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Full text of "The silver king, a drama in five acts"

THE SILVER KING 



A DRAMA IN FIVE ACTS 



BY 

HENRY ARTHUR JONES 

AND 

HENRY HERMAN 



I held it truth with him who sings 
To one clear harp in divers tones. 

That man may rise on stepping stones 
Of their dead selves to higher thing*. 

But who shall so forecast the years 
And find in loss a gain to match, 

And reach a hand through time to catch 
The far off interest of tears > 

TENNYSON: "In Meraorium.* 



COPYRIGHT, 1907, BY HENRY ARTHUR JONES 



All Rights Reserved 

CAUTION: Professionals and amateurs are hereby warned that "THE 
SILVER KING," being fully protected under the copyright laws 
of the United States of America, and the British Empire, and the 
other countries of the Copyright Union, is subject to a royalty, and 
anyone presenting the play without the consent of the owners or their 
authorized agents will be liable to the penalties by law provided. 
Do not make any arrangment for the presentation of this play with- 
out first securing permission in writing from Samuel French, at 
25 West 45th Street, New York City, or at 811 West 7th Street, 
Los Angeles, Calif. 



NEW YORK 
SAMUEL FRENCH 

PUBLISHER 
25 WEST 45tH STREET 



LONDON 

SAMUEL FRENCH, LTD. 

26 SOUTHAMPTON STREET 

STRAND, W.C.2 



ft? 




7 



PERSONS REPRESENTED. 



WILFRED DENVER. 

CAPTAIN HERBERT SKINNER, 

HARRY CORKETT, 

ELIAH COOMBE, 

CRIPPS, 

DANIEL JAIKES, 

SAM BAXTER, 
GEOFFREY WARE, 
TUBES, 



BlNKS, 

BROWNSON, 
PARKYN, 
FRANK SELWYN, 

GAFFER POTTLE. 

LEAKER, 

NELLY DENVER, 

OLIVE, 

TABITHA DURDEN. 

SUSY, 

CISSY DENVER, ) 
NED DENVER, V 
MRS. GAMMAGE 



Known as " The Spider." 
Clerk lo Geoffrey Ware. 
A receiver of stolen goods. 
A locksmith. 
An old servant in the Denvev 

family. 
A detective. 
An engineer. 
Landlord of the " Wheat, 

sheaf." 

Tradesmen. 

A parish clerk. 
Secretary to Mr. John Frank 
lin. 

A porter. 
Denver's wife. 
Skinner's wife. 



The waitress 
" Chequers." 

Nelly's children. 



at the 



RAILWAY INSPECTOR. PASSENGERS, CLERKS, RUSTICS, 
CHILDREN, TRADESMEN, DETECTIVES, SERVANTS, ETC. 



The following is a copy of the playbill of the first performance 
of the " Silver King" at the Princess's Theatre, London : 

ON THURSDAY, NOVEMBER i6TH, 1882, AND FOLLOWING EVENINGS 

will be acted an entirely New and Original Drama, entitled 

THE SILVER KING 

WRITTEN BY 

HENRY A. JONES AND HENRY HERMAN. 
Produced under the sole direction of Mr. Wilson Barrett. 



WILFBBD DENVER Mr. Wilson Barrett. 

NIC 1. 1. IK DENVER, his Wife Miss Eastlake. 

CISSY AND NED, their children Misses M. Clitherow and C 

Burton. 

DANIEL JAIKES, their Servant Mr. George Barrett. 

FRANK SBLWYN, Private Secretary 

to Mr. John Franklin Mr. Neville Doone. 

GEOFFREY WARE, an Engineer. . . Mr. Brian Darley. 

SAMUEL BAXTER, a Detective Mr. Walter Speakman. 

CAPT. HERBERT SKINNER, known 

as " The Spider " Mr. E. S. Willard. 

HENRY CORKETT, Geoffrey Ware's 

Clerk Mr. Chas. Coote. 

ELIAH COOMBE, a Marine Store 

Dealer Mr. Clifford Cooper. 

CRIPPS, a Locksmith Mr. Frank Huntley. 

MR. PARKYN, Parish Clerk of Gad- 

desden Mr. J. Beauchatnp. 

MESSRS. BINKS AND BROWNSON, Messrs. H. Deane & Chart. 

Tradesmen ford. 

BILCHER AND TEDDY, Betting Men, Messrs. Warin & C. Gurth. 
TUBBS, Landlord of the "Wheat- 
sheaf " Mr. H. de Solla. 

GAFFER POTTLE Mr. J. B. Johnstone. 

i 



THE SILVER KING 



CABMAN Mr. H. Evans. 

LEAKER, a Porter. . . . , Mr. W. A. Elliott. 

SERVANTS Messrs. C. Crofton & Colea 

DETECTIVES Messrs. Polhill & Bland. 

PORTER, Mr. Carson Newsboy,.. . .Mr. Besley. 
OI.IVE SKINNER, Capt. Skinner's 

Wife Miss Dora Vivian. 

TABITHA DURDEN Mrs. Huntley. 

SUSY, Waitress at the " Chequers "Miss Wood worth. 

MRS. GAMMAGE Mrs. Beckett. 

LADY PASSENGER Miss Nellie Palmer. 

SCHOOLGIRLS Misses J. & F. Beckett. 

Railway Officials, Clerks, Children, Passengers. 

SYNOPSIS OF SCENERY. 

ACT I. 
SCENE. I. The Skittle Alley of " The Wheatsheaf," darken- 

well. 

SCENE. II. Clerkenwell Close. 
SCENE. III. 114 Hatton Garden. 

ACT II. 

SCENE. I. Room in Denver's House. 
SCENE. II. A London Railway Station. 
SCENE. III. A Country Lane. 
SCENE. IV. " The Chequers, " Gaddesden. 
SCENE. V. Room in "The Chequers." 

ACT III. 

SCENE. I. Skinner's Villa, near Biotnley. 
SCENE. II. Nellie Denver's Home (Winter). 

ACT IV. 

SCENE. I. Library at the Lawn, Kensington Park Gardens. 
SCENE. II. The Grange, Gardenhurst. 
SCENE. III. Outside Black Brake Wharf at Rotherhithe. 
SCENE. IV. Black Brake Wharf, Rotherhithe. 

ACT V. 

SCENE. I. Reception Room at the Lawn. 
SCENE. II. Skinner's Villa. 
SCENE. III. The Grange. 

Three Years and Six Months elapse between Acts 2 and 3. 
Six Months elapse between Acts 3 and 4. 



The following is a copy of the playbill of the first performance 
of the "Silver King," at Wallaces Theatre, New York. 

ON SATURDAY EVENING. JANUARY 27TH, 1883 

FIRST NIGHT 
After Months of Careful Preparation of an Entirely 

Hew and Original Drama 

ENTITLED 

THE SILVER KING 

WRITTEN BY 

MESSRS. HENRY A. JONES AND HENRY HERMAN 

At produced at the PRINCESS THEATRE London, under direction of 

MR. WILSON BARRETT 

and here by hjs representative, 

MR. CHARLES CATHCART. 

THE SCENERY BY MR. R. MARSTON 

(By the courteous permission of Mr. A. M. Palmer, oi the Union Square Theatre) 
MR. P. GOATCHER AND MR. J. MAZZANOVICH, 

The Overture and Incidental Music by Mr. Michael Connelly. 

Mechanical Effects by Mr. F. Dorrington. 

Appointments and Furniture by Mr. E. Siedle. 

Gas and Calcium Effects by Mr. J. F. DriscolL 



I held it truth, with him who sings 
On one clear harp of divers tones, 
That men may rise on stepping stones 

Of their dead selves to higher things. 

TENNYSON. 



Hi 



THE CAST. 

WILFRED DENVER Mr. Osmond Tearle. 

His First Appearance this Season. 
NELUE DENVER, his wife Miss Rose Coghlan. 

CISSY ( .. i-u 1 , ... Miss Carrie Elberts. 
NED {their children } Miss May Germon. 

DANIEI, JAIKES, an old servant of 
the Denver family Mr. John Gilbert. 

CAPT. HERBERT SKINNER, known 
as " The Spider," Mr. Herbert Kelcey. 

SAM BAXTER, a Detective Mr. C. P. Flockton. 

EUAH COOMBE, a Marine Store 
Dealer . . . . Mr. Daniel Leeson. 

HARRY CoRKETT, Clerk to Geoffrey 
Ware Mr. Sidney Howard. 

CRIPPS, a Locksmith Mr. Harry Gwynette. 

FRANK SELWYN Mr. J. C. Buckstone. 

GEOFFREY WARE, an Engineer. . .Mr. Harry Bell. 

PARKYN, Parish Clerk at Gaddes- 
den Mr. C. E. Edwin. 

BII.CHER Mr. Charles Foster. 

TUBES, Landlord of " The Wheat- 
sheaf " , Mr. John Germon. 

GAFFER POTTLE Mr. H. Meeker. 

LEAKER, a Porter Mr. W. Butler. 

TEDDY Mr. H. Pearson. 

INSPECTOR Mr. F. N. Salter. 

PORTER Mr. S. Dubois. 

BINKS I T j I J.Gibson. 

JENNINGS \ Tradesmen \ Mr. T. Joyce. 

DETECTIVE Mr. C. Burnell. 

NEWSBOY Master J. Lein. 

OWVE SKINNER, Capt. Skinner's 

Wife Miss Agnes Elliott 

TABITHA DURDEN Miss E. Blaisdell. 

SUSY, Waitress at " The Chequers, "Miss Marion Booth. 

MRS. GAMMAGE Mrs. J. Elberts. 

Railway officials, Children, Passengers, Detectives, etc. 

iv 



SYNOPSIS OF SCENERY. 

ACT I. 

SCENE. I. Skittle Alley of " The Wheat- 

sheaf," Clerkenwell J. Mazzanovich. 

SCENE. II. Clerkenwell Close J. Mazzanovich. 

SCENE. III. 114 Hatton Gardens J. Mazzanovich. 

ACT II. 

SCENE. 1. Room in Denver's House P. Goatcher. 

SCENE. II. London Railway Station J. Mazzanovich. 

SCENE. III. A Country Lane J. Mazzanovich. 

SCENE. IV. "The Chequers," Gaddesden J. Mazzanovich. 

SCENE. V. Room in " The Chequers " J. Mazzanovich. 

Three Years and Six Months Elapse. 

ACT III. 

SCENE. I. Skinner's Villa R. Marston. 

SCENE. II. Nellie Denver's Home R. Marston. 

Six Months Elapse. 

ACT IV. 

SCENE. I. Library at The Lawn, Kensington Park 

Gardens P. Goatcher. 

SCENE. II. The Grange, Gardenhurst P. Goatcher. 

SCENE. III. Outside Black Brake Wharf at Rother- 

hithe P. Goatcher. 

SCENE. IV. Black Brake Wharf P. Goatcher. 

ACT V. 

SCENE. I. Reception Room at The Lawn P. Goatcher. 

SCENE. II. Skinner's Villa R. Marston. 

SCENE. III. The Grange P. Goatcher. 



ACT I. SCENE I. "THE WHEATSHEAF" 
Street Cloth 



Door Leading to Bar\ Backing 




Left 



ACT I. SCENE II. STREET CLOTH IN 1 



ACT I. SCENE III. GEOFFREY WARE'S ROOM 

Backing 

Mreplace Backing 



Hotaetop Backing 




Right 



Left 



ACT I. 1 * 

SCENE: The Skittle Alley at the " Wheatshcaf" 
Clerkenwell. 

(Discover TUBES, TEDDY, BILCHER and drinkers. 
BlLCHER is in the midst of an excited narrative, 
the others are grouped round him at bar?) * 

BILCHER. 

And they kept like that, neck and neck the three 
of 'em till just as they were turning the corner 
drawing in home, and then Marcher put on a bit of 
a spurt, and by Jove, Blue Ribbon shot ahead like a 
flash of greased lightning and won by a short head. 
Never saw such a pretty finish in my life ! 

(Enter WARE. 1 ) 

WARE. 
(To BlLCHER.) Well, what about Denver? 

BILCHER. 

(70 WARE.) Doubled up this time and no mis- 
take. Went a smasher on Patacake and lost every- 
thing owes me a hundred and fifty pounds besides. 

WARE. 

Ah ! (Aside.) It has come at last then. (To 
BlLCHER.) You're sure you've cleaned him out) 



BILCHER. 
me and Braggins between 



Oh yes, me ana craggms between us. 
obliged to you for introducing him to us. 



Much 



1 Music taktt 
curtain /. 

1 Betinntr* 
Tuttt, Teddy, 
Bilcker, 
Jaikes, Ware, 
and othtrt. 



' Lightt up. 
FuU. 



At rise a/ 
curtain call 
Denver, 
Coombe, 
Bajctrr and 
Corkttt. 



* Gate R. V. K. 
He comet to 
Bilfker. Tktf 
go dawn U C. 



ACT I 



THE SILVEK KING 



SC. I 



* Bilcher re- 
turns to bar. 



* Gate R. u. B. 
8 Behind bar. 



Music cue. 



WARE. 



How did he take it? 

BILCHER. 

Oh, tried to laugh and joke it oft. He's as drunk 
as a fiddler ; he was pretty mellow when we started 
this morning, and we've kept him well doctored up 
all day. 

WARE. 
That's right. Keep him at it. Where is he ? 

BILCHER. 

We left him drinking at the bar at Waterloo Sta- 
tion ; but he's promised to turn up here. 

WARE. 

I'll run in and have a look at him by and by. 1 (Go- 
ing, aside.} Ruined ! Now, Nellie Hathaway, I 
think I'll show you that you made a slight mistake 
when you threw me over and married Wilfred Den- 
ver. 

(Exit WARE. 2 ) 

TUBES. 8 
So poor young Denver came a cropper to-day? 

BILCHER. 
Yes. 

TUBES. 

Poor fellow ! I'm sorry for him. He's a down- 
right good-hearted, jolly young fellow, Mr. Denver 
is. 

TEDDY. 

So he is, Tubbs, when he's sober. 

BILCHER. 

And that ain't been the last six months * Tubbs 
takes care of that. 

6 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



(Enter JAIKES l as if looking round for somebody?) 

TUBES. 

(In low -voice to drinkers at bar.) Look ! There's 
Mr. Denver's old servant he's come to look after 
his master. 

JAIKES. 

What cheer, Mr. Tubbs ? 

TUBES. 

You must give him a little extry time to-night. 
There's a good many public houses between Epsom 
and here. 

JAIKES. 

Ah, but he'll be home early to-night ; he promised 
the missis he would ; and I want to ketch him and 
pop him off to bed quiet afore she sets eyes on him, 
d'ye see? 

TUBES. 

Ah, I shouldn't wonder if he's a bit fresh, eh ? 

JAIKES. 

Anybody might happen to get a bit fresh on Derby 
Day, you know. 

TUBES. 

He's been going it a pretty pace lately, ain't he? 

JAIKES. 

Well, he's a bit wild, but there ain't no harm in 
him. Bless you, it's the blood ; he's got too much 
nature in him, that's where it is. His father was 
just like him when he was a young man. Larking, 
hunting, drinking, fighting, steeple-chasing any 
mortal spree under the sun, out all night, and as fresh 
as a daisy in the morning! And his grandfather, old 
Squire Denver, just such another. There was a man 
for you if you like. The last ten years of his life he 
never went to bed sober one night. Yes, he did one 
night, when the groom locked him in the stable by 
mistake, and then he was ill for months afterwards.' 

7 



1 Gatt R. u. B. 



1 Teddy hand* 
J a ikes stool 
vihickjaiket 
sitt ttf<m, C 



AUlaufk. 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



TEDDY. 
Oh, he could take his lotion pretty reg'lar, eh ? 

JAIKES. 

I believe you. Well, when I was a dozen years 
younger, I could take my whack, and a tidy whack 
it was too, but, bless you, I wasn't in it with old 
Squire Denver, and Master Will's a chip of the old 
block. He'll make a man yet. 1 



* Music cue. 



* R. U. B. 

\ Call Skinner. 

8 Goes to table R. 



BlLCHER. 

He'll make a madman if he doesn't leave off drink- 
ing. 

JAIKES. 

You let him be \ He's all right Master Will's 
all right \ 

(DENVER rolls in gate?) * 
DENVER. 

(Very drunk.) Yes, I'm all right I'm all right! 
I'm 's drunk as a fool, and I've lost every cursed 
ha'penny I've got in the world. I'm all right ! 3 

TUBES. 
What, backed the wrong horse, Mr. Denver? 

DENVER. 

No, Tubbs, no, I backed the right horse, and then 
the wrong horse went and won. 4 



That's a pity ! 



TEDDY. 



DENVER. 



Not a bit of it. I've lost, you've won if there 
were no fools like me in the world, what would be- 
come of the poor rogues ? 

BlLCHER. 

Well, you seem pretty merry over it. 
8 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



DENVER. 1 

Yes, Bilcher. I've lost my money to-day and to- 
morrow I shall lose your acquaintance. I'm quite 
satisfied with the bargain. 

JAIKES. 
What ? Ba.d luck again, Master Will ? * 

DENVER. 

The devil's own luck, Jaikes. I put everything on 
Patacake, and I'm ruined, Jaikes. 

JAIKES. 
No, Master Will, don't say that ! 

DENVER. 

Well, say stumped, cleaned out, licked into a 
cocked hat. Bilcher, 8 I owe you a hundred and fifty 
pounds. 

BILCHER. 

Yes, and I should like to know how I'm to be 
paid. 

DENVER. 

So should I, Bilcher ! 

BILCHER. 

Why didn't you take my advice? I told you that 
blackguard Braggins was doing you. 

DENVER. 

Yes, and Braggins told me the same about you. 
Come, Bilcher, don't be greedy * you've had a good 
picking out of me, let the other blackguards have 
their turn. 

BILCHER. 
I wash my hands of you. 

DENVER. 

Very well, Bilcher, they won't be any the worse 
for a good wash. 5 



1 Teddy replace* 
stool at bar. 



1 Goes to Denver. 



* Belcher drop* 
down L. c. 



4 Rising and 
going centre. 



Returns t 
table R. 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. I 



JAIKES. 1 
Come Master Will, you'd better come home. 

DENVER. 

Home! What should I go home for? To show 
my poor wife what a drunken brute she's got for a 
husband ? To show my innocent children what an 
object they've got for a father? No, I won't go 
home, I've got no home. I've drunk it up. 

JAIKES. 

For mercy's sake, Master Will, don't talk like 
that! 

DENVER. (Furiously?) 
Get home with you ! 



1 Grouts R. 



stable. 



Seated at table 
R. 



Yes I'll go home! 



JAIKES. 2 



DENVER. 



(Drops his voiced) Jaikes, don't let her come here 
and find me like this tell her I haven't come back 
tell her I'm not to be found tell her any lie that 
comes handiest, but don't let her see me. Be off 
now, be off ! s 

JAIKES. 

(Going.} Poor Master Will! Ruined! What'll 
become of poor Missus and the dear little 'uns? 

(Exit?} 
(BAXTER has entered*} 

DENVER.' 

(Takes out revolver?) There's always one way 
out of it. If it wasn't such a coward's trick I'd do it. 

BAXTER. 

(In a low voice to DENVER.) If you don't know 
what to do with that, I'll take care of it for you. 
10 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



DENVER. 

(Putting revolver in pocket again.} Thank you, I 
do know what to do with it, much obliged for 
your advice. (Aside.) I may want it, to-night. 1 

(BAXTER looks after him, shrugs his shoulders, goes 
to table and picks up newspaper. COOMBE enters 
directly after BAXTER. Enttr HENRY CORKETT, 1 
a young cockney clerk, flushed, swaggering, cigar 
in mouth, hat on one side.) 



CORKETT. 

(With patronising wave of hand to TUBES.) Ha, 
Tubbs, how do ? 

TUBES. 
How do, 'Any ? 

CORKETT. 

'Enery Corkett, Esquire, from you, Tubbs, if you 
please. What do you think of that, Tubbs, eh? 
(Flourishing a roll of bank notes.) Backed " Blue 
Ribbon " for a win and a place, and landed five hun- 
dred pounds. Look there ! (Flourishiug notes.) 

DENVER. 
Biggest fools, best luck ! 

CORKETT. 
(Turning round angrily.) What did you say ? 

DENVER. 

I said I wished I'd got no brains, because then I 
could make money at horse racing. 

CORKETT. 

Oh, it's you, is it, Mr. Denver? I've seen you at 
my guv'nor's place in Hatton Garden. You know 
me. My name's Corkett I'm Mr. Ware's clerk. 

COOMBE. 1 

(Aside.) Mr." Ware's clerk ! 

II 



1 Gott to co 
ter. 



1 Gait *. u. R. 
Goes straight 
to bar. 



S tail dot talk 

B. 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. i 



1 Ctittre. 



Attar, 



DENVER. 

(After staring at him a moment?) No, beg pardon, 
but I don't know you. 

BAXTER. 1 

(Aside, seeing COOMBE.) Mr. Eliah Coombe ! 
Any little game on to-night, I wonder ? A glass of 
bitter. 

CORKETT. 2 

Bitter be blowed ! Have some champagne. Tubbs, 
it's my shout. Champagne for everybody. 

COOMBE. 

(Aside, watching CORKETT.) Mr. Ware's clerk. 
If I could get hold of him it would make our little 
job easy to-night. (Rises and goes up to Skittle Alley 
with drink?) 

CORKETT. 
Come, gentlemen all, drink my health ! 

DENVER. 

Certainly ! (Raising his glass?) Here's to the 
health of the beggars that win put them on horse- 
back and let them ride to the devil ! * 

TUBBS/ 

(To CORKETT.) Don't take any notice of him. 
He's been hard hit at the Derby to-day. 

CORKETT. 

Look here, gentlemen, I'm fly ! Hang the ex- 
pense " 



* R. Goes to table 

R. and sits. 

* Corkett goes 
towards Den- 
ver but is held 
back by others. 



B Returns to bar. 



8 Gets to table L. 
and sits. 



1 Goes to head of 



5 



BAXTER. 



You young ass, put those notes in your pocket 
and go home to bed. 6 

CORKETT. 

(Turns sharply around?) Shan't ! Who are you ? 7 
Can you show as much money as that ? No ! Then 
you shut up and take a back seat. I've won my money 
12 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



fair and honest and I shall spend it how I like. 
Hang it, I shall light my pipe with it if I like. Give 
me a cigar, Tubbs. 

(TUBES gives him cigar. CORKETT strikes match?) 

(To BAXTER.) There ! That's a five pound note. 
(Lights the note with match and then lights cigar with 
note] There, that'll show you what I'm made of? 
I'm a gentleman, I am. Money ain't no object to 
me. 1 

DENVER. 

(Aside.} That fool with five hundred pounds, and 
to-morrow my wife and children will be starving. 
( To CORKETT.) Look here, you ! You've got more 
money than you know what to do with, I'll have you 
at any game you like for any stake. 



CORKETT.* 
I don't want your money. 

DENVER. 

But I want yours! If you've got the pluck of a 
rabbit, stake it, win or lose. 

CORKETT. 
Very well, what shall it be ? 

DENVER.* 
Cards Billiards, I don't care. 

CORKETT. 
Fifty up then I'm ready ! 

DENVER. 

Come on, then. Hang it all, my luck must 
change! It shall change! I will win or the devil's 
in it ! 4 (Exit?} 

CORKETT. 

Come on, gentlemen, and see the fun ! 
(Exit, followed by several of the drinkers, leaving only 
one or two at bar). 
13 



1 Re turns to bar 



1 Going L. C 



' Ristt and fo*t 



l_ 2 B. 

Music cut' 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. i 



Music cue. 
$ Call Nelly. 



1 L. tabie, and 
tits. 



COOMBE. 

(Aside.) The Spider at last ! 

(Enter SKINNER R. U. E. * Very well dressed. Light 
summer overcoat and faultless evening dress.) 

BAXTER. 

(Aside) The Spider and Coombe. There's some 
big game on to-night. 

SKINNER. 

(Glancing round.) Baxter the detective! The 
deuce ! (Goes to him) l Anything fresh in the 
paper ? 

BAXTER. 

Blue Ribbon pulled it off to-day. 

SKINNER. 
Ah, I don't bet. 

BAXTER. 

They've caught the man who committed the jewel 
robbery at Lady Fairford's. (Giving him paper and 
indicating paragraph?) It may interest you, it seems 
he was quite a swell, as well dressed as you are ! 

SKINNER. 
Was he ? The cheek of these fellows ! 

BAXTER. 

You're right they -are cheeky ! (Looks straight 
at SKINNER for some moments?) 

(SKINNER'S face remains perfectly impassive?) 
(Aside?) A cucumber isn't in it with him.* 

COOMBE. 8 

(To SKINNER.) My dear boy, I'm so glad you've 
come. 

SKINNER. 

(In a low voice without taking his eyes off the 
14 



* Rises and goes 
to bar. 



1 Has got up and 
crept dawn c. 
gets it,, of Skin- 
ner. 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT 1 



If you accost me again in a public place, I'll 
wring your neck for you, you old weasel ! 

COOMBE. 1 

My dear boy, business is business, and it's a big 
fortune for us all a sackful of diamonds in Hatton 
Garden no risk no danger, all as safe and easy as 
saying your prayers. 

SKINNER. 
How do we get in ? 

COOMBE. 

Cut through the wall of the next house. There's 
a young chap playing billiards inside 

SKINNER. 

Will you hold your infernal cackle ? Don't you 
see that man watching us ? * It's Baxter the detec- 
tive. 

COOMBE. 

(Alarmed.) Baxter the detective ? 

SKINNER. 

Yes, you fool, don't look at him. He means to 
follow me up. I'll throw him off the scent directly. 

(Re-enter CORKETT, followed by drinkers. 1 ) 

CORKETT. 

(Elated.) Landed him proper, didn't I ? Ha, 
Tubbs, pulled it off again, my boy ! 

TUBES. 
What have you won, 'Arry ? 

CORKETT. 
Rather ! Why, he wasn't in it. 

COOMBE. 

(Aside to SPIDER.) See that young sprig there 

IS 



1 Crottet in /rout 
of Skinner 
and sits L. of 

table L. 



1 Baxter kat 
noted kimttff 
at table R. 



L. 2 B. a 
to bar. 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. I 



he sleeps in the house we want to get into if we 
could get hold of him 



1 Goes up to 
counter. 



* Goes up to R. 
U. B. then 
down to L. 
table again to 
get his stick, 
crosses to R. 2. 



8 At gate. 

' R. 2 E. 



1 Coming c. 



SKINNER. 



Will you shut up ? 

CORKETT. 

Now, gentlemen, let's be merry ! Drink up I 
Look here, I've made my money like a gentleman 
and I'll spend it like a gentleman. 

SKINNER. 

Just relieve him of those notes while I draw off 
Baxter's attention. You'll be able to get hold of 
him when he's cleaned out. 

COOMBE, 

You'll be there as soon as it*s dusk a hundred 
and fourteen, Hatton Garden. 

SKINNER. 
Where's the Ancient Briton ? 

COOMBE. 
He'll be on the spot. 1 

SKINNER. 

Right ! So you want to have a finger in our pie, 
do you, Sam Baxter? 2 {Seeing that BAXTER is cau- 
tiously following him.} That's right ! Follow me 
up ! I'll lead you a pretty dance to-night. 8 (Shouts 
eft.) Hi ! Boy ! Get me a hansom ! 

(Exeunt SKINNER and BAXTER)* 

(COOMBE has in the meantime picked CORKETT'S 
pocket?) 

CORKETT. 

Now, gentlemen, I'm blowed if I don't stand you 
another bottle of champagne. I've got money 
enough (Stops short suddenly?) Here, somebody's 
stole my money. 5 

16 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



TUBES. 

What ? Nonsense ! 'Enery, there ain't no thieves 
here. Feel again. 1 

CORKETT. 

(Feeling desperately in his pockets) Yes, it's gone. 
It's gone. My money I'm robbed, I'm ruined ! I'm 
ruined ! Give me my money, do you hear give me 
my money or I'll (Seises BlLCHER, who happens to 
stand next to him, by the throat.) 

BlLCHER. 

(Shaking him off roughly) You hold off, youngster, 
or I'll smash you. I haven't got your money. 

CORKETT. 

Somebody's got it ! Somebody must have it ! 
COOMBE.* 

Come, gentlemen, no larks with the poor young 
fellow. If you've got his money give it back to 
him ! 

CORKETT. 

(Crying piteously) I'm ruined, you know, I'm 
ruined ! 

COOMBE. 

(Suddenly.) Why, of course, that man must have 
it. 

CORKETT. 1 

Which ? (Runs to COOMBE.) 

COOMBB. 

Why, the man with the billy-cock hat and check 
trousers ! (Describing BAXTER.) I saw him sneak- 
ing round your elbow he's got it. 

CORKETT. 
Which way did he go? 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. I 



* Goes to bar. 



Now back be- 
hind bar. 



COOMBE. 

This way come on ! I'll help you catch him I 
shall know the rascal again when I see him come 
on ! 

CORKETT. 

Come on, gentlemen, and help me find him. I'm 
ruined. I'm ruined. (Crying pit eously.} 

(Exit COOMBE followed by CORKETT. 1 ) 

ENTER DENVER.' 

DENVER. 

There's another man ruined. Cheer up ! We'll 
go to the dogs together. Tubbs, give me some 
brandy. 8 

TUBES. 4 

You've had enough, Mr. Denver. 

DENVER. 

I'm the best judge of that it's a free country 
anybody can drink himself to death that likes I 
will have it, I will. 8 

(Enter GEOFFREY WARE. 6 ) 

WARE. 

( Watching DENVER.) Ah, there you are, my fine 
fellow. I think my plan is working pretty well. I 
think Nelly had better have married me after all. 
Stick to it, I'll bring you to the gutter, I'll see you 
in the workhouse yet before I've done with you. 
(Comes up to DENVER, slaps him on the back cordially?) 
Well, Will, how are you ? 

DENVER. 

I'm three parts drunk and the rest mad, so keep 
out of my way, Geoffrey Ware. 

WARE. 7 

Nonsense, Will, I never saw you looking so bright 
and sober. I'm very glad for Nelly's sake. 
18 



Sits R. O/L. 
table. 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT r 



j 



DENVER. 

(Fiercely rising.) Whose sake ? 
WARE. 

Mrs. Denver excuse the slip of the tongue. She 
was once engaged to me, you know. 

DENVER. 
She knew better than to marry you, didn't she ? 

WARE. 
It seems she did, for she married you. 1 

DENVER. 

Yes, and she'll stick to me through thick and thin. 
Why, you sneaking cur, do you think my wife can't 
see through you ? Do you think I don't know why 
you're always creeping and skulking about my house 
under pretence of being my friend? Now listen to 
me, I'm going to the dogs* I'm drinking myself to 
death as fast as I can. I shall be dead in no time, 
but she won't marry you, Geoffrey Ware. She'll 
marry a sweep sooner you know, a sweep of the 
other sort I mean. Now you've got it straight, go 
and chew the cud of that, and then buy a rope and 
hang yourself. 1 

WARE.* 

Come, Will, I don't bear you any grudge for tak- 
ing away my sweetheart, I'm only too glad to see 
what a nice, kind, sober husband she's got. 

DENVER. 

I've warned you once. Take a fool's advice and 
keep out of my way. The devil's in me to-night, 
and he'll break out directly. 

WARE. 

Ah, well, take care of yourself, dear boy, for my 
sake. Give my kindest regards to Nelly. 

(DENVER rising, dashes the contents of his glass in 
WARE'S face. TUBE & BILCHER conic down and 
seize DENVER. TEDDY gets WARE away?) 

19 



1 Ruing. 



Taking uf kit 
floss and sitt 
\~qftabU. 

E.C. 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



DENVER. 

(Held by TUBES and BiLCHER.) Take that man 
away ! Take him away before I kill him. 

WARE. 

Ta, ta, Will, don't forget my message to your 
better half. (Exits. 1 ) 

TUBES. 

Now, Mr. Denver, you'd better go home, you 
know. 

DENVER.* 

No, no, let me stay here, Tubbs ! Oh, my head ! s 
(Lets his head fall on tabled) 

TUBES. 

Come away, Mr. Bilcher, perhaps he drop off to 
sleep and then we can carry him home. 4 

DENVER. 

Yes, carry me home, Tubbs, and sing " Here the 
conquering hero comes!" and then bury me and 
play the Dead March in Saul. 5 

(TUBES has beckoned all off?) 

(DENVER is alone. NELLY Enters* comes down 
behind him very timidly, he starts, turns around and 
sees her.) t 

DENVER. 
Nelly, you here ! You in this place ? 

NELLY. 7 
Yes, isn't a wife's place by her husband's side ? 

DENVER. 

Not when he's such a husband as I am. You go 
home, my darling ; you go home, I'll come by and 
by. 

NELLY. 

No, my poor Will, come now ! 
20 



l_ of table L. 
* Seated 



* Goes back into 
bar. 



* Music cue. 



8 Gait R. u. K. 



J Call Coombe, 
Corkett. 



' . of Denver, 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT 1 



DENVER. 

I've ruined you, Nell, I've lost every sixpence I've 
got in the world. To-morrow you and the chicks 
will be starving. Ah, Nell, my bonnie, bonnie girl, 
look at me what made you marry me, a drunken 
brute like me? 

NELLY. 

Because I loved you I love you still. Never 
mind the past, dear, come home and make a fresh 
start to-morrow. 

DENVER. 

I can't. I must go on. I can't stop. I'm going 
down, down as fast as I can go I don't know 
where ! 

NELLY. 

(Throwing her arms round him?) Oh, don't say 
that, dear. You must stop yourself for my sake 
for your Nell's sake. 

DENVER. 

(Stroking her face?) The sweetest and truest wife 
a man ever had, and married to such a wretch as I 
am. (Changing his tone?) Don't you come here! 
You only make me think what a brute I've been to 
you. 

NELLY. 

Oh, Will, I have just put our little Cissy and Ned 
to bed and they have said " God bless dear father! " 

(GEOFFREY WARE Enters behind unperceived. 1 ) 
DENVER. 

(Starting up maddened?) Ah ! Don't teach them 
that ! Don't teach them to pray for me. Teach 
them to curse and hate me. Go away, Nell, don't 
you see the people all staring at us? Go home, my 
girl ! I'll come home when I'm sober. Go home, 
m y g' f l & home ! (Rushes to bar?) Tubbs, give 
me some brandy, don't keep me waiting ! 

(NELLY goes a step after him and then sinks into chair 
crying?) 

21 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. i 



1 Down l of 
Nelly. 



* Rising. 



* Crosses to 

R. 2 B. 



Flourishing 

revolver. 



WARE. 1 

(To her in low voice?) Have you suffered enough ? 
NELLY. 1 

(Hiding her tears?) Geoffrey Ware ! (Aside?) 
That he should see me here ! 

WARE. 

Has he dragged you deep enough into the mire 
or will you go deeper still, to rags, to the gutter, to 
starvation ? Nelly, you once promised to be my 
wife. 

NELLY. 

Yes, and I repented even before I promised. I 
never loved you and you know it. You worried me 
into a consent, and when I found out my mistake, I 
told you of it and married a better man ! 

DENVER. 

(Whose back is towards them?) That hound back 
again, and talking to my wife. 

WARE. 

Ah, there stands the better man ! Look at him 
A pattern husband a pattern father, prosperous, 
happy, respectable, sober! 

NELLY. 

Oh, this is manly of you. What harm have I ever 
done to you ? 

WARE. 

You married him. I swore that day I'd ruin him, 
and I kept my word. Good evening, Mrs. Denver.' 

DENVER. 
(Turning?) Stop, you cur, and answer to me. 4 

WARE. 

(Coolly?) My dear fellow, you're drunk, you know 
(Exit laughing at DENVER. 6 ) 

(DENVER rushes at him. NELLY stops him.) 
22 






SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



* Both Ntlty and 
Jaiket hold 
Denver. 



NELLY. 
Ah, Will, he's not worth it. 

(TUBES and OTHERS enter from house. 1 JAIKES 

enters from gate?) 'Gate*, u. 

DENVER.* 
Let me get at him ! Let me go ! 

JAIKES. 
Master Will ! Master Will 

NELLY. 
No, no ! Will, he's not worth it. 

JAIKES. 
What are you going to do, Master Will? 

DENVER. 

I'm going to kill that man ! I'll shoot him like a 
dog ! 

(Breaks from them and rushes off.) * 

NELLY. 

(Calling after him) Will ! Will ! Stop ! Ah, 
will nobody stop him ? & 

(JAIKES and NELLY go o/.<) 

END OF SCENE I. 



SCENE II. T A Street in Clerkenwell* 
(Enter COOMBE and CORKETT.')* 

COOMBE. 

You say you don't know the numbers of the 
notes? 

CORKETT. 

No, I only took 'em off the bookmaker this after- 
noon and I never took the numbers. 

23 



* Music. 



Front tcent. 



Left. Run- 
ning ; Corkttt 
Jint, Coomt* 
following u\ 
ff/trtatk. 

\ Call Wart, 
Leafier, 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



> Corkett R. c. 
Coombe L. c. 



COOMBE. 1 

(Aside} That's lucky ! (Aloud.} Well, you see 
the man got off with them. 

CORKETT. 

Yes, and I say, you won't split on me, will yer ? 
I'd borrowed that money to put it on " Blue 
Ribbon." 

COOMBE. 

Borrowed the money ? 

CORKETT. 
Yes, eighty pounds off my guv'nor, Mr. Ware. 

COOMBE. 

Oh, I see, without his knowing, that's awkward 
that's very awkward. 

CORKETT. 

I'd got the straight tip I knew Blue Ribbon was 
a moral, and I meant to put the money back, honor 
bright I did. 

COOMBE. 

Of course you did. You was actuated by very 
honourable intentions. 

CORKETT. 

And now I shall be found out to-morrow and 
have to go to quod. 

COOMBE. 

Ah, that's a pity, and the worst of it is the judges 
are so unfeeling to parties as borrow their guv'nor's 
money without mentioning it to their guv'nors. 



Are they ? 



CORKETT. 



COOMBE. 



Oh, brutal, especially to young men as borrow 
their guv'nor's money to put it on horses. 
24 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



CORKETT. 

You don't say so. I say how long do you think 
I shall get ? 

COOMBE. 

Well, if you happen to get a nice, kind, feeling 
judge with his stomick in good working order, you 
may get off with say seven years. 

CORKETT. 
Seven years? 

COOMBE. 

Yes, but don't reckon on that. There was a 
young fellow tried at the Old Bailey a week or two 
since, for borrowing money as you've done, a hand- 
some, pleasant young man he seemed to be, just like 
you. 

CORKETT 

Yes, and what did he get ? 

COOMBE. 
Fourteen years. 

CORKETT. 1 
(Collapses!) Fourteen years ! 

COOMBE. 
Yes, I felt quite sorry for him. 

CORKETT. 1 
I say, what's it like in 

COOMBE. 

Speaking from hearsay, it ain't likely to suit a 
a young man of your constitution. It'll bottle you 
up in less than three months. 

CORKETT. 
Think so ? 

COOMBE. 

Sure of it. Skilly won't relish much after cham- 

25 



> Fall* on 
Coombt't 
shoulder. 



* KtcovertHf 
kimitlf. 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



pagne, will it ? And as for the treadmill, though it's 
a prime exercise, as a game it ain't to be compared 
to billiards. 

CORKETT. 
What can I do ? 

COOMBE. 

Well, I've took a bit of a fancy to you, and I'll 
tell you what I'll do. I'll lend you the eighty 
pounds. 

CORKETT. 

(Seizing his hand eagerly?) You will ? You're a 
brick ! 

COOMBE. 
Yes, providing you'll oblige me in a little matter. 

CORKETT. 

I'll do anything for you. You're a jolly kind old 
man and no mistake. 

COOMBE. 

You live at a hundred and fourteen Hatton 
Garden, don't you ? 

CORKETT. 
Yes. 

COOMBE. 

Who sleeps in the house beside you ? 

CORKETT. 
Only my guv'nor and the old porter. 

COOMBE. 
Your guv'nor spends his evenings out, don't he? 

CORKETT. 
Comes in about twelve as a rule. 

COOMBE. 

Well, a friend of mine wants to spend half an 
26 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT 1 



hour in your guv'nor's sitting-room to-night he's a 
photographer and he's taking views of London. 
Could you let us into the house and keep the old 
porter out of the way ? 



I say, what's up ? 



CORKETT. 



COOMBE. 



Never mind, will you help us or will you go to 
quod to-morrow ? 

CORKETT. 
I'll help you. 

COOMBE. 1 
There's a sensible young man. 

(Enter JAIKES excited. 1 } 

JAIKES. 

(Crossing.') I've lost my way in these courts and 
alleys and goodness knows what mischief's happen- 
ing (Seeing CORKETT.) Ah, you're Mr. Ware's clerk, 
aren't you ? 

CORKETT. 
Yes. Why, it's Mr. Denver's servant, ain't it ? 

JAIKES. 

Yes, come on with me to Mr. Ware's in Hatton 
Garden. Come on quick. 

COOMBE. 
(Aside.} Hillo, I must stop this. 

CORKETT. 

(Exchanging a glance with COOMBE.) What's 
the matter ? 

JAIKES. 

Murder'll be the matter if we don't stop it. My 
poor master's got the drink inside of him. He's 

27 



1 Cresset R. 
Uaves Corkttt 



1 Left. 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



beside himself, he's threatened to kill Mr. Ware. 
Come and help me get him away. 



* Coining be- 
tween Jaikes 
and Corkett. 



COOMBE. 1 

I beg your pardon, are you looking for the young 
gentleman as was drinking in the " Wheatsheaf " 
just now? 

JAIKES. 
Yes, have you seen anything of him ? 

COOMBE. 

Yes, he came out of that public house not two 
minutes ago, and he took a cab and told the driver 
to go to Charing Cross Station, didn't he? (To 
CORKETT.) 

CORKETT. 
Yes, 'ansom. 

JAIKES. 
Are you sure it was my master ? 

COOMBE. 

Oh, quite sure. (To CORKETT.) You're sure it 
was Mr. Denver, ain't you ? 

CORKETT. 
Oh yes, I'll take my oath of it. 

COOMBE. 

It's very lucky you met us. You'll find your 
master at Charing Cross Railway Station. Make 
haste. 

JAIKES. 

Thankyou, mate, thank you, I'll go there straight ! 
(Exit?) 

COOMBE. 

Yes, do, you old fool, and you won't find him. 
We shall have to look out and keep that tipsy fellow 
out of our way. (To CORKETT.) Now, my dear 
28 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



boy, you stroll on just in front of me. Don't get 
out of my sight that's it ! 

CORKETT. 

No, and if I once get out of this mess I'll never 
get into another. (Exit. 1 ) 

COOMBE. 

That's done neat and clean. Now if the Ancient 
Briton can't work in off the leads, this young gentle- 
man will open the front door for us, and all we've 
got to do is to walk upstairs. 1 (Exit?) 



END OF SCENE II. 



SCENE III. 

SCENE. GEOFFREY WARE'S sitting room in Hatten 
Garden? Window right. Table with cloth centre, 
sideboard against right wall. Door at back. 

(Discover WARE standing by table with hat on button- 
ing his gloves, also LEAKER, an old porter, at door 
L. C.)* 

WARE. 
Leaker, I'm going out, leave the door on the latch. 

LEAKER. 
Yes, sir. Shall I wait up for you, sir? 

WARE. 

No, I don't know what time I shall be back. I 
may come in in half an hour, or I may not come in 
at all. You can go to bed when you like. (Going 
out at aoo+.) Good night. 



LEAKER. 



Good ni^ht, sir.* 



(Exit WARE at back. LEAKER takes out light* and 
exit after hint.) 
29 



* Music cut. 



* Light, % / 



% Call Denver 
Coombt. 



Music cut. 

Ligktt chttk 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. Ill 



(A pause. Stage dark. CRIPPS is seen at window, he 
lifts window noiselessly and Enters very softly 
with dark lantern in his hand.) 



1 Croats L 



I. of table. 



CRIPPS. 

Coast clear, that's all right ! * (Moves away sideboard 
from wall.) This must be the spot. (Listens a 
short, faint, peculiar whistle is heard off. CRIPPS 
returns it and goes on lifting sideboard?) 

(Enter SKINNER at back?} 
SKINNER. 



All clear ? 
Yes, Captain ! 
Light ! 



CRIPPS. 



SKINNER. 



(CRIPPS turns lantern on SKINNER, helps him off 
with coat, discovers faultless evening dress-suit. 
SKINNER turns up his sleeves.)* 

Give me my tools. You'll find them in that 
pocket. 

(CRIPPS takes case out of pocket, hands it to SKINNER, 
then puts coat on front of table. SKINNER opens 
case and looks at tools.) 

CRIPPS. 3 

Beauties, ain't they ? I was a week making them 
jemmies. 

SKINNER. 

Well, it was time well spent. What the plague 
did you want me for to-night? I was just starting 
for Lady Blanche Wynter's dinner party. 

CRIPPS. 

(Measuring along wall?) What the blazes has that 
got to do with me ? If you're above your business, 
say so, and I'll crack the crib myself. 
30 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



SKINNER. 

(Takes from neat mahogany case a tool and lays it 
on table?) Give me the plan ! 

(CRIPPS gives him the plan he studies it.) 

CRIPPS. 

The safe's just the other side of this wall here. 
Thinks I when I was a-fixing up that there safe, 
" this'll be a splendid plant for us;" and the gents 
next door was extry particular about having it made 
strong. " Cause," says they, " there'll often be fifty 
pounds worth of diamonds in that there safe." 

SKINNER. 

( Who has been studying plan and not listening to 
CRIPPS.) Shut up ! Not so much cackle. Now, 
Cripps, look alive, because I must be at Lady 
Blanche's dance at twelve. 

CRIPPS. 
Blow Lady Blanche ! 

(SKINNER takes up instrument, comes to wall, is about 
to pierce it when noise of knockiug and ringing is 
heard down stairs.) 

SKINNER. 
What's that row ? 



(Enter COOMBE in great trouble.) 
COOMBE. 

My dear boy, here's that tipsy fellow down at the 
door, playing deuce and tommy, swears he'll pull the 
house down if we don't let him come up. 

(Knocking and ringing continues.) 

SKINNER. 
What's he want ? 

COOMBE. 

Mr. Ware. He won't take our word he's out- 
What can we do ? 

31 



1 L. c. door 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. Ill 



SKINNER. 
Send him up here. 

COOMBE. 

What, here ? 

SKINNER. 

Yes, tell him Mr. Ware's at home and send him up. 
(Exit COOMBE.) l 

Where's my chloroform pad ? * Oh, here it is. 
(Pours chloroform on pad.} I'll soon quiet him. 
Cripps, out with that light. Stand there ! 3 

(Stage dark. They stand behind door.} * 

COOMBE. 
There he is you'll find Mr. Ware in 



J Door L. c 

1 Gets pad from 
Pocket. 

' Music eve. 

Skinner R. of 
door, Crippi L. 



1 Door L. c. 



(Outside?) 
that room. 



(Enter DENVER 6 %vit 'h revolver, followed by COOMBE.) 

DENVER. 

Now, you hound, come out and settle accounts 
with me. Come out and show your face. Where 
are you ? 

(SKINNER leaps out on him, and puts chloroform on 
pad over DENVER'S nose. CRIPPS helps him. 
DENVER struggles but is overpowered ; they lay 
him on rug by fireplace?) 

SKINNER. 

That revolver ! Take it away from him, put it on 
the table. 

(CRIPPS takes revolver?) 

Lie there, you brute ! You won't trouble us any 
more. 

(CRIPPS is examining revolver as SKINNER crosses.) 

Put that revolver down, Cripps, anywhere on the 
table. Look alive ! Show me a light. (Getting to 
wall again?) 

32 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



(Enter CORKETT suddenly.) ' 
CORKETT. 

(In a frightened whisper!) Here, where are you ? 
I say, clear out of this all of you. Here's my guv'- 
nor coming back he's left something. Oh, crimes, 
here he is. 

(Enter WARE. He stands a moment in doorway 
strikes match. CORKETT tries to dodge by him.) 

WARE. 

(Sees him.) Hillo? What are you doing here ?* 
Who are these men ? * What business have you here ? 

SKINNER. 

We are friends of your clerk we met him at the 
Derby, and he insisted on our coming here to spend 
the evening with him, and so naturally as a matter 
of course (Coolly putting tools in box.) excuse me, 
I have an appointment ! 

WARE. 

Wait a bit, I want this cleared up ! (Sees tools on 
table.) Ah ! These are burglars' tools ! A revolver ! 
Help ! Murder ! Thieves ! * 

SKINNER. 

(Snatching up revolver and shooting WARE^ Take 
that, you fool, since you won't be quiet ! 

(WARE falls in front of table a pause.) 

COOMBE. 
My dear boy, this is terrible. 

CORKETT. 4 
He's killed him, he's killed him ! 

SKINNER. 
Cripps, back with the case sharp ! Everybody off. 

(They put back bookcase quickly.) 
3 33 



1 Doer L.C. 



1 Draft down L 



* Gott uf if 
tabU. 



*. of talk 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



CORKETT. 

We shall all swing for this. (Shows great fright?) 

SKINNER. 
You will, if you don't keep your mouth shut. 

CRIPPS. 

We must risk the leads come on we mustn't be 
seen coming out of the door. (Gets out at window?) 

SKINNER. 

(Putting on coat and coolly pocketing tools?) Look 
alive, Coombe ! Shake up that idiot ! (Indicating 
CORKETT who is paralysed with fright?) 

COOMBE. 

(Shaking CORKETT.) Come on, or else they'll 
collar you for this. (Hurries him out of window and 
gets out himself?) 

SKINNER. 1 

(Looking at WARE.) I've gone a step too far this 
time. The fool ! Why wouldn't he let me pass ! 

(Gets out of window and closes it down?) 

(Stage dark. A pause. Enter LEAKER with candle* 
rubbing his eyes and yawniug as if just wakened from 
sleep?) 

LEAKER. 

( Yawning?) I thought I heard a noise like a shot. 
I must have been dreaming. I wonder how long 
I've been asleep ? Mr. Ware not come yet. (Going 
a step or tivo and stumbling over DENVER.) Hillo ! 
Who's this ? (Stoops and looks down?) Why, it's 
Mr. Denver! How did he get in here? 3 (Kneels 
down and shouts at and shakes DENVER.) Mr. Den- 
ver ! Wake up, wake up ! 

(DENVER mutters something and stirs?) 

Don't lay there, sir. Let me assist you into this 
chair. (Shakes him?) Drunk again. D'ye hear, 
34 



1 Skinner is 

about to place 
revolver in his 
pocket when he 
sees Denver 
and places it 
on table in- 
stead. 



Lights % up. 



* Puts candle on 
mantelshelf. 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT I 



Mr. Denver, wake up ! (Shakes him and gets him 
into chair.) l 

DENVER. 

(Rousing himself and opening his eyes) Al'right ! 
Don't be in a hurry. Where am I ? 

LEAKER. 
You're in Mr. Ware's room at Hatton Garden, sir. 

DENVER. 

(In chair.) Of course I am. (Passing his hand 
over his head, drops back into chair.) 

LEAKER. 
Shall I light you downstairs ? 

DENVER. 

No, I'll go soon. Who is it Leaker? 

LEAKER. 
Yes, it's Leaker. 

DENVER. 

You know me, Leaker? 

LEAKER. 

Yes, I know you, sir. I'd better let him stay, he 
won't do any harm. (To DENVER.) I'll leave you 
the candle, sir, and you can go home when you've 
quite woke up. Well, good-night, sir, I'm going to 
bed. Mind you latch the street door when you go 
out. Good-night, sir. 

DENVER. 

Latch street door all right, Leaker. 
(Exit LEAKER D. in F. 1 ) 

(Sits tip and stares round him, tries to collect him- 
self.) What's up? What's the matter? (Shakes 
himself.) What am I doing here ? This won't do ! 
Get home ! Get home, you drunken scoundrel ! 

35 



ACT I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



Aren't you ashamed of yourself, Will Denver? 
Keeping your poor wife sitting up half the night foi 
you get home, d'ye hear, get home. (Raises him- 
self with difficulty and stares round and staggers?) 
What's the matter with my head ? I can't recollect ! 
What place is this ? ( With a sudden flash of recol- 
lection^) Ah ! Geoffrey Ware's room, I remember 
yes, yes, I said I'd kill him and Oh, my head, I'd 
better get home. Where's my hat ? (Gets up, takes 
candle, staggers, steadies himself, comes round table, 
sees WARE.) What's that? It's Geoffrey Ware) 
What's he doing here ? Get up, will you ? (Kneels 
down.} Ah, what's this? Blood! He's shot ! My 
God, I've murdered him. No ! No ! Let me think. 
What happened ? Ah yes, I remember now I came 
in at that door, he sprang at me and then we strug- 
gled. (Looking at revolver?) My revolver. One 
barrel fired I've murdered him. No, he's not dead, 
Geoffrey Ware ! Is he dead ? (Eagerly feeling 
WARE'S pulse.} No, it doesn't beat. (Tears down 
WARE'S waistcoat and shirt, puts his ear over WARE'S 
heart.} No, no, quite still, quite still. He's dead ! 
Dead! Dead! Oh, I've killed him I've killed him. 
(Rising frantically, takes up revolver and puts it in 
his pocket.) What can I do? (With a great cry.} 
Don't stare at me like that ! (Snatching off table 
cover and throwing it over body, his eyes fixed and 
staring at it unable to take off his glance} Close 
those eyes, Geoffrey close them. Ah, yes, I mur- 
dered hirr 1 ve done it I've done it murdered 
himj (Exit, his lips mechanically Jabbering.} I've 
done it ! I've done it ! I've done it ! I've done 
it! I've done it I 1 (Exit.) 

END OF ACT I. 

(A night passes between Act i and 2.) 



ACT II.* 

SCENE I. Interior of DENVER'S house* Window 
at back. Doors right and left. Small table centre of 
stage. Chairs right and left. 1 

The clock strikes six* 
(NELLY discovered at window looking anxiously off^ 

NELLY. 
Six o'clock ! Will he never come? 

{Enter JAIKES. 4 ) 
Well, Jaikes? 

JAIKES. 
I can't see nothing of him, missus ! 

NELLY. 
You don't think he has carried out his threat ? 

JAIKES. 

Not he, missus, don't you fear. Mr. Will won't 
do no harm. Now don't you sit up any longer, 
missus. 

NELLY. 

I'm used to it, Jaikes, I'm used to it. 

JAIKES. 

This sitting up o* nights is making you quite pale 
and thin, and such bonny rosy cheeks as you used 
to have in the old days. 

37 



J Be/ft utter t. 
Nelly, Jaik 



* Music to optn. 

Lights full *P 
% Call Denver. 



* Doori. 



ACT II. SCENE I. DENVERS HOUSE 
Backing 




Right 



Door 



French Window 



Chair 




| [ Chair. 




Door 



Left 



ACT II. SCENE II. RAILWAY STATION IN 1 



ACT n. SCENE in, EXTERIOR OP THE "CHEQUERS" IN 2 
Interior Backing 

poor 



Porch 



u 

Seat 




Left 



ACT n. SCENE rv. 

INTERIOR OF THE "CHEQUERS" (AN OLD VILLAGE INN) 
Wood Backing Interior Backing 




Window 




D 

Chair 



| | Chair 



Door / 

PegYm Wall 



Dresser 




Right 



Lelfc 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. I 



1 Gets down to 
chair, sits R. 
of table. 



R. of Netty. 



NELLY. 

Ah, the old days the dear old Grange. The 
happy, happy times that will never come again. 

JAIKES. 

Yes, it will, missus. I don't know how, but 
some'ut inside me prophesies as it will. 

NELLY. 1 

Bless you, Jaikes, I don't know how I shall bear 
my troubles when you are gone. 

JAIKES.* 

When I'm what, missus ? 
NELLY. 

Gone yes, we're ruined ; we can't pay you the 
wages we owe you. 

JAIKES. 

There'll be time enough for that when I asks 
you. 

NELLY. 

Ah, but we can't afford to keep a servant any 
longer you have clung to us all through, my old 
friend, but We shall have to part from you now. 

JAIKES. 
You won't find me so easy to 



Will you, though? 
get rid of. 



NELLY. 



Crosses to R. 



Ah, Jaikes, we're a sinking ship, you'd better 
leave us before we go down. 

JAIKES. 

No, missus, my voyage is pretty well over, and if 
you go down, I'll go down with you. I stuck to 
you in your prosperity I took your wages when 
your purse was full, and your hand was free, and I 
ain't going to leave you now adversity's come and 
the cupboard's empty. No ! No ! s 
38 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



1 Riv*. 



NELLY. 

Dear kind Jaikes, but you know you could go 
back to the Grange ; they want a butler, and would 
be glad to have you. 

JAIKES. 

I daresay they would, but they won't get me I 
know when I'm well off. 

NELLY. 

But I am forgetting, Jaikes, you must be very 
tired. Go and get some sleep. 

JAIKES. 

I'd rather wait with you, missus. 
NELLY. 1 

I'll call you, Jaikes, if I want any help. Go, 
Jaikes, go just to please me. 

JAIKES. 
Very well, missus, if you wish it. 

NELLY. 
There's a good Jaikes. Good night. 

JAIKES. 

Not 'good night,' missus, it's 'good morning.' 1 
(Exit JAIKES.') 

NELLY.* 
Ah ! if it were the dawn of a new and happy life ! 

(Enter DENVER/)* 
Will!* 

DENVER. 

Don't touch me ! You don't know what I am ! 
Keep away from me ! 



* Afutic. 



Goes to win- 
dow. 



Left. 

J Call Baxttr, 
tnd Dtttctivt. 



Crosut to L. 



39 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc I 



* Gets R., after a 
momentary 
look of bewil- 
derment. 



* L. of table. 



Retreats to L. 
flat. 



* Sinks on chair 
R. of table. 
Nelly gets to R. 

Coming to him. 



NELLY.* 

Ah, Will ! Not that not that ! For mercy V 
sake, say it's not true ! 

DENVER. 1 

Ah, if I could ! Yes it's true ! I've killed him ' 
Oh, if I could wipe it out ! If I could bring bach 
the past few hours ! Fool ! Fool ! Fool ! 

NELLY. 
How did it happen ? 

DENVER. 

I don't know! I was mad dazed. I went to 
his rooms, it was dark I called out for him he 
sprang upon me from behind the door we struggled 
I suppose my revolver must have gone off and 
then I I I don't know what happened. The 
next thing I remember was Leaker, the porter, woke 
me and left me and I looked round the room and 
and (Picturing the scene) there he was dead 
dead shot by me. s Look ! Look ! he's staring at 
me. Look! Look! He'll stare at me for ever. 
There ! Don't you see him ? (Pointing to the floor .) 
Hide him hide him from me ! 

NELLY. 

( With a great cry of pity goes to him and covers his 
face with her hands.) Oh, my poor Will ! 

DENVER. 

Don't touch me, I say ! There's blood upon my 
hands. 4 Oh, my poor girl! Have I brought you to 
this? 

NELLY. 6 

Don't think of me think of yourself you must 
hide! 

DENVER. 

Hide ! No ! let them come and take me, you will 
be well rid of me. 

(NELLY puts her arms round his neck) 
40 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



Don't pity me. If there is a spark of love left in 
your breast for me, crush it out. Oh, I've been 
the maddest fool that was ever sent upon this earth 
to work mischief. 



NELLY. 1 
What time was it when it happened ? 

DENVER. 

I don't know a little before twelve, I think. I've 
been rushing about the streets ever since trying to 
get away from him and from myself. 

NELLY.* 

You mustn't stay here ! This will be the first place 
they will search. You must go to one of the big rail- 
way stations and take a ticket for a long distance 
do you see make it appear you are trying to leave 
the country, and then you must leave the train at 
the first station, and so throw them off the scent. 
(Puts her arms round DENVER'S neck.*) You'll do as 
I tell you, won't you, Will ? 

DENVER. 

Oh, my wife ! Why don't you hate me ? Why 
don't you curse me? 

NELLY. 

Because you never had so much need of my love 
and of my prayers as you have now. We're wasting 
time. What money have you ? 

(DENVER feels in his pocket, takes out revolver.*) 
DENVER. 

Ah ! this cursed thing ! Take it away before I 
do any more mischief with it. 

(NELLY takes it from him?) 
NELLY. 

Never mind that now. I'll get rid of it when you 
are gone. (Puts revolver on table.) What money 
have you? 

41 



1 Behind Den- 
ver' t chair. 



* On tkt *. */ 
Dtnvtr. 



* From behind. 



4 Moves L. of 
tabli. 



Sht it ttanding 
front of chair 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



J Call Railway 
Inspector, 
Rail-way Pas- 
sengtrs, News- 
6oy, Tipsy 
Passenger, 
Lady Passen- 
ger. 



DENVER. 
Not a shilling in the world. 

NELLY. 

Nor I. Ah, you will be lost and all for the want 
of a few pounds. 

(JAIKES has enter edduring the last speech?) * * 

JAIKES. 

No, missus, he shan't. I've saved up a little 
money against a rainy day, and Master Will's as 
welcome to it as if it was his own. But what has 
happened ? 

NELLY. 

Oh, the worst ! Out of pity don't ask. Only 
help us. 

JAIKES." 
Aye, that I will. What can I do? 

NELLY. 3 

Quick, get the money. Wait ! Your master 
must have some disguise. Think what he can have. 

JAIKES. 

Yes, missus. There's my poor brother Frank's 
things. They sent 'em to me when he died. How 
will they do ? 

NELLY. 

Sailor's clothes ! They'll do. Quick ! Get them 
and put them into the portmanteau and, Jaikes, 
his top coat and hat. Hurry, it's life or death ! 

(Exit JAIKES. 4 ) 

(Goes to DENVER and puts her arms around his 
neck.} Oh, Will, you must save yourself for my sake. 

DENVER. 5 

I shan't escape they'll soon run me down, Nell. 
42 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



> NtUy It ads 
Denver to- 
wards door R., 
fautes, then fit 
retreats to 
front oftablt. 



Door*. 



*R. 



NELLY. 

Ah ! no, no, no, you must escape ! You shall ! 
Oh, how I will pray for it this night, and you will do 
your utmost for my sake ? You will find means of 
letting me know where you are ? 

DENVER. 

Yes, and the children my little Ned and Cissy 
dare I kiss them before I go ? 

NELLY. 

Yes come, they are asleep. 1 
DENVER. 

No! No! I'm not fit to kiss them! Oh, 
Nelly, when they grow up and ask for their father, 
what will you say ? (Bursts into tears.) 

(Enter JAIKES * with overcoat, hat t portmanteau and 
purse.) 

JAIKES. 8 

Here you are, Master Will. You'll find poor 
Frank's clothes inside he was about your figure. 
Here's the money there's nearly forty pounds. 

(NSLLY helps DENVER on with his overcoat^) 

DENVER. 
I can't take your savings, Jaikes. 

JAIKES. 

Don't say mine, Master Will. It all came from 
you and if the last drop of blood in my old heart 
could save you, you should have that as well. 

NELLY. 4 
Quick, dear ! you must take it. 

DENVER. 5 

Give me a few pounds and then I'll shift for my- 
self.' Here, you keep the rest for her. You'll take 
care of her, won't you, Jaikes ? 

43 



1 Takes money 
from Sttrtt. 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



3 Describes Bax- 
ter goes to 
door L. 



JAIKES. 
You needn't ask me that, Master Will. 

NELLY. 

( Throwing her arms round DENVER.) Oh, Will ! 
that ever we should part like this ! 

(Loud knock at door. 1 ) 
What's that? 

DENVER. 
They have come for me. 

JAIKES. 

(Goes to window and looks off.) A chap with a 
billycock hat and check trousers. 1 

DENVER. 
It must be a detective. What shall I do ? 

NELLY. 
This way quick, we'll try to keep him.* 

DENVER. 

Good-bye ! Oh, my wife, forgive me ! Forgive 
me ! 4 

NELLY. 
Go for your life ! 

(NELLY hurries DENVER off?) 

(Then turns to JAIKES.) Jaikes, quick to your 
room. Look out of your window. Ask the man to 
wait a few minutes. Keep him as long as you can. 6 

(Hurries JAIKES off}) 

(Sinks exhausted into chair*) Oh, my husband I 
my husband ! 

(BAXTER enters through window? NELLY hears him 
and turns with a shriek?) 
44 



Getting him to- 
wards R. door. 



Kisses Netty. 



6 R. door. 



* Music cite. 



R. of table. 



* And goes down 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



NELLY. 1 

Ah, what do you want ? 

BAXTER.* 

Mr. Wilfred Denver is he at home ? 
NELLY. 

(Making a desperate effort to appear calm.} Yes 
of course he is he is upstairs in bed. What do you 
want him for ? 

BAXTER. 8 

(Looking at her keenly.) I think you know ; but 
if you don't I'd rather not tell you. I must see him 
at once. 

NELLY. 

Yes, on what business? Can't you tell me? I 
am his wife. 

BAXTER. 
God help you then ! 

NELLY. 

Why why ? Tell me your business I must I 
will know. 

BAXTER. 

Since you will know, I want him on a charge of 
murder. 

NELLY. 

Murder ! Oh, he is innocent, he'll be able to 
explain. 

BAXTER. 

No doubt ! I must see him at once. 
NELLY. 

I'll tell him. Will you kindly sit down and wait 
a few minutes till he is dressed ? 

BAXTER. 

Mrs. Denver, forgive me, you are not telling me 
the truth your husband is not in this house. 

45 



1 Risine and 
ttanding IH 
front of tablt 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



1 Goes towards 
door L. 



* Door L. 



Doori~ 

* Gets to door L. 



NELLY. 

Yes yes, wait a few moments. What makes you 
think I am deceiving you ? Wait sit down, I will 
fetch him. 1 

(2nd DETECTIVE rushes intf 

DETECTIVE. 

Here, Sam ! Look alive ! Our man's got away 
in a cab. Quick, we'll catch him ! 

(Exit.}* 

(NELLY throws up her arms in despair? BAXTER is 
going, sees revolver on table, picks it up.) 

BAXTER. 

Revolver ! One barrel fired ! We'll see if the 
bullet '11 fit it. 

NELLY. 

(At door, clinging to BAXTER.) No, no, you 
shan't go ! 

BAXTER. 

I must do my duty ! Stand aside, Mrs. Denver, 
I must do my duty. 

(Exit BAXTER, 5 NELLY clinging to him and trying 
to stop him.) 

END OF SCENE I. 



8 Lights full up. 



7 In ist Grooves 
folding doors 
in v..flat. 

Music to open. 

% Call Parkyn, 
Binks, Bran- 
son. 

L. IB. 



SCENE II. 6 

SCENE : A London Railway Station} + 

(INSPECTOR opens doors. During scene, passengers 
of all classes enter from left and pass off through 
doors at back.) 

(Enter DENVER hurriedly 8 %vith portmanteau ; 
he glances behind him, looks furtively round.) 
46 






SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



DENVER. 

They're after me. Will they reach the station 
before the train starts? It's my last chance ! 

{Newspaper boy coming through door?) 
BOY. 



Paper, sir ? 
No! 



DENVER. 



BOY. 



Winner of the Derby, sir ! Murder in Hatton 
Garden last night. 

DENVER. 

(Starting slightly?) Yes, give me one any one 
will do. (Gives coin to boy and takes paper?) 

INSPECTOR. 

(Coming just through doors. 1 } Now, sir, quick if 
you're going by this train. Your ticket? 

(DENVER shows ticket, INSPECTOR looks at it.} 

Liverpool front carriage next the engine. Make 
haste ! 

(DENVER exit hurriedly through doors in flat?) 

BOY. 

That cove's in a big hurry. Give me a tanner 
penny for the paper, fivepence for the boy. 

(Exit. 1 ) 
(Enter a TIPSY PASSENGER. 4 ) 

TIPSY P. 

(Going up to INSPECTOR.) Excuse me, sir, I want 
to ask you a simple question. 



INSP. 



Well, what is it ? 



Wkiftle keard 
off a tecond 
whistle heard 
in reply at a 
little dutantt 
off. 



47 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



* L. of Inspector. 



* Inspector 
throws T. P. 
R. 



* Through door 
C. 



/Ji>>. enters 
door F. 



TIPSY P. 1 

I've got a third class ticket for Glasgow, guv'nor. 
(Produces ticket?) Look there, you can see it's all 
square what I wish to know is simply this does 
that include refreshments on the road ? 

INSP. 
(Angrily?) No, it don't ! 

TIPSY P. 

All right, guv'nor, no 'fence, I hope merely a 
suggestion on my part Railway Companies pr'vide 
r'freshments on the road. Splendid idea, old flow ! 
Bring you in lots of traffic. 2 

(Enter well-dressed Lady. INSPECTOR leaves TlPS" 
PASSENGER and goes up to her, touches his cap very 
respectfully?) 

INSP. 
( Very servilely?) Can I find you a carriage, madam } 

LADY. 
Yes. First class to Manchester. 

INSP. 

Yes, madam. Allow me to take your rugs and 
umbrella. 

(LADY gives up things to INSPECTOR.) 
Thank you this way, madam. 

(Bows her off very respectfully.) 9 

TIPSY P. 

That's because she's a first classer. They don't 
show me to my carriage. 

INSP. 

(Coming to door at back, rings bell?) This way for 
Rugby, Stafford, Crewe, Manchester, Liverpool 
and the North. 

(Goes off again.*) 
48 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



1 L. of kirn. 



TIPSY P. 1 

(With much tipsy dignity^ Will you kindly con- 
duct me to a third class smoking carriage ? 

INSP. 

(Has returned?) Third class smoking at end of 
the train. 

TIPSY P. 

Kindly conduct me to my carriage and open the 
door for me. 

INSP 
Get out ! Go and find your carriage. 

TIPSY P. 

No, I will not find my carriage. I will be escorted 
to my carriage. 

(INSPECTOR takes him by the scruff of the neck and 
runs him off.) 

(BAXTER rushes on. 1 ) 

BAXTER.* 
Express gone ? 

INSP.* 
Yes, three minutes ago. 

BAXTER. 

Just my luck again. I missed the Spider last 
night, and now this man's missed me. (To IN- 
SPECTOR.) Did you happen to notice a gentleman 
in a brown overcoat, brown hat, with a portmanteau * 

INSP. 

Rather dark, with small beard and moustache ? 

BAXTER. 
Yes. 

INSP. 

The very man. Came through this door about 
4 49 



L.IE. 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



1 Crosses as he 
speaks to L. 



Music cue. 

L. I B. 



8 Lights full up. 
\CallSusie. 



8 Parky*. L. C. 
Parkyn, 
Brownson be- 
side him and 
Sinks beside 
Brownson. 



three minutes ago he caught the express. 1 He's 
got a first class ticket for Liverpool. He's in the 
front carriage of the train. 

BAXTER. 
Where does the train stop the first place? 

INSP. 
Rugby nine thirty-five. 

(Exit*) 

BAXTER. 

(Takes out pocketbook and writes hurriedly?) 
" From Sam Baxter, Scotland Yard. To Police 
Station, Rugby. Meet nine thirty-five down ex- 
press, detain Wilfred Denver front carriage of train 
about thirty, dark, small beard and moustache, 
brown hat, brown overcoat. Wanted for murder." 
I'll just nip across to the Telegraph Office, then to 
Scotland Yard. We shall nab him at Rugby. 3 

(Exit BAXTER.*) 

END OF SCENE II. 



SCENE III. 6 * 

SCENE : The exterior of " The Chequers" a way- 
side Inn with deeply recessed porch towards right. 

(Discovered seated in the porch drinking and smok- 
ing BlNKS and BROWNSON, two tradesmen, and 
PARKYN the Parish clerk. PARKYN is reading 
the " Daily Telegraph"}* 

BlNKS. 

(Politely?] When you're quite finished with that 
paper, Mr. Parkyn. 

PARKYN. 

When I've quite finished with it, Mr. Binks, I'D 
hand it over to you. 

-*> 50 






SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



BROWNSON. 

Yes, Parkyn don't be greedy. Let's all have 
benefit of the news. 

PARKYN. 

I'm reading about a murder as was committed in 
Hatton Garden, London, last night. 

BROWNSON. 
Ah, I like a good murder ; it's very pretty reading. 

BlNKS. 

Ah ! it's wonderful how tastes differ. Now my 
wife, she's all for divorce and breach of promise cases. 

BROWNSON. 

So's my missus. It's my belief that women never 
look at a newspaper for anything except these spicy 
little bits. 

BlNKS. 

Well, a divorce is all very well in its way, but I 
say, Give me a jolly good murder, one as ain't found 
out for a month or two, and puzzles judge and jury 
and everybody. That's what I like. 

BROWNSON. 

Ah ! and where you ain't quite certain it's the 
right man till after he's hung, eh ? (Regretfully^) 
Ah ! we don't get such murders nowadays. 

BlNKS. 

Have they found out who done the murder as 
you're reading about, Mr. Parkyn ? 

PARKYN. 

Oh yes, a party by the name of Denver. There 
ain't no doubt about that. 

BROWNSON. 

Ah, that's a pity. It takes away all the interest 
and excitement. 

51 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



BlNKS. 

I don't wish to hurry you, Mr. Parkyn, but when 
you've quite finished with the paper. Excuse me. 

PARKYN. 
Don't mention it, Mr. Binks. 

BlNKS. 

(Aside to BROWNSON.) Parkyn gets more hoggish 
over the paper every day. 

BROWNSON. 

Read it out loud, Parkyn, and then we can all 
hear it. 

PARKYN. 

Very well, gentlemen, if it's the wish of the com- 
pany. 

BINKS. 

I think it's my turn to read out loud to-night, Mr. 
Parkyn. You read out the " Horrible affair at Cam- 
berwell " last night, and the " Revolting Tragedy " 
the night before. 

PARKYN. 

Well, Mr. Binks, and if I did, am I not the clerk 
of this parish ? 

BINKS. 

Yes, Mr. Parkyn, but because we're obliged to 
listen to you on Sundays when you've got us in 
church and we can't help ourselves, is no reason why 
you should bullyrag us a week-days when we've got 
the right of reply. 

PARKYN. 

Perhaps you are not aware, Mr. Binks, that the 
Lord Bishop of this diocese has particularly admired 
my reading of the psalms. 

BINKS. 

Very likely, Mr. Parkyn, but then the psalms is 
one thing and " The Daily Telegraph " another. 
52 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



PARKYN. 
Gentlemen, I'm in your hands. 

BROWNSON. 

Go on, Mr. Parkyn, read out let's hear all about 
this murder. 

PARKYN. 

Mr. Binks, you are in a minority. 1 (Coughs, ad- 
fusts his spectacles, looks severely at BlNKS and be- 
gins!) " A Downward Career." 

BROWNSON. 

Wait a bit, let's fill up our glasses and then we 
can start comfortable. (Calls.) Susy ! Susy, my 
dear ! 

(ENTER SUSY from house.) t 

SUSY. 1 
Did you call, sir? 

BROWNSON. 

(Giving her his glass.) As per usual, my dear. 
(SUSY takes glass 'and exits.)* 

PARKYN. 

(Reading.) "A downward career. Last night a 
shocking murder was committed at 114 Hatton 
Garden. The victim was a young engineer named 
Geoffrey Ware, who occupied the first and second 
floors of the house in question. It appears that a few 
minutes before eleven last night, James Leaker, the 
porter, and the housekeeper of the premises, went 
into Mr. Ware's room, and found there an acquaint- 
ance of the deceased, by name Wilfred Denver." * 

(ENTER SUSY 6 with glass of grog which she places in 
front of BROWNSON.) 



SUSY. 
Hot or cold, Mr. Brownson ? 



1 Parkyn putt 
paper under 
hit left arm. 
Rinks and 
Brownson 
read it fur- 
tively, Parkyn 
sees them and 
snatches paper 
away. 



J Call Denvtr. 
1 Goes to Binkt. 



Chucks Binkt 
uncle* chin 
then Parkyn. 
Parkyn rus- 
tles Paper at 
her as the ex- 
its, Binks and 
Brtnuuson 
cough. 



.Music. 



From porch C 



53 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



1 Susie tosses her 
head and ex- 
its slamming 
door. 

* Right. 



R. of porch. 



PARKYN. 

If you interrupt, Susy, it's impossible for me to 
read. 1 

(DENVER limps on* in travel-stained sailors dress, 
haggard and lame he is clean shaven and appears 
utterly prostrate and exhausted?) 

DENVER. 

(Aside.) I can't drag a step further. Let them 
come and take me and end it. (Gets to porch and sinks 
on seat?) 

PARKYN. 

(Resuming.) " And found there an acquaintance 
of the deceased, by name Wilfred Denver." 

(DENVER starts up as if shot, glances fiercely round 
at all of them?) 

DENVER. 
Well! 

(They all stare round at him.) 

BROWNSON. 
What's the matter, mate ? 

DENVER. 

(Recovering himself) Nothing I beg pardon, 
gentlemen I was thinking of something else. 
Don't take any notice of me. (Sits.) 

BROWNSON. 
Go on, Mr. Parkyn. 

PARKYN. 

(Resuming) " Wilfred Denver, a young fellow of 
good connections, who has lately been leading a life 
of gambling and dissipation and who had returned 
54 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



from the Derby in a drunken frenzy, aggravated it 
is said by heavy betting losses." 

DENVER. 
(Starting up fiercely and calls.) Waiter ! Waiter ! 

PARKYN. 

(Looking at him severely <n>er his spectacles!) I 
really cannot read, sir, if you interrupt. 

DENVER. 

(Savagely.) Who asked you to read ? Keep your 
tongue quiet for a few minutes, can't you? 



(PARKYN puts down paper in disgust, BlNKS and 
BROWNSON snatch it up and read. Enter SUSY 
from Inn) * 

SUSY. 
Did you call, sir? 

DENVER. 

Yes, something to eat. Anything there is in the 
house. Lay it in a private room. 

SUSY. 
Yes, sir. 

(Exit into house!) 

BROWNSON. 
Have they caught the man ? 

(DENVER listens attentively!) 

BINKS. 

No, but the police are after him. Here's a de- 
scription of him. " About thirty, medium height, 
well built, clean cut features, with dissipated look, a 
small beard and moustache." 

PARKYN. 

Poor fellow, I wonder how he feels to-night. 

55 



1 Sraamsem 
snatches paper 
from ground. 
Sinks 
inatchti U 
from Brovm- 
ton. Parky* 
fetlt on 
groirrdfor 
paper audit 
visibly an- 
noyed u'un kt 
finds Sinks 
has ii. 






ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



BROWNSON. 
Ah ! I shouldn't like to be in his shoes. 

DENVER. 

Are you talking about the Hatton Garden mur- 
der? 



Yes, sir, we are ! 



PARKYN. 



DENVER. 



Ah ! I know Hatton Garden very well. Have 
they discovered anything fresh ? 

BINKS. 

No, that's only the morning paper. The evening 
paper ain't come yet. 

DENVER. 

It is to be hoped they'll catch the man before 
long. 

PARKYN. 
Oh, I expect they'll soon run him down. 

DENVER. 

Yes, I expect so. (Aside?) I shall betray myself 
in another moment. 

BINKS. 
(To DENVER.) Stranger in these parts, mate? 

DENVER. 
Yes no I know them a little. 

BINKS. 
Sailor, eh ? (Noticing his clothes?) 

DENVER. 
Yes. 

PARKYN. 

Where might you be making for, sir ? 
56 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



DENVER. 
I'm going to join my ship. 

BROWNSON. 
And where might that be, mate ? 

DENVER. 

She's at at at (Starting up furiously?) What 
the devil's that got to do with you ? (Shouts.) 
Waiter ! Waiter ! 

(Enter SuSY/rw Inn.) 

Show me to a private room where these men can't 
pester me. 

(Exeunt DENVER and SUSY into house) 

PARKYN. 

(Rises.) Pester him! Why, what's the matter 
With the man ? * 

BINKS. 

(Rising) Pester him indeed ! I wonder who he 
Is? 1 (Looking after him.) o<v 

PARKYN.' 

He's a madman, that's what he is. Did you no- 
tice how he stared at us? 

BROWNSON.* * uc 

Perhaps he has escaped from somewhere. 

BINKS. 

Let's go in and put Mrs. Buddens on her guard. 
He's a dangerous character to have about the house. 8 Exuprck c 

BROWNSON. 

Yes, come on, Mr. Parkyn, we may find out some- 
thing more about him.' 

(Exeunt ALL into Inn) 
(Rapid change to interior.) 
57 






ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. iv 



1 Lights full uf. 



*L.F. 



SOt L. of table. 



SCENE IV. 1 

SCENE : Room in " The Chequers." 

(Discover DENVER hanging cap on peg.* SUSY right 
of table laying cloth,} 

(MUSIC to begin.) 

SUSY. 
You look tired. 

DENVER. 
(Getting L. of table.) Yes, my girl, I am. 

SUSY. 
What's the matter with your foot ? 

DENVER. 
Nothing. 

SUSY. 
That's a fib you're quite lame. 

DENVER. 

No, no, I've walked a good bit to-day and I'm 
dead beat. 8 

SUSY. 
Never mind, you'll be better to-morrow. 

DENVER. 

Yes, I shall be better to-morrow. Bring me some 
water, will you ? 

SUSY. 
Yes anything else ? 

DENVER. 
You get the London evening paper here? 

SUSY. 

Yes ; it generally comes about this time. 
58 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



DENVER. 

Let me have it the moment it comes. (Aside?) I 
can't help what they suspect, I must know. 

(SUSY is looking compassionately at him.) 

Don't look at me, there's a good girl, go out 
shut the door, and don't let me be disturbed. 

SUSY. 



is. 



(Going out, aside.) Poor fellow, I wonder who he 

(Exit * leaving it open.) 

DENVER. 

How long will it last ? I wonder if anyone saw 
me jump from the train. What a fearful jump ! 
What a mercy I wasn't dashed to pieces. I wonder 
what time it is. It must be about a quarter-past 
eight. A quarter-past eight. And yesterday at this 
time I was innocent ! Yesterday he was alive and 
I could laugh and play the fool, and_ now ! Oh 
rjr>^ \ pn*. hark Thy universe and give me 'yesTerday ! 
Too late ! Too late ! Ah, my wife, how thoughtful 
she was. Shall I ever see her again and my chil- 
dren Ah, Heaven, work out some way of escape for 
me not for my own sake, not to shield me from the 
just consequences of my crime, but for the sake of 
my dear wife and innocent children who have never 
done any wrong. Spare me till I have made atone- 
ment for the evil I have done. (Looks round.) I 
wonder where I am ? I must have dragged at least 
twenty miles to-day. (Sees Railway Time Table.)* 
Ah, a Railway Time Table, then there is a station 
somewhere near. (Crosses and gets Time Table and 
returns to table and sits.) 

(Enter SUSY 1 with water.) 

SUSY. 

(Pouring out water) There you are ! * 

59 



1 D. r. u.c. 



* Time TabU it 
I- o/fioer. 



D.F. 



At R. oftatU, 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. IV 



DENVER. 
Thank you, my girl. (Drinks.) 

SUSY. 
You ain't a bit like a sailor. 1 

DENVER. 
Why not ? What makes you think that ? 

SUSY. 



1 Polishing tray. 



* Polishing tray 
furiously. 



Exit door L C. 



Sailors are always hearty and jolly, and want te 
kiss me. 1 (Pauses?) I know you've hurt your foct 
I wish you'd let John the ostler see it he's as good 
as a doctor for sprains, and he'll tell you what to 
bathe it with. 

DENVER. 

No no let me alone, that's all I want, and don'1 
forget the Evening Paper. 

SUSY. 

Very well, you shall have it the moment it comes. 
(Exit leaving door open^f 

DENVER. 

I can't eat, and yet I must I must put some 
strength into me. I can't last out another day like 
this. 

(PARKYN and BROWNSON talk outside. DENVER 
sees the door open, limps up to it and is about to shut 
it when his attention is arrested.} 

Hark ! What are they talking about in there ? 

PARKYN (voice heard outside). 

I never heard sentence of death passed but once, 
and that was when I was a boy, but I shall never 
forget it. 

BiNKS. 

(Outside^ Tell us all about it, Mr. Parkyn. 
60 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



PARKYN. 

(Outside?) Well ! It was on James Beecroft, the 
Aylesbury murderer; and the jury had been over 
two hours deliberating and it was late at night, and 
the court was lighted with candles in them days. 
And one of the candles was burnt down to the 
socket and kept on drip, drip, drip on my shoulder ; 
and I couldn't stir, for we was packed at tight as 
herrings in a barrel ; and the jury came out and every- 
body was as quiet as death ; and the foreman of the 
jury gave in the verdict, and that candle went out 
the very moment as he said "Guilty." And the 
man's wife was in court and she screamed out to the 
judge to save her husband, and they had to drag her 
out of court, and she was carried out shrieking like 
a mad thing. And the judge was sobbing like a 
baby and when the court had got quiet again, the 
judge took out the Black Cap 

(DENVER slams the door furiously!) 

DENVER. 

God ! I can bear it no longer. Have mercy upon 
me, and end it now. (Comes down C.) 

(Enter SUSY with paper.) 
(He stares at her.) Well ? 



SUSY. 



Paper, sir. 1 



(DENVER takes paper from her mechanically and 
watches her out of room. She delays her Exit a 
moment looking at him. The moment she has gone, 
he opens the paper and with feverish haste looks up 
and down it.) 

DENVER.' 

What's this ? " Terrible railway calamity. 
Seven thirty-five express from Euston ' That's 
the train I was in. (Reading breathlessly.) " as- 

61 



i-of Deitvtr. 



1 Sit* L. tftabU 



ACT II 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. IV 



Rises. 
* Music. 



* D00TL. C 



4 Down L. 



cending an incline came into collision with 
some detached wagons of a goods train descending 
the incline on the same line of rail one of the 
wagons was loaded with petroleum the bar- 
rels burst with the shock, the vapour of the oil came 
in contact with the engine fire and in a moment the 
front part of the train was wrapped in fierce and inex 
tinguishable flames. The three front carriages, with 
all their occupants, were burning for upwards of an 
hour and were unapproachable on account of the in- 
tense heat. Nothing was left of them but cinders. 
Amongst the ill-fated passengers was Wilfred Den- 
ver " "who committed the murder in Hatton Gar- 
den last night " What's this ? " and who has thus 
paid the last penalty of his crime in the very act of 
flying from justice." (Reads again.} 



ill-fated . passagexs,.was..Wj]frecL Denv-er " Yes, it 
is here ! " paid the last penalty of his crime." Then 
I am dead dead to all the world. 1 Dead ! Yes, 
dead ! 2 

(Kneels.') Merciful Father, Thou hast heard my 
prayer and given me my life. I take it to give it 
back to Thee. My wife ! She will see this and 
think me dead. Ah ! better so, better so than to be 
tied to a murderer ! (Rises.) Yes, my darling, I have 
done you harm enough ! Now I will set you free. 

(Enter SUSY. 3 ) 
How far is it to the station ? 

SUSY.* 
A mile, sir. 

DENVER. 
There is a late train down to Bristol, is there not? 

SUSY. 
Yes, sir, the down night mail. 

DENVER. 

Order a horse and conveyance to meet it at once. 
62 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT II 



Yes, sir. 



SUSY. 

(Exit. 1 ) 
DENVER. 



I shall reach Bristol to-night Wilfred Denver is 
dead ! Tcvmorrow I begin a new life !_" 

END OF ACT II. 



1 /?<*> ue 



1 Mutic fortt /09 
curtain. 



Bight 



ACT III. SCENE I. "THE SPIDER'S VILLA" 
This Scene is also Act V, Scene I. with a Door R instead of Fireplace 

Snow Backing 




Window 



Curtains to Window 



Armchair 




Cabinet 

Q 

Armchair 




Door 



Left 



Right 



ACT HI. SCENE II. SNOW SCENE 
Snow Cloth 



Interior Backing 



Railings 



Railings 



Q Door 


=3 


Tu 


Small Table Door/ 


Porch 


Doid Chair <{_ 


J 




o Small 




fe 






4 Old 




o 

D 






Table 




C 
^ 




Bench 




- _ 





Steps 




Left 



J Beginners. 
Skinner^ 
Olive. 

This scene is 
built on a plat- 
form dividing 
in the c. to 
wheel off at 
change. 

1 Lights full up. 
Music to open. 

*R. 

\ Call Coombe, 
Cripps, Ser- 
vant. 

' R. c. by win- 
dow. 

Coming down 
to Skinner, 



ACT III. * 

(SCENE I. SKINNER'S villa at Bromley. A 
luxuriously furnished apartment. Door right, 
window at back shelving a snowy landscape outside. 
Fireplace right, with large comfortable fire burning. 
Door left.) 

(Discover OLIVE SKINNER at window locking out. 
SKINNER is seated 2 in a luxurious arm-chair near 
fire. He is reading a French novel.) * 

OLIVE. 8 

More snow! 4 Herbert, you don't really mean to 
turn that poor woman and her children out of that 
wretched cottage ? 



Yes, I do ! 



Why? 



SKINNER. 



OLIVE. 



SKINNER. 



They are starving, one of the children is dying. 
I object to people starving and dying on my prop, 
erty. 

OLIVE. 
But what will they do? Where will they go ? 

SKINNER. 

There's a nice comfortable workhouse about two 
miles off. 

64 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



OLIVE. 1 

But surely, Herbert 

SKINNER. 

Now don't argue, Olive, the woman can't pay her 
rent she must go ! 

OLIVE. 
But it isn't her fault she is poor.* 

SKINNER. 

Fault! It's no fault in England to be poor. It's 
a crime. That's the reason I'm rich. 

OLIVE. 

Rich ? When I think how our money is got, I 
grudge the poorest labourer's wife her crust of bread 
and drink of water.* 

SKINNER. 

Ah, that's foolish. My dear Olive, all living crea- 
tures prey upon one another. The duck gobbles up 
the worm, the man gobbles up the duck, and then 
the worm gobbles up the man again. It's the great 
law of nature. My profession is just as good as any 
other, till I'm found out. 

OLIVE. 4 

When you talk like that I hate you. Your pro- 
fession, indeed ! Burglary burglary and (In a 
whisper.) murder ! 

SKINNER. 

(Starts up with a 'frightened look and seizes her by 
wrist.) If you remind me of that cursed affair again 
I'll I'll (Dropping her hand.) There, don't be a 
fool, Olive, don't do it again, there's a good girl. 5 

OLIVE. 

You're not quite deaf to the voice of conscience, 
it seems. 

5 65 



1 Puts her arm* 
on tht back of 
hit chair. 



Pause, fttt to 
iuork-tablt. 



Pause. 



* Risttfott t 
him. 



' Sluts into a 
chair, deadly 
quiet, and 
ttares in front 
of him. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. l 



SKINNER. 
I wish to goodness I could be deaf to your voice 



1 Gets back to 
work-table 
and sits. 



1 Rising and 
putting his 
arm on the 
mantel-piece. 



Turning to 
Olive. 



* Doori* 

\ Call Corkett. 



8 L. door. 



' Skinner crosses 
to L. Olive 
gets up to -win- 
dow. 



L. D. 



occasionally. 



OLIVE. ] 



Herbert, can't you make some reparation, can 
you not do something to wipe the stain off that 
man's memory ? 

SKINNER. 

No, I can't ! * Shut up ! What a fool I was to 
tell you. 

OLIVE. 

Do you think I would have let you tell me if I had 
guessed what your secret was? I've not had one 
peaceful moment since. 

SKINNER. 3 

No, and what's more, you haven't let me have 
one either. For Heaven's sake, Olive, don't look 
like that, or you'll be old and ugly in no time. 
Let's forget the cursed thing. 

(Enter SERVANT.) * * 

(To SERVANT, his manner entirely changed') 
They've come ? 



Yes, sir. 
Send them up. 



SERVANT. 

SKINNER. 



(Exit SERVANT.) 5 
(OLIVE rises and is going out?) 

You'd better stay one must be polite to one's busi- 
ness acquaintances. 6 

(Enter SERVANT 7 showing in COOMBE and CRIPPS.) 

(Exit SERVANT.) 
66 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



COO M BE. 

My dear boy ! 



(To OLIVE). 1 



(To SKINNER.) 1 
How d'ye do, ma'am ? 

(He holds out his hand to OLIVE, she shrinks from 
taking it. SKINNER throws her a look of com- 
mand, she then shakes hands with COOMBE.) 

CRIPPS. 3 

(Is smoking a short pipe, does not take off his hat, 
nods familiarly to OLIVE.) My respects, ma'am. 
(Looks round the room.} Spider, this is a blazing 
snug crib you have got here. 

SKINNER. 4 

Yes, pretty well. By the way, Cripps, I wish 
you'd be a little more careful in your selection of 
adjectives. 

CRIPPS. 5 

What's the matter with my adjectives ? Them as 
don't like my company can leave it. 

OLIVE. 8 

Then there's no occasion for me to stay, I think. 

CRIPPS. 

(Seated in easy-chair stretching out his legs and 
smoking short pipe.} Not a bit, ma'am. No offence 
to you, but I hates a parcel of women folk poking 
their noses where they ain't wanted. There ! 
That's what I call business. There ain't no non- 
sense about me. 

SKINNER. 
No, nor any superfluous politeness. 



CRIPPS. 
I hates politeness. I hates folks as are civil and 

67 



1 A dvancing to 
kirn. 

1 Afttr crossing 
taker. 



Sit* in chair L. 



* Crossing to L. 
and txits door 
L. 



* Skinner of ens 
the door for 
her, then 
comes to c. &# 
tvueen Coomtt 
and (.'riffs. 
The former 
hat seated 
himself in 
chair oy work- 
table. Skin- 
ner fasses 6e- 
hind (.riffs to 



stuck up. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



c. 



* Crosses to R. c. 



* Is seated in 
chair by work- 
table. 



' Leans against 
the arm of 
chair. 



SKINNER. 1 

My dear fellow, consider the dignity of our pro- 
fession. There's no reason why we shouldn't be 
gentlemen. 

CRIPPS. 

Gentlemen ! There's nothing of the gentleman 
about me. 

SKINNER. 

Hush, don't tell us so, or we shall begin to believe 
it by and bye. 2 

COOMBE. 3 

Now, my dear boys, let's get to business. 

SKINNER. 

Fire away, Father Christmas ! * I'm all attention ; 
but before we set out for fresh woods and pastures 
new, let's square Lady Blanche's diamonds. Where 
are they ? 

COOMBE. 

Down at my wharf by the river along with the 
other swag. 

SKINNER. 
Who looks after that place now ? 

COOMBE. 
It's locked up at present. 

SKINNER. 

That won't do, you know you must keep some- 
body there somebody you know. 

COOMBE. 
You can't spare one of your people, I suppose ? 

SKINNER. 

No, I'm very comfortably suited just now. My 
coachman has just done eighteen months ; my cook's 
68 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



a jewel she's the one that stole Lord Farthinghoe's 
silver I always like to encourage enterprise. My 
housemaid was born in Durham jail, and my footman 
I took out of charity when his father went to do his 
fourteen years. In fact, I haven't a soul about the 
place that I can't trust. 

(Enter SERVANT.) ' 

SERVANT. 
The Duke of New York's below, sir. 

SKINNER. 

That fellow ! Give him a bit of dinner and kick 
him out of the place. 

SERVANT. 
He says he must see you, sir. 

SKINNER. 
(Shrugs his shoulders.} Send him up. 1 

SERVANT. 3 

Here he is, sir. 

(Enter CoRKETT door, * seedy, half starved, dirty, 
shivering, unshorn, ragged, his hair cropped as if 
just out of prison!) * 

(Exit SERVANT.) 5 
COOMBE. 6 

Dear me! Why, it's our dear old friend, Mr. 
'Enery Corkett. 

CORKETT. 7 

Your old friend. A pretty hole you let your 
friends into. 



COOMBE. 

My dear boy, what was we to do ? Why, it might 
have happened to any of us. 

69 



1 Goes tofirt. 
' Looking ojf L 



% Call Ntlly. 
Doorl~ 
Rises. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



1 Seated in arm- 
chair. 



* L. ef 'Skinner. 



1 Coombe Kat 
seated himself 
+. of table. 



CORKETT. 

All my eye, Father Christmas. You were wide 
oh, you three, and you meant to let me in. There's 
Spider there, (Goes to SKINNER.) Now then, Mr. 
Spider, can't you speak to an old pal ? 

SKINNER. 1 

So ! you're out again, are you ? 

CORKETT. 1 

Yes, I've just done the twelve months as you 
ought to have done. 

SKINNER.* 

Very well, don't brag about it, and perhaps you'll 
get another twelve months. 

CORKETT. 
Oh no, I shan't, I'm going to turn honest. 

SKINNER. 

Very well you make an infernally bad rogue, 
Corkett I don't know how you'll answer in the 
other line. My private opinion is you won't be a 
credit to either. 

CORKETT. 

I ain't going to be your tool and cat's-paw any 
longer. 

SKINNER. 
Very well. 

CORKETT. 

Here you are living in bang up style, surrounded 
by every luxury. 

SKINNER. 

The fruits of years of honourable industry. 
70 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT ir 



I Stated i* chair. 



CORKETT. 

While I ain't got the price of a glass of bitter. 

SKINNER. 
Try a few bitter reflections. 

CORKETT. 
No, I shan't ! I shall try honesty. 

SKINNER. 1 

Do it's always the last resource of people who 
fail as rogues. 1 

CORKETT. 

And mind you, Spider, once I do turn honest, I 
shall turn damned honest, and make it jolly hot for 
all of you. 

Coo M BE. 2 

Come, come, you know what the Spider is, you 
must brush him the right way of the wool.* Now 
we've got a splendid plant on, ain't we, Spider, and 
he shall stand in. 



No, I'm d- 



SKINNER. 
if he shall. 

COO M BE. 



(Aside to SKINNER.) My dear boy, we must keep 
his mouth shut or else he'll go and blab about that 
Hatton Garden affair. 

SKINNER. 

Corkett ! Corkett !* I'm not to be bullied, but if 
you behave yourself, I don't mind doing something 
for you.' 

CORKETT. 

All right, I'm fly ! Let's have some dinner to 
start with. I've got rats inside of me. What time 
do you dine, Spider? 

7' 



Comet to Cor- 
kett and fttt 
hint c. 



* Corkett foes H 
to cabinet at 
tack. 



Corkett foft t 
kirn. 

Coombe c. dift 
Corkett in 
ribs. Corkett 
digt him back 
Coombe then 
tits chair K. of 
table. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



* Doori~ 



SKINNER. 
Seven. 1 But pray don't wait for me. (Rings.) 

CORKETT. 

I won't ; I'll have some lunch now, and then I'll 
dine with you by and bye. 

SKINNER. 

We always dress for dinner. Mrs. Skinner makes 
a point of it. 

CORKETT. 

Very sorry, Spider, I've left my dress togs with 
my uncle. You'll have to excuse morning dress this 
time. 

(Enter SERVANT.) 2 

SKINNER. 
Some lunch for this gentleman. 

CORKETT. 
And some wine, Spider. 

SKINNER. 3 

Some claret for the gentleman. 

CORKETT. 
Claret be blowed. Let's have some champagne. 

SKINNER. 
Some champagne for the gentleman. 

CRIPPS. 

(Rising?) I think I'll join the gentleman. I've 
had one dinner, but mine's a wonderful accommo- 
dating sort of stomach. 

(Exeunt SERVANT and CRIPPS.)* 

CORKETT. 
Au revoir (Going.) Spider meet you at dinner. 



Door'L. 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



* R. C by firt, 
looking after 
him. 



* Gels to C. 



4 Door l. 



Seven, I think you said. (Aside.) If I can't take it 
out of Spider, I'll take it out of his champagne. 

(Exit.) 1 * Door 

SKINNER. 2 

The brute ! If he gets a spoonful of wine into 
him, it'll fly into the place where his brains ought to 
be, and he may open his mouth too wide. Coombe, 
you'd better go and look after him. 8 

COOMBE. 

All right, my dear boy. Anything for an honest 
living. 

(Exit.)' 

SKINNER. 5 

That cursed Corkett turned up again ! Am I 
always to be reminded of that ? I wish they'd all die. 
I'll cut the whole gang after my next ' coup,' disap- 
pear, retire to some quiet country place, go to church 
regularly, turn churchwarden and set an example to 
all the parish. 6 

(Enter OLIVE showing in NELLY. She is haggard, 
pale and very poorly dressed?) T * 

OLIVE. 

(To NELLY.) Come in. Here is my husband 
you shall speak to him yourself. 

SKINNER. 

What is it now? Do shut that door. 

(NELLY shuts door.) 
What is it ? 

OLIVE.' 

This is the poor woman who lives in the gardener's 
old cottage. 

73 



Goes tofirt 
and sit* in 
arm-chair. 



r They enter by 

L. door. 



t Calljaiket. 



* At back ef kit 
ckair. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



1 Centre. 



1 Olive gets to 
window. 



* Turning to 
Olive. 



Gets L. 



NELLY. 1 

Mercy, sir, mercy on a starving woman and a dying 
child. 

SKINNER. 

My good woman, you'll be much better off in 
the workhouse. You will be provided with food 
and your child will be attended by a doctor. 

NELLY. 

But he will die it will kill him to move him this 
bitter weather. Have mercy, sir, have mercy ! J 

SKINNER. 

Now please don't make a scene. I've made up 
my mind to pull down that cottage. It isn't fit for 
a dog to live in. 

NELLY. 

Then let me live in it, and my children, only fora 
few days only till my child is better or dead. 

SKINNER. 

Yes, that's just it ! Your child may die and I 
don't wish him to die on my property, a hundred 
yards from my door. I dislike death, it's a nuisance, 
and I don't wish to be reminded of it. 

NELLY. 

Ah, but think of it, it's the last chance for my 
child. If you turn us out to-night, my boy will die. 

OLIVE. 
Oh, Herbert, think what you are doing! 

NELLY.* 
Oh, thank you for that. Beg him to let me stay. 

OLIVE. 

I have no influence over my husband. 1 
74 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



1 Riies and 
ttandt with 
back tofirt. 



SKINNER. 

(To NELLY.) Have the goodness to believe I 
mean what I say. 1 

(NELLY kneels to him.) 
Now get up, there's no need to kneel to me. 

NELLY. 

Yes ! yes ! there is much need. You shall not 
say me 'no. 1 Oh, I'm sure you are good and kind 
at heart you do not wish my boy, my brave, beauti- 
ful boy to die. Ah, you are listening you will have 
mercy yes, yes, yes ! 



SKINNER. 

(After a pause) Very well. If you don't bother 
me any more you can stay till your child gets better. 1 

NELLY. 
(Rises.) God bless you ! God bless you ! 

SKINNER. 

Yes, we know all about that. Now go away and 
don't make any more fuss.* 

NELLY. 

Oh, but I can't help thanking you and * you too 
with my whole heart. 

SKINNER. 
There, that'll do, Olive, show the woman out. 

OLIVE.' 

Will you come this way, Mrs I don't know your 
name. 

NELLY. 

My name is Nelly. (TV SKINNER.) Thank you 
again and again. You have saved my child's life. 

(Exeunt OLIVE and NELLY.)* 
75 



1 Gott to fir* 



* Olivt crotttt R 



TurnitiftO 
Olivt. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. I 



IL.D. 



8 Crosses to 
Coombe, 



L.O 



(COOMBE Enters l almost instantaneously, looking 
scared?) 

SKINNER. 
What's the matter now ? 

COOMBE. 

(Pointing out after NELLY.) That woman! That 
woman ! 

SKINNER. 

Well, what of her ? What's the matter, man ? 
Have you seen a ghost ? 2 

COOMBE. 3 

I knew her again in a moment. 

SKINNER. 4 

Who is she ? 

COOMBE. 
Denver's widow. 

SKINNER. 
You must be mistaken. How do you know her? 

COOMBE. 

They pointed her out to me at the inquest on 
Ware's body. I'm not likely to forget her. 

SKINNER. 

(Aside.) That man's widow here at my door. 
(Stands pale and speechless, for a few moments, 
then in a low, hoarse voice speaks to COOMBE.) 
Coombe, you can do this job for me. 



What? What? 



COOMBE. 



SKINNER. 



My wife has got a maggot in her brain about that 
76 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



Hatton Garden accident. If she finds out that this 
woman is Denver's widow, she'll make my life a pur- 
gatory and the whole business'll leak out. 

Coo M BE. 
What's to be done? 

SKINNER. 

She's living in that old tumble-down cottage of 
mine you know. She can't pay her rent she's 
had notice to quit for the last fortnight go and get 
some men and turn her and her belongings out of 
my place. 

Coo M BE. 
All right, leave it to me. 



Do it at once. 



It's done. 



SKINNER. 



Coo M BE. 



(Exit.) 

SKINNER. 

Denver's widow ! Lucky I found it out and can 
bundle them out. They can do their starving some- 
where else they shan't do it on my property. 1 



END OF SCENE I. 



SCENE II. 4 

SCENE : NELLY DENVER'S home, 
interior and school/louse? 



Winter. Cottage 



(Enter NELLY from inner room of cottage. She 
pauses at the door and looks in again, speaking as 
she looks.) 

77 



1 DoorL. 



1 Music. 
* Doori- 



Light, %. 



Mtttic to Ar/M. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



J Call Cissy and 
all tchool 
children. 



* Crosses stage. 

* R. of table. 



Hanging his 
hat on a peg. 



NELLY. 

Sleep on, my darling boy ! You are happier so. 
You do not feel you are hungry, and you do not tear 
your poor mother's heart by begging for the food 
she has not got to give. 

(Enter JAIKES 1 through stile with bundle of sticks and 
some coal in an old sack. He is beating himself to 
keep warm.) t 

JAIKES. 
This is a freezer and no mistake.* (Enters cottage) 

NELLY.' 
(Eagerly.) Well, Jaikes, any success ? 

JAIKES. 4 

Success, missus, rather ! Things is looking up. 
What do you think ? I'ye been and earned a shill- 
ing this afternoon. 

NELLY. 

(Joyfully.) A shilling, Jaikes? 

JAIKES. 5 

Yes, a whole shilling, straight off ! Earned it all 
in a couple of hours. There it is ! (Puts shilling on 
table) 

NELLY. 

Oh, Jaikes, isn't that lucky ! I was just wonder- 
ing whether we should have anything to eat to- 
night. 

JAIKES. 

Eat ! Lor' bless you, we'll have a reg'lar Lord 
Mayor's banquet. What did the gentleman say 
about letting us stay on ? 

NELLY. 

At first he was very hard and cruel and said we 
78 



L. of talk. 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



must go, but I went down on my knees to him and 
begged so hard and wouldn't take ' no/ till he was 
obliged to say we might stay till Ned was better. 

JAIKES. 

Bless your sweet, pale face, missus, he must have 
had a heart made of brickbats if he could have said 
4 no ' to you. 1 

NELLY. 

And so you see we haven't got to turn out after 
all, Jaikes. 

(JAIKES begins to put sticks and lay fire?) 
You have brought some wood and some coals ? * 



1 Crosses to fire- 
plaee B. 



1 Gttt L. of him. 



JAIKES. 

Yes ; you see it gets a bit chilly towards the even- 
ing, and I thought a fire 'ud look cheerful. 

NELLY. 
Where did you get the firing from, Jaikes? 1 

JAIKES. 
I begged it off Bodgers the baker. 

NELLY. 

Bodgers the baker that dreadful hard-hearted 
man ? 

JAIKES. 

Oh, Bodgers is all right once you get the right 
side of him, though judging from Bodgers 'squint 
you'd think he was capable of anything, 

NELLY. 

And how did you manage to get the soft side of 
him? 4 

JAIKES. 

Well, I went to work artful ; you see, Bodgers's 
missus is a regular downright tartar. 

79 



* Gets matches 
from the man- 
tel-piece. 



* Lights match 
and fives it to 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



1 Lights fire. 



' Rises and puts 
sack up stags 



8 Kneels by fire. 



4 Coming down 
L. of table. 



* Rise*. 



NELLY. 



Is she ? 



JAIKES. 

Oh, yes, she leads Bodgers a dreadful life. It's 
no wonder he squints * with such a wife as he's got. 
Well I hangs about the bakehouse and sympathises 
with Bodgers, and says all the hard things as I could 
invent about womenkind. Oh, I laid it on thick ! * 

NELLY. 
But you didn't mean it, Jaikes ? 8 

JAIKES. 4 

Not I, missus. My private opinion of women is 
as they're angels, you in particular, missus. Well, I 
kept on helping Bodgers and a sympathising with 
him, and Bodgers, he says, " I know what you're 
after, you old vagabond," says he. 

NELLY. 
He called you an old vagabond ? 

JAIKES. 
Yes, but I didn't take no notice of that. 

* 

NELLY. 
No, put it down to his ignorance. 

JAIKES. 

Yes, that's what I did, '' You're after a job, you 
old scarecrow," says he. " Now be off ! Get out, 
'cos I shan't employ you," and he takes a shilling 
out of the till and chucks it down at me, and I picks 
it up and I says, " I takes it, Mr. Bodgers, just to 
show the respect I've got for you, and 'cos I know 
you'd be offended if I didn't 

NELLY. 

That was clever of you, Jaikes, to earn a shilling 
in that way. 5 

80 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



1 Putt ckair . 
of table. 

sa. 



Got* L. o/tabl* 



JAIKES. 

It was artful, wasn't it ? And now, missus, what 
shall we do with it ? l 

NELLY. 2 

Well, Jaikes, it's your money. 

JAIKES. 8 

No, missus, I only earned it for you and the dear 
little master and missy. 

NELLY. 
Well, what do you think, Jaikes? 

JAIKES. 
Faggots is cheap and relishing. 

NELLY. 
I don't think they like faggots. 

JAIKES. 

No ? What do you say to some nice red herrings 
soft roe'd 'uns ? 

NELLY. 

Yes, red herrings are nice, but do you think, Jaikes, 
there is enough support in them for growing 
children? 

JAIKES. 

Well, perhaps there ain't, but there's plenty of 
flavour. (Suddenly.) I've got it, missus ! 



NELLY. 



Well, what, Jaikes ? 

JAIKES. 

Saveloys ! After all, there's nothing like saveloys, 
is there ? Talk about your partridge, your venison, 
and your 'are, why, I've tasted saveloys as 'ud give 
6 81 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



'em all a start if it came to a question of game. But 
there, missus, you take the shilling and spend it how 
you think proper. 



1 Rises and puts 
back chair. 



* Puts on her 
bonnet and 
shawl. 



l_ of tabU. 



Gtts to fire. 



NELLY. 1 

You may be sure I shan't forget half an ounce 
of tobacco. 1 

JAIKES. 

Tobacco now don't you, missus, I've given up 
smoking. 

NELLY. 
Given up smoking, Jaikes ? 

JAIKES. 3 

Yes ; you see, missus, there's so many boys have 
took to it lately I thought it was about time for 
men to leave off.* 

NELLY. 

Well, I shall insist on your having a good hearty 
meal with us. 

JAIKES. 

Now don't you, missus. I ain't hungry. I've 
been smelling the dinners at Bodgers' all day, and 
what with his roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, his 
beefsteak and kidney pie, roast duck and stuffing, I 
sniffed and sniffed at them till I got a reg'lar attack 
of indigestion. 

NELLY. 

Well, if you don t manage to find a great big ap- 
petite before I come back, there'll be such a to-do 
in this house as never was. 

JAIKES. 

Don't I tell you, missus, I ain't hungry. Now 
you make haste and get something for Master Ned 
by when he wakes. 
82 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



1 Draft dffam L. 

of table. 



*Gelt to . e) 

tabU. 



NELLY. 

(Going to inner door and looking off.) Look, Jaikes, 
how pretty he looks in his sleep. 

JAIKES. 1 

(Going to inner door.} Yes, bless his heart How 
much he do remind me of but I mustn't say that, 
must I ? 

NELLY. 

Yes, say it, Jaikes I like to think of him my 
dear dead Will ! Whatever his faults, he was always 
the best of husbands to me. (Crying a little, then 
wiping away her tears.) But there, I mustn't cry to- 
day now we've been so fortunate. Oh, Jaikes, I feel 
so much happier. I think we shall weather the 
storm after all.* 

JAIKES. 

Why, of course we shall, now I can go and earn 
shillings off-hand like that. 

NELLY. 

(Taking JAIKES' hands and swinging them back- 
wards and forwards in her own.} And the cruel 
winter will soon be over. 

JAIKES. 
And the nice warm spring days will come. 

NELLY. 
And darling Ned will get well and strong again. 

JAIKES. 

And I shall get lots of work and earn heaps of 
money. 

NELLY. 

How happy we shall be ! 

83 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



JAIKES. 

Lor' bless you, missus, we shall get on like a house 
afire now. 

NELLY. 

Dear old Jaikes ! Wait here, Jaikes, I'll be back 
soon, and then we'll have our Lord Mayor's Banquet 
all together. 



1 L. 2 B. 

J Call Denver. 

* Crossing to 
fire. 



' Speaks as he 
crosses stage. 



L.O. E. 



(Opens door, crossing stage, Exit.) 1 * 

JAIKES. 

Blow up, Bodgers ! * (Poking up fire) There ! 
That's a blazing up beautiful. We shall soon have 
quite a Fifth of November. Master Ned's asleep- 
ing as sound as a top Miss Cissy will be out of 
school soon and she'll take care of him. I wish I 
could earn another sixpence. We can't have much 
of a Lord Mayor's Banquet with a shilling, but with 
eighteen pence, what a treat we could have. (Exit 
from cottage)* I'll try ! I'll try ! There's life in 
the old dog yet. 

(Exit * running feebly and beating his arms) 

(CHILDREN in school sing the following hymn. After 
first verse enter DENVER. 5 He has changed very 
much, his hair is almost white, and his face worn, 
his manner grave and subdued. He enters listen- 
ing to the children's voices. The hymn is sung to 
the accompaniment of an harmonium) 

ist Verse. 

What though my sins as mountains rise 
And reach and swell to Heaven, 

Yet Mercy is above the skies 
I may be still forgiven. 

2nd Verse. 

Then let me stay in doubt no more 

Since there is sure release, 
For ever open stands the door, 

Repentance, Pardon, Peace. 
84 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



DENVER. 1 

Repentance, Pardon, Peace ! The old, old mes- 
sage ! The sweet old message ! That must be for 
me yes, even for me. 1 

They are coming out. Perhaps I shall be able to 
get some news of my dear ones. I have tracked them 
so far, from one wretched home to another Shall I 
ever find them, or find them only in the grave?* 

(CHILDREN come out of school? skipping, shouting, 
laughing, etc. ClSSY DENVER comes out among 
the others ; they are laughing, romping, and play- 
ing. She stands apart for a moment and then goes 
timidly up to them.} 

CISSY.' 
Let me play with you ! 

BIG GIRL.* 

No, come away from her, girls ! Nobody is to 
speak to her. (70 ClSSY.) Our fathers and mothers 
are respectable. Come on, girls ! 

(Exeunt all t/ie school-girls but one." 1 ) 

(ClSSY is left sobbing when the little school-girl who 
has stayed behind goes up to her and offers ClSSY a 
piece of cake.) 

LITTLE GIRL. 

There, Cissy, don't you cry. I've got a piece of 
cake. There (Giving cake.) don't you tell anybody 
I love you if the others don't. 

(Kisses ClSSY and runs off. 6 ) 

DENVER.' 
Why are you crying, my dear ? 

CISSY. 10 

The girls won't play with me. They won't 
speak to me. 

85 



1 Sinking on 
bench L. c 



1 Noise of chil. 
dren in school. 



* Retire* 
stage. 

L.J.. 



USB. 



L. a B. Cisty it 
crying. 

Denver comet 

down to City. 



R. o/Denvtr. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



DENVER. 

Why how's that ? What makes them so cruel ? 
(CISSY is silent.} 

Come, tell me all about it. You're not afraid of 
me, are you ? 

CISSY. 
(Looking up into his face.) No, I like you. 

DENVER. 

That's right. I thought we should get on to- 
gether. Now tell me all your troubles why won't 
they play with you ? 

CISSY. 

(Looking cautiously round.) You won't tell any- 
body, will you ? 

DENVER. 
No, I promise you it shall be a secret. 

CISSY. 
(In a whisper) They say my father killed a man. 

(DENVER starts up stung with pain and turns away 
his face) 

Ah ! that makes you turn away from me. 

DENVER. 

No ! No, my dear, don't think that. Tell me 
quick what is your name ? 



Cissy Denver. 



CISSY. 



DENVER. 



(Aside) My own child ! The sins of the father 
are visited upon the children. Oh, Heaven, is it 
just? What has this innocent lamb done that she 
should be hounded for my crime. 
86 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



CISSY. 
Why are you crying ? 

DENVER. 

Never mind me I Never mind me! Where do 
you live ? 

CISSY. 
(Points) In here. 

DENVER. 
In there? 

CISSY. 

Yes, will you come in ? (Goes inside the cottage, 
leaves the door open. As soon as she sees the fire, she 
runs to it.) 

DENVER. 

My own little Cissy that I left a toddling baby. 
(Enters cottage .) 

CISSY. 

(Kneeling by fire and clapping hands) Oh, look ! 
A fire ! A fire ! We haven't had a fire for I don't 
know how long. ( Warms her hands) 

DENVER. 

(At back of table aside) In this wretched hole 
and without a fire! (Comes /0CISSY aloud) Who 
else lives with you, Cissy? 

CISSY. 

Mother and Ned, and our old Jaikes. You don't 
know our old Jaikes. I do love him ! 

DENVER. 
God bless him ! Where are the others, Cissy ? 

CISSY. 
I daresay Jaikes has gone to (jet some work, and 



mother is in the next room nursing Ned, I'll tell her 
you 're here. 1 

37 



* atu t g**t 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



1 Gets towards 
door. 

* At the door, 
preparing to 
go. 



At door. 



uc 



b Gets chair, 
places it k. of 
table by fire. 
Dusting chair 
with pinafore. 



DENVER. 1 

No, no, I must go I have no business here. 1 

CISSY. 

( Who kas been to inner door, opened it and looked in.) 
No mother isn't at home. Oh, I know, we can't 
pay our rent, and she's gone to ask the gentleman to 
let us stop on for a few days. 8 

DENVER. 
(Aside?) To stay on here ! 

CISSY. 
(Runs to door.} Ned's in there, he's asleep. 

(DENVER is going to door to look, ClSSY closes door 
and comes away?) 

Hush ! you mustn't wake him. He's been very ill. 

DENVER/ 
111 ! Not very ill ? Not dangerously ill ? 

CISSY. 

(Goes to him?) Yes, but he's getting better. 
Won't you sit down and warm yourself. There's 
only one chair, but you may have that. 6 

DENVER. 

(Sits?) May I ? And will you come and sit on 
my knee? (Holds out his arms?) Don't be afraid 
come ! 

CISSY. 
(Going to him?) Oh, I'm not a bit afraid of you. 

DENVER. 
What has been the matter with your little brother ? 

CISSY. 

(Sitting on DENVER'S knee?) The doctor says he 
88 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



has not had enough to eat. We have been so poor ; 
sometimes we hive scarcely had anything for days. 
Mother tried to get a living by teaching, but when 
people found out who my father was, they wouldn't 
let her teach any more. 

DENVER. 

(Aside.') The fiends! (Aloud.) But your mother 
has had some money some friends have sent her 
some, eh? 

CISSY. 
No, she has no friends. 

DENVER. 

Yes, Cissy, yes think again. She has had some 
money sent her ? 

CISSY. 
No ; who would send her money ? 

DENVER. 

(Aside.) It has never reached her. (Aloud.) And 
does the doctor think your little brother will get 
better ? 



ClSSY. 1 

Yes ; if he could have nice things to eat. 

DENVER. 

So he shall ! Everything that money can buy. 
(Takes out purse.) Here, take this, you'll find plenty 
of money in that. 

CISSY. 
Is that for mother ? Oh, that is kind. 

DENVER. 

No, my dear, don't say that. Wait a minute. 
I've got some more money loose in my pocket. 
(Taking it out and putting it in purse.) There, now 
you've got all my money. 



Gett 
ver's 



t off L 
'j krue. 



Dtn 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



CISSY. 
And what will you do without it ? 

DENVER. 

Oh, I've got plenty more at home ; and now 
(Looking hungrily at her and longing to embrace her.) 
I wonder if you'll give me a kiss ? 



Yes, that I will. 



CISSY. 



DENVER. 



(Takes her in his arms and kisses her hungrily?) 
Don't take any notice of me, dear don't mind my 
kissing you. I had a little girl of my own once, and 
when I kiss you it seems as if she came back to me 
again. 



CISSY. 



She is dead then ? 



DENVER. 

Yes, dead (Aside.} to me. Suppose, Cissy, that 
you I mean that I (Aside.) I can't say it ! 

CISSY. 

I know I should have been very fond of you if 
you had been my father. 

DENVER. 

(Clasps her in his arms eagerly and kisses her again 
and again) God bless you, my darling ; you mustn't 
mind when your schoolfellows speak unkindly of 
your dead father. 

CISSY. 

I won't I don't believe it's true. I don't believe 
he was a bad man, because if he had been, Jaikes and 
mother wouldn't have been so fond of him. 
90 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



DENVER. 

Always think that, my dear, always think that. 
How thin your clothes are, dear. (He takes his 
muffler off and puts it round ClSSY.) There, dear, 
that will keep a little of the cold out. 



CISSY. 



Oh, isn't it pretty ? 



DENVER. 

There, now run and find your mother and give 
her that purse. 

ClSSY. 1 

And who shall I tell her gave it to me? 

DENVER. 

Say somebody gave it to you who happened to 
see you and thought you were like a little girl he had 
lost, and say, too, that (Breaking doivn, aside.} Oh, 
my wife, if I could but send you one word from my 
living grave ! 

CISSY. 
Yes, what else shall I say ? 

DENVER. 

(Rising} I dare not ! No, dear, there is no other 
message. Your mother does not know me. (Kisses 
her} Run along, dear, make haste and tell her of 
your good fortune. 

CISSY. 

Yes, that I will ! (Coming out of cottage} She's 
gone to Mr. Skinner's that nice big house across 
the field. 

(Exit}* 

DENVER. 

(Following her to door} Run on then, my brave 

91 



1 Getting round 
l_ oftablt. 



L.ai 



ACT III. 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. II 



little queen. (He watches her off and then looks care- 
fully and cautiously round.} My boy, I must see my 
boy ! (Re-enters cottage cautiously.) Just one look, 
one kiss, nobody is about. 



IL.IB. 

\CallNtlly, 
Olive^Coombe. 

J Crossing stage. 



* Goes up to stile. 



8 L. of Denver 
up stage. 



(DENVER goes into inner room, is absent a few mo- 
ments then returns in tears. JA1KES Enters x rub- 
bing his hands to warm them.) * 

JAIKES. 2 

Artfulness ain't done it this time. Not a blessed 
ha'penny ! Whew ! it gets colder and colder. 3 I 
wonder where the missy is ? 

DENVER. 

(Coming- out.) My little baby boy that I left, 
grown so thin, so pale, so wasted is there no end to 
my sin, no end to its bitter fruit ? (Sees JAIKES 
aside) Jaikes! 

JAIKES. 
Hillo! What are you doing in there? 

DENVER. 4 

( Turns away his face from JAIKES and muffles it 
partly with his cape so that JAIKES does not see his 
features?) Excuse my intrusion, I was passing your 
cottage and happened to come in. I take a great 
interest in the sick poor. There's a little boy in 
that room he's dangerously ill send for the doctor 
to see him at once. Have the best advice you can 
get and give him some nourishing food, the best of 
everything. (Still keeping his face averted from 
JAIKES and speaking in slightly disguised tones) 

JAIKES. 5 

Oh, yes, that's all very well, but where's the 
money to come from ? 

DENVER. 

(Aside) Cissy has my purse. (Aloud) I will pay 
for whatever is required. I have just given away all 
92 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



the money I have about me, but you can have the 
bills sent in to me. John Franklin, Kensington 
Gardens, London. 

JAIKES. 

Oh, yes, it's likely I can get tick on the strength 
o* that, ain't it ? A pound of tea and a quartern loaf 
and put it down to Mr. John Franklin, Kensington 
Gardens, London. 

DENVER. 
Do as I tell you you will find it all right. 

JAIKES. 

Who is Mr. John Franklin ? If you want to help 
us.why don't you give us some money and let's have 
a look at your face ? (Peers round DENVER'S muffler 
and recognises hitn.) Master Will ! (Drops on his 
knees.) Master Will ! God forgive me ! It's Master 
Will come back from the dead. Say it's really you, 
Master Will ! 

DENVER. 

Yes, it is I, come back, as you say from the dead. 
My wife! Is she well? How is she? Has she suf- 
fered much ? Does she ever speak of me? 

JAIKES. 

Oh, Master Will, I can't tell you what she's had 
to go through. It's been a terrible hard fight for 
her, but she's borne up like a angel. Oh, sir, you've 
come back at the right time. We're nearly starving. 



DENVER. 1 

Starving ? That's all over now. I'm rich, Jaikes, 
I'm rich ! When I left England I went to^the Silver 
Mines of Nevada I had to struggle hardaF firsFand 
could only send you a few dollars I was almost 
starving myself, but one morning I struck a rich vein 
of silver; to-day I'm richer than lean count; and 
then I sent you a thousand dollars, and so none of 
it reached you ? 

93 



1 ffeffsJaiJtft to 
ttat on tunck 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



JAIKES. 

No, sir, you see we've changed our home so often 
and she always took care not to leave our address 
for fear 

L. o/Jaikes. DENVER. 1 

For fear my wretched story should follow you, I 
see. 

JAIKES. 

Ah, sir, don't say any more about that that's all 
past now. Oh, don't you mind my crying, sir ; to 
see you come back like this is too much for me I 
can't believe it, sir. (Rises.) And Miss Nelly she'll 
go mad with joy. 

DENVER. 
She must not know, Jaikes. 

JAIKES. 
Not know ? Not tell her, Master Will ? 

DENVER. 

Not yet ! Not yet. Listen, Jaikes, I have come 
back to England with one thought, with one resolve 
to make -her happy. Whatever happens to me, 
that I will do. Shall I ask her to share my night- 
mare of a life, put her on a ceaseless rack of anxiety 
and suspense, torture her as I am tortured ? Heaven 
forbid ! 

JAIKES. 

But surely, Master Will, you are safe after all 
these years ? 

DENVER. 

I shall never be safe till I stand in the dock to 
answer for my crime I shall be safe then. I've 
started a hundred times to give myself up, but I have 
always been held back by the thought that I was not 
myself that night ; but it will come, Jaikes, 
94 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



JAIKES. 
What will come, sir ? 

DENVER. 

Detection. It may be to-morrow, or it may not 
be for years, but it will come, and if I were to join 
her, suspicion would be aroused at once. I might 
be discovered, dragged from her side, tried, con- 
demned and hanged. 

JAIKES. 

Master Will ! But if missus could but know. If 
she could but know. 

DENVER. 

Not yet Jaikes. Listen, you shall take her from 
this poverty and put her in her old home with every, 
thing that money can buy, and then, when I have 
made her rich, cheerful, contented, I will ask myself 
whether I may dare to throw the shadow of my life 
across her happiness. In the meantime, promise me, 
swear to me that she shall not know. 

JAIKES. 
Why, of course, Master Will, if you wishes it. 

DENVER. 

Jaikes, I must see her I am dying to look on her 
dear face, to hear one word from her lips to see 
her without being seen. 

JAIKES. 

That's easily managed. Stand here, 1 you'll be able 
to see her and hear her and she'll never be none the 
wiser. 

DENVER. 

God bless you, my dear old Jaikes, for all your 
kindness. God bless you, I shall never be able to 
repay you. 

95 



terior of tat' 
taft window. 



ACT III 



SC. II 



JAIKES. 

There now, don't you talk nothing about that, 
Master Will. Why, to see you come back like this 
pays me fifty times over. I allus said you would. 
(Crying with Joy.) I allus said l (Looks off?) Here 
comes Miss Nelly. 

(DENVER and JAIKES go up and get behind cottage. 
Enter NELLY, 8 crosses stage and goes into cottage?)* 



1 Music. 



1 u a B. 

J Call Cisty. 



* Goes up to door 
of inner room, 
looks inside, 
shows content 
and shuts door. 



* Takes off bon- 
net and shawl 
and hangs 
them up. 



Standing L. by 
tittle. 



r *. of table. 



DENVER. 

(Coming from behind.) My wife ! My poor wife ! 
(NELLY in cottage puts her purchases on table.) 

NELLY. 

There, my precious ones, you shall have a meal 
to-night at any rate. 8 I wonder where Jaikes and 
Cissy are ? * 

DENVER. 

My own Nell, the girl who left her own bright 
home to follow my cursed fortunes. Oh, if I look 
another moment I must rush to her and hold her in 
my arms ! 

(Enter OLIVE, quickly" crosses stage and enters cottage. 
DENVER retires behind cottage and comes out again 
after she has entered?) 

OLIVE. 6 

I am the bearer of bad news. My husband has 
repented of his kindness. He will not let you stay 
here. 

NELLY. 7 

Not let me stay here ? 

OLIVE. 

No since you left him he has learned who you 
are. He has found out that you are the wife of a 

(DENVER turns aside as if stabbed with pain?) 
96 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



NELLY. 

(Checks OLIVE.) Ah no, no, for pity's sake don't 
say it. I have heard the word so often. Yes, it is 
true I am the widow of such a man, and for that I 
am to be punished, it seems. (Sobbing?) 

OLIVE. 

Who knows it is true ? Who knows that your 
husband did really kill that man ? 

DENVER. 
(Eagerly^ What's that? 

NELLY. 
Why, what doubt can there be ? 

OLIVE. 

It was never proved. He was never tried. Who 
knows but that there might have been some terrible 
mistake ? 

DENVER. 
(Outside?) Some terrible mistake ? 

NELLY. 
What do you mean? What do you know? 

OLIVE. 

(Recovering herself quickly.} Nothing I thought 
it might comfort you to think your husband was in- 
nocent. It could do no harm now that he is dead ; 
but I am forgetting my errand. I came here to help 
you and I dare not stay. (Takes out purse.) 

(COOMBE'S voice heard off.) 1 

COOMBE. 

(Outside.) You can wait here. Be ready if I want 
you. 

(COOMBE Enters? as DENVER hears and sees 

COOMBE, he retires) 1 
7 97 



'L.1B. 

1 L. U. K. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. li 



COOMBE. 
But we'll try persuasion first. (Enters cottage.) 

DENVER. 1 

The man who showed me into Geoffrey Ware's 
room that dreadful night. What does it mean ? 



1 Coming away 
from cottage. 



OLIVE. 

There are three pounds five shillings. It is all I 
have. 

(Takes money out of purse and shows it empty. 
COOMBE, who has entered unseen by NELLY or 
OLIVE, gets to back of table and picks up money.) 

COOMBE. 

It won't be necessary, ma'am. I'll take it to your 
husband. Your husband wants you you'd better 
go. (Holds door of cottage open for OLIVE.) 

OLIVE. 

Oh, if he were not my husband ! 
(Exit quickly from cottage and crosses stage, going 



COOMBE. 

(Calling after her.) Ah ! you shouldn't have 
took your place for life. (Shuts door and turns to 
NELLY.) 

DENVER. 

What now ? If I stop this ruffian he'll call his 
men and there may be a disturbance, and I may be 
involved. What can I do? 

COOMBE. 

Now, my dear good lady, 3 there's a pleasant way 
of doing things and a unpleasant, and I always try 
the pleasant way first. 
98 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT III 



NELLY. 

Oh, don't make any words about it. You have 
come to turn me out, is it not so? 

COOMBE. 

Oh, dear no. I've only come to ask you in the 
kindest manner possible to pay your rent. Three 
pounds five shillings. 

NELLY. 

How can I pay it ? I haven't a shilling in the 
world, and you know I haven't. 1 

DENVER. 
(Outside.) Where is Cissy ? Where is the money ? 

COOMBE. 

Ah, that's a pity ! Because as you can't pay you 
must go. 



* R. oftabit. 



NELLY. 

No, no ! Let me stay to-night only to-night. I 
will go to-morrow morning. My child is in that 
room very ill, and if he is moved in this bitter 
weather, it will kill him. Let me stay to-night, I 
will do no harm. 

COOMBE. 

Now look here, my dear good lady it's no good 
your begging and praying to me, 'cos go you must. 

NELLY. 
Oh, is there no tenderness, no pity on the earth ! * 

COOMBE. 8 

Now, look sharp ! Are you going to pack up? 

NELLY. 

Yes, yes, give me a little time, I will go. (Goes 
into inn f r room, re-entering almost immediately very 
determinedly^) No, I will not go. My child is sleep- 

99 



oittfuf stag*. 

Gett round 
front of taolt 
to fir t. 



ACT III 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



* Goes towards 
door. 

* Getting to R. of 
taole. 



ing. He is getting better, I will not wake him and 
take him into the bitter cold to kill him. (She bolts 
the door and stands with her back to it.) 

COOMBE. 

(Stands with his back to fire.) Will you go quietly, 
or shall I have to send for my men to turn you out ? 

NELLY. 

I tell you I will not go. Go back and tell your 
master that here I stay I and my children till he 
drags our bodies out and flings them into the streets. 

COOMBE. 

Oh very well, we must try the unpleasant way 
then. 1 

NELLY. 2 

Merciful Father, help me now 1 

DENVER. 
(Outside) I can bear it no longer, 

(Comes to door t is about to open it when ClSSY 8 runs 
to him.) 

Quick, my child, give your mother the money ! 
(Pushes her through doorway. He has opened the 
door.) 

CISSY. 4 
Mother, look what the kind gentleman gave me ! 

NELLY. 

(Seizes money eagerly.) An angel from Heaven 
has sent it. 5 

To COOMBE, as she throws money on the table.) 
Here, take your money ! Now you go ! (Points to 
door) 

(COOMBE baffled, picks up money) 

END OF ACT III. 
IOO 



' Enters L. 2 L- 



Kunming' to R. 
o/NeUy. 



ACT TV. SCENE I. HANDSOME CHAMBER CLOTH IN 1 



ACT TV. SCENE II. GRANGE. SCENE IN 5 
Back Cloth 




Fence 



^Garden Gate 





Arbour 



o 



Flower 
Setriece 



ACT IV. SCENE III. EXTERIOR OF WHARF SCENE IN 1 



ACT IV. SCENE IV. INTERIOR OF WHARF 
River Cloth 

Ground Bow 

Window 



DC or 



Rigbi 



Bales and Cases 



D 

Chair 




Fireplace 



D 

Chair 



V 



LefT 



ACT IV. * 

SCENE I. 1 

SCENE :* Room in DENVER'S house, Kensington Gar- 
dens. Doors right and left. Window to left. 

(Enter FRANK SELWYN showing in BAXTER.' * 

BAXTER.* 
Mr. John Franklin not in, eh ? 

SELWYN.' 
No. I am his private secretary. 

BAXTER. 

(Looking at him keenly.) Oh ! you are his private 
secretary? (Aside.) This is the young sprig I'm 
after. 

SELWYN. 
Perhaps I might do. 

BAXTER. 
No. I think not. When can I see Mr. Franklin ? 

SELWYN. 
It's uncertain. What's your business ? 

BAXTER. 

That's my business ! I'll wait. (Turns back to 
audience and stands looking at picture on wall, 
whistling.) 

101 



J Btginnert. 
Baxter, 
Seltvyn. 

1 Music to off*. 



* Left. 

% Call Denver. 

L. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



SELWYN. 

(Aside, looking at BAXTER.) Can he have come 
about that cursed cheque ? It must come sooner or 
later. Mr. Franklin must find me out, find out that 
I have repaid his goodness by robbing him, returned 
his trust by forging his name ! 

BAXTER. 

(Turning round.) I suppose you've got a nice 
comfortable berth as Mr. Franklin's private secre-, 
tary? 

SELWYN. 
Yes. 

BAXTER. 
Very rich man, isn't he ? 

SELWYN. 
Very. 

BAXTER. 
Made his money in Silver Mining, didn't he ? 

SELWYN. 
Yes. 

BAXTER. 

Ah ! so I've heard. Went to bed one night a 
common miner, and the next a millionaire. 

SELWYN. 
I've heard so. They call him the Silver King. 

BAXTER. 
Gives a lot of money away, doesn't he ? 

SELWYN. 

His whole life is spent in doing good. He's as 
noble and generous as he is rich. 
102 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



BAXTER. 

Ah ! employs you to look after the deserving 
cases trusts you with his purse, and his cheque book 
occasionally, eh ? 

SELWYN. 
( Wildly.} What do you mean ? 

BAXTER. 

Nothing, only you must take care he doesn't get 
imposed on. (Aside.) It's all right the young 
idiot ! 

SELWYN. 
(Aside.) It must come ! 

(Enter DENVER.) * * 

DENVER. 
Somebody wishes to see me, Frank ? 

BAXTER. 
Mr. John Franklin ? (Looking at DENVER.) 



DENVER. 2 

Yes, I am John Franklin. What do you want ? 

BAXTER. 3 

I beg pardon. That is my card. (Giving card) 
Sam Baxter, Scotland Yard. (Aside, as DENVER 
takes card) I've seen you before somewhere, my 
gentleman. 

DENVER. 

(Wincing under BAXTER'S steady gaze.) Well, 
what is your business? I must beg you to make 
haste as I have to catch a train into the country. 

BAXTER. 
Then I'll come to the point at once. 

(Opens his pocket-book, takes out papers. SELWYN 
is going, BAXTER stops hint.) 

103 



Right. 

t Call fat : ket ; 
Tabby * Mr*. 
Gantmaet, 
Gafftr Pottlt 
and villagtrs. 



1 Comes C 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. i 



Mr. Private Secretary, you needn't go. We may 
want you. (Aside, looking at papers.} Now where 
have I seen you before, Mr. Franklin? (Aloud, tak- 
ing a cheque from pocket-book^) Oh, her it is ! 

SELWYN. 
(Aside.) The cheque I forged ! 

BAXTER. 
You bank at the County and Metrojwlitan ? 

DENVER. 
Yes. 

BAXTER. 

This cheque was presented yesterday for payment 
in the ordinary way. The clerk refused to cash it, 
detained the presenter and sent for you immediately. 
You were not at home, and so the affair was placed 
in my hands. 

(DENVER comprehends the situation, and as SELWYN 
makes a movement as if to speak, stops him with a 
look of caution and silences him.) 

DENVER. 
(To BAXTER.) Give me the cheque. 

(BAXTER gives cheque, DENVER looks at it.) 
Well? 

BAXTER. 
That signature, sir ? 

DENVER. 

Well? 



* Sehvyn makes 
a movtnent as 
if to speak hit 
Denver stops 
hint with a 
glance. 



BAXTER. 
Is it in your handwriting, sir ?* 

DENVER. 

Yes, it's quite right. 
104 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



(SELWYN gives sigh and shows immense relief, and is 
about to blab out his gratitude. DENVER stops 
him with a look.} 

Yes, the signature is a little awkward. I must 
have been in a hurry. 

(BAXTER still looks incredulous.) 
Do you doubt me ? 

BAXTER. 

Oh, no, sir, if you say so, sir, of course it's all 
right if you wrote the cheque why, there's an end 
of the matter, isn't there, sir ? 

DENVER. 

I think so. You may take the cheque back to the 
bank, tell the cashier it is all right. If necessary I'll 
call at the bank to-morrow and make the matter 
right. Will you accept a five-pound note for your 
trouble ? l 

BAXTER. 

Thank you, sir, and if ever you should want my 
assistance in any little matter of business, sir, I shall 
be happy to oblige you, sir, and to keep my mouth 
shut. (In putting the note in his pocket lie intention- 
ally drops a piece of paper.) 

DENVER. 
Thank you, I have your card. 

BAXTER. 

(Aside to DENVER.) Keep your eye on that 
youngster he's got mixed up with a bad lot. 
(Aloud.) Good day, Mr. Franklin. 1 

^ DENVER. 
Good day, Mr. Baxter. (Turns to SELWYN.) 



1 Giver &**<*> 
noU 



BAXTER. 

(Glancing back at DENVER aside.) I've had you 
through my hands somewhere. (Exit.)* 

105 



Lt/). 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. i 



1 Denver crosses 
to Selivyn and 
puts his hand 
on his 
shoulder. 

* Crosses to R. 



Right door. 



* R. door. 



DENVER. 1 

Don't do it again, my boy, don't do it again ! * 

SELWYN. 

I never will, sir ! Oh, sir, your kindness breaks 
my heart ! I've been such a bad fellow, sir! I don't 
deserve that you should forgive me. I shall be 
ashamed to meet you in the future, sir. 

DENVER. 

I hope not. This was your first step downwards, 
pray that it may be your last. 

SELWYN. 
It shall ! It shall ! 

DENVER. 

Remember, I still trust you ! 
(Exit.)* 

SELWYN. 
I'll make a fresh start to-day. God bless him ! 



(Re-Enter BAXTER.) 8 

BAXTER. 

I beg pardon, I must have dropped a paper here ! 
Nobody here ! (Picks up the paper he had previously 
dropped, creeps to the window and looks out.} There 
goes Mr. Franklin in a cab. Drives off ! Now when 
and where have I had that man through my hands? 
Deuce take my memory! (Comes slowly away from 
window.} Dear! Dear! (Snaps his fingers and taps 
his forehead to aid his memory in crossing the stage, 
stops suddenly.) Good heavens ! Yes ! that's the man ! 
Derby night four years ago ! The Skittle Alley at 
the " Wheatsheaf " the revolver, whew ! Here's a 
find ! John Franklin, millionaire, philanthropist and 
1 06 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



Silver King, an unhung murderer. The hair grown 
grey but the same face. By Jove! What a catch 
for me ! l 



(Exit very swiftly and with great animation?) 
END OF SCENE I. 



SCENE II. 1 
(Exterior of The Grange?) 

(Discover OLD VILLAGE PEOPLE. JAIKES enters* 
very respectably dressed.) * 

JAIKES. 

Well, Gaffer Pottle! Mrs. Gammage ! Hillo, 
Tabby ! 

GAFFER.* 

(An ancient decrepit villager.) My humble re- 
spects, Muster Jaikes. (Turning to TABBY.) Curt- 
sey, Tabitha ! Curtsey ! Curtsey, you old fool ! 
Don't you know Muster Jaikes is Master of the 
Grange and Lord of the Manor ? 

TABBY. 6 

Ah, Daniel Jaikes and me was brought up to- 
gether. I ain't going to curtsey to Dan'l Jaikes. 
I'm going to shake hands with him.' Don't you re- 
member how fond we was of one another when we 
was boy and girl together, eh, Dan'l dear ? 

JAIKES. 7 

No, I don't. It's too many years ago and 
don't call me Dan'l. 8 (Aside.) Tabby's a setting 
her cap at me again, I must put a stop to that. 

GAFFER. 

I hopes Miss Nelly is pretty tolerable ? 

107 



1 Music. 



Call Ntlly, 
Citsy, Nut. 



Crotset to C. 



Tabby gott uf 
ttaft. 






ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



JAIKES. 

Oh, she's all right ! Your dinner ain't ready yet. 
You can wait here a few minutes, and mind you all 
behaves yourselves ! ( Very severely to TABBY.) Tab- 
by, let those flowers alone. I'll tell Mrs. Denver 
you have arrove. 

(Exit JAIKES.) 1 

GAFFER. 

Dan'l Jaikes seems to be rather 'igh and mighty 
now he's come into his fortin' ! 

MRS. G. 1 

Ah ! Fancy Dan'l Jaikes coming and buying the 
Grange and being Lord of the Manor, and bringing 
Miss Nelly back to live in it. 

GAFFER. 

I can't make out who this here Uncle Samiwell 
was as has died and left Dan'l all this money. 

MRS. G. 

Aye, Dan'l never had no Uncle Samiwell as ever I 
heered on. 

TABBY. 

Ah, you folks don't know nothin' about it. Dan'l's 
master of the Grange, ain't he ? And I wouldn't say 
as I mightn't be missus afore long. 

GAFFER. 

I wouldn't say as you mightn't, Tabby. Pigs 
might fly, but I've kep' pigs for up'ards of fifty years, 
and I never see 'm make a start. 

MRS. G. 

No, Tabby, Muster Jaikes didn't seem to be no- 
ways particler smit with you just now. 
1 08 



* Coming down 
stag*. 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



1 Music. 

* L. U. B. 

R. 
u 

c. 



GAFFER. 

Aye, aye, Tabby, you've had three husbands and 
buried 'em all. You let well alone. 1 

(Enter from house 1 NELLY well dressed, with ClSSY* 
and NED * clinging to her, one on each side. J AIKES 
following them. Old People bow and curtsey!) 

NELLY.' 

Well, you have come, all of you, that's right. 
How do you do, all of you ? (Shaking hands with 
some of them!) How do you do, Tabby ? 

TABBY/ 

We're all well and hearty, thank you kindly, and 
we be mortal glad to see you back at the Grange 
again, bain't we, Gaffer ? 

GAFFER. 

Aye, we didn't like they folks as come here when 
you and Muster Denver left. 

MRS. G. 7 
They was mean, they was. 

TABBY. 

Aye, no beef and coals at Christmas, no pea soup, 
no blankets, no flannel petticoats, no nothing!- 

(ClSSY runs off into shrubbery!)* 

GAFFER. 

Aye, we knowed when you come back, Miss Nelly, 
there'd be plenty for everybody. 

NELLY. 

I hope so. You see, my friends, I have known 
what it is to be poor myself. Since I left you I have 
heard my children cry for bread, indeed, if it were 
not for the kindness of my old friend here 

(Indicating JAIKES, who shuffles about and looks very 
uncomfortable!) 
109 



Cissy runs off 
with Ntd 

R. 2 R. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



JAIKES. 1 

Yes, yes, missus ! We'll drop the subject. 

NELLY. 

No, we will not. You know I owe everything to 
you. (To the old people.) Go and have your dinner, 
all of you. You'll find it ready in the hall. It is 
Jaikes that provides it for you, not I. First thank 
the Giver of all good, and then thank our dear old 
Jaikes. 2 

JAIKES. 
No, no, I won't be thanked 1 

(Hurries them into house.)* 
Be off, you old vermints, be off ! 

(TABBY stops behind^) 
Now, Tabby ! 

NELLY. 
What do you want ? 



1 Crosses to seat 
R. c. and sits. 



8 L. of Tabby. 



L. U. B. 



TABBY.* 

(Curtseying to NELLY.) Oh ! if you please, Miss 
Nelly, we liked that bit of beef you sent us so much. 
The next time we hopes it'll be a little larger and 
not quite so fat. And I'm getting short o' tea and 
candles, and a little drop of gin is comforting afte 
washing all day. And my best gown's wore out. 

JAIKES. 5 

Good job too ! I wish it was your tongue in- 
stead. 

NELLY. 
Very well, Tabby, I won't forget you. 

JAIKES. 

Now will you be off and get your dinner, or else 
you shan't have none ! Be off ! (Hurries her off.) 

(Exit TABBY.) 6 
no 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



The old hussy ! You mustn't let her impose on 
you, missus. 

NELLY. 

Ah, Jaikes, it is for you to say you are master 
here. 

JAIKES. 1 

Yes, yes of course, so I am I forgot that ! Still, 
you know, missus, all this money is, as you may say, 
yours. 

NELLY. 
Mine, Jaikes? 

JAIKES. 

Yes, you see my Uncle Samuel left particular in- 
structions in his will well, never mind my Uncle 
Samuel, we'll drop the subject. Ain't you 'appy 
now you're back in your old home, missus? 

NELLY. 
Yes, Jaikes. I am happy ! (Sig/ts.) 

JAIKES. 
Quite happy, Missus? 

NELLY. 

(Sighs.) Yes, Jaikes, happier than I ever hoped 
to be. 

JAIKES. 

There's some'ut, missus ! I can see something 
you miss, now, ain't there? Tell the truth. 

NELLY. 
Yes, Jaikes, there is. 

JAIKES. 

What is it, missus? I've ordered 'em to lay out 
the garden just as it used to be and to plant a new 
chestnut tree where the old 'un was blown down 

ill 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



Music. 



NELLY. 
It isn't that, Jaikes. 

JAIKES. 

The old fish-pond as they folks filled up I'll have 
it dug out again ? 

NELLY. 

Ah, no, don't trouble about that. 
JAIKES. 

Then what is it, missus ? You shall have it if it 
costs a mint of money. 1 

NELLY. 

Oh, Jaikes, can't you see what it is? I'm back in 
my old home without the man who made it all dear 
to me without my Will ! Oh, I love him still yes, 
I love him as much to-day as the day I married him 
in the church yonder. It was under this tree I 
promised to be his wife. Oh, Jaikes, I remember it 
as if it were yesterday. Everything here, every tree, 
every brick in the old house, every little nook and 
corner brings back to me his dear handsome face 
until I can sometimes hardly stop myself from run- 
ning all through the grounds and fields and calling 
out " Will ! Will ! come back to me, come back to 
me, if it were but for a moment ! " Now you know 
what it is I miss in my old home, my husband's love 
and you can't give that back to me, Jaikes, no, no, 
not that, not that ! (Exit'.)** 

JAIKES. 

(Looking after her.} Can't I ? Oh, yes, I can, 
and I will, too, this very day ! I've wrote and told 
him I can't keep his secret no longer he's on his 
way to you now as fast as the train can bring him ! 
You wait a bit, missus, and I'll dry up them tears 
for you ! You shall be the happiest woman in 
England afore this day's over, that you shall ! Make 
haste, Master Will, make haste and come ! 

(Re-Enter TABBY.) 

Hillo! what now, Tabby? 4 
112 



1 L2 E. 

t Call Denver. 



1 l~ 3 K. 

* Jaikes has his 
back to Tabby 
"who tafs him 
on the back. 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



TABBY. 

(Very affectionately) Oh, Dan'l dear ! I'm so glad 
you've come back again. Ain't you glad to be back 
among your old friends, Dan'l dear? 

JAIKES. 

(Cautiously edging from her.) Yes yes mid- 
dling! 

TABBY. 

Don't you remember when we used to go cow- 
slipping, eh, Dan'l ? 

JAKES. 1 

(Resolutely.) No, I never went cowslippin' along 
of you, Tabby. 

TABBY.' 

Oh, yes, you did, Dan'l. And our games at hide 
and seek? 



No 



JAIKES. 



TABBY. 



Oh, yes, Dan'l, I used to hide and you used to try 
and find me. 

JAIKES. 

Oh, no, Tabby ! I used to hide and you used to 
try and find me ! 

TABBY. 

Oh, Dan'l, you don't know how fond I've allays 
been of you, and now you're gettin' old and I'm 
gettin' old 

JAIKES. 

Yes, you are, Tabby, and precious ugly into the 
bargain ! 

TABBY. 

And I've been thinking how nice it 'ud be if we 
could end our days together. 

8 113 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. II 



JAIKES. 

I'm much obliged, Tabby, but I don't want to end 
my days just at present. 

TABBY. 

Ah, but, Dan'l dear me to take care of you and 
nurse you up, and you to take care of me and nurse 
me up wouldn't that be nice ? 

JAIKES. 

(Resolutely?) No, no, you might like it ; but I 
ain't ambitious, Tabby, I'm very content as I am. 

TABBY. 
Ah, Dan'l you've never been married. 

JAIKES. 
And you have three times. 

TABBY. 

And the best of wives I've made, I'm sure. Ask 
my three good men else. 

JAIKES. 

It 'ud be a sin to disturb 'em now they've got a 
bit of peace. 

TABBY. 
And I should make a better wife now than ever. 

JAIKES. 
You ought, Tabby, you've had plenty of 



1 Tatty starts 
back horrified. 



nence. 



TABBY. 



(Taking his arm affectionately?) Well, then, what 
do you say, lovey when shall we be married ? 

JAIKES. 

(Aghast?) Married ! Me marry you ! Why, you 
old Mormon, 1 you old female Henry the Eighth J 
114 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



You old wolf in sheep's clothing ! You you, you 
old Bluebeard in petticoats! Me marry you! 
Never! Never! Be off with you ! Be off! (Frightens 
her off.) 

(Exit TABBY.) > 

I've had a narrow squeak that time ! 

(Enter ClSSY with flower s.y 

CISSY. 

Look, Jaikes, for mamma ! Aren't they pretty ? 
Oh, Jaikes, it was kind of you to bring us to this 
beautiful home ! 

JAIKES. 

Ah ! it ain't me, little missy, it isn't me as is doing 
it at all ! 



(DENVER 4 appears at gate.) 
DENVER. 



JAIKES. 



Jaikes ! 

Master Will ! 

DENVER. 
Is anybody about ? Can I come in ? 

JAIKES. 

Yes, come in, Master Will ! Miss Nelly's gone to 
give her poor people their dinner and I'm all alone. 8 

DENVER. 
You're sure I shan't be seen ? 

JAIKES. 4 

No fear, sir, I'll keep a good look out. 

DENVER. 

How is she ? Is she quiet well and happy and 
the children ? 



Exit City 

L. 2 B. 

4 Enters R. U. B. 



Denver \ernu 
dawn C 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. II 



JAIKES. 

Yes, they're all quite well. Oh, Master Will, I'm 
so glad you've come. I can't hold out much longer! 
Uncle Samuel has got me into a dreadful mess ! I 
wish we hadn't invented him. And then there's all 
that money as you sent her anenonymously from 
America. 



1 Grasses slowly 
to seat R. of 
Jaikes. Jaikes 
close to L. of 
seat. 



DENVER. 



Yes? 



JAIKES. 

Well, it didn't turn up while we was starving, but 
now we're rolling in money and it's a nuisance, it all 
turns up as bold as brass. Oh, Master Will, don't 
hide it from her no longer tell her as you're alive 
you wait here I'll go and fetch her to you. 

DENVER. 
Stop, Jaikes, you mustn't go ! 

JAIKES. 

Master Will, when you brought her back here and 
spent all that money to make the old place just like 
it used to be when she was a girl, you thought you 
was going to make her happy, didn't you ? 

DENVER. 1 

And have I not made her happy? What more 
can I do ? 

JAIKES. 

Why, sir, don't you see home ain't four walls and 
the ceiling and the furniture home's the place 
where them as loves us is and it was you what 
made this place home for her, and she's breaking 
her heart 'cause it's her home no longer. 

DENVER. 

Jaikes, I will tell you why my wife must not know 
that I am alive, and when I have told you never 
speak of it again. Last night I went down to the 
river to a place owned by that man Coombe. 
116 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



JAIKES. 

What, the man as was going to turn the missus 
out? 

DENVER. 

Yes, I've been following him up for the last six 
months, ever since I recognised him as the man that 
showed me into Geoffrey Ware's room that night. 
Just as drowning men catch at straws, I have caught 
at the straw of a hope that I might find out some- 
thing. I don't know what something that might 
give me a right to believe that I did not shed that 
man's blood 

JAIKES. 
Ah, how happy it would make her ! 

DENVER. 

And so night after night I go to that place and 
watch, and watch, and watch. I've tried to get in, 
all in vain, it's a hopeless task. Well, when I got 
back last night, I found your letter waiting for me 
begging me to make myself known to my wife. I 
read the letter again and again, and the more I tried 
to persuade myself that for her dear sake I must 
keep silence, the more my heart cried out " I must 
have her ! I will have her ! If I die for it, she shall 
be my own again!" And then I thought I would 
take her out to Nevada, to the city that I have built, 
where every man would shed his blood for me, and 
every child is taught to reverence the name of John 
Franklin. " There," I thought, " I shall be free from 
the past, safe from the law there," I said, " we will 
live the rest of our days honored, happy, beloved, 
in peace with ourselves and all the world." And so 
I spent half the night planning out a happy future 
with her and my children. Oh, Jaikes, I was so 
happy I couldn't sleep for joy of it, and when at 
last I put my head on my pillow, my one thought 
was " To-morrow I will tell her I am alive ! To- 
morrow I will take her in my arms and call her my 
wife again ! " 

117 




ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. II 



Call Cissy, 
Gaffer Pottlt. 



JAIKES. 

And so you shall, Master Will ! Let me fetch 
her to you ! Let me fetch her to you ! t 

DENVER. 

Stay ! I fell asleep, Jaikes do you know what a 
murderer's sleep is? It's the waking time of con- 
science ! It's the whipping-post she ties him to while 
she lashes and stings his poor helpless guilty soul ! 
Sleep ! It's a bed of spikes and harrows ! It's a 
precipice over which he falls sheer upon the jags and 
forks of memory ! It's a torchlight procession of 
devils, raking out every infernal sewer and cranny of 
his brain ! It's ten thousand mirrors dangling round 
him to picture and re-picture to him nothing but 
himself. Sleep oh ! God, there is no hell like a 
murderer's sleep ! 1 That's, what my sleep has been 
these four years past. FT fell asleep last night and I 
dreamed that we were"fcver in Nevada and we were 
seated on a throne, she and I ; 2 and it was in a great 
hall of Justice, and a man was brought before me 
charged with a crime ; and just as I opened my 
mouth to pronounce sentence upon him, Geoffrey 
Ware came up out of his grave, with his eyes staring, 
staring, staring, as they stared at me on that night, 
and as they will stare at me till I die, and he said, 
" Come down ! Come down ! you whited sepulchre ! 
How dare you sit in that place to judge men?" 
And he leapt up in his grave close to the throne 
where I was and seized me by the throat and 
dragged me down, and we struggled and fought like 
wild beasts we seemed to be fighting for years 
and at last I mastered him, and held him down and 
wouldn't let him stir. 8 And then I saw a hand com- 
ing out of the sky, a long, bony hand with no flesh 
on it, and nails like eagle's claws, and it came slowly 
4 out of the sky, reaching for miles it seemed, 
slowly, slowly it reached down to the very place 
where I was, and it fastened on my heart, and it 
took me and set me in the justice hall in the pris- 
oner's dock, and when I looked at my judge, it was 
Geoffrey Ware ! And I cried out for mercy, but 
118 



Holding 
Jaikes hand. 



* Releases 
faikes 1 hand 
and rises. 



' Sits again. 



' Raising his 
hand. 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



Holding 
Jaikes arm. 



* Drops into 
garden seat 
and sobs. 



% Call Nelly, 
Coomte, 
Crippt. 



there was none! And the hand gripped me again 
as a hawk grips a wren, and set me on the gallows, 
and I felt the plank fall from my feet, and I dropped 
dropped, dropped and I awoke !*J //** hand 

^ across kit eyes. 

JAIKES. 
For mercy's sake, Master Will 

DENVER. 

Then I knew that the dream was sent for a mes- 
sage to tell me that though I should fly to the utter- 
most ends of the earth * as high as the stars are 
above, or as deep as the deepest sea bed is below, 
there is no hiding-place for me, no rest, no hope, no 
shelter, no escape ! * 

(A pause. CISSY runs on.)** 

CISSY. 
Jaikes, who's that ? 

(DENVER looks up and strives to hide his fears.) 

Oh ! it's you ! (She runs to him and sits on his 
left knee.) You've come to see us in our new home ! 
But you are crying what's the matter? Are you 
unhappy? 

DENVER. 

(Putting his arms round her.) Not now, Cissy 
not now ! Not now ! 

CISSY. 
Jaikes, do you know the kind gentleman ? 

JAIKES. 

( Who has gone tip stage and keeping watch looking 
off.) No, missy, no ! 

CISSY. 

I'm so glad you've come! You shall come and 
live with us, will you? 



DENVER. 
What would you do with me? 



119 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. II 



CISSY. 

You shall play with Ned and me. We've got a 
rocking horse and soldiers, and lots of things. 

DENVER. 
What games we could have, couldn't we? 

CISSY. 

(Clapping her hands.) Yes ! Oh, do stay, will you ! 
Do! Do! 

DENVER. 

And your mother? 

CISSY. 

Oh, I know she'd be glad to have you. She's al- 
ways talking about you and wondering who you 
are. Who are you ? 

DENVER. 
Who am I? 

CISSY. 

Yes, tell me tell me true ! 

DENVER. 
Well, I'm a king. 

CISSY. 
But what king are you ? 

DENVER. 

I'm the Silver King ! At least that's what men 
call me. 

JAIKES. 

(Looking off.) The other way, Gaffer Pottle this 
(Calls out severely) is private ! (Looking at DENVER 
warningly.) 

DENVER. 

(Starting up) I must go good-bye, Cissy ! 
(Kisses her.) 

1 20 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



CISSY. 

(Holding DENVER'S hand.) No, no, you mustn't 
go ! Mamma does want to see you so badly ! Wait 
here ! I'll go and fetch her. 

(Runs off to house calling.)* 
Mamma ! 

JAIKES. 1 
Master Will, won't you stay ? 

DENVER. 

No, Jaikes let me go! Not a word, for her 
sake ! Let me go ! (Exit quickly) * 

(Enter ClSSY.) 4 
ClSSY. 8 

Come on, mamma ! (Looks round.) Where is he, 
Jaikes ? 

(Enter NELLY.)' 

NELLY. 7 
Where is he ? 

JAIKES. 
Where's who, missus ? " 

NELLY. 

The gentleman who was here who gave the purse 
to Cissy. 

JAIKES. 

Oh, yes, missus, there was a gentleman here, but 
as as he was rather pressed for time he had to go 
to to catch his train. 

NELLY. 

(Going up towards gate) Why did you let him 
go, Jaikes, when you knew how much I wanted to 
thank him? He can't have got far I'll go after him. 

(Is preparing to go after DENVER, JAIKES goes be- 
fore her.) 

121 



R. U. R. 

From hovit. 



* From houst. 
'L. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. n 



JAIKES. 

No, don't you go, missus! I'll run after him and 
bring him back. I shall catch him before he gets to 
the station. 

(Exit JAIKES l after DENVER.) 



1 R. U. B. 



1 R. C. Cissy is 
at gate looking 
after Jaikes. 

Cissy comes 
down to her 
mothers and 
stands L. of 
her. 



* Ntlly is seated. 



NELLY. 

(At gate, slowly comes down to seat.}* Who can it 
be, this unknown friend, this silent, unseen protector, 
this guardian who is ever watching over my path ? 
Cissy, 8 what was the gentleman like ? 4 

CISSY. 
Oh, he was a very nice old gentleman ! 

NELLY. 
Old? 

CISSY. 

Oh, yes, his hair was nearly white, and he was 
crying so much. 

NELLY. 

Crying? Why should he cry? (With sudden joy, 
aside} Can it be? Oh, if it were he, if it could be, 
if it might be, if it were possible! (Eagerly snatches 
locket from neck, opens it, shotvs it to ClSSY very 
eagerly} Cissy, was he like this ? 

CISSY. 
Why, that's my father's likeness, mamma ! 

NELLY. 
Yes, was he like that ? 

CISSY. 

(After looking at it for a moment or two.} Oh, no,, 
mamma ! The Silver King's hair is nearly white. 

NELLY. 

But the face, Cissy, the face ? 
122 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



CISSY. 

(Looking again.} No, my .father's face is quite 
young and happy, and the Silver King's face is so 
sad and old. No, the Silver King isn't a bit like 
that. (Kneels by NELLY.) 

NELLY. 

(Shutting up locket?) Of course not, I knew it was 
impossible ! I was mad to dream of such a thing. 

CISSY. 

Mamma, it wasn't true, was it, what the school- 
girls used to say ? 

NELLY. 
What, dear ? 

CISSY. 
That my father had killed a man. 

NELLY. 

(Aside.} I can't tell her the truth, I will not tell 
her a lie ! 

(Enter JAIKES at gate.} 

JAIKES. (Panting breathless} 
I couldn't catch him, missus. 

(ClSSY goes up to gate and looks off} 

I followed him right up to the station and the 
train had just started ! 

(Whistle heard.} 1 

ClSSY. 2 

Oh, Jaikes, that is a story ! The train's only just 
started, for I heard the whistle and I can see the 
smoke. (Points off R.)* 

(NELLY goes up to gate, looks at JAIKES, who shuffles 
about and looks guilty and miserable} 

123 



* A I fate looking 
off*. 



' Cissy runs off 
L. 3 B. anart- 
turns immfiii- 
atelyivith Ntd 
they tit in 
arbour L. C. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



At gate. 



* Down t. 



1 Coming down 
R. C. 



* Croats R. 



c 



* Music. 



NELLY. 1 

Why are you playing me false? Why don't you 
tell me the truth ? 

JAIKES. 2 

(Aside, very uncomfortable) It'll come out it'll 
come out ! 

NELLY." 

Who is this man? Your uncle who died ? This 
gentleman who gave the purse to Cissy, this unknown 
friend who sent me all that money from America 
who is he ? 

JAIKES. 

How should I know? I hates folks as sends 
anenonymous letters I'd string 'em all to the nearest 
lamp-post without judge or jury ! * 

NELLY. 

Jaikes, I will take no more money from you, no 
more food, no more shelter till I know where it comes 
from. As bare and helpless as we came into this 
Grange, I and my children will leave it this very day 
and go out again to starve unless I know who it is 
that is loading me with all this wealth and kindness. 
Who is he, Jaikes ? Who is he ? Who is he, I say ? 

JAIKES. 
Oh, missus, can't you guess? 

NELLY.' 

(Frantically.} Ah, I know it! I knew it ! He 
is alive ! Take me to him ! Make haste ! I cannot 
wait a moment ! (Catching ClSSY and NED in her 
arms.) Ned ! Cissy ! My darlings, kiss me, kiss 
me, your father is alive! 6 (Kissing them eagerly, 
crying with joy.) 

PICTURE. 

END OF SCENE II. 

NOTE. When the piece is played in six acts the curtain falls here 
and the third scene becomes the first scene of the next act. 
124 






SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



SCENE in. 1 

(Front scene. The exterior ofCoombe's Wharf, with 
gate leading into the wharf yard.) 

(Enter CRIPPS from yard looking round.) 1 

CRIPPS. 

Now I wonder whether Father Christmas intends 
to turn up or whether I'm to be kept here all the 
night ? 

' (Enter COOMBE.)' * 

Oh, here you are ! 

COOMBE.* 

My dear boy, I hope I ain't kept you waiting very 
long, my dear boy. 

CRIPPS. 

Yes, you 'ave, and the next time just you give me 
the straight tip and I'll go and get drunk instead of 
wasting my time. 

COOMBE. 
Where's the Spider ? 

CRIPPS. 

He's just gone, and he wanted to know why the 
blazes you don't get somebody to look after this 
crib and let us in instead of keeping us hangin' about 
the place as if we was suspicious characters. 

COOMBE. 
I wish I could get hold of a likely party. 

CRIPPS. 
I thought you had got your heye upon a man- 

COOMBE. 

So I had, little Johnny Piper, the very man for 
the job. 

125 



Lifktt % /. 



EnttrfL. 



\ Call Denvtr, 
Corkttt, 



AC I 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



CRIPPS. 
Well, why didn't you have him ? 

COOMBE. 

He got the clinch only last week eighteen 
months. You see it's no good having anybody here 
as ain't got a unblemished character. We don't 
want to have the bluebottles come sniffing round 
here, do we ? 

CRIPPS. 
Not likely ! 

COOMBE. 
I suppose the Spider's comin' back ? 

CRIPPS. 

Yes, he didn't seem much to relish the prospect 
of spending his time with me in your back -yard here, 
so he's gone off to his club he said he'd be back 
here at ten. 

COOMBE. 
Ah ! the Spider always keeps Greenwich time. 

CRIPPS. 

Yes, other folks' Greenwich time, when he can 
nobble 'em. Ah ! the Spider's a deep 'un ! He was 
never bred up on pidgin's milk, Spider wasn't. 

COOMBE. 

Spider's too grasping. We shall have to take him 
down a peg or two. 

CRIPPS. 

It's that viller residence of his what swallows up 
all our hard won earnings. Why, you and me might 
take viller residences if we liked, couldn't we ? 



COOMBE. 



Yes, of course. 



126 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



1 Cr asset R. 



CRIPPS. 

And we could keep our cooks and buttons, and 
'arf a dozen 'osses, and mix with the gentry if we 
felt so disposed, couldn't we ? 

COOMBE. 

Yes, to be sure we could but we don't. 

CRIPPS. 

No 'cos why ? 'Cos the less we mix with the 
gentry the better except in the way of business. 

COOMBE. 

Yes, Master Spider's a flying too high for us. 
You back me up to-night and we'll clip his wings a 
bit. 

CRIPPS. 

AU right. I'll back you up. Come on inside. 1 
(Going in.) 

(DENVER Xnters* dressed as a ragged, shabby old 
porter!) 

DENVER. 3 

Here's poor deaf Dicky. (Grinning to COOMBE.) 

COOMBE. 
No ! nothing for you to-night, Dicky ! 

DENVER. 

Yes, guv'nor, find a job for Dicky. Poor deaf 
Oicky 1 Find a job for poor deaf Dicky, guv'nor ! 

CRIPPS. 
Who the blazes is this cove? 

COOMBE. 

Oh, he's been knocking about here on and off for 
the last six months. 4 He's handy to run errands 
and take letters to the sea captains that want to 

127 



* Crosses to L. of 
Coombe. 



Cr asset t 
Cr&s. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



buy my old iron, d'ye see ? (Winking and nudging 
CRIPPS.) He's as deaf as a post, and he ain't quite 
right in his upper storey. 

DENVER. 

Don't be hard on poor deaf Dicky, guv'nor give 
Dicky a job ! Dicky run very fast and get back in 
no time. Find a job for poor deaf Dicky. 

COOMBE. 
(Shaking his head vigorously.} No ! no ! no ! 

DENVER. 

Mr. Coombe shakes his head and says No ! no ! 
no ! but Dicky says Yes ! yes ! yes ! Poor Dicky, 
so hungry ! Dicky hasn't had a job all day. 

COOMBE. 

(Entering wharf} No no, I've got no jobs to- 
night. 

DENVER. 

(Imploringly, stopping him} Dicky only wants a 
master to treat him kind and dry bread to eat and 
rags to wear Dicky's so cold. 

CRIPPS. 

Well, be off and get what you want at the work- 
house, you forty horse power idiot ! 

COOMBE. 

Oh, he's useful to me sometimes. (Takes out 
money.} There's a sixpence. Go and get some sup- 
per ; and don't make a beast of yourself. 

DENVER. 

Thank you, guv'nor, thank you ! Dicky do any. 
thing for you, guv'nor ! Dicky very fond of you ! 
Dicky likes 

COOMBE. 

(Pointing him off} Be off with you ! 
128 



SC. Ill 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



* Denver en- 
deavovrs to 
follow them 
hut doortlaml 
in kisfact. 



DENVER. 

(Running off.) Dicky's got a sixpence ! Dicky's 
got a sixpence ! 

CRIPPS. 

(Looking after Aim.) He's as daft as forty blessed 
hatters. Come in, Father Christmas ! 

1 (COOMBE and CRIPPS go into gate.) 
( The gate closes with a clang? 
DENVER. 

Shut out! Shut out ! Shall I never worm my- 
self in ? I must be mad to dream that ever I shall 
wring this man's secret from him ; and yet he was in 
Geoffrey Ware's room that night ! Let me think of 
that ! Let me beat it into my brain. This man led 
me up those stairs why ? why? Oh, if I could but 
remember after that !* No ! no ! All's dark ! All's 
uncertain. To think that within a dozen yards of 
me, there is a man whose word might give me wife, 
children, home, all ! All ! And I stand here and 
can do nothing! 

(Enter CORKETT loudly dressed) * * 

CORKETT. 

(Aside) Now I wonder which is old Coombe's 
shanty ? I know it's somewhere about here ! 5 

DENVER. 

(Sauntering by him in apparent carelessness and 
recognises him.) Geoffrey Ware's old clerk ! What 
has he to do with this man ? Can this be another 
link in the chain ?* 

CORKETT. 7 

(Aside) I can see their little dodge. They mean 

to cut 'Enery Corkett. Spider's never at home 

when I call, and when I met him in Regent's Street 

9 



* Passing ka 
hand over hit 
Jorektad. 



"L. 

% Call Skinner. 



Goes to x. 



* Cr asset t* up 
treme U 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. in 



1 Denver comes 
to hint. 



the other day, he wouldn't so much as give me a 
friendly nod ; stared at me as if I was so much dirt. 
I ain't going to be treated like so much dirt, and 
I ain't going to be cut, or else I shall cut up rough. 
I'll just let master Spider see as 'Enery Corkett's as 
good as he is. Now I wonder where Father Christ- 
mas hangs out ? (Sees DENVER.) Hillo ! I say, my 
good fellow ! 

DENVER. 1 
(Holding his hand to his ear.} Eh ? 

CORKETT. 

(Aside.} He's deaf ! (Shouts.) Can you tell me 
where I can find a party by the name of Coombe a 
marine store dealer ? Coombe ! 

DENVER. 
Deaf Dicky got no home got no friends. 

CORKETT. 

(Aside.) He's a blooming idiot ! (Shouts) Well, 
find me a party by the name of Coombe. He lives 
in the Gray's Inn Road, and he's got a wharf some- 
where down here Coombe ! 

DENVER. 

(Nodding.) Coombe! Dicky knows Mr. Coombe! 
White hair, red nose, spectacles, nice kind gentleman, 
good old gentleman ! 

CORKETT. 

That's him ! A perfect beauty, old Coombe is. 
Where is he ? 

DENVER. 

Dicky mustn't tell. Dicky take message give 
Dicky letter and sixpence and Dicky take it to Mr. 
Coombe let Dicky take letter to Mr. Coombe. 

CORKETT. 

Oh, I see caution's the word ! Father Christmas 
130 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



don't want to be smelt out. I'll go into a pub and 
write a letter to Coombe and give it to this daffy to 
take, and then I'll follow him up and see where he 
goes. (Shouts.) Well, come on, old dunderhead, 
I'll give you a letter to take to him. 

DENVER. 

Thank you, thank you ! Dicky take it to Mr. 
Coombe 1 

(Exit CORKETT.) 1 



DENVER. 
At last ! At last ! At last ! 

(Exit after CORKETT.) 5 
END OF SCENE III. 



SCENE IV. 4 

Interior and Exterior of COOMBE'S Wharf. 
(Discover COOMBE and CRIPPS.) 5 

CRIPPS. 
I say, let's have some wet. (Lights pipe.) 

COOMBE. 



Put a name on it. 



CRIPPS. 



Oh, beer, gin, rum, whisky, brandy, anything as 
has got some taste in it. 

COOMBE. 

I'll give you a wee drop of prime Highland whisky, 
my dear boy. 

(Exit at inner door.)* 

CRIPPS. 

(Shouting after him) Bring the jar while you are 
about it. 



*. 



* Mtttie. 
*. 



Light* %*p. 



' Coombe and 
Cripps insult 
hut. Cripps 
teated at back 
of tabU 
Coombe stand- 
ing L. of table. 



u u. a. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. iv 



(SKINNER Enters l outside and whistles.) 
The Spider ! 

(Rises and goes to door, unlocks it, admits SPIDER, 
then closes door and r clocks it.) 



* Crosses to L. 
foot of table. 



1 Seats himself 
at back of 
table. 



L. 



SKINNER. 1 

Well ! ( Taking off gloves) Where is the vener- 
able Coombe ? 

CRIPPS." 

The venerable Coombe is getting this child some 
whisky. 

SKINNER. 

(Dropping his voice) Between ourselves, I half 
suspect Mr. Coombe means to execute a double 
shuffle on his own account with those diamonds of 
Lady Blanche. 

CRIPPS. 
He'd better not try it on. 

SKINNER. 

Just so ! You back me up and we'll get at the 
truth to-night. 



All right ! 



CRIPPS. 
I'll back you up. 



(COOMBE re-enters ' with whisky jar and water jug 
and glass, which he sets down in front #/ CRIPPS 
who helps himself largely) 

COOMBE. 5 

(Cordially holding out his hand to SKINNER.) My 
dear boy, I'm delighted to see you. 

SKINNER." 

Reciprocated, Mr. Coombe there's something 
magical in the grasp of your hand. It's horny and 
damned dirty what of that ? It's honest ! The 
132 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



shake of an honest hand does me good. (Takes out 
his handkerchief and wipes his hands behind his 
back.) 

(Enter DENVER l outside with letter. Knocks at door. 
SKINNER puts out light.) 

CRIPPS. 
Who the blazes is that ? 

COOMBE. 

(Goes to door? calls out.) Who's there? Who's 
there? 

DENVER. 

(Knocks) Poor deaf Dicky got letter for Mr. 
Coombe. Let Dicky in please. 



* Door in central 
partition. 
Coombe goet 
behind tabU to 
door. Skin- 
ner draft 
down i_ 



COOMBE. 

All right, Spider, it's only a deaf idiot that brings 
messages for me ! (Opens door.) 

(SKINNER lights candle.)* 

DENVER. (At door.) 

Letter, guv'nor. Gentleman wanted to know 
where Mr. Coombe lived. Dicky wouldn't tell him. 
Dicky wanted to bring letter and earn sixpence 
gentleman give Dicky twopence, gentleman hadn't 
got any more. 

(He has been trying to enter but COOMBE stops at the 
door.) 

COOMBE. 
All right ! Give me the letter. Wait ! 

(DENVER is coming inside. COOMBE shoves him 

out.) 

No, outside ! (Shuts door in DENVER'S face.) 

DENVER. 

(Outside.) How long ? How long ? 

133 



* Skinner titt I. 
oftabU. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. iv 



1 Coombe sits K. 
<tf tabU. 



* Denver is lis- 
tening at door 
till Coombe 
opens same. 



Strikes ttible 
with his fist. 



COOMBE. 1 

(Opens letter?) From the Duke of New York. 

SKINNER. 

Curse the fellow ! To think how many good people 
die off every day, and yet that blackguard persists 
in living on. 

COOMBE. 2 

(Reads letter?) " Dear Father Christmas : I'm 
cleaned out and I want a little of the rhino. You 
ain't treating me fair. I must see you to-night, so 
send me back a message by the idiot who brings 
this." 

SKINNER. 

(Snatching letter?) Tell him to go to the devil ! 
Now, Coombe, sharp's the word ! Let's get to 
business. 

COOMBE. 
I'll send off Deaf Dicky first. 

CRIPPS. 

(Suddenly struck with an idea?) Boil me down 
into mock turtle soup ! 3 

SKINNER. 

What's the matter, Cripps ? 

^ 

CRIPPS. 

Why, the deaf chap would be just the man to keep 
this here crib. 

SKINNER. 

We ought to have somebody here. What's the 
fellow like? 

COOMBE. 

He's deaf and an idiot. The police'd never be 
able to get anything out of him, and he could never 
tell any lies against us. 
134 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



t Call Corkttt. 



1 Coombtvuorkt 
rmtnd back of 
table and tilt 
u 



SKINNER. 

That's the sort of man we want. Bring him in I 
Let's have a look at him. 

(COOMBE opens the door and beckons DENVER in. He 
comes in grinning and touching his cap to SKINNER 
and GRIFFS) * 

SKINNER. 
What's your name ? 

(DENVER touches his cap and grins^f 
What's your name ? 

DENVER.* 

(Nodding and grinning?) Yes, guv'nor ! 

CRIPPS. 

What's your confounded name, you thick-headed 
hoddy-dod ? * 

DENVER.* 

He's round at the public house. Dicky go and 
fetch him, guv'nor? 

SKINNER. 8 

This man would be a perfect treasure in the wit- 
ness box. 

DENVER. 
Dicky go there if you like, guv'nor. 

SKINNER. 
I should like to see him under cross-examination. 

DENVER. 
Dicky take him an answer ? 

SKINNER. 

(Shaking his head.} No answer. Listen ! You 
want work don't you WORK ! (Shouting.) 

135 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. iv 



DENVER. 

Work ? Oh, yes, guv'nor ! Dicky work very hard 
scrub the floor, run messages. Dicky do what you 
tell him. 

SKINNER. 

Coombe, this man is like you. He'll do anything 
for an honest living. 

COOMBE. 1 

Shall we have him ? 

DENVER. 

Dicky be as faithful as a dog. Dicky follow you 
about everywhere and never leave you never leave 
you. 

SKINNER. 2 

The devil you won't ! That would be rather 
awkward ! 

DENVER. 
Give poor Dicky a chance, guv'nor. 

SKINNER. 

He's as safe as anybody we can get. All right, 
Coombe, give him a trial ! 3 

DENVER. 
What did you say, guv'nor? 

SKINNER. 

(Indicating COOMBE.) No, he'll tell you. I can't 
shout any more. 4 

COOMBE. 5 

You can come here as porter and sleep on the 
premises. ( Takes a shilling and counts on his fingers.} 
Look ! Fifteen shillings a week fifteen shillings ! 

DENVER. 

Oh, thank you ! thank you ! Dicky so glad ! so 
glad ! so glad ! 

136 



Goes up R. of 
table. 



* Goes -up behind 
chair R. 

* Crosses to R. 
shouting. 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



1 Coomb t got* 
up stag* round 
R. of table and 
off L. v. K. 
DfHVfr/ol- 
lovit hint. 



* Skinner titt R. 
of tablt. 



COO M BE. 

(Beckoning DENVER.) Come this way, I'll show 
you where you've got to sleep. Sleep ! l 

DENVER. 

Dicky stay here always Dicky very fond of Mr. 
Coombe Dicky stay here always! Thank you, Mr. 
Coombe thank you, too. sir ! Thank you, too ! 

(Exit at inner door? after COOMBE.) 

SKINNER. 3 

( To CRIPPS, taking out moulds .) Cripps, I want 
you to make me some keys to fit these moulds. 

(Explains to CRIPPS in dumb show. Enter CORKETT 
out side $ 

CORKETT. 

That idiot's a longtime gone. This was the place 
he went in at. (Looks through the keyhole.) There's 
a light inside. (Knocks.) 

SKINNER. (Puts out light.) 
Who the plague is that ? 

(CORKETT knocks again, and whistles in peculiar 
manner. 

CRIPPS. 

It's that blessed Duke of New York. 
SKINNER. (Relighting.) 
You'd better let him in or else he'll kick up a row. 

(CRIPPS goes to door, unlocks it, admits CORKETT, 
who is very loudly dressed, outrageous tweed snif, 
eyeglass, crutch stick, white hat, light kid gloT.>es. 
CRIPPS locks door, leaving key.)* 

CORKETT. 

How do, dear boys !' Ah, Spider, old chummy ! 
(Waving his hand to SKINNER.) Bless you, bless 
you ! 

'37 



' CriMs returitt 
to nil seat at 

he ad cj tabU. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. IV 



SKINNER. 

Bless yourself ! Pray for some brains. What do 
you want here ? 

CORKETT. 
L. s. d., especially the L. 

SKINNER. 

What have you done with that last twenty 
pounds? 



* Crosset to L. 



1 L. u. B. 



* Goes up and 
tits on bales. 



Blued it! 1 



CORKETT. 



SKINNER. 



(Looking at CORKETT'S clothes^) You've been to 
my tailor's again, I see. 

CORKETT. 

Yes. Neat, ain't they ? Told him to put 'em 
down to your account. Hope you don't mind it, 
dear boy ! 

SKINNER. 

( Venomously^) Take care, you brute ! You're 
nearly at the end of your tether ! 

(Enter COOMBE.)* 

COOMBE. 

(Seeing CORKETT, shakes hands with him.) Why, 
it's our young friend, 'Enery Corkett. 

CORKETT. 
Dear old Father Christmas ! 3 

SKINNER. 

Now, Coombe, have you stowed away your March 
hare? 

138 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



COOMBE. 1 

Yes, I've took him up to the cock-loft and give 
him some bread and cheese and left him. He seems 
happy enough. 

SKINNER. 

Then business sharp. Where's the money-box ? 
(COOMBE takes cash-box out of chimney, opens it and 



1 Sits L. oftabtf 



takes out money.} 
CRIPPS. 



How much ? 



COOMBE. 
A hundred and eighty. 

SKINNER. 

Only a hundred and eighty for all that plate? I'd 
better have left it on Sir George's sideboard I shall 
miss it the next time I dine with him. 

COOMBE. 

(Giving money to CRIPPS and SKINNER.) That 
clears Sir George's plate. 

SKINNER. 

(Pocketing money?) Right! (TVCOOMBE.) Now, 
my venerable chum, just one word with you about 
Lady Blanche's jewels where are they ?* 

COOMBE. (Uneasily.} 

Well, you see, my dear boy, I didn't like to leave 
them here and and so I took 'em to my own place 
my shop in the Gray's Inn Road. I thought 
they'd be safe there. 1 

SKINNER. 

Now, Coombe, you're telling lies, you know. Lies ! 
and setting a bad example to Cripps here ! 

139 



* Coombe shuts 
cask-box with 
a bang. 



' Coombt re- 
turns cask-tax 
to chimney- 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. IV 



1 At top of tabU. 



2 Uj> stage. 

8 Comes down L. 
4 Music cue. 



CRIPPS. 1 

Yes. Father Christmas, don't you try any hanky 
panky tricks with this child. You know me. Handle 
me gentle, use me well, fair and square, I've got the 
temper of a sucking lamb, haven't I, Spider? 

SKINNER. 

You have, Mr. Cripps, and also its playfulness and 
innocence. 

CRIPPS. 

But rub me the wrong way come any dodge, try 
to do me out of my fair share of the swag, and then 
! (Brings fist on table with tremendous forced) 

SKINNER. 

Then you have the ferocity of the British lion in 
mortal combat with the apocryphal unicorn. Now, 
Coombe, once more, where are Lady Blanche's 
diamonds? 

COOMBE. 

My dear boy, I've got a gentleman coming to see 
'em next week a gentleman from Amsterdam. 

CRIPPS. 
Damn Amsterdam ! 

SKINNER. 
Never mind that, I want my property ! 

CORKETT. 2 

(Aside?) There's a reward of a thousand pounds 
offered for them jewels, I'll have a cut in here ! * 4 

(DENVER creeps on and hides behind bales and 
listens with great interest?) 

SKINNER. 

Those jewels are worth six thousand pounds, and 
once more for the last time, where are they ? 
140 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



1 Butt ring fist on 
table. 



1 Banging fist 
on tablt. 



Banging fitt 
on table. 



4 Banging fitt 
on table. 



COO M BE. 

Don't get into a temper, Spider ! I tell you I may 
have a customer for 'em next week we'll settle for 
'em then ! ' 

SKINNER. 

No, we won't settle for them then, we'll settle for 
them now ! * 

CRIPPS. 
Yes, we'll settle for 'em now ! * 

CORKETT. 
(Joining in.) Yes, we'll settle for 'em now ! * 

SKINNER. 

(Turning sharply on CORKETT.) You infernal 
jackanapes, what business is it of yours ? 

CORKETT. 

Every business of mine, Mr. Spider, look there ! 
( Turns out his pockets, shows they are empty.') That's 
what business it is of mine ! I mean to have fifty 
quid out of this ! 

SKINNER. 
Oh, you do, do you ? 

CORKETT. 

(Promptly.) If you don't give it me I'll let on 
about Hatton Gardens four year ago. 

(DENVER starts violently and shows great interest.) 

SKINNER. 
( With deadly rage.) I f you say h al f a word more 

CORKETT. 
(Promptly.) Half a word more ! ' 

(SKINNER seises him by the throat, COOMBE seizes 
SKINNER.) 

141 



Skinner seiiet 
Corkett by tkt 
throat ana 
throws him 
round*, into 
the arms of 
Cri* 
Coomb* , L., 
seizes Skinner 
from behind 
and restraint 
him. 



ACT IV 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. IV 



COOMBE. 

(Alarmed.) Come, come, my dear boys, this won't 
do! 

CRIPPS. 
(Holding CORKETT.) * Stow it, Spider, stow it ! 

SKINNER. 

I've given you rope enough, Mr. Corkett ! 
CORKETT. 

(Still held by CRIPPS.) Don't you talk about rope, 
Spider! If it comes to hanging, it won't be me, it'll 
be you ! 

(DENVER shows great interest. SKINNER tries to 
get at CORKETT. COOMBE interposes^) 

SKINNER. 

Curse you, will you never give me peace till I kill 
you ? 

CORKETT. 

Yes, as you killed Geoffrey Ware ! 

(DENVER,, no longer able to restrain himself, leaps up 
with a terrific scream of joy.) 

DENVER. 

Ah ! innocent ! Innocent ! Thank God ! 
ALL. 

(Turns round and sees DENVER.) Who is it ? Who 
is it? 

DENVER. 

Wilfred Denver ! ( To CRIPPS and CORKETT, who 
are in front of door -.)* Stand from that door! 

(They do not move. DENVER flourishes crowbar 
CRIPPS and CORKETT retreat down stage.) 
142 



SC. IV 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV 



1 ALL. 

(Overcome, helpless?) Stop him ! Stop him ! 

DENVER. 

Stop me ! The whole world shall not stop me 
now! 

(Gets through door * and bangs it to.} 
PICTURE. 

END OF ACT IV. 



t Beginners. 
Spider, Olive. 



up and 
work with. 
candle. 

Music to of en. 

1 The stage set 
with cabinet 
fixed to flat, 
so as to draw 
off at change. 
window cur- 
tain -R.flat. 

* L. crosses stage 
to door R. and 
calls off. 



\ Call Coomoe, 
Cripps, 
Corkett. 



* Comes to chair 
c sits. 



ZW-R. 



R. 



ACT V. * 

SCENE I. SKINNER'S villa as in the first scene of 
Act 2, Night. Moonlight^- 

(Enter SKINNER with a lighted candle and bag by 
door.) * 

SKINNER. 3 

Olive! (Pause.) Olive! Olive!* 



OLIVE. 



(Outside.) Yes! 



SKINNER. 

Come down at once, I want you. 4 (Takes jewel 
case and cash-box out of bag.) Now, have I got every- 
thing? Yes, I think so, everything worth taking. 
Coombe's private cash-box. (Taking a jemmy from 
his pocket and prises cash-box open, takes out jewels.) 
As I thought Lady Blanche's jewels ! The old fox ! 
The old sweep ! I knew he meant to rob me. (Takes 
out a bag of money from cash-box.) Hillo, Mr. 
Coombe's private savings ! That's lucky. They'll 
come in handy at a pinch. (Puts bag in his pocket) 

(Enter OLIVE. 5 She is in a dressing gown and with 
her hair down as if newly aroused from sleep.) 



OLIVE., 



What do you want ? 
144 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT V 



SKINNER. 1 

Shut the door. 

OLIVE. 
Herbert! Something has happened. What is it? 

SKINNER. 
The worst. That man Denver is alive. 

OLIVE. 
. Alive ! No Impossible ! 

SKINNER. 

Yes, and has got on our scent. Knows every- 
thing. 

OLIVE. 

Have I not always said a day of retribution would 
come ? 

SKINNER. 

For Heaven's sake don't preach now. Listen to 
me, and if you make one mistake in carrying out my 
instructions, it's death and ruin to me. Now will 
you obey? 

OLIVE. 
Oh, Herbert ! 

SKINNER. 
No sermons. Will you do as I tell you ? 

OLIVE. 
You know I will if it's to save you. 

SKINNER. 

You see all this? (Opens cabinet puts all the 
jewels, etc., into it.) 



OLIVE. 



Yes. 
10 



145 



ACT V 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. I 



1 Puts Olive to 
R. C 



SKINNER. 

While this is safe, I'm safe, 
ruined you understand ? 



If it's found, I'm 



Yes. 



OLIVE. 



SKINNER. 



(Locking cabinet and giving the key to OLIVE.) 
There's the key. The moment I leave this house, 
take all that, sew it securely in your dress, walk to 
Lewisham, take the first train to Charing Cross and 
the morning express to Paris go to the old address, 
I'll join you as soon as I can. 1 Remember what's 
at stake. If you find yourself watched or followed, 
get rid of it burn it, plant it on somebody else, for 
Heaven's sake, don't be found with it on you. 
Don't write to me. Now, is that all ? Yes, that's all. 

\ 
OLIVE. 

I shall not see you again ? 

SKINNER. 
Not for a week or two. Good-bye ! (Kisses her.} 

OLIVE. 

Good-bye, Herbert. Take care ! 
SKINNER. 

It's you who must take care. I can trust you, 
Olive ? 

OLIVE. 
Yes, I will make no mistake. It shall not be found. 

SKINNER. 

Good girl ! I shall make something of you yet. 
(Whistle heard off) 

Coombe ! (To OLIVE.) Now be off. The moment 
the house is clear set to work. 

(Exit SKINNER.) * 
146 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT Y 



OLIVE. 
Oh, Herbert, what am I doing for your sake ? 

(Exit OLIVE.) 1 
(Enter SKINNER * followed by COOMBE, CRIPPS and 

CORKETT.) * 



COOMBE. 3 

My dear boy ! What luck ! Did you follow 
him up ? 

SKINNER. 4 

Yes, to a big place in Kensington Gardens; he's 
John Franklin, the millionaire. The Silver King ! 

COOMBE. 
Well, what did you do, my dear boy ? 

SKINNER. 

Cheeked it out, went into the place and asked for 
him gave my name and was shown up. 

CORKETT. 5 
And what did he say, Spider? 

SKINNER. 

He's just driven off into the country Heaven 
knows why ; but I got his address and I can put 
my hand on him when I choose. 

CRIPPS. 6 
Yes, but can you stop his jaw ? 

SKINNER. 

Yes, I can stop his if, I can stop yours ! Now look 
here, you three we are perfectly safe while we hold 
our tongues. There's not a fraction of evidence 
against us, and there never will be if we keep quiet. 
But the moment one of us opens his mouth, it's 
transportation for all of us. Now, do we stick to- 
gether ? 

147 



1 Door*. 



1 Door t_ 

\ Call Baxttr, 
Larkyn. 



L. of Coomb*. 






ACJT V 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. i 



* Coombe crosses 
to L. Cripps 
and Corkett 
gets round 
back to R. 



CRIPPS. 
Yes, of course we will, Spider. 

SKINNER. 

Right ! Now there's not a moment to waste. 
Coombe, you go to your place in the Gray Inn's 
Road. 1 You may get a visit from the police to-mor- 
row be ready for them ; destroy every scrap that 
could tell a tale. Sharp's the word off you go ! 

COOMBE. 
But the swag at the wharf ? 

SKINNER. 

The swag is not at the wharf. It's safe. Now 
will you go ? 

(Hustles COOMBE off) * 

Now you, Cripps, you go to the Lawn, Kensing- 
ton, and watch the house. 



* Door L., Skin- 
ner gets back 
toe. 



*R. 



Whose house ? 



CRIPPS. 3 



SKINNER. 



Denver's Franklin's, or whatever he calls him- 
self take the Moucher with you and send him to 
the Carr Lane Crib to report every three hours. 

CRIPPS. 
But the blessed swag what about that ? 

SKINNER. 
Don't I tell you the swag is safe? 

CRIPPS. 

Yes, but where is it ? What do you call safe ? 
148 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT V 



SKINNER. 

I call a thing safe, Cripps, when that thing is in 
my possession and its whereabouts is known only to 
myself. Now the swag is safe in that sense. 



CRIPPS. 



That's all my eye ! 



SKINNER. 
You shall have your share when the time comes. 

CORKETT. 1 
(Aside.) Yes, and I'll have mine. 

SKINNER. 

No words~(70 CRIPPS.) Bundle off ! 
(Shoves CRIPPS off.) * 

CORKETT. 8 
And what am I to do, Spider ? 

SKINNER. 

You ! 4 It was your cursed blabbing that brought 
us into this infernal mess. Now I'll give you just 
one word of caution. If you ever open your mouth 
one single half inch, it's all up with you. If that 
Hatton Garden business comes to light if it's ever 
known that Denver didn't do it, it will be known 
that Corkett did. We've made up our minds 
that if one of us has to swing for it, it'll be you. 
Now you're warned. 5 

CORKETT. 

Oh yes, Spider, I'll take my davy I'll never men- 
tion it again. 

SKINNER. 

( Taking money bag from pocket?) Now if I let you 
have a sufficient sum, do you think you can manage 
to make yourself scarce for three months ? 

149 



1 Door I- 



8 Dropping 
down R. 



Sift l_ c. 



ACT V 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. I 



1 R. of Skinner. 



* Crossing to L. 



* Left. 



I'll try, Spider. 

tinent if I'd got coin enough. 
Amsterdam. 



CORKETT. 1 
I should like to go on the Con- 



I've got a pal 



in 



SKINNER. 
Very well, I'll let you have fifty pounds. 

CORKETT. 

Fifty pounds ! Oh, come, Spider, don't be stingy 1 
Three months and they're sure to cheat me. I can't 
speak a word of Dutch. Make it a hundred and I'll 
be off slick to-morrow morning. 

SKINNER. 

I shall give you sixty and not a penny more. 
(Begins to count out money aside.} Coombe's money 
comes in handy. 

CORKETT. 
( Watching him, aside.} That's one of old Coombe's 



bags. How did Spider get 
brought the swag here. 



that ? He must have 



SKINNER. 

(Giving him money.} There you are, and don't 
reckon on getting any more from me. I've had just 
as much of you as I can swallow. There's a train 
from Liverpool Street to Harwich at eight o'clock. 
You'd better go by it. 

CORKETT. 1 

All right, Spider, I'm off. Ta, ta. 



SKINNER. 

I think I've shut his mouth for the time ; but the 

moment he's spent the money he'll come back. 

Curse them, I won't trust any of them. Now let me 

see ! Olive is safe ! The swag is safe ! Nothing 

150 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT v 



can touch me. The Grange, Gardenhurst, Bucks. 
Now then for Mr. John Franklin. 

(Puts out light and Exit.} ' 
(A pause. Enter BAXTER cautiously by window.)* 



BAXTER. 3 

The light out. Which way did they go ? He 
brought that stuff here. It must be in the house 
somewhere. Oh, if I could only nab you, Spider. 
To think that I know that that rascal has had his 
finger in every jewel robbery for the last ten years, 
and I've never been able to lay my hands on him. 
But I think I shall be one too many for you this 
time. There's some big swag about here to-night, 
and I don't leave this house till I've smelt it out. 4 
(Hears footsteps and retreats to window.) 8 

(Enter OLIVE.) 
(Aside.) The Spider's wife ! 

OLIVE.' 

They have left the house now is the time. (Goe* 
to cabinet and unlocks it.) Oh, how my heart beats. 
Courage for Herbert's sake. Hark, who's that ? 
Somebody at that window. Who can it be ? (Leaves 
cabinet open, stands back, touches BAXTER screams.) 
Who's there? 

BAXTER. 
Silence for your life. 

(Struggles with OLIVE, who would scream out, but 
that BAXTER puts his hand over lier mouth and 
hustles her offT>. R.) 

Who's this coming? Is it Spider? Steady, Sam, 
steady ! (Hides behind curtain) 

(Re-Enter CORKETT.) 7 * 

CCRKETT. 

Spider's safe off. He's all right the swag must 



1 Door\~ 
*R.C 



4 Gats towards 
D. R. 

R.C. 



* Enters R. 



Call Denver, 
Ntlly^Jaikit, 
Citty, N*d. 



ACT V 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. I 



be here. He couldn't have carted it nowhere else. 
Now where's he put it ? All's quiet if I can only 
collar it I will make myself scarce. I'll go to the 
continent and enjoy myself. (Knocks against cabinet?) 
What's that ? Why it's the blessed cabinet. Crimes ! 
It's open ! (Feels inside?) These are the cases ! 
Here's a lucky squeeze. (Takes jewel cases out, etc?) 
Golly, here's all the blessed lot of it. Why it'll be a 
perfect little gold mine to me. (Kneels down to look 
at jewels and stuffs them into his pockets quickly?) I 
can be honest now for the rest of my life. After all, 
honesty is the best policy. (Stuffs one case under 
his waistcoat?) Won't old Spider be jolly mad when 
he finds it out. I'm off my name's Walker ! 

(During the latter part ofCORKETT'ssfleec/t, LARKIN' 
a detective, has sneaked round from window?- As 
CORKETT rises and is going off* he confronts him. 
TABLEAU. CORKETT then turns to escape right 
and is met by BAXTER who pounces on him?) 



TOL. 



BAXTER. 

No, it isn't ! It's Corkett ! I know you, you 
young blackguard. (To LARKIN.) Turn on the 
light. 

CORKETT. 3 
Nobbled Baxter fourteen years ! 

BAXTER. 

Now, my young friend, turn out. Let's see what's 
in your pockets. 

CORKETT. 
I've only got my handkerchief. 

BAXTER. 
Let's have a look at it. 

CORKETT, 

And a bunch of keys ! 
152 



SC. I 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT V 



1 From toat 
pocket. 



BAXTER. 
Turn out produce ! 

(CORKETT begins to gingerly fumble about and pro- 
duces not hing.) 

Now, will you hand over? 

CORKETT. 
Yes, sir. (Produces a jewel case.) 1 

BAXTER. 

(Opens it.) The Honourable Mrs. Farebrother's 
rings. Stolen from her maid while travelling. 

CORKETT. 
I don't know neither her nor her maid. 

BAXTER. 
Fire away ! The next ! 

(CORKETT produces another? BAXTER looks at it.) 

Hunt and Cask. Bracelets ! Bond Street rob- 
bery last Autumn. 

CORKETT. 
I can prove an alibi. I was in quod at the time. 

BAXTER. 

The next ? Look alive ! Here, I've got no time 
to waste. ( Taps CORKETT'S waistcoat where case is.) 
What's this? (Takes out case and looks at it.) By 
Jove, Lady Blanche Wynter's jewels ! 

CORKETT. 

Yes, I was just agoing to take 'em to her. 
BAXTER. 

I'll save you the trouble. 

153 



1 From coat 
pocket. 



ACT V 



THE SILVER KING 



SC. II 



CORKETT. 

There's a reward of a thousand pounds offered for 
them jewels. 

BAXTER. 
I'll save you the trouble of taking that too. 

CORKETT. 

I say, you know, I'll just tell you how this hap- 
pened now it ain't my fault, it's my misfortune 



1 Baxter takes 
hold ofCor- 
kett by the col- 
lar and hustles 
him off*., c. 



* Music. 



1 Lights full up. 



Music. 



% Call Skinner. 



* Comes down 
and sits on 
seat R. C. 



Bypath R U. K. 

L. V. B. 



BAXTER. 

Oh yes, you're a very much injured young man. 
Now, my sweet innocent, you just come along nicely 
with me. 

CORKETT. 

Yes, so I will. I'll come like a lamb. But I say, 
you know, this ain't my swag not a blessed bit of 
it. It's all Spider's. 1 

BAXTER. 

We'll talk about Spider by and by. Trot ! 
(Exeunt all through window.) * 
END OF SCENE I. 



SCENE II." 

SCENE : The Grange, Gardenhurst. As in Act 
IV. SCENE 2. Early Morning* 

(NELLY discovered at gate 6 looking anxiously off.)** 

NELLY. 

Make haste, Jaikes, make haste and bring him to 
me. 7 What if Jaikes could not find him or if Will 
would not come? Oh yes, he will the train is 
whirling him to me. He is coming he is coming! 

(DENVER and JAIKES Enter* DENAER sends 
JAIKES off.} 9 

154 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT V 



DENVER. 

(To JAIKES, as they enter.) Go round to the front 
and bring her to me. 

(Exit JAIKES.) ' 
(At gate, sees NELLY.) Ah, there she is. (Aloud) 

(NELLY turning, sees him, does not recognise him for 
a minute he holds out his arms and she drops 
gradually into them.) 

NELLY. 2 

Is it my Will ? My Will this face this white 
hair my Will alive ? 

DENVER.' 

(Clasping her.) Nell! (Kisses her hungrily a long 
embrace.) 

NELLY. 

(Hysterically.) Oh, Will don't speak. Don't say 
a word. Only let me look at you. Oh, let me cry or 
else my heart will break. Don't stop me, Will. 
Ha, ha, ha ! (Sobbing and laughing in DENVER'S 
arms.) 

(Enter JAIKES.) 4 

JAIKES. 

(Aside.) I can't find her nowhere she ain't at 
home. (Sees NELLY in DENVER'S arms) Ah, yes, 
she's at home at last. (Creeping quietly off on tip- 
toe.) 

DENVER. 
(To JAIKES.) Where are you going ? 

JAIKES. 
I'm going to have a look at the weather, Master 

(Exit JAIKES.)' 
155 



ACT V 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



DENVER. 

(Sitting on seat, NELLY at his feet* soothing her.) 
That's right, have a good cry and ease your heart. 
Oh, Nell! Nell ! I've such news for you the best 
news ever spoken. There is no other news think 
of it I never killed that man, I am innocent ! 

NELLY. 

Oh, Will, can it be so? Oh, Will, it seems to me 
as if I were dreaming. I can only look in this dear 
changed face and ask " Is it true ? " 

DENVER. 
Yes, my own. Do you think I am changed ? 

NELLY. 

Yes, and no changed and not changed you are 
always the same to me you are always my Will ! 
You are not changed a bit. 

DENVER. 

Nell, our children our little Ned and Cissy 
where are they ? 

NELLY. 

I was waiting for you to ask that, I've been watch- 
ing them all night. Come, we'll go and wake them. 

(Enter JAIKES, * with the two children, one on each 
side, dragging him by each hand.) 

JAIKES. 

Gently gently, missy gently, Master Ned ! 
That's my old rheumaticky arm. Don't you pull it 
out of joint, you young Turk. 

DENVER. 

(Meeting children and taking them to seat, puts them 
on his knees^f Ned, Cissy, do you know me? I'm 
your father that was dead I am alive again and I 
have come home to you, my brave boy, my dear little 
girl ; put your arms round my neck, both of you. 
Quite, quite close that's it, my darlings! 
156 



* Cissy on R. knee 
and Ned on L. 
knee. 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT V 



CISSY. x 
I know who that little girl was that you lost ! 

DENVER. 
Well, tell me who was she ? 

CISSY. 
Why me, wasn't she ? 

DENVER. 

Yes, I've found her now I shall never lose her 
again. 

CISSY. 

No, we shall never let you go away again, shall we, 
mamma? 

NED. 
But you are crying ? 

CISSY. 
And Jaikes, you too? What is there to cry for? 

JAIKES. 

Don't you take no notice of me, missy. (Blubber- 
ing?) I'm not crying I'm only laughing the wrong 
way. 

NELLY. 2 

Cissy, when you were a little baby and could just 
run about, you used to call somebody upstairs and 
down all over the house don't you remember? 
Who was it ? 

CISSY. 
(Hugging DENVER.) Daddy ! 

JAIKES.* 

Yes, missy, and I can remember when your daddy 
used to go toddling a calling " Jaikes " all over the 
house. Ah, Master Will, I can just remember your 

157 



ACT V 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



1 Netty gets to 
back of seat. 

* Bypath R. u. B. 
stands at gate 



\ Call Baxter, 
Larkyn* 



great great-grandfather. I've seen five generations of 
you and I've never had a happier moment than this 
in all my life. 1 

(Enter SKINNER * looking anxiously round. His face 
is livid and his whole appearance betokens his intense 
anxiety?) * 

NELLY. 
(Sees SKINNER.) Look, Will, that man ! 

DENVER. 

(Starts up, sees SKINNER to JAIKES.) Jaikes, 
take my children away ! 

(Exit JAIKES 8 with CHILDREN.) 

(To NELLY.) Go into the house, Nell. I will 
come to you when I have sent this man away. 4 

NELLY. 5 

No, let me stay I would rather stay ! 

SKINNER. 
(Advancing?) Mr. John Franklin ! 

DENVER. 

Denver, sir. (To NELLY.) Come, Nell, I have no 
business with this man ! 



L. 3 K. 



Passes Netty to 



8 As they both 
get L. c. on 
Denver's L. 



.& 



SKINNER.' 

Mrs. Franklin, I hold your husband's life in my 
hands. If you value it, beg him to hear what I have 
to say. 

NELLY. 

Oh, Will, is it true ? Are you in danger ? Yes, 
let us hear what he has to say. 

SKINNER. 
What I have to say must be said to him alone. 

NELLY. 
Oh, Will, listen to him for my sake ! 



SC. II 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT V 



uc. 



DENVER. 
Remain within sight, within call. 1 (To SKINNER.) 

T^T i * 

JNow, sir ! 

SKINNER.* 
Look here, Mr. Franklin ! 

DENVER.' 
Denver, sir ! 

SKINNER. 

I thought I had better not mention that name I 
do not want to get you into trouble. 

DENVER. 
I'll take care you don't do that ! 

SKINNER. 

(Aside.} He seems calm he means mischief. 
(A/oud.) You appear to misunderstand me. 

DENVER. 

Not at all ! I understand you perfectly. I've 
watched you night and day for the last five months. 

SKINNER. 

( Whose self -confidence is shaken by DENVER'S cool- 
ness.) What do you know ! What have you seen ? 

DENVER. 
Enough for my purpose. 

SKINNER. 
And you mean to use it ? 

DENVER. 
I do. 

SKINNER. 

Take care ! I warn you, don't quarrel with me. 
I'll give you a chance if you're wise, you'll take it 
before it's too late. 

159 



ACT V 



THE SILVER KING 



sc. ii 



1 Enttrt L. 2 H. 



1 On L. of Dtn- 



Go on. 



DENVER. 
SKINNER. 



We are both in a devil of a mess. Why not make 
a mutual concession, silence for silence you keep 
quiet on my affairs, I will keep quiet on yours you 
allow me to pursue my business, I allow you to pur- 
sue yours. 

DENVER. 
And the alternative? 

SKINNER. 

You fight me I fight you. You proclaim me a 
thief and get me a possible five or seven years I 
proclaim you as a murderer and get you hanged. 
Take care, it's an edged tool we are playing with. It 
cuts both ways, but the handle is in my hands, and 
the blade towards you. You had better remain John 
Franklin Wilfred Denver is dead let him remain 



so. 



DENVER. 



You lie ! Down to your very soul, you lie ! Wil- 
fred Denver is alive, and to-day all the world shall 
know it. (Calls.) Nell ! 

(NELLY l comes to him.) 

There stands the murderer of Geoffrey Ware ! He 
wants to bargain with me, shall I hide myself or shall 
I tell the truth to the world ? Shall I make peace 
with him or shall Ifight him? Give him his answer, 
Nell! 

NELLY. 2 

You shall fight him ! 

DENVER. 
You have your answer go ! 

SKINNER. 

I shall go straight from here and give information 
to the police that Wilfred Denver is alive. 
160 



THE SILVER KING 



L. and two Wharf wings R. Wall piece across stage R. 
Cut border in 2. 

ACT V. 

Scene i Fancy chamber 2. Doors R. and L. Window R. C. 

Chamber borders. 
Scene 2 Repeat Scene 2 Act 4. 



PROPERTY PLOT. 

ACT I. 

Scene i Two round iron tables, i long wooden table, i form, 
4 wooden chairs, 3 high stools, 4 white wine glasses, 4 
green glasses, 4 champagne glasses, 4 tumblers, cork-screw, 
water bottle, 3 cigar boxes, small tray, plenty of bottles, 3 
small mugs, clay pipes, matches in match trays, 6 cigars, 
banknotes for Corkett, 2 glass cloths, champagne bottle 
with ginger ale in same, revolver for Denver, small cane for 
Corkett, plenty of newspapers. 

Scene 2 Nothing. 

Scene 3 Dark furniture, 3 chairs, large round table on casters, 
large cover on same, arm-chair. R., bookcase L., fireplace, 
clock, fire-irons, fender and mat to same, ornaments, on 
mantel-shelf R. candle in brass candlestick, table under 
window R., cover and books on same, lighted lantern, two- 
foot rule, box of burglars' tools, two loaded revolvers, 
knocker and bell off stage, L. C., plan for Cripps, chloro- 
form pad for Spider, small phial, carpet and rugs. 

ACT II. 

Scene I Square table C., with cover, 4 chairs, portmanteau, 
bag of coins, curtains to window C., revolver for Denver, 
knocker in prompt entrance, carpet and rugs. (Dress stage 
with fancy table plants, etc.) 

Scene 2 Bundle of papers (newspapers). 

Scene 3 Small tray, 2 glasses, Daily Telegraph, 2 long pipes, 
glass cloth, ivy for porch, rustic bench. 

Scene 4 Square table C., chairs R. and L. at back, time table 
hung on scene at back L., cloth on table, plate, knife and 
fork, small tray, jug of water and glass, newspaper, dish ( 
loaf of bread, gong-bell, toast, parsley. 

165 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT in. 

Scene i 2 arm-chairs, x small chair, small table, fancy book, 
curtains to window R. C., mats for door, pipe for Cripps, 
work basket, book, newspaper. 

Scene 2 Small round table, i old chair, small basket, sack 
with paper and coke, box of matches, organ off stage L., 5 
small packets, loaf of bread, coin for Jaikes, purse of coin 
for Olive, purse of coin for Denver, cake for child. 

ACT IV. 

Scene I Pocket-book and card, also cheque for Baxter, bank 

note and pocket-book for Denver. 
Scene 2 Garden seat with arms R. C., 2 garden chairs, bunch 

of flowers, locket for Nelly, plants and flowers. 
Scene 3 Large key, cigarette for Corkett. 
Scene 4 Stone bottle and 2 tin cups, cash-box in fireplace, 3 

packets of coin in same, crowbar, bales of goods, candle in 

old candlestick, 3 wooden chairs, old table, box of matches, 

wax moulds, letter for Denver. 

ACT V. 

Scene r Black bag, 3 jewel cases, cash-box, bag of coin, 
burglars' tools, lighted candle in brass candlestick, I chair, 
cabinet at back of scene, lighted lantern. 

Scene 2 Repeat Act 4, Scene 2. Handcuffs, 



GAS PLOT. 



ACT I. 



Scene i Full up. 
Scene 2 Three-quarters up. 
Scene 5 Down low to open. 
Fire to light. 



To work with candle. 



Scene i Full up. 
Scene 2 Full up. 
Scene 3 Full up. 
Scene 4 Full up. 



ACT II. 
Bunch at window. R. C. 



Bunch at window. 
1 66 



R. C. 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IIL 

Scene i Full up. 
Scene 2 Full up. 

Fire to light at cue R. H. 

Bunch or strip at back of cloth. 

ACT IV. 

Scene i Full up. 

Scene 2 Full up. Bunches in wings R. and L. 

Scene 3 Half up or Green foots. 

Scene 4 Half up or Green foots. 

Borders half up or Green. 

Green length behind wall. 

ACT V. 

Scene I Down to begin work with candle and lantern. 
Scene 2 Full up. Bunches in wings R. and L. 

NOTE. All changes made in darkness. 



167 



THE SILVER KING 



CALLS. 
ACT I. 

Scene r Beginners. Bilcher, Teddy, Tubbs, Geoffrey Ware, 

Jaikes, and others. 

At rise of curtain. Denver, Corkett, Baxter, Coombe 
At Denver's entrance. Spider. 
At Spider's entrance. Nelly. 
At Nelly's entrance. Coombe, Corkett. 

Scene 2 At opening of Scene 2. Ware, Leaker, Cripps, Spider. 
Scene 3 At opening of Scene S. Denver, Coombe. 



ACT II. 

Scene i Beginners. Nelly, Jaikes. 

At rise of curtain. Denver. 

At Denver's entrance. Baxter and Second Detective. 

At Jaikes' 2nd entrance. Railway Inspector, Rail- 
way Passengers, Newsboy, Tipsy Passenger, Lady 
Passenger. 

Scene 2 At opening of Scene 2. Parkyn, Binks, Bronson. 

Scene 3 At opening of Scene S. Susie. 

At Susie's 1st entrance. Denver. 



ACT III. 

Scene i Beginners. Spider and Olive. 

At rise of curtain. Coombe, Cripps, Spider's 

Servant. 

At 1st entrance Spider's Servant. Corkett. 
At Corkett' s entrance. Nelly. 
At Nelly's entrance. Jaikes. 

Scene 2 At Jaikes' 1st entrance. Cissy and all School-children. 
At Nelly's exit. Denver. 

At Jaikes' 2nd entrance. Nelly, Olive, Coombe. 
At Nelly's Entrance. Cissy. 
168 



THE SILVER KING 



ACT IV. 

Scene I Beginners. Baxter, Selwyn. 
At rise of curtain. Denver. 

At Denver's entrance. Jaikes, Tabby, Mrs. Gam- 
mage, Gaffer Pottle, and all villagers. 

Scene 2 At opening- of Scene Nelly, Cissy, and Ned. 
At Nelly's exit. Denver. 

Cue "Let me fetch her to you." Cissy, Gaffer Pottle. 
At Cissy's entrance. Nelly, Coombe, Cripps. 

Scene 3 At Coombe's entrance. Denver, Corkett. 
At Corkett's entrance. Spider. 

Scene 4 At Denver's entrance to hut. Corkett 



ACT V. 

Scene I Beginners. Spider, Olive. 

At opening of Scene 1. Coombe, Cripps, and 

Corkett. 

At Coombe' s entrance. Baxter and Larky n. 
At Corkett' s 2nd entrance. Nelly, Denver, Jaikes, 
Cissy, Ned. 

Scene a At opening of Scene 2. Spider. 

At Spider's entrance. Baxter, Larkyn. 



169 



329 



il 



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