ....'.' 



ROBERT ALBERGHINI 

"Bob" 
Plymouth 
MAJOR: Olericulture. PLACE- 
MENT: University of Mass 
Agricultural Cramberry Experi- 
ment Station, East Wareham, 
Mass. ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn 
Board 2 ; Olericulture Club 2. 
Cramberries and girls equal 
my future. 
RICHARD W. BARAKIAN 
"Dick" 
West Boylston 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Worcester State 
Hospital. ACTIVITIES: Short- 
horn Board 1, 2, Sports Editor 2; 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2 ; Kappa 
Kappa 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 
What's for supper? 



GORDON K. ANDERSON 
"Andy" 
Holden 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT. Clear Lake 
Ducic Farm, Sandwich. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Poultry Club 1, 2; Square 
Dance Club 1, 2. 

I'm shook 

HARVEY E. BASKIN 
"Abe" 
Franklin 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Garelick Bros. 
Farm, Inc. Franklin. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Kappa Kappa 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2 ; Square Dance Club 1 ; 
Inter-fraternity Council 2. 
I'm going to raise Ayrshires 
and Douzers. 





19 




PHILIP A. BERNARD 
"Phil" 
West Roxbury 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Angell Mem- 
orial Hospital M.S.P.C.A., Bos- 
ton. ACTIVITIES: Vice-Presi- 
dent 2 ; Student Council 2 ; 
Shorthorn Board Activities Editor 
2; Animal Husbandry Club 2; 
Little International 2 ; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2, Vice-President 2; 
Dairy Classic 2 ; Veteran. 

Gee, that's the greatest 

WHITNEY DUFFY BLOOD 
"Whit" 
Wollaston 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Almquist's Flowerland, 
Quincy. ACTIVITIES: Floricul- 
ture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2. 
Whit and art combined 



RICHARD BETHEL 
"Dick" 
Mendon 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Stobbart's 
Nursery, Franklin. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Hort Show 1, 2; Hort 
Club 1, 2. 

Keeping my help busy. 

CLIFFORD WEBSTER 
BOSSELMAN, JR. 

"cnr 

Medfield 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Pederzini and Sons 
Florists, Medfield. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Shorthorn Board 2, As- 
sistant Editor 2 ; Floriculture Club 
1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2, Treasurer 2; Square 
Dance Club 1,2; 

A courageous man with the 
corsaged women 



JOSEPH P. BIGELOW, JR. 
"Joe" 
Lunenburg 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Clover Hill 
Farms, Lunenburg, Mass. AC- 
TIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; 
Animal Husbandry Club 2; Little 
International 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 
Never say die. 

THEODORE F. BOYER 
"Ted" 
Danbury, Conn. 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: Edgehill Inn, 
Nahant; Gene's Pastry Shopp, 
Provincetown ; Kayar Bake Shop, 
Queens, N. Y. ACTIVITIES: 
Hort Show 2 ; University Stew- 
ards Club 2, President; Veteran. 
The next manager of 
dining commons 



20 







ELAINE JOAN BRANDT 
Holyoke 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Fenton's Flower Shop, 
Holyoke. ACTIVITIES: Class 
Officer 1, Secretary; Student 
Council 1 ; Shorthorn Board 2 ; 
Floriculture Club 2; Hort Show 
1, 2; Campus Chest 2, Chairman 
of Stockbridge School; Lutheran 
Club 2. 

Too many irons in the fire 

FRANCIS X. CAMPBELL 

Dedham 

MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 

PLACEMENT: University of 

Mass. Farm, Amherst, Mass. 

ACTIVITIES: Student Council 

2; Shorthorn Board, Photography 

Editor 2 ; Animal Husbandry Club 

1, 2; Little International 2; 

Dairy Classic 2; F.F.A. 1; 

There's always room in 

his trailer 



KENNETH M. BRISCOE 
"Ken" 
Avon 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Avon Greenhouses, 
Avon. ACTIVITIES: Floricul- 
ture Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 2. 
2 more days til Friday 



JOHN EDWARD CANNON 
"Jack" 
Newton 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Norum- 
bega Nurseries, Weston. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Hort Show 1, 2; Alpha 
Tau Gamma 1, 2; Hort Club 1, 
2, President 2. 

Fix me up! 



EUGENE R. BROOKS 
Vernon 
MAJOR : Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: Ochaco National Forest 
Prineville, Oregon. ACTIVI- 
TIES : Student Council 1 ; Fra- 
ternity, A.T.G., 1 ; Forestry Club 
1,2; Veteran. 
Can't compare with Brattleboro 



RICHARD ALAN CANNON 
"Dick" 
Brockton 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT : Avon Greenhouses, 
Avon, Massachusetts. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Glee Club 1; Floriculture 
Club 1, 2, President 2; Horticul- 
ture Show 1, 2. 

Flori class Taxi Service! 





21 




DAVID W. CARLSON 
"Dufoe" 
Norton 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Lowland Farm, 
Monterey. ACTIVITIES: Class 
Officer 1, Vice-President; Student 
Council 1 ; Shorthorn Board 2 ; 
Football 1, 2; Basketball 1, Mana- 
ger; An. Hus. Club 2; Little 
International 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 
I'rn faster than I look. 

PHILLIP HURD COLLIER 
"Phil" 
Groton 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Gibbet Hill 
Farm, Groton. ACTIVITIES: 
An. Hus. Club 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Kappa Kappa 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2 ; Veteran. 

One laugh is worth a 
thousand gronns. 



RICHARD P. CHARRETTE 
"Dick" 

Northampton 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Hampshire 
Tree and Landscape Co., Florence. 
ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Hort Club 1, 2. 

Oh! my knee. 



DAVID C. CROWELL 

uave 
Stow 
MAJOR : Poultry Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Rail Tree Farm, 
Carlisle. ACTIVITIES: Poultry 
Club 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 
1, 2. 

A.T.G. tonight 



KENNETH A. CHERRY 
Ken 
Walpole 
MAJOR: Dairy. PLACE- 
MENT: Deerfoot Farms, New- 
ton. ACTIVITIES: Treasurer 2; 
Student Council 2 ; Shorthorn 
Board Business Manager 2 ; Foot- 
ball 1; Dairy Club 1, 2, Treasu- 
rer 2. 

fVhat we need is a freshman 
convocation. ' 

THOMAS J. CURRAN 

I ommy 

Chelmsford 

MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 

PLACEMENT : Great Brook 

Farms, Carlisle. ACTIVITIES: 

Basketball 2; An. Hus. Club 1, 

2; Little International 2; Kappa 

Kappa 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 

Let's play a little ball. 



22 





HENRY PAUL CUSICK 
"Hank" 
Worcester 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: Howard John- 
sons', North Oxford, Mass. AC- 
TIVITIES: Basketball 1, 2; 
Horticulture Show 1, 2; Univer- 
sity Stewards' Club 1, 2. 
Basketball ring. 



BERNARD D. DAVIS 
Joernte 
Orange 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Longview Farm, 
Gilbertville. ACTIVITIES: An. 
Hus. Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2 ; Dairy Clas- 
sic 2. 

Hey ! What ya doing 



CHARLES R. DAILEY 
"Rock" 
Lowell 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
ACTIVITIES: Class Officer 1, 
President ; Student Council 1 ; 
Football 1; Hort Show 1, 2; 
Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; Inter- 
fraternity Sports 1, 2; Veteran; 
Newman Club 1 ; University 
Stewards Club 1, 2. 

Class politics 

JOHN ARTHUR DAVIS 
"Johnny" 
Templeton 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Gordon M. 
Cook, Hadley. ACTIVITIES: 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2. 

Oh how I hate to get up 



in the morning 



DONALD G. DAVENPORT 
"Don" 
Shelburne 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Clover Hill 
Farm, Lunenburg, Mass. AC- 
TIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; 
Glee Club 1 ; Animal Husbandry 
Club 1, 2; Little International 
2; Dairy Classic 2; F.F.A. 2; 
Veteran. 
/ should have stayed in the Army. 

JOHN CHARLES DECAS 
"Deke" 
Wareham 
MAJOR: Vegetable Gardening. 
PLACEMENT: University of 
Mass. Experimental Station, 
Wareham, Mass. ACTIVITIES: 
Football 1, 2; Horticulture Show 
1, 2; Fraternity A.T.G. 2; Inter- 
fraternity Sports; Basketball 2. 

His majors: Girls and Sports 




23 






DONALD JESSE DeWOLF 
"Don" 

Newton 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Medfield State 
Hospital, Medfield, Mass. AC- 
TIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; 
Dance Committee 2 ; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; 
Veteran. 
The man with the foghorn voice. 

DONALD T. DUNHAM 
"Dorky" 
Worcester 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Worcester State 
Hospital Farm, Worcester. AC- 
TIVITIES : An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Kappa 
Kappa 2; Dairy Classic 2; Pep 
Band 2 ; Concert Band 2 ; Veteran. 

Aw, fellers, leave me alone! ! 



JOHN F. DONOHUE 
"Jack" 
Holyoke 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: University of 
Massachusetts Farm, Amherst. 
ACTIVITIES: An. Hus. Club 
1,2; Little International 2 ; Kappa 
Kappa 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; 
Veteran. 

The Happ]/ Horseman 



FREDERICK L. DUSTIN 

"Dusty fluffy" 
Melrose 
MAJOR : Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT : Dodge Associates, Wen- 
ham, Mass. ACTIVITIES: Hor- 
ticulture Show 1, 2; Fraternity 
Alpha Tau Gamma 2 ; Arbori- 
culture Club 1, 2. 
This buddy of mine back home. 



MANUEL J. DUARTE 

" Manney" 
West Barnstable 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Strathglass 
Farm, Port Chester, New York. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 
2; Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2 ; Square Dance Club 1, 2. 
Fisherman turned Farmer. 



ARTHUR B. ELMERS 
"Art" 

Staten Island, New York 
MAJOR: Horticulture. PLACE- 
MENT: New Jersey Experiment 
Station, Rutgers University. AC- 
TIVITIES: Hort Show 2; 
Veteran. 

What I mean to say is — 



24 









JOSEPH H. FARQUHAR 
"Joe" 
Fiskdale 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: Public House, 
Sturbridge. ACTIVITIES: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Stockbridge Softball 
Team ; University Stewards Club 
1,2. 

The man whose car will 
never wear out 



ROBERT L. FREEMAN 
"Bob" 
North Abington 
MAJOR : Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: University of Massachu- 
setts. ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 
1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2, 
Treasurer 2 ; Arboriculture Club 
1, 2. 

Wine, Women and soft music. 



HERBERT L. FERRY 
"Herb" 
Chester 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst. AC- 
TIVITIES: Student Council 2; 
Shorthorn Board 2; An. Hus. 
Club 2 ; Little International 2 ; 
Kappa Kappa 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; 
Veteran. 

Think I'll trade this paint job 
for a good engine. 

FREDERICK W. FREY 
"Fritz" 
South Hadley Falls 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: Fremont National Forest, 
Lakeview, Oregon. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Football 1; Basketball 1; 
Horticulture Show 2 ; Forestry 
Club 1, 2. 

Hi Sweet! 



RICHARD W. FRANKLIN 
"Dick" 
Feeding Hills 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Franklin Poul- 
try Farm, Feeding Hills. AC- 
TIVITIES: Octet 1, 2; Poultry 
Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2; Veteran. 
A little constructive criticism 

NORMAN GROVER GAGE 

Natick 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Grafton State 
Hospital, North Grafton. AC- 
TIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 
Secretary 2 ; Little International 
2; Kappa Kappa 2; Dairj^ Classic 
2; University Marching Band 1, 
2; University Pep Band 1, 2; 
University Concert Band 2. 
But I don't want to go 
to the flicks. 






25 






OTTO A. GARTMAN 

LrUS 

Holyoke 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: H. A. 
Mathieu Tree Co., Easthampton. 
ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Alpha Tau Gamma 2 ; Hort Club 
1, 2; Veteran. 

Get me a date. 



JOSEPH H. GAUNT, JR. 
"Grunt" 

South Hadley 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: Yankee Pedler 
Inn, Holyoke. ACTIVITIES: 
Hort Show 1, 2; Alpha Tau 
Gamma 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; 
University Stewards Club. 

Class parasite. 



PAUL WILLIAM GERDIN 
"Paul- 
State Line 
MAJOR: Poultry. PLACE- 
MENT: Mountain Side Poultry 
Farm, Arthur Yerdes, Pittsfield, 
Mass. 

What's at the show tonight? 



DONALD J. GREEN 
Greente 

Shrewsbury 
MAJOR: Horticulture. PLACE- 
MENT: Shrewsbury Nurseries. 
ACTIVITIES: Football Mana- 
ger 2; Basketball 1,2; Hort Show 
1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2; 
Hort Club 1, 2; Inter-fraternity 
Sports 1, 2. 

Gimmie a dime! ' 



EDWARD SMITH HALL 
"Ed" 
Uxbridge 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: HyCrest Farms, 
Sterling. ACTIVITIES: Short- 
horn Board 2; Basketball 1, 2; 
An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 
'That's ri-i-ight! 



JAY ALBERT HAMMOND 
"Hafnbone" 
Brighton 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Old Acres Farm 
and Dairy, Concord. ACTIVI- 
TIES: An. Hus. Club 1; Little 
International 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; 
Hockey 1. 

Let's take a break. 



26 










JOHN B. HARDING 
"Jack" 
Arlington 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Great Brook 
Farms, Carlisle. ACTIVITIES: 
An. Hus. Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; 
Hockey 1. 

One more car, and he becomes 
a dealer. 



RICHARD A. HARDING 
"Dick" 
South Windham, Maine 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: J. W. Minott Co. — 
Florists, Portland, Maine. AC- 
TIVITIES: Octet 1 ; Floriculture 
Club 1,2; Hort Show 1,2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; S. C. A. 1. 

/ gotta peel my potatoes. 



WILLIAM H. HARNISH 
"Bill" 
Quincy 
MAJOR: Dairy Industry. 
PLACEMENT: Eliot Creamery 
Inc., Milton. ACTIVITIES : 
Shorthorn Board 2 ; Dairy Club 
1, 2; Dairy Classic 2. 

That's a dirty dog. 



WILLIAM R. HATHAWAY 
"Bill" 
North Eastham 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: Howard John- 
sons', Orleans, Mass. Cape Code. 
ACTIVITIES: Horticulture 
Show 1 ; Veteran. 

Everyones against me. 



JOHN SCOTT HAY, JR. 
"Jack" 
Fitchburg 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: White Mountain Na- 
tional Forest, United States Forest 
Service, New Hampshire. AC- 
TIVITIES : Basketball 1 ; Horti- 
culture Show 2; Forestry Club 2. 
Get on your own side of the bed. 



WARREN CARTER HILL 

"The Senator" 
Newtonville 
MAJOR: Poultry. PLACE- 
MENT: Top's Farm, John G. 
Hall (Owner), Norfolk, Mass. 
ACTIVITIES: Poultry Club 1, 
2; Roister Doister 1, 2; Veteran. 
Why sure'a 




11^*5 






27 






ROBERT T. HOLWAY 

"Bob" 

Cambridge 

MAJOR : Animal Husbandn'. 

PLACEMENT: Linwald Farm, 

Petersham. ACTIVITIES : Little 

International 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 

/ question the motion. 



ARTHUR S. HOVEY III 
"Art" 
Lynn 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Harry S. 
Middendorf, Hamilton. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Hort Show 2; Hort Club 
2; Veteran. 

Hi Ya! 



DONALD A. HOMER 
"Don-Farmer" 
Franklin 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Rain Dot, Wal- 
pole, Mass. ACTIVITIES: Short- 
horn Board 1, 2; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2; 4-H Club, 
Treasurer 1, 2; Little Interna- 
tional 2 ; Fraternity Kappa Kappa 
1, 2; Dairy Classic 2; Square 
Dance Club 1 . Hey! Farmer. 

BERNARD KATZ 

ft Ti ' *> 

rSerme 
Roxbury 
MAJOR : Dairy Management. 
PLACEMENT: Mansion House 
Ice Cream Co., East Cambridge. 
ACTIVITIES: Class Officer 2, 
President 2 ; Student Council 2, 
President 2; Octet 1, 2; Dairy 
Club 2, Co-Chairman; Veteran. 
You need connections. 



RICHARD F. HOUSTON 
"Dick" 
Westboro 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Brigham's Greenhouses, 
Westboro. ACTIVITIES: Flori- 
culture Club 1, 2, Vice-President 
2; Hort Show 1, 2. 

How about that! 



WALTER F. KELLEY 
"Kell" 
Brookline 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Earle B. 
Mosher, Inc., Wellesley. AC- 
TIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2, 
Chairman 2 ; Alpha Tau Gamma 
1, 2; Hort Club 1, 2, Treasurer 
2. 

Long live the Hort Show. 



28 







t.r 










GEORGE H. KENNEDY 
"Senator" 
Northampton 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Lone Maple 
Farm, Feeding Hills. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2, Secretary 
2 ; Little International 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2. 

If^ait till I get my model ' A' . 

STANLEY JOSEPH KUZIA 

"Stan" 

Adams 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Hurlwood Hol- 
stein Farm, Ashley Falls. AC- 
TIVITIES: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Kappa 
Kappa 2; Dairy Classic 2; Square 
Dance Club 1, 2. 

Could you please explain 
that again sir? 



CHARLES A. KILBOURN 
"Dad" 
Townsend 
MAJOR : Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Brewer Tree Expert 
Co., Worcester. ACTIVITIES: 
Hort Show 1, 2; Arboriculture 
Club 1, 2; Veteran. 

That 2 m A.M. Bottle . . .! 



JOHN A. LIPSKI 
"Lip" 
Hadley 
MAJOR : Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: Fremont National Forest, 
Werner Dist. 1, Lakeview, Ore- 
gon. ACTIVITIES: Horticul- 
ture Show 1, 2. 

You should of seen it! 



DEAN W. KIMBALL 
Lunenburg 
MAJOR: Horticulture. PLACE- 
MENT: Landscape Clinic Nur- 
sery, Dover, New Hampshire. 
ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2; 
Hort Club 1, 2, Secretary 2. 
How do you spell . 



WILLIAM E. LOCKLIN 

"Willie" 
West Roxbury 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Medfield State 
Farm, Medfield, Mass. ACTIVI- 
TIES; Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; Fraternity, Kappa Kappa 
House Marshal; Dairy Classic 2. 
/ fine you 25c. 






29 







HARRY JAMES MADRU 
"Bud" 
Westfield 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Aitkens Florists, Spring- 
field and Agawam. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Floriculture Club 1, 2; 
Hort Show 1, 2. 

Quiet! Genius at work. 



RONALD H. MITCHELL 

"Mitch" 
Longmeadow 
MAJOR: Dairy. PLACE- 
MENT: General Ice Cream 
Corp., Springfield, Mass. AC- 
TIVITIES: Student Council 1; 
Dairy Club 1, 2; Football 1; 
Veteran. 

I'm getting married in April. 



THOMAS A. MALLAN 
1 ex 

Stormville, N. Y. 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Grafton State 
Hospital, North Grafton. AC- 
TIVITIES: An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Kappa 
Kappa 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; Square 
Dance Club 1. 

It was a rainy, foggy night on 

the N.J.T.P / .' 

DANTE LINDO MOLTA 
"Moldy" 
Springfield 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Griffin's 
Nursery, Southwiclc. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Football 1, 2, Co-Captain 
2; Basketball 1, 2; Hort Show 1, 
2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2, Vice- 
President 2; Hort Club 1, 2; 
Inter-fraternity Sports 1 ; Veteran. 
More skosh! 



EVERETT L. MARTIN, JR. 

LrUS 

Cheshire 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Elmartin Farm, 
Cheshire. ACTIVITIES: An. 
Hus. Club 1 ; 4-H Club 1 ; Little 
International 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; 
Square Dance Club 1. 

It's either the Army or 
100 miles a day. 



GEORGE W. MOORE 

"Buddy" 
Roslindale 
MAJOR: Poultry. PLACE- 
MENT: Jerard's Turkey Farm, 
Saxonville, Mass. ACTIVITIES: 
Poultry Club 1, 2; Veteran. 
Any body for the gedunk? 



30 










ELWYN A. MURRAY 
"Skip" 
Leyden 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: HyCrest Farm, 
Sterling. ACTIVITIES: Animal 
Husbandry Club 1 ; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 
A brown covj can heat a red 
and white one anytime! 



ROBERT HARRY NEPPER 
"Boh" 
Tiffin, Ohio 
MAJOR : Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: McNeal Tree Service, 
Tiffin, Ohio. ACTIVITIES: 
Football 1, 2; Basketball 1; Hort 
Show 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 
1; Arboriculture Club 1, 2. 
Ohio's gift to Stockhridge. 



THOMAS WILLIAM NIX 
1 om 
Quincy 
MAJOR: Poultry. PLACE- 
MENT: Mayo's Duck Farm, 
East Orleans, Mass. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Poultry Club 1, 2; Alpha 
Tau Gamma 2; F.F.A. 1, 2, State 
Vice-President; Square Dance 
Club 1. 

Got that all down. 



JAMES LOWE OBER 
"Jim" 

Painted Post, New York 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Rochester 
Red Wing Stadium, Rochester, 
New York. ACTIVITIES: Glee 
Club 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 
1, 2, Secretary 2; Hort Club 2; 
Inter-fraternity Sports 1, 2; Track 
2. 

Oh Really! 



ROBERT W. PARSONS 
"Boh" 
Chelsea 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: Ship Ahoy Res- 
taurant, Orleans. ACTIVITIES : 
Kappa Kappa 1, 2, President 2; 
S.C.A. 1, 2; Cup and Blade 1, 2. 
The best chef on Cape Cod. 



RODNEY L. PERVIER 
"Rod" 
East Templeton 
MAJOR: Horticulture. PLACE- 
MENT : Grahn the Florist, West- 
minster. ACTIVITIES: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Hort Club 1, 2, Vice- 
President 2. 

Cow Caller. 



iwMKMWWKWft^-; 





^ ^^^ 







y 







31 






ROBERT H. PLATEN IK 
"Bob" 
West Springfield 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Springfield 
Country Club, Springfield. AC- 
TIVITIES: Basketball 1, 2; 
Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club 2; 
Veteran. 

Do you care. 



GEORGE F. PRATT 
Weymouth 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Harco Orchards 
and Poultry Farm, Easton. AC- 
TIVITIES: Poultry Club 1, 2, 
Secretary 1 ; Veteran. 

Gotsha Cards'? 



JOHN F. PUTNAM 
"Putt" 
Grafton 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: Howard John- 
son Co., Framingham. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Horticulture Show 1, 2; 
Fraternity, Kappa Kappa 1, 2; 
Square Dance Club 1, 2; Univer- 
sity Stewards Club 1, 2; Chan- 
ning Club 1. 
Every time he opens his mouth, 
he puts his food in it. 



JAMES W. RANKIN JR. 
"Jim" 
Charlton 
MAJOR: Poultry. PLACE- 
MENT: J. J. Warren's Poultry 
Farm. ACTIVITIES: Poultry 
Club 1, 2. 

Whatf What? What? 



PAUL E. RICHARDSON JR. 
"Shorty" 
Huntington 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: McKinney 
Farm, Huntington. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Little International 2 ; 
Dairy Classic 2. 

Better late than never. 



COLIN J. ROBIN 
"Robin" 
Westport 
MAJOR : Poultry Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Mayo's Duck 
Farm, East Orleans. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Poultry Club 1, 2, Secre- 
tary. 

Somebody goofed 



32 










CARL JOHN ROZICKI 

Florence 

MAJOR : Food Management. 

ACTIVITIES: Hort Show 1, 2. 

The Quite Man. 



LAWRENCE S. RURA 
"Larry" 
South Deerfield 
MAJOR : Vegetable Growing. 
PLACEMENT: Stephen Rich- 
ardson, Sunderland. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Football 1, 2; Alpha Tau 
Gamma 2; Olericulture Club 1, 
2, Vice-President 2. 

IV hat are you trying to say? 



JOSEPH M. RUSSELL III 
Joe 
Hardwick 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Rustle Crest 
Farm, Hardwick. ACTIVITIES: 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2 ; University Concert 
Band 1. 

The Hardwick Butcher 



PETER E. SCHWAMB 
"Pete" 
Arlington 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: Lookout United States 
Forest Service, Silver Lake, Ore- 
gon. ACTIVITIES: Fraternity, 
A.T.G. 1, 2; Forestry Club 1. 
What' s in it for a married Man? 



DEBORAH A. SEALEY 
"Debby" 
Southboro 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Stone Steps 
Farm, Bethel, Vermont. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Secretary 2; Student 
Council 1, 2; Shorthorn Board 2; 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2, 
Treasurer 2 ; Little International 
2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 

Jerseys and Hosses, please. 



RAMON RUSSELL SEARS 
"Ray" 
Goshen 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Roderick 
Macleod, Williamsburg, Mass. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 
2; Basketball 1, 2; Horticulture 
Show 1, 2; Horticultural Club 
1,2. 

I'll put greenhouses in that 
parking lot. 






33 






DAVID A. SJOSTEDT 
"Swede" 
Auburn 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: Gifford Pinchot Na- 
tional Forest, Randle, Washing- 
ton. ACTIVITIES : Horticulture 
Show 2 ; Forestry Club 1 , 2. 
Very Pretty. 



LLOYD ALTON SLOAT 
"Sloatie" 
Ware 
MAJOR: Floriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: French Hall Green- 
house, University of Massachu- 
setts. ACTIVITIES : Floriculture 
Club 1, 2; Hort Show 1,2. 
Don't pick on me. 



BRADLEY GAGE SMITH 
"Smity" 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
MAJOR : Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Asplundh Tree Expert 
Co., Jenkintown, Penn. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Horticulture Show 1, 2; 
Arboriculture Club, President 1, 
2. 

The true Asplundh kid. 



DAVID T. SOUTTER 
"Dave" 
WoUaston 
MAJOR: Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: "EdgehiU Inn", 
Nahant. ACTIVITIES: Hort 
Show 1, 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 2; 
Newman Club 1, 2; Inter-fra- 
ternity Sports 1, 2; University 
Stewards Club 1, 2. 

Society variety is the spice 
of life. 



PAUL BERNARD SOUSA 
Sousy 
Fairhaven 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Manuel P. 
Soaries, Fairhaven. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandr>' Club 
1, 2; Little International 2; Dairy 
Classic 2. 

Let's go to Shumway's 



JOHN STASHEWKO JR. 
"John" 
Stamford 
MAJOR: Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Elmcroft Tree Service, 
Stamford, Conn. ACTIVITIES: 
Horticulture Show 1, 2; Frater- 
nity Alpha Tau Gamma 2; Ar- 
boriculture Club 1, 2. 

/ can do anything but that's all. 










MELVIN A. STEPHENS JR. 
"Steve" 
Somerville 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Allenholm 
Farm, South Hero, Vermont. AC- 
TIVITIES: Shorthorn Board, 
Art Editor 1, 2; Football 1, 2; 
Basketball 1, 2; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 2 ; Little Interna- 
tional 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; Veteran. 
One picture is worth a 
thousand words. 



JOHN JOSEPH SULLIVAN 
"Sully" 
Winthrop 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: Kaniksu National Forest, 
Newport, Washington. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Horticulture Show 1, 2; 
Forestry Club 1, 2. 

Hey! A be-eee-eq wan. 



ARTHUR J. STOHLMANN 
"Dork Jr." 
Adams 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Arthur A. Stohl- 
mann, Adams, Mass. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Fraternity, Kappa 
Kappa 2; Dairy Classic 2. 
/ just got back from Chicago. 



RAY ALLISON SWANSON 
"Stonewall" 
Marlboro 
MAJOR: Forestry. PLACE- 
MENT: Sierra National Forest, 
North Fork, California, United 
States Forest Service. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Horticulture Show 1, 2; 
Forestry Club 1, 2. 

My mind is made up.' ! 
Don't confuse me with the facts. 



HENRY D. SULLIVAN 
"Hank" 
West Roxbury 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Powisset Farm, 
Dover, Mass. ACTIVITIES: 
Shorthorn Board 2; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Fraternity Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2. 
Off we go into the wild 
blue yonder. 

JOHN HIRAM TEMPLE 
"Jack" 
Shelburne Falls 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: River Wind 
Farm, Shelburne Falls. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; Little International 2 ; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Dairy Classic 2. 
"Shelburne Falls . . . That's 
God's Country" 




^ ^^ 



i » 







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■"SKr:'^ 



35 






PARKER C. TEMPLE 

Upton 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Danvers State 
Hospital, Hathorne. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2, Vice-President 2; Little 
International 2; Kappa Kappa 1, 
2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 

Which Temple are youf 



HOWARD E. THURSTON 

"Howie" 

Needham 
MAJOR: Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Hartney Tree Surgeons, 
Dedham. ACTIVITIES: Foot- 
ball 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma, 
Sergeant-at-Arms 2 ; Arboriculture 
Club 1, 2; Basketball 1, 2; 
Hockey 1. 

The pole saw is his meat. 



DAVID R. TITCOMB 

Dave 
Lowell 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Danvers State 
Hospital, Danvers. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Glee Club 2; An. Hus. 
Club 1, 2; Little International 2; 
Dairy Classic 2; Veteran. 

But Pop, I Think 



LAWRENCE L. TURNER 

Larry 
West Cummington 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst. AC- 
TIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 2; 
An. Hus. Club 1, 2; 4-H Club 1, 
2 ; Little International 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2; Square Dance Club 1, 2. 
Windows are to look through — 
not fall through. 



EDWARD L. UHLMAN JR. 
"Ed" 
Westboro 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Sunset View 
Dairy Farm, Westboro, Mass. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 
2; Basketball 2; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 
Now I've got it. 



JOHN S. UHLMAN JR. 
"Jack" 
Westboro 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Sunset View 
Dairy Farm, Westboro, Mass. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board 
2; Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2. 

Now you're getting it. 



36 













JOHN L. UNDERCOFFLER 
"Undy" 
Royersford, Penn. 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Under- 
coffler's Landscape Gardener, 
Royersford, Penn. ACTIVITIES : 
Hort Show 1, 2; Hort Club 1, 2; 
Veteran. 

I'll get even with you guys. 



KENNETH L. WALKER 
Ken 
Westboro 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Lowell K. Wal- 
ker, Westboro, Mass. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Student Council 1; Short- 
horn Board, Assistant Editor 2 ; 
Animal Husbandry Club 1, 2; 
Little International 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2. 

Early to Bed : Early to Rise. 



CHARLES NOBLE WALDO 
"Chuck" 
Hadley 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Crystal Brook 
Farm, Tyringham. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; Little International 2; Kappa 
Kappa 2 ; Dairy Classic 2. 

But you have to take into 
consideration . . . 



ERNEST H. WASHBURN JR. 
Ernie, "Country" 
Pembroke 
MAJOR: Ornamental Horticul- 
ture. PLACEMENT: Mrs. 
Winthrop Coffin (Private Estate), 
Duxbury, Mass. ACTIVITIES: 
Horticulture Show 1, 2; Horticul- 
ture Club 1, 2. 

Hi! Smilie. 



JOHN WALKER III 

"Johnny" 
Agawam 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Pioneer Farm, 
Old Lyme, Connecticut. AC- 
TIVITIES: Animal Husbandry 
Club 2; 4-H Club 1, 2; Kappa 
Kappa 1, 2; Little International 
2; Dairy Classic 2. 

There's only one breed 
. . . Jerseys! 
GEORGE S. WEAVER JR. 
"Rebel" 
Triadelphia, West Virginia 
MAJOR: Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Virginia Hurst 
Farm, Triadelphia, West Virginia. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board, 
Editor-in-Chief 2; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Kappa Kappa 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2. 

Let's go to the Flicks. 









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37 






KENNETH NEAL WELCH 
"Ken" 
Pittsfield 
MAJOR : Food Management. 
PLACEMENT: The Lord Jef- 
fory Inn, Amherst, Mass. AC- 
TIVITIES: Horticulture Show 
1, 2; Fraternity Alpha Tau 
Gamma 1 ; University Stewards 
Club 1, 2, Treasurer 1. 

Do you want to cook? 



LOYAL DURAND WRIGHT 
"Will" 

Winchester 
MAJOR: Poultry Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Caldwell Farms, 
Littleton. ACTIVITIES: Poultry 
Club 1, 2; Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 
2 ; Hockey 1 . 

I'm Snowed 



JAMES CLARKE WELSH 
"Jim" ' 
Concord 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Last Chance 
Ranch, Lake Placid, New York. 
ACTIVITIES: Shorthorn Board, 
Statistics Editor 2 ; Animal Hus- 
bandry Club 1, 2; Little Inter- 
national 2 ; Fraternity Kappa 
Kappa 2 ; Dairy Classic 2 ; Hockey 
Ayrshires are Thumper's buTnpers. 
ROLAND G. ALLENBY 
"Gib" 
Falmouth 
MAJOR : Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Hampshire Tree and 
Landscape Service, Florence, Mass. 
ACTIVITIES : Floriculture Club 
1; Horticulture Show 1, 2, 3; 
Alpha Tau Gamma 1 ; Horticul- 
ture Club 1, 2, Vice-President 2; 
Aboriculture Club 2; Hockey 1. 
Class of 1954 



ENOS ROSS WHITE JR. 
Koss 
Brattleboro, Vt. 
MAJOR : Animal Husbandry. 
PLACEMENT: Arthur I. Scho- 
field, Cochituate, Mass. ACTIVI- 
TIES: Animal Husbandry Club 
1, 2; Little International 2; Fra- 
ternity Kappa Kappa 2 ; Dairy 
Classic 2 ; Square Dance Club 1, 2. 
The quiet type. 
ROBERT HOWE DAVIS 
"Bob" 
Billerica 
MAJOR : Arboriculture. PLACE- 
MENT: Arboriculture Depart- 
ment, U. of M. ACTIVITIES: 
Student Council 3 ; Horticulture 
Show 1, 2, 3; Campus Chest 3; 
Alpha Tau Gamma 1, 2, 3, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer 2, President 
3 ; Arboriculture Club 2, 3 ; Bas- 
ketball 1, 2 (Inter-fraternity). 
Class of 1954 



38 






To Our Prof. 



V. A. Rice., B. S. North Carolina State College ; 
M. Agr. Massachusetts Agricultural College; D. 
Agr. North Carolina State College ; Assistant State 
4-H Club Leader, Massachusetts, 1916 to 1919. 
Acting Head, Animal Husbandry Department, 
University of Massachusetts, 1923 to 1926; De- 
partment Head, 1930 to 1955; Dean, School of 
Agriculture, 1930 to 1950. Phi Kappa Phi; Sigma 
Xi ; Alpha Zeta ; Member, American Dairy Science 
Association ; American Society of Animal Produc- 
tion; American Association for the Advancement of 
Science ; American Genetics Society ; American 
Eugenics Society. 

Author, "Breeding and Improvement of Farm 
Animals," Rice and Andrews; "Breeding Better 
Livestock," Rice, Andrews and Warwick; numerous 
articles in the technical journals and popular ar- 
ticles in the farm periodicals. 

Victor Arthur Rice was an undergraduate stu- 
dent at North Carolina State College from 1912 
to 1916. As one of the first 4-H Club Leaders in 
Massachusetts, he plunged into his job with un- 
limited enthusiasm and soon Pig Clubs and other 
4-H activities blossomed forth all over the State. 
As a teacher of Animal Husbandry, "Prof" Rice has 
inspired two generations of University and Stock- 
bridge students to acquire a lasting zeal for learning 
and a sound foundation in the basic principles of 
feeding, breeding and managing all classes of farm 
animals. As Head of the Animal Husbandry De- 
partment, he has demonstrated with the college 
herds and flocks how to successfully apply the 

principles of genetics for herd improvement, and as 
a consultant to various breed organizations and to 
individual herd owners, he has endeavored to place 
breed improvement programs on a sound genetic 




Fictor Arthur Rice, B.S., M.A., Dr. A. 

basic. During 20 years as Dean of the School of 
Agriculture, he provided progressive leadership for 
the agricultural organizations of Massachusetts and 
for the various Departments of the School, striving 
always to encourage better teaching, sound research, 
enthusiastic extension work, and better farming. 

His unusual ability to translate the results of 
basic research in animal breeding into guiding 
priciples easily understood by the student and the 
practical dairyman, as well as the registered herd 
owner, has made him a popular speaker through 
the eastern half of the United States and in Canada, 
a regular contributor to the various breed journals 
and other ^ricultural periodicals, and he has written 
two textbooks which are standard texts among 
American colleges and high schools as well as being 
translated into Spanish for use in Central and South 
America. 

V. A. Rice, effective administrator, inspiring 
teacher, popular author and lecturer, authority on 
breeding better livestock, through his enthusiastic 
leadership and constant example has inspired high 
standards of performance for those who have 
studied under him or worked for him, and his 
achievements at the University of Massachusetts 
during the past 40 years have set lofty goals for 
those who would follow in his footsteps. 

Richard C. Foley 



39 




"SSt 



Fred Wall, President Agnes R. Smit, Secretary 

John G. Sears, Vice-President William E. Rodenhizer, Treasurer 

Freshmen Officers 



40 





L.-ati-J;:i3ai.ii>*.....'. I U^^-vi. 




'^r 



Class of 1956 




XX 





-^ 




Sen 



ors 




Fresh 



men 



Front Ro^v, left to right: Dunham, Homer, Abbott, Baskin, Hall, Stephens, Bernard, 
Campbell, Sullivan. Second Roil'. Kennedy, Temple J., Davis B., Davis J., Kuzia, 
Davenport, Uhlman E., Souza, Uhlman J. Third Row. Duarte, Collier, Harding, 
Welsh, Barakian, Temple P., Mallon, Stohlmann. Fourth Row. Weaver, Richardson, 
Baker, Russell, Walker K., Martin, Locklin, Murray, Ferry. Fifth Row. Hammond, 
DeWolfe, Holway, Sealey, White, Bigelow, Walker J., Waldo, Turner. Sixth Row. 
Carlson, Donohue, Curran, Gage, Titcomb. 



Animal Husbandry 



Front Row, left to right: York, Resendes, Barnett, Lence, Murphy, Stone, Izenberg, 
Zecher, Bordeaux. Second Row: Baker, Mateau, Forte, Zimmerman, Stewart, Pomeroy, 
Flynn. Third Row: Slattery, Green, Rhodenhizer, Morse, Perkins, Burne, Gurin. 
Fourth Row: Stone, Beauegard, White, Wilcox, Dugas, Dalrymple. Fifth Row: 
Strutters, Enos, Hurle, Rolfe, Sworde, Lee, Anderson. Sixth Roiv: Barakian, Vanshegan, 
Brown, Whelan, Gushing, Hamilton, Myer, Lee, Bongiorno, Hutchinson. 




44 




Front Row, left to right: H. Thurston, C. Kilbourn, B. Smith, J. Stashenko, R. Davis. 
Second Row. R. Freeman, R. Nepper, Prof. King, G. Allenby. 



Arb 



oncuiTure 



It 



Front Row, left to right: J. Humbert, R. Wonamaker, W. Calnan, M. Foy, G. Tyler, 
J. Edwards. Second Roiu: R. Hammare, W. Fellman, W. Rose, G. Freed, Prof. King, 
D. Lyon. Third Row: A. Cox, R. Sanna, C. McKeon, R. Belanger, G. Doty, R. 
McKean. 



Seniors 




Fresh 



men 




45 




Sen 



lors 




Front Rotv, left to rig /it: R. Conti, Rix. Second Roiv: 
'■\ A. Weatherby, C. Johnson, J. Peterson, A. Chandler, A. 
Doak. 



Dairy 



Fresh 



men 



Front Roiv, left to right: William Harnish, Ronald 
Mitchell. Second Row: Kenneth Cherry, Bernard Katz. 



46 





Front Roiu, left to right: L. Sloat, C. Bosselman, E. Brandt, R. Houston, K. Briscoe. 
Second Row. R. Cannon, R. Harding, W. Blood, H. Madru. 



Seniors 



Floriculture 



Fresh 



men 



Front Row, left to right: G. Leslie, J. Cleary, F. Schultz, D. Moriarty, R. Ellery, P. 

Fleuriel, E. Yukl. Second Row: D. Mrozinski, G. Richards, F. Hawes, A. Hawes, C. 

Kennedy, K. Gropf, W. Butts. Third Roiu: R. Elwell, E. Bardy, D. Miller, R. 
Tierney. 





47 




Seniors 



Front Roiv, left to right: J. Guam, C. Dailey, T. Boyer, C. Rozicki. Second Row. 
J. Putnam, D. Soutter, H. Cusick, K. Welch, R. Parsons, J. Farquar. 




Food Management 



h Front Roil; left to right: D. Stockbarger, B. Whitestone, H. Dakers, H. Cocca, W. 

rr\ pi p Predeger, D. Goldmen. Second Row: H. Allen, J. Messier, R. Wilkes, R. Hutchins, 
D. Janis, J. Rojcewicz. 




48 




Front Roiv, left to right: F. Frey, Prof. Ganley, J. Lipski, J. Sullivan. Second Row. 
R. Swansen, J. Hay, D. Sjostedt, G. Brooks, P. Swamb. 



rorestry 



Seniors 



Front Row, left to right: ]. Thurlow, L. Williamson, G. Burbank, P. Dzikiewicz, T. ■- i 

Callahan. Second Roil-: M. Shannon, R. Frye, W. Care, A. Watts. Third Roii.: W. rrGShmGn 

Ogden, R. Black, L. Oberlander. 






jjj^^^^^ 






i 




49 




Seniors 




Fresh 



men 



Front Row, left to right: R. Bethel, D. Kimball, B. Pervier, J. Cannon, W. Kelly, D. 
Green. Second Roiv: J. Ober, A. Elmers, R. Platnick, A. Hovey, J. Undercoffler. 



Ornamental Horticulture 



Front Roif, left to riff /it: D. Hodges, J. Seans, A. Johnson, T. Kuzchevski. Second 
Row: R. Paradise, L. Peppin, L. Alessio, J. Lynch. 



50 





Front Roiv, left to right: J. Rankin, G. Anderson, T. Nix, D. Crowell, D. Franklin. 
Second Roiv: L. Wright, G. Pratt, G. Moore, C. Robin. 



Poultry 



Front Row, left to right: K. Cox, J. MacKinstry, R. Fitzpatrick, R. Nowak, T. Hitch- 
ings, K. Gricus. Second Roiv: K. Chickering, D. Upton, S. O'Flanagan, P. DeSantis, 
M. Thurston. Third Row:]. DePonte, R. Clark, S. Perry. 



Seniors 






Freshmen 





51 




olericulture 




Sen 



lors 



Left to right: Robert Alberghini, John 
Decas, Lawrence Rura. 




Freshmen 



Left to right: James Shatos, Donald 
Lee, Donald Lawrence, David Shan- 
non. 



Turf Maintenance 



Fresh 



men 



Front Row, left to right: W. 
Smith, V. Eberhardt, E. 
Murphy, R. Loynd, M. Joy, 
W. Edlund. Second Roiu: 
S. Boraski, L. O'Keefe, L. 
Gerrior, P. Hunt. 




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w^^i^^^isi^^mss. 



« p r, rj f^Ih^ « o 





\ 



Front Roiu, left to right: Rix, Rhodenhizer, Tierney, Crowell, York, White- 
stone, Perry, Wall, Pepin. Second Roiu: Gashman, Williamson, Green, 
Thurston, Molta, Davis, President, Prof. Barrett, Advisor, Ober, Cannon, 
Wright, Rose. Third Roiu: Davis, Allessio, Kelly, Dustin, Schwamb, Freed, 
Wayland, Sears, Lyons, Cook. Fourth Row: Nix, Decas, Ogden, Nepper, 
Black, Stashenko, Johnson, Dugas, McKeon. 



Alpha 

Tau 
Gamma 



Kif::y.<^yM^^^^ 










^^^*;t^^# 



This year's social calendar found every member of Alpha Tau 
Gamma participating in one way or another in the various 
activities of the fraternity. A. T. G. also lived up to its good 
reputation by leading campus activities in many ways. Alpha Tau 
Gamma won the competitive campus Community Chest Drive and 
established good public relations by participating in all inter-fra- 
ternity competition. 

This year's social calender found Alpha Tau Gamma sponsoring 
many parties. Of course there was the incomparable Saturday night 
party as the standard item on the social calendar, but highlights of 
the season were a gay football rally and dance, French party, 
Christmas party with Pop Barrett acting as Santa Claus, Ship- 
wreck party, and the Friday night party with the sorority. The 
traditional rope pull between Kappa Kappa and Alpha Tau Gamma 
was one more victory of which the boys from A.T.G. can boast. 

December 6 saw the final initiation of men followed by their 
pledging duties, which consisted of many unusual stunts which were 
carried out with much enthusiasm. 

On February 28 the annual election of next year's officers was 
made. Those elected were : Louis Allessio, President ; Dale Freed, 
Vice-President; Les Williamson, Secretary; and John Dugas, Treas- 
urer. 

Before the freshmen left for placement training the annual 
banquet was held on March 12, 1955 at the Chateau Harmony. 
The guest speakers were President Jean Paul Mather, Stockbridge 
Director Fred P. Jeffrey, and Commissioner of Agriculture L. Roy 
Hawes. 

So 1954 and 1955 proved to be another successful year for the 
brothers of Alpha Tau Gamma of which they can be proud. 



55 






Front Row, left to right: Gage, Moriarty, Locklin, Kennedy, R. Parsons, President, Dr. L. Baker, 
Advisor, Bernard, Bosselman, Sullivan, Watts. Second Row. Schultz, Barakian, Johnson, Kuzia, 
Hutt, P. Temple, White, Rojcewicz, Stohlman, Schiraga, Mallan. T/iird Row: Dunham, Gurin, 
Mason, Flynn, DeSantis, O'Flanagan, Hume, Cox, Hurle, Gricus, J. Temple, Welsh, Collier, 
Curran. 






Kappa Kappa 



56 





With most of the senior An. Hus. class and a good freshman 
class, Kappa Kappa started off the year with a bang. Under the 
excellent counseling of our very popular House Advisor, Doctor 
Lou Baker of the Dept. of An. Hus., who was unanimously elected 
an honorable member, all of our activities proved successful. 

The house had several good Saturday night parties, for which 
the house itself had much work done to it; add the decoration to 
the "new look" of the house and then follow all this up with a stag 
party on the night before Christmas Recess, and we're back where 
we started from. 

Initiation of freshmen and senior pledges was started and con- 
cluded late in the first semester. With a complete ritual by our 
very able V. P., the pledges became the next year's representatives 
of KK. For the first time in the history of the house, during the 
Winter Carnival weekend, members were actually as numerous as 
during a school week. This was mainly due to the Sno Ball Dance 
sponsored by the Senior Stockbridge Class, and organized through a 
very active Student Council. Many of the members of KK were the 
"works" of the Student Council. 

The yearly Kappa Kappa banquet was held at the Williams 
House on March 5th and was an extremely gay event. 

With the efficient and successful house officers and dance com- 
mittees the year proved to be a very happy one. 

It is with deepest regrets but fondest memories that we must 
now say goodbye to dear old Kappa Kappa. 








Animal Husbandry Club 



Our "An Hus" Club here at the University of Massachusetts 
was organized in 1920 under the impetus of Prof. V. A. Rice. Each 
year it sponsors the "Little International" and the "Dairy Classic", 
in which Stockbridge and University students fit and show live- 
stock in competition. Also during the year various interesting 
speakers and programs are presented for the benefit of the members. 

Officers for the following school year are elected each March 
before the Stockbridge freshmen go out on placement. The positions 
of Vice-President and Treasurer are filled by Stockbridge students. 

The Animal Husbandry Club is one of the largest organizations 
on campus, and a good half of the membership is made up of two- 
year men. 

Arboriculture Club 

The "tree doctors" you see about campus doing 
various sorts of surgical work on our trees are well- 
trained arborists. The interest and ambition that has 
been shown by these strong, agile, sure-footed men 
will lead them to a bright and prosperous future. 
The club has had speakers in the arboriculture 
field who have given talks on many interesting 
subjects. Our field trips and meetings have added 
greatly to our knowledge of the arboriculture in- 
dustry. 




The club is an influential organization that is 
helping to mold many ambitious young men into 
respected and successful arborists. 







V=s^ 






^ 



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■>/ 




The energetic Dairy Club is made up of mem- 
bers of Stockbridge and University Dairy majors. 
They hold meetings twice a month pertaining to 
proper handling of milk and milk products. They 
also discuss salesmanship, servicing and mainten- 
ance of dairy equipment and qualifications for dif- 
ferent dairy opportunities. 

The organization presented its first Dairy 
Alumni Breakfast Reunion last year and it will 
now be an annual event. 

The annual Dairy Club Banquet is always an 
educational as well as an entertaining affair. 

The functions of the club should be educational 
and interesting to any student majoring in Dairy 
Industry. 




Dairy Club 



Forestry Club 



The Forestry Club is made up of a group of 
Stockbridge and University students who are in- 
terested in the forestry industry throughout the 
country. 

Outstanding foresters and men in related fields 
are invited to speak to our club about interesting 



and educational topics. Movies and products of 
the forestry industry are examined by the members 
of the club at the meetings, adding greatly to their 
knowledge of the forestry field. 

Success of the club is attributed to the intense 
student interest and wonderful cooperation of the 



faculty advisors. 





59 



Horticulture 




The HORTICULTURE CLUB was formed 
in 1936 by the students of the Horticulture Depart- 
ment, with the aim to promote the interests of pro- 
fessional horticulture. 

Meetings are held the third Wednesday of 
every month at which Stockbridge freshmen and 
seniors have the opportunity to become better ac- 



quainted and to share horticultural experiences. 
Various aspects of the horticultural profession, as 
well as related topics, are presented by competent 
and outstanding men already in the field. Educa- 
tional films or photographic slides are often used 
to illustrate and further explain the subject being 
discussed. 



Floriculture Club 



The purpose of the FLORICULTURE CLUB 
is to bring together Stockbridge and University 
students majoring in Floriculture and all others 
who are interested in this field. 

During the monthly meetings, guest speakers 
are invited to speak on various problems and 
trends which have arisen recently in the Flori- 



culture industry. Also, there are many educational 
films and colored slides presented to increase in- 
terest and to aid explaining the subject more 
clearly. 

As one of its activities, the FLORICULTURE 
CLUB made up and designed all the corsages for 
the Annual Horticulture Show. 



60 





Poultry 
Club 




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Hlf 



Membership in the Poultry Science Club is 
open to Stockbridge and University students. Ac- 
tivities are both social and educational. The basic 
function of the club is to promote fellowship 
among poultry students and to acquaint the mem- 
bers with various branches of the poultry in- 
dustry. 

Meetings this year were held on every third 



Tuesday. The speakers at meetings were men in 
various branches of the poultry industry or one 
of the allied fields. 

This year the club is going to set up exhibits 
and prepare a chicken barbecue for "Open House" 
which will be held on April 23rd. 

We wish to express our gratitude to Prof. 
Vondell for his guidance and cooperation. 



Olericulture Club 



Membership in the Olericulture Club is open 
to anyone in Stockbridge or the University who 
is interested in vegetable culture and its various 
allied fields. The purpose of the club is to develop 
interest and to provide information about the 
numerous phases of the field. 



Our many activities consist of business meetings 
and social gatherings, all of which are interesting 
and enjoyable. The officers and members of the 
club extend their thanks and appreciation to all the 
members of the faculty who helped make our meet- 
ings and activities a success. 




ii— i m , j ' i T^ 




61 




Food 
Management 

Club 




The purpose of this club is to promote further 
interests in the hotel and restaurant business 
through lectures, motion pictures and field trips. 
The club is open to all two and four year majors 
in Food Management. Each member takes part 
in a function of the club. We had an exhibit in 
the Horticulture Show last fall and also served as 



caterers to many University and Stockbridge func- 
tions. Among these were: The President's re- 
ception, the Military Ball, a faculty Christmas 
party, the Stockbridge Sno-Ball, the Winter Carn- 
ival Ball, and also the Hotel and Restaurant Sem- 
inar and the Allied Industries Conference held af 
the University in February. 



Varsity "S" Club 



These are the officers: President, John 
Sears; Vice-President, H. Dale Freed; 
Secretary, David Hodgen ; Treasurer, 
Arthur Johnson ; Advisor, Coach Steve 
Kosakowski. 



The Varsity "S" Club was newly formed this 
year and its members are athletes who have re- 
ceived their letter or letters in any Stockbridge 
sport. The meetings, which are held once a month, 
are designed to provide a social get-together and 
serve as an opportunity for the members to see 
sport movies, hear speakers in the sports world, 
etc. The meetings were climaxed by a banquet at 
the end of the year. 





FEATURES 



HORT SHOW 



LITTLE INTERNATIONAL 





Ql> 



V/INTER CARNIVAL 



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Horticulture 



The 42nd Annual Horticulture Show, held on No- 
vember 5, 6, and 7, in the Cage, was a huge success. A 
record crowd of 27,000 viewed the splendid harvest, floral, 
and woodland displays. 

"Contemporary Living" was the theme of the show 
this year. The main feature was a contemporary home 
surrounded by suitable plantings produced by the Land- 
scape Architecture Department. 

Stockbridge and University students arranged several 
outstanding 10' x 10' exhibits. 



64 




Department exhibits were better than ever this year. 
Each one showed imagination and our visitors were most 
interested. 

Elaine Stewart was crowned queen and presided over 
the show with two attendants, Marilyn Votano and 
Beverly Giles. 

Credit for the show goes to those students from Stock- 
bridge and the University who devoted so much of their 
time and effort to the show. We also wish to extend our 
thanks and appreciation to those members of the faculty 
who helped make this show such a success. 




Little Internationol 



In 1938, Professor M. E. Ensminger, now 
Head of the Animal Husbandry Department at 
Washington State College, originated the "Little 
International" livestock fitting and showing con- 
test here at the University of Massachusetts. This 
is modeled after the famed International Livestock 
Show in Chicago. 

The show is entirely student organized and 
run under the auspices of the Animal Husbandry 
Club. This year there were about seventy contest- 
ants competing for the many prizes and trophies, 
many of which have been made available by live- 
stock enthusiasts in the Northeast. Prizes included 
subscriptions to various agricultural and breed mag- 
azines, equipment such as halters, lead shanks, 



'<■}- i 






Livestock Show 



brushes, and a set of livestock clippers for the Pre- 
mier Showman. 

All four-year and Stockbridge students in the 
University pursuing the fat stock course were re- 
quired to fit and show animals. Breeds shown were : 
Beef, Angus and Hereford ; Sheep, Shropshire and 
Southdown ; Swine, Chester White ; Horses, Mor- 
gan. All these animals were from the College 
farm. 

WINNER IN BEEF: Richard Ridder—Wm- 
NER IN SWINE: Kenneth West— WINNER 
IN SHEEP: Stanley Kuzia— WINNER IN 
HORSES: Jack U hlman— RESERVE PRE- 
MIER SHOWMAN: Ralph Hastings— PRE- 
MIER SHOWMAN: James Clapp. 






Winter 



The annual carnival weekend at the University 
of Massachusetts was a sad affair this year. Mother 
Nature did not cooperate with us, and the ground 
was as bare as it could be. The weather was cold 
enough, however, and many students took ad- 
vantage of the excellent skating. But there was 
no skiing, and the beautiful snow sculptures, for 
which we are famous, just didn't materialize. 





Carniva 



The social functions came off as well as ever, 
with Stockbridge incorporating something new into 
the program — its Sno-Ball. This was a big affair 
for us, and we had two bands, plus some wonderful 
harmonizing by our own Blue and White Quartet. 

Since there was no snow to speak of this year 
(unfortunately) and consequently no good winter 
scenes, we are including photos of some of last 
year's prize-winning snow sculptures. 



%=^ 







Front Roiii, left to right: John MacKinstry, James Ober, Karl Cox, Bruce Dalrjmple, William 
Calnan, Richard Franklin, David Titcomb, Bernard Katz. 




^^ 



Stockbridge Octet 



From the singing of barbershop ballads to the performance of Fred Waring's 
arrangements, the Blue and White Octet has demonstrated its versatility. Under the 
experienced leadership of Russell Falvey, the octet is rapidly becoming one of the 
most outstanding vocal groups on campus. 

With only three members returning from last year's original octet, the group 
was quickly organized from auditioners. Between the hours of five and six, Monday 
through Wednesday, those minor chords of My Evaline and the lively refrain of 
or Ark's Amovering could be heard issuing forth from Memorial Hall as the 
Blue and White Octet rehearsed for its next performance. 

Starting the season off in an appearance before the Dairy Club Alumni Break- 
fast, the octet went on to sing at various campus afiairs, finally to appear in the Off- 
Campus Varieties, where they were acclaimed to be one of the outstanding hits of 
the show. From this successful campus-wide debut, the Blue and White not only 
gained popularity and recognition for itself, but indirectly made one further step 
toward creating good feeling between Stockbridge and the University proper. 



70 





Front Roiv, left to right: R. Loynd, D. Ozella, D. Carlson, 
L. Rura, D. Molta (Captain), J. Decas, R. Nepper, H. 
Thurston. Second Row. R. Tierney, (Mgr.), V. RIx, R. 
Arello, A. Johnson, R. Black, J. Tierney, J. Sears, S. 
Perry. Third Roins S. /fosakowski {Coach), L. Ober- 
lander, W. Rhodenhizer, D. Freed, D. Miller, L. Allessio, 
M. Stephens, P. DiVincenzo {Asst. Coach). 



Fifty football aspirants met "Steve" Kosakowski 
on September 27, 1954. Only twenty-one of these 
were on hand when the regular season ended. 

"So you think you have troubles?" "Steve" 
had the impossible to do ! With only four starters 
returning: Captain Dante Molta, John Decas, 
Howie Thurston, and Dick Geffroys, he had to 
mold a team, pick eleven starters, and have his 
team ready to meet powerful Thayer Academy — 
all in just four days. 

From the scoring outlook this was a dim season 
indeed, but characteristic of all Stockbridge teams, 



Footb 



a 



the boys never quit fighting. With a few good 
breaks, the final scores would have been different. 

Even with the not too impressive record of our 
team, the spirit was very high. Stockbridge saw 
its first football rally on November 12, 1954, and 
motorcade to Mt. Hermon Academy the following 
day. 

For the first time in the Stockbridge School of 
Agriculture history tri-captains were elected for 
the 1955 season. They are: Guard Vern Rix, 
Tackle Dale Freed, and End Jack Tierney. 



Thayer 


6 


S.S.A. 





Monson 


14 


S.S.A. 





Vermont 


12 


S.S.A. 


6 



Nichols J. C. 8 
New Hampton 25 
Mt. Hermon 27 



S.S.A. 
S.S.A. 13 
S.S.A. 6 



72 











■ A t)>i 



•?1S.W--W" 



^-'mJ^W 






Basketba 





Front Roiv, left to right: R. Arello, P. Edwards, 
H. Cusick, Captain, J. Zecher, E. Hall. Second 
Row. H. Woronicz {Coach) M. Joy, R. Black, 



W. Ogden, J. Sears, D. Hodgin (Manager) . 
Third Row. L. Allessio, R. Murphy, A. Johnson, 
W. Rhodenhizer, R. Sears. 



The Stockbridge basketball team under the able coach- 
ing of Henry Woronicz started practicing November 29th 
for their ten game season schedule. 

By January 10th the boys had put in many hard hours 
of work both practicing and learning new plays, and the 
team was in good shape for the first game of the season. 

Although the team came through with a 1 and 8 record, 
we owe the boys a great deal of thanks for their cooperative 
effort and good sportsmanship. All of the games were real 
thrillers with many of them being lost by only a few points. 

The team Captain, Hank Cusic, a 6'2" lad from Wor- 
cester, set an all time cage record last year, and tied it again 
this year during the Monson Academy game. This record 
stands at 42 points and has yet to be broken by any team. 
University or otherwise, while playing at the cage. 

Thus we owe our sincere thanks to all players for sup- 
porting our school and also to all others who had any con- 
nection with the team. 



Worcester Jr. College 
Vermont Academy 
Monson Academy 
Williston Academy 
Worcester Jr. College 
Monson Academy 
Leicester Jr. College 
Vermont Academy 
Thayer Academy 




75 



im'^'^f^Vl ^ i ti' . j< w* a> «wwr aw* v«v*»(k je^^iwwwjww- -'^t^ - ,yi. x-«»*jflsww»» 




a n 




Front Roiv, left to right: John Sullivan, Bernard Katz, 
Donald Davenport, Elaine Brandt, David Sjostedt, Joseph 
Farquhar. Second Row. James Rankin, Lloyd Sloat, 
George Weaver, Warren McAvoy, Joseph Bigelow, 
Richard Cannon, Harold Handley. 



STOSAG 



"Stosag", the Stockbridge honorary society, is 
a truly distinguished achievement which Stock- 
bridge students may attain. 

Members of "Stosag" must have grades which 
average "B" and have no grades below "C" 
for the first three semesters. 

"Stosag' was established in 1935 at the sug- 
gestion of Professor Miner J. Markuson to en- 
courage high scholarship. Engraved certificates 



are awarded to members of the graduating class 
who have achieved this distinction. The name 
"Stosag" stands for "Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture", — "Sto" from Stockbridge, "S" from 
School, and "Ag" from Agriculture. 

To all of you who have attained this distinction, 
we extend our sincere congratulations. May you 
always set such high standards in all your future 
undertakings. 



The Sixteenth Annual election by Stockbridge 
Faculty Advisory Committee encourages and rec- 
ognizes high scholastic ability and sound practical 

Donald Gould Davenport*, Animal Husbandry, 
Shelburne Falls — Harold Thurston Handley, Jr.*, 
Floriculture, Lexington — James PVarren Rankin, 
Jr., Poultry Husbandry, Charlton — Lloyd Alton 
Sloat, Floriculture, Ware — Bernard Katz, Dairy 
Industry, Roxbury — Elain Joan Brandt, Floricul- 
ture, Holyoke — Warren Oliver McAvoy* , Flori- 
culture, Williamsburg — Joseph Henry Farquhar, 
Jr., Food Management, Fiskdale — David Albert 



training. Average grade must be B or better to 
qualify, with no grade less than C. Names placed 
in order of rank. 

Sjostedt, Forestry, Auburn — George S perry 
Weaver, Jr., Animal Husbandry, Triadelphia, 
West Virginia — Richard Alan Cannon, Floricul- 
ture, Brockton — John Joseph Sullivan, Forestry, 
Winthrop — Joseph Prescott Bigelow, Jr., Animal 
Husbandry, Lunenburg — Eugene R. Brooks, For- 
estry — Paul W. Gerdin, Poultry — Parker C. 
Temple, Animal Husbandry. 
*Veteran 



77 



Lotto 



Lotta Crab free in San Francisco 



Her career in San Francisco may be said to 
have started in 1856, when her ambitious mother 
brought her from the mining camps of Grass Val- 
ley, Rabbit Creek, etc., to seek an opening in San 
Francisco. 

Tom Maguire, impresario of the time, would 
have none of her, so several months were spent in 
touring the nearby county of Sonoma, with small 
companies. 




Upon their return to San Francisco Mrs. Crab- 
tree again approached Maguire, but to no avail, 
and the child was then presented in such famous 
saloons as the Bella Union, by her ambitious 
mother. Here she made a distinct impression on 
the somewhat surfeited patrons; and in 1856 she 
appeared in a mixed bill at the American Theater 
in San Francisco, billed as "la Petite Lotta" doing 
a song and dance act. 

After this engagement Lotta again went on 
tour through the Sacramento Valley by stagecoach. 
This was followed by a tour of the San Joaquin 
Valley in 1858. 

By 1859 San Francisco's music halls were ready 
to welcome Lotta, and Tom Maguire booked her 
for an engagement in his Opera House. She also per- 
formed at the What Cheer, Gilbert's, the Apollo and 
the Eureka, and overnight she leaped to fame and 
acclaim. "A public which demanded diversity, 
found it in ample portions in her small person, 
sturdy, yet delicate, and full of a quaint row- 
dyism . . . One of the strolling players encountered 
in the mountains had taught Lotta to strum the 
banjo". (S. F. Theatre History, W.P.A. Project, 
Vol. 6). 

She appeared on the same bills with many of 
the famous minstrels, and since this form of enter- 
tainment was much sought after Lotta was in her 
element. 

In 1863, when Lotta was sixteen she played 
at "The Willows" famous San Francisco resort. 
But in spite of her fame she was completely isolated 
from the people of her profession, and she was 
called "Lotta the unapproachable". Her mother 
was constantly at her side shielding her from con- 
tact with the theatrical element. 



LOTTA'S FOUNTAIN 

Photo — Courtesy of Society of California Pioneers 



78 



Crabtree 



In the summer of 1863 she became a great 
friend of the famous Adah Menken who was play- 
ing in San Francisco in "Mazeppa". They be- 
came inseparable. When she was almost 17 Mrs. 
Crabtree decided to taice her prodigy to New York, 
and her successes were recounted in the San Fran- 
cisco press. 

Mrs. Crabtree, who made all the decisions, de- 
cided to return to San Francisco in 1869, and it 
proved a wise move. Lotta appeared at the Cali- 
fornia Theater, August 14, 1869, and she played 
a successful engagement in spite of the adverse crit- 
icisms of her act. 

After triumphs at home and abroad she came 
back to San Francisco from time to time for brief 
engagements. In 1875 she presented to the city of 
San Francisco LOTTA'S FOUNTAIN. It was 
dedicated September 9th, which is California's Ad- 
mission Day. 

"In spite of her immense popularity Lotta felt 
that her gift could be construed as a gesture to seek 
favoritism and for a time refused to appear in San 
Francisco," but in spite of this she appeared at the 
Baldwin Theater during August and Sept. 1879. 
In 1880 she formed her own company for a tour 
of the west and south. 

In 1891 she retired from the stage after more 
than thirty years. In 1915 she revisited San Fran- 
cisco for the Panama Pacific Exposition, and she 
was awarded a medal and a gold nugget. She ap- 
peared at Lotta's Fountain to receive an ovation. 
She only remained in the city for a few days and 
then returned east. 

There is now a plaque on Lotta's Fountain 
commemorating Christmas Eve, 1910 when Luisa 
Tetrazzini sang at its base. 




Editor's Note: 

Graduates of the Stockbridge School of Agri- 
culture are eligible to borrow money from the 
Lotta Crabtree Agricultural Fund without interest 
for the purpose of getting started in farming. 
Former issues of the Shorthorn have published 
articles concerning Lotta Crabtree. The following 
article concerning her life in San Francisco is here 
published for the first time in this book. The article 
luas submitted by "The Society of California Pio- 
neers 456 McAllister Street, San Francisco". 



79 



Pop Barrett's Message 



A short time ago a student told me that his 
parents had tried to discourage him from taking 
a course at the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 
They argued that there was so much information 
available which was being disseminated to farmers 
by the Agricultural Extension Service, by the Farm 
Bureau, by Agricultural papers, by Farmers' Co- 
operatives, by the Soil Conservation Service and by 
various other organizations that it was a waste of 
time and money to spend two years studying any 
phase of agriculture. In fact, it was getting so 
that if a farmer had a problem in animal diseases, 
plant pests or even questions about soils and ferti- 
lizers he could obtain the information free from 
the proper department at his State University. In 
the argument the idea seemed to be to let the 
specialists and the researchers in the various fields 
do the thinking and planning for the farmer and 
his family. 

In discussing the matter with the student I 
told him that I agreed with many of the state- 
ments made by his parents. He was very much 
surprised at my attitude because he had felt that 
his parents were all wrong in their point of view. 
He said, "Here I am about to be graduated and 
you are practically telling me that I have wasted 
my time and money studying at the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture the past two years." At the 
moment I made no comment, hoping that he would 
see what I was driving at and come up with the 
correct answer to the problem. He went on, 
"Sure, I have had a good time here; I have made 



r>^- 






80 




a lot of friends and think that I have learned 
something about the scientific aspects of agriculture. 
But I am still wondering a bit if it has all been a 
\vaste of time as my parents tried to tell me before 
I started." 

In order to answer his questions, to banish for- 
ever the doubts in his mind and to show him my 
thinking on the matter I told him about Jim, a 
former student of mine who served in World War 
II. At one time Jim was on an island in the 
South Pacific and his unit was waiting for orders to 
move. While looking about for something to do, 
Jim discovered a small supply of Kodak film to- 
gether with chemicals for developing and paper 
for printing. No camera was available so he de- 
cided to make one. He took a shoe bo.x, cut it 
down to the size desired, punched a small aperture 
in the front to admit light, made a slide to close 
the opening and he had a camera. He took quite a 
number of pictures and they came out exceedingly 
well. 

My visitor looked at me for a moment and then 
said, "Jim must have understood the fundamentals 
of photography in order to do that." 

"Right," I replied." "Now do you see what I 
was driving at?" 

"Yes, I think I do. I have learned many of the 
important fundamentals of Agriculture and believe 
that I can apply them to nearly any situation which 
presents itself." 

"O.K.," I said, "I will give you a hundred 
on that answer." 

My student seemed to be looking for something 
else from me so I continued, "Your parents were 
absolutely right in what they said about the 
amount of information available in all fields of 
agriculture. However, farming still requires plenty 
of original thinking and planning in order to be 
successful. You have more 'tools' to work with 
than the fellow who has not had your training." 

As the young man rose to go he said, "Now 
I understand what you meant when you told us 
in class that if we learned nothing else, while at 
the Stockbridge School of Agriculture than where 
information can be found and how we should 
apply it, we have not wasted our time here." 



Men's Placement 



Emory E. Grayson 

Director of Placement, 

B.S. Massachusetts Agricultural College 



PLACEMENT TRAINING- 
SUMMER OF 1954 

Just for the sake of variety or change, I am 
going to write about some of the happenings ex- 
perienced by your classmates (or you, perhaps) 
and your training supervisor during the placement 
season. 

I drove out to a field, where I had been told 
I would find the student, stepped out of the car 
only to hear a woman yelling "Get off my land — 
get out of here". I could see the student on a 
tractor so did not know just what the score was 
but decided to wait and see. I located the old lady 
by then and she was still yelling, but the student 
drove up and said to pay no attention to her as 
she was "off the beam". It startled me a bit at first. 
I walked into the barn where the student was 
(or had been) stowing baled hay with an electric- 
ally operated hoist and was that hoist fouled up. 
The rope was everywhere but where it should have 
been. I'm sure a knife used in several places was 
the only solution. The boss was not there and I 
left before he returned. I do not know just what 
he did have to say, but I am sure he would be any- 
thing but pleased. 

How could a big cow step on a man's hand? 
I guess he was putting rubbers on her to keep her 
out of the mud. Anyway, he got a 15-day vacation 
with a badly mashed hand. Shortly after he re- 
turned to work, a bull gave him another 6-day 
sick leave by slamming him into a wall. Perhaps 
he may switch to Floriculture. 

A student had an accident which required a 
doctor's care. The doctor's fee was covered by in- 
surance which the student had and also by the 
employer's insurance but they did not get together 




and decide who was to pay the bill for a few months. 
So the doctor sent the bill to me, not only once 
but three times. Whoever suggested he bill me 
for his service is more than I know. I am re- 
sponsible for many things on placement, but I 
draw the line there. No bills. 

At least four men stepped off the deep end into 
matrimony during the summer as they asked for a 
week off for a honeymoon. 

So as I have said before — everything happens on 
placement. 

I want to take this time to wish you all suc- 
cess and happiness in the future. I will always be 
glad to hear from you at any time and will be 
most happy to try to assist you in future employ- 
ment. 

The most fertile soil does not necessarily pro- 
duce the most abundant harvest. It is the use we 
make of our faculties which renders them valuable. 
To quote Benjamin F. Fairless: "What is the 
recipe for successful achievement? There are just 
four essential ingredients : Choose a career you 
love. Give it the best there is in you. Sieze your 
opportunities. Be a member of the team. In no 
country but America is it possible to fulfill all four 
of these requirements." 

Emory E. Grayson 



82 




STOCKBRIDGE SCHOOL OF AGRICULTURE 
PLACEMENT TRAINING— SUMMER 1954 

Following is the geographical distribution of employers: 



Massachusetts 


104 


2 


Ohio 


1 


Connecticut 


2 




West Virginia 


1 


Maine 


3 




Pennsylvania 


2 


New Hampshire 


2 




California 


1 


New York 


3 




Oregon 


6 


New Jersey 


2 




Washington 


3 


Vermont 


1 


1 







STOCKBRIDGE CLASS OF 1955 
PLACEMENT IN MASSACHUSETTS 



At the end of the second semester there were 131 men 
and 3 women eligible to be assigned to training jobs. 
The breakdown by majors follows : 











Returning 












Former 


Seniors 




Placed 


Withdrew 


Returned Freshmen 


Totals 


Animal Husbandry 


47 


3 


44 


4 


48 


Arboriculture 


9 




9 




9 


Dairy Industry 


7 




7 




7 


Fine Turf 


3 




3 






Floriculture 


9 


1 


8 




8 


Ornamental Horticulture 


16 


4 


12 


1 


16 


Poultry Husbandry 


13 


4 


9 


2 


11 


Vegetable Gardening 


4 




4 




4 


Food Management 


12 


1 


11 


1 


12 


Forestry 


11 


2 


9 




9 


Totals 


131 


15 


116 


8 


124 


Women 


3 


1 


2 




2 



Following are the reasons students did not return : 



Draft 3 

Failed in Placement 3 

Finances — Marriage 2 

Failed Scholastically 1 



Develop own Project 1 

Enter Univ. Mass. 2 

Wrong Vocation 2 

Unknown 2 



83 




Women's 
Placement 



Carroll Burr Cornish, 

Placement Officer for Women, 

Grinell College A.B., 

Syracuse University M.A. 



My husband, who travels extensively in the 
United States and Canada, is deeply impressed by 
the number of persons in vi^idely scattered areas who 
know and speak favorably of the Stockbridge 
School of Agriculture. Last summer, for example, 
he met a New Yorker who owned an upstate farm 
and was thinking of sending his farm manager 
here for a two-year course. A day or so later at a 
southern university he talked to an administrator 
who was considering establishing at his institution 
one of the two-year courses of study taught here. 
And but a week after that in a northern con- 
struction camp in Canada a young man spoke to 
him who was saving money with the intention of 
attending Stockbridge. 

These are not isolated cases. Our two-year 
program is known far and wide and the quality 
and versatility of our graduates is attracting wide- 
spread attention within and far beyond the borders 
of Massachusetts. 

While we know that the greatest contribution 
women have made to agriculture is in the love, 



loyalty, inspiration, and cooperation they have given 
to their farming husbands, there is a place today as 
there never was before for women in nearly every 
field who wish to make contributions of their own 
quite independent of their husbands. It is not un- 
common to meet and hear of women who are ed- 
itors of farm and garden publications, landscape 
architects, owners of horticultural businesses and 
farmers. In short, there is a place for every Stock- 
bridge girl. 

In closing I would like to leave a thought with 
you well summed up in the words of one of George 
Bernard Shaw's characters: 

"People are always blaming the circum- 
stances for what they are. I don't believe in 
circumstances. The people who get on in this 
world are people who get up and look for the 
circumstances they want, and if they can't 
find them, make them." 
Goodbye for the present. Do keep in touch 
with the Placement Office. We always enjoy a call 
or letter from one of our graduates. 



Carol Burr Cornish 



84 



Withd 



rawa s 



Carl Hjalmar Asplundh, Jr. 

William McKinley Aurnhammer, Jr. 

John Barns 

Margaret Anne Bean 

Birnie Francis Bickford 

Thomas Joseph Brophy, Jr. 

Donald James Bryant 

Gerald John Buckley 

Francis William Capone 

Donald Allen Cherry 

Susan Cook 

Joseph Thomas Corbett 

Nicholas Alexander Cousens 

James Henry Doherty 

Richard Manning Duncan 

Joseph Clarke Fahey 

Howard Richardson Fiske, Jr. 

Edgar Luther French 

Richard Warren Geoffroy 

Alvan Philip Gildersleeve 

Edward Francis Gundal 

Mark Anthony Hall 

James Hallett, Jr. 

Carl Gottlieb Hampe 

John Knox Hill, Jr. 

Walter Francis Jones 

Donald Ballard Kenyon 

Robert Lawton Kramer 



George Joseph Franz, Jr. 
Anthony Joseph Kuppe 
David Watson Leitch 
Joseph Anthony Masciotra 
David Keith Mason 
Mary Dorothy Michalik 
Joseph Leon Mullens 
Lawrence Francis Nickerson, Jr. 
Robert Herbert Nordborg 
Robert Earl Paddock 
John Gilman Peterson 
Donald Everett Randall 
Charles Edward Reynolds, Jr. 
Philip Benedict Reynolds 
Charles Daniel Riordan 
Charles Henry Rogers, Jr. 
Donald Clark Rollins 
Richard Charles Romano 
John Nichols Rose 
Edmund Francis Sentkowski 
Frederick Lawton Shaw, Jr. 
Chester Wendell Smith 
Kenneth Elmer Stebbins 
Joseph Edward Stolecki 
Guido Joseph Valanzola 
Harry Wald 

Richard Ferdinand Walter 
Glenn Richard Whiteley 



85 



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ANNUALS 



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Tel. Amherst 456 



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86 



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87 



Acknowledgements 



The Shorthorn Board wishes to acknowledge the following 
people who contributed in no small way to the publication of this 
book : 

PROFESSOR ROLLIN BARRETT— advisor and efficiency ex- 
pert. 

PRESIDENT MATHER, DEAN SEILING and DIRECTOR 
JEFFREY for their cooperation and messages. 

Mr. Grayson and Mrs. Cornish — placement directors. 

Mr. Mitchell Koldy — photographer. 

Mr. Robert McCartney — University publicity. 

Mr. Tilley — pictures. 

Mr. Vondell — dedication and pictures. 

Dr. Hankinson — article on Professor Nelson. 

Professor Foley — article on Professor Rice. 
Robert Hume — (a former editor) pictures and help. 

Finally our thanks to all those who contributed in any way to the 
publication of this book. 



88 



i 



i