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Full text of "Sketches of Rush County, Indiana"

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SKETCHES 



OF 



RUSH COUNTY 

INDIANA 



EDITED BY 



MARY M. ALEXANDER 

A GRAND-DAUGHTER 
OF THE REVOLUTION 



AND 

CAPITOLA GUFFIN DILL 



Printed by 

THE JACKSONIAN PUBLISHING COMPANY 

RUSHFILLE, INDIANA 

1915 



.1^9 6- A 3 



COPYRIGHT 1915 

BY 

THE RUSHVILLE CHAPTER 

OF THE 

Daughters of the American Revolution 



// 



£21 

NOV -4 J9I5 



i)Cl.A414441 



To the 

RUSHVILLE CHAPIER 

of the 

Daughters of the American Revolution 




MARY M. (THOMAS) ALEXANDER 



EC 



=][D 



Published Under the Auspices of the 

RUSHVILLE CHAPTER, D. A. R. 
SARAH CRAWFORD GUFFIN, Regent. 



SALUTATION 



These sketches are principallj^ written about 
people who played the heroic part in the experiences 
of every day life. They died unsung and unappreci- 
ated and we, their children, have come into the rich 
heritage they left us. I have long wished some other 
hand than mine had told of them. 

Yielding to the impulse, I have written for the 
retrospection of the aged, and for the information of 
the young regarding some of the incidents in the 
history of our county. In sending them out, I wish 
to acknowledge my indebtedness to the two countj^ 
Atlases for much of the early history of the county. 
The remainder has been drawn from tradition and 
reminiscence. 

Imperfect as these brief sketches may be, I trust 
the reader may find something of interest in them. 

M. M. A. 



PART I. 
BEGINNINGS OF THE COUNTY 

About the year 1744 the powerful aud warlike 
Delaware* tribe of Indians were driven from the 
Atlantic seaboard and passing the Alleghany moun- 
tains they built their wigwams on the river Mahon- 
ing in Western Pennsylvania. In the year 1784 they 
were again compelled to move farther West. They 
stopped in Western Ohio and Eastern and Central 
Indiana. Here they remained until by treaties, made 
from time to time, they relinquished their title to all 
their rich domain and agreed to go beyond the Mis- 
sissippi River. 

At a final treaty made Oct. 26, 1818, at St Mary's, 
in the State of Ohio, between United States Com- 
missioners and the Delaware nation of Indians, the 
latter ceded to the United States Government all 
their claim to land in the State of Indiana. This 
tract of land was known as ''The New Purchase," 
but was later named Delaware County and included, 
in whole or in part, what are Morgan, Shelby, De- 
catur, Henry, Bartholomew, Rush, Johnson and 
Allen counties. 



* It was the Delaware Indians that William Penn made 
treaties with in Pennsylvania. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Their principal village in this county was in 
Union Township, on what is known as ''Arnold's 
Home" farm. Here they named the stream nearby 
"Mahoning," in memory of their former home. 
Later white men called it Ben Davis, that being the 
name of the Chief of the Delawares. Ben Davis re- 
turned, in 1820, to visit his old hunting grounds. 
AVhile drinking at a tavern in Brookville, where he 
had visited often before, he boasted how his band 
had murdered a family, except a fleet-footed boy, 
who escaped. That boy, now a man, listened to the 
recital. The next day Ben Davis was found dead in 
his temporary camp, a bullet hole in his head. No 
effort was made to find out who fired the shot. 

First Land Office. 

A Government Land Office was opened at Brook- 
ville in 1820. 

The Legislature of 1821 authorized the formation 
of a new county, west of Franklin and Fayette. The 
same year the land was surveyed and named Rush 
County, in honor of Dr. Benjamin Rush, of Phila- 
delphia, by his friend and former pupil, Wm. B. 
Laughlin, one of the Government surveyors, but now 
a member of the Legislature. 

The land was rapidly taken up. In three months 
after the land was surveyed one hundred and sixty- 
eight persons had entered land in the county and in 
1821 two hundred and seventy-eight. Yet, when 
Indiana was admitted to the Union in 1816, no white 
man had pitched his tent in what is now Rush 
County. 

Early in 1819 many squatters, principally from 
Kentucky, had built their cabins and made some im- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



provements on a part of the public domain. Some 
of these squatters hastened back to Kentucky to tell 
their friends that the country was now opened for 
settlement, and to insist on their coming to the ' ' New 
Purchase." They gave such glowing accounts of the 
fertility of the soil, fine timber, abundance of wild 
game and the level surface of the country that they 
were deemed, by some who heard them, as extremely 
visionary. Many of their listeners were Pennsyl- 
vania Dutch who had always lived in a mountainous 
region. These were especially incredulous. After 
listening to what they regarded as exaggerations, 
they would turn away and say to others, "Well, he is 
a hoosher, " (meaning a husher, or silencer). This 
epithet became proverbial until all who returned 
from Indiana were facetiously called "hooshers.." 
This, my Kentucky parents told me, was the origin 
of the name ''Hoosier," as it was pronounced later. 

Many of these squatters bought their land and 
became not only the pioneers of the county, but were 
the means of bringing in a great many permanent 
settlers. These began the building of homes and the 
clearing away the dense forests. 

In the construction of these cabin homes neither 
nails nor hardware were used. The logs were cut 
the required length, hewn on two sides and notched 
near the ends, and fitted together at the corners, as 
they were placed one above another. Small logs 
were laid lengthwise on these for the upper joists, 
on which long hand-riven clapboards were laid. 
Graded lengths formed the gables. Small logs were 
placed on these, from one end of the building to the 
other, on which the board roof was placed. Other 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



logs were laid on the boards to hold them in place 
while wooden braces kept them apart. 

The floor was made from large logs split in two, 
and made smooth with a broad-axe. These were 
called puncheons and were laid on log sills. 

The doors were made from long boards fastened 
to long wooden hinges with wooden pins, and hung 
on a wooden pivot. A leather string was attached 
to a wooden latch and passed through a small hole 
in the door. When this "latch string was out" the 
inmates were at home to all who called. When the 
latch string was pulled in the door was "locked," 
but this seldom occurred. 

A place was cut in a side wall for a window. 
When glass could not be obtained this space was 
covered with greased paper in winter. 

For the fire-place an opening was cut out at one 
end of the cabin several feet wide and the chimney 
built on the outside. A heavy framework of slabs 
was fastened to the house and mortar and large 
rocks placed inside of it five feet high. The upper 
part was finished with square sticks and mortar. 

A crane was fastened in one of the side walls of 
the fire place on which dinner pots and kettles were 
hung over the fire. In these fireplaces great, cheer- 
ful fires burned in winter. A fire once kindled on 
the hearth (emblem of undying love) was seldom 
permitted to die out : a sentiment almost universal. 

Iron skillets and ovens, with short iron legs, and 
lids of the same material, were used for cooking on 
the hearth by placing live coals under and over 
them. Pies were made on a table, carried on the 
hands and laid, and cooked, in a skillet. There 
were no pie pans. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



The dishes, usually, were of pewter, and required 
much scouring to keep them bright. 

The hunter's rifle was laid on two forked sticks 
over the door, ready for use if game of any kind 
appeared. 

Candles were made by putting candle wick on 
sticks three feet long, then dipping and cooling 
alternately in a deep kettle filled with melted tal- 
low. 

The furniture and the woodwork of the farming 
implements were usually made by the owner, with 
the exception of the spinning wheels. These were 
made by wheelwrights. 

These beginnings were primitive, but they had 
their compensations. The settlers were on a com- 
mon level. Neighbors were helpful in their work 
and in every time of need. They assisted each other 
in building, wood-chopping and log-rolling, where 
fine timber was burned that would bring fabulous 
prices today. 

Later wheat was sown broadcast by hand and 
dragged under by a horse attached to brush. It was 
reaped with a sickle, then tramped out on a puncheon 
floor, or on hard ground, with horses and cleaned 
by winnowing. Corn was planted by hand, covered 
and cultivated with a hoe. 

Women often assisted the men with their work, 
kept house, picked, carded, spun and colored the 
wool, then wove the wool and flax into cloth and 
made it into garments and household needs. They 
planted and cultivated the garden, gathered medicin- 
al herbs, prescribed and cared for the sick. The 
washing was done on the hands. All the sewing was 
done by hand. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Brides were married in a bridal cap and wore 
caps ever after. When older they wore large, white 
kerchiefs about their shoulders. In the midst of 
their activities hospitality was universally practiced. 
Neighbors often spent the evening with each other. 
The family all went together and had "supper" with 
the hostess. Cooking was done on the crane and in 
front of the open fireplace. A few women had "re- 
flectors" made of tin, with a shelf or two on the 
inside, with an open front. In these delicious bis- 
cuits were baked in front of the fire ; Johny-cake, 
made of corn meal, was baked on a board set on 
edge before the fire ; ash-cake was biscuit dough 
baked in hot embers; squashes, potatoes and eggs 
were often cooked the same way. Plums, wild 
grapes, gooseberries, raspberries, blackberries, dew- 
berries grew in the woods. These were gathered, 
dried, and stored away for winter. Honey was 
found in bee trees. 

The first settlers were usually young married 
people seeking to build up homes. Later the young 
people had corn huskings, wood choppings, quiltings, 
singing schools and spelling bees, where fun and in- 
nocent pastimes were enjoyed. Sometimes there was 
a dance, but it was the stately minuet, cotillion and 
Virginia reel. 

The life of the pioneers, while mainly quiet and 
uneventful, cannot all be painted in roseate hues, for 
life everywhere has its sorrows and its tragedies. 
Now and then a man, while felling trees, would be 
killed by a tree falling upon him. Both men and 
boys occasionally shot themselves, accidentally, while 
hunting. Sometimes a boy Avould get lost while 
hunting the cows in the dense woods, where mos- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



quitoes swarmed. These happenings called forth the 
strongest sympathies and ready help of neighbors. 

Money was scarce and interest was sometimes as 
high as twenty percent. This caused people to resort 
to barter in exchange for commodities and for work. 
A man's wages was estimated at thirty-seven and a 
half cents per day. Housework from two to three 
"bits" per week. 

Hogs, cattle and turkeys were driven to market 
in Cincinnati. Wheat and all kinds of country pro- 
duce were hauled to the same market. Wheat sold for 
thirty-seven and a half cents a bushel, corn ten cents 
per bushel. Hogs sold for from one dollar to one 
dollar and a half per head. Eggs brought from two to 
three cents per dozen, butter three cents per pound, 
hens fifty cents per dozen. Good cows sold for from 
eight to ten dollars. Horses sold for from twenty to 
thirty dollars. 

Postage on a letter from one state to another was 
a "bit" (121/2 cents), more according to distance. The 
recipient paid the postage. Much time was spent in 
hunting. The bullets used were made, one at a time, 
in hand molds. Squirrels were so numerous they 
were a menace to the corn crop from the time it was 
planted until used. Often a score or more were shot 
on one tree and left on the ground. These were the 
gray squirrel and were migratory. In the Fall they 
moved southward in droves, eating the "mast" 
(beech and other nuts) and the corn, from the hogs. 
They swam the creeks and rivers in swarms. Farm- 
ers organized and often shot as many as a thousand 
a day. They are almost extinct now. No fox squir- 
rels were seen in the county prior to 1842. 

Several bears were killed in the western part of 



8 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

the county in 1830. Bradford Norris shot one in 
1834. Isom Webb shot one from his door. George 
Thomas killed two. 

For many years the passenger, or wild pigeons, 
were so numerous they darkened the sky, when 
flying, for long distances. When they were on the 
ground feeding on beech nuts, the earth seemed to 
be moving for more than an acre at a time. Where 
they gathered to roost at night their weight broke 
the limbs off the trees. They are now extinct. The 
last one, named Martha, died in the Cincinnati Zoo 
recently. 

But few natural springs were found in the county 
and well digging was a necessity. Many thrilling 
stories were told of narrow escapes from death on 
account of the "damps" (carbonic acid gas) found 
in some wells. Live coals and fire-brands were 
thrown in to drive out the gas. 

Itinerants. 

There were no churches, but itinerant ministers 
followed Indian trails and visited different localities. 
When one of these arrived at a home a boy was 
dispatched immediately to notify the neighbors that 
there would be services in the home that evening. 
These itinerants carried all the library they owned 
with them, which was a well-worn Bible and some- 
times a hymn book. If the people were not familiar 
with the hymn the preacher "gave out" two lines; 
when these were sung he pronounced two more lines. 
They received little or nothing for their services. 
Often, on Sunday, there would be a prayer meeting 
and song service in some home, when the "congre- 
gation" would remain for the noonday meal. On 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



these occasions the fellowship was beautiful. All 
evening services were announced to begin at "early 
candle light." There was a general handshaking 
and much fervor while singing the final song. 

In the absence of a minister and an undertaker 
Christian burial was not neglected. In every com- 
munity there was some man who acted in the ca- 
pacity of the former, while sympathetic hearts and 
friendly hands supplied the place of the latter. Reg- 
ular funeral sermons were preached months after 
burial when a minister came around. 

Singing. 

Singing seemed to be a habit with the people. 
They sang at their work and at social gatherings. 
While traveling through the wilderness they sang 
whether it was day or night. Yet few children were 
taught to sing. A beautiful custom prevailed in some 
neighborhoods, that of singing a hymn for the com- 
fort of the dying. Many souls were wafted upward 
on the wings of sacred song. The sentiment ex- 
pressed in the following lines explains this custom : 

''When one was called to leave us 

And fly away to God, 
We cheered him with our voices 

While crossing Jordan's flood. 
Then, with our friend departed 

We seemed the earth to leave 
And soaring up like seraphs 

Forgot to weep and grieve." 

There were no public burying grounds and the 
dead were, usually, buried on farms. Unfortunately 
nearly all these graves have become obliterated. 



10 SKETCHES OE RUSH COUNTY 



When more settlers arrived the need of a place 
for public worship became necessary. A platform, 
and plank seats, were provided on some generous 
man's farm where services were held in summer. 
Thus in Rush county, also, "the groves were God's 
first temples." 

Taverns. 

The highways were new and unimproved, which 
made traveling difficult and slow. This required 
many stopping places for emigrants and others. 
These usually were the homes of the pioneers and 
were called "Taverns." These taverns were regu- 
lated by license. Many amusing, sometimes sad, 
incidents were experienced by both proprietor and 
guest. One of these taverns was kept by a Mr. 
Beckner in Burlington, now Arlington. One evening, 
a covered wagon, with emigrants, stopped for the 
night. The wife kept crying all evening because she 
was leaving her "good neighbors back in Ohio." To 
comfort her, Mr. Beckner said, "Never mind, you 
will find just such neighbors where you are going." 
The next evening another emigrant family called for 
entertainment. This wife kept up a tirade of abuse 
about her ''mean neighbors she was leaving back in 
Ohio." "Never mind," said Mr. Beckner, "you 
will find just such neighbors where you are going." 

When the public roads were somewhat improved 
toll gates, with a pole across the road, were erected 
where toll was charged to pay the expenses of the 
road. These tolls were very annoying and later were 
dispensed with and public taxation substituted. 
Later there were guide posts at the forks of roads. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Poor Farm. 

A county "Poor Farm" was maintained for sev- 
eral years seven miles northwest of Rushville, for 
which one hundred and seventy acres had been pur- 
chased in 1839. The dependent poor, it has been 
said, were treated badly at this place. A new County 
Asylum was located one and a half miles east of 
Rushville in 1855 or 1856. 

Rushville 's Beginning. 

In December, 1820, William B. Laughlin built the 
first dwelling on the north bank of Flatrock, a block 
east of what was later the Carmichael mill site. lii 
1821 he built a gristmill near by. A few more cabins, 
a blacksmith shop and a chair factory formed a 
nucleus for a town. On June 17, 1822, the County 
Commissioners selected a site for the county seat. 
They were Amaziah Morgan, Jehu Perkins and John 
Julian. William B. Laughlin had donated twenty- 
five acres and Zachariah Hodges forty-five acres to 
secure the location. 

Conrad Sailors was appointed County Agent and 
ordered to survey the land donated, and lay off not 
less than one hundred and fifty nor more than two 
hundred lots, not including a central square on which 
public buildings were to be built. 

On July 29, 1822, lots were offered for sale. John 
Smith bought the first lot just east of what is now 
the Red Men's Hall. The streets were called India- 
napolis, Connersville, Brookville and Knightstown 
roads. The town was not incorporated until 1842. 

In the town the houses were built flush with the 
sidewalk, as it was called. This left room on the 
lot, in the rear of the home, for a cow (that wore a 



12 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

COW bell and browsed in the woods through the day) 
a garden and chickens. The latter often caused 
trouble among neighbors. 

Tea parties were enjoyed by the young girls, 
later a ride in the omnibus about town was a treat 
for them with their gentlemen friends. The arrival 
of the stagecoach from Cincinnati attracted much 
attention. During the cholera panic of 1833, when 
people were fleeing from the cities, the arrival of 
the stage, with its load of refugees, was greatly 
feared by the people. 

Newspapers. 

The first paper published in Rush County was 
the "Dog Fennel Gazette," about ten by twelve 
inches in size. Its editor and proprietor was Wil- 
liam D. M. Wicksham, an original genius. It was 
printed on the top of a large sycamore stump. A 
pole inserted in a mortise in a tree was used for a 
lever. The first number was issued late in 1822, 
or early in 1823. When his press was improved, he 
called it "Wickham's Velocity Press." 

The next paper was called "The Rushville Her- 
ald" and was edited by Samuel Davis and Thomas 
Wallace. This was followed by the "Rushville 
Whig." The latter published "Rip Van Winkle" 
as a serial. Three papers, the Republican, Jack- 
sonian and American, now supply the local news. 
Other papers are published in the county. 

Stores. 

A general store was kept by Joseph Hamil- 
ton, in what is now the Grand Hotel. Harvey W. 
Carr had a store, saddle and harness shop and dwell- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 13 

ing in a brick building on the corner where the 
-Peoples' Bank now stands. Thomas Worster had 
a store and dwelling next door north. Hibben and 
Flinn, Carmiehael and Rush also had stores. All of 
them sold goods on Christmas time. Henry McCom- 
us, Jack Stevens clerk, had a store at Marcellus. 

The greatest curiosities in town were a wolf, a 
lone negro and a hairless Mexican dog. 

Physicians. 

Dr. Kipper was the first physician to locate in 
the county. Dr. H. G. Sexton came in 1822. Dr. 
Frame came soon after. "Fever and ague" was the 
principal disease they had to contend with. It was 
caused by malaria induced by the swampy condi- 
tion of the country, or swamp mosquito. 

A medical society was organized in 1846, com- 
posed of doctors H. G. Sexton, William H. Martin, 
William Frame, William Bracken, John Howland 
and Jefferson Helm. 

Attorneys. 

Some of the prominent lawyers were Wick, Mor- 
ris, Eggleston, Test and others. Later George 
Brown Tingley, a very brilliant man, was admitted 
to the bar. He removed to California in 1849. Soon 
after his arrival in Sacramento, he was nominated 
and later elected to the Legislature, where he formu- 
lated nearly all the early laws of that state. The 
first dispatch sent over the first telegraph line to 
the Pacific coast announced his death. 

Courts. 

Circuit court was organized April 4, 1822, at the 



14 SKETCHES OF RUS H COUNTY 

home of Stephen Sims, on what is known as the 
Henry Giiffin, later the Aaron Frazee farm, in Circle- 
ville — Hon. William W. Wick presiding judge ; John 
Hays, sheriff. The latter became insane soon after, 
wandered to Hancock county, was placed in jail, set 
fire to the jail, and was consumed with it. 

For a term of court the prosecutor received five 
dollars, the constable one dollar and fifty cents, 
grand jurors seventy-five cents per day. Benjamin 
Sailors was allowed $25 for listing the property, 
which was the first allowance made out of the treas- 
ury of Rush county. Eyland T, Brown took the 
first census. Peter Looney served on the first grand 
jury. 

The second term of court was held October, 1822. 
Edward I. Swanson was foreman of this grand jury. 
Eleven years later he was executed for murder. 

April 24, 1823. The first man naturalized in the 
county was Aaron Anderson, an Irishman. Isaac 
Arnold applied five years later. 

At the November term of court, 1822, the con- 
tract w^as let for a jail. It was the first public build- 
ing erected in the county. It was two stories high, 
built of large hewn logs. The upper story had two 
rooms, one for women, the other for debtors. There 
was a trap door in this floor through which prisoners 
were sent down into the room on the first floor. An 
outside stairway led to the upper floor. 

The first court house was built in 1823. It was 
a two story brick, forty feet square, with walls 
twentj^-two inches thick. The first floor was also of 
brick. It cost about $2,500. The second court house 
was built in 1847-48. It was also of brick, fifty by 
eighty feet, two stories high, and cost $12,000. The 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 15 

present court house was completed and accepted 
February 2, 1898. The final cost, $257,385.38. 

Trials. 

The first murder trial was that of Alexander 
Young for the murder of John Points, who was elop- 
ing with Young's daughter. It is said that Young 
never smiled again. Some authorities say he was 
acquitted, others that he was sentenced for one year 
and then pardoned. Young's daughter was insane 
for thirty years, oblivious to everything but the 
memory of July, 1827. 

The second trial was that of Edward I. Swanson 
for the murder of Elisha Clark, on October 4th, 1828, 
at a militia muster on the farm of Dr. John Arnold, 
four miles east of Rushville. At this muster an elec- 
tion was held for captain of militia. Clark and 
Swanson were opposing candidates for the place. 
The former was elected. As usual, the successful 
candidate treated the voters to a drink of whiskey. 
Swanson drank from the bottle as it was passed 
around and the men all departed for their homes, 
except a few. 

A feud had existed between Clark and Swanson 
for some time and while the latter Avas smarting 
under his defeat he heard Clark's friends congratu- 
lating him on his "large majority," and also heard 
Clark's reply, "I have but one enemy." This 
angered Swanson, and he raised his gun, behind the 
men, and shot Clark. 

Louis Clark and Richard Blacklidge sprang upon 
Swanson, but in an instant Mrs. Swanson (a woman 
of Herculean strength) her daughter, and a Mrs. 
Crusan rushed to his rescue and Swanson fled. 



16 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Three weeks later he was discovered by a Mr. 
Washam asleep behind a big log in his clearing near 
Williams Creek, on the Connersville road. Wash- 
am and two other men procured a rope and stealing 
up on the sleeping man they secured his gun and 
then him. Swanson merely remarked, "I've slept 
too long." 

Mr. Washam brought the captured man to Rush- 
ville and received the reward of fifty dollars which 
had been offered for his capture. Swanson lay in 
jail five months. 

On April 9, 1829, he was brought out for trial, 
which was begun and finished on the first day. The 
prosecution was conducted by William W. Wick and 
James Whitcomb, and the defense by Charles H. 
Test. William Bussell was sheriff. 

The next day, April 10th, the jury was charged 
and sent out to deliberate. They shortly returned 
with a verdict of "guilty" and Judge Bethr.el Mor- 
ris sentenced him to be hanged May 11, 1829, just 
thirty days after sentence had been passed. 

Swanson became despondent and desired to hear 
a sermon preached. Rev. James Havens, of the 
M. E. church, granted his wish and preached to him, 
using the words of Job in Jiis affliction, "I know 
that my Redeemer liveth, and that he shall stand at 
the latter day upon the earth." 

Swanson had a morbid dread of his body falling 
into the hands of doctors for dissection. Therefore 
he requested his neighbor, David Looney, to take 
charge of it, and bury it in what should always be 
an unknown grave. 

On the appointed day, Mr. Looney drove to town. 
After putting the rude coffin in his wagon, he drove 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 17 

to the jail for the condemned man and from there 
to the scaffold, which stood on the hill, in the alley 
between Main and Morgan streets, in the rear of the 
residence of the late Dr. Pugh. 

The county mounted militia, with muffled drum, 
marched from the jail to the scaffold. Swanson saw 
no sympathetic face in the throng about him and no 
one to sing to comfort him in his last hour. Sitting 
on his coffin, in the wagon, he began singing for 
himself what was afterward known as 

Swanson 's Death Song. 

There is a land of pleasure. 

Where streams of joy forever roll, 

'Tis there I have my treasure 
And there I hope to rest my soul. 

Long darkness dwelt around me. 
With scarcely once a cheering ray. 

But since my Savior found me 
A light has shown along my way. 

My way is full of danger, 

But 'tis the path that leads to God, 

And like a faithful soldier 

I'll bravely march along the road. 

Jordan's waves shall not affright me, 
'Tho they're deeper than the grave, 

If Jesus stand beside me 

I'll rise upon the rolling wave. 

Swanson claimed to be converted and believed 
if he gave his life for the life he had taken, that 
would atone for his rash act and he Avould be for- 



SKETCHES OF EUSH COUNTY 



given. His last words were, "I know my Redeemer 
liveth." 

William Pearsey, a member of the light horse- 
men (mounted militia on white horses, whose duty 
was to attend all public hangings and form a hollow 
square around the scaffold) believed he expressed 
the feeling, at the last moment, of the members of 
the militia that they would gladly have fallen back, 
if they could have done so, and permitted Swanson 
to escape. He had been respected and had filled 
several minor offices of trust. 

Mrs. Susan M. Tingley, widow of the late B. 
Frank Tingley, and step-daughter of William Pear- 
sey, is perhaps the only one now living who remem- 
bers seeing Swanson as he was brought down the 
jail steps on the day of his execution, although 
there was an immense crowd present. 

All executions were public in those days, on a 
hill where they could be seen, and attracted all 
classes. Two men walked barefoot from Clarksburg, 
Decatur county, to see Swanson hung. Parents 
brought their children to see what they conceived 
to be an impressive object lesson. This was the only 
l^ublic execution in Rush county. 

When the execution was over the body was 
placed in the rude coffin and given into the care of 
David Looney, who drove with it to his home on the 
south side of the Connersville pike, just east of what 
is now Farmington. His brother, John Looney, lived 
on the corner of what is now Farmington, and his 
brother-in-law, James Wiley, lived east of him 
(David Looney). These men took the coffin out of 
the wagon and placed it on a sled and hid it. In 
the night they went to a clearing east of David 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 19 

Looney's house, where a large, forked tree had 
fallen. They parted the branches between the forks, 
raked the leaves away and in the fallen top of the 
tree they dug the grave, then hitched a horse to the 
sled and noiselessly drove to the grave. When the 
grave was almost filled they placed a large number 
of small sticks in it and larger ones at each end, then 
filled up the grave and brushed the leaves back over 
it, thus concealing it. 

A few years later, the brothers, Looney, went 
secretly and dug down until they found the sticks 
as they had placed them and were assured that they 
had successfully carried out a sacred trust, and that 
the remains of a former friend and neighbor were 
undisturbed and there in that field, somewhere, still 
lies all that is mortal of Edward I. Swanson, and no 
man knows the place of his sepulture, for those 
men carried the secret with them to their graves. 

David and John Looney now sleep in the Alger 
graveyard northeast, and in sight of, the unknown 
grave of Swanson. James Wiley moved to Zions- 
ville, Ind., where he died and was buried. 

The cost for the hanging of Swanson was : Bev- 
erly R. Ward, five dollars for making a coffin ; Wil- 
liam Bupelt, for rope, cap, shroud and gallows, ten 
dollars, and David Looney two dollars for burying 
him. Total cost for the execution and burial, seven- 
teen dollars. Mrs. John Looney spun the flax thread 
of which the rope was made that hung Swanson. 

The true history of the burial of Edward I. Swan- 
son, and the name of the three men who buried him, 
also the circumstances of the same (but not the 
place) are here given to the public for the first 
time. 



20 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

George Looney, Sr., is the only survivor of those 
three men, or their families. His father, John Loon- 
ey, before his death, confided to him the circum- 
stances connected with the burial (but not the place) 
and who did it. From him the writer obtained the 
facts. 

The attitude of Swanson, in his last moments, 
was regarded by some as that of indifference, by 
others as that of resignation. Indeed, the whole 
tragedy was viewed by different persons in different 
ways. 

Elections. 

The annual election was held on the second Tues- 
day in August. All voters came to the county seat 
to vote. Several men would get drunk on this occas- 
ion and fights were frequent, and were seldom 
interfered with. One of these fighters was John 
Pentecost, a large, pugilistic man who lived in the 
western part of the county. He was careful, when 
drinking, to select some man who was physically 
weaker than himself. On one occasion he whipped 
a good, unoffensive neighbor of his. The next Sun- 
day, the circuit rider filled his appointment near 
them. As he usually did the minister called on this 
good brother to pray, which he did. In it he ex- 
claimed, ''0 Lord, send us a pentecost," then re- 
membering his bruises he added "but not John 
Pentecost." 

Whiskey was used freely in those days at mus- 
ters, elections, horse races, shooting matches, etc. It 
was thought to be indispensable in the harvest field, 
and was used by all who had wheat to cut. George 
Thomas, of Walker Township, was the first man in 



SKETCHES OF EUSH COUNTY 21 

the county to banish it from the harvest field and 
substitute a lunch. Alfred Thompson, of Blue Ridge, 
was the next. His neighbors refused to help him 
cut his wheat. His daughter left the summer school 
in Brookville College, came home and drove her 
father's reaper. 

Schools. 

Isaac Phipps taught a school in what is now 
Noble Township, in 1829-21, before the county was 
organized. 

Dr. William B. Laughlin taught the first school 
in Eushville, in 1822, in a log cabin where the Red 
Men's Hall is now located. Among the pupils at 
that school were David A. Crawford, Matthias Par- 
sons and James "Hog" Walker. 

In 1828, Dr. Laughlin opened a classical academy 
in his own building for teaching the higher branches 
of education, which he taught for several years. 
John Arnold was a pupil. B. F. Reeve and his 
pupil, Elijah Hackleman, were among the earliest 
teachers in the eastern part of the county. The 
former taught for sixteen years. 

In the country districts neighbors volunteered to 
build the first school houses. They were built of 
logs, like the cabins, with a very large fireplace. The 
furniture was, often, rail benches placed around 
the wall. The schoolmaster was frequently illiter- 
ate and cruel. These were the times of ''lickin' and 
larnin'." There were summer and winter schools, 
with eight hours a day for study, with no intermis- 
sion, except the noon hour. Boys and girls recited 
in separate classes, or more frequently alone, as 
there were seldom two books alike in the school, 



22 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

except the spelling book. They also played on sep- 
arate playgrounds. Some of these schools were 
called "loud" schools, because the pupils studied 
some of their lessons aloud. (The louder the bet- 
ter.) 

Poor children sometimes brought a wooden pad- 
dle to school with the alphabet pasted on it. A pro- 
gressive teacher would make small wooden blocks 
and paste the letters on them and have the children 
hunt them out. 

Spelling was thoroughly taught from Webster's 
spelling book. The first reader had selections from 
Percival, Barbould and like authors. They were 
more difficult to read, and harder to understand than 
the fourth and fifth readers of the present time. 

The teacher wrote sentences in copy books for 
pupils to imitate with a goose quill pen, which the 
teacher made. Arithmetic was taught by some 
teachers, stating a problem on a slate for the pupil 
to solve. 

In the country, schoolhouses were few and far 
between. Children followed *blazed trees through 
the wilderness, mud and swamps from their homes 
to school. 

The first school in Walker township was taught 
by Reuben Heflin, in the old log Baptist church 
southeast of what is now Homer. Enoch Goodwin 
taught in the same house when Joseph Cotton and 
M. B. Hopkins attended. It is related of these boys 
that when the teacher went home to dinner they 
would mount the pulpit and declare their tongues 



* White men learned to "blaze" trees from the Indians. 
This consisted in cutting some bark from each side of the trees 
for guides through the woods. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 23 

should make them a living or they would dispense 
with them. The former became a prominent minis- 
ter in the Methodist Episcopal church, while the lat- 
ter became equally prominent as a minister in the 
Christian church. 

James Remington was among the earliest teach- 
ers in this township. He was a terror to evil doers. 

The usual contract was made with James Alex- 
ander April 8, 1842, to teach a school in this town- 
ship, for which he was to receive $1.50 per scholar 
for three months or "its equivalent in corn, wheat, 
oats, flax, goose feathers or other merchandise to 
be delivered." 

A ]Mr. Rawlings taught in Union township in an 
early day. The first morning he asked the children 
their names, also what the five senses were. When 
none could answer the question, he whipped all of 
them, then told them they were "seeing" etc., then 
assured them they would never forget them. It is 
said they never did. 

A Miss Lazure was the first female teacher in Rush- 
ville. Her pupils had to sit, like statues, eight hours 
a day. 

Miss Lydia Rawlings, whose father taught in 
Union township, followed her a few years later. 
Afterwards she taught in Walker township. 

At Christmas time, in' the country, the boys 
would repair to the school house very early to bar 
out the teacher until he would agree to treat the 
school to apples and candy. 

It is related of B. F. Reeve that he went, one 
Christmas morning, to his school house before day- 
light. When the bovs came a little later he told 



24 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

them he was glad to see them so early and they 
might take their seats and begin studying at once. 

In the summer of 1842, Edgar Eden taught in 
Walker township, east of the old log Baptist church. 
He was succeeded the next winter by his brother, 
John R., who afterward removed to Illinois and was 
a member of Congress from Sullivan county for six- 
teen years. 

Woman's Sphere. 

AYoman's sphere was very limited. She seldom 
engaged in business, and many years elapsed before 
she taught school. She was not supposed to own 
any property in her own name. All she inherited 
was claimed, and often sold, by her husband or 
guardian, because she would "not know what to do 
with it." 

Fathers willed their land to their sons for the 
same reason. Men sat on one side of the church 
and the women on the other. 

Women, being the "weaker sex," were not sup- 
posed to be mentally capable of acquiring an edu- 
cation, therefore girls were not admitted to schools 
of higher learning. A half-century has scarcely 
elapsed since the barriers have been removed and 
both sexes have been admitted on equal terms. 

Sarah Morrison was the first woman to gradu- 
ate from what is now our state university. Jennie 
Laughlin was the first to receive a diploma from 
what is now Butler College. These girls braved the 
opposition of both students and professors. They 
had to answer the hardest questions and solve the 
hardest problems. 

In 1844, Rev. D. M. Stewart secured female teach- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 25 

ers from the East. The Misses Carrie and Lydia 
Warner came and taught in the basement of tlie 
Presbyterian church, now Red Men's Hall. The lat- 
ter became the wife of Leonidas Sexton. 

The Landon sisters succeeded the Misses Warner. 
Nelle became the wife of Dr. W. M. Martin. Jennie 
married Norval Cox. The Moreley sisters taught 
in the seminary. Harriet became the wife of Wil- 
liam H. Smith. The Cramer sisters followed. Lu- 
cretia became the second wife of Dr. H. G. Sexton. 
All of these were eastern ladies. 

William Thrasher taught in the basement of the 
Christian church, cor. Second and Morgan Sts. Later 
he was Professor of Mathematics in Butler College. 
He was succeeded by Amzi Atwater, who soon after 
became a professor in our state university. 

Academies. 

An academy was conducted at Richland, under 
the direction of the United Presbyterians. At 
Carthage, a school was managed by the Friends. 
Flatrock Seminary, in Noble township, was founded 
by members of the Christian church. 

In 1847, George Campbell, one of the best edu- 
cated pioneer ministers of the Christian church, tried 
to establish a school for higher learning in Rush- 
ville. Meeting with little encouragement from the 
citizens of the town, he rented what had been a 
tavern in Marcellus (now Farmington, and owned by 
George Looney, Sr.) The first pupils to enroll 
were W. W. Thomas and Cyrus Mull, of Walker 
township. These were followed by W. W. Arnold, 
Alice and Lizzie Helm, Louis Wiles, P. W. Rush, 
and others. Ho conducted this school verv success- 



26 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

fully for two years. So many students were apply- 
ing for admission that he again turned to his friend, 
George Thomas, for advice and was told to ''tear 
down and build greater," and being given financial 
aid and encouragement he began, at once, to canvass 
Rush and Fayette counties for funds, assisted by 
Henry Pritchard and others, to build an academy 
at Fairview, on the line between the two counties. 

The building was completed and school opened 
December 1, 1849. Allen R. Benton, a recent gradu- 
ate of Bethany College, Va., Avas chosen President ; 
S. K. Hoshour, a scholarly man, versed in seven 
languages, from Philadelphia, first assistant, and 
George Campbell second assistant. These men were 
all ministers in the Christian church. After a few 
years of phenomenal success, the school became in- 
adequate to meet the demands made upon it. Then 
its successor, the N. W. C. University, (now Butler 
College) was established at Indianapolis. In 1854, 
Profs. Benton and Hoshour were transferred there. 

Among the first provisions of the new state was 
the setting aside of one section in sixteen for school 
purposes. Several years seem to have elapsed before 
an income from this source was available. Yet this 
was the foundation from which has come our present 
public school system, which is equalled by few and 
surpassed by none. 

In 1841, the County Commissioners appointed 
school trustees who purchased two lots on the south- 
west corner of Third and Julian streets and erected 
thereon a brick building thirty-three by fifty-three 
feet, two stories high. At first, only the common 
school branches were taught for which tuition was 
paid. The building and ground were paid for by 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 27 

money derived from sale of school lands, fines, etc. 

In 1852, the legislature directed the sale of all 
seminar}^ property (which foreshadowed the present 
school system). The one in Rushville was bought, 
in 1853, by the school trustees for the town corpora- 
tion, for $2,500. 

*In the fall of 1853,'^ George A. Chase, an eastern 
man, was employed to teach in this building. This 
was the first public, also the first graded school 
taught in Rushville. Thomas A. Gelpin, Mrs. George 
A. Chase, and Mrs. Mary A. Looney taught in the 
grades. 

This school was well attended. Of the forty girls 
in the high school, ''who upon the playground met," 
the writer only remains in Rushville. Gertrude 
(Robinson) Hibben, of Indianapolis, and Laura A. 
(Wolfe) Oglesby, of Lebanon, 0., are the other sur- 
vivors. The next year the school board returned to 
the old method of the subscription schools. In Sep- 
tember, 1866, the seminary was sold to Thomas Pugh 
for $1,950. Then began the era of our public school 
system. 

Milton B. Hopkins returned from Cincinnati and 
organized a graded school, assisted by his wife, at 
Pleasant Ridge (Goddards) Walker township, in 
1857-8. This is supposed to have been the first grad- 
ed school taught in the country. 

Professor David Graham began teaching in Rush- 
ville in what was then the new school building, 
October 4, 1869. He continued to be superintendent 
until 1882, when he resigned. Rebecca A. Moffett 
was principal until her death, June 20, 1886. This 

* In this same year the free school was opened in In- 
dianapolis. 



28 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

school building burned and a new one was built and 
named in honor of Professor David Graham. 

Professor Andrew Graham taught in the Rush- 
ville Academy in 1891-92, when he resigned to 
become superintendent of the Soldiers' and Sailors' 
Orphans' Home, at Knightstown Springs. The 
Academy burned in 1894. 

William S. Hall, father of our Ex-Lieutenant 
Governor, Frank J. Hall, was the first school official 
in the United States to consolidate the township 
schools. He abandoned five school houses and erect- 
ed a central school building at Raleigh, in which a 
graded school was opened in 1877. Rush county now 
has eleven graded high school buildings, three com- 
missioned and five certified schools. 

Few of the early settlers used the dialect lan- 
guage attributed to them. There were many men 
and women of refined natures and high ideals who 
represented the best things in human life. Many 
of them came from good families in older states and 
were ambitious and enterprising and laid the founda- 
tion for our present prosperity. They left influences 
on their generation that have lived after them. 

Churches. 

We will now go back to the early days and tell 
of the erection of church buildings and the organiz- 
ing of congregations in the county. The first to 
preach to the pioneers were the Methodist and Bap- 
tist itinerants. The latter built the first church in 
the county at Little Flatrock, also the first brick 
church in Rushville, southeast of the court house. 

A claim has been made that a Christian church 
was organized at the home of John Morris, in Noble 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 29 



township, in 1820, and then transferred to Orange, 
Fayette County. Elder John P. Thompson organ- 
ized the Baptist church in April, 1821, at Little Flat- 
rock. Soon after he became identified with the Dis- 
ciple, or Christian church, and nearly all of his con- 
gregation went with him. This is claimed to be the 
first permanently organized Christian church in the 
slate. There are now seventeen in this county. 
John 'Kane organized the first Christian church in 
Rushville in August, 1841. The country churches at 
Concord and Pisgah united with the church in Rush- 
ville at that time. 

J. F. Crowe organized a Presbyterian church in 
Rushville, January 25, 1825. The first regular pas- 
tor, Thomas Barr, lived in a hewed log house on a 
knoll west of the J. D. Case planing mill. He died 
in 1835 and was buried in the lower graveyard. 
Years afterward, his remains were removed to East 
Hill Cemetery and buried near those of the Rev. G. 
B. Brittain. 

The United Presbyterian church was organized 
at Bethseda, now Milroy, November 18, 1828. J. N. 
Presley was pastor from 1838-51. N. C. McDill was 
ordained and installed pastor of Richland and Mil- 
roy Nov. 23, '52. He resigned the latter in '59 and 
retained the former until his death, March 1, 1903. 
The church at Vienna, now Glenwood, was organ- 
ized September 11, 1847; the one in Rushville, Octo- 
ber 1, 1879. 

In 1824, Rev. John Strange was assigned to the 
Madison circuit of the M. E. church, which included 
the southern half of the state, to which Rush county 
belonged. He visited this county several times. It 
is related of him that his name was Strange and that 



30 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

he Avas a strange man. When riding through the 
forest he liked to sing, "No foot of land do I pos- 
sess; no cottage in the wilderness." When leaving 
a wealthy friend near Vincennes, the friend present- 
ed him with a deed to eighty acres of land. Rev. 
Strange started away on his horse, but soon began 
singing, "No foot of land — " then remembering the 
deed he returned to his friend saying, "Here, take 
back this deed, I would rather sing my favorite 
song than to own all the land you possess." The 
friend, later, gave the deed to Mrs. Strange. His 
zeal knew no bounds. Now and then an admirer of 
his unselfish life seeks for his grave in a neglected 
graveyard to lay a tribute of flowers on it 

Rev. James Havens, when a circuit rider, 
preached in Rushville as early as 1821. He removed 
to Rushville in 1824, at the age of thirty-three years, 
where he lived until his death, Nov. 4, 1864. His 
motto was, "Let brotherly love continue." 

About 1821 or 1822, a company of North Caro- 
lina Friends came to the county. They erected a log 
church at Walnut Ridge, near Carthage. They op- 
posed slavery and were staunch advocates of educa- 
tion. 

Father Henry Peters organized a Catholic church 
in Rushville in 1853, with eight families. They now 
have a large church, a beautiful residence for the 
priest, and a parochial school and a home for the 
Sisters. There is a Wesleyan church at Carthage, 
Methodist Protestant church at New Salem, a Chris- 
tian Union at Homer, and one at Blue Ridge. The 
United Brethren have a church at Hopewell. There 
are three colored churches in the countv. Nearlv all 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 31 

these churches have Sunday schools, missionary and 
aid societies. 

Moscow and vicinity has sent more native sons 
into the ministry than any other locality in the 
county. The Methodist church has been represented 
from there by the Eevis's, Sculls, Robert McDuffey, 
Joseph Cotton, M. B. Hyde and the Machlins; the 
Christian church by three. M. B. Hopkins became 
prominent as a preacher and lawyer and was twice 
elected State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

Knowles Shaw became the most noted evangelist 
of his time. He had but little instruction in either 
vocal or instrumental music, yet he could sing and 
play a piece of music at sight. He composed words 
and music for many songs. One of the best known 
is ''Bringing in the Sheaves" which is now sung in 
several languages. His last words were: "It is a 
grand thing to rally people to the cross." 

Austin Hudson went to Illinois, where he did a 
good work in the ministry. 

The three last mentioned were poor orphan boys 
who made their way to prominence and usefulness. 

There are now fifty-six church buildings in the 
county. 

Sunday Schools. 

Judith Henly is supposed to have organized, at 
Carthage, the first Sunday school in the county. 
Early in the 40 's. Rev. D. M. Stewart organized the 
first Sunday school in Rushville. George Thomas, of 
Homer, organized, and for many years superintend- 
ed, the first Sunday school in the country. The early 
Sunday schools were supplied with Sunday school 
libraries. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



There were four ministers in the former days of 
Rush county who left impressions on the lives of the 
people that will never die. They were the Revs. N. 
C. McDill, of the United Presbyterian church ; James 
Havens, of the Methodist church ; John 'Kane, of 
the Christian church, and D. M. Stewart, of the 
Presbyterian church. They were zealous and sincere 
in what they believed and labored unceasingly for 
the upbuilding of the community. They were digni- 
fied in manner and their preaching was of a high 
order. We have listened to all of them and felt 
benefited by what they said. 

One sultry Saturday evening, Father Havens, as 
he was called in his later days, preached in the 
northwest room in the basement of the then unfin- 
ished, but now the old M. E. church, to a small audi- 
ence. He seemed to forget the heat and the few 
people before him. 

His pioneer camp-meeting days were past and he 
was now in the beautiful calm of life's evening. As 
he preached on "The Church Militant and the 
Church Triumphant, or the Church Military and the 
Church Victorious," he seemed inspired. 

Orphans' Home. 

A county orphanage was maintained for a few 
years where the Moore greenhouses are now. 

On Feb. 7, 1888, the county commissioners pur- 
chased a site for a County Orphans' Home from 
John F. Moses, one mile north of Rushville, and 
erected suitable buildings. 

In 1890 the Commissioners decided to consolidate 
the Rush County Home with that of Henry County 
at Spiceland and the children were removed there. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 33 



On July 13, 1901, the Commissioners sold the site to 
Amos Blacklidge, who remodeled the residence. It 
is now known as Hill View Farm. 

Politics. 

Politics caused intense partisanship and many 
friendships were broken in the radical discussions of 
the time. Candidates for minor offices usually nomi- 
nated themselves. 

The Gen. William Henry Harrison campaign, of 
1840, excelled all others in enthusiasm and excite- 
ment. His success in subduing the Indians, at the 
battle of Tippecanoe, had stirred the whole nation. 
Indiana was the storm center of political activity 
during the canvass. 

Long processions drove from one town to another, 
for rallies, in which the whole Whig population 
seemed to join. Glee Clubs sang songs about "Tip- 
pecanoe and Tyler, too" until they made the welkin 
ring. 

Young ladies, dressed in white, with evergreen 
wreaths on their heads and flags in their hands, rode 
in great canoes. Gen. Harrison was called "Old 
Tip" and the name "canoe" was an abbreviation 
of Tip-e-canoe. These canoes were made from 
large trees and were sometimes forty feet long, 
made from logs, put on log wagon wheels, in 
which a "Goddess of Liberty" stood under an 
arch of cedar boughs. They were almost as dem- 
onstrative as the young men. There were one or 
more log cabins in the processions, also on wheels, 
(like the canoes) in which a woman sat at a small 
spinning wheel while strips of dried pumpkin and 
strings of dried apple hung overhead. Several 'coon 



34 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

skins ornamented the outside walls. There was a 
pole on the top of the cabin with a racoon tied at 
the base while a live (Democrat) rooster was tied 
on a small platform at the top. I am sorry to say 
that when the speaking was over the hungry 'coon 
was permitted to climb the pole and make the feath- 
ers fly. 

P. A. Hackleman was editor of the Rushville 
"Whig and John L. Robinson of the Rushville Jack- 
sonian. They were radical and forceful writers. 

Uriah Thomas and Sanford H. Hilligoss, of Walk- 
er Township, cast the first Freesoil votes in the 
county. They were severely criticized and roundly 
abused by their Whig neighbors for ''losing" their 
votes. They would reply, "No, we have planted 
them and they will grow." This was the beginning 
of the Abolition movement in the county. These two 
men were good singers and went about singing their 
Abolition songs and making converts until they saw 
the ushering in of the Republican party in 1856. 
These two men lived to see, also, the final abolition 
of slavery. 

A great change had taken place in regard to slav- 
ery. When Indiana was admitted to the Union, in 
1816, the census showed there were 1,090 colored 
slaves in the state. In 1830, there yet remained three 
of these, two of them in Rush county. Mrs. William 
Wilson (grandmother of Rich and Dick Wilson) had 
purchased them at her father's sale in Kentucky. 
She brought them with her to this county. They 
were called Lee and Jess. She paid $500 for one 
and $700 for the other. In 1816, the owners of these 
numerous slaves, and their sympathizers, came near 
causing Indiana to be admitted to the Union as a 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 35 

slave state. The excitement at the time was intense. 
Banks. 

State, or what were called "wild cat" banks, 
were so unreliable in 1847 that they greatly inter- 
fered with the business of the country on account of 
their numerous failures. Ofttimes bank notes sup- 
posed to be good one day would prove worthless the 
next. This caused a financial panic. The first State 
Bank was established January 28, 1834. 

The first bank in the county was the Rushville 
branch of the State Bank organized in 1857, with 
George Hibben, president ; W. C. McReynolds, cash- 
ier; Joseph M. Oglesby, teller. It was reorganized 
February 22, 1865, as a National Bank, with George 
C. Clark, president; John B. Reeve, cashier. The 
Rush County Bank was organized in 1857 as a pri- 
vate bank, Leonidas Sexton, president. In 1871, it 
became a National Bank. Leonidas Link has been 
its president since 1884. The Farmers Bank opened 
its doors for business August 19, 1891. Arthur B. 
Irvin is president. The People's Bank was organ- 
ized as a private bank in 1900 by the late Edwin 
Payne. It was reorganized as a National bank in 
1904. Earl H. Payne is president. 

Rush county has four National banks, six State 
banks, two trust companies, two building and loan 
associations, with total assets of about $4,000,000. 

When Reu Pugh was county treasurer in 1854, 
he was sent to Shelbyville to borrow $2,000 for the 
county. When he had secured the money, he placed 
it in saddle bags, which he threw across his saddle. 
The roads were almost impassable and night came 
on when he was west of Manilla. For some time he 



36 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

had realized that two highwaymen, also on horse- 
back, were pursuing him. When near Goddard's tav- 
ern, just east of Pleasant Ridge (Goddard's) church, 
he urged his jaded horse to still greater speed. At 
the tavern gate he turned in, where in the darkness 
the men missed him. A few minutes later he was 
relieved by hearing them pass on. Mr. Reu Pugh, 
was one of the most enterprising citizens of Rush- 
ville, always in the forefront of everything that 
would advance the interests of the town. 

Military History. 

Rush Qounty had a large number of soldiers of 
the xVmerican Revolution within her borders. The 
following is a list of persons drawing Revolutionary 
pensions in Rush county, 1835. John Aldridge, 
buried on Aldridge farm in Orange Tp. ; Aaron Car- 
son, Samuel Caswell, Ebenezer Clark, Isaac Cox, Ben- 
jamin Cruzan, Henry David, Isaac Duncan, Leonard 
Edleman, Matthew Gregg, Daniel Grant, Jacob Hite, 
John Hardy, Thomas James, James Lane, John Le- 
gore, John Lewis, buried near Flatrock; William 
Mauzy, buried at East Hill ; Henry Mezer, John 
Pollock, Aaron Redman, John Riley, Henry Smith, 
Michael Smith, William Smith (the Smiths were 
buried at Pleasant Run graveyard) John Yarbrough, 
John Finney, John Watson. 

The following list drew pensions in Rush county 
in 1840 : 

Joel Berry, John Carson, Michael Smith (these 
three lived in Noble township), Henry Smith, Rich- 
land township ; James Fardice, Orange Township ; 
John Robinson, Rushville township ; Mary Collins, 
Posey township ; James Hunt, Jackson township ; 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 37 

Henry David, Jackson township ; George Ishaw, Cen- 
ter township; John Wyatt, Anderson township; 
George Brown, Richland township, (grave marked 
with government marker) ; Robert Caldwell, Concord 
graveyard, grave marked with government marker; 
Zephaniah Posey, Hopewell graveyard, Richland 
township, (grave has government marker). James 
Bromlee, John Lewis and Patrick Logan were buried 
in Flatrock cemetery. David Peters was buried in 
Goddard's graveyard. David Fleener, buried in 
Hannegan graveyard. Thomas Cassady, buried in 
Lower (Kelly) graveyard. 

Many survivors of the war of 1812-14 located in 
Rush county. Among the number were Benjamin 
Norris, Cornelius W. Anderson, William Wilson, 
Gabriel C. McDuffey and Daniel Thomas, who were 
in the battle of the Thames, in Canada, October 5, 
1813, where the famous Indian chief, Tecumseh, was 
killed. William Wilson helped bury the chief. 

In the Black Hawk War four men volunteered 
from this county. They enlisted July 23, 1832. 

The county was not in sympathy with the call for 
troops for service in the Mexican war of 1846-47, and 
were so slow in getting up a company that they were 
not needed. Hon. George B. Tingley, Representative 
from Rush county in the Legislature, and Capt. 
Nehemiah Hayden, a Clerk of the House, decided 
that the county should be represented in that war. 
They resigned their positions and hastened to join 
the troops rendezvoused near New Albany and were 
soon on the way to the border. Mr. Tingley became 
a Commissary, but went into the battle of Buena 
Vista, fought February 23, 1847. The man on his 
right was killed, the one on his left fell mortally 



38 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

wounded, a bullet passed through his beard while 
the rod of his muzzle-loading gun was shot in tv/o. 
In this battle, the Mexicans, under Gen. Santa Ana, 
numbered 23,000, while Gen. Taylor had but 4,759 
men. 

When the Civil War of 1861 broke out, the state 
had only 500 stand of small arms, and eight pieces 
of cannon, which were practically useless, and not 
a dollar available for war purposes. George Thomas, 
of Homer, Representative in the General Assembly, 
donated $2,000 to assist in providing blankets, etc., 
for the volunteers. Rush county furnished for the 
war 2,395 soldiers, more than enough for two full 
regiments. The county spent over a quarter million 
dollars for bounties, etc., during the war. 

The 22nd Battery (Captain, B. F. Denning) had 
several Rush county men in it. It was mustered 
December 15th, 1862. It threw the first shell into 
Atlanta, was mustered out June 7, 1865, Capt. Den- 
ning fell July 4, 1864, at the battle of Kanesaw 
Mountain. 

The 52nd Regt., Col. E. H. Wolfe, had many Rush 
county men in it. 

Co. D, 68th Ind. Regt., (Captain J. H. Mauzy) 
was composed principally of Rush county volunteers, 
was accepted for service August 19, 1862, was cap- 
tured at Munfordsville, Ky., soon after, was paroled, 
exchanged and returned to the front. This regiment 
was regarded by Gen. Rosecrans as one of the best 
in the service and he had it lead the march from Mur- 
freesboro to Chickamauga. It participated in many 
of the hardest battles. Edward A. King, of the 
regular army, was its Colonel. He was well liked 
by his men. He was killed while acting as Brigadier 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 39 



in the second day's fight at Chickamauga. Johnny 
Carr, son of Harvey W. Carr, of the 16th Ind. Bat- 
tery, saw Col. King fall. He ran back when the 
Union forces were temporarily retreating. Calling 
for help, he secured the Colonel's body and brought 
it out on a caisson in his own battery. This circum- 
stance is recorded on the battery 's state monument, 
at Chickamauga. 

When Gen. Grant ordered the valley around Chat- 
anooga cleared of rebels, he went up on Orchard 
Knob, within the city limits, with Generals Thomas 
and Sherman, to observe the fight. The order was 
successfully carried out. Then Samuel Bodine, 
(color bearer and brother of the late Charles Bo- 
dine) of Co. D, 68th Ind. Regt., called out ''Boys, 
while we have them on the run let us keep them 
going." Then giving a shout which was taken up 
along the entire line, he sprang forward up the steep 
ridge, when he was shot, Nov. 5, 1863. His remains 
were sent home and were interred in East Hill cem- 
etery. The army rushed on up the long ridge and 
thus the battle of Mission Ridge was fought "with- 
out orders." When Gen. Grant saw the army rush 
forward, he turned to the other Generals and said, 
"Nothing but victor j/ will save the leaders in this 
from court martial. 

The 16th Ind. Regt., Col. P. A. Hackleman, was 
organized for one year's service, was mustered out 
at Washington, D. C, May 14, 1862. 

It was re-organized May 17, 1862, for three years 
service. After participating in many engagements 
in the war, it was mustered out at New Orleans in 
June, 1865. Rush county had three companies in 
this regiment. 



40 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Col. P. A. Hackleman was promoted to Brigadier 
General. He was the only officer of the line from 
our state to fall in the conflict. He was mortally 
wounded at the battle of Corinth, Miss., Oct. 3, 1862. 
His last words were: "I am dying, but 'tis for my 
country." 

Lieut.-Col. Joel Wolfe fell at the battle of Rich- 
mond, Ky., Aug. 30, 1862. 

Company M. of the 121st Regiment was entirely 
from Rush county. In the explosion of the steamer 
Sultana, April 26, 1865, the company lost fifty-five 
men. Others were made invalids for life by injuries 
received and by remaining in the cold water for 
hours before being rescued. 

Company E, 123rd Regt., was wholly from Rush 
county and w^as organized January 13, 1864. Wm. 
A. Cullen was Lieut. Col. and Dr. J. H. Spurrier 
surgeon. 

In July, 1863, Governor Morton was notified that 
a rebel force estimated at six thousand men, under 
General John H. Morgan, had crossed the Ohio River 
and were marching on Corydon, Indiana. The Gov- 
ernor immediately issued a call for volunteers to 
pursue the invaders. Within forty-eight hours, 
sixty thousand men had tendered their services and 
were accepted. The Rushville Home Guards were 
among the number. 

The Homer Home Guards, (Elias T. Hilligoss, 
Captain) drilled almost night and day during the 
raid, expecting hourly to be called into service. 

Rushville and Rush county were completely iso- 
lated during the raid — getting no news by either 
mail or railroad train, the authorities having taken 
possession of both. Telegraph lines that were not 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 4] 



cut by Morgan's men were used by the pursuers. 
The Rushville Home Guards were not heard from 
during their absence. 

The 104th Regt., under Col. James Gavin, num- 
bered 714 men from Rush, Marion and Madison 
counties. 

It was organized within forty hours after Gov- 
ernor Morton's call for minute men to repel Mor- 
gan's raid. It was mustered out July 18, 1863. 

The Indiana Legion was composed of Home 
Guards during the Civil War. The drilling they 
did fitted many for service in the field. 

The Civil War was a great leveler in many ways, 
especially among the different denominations. There 
was a breaking up of the faith in old traditions of 
religion. The people worked together in Soldiers' 
Aid Societies, and in other ways that brought them 
close together, which mutual sympathy intensified. 

There were so many funeral services in memory 
of those who fell in camp and on the battlefield that 
people who had only attended the church to which 
they belonged went to other churches in sympathy 
with the sorrowing. At these services, near the close 
of the war, more than half the women were arrayed 
in ''the trappings and the suits of woe." During the 
four years of the Civil War, Indiana supplied nearly 
a quarter million soldiers. 

Knightstown Springs are located near the north- 
ern boundary of the county. For several years, a 
hotel and bath houses were maintained there. The 
fine mineral water attracted many visitors. Prof. 
John Hare used the buildings in winter for a girls' 
boarding school. 

During the session of the Legislature in 1867 an 



42 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

act was passed- making an appropriation for the 
establishment of a Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' 
Home. The Knightstown Springs, with several acres 
of ground, were selected by the state for this pur- 
pose. The buildings were then on the west side of 
the turnpike. A temporary hospital was built near 
there to which the state brought (in June, 1867) a 
number of sick and wounded soldiers. 

The corner stone for the main building was laid 
on the east side of the road on July 4, 1867, with 
appropriate ceremonies. Acting Governor Conrad 
Baker and many other civil and military officers 
were present. The people in attendance that day 
were estimated at five thousand. Lincoln Hall is 
used for Sunday school, church, lecture and school 
purposes. A two story hospital is located on the 
opposite side of the grounds. 

Rush county sent one hundred and sixty men to 
the Spanish-Cuban war, June 30, 1898. They became 
Co. H, 161st Indiana, James M. Gwinn, Capt. ; Geo. 
H. Caldwell, Lieut. Many of them went to the Phil- 
ippines, where they saw service. 

General Assembly. 

Thomas A. Hendricks, Sr., was the first Repre- 
sentative from what is now Rush county, in the State 
Legislature, when it met in the Marion county court 
house. A few others names follow: Amaziah Mor- 
gan, Charles H. Test, Adam Conde, Samuel Bigger, 
Dr. William Frame, B. F. Reeve, Alfred Posey, 
George B. Tingley, Thomas Worster, Dr. Jefferson 
Helm, P. A. Hackleman, R. S. Cox, George Clark and 
D. M. Stewart. 

In 1861, E. H. M. Berry, Senator, and George 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 43 

Thomas, Representative, in the General Assembly, 
shared in the exciting scenes caused by the firing on 
Ft. Sumpter. The following incident will illustrate 
the intense excitement that prevailed. Horace Heff- 
ron was a large, overbearing Democrat. Moody was 
a small, black-eyed, firey Republican. They held 
radically different views about voting appropriations 
for the prosecution of the war and became bitter 
enemies. The former challenged the latter to fight 
a duel, which was promptly accepted. They repaired, 
with their seconds, to a secluded place back of Cov- 
ington, Kentucky, where their friends prevailed on 
them to agree to a truce. Both these men later 
became colonels in the Union army. 

At the close of the called session of the Legisla- 
ture, in April, '61, Mr. Thomas resigned, came home 
and recruited volunteers for the 52nd Regiment, of 
which E. H. Wolfe became Colonel. On account of 
his age and ill health, Mr. Thomas returned from 
camp. Gov. Morton always passed him to the front 
whenever there was trouble there. When his son, 
D. L. Thomas, was badly wounded at the battle 
of Chickamauga, he hastened to Chattanooga and 
telegraphed the Governor to have the Indiana 
wounded transferred to their own state. The re- 
quest was granted. 

Railroads. 

The first railroad in the state was built in 1846, 
between Madison and Indianapolis. Soon after this 
time, George Thomas, of Walker township, took a 
wagon load of peaches to Madison. When he arrived 
there, the market master ordered him to dump the 



44 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

entire load into the river, because of the damaged 
condition of a part of the fruit. On his way back he 
crossed the tracks of the aforesaid railroad, whose 
charter had been secured by his uncle. Col. John M. 
Lee, Representative from Bartholomew county. He 
then and there resolved to have a railroad to Rush- 
ville. For three years, he labored for that end, meet- 
ing with strong opposition on all sides. Mer- 
chants said they had always "wagoned" their goods 
from Cincinnati and that way was cheaper than 
building a railroad. Doctors and lawyers feared a 
great influx of professional men if we had a railroad. 
Old Mr. N — thought the riff-raff of the cities would 
be dumped on the town to demoralize the place. 
Farmers said the train would kill their live stock, 
which ran at large, and the locomotive would set fire 
to their farms, which proved no myth, as the fuel 
used in the engines was wood and the large, funnel- 
shaped smokestacks had no wire screens over the top 
to catch the sparks. 

By continued persistence, and by donating the 
right of way through two farms, subscribing $1,000, 
also gratuitously grading a mile of the road, and sup- 
plying oak ties and stringers for the same, Mr. Thom- 
as finally succeeded in getting the railroad. He and 
Jacob Mull, of Manilla, and Roland Carr, of Rush- 
ville, gave their individual notes for $18,000 apiece, 
to buy flat bar rails for the road when land was 
worth only $20 and $25 per acre. 

The first train on the road ran in from Shelby- 
ville on September 10, 1850. A great crowd came to 
town to see it arrive. One old lady exclaimed, look- 
ing at the flat iron bars of the track, "Why, I 
thought the cars would come in on runners." 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 45 



These flat bars on oak stringers were not satis- 
factory because the train ran off the track too fre- 
quently. 

The road bed was raised and the ''T" rails were 
laid in the spring of 1860. Mr. George Thomas board- 
ed seventeen men, free, three weeks during the re- 
construction of the road. 

An amusing incident occurred while the road was 
being rebuilt. An Irishman, late from the "Green 
Isle," was water carrier. While he was gone to a 
neighboring house for water, the workmen stirred up 
a very large yellowjackets nest. They hurried on 
farther and were raising the old ties when Pat came 
back and ran into the infuriated insects. He put the 
bucket of water down and began picking them off, 
saying, "Och, how the flies in Ameriky bite." Pres- 
ently, he was saying, "Och, Och, Och," and making 
scores of rapid gyrations. The other men, amid 
roars of laughter, called to him to "come away." 
He ran towards them and the "jackets" went too. 
It took an hour to collect the men from the woods. 
That part of the road bed was finished by starlight. 

David C. Branam, of Madison, was General Su- 
perintendent and a Mr. Robinson was construction 
supervisor. 

On May 12, 1860, a free excursion and hotel ac- 
commodations, were given to three hundred invited 
guests from Rushville and vicinity by the people of 
Madison. The train was run in two sections, one in 
charge of David C. Branam and the other of his 
brother, Hickman Branam. 

On June 14, of the same year, Rushville returned 
the compliment by entertaining a number of promin- 
ent citizens of Madison. 



46 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

When the train arrived in Rushville, Mr. Branam 
invited other officials of the road to mount the engine 
and tender (which was filled with wood for fuel) and 
accompany him back to the home of Mr. Thomas to 
honor him for his heroic and sacrificing interest in 
securing the road. 

Frank Ringel was the first conductor for several 
years. T. J. Carr was his immediate successor. 

Other railroads have been completed to Rushville 
in the following order, viz., C. H. & D., Dec. 25, 1867 ; 
Cambridge City, July 4, 1868; Greensburg, Sept., 
1881 ; New Castle, 1882 ; Anderson, 1887. A line of 
the "underground" railroad for fugitive slaves ran 
through this county in the days of slavery. 

The I. & C. traction line was completed to Rush- 
Fire Protection. 

ville, June 29, 1905. The power house for this line 
is located in East Rushville. It runs cars to India- 
napolis, Shelbyville, Greensburg and Connersville. 
Electricians from several foreign countries, as well as 
from other parts of our own, have visited the plant 
to study its construction and operation. 

Prior to 1881 Rushville depended on a "bucket 
brigade." In that year a steam fire engine was 
purchased at a cost of $4,300. A Gamewell fire alarm 
was contracted for Nov. 9, 1891. 

Natural Gas. 

Natural gas was discovered at Carthage in Sep- 
tember, 1887. Later, it was piped to Rushville. 
Since then, the Rushville Natural Gas Company, the 
People's, the Central Fuel, and the Rushville Supply 
Company have tapped different fields and their pipe 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 47 

lines furnish an ample supply for domestic use. 
There are scores of producing private wells in the 
county. 

Rushville has an automatic telephone system that 
has attracted investigation from other countries as 
well as from many parts of our own. 

The down town district has cluster, or pedestal, 
electric lights. 

County Fairs. 

The first county fair was held September, 1851, 
in a woods pasture where the Greensburg (Big 4) 
railroad station is located. But little stock or any- 
thing else was entered. A buffalo, several deer, a 
few horses and other live stock were the principal 
attractions. P. A. Hackleman was secretary. The 
two next years, 1852-3, the fairs were held northwest 
of the J. D. Case planing mills. 

A permanent organization was formed and land 
bought east of Rushville, in 1854, where some of the 
best county fairs in the state are held. 

Horses. 

John Gray was among the earliest breeders. In 
1835, he brought "Old Alec" from Kentucky. His 
son, William Gray, continued to keep fine horses. 
He bought ''Tom Hal" from John Shawhan, a 
famous horse. His son, John T. Gray, introduced 
the Hambletonian horses. 

Rush county is indebted to James AVilson for the 
introduction of the "Blue Bull" horses. These 
horses have been at the head of all trotting horses — 
without a noted ancestral line they have become 
famous. The fame of the sire of these horses was 



48 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNlx 

known in several states. When he died, Mr. Wilson 
had a fine marble monument erected over him. 

Samp Wilson, son of James Wilson, was one of 
the greatest drivers in the country. Blue Bull horses 
sold for high prices. Mila C. sold for $10,000 (record 
2,261/2). 

W. A. Jones was the owner of Elgin Boy and 
Raven Boy. J. M. Amos owned Legal Tender, a 
noted race horse. 

John Shawhan, William S. Hall, and others 
brought other fine horses to the county for which the 
county is now famous. 

John T. McMillin imported Norman horses from 
France for several years. 

Cattle. 

From 1854 to 1856, Garrett Wycof¥, James and 
Jonathan Caldwell, Isaac B, Loder and William S. 
Hall imported high grade cattk from Kentucky. 

In 1868, E. S. Frazee, George W. Thomas and 
Thomas A. Cotton began to establish show herds of 
Short Horn cattle. Others followed until the cattle 
of the county were greatly improved. 

Woodson ^Y. Thrasher, E. S. Frazee, George W. 
Thomas, R. H. Phillips and Thomas A, Cotton assist- 
ed in organizing the first Short Horn Breeder's As- 
sociation. This was the first live stock association 
organized in America. 

In 1870, E. S. Frazee and George W. Thomas col- 
lected individual herds that were prize winneirs. The 
latter bred and sold the highest priced Short Horn 
cow ever produced in the county, also realized the 
highest average price in a public sale. These men 
assisted in organizing the National Short Horn As- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 49 

sociation. In 1890, they assisted in getting out the 
Short Horn Herd Book. Mr. Thomas suggested the 
special judge for fairs and was the first man to act 
in that capacity. 

The original registered Jersey cattle men were E. 
W. Shrader and George W. Reeve, A. P. Walker 
and John P. Boyd. 

Jersey cattle are numerous now in the county. 

Sheep. 

Leonidas McDaniel and G. W. Mauzy introduced 
Cotswold, South Down and Merino sheep. 

Hogs. 

Jeremiah Smith brought the first Poland China 
hogs to the county. He was followed in the business 
by Weir Cassady, George W. and D. L. Thomas and 
John H. Bebout. Geo. W. Thomas bred ''Fred Doug- 
lass," the hog that took grand sweepstakes at a St. 
Louis Fair, the highest prize ever given to a hog. 
This hog was the grand sire of ''Geo. Wilks" that 
was at the head of John H. Bebout 's herd and made 
it famous. 

Many other breeds of hogs are now owned in the 
county. Corn and hogs are making the county at- 
tractive to farmers and are bringing prosperity to all 
lines of business. James Walker was among the 
early drovers. He often had as many as two thou- 
sand hogs in one drove. He became known as 
"Hog" Walker. James Wilson, John Shawhan, Oli- 
ver brothers and Jonathan Caldwell were prominent 
drovers. The hogs were driven to Cincinnati, one 
driver for each 100 hogs. 

Fred A. Capp was the best known auctioneer of 



50 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Rush county. He was genial and energetic. His 
voice never failed or became hoarse. He was suc- 
cessful in selling live stock, farming implements and 
household goods. 

Libraries. 

When the State's first Constitution was adopted 
under the old elm at Corydon in 1816, provision was 
made for libraries. When a new county was laid off 
10 per cent was to be reserved from the sale of lots 
for the foundation and maintenance of public librar- 
ies. These libraries were to be kept in the seats of 
justice and controlled by a library commission. 

When the Capitol was removed to Indianapolis 
in 1821, the Legislature made the library laws still 
more confusing, resulting in little progress being 
made. 

In the late 40 's Rushville had a small library, 
presumably supported by the 10 per cent, levy afore- 
said. If so, it was the first money derived from that 
source. 

About 1850 the Legislature passed a law provid- 
ing for Township Libraries. Prof. W. C. Larabee, 
of Greencastle, went East and purchased books for 
every township in the state. The books were uni- 
formly in sheep binding, although but few of them 
were regarded as standard works. These books were 
placed in local stores in the various townships. The 
proprietor received little instruction or adequate 
pay for the care of the books and they were soon 
dissipated. 

Later there was a small library in Rushville 
known as the Mechanics' Library. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Burial Grounds. 

The first graveyards were small and were made 
on farms and were used for the family and near 
friends. The first neighborhood burial ground was, 
probably the Lower later called the Kelly graveyard 
south of Rushville. These were succeeded by others 
usually located near a church. The upper and lower 
graveyards were used by citizens of Rushville and 
vicinity until 1859, when nineteen acres were pur- 
chased east of Rushville, platted and named East 
Hill Cemetery. In one generation the lots have been 
sold and twenty more acres have been added. An 
archway, chapel and receiving vaults have been 
built. 

Joel Wolfe G. A. R. Post has erected a monument 
in this cemetery to the memory of their deceased 
comrades at a cost of $1,350 and it is the only sol- 
diers' monument in the state erected by a Grand 
Army Post. 

Calvary Cemetery, northeast of town, is owned 
by Catholics and is being improved each year. 

Miscellaneous. 

Mound Builders once occupied the county. One 
mound is west of the ''Arnold Home." There are 
remains of others northwest of Rushville (one cov- 
ered about ten acres) and in other places in the 
county as well. 

A small stream on the Alexander farm northwest 
of Rushville is called "Moccasin" because so many 
Indian moccasins, or shoes, were found along its 
once marshy borders where the Indians had been 
trapping. Many Indian flint arrow heads have been 



52 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

found in the same locality. Arrow heads have been 
found all over the county. This indicates that In- 
dians were once numerous in the county. 

Three-fourths of the state was held by Indians 
when the Constitution was adopted, but none of 
them were building mounds, thus proving a pre- 
existent race. 

The first public roads in the county had many 
stumps in them. Logs and brush were piled up on 
either side of the road. Small logs and brush were 
laid across the road in marshy places. This was 
called "corduroy." 

The first carriages brought to the county had 
high wheels, so they could be driven over the numer- 
ous stumps in the road and through the unbridged 
streams. Folding steps were placed on one side of 
the body of the carriage that could be unfolded 
when people wished to mount or alight. 

The stage coach was built for service. The in- 
side seats were similar to those of the modern cab, 
while the side seats were much like those in auto- 
mobiles. The stages were usually painted in vari- 
ous colors and drawn by six horses. The baggage 
was placed inside a railing around the top. There 
were relay stations along the road where the tired 
teams would be exchanged for fresh ones. The 
coaches were driven at a fast rate where possible. 
The approach to a tavern, and departure, was an- 
nounced by the blowing of a bugle. 

Thomas Cassady, great-grandfather of Mrs. Sar- 
ah Crawford Guffin (J. P.), built the third house in 
Rushville. 

The first postmaster was Charles Veeder, in 1822. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 53 



George C. Clark was operator in the first tele- 
graph office in Rushville. 

In 1831, William Arnold, only brother of the late 
Mrs. D. M.' Stewart, had a tanyard where the glove 
factory is now located. 

Several years later, a stave and barrel factory oc- 
cupied the site of the tanyard. Here two mischievous 
boys repaired (who expected a whipping at the semi- 
nary south of there) to tie shavings on their backs 
and arms, under their coats, before returning to the 
teacher, Mr. Louis Thomas, a genial Kentucky law- 
yer The boys yelled lustily, but the teacher soon 
realized he was hitting padded backs and secretly 
enjoyed whipping them. Each party supposed the 
other was being deceived. 

A doctor Runnels (Reynolds) was an early physi- 
cian in Wilmington, now Manilla. He often imbibed 
too freely of the cup that inebriates but never cheers. 
One evening, as he was returning from a professional 
visit, he rode into a flock of ducks that were roost- 
ing in the road. They ran about quacking, as ducks 
do. The doctor dismounted and began to belabor 
them with his riding whip when the owner appeared 
and inquired what the trouble was. The doctor said, 
'Hhese pesky things are calling me a quack, and I 
will take that from no living thing." 

He was persuaded to ride on. Soon he heard a 
frog, in the creek near by, calling, ''R-runnels, R-run- 
nels." Thinking it some person calling him, he an- 
swered "Here." 

Snakes of many kinds were very numerous m 
pioneer days and continued so until hogs became 
plentiful. They ate even the venomous species with- 
out injury. 



54 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

The first settlers found a large tract of densely 
fallen timber in the southern part of what is now 
Rush county. They believed a severe cyclone had 
passed over that section at some previous time. They 
called a stream that flowed through it '' Hurricane 
Creek." 

The early settlers had little use for law, judges, 
prisons or sheriffs. Differences and injuries were 
usually settled by force or arbitration. 

The first license issued to retail intoxicants was 
granted to John Perry on November 1, 1824. The 
fee was $7.50. 

Judges and lawyers rode the circuit, holding 
court, for several years. They carried their papers 
and law books in saddle bags. 

From 1822 poor and homeless orphan children 
were apprenticed, males until twenty-one and fe- 
males until eighteen. Indigent men and women were 
farmed out on contract by overseers of the poor 
until a poor farm was bought and equipped. 

Rushville was governed by a town board until 
1842. Among the last Presidents were John P. Guffin 
and John H. Bebout. 

A city council was organized Sept. 6, 1883. The 
first councilmen were Leonidas Link, Absalom Pavey, 
John J. Touts, John A. Readle, Martin Bohanon arid 
John B. Reeve; George Puntenney, mayor; Joseph 
A. Armstrong, clerk; W. E. Havens, treasurer, and 
Samuel Vance, marshal. 

The leech, lancet and blister were used externally 
and large, sickening powders, that often had to be 
dissolved in a tablespoon, were administered by the 
doctors. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 55 

The pioneers buried the dead — men, women and 
children — in long, white robes, called shrouds. A 
small, white kerchief was laid over the face. 

The coffin was made narrow at each end and un- 
lined. Not until in the 50 's were the dead buried in 
clothing such as they wore while living. 

Every neighborhood had a shoemaker and a man 
who extracted teeth with a "pulliken" or turnkey. 

Itinerant ministers traveled and preached to the 
people for two generations. Rev. Asbury, it is said, 
traveled as many miles as would take him twelve 
times around the world. 

People often rode, on horseback, ten or twelve 
miles to "meeting" to hear these itinerants preach. 

Six per cent, was allowed on collections when 
settling up an estate. This was all the remuneration 
they received — a mere pittance in many cases. 

Rush county shared in the gold craze of '49 and 
several young men went with emigrant wagon trains 
across the plains to California in search of the pre- 
cious metal. 

Much of the geography was taught, in the '50 's 
by singing the names of the states and their capitals, 
also the names of counties and county seats and the 
names of rivers and their length. 

Sometime in the late '40 's, a converted Indian 
passed through the county preaching to the white 
people, entreating them to lead Christian lives. He 
sang in the Indian and the English language and at- 
tracted much attention. 

In the '40 's and '50 's peddlers carrying Irish linen 
tablecloths, peddlers with boxes of jewelry, peddlers 
with leather straps attached to swing over the shoul- 
der ; Italians with plaster of Paris toys, peddlers with 



56 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

notions, small wagons with all kinds of merchandise, 
and agents of various kinds, literally swarmed over 
the country. 

In 1847-8, the spirit rappings caused much excite- 
ment. A few persons became insane because of the 
manifestations they claimed to have experienced. 

In the same year the people of this county con- 
tributed, with other sections, to the supplies which 
were being sent to the starving people of Ireland, 
caused by the total failure of the potato crop there. 

In July, 1854, a cyclone destroyed much timber 
and fencing, also a large barn on the farm of Landon 
Gardner, six miles west of Rushville. The barn was 
carried high in the air, broken into fragments and 
scattered for long distances. Horses were killed, 
chickens were stripped of their feathers and all their 
bones broken ; wheat was scattered over a neighbor- 
ing farm. 

In the spring of 1850, Alexander Campbell held 
a meeting at Fairview, assisted by the faculty of 
Fairview Academy. He returned to the county and 
preached in the old Rushville Christian church in 
1859. 

In 1850, P. T. Barnum brought Jennie Lind, the 
"Swedish Nightingale," to this country. One of the 
places visited was Madison, Indiana. A number of 
music lovers from Rushville went to hear her. The 
whole continent was enraptured with her melodies. 

In the fall of 1861, Stephen Duncan organized a 
singing class in the old Christian church, now Pythi- 
an Hall. He used the ''Diapason" and accompanied 
the singing with a violin. 

John H. Spurrier used the same book and a violin 
in singing classes in several places. In 1903, he gath- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 57 



ered the surviving members of the old Diapason sing- 
ers into a class that meets annually in Rushville. 

This class is similar to the old "Missouri Har- 
mony" class which was organized at Morristown in 
1836 and re-organized by survivors several years 
later. The members of the two last mentioned of 
these classes are now singing in the "Choir Invis- 
ible" and an old re-organized Diapason class has 
taken their places. 

Fred Douglass, the noted ex-slave and orator, 
made a long speech in behalf of his race on a plat- 
form at the northwest corner of the court house yard, 
during the early years of the Civil War. His head 
was almost white, but his voice was strong as he 
plead for those who were yet in bondage. 

What is remembered as the "cold New Year's 
Day" occurred January 1, 1864. 

In 1872, A. N. Norris invented a wheat drill, 
which his brother, D. C. Norris, patented. It was 
manufactured by the Norris brothers northeast of 
Rushville, and was regarded as one of the best drills 
on the market. It was sold and shipped all over the 
United States and to other countries. 

The evolution experienced in reaping, threshing 
and cleaning wheat has been marvelous. The pio- 
neers cut the wheat with a sickle, tramped it out on 
a floor, or hard ground, with horses, and cleaned it 
by winnowing it with a strong home-made linen 
sheet. 

Later, the wheat was cut with a w^heat cradle and 
threshed by a slow horse-power machine. Next, a 
crude steam engine threshed it and a hand-power 
wheat fan was used to separate the grain from the 
chaff. 



58 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

This was improved upon until a steam engine 
threshed and separated the wheat and chaff. This 
way required thirt}^ to forty men to haul in the 
shocks, run the machinery and stack the straw. All 
the help had to have dinner and supper with the 
owner of the wheat ; the horses had to be fed also. 

Now an engine runs the separator, measures the 
grain and stacks the straw. The men provide their 
own dinner and horse feed and the old-time tired 
farmer's wife of the harvest time is no more. 

The "Grangers," or "Patrons of Husbandry," 
was a secret organization founded at Washington, 
December 4, 1867, for the promotion of farmers' in- 
terests, women as well as men being members. In 
six years the membership reached 1,500,000. 

There were three or four Granges in Rush county. 
The one at Homer erected a two-story building. The 
upper one was used for the transaction of business 
and as a civic center for the members. The lower 
one was used for a community store. G. W. Thomas 
was either Purchasing Agent or President during its 
existence. 

When musical instruments began to be used in the 
homes, some of the young people began to clamor for 
their use in the churches. Others believed their use 
in public worship would be sacrilege and were de- 
cidedly opposed to their introduction. The conten- 
tion came near disrupting some churches. 

The frame siding, rafters, ceiling, flooring, doors, 
window sashes and shingles of the first frame houses 
in the county were all hand-made. These houses are 
very substantial. 

An Old Settlers' Association was formed on Aug. 
19, 1869, which met at the county fair grounds and 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 59 



was largely attended. For several years, D. M. Stew- 
art was the first President and Dr. John Arnold was 
secretary. 

Old relics of various kinds were exhibited. Har- 
mony Laughlin had a calico bed comfort, with a light 
background and small, purple flowers on it. There 
were no two flowers alike on either side of it. It had 
been brought from Holland. There were mold board 
plows, hackles, hand cards for carding wool, and 
making rolls for spinning, reels for winding the 
yarn, which was spun on the big wheels ; flax sewing 
thread, which was spun on the little wheels; old- 
fashioned dishes and watches, some of them a hun- 
dred years old; hand-knit lace, samplers (alphabet 
worked on home-made linen), old books, quaint 
shoes, round brooms, home-made rugs, papers of 
round-headed brass pins, silhouette pictures, linen 
table cloths, counterpanes which women had spun 
and woven, etc. Prominent men came from many 
places to be present. Among the number was Gov. 
Conrad Baker. They and the early settlers pro- 
vided interesting programs until the curtain of time 
fell on the actors. 

A Building and Loan Association was incorpor- 
ated June 2, 1877, with D. M. Stewart, President; 
Leonidas Link, Vice President, and J. Q. Thomas, 
Secretary and Treasurer. Eleven similar associa- 
tions have been formed since. 

These associations have made it possible for many 
persons to buy lots and build comfortable homes who 
otherwise might never have had a permanent place 
in which to live. 

A Ladies' Musicale was organized at the home 
of A. G. Mauzy on Dec. 13, 1886, by his daughter, 



60 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Mrs. Siddie Cole-Mowers. The first officers were 
Mrs. Mowers, President; Mrs. Theo. Abercrombie, 
Vice President; Mrs. Ella Pugh, Secretary; Mrs. C. 
H. Gilbert, Treasurer. 

It is next to the oldest musical organization in 
the state, the Matinee Musicale, of Indianapolis, hav- 
ing precedence. 

The ladies have purchased two violins and have 
given a musical education to a talented young musi- 
cian. 

They have held many receptions for their friends 
that have been very enjoyable. At one of these 
Mrs. C. H. Gilbert read a history of the society on 
its twentieth anniversary and is planning to con- 
tinue its history until December 13, 1916, when they 
expect to celebrate the thirtieth anniversary of its 
continuous organization. 

The Monday Circle is a literary society composed 
of twenty-five ladies. It was organized in 1893 by 
Mrs. Hannah Cullen Sexton and has done work of 
a high order continuously since. 

The Shakespeare Club was organized in 1910, 
with Miss Anna Marlatt as President. The work is 
along the line of the drama. The membership is 
limited to seventeen. Kathryn Petry is President at 
this time. 

The Coterie, a miscellaneous literary club, was 
organized by Mrs. Mary Holmes, and she was the 
first Secretary. The membership is limited to seven- 
teen. Mrs. J. T. Paxton is now President. Carthage, 
Glenwood and Milroy have women's study classes. 

The Social Club was organized March 13, 1896. 
Melodeon Hall was purchased and converted into 
suitable rooms for convenience of members. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 61 



Francis Murphy, noted temperance lecturer, held 
a series of meetings in Rushville in 1879 (in what 
was then Melodeon Hall) that stirred the town. A 
great many people signed the pledge. 

W. J. Munhall held the first large union revival 
in Rushville, in the old Christian church, in the 
spring of 1885. The services were characterized by 
good singing and earnest preaching. 

Dr. Orr held a union meeting in June, 1911. Dr. 
Biederwolf held one in the fall of 1912. Both these 
meetings were held in a temporary tabernacle. 

Mrs. May W. Donnan, of Indianapolis, lectured 
on literary subjects most acceptably to Women's 
Study Classes from 1905 until her death in 1913. She 
had a fine personality and a remarkable memory. 
During the eight years of her work in Rushville, she 
endeared herself to her classes. 

For several years good lecture courses have been 
held in winter. Mrs. Demarchus C. Brown, of India- 
napolis, gave a series of popular lectures in the 
Graham school building in the winter of 1914-15. She 
also gave lectures before the Monday Circle that 
were thoroughly enjoyed. 

The Grand Army of the Republic was organized 
in 1866 as a political order. There was a Post in 
nearly every township. Later it became a patriotic 
organization and continues so. Its membership is 
composed of the ex-soldiers of the Civil War who 
were honorably discharged. 

As they annually march with music and ''Old 
Glory" on Decoration Day to lay a tribute of flow- 
ers on the graves of departed comrades, the old sol- 
diers become fewer while the graves become more 
numerous. It is pathetic to see the faltering step 



62 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

and depleted ranks as they enter the city of the 
dead. 

A Woman's Relief Corps was organized August 
20, 1887. Much relief work has been done for sol- 
diers and their families. 

A Woman's Christian Temperance Union was 
organized April 21, 1888, by Mrs. Louise M. Thomp- 
son, of Greensburg. The ladies worked along tem- 
perance, evangelistic and charitable lines. Religious 
services were held at the county asylum and county 
orphanage. Holiday gifts were given to the inmates 
of both. An industrial school, a Sunday school for 
poor children and a reading room were sustained 
for a time. They induced the churches to banish 
manufactured wine from the communion table and 
substitute the juice of the grape. 

Secret societies were opposed by many of the 
early settlers and few men became identified with 
them. The following fraternal societies now have 
lodges in the county : Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights 
of Pythias, Red Men, Maccabees, Modern Wood- 
men, Elks, Ancient Order of United Workmen, 
Patriotic Sons of America, G. A. R., W. R. C, and 
Knights of Columbus. 

The Hilligoss family of this county have an an- 
cestral record which throws much light on the early 
history of this country. As it deals, indirectly, with 
some of the county's history, it is inserted. Michael 
Hilligas, a German nobleman of Alsace, then a 
province of France, removed to Germany on account 
of the Huguenot persecutions. From there he emi- 
grated to Philadelphia. His son, Michael, was made 
Provincial Treasurer in 1765 and held the office 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 63 

until 1789, having been Provincial, Colonial and 
United States Treasurer. He died in 1804. 

See ''Financial History of the United States," 
by Albert S. Belles, Vol. 1; ''Journal of Congress," 
Vols. 1 and 2. Michael Hilligas had contributed lib- 
erally to the calls for financial help during the Revo- 
lution, but owing to the depressed condition of 
"finance afterward he was never reimbursed. His 
portrait is on the $10 gold certificates of the United 
States. 

George Peter Hilligas, a nephew of Michael Hilli- 
gas, was drum major under Washington during the 
war of the American Revolution and was with him 
at the surrender of Saratoga. He came to Kentucky, 
after the war, where he died. 

Some of his family came to Rush county where 
they helped to clear away the wilderness. In remov- 
ing westward the name broadened into Hilligoss. 

A summer Chautauqua was instituted in 1901. 
It was held under a tent until the present Coliseum 
was built. Good programs have been given by some 
of the best talent obtainable. Such men as W. J. 
Bryan and others of note. 

The 1915 Chautauqua had on its program Hon. 
Champ Clark, Speaker of the U. S. House of Repre- 
sentatives; Helen Keller, the deaf and blind girl, 
who is well educated and has learned to talk; the 
Royal Welsh Male Singers (three of their sixteen 
members went down, May 7, 1915, when the Lusi- 
tania was torpedoed) ; Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, of 
New York City; Grace Hall-Riheldaffer, famous 
singer ; Dr. Carolyn E. Geisel, of Battle Creek, Michi- 
gan, and others. 

Three of Rushville's citizens have been Repre- 



64 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

sentatives in the United States Congress. John L. 
Robinson was a member in 1844. He was an inti- 
mate friend of Jefferson Davis, who was also a mem- 
ber at that time. 

Leonidas Sexton was Lieut. Governor in 1873 
and a member of Congress in 1876. 

James E. Watson was elected to Congress in 1894, 
1898, 1900, 1902, 1904 and was nominated for Gov- 
ernor of Indiana in 1908. 

John K. Gowdy left Rushville as United States 
Consul to Paris, France, on April 20, 1897 ; returned 
to Rushville October 21, 1905. He received his ap- 
pointment from President William McKinley. 

Judge Douglas Morris is one of the Supreme 
Court Judges of Indiana. 

In three years death claimed three of Rushville 's 
ablest lawyers, Leonidas Sexton, George B. Sleeth 
and Jesse J. Spann. 

Pleasant A. Hackleman was a candidate for Con- 
gress on a Temperance platform in 1860. He was 
also a delegate to the Peace Congress held in Wash- 
ington, in February, 1861, for the purpose of adjust- 
ing the differences between the North and the South. 
The effort was a failure. 

Admiral George Brown, who for three years was 
at the head of the United States Navy, was a native 
of Rushville. 

Dr. James Thomson, the late noted oculist, of In- 
dianapolis, was once a shoemaker in Moscow. 

For several years, pupils had to deliver orations 
at their graduation. A prominent man is now select- 
ed to deliver an address instead. 

On March 25, 1913, occurred the greatest flood 
Rushville ever experienced. The water ran in tor- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 65 

rents down Perkins street, south of the C, H. & D. 
Railroad, flooding many houses. 

The water in Main street was more than a foot 
deep between Second and Fourth streets. Business 
blocks in that section were also flooded. The grades 
east and south of town were overflowed and badly 
damaged. One life was lost. 

Rushville and vicinity sent a car load of flour to 
the starving Belgians in the spring of 1915. 

A light snow fell in Rushville August 5, 1915. 
The weather was colder than January 17, 1914. This 
month will be remembered as the coldest and rainiest 
within the memory of the oldest settler. 

Rush county has an area of twenty-three miles 
north and south and eighteen miles east and west. 
It has no large city, yet its per capita is second to 
but one in the state. 

Rushville is located near the center of the county. 
It is a beautiful little city, noted for its flne resi- 
dences, well kept lawns, maple shade trees, asphalt 
pavements and straight streets. Its water supply 
is drawn from artesian wells. Its streets are elec- 
trically lighted. Good roads lead into it. Main 
and Second streets were paved with brick in 1910; 
Perkins street in 1912. 

Towns. 

Carthage is located on the east bank of Big Blue 
River, in Ripley township. It was laid out by John 
Clark and Henry Henley, August 18, 1838. It is a 
thriving place on the Big Four Railroad. It has one 
of the largest strawboard plants in the state, a fine 
library building, a commissioned high school, a bank 
and a local newspaper. 



68 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Milroy. Milroy is situated near the southern 
boundary of the county on the bank of Little Flat- 
rock River. It is in a fine agricultural district and 
does a large amount of shipping and other business. 
It is on the Big Four Railroad and has a bank. In 
1830, Nathan Julian and Nathan Tompkins laid out 
the town. 

Manilla. Manilla is located in Walker township, 
on the Pennsylvania Railroad. It was laid out Jan. 
4th, 1836, by Jacob Mull, Elias Murphy, Jonathan 
Murphy and Jonathan Edwards. The place was sur- 
rounded by North Carolinians, who named the place 
Wilmington in honor of their former home. The 
name was changed later to Manilla. Jacob Mull had 
the first dry goods store. It has a bank. 

Arlington (Burlington) was laid out April 12th, 
1832, by James Collins and Levin Burt. Dr. James 
W. Green and Jacob Beckner were prominent citi- 
zens. It is located on the C. H. & D. railroad and 
the I. & C. traction line. It also has a state bank. 

Glenwood (formerly Vienna) is on the C. H. & D. 
railroad and the I. & C. traction line. It was laid out 
by Dr. Jefferson Helm, June 23rd, 1882. Mr. Steele 
was the first tavern keeper and first postmaster. 

New Salem. Moses Thompson had the town plat- 
ted in February, 1831. The place is surrounded by 
a good farming section and an enterprising com- 
munity. Dr. Anthony was the second inhabitant, fol- 
lowed by Reuben Runion, who built a blacksmith 
shop, and Israel Knapp, a wagon maker. 

Falmouth. A trading post was located here early. 
That part located in Fayette county was probably 
laid out in 1824. The part in Rush county was 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 67 

platted in July, 1832. In 1835 several Kentuckians 
settled in and around Falmouth, Among them were 
John David, Daniel Baker and Joseph Piper. It is 
on the Pennsylvania railroad. 

Richland. This place is in a country of unusual 
fertility. The Richland Academy was one of the 
early schools of note in the state. The town was 
laid out December 14, 1854, by A. P. Butler, T. L. 
Stewart, H. C. Robinson, J. R. Hood, S, H. Caskey, 
N. H. Gwinup, G. Butler and Jacob Hite. 

Homer is located on the Pennsylvania railroad 
lines two miles east of Manilla. James Andrews and 
Jesse Jarrett built an upright saw mill here in 1850. 
They had a well dug under the mill to supply a large 
stationary boiler with water. When about twenty 
feet down, the men left their shovels and picks in 
the excavation over night. The next morning they 
found the bottom of the well had fallen out and a 
large stream of clear, cold Calybeate water was 
flowing out, which continues to flow. The shovels 
and picks were never recovered. 

Benjamin Wyman and Alex Bridges were the flrst 
merchants. 

Raleigh is a flourishing village in Washington 
township. It was laid out in 1841 and was called 
McCanns. In 1847 it was recorded under the name 
of Raleigh. It has the first consolidated school in 
the United States. 

The names of small towns in the county are : 
Henderson, Farmington, Sumner, Blue Ridge, Mos- 
cow, Gowdy, Williamstown, Fairview, Sexton, Mays, 
Gings and Mauzy. 

At a Republican barbecue held at Rushville, Sept. 
16th, 1915, James E. Watson formally announced 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



himself a candidate for United States Senator. The 
attendance was estimated at eight or ten thousand 
people. 

Conclusion. 

Since the squatters began to build homes in Rush 
county a great transformation has taken place. The 
log cabin has given place to comfortable, even pala- 
tial homes. The forests and rail fences have almost 
disappeared. Farmers now ride when they plow, 
or reap their grain. Automobiles and thoroughbred 
horses, steam and interurban cars furnish transpor- 
tation. Natural gas, telephones, daily mails and 
graded schools give to town and county the same 
advantages. 

Then here is a health to Rush county, the fairest 
among a thousand. No lakes, no mountains, bogs or 
large rivers break the surface of the country. There 
is no waste land, no barrens. Her sons and daugh- 
ters travel to distant parts, but return to what they 
believe to be the garden spot on earth. When they 
pass away they may rest in the most beautiful ceme- 
tery that any county town can claim. 

Be a Booster. 

(Written for Sketches of Rush County.) 
Do you know there's lots of fellers 

Settin' 'round in every town, 
0, so grouchy an' a kickin', 

Knockin' every good thing down? 

We'd not have jiou be this feller 
'Cause your town is best on earth, 

So just be a Rushville booster. 

Praise and boost for all vou're worth 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 69 



If what people do don't suit you 

And the town seems kinder wrong 

Why don't you commence a boostin' 
Just to help yourself along? 



'Cause if things should stop a going 

You'd be in a sorry plight; 
Keep that Rushville horn a blowin', 

Boost her up with all your might. 

If your town's worth boostin' — boost her 
Don't hold back and wait to see 

If some other feller's willin'; 
You be first — the country's free. 

No one holds a mortgage on you, 
It's your town as much as his, 

And if Rushville 's shy on boosters 
You get in the boostin' biz. 

— Anna Clark Urmston. 
Indianapolis. 



70 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



PART II. 



HISTORY OF COMPANY M, 121 ST REGIMENT, 9TH 
INDIANA VOL. CAVALRY. 



(Written by Capitola Giiffin Dill.) 

Company M, 121 Regiment 9th Indiana Volun- 
teer Cavalry, was recruited by Captain James Henry 
Frazee, Lieutenant James B. Jones and Nathan J. 
Leisure, in Rush county, Indiana. Mustered one-half 
of the company in U. S. service 31st of December by 
Captain J. H. Farquhar, 19 U. S. A. and the com- 
pany was completed March 4, 1864. Went into camp 
Carrington, Indianapolis, December 16, 1863 ; moved 
to Camp Shanks, Indianapolis, February 12, 1864. 
Organized March 4, 1864, at Camp Shanks, India- 
napolis. The words, "My Country, Right or 
Wrong" in large letters are to be found on the sol- 
diers discharge of the company. 

Privates in this company were : 

Allentharp, William; served 11 months in 52nd 
Regiment. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 71 

Armstrong, William. 

Battersby, Charles. 

Begley, Patrick. 

Bradburn, James, was in the battle of Munfords- 
ville, Ky., Company D, 68th Ind, 

Brown, Henry. 

Benjman, Theodore, was in battle of Phillipi, 
Laurel Hill and Cheat River, in 3 months service. 
Company F, 6th Regiment, Indiana Vol. 

Blake, George W. 

Bormer, Alexander. 

Chance, George W. 

Chance, William H. 

Creed, Homer. 

Conklin, Levi ; served twelve months in 16th In- 
diana Regiment. 

Cox, Jonathan. 

Damern, George W. 

Belong, Chancy. 

Dogget, William P. ; served six months in Com- 
pany F, 16th Ind. Regt. 

Edwards, Wesley. 

English, Samuel ; in skirmish at Gurrill 's Hill, 
Tennessee, Company C, 8th Regiment Kentucky Vol, 

Fletcher Barton. 

Flowers, William. 

Forester, David; died March 8 at home. 

Frazee, Joseph. 

Frazier, Andrew. 

Garner, John. 

Guffin, John P. ; served six months in Company 
G, 52nd Ind. 

Gruel, Nathan E. 

Halliway, Enos. 



72 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Haney, Patrick. 

Hoye, Martin. 

Hunnycut, Tilman. 

Hutchinson, Robert. 

Harvey, Robert. 

Huffman, William. 

Isentrager, William L. ; was in battle of Fort 
Donelson, Company G, 52nd Ind. 

Istentrager, James M. 

Jessup, Columbus. 

James, Joseph. 

James, Daniel; was in battles at Richmond, Ky., 
and Arkansas Post, Company H, 16th Ind. 

King, Samuel. 

Lautherer, Charles ; was in two battles before 
Vicksburg and two at Jackson, Miss., in Company 
B, 72nd Ohio Regiment. 

Louks, John; deserted. 

Linville, George. 

Madison, William. 

Maple, Ephraim B. ; served fourteen months, 
Company I, 37th Regiment, Ind. Vol. 

Maple, John J. ; was in battle of Fort Donelson, 
Company F, 52nd Ind. Regiment. 

Maple, Levi. 

McMichael, Thomas. 

McGinness, Samuel S. 

McGee, George H. 

Milhard, Theodore. 

Miller, Daniel. 

Moore, Gardner. 

Moore, Robert. 

Orcutt, George S. ; was in the battle of Clinch 
Mountain, Tenn., Company I, 117 Ind. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 73 



Pickering, Lewis. 

Pea, Ute; was in the battle of Donelson, Com- 
pany H, 52nd Ind. Regiment. 

Poston, Ira. 

Raymond, Samuel L. 

Ralston, Meshig. 

Ridley, Franklin. 

Ryon, John A. 

Shephard, Thomas. 

Smith, Milton. 

Smith, Lorenzo. 

Stevens, Amos W. 

Stevens, Henry J. ; was in battle of Fort Donel- 
son, Company G, 52nd Ind. Regiment. 

Story, Isham. 

Spacy, Oscar F. ; was in battle of Donelson and 
siege of Corinth, Company G, 52nd Ind. 

Scoolcraft, Jacob ; deserted. 

Thrasher, Samuel K. 

Tuttle, James. 

Taylor, David F. 

Walker, Augustus. 

Wright, Jonathan. 

Woods, Robert E. 

Company Officers. 

COMMISSIONED. 

James H. Frazee, Captain, enlisted as private in 
52nd Ind. Promoted to Lieutenant. Was in the bat- 
tle of Fort Donelson and in charge on the left at the 
siege of Corinth, and in numerous skirmishes. 
Served twenty-six months. 

James B. Jones, 1st Lieutenant, was in battle of 
Bowling Green and Chattanooga. Wounded at 



74 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Stone River in the mouth and right lung; IVo oz. 
ball extracted from right side seven days after 
wound was received. 

Nathan J. Leisure, 2nd Lieutenant, served six 
months as Sergeant in 52nd Indiana Regiraent. Was 
in the battle of Fort Donelson. 

NON-COMMISSIONED. 

Sergeants — 

Jacob B. McGinness, orderly, served six months 
in Company F, 16th Ind. 

John H. Bonnett, Q. M. 

William L. Peckham, Com., served twenty-six 
months in Company F, 16th Regiment, Indiana Vol. 
Was taken prisoner in battle of Richmond, Ky., 
August 30, 1862. Was in Arkansas Post and in all 
the battles that occasioned the fall of Vicksburg. 
In several skirmishes with forces under Dick Tay- 
lor, was promoted from 4th Sergeant to 2nd Lieu- 
tenant April 1, 1863. 

Thomas Frazee, 1st. 

Leonidas Thrasher, 2nd. 

Alexander Abernathy, 3rd. Was in the battle of 
Baton Rouge, La., Company G, 21st Ind. Vol, 

David Gaskill, 4th, was in the battle of Boon- 
ville, Carthage and Springfield, Mo. 

John W. Moore, 5th. 
Corporals — 

John M. Armstrong, 1st. 

John B. Moore, 2nd. 

Joseph Alexander, 3rd. 

Milton Hunt, 4th. 

John L. LaBarr, 5th. 

Russell Keeler, 6th. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 75 

Peter B. Cramer, 7th. 

William Bragg, 8th. 
Buglers — 

Oliver G. Hunt, served six months in Company 
I, 115th Regiment. 

Lucius B. Williams. 
Farrier — 

Isom Griffin. 
Blacksmith — 

Josiah Watson. 
Saddler — 

David S. Mason. 
Wagoner — 

David R. Crawford ; was in the battle of Corinth 
on detached service, under Gen. Hackleman, Arkan- 
sas Fort, Company C, 16th Regiment, Indiana Vol. 

While on their way north from New Orleans, 
with the Company under Col. Eli Lily, of Indianapo- 
lis, Jonathan G. Wright, John P. Guffin, Robert 
Hutchinson and Daniel James, Rush county boys, 
were captured by the Confederates across the river 
from Memphis, Tenn., January 11, 1865, and held 
prisoners for two months and a half in the bushes, 
being fed on corn meal mixed with water, baked on 
a chip of wood. This bread and water was all they 
had to eat. Their clothes were all taken from them, 
except their pants and shirt. After the date had 
been set for their execution, the four of them escaped, 
hiding during the day in the swamp bushes, part of 
the time standing in water up to their necks, and 
walking all night for three days and three nights, 
when they were overtaken, ordered to halt, and 
throw up their hands. The first three obeyed and 



76 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Daniel James was shot through the head; leaving 
him lay, the three were taken back. 

Jonathan Wright said John P. Guffin worried so, 
knowing they were soon to be shot; he was only 
about nineteen years old at this time. 

They were exchanged about a week before the 
date set for their execution and were soon dis- 
charged from service. 

They went to the wharf early in the morning to 
take the Sultana, a steamboat running between New 
Orleans and St. Louis and found she had unloaded 
her freight and sailed at two o'clock that Wednes- 
day morning. The passenger list of over 2,300 almost 
entirely of Union soldiers. Of these 2,031 put on at 
Vicksburg were ghastly skeletons called "paroled 
prisoners" from Andersonville and Cahaba prisons 
eagerly counting the hours until they should be home 
with wife and mother. 

When the Sultana was seven miles above Mem- 
phis, her boilers exploded, tearing out the entire cen- 
ter of the boat, and she burned to the water's edge 
April 27, 1865. 

Some were scalded to death immediately ; those 
who were not injured were jumping overboard. The 
river for a mile around was full of floating people. 
The cry of the women ; the groans of those who were 
wounded and thrown from the boat by the explosion ; 
the cries for help when none were there to assist. 
The burning boat soon attracted attention and the 
steamer Bostona, only a mile above, hurried to the 
scene. Everything that could float was thrown into 
the river. Every effort was made by the officers of 
the Bostona to render aid to the drowning jnulti- 
tude. Ten of this company perished. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 77 



Oscar Spacy jumped from the burning b:)af and 
clung to part of a stairway, floated and swam nine 
miles down the river ahead of the burning oil from 
the Sultana, which flowed on the water. He was 
taken from the river at daylight, wrapped in flannel 
and cared for by the "Sisters of Charity." He was 
one of the "paroled prisoners," having just been re- 
leased from the Cahaba prison of Alabama, where he 
had endured all kinds of hardships for six months. 

Over fourteen hundred lost their lives at the time 
of the explosion and nearly three hundred died in 
the hospitals at Memphis. 

For days following the destruction of the Sul- 
tana, the people of Memphis, impoverished by the 
war, which was just closing, forgot sectional feeling 
and laid aside the memories of their own dead upon 
a hundred battlefields to give themselves and all that 
was theirs to procuring the comfort of the survivors. 
Homes were thrown open to the wrecked soldiers as 
to brothers. The pall of horror which lowered above 
the charred timbers of the Sultana blotted out, for 
the time at least, the animosities of warfare. 

Jonathan Wright, John P. Guflin, and Robert 
Hutchinson went back to the soldiers home in Mem- 
phis until they were able to get transportation to the 
North. They arrived in Indianapolis about May 9th, 
coming by way of Shelbyville to Rushville. 

They were in twenty-two or twenty-three battles, 
among which was the one at Palaska, the Nashville 
fight and the one at Franklin National Pike, where 
there were nine hundred men in the morning and 
only one hundred and forty-eight at night — this 
being one of the hardest fought small battles of the 
Civil War. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



HISTORY OF 
NATIONAL SOCIETY D. A. R. 

By MARY M. ALEXANDER. 



Origin and Aims of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. 

On the evening of July 11, 1890, the Sons of the 
American Revolution gave a banquet in Wash- 
ington. Senator John Sherman, of Ohio, was the 
speaker. 

The speech was printed in the Washington Post 
on July 12. Mrs. Mary S. Lockwood read the speech 
and assisted by Mrs. Ellen Hardin Walworth, Miss 
Eugenia Washington and Miss Mary Desha, began 
the D. A. R. movement. On October 11, 1890, seven- 
teen women in Washington organized the society of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

The first woman to apply for membership was 
Mrs. Benjamin Harrison, who was made first Presi- 
dent General. 

Act of Incorporation. 

Fifty-fourth Congress of the United States of 
America. At its first session, begun and held in the 
city of Washington on the second day of December, 
one thousand eight hundred and ninety-five. 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentatives of the United States of America in Con- 
gress assembled, that the founders, associates and 
successors of the Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution are hereby created a body corporate and 
politic for patriotic, historical and educational pur- 
poses. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 79 

Said society shall report annually to the Secre- 
tary of the Smithsonian Institution, who shall com- 
municate to Congress anything of national interest 
or importance. 

(Signed) GROVER CLEVELAND, 

President. 
A. E. STEVENSON, 

Vice President. 

Eligibility. Any woman, eighteen years of age 
or more, is eligible to membership, provided she be 
descended from a man or woman who, with unfailing 
loyalty rendered material aid to the cause of Ameri- 
can independence. 

The society now numbers 177,132 and has an or- 
ganization in every state in the Union, as well as 
Chapters in England, France, China, Mexico, Cuba, 
Hawaii, Porto Rico and the Philippines. Their motto 
is ''Home and Country." 



80 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

HISTORY OF 
RUSHVILLE CHAPTER D. A. R. 

■Written by 

MRS. MARY M. ALEXANDER 

And 

MRS .CAPITOLA GUFFIN DILL 



The Rushville Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution was organized with 109 char- 
ter members in Rushville, September, 1909, by Mrs. 
J. W. Moore. She was unanimously elected its first 
Regent. 

At a reception given in honor of Mrs. John W. 
Dinwiddle, State Regent, of Fowler, Ind., the writer 
suggested a book shower as a nucleus for a city 
library, which was given February 22, 1911, at which 
time over six hundred books were donated. 

The county commissioners granted two rooms 
in the court house for the use of the library, also one 
room for a ladies' rest room. 

After the requirements of the law in reference 
to public libraries had been complied with, the Chap- 
ter surrendered it to the city of Rushville, which 
now maintains it very successfully. There are now 
approximately four thousand volumes on its shelves. 
Miss Mary Sleeth has been librarian continuously 
up to the present time. 

The Chapter has planted trees in the City Park, 
held contests among the public school pupils for 
best essays on patriotic subjects, for which prizes 
were given, and done other work of an educational 
nature. 

The Chapter solicits information in regard to the 
location of graves of soldiers of the Revolution so 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 81 

that government markers may be placed on them, 
also any other items of interest pertaining to the 
early history of our country. Sarah Crawford Guf- 
fin (J. P.) is Regent at present. 




Our emblem is a golden wheel 

Banded with deepest blue 

Each shining spoke tipped with a star 

The distaff showing through 

The only jewel in the world 

That money can not buy 

VVithout such proof of ancestry 

As no one can deny. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



THE LINEAGE OF THE DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN 
REVOLUTION OF THE RUSHVILLE CHAPTER. 



Capitola Guffin Dill, Registrar. 

ABBOTT, JOHN, a soldier in the Revolutionary War, from 
New Jersey. Reference, D. A, R. Nat. No. 78289. Decendant — 
Mrs. Inez Craig (T. A.). 

ALDRIDGE, JOHN, served as private in Rev. War, b. Mar. 
1759, d. Nov. 17, 1843, in Indiana. He was in battle of 
Brandywine and York. Ref. Ind. pen. rolls, p. 30. Census of 
Penna. 1840, p. 185. Decendant — Melissa Aldridge Wagner 
(Hayden). 

AT LEE, JUDGE WM. AUGUSTUS, b. July 1, 1735, in 
Philadelphia, Pa., d. Sept. 9, 1793, Lancaster, Pa. Rev. soldier, 
chairman of Committee of Safety and Commissary, and Supt. 
of arsenal barracks and British prisoners then at Lancaster, 
Pa. Ref. Genealogical Rec. of At Lee family by Edwin At Lee 
Barbour, A.M. Nat. No. D. A. R. 46613. He m. Aug. 31, 1763, 
Esther Bowes Sayre b. 1748, d. July 6, 1790. Children— Eliza- 
beth Amelia, b. Jan. 19, 1765, m. Maj. Mores White; Mary 
Rachel, b. April 16, 1766, m. Edward Victor James; Esther 
Jane, b. Sept. 11, 1776; Jane, b. July 14, 1769, m. Rev. Elisha 
S. Rigg; Wm. Pitt, b. Dec. 27, 1770, d. 1772; Wm. Pitt, b. 
Sept. 24, 1772, m. Sarah Light; John Sayre, b. Mar. 27, 1774, 

m. Elizabeth ; Edwin Augustus, b. Nov. 16, 1776, m. 

Margaret Snyder; Esther Bowes, b. Feb. 8, 1778, m. Rev. Wm. 
Wliite; Sarah Ann, b. June 5, 1780, m. Thomas Vickrey; 
Charlotte Hazen, b. July 13, 1782, m. Nathanial Hazen White 
and Rev. Joshua Rowe. Descendant — Emma L. Browne Lam- 
bert, Rev. I. D. 

BALL, ZOPHER, b. Frederick, Va., d. 1803. Rev. soldier in 
Capt. Eleazer Williamson's Co. of rangers in Penna. 1778 to 
1783. Ref. Penna Archives, Vol. 23; Third Series p. 331; Vol. 4 
p. 757, and Vol. 14 p. 716. Ch. were Caleb, b. 1755. He m. Phebe 
Walton. Dennis, Henry, Isaiah, Abel and John. Decendants— 
Rhoda Gary Green (T.B.), Emily Gary Wilson (M.R.), Caro- 
line Gary Hubbart (F. B.), Jennie Gary Van Osdol (D. D.), 
Eva Ball. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



BAILEY, THOMAS, b. April, 1757, Va., d. 1820 in Ky 
Rev. soldier, served as private in Capt. Thos. Ridley's Co., 
formerly Capt. John Holcome Co., 4th Va. Reg., commanded 
by Col. Thos. Elliott. Ref. Adjutant Gen. Office, War Dep 
Pay roll, Apr. 1777. His children were — Wm., b. Dec. 1789; 
Isaac b. Apr. 1791, m. Phoeba Budd; Jackson b. Oct. 1793, m. 
Mary Russell; Alfred b. Jan. 1796, m. Ladosha La Follette; 
Elizabeth b. Jan. 1799, Chas. Lord; Henry b. Feb. 1802, un- 
married; Ruth b. Dec. 1809, unmarried; Thomas M. b. Aug. 14 
1811, m. Susan Harlow. Decendant — Alberta Mahan Walker 
(A. P.). 

BANTA, ABRAHAM, b. Hackensack, July 7, 1745, d. Ky 
after 1781. Rev. sol. pri. in Capt. Hugh Campbell's Co. 2nd 
Battalion of York Co. Pa. under Col. Robt. McPherson. Ref. 
Frisian Family p. 88, by Theo. M. Banta. Nat. D. A. R. No. 
66990. He m. Margrieta Manfort. Children — Rachel b. Oct. 
23, 1768, m. Peter Banta; Hendrick, b. May 31, 1771, m. Wil- 
mutte Combs; Johanna b. July 4, 1773, m. Demott; Marrieta 
b. Aug. 31, 1777; Peter b. Oct. 24, 1782, m. Mary Vorhies; 
Christiana, m. Andrew Shuck. Decendant — Mary Helen Wal- 
den (C. E.). 

BLACKLIDGE, ICHOBUD, Rev. soldier, a private in Capt. 
Henman's Co. N. J., Class No. 13, was b. in Elizabethtown, 
N. J., Jan. 1, 1745, d. Pulaski Co., Ky. Ref. Record of N. J. 
troops convened May 11, 1778. Nat. D. A. R. No. 59727. He 
m. Susan Woodruff. Decendants — Grace Blacklidge Spivey 
(A. v.), Emma Blacklidge, India Blacklidge Alexander (W. A.). 

BROCKWAY, EDWARD, b. Lyma, Conn., 1736, d. Hart- 
ford, 0., Mar. 4, 1813. First enlisten a p. in Capt. Josiah 
Fowler's Co. from Branford, Conn., 1775; 2nd enlisted as ser- 
geant in Capt. Jonathan Colkin's Co. Aug. 24, 1777. Dis- 
charged Oct. 1777. Third enlisted from Hartford, Conn., in 
Col. Martin Smith's Reg. Ref. Connecticut Men in the Rev. p. 
6; p. 505 appears the 2nd enlistment; p. 562 3rd enlistment. 
Children — Edward Brock way b. 1760, m. Rachel Selby. De- 
scendant, Mildred Moore Amos (W. M.). 

BROWN, GEORGE, b. Hardy Co., Va., June 22, 1760, d. 
Milroy, Rush Co., Ind., Sept. 21, 1825. Served as sergeant in 
Rev. War in Capt. J. Valentine's Co. 1st Va. Reg. Command- 
ed Col. Geo. Gibson. Ref. Nat. D. A. R.. No. 5213. He m. 



84 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Sept. 8, 1788, to Rebecca Conrad. Descendant — Mate Power 
Jay (Wm.) 

CALDWELL, ROBERT, b. Fayette Co., Penn., June 1, 1757, 
d. Rush Co., July 31, 1845. Enlisted 1776, served three years 
Capt. Windell Onry, Capt. Swearinger, Capt. John Finley, Col 
Enos McCoy, Col. Daniel Broadhead, Col. Morgan, Penn. troops. 
Was in the Saratoga campaign and capture of Burgoyne's 
army. Ref. Pension Bureau Dept. of Interior, Pen. Rolls from 
Nichols Co., Ky., Nat. No. 3580, S. A. R. He m. Sarah Ann 

Fryer. Children — Nancy m. Smith. William m. Rebecca 

Havner, Elizabeth m. Scott, Robert, James, Mary (Polly) 

m. Howe, Joseph David, Jane m. Ploughe, Sallie m. 

Foster, Tabitha m. McVey. Descendants — Uina Ford 

Black (Earnest), Lenora Alexander Blacklidge (Amos). 

CARR, WILLIAM, b. in Penn. in 1745, d. Redbank, Lewis 
Co., Ky., in 1814. Rev. soldier served as private in Virginia 
Reg. Ref. D. A. R. Nat. No. 73459. First wife, Rebecca Whir- 
ley. Children — Harvey Werley m. E. W. Walker, Jane Petit; 
ley. Children — Harvey Worley Carr, m. E. Walker and Jane 
petit; Roland T., Isaac, Abraham and William. Second wife, 
Susan Brandenburg. Children — Moses, Jacob, and John m. 
Alcestis Laughlin. Descendants — Jessie Spann Gary (A.L.), 
Lillie M. Mauzy (C. A.). Hypatia Carr Marshall (S. M.), Ruth 
Carr Poe (W. B.), Rena Poe Warner (F.). 

CARROLL, WILLIAM, b. Ireland before 1763, d. Alliganig 
Co., N, Y., August, 1824. Was a private in Capt. Thomas As- 
key's Co. 1st Battalion Cumberland Co. Militia, 1782, James 
Dunlap, Col. Ref. p. 131, Vol. 6, Penn. Archives, 5th series. He 
m. Phebe Wortman, of N. J. Children — John, Louis Wortman, 
Richard, James b. 1789 m. Lucy Gregory; Phoebe b. 1801, m. 
Peter Gregory. Descendant — Edessa Carroll Innis (H. T.). 

CASS AD Y, THOMAS, born before 1757 in Virginia, died in 
Rush county, Indiana, September 6, 1825, b. in the Kelly grave- 
yard, in Rush county. Ref. War Dept., Adjutant Gen. office. 
House of Delegates of Virginia, 1834, Doc. No. 44. House of 
Delegates, 1834; War Department Adj. office, ''A List of Sol- 
diers of Virginia." He married Mrs. Margaret McGruff Hale, 
who died 1823. Children— Weir, b. 1780, d. 1833, m. in 1811 
to Elizabeth (Getsy) Gruell, b. Jan. 6, 1791, d. Sept. 25, 
1886; Thomas, m. Rachel Crawford; William, m. Sarah 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 85 

Webb; Simon, m. twice, Jermina McCray and Dilly . Simon 

and Elizabeth were twins, born October 25, 1787. Elizabeth 
m. Isom Webb. Eleanor (Nellie) married Thomas Douglas. 
Sampson, born Sept. 15, 1791, married Cornelia Webb. Descend- 
ants — *Sarah Crawford Guffin (J.P.), *Margaret Crawford 
Friend (Theo.), *Rachel Crawford Jones, married twice, Clay 
King, David Jones; Margaret Crawford (D.A.), Rachel Hop- 
kins (George), Anna F. Ridenbaugh (Benjamin), Nellie Riden- 
baugh McVay (W.G.), Alma Cassady Winship (J.T.), Eliza- 
beth Cassady Caldwell (J.E.), Emma Cassady, Laura Mere- 
dith, Dove C. Meredith, Eleanor McCann Carlisle (P.C), Capi- 
tola Gufiin Dill (Wm.), Mable Cassady Beaver (Samuel), Jes- 
sie Cassady Green (Hal), Mary Cassady Cotton (Frank W.). 

CLAYPOOL, BETSEY ROSS, b. Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 1, 
1752, d. Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 30, 1836. She was considered 
the finest needle worker in America; this, and Gen. Geo. Wash- 
ington's high regard for her, led the committee to consult 
her about the flag. Mrs. Ross suggested that the stars have 
but five points instead of six. She made the first American 
flag and it was first used at Saratoga and on its first battle 
led to victory. Ref. U. S. A. history. Descendant — Emma 
Merrill Havens (Wm. E.). 

CORTELYOU, HENRY, b. New Brenwick, N. J., July 1, 
1760, d. Keording, Hamilton Co., 0., Jan., 1825. He was a 
minute man — private in the Somerset Co. N. J. militia. Ref., 
"The Berglen Family," by L. G. Berglen, of N. Y., foot notes 
p. 228-308-264. Certificate of service of Henry Cortelyou by 
Hon. W. Stryker, Adj. Gen. of N. J. Descendant — Mary Eliza- 
beth Lawrence Jones (F.P.). 

CONE, RUFUS, b. East Haddam, Oct. 10, 1737, was taken 
prisoner in 1776 and never heard from. He enlisted in 8th 
Co. of 7th Reg. of Connecticut Continentals under Col. Charles 
Webb, July 10, 1775. He enlisted in Capt. Jewett's Com- 
pany, 17th Continental Reg., Col. Huntington. Was in the 
battle of Long Island, August 27, 1776. Half this regi- 
ment were taken prisoners and he was missing. Ref. Cone 
family in America, by W. W. Cone, of Bradsville, Md. 



*Granddaughters of Weir Cassady, a soldier in the War 
of 1812. 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Com. Minn, the Rec. pp. 83, 102. He m. Dec. 1760, Esther 
Stewart, b. Sept. 1743, d. Sept. 1826. Children— Philena b. 

Jan. 8, 1762; Azel, b. June 8, 1763, m. Kesiah ; Grace C. 

b. April 14, 1765, m. Phineas Smith; Clarissa b. Dec. 9, 1767; 

Esther b. Sept. 10, 1770; Huldal b. July 5, 1772 m. 

Howard; Charles b. May 15, 1773, m. Jane Harvey. Descendant 
— Emma Buell Sexton. 

CAMPBELL, THOMAS, b. Scotland, July 10, 1737, d. Maine, 
Oct. 18, 1803. He was a private in Capt. Geo. Reid's Co., Col. 
John Starks Reg. of N. H. militia. Ref. D. A. R., Nat. No. 
18437. His w., Margaret Dunning, b. Nov. 25, 1740, d. Sept., 
1814, m. Jan. 1, 1760. Children— Daniel, b. Jan. 19, 1762, m. 
Elizabeth Thomas; Mary, b. May 10, 1764, m. Levi Bradley; 
Thomas, b. Oct. 10, 1766, m. Sahara Knapp; James, b, Sept. 
23, 1768, m. Margaret Boyd; Robert, b. Sept. 6, 1770, m. Bet- 
sey Knapp; Elizabeth, b. Jan. 3, 1773, m. Elisha Crane; Mar- 
garet, b. Sept. 23, 1774; Eleanor, b. April 9, 1776, m. Samuel 
Eastman; Susanna, b. April 18, 1778, m. William Hammond; 
Martha, b. Feb. 18, 1781, m. Edwin Sweet; Jane, b. May 18, 
1783, m. Daniel Dudley; Margaret, b. Feb. 25, 1785, m. John 
Smith. Descendant — Helen Campbell Havens (Walter). 

DAVIS, WILLIAM, b. Ireland, May 15, 1730, d. Crawford 
Co., Pa., Sept. 20, 1824. He served three years enlisting for 
Groten, Mar. 17, 1777. He exchanged with a man named 
Geo. Walton, March 26, 1777, and later was in the Georgia 
Battalion. Ref. Genealogy of Davis family by T. K. Davis, 
D. D., Wooster, 0. See Nat. No. 26556 and 11311, D. A. R. He 
m. Mary Means, 1757. Children — Daughter, d. in infancy; 

James, Joseph, b. 1762, m. Sarah Shoch; William m. Kir- 

by; daughter, d. in infancy; John, 1764-1837, m. Mary McGon- 
negel; Patrick, daughter, Henry, Samuel. Descendants — 
Frances Sarah Cullen (Judge Wm. A.), Hannah Cullen Sex- 
ton (J.C), Frances E. Sexton Green (D.C.). 

DIXON, THOMAS, b. Conn. March 14, 1732, d. Sterling, 
Conn, March 13, 1802. He was a minute man at Lexington 
alarm, also a sergeant. Ref. D. A. R. Nat. No. 27194. He m. 
Lydia A. Parks, 1760, at Plainfield, Conn. Children — James, 
b. June 11, 1760, killed in accident; John, b. August 30, 1761; 
Mary b. Dec. 25, 1762; Eunice, b. Apr. 22, 1764; Nancy, b. 
Jan. 22, 1766; William, b. Sept. 4, 1767; Charles, b. Nov. 2, 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 87 

1768; Lydia, b. Sept. 19, 1771; Fernum, b. May 12, 1774. 
Descendant — Mary Alice Reeve (deceased) (J. B.). 

ELLIS, John, a Rev. soldier. Ref., Nat. D. A. R. 75845. 
Descendant — Frances Davis CuUen (W.A.) 

FRAZEE, SAMUEL, b. Penn., Nov. 5, 1753, d. Mason Co., 
Ky,, Nov. 12, 1848. He fought under Col. Bowman, also in 
Capt. Williams Harrod's Co. in Western Dep. Ref. Nat. D. A. 
R., No. 29858. He m. 1777 Rebecca Jacobs, b. 1761, d. 1836. 
Children— Hannah, b. 1789, m. Joseph Pollock; Ephriam, b. 
1792, m. Susan M. Domphan; Joseph, b. 1794, m. Mary Ann 
Cobwrin; Jacob, b. 1796, m. Ann Frazee; Rebecca, b. 1799, m. 
Thomas Domphan; Lewis, b. 1802. Descendant— Helen Camp- 
bell Havens (Walter). 

FINLEY, JOSEPH LEWIS b. near Greensburg, Pa., Feb. 
20, 1753, d. Ohio, May 23, 1839. He served as Captain and 
First Lieutenant Major in 13th Penn Reg., was commissioned 
as 1st Lieutenant, Oct. 24, 1776, promoted to Captain Oct. 20, 
1777, resigned July 10, 1778. Ref. Penn. S^ate Library 
Division of Public Records, p. 512, Vol. 2, Penn. Archives, 
5th Series, Nat. D. A. R., No. 72075. He m. July 4, 1782, 

Jane Blair, d. July 1, 1840. Children— Hannah, b. 

m. Col. John Lodwick; Juliet, Michael, Elizabeth, Nancy, 

John, b. , m. Rebecca Plumm; Joseph, Ebenezer, Mary, 

m. Joseph (John) Patterson; Samuel, Margaret, m. Simon 
Chipps; James, m. Eliza Rothmel. Descendant — Frances Fin- 
ley Oneal (L. A.). 

GILPIN, ISRAEL, b. Delaware, Oct. 4, 1740, d. Boon Co., 
Ky., July 4, 1834. He served as Capt. under Col. John Mc- 
Kinley, Delaware troops. Later served as Colonel and Pur- 
chasing Commissary. Battle of Brandywine was fought on 
his farm and house used for Gen. Howe's headquarters. Ref., 
Dept. of Interior, Bureau of Pensions, I. S. C, and S. File 4297, 

Rev. War. He m. Giles. Children— Nancy, b. 1778, m. 

W. Perkins. Descendant — Alice Perkins Caldwell (Fred). 

GRAY ROBERT, b. Ireland, 1743, d. . He took oath of 

allegiance to U. S. A., served under Gen. Putnam and Gen. 
Watta. He served under Capt. Swilertt and Captain Jonathan 
Robinson. Ref. Nat. N. D. A. R., 41556. 

He m. Agnes . Robert Gray had ten sons and one 

daughter. Descendants — Agnes Daily Spurrier (J.A.); Ida 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



Miriam Spurrier McDaniel (M.R.) ; Hazel D. Spurrier Swihart 
(J.W.). 

GREEN, THOMAS, b. Rhode Island, 1760, d. near Brook- 
ville, Ind., 1822. He enlisted in R. I. Regt. under his cousin, 
Gen. Nat. Green, and made the trip between the North and 
South army overland, passing through the British lines with- 
out detection or capture 85 times. He served as Captain two 
years 1st Lieutenant two years 2nd Lieutenant two years, 
sergeant two years. He was made Judge Advocate and Land 
Commissioner of Ter. of Ind. and located at Ft. Brookville, 
Ind. He was accidentally drowned. Ref. Nat. D. A. R., No. 
69498. He m. Elizabeth Matthews. Children were — Daniel, b. 
Oct. 17, 1783, m. Nancy Vardaman and Peggy Bell Lair; Eliza- 
beth, b. Feb. 11, 1785, m. John Wagoner; Susanna, b. Mar. 7, 
1787, m. John Scott; Agnes, b. August 13, 1788, m. Henry Har- 
mon; Nancy, b. April 11, 1790, m. Thomas Hill, and Wm. Whit- 
sett; Ransbird, b. Feb. 25, 1792, m. Ruth Morgan; Drusilla, b. 
Nov. 25, 1793, m. Levi Cooper; James, b. April 11, 1795, m. 
Mary Ewing, Martha Ewing; Samuel, b. Feb. 5, 1797, m. Betsy 
Hittle; Lot, b. April 15, 1799, m. Anna Cooper and Sarah 
Huston; Ascena, b. May 15, 1801, m. Thomas Wolverton, and 
Stephen Sparks. Descendants — Florence Green Moore (J. W.), 
Alpha Green Eads (J.B.), Stella Green Rucker (J.M.), Patience 
Rucker, Lottie Green Tatman, (C.E.), Nellie Green Schrader 
(Conrad), Mary Brann Smith (A.P.). 

HACKLEMAN, JACOB, b. Maryland, July 16, 1752, d. Rush 
Co., Ind., Jan. 16, 1829. He lived in Lincoln Co., N. C, dur- 
ing Rev. War; served as Rev. soldier; was wounded in right 
arm and hired John Gant to serve the rest of his time. Ref., 
Family Record, Vol. 1, by Brig. Gen. Pleasant A. Hackleman. 
Nat. D. A. R., No. 73985. He m. Mary Osborne, b. 1754, d 
1824, m. 1773. Children— Elizabeth, b. July 20, 1774, m. Wm. 
Tyner; Abraham, b. Sept. 25, 1775, m. Margaret Tyner; Sarah, 
b. Dec. 24, 1776, m. Wm. Millner; Katherine, b. August 8, 1778, 
m. Conrad Sailors; Isaac, b. March 26, 1730, m. Elizabeth 
Hawkins, and Rachel Cotton; Mary, b. Nov. 17, 1781, m. Green 
B. Lines; Margaret, b. Nov. 17, 1781, m. Henry Lines; Jacob, b. 
Jan. 14, 1784, m. Riller Robeson; John, b. Dec. 16, 1785, m. 
Sarah Adams; Susan, b. Sept. 9, 1787, m. Samuel Williams and 
William Smith; Michael, b. April 12, 1789, m. Katherine Webb; 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 83 

Thomas, b. 1790, m. Katherine Alensworth; Fanny, b. May 12, 
1793, m. Jesse Webb; Riller, b. June 11, 1799, m. James Davis. 
Descendants — Fanny Hackleman Ayres (I.W.), Josephine 
Hackleman Conner (S.C.) deceased, Adelia Megee Mcintosh 
(D.R.), Sallie Monroe Henley, Minnie Mills Elliott (H.A.), 
Fanny Armstrong Ames (J.J.), Ruby Amos Strong (E.A. Ja.), 
Stella Downey Cofield (E.D.), Bertha Nelle Lyons Tittsworth 
(John). 

HAMILTON, JOHN, b. England, d. . A Rev. soldier, 

served as sergeant under Captain Isaac Seelys Co., 5th Penn. 
Reg., commanded by Captain Francis Johnson. Ref., D. A. R. 
Nat. No. 16140. Children — John, Samuel, m. Dilly Donovan; 
Edward, m. Mary Hutchinson. Descendant — Beulah Hamilton 
Frazee (L.A.). 

HENDRICKS, ABRAM, b. Penn., Nov. 5, 1749, d. Penn., 
1819. Served as private under Capt Matthew Griers, Com. of 
Buck Co. militia, 1780. Later he served in the ranging force 
of Westmoreland Co. Ref. Nat. D. A. R., No. 28072. The Life 
and Speeches of T. A. Hendrick, page 41-42. He m. Anna 
Jamieson, b. 1754, d. 1835. Children — Abram Jr. m. Miss Hen- 
derson; Jamison, Daniel, William, b. August 17, 1776, m. Miss 
Paul; John, b. Jan. 29, 1778, m. Miss Thompson; Thomas, b. 
Jan. 28, 1773, m. Elizabeth Timble; Ann, m. William Hen- 
derson; Rachel, m. Judge Pullock; Mary, b. Nov. 12, 1789, m. 
John McHargh. Descendant — Mary Nesbitt Cowan (S. E.). 

HALLETT, JOSEPH, b. Barnstable, Mass., Sept. 21, 1736, 
d. Barnstable, Mass., March 29, 1809. Was corporal in 
Capt. Joshua Gray's Company, also private under Captain 
Elisha Nye's Company, stationed at Elizabeth Islands, and 
private under Captain Elisha Hedge's Company, Col. Freeman's 
Reg. Ref., Swift Old Barnstable Families, Vol. 1, p. 518; Mass. 
Soldiers and Sailors, Rev. War., Vol. VII, p. 125; Barnstable 
Death Rec, p. 8, Marriage Rec, page 4'5, and Church Rec, p. 
150-157. Lewisana, New York, Gen. p. 91, Vol. 7, p. 28, Vol 6. 
He m. Thankful Baxter, m. Apr. 12, 1760. Children— Jane, 
Mary, m. Smith; Hannah, m. Lewis; triplets baptized Sept. 
27, 1767; Desire, b. July 14, 1771; Joseph, b. Sept. 8, 1776; 
Richard, b. June 27, 1779. Descendants — Frances Davis Cullen 
(W.A.), Hannah Cullen Sexton (J.C), Angeline M. Yeagf?r 



90 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Lewis (L.B.), Mary Lewis Hovey, (F.H.), Frances Sexton 
Green (D.C.). 

INNIS, JAMES, b. Montreal, Canada, between 1756-1762, 
d. Jumata Co., Pa., Oct. 21, 1826. Was a private. His first 
wife Avas Ann Arbuckle. Ref. Rec. from Pension Dept. 
Children by first wife — Francis, William, Samuel, James, John, 
Elizabeth, Nathaniel, Alexander, b. Sept. 2, 1794, m. Christian 
Kirkpatriek; Joseph, Ann, Children by second wife — Sarah, 
Mary, Isabella, Robert, Jane, Ebenezer, Nancy. Descendants — 
Elizabeth Innis Boys (G.B.), Orma Archer Innis Smith (J.L.). 

ISBELL, THOMAS, b. Albermarle Co. Va., Jan. 27, 1753, 
d. Wilkes Co., N. C, Oct. 27, 1819. Was a private in Capt. 
Thos. Walker's Company 9th Va. Reg., commanded by Thos. 
Fleming, Esq., also designated as Capt. Wm. Henderson's Co., 
9th Va. Reg., commanded by Col. Geo. Matthews. Ref. War 
Dept. record Nat. D. A. R., No. 59724. He m. Discretion How- 
ard, b. 1764, d. 1848, and m. 1782. Descendant— Mary I. Cole- 
man (T.A.). 

JAMESON, DAVID, b. 1757 in N. J., d. 1833, in Ky. A Rev. 
soldier, served as a private in the 5th Co., 2nd New Jersey 
Regt., commanded by Lieut Col. F. Barber. Was a private 
under Lievit J. Cummings, also a private in Washington's com- 
mand to close of war. Record and Pension Of., War Dept., 
Washington, D. C. Rec. in Of. of Adjutant Gen., Trenton, 
N, J.; Stryker's officers and men of N. J. in the Rev., page 
219. His wife, Hannah Richards, d. August 19, 1814. Chil- 
dren — Samuel, in war of 1812, m. Woods; John, m. 

Lucy Monfort; W^esley, m. Mary Reed; Thomas, m. Lucinda 
Cartmel; Rebecca, b. in fort to be safe from Indians, m. John 
Cotton, Hester Ann, m. James Heming; Elizabeth, m. James 
Mauzy; Margaret, m. James Culton; Sarah, m. John Lore. 
Descendants — Mary Francis Payne (Edwin); Sarah Mauzy 
Mowers (Rev.), Lucia Wilson Beher (Carl). 

JACQUES, JONATHAN, a private in a New Jersey regi- 
ment in the Revolutionary War. Ref. and Rec, Nat. D. A. R., 
No. 61919. Descendant — Ada B. Jacquess. 

LEE, THOMAS, b. Cortlandt Manor, N. J., July 1, 1728, 
d. Morristown, N. J., Jan. 7, 1805. His name will be found 
in 1st Battalion Somerset Co., also state troops and Contin- 
ental Army. The name Thos. Lee, also Militia Strykus, offi- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 91 

eers and men of N. J. Ref. D. A. R. Nat. No. 75856. He m. 
Dinah Perrine, b. 1731, d. 1791, m. 1775. Children— Peter, Paul, 
Israel, Philip. Thomas, William, Dinah b. 1775, m. Abija Cul- 
ter. Descendants — Bessie Ann Lee Van Osdal (Harry) ; Luna 
Marie Lee. 

LEE, PETER PERRINE, b. Woodbridge, N. Y., Mar. 10, 
1756, d. North Bend, 0., Sept. 22, 1844. Private soldier New 
Jersey troops. Ref. Nat. D. A. R., No. 25197-31396. He m. 
Ruth Huntington Gard, b. 1764, d. 1819. Children— Elsy Cul- 
pepper Lee. b. 1795, m. Sarah Ann Murphy; 1st ch. Malinda 
m. Jonathan Lyon; 7th ch. Rodney Jefferson, 8th ch. 
Monroe Wells. There were nine ch., three girls and six 
boys. Descendants — Bessie Ann Lee Van Osdol (Harry) ; Lura 
INIarie Lee. 

LEWIS, JOHN, b. Lowder Co., Va., 1749, d. Rush Co., Ind., 
1841. He served as a private in a Va. Reg., 1777, under Col. 
Abraham Shepherd, from Lowder Co., Va., later he enlisted 
at Washington Co., Pa., served as Sergeant. Ref. D. A. R. 
Nat. No. 31392 and 31393; Bureau of Pensions. He m. Mary 
Power. Descendants — Capitola Guffin Dill (Wm.) ; Comma 
GufRn Gray (Morton) ; Bertha Carney Logan (H.V.) ; Grace 
Wilson Carney (Seneca); Auda Wilson Alexander (George). 

LEWIS, LEMUEL, b. Mass., May 23, 1725, d. New York 
about 1816. Served as private in Capt. Jothan Hoguhton's Co. 
of Col. Samuel Denny's Reg. Ref. Mass. Soldiers and Sailors 
in Rec. Vol. 9, p. 750. Rec. from Adj. Gen. office of War Dep., 
Washington, D. C. Family Rec. by Mark W. Lewis, Superior, 
Wis. He m. Temperance Bearce, b. Mar. 17, 1732, d. May 1776, 
m. March 7, 1750. Children— Jonathan, b. 1766; George, b. 1754; 
Richard, b. 1751; Temperance, b. 1757; Lydia, b. 1759; 
Lemuel, b. 1761; Bethia, b. 1764; Jean, b. 1754; Anna, b. 1768; 
Rachel, b. 1761. Descendants — Frances Davis Cullen (Jud. W. 
A.); Hannah C. Sexton (Dr. J. C.) ; Frances E. Sexton Green 
(D. C). 

MAUZY, WILLIAM, b. in Virginia 27th Dec, 1755, d. in 
Ind., 6th Apr., 1837. A private — served in Girard's Virginia 
Regt., Rev. War, from 1776 to 1780. He was a pensioner, was 
at the surrender of Cornwallis, at Yorktown, Va., Oct. 17, 
1781. Rec. and Pen. office War Dept., Washington, D. C; Rec. 
in office of Adjutant Gen., Trenton, N. J.; D. A. R. Nos. 16643, 



92 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Married Ursulla Arnold, b. Feb. 22, 1753, d. May 8, 1823. 
Children — Nancy, m. Chas. Jones; Elizabeth, m. Roland Grant; 
James, m. Elizabeth Jameson; George, m. Lillian Gren- 
stard; Sallie, m. Wra. Jones; John A., m. Polly Gooding; 
Silas, m. Nancy Gooding; Peter Wm., m. Sallie Gooding; 
Henry, unmarried. Descendants — Sarah Mauzy Mowers, Mary 
Francis Payne (Edwin), Marian Mauzy Jones (H.O.), Anna 
Mauzy Moore (H.W.), Sallie Bell Case (J.D.), Martha Bell 
Grindle (Wilford), Eva Francis Bell Hires (Elmo). 

MILLER, JOHN, b. Pennsylvania, 1752, d. Rush Co., Ind., 
1836. Enlisted August, 1776, for three years as private under 
Capts. Montgomery, Swearinger and Finley, Cols. Marckey 
and Broadhead, in 8th Pa. One year Morgan Rifle Co. Was 
in battle of Borgune and others. Application for pension 
Sept. 15, 1818. Res. Fleming Co., Ky., and allowed. Ref. 
Dept. of Interior, Bureau of Pensions, Rolls p. 92. Children 
— Mary, m. James Hillis; Sarah, m. James Kitchen; 

Oliver, m. ; William, m. Jane Curry; John, m. Ellen 

Beckett; Alexander, m. Hannah Morrison; Josiah, m. Lucinda 
Jones. Descendants — Nannie H. Ross (S), Margaret Miller 
English. 

McGEE, JOHN, b. Middlesex Co., N. J., Mar. 20, 1761, 
d. Ky., 1833. Enlisted in 1776; served as private under Capt. 
David Chambers and B. Smock, and Col. Wm. Scudder in N. J. 
Was in battle of Monmouth. Ref. Dept. of Interior, Bureau 
of Pensions. Rec. Div. V. L. M., File 1230, Rev. War. He m. 
Miss Ellison. Children — James m. Mary Kenning; John, Rob- 
ert, Seth, William, Jesse, Samuel, Ellison. Descendant — Mae 
Bebout Stiers (Wilber). 

McDANIEL, WILLIAM, SR., b. in Terre Haute, Ind., 1732, 
d. Vigo Co., Ind., 1817. He served as private in the 3rd Troop, 
1st Regiment Light Dragoons, Continental Troops, Revolution- 
ary War. Ref. Adj. Gen. Office, War Department, No. 1578829. 

Children— William McDaniel, b. 1753 and m. Elizabeth . 

Descendant — Alberta Maline Walker. 

McDANIEL, WM., b. in Scotland, 1753, son of Wm. McDan- 
iel, Sr., d. in 1844. Private in Captain Joseph Spencer's Co., 
7th Reg. Va., com. by Col. Alexander McClenachan ; discharged 
April 10, 1778. Ref. Adjutant Gen. office War Dept.. Albert 
]\IcDaniel. Verified by certificate from War Dept., L. B. He 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 93 

m. Elizabeth , b. 1709, m. 1783, d. 1844. Children- 
Elizabeth, b. 1785, m. Richard Bucker; Harriett, b. 1788, m. 
Daniel Stinet; George, b. 1790, m. Arzelda Bucket; Alimara, 
b. 1800, unmarried; Aaron, b. 1803, m. Mary Fields. Descend- 
ant — Alberta Mahin Walker. 

McQueen, THOMAS, b. Baltimore, Md., December, 1701, 
d. in Ind., 1838. Rev. soldier. Taken prisoner by Indians 
and escaped from them at two different times. Last 
time was sold to the British, put in irons and kept three 
months. He refused to join British army. At close of 
war, returned home, after an absence of two years. Acted 
in the capacity of patriot and private. Ref. Dept. of Interior 
of Pensions. File 33080; Indiana Pension Rolls, p. 38. Pen- 
sioner, Washington, D. C. Was m., 1785, to Sarah Vaughn, 
d. 1839. Children— Mary, b. 1780, m. Daniel Thomas; Uriah, m. 
Elizabeth Tanner; Joshua, m. Elizabeth Brown; Elizabeth, m. 
John Staughton; Nancy, m. Moses Joiner; Jennie, m. Thos. 
Green Lee; Sallie, m. James Love; Debora, m. Wm. Brown; 
Benjamin, m. Lydia Dixon; Joseph, m. Nancy Stoughton; John, 
m. Marcelia Beaty; Thomas. Descendants — Mrs. Mary M. 
Thomas Alexander, Mrs. Lenora Alexander Blacklidge. 

NICHOLS, FRANCIS, b. in New Hampshire, Jan. 10, 1705, 
d. Ohio, Sept. 30, 1808. He served in Rev. War from July 10, 
1781, to Dec. 11, 1781. Ref. Adj. Gen. office of New Hamp- 
shire, Vol. Ill, page 254. Nat. I). A. R., No. 20020. Descend- 
ant — Sadie D. Allen. 

NORRIS, AQUILA, b. before 1750, Va. or Md., d. in Brown 
Co., Ohio, Feb. 6, 1812. Served as Captain in Rev. War, from 
Harford Co., Md. Index to Maryland militia, 1778-79 p. 49. 
Aquila Norris and Captain Joseph Norris were brothers; their 
children married Benjamin and Priscilla. See National No. 
89402. Aquila Norris, m. Hannah . Children — Eliza- 
beth, m. cousin, James Norris; Martha, m. Whitfield Hyatt; 
William; Temperance, m. Wm. Miller; Elisha, m. Elizabeth 
Bush; James, m. Nancy Gates; Aquila, m. Sarah Sargent; 
Nathan, m. Mary Walton; Ruth and Naomi, twins, m. 
Armstrong brothers; Priscilla B., m. Capt. Benjamin Nor- 
ris, 1814. Descendants — Leila Norris Gilbert (Dr. C. H.), Leo- 
nora Norris, Zenith Alice Norris. 

POSEY, ZEPHANIAH, b. Va. Dec. 1753, d. Hamilton Co., 



94 SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 

Ohio, 21st Oct., 1826, buried in Hopewell cemetery, Rush Co. 
Ind. Private soldier, promoted to sergeant. Served three 
years in a Va. regiment commanded by Col. Daniel Mor- 
gan and Lieut. Col. John Cropper. Was transferred to 
Capt. Geo. Rice's Co., 11th and 15th Va. Regt., and sub- 
sequently to Capt. Philip Slaughter's Co., known as Lieut. 
James Wright's Co., 7th Va. Reg. Discharged Nov. 1, 
1779. Ref. Adjutant Gen. War Dept.; Ohio Year Book, S. A. 
R. 1898, p. 195. Pensioned June 23, 1819. Sergeant of Va. 
Continentals Co. in Hamilton Co., Ohio, under act of Congress, 
1818. He m. Mary Jackson, b. 1760, d. 1839. Children— Nancy, 

b. 1782, m. Marshall; William, b. 1784; Frances, b. 1786, 

m. Marshall, and Deeters; Sallie, b. 1788, m. 

Jacob Miller; Arnsted, b. 1793, m. Kathern Miller; Alfred, b. 

1796, m. Stathem; Cecelia, b. 1799, m. Sherman; 

Louisa, b. 1801, m. Jameson; Albert, b. 1805. Descend- 
ants — Sallie E. Adams, Charlotte Callaghan, Nellie Gantner 
Havens (H.S.), Fannie Posey Hugo (Chas.), Nellie Adams 
Leach (Will), Sarah Moore (Alvin), Luella Posey Yakey 
(A.L.), Minnie Posey Moffett, Anna Posey Deming (Albert). 

SEXTON, OLIVER CHAPIN, b. Wellbraham, Mass., 1759, 
d. Lambertville, Mich., 1845. Was a private from Hampshire 
Co., Mass., under Capt. Woodbridge in Col. Tyler's Regt., also 
served in Capt. John Morgan Co. Company detached from 
militia of Hampshire and Worcester counties to guard stores 
and magazines at Brookfield and Springfield. Ref. from State 
Sec. of Mass. for Noah Sexton and his son, Oliver Sexton, ser- 
vice in Rev. War. Noah Sexton, Vol. 9, p. 421. Oliver Sexton, 
Vol. 23, p. 194; Vol. 24, p. 140; Vol. 25, p. 194. He m. Jerusha 
West. Children — Oliver, m. 1st wife Harriet Bliss; David, 
Jerusha West, m. Benjamin Munsel and Harris Winslow; Earl, 
m. Esther Preston; Horotis Gates, b. Jan. 21, 1796, m. Hannah 
Pugh and Lucretia Cramer; Ruby. m. Zelotus Lambard; Ori- 
mel. Descendants — Lou Sexton Havens (G. H.) ; Sallie Sex- 
ton Parsons (Dr. C. H.) ; Frances E. Sexton Green (D. C). 

SHIPLEY, HENRY, b. Maryland, 1759, d. Fayette Co., 
Pen., Feb. 28, 1828. Enlisted 1776, served different times, until 
1783, under Capt. Joseph Burgess, Striker, Bergers, Chas. Ham- 
mond, Woodward, Richard Oorcry, and Col. John Edward 
Howard, Levin Lawrence and Dorcey. Was in the 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 95 

battles of Long Island, Paoli, Germantown and Cumden. Ref. 
Rev. War Recs. I. S. C. W. File 6046; Dep. Interior, Bureau 
of Pensions, Washington, D. C. m. Ruth Howard Aug. 1782, 
Baltimore, Md. Children — Amely, b. June 10, 1783; Amon, 
b. Sept. 24, 1784; Henry, b. March 24, 1789; Ruth, b. March 
30, 1791; Mary, b. Nov. 24, 1793; Benedict, b. Oct. 13, 1795; 
Betsey, b. Sept. 26, 1797, m. Abigail Randolf; Nancy, b. June 
10, 1820; Aman Massene, b. Oct. 15, 1806. Descendant— Ethel 
Conaway Peters (W. W.). 

SMALLEY, John, b. Middlesex Co., N. J., 1747, d. Butler 
Co., 0., 1838. Was a private in Middlesex Co., N. J. Militia; 
also private under Capt. Marming's Company, 1st Reg., Mid- 
dlesex Co., N. J., militia. Col. John Webster, 1780, at Battle 
Springfield, N. J. Ref. Adj. Gen. office, N. J. Nat. D. A. R., 
22668. He m. Amy Sutton. Children— Mary, b. 1770, m. 
Moses Vail. Descendant — Sarah E. Pugh (D.). 

SMILEY, THOMAS, b. 1748, d. 1802. He was a private 
in Capt. Wm. Campbell's Co., 1780-1781. The 7th Battalion of 
Cumberland Co. militia were called to perform a tour of 
duties. He was in the 6th class. Ref. p. 475-486-500, Vol. 6, 
5th series Pa. archives. He m. Margaret Ross, d. 1828, m. 
between 1775-1780. Children— Ross, b. Feb. 18, 1788, m. May 
Abernathy; Thomas, William, m. Miss Groves; Margaret, m. 
Mr. Douglis; Elizabeth, m. Mr. Parker; Mary m. Jacob Ash- 
paugh; Rebecca, m. John Gabrell; John m. (his cousin) Jane 
Smiley. Descendant — Ruby 0. Smiley. 

SMILEY, JOHN, Cumberland Co., Pa., 1745, d. Hamilton, 
0., 1806. The war record of John Smiley is the same as his 
brother, Thomas Smiley. He m. Christiana Robertson, b. about 
1750, d. about 1840; m. 1778, at Mifflin Co., Pa. Children- 
Thomas, b. 1780, m. Miss Hall; Nancy, b. Oct.11, 1782, m. 
Philip Gordon; Alexander, b. 1784; Jane, b. 1785, m. her 
cousin, John Smiley; Margaret, b. 1787, m. Mr. Cohen and Mr. 
Nixon; James, b. 1789, m. Lucinda Wycolf, and Dorcas Dickey. 
Descendant — Ruby 0. Smiley. 

VOHEES, ABRAHAM, b. Neshanic, N. J., Sept. 16, 1730, 
d. Reading, O., 1812. He was a private in Capt. Jacob Ten- 
eyck's Co., 1st Battalion N. J. militia and in N. J. Contin- 
ental line. Ref. Adj. Gen. office N. J. Gen. of Van Voorhees 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 



family by E. W. VaiiVoorhees. Descendant — Mary S. Law- 
rence .Jones (F.P.). 

WALLACE, SAMUEL, b. County Tyrone, Ireland, 1730 or 
173(), d. Cumberland Co., Pa., Sept., 1798. He was a private 
of Capt. Robt. Chugage's Co., 1st Reg. Continental Troops, Pa. 
He was Capt. 5th Co., 3rd Bat.. Cumberland Co. Associations 
and Militia. Ref. War Dept., Adj. Gen. office, D. A. R., Nat. 
No. 62579. m. Margaret Wallace, b. 1740, d. 1782. Children- 
John, b. Nov. 14, 1763; Mary, b. Sept. 8, 1765; Sarah, b. Oct. 8, 
1767; Joseph, b. June 30, 1769; Samuel, b. June 20, 1771; Mar- 
tha, b. April 23, 1773; William, b. August 31, 1775; Eliza, b. 
Oct. 17, 1777; Mary, b. August 15, 1780. Descendant — Jennie 
Wallace Payne (Ralph). 

WINSHIP, JABEZ LATHROP, b. Norwich, Conn., 1752, 
d. Brookville, Ind., 1827. He served as private in Capt. Latti- 
mir's Company, Col. Samuel H. Parson's Regt. State Militia, 
New London, Conn. Ref. D. A. R. Nat. No. 68012; Page 163, 
Rush Co. Ind. history, pub. by Brant and Fuller, 1888. Page 
320, Cole and Winship Genealogy. He m. Hannah Forsythe, d. 
1836. Descendants— Sarah Winship Riley (B.W.); Ruby Riley 
Crist (C.S.) ; Alice R. Winship, Nell Winship, Cora Winship. 

WYATT, JOHN, b. June 4, 1748, London, Eng., d. Milroy, 
Ind., June 17, 1833. He enlisted, 1778, Capt. Joseph Crockett's 
Co., Col. Abraham Bowman's Reg. Was in battle of Mon- 
mouth. Enlisted again, 1778, in Capt. Steed's Co., Col. Wm. 
Heth's Reg. Captured at Charlestown, S. C, held six months. 
Volunteered under Col. Campbell, in militia, served two months 
at Yorktown. Ref. Nat. No. D. A. R., 74788; Dept. of Interior, 
Bureau of Pensions, Washington, D. C; Pen. claim file 16303. 
He m. Susan Summitt. Children — Mary, b. Oct. 23. 1784, m. 

Nathan Tompkins; Sarah, m. Lingenfelter; Elizabeth, 

m. Lingenfelter; James, m. Mary S. Campbell; John 

(Jack) m. Howard; Jessie, Samuel, William, George m. 

Elizabeth Utt, or Ott; Nancy, m. Bowling, and 

Price; Priscilla, m. Rise and Glore. Descendants 

— Lillian Barton, Nelle Bosley Parsons (J. P.), Georgia Wyatt 
Moore (Earl), Louise Tompkins, Nellie T. Betker (T. W.), 
Alta Wyatt Long (F.B.) deceased, Catherine S. Barton Crane 
(Claud R.). 

YOUNG, PHILIP, of New Jersey, a private in Revolution- 



SKETCHES OF RUSH COUNTY 97 

ary War. Record and Ref. Nat. D, A. R. No. 76866 and 76867. 
Descendants — Estella Armstrong, Myrtle Armstrong. 



NOTE — Abbreviations used in the lineages: b., born; 
Capt., Captain; d., died; Gen., Genealogical; Lieut., Lieutenant; 
m., married; Nat., National; No., niunber; p., page; p., private; 
Ref., Reference; Rec, Record; Rev., Revolution; Vol., Volume; 
of., office; w., widow. 



RUSH COUNTY OFFICIALS 
1915 

A. R. Holden, Auditor 

Arie M. Taylor, Clerk 

Newton Newbold, Supt. of County Home 

Charles Brooks, Recorder 

Voorhees Cavitt, Sheriff 

Adolph Cameron, Surveyor 

John 0. Williams, Treasurer 

Henry Schrader, Assessor 

Will M. Sparks, Judge 

A. C. Stevens, Prosecuting Attorney. 



RUSHVILLE CITY OFFICIALS 
1915 

Clate Bebout, Mayor 

Carl L. Gunning, Clerk 

J. P. Stech, Treasurer 

Geston P. Hunt, Post Master 
Post Office, Masonic Bldg. 



PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 

OF 

RUSHVILLE, 1915 

Arranged by Capitola Guffin Dill. 



ATTORNEYS 

JAMES T. ARBUCKLE 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Rooms 7—8, I. 0. 0. F. Bldg. 



HOWARD E. BARRETT 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Rooms 9—10, I. 0. 0. F. Bldg. 

CLAUD CAMBERN 

ATTORNEY. 



CHAUNCEY W. DUNCAN 

ATTORNEY 
Peoples Bank Bldg. Phone 1758 

A. L. GARY 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

Peoples National Bank 

LOUIS C. LAMBERT 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

Abstracts, Loans and Real Estate. 

1091/2 N. Main St. Phone 1237. 



DIRECTORY 



ATTORNEYS— 

(Continued) 

FRANK J. HALL GEORGE W. CAMPBELL 

HALL & CAMPBELL 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 



SAMUEL L. INNIS 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

Peoples National Bank. 

JOHN H. KIPLINGER DONALD L. SMITH 

KIPLINGER & SMITH 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
Smith & Cambern Bldg. 

JOHN D. MEGEE A. J. ROSS 

MEGEE & ROSS 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
Miller Law Bldg. 

BENJAMIN F. MILLER 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Miller Law Bldg. 

WALLACE MORGAN 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Cutter Bldg. 

T. M. OFFUT 

LAW AND ABSTRACT 
Phone 3268 245 N. Main st. 



DIRECTORY 



ATTORNEYS— 

(Continued) 

WALTER E. SMITH 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

LOANS INSURANCE 

Rushville National Bank Bldg. Phone 1318 



A. C. STEVENS 

ATTORNEY 
132 N. Main Street. 



JOHN Q. THOMAS 

ATTORNEYS AT LAW 
INSURANCE. Phone 1215. 



JOHN A. TITSWORTH 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Miller Law Bldg. 



SAMUEL L. TRABUE 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 
Cutter Bldg. 



JAMES E. WATSON 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

Miller Law Bldg. 



iv DIRECTORY 



ATTORNEYS— 

(Continued) 

GEO. W. YOUNG VINCENT YOUNG 



YOUNG & YOUNG 

Peoples National Bank Bldg. 



DENTISTS 

VERL A. BEBOUT 

DENTAL SURGEON 
Cor. Fourth and Main Streets. 

Phones: Office 2016, Residence 1525. 



DR. CARL F. BEHER 

DENTIST 
Phone 1411. 116 West Third St. 



P. H. CHAD WICK 

DENTIST 
Phone 1488. 203 West Third St. 



CHARLES S. GREEN 

DENTIST 
134 E. 2nd St. 

Phones: Office 1102, Residence 1598. 



FRANCIS R. McCLANAHAN, D.D.S. 

118 West 3rd Street. 
Phone 1196. 



DIRECTORY 



DENTISTS— 

(Continued) 

DR. HALE H. PEARSEY 

DENTIST 
103 East Third St. 

Phones: Office 1798, Residence 1510. 



DR. FRANK SMITH 

DENTIST 
229 N. Morgan St. 

Phones: Office 1496, Residence 1297. 



DR. FRANK SPARKS 

DENTIST 
310 N. Main St. Phone 1233. 



ENGINEERS 

WILLIAM DILL 

CONSULTING ENGINEER 

Designing, Surveying and Landscaping. 

Patent-right Drawings. 

Phone 1201. 



ARVEL R. HERKLESS 

CONTRACTOR AND ENGINEER 
1005 N. Main St. Phone 1492. 



ELECTRIC 
ENGINEER 

A. T. MAHIN 

SUPERINTENDENT 
City Water, Light and Power Plant. 



DIRECTORY 



MINISTERS 

REV. A. D. BATCHELOR 

ST. PAUL'S METHOD] ST CHURCH 

REV. S. G. HUNTINGTON 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 

REV. IRA D. LAMBERT 

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

REV. M. W. LYONS 

ST. MARY'S CATHOLIC CHURCH 

REV. W. A. JAMIESON 

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

REV. VIRGIL W. TEVIS 

DISTRICT SUPT. OF M. E. CHURCH. 

REV. C. M. YOCUM 

MAIN STREET CHRISTIAN CHURCH 



TEACHERS 
OF PIANO 

CO-OPERATIVE STUDIOS OF MUSIC 

Miss Olive Biiell, Primary, 1st and 2nd Years. 

DUNNING SYSTEM FOR BEGINNERS IN CLASS WORK 

Phone 3106 

Miss Jessie Kitchen, Intermediate and Advanced. 

EFFA ELLIS PERFIELD SYSTEM 

OF KEYBOARD HARMONY IN CLASS WORK. 

Phone 1021. 

MISS JENNIE G. MADDEN 

TEACHER OF PIANO 

Easy Terms. 

833 N. Main St. Phone 3240. 



DIRECTORY 



TEACHERS 
OF PIANO 



THE DUNNING SYSTEM 

MRS. LUCY MEREDITH. 
516 North Morgan St. Phone 1756. 



PHYSICIANS 

DR. W. S. COLEMAN 

315 N. Main St. 
Phones: Office 1045, Residence 1444. 



DR. D. H. DEAN 

Corner Morgan and Third Sts. 

Phones: Office 1025, Residence 1100. 



FRANK H. GREEN, M.D. 

Office: 134 E. Second St. Phone, 1102. 
Residence: 314 N. Perkins St. Phone 1235. 



DR. LOWELL M. GREEN 

Office: Telephone Bldg. Phone, 1567. 
Residence: 329 E. Sixth St. Phone, 1129. 



C. H. GILBERT, M.D. 

EYE AND EAR SURGEON 

Ghisses furnished. 

331 N. Main St. Phone 1058. 



DIRECTORY 



PHYSICIANS— 

(Continued) 



FRANK G. HACKLEMAN, M.D. 

EYE, EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Glasses furnished. 

Phones: Office 1119, Residence 1209. 



DR. JOS. B. KINSINGER 

OSTEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN 

Graduate of the American School of Osteopathy, 

at Kirksville, Mo. 

Kramer Bldg. Phones: Office 1587, Res. 1281. 



DR. H. V. LOGAN 

The Logan Bldg.. 333 N. Main St., Phone 1225. 
Residence, 520 N. Morgan St. Phone 1423. 



DR. CHAS. H. PARSON 

Office:: 410 N. Main St. 
Phone 1050. 



J. T. PAXTON, M.D. 

Office: Logan Building. Phone 1485. 
Residence: 333 W. 7th St. Phone 1199. 



DR. J. C. SEXTON 

SURGEON 
Office: West Fifth St. Phone 3212. 



DIRECTORY 



PHYSICIANS— 

(Continued) 

WILL G. SMITH 

PHYSICIAN 
Office Phone 1001. Residence Phone 1084. 



D. D. VAN OSDOL, M.D. 

Office: 229 N. Morgan St. 
Phones: Home 3214, Office 3114. 



E. I. WOODEN, M.D. 

Office: Poimdstone Bldg. 
Phones: Home 1683, Office 1394. 



DR. D. D. DRAGOO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Office: 125 S. Main St. Call day or night. 

Phones: Office 1062, Residence 1136. 



VETERINARIES— 

R. J. HALL, D.A.Se. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO IMMUNING HOGS. 
Phone 3308. 



DR. A. A. MULL 

VETERINARY 
122 S. Main St. Phone 1668. 



DIRECTORY 



BUSINESS DIRECTORY 

OF 

RUSHVILLE, 1915 



ABSTRACTOR 

CHARLES G. NEWKIRK 

Abstracts of Title. Fire and Tornado Insurance. 
299 No. Main St. Phone 3252. 



AUCTIONEER 

AUCTIONEER 

That Knows the People, When and What to Sell 

CLEN MILLER 



AUTOMOBILES 

THE FORD 

KNECHT & GARTIN 
136 East Second St. Phones: 1665, 1731. 

AUTO LIVERY 
AND TAXI 

LAKIN'S TAXI AND AUTO LIVERY 

CALLS MADE DAY OR NIGHT 
Day Phone 1338. Night Phone, Lakin 1719. 



BAK E Rl ES 

SANITARY BAKERY 

T. L. PHELPS, Prop. 
Phone 2060. 125 W. Second St. 



DIRECTORY 



BAKERIES— 

(Continued) 



A. F. TALBERT 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

High Grade Bakery Goods 

Phone 1419. McLaren St. 



GUS WILKINSON 

QUALITY BAKE SHOP 

We buy our Flour from Rush County farmers. 

Kramer Bldg. 



BLACKSMITHS 

W. M. BROWN 

HORSE SHOEING 
Phone 1415. 135 East First St. 



J. J. GERAGHTY 

HORSE SHOEING 
Phone 1092. South Main Street. 



E. M. KELLEY 

HORSE SHOEING 
Phonel052. 119 East Third Street. 



BANKS 

A. B. IRVTN, Pres. W. E. WALLACE, Vice-PreB 
T. L. HEEP, Sec. 

FARMERS TRUST COMPANY 

Capital $50,000.00. Surplus $2,500.00. 
240 N. Main St. 



DIRECTORY 



BANKS— 

(Continued) 




EVERY SERVICE 
That a Bank may ren- 
der its Customers is 
performed by us 
cheerfully, promptly, 
and on the very best 
terms. 
A CHECKING AC- 
COUNT INVITED 
We pay THREE per 
cent Interest on SAV- 
INGS ACCOUNTS and 
CERTIFICATES OF 
DEPOSIT. 

No Account too small 
to receive Prompt and 
Courteous Attention. 

A Share of Your 
Business Invited. 
THE PEOPLES LOAN 
AND TRUST CO. 
Rushville, Indiana. 
"The Home for Sav- 
ings." 



LON LINK, Pres. LEWIS SEXTON, Cashier. 

RUSH COUNTY NATIONAL BANK 

3% INTEREST PAID ON TIME DEPOSITS. 
A. L. WINSHIP, Pres. WILBUR STIERS, Cashier. 

RUSHVILLE NATIONAL BANK 

Oldest Bank in Rush County. 

Capital $100,000.00. Surplus $75,000.00. 

Northeast Corner Main and Second Streets. 



BARBER 



CHARLIE MOORE 

BARBER 

A Full Line of Toilet Articles. 

214 N. Main St. 



CANDIES AND 
ICE CREAM 



GREEK CANDY STORE 

221 Main St. 
HOME 3kIADE CANDY AND ICE CREAM. 



DIRECTORY 



CANDIES AND 
ICE CREAM— 
(Continued) ___^ . , ^ 

CARON'S ICE CREAM 

For 

QUALITY 

Phone 1300. 212 N. Main Street. 



VISIT THE SANITARY 

ICE CREAM PARLOR 

115 West Second Street. 
L. E. WALLACE 



CARRIAGE 

WADE SHERMAN 

Phone 1392 South Perkin St. 



Carriage Building and Repairing. 
Automobile Painting a Specialty. 
Refitting of Rubber Vehicle Tires. 



CHICKENS 

MRS. GEORGE W. THOMAS 

Breeder of Barred Plymouth Rock Chickens. 
324 N. Perkins St. Phone 1609. 



CLOTHIERS 

BLISS & COWING 

CLOTHING SHOES 



WILL G. MULNO 

$10 and $15 SUITS AND OVERCOATS 
Phone 1312. 109 W. Second St. 



DIRECTORY 



CLOTHIERS— 

(Continued) 

KNECHT'S 0. P. C. H. 
Try Us 

230 N. Main St. Phone 1397. 



FRANK WILSON 

CLOTHIER AND HATTER. 



COAL 

DANIEL F. MATLOCK 

Dealer In 
HARD AND SOFT COAL. 
Phone 3237. West Second, by J. M. & I. Station 



CONTRACTORS 

THOMAS CAULEY 

CEMENT CONTRACTOR 
ORNAMENTAL AND STUCCOING. 



JOHN CROWLEY 

BUILDER AND CONTRACTOR. 



E. V. BERGEN 

CONTRACTORS. 

Cement Work and Asphalt Street Paving. 

Franklin, Indiana. 



DIRECTORY 



CONTRACTORS— 

(Continued) 

WALTER REINHEIMER 

CONTRACTOR 
Road and Bridge Builder. 
Street and Road Oiling. 



DAIRY 

HALL GREEN DERBY GREEN 



GREEN & GREEN 

MILK THAT IS MILK 
Phone 3149. 



DECORATORS 

ED. CROSBY 

PAINTS AND WALL PAPER 

Interior and Exterior Decorator. 

309 North Main Street. Phone 1035. 



THE G. P. McCARTY CO. 

WALL PAPER AND PAINT 
Phone 1572. 114 W. Third Street. 



DRUG STORES 

WE'HE IN BUSINESS FOR YOUR HEALTH 

COURT HOUSE DRUG STOFE 

THE PENSLAR STORE 
Decorating Department. 



COURT HOUSE STORE 

V. H. McCONNELL 
109 N. Main St. Phone 1551, 



DIRECTORY 



DRUG STORES— 

(Continued) 

HARGROVE & MULLIN 

DRUGGIST 

239 N. Main Street. Phone 1403. 



BUY DRUGS OF 

LYTLE 

HE HAS IT. 



F. E. WOLCOTT, Druggist 

KADAKS, PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES 
Phone 1153. Main Street. 



DRY CLEANERS 

BxiLL & BEBOUT 

DRY CLEANERS. 
Phones: 1154 and 3276. 



DRY GOODS— 

CALLAGHAN CO. 

HOSIERY, CORSETS, HAVENS SHOES 
116 East Second Street. 



E. R. CASADY 

227 Main St. Phone 1143. 

DRY GOODS, NOTIONS, CARPETS, 

SUITS, CLOAKS, SKIRTS. 



DIRECTORY 



DRY GOODS 

(Continued) 



GUFFIN DRY GOODS CO. 

CLEANEST STOCK BEST SERVICE 



HOGSETTS STORE 

FOR EVERYTHING IN DRY GOODS, ETC. 
112 East Second Street. 



The History of Rush County 

Would be incomplete without the mention of 

THE MAUZY COMPANY 

Rush County's Largest Dry Goods Store for 60 Years. 



STERN & CO. 

OUTFITTERS TO WOMEN 
220 N. Main Street. 



FACTOR, Es^^^^ E. FRANCIS CO. 

Manufacturers of 

GLUE ROOM EQUIPIMENT 

WOODWORKING MFGY., FACTORY TRUCKS 



DARNELL AND BOYS 

ICE CREAM AND ICES 
Phone 1099. 221 N. Morgan Street 



DIKECTORY 



FACTORIES 

(Continued) 

INNIS PEARCE & CO. 



Manufacturer of 
FURNITURE. 



NATIONAL MANUFACTURING CO. 

Manufacturers of 

FARM GATES AND FIXTURES. 

Phone 1101. 

THE PARK FURNITURE COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
PARLOR AND LIBRARY TABLES, 

PEDESTALS AND TABORETS 



Frank S. Reynolds, Manager. Anna B. Cox. 

REYNOLDS MFG. CO. 

MFGRS. LUMBER 
DEALERS IN LOGS, COAL AND WOOD. 



RUSHVILLE FURNITURE CO. 

Belmont. 
Manufacturer of BED ROOM FURNITURE 
CIRCAUSION WALNUT, MAHOGANY, 

OAK, AND BLACK WALNUT 



A. B. Irvin, Pres. J. Clias. Caldwell, Mgr. 

Theo. L. Heeb, Treas.-Sec. 

RUSHVILLE GLOVE COMPANY 

Manufacturers of 
COTTON GLOVES. 



DIRECTORY 



FACTORIES— 
(Continued) _ ___^ 

SMOKE WINGERTER 

FAIR PROMIS 5C CIGAR 
VEGA 17th IOC CIGAR 



FARM 



FEED BARN 



MARY POSTON 

THE PINES FARM 



GEO. P. SMALLEY 

LIVERY AND FEED BARN 
301 E. 2iid St. Phone 1571. 



FERTILIZER ___ 

A. B. NORRIS 

DEALER IN ARMOUR'S HIGH GRADE 

ANIMAL MATTER FERTILIZER 

Office H. M. Cowing. 



V. W. NORRIS 

Dealer in 
HIGH GRADE FERTILIZERS 
Office: Polk's Hdw. Co. Phone: Res. 1631. 



FLORISTS ___ 

CITY GREEN HOUSES 

High Class Funeral and Wedding Designs 
Cut Flowers and Decorative Work a Specialty 
Low Prices and Fine Quality Our Strong Feature 

GEO. W. FLEENER, Prop. Phone 1639. 



DIRECTORY 



FLORISTS— 

(Continued) 

GLENN E. MOORE 

FLORIST 
Phone 1409. 359 East Sixth Street. 



A. L. SCHETGEN 

FLORIST 
Phone 2047. Belmont. 



FURNITURE 
DEALERS 

FRED A. CALDWELL 

FURNITURE DEALER 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 

North Side Square 

Office Phone 1051. Residence Phone 1231. 



GEO. C. WYATT & CO. 

FURNITURE AND FUNERAL SUPPLIES 
Phones: 1019, 1081, 1261, 1733. 



GAS COMPANY 

WILL E. HAVENS, Pres. 

PEOPLES NATURAL GAS COMPANY 

GEO. W. OSBORN, Sec. 



GARAGES 

WILLIAM BOWEN 

AUTOMOBILES 

Repairing- Sundries Storage 



DIRECTORY 



GARAGES— 

(Continued) 

THE BUSSARD GARAGE 

0. F. BUSSARD, Proprietor. 
Cor. Perkins and Second St. Phone 1425. 



NEWHOUSE GARAGE 

AUTO LIVERY, REPAIR WORK 

Phone 1067. 
Bewteen 2nd and 3rd off Perkins St. 



UWANTA GARAGE 

LONG & WINSHIP, Proprietors. 

AUTO REPAIRING DAY STORAGE FREE 

East Second St. 



GIFT STORE 

THE GIFT STORE 

Rushville, Ind. R. H. JONES. Greensburg, Ind. 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY 
CHINA AND FANCY GOODS 



GRAIN DEALERS 

BALL & ORME 

Dealers in 

GRAIN, SEEDS, FLOUR. FEED AND SALT 

Elevator on C, H. & D. R. R. 



RUSHVILLE CITY MILLS 

C. J. BICKHART, Proprietor 

MEAL AND ALL KINDS OF FEED GRINDING 

South Morgan St. 



DIRECTORY 



GRAIN DEALERS— 

(Continued) 

IF YOU WANT SANITARY FLOUR USE 

CLARK'S PURITY 

FOR SALE AT ALL GROCERIES 



THEO. H. REED & SON 

Dealers in 

GRAIN, FLOUR AND FEED 

Phone 1079. Elevator on West Second St. 

WINKLER GRAIN CO. 

GRAIN, SEEDS, FLOUR, FEED AND SALT 

Phone 1418 

Elevator on Second and Cerro Gordo Sts. 



GROCERS 

A. L. ALDRIDGE 

GROCERS AND FRUITS 
Phone 1406. 106 East Second St. 



San Marts and Old Master Coffees 

ARE TWO THE BEST COFFEES SOLD ANYWHERE 

We have the exclusive sale of them in Rushville. 

L. L. ALLEN 

327-329 Main St. Phone 1420. 



CHAS. R. BERRY 

FANCY AND STAPLE GROCERIES 
Phone 1156. 234 W. Second Street. 

B. A. BLACK 

GROCERIES AND NOTIONS 
132 West Second Street. Phone 1133. 



DIRECTORY 



GROCERS— 

(Continued) 

BROWN BROS. 

GROCERIES BEST BRANDS OF COFFEE AND TEA 

Highest Price Paid for Country Produce 

Phone 1861. 103 East First Street 



W. E. CLARKSON & SON 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 
Phone 1501 509 W. Third St. 



FRED COCHRAN 

THE HOME OF GOOD THINGS TO EAT 
105 W. First St. Phone 1148. 



COURT HOUSE GROCERY 

For 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

JOHN W. COHEE, Prop. Phone 1150. 



L. H. HAVENS & CO. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 
Cor. 7th and Main. Phone 1176. 



HOMER HAVENS 

EXCLUSIVE AGENT FOR 
CHASE & SANBORN'S COFFEE AND TEA 



DIRECTORY 



GROCERS— 

(Continued) 

EDWIN KEATON 

DEALER IN STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 

Cor. Sexton and Seventh Sts. 
Phone 1124. 



J. KELLY, JR. 

GROCER 
227 Main St. Phone 1123. 



McKEE GROCERY CO. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 
West 5th St. Phone 1188. 



JOHN M. PERRY 

FRUITS, VEGETABLES, GROCERIES AND MEATS 
Phone 1624. West Seventh Street. 



HABERDASHER 

BETKER'S SHOP 

OUR FALL AND WINTER LINE 

OF 1500 IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC WOOLENS 

ARE OPEN TO YOUR INSTRUCTION 

237 N. Main Street. 



HARDWARE 

GUNN A. HAYDON 

HARDWARE, STOVES AND CABINET MANTELS 

Most Complete Stock in Rush County. 

Prompt Delivery. Phone 1042. 



DIRECTORY 



HARDWARE— 

(Continued) 

E. E. POLK 

FOR UNEXCELLED HARDWARE 

Stoves and Nifty Sporting Goods. 
119 W. 2d St. Phone 1340. 

JOHN B. MORRIS 

Hardware, New Process Gas Ranges, Coil Oil Stoves, Florence 
Hot Blast and Coal Stoves, Anker Halth Cream Sepa- 
rators, Oliver Plows, Rude Grain Drills and Belling. 



HOTELS 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

S. W. NICHOLAS, Prop. 
SELLS MEAL TICKETS. 

SCANLAN HOUSE 

0. p. WAMSLEY, Prop. 
Phone 1120. 113 South Main Street 

P. A. MILLER, Prop. 
When in Rushville Visit 

THE GRAND HOTEL 

AMERICAN AND EUROPEAN 
Rooms 50 ets. Dining Room in Connection. 

BEERS COTTAGE HOTEL 

BOARD BY THE WEEK, DAY OR MEAL. 
335 N. Morgan St. Phone 1168. 

THE ROSS HOUSE 

325 NORTH MAIN STREET 
Phone 1524. 



DIRECTORY 



INSURANCE 

NIPP INSURANCE & REALTY CO. 

INSURANCE, LOANS AND REAL ESTATE 
Phone 2084. Rushville Nat. Bank. 



R. F. SCUDDER 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
I. 0. 0. F. Bldg. Phone 1179. 



IMPLEMENTS 

H. M. COWING 

HARNESS, BUGGIES, CARRIAGES AND IMPLEMENTS 

113-117 W. First St. 



E. A. LEE 

SPECIALIZING IN IMPLEMENTS 
Phone 1010. South Jackson St. 



WE THANK YOU FOR YOUR PAST PATRONAGE 

AND TRUST THAT WE MAY, BY CLEAN 

METHODS, RETAIN IT. 

O'NEAL BROTHERS 



J. W. TOMPKINS 

East First Street. 

BUGGIES, HARNESS AND 

ALL KINDS OF FARM IMPLEMENTS. 



DIRECTORY xxvii 



IRON DEALER 

HYMAN SCHATZ 

IRON, METALS, RUBBER AND HIDES 
Phone 1516. 315 N. Sexton Street. 



JEWELERS 

ABERCOMBIE BROS. 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 
Phone 1649. 233 N. Main St. 



KENNARDS 

DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY, SILVERWARE 
Cor. Main and Third Streets. 



W. B. POE & SON 

JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS 

N. Main Street. 



LAUNDRY 

THE RUSHVILLE LAUNDRY 

Lee Pyle, Proprietor. 

SOFT WATER FOR WASHING. 

320 N. Morgan St. Phone 1342. 



LOANS 

A. C. BROWN 

STOCKS — FARM LOANS — BONDS 
Phone 1296. Cutter Bldg. 



DIRECTORY 



LUMBER 

JOHN P. FRAZEE 

Dealer in 

LUMBER, COAL, SWIFT'S FERTILIZER, 

WIRE FENCE AND POSTS 



J. W. PINNELL R. C. TOMPKINS 

PINNELL-TOMPKINS LUMBER CO, 



MEAT MARKETS 

When you have Hogs to Sell, call on 

H. H. KRAMER 

PORK AND BEEF PACKER 
220 Main St. Phone 1569. 



THE PEOPLE MEAT MARKET 

THE ONLY SANITARY MARKET IN THE CITY. 
Phone 2026. Davis & Lyons, Prop. 



L. C. SHARP 

Phone 1310. 715 West Second St. 

FRESH AND SALT MEATS 

TRY DOVE BRAND HAMS 



MILLINERY 

MRS. BELLE OLIVER COSAND 

MILLINERY 
Phone 1495. 118 West Second St. 



DIRECTORY 



MILLINERY— 

(Continued) 



MISS IDA DIXON 

MILLINERY AND HAIR GOODS 
108 West Second St. Phone 1681. 



MONUMENTS 

J. B. SCHRICHTE 

Manu factors of 
ARTISTIC MONUMENTS AND MAUSLOEUMS 
117-121 Main St. Established 1859. 

MOTOR CYCLES 



ELLMAN & SON 

Agents for 

EXCELSOR AND INDIANA MOTOR CYCLES 

Phone 2017. 121 East First St. 



NEWSPAPERS 

THE 

RUSHVILLE JACKSONIAN 

YOUR HOME PAPER. 
We Make Artistic Job Work a Specialty. 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

THE VOORHIS STUDIO 

Phone 1450. 122 W. 2nd St. 

FOR ANYTHING PHOTOGRAPHIC 

DOROTHY M. BOOTH, Prop. 



PIANOS 



BOXLEY'S PIANO STORE 

, Is Headquarters for the 
FAMOUS COLUMBIA GRAFOUSLAS 
AND RECORDS FOR ALL TALKING MACHINES. 
Visit the New Boxley Store on West Second Street. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



PIANOS— 

(Continued) 

1873 1915 

JOHN A. SPURRIER 

PIANO DEALER 



A. P. WAGONER 

Dealer in 

PIANOS AND PLAYER PIANOS 

Phone 1336. 305 N. Main St. 



PLUMBING 

BEAL BROS. 

TINNERS, ROOFERS, AND PLUMBERS 
HEATING CONTRACTORS SANITARY PLUMBERS 

On tlie Square. Phone 1044. 



CAPP PLUMBING AND ELECTRICAL CO. 

SANITARY PLUMBING, HOT WATER HEATING 

ELECTRICAL WORK 

Masonic Bldg. Phone 1091. 



JAMES FOLEY 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

MOTORCYCLES AND BICYCLES 
Phone 1521. 223 N. Morgan St. 



RUSHVILLE PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 

J. H. LAKIN, Manager 
311 N. Main Street. Phone 1338. 



DIRECTORY 



POOL ROOMS- 
ARCADE POOL ROOM 

WALKER & HOSIER, Proprietors. 
118 East Second St. Phone 1363. 



O'NEIL AND RYAN 

POOL ROOM AND BASE BALL HEADQUARTERS 
Cor. First and Main. Phone 2082. 



POULTRY 

ADAMS PRODUCE COMPANY 

POULTRY 

203 South Main Street 

Phone 1258. 



REAL ESTATE 

HOMER W. COLE 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
Phone 3252. N. Main Street. 



JOHN C. FRAZIER 

THE LEADING LAND SALESMAN OF INDIANA 

Office: 631 N. Morgan St., Rushville, Ind. 

Phone 1465. 



WARREN P. ELDER 

REAL ESTATE BOUGHT, SOLD AND TRADED. 
Phone 1395. 218 North Main Street. 



DIRECTORY 



REAL ESTATE— 

(Continued) 

W. E. INLOW 

REAL ESTATE 

Farm and City Loans at Lowest Rates. 

Phone 1395. North Main Street. 



MRS. ROBERT RETHERFORD 

REAL ESTATE PROPOSITIONS THAT PAY 

Farms, Modern Homes, Loans and Collection. 

Phone 1451. 



E. B. POUNDSTONE 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 
Phone 1688. 234 N. Main Street. 



RESTAURANTS 

CITY RESTAURANT 

JAMES WORSTER, Prop. 

GOOD EATS QUICK SERVICE 

110 W. 3d St. Phone 1206. 



JOHN MADDEN 

RESTAURANT 
Phone 1068. 103 West First Street. 



SEED CORN 

WILLIAM A. ALEXANDER 

Originator of 

ALEXANDER'S GOLD STANDARD SEED CORN 

Rural Route No. 7. 



ADVERTISEMENTS 



SEWING MACHINES— 

L. E. GING 

SINGER SEWING MACHINE 
233 N. Main St. Phone 1649. 



SHOE DEALERS 

BODINES 

THE SHOP FOR GOOD SHOES 

TRY THEM and be pleased. 



BEN A. COX 

THE SHOE MAN 
WE FIT YOU 

Main St. 



TAILORS 



E. M. OSBORNE 

MERCHANT TAILOR 
232 N. Main St. 



TYNER, THE TAILOR 

218 Main Street. 



TELEPHONE 

THE RUSHVILLE 

CO-OPERATIVE TELEPHONE COMPANY 
321 North Main St. Automatic System. 



THEATRE 

PRINCESS THEATRE 

THE BEST IN PICTURES AND MUSIC 



xxxiv DIRECTORY 



TINSHOP 

311 N. Main St. Phone 1635. 

E. W. ALBRIGHT 

FURNACES ROOFING REPAIRING 



VARIETY 
STORE 

DRAKIS, WELCOME VARIETY STORE 

FRESH CANDIES, PEANUTS, HOSIERY FANCY CHINA, 

DINNERWARE AND KITCHEN WARE. 

The Store Where You Are Always Welcome. 



Index 

d] 



Abercrombie, Mrs. T 60 

Alexander, James 23 

Amos, J. M 48 

Andrews, J 67 

Anderson, Aaron 14 

Armstrong, Jos 54 

Arnold, Isaac 14 

Arnold, Dr. John 15 

Arnold, John 21,59 

Arnold, William 53 

Arnold, W. W 25 

Anthony, Dr 66 

Atwater, Amzi 25 

Baker, D 66 

Barr, Thomas 29 

Bebout, John 54 

Bebout, J. H 49 

Beckner, Mr 10 

Benton, Prof 26 

Benton, Allen 26 

Berry, E 42 

Bigger, Samuel 42 

Blacklidge, Richard 15 

Blacklidge, Amos 33 

Bodine, Samuel 39 

Bohannon, Martin 54 

Boyd, J. F 49 

Brackner, Wm 13 

Branan, David 45 

Bridges, A 67 

Brittain, Rev. G. B 29 

Brown, Admiral 58 

Brown, Ryland 14 

Bupelt, Wm 19 

Burt, Levin 66 

Bussell, William 16 

Butler, A. P 67 

Butler, G 67 

Caldwell, Geo 42 

Caldwell, Jonathan 48 

Caldwell, James 48 

Caldwell, Jas 49 

Campbell, Alva 56 



Campbell, Geo 25 

Capp, Fred A 49 

Carr, Harvey 12 

Carr, Harvey W 39 

Carr, Johnny 39 

Carr, T. J 46 

Carr, Roland 44 

Caskey, S. H 67 

Cassady, Thos 52 

Cassady, Weir 49 

Case, J. D 29 

Chase, Mrs. Geo. A 27 

Chase, Geo. A 27 

Clark, George 35, 42,53 

Clark, John 65 

Clark, Elisha 15 

Clark, Louis 15 

Collins, James 66 

Conde, Adam 42 

Cotton, T. A 48 

Cotton, Jos 31 

Cotton, Joseph 22 

Cox, Normal 25 

Cox, R. S 42 

Cramer, Lucretia 25 

Crawford, David A 21 

Crowe, J. F 29 

Crusan, Mrs 15 

Cullen. Wm 40 

David, John 66 

Davis, Ben 2 

Davis, Sam 12 

Denning, Capt. B. F 38 

Desha. Miss Mary 78 

Dinwiddle, Mrs. J. W 80 

Duncan, Steph 56 

Eden, Edgar 24 

Eden, John R 24 

Edwards, J 66 

Eevis 31 

Eggleston, Mr 13 

Farquhar, Capt. J. H 70 

Frame, Dr 13 



INDEX 



Frame, William 42 

Frazee, E. S 48 

Frazee, Capt. J. H 70 

Frazer, Aaron 14 

Gardner, Landon 56 

Gavin, Jas 41 

Gelpin, Thos. A 27 

Gilbert, Mrs. C. H 60 

Goodwin, Enoch 22 

Gowdy, J. K 64 

Graham, David 27 

Graham, Andrew 28 

Gray, John 47 

Gray, William 47 

Green, J. W 66 

Guffin, Henry 14 

Guffin, John 54 

Guffin, Mrs. Sarah C 80 

Guffin, J. P 75 

Gwinn, Jas 42 

Gwinup, N. H 67 

Hackleman, P. A 

34, 39, 42, 47, 64 

Hackleman, Elijah 21 

Hall, W. S 28,48 

Hall, Frank J 28 

Hamilton, Jos 12 

Hare, John 41 

Harrison, Mrs. B 78 

Haven, W. E 54 

Havens, Jas 30 

Havens, Rev. James 16 

Havens, James 32 

Havens, James 32 

Hayden, Nehemiah 37 

Hays, John 14 

Helm, Jeff 13 

Helm, Alice 25 

Helm, Lizzie 25 

Helm, Dr. J 60 

Helm, Jeff 42 

Hendricks, Thos 42 

Henley, Henry 65 

Henly, Judith 31 

Hibben, Gertrude (Robin- 
son) 27 

Hibben, Geo 35 

Hiflin, Reuben 22 

Hilligoss, Sanford 34 

Hilligoss, Elias 40 



Hite, J 67 

Hodges, Zachariah 11 

"Hog" Walker 49 

Holmes, Mary 60 

Hood, J. R 67 

Hopkins, M. B 22,27,31 

Hopkins, M. B 31 

Hoshour, S. K 26 

Hoshour, Prof 26 

Howland, John 13 

Hudson, Austin 31 

Hutchinson, Robert 75 

Hyde, M. B 31 

Irwin, Arthur 35 

James, Daniel 75 

Jarrett, J 67 

Jones, W. A 48 

Jones, Lieut. J. B 70 

Jones, J. B • 73 

Julian, John 11 

King, Edward A 38 

King, Col 39 

Kipper, Dr 13 

Knapp, 1 66 

Landon, Nelle 25 

Landon. Jennie 25 

Larabee, W. C 50 

Laughlin, W. B 2, 21 

Laughlin, Jennie 24 

Laughlin, Harmony 59 

Laughlin, William B 21 

Lazure, Miss 23 

Leisure, N. J 70,74 

Link, L 35, 54, 59 

Lockwood, Mrs. Mary S. . . 78 

Loder, I. B 48 

Looney, Peter 14 

Looney, David 16, 18, 19 

Looney, John 18 

Looney, John 18, 19 

Looney, Mrs. J 19 

Looney, Geo 20 

Looney, Mrs. Mary A 27 

Machlins 31 

Marlatt, Anna 60 

Martin, Wm 13 

Martin, Dr 25 

Mauzy, Capt. J. H 38 

Mauzy, A. G 59 

Mauzy, G. W 49 



INDEX 



Morgan Amaziah 11 

McComus, Henry 13 

McGinniss, J. B 74 

McDaniel, L 49 

McDill, N. C 29,32 

McDiiffey, Robert 31 

McMillin, John T 48 

McReynolds, W. C 35 

Moffett, Rebecca A 28 

Moore, Mrs. J. W 80 

Moreley, Harriet 25 

Morgan, Amaziah 42 

Morris, John 29 

Morris, Mr 13 

Morris, Judge Bethuel.... 16 
Morris, Judge Douglas ... 64 

Morrison, Sarah 24 

Moses, John 32 

Mowers, Siddie 60 

Mull, Cyrus 25 

Mull, Jacob 44, 66 

Murphy, J 66 

Norris, Bradford 8 

Norris, A. N 57 

Norris, D. C 57 

Oglesby, Laura A. 

(Wolfe) 27 

Oglesby, Jos 35 

O'Kane, John 29, 32 

Oliver Bros 49 

Parsons, Matthias 21 

Pavey, Absalom 54 

Paxton, Mrs. T. J 60 

Payne, Edwin 35 

Payne, Earl 35 

Pearsey, Wm 18 

Peckham, W. L 74 

Piper, J 67 

Pensioners, 1835 36 

Pensioners, 1840 36-37 

Perkins. John 11 

Perry, John 54 

Petry, Kathryn 60 

Peters, Henry 30 

Phipps, Isaac 21 

Phillips, R. H 48 

Points, John 15 

Posey, Alfred 42 

Presley, J. N 29 

Pritchard, Henry 26 



Privates Civil War 70 

Pugh, Ella 60 

Pugh, Dr 17 

Pugh, Thomas 27 

Pugh, Ren 35 

Puntenny, Geo 54 

Rawlings, Mr 23 

Rawlings, Lydia 23 

Readle, John 54 

Reeve, B. F 21,23,42 

Reeve, John 35, 54 

Reeve, Geo. W 49 

Remington, James 23 

Ringel, Frank 46 

Robinson, J. T 64 

Robinson, H. C 67 

Robinson, John 34 

Robinson, 45 

Rosecrans, Gen 38 

Runnels, Dr 53 

Runion, R 66 

Rush, Benjamin 2 

Rush, P. W 25 

Sailors, Benj 14 

Sailors, Conrad 11 

Santa Ana, Gen 38 

Sculls 31 

Sexton, H. G 13, 25 

Sexton, L 35,64 

Sexton, Leonidas 25, 64 

Sexton, Mrs. H 60 

Sexton, L 64 

Shaw, Knowles 31. 

Shawhan, John 47, 48, 49 

Shrader, E. W 49 

Sims, Stephen 14 

Sleeth, Geo. B 64 

Sleeth, Miss Mary 80 

Smith, Wm 25 

Smith, John 11 

Smith, Jeremiah 49 

Spacy, Oscar 76 

Spann, J. J 64 

Spurrier, J. H 40 

Spurrier, John 56 

Steele, M 66 

Stevens, Jack 13 

Stewart, D. M 25 

Strange, John 29 

Stewart, D. M.. . .31, 32, 42, 59 



INDEX 



Stewart, Mrs 53 

Stewart, T. L 67 

Swanson, Ed 14 

Swanson, Edward 1 15 

Taylor, Gen 38 

Test, Mr 13 

Test, Charles H 10 

Test, Chas 42 

Thomas, W. W 25 

Thomas, Geo 

8, 26, 31, 38, 42, 43, 45 

Thomas, D. L 43,49 

Thomas, J. Q 59 

Thomas, Louis 53 

Thomson, Jas 58 

Thomas, Uriah 34 

Thompson, Alfred 21 

Thompson, J. P 29 

Thompson, M 66 

Thrasher, Wm 25 

Thrasher, W. W 48 

Tingley, Geo 13,42 

Tingley, Susan 18 

Tingley, Frank 18 

Tingley, Hon. G. B 37 

Touts, John 54 

Vance, Sam 54 

Veeder, Chas 52 

Walker, A. P 49 

Walker, "Hog" James ... 21 

Wallace, Thos 12 



Walworth, Mrs. Ellen 78 

War 1812-14 37 

War, Black Hawk 37 

Ward, Beverly 19 

Warner, Carrie 25 

Warner, Lydia 25 

Washam, Mr 16 

Webb, Isom 8 

Watson, Jas 64 

Watson, Jas. E 67 

Whitcomb, James 16 

Wick, Mr 13 

Wick, Wm 14 

Wick, Wm. W 16 

Wicksham, Wm 12 

Wiles, Louis 25 

Wiley, James 18,19 

Wilson, James 47, 49 

Wilson, Samp 48 

Wilson, Mrs. Wm 34 

Wilson, Dick 34 

Wilson, Rich 34 

Wolfe, Col. E. H 38 

Wolfe, E. H 43 

Wolfe, Joel 40 

Worster, Thos 13 

Worsten, Thos 42 

Wright, Jonathan G 75 

Wycoff, Garrett 48 

Wyman, B 67 

Young, Alexander 15 



HK 2 79 



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