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Full text of "Sixteenth Annual Report of The National Farm School November, 1913"

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Officers of the National Farm School 

1913—1914 



President 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Germantown. 

Vice-President Treasurer 

HARRY B. HIRSH ■. ISAAC H. SILVERMAN 

Executive Secretary 
A. H. FROMENSON 
407 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia. 

LOCAL BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, President. HARRY B. HIRSH, Vice-President 

I. H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer. A. H. FROMENSON, Execiitive Secretary. 

HONORARY TRUSTEES 

(Having served consecutively for ten years) 

ADOLPH EICHHOLZ I. H. SILVERMAN S. GRABFELDER 

HOWARD A. LOEB MORRIS A. KAUFMANN ARNOLD KOHN 

SIMON FRIEDBERGER 

ELECTED TRUSTEES 

(Term Expires 1914) (Term Expires 1915) (Term Expires 1916) 

BARNETT BINSWANGER HART BLUMENTHAL ALBERT J. BAMBERGER 

HARRY B. HIRSH HORACE HANO W. ATLEE BURPEE 

ABRAHAM ISRAEL ALFRED M. KLEIN HARRY FELIX 

LEON MERZ ISAAC LANDMAN DANIEL GIMBEL 

LOUIS NUSBAUM BARNEY SELIG JOS. N. SNELLENBURG 

NATIONAL AUXILIARY BOARD 

LOUIS I. AARON Pittsburgh, Pa. 

DANIEL ALEXANDER Salt Lake City, Utah 

MRS. JULIUS ANDREWS Boston, Mass. 

HENRY BEER New Orleans, La. 

I. W. BERNHEIM Louisville, Ky. 

HARRY CUTLER Providence, R. L 

NATHAN ECKSTEIN Seattle, Wash. 

HENRY FRANK Natchez, Miss. 

MAURICE FREIBERG Cincinnati, Ohio 

BERNARD GINSBURG .Detroit, Mich. 

A. HIRSHHEIMER LaCrosse, Wis. 

ADOLPH LEWISOHN New York City 

JACOB M. LOEB Chicago, 111. 

LOUIS NEWBERGER Indianapolis, Ind. 

J. E. OPPENHEIMER Butte, Mont. 

E. RAAB Richmond, Va. 

EDW. E. RICHARDS Mobile, Ala. 

ALEX. SANGER Dallas, Tex. 

LOUIS SCHLESINGER Newark, N. J. 

SIG. SICHEL Portland, Ore. 

SIGMUND SONNEBORN Baltimore, Md. 

DAVID STERNBERG Memphis, Tenn. 

MORRIS WEIL Lincoln, Neb. 

HARRIS WEINSTOCK Sacramento, Cal. 

A. YOUNKER Des Moines, Iowa 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



THE FACULTY 



JOSEPH KRAUSKOPF, D. D., President. 
JOHN HOSEA WASHBURN, Ph. D, (Gottingen). 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry, Director 
WILLIAM H. BISHOP, B. Sc. (Mass. Agricultural College), 

Professor of Agriculture, Superintendent of the Farms 
WALTER F. FANCOURT (Kew Botanical Gardens, England), Professor of Horticulture 
P. H. PROUTY, B. S. (Mass. Agricultural College), 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 
GEORGE EATON, Jr., Assistant Professor in Agriculture 
MRS. CHARLES NIGHTINGALE, Instructor in English 
LYDIA PRICHETT BORDEN, Instructor in Biology and Natural Science. 
WESLEY MASSINGER, V. S., Professor of Veterinary Science and Farm Hygiene 
MISS HETTY ABRAHAM, Matron 
MRS. JOSEPHINE LOEB, Assistant Matron 
HARMAN KRAFT, Foreman, Home Farm 
HOWARD F. YOUNG, Foreman, Schoenfeld Farm No. 3. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 



Finance Committee Supply Committee 

Harry B. Hirsh, Chairman Hart Blumenthal, Chairman 

Arnold Kohn Barnett Binswanger Adolph Eichholz Harry B. Hirsh 

Budget Committee House Committee 

Alfred M. Klein, Chairman Leon Merz, Chairman 

Hart Blumenthal Harry B. Hirsh Jos. N. Snellenburg Howard A. Loeb 

Leon Merz Bernard Selig t, ^ ^ ^ 

-rx T- ,• TT TT Property Committee 

Harry renx Horace Hano t, c^ ^r • 

Bebnard Selig, Chairman 

Committee on Curriculum a. J. Bamberger Simon Friedberger 

Louis Nusbaum, Chairman 
J. H. Washburn W. H. Bishop Graduates Committee 

Alfred M. Klein Isaac Landman Isaac Landman, Chairman 

, , . . ^ . Hart Blumenthal Harry B. Hirsh 

Admission Committee 

Morris A. Kaufmann, Chairman Farm Products 

Isaac Landman Bernard Selig Daniel Gimbel, Chairman 

J. H. Washburn Alfred M. Klein Harry Felix Samuel Grabfelder 

Committee on Schoenfeld Farms 

Barnett Binswanger, Chairman 

Leon Merz Harry Felix 

LADIES' EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOCAL BOARD 

Mrs. R. B. Schoneman, Chairman Mrs. Joseph Guckenheimer, Treasurer 

Mrs. Harold C. Krauskopf, Secretary 
Mrs. A. J. Bamberger Mrs. Harry B. Hirsh 

Mrs. Isidore Baum Miss Frieda Jonas 

Mrs. Max Berg Mrs. David Kirschbaum 

Mrs. David Berlizheimer Mrs. A. M. Klein 

Mrs. Hart Blumenthal Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf 

Mrs. B. B. Bloch Mrs. M. F. Langfeld 

Mrs. C. Davidson Mrs. Henry Rosenthal 

Mrs. Adolph Eichholz Mrs. Meyer Schamberg 

Mrs. Martha Fleisher Mrs. I. H. Silverman 

Mrs. Simon Friedberger Mrs. Meyer Sycle 

Honorary Surgeon to the School, Sidney L. Olsho, M. D., 220 S. Sixteenth St. Phila. 

Honorary Dentist to the School, L. I. Bernstein, D. D. S., 1901 N. 32d Street, Phila. 

Honorary Oculist to the School, J. Chas. Knipe, M. D., 2035 Chestnut Street, Phila. 

Accountant to the School, Alfred M. Gross, 406 Mutual Life Building, Phila. 



"Light Amid the Encircling Gloom" 

Address by Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D. 

Founder and President of The National Farm School, at its Sixteenth jJnnual Meeting 
FARM SCHOOL. PA., OCTOBER 19. 1913 



I. 

No one need begrudge us the glow of pride with which we 
welcome you on this annual pilgrimage to The National Farm 
School. The occasion is significant. It bears the palm of victory, a 
victory that rests in the consciousness that we are to-day witnessing 
the fulfilment of a prophecy, dared by us when this Farm School 
was first projected, nineteen years ago. 

We feel justified in congratulating ourselves because all that we 
look upon is eloquent testimony that the visions we followed were 
not illusions, but a light that showed us the path "amid the encircling 
gloom," 

We have builded better than we knew. Hence we do not apolo- 
gize for the thrill of pride that throbs within us. We realize that in 
the fall of 1894 we foresaw the urgent need of the twentieth cen- 
tury, and began the agitation for The National Farm School, with 
the result that we are here foregathered under the auspices of this 
institution, surrounded by the produce of the fields, and this splen- 
did showing of young manhood, the students of the school, who 
have dedicated themselves to the cause we have sacredly fostered, 
from the day of its opening, sixteen years ago. 

In our congratulations are mingled the recollections of the scorn 
and sneer of our opponents and detractors, some of whom have not 
yet ceased. We recall the fact that in promoting this institution we 
had to travel the length and breadth of the land to raise the neces- 
sary funds to establish it. What that meant only those who are 
intimate with the rise of this institution can retell. But it implied 
teaching the ignorant how to vitalize their wealth, as well as of in- 
structing society in general as to the importance and necessity of 
agriculture. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Looking back on those early years of the Farm School, we can 
see more clearly now than we could then that it was a venturesome 
undertaking to have dared to buy the first of our farms, in the year 
1895, when the undertaking was subjected to the ridicule of an 
overwhelming majority. 

It seems now the daring of a "fool rushing in where angels 
feared to tread," that, in 1896, with the opposition of those who 
were relied upon to assist, we dared break ground and lay the cor- 
nerstone of the first building, which has ever been in our hearts the 
Main Building. 

We had perhaps a unique distinction in daring to open a school 
with only eight pupils. Some even of that small number were skep- 
tical as to the value of the instruction they were to receive. Some 
of them were discouraged by the misgivings even of their own 
families. 

The fact that we started is the important one. We had been 
told that even if our institution were opened, we could get no pupils, 
that boys would not leave the city and isolate themselves in the 
country. This assertion was followed by the wail of those who, 
wise in their own conceit, were positive that, even if by strong per- 
suasion we induced a few students to attend our school, we would 
not retain them, and at the end of a short term we would have 
nothing but empty benches and the record of a dismal failure. 

Such was the attitude of mind when we started. This educa- 
tional infant was not born into the world with joy. There were no 
loud acclaims when it was known that our doors were open. There 
resounded no jubilant fanfares of welcome. It is, therefore, the 
more remarkable to note the change of attitude that has taken place 
within the few years encompassed by the history of our school. 

Within the sixteen years that we have been in existence there 
has been a total shifting of viewpoint on the part of the nation 
toward the farmer. Farming and farm life were then regarded as 
the least attractive of pursuits. They represented the lowest round 
in the social ladder. The farmer was the defeated, the thwarted. 
He was beaten in the game by the business man or professional man, 
and resorted to the farm as a side door to the poorhouse. The 
farmer was then without prestige or position. He was a hayseed, 
a jehu, unlettered, uncultivated, the butt of every jokesmith, the 
model for every cartoonist. If a man could do nothing else, or had 
failed in everything undertaken, he was advised to take to the farm. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



If our infant school had any lullaby crooned over its cradle, it was 
the song of derision. Nothing was regarded as so preposterous 
then as the thought that a city boy would voluntarily leave the 
swarming city, with its allurements, its theaters and resorts, for the 
quiet and simplicity of country life. 

The fact that present-day society has departed widely from this 
conception of farming and the farmer is due to influences greater 
than any we foresaw. The entire nation has changed its views on 
farming. The position of farmer has been elevated. The humblest 
of vocations in our day has become the most exalted. 

Farming has become one of the most scientific of callings. In- 
stead of being the shiftless, haphazard pursuit of unskilled men, it 
has now risen in the esteem of men because of the knowledge re- 
quired of the farmer. He can walk among men with his head erect. 
Without him the millions starve. He makes possible the prosperity 
of our land and of its people. Without him Wall Street becomes 
a heap of ruins, and all bonds and stocks a bundle of waste paper. 
Cut off the prairies from the mart, and your cities are as Tyre and 
Nineveh of old. We always knew this, but we never knew how true 
it was until recent days forced the truth home. 

The greatest concern of the nation now is not war ships and 
marines. There are greater burdens confronting our Government 
than the tariff' and the currency bills. How to make food grow 
where before grew weeds is now of larger consideration to Gov- 
ernment and Senate than war balloons or armored aeroplanes. The 
daily paper that a decade ago would have excluded from its columns 
matters appertaining to farming, now welcomes contributions, even 
goes the length of devoting entire pages to the problems of the 
farm. 

Colleges, too, that two decades ago regarded Greek of more 
consequence than grain, and looked upon the classics as the sole 
means of educational salvation, who scorned the farmer as a boor 
and held its nose from the odor of the barn ; whose conception of 
culture was being able to do nothing useful — yes, even the foremost 
of the colleges are eager to introduce courses in agriculture in their 
curriculum. 

The importance of the function of the farmer has become the 
concern of the people. It touches them in their daily lives on every 
side. The "Back to the Farm" slogan is no longer a bit of unasked- 
for advice, but a song of peace as those who chant it enter into a 



8 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

more efficient and joyful life. "Back to the Farm" means back to 
sanity, back to health, back to efficiency, and, most vital of all, back 
to life. 

The nation realizes as never before that the source of life is 
rooted in the soil, and that on the farmer the prosperity of the na- 
tion depends. Note the action of recent legislatures on the matter 
of appropriations for agricultural training. In Michigan the State 
Senate has favorably acted upon a bill to double the tax for their 
state agricultural college, so that this institution will receive $1,000,- 
000. In our own State the legislature has appropriated a larger sum 
than it has ever given before for agricultural education in its state 
college. The sentiment of the people is overwhelmingly in favor of 
this use of their money. Delaware is establishing additional agri- 
cultural training schools, and Maryland is about to replace its old 
college of agriculture for one that shall be able to meet the new 
scientific requirements, and a largely increased number of pupils. 
In New York and New Jersey agricultural training is receiving 
more attention than ever. 

II. 

Increased appropriation of State legislatures for agricultural 
training is not the only testimony of the increased recognition of the 
importance of the farm and farmer to the nation. We notice it in 
the enormous outflow of agricultural literature, and in the formation 
of societies whose avowed intent is to. plant people on the land. 
More particularly do I refer to the organization known as the "For- 
ward to the Land Movement." 

The object of this society is to send people forth upon the land 
to work it, and to possess it. It realizes that a healthy man is worth 
more in dollars and cents than a half-sick one. It is wakening to 
the fact that children are more valuable to the State when they are 
well protected, housed, fed and educated than when they are 
neglected. 

It is endeavoring to enlist public-spirited capitalists to invest in 
agricultural lands contiguous to large cities, and to help equip this 
land for occupancy by the working people. 

The scheme is by no means unknown to us who have been ad- 
vocating a similar condition for our own particular problem these 
many years. But it is gratifying to see that the message we have 
been delivering here, on this very platform, for many years, has not 
fallen on deaf ears, but has been heard elsewhere and is heeded. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



The Forward to the Land Movement is one of the many evidences 
deduced to show the drift of the age. For nations, it has been ob- 
served, do not perish from the multitude of their farmers, but from 
the lack of them. Not in the fields, but in the narrow lanes and 
crowded cities are sown the seeds of destruction of a nation. The 
Forward to the Land Movement, like The National Farm School,, 
tends to draw people to the land, and spells safety and perpetuity 
for us as a nation. 

In this connection the work of The American Immigration and 
Distribution League must be cited. This organization, containing 
among its members nine governors and scores of the foremost social 
workers of our land, was perfected this spring in the city of New 
York, for the purpose of improving, in the best way possible, the 
condition of immigrants entering the United States, and to relieve 
the congestion in the larger cities. Among some of the objects of 
this league will be an appeal to the State legislatures to award suit- 
able loans to worthy immigrants to enable them to settle on the land 
instead of flocking into the cities, as 65 per cent, have been accus- 
tomed to do in times past. Many of the immigrants have labored 
on land before coming here, and would continue to till the soil were 
they enabled to procure land. The league proposes to aid such cases- 

Here, again, is one of the visions of this school realized by- 
others. It has been our hope that among us would arise those who* 
would prevent the congestion of our Jewish quarters by providing: 
means for the Jewish immigrant to betake himself to the land. We: 
were derided as visionaries, and men turned their backs upon our- 
advocacy as being unworthy of serious thought. But the words ofr 
the Psalmist have again proved true : The stone that the builders; 
rejected has become one of the chief cornerstones. What we pro- 
posed for our people, and what was rejected, has been accepted by- 
others and turned into good. The movement land-ward is not con- 
fined to the agitation of a few societies, although these are scattered! 
from one end of the country to the other. The movement shows its; 
far-raching effect in the drift from the factory and mills toward the 
farm, the return of the worker to the land. The lament that Oliver- 
Goldsmith uttered in his "Deserted Village" and other poems, when' 
he detected the drift of the workingmen of his day leaving their 
sweet little homes, the thatched cottages, for the factories of indus- 
trial England, can now be substituted by another melody, a poem- 
rather, of the returning worker, who, having been despoiled of his- 
own estate, sets his face towards Mother Earth. An investigation, 
for example, in the Pittsburgh district, covering a number of 



10 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

months, has convinced the Industrial Commission of Pittsburgh that 
the acute labor famine in that section for the past year was traceable 
largely to the "Back to the Farm Movement." Hundreds of mill 
workers declared that they had listened to the call of the open coun- 
try, and had gone to the agricultural sections of the West to engage 
in purusits of the soil and to live lives less complicated than that of 
the big industrial centers. The manufacturers, who were most seri- 
ously affected by the shortage of laborers, avowed in their conceit 
that the desertee from the mills would return in the fall, but the in- 
vestigation showed that but the smallest percentage returned to the 
smudge and soot of the furnaces. 

With this undeniable land-ward drift, the rapid rise of agricul- 
tural colleges the country over is in no subtle way intimately con- 
nected. The registration this year in the agricultural schools is the 
largest ever attained. At Ames, Iowa, for example, the Iowa State 
Agricultural College has over 700 students in the freshman class of 
.a four year's agricultural course. The students entering this, and 
:similar institutions, are not entirely recruited from the countryside, 
.are not entirely sons and daughters of farmers ; among them will be 
found many city-bred boys. The latter begin to rebel against the 
•corporation-dominated and autocratic structure of industrial life in 
the modern cities, and are averting it by preparing themselves for 
■country life. That these city-born youths, who are entering agri- 
cultural colleges, do not crave vast wealth, was revealed by a ques- 
tionaire which Professor Bailey, of Cornell, circulated in the State 
College of New York, ascertaining the purpose which inspired them 
to take up farming. The answers showed that every one had a 
higher ideal of living as the propelling motive. Farming appealed 
to them because it satisfied their love of nature and their desire for 
a free, independent life. Personal emoluments were subordinated to 
independence of living, which is the striking note in the replies. 
Students who come to colleges for training in the science of farm- 
ing with such a motive as this make better farmers even than the 
sons of farmers. On some farms city-bred boys are sought in pref- 
erence over those born in the country. They are found to be 
quicker, they have nothing to unlearn, feel more enthusiastic about 
their work, have higher ideals and more ambition. 

No phase of this movement is so significant as the fact that our 
city boys are hearing the call of the soil and flocking in large num- 
bers to the farm. There is to-day no more accepted method of 
dealing with law-breaking and dependent youths in the matter of 
character-building than to place them on farms. This is the scheme 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 11 

of the Industrial School of New York, situated a few miles from 
Rochester, where a 1400-acre farm has been set aside for the pur- 
pose of re-making the character of the boy convicted of petty crime 
by putting him on a farm. Th true philanthropist recognizes in 
this one of the means of helping his fellows to regain their manhood 
and their place in society. 

III. 

In all these movements mentioned the purpose is to replace 
people on the land. After thorough tests, increasing numbers of men 
of means, who have the welfare of their fellows at heart, are now 
giving attention to the clamor of the sociologists who recognize the 
value of the farm as a means of relieving intolerable conditions in 
the larger cities. In farming and in the ability to place people on 
farm lands, amid conditions that conduce to their continuance there, 
rests the hope of saving the next generation from the curses of the 
crowded ghettoes and "east sides" and other over-populated centers. 

Philanthropists are now more alive to this possibility than they 
have ever been before. Farm Schools are arising in many places. 
This is no longer one of the few institutions of its kind. But it was 
a pioneer in a way, and has paved the way for other schools. One 
writer, in speaking of this school, says it was a "miracle" to decoy 
Jewish boys from the sweatshops and convert them into successful 
farmers. The sixteen years that this school has been founded have 
witnessed all these tremendous changes, and have brought to pass 
what was heretofore considered almost unattainable. 

To what are these changes attributable? There are several an- 
swers. Man is, before all things, an animal with the primal needs 
of sustaining animal life. He must be clothed and housed, but more 
than all he must be fed if he is to live. The vast bulk of man's food 
comes from the earth. The less food produced, the more it costs. 
This very obvious consequence has resulted in doubling the price of 
food within ten years. 

The high cost of living is more menacing than a war scare. It 
is the ever-increasing cost of foods, due to the disproportion between 
producers and consumers, that has inflated the values of foods. 
Within the last ten years the mouths to be fed in this country have 
increased 16,000,000. Increasing population on the one hand, and 
ever-decreasing farm population on the other, have brought to pass 
a circumstance in which the mightiest nation of earth has been com- 
pelled to make a serious study of its standing on the subject of food. 



12 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

AH wealth is traced to the soil. Cut off the supply of wealth at its 
source means ruin. The farmer has become a mighty man because 
there is no other to look to for our food. The farm that was tol- 
erated as a necessary evil has become a necessity which precedes in 
importance the city with all its commerce and industries. 

Cities will always be required in the economy of nations. But 
the crowding of vast numbers of peoples into small areas was never 
required. It was not asked of us to deprive people of God's sun- 
light and air, which is as the breath of life. There will be a terrible 
reckoning for our overrated industrialism and trade when they will 
be asked to answer for the terrible blight they have imposed on the 
lives of the peoples who have withered away in the horrible dens of 
our cities. They will be asked to explain the cramped, sordid lives 
they have enforced on those who did their bidding. They will be 
required to atone for the stunted limbs, the pale cheeks, the prema- 
turely aged and blasted lives and hopes of millions of God's crea- 
tures. 

The congestion of human beings in our cities has reached a stage 
when it is a defamation of the human being. The crowded streets, 
the teeming tenements, the swarms of children in the city streets, 
along the Atlantic coast, have compelled attention from the thought- 
ful of the nation. It required neither the wisdom of an Aristotle 
nor the penetration of a Darwin to realize that the crowded, con- 
gested cities were the breeding spots of disease and discontent. The 
social unrest of the day is fanned into a flame by crowds of men and 
women dwelling together in misery. The struggle for existence is 
keener, acuter, and more hectic in the cities. Congestion conduces 
to crime and vice, and crime and vice are spun from our over- 
crowded quarters. Privacy is a preventive. But privacy is un- 
known in the crowded sections of the cities, where the poor among 
us live and get their living. 

This is a familiar tale, we admit, but like all great truths it is 
not vitiated by repetition. The overcrowding in commercial New 
York has produced more crime among our own people than any 
catastrophe that has ever befallen Israel in its long histor}^ This 
condition might well have been averted, in large part, if the warn- 
ing we sounded had been heeded in time. If, instead of belittling 
our proposition, on the grounds that a mere Rabbi is incapable of 
giving practical advice, men had listened to our suggestions and en- 
deavored to stem the tide that was flocking into the cities in the 
early eighties and nineties, another chapter might have been written 
in American Jewish history. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 13 

Want and misery multiplied as abundantly as the sands on the 
shore, destitution as plentiful as the stars in heaven. The philan- 
thropist began his beneficent efforts toward amelioration. It was 
immediately evident that whatever was undertaken toward relieving 
the distress of the hosts was only palliative. The need for the re- 
moval of the symptom was the process to follow. How to prevent 
the condition was not so much in evidence then as later. Preventive 
charity was the apparent salvation of the embattled multitude. For 
another affliction was arising to assail the people more dreadful than 
any, and that was Tuberculosis. 

Few realize what a tremendous tax tuberculosis imposes on the 
Jews of America. In 1912-13 there was spent for the maintenance 
of the nine Jewish tuberculosis sanatoria in the United States the 
sum of $660,000. During the same time that this sum was spent for 
the maintenance of sanatoria, an ever-increasing, now amounting to 
$238,000, sum was expended for the maintenance and support of 
families whose breadwinner was afflicted with that disease, and for 
the support of widows and orphans whose plight is due to the dread 
scourge. 

Who is to blame for this dreadful condition? Is it the Jewish 
immigrant? He does not bring tuberculosis with him from his old 
home in the pales of settlement or the Judengassen of Europe. Of 
the 126,000 Jewish immigrants admitted into this country last year 
only one was deported because of tubercular symptoms. American 
liberty and opportunity are bought at the price of the immigrant's 
lungs. It is the price he must pay for his tenement and the oppor- 
tunity to eke out a miserable existence. 

This tuberculary condition of the city dwellers among us sounds 
an alarm against which we dare not set our ears. These are the 
facts ; they speak more vehemently than argument of the impelling 
urgency to arrest this state of affairs. 

One of the remedies at hand is this school and the cause to- 
which it is dedicated. We are not so arrogant as to say that with us 
alone is wisdom, and that all other ways are inconsequential. It is 
our belief, and in that belief we have persisted, that by prevailing 
upon some families, now dwelling in these ghettoes, to come and 
dwell on the farms, we may be able to create a land-ward tide that 
will be, in time, a matter of some moment. For the overcrowding 
in the cities does not abate. Incoming immigrants but aggravate the 
evil. Every outburst of fanaticism in the old world leaves a dis- 
tressing offspring of misery at our threshold. For every Kischineff 



14 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

there is an overcrowded tenement. These facts are incontestible. 
They are the commonplace verities of every charity board. What 
has been done, aside of our efforts, to divert this influx of immi- 
gration unto the cities? Little that can be accepted as potential. 
Insufficient means hampers the work of the Jewish Agricultural Aid 
Society of New York. Galveston's effort to parcel out among the 
South and West some of our people entering its port is splendid as 
a distributing measure, but it does not effect colonization. In locat- 
ing some of our Jewish brethren in the genuinely successful colony 
of Utah, of which another will speak to us to-day from personal 
knowledge, we have shown what needs to be done. By it we were 
partly fulfilling the mission for which we had called this school into 
being. Thus far The National Farm School and a similar institution 
in Woodbine, N. J., under the auspices of the Baron de Hirsch 
Fund, stand almost alone among all Jewish efforts in this country 
where a systematic effort is being made to train and prepare Jewish 
people to inhabit the land. 

If America has spelled opportunity, the American farm of to- 
day is that opportunity. Never before has the cry for farm laborers 
been so loud and the need of tilling the deserted farms been so in- 
sistent. There is never a glut of farm workers on the market. The 
army of unemployed are recruited from among those who are 
abandoning the farm, not possessing it. The overworked farm does 
not exist here, as it does in older countries. But the underworked 
farm is found in every county and township in the State. The 
farms of our day are not made to yield their capacity crops, because 
we have not enough workers to meet the requirements of intensive 
farming. During the harvesting season the demand for farm labor- 
ers is so great that railroads provide free transportation in some 
instances to the men willing to help Uncle Sam reap his bumper 
crops. Not only has he who tills the land plenty to eat, but he who 
is willing to farm has also perpetual employment. 

No labor offers better returns. The splendid rewards in store 
for those who are investing in farms is attested on every hand. 
Every farmer is a capitalist as well as a laborer. He works for 
himself and upon the property in which his own capital is invested. 
He is nature's true nobleman. The aristocracy of all times has been 
founded upon the possession and care of the land. The happiness 
and healthfulness of the life has been the theme of the poets of all 
ages. The Eclogues of Virgil have had imitators, as he in turn 
copied the Idyls of the Greek poets. Antedating even the poet of 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 15 

the classical era was the dream of the prophet whose conception of 
the Messianic Age was such a time when each man would sit be- 
neath his own vine and fig tree, with none to hurt him, and none 
to make him afraid. 

IV. 

The outlook is encouraging. The means of alleviating distress 
by the methods introduced by this school is being advocated in 
every charity conference in our country. Preventive methods in 
charity is the call of this new century of ours. It is an innovation 
over the older and emotional regime so much applauded by our 
fathers. With rare exception they gave indiscriminately, mingling 
their tears with those of their supplicants. But no means was taken 
to prevent further appeal. The poor must be ever among us, they 
said, and acted accordingly by keeping them poor. But the newer 
school of preventive charity attacks the problem at its source. To 
prevent rather than to provide is its endeavor. 

But the newer school is unfortunately without the means of 
installing the organization required by the preventive measures. It 
has not the large sums at its disposal to eradicate the evil. It is, 
therefore, impotent to apply to its fullest test that adequate allow- 
ance which could make thorough work of the project such as our 
school undertakes. It is practically without sufficient means of car- 
rying through the many allied endeavors that are involved in this 
school. Had we had larger funds at our disposal we could have 
made more headway. We could have counted by now our graduates 
by the thousands, instead of by the hundreds, and our colonies by 
the score, instead of a single one. This chronic lack of funds miti- 
gates against our rapid advancement. We are hampered on every 
hand. We need more farm land, more instructors, more money to 
admit and care for more students, and more room in which to 
house them and care for them. We have scarcely enough of in- 
come adequately to keep and instruct the eighty odd students who 
are now receiving their agricultural training at our school. The 
needs of our institution are incessant and clamorous, and yet the 
possibility of satisfying them are, as they ever have been, beyond 
our reach. We have been compelled to resort to makeshifts of one 
kind or another to meet these conditions. One of these changes was 
the shortening of the curriculum. The four-year course has been 
reduced to a three-year course to make room the sooner for a new 
class. We did this with great reluctance, but the desire to benefit 



16 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

at least a fraction of the large numbers who ceaselessly clamor for 
our instruction necessitated this step. 

Small as our income is, much of it must be expended in propa- 
ganda work, both by mail and in person, to keep our membership 
intact, and to replace losses sustained by death or resignation. Had 
we an endowment, moneys now expended in seeking and keeping 
paying membership could be used toward educating larger numbers 
of students. 

With all our disadvantages, which at times are disheartening, 
we are nevertheless steadily progressing. The school is better able 
to stand on its own record than ever before. Thousands are ac- 
quainted with the work of The National Farm School to-day where 
there were not fifty a decade ago. We are laboring zealously for 
that time when the school will require no other claim for the ap- 
proval and support of men of means than the fact that it is a neces- 
sity in the economy of the nation. 

Our student body is likewise increasing with a rapidity that 
shows how eagerly the youth of the present day are alive to the op- 
portunities presented by farming and the farm life. Our enrollment 
is now the largest in our history. 

The yield of crops this year is also gratifying. In another re- 
port will be told the exact figures. The yield per bushel is the 
largest of .any year since we commenced cultivating our farms. The 
money realized from the sale of various farm produce is also largest 
in the history of our school. 

The number of students who took a complete or partial course 
of instruction last year was 112. Twenty-six were graduated last 
March, all of whom went forth to pursue the calling for which they 
were trained, some on farms of their own, some to specialize in 
higher agricultural colleges, some to superintend agricultural estates, 
or to take charge of agricultural departments in eleemosynary in- 
stitutions, and some to work as orchardists, florists, and the like. 
Encouraging accounts continue to come to us from graduates of our 
institution — one of them was recently chosen as Director of Agricul- 
ture of the High School, of Canby, Minn; another is making 
scholarly and original researches for the Agricultural Department of 
the United States Government, the result of which researches are 
being spread broadcast in scientific journals. Quite a number have 
secured sufficient means, while working for others, to purchase farms 
of their own, and to remove to these their respective families, 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 17 

former occupants of the crowded ghettoes. While it is to be re- 
membered that our institution is but a school, and that when stu- 
dents come to us they know, with the rarest exception, nothing at all 
of farming, nor have they the strength, at first, for the hard work 
required on a farm, nevertheless it is a source of pleasure to re- 
port the splendid results achieved by them on our farms. 

V. 

Speaking of our benefactors, we are reminded of the death of 
Mrs. Louis I. Aaron, of Pittsburgh, whose name, together with 
that of her husband, is inscribed over the entrance of our dairy, 
which they erected upon our grounds. As a token of our deep sense 
of loss, and an expression of our sympathy with the bereaved hus- 
band and sons, the doors of the dairy have been draped in mourn- 
ing, so that, for one whole month, its sombre color may tell to the 
students and passers-by of the kind and helpful friend our school 
has lost. In this connection we also note with sorrow the death of 
Mr. Ferdinand Westheimer, of St. Joseph, Mo., and Mr. Morris 
Horkheimer, of Wheeling, W. Va., both members of our National 
Auxiliary Board, to the respective families of whom resolutions of 
condolence were duly sent by the Board. 

Turning from the dead to the living, and from the helpers who 
have passed away to those who are with us still, we express our 
gratitude for the excellent work done by the Faculty and Matrons 
of our school, by our Board, and by our Ladies' Auxiliary Com- 
mittee. Also by Mr. A. H. Fromenson and Miss Mona Binswanger, 
who have taken upon themselves the difficult task of traveling from 
place to place for the purpose of making propaganda for our cause 
and soliciting memberships. 

This year ends the sixteenth of my presidency of The National 
Farm School. I have endeavored to discharge the duties since its 
founding to the best of my ability. I am only too conscious that bet- 
ter work could have been done had a prominent and practical busi- 
ness man been at its head, especially one who had more time at his 
disposal than I could give, seeing that the ministering to one of the 
largest congregations in the land does not afford much leisure for 
the development and management of so difficult an institution as 
this. A splendid opportunity presents itself at the present time for 
placing into the presidential office the kind of man this institution 
requires. Day after to-morrow I start upon a tour of study and 



18 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

observation in the Orient, which is to consume many months. It is 
incumbent upon you to select a successor to the presidential office. 
By doing so you will but gain another worker for the cause. New 
men have new ways and make new friends, and both of these are 
often conducive to larger results. Inasmuch as my deep interest in 
the institution and my work for it will continue with the same vigor 
after my return as before my leaving, you will retain the support 
you have, and gain besides. Let me bespeak for my successor the 
same hearty co-operation of the Faculty and Matrons, of the Board 
and membership, they have at all times extended to me. For me 
there will be no greater pleasure and no greater reward for past 
service than the knowledge that larger, speedier growth, and larger 
achievement crown the efforts of the new administration. 



The Twelfth Graduation 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, 
March 2. 1913 



The largest graduating class in its history, twenty-two, received 
diplomas at The National Farm School on March 2, 1913. Dr. 
Joseph Krauskopf, President and Founder of The National Farm 
School, was the presiding officer, and Judge Isaac Johnson, of the 
State Board of Charities and Corrections, was the principal speaker. 
William H. Bishop, professor of agriculture at the School, also 
spoke, and the diplomas were distributed by the Director of the 
School, Dr. J. H. Washburn, to the following: 

Philip Amrum, David Jaffe, Michael Samson, 

J. S. Capek, Carl H. Kahn, Isadore Sobel, 

Lawrence Crohn, A. L. Kravet, M. Stolaroff, 

Martin Fereshetian, S. Leibowitz, Benjamin Weightman, 

Beryl Harrison, Julius Levinson, Harry S. Weiss, 

Louis Helfand, Louis Redalia, A. Witkin, 

W. W. How, Samuel M. Rosenberg, Aaron Woolwich, 

James Work. 

The gold medal for highest efficiency, offered by the Alumni 
Association of the School through its secretary, Charles Horn, was 
won by Abraham Witkin. 







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THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 19 



THIS YEAR'S CROP 



From the President's Message 

The School, with student labor entirely, produced this year: 

146,103 quarts of milk. 
300 tons silage. 
240 tons hay. 
78 tons stover. 

12 tons oats, peas and other vegetables. 
1,950 bushels corn. 
1,000 bushels apples. 
700 bushels rye. 
70 bushels pears. 
40,000 ears green corn. 
100 baskets peaches. 
600 bunches asparagus. 
250 pounds grapes. 

And diverse other products of fields, orchards, nursery and green- 
houses. 

Of livestock we have on hand : 

25 horses. 
51 cows. 
14 heifers. 
14 swine. 
665 heads of poultry. 

The cash sales of the year from our farms and nursery amount 
to $10,448.51. Besides this, there was furnished to the boarding 
department foodstuff, raised upon our grounds, by our students, 
having a money value of $2440.65. 



20 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



ADDITIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS 



From the 'President's Message 

Conspicuous among the additions to our plant during the past 
year was the steel flagpole, erected by Mr. Adolph S. Ochs, of New 
York, and consecrated to the memory of his departed sister-in-law, 
Mrs. Bertie Gans Ochs. The large, handsome flag was the gift of 
Mr. J. Walter Freiberg, of Cincinnati. Mention may also be made 
of the removal and reconstruction of one of the silos ; a new tin 
roof on our lumber shed ; the enlarging of the storeroom ; planting 
of a hedge at Farm No. 1 ; fencing one pasture and renovating an- 
other ; tile-draining several thousand feet of land ; completing the 
main avenue of the nursery. All of this work was done by our stu- 
dents, under the guidance and with the assistance of one or two 
skilled mechanics. 

A notable addition to our plant during the past year was the 
Arboretum, a gift consecrated to the memory of the late Mr. B. A. 
Feineman, of Kansas City, father of Mrs. Krauskopf. This Ar- 
boretum consists of more than 6000 young ornamental trees of all 
kinds — oaks, maples, larches, catalpas, Lombardy poplars, etc., and 
many thousands of shrubs and bushes. These are to become the 
parent stock of a large plantation of trees and shrubs, and in which 
it is believed the Farm School will have a profitable trade in the 
near future. The nursery is one of the most attractive sights on 
our grounds, and we invite our friends to favor it with their visit. 
Its location is across the railroad tracks, opposite the station. 

The reports of the other departments will tell their own story. 
One of the most interesting will be the statement that we suc- 
ceeded, during the past year, in disposing of the farm in North 
Carolina, which Mr. Henry Hellman, of New York, donated a few 
years ago, and which, owing to the distance and to lack of means, 
we found difficult to operate. When the purchase price shall have 
been paid in full, a farm nearer home will be bought, and operated 
by students of our school, in accordance with the wishes of the 
donor. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 21 



LARGE MONEY DONATIONS 



From the 'President's Message 

Of money donations received during the year we take pleasure 
in mentioning- : 

The State of Pennsylvania $10,000.00 

A friend, New York City 500.00 

Estate of Samuel Woolner, Peoria, 111 500.00 

Leopold Keiser, Buffalo, N. Y., Bequest 500.00 

Cass Sunstein, Pittsburgh, Pa., Bequest 100.00 

Life Memberships (money placed in Endowment Fund : 

Emile Berliner, Washington, D. C 100.00 

Miss Rosalie Bernheimer, New York City 100.00 

Mendes Cohen, Baltimore, Md 100.00 

Henry L. Frank, Chicago, 111 100.00 

Mrs. Henry M. Kalvin, Brooklyn, by her father, 

A. Reiter, Cincinnati, Ohio 100.00 

Mrs. Theodor Landenberger, New Rochelle, 

N. Y 100.00 

Marcus Rauh, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

E. Raab, Richmond, Va 100.00 

Samuel E. Reinhard, Baltimore, Md 100.00 

Mrs. Rudolph Samson, San Francisco, Cal 100.00 

Louis Schlesinger, Newark, N. J 100.00 

Seligman Schloss, Detroit, Mich 100.00 

Isaac L. Silberberg, Niagara Falls, N. Y 100.00 

Isaac Strouse, Baltimore, Md 100.00 

Henry Wollman, New York City 100.00 

William J. Wollman, New York City 100.00 

W. B. Woolner, Peoria, III 100.00 

Children of Mrs. Sophia Rothschild, Summit- 

ville, Ind., in her memory 100.00 

Large Contributions to General Fund: 

Jacob H. Schiff, New York City 600.00 

N. Snellenburg, Philadelphia 500.00 

Nathan Krauskopf, New York City 200.00 

Max Lowenthal, Rochester, N. Y 175.00 

District Grand Lodge No. 7, 1. O. B. B 150.00 

District Grand Lodge No. 1, I. O. B. B 100.00 



22 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

District Grand Lodge No. 2, L O. B. B $100.00 

Samuel Friedheim, Rockhill, N. C 100.00 

Alexander Hyman, New Orleans, La 100.00 

Orphans' Society, Wilkes-Barre, Pa 100.00 

Martin Schwartz, Indianapolis, Ind 100.00 

Sloss Family, San Francisco, Cal 100.00 

Maurice Stern, New Orleans, La 100.00 

Mrs. Isaac Strouse, Baltimore, Md 100.00 

Westheimer Family, St. Joseph, Cincinnati and 

Baltimore 100.00 

To Funds of Schoenfeld Farm, No. 3: 

Arthur Kuhn, New York City 100.00 

Contributions to General Fund by Jewish Federated Charities: 

Philadelphia, Pa $8,000.00 

Pittsburgh, Pa 500.00 

Kansas City, Mo 350.00 

Indianapolis, Ind 200.00 

Memphis, Tenn 200.00 

Montgomery, Ala 100.00 

Little Rock, Ark 100.00 

Toledo, Ohio 100.00 

Milwaukee, Wis 100.00 

Nashville. Tenn 75.00 

Of Other gifts we gratefully acknowledge the donation of paper, 
sufficient for 5000 copies of our Year Book, from Martin and W. H. 
Nixon and Thos. W. Price & Co., both of Philadelphia. From the 
Needle- Work Guild of America, Philadelphia Section, 325 garments. 
From W. Atlee Burpee, a donation of farm and garden seeds and 
subscriptions to magazines and farm journals for the library, to the 
value of nearly $150. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 23 

Sixteenth Annual Spring Fe^ival 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, June 1, 1913. 



A brilliant and representative assemblage gathered at The 
National Farm School on Sunday, June 1, 1913, to witness and 
participate in theAnnual Spring Exercises, which have become so 
notable in the history of the institution. For the first time the Far 
West was represented, its spokesman being that distinguished pub- 
licist and statesman, Hon. Julius Kahn, member of Congress from 
California, who presided. 

In opening the ceremonies, and before turning the gavel over 
to the chairman. Doctor Krauskopf, President and Founder of the 
institution, said : 

"Last year, we are told, some one hundred millions of dollars 
were donated in our country by philanthropists for purposes of 
higher education. For that sum of money twenty-thousand small 
farms could have been purchased and equipped at an average cost 
of $5000 each, and these twenty thousand farms could have, 
within a short time, supported healthily and happily one hundred 
thousand souls, by far the greater part of whom are to-day de- 
pendent on the charities, or are wasting away because of a want 
of it. And every cent of the money thus expended could have 
been made returnable, after a few years, to the loaners or to the 
respective communities. Had that sum of money been donated 
for the training of lads in the science and practice of agricul- 
ture, such as is given at The National Farm School, the mere in- 
terest of it would have sufficed to free annually one thousand 
young men from the thraldom of the congested city, and prepare 
them to lead annually thousands of suffering and dependent peo- 
ple to health and wealth and happiness." 

Congressman Kahn, in accepting the gavel, painted vivid word- 
pictures of slum-horrors in the large cities, and congratulated 
Doctor Krauskopf and The National Farm School upon the splen- 
did work that is being done by this institution to bring the residents 
of those unwholesome surroundings back to the soil. 

After Prof. Joel S. Spingarn, of Columbia University, and Dr. 
Solomon Solis-Cohen, of Philadelphia, had spoken, the attention 
of the assemblage was directed to the particular feature of the 
day — the raising of the steel flagpole donated by Adolph S. Ochs, 
of New York, in memory of Bertie Cans Ochs, the dedicatory ad- 



24 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

dress being delivered by Prof. Scott Nearing, of the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

The annual custom of planting and consecrating trees to the 
memory of departed friends of the school followed. Special 
tributes were delivered by Dr. Wm. Rosenau, of Baltimore, to the 
late Isaac Strause, of Baltimore, and by Rev. Dr. Henry Berkowitz, 
of Philadelphia, to the late B. A. Feineman, who had been one of 
the foremost citizens of Kansas City, Mo. Kaddish was pronounced 
by the Rev. Wm. Armhold. Following an al-fresco luncheon, the 
festive trees were dedicated. 

The concluding ceremonies of the day were the installation of 
forty-five Freshmen by Prof. J. P. Lichtenberger, of the University 
of Pennsylvania, and Henry Houck, Secretary of Internal Affairs 
of the State of Pennsylvania. The distribution of prizes to mer- 
itorious students by the Director of the School, John H. Washburn, 
concluded the exercises. 



The Succoth Pilgrimage and Sixteenth 
Annual Meeting 

Farm School, Pennsylvania, October 19, 1913. 



More than the ordinary interest and enthusiasm reigned at 
this year's Succoth Pilgrimage, held on the grounds of the 
School, on Sunday, October 19, 1913, in conjunction with the 
Sixteenth Annual Meeting of the Institution. Over six hundred 
persons journeyed to the School in the special train from Phila- 
delphia, while several hundred more came in automobiles and 
from the towns in the vicinity of the School. 

One reason for the large attendance — probably the largest 
that ever participated in a Farm School Succoth Pilgrimage — 
was the fact that the day afforded an opportunity to bid Dr. 
Krauskopf, President and Founder of the Institution, "God- 
speed" on his year's tour of the world, upon which he was to 
enter two days later. 

The speakers included Justice Leon Sanders, of New York, 
President of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society and Grandmas- 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 25 

ter of the Independent Order B'rith Abraham, the largest Jewish 
fraternal order in the world ; Prof. Carl Kelsey, of the University 
of Pennsylvania; Hon. William H. Berry, Collector of Ports of 
Pennsylvania; and Rabbi Charles J. Freund, of Harrisburg, Pa. 

Judge Sanders, who presided, paid a glowing tribute to 
those at the head of the Institution, to whose enthusiasm and 
indefatigable efforts the great results achieved by the School are 
due. He said in part: 

"Such an institution as the Farm School makes it possible for 
many Jews to return to their old avocation — agriculture. They 
will be enabled to make abandoned farms useful, and prove that 
the Jewish people are not only content to follow commercial 
pursuits, but are willing to devote their time and attention in a 
direction not so profitable in a financial sense, but one which 
will make the world happier and better. The Jews would have 
remained farmers at all times, if they had been given the chance; 
but after the destruction of the Temple they could claim no place 
as their home and were compelled to become merchants and 
traders, so that they could carry their worldly goods with them 
in their wanderings. To-day, in the changed conditions, in this 
great country of ours, an institution like the Farm School de- 
serves public sympathy and support, since it enables the Jewish 
people to take up agriculture. Immigrants, by taking up this work, 
will be welcome additions to our population, furnishing Ameri- 
cans and all the world with food." 

Professor Kelsey, in a most striking address, said that the 
people are awakening to the need of more scientifically trained 
men to till the soil. 

Collector Berry directed his address to the students and 
counseled, above all things, the development of the spirit of 
manhood. 

Rabbi Freund told the story of the colony at Clarion, Utah, 
established under the guidance and leadership of The National 
Farm School and its graduates. Rabbi Freund, while incumbent 
at Salt Lake City, had ample opportunity to watch the growth 
and development of this colony, from its unpretentious begin- 
ning. He told of his skepticism, when the plan was first un- 
folded to him and when the first settlers arrived; of his per- 
sonal visits to the colony ; of the transformation of the barren 
desert land into fields of waving wheat and alfalfa; of the ear- 
nestness of the people on the land; and how his skepticism was 



26 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

gradually turned into unbounded enthusiasm for the cause and 
a certainty that the colony must, and will, be a success. 

The following telegram from Mr. Jacob H. Schiff, of New 
York, addressed to Dr. Krauskopf, was read by Judge Sanders : 

"I very much regret my inability to be with you on Sunday 
at your Succoth Harvest Pilgrimage and wish you, the Directors 
and guests, every success m the great work you are doing. When 
you return from the lengthy journey upon which you are about 
to set out, I hope you will find the Farm School as prosperous as 
you leave it. Godspeed to you and your meritorious work." 

Dr. Krauskopf delivered his annual message, entitled "Light 
Amid the Encircling Gloom," printed in another part of this 
Year Book. 

Reports were submitted by the Treasurer, Mr. Silverman ; 
the Director, Dr. Washburn ; Professor Bishop, head of the 
Agricultural Department ; Professor Fancourt, of the Horticul- 
tural Department; and by Miss Abraham, the Matron; all of 
which are published in this book. 

After the distribution of prizes to the students, the annual 
election was held, resulting in the re-election of Dr. Krauskopf, 
as President; Harry B. Hirsh, as Vice-President; and the fol- 
lowing Trustees for a three-year term : A. J. Bamberger, W. 
Atlee Burpee, Harry Felix, Daniel Gimbel and Joseph N. Snel- 
lenburg. 

The following were elected on the National Auxiliary 
Board : Daniel Alexander, of Salt Lake City ; Jacob M. Loeb, 
of Chicago ; J. E. Oppenheimer, of Butte, Mont. ; Louis Schles- 
inger, of Newark, N. J. 



^^^(?^"^^^ 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 27 

Report of the Treasurer 

For the Year Ending September 30, 1913. 



Due to the extraordinary efforts of the President of the School 
and the splendid work of our Executive Secretary, during the past 
year, we are able to show a reduction in our deficit from $9,722.52 
to $7,202.60. Considering that, instead of 103 students as last year, 
112 were instructed at the School this year, that we have added an 
Assistant Matron to our staff and that, in order to retain valuable 
instructors, the Board raised their salaries somewhat, we show a 
splendid accounting of the trust placed in our hands by the State of 
Pennsylvania, the Federation of Jewish Charities of Philadelphia 
and other cities, and by the more than 2,000 annual subscribers to 
our cause. 

Our Endowment Fund has been increased during the past year, 
from $88,760.31 to $92,160.31. This increase of $3,400 was made 
possible by $1,100 in bequests; $1,700 in life memberships; and 
$600 in special donations for this purpose. 

It is desirable to explain the item of propaganda. That we 
were able to reduce our deficit this year by $2,519.^2 and increase 
our Endowment Fund by $3,400 is due, in a great measure, to the 
thousands of year books, programmes for the spring and fall ex- 
ercises, and copies of the President's message that were mailed 
broadcast. To give only a few instances : 

The sum of $500, noted in the Endowment Fund report, ''From 
a friend, New York City," resulted from the receipt of a year book 
by an heretofore stranger to the School. A former Philadelphian, 
now living in New York, was reading the Year Book in the Stock 
Exchange, handed it to a friend, and received, in return, $50 for 
the School. It is quite common for friends of the School, who re- 
ceive our invitations to the spring and fall exercises, to mollify us 
for their inability to attend, by sending, with their regrets, a check 
for the funds of the School. 

This extraordinary expenditure for propaganda will have to 
continue, it seems, until the Endowment Fund of the School is 
sufficient to carry it. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ISAAC H. SILVERMAN, Treasurer. 



28 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

GENERAL FUND 

Deficit, October 1, 1912 $9,722.52 

INCOME. 

Dues and Donations $9,909.85 

State of Pennsylvania 10,000.00 

Federation of Jewish Charities (Philadelphia) 8,000.00 

Income from Investments 4,365.71 

Sale of Farm Products (Home Farm) 5,771.50 

Memorial Trees 946.03 

Festive Trees 259.50 

Library 13.20 

Sundries 10.42 



39,276.21 
$29,553. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Beds and Bedding $126.00 

Brooms and Brushes 16.18 

Conveyance (Freight, Expressage, Telephone) 1,138.14 

Dry Goods 2,036.34 

Educational Supplies 365.70 

Farm Supplies 6,793.93 

Fuel 1,675.08 

Groceries 2,167.05 

Horticultural Department 520.03 

Interest 249.14 

Insurance 537.44 

Ice 2.58 

Lighting 509.10 

Ladies' Auxiliary Committee (Emergency Fund) 105.00 

Medical Supplies 127.61 

Nursery 61.88 

Painting 155.03 

Provisions 4,811.58 

Printing and Stationery 534.99 

Plumbing 412.66 

Repairs 407.56 

Rent 287.04 

Spraying 59.83 

Sundries 640.77 

Salaries— Officers 2,304.83 

Teachers 6,226.38 

Matron 1,020.00 

Taxes 310.96 

Wages 3,059.90 



$36,662.73 



IMPROVEMENTS TO PLANT. 



Blacksmith Shop $85.83 

Shed 32.42 

Nev^r Roof on Lumber Shed 156.00 

Manure Truck 75.86 



350.11 



IMPROVEMENTS TO HERD. 



Live Stock 262.80 

Sanitation of Cow Stall 172.53 

Sanitation of Sheep Pens 109.51 



544.84 
37,557.68 

$8,003.99 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 29 



PROPAGANDA 

RECEIPTS. 

General $9,187.70 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Spring and Fall Exercises $435.27 

Year Book 193.65 

Executive Secretary, Special Canvasser and Literature... 7,759.39 

8,386.31 

801.39 



Deficit September 30, 1913 $7,202.60 

RECAPITULATION. 

Due Girard Trust Company $2,000.00 

Due Endowment Fund 4,81 1.92 

Due Students' Deposit 390.68 

$7,202.60 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

Bank Balance, October 1, 1912 1,500.56 

RECEIPTS. 

Bequests — 

Estate of Samuel Woolner, Peoria, 111 $500.00 

Estate of Leopold Reiser, Buffalo, N. Y 500.00 

Estate of Cass Sunstein, Pittsburgh 100.00 



Life Memberships — 

Isaac Strouse, Baltimore, Md $100.00 

Emile Berliner, Washington, D. C 100.00 

Samuel Reinhard, Baltimore, Md 100.00 

W. B. Woolner, Peoria, 111 100.00 

Marcus Rauh, Pittsburgh, Pa 100.00 

Henry L. Frank, Chicago, 111 100.00 

Mendes Cohen, Baltimore, Md 100.00 

Rosie Bernheimer, New York City 100.00 

Mrs. Theodor Ladenburger, New Rochelle, N. Y 100.00 

Henry Wollman, New York City 100.00 

Wm. J. Wollman, New York City 100.00 

E. Raab, Richmond, Va 100.00 

Louis Schlesinger, Newark, N. J 100.00 

Mrs. Henry M. Kalvin, Brooklyn, N. Y 100.00 

Mrs. Rudolph Samson, San Francisco, Cal 100.00 

Isaac L. Silberberg, Niagara Falls, N. Y 100.00 

Seligman Schloss, Detroit, Mich 100.00 

Donations — 

From a friend. New York City 500.00 

Children of Mrs. Sophia Rothschild, Summitville, Ind., 

in her memory 100.00 

Repayment, account Mortgages — 

117 N. Florida Ave., Atlantic City $2,600.00 

Randolph and Oxford Sts., on account 300.00 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Commission $15.35 

National Farm School, account Loan 252.17 

Purchase of Securities 3,084.65 



$1,100.00 



1,700.00 



600.00 



2,900.00 
$6,300.00 



$7,800.56 



3,352.17 



Bank Balance, September 30, 1913 $4,448.39 



30 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



INVESTMENTS. 

1st Mortgages, 5.4%— 322 N. Sixth St $3,000.00 

1323 N. Seventh St 3,000.00 

323 Washington Ave. and rear 2,500.00 

2008 S. Tenth St 2,000.00 

611 Lombard St 2,000.00 

1035 South St 5,000.00 

515 Wolf St 1,400.00 

S. E. corner Marshall and Oxford Sts 3,000.00 

2106 W. Norris St 3,000.00 

601 Dickinson St 4,000.00 

709 S. Eighth St 2,000.00 

N. E. side Fifty-fifth St. and Chester Ave 6,000.00 

60 N. Fifty-fourth St 1,800.00 

964 N. Se'ond St 4,500.00 

4170 Poplar St 2,000.00 

1411 N. Wanamaker St 1,400.00 

N. W. corner Thirty-second and Berks Sts 4,000.00 

5 %— 2130 S. Tenth St 1,200.00 

611 Pike St 1,200.00 

5:^%— 305 S. Sixth St 2,700.00 

1816 N. Marshall St 1.800.00 

6 %— 224 N. Ohio Ave., Atlantic City 3,500.00 

2871-73-75 Tulip St 1,500.00 

Market St. L 4's 5,000.00 

P. & R. 4's 2,000.00 

Wisconsin Central Ist 4's •. 2,000.00 

P. R. R. Convertibles 35^% 5,000.00 

E. & P.'s 4's 4,200.00 

Participation Bond. Mortgage Trust Company, St. Louis 100.00 

National Farm School 4.811.92 

Schoenfeld Farm No. 3 2 000.00 

87,711.92 

Total ■ $92,160.31 



Report of Schoenfeld Memorial 
Farms Committee 

For the Year Ending September 30, 1913. 



It is with gratification and pleasure that, as Chairman of the 
Flora Schoenfeld Memorial Farms Committee, I submit to you the 
fifth annual report of the Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, which shows a 
net profit on the year's work of $1594.52. The past year has been 
the most successful in the history of our incumbency of this farm. 
The sale of farm products for the year totals $4878.16, which 
includes the sale of 49,865 quarts of milk. 

The actual work on this farm, as well as on the Schoenfeld 
Farms No. 1 and 2, is reported on in the Director's Report and 
the Agricultural Department Report. 

Aly thanks are due the various members of my Committee for 
the very efficient and earnest help they have afforded me in the 
administration of the aft'airs of these farms. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 31 

FARM NO. 3. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
October 1, 1912, to September 30, 1913. 

GAIN 

Sale of Farm Products $4,878.16 

Inventory, September 30, 1913 3,600.00 

Interest on Bank Deposits 13.48 

Sale of Lumber 156.61 

Donation from Mr. Arthur Kuhn, of New York, for 

Improvements on Farm 100.00 

$8,748.25 

LOSS 

Repairs $35.76 

Board of Extra Help 308.20 

Wages 725.98 

Work on Logs 740.13 

Coal 6.40 

Spraying 17.56 

Farm Supplies (Including Inventory of September 30, 

1912, of $3574.60) 4,030.54 

Depreciation on Implements 131.25 

Depreciation on Live Stock 206.50 

Fertilizer, Grain, etc 951.41 

7,153.73 

Net Gain, 1913 $1,594.52 

ACTUAL FINANCIAL STANDING. 
ASSETS 

Real Estate $15,000.00 

Implements 743.75 

Live Stock 1,858.70 

Bank Balance, September 30, 1913 644.68 

Inventory, September 30, 1913 3,600.00 

$21,847.13 

LIABILITIES 
Due Endowment Fund $2,000.00 

Net Worth $19,847.13 

Capital Account, 1912 $18,252.61 

Net Gain, 1913 1,594.52 

$19,847.13 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. BINSWANGER, 

Chairman. 



32 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Report of the Director 

John H. Washburn, Ph. D. 



The Student Body : One hundred and twelve young men have 
received instruction at The National Farm School during the past 
year. Twenty-six were granted diplomas and certificates. Many 
young men, after staying a year or two at the school, are obliged 
to leave before completing the whole course in order to help their 
parents at home on the farms. At the present time there are eighty- 
two at the institution. 

The required course of study has been reduced from four years 
to three during the past year. This will enable those who want to 
go on to farms for themselves as soon as possible to get the essen- 
tials of an agricultural education in three years, while those who 
are fortunate enough to take a longer course can take advantage of 
a one-year post-graduate course for advanced work, along any of 
the special lines of work at the institution. They can specialize in 
nursery work, care of greenhouses, in dairying or orcharding. 

The appointment of a teacher of biology by the Board of Man- 
agers for the coming year will enrich the course of instruction 
materially. 

Farm Work : The practical work on the farm is for the pupil's 
instruction and for production. Our students are changed from 
time to time to different departments. Assignments to different 
duties in each department gives them the opportunity to learn by 
both experience and observation all of the technique related to the 
various divisions of farming. 

I like to repeat that all of the work performed on our farm of 
360 acres, caring for our 25 horses, 114 swine, 65 cattle and about 
1000 poultry, is done by our students. The amount of work per- 
formed within the year, as will be shown by what we have accom- 
plished in crops cared for and produce sold, is very considerable. 
Still, the amount of productive labor actually accomplished by each 
pupil is very small, owing to the fact that during the pupils' course 
at the school they are learning; and, although they work very hard 
and become very much exhausted in this new work, the amount 
really accomplished is very much less than that of the ordinary farm 
laborer, who works where he is the most efficient from the begin- 
ning to the close of the day. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 33 

A young man in learning to plow will only plow about one-sixth 
as much as a common plowman, and will probably work many times 
as hard. At the same time he is using his pair of horses, and the 
result is that the team has only done one-sixth of its normal work 
under normal conditions. That is true for every operation; and, 
associated with it is the fact in the minds of the student that we are 
a school, and that a school does not require the serious effort de- 
manded by an employer, who pays money for that effort. These 
factors add difficulties to our teaching our young men the amount 
and quality of service that would be required by an employer. 

The Crops: Notwithstanding these difficulties we have pro- 
duced 146,103 quarts of milk, 142 swine, 14 young calves, harvested 
300 tons of silage, 240 tons of hay, several hundred bushel of 
apples, 40,000 ears of sweet corn, 2000 bushels of corn, several tons 
of vegetables, 100 bushels of rye, etc. The great object of all this is 
to teach our young men to become both farmers and workers. No 
one can successfully direct others on a farm until he understands 
the operations himself and knows how much to expect a man to 
perform for a day's labor. 

Horticultural Department: The horticultural department 
has grown rapidly during the past year. Some 30,000 additional 
plants, trees and shrubs were added to the nursery. Many of the 
older plants were sold. A very attractive sight is the bed of 20,000 
privet which were cut by the pupils last winter, prepared in the 
greenhouses and set out in the spring. A very attractive bed of 
evergreens, of over twelve different species and kinds, started in 
the greenhouses from cuttings, is making a very good growth and 
greatly adds to the value and attractiveness of the nursery. The 
carnation crop was followed by a crop of tomatoes. The work 
performed this year on the beautifying of the grounds and in the 
greenhouses is better than in the past. The greenhouses have been 
more than self-supporting. Over $550 worth of flowers has been 
sold from the houses and from the nursery over $200 worth. The 
vegetable gardens have furnished the boarding department with 
small fruits and vegetables, as will be seen in the detailed report 
of the department. 

The apple orchards have done well. Their condition is better 
than ever before. The pear and peach orchards are progressing. 
The late frost killed most of the fruit blossoms. The trees, how- 
ever, are in excellent condition for another year's work. 



34 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

ScHOENFELD Farms : The Schoenfeld Farms will be reported 
elsewhere. The quality of work on both of these farms is posi- 
tively superior to that of any other year, due to a better classifica- 
tion of the labor, more boys to work the farm, and the fact that 
the farms have improved each year, making possible better farming 
on better land. 

The Household: The health of the pupils has been good 
during the past year, as in former years. A few minor accidents 
from the farm work have occurred. We are deeply indebted to the 
Jewish Hospital for their remarkable care of our pupils in the case 
of severe accidents or serious sickness. The condition of the build- 
ings is gone into more specifically by the Matron. The care of the 
individual rooms in the dormitories by the students has been espe- 
cially good. 

We are glad to welcome back, as Assistant Matron, Mrs. Jo- 
sephine N. Loeb, who was obliged to leave a little over a year ago 
on account of sickness. She has returned in good health to her 
work, which has been performed during her absence by Mrs. Clara 
Barnes. 

The cash receipts from all the departments of the institution 
during the past year amounted to $10,448.51. In addition to this 
should be added products delivered to the boarding department and 
the Director's house which, if sold, would amount to $2440.65, mak- 
ing a total of nearly $13,000 for the year. 



Agricultural Department Report 

Prof. W. H. Bishop. 

The Agricultural Department embraces three distinct units, 
viz: The Home Farm, Schoenfeld Farm No. 1 and Schoenfeld 
Farm No. 3. Each of these farms has its own peculiar features, 
although all serve as laboratories for the instruction of the pupils. 

Schoenfeld Farm No. 3: The fundamental feature of the 
Schoenfeld Farm .No. 3 is that of a business farm, growing products 
for sale. There, as on most well-managed farms, are two major 
lines of work and consequently income, with several subsidiary 
crops to help out. About one-half of the total income is from the 
dairy and rather less than one-fourth from the sale of hay. The 




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THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 35 

remainder comes from a variety of products such as apples, cider, 
pears, lima beans, tomatoes, pigs, sweet corn, wood, etc. It gives 
to the students a good example of a farm managed more nearly as 
a farmer would handle one than can be the case where a farm is 
intimately connected with the administration of a school. This 
farm contained, when purchased, about 15 acres of neglected, un- 
cared for, unproductive land, used as a pasture for cattle and af- 
fording them very little food. We could not afford to let this land 
remain in that condition. Hence, during the past three seasons, we 
have been at work reclaiming these fields. A great deal of labor and 
some money has been expended in draining, taking out trees, rocks 
and stones, and subduing it preparatory to profitable cultivation. 
One field has finally been seeded to pasture grasses and in the other 
we hope before this year is over to have several hundred feet of tile 
laid, so that it may be made dry enough to cultivate next season. 
Some of these acres will now take rank among the most productive 
of the farm. 

The Home Farm : The Home Farm presents an entirely dif- 
ferent proposition. Burdened, as it is, with a multitude of activities 
connected with the administration of the school, from which the 
other farms are largely relieved, the work of the students upon 
it is far more varied and not so entirely devoted to the raising 
of crops and their disposal as it is on the Schoenfeld Farms. 
In addition to growing the same crops as are grown on the other 
farms, it has the care of the milk in the dairy house, including its 
preparation for market and its shipping, the making of the surplus 
into butter and cheese, and the handling of cream, together with the 
care of all the utensils and machinery concerned therewith. The 
care of the swine, poultry and young cattle adds to the variety of the 
work on this farm. A certain amount of work is performed in co- 
operation with the Horticultural Department, in caring for the 
school grounds, the vegetable gardens and the orchards. Improve- 
ments to the grounds and buildings on the campus are continually 
being made, necessitating more or less labor from the Home Farm 
squad. For the purely agricultural work required of it, this farm 
sorely needs more land. Yearly the land allotted to farm crops 
grows less, making the cost of cultivation of the remainder propor- 
tionately more expensive and less profitable. For it should always 
be remembered that the most profitable proposition in agriculture is 
not the "little farm well tilled," but the "large farm well managed," 
to quote a high authority on the subject. 

I hope the time may come when we may have sufficient acreage 



36 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

connected with this farm so that a proper rotation of crops may be 
practiced. At present the farm is limited to growing a large acreage 
of corn and a few acres of grass for hay, while a more economical 
arrangement would be a larger acreage of grass and proportionately 
smaller fields of corn, but the present development of the school 
seems to demand the policy now pursued. Practically all of the 
available land on the Home Farm is now in a good state of cultiva- 
tion. 

ScHOENFELD Farm No. 1 : The Schoenfeld Farm No. 1 has as 
Its manager a young graduate of the school, there trying for the first 
time his skill in that line. This manager is changed yearly, but the 
organization and policy of the farm having been fixed by the school 
authorities remains the same from year to year, otherwise it would 
be impossible for the student manager to get the valuable training 
which he does. The present year is the most successful in the his- 
tory of the farm. It is showing the results of past work, and its im- 
provement this year is greater than that of any years in its 
history. The crops are larger and the land better cared for. It 
presents to the students an example of a highly specialized farm 
devoted to the crops best suited to this locality; more than three- 
fourths of its income being from the dairy herd; a small flock of 
poultry, a patch of sweet corn or tomatoes and the surplus hay give 
the remainder of the income and affords a certain amount of variety 
to the workers. 

The plan of the school in shifting the workers from one farm 
or department to another gives opportunity for observation upon 
the differences in management necessitated by the different kinds of 
work. 



Horticultural Department Report 

Prof. W. F. Fan court. 

The Greenhouses : Greenhouse property is very perishable, 
but with proper attention to painting and repairs — done entirely by 
student labor — our greenhouses are in good physical order. It was 
necessary, however, to purchase a new ventilating apparatus for the 
Rose Krauskopf Greenhouse. All our propagating is done in this 
structure, and since the establishment of the nursery our plant prop- 
agation has increased largely. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 11 

The Theresa Loeb Greenhouse, although built some years, still 
maintains its usefulness. The large, modern Francis E. Loeb 
Greenhouse steadily returns good results. Carnations are grown in 
this house for a winter crop, supplemented with the tomatoes in the 
spring. Both crops have always been uniformly good, and profit- 
able, too. 

The Nursery : It was a happy inspiration of Doctor Kraus- 
kopf when he suggested the removal of the nursery from its quar- 
ters in the rear to its present position, south of the railroad. Of 
its highly educational value to the students I have spoken in former 
reports. 

We are still enjoying the annual gift of $100 from Mr. Nathan 
Krauskopf for the maintenance of a Memorial Circle adorning our 
nursery in honor of his mother. This is a beautiful feature of our 
Avork, as well as a direct aid to the institution, and I am hopeful 
that, in time, others will be prompted to memorialize dear, departed 
ones in a similar manner. Needless to say, the Krauskopf Me- 
morial Circle is an object of loving care. 

There have been planted in the Strauss Roses and Rhododen- 
dron Section, the past summer, seventy-five plants of the famous 
rose, Pink Killarney, perhaps by far the most desirable rose that 
has been introduced in the last quarter century. It withstands the 
rigors of our severest winters and will make the Strauss section in 
1914 more attractive than ever before. 

Besides all these, our students propagated last winter 20,000 
privets, and a large batch of evergreens ; these were added to the 
nursery. We have been fortunate in our sales, having but one plant 
to replace under our guarantee. 

The Arboretum : Feeling encouraged with the success of the 
nursery, Doctor Krauskopf conceived the idea of planting an ar- 
boretum. For this upwards of 6000 young trees (one and two years 
old) were purchased in the early spring, and planted in nursery 
TOWS. There were also planted 1000 pear and cherry stocks, these 
to be used for budding and grafting. In addition, there were 2000 
young shrubbery added to the nursery, the entire expense being 
borne by Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf in memory of their father, 
the late Mr. B. A. Feineman, of Kansas City. 

Vegetables : Supplying the house with vegetables is an im- 
portant feature of this department. When it is considered that 
there are over a hundred mouths to feed, it may readily be seen that 



38 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

it is not a miniature job to supply the food. Not less than 3000 ears 
of corn are supplied for a single meal. If carefully handled, two 
buckets of lima beans may suffice for one meal. Other vegetables 
are used in like proportions. In a large measure I attribute the 
superb health our students uniformly enjoy to the abundance of 
vegetables and fruits supplied them. The usual quantities of to- 
matoes, beans, etc., have been canned for winter use. 

The memorial trees, with but few exceptions, have done well, 
and receive constant care. 

The cash sales from the department were : From the nursery, 
$19^.30; from the greenhouse products, $544.63; from the vegetable 
gardens, $23.30; vegetables supplied for the boarding house, 
$692.23, making a total of $1459.46. 



Bucks County Horticultural Society 

The Bucks County Horticultural Society, founded and organ- 
ized at the National Farm School, of which the Director of the 
School, Dr. J. H. Washburn, has been the President since its incep- 
tion, held its leading meeting of the year in Segal Hall, on May 
23, 1913. 

The Society has a membership of over one hundred, consisting 
of farmers, orchardists and fruit growers, mostly of Bucks County. 
These meetings are very inspiring to the student body. They treat 
horticultural matters entirely from the standpoint of the practical 
grower, who is in the work entirely for a livelihood. At each meeting 
there is a speaker of renown. During the past year the Society 
and student body have been addressed by Professor Waite, of the 
Department of Pomology of the Government Department of Agri- 
culture ; Doctor Funk, of the State Horticultural Society ; and Prof. 
M. A. Blake, of the New Jersey State Experiment Station. At 
this meeting Doctor Washburn resigned the presidency and E. F. 
Bowlby, of Doylestown, Pa., was elected President. The officers 
of the Society are : 

President, E. F. Bowlby, Doylestown, Pa. 
Vice-President, F. T. Woodman, Rushland, Pa. 
Treasurer, J. T. Diehl, Perkasie, Pa. 

Executive Committee : J. H. Washburn, chairman, Farm 
School, Pa. ; S. B. Denlinger, Doylestown, Pa. ; Henry Arnold Todd, 
Doylestown, Pa. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 39 

Dome^ic Department Report 

Hetty Abraham, Matron. 

The year just ended has been one of advancement in this de- 
partment. The students, to the number of 112, have been in re- 
markably good health. Indeed, there is practically no illness 
whatever to report. 

The Freshman class, admitted in the spring, has remained prac- 
tically intact, and has speedily acquired the Farm School spirit. 

The usual supply to the Domestic Department from the dairy 
includes milk, cream, butter, cheese and skimmed milk. The Poul- 
try Department has furnished a reasonable supply of chickens, 
ducks and eggs ; the kitchen garden furnished a bountiful quantity 
of excellent vegetables, and will be able to supply fresh and sweet 
corn until late in October. 

The store room has been enlarged, enabling us to lay in a larger 
supply of groceries to guard against the serious menace of famine 
if snowbound, a situation that it has strained our nerves to avoid 
in the past. 

I regret that we are still hampered by an inadequate dining- 
hall. This is a very serious matter. To crowd anywhere from 75 
to 90 husky young men into a room that was intended for 25 is a 
hardship on them, and makes discipline and proper service practi- 
cally impossible. Fortunately, our students are good natured and 
inclined to gentlemanly conduct, and do what they can to relieve 
the situation. But they cannot do much ; neither can we. I am 
hoping that some good friend of the institution will be moved to 
give us a domestic hall, sufficiently adequate for our ever-growing 
institution. 

We have done the usual amount of canning, preserving, pick- 
ling and jellying — about 1200 quarts — and I have often thought, 
Avhile we were engaged in this, what an excellent work the National 
Farm School could do if it had the means for a Domestic Science 
Department for girls, where we could teach them these and the 
many other things that would fit them for life as farmers' daugh- 
ters and as farmers' wives. 

Our supply of apples, raw and cooked — an important factor in 
the maintenance of the excellent health standard at The National 
Farm School — lasted until late in May. 

We gratefully acknowledge the many donations recorded else- 
where. 



40 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Report of the Ladies' Auxiliary Board 



Monthly meetings were held in the Board Room of Temple 
Keneseth Israel, at which reports from the chairmen of the various 
committees and from the Matron of the School were presented and 
discussed. 

Regular visits were made to the School and, at the Annual 
Spring Festival and the Succoth Pilgrimage, the ladies acted as 
hostesses. 



NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL SEWING CIRCLE 



Good work was done by the members of the National Farm 
School Sewing Circle, in supplying the linen room of the School with 
the necessary sheets, waiters' aprons, laundry bags, bedspreads and 
towels. Thanks are due the ladies who made the many articles and 
who gave their valuable time for the work ; also to the following for 
contributions of money and material : Mesdames Berlitzheimer, 
Dannenbaum, Fleisher, Geis, Langfeld, Mitchell, Raab, Rosenthal, 
Schamberg, Schoneman, Snellenburg, and the Misses Jonas and 
Rosenbaum. 

MRS. R. B. SCHONEMAN, 

Chairman. 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

EMERGENCY FUND 

Dr. 

1912. 

September 1st, Balance on hand $1.39 

October 4th, Appropriation, October, November, December, 1912 35.00 
November 16th, Appropriation, July, August, September, 1912.. 35.00 

1913. 
February 3d, Appropriation, January, February, March, 1913.. 35.00 

April 6th, Appropriation, April, May, June, 1913 35.00 

May 6th, Donation through Mrs. Leon Merz 16.00 

$157.39 

Cr. 

1912. 
October 9th, N. Snellenburg & Co $1.32 

1913. 

February 3d, Zellner Bros 4.66 

April 14th, N. Snellenburg & Co 18.75 

May 19th, Refreshments at Farm School 7.20 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 41 

May 19th, N. Snellenburg & Co 41.40 

September 25th, Balance on hand 84.06 

157.39 



LADIES AUXILIARY FUND 

Dr. 
1912. 
September 1st, Cash on hand $61.95 

Cr. 
1912. 

November 12th, Commutation tickets to Farm School 14.60 

1913. 
February 3d, Mrs. Schoneman, for Chrisamas, 1912, disburse- 
ments 9.50 

September 25th, Balance on hand 37.85 

$61.95 

MRS. JOS. GUCKENHEIMER, 

Treasurer. 



The Alumni Association 



The Alumni Association held its fourth annual meeting on 
October 19, 1913, at Segal Hall, Farm School, Pa. There were 
present 18 Alumni; of these 7 are farmers occupying their own 
farms within the vicinity of their Alma Mater. Numerous letters 
and telegrams were received from graduates, who, owing to the 
fact that they are located at distant places, could not attend, 
showing their loyal support to the Association and to their Alma 
Mater. The secretary, Charles Horn, '06, reported that a great 
many of the graduates are holding excellent agricultural po- 
sitions, and a number of them are purchasing farms of their 
own within the vicinity of the School, besides those who have 
already settled there. 

The gold medal that was offered at our previous annual 
meeting to the student who had been most efficient in practical 
and theoretical general agriculture was awarded to Abraham 
Witkin, at the 1912 graduation exercises, by the secretary. 
Officers were elected for the ensuing year, as follows: 

President, Jacob Ratner, '05. 
Vice-President, Samuel Galblum, '08. 
Secretary and Treasurer, Charles Horn, '06. 
Executive Committee, Max Colton, '10, and Meyer Gold- 
man, '03. 



42 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

What some of the Graduates of the National 
Farm School are doing. 



Aarons, Harry, Downsman, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm ("Sunnybrook 
Farm" ) . 

Amrum, Philip, Franklin Park, N. J. — Trucking. 

Anderson, Victor, Sanatoga, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Atkatz, Joseph, care of F. T. Stryker, Highlands, N. J. — Farm manager. 

Berg, Henry, East Mansfield, Mass. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Blackman, Morris, Philadelphia. — Chemicals. 

Borovick, George, Chicago, III. — Pharmacist. 

Brodel, Samuel, Berkeley, Cal. — Specializing, University of California. 

Brown, Benj., Covington, Ky. — General farming. 

Burd, Louis, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Capek, Thaddeus S., Stamford, Conn. — Dairying. 

Chodesh, Benj., Gap, Pa. — Doctor of veterinary. 

Coltun, Max J., Summitt, N. J. — Health officer. 

Crohn, Lawrence W. — Truck farming in New Jersey. 

Druckerman, Benjamin — On farm in New York State. 

Einstein, Sylvan D., Easton, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Epstein, Abraham, R. F. D. No. 3, Stamford, Conn. — Dairying on rented 
farm. 

Erde, Herman W., E. Lansing, Mich. — Attending Michigan State Agricultural 
College. 

Feldman, N., Philadelphia — Specializing in veterinary science at University 
of Pennsylvania. 

Fereshetian, Martin, Meadville, Pa. — Specializing at college. 

Fleisher, Max, Vineland, N. J. — Superintendent of dairy. New Jersey Train- 
ing School. 

Frank, Harry, Jr., care of S. Ettinger, Tinley Park, 111. — Poultry farm man- 
ager. 

Friedman, David A. — Specializing, Utah Agricultural College. 

Friedman, S., New York City. — In business. 

Galblum, S., Washington, D. C. — In business. 

Glantz, Emanuel, Danboro, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Goldberg, Benj., Mohegan Lake, N. Y.— General agriculture. 

Goldman, Jos., Rockford, 111. — Dairying. 

Goldman, Meyer, Norma, N. J. — Instructor in elementary agriculture to 
children of Jewish Colony. 

Gordon, Abe, Rochester, N. Y. — On his own farm. 

Green, Meyer, Elizabeth, N. J. — Civil Engineer. 

Harrison, Beryl, Grimes, Iowa — On his own farm. 

Hausmann, Samuel, Ellensville, N. Y.— On his own farm. 

Helfand, Louis I. — Post-graduate work at School, in charge of Schoenfeld 
Farm No. 1. 

Heller, Chas. J., Newark, N. J. — Manager, fertilizer company. 

Hirsch, Harry S., Lyons, 111. — On his own poultry farm. 

Hirsch, Louis, Pittsburgh, Pa. — In business. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 43 

Horn, Charles, Philadelphia. — Assistant Superintendent, Philadelphia Vacant 
Lots Cultivation Association. 

Horn, Irving, Philadelphia. — In business. 

How, W. Walter, Philadelphia.— Clerk. 

Ibaugh, George W., Middleport, Pa. — Farm manager. 

Jaffe, David — Post-graduate work at School. 

Kahan, Jacob, Rushland, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Kahn, Carl H. — On cotton plantation in South. 

Kravet, Lewis — Post-graduate work at School. 

Krinzman, Philip, Elizabeth, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Kysela, Rudolph, Denver, Colo. — In business. 

Landsman, Harry, Yonkers, N. Y. — On dairy farm. 

Lauchman, Wm., Goldsboro, N. C. — Farm manager. 

Lebeson, Harry, Columbus, Ohio — Attending Ohio State College. 

Lebeson, Herman, Columbus, Ohio. — Attending Ohio State College. 

Leflf, Isador, Novelty, Ohio. — Cultivating his own farm (Ivermoot Farm). 

Leib, Louis, Washington, D. C. — Manager of dairy company. 

Leiser, Monroe, Eagle Lake, Fla. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Lenik, Benjamin, R. F. D. ZT , Mendota, 111. — General agriculture. 

Leon, Marcus, Des Moines, la. — In business. 

Levy, Jerome, Chicago, 111. — Specializing in chemistry. 

Levin, Julius N., Situate R. I. — Cultivating his own farm. 

Levinson, Julius, Aurora, 111. — Greenhouse work. 

Lipschutz, Nathan, Williamson School, Pa.- — Assistant Herdsman, Williamson 
Trade School. 

Lubin, Harry, Philadelphia. — With Chestnut Tree Blight Commission. 

Major, Edward. — Specializing, Cornell University. 

Malish, M., Philadelphia. — Dairy business. 

Margoliuth, Aaron, Minneapolis, Minn. — General agriculture. 

Michaelson, M., Indianapolis, Ind. — Manager, National Tree Surgery Com- 
pany. 

Miller, A., Chicago, 111. — Seeds and floriculture business. 

Miller, Joseph, Salt Lake City, Utah. — With Park Commission. 

Minkowsky, J., Belmont Farm, Perryville, Ohio. — Dairyman. 

Mitzmain, Maurice, B. A., M. Sc, Philippine Islands. — Entomologist, Veter- 
inary Corps, Philippine Islands Department of Agriculture. 

Monblatt, Alex., Chicago, 111. — In business. 

Morris, Max, New Orleans, La. — Treasurer of land compan}^ 

Moskovitz, Morris, Neshaminy, Pa. — On his own farm. 

Naum, Harry, Nassau, N. Y. — Farm manager, Working Men's Circle Sani- 
tarium. 

Norvick, Jacob, Philadelphia. — In business. 

Ostrolenk, Bernard, Canby, Minn. — Director, Agricultural Department, State 
High School. 

Ostrolenk, Lewis, Gloversville, N. Y. — Dairying. 

Packer, Benjamin, Chicago, 111. — Farm manager. 

Peyser, Sol., New York City. — Attorney. 

Putterman, M., Columbus, Ohio. — Specializing, Ohio State University. 

Ratner, Henry, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 
Farm) with brother. 

Ratner, Jacob, Norristown, Pa. — Cultivating his own farm (Valley Brook 



44 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

Farm) with brother. 
Ratner, Joseph, Detroit, ]\Iich. — Farm manager. 
RedaHa, Lewis, ^lays Landing, N. J. — Orcharding. 
Rich, Harry, Weatogue, Conn. — General manager, Tobacco Plantations of 

American Sumatra Tobacco Company. 
Rock, Louis, Philadelphia. — In business. 
Rocklin, S. S., Mohegan Lake, N. Y.— Stock raising. 
Rose, Leonard, Alilwaukee, Wis. — Studying chemistry. 
Rosenberg, N., Rome, N. Y. — General agriculture. 
Rosenberg, Sam'l M. — On farm near Philadelphia. 
Rosenfelt, Maurice, Philadelphia. — Florist. 
Rudley, Samuel, Philadelphia. — Instructor in gardening and in charge of 

beautifying public school grounds for Board of Education. 
Salinger, Morris, Grimes, Iowa. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Sarner, Jos. L., Philadelphia. — In business. 
Schlesinger, Alphonse, New Orleans, La. — In business. 
Schulman, Harry, St. Louis, Mo. — Assistant manager, Traftic Department, 

Missouri-Pacific Railway Company. 
Serber, D., Land Title Building, Philadelphia. — Attorney. 
Serlin, \Vm. J., Detroit, Mich. — In business. 
Silver, Chas., Monroeville, N. J. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Sobel, Isidore. — On farm in New York State. 
Sobel, Sol., Ridgewood, X. J. — Farm manager. 
Snowvice, Wm., Bridgeton, N. J. — On his own farm. 
Sparberg, Geo. L., Oshkosh, Wis. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Speyer, Aaron, R. F. D. No. 3, Painesville, Ohio. — Cultivating his own farm. 
Stabinsky, Julius, Atlanta, Ga. — Dairying. 
Stern, Isaac, New York City — Manager, machine company. 
Taubenhaus, Jacob, Newark, Del. — Assistant Chief in Department Plant 

Pathology, Delaware Agricultural Experiment Station. 
Wallman, Israel, Columbus, Ohio. — Specializing, Ohio State University. 
Weightman, Benj., Tampico, 111. — Farm manager. 
Weinberg, Harry, Palestine, Texas. — In charge of tobacco plantations of 

Wm. Taussig Tobacco Company. 
Weiss, Harry, Youngstown, Ohio. — Stockman. 
Wiseman, J. H., Pittsburgh, Pa. — Instructor in gardening. Board of Public 

Education. 
Witkin, Abraham, Penllyn, Pa. — Horticulture. 
Wolf, E. H., Philadelphia. — In business. 
Woolwich, Aaron, Reading, Pa. — Greenhouse work. 
Work, James, Narberth, Pa. — Nursery work. 
Zalinger, Bernie A., Chicago, 111. — Florist. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 45 



The Graduates' Aid Fund 



The Graduates' Aid Fund, founded by Mr. William Volker, 
of Kansas City, Mo., has for its object the building up of a fund, 
the interest of which is to be devoted to extending loans to such 
of the graduates of The National Farm School who shall estab- 
lish themselves on farms of their own. 

Contributions have been received from : 

William Volker, Kansas City, Mo $150.00 

A. W. Benjamin, Kansas City. Mo 100.00 

Henry Hellman, New York City 200.00 

Barnett Binswanger, Philadelphia 50.00 

Adolph Eichholz, Esq., Philadelphia 50.00 

Benjamin Finberg, Philadelphia 50.00 

Hart BlumenthaC Philadelphia 50.00 



Institute of Jewish Farmers 



at 



The National Farm School, February 27, 191 3. 



An Institute of Jewish Farmers, in the vicinity of the National 
Farm School, was hied at that institution on February 27th. Not- 
withstanding a very stormy day, there were present sixteen farmers, 
family men, three of whom were accompanied by their wives. These 
farmers represent a holding of 1347 acres, 135 cows, 42 horses, in 
addition to the usual small stock of the farm. Twelve of these 
farmers specialize in dairying, three in poultrying and one in 
trucking. 

The Institute was held under the auspices of the Federation 
of Jewish Farmers of America. Addresses were made and instruc- 
tion given by the members of the faculty of the National Farm 
School. 

The Doylestown Intelligencer says : "Bucks County has more 
Jewish farmers than any other county in Pennsylvania. This is due 
to the influence of the National Farm School and the men back of 
that institution." The fact that there were so many dairying men 
present, made a special study of sanitary barns and milk producing, 
as conducted at the National Farm School, the most interesting 
feature of this institute. 

Including the land owned by the National Farm School, nearly 
1800 acres of Bucks County are cultivated by Jews. 



46 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Sundry Donations 



Blumenthal, Mrs. Hart, Philadelphia. — Treat of cake for the Household. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, Philadelphia. — Subscriptions to papers and magazines for 
Library. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, Philadelphia. — Garden, iield and flower seeds, to the value 
of $100. 

Chicago Israelite^ Chicago, 111. — Free subscription. 

Dill & Collins Company, Philadelphia. — Glazed paper used in this book. 

Fancourt, E. J., Philadelphia. — 100 Killarney rose bushes. 

Fleisher, Mrs. M., Philadelphia. — Waiters' coats. 

Freiberg, J. Walter, Cincinnati, Ohio. — Large, handsome flag for new flag- 
pole. 

Friedman, B. C, Philadelphia. — 60 pounds Matzos. 

Garret-Buchanan Co. — 5 reams paper for this book. 

Guckenheimer, Mrs. Joseph, Philadelphia. — Seventeen volumes for Library. 

Hirsch, Henry, Archbold, Ohio. — Quantity of seeds. 

Hirsch, Mrs. Moses, Chicago, 111. — Quantity of flat silver. 

Jewish Criterion, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Free subscription. 

Jewish Exponent, Philadelphia. — Free subscription. 

Jewish Publication Society, Philadelphia. — Number of volumes for Library. 

Jewish Review and Observer, Cleveland, Ohio. — Free subscription. 

Jewish Voice, St. Louis, Mo. — Free subscription. 

Kirschbaum, Mrs. David, Philadelphia. — Waiters' coats. 

Lubin, S., Philadelphia. — Five moving picture entertainments. 

Manischewitz, B., Cincinnati, Ohio. — 110 pounds Matzos. 

Miller, A., Chicago, 111. — Several hundred tuberous-rooted Begonias. 

National Farm School Sewing Circle, Philadelphia. — Kitchen, bath, face and 
roller towels, spreads, sheets, pillow cases, laundry bags, etc. 

National Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mich. — Free subscription. 

Needlework Guild of America, Philadelphia Section. — 325 useful garments. 

Nixon, Martin and W. H., Philadelphia. — Paper for this book. 

Ochs, Adolph S., New York City. — Steel flagpole and cost of erection. 

Price, Thomas W. Company, Philadelphia. — Paper for the cover of this book. 

Samuel, J. Bunford, Philadelphia. — Subscription to Popular Electricity. 

Schoneman, Mrs. R. B., Philadelphia. — Number of aprons and quantity of 
sewing material. 

Snellenburg, N. & Co., Philadelphia. — Four American flags and loan of 
bunting for decorating purposes at public functions. 

Spitz, Samuel, Philadelphia. — Pail of mince meat and two smoked tongues. 

Sternberg, Samuel, Philadelphia. — Horse. 

Tickner, Mrs. H. J., Philadelphia. — 75 pairs men's hose. 

Western Fruit Grower, St. Joseph, Mo. — Free subscription. 

Wolf Bros., Philadelphia. — Envelopes for mailing this book. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 47 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 



POST-GRADUATE CLASS. 

HELFLAND, L. I ' Philadelphia, Pa. 

JAFFE, DAVID Philadelphia, Pa. 

KRAVET, LEWIS New York, N. Y. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

ABRAMS, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

BLUME, HENRY El Paso, Texas 

CHARON. OSCAR Philadelphia, Pa. 

FINKEL, JACOB Philadelphia, Pa. 

FRIED, ALBERT Vermilion, Ohio 

FRIEDMAN, AARON Philadelphia, Pa. 

GINSBERG, LEO Pittstown, N. J. 

GORDON, ABE Rochester, N. Y. 

HECKER, GEORGE Philadelphia, Pa. 

JOHNSTON, EDWARD Lansdowne, Pa. 

KERNER, SAMUEL Pittsburgh, Pa. 

LEVY, HENRY New York, N. Y. 

M'CRACKEN, WILLIAM J Philadelphia, Pa. 

RASKIN, JACOB New York, N. Y. 

ROSENTHAL, JOSEPH New York, N. Y. 

SCHULTZ, RUDOLPH Newark, N. J. 

WEIGLE, FRED Philadelphia, Pa. 

ZWEIGHAFT, BERNARD Alliance, N. J. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

BAUTMAN, ISRAEL Newburgh, N. Y. 

BILIK, JACOB Franklin Park, N. J. 

BRODSKY, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

BURCHUK, ALEX Philadelphia. Pa. 

BURTON. MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

DAVIDSON, SAMUEL Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

ELKON, SAMUEL Rochester, N. Y. 

GEORGE, HOWARD Philadelphia, Pa. 

GREENBURG, A Philadelphia, Pa. 

HORNSTEIN, MOSES Boston, Mass. 

JENKINS, ALBERT Philadelphia, Pa. 

KASKIN, LOUIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

KLEIN, ELMER Cleveland, Ohio 

LASKER, SAMUEL Providence, R. L 

LECHNER, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

LIGHT, PHILIP Newark, N. J. 

MILLER, PHILIP Philadelphia, Pa. 

NUSSBAUM, CHARLES Philadelphia. Pa. 

RIEUR, JACOB New York, N. Y. 

ROSS, HENRY Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SANDLER, JACOB Philadelphia, Pa. 



48 THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 

SCHUTZBANK, JACOB Freehold, N. J. 

SELIGMAN, FRANK Brooklyn, N. Y. 

SEMEL, MAX New York, N. Y. 

SHOR, HARRY New York, N. Y. 

SORKIN, LEWIS Bayonne, N. J. 

ULMAN, JULIUS Savannah, Ga. 

FRESHMAN CLASS. 

ABRAMS, CHARLES Philadelphia, Pa. 

BILIG, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

BOONIN, LEON Philadelphia, Pa. 

CITRON. HYMAN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DORFMAN, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

DRUCKMAN, MORRIS Brooklyn, N. Y. 

DUBLIN, SAMUEL Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ELLIS, ROBERT Brooklyn, N. Y. 

ELLNER, JOSEPH New York, N. Y. 

EPSTEIN, HARRY Philadelphia, Pa. 

EZRIN, BENJAMIN Philadelphia, Pa. 

FALKOWITZ, ISIDORE New York, N. Y. 

FEINBERG, HARRY New York, N. Y. 

FLEISHMAN, LEON Philadelphia, Pa. 

FREED, HENRY Brooklyn, N. Y. 

GOLDBERG, BARNEY Caldwell, N. J. 

GOLDFINE, BENJAMIN New York, N. Y. 

GOLDMAN, JACOB St. Louis, Mo. 

GOLDSTEIN, JACOB Cleveland, Ohio 

GOLDSTEIN, RAY Atlantic City, N. J. 

GREEN STEIN, BENJAMIN Wilmington, Del. 

GROOTS, FRANK Philadelphia, Pa. 

HANTCHAROW, PINCUS New York, N. Y. 

HARKAVY, MORRIS New York, N. Y. 

HELLMAN, SIMON New Orleans, La. 

KALLEN, SAMUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

KESSELMAN, BENJAMIN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

KESSLER, SAMUEL Brooklyn, N. Y. 

KLEVANSKY, ABRAHAM Reading, Pa. 

KRIVIN, DAVID Brooklyn, N. Y. 

LAUER, SAMUEL New York, N. Y. 

LERNER, MANUEL Philadelphia, Pa. 

LEVINTOW, A Philadelphia, Pa. 

LIEBLING, J New York, N. Y. 

MAGRAM, NATHAN New York, N. Y. 

MOREINIS, WILLIAM New York, N. Y. 

OXENHANDLER, ISAAC New York, N. Y. 

ROBE, BENJAMIN New York, N. Y. 

RUBINOFF, LOUIS Pittsburgh, Pa. 

SCHWEITZER, HYMAN .Cleveland, Ohio 

SELECTER, MEYER Philadelphia, Pa. 

SHAPERA, SOLOMON New York, N. Y. 

SHAPSAI, ABRAHAM New York, N. Y. 

STAMEN, HARRY Chelsea, Mass. 

STERN, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 

TOOR, CECIL J Philadelphia, Pa. 

WADE, BENJAMIN Brooklyn, N. Y. 

WOLF, JESSE Philadelphia, Pa. 

WOLFSON, MORRIS Philadelphia, Pa. 



[^ t= =11 II fcJMI =11 I I I I — = j 

Prizes to Students 



The appeal made to friends of the school to contribute 
money prizes for efficiency in the various departments of 
the School, was answered, to so pleasing an extent, that, 
during the past year, $319.50, in cash, were awarded to the 
various students at the School for proficiency, effort and 
improvement. The money for these prizes is contributed 
as follows : 

"The Herbert T. Hyman Prizes," The interest of 
$150.00 donated by Mrs. Bernard Sluizer, in memory of 
her son. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of 
$250.00 contributed to the Endowment Fund by Harry 
Louchheim, of New York, in memory of his father. 

"The Joseph Louchheim Prizes." The interest of 
$250.00 contributed to the Endowment Fund by Mrs. L. 
S. Eliel, of Philadelphia, in memory of her father. 

"The Anchel Rosenthal Prizes." The interest of 
$500.00 bequeathed to the Endowment Fund. 

"The Harriet B. Labe Prizes." The interest of $100.00 
bequeathed to the Endowment Fund. 

Mr. Samuel Grabfelder, Philadelphia (annual) $25.00 

Mr. Geo. F. Hoffman, Philadelphia (annual) 25.00 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Krauskopf, Philadelphia (annual) . 25.00 
Mr. Louis Loeb, New York, in memory of his wife (an- 
nual) 25.00 

Mr. Joseph Potsdamer, Philadelphia (annual) 25.00 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Sinberg, Philadelphia (annual) . . 25.00 

Mr. Ralph Blum, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Gabriel Blum, Philadelphia, in memory of her sis- 
ter (annual) 10.00 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in mem- 
ory of their son Ralph (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. Sol Blumenthal, Philadelphia, in memory of her 

husband (annual) 10.00 

Mr. David Kirschbaum, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr. Moe Lieberman, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. L. Marks, Chicago, in memory of his son (annual) 10.00 

Mr. I. H. Silverman, Philadelphia (annual) 10.00 

Mrs. D. Berlizheimer, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mr. Samuel D. Lit, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mr. A. Miller, Chicago 5.00 

Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, Philadelphia (annual) 5.00 

Mrs. Jacob Weil, Philadelphia, in memory of Hulda 

Oppenheimer 5.00 

Mr. George C. Watson, Philadelphia (annual) 2.00 

J ^Ji =" ■■ ■■' ' ■ ■' " ==J 



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f, ,-y.'. _('.'/ <-y. , 




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fit t/S 



Farms Donated 



In memory of Flora Schoenfeld, 

by her husband, Max Schoenfeld, 

of Rorschach, Switzerland. 



I. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 1 , 

40 acres, in the Spring of I 904. 

II. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 2, 

38 acrei. in the Spring of 1 905 

III. Flora Schoenfeld Farm No. 3, 

163 acres, in the Fall of 1907. 

These farms all adjoin the original tract of 
Farm School land. 



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Buildings Donated 




I. Theresa Loeb Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Theresa Loeb, Ogontz, Pa., by her family. 
Erected 1898. 

II. Ida M. Block Memorial Chapel, 

In memory of Ida M. Bloch, Kansas City, INIo., by her 
husband and family. Erected 1899. 

III. Zadok M. Eisner Memorial Laboratory, 

In memory of Zadok M. Eisner, Philadelphia, Pa., 
by his wife. Erected 1899. 

IV. Rose Krauskopf Memorial Green House, 

In memory of Rose Krauskopf, Philadelphia, Pa., by 
her children. Erected 1899. 

V. Dairy, by Mr. and Mrs. Louis I. Aaron. 

Pittsburg, Pa. Erected 1899. 

VI. Adolph Segal Hall, 

Containing Library, Lecture Hall, Administration Of- 
fices and Dormitories, by Mr. Adolph Segal, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. Erected 1906. 

VII. Frances E. Loeb Vegetable Forcing 
Green House, 

In memory of Frances E. Loeb, by her husband. 
Erected igo8. 



i 



M 



emoria 



1 T 



rees 



Planted in Spring, 1913, in Memory) of 



MOBILE, ALA. 
Korchheimcr, M. 

LITTLE ROCK, ARK. 
Baumgarten, Simon 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Dinkelspiel, Babette 
Meyer, Louisa 
Sacks, Lippman 
Samson, Rudolph 
Son, Adolph A. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 
Mayer, Henry 
Speyer, Isaac 

QUINCY, ILL. 
Kingsbaker, Moses 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Efroymson, Jacob 
Kiser, Gottlieb 
Kiser, Mrs. Gottlieb 

DES MOINES, IOWA 
Vounker, Tina 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 
Levy, Henry 

NEW ORLEANS, LA. 
Hart, Maurice J. 
Hyman, Solomon 
Steinhardt, Emanuel 

BALTIMORE, MD. 
Hess, Rebecca E. 
Kahn, Leon 
Katz, Zadock 
Spandauer, Levi 
Spandauer, Rose Hutzler 
Strouse, Isaac 
\'an Leer, Hannah 
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 
Weil, Eli 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 
Rice, Jonathan 

KANSAS CITY, MO. 
Feineman, B. A. 
Wollman, Jonas 

ST. JOSEPH, MO. 
Westheimer, Ferdinand 

VICKSBURG, MISS. 
Brown, Victor 

NEW YORK 
Berl, Eugenia 
Bruck, George 
Cahn, David 
De Boer, Jane Hunt 
Herrmann, Nathan 
Hess, Rosie 
Kleinert, Isaac B. 
Kramer, Susanna 



Naylor, Reubin 
Sloss, Florence 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 
Marshall, ZiUah 

AMSTERDAM, N. Y. 
Behr, Moses 
Levi, Solomon 

BROOKLYN, N. Y. 
Cohen, Rae 

CINCINNATI, OHIO 
Senior, Thomas E. 

MARION, OHIO 
Hershberg, Betsy 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Abel, Sophie 
Berg, Josephine 
Bowers, Aaron J. S. 
Darmstadter, Aaron 
Davidson, Amalie 
Fabian, Louis 
Feldenheimer, Amelia M. 
Feldman, Samuel 
Fleishman, Cecelia 
Fleishman, Jack 
Friedman, Sadie Engleman 
Goldsmith, Fannie 
Goldsmith, Jacob 
Goldstein, Clara 
Goldstein, Samuel 
Halbkram, Rose 
Harburger, Hortense Louis 
Heilbron, Sigmund 
Hirschberg, Malvina 
Hirschberg, Marcus • 
Hirschberg, Max 
Hirsh, Gabriel 
Hoffman, Alexander 
Isaacs, Sophie 
Kahn, Milton J. 
Kaufman, Lena 
Kaufmann, Sophie 
Kirschbaum, Bernie 
Kohn, Heinrich 
Kohn, Jeanette 
Kohn, Sarah 
Kohn, Siegfried 
Levy, Hannah 
Lindeman, Bertha 
Lohren, Jerome 
Manko, Kaufman 
Manko, Lester K. 
Manko, Martha 
Mayer, Daniel 
Mayer, Fanny 
Mayer, Joseph 
Mayer, Julia 
Mayer, Louis 
Mayer, Samuel 



Morris, Susana S. 
Myers, Eli A. 
Nathanson, Julia 
Ochs, Bertie Gans 
Pollock, Mrs. Nathan 
Rice, Nathan H. 
Rosenberg, Frieden 
Rosenthal, Edwin 
Rosenthal, Sarah 
Rosin, Moritz 
Samuels, Barney 
Schwarz, Jenny 
Sanson, Joseph 
Sanson, Samuel 
Shoenberg, Samuel J. 
Silberman, Henry 
Silberman, Rachel 
Silberstein, Annie Teller 
Smith, Samuel H. 
Spitz, Emanuel 
Stein, Isaac B. 
Ullman, Michael 
Ullman, Regina 
Walker, Leon J. 
Walter, Edwin H. 
Weil, Chaja 
Weil, Moses 
Weil, Samuel 
Wilson, Edward D. 
Winstock, Isaac S. 

MEADVILLE, PA. 
Reefer, Jeannette 
Reefer, Morris H. 

PITTSTON, PA. 

Brown, Mrs. Albert 

TAMAQUA, PA. 
Epstein, Yetta 
Livingstone, Sigmund 

UNIONTOWN, PA. 
Rosenbaum, Sol. J. 
Stern, Rebecca 

YORK, PA. 
Lehmayer, Nathan 

MEMPHIS, TENN. 
Coleman, Solomon 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 
Malevinsky, Dora 

DALLAS, TEXAS 
Harris, A. 

WHEELING, W. VA. 
Horkheimer, Morris 

CLARKSBURG, W. VA. 
Levy, Sidney H. 

BERLIN, GERMANY 
Klonower, Herman 
Klonower, Rosalie 




Permanent Improvements 

I. Lake Archer Rosenthal 

In memory of Archer Roienthal, Philadelphia, Pa., by his broth- 
er and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Rosenthal, built in 1 908. 

II. Elise Binswanger Nursery 

In memory of Elise Binswanger, Kansas City, Mo., by her grandson 
and granddaughter, planted in 1 909 

Samuel Strauss, Jr., Division of Nursery 

Rhododendrons and Roses in memory of Samuel Strauss, Jr., Phil- 
adelphia, by his wife, 1910. 

Louis I. Aaron Ice House 

In honor of his 70th birthday, by Mr. Louis I. Aaron, of Pittsburg, 
Pa. Erected 1911. 

FESTIVE TREES 

Planted in Spring, 1913, in Honor of 

Mr. and Mrs. Nathan S. Cohen, Wheeling, W. Va. — Wedding, February 12, 1913. 

Mr and Mrs. Abraham Fellheimer, Philadelphia — Wedding, March 17, 1913. 

Mrs. Harry Herzberg, Philadelphia — Recovery from illness, October, 1912. 

Florette H. Hinlein and Jerome Lehman, Philadelphia — Betrothal, August 16, 1912. 

Mr. and Mrs. Irving W. Isaacs, Philadelphia — Wedding, January 8, 1913. 

Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., Philadelphia — Twenty-fifth anniversary of ministry 

in Keneseth Israel, October 19, 1912. 
Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., Philadelphia — Fifty-fifth birthday anniversary, 

January 21, 1913. 
Madeleine R. Krauskopf, Philadelphia — Confirmation, June 11, 1913. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jacob L. Krauss, Philadelphia — Wedding, February S, 1913. 
Alma Ladenburger, New Rochelle, N. Y.— Birth, June 28, 1907. 
Leonard Ladenburger, New Rochelle, N. Y. — Birth, October 21, 1903. 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Levy, New Orleans, La. — Wedding, March 19, 1913. 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis M. Levy, Philadelphia— f^eddw^r, December 19, 1912. 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Lieberman, Philadelphia — Twentieth wedding anniversary, January 

5, 1913. 
Eleanor Lieberman, Philadelphia — Birth, February. 7, 1913. 
Jane Lieberman, Philadelphia — Birth, February 7, 1913. 
Jacob Marshall, Syracuse, N. Y. — Eighty-fourth birthday, April 6, 1913. 
Hulda Oppenheimer, Charlotte, N. C. — Birth, September 1, 1912. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clay Samuels, Philadelphia — Wedding, April 1, 1913. 
Mr. and Mrs. Elkin Seligsohn, Omaha, Neb. — Golden wedding, June 24, 1912. 




D 



Scholarships 



1908— "WM. S. RAYNER SCHOLARSHIP." The 
income of $5,000 contributed to the Endowment 
Fund by his daughter, Mrs. Bertha Rayner 
Frank. 

1908— "DR. SAMUEL L. FRANK SCHOLAR- 
SHIP." The income of $5,000 contributed to 
the Endowment Fund by his wife, Mrs. Bertha 
Rayner Frank. 



Pri 



izes 



1907— "THE HERBERT T. HYMAN PRIZES." 
The interest of $150 donated by Mrs. Bernard 
Sluizer, in memory of her son. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Harry Louchheim, of New York, 
in memory of his father. 

1908— "THE JOSEPH LOUCHHEIM PRIZES." 
The interest of $250 contributed to the Endow- 
ment Fund by Mrs. Louis S. Eliel, in memory 
of her father. 

1910— "THE ANCHEL ROSENTHAL PRIZES." 
The interest of $500.00 being the income of a 
bequest. 

191 1— "THE HARRIET B. LABE PRIZES." 

The interest of $100.00, being the income of a 
bequest. 



P i i ' =n f5i i i ii [5i ii Di fp) 



Legacies and Beque^s 

Money received in legacies and bequests is placed in the 

Endowment Fund. 
Estate of — 
1895 — In memoriam Jacob Tuck and wife, by their 

children, Philadelphia $1,00000 

1899 — Carolyn Parent Nirdlinger, Philadelphia... 50000 

1903 — Jacob H. Hecht, Boston, Mass 500 o& 

1905 — Moses Lichten, Philadelphia 500 00 

1906 — Marx Wineland, Frostberg, Md., 500 00 

1907 — Frances Seligman, Philadelphia, 

(For Bernard and Frances Seligman Library Alcove . , . 200 OO 

" — Fannie Houseman, Philadelphia, 

(In memory of her son, Arthur Ballenberg Houseman) . 100 OO 

" — Edward Popper, Greenville, Texas, lOO oo 

" — Samuel W. Goodman, Philadelphia, 200 00 

" — Fannie Simon, Philadelphia, 50 00 

" — Isaac Sailer, Philadelphia 500 00 

igoS — Leah Bernheimer, Mobile, Ala., 100 00 

" — Eleanore Samuel, Philadelphia, 343 29 

« — Solomon Blumenthal, Philadelphia, 250 00 

1909 — Moses H. Stern, Philadelphia 500 00 

" —Esther Sailer, Philadelphia, 78 05 

" — Rebecca Haas, Indianapolis, Ind., 100 00 

" —Blanche Loeb, New York 1,000 00 

jgio — Anchel Rosenthal, Philadelphia 500 00 

" — Abraham Lipman, Pittsburgh, Pa 500 00 

" — Henrietta Morgenroth, Louisville, Ky 500 00 

" — In Memory of Milton L. Snellenburg, by his 

Father 2,000 00 

igii — Samuel Baldauf, Oskaloosa, Iowa 300 00 

" — Max Bamberger, Philadelphia 5.000 00 

" ^Harriet B. Labe, Philadelphia 100.00 

" —Adolph Leberman, Philadelphia 100 00 

1912— Annie M. Ferguson, Pittsburgh, Pa 100 00 

" — Mina Friedman, Chicago, 111 100 00 

" — Benjamin Kahn, Philadelphia 200 00 

" —Louis Lowenthal, Rochester, N. Y 500 00 

" —Levi Stern, Philadelphia 100 00 

" — Abraham Weiler, Columbus, Ohio 200 00 

1913— Leopold Keiser, Buffalo, N. Y 500 00 

" —Estate of Sophia Rothschild, Summitville, Ind. 100 00 

" —Cass Sunstein, Pittsburgh, Pa 100 00 

" —Estate of Samuel Woolner, Peoria, 111 500 00 



LEGACIES AND ENDOWMENTS 

TO THE FEDERATION OF JEWISH CHARITIES OF 
PHILADELPHIA 

1902 — Mrs. Carrie Hamberg, in memory of her hus- 
band, Isaac Hamberg $100.00 

1902 — Children of David Ettinger, in memory of 

their father 100.00 

1903 — Mrs. Alice Hagedorn, in memory of her hus- 
band, John J. Hagedorn 5,000.00 

1903— Herman Jonas Bequest 7,500.00 

1903— Mrs. Carrie Hamberg (additional) 100.00 

1903— Ernst Kaufmann Bequest 2,000.00 

1904— Mrs. Carrie Hamberg (additional) 100.00 

1904 — Augustus Marks, in memory of his wife, Vir- 
ginia Marks 50.00 

1904 — Augustus Marks (additional) 10.00 

1905— Augustus Masks (additional) 300.00 

1905 — Sigmund Roedelheim Bequest 500.00 

1905 — Mrs. Carrie Krieger, in memory of her husband, 

Samuel Krieger 1,000.00 

1905 — Wm. Krieger, in memory of his father, Samuel 

Krieger 100.00 

1905— Herman B. Blumenthal Bequest 2,000.00 

1905 — S. M. and M. S. Fridenberg, in memory of 

Esther, wife of S. M. Fridenberg 1,000.00 

1906— Augustus Marks (additional) 140.00 

1908 — Mrs. Fannie A. Leberman , Bequest 500.00 

1908— Isaac Herzberg Bequest 3,000.00 

1909 — Simon and Rosa Fleisher Endowment (by their 

children) 5,000.00 

1909 — D. Frank Greenewald, in memory of his mother, 

Sallie Gimbel Greenewald 2,000.00 

1909 — Adolph Weyl, in memory of his wife. Rose Weyl 50.00 

1909— Herman Loeb Bequest 3,000.00 

1909— Henry Rothschild Bequest 1,500.00 

1910 — The Milton L. Snellenburg Fund (Endowed 

by his father, Nathan Snellenburg) 2,000.00 

1911 — Simon Bacharach Bequest 200 00 

1911— Adolph Weyl (additional) 50.00 

1911 — Mrs. Florence Liveright, in memory of her son, 

Benjamin Kahn Liveright 500.00 

1911— Albert M. Nusbaum Bequest 1,000.00 

1911 — Esther Bacharach Bequest 200.00 

1911 — Abram Herzberg Bequest 500.00 

1911— Leon Cans Bequest 5,000.00 

1911 — Charlotte Harburger Bequest 200.00 

1911— Meyer Frank Bequest 200.00 

1911 — Adolph Weyl. in memory of his grandchild, 

Ruth Weyl Bernheimer 25.00 



1912- 


-JosEPH RossKAM Bequest 


1,000.00 


1912- 


-Adolph Weyl Bequest 


100.00 


1912- 


-Martin Frank, in memory of his parents, Leon 






and Mathilde Frank 


500.00 


1912- 


-The Simon and Esther Bacharach Endow- 






ment, by their children 


1,500.00 
50.00 


1912- 


-GusTAv Bacharach Fund 


1912- 


-Leah Abeles Goldsmith, in memory of her 






brother, Simon Abeles 


500.00 


1912- 


-Meyer Seidenbach Bequest 


1,000.00 


1913- 


-Julius Siedenbach Bequest 


1,000.00 


1913- 


-SiGMUND Heilbron Bcquest 


400.00 


1913- 


-Emanuel Rubel Memorial 


900.00 


1913- 


-Mrs. Henry Schwarz Bequest 


100.00 


1913- 


-Mrs. Hannah Hoffman, in memory of her son. 






Alexander Hoffman 


100.00 


1913- 


-Morris Pf^lzer Bequest 


5,000.00 



SPECIAL DONATIONS 
which have been placed in the endowment fund. 

1912— Benjamin Wolf, upon his Fiftieth Birthday $5,000.00 

1913 — The Children of Mrs. Elias Wolf, in honor of her Eightieth 

Birthday 2,500.00 



58 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



LIFE MEMBERS 



One payment of $100.00, one time, into the Endowment Fund 
ALARAAIA 



Mobile 

*Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 

CALIFORNIA 

Bakersfield 

Cohn, C. 
San Francisco 

Gunst, M. A. 
Hellman, Isaias W. 
Meyer, Mary Jeannette 
Neustadter, ]\Irs. J. H. 
Rosenbaum, j\Irs. C. 

W. 
Samson, Mrs. Rudolph 

DIST. OF COLUMBIA 

Washington 

Berliner, Emile 

ILLINOIS 

Champaign 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 

Kuhn, Florence L. 
Chicago 

Bauman, Mrs. Edw. 

Frank, Henry L. 

Greenebaum, ]\Ioses E. 

Joseph, L. 

Mandel, Mrs. Emanuel 
*Mandel, Leon 

Reitler, Chas. 

Stettauer, Mrs. D. 
Peoria 

Woolner, Mrs. Miriam 
S. 

Woolner, Seymour A. 

Woolner, Mrs. W. B 

Woolner, W. B. 
Rochelle 

Hilb, Emanuel 

INDIANA 

Ligonier 

Straus, Isaac 
Straus, Jacob 

IOWA 
Wavei-ly 

Slimmer, A. 
Sioux City 

Wise, Airs. Chas. 

* Deceased. 



KENTUCKY 

Owensboro 

Shorten, J. D., 

LOUISIANA 

New Orleans 

District Grand Lodge, 

No. 7, I. O. B. B. 
*Newman, Isidore 
Newman, Mrs. Henry 

MABYLANT> 

Baltimore 

Cohen, Mendes 
*Rayner, Wm. S. 

Reinhard, Samuel E. 
*Strouse, Isaac 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston 

Hecht, Mrs. Lina 
Rawitser, Fred 
Shuman, A. 

MICHIGAN 

Detroit 

Schloss, Seligman 

ivnssissippi 

Natchez 

Frank, H. ' 

MISSOURI 

St. Joseph 

Westheimer Mr. and 

Mrs. Ferdinand 
Westheimer, Samuel 
St. Louis 
*Rice, Jonathan 
Stix, C. A. 

NEW JERSEY 
Newark 

Schlesinger, Louis 

NEW YORK 
Brooklyn 

Kalvin, Mrs. Henry ^l. 
Buffalo 

Winkler, Mrs. R. S. 
New York City 

*Abraham, A. 
Bernheimer, ]\Iiss 
Rosie 



Blumenthal, Geo. 
Budge, Henry 
Goodhart, Philip J. 
Guggenheim, Wm. 
Hays, Daniel P. 
Heinsheimer, Alfred 

M. 
Hermann, Ferdinand 
Kaufmann, B. 
Krauskopf, Mary G. 
Lewisohn, Adolph 
*Mack, Jacob W. 
Marshall, Louis 
Meyer, Wm. 
Morganstern, Albert 

G. 
Salomon, Wm. 
Silberberg, G. 
Sidenberg, G. 
Warburg, Felix M. 
Warburg, Paul M. 
Wollman, Henry 
Wollman, Wm. J. 
New Rochelle 

Ladenburger, M r s, 

Theo. 
Viagara Falls 
Silberberg, Bertha 
Silberberg, Isaac L. 
Rochester 
Lowenthal, M. 
Silberberg, M. 
Silberberg, G. 

OHIO 

Cincinnati 

Block, Samuel 

Klein, Samuel 

Lowman, Leo. J. 

Meis, Henry 

Reiter, A. 

Sturm, Simon 
Columbus 

B'nai Israel Sister- 
hood 

Lazarus, Fred'k. 

Lazarus, Ralph 

^liller, Leopold 

Zion Lodge No. 62, 
I. O. B. B. 
Youngstown 

Theobald, Mrs. C. 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Altoona 

Kline, Henry S. 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



59 



I/anghorne 

Branson, L L. 

Philadelphia 

Betz & Son 

Bloch, B. B. 

Blum, Ralph 
*Blumenthal, Herman 
*Blumenthal, Sol. 

Byers, Jos. J. 

Clothier, Isaac H. 

Fleisher, Martha S. 

Grant, Adolph 

Harrison, C. C. 

Hagedorn, Mrs. Alice 
*Jonas, Herman 

Kaas, Andrew 

Kaufmann, Morris A. 

Kayser, Samuel 

Krauskopf, Harold 

Langfeld, A. M. 

Levy, Sol. 

Lit, S. D. 
*Merz, Daniel 

Merz, Mrs. Regina 

Manko, L. H. 

Morris, Chas. E. 

Morris, Effingham B. 

Muhr, Jacob 
*Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
*Pfaelzer, Simon 

Raab, Mrs. Julia 

Reform Congregation 
Keneseth Israel 
*Rorke, Allen B. 

Rosenberg, Grace 

Rosenberg, Walter J. 

Rosenberg. Walter I. 

Schloss, Mrs. Herman 

Schoch, Henry R. 

Sternberger, Samuel 



Silberman, Mrs. Ida 

Silverman, I. H. 
*Snellenburg, J. J. 

Snellenburg, Nathan 

Snellenburg, Samuel 

Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
*Teller, Benj. F. 

Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
*Teller, Joseph R. 

Trautman, Dr. B. 

Wanamaker, John 
*Weiler, Herman 

Wolf, I., Jr. 
*Zweighaft, Simon 
Pittsburgh 

Aaron, Marcus 

Browarsky, Max 

Cohen, Aaron 

Cohen, Josiah 

Dreifus, C. 
*Frank, Samuel, by his 
son, Ed. K. Frank 

Guckenheimer, Isaac 

Hamburger, Philip 

Hanauer, A. M. 

Kaufman Bros. 

Rauh, IMarcus 

Rauh, Mrs. Rosalie 

Weil, A. Leo. 

TEXAS 

Dallas 

Sanger, Alexander 

Sanger, Mrs. Philip 

Silberstein, A. 
Fort Worth 

Lev}', Sam 
Galveston 

Lasker, M. 



VIRGINIA 

Norfolk 

Ladies' Hebrew^ Be- 
nevolent Asso. 
Richmond 

Millhiser, Gustave 

Millhiser, Mrs. Clar- 
ence 

Raab, E. 
Liynchburg 

Guggenheimer, Mrsi 
j\Iax 

WASHINGTON 

Seattle 

Galland, Bonham 
Galland, Mrs. C. K. 
Gottstein, Meyer 
Gottstein, Rebecca 
Lang, Julius C. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Wheeling 

Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 
Solomon & Rubin 
Weil, J. 

FOREIGN 

ENGLAND 

London 

jMeyer, Arthur 

SWITZERLAND 

Rorschach 

*Schoenfeld, Max 



Contributions by Federations of Charities 



Philadelphia $8000.00 

Pittsburgh 500.00 

Kansas City 350.00 

Indianapolis 200.00 

Memphis 200.00 

Little Rock 100.00 



^Montgomery $100.00 

St. Paul 100.00 

Toledo 100.00 

Nashville 75.00 

El Paso 35.00 

Shreveport 30.00 



Milwaukee 100.00 Vicksburg 25.00 



* Deceased. 



60 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Li^ of Members and Contributors 

For the Year ending September 30, 1913. 



ALABAMA 

Alexander City 

Herzfeld, R $25.00 

Benton 

Cadden, J. J 5.00 

Binningham 

Adler, Ike 10.00 

Adler, Morris .... 25.00 

Adler, Sam 15.00 

Blach, Max 5.00 

Caheen Bros 10.00 

Congregation 

Emanuel 5.00 

Ezekiel, B. F 10.00 

Fies, Eugene .... 25.00 

Reiser, Leo 5.00 

Klotz, Simon .... 5.00 

Mark, Otto 10.00 

Pizitz, Louis 5- 00 

Rich, David 500 

Saks, Herman .... 10.00 

Shapiro, Isadore . . 5.00 

Spiro, S 5-00 

Steiner, L. K. ... 10.00 

Williams, T., Sr. .. 5.00 

Camden 

Bloch, S. D 1.70 

Demopolis 

Ely, Jennie M. . . 5.00 

Folda, L 5.00 

Fronzig, J., & Co.. 5.00 

Goldman & Stern.. 5.00 

Mayer Bros 5-oo 

Mayer, Robert . . . 5.00 

Livingston 

Tannenbaum, B. ... S-oo 
Mobile 

**Bernheimer, Mrs. L. 

Bloch Bros 5.00 

Bloch, Alex 5.00 

Bloch, M. D 5-00 

Brown & Brown .. 10.00 

Brown, Leo M. ... 5.00 
Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Cramer, Alphonse.. 5.00 

Curjel, H 5.00 

Dreyfus, Nathan . . 5.00 

Eichold, L 5.00 

Eichold, Samuel . . 5.00 

Forchheimer, Ferd. 5.00 

Forchheimer, Louis 5.00 

Forchheimer, M. C. 5.00 

Friedman, J. AI. . . 5.00 

*Life Member 
•♦Deceased Life Member 



Gabriel, Heyman . 


5-00 


Leva, Jackson 


5.00 


Gans, M. L 


5-00 


Leva, Leo 


5.00 


Guggenheim, E. . 


5-00 


Liepold, Jake 


5.00 


Haas, S 


5.00 


Maas, Leo S 


5.00 


Hammel, L 


. 25.00 


Meyer & Elkan 


5.00 


Hess, Henry .... 


5.00 


Meyer, M. J 


5.00 


Kahn, Sol 


5-00 


Schuster, B. J. ... 


10.00 


Levy, A. G 


5-00 


Siegel, Jerome .... 


5.00 


Lowenstein, A. . . 


5-00 


Tepper, B. F 


5.00 


Lowenstein, L. . . 


5-00 


Tepper, Jacob .... 


5.00 


Lowenstein, Sidney 10.00 


Weinberg, H. A. . , 


5.00 


Metzger Bros. . . . 


10.00 


Tuscaloosa 




Mitchell, Walter . 


10.00 


Morris, George . . . 


5.00 


Moses, Rabbi A. G 


10.00 


Uniontown 




Olensky, J. W. .. 


5-00 


Pake, L. J 


5-00 


Pincus, E. A. ... 


5.00 


Wetumpka 




Piser, H 


5-00 


Hohenberg, M. k 




Pollock, L 

R e i s s Mercantil 




Co 


5.00 






Co 




ARIZONA 

Tucson 




Richard, E. E. .. 


5-00 




Rubel Candy Co.. 


5-00 


Jacobs, L. M 


10.00 


Schatz, Philip . . . 


5-00 






Schwartz, I 


5-00 


ARKANSAS 




Schwarz, Jos. . . . 


. 10.00 


Helena 




Simon, J. S 


5.00 


Solomon, Louis . . 


2.00 


Weiss, J. W 


5.00 


Hot Springs 




Zimmern, Lee . . . 


5-00 


Fellheimer, H. ... 


$.00 


Zimmern, S. .... 


5.00 


Lyons, I. A., .... 


i.*o 


Montgomery 




Little Rock 




Kahn, M 


5-00 


Baumgarten, Mrs. 








R 


5.00 


Loeb, Jacques 




family of 




Federation of Jew- 






ish Charities 100.00 


Montgomery, Kahl 


10.00 


Mariannna 




United Hebrew 










100.00 






Weil, Mrs. E. L. . 


5-00 


CALIFORNIA 
Bakersfield 




Selma 




*Cohn, C. 




Adler, J. C 


5.00 
5-00 


Cohn, C 


5.00 


Benish & Meyer . 


Fresno 


Blauner, I 


5-00 


Einstein, L., & Co. 


10.00 


Bloch Bros 


5-00 


La Jolla 




Eliasberg, E. D. . 


5.00 


Lieber, W. S 


5.00 


Erlenbach, L. ... 


10.00 


Lieber, Mrs. W. S. 


5.00 


Heineberg, M. E. 


5-00 


Lockeford 




Hirschfield, Mrs. J 


5-00 


Bruml, Mrs. H. J.. 




Hohenberg, Morris 
Isaacson & Marks 
Kahn, A. G 


5.00 
5.00 
5.00 


Los Angeles 

Bibo, Joseph 

Brownstein, D. J... 


5.00 

10.00 


Kahn, Nathan . . . 
Kayser, Isidore . . 


S.oo 
S.oo 


Cohn, Kaspare . . . 
Goldstein, M. H... 


t*.oc 

s.oo 

2.00 


Ladies' Hebrew 




Hecht, Rabbi S. .. 


Ben. Soc'y .... 


25.00 


Hellman, Maurice 




Lehman, M. M. . 


S.oo 


S 


10.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



61 



Hoffman, Hugo . . S-o" 

Kingsbaker, Mrs. C. 5.00 

Levi, Simon, Co... jo.oo 

Lissner, M 10.00 

Loew, J 10.00 

Louis, H. M 10.00 

Meyer, Alex 10.00 

Mosbacher, Geo. .. 10.00 
Murphey, Mrs. J. 

L 5-00 

Newmark, Harris.. lo.oo 

Newmark, M. H. . . S-oo 

Newmark, M. R. . S-oo 

Kordlinger, L. S. . . S-oo 

Norton, Isaac 5-°° 

Rods, Jacques S-oo 

Seligman, Carl . . . 5-oo 

Oakland 

Jonas, Abraham .. S-oo 

Lavenson, A. S. . . 10.00 

Scharman, H 5-0° 

Sacramento 

Bonnheim, A 10.00 

Cohen, Isidor 23.00 

Jai=fe. M. S 10.00 

Klaber, Mrs. Her- 
man 5-00 

Lubin, L. J lo-oo 

San Diego 

Blochman, A 25.00 

San Francisco 

Anspacher, Philip.. 10.00 

Arnstein, Ludwig . 10.00 

Aronson, A 10.00 

Bachman, Arthur . S-oo 

Bachman, Mrs. S.. S-oo 

Bissinger, Samuel. 5-oo 

Bloom, Samuel . . . 5-°° 

Brandenstein, Edw. 10.00 

Brenner, Gus 10.00 

Cahn, M. A S-oo 

Dinkelspiel, J. S... 5-Oo 

Esberg, A. 1 10.00 

Fries, William .... 5.00 

Gellert, Isaac S-oo 

Gerstle, Mrs. Han- 
nah S-oo 

Goldstein, E. L. .. 10.00 

Greenebaum, Jacob 10.00 

* Gun St, M. A. 

Gunst, Morgan A.. 10.00 

Haas, A 25.00 

Hellman, I. W. . . 25.00 

*HeIIman, Isaias W. 
Hirschfelder, Dr. 

J. O S-oo 

Ickelheimer, S S-oo 

Jacobi, J. J 10.00 

Kaufmann, William 5.00 

Koshland, M. S... 2S-oo 

Lachman, Henry... 10.00 

*Life Member 

** Deceased Life Member 



Levison, J. B 10.00 

Levy, Emile 10.00 

Levy, Jules 10.00 

Lilienthal, J. W... 10.00 
Metzger, Louis . . . 10.00 

* Meyer, Mary J. 
*Neustadter, Mrs. J. 

H. 
*Rosenbaum, M r s. 
C. W. 
Rosenberg Bros. & 

Co 25-00 

Sachs, Mrs. Lipp- 

inan 10.00 

S a h 1 e i n , Mrs. 

Henry 5.00 

* Samson, I\Irs. Ru- 

dolph 

Schoenb'erg, Louis. 10.00 

Schwabacher, L. A. 5.00 

Swabacher, Mrs. L. 10.00 

Sinsheimer, B. ... 10.00 

Sloss, Mrs. M. C. . S-oo 

Sloss Family 100.00 

Son, Mrs. A. A. .. 10.00 

Spiegl, L. M 10.00 

Walter, C. R ,10.00 

Wagenheim, H. . . 10.00 

Weinstock, Harris. 25.00 

Wise, Otto 1 10.00 

San Rafael 

Herzog, S. K 5-oo 

Lichenstein, B. IL . 10.00 
Wormser, Mrs. S. 

1 5-00 

Stockton 

Conway, M 5-oo 

Emden, Wm S-oo 

Frankenheimer 

Bros 10.00 

Granich, B 10.00 

Levy, M- & Bro 10.00 

Stein, I. F 5.00 

COLORADO 

Colorado Springs 

Cahn, Isaac 5-00 

Denver 

Kubitshek, Henry. 10.00 

Mayer, Leopold . . 5-oo 

CONNECTICUT 

Hartford 

Lyon, Bernhard... 5.00 
New Haven 

Adler, F. M 10.00 

Adler, Max 10.00 

Berman, Barnett . 5.00 
Entertainment Com. 

C. of J. W 30.00 

Freedman, Isidor.. 10.00 



Goodhart, J. P. .. 10.00 

Heller, L. C 10.00 

Ilerz, L. H 5.00 

Johnson, J., & Sons 10.00 

Kafka, A. & C. . . . 5.00 

Kleiner, Chas 5.00 

Levy, Dr. David.. 5.00 

Mann, M., & Bro.. 5.00 

Mendel, Adolph .. 10.00 

Muhlfelder, S. ... 5.00 

Nathanson, S. J. . 5.00 

Newman, J. J. . . 25.00 
Rogowski, Mrs. A. 

B 5.00 

Rosenberg, L. L. . . 5.00 

Rosenbluth, L. M. 5.00 

Sagal, L. M 5.00 

Schoenberger, E., & 

Sons .5.00 

Shartenberg & Rob- 
inson 5.00 

Shoninger, S. B. . . 10.00 

Slade, Benj 5.00 

Ullman, I. M 10.00 

Ullman, J. H 5.00 

Ullman, L. M. ... 10.00 

Zunder, Albert . . 5.00 
Stamford 

Silverberg, M r s. 

Flora 25.00 

Stokes, Rose Pastor 5.00 
Waterbury 

Chase, Isidor 5.00 

DELAWARE 



Seaford 




Greenabaum, E. . . 


5.00 


Van Leer, Chas. . . 


5-00 


Wilmington 




Levy, Morris 


5-00 


Moses Montefiore 




Ben. Socy 


5-00 


Wilson, J. H 


10.00 



DIST. OF COLUMBIA 
Washington 

Bavimgarten, Leo . . 5.00 

Behrend, Amnon . 5.00 

Behrend, R. B. ... 5.00 

Bensinger, S 2.00 

*BerIiner, Emile 

Berliner, Emile . . . 100.00 

Blout, I. L 5.00 

Blumenfeld, M r s. 

M S-OO 

Brylawski, A 5.00 

Cohen, Mrs. Ed- 
ward 10.00 

Cohen, Max 5.00 

Eisenmann, Jacob. 3.00 

Fellheimer, M. ... 5.00 



62 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Gichner, Fred S.. 


5.00 


Goldenberg, M. . 


25.00 


Goldsmith, C. A. . 


5.00 


Hahn & Co., Wm. 


5.00 


Hecht, Alex: 


20.00 


Heidenheimer, E. 


5-00 


Heilprin, G. F. . 


10.00 


Hillman, Joel . . . 


S-oo 


llopfenniaier, Lewis 


10.00 


Horn & Son. N. . 


5.00 


Kann, Sigmund . 


5.00 


Kaufman, D. J. . 


25-00 


Lansbergh, Jas. . 


5-00 


Lauchheimer, A. H 


5-00 


Luchs, Jos 


2.00 


Luchs, Leopold . . 


5-00 


Lyon, Simon .... 


5-00 


Oppenheim, Gustave 


5-00 


Oppenheim, Simon 


5-00 


Peyser, J. I 


5.00 


Rich, M. M 


3-00 


Salamon, B 


1. 00 


Sondheimer, J. . . 


5-00 


Tobriner, L 


5-00 


^^^allerstein, M r s 




G 




\\'ashington Hebre\\ 






5.00 
5.00 


VVeser, Fanny B. . 


West, Emil 


5-00 


Wolf, Mrs. M. B. 


5.00 


FLORIDA 





Jacksonville 

Hirschberg, Julius. 

Pensacola 

Elkan, M. J 

Hebrew L a d i e s' 
Ben. Socy 

GEORGIA 



Albany 




Brown, S. B 


10.00 


Atlanta 




Haas, Leopold, Jr. . 


3-00 


Hebrew Ben. Con- 




gregation 


10.00 


Kutz, Max 


10.00 


Trounstine, L. J. . 


5-00 


Eastman 




Herrman, Mrs. J. 




D 


5.00 


Sandersvllle 




Cohen, Louis .... 


5-00 


Savannah 




Falk, D. B 


10.00 


Myers, Lee Roy... 


35.00 


Solomon, J. A. . . 


S.oo 


West Point 




Hagedorn, P 


5-00 


Hagedorn, Mrs. Z. 


5.00 



IDAHO 

Boise City 

L a d i e s' Judith 
Montefiore So- 
ciety 5.00 

ILLINOIS 

Athens 

Salzcnstein, C. S. . 5.00 

Champaign 

Kuhn, Caroline L. 
Kuhn, Florence L. 

Chicago 

Adler, Mrs. D. K. 5.00 

Alschuler, A. S. .. 25.00 

Alschuler, Saml. . . 5.00 

'Bauman, Mrs. Edw. 

Becker Bros. & Co. 10.00 

Binswanger, A. . . . 10.00 

Binswanger, Jacob. 10.00 

Block, E. J 10.00 

Born. M, & Co... 10.00 

Brenner, Nathan . . 25.00 

Davis, Jas 5.00 

Eisenstaedt, Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Fogel, Mrs. Fannie 5.00 
Foreman, Oscar 

G 5.00 

* Frank, Henry L. 

Gatzer, August 5.01 

Gimbel, Chas. A. . . 10.00 

Greenebaum, Elias. 10.00 

Greenebaum, H. N. 5.00 

•Greenebaum, Moses E. 

Haas, Chas 25.00 

Harris, Mrs. S. H. 5.00 

Hart, Mrs. Harry. 10.00 

Horner, Jos 10.00 

5-00 
10.00 



Hyman, Cora B. 

Isaiah Temple . 
*Joseph, L. 

Katz, Eugene . 

Kirchberger, R. 

Klee, Max .... 

Kohn, S. A. . . . 

Leven, Ben 10.00 

Lieberman, Mrs. M. 2.00 
•Mandel, Mrs. Emanuel 
•*Mandel, Leon 

Mandl, Sidney . 

Meyer, A. C. . 

Orchel, Mrs. I. 
*Reitler, Chas. 

Richter, Simon 

Rosenwald, M. 

Rubovits, Toby 

Samuels, Caesar 

Schanfarber, Rev. 

Tobias 5.00 



10.00 

10.00 

10.00 

5.00 



10.00 

10.00 

S-oo 

5-00 

500 

5.00 

10.00 



Schwabacher, Mor- 
ris 10. oo 

Silberman, Adoplh. 25.00 
Solomon, Mr. and 

Mrs. Henry 10.00 

Stein, Adolph .... 10.00 

Stein, Ignatz 10.00 

Stein, Sam 5.00 

•Stettauer, Mrs. D. 
Stolz, Rev. Dr. 

Jos 10.00 

Stone, A. L 10.00 

Straus, A. S 5.00 

Straus, M. L 10.00 

Taussig, M 10.00 

Thorsch, Victor . . 5.00 

Wurmser, Lucile P. 2.00- 
Galesburg 

Jewish Aid Society 5.00 

Peoria 

Szold, Esther 3.00 

*Woolner, Mrs. M. 

S. 
*Woolner, Seymour 

A. 
*^^'oolner, Mrs. W. 

B. 
*Woolner. W. B. 

Rochelle 

*Hilb, Emanuel 

Rock Island 

Mosenfelder, Mrs. 

L 5.00 

Simon, L 5.00 

Rushville 

Galowich, Jacob . . 5.00 
Washburn 

Fuiks, Jacob 3.0a 

INDIANA 

Angola 

Stiefel, Mrs. L. C. 3.00 
Attica 

Levor, L. S 2.50- 

Columbia City 

Ladies' Hebrew 

Ben. Socy 5.00- 

Evansville 

Heimann, Abraham 5.00- 

Schenhauser, S. . . 5.00 
Fort Wayne 

Ackerman, Abe .... 10.00 

Baum, Jas 5.oi> 

Freiburger, Herman 5.0a 

Silberman, Adolph. 25.00 

Freiburger, Jos. . . 5.00 
Freiburger, L e o - 

pold 10.00 

Freiburger, Mrs. 

Simon 5.00 

Greensfelder, Mollie i.oo- 
Ladies' Hebrew 

Ben. Socy lo.oo- 



•Life Member 

'* Deceased Life Member 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



63 



Lehman, Ben . . . . 


5-00 


Lehman, Isidor . . . 


S-oo 


Levy, Ben 


S.oo 


Nathan, Julius .... 


5-00 


Rothschild Bros. . . 


S-oo 


Stiefel, Mrs. Louis 


S.oo 


Goshen 




Salinger, Nathan . 


S-oo 


Hammond 




Wolf, Leo 


10.00 


Huntingdon 




Lauferty, D. E. .. 


10. ou 


Indianapolis 




Federated Jew- 




ish Charities 


200.00 



2.00 
10.00 
100.00 

5-00 
S-oo 



Messing, Rabbi M. . 
Newberger, Louis. 
Schwartz, Martin . 
Sommers, Chas. B. 

Kendallville 

Keller, L. J 

Kokomo 

Levi, J. S 5.00 

LiaFayette 

Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Society 5.00 

Loeb, J. L 5.00 

L/igonier 

Hebrew Ladies' 

Ben. Socy 10.00 

Loeb, Mrs. M 5.00 

*Straus, Isaac 

Straus, Isaac 25.00 

* Straus, Jacob 
Straus, Jacob .... 20.00 
Madison 

Sulzer, Louis 5.00 

Mt. Vernon 

Ladies' Temple So- 
ciety 

Muncie 

Hene, M 

Portland 

Weiler, Morris ... 
South Bend 

Cronbach, Rabbi A. 
Wetzstein, Mentor. 

Summitville 

Rothschild, Children 
of Sophia, in her 
memory 100.00 

Warner, Children of 
Anna, in her 
memory 15.00 

Terre Haute 

Hebrew Ladies' 

Aid Socy 15.00 

Herz, A 5.00 

Kaplan, Dr. J. H. . 5.00 
Wabash 

Hyman, L. L S.oo 

*Life Member 

** Deceased Life Member 



S-OO 



5-00 



S-OO 



5-00 
5.00 



IOWA 

Charles City 

Hecht, Jos 10.00 

Des Moines 

Brody, Abraham . . 5.00 

Brody, Meyer .... 5.00 

Cohen, M 5.00 

Cohen, M. H 10.00 

Davidson, S., & 

Bros 15.00 

Frankel, A 5.00 

I'Vankel, Mrs. B. . . 10.00 

Frankel, M 10.00 

Friedlich, I. & A.. 15.00 

Ginsberg, L 5.00 

Goldman & Co- 

bacher Co 20.00 

Joseph, S., & Sons 10.00 

Lederer, Mrs. E. .. 25.00 

Mandelbaum, J. .. 10.00 

Mandelbaum, M. . . 25.00 

Mandelbaum, S. .. 15.00 

Marks, R 5.00 

Oransky, L 5.00 

Rosenfield, M 10.00 

Samish, M 25.00 

Sheuerman Bros. . 25.00 

Sheuerman, L. ... 10.00 

Schloss, M 10.00 

Stern, Mrs. M 10.00. 

Wilshenski, N. M. . 25.00 

Wolf, E 10.00 

Younker, L. M. . . . 10.00 

Younker, M 10.00 

Keokuk 

Weil, J. B 5.00 

Oskaloosa 

Rosenblatt, A 5.00 

Sioux City 

Davidson Bros. Co. 25.00 

Degen, Morris .... 10.00 

Dryfoos, S 5.00 

Fribourg, A. L. . . 5.00 

Galinsky, A. S. . . 10.00 

Galinsky, H 5.00 

Home Furniture Co. 5.00 
Jewish Ladies' Aid 

Society 10.00 

Kalish Bros 20.00 

Levitt, T. 1 5.00 

Newman, J 2.50 

Pill, Max 5.00 

Rosenstock Bros. . . 5.00 

Schulein, Sig 10.00 

•Wise, Mrs. Chas. 
Waverly 

* Slimmer, A. 

KANSAS 

Iieavenworth" 

Ettenson, Mrs. H. . 5.00 

Woolfe & Winnig. 5.00 



McPherson 

Strouse & Son, J. . . 
Salina 

Stiefel, M 


S-OO 

5-00 


Stiefel, S 


500 


Topeka 

Snattinger, M. . . . 


S-OO 



ItBNTUCKY 

Bowling Green 

Cristal, Sam'l 5.00 

Nahm, Mrs. Sam'l 5.00 
Danville 

Lyons, Saml 10.00 

Lyons, Sam and 

Henry 5.00 

Lexington 

Shane, Miss R. ... 5.00 

Speyer & Sons . . . s-oo 

Weil, Jonas 5.00 

Wolf, Simon S-oo 

Louisville 

A well-wisher .... 2.00 

Bernheim, B 50.00 

Bernheim, F. D. .. 10.00 

Bernheim, I. W. . . 50.00 

Bernheim, Lee S.. 10.00 

Blum, S 5.00 

Brooks, Mrs. M. . . 5.00 
Ehrman, Hilmar . . 5.00 

Flarsheim, A. B. .. 10.00 

Flarsheim, M. H... 10.00 
Grabfelder, Mose . 5.00 
Grabfelder, R. A.. 5.00 
Gutman, H. J., & 

Co 5.00 

Haas, Sam'l 5.00 

Hess, B S-OO 

Hyman, Jacob .... 5.00 

Isaacs Bros 5.00 

Jacoby, Zach 5.00 

Kaufman, Henry . 5.00 

Kohn, Aaron 10.00 

Levy, Mrs. Henry. 25.00 

Levy, Sol s-oo 

Meyers, S. J 5.00 

Roth, A. S 10.00 

Sabel, M., & Sons. 10.00 

Sachs, Edw 5.00 

SelHgman, Alfred . 5.00 

Shapinsky, S 5.00 

Shapinsky, Theo. . 2.50 
Sloss, Stanley E--. S-oo 
Straus, Benjamin. 10.00 
Straus, Mrs. Her- 
man s.oo 

Trost Bros 5.00 

Maysville 

Merz, Mrs. A. L. . S-oo 
Merz, Eugene . . . s-oo 
Merz, Millard s-oo 



64 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Owensboro 

Hirsch, Col. A. .. lo.oo 

Rosenfeld, Mrs. A. lo.oo 
•Shorten, J. D. 

Paducah 

Benedict, Mrs. J. . 5.00 

Biederman, Jake . . 5.00 

Cohen, Ike 3-oo 

Dreyfuss, Sol 5-oo 

Fels, Mrs. E S-oo 

Fels, S 5-00 

Friedman, Herman. 10.00 

Friedman, J. L 25.00 

Keiler, J. M 10.00 

Laevison, J. B. ... 5.00 

Levin, Frank 5.00 

Levy, Mrs. Hannah 5.00 
Livingston, M., & 

Co 5-00 

Loeb, Miss F. M, . 25.00 

Loeb, Rudolph . . . 5.00 

Marks, M S-oo 

Michael, Chas S-oo 

Muth, Jacob S-oo 

Pearson, Ike 5-oo 

Simon, Mose 5.00 

Steinfeld, M 2.00 

Tick, S. 1 3-00 

Wallerstein, H. & J. 2.00 

Weil, H., & Sons.. 5.00 

Weil, Mrs. Jeanette 5.00 

Weille, B., & Sons. 10.00 

Shelbyville 

Samuel, Leopold . . 5.00 

liOUISIANA 

Alexandria 

Gehr, Gus 10.00 

Ginsberg, B 10.00 

Jackson, I i.oo 

Jackson, S 2.50 

Kaufman, I. J. . . . 2.50 

Lehman, Miss A... i.oo 

Levin, Jos 2.00 

Mann, D. E. ..... S-oo 

Manus, Harry 2.50 

Nachman, W. B. . . i.oo 

Peterson, Wm 2.00 

Posner & Fried . . 10.00 

Pressburg, H. H... i.oo 
Rothstein, Rabbi L. 

J 5-00 

Sackman Bros 5.00 

Simon, A. E 15.00 

Simon, A. E 25.00 

Simon, H 5-oo 

Simon, S 10.00 

Weil, Ben 5-00 

Weinberg, M 2.50 

Weiss & Goldring. 10.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Jeanerette 

Wormser, M., & 

Co 5-00 

Monroe 

Baer, I., $.0'^ 

Bloch, J. S S-on 

Gross, Mrs. F. . . . 2.50 

Meyer, Sol S"" 

Titche, Chas 5.00 

Morgan City 

Ladies' Hebrew 

Aid Socy 3.00 

Natchitoches 

Levy, Sam 5.00 

Nelken, Sam 10.00 

Semmelman, Mar- 
shall 5.00 

New Orleans 

Alcus, S. T 25.00 

Aron, Herman .... 5.00 

Benjamin, E. V. . . 50.00 

Bloom, Jac 10.00 

Blum, Abe 25.00 

Blum, Sam 5.00 

Bonart, Sam 5.00 

Bruenn, Bernard . 5.00 

Cohn, B 5.00 

Council of Jewish 

Women 25-09 

Danziger, A. D. . . 5.00 

Uennery, Cbas. ... 10.00 

Dinkelspiel, Jos. . . 10.00 

Falk, H. L 5.00 

Feingold, Dr. M. . . 5.00 

Fellman, Leon . . . 25.00 

Fichtenberg, H. .. 10.00 

Frank, Leon 10.00 

Godchaux, Albert.. 10.00 

Godchaux, Chas. •. . 10.00 

Goldberg, Abraham 10.00 

Gumbel, Ferd 5.00 

Hart, Mrs. M. J.. 20.00 
Hausmann, T., & 

Sons 10.00 

Heidenheim & Levy 5.00 

Hiller, Jonas 25.00 

Hyman, Alex 125.00 

Israel, Sam'l 5.00 

Kahn, S. H 5.00 

Kaufman Co., C. A. 10.00 

Klein Bros 10.00 

Kohlmann, Louis . 5.00 

Kohlmann Mfg. Co. 5.00 

Kohlmann, Sig. . . 5.00 

Kohn, Joseph .... 15.00 

Lemann, Monte M. 5.00 

Lemle, Gus 5.00 

Levy, Loeb & Co.. 5.00 

Levy, M. M 10.00 

Levy, S. S 25.00 

Loeb, Jos. S 5.00 



Lowy, Max 5.00 

Lyons, I. L 10.00 

Maas, Jacob S-oo 

Mann, Max i.oo 

Marks, Ferd., Ins. 

Ag. Ltd 5.00 

Marx, A., & Sons. 10.00 

Marx, Archibald A. 10.00 

Mayer, Gus 10.00 

Mayer, Israel & Co. 5.00 
Mayer, Norman & 

Co 10.00 

Moss, W. Irving . . 10.00 
Neugass, Mrs. Ed- 
win s.oo 

Newburger, Silvan. 5.00 
Newman, H. & C, 

Ltd 50.00 

••Newman, Isidore 
Newman, Isidore & 

Son 50.00 

•Newman, Mrs. Henry 

Pfeifer, Simon ... 10.00 

Pokorny, Dave ... S-oo 

Pokorny, Mrs. Dave 5.00 

Pokorny, John . . . 5.00 

Rosenberg, Abe. . . 10.00 

Rosenthal Bros. .. 10.00 

Rosenthal, S. S. . . S-oo 

Saal, M. R s-oo 

Scherk, Louis .... 10.00 

Schwartz, S. J. ... 25.00 

Steinhardt & Co. .. 10.00 

Steinhardt, Simon. 5.00 

Stern, J. H 5.00 

Stern, L. L 5.00 

Stern, Maurice . . . 100.00 

Sugarman, Chas. . . 5.00 

Weil, Herman . . . 5.00 

Weis, F. S 5-00 

Weis, Julius, Est. 

of 25.00 

Weis, Simon 10.00 

Wolf, Albert J. ... 10.00 

Wolf, Morris 5-00 

Wolff, Solomon . . 5.00 

St. Francis ville 

Teutsch, R 2.50 

St. Rose 

Levy, A 5.00 

Shreveport 

Federated Jew- 
ish Charitiei 30.00 

MARYLAND 



Baltimore 




Adler, Chas 


5.00 


Adler, Simon C. . . 


5-0O 


Adler, Mrs. S. J... 


2.00 


Ambach, H. M. ... 


5.00 


Benesch & Sons, 




Isaac 


20.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



65 



Bernheimer, Ferd.. 5.00 

Block, Simon J. . . 5.00 

Blum, Isaac 5.00 

Bluthenthal, A. ... 10.00 

Burk, Chas 5.00 

Cahn, Coblins & 

Co 20.00 

Cohen-Adler Shoe 

Co 10.00 

Cohen, Miss Bertha 5.00 

Cohen, B. E 5.00 

Cohen, I. Son . . . 10.00 
*Cohen, Mendes 

Cone, Dr. Claribel. 5.00 

Cone, F. W S-oo 

Cone, Dr. S. M 10.00 

Deiches, Wm 5.00 

Drey, Elkan 10.00 

Eilan, Abraham . . 5.00 
Eisenberg, Abra- 
ham 10.00 

Engel, Jacob 10.00 

Epstein, Jacob .... 5.00 

Fader, A. S-oo 

Fine, Israel & Son 5.00 

Fox, Robert 5-oo 

Frank, Solomon .. 10.00 

Cans, Chas S-oo 

Goldenberg, Julius. 10.00 
Goldenberg, Mrs. 

R 5-00 

Goldschmid, Mrs. 

R 500 

Goldsmith, Jacob & 

Bro. 10.00 

Gottschalk, Jos. .. 10.00 

Gottschalk, Levi .. 10.00 

Greenbaum, L. E. . 10.00 

Greif, D. L' S.oo 

Greif, Leonard . . . 5.00 

Greif, Max 5.00 

Greif, Simon S.oo 

Gutmacher, Rev. A. 5.00 

Gutman, L. K 5.00 

Halle, Isaac 5.00 

Hamburger Bros. & 

Co 5-00 

Hamburger, M. J.. 5.00 

Hanline Bros 10.00 

Hecht, Emanuel . . 25.00 

Hecht, Mrs. L. A.. 10.00 

Hecht, M. S 5.00 

Heineman Bros. .. 25.00 

Hochschild, Max . . 10.00 

Hollander, M 5.00 

Hollander, S. C. . . 5.00 

Iseman, M. H. ... 10.00 

Kahn, Mrs. Rebecca 25.00 

Kann, Sig 25.00 

Katz, A. R 10.00 

Katz, Meier S.oo 

Katz, Mrs. Z S.oo 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Kaufman, L., & 

Sons 

Kemper, David . . 
Kohn, Benno . . . 

Kohn, L. B 

Koshland, Mack . 
Kraus, Henry . . . 
Lauchheimer, S. H 

Lauer, A. C 

Lauer, Martin . . . 
Lehman, Judah . . 
Leopold, Isaac . . . 
Levy, Alfred .... 
Levy, Mr. and Mrs 

Julius 

Levy, Wm 

Likes, A. H. . . 
Likes, Lena . . . 

Maass, A 

Mandelbaum, S. 
Mann, Mrs. Han 

nah 

Moses, Jacob M. . 
Nassauer, J. G. . 
Nathan, Milton . 
Nusbaum, Max . . 
Oppenheim, Eli . . 
Oppenheim, I. A. . 
Oppenheim, I. M. 
Pollack, Mrs. H. . 
Putzel, Lewis . . . 
Rayner, A. W. . 
*Rayner, Wm. S. 
*Reinhard, Samuel 

E. 
Rosenau, Dr. Wm. 
Rosenberg, Simon.. 
Rosenfeld, Mrs. 

Goody 

Rosenheim, H., & 

Son 

Rosenthal, Samuel. 
Rothholz Bros. . . . 

Rothholz, J 

Rothschild, M. ... 

Rothschild, S 

Salabes, S 

Samuels, Morton . 
S a r 1 o n i s, Mrs. 

Sarah 

Schloss Bros. & 

Co 

Schwab, H., & 

Sons 

Sonneborn, Henry. 
Sonneborn, M. S. . 
Sonneborn, Sig. B. 
Stern, Simon H. . . 

Strouse, Ben 

*Strouse, Isaac 
Strouse, Mrs. Isaac 
Strouse, Mrs. Ma- 





thilda 


S-OO 
5.00 


5-00 


Strouse, M. I. ... 


5.00 


Thalheimer, Sam. 


10.00 


5-00 


Ulman, Nathan . . 


5.00 


S-OO 


Van Leer, C. & M 


10.00 


S.oo 


Van Leer, Milton 


S-oo 


5-00 


Wallach, S. M... 


S-OO 


5-00 


Wallerstein, D. S. 


5-00 


S-oo 


Walter, M. R. .. 


10.00 


S-OO 


Weinberg, A. I. . 


10.00 


S.oo 


Weinberg, Mrs 




5-00 


Cecelia 


S-OO 


10.00 


Wertheimer Bros. 


5-00 




Westheimer, H. F 


10.00 


25-00 


Westheimer, M. F 


. 10.00 


10.00 


Wiesenfeld, Jos. . 


10.00 


5-00 


Wyman, Maurice . 


5.00 


5-00 


Oumberland 




S-oo 


Rosenbaum, Simon 5.00 


10.00 


Rosenbaum, Sus 






man 


S-OO 


S-OO 






S-oo 


MASSACHUSETTS 


S-OO 






5-00 


Boston 




10.00 


Agoos, L 


10.00 


10.00 


Baer, Louis 


10.00 




Demelman, L. E.. 


5-00 


S-OO 


Fox, Isidor 


S-oo 


5.00 


Frank, Meyer . . . 


10.00 




Gold, Samuel . . . 


5-00 


5-00 


Goodman, Mrs. 






Sam'l 


5.00 
2.00 




Green, Joseph . . . 




Hailparn, Miss J. 


5-00 




*Hecht, Mrs. Lina 




5.00 


Hillson, H. M., & 


S-OO 


Co 


S-oo 
5-00 




Joseph, A 


10.00 


Koshland, A. ... 


S-oo 




Koshland, J 


S-oo 


10.00 


Peavy, G. I 


S-OO 


10.00 


Ratshesky, A. C. . 


5-00 


5-00 


"Rawitzer, Fred. 




5.00 


Scheinfeldt, Sol. . 


10.00 


5-00 


Schoener, J. Y. . 


S-oo 


10.00 


Schwartz, H., & 


5.00 


Co 


5-00 


25-00 


*Shuman, A. 




Zeitlin, Morns . . . 


5-00 


S-OO 


Ziegel, L 

Brookline 


5-00 


15.00 


Andrews, Julius . 
Kaffenburgh, Mrs 


5-00 




I 


5-00 


50.00 


Salomon, I\Irs. P 




G 


5.00 


25-00 


Sondheim, Mrs. P 


5-00 


T 


S.oo 


10.00 


Cambridge 






Greenbaum, Amelia s-o« 


100.00 


Jamaica Plain 






Brandt, C 


S.oo 



66 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Roxbury 




Bemidji 




Van Noorden, E. . 


S-oo 


Berman, Lcaii . . . 


5-00 


Walthani 




Minneapolis 




Bayard, Harris . . . 


5-00 


Adelsheim, E. . . . 


5.00 


Worcester 




Apt, L. C 


5-00 


Grodberg & Hirsch. 


5-00 


Bearman, A. N.. . . 


5.00 






Bearman Bros. . . 


5.00 


MICHIGAN 




Blumenkranz, E. I\ 


L 5.00 


Alma 




Bresler, J. C 


10.00 


Pollasky. M 


S.oo 


Cohen, M. L., & C 


3. 5-00 


Bay City 




Davis, H. J 


5.00 


Greenberg, Karl .. 


1. 00 


Davis, J. M 


5.00 


Charlotte 




Eisler, Adolph . . . 


25.00 


Vomberg, M 


5-00 


Friedman Bros. . . 


10.00 


Detroit 




Gradwohl, B 


10.00 


Brown, Jacob .... 


5.00 


Green, H. H 


5-00 


Cohen, S. R 


5.00 


Gross, A. M 


5.00 


Fechheimer, H. M. 


5-00 


Gruenberg, Mrs. . 


r. 


Glicman, Mrs. Etta 


5-00 


H 








Glicman, Henry . . 


5-00 


Harpmann, J 


5.00 


Goldberg, Isaac . . . 


5-00 


Harris, M. H. ... 


5.00 


Goldman, A 


5.00 


Hartman, J. H. . 


5-00 


Goldstein, H. J. . . 


10.00 


Heller, B 


5-00 


Heavenrich, T. A. . 


5-00 


Heller, Mrs. A. H. 


5.00 


Heineman, S. E. . . 


5.00 


Jacobs, B 


10.00 


Helfman, Harry . . 


5-00 


Kronick, M. J. . . 


10.00 


Kahn, Albert 


10.00 


Kurstin, M. A... 


5.00 


Krolik, H. A 


10.00 


Moss, Chas 


5.00 


Levy, Chas 


5-00 


Rees, Julius 


10.00 


Levy, Wm. K. ... 


5-00 


Rosin, J. A 


10.00 


Marx, Mrs. B. I. . . 


5.00 


Shanfeld, J. H. . . 


5.00 


Musliner, L. S. ... 


3-00 


Stromberg, A. . . . 


5.00 


Parish, Jos 


5-00 


Taussig, Sig 


5.00 


Peritz, I . 


S.oo 


Vehon, H. H. ... 


10.00 


Rosenfield, Monroe. 


5-00 


Weil, Isaac 


10.00 


Rothman, E. M. .. 


5-00 


Weiskopf, H 


5.00 


*Schloss, Seligman 




Weisman, Wm. . . 


5-00 


Siegel, Benjamin . 


S-oo 


St. Paul 




Sloman, Eugene . . 


10.00 


Federated Jew- 




Van Baalen, I ... 


lO.OO 


ish Charities 


100.00 


Wineman, Andrew. 


5-00 






Wineman, Henry.. 


s.or 


MISSISSIPI 


»I 


Wineman, L, 


I s.oo 






Wolfe, N 


5-00 


Brookhaven 




Elk Rapids 

Alpern, H 


S-oo 


Cohn, D. Z 

Cohn, Louis 


10.00 

10.00 


Grand Rapids 




Greenville 




Wolf, G. A 


S-oo 


Goldstein, Nathan 


5-00 


Hawks 




Kosciusko 




Horwitz, Harris . 




Collected by Mrs. 




Lansing 

Jewish Women's 




L. Lowenberg . 
Meridian 


7-75 


Aid Society 

Saginaw 


S-oo 


Arky, J. L 

Arkey, L. H. _ . . . 
Greenwald, S. ... 


5.00 
5-00 


Heavenvich, Max . 


S-OO 


5-00 


Sault Ste. Marie 




Klein, S. A 

Loeb, A 


5-00 


Moses, D. K 










Meyer Bros 


10.00 


MINNESOTA 




Moskovitz, A. . . 
Rothenberg, L. . . 


5-00 

5-00 


Austin 




Threefoot, H. M. 


10.00 


Hirsh, Geo 


10.00 


Threefoot, K. ... 


10.00 



Natchez 

*Frank, Henry 

Frank, Henry .... 5.00 

Zerkowsky, Isaac . 5.00 
Vicksburg 

American Export 

Co 5.00 

Federated Jew- 
ish Charities 25.0O 

Baer, Leon 5.00 

Beer, M. D 5.00 

Bloom, Louis .... 10.00 

Brown, Abe 5.00 

Brown, Mrs. Rosalie 25.00 
Feld, P. H., Cotton 

Co 10.00 

Hirsch, J. K 10.00 

Hirsh, J 5.00 

Klaus, E 5.00 

Ladies' Hebrew 

Ben. Socy 10.00 

Landau, M. D. ... 5.00 
Laudenheimer, 

David 5.00 

Laudenheimer, 

Dan 5.00 

Laudenheimer, 

Nathan 5.00 

Levy, M. F 5.00 

Lyons, Ed 10.00 

Lyons, Walter .... 5.00 

Marcus, Samuel .. 5.00 

Metzger & Co 5.00 

Metzger, Maurice.. 5.00 

Nelson, J. E 5.00 

Shclenker, D. J. . . 10.00 
Yazoo City 

Wise, H 10.00 

anssouRi 

Kansas City 

Federated J^vf- 

ish Charities 350.00 

Levy, Family of 

Isaac 10.00 

Louisiana 

Michael Bros 5.00 

St. Joseph 

Binswanger, I. J... 5-00 

Binswanger, Simon 5.00 

Block, Ellsworth .. 10.00 

Block, Harry 10.00 

Block, Samuel .... 10.00 

Ehrlich, A. H. ... 5.00 

Ehrlich, Wm. H. . 5.00 

Feltenstein, David. 5.00 

Fishmon, H i.oo 

Handler Bros 5.00 

Hassenbusch, Sam- 
uel 10.00 

Hirsch Bros. Dry 

Goods Co 5.00 



'Life Member 
''Deceased Life Member 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



67 



Hirsliorn, A. S. . . 5.00 
Lowenstein, Mrs. 

W 5.00 

Newburger, Bern- 
hard 10.00 

Schloss, Moses A. . 2.00 

Siegel, Lewis S-oo 

Westheimer, B. S. 10.00 

Westheimer, D. F. 5.00 

Westheimer, E. F. 10.00 
*Westheimer, I\Ir. 

and Mrs. Ferd. 
'Westheimer, Samuel 

Westheimer, S. F. 5.00 
Westheimer, Sons 
of Ferd., of Bal- 
timore, Cinn. and 

St. Jos 100.00 

St. Louis 

Ackerman, Leopold 10.00 

Aloe, L. P 10.00 

Altheimer, Bessie . 5.00 

Baer, J. A 10.00 

Baer, Sigmond ... 10.00 

Bowman, Samuel . lo.oo 

Brj', Xathan 10.00 

Drey, Mrs. A. L. . 5.00 

Eiseman, David . . . 10.00 

Eisenstadt, Mrs. . . 2.00 

Epstein, J. 1 5.00 

Frank, August .... 5.00 

Frank, Mrs. A. ... i.oo 

Frohlichstein, S. H. 5.00 

Fuller, Aaron .... 10.00 

Glaser, Julius .... 10.00 

Goldman, Alvin D. 10.00 

Goldman, Hari-y .. 10.00 

Goldman, 1 10.00 

Greensfelder, Ber- 
nard 10.00 

Harris, Ben 25.00 

Hecht, Max 5.00 

Herzog & Bro., L. 10.00 

Hirsch, Herman . . 5.00 

Landau, A 25.00 

Lesser, Harry .... 10.00 

Levis, Leo 10.00 

Lippman, J. M. . . 5.00 

Littman, M 10.00 

Marples, Mrs. H. . 10.00 

Marx, E. J 5.00 

Marx, Henry 10.00 

Marx, Samuel .... 5.00 

May, David 25.00 

May, Morton J. .. 10.00 

Mayer, Herman . . 5.00 

Meyer, i\Iax J. ... 5.00 

Michael, Elias .... 10.00 

Nathan, Emil 10.00 

Renard, Louis .... 10.00 
**Rice, Jonathan 

Rosenthal, LB. .. 10.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Rothschild Bros. 

Hat Co 5.00 

Sale, Lee 5.00 

Sale, Rev. Dr. 

Saml 10.00 

Sandfelder, 1 5.00 

Schoen, Mrs. I. L. 5.00 

Schwab, L. J 5.00 

Seelig, S 5.00 

Shoenberg, Col. M. 25.00 

Shoenberg, S. M... 10.00 

Shroder, S. W. . . 5.00 

Singer, Adolph . . . 5.00 

Singer, J. W 5.00 

Solomon, I. W. . . 5.00 

Sommers, David . . 10.00 
•Stix, C. A. 

Stix, Chas. A. ... 25.00 

Stix, Chas. H. ... 10.00 

Stix, E. W 5.00 

Stix, Wm 10.00 

Straus, Mrs. H. . . 10.00 

Straus, Louis .... 10.00 

Taussig, Wm 25.00 

Waldheim, A 15.00 

Weil, Max :;.oo 

Wolf, Dr. A. S. .. 5.00 

Wolff, Mrs. S 5.00 

Tipton 

Cohn, Rosalie .... 5.00 

MONTANA 

Butte 

Linz, M 5.00 

Meyer, Wm 5.00 

Oppenheimer, J. E. 25.00 

Great Falls 

Wertheim, N 5.00 

Missoula 

Leiser, Miss E. . . . 5.00 

NEBRASKA 

Lincoln 

Fogelson, H 2.00 

Friend, Morris ... 5.00 

Ksensky, S. A. ... 5.00 

Mayer, Chas 5.00 

Mayer, H. L 5.00 

Mayer, Simon D. . . 5.00 

Pepperberg, Julius. 5.00 

Sandlovich, A. S. . . 5.00 

Schlesinger, H. .. 10.00 

Seelenfreund, Wm. 5.00 

Simon, Ben 5.00 

Weil. M 10.00 

Omaha 

Brodsky, S 10.00 

Heyn, L. G. and J. 

F 10.00 

Levi, J 5.00 

Levy, M 10.00 



Rosenthal, B. & H. 10.00 
Seligsohn, Mr. and 

Mrs. Elkan .... 10.00 

Gluck, Israel 5.00 

The Novelty Co... 5.00 

NEW JERSEY 

Atlantic City 

Wolf, Mrs. Albert. 5.00 

Camden 

Blank, J. Z 5.00 

East Orange 

Back, Albert j.oo 

Montclair 

Hirsh, Mrs. Sam- 
son 5.00 

Newark 

Bamberger, Louis . 10.00 

Fabian, Mrs. Ray. . 5.00 

Fuld, Felix 25.00 

Goetz, Joseph 5.00 

Michael. Chas. . . . 5.00 

Michael, Oscar ... 5.00 

Plant, Moses 5.00 

*Schlesinger, Louis 

Stern, Mrs. C. ... 5.00 

Straus, M., & Sons 5.0c 

Paterson 

Basch, Isaac 10.00 

Bilder, D. H 5.00 

Cohen, Chas 5.00 

Cohen, David 5.00 

Fabian, Jacob .... 5.00 
Friedlander & 

Jacobsohn 5.00 

Gootenberg, G. ... 5.00 

Greenberg, Ben. . . 5.00 

Grunauer, L. H. . . 5.00 

Haimowitz, A 5.00 

Haines, H. B 5.00 

Holzman Silk Mfg. 

Co 5.00 

Kantor, S 5.00 

Kitay, N. B 5.00 

Konner, L 5.00 

Lefkowitz, D. J. . . 5.00 

Levi, A. L 10.00 

Lewis, Jos 10.00 

Lubelski, Herbert. 5.00 

Ramsey, Mrs. Geo. 5.00 

Rogowski, M 5.00 

Salzberg, H 5.00 

Slater, A. H 5.00 

Steinberg, Max . . . 5.00 

Phillipsburg 

Nie, Alice E 5.00 

Plainfleld 

Newconi, Wm. . . . 5.00 

Ridgewood 

Dreyfus, F. T 5.00 



68 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Somerville 

Mack, A. W 5.00 

Mack, Mrs. L. C. . 5-oo 

NEW MEXICO 
Albuquerque 

Ilfeld, Louis 5-00 

Las Vegas 

Ilfeld, Chas 5-0o 

Santa Fe 

Hersch, Mrs. Jos. . S-oo 

Roswell 

Jaffa, Mrs. Nathan s-oo 

Silver City 

Lindauer, Samuel.. 5-oo 

NEW YORK 
Albany 

Congregation Beth 

Emeth 25.00 

Council of Jewish 

Women 10.00 

Sporborg, Mrs. 

H. J 5.00 

Steefel, J. L 10.00 

Waldman, L. I. ... 10.00 

Binghamton 

Hirschmann, Sig. J. S-OO 

Brooklyn 

Blum, E. C 10.00 

In sympathy i.oo 

Jaffe, L. J 5-00 

Joachim, C. J 10.00 

*Kalvin, Mrs. H. M. i.oo 

May, Daniel i.oo 

Mishkind, Isidor . . 5.00 

Rothschild, S. F. . . 10.00 

Sternau, S S-oo 

Werbelovsky, J. H. 10.00 
Werbelovsky, Est. 

of J. H 5-00 

Werbelovsky, David 5.00 

Buffalo 

Block, Mrs. Jos. .. 10.00 

Boasberg, Emanuel 5.00 

Brozman, N. H. . . i.oo 
Fleischmann, 

Simon 5-oo 

Harris, Samuel . . . 5.00 
Hayman, Michael, 

& Co 5-00 

Jacobson, S 5.00 

Keiser, August . . . 5.00 

Maisel, Louis .... 5.00 

Oppenheimer, A. . . 5.00 

Shroder, Milton . . 5.00 

Spangenthal, A. . . 5.00 

Warner, H. & P. . . 5-oo 

Wile, Mrs. Clara.. 5.00 

Wile, Herman . . . 5.00 

*Life Member 
•'Deceased Life Member 



'Winkler, Mrs. R. S. 

Winters, A 10.00 

Wolff, Mi-s. Nathan 5.00 
Delhi 

Stern, Aaron 5.00 

Elmira 

Council of Jewish 

Women 5.00 

Friendly, H 3-oo 

Far Rockaway 

Eiseman, Mrs. Sam 5.00 

Gloversvllle 

Littauer, L. N. ... 50.00 

Herkimer 

Schermer, Benj. . . i.oo 
Mount Vernon 

Mann, Leon 10.00 

Newburgh 

Stroock, Jos 10.00 

New Rochelle 

Grant, Adolph .... 10.00 

Hecht, Bernard . . . 5.00 
*Ladenburger, Mrs. 
Theo. 

Stearns, Benj 10.00 

Worms, Mrs. Sid.. S-oo 

Niagara Falls 

Silberberg Bros. . . 5.00 
*Silverberg, Bertha 
*Silberberg, I. L. 

Silberberg, M. L. . . 5.00 

Olean 

Marcus, H. W. . . 5.00 
Rochester 

Adler, Abram .... 10.00 

Adler, Isaac ..... 5.00 

Adler, Mrs. Lewis. 5.00 

Adler, Solomon . . 5.00 

Bakrow, Mrs. J. . . 5.00 

Benjamin, A. E. . . 5.00 

David, Marcus . . . S-oo 

Garson, Mrs. J. L. 5.00 

Katz, A. J 10.00 

Kirstein, Mrs. J. 

E 10.00 

Kochenthal, Marcus 5.00 

Lowenthal, Geo. . . 10.00 

Lowenthal, Max... 175.00 

*Lowenthal, M. 

Mannheimer, Ike . . 5.00 

Meyers, M. M. . . 5.00 

Michaels, Jos 20.00 

Miller, William . . 5.00 

Present, Philip .... 5.00 
Rosenberg, M r s. 

Lena 5.00 

Rosenberg, Mrs. 

Theresa 5.00 

•Silberberg, G. 

•Silberberg, M. 

Stern, Isaac 5.00 

Stern, Morley A... 15.00 



Weil, Katherine M. 5.00 

Weil, S. M 5-00 

Weill, Samuel S-oo 

Wile, Mrs. Carrie. 5.00 

Wile, J. M 10.00 

Wile, Simeon .... . 5.00 

Wile, Sol 10.00 

Schenectady 

Lichtenberg, Ches- 
ter 10.00 

Syracuse 

Council Jewish 

Women 5-oo 

Eisner, Henry . . . 500 

Jacobson, Dr. N... 10.00 

Levy, T. A 5.00 

Warrensburgh 

Baumann, J. P. • ■ S-oo 

NEW YORK CITY 

**Abraham, A. 

Adler, Max 5-oo 

Alexander, A. A... 5-oo 
Alexander, Leo . . 5.00 
Alland, Maurice .. 5.00 
Armstrong, Paul.. S-oo 
Auerbach, Louis .. 10.00 
Austrian, Mrs. J.. 5.00 
Bash, Mrs. Henri- 
etta 20.00 

Bauer, Abram .... 5.00 

Beer, Mrs. J 10.00 

Behr, Pauline .... 5.00 
Beller, Mr. and 

Mrs. A 10.00 

Benjamin, M. W. . 10.00 

Berl, Miss Blanche 10.00 

Berliner, S 4.00 

Bernheim, Isaac . . 5.00 

Bernheimer, !M. E.. 10.00 
*Bernlieimer, Miss 

Rosie 

Berolzheimer, Emil 25.00 

Bijur, Nathan .... 10.00 

Billwiller Bros. . . 10.00 

Bing, A. M 10.00 

Bloomingdale, H. 

C 5.00 

Bloomingdale, I. I. 10.00 
Bloomingdale, Mrs. 

J. B 10.00 

Blum, Jos. A 10.00 

•Elumenthal, Geo. 

Blumgart, L'ouis . . 5.00 

Blun, Ferd. S. M. . 5.00 
Bookman, Mrs. 

Jacob 5.00 

Bookman, Estate of 

J 10.00 

Borg, Misses Elsie 

and Edith 30.00 

Bowsky, Louis . . . 5.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



69 



Brand, Herman . . S-oo 

Breslauer, A S-oo 

Brill, I S-oo 

Bruck, Theresa L. . S-oo 

Buchman, Julius .. lo.oo 
"Budge, Henry 

Busch, J 1. 00 

Buttenwieser, J. L. lo.oo 

Calm, Mrs. Cecilia 5.00 
Centennial Lodge 
No. 763, F. and 

A. M 10.00 

Cohen, J. H 10.00 

Cohen, Max 10.00 

Cohen, N. D 5-oo 

Cohn, Sale S-oo 

Conheim, Herman. 10.00 

Cowen, Moses .... 10.00 

Danenbaum, Chas. 5.00 

De Boer, D. H. . . S-oo 

Dreyfuss, Ludwig . 10.00 

Einstein, J 10.00 

Eiseman, Mrs. Sam. 5.00 

Elsberg, Mrs. R... 10.00 

Erlanger, A 25.00 

Estricher, Henry.. 5.00 

Falck, Harry .... S-oo 

Falk, B. J 5-00 

Fechheimer, C. ... 5.00 

Felsenheld, E. ... 10.00 

Felstiner, M 5.00 

Fischer, Isi 10.00 

Fleischer, Nathan . 5.00 
Fleishman, Marco.. 10.00 
Floersheimer, Sam- 
uel & Bro 10.00 

Frank Bros S-oo 

Frank, Mrs. A. B. . 10.00 

Frankel, D. J S-oo 

Friedlander, Mrs. 

S 10.00 

Friedman, Sol. & 

Co 10.00 

Fuerst, A. F 5.00 

Fuhs & Levin .... 5.00 

Glass, Henry 10.00 

Glazier, Mrs. S. W. 25.00 

Goldberg, Isaac ... 10.00 

Goldenberg, S. L.. S-oo . 

Goldsmith, Herman 5.00 

Goldsmith, Theresa. 10.00 
♦Goodhart, P. J. 

Goodman, A 5.00 

Goodman, Edw. B.. 10.00 

Gottheil, Paul 5.00 

Greenhut, J. B. ... 50.00 

Greenhut, N. W. .. 10.00 

Grossman, Emil . . S-oo 
'Guggenheim, Wm. 

Guinzburg, A. M... 10.00 
Guinzburg, Col. H. 

A 10.00 

*Life MemBer 
'•Deceased Life Member 



Guinzburg, Victor.. 25.00 
"Hays, Daniel P. 

Heavenrich, Julius. i.oo 

Heine, D. R S-oo 

"Heinsheimer, A. M. 

Heller, L., & Son.. 10.00 

Hendricks, Mrs. C. 10.00 
"Hermann, Ferdinand 

Hermann, Julius . 10.00 

Hess, Selmar 10.00 

Heyman, Saml. . . . 10.00 

Hilder, Moritz 10.00 

Hirsch, Adolf .... 5- 00 

Hirsch, C. J S-oo 

Hirsch, M. J 10.00 

Hirsh, Jacob 10.00 

Hirsh, Julius 10.00 

Holzman, Ascher . 10.00 

Holzman, S. L. . . 5.00 

Horkheimer, B. S. 5.00 
Horkheimer, Es- 

telle S 10.00 

Hyman, Mrs. Jos. 30.00 

Ikelheimer, Ida . . 5.00 

Ikle, Chas F S-oo 

Isaacs, Bendet .... 10.00 

Isaacs, M. A 10.00 

Iserson, A. S. ... 5.00 

Jacob'son, H. H. . . 10.00 

Janowitz, Julius . . 35.00 

Jellenik, Felix .... 10.00 

Jonas, William ... 25.00 

Jonasson, Jos 5.00 

Kahn, Leopold . . . 10.00 

Kahn, Louis 5.00 

Kaufman, Julius .. 10.00 
*Kaufmann, B. 

Kaufmann, H. M.. 10.00 
Kaufmann, Mrs. H. 

M 10.00 

Kayser, Julius . . . 10.00 

Klein, Mrs. Babette 5.00 

Klein, William . . . 15.00 

Kleinert, Mrs. Isaac 20.00 
Klingenstein, Mrs. 

Chas 5.00 

Knopf, Samuel ... 5.00 

Kohlman, Chas. . . 10.00 
Kohnstamn, Leo, 

Ed. and Jos 25.00 

"Krauskopf, Mary G. 

Krauskopf, Nathan. 200.00 

Krower, Louis .... 10.00 

Kuhn, Arthur .... 150.00 

Ladenburger, Theo. 25.00 

Lang, Gabe 5.00 

Lang, H. H 5.00 

Lauterbach, Edw. . 10.00 

Lehman, H. H. ... 10.00 
Lehman, Mrs. 

Mayer 25.00 

Leventritt, David. 10.00 



Levi, Henlein .... 5.00 

Levi, Mrs. Leo N. 5.00 

Levine, J. C 25.00 

Levor, Gustav .... 10.00 

Levy, E. B S-oo 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Levy, M. S 5-oo 

"Lewisohn, Adolph 

Lewisohn, Sam A. 10.00 
L i e b m a n, Mrs. 

Chas 5.00 

Lilianthal, Mrs. C. 5.00 

Lipper, Arthur ... 10.00 

Loeb, A. M 5.00 

Loeb, Emil 5.00 

Loeb, Louis 30.00 

Loewenstein, Her- 
man 5.00 

Lorsch, Henry ... 10.00 

Louchheim, H. P.. 10.00 

Mack, Fred A. ... lo.oo 
'"Mack, Jacob W. 

Mack, Marc H. .. 10.00 

Marceese, A. J. . . 5.00 

Marks, Sig 5-oa 

"Marshall, Louis 

Mautner, Julius .. to.oo 

Mayer, David .... 10.00 

Mayer, M. W 10.00 

Mayer, Morris .... 10.00 

Mayer, O. L 10.00 

Mendelsohn, ,Sig- 

mund 10.00 

Meyer, Dr. Alfred. 10.00 

Meyer, David .... 5.00 

Meyer, H, D 20.00 

"Meyer, Wm. 

Modry, 1 3.00 

*Morganstern, Al- 
bert G. 

Morgenthau, G. L. . 10.00 

Morgenthau, Henry 10.00 

Moses, Mrs. E. ... 5.00 

Moses, Rev. I. S. .. 5.00 

Myers, T. W 10.00 

Nathan, H. H 10.00 

Naumburg, Elkan . 50.00 

Newstate, Jacob . . 5.00 

Nordlinger, E. S. . . 10.00 

Ochs, A. S 25.00 

Oppenheimer, P. 

H 10.00 

Oppenheimer, Z. H. 10.00 

Ottinger, Marx .. 10.00 

Peierls, Siegfried.. 10.00 

Pfeiffer, Isaac .... 10.00 

Price, David 5. 00 

Pulaski, M. H. ... 10.00 

Reiter, L. M 5.00 

Rice, I. L 5.00- 

Rice, S M 25.00 

Rich, M. P 5.00 



70 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Rich, Mrs. S lo.oo 

Rosen Bros 5.00 

Rosenbaum, A. A.. 10.00 

Rosenbaum, Selig. 25.00 

Rossbach, Jacob .. 10.00 

Rossbach, Leopold 10.00 

Rithschild, Jacob . 5.00 

Rothschild, Louis.. 10.00 

Rothschild, L. F. .. lo.oo 
Rothschild, Mrs. 

Wm 5.00 

Sachs, Harry 25.00 

Sachs, Loxiis lo.oe 

Sachs, P. J 10.00 

Sachs, Samuel .... 25.00 

Sadler, Leo 5.00 

Saks, Isidore 5.00 

•Salomon, Wm. 

Samuels, J 10.00 

Schaffner, Abe . . . 5.00 

Schiff, Isaac 5.00 

SchifiF, Jacob H. . . 600.00 
SchifF, Mortimer H. 50.00 
Schoenfeld, David . 25.00 
Schoenfeld, Mrs. D. 5.00 
SchoUe, Mellville J. 5.00 
Seasongood, A. J.. 10.00 
Seligman, Mrs. De- 
Witt J 10.00 

Seligman, E. R. A. 5.00 
Seligman, Jeffer- 
son 25.00 

Schaff, Carl 5.00 

Shainwald, . Ralph 

L. 50.00 

Shiman, David ... 10.00 

Shoenberg, L. D. . 25.00 

Shrier, Samuel . . . 5.00 

Sicher, D. D 10.00 

*Sidenberg, G. 

Sidenberg, Henry . 5.00 

Sidenberg, Richard 5.00 
•Silberberg, G. 

Silver, S. L 5.00 

Silverberg, A. S... 25.00 
Simon, A. L. and 

L. L 15.00 

Simon, Franklin, & 

Co 10.00 

Simon, R. E 10.00 

Simons, Isaac .... 5.00 

Sloss, A. M 10.00 

Sloss, M. M 5-00 

Sommerich, Edwin 5.00 
Sondheim, Max ... 5.00 
Sonn, Mrs. Flor- 
ence 5-00 

Speyer, James .... 10.00 

Spiegelberg, W. .. 10.00 

Stein, Abraham .. 10.00 

Steinam, Abraham. 10.0c 

Steiner, David ... 10.00 

*Life Member 
'♦Deceased Life Member 



Steiner, Joseph ... 10.00 

Steiner, S. S 10.00 

Steinhardt, Henry. 10.00 

Stern, Alfred .... 5.00 

Stern, Benjamin .. 10.00 

Stern, Leo 5.00 

Stern, Leopold, 68 

Nassau 10.00 

Stern, Leopold, 142 

W. 14th 5.00 

Stem, Meyer .... 10.00 

Stern, N. B 10.00 

Sternberg, Fred. . . 5.00 

Stiefel, Helen S. .. 5.00 

Straus, P. S 25.00 

Strauss, Chas. . . . 25.00 

Strauss, D. R. ... 10.00 

Strauss, Ignatius . . 5.00 

Stroock, L. S 5.00 

Stroock, R. L. ... 5.00 

Strouse, Mrs. Eli . 2.00 

Sulzberger, Cyrus.. 5.00 

Sulzberger, Sol. . . 5.00 

Sutro, Lionel .... 5.00 

Sylvester, James . . 5.00 
Tannenbaum, Leon, 

Sr 10.00 

Toch, H. M 5.00 

Toch, Maximilian 10.00 

Tuska, Benjamin. . 10.00 

Ufland, Abraham.. 5.00 

Ulmann, B 10.00 

L'ntermej'er, Henry 5.00 

Van Raalte, Z. ... 5.00 

Veit, B 5.00 

Vollter, A 5.00 

Vorhaus, J. & Sons 5.00 

\'orhaus, L. J. ... 5.00 

W. M. S. .' 50.00 

Wallach, Moses . . 5.00 

Wallach, Xathan . . 5.00 
*Warburg, Felix M. 
•Warburg, Paul M. 

Weil, Dr. Isaac . . . 5.00 

Weil, Max 10.00 

^^"eiaman, J 2.00 

Weinberg, A 10.00 

Werner, Adolph .. 10.00 

Wertheim, Jacob .. 10.00 

Wile, E. W 10.00 

Wineburgh, Jesse . 5.00 

Wolfe, S. Herbert. 5.00 

Wolff, A. L io.o» 

Wolff, Mrs. A. R.. 5.00 

Wolff, L. S 10.00 

Wolff, Wm. E. . . . 5.00 
*Wollman, Henry 
*Wollman, Wm. J. 

Wollman, Wm. J.. 10.00 

Woolf, Morris L. .. 25.0* 

Zeckendorf, Louis . 5.00 

Younker, Herman. lo.o* 



Zinke, Isaac L. ... lo.o* 

Zinke, Louis 10.00 

XORTH CAROLINA 
Charlotte 

Oppenheimer, Leon 5.00 

Durham 

Kronhcimer, B. F. 5.00 

Goldsboro 

Weil, Leslie 5.00 

Weil, Sol 10.00 

Green.sboro 

Cone, Caesar .... 10.00 

States ville 

Hebrew Ladies' Aid 

Society 5.00 

Wilmington 

Jacobi, Mrs. J. X.. 5.00 

Solky, J. M 5.00 

XORTH DAKOTA 
Fargo 

Stern, Max s-oo 

OHIO 

Akron 

Akron Schwester- 

bund 5.00 

Gross, Rabbi L. D. 5.00 
Archbold 

Hirsch, Henry 10. o« 

Bellaire 

Blum, Mrs. Henry 5.00 

Blum, Isaac 5.00 

Blufftou 

Wise Bros 5.00 

Canton 

Stein, Mrs. Max . . 3.00 

Stern, Miss Mary. 5.00 
Chillicothe 

Schachne, J. R. . . 10.00 
Cincinnati 

Acb, Samuel 5.00 

Berman, O. A. ... 5.00 

Bernheim, E. P. . . 5.00 

Eernheim, M. L'. .. 10.00 

Bettman, Levi .... 10.00 
Bettmann, B e r n- 

hardt 5.00 

Bing, Mrs. Ida ... 10.00 

Block, Abe 5.00 

Block, J. E 5.00 

Block, Leon 5.00 

•Block, Samuel 

Dreifus, D. S 5.00 

Eichberg, Harry . . s-oo 

Elsas, Lew 5.00 

Englander, I s.o» 

Ezekiel, H. C. ... 2.00 

Fox, Henry 5.00 

Fox, Solomon .... 20.00 
Frank, Miss Paul- 
ine 5.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



71 



Freiberg, Abe .... lo.oo 

Freiberg, A JM. ... 5.00 

Freiberg, Bernard . 5.00 

Freiberg, H. A. . . 5.00 

Freiberg, J. A. ... 5.00 

Freiberg, Jos lo.oo 

Freiberg, J. W. . . . 10.00 

Freiberg, M. J. . . 25.00 

Freiberg, Sid. J. . . 5.00 

Fries, Gus R 5.00 

Furst, Jos 10.00 

Goldsmith, Hugo . . 5.00 

Guggenheim, Eli... S.oo 

Hahn, Henry .... 5.00 
Hessberg, iNI r s . 

Danl 5.00 

Johnson, D. I. ... 10.00 

Jonap, H 5-00 

Kahn, E. Sons Co. 5.00 

Kaufman, Lee .... 5.00 

Klein, Joseph D. .. 10.00 

•Klein, Samuel 

Klein, Samuel ... 10.00 

Krohn, I. M S-oo 

Krohn, Louis 5.00 

Lefkowits, Chas.... 5.00 

Levy, H. M; S-oo 

•Lowman, Leo J. 

Magnus, J. A. ... 10.00 

Marks, L. V S-oo 

Marx, Louis 10.00 

May, Bros 5.00 

Mayer, E 10.00 

Mayer, Mrs. L. . . S-oo 

•Meis, Henry 

Meis, Nathan 5.00 

Meiss, Harry S.oo 

Meiss, Leon ' 5.00 

Mendel, Henry ... 10.00 

Miller, E. L S-oo 

Ottenheimer, Jacob 5.00 

Peyser, S. D 5.00 

Phillips, G. J 10.00 

Plaut, Aaron S.oo 

Pollak, Emil 10.00 

Pritz, C. E 5.00 

Pritz, S. E 5.00 

Rauh, L. S 5.00 

•Reiter, A. 
Rheinstrom, Sig- 

mund 5.00 

Rosenthal, Samuel. 10.00 

Rosenthal, Wm. H. 5.00 

Rothschild, Lester. s.oo 
Seasongood, Estate 

of Alfred 10.00 

Seinsheimer, Mrs. 

Saml 5.00 

Shohl, Chas 5.00 

Silverglade, M. . . 5.00 
Sinsheimer, Miss 

Bessie 10.00 

•Life Member 
•*Deceased Life Member 



Smith, Mrs. J. J.. 5.00 

Stark, Dr. Sigmar. 10.00 

Stein, Hugo 10.00 

Stern, Max 10.00 

Stix, Mrs. Fanny.. 5.00 

Straus, Samuel ... 10.00 
"Sturm, Simon 

Thurnauer, C. M. . 5.00 

Trager, I. N 5.00 

Trager, Mrs. Isi- 
dore 10.00 

Trager, J. G 5.00 

Trost, S. W 10.00 

Trounstine, Victor. 5.00 

Troy, Ernst 10.00 

Ullman, Adolph . . 5.00 

Waldner, Adolph . 5.00 

Wertheimer, Em. ■ • 10.00 

Westheimer, L. F. . 10.00 

Westheimer. M. F. 10.00 

Winkler, Eli S-oo 

Winkler, Mrs. I. . . 5.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Jacob . 5.00 
Wolfstein, Mr. and 

Mrs. A. N 5-00 

Wolfstein, Jesse, . . 5.00 

Wyler, I. A 5.00 

Cleveland 

Braham, L. A S-oo 

Dauby, N. L S-oo 

Daughters of Is- 
rael, Lodge No. I 5.00 
Eisenman, Chas. . . 5.00 
Forchheimer, B. . . 5.00 
Gries, Rabbi M. J.. 10.00 

Gross, Sam'l 5.00 

Halle, Mrs. M. . . 10.00 

Hartman, Sam. . . 5.00 

Hays, C. J 5.00 

Hays, Joseph 5.00 

Hexter, K. W. . . . 5.00 

Joseph, Isaac 10.00 

Joseph, Sigmund . . 5.00 

Landesman, Ida . . 10.00 

Lowenstein, Ben . 5.00 

Mahler, B 10.00 

Marks, M. A 5.00 

New, Benj 5.00 

New, Harry 5.00 

Newburger, E. N. . 5.00 

Peskind, Dr. A. .. lo.o© 

Shlesinger, H 5.00 

Shlesinger, Sig . . . 5.00 

Stearn, Abraham .. 10.00 

Weil, Mayer 5.00 

Wolf, L. J 10.00 

Columbus 

Basch, Jacob 5.00 

•B'nai Israel Sisterhood 

•Lazarus, Frederick 

Lazarus, Fred. . . . 50.00 

•Lazarus, Ralph 



•Miller, Leopold 
Schonthal, Jos. . . . 10.00 
Schwartz, Hattie . 5.00 
Weiler, Miss Amy S'Oo 

Crestline 

Reder, Jake 5.00 

Dayton 

Ach, F. J 10.00 

Daneman, Mrs. Ja- 
cob 1. 00 

Lessner, Adam . . . 5.00 

Gallon 

Gottdiener, H 5.00 

Hamilton 

Kahn, B. B 5.00 

Kahn, Felix 5.00 

Kahn, Lazard .... 2.50 

Lima 

Michael, N. L S-oo 

Lorain 

Klein, J. S 10.00 

Marion 

Council of Jewish 
Women 7-oo 

Hershberg, H. L. . . 20.00 
Mt. Vernon 

Meyers, Mrs. Max. 5.00 
Plymouth 

Spear, Mrs. Sol. . . 5.00 
Sandusky 

Kaplan, Samuel . . S-oo 

Springfield 

Jewish Ladies Aid 

Soc'y 5-00 

Levy, M. D. . 5.00 

Toledo 

Federated Jew- 
ish Charities 100.00 

Landman, Otto . . 5.00 
Wooster 

Freedlander, Mrs. 

1 500 

YoungstowTi 

Grossman, Dr. J. 

B s-oo 

Guthman, Leo . . . 5-0° 

Hirshberg, B 5.00 

Regenstreich, L. ... S-oo 
Rodef S h o 1 e m 

Sisterhood S-OO 

Strouss, I S-OO 

•Theobald, Mrs. C. 
Weil, Mrs. Samuel. 5.00 
Zanesville 

Starr. A. E S-oo 

OKLAHOMA 

Tulsa 

Cohen, Isaac 5.00 

OREGON 
Portland 

Cohen, D. .S 10.00 



72 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Goldsmith, R lo.oo 

L'ang, M lo.oo 

Lauterstein, J 5.00 

Lesser, J S-oo 

Loeb, Mrs. Elisa.. 10.00 

Neustadter Bros. . . 25.00 

Selling, Ben 25-00 

Shemansld, J 10.00 

Swett, Z 5.00 

Weinstein, N. & S. 5.00 

PENNSYLVANIA 

AllentowTi 

Harris, Wm. T. . . 5.00 

Heinz, Maurice ... 5.00 

Herman, S. M. . . 5.00 

Hess, Chas 3.00 

Hess, Max 5.00 

Hoffman, Sol 5.00 

Judas, J 3.00 

Kline, Chas 5.00 

Merkel, Jos 5.00 

Nathan S: Schatten- 

stein 5.00 

Rapaport, ]Max . . . 5.00 

Samuels, A 10.00 

Sofransc}', Abra- 
ham 10.00 

Altoona 

*Kline, H. S. 

Berwick 

Schain, J. 'M 10.00 

Bethlehem 

Reis, Louis 5.00 

Braddock 

Katz, L. A 5.00 

Bradford 

Greenewald, D. C. . 5.00 
Carlisle 

Berg, Miss Selma . 10.00 
Chester 

Levy, Moses i.oo 

Coatesville 

Braunstein, Isaac . 5.00 

Marcus, Jacob . . . 5.00 
Doylesto«Ti 

Shoemaker, PI. J... 5.00 

Easton 

Bricker, W. R. . . 2.00 

Brown, J 5.00 

Buggen, A 2.00 

Feinberg, Jacob . . 5.00 

Feinberg, Meyer . . 5.00 

Friedlich, Mrs. C. 5.00 

Hellman, Israel . . 5.00 

Hesse, Hermann .. i.oo 

Hochmann, I. B... i.oo 

Kahn, E 5.00 

Klopfer, S. C. ... 5.00 

Kowitz, M., & Co. 2.50 

Krohn, M i.oo 

Lichtman, Henry . 2.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Lipschitz & Peters. 5.00 

Mayer, B. A 2.00 

Mayer, Jacob S-oo 

Menlein, M 5.00 

Moses, Leon 5.00 

Moses, Moses .... 5.00 

Ralph Bros 5.00 

Ralph, Herman . . . 5.00 

Rosenbaum, Levi . 5.00 

Rosenfelt, L 5.00 

Samuels, N i.oo 

Erie 

Baker, Isaac, & 

Son 10.00 

Cohen, Marcus . . . 5.00 

Felheim, Lyman . . 5.00 

Morris, A 5.00 

Schaffner, Abraham 5.00 

Schaffner, Jacob . . 5.00 

Schaffner, Milton . 5.00 

Schaffner, Morris . 5.00 

Schlosser, D 5.00 

Schuster, S. M. . . 5.00 

Sobel, Isador .... 5.00 

Straus, I. N 5.00 

Warner, E. W. . . 5.00 

Wertheim, 1 5.00 

Harrisburg 

State of Penna j$ 1 0,000 

Astrich, Herman .. 10.00 

Claster, H. C. ... 5.00 
Cohen, S. E., & 

Son 5.00 

Friedman, W. E. .. 10.00 

Goldsmith, Jos. . . 5.00 

Gutman, J. E. ... 5.00 

Hirschler, A. . . ; . 5.00 

Jacobson, A. S. . . 5.00 

Jacobson, D. R. . . 5.00 

Jacobson, M. E. . . 5.00 

Kamsky, L 5.00 

Kaufman, D. S. . . 10.00 

Kuhn, Sol 5.00 

Miller & Kades . . 5.00 
Nachman, J., & 

Hirsh, Simon .. 5.00 

Schleisner, W. B. . 5.00 

Simms, A. J 5.00 

Strouse, Benj 5.00 

Strouse, Jos 5.00 

Strouse, Wm 5.00 

Tausig's, Jacob, 

Sons 5.00 

Tyroler, M. L. ... 5.00 
Williams & Freed- 

man 5.00 

Wormser, A. G. . . 5.00 
Hazleton 

Benjamin, David.. 5.00 

Friedlander, M. . . 5.00 

Jenkintown 

Silberman, Max . . 5.00 



Johnstown 

Rothstein, M s-oo 

liittanning 

Einstein, Jacob ... 5.00 

Lancaster 

Cohen, E. M s-oo 

Geisenberg, L. R... 5.00 
Hecht, Mrs. H. .. 10.00 
Hirsh, Mrs. Au- 
gusta 5.00 

Hirsh, M. B 5.00 

Levy, Morris 5.00 

Levy, William .... 5.00 

Lurio, M. & Bro... 5-oo 
Michaeles, M., & 

Son 5.00 

Moss, S. R S-oo 

Ottinger, S. M. ... 5.00 

Rich, Israel 5.00 

Rindskopf, H. J. . . 5.00 

Rosenstein, Albert. 5.00 

Rosenthal, Isidore. 5.00 

Rosenthal, Morris . 5.00 

Ryder, H. J 5-oo 

Siesel, Samuel . . . 5.00 

Weill, Henry 5.00 

Langhome 

*Branson, I. L. 

Luzerne 

Freedman, Max.... 5.00 
McKeesport 

Friedman, Henry.. s-oo 
New Castle 

Feuchtwanger, M. . 5.00 
Ogontz 

Bowers, Chas. S. . . 50.00 

Oil City 

Brounschonger, M., 

Jr 10.00 

Olyphant 

Needle, Harry .... 5.00 
Pittsburgh 

*Aaron, Marcus 
Aronson, Leonard . 5.00 
Benswanger, E. . . 5.00 

*Browarsky, Max 
Cerf, Miss E. K... 5.00 

•Cohen, Aaron 

* Cohen, Josiah 

*Dreifus, C. 

Federated Jevf- 

ish Philanthropie 500.000 
Floersheim, B e r - 

thold 5.00 

**Frank, Samuel 

Goldsmit, Louis . . s-oo 
"Guckenheimer, Isaac 
•Hamburger, Philip 
•Hanauer, A. M. 
•Kaufman Bros. 
Kaufmann, Isaac . 10.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



11 



Kaufmann, M r s. 

Jacob 25.00 

Kaufmann, Nathan. 5.00 

Lipman, H. M. ... 5.00 

Raphael, R, I. ... 5.00 

*Rauh, Marcus 

*Rauh, Mrs. Rosalia 

Rothchild, M. N... 5.00 
Solomon, Kaskel . . 10.00 

Stadfield, Jos 5.00 

Sunstein, Mrs. C. . so-oo 

*Weil, A. Leo 

Weil, A. Leo 25.00 

Wolf, Mrs. Fred.. 10.00 

Pittston 

Brown, Albert .... 10.00 

Pottstown 

Mosheim, S i.oo 

Weitzenkorn, M. . . 5.00 

Reading 

Baer, 1 5.00 

Bash, Wm 5.00 

Epstein, Justus . . 3.00 

Goldman, E 5.00 

Loeb, Emanuel . . . 5.00 

Marcus, Nathan . . 5.00 

Merzbacher, Meyer. 5.00 

Schweriner S. S. .. 10.00 

Sondheim, Jonas,.. 5.00 

Weil, Morris 5.00 

Whiteson, Mrs. I. 5.00 

Rochester 

Rapport, H. T. ... 5.00 

Rydal - 

Nathanson, H. M. . 25.00 
Scrantpn 

Ball, 'Chas 5.00 

Barasch, S 3.00 

Blau, A 10.00 

Blume, Max 5.00 

Brandwene, Jos. . . 5.00 

Cohen, A. B 5.00 

Cohen, H 5.00 

Cohen, H. A 5.00 

Cohn, Meyer 5.00 

Connor, Louis .... 5.00 

Engel, Chas. B. . . 5.00 

Feld, Jacob 3.00 

Finkelstein, 1 5.00 

Finkelstein, Max J. 5.00 

Frank, Sam. H... 5.00 
Freedman, Dr. A. 

S 5.00 

Friedman, L 5.00 

Goldberg, A 5.00 

Goldsmith, R. M. . 10.00 

Goldsmith, Sol. . . 5.00 

Goodman, H 5.00 

Goodman, Isadore.. 5.00 

Goodman, M. L. . . 5.00 

Goodman, N. G. .. 5.00 

Grass, Alex 5.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Greenberger, I. ... 5.00 

Gross, Saml 5.00 

Grossman, Jacob . . 5.00 

Halpert, Dr. H. A. 5.00 

Harris, D., & Co.. 5.00 

Heinz, B 10.00 

Janko, Wm 5.00 

Judkowitz, Max . . 5.00 

Kaplan Bros 5.00 

Kaplan, M 5.00 

Kaufman, M. S. . . 5.00 

Kleeman, Oscar ... 5.00 

Kohn, Dr. L. W. . 5.00 

Kramer, A. N. ... 5.00 

Krotosky Brothers. 10.00 

Landau, David . . . 5.00 

Levy, K s-oo 

Levy, N. B 5.00 

Levy, N. M 5.00 

Long, Arthur .... 10.00 

Marcus, Adolph . . 3.00 

Mechlovic, J s-oo 

Moses, B 5-00 

Newman, A 5.00 

New Wall Paper 

Co 5.00 

Oettinger, Louis . . 5.00 

Oppenheim, J. E. . 10.00 

Phillips, Geo 5.00 

Prinstein, David . . 5.00 

Rice, Alfred 10.00 

Raker, D. M 5.00 

Roos, Dr. E. J. ... 5.00 

Roos, I. J 3.00 

Rubenstein, 1 2.50 

Schiff, A s.oo 

Schiffman, N 2.00 

Schiller, A. L 5.00 

Schwartz, A 3.00 

Schwartz, J 3.00 

Siegel, M. L 5.00 

Silverstein, Dr. N. 5.00 

Solomon, M 5.00 

Toll, Dr. R. M. . . 5.00 

Trucker. Saml. . . . 3.00 

Y. M. H. A 5.00 

Ziegler, T 5.00 

Shamokin 

Gelb, W. B., & Co. 5.00 
Susquehanna 

Levi, Mrs. R 5.00 

Tamaqua 

Livingstone, M r s. 

L 25.00 

Titus ville 

Berwald, H. P. ... 5.00 

Uniontown 

Rosenbaum, M r s. 

L 10.00 

Stern, Jos 25.00 

Wilkes-Barre 

Coons, J. S 5.00 



Orphans' Socy. ... 100.00 

Lazarus, H 10.00 

Long, Mrs. Dora . . 5.00 

Marks, Mrs. L. U. s-oo 

Stern, H. F 5.00 

Strauss, S. J S-oo 

Weitzenkorn, J. K. 10.00 

Williamsport 

Goldenberg, C. N., 

& Co 5-00 

York 

Grumbacher, Mrs. 

C 5-00 

Jandorf, Mrs. D. L. 5.00 

Lebach, Mrs. L. . . 3.00 

Lehmayer, L. R. . . 5.00 

Lehmayer, Mrs. N. 15.00 

Lehmayer, Wm. . . 5.00 

Petow, E. 1 5.00 

Reineberg, Lee . . . 5.00 

Schmidt, H. S. ... 5.00 

Walker, Mrs. B. . . 5.00 
Wilhelm,' Mrs. J. 

T 1.00 

Philadelphia 

Abel, A. S., & Son, 

Jesse 10.00 

Baird, J. E 10.00 

Baum, Saml 5.00 

Beckman, S 10.00 

Belber, H. S 40.00 

Berg, Lottie S. ... 5.00 

Berg, Mrs. Max . . 10.00 

Bernstein, M 5.00 

*Betz & Son 

Blank, Mrs. H. . . . i.oo 
*Bloch, B. B. 
*Blum, Ralph 
**Blumenthal, Herman 
**Blumenthal, Sol. 

Boonin, A. E 5.00 

Bronner, Henry .. 10.00 

Bronner, Maurice . 10.00 

Brown, J. Howard. 5.00 
*Byers, Jos. J. 

Calwell, Chas. S. . . 10.00 
Class of 191 1, K. I. 

Religious School. 5.00 
*CIothier, Isaac H. 
Darmstadter, Grand- 
children of 

Aaron 10.00 

Delaney & Co. . . . 5.00 

Delevie, Mrs. I. S. . 10.00 
D e Y o u n g, Mrs. 

Clias 5.00 

Engleman, Miss E. 5.00 

Federated Jew- 
ish Charities 8,000.00 

Feldenheimer, Mrs. 

R. M 10.00 

Feldman, Nathan . 5.00 



74 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Fellheimer, Mrs. A. 5.00 
Feustman, M. M. . 5.00 
*FIeisher, Martha S. 
Fleishman, M r s. 

J3ck 10.00 

Fuguet, Howard .. 10.00 
Geiger, Mary S. . . 10.00 

Geis, Moe 50.00 

Goldstein, S i^.oo 

Goldstein, M r s. 

Saml 500 

*Grant, Adolph 

Graves, N. Z 5.00 

Greenewald, M r s. 

^ 5.00 

*Hagedorn, M r s. 
Alice 
Halbkram family . . 5.00 

*Harrison, C. C. 
Heebner, Saml. . . . 5.00 
Heidelberger, Chas. 5.00 
Heilbron, Mrs. S. . 10.00 
Heller, Mrs. H. U. 10.00 
Hensell, Colladay 

,,., *^° 5.00 

Jonas, Herman 

Herzberg, Mrs. 

Harry 3„o 

Herzberg, Mrs. 

Walter jq.oo 

Hilbronner, Fannie 3.00 

Hirsh, Mrs. Gabriel 20.00 

Hirsh, H. B ,5.00 

Hoffman, Mrs. H. . 5.00 

Isaacs, I. W 5.00 

Isaacs, Isaac 5,00 

Kaas, Andrew 

Kahn, Mrs. M. J.. 5.00 

Katzenberg, Mr. 

and Mrs. L 10.00 

Kaufman, J. S. ... 5.00 
*Kaufmann, M. A. 

Kaufmann, family 

of Sophie 50.00 

*Kayser, Samuel 

Kirschbaum, Benno 15.00 

Kirschbaum, Mrs. 

C 

25.00 

Klinordlinger, A... 5.00 
Klonower, Oscar .. 10.00 

Kohn, Mina 15.00 

Kraus, S. C 50.00 

*Krauskopf, Harold 
Krauss, Mr. and 

^^rs. J. L 15.00 

Landman, Rabbi 

and Mrs. 1 10.00 

*Langfeld, A. M. 
Lane, David H. . . 25.00 
Lang, Mrs. Gabe.. 5.00 
Lehman, Mrs. Jer- 
ome 5.00 

*Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Levy, L. M 

*Levy, Sol. 
Lieberman, M r , 
and Mrs. A. . . . 
Lindeman* Bertha, 
in memory of . . 
*Lit, S. D. 
L'oeb, Hortense H. 
Louis, Mrs. N. . . 
Mailert, Miss H... 
*Manko, L. H. 
Marshall, Jacob .. 
**Merz, Daniel 
*Merz, Regina 
Miller, Wm. W. . . 
Moore & White 

Co 

*Morris, Chas E. 
*Morris, Effingham 

B. 
*Muhr, Jacob 
Myers, Mrs. Yette 

Nachod, J. E 

Norris, Dr. G. W. 
Oppenheimer, Mrs. 

Chas 

Oppenheimer, Miss 

Sophie 

Ostheimer, Wm. J. 
"Pepper, Dr. Wm. 
**Pfaelzer, Simon 
Pfeifer, Mrs. Jos.. 
*Raab, Mrs. Julia 

Raff, A. R 

Raphael, Herb., 
Arthur and Ade- 
laide 

*Reform Congrega- 
tion Keneseth 
Israel 

Rice, Sid. G 

**Rorke, Allen B. 
Rosenbaum, Han- 
nah D. 

*Rosenberg, Grace 

Rosenberg, H 

Rosenberg, I 

*Rosenberg, W. I. 
*Rosenberg, W. J. 
Rosenthal, Mrs. E 

J 

Rosenthal, Harry . 
Rosenthal, Hiram.. 
Rosin, Mrs. M. ... 

Rothschild, S 

Rubin, Mrs. Jos... 
Samuels, Mr. and 

Mrs. H. C 

*Schloss, Mrs. Her- 
man 
*Schoch, Henry R. 
Schoenfeld, Isidor. 



S-oo 

5.00 

5-00 

5.00 
10.00 
10.00 

30.00 

25.00 
5-00 



S-oo 
5-00 
5-00 



5-00 
5-00 



5-00 
10.00 



25.00 
10.00 

5-00 
10.00 

5-00 
20.00 



Schwacke, J. H. . . 5.00 

Sharp, S. S 10.00 

Shoenberg, Mrs. S. 

J S-oo 

Showell, E. B. ... 5.00 
*Silberman, Mrs. Ida 

Silberman^ Mrs. Ida 25.00 
* Silverman, I. H. 
Smith, Mrs. Jennie 25.00 
Smith, Solomon . . 5.00 
**Snellenburg, J. J. 
*Snellenburg, Nathan 

Snellenburg, Nathan 500.00 
*Snellenburg, Samuel 

Sobel, J 5.00 

Spitz, Arthur .... 10.00 

Springer, E 5.00 

Stamm, Jos 5.00 

Stein, Mrs. LB. . . 10.00 
*Sternberger, Samuel 
*Swaab, M. M., Jr. 
**Teller, Benj. F. 
*Teller, Mrs. B. F. 
**Teller, Jos. R. 
*Trautman, Dr. B. 

Walter, Simon . . . 5.00 
*Wanamaker, John 
Weil, Mrs. Samuel 5.00 
**Weiler, Herman 

Wells, Geo. B 10.00 

Weyl Bros 10.00 

Whitall, Wm. H. . 10.00 
Wieder, Mrs. C. P. lo.oo 

Wile, Rose 5.00 

Wilson & Richards 5.00 
Wilson, Morris R. . 5.00 
Wilson, Rose S. . . 5.00 
Winelander, Max . 5 00 
Winstock, W. B... 1000 
*Wolf, I., Jr. 
**Zweighaft, Simon 

RHODE ISLAND 
Providence 

Cutler, Harry .... 5.00 
SOUTH CAROLINA 
Florence 

Sulzbacher, S. I... 10.00 
Rock Hill 

Friedheim, Julius. 5.00 
Friedheim, Samuel 1 00.00 
TENNESSEE ' 
Chattanooga 

Adler, H. C 10.00 

Barras, Chas i.qo 

Barras, Sam 2.00 

Benkovits, B 5.00 

Blumberg Bros. . . 3.00 

Brandman, Morris. 5.00 
Consolidated Iron & 

Metal Co 5.00 

Diamond, M 5.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



75 



Dubroff, L 1. 00 

Edelstein, Abe. . . . 2.00 

Frank, Harry .... .i.oo 

Frank, Leonard I. lo.oo 

Frank, S. H i.oo 

Goodman, H., Jr... 5.00 

Harris, A. H 500 

Heyman, Paul ... 500 

Levin, A. N i.oo 

Milgram, B i-oo 

Mitchell, 1 3-00 

Morris, J i-oo 

Moyses, Max .... 5-oo 

Pearlman, J i.oo 

Poss, Ike 10.00 

Rosenheim, Wm. . 5.00 

Silverman, J 2- 00 

Silverman, M. H.. 5.00 

Silverman, N.' M... S-oo 

Silverman, Saml... 5.00 

Simpson, Harry . . 5-oo 

Simpson, Mose . . . 5-oo 

Slabosky, A 5-oo 

Solomon, Aaron . . i.oo 

Steiner, H. W. ... 5-oo 

Wassman, Emil . . . 5-oo 

Wassman, Lee L'. . 5. 00 

Winer, Harry .... 5.00 

Winer, Ike 5-oo 

Clarksville 

Adler, M 10.00 

Knoxville 

Rosenthal, D. A. . 5.00 
Memphis 

Binswanger, M. S.. 5.00 
Coleman, Mrs. Han- 
nah 5.00 

Federated Jew. 

ish Charities 200.00 

Haase, Chas. J.... 10.00 

Roth, Louis 5.00 

Nashville 

Bernstein, Phil, and 

Clarence, Jr. . . . 10.00 

Bloomstein. Max.. 25.00 

Bromberg, Dr. 

Perry 5.00 

Cohen & Nathan . . 5.00 

Cohen, R. & A.... 10.00 

Federated Jew. 

ish Charities 75.00 

Haas, Alex 5.00 

Hirsch, Sam 10.00 

Jacobus, J. M 5-00 

Jonas, L 5- 00 

Lebeck Bros 5-oo 

Levy, Sam., & Co. 10.00 

Loveman, Adolph.. 5.00 

Loveman, D 10.00 

Loventhal, L. J. . . 5-oo 

Lowenheim, D. ... 5-oo 

Lusky, Mrs. J. C. . 5.00 

•Life Member 
**Deceased Life Member 



Meyer, A. H 5-oo 

Morse, I. B 5-oo 

Rich, Schwartz & 

Joseph 5-00 

Sawyer, Sol 5-oo 

Skalovvski, M. H.. 5.00 

Simon, Chas 5-oo 

TEXAS 
Beaumont 

Deutser, B S-oo 

Ladies' Ben. Soc. . 10.00 
Big Springs 

Fisher, Mrs. Anna 5.00 
Crawford 

Marks, M 10.00 

Dallas 

Dreyfuss, G 5.00 

Hexter, V. H. ... 10.00 

Kahn, E. M 25.00 

Kahn, J S-oo 

Kramer, Arthur .. 5.00 

Linz, Simon 5.00 

Miller, I. A 2.50 

Myers, Seymour . 5.00 

Ortlieb, Max S-oo 

•Sanger, Alexander 

Sanger Bros 5-oo 

•Sanger, Mrs. Philip 

Scheline, H. S. . . S-OO 

*Silberstein, A. 

Swope, Jos 10.00 

El Paso 

Aronstein, S 5-oo 

Jewish Relief Society 35.00 

Krupp, Harris .... 5-00 

Mathias, A S-Oo 

Ravel, E 5-oo 

Ravel, Jos 5-00 

Stolaroff, 1 5-00 

Temple Mt. Sinai 

S. S 10.00 

Weiss, J 5-00 

Fort Worth 

Bath, F. P 10.00 

Brann, H 25.00 

Brown, Isidor . . . 5.00 
Council Jewish 

Women 5-oo 

Friedman, Mrs. A. 5.00 

Friend, A. M S-oo 

Gernsbacher Bros . 5.00 

Goetz, A. S 5.00 

Joseph, S. A 5.00 

Levy, D S-oo 

*Levy, Sam. 

Marx, Herman . . . 5.00 

Weltman, Mrs. L. . 2.00 

Galveston 

Cohen, R. 1 5.00 

Hebrew Ben. Socy. 25.00 
*Lasker, M. 

Ullman, J. L 5-oo 



Houston 

Malevinsky, Isidor. 5.00 

Sam, Jake IT 5-oo 

Tiras, 1 2.50 

Wfstlieimer, S. J.. 5-oo 

Midland 

Ilalff, H. M 10.00 

Palestine 

Ilalporn, M 5-oo 

Maier, S 5-oo 

San Antonio 

Berman, 10.00 

Blum, Mrs. Fannie 5.00 

Halff, Mrs. M. . . . 25.00 

Halff, Mrs. S 25.00 

Holzmark, Mrs. T. 5.00 

Joske, Alex 10.00 

Oppenheimer, H. 

M 10.00 

Oppenheimer, J. 

D 10. oa 

Texarkana 

Heilbron, L 5-oo 

Tyler 

Wadel, B 5-oo 

Waco 

Wohlberg, Manuel. 1.00 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City 

Baer, Adolph 5.00 

Jewish Relief So- 
ciety S.oo 

Rosenblatt, N. ... 10.00 
Sweet, Leon 5.00 

VIRGINIA 

Harrisonburg 

Bloom, Bernard . . 5.00 
Oestreicher, S. ... i.oa 

Lynchburg 

*Guggenheimer, Mrs. Max 
Lazarus, L. ' ^o 

Norfolk 

Hecht. Jacob "I.t-o 

Hirschler, E 5.00 

Hornthal. '"-frs. C. . 5.00 
*Ladiep' ' * b r e w 
Ben. Socy. 

Spogat, J. W 5.00 

Richmond 

Binswanger H. S. . 5.00 

Galesld, Dr. S. . . 5.00 

Hutzler, H. S. ... 5.00 

Kaufman, 1 5.0" 

Levy, Arthur .... 5.00 

•Alillhiser, Mrs. C. 

Millhiser, Mrs. C. . 5.00 

Millhiser, Emanuel 5.00 

•Millhiser Gustave 

*Raab, E. 

Raab, E 5.00 

Thalhimer, M. G. . 5.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Roanoke 




Sessler, Rabbi M. . 


5.00 


Staunton 




Strauss, L. G. ... 


S-oo 


WASHINGTON 


Chechalis 




Kaufman, H. A... 


10.00 


Everett 




Hochstadter, Bern- 




ard 


S-oo 


Seattle 




Dellar, Joseph .... 


5.00 


Eckstein, Mrs. N. . 


10.00 


Frauenthal Bros. . 


10.00 


*Galland, Bonham 




♦Galland, Mrs. C. K. 




Gottstein, M. & K. 


25.00 


*Gottstein, Meyer 




*Gottstein, Rebecca 




*Lang, Julius C. 




Loeb, S. S 


10.00 


Moyses, Ben 


10.00 


Shemanski, A. ... 


5-00 


Weinburg, Mrs. L'. 


2.50 



Tacoma 

Feist, Theo 5-oo 

Jacob, Meyer 10.00 

Ladies' Montefiore 

Society 500 

WEST VIRGIXIA 
Bluefield 

Heller, Mrs. F. S. 5.00 

Charleston 

Baer, Ben 5.00 

Frankenburger, !M. 5.00 

Clarksburg 

Levy, Ben 5.00 

Parkersburg 

Nathan, Mrs. Ben 5.00 
Wheeling 

Bloch, S. S 3.00 

*Horkheimer, Mrs. B. 

Horkheimer, Mrs. 

M 13.00 

Isenberg, Israel . . S-oo 

Rice, A. M 3.00 

Rice, S. M 5.00 

* Solomon & Rubin 

Sonneborn, M. ... 5.00 



'^Life Member 



*\Veil, J. 

Wolf, Leo 500 

WISCONSIN 
Appleton 

Marshall, L. J. ... 5.00 

La Crosse 

Hirshheimer, A. . . 25.00 

Milwaukee 

Aarons, Lehman . . S-oo 

Cohen, Mrs. G. ... 5.00 

Landauer, Max .. 10.00 

Levi, Rev. Chas. . . S-oo 

Miller, Morris S-oo 

Schuster, Bertha.. 5.00 

Schuster, Chas. ... 3.00 

Federated Jaw- 

ish Charities 100.00 

CANADA 

Toronto 

Scheuer, Edmund . 10.00 

ENGLAND 

London 

* Meyer, Arthur 

SWITZERLANT) 

Rorschach 

**Schoenfeld, Max 



Contributions received from Religious Schools 



ALABAMA 
Anniston 

. Beth El $6.50 

ARKANSAS 

Pine Bluff 

Anshe Emeth 5.55 

CONNECTICUT 
Hartford 

Beth Israel 10.00 

FLORIDA 
■Jacksonville 

Ahavath Chesed 4.00 

ILLINOIS 
Chicago 

Isaiah 10.00 

Peoria 

Anshai Emeth 10.00 

INT>IANA 
Fort Wayne 

Achduth Vesholom 2.50 

South Bend 

Beth El Confirmation Class 

of 1913 3.00 

IOWA 
Davenport 

B'nai Israel 2.00 

Des Moines 

B'nai Jeshurun 5.00 

KENTUCKY 
Henderson 

Adath Israel 14.50 

Lexington 
Adath Israel 3.50 



LOUISIANA 
Alexandria 

Gemiluth Chassodim 12.00 

NevF Iberia 

Gates of Prayer 3.00 

New Orleans 

Temple Sinai 8.00 

MISSISSIPPI 
Greenville 

Hebrew Union 2.00 

Vicksburg 

Anche Chesed 12.00 

NT]W YORK 
Buffalo 

Beth Zion 15.00 

OHIO 
Bellaire 

Bellaire 1.33 

Piqua 

Anshe Emeth 2.00 

Toledo 

Shomer Emoonim 5.00 

PENNSYLVAN^A 
Scranton 

^ladison Avenue 7.50 

Philadelphia 

Keneseth Israel. Class 1911.. 5.00 
TENNESSEE 
Knoxville 

Beth El 6.60 

TEXAS 
El Paso 

Mt. Sinai 10.00 

Waco 

Member of Rodef Sholom... 1.00 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



77 



Benevolent Orders 

Contributing Lodges 



Independent Order D'nai Brith 



$5 



ALABAMA 

Birmingham 

Birmingham Lodge 
No. 368 

Mobile 

Beth Zur Lodge No. 
84 

Montgomery 

Alabama Lodge No. 
299 

CALIFORNIA 

Oakland 

Oakland Lodge No. 
252 

Sacramento 

Etham Lodge No. 37. 

CONNECTICUT 
New Haven 

Hoieb Lodge No. 25 
COIiORADO 



Colorado Springs 

Colorado Springs 
Lodge No. 523 ... 5 

Denver 

Denver Lodge No. 171 10 
DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

Wilmington Lodge 

No. 470 5 



DIST. OF COLUMBIA 

5 



Washington 

Argo Lodge No. 413.. 



GEORGIA 

Columbus 

Columbus Lodge No. 
77 5 

Savannah 

Joseph Lodge No. 76. 5 

ILLINOIS 

Bloomington 

Abraham Lincoln 
Lodge No. 190 ... . 5 

*Life Member 



Lincoln 

Liberty Lodge No. 294 5 

Springfield 

Ernes Lodge No. 67.. 5 

INDIANA 

Fort Wayne 

Emek Beracha Lodge 
No. 61 25 

IOWA 

Des Moines 

Des Moines Lodge No. 
330 5 

KENTUCKY 

Lexington 

Lexington Lodge No. 
289 5 



LOUISIANA 

Alexandria 

Rebecca Lodge No. 
240 

New Orleans 

* District Grand Lodge 

No. 7 
District Grand Lodge 

No. 7 



150 



MICHIGAN 

Kalamazoo 

Mishan Lodge No. 
247 

MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 

Minneapolis Lodge 
No. 271 



ivnssissiPPi 

Greenville 

Deborah Lodge No. 
161 

Columbus 

Joseph Herz Lodge 
No. 181 

MISSOURI 
St. Joseph 

Joseph Lodge No. 73. 



St. Louis 

Eben Ezra Lodge No. 

47 10 

Missouri Lodge No. 

22 5 

MONTANA 

Butte 

Baron De H i r s c h 
Lodge No. 420 5 

NEW MEXICO 

East Las Vegas 

J. E. Rosenwald Lodge 
No. 545 10 



NEW YORK 

Albany 

Gideon Lodge No. 

140 5 

New York City 

District Grand Lodge 

No. 1 100 

Hebron Lodge No. .5 5 
Henry Jones Lodge 

No. 79 2 

Zion Lodge No. 2... 10 
Plattsburg 

Joel Lodge No. 118. . 5 
Rochester 
Zerubbabel Lodge No. 
53 



10 



OHIO 



10 



Cincinnati 

The Cincinnati Lodge 

No. 4 10 

District Grand Lodge 

No. 2 100 

Cleveland 

Cleveland Lodge No. 

16 10 

Columbus 

* Zion Lodge No. 62 

Dayton 

Eschol Lodge No. 55 10 

OREGON 

Portland 

Theodore Herzel 
Lodge No. 314 ... 10 

Portland Lodge No. 
416 10 



78 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



PENNSYIiVAXIA 

Braddock 

Braddock Lodge Xo. 
516 5 

TEXIVESSEE 

Memphis 

Memphis Lodge Xo. 
35 10 

Xashville 

Maimonides Lodge 

Xo. 46 5 

TEXAS 

San Antonio 

Edar Lodge Xo. 211. 5 
Tyler 

Edward Lasker Lodge 
Xo. 347 5 

UTAH 

Salt Lake City 

B. F. Peixotto Lodge 
Xo. 421 10 

AVASHTNGTOX 

Seattle 

Hildesheimer Lodge 
Xo. 503 3 

WISCOXSIX 

Milwaukee 

Isaac Lodge Xo. 87.. 3 
Gilead Lodge Xo. 41. 5 

Independent Order 
BWith Abraham 

COLORADO 

Denver 

Pride of Denver 
Lodge No. 333 ... 5 

COX'X^CTICUT 

X'ew Haven 

Columbus Lodge Xo. 

61 5 

X'ew London 

Pride of Xew London 
Lodge X'o. 466 ... 5 
Xomich 

Independent Xorwich 
Lodge Xo. 309 ... 1 
Torrington 

Torrington Lodge Xo. 
326 2 



GEORGLl 

Atlanta 

Georgia Lodge Xo. 
493 5 

ILLIXOIS 

Chicago 

Dr. George Sultan 

Lodge Xo. 307 ... 10 
Pavelocher Lodge Xo. 
Xo. 612 5 

TXTDIAXA 

Indianaj>oli.s 

Zion Lodge Xo. 221.. 10 

MARYLAXD 

Baltimore 

Benjamin Szold Lodge 
No. 211 5 

Ahron Friedenwald 

Lodge Xo. 323 ... 5 

MASSACHTSETTS 

Attleboro 

First Attleboro Lodge 

No. 442 5 

Ea.st Boston 

Lord Beaconsfield 

Lodge X'o. 534 ... 2 
Boston 

Knights of Liberty 
Lodge Xo. 271 ... 5 
Brockton 

Pride of Brockton 
Lodge X'o. 273 ... . 3 

>nSSOL'RI 

Kansas City 

Berrv' Dantzig Lodge 

Xo. 499 5 

Star of Kansas City 
Lodge X'o. 424 ... 5 
St. Louis 

Xathan Frank Lodge 
Xo. 87 3 

XEW HAMPSHIRE 

Manchester 

Granite State Lodge 
Xo. 181 5 

XEW JERSEY 

Elizabeth 

Elizabeth Lodge Xo. 

676 10 

Morristown 

Morristown Lodge Xo. 

375 1 



XEW YORK 

BrookljTQ 

Pride of Brooklyn 

Lodge Xo. 467 10 

Elmira 

Berger Lodge Xo. 388 3 
Kingston 

Kingston Lodge Xo. 

321 5 

Xew York City 
Roumanian American 

Lodge X'o. 83 5 

Rochester 

Alfred Dreyfus Lodge 

Xo. 201 10 

Syracuse 

Samuel Lodge Xo. 

241 5 

Utica 

Roscoe C o n k 1 i n g 
Lodge X'o. 364 .... 2 

OHIO 
Cleveland 

Gotthold Ephraim Les- 
sing Lodge X'o. 37. 5 

PEXXSYLVAXIA 

Homestead 

Homestead Lodge Xo. 

437 5 

McKeesport 

McKeesport Lodge 

Xo. 447 5 

Philadelphia 

Dr. Theodore Herzel 

Lodge X'o. 183 5 

Victor Hugo Lodge 

Xo. 299 5 

Hyman Lodge Xo. 75. 10 
Jezerzane Lodge Xo. 

405 5 

Pittsburgh 

Pittsburgh Lodge X'o. 

359 5 

Pottstown 

McKinley Lodge Xo. 

283 5 

South Bethlehem 

So. Bethlehem Lodge 
Xo. 324 5 

RHODE ISLAXT) 

Providence 

Hope of R. I. Lodge 
Xo. 549 3 

Pride of R. I. Lodge 
Xo. 124 3 

Providence Lodge No. 
214 5 

So. Providence Lodee 
No. 328 :. 5 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



79 



TENNESSEE 

Chattanooga 

Chattanooga Lodge 

No. 449 5 

AIRGINIA 

Newport News 

\'irginia Lodge No. 
195 5 

Order B'riih Abraham 
CALIFORNIA 

Ijos Angeles 

Los Angeles Lodge 
No. 414 5 

COLORAIK) 

Denver 

Queen City Lodge 
No. 113 5 

CONNECTICUT 

New London 

New London Lodge 
No. 295 5 

South Norwalk 

South Norwalk Lodge 
No. 185 5 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

B'nai Ephraim Lodge 
No. 172 5 

Oriental Lodge No. 

193 10 

La Salle 

La Salle City Lodge 
No. 317 S 

INDIANA 

Indianapolis 

Indianapolis Lodge 

No. 230 5 

MAINE 

Saco 

Independent of Bidde- 
ford Lodge No. 367 5 

MARYLAND 

Baltimore 

Rigar Lodge No. 83. 5 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Roxbui'y 

Ahavath Achim Lodge 
No. 174 2 



MINNESOTA 

Minneapolis 

Minneapolis City 

Lodge No. 63 5 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Manchester 

Manchester City 

Lodge No. 264 ... 5 

NEW YORK 

Buffalo 

Niagara Lodge No. 
148 5 

Elniira 

Elmira City Lodge 
No. 272 3 

OHIO 

Lorain 

Lorain Lodge No. 502 2 
Youngstown 

B'ne Moses Lodge No. 
209 5 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Pittsburgh 

Allegheny County 

Lodge No. 296 .. . 5 
Hope Lodge No. 210. 2 

Scranton 

Scranton City Lodge 
No. 47 5 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

Providence City Lodge 
No. 143 5 

Rhode Island Lodge 
No. 213 5 

Star of R. I. Lodge 
No. 330 4 

TEXAS 

Dallas 

Alexander Kohut 

Lodge No. 247 .. . 5 

WASHINGTON 
Seattle 

Seattle Lodge No. 
460 5 

Independent Order 
B'rith Sholom 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington 

Delaware Lodge No. 
141 5 



NEAV JERSEY 

Elizabeth 

Pride of Elizabeth 

Lodge No. 271 2.50 

Perth Amboy 

First Perth Amboy 
Hebrew Mutual Aid 

Lodge No. 200 10 

Woodbine 

Woodbine Lodge No. 
67 5 

NEW YORK 

Glens FaUs 
Elmira 

Elmira Max Nordau 
Lodge No. 281 3 

Anshe Sholom Lodge 
No. 219 5 

OHIO 

Youngstown 

Federal Lodge No. 170 10 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia 

B. F. Miller Lodge 

No. 2 10 

Ponevyezh Lodge No. 

43 5 

Wilkes-Barre 

Diamond City Lodge 
No. 135 S 

RHODE ISLAND 

Providence 

Friendship Lodge No. 
188 5 

Independent Western 
Star Order 

^^CHIGAN 

Detroit 

Detroit Lodge No. 
No. 118 10 

OHIO 

Canton 

Stark Lodge No. 129. 5 
Steubenville 

Jehudah Hamachby 

Lodge No. 131 ... 5 

Youngstown 

Youngstown Lodge 

No. 136 5 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Bradford 

Wm. Penn Lodge No. 
145 S 



80 



THE NATIONAL FARM SCHOOL 



Philadelphia 

Germantown Lodge 

No. 218 S 

York 

Abe Trattner Lodge 
No. 167 10 

WISCONSIN 

Sheboygan 

Sheboygan Hebrew 
Lodge No. 78 5 

Independent Order 
Free Sons of Israel 

WISCONSIN 

Milwaukee 

Cream City Lodge No. 
63 S 

Order Knights of 
Joseph 

ILLINOIS 

Chicago 

King David Lodge 

No. 101 10 

MISSOURI 

St. Louis 

Jonathan Rice Lodge 
No. 100 10 

Kaiser Franz Joseph 
Lodge No. 110 2 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia 

Baron Gihsburg Lodge 
No. 40 10 

Pittsburgh 

Abr. Goldfaden Lodge 
No. 80 5 

Independent Order 
Free Sons of Judah 

NEW YORK 

New York City 

Justice Lodge No. 26. 10 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Braddock 

Moses Ben Anirom 
Lodge No. 158 15 

Independent Order 

United Hebrews of 

America 

MASSACHUSETTS 

Brockton 

Pilgrim Lodge No. 45 5 

Workmen's Circle 
GEORGIA 

Savannah 

Branch No. 383 1 

NEW YORK 

Brooklyn 

Branch No. 6 3 



PENNSYLVANIA 

Pittsburgh 

Branch No. 45 5 



LADIES' LODGES 

Independent Order 
True Sisters 

CONNECTICUT 

New Haven 

Jochebed Lodge No. 4 5 

NEW YORK 

New York City 

Bathia Lodge No. 10. 5 
Hadassah Lodge No. 8 5 

Rochester 

Branch No. 27 S 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Philadelphia 

B'noth J e s h u r u n 
Lodge No. 2 10 



Independent Order 
B'rith Abraham 

MISSOURI 

St. Louis 

Leah Ladies' Lodge 
No. 5 2 



Rabbi Joseph Krauskopf, D. D., President I. H. Silverman, Treasurer 

4715 Pulaski Avenue, Philadelphia 60S Land Title Bldg., Philadelphia 

Abraham H. Fromenson, E.vectitive Secretary 
407 Mutual Life Building, Philadelphia 



iil0mb?rBl|tp at (illif Natwttal Sfarmiirlnnil 

I, the undersigned, being in sympathy with the object of "The 
National Farm School" — the training of lads in the practice and 
science of agriculture, for agricultural callings — do hereby agree to 
subscribe as one of the Maintainers of the institution, the dues of 
a Life Member ($100.00) Patron ($25.00) Supporter ($5.00) 
Friend ($50.00) Member ($10.00) 

Name 

Address 

Date . 



NOTE — Underscore the class of membership you wish to join. Life Membership 
calls for but one (the first) payment. Make check payable to THE NATIONAL 
FARM SCHOOL. 



3mvx of IC^garg to ®I|? National iFarm #rI|ool 

"/ give and bequeath unto The National Farm School, Bucks 

County, Pa., near Doylestown, the sum of dollars, 

free from all taxes, to he paid to the Treasurer, for the time being, 
for the vise of the institution." 



3txxm of i^tttfi^ 

ON REAL ESTATE OR GROUND RENT 

"I give and devise unto The Naiional Farm School, Bucks 
County, Pa., near Doylestown {here describe the property or ground 
rent), together with the appurtenances, in fee simple, and all policies 
of insurance covering said premises, whether fire, title or otherwise, 
free from all ta.res." 



OUR CONSTANT AMBITION 

Has been to furnish Gas that would 
give satisfadion. To this end we have 
spared no effort or necessary expense. 
^ Constantly we have sought the 
most modern and efficient system. 

Service to our consumers has been the result. 

Such has been and will 
continue to be our aim. 

The United Gas Improvement Co. 

Philadelphia 



PEARLS JEWELS 

SILVERWARE 
WATCHES CLOCKS 



T.E.CALDWELL^G). 



INCORPORATED 1876 

The Real Estate 
Title Insurance and Trust Company 

of Philadelphia 

523 Chestnut Street 

Across from Independence HjJl 

The Oldest Title Insurance Company in the World 

Capital, [full paid] $1,000,000 

Surplus and Undivided Profits, [earned] nearly $ ] .400.000 

Member o\ the Clearing House 
State and City Depository 

Insures Titles Executes Trusts Becomes Surety 

Receives Deposits Rents Safe Deposit Boxes 

EMIL ROSENBERGER, President 



AK APPRECIATION 

The following letter, entirely unsolicited, attestr 
the high character of all our work: 

"My Dear Mr. Gutekunst: 

Please accept my sincere thanks for the photo- 
graphs you have made of me, and which have just 
reached me. They are certainly a magnificent likeness^ 
and well attest the fact that the h-and that has de- 
lighted Philadelphia with its art for the past half cen- 
tury hajs not yet lost its cunning. 

"Trusting that kind Providence may spare you to- 
us and to your art yet many a year in health and 
good cheer, I am 

Very appreciatively yours, 

"JOS. KRAUSKOPF." 

F. GUTEKUNST, T^S Arch Street and 1700 North Broad Street 






WALNUT AT THIRTEENTH 

PHILADELPHIA 



EUGENE G. MTLLER, managers 



Compliments oi 



B. N. A. 



Powers - Weightman - Rosengarten Co. 



SELECTED FURS 

OF DEPENDABLE QUALITY 

We are showing an extensive assortment of Three-quarter and 
the new draped model Coats and Fur Novelty Sets in all the fash- 
ionable and contrasting Furs. 

FUR REPAIRING, REMODELING 

To obtain best results place your order now, before the great 
fall rush is on. 

Old-style furs remade into any of the newest models displayed 
in our extensive stock, assuring the best results. 

M. Schosberg & Co., Furriers 

Established 1889 1230 Chestnut Street 




Furs 

of 

the 

Better 

Grade 



31 ■ 1 c 



THEO. R SIEFERT 



14 



lout Street 



BoNwiT, Teller & Co. 

CHESTNUT AT THIRTEENTH STREET 

APPAREL OF INDIVIDUALITY 

for the 

WELL DRESSED WOMAN, 
MISS AND GIRL 



AT SENSIBLE PRICES 



HOSKINS 



904-906 

CHESTNUT STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 



Printing Office Furniture 

Engraving Filing Devices 

Stationery Cutlery 

Blanl^ Bool^s KodaJ^s 

Loose Leaf Devices Leather Goods 

^ Larger and mo^ Complete Stock in Philadelphia 
^ Fadlory and Printery on the Premises 

COMMERCIAL STATIONERS 
and OFFICE OUTFITTERS 



Diamond 
Jewelry 



Broochej-Bar Pinj 
Necklacej' - Ringj 
Earringj-PendanU 
Scarf Pm- Bangle J 
Bracelets - JtudJ" 
Full-Drejj Seis 
Jleeve Button j- 



TheMey^anksIMeCq 

Cheslnui Jtreet, PhiJa^delphia 



CAPITAL $ 1 .000,000.00 SURPLUS $ 1 ,250,000.00 

The Commonwealth 
Title Insurance and Trust Company 

Chestnut and Twelfth Streets 
PHILADELPHIA 



PAYS INTEREST ON DAILY BALANCES 

RENTS SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES $3 TO $100 

INSURES TITLES TO REAL ESTATE 

TAKES EN riRE CHARGE OF REAL ESTATE 

ACTS AS EXECUTOR, ADMINISTRATOR, GUARDIAN AND TRUSTEE 
WILLS RECEIPTED FOR AND KEPT WITHOUT CHARGE 

WE INVITE YOUR BUSINESS 

DIMNER BEEBER, President JAMES V. ELLISON, Treasurer 



KERR AND COMPANY 

Tailors to Gentlewomen 



1 19 South Seventeenth Street 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



CRANE'S '^"Tukr^^ 



Store, Tea Room and Order Department T /""^ 1 ' 

1310 Chestnut Street 1 V>- JlLi 

Philadelphia 

Only 2 blocks from either Broad Street 
Station or Reading Terminal 



CREAM 



Main Office : 23rd Street below Locust 



Crane's Ice Cream costs more than others — there is a reason 



JACOB REED'S SONS 

Men's and Boys' Wear: Clothing 

Furnishings: Hats: Custom Tailoring 

Uniforms: Liveries and Automobile 
Apparel 

1424-1426 CHESTNUT STREET 
Philadelphia 







OUR STOCK IS FAMOUS 

for ifs Magnitude and Magnificence 

We carry the Fine^ and 

Richer Line of 

High Class Diamond Jewelry 

of any house in Philadelphia. All of our Producftions 
are Thoroughly Smart and Di^ncftly Original 



E. J. HERTZ 



THIRTEENTH BELOW 
CHESTNUT STREET 



A. F. BORNOT BRO. CO. 

FRENCH SCOURERS 
= AND DYERS ^ 

SEVENTEENTH STREET AND FAIRMOUNT AVENUE 

BRANCHES 
535 Cheftnut Street S. W. Cor. Broad and Taisker Streets 

7 1 4 North Broad Street N. E. Cor. Twelfth and Walnut Streets 

. PHILADELPHIA 

1 224 F Street, WASHINGTON, D. C. 
716 Market St., WILMINGTON. DEL. 

Why not send us all your IMPORTANT CLEANING ? 



1833 



iauta' Jura 

NOW IN OUR 80TH YEAR 

UP-TO-DATE AND EXCLUSIVE STYLES IN 

FINE FUKlS 

WE INVITE YOUR INSPECTION 



1913 



DAVIS' FUR SHOP 



1120 CHESTNUT STREET 



Next to Keiths 



Philadelphia 



Compliments of 

THE 
ROSENBACH GALLERIES 



Coioenacle Hotel 



RYAN'S 

Theatre Ticket Offices 

PHILADELPHIA, PA, 

MAIN OFFICE 

The BELLEVUE STRATFORD 

Phone Locust 1200 

BOTH TELEPHONES 

THE ANTIQUE SHOPS OF 

J. M. WINTROB 

918-926 PINE STREET 

Philadelphia 
Rare Old Pieces, Oddities 

Skillfully Reproduced 



Quality ■ If B Made 

I riardwood 




Fi 



oors 

HEATON 
&WOOD 

Parquetry, Wood 
Carpet and Giillet 

1802 Chestnut St. 



Hanufartur^rs ilutuai 
iFtrF JtiBuranrF CEo. 

ARCADE BUILDING 
Philadelphia 
EDWIN I. ATLEE, President 



PRINTERS 

and 

Compilers of Trade Lists 

208-210 S. FOURTH STREET 



F. BRECHTS SONS 

CIGAR BOX MANUFACTURERS 

109-113 N. Orianna Street 

Philadelphia 

JULIUS LEVY 

FURS MILLINERY 

1423 WALNUT STREET 




IMPORTER 

HATS 

GOWNS 

CORSETS 

FURS TAILORED SUITS 

1732 CHESTNUT STREET 



BAILEY-LUSH COMPANY 



Fireproof Construction 



201 N. Broad St. Philadelphia 



The Vulcanite Paving Co. 

Land Title Building Philadelphia 

General Contradlors for Reinforced Concrete 
Conarudlion, Asphalt, Mailic Water- 
proofing, Insulation, Belgian Block 

Asphalt Block and Vitrified Brick Paving 

Asphalt, IVIadic and Cement Floors our Specialty 



William E. Wark, President, Treasurer 

Ralph N. Prieft, Vice-President 

William H. Hoehler, Secretary 

W. E. Wark Co. 

ENGINEERS and CONSTRUCTORS 

StruSlural Steel Ornamental Iron Work* 
Steel Towen and Concrete Designs 

1737 Filbert Street Philadelphia 



DAWES & POTTEIGER 

Pfunting Contractors 

Office, 1829 FILBERT STREET 

Warehouse & Shop, 1828 Cuthbert Street 

Philadelphia 

Member of Master Builders' Elxchange. 
Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce. 



Crosby Marble Company 

Interior Marble Work, Mosaic 
and Tiling 

1421 Land Title Building 

Philadelphia 

Telephone, Spruce 5536 



EaaWished 1877 

William McCoach 

Plumbing and Heating Contractor 

i 607 Sansom Street 
Philadelphia 



Bell Phone 



H. B, Frazer & Co. 

ELECTRIC CONTRACTORS 

Real EiState Tru^ Building 
S. E. Cor. Broad &Cheihiut Sts. 

Philadelphia 



Compliments of 

MAGAZINER & POTTER 
ARCHITECTS 

Independence Square (137 S. Fifth St.) 



M. J. DALTON CO. 



CIGAR IMPORTERS 



Philadelphia 



Henry J. Walter 

Secretary of Building Associations 

Fourth Floor Bailey Building 

1218 CHESTNUT STREET 



Gold and 
Silver Slippers 




Bridal Gifts, Handsome Pfc- 

tures, Artistic Framing 

of Pictures 



"tV/E- carry Gold and Silver 
Evening Slippers in ail 
sizes in stock at $6. 
q Satins, all colors $3.50 
Pure Silk Stockings 95c 

GEUTING'S 

(Pronounced Gyring) 
1 230 Market Street Philadelphia 




OTTO SCHEIBAL 

Art Shop 20 N. Ninth St. 




Compliments of 

ROSE MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia 



ASHER'S 

S. E. Cor. 22d & Walnut Sts. 

Philadelphia 

SWIMMING AND 

DANCING SCHOOLS 

Tango, Hesitation Waltz. 
One-Step, Boston, taught in 
class and private lessons. Swim-^ 
ming pool open all year. Large 
ball room and ten extra rooms, 
especially adapted for wed- 
dings, receptions and all social 
functions. Estimates cheerfully 
given. 

Application should be made 
to 

SYDNEY S. ASHER or 
RUDOLPH CALMANN, 

Manager 



1914 BUICKS 




The Tremendous Power and Dependable "GOING" Quality 
of the Past Linked with the Engineering Refinements of 1914 

The same values that have sold Buicks in the pa^ are selling Buicks this year- 
Then there is the added value of the Delco Eleiflric Starting, Lighting and 
Ignition, Left-Side Drive Center Control — every advanced improvement. 

You cannot afford to miss an inspection of these excellent cars. 



BUICK MOTOR CO, 

235 North Broad Street 



Philadelphia 



As Philadelphia Leads the World So 

i^ariumtrk Sc Mu^n Company 

Lead Philadelphia in the Manufacfture of 

The high ^andard of our well-knov^fn weaves 
has been uniformly maintained for years and 
today w^e enjoy the confidence and respedt 
of the befl houses throughout the country 
FORTY SIZES OF RUGS IN STOCK 

SPECIAL SIZES MADE TO ORDER 

Hardwick & Magee Company 

Successors to Ivins, Dietz & Magte 



RETAILERS OF ALL STANDARD FLOOR COVERINGS 

1220-1222 MARKET STREET 





MIKVE ISRAEL SYNAGOGUE 

BROAD AND YORK STS. PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

BUILT BY 

THE CHAS. McCAUL COMPANY 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Offices: Philadelphia Washington Baltimore Toledo Atlanta Savannalb 



Edward Atkins 



CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 




249 SO. 24TH STREET 



PHILADELPHIA 



STETSON HATS 

STETSON STORE 

1108 CHESTNUT ST. 

MacDonald & Campbell 

Men's and Young Men's Suits and 
Overcoats, $15, $18, $20 up to $50 

Ready-to-wear garments of the unusual 
merit you expect from us, specially made to 
meet the requirements of our critical patronage, 
but as low in price as Suits and Overcoats which 
cannot claim their distinction. 

Hundreds of models, shades, colorings and 
patterns that are exclusive to us and strikingly 
emphasize our reputation as the Fashion Center 
for Men's Clothing. 

N. B. — For a long time we have extended to 
our friends and customers the courtesy of free 
local telephone calls. 

We want aU to know it, that they may come 
in the store and use any one of the eighteen sta- 
tions for local calls absolutely free of charge, 
without feeling under any obligation. 

1334-1336 CHESTNUT STREET 
Store Closes 6.30 




BOILERS 
For Heating by Steam 
Hot Water and Vapor 

THE H. B. SMITH CO. 

1 225 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



MENLO Round Boiler 



THE EIGHTH NATIONAL BANK 

PHILADELPHIA 

(Established 1864) 

Capital, $275,000 Surplus, $850,000 

WM. J. MONTGOMERY, President 

SAMUEL BELL, JR., Vice-President 

CHARLES B. COOKE, Cashier 

JOHN D. ADAIR, Assistant Cashier 
Directors — Charles Porter, Samuel Bell, Jr., Robert Carson, 
Frank Buck, Wm. J. Montgomery, Samuel T. Kerr, Robert S. 
Irwin, Theo. F. Miller, Frank C. Gillingham. 

N. CRAMER & SONS 

Manufacfturers of 

CLOAKS AND SUITS 

1427 VINE STREET 

Philadelphia 



Alex Wolfington^s Son 

BTHLDER OF AUTOMOBILE BODIES 

8-14 NORTH TWENTIETH STREET 



PHILADELPHIA. 



B. HOOLEY & SON 

SILK MANUFACTURERS 

435-439 NORTH BROAD STREET 
PHILADELPHIA 

Telephones — Keystone, Main 390. Bell, Market 409 

National Aniline & Chemical Co. 

Aniline Colors, Dyestuffs, Chemicals 

109 North Water Street Philadelphia 

Agent for Schoelkopf, Hartford & Hanna Co. A. Lee Company 



Aarnn ^ana 



\Z\ Halnut i'L 



lallmg^r $c Parrot 

BOYERTOWN BUILDING 

NEW YORK, 345, 347 Broadway BOSTON, 67 Chauncey St. 

CHICAGO, 605 Medinah Temple 

Olatlm $c dompatt^ 

YARNS 

128-130 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 

Cops, Skeins, Cones, Tubes and Warps 



ROY A. HEYMANN 

REAL ESTATE 

1 500 LAND TITLE BUILDING 



SIXTH NATIONAL BANK 

N. W. Cor. SECOND AND PINE STREETS 
Philadelphia 
JOHN P. WILSON, President 

DANIEL BAIRD, Vice-President 

JAMES C. SUTTON, Second Vice-Pres. 

WILLIAM SALTER, Cashier 

Directors — John P. Wilson, Henry Shetzline, James C. Sutton, 

J. Frank Adams, Daniel Baird, John C. Wilson, Louis J. Kolb, 

William C. May, Harrison C. Rea, E. Stockton Woodward, Norman 

C. Ives, William Silverman. 



Compliments of 



M. Haber & Co. 



Disinfectants and Disinfecting Appliances 

Houses Scientifically Fu/migated 
We are Experts in the Line 

West Disinfecting Company, Inc. 

The largest manufacturers of Disinfectants and Disinfecting 

Appliances in America 

Main Office and Laboratory, New York. 

Philadelphia Office, 1303 Race Street 

CHARLES AUERBACH, Manager Both Phones 



MASTBAUM BROS. & FLEISHER 

REAL ESTATE 

1328 South Penn Square 



JOSEPH S. KEEN JR. President and General Manager 

GEORGE M. BUNTING, Vice-President and Treasurer 
H. BAYARD HODGE, Sec. and Asst. Treas. 

WM. H. ROTH, Assistant Secretary 

American Pipe and Construction Co. 

ENGINEERS AND CONTRACTORS 

112 North Broad Street Philadelphia 

J. W. LEDOUX, Am. Soc. C. E., Chief Engineer 

JAMES H. DAWES, General Superintendent Construction Dept. 

HAROLD PEROT KEEN, General Supt. Operating Department. 

Charles I. Kent, Pres. William L. Guenther, Vice Pres. Leon Rosenbaum, Treas. & Sec. 

J. JACOB SHANNON & CO. 



<^LE> 



Mill, Mine, Railroad, Builders' M 1744 



, ^ o !• ^MARKET STREET i 

and Contractors Supplies, m ph,lada. 

HARDWARE ., , ^ ^ . mshannon&cqJ 

Hardware and Lquipment Meouipment/ 

1744 Market Street 1744 

Asa W. Vandegrift, Pres. Nelson M. Vandegrift, Vice Pres. F. W. Hudtwalcker, Sec'y & Treas. 
Keystone and Bell Telephones 

Sheip & Vandegrift 

Incorporated 

LUMBER AND MILLWORK 

Poplar, Bass, Chestnut, Oak Planing, Re-Sawing, Moulding 

Nos. 8 1 4-832 N. Lawrence St. Philadelphia 



McNICHOL 



Pavmg and Conslrudion Company 



General Contractors 



(923 CHERRY STREET PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

GOLD SEAL BEER 

BREWED BY THE 

Continental Brewing Co. 

MADE FROM THE VERY FINEST 
QUALITY OF MALT, AND THE 
BEST GROWTHS OF HOPS 



BREWERY 



21st Street and Washington Avenue 

PHILADLPHIA. PA. 



®l|r llla;rBttr Aparlmrnt T|fllrl 

Broad Street and Girard Avenue 

Most attractive and centrally located apartment house in Philadelphia. 
All apartments with outside exposure. 

Special new American plan. Dining room for families. Environments 
unexcelled. Table unsurpassed. Apartments on long and short term leases. 

W. H. WHITESIDE, J. W. DOUGHERTY. 

General Manager Assistant Manager 

New Management 

BEYOND COMPETITION 

BAILEY'S PURE RYE 

For the Use of Gentlemen who can Appreciate a Perfect 
Flavor and Aroma Combined with all the Requisites 
Necessary to Assist Convalescents When Recommended 
by a Physician. Fully Matured and Bottled. 

HUEY & CHRIST 

1308 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

THE NEW HOTEI. HANOVER 

CLAUDE M. MOHR. Manager 

Arch and Twelfth Streets, Philadelphia 
Newly Furnished Throughout Music in Cafe 

European Plan 
Rooms, without bath, $1.00 per day and up 

Rooms with bath, $ I 5 per day up 

Rimning Hot and Cold Water and Telephone in Every Room 

Table d'Hote Dinner, 50 Cents, 1 2 to 8 P. M. 

Special Table d'Hote Dinner, $1.00, 12 to 8 P M. 

Cuisine and Service Unexcelled 



^^ "PHILADELPHIA" 

The Lawn Mower standard since 1869 




"GRAHAM" All Steel 



For over 44 years the 
"Philadelphia" Mowers have main- 
tained unchallenged supremacy 
amongit Lawn Mower Manufa<a- 
urers. We are the originators of 
ALL STEEL Mowers, Styles 

"A" & "GRAHAM" 

All Knives Vanadium 

Crucible Steel 

18 Styles HAND and 6 Styles 

HORSE, all o{ the Higheft Grade 

For Catalog & Prices Addresi 



The Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 



Thirty-firil and Chestnut Streets 



PhOadelphia, Pa.. U. S. A. 



THE PEN-DAR CONSUMER 

A New and Safe Idea 
Made entirely of Galvanized Wire and 
Iron, almost indestructible, used for Burning 
Waste Paper and other combustible material; 
also a neat Basket for Waste Paper, Leaves, 
etc. 

No. 1, 20 in. diameter x 30 in. high $3.00 

No. 2, 17 in. diameter x 2-5 in. high 2.00 

No. 3, 14 in. diameter x 21 in. high 1.80 

No. 4, 12 in. diameter x 18 in. high 1.50 

We also manufacture Wire Cloth, Wire 
and Iron Work, Wire Garden Furniture, Trel- 
lis and Flower Bed Border, Lawn and Poultry 
Fencing and Gates. Everything in Wire and Iron 
Pen-Dar Leaf Racks — Used on wheel- 
barrows with removable sides, for gath- 
ering leaves, cut grass and rubbish; 
capacity, 10 bushels ; made of galvan- 
ized wire, bolted to a wooden case. Price 
(not including wheelbarrow), $4.00. 
Ask for Catalog of what you may want. 

Manufactured by ; Qc ,i.nnia 3J6H b sr. 

Edward Darby &Soii^f^1Mi^mtA^st, 





Jfortli f^nn lank 

29th & DAUPHIN STREETS 

PH1J_ADELPHIA. PA 



.2 per cent interest on check accounts on balances of $1 00 or over. 
3V2 per cent interest on saving fund accounts. 
Every courtesy extended consistent with safe banking. 
Your account is solicited, 

LOUIS H. MICHEL. President K T. MOVER, Cashier. 



OWEN LETTER'S SONS 

BEST COAL 




MAIN YARD 

Trenton Avenue and Westmoreland Street. 



Olaljan PrintinQ Olnmpan^ 



1332 ARCH STREET 

PHILADELPHIA 

Jtrtlj $c JffnBter Qlnmpciny 

DYERS AND FINISHERS OF PIECE GOODS 

We are specially equipped for Fine All-Wool and Silk and Wool 

Mixed Fabrics 

"BRIGHT COLORS— SUPERB LUSTER" 

The Belber Trunk and Bag Company 

Manufacturers of 
Trunks, Dress-Suit Cases, Telescopes Bags and Leather Goods 

Columbia Avenue, Mascher, Turner and Hancock Streets 
Philadelphia, Pa., U. S. A. 
Office, 1641 Hancock Street 

John C. Humphreys William O. Humphreys 

JOHN C. HUMPHREYS & SON 

Contracting Plasterers 

, Metal Lath Construction 

1233 St. James Street 

PHONES PHILADELPHIA 

Bell. Walnut 838 
Keystone, Race 863 



$2,000,000 



1 A/1 AQ patrons have more than the above amount on 
1U4UO deposit here 



The Northwestern Trust Company 

RIDGE AND COLUMBIA AVENUES 

WILLIAM FREIHOFER, Presiden 

TABLE LINEN IS IRONED BETTER 

At our Laundry than it is possible for it to be ironed at home. 

We give your linen a finish that shows off to advantage every 
thread in the pretty pattern. 

We iron it dry, so it holds its stiffness and finish, and we iron 
it flat and square, without wrinkles, turned-over edges or other 
marks of hasty, careless work. 

Our service is reasonable in cost, and adds a great deal to the 
beauty of your table setting. 

Send postal or phone. 

EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY COMPANY 
Will Treat You Right Nineteenth and Montgomery Avenue 

Hulton Dyeing & Finishing Company 

(Incorporated) 
2712 JASPER STREET 
Philadelphia 
DYERS OF 

Fast Colors, Woolen and Worsted Yarns and Slubbing in the 
BaU. 
FINISHERS OF 

Woolen and Worsted Piece Goods, Men's Wear Fabrics, Dress 
Goods, Etc., Etc. 



Joseph Call 

Painter anb Sgroralor 

1727 N. Tenth Street 

Brick Fronts a Specialty 



Compliments 

ISADORE ROSENBLUTH 
CARL S. GROSS 



HENRY R. HALLOWELL 
&SON 

Hot House and Imponed Fancy 
Fruits 

The Retal Estate Trust Co. Bldg. 
Broad and Chestnut Streets 

Philadelphia 



THOMAS H. WrLSON" 
Manufacturer of Fine Worsteds 

1420-1432 North Howard Street 
Philadelphia 



• CARNWATH, BELU& CO. 

Steam Packing Box Manufacturer;^ 

6 1 3 and 6 1 5 Cherry Street 
608 and 610 Quarry Street 

Telephone Philadelphia 



O. FUHRMANN 


H. TOGGWEIIFR 


Vienna Ladies* Tailor 


Heaters, Ranges, Roofing 


1507 North Fifteenth Street 


3120 Ridge Avenue 



Bell Phone Keystone Phone 

AUGUST GEIGER 

Heating and Contracting Engineer 
Steam and Hot Water Heating 

1 1 4 North Sixth Street 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Certified Milk 

WILLS-JONES-McEWEN CO, 

Milk and Cream in Quantities 

Twenty-sixth below Oxford 

Montgomery Ave,, West of 12th St, 

Block 6600 Germantown Ave. 

Philadelphia 




The-Man-on-the-Spot 

Everything in Real Estate 

CHARLES W. RUETER 

Mam Office 

1703 Tioga Street 

Germantown Office 
Main and Chelten Avenue 



"For things good to eat — see Gibb" 

MORRIS M. GIBB 

Fancy Groceries, Meats and 
Provisions 

Cor. York Road and Rockland St 

Logan 
Phon^— Tioga 6845 



GEO. W. FREEMAN 
Pharmacist 

Busy Comer, Broad and Rockland 
Streets, Logan, Phila. 



FURS 

Made to Order, Remodeled and 
Repaired at the Lowest Prices 

LOUIS STEVEN 

Broad and Erie Avenue 



For Good Things to Eat, go to 

WILSON 

Branchtown, Philadelphia 



J. SELLERS PENNOCK 



Sanitary Plumbing and Heating 



S. E. Cor. Seventh and Filbert Sts. 



Henry Bell, President 

Henry K. Walt, Vice-President 

Freeman S. Hunsberger, Treasurer 

BELL, WALT & CO., INC. 

Wholesale Boots, Shoes and 
Rubbers 

28 North Third Street 



BOYERTOWN BURIAL 
CASKET CO. 

Bronze, Metallic, Hardwood and 

Cloth-covered Caskets, Robes 

and Linings 

Phila,. Pa. Boyertown, Pa. 

New York, N. Y. 



Both Ph<me$ 

WILLIAM MEYER 
Steam Packing Box Manufacturer 
206-2 1 6 Quarry Street, Phila. 
Carpenter work. Shelves and fix- 
tures a specialty. Jobbing in all its 
branches. 
Cor. Bread, between Second and 
Third, Race and Arch Streets 



FENNER 
DRUGS 



Broad ami Columbu Atoum 



Compliments of 



DR. ELLIS LEVY 



r 



Emanuel Asher & Son 

IFun^ral itrwtor 

1602 DIAMOND STREET, PHILADELPHIA 

Bell Phone, Diamond 898 
Keystone Phone, Park 979 



The entire building, 1 602 Diamond Street, 
is now devoted to the business, and is at the 
disposal of our patrons for the care and burial 
of their dead. Funerals can be held at the 
parlor at any time. 



ATLANTIC CITY, 22 N. DELAWARE AVENUE 

Atlantic Coast Phone — 222 

RESIDENCE, 1 8 1 4 ERIE AVENUE 
Bell Phone, Tioga 7663 

Automobile Service if desired 






Bell. Poplar B% TELEPHONES Keystone. Park 67-7:1 

®ell. Poplar 897 
©ell Poplar 3369 A 

NEVER CLOSED 

Haag Stable Company 

Limited 
SIXTEENTH STREET, BELOW DIAMOND 

Philadelphia 

UP-TO-DATE EQUIPAGES 

OPERA BUSSES BRIDAL COACHES VICTORIAS 

CABRIOLETTE HANSOMS BROUGHAMS CUT UNDERS 

COACHMEN IN FULL LIVERY 



ESTABLISHED 1855 



Thomas Delahunty 




Underground Vaults and 
Mausoleums a Specialty 

3811 to 3821 Ridge Ave. 

Opposite 
North Uurel Hill Cemetery PHILADELPHIA 




EXPORT SALES OFFICE 
810 Bridge Street, New York 

T)o^lestown Agricultural Co. 

Manufactureis of 

Qrain Separators, Ensilage & Dry Fodder Cutters & Shredders 

DOYLESTOWN, PA. 

Executes Trusts Pays Interest on Deposits Insures Titles 

BUCKS COUNTY TRUST COMPANY 
Authonzed Capital, $250,000 Paid-in Capital, $125,000 

Surplus, $190,000 
HUGH B. EASTBURN, President and Trust Officer 
GEORGE WATSON, Vice-Pres. and Asst. Trust Officer 
THOMAS ROSS, Second Vice-President 
T. O. ATKINSON, Treasurer 

GEO. H. MILLER, Asst. Treasurer 

HARRY C. GARNER, Assistant Secretary 
Doylestown, Pa. 



THE FOUNTAIN HOUSE 

Doylestown, Bucks Co., Pa. 
Francis C. Mireau 


HENRY S. BEIDLER 

Doylestown, Pa. 

Coal, Flour, Grain, Feed, Clover 

Seed, Timothy and Agricultural 

Implements, Fertilizers, Lime, etc. 


H. B. ROSENBERGER 

Coal, Lime, Cement, Ha^ 

West Ashland Street 

Doylestown, Pa. 


C. S. WETHERILL 

Coal, Lumber and Millwork 

143 West State Street and 

242 West Ashland 

Doylestown, Pa. . ''- 


RANDALL'S 
Hardware Deparliuent Store 
Main Street and Oakland Avenue 
Builders' Hardware, Mechanics* 
Tools and Supplies, House furnish- 
ing Goods, Cutlery and Stationery, 
Sporting Goods, Wall Paper, 
Paints and Varnishes, Farm Equip- 
ments and Garden Supplies. 

Doylestown, Pa. 
Both Phones Established 1873 


Plumbing, Steam, Hot Water and 

Warm Air Heater Work. 

General Repairing and Machine 

Shop. 

Both Phones. Doylestown, Pa. 

MICHAEL A RUfE 

(Formerly Rufe Bros.) 

New Location, Taylor Street, 

Between Main and Pine Streets 



State Charter, 1834 National Charter. 1864 

THE DOYLESTOWN NATIONAL BANK 

Doylestown, Pa. 

Capital $105,000.00 

Surplus $105,000.00 

Undivided Profits 1 45.000.00 

250,000.00 

Deposits 1. 1 37,000.00 

JOHN M. JACOBS. President JOHN N. JACOBS. Cashier 

C. LOUIS SIEGLER D. D. S. 
21 North Main Street. Doylestown. Pa. 



W. H. SWARTLEY 

Manufacturer of Cider and Vinegar 

Cor. State and West Streets 
P. O. Box 4 1 2 Doylestown. Pa. 



"Get it at Pearce's and it will be 
right" 

SAMUEL R. PEARCE 

Pharmacist 

Hart Building, Doylestown, Pa. 



WM. P. ELY & SON 

Dealer in Ready-lo-wear Cloth- 
ing for Men. Boys. Children; 
Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats. 
Caps. Boots and Shoes. 

Opposite P. & R. Depot 
Doylestown 



FRED'K SABIN & CO.. INC. 
Howard Miller, President 

Heatmg Contractors 

237-39-41 Bread Street 
Philadelphia 



JOSEPH P. WILDE 

Importer of Cheese, Delicacies and 
Fancy Groceries 

Commission Merchant 

825-827 North Second Street 

Philadelphia. Pa. 



JAMES BARRETT 

Dealer in Paints and Oils, Ce- 
ment, Terra Cotta Pipe, Horse 
Clothing and full line of Hardware, 
etc. 

Cor. Main & Ashland, Doylestown 

Bell Phone 1 84.A 

EMIL PEITER 

Bakery and Confectionery 

Pure Ice Cream 

Opp. Masonic Hall, Doylestown 



ROYAL SILK COMPANY 



Doylestown, Pa. 



R. U CLYMER 
Department Store 

36, 38 and 40 West State Street 
Doylestown, Pa. 



Phone Connections Estab. 1849 

CARL WILDE 

Emmenthaler Kdse, Foreign Cheese 
and Delicatessen 

357 North Second Street 
Philadelphia. Pa. 



Columbia Avenue Trust Company 

Broad and Columbia Ave. 

Capital Paid in $400,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits (earned) 490,000.00 

Patronage Solicited 

SYL. A. LEITH, President WM. ALLEN, Vice-President 

WM. A. CARLILE, Secretary and Treasurer 

When Dissatisfied with Your Work, try 

FORREST LAUNDRY 

1221-23-25 Columbia Avenue 
Lace Curtains and Floor Linens a Specialty 
Both Phones 




The Wright 
Gas Iron 



WRIGHT GAS IRON 
& NOVELTY CO. 

Front Street and Lehigh Avenue 




NATIONAL CASKET COMPANY 



THE TENTH NATIONAL BANK 

OF PHILADELPHIA 

Broad Street, south of Columbia Avenue (New Bank Building) 
Established December 14, 1885 

Capital $200,000.00 

Surplus and Profits 139,445.51 

ACCOUNTS SOLICITED 

Dividends Paid to Date (Nov., 1912) . . . $284,060.00 

Storm Porch Enclosures Metal Weather Stripping 

Samuel B. MacDowell & Son 
RUSTLESS WIRE 

Window and Door Screens 

1927 WEST MONTGOMERY AVE. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Telephone Connection 

OSWALD LEVER CO. 

INC. 
Manufacturers of 

"^wa^^i^a^ntofher Textilc Machinery 

For COTTON, WOOLEN and SILK 

Lehigh Avenue and Front Street Philadelphia, Pa. 

The Class & Nachod Brewing Co. 

SOLITAIRE BEER IS GOOD 

Bottling Beer a Specialty 

1720-38 MERVINE STREET PHILADELPHIA 



WM. R. DOUGHERTY 

Carpenter and Builder 
1608-1610 Sansom St.. Phila. 

Jobbing Work of All Kinds 
Attended to 



Compliments of 

D. ATLAS 



EDW. G. MURRAY & CO. 
No. 9 Bank Street 



S. W. Goodman Company 

Prinien 

321-323 Cherry Street 

Philadelphia 



Both Phones 

S. M. MELZER 

Manufacturer of 

Displayi Fixtures, Shoi» Forms,Wax 

Figures, Brass Railings 

915 Filbert Street 

CASPER B. TRACEY. Mgr. 



Estab. 1883 Both Phones 

Merchants* Parcel Delivery 

Stewart & Graham, Proprietors 

Packages delivered to all parts of 

the city at lowest rates. Special 

arrangements made with business 

houses of otfier cities for ddiveiy of 

packages m Philadelphia and Cam- 

1010-1014 Rae* St. Phda. 



Cable address, "Minaret Phila." 

GEO. S. COX & BRO.. Inc. 

Minaret Mills 

Manufacturers of Hair Cloth 

Cambria and Ormes Streets 

Philadelphia 



J. a GRIEB & SONS 

Wholesale Shoes and Rubbers 

531 Market St. Philadelphia 



Jonathan Ring & Son 

Incorpoiated 

Hancock and Montgomery Avenue 



O. K. ADDRESSING CO. 



Betz Building 



^rtttuigltiattta Knit (doat 

The only Knit Sweater Coat Made 
with Notar Buttonholes 

lOlO-12-M Race St.. PhUa. 



Bell Phone— Market 899 
Keystone — Main 170 and 36-36 

Edwin J. Schoettle Co. 

Paper Boxes and Mailmg TiAm 

237 North Sinh Stmt. PIhU. 



THE ^MANUFACTURERS 
NATIONAL BANK 

CAPITAL, $500,000 
Surplus and Undivided Profits 

"iMllaiii H. Heisler President 

Fred. W'. Falrlanib, Asst. Treas. 

Samuel Campbell, Cashier 

Vour Business solicited and will b-e 
well cared for 



Penn Upholstered Furnitare Co. 

iioo-^2o7 South Thii-d Street 
Philadelphia Pa. 



RELIABLE LADIES' 

TAILORING COMPANY 

905 Market Street 

1021 Chestnut Street 



Pactory, Burlington, Iowa 

MISSISSIPPI PEARL 
BUTTON COMPANY 

Salesroom, 1017 Arch Street 
Philadelphia 

P. LAUBER. 



J. PRESS & SONS 

'V^'holesale and Retail Jewelers 
and E}xpert Diamond Cutters 

We offer you the services of the 
most expert diamond cutting depart- 
ment in the country. We remove 
flaws from diamonds, transform old- 
fashioned square diamonds into 
brilliant round stones, make dull 
diamonds brilliant, etc. 

N. W. COR 8th AND CHESTNUT 

Open Evenings 



The Hasting & Mcintosh Truss Co. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 
Hard Rubber, Elastic and Leather- 
Covered 
TRUSSES 

ftole Makers of the Celebrated 
DR. McINTOSH NATURAL. 

UTERINE SUPPORTER 

For Home and Export Trade 

Abdominal and Uterine Supporters. 

Shoulder Braces, Crutches, 

Elastic Hosiery and 

Body Bells 

»12 WALNUT ST., PUla., U, S. A, 



LINSK & BASS 

Manufacturers of 

CHILDREN'S & JUNIORS^ 
DRESSES 

919-921 W;.lnut Street 

Philadelphia, Pa, 



David Weber Theo. Crreenwald 

DAVID WEBER & CO. 

PAPER ROX MAKERS 
Corrugated Paper 

Corrugated Bottle W^rappers 

Connigated Shipping Cases 
Folding Boxes, Bottle Boxes and 
Sletal Edge Boxes 

N. W^. Cor. Fifth and Locnst Sts. 



SACKS BROTHERS 



1228 Cherry Street 



THE BEST 



SEEDS 



PLANTS 



BULBS 

Catalogue mailed free 

HENRY A. DREER 

714 Chestnut St., Phila., Pa. 



D. R. WORMAK 

442 Bourse, Philadelphia 

Dealers in Grain and Feed 

Agents for Gluten, Peanut 
Cake, Dried Brewers' Grains 
and Buckwheat and Rye Flour, 
etc. 



CHARLES GROSS 

Pasieurized Milk and Cream 

2123 Westmoreland Street 
Philadelphia 



CAPLAN AND SAIL 



R. E. W. W. 



Bell Phone, Filbert 29-49, 29-50 
Key^one Phone, 38-35, 38-36 

H. D. REESE 

Dealer in the Finest Quality of 

Beef, Veal, Mutton, Lamb 

and Smoked Meats 

1208 Filbert Street 

Philadelphia 



Both Phones^ 

Let Us Estimate on Anything 
EDWARD FAY & SON 

Contractors and Builders 

2 South Mole Street 

Philadelphia 



Compliments of 



WILKINSON BROS. & CO., Inc. 



J. E. FITZGERALD 



M. OFFEN 



CHRISTIAN PFAFF 

Wholesale Wine and Liquor 

Dealer 

S. E. Cor. Passyunk Avenue 

and Catherine Street 

Philadelphia 



WRAPPING PAPER 

Twines, Envelopes, Paper Bags 

Wax Paper for Lunches, 50 cents for 
480 sheets. Toilet Paper, $3 per case. 
White Envelopes, 25 cents per box. 
Paper Napkins, 50 cents per thousand. 
Paper Towels, 35 cents; 3 for $ I . 

EZRA LEVINSON 

26 South Fifth Street 



KLINE & WARD'S CHAR- 
ACTER WALL PAPERS 

are very essential to a "tasty" home, 
as much depends upon the charac- 
ter of a paper in producing- a tasty 
home. Our new fabric effect waU 
papers have a character that reflects 
peace and harmony on the entire 
interior. We know you will be 
pleased when you see them, they 
are so full of real merit. 

Kline & Ward, 711 N. Broad St. 



JUNGMANISPS 
BEEF, WINE AND IRON 



50c ''""'''"'^' 



None better 

Jungmann's Drug Store 

Fourth and Noble Streets 



HOFFMAN-CORR MFG. CO. 

Ask Your Dealer and insist on hav- 
ing your Awnings made from 
HOFFMAN GOLD MEDAL BRAND 

AWNING STRIPES 

Liarsesit Rope and Xrvine House In 

the World 

CONTRACTORS TO THE 
GOVERNMENT 
FUIadelphla Ne\r York 

312 Market St. 150 Duane St. 



MARGOLIN & BLOCH 



203 South Fifth Street 



Telephone 

CONKLING-ARMSTRONG 
TERRA COTTA CO, 

Manufacturers of 

Architectural Terra Cotta Work 

Philadelphia 

Office: Builders' Exchange, 
Philadelphia 



;^ BORAX SOAP. 



MADE IN PHILADELPHIA BY 

Chas. W. Young & Co. 



HOBDELL 
Practical Dyer of 
Ostrich Feathers 

We solicit your feather wants 

in all its branches 
Dyeing, Cleaning and Curli/ng 

154-156 N, Thirteenth St. 



Bank and Office Partitions 

John £. <Sjostr<»n Company, Inc 

Cabinetmakers 

1719 N. Tenth Street 

Philadelphia 



BERGER BROS. CO. 

Tinners^ Hardware and Roof- 
ers^ Supplies 

237 Arch Street, Philadelphia 



HARRY R. RUST 

Manufacturer of 

Interior Hardwood Fittings^ 

Office and Store Work 

Fine Furniture, Wood Mantels, 

Steam Saw Mill 

724 and 726 Ludlow Street 

41 North Hutchinson Street 




'•'5 stahd 



Frank H. Stewart Electric Co. 

Electrical Supplies 

37 and 39 N. Seventh Street 

Old INIint Building Phila. 



Albert Gentel, Inc. 


f 

WRlGLErS 




BIG 10 


ELECTRICAL WORIC 
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION 


CLEANER 
BETIER 


1503 Columbia Ave. 


CLEANER 


Philadelphia- 


BIGGER CAN 




AT ALL 


Biancli 
4466 Germantown Ate^ 


GROCERS 



762 



1914 



MEAT S 

STALLS: 

1234 to 42 Reading Terminal 

Market 

ARCH STREET FRONT 

Telephone Connection PHILADELPHIA 




STANTON H. HACKETT 
269 SOUTH ELEVENTH STREET 

Chairs &. Mission Furniture 



n n c 



n c 




I KLOSFIT PETTICOAT I 

Needs No Alteration 

Thousands of Well Dressed 

Women are Wearing the 

"KLOSFIT" Petticoat 



Klosfit are made with 
"V" shape elastic 
gusset over each hip | 

because it is the most perfect fitting petticoat ever devised and real 
petticoat comfort was never realized until the commg of the "Klosfit" 

To the woman who desires to be well-gowned the 

Klosfit is an absolute necessity 

SOLD BY ALL DEALERS 



^\M\ 



3 n 



D D C 



□ 



THE INTEGRITY TITLE INSURANCE 

TRUST AND SAFE DEPOSIT CO. 
S. W. Cor. 4th & Green Sts., Philadelphia 

Capital Stools, Full Paid $500,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits 1,104,425.71 
Deposits 4,358,677.04 

BANKING DEPARTMENT 

Receives money on deposit, subject to 
check on sight, allowing 2 per cent, in- 
terest. Rents boxes for safe keeping of 
valuables in burglar and fire-proof vaults, 
for $3.00 and upwards. Letters of Credit 
and International Checques for Travelers 
issued, available everywhere. 

SAVING FUND DEPARTMENT 
Open from 9 A. M. to 4 P. M. 
Monday to 7 P. M. Saturday to 1 P. M. 
3 per cent, interest allovred on deposits 
TBTLE AND REAL. ESTATE DEPARTMENT 
Examines and insures titles to real estate. Collects rents, dividends, 
interest, etc. Money loaned on mortgage and mortgages for sale. Attends 
to all details pertaining to buying, selling and conveying of real estate. 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 
Transacts all Trust Company business and acts in the capacitj'^ of execu- 
tor, administrator, guardian or Trustee, taking entire charge of estates. All 
valuables received for .safe keeping. Wills receipted and kept in safe boxes 




without charge 
OFFICERS 

President 
George Kessler 

First Vice-Pres 
Philip Spaeter 



George Kessler 
Philip Doerr 
Fred. Orlemann 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



Fred'k Gaeckler 

George Nass 

C. J. Preisendanz 



Second Vice-Pres. Philip Spaeter 



Chas. G. Berlinger Daniel W. Grafly 



Philip Doerr 

Sec. and Treas. 
H. Wischman 

Trust Officer 
Philip E. Guckes 



Wm. H. Rookstool 
Albert Hellwig 
John Greenwood 



J. Edwin Rech 
A. P. Kunzig 
A. F. Schoenhut 
Chas. W. Miller 



Wm. G. Berlinger 
Chas. Strickler 
Jacob Kramer 
I. P. Strittmatter, 
M. D. 
J. McGlynn 
Jos. Medicus 
Gus. A. Kirchner 



Sif Spamlfn aprrrljf n Srutsrlj 



Compliments of 


Atlantic Coast Tel. 488 M 




\. J. JEl'FRIES 


HOTEL TRAYMORE 


Real Estate 




314 Bartlett Building 


Atlantic City, N, J, 


Atlantic City, N. J. 


ROYAL PALACE HOTEL 


Compliments of 


Atlantic City, N. J. 


P. E. SHARPLESS CO. 


OPEN ALL YEAR 


Fancy Table Butter and Cheese 


SAMUEL HANSTEIN, Prop. 


Evaporated Milk 


LYMAN J. WARTROUS, 


813-819 N. Eleventh Street 


Manager 


Philadelphia 



RALEIGH HOTEL 

Ocean End, St. diaries Hace 
Atlantic City 



Booklet and Rates on request 



H. J. DYNES 



m^atfi, Prnmatnttjs 



12114 Atkttttr Aw. 

Atlanttr Olttg. N. 31. 



irni Pafifiijuttk Atip. 

^iyilabflpljia 



Abbott's Alderney Dairies 

1317 Memorial Avenue 

Atlantic City, N. J. 

JACOB MANDERY, Manager Phone 6 1 5 

We make a Specialty of Certified Milk and Cream 
Hotel Guests & Cottagers given special attention 

All Bottles Sterilized before using 



'."^SSfci-^ 



JESSE SHULMAN & CO. 



DRESSES 



12 and 14 West 32nd St. 



New York City 



A. SCHWARTZ & CO. 

37-39 West 28th Street 
New York 


Wpltman, pnllark & (Ea. 

Cloaks and Suits 

35 West 33rd Street 

New York 


M. WEINSTEIN & CO, 

Cloaks and Suits 

151 W. 30th Street 

New York 


Compliments 

KURZROK BROS. CO. 


Im. Steele & Sons 
Company 


Gittelman's Sons. 



Both Phones 



George L. Sipps 

CARPENTER, BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR 
912 LOCUST STREET 



THE JEWISH EXPONENT 

Devoted to the interests of the Jewish people 

Representative of Jewish Institutions and welcomed in the Jewish 

Home 

Published every Friday Subscription price, $3.00 Per Annum 

Philadelphia Office, 608 Chestnut Street 

Baltimore Office, 120 Aisquith Street 




Always the higheS quality of beer ever brewed. 

Always a delicious beverage — ju^ stimulating enough to 
give it zest. 

Always a hesJthful, satisfying food. 

Uniform in taste, color, nourishment and quality. 

Ask your bottler to supply you. If he can't, then let us 
know. 



F. A. POTH & SONS, Inc. 

3 1 st and Jefferson Streets 

Philadelphia 
keystone. Park 874 Bell. Poplar 451 1-1 2-13