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Full text of "Silhouette (1991-92)"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/silhouette19919288agne 



RIGHT Here & RIGHT Now 
• Silhouette • 




RIGHT Here & RIGHT Now - 

the Silhouette has arrived in your (hopefully 
eager) hands after far too many delays and 
misadventures. This Is a compilation issue 
covering two academic years. As such, this 
edition is the product of two distinctly differ- 
ent editors - and staffs - and represents a 
medley of their ideas and concepts. 

Margaret Hammond ('91 Editor) contributed 
the colorful retrospective view of the world 
outside ASC in mini-mag form (pages 49- 
72). Katie Tanner ('92 Editor) had the energy 
to persevere with production in spite of the 
odds. So ... 

^fua^me t^ ^i^^ene«tee . . . 

if you will, that a creative, intelligent mind 
can contribute to the production of your 
yearbook ... or to the service of any number 
of organizations here at Agnes Scott. 

Become involved! 

RIGHT Here & RIGHT Now 

the Silhouette is setting a new course. 

With this "compilation" edition, we aspire to 
close the door once and for all on books 
produced and delivered after the fact - often 
with a loss of detail. 

If portions of this book are found lacking in 
material, thoroughness or description, please 

you might have made by being an active 
participant on the Silhouette staff. 

RIGHT Here & RIGHT Now 

we present the 1991 -1992 Silhouette. 




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Pamela Wolf Allen 

DoRAViLLE. Georgia 



Jerri Delores Lori Ammons 

Mableton, Georgia 



Annmarie Anderson 

Clarksville, Georgia 




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Linda Wertz Anderson 

Lawrenceville, Georgia 



MicHELE Anne Barard 

New Orleans, Louisiana 



Stephanie Yvonne Bardis 

Decatur, Georgia 




Ashley Catherine Barnes 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Beth Ann Blaney 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



Julia Ella Booth 

Zebulon, Georgia 




Katrina Ann Brewer 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Jennifer Marie Bridges 

Decatur, Georgia- 



Ashley Beth Carter 

Atlanta, Georgia 






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Cara MaryJo Cassell 

Atlanta, Georgia 



KiMBERLY Anderson Chastain 

Tucker, Georgia 



April Marie Cornish 

Decatur, Georgia 




Susan Kimberly Cowan 

Macon, Georgia 



Catherine Lee Craddock 

Athens, Georgia 



Davina Alane Crawford 

Covington, Georgia 




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Kathryn Elisabeth Cullinan 

Columbia, South Carolina 



Allison Kirke Davis 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Sara Christine Dickert 

KiNGSPORT, Tennessee 




Denice Lynne Dresser 

Bent Mountain, Virginia 



Carol Dianne Duke 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Melissa Anne Elebash 

Pensacola, Florida 



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Christian Victoria Ford 

Columbus, Georgia 



Valerie Claudia Fuller 

Hayesville, Georgia 



Elizabeth Ann Gardina 

Atlanta, Georgia 




Regina Greco 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Bettina Magdalena Gyr 

Houston, Texas 



Sharon Elizabeth Harp 

Lakeland, Florida 




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Anne Francoise Harris 

Charlotte, North Carolina 



Elizabeth Nicole Harrison 

Scottsville, Kentucky 



Debra Leigh Harvey 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 




Lana Rare Hawkins 

Lake City, Florida 



Holly Joye Henderson 

Pavo, Georgia 



Christia Elaine Holloway 

Marietta, Georgia 




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Joy Elizabeth Howard 

St. Mary's, Georgia 



Alyssa Lynne Hurd 

Alpharetta, Georgia 



Sakina Masuma Husein 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 




Margaret Ellen Innes 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



Kristy Lyn Jay 

Macon, Georgia 



Betty Karen Johnson 

Columbia, South Carolina 



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Heather Jill Kelley 

Lakeland, Florida 



Janet Lynn Kidd 
Elberton, Georgia 



Joan Sanford Kimble 

Decatur, Georgia 




Carole Sue King 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Julie Elizabeth King 

Athens, Georgia 



Kimberly King Kizirian 

Tallahassee, Florida 




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Velma Julia Lanford 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Christina Marie Lewandowski 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Yvonne Grant Lindsey 

Atlanta, Georgia 




Jin Liu 

Shanghai, Ppls. Rep. of China 



Alicia Glenn Long 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



Wendy Lyn MacLean 

Orlando, Florida 




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Mary Cecelia Mathewes ' 
/It. Pleasant, South Carolina 



Jean Odette McDowell 

Decatur, Georgia 



Sarah Ann McMillan 

Savannah, Georgia 



Lauren Russell Miller 

Athens, Georgia 



Melanie Cassandra Mortimer 

DuNwooDY, Georgia 



Cynthia Marie Mossman 

Lexington, Kentucky 



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Margaret Estelle Murdock 

GuLFPORT, Mississippi 



Daphne Michelle Norton 

CoNYERS, Georgia 



Stephanie Margaret Pfeifer 

Dacula, Georgia 




Geraldine Elaine Pike 

Columbia, South Carolina 



Jennifer Miriam Pilcher 

Augusta, Georgia 



Cathy June Pitney 

McDonough, Georgia 




*****^ 




Shannon Lane Price 

Decatur, Alabama 



Jennifer Nell Prodgers 

Atlanta, Georgia 



LeAnn Hall Ransbotham 

Smyrna, Georgia 



Michelle Virginia Roberts 

Mobile, Alabama 




Lessye Katherine Robinson 

Decatur, Georgia 



Vivian Emelina Sakir 

Decatur, Georgia 



Jennifer Carole Seebode 

Roanoke, Texas 



13 




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Elizabeth Anne Seward 

Augusta, Georgia 



Tamera Lynn Shirley 

Clarkesville, Georgia 



Natasha Darshan Singh 

New Delhi, India 



Erika Vedra Stamper 

Jacksonville, Florida 



Lydia Leigh Stanford 

Clayton, Georgia 



Mary Alice Smith 

Martinez, Georgia 




Stephanie Dale Strickland 

RoswELL, Georgia 





Suzanne Frances Sturdivant 

Raleigh, North Carolina 



DiERDRE DiONNE StURGIS 

Augusta, Georgia 



Sarah Katherine Tarpley 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



Christine Beth Tibbetts 

Decatur, Georgia 




Stephanie Ruth Wallace 

Marietta, Georgia 



Allyson Holt Whitley 

Burlington, North Carolina 



Candace Alicia Woodard 

Pensacola, Florida 




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Andrea Carol Abrams 

Decatur, Georgia 



Anjail R. Ahmad 

Decatur, Georgia 



Frances Elizabeth Akins 

Winterville, Georgia 




Courtney Elizabeth Alison 

Bush, Louisiana 



Eve Champion Allen 

Augusta, Georgia 



Kerri Diane Allen 

Columbus, Georgia 




Lisa Kirsten Anderson 

Brandon, Mississippi 



Laura Elizabeth Andrews 

Winter Haven, Florida 



Helene Elizabeth Barrus 




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Elizabeth Lyon Bass 

Columbia, South Carolina 



Anne Elizabeth Beardon 

Atlj\nta, Georgia 



Teresa Ann Beckham 

Raleigh, North Carolina 




Meredith Leigh Bennett 

Newberry, South Carolina 



SiDRA Irene Bennett 

Cedar Park, Texas 



Ruth Sandra Blackwood 

Orange, Connecticut 




Rebecca Barry Boone 

Wilton, Connecticut 



Carol Louise Braswell 

Montgomery, Alabama 



Bernadette Teresa Brennan 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



17 




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Amy Katherine Bridwell 

Inadialantic, Florida 



Jennifer Melinda Bruce 

AcwoRTH, Georgia 



Jessica Charlotte Carey 

Decatur, Georgia 




Juliet Antonia Carney 

Tallahassee, Florida 



Beth Anne Christian 

KiNGSPORT, Tennessee 



Brooke Marie Colvard 

Piedmont, Alabama 





Caroline Regan Cone 

Frankfort, Kentucky 





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CouLEEN Clare Cordis 

Beaumont, Texas 



Michelle Lee Cox 

West Columbia, South Carolina 



KiMBERLY Grace Creagh 

Marietta, Georgia 




Jenessa Huntingdon DeFrees 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Paula Noelle Dixon 

Valdosta, Georgia 





Staci Anne Dixon 

Macon, Georgia 



Cindy Renee Dunn 

Williamson, Georgia 



Vanessa Lynn Elliott 

RoswELL, Georgia 



NiTA Afroza Faruque 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Jeanette Marie Elias 

Houston, Texas 




Rhina Maria Fernandes 

Kabwe, Zambia 







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Barbara Noelle Fleming 

Arlington, Virginia 



Christy Elizabeth Foreman 

Marietta, Georgia 



Laurie Ann Fowler 

Peachtree City, Georgia 







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Elizabeth Alexander Fraser 

Decatur, Georgia 



Rita Diane Ganey 

Eagle Lake, Florida 




Anna Ruth Gladin 

East Ellijay, Georgia 




BZZZS 




Shannon Williams Grace 

Panama City, Florida 



Elissa Anne Gydish 

Orange Park, Florida 




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Margaret Ann Hammond 

Gadsden, Alabama 



Mary Ann Hickman 

Etowah, Tennessee 



Anne Marie Haddock 

Albany, Georgia 




Ginger L. Hicks 

Decatur, Georgia 




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Amy Buice Higgins 

Cornelia, Georgia 



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KiMBERLY Dee Hinder 

Wauchula, Florida 



Kristin Houchins 

Stockbridge, Georgia 




Christine Annette Jackson 

Carrollton, Georgia 



Janet Elizabeth Johnson 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 



Pamela Jean Kellner 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 



23 




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Sara Talin Keyfer 

Atlanta, Georgia 



Laura Noel Khare 

Columbia, South Carolina 



Sarah Loyce Kimble 

LiTHONiA, Georgia 



Amanda Elizabeth King 

Jacksonville, Florida 



Donna S. Kimball 

Atlanta, Georgia 




Julianne Elaine Kite 

Knoxville, Tennessee 



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Kristin Liane Lemmerman 

Lancaster, California 



Sarah Ruth Lightfoot 

KiNGSPORT, Tennessee 



Sarah Anne MacMillan 

Tallahassee, Florida 




LocKEY Allen McDonald 

Decatur, Georgia 



Sandee Kay McGlaun 

Gainesville, Georgia 



Karen Anne McNay 

Decatur, Georgia 




aaEBEC 




Susan Lyn McTier 

St. Simons Island, Georgia 



Lee Butler McWaters 

Decatur, Georgia 



Eva Maria Mihlic 

Novi Sad, Yugoslavia 



Angela Nicole Miller 

Pensacola, Florida 



EULALIE DrURY MeLLEN 

Tucker, Georgia 




Claudia Christine Miller 

Lebanon, Georgia 




■■■■■■■P 



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Cathleen Genevieve Monturo 

LiLBURN, Georgia 



Elizabeth Ann Morgan 

milledgeville, georgia 



Ami Nagao 

Alpharetta, Georgia 




Cynthia Anne Neal 

Abington, Virginia 



Catlin Yvette Olsen 

Pensacola, Florida 



Donna Louise Perkins 

Yatesville, Georgia 





Emily Winnette Perry 

CoNYERS, Georgia 



Carolyn Paige Priester 

Jacksonville, Florida 



Mary Elizabeth Quinley 

Williamsburg, Virginia 




Stephanie Jon Richards 

Glyndon, Minnesota 



Lisa Ann Rogers 

Baltimore, Maryland 



Kara M. Russell 

BuFORD, Georgia 



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Laura Elise Shaeffer 

Marietta, Georgia 



Christie Sinhee Shin 

Decatur, Georgia 



Mary Elizabeth Simmons 
Stone Mountain, Georgia 




Dawn Michelle Sloan 

Gallatin, Tennessee 



Faith St. Michael 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 



Barbara Grace Stitt 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 



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Barbara Bailey Swann 
Clarkston, Georgia 



Jennifer Gail Trumbull 

Nashville, Tennessee 



AsAKO Taniyama 

Alpharetta, Georgia 



Allison Paige Theisen 

Stone Mountain, Georgia 




Amy Lynn Tyler 

West Point, Georgia 



Barbara Anne Van Campen 

Rekem, Belgium 




Annetta Leora Williams 

DuNwooDY, Georgia 



Laraine Beth Williams 

McDoNOUGH, Georgia 



Mary Elizabeth Williams 

ToccoA, Georgia 



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Susan Adams 
Elena Adan 
Cathy Alexander 
Wendy Allsbrook 



Laura Barlament 
Kelli Barnett 
Layli Bashir 
Julie Bragg 



Laura Camp 
Sarah Carruthers 
Ellen Chilcutt 
Madeline Cohn 



Crystal Couch 
Kristin Counts 
Karen Cox 
Anna Crotts 



Michelle Diaz 
Sara DiGiusto 
Sarah Fisher 
Jennifer Garlen 



eizJA 4 '93 \ 31 








Lauren Granade 

Aimee Griffin 

Cari Haack 

Betty Hammond 



Ginger Hartley 

Stephanie Hawes 

Stacey Honea 

Elizabetln Isaacs 



Meredith Jolly 

Wendy Jones 

Many Frances Kerr 

Akiko Kizaki 

32 } ^leu^ o^ '93 




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Robin Lane 
Mary Curtis Lanford 
Lisa Lanl<shear 
Jennifer Lard 



Cara Lawson 
Claire Lemme 
Amber IVIartin 
Micineile Martin 



Debbie Miles 
Andra Moore 
Helen Nash 
Brooke Parish 



e&j^ 4 '93 \ 33 





Tracy Peavy 
Jeanne Peters 

Allison Petty 
Ella S J. Porter 



Carrie Powell 

Shannon Ramker 

Cathy Rouse 

Misty Sanner 



Barbara Scalf 

Chen Song 

Fotini Soublis 

Liz Strickland 

/ (^tnJA 0^ '93 



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Shakina Swift 
Katie Tanner 
Nil<i Twilla 
April Van Mansfield 



Chrissie Van Sant 
Alexandra Wack 
Jen Waddell 
Helyn Wallace 



Deborah Watters 
Angela Weaver 
Tina Wells 
Alaina Williams 




nnnnnzEE 



■■■■■■■■■■■I 




Karyn Adams 

Leila alHusaini 

Janelle Bailey 

Maria Baiais 



Ashley Banks 

Beth Barnes 

Tracy Barnes 

Darby Beach 



Bethany Blankenship 

Raquel Bordas 

Britt Brewton 

Alyson Bunnell 



Emily Callahan 

Sarah Cardwell 

Tracy Casteel 

Melanie Clarkson 



Ju''e Colley 

Leigh Gopeiand 

Marina Cosiarides 

Perrin Cothran 



36 / (^laaa. o^ '94 





Elizabeth Franklin 

Kathy Gilmore 

Tiffany Goodman 

Tara Greene 



English Hairrell 
Gharmain Hankins 

Courtney Harris 
Willa Hendrickson 



Debbie Herron 

Elizabeth Hertz 

Kathleen Hill 

Josie Hoilman 

^Caio. a^ '94 



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Staci Holsomback 
Emily Hornak 
Laura Home 
Kaki Horton 



Betsy Horton 
Beth Hunt 
Kim Johnson 
Mary Jordan 



Claire Laye 
Stephanie Lynn 
Marianna Markwalter 
Sharon Martyr 



o^ '94 \ 39 





SHS 




Laura Rice 
Kelley Rogers 
Jessica Roosevelt 
Sara Sabo 



Kari Sager 
Donna Scott 
Tamara Shie 
Julia Short 



Amy Smith 
Michelle Smith 
Carole Sneed 
Charlotte Stapleton 

eioi^o^ '94 




41 




EzmnmnzE 



SZB 







Kim Sullivan 

Kate Tittle 

Helen Tucker 

Christine Wade 



Kim Walker 
Lara Webb 
Nikki Webb 
Laura Wells 



Stacia Wells 

Christy Wilson 

Nancy Zehl 



&-'M<i.i4 '94 




jmu 




Tammy Bain 
Christy Beal 
Ciiarla Bland 
Judy Bowers 



Cara Carter 
Elizabeth Cherry 
Carrie Clemence 
Laura Collins 



Nadine Curry 
Emily Davis 
Ann DeLoach 
Emily Dembeck 



Holly DeMuth 
Angie Dorn 
Annette Dumford 
Kathryn Durkee 



Daniela Edelkind 
Laura Edwards 
Melanie Effler 
Joy Farist 

Ci<iuiA<4 '95 





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Gretchen Fouchecourt 

Nicole Gosnell 

Amy Green 

Tina Gurley 



Deirdra Harris 

Amanda Heins 

Daka Hermon 

Laura Hinte 



Kelly Holton 

Jenrvfcr Jenkins 
Yiofik-j jirnenez 
Eryn Livingston 



44 } eiaoA o4 '95 





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Shannon Lord 
Liza Mann 
Kavitha Mathew 
Cathy May 



Angela McNeal 
Charmaine Minniefield 
Kerry Murphy 
Wendy Parker 



Kim Plafcan 
Stephanie Price 
Cheryl Reid 
Wendy Riviere 





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Sonya Saskin 

Ashley Seaman 

Lisa Sebotnick 

Dana Shea 



Jennifer Sherrouse 

DeeDee Smart 

Jennifer Smith 

Mary Snyder 



Jennie Sparrow 
Julie Stinson 
Emiiy Stone 
Katl-iieen Stromberg 



4 '^5 





Margo Thompson 
Ayn Van Syke 
Tracy Walker 
Cynara Webb 



LaToya Williams 
Holly Williamson 
Kim Wright 



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A look 

at the 

lATorld 

b^ond 

Agnes 

Scott 

1990-98 




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U.S. Troops 
leave for 
Middle East 



As of mid-October (1990), 
more than 200,000 U.S. 
troops had been deployed 
to Saudi Arabia, Pentagon 
soTXPces said. They were prepar- 
ing to defend the desert kingdom 
from a possible Iraqi attack. 

Iraq had about 430,000 men in 
Kuwait and southern Iraq, ac- 
cording to the Pentagon. 

U.S. soldiers were flown in on 
commercial jetliners to meet up 
with their roughly 300 Mi- 
Abrams tanks and other equip- 
ment which was shipped from 
their bases several weeks prior. 



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The portrait of Saddam Hussein shows a man with a 
strange duality: tough, yet fearful; inspiring fear in his 
own people, yet also basking in a kind of populist 
veneration from m.any of the region's Arabs. 



Fear and terror surround 

the Iraqi President, and . . . 

analysts believe that this 

^imate could be his undoing. 



"^■^1 



The _. J one of a poor orphan who rose to 

power thx&agl'j. opportunism ajid brutality, whose anti- 
Western views were shaped in childhood, and who now 
- commanding the world's fourth largest army - is 
trying to deliver on his nationalist dreams. 






•■^ty. 



^^There's no doubt in my mind that 
we'll succeed here if we have to,** 



said Col. Barry Willey. 



The U.S. Army's heaviest ground firepower reached 
Saudi soil in August (1990) for deployment behind 
Arab forces manning the front line in the standoff with 
[raq. 

Dozens of Ml-lP tanks and M2 Bradley armored 
infantry fighting vehicles, and scores more heavy 
support vehicles, rolled off two huge transport ships at 
a port in northeastern Saudi Arabia and made their 
way north into the desert. 

"Bring them (the Iraqis) on," said a U.S. sergeant. 
'We have the training and technology; they've got the 
aimibers. We'U take them out." 



U.S. Tanks 

R JS a C H 



'Pft "pocea- 





Operation Welcome Home 




Desert Storm Conunander 
General H. Norman 
Schwarzkopf gave a thumbs 
up to the crowd as he made his 
way up Broadway during New 
York's Operation Welcome 
Home ticker tape parade in 
June 1991. 

Schwarzkopf, General Colin 
Powell and Defense Secretary 
Dick Cheney were the grand 
marshals of the New York 
parade, with over 600,000 
people turning out to welcome 
the soldiers home. More than 
1 million people attended 
welcome home parade May 1 9 
in Hollywood, and an estimated 
800,000 turned out for the 
parade in Washington. 

"U.S.A.! U.S.A.!" the flag- 
wa-ving crowd chanted during 
a half -hour of nighttime fire- 
works over the Bast River in 
New York City. The $1 million 
display was accompanied by 
the New York Pops Orchestra. 
A teary-eyed Korean War vet- 
eran said, "These young boys 
put their Uves on the line and 
now they're getting their re- 
ward." 




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In the aftermath 




Environmental 
disaster 

Kuwait Oil Well Fires 

Firefighters were iinprepared for the sight they were 
met with in Kuwait — scores of oil wells sending 
plumes of red and orange flames 30 yards into the air. 
Oil lakes and soot blackened the sand. 

Diirlng the seven-month Iraqi occupation of Kuwait, 
more than 730 oil wells were damaged or set ablaze. 
Firefighting crews have been able to extinguish 584 
wells since the effort began in March 1991. 

When the effort to combat the blazes began in 
March, it took an average of four days to put out one 
well fire. Now the teams are averaging 8.5 weUs each 
day, according to OU Minister Hamous al-Rquba. 

OU experts say that if the effort continues at the 
same rate, the wells should be capped before the end of 
the year, earUer than the projected date of March 
1992. 

The faster rate of progress has been attributed to 
the increase in the number of firefighting companies, 
the avaUabUity of needed equipment, the completion of 
the water system and the growing experience of the 
firefighters. 

Teams from the United States, Canada, China, Iran, 
Kuwait, Hiongary and France are all working together 
to clean up this environmentaJ disaster. 

Refugees 
of war 

About 2 million Iraqi 
Kurds and other minori- 
ties fled north in April 
1991 when Kurdish rebels 
in the north and Sluite 
Muslim rebels in the south 
faUed to oust President 
Saddam Hussein in the 
aftermath of the Persian 
Gulf War. At least 6,700 
of the Iraqi refugees died 
fleeing to the Turkish 
border. 

The United States spent 
about $443 million on the 
Kurdish relief effort. 



'Pft- "pOCMi. 





^ 



Summit Agreements 




Celebrating the fruits of their summit diplomacy, President Bush 
and Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev shook hands and signed a 
sheaf of agreements, including a conditional trade accord. During the 
June (1990) summit, the leaders also embraced a preliminary deal to 
cut long-range nuclear arms. 

The two leaders also agreed to strive for an elusive agreement on 
reduction of troops, tanks and other conventional weapons in Eiirope. 




Elections in Romania 



Vice-;:-:! Romanians voted May 20 (1990) in their first free elections 
in 53 j-^^-s. Interim President Ion niescu won in a landslide victory, but 
the Wrj optiosition candidates alleged nixmerous instances of election 
fraud, jliesau had been heavily favored to win the presidency. 

The main issi:.es of the camipaign included moving Romania's central- 
ized sociahsi:. 3yst,em to a free-market economy and dismantling the 
CoTTiTTTunist system. 



Convoys of Soviet tajiks moved into Moscow^ 
less than two miles from the Kremlin. The 
Communist hard-liners who ousted Gorbachev 
sent the army's tanks rolling within a mile or 
the Russian Parhament building. 



I think what is 
happening now 
. . . represents an 
event of momen- 
tous importance, 
not only for our 
two countries but 
for the world," 

- MikhaU S. Gorbachev 
Jime 1990 




As a former Gorbachev adviser spoke to the;. 
crowds, denouncing the coup and demandin^t 
that Gorbachev be allowed to address the* 
Soviet people, hands were raised m applause, t 



Freedom has come to the Soviet Union 

A real coup... 



Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and his family 
fere placed under hoiise arrest in the Crimea on 
August 19, 1991, as an eight-man emergency commit- 
ee led by Vice President Gennady Yanayev took power 
a a coup attempt in the Soviet Union. 

Russian President Boris Yeltsin caUed on Russians to 
esist the takeover, and resist they did. Constructing a 
protective himian waU around Yeltsin's headquarters, 
lis supporters demanded Gorbachev's return. 

On Wednesday, as the Communist Party denounced 
tie takeover, Yanayev and the other coup leaders fled 



Moscow. Latvia and Estonia declared inomediate 
independence from the Soviet Union. 

Before dawn on Thursday, August 22, an Aeroflat jet 
arrived at Vnukovo airport, Moscow, bringing home 
Gorbachev and his entourage. 

The coup had failed, and before the day was 
through, aU coup leaders were arrested except for 
Interior Minister Boris Pugo, who reportedly killed 
himself. 




Crowds of perplexed people wandered among the many Soviet tanks 
parked behind the Red Square during the military coup hours. 




issian President Boris Yeltsin waved the white-blue-and-red Russian 
fColor flag from the Russian Federation building before a crowd of 
out 1 00,000 jubUant supporters celebrating the end of the three-day 
up attempt. Bodyguards held bulletproof shields in front of him. 



In addition to telephone service being cut to all KGB buildings and 
Gorbachev naming a new chief of the KGB, the statue of the founder 
of the KGB was toppled whUe thousands of Muscovites watched. 



'?(t "paCMA- 




o«us 




Massive crowds turned out 
for African National Congress 
leader Nelson Mandela at every 
stop on his six-week tour of 
three continents. Mandela vis- 
ited 1 4 nations in Europe, North 
America, and Africa, achieving 
his goals: urging foreign govern- 
ments to maintain sanctions 
against South Africa, raising 
fiinds for the AUG and explain- 
Ln.s: the goals of his movement. 



^tc'pa, 



Does 

Mike Tyson 

live near 

here? 

ff 



The ANC says it aims to create 
a non-racial democracy and to I 
distribute the nation's wealth 
more equally. Mandela, the 
ANC's deputy president, has said 
he favors a mixed economy, j 
Nelson Mandela, one of the 
world's most celebrated poUticali 
prisoners, was freedby the South ! 
African government in Pebru^ 
ary after 27 years in prison. He 
was serving a life sentence foiii 
allegedly plotting sabota-ge toj 
overthrow the white govmment.i 




- Nelson Mandela, 

dioring his visit tio 

New York City 




Ghamoorro 
victory 



Violeta Barrios de Chamorro, 
publisher of Nicaragua's opposition 
newspaper, led a 14-part coalition 
to victory over Sandinista rule de- 
spite political inexperience. 

"The Nicaraguan people have 
shown that they want to live in 
democracy, in peace and in free- 
dom," Mrs. Chamorro told more 
than 1,000 cheering supporters at 
her election headquarters on Feb- 
ruary 26, 1990. 

The general election was moni- 
tored by more than 3,000 interna- 
tional observers. They all pro- 
nounced the voting free and fair 
and the count clean. 




Back In SOUTH AFRICA 



President F.W. de Klerk, African 
National Congress president Nelson 
Mandela and Zulu Inkatha leader 
Mangosuthu Buthelezi came together 
in September 1991 when black and 
white leaders gathered to sign a peace 
pact in a bid to end faction fighting 
that has claimed hundreds of lives in 
South Africa. 



The accord, which created groups 
to investigate violent acts by police 
and citizens, marked the first joint 
agreement between the government 
and the two main black movements. 

It was also seen as an im.portant 
test of whether the main political 
groups can work together for reforms 
to end white-minority rule. 



The government and the ANC 
reached a cease-fire in August 1990 
and Mandela and Buthelezi agreed to 
peace terms in January 1991. But in 
both instances, the violence raged on. 

At least 6,000 people have been 
killed in the past six years. 



^tt "pocui^ 





German 
reimification 



World leaders welcomed a united 
Germany into the international 
commiianity on October 3 (1990), 
but concerns about the balance of 
power tempered some European 
enthusiasm.. 

"A new era is beginning for 
Germany, for Europe and indeed, 
we hope, for the world," Secretary 
of State James A. Baker m declared 
in New York. 

In a message to governments 
worldwide. Chancellor Helmut Kohl 
pledged that Germany would never 
again pose territorial claims that 
marked Germany from its initial 
unification in 1871 to its defeat and 
division in World War n. "In the 
futiire, only peace will emanate 
from German soil," Kohl said. 

His message came after Germany 
held a nightlong nationwide celebra- 
tion with fireworks and music. 

The nation united at the stroke of 
midnight when a giant German flag 
was raised in front of the battle- 
scarred Reichstag building in Berlin. 
Kohl and other leaders joined in 
singing the national anthem. 

The unification came 1 1 months 
after the Berlin Wall fell in a peace- 
ful revolt that cast aside Commvmist 
East German overlords. 



ALL 



6i 

I want my wall back. 

ff 



- T-shirts in West Berlin, 

in response to the deluge of shoppers 

from the Eastern Bloc 




Civil war in Yugoslavia 

Both Croatia and Slovenia proclaimed radependence on June 25, 
and within 24 hours, military tanks were rolling toward border 
crossings and airports, attempting to secure the countty. The trade 
of artillery fire began. 

Strong ethnic and political divisions have existed in the country for 
centuries, but the peaceful co-existence that has been maintained in 
the region for decades has splintered. 

More than 5,000 people have been killed since civil war began in 
Yugoslavia, and the coimt is stiQ rising. 




Get a piece of the Rock! 



Stores across America and abroad are sell- 
ing out of chunks of cement and rock?!? 

Yes, it is true. People everywhere are buy- 
ling pieces of the Wall. Novelty shops are not 
ieven able to keep them in stock. The average 
jseUing price is about fifteen doUars a "chunk." 
! The only thing better than buying a piece of 
jthe Wall is knocking off a chunk yourself! 



% "Pacui, \ 59 





Mideast peace talks 

Smashing 
a 43-year 
taboo 



Arabs and Israelis left Madrid, 
Spain, with mixed feelings of frus- 
tration and anticipation after an 
intense foray into the realm of 
peace. Israel and Syria were mired 
in recriminations, but prom.ised to 
m.eet again. 

The talks smashed a 43-year 
taboo on direct Israeli- Arab talks, 
setting in motion a process of face- 
to-face negotiations to resolve one 




of the most intractable regional 
conflicts in the world. 

The United States and Soviet 
Union sponsored the November 
talks, and President Bush's assess- 
ment was: "We have a long way to 
go and interruptions wiU probably 
occiir, but hopes are bright." 

Syria refused an Israeli request 
to establish direct contacts to 



arrange the site for the next round 
of talks, schediiled later in Novem- 
ber, 1991. 

Nonetheless, both agreed to meet 
again — if the United States comes 
up with an acceptable location. 
Officials on both sides said Washing- 
ton or other sites in North America 
were possible. 



G-7 Economic 
Sinninit 



Leaders of the world's seven 
largest industrial democracies 
began arriving in London on July 
14, 1991, for the July 15-17 
economic summit fociising on aid 
for the Soviet Union. 

Mikhail Gorbachev made a two- 
l''i'jr presentation to the leaders 
oJ '.:.i United States, Britain, 
Cai..'./v5., France, Germany, Italy 
and J&p-u"- that closely followed 
the S3-page l&tter he had sent to 
each of tnein the week before. 

By the close of the summit, the 
Group of Seven had offered 




Gorbachev technical assistance and 
a special association with the 
International Monetary Fund, but 
not the enormous economic aid he 
had sought. 

Although financial aid was not 
forthcoming, Ljubo Sire, director of 
the Center for Research into Com- 
munist Economies, said, "the very 



fact that this m.eeting has taken 
place has unproved the chances for 
the Soviet Union to attract invest- 
m.ent." 

"It always makes a difference 
when the powers that be in Western 
countries become interested in the 
fate of a country with which trade 
is possible." 



Terry Atiderson freed 



Terry Anderson emerged on 
December 4, 1991, from the dark 
hole of 6 1/2 years of captivity in 
Lebanon and was handed over to 
U.S. officials, ending a brutal hos- 
tage ordeal for both himself and the 
[Jnited States. 

Asked what had kept him going 
tn captivity, Anderson, the chief 
Middle East correspondent for The 
l\5S0Ciated Press, said it was his 
3ompanions, his faith and his 
stubbornness. 

"You just do what you have to 
io," he said. "You wake up every 
lay and summon up energy from 
jomewhere, and you get through 
he day, day after day after day." 

Anderson, 44, the longest-held 
ATestern hostage, came to personify 
he long-running hostage ordeal. 



You 

just do 

what 

you 

have 

to do. 



Asked if he had any last words for 
his kidnappers, he rolled his eyes 
and said: "Goodbye." 

The freedom of Anderson marked 
the end of a hostage saga that 
haunted two American presidencies. 

He was the 1 3th and last Ameri- 
can captive freed since Shiite 
extremists in 1 984 launched a 
campaign of seizing foreigners in 
Lebanon to drive out Western 
influence which they claimed cor- 
rupted the nation. Many of the 
Americans were tortured and 
beaten during their captivity, and 
three died. 

Terry Anderson is shown in 
Wiesbaden, Germany, on December 
5, 1991, with former hostages 
Joseph Gicippio (left) and Alann 
Steen (right). 





Su^maiie c^a^t^^ ... 




Souter becomes 
105th Justice 

David H. Souter, a mjld-inan- 
nered, well-read and previously 
little-known judge from Mew 
Hampshipe, became history's 
105th Supreme Court justice in 
October (1990) after pledging to 
"do equal right to the poor and to 
the rich." 

In a brief ceremony in the 
crowded courtroom, Souter, 51, 
was administered the judicial 
oath of office by Chief Justice 
William H. Rehnquist and aJmost 
immediately got to work hearing 
high court arguments with his 
eight new colleagues. 



Thurgood 
Marshall 
retires 



Thurgood Marshall, the first 
African- American member of the 
Supreme Court, was less than a 
week shy of his 83rd birthday 
when he announced on Jiine 27, 
1991, that he was retiring. His 24 
years on the bench followed 23 of 
fighting before that court and 
others for the rights of the op- 
pressed and forgotten. 

He won 29 of the 32 cases he 
arguel before the Supreme Court 
while he ^^ras head of the NAACP 
Legal Defense Fund and, later, 
while he was the federal 
government's solicitor general. No 
victory was sweater, or more 
earthshaking, than his 1954 coup 
in Brown vs. Board of Education 



4^ 



. . . the court 

[is] at a 

pivotal time in 

its history. 

ff 

when the coiort ruled that racially 
segregated schools were imconstitu- 
tional. 

Marshall, the great-grandson of a 
slave, grew up in Baltimore and 
graduated from Lincoln University 
in Pennsylvania. He was refused 
admission to the University of 
Maryland Law School and attended 
Howard University instead. He 
traces his passion for civil rights to 
his father, who was a country club 
steward. 

Marshall's pioneering civil rights 
career helped reshape the racial 




norms of the nation and earned hin 
an exalted but iiltimately lonely 
position on its highest court. 



J 



Sci^2ne0ie CJ^aiCe^t^^ ... 




Clarence Thomas 



"Only in America" 



Forty-three year old Clarence 
Thomas grew up poor, Black axid 
Democratic in Pinpoint, Georgia, but 
later switched parties and becamie a 
controversial symibol of Black 
conservatism. 

"Only in America," Thomas said 
after President Bush announced his 
nomination as the second Black 
justice on the Supreme Court. 
Thomas will succeed Thurgood 
Marshall who has retired. 

Prior to Thomas's nomination to 
the Supreme Coiirt, he served as an 
assistant attorney general in Mis- 
souri, a legislative assistant to Sen. 
John Danforth (R-Mo.), 
seven years as 
chairman of the 
Equal Employment 
Opportunity Commls- )) IhlOUglh iS 




Anita Hill 




sion and a judge of the U.S. Circmt 
Court of Appeals for the District of 
Colinnbia. 

In addition to the controversy of 
Thomas's legal views, a charge of 
sexual harassment was brought 
against him by law professor Anita 
HOI. Thomas vehemently denied 
the allegations and said, "This is 
Kafkaesque. Enough is enough." 

After much debate over who was 
right and who was wrong - 
Clarence Thomas, Anita HUl, the 
system itself - the United States 
Senate voted to confirm hun. 

On October 18, 1991, Clarence 
Thomas became the 
106th United States 
Supreme Court 
Justice. 



"Find someone you can trust. . ." 

Although Thomas was confirmed, 
professor Hill insisted that by 
letting her story be known she had 
accomplished everything she set out 
to do. "All that's happened has 
made the general public much more 
aware of sexual harassment than 
ever before," said Hill. 

She offered one piece of advice to 
victim's of sexual harassment. 
"Try to find somebody you caji 
trust and teU them, " she said, "try 
to find somebody who can help 
make you feel that you are not at 
fault. Find someone you can trust 
because you can't take it an out on 
yourself, you can't Internalize it." 



Life has not been the same for 
law professor Anita HUl since going 
public with allegations that Supreme 
Court Justice Clarence Thomas 
sexually harassed her nearly a 
decade ago. 

HUl was valedictorian of her high 
school in 1973 and went on to 
Oklahoma State University as a 
National Merit Scholar, graduating 
in 1977 with a degree m Psychol- 
ogy. From there she went to Yale 
University to receive a law degree 
in 1980. 

Most friends and colleagues 
described her the same way — 
honest, slacere and a principled 
person. 



^<* "pOCUi, 




<o«us 




ounting the homeless 



.7 xniMon spent 



A legion of clipboard-toting coimters sought out 
helters, subways and steam grates on March (1990) 
n the broadest attempt ever to find out the extent of 
Lomelessness since it became a national disgrace in the 
,980s. 

Some hom.eless didn't mind the government intru- 
ion. "It shows that they're starting to recognize us as 
Lumans and not the scimi of the earth, "said one young 
aajQ of the streets. 

Another homeless man said, "What are they going to 
Lse the num.bers for anyway? To tell us there ain't no 
Lomeless problem? I'm a living example that there is 
, problem. We need jobs, not surveys." 



The U.S. Census Bureau is spending $2.7 million to 
taUy homeless Americans, but critics fear an 
undercount will allow the government to justify cuts in 
services. 

The homeless — now estimated to number 250,000 
to 3 mUlion — were asked their name, age, sex, race 
and marital status. 

As Washington, D.C.'s deputy mayor for economic 
development said, the count is important because "only 
when we know how many homeless there are can 
improvements be made in the delivery of services." 




Five TT.S. Presidents 
open Reagan Library 

Ronald Reagan threw open the doors of his presiden- 
tial library on November 5, 1991, and invited the 
public to judge his turn in the WMte House. 

A military band played "HaU to the Chief" and the 
crowd of 4,200 invited guests cheered as President 
Bush and former Presidents Carter, Nixon and Ford 
joined Reagan in the first gathering ever of five past or 
current presidents. 

The National Archives will operate the library at an 
estimated $1.5 mOlion annual cost to teixpayers. 



Flag Protection Act 

The U.S. Senate rejected a 
constitutional amendment against 
flag burning on Jvme 26, 1990, 
with critics arguing that it was 
already dead and being debated 
largely as ammunition for use 
against them at election time. 

The Senate voted 58-42 in 
favor, leaving it nine short of the 
required two thirds majority 
needed to approve amendments. 

President Bush called for 
approval of the measure, which 
said simply that "Congress and 
the states shall have power to 
prohibit the physical desecration 
of the flag of the United States." 

But the House rejected it with 
Democratic leaders sa3nng that it 
amounted to placing limits on 
freedom of speech. 




^K "pocaa- 





^Tiecu^ a^ t^ fdiZHet Sf^i^ 



# # # 



Earth Day '90 

On April 22, 1990, an estimated 
200 million people all over the 
planet celebrated the 20th anniver- 
sary of Earth Day as activists 
pleaded for the rise of a new "con- 
servation generation" to care for 
the fragile enviroment. 

In Washington, Earth Day founder 
Gaylord Nelson upged more than 
100,000 people massed at the foot 
of the Capital to work to motivate 
politicians and coiporate leaders to 
envipomental action. 

"I don't want to come back here 
20 years from now and have to teU 
yoim sons and daii^ters that you 
didn't do yoiir duty," said Nelson, 
74, who originated Earth Day when 
he was a Senator from Wisconsin. 

Earth Day was celebrated in more 
than 3,600 U.S. commimities and 
in 140 other nations, according to 
organizers. 





We've got to 

raise a 

conservation 

generation. 

- Gaylord Nelson 




*}Hr "pa- 



Earthquake 
in Philippines 

A m.ajor earthquaike jolted 
Mamla and surrounding Luzon 
island on J\aly 16, 1990, killing 
at least 1 93 people and leaving 
hundreds more trapped in col- 
lapsed buildings. 

Most of the victims in Baguio, 
about 50, were at the Hyatt 
Hotel. The entire front section of 
the Hyatt, the city's plushest 
hotel, collapsed. 

Aftershocks continued the 
following day, forcing many 
residents to sleep on the streets 
after the quake, which measured 
7.7 on the Rlchter scale. 

A 7.8 quake struck the Philip- 
pines in 1976, killing 8,000 
people. Most died in a tidal wave 
that struck Minaneo. 




^mC6ecf(Md ,., 




^^^!^^^H 


Solar Eclipse 


v^ 


^^^ n July 11,1991, the moon slipped over the 
■ ^M sun in the celestial ceremony of the eclipse, 
^^ turning day into night for thousands of 
viewers and scientists. 

About 500 astronomers and tens of thousands 
of tourists came to see the moon line up between 
the sun and Earth and plunge into darkness a 1 60- 
mdle-wide swath stretching from Hawaii to Mexico's 
Baja Peninsula, central and southern Mexico, 
Central America, Colombia and Brazil. 

One after another, spectators around the 
mountaintop astronomy observatory in Hawaii 
exclaimed, "Oh, my God!" as the sky went dark. 
This was the f ipst time an eclipse path of totality 
passed over a major observatory, scientists said. 

One objective of the scientists was to learn more 
about why the siin's corona is about 3 million 
degrees Parenheit, while the sun's surface is only 
10,000 degrees. Other experiments involved 
taking photos through the siin's atmosphere and 
watching the effect on Earth's atmosphere. 







Southern Floods 



The Southern U.S. spent much of the Spring of 1990 
rtn?lnging itself out after weeks of flooding turned entire 
iowns into muddy lakes where buildings poked up like 
onotty tree stumps, and the toU of shattered lives was 
iremendous. 

While parts of the Mid-West dealt with heavy rainfall 
ind floods, those states suffering the most damage 
were Texas, Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi. 




Biospheres 

A sealed structure of steel and glass will be "home" 
for two years to f oiir men and four women; nothing will 
be introduced from the outside. The structure, called 
Biosphere 2, is about the size of 2- 1 /2 football fields and 
contains aU necessities of life. 

In addition. Biosphere 2 houses 3,800 species of 
animals ajid plants and five ecosystems. 

This $100 million project has taken seven years to 
put together and hopes to be the model for other self- 
sufficient environments. 




¥om\js 




Madonna 

Madonna kicked off her 

1990 world tour, "Blonde 

Ambition," with a seven-concert 

tour of Japan beginniag ia 
April, then came back to 

perform in the U.S. and on 
to more shows in Europe. 




ir two-hoiir 



singt: 



througi 



5oent 



costume changes, reinvent! 
herself with each chan 



"Express Yourself" is Ji 

AlthoUp... 



what Madonna does. 



her performance is "Causing a 
Commotion," the "Blonde 



mbition" tour is nothing less 
than a satisfying show» 



"pOtMO, 




Roseanne sang ... 
sortof ••• 

It was crude, even lewd. 

Majiy people said that Roseanne 
Barr was a disgrace for her shrill 
rendition of the national anthem at 
a National League baseball double 
header and a crude on-field gesture 
afterward. 

But others said simply: Lighten 
up. 

They maintained the comedian 
who stars on the popular sitcom 
"Roseanne" did the best she coiild 
or may have become confused by 
the sound system's delay and re- 
sorted to shtick. 




Paul Simon is stOl singing after 
lU these years. On August 15, 
991, Simon and a 17-piece band 
rawn from five nations stepped on 
tage in Central Park for a free 
oncert lasting almost three hours. 
Irstwhile partner Art Garfimkel 
ras not, however, by his side. 

The concert was a retrospective 
f Simon's career, from the simple 
eginnings of low-budget doo-wap of 
tie '50s in Queens, NY to the 
ulsating South African sounds and 
hythms of his 1986 "Graceland" 
Ibum and the Afro-Brazilian 
rumming and Antonio Carlos 




Still singing 
after all 
these years 



Jobim chord chem.istry of his latest, 
"The Rhythm of the Saints." 

Most of Simon's work is a com- 
plex miixture of music from the 
United States and other lands — 
Jamaican reggae, Louisiana zydeco, 
gospel, jazz, rock, English pastoral, 
the Blues and African chants. 

The Central Park concert, at- 
tended by over 500,000 fans, is 
part of a longer trip, a pause in his 
"Born at the Right Time" tour of 
almost 14 months that he says wiLL 
end early next year in Africa after 
stops in Japan, China, Australia, 
and South America. 



- The big question 

on the popular 

television series 

Twin Peaks 



*?K "poeiU, 





Nolan Ryan 
wins 300 

Defeating the Milwaukee Brewers 
on July 31, 1990, Texas Rangers 
pitcher Nolan Ryan won his 300th 
game. "I feel more relieved than 
anything else after all the buildup," 
Ryan said after joining the 300 
Club. 

A crowd of 51,533 showed up to 
cheer Ryan on at Coiinty Stadium. 

Ryan has becom.e one of ten 
major league pitchers to win 300 
games. 





End of an era 



Magic Johnson retires 



Magic Johnson, whose 
beaming sm.ile aJid spar- 
kling play entertained bas- 
ketball fans for more than a 
decade, announced on No- 
vember 7, 1991, that he 
had tested positive for the 
AIDS virus and was retir- 
ing. 

" B e - 
cause of 
the HIV vi- 
rus I have 
attained, I 
will have 
to an- 
nounce my 
retirement 
from the 
Lakers to- 
day," Johnson told report- 
ers at the Formn, where he 
played for 12 superstar 
seasons with the Los Angeles 
Lakers. 

Johnson said he would 
become an AIDS activist and 
campaign for safe sex. 

More than just a basket- 
ball star who led the Lakers 
to five NBA championships, 
Johnson has been a philaji- 



6i 

I plan on... 
livingfora 
long time. 



^t- 



thropist, a prominent 
corporate spokesman and 
a role model for young 
people. His broad grin, 
familiar nickname and 
electrifying ability have 
made him familiar to 
people around the world. 
"I'm going 
to go on, 
I'm going 
to beat it 
and I'm 
going to 
havefim," 
he in- 
sisted, dis- 
playlng 
some of 
the irre- 
pressible zest for Ufe that 
he brought daily to the 
basketball court. 

Johnson, whose given 
name is Earvin, received 
his nickname from a 
Lansing, Michigan, 
sportswriter after a 36- 
point, 18-rebound, 16- 
assist performance in 
high school. 



lEOUiWMUi 



Georgia beats Clemson; N.C. State edges Tech / El 



SljcI\llanta3ournnl 

THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION 



SUNDAV INSIDE 



ieKjiib County 
lesegi-egation 



i'^ I 



f s Atlanta 





City goes 
crazy over 
tniracle team 



v^ iiou\tott. 



What's ahead for the Braves 



Playoff (1 kets 



PLAYOFFS ^ 



T 



Hill 



SPECIAL BRAVES SECTION INSIDE / Fi 



World Series 
1990 




The Cincinnati Reds, given no chance 
to beat the Oakland Athletics, needed 
only four qiiick games to win the 
World Series In one of the biggest 
upsets in baseball history. 

The Reds completed their improb- 
able sweep on October 20,1990, in 
spite of losing two star players to 
injiiries. Cincinnati relied on Jose Rijo 
and rallied for two runs in the eighth 
inning to win 2-1, and that was it. 



World Series 
1991 




After all the twists, turns and ten- 
sion, the closest of World Series ended 
in the closest of games. 

The Minnesota Twins squeezed past 
the Atlanta Braves 1 -0 on pinch-hitter 
Gene Larkin's single in the bottom of 
the 1 0th inning on October 27, 1991, 
to win Game 7 and end baseball's most 
dramatic odyssey. 

Never before had three Series games 
gone into extra innings , and the Braves 
and Twins saved the best for last, 
matching zero for zero, pressure pitch 
for pitch, even turning back bases- 
loaded threats in the same inning. 




"I've never felt 

more elated in 

my entire life. 

Ifeltlikean 

exclamation 

point had just 

been laid down 

in the life 

of our dly ." 



- Atlanta Mayor 

Maynard Jackson, 

after learning that his city had 

been selected as the site of the 

1996 Summer Olympics 



72 / ^li "^liCM, 



RIGHT Here & RIGHT Now 
• Silhouette • 





iUiunnae 
Affairs 



Academic 
Computdng 




Tom Maier, Director 

Wendy Davis 

Not pictured • Colleen Russo 



Art 



Donna Sadler 



Accounting • Personnel 




Kay G-n- 'an, Alumnae Services 
Cynthia Poe, Alumnae House Hostess 
Lucia Sizemore, Director 
Anne Schatz "■'--:- Activities 



/ "yftettvui. & j';r>-i.-tfe6(i- 



Karen Roy, Assistant Vice President, Finance • Miriam Lyons, Accounts Payable • 
Lil Daniel, Accounts Receivable • Kate Goodson, Comptroller • Janet Gould, Acting 
Director, Personnel & Payroll • Susan Hester, Staff Acountant 




^^B^BH^BBI^^^^l^^ 



Admissions 




Front row: Faye Noble • Kathryn Dean • Jenifer Cooper • Terry Lahti, Director 
Back row: Sally Mairs • Anne Miller • Elizabeth Orth 



Tower Council 




Campus Events 
& Conferences 






Dot Markert, Conference Coordinator 
Mollie Merrick, Assoc. Dean of Students 



Classical Languages 
& literature 



^ 


II 


1 


■ 




i 




i 

4 


i ' 



Gail Cabisius • Sally MacEwen 



Chemistry 




Left: Alice Cunningham 
Top: Leon Venable 



76 /'TH'Stttana. & THetOeoi. 



Chaplain 




Patti Synder, Chaplain 



Christian 
Association 




Candy Woodard, Mary Rognoni, 
Misty Sanner, Niki Twilla 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^B^B 



Career Plamiing Sc Placement 



Agnes Scott offers students off-campus 
work experience through the Internship and 
Externship programs. The Career Planning 
and Placement Office has sponsored this 
productive program for eleven years, and 
the program continues to grow. 

The internship program offers a wide 
range of opportunities, from working with 
exotic animals at Zoo Atlanta to taking an 
government internship in Geneva, Switzer- 
land. These placements may last for a 
summer - or as long as a year. So far there 
have been a total of about 275 internships to 
choose from in many different fields 
throughout the year. 

During the Christmas break, CP&P also 
offers week-long externships for people who 
want to try a shorter program. In 1991, they 
offered about 60 externships to Agnes Scott 
students. If a person does not find a job quite 
suitable to her, CP&P offers to work with her 
and create an externship which she will 
enjoy. Usually these jobs are in the Atlanta 
area. 

CP&P stresses that any student may 
become an intern or extern, and the offers 
are not limited exclusively to 
upperclasswomen. "In fact," CP&P Assis- 
tant Director Laurie Grant Nichols said, "last 
year more first-year students participated 
than any other year." 



Whether an internship or an externship, 
these jobs provided great benefits to their par- 
ticipants. Some offered a salary, some became 
full-time positions, and all of them opened doors 
forthose who became involved in the programs. 
However, if you don't find your cup of tea in 
this long list of opportunities, Career Planning 
and Placement is willing to help create a special 
externship for you. These programs are open 
to everyone, not just the upperclass students. 
Some of these jobs, though not many, offer a 
salary as well as gainful experience. And who 
knows? In just a few weeks, you may learn a 
lesson or even land a full-time job. 





Jo Rannsey 

Amy Schmidt, Director 

Laurie Nichols 



Career 
Advisory Board 

Janelle Bailey, Mariken Ronde (Chair), 
Juliet Carney, Meredith Jolly 
Laurie Grant Nichols, Advisor 



Counselor 




Computing & Information Systems 





Left: Rob Thies, Director • 
Scott Nichols • Maria 
Botelho • Matthev\/ Parkin 
Top: Ninette Waters • 
Carolyn Malcom 



iargaret Shirley 



"THetOvii. & 'JHetOeea, 




Dean of Students 





Jan Johnson, Administrative Assistant 

Gue Huson, Dean of Students 

Brenda Jones, Assistant Dean of Students 




78 



& "J^Cmieci, 



Social Council '9 1 




Front row: Shannon Grace, Lisa Rogers, 

Wendy Baker, Chrissie Van Sant, Davina 

Crawford, Colleen Covatts 

Back row: Sally McMillan, Shannon Ramker, 

Sara DiGiusto, Bernadette Brennan, Elizabeth 

Fraser 



Evolution within 
the Dean's Office 

in the past two years we have seen an 
interesting progression of personalities in 
the Assistant Dean of Students position at 
the College: from Karen Green (left, "Ms. G" 
to those who knew her, which was every- 
one) to Brenda Jones, a powerhouse of 
energy and acerbic wit, joined above by Patti 
Snyder, Chaplain, and Dean Hudson. Fol- 
lowing Brenda is VictorWilson,anothercoup 
for Dean Hudson; not only has she main- 
tained cultural diversity in her staff, but gen- 
der diversity as well. 

Orientation 
Council 

Front row: 

Catherine Craddock, Dawn 
Hayes, Lisa Rogers, Regan Cone, 
Fran Akins, Ginger Hicks 
Back row: 

Jean IVIcDowell, Margaret 
Murdock, Janet Kidd, Jenessa 
DeFrees, Winnie Varghese 



Social Council '98 




Front row: Crystal Jones, Charia Bland, 
Stephanie Richards, Shannon Grace 
Back row: Perrin Cothran, Claire Laye Julie 
Bragg, Helyn Wallace, Lauren Granade 



im 



Dean of the College 




Front row: 

George Brown, Global Awareness 

Sarah Blanshei, Dean of the College 

Dolores Shelton, Administrative Assistant 

Back row: 

Sharon Maxted, Administrative Assistant 

Harry Wistrand, Associate Dean of the College 

Dana Scholars 




The Global Awareness 
program provides the opportunity 
for an international experience to 
every Agnes Scott student. The 
Global Awareness Office, 
formerly under the direction of 
Dr. George Brown in the Office of 
the Dean of the College, 
coordinates summer programs, 
as well as German and French 
exchange programs offered by 
the College. The office also helps 
students plan in-country experi- 
ences, such as studying a year 
"abroad" in another American 
institution, the most recent 
addition to the Global Awareness 
program is the winter program, in 
which students "combine 
classwork in the fall and spring 
semesters with a January travel 
experience." This introductory 
experience is designed particu- 
larly for sophomores, although it 
is available to any students who 
has been at Agnes Scott for at 
least one semester. 

The destinations for the 
"January experience" in the past 
have included Hong Kong, 
Germany, France and Mexico. 



Front row: 

Adrienne Vanek, 
Allison Davis 
Back row: 

Carl Haack, Margaret 
Murdock, Catherine 
Craddock, Shannon Price, 
Cindy Dunn, Brooke 
Parish, Amy Higgins 



Development 




Liz Schellingerhoudt 
Jean Kennedy 
Bonnie Johnson, 
Vice President 
Peggy Owens 
Peg Walton 



The summer programs have 
included travels in Greece, 
England and Nepal, among 
others. The 1991 host cities in 
January were Oaxaca, 
Mexico, and Tbilisi, Georgia, 
U.S.S.R. The destinations for 
each year's travels depend 
primarily upon student 
interest, faculty specialty, and 
ability to establish a beneficial 
host family system in the 
prospective community. 

Classes in the fall semes- 
ter help each student learn 
about the culture of the 
community she will visit, as 
well as help her focus on a 
special project which she will 
research during her stay. In 
the spring, the emphasis in 
the class is on positive re- 
entry adjustment to home 
after what is sometimes a life- 
changing experience. 

The College has made a 
significant commitment 
(financial and othenwise) to 
the Global Awareness 
program, with the idea that 
"'global awareness' ... should 
be a fundamental component 
of any liberal arts education." 
The Agnes Scott community 
takes pride in the over fifty 
percent of the graduating 
class of 1991 has participated 
in an overseas experience. 
The Global Awareness office 
hopes to make that percent- 
age even higher in the future. 

Quotes are from the 1991-93 
Agnes Scott College Catalog. 
Special thanks to Dr. George 
Brown for his help with this 
articie. 



"THetttona, & "THetOeea^ 





Economics 




Ed Sheehey 
Rosemary Cunningham 
Ed Johnson 



Education 




Beth Spencer 



English 




Left: 

Jack Nelson 
Chris Ames 
Steve Guthrie 
Peggy Thompson 
Linda Hubert 
Right: 
Pat Pinka 
Not pictured: 
Bo Ball 
Christine Cozzens 



80 /•TUaOo'ui, & -y/teHSeea, 





Top, left to right: 

Regine Reynolds-Cornell 
Christabel Braunrot 
Bottom, left to right: 

Rosemary Eberiel 
Hugette Chatagnier 





Susanne Koenigsmann, Teaching Assitant 
Ingrid Wieshofer 
Gunther Bicknese 




Kathy Gillmore, Mary Claire King, IVlartha Daniel, Susan 
Abernathy, Susanne Koenigsmann, Ruth Hennig, Kristin 
IVlezger, Jenessa DeFrees 




F*G 



Faculty 
Services 




Seated: 

Pat Gannon 
Standing: 

Nita IViilan 
Janet Spence 
Shirley Weathers 





Health 
Services 




Vlary Lu Christiansen 
^at O'Doherty (seated) 



One of Agnes Scott's 
unique benefits is the trust 
that is established in fellow 
students through the 
upholding of the Honor 
Code. Though its restrictions 
may seem rigid and conse- 
quences of noncompliance 
somewhat harsh, the 
freedom the Honor Code 




Jeanette Elias 
Cynthia Neal 
Daphne Norton 



gives compensates tenfold for 
any negative first impressions 
of the system. A student can 
leave her dorm room door 
open; washed clothing left 
overnight in the laundry room 
will still be there - and might 
even be folded. "Lost" items 
are often found in the exact 
spot where they were left. "It's 
wild to be able to leave your 
notebook in the dining hall on 
Monday, remember it on 
Wednesday, and it still be 
there," stated Willa 
Hendrickson ('94). The 
liberties that the Honor Code 
allow alleviate some of the 
"always on your guard" 
feelings that may come with 
being around so many people 
in a large university. 



Probably the most benefi- 
cialfeatureoftheHonorCodeisthat 
since one is "bound by honor" 
and "pledged" to refrain from 
breaking the code, professors 
trust students with take-home 
tests. Given the freedom to take 
a test at leisure in a setting 
comfortable to that student rather 
than in a stressful environment 
with the professor proctoring at 
the door not only takes pressures 
off both the teacher and student, 
but also treats the student as the 
mature, responsible adult she is. 



History 





Tommie Sue Montgomery 
Latin American Studies 



Michele Gillespie 
Michael Brown 
Penny Campbell 
Kathy Kennedy (seated) 




Mani Kamerkar 




Interdonn 

Officers: 

President: 

Susan Cowan 
Vice President: 

Denice Dresser 
Secretary: Brooke Price 
Dorm Presidents: 
Sarah McMillan - Main 
Vanessa Elliot - Rebekah 
Allison Davis - Inman 
Eve Allen - Winship 



L«M 



library 





Front row: Carl Beck • Kay Heupel Scott • Lillian Newman • 
Resa Harney • Second row: Joyce Manget • Cynthia Rich- 
mond • Judith Jensen, Director • Third row: Amy Chambers 
Dement • Lee Sayrs 



Mathematics 



Many times people feel 
more comfortable tackling 
problems when they are 
among friends. In the 
Collaborative Learning 
Center (better known as the 
CLC), people are encour- 
aged to work together in a 
relaxed learning environ- 
ment. The CLC is only a 
part of what is housed inside 
the student annex, located 
between Winship Hall and 
the Alston Center. The 
annex building is also the 
meeting place of Rep 
Council, other student 
government offices, and the 
Faculty Club. However, four 
of the rooms on the bottom 
level of the annex, two of 
which are equipped with 
computers, are designated 
for collaborative learning. 

The operation of the CLC 
was started in 1 989 by Dr. 
Myrtle Lewin and Dr. 
Christine Cozzens. Its 




Bob Leslie • Daniel Waggoner • Larry Riddle • Myrtle Lewin 



purpose was to "provide a place 
where any student could sit down 
and work in a talking environ- 
ment so collaborative work could 
take place." It allows and 
enormous amount of freedom 
and provides an alternative study 
area to the library. "It is like a 
talking study hall," Dr. Lewin 
said. You can work here with 



food, of course not at the 
computer tables .... There has 
been no abuse to the rules and it 
has generally been used with the 
kind of respect it deserves." 
Many people have made 
great use of the facilities. 
Christie Shin, an RTC at Agnes 
Scott says, "I spend one or two 
hours here daily. Sometimes I 



come here to study when I 
have time in between classes. 
I have two children and a 
husband, so sometimes I 
don't want to study at home." 
Sophomore Melissa Johnson 
spent about an hour a week in 
the CLC as part of a tutorial 
math program required for Dr. 
Lewin's classes. With other 
people, Melissa says, "it 
makes it more interesting and 
less monotonous." 

Peer tutors can be found to 
help students with math and 
some of the sciences. In 
time, Dr. Lewin hopes that 
more professors will make 
use of the CLC as a place to 
give students the nudge they 
need, while encouraging them 
to work on their own. "Tutor- 
ing," Dr. Lewin says, "is not 
the main part of collaborative 
learning. The heart of 
collaborative learning is to 
have the student do what she 
wants to do, not what the 
teacher wants her to do." 



Music 




Cal Johnson 
Ted Mathews 
Ron Byrnside 



London Fog 




Front row: 

Michelle Cox, Laura Home, 
Ellen Chilcutt, Julie Bragg 
Back row: 

Julie Dykes, Kate Little, 
Claire llaye. Amy Higgins, 
Lauren Fowler, Ron Byrnside 



Media 
Resources 




Linda Hilsenrad 



"MMtotA & "THetOeeak ^'^ 




Office 
Services 




Ruby Perry-Ellis 



Witkaze 




Front row: 

April Cornish, Kelley Rogers, Bryn Perry, Melanie Clarkson, 

Melissa Johnson, Delvory Gordon, Kiniya Harper 

Back row: 

Natasha Browner, Kimberly Colliet, Shanika Swift, Rebecca 

Nowlin, Kech Payne 

Advisor: Ruby Perry-Ellis 



Philosophy 




David Behan 



Physics & Astronomy 




Alberto Sadun, Astronomy • Art Bowling, Physics 



Political Science 




Gus Cochran Cathy Scott 

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

College Democrats 

Front row: 

Leigh Bennett 
Wendy Allsbrook 
Back row: 
Julie Bragg 
Elena Adan 
Winnie Varghese 
Deborah Watters 
Missy Mullinax 



College Republicans 

Front row: 

Amy Bridwell 
Fran Akins 
Emily Hornak 
Mary Frances Kerr 
Back row: 
Bernadette 
Brennan 
Amanda King 





"""n ffl 

President's Office 




During the year, 
President Rutli Schmidt 
will often set aside time 
from her busy schedule to 
strengthen her relations with the 
Agnes Scott community by 
opening her door to personally 
address questions and concerns 
of campus community members 
during what is called the 
President's Open Office Hour. 




During this time, students, 
faculty, and staff members 
can go In to see her and ask a 
brief question or offer 
suggestions that may later be 
considered for a college 
project. If this hour is not 
opportune, one can schedule 
an appointment with President 
Schmidt or talk with someone 
who may be able to answer 
their questions. 

This is a welcome chance 
to meet the president, to show 
her the level of community 
concern about certain issues, 
and that individuals are willing 
to get involved. For the 
president, it is an opportunity 
to develop a more personal 
relationship with the Agnes 
Scott community. 



Bertie Bond 




President Ruth Schmidt 



Theresa Sehenuk • Tan Hille • Lea Ann Hudson 



Psychology 




Seated: 

Ayse Garden 
Barbara Blatchley 
Standing: 
Tom Hogan 
Eileen Cooley 

Psychology Club 

Front row: 

Ayse Garden, Rhina Fernandes, 
Lisa Anderson, 
Allison Davis, 
Ginger Hicks 
Back row: 
Helen Harber, 
Janet Kidd, 
Gourtney 
Alison, Julie 
King 



Post Office 




Robert Bell 
Grover Harris 
Ursula Booch 



')HeMt<m.& "VtettteeaK 85 





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& ')f(etftee^ 



Physical Education & Athletics 



Athletic 
Association 

Wendy Jones 
Christy Jackson 
Mary Curtis Lanford 



Basketball 

Front row: 

Britton iVlcMullin, Cliristy 
Jacl<son, Noelle Dixon, Amy 
Tyler, Dee Dee Tucker 
Back row: 
Tara Squires, Hawa 
i\/leskinyar, Wendy Jones, 
Doris Black • Coach, Kim 
Creagh, Tracy Casteel, Cindy 
Peterson • Asst. Coach 
Not pictured: Betty Hammond 



Soccer 

Front row: 

Tracy Barnes, Becca Boone, 

Elizabeth Hartz, Marika 

Ronde 

Back row: 

Cheryl Appleberry • Trainer, 

Amanda Daniel, Anne 

Bearden, Beth Barnes, 

Tamara Shie, Tony Serpico • 

Coach 




Tennis 



Front row: 

Courtenay King, Kristin 
Mezger, Cathy Alexander, 
Kristin Louer 
Back row: 

Cindy Peterson • Coach, 
Cheryl Appleberry • Trainer, 
Kate Simkins, Reina Barretto, 
Mary Beth Quinley, Debbie 
Miles, Elizabeth Seward 



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Publications 




Center: 

Celeste Pennington, Manager 



Silhouette 



Profile 




Front row: 

Josie Hoilnnan, Tonya Smith, 

Barbie Stitt 

Back row: 

Rita Ganey, Laura Shaeffer, 

Sandee IVIcGlaun 




Front row: 

Stephanie Hawes, Kathy Gillmore 

Back row: 

Kelli Barnett, Elena Adan, Josie 

Hoilman, Jenessa DeFrees, Tonya 

Smith 



Above: 

Kelly Holton 

Katie Tanner, '92 Editor 

Natasha Browner 

Right: 

Margaret Hammond, '91 Editor 



Public 
Relations 




Carolyn Wynens 
Sara King Pilger 




"THettfyti. & THetOeeak 87 





Rep Council '91 




Rep Council '93 



Front row: 

Robyn Porter, Kara 
Russell, Mary Frances 
Kerr, Deborah Watters, 
Tammy Shirley, Holly 
Henderson 
Second row: 
Amy Higgins, Wendy 
Allsbrook, Talin Keyfer, 
Betsy Johnson 
Back row: 

Ellie Porter, Stephanie 
Strickland, Margaret 
Murdock, Debbie Miles, 
Janet Johnson, Donna 
Kimball, Annetta Wil- 
liams, Laura Shaeffer 



Officers: 

Tracy Peavy, Secretary 
Amy Higgins, President 
Jessica Carey, 

Vice President 
Meredith Jolly, Treasurer 




R.S.O. 



\ ""z' 



& "THeMtee^i. 



(Alphabetically) 
Martha Barfield, Helene 
Barrus, Susan Buckley, 
Ramona Davidson, Cynthia 
Davis, Nancy Dickenson, 
Leslie Dowdey, Leslie 
Glenn, Sandi Harsh, 
Ginger Hicks, Angela Hill, 
Deborah Houston, Carole 
Ivory, Priscilla Jaggers, 
Rosemarie Kelly, Donna 
Kimball, Sue King, Peggy 
Lyie, Melody Martin, Lee 
Butler McWaters, Kathy 





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Monturo, Dianne O'Donnell, 
Hyun Park, Melanie Pavich- 
Lindsay, Gina Pursell, Christie 
Shin, Marcia Sneddon, Susan 



Stanley, Faith St. Michael, 
Mary Jo Thompson, K.C. 
Thurmond, Connie Tibbitts, 
Beth Williams 



aiegistrar 




ary K Jarboe, Registrar 
a Ruth Thies 



Sociology & 
Anthropology 




Martha Rees 
Bernita Berry 




Service Organizations 




Jennifer Bruce 
Lisa Anderson 
Rhina Fernandes 



Circle K 

Front row: 

Jenny Sparrow, Holly 

DeMuth, Tracy Casteel 

Back row: 

Ginger Hartley, Wendy 

Riviere 



iAlA 




Front row: 

Chrissie Van Sant, Wendy 

Allsbrook, Madeline Cohn, 

Talin Keyfer 

Back row: 

Kelli Barnett, Barbara Scalf, 

Deborah Watters, Winnie 

Varghese 



Spanish 

Spanish Club 






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Molly Simmons, Kristin Houchins, 
Elena Adan, Emily Hornak, 
English Hairrell 



Rafael Ocasio 
Eloise Herbert 



Student 
Activities 




Ellen Wheaton 



90 /'me*aiyu.&'me*aee^ 




Theatre 



Right: 

Becky Prophet 
Not pictured: 

Dudley Sanders 




From the production Gome Back to the 
Five 8e Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean 






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RIGHT Here & RIGHT Now 
• Silhouette • 



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Bottled Under Authority of "The Coca-Cola Company" by THE ATLANTA COCA-COLA BOTTLING COMPANY. 



RABERN - NASH COMPANY, INC. 

specialists in Floor Covering 

727 E. College Avenue 

Decatur, Georgia 30031 

(404) 377-6436 




ECLECTIC COIIECTIIIES 



Estates Bought 
Consignments 

Sport Cards 
Used Furniture 

MICHAEL RUDY 

2707 E. College Avenue 

Decatur, Georgia 30030 

(404) 377-2100 




BUCK'S DECATUR 

116 E. PONCE DE LEON AVENUE 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 

(404) 373-7797 



SensaUonal 
Subs 



SENSATIONAL SUBS, INC. 

5414 Buford Highway 

Doraville, Georgia 30340 

(404) 457-1283 



wondaleI 
veterinary 

HOSPITAL 



Small Animal 
Medicine & Surgery 

David G. Williams DVM 

MoN - Fri 8am-6pm 
Sat 8am-Noon 

Near Avondale Marta Station 

6 Avondale Rd. Av. Es. 

294-4800 



HUNT'S WRECKER SERVICE 




154 Olive Street 

Avondale Estates. Georgia 30002 

(404) 292-6697 

Garlon Hunt 
Lamar Hunt 

24 Hour Wrecker Service 



A 



ATLANTA 
AUTOMOTIVE, INC. 



2748E. COLLEGE AVENUE 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 

(404) 373-1577 



SUPERB FOOD 

BREAKFAST, LUNCH AlHD DINNER 
ALWAYS COOKED TO YOUR ORDER 



_ ^ ^_ Clairmont at 
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OF Briarcliff Road 

633-1889 
6AM -11PM 



PANCAKES® RESTAURANT 



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American Professional Risk Services, Inc. 



STEWART BROS. 



Blacki 
Top 1 



2480 PLEASANTDALE ROAD ^^ 

P.O. BOX 48426 I^OSSdinc 

DORAVILLE, GEORGIA 30340 

OfTice Phone: 447-5810 Shop Phone: 366-1711 



/" p; — N 



li 



MECHANICAL 
INDUSTRIES COUNCIL 

1950 Century Blvd. • Suite 5 

Atlanta, Georgia 30345 

(404)633-9811 



NEIGHBORHOOD 

PLAYHOUSE 



PERKIN ELMER 



Atlanta Branch Office 
510 Guthridge Court 
NorcrosB.GA 30092 



RANDALL AND LASETER 

ARCHITECTS 

150 EAST PONCE De LEON AVENUE 

POST OFFICE BOX 247 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 30031-0247 

(404) 377-7620 



Offia., 373-2296-7 



•Rps., 469-6338 



%p6eTt L. LittUjidd 

Mlomeij at Law 



One 'Decatur 'foivn Center 
SuiU 340 



450 Tonce "De Leon Avenue 
"Decatur, georgia 30030 



INC. 



/ACS/ 

Heating & Air Conditioning 

Since 1969 
P.O. Box 1346 • Decatur, Georgia 30031 




Patricia J. Morrell 

PRESIDENT CEO 



MUKKhLL 



LANDSOAPIN<» 



DESIGN • MMNTfLSACt • SEASO.N.U COLOR • INSTALLATION ■ TbtHNII^AL SW.ll.tS ■ IKKILAIIIIS 

P.O. BOX 620245 • Atlanta, Georgia 30362 • (404)662-8775 • FAX (404I6620732 



CDCFTX«aDa(xs3ajQM. iD 
lr-«>n c3«»..lna. 

THE ONE AND ONLY 

ORIGINAL 

ARTISTIC ORNAMENTAL 

IRON CO., INC. 

1(404) 373-652l~| 



RESIDENTIAL 4 COMMERCIAL 

BEAUTIFUL ORNAMENTAL 

IRON GATES 

CUSTOM DESIGN & INSTAl,Ij\TION 

ELBCTTEIC 0PENEES-RADIOa)NTROIJJJ) 




1977 College Avenue N.E. professional design service 



Best of Luck on the Future 
From 

The Elegant Sandwich 

Perimeter Lenox Underground 

396-1770 231-9018 577-4770 



JEWELRY • REPAIR • DESIGN 




HANDCRAFTED JEWELRY TRADEWORK 



6075 ROSWELL ROAD 

SUITE 619 

ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30328 



OFFICE: 252-0028 




W.J. SKILLERN 
DAVID SKILLERN 



SKILLERN'S AUTO SERVICE 

252 SOUTH COLUMBIA DRIVE 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 

(404) 373-7979 

(404) 373-6611 




Service At Its Best 
DON DAVIS SERVICE CENTER 

359 W. Ponce De Leon Avenue 
Decatur, Georgia 30030 

ComputAr Balancing 

Front End Allgnmsnl 

Brakawork • Tun«-ups 

TIras • Botlarlas • Acc*»orlaa 

Road Sarvic* • Wracksr Sarvlc* 

378-6751 • Automatic Car Wa.h - 373-9122 






PRINTING 



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CHARLIE MIZELL 
OWNER 

The Decatur Commons 

205 Swanton Way 

Comer of Commerce Dr. & Swanton Way 

Decatur, Georgia 30030 

(404) 378-4231 

Fax: (404) 373-3884 



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tin 



kee (Jlibb 

Established 1968 

Pamela de Journo 

2 Pine Street 
Avondale, Georgia 30002 

(404) 294-5222 



er 



James Moore & Associates 

70 Perimeter Center East 

Atlanta, Georgia 30346 

(404) 394-2666 

Insurance and Bonding 



Compliments 

of 
Dearborn Animal Hospital 

715 East College Avenue 
Decatur, Georgia 30030 



Ben Spencer 




(404) 378-7565 



SPENCER'S TIRE COMPANY 

402 East Howard Avenue 
Decatur, Georgia 30030 



GEORGIA VALVE AND FIHING COMPANY 

3361 West Hospital Avenue 

Atlanta, Georgia 30341 

Bus. (404) 458-8045 the 

Fax (404) 454-7930 



■ :/-77/jj 



SWAGELOK 
companies 




Compliments of 

McKinney's Apothecary Inc. 

542 CHURCH STREET 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 

PHONE 378-5408 




Js^^ A= Wts'Lilj Sk i llij s: 



fZf^^J' 2 til ft ■ ■ I'actotes 



5680 OaUbrook Parkway-Suite 145-Norcross, Georgia 30098 

DESIGN & INTEGRATIO N OF 

LIFE SAFETY CONTROL SYSTIEMS 



WILLIAM J. SKILLAS 



(4(M) 242-7501 



CI Bank South Service 



Our first name is Bank, but 
our femily name is Soutli. 

Al Bank South, we have a simple philosophy — is a lol to like about us. After all. our first name is 



to treat each of our customers with the special 
attention and service that will make them feel 
right at home with us— like part of the family. 

If you're looking for a little more attention and 
personal service from your bank, you'll find there 



Bank, but our family name is South 



-0^ 



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Pytombar FDIC. 1988 Bank South Corporation. 



Sharian, Inc. 

Rug Cleaning and 
Oriental Rug Sales 



368 W. Ponce De Leon Avenue 
Decatur, Georgia 30030 
(404) 373-2274 



\%9& 



GARY E. COTON 

PRESIDENT 



World Travel Advisors 

1605 Chantilly Drive, N.E. 

Suite 100 

Atlanta, Georgia 30324 

(404) 325-3700 

TELEX 80-4672 



On The Occasion Of Our 

100th Anniversary, We'd Like To 

Celebrate By Thanking Our Customers 

This year Trust Company Bank is 100 years 
old. In ail this time. Trust Company has been an 
integral part of Atlanta, lending strength and 
support to the growth and prosperity of this dty, 
our state, and region. We are grateful to all our 
customers and friends who have helped us reach 
our 100th year with a continuing record of prof- 
itability, strength and stability. As we move into 
our second 1 00 years, we are confident that Trust 
Company Bank will maintain its steady progress 
and high level of dependable service to this com- 
munity. We thank you for helping us achieve this 
milestone anniversary. 




One Hundred "rfears Of Service 

SonTniU, A SunTnm Bank, Tnut Compuiy Bank aid ihe T Design uc 
iciviceiniriciof SunTniftBanki.Inc Member FDIC 



Mordr, Davis 
& Company 

567 LaDonna Drive, Decatur, Georgia 30032 



The Soundd Investment Co. 

3586 Pierce Drive 

Chomblee, Georgia 30341 

404-458-1679 



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ATLANTA 




\mtjfj ?.9MPANY I 



1084 HOWELL Mill ROAD, N. W., ATLANTA. GEORGIA 30318 

PHONE 404-875-0256 

COMPLETE ENGINEERING LAYOUTS • STEEL SHELVING 

SHOP EQUIPMENT • LOCKERS • PALLET RACKS 



What can 
Narsh & McLennan 
do abontyonr risks? 

I 



Identily, 
them 



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Protect 
yon from 
them 



Help control 
them 



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We're Marsh & McLennan, 
the world's leading insurance 
broker. We have risk 
management specialists 
in every major industry, 
trained to give your company 
the best possible insurance 
protection at the least cost. 



sh <i McLsn 



DISPATCHED ^^CC^^^tO^ {\) 

PEST SERVICES, INC. 

OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE 
MOISTURE CONTROL & TERMITE REPAIRS 

COMPLETE HOUSEHOLD & COMMERCIAL 

PEST CONTROL SERVICE 

-OUTSIDE and INSIDE PROTECTION- 

'FIGHTING TERMITES, 

FJ.EAS * OTHER PESTS 

IS NO GAMEr 2525 DALLAS HWY S.W. 

■!■ esq MARIEHA. GA 

— "^ 30065 




404-422-0534 



• TERMITE 

CLEARANCE 

LETTERS 

•PRE-TREATNEW 
CONSTRUCTION 
•SURETY BONDED 



•TERMITES 

•ROACHES 

•FLEAS k TICKS 

•ANTS 

•MITES 

•FUNGUS 

•CARPENTER >EES 

•POWDSIPOSIKriiS 



•RATSk MICE 

•MiaiPEDESk 

CENTIPEDES 

•SILVERFISH 

•MOTHS 

•HORNETS 

•SCORPIONS 

•WASPS 




GEORGIA DUCK AND 

CORDAGE MILL 

POST OFFICE BOX 865 

SCOHDALE, GEORGIA 

30079 

MANUFACTURER OF CONVEYOR 

BELTING AND INDUSTRIAL 

TEXTILES 




|>NV^./<r ■ -r-^ -— — -■-'-;-,.■.■■,-;.•. w::^ 




mi^'j^x;^ ■..^:v.^. 



Gary Nelson 
Manager 



601 E. COLLEGE AVENUE 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 

(404) 373-3335 



BURTON'S GRILL 

1029 Edgewood 

Atlanta, Georgia 30307 

(404) 525-3415 




• Custom Prescription Compounding 

• Senior Citizens Discounts 

• Surgical Supplies 

• Fast Personal Service 



215 CLAIRMONT • DECATUR, GA 30030 
(404) 3786415 



Scientific Water Treatment.^.ethicaUy applied 

TECHNICAL SPECIALTIES CORPORATION 

250 Arizona Avenue, N.E. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30307 

(404)378-1403 



Congratulations 
Class of 92 

McCurdy and Chandler 

250 Ponce de Leon Ave. 

Decatur, Georgia 30030 
(404)373-1612 



Learn How lb 
Afford College 



Decatur Federal is a 
friend of the family. 



Ihlk to our college loan specialists. 

Decatur Federal is one of the 
largest education lenders in 
Georgia. Our college loan 
speciSists can provide a wide 
range of low-cost, government- 
backed loans. 

VCfe'll give you personal 
attention and process your 
application Cast. For complete 
information, call Decatur 
Federal's College Loan Depart- 
ment at (404) 37 1-4199, or 
Stop by any branch office for an 
application. 




FDIC INSURED 



DECATUR 
FEDERAL 

The Family Bank 



DAVE 




TOM 

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER 



IMPORT • DOMESTIC 

COMPLETE MECHANICAL SERVICE • BODY WORK • PAINT 

301 DeKalb Industrial Way • Decatur, Ga 30030 • (404) 292-8803 

Mention this Ad with Student ID receive $10.00 off oil change. 



W. Hugh Spruell, m.d. 

RHEUMATOLOGY 

2712 North Decatur, Georgia 30033 

(404) 292-8333 



BY APPOINTMENT 



BEN W. JERNIGAN, JR. D.M.D. 

General Dentistry 

SUITE 340 • FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

SLS W. PONCE DE LEON AVE. • DECATUR, GA 30030 

(404)378-1466 



SHIELDS MARKET 

143 Sycamore Street 

Decatur, Georgia 30030 

(404) 377-6897 



1 14 E, Trinity Place 
Decatur, OA 30030 



(404) 371-9554 
Open 7 Days a Week 



MOGHUL SALUTE 

Authentic Indian Cuisine 

Famous For-Quality & Taste, Party Catering & 

Carryout Services 

Lunch 1 1 :30 A.M. -3:00 P.M. Cocktails With Live Music 

Dinner 5:00 P.M. -10:30 P.M. 11:00 P.M.-2:30 A.M. (Weekend) 

Available For Parties & Conferences 



/IFCO 

Realty Associates 

Twelve North Parkway Square 

4200 Northslde Parkway, N.W. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30327 




An 

Answer 
to Energy Savings 
& Affordable Comfort 



Atlanta Gas Light Company 

Georgia Naluial Gas Compan, Savaruiah Gas Company 



Piccadilly 

Classic American Cooking 

2595 N. Decatur Road 

Decatur, Georgia 30033-6126 

(404)373-5116 




mRVFIELD 



takes the best and 
makes it BETTER 



Carfton Q Cover Insurance Agency 

3646 Clairmont Road 

Chamblee, Georgia 30341 

(404)451-1646 

AUTO • FIRE • HOMEOWNER • BURGLARY • GLASS 
LIFE • ACCIDENT • HEALTH and ALLIED LINES 




'^. 



INSULATION 

GENERAL OFFICES 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 



DIVISION OF NATIONAL SERVICE INDUSTRIES INC. 

3250 Woodstock Road, S.E. 
Atlanta, Georgia 302316 



Lewis E. Watson 
Branch Manager 



Phone: (404) 622-4611 
Home: 483-2355 



PLUMBERS and STEAMFITTERS LOCAL 72 




THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE FOR UNITED ASSOCIATION SKILLED CRAFTSMEN 

Composid of journeymtn and apprentices zuhc Have juris diction aver every 

6rattc/i of tAt pCumiin£ and pipe fitting industry. 



Grinnell 



FIRE PROTECTION SYSTEMS COMPANY 

2385 Lithonia Industrial Blvd. 

Lithonia, Georgia 30058 

(404) 482-7346 



BOB CARROLL 
APPLIANCE COMPANY 

2122 North Decatur Plaza 

Decatur, Georgia 30033 

(404) 634-2411 



Dairg 



Two Locations To Serve You 

NISAR MOMIN 
FIROZ MOMIN 



253 E. Trinity Place 

Decatur, GA 30030 

(404) 373-6773 



2100 Pleasant Hill Rd. 

Duluth, GA 30136 

(404) 476-1125 



If you 
want a bank 

that gets 

things done, 

welcome to 

Personal Banking. 

Welcome to 

WACJIOVIA 



AHEUGSNGGNCEFI8 



AMERICAN CONCEPTS 

I Fasteners • Tools • Const Supplies 
Hardware & Maintenance Products 



1170 Custer Avenue S.E. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30316 

Office (404) 622-3080 FAX: (404) 627-6668 




LAW FIRM OF 
C. ANTHONY CUNNINGHAM, Esq. 



119 EAST COURT SQUARE 

SUITE 209-A 

DECATUR, GEORGIA 30030 

Phone (404) 378-4340 FAX: (404) 378-3489 



OFFICE-(404) 522-5872 / 522-5135-6 

LABORERS INTERNATIONAL UNION OF 
NORTH AMERICA 

LOCAL NO. 438 

AFFILIATED WTTH AFL-CIO 
AND NORTH GEORGIA BUILDING TRADES COUNCIL 

1004 EDGEWOOD AVENUE, N.E. 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 30307 



BloGuard 
Pool and Spa 
Products 



Relax. Bring your pod to HoCjuaid 

Bio-Lab, Inc., 627 East College Avenue, Decatur. GA 300."? 1 




Compliments 
of 

JOHNSON 
jSlLJIGGINS 

191 Peachtree Street, N.E. 
Suite 3400 

Atlanta, Georgia 30303-1762 



ymuita 

^^ DAIRIES ^ 



'<(f^Hmeto m Fresh Dairj 

ATLANTA DAIRIES, INC. 

777 Memorial Drive S.E. 

Atlanta, Georgia 30316-1195 

(404) 688-2671 



PETl DAIRY 



Engineering 
Associates 



I 



nc. 



@ 



ENGINEERING AND MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTSSINCE 1956 

The Facility Management Consultant Division of Engineering 
Associates Provides Consulting Services in the Areas of: 



Maintenance 
Housekeeping 
A I -Grounds Care 

•Energy Conservation 
W •Telecommunications 

2625 Cumberland Parkway / Suite 100 / Atlanta, Georgia 30339 
(404) 432-8833 



'Modernization Planning 
Capital Improvements Budgeting 
'Cost Reductions 
'Productivity Improvement 
'Operations Analysis 



Compliments of 



GEORGIA 
FEDERAL 
CREDIT 
UNION 



'Your Family's Financial Cooperative'" 




Ciarkston 

292-6868 



Atlanta 
452-8233 



Conyers 
483-5211 



Dalton 
226-1199 



:k bridge 

4-3600 



Lithonia 
482-4033 



LaFayette 
638-5800 




A 
TRADITION 
IN PRINTING 
SINCE 1939 



LETTERHEADS 

ENVELOPES 

BUSINESS CARDS 

BROCHURES 

NEWSLEHERS 

FLYERS/INSERTS 

BOOKLETS 

FORMS 

LABELS 

EMBOSSING 

NUMBERING 

DIE-CUniNG 



225 N. McDonough St. • Decatur, GA 30030 

"WE NOW OFFER OFFICE & ART SUPPLIES" 

BRUCE GRUBER, Owner (404) 373-3337 



National 

Linen 

Service 



William C. Maine 
Vice President 
General Manager 




525 Glen Iris Drive, N.E. 
Atlanta, Georgia 30308 
(404) 522-7335 

A Division of National 
Service Industries, Inc. 




Short Term Commitments 
Long Term Gains 

Earn while you learn. Make a short term commitment to a 
temporary assignment during vacations or breaks. Earn good 
pay with Western Temporary Services and gain valuable 
experience on the job. Work when you want, where you want, 
for as long as you want. We're always here when you need 
money most. Give us a call. Western Temporary Services. The 
one to call when you want to work. 

Stop in and ask for your complimentary "Guide to Successful 
Interviewing" booklet. Over 350 offices worldwide, 100% 
American owned. 



1 1 50 Hammond Dr. N.E 
Sandy Springs, GA 30328 ^tj 
393-4455 888-0003 279-0007 
Perimeter Midlown Gwinnett 



8 Divisions 
EOE-M/F/V 



Western 

lEINBlEVSEtVICES. 




^yijj^^igligigij 



■* '""''^^^''^ 



^^ 




yv^MMMj «r*wv. CONFERENCE PLAZA 

WINSER OF DEVELOPMENt^MODlERNIZATtON AWARD 



The new Holiday Inn Atlanta-Decatur Conference Plaza submits the 
Atlanta alternative. An ultra-modem hotel and conference plaza 
amidst a quiet historic setting in the heart of Decatur. 

Look what we have to offer. . . 

185 deluxe guest rooms 14,000 square feet of quality meeting and banquet space • 104 fixed-seat amphitheater • 
The All-American Cafe Restaurant • The ReUnion sports bar and patio • A fitness center with all the latest exercise 
equipment • MARTA rail station less than two blocks away • Indoor Pool • Gift Shop • Complimentary parking 
The closest Hotel to Agnes Scott College • Special rates for Agnes Scott College students, parents, and faculty. 



^feasejoin us for tHe foCCozvin^ food 'Bar in tfie 

Served Monday - Friday 




Located in tfie 
Cobby of the OCotef 



Friday 
SPECIAL SEAFOOD BUFFET 

f-OOpLm.- 10:00 p.m. 



BREAKFAST BUFFET 

7.00 a.m. -10:30 a.m. 

LUNCHEON BUFFET 

11.30 a.m. -2:00 p.m. 

tl0.9$ - Adnks 
t9.9S - Senior Cilizais 
l5.$0-CliiUiai$-l2]rnt 



15.23 - AdulU 

14.7$ - Senior Citizros 

f2.50-CbU(lrca5'12yn. 

15.95 - Adults 

14.95 - Senior aiiztos 

t3.50-ChUdica5-12yn. 



Sunday 



BRUNCH 

11.00 am.. 2 00p.m. 



(8.95 - Adults 

J7.95 - Senior CitUens 

1450 -Children 5-12 yn. 



130 Clairemont Avenue 
Decatur, Georgia 30030 



^ •\^OyicXX) SVVA? 



Tel: (404) 371-0204 

1-800-225-6079 
FAX: (404) 377-2726 



Dear iSignes Scott, 

Well, "the" yearbook has finally arrived -right 
here, right now. These past two years have been 
ones of hard work, frustration, lots of creativity, 
desperation, etc., for the Silhouette staff. But this 
conglomeration of 1 99 1 and 1 992 is completed at 
last, and we hope that you are pleased. 

This book would not be here now if it wasn't for 
the wonderful understanding and help of Pat 
Arnzen, Dean Hudson, Dan Troy, Anthony Ad- 
vertising, Margaret Hammond, Natasha Browner, 
Wendy Riviere, Kelly Holton, and everyone else 
who helped us along the way. Thanks! I want to 
personally wish Natasha and future editors of the 
Silhouette "Good Luck." Gosh, imagine the dif- 
ference if Agnes Scott's yearbooks started com- 
ing out in May again (or at least in the same 
academic year)! 

I'm really glad this book is out so the Silhouette 
staff can make a fresh start and all of us can 
finally have a yearbook. Enjoy this collection of 
memories and look back at 1991 and 1992 with 
fondness. 

Fondly, 
Katie Tanner 
Class of 1993 



Additional thanks are sent to Kathy Gillmore and 
Julie Cross, both of whom spent many hours on 
the '91 edition but are no longer at ASC. 



-Pat 



104