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Full text of "Slang and its analogues past and present. A dictionary, historical and comparative of the heterodox speech of all classes of society for more than three hundred years. With synonyms in English, French, German, Italian, etc"

AND ITS 



SLANG 

ANALOGUES 

PAST AND PRESENT. 

A DICTIONARY, HISTORICAL AND COMPARATIVE, OF THE 
HETERODOX SPEECH OF ALL CLASSES OF SOCIETY 

FOR MORE THAN THREE HUNDRED YEARS. 



WITH SYNONYMS IN ENGLISH, FRENCH, GERMAN, 
ITALIAN, ETC. 



COMPILED AND EDITED BY 

JOHN S. FARMER and W. E. HENLEY. 



VOL. III. Fla. TO Hyps, 




PRINTED FOR SUBSCRIBERS ONLY, 

MDCCCXCIII. 



9E 



v/.2> 





LABBERGAST, 
verb, (colloquial). 
To astound; to 
stagger, either 
physically or men- 
tally. [O. E., 
FLAB = to frighten 
4- CAST = to scare. ] Fr. , abalober; 
baba (from ebahi = astounded) ; 
epater (= flatten out). Sp., que~ 
darse de, or hecho, una pieza 
( = ' knocked all of a heap ') 
See FLOORED. 

1772. Annual Register, ' On New 
Words.' Now we are FLABBERGASTED 
and bored from morning to night. 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, etc., 
p. 79. His colleagues were FLABBER- 
GASTED when they heard of Castlereagh's 
sudden death. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends 
<' Brothers of Birchington'). He was quite 
FLABBERGASTED to see the amount. 

1841, Punch, vol. I., p. 261. We 
rather just imagine they will be not a 
little puzzled and FLABBERGASTED to 
discover the meaning or wit of some of 
those elegant phrases. 

1864. Derby Day^ rx 67. You're sort 
of FLABBERGASTED. It's taken all the 



wind out of you like, and you feel like an 
old screw a blowing up Highgate Hill. 

1889. Licensed Victuallers' Gazette* 
18 Jan. Poor Clarke was completely 

FLABBERGASTED. 

1891. National Observer, i Aug. In 
no other sport is the laudator temporis 
acttso completely FLABBERGASTED as here. 



FLABBERDEGAZ, subs, (theatrical). 
Words interpolated to dissemble 
a lapse of memory; GAG (q.v.). 
Also, imperfect utterance or bad 
acting, 

FLAG, subs. (old). I. A groat, or 
fourpenny piece. Also FLAGG, 
and FLAGGE. For synonyms, 
see JOEY. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 65. 
Roge. But a FLAGGE, a wyn, and a make. 
(But a groat, a penny, and a half-penny.) 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Kept. 1874) s.v. 

1 7 14. Memoirs of John Hail ( 4 th ed. ), 

p. 12, S.V. 

1725. JONATHAN Wn.r, Canting 
Diet., s.v. 

1851-61. H. MAVHEW, Land. Lab. 
.nd Lend. Poor, vol. I., p. 269. A 



i 



Flag. 



Flag-flasher. 



tremendous black doll bought for a FLAG 
(fourpence) of a retired rag-merchant. 

2. (common). An apron ; 
hence a badge of office or trade ; 
cf. t FLAG-FLASHER. Equivalents 
are BELLY-CHEAT and FIG-LEAF. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Land. Poor, vol. I., p. 232 (List of 
patterer's words), s.v. 

1872, Dundee Advertiser, 20 April? 
1 Report of Meeting of Domestic Servants. 
It was contended that they were com- 
pelled to wear what was generally known 
as a FLAG. 

1887. W. E. HENLEY, Dillon's 
Straight Tip. Suppose you try a different 
tack, And on the square you flash your 

FLAG. 

3. (obsolete). A jade. 

1539. DAVID LYNDSAY, Thrie 
Estaitis. Works [Ed. Laing, 1879], ii. 109. 
Ane fistand FLAG. 

4. (common). The menstrual 
cloth. Variants are bandage ; 
clout ; danger-signal ; diaper ; 
double clout (Durfey) ; gentle- 
man's pleasure garden padlock ; 
periodicity rag ; the red rag ; 
sanitary towel ; window-curtain. 

THE FLAG (or DANGER-SIG- 
NAL) is UP="The Captain's at 
home"(GROSE),*.., the menstrual 
flux is on. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To 
have domestic afflictions, or the 
D.A.'s; to have the FLOWERS 
(q.v. ) ; to have one's grandmother, 
or little friend, or auntie, with one ; 
to have them (or it) on ; to be in 
a state of ' no thoroughfare ' ; to 
have the red rag on ; to be road- 
making ; to have the street up for 
repairs ; to be at Number One, 
London'; to have 'the gate locked 
and the key lost.' 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Avoir 
ses cardinales (literally, to have 
one's reds) ; avoir les histoires ; 



avoir les affaires (common) ; avoir 
ses anglais (in allusion to the scar- 
let of English soldiers) ; broyer 
des tomates ( = tomato - crushing); 
avoir son marquis (COTGRAVE) ; 
avoir lesfleurs rouges ; avoir sa 
chemise tachee (COTGRAVE) ; voir 
Sophie ; avoir les ordinaires. 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Mar- 
chese (FLORio), marchesano ( = 
menses. Michel says, Art. marque 
= a month, a woman. "Ilnesaurait 
etre douteux que ce nom ne soit 
venu a cette division de 1'annee, 
de rinfirmite periodique qu'ont 
les marques, ou femmes, lors que 
la Lune, pour tenir sa diette et 
vaquer a ses purifications men- 
struelles, fait marquer les logis 
feminins par son fourrier, lequel 
pour escusson n'a que son im- 
pression rouge "). 

To FLY THE FLAG, verb. phr. 
(tailors'). To post a notice that 
'hands' are wanted. See also 
FLY THE FLAG, post. 

FLAG OF DEFIANCE, subs. phr. 
(old nautical). A drunken roy- 
sterer. For synonyms, see ELBOW- 

CROOKER. 

To HANG OUT THE FLAG OF 
DEFIANCE (or BLOODY FLAG), verb, 
phr. To be continuously drunk. 
[An allusion to the ' crimson face' 
(COTGRAVE] and the pugnacity 
of certain terms of inebriety.] 
For synonyms, see RINKS. 

1690. B. E. , New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew, s.v. THE FLAG OF DEFIANCE is 
OUT (among the Tarrs) the Fellow's Face 
is very Red, and he is Drunk. 

1785. GROSE, Diet. Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

FLAG- FLASHER, subs, (common). 
One sporting a badge or other 
ensign of office (cap, apron, uni- 



Flag-about. 



Flam, 



form, etc.) when off duty, Cf, t 
FLAG, sense 2, 

FLAG-ABOUT, subs. (old). A strum- 
pet. [From FLAG, a paving- 
stone]. For synonyms, see 
BARRACK-HACK and TART. 



FLAG* FLYING, See FLAG, 

FLAG OF DISTRESS, subs, phr, 
(common). i, A card announc- 
ing 'lodgings,' or 'board and 
lodgings.' Hence, any overt sign 
of poverty. 

2. (common). A flying shirt- 
tail; in America, a LETTER IN 

THE POST-OFFICE (q.V,), 

FLAGGER, suts. (common). A 
street - walker. For synonyms, 
see BARRACK-HACK and TART, 

1865. Daily Paper, Police Report. 1 
She wasn't a low sort at all she wasn't a 
FLAGGER, as we call it. So I replies, ' I 
am well, thankee ; and am happy to say I 
feel as such.' 

FLAGS, subs, (common), Linen 
drying and flying in the wind, 
For synonyms, see SNOW, 

FLAG UNFURLED, subs, phr. (rhym- 
ing). A man of the world. 

FLAG-WAGGING, subs, (military). 
Flag-signal drill. 

FLAM , subs, (colloquial). Non- 
sense (for synonyms, see GAMMON); 
humbug ; flattery ; or, a lie : as 

A REGULAR FLAM (for Syno- 

nyms, see WHOPPER). Cf. FLIM- 
FLAM. 

1688. FLORIQ,^ WorUe ofWordes, 
[C/., FLIM-FLAM.] 



1647. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Humourous Lieutenant, iv., i. With 
some new FLAM or other, nothing to 
the matter. 

1664. BUTLER, Hudibras, pt. II,, 
ch. iii., p, 29. A FLAM more senseless 
than the roguery of old aruspicey and 
aug'ry. 

1742-4. ROGER NORTH, Lives of the 
Norths, ch. i., p. 368. They must have 
known his Lordship better and not have 
ventured such FLAMS at him. 

1760. FOOTE, Minor, Act II, Had 
the FLAM been fact, your behaviour was 
natural enough. 

1762, FOOTE, Liar, bk. II., ch. ii. 
Can't you discern that this FLAM of Sir 
James Elliot's is a mere fetch to favour his 
retreat ? 

1830. SIR E. B, LYTTON, Paul 
Clifford, p. 298 (ed. 1854). Harry .... 
told you as ow it was all a FLAM about 
the child in the bundle ! 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends 
(ed, 1862), p. 325. No trick nor FLAM, 
but your real Schiedam. 

1849. C. KINGSLEY, Alton Locke, 
ch. ii. And their pockets full they crams 
by their patriotic FLAMS, And then swear 
'tis for the good of the nation, 

1850. D. JERROLD, The Catspaw, 
Act II, Though the story of that scoundrel 
Coolcaid, Augustus Coolcard and I was 
never before deceived never is a FLAM 
all a FLAM. 

1870. Leadon Figaro^ 22 Sept. Is 
not your boasted power a FLAM ? 

1887. W. E. HENLEY, Villon's Good 
Night. You flymy titters fond of FLAM. 

2. (old), A single stroke on 
the drum. --[GROSE, 1785.] 

Adj, (old). False, 

1692. SPRAT, Relation of Young's 
Contrivance (HarL Misc. yi, 224). To 
amse him the more in his search, she 
addeth a FLAM story that she had got his 
hand by corrupting one of the letter-carriers 
in London. 

Verb (colloquial). i. To take 
in ; to flatter ; to lie ; to foist or 
fob off, FLAMMING = lying. 



Flambustious. 



Flanders Pieces. 



1658. ROWLEY AND FORD, &c., 
Witch of Edm., ii., 2. Was this your 
cunning ? and then FLAM me off with an 
old witch, two wives, and Winnifride. 

1688. SHADWELL, So. ofAlsatia, II. 
in wks. (1720) iv. 41. Does he think to 
FLAM me with a lye ? 

1830. S. WARREN, Diary of a Late 
Physician, ch. V. But I'll show him 
whether or not I, for one of them, am to 
be jeered and FLAMMED with impunity. 

1835. MARRYAT, Jacob Faithful, 
ch. xxviii. HoW she did FLAM that poor 
old Domine. 

(American University). To 
affect, or prefer, female society ; 
to GROUSE (q.v.). [A corrup- 
tion of FLAME (q.v.)}. See 
MOLROWlNG. 



^'. (American). 
Showy ; gaudy ; pleasant. 

1868. Putnam's Magazine. We will 
have i FLAMBUSTIOUS time. [Cf., SHAKS- 
PEARE (1608), Antony and Cleopatra, iii., 
iii Let's have one other GAUDY night.] 

FLAM DOODLE, subs. (American). 
Nonsense ; vain boasting. 
Probably a variant of FLAP- 
DOODLE (q.v.). 

1888. New York Sun. We wasn't 
gcin' to have any high falutin' FLAM- 
DOODLE business over him. 

FLAME, subs, (colloquial). i. 
A sweetheart ; a mistress in keep- 
ing. OLD FLAME = an old lover; 
a cast-off mistress. Also (2) a 
venereal disease. 

b. 1664. d. 1721. MATHEW PRIOR [in 
Palgraye's "Golden Treasury of Songs and 
Lyrics," ed. 1885]. Euphelia serves to grace 
my measure, but Chloe is my real FLAME. 

1757. FOOTE, Author, Act I. Let's 
see, Mr. and Mrs. Cadwallader, and your 
FLAME, the sister, as I live. 

1846-8. THACIS-ERAY, Vanity Fair, ch. 
xiv. On this Rebecca instantly stated 
that Amelia was engaged to be married to 
a Lieutenant Osborne, a very old FLAME. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, s.v-. 



FLAM ER, subs, (colloquial). A man, 
woman, thing, or incident above 
the common. [Literally con- 
spicuous to flaming point, i.e., as 
a light in the dark]. For syn- 
onyms, see STUNNER. 

1840. H. COCKTON, Valentine Vox, 
ch. ii. Concocting a criticism on the 
evening's performance, which certainly 
was, according to the signer's own ac- 
knowledgment, a regular FLAMER. 

FLAMES, subs, (old). A red-haired 
person. Cf., CARROTS and 
GINGER. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
etc., p. 79. Who should I fling my pre- 
cious ogles upon but FLAMES she as lived 
at the ' Blue Posts.' 

FLAMING, ppl. adj. (colloquial). 
Conspicuous; ardent; STUNNING 
(q.v.). For synonyms, see A 1 
and FIZ2ING. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Conv., Dialogue 
II. Lord Sparkish. My Lady Smart, 
your ladyship has a very fine scarf. Lady 
Smart. Yes, my lord, it will make a 
FLAMING figure in a country church. 

1776. RUBRICK, The Spleen, ii. I'l 
send a FLAMING paragraph of thei 
wedding to all the newspapers. 

1872. BESANT and RICE. Ready 
Money Mortiboy, ch. xxx. He called one 
of the children, and sent her for a bill. She 
presently returned with a FLAMING poster. 

FLANDERKIN, subs, (old), .&?* quot. 

1690. B; E,, New Diet, of the Cant- 
ting Crew, s.v. A very large fat man or 
horse ; also natives of that country. 



FLANDERS FORTUNES, subs. phr. 
(old). Of small substance. 
B. E. , New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew (1690)^ 

FLANDERS PIECES, sufis. phr. (old). 
See quot. 

1690. B. E. , New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FLANDERS PIECES, pictures that 
look fair at a distance, but coarser near at 
hand. 



Flank. 



Flapdoodle. 



FLANK, verb (common). i. To 
crack a whip ; also, to hit a 
mark with the lash of one. 

1830. SIR E. B. LYTTON, Paul Clif- 
ford(t&. 1854), p. 18. He then, taking up 
a driving whip, FLANKED a fly from the 
opposite wall. 

1833. ' An Anglo - sapphic Ode ' 
(WHIBLEY, Cap and Gown, p. 136). 
Kicks up a row, gets drunk, or FLANKS 
a tandem whip out of window. 

2. (colloquial). To deliver 
a blow or a retort ; to push ; to 
hustle ; to quoit (Shakspeare). 
i.,Jlanquer : as \njtanguer & la 
porie, and Je lui ai fianque un 
fameux coup de pied au cut I 

A PLATE OF THIN FLANK, 
subs.phr. (common). -A 'sixpenny 
cut' off the joint. See N. Twill 
in Fancy Too Late for Dinner. 

To FLANK THE WHOLE BOTTLE, 
verb. phr. (American soldiers'). 
To dodge, i.e., to OUTFLANK, 
to achieve by strategy. For 
synonyms, see STICK. 

1871. DE VERB, Americanisms, p. 
286. When the men wished to escape the 
attention of pickets and guards by slipping 
past them, they said they FLANKED them ; 
drill, and detail, and every irksome duty 
was FLANKED, when it could be avoided by 
some cunning trick. Soon, however, 
honesty itself was thus treated, and the 
poor farmer was FLANKED out of his pig 
and his poultry, and not infrequently even 
the comrade out of his pipe and tobacco, 
if not his rations. The height of strategy 
was employed in these various_/?a man- 
auvres, when the Commissary could be 
made to surrender some of his whiskey, 
and thus it came about, in the South at 
least, that to FLANK THE WHOLE BOTTLE 
was a phrase expressive of superlative cun- 
ning and brilliant success. 

FLANKER, subs, (common). A 
blow; a retort; a kick. /., 
FLANK, sense i. 

FLAN KEY, subs, (common). The 
posteriors. For synonyms, see 



BLIND CHEEKS and MONOCULAR 
EYEGLASS. 

1848. DUNCOMBE, Sinks of London, 
s.v. 

FLANNEL. See HOT FLANNEL. 

FLANNELS. To GET ONE'S FLAN- 
NELS, verb. phr. (schools'). To 
get a place in the school football 
or cricket teams, or in the boats. 
Cf.y 'to get one's colours,' or 
'one's blue.' 

FLAP, subs, (thieves '). i. Sheet-lead 
used for roofing. Fr., doussin ; 
noir. C/., BLUEY. 

2. (old). A blow. 

1539. DAVID LYNDSAY, Thrie 
Estaitis. Works [Laing, 1879], ii. 73. 
And to begin the play, tak thairane FLAP. 



Verb (thieves'). I, To rob ; to 
swindle. For synonyms, see 
PRIG and STICK. 

2. (common). To pay ; ' to 
fork out.' Cf. t FLAP THE 
DIMMOCK. 

3. (venery). To possess a 
woman. For synonyms, see 
GREENS and RIDE. 

To FLAP A JAY, verb. phr. 
(thieves'). To swindle a green- 
horn ; to SELL A PUP (q.v.). 

1885. Daily Telegraph, Aug. i8th, 
p. 3., col. i. Jle and three others of the 
' division ' had ' cut up ' 70 between them, 
obtained by FLAPPING A JAY, which, 
rendered into intelligible English, means 
plundering a simple-minded person. 

To FLAP THE DIMMOCK, verb 
phr. (common). To pay. [From 
FLAP, a verb of motion + DIM- 
MOCK = money]. Cf. t FLAP. 

FLAPDOODLE, subs, (colloquial). 
i. Transparent nonsense; "kid." 



Flapdoodler. 



Flap-sauce. 



Also FLAMDOODLE and FLAM- 
SAUCE, or FLAP-SAUCE. For 
synonyms, see GAMMON. 

1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, 
ch. xxviii. ' It's my opinion, Peter, that 
the gentleman has eaten no small quantity 
of FLAPDOODLE in his lifetime.' ' What's 
that, O'Brien,' replied I. ' Why, Peter, 
it's the stuff they feed fools on.' 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at Oxford. 
I shall talk to our regimental doctors 
about it, and get put through a course of 
fools' diet FLAPDOODLE they call it, what 
fools are fed on. 

1884. S. L. CLEMENS ('Mark 
Twain'), Hwck. Finn, xxv., 247. 
A speech, all full of tears and FLAP- 
DOODLE about its being a sore trial for him 
and his poor brother to lose the diseased 
[deceased]. 

2. (venery). The penis. 
(Urquhart). For synonyms, see 
CREAMSTICK and PRICK. 

To TALK FLAPDOODLE, verb. 
phr. (American). To brag; to 
talk nonsense. 

1888. Daily Inter-Ocean, Mar. 2. 
Possibly rich men will turn from sharp 
dealing, from debauchery, from FLAP- 
DOODLE fashion to a common-sense recog- 
nition of a situation, which clearly shows 
that wealth is no longer what it used to be 
autocratic, absolute, the ruler of all else. 

FLAPDOODLER, subs. (American). 
A braggart agitator ; one that 
MAKES THE EAGLE SQUEAL, 



FLAP-DRAGON, subs. (old). The 
pox or CLAP (q.v.). For syno- 
nyms, see LADIES' FEVER. 

1690. B. E. , New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew, s.v. FLAPDRAGON, a clap or pox. 

Verb. (old). To gulp down 
hastily, as in the game of flap- 
dragon. 

1604. SHAKSPEARE, Winter's Tale, 
Act III., Sc. 3. But, to make an end of 
the ship : to see how the sea FLAP- 

DRAGONED it ! 



FLAPMAN, subs, (prison). A 
convict promoted for good 
behaviour to first or second class. 



FLAPPER, subs, (common). I. 
The hand; also FLAPPER- 
SHAKER. For synonyms, see 
DADDLE and MAULEY. 

1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, ch. 
vii. My Dear Mr. Simple, extend your 
FLAPPER to me for I'm delighted to see 
you. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum or 
Rogues' Lexicon, s.v. 

1866. London Miscellany, May 19, 
p. 235. 'There's my FLAPPER on the 
strength of it.' Guy shook hands with the 
eccentric stranger heartily. 

2. (common). A little girl. 
[Also a fledgeling wild duck.] 

3. (venery). A very young 
prostitute ; cf. t sense 2. 

4. (common). A dustman's 
or coal-heaver's hat ; a FANTAIL 



5- (in. pi.). Very long - 
pointed shoes worn by ' nigger ' 
minstrels. 

6. (venery). The penis. (For 
synonyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK). 

7. (colloquial). A parasite ; 
a remembrancer. (Cf. SWIFT, 
Gulliver, ' Laputa.') 

FLAPPER- SHAKING, subs. 
(common). Hand -shaking. 

1853. BRADLEY ('Cuthbert Bede'X 
Verdant Green, pt. II., ch. iv. Wonder- 
ing whether ... if the joining palms in a 
circus was the customary FLAPPER- 
SHAKING before 'toeing the scratch' for 
business. 



FLAP-SAUCE. See FLAPDOODLE. 



Flare. 



Flare-up. 



FLARE, subs, (nautical). I. Prima- 
rily a stylish craft ; hence, by 
implication, anything out of the 
common. For synonyms, see 
STUNNER. 

2. (colloquial). A row ; a 
dispute; a 'drunk'; or spree. 

Cf., FLARE-UP. 

Verb, (thieves'). I. Specifi- 
cally to whisk out ; hence, to 
steal actively, lightly, or 
delicately. 

1850. Lloyds Weekly, 3 Feb. Low 
Lodging Houses of London. B. tried 
his pocket saying, 'I'll show you how to 
do a hankerchief ' ; but the baker looked 
round and B. stopped ; and just after that 
I FLARED it (whisked the handerchief out) ; 
and that's the first I did.' 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab, and 
Lend. Poor, I., 457. Just after that I 
FLARED it (a handerchief). 

2. (common). To swagger ; 
to go with a bounce. 

1841. LEMAN REDE, Sixteen-String 
Jack, ii., 3. Crissy Odsbuds, I'll on with 
my duds, And over the water we'll FLARE.) 

ALL OF A FLARE, adv. phr. 
(thieves'). Bunglingly. 

1839. BRANDON, Poverty, Mendicity, 
and Crime, p. 113. Some of the girls at 
Milberry's pick pockets at night : while one 
talks to the man, the other robs him ; but 
they are not dextrous, they pull it out ALL 

OF A FLARE. 

FLARING, adj. and adv. (collo- 
quial). Excessive : e.g., a 
FLARING lie; FLARING drunk; 
a FLARING whore ; see FLAMING. 

FLAK E- UP (or -Our), suds. (popular). 
An orgie ; a fight ; an outburst 
of temper. Also a spree. 

1838. HALIBURTON, Clockmaker, 2 
Ser. ch. x. Some of our young citizens . 
. . got into a FLARE-UP with a party of 
boatmen that lives in the Mississippi ; a 
desperate row it was too. 



1847. Punch, vol. XIII., p. 148, 
Address at the Opening of a Casino. In 
for FLARE-UP and frolic let us go, And polk 
it on the fast fantastic toe. 

1851. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, I., p. 160. These (hot eel) 
dealers generally trade on their own 
capital ; but when some have been having 
a FLARE-UP, and have 'broke down for 
stock ' to use the words of my informant, 
they borrow ;i and pay it back in a week 
or a fortnight. 

1879. JUSTIN M'CARTHY, Donna. 
Quixote, ch. xvii. Paulina had a hard 
struggle many a time to keep down her 
temper, and not to have what she would 
have called a FLARE-OUT. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Barney; 
batter; bean-feast ; beano ; break- 
down ; burst ; booze (specifically 
a drinking-bout); caper; devil's 
delight ; dust ; fanteague ; fight ; 
flare ; flats-yad (back slang) ; 
fly ; gig ; hay-bag ; hell's delight ; 
high jinks; hooping up; hop ; 
j a gg jamboree ; jump ; jun- 
ketting ; lark ; drive ; randan ; 
on the tiles ; on the fly ; painting 
the town (American); rampage; 
razzle-dazzle ; reeraw ; ructions ; 
shake ; shine ; spree ; sky- wan- 
nocking ; tear ; tear up ; toot. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. La 
nocerie (popular : une noce a tout 
casser ; or, une noce de b&tons de 
chaise a grand jollification) ; 
faire des crapes ( = to have a rare 
spree) ; badouilter (popular : es- 
pecially applied to drinking bouts). 

ITALIAN SYNONYM. Far 
festa alle campane. 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Trapi- 
sonda (a drunken revel) ; holgueta. 

Verb (common). To fly into 
a passion. 

1849. MAHONEY, ReL Father Prout, 
I., 319. 'Vert- Vert, the Parrot.' Forth 
like a Congreave rocket burst, And 
storm'd and swore, FLARED UP, and 
curs'd. 



Flash. 



Flash. 



1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. xii. 
He was in the ' Cave of Harmony,' he says, 
that night you FLARED UP about Captain 
Costigan. 

1871. Daily Telegraph, 8 June, 
4 Paris in Convalescence.' On this he 
FLARED UP like a Commune conflagration, 
and cried out ; ' Shame, in the name of 
religion, art, and history ! ' 



FLASH, subs. (old). i. The vulgar 
tongue ; the lingo of thieves and 
their associates. To PATTER 
FLASH = to talk in thieves' lingo. 
[The derivation of FLASH, like 
that of French argot, is entirely 
speculative. It has, however, 
been generally referred to a dis- 
trict called FLASH (the primary 
signification as a place name is 
not clear), between Buxton Leek 
and Macclesfield : there lived 
many chapmen who, says Dr. 
Aiken ("Description of Country 
round Manchester"}, 'were known 
as FLASH-MEN . . . using a sort 
of slang or cant dialect.'] 

1718. HITCHIN. The Regulator of 
Thieves, etc., with Account of FLASH 
words, etc. (Title). 

1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
II., 69. Jigger, being cant or FLASH 
(or door. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 25. With respect to that peculiar 
language called FLASH, or St. Jiles' 
Greek, etc. 

1830. SIR E. B. LYTTON, Paul 
Clifford, ch. viii. Here a tall gentleman 
marched up to him, and addressed him in 
a certain language, which might be called 
the freemasonry of FLASH. 

1839. HARRISON AINSWORTH, Jack 
Sheppard (1889), p, 12, ' What does he 
say ? ' roared the long drover. ' He says 
he don't understand FLASH,' replied the 
lady in gentleman's attire, 

1843-4. HOOD, Miss Kilmansegg. 
His cheeks no longer drew the cash. 
Because,as his comrades explain'd in FLASH, 
He had overdrawn his badger. 

1827. MAGINN, Vidocq's Song. 
Pattered in FLASH like a covey knowing. 



1864. Athenceum, 29 Oct. The 
northern village of ill-repute, and bearing 
that name (FLASH) gave to felonious high- 
flying the term FLASH. 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, From Post to 
Finish, p. 278. Why, when the late Lord 
Lytton wrote Pelham it was brought 
against him that ' his knowledge of FLASH 
was evidently purely superficial.' FLASH, 
my sister, is merely recondite slang or 
thieves' argot. 

ENGLISH ANALOGUES. Back 
Slang or Kacab-Genals (the main 
principle consists in roughly pro- 
nouncing the word backwards, as 
erifior jire, dab for bad, etc. : the 
practice exists in most languages) ; 
CANT (q.v.}', Centre Slang (the 
central vowel is made the initial 
letter, vowels and consonants being 
added at pleasure) ; Gammy(North 
country : mainly composed of 
Gypsy words) ; Gibberish (formed 
by inserting a consonant between 
each syllable of a word, the result 
beinsj the F, G, H, M or S gib- 
berish, according to the letter 
used : thus, " goming mout tom- 
daym," or " gosings outs tos- 
days ? " = going out to-day ?) ; 
jargon ; the Green Lingo 
(French thieves') ; Marrowskyirg 
or Hospital Greek (manufactured 
by transferring the initial letters 
of words ; plenty of rain thus 
becomes renty of plain : the 
'Gower St. dialect' of Albert 
Smith, Mr. Ledbury) ; Ped- 
lar's French (old cant : FLORIO, 
1598 ; COTGRAVE, 1612) ; 
RHYMING SLANG (q.v.) SLANG 
(q.v.)', St, Giles' Greek (last 
century for Slang as distinguished 
from Cant) ; Thieves' Latin; the 
Vulgar Tongue ; YOB-GAB (q.v. ) ; 
NOTIONS (q.v.) ; ZIPH (q.v.). 

FRENCH AND OTHER ANA- 
LOGUES. Argot or arguche ; la 
langue verte (properly gamesters') ; 
le lan.gagt soudardant (soldiers' 



Flash. 



Flash. 



lingo); lejars; le jargon jobelin; 
(CoTGRAVE, Didionarie^ 1611. 
Jargon = ' Gibridge, fustian lan- 
guage, Pedlar's French, a bar- 
barous jangling ') ; le langage de 
Vartis ; langage en lent (formed 
by prefixing " 1 " and add- 
ing the syllable "em," pre- 
ceded by the first letter of the 
word); thus "mam" becomes 
" lainmem." A similar mode of 
dealing with words of more than 
one syllable is to replace the first 
consonant by the letter "1," the 
word being followed by its first 
syllable preceded by "du"; thus, 
" jaquette" becomes " laquette du 
jaq" or if " m " be used as a key- 
letter, " maquette du jaq" etc. ; 
le javanais here the syllable 
" av " is interpolated ; e.g., "jave 
favai vavujaveudavi" = (je Fai 
vu jeudi). GERMAN. Roth- 
ivalsch (from Roter = beggar or 
vagabond + walsch = foreign) ; 
Gaunersprache ( = thieves' lingo). 
ITALIAN. Lingua gerga (abbre- 
viated into gerga; (FLORio, 1598 
( g er g Pedlar's French, fustian, 
or roguish language, gibbrish ') ; 
lingua franca (Levantine : the 
source of some English slang); 
lingua furbesca. DUTCH. Bar- 
goens. SPANISH. Germama(the 
Gypsies were supposed to have 
come from Germany) ; jeriganza. 
PORTUGUESE. Calao (Zincali or 
Calo = Gypsy). 

2. Hence, at one period, es- 
pecially during the Regency days, 
the idiom of the man about town, 
of Tom and Jerry dom. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. xxix. To the cultivation in our times, 
of the Science of Pugilism, the FLASH 
language is indebted for a considerable 
addition to its treasures. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
etc, They were invariably thieves and 



gamblers who used FLASH formerly ; but 
other kinds of persons, now-a-day, who 
may be rippishly inclined, adopt similar 
terms and phrases, to evince their uppish- 
ness in the affairs of life. These gentle- 
men also consider all terms of art and of 
science as FLASH ; .... of course, those 
words and sayings which are approp: iate to 
the turf, the ring, and field sports, are 
equally considered as FLASH by them, and 
the word has been applied (too generally we 
allow), to all this species of quid fro quo 
lingo. 

3. (old). See quot. and cf., 
with a Shaksperian gloss of 
FLASH = a burst of wit or 
merriment. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Diet, (sth ed.), 
FLASH (s.), also a boast, brag, or great 
pretence made by a spendthrift, quack, or 
pretender to more art or knowledge than 
he really has. 

4. (old). A showy swindler. 
(e.g., the Sir Petronel Flash of 
quot. ) ; a blustering vulgarian. 

1605. MARSTON, JONSON, and 
CHAPMAN, Eastward Hoe ! iv. i. 'Sir 
Petronel Flash, I am sorry to see such 
FLASHES come from a gentleman of your 
quality. 

1632. SHIRLE.Y. Love in a Maze, i., 
2. The town is full of these vain- 
glorious FLASHES. 

5. (old). A peruke or perriwig, 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the 
Canting Crew, s.v. 

1785. GR.OSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue. Rum FLASH, a fine long wig. 
Queer FLASH, a miserable weather-beaten 
caxon. 

6. (common). A portion ; a 
drink ; or GO (q.v.). Cf., FLASH 
OF LIGHTNING, sense i. 

Adj. (common). i. Relating 
to thieves, their habits, customs, 
devices, lingo, etc. 

1782. GEO. PARKER, Humorous 
Sketches, p. 34. No more like a kiddy 
he'll roll the FLASH song. 



Flash. 



10 



Flash. 



1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, 'Long 
Neds Song.' And rarely have the gentry 
FLASH, In sprucer clothes been seen. 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. 
viii. I suppose you don't know what a 
beak is, my FLASH com-pan-i-on. 

1852. SNOWDON, Mag: Assistant 1 
3rd ed., p. 448. I have seen Cheeks (a 
FLASH name for an accomplice). 

1863. C. READE, Hard Cash, II., 
244. He used some FLASH words, and 
they were shown into a public room. 

1864. Comhill Magazine ', ii., 336. 
In the following verse, taken from a pet 
FLASH song, you have a comic specimen 
of this sort of guilty chivalry. 



2. (thieves'). Knowing ; ex? 
pert ; showy. Cf. , DOWN, FLY, 

WIDE - AWAKE, etc. Hence 

(popularly), by a simple transi- 
tion, vulgarly counterfeit, 
showily shoddy : possibly the 
best understood meanings of the 
word in latter-day English. To 
PUT ONE FLASH TO ANYTHING = 

to put him on his guard; to 
inform. 

1819. MOORE. Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 19. Another philosopher, Seneca, has 
shown himself equally FLASH on the sub- 
ject. 

1835. DICKENS, Sketches by Boz, 
p. 17. Laying aside the knowing look, 
and FLASH air, with which he had repeated 
the previous anecdote. 

1836. MARRY AT, Japhet, etc., ch. 
Ivii. He considered me as ... a FLASH 
pickpocket rusticating until some hue and 
cry was over. 

1839. W. H. AINSWORTH, Jack Shep- 
pard, p. 138 (ed. 1840). ' Awake ! to be 
sure I am, my FLASH cove,' replied Shep- 
pard. 

1865. M. E. BRADDON, Henry Dun- 
bar, ch. v. He . . . took out the little 
packet of bank-notes. ' I suppose you can 
understand these,' he said. The languid 
youth . . . looked dubiously at his cus- 
tomer. ' I can understand as they might 
be FLASH uns,' he remarked, significantly. 

1888. C. D. WARNER, Their Pilgrim- 
age, p. 157. The FLASH riders or horse- 
breakers, always called ' broncho busters,' 
can perform really marvellous feats. 



3. (originally thieves', now 
general). Vulgar, or black- 
guardly ; showy ; applied to one 
aping his betters. Hence (in 
Australia), vain glorious or swag- 
gering. The idea conveyed is 
always one of vulgarity or showy 
blackguardism. 

1830. Sir E. B. LYTTON, Paul 
Clifford (ed . 1 854), p. 2 1 . A person of great 
notoriety among that portion of the elite 
which emphatically entitles itself FLASH. 

1861. A. TROLLOPE, Framley Par- 
sonage, ch. ix. If the dear friendship of 
this FLASH Member of Parliament did not 
represent that value, what else did do so ? 

1880.^ G. R. SIMS, Three Brass Balls, 
Pledge x.i. The speaker was one of the 
FLASH young gentlemen who haunt 
suburban billiard-rooms, who carry chalk 
in their pockets, and call the marker 
' Jack.' 

4. (common), In a set style. 
Also used substantively. 

1819. VAUX, Flash Diet., p, 173. s.v. 
A person who affects any peculiar habit, 
as swearing, dressing in a particular 
manner, taking snuff, etc., merely to be 
taken notice of is said to do it out of 

FLASH. 

1828. The English Spy, vol. I., 
p. 189. The man upon that half-starved 
nag Is an Ex S ff, a strange wag, Half- 
PL ASH and half a clown. 

1851. MAYHEW, Lon. Lab. and Lon. 
Poor, i., p. 36. They all of them (coster 
lads) delight in dressing FLASH as they 
call it. ... They try to dress like the 
men, with large pockets in their cord 
jackets j and plenty of them. Their 
trousers, too, must fit tight at the knee, 
and their boots they like as good as 
possible. A good 'kingsman/ a plush 
skull-cap, and a seam down the trousers 
are the great points of ambition with the 
coster boys. 

[Hence, in combination, FLASH-CASE, 

CRIB, DRUM, HOUSE, KEN, Or PANNY (see 

FLASH - KEN) ; FLASH COVE (g.v.) \ 
FLASH-DISPENSARY (American=a board- 
ing house), especially a swell brothel ; 
FLASH-GENTRY (= the swell mob or 
higher class of thieves) ; FLASH-GIRL, 

MOLL, -MOLLISHER, "PIECE Or -WOMAN ( = a 

showy prostitute); FLASH-JIG (costers'= 
a favourite dance); FLASH-KIDDY (=a 
dandy) ; FLASH - LINGO, or SONG ( *= 



Flash. 



ii 



Flash-Case. 



1 patter," or a song interlarded with cant 
words and phrases); FLASH-MAN (q.v.) ; 
FLASH-NOTE (= a spurious bank-note) ; 
FLASH-RIDER (American, see BRONCHO- 
BUSTER) ; FLASH TOGGERY ( = Smart 
clothes; FLASH VESSEL (=a gaudy look- 
ing, but undisciplined ship)J. 

1821. EG AN, Tom and Jerry, [1890,] 
p. 58. The rusticity of Jerry was fast 
wearing off ... and he bid fair, etc. 
. . to chaff with the FLASH MOLLISHERS. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookiuood, p. 
Soon then I mounted in Swell St. High, 
And sported my FLASHIEST TOGGERY. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, L, p. 14. The other dances 
are jigs FLASH JIGS hornpipes in fetters 
a dance rendered popular by the success 
of the noted Jack Sheppard. 

Verb (common). I. To show; 
to expose. 

[Among combinations may be men- 
tioned, TO FLASH ONES IVORIES = tO show 

one's teeth, to grin (Grose) ; TO FLASH 
THE HASH = to vomit (Grose) \ TO FLASH 
THE DICKEY = to show the shirt front ; TO 
FLASH THE DiBS=to show or spend one's 
money; TO FLASH A FAWNEY=IO wear a 
ring; TO FLASH ONE'S GAB=IO talk, to 
swagger, to brag ; TO FLASH THE BUBS= 
to expose the paps ; TO FLASH THE 
MUZZLE (g.v.) ; TO FLASH ONE'S TICKER 
= to air one's watch ; TO FLASH THE 
DRAG = to wear women's clothes for 
immoral purposes ; TO FLASH THE 

WHITE GRlX = see GRIN J TO FLASH IT 

(g.v.\ or TO FLASH ONE'S MEAT (cf., 
MEAT-FLASHER) ; TO FLASH A BIT (g.v.) ; 
TO FLASH THE FLAG to sport an a^ron ; 
TO FLASH THE WEDGE =to 'fence' the 
swag, etc.] 

1812. VAUX, Flash Diet. Don't 
FLASH YOUR STICKS, don't expose your 
pistols. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 2. His lordship, as usual, that very 
great dab At the flowers of rhet'ric, is 

FLASHING HIS GAB. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
etc. He FLASHED THE BLUNT, made a 
show of money to dazzle the spectators. 

1825, E. KENT, Modern Flash Diet. 
FLASHING HIS IVORY, shew his teeth. 

1834. W. H. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, 
(ed. 1864), p. 176. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends. 
'The Dead Drummer.' When traveling, 



don't FLASH YOUR NOTES Or YOUR CASH 

Before other people its foolish and rash. 

1887. W. E. HENLEY, Villon's Good- 
Night. Likewise you molls that FLASH 
YOUR BUBS, For swells to spot and stand 
you sam. 

1887. W. E. HENLEY, Straight Tip. 
Go crying croaks, or FLASH THE DRAG. 

To FLASH A BIT, verbal phr. 
(venery). To show up ; to permit 
examination; 'TO SPREAD' \q.v.} ; 
to behave indecently. Said of 
women only. 

TO FLASH IT* or TO FLASH 

ONE'S MEAT. To expose the 
person. [Hence MEAT-FLASHER] 
(q.v*}. Said usually of men. 

TO FLASH THE MUZZLE (old). 
To produce a pistol. 

c. 1823. Ballad (quoted in Don Juan 
xi.). On the high toby spice FLASH THE 
MUZZLE In spite of each gallows old scout. 

TO FLASH IT ABOUT, or TO 
CUT A FLASH or DASH, verbal 
phr. (common). To make a 
display ; to live conspicuously 
and extravagantly. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 
ch. iii., p. 220. He FLASHED IT ABOUT a 
good deal for a long time, going from one 
place to another. Sometimes he was a 
lord, at others an earl. 

To GO FLASHING IT, verb. phr. 
(venery). To have sexual inter- 
course. For synonyms, see GREEN s 
and RIDE. 

FLASH-CASE (or -CRIB, -HOUSE, 
-DRUM, -KEN, -PANNY, etc). i. 
A house frequented by thieves, as 
a tavern, lodging - house, fence 

1690. B. E. , New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew FLASH-KEN, c., a house where 
thieves use, and are connived at. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1821. D. HAGGART, Life, ' Glossary,' 
p. 172. FLASH-KAiN,a house for receiving 



Flash- Cove. 



12 



Flash-Man. 



stolen goods. [Haggart's spelling, being 
that of the respectable Edinburgh lawyer 
who took down his 'confessions' is 
generally misleading and inaccurate.] 

1828. SMEETON, Doings in London, 
p, 39. It is a game in very great vogue 
among the macers, who congregate nightly 
at the FLASH-HOUSES. 

1830. LYTTONJ Paul Clifford, p. 50 
(ed. 1854). There is one Peggy Lobkins 
who keeps a public house, a sort of FLASH- 
KEN called ' The Mug ' in Thames Court. 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Sheppard 
(ed. 1840), p. 271. I've been to all the 
FLASH-CASES in town, and can hear 
nothing of him or his wives. . . . Ibid^ 
p. 135. ' The Black Lion ! ' echoed Terence, 
I know the house well ; by the same 
token that it's a FLASH-CRIB.' 



2. (common). A brothel; a 
haunt of loose women. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum (Flash 
song quoted under FLASH-PANNEYS). 
Next for his favourite mot the kidcley 
looks about, And if she's in a FLASH- 
FANNY he swears he'll have her out ; So he 
fences all his togs to buy her duds, and 
then He frisks his master's lob to take her 
from the bawdy ken. 

1830. LYTTON, PaulCUJford, ch. xvi. 
(ed. 1840). You know how little I frequent 

FLASH-HOUSES. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends 
(ed. 1862), p. 380. Those troublesome 
swells, Who come from the play-houses, 
FLASH-KENS, and hells. 

1840. MACAULAY, Essays : ' Lord 
Clive.' The lowest wretches that the 
company's crimps could pick up in the 
FLASH-HOUSES of London. 

1852. BRISTED, Upt>er Ten Thousand, 
p. 34. That is Mary Black who keeps the 
greatest FLASH HOUSE in Leonard Street. 

FLASH-COVE (also FLASH-COM- 
PANION), subs, (common). A 
thief; a sharper; a FENCE (q.v.). 

1825. E. KENT, Modern Flash Diet. 
FLASH-COVE, the keeper of a place for the 
reception of stolen goods. 

1839. H. AINSWORTH, Jack Skeppard 
(1889), p. 60. ' Awake ! To be sure I am, 
my FLASH-COVB ! ' replied Sheppard. 



FLASH-MAN, subs. (old). 
Primarily a man talking FLASH 
(see quots., 1823 and 1802); hence, 
a rogue, a thief, the landlord of 
a FLASH-CASE (q.v.). Also a 
FANCY-JOSEPH (for synonyms, see 
FANCY - MAN). In America, a 
person with no visible means of 
support, but living in style and 
* snowing up ' well. 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 141. A FLASHMAN is one who lives on 
the hackneyed prostitution of an un- 
fortunate woman of the town. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
II., i. Soon one is floored upon the ground. 
While loud her FLASHMAN cries, ' Arise, 
my ladybird, arise ! ' 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
etc., p. 80. Derived from his language, 
and this again has its appellation ('tis 
suggested) i'rom the first FLASH-MEN being 
highwaymen, that then generally abounded 
(circa 1770). He is the favorite, or pro- 
tector of a prostitute, whose FLASH-MAN he 
is ; and she is called inversely, his FLASH - 
WOMAN. 

c. 1833. Broadside Ballad. My 
FLASH-MAN has gone to sea. 

1849. New South Wales, Past, Present, 
and Future, ch. i., p. 14. This man was 
known to Mr. Day to be what is termed a 
FLASH-MAN ; and, seeing MS own imminent 
danger, he instantly spoke to him and 
called him a cowardly rascal, and offered 
to give him shot for shot, while he was 
re-loading, 

1859. H. KINGSLEY, Geoffrey 
Hamlyn, ch. v. You're playing a dan- 
gerous game, my FLASHMAN. 

1862. SMILES, Lives of the Engineers, 
vol. I., pt. 5, ch. i., p. 307. Those articles 
were sold throughout the country by 
pedestrian hawkers, most of whom lived iri 
the wild country called THE FLASH, fiom 
a hamlet of that name situa'ed between 
Buxton, Leek, and Macclesfield .... 
Travelling about from fair to fair, and 
using a cant or slang dialect, they became 
generally known as FLASH-MEN, and the 
name still survives (to which may be 
added : They paid, at first, ready money, 
but when they had established a credit, 
paid in promissory notes which were 
rarely honored. 



Flash of Lightning. *3 



Flasher. 



a. 1873. Lyra Flagitiosa. [Quoted 
in HOTTEN.] My FLASH MAN'S in quod, 
And I'm the gal that's willin', So I'll 
turn out to-night, And earn an honest 
shillin'. 

FLASH OF LIGHTNING, subs. phr. 
(old). i. A glass of gin ; a diam 
of neat spirit. See Go and 
DRINKS. Latterly, an ' Ameri- 
can drink.' See quot. 1862. 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 164, s.v. 

1821. P. EGAN, Tom And Jerry 
(ed. 1890,), p. 79. I have not exactly 
recovered from the severe effects of the 
icpeated FLASHES OF LIGHTNING and 
strong claps of thunder, with which I had 
to encounter last night. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf 
(quoted in). But ere they homeward 

pik'd it, A FLASH OF LIGHTNING Was 

sarv'd round to every one as lik'd it. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, (ed. 
1854), p. 141. The thunders of eloquence 
being hushed, FLASHES OF LIGHTNING, 
or, as the vulgar say, ' glasses of gin ' 
gleamed about. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, i., p. 168. The stimulant of 

a FLASH OF LIGHTNING . . . for SO a 

dram of neat spirit was then called. 

1862. E. MACDERMOTT, Popular 
Guide to International Exhibition, 1862, 
p. 185. In the vestibule of each refreshment 
room there is an American bar, where 
visitors may indulge in ... gum-ticklers, 
eye-opentrs, FLASHES OF LIGHTNING . . . 
and a variety of similar beverages. 

2. (nautical). The gold braid 
on an officer's cap. 

FLASH IN THE PAN, subs. phr. 

(venery). Connection without 

emission. Cf. DRY-BOB (q.v.). 

Also verbally. 

1719. DURFEY. Pills, v., 340. Still 

hawking, still baulking, You FLASH IN 

THE PAN. 

FLASHY, adj., and FLASHILY, or 
FLASH LY, adv. (old : now collo- 
quial). Empty; showy; tawdry; 
insipid. 

1637. MILTON, Lycidas, 123. Their 
tean and FLASHY songs Grate on their 
crannel pipes of wretched straw. 



1693. CONGREVE, Old Batchelor, Act 
I., sc. iv. It is oftentimes too late with 
some of you young, termagant, FLASHY 
sinners. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., ii., 12. 
A FLASHY town beau. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary, (sth ed.) 
FLASHY (a), vain, bragging, boasting, 
foolish, empty ; also anything waterish and 
unsavoury. 

1755. The World, No. 149. Whose 
melodious voices give every syllable (not 
of a lean and FLASHY, but of a fat and 
plump song) its just emphasis. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, p. 13, 
(ed. 1854). Vy it be ... the gemman 
vot payed you so FLASHLY. 

18o7. Song in DUCANGE ANGLICUS, 
The Vulgar Tongue, p. 42. Your fogle 
you must FLASHLY tie. 

1863. SPEKE, Journal of the Dis- 
covery of the Nile, p. 154. FLASHILY 
dressed in coloured cloths and a turban, he 
sat down in one of our chairs. 

1864. BRADDON, Henry Dunbar, 
fch. v. But he evinced rib bad taste in the 
selection of a costume. He chose ho 
gaudy colours, or FLASHILY cut vestments. 

1873. Casselfs Magazine, Jan., p. 
246, col. 2. They are rather prone to 
dress FLASHILY, and wear, when in full 
fig, no end of jewellery. 

1874. MORTIMER COLLINSJ Frances, 
ch. xvii. That wild set of people Captain 
Heath picked up with members of Parlia- 
ment and FLASHY young women all 
driving four horses, I don't know where. 

1882. Century Magazine, xxvi., 295. 
As stones, they were cheap and FLASHY^ 

FLASH -TAIL, subs. (Common). A 
prostitute. See TAIL. 

1868. Temple Bar, xxiv., p. 538-9. 
Picking-up Moll. ... a FLASHTAIL? a 
prostitute who goes about the streets at 
nights trying to pick up toffs. 

FLASHER, subs. (old). A high- 
flyer ; a fop ; a pretender to wit. 
For synonyms, see DANDY. Also 
(quct. 2), a BONNET (q.v.). 

1779. D'ARBLAY, Diary, etc. (1876). 
vol. I., p. 185. They are reckoned the 
FLASHERS of the place, yet everybody 
laughs at them for their airs, affectations, 
and tonish graces and impertinences. 



Flashery. 



Flat. 



1880. Derbyshire Gatherer, p. 128. 
Long before this date (circa 1800) the cant 
name of FLASHER was applied to the. man 
who sat by the table in the gambling- 
house to swear how many times he had 
seen lucky gamesters break the bank. 

FLASH ERY, subs. (old). Inferior, 
or vulgar, elegance, dash, dis- 
tinction, display. 

FLASH-YAD, subs, (back-slang). A 
day's enjoyment. For synonyms, 
see FLARE-UP. 

FLASHY BLADE or SPARK, subs. 
phr. (old). A DANDY (q.v. ) ; now 
a cheap and noisy swell, whether 
male or female j C/i, FLASHER. 

1719. DURFEY, Pill?, etc., vi,, 104. 
In youth a nauseous FLASHY FOP, in elder 
days a bore. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 40. For though all know that FLASHY 
SPARK, etc. 



fo. (colloquial).-i. A green- 
horn ; noddy ; gull. For syno- 
nyms, see BUFFLE and CABBAGE- 
HEAD; also SAMMY-SOFT. 

1762. GOLDSMITH, Life of Nash, in 
wks. p. 546 (Globe). Why, if you think me 
a dab I will get this strange gentleman, or 
this, pointing to the FLAT. Done 1 cries 
the sailor, but you shall not tell him. 

1789. G. PARKER, Life's Painter, p. 
142. Who are continually looking out for 
FLATS, in order to do them upon the 
broads, that is, cards. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 59. Poor Johnny Raw, what mad- 
ness could impel, So rum a FLAT to face so 
prime a swell. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends. 
' Misadventures at Margate.' He's been 
upon the mill, And cos he gammons all the 
FLATS we calls him Veepin Bill. 

1841. LYTTON, Night and Morning, 
bk. II., ch. ix. ' Did he pay you for her?' 
' Why, to be sure, he gave me a cheque on 
Coutt's.' 'And you took it? My eyes? 
what a FLAT.' 

1847. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, ch. 
xiv. I won two hundred of him at the 
Cocoa-tree. He play, the young FLAT ! 



1847. Punch, vol. XIIL, p. 148. It 
mayn't precisely please the moral FLAT. 
You won't find fault with it, kind friends, 
for that. 

1848. THACKERAY, The Book of 
Snobs, ch. x. When he does play he 
always contrives to get hold of a good 

FLAT. 

1857. DUCANGE ANGLICUS, The Vul* 
gar Tongue, p. 39. Fawney-droppers 
gammon the FLATS and take the yokels in. 

1866. YATBS, Black Sheep, I., p. 70. 
The genius which had hitherto been con- 
fined to bridging a pack of cards, or ' se- 
curing ' a die, talking over a FLAT, or win- 
ning money of a greenhorn. 

1880. MORTIMER COLLINS, Thoughts 
in My Garden, vol. II., p. 180. Their 
quack medicines that will cure every- 
thing, and their sales of invaluable 
articles at a loss, and a thousand other 
devices to catch FLATS. 

1887. W. E. HENLEY, Villon'* Good- 
night. You FLATS and joskins great and 
small. 

1889. Pall Mall Gazette, .Sept. 21, 
p. 3, col. i (In a London Gambling Hell). 
The FLATS who play faro (Cross-heading). 

2. (American thieves'). An 
honest man. 



3. (American), 
dismissal; a jilting. 



A lover's 



Adj. (colloquial and literary), 
Downright ; plain ; straight- 
forward ; as in THAT'S FLAT? 

a FLAT LIE, " FLAT BURGLARY," 

etc. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, i King Henry 
IV, Act I., Sc. 3. Wor. : You start away, 
And lend no ear to my purposes. Those 
prisoners you shall keep. Hot. '. Nay, I 
will ; THAT'S FLAT. 

1835-40. HALIBURTON, The Clock' 
maker, p. 6, preface (ed. 1862). 

1848. LOWELL, Fable for Critics, 
p. 19. (A fetch, I must say, most trans* 
parent and FLAT). 

[There are other usages, more or less 
colloquial: e.g., Insipid; tame; dull: as 
in Macaulay's "FLAT as champagne in 
decanters." On the Stock Exchange, 
F LAT = without interest : S tock is borrowed 
FLAT when no interest is allowed by the 
lender as security for the due return of the 
scrip.] 



Flat-back. 



Flatch. 



Verb (American). To jilt. 
Cf., suds., sense 3. For syno- 
nyms, see MITTEN. 

1871. DE VERB, Americanisms, p. 
602. To FLAT, in the West, means to 
jilt, and is probably derived from another 
slang phrase, 'to feel flat," denoting the 
depression which is apt to follow such a 
disappointment. 

To FEEL FLAT, verb. phr. 
(American). I. To be low- 
spirited; out of sorts ; OFF COLOUR 



1838. J. C. NEAL, Charcoal Sketches. 
Not to hurt a gentleman's feelings and to 
make him FEEL FLAT afore the country. 

2. (American). -To fail ; to 
give way. Also used substan- 
tively. 

FLAT AS A FLOUNDER (or 
PANCAKE),/^. (colloquial). 
Very flat indeed. Also FLAT AS 

BE BLOWED. 

1882. Punch, vol. LXXXII, p. 177, 
col. i. 

TO BRUSH UP A FLAT. See 

BRUSHER. 

To PICK UP A FLAT, verb. 
phr. (prostitutes'). To find a 
client. Fr. , lever or faire un 
micht (miche = bread, from 
michon money. Compare 

BREADWINNER : under MONO- 
SYLLABLE (g.v.))> 

1869. GREENWOOD, Seven Curses of 
London. On the chance that she will, in 
the course of the evening, PICK UP A 
FLAT. 

TO HAVE (Or DO) A BIT OF FLAT, 
verb. phr. (venery). To indulge 
in sexual intercourse. For syno- 
nyms, see GREENS and RIDE. 

FLAT- BACK, subs, (common). A 
bed - bug. For synonyms, see 
NORFOLK HOWARD. 



FLAT- BROKE, adj. (colloquial). 
Utterly mined j DEAD - BROKE 
(q.v.). 

FLAT-CATCHER, subs, (common). 
An impostor. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
i., 6. Cofe (speaking of a horse). Well, 
Master Gull'em, do you think we shall get 
the FLAT-CATCHER off to-day ? 

1841. Blackwoods Ma?., 1., 202. 
Buttoners are those accomplices of 
thimble-riggers . . . whose duty it is :o 
act as FLAT - CATCHERS or decoys, by 
personating flats. 

1856> MAYHEW, Great World of 
London, p. 46. And FLAT-CATCHERS, or 
' ring-droppers,' who cheat by pretending 
to find valuables in the street. 

1864. London Review. June 18, p. 
643. 'The Bobby' or chinked -back 
horse, is another favourite FLAT-CATCHER. 

1869. WHYTE-MELVILLE, M. or N., 
p.^no. Rather a FLAT-CATCHER, Tom? 
said that nobleman, between the whiffs of 
a cigar. 

FLAT-CATCHING, subs, (common). 
Swindling. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry, p. 118, 
The no-pinned hero, on being elevated, 
gave, as a toastj * Success to FLAT-CATCH- 
ING,' which produced roars of laughter 
and shouts of approbation k 

1869 GREENWOODJ Seven Curves of 
London,. To mark the many kinds of 
bait that are used in FLAT-CATCHING, as 
the turf slang has it. 

FLATCH, adj. (back-slang). A half. 
FLATCH-KENNURD = half drunk ; 
FLATCH-YENORK = half-a-crown j 
FLATCH-YENNEP = a half-penny 
(see subs., sense i). 

Subs, I. A half-penny. [An 
abbreviation of FLATCH-YENNEP. ] 
For synonyms, see MAG. 

c.1866. VANCE, The Chickaleary Cove. 
I doesn't care a FLATCH as long as I've a 
tach. 

2 (coiners'). A counterfeit 
half-crown. For synonyms, see 
MADZA. 



Flat-cap. 



16 



Flats. 



FLAT-CAP, stibs. (old). A nick- 
name for a citizen of London. 
[In Henry the Eight's time flat 
round caps were the pink of 
fashion ; but when their date was 
out, they became ridiculous. The 
citizens continued to wear them 
long after they were generally 
disused, and were often satirized 
for their fidelity]. 

1596. BEN JONSON, Every Man in H ., 
ch. ii., v. i. Mock me all over From my 
FLAT-CAP unto my shining shoes. 

1602. DEKKER, Honest Whore. Old 
Plays, Hi., 304. Come, Sirrahj you FLAT- 
CAP, where be those whites ? 

1605. MARSTON, Dutch Court, ii., i. 
Wealthy FLAT-CAPS that pay for their 
pleasure the best of any men in Europe. 

1613. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Hon. Man's Fort,, v. 3. Trade? to the 
city, child : a FLAT-CAP will become thee. 

FLAT-COCK, subs, (old). A female. 
[GROSE, 1785.] For synonyms, 
see PETTICOAT. 

FLAT-FEET, subs, (common). Spe- 
cifically the Foot Guards, but also 
applied to other regiments of the 
line. Also (generally with some 
powerful adjective), applied to 
militia men to differentiate them 
from linesmen. For synonyms, 
see MUD-CRUSHER. 

FLAT-FISH, (generally, A REGULAR 
FLAT-FISH) subs, (common). 
A dullard. [A play upon FLAT 
= stupid, and FJSH = something 
to HOOK or catch.] For syno- 
nyms, see BUFFLE, CABBAGE- 
HEAD, and SAMMY-SOFT. Cf., 
Fr., platpied = a contemptible 
fellow. 

FLAT-FOOTED, adj. (American). 
Downright ; resolute ; honest. 
[Western : the simile, common 
to most languages, is of a man 



standing, his back to the wall, 
resolute to accomplish his pur- 
pose.] 

1858. Harper's Magazine, Sept. His 
herculean frame, and bold, FLAT-FOOTED 
way of saying things, had impressed his 
neighbours, and he held the rod in terrorism 
over them. 

1871. Philadelphia Bulletin, Mar. 
23. 'The row at St. Clement's Church/ 
Now the Committee of the vestry put their 
FOOT FLATLY down on auricular confessi on 
and priestly absolution. 

1887. R. A. PROCTOR, Knowledge, 
June i. When, in America, General 
Grant said he had PUT HIS FOOT opwN 
and meant to advance in that line if it 
took him all the summer, he conveyed . _. . 
the American meaning of the expression 

FLAT-FOOTED. 

FLAT- HEAD, subs. (American). 
A greenhorn ; a SAMMY-SOFT 



FLAT-IRON, subs, (common). A 
corner public house. [From the 
triangular shape.] 

FLATTIE or FLATTY, subs. 
(common). A gull. [A diminu- 
tive of FLAT, sense i.] Formerly 
cheap - jacks' = one in a new 
'pitch.' 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, vol. I., p. 232. They betray 
to the FLATTIES (natives) all their profits 
and proceedings. 

FLAT - MOVE, subs. (old). An 
attempt or project that miscarries ; 
folly and mismanagement gener- 
ally. GROSE. 

FLATS, subs. (old), i. Playing 
cards. For synonyms, see KING'S 
BOOKS. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 56. We 
2f-crib. 



played at FLATS in a budging-cril 

2. (old). False dice, 
synonyms, see FULHAMS. 



For 



Flats and Sharps. 



Flax-wench* 



3. (old). Base money. 

MAHOGANY FLATS, subs. phr. 
(common). Bed-bugs. For syno- 
nyms, see NORFOLK HOWARDS. 

FLATS AND SHARPS, subs. phr. 
(old). Weapons. 

1818. SCOTT, Heart of Midlothian, 
cb. xxx. ' I have known many a pretty 
lad cut short in his first summer upon the 
road, because he was something hasty with 

his FLATS AND SHARPS.' 

FLATTEN OUT, verb, phr, (Ameri- 
can). To get the better of (in 
argument or fight). For syno- 
nyms, see FLOOR, FLATTEN ED- 
OUT = ruined ; beaten. 



Now, TO SHOOT THE CAT. For 

synonyms, see ACCOUNTS and 
CAST UP ACCOUNTS. Cf., Fox, 
verb, sense I. 

1653. URQUHART, Rabelais, bk. I., 
ch. xi. He would FLAY THE FOX. 

2. (American). To clean out 
by unfair means. 

TO FLAY or SKIN A FLINT, 

verb. phr. (old). To be mean or 
miserly. See SKINFLINT. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew, s.v. He'll FLAY or SKINN A FLINT 
of a Meer Scrat or Miser. 

1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, vol. 
II., p. 194 (ed. 1846). Report says she 

WOUld SKIN A FLINT ifsheCOuld. 



FLATTER-TRAP, subs, (common). 
The mouth. Fr., la menteuse, 
but for synonyms, see POTATO- 
TRAP. 

1859. MATSELL, Vacabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, s.v. 

FLATTY- KEN, subs, (thieves') See 
ouot. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, vol. I., p. 261. Some take up 
their abode in what they Call FLATTY- 
KENS, that is, houses the landlord of 
which is not 'awake' or 'fly' to the 
' moves ' and dodges of the trade. 

FLAWED, ppL adj. (common). I. 
Half drunk ; ' a little crooked ' ; 
quick-tempered. GROSE. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED* 

2. (venery). * Cracked in the 
ring ' ; i.e., deflowered. 



FLAY BOTTOM or FLAYBOTTOMIST, 

suds. (common). A school- 
master, with a play on the word 
phlebotomist = a blood - letter. 
GROSE. Fr., fouette-cul ; and 
(COTGRAVE) " Fesse-cul, a pedan- 
tical whip-arse." 

FLAVOUR, TO CATCH (or GET) 
THE FLAVOUR. verb. phr. 
(common). I. To be intoxi- 
cated. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

2. (venery). To be 'half-on' 
for coition ; to wax PROUD 
(q.v.) : said of men and women 
both. 

FLAX, verb. (American). To beat 
severely ; TO GIVE IT HOT (q.v.). 
For synonyms, see TAN. 



FLAY (or FLAY THE FOX), verb* 
phr. (old). To vomit : 'from the 
subject to the effect,' says COT- 
GRAVE ; ' for the flaying of so 
stinking a beast is like enough to 
make them spue that feel it.' 



FLAX-WENCH, subs. (old). A 
prostitute. For synonyms, see 
BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

1604. SHAKSPEARE, Winters Tale, 
i., 2. My wife's a hobby-horse ; deserves 
a name As rank as any FLAX-WENCH. 
2 



Flea. 



18 



Fleece. 



FLEA. To SEND AWAY WITH A 
FLEA IN THE EAR. verb. phr. 
(common). To dismiss with 
vigour and acerbity. 

1854. Notes and Queries, 8 Apl., 
p. 322, col. 2. The luckless applicant is 
peremptorily dismissed with an imperative 
' flee ! "... or, facetiously, WITH A FLEE 

IN HIS EAR. 

TO HAVE A FLEA IN THE 
EAR = (i) to fail in an enter- 
prise ; and (2) to receive a scold- 
ing, or annoying suggestion. 

TO SIT ON A BAG OF FLEAS. 
verb. phr. (common). To sit 
uncomfortably ; ON A BAG OF 
HEN FLEAS = very uncomfortably 
ndeed. 

TO CATCH FLEAS FOR, verb, 
phr. (venery). To be on terms of 
extreme intimacy : e.g., '.I catch 
her fleas for her ' = She has 
nothing to refuse me. Cf., 
Shakspeare (Tempest , III;, 2.)> 
' Yet a tailor might scratch her 
wheree'er she did itch.' 

IN A FLEA'S LEAP> adv. phr. 
(old). In next to no time ; 

INSTANTER (q.V.}. 

FLEA-AND- LOUSE, subs-, (rhyming 
slang). A house; For syno- 
nyms, see KEN. 

FLEA-BAG, subs, (common). A 
bed ; Fr. ttn pucier-. For syno- 
nyms, see KIP. 

1839. LEVER, Hurry Lorrequer, eh. 
xl. 'Troth, and I think the gentleman 
would be better if he went off to his FLEA- 
BAG himself.' 

LEA- BITE, subs-, (old). A trifle. 

1630. TAYLOR, Works. If they doe 
lose by pirates, tempests, rocks, 'Tis but a 
FLEABITE to their wealthy stockes ; Whilst 
the poore cutpurse day and night doth 



toile, Watches and wardes, and doth him- 
selfe turmoile. 

1785. GROSE, Diet. Vulg. Tongue, 



FLEA-BITING, subs. (old). A trifle. 

1621. BURTON, Anatomy of M elan 
choly. Their miseries are but FLEA 
BITINGS to thine. 

FLEA- (or FLAY-) FLINT, subs. 
(old.) A miser : Cf., SKIN 
FLINT (q.v.). 

1719. DURFEV, Pills, etc., i., 141 
The FLEA-FLINTS . . . strip me bare. 

FLEAR, verb. (old). To grin. A 
FLEARING FOOL = a grinning 
idiot. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. 

FLEECE, subs. (old). An act of 
theft. Cf. , old proverb, ' to go out 
to shear and come home shorn.' 
For synonyms, see SKIN. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FLEECE, to Rob, Plunder, or strip. 

1703. MRS. CENTLIVRE, Beau's 
Duel, ii., 2. Had a FLEECE at his purse, 

2. (venery). The female 
pubic hair. Fr. ioison (BAUDE- 
LAIRE) ; It. ) barbiglioni (FLORio). 
For foreign synonyms, see MOTT. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Ban- 
ner (Durfey) ; bandoliers (old) ; 
beard ; bearskin ; belly-bristles ; 
belly - thicket ; belly - whiskers ; 
Boskage of Venus ; broom ; 
brush ; bush ; cat-skin ; clover- 
field ; cunny - skin (Durfey) ; 
Cupid's Arbour ; cunt-curtain ; 
damber-, dilberry-, gooseberry-, 
furze-, quim-, or whin -bush ; 
down ; Downshire ; front-door- 
mat ; feather (Prior and Moore); 
fluff; forest (Donne); fud (Burns) ; 
fur ; fur-below (old catch); 'grove 
of eglantine ' (Carew) ; hedge on 



Fleece. 



Fleet-Streetese. 



the dyke ; lower- wig (Burton) ; 
moss ; mott-carpet ; mustard- 
and-cress ; nether eye-brow (or 
-lashes); nether- whiskers; parsley 
(Durfey) ; plush; quim-whiskers ; 
quim-wig ; scut (Shakspeare) ; 
shaving-brush (cf,, LATHER); 
scrubbing - brush ; shrubbery ; 
sporran ; stubble (see POINTER) ; 
sweet-briar ; thatch ; tail - fea - 
thers ; ' toupee ; ' * tufted hon- 
ours ' ; twat-mg. 

Verb (now recognised). To 
cheat ; to shear or be shorn (as a 
sheep). 

1593. NASHE, Christ's Teares, in 
wks. (Grosart) IV. 140. Tell me (almost) 
what gentleman hath been cast away at 
sea, or disasterly souldiourizd it by lande, 
but they (usurers) have enforst him there- 
unto by their FLEECING, 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, I King Henry 1 'V., 
ii., 2. Down with them : FLEECE them ! 

1620. DEKKER, His Dreamt, in wks, 
(Grosart) III. 52. Catchpolles, and varlets, 
who did poore men .FLEECE (To their 
undoing) for a twdve-peny peece. 

1712. ARBUTHNOT, Hist, of John. 
Bull, pt. IV., ch. ii. When a poor man 
has almost undone himself for thy sake, 
thou art for FLEECING him. 

1822. SCOTT, Fort, of Nigel, ch. 
xxiii. He is now squeezed and FLEECED 
by them on every pretence. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Cruise of the Midge, 
p, i<i6. He was stabbed by the Raga- 
muffin he had FLEECEO. 

.1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch* 
xxxJL Bloundell is a professional black- 
leg, and travels the Continent, where he 
picks Up young gentlemen of fashion and 
FLEECES them. 

1859. Times, 25 Oct. 'Review of 
Dean Ramsay's Reminiscences.' I don't 
know whether they are black or white 
sheep, but I know that if they are long 
there they are pretty certain to be 

FLEECED. 

1891. Licensed Victuallers Gazette, 
1 6 Jan. How you would be FLEECED ! 
You've got a lot to learn yet. 

Hence FLEECED = turned; DEAD- 
BROKE (q.v . for synonyms). 



FLEECER, subs, (old), A thief. 

1600-69. PRYNNE, Breviatt. Not 
FLEECERS, but feeders. 

FLEECE- HUNTER, or -MONGER, 

subs. phr. (venery). A whore- 
master. For synonyms, see MOL- 
ROWER. 



FLEETER-FACE, subs. (old). A 
pale - face ; a coward. C/"., 
Shakspeare's 'cream-faced loon.' 

1647, BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Queen of Corinth. You knew where you 
are, you FLEETER-FACE. 

FLEET-NOTE, subs. (old). A forged 
note. 
1821, Real Lift in London, 

FLEET OF THE DESERT, subs, phr. 
(common). A caravan ; c/. t 
SHIP OF THE DESERT = Camel. 

FLEET-STREET, subs. phr. (collo- 
quial). The estate of journalism, 
especially journalism of the baser 
sort. 

FLEET-STREETER, subs, (collo- 
quial). A journalist of the baser 
sort ; a spunging PROPHET (q.v.)\ 
a sharking dramatic critic ; a SPICY 
(q.v.) paragraphist ; and so on. 

FLEET-STREETESE, subs. phr. 
( colloquial) . The so - called 
English, written to sell by the 
FLEET-STREETER (q.v.\ or baser 
sort of journalist : a mixture of 
sesquipedalians and slang, of 
phrases worn threadbare and 
phrases sprung from the kennel ; 
of bad grammar and worse 
manners; the like of which is im- 
possible outside FLEET-STREET 
(q.v.\ but which in FLEET- 
STREET commands a price, and 
enables not a few to live. 



FUg. 



20 



Flesh-broker. 



FLEG, verb. (old). To whip. 
BAILEY. 

FLEMISH ACCOUNT, subs. pkr. 
(old). A remittance less than 
was expected ; hence, an unsatis- 
factory account. [Among the 
Flemings (the merchants of 
Western Europe when commerce 
was young) accounts were kept 
in livres, sols, and pence ; but 
the livre or pound only = I2s., 
so that what the Antwerp mer- 
chant called one livre thirteen 
and fourpence would in English 
currency be only 2os. ] 

1668. T. BROWN, The Accurate 
AecomgUuttt etc. Quoted in N> and Q. i. 
S. I., 286. London, August loth, 1668. To 
Roger Pace, Factor, etc., for 10 pieces cont. 
746 Ells Fl. at IDS. Flem. per Ell is ^373 
Flem. Exchange at 355. makes Sterling 
Money 21^ 25. rod. 

1774-1826. 7>/. Antiq., p. 1773. A 
person resident in London is said to have had 
most of Caxton's publications. He sent them 
to Amsterdam for inspection, and on 
writing for them was informed that they 
had been destroyed by accident. ' I am 
very much afraid,' says Herbert, ' my kind 
friend received but a FLEMISH ACCOUNT of 
his Caxton's. 

1785. GROSF. Diet. Vulg. Tong. 
FLEMISH ACCOUNT, a losing or bad 
account. 

FLESH, subs. (old). Generic for the 
organs of generation, male or fe- 
male. Also (of women) FLESHLY- 
PART. 

1604. SHAKSPEARE, Winters Tale, 
iv., 3. She would not exchange FLESH 
with one that loved her. 

1605. Cymbeline, i., 5. Tf you buy 
ladies' FLESH at a million a dram you can- 
not preserve it from tainting. 

1620. PERCY. FolioMSS. [Hales & 
Furnivall, 1867]. 'As I was ridinge by 
the way.' Sweet hart, shall I put my 
FLESH in thine ? 

FLESH, verb. , or, FLESH IT ; or, TO 
BE FLESHED IN (venery). To 
have carnal knowledge of to be 
' one flesh with ' a woman. 
[For synonyms, see GREENS and 



RIDE.] An equivalent in the 
passive sense is TO FEEL HIS 
FLESH IN ONE'S BODY (said by 
women only). 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes, 
Andarin Camafau. To go a FLESHING 
or a wenching: (Camafau = thQ brat-get- 
tingplace ; the hole of content). 

FLESH AND BLOOD, subs. phr. 
(common). Brandy and port in 
equal proportions. See DRINKS. 

FLESH-BAG, subs, (common). A 
shirt or chemise. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Biled 
rag (American); camesa; carrion- 
case ; commission ; dickey 
(formerly a worn - out shirt) ; 
gad (gipsv); lully; mill tog; 
mish ; narp (Scots') ; shaker ; 
shimmy ( = a chemise, Marryat) ; 
smish. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Une 
liquette or limace (thieves' : from 
the Gypsy. The form also occurs 
also in the Italian lima) ; un 
panais (popular). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Kamis, 
Kamsel, Kemsel, or Gemsel 
(from med. Lat., Camisiale ; 
Fr. camisole] ; Kesones, Kusones, 
or Ksones (also = cotton and 
underclothing ) ; Staude or 
Stauden ; Hanfstandt (Libtr 
Vagatorum : literally hempshrub). 

ITALIAN SYNONYM. Lima 
(see Fr., limace). 

1820. London Magazine, i., 29. They 
are often without a FLESH-BAG to their 
backs. 

FLESH-BROKER, subs. (old). i. 
A match-maker. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FLESH-BROKER, a match-maker ; 
also a bawd ; between whom but little dif- 
ference, for they both (usually) take money. 

2. A procuress [GROSE]. Cf. , 
FLESH - FLY, FLESH - MONGER, 



Flesh-fly. 



21 



Flick. 



and FLESH-MARKET. For syn- 
onyms, see MOTHER. 

FLESH-FLY (also, FLESH-MAGGOT), 
subs. (old). A whoremaster. 
For synonyms, see MOLROWER. 

1781. COWPER, Progress of Error, 
323-324. Oh ! that a verse had power, and 
could command far, Far away, these FLESH- 
FLIES of the land. 



FLESH - MARKET, or FLESH- 
SHAMBLES, subs, (common). 
A brothel or FLASH-HOUSE (y.v.); 
also the pavement, in Piccadilly or 
Regent -street, for instance, where 
whores do congregate. Cf., 
MEATMARKET. 

1608. JOHN DAY, Humour out of 

Breath, II. I Asp She may bee 

well discended ; if shee be, Shee's fit for 
love, and why not then for me. Boy. And 
you be not fitted in Venice 'tis straunge, 
for 'tis counted the best FLESH-SHAMBLES 
in Italic. 



FLESH-MONGER, subs. (old). A 
procurer ; a whore-master. [From 
Eng. FLESH + MONGER]. For 
synonyms, see MOTHER and 
MOLROWER. Cf. t FLESH-FLY, 
FLESH-MARKET, and FLESH- 
BROKER. 

1603. SHAKSPEARE, Measure for 
Measure, V., i. And was the duke a 
FLESH-MONGER, a fool, and a coward, as 
you then reported him to be ? 

FLESH MONGERING. TOGOFLESH- 

MONGERING, verb. phr. (venery). 
To quest for women ; to GO ON 
THE PROWL (q.V.)., or AFTER 

MEAT. See GREENS and RIDE. 



FLESH-POT. SIGHING FOR THE 

FLESH-POTS OF EGYPT. phr. 
(common). Hankering for good 
things no longer at command. 
[Biblical]. 



1884. HAWLEY SMART, From Post 
to Finish, p. 131. Do you think it is a 

HANKERING AFTER THE FLESH-POTS, and 

that the canon's cook reconciles me to the 
canon's opinions ? 

FLESH-TAILOR, subs. (old). A 
surgeon. For synonyms, see 
SAWBONES. 

1633. FORD, 'Tit Pity She's a Whore, 
iii. Oh, help ! help ! help ! Oh, for a 
FLESH-TAILOR quickly. 



FLESHY, subs. (Winchester 
lege). See CAT'S HEAD. 



Col- 



F L ETC H, subs, (prison). A spurious 
coin. Cf., FLATCH. 

FLICK, or FLIG, subs, (colloquial). 
I. A cut with a whip - lash ; 
hence, a blow of any sort. A 
FLICKING is often administered 
by schoolboys with a damp towel 
or pocket - handkerchief. For 
synonyms, see TANNING. 

1750. FIELDING, Tom Jones, bk. VI., 
ch. ij. ' I do know you are a woman," 
cries the squire, ' and it's well for thee, that 
art one ; if had'st been a man, I promise 
thee I had lent thee a FLICK long ago. 

1787. GROSE, Provincial Glossary, 
s.v. VLICK. 

2. (common). A jocular salu- 
tation ; usually OLD FLICK. Cf. t 
CODGER and MY TULIP. 

1883. Punch, 28 July, p. 38, col. i. 
Well, last night, They'd a feet in these 
gardens, OLD FLICK, as was something too 
awfully quite. 

Verb, (thieves'). i. To cut. 

1690. B.E., New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FLICKING, c. , to cut, cutting. 

1728. BAILEY, Eng. Diet. (FLICK is 
given as a ' country word ') 

1785. GROSB, Diet. Vulg. Tongue- 
FLICK me some pannam and cassan, cut 
me some bread and cheese ; FLICK the 
peter, cut off the cloak bag or port- 
manteau. 



Flicker. 



22 



Flier. 



17&1. CAREW, Life and Adventures, 
q,v. 

1837. DISRAELI, Venetict, ch. xiv. 
FLICK the bread, cut the bread. 

1859, MATSELL, Vocabulum or 
Rogues Lexicon, s.v. FLICK the Peter 
and rake the swag for I want to pad my 
beaters, 

2. (colloquial). To strike 
with y or as with, a whip. 

1836, DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xliiL, 
Near him, leaning listlessly against the 
wall, stood a strong - built countryman, 
FLICKING with a worn-out hunting whip 
the top-boot that adorned. hi& right foot. 

1852. DICKENS, Bleak Hemse, ch, 
xxvii. Who . . . receives this com- 
pliment by FLICKING Mr. George in the 
face with a head of greens. 

1854. Our Cruise in the Undine, 
p. 103. It appeared to us that one of the 
most frequent, and therefore we supposed 
the principal stroke aimed at (in a Heidel- 
berg duel), was to strike your sword low- 
down, perhaps four inches from the handle, 
upon your adversary's bandaged arm, so 
that the end of the weapon (the only part 
that is sharpened) should FLJCK itself 
against your opponent's face. 

1863. HON. MRS. NORTON, Last 
and Saved, p. 29. Drivers shouting, 
swearing, and FLICKING at the horses. 

FLICKER, subs. (Old Cant). A 
drinking glass. 

1690. B.E., New Diet ^of the Canting 
Crew. FLICKER, c., a drinking-glass.. 
FLICKER SNAPT, c., the glass is broken; 
NIM THE FLICKER, c., steal the glass ; 
RUM FLICKER, c., a largeglass or rummer ; 
QUEER FLICKER, c., a green or ordinary 
glass. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Une 
lampe (masons') ; un girindal 
(popular) ; un godet (very old) ; 
une gobette (thieves') j un gobeson 
(thieves'). 

Verb. i. To drink. MATSELL, 

2. (old). To laugh wantonly ; 
also to kiss, or lewdly fondle a 
woman. PALSGRAVE. For syno- 
nyms, see FIRKYTOODLE. 



1690. B. E. , New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew, s,v. FLICKER, to grin or flout. 

Also FLICKING = (i) drinking, 
and (2) wanton laughter. 

LET HER FLICKER, phr. 
(American). Said of any doubt- 
ful issue : fe let the matter take 
its chance.' 



FLrcKET-A- PLACKET, adv. (old). 
Onomatopoetic for a noise of 
flapping aad flicking. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., ii., 20. 
Their bellies went FLICKET-A-FLACKET. 



FLIER or FLYER, suds, (facing and 
yachting). I. A horse or boat 
of great speed ; also (American 
railway) a fast train ; hence, by 
implication,anythingof excellence. 
C/., DASHER, DAISY, etc. Also 
adj. , = keen for. 

1865. BRADDON, Henry Dnnbar. ch, 
xxii. The mare's in splendid condition ; 
well, you saw her take her trial galfop the 
other morning, and you must know she's 3 
FLIER, so I won't talk about her.. 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, From Post t<? 
Finish, p. 156. Atalanta might be a 
FLYER, but an artist like Pycroft, with a 
clever colt like Newsmonger under him, 
was quite likely to outride whatever boy 
Mr. Pipes aright now be able to pick up. 

1888. St. Louis Globe- Democrat, 2 
Mar. In spite of the strike passenger 
trains, what are known as the FLYERS, are 
running with reasonable regularity. 

1890.. Bird o' Freedom, 19 Mar., p. 
i, col. i. Clearly the G.O.M. is no FLIER 
over this course. 

1891. Licensed Victuallers' Gazette, 
20 Mar. Although he may doubtless be 
made a good deal better he may turn out 
to be no FLIER. 

1891. BURY AND HILLIER. Cycling, 
p. 6. A moderate rider, not being an 
athlete or a FLIER . . . can . . . get over in 
an hour seven or eight miles of ground OH 
a tricycle. 



Flies. 



23 



Flim-flam. 



1891. Anti-Jacobin, 23 May, p. 400. 
When Dangerous, Plenipotentiary, Bay 
Middleton, and other FLYERS ran. 

1891. Morning Advertiser, 28 Mar. 
In any event, he was never a FLYER at 
breakfast. But late at night, and when, 
perhaps, he tumbled across something 
equivalent to woodcock, tripe and onions, 
or a hot lobster, say, why then, take my 
word for it, he made up for previous ab- 
stinence. 

1891. National Observer, i Aug. It 
remains to be seen whether large yachts 
constructed on the same principle will be 
equally invincible : that is, if the FLYERS 
we have are one and all to disappear. 

2. (football). A shot in the 
air. See MADE-FLYER. 

3. (American). A small hand- 
bill ; a DODGER (q.v.). 

To TAKE A FLIER (American 
trade). I. To make a venture ; 
to invest against odds. 

2. (venery). To copulate in 
haste (GROSE) ; to do a FAST- 
FUCK (q.v.). 

FLIES, subs, (rhyming). Lies. 
Hence, nonsense; trickery ; deceit. 

THERE ARE NO FLIES ON ME, 
ON HIM, etc., phr. (common). 
' I am dealing honestly with you;' 
'he is genuine, and is not hum- 
bugging.' In America, the ex- 
pression is used of (i) a man of 
quick parts, a man who ' knows 
a thing without its being kicked 
. into him by a mule' ; and (2) a 
person of superior breeding or 
descent. Sometimes the phrase 
is corrupted into 'no fleas.' See 
GAMMON. 

1868. DIPROSE, ST. CLEMENT DANES, 
Past and Present. To Deaf Burke, the 
celebrated pugilist, is attributed the old 
story of the ' flies and the gin and water ; " 
and hence the term ' no flies ' became 
prevalent. Burke had ordered .... some 
' hot and strong and a dash of lemon. ' The- 
goblet was brought . . Burke raised . . . 
the nectar to his lips, and beheld some 



dissipated flies lying at the bottom of the 
tumbler ; he placed the glass on the table, 
and deliberately removed the flies with the 
spoon, five or six in number, and laid them 
side by side before him, and then giving 
a hearty pull at the gin and water, he as 
deliberately replaced the flies .... and 
passed it to his friend. His companion 
stared angrily. 'Do you dare to insult 
me, and in the presence of company ? ' 
said the irate vis-a-vis. ' Pardon me,' 
replied Burke, quietly handing the glass 
a second time, ' though I don't drink FLIES 
myself, I didn't know but what others 
might. 1 

1888. Detroit Free Press, 25 Aug. 
THERE AIN'T NO FLIES ON HIM, signifies, 
that he is not quiet long enough for moss 
to grow on his heels, that he is wide 
awake. 

1888. Missouri Republican, 24 Feb. 
People who are capable of descending to 
New York and Boston English are fully 
justified in saying that THERE ARE NO 
FLIES ON ST. LOUIS or the St. Louis 
delegation either. 

FLIGGER (also FLICKER), verb.(o\&). 
To grin. 

1720. DURFEY Pills, etc., vi., 267. 
He FLIGGERED, and told me for all my 
brave alls He would have a stroke. 

FLIM. See FLIMSY. 

FLIM-FLAM, subs. (old). An idle 
story; a sham; a ROBINHOOD 
TALE (q.v.). A duplication of 
FLAM (q.v.). 

1589. Pappe with an Hatchet (ed. 
1844) p. 39. Trusse up thy packet of 
FLIM-FI.AMS, and roage to some countrey 
faire, or read }t among boyes in the belfrie. 

1630. TAYLOR, IVorkes. They with 
a courtly tricke, or a FLIM-FLAM, do nod 
at me, whilst I the noddy am. 

1750. FIELDING, Tom Jones, bk. 
XVII I., ch. xii. I thought thou had'st 
been a lad of higher mettle than to give 
way to a parcel of maidenish tricks. I 
tell thee 'tis all FLIM-FLAM. 

1780. MRS. COWLEY, The Belle's 
Stratagem, iii., i. Mr. Curate, don't 
think to come over me with your FLIM- 
FLAMS, for a better man than ever trod in 
your shoes is coming over-sea to marry 
me. 



Flimp. 



24 



Flimsy. 



1805. ISAAC DISRAELI, FLIM-FLAMS; 
or the Life and Errors of my Uncle, and 
the Amours of my Aunt [title]. 

1825. C. LAMB, Munden (in London 
Magazine) Feb. I wonder you can put 
such FLIM-FLAMS upon us, sir. 



Adj, (old). Idle ; worthless. 

1589. N Asms^Month 's Minde, in wks. 
174. But to leaue 
and loytering lies. 



Vol. I., p. 174. But to leaue thy FLIM 
FLAM tales 



1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Filastroccola, FLIM - FLAM tales, old 
wiues tales as they tell when they spinne, 
a tale without rime or reason, or head or 
foote. 

1633. T. NEWTON, Lennie's Touch- 
stone of Complexions, p. 120. Reporting 
a FLIM-FLAM tale of Robin Hood. 

1750. OZELL'S Rabelais, vol. V., p- 
247. Glibly swallow down every FLIM- 
FLAM story that's told them. 

1853. LYTTON, My Novel, bk. X., 
ch. xix. I wish you'd mind the child it 
is crumpling up and playing almighty 
smash with that FLIM-FLAM book, which 
cost me one pound one. 



FLIMP, verb, (thieves') I. To 
hustle or rob. To PUT ON THE 
FLIMP = to rob on the highway. 
For synonyms, see CRACK and 
PRIG. 

1839. BRANDON, Poverty, Mendicity, 
and Crime, p. in. To take a man's 
watch is to FLIMP him, it can only be 
done in a crowd, one gets behind and 
pushes him in the back, while the other in 
front is robbing him. 

1857. SNOWDEN, Mag. Assistant, 
3rd ed., p. 445, s.v. 

2. (venery). To copulate. 
For synonyms, see RIDE. 



FUMPING, subs, (thieves'). Steal- 
ing from the person. 

1857, DUCANGE ANGLICUS, Tht 
Vulgar Tongue, p. 38. He told me as 
Bill had FLIMPED a yack. 

1862. Cornhill Mag., vol. vi., p. 
651. We are going a-h LIMPING, buzzing, 
cracking, etc. 



1861. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, ch. 
Ix. FLIM PING is a style of theft which I 
have never practised, and, consequently 
of which I know nothing. 

FLIMSY, or FLIM, subs, (common). 
I. A bank-note. [From the thin- 
ness of the paper. ] SOFT-FLIMSY 
= a note drawn on 'The Bank of 
Elegance,' or ' The Bank of En- 
graving.' For synonyms, see 
SOFT. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

1818. P. EGAN, Boxiana, iv., 443. 
Martin produced some FLIMSIES and said 
he would fight on Tuesday next. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends 
('Merchant of Venice'). Not 'kites, 
manufactured to cheat and inveigle, 
But the right sort of FLIMSY, all sign'd, 
by Monteagle. 

1855. Punch, XXIX., 10. 'Will 
you take it in FLIMSIES, or will you 
have it all in tin ? ' 

1870. Chambers Journal, g July, 
p. 448. ' What would it be worth ? ' 'A 
FLIM, Sam.' 

1884. Daily Telegraph, 8 Apl., col. 
3. One of the slang terms for a spurious 
bank-note is a SOFT-FLIMSY. 

1891. HUME NISBET, Bail Up \ 
p. 149. Next morning when I went to 
the bank to collect the swag, they stopped 
the FLIMSY, and had me arrested before I 
could look round. 

2. (journalists'). News of all 
kinds ; POINTS (q.v.). [From 
the thin prepared paper used by 
pressmen for making several 
copies at once]. First used at 
Lloyd's. 

1861. Cornhill Magazine, iv., 199 
' At Westminster,' my lord is neither a 
mumbling nor a short-tempered judge ; he 
will . . . read them a great deal of his 
notes, which are a thousand-fold clearer, 
fuller, and more accurate than the 
reporter's FLIMSY. 

1865. MorningS 'tar ('The Flaneur'). 
A London correspondent, who, by the aid 
of FLIMSY misleads a vast number of pro- 
vincial papers. 

1870. London Figaro, 23 Sept. 
1 Special Lining.' We do not think it is 



Flinders. 



Flint. 



altogether worthy of the high repute of 
the Pall Mall Gazette to publish FLIMSY 
as a special correspondence. 

1876. BESANT and RTCE, Golden 
Butterfly, ch. xviii. The sharpest of the 
reporters had his FLIMSY up in a minute, 
and took notes of the proceedings. 

FLINDERS, subs. (common). 
Pieces infinitesimally small. 

1870. New York Evening Sun, 24 May. 
Report of Speech of Mr. Chandler. Let 
us knock the British crown to FLINDERS ; 
let us arrange for some one or two hundred 
thousand British graves forthwith, and 
cabbage the whole boundless continent 
without any further procrastination. 

FLING, subs, (colloquial). I. A fit of 
temper. 

2. (common). A jeer ; a 
jibe ; a personal allusion or 
attack. 

1592. SHAKSPEARE, I Henry VI., 
Hi., i. Then would I have a FLING at 
Winchester. 

1888. Star, 10 Oct. Those writers 
who had a FLING at Iddesleigh after 
his poor running at Stockton will have 
to take their words back some day. 

1890. Pall Mall Gazette, 24 July, 
(.. col. 2. As the disputants warmed up, 
little personal FLINGS were of course 
introduced 

Verb (old). I. To cheat ; to 
get the best of; to DO (q.v.) or 
diddle. GROSE. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. 
xxi. FLUNG the governor out of a 
guinea. 

2. (Scots). To dance. 

1790. BURNS, Tarn O' Shanter. To 
tell how Maggie lapt and FLANG (A souple 
jaud she was, and strang). 

3. (venery). To move in the 
act; to BACK-UP (q.v.). Fr., 
' frizer la queue = to wriggle the 
tayle (in leachering). ' COT- 
GRAVE. 

1539. DAVID LYNDSAY, Three 
Estaitis, Works (Ed. Laing, Edinburgh, 
1879). I traist sche sal find you FLINGING 
your fill. 



Rut, 



To FLING OUT, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To depart in a 
hurry, and, especially, in a temper. 

To FLING (or FLAP) IT IN ONE'S 
FACE, verb. phr. (prostitutes') 
To expose the person. 

IN A FLING, adv. phr. (collo- 
quial). In a spasm of temper. 

To HAVE ONE'S FLING, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To enjoy full 
liberty of action or conduct. Cf. t 
HIGH OLD TIME. 

1624. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER, 
Rule a Wife, &>c., iii., 5. I'll have a 
FLING. 

1846-8. THACKERAY. Vanity Fair, 
ch. xiii.- Hang it; the regiment's just 
back from the West Indies, I must HAVE A 
LITTLE FLING, and then when I'm married 
I'll reform. 

1855. THACKERAY, Ne-wcomes, II., 
1 1 8. I don't want to marry until I HAVE 

HAD MY FLING, yOU know. 

1880. GILBERT, Pirates ofPenzance. 
Peers will be peers, And youth will HAVE 

HIS FLINQ. 

1891. HUME NISBET, Bail Up! 
p. 253. If policy (police) show up, then 
you let me HAVE MY FLING, eh ? 

TO FLING DIRT. See DIRT. 



FLINGER, subs. (Scots). A dancer. 

1821. SCOTT, Pirate, ch. ix. That's 
as muckle as to say, that I suld hae minded 

Siu was a FLINGER and a fiddler yoursel', 
aister Mordaunt. 

FLING- DUST, subs. (old). A street- 
walker. For synonyms,, see 

BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

FLINT, subs, (workmen's). A man 
working for a 'Union ' or ' fair ' 
house; non- Unionists are DUNG 
(q.v.). Both terms occur in 
Foote's burlesque, The Tailors: 
a Tragedy for IVarm Weather^ 
and they received a fresh lease of 
popularity during the tailors' 



Flip. 



26 



Flip-flap. 



strike of 1832. See quots. C/., 
SCAB Soc, SNOB, SNOB-STICK, 
and KNOBSTICK. 

1785. GROSE, Diet. Vulg. Tongue, 
FLINTS, journeyman taylors who, on a 
late occasion, refused to work for the 
wages settled by law. Those who sub- 
mitted were by the mutineers stiled dungs, 
i.e., dunghills. 

1832. P. EGAN, Book of Sports, p. 
34. Jack Reeve is without a rival ; the 
throne of the FLINTS is decidedly freehold 
property to him. 

1834. Nodes Amb.,xxxiv., vol. IV., 
p. 83. (The company is discussing the 
tailors' strike). TICKLER. The FLINTS 
flash fire, and the day of the dungs is 
gone. 

OLD FLINT, subs. phr. (com- 
mon). A miser : one who 
would 'skin a flint,' i.e., stoop to 
any meanness for a trifle. 

1840. DICKENS, Old Curiosity Shop, 
ch. vii., p. 34. It's equally plain that the 
money which the OLD FLINT rot him 
first taught me to expect that I should 
share with her at his death, will all be 
hers. 

To FIX ONE'S FLINT. See 
Fix. 

To FLINT IN, verb. phr. 
(American). To act with energy; 
not to stand on ceremony; to 
pitch into ; to tackle. A verb of 
action well-nigh as common as FIX 



FLIP, subs, (common). I. Hot 
beer, brandy, and sugar ; also, 
saysGrose,calledSiR.CLOUDESLEY 
after Sir Cloudesley Shovel. See 
DRINKS. 

1690. JB. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FLIP, Sea Drink, of small 
beer (chiefly) and brandy, sweetened and 
spiced upon occasion. 

1690. WARD, London Spy, part II., 
p. 41. After the drinking a Kan of Phlip 
or a Bowl of Punch. 

1705. WARD, Hudibras Redivivus, 
vol. I., pt. 4, p. 8. So have I seen on 
board of ship, Some knawing beeff, some 
spewing FLIP. 



1748. SMOLLETT, Rod. Random, ch 
xxiv. He . . . sent for a can of beer, of 
which he made excellent FLIP to crown the 
banquet. 

1810. CRABBE, The Borough, Letter 
1 6. Nay, with the seamen working in the 
ship, At their request, he'd share the grog 
and FLIP. 

1875. C. D. WARNER, Backlog 
Studies, p. 1 8. It was thought best to 
heat the poker red-hot before plunging it 
into the mugs of FLIP. 

2. (popular). A bribe or 
douceur. 



3. (common).- 
or snatch. 



-A light blow, 



1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 23. 
Barney made a very unceremonious FLIP 
at the bit. 

Verb (thieves'). To shoot. 
1819. VAUX, Flash Diet., s.v. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood (ed 
1864), p. 273. FLIP him, Dick; fire, or 
I'm taken. 

To FLIP UP verb. phr. 
(American). To spin a coin. 

1879. New York Tribune, 4 Oct. 
The two great men could FLIP UP to see 
which should have the second place. 

FLIP-FLAP, subs, i (old). I. A 
flighty creature. 

1702. VANBRUGH, False Friend, i. 
The light airy FLIP-FLAP, she kills him 
with her motions. 

2. (popular). A step-dance ; 
a CELLAR-FLAP (q.v.). Also 
(acrobats') ; a kind of somer- 
sault, in which the performer 
throws himself over on his hands 
and feet alternately. 

1727. GAY, Fables, ' Two Monkies.' 
The tumbler whirls the FLIP-FLAP round. 
With sommersets he shakes the ground. 

1872. BRADDON, Dead Sea Fruit, 
ch. xiv. There ain't nothing you can't do, 
Morty, from Shylock to a FLIP-FLAP. 



Flipper. 



27 



Floater. 



1889. Pall Mall Gazette, 12 Nov., 
p. 6, col. 2. There were the clowns who 
danced, turned somersaults, FLIP-FLAPS, 
and contorted themselves. 



3. (American). 
tea-cake. 



A kind of 



1876. BESANT and RICE, Golden 
Butterfly, ch. xviii. The first evening I 
took tea with Mrs. Scrimmager. 'It must be 
more than a mite lonely for you,' she said, 
as we sat over her dough-nuts and FLIP- 
FLAPS. 

4. (nautical). The arm. For 
synonyms, see BENDER. 

5. (venery). The penis. 

1653. URQUHART, Rabelais, I., 20. 
I might have cleft her water-gap And 
joined it close with my FLIP-FLAP. 

FLIPPER, subs, (nautical and 
common). I. The hand, TIP 
us YOUR FLIPPER^ give me your 
hand. [From the flipper or 
paddle of a turtle.] For synonyms, 
see D ADDLE and MAULEY. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends,. 
'Lay of St. Gengulphus.' With those 
great sugar-nippers they nipp'd_ off his 
FLIPPERS, As the clerk, very flippantly, 
termed his fists. 

1884, Punch, ii Oct. 'Any at a 
Political Picnic.' Old Bluebottle TIPPED 
ME HIS FLIPPER, and 'oped I'd ' refreshed,' 
and all that. 

2. (common). See FLAPPER. 

3, (theatrical), Part of a, 
scene, hinged and painted on both 
sides, used in trick changes. 

FLIRTATIOUS, a,dj. (American), 
Flighty. 

1881, W. D. HOWELLS, D. Breens 
Practice, ch,. i., "Oh, you needn't look 
after her.. Mr. Libby ! There's nothing 
FLIRTATIOUS about Grace," said Mrs. 
Maynard. 

FLIRT-GILL, FLIRTGILLIAN, or 
GILL- FLIRT, subs. (old). A 
wanton ; a CHOPPING GIRL (q.v. )j 



specifically a strumpet. For syno- 
nyms, see BARRACK-HACK and 
TART. 

1595. SHAKSPEARE, Romeo and 
Juliet, ii., 4. Scurvy knave ! I am none 

Of his FLIRT -GILLS. 

1713. Guardian, No. 26. We are 
invested with a parcel of FLIRT-GILLS, who 
are not capable of being mothers of brave 
men. 

1729. GAV, Polly, ii. 4. While 
a man is grappling with these GILL- 
FLIRTS, pardon the expression, Captain, 
he runs his reason aground. 

1822. SCOTT, Fort, of Nigel, ch. v. 
She is a dutiful girl to her god-father, 
though I sometimes call her a JILL-FLIRT. 

FLIRTINA COP-ALL, subs. phr. 
(common). A wanton, young or 
old ; a MEN'S WOMAN (q.v.}. 

FLQAT, subs, (theatrical). The foot- 
lights : before the invention of 
gas they were oil-pans with float- 
ing wicks. Cf. , ARK-FLOATER. 

1886. Saturday Review, 24 July, 
p. 108. To an actor the FLOAT is not what 
it is to a fisherman. 

1889. Answers, 8 June, p. 24. _ He 
slapped me on the back, put me in a 
hansom, and cried, ' We'll have you behind 
{he FLOAT (footlights) in a week.' 

IF THAT'S THE WAY THE 
STICK FLOATS. See STICK. 

FLOATER, subs* (Stock Exchange). 
An Exchequer bill j applied also 
to other unfunded stock, 

1871, Temple Bar, XXXI,, 320. On 
the Stock Exchange, where slang abounds, 
FLOATERS is a term which would puzzle 
outsiders. FLOATERS are Exchequer 
bills and their unfunded stock. 

2. (common). A sijet dump, 
ling in soup. 

3. (political). A vendible voter. 

1883. Graphic, 17 Mar., p. 279, col. 
3. ' How many voters are there f asked! 
a. candidate in one of these pure-blooded 



Floating Academy. 28 



Flog. 



Yankee townships. ' Fourhundred.' 'And 
how many FLOATERS, i.t. t purchasable?' 
' Four hundred.' 

1888. New York Herald, 4 Nov. 
The Building Materials Exchange people 
were in line to the number of about 200, 
with a band, ?.nd were followed by a six- 
teen-horse stage of the ' Long Tom ' shape 
containing a lot of FLOATERS and some 
fifers and drummers. 

4. (Western American). A 
candidate representing several 
counties, and therefore not con- 
sidered directly responsible to any 
one of them. 

1853. Texas State Gazette, 16 July. 
J. W. Lawrence, Esq., requests us to with- 
draw his name as a candidate for FLOATER 
in the district composed of the counties of 
Fayette, Bastrop. and Travis. 

5. (venery). The penis. For 
synonyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK. 



FLOATING ACADEMY, subs. phr. 
(old). The hulks; also CAMP- 
BELL'S ACADEMY (q.v.), and 

FLOATING HELL (q.V.). For 

synonyms, see CAGE. 

FLOATING BATTERIES, subs. phr. 
(military). I. Broken bread 
in tea ; also SLINGERS (q.v.}. 

2. (American). - The Con- 
federate bread rations during the 
Secession. 

FLOATING COFFIN, subs. phr. (nau- 
tical). A rotten ship. 

FLOATING HELL, or HELL AFLOAT, 
subs. phr. (nautical). A ship 
commanded by (i) a brutal 
savage, or (2) a ruthless disci- 
plinarian. See also FLOATING 
ACADEMY. 

FLOCK, subs, (colloquial). A clergy- 
man's congregation. Also any 
body of people with a common 



haunt or interest : e.g. , a family 
of children, a company of soldiers, 
a school of girls or boys, ' a cab- 
ful of molls,' and such like. 

TO FIRE INTO THE WRONG 

FLOCK, verb. phr. (American 
pioneers'). To blunder. A 
variant is TO BARK UP THE 

\VRONG TREE. 

1858. New York Herald, 9 Nov. 
When Mr. Saulsbury rose and called the 
Speaker's attention to the alleged blunder 
in the Secretary's report, his own friends 
jumped up in great excitement and pulled 
him down ; he soon found out that he had 

FIRED INTO THE WRONG FLOCK. 

FLOCK OF SHEEP, subs, phr.i. 
(gaming). A hand at dominoes set 
out on the table. 

2. (colloquial). White waves 
on the sea : WHITE HORSES (q.v. ). 

FLOG, subs. (American thieves'). 
i. A whip. A contraction of 
FLOGGER (q.v.). To FLOG (now 
recognised), is cited by B. E. 
(1690), GROSE, and the author of 
Bacchus and Venus as Cant. 

TO BE FLOGGED AT THE 

TUMBLER, verb, phr. (old). To 
be whipped at the cart's tail. 
See TUMBLER. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. 

TO FLOG THE DEAD HORSE, 
verb. phr. (common). i. To 
work up an interest in a bygone 
subject ; to try against heart ; to 
do with no will nor liking for 
the job. [Bright said that Earl 
Russell's Reform Bill was a DEAD 
HORSE (q.v.), and every attempt 
to create enthusiasm in its favour 

was FLOGGING THE DEAD 
HORSE.] 

2. (nautical). To work off an 
advance of wages. 



Flogger. 



29 



Floor. 



TO FLOG A WILLING HORSE, 

verb. phr. (common). To urge 
on one who is already putting 
forth his best energies. 

FLOGGER, subs. (old). i. A whip; 
cf., FLOG. GROSE gives the 
word as Cant. Fr. , un bouis. 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 173, s.v. 

2. (theatrical). A mop (i.e., 
a bunch of slips of cloth on a 
handle) used in the painting 
room to whisk the charcoal dust 
from a sketch. 

FLOGGING,///, adj. (old). Careful; 
penurious. 

FLOGGING-COVE, subs, phr* 
(prison) I. An official who ad- 
ministers the CAT (q.v.\ 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FLOGGING COVE, c. the 
Beadle, or Whipper ill Bridewell, or any 
such place. 

1785. GROSE, Diet. Vulg. Tongue, 
s.v. FLOGGING-COVE, the beadle, or 
whipper, in Bridewell. 

2. See FLOGGING CULLY. 

FLOGGING CULLY, subs. phr. 
( venery ). A man addicted, 
whether from necessity or choice, 
to flagellation; a WHIPSTER 

(?) 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FLOGGING, c. a Naked 
Woman's whipping (with rods) an Old 
(usually) and (sometimes) a young Lecher. 

FLOGGING STAKE, subs. phr. (old). 
A whipping post. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

FLOGSTER, subs. (old). One 
addicted to flogging. Specifically 
(naval), a nickname applied to 



the Duke of Clarence (afterwards 
William IV). 

FLOOR, verb, (colloquial). I. To 
knock down. Hence to vanquish 
in argument ; to make an end of ; 
to defeat ; to confound. See 
FLOORED and DEAD-BEAT. 

1785. GROSE, Diet. Vulg. Tongue. 
FLOOR the pig, knock down the officer. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 15. That 
moment the farmer let fly at the drover, 
which FLOORED him. 

1857. G. A. LAWRENCE, Guy 
Livingstone, ch. xxi, ' When I saw him 
so FLOORED as not to be able to come to 
time, I knew there had been some hard 
hitting going on thereabouts, so I kept 
clear.' 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry, p. 10. 
Then (apostrophising ' Maga ') FLOOR me 
not. Ibid., p. 60, The Corinthian, being 
no novice in these matters, FLOORED two or 
three iii a twinkling. 

1835. COLERIDGE, Table Talk (pub- 
1 ished posthumously). The other day I 

was what you may called FLOORED by a 
jew. 

1836. C. DICKENS, Pickwick Papers 
p. 425 (Ed. 1857). Even Mr. Bob Sawyer 

.... was FLOORED. 

1862. MRS. H. WOOD, The Chan- 
nings, ch. v. ' So if the master is directing 
his suspicions to the seniors, he'll get 

FLOORED.' 

1870. L. OLIPHANT, Piccadilly, Pt. 
V., p. 196. 'Whenever the mammas 
object to asking her on account of that 
horrid Lady Wylde,' I FLOOR all opposition 
by saying, ' Oh, Lady Jane Helter will 
bring her.' 

1888. Sportsman, 28 Nov. Pope, 
who was the fresher, started at a terrific 
pace and drove his man all over the ring, 
ending by FLOORING him. 

TO FLOOR THE ODDS. 

(betting men's). Said of a low- 
pnced horse that pulls off the 
event in face of the betting. 

1882. Daily Telegraph, 16 Nov. 
The odds were, nevertheless, FLOORED 
from an unexpected quarter. 



Floor. 



Floored. 



1889. Echo, 24 Jan. As the odds 
betted on Miss Jessie II. were easily 
FLOORED by Marsden. 

2. (drunkards'). To finish ; 
to get outside of. E.g.) ' I 
FLOORED three half-pints and a 
nip before breakfast.' 

1837. Punch, 31 Jan. Dear Bill, this 
stone jug. ... Is still the same snug, 
Free-and-easy old hole v Where Macheath 
met his blowens, and Wylde FLOORED his 
bowl. 

18(?). Macmillan's Magazine (quoted 
in Century Diet). 1 have a few bottles 
of old wine left : we may as well FLOOR 
them. 

3. (university). To pluck ; 
to PLOUGH (q.V. ). 

TO FLOOR A PAPER, LESSON, 
EXAMINATION^ EXAMINER, etc., 

verb, phr, (university). To 
answer every question ; to 
master ; to prove oneself superior 
to the occasion. 

1852. BRISTED, Five Years in an 
English University, p. 12. Somehow I 
nearly FLOORED the paper. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at 
Oxford. I've FLOORED my Little Go. 

To FLOOR ONE'S LICKS* verb, 
phr. (common). To surpass one's 

Self; to CUT-AROUND (q.V. ) 

1844. PUCK, p. 14. Now slowly 
rising, raised his pewter and FLOORED HIS 



TO HAVE, HOLD, or TAKE 
THE FLOOR, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To rise to address a 
public meeting ; in Ireland, to 
stand up 1o dance ; and, in 
America, ' to be in possession of 
the House.' 

1882. McCABE-, New York, xxi., p. 
342. A member making a bid below or 
an offer above the one which HAS THE 
FLOOR. 

1888. St. Louis Globe - Democrat, 
After a half hour's recess Mr. Glover 

TOOK THE FLOOR. 



1889. Pall Mall Gazette, n Nov., 
p. 6, col. i. The Duke of Rutland, how- 
ever, who ' TOOK THE FLOOR ' non- 
politically at the end of the evening, was 
really 'felicitous' in his few remarks. 

FLOORED, ppl. adj. (colloquial). 
I. Vanquished ; brought under ; 
ruined. For synonyms, see DEAD- 
BEAT and infra. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Basket- 
ted ; bitched ; bitched -up; bowled 
out ; broken up ; buggered up ; 
busted; caved in; choked-off; 
cornered ; cooked ; coopered up ; 
dead-beat ; done brown ; done 
for ; done on toast ; doubled up; 
flattened-out ; fluffed ; flum- 
moxed ; frummagemmed ; gapped; 
gone through St. Peter's needle ; 
gone under ; gravelled ; gruelled ; 
hoofed out ; in the last of pea- 
time, or last run of shad ; jacked - 
up ; knocked out of time ; knocked 
silly; looed; mucked-out; petered 
out; pocketed ; potted ; put in his 
little bed ; queered in his pitch ; 
rantanned ; sat upon ; sewn up ; 
shut-up ; smashed to smithereens; 
snashed ; snuffed out ; spread- 
eagled ; struck of a heap ; 
stumped ; tied up ; timbered ; 
treed ; trumped ; Up a tree. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Mon 
linge est lave (pop. : = I have 
thrown up the sponge) ; cotter 
sous bande ( = to put in a hole : 
at billiards, bande = cushion) ; avoir 
son affaire (pop : = to have got a 
' settler ' ) ; aplalir (fam : = to 
flatten out) ; aplomber (thieves' : = 
to brazen down ; to bluff) ; etre 
pris dans la balancine (pop. : =to 
be in a fix) ; se faire cotter 
(familiar) ; envoyer quelqdun 
s'asseoir, or s'asseoir sur quelqitun 
(popular). 

ITALIAN SYNONYM. 
= to overturn). 



Floorer. 



Flop. 



SPANISH SYNONYMS. Pesado 
(doubled-up : from peso weight) ; 
aculado (from ocular = to corner) ; 
arrollar ( = to sweep away, as a 
torrent) ; aturrullar ( = to shut 
up) ; cogite ! ( ' I've got you/ 
or, ' there I have you ! ') 

2. (common). Drunk ; in 
Shakspearean ' put down ' : as Sir 
Andrew Aguecheek, ' Never in 
your life, I think, unless you see 
Canary PUTMEDOWN.' ( Twelfth 
Night, i., 3). For synonyms, see 
SCREWED. 

3. (painters'). Hung low at 
an exhibition ; in contradis- 
tinction tO SKYED (^Z>.)> and ON 
THE LINE (q.t>.). 

FLOORER, subs. (common), 
I. An AUCTIONEER (y.V:)i or 
knock-down blow; cf. 9 DIG, 
BANG, and WIPE. Hence, sudden 
or unpleasant news; a decisive 
argument ; an unanswerable 
retort j a decisive cheek. Sp., 
peso-. 

1819. T-. MOORE, Tori. Crib's 
Memorial, p. 20 For in these FANCY 
times, 'tis your hits in the MUNS, And your 
CHOPPERS and FLOORERS that govern the 
funds. 

1839. SWINTON, Trial of Wm. 
Humphreys, p. 297. It is a downright 
FLOORER to the Grown. 

1856. BRADLEY (' Cuthbert Bede'), 
Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green. The 
Putney Pet stared . . . The inquiry 
for his college was, in the language of his 
profession, a ' regular FLOORER.' 

1861. H. C. PENNELL, Puck on 
Pegasus, p. 20. What a FLOORER to my 
hopes is this performance on the ropes ! 
Miss Marianne suspensa scalis (Would 
twere sus. per coll instead). 

1868. Casselfs Magazine, 4 Jan., 
p. 213. ' Ah, she hasn't told you of the 
strokes I have had, one arter the other 
clean FLOORERS, ( and left like a log of 
wood in my bed.' 



2. (schools'). A question, or a 
paper, too hard to master. 

3. (bowling alley). A ball that 
brings down all the pins. 

4. (thieves'). A thief who trips 
his man, and robs in picking him 
up ; a RAMPER (q.v.). 

1809. G. ANDREWS, Diet, of the 
Slang and Cant Languages, s.v. 

FLOORING, subs, (pugilists'). 
Knocking down. Hence, to van- 
quish in all senses. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. xii. Cross-buttocking . . . being 
as indispensable an ingredient, as nobbing, 
FLOORING, etc. 

FLOOR-WALKER, subs. (American). 
A shop -walker. 

FLOP, subs, and verb. (American 
university). I. A BITE (g.v.); 
a successful dodge. 

1856. HALL, College Words and 
Customs. Any 'cute' performance by 
which a man is sold is a good FLOP, and by 
a phrase borrowed from the base-ball ground 
is ' rightly played.' The discomfited indi- 
vidual declares that they ' are all on a side,' 
and gives up, or 'rolls over,' by giving his 
opponent 'gowdy.' A man writes cards 
during examinations to 'feeze the profs'; 
said cards are 'gumming cards, 1 and he 
FLOPS the examination if he gets a good 
mark by the means. One usually FLOPS 
his marks by feigning sickness. 

2. (common) A sudden fall 
or ' flop ' down. 

3. (common). A collapse or 
breakdown. 

4. (For FLAP or FLIP, old). 
A light blow. 

1662. Rump Songs, ii., 3. The good 
the Rump will do, when they prevail, Is 
to give us a FLOP with a fox's tail, Which 
nobody can deny. 



Flop. 



Flounder. 



Verb, (colloquial). I. To fall, 
or flap down suddenly. A variant 
of 'flap.' Fr., prendre. un billet 
de parterre. 

1 742. FIELDING, Joseph A ndrews, bk. 
iv. ch. v. She had FLOPPED her hat over 
her eyes. 

1859. DICKENS, Tale of Two Cities 
bk. ii. ch. i. If you must go FLOPPING 
yourself down. 

1870. Public Opinion, 12 Feb. But 
even if they were more numerous and 
greater than they are, we should hold 
aloof from the crowd that FLOPS in his 
presence with love and awe, as the dismal 
wife of Jerry Cruncher FLOPPED in pious 
misery. 

1883. The Theatre, Feb., p. 93. She 
is able to call in tumbling to the aid of 
tragedy, and bring the plastic arts to the 
portrayal of the passions ; to FLOP through 
four such acts as these night after night^ 
and finish with a death-scene warranted 
correct, to the very last kick and quiver. 

1891. HUME NISBET, Bail Up! p. 
1 1 8. He cursed under his breath each 
time he rose to follow, and smothered a 
yell of pain and horror each time he 

FLOPPED DOWN. 

2. (pugilists'). To knock down; 
to FLOOR (q.v.). 

1888. Sporting Life, 15 Dec. 'E 
carnt FLOP a bloke. 

Adv. (colloquial). An onom- 
atopoeia expressive of the noise 
of a sudden and sounding fall. 
Often used expletively, as SLAP 
(q.v.) is, and the American RIGHT 
(q.v.) 

1726. VANBRUGH, Journey to Lon- 
don, Act I., Sc. 2. That down came I 
FLOP o' my feace all along in the channel 

1860. Punch, v. 38, p. 255. 'Twixt 
two stools, FLOP, he let me drop, The 
fall it was my murther. 

1881. JAS. PAYN, Grape from a 
Thorn, ch. vi. ' She'll roll down, papa, 
and come FLOP." 

To FLOP OVER, verb. phr. (col- 
loquial). To turn heavily; hence 
(in America), to make a sudden 
change of sides, association, or 
allegiance. 



FLOP-UP, subs. (American). A 
day's tramp, as opposed to a SOT- 
DO WN = half a day's travel. 
1888. Detroit Free Press, 15 Sept. 

' Stranger, did ye lope it?' (come on foot). 

' Yes.' ' A mile or a sot down ? ' ' More'n 

that. About a dozen FLOP-UPS.' 

FLOP-UP-TIME = Bedtime. 

[FLOP, too, is something of a vocable of 
all-work. Thus TO FLOP iN=(venery) 
to effect intromission ; TO FLOP ROUND 
= to loaf; to dangle; TO FLOP AJUDY=IO 
lay out, or ' SPREAD' (q.v.), a girl ; TO DO 
A FLOP=(colloquial)tosit, or to fall, down, 
and (venery) to lie down to a man ; TO FLOP 
OUT = to leave the water noisily and 
awkwardly ; belly-FLOPPiNG = belly-bump- 
ing, coition ; a FLOP in the gills =a smack 
in the mouth. 1 

FLORENCE, subs, (old) 'A wench 
that has been touzed and ruffled. ' 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew, and (1785) GROSE, s.v. 

FLOSTER, subs, (common). A 
mixed drink : sherry, noyau, 
peach-leaves, lemon, sugar, ice, 
and soda-water. Cf., FLESH- 

AND-BLOOD. 

PLOUGH. To FALL (or GO), PLOUGH 
(or FLOUSH), verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To come to pieces; to 
sag suddenly on the removal of a 
restraining influence : as a pair of 
stays. 

1819. MOOREJ Tom Crib, p. 13. Old 
Georgy went FLOUSH, and his backers 
look'd shy. 

FLOUNCE, verb, (colloquial). To 
move with violence, and (gene- 
rally) in anger. Said of women, 
for whom such motion is, or 
rather was, inseparable from a 
great flourishing of flounces. 

FLOUNDER, subs, (riverside thieves'). 
i. A drowned corpse. Cf., 
DAB, and for synonyms, see 
STIFF. 



Flounder-and-Dab. 33 



Flue. 



2. (Stock Exchange). To sell, 
and afterwards re-purchase a 
stock, or vice versti. 

1889. Echo, i Feb. A third expedient 
offers itself namely, to turn round and 
buy ; but this operation goes by the name 
of * FLOUNDERING ' especially when the 
speculator loses both ways. 

FLOUNDER-AND-DAB, subs, phr, 
(rhyming). A cab. For syn- 
onyms, see GROWLER. 

FLOU-R, wbs. (American). Money, 
For synonyms, see ACTUAL and 
GILT. 

FLOURISH, stfbs, (venery). Coftion 
in a hurry; FLYER (q.v.); a FAST- 
FUCK (q.v.). Also verbally. For 
synonyms see GREENS and RIDE. 

1796. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tffngue (srd ed.J, s.v. To enjoy a ^oman 
with her clothes on or without going to 
bed. 

Verb (colloquial.) To be in 
kick : e.g. , ' I flourish * = * I am 
werll off ; ' Do you flourish,' or 

* Are you flourishing ?' = ' Have 
you got any money ?' 

FLOURISHING,^', (colloquial). 
A retort t the enquiry, ' How 
are you?' The equivalent of 

* Pretty well, thank you ?' 

To FLOURISH IT, verb. phr. 
{venery). To expose the person. 

FLOWER, sub-s. (venety). i. The 
{vnatepudendum. Also FLOWER- 
POT. For synonyms, see MONO- 
SYLLABLE. 

2. Inpl. (conventional). The 
menstrual flux. Cf., FLAG, 
sense 3. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde ofWordes. 
Biancure, the monthly FLOWERS that 
"women have. 



1611, COTGRAVE, Dictionarie* Le 
fourrier de la lune amarque le logis, appli- 
cable to a woman that hath her FLOWERS. 

FLOWER FANCIER, subs. phr. 
(venery), A whore-master. 

FLOWERY, subs, (thieves'), Lodg- 
ing ; entertainment ; ' square the 
omee for the FLOWERY' = pay 
the landlord for the lodging. 
\_Lingua Franca.'] 

FLOWERY LANGUAGE, subs. phr. 
(colloquial). A euphemism for 
blasphemous and obscene speech. 

FLOWER or CHIVALRY, subs, phr, 
(venery). The female puden- 
dum. For synonyms, see MONO- 
SYLLABLE. 

FLOWING-HOPE, subs, (military). 
A forlorn hope, 

FLUB-DXJB-AND-GUFF, subs. phr. 
"(American). Rhetorical embel- 
lishment; HIGH-FALUTIN' (q.v.). 

1888. Detroit Free Press, August. 
Rev. Mr. Selah (to d<esk editor of the 
Daily Roarer) ' Mr. Seezars, are you 
going to publish my prayer in full ? ' Desk 
^ditor-^In full? Well, I guess not. 1 
(Changing his tone) ' However, we'll do 
what we can for you. By swiping out 

the FLUB-DUB-AND-GUFF, I gUCSS We'll 

have room to put in the points.' 

FLUE, subs. (old). i. The Re- 
corder of London or any large 
town. BAMFYLDE MOORE - 
CAREW. 

2, (colloquial). The filth, 
part fluff, part hair, part dust, 
which collects under ill-kept beds, 
and at the junctures of sofas and 
chairs ; BEGGAR'S VELVET (q.v. ). 

I860, DICKENS, Uncommercial 
Traveller. 'Arcadian London.' A power 
they possess of converting everything 
into FLUE. Such broken victuals as they 
take by stealth appear (whatever the nature 

3 



Flue-faker. 



34 



Fluffiness. 



of the viands) to generate FLUE 

Ibid. 'Refreshment for Travellers.' Take 
the old established Bull's Head ..... 
with its old-established FLUE under its old 
established four-post bedsteads. 

3. (common). A contraction 
of 'influenza.' 

Verb (common). To put in 
pawn. 

IN (or UP) THE FLUE, phr. 
(common). Pawned. For syn- 
onyms, see POP. 
1821. Real Life, etc., I., p. 366. 

1851. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, II., p. 250. I've had some- 
times to leave half my stock IN FLUE with a 
deputy for a night's rest. 

UP THE FLUE (or SPOUT), adj. 
phr. (colloquial). Dead ; col- 
lapsed, mentally or physically. 

To BE UP ONE'S FLUE, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To be awk- 
ward for one. THAT'S UP YOUR 
FLU E = That's a 'facer,' or that's 
up against you. 



FLUE-FAKER (or SCRAPER), subs. 
(common). A chimney-sweep. 
[From FLUE + FAKER (g.v.).] 
MINOR CLERGY = young chimney 
sweeps. For synonyms, see 
CLERGYMAN. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry, p* 60. 
The ' office ' has been given to ' shove ' the 
poor FLUE-FAKER against Tom's light drab 



1859. MATSELL. 
Jf ague's Lexicon, s.v. 



Vocabulum, or 



1882. Punch. LXXXII., p. 185, col. 2. 

FLUFF (or FLUFFINGS), subs, (rail- 
way clerks'). i. Short change 
given by booking-clerks. The prac- 
tice is known as FLUFFING. Cf., 
MENAVELINGS. Fr., des jrtiges 
( = more or less unlawful profits 
of any sort). 



1890, Star, 27 Jan. Many porters 
on this line are but getting 155. per week, 
and with regard to ' tips,' or, as we say, 
' FLUFF ' well, would you not think it 
mean to tell your servant when you en- 
gaged him that such were strictly for- 
bidden by punishment with dismissal, and 
then proclaim to the world that with good 
wages and tips your servant was well paid. 

2. (theatrical). 'Lines' half 
learned and imperfectly de- 
livered. Hence, To DO A FLUFF 
= to forget one's part. 

1891. W- ARCHER, The World, p. 
28, col. i, line 34. But even as seen 
through a cloud of FLUFF the burlesque is 
irresistibly amusing. 

3. (venery). The female pu- 
bic hair. For synonyms, see 
FLEECE. 

Verb, (railway clerks'). I. To 
give short change. 

2. (common). To disconcert, 
to FLOOR (q.v.). Cf., FLUFF IN 
THE PAN = a failure. 



3. (theatrical). To forget 
one's part. Also To DO A 
FLUFF. 

FLUFF IT I Intj. (common). An 
interjection of disapproval : 'Be 
off!' Take it away !' 

FLUFFER, subs, (common). i. A 
drunkard. Cf. t FLUFFINESS. 

2. (theatrical). A player 
'rocky on his lines'; i.e., given 
to forgetting his part. 

3. (old). A term of contempt. 

FLUFFINESS, suds, (common). 
i. Drunkenness. Cf., FLUFFY 
and FLUFFER. 

1886. Fun, 4 August, p. 44. A 
sullen-faced, clerical -looking young man, 
charged with FLUFFINESS in a public 
conveyance, said he was sober as a judge 
when taken into custody. 



Fluffy. 



35 



Flummergasted. 



2, (theatrical), The trick, or 
habit, of forgetting words. 

FLUFFY, adj. (common and theat- 
rical). Unsteady ', of uncertain 
memory. Cf* t FLUFFER (sense 2), 
and FLUFFINESS (sense 2). 

1885. Referee, July 26, p. 3, col. 2. 
In the last act Groves and one or two 
others were either wfaat actors call FLUFFY 
in their lines, or else Mr. Cross was guilty 
of irritating tautology, 

FLUKE, subs, (common). In 
billiards, an accidental winning 
hazard ; in all games a result not 
played for; a CROW (<?.&*). In 
yachting an effect of chance ; a 
result in which seamanship has 
had no part. Hence, a stroke of 
luck. Sp., bambarria, 

1857. Notes and Queries, z S. IV., 
p. 208, col. i. In playing at billiards, if a 
player makes a hazard, etc. , which lie did 
not play for, it is often said that he made 
a crow. . . . Another term is, 'He 
made a FLOOK (or FLUKE). 

1869. WHVTE MELVILLE, M or N, 
p. 100. ' Oily lost a pony on the whole 
meeting,' answered Dick triumphantly. 
* And even that v/as a FLUKE, because 
Bearwarden's Bacchante filly was left at 
the post. 

1873. BLACK. Princess of Thule, 
ch. xix. ' These conditions are not often 
fulfilled it is a happy FLUKE when they 
are. 

1880. HAWLEY SMART, Social 
Sinners, ch, xxxii. ' I suppose, by your 
asking the question, you have > become 
acquainted with Mr. Solamo's past,' 
'That's just it, Mr. Prossiter; by an odd 
FLUKE I have.' 

1891. HUME NISBET, Bail c^/'p, 
144, He was now being cured only to be 
hanged, most kely, unless by some happy 
FLUKE he got off with imprisonment for 
life. 

Vtrb (common and billiards). 
I. To effect by accident. 

1888. Sportsman, 20 Dec, Fortune 
once more assisted Mitchell, who, in trying 
to make a red loser, FLUKED a cannon, 
from which he got on the spot, and made 
forty-three winners in a braak of 161* 



2. (schoolboys'). To shirk. 

1864, Eton School Days, ch. xvi,, 
p, 203. ' By Jove ! I think I shall FLUKE 
doing Verses ; I should like to see Paddy 
drive tandem through College,' said 
Butler Burke. 

To CUT FLUKES OUT, -verb, 
phr, (nautical). To mutiny ; to 
turn sulky and disobedient, 

To TURN FLUKES, verb, phr, 
(nautical). To go to bed ; i,e. t 
TO BUNK (g.v.), or turn in, 

FLUKY, or FLUKEY, adj, (common). 
Of the nature of a FLUKE 
(y.y,) ; t.-e., achieved more by 
good luck than good guidance. 

1882. Standard, 3 Sept. Bonnorgot 
a FLUKEY three to square leg. 

1891, Licensed Viet. Gazette, 20 
March, Now, Grady was a smart young 
Irishman who had thiashed Stevens twice 
in days gone by, and had won a somewhat 
FLUKEY victory over Young Norley. 

Hence FLUKINESS = abounding 
in FLUKES, 

1886, ///. Sport. <wd Dram. News, 
co Feb., p. 579. There is no FLUKINESS 
about him : he makes his runs because he 
is an excellent batsman, and takes his 
wickets because he is an excellent bowler. 



FLU MM A DIDDLE, subs. (American). 
i. Nonsense j FLUMMERY(^.Z>.). 

2. (nautical), A sea-dainty. 

1884. G. A. SALA, in III. Ltndo* 
News, July 10, p. 51, col 2. I suppose that 
when the friendly skippers GAM [<?.v.], 
they feast on FLUMMADIDDLE, a dish 
composed, I am given to understand, of 
stale bread, pork fat, molasses, cinnamon, 
allspice, and cloves. 

FLUMMERGASTEO, ///. adj. (collo- 

rial). Astonished ; confounded, 
variant of FLABBERGASTED 



Flummery. 



Flummut. 



1849. New South Wales : Past and 
Present, ch. i., p. 14. This coolness so 
completely FLUMMERGASTED the fellow, 
that he kept talking until Mr. Day shot 
him through the shoulder. 

FLUMMERY, subs, (colloquial). I. 
Nonsense; GAMMON (g.v.)i flat- 
tery. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. Oatmeal and water boiled 
to a jelly ; also compliments : neither 
. . . over-nourishing. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's Log, 
ch. i. I shall . . . blow off as much of 
the froth as I can, in order to present the 
residuum free of FLUMMERY. 

1846. THACKERAY, Yellow Plush 
Papers. She swallowed Lord Crabs' 
FLUMERY just as she would so many 
musheruims. 

1854. WHYTE MELVILLE, General 
Bounce, ch. xii. None of the dubious, 
half-expressed, sentimental FLUMMERY. 

2. (American nautical). A 
kind of bread pudding. 
NORDHOFF. 

3. (old). Oatmeal and water 
boiled to a jelly. GROSE (1785). 

FLUMMOX, FLU M MOCKS, or FLUM- 
MUX, verb, (colloquial). I. To 
perplex, dodge, abash, of silence ; 
to victimize; to BEST (q.v.) ; to 
disappoint-. Also CONFLUMMOX. 

TO FLUMMOX (or CONFLUMMOX) 
BY THE LIP = TO OUTSLANG 

(q.v.), of talk down; TO FLUM- 
MOX THE COPPERS = to dodge 
the police; TO FLUMMOX THE OLD 
DUTCH = to cheat one's wife, 
etc. For synonyms, see FLAB- 
BERGAST. 

2. (theatrical). To confuse, 
to QUEER (q.v-.). Cf.y CORPSE. 

3. ( American ). Used in the 
passive sense = to abandon a pur- 
pose ; to give in ; to die. 

Subs. (American University). 
A bad recitation ; a failure. 



f p i 



FLUMMOXED,///, adj. (thieves' and 
general). i. Spoilt ; ruined ; 
drunk ; SENT DOWN (q. v.) ; BOSHED 
(q.v.) ; defeated ; disappointed ; 
silenced; FLOORED (q.v.). 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xxxiii., 
p. 283. ' And my 'pinion is, Sammy, that 
if your governor don't prove an alleybi, he'll 
be what the Italians call reg'larly FLUM- 
MOXED, and that's all about it ' 

1840. WHIBLEY, Cap and Gown, 
p. 170. So many of the nien I know 
Were FLUMMOXED at the last great go. 

1861. H. C. PENNELL, Puck on Pega- 
sus, p. 17. I felt FLUMMOX'D in a 
brown (study understood) old fellow. 

1864. Cornhill Magazine, Dec., 
742. 'I sa^, Tom.' 'Yes, mate.' 'I 
should have a fit heave a bucket of water 
over me.' Tom was too astonished, or, as 
he expressed it, CONFLUMMOXED to make 
any reply. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 25 July, p. 2, 
col. i. I'll give Tom his due, and say of 
him that for FLUMMOXING a cuss (Custom 
House Officer) or working the weed, I 
don't know any one he couldn't give a 
chalk to and beat 'em. 

1890. Punch, 30 Aug.. p. 97. I'm 
fair FLUMMOXED, and singing, ' Oh, what 
a surprise ! ' 



FLUMMOCKY, adj. (colloquial). 
Out of place ; in bad taste. 

1891. F. H. GROOME. btac'kwood's 
Mag, Marchj p. 319. ' It is a nice solemn 
dress,' she said, as she lifted a piece tb ex- 
amine it more closely ; ' there's nothing 
FLUMMOCKY about it.' 

FLUMMUT, subs. ( vagrants' ). A 
month in prison. See FLUM- 
MOXEb. For synonyms, see DOSE. 

1889. Answers, 2oth July, p. 121 
col. 2. If you want to get rid of an impor- 
tunate tramp tell him to ' stow his patter,' 
or you will get him a FLUMMUT. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, vol. I., p. 232. He 
tpatterer] mostly chalks a signal on or near 
the door. I give one or two instances. 
. . . i ' FLUMMUT/ sure of a month in 



Flump. 



37 Flurry One's Milk. 



FLUMP, verb, (colloquial). To fall, 
put, or be set, down with violence 
or a thumping noise. Onoma- 
topoeic. Also to COME DOWN 
WITH A FLUMP Cf.y PLUMP and 
CACHUNK. 

1840. THACKERAY, Paris Sketch 
Book, ch. v. Chairs were FLUMPED down 
on the floor. 

1865. H. KINGSLEY, The Hillyars 
and the Burtons^ ch. Ixii. Before my 
mother had been a week in the partly- 
erected slat-house, the women began to 
come in, to FLUMP down into a seat and 
tell her all about it. 



FLUNK, subs. (American colloquial). 
i. An idler, a LOAFER (q.v.) or 
LAWRENCE (q.v.), 

2. (Also FLUNK-OUT). A 
failure, especially (at college) in 
recitations ; a backing out of un- 
dertakings. 

1853. Songs of Yale. In moody 
meditation sunk, Reflecting on my future 

FLUNK. 

1877. Brunonian, 24th Feb. A FLUNK 
is a complete fizzle ; and a DEAD FLUNK is 
where one refuses to get out of his seat. 

1888. Missouri Republican, iith Feo. 
Riddleberger forced tb.e presidential possi- 
bilities of the senate to a complete FLUNK. 

Verb (American). To retire 
through fear ; to fail (as in a 
lesson) ; to cause to fail. Cf. % 
FUNK, 

1838. NEAL, Charcoal Sketches, IV. 
Why, little 'un, you must be cracked, if 
you FLUNK OUT before we begin. 

1847. Tfc Yale Banger, 22 Oct. 
My dignity is outraged at beholding those 
who fizzle and FLUNK in my presence 
tower aboye me. 

1853. Atnherst Indicator, p. 253, 
They know that a man who has FLUNKED. 
because too much of a genius to get his 
lesson, is not in a state to appreciate 
joking. 

1871. JOHN HAY, 'Jim Bludso of the 
Prairie Bell.' in New York Tribune, Jan. 
1'ut he never FLUNKED, and he never lied/ 
I reckon he never know'd how. 



FLUNKEY, subs, (nautical). i. A 
ship's steward. 

2. (American.) An ignorant 
dab.bler in stock ; an inexperi- 
enced jobber. 

1862. A Week in Wall St., p. 90. 
A broker, who had met with heavy losses, 
exclaimed : 'I'm in a bear-trap, this 
won't do. The dogs will come over me. 
I shall be mulct in a loss. But I've got 
time ; I'll turn the s,cale ; I'll help the bulls 
operate for a rise, and draw in the 

FLUNKIES. 

3. (American University.) 
One that makes a complete failure 
in a recitation ; one who FLUNKS 
(q.v.}. 

1859, Yale Lit. Magazine. _ \ 
bore him safe through Horace, Saved hini 
from the FLUNKEY'S doom. 

4. (colloquial). A man-ser- 
vant, especially one in livery. 
Hence, by implication, a para- 
site or TOADY (q.v.). Fr., un 
larbin. 

1848. THACKERAY, Book of Snobs, 
ch. v. You who have no toadies ; you 
whom no cringing FLUNKEYS or shopmen 
bow out of doors. 

Whence, FLUNKEYISM=: Blind 
worship of rank, birth, or riches. 
Fr., la larbinerie. 

1857. J. E. RITCHIE, Night Side of 
London, p. 23. Our trading classes, be- 
coming richer and more sunk in FLUNKEY- 
ISM every day. 

FLURRYMENT, subs, (common.) 
Agitation ; bustle ; confusion ; 
nervous excitement. [Pleonastic, 
fiom FLURRY.] 

1848. TONES, Sketches oj Travel, 
p. II. Mafy and all on em was in a 

monstrous FLURRYMENT. 



FLURRY ONE'S MILK, verb. phr. 
(common). To be worried, angry, 
or upset ; To FRET ONE s KID- 
NEYS (q.v.} ; To TEAR ONE'S 
SHIRT, or ONE'S HAIR (q.v.). 



Flush. 



Flush. 



FLUSH, subs, (gamesters'). A hand 
of one suit. 

Adj. (colloquial). I. With 
plenty of money ; the reverse of 

HARD UP (q.V.\ ; WARM (q.V.)~, 

Also abounding in anything : e.g. 

FLUSH OF HIS PATTE R = full of his 
talk ; FLUSH OF THE LOTION = 

liberal with the drink ; FLUSH OF 
HIS NOTIONS = prodigal of ideas ; 

FLUSH OF HER CH ARMS = lavish 

of her person ; and so forth. 

1603. DEKKER, Batchelors Banquet, 
ch. viii. Some dames of the company, 
which are more FLUSH in crownes- than 
her good man. 

1605. The Play of Stucley, 1. 538. 
They know he hath received His marriage 
money: they perceive he's FLUSH And mean 
to share with him ere all be gone. 

1663. DRYDEN, Wild Gallant, Act 
II. Con. Since you are so FLUSH, sir, you 
shall give me a locket of diamonds, of 
three hundred pounds. 

1690. B. E., Ne-w Diet, of the 
Canting Crew. FLUSH in the pocket c. 
full of money. The cull is FLUSH in the 
fob, the Spark's pocket is well lined with 
money. 

1767. O'HARA, Two Misers, Act I. 
What stops many an hopeful project ? lack 
of cash {looking archly a-t him\ Are- 
you FLUSH, Sir ? 

1785. GROSE, Diet. &f the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1846. THACKERAY, V^ F., vol. I. 
ch. xxviii. The expenses were borne by 
Jos and Osbprne, who was FLUSH of money 
and full of kind attentions to hi$ wife. 

1861. A. TROLLOPE, Framley Parson- 
age, ch. viiL Allow me to draw on. you 
for that amount at three months. Long 
before that time I shall be FLUSH enough. 

1864. Economist, 29 Oct. The 
world was then, if such a very colloquial 
expression could be pardoned, ' FLUSH of 
cash,' and it sent in that cash rapidly and 
at once. 

2. ( common ). Intoxicated 
(*.*., full to the brim); also 
FLUSHED. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 



3. (colloquial). Level: e.g., 
FLUSH with the top, with the 
water, with the road, with the 
boat's edge, etc. 

Verb* (common). I. To whip. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To 
bludgeon ; to bumbaste j to breech 
(Cotgrave) ; to brush ; to club ; to 
curry ; to dress with an oaken 
towel ; to drub ; to drybeat j to 
dry-bob ; to drum; to fib; to flap ; 
to flick ; to flop ; to jerk ; to give 
one ballast ; to hide ; to lamm ; 
to larrup ; to paste ; to punch ; 
to rub down ; to swinge ; to 
swish ; to switch ; to trounce ; to 
thump \ to tund (Winchester) ; 
to wallop. See also TAN. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Donner 
Favoine (pop. =to give a feed of 
hay); allumer (popular) ; bouiser 
(thieves' : un bouts = a. whip). 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Smane- 
grare ; cotillare ; corillare ; cerire. 

?. (colloquial). To clean by 
filling full, and emptying, of water : 
e.g., to FLUSH a sewer ; to ; wash, 
swill, or sluice away. Also to fill 
with water : e.g. :% to FLUSH a lock. 

1884. HENLEY and STEVENSON,. 
Admiral Guinea, i., 8. Pray for a new 
heart ', FLUSH OUT your sins with tears, 

3. (shooting). To start or 
rai^e a bird from covert : e.g., TO 
FLUSH a snipe, or a covey of 
partridges. Hence (venery) TO 
FLUSH A WILD DUCK = to single 
out a woman for GROUSING (q.v.\* 

TO COME FLUSH ON ONE, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To come sud- 
denly and unexpectedly (Marvell); 
to overwhelm (as by a suddep 
rush of water). 



Flushed on the Horse. 39 



Flustration. 



FLUSHED ON THE HORSE, phr. 
(prison). Privately whipped in 
gaol. 

FLUSH-HIT, subs. phr. (pugilistic). 
A clean blow ; a hit full on the 
mark and straight from the 
shoulder. For synonyms, see 
DIG. 

1891. Lie. Viet. Mirror, 30 Jan., p. 
7, col. 2. Landed a very heavy FLUSH HIT 
on the mouth. 

Adv. ( colloquial ). Full ; 
straight; RIGHT ON (q.v.). 

1888. Sporting Life, 15 Dec. 
Both cautious, Wilson with marked 
frequency leading off, and getting the left 
FLUSH on the face. 

FLUSTER, verb. (old). To excite ; 
to confuse, abash, or FLUMMOX 
(q.v.} ; to upset, or be upset, with 
drink. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Othello, I., 3. 
The very elements of this warlike isle, 
Have I to-night FLUSTER'D with flowing 
cups. 

1711. Spectator, No 87. It is very 
common for such as are too low in consti- 
tution to ogle the idol upon the strength of 
tea, to FLUSTER themselves with warmer 
liquors. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., ii., 2<$i, 
When I vext proud.Celia just come from 
ray glass, She tells me I'm FLUSTERED, 
and look like an ass. 

1731. FIELDING, Letter Writers. 
Act II., Sc. 5. Who hath taken me to the 
tavern, and, I protest, almost FLUSTER'D 
me. 

FLUSTERED (or FLUSTRATED),///. 
adj. (old). Excited by drink, 

' circumstances, another person's 
impudence, etc; also mildly drunk. 
Cf., FLUSTICATED. For syn- 
onyms, see SCREWED. 

1686. Common, oj Women, Prol. 
Another to cumpleat his daily task, 
KLUSTEK'D with claret, seizes on a mask. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the 
Canting Crew. FLUSTERED, drunk. 



1709. STEELE, Tatler, No. 3. I 
. . . therefore take this public occasion 
to admonish a young Nobleman, whocame 
FLUSTERED into the box last night. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Diet. ( 5 th ed.) 
FLUSTERED (a) . . . somewhat intoxi- 
ated with liquor. 

1750. FIELDING, Tom Jones, bk. XIV. 
ch. ix. This latter, though not drunk, 
began to be somewhat FLUSTERED. 

1779. The Mirror, No. 57. All of 
them FLUSTERED, some of them perfectly 
intoxicated. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

FLUSTICATED, or FLUSTRATED,///. 

adj. (old and colloquial). Con- 
fused ; in a state of heat or 
excitement. Cf., FLUSTERED. 

1712. Spectator, No. 493. We were 
coming down Essex Street one night a 

little FLUSTRATE.D. 

1766. COLMAN, Cland. Marriage V. t 
in works (1777) i. 271. Your mind is too 
much FLUSTRATED, andyoucan neither eat 
nor drink. 

1843. Maj. Jones' Courtship, I. 
Somehow I was so FLUSTRATED that I 
tuk the rong way. 

1847. PORTER, Big Bear, &c., p. 98. 
I sot down, being sorter FLUSTICATED 
like, thinkin' of that skrape, last time I 
was there. 

FLUSTRATION, subs, (old and collo- 
quial). Heat; excitement; bustle; 
confusion; FLURRY (q.v.). 

1771. SMOLLET, Humphrey Clinker, 
I., 126. Being 1 was in su<.h a FLUSTRA- 
TION. 

1843. Major Jones' Courtship, viii. 
The old woman's been in a monstrous FLUS- 
TRATION 'bout the comet. 

1847. PORTER, Quarter Race, etc., 
p. 177. My wife is in a delicut way, and 
the frite might cause a FLUSTRATION. 

1848. JONES, Studies of Travel, p. 
21. The old woman was in such a FLUS- 
TRATION she didn't know her lips from 
anything else. 

1872. MORTIMER COLLINS, Two 
Plunges for a Pearl, vol. II., ch. vii. 
Then was this pretty little actress whom he 
admired in a great stale of FLUCTUATION. 



Flute. 



Fly. 



FLUTE, subs. (old). I. The recorder 
of a corporation. 

1598. FLORIO, A WorldeofWordes. 
Tibia, a FLUTES, a recorder, a pipe. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the 
Canting- Crew. FLUTED c. The recorder of 
London or of any other town, 

1785. GBOSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1825 KENT, Modem Flash Diet. 
FLUTE the recorder of any town. 

2. (venery). The penis. Also 

the ONE-HOLED, THE LIVING, 
O* THE SILENT FLUTE. TO PLAY 
A TUNE O-N THE ONE -HOLED 

FLUTE = to have cosnection. Cf. , 
Dryden (Sixfh fttvenal, line 107). 
' And stretch his QUAIL-PIPE till 
they crack his< voice.' For syno- 
nyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK. 

1720. DURFEY, Pills, etc, vi., 31... 
He took her by the middle, And taught 
her by the FLUTE. 

1736. Cupid r p, 163. The Flute is 
good that's made of Wood And is r I own r 
the neatest ; Yet ne'ertheless I must confess, 
The SILE.NT FLUTE'S the sweetest. 

FLUTTER, subs, (common). i. An 

attempt, or SHY (q.v.) t at any- 

. thing; a venture in earnest; a 

spree ; a state of expectancy (as 

in betting). Hence gambling. 

1883. Echo, 26 Feb. p. 4, col. 2. I 
have no stable tip, but I fancy the animal 
named will at any rate afford backers a 
FLUTTER for their money. 

1889. Licensed Viet. Gazette, 8 
Feb. Of course he told her he only went 
in for a little FLUTTER occasionally. 

1890. Saturday Review* i Feb., p. 
134, col. i. They find out the addresses of 
people whom they see at the races 
people whom they suspect to be fond of a 
FLUTTER, and then an invitation is sent to 
a little soiree inlime. 

1887. HENLEY, Culture in the Slums, 
iii. I likes a merry little FLUTTER, I keeps 
a Dado on the sly, In fact my form's the 
blooming Utter. 



2. (common). The act of 
spinning a coin. 

3. (venery). Connection de- 
floration. TO HAVE HAD A 
FLUTTER = (I) TO HAVE BEEN 

THERE (cf.y GREENS) ; and (2) to 
have lost one's maidenhead. 

Verb, (common). I. To spin 
a. coir* (for drinks), j also to 
gamble, 

2. (common).. To go in for a 
bout of pleasures 

TO FLUTTER THE RIBBONS, 
verb-, phr. (common) To drive, 

1864. Eton School Days,, chap., i, p*. 
ii. As I was going to be saying, I used to 

FLUTTER THE RIBANDS of the London. 

Croydon and South Coast coach. 

[FLUTTER,, if not a word of all- work, is. 
a word with plenty to do. Tims,. TO HAVE- 
(or DO) A FLUTTER = to have a LOOK IN 
(g.z-.), to go on the spree, and (of both sexes) 
to.have carnal connection ; TO BE ON THE 
FLUTTER = to be on the spree, and also> 
(venery) to be ALL THERE (q.v.) or ON 

THE SPOT (<J.V.)\ TO FLUTTER A JUDY 

both to pursue and to possess a girl ; TO 
FLUTTER A. BROWN = to spin & coin ; TO 

FLUTTER (or FRET) ONES KIDNEYS = U> 

agitate, to exasperate ;, TO FLUTTER A 
SKIRT =to walk the streets j and so forth. J 

FLUX, verb (old), i. To cheat ; 
to cozen ; to overreach. For syn* 
onyms, see STICK. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue^ s,v. 

2. (old.) To salivate. Grose* 
(1785). 

FLY, subs, (old), A familiar; hence, 
by implication, a parasite or 
SUCKER (q.v.). [In the sixteenth 
and seventeenth century it was 
held that familiar spirits, in the 
guise of flies, lice, fleas, etc.^ 
attended witches, who for a 
price professed to dispose of the 
power for evil thus imparted. ] 



Fly. 



Ffy. 



1596. LODGE, Incarnate Devils. 
This divel prefers an Ephimerides before 
a Bible ; and his Ptolemey and Hali before 
Ambrose, golden Chrisostome, or S. 
Augustine : promise him a familiar, and he 
will take a FLIE in a box for good paiment. 

1610. BEN JONSON, Alchemist i. 
You are mistaken, doctor, Why he does 
ask one but for cups and horses, A rifling 
FLY, none of your great familiars. 

1622. MASSINGER, Virgin Martyr, 
ii., 2. Courtiers have FLIES That buzz all 
news unto them. 

2. (old). A printer's devil; 
specifically a boy who lifted the 
printed sheets from the press. 
[Now the vibrating frame used 
for the same purpose.] 

1688. R. HOLME, Academy ^ of 
Armory. These boys do in a printing- 
house commonly black and bedaub them- 
selves, when the workmen do Jocosely 
call them devils, and sometimes spirits, and 
sometimes FLIES. 

3. (trade), r-A customer. 

4. (common). The act of 
spinning a coin. Cf., t FLUTTER. 

5. (old). A public wagon : 
afterwards, (colloquial) a Four- 
wheel hackney coach. Fr., 
mouche ( fly) = a public boat on the 
Seine. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall, s.v. 

6. (common). A policeman. 
For synonyms, see BEAK and 
COPPER, 

1857. SNOWDEN, Magistrates' Assis* 
tant^ 3rd ed. r p. 446. A policeman ; a 



Adj. (common). I . Know- 
ing ; ARTFUL (q.v.) ; up to every 
move ; cute. Also FLY TO, 

A-FLY, FLY TO THE GAME, and 

FLY TO WHAT'S WHAT. C/., 
AWAKE, and, for synonyms, see 
KNOWING ; FLY DOG (q.v.). 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, Cheese 
it, the coves are FLY=be silent, the people 
nd our discourse. 



1823. W. T. MONCRIEFF, Tom a>id 
Jerry, Act II., Sc. 2. Jerry. Charlies' 
fiddles? I'm not FLY, Doctor. Log. 
Rattles, Jerry, rattles Jerry rattles I 
you're FLY now, I see. 

1838. GLASCOCK, Land Sharks and 
Sea Gulls., II., 4. That's right; I see 
you're FLY to, every fakeiuent. 

1850. Lloyd's Weekly y 3 Feb. ' Low 
Lodging Houses of London.' They say 
the FLIEST is easy to take in sometimes 
that's the artfujlest ; but I could dp no 
good there. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Land. Poor, vol. I., p. 260. *We 
were too FLY to send anybody to market 
but ourselves.' 

1861. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, ch. 
xxxv. \Chas. Ravenshoe to Shoeblack\ 
'On the cross?' said Charles. 'Ah,' 
the boy said, ' he goes out cly-faking and 
such. He's a prig, and a smart one, too.. 
He's FL.Y, is Harry. 

1876. Miss BRADDON, Dead Men** 
Shoes, ch. lii. ' Go and fetch the cleverest 
police officer in Liverpool, and let him wait 
outside this door till I want him.' ' I'm 
FLY,' answers the youth, brightening at the 
prospect of excitement and remuneration. 
*Case of' bezzlement, I suppose, Sir?' 

1877. Five Years Penal Servitude, 
ch. ii., p. 125. A certain prisoner, who, 
was what is termed a very FLY man, i.e., 
a clever, scheming fellow . . . sounded 
him as to getting tobacco and other 
matters. 

188(?>. _ JENNY HILL Broadside 
Ballad. I've cut my wisdom teeth, some 
at top, some underneath. ... So you 
needn't try it on ; I'm FLY. 

1890. Punch, 30 Aug., p. 9. Briggs, 
Junior, a lobsculter called 'me ; I wasn't 
quite FLY to his lay. 

1891. Licensed Victuallers' Gazette, 
9 Jan. If you get among a FLY lot, why 
they'd skin you in less than no time, 

2. (common). ^Dextrous. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, bk. 
III., ch. v. No dummy hunter had forks 

SO FLY. 

1839. REYNOLDS, Pickwick Abroad, 
p. 223. We'll knap afogle with fingers FLY. 

3. (venery). Wanton. FLY- 

GIRL, -WOMAN, Or -DAME 3 

prostitute. 



Fly. 



42 



Fly. 



1888. San Francisco News Letter, 4 
Feb. ' I'm just gettin' sick'n tired o' the 
way 't them FLY dames go on, 'n the way 
t the fellahs hang round 'em 'n dance with 
'em 'n so forth.' 

Verb, (thieves'). I. To toss ; 
to raise ; TO FLY THE MAGS 
= to toss up halfpence (cf. , sw&s. , 
sense 4). 

1857. SNOWDEN, Magistrates' As* 
sis f ant, 3rd ed., p. 447. To lift a window, 
to FLY a window, 

2. (pugilistic). To give way : 
as, china FLIES in the baking. 

1865. G. F. BERKELEY, My Life, II. 
296. Heenan . . . told me his right hand 
was worth nothing to him, and we have 
since seen that his left FLIES, or, in other 
words, becomes puffed, softened, or se- 
verely damaged by the force of his own 
blows. 

To FLY AROUND, verb, phr, 
(American). To bestir oneself; 
to make haste. Also TO FLY 

AROUND AND TEAR ONE'S SHIRT. 

1851. HOOPER, Widow Rugby s Hus- 
band, p. 44, Old 'ooman, FLY AROUND, 
git somethin' for the Squire and Dick to 
gat. 

To FLY THE FLAG, verb, phr. 
(colloquial). I. To walk the 
streets. 

2. (vulgar). To experience 
the menstrual flux, 

See also FLAG. 

TO FLY HIGH (or RATHER 

HIGH). i. verb. phr. (common). 
To get, or be drunk. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

2. (colloquial). To keep the 
best company, maintain the best 
appearances, and affect the best 
aims : i.e., to be a HIGH-FLIER 
(q : v). Also, to venture for the 
biggest stakes in the biggest way. 



To FLY LOW, vet 6. phr. (col- 
loquial). To make as little of 
oneself as possible ; to SING 
SMALL (q.v. ) ; and (among thieves) 
to keep out of the way when 

WANTED (q.V.). 

TO FLY OFF 1HE HANDLE, 

verb. phr. (American pioneer). 
To lose temper ; to fail of 
a promise ; to jilt ; to die ; also 

TO SLIP OFF THE HANDLE (q.V.) ; 

to disappoint in any way. [In 

pioneer life for an axe to part 

company with its handle is a 

serious trial to temper and 
patience.] 

1843-4. HALIBURTON, The Attache. 
You never see such a crotchical old critter 
as he is. He FLIES RIGHT OF* THE 
HANDLE for nothing 

1867. Home Journal (New York), 
21 July (speaking of a man who had 
succeeded to a large fortune it says) he 
WENT OFF THE HANDLE in England 
rather unexpectedly. 

1871. DE VERB, Americanisms, p. 
195 If a fair lady loses her temper, or 
worst of all, if she bleaks the tender 
promise, she is said to FLY OFF THE 
HANDLE, and the disappointment is as 
serious to the unlucky lover as a lost axe 
to many a settler. 

1888. Piitsburg Chronicle. ' I can't 
say that I'am stuck on Sue Fitzpercy,' 
remarked Amy. ' She is liable TO FLY OFF 

THE HANDLE.' 

To FLY OUT, verb. phr. (col- 
loquial). To get angry ; to scold. 

1612. CHAPMAN, Widows Tears, 
Act II., p. 317 (Plays, 1874). For where- 
fore rage wives at their husbands so when 
they FLY OUT ? for zeal, against the sin ? 

1665-6. PEPYS, Diarv, 17 Jan. 
It is to be feared that the Parliament will 
FLY OUT against him and particular men, 
the next Session. 

3712. Spectator, No. 479. He 
(Socrat.es) has said, My dear friend, you 
are beholden to Xantippe, that 1 bear so 
well your FLYING OUT in a dispute. 

1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. 
xx. 'And then the Colonel FLIES OUT 
about his boy, and says that my wife 
insulted him ! ' 



Fly. 



43 



Fly. 



TO MAKE THE FUR (or 

FEATHERS) FLY, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To attack effectively ; 
to make a disturbance ; to quarrel 
noisily, like two torn cats on the 
tiles, who are' said (in American) 
to pull fur, or to pull wool. 

1847. PORTER, Big Bear, etc., p. 
132. Thar, they've got him agin, and now 
the FUR FLIES. 

1888. Denver Republican, 29 Feb. 
'Wait until the National Committee 
assembles on February 22,' said the 
organizer, 'and you will see the FUR FLY 
from the Cleveland hide.' 

TO TAKE ON THE FLY, Wrb* 
phr. (vagrants'). To beg in the 
streets ; a specific usage of adver- 
bial sense. 

1851-61. MAVHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, II., p. 59. The ' first move ' 
in his mendicant career was TAKING THEM 
ON THE FLY, which means meeting the 
gentry on their walks, and beseeching or at 
times menacing them till something is 
given. 

To FLY A KITE, verb phr. 
(common). To raise money by 
means of accommodation bills ; 

TO RAISE THE WIND (^.Z/.). 

1812. From an old Dublin Jester. 
[The story, however, with slight variations 



I j. lie Mvrjfj nuwcvci, wikii sugiiL vaiidiiuii:>f 

is told of other judges. See N. and Q., 6 
S. ix., 326-394.] In a case before the Lord 
Chancellor of Ireland Mr. Curran, on be- 



half of the suitor, prayed to be relieved 
from the payment of some bills for which 
he had not received consideration, but only 
lent his name as an accommodation. Mr. 
Curran, in the course of his pleadings, men- 
tioned the terms KITE and RAISING THE 
WIND several times, when his lordship re- 
quested to know the meaning of the words. 
'My lord,' Mr. Curran replied, 'in your 
country (meaning England) the wind gene- 
rally raises the kite, but with us, signifi- 
cantly looking at the gentlemen of the bar, 

THE KITE RAISES THE WIND.' 

1848. Punch, XIV., p. 226. ' The 
Model Gentleman." He never does ' a 
little discounting ' nor lends his hand to 

' FLYING A KITE.' 

1849. Perils of Pearl Street, p. 82. 
FLYING THE KITE is rather a perilous ad- 
venture. 



1880. G. R. SIMS, Ballads of Baby- 
lon (Little Worries). You have a KITE you 
cannot FLY, and creditors are pressing. 

1891. Licensed Victuallers Gazette* 
23 Jan. Prince Alexis Soltykoflf, who ha 
been FLYING KITES, and getting into 
trouble thereby, is the only son of Prince 
Soltykoff, the steward of the Jockey Club. 

2. (thieves') To go out by 
the window. 

3. ( lodging - house ). To, 
evacuate from a window. 

4. (colloquial), To attempt 5 
to set one's cap at. 

1863. H. KINGSLEY, Austin Elliot , 
ch. xii. ' They- say that you FLEW YOUR 
KITE at that girl of George Cecil's who has 
married that prig, Lord Mewstone.' 

TO FLY THE BLUE PIGEONj 

verb. phr. (thieves'). To steal 
lead from roofs. See BLUE- 
PIGEON. Fr., faire la mastar 
au gras-double, or la faire au 
mastar. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1789. G. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
Thieves who FLY THE BLUE PIGEON, that is, 
who steal lead off houses, or cut pipes away 
. . . cut a hundredweight of lead, which 
they wrap round their bodies next to the 
skin. This they call a BIBLE (q.v.), and 
what they steal and put in their pockets, 
they call a TESTAMENT (g.v.). 



1887. Judy, 27 April, p. 200. ' A 
burglar whose particular LAY was FLYING 
the BLUE PIGEON, i.e., stealing lead. 

To LET FLY, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To hit out. [From 
cock-fighting.] 

1859. Punch, vol. XXXVII., p. 54. 
' Essence of Parliament.' Monday, 25 July. 
Lard Lyndhurst LET FLY and caught him 
what (if pugilistic terms be not out of place 
when one is alluding to so pacific a 
personage; may be designated an extremely 
neat one on the conk. 

NOT A FEATHER TO FLY WITH, 
adv. phr. (common). Penniless 
and ruined ; DEAD-BROKE (q.v. 
for synonyms). 



Fly-blow. 



44 



Fly-catcher. 



TO BREAK A FLY ON A WHEEL, 

verb. phr. (colloquial). To make 
a mountain of a molehill. Cf., 

TO CRACK A NUT WITH A 

NASMYTH HAMMER = to lavish 
force or energy. 

THE FLY ON THE WHEEL, 

subs. phr. (colloquial). One who 
fancies himself of mighty import- 
ance. [From the fable.] 

I DON'T RISE TO THAT FLY, 
phr. (common) == I don't believe 
you ; you won't catch me with 
such bait as that. [From fly- 
fishing. ] 

OFF THE FLY, adv. phr. (collo- 
quial). On the quiet ; laid up in 
dock ; doing nothing : said of a 
Strumpet retired from business, or 
a man (or woman) who has given 
over the pursuit of pleasure. 

ON THE FLY, adv. phr. (popu- 
lar). i. Walking the streets ; 
out for a LARK (q.v.) ; OFF 
WORK (q.v.); out on the SPREE 



2. (thieves') In motion : e g. , 
' I got in one ON THE FLY ' = I 
landed a blow while I was run- 
ning. 

1868. Temple Bar, xxiv., p. 538. 
I prigged an old woman's poke ON THE 
FLY. 

FLY-BLOW, subs, (common). A 
bastard; cf. y BYE -BLOW. A 
nonce word. 

1875. OUIDA, Signet, vol. I., ch. 
viii., p. 140. No doubt that little FLY- 
BLOW is his own. 

FLY-BLOWN, adj. (common). i. 
Intoxicated. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1877. Judy, 18 May, p. 236. The 
officer assisted the pastor out, and hinted 
that he was slightly ' FLY-BLOWN.' 



2. (Australian). Cleaned- 
aut ; without a rap ; HARD- UP 
(q.v. for synonyms). 

1889. Star, 3 Jan. Our diggers go 
into Castlemame to get their hair cut, and 
on.ce there, they get on the spree, and 
comeback FLY-BLOWN. 

3. (common). Used, or done- 
Up J WASHED-OUT (q.V.\ 

4. (venery). Deflowered. Also 
STALE (q.v.j ; 'known for a 
wanton.' ^\lso. suspected of 
disease. 

FLY-BY-NIGHT, subs. (old). i. 
A sedan chair on wheels ; a 
usage of the Regency days. 

2. (common). A defaulting 
debtor ; one who SHOOTS THE 
MOON (q. v. ). Also applied to the 
act. 

3. (venery). A prostitute. 
See BAT, and for synonyms, 
BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

4. (common). A noctambu- 
list for business or for pleasure : 
i.e. , a burglar or a common 
SPREESTER (q.V.\ 

5. (obsolete). A term of 
opprobrium. 

1796. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue (3rd ed.), s.v. An ancient term of 
reproach to an old woman, signifying that 
she was a witch, and alluding to the 
nocturnal excursions attributed to witches 
who were supposed to fly abroad to their 
meetings mounted on brooms. 

6. (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

FLY- CAGE, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For synon- 
yms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

FLY-CATCHER, subs, (venery). i. 
The female pudendum. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 



Flycop. 



45 



Flying Covt. 



2. (common). An open- 
mouthed ignoramus; a GAPE- 
SEED (q.v.) SYDNEY SMITH. 
Fr. , gobe-mouche. 

FLYCOP, subs. (American). A 
sharp officer; one well broken 
in to the tricks of trade. [From 
FLY = knowing + COP, a police- 
man.] 
1859. MATSELL. Vocabutum or 

Rogue's Lexicon^ s.v. 

FLY- DISPERSES SOUP, subs. phr. 
(common). Oxtail. 

FLYER. k. See FLIER in all 
senses. 

2. (old). A shoe. For 
synonyms, see TROTTER-CASE. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of Terms, 
etc., s.v. 

1786. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1791. Life and Adventures of 
Bantfylde Moore Carew, s.v. 

1861. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, vol. II., p. 34. There is 
another article called a FLYER, that is, a 
shoe sold without being welted. 

3. (Winchester). A half- volley 
at football. A MADE-FLYER is 
when the bound of the ball is 
gained from a previous kick, by 
the same side, aga nst canvas or 
any other obstacle, or is dropped, 
as in a * drop-kick ' This is now 
confused with a ' kick-up. ' 

FLY-FLAPPED, adj. (obsolete). 
Whipped in the stocks, or at the 
cart's tail. GROSE. 

FLY-FLAPPER, subs. (old). A 
heavy bludgeon. 

FLY- FLAT, subs. (turf). A would-be 
connoisseur and authority. [From 
FLY = knowing 4- FLAT = a fool.] 



FLYING. To LOOK AS IF THE 
DEVIL HAD SHIT HIM (or HER) 
FLYING (common and proverbial). 
Said in derision of one odd- 
looking, filthy, or deformed. 

FLYING- ANGEL. See ANGEL. 

FLYING BRICKLAYERS, subs. phr. 
(military). The mounted Royal 
Engineers. 

FLYING CAMPS, subs. phr. (old). 
Couples or gangs of beggars. 

1699. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. Beggars plying in FLYING CAMPS. 
Beggars plying in bodies at funerals. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

FLYING-CAPER, subs, (thieves') An 
escape from prison j LEG-BAIL 
(q.v.). 

1864. Daily Pafer, ' Police Report.' 
The blues are always ready to spot a 
fellow who has tried on the FLYING-CAPER 
with them, and given them leg-bail. 

FLYING-CAT. See CAT. 

FLYING COUNTRY, subs. pkr. (hunt- 
ing). A country where the GOING 
(q.v.) is fast and good. 

1856. WHYTE MELVILLE, Kate 
Coventry, ch. xii. The heavy-top hounds 
are an establishment such as, I am given 
to understand, is not usually kept in 
Leicestershire, Northamptonshire, and 
other so-called ' FLYING COUNTIES.' 

FLYING COVE, subs. pkr. (American 
thieves'). An impostor who gets, 
or tries to get, money from per- 
sons who have been robbed by 
pretending to give such informa- 
tion as will lead to recovery. 
Formerly, FLYING- PORTER 
(GROSE). 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum or 
Rogues" Lexicon, s.v. 



flying -dustman* 



Fly-slicer. 



FLYING-DUSTMAN. See STIFF-UN. 

FLYING - DUTCHMAN, subs, (com* 
mon). The London and Exeter 
express (G. W, R. ). See also FLY- 
ING SCOTCHMAN and WILD 
IRISHMAN. Cf,, DEAD-MEAT 
TRAIN and LARKY SUBALTERN'S 
COACH* 

FLYING-HORSE (or MARE), subs. 
(wrestling). The throw by which 
an opponent is sent over the head. 
Introduced, says Bee, by Parkins. 

1754. FOOTE, Knights, Act I. But 
we don't wrestle after your fashion ; we 
ha' no tripping ; fath and soul ! we all go 
upon close hugs or the FLYING-MARE. 

1884. Referee, 23 March, p. i., col. 
i In the third and last bout, Klein 
brought his man clean over his head 
holding him by his own with a sort of 
FLYING - MARE, and elicited thunders of 
applause. 

1886. Pall Mall Gazette, 5 July, p. 
4. On a Mississippi steamer he astonished 
a rowdy who was shocked at his unnatural 
objection to whisky, by performing upon 
him the feat known to British wrestlers as 

'the FLYING MARE.' 

FLYING-JIGGER OR GYGGER, subs. 
(thieves'). A turnpike gate. 
JIGGER = a door or gate.] 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum or 
Rogue's Lexicon, s.v. 

FLYING-MAN, subs, (football). A 
skirmisher good at taking, and 
running with, the ball. 

1864. Eton School Days, ch. 23, 
p. 255. He possessed good wind, and was 
a very good 'kick -off,' and he could 
' bully ' a ball as well as any one. He was 
a little too heavy for ' FLYING-MAN,' but he 
made a decent 'sidepost,' and now and 
then he officiated as ' corner.' 



FLYING-MARE. &*? FLYING-HORSE. 



FLYING PASTY, subs. phr. (obsolete), 
Excrement wrapped in paper 
and thrown over a neighbour's 
wall. [GROSE. ] 

FLYING- PORTER, See FLYING COVE. 

FLYING-STATIONER, subs, (street) 
A hawker of street ballads ; a 
PAPERWORKER(^.Z>.), or RUNNING 

PATTERER (q.V.). Cf., CROAK. 

'Printed for the FLYING-STA- 
TIONER ' is the imprimatur on 
hundreds of broadsheets from the 
last century onwards. 

1785k GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. Ballad singers and hawkers 
of penny histories. 

1851-61. H; MAYHEW, L*nd* Lab. 
And Lond. Poor, Vol. I , p. 228. That 
order or species of the pattering genus 
known as FLYING STATIONERS, from the 
fact of their being continually on the move 
while describing the attractions of the 
papers ' they have to sell. 

1886. Athentzum, 31 July, p. 139. 
in the Newate 



gate 
dder 



Scores of tracts were issued 
region, from Giltspur Street to Blowbla 
Street, whence numbers of FLYING STA- 
TIONERS drew their supplies long before 
either of the Catnachs were born. 



FLYMY. Adj. (streets). Knowing , 
FAST (q.v.) ; roguish 5 sprightly. 
From FLY (q.v.). 

1887. W. E. HENLEV, Vilivtts Good 
Night. You FLYMY titters fond of flam. 

FLY-MY-KITE, subs. phr. (rhyming). 
A light. 

FLYMY-MESS, TO BE IN A FLYMY. 
MESS, verb, phr, (military). To 
be hungry and have nothing to 
eat. For synonyms, see PECKISH. 

FLY-SLICER, subs, (common). A 
cavalry-man : cf., MUDCRUSHER. 
French lancers are allumeurs de 
gaz, their weapons being likened 
to a lamplighter's rod. 



Fly the Garter. 



47 



Fob. 



1785 GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. FLY-SLICERS: Life-guardmen, 
from their sitting on horseback, under an 
arch, where they are frequently observed 
to drive away flies with their swords. 



FLY THE GARTER, sul^phr. (school- 
boys'). Leap-frog. 

1863. G. A. SALA, Brtakfasi in Bed, 
Essaj VIII. ,p. 187 (1864). He has very 
probably been playing FL V-THE-GARTER in 
the gutter instead of waiting his turn at the 
office. 



FLY-TRAP, subs, (common). i. 
The mouth. For synonyms, see 
POTATO TRAP. 

2. (venery). The female /- 
dendttm. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE, 



FOALED, adj. (hunting). Thrown 
from a horse. r. y faire par ache. 

FOB, or FUB, subs. (old). I. A 
cheat ; a trick ; a swindle. To 
COME THE FOB- to impose upon ; 
to swindle : tf., COME OVER. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FOB. c., a cheat trick. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
' Tongue^ FOB, s.v. 

1852. JUDSON, Mysteries of New 
York, ch. vii. He come ze FOB on some of 
ze nobilitie, and zey invite him to go to 
Amerique. 

2. (old : now recognised); A 
breeches pocket ; a watch pocket. 

1678. BUTLER, Hudibras, III., i., 
107. Had rifled all his pokes and FOBS Of 
gimcrack whims and gingumbobs. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FOB, c., also a little pocket. 

1703. MARVELL, Poems on Affairs 
of State. ' Royal Revolutions." When 
plate was in pawn and FOB at an ebb. 
Ibid. 'Last Instructions,' etc. More 
gold in's FOB, more lace upon his coat. 



1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

3. (common). A watch chain 
or ribbon, with buckle and seals, 
worn hanging from the fob. 

Verb, (old). I. To rob; to 
cheat ; to pocket ; also TO FOB 
OFF. 

1700 V CONGREVE, Way of the World, 
i., 9. There were items of such a 
treaty in embrio ; and if it shou'd come to 
life poor Mirabell wou'd be in some sort 
unfortunately FOBB'D, i'faith. 

1703. MRS. CENTLiVRE,6Y0/m Heiress, 
III., iv., wks. (1872), i., 358. I shall be 
FOBBED of my mistress by and by. Why, 
Frank, why, thou wilt not FOB me, wilt 
thou? 

1731. FIELDING, Grub Street Opera, 
ii, 5. While ev'ry one else he is FOBBING, 
He still may be honest to me. 

1789, WOLCOT [P. Finder], Rowland 
for an Oliver-, in wks. (Dublin. 1795), Vol. 
II.j p. 159. To use a cant phrase, we've 
been finely FOBP.'D, Indeed, have very dex- 
t'rously been robb'di 

1840. HOWITT, Visits to Remark- 
able Places, p. 170. Very pretty sums he 
has FOBBED now and then. 

1842. Punch, III., p. 239, col. 2. The 
world turns its back on you, and neither by 
cards nor dice can you FOB your brother 
mortal out of a single guinea. 

2. (old). To deceive; trifle 
with ; disappoint ; to put off 
dishonestly or unfairly, 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV.) 
ii., i. A hundred mark is a long loan fora 
poor lone woman to bear, and I have borne, 
and borne, and bornej and have been 

FUBBED off and FOBBED off. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Othello, IV., 2. 
I think it is seurvy> and begin to find my- 
self FOBBED in it. 

1610. SHAKSPEARE, Coriolanus, I., 
i. You must not think to FOB off our dis- 
grace with a tale. 

1884. Fortnightly Review, XXXVI. , 
p. 75. In nothing are amateur backers of 
horses FOBBED OFF by professionals with 
jess than the legitimate odds than in back- 
ing double and triple events.. 



Fobus. 



Fogey. 



1864. The Tramp Exposed, p. 7. A 
miserable, a job lot of humanity as had ever 
been FOBBED OFF on a defrauded universe. 

TO GUT A FOB, verb. phr. 
(old). To pick pockets. Cf., 
FOB, verbal sense I. For syn- 
onyms, nee PRIG. 

1819. MOORE, Tom CrW's Memorial, 
i. Diddling your subjects, and GUTTING 
their FOBS. 

FOBUS, subs. (old). An oppro- 
brious epithet. 

1677. WVCHERLEY, Plain Dealer, II., 
i. Ay, you old FOBUS. 

2. (venerv). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, set 
MONOSYLLABLE. 



FODDER, subs. (c6mmon). Paper 
for the closet, BUM - FODDER 



FCETUS. TO TAP THE FO2TUS, 
verb. phr (medical). To 
procure abortion. 

Fb"G, subs, (old) Smoke. 
GROSE [1785]'; Modern flash 
Diet. [1823] ; MATSELL [1859]. 
[Cf., Focus.] 

IN A FOG, subs. phr. (collo- 
quial). In a condition of per- 
plexity, doubt, difficulty, or 
mystification : as, ' I'm quite in 
FOG as to wha you mean.' 

Verb (old). i. To smoke. 

2. "(colloquial). To mystify ; 
to perplex ; to obscure. 

1836. W. H. SJHITH, / The Thieves 
C haunt.' There's a nook in the boozing- 
ken, Where many a mug I FOG. 

1883. Punch, May, p. 210, col. T. 
So large a picture, treated so ideally 
Not th&t that means stricture FOGS ns to 
find room for ft. 



1883. Daily Telegraph, 29 Sept. We 
turns what we say into tangle talk so as to 
FOG them. 



FOGEY, or FOGY, FOGAY, or FOGGI, 

subs. (old). An invalid or garri- 
son soldier or sailot 1 . Whence the 
present colloquial usages : (i) a 
person advanced in life, and (2) 
an old-fashioned or eccentric per- 
son ; generally OLD FOGEY. [De- 
rivation doubtful ; suggestions are 
(i) from Su. G. fade and (2) 
from Eng. folk. See Notes and 
Queries, i S. vii., 354, 559, 632 ; 
viii., 64, 154, 256, 455, 652; 6 
S. ix., 10, 195.] 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongite, s.v. 

1812. Letter quoted in Notes and 
Queries, 6 S. , ix. , 10;. My company is now 
forming into an invalid company. Tell 
your grandmother we will be like thu 
Castle FOGGIES. 

1855. THACKERAY, The Ballad of 
Bouillabaisse. When first I saw ye, cari 
luoghi, I'd scarce a beard upon my face, 
And now, a grizzled, grim OLD FOGY, I sit 
and wait for Bouillabaisse. 

1864. Tangled Talk, p. 104. An OLD 
FOGEY, who particularly hated being 
'done.' 

1867. NESMITH, ' Reminiscences o^ 
Dr. Anthon,' in The Galaxy, Sept., p. 6u' 
The adherents of ' progress ' mostly regard 
classics as OLD FOGEY, -and ' see no use ' in 
the laborious years which youth spend upon 
them. 

1883. JAMES PAYN, The 'Canon's 
Ward, ch. xv. 'He would have preferred 
some bookish sneak like Adair, or some 
OLD FOGEY like Mavors.' 

1888. Sporting Life, 10 Dec. So it 
is with the sister art of music, for I (myself 
something of an OLD FOGEY in such 
matters). 

So also FOGEYISH = old-fash- 
ioned j eccentric. FOGEYDOM = 
the state of FOGEYISHNESS ; and 
FOGEYISM = a characteristic of 
FOGEYDOM-. 



49 



Fogle. 



1877. BESANT and RICE, Golden 
Butterfly, ch. i. They repaired arm-in- 
arm to their club the Renaissance, now 
past its prime, and a little FOGYISH. 

1883. Saturday Review, 31 March, 
p. 403, col. i. Not the least among the 
pleasures of FOGEYDOM, so ably depicted 
by Thackeray, is the confidence that it 
inspires in the hearts of the fairer sex. 

FOGG AGE, subs, (colloquial). Fod- 
der, especially green-meat. 

1785. BURNS, To a Mouse. And 
naething now to bigg a new ane O'FOGGAGE 
green. 



FOGGED, ppl. adj. (common). i. 
Drunk. Cf., FOGGY. For syno- 
nyms, see DRINKS and SCREWED. 

2. ( common ). Perplexed ; 
bewildered ; at a loss. [From 
FOG (q.v.), to perplex]. For 
synonyms, see FLABBERGASTED. 

1883. Illust. London News, 6 Jan., 
p. 6, col. 3. They were all treading on 
one another's heels, trying to do their best, 
but hopelessly FOGGED. 

1887. A II the Year Round, 30 July, 
68. An Australian says that he is 
shed just as an Englishman, equally 
characteristically, declares that he is 

FOGGED. 



FOGGER, subs, (old). I. A buck* 
ster ; a cringing, whining beggar ; 
a pettifogger. 

1614. Terence in English* I shall be 
exclaimed upon to be a beggarly FOGGER, 
greedily hunting after heritage. 

2. (old). A farm servant whose 
duty is to feed the cattle ; i.e., to 
supply them with FOGGAGE (q.v.). 

FOGGY, adj. (common). I. Drunk ; 

/.., CLINCHED or HAZY (q.V.) 

For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

2. (colloquial). Dull; fa twitted; 
THICK (y.v.). 



FOGLE, subs, (thieves'). A silk 
handkerchief; also generic. [Cf. t 
Ita.l.,f0g/ia = SL pocket, a purse : 
Fr., fouille = a pocket]. A 
cotton handkerchief is called a 
CLOUT. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Ban- 
danna ; belcher ; billy ; clout ; 
conch-clout ; fam-cloth ; flag ; 
kent-rag ; madam ; muckender ; 
mucketer (FLORIO) ; nose-wipe ; 
pen - wiper ; rag ; sneezer ; snot- 
tinger or snot-rag ; stook ; wipe. 
See BILLY. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
cachemire (popular) ; un blave 
or blavin (thieves'; from O.F., 
blave = blue) ; une fassolette 
(thieves': It., fazzoletto)', un 
chiffon or chiffoi nion (popular = a 
rag) ; un moufion (popular) ; les 
mouchettes (popular = wipes). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. 
Schneitzlingsschneiche (cf., SNOT- 
RAG) ; Flammert or Flamnie 
(also a neckerchief and an apron) ; 
Wisch ( = also clothing of any 
kind). 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulg. 
Tongu,e, s.v, 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry (1890), 
p. 74, Jerry's sneezer was touched with 
some convulsive efforts so that his FOGLE 
was continually at work. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood bk. 
Hi., ch. 5. FOGLES and fawnies soon went 
their way. 

1837, DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. 
xviii. ' If you don't take FOGLES and 

tickers ' r What's the good of talking in 

that way?' interposed Master Bates : 'he 
don't know what you mean.' ' If you 
don't take pocket - handkerchiefs and 
watches,' said the Dodger 

1841. Tait's Edinburgh Mag., viii., 
p. 220. Fawnies or FOGLES, onions gay, 
all were the same to me. 

1849. Punch's Almanack, ' The Swell 
Mobsman's Almanack.' Their FOGLES fetch 
next to nothing. 



Fogle-hunter. 



5 



Foist. 



1858. A. MAYHEW, Paved with Gold, 
bk. II., ch. i., p. 60. They're just made 
for hooking a FOGLE [handkerchief] out of 
a clye. 

FOGLE- HUNTER, subs, (thieves'). 
A thief whose speciality is FOGLES 
(q.v.) Fr. un blaviniste or un 
chiffonier, but for synonyms, see 
STOOKHAULER. 

1827. MAGINN, in Black-wood 's Mag. 
.... the FOGLE HUNTERS doing Their 
morning fake in the prigging lay. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. 
xvi. Who's here so base as would be a 

FOGLE-HUNTER ? 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist, p. 44. 
'What's the matter now?' said the man ? 
carelessly. 'A young FOGLE-HUNTER,' re 
plied the man who had Oliver in charge^ 

1843. Punch, IV., p. 129. Rich 
charities the chapel throng. The swell mob 
they are there, The Bishop's sermon is not 
long, The FOGLE-HUNTER ware I 

FOGLE - HUNTING (or DRAWING), 

stibs. phr. (thieves'). Stealing 
pocket-handkerchiefs; i.e., 'prig- 
ging of wipes. ' 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, etc., p. 
82. Q. 'Where's Teddy?' A. ' He's out 
a FOGI.E-HUNTING.' Sometimes 'tis said 
' drawing FOGLES,' and ' FOGI.E-DRAWING.' 

FOGRAM, or FOGRUM, subs. (old). 
A fussy old man. [Cf., collo- 
quial sense of FOGEY.] 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the V-ulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1793. BUTT, Poems. We teach old 
maxims, neither less n<~>r more, Than Locke, 
or humble Hooker taught before, Those 
FOGRUMS, quizzes, treats, and bores, and 
gigs. Were held in some account with an- 
cient prigs. 

1798. O'KEEFE, Fontambleau, II., 
3. Never mind, old FOGRUM, run away 
with me. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, s.v. 

Adj. (old). Fogeyish ; stupid. 

1777. FOOTE. -Trip to Calais, i, 
Father and mother <ire but a couple of 
FOGRUM old fools. 



Hence FOGRAMITY = ( i ) 
FOGEYISM (q.v.}, and (2) the 
state of FOGEYISH NESS. 

1796. D'ARBLAY, Camilla, ii., 5. 
Nobody's civil now, you know, it is a FO- 
GRAMITY quite out of date. 

FOGUE, adj. (American thieves') 
Fierce ; fiery. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogues Lexicon, s.v. 

FOGUS, .m/v. (old). Tobacco. \_Cf. y 
FOGUS.] For synonyms, see 
WEED. 

1671. HEAD, English Rogue, I., v., 
p. 49 (1874), s.v. 1724. COLES, English 
Diet., s.v. 1785. GROSE, Diet, cf the 
Vulg. Tongue. Tip me a gage of FOGUS. 

1821. HAGGAKT, Life, p. 133. A 
hole in the roof of my cell, through which 
I handed her plenty of FOGUS. 

1834. H. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, 
bk. III., ch. v. Troll us a stave, my an- 
tediluvian file, and in the meantime tip me 
a gage [pipe] of FOGUS, Jerry. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, s.v. 

FOILER, subs, (old). A thief. 

1669. Nicker Nicked, in Harl. 
Misc. [ed. Park], ii., 108. Given in list of 
names of thieves. 

Foi N , verb, (obsolete). To copulate, 
i.e., to thrust, TO POKE (q.v.). 
Also subs. 

1598. F LOR 10, A Worlde of IVordes. 
Scazzata : A thrust, a push, a FOYNE, 
or the serving to a woman of a man's 
pricke. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV., 
ii., 4. Thou whoreson little tidy Bartholo- 
mew boar pig, when wilt thou leave fight- 
ing o'days, and FOINING o'nights, and 
begin to patch up thine old body for 
heaven ? 

FOIST, FOYST, or FYST, subs. (old). 
I. A cheat ; a swindler ; a 
sharper. 

1592. JOHN DAY, Blind Beggar 
(Bullen), p. 21. Your nipper, your FOYST, 
your rogue, your cheat. 



Foist. 



Follower. 



1596. BEN JONSON Every Man in 
His Humour iv. , 7. Prate again, as you 
like this, you whoreson FOIST you. 

1607. DEKKER, Jests to Make you 
Merie in wks. (Grosart) II., 326. Now to 
our FOYSTS, alias pickpocket, alias cut- 
purse. 

1609. DEKKER, Lanthorne and 
Candelight, in wks. (Grosart) III., 212. 
A FOYST nor a Nip shall not walke into a 
Fayre or a Play-house. 

1611. MIDDI.ETON, Roaring Girl, 
O. PI., vi., 113. This brave fellow is no 
better than a FOIST. FOIST ! what is 
that ? A diver with two fingers ; a pick- 
pocket ; all his train study the figging law, 
that's to say cutting of purses and 

FOISTING. 

2. (old). A trick; a swindle ; 
an imposture. Also FOYSTER 
and FOISTER. 

1605. BEN JONSON, Volpone or the 
Fox, iii., 9. Put not your FOISTS upon 
me. I shall scent 'em. 



3. (old). A silent emission of 
wind through the anus (see quot., 
sense 2) ; a CHEESER. See FART 
and FOUSTY. [Coles has to fyst, 
vissio ; which in his Latin part 
he renders to fizzle. Also 
FYSTING CUR ; and in Sherwood's 
English Dictionary, subjoined to 
Cotgrave, FYSTING CURS, and 
other offenders of the same class, 
are fully illustrated. ] 

1598. FLORIO, A WorldeofWordes. 
Loffa, a fizle, a FISTE, a close fart. 

1605. JONSON, Eastward Hoe, pi. iv., 
270. Marry, FYST o 1 your Ruidess. I 
thought as much. 

1662. Rump Songs, II., 3. That a 
reason be enacted (if there be not one), 
Why a fart hath a voice, and a FYST hath 
none, Which nobody can deny. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FOYST . . . also a close strong 
stink, without noise or report. 

1785. GROSE. Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. FICE or FOYSE. 



Verb, (old). I. To trick ; to 
swindle ; to pick pockets. 

1607. DEKKER, Jests to Make You 
Merie, in wks. (Grosart) II., 332. But now 
to the manner of the FOYSTING of a pocket, 
the sharing of the money, and how honest 
men may avoide them. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Rept., 1874). To FOYST, 
to picke a pocket. 

1653. MIDDLETON, Spanish Gipsy* 
ii., i. I mean filching, FOISTING, 
nimming. 

2. (old). To fart. Also to 
copulate (URQUHART). 

1539. DAVID LYNDSAY, Thrie 
Estaitis (Works, Laing, 1879), ii., 109. 
Ane FISTAND flag. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
L off are, s.v. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionnarie, 
Vessir, s.v. 

FOISTER, or FOYSTER, subs. (old). 
A pick-pocket ; a cheat. 

1598. FLORIO, A WorldeofWordes. 
Barattiere, a barterer, a trucker, a marter, 
an exchanger, a briber, a cheater, a false 
gamester, a cousener, a broker, a fripper, a 
chaffrer, a cogger, a FOYSTER, a deceiuer, 
a coni-catcher, a bareter, a prowler. 

(?). Mirrour for Magistrates, p. 483, 
When facing FOISTERS, fit for Tiburn. 
fraies, Are food-sick faint. 

FOLLOWER, subs, (colloquial). A 
maid - servant's sweetheart ; a 
beau. For synonyms, see JOMER. 

1838. DICKENS, Nicholas Nicklebv, 
ch. xv. Five servants kept. No man. No 

FOLLOWERS. 

1860. Chambers Journal, XIII., p. 
32. No FOLLOWERS allowed. 

1870. Spectator, 15 Jan. It is safe-, 
unkind as it may seem, to forbid the 
presence of a ' FOLLOWER ' in the house. 
A girl is less likely to get into mischief 
when she is walking with her friend in the 
street or talking with him over the area 
gate, than when she receives him alone in 
the kitchen. 

1872 The Ladies, 29 June, p. 335. 
If you take into consideration that ' FOL- 
LOWERS ' are in most houses strictly for- 



Follow -me-lads. 



Fool-monger. 



bidden, what wonder is it that girls are now 
and then caught flirting with the butcher 
and the baker at the area railings ? 

FOLLOW - ME - LADS, subs. phr. 
(common). Curls or ribands 
hanging over the shoulder ; cf. y 
Fr., suivez - moi-jeune-homme = 
ribbons flying behind a lady's 
dress. Also FOLLOWERS. 

1872. Spectator. ' FQLLOW-ME-LADS* 
are not in themselves very pretty, though, 
like any other fashion, they become the 
Princess, and they are exceedingly costly. 

FOLLOW ON, sufa. phr. and verb 
(cricket). A team eighty runs 
behind the other in the first 
innings is obliged to FOLLOW 
ON; i.e., to take to the wickets 
a second time. A run more, 
and it SAVFS THE FOLLOW ON. 

1891. Pall Mall Gazette^ 5 Aug. 
'Notts, v. Surrey.' The game, with a 
possible prospect of the FOLLOW-ON, being 
saved. 

FOLLOW YOUR NOSE I intj. phr. 
(streets'). A retort on asking 
the way. The full phrase is, 
' Follow your nose, and you are 
sttre to go straight.' 
1620. PERCY, Folio MSS., p. 462. 

He went to the sea syde, and FFOLLOWED 

HIS NOSE. 

1854. Notes and Queries, x., p. 66. 

In what collection of tales published in 1834 

shall I find the tale entitled FOLLOW YOUR 



FOO-FOO, suds. (American). A 
person of no account ; an insig- 
nificant idiot ; a POOP^.Z'.). 
1837. A Glance at New York (in 

Bartlett). Don't know what a FOO-FOO is? 

Well, as you're a greenhorn, I'll enlighten 

you. A FOO-FOO, or an outsider, is a chap 

that can't come the big figure. 

FOOL, subs, (colloquial.) A dish of 
gooseberries, boiled with sugar 
and milk. [Fr., groseilles en 
foule.] Also, a GULL (q.v.). 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., III., 9. 
4 Praise of the Dairy Maid.' A lady, I 



heard tell, Not far off did dwell, Made her 
husband a FOOL, and it pleased him quite 
well. 

1774. GOLDSMITH, Retaliation. 
And by the same rule, Magnanimous 
Goldsmith's a gooseberry FOOL. 

No FOOL, subs. phr. (Ameri- 
can colloquial). A phrase lauda- 
tory, applied to neuter nouns, 
Cf., No SLOUCH. 

1848. JONES, Sketches of Travel, p. 
33. I tell you what, Charlston ain't no 
FOOL of a city, 

TO MAKE A FOOL OF, verb, phr. 
(colloquial). To delude. Spe- 
cifically (venery), to cuckold, or 
to seduce under promise of mar- 
riage. 

TO FOOL ABOUT (or AROUND), 
verb. phr. (American). To 
dawdle ; to trifle with ; to be 
infatuated with ; to hang about ; 
to defraud. 
1837. A Glance at New York. Mose 

Now look a-here, Liz, I go in for Bill 

Sykes, cause he runs wid our machine ; 

but he musn't come FOOLIN' ROUND my 

gal, or I'll give him fits. 

1884. H AWLEY SMART, Post to- Finish, 

ch. xvii. From wh;at I hear, you came to 

Riddleton, FOOLING after my daughter. 

Now, I'll have no caterwauling of that 

sort. 

1891. GUNTE.R, Miss Nobody of No- 
where, p. 124. I should th,ink you had too 
much ed-u-cash to FOOL ABOUT such a 
going on. 

FOOL- FINDER, suds, (obsolete). A 
bum-bailiff. GROSE. 

FOOLISH, adj. (prostitutes') Said 
of a man that pays. ' Is he 
FLASH (q.V.} or FOOLISH = Is he 

the cully or the other.' GROSE. 

FOOL-MONGER, subs, (colloquial). 
A person, male or female, living 
by their wits, e.g., a PROMOTER 
(q.v.) ; a betting - man ; a 
swindler. Also FOOL-CATCHER 
and FOOL- TRAP (.v.). 



Foolometer. 



S3 



Foot. 



FOOLOMETER, subs, (colloquial). 
A standard, positive or neuter, 
whereby to gauge the public taste. 

FOOL'S FATHER, subs. phr. 
(theatrical). The pantaloon or 
OLD 'UN. (q.v.) 

FOOL-STICKER, subs. phr. (venery). 
The penis. For synonyms, see 
CREAMSTICK and PRICK. Also 
FOOL-MAKER. 

FOOL'S WEDDING, subs. phr. (com- 
mon). A party of women. For 
synonyms, see HEN PARTY. 

FOOL-TRAP, subs, (colloquial). I. 

A FOOL-MONGER (q.V.). 

2* (venery). The female pu- 
dendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 



3. (colloquial), A high-class 
harlot. 

FOONT^M^. (thieves') Asovereign 
[Probably a corruption of Ger, 
Pfund.] For synonyms, see 
CANARY, 

1879. J. W. HORSLEY, in Macnt. Mag., 
XL., 502. The mob got me up a break 
(collection,), and I got between five or six 
FOONT (sovereigns). 

FOOT, verb, (common). i. To 
acknowledge payment ; e.g., TO 

FOOT A BILL ; cf., FOOT-UP. 

1848. DURIVAGE, Stray Subjects, 
p. 183. If our plan succeeded the land- 
lord was to FOOT the bill, and stand treat. 

2. (football and colloquial X 
To kick; to HOOF (^.t/.). Cf., 
Merchant of Venue, I., 3, You, 
that did void your rheum upon 
my beard, And FOOT me, as you 
spurn a stranger cur. 

1852. BRISTED, Upper TenThottsand, 
p. 223. Both teams were FOOTING their 
very best. 



To FOOT IT, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To walk. For synonyms, 
see PAD THE HOOF. 

1892, PRICE, From Arctic Ocean to 
Yellow Sea. The discomfort of having to 
FOOT IT. 

ToFOOT-UP,ew./>fcr. (Ameri- 
can colloquial). To sum up the 
total (of a bill); to TOT UP (q.v.). 
Hence, to pay ; to discharge one's 
obligations; to RECKON UP (q.v.); 
to summarize both merits and 
defects, and strike a balance. 
FOOTING- UP = the reckoning, the 
sum total. Fr., gomberger. 

1865. SALA, A Trip to Barbary. 
The Arab abhors statistics. He won't be 
tabulated if he could help it, and were you 
to go to Algeria, Doctor Colenso, you 
would find a deeply rooted objection 
among the people to the reckoning, or 
FOOTING-UP, as the Americans call it, of 
anything animate or inanimate. 

1871. DE VERB Americanisms, p. 
310. To FOOT A BILL, by paying the 
amount at the bottom of the account, is a 
phrase equally well known abroad and 
with us. 

1882. McCABE, New York, XXI., 
333. The transactions of * the Street ' FOOT 
UP an almost fabulous sum daily. 

1884 G. A. S[ALA], in ///. Lon. News, 
29 March, p. 294, col. 3. They FOOT UP 
(American English) to an almost alarming 
amount in thousands of dollars. 

To PUT ONE'S BEST FOOT (or 
LEG) FOREMOST, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To use all possible des- 
patch ; to exert oneself to the 
utmost. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, King John, iv., 
2. Nay, but make haste ; the BETTER 

FOOT BEFORE. 

To PUT ONE'S FOOT INTO ANY- 
THING, verb. phr. (colloquial). 
To make a mess of it ; to get into 
a scrape. THE BISHOP (i.e., the 

Devil) HAS PUT HIS FOOT IN IT 
(Old English proverb) is said of 
burned porridge or over-roasted 
meat. GROSE, Fr., faire unt 
gaffe. 
J823, BEE, Diet, of the Turf, s.v. 



Footer. 



54 



Footlicker. 



1888. Daily Telegraph, 7 May. Faire 
une gaffe, in modern Parisian slang, may 
be best rendered as to PUT YOUR FOOT IN 
IT. 

TO HAVE ONE FOOT (or LEG) 

IN THE GRAVE, verb, phr. (com- 
mon). On one's last legs ; 

MEASURED FOR A FUNERAL 

SERMON. Also as adj. 
1825. English Spy, i., pp. 199-200. 

With ONE LEG IN THE GRAVE he'll 

laugh. 

1890. Globe, 15 May, p. 5, col. 2. 
ONE-FOOT-IN-THE-GRAVE paralytic sort of 
people. 

To PULL FOOT, verb. phr. 
(American). To make haste. 
Variants are TO TAKE ONE'S FOOT 
IN ONE'S HAND, and TO MAKE 
TRACKS ; but for synonyms, see 
ABSQUATULATE and SKEDADDLE. 

1825. NEAL, Brother Jonathan, Bk. 
I., ch. iv., How they PULLED FOOT when 
they seed us commin. 

1836. MICHAEL SCOTT. Tom 
Cringle's Log, ch. viii. ' Why, PULL FOOT, 
captain,' promptly replied Paul. 

1843-4. HALIBURTON, .Sam Slick in 
England. I look'd up ; it was another 
shower, by gosh. I PULLS FOOT for dear 
life. 

To TAKE MR. FOOT'S HORSE, 
verb. phr. (old). To walk ; to 
GO BY SHANK'S MARE (q.v.) 
For synonyms, see PAD THE 
HOOF. 

TO KNOW THE LENGTH OF 
ONE'S FOOT, verb. phr. (old). 
To be well acquainted with one's 
character. 

1581. LILLY, Euphues, etc. But 
you shall not know the LENGTH OF MY 
FOOT, untill by your cunning you get 
commendation. 

1614. Terence in English. He 
measures an other MAN'S FOOTE BY HIS 
OWNE I.ASI. Hee considers an other 
mans meaning by his owne intent. 

FOOTER, subs. (Harrow : once 
common). i. Short for Moot- 
ball.' 



2. (University). A player of 
football according to Rugby rules. 

FOOT- HOT, adv. (Old English). In 
hot haste ; HOT- FOOT (q.v.) 

1848. Burton Waggeries, etc., p. 65. 
I'm darned if I don't streak it to the Squire's 

FOOT-HOT. 

FOOTING, subs, (common). Money 
paid on entering upon new duties, 
or on being received into a work- 
shop or society : as at sea when a 
comrade first goes aloft. Form- 
erly FOOT- ALE : cf., GARNISH. 
Fr., arroser ses galons to 
christen one's uniform. 

1777. HOWARD, State of Prisons in 
England and Wales, quoted in J. ASHTON'S 
The Fleet, p. 295. A cruel custom obtains 
in most of our Gaols, which is that of the 
prisoners demanding of a new comer 
garnish, FOOTING, or (as it is called in 
some London Gaols) chummage. 

1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
I., 48; I must instantly pay down two 
shillings for my FOOTING. 

1788. G. A. STEVENS, Adv. of a 
Speculist, i., 211. I was drove from street 
to street by women of my own profession, 
who swore I should not come in their 
beats until I had paid my FOOTING. 

1830. CARLETON, Collegian's Colleen 
Bawn, 94. ' Pay your FOOTING now, 
Master Kyrle Daly, before you go farther,' 
said one. 

1841). HALiBURTONi Clockmaker, 3 
S., ch. iii. ' Waiter, half-a-dozen of iced 
champagne here, to pay for Mr. Slick's 
FOOTIN'.' 

1891. CLARK RUSSELL; An Ocean 
Tragedy, p; 86; I was going aloft and 
wished to PAY MY FOOTING. 

FOOTLE, verb., and FOOTLING, 

adj. ( colloquial ). To dawdle, 
trifle, potter ; dawdling, trifling, 
pottering; MESSING ABOUT (q.v. ). 

FOOTLICKER, stibs. (old). A ser- 
vant : a lickspittle. 

1609. SHAKSPEARE, The Tempest, 
IV., i. D,o that good mischief which may 
make this island Thine for ever, and 1^ thy 
Caliban^ For aye thy FbbT-LiCKER. 



Footlights. 



55 



Fop's Alley. 



FOOTLIGHTS. To SMELL THE 
FOOTLIGHTS, verb. phr. (theatri- 
cal). To acquire a taste for 
theatricals. [Footlights = the 
FLOAT (q.v.) ; the row of burners 
in front of the stage. ] 

TO SMELL OF THE FOOTLIGHTS. 
To carry theatrical concerns and 
phraseology into private life ; to 
TALK SHOP (q.V.). 

FOOTMAN'S INN, subs. phr. (old). 
A poor lodging ; a jail. Fr., Hdtel 
de la modestie = the Poor Man's 
Arms. 

1 608. Pennies Parliament of Threed- 
bare Poets. Those that depend on destiny, 
and not on God, may chance look through 
a narrow lattice at FOOTMAN'S INN. 

1612. ROWLAND, Knave of Hearts. 
Which at the heeles so hants his frighted 
ghost, That he at last in FOOTMAN'S-INNE 
must host, Some castle dolorous "compos'd 
of stone, Like (let me see) Newgate is 
such a one. 

FOOTMAN'S MAUND, subs. phr. 
(old). An artificial sore, as from 
a horse's bite or kick. The FOX'S 
BITE of schoolboys. Also the 
SCALDRUM DODGE, or MAUND 
(q.v.). MAUND = a cadger's sale- 
basket. Cf., MASONS' MAUND. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew, s.v. An artificial sore made with 
unslacked lime, soap, and the rust of old 
iron, on the back of a beggar's hand, as if 
hurt by the bite or kick of a horse. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulg. 
Tongue ; s.v. 

FOOT - RIDING, suds, (cyclists'). 
Walking and wheeling one's 
machine instead of riding it. 

1887. T. STEVENS, Round the World 
on a Bicycle. Already I realise that there 
is going to be as much FOOT-RIDING as 
anything for the first part of my journey. 

FOOT-SCAMP, subs, (old). A foot- 
pad. G. PARKER. 



FOOTSTOOL. See ANGELS' FOOT- 
STOOL. 

FOOT-WOBBLER, subs, (old, 
soldier's'). An infantryman. For 
synonyms, see MUDCRUSHER. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, oj the Vulg. 
Tongue, s.v. 

FOOTY, adj. (old). Contemptible ; 
worthless. Fr., foutu. GROSE. 

1836. MICHAEL SCOTT, Tom Cringle 's 
Log, ch. v. My eye, Captain, no use to 
dodge from her ; it is only dat FOOTY little 
King's cutter on de Jamaica station. 

FOOZLE, subs, (common and sport- 
ing). i. A boggle ; a miss. 

2. (common). A bore ; a 
fogey ; and (in America) a fool ; 
a GREEN 'UN. For synonyms, 
see BUFFLE, CABBAGE - HEAD, 
and SAMMY SOFT. 

1867. RHODA BROUGHTON, Cometh 
up as a Flower, ch. xxvi. Frumps and 
FOOZLES in Eaton Square. 

Verb, (common). To miss; to 
boggle ; to MUFF (q.v.). 

1888. Field, 25 Feb. Park FOOZLED 
his second stroke. 

FOOZLED (or FOOZLEY), adj. 
(colloquial). Blurred in appear- 
ance and effect ; fuzzy ; MUFFED 
(q.v.). Often said of badly 
painted pictures, or parts of pic- 
tures. 



FOP- DOODLE, subs. (old). An 
insignificant man ; a fool. 

1689. SHADWELL, Bury Fair. Ccrr.e 
come, you brace of FOP-DOODLE 

FOP'S ALLEY, subs. phr. (old). See 
quot. 1883. 

1782. D ARBLAY, Cecilia, bk. II., ch 
iv. Sir Robert Floyer, sauntering down 
FOP'S ALLEY. 



Forakers. 



Forefoot. 



1883. SALA, Echoes of the Year, p. 
369. FOP'S ALLEY was the gangway run- 
ning parallel to the footlights, between the 
last row of the stalls and the first row of 
the pit in Her Majesty's Theatre, and in 
its palmiest days it was always graced by 
the presence of a subaltern of the Guards 
in full uniform, daintily swinging his bear- 
skin. 

FORAKERS, subs. (Winchester 
College). The water - closet. 
[Formerly spelt foricus and 
probably a corruption of/ori/as, 
an English plural cf the Latin 
forica.] For synonyms, see MRS. 
JONES. 

FORAMINATE, verb (venery). To 
copulate. For synonyms, see 
GREENS and RIDE. 

FORCE, subs, (colloquial). The 
police ; properly a body of men 
trained for action. For synonyms, 
see BEAK and COPPER. 

1868. BR ADDON. Trail of the Serpent. 
bk. IV., ch. vi. 'I should like to ... 
bring a child up from the very cradle to 
the police detective line, to see whether I 
couldn't make that 'ere child a ornament 
to the FORCE.' 

1883. Daily Telegraph^ 5 April, p. 2, 
col. i. But in all my experience of THE 
FORCE, I think I never saw a policeman's 
eyes so expressive of gratitude. 

TO FORCE THE VOUCHER, verb. 

phr. (turf). It is customary for 
sporting tricksters to advertise 
selections and enclose vouchers 
(similar to those sent out by respect- 
able commission agents) for double 
or treble the current odds. The 
correspondent is informed that, in 
consequence of early investments, 
the extra odds can be laid ; 
a remittance is requested; the 
VOUCHER is FORCED; and then 
the firm 'dries up,' and changes 
its name and address. 

FORCEMEAT BALL, subs. phr. (old). 
Something endured from com- 
pulsion : as (i) a rape: (2) 
going to prison ; (3) transporta- 



tion ; (4) an affiliation order ; (5) 
abstention (from drink, pleasure, 
etc.) through impecuniosity. 

FORCEPS, subs. (old). The hands. 
[Properly a pair of surgeon's 
pincers.] For synonyms, see 
DADDLE. 

FORE-AND-AFT, verb, (venery). 
To copulate. See GREENS and 
RIDE. 

FORE-AND-AFTER, subs. phr. (Ame- 
rican). i. See quot. 

1840. HALIBURTON, Clockmaker, 3 
S., ch. xi. ' The way she walks her 
chalks ain't no matter. She is a regular 

FORE-AND-AFTER.' 

2. (venery). A DOUBLE-BAR- 
RELLED (q.v.) harlot. [As in the 
song attributed to an eminent 
living man of letters : " Sing 
whore, sing whore, Behind and 
before, Her price is a shilling 
She never gets more."] 

FORE- BUTTOCKS, subs. (old). The 

paps. For synonyms, see DAIRY. 

a. 1745. SWIFT, POPE, and 

ARBUTHNOT, Misc. iv., 222. Now her 

FORE-BUTTOCKS to the navel bare. 

FORECASTER, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For synonyms, 
see MONOSYLLABLE. 

FORE-COACH-WHEEL, subs, (com- 
mon). A half-crown. For 
synonyms, see CAROON. 

FORE-COURT, subs, phr, (venery). 
The female pudendum. Also 
FORE - HATCH, FORE - CASTLE, 
and FORE-ROOM. For synonyms, 
see MONOSYLLABLE. 

FOREFOOT, subs. (old). The hand. 

1599. SHAKSPEARE, Henry V. t II., i. 
Give me thy fist ; thy FOREFOOT to me 
give. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue. 



Foregather. 



57 



Fork. 



FOREGATHER, verb. (old). To 
share the sexual embrace. For 
synonyms, see RIDE. 

FORE HATCH, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For synonyms, 
see MONOSYLLABLE.. Also FORE- 
CASTLE. 

FOREMAN, subs. (old). i. The 
penis. For synonyms, see 
CREAMSTICK and PRICK. [C/., 
FOREWOMAN.] 

1647. Ladies Parliament (q.v.). 

FOREMAN OF THE JURY, subs, phr* 
(old). A babbler ; one with the 

GIFT OF THE GAB (q.V.). 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FOREMAN OF THE JURY, he that 
engrosses all the talk to himself. 

1785. GROSE, Diet* of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

FORESKIN HUNTER, subs. phr. (ve- 
nery). A harlot. For synonyms, 
see BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

FOREST, subs, (venery). The fe- 
male pubic hair. For synonyms, 
see FLEECE. 

1573-1631. DONNE, Elegies, xviii. 
Yet ere thou be where thou would'st be 
embayed, Thou must upon another FOREST 
set, Where many shipwreck and no further 
get 

1720. DURFEY, Pills, etc., vu, 146. 
Give me the Country lass, That trips it 
o'er the field, And opes her FOREST to 
the first. 

FORE-STALL, subs, (thieves'). In 
garotting, a look-out in front of 
of the operator, or UGLY-MAN 
(q.v.) ; the watch behind is the 

BACK-STALL (q.V. ). [From FORE 
+ STALL (q.V.).} 

FOREWOMAN, subs. (old). The 
female pudendum. For syno- 
MONOSYLLABLE. 



FORK, subs. (old). I. A pick- 
pocket. Fr., ' Avoir les mains 
crochues \Q be a light-fingered 
or lime-fingered filcher ; every 
finger of his hand as good as a 
lime-twig. ' COTGRAVE. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue. 

2. (thieves'). A finger. The 
FORKS = the fore and middle 
fingers ; also cf., (proverbial) 
' Fingers were made before FORKS.' 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. 
Claws ; cunt - hooks ( Grose ) ; 
daddies (also the hands) ; divers ; 
feelers; fives; flappers; grapplers; 
grappling irons ; gropers ; hooks ; 
nail-bearers ; pickers and stealers 
(Shakspeare) ; corn-stealers ; Ten 
Commandments ; ticklers ; pink- 
ies ; muck-forks. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Les 
apdtres (thieves' : = the ten 
Apostles) ; les fourchettes, or 
les fourchettes d'Adam (popular : = 
Adam's forks) ; le peigne 
d'allemand (thieves': RABELAIS). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Ezba 
( = the finger, especially the first 
or fore-finger. The names of the 
others are: Godel=\he. thumb; 
Ammo = the middle - finger ; 
Kemizo = the ring-finger ; Seres, 
i.e., ' span ' the little finger) ; 
Griffl'ng ( = also the hand. From 
gretfen = tQ seize). 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. 
Mandamiento( = acommandment: 
ff., TEN COMMANDMENTS) ; 
tijeras ( = the fore- and middle 
fingers; MlNSHEU (1599) Diction- 
arie, tijeras = ' small sheares, 
seizers, snuffers.'). 



Fork. 



Fork. 



PORTUGUESE SYNONYM. 
Medunhos. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 121. My 
FORKS were equally long, and they never 
failed me. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood. ' Nix 
my Dolly.' No dummy hunter had 
FORKS so fly. Ibid. Jack S^heppard 
(1889), p. 20. I'll give him the edication of 
a prig teach him the use of his FORKS be- 
times. 

1841. Taifs Edinburgh Mag., VIII., 
p. 220. My FORKS were light and fly, and 
lightly faked away. 

1891. Licensed Victuallers Gazette, 
9 Feb. Up they came briskly with smiling 
mugs, shook hands, then stepped back a 
pace or two, put up their FORKS, and the 
spectators were hushed into silence, for 
they saw that the battle was about to 
begin. 

3. In plural (common). 
The hands. 

4. (old). A gibbet; in the 
plural = the gallows. [FORK is 
often applied to anything re- 
sembling a divarication (as of a 
tree, river, or road), etc. : C/., 
sense 2. C/., Cicero (de Div.) 
i., 26). Ferens fur cam ductus 
est: a slave so punished was 
called furcifer.~\ 

5. (old). A spendthrift. 
1725, New Canting Diet., s.v. 

6. (tailors' and venery). The 
CRUTCH (q.V. ), NOCKANDRO^.Z'.), 

or TWIST (q.v.). [Thus, A BIT 
ON A FORK = the female puden- 
dum; a GRIND (g.v.}.] Fr., 
* Fourcheure, that part of the 
bodie from whence the thighs 
depart. ' COTGRAVE. 

Verb (old). I. To steal ; spe- 
cifically to pick a pocket by in- 
serting the middle and fore- 
finger. Also TO PUT ONE'S 
FORKS DOWN : Fr., vol a la four- 
chette. 



1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. LET'S FORK HIM, c. Let us pick 
that man's pocket, the newest and most 
dextrous way ; it is to thrust the fingers 
straight, stiff, open, and very quick into the 
pocket, and so closing them hook what can 
be held between them. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue. Let us FORK him. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. 
xvi. Yet so keen was his appetite for the 
sport, that the veteran appropriator abso- 
lutely burst into tears at not having 
' FORKED more." 

1878. C. HINDLEY, Life and Times 
of James Catnach. Frisk the Cly and 
FORK the Rag, Draw the fogies plummy. 

2. (venery). To open up, or 

SPREAD (q.V.). 

TO FORK OUT, or OVER (some- 
times abbreviated to FORK). Verb, 
phr. (common). To hand over; 
to pay ; TO SHELL OUT (q.v.). 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. 
xxxi. The person FORKS him OUT ten 
shiners. 

1836. DICKENS, Sketches by Boz, 
p. 84. His active mind at once perceived 
how much might be done in the way of . . . 
shoving the old and helpless into the wrong 
buss, and carrying them off ... till they was 
rig'larly done over, and FORKED OUT the 
stumpy. 

1837. BARHAM, I. L., The Execution. 
He Pulls up at the door of a gin-shop, and 
gaily Cries, ' What must I FORK OUT to 
night, my trump, For the whole first-floor 
of the Magpie and Stump ? ' 

1840. Comic A Imanack. ' Tom the 
Devil,' p. 214. ' That's a nate way of 
doin' business, sure enough,' was the com- 
mentary ; ' ounly I can't larn the sinse of 
going to a private lodging, where, if you 
ordher a kidney for breakfast, you're ex- 
pected to FORK OUT to the butcher. 

1852. H. B. STOWE, Uncle Toms 
Cabin, ch. viii. You've got to FORK OVER 
fifty dollars, flat down, or this child don't 
start a peg. 

1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend, 
Bk. III., ch. i. 'Now,' said Fledgeby, 
' FORK OUT your balance in hand, and prove 
by figures how you make it out that it ain't 
more.' 



Forker. 



59 



form. 



1867. _ Albany Argus, 5 Sept. Now, 
sir, you will please FORK OVER that money 
to me, and pay your bill, or I'll have the 
law out of you, as sure as you are born. 

1887. Lippincotfs Magazine, Aug., 
p. 10.9. Just calculate my percentage of 
our liabilities, and allow me to FORK OVER. 

1888. Detroit Free Press, 9 Sept. 
The dozen screw-drivers came up C. O. D. 
and he had to FORK OVER for them. 

To FORK ON, verb.phr. (Ameri- 
can). To appropriate. Cf., To 

FREEZE ON TO. 

To PITCH THE FORK, verb. phr. 
(popular). To tell a pitiful tale. 

TO EAT VINEGAR WITH A 

FORK, verb. phr. (common). A 
person either over-shrewd or over- 
snappish is said to have EATEN 

VINEGAR WITH A FORK. Fr., 

Avoir mange de Fo settle. See 
NETTLE. 

FORKER, subs, (nautical). A dock- 
yard thief or FENCE (q.v.). [From 
FORK = to steal + ER. ] 

FORKING, subs, (thieves'). i. 
Thieving. See FORK. 

2. (tailors'). Hurrying and 

SCAMPING (q.V.}. 

Fo RKL ESS, adj. (thieves'). Clumsy; 
unworkmanlike; as without FORKS 



snibs, accompanying a lushy cove, and 
going to work in a very FORKLESS manner 

FORLOPER, subs. (South African). 
A teamster guide. 

FORLORN HOPE, subs. phr. (collo- 
quial). A gamester's last stake. 
GROSE. 

FORM, subs, (turf.) i. Condition ; 
training ; fitness for a contest. 



IN or OUT OF FORM = in or out of 

condition, i.e., fit or unfit for 

work. BETTER or TOP FORM, 

etc. (in comparison). Cf., COLOUR. 

1861. WALSH, The Horse, ch. vi. 

If it be supposed that two three-year-olds, 

carrying the same weight ; could run a 

mile and a-half, and come in abreast, it is 

said that the FORM of one is equal to that 

of the other. 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, Post to 
Finish, ch. xxxv. When fillies, in racing 
parlance, lose their FORM at three years 
old, they are apt to never recover it. 

1868. WHYTK MELVILLE, White 
Rose, ch. xxxiv. That mysterious pro- 
perty racing men call ' FORM ' 

2. (colloquial). Behaviour 
(with a moral significance : as 
GOOD FORM, BAD FORM = agreeable 
to good manners, breeding, prin- 
ciples, taste, etc., or the opposite). 
This usage, popularised in racing 
circles, is good literary English, 
though the word is commonly 
printedinin verted com mas (" ") : 
SHAKSPEARE (Tu-o Gentlemen of 
Verona , 4), says, ' Can no way 
change you to a milder FORM,' 
i.e., manner of behaviour. 

1871. Orchestra, 13 Jan. This 
squabble at the Globe may most fitly, per- 
haps, be characterised by the words ' BAD 
FORM.' 

1871. The Drawing Room Gazette, 
Dec. 9, p. 5. It is an open question, 
whether snubbing be not, like cutting, in 
the worst possible 'FORM.' 

1873. Belgravia, Feb. The de- 
meanour and conduct which the 'golden 
youth ' of the period call ' GOOD FORM ' was 
known to their fathers as bad manners. 

1881. JAS. PAYN, Grape from a 
Thorn, ch. xvii. It would be considered 
what they call ' BAD FORM ' in my daughter 
Ella if she were known to be a contributor 
for pay to the columns of a magazine. 

1890. Speaker, 22 Feb , p. 211, col 2 
Still, after all, we doubt very much 
whether it be fair, or right, or even prudent 
it certainly is not 'GOOD FORM' to 
publish to a world of Gallios a lot of 
irreverent bar-mess and circuit 'good 
stories,' worked up about living Lord 
Chancellors, Lord Justices, and other 
present occupants of the judicial bench. 



Forney. 



60 



Forty-foot. 



3. (common). Habit; GAME 
(q.v.) : e.g., 'That's my FORM = 
That's what I'm in the way of 
doing ' ; or ' That's the sort of 
man I am.' 

1884. Punch, n Oct. ' Arry at a 
Political Picnic.' Athletics ain't hardly 
my FORM. 

FORNEY, subs (thieves'). A ring ; 
a variant of FAWNEY (q.v.). 

1871. EGAN, Finish of Tom and 
Jerry, p. 243. He sports a diamond 
FORNEY on his little finger. 

FORNICATING-ENGINE (-MEMBER; 
-TOOL), subs* phr. (venery). The 
penis. For synonyms, see CREAM- 
STICK and PRICK. 

FoRNICATOR,jfo. (venery). T. The 
penis. For synomyns, see CREAM- 
STICK and PRICK. 

2. In//, (obsolete), The old- 
fashioned flap trousers. 

FORNICATOR'S HALL, subs. phr. 
(venery). The i&a\&\& pudendum. 
For synonyms, see MONOSYL- 
LABLE, 

FORT, subs, (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

1620. PERCY, Folio MSS. [Hales & 
Furnivall, 1867 ]. ' Come, Wanton 
Wenches.' When they your FFORT 
beleauger; grant but a touch or a kisse 
ffor a tast. 

FORTUNE-BITER, subs, (obsolete). 
A sharper. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., ii. 'Hey! 
for Richmond Ball ' ! FORTUNE-BITERS, 
Hags, bum-fighters, Nymphs of the 
Woods, And stale City goods. 

FORTUNE-TELLER, subs. (old). A 
magistrate* 

1690. B E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FORTUNE-TELLERS, c. the Judges 
of Life and Death, so-called by the Canting 
Crew. 



1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulg. 
Tongue. FORTUNE-TELLER, or cunning 
man ; a judge who tells every prisoner his 
fortune, lot, or doom ; to go before the 
FORTUNE-TELLER, lambskin man or con- 
juror, to be tried at an assize. 

1871. EGAN, Finish of Tom and 
Jerry, p. 242. He had been werry cruelly 
used by the FORTUNE-TELLERS. 

FORTY. To TALK FORTY (more 
commonly NINETEEN) TO THE 
DOZEN, verb. phr. (colloquial). 
To chatter incessantly ; to gabble. 

TO WALK OFF FORTY TO THE 

DOZEN = to decamp in quick time. 

1891. FARJEON, Mystery of M, Felix, 
p. 107. He run agin me, he did, and I 
used, ' Who are yer pushing of? ' He 
didn't say nothink, but walked off FORTY 

TO THE DOZEN. 

ROARING FORTIES, subs. phr. 
(nautical). The Atlantic between 
the fortieth and fiftieth degrees of 
latitude ; also applied to the same 
region in southern latitudes. 

FORTY- FACED, adj. (colloquial). 
An arrant deceiver : e.g.. a 

FORTY-FACED liar, a FORTY- 
FACED flirt, and so forth. 

FORTY- FIVE, subs. (American). 
A revolver. For synonyms, see 
MEAT IN THE POT. 



FORTY-FOOT or FORTY-GUTS, subs. 
(common)* A fat, dumpy man, 
or woman. In contempt. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. 'All 
arse, and no body ' ; arse-and- 
corporation; all-belly (Cotgrave) ; 
all guts (idem); bacon - belly; 
barrel-belly; belly-god; bladder- 
figured ; bosse - belly ; Bosse of 
Billingsgate(Florio = a fat woman) ; 
chuff (Shakspeare) ; Christmas 
beef ; double-guts ; double-tripe ; 
fat-cock ; fat-guts (Shakspeare 
and Cotgrave) ; fatico ; fattymus or 



Forty-jawed. 



61 



Fossick. 



fattyma ; fubsy ; fat Jack of 
the bonehouse ; fat-lips ; flan- 
derkin ; fustiluggs ( Burton ) ; 
fussock ; gorbelly ; grampus ; 
gotch-guts ; grand-guts (Florio) ; 
gulche ( Florio ) ; gullyguts ; 
gundigutts ; guts ; guts - and - 
stomach ; guts - and - garbage ; 
guts - to - sell ; hoddy - doddy ; 
humpty-dumpty ; hogshead ; hop- 
per-arse ; Jack Weight ; loppers ; 
lummox ; paunch ; pod ; porpoise ; 
pot-guts ; princod ; pudding-belly ; 
puff-guts ; ribs ; ' short-and-thick- 
like - a - Welshman's-cock ' ; slush- 
bucket; sow (a fat woman); spud; 
squab ; studgy-guts ; tallow-guts ; 
tallow - merchant ; thick - in - the- 
middle ; tripes ; tripes and trulli- 
bubs ; tubs ; waist ; water-butt ; 
walking ninepin ; whopper. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un gros 
bajaf (popular) ; un bout de cut 
(popular); un bas de plafond, or 
de cul (popular) ; un brasset ( = a 
tall, stout man) ; un berdouillard. 

SPANISH SYNONYM. An- 
gelon de retablo (generally 
applied to a pot-bellied child). 

FORTY-gAWED, adj. (colloquial). 
Excessively talkative. 

FORTY- LUNG ED, odj< (colloquial). 
Stentorian ; given to shouting ; 
LEATHER-BUNGED (q.V.}. 

FORTY-ROD or FORTY-ROD LIGHT- 
NINO, subs. phr. (American). 
Whiskey ; specifically, spirit of 
so fiery a nature that it is cal- 
culated to kill at Forty Rods' 
distance, i.e. , on sight. Cf. , ROT- 
GUT. For synonyms, see DRINKS 
and OLD MAN'S MILK. Cf., 
FLORIO (1598), Catoblepa, 'a 
serpent in India so venomous 
that with his Ipoke he kils a man 
a mile off.' 



1884. M. TWAIN, Huck. Finn, ch. v., 
p. 36. He got powerful thirsty and dumb 
out on to the porch-roof and slid down a 
stanchion, and traded his new coat for a 

jug Of FORTY- ROD. 

FORTY-TWA,JW&y. (Scots). A com- 
mon jakes, orBOGSHOP (q.v.). in 
Edinburgh : ' so called from its 
accommodating that number of 
persons at once' (Hotten). [Long 
a thing of the past.] 

FORTY WINKS, subs. phr. (collo- 
quial). A short sleep or nap. 
See DOG'S SLEEP. 

1866. G. ELIOT, Felix Holt, ch. xliii. 
She was prevented by the appearance of 
old Mr. Transome, who since his walk had 
been having ' FORTY-WINKS' on the sofa in 
the library. 

1871. EGAN. Finish to Tom and 
Jerry, p. 87. On uncon<manly big gentle- 
men, told out, taking FORTY-WINKS. 

[Forty is often used to signify an in- 
definite number ; cf., Shakspeare's usage, 
' I could beat forty of them (01 . Hi., i) ; 
' that the slave had forty thousand 
lives' (Othello iii., i) ; 'forty thousand 
brothers' (Hamlet, v., i) ; 'The Humour 
of Forty Fancies ' ( Taming of the Shrew) ; 
and Jonson 'Some forty boxes' (Silent 
Woman).} 



FOSSED, ppl. adj. (American 
thieves'). Thrown; cf., [foss = 
a ditch]. 

FOSSICK, verb (Australian miners'). 
To work an abandoned claim, 
or to wash old dirt ; hence to 
search persistently. [Halliwell : = 
to take trouble, but cf., fosse, a 
ditch or excavation.] Also FOS- 
SICKING = a living got as afore- 
said ; FOSSICKER = a man that 
works abandoned claims ; FOS- 
SICKING ABOUT = (American) 
SHINNING AROUND, or in Eng- 
land FERRETING (q.V.\ 

1870. Notes and Queries, 4 S., vi., p. 3. 



FOIL. 



62 



Four-and-nine. 



1878. Fraser's Mag., Oct., p. 449, 
They are more suited . . . to plodding, 
FOSSICKING, persevering industry, than 
for hard work. 

1887. SALA, in ///. Lend. News, 
12 Mar., p. 282, col. 2. ' To FOSSICK ' in 
the old digging days was to get a living by 
extracting gold from the refuse wash-dirt 
which previous diggers had abandoned as 
worthless. 

1890. Illustrations, Jan., p. 158. 
After some ' FOSSIKING ' we discover three 
or four huts within 'cooee,' all diggers, 
all ' hatters,' and mostly good fellows. 



Fou, or Fow, adj. (old English and 
Scots' colloquial). Drunk ; vari- 
ants are BITCH-FOU; GREETIN'- 

FOU J PIPER - FOU J ROARING - 

FOU ; FOU AS BARTY (Burns) ; 
PISSING-FOU : and so forth. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. Also (Scots') = full 
of food or drink, as in quot. 
under date 1815. 

1697. VANBRUGH, Provoked Wife, 
III., ii. (quoted in). Then sit ye awhile, 
and tipple a bit, For we's not very FOU, 
but we're gayly yet. 

1787. BURNS, Death and Dr. 
Hornbook, st. 3. I was na FOU, but just 
had plenty. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xlvi. ' Are ye FOU or fasting ? ' ' Fasting 
from all but sin.' 

1857. J. E. RITCHIE, Night Side 
of London, p. 166. The time admits of a 
man getting FOU between the commence- 
ment and the close of the entertainment. 

FOUL, subs, (nautical and aquatic). 
A running into ; a running 
down. 

Verb. (idem). To run against ; 
to run down. Also TO COME 
(or FALL) FOUL OF. 

[FoUL, adj. and verb, is used in two 
senses : (i)= dirty, as a FOUL word, a FOUL 
shrew (Dickens), to FOUL the bed, &c. ; 
and (2)=unfair, as a FOUL (i.e., a felon) 
stroke, a FOUL blow, and so forth.] 

1626. CAPTAIN JOHN SMITH, 
Accidence for Seamen, in wks. (Arber), 
p. 796. Boord and boord, or thwart the 
hawse, we are FOULE on each other. 



1724. E. COLES, Eng- Diet. FOUL, 
hindred or intangled with another ship's 
ropes, etc. 

1754. Connoisseur, No. 3. Which 
sailed very heavy, were often a-ground, 
and continually ran FOUL on each other. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at 
Oxford, ch. xiii. Their coxswain . . . 
had to pull his left hand hard or they 
would have FOULED the Oxfordshire 
corner. 

1885 Illus. London News, March 28, 
p. 316, col. i. In 1849 there were two races 
in the course of the year ; Cambridge won 
the first, Oxford the second, on a FOUL (the 
only time the race has been so won). 

1889. Licensed Victuallers Gaz., 18 
Jan. Dick was done out of the stakes on 
an appeal of FOUL. 

To FOUL A PLATE WITH, ver- 
bal phr. (old, colloquial). To 
dine or sup with. GROSE. 

FQULCHER, subs, (thieves'). A 
purse. 

1877. Five Years Penal Servitude, 
ch. Hi., p. 243. 'A FOULCHER, with flimsies 
and couters for a score of quid in it.' 

FOUL-MOUTHED, adj. (colloquial). 
Obscene or blasphemous in 
speech. 

FOUND IN A PARSLEY-BED. See 
PARSLEY-BED and GOOSEBERRY- 
BUSH. 

FOUNTAIN OF LOVE, subs. phr. 
(venery). The female pudendum. 
For synonyms, see MONO- 
SYLLABLE. 

FOUR-AND-NINE (or FOUR-AND- 
NINEPENNY), subs. phr. (old). 
A hat. [So-called from the price 
at which an enterprising Bread 
Street hatter sold his hats, circa 
1844, at which date London was 
hideous with posters displaying a 
large black hat and * 45. and 9d. ' 
in white letters.] 

1844. Advertisement Couplet. When- 
e'er to slumber you incline, Take a short 
nap at FOUR-AND-NINE. 



Four-bones, 



Fourth. 



1846. THACKERAY, Yellow Plush 
Papers, p. 152 (ed. 1887). You may, for 
instance, call a coronet a coronal (an 
'ancestral coronal,' p. 74) if you like, as 
you might call a hat a ' swart sombrero,' a 
' glossy FOUR-AND-NINE,' ' a silken helm 
to storm impermeable, and lightsome as the 
breezy gossamer ; ' but in the long run it is 
safer to call it a hat. 

1847. THACKERAY, Mrs. Perkins's 
Ball (The Mulligan). The Mulligan has 
withdrawn his custom from the ' infernal 
FOUR-AND-NINEPENNY scoundthrel,' as he 
calls him. The hatter has not shut up shop 
in consequence. 

1849. VIATOR, Oxford Guide. He 
then did raise his FOUR-AND-NINE, And 
scratched his shaggy pate. 

1867. JAS. GREENWOOD, Unsent. 
Journeys, xxx., 229. Because he wore a 
FOUR-AND-NINE, and had a pencil stuck 
behind his ear. 

FOUR- BONES, subs, (thieves'). 
The knees. 

1857. Punch, 31 Jan. 'Dear Bill, 
This Stone-jug.' For them coves in Guild- 
hall and that blessed Lord Mayor, Prigs 
on their four bones should chop whiners 
I swear. 

FOUR- EYES, subs, (common). A 
person in spectacles : 'a chap that 
can't believe his own eyes.' 

FOUR-HOLED MIDDLINGS, subs, 
phr. (Winchester College). 
Ordinary walking shoes ; cf, 
BEESWAXERS. Obsolete. 

FOUR KINGS. THE HISTORY (or 

BOOK) OF THE FOUR KINGS. 

subs. phr. (old). A pack of 
cards ; otherwise, a CHILD'S BEST 

GUIDE TO THE GALLOWS, Or THE 

DEVIL'S PICTURE BOOKS. Fr., 
Livre des quatre rots. 

FOUR-LEGGED BURGLAR-ALARM, 
subs. phr. (common). A watch 
dog. 

FOUR-LEGGED FROLIC, subs. phr. 
(venery). The act of kind : 
a reminiscence of the proverb, 
' There goes more to a marriage 
than four bare legs in a bed.' For 
synonyms, see GREENS and RIDE. 



FOUR- POSTER, subs. phr. (collo- 
quial). A four-post bedstead. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xliv. 
' Vill you allow me to en-quire vy you 
make up your bed under that ere deal 
table ?" said Sam. ' 'Cause I was alvays 
used to a FOUR-POSTER afore I came here, 
and I find the legs of the table answer 
just as well,' replied the cobbler. 

FOUR SEAMS AND A BIT OF SOAP, 

subs. phr. (tailors'). A pair of 
trousers. See KICKS. 

FOUR (more commonly THREE) 
SHEETS IN THE WIND, adv. phr. 
(nautical). Drunk ; cf., HALF 
SEAS OVER. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

FOURTEEN HUNDRED, . . . phr. 
(Stock Exchange). A warning 
cry that a stranger is in the 
' House.' 

1887. ATKIN, House Scraps. So, 
help me Got, Mo, who is he? Instead of 
replying in a straightforward way, Mo 
raised his voice as loud as he could, and 
shouted with might and main, ' FOURTEEN 
HUNDRED new fives ! ' A hundred voices 
repeated the mysterious exclamation. 

1890. Cassetfs Saturday Journal, 
26 April. The cry of 'FOURTEEN HUNDRED' 
is said to have had its origin in the fact 
that for a long while the number of members 
never exceeded 1,399 an d it was customarj 
to hail every new comer as the fourteen 
hundredth. It has, in its primary sense, 
long since lost significance, for there are 
now nearly three thousand members of the 
close corporation which has its home in 
Capel Court. 

FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT PER- 
SUASION, subs. phr. (American). 
Negroes. [From the number 
of the clause amending the Con- 
stitution at the abolition of slavery.] 

1888. Times Democrat, 5 Feb. To 
take the law is one of the greatest privileges 
in the estimation of the colored folk that 
the FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT conferred, 
and, whether offender or defendant, they 
take a pride in summonses beyond de- 
scribing. 



Fourth Estate. 



64 



Fox. 



FOURTH, subs. (Cambridge Uni- 
versity). A REAR (q.v.} or jakes. 
[Origin uncertain ; said to have 
been first used at St. John's or 
Trinity, where the closets were 
situated in the Fourth Court, 
Whatever its derivation, the term 
is now the only one in use at 
Cambridge, and is frequently 
heard outside the university.] 
The verbal phrase is TO KEEP A 
FOURTH (see KEEP). 

ON HIS FOURTH,/^?-, (common). 
Hopelessly drunk. For syn- 
onyms, see DRiNKsand SCREWED. 

FOURTH ESTATE, subs. phr. (liter- 
ary). The body of journalists ; 
the 'Press.' [Literally the Fourth 
Estate of the realm, the other 
three being Queen, Lords, and 
Commons.] 

1855. Notes and Queries. I S. xi., 
P- 452. 

1857. J. E. RITCHIE, Night Side of 
London^ p. 202. Let me say a word about 
these exceedinglyseedy-looking individuals 
connected with the FOURTH ESTATE. 

FOUR-WHEELER, subs, (common), 
A steak. 

2. (colloquial). Afour- wheeled 
cab ; a GROWLER (y.v.). 

1873. BLACK, Princess of Thnle, 
ch. 10. Having sent an all their luggage 
by a respectable old FQUR-WHEELEK. 

FOUSTY, adj. (colloquial). Stink- 
ing [probably derived frorn FOIST, 
sense 3]. 

FOUTER,ZW, and FQUTERING, subs. 
(common). To meddle, impor- 
tune, waste time and tongue ; the 
act of meddling, importunity, 
wasting time and tongue. E.g., 
4 Don't come FOUTERING here ! ' 
[From the French, f outre : the 
sense of which is intensified in a 
vulgarism of still fuller flavour]. 

Fox, subs. (old). A sword ; specifi- 
cally, the old English broadsword. 



[Derivation dubious. Suggest- 
tions are : (i) from a maker's 
name ; (2) from the fox some- 
times engraved on the blade ; (3) 
from the Latin falx.] For syno- 
nyms, see CHEESE-TOASTER and 
POKER. 

1598, SHAKSPEARE, Henry V., 4. 

sigRieur Dew, thou dy'st on point of 
FOX. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair, 
ii. A fellow th,at knows nothing but a 
basket-hilt, and an old FOX in't. 

c. 1640. [SHIRLEY], Captain Under- 
wit, in Bullen's Old Plays, ii., 321. Un. 
An old FOX blade made at Hounsloe 
heath. 

1667. SHIRLEY, Love Tricks, Act II., 
Sc. i. They say your swcyds most com- 
monly are FOXES, and have notable metal 
in them,. 

1700. CONGREVE, Way of the World, 
Act V., Sc. 10. Sir, I have an old FOX by 
my thigh, shall hack your instrument of 
ram vellum to shreds, Sir. 

1821. SCOTT, Kenilworth, ch. iv. 
' Come, come, comrade,' said Lambourne, 

1 here is enough done, and more than 
enough, put up your FOX, and let us be 
jogging:' 

Verb,, (pld), -I. To intoxicate. 
FOXED = drunk ; TO CATCH A FOX 
= to be very drunk ; while TO 
FLAY THE FOX (Urquhart) = to 
vomit, to shed your liquor, i.e., 
to get rid of the beast. 

1611. BARRY, Ram Alley, Act IV. 
They will bib hard ; they will be fine sun- 
burnt, Sufficient FOX'D or coltimber'd now 
and then. 

1633. HEYWOOD. Eng. Travellers, 
IV., v., p. 266 (Mermaid Series), Rioter. 
Worthy Reginald. Reig. Will, if he now 
come off well, FOX you all, Go, call for 
wine. 

c. 1640. [SHIRLEY], Captain Under- 
wit, in Bullen's Old Plays, n.. 375. Then 
to bee FOX'D it is no crime, Since thickest 
and dull braines It makes sublime. 

1661. T. MIDDLETON, Mayor of 
Quinborough, V., i. Ah, blind as one 
that had been FOX'D a sevennight. 

1673. SHADWELL, Epsom Wells, IV., 
in wks. (1720), ii., 248. But here's my 
cup. Come on. Udsooka, I begin to be 
FOX'D ' 



Fox. 



Foxy. 



1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 194. 
Come, let's trudge it to Kirkham Fair : 
There's stout liquor enough to FOX me. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Convert., Dial. 
2. Lady Sin. But, Sir John, your ale is 
terrible strong and heady. . . . Sir John. 
Why, indeed, it is apt to FOX one. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.). Fox (v.) . . . also to make a person 
drunk or fuddled. 

1891. Sporting Times, n April. 
And so to bed well nigh seven in the morn- 
ing, and myself as near FOXED as of old. 

2. (old). To cheat ; to trick ; 
to rob (colloquial at Eton). For 
synonyms, see GAMMON. 

1631. MAYNE, City Match, iii., i. 
Fore Jove, the captain FOXED him rarely. 

1866. Notes and Queries,?,, S. x., 123. 
Where the tramps . . . out of their gout 
are FOXED. 

3. (common). To watch 
closely. Also TO FOX ABOUT. 
Cf., FOX'S SLEEP. For syn- 
onyms, see NOSE. 

1880. GREENWOOD, Odd People in 
Odd Places, p. 61. ' You keep it going 
pretty loud here, with a couple of police- 
men FOXING about just outside.' 

4. (colloquial). To sham. 

1880. One and All, 6 Nov., p. 296, 
1 Let us look at these vagabons ; maybe 
they're only FOXIN'.' The two men who 
had received such tangible mementos of 
the whip-handle and the blackthorn lay 
perfectly still. 

5. (American). To play 
truant. 

6. (booksellers'). To stain ; to 
discolour with damp ; said of 
books and engravings. FOXED 
= stained or discoloured. 

1881. C. M. I[NGLEBY] in Notes and 
Queries (6th S., iv., 96). Tissue paper 
harbours damp, and in a damp room will 
assuredly help to FOX the plates which 
they face. 

1885. AUSTIN DOBSON, At the Sign 
of the Lyre, 83. And the Rabelais 
FOXED and flea'd. 



7. (theatrical). To criticise 
a ' brother pro's ' performance. 

8. (common). To mend a 
boot by ' capping ' it. 

TO SET A FOX TO KEEP 

ONE'S GEESE, phr. (common). 
To entrust one's money, or one's 
circumstances, to the care of 
sharpers. Latin, Ovem lupo 
commisisti. 

To MAKE A FOX PAW, verb, 
phr. (common). To make a 
mistake or a wrong move ; speci- 
fically (of women) to be seduced. 
[A corruption of the Fr. faux pas.} 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. 

Fox's SLEEP, subs. phr. (common). 
A state of feigned yet very 
vigilant indifference to one's 
surroundings. [Foxes were 
supposed to sleep with one eye 
open.] 

1830. SIR J. BARRINGTON, Personal 
Sketches, Vol. III., p. 171 (ed. 1832). Mr. 
Fitzgerald, he supposed, was in a FOX'S 
SLEEP, and his bravo in another, who, in- 
stead of receding at all, on the contrary 
squeezed the attorney closer and closer. 

FOXY, adj. (colloquial). i. Red- 
haired ; cf. t CAfcROTTY. 

1828. G. GRIFFIN, Collegians, ch. ii. 
Dunat O'Leary, the hair-cutter, or FOXY 
Dunat, as he was named in allusion to 
his red head. 

2. (colloquial). Cunning ; 
vulpine in character and look. 
Once literary. J onson ( 1 605 ) calls 
his arch-foist VOLPONE, the second 
title of his play being ' The Fox ;' 
and Florio (1598) defines Volpone 
as ' an old iox, an old reinard, 
an old, crafty, sly, subtle com- 
panion, sneaking, lurking, wilie 
deceiver. ' 

5 



Foy. 



66 



Free. 



d. 1536. TYNDALE, Workes, p. 148. 
Oh, FOXV Pharisay, that is thy leuen, of 
which Christ so diligently bad vs beware. 

1849. DICKENS, David Copperfield, 
ch. xlix., p. 429 Whatever his state of 
health may be his appearance is FOXY, not 
to say diabolical. 

3. (American cobblers'). 
Repaired with new toe-caps. See 
Fox, verb, sense 8. 

1877. M. TWAIN, Life on the Missis- 
sippi, ch. Ivii., p. 503. It was the scarecrow 
Dean in FOXY shoes, down at the heels ; 
socks of odd colours, also ' down." 

4. (booksellers'). A term 
applied to prints and books 
discoloured by damp ; see Fox, 
verb, sense 6. 

5. (painters' : obsolete). In- 
clined to reddishness. 

d. 1792. SIR J. REYNOLDS, Notes on 
Dufresnoy. That (style) of Titian, which 
may be called the Golden manner, when 
unskilfully managed, becomes what the 
painters call FOXY. 

6. (common). Strong-smell- 
ing. Said of a red-haired man 
or woman. 

FOY, subs. (old). A cheat ; a 
swindle. 

1615. GREENE, Thieves Falling Out. 
You be crossbites, FOYS, and nips. 

FOYL-CLOY, subs, (old). A pick- 
pocket; a rogue B.E. [1690]. 

FOYST, subs, and verb. See FOIST. 
FOYSTER. See FOISTER. 
FRAGGLE, verb. (Texas). To rob. 

FRAGMENT, subs. (Winchester 
College). A dinner for six 
(served in College Hall, after the 
ordinary dinner), ordered by a 
Fellow in favour of a particular 
boy, who was at liberty to invite 
five others to join him. Obs. A 



fragment was supposed to consist 
of three dishes. Winchester 
Word-book [1891]. 

FRAMER, subs. (American thieves'). 
A shawl. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, s.v. 

FRATER, subs. (old). A beggar 
working with a false petition. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat, s.v. FRA- 
TER, a beggar wyth a false paper. 

1622. FLETCHER, Beggar s Bush, ii., 
i. And these what name or title e'er they 
bear, Jarkman, or Patrico, Cranke, or 
Clapper-dudgeon, FRATER, or Abram- 
man, I speak to all That stand in fair 
election for the title Of king of beggars. 

1791. Life -ofBamfylde Moore-Careiv. 
1 Oath of Canting Crew.' Rogue or rascal, 
FRATER, maunderer, Irish toyle, or other 
wanderer. 

FRAUD, subs, (colloquial). A 
failure ; anything or body disap- 
pointing expectation ; e.g., an 
acquaintance, a picture, a book, 
a play, a picture, a bottle of wine. 
Actual dishonesty is not neces- 
sarily implied. 

1882. Punch, LXXXIL, p. 177, col. i. 
A FRAUD, Charlie ! 



FRAZE. See VESSEL. 

FREAK, subs. (American show- 
men's). A living curiosity : as 
the Siamese Twins, the Two- 
headed Nightingale. [Short for 
'freak of nature.'] 

FREE, adj. (Oxford University). 
Impudent ; self-possessed. 

1864. TENNYSON, Northern Farmer, 
(Old Style), line 25. But parson a coomes 
an' a goos, an' a says it easy an' FREEA. 

Verb. (old). To steal ; cf., 
ANNEX and CONVEY. For 
synonyms, see PRIG. 



Free-and-Easy. 



Free Fight. 



1857. SNOWDEN, Magistrates Assis- 
tant, 3rd ed., p 444. To steal a muff. To 
FREE a cat. 



1859. MATSELL, 
Rogue s Lexicon, s.v. 



Vocabulum, 



1882. McCABE, New York, ch. xxxiv., 
p. 509. (Given in list of slang terms.) 

FREE-FUCKING, subs, (venery). 
General lewdness. Also the 
favour gratis. Also fidelity to 
the other sex at large. 

FREE OF FUMBLER'S HALL, 
adv. phr. (venery). Impotent; 
unable to do 'the trick.' 
[FUMBLER'S HALL = female pu- 
dendum. ] 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue s.v., 
A saying of one who cannot get his wife 
with child. 

FREE, GRATIS, FOR NOTHING, 
phr. (common). A pleonastic 
vulgarism. Cf., ON THE DEAD. 

TO MAKE FREE WITH BOTH 

ENDS OF THE BUSK, verb. phr. 
(venery). To take liberties with 
a woman. Cf., BOTH ENDS OF 

THE BUSK. 

FREE OF THE HOUSE, adj. 
phr. (colloquial). Intimate ; 
privileged to come and go at 
will. 

FREE OF THE BUSH, adj. phr. 
(venery). On terms of extreme 
intimacy. See BUSH. 

[For the rest, the commonest sense of 
FREE is one of liberality: e.g., FREE OF 

HIS FOOLISHNESS = full of chaff J FREE- 
HANDED = lavish in giving ; FREE- 
HEARTED=generously disposed ; FREE OF 
HER FAVOURS = liberal of her person : 

FREE OF HIS PATTER = full of talk.] 



FREE-AND-EASY, subs, (common). 
A social gathering where you 
smoke, drink, and sing ; generally 
held at a public house. 



1796. (In BEE'S Diet, of the Turf, 
published 1823, s.v.). Twenty seven years 
ago the cards of invitation to that (FREE- 
AND-EASY) at the ' Pied Horse,' in Moor- 
fields, had the notable ' N.B. Fighting 
allowed.' 

1810. CRABBE, The Borough, Letter 
10. Clubs. Next is the club, where to 
their friends in town, Our country neigh- 
bours once a-month come down ; We term 
it FREE-AND-EASY, and yet we Find it no 
easy matter to be free. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. FREE- 
AND-EASY JOHNS. A society which meets 
at the Hole in the Wall, Fleet Street, to 
tipple porter, and sing bawdry. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry (ed. 
1890), p 91. Blew a cloud at a FREE-AND- 
EASY. 

1843. MACAULAY. Essays : Glad- 
stone on Church and State. Clubs of all 
ranks, from those which have lined Pall- 
Mall and St. James's Street with their 
palaces, down to the FREE-AND-EASY 
which meets in the shabby parlour of the 
village inn. 

1869. MRS. H. WOOD, Roland Yorke, 
ch. xii. He tilted himself on to a high 
stool in the middle of the room, his legs 
dangling, just as though he had been at a 
FREE AND-EASY meeting. 

1880. JAS. GREENWOOD, Odd People 
in Odd Places, p. 64. A roaring trade is 
done, for instance, on a Saturday evening 
at the ' Medley ' in Hoxton, a combination 
of theatre and music-hall, and serves as a 
FREE-AND-EASY chiefly for boys and girls. 

1891. Cassell's Saturday Journal, 
Sept., p. 1068, col. 3. The FREE AND EASY 
of to-day among us is a species of public- 
house party, at which much indifferent 
liquor and tobacco are consumed, songs are 
sung, and speeches are got rid of. 

FREEBOOKER, subs, (journalists'). 
A 'pirate' bookseller or 

Publisher ; a play on the word 
reebooter. 

FREE FIGHT, subs, (colloquial). 
A general mellay. 

1877. W. MARK, Green Past, and 
Pice., ch. xxx. That vehement German 
has been insisting on the Irish porters 
bringing up all our luggage at once ; and 
as there has been a sort of FREE FIGHT 
below he comes fuming upstairs. 






Free-fisliery. 



68 



Freezer. 



FREE-FISHERY, subs. phr. 
(venery). The ivcna\& pudendiim . 
For synonyms, see MONO- 
SYLLABLE. 

FREEHOLDER, subs, (venery). i. 
A prostitute's lover or FANCY- 
MAN. Cy.', FREE-FISHERY, and 
for synonyms, see JOSEPH. 

2. (old). A man whose wife 
insists on accompanying him to a 
public house. 

190. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew, s.v. 1785. GROSE, Diet, of the 
Vulg. Tongue ; s.v. 

FREE-LANCE, subs, (common). 
An habitual adulteress. 

c!889. (Quoted from Spectator in 
' Slang, Jargon, and Cant '). Sooner than 
be out of the fashion they will tolerate 
what should be most galling and shaming 
to them the thought that by these they 
are put down among the FREE-LANCES. 

Also said of a journalist attached 
to no particular paper. 

FREEMAN, subs., (venery). A 
married woman's lover. 

FREEMAN OF BUCKS, subs. phr. 
(old). A cuckold. [In allusion 
to the horn.] GROSE. 

TO FREEMAN, Or TO MAKE A 

FREEMAN OF, verb. phr. (school- 
boys'). To spit onthe/<?ww of a 
new comer. Also To FREE- 
MASON. 

FREEMAN'S QUAY. To DRINK, or 
LUSH, AT FREEMAN'S QUAY, verb, 
phr. (old). To drink at another's 
expense. [Freeman's Quay was 
a celebrated wharf near London 
Bridge, and the saying arose 
from the beer that was given to 
porters, carmen, and others going 
there on business.] 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 



FREEZE, subs, (colloquial). I. The 
act or state of freezing ; a frost. 

2. (old). Hard cider. 
GROSE. 

Verb. (American). To long 
for intensely ; e.g., ' to FREEZE to 
go back,' said of the home-sick ; 
'to FREEZE for meat.' 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West (1887), p. 129. Threats of vengeance 
on every Redskin they met were loud and 
deep ; and the wild war songs round their 
nightly camp-fires, and grotesque scalp- 
dances, borrowed from the Indians, proved 
to the initiated that they were, one and all, 
HALF-FROZE for hair.' 

2. (thieves'). Hence, to ap- 
propriate ; to steal ; ' to stick to.' 

3. (old). To adulterate or 
BALDERDASH (q.v.) wine with 
FREEZE (q.v. sense 2). GROSE. 

To FREEZE TO (or ON TO), verb 
phr. (American). To take a 
strong fancy to ; to cling to ; to, 
keep fast hold of; and (of persons) 
to button-hole or shadow. 

1883. Graphic, 17 March, p. 287, 
col. i. If there was one institution which 
the Anglo-Indian FROZE to more than 
another, it was his sit-down supper and 
its consequences. 

J888. Daily Inter-Ocean, 2 March. 
The competence of a juror was judged by 
his ability to shake ready-formed opinions 
and FREEZE ON TO new ones. 

To FREEZE OUT, verb. phr. 
(American). To compel to with- 
draw from society by cold and 
contemptuous treatment ; from 
business by competition or 
opposition ; from the market by 
depressing prices or rates of 
exchange. 

FREEZER, subs, (common). i. A 
tailless Eton jacket; cf.> BUM- 
PERISHER. For synonyms, see 

M O N K E Y -J AC K ET. 



French-elixir. 



69 



French Gout. 



2. (colloquial). A very cold 
day. By analogy, a chilling look, 
address, or retort. 



FRENCH - ELIXIR (CREAM, LACE, 
or ARTICLE), subs. phr. (com- 
mon). Brandy. [The custom 
of taking of brandy with tea and 
coffee was originally French. 
Whence French Cream. LACED 
TEA = tea dashed with spirits]. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
ix. ' Get out the gallon punch-bowl, and 
plenty of lemons. I'll stand for the 
FRENCH ARTICLE by the time I come back, 
and we'll drink the young Laird's health.' 

1821. Real Life, i., p. 606. Not 
forgetting blue ruin and FRENCH LACE. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Ball- 
of-fire ; bingo ; cold tea ; cold 
nantz ; red ribbon. 



FRENCH SYNONYMS. Le par- 
fait amour du chiffonnier (i.e., 
ragman's happiness = coarse 
brandy) ; le trois-six (popular : = 
ROT-GUT) ; Jil-en-quatre, fil-en- 
tmis, fil-en-six (specifically, old 
brandy, but applied to spirits 
generally); le dur ( = a drop of 
hard : common) ; le raide (popu- 
lar = a drop of stiff) : le cheniqtie 
or chnic (popular : ) ; le rude 
(popular : =a drop of rough, i.e., 
coarse brandy) ; feau d*affe 
(thieves') ; le pis sat d'ane (popu- 
lar : = donkey's piss ; sometimes 
applied to bad beer, which is 
likewise called pissat de vache] ; 
Favoine (military = hay, as who 
should say ' a nose bag ' ) ; le 
bianc (popular = brandy or white 
wine) ; le possede (thieves' : BIN- 
GO) ; le raspail (popular : ) ; le 
eric (popular : also crik, crique, 
or cricque rough brandy :) ?k 
schnaps (popular) ; le schnick 



(common : = bad brandy) ; le 
camphre (popular : = camphor ; 
applied to the coarsest spirit) ; le 
sacre-chien or sacre-chien tout pur 
(common : = the vilest sold) ; 
casse-poitrine (common : = brandy 
heightened with pepper ; cf., 
ROT-GUT) ; le jaune (rag- 
pickers' : = a drop of yellow ) ; 
tord-boyaux (popular = twist-gut); 
la consolation (popular = a drop 
of comfort); requiqui (work- 
men's) ; eau de mort (common : 
= death - water) ; le Tripoli 
(rank brandy) ; casse - gueule 
( = ' kill the-carter ' ; applied to 
all kinds of spirits). 

FRENCH FAKE. subs. phr. 
(nautical). The fashion of coiling 
a rope by taking it backwards 
and forwards in parallel bands, 
so that it may run easily. 

FRENCH GOUT (or DISEASE, 
FEVER, etc.), subs. phr. (com- 
mon). Sometimes CLAP (g.v.}, 
but more generally and correctly 
syphilis, Morbus Gallicus, es- 
pecially with older writers. For 
synonyms, see LADIES FEVER. 
AlsoTHE FRENCHMAN. FRENCH 
Pox = a very bad variety of 
syphilis. The French them- 
selves always refer to the 
ailment as the mal de Naples, for 
which ste MARSTON (1598) and 
his 'Naples canker,' and FLORIO 
(1598) mal di Napoli=iQuc\i 
pocks. Cf., SHAKSPEARE, Henry 
V.,y., I. News have I that my 
Nell is dead i' the spital Of 
malady of France. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Luc, a plague .... It is also used for 
the FRENCH POXE. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie, Mal 
de Naples, the FRENCH POCKS. 

1690. B. E. Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. Cs.v.). 



FrencJiified. 



70 



French Leave. 



1740. Poor Robin. Some gallants 
will this month be so penurious that they 
will not part with a crack'd groat to a poor 
body, but on their cockatrice or punquetto 
will bestow half a dozen taffety gowns, 
who in requittal bestows on him the 
FRENCH POX. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. He suffered by a blow over 
the snout with a French faggot-stick ; i.e., 
he lost his nose by the POX. 

FRENCHIFIED, adj. (old). 
Clapped ; more generally and 
accurately poxed. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Creiv, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. FRENCHIFIED, infected 
with the venereal disease ; the mort is 

FRENCHIFIED=THE WENCH IS INFECTED. 

FRENCH LEAVE, To TAKE FRENCH 
LEAVE, verb. phr. (colloquial). 

(1) To decamp without notice ; 

(2) to do anything without per- 
mission ; (3) to purloin or steal ; 
(4) to run away (as from an 
enemy). [Derivation obscure ; 
FRENCH, probably traceable to 
the contempt engendered during 
the wars with France ; the com- 
pliment is returned in similar ex- 
pressions (see Synonyms) + LEAVE 
= departure or permission to 
depart. Sense i is probably the 
origin of senses 2,3, and 4. See 
Notes and Queries, I S. i, 246 ; 
3 S. vi, 17 ; 5 S. xii, 87 ; 6 S. v, 
347, 496; viii, 514; ix, 133.213, 
279; 7 S. iii, 5, 109, 518.] 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To 
retire up (one's fundament) ; to 
slope ; to smouge ; to do a sneak ; 
to take the Frenchman ; to 
vamoose. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. 
S 1 escarpiner (popular : = to 
flash one's pumps ; escarpin = 
a dancing ^s\QQ.\jouerde C escarpin 
to ply one's pumps, (i6th 



century) ; s'echapper, s*esquiver, 
filer, disparaitre, s'edipser, se 
derober, se retirer, and s'en aller d 
V anglaise ( = to take English 
leave) ; pisser a P anglaise ( = to do 
an English piss, i.e. , affect a 
visit to the urinal) ; prendre sa 
permission sous son coude (popular : 
literally to take one's leave under 
one's arm) ; ficher or foutre le 
camp. 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. 
Franzb'sischen Abschied nehnien 
( = to take French leave : from 
GUTZKOW, R. 4, 88, etc, born 
1811); franzosischer Abschied 

(IFFLAND, 1759-1814, 5, 3, 117) J 

auf gut franzbsisch sich 
empfehlen (BLUMAUER, 2, 72, 
1758-1798: also GUTZKOW, R., 
4, 88) ; hinter der Thur urlaub 
(= to take leave behind [or 
outside] the door, i.e., after one 
has got outside it : quoted by 
SANDERS, from FISCHART, 1550- 
1589) ; hinter der Thiire Abschied 
nehmen ( = to say good-bye out- 
side, to take French leave) ; also, 
er beurlaubte sich in aller Stille, 
explained as er stahl sich, schlich 
sich davon, and translated ' he 
took French leave ' ; also, sich 
aus einer Gesellschaft stehlen. 
HILPERT'S Diet., 1845. 

SPANISH SYNONYM. 
Despedirse d la francesa ( = to 
take French leave). 

1771 . SMOLLETT, Humphrey Clinker, 
p. 54. He stole away an Irishman's bride, 
and took a FRENCH LEAVE of me and hi 
master. 

1805. Newspaper (quoted in Notes 
and Queries, 5, S. xii., 2 Aug., 79, p. 87, 
col. 2). On Thursday last Monsieur J. F. 
Desgranche, one of the French prisoners 
of war on parole at Chesterfield, took 
FRENCH LEAVE of that place, in defiance 
of his parole engagement. 

1854. F. E. SMEDLEV, Harry Cover- 
dale, ch. Iviii. ' I thought I would avoid 



French Letter. 



Fresh Bit. 



all the difficulties ... by taking FRENCH 
LEAVE, and setting off in disguise and 
under a feigned name." 

1885 STEVENSON, Treasure Island, 
ch. xxii., p. 178 (1886). My only plan was 
to take FRENCH LEAVE, and slip out when 
nobody was watching. 

1892. Globe, 25 Mar., p. 5, col. T. 
They finally resolved to go on FRENCH 
LEAVE to the place. 

FRENCH- (also AMERICAN, 
SPANISH, and ITALIAN) LETTER, 

subs.phr. (colloquial). A sheath 

of india-rubber, gold beater's 
skin, gutta-percha worn by a 
man during coition to prevent 
infection or fruition. Usually 
described in print as SPECIALITIES 

(q.V.). Or CIRCULAR PROTECTORS 

and (in U.S.A.) as SAFES 
(q.v.). See CUNDUM. Fr., 
capote anglaise. 

FRENCH PIGEON, subs. phr. 
(sportsman's). A pheasant 
killed by mistake in the 
partridge season. Also MOKO 
and ORIENTAL (q.v.). 

FRENCH PIG, subs.phr. (common). 

A venereal bubo; a BLUE BOAR 
(.v.), or WINCHESTER GOOSE 



FRENCH PRINTS, subs, (colloquial). 

Generic for indecent pictures. 

1849-50. THACKERAY, Pendennis //., 
ch. xxxi. Young de Boots of the Blues 
recognised you as the man who came to 
barracks, and did business, one-third in 
money, one-third in eau-de-Cologne, and 
one third in FRENCH PRINTS, you con- 
founded, demure, old sinner. 

FRENCH VICE, verb. phr. (venery). 

A euphemism for all sexual 
malpractices; LARKS (q.v.). First 
used (in print) in the case of 
Crawford v. Crawford and Dilke. 

FRENCHY, subs, (colloquial). A 
Frenchman. 



FRESH, adj. (University). I. Said 
of an undergraduate in his first 
term. 
1803. Gradus ad Cantabrigiam, s.v. 

1866. TREVELYAN, Horace at Athens. 
When you and I were FRESH. 

2. (common). Slightly in- 
toxicated ; elevated. For syn- 
onyms see DRINKS and SCREWED, 
(Scots' = sober). 

1829. MARRYAT, Frank Mildmay, 
ch. xiii. Drinking was not among my 
vices. I could get FRESH, as we call it, 
when in good company and excited by wit 
and mirth ; but I never went to the length 
of being drunk. 

3. (Old English and modem 
American). Inexperienced, but 
conceited and presumptuous ; 
hence, forward, impudent. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, King John, iii., 
4. How green you are and FRESH in this 
old world. 

1886. FRANCIS, Saddle and Mocas- 
sin. ' Has Peggy been too FRESH ?' Her 
sunburnt cheeks flushed. 

4. (common). Fasting ; op- 
posed to eating or drinking. 

FRESH AS PAINT, AS A ROSE, 
AS A DAISY, AS A NEW-BORN 
TURD, etc., phr. (common). Full 
of health, strength, and activity ; 
FIT (q.v.). 

1864. E. YATES, Broken to Harness, 
ch. xix. This is his third day's rest, and 
the cob will be about as FRESH AS PAINT 
when I get across him again. 

1880. Punch's Almanack, p. 12. 

FRESH ON THE GRAFT, aaV./^r. 
(common). New to the work. 
Cf., FRESH BIT. 

FRESH BIT, subs. phr. (venery). 
A beginner ; also a new mistress. 
Cf., BIT OF FRESH = the sexual 
favour : MEAT, or MUTTON, or 
FISH (q.v.), being understood. 



Freshen Ones Way. 7 2 Freshivater Soldier. 



FRESHEN ONE'S WAY, verb. phr. 
(nautical). To hurry ; to quicken 
one's movements. [The wind 
FRESHENS when it rises.] 

FRESHEN UP, verb. phr. (colloquial). 
To clean ; to vamp ; to revive ; to 
smarten. 

FRESHER, subs. (University). An 
undergraduate in his first term. 

FRESHERS. THE FRESHERS, subs. 
(University). That part of the 
Cam which lies between the Mill 
and Byron's Pool. So called be- 
cause it is frequented by FRESH- 
MEN (q.v.). 

FRESHMAN (or FRESHER), subs. 
(University). A University man 
during his first year. In Dublin 
University he is a JUNIOR FRESH- 
MAN during his first year, and a 
SENIOR FRESHMAN the second 
year. At Oxford the title lasts 
for the first term. Ger., Fucks. 

1596. NASHE, Saffron Walden, in 
wks. iii., 8. When he was but yet a 
FRESHMAN in Cambridge. 

1611. MIDDLETON, Roaring Girl, 
Act iii., Sc. 3. 6". Alex. Then he's a 
graduate. .5". Davy. Say they trust him 
not. S. Alex. Then is he held a FRESH- 
MAN and a sot. 

1767. COLMAN, Oxonian in Town, 
ii., 3. And now I find you as dull and 
melancholy as a FRESHMAN at college 
after a jobation. 

1841. LEVER, Charles O'Malley, ch. 
xiv. ' This is his third year,' said the 
Doctor, ' and he is only a FRESHMAN, hav- 
ing lost every examination.' 

1891. Snorting Life, 20 Mar. The 
mile, bar accidents, will be a gift to B. C. 
Allen, of Corpus, who has more than main- 
tained the reputation he gained as a 

FRESHER. 

Adj. (University). Of, or 
pertaining to, a FRESHMAN, or a 
first year student. 



FRESH MANSHIP, subs, (old). Of 
the quality or state of being a 
freshman. 

1605. JONSON, Volfone, or the Fox, 
iv., 3. Well, wise Sir Pol., since you 
have practised thus, Upon my FRESHMAN- 
SHIP, I'll try your salt-head With what 
proof it is against a counter-plot. 

FRESHMAN'S BIBLE, s^^bs. phr. 
(University). The University 
Calendar. 



FRESHMAN'S CHURCH, subs. phr. 
(University). The Pitt Press at 
Cambridge. [From its ecclesias- 
tical architecture.] 

FRESH MAN'S LAN DM ARK, subs. phr. 
(University). King's College 
Chapel, Cambridge. [From the 
situation. ] 

FRESHWATER MARINER (or SEA- 
MAN), subs. phr. (old). A beggar 
shamming sailor ; a TURNPIKE 
SAILOR (q.v.). 

1567. HARM AN, Caveat (1869), p. 48, 
These FRESHWATER MARINERS, their shipes 
were drowned in the playne of Salisbury. 
These kynde . . ,'counterfet great losses on 
the sea. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FRESHWATER SEAMEN, that 
have never been on the Salt, or made any 
Voyage, meer Land-Men. 

FRESHWATER SOLDIER, subs. phr. 
(old). A raw recruit. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of IVordes, 
Biancone. A goodly, great milke-soppe, 

a FRESH WATER SOLDIER. 

1603. KNOLLES, Hist, of the Turkes. 
The nobility, as FRESHWATER SOLDIERS, 
which had never seen but some slight skir- 
mishes, made light account of the Turks. 

1696. N omenclatpr. Bachelier aux 
armes, nouveau ou jeune soudard. A 
FRESHWATER souLDiER : a young soul- 
dier : a novice : one that is trayned up to 
serve in the field. 



Fret. 



73 



Frig. 



FRET, To FRET ONE'S GIZZARD, 

GUTS, GIBLETS, KIDNEYS, CREAM, 

etc., verb. phr. (common). To 
get harassed and worried about 
trifles ; TO TEAR ONE'S SHIRT 



FRIAR, siibs. (printers'). A pale 
spot in a printed sheet. Fr. , un 
moine ( = monk). 

FRIB, subs. (old). A stick. For 
synonyms, see TOKO. 

1754. Discoveries of John Poulter, 
p. 43. A Jacob and FRIB ; a ladder and 
stick. 

FRIBBLE, subs. (old). A trifler ; a 

contemptible fop. [From the cha- 

racter in Garrick's Miss in her 

Teens (1747)]- 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 

Tongue, s.v. 

1860. THACKERAY, Four Georges. 
George, IV. That FRIBBLE, the leader of 
such men as Fox and Burke ! 

FRIDAY- FACE, subs. (old). A 
gloomy, dejected-looking man or 
woman. [Probably from Friday 
being, ecclesiastically, the banyan 
day of the week. ] Fr. , figure de 
careme. 

1592. GREENE, Groatsworth of Wit, 
in wks. xii., 120. The Foxe made a FRI- 
DAY-FACE, counterfeiting sorrow. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of tke Vulg. 
Tongue, s.v. 

1889. Gentleman's Mag., June, p. 
593. FRIDAY-FACE is a term still occasion- 
ally applied to a sour-visaged person ; it 
was formerly in very common use. 

FRIDAY- FACED, adj. (old). Morti- 
fied ; melancholy ; ' sour-featured' 
(Scott). 

1592. JOHN DAY, Blind Beggar, Act 
iii., Sc. 2, p. 57. Can. No, you FRI- 
DAY-FAC'D frying-pan, it was to save us all 
from whipping or a worse shame. 

1606. Wily Beguiled (Hawkins Eng. 
Dr., iii., 356). Marry, out upon him ! 



What a FRIDAY-FAC'D slave it is ! I think 
in my conscience his face never keeps 
holiday. 

FRIEND (or LITTLE FRIEND),^^. 
The menstrual flux or DOMESTIC 
AFFLICTIONS (q.v.) y whose ap- 
pearance is sometimes announced 
by the formula ' My little friend 
has come.' Conventionalisms are 
queer ; poorly ; changes (Irish) ; 
' the Captain's at home ' (GROSE). 
See FLAG. 

TO GO AND SEE A SICK 
FRIEND, verb. phr. (venery). 
To go on the loose. See GREENS. 

FRIEND CHARLES. See CHARLES 

HIS FRIEND. 

FRIENDLY LEAD, subs. phr. 
(thieves'). An entertainment (as 
a sing-song) got up to assist a 
companion in TROUBLE (q.v.), or 
to raise money for the wife and 
children of a ' quodded pal. ' 

1871. Daily Telegraph, 4 Dec. This 
was the secret business, the tremendous 
conspiracy, to compass which it was deemed 
necessary to act with infinitely more cau- 
tion than the friends of Bill Sikesfeel called 
on to exercise when they distribute tickets 
for a FRIKNDLY LEAD for the benefit of 
Bill, who is 'just out of his trouble.' 

1889. Casselfs Saturday Journal, 
5 Jan. The men frequently club together 
in a FRIENDLY LEAD to help a brother in 
distress. 

1892. Ally Sloper, 2 Apr., p. 106, col. 
3. My father takes the chair at FRIENDLY 
LEADS. 

FRIENDS IN NEED, subs. phr. (com- 
mon). Lice. For synonyms, see 
CHATES. 

FRIG, verb trans, andrefl. (venery). 
To masturbate. Also subs. = 
an act of masturbation. Known 
sometimes as KEEPING DOWN THE 
CENSUS. [Latin, fricare = to rub.] 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To 
bob; to box the Jesuit ['St. 
Omer's lewdness,' Marston, 



Frigate. 



74 



Frills. 



'Scourge' (1598)]; to chuff; 
to chuffer ; to claw (Florio) ; 
to digitate (of women) ; to 
eat (or get) cock-roaches ; to 
bring up (or off) by hand ; 
to fight one's turkey (Texan) ; to 
hnger or finger-fuck (of women) ; 
to friggle (Florio) ; to fuck one's 
fist (of men) ; to fetch mettle 
(Grose) ; to handle ; to indorse ; 
to jerk, play, pump, toss, or work 
off ; to lark ; to milk ; to mount 
a corporal and four ; to mess, or 
pull about ; to play with (school- 
boys'), to rub up ; to shag ; to 
tickle one's crack (of women) ; to 
dash one's doodle ; to touch up ; 
to play paw-paw tricks (Grose) ; 
to wriggle (old). For foreign 
synonyms, see WRIGGLE. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes 
Fricciare ... to FRIG, to wriggle, to 
tickle. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie, 
Branler la pique, To FRIG. 

1728. BAILEY, Diet., s.v. FRIG, to 
rub. 

c. 1716-1746. ROBERTSON of Struan. 
Poems, 83. So to a House of office . . . 

a School- Boy does repair, To . . . fr 

bis P there. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue., s.v. 



FRIGATE, subs, (common). A 
woman. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FRJGGATwell rigg'd,awoman 
well drest and gentile. 

17S5. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. A 
well - rigg'd FRIGATE, a well - dressed 
wench. 



FRIGGING,.^ Ay. (venery). i. The act 
of masturbation ; the ' cynick fric- 
tion' (Marston, Scourge}', other- 
wise SIMPLE INFANTICIDE. 

2. (old). Trifling [GROSE, 
1785-] 



Adj. and adv. (vulgar). An ex- 
pletive of intensification. Thus, 
FRIGGING BAD = ' bloody ' bad ; a 
FRIGGING IDIOT = an absolute 
fool. See also FOUTERING and 
FUCKING. 

FRIGHTFULLY, adv. (colloquial). 
Very. An expletive used as 
are AWFULLY, BEASTLY, BLOODY, 
etc. (q.v.). 

FRIG- PIG, subs, (old). Afinnicking 
trifler. 

1785. GROSE, Diet. Vulg. Tongue, 
s.v. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

FRIGSTER (in fern. FRIGSTRESS) 
subs, (venery). A masturbator ; 
an INDORSER (y.v., also^a 
Sodomite). 

FRILL ERY, subs. (common). 
Feminine underclothing. For 
synonyms, see SNOWY. To EX- 
PLORE ONE'S FRILLERY (venery) 
= to grope one's person. 

FRILLS, subs. (American). 
Swagger ; conceit ; also accom- 
plishments (as music, languages, 
etc.); and culture; ef. t MAN 

WITH NO FRILLS. 

1870. Sacramento Paper (quoted in 
De Vere). ' I can't bear his talk, it's all 
FRILLS.' 

1884. CLEMENS ("Mark Twain'), 
Ad-ventures of Huck, Finn. 33. I never 
see such a son. I bet I'll take some 
of these FRILLS out of you before I'm 
done with you. 

TO PUT ON ONE'S FRILLS, verb, 
phr. (American). To exaggerate ; 

TO CHANT THE POKER ; to 

swagger ; to put on SIDE (q.v.) ; 
to SING IT (q. v. ). Fr. , se gonfler 
le jabot, and faire son lard. 

1890. RUDYARD KIPLING National. 
Observer, March, 1890, p. 69. 'The Oont.' 
It's the commissariat camel PUTTING ON 

HIS BLOOMING FRILLS. 



Print. 



75 



Frisk. 



2. (venery). To get wanton 
or PRICK-PROUD (q.v.}\ in a 
slate of MUST (a.v.}. 

TO HAVE BEEN AMONG ONE'S 
FRILLS, verb. phr. (venery). To 
have enjoyed the sexual favour. 
. For synonyms, see GREENS. 

PRINT, subs. (old). A pawnbroker. 
For synonyms, see UNCLE. 

1821. Real Life in London, i., 
p. 566. 

FRISCO, subs. (American). Short 
for San Francisco. 

1870. BRET HARTE, Poems, 'Chiq- 
uita.' Busted hisself at White Pine, and 
blew out his brains down in FRISCO. 

1890. Sporting Life, 8 Nov. The 
battle . . . took place in the theatre, 
Market St., FRISCO. 



FRISK, subs. (old). I. A frolic ; 
an outing; a LARK (q.v.) ; 
mischief generally. 

1697. VANBRUGH, Provoked Wife, 
iii., i. _ If you have a mind to take a 
FRISK with us, I have an interest with my 
lord ; I can easily introduce you. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1825. The English Spy, vi , p. 162. 
Dick's a trump, and no telegraph up to 
every FRISK, and down TO every move of 
the domini, thoroughbred and no -want of 
courage. 

1852. DICKENS, Bleak House, ch. 
xx., p. 171. _ ' When you and I had the 
FRISK down in Lincolnshire, Guppy, and 
drove over to see that house at Castle 
Wold.' 



2. (old). A dance. 



1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 274. 
Let's have a neat FRISK or so, And then 
rub on the law. 

1782. ^COWPER, Table Talk, 237. 
Give him his lass, his fiddle, and his FRISK, 
Is always happy, reign whoever may 

1880. OUIDA, Moths, ch. xiv. And 
her fancy-dress FRISKS, and her musical 
breakfasts, were great successes. 



3. (venery). The act of copu- 
lation. See GREENS and RIDE. 

Verb (thieves'). i. To search; 

TO RUN THE RULE OVER (q.V.}\ 
Especially applied to the search 
made, after arrest, for evidence of 
character, antecedents, or identity. 
Hence, careful examination of 
any kind. 

1781. G. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 179. They FRISK him? That is search 
him. Ibid., p. 122. Puttting a lap-feeder 
in our sack, that you or your blowen had 
prig'd yourselves though we should stand 
the FRISK for it. 

1828. JON. BEE, Pict. of London. 
p. 69. The arms are seized from behind 
by one, whilst the other FRISKS the pockets 
of their contents. 

1852. JUDSON, Mysteries, etc. of New 
York, ch. vii. Vel sare, the offisare 'ave 
FRISK me : he 'ave not found ze skin or ze 
dummy, eh ? 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, p. 21. ' The knuck was 
copped to rights, a skin full of honey was 
found in his kick's poke by the copper 
when he FRISKED him'; [i.e.] the pick- 
pocket was arrested, and when searched by 
the officer a purse was found in his panta- 
loons pocket full of money. , 

2. ( thieves' ). To pick 
pockets ; to rob. To FRISK A 
CLY = to empty a pocket. 

1852. JUDSON, Mysteries, etc. 0f 
New York, ch. iv. You're as good a 
knuck as ever FRISKED a swell. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 13 June, 
p. 7, col. 3. The ragged little wretches 
who prowl in gangs about the suburbs, 
who crawl on their hands and knees into 
shops in order to ' FRISK the till." 

3. (venery). To 'HAVE (q.v.) 
a woman.' For synonyms, see 
RIDE. 

TO DANCE THE PADDINGTON 
FRISK, verb. phr. (old). To 
dance on nothing; i.e., to be 
hanged. [Tyburn Tree was in 
Paddington.] For synonyms, sec 
LADDER. 



Frisker. 



76 



Frog's March. 



FRISKER, subs. (old). A dancer. 

1719. DORFEY, Pills, etc., ii., 20- 
At no Whitsun Ale there e'er yet had been 
Such Fraysters and FRISKERS as these 
lads and lasses. 

FRIVOL or FRIVVLE, verb, (collo- 
quial). To act frivolously ; to 
trifle. [A resuscitation of an 
old word used in another sense, 
viz. , to annul, to set aside]. 

1883. W. BLACK, Yolande, ch. xx. 
1 Mind, I am assuming that you mean 
business if you want to FRIVOLE, and pick 
pretty posies, I shut my door on you but, 
I say, if you mean business, I have told 
Mrs. Bell you are to have access to my 
herbarium, whether I am there or not.' 

FROG, subs, (common). I. A 
policeman. For synonyms, see 
BEAK and COPPER. 

1881. New York Slang Diet., 'On 
the Trail.' I must amputate like a go- 
away, or the FROGS will nail me. 

1886. Graphic, 30 Jan., p. 130, col. i. 
A policeman is also called . . . a ' frog, 
the last-named because he is supposed to 
jump, as it were, suddenly upon guilty 
parties. 

2. (common). A Frenchman. 
Also FROGGY and FROG-EATER. 
[Formerly a Parisian ; the shield 
of whose city bore three toads, 
while the quaggy state of the 
streets gave point to a jest com- 
mon at Versailles before 1791 : 
Qu'en disent les grenouilles? i.e., 
What do the FROGS (the people 
of Paris) say?] 

^1883. Referee, 15 July, p. 7, col. 3. 
While Ned from Boulogne says ' OUT mon. 
brave,' The Froggies must answer for 
Tamatave.' 

3. (popular). Afoot. For 
synonyms, see CREEPERS. 

To FROG ON, verb. phr. (Ame- 
rican). To get on ; to prosper 

FROGGING-ON = SUCCCSS. 



FROG-AND-TOAD, subs, (rhyming) 
The main road. 



FROG-AND-TOE, subs. (American 
thieves'). The city of New 
York. 

1^59. MATSELL Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, p. 35. Coves, let us 

FROG-AND-TOE, COVCS, let US gO tO New 

York. 



FROGLANDER, sttbs. (old). A 
Dutchman. Cf., FROG, sense 2. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew, s.v. 

1852. JUDSON, Mysteries, etc. of New 
York, ch. xiv. The funny swag which 
they raised out of the FROGLANDER coves. 



FROG-SALAD, subs. (American). A 
ballet ; i.e., a LEG-PIECE (q.v.). 

FROG'S MARCH. To GIVE THE 
FROG'S MARCH, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To carry a man face 
downwards to the station ; a 
device adopted with drunken or 
turbulent prisoners. 

1871. Evening Standard, ' Clerken- 
well Police Report,' 18 April. In cross- 
examination the police stated that they did 
not give the defendant the FROG'S MARCH. 
The FROG'S MARCH was described to be 
carrying the face downwards. 

1884. Daily Neivs, Oct. 4, p. 5, col. 2. 
They had to resort to a mode of carrying 
him, familiarly known in the force, we 
believe, as the FROG TROT, or sometimes 
as the FROG'S MARCH. . . . The prisoner is 
carried with his face downwards and his 
arms drawn behind him. 

1888. Daily Telegraph^ 22 Dec. 
Whether the ' bobbies ' ran the tipsyman in, 
treating him meanwhile to a taste of the 
FROG'S MARCH, and whether he was fined 
or imprisoned for assaulting the police, is 
not upon the record. 

1890. Bird o' Freedom, 19 Mar., p. i 
col. i. And then he gets the FROG'S 
MARCH to the nearest Tealeaf's. 



Frogs Wine. 



77 



Ffvttdacioux. 



FROG'S WINE, subs. phr. (old). 
Gin. For synonyms, see DRINKS 
and SATIN. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

FROLIC, subs, (common). A merry- 
making. 

1847. ROBB. Squatter Life, p. 133- 
At all the FROLICKS round the country, 
Jess was hangin' onter that gal. 

FROSTY- FACE, subs. (old). A pox- 
pitted man. Grose (1785). 

FRONT, verb (thieves'). To conceal 
the operations of a pickpocket ; 
to COVER (q.v.). 

1879. J. W. HORSLEY in Macmillaris 
Mag., XL., 506. So my pal said, ' FRONT 
me (cover me), and I will do him for it." 

FRONT-ATTIC (or -DOOR, -GARDEN, 

-PARLOUR, -ROOM, Or -WIN DOW). 

subs. phr. (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. To HAVE (or 

DO) a BIT OF FRONT-DOOR WORK 

= to copulate. 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, s.v. 
Mrs. Fubb's FRONT-PARLOUR (.vide Tom 
Rees) is not to be mistaken for any part of 
any building. 

FRO NT- DOOR MAT, subs. phr. 
(venery). The female pubic hair. 
For synonyms, see FLEECE. 

FRONT-GUT, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For syno- 
nyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

FRONTISPIECE, subs, (pugilists'). 
The face. For synonyms, see 
DIAL. 

1K18. P. EGAN, Boxiana, I., p. 221. 
Tyne put in right and left upon the Jew's 
FRONTISPIECE two such severe blows, that 
Crabbe's countenance underwent a trifling 
change. 

1845. BUCKSTONE, Green Bushes, i., i. 
It's a marcy my switch didn't come in 
contract with your iligant FRONTISPIECE. 



1860. Chambers Journal XI 1 /., 
p. 368. His forehead is his FRONTISPIECE. 

1864. A. TROLLOPE, Sm. Ho. at 
Allington (1884), vol. "., ch. V., p. 47. 
He said that he had had an accident -or 
rather, a row and that he had come out of 
it with considerable damage to his 

FRONTISPIECE. 

1891. Sporting Life, 28 Mar. It 
must be confessed that the ludicrous was 
attained when Griffiths subsequently 
appeared with a short black pipe in his 
distorted and battered FRONTISPIECE. 

FRONT-WINDOWS, subs, (common). 
I. The eyes ; also the face, 

2. In sing: (venery). The 
female pudendum. Cf., FRONT- 
ATTIC ; and for synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

FROST, subs, (common). A com- 
plete failure. Cf., Fr., un four 
noir. Also un temps noir=a. 
blank interval; a prolonged silence 
(as when an actor's memory fails 
him). 

1885. Saturday Review, 15 Aug., 
p. 218. He is an absolute and perfect 

FROST. 

1885. Bell's Life, 3 Jan., p. 3, col. 6. 
We regret we cannot write favorably con- 
cerning this matter, the affair being almost 
as big a FROST athletically as it was 
financially. 

1889. Star, 17 Jan. The pantomime 
was a dead FROST. 

2. (common). A dearth of 
work ; TO HAVE A FROST = to be 
idle. 



FROUDACIOUS, FROUDACITY, adj. 
and subs. See quots. 

1888. Colonies and India, 14 Nov. 
The word ' FROUDACITY,' invented by Mr. 
Darnell Davis in his able review of The 
Bow of Ulysses, recently published, has 
reached the height of popularity in the 
Ausralasian Colonies, where it has come 
into everyday use. In the Melbourne 
Assembly the other day an hon. member 
observed speaking of some remarks made 
by a previous speaker that he never heard 



Froust. 



Frump. 



such FROUDACIOUS statements in his life. 
The colonial papers are beginning, also, to 
spell the word with a small 'f,' which is 
significant. 

1889. Graphic, 16 Feb. By exposing 
some of Mr. Froude's manifold errors (the 
most dangerous is that which assumes the 
sour Waikato clays to be rich because they 
grow fern) he justifies the Australian 
adjective FROUDACIOUS. 

FROUST, subs. (Harrow Scnool). 
I. Extra sleep allowed on Sunday 
mornings and whole holidays. 
r.,faire du lard. 

2. (common). A stink ; stuffi- 
ness (in a room). 

FROUSTY, adj. (common). Stink- 
ing. 

FROUT,a^'. (Winchester College). 
Angry ; vexed. 

FROW (or FROE, or VROE), subs. 
(old). A woman ; a wife ; a 
mistress. [From the Dutch.] 

1607. DEKKER, Westward /^,Act.V.> 
Sc. i. Eat with 'em as hungerly as 
soldiers ; drink as if we were FROES. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing- Crew, V. Brush to your FROE and 
wheedle for crap, c. whip to your mistress 
and speak her fair to give or lend iyou 
some Money. 

1754. B. MARTIN, Eng. Diet. (2 ed.), 
s.v. 

1789. PARKER, Life's Painter, p. 119 
A flash of lightning next Bess tipt each 
cull and FROW. 

FRUITFUL \/\NE,sztl>s.pkr. (venery). 
The female pudendum. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
FRUITFUL VINE. A woman's private parts, 
i.e., that has flowers every month, and 
bears fruit in nine. 

FRUMMAGEMED, adj. (old). 
Choked ; strangled ; spoilt. 

1671. R. HEAD, English Rogue, Pt. 
I., ch. v., 49 (1874). FRUMMAGEM, Choakt. 



1724. E. COLES, Eng. Diet. FRUM- 
MIGAM, c. choaked. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
Choaked, strangled, or hanged. Cant. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xxviii. ' If I had not helped you with 
these very fambles (holding up her hands), 
Jean Baillie would have FRUMMAGEM'D 
you, ye feckless do-little ! ' 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 21. There he lay, almost FRUMMA- 
GEM'D. 



FRUMP, subs. (old). i. A con- 
temptuous speech or piece of 
conduct ; a sneer ; a jest. 

1553. WILSON, Art of Rhetorique, 
p. 137. (He) shall be able to abashe a 
right worthie man, and make him at his 
witte's ende, through the sodaine quicke 
and vnlooked FRUMPE giuen. 

1589. GREENE, Menaphon, p. 45. 
For women's paines are more pinching if 
they be girded with a FRUMPE than if they 
be galled with a mischiefe. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Bichiacchia, jestes, toyes, FRUMPS, flim- 
flam tales, etc. 

1606. T. DEKKER, Seven Deadly 
Sinnes, p. 44 (ed. Arber). The courtiers 
gives you an open scoffe, ye clown a secret 
mock, the cittizen yat dwels at your thresh- 
aid, a ieery FRUMP. 

1630. TAYLOR, Works. But yet, me 
thinkes, he gives thee but a FRUMPE, In 
telling how thee kist a wenches rumpe. 

1662. Rump Songs, 'Arsy-Varsy, etc., 
ii., 47. As a preface of honor and not as 
a FRUMP, First with a Sir reverence ushers 
the Rump. 

1668. DRYDEN, An Evening's Love'' 
Act IV. Sc. 3. Not to be behindhand 
with you in your FRUMPS, I give you back 
your purse of gold. 

2. (common). A slattern ; 
more commonly a prim old lady ; 
the correlative of FOGEY (q.v.). 
Fr. , un graillon. 

1831. J. R. PLANCHE, Olympic 
Revels, Sc. i. Cheat, you stingy FRUMP ! 
Who wants to cheat ? 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
I., p. 157. Get into the hands of the other 

Old FRUMPS. 



Frmnper. 



79 



Fub. 



1857. THACKERAY, Virginians, ch. 
xxxi. She is changed now, isn't she ? 
What an old Gorgon it is ! She is a great 
patroness of your book-men, and when that 
old FRUMP was young they actually made 
verses about her. 

3. (old). A cheat ; a trick. 

1602. ROWLAND, Greene's Ghost, 
37. They come off with their . . . FRUMPS 

Verb (old). To mock; to in- 
sult. 

1589. NASHE, Month's Mind, in 
Works, Vol. I., p. 158. One of them . . . 
maketh a iest of Princes, and ' the troubling 
of the State, and offending of her Maiestie, ' 
hee turneth of with a FRUMPING forsooth, 
as though it were a toie to think of it. 

1593. G. HARVEY, Pierces Super, in 
Works II., 107. That despiseth the graces 
of God, flowteth the constellations of heaven, 
FRUMPETH the operations of nature. 

1609. Man in the Moone. Hee . . . 
FRUMPETH those his mistresse frownes on. 

1757. GARRICK, Irish Widow, I., i. 
Yes, he was FRUMPED, and called me old 
blockhead. 



FRUMPER, subs. (old). A sturdy 
man ; a good blade. 

1825. KENT, Modern Flash Diet., 



FRUMPISH, adj. (colloquial). 
Cross-grained ; old-fashioned and 
severe in dress, manners, morals, 
and notions ; ill-natured ; given 
to frumps. Also FRUMPY. 

1589. GREENE, Tullies Love, in 
wks. vii., 131. Who were you but as 
fauourable, as you are FRUMPISH, would 
soone censure by my talke, how deepe I 
am reade in loues principles. 

1701. FARQUHAR, Sir Harry 
Wildair, Act. V., Sc. 5. She got, I don't 
know how, a crotchet of jealousy in her 
head. This made her FRUMPISH, but we 
had ne'er an angry word. 

1757. FOOTE, Author, Act II. And 
methought she looked very FRUMPISH and 
jealous. 

1764. O'HARA, Midas, I., 3. La! 
mother, why so FRUMPISH ? 



1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend, 
Bk. I., ch. xi. ' Don't fancy me a FRUMPY 
old married woman, my dear ; I was mar- 
ried but the other day, you know.' 

1889. Modern Society, 12 Oct., p 
1271, col. 2. Quite an elderly and super- 
annuated look is given to the toilette which 
is finished off by a woollen cloud or silken 
shawl, and only invalids and sixty-year-old 
women should be allowed such FRUMPISH 
privileges. 

FRUSHEE, subs. (Scots'). An open 
jam tart. 

FRY, verb (common). To translate 
into plain English. Cf., BOIL 

DOWN. 

1881. JAS. PAYN, Grape from a 
Thorn, ch. xxx. ' I shall repose the great- 
est confidence in you, my dear girl, which 
one human being can entrust to another.' 
was one of its sentences, which, when it 
came ' to be FRIED,' meant that she should 
delegate to her the duties of combing Fido 
and cutting her canary's claws. 

GO AND FRY YOUR FACE, phr. 
(common). A retort expressive 
of incredulity, derision, or con- 
tempt. 

FRYING-PAN. To JUMP FROM THE 

FRYING - PAN INTO THE FIRE, 

verb. phr. (common). To go 
from bad to worse. Cf. , ' from 
the smoke into the smother ' (As 
You Like it, i., 2.). Fr., tomber 
de la poele dans la braise, 

1684. BUNYAN, Pilgrim's Progress, 
Part II. Some, though they shun the 
FRYING-PAN, do leap into the fire. 

To FRY THE PEWTER, verb 
phr. (thieves'). To melt down 
pewter measures. 

F SHARP, subs. phr. (common). 
A flea ; cf. , B flat. 

FUANT, subs. (old). Excrement. 
B.E., Diet, of the Canting Crew. 

FUB, verb. (old). To cheat ; to 
steal ; to put off with false 
excuses. Also Fu BBERY = cheat- 
ing, stealing, deception. 



Fubsey. 



Fucking. 



1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV., 
II., i. I have borne, and borne, and borne, 
and have been FUBBED OFF, and FUBBED 
OFF from this day to that day. 

1604. MARSTON, Malcontent, i., 3. 
O no ; but dream the most fantastical. O 
heaven ! O FUBBERY ! FUBBERY ! 

1619. FLETCHER, Mons. Thomas, ii., 
2. My letter FUBB'D too. 

1647. CARTWRIGHT, Ordinary iv., 
4. I won't be FUBBED. 



FUBSEY or FUBSY, adj. (old). 
Plump ; fat ; well-filled. FUBSY 
DUMMY = a well-filled pocket 
book ; FUBSY wench = a plump 
girl. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1825. English Spy, I., p. 188. Old 
dowagers, their FUBSY faces, Painted to 
eclipse the Graces. 

1837. MARRYAT, Snarley-ymv, I., 
ch. viii. Seated on the widow's little 
FUBSY sofa. 

FUBSINESS, subs, (common). 
Any sort of fatness. 

FUCK, subs, (venery). I. An act 
of coition. For synonyms, see 
GREENS. 

2. (venery). The seminal 
fluid. For synonyms, see CREAM. 

Verb, (common). To copulate. 
For synonyms, see GREENS and 
RIDE. 

c. 1540. DAVID LYNDSAY, 'Flyting 
ivith King James' Aye FUKKAND like 
ane furious fornicator. 

1568. CLERK, Bannatyne MSS., 
Hunterian Soc. Publication, p. 298. He 
clappit fast, he kist, he chukkit, As with 
the glaikkis he wer ourgane; Yit be his 
feiris he wald haif FUKKIT. 

1568. Anonymous, Bannatyne MSS., 
Hunterian Soc. Publication, p. 399. 'In 
Somer when Flouris will Smell.' Allace ! 
said sch, my awin sweit thing, Your 
courtly FUKKING garis me fling, Ye wirk 
sae weill. 



1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes, 
Fottere. To jape ; to sarde, to FUCKE ; 
to swive ; to occupy. 

1620. PERCY, Folio MSS., p. 459. 
[Hales and Furnivall, 1867.] A mighty 
mind to clipp, kisse, and to FFUCK her. 

1647-80. ROCHESTER, l Written under 
Nellys Picture' Her father FUCKED 
them right together. 

1683. EARL OF DORSET, 'A Faithful 
Catalogue.' From St. James's to the 
Land of Thule, There's not a whore who 
F s so like a mule. 

c. 1716-1746. ROBERTSON of Struan, 
Poems, 256. But she gave proof that she 
could f k, Or she is damnably bely'd. 

1728. BAILEY, English Diet., s.v. 
FUCK . . . Feminam subigitare. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. F K, 

to copulate. 

c. 1790(?). BURNS, Merry Muses. And 
yet misca's a poor thing That FUCKS for 
its bread. 



FUCKABLE, adj. (venery). 
Desirable. Also FUCKSOME. 

FUCKER, subs, (common). i. A 
lover; a FANCY JOSEPH (q.v.). 

2. (common). A term of 
endearment, admiration, derision, 
etc. 

FUCK-FINGER, subs. phr. (venery). 
A fricatrix. 

FUCK- FIST, subs. phr. (venery). A 
FRIGSTER (q.v.}\ a masturbator. 
For synonyms, see MILKMAN. 

FUCK- HOLE, subs. phr. (venery). 
The female pudendum. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

FUCKING, subs, (venery). Generic 
for the ' act of kind. ' 

1568. SCOTT, Bannatyne MSS., 
Hunterian Soc. Publication, p. 363. ' To 
the Derisioun of Wantoun Wemen.' Thir 
foure, the suth to sane, Enforsis thame 
to FUCKING . . . Quod Scott. 



Puckish. 



Si 



Fuddled. 



1575. Satirical Poems, etc., Scottish 
Text Soc. Pub. (1889-90) i., 208. 'A 
Lewd Ballat.' To se forett the holy frere 
his fukking so deplore. 

Adj. (common). A quali- 
fication of extreme contumely. 

Adv. (common). I. Intensi- 
tive and expletive ; a more 
violent form of BLOODY 
See FOUTERING. 

FUCKISH, adj. (venery). Wanton; 
PROUD (q*v.); inclined for 
coition. 

FUCKSTER, subs, (venery). A 
good PERFORMER (q.v.}\ one 
specially addicted to the act. A 

WOMAN-FUCKER (FLORIO), but 

in feminine FUCKSTRESS. 

FUD, subs, (venery). The pubic 
hair. For synonyms, see 
FLEECE. Also the tail of a hare 
or rabbit. 

1785. BURNS, The Jolly Beggars. 
They scarcely left to co'er their FUDS. 

FUDDLE, subs, (common). i. 
Drink. [Wedgwood : A corrup- 
tion of FUZZ.] 

1621. BURTON, Anatomy of Melan- 
choly. The university troop dined with 
the Earl of Abingdon and came back well 
FUZZED. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew, s.v. FUDDLE, Drink. ' This 
is rum FUDDLE, c. this is excellent Tipple.' 

1705. WARD, Hudibras Redivivus, I., 
Pt. iv., p. 18. And so, said I, we sipp'd 
our FUDDLE, As women in the straw do 
caudle, 'Till every man had drown'd his 
noddle. 

1733. BAILEY, Erasmus, p. 125 
fed. 1877,). Don't go away ; they have 
had their dose of FUDDLE. 

2. (common). A drunken 
bout ; a DRUNK. 

1864. Glasgow Citizen, 9 Dec. 
Turner is given to a FUDDLE at times. 



Verb, (colloquial). To be 
drunk. 

1720. DURFEY, Pills, etc., vi., 265. 
All day he will FUDDLE. 

1754. B. MARTIN, Eng. Diet. ( 2 nd 
ed.). To FUDDLE, i. To make a person 
drunk. 2. To grow drunk. 

1770. FOOTE. Lame Lover, iii. 
Come, Hob or Nob, Master Circuit let 
us try if we can't FUDDLE the serjeant. 

1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. x. 
He boxed the watch ; he FUDDLED himself 
at taverns ; he was no better than a 
Mohock. 

1889. Echo, is Feb. If rich, you 
may FUDDLE with Bacchus all night, And 
be borne to your chamber remarkably 
tight. 

FUDDLECAP (or FUDDLER), subs. 

(common). A drunkard ; a boon 
companion. For synonyms, see 
LUSHINGTON. 

1607. DEKKER, Jests to make you 
Merie, in wks. (GROSART) ii., 299. And 
your perfect FUDDLECAP [is known] by his 
red nose. 

d. 1682. T. BROWNE, Works, iii. 
93. True Protestant FUDDLECAPS. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. FUDDLECAP, a drunkard. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.) FUDDLECAP (S.) one that loves 
tippling, an excessive drinker, or drunkard. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg.Tongue, s.v. 

FUDDLED, adj. (colloquial). 
Stupid with drink. For synonyms, 
see DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1661. PEPYS, Diary, 8 March 
After dinner, to drink all the afternoon 
... at last come in Sir William Wale, 
almost FUDDLED. 

1713. Guardian, No. 145. It was 
my misfortune to call in at Tom's last 
night, a little FUDDLED. 

1730. THOMSON, A utumn, 537. The 
table floating round, And pavement faith- 
less tO the FUDDLED foot. 

1838. DICKENS, Nick. Nickleby, ch. 
lx., p. 485. You're a little FUDDLED to- 
6 



Fudge. 



82 



Fudge. 



night, and may not be able to see this as 
clearly as you would at another time. 

1841. Punch, I., p. 74. The Sultan 
got very FUDDLED last night with forbidden 
juice in the harem, and tumbled down the 
ivory steps. 

1864. Glasgow Citizen, 19 Nov. No 
other word has so many equivalents as 
1 drunk.' . . . One very common and 
old one has escaped Mr. Hotten 

FUDDLED. 

1888. Daily News, 28 Nov. Music 
halls would soon decrease in numbers if 
drink were not sold in them, for sober 
people would not go to see spectacles only 
attractive to those who were half 

FUDDLED. 

FUDGE, subs, (colloquial). Non- 
sense ; humbug ; an exaggeration ; 
a falsehood. [Provincial French, 
fuche, feuche ; an exclamation of 
contempt from Low Ger. fuisch 
= begone ; see, however, quots. 
1700 and 1712.] Also as an ex- 
clamation of contempt. 

1700. ISAAC DISRAELI, Notes on the 
Navy. There was, in our time, one 
Captain Fudge, a commander of a 
merchant-man ; who, upon his return from 
a voyage, always brought home a good 
cargo of lies ; insomuch that now, aboard 
ship, the sailors, when they hear a great 
lie, cry out FUDGE. 

1712. W. CROUCH, A Collection of 
Papers. In the year 1664 we were 
sentenced for banishment to Jamaica by 
Judges Hyde and Twisden, and our 
number was 55. We were put on board 
the ship Black Eagle ; the master's name 
was FUDGE, by some called LYING 
FUDGE. 

17(56 GOLDSMITH, Vicar of Wakefield, 
ch. xi. Who . . . would cry out FUDGE ! 
an expression which displeased us all, and, 
in some measure, damped the rising spirit 
of the conversation. 

1841. LYTTON, Night and Morning, 
Bk. II., ch. vii. Very genteel young 
man prepossessing appearance (that's a 
FUDGE!) highly educated; usher in a 
school eh? 

1850. THACKERAY, Rebecca and 
Roivena, ch. i. Her ladyship's proposition 
was what is called bosh ... or FUDGE in 
plain Saxon. 



1861. Comhill Magazine, iv., 102. 
' A Cumberland Mare's Nest.' ... Up 
jumped the worthy magistrate, And 
seizing ' Burn,' Of justices the oracle and 
badge, he straight Descended tol his 
' lion's den ' (a sobriquet in FUDGE meant) 
Where he, 'a second Daniel,' had often 
1 come to judgment.' 

1864. Tangled Talk, p. 108. It is 
FUDGE to tell a child to ' love' every living 
creature a tapeworm, for instance, such 
as is bottled up in chemists windows. 

1865. Morning Star, i June. Old as 
I am and half -woor out, I would lay (too 
bad, Mr. Henley, this) upon my back and 
hallo FUDGE ! 

1882. Daily Telegraph, 5 Oct., p. 2, 
ccl. 2. Much that we hear concerning the 
ways and means of the working classes is 
sheer FUDGE. 

Verb, (colloquial). I. To 
fabricate ; to interpolate ; to 
contrive without proper materials. 

1776. FOOTE, The Bankrupt, iii., 2. 
That last ' suppose ' is FUDGED in. 

1836. MARRY AT, Midshipman Easy, 
ch. xviii. By the time that he did know 
something about navigation, he discovered 
that his antagonist knew nothing. Before 
they arrived at Malta, Jack could FUDGE a 
day's work. 

1858. SHIRLEY BROOKS, Gordian Knot. 
Robert Spencer was hiding from his 
creditors, or FUDGING medical certificates. 

1859. G. A. SALA, in John Bull, 21 
May. I had provided myself with a good 
library of books of Russian travel, and so 
FUDGED my Journey Due North. 



2. (schoolboys') To copy ; 
to crib ; to dodge or escape. 

1877. BLANCH. The Blue Coat Boys 
97. FUDGE, verb., trans, and intrans. 
To prompt a fellow in class, or prompt one- 
self in class artificially. Thence to tell ; 
e.g., 'FUDGE me what the time is.' 

3. (common). To botch j to 
bungle ; to MUFF (q.v.) 

4. (schoolboys'). To advance 
the hand unfairly at marbles. 



P T 



Fug. 



Full. 



FUG, verb (Shrewsbury School). 
To stay in a stuffy room. 



. (venery). To possess; 
TO HAVE (q.v.}. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 126. 
Who FUGELLED the Parson's fine Maid. 

FUGGY, subs, (schoolboys'). A hot 
roll. 

Adj. (Shrewsbury School). 
Stuffy. 

FUGO, subs, (obsolete). The 
rectum, or (COTGRAVE) 'bung- 
hole.' 

1720. DURFEY, Pills, etc., vi., 247. 
This maid, she like a beast turned her FUGO 
to the East. 

FULHAMS or FULLAMS, subs. (old). 
Loaded dice ; called ' high ' or 
' low ' FULHAMS as they were 
intended to turn up high or low. 
Cf., GOURDS. [Conjectural ly, 
because manufactured at Fulham, 
or because that village was a 
notorious resort of blacklegs.] 
For synonyms, see UPHILLS. 

1594. NASHE, Unf. Traveller, in 
wks. v., 27. The dice of late are growen 
as melancholy as a dog, high men and low 
men both prosper alike, langrets, FULLAMS, 
and all the whole fellowshippe of them will 
not affoord a man his dinner. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE. Merry Wives 
of Windsor, i., 3. Let vultures gripe thy 
guts ! for gourd, and FULLAM holds, And 
high and low beguile the rich and poor. 

1599. JONSON, Every Man out of His 
Hum., iii., i. Car.: Who! he serve? 
'sblood, he keeps high men, and low men, 
he ! he has fair living at Fullam. 
[Whalley's note in Gifford's Jonson, ' The 
dice were loaded to run high or low ; 
hence they were called high men or low 
men, and sometimes high and low 
FULLAMS. Called FULLAMS either because 
F. was the resort of sharpers, or because 
they were chiefly made there.] 

1664. BUTLER, Hudibras, Part II., 
C. i., 1. 642. But I do wonder you should 
chuse This way t' attack me with your 
muse, As one cut out to pass your tricks 
on, With FULHAMS of poetic fiction. 



[Note in Dr. Nash's Ed., vol. I., 
p. 272 (Ed. 1835). ' That is, with cheats 
or impositions. FULHAM was a cant word 
for a false die, many of them being made 
at that place.'] 

1822. SCOTT, Fortunes of Nigel, ch. 
xxiii. Men talk of high and low dice, 
FULHAMS and bristles . . . and a hundred 
ways of rooking besides. 

2. (colloquial). A sham ; a 
MAKE-BELIEVE (q.v.). [From 
sense i.] 

1664. BUTLER, Hudibras, ii., i, 
FULHAMS of poetic fiction. 

FULHAM VIRGIN, subs. phr. (collo- 
quial). A fast woman. Cf., 
BANKSIDE LADY; COVENT 
GARDEN NUN; ST. JOHN'S WOOD 
VESTAL, etc. 

FULK, verb (old schoolboys'). To 
use an unfair motion of the hand 
in plumping at taw. GROSE. 

FULKE, verb (venery). To copulate. 
[A euphemism suggested by Byron 
in Don Juan, the first and last 
words of which, so adepts tell 
you, are ' I ' and ' FULKE.'] 

FULKER, subs. (old). A pawn- 
broker. For synonyms, see UNCLE. 

1566. GASCOIGNE, Supposes, ii., 3. 
The FULKER will not lend you a farthing 
upon it. 

FULL, adj. (colloquial). i. Drunk. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

1888. Detroit Free Press, 15 Dec. 
When he was FULL the police came and 
jugged. 

2. (turf). Used by book- 
makers to signify that they have 
laid all the money they wish 
against a particular horse. 

FULL-GUTS, subs. phr. (com- 
mon). A swag-bellied man or 
woman. 



8 4 



Full. 



A FULL HAND, subs. phr. 
(American waiters'). Five large 
beers. For analogous expressions, 
see Go. 

FULL IN THE BELLY, subs. phr. 
(colloquial). With child. 

FULL IN THE PASTERNS (or 
THE HOCKS), subs. phr. (collo- 
quial). Thick-ankled. 

FULL TEAM, subs. phr. 
(American). An eulogium. A 
man is a FULL TEAM when of 
consequence in the community. 
Variants are WHOLE TEAM, or 

WHOLE TEAM AND A HORSE TO 

SPARE. Cf., ONE-HORSE = mean, 
insignificant, or strikingly small. 

FULL IN THE WAISTCOAT, adj. 
phr. (colloquial). Swag-bellied. 

FULL OF 'EM, adj. phr. (com- 
mon). Lousy; nitty; full of 
fleas. 

FULL TO THE BUNG, adj. phr. 
(colloquial). Very drunk. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

To HAVE (or WEAR) A FULL 
SUIT OF MOURNING, verb. phr. 
(pugilists'). To have two black 
eyes. HALF - MOURNING = one 
black eye. For synonyms, see 
MOUSE. 

TO COME FULL BOB, verb, 
phr. (old colloquial). To come 
suddenly ; to come full tilt. 

1672. MARVELL, Rehearsal Trans- 
posed (in Grosart, iii., 414). The page and 
you meet FULL BOB. 

FULL AGAINST, adv. phr. i. 
Dead, or decidedly opposed to, a 
person, thing, or place. 



FULL-BOTTOMED (or 

-BREECHED, Or -POOPED), adv. 

phr. (colloquial). Broad in the 
behind; BARGE- ARSED (q.v.) 

FULL-FLAVOURED, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). Peculiarly rank : 
as a story, an exhibition of pro- 
fane swearing, an emission of wind, 
etc. 

FULL - FLEDGED, adv. phr. 
(venery). Ripe for defloration. 

FULL-GUTTED, adv. phr. (collo- 
quial). Stout ; swag- bellied. 

FULL OF EMPTINESS, adv. 
phr. (commoTi). Utterly void. 

FULL ON,aafo. phr. (colloquial). 
Set strongly in a given direc- 
tion, especially in an obscene 
sense : e.g. , FULL ON FOR IT or 
FULL ON FOR ONE = ready and 
willing au possible. 

AT FULL CHISEL, adv. phr. 
(American). At full speed; with 
the greatest violence or im- 
petuousity. Also FULL DRIVE; 

FULL SPLIT. Cf., HICKETY 
SPLIT ; RIPPING ; STAVING 
ALONG ; TWO-THIRTY, etc. 

IN FULL BLAST, SWING, etc., 
adv. phr. (colloquial). In the 
height of success ; in hot pursuit. 

1859. SALA, Twice Round the Clock, 
5 a.m., Part I. At five a.m. the publica- 
tion of the Times newspaper is, to use a 
north-country mining expression, in ' FULL 
BLAST.' 

1884. Daily News, Feb. 9, p. 5, col. 
2. If he visit New York in that most 
pleasant season, the autumn, he will find 
that the ' fall ' trade is ' in FULL BLAST.' 

1888. Daily Telegraph, 17 Nov. 
By half-past ten o'clock the smoking-room 

was IN FULL SWING. 

IN FULL DIG, adv. phr. (com- 
mon). On full pay. 



Fuller's Earth. 



Fumbler's Hall. 






IN FULL FEATHER, see 

FEATHER. 

IN FULL FIG. i. See FIG (to 
which may be added the follow- 
ing illustrative quotations). 

1836. M. SCOTT, Cruise of the 
Midge, p. 178. In front of this shed 
FULL FIG, in regular Highland costume, 
philabeg, short hose, green coatee, bonnet 
and feather, marched the bagpiper. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Cringle's Log, ch. 
xi. Captain Transom, the other lieutenant, 
and myself in full puff, leading the van, 
followed by about fourteen seamen. 

1838. HALIBURTON, Clockmaker, 
(2nd ed.), ch. viii. ' Lookin 1 as pleased as 
a peacock when it's IN FULL FIG with its 
head and tail up.' 

1841. Punc h, i., p. 26, col. i. Dressed 
IN FULL FIG sword very troublesome 
getting continually between my legs. 

1874. MRS. H. WOOD, Johnny 
Ludlow (ist ed.), No. IV., p. 62. When 
our church bells were going for service, 
Major Parrifer's carriage turned out with 
the ladies all IN FULL FIG. 

2. adv. phr. (venery). Said 
of an erection of the penis ; 
PRICK-PROUD (q.v.\ For syn- 
onyms, see HORN. 

LIKE A STRAW-YARD BULL : 
FULL OF FUCK AND HALF STAR- 
VED, phr. (venery). A friendly 
retort to the question, ' How goes 
it?' i.e., How are you? 

FULL OF IT, phr. (common). 
With child. 

FULL OF GUTS, phr. (collo- 
quial). Full of vigour ; excellently 
inspired and done : as a picture, 
a novel, and so forth. See GUTS. 

FULL OF BEANS, see BEANS. 
FULL OF BREAD, see BREAD. 



FULLER'S EARTH, subs. phr. (old). 
Gin. For synonyms, see SAT' N. 



1821. Real Life in London, i., 394. 
The _ swell covies and out-and-outers find 
nothing so refreshing, after a night's spree, 
when the victualling office is out of order, 
as a little FULLER'S EARTH, or dose of 
Daffy's. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
iii., 3. Bring me de kwarten of de FUL- 
LER'S EARTH. 

FULLIED. TO BE FULLIED, verb. 

phr. (thieves'). To be committed 
for trial. [From the newspaper 
expression, 'Fully committed.'] 
Fr., fore mis sur la planche au 
pain. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, London Lab. 
and Lon. Poor, Vol. iii., p. 397. He 
got acquitted for that there note after he 
had me ' pinched ' (arrested). I got FUL- 
LIED (fully committed). 

1879. HORSLEY, ' Autobiography of a 
Thief,' in Macmillaris Magazine, xl., 
506. I ... was then FULLIED and got 
this stretch and a half. 

1889. Answers, 13 April, p. 313. At 
the House of Detention I often noticed such 
announcements as 'Jack from Bradford 
FULLIED for smashing, and expects seven 
stretch,' i.e., fully committed for trial for 
pas ; ing bad money, and expects seven 
years' penal servitude. 

FULNESS. THERE'S NOT FULNESS 
ENOUGH IN THE SLEEVE TOP. 
phr. (tailors'). A derisive answer 
to a threat. 

FUMBLER, subs. (old). An im- 
potent man. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the. 
Canting Crew. FUMBLER, c., an upper- 
forming husband ; one that is insufficient ; 
a weak Brother. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., vi., 312. 
The old FUMBLER (title). 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

c 1790. BURNS, ' David and Bath- 
sheba,' p. 40. ' By Jove,' says she, ' what's 
this I see, my Lord the King's a FUMBLER.' 

FUMBLER'S HALL, subs. phr. (ven- 
ery). The female pudendum. 
See, however, quot. 1690. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 



Fumbles. 



86 



Funds. 



1690. B. E., New Diet, of the 
Canting Crew. FUMBLER'S HAI.L, the 
place where such (FUMBLERS, q.v.) are to 
be put for their non-performance. 

FREE OF FUMBLER'S HALL, 
phr. Said of an impotent man. 



FUMBLES, subs, (thieves'). Gloves 

1825. KENT, Modern Flash. Diet 
S.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon s.v. 

1881 . New York Slang Diet. , s.v. 

FUN, subs. (old). I. A cheat; a 
trick. 

1690. B.E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew s.v. 

2. (old). The posteriors, 
or WESTERN END (MARVELL). 
Probably an abbreviation of fun- 
dament. For synonyms, see 
BLIND CHEEKS and MONOCULAR 
EYE-GLASS. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. I'll kick your FUN, c., I'll kick 
your arse. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

Verb. (old). I. To cheat ; to 
trick. Also TO PUT THE FUN ON. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. What do you FUN me? Do you 
think to Sharp or Trick me ? Ibid. He put 
the FUN upon the cull, c., he sharp'd the 
Fellow. Ibid. I FUNN'ohim, c., I was too 
hard for him ; I outwitted or rook'd him. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1859 MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogue's Lexicon, s.v. 

To POKE FUN AT, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To joke ; to ridi- 
cule ; to make a butt. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
i., p. 280. O fie! Mister Noakes, for 
shame, Mr. Noakes ! To be POKING YOUR 
FUN at us plain-dealing folks. 



1855. HALIBURTON ('Sam Slick') 
Human Nature, p. 124. I thought you 
was POKIN" FUN at me; for I am a poor 
ignorant farmer, and these people are 
always making game of me. 

1865. NEAL, Charcoal Sketches (in 
Bartlett). Jeames, if you don't be quit 
POKING FUN at me, I'll break your mouth, 
as sure as you sit there. 

TO HAVE BEEN MAKING FUN, 

verb. phr. (common). Intoxi- 
cated. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

TO HAVE (or DO) A BIT OF FUN, 
verb. phr. (venery). To procure 
or enjoy the sexual favour. For 
synonyms, see GREENS.. 

FUNCTIOR or PUNCTURE, subs. 
(Winchester College). An iron 
bracket candlestick, used for the 
nightlight in college chambers. 
[The word, says Winchester 
Notions, looks like fulctura, 
an earlier form of fulture, mean- 
ing a prop or stay with phonetic 
change of / into . ] 

1870. MANSFIELD, School Life at 
Winchester, p. 68. Beside the window 
yawned the great fireplace, with its 
dogs, on which rested the faggots and 
bars for the reception of the array of 
boilers. Above it was a rushlight, fixed in 
a circular iron pan fastened to a staple in 
the wall ; it was called the FUNCTIOR. 

FUNDAMENTAL FEATURES, subs, 
phr. (common). The posteriors. 
For synonyms, see BLIND 
CHEEKS and MONOCULAR EYE- 
GLASS. 

1818. MOORE, Fudge Family, ix., 
Aug. 21. O can we wonder, best of 
speechers, When Louis seated thus we see, 
That France's ' FUNDAMENTAL FEATURES' 
Are much the same they used to be ? 

FUNDS, subs. (colloquial). - 
Finances; e.g. 'my FUNDS are 
very low. ' 



Funeral. 



Funk. 



FUNERAL. IT'S NOT MY (or YOUR) 
FUNERAL, verb. phr. (American). 
i.e.) It is no business of mine, 
or yours. Fr. , nib dans mes blots 
( = that is not my affair). Also 
used affirmatively. 

1867. MRS. WHITNEY, A Summer in 
Leslie Goldthwaite' s Life, p. 183. ' It's 
NONE OF MY FUNERAL, I know, Sin Saxon,' 
saidMissCraydocke. ' I'm only an eleventh- 
hour helper ; but I'll come in for the 
holiday business . . . that's mere in my 
line.' 

1871. DE VERB, Americanisms, p. 

. This is NONE OF YOUR FUNERAL is 

heard quite frequently as an indirect 
rebuke for intermeddling, with the 
ludicrous undercurrent of thought, that 
the troublesome meddler has no right to 
be crying at a strange man's funeral. 

1877. Hartford Times, 17 Oct. 
Senators Elaine and Barnum passed down 
to New York, en route to Washington, on 
Wednesday last, when Barnum asked 
Elaine how he liked the news from Ohio. 
' Oh, that ISN'T MY FUNERAL, I want you 
to understand,' replied the plucky Maine 
Senator. 

1888. Missouri Republican, 8 Apr. 
After a lot of slides had been exhibited 
the audience howled for Miss Debar. It 
got so noisy that Mr. Marsh reluctantly 
exclaimed' Well, is this YOUR FUNERAL 
or mine ? ' 

FUNGUS, subs. (old). An old man. 

FUNK, subs. (old). I. Tobacco 
smoke ; also a powerful stink. 
C/.y Ger.,funfo; Walloon funki. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. What a FUNK here is ! What 
a thick smoke. Smoak of Tobacco is 
here ! Ibid. Here's a damn'd FUNK, here's 
a great stink. 

2. (vulgar). A state of 
fear ; trepidation, nervousness, 
or cowardice; a STEW (q.v.). 
Generally, with an intensitive, 
e.g., a 'mortal,' ' awful,' 'bloody,' 
' blue,' or ' pissing FUNK. Fr., 
la guenelte ; leflubart (thieves') ; 
la frousse (also = diarrhoea). 
It., filo=- thread. 



1796. WOLCOTT, Pindarina, p. 59. 
If they find no brandy to get drunk, 
Their souls are in a miserable FUNK. 

1819. MOORE. Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 21. Up he rose in a FUNK. 



1821. 
p. 91. I was in a complete FUNK. 

1837. BARHAM, I. L., Look at the 
Clock, ed. 1862, p. 39. Pryce, usually 
brimful of valour when drunk, Now ex- 
perienced what schoolboys denominate 
FUNK. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far West, 
p. Q. The mules, which was a-snorting 
with FUNK and running before the Injuns 
. . . followed her right into the corral, and 
thar they was safe. 

1850. Literary World (New York), 
30 Nov. So my friend's fault is timidity 
... I grant, then, that the FUNK is sub- 
lime, which is a true and friendly admis- 



1856. THOM AS HUGHES, Tom Brown's 
School-days, p. 196. If I was going to be 
.flogged next minute, I should be in a blue 

FUNK. 

1859. WHITTY, Political Portraits, 
p. 30. Lord Clarendon did not get through 
the business without these failures, which 
result from the intellectual process termed 
freely FUNK. 

1861. Macmillan 's Magazine, p. 211. 
I was in a real blue FUNK. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at Ox- 
ford, ch. xxxvi. 1 was in a real blue FUNK 
and no mistake. 

1870. London Figaro, 19 Oct. After 
the Fire. He was in a mortal FUNK, no 
doubt. 

1871. MAXWELL, in Life (1882), xvi., 
382. Certainly x^Pov &t is the Ho- 
meric for a blue FUNK. 

1888. Casselts Saturday Journal, 29 
., p. 305. You'r 
about nothing at all. 



Dec., p. 305. You're always in a FUNK 
thin 



3. (schoolboys'). A coward. 

1882. F. ANSTEY, Vice VersA, ch. v. 
Bosher said, ' Let's cut it,' and he and 
Peebles bolted. (They were neither of 
them FUNKS, of course, but they lost their 
heads.) 

Verb, (common). I. To smoke 
out. See FUNK THE COBBLER. 



Funk. 



88 



Funk. 



1720. DURFEY, Wit and Mirth, vi., 
303. With a sober dose Of coffee FUNKS 
his nose. 

1578. GROSE ; Vulg. Tongue. FUNK, 
to smoke, figuratively to smoke or stink 
through fear. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
ii., 2. Tom. But, I say, only see how 
confoundedly the dustman's getting hold of 
Logic we'll FUNK him. (Tom and Jerry 
smoke Logic}, Log. Oh, hang your cigars, 
I don't like it; let's have no FUNKING. 

1841. Punch, I,, p. 172. Look here 
. . . isn't it considerable clear they're a all 
FUNKING like burnt cayenne in a clay pipe, 
or couldn't they have made a raise somehow 
to get a ship of their own, or borrow one to 
send after that caged-up coon of a Macleod. 



2. (common). To terrify ; to 
shrink or quail through nervous- 
ness or cowardice. 

1858. A. MAYHEW, Paved -with Gold, 
Bk. III., ch. vi., p. 294. Perhaps we're 
only FUNKING ourselves useless, and it 
mayn't be the farm chaps at all. 



FRENCH SYNONYMS. Pani- 
quer (thieves' : Panique = sudden 
fright) ; blaguer (familiar : = to 
swagger : // avait fair de blaguer 
mais il rfetait pas a la noce = he 
put on a lot of side, but he didn't 
like it) ; avec la cceur en gargousse 
(sailors' =* with sinking heart) ; 
avoir une fluxion (popular : 
fluxion = inflammation) ; avoir 
la flemme (popular : also = 
to be idle) ; avoir le trac or trak 
(general) ; foirer (popular : foire 
= excrement) ; leziner (popular : 
also = to cheat). 

SPANISH SYNONYM. Paja- 
rear. 

ITALIAN SYNONYM. Filare 
( = to run: r., filer). 

4. (colloquial). To be nervous; 
to lose heart. 



3. (colloquial). To fear; to 
hesitate ; to shirk ; and (among 
pugilists) TO COME IT (q.V.). 

< 1836. SMITH, The Individual, ' The 
Thieves' Chaunt.' But dearer to me Sue's 
kisses far Than grunting peck or other 
grub are, And I never FUNK the lambskin 
men When I sits with her in the boozing 
ken. 

1846. Punch, X., p. 163. But as yet 
no nose is bleeding, As yet no man is 
down ; For the gownsmen FUNK the 
townsmen, And the townsmen FUNK the 
gown. 

1848. J. R. LOWELL, Biglow Papers. 
To FUNK right out o' p'lit'cal strife ain't 
thought to be the thing 

1873. M. COLLINS, Squire Sil- 
chesters Whim, ch. xvii. Come along ! 
don't FUNK it, old fellow. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To 
come it; to lose one's guts ; lo 
shit one's breeches ; to get the 
needle (athletic). 



1827. 'Advice to Tommy,' Every 
Night Book (^y the author of 'The Cigar '). 
Do not go out of your depth, unless you 
have available assistance at hand, in case 
you should FUNK. 

1856. HUGHES, Tom Brown's School 
Days, ii., p. 5. He's FUNKING; go in 
Williams ! 

1857. MONCRIEFF, The Bashful 
Man, ii., 4. Ah ! Gyp, hope I sha'n't get 
plucked; FUNK confoundedly : no matter, 
I must put a bold face on it. 

1857. HOOD, Pen and Pencil Pic- 
tures, p. 144. I have seen him out with 
the governor's hounds : he FUNKED at the 
first hedge, and I never saw him again ! 

1863. READE, Hard Cash, ii. , p. 135 
I told him I hadn't a notion of what he 
meant ! ' O yes I did,' he said, 4 Captain 
Dodd's fourteen thousand pounds ! It 
had passed through my hands.' Then I 
began TO FUNK again at his knowing that. 
... I was flustered, ye see. 

1865. H. KINGSLEY, The Hillyars 
and the Burtons, ch. xxxiii. The sound 
of the table falling was the signal for a 



Funker. 



Funnel. 



rush of four men from the inner room, who 
had to use a vulgar expression, FUNKED 
following the valiant scoundrel Sykes, but 
who now tried to make their escape, and 
found themselves hand to hand with the 
policemen. 

1871. Morning Advertiser, u Sept. 
1 Holy Abr'ham ! ' mused he vauntingly, 
' shall British sailors FUNK, While tracts 
refresh their spirits, tea washes down their 
junk?' 

1890. Pall Mall Gazette, 17 Oct. 
p. 2, col. i. They wanted badly to get 
one steamer loaded and sent to New 
Zealand. The non-union men FUNKED 
loading her on account of the union men. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gazette, 13 Feb. 
Smith's friends thought he was FUNK- 
ING, and shouted to Tom to go in and 
punch him. 

5. (schoolboys'). To move the 
hand forward unfairly in playing 
marbles ; to FUDGE (q.v.). 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. FUNK, 
to use an unfair motion of the hand in 
plumping at taw. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, i., p. 144. I've noticed them, 
too, playing at ring-taw, and one of their 
exclamations is ' Knuckle down fair, and 
no FUNKING.' 

TO FUNK THE COBBLER, Verb. 

phr. (schoolboys'). To smoke out 
a schoolmate : a trick performed 
with asafoetida and cotton stuffed 
into a hollow tube or cow's horn ; 
the cotton being lighted, the 
smoke is blown through the key- 
hole. 

1698-1700. WARD, London Spy, Pt. 
IX., p. 197. We smoak'd the Beans almost as 
bad as unlucky schoolboys us'd to do the 
COBLERS, till they sneak'd off one by one, 
and left behind 'em more agreeable Com- 
pany. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the VuJg. 
Tongue, s.v. 

See also PETER FUNK. 



2. (thieves'). A low thief. 

1848, BUNCOMBE, Sinks of London, 
etc., s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, or 
Rogues Lexicon. FUNKERS, the very 
lowest order of thieves. 

3. (colloquial). A coward. 

4. (prostitutes'). A girl that 
shirks her trade in bad weather. 

FUNKING-ROOM, subs, (medical). 
The room at the Royal College of 
Surgeons where the students 
collect on the last evening of their 
final during the addition of their 
marks, and whence each is sum- 
moned by an official announcing 
failure or success. 

1841. Punch, I., p. 225, col. 2. On 
the top of a staircase he enters a room, 
wherein the partners of his misery are col- 
lected. It is a long, narrow apartment, 
commonly known as the FUNKING-ROOM. 

FUNKSTER, subs. (Winchester 
College). A coward; one that 

FUNKS (q.V.}. 

FUNKY, adj. (colloquial). Nervous; 
frightened ; timid. 

1845. NAYLOR, Reynard the Fox, 
46. I do seem somewhat FUNKY. 

1863. C. READE, Hard Cash, I., 143. 
On his retiring with twenty-five, scored in 
eight minutes, the remaining Barkingto- 
nians were less FUNKY, and made some 
fair scores. 

1876. HINDLEY, Life and Ad-ven- 
tures of a Cheapjack, p. 237. The second 
round commences with a little cautious 
sparring on both sides, the bouncing Elias 
looking very FUNKY. 

1891. HUME NISBET, Bail Up! p. 
51. ' 1 11 noy FUNKY,' returned the China- 
man impressively. 



FUNKER, subs. (old). i. A pipe ; a 
cigar; a fire. [From FUNK = to 
smoke + ER.] 



FUNNEL, subs, (common). The 
throat. For synonyms, see GUTTER 
ALLEY. 



Fuuniment. 



furwso. 



1712. BLACKMORE, Creation, Bk. VI 
Some the long FUNNEL'S curious mouth ex- 
tend, Through which the ingested meats 
with ease descend. 



FUNNIMENT, subs, (colloquial). 
I. A joke, either practical or 
verbal. 

2. (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

FUNNY, subs, (nautical). A clinker- 
built, narrow boat for sculls. 

1837. BARHAM, I. L., Sir Rupert 
the Fearless. Sprang up through the 
waves, popped him into his FUNNY, Which 
some others already had half-filled with 
money. 

1882. Field, 28 Jan. The only ob- 
tainable craft, besides FUNNIES, pair-oars, 
and randans, were a couple of six-oars. 

To FEEL FUNNY, verb. phr. 
(common). To be overtaken 
with (i) emotion, or (2) drink: 
e.g., to wax amorous, or GET THE 
FLAVOUR ( q.v.) ; to begin to be 
the worse for liquor. 

FUNNY BIT, suds. phr. (venery). 
The female pudendum. 

FUNNY BONE, subs, (popular). The 
elbow, with the passage of the 
ulnar nerve connecting the two 
bones : the extremity of the 
humerus. 

1837. BARHAM, I. L. (Blondie 
Jacke). They have pull'd you down flat 
on your back ! And they smack, and they 
thwack, Till your FUNNY BONES crack, 
As if you were stretch'd on the rack. 

1853. THACKERAY, ' Shabby Genteel 
Story,' ch. ix. He had merely received 
a blow on that part which anatomists call 

the FUNNY BONE. 

1870. Lowell Courier. Thanks for 
your kind condolence ; I would write A 
merry rhyme in answer if I might ; But 
then confound the fall ! the very stone 
That broke my humerus hurt my FUNNY 
BONE ! 



FUNNY-MAN, subs, (common). A 
circus clown. Also a joker in 
private life. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor., III., p. 129. What I've 
earned as clown, or the FUNNY MAN. 

FUR, subs, (venery). The pubic 
hair. For synonyms, see FLEECE. 

TO MAKE THE FUR FLY. 

See FLY. 

To HAVE ONE'S FUR OUT, 
verb. phr. (Winchester College). 
To be angry. For synonyms, 
see NAB THE RUST. 

FUR AND FEATHERS, subs. phr. 
(sporting). Generic for game. 

FUR-BELOW, subs, (venery). The 
female pubic hair. For synonyms, 
see FLEECE. 

16(7). Old Catch. Adam caught Eve 
by the FUR-BELOW, And that's the oldest 
catch I know. 

FURIOSO, subs, (old). A blusterer ; 
Ital. , fiirioso raving. 

1692. RACKET. Life of Archbishop 
Williams, ii., p. 218. A violent man and 
a FURIOSO was deaf to all this. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. -Barker ; 
blower ; bobadil ; bouncer ; 
bulldozer (American) ; cacafogo ; 
Captain Bounce ; Captain Bluff ; 
Captain Grand ; Captain 

Hackam ; cutter ; fire-eater ; 
hector ; huff-cap ; humguffin ; 
gasser ; gasman ; mouth ; mouth- 
almighty ; pissfire ; pump-thund- 
er ; ramper ; roarer ; ruffler ; 
shitefire ; slangwhanger ; spitfire ; 
swashbuckler; swasher; teazer ; 
Timothy Tearcat. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
avale-tout-cru (popular : an eat- 
all-he-kills) ; unfendartat fendart 



Furk. 



Furze Bush. 



(popular : = a cutter) ; un avaleur 
de charrettes ferees (popular) ; un 
mata (printers' : from matador=z. 
bull-fighter) ; unbousineur (popu- 
lar : bousin = uproar, shindy) ; un 
bourreau de crdnes (military) : = 
a scull-destroyer; un bceufier 
(popular : =an ugly customer) ; 
un mauvais gas (familiar : 
from garfori) ; un homme qui a 
Fair de vouloir tout avaler 
(familiar : a man who looks as 
though he'd swallow the world) ; 
un croquet (popular). 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Per- 
donavidas ; Jierabras( fiera = a wild 
beast) ; bo tar ate ; macareno caca- 
= 3i shitfire). 



FURK, FERK, FIRK, verb. (Win- 
chester College). To expel ; to 
send (as on a message) ; to drive 
away. Also TO FURK UP and 
FURK DOWN. [Old English 
ferdan, High German ferken, 
Middle English to lead or send 
away.] 

FUR MEN, subs. (old). Aldermen. 
From their fur- trimmed robes. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew, s.v. 

1786. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
FURMITY- FACED, adj. phr. (old). 

White -faced (FURMITY is 
described by GROSE as 'wheat 
boiled to a jelly '). To simper 
like a FURMITY kitten (GROSE), see 
SIMPER. 



FURNISH, verb, (common). To fill 
out ; to improve in strength and 
appearance. 

FURNITURE PICTURE, subs. phr. 
(artists'). A 'picture' sold not 



as a piece of art but as a piece of 
upholstery, such things being 
turned out by the score, as pianos 
are, or three-legged stools; the 
worst and cheapest kind of POT- 
BOILER (q.v.). 

FURROW, subs, (venery). Also 
CUPID'S (or the ONE-ENDED) 
FURROW, etc. The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. To DRAW A 

STRAIGHT FURROW. See DRAW. 

TO FALL IN THE FURROW, 
verb. phr. (venery). To achieve 
emission. 

To FAIL (or DIE) IN THE 
FURROW, verb. phr. (venery). 
To do a DRY-BOB (q.v.). 

FURRY TAIL, subs. phr. (printers'). 
A non-unionist; a RAT (q.v.). 
Specifically, a workman accepting 
employment at less than ' Society' 
wages. C/., DUNG, FLINT, etc. 

FURTHER. I'LL SEE YOU FURTHER 
FIRST, phr. (colloquial). A 
denial. I'LL SOONER DIE FIRST 
(q.v.). 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lend. Lab. and 
Lend. Poor, i., p. 29. I gave a country 
lad 2d. to mind him (the donkey) in a 
green lane there. I wanted my own boy 
to do so, but he said, I'LL, SEE YOU 
FURTHER FIRST. A London boy hates 
being by himself in a lone country part. 
He's afraid of being burked. 

FUR TRADE, subs. phr. (old). 
Barristers. 

1839. REYNOLDS, Pickwick Abroad, 
ch. xxvi. Let nobs in the FUR TRADB 
hold their jaw, And let the jug be free. 



FURZE-BUSH, subs. phr. (venery). 
The female pubic hair. For 
synonyms, see FLEECE. 



Fussock. 



92 



Fuzz. 



FUSSOCK, and FUSSOCKS, subs. 
(old). Opprobrious for a fat 
woman. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FUSSOCKS, a meer FUSSOCKS, 
a Lazy Fat-Arsed Wench, a fat FUSSOCKS, 
a Flusom, Fat, Strapping Woman. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulg- 
Tongue, s.v. 

FUST (or FUST OUT), verb. (Ameri- 
can). To end in smoke ; to go to 
waste; to end in nothing. Cf., 
FIZZLE. 



FUSTIAN, subs, and adj. (old). i. 
Bombast ; bad rhetoric ; sound 
without sense : bombastic ; rant- 
ing. Now accepted. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV, 
II., 4. Thrust him downstairs; I cannot 
endure such a FUSTIAN rascal. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Twelfth Night 
II., 5. A FUSTIAN riddle. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Othello, II., 3. 
And discourse FUSTIAN with one's own 
shadow. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FusTiAN-verse, verse in words 
of lofty sound and humble sense. 

1828-45. HOOD, Poems, i., p. 105 (ed. 
1846). The saints! the bigots that in 
public spout, Spread phosphorous of zeal 
on scraps of FUSTIAN, And go like walking 
' Lucifers ' about These living bundles of 
combustion. 

2. (common). Wine ; WHITE 
FUSTIAN = champagne ; RED 

FUSTIAN = port. 

1834. W. H. AINSWORTH, Rookwood- 
p. 51 (ed. 1864). I'm as dry as a sandbed- 
Famous wine this beautiful tipple better 
than all your red FUSTIAN. Ah, how poor 
Sir Piers used to like it ! 



pallian ! you FUSTILARIAN ! I'll tickle 
your catastrophe. 



FUSTILUG (or FUSTILUGS), subs. 
(old). Apiece ofgrossness, male 
or female ; a coarse and dirty 
Blowzalinda ; a foul slut ; a fat 
stinkard. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. FUSTILUGGS, a Fulsom, 
Beastly, Nasty Woman. 

1739. JUNIUS (quoted in Encly. 
Diet.). You may daily see such FUSTI- 
LUGS walking in the streets, like so many 
tuns. 

1785. GROSE, Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue. 



FUTTER, verb, (venery). To 
copulate. Fr., f outre. [A coinage 
of Sir. R. Burton's, who makes 
continual use of it in the 
Thousand Nights and a Night. ] 
For synonyms, see GREENS and 
RIDE. Also TO DO A FUTTER. 

1885. BURTON, Thousand Nights, 
II., 332. Eating and drinking and 
PUTTERING for a year of full twelve 
months. 

1890. BURTON, Priapeia, Ep. xii. 
Thee, my girl, I shall FUTTER. 



FUTURE, TO DEAL IN FUTURES, 
verb phr. (Stock Exchange). To 
speculate for a rise or fall. 

186?. Globe, i Dec. He DEALS IN 
FUTURES, i.e., speculates in cotton with 
Stock Exchange folks, or speculates in 
securities. 



Fuzz, verb, (old). I. To shuffle 
cards minutely ; also to change 
the pack.' [GROSE.] 



FUSTILARIAN, subs. (old). A low 
fellow ; a common scoundrel. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV., 
II., t. Away, you scullion! you ram- 



(old). To be, or to make, 



2. 

drunk. 



1685. Life of Amb. Wood, 14 July. 
Came home well FUZD. 



Fuzziness. 



93 



Fyst. 



FUZZINESS, subs. (old). The con- 
dition of being in drink. Hence 
blurredness ; incoherence ; be- 
wilderment. 

FUZZY, adj. (common). I. Drunk. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. Hence blurred (as a 
picture) ; tangled ; incoherent or 
inconsequent. 

1876. HINDLEY, Life and Adven- 
tures of a Cheap Jack, p. 324. Her hus- 
band or any other man might have drunk 
six glasses, with no more hurt than just 
making him a little FUZZY. 

2. (popular). Rough; as in 
a FUZZY head ; a FUZZY cloth ; 
a FUZZY bit (= a full-grown 
wench) ; a FUZZY carpet ; etc. 

FUZZY-WUZZY, subs, (military). A 
Soudanese tribesman. 



1890. RUDYARD KIPUXG, National 
Observer, 8 Mar., p. 438, col. T. So 'ere's 
to you FUZZY-WUZZY And your 'ome in the 
Soudan, You're a pore benighted 'eathen 
but a first-class fighting man ; And 'ere's to 
you FUZZY-WUZZY with your 'ay-rick 'ead 
of 'air, You big, black bouncing beggar, 
for you bruk a British square. 

FYE-BUCK, subs. (old). Asixpence. 
For synonyms, see BENDER. 

1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
II., 56. You give a shilling to buy a 
comb, for which he gives sixpence, so 
works you for another FYE-BUCK. 

1885. Household Words, 20 June, 
p. 155. ' Buck ' is most likely a corruption 
of FYE-BUCK, a slang name for sixpence, 
which is now almost, if not altogether, 
obsolete. 



FYLCHE. See FILCH. 



FYST. See FOIST. 





AB F subs, (vulgar). 
i.Themouth; 
also GOB. For 
synonyms, see 
POTATO-TRAP. 

1785. GROSE, 
Diet, of the Vulgar 
Tongue, s.v. 

1785. BURNS, Jolly Beggars. And 
aye he gies the touzie drab The tither 
skelpin kiss, While she held up her greedy 
GAB, Just like an aumos dish. 

1820. SCOTT, The Abbot, ch. xiv. 
1 And now, my mates,' said the Abbot of 
Unreason, ' once again digut your GABS 
and be hushed let us see if the Cock of 
Kennaguhair will fight or flee the pit.' 

1890. Rare Bits, 12 Apr., p. 347. 
' Clap a stopper on your GAB and whack 
up, or I'll let 'er speak !' 

2. (vulgar). Talk ; idle babble. 
Also GABB,GABBER, and GABBLE. 

1712. Spectator, No. 389. Having 
no language among them but a confused 
GABBLE, which is neither well understood 
by themselves or others. 

1811. POOLE, Hamlet Travestied, I., 
3. Then hold your GAB, and hear what 
I've to tell. 

1863. C. READE, Hard Cash, ch. 
xxxiv. ' Hush your GAB,' said Mr. Green, 
roughly. 

1887. Punch, 10 Sept., p. in. 
Gladstone's GAB about 'masses and 
classes ' is all tommy rot. 

Verb (vulgar : O. E. , and now 
preserved in GABBLE). To talk 
fluently ; to talk brilliantly ; to lie. 

1383. CHAUCER, Canterbury Tales 
1652. I GABBE nought, so have I joye or 
blis. 



1402. [?T. OCCLEVE], Letter o/ 
Cupid, in Arber's Garner, vol. IV., p. 
59. A foul vice it is, of tongue to be 
light, For whoso mochil clappeth, gabbeth 
oft. 

1601. SHAKSPEARE, Twelfth Night, 
Act II., Sc. iii. Mai. . . . Have you no 
wit, manners, nor honesty, but to GABBLE 
like tinkers at this time of night. 

J663. BUTLER, Hudibras, pt. I., ch. 
i., p. 5. Which made some think when he 
did GABBLE Th' had h> ard three Labourers 
of Babel. 

1786. BURNS, Earnest Cry and 
Prayer, st. 10. But could I like Mont- 
gomeries fight, Or GAB like Bcswell. 

1880. G. R. SIMS, Zeph, ch. vii. An 
elderly clergyman . . . GABBLED the 
funeral service as though he were calling 
back an invoice at a draper's entering 
desk. 

1887. Punch, 10 Sept., p. in. Gals 
do like a chap as can GAB. 

GIFT OF THE GAB (or GOB), 
subs. phr. (colloquial). The gift 
of conversation; the talent for 
speech. Fr. , rf avoir pas sa langue 
dans sa poche. 

d. 1653. Z. BOYD, Book oj Job, quoted 
in brewer * Phrase and Fable, s.v. , 'GAB. 
There was a good man named Job, Who 
lived in the land of Uz, He had a good 
gift of the GOB. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant- 
ing Crew. GIFT OF THE GOB, a wide 
open Mouth ; also a good Songster, or 
bingmg-master. 

Diet, of the 



1820. SHELLEY, (Edipus Tyrannus, 
Act I You, Purganax, who have the 
GIFT o' THE GAB, Make them a solemn 
speecn. 



Gabble. 



95 



Gad. 



1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. 
xliii. And we'll have a big-wig, Charley : 
one that's got the greatest GIFT OF THE 
GAB : to carry on his defence. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, I., 250. People reckon me 
one of the best patterers in the trade. I'm 
reckoned to have the gift that is, THE 

GIFT OF THE GAB. 

1869. WHYTE-MELVILLE, M. or N., 

p. 29. I've GOT THE GIFT OF THE GAB, I 

know, and I stick at nothing. 

1870. Land. Figaro, 18 Sept. 'Of 
all gifts possessed by man,' said George 
Stephenson, the engineer, to Sir William 
Follett, ' there is none like the GIFT OF 

THE GAB.' 

1876. HINDLEY, Life and Adven- 
tures of a Cheap Jack, p. 193. Others, 
although they have the GIFT OF THE 
GAB when they are on the ground, as soon 
as they mount the cart are dumbfounded. 

To BLOW THE GAB, verb. phr. 
(vulgar). To inform ; TO PEACH 

\q.V.}. Also TO BLOW THE GAFF 
(q.V ). 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1834. AINSWORTH Rookwood, bk. 
III., ch. 5. Never BLOW THE GAB or 
squeak. 

To FLASH THE GAB, verb. phr. 
(common). To SHOW OFF (q.v.} 
in talk ; </., AIR ONE'S VOCABU- 
LARY. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 2. While his Lordship . . . that very 
great dab At the flowers of rhet'ric is 

FLASHING HIS GAB. 

GABBLE, subs, (colloquial). i. A 
gossip. Also GABBLER, GABBLE- 
GRINDER, GABBLE-MERCHANT, 
and GABBLE-MONGER. 

2. (colloquial). A voluble 
talker. 

GABBLE-MILL, subs. (American). 
i. The United States Congress. 
Also GABBLE-MANUFACTORY. 

2. (common). A pulpit. For 
synonyms, see HUMBOX. 



3. (common). The mouth. 
For synonyms, see POTATO-TRAP. 

GABLE, subs, (common). The head. 
Also GABLE-END. For synonyms, 
see CRUMPET. 

GABSTER, subs, (common). A 
voluble talker, whether eloquent 
or vain ; one having the GIFT OF 

THE GAB (q.V.). 

GAB-STRING. See GOB-STRING. 

GABY (also GABBEY and GABBY), 
subs, (common). A fool; a bab- 
bler ; a boor. Icl. gapi=. a foolish 
person, from gapa to gape. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

1856. T. HUGHES, Tom Brown's 
School Days, pt. i, ch. iii. Two boys, 
who stopped close by him, and one of 
whom, a fat GABY of a fellow, pointed at 
him and called him young ' mammy-sick.' 

1859. H. KINGSLEY, Geoffrey 
Hamlyn, ch. ix. Don't stand laughing 
there like a great GABY. 

1875. OUIDA, Signa, vol. I., ch. iv., 
p. 47. ' You have never dried your clothes, 
Bruno,' said his sister-in-law, 'What a 
GABY a man is without a wife ! ' 

GAD, subs, (common). An idle 
slattern. An abbreviation of 
GAD-ABOUT (q.V.). 

Intj. (common). An abbrevia- 
tion of BY GAD ! Cf. AGAD, 
EGAD themselves corruptions of 
BY GOD, Lit. 

ON THE GAD, cutv. phr. (old). 
i. On the spur of the moment. 

1605. SHAKSPEARE, Lear, i., 2 . 
All this is done UPON THE GAD. 

2. (colloquial). On the move, 
on the gossip. 

1818. AUSTEN, Persuasion. I have 
no very good opinion of Mrs. Charles' 
nursery maid. . . . She is always UPON 

THE GAD. 



Gadabout. 



96 



Gaff. 



3. (colloquial). On the spree 
(especially of women) ; and, by 
implication, on the town. 

To GAD THE HOOF, verb. phr. 
(common). To walk or go with- 
out shoes ; TO PAD THE HOOF 
(q.v.}. Also, more loosely, to 
walk or roam about. 

1852. SNOWDEN, Mag, Assistant, 
3rd ed., p. 447. Going without shoes, 

GADDING THE HOOF. 



GADABOUT, subs, (colloquial). A 
trapesing gossip ; as a housewife 
seldom seen at home, but very 
often at her neighbours' doors 
[From GAD = to wander, to stray 
(Cf., Lycidas: 'the gadding 
vine') + ABOUT.] Used also as an 
adjective; e.g., 'a GAD-ABOUT 
hussey.' 

GADSO, subs, (old) The penis. 
Italian cazzo. For synonyms, 
see CREAMSTICK and PRICK. 

Intj. (old: still literary and collo- 
quial). An interjection. [A relic 
of phallicism with which many 
popular oaths and exclamations 
have a direct connection, espe- 
cially in Neo-Latin dialects. A 
Spaniard cries out, CAR AJO! ( the 
member), or COJONES ! ( the 
testicles) ; an Italian says CAZZO 
(the penis} ; while'a Frenchman 
exclaims by the act itself, 
FOUTRE ! The female equivalent, 
(cotfo with the Spaniard, CONNO 
with the Italian, CON with the 
Frenchman, and CUNT with our- 
selves), was, and is, more generally 
used as an expression of con- 
tempt, which is also the case 
with the testicles. (Cf., ante, 
ALL BALLS !) Germanic oaths 
are profane rather than obscene ; 
except, perhaps, in POTZ ! and 
POTZTAUFEND ! and the English 



equivalent Pox ! which last is 
obsolete. See CATSO. [In Florio 
(A Worlde of Wordes, 1598), 
Cazzo = ' a man's privie member,' 
and cazzo di mare = a pintle fish ; 
while cazzica = 'an interjection 
of admiration and affirming. 
What? Gad's me, Gad forfend, 
tush.'] 

1697. VANBRUGH, Provoked Wife, 
iii., i. Sir? GADSO! we are to consult 
about playing the devil to night. 

1770. FOOTE, Lame Lover, i. 
Gadso ! a little unlucky. 

1838. _ DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. iv. 
' GADSO ! ' said the undertaker . . . 'that's 
just the very thing I wanted to speak to 
you about.' 

GADZOOKS I intj. (old and collo- 
quial). A corruption of GADZO 



GAFF, subs. (old). i. A fair. ' 

1754. Discoveries of John Poulter, 
p. 32. The first thing they do at a GAFF 
is to look for a room clear of company. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
The drop coves maced the joskins at the 
GAFF ; the ring-droppers cheated the 
countryman at the fair. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 22. We 
stopped at this place two days, waiting to 
attend the GAFF. 

]823. JON. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
etc., s.v. A fair is a GAFF as well as all 
the transactions enacted there. 

2. (common). A cheap, low 
music-hall or theatre ; frequently 

PENNY-GAFF, Cf., quot. 1823, 

sense i. Also DOOKIE. Fr., 
un beuglant ( = a low music-hall ; 
beugler=\.Q bellow); un bouisbouis 
(bout = brothel) ; une guinche 
(popular). See also quot. 1889. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, I., p. 46. They court for a 
time, going to raffles and GAFFS together, 
and then the affair is arranged. 

1869. GREENWOOD, Seven Curses of 
London, p. 68. A GAFF is a place where 
stage plays, according to the strict interpre- 



Gaff. 



97 



Gaffer. 



tation of the term, may not be represented. 
The actors of a drama may not correspond 
in colloquy, only in pantomime ; but the 
pieces brought out at the GAFF are seldom 
of an intricate character, and the not over- 
fastidious auditory are well content with 
an exhibition of dumb-show and gesture. 

1870. Orchestra, 18 Feb. The ab- 
solute harm done by these GAFFS does 
not consist in the subjects represented. 

1889. Notes and Queries, 7 S. vii., p. 
395, I have often heard the British soldier 
make use of the word when speaking of the 
entertainment got up for his benefit in 
barracks. 

3. (prison). A hoax ; an im- 
posture. Cf. y Fr., o^?=joke, 
deceit. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 
ch. iv., p. 312. I also saw that Jemmy's 
blowing up of me wos all GAFF. He 
knew as well as I did the things left the 
shop all right. 

1892. HUME N is BET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 227. Can you put me up 
to this other GAFF. 

4. (old sharpers'). A ring 
worn by the dealer. [From gaffe 
==a hook.] 

5. (American cock-pit). A 
steel spur. 

6. ( anglers' ) A landing 
spear, barbed in the iron. 

Verb. (old). I. To toss for 
liquor. See GAFFING. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf, s.v. 

2. (theatrical). To play in a 
GAFF (q.v. sense 2). 

TO BLOW THE GAFF, Or GAB 

(q.v.)) verb. phr. (common). To 
give information ; to let out a 
secret For synonyms, see PEACH. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. To 
BLOW THE GAB (cant;, to confess, or 
impeach a confederate. 

1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, ch. 
xliii. One of the French officers, after 
he was taken prisoner, axed me how we 



had managed to get the gun up there ; but 
I wasn't going to BLOW THE GAFF. 

_1877. Five Years Penal Servitude, 
ch. ii., p. 122. The prisoner, burning for 
revenge, quietly bides his time till the chief 
warder comes round, then asks to speak to 
him, and BLOWS THE GAFF. 

1891. Referee, 8 Mar. Under sacred 
promise not to BLOW THE GAFF I was put 
up to the method. 



GAFFER, subs. (old). i. An old 
man ; the masculine of GAMMER 
(q.v.\ Also a title of address: e.g., 
* Good day, GAFFER ! ' Cf. , 
UNCLE and DADDY. Also (see 
quot. 1710), a husband. 

1710. Dame Hurdle's Letter (quoted 
by NARES). My GAFFER only said he 
would inform himself as well as he could 
against next election, and keep a good 
conscience. 

1714. GAY, Shepherd's Week. For 
GAFFER Treadwell told us, by-the-bye, 
Excessive sorrow is exceeding dry. 

1842. TENNYSON, The Goose. Ran 
GAFFER, stumbled Gammer. 

2. (common). A master; an 
employer; a BOSS (q.v.}\ (athletic) 
a pedestrian trainer and 'farmer'; 
and (navvies') a gang-master or 
GANGER (q.v.}. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., iv., 123. 
In comes our GAFFER Underwood, And 
sits him on the bench. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Diet, (sth ed.) 
GAFFER (S.) a familiar word mostly used 
in the country for master. 

1885. Daily News, 24 Jan., p. 3, 
c. i. They go and work at fivepence, 
and some on 'em as low as threepence 
halfpenny, an hour ; that's just half what 
we get, and the GAFFERS keep 'em on and 
sack us. 

1888. Sportsman, 20 Dec. Comic 
enough were some of the stories ' Jemmy ' 
told of his relations with ' the GAFFER.' 

1889. Broadside Ballad, 'The Gaf- 
fers of the Gang.' We are the boys that 
can do the excavations, We are the lads for 
the 'atin' and the dhrinkin', With the ladies 
we are so fascinatin', Because we are the 
GAFFERS of the gang. 

7 



Gaffing. 



98 



Gag. 



3. (old). A toss-penny; a 
gambler with coins. From 
GAFFING (q.v.\ 

1828. JON BEE, Living- Picture of 
London, p. 241. If the person calling for 
' man ' or ' woman ' is not right or wrong 
at five guesses, neither of the GAFFERS 
win or lose, but go again. 

Verb, (venery). To copulate. 
For synonyms, see GREENS and 
RIDE. 



GAFFING, subs. (old). See quot. 

1821. PIERCE EGAN, Life in London, 
p. 279. GAFFING was unfortunately for 
him introduced. Ibid. NOTE. A mode of 
tossing for drinks, etc., in which three coins 
are placed in a hat, shaken up, and then 
thrown on the table. If the party to ' call ' 
calls 'heads' (or 'tails') and all three 
coins are as he calls them, he wins ; if 
not, he pays a settled amount towards 
drinks. 

1839. BRANDON, Poverty, Mendicity, 
and Crime, s.v. 



GAG, subs, (common). I. A joke ; 
an invention ; a hoax. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
s.v. _ GAG a grand imposition upon the 
public ; as a mountebank s professions, his 
cures, and his lottery-bags, are so many 
broad GAGS. 

1871. All the Year Round, 18 Feb., 
p. 288. You won't bear malice now, will 
you? All GAG of mine, you know, about 
old Miss Ponsonby. 

1885. Daily News, 16 May, p. 5, 
c. 2. ' The Mahdi sends you lies 
from Khartoum, and laughs when you 
believe them,' said a native, lately. We 
need not gratify the Mahdi by believing 
any bazaar-GAG he may circulate. 

2. (theatrical). Expressions 
interpolated by an actor in his 
part : especially such as can be 
repeated again and again in 
the course of performance. 
Certain plays, as The Critic, are 
recognised 'gag-pieces,' and in 
these the practice is accounted 
legitimate. Cf., Hamlet, iii., 2 : 



'And let those, that play your 
clowns, say no more than is set 
down for them.' Cf., WHEEZE. 
Fr. , la cocotte (specifically additions 
to vocal scores). A typical ex- 
ample is the ' I believe you, my 
boy ! ' of the late Paul Bedford. 
In the quot. under 1851-61, it is 
probable that GAG = PATTER (q.v. ) 

1841. Punch, i., p. 105. I shall do 
the liberal in the way of terms, and get up 
the GAG properly. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Lend. Poor, iii., p. 148. When I go out I 
always do my own GAG, and I try to knock 
out something new. 

1866. W. D. HOWELLS, Venetian 
Life, ch. v. . . . I have heard some 
very passable GAGS at the Marionette, but 
the real commedia a braccio no longer 
exists. 

_ 1889. Globe, 12 Oct., p. 4, c. 4. In 
a high-class music hall it is a rule that no 
song must be sung till it is read and signed 
by the manager, and this applies even to 
the GAG. 

1890. Pall Mall Gazette, 5 Mar., 
p. 4, c. 3. Mr. Augustus Harris pointed 
out that if the clause were carried the 
penalty would, in many cases, be incurred 
twenty times in one scene, for actors and 
singers were continually introducing GAG 
into their business. 

3. (American). A common- 
wealth of players in which the 
profits are shared round. Cf., 
CONSCIENCE. 

1847. DARLEY, Drama in Pokerville, 
p. 124. The artist .... merely 
remarking that he had thought of a GAG 
which would bring them through, mounted 
a ladder, and disappeared. 

4. (American). A fool ; i.e., a. 
thing to laugh at. For synonyms, 
see CABBAGE- and BUFFLE-HEAD 
and SAMMY SOFT. 

1838-40. HALIBURTON, The Clock- 
maker, p. 46. ' Sam,' says he, ' they tell 
me you broke down the other day in the 
House of Representatives and made a 
proper GAG of yourself.' 



Gag. 



99 



Gage. 



5. (Christ's Hospital). Boiled 
fat beef. GAG-EATER = a term of 
reproach. 

1813. LAMB, Chris fs Hospital, in 
wks., p. 324 (ed. 1852). L. has recorded 
the repugnance of the school to GAGS, or 
the fat of fresh beef boiled ; and sets it 
down to some superstition. ... A GAG- 
EATER in our time was equivalent to a 
ghoul . . . and held in equal estimation. 

6. (Winchester College). An 
exercise (said to have been 
invented by Dr. Gabell) which 
consists in writing Latin criti- 
cisms on some celebrated piece, 
in a book sent in about once a 
month. In the Parts below Sixth 
Book and Senior Part, the GAGS 
consisted in historical analysis. 
[An abbreviation of ' gathering. '] 

1870. MANSFIELD, School-life at 
Winchester College ; p. 108. From time to 
time, also, they had to write ... an 
analysis of some historical work ; these 
productions were called GATHERINGS (or 
GAGS). 

Verb, trs. and intrs. (theatrical). 
I. To speak GAGS (q.v.), sense 
2. Fr., cascader. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab, and 
Land. Poor, III., 149. He has to GAG, 
that is, to make up words. 

1852. DICKENS, Bleak House., ch. 
xxxix. The same vocalist GAGS in the 
regular business like a man inspired. 

1883. Referee, 15 April, p. 3, c. i. 
Toole . . . cannot repress a tendency to 
GAG and to introduce more than is set 
down for him by the author. 

2. (old). To hoax ; to puff. 

1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
II., 154. Having discovered the weak 
side of him he means to GAG. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
etc., s.v. A showman cries 'Walk in, 
ladies and gentlemen, they're all alive,' 
but the spectators soon perceive 'tis all 
stuff, reproach Mr. Merryman, and he, in 
excuse, swears he said ' they -were ' and 
not ' are alive.' He thus GAGS the public. 



1876. HINDLEY, Life and Adven- 
tures of a Cheap Jack, p. 325. Then they 
GAG the thing up, and send their bills out 
about the immense cost of scenery and 
dresses, and other expenses they are at, 
etc. 



3. (thieves'). To inform ; to 
ROUND ON (q.v.) ; also TO BLOW 
THE GAG. Cf.y GAFF, GAB, 
etc. For synonyms, see PEACH. 

1891. Morning- Advertiser, 28 Mar. 
She . . . besought them with (crocodile) 
tears not to GAG on them, in other words 
not to give information to the police. 

ON THE HIGH GAG., adv. phr. 
(old). On the whisper ; telling 
secrets ; cf., verb, sense 3. 

1823. KENT, The Modem Flash 
Diet., s.v. 

1848. BUNCOMBE, Sinks of London, 
etc., s.v. 

ON THE LOW GAG, adv. phr. 
(old). On the last rungs of 
beggary, ill-luck, or despair. 

1823. KENT, The Modern Flash 
Diet., s.v. 

1848. BUNCOMBE, The Sinks of Lon- 
don, etc., s.v. 



To STRIKE THE GAG, verb, 
phr. (old). To cease from chaff- 
ing. 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Shepfard 
(ed. 1889), p. 43. 'A clever device,' 
replied Jonathan ; ' but it won't serve your 
turn. Let 



;t us pass, sir. STRIKE THE GAG, 



Blueskin.' 



GAGE (GAUGE or GAG), subs. (old). 
I. A quart pot (i.e., a measure). 
Also a drink or GO (q.v.). 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 65. 
A GAGE, a quart pot. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Kept., 1874). GAGE, a 
quart pot. 

1622. J. FLETCHER, Beggars Busk. 
I crown thy nab with a GAGE of benbouse. 






Gagers. 



Gail. 



1656. BROOME, Jovial Crew, Act ii., 
I bowse no lage, but a whole GAGE Of 
this I bowse to you. 

1690. B. E. New Diet, of the 
Cant. Crew. GAGE, c. A pot or pipe. 
Tip me a GAGE, c. give me a pot, or pipe. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall (4th 
ed.), p. 12. GAGE, a pot. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GAGE, 
a quart pot, also a pint (cant). 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 40. We 
drank our GAUGE and parted good friends. 

2. ( 1 8th century). A chamber- 
pot. 

3. (old). A pipe. 

1690. B. E., New Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew (See quot. 1690 under sense i). 

1796. GROSE. Vulg. Tongue (yd 
Ed.), s.v. 

1834. H. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, 
Bk. III., ch. v. In the mean time, tip 
me a GAGE of fog us, Jerry. 

4. (American). A man. For 
synonyms, see COVE. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum or 
Rogue's Lexicon. Deck the GAGE, see 
the man. 

GAGERS, subs. (American). The 
eyes. For synonyms, see GLIMS. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

GAGGA, subs. (old). See quot. 

1796. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue ( 3 rd Ed). 
Cheats who by sham pretences and wonder- 
ful stories of their sufferings impose on the 
credulity of good people. 



GAGGER, subs, (theatrical). A 
player who deals in GAGS (<?.v.), 
sense 2. Also GAGGIST, GAG- 
MASTER, and GAGSTER. 

1841. Punch, Vol. I., p. 169. Men 
with ' swallows ' like Thames tunnels, in 
fact accomplished GAGGERS and unrivalled 
'wiry watchers.' 

1887. BURNAND and A'BECKETT in 
Fortn. Review, April, p. 548. Robson 
. . . was an inveterate GAGGER, 



1890. Globe, 3 March, p. i, c. 4. 
The low comedy was much toned down 
... In other words, the GAGGERS were 
Sagged. 



GAGGERY, subs, (theatrical). The 
practice of GAGGING (<?.#.), sense 
3- 

GAGGING, subs. (old). i. BLUFF 
(q.v.); specifically, BUNCO-STEER- 
ING (q.v.), the art of talking over 
and persuading a stranger that he 
is an old acquaintance. C/!,GAG, 
verb, sense 2. 

1828. G. SMEATON, Doings in London, 
p. 28. One of the modes of raising money, 
well known in town by the flash name of 
GAGGING, has been practised of late 
to a considerable extent on simple country- 
men, who are strangers to the ' ways of 
town.' 

2. (cabmen's). Loitering about 
for ' fares' ; ' crawling.' 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, Vol. III., p. 366. The 
means used are GAGGING, that is to say, 
driving about and loitering in the thorough- 
fares for jobs. 

3. (theatrical). Dealing in 
GAGS (0.8.), sense i. Also as 
ppl. adj. 

1883. The Echo, 5 Jan., p. 2, c. 3. 
A protest, by no means unneeded, against 
the insolence or ignorance of some play- 
wrights, and GAGGING actors. 

1889. Answers, 27 July, p. 143, c. 2. 
GAGGING is a thing about which the public 
know little. 



GAGGLER'S COACH, subs.phr. (old). 
A hurdle. 

1823. KENT, Modem Flash Diet., 
s.v. 

1848. DUNCOMBE, Sinks of London 



GAIL, subs. (old). A horse, For 
synonyms, see PRAD. 



Gaily-like. 



101 



Galimaufrey. 



GAILY -LIKE, adj. (American). 
Showy ; expensive : BANG - UP 

fete). 

1872. CLEMENS (Mark Twain), 
Undertaker's Chat. Now, you know how 
difficult it is to roust out such a GAILY-LIKE 
thing as that in a little one-horse town like 
this. 

GAIN-PAIN, subs. (old). A sword; 
specifically, in the Middle Ages, 
that of a hired soldier. [From Fr. , 
gagner = to gain + pain = bread. 
Cf.j BREADWINNER (prostitutes') 
and POTBOILER (artists').] For 
synonyms, see CHEESE-TOASTER 
and POKER. 

GAIT, subs, (colloquial). Walk in 
life ; profession ; mode of making 
a living ; GAME (q.v.). 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum. 'I say, 
Tim, what's your GAIT now ? ' ' Why, you 
see, I'm on the crack ' (burglary). 

GAITERS, subs. (American collo- 
quial). Half boots; shoes. 

GAL, subs, (common). I. A girl ; 
a servant-maid ; a sweetheart. 
BEST GIRL = favourite flame. 

2. (common). A prostitute. 
For synonyms, see BARRACK- 
HACK and TART. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Lend. Poor, I., p. 535. Upon the most 
trivial offence in this respect, or on the 
suspicion of an offence, the GALS are sure 
to be beaten cruelly and savagely by their 
' chaps.' 

3. (American). A female 
rough. 

GALANEY. See GALENY. 

GALANTY (GALLANTY or 
GALANTEE) SHOW, subs. phr. 
(common). A shadow panto- 
mime : silhouettes shown on a 
transparency or thrown on a white 
sheet by a magic lantern. Specifi- 



cally, the former. See PUNCH 
AND JUDY. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, Vol. III., p. 81. The 
GALANTEE show don't answer, because 
magic lanterns are so cheap in the shops. 

1884. Casselts Technical Educator, 
pt. 10, p. 244. That reminiscence of the 
nursery, the GALANTY SHOW. 

1888. Notes and Queries, 7 S. v., 
p. 265. A flourish on the panpipes and 
a rumble on the drum was followed by 
the cry, GALANTY-SHOW ! 

GAL- BOY, subs. (American). A 
romp ; a TOM-BOY (q.v.). 

GALEN, subs, (common). An 
apothecary. For synonyms, see 
GALLIPOT. 

GALENA, stibs. (American). Salt 
pork. [From Galen, 111., a chief 
hog - raising and pork - packing 
centre], 

GALENY (or GALANY), subs, (old). 
The domestic hen ; now (West of 
England) a Guinea fowl. [Latin, 
gallina]. For synonyms, see 
CACKLING-CHEAT. 

1887. Temple Bar, Mar., p. 333 
It's a sin to think of the money you'd be 
spending on girls and things as don't know 
a hen's egg from a GALEENY'S. 

GALIMAUFREY, subs, (old). i. A 
medley ; a jumble ; a chaos of 
differences. \*., gallimaufrte=* 
a hash]. 

1592. NASHE, Pierce Penilesse, in 
wks., ii., 93. Coblers, Tinkers, Fencers, 
none escapt them, but they mingled them 
all on one GALLIMAFREY of glory. 

1592. JOHN DAY, Blind Beggar, 
Act iv., Sc. i, p. 75. Can. Let me be torn 
into mammocks with wilde Bears if I make 
not a GALLEMAUFRY of thy heart and 
keep thy Skull for my quaffing bowl. 

1604. SHAKSPEARE, Winters Tale, 
Act iv., Sc. 4. And they have a dance 
which the wenches say is a GALLIMAUFRY 
of gambols, because they are not in't. 

1690. DURFEY, Collin's Walk, ch> 
ii., p. 58. But, like thy Tribe of canting 
Widgeons, A GALLIMAUFRY of Religions. 



Gall. 



102 



Gallantry. 



1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
i., 207. A compound of Player, Soldier, 
Stroller, Sailor, and Tinker! An odd 

GALLIMAUFRY ! 

1860. HALIBURTON (Sam Slick), 
The Season Ticket, No. 7. This portion 
of my journa 1 , which includes a variety ot 
topics and anecdotes, some substantial 
like solid meat, some savoury as spicy 
vegetable ingredients, and some fragments 
to swell the bulk, which, though not 
valuable as materials, help to compound 

the GALLIMAUFRY. 

2. (old). A hodge-podge of 
scraps and leavings. 

1724. COLES, Eng. Diet.; 1728. 
BAILEY, Eng. Diet. ; 1785. GROSE, 
Vulg. Tongue; 1811. Lexicon Bala- 
tronicum. 

3. A mistress. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives, 
ii., i. He loves thy GALLYMAWFRY ; 
Ford, perpend. 

4. (venery). The female pu- 
dendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 



GALL, subs. (common). Effrontery; 

CHEEK (q.v.) ; BRASS (q.v.) ; 

e.g. , ' Ain't he got a GALL on 

him?' 

1789. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue (srd 
Ed.), s.v. His GALL is not yet broken, 
a saying used in prisons of a man 
just brought in who appears melancholy 
and dejected, [i.e., 1 He is not yet embittered 
enough to care for nothing, and meet every- 
thing with a front of brass.'] 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s,v. 
a 1891. New York Sun (quoted in 
Slang, Jargon, and Cant, s.v.). 'What 
do you think he had the GALL to do 
to-day ? ' Brown : ' He has the GALL to 
do anything.' Dumley : ' He asked me to 
drink with him ; but he'll never repeat the 
impudence.' 

GALLANT, subs, (old). A DANDY 
(q.v.}', a ladies' man; a lover ; 
a cuckold-maker, whether in 
posse or in esse (Shakspeare). 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives, ii. 
One that is well-nigh worn to pieces with 
age to show himself a young GALLANT \ 



1598. SHAKSPEARE, i Henry IV., 
ii., 4. GALLANTS, lads, boys, hearts of 
gold, all the titles of good fellowship come 
to you. 

1663. DRYDE.V, The Wild Gallant 
[Title.] 

1690. B.E., A New Diet. GALLANT 
a very fine man ; also a Man of Metal, or a 
brave Fellow ; also one that Courts, or 
keeps, or is Kept by, a Mistress. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., iv., no 
There's never a GALLANT but sat at her 
hand. 

1751-4. JORTIN, Eccles. Hist, (quoted 
in Encyclopedic Diet.). As to Theodora, 
they who had been her GALLANTS when 
she was an actress, related that daemons, or 
nocturnal spirits, had often driven them 
away to lie with her themselves. 

Adj. (old). (i). Valiant 
(2) showy ; (3) amorous. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 40. O 
London is a fine town, and a GALLANT 
city. 

Verb, (old). To sweetheart; 
to squire ; to escort ; to pursue or 
to enjoy. 



To GALLANT A FAN. verb, 
pkr-. (old). To break with 
design, to afford an opportunity 
of presenting a better. B.E. 
(1690). 

GALLANT FIFTIETH, subs. phr. 
(military). The Fiftieth Foot. 
[For its share in Vimiera, 1808.] 

Also, BLIND HALF HUNDRED 
(q.V.)', and DIRTY HALF 
HUNDRED (q.V.). 

GALLANTRY, subs. (i). SPARKISH] 
NESS (q.v. ) ; dandyism; (2) the 
habit, or pursuit, of the sexual 
favour. A LIFE OF GALLANTRY 
= a life devoted to fc the other 
sex. 



Gallery. 



I0 3 Galley-yarn. 



GALLERY, subs. (Winchester 
College). A commoner bedroom. 
[From a tradition of GALLERIES 
in Commoners.] See GALLERY- 
NYMPHS. 

TO PLAY TO THE GALLERY, 
verb. phr. (colloquial). To act 
so as to win the applause of the 
vulgar : i.e., to abandon dis- 
tinction and art for coarseness of 
means and cheapness of effect. 
Said indifferently of anyone in 
any profession who exerts himself 
to win the suffrages of the mob ; 
as a political demagogue, a 
'popular' preacher, a 'fashion- 
able ' painter, and so on. 

1872. Standard, 23 Oct. ' New York 
Correspondence.' His dispatches were, 
indeed, too long and too swelling in phrase ; 
for herein he was always PLAYING TO 

THE GALLERIES. 

Hence, GALLERY-HIT, SHOT, 
STROKE, etc. = a touch designed 
for, and exclusively addressed to, 
the non-critical. 

To PLAY THE GALLERY, verb. 

phr. (colloquial). To make an 

audience ; to applaud. 

1870. Echo, 23 July, p. 5, c. 
4. He seemed altogether a jovial, amusing 
sort of fellow, and as we were close by 
him, and constantly called in to PLAY 
THE GALLERY to his witty remarks, we 
asked him, when his friends left him, to 
join our party. 

GALLERY NYMPH, subt. phr-. 
(Winchester College). A house- 
maid. See GALLERY. 

GALLEY PUT A BRASS GALLEY 
DOWN YOUR BACK, verb, phr* 
(printers'). An admonition to 
appear before a principal ; imply- 
ing that the galley will serve as a 
screen. 

GALLEY- FOIST, subs. (old). The 
state barge, used by the Lord 



Mayor when he was sworn in at 
Westminster. 

1609. REN JONSON, Silent Woman, 
iv., 2. Out of my doores, you sons of noise 
and tumult, begot on an ill May day, or 
when the GALLEYFOIST is afloate to West- 
minster. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s. v. 

GALLEY - GROWLER or -STOKER, 

subs, (nautical). A loafer ; a 
MALINGERER(^.Z/.); a GRUMBLE- 
GUTS (q.v.). 

GALLEY-HALFPENNY, subs. (old). 
A base coin, tempus Henry IV. 
[So called because it was com- 
monly imported in the Genoese 
galleys. See Leake, English 
Money, p. 129 ; Ruding, Annals 
of Coinage, i., 250 ; and Stow, 
Survey (ed. 1842) p. 50.] 

GALLEY-SLAVE, subs, (printers'). 
A compositor. [From the oblong 
tray whereon the matter from the 
composing stick is arranged in 
column or page.] For synonyms, 
see DONKEY. 

1683. MOXON, s.v. 

GALLEYWEST, adj. or adv. 
(American). An indefinite super- 
lative. C/., ABOUT-EAST. 

1884. CLEMENS, (M. Twain) Huck. 
Finn, xxxvii. , 382. Then she grabbed up the 
basket and slammed it across the house, 
and knocked the cat GALLEYWEST. 

1837. FRANCIS, Saddle and Mocassin 
(quoted in Slanp, Jargon, and Cant). I'll 
be darned if this establishment of yours, 
Hunse, don't knock any one of them GALLEY. 
WEST ! GALLEYWEST, sir, that's what it 
does. 

GALLEY- YARN (or NEWS), sttbs. 

phr. (nautical). A lying story ; 

a swindle or TAKE - IN (q.v.). 

Frequently abbreviated to ' G.Y.' 
1884. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Admiral Guinea, iii., 4. What? lantern 
and cutlass yours ; you the one that knew 
the house ; you the one that saw ; you the 
one overtaken and denounced; and you 
spin me a GALLEY-YARN like that. 



Gallied. 



104 



Gallivant. 



G A L L I ED, ///. adj. (old). 
' Harried ; vexed ; over-fatigued ; 
perhaps like a galley - slave ' 
(GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v.). In 
Australia, frightened. 

GALLI NIPPER, subs. (West Indian). 
A large mosquito. 

1847. PORTER, Big Bear, etc., p. 
119. In the summer time the lakes and 
snakes . . . musketoes and GALLINIPPERS, 
buffalo gnats and sandflies . . . prevented 

he Injins from gwine through the country. 

1888. Lippincotfs Magazine. I 
thought the GALLINIPPERS would fly away 
with me before the seed ticks had sucked 
all my blood. 

GALLIPOT, subs, (common). An 
apothecary. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v 

1836. M. SCOTT, Cringle's Log, ch. 
xiv. In truth, sir, I thought our surgeon 
would be of more use than any outlandish 
GALLIPOT that you could carry back. 

1848. THACKERAY, Book oj Snobs, 
ch. xxvii. ' Half a-dozen little GALLIPOTS,' 
interposed Miss Wirt. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Bolus; 
bum - tender ; clyster - giver ; 
cl) ster-pipe ; croaker ; crocus ; 
drugs ; Ollapod (from a creation 
of the Younger Coleman's) ; gage- 
monger ; Galen (from the great 
physician) ; Jakes-provider ; pill- 
box; pill -merchant ; pills ; squirt; 
salts-and-senna ; squire of the pot. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
mirancu (obsolete : a play on 
mire en cut, respecting which cf., 
Beralde, in Moliere, Malade 
Imaginaire : ' On voit bien que 
vous n "" avez pas accoutume deparler 
a des visages ') ; un limonadier 
de posterieu-f s (popular : cf., 'bum- 
tender ' ; unfltitencul (common) ; 
un insinuant (popular : one who 
* insinuates ' the clyster-pipe). 



GERMAN SYNONYMS. Roke- 
ach, Raukeach, or Raukack (from 
the Hebrew). 

GALLIVANT, verb, (colloquial). i. 
To gad about with, or after, one of 
the other sex ; to play the gallant ; 
to ' do the agreeable. ' 

1838. DICKENS, Nicholas Nickleby, 
ch. Ixiv. You were out all day yesterday, 
and GALLIVANTING somewhere, I know. 

1862. H. BEECHER STOWE, in The 
Independent, 27 Feb. What business had 
he to flirt and GALLIVANT all summer with 
Sally Kittridge? 

1886. HAWLEY SMART, Struck Down, 
xi. The ramparts is a great place for 
GALLIVANTING. 

1863. H. KINGSLEY, Austin Elliot, 
L, 112. It's them gals, Mr. Austin. Come 
in afore she sees you, else she'll not be at 
home. She is GALLIVANTING in the pad- 
dock with Captain Hertford. 

2. (colloquial). To TRAPES 
(q.v.} ; to fuss ; to bustle about. 

1859. Boston Post, 10 Dec. Senator 
Seward is GALLIVANTING gaily about 
Europe. Now at Compiegnfej saying soft 
things to the Empress and studying des- 
potism, now treading the battle-field of 
Waterloo, then back at Paris, and so on. 

1871. C. D, WARNER, My Summer 
in a Garden. More than half the Lima 
beans, though on the most attractive sort of 
poles, which budded like Aaron's rod, went 
GALIVANTING off to the neighboring grape 
trellis. 

1848. RUXTON, Far West, p. 145. 
The three remaining brothers were absent 
from the Mission . . . Fray Jose, GALLI- 
VANTING at Pueblo de los Angeles. 

1863. NORTON, Lost andSaved, p. 
255. A pretty story, if, when her services 
were most wanted by the person who paid 
for them, she was to be gadding and GAL- 
LIVANTING after friends of her own. 

1865. M. E. BRADDON, Henry Dun- 
bar, ch. x. A pretty thing it would have 
been if your pa had come all the way from 
India to find his only daughter GALLIVANT- 
ING at a theaytre. 

1870. London Figaro, 6 Dec. You're 
never content but when you're GALAVANT- 
ING about somewhere or other. 



Gallivate. 



105 



Galloivs. 



QALLIVATE, verb (American). To 
frisk ; to ' figure about ' ; cf. , 
GALLIVANT. 

GALLON. WHAT'S A GALLON OF RUM 
AMONG ONE? phr. (American). 
The retort sarcastic ; applied, 
e ., to those with 'eyes too big 
for their stomach ' ; to dispro- 
portionate ideas of the fitness 
of things, and so forth. 

GALLON DISTEMPER, su&s. phr. 
(common). I. Delirium tremens; 
(2.) the lighter after-effects of 
drinking. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. (i) For 
the former, barrel-fever ; black- 
dog ; blue- devils ; blue Johnnies 
(Australian); B. J's. (idem.); 
blues ; bottle - ache ; D. T. ; 
horrors; jim-jams; jumps; pink- 
spiders ; quart-mania ; rams ; rats ; 
shakes ; snakes in the boots ; 
trembles ; triangles ; uglies. 

2. For the latter : a head ; hot- 
coppers ; a mouth ; a touch of the 
brewer ; a sore heid (Scots). 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Avoir 
mal aux cheveux ( familiar = the 
hair-ache) ; les papillons noirs ( Cf. , 
pink spiders ; also = hypochon- 
dria) ; avoir fume dans une pipe 
neuve ( = sick of a new clay). 

GALLOPER, sttbs. (old). i. A blood 
horse ; a hunter. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
The toby gill clapped his bleeders to his 
GALLOPER and tipped the straps the 
double. 

2. (military). An aide-de- 
camp. 

GALLOW-GRASS, subs.pkr. (old). 

Hemp. [/'.., halters in the rough.] 

1578. LYTE, Trans, of Dodoens 

History of Plantes, fol. 72. Hempe is 

called in .... English, Neckweede, and 

CALLOWGRASS. 



GALLOWS, subs. (old). i. A 
rascal ; a wretch deserving the 
rope. 

1594. SHAKSPEARE, Love's Labout 
Lost, v., 2. A shrewd unhappy GALLOWS 
too. 

1754. B. MARTIN, Eng. Diet. (2nd 
ed.). s.v.=a wicked rascal. 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist. (To 
Oliver). Now, young GALLOWS. 

1838. 

London, ch." ii., p. 
young GALLOWS 
ribs to powder ! 



JAS. GRANT, Sketches in 
. ii., p. 58. Blow me tight, 
.ows, if I don't pound your 



2. (common: generally in. 
pi. GALLOWSES). A pair of 
braces 

1835. HALIBURTON, Clockmaker, 
i S., ch. xv. Chock-full of spring, like 
the wire end of a bran new pair of 
trouser GALLUSES. 

1848. DURIVAGE, Stray Subjects, p 
168. If I wouldn't spile his picter bust my 
boots and GALLOWSES. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW,<7< Lab. and 
Land. Poor, vol. I., p. 431. The braces, 
which in some parts of the country are 
called ' GALLOWSES." 

c. 1852. Traits of American Humor, 
p. 58. Hole on, dod drot you, wait till 1 
unbutton my GALLOWSES. 

1864. JAMES, etc, Italian-English 
Diet. GALLOWSES, batilla. 

1883. G. A. S[ALA], in ///. Land. 
News, Sept. 22, p. 275, c. i. Biaces 
(which, when I was young, used, in the 
north of England, to be known by the ex- 
pressive name of GALLOWSES.) 

Adv. (old). Excessively; same 

as BLOODY, BLEEDING, (q.V.\ etc. 

(As adj.) great ; uncommon ; real. 

c. 1551. L. SHEPHERD. John Bon 
in Arber's Garner, Vol. IV., p. 109. Ye, 
are much bound to God for such a spittle 
holiness. A GALLOWS gift ! 

1789. PARKER, Life's Painter, p. 
120. Some they pattered flash with GAL- 
LOWS fun and joking. 

1827. EGAN, Anecdotes of the Turf, 
etc., p. 44. Then your blowen will wax 
GALLOWS haughty! [Also quoted in notes 
to Don Juan.} 



Gallows-bird. 



1 06 



Galoot. 



1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, p. 
293. (ed. 1854). Ah, Dame Lobkin, if so 
be as our little Paul vas a vith you, it 
would be a GALLOWS comfort to you in 
your latter hend ! 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, III., 90. I'll be smothered if 
I'm going to look down that GALLOWS 
long chimney. 

1861. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, ch. 
xli. And the pleece come in, and got 
CALLUS well kicked about the head. 

1869. GREENWOOD, Seven. Curses of 
London, p. 244. Put it on your face so 
CALLUS thick that the devil himself won't 
see through it. 

GALLOWS-BIRD (also NEWGATE- 
BIRD), j7/fo. (common). I. A son 
of the rope ; an habitual criminal; 
a vagabond or scoundrel, old or 
young ; a crack-rope or wag- 
halter (CoTGRAVE ; a gallows- 
clapper (FLORio). Fr., gibier 
de Cayenne, or de potence. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
One that deserves hanging. 

1822. SCOTT, Fortunes of Nigel, 
ch. xi. That very GALLOWS-BIRD were 
enough to corrupt a whole ante-chamber of 
pages. 

2. (common). A corpse on, or 
from, the gallows. 

1861. READE, Cloister and Hearth, 
ch. xxviii. I ne'er minced (dissected) ape 

nor GALLOWS-BIRD. 

GALLOWS- FACED, adj. (old) Evil- 
looking ; hang-dog. Also GAL- 
LOWS-LOOKING. 

1766. H. BROOKE, Fool of Quality, 
ii. 16. Art thou there, thou rogue, thou 
hang-dog, thou GALLOWS - FACED vaga- 
bond ? 

1768. GOLDSMITH, Good - natured 
Man, Act v. Hold him fast, he has the 
GALLOWS in his FACE. 

1837. BARHAM, I. L. (Misadv. at 
Margate"). A little GALLOWS-LOOKING 
chap dear me ! what could he mean ? 

GALLOWS-MINDED, adj. (collo- 
quial). Criminal in habit and 
idea ; also, evil-hearted. 



GALLOWSNESS, subs. (old). Ras- 
cality; recklessness; mischievous- 
ness. 
1859. G. ELIOT, Adam Bede, ch. vi. 

I never knew your equal for GALLOWSNESS. 

GALLOWS- RIPE, adj. (old). Ripe 
for the rope. 

1837. CARLYLE, French Revolution, 
Pt. II., bk. v., ch. iii. Loose again, as 
one not yet GALLOWS-RIPE. 

GALLUS. See GALLOWS. 

G ALLY- FOIST See GALLEY-FOIST. 

GALLYSLOPES, subs. (Old Cant). 
Breeches. For synonyms, see 
KICKS. 

GALOOT (also GALLOOT and GEE- 
LOOT), subs, (general). A man 
(sometimes in contempt) ; also 
(in America) a worthless fellow 
(or thing, see quot. 1888) ; a 
rowdy; a CAD (q.v.}, 

1835. MARRYAT, Jacob Faithful, 
ch. xxxiv. Four greater GALLOOTS were 
never picked up, but never mind that. 

1869. S. L. CLEMENS (Mark Twain) 
Innocents at Home, p. 22. He could lam 
any GALOOT of his inches in America. 

1871. JOHN HAY, Jim Bludso. I'll 
hold her nozzle agin the bank Till the last 
GALOOT'S ashore. 

1885. Saturday Review, Feb. 7, p. 
167. I'll never draw a revolver on a man 
again as long as I live.' . . . ' Guess 
I'll go for the GALOOT with a two-scatter 
shoot-gun. 

1888. New York Tribune, May 16. 
It is better to have a Carrot for a President 
than a dead beat for a son-in-law. In this 
way we again score a live beat on the 

GALOOT. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 137. 'My 
dear boy, I may be a GALOOT about 
literature, but you'll always be an out- 
sider in business. 

ON THE GAY GALOOT, adv. 

phr. (common). On the spree, 
1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 

3- I'm off ON THE GAY GALOOT SOme- 

wheres. 



Galoptious. 



107 



Gambler. 



GALOPTIOUS or GALUPTIOUS, adj. 
(popular). Delightful ; a general 
superlative. 

1887. Judy, 21 Sept., p. 140. Four 
young ladies represented the GALOPSHUS 
sum of 20,000,000 dollars. 

GALORE (also GALLORE and GO- 
LORE), adv. (old ; now recog- 
nised). In abundance ; plenty. 
[Irish and Gaelic go leor = in 
plenty.] 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West, p 14. GALORE of alcohol to ratify 
the trade. 

1866. C. READE, Never Too Late, 
ch. Ix. He found rogues GALORE, and 
envious spirits that wished the friends ill. 

1891. Licensed Vic. Mirror, 30 Jan., 
p. i, c. i. Of chit-chat this week we have 
GALORE, and the difficulty is how to sift 
the wheat from the chaff. 

GALUMPH, verb. (American). To 
bump along (Onomatopoeia). 

1888. New York World, 13 May. 
The young man tackled the driver of a 
green bobtail car that GALUMPHED through 
Lewis Street at a high rate of speed. 

GALVANISED YANKEE, subs. phr. 
(American Civil War). A GREY- 
BACK (q.v.) who took the oath to 
the North and served in its 



GAM, subs, (thieves'). i. Pluck; 
gameness. 

1888. Casselts Saturday Journal, 
8 Dec., p. 260. I'm not so sure about his 
lack of cunnin', speed, or GAM. 

2. (American thieves') Steal- 
ing (MATSELL, 1859). 

Verb. (American thieves'). I. 
To steal. 

2. (American). To engage 
in social intercourse ; to make a 
call ; to have a chat. See 
GAMMING. 



GAMALIEL, subs, (colloquial). A 
pedant ; a person curious of the 
letter and the form : e.g., ' these 
GAMALIELS of the theory ' = these 
ultra-puritans, to whom the spirit 
is nothing. 

GAMARUCHE, suds, (venery). See 
CUNNILINGIST and COCK- 
TEASER. Verb (venery). To 
irrumate ; to BAG-PIPE (q.v.). 
Also to CUNNILINGE (q.v.). Fr., 
gamahucher. 

GAMB (or GAM), subs. (old). A 
leg. In use also in this sense as 
an heraldic term. [It., gambe ; 
Fr., jambe ; probably through 
Lingua Franca.] For synonyms, 
see DRUMSTICKS and PINS. 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 143. If a man has bow legs, he has 
queer GAMS, GAMS being cant for legs. 

1796. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue ( 3 rd ed.), 
s.v. 

1819. MOORE, Memorial, p. 61. 
Back to his home, with tottering GAMS. 

1887. HENLEY, Villon's Good Night. 
At you I merely lift my GAM. 

[To FLUTTER A GAM=to dance ; TO 
LIFT A GAM = to break wind ; TO GAM rr= 
to walk ; to run away ; TO LEG IT (q.v.)]. 



GAMBLE, subs, (colloquial). A 
venture : a FLUTTER (q.v.). 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 250. And 
you know the Flying Scud was the biggest 
GAMBLE of the crowd. 



GAMBLER, subs, (old, now recog- 
nised). See quots. 

1778. BAILEY, Eng. Diet. GAMBLER, 
a guinea-dropper ; one class of sharpers. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GAM- 
BLER, a sharper ; a tricking gamester. 

1816. JOHNSON, Eng. Diet, (nth 
ed.)- GAMBLER, a cant word, I suppose. 
A knave whose practice it is to invite the 
unwary to game and cheat them. 



Gambol. 



108 



Game. 



1890. CasseltsEnc.Dict. GAMBLER, 
one given to playing for a stake. 

GAMBOL, subs, (booking clerks'). 
A railway ticket. 

1882. Daily News, 6 Sept., p. 2, 
c. 5. ... Mr. Chance [the magistrate] 
asked what GAMBOLS meant. The inspector 
said doubtless the railway tickets. 

GAM -CASES, subs. (old). Stock- 
ings (PARKER, Life's Painter). 
[From GAM = leg + CASE. ] 

GAME, subs, (old). i. The pro- 
ceeds of a robbery ; SWAG (q.v.). 
1676. Warning for Housekeepers. 
Song. When that we have bit the bloe, 
we carry away the GAME. 

2. (old). A company of 
whores. A GAME - PULLET = a 
young prostitute, or a girl inclined 
to lechery ; cf. , adj. , sense 8. 

1690. B.E., New Dictionary, s.v. 
. . also a Bawdy house, lewd women. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
GAME . . . Mother, have you any GAME, 
Mother, have you any girls? 

3. (old). A gull ; a sim- 
pleton. For synonyms, see 
BUFFLE and CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1690. B. E., New Dictionary. 
GAME, c. Bubbles drawn in to be 
cheated. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

4. ( thieves' ). Specifically, 
THE GAME = thieving; also 
(nautical), slave trading ; and 
(venery), the practice of copula- 
tion (e.g., good at THE GAME = 
an expert and vigorous bedfellow. 
Cf.y SHAKSPEARE, Troilus, 
iv., 5, 'Spoils of opportunity, 
daughters of the GAME '). In quot. 
(1639) it would seem that HEN OF 
THE GAME = a shrew, a fighting 
woman. 

1639-61. Rump, ii., 185. 'Free 
Parliament Litany.' From a dunghill Cock 
and a HEN OF THE GAME. 

1640. Ladies' Parliament. Stamford 
she is for THE GAME, She saies her husband 



is to blame, For her part she loves a foole, 
If he hath a good toole. 

1668. ETHEREDGE, She Would if 
She Could, i., i. A gentleman should not 
have gone out of his chambers but some 
civil officer of the GAME or other would 
have . . . given him notice where he might 
have had a course or two in the afternoon. 

!"(?). BURNS, Merry Muses, ' Jenny 
Macraw ' (old song). Jenny Macraw was 
a bird of THE GAME. 

1839. BRANDON, Poverty, Mendicity, 
and Crime, Glossary. On THE GAME 
thieving. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, i., 263. Whether the GAME 
got stale, or Peter became honest, is 
beyond the purport of my communication 
to settle. 

1852. SNOWDEN, Mag. Assist, (srd 
ed.), p. 444, s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum or 
Rogue s Lexicon, s. v. The particular 
line of rascality the rogue is engaged in ; 
thieving; cheating. 

1860. Chambers Journal, Vol. 13, 
p. 281. I asked him if he meant by a 
trading voyage, the GAME. 

5. (colloquial). A source of 
amusement ; a LARK (q.v.) : a 
BARNEY (q.v.); as, e.g., It was 
such a GAME ! 

6. (colloquial). A design ; 
trick ; object ; line of conduct : 
e.g., What's your 1'ttle GAME = 
What are you after ? Also, None 
of your little GAMES ! = None of 
your tricks ! See HIGH OLD 
GAME. 

1854. WHYTE MELVILLE, General 
Bounce, ch. ix. Honesty, indeed ! if 
honesty's the GAME, you've a right to 
your share, what Mrs. Kettering intended 
you should have, 

1857. DUCANGE ANGLICUS, The Vulg. 
Tongue, p. 9. GAME n. Intention. 
' What's your GAME ? ' or, ' What are you 
up to ? ' (very generally used). 

1870. Standard, 27 Sept. If we 
accept the meaner GAME which the Times 
indicates for us, it can only be by deliberate 
choice. 

1879. JUSTIN MCCARTHY, Donna 
Quixote, ch. xiii. Come, what's your 
little GAME? 



Game. 



109 



Game. 



1883. EDW. E. MORRIS, in Long- 
mans Mag., June, p. 176. A youth, who 
left England, and then carried on the same 
GAME in Australia. 

1889. Standard, i May, p. 5, c. i. 
The ' GAME of law and order ' is not up, 
in Paris. 

1890. Punch, 30 Aug. , p. 97. Mug's 
GAME ! They'll soon find as the Marsters 
ain't going to be worried and welched. 

1891. J. NEWMAN, Scamping Tricks, 
P- 46. She knew hov to work THE GAME 
of fascination right. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 349, 'It was 
the thing in your times, that's right 
enough ; but you're old now, and THE 
GAME'S up. 

Adj. (old). i. Plucky; endur- 
ing ; full of spirit and BOTTOM 
(q.v.). [Cock-pit and pugilists'. 
The word may be said to have 
passed into the language with the 
rise to renown of Harry Pearce, 
surnamed the GAME CHICKEN.] 

1747. CAPT. GODFREY, Science of 
Defence, p. 64. Smallwood (a boxer) is 
thorough GAME, with judgment equal to 
any, and superior to most. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib's Memorial, 
p. 57. Pitying raised from earth the GAME 
old man. 

1821. P. EGAN, Tom and Jerry 
(ed. 1891), p. 38. Tom, however, was too 
GAME to acknowledge any sort of alarm at 
this slight visitation. 

1823. E. KENT, Mod. Flash Diet. 
GAME, s.v. Sturdy, hardy, hardened. 

1827. REYNOLDS, Peter Corcoran, 
The Fancy. ' The Field of Tothill.' The 
highest in the fancy all the GAME ones, 
Who are not very much beneath her 
weight. 

1855. A. TROLLOPE, The Warden, 
ch. viii. He was a most courageous lad, 
GAME to the backbone. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 19 June, 
p. 395. The round had lasted sixteen 
minutes, and no one present had ever seen 
GAMER or more determined fighting. 

2. (common). Ready ; willing ; 
prepared. [Also from cock-fight- 
ing. See sense i]. 



1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, p. 99, 
(ed. 1857). 'All alive to-day, I suppose?' 
' Regular GAME, sir. ' 

1856. READE, Never Too Late 
ch. xxi. I'm GAME to try. 

1865. Bentley, p. 182, 'The Excur- 
sion Train.' Again to London back we 
came The day the excursion ticket said, 
And really both of us felt GAME To travel 
round the world instead. 

1880. Punch 's Almanack. Got three 
quid ; have cried a go with Fan, GAME to 
spend my money like a man. 

1891. FARJEON, The Mystery of 
M. Felix, p. 103. 'I'm GAME,' said 
Sophy, to whom any task of this kind was 
especially inviting. 

1891. HUME NISBET, Bail Up! 
p. 51. 'Yes, I am GAMEY, you bet 1' 
exclaimed the Chinaman, softly. 

1891. J. NEWMAN Scamping Tricks, 
p. 121. It is nearly midnight. I am 
GAME for another hour, are you ? 

3. (old). Lame ; crooked ; dis- 
abled : as in GAME LEG. 

1787. GROSE, Prov. Glossary. GAME- 
LEG, a lame leg. 

1825. SCOTT, St. R (man's Well, 
ch. i. Catching hold of the devil's GAMK 
leg with his episcopal crook. 

185T. G. BORROW, La-uengro, ch. 
Ixvii., p. 204 (1888). Mr. Platitude, 
having what is vulgarly called a GAME 
leg, came shambling into the room. 

1875. JAS. PAYN, Walters Word, 
ch. i, Well, you see, old fellow, with a 
GAME-arm (his left arm is in a sling), and 
a GAME-leg (he has limped across the 
platform with the aid of his friend, and 
also of a crutch), one feels a little helpless. 

4. (thieves'). Knowing; wide- 
awake ; and (of women) FLASH 
(q.v. ), or inclined to venery. E.g., 
GAME- COVE = an associate of 
thieves; GAME-woman = a pros- 
titute: i.e., a woman who is 
GAME (sense 2) ; GAME-PULLET 
(GROSE) = a girl that will show 
sport, a female GAME - COCK ; 
GAME-SHIP (old) = a ship whose 
commander and officers could be 
corrupted by bribes to allow the 
cargo to be stolen (CLARK 
RUSSELL). 



Game. 



1 10 



Gamester. 



1676. ETHEREDGE, Man of Mode, 
ii. Go on, be the GAME mistress of the 
town and entice all our young fops as fast 
as they come from travel. 

COCK OF THE GAME, subs. phr. 
(old). A champion; an un- 
doubted blood ; a star of magni- 
tude (cock-pit). 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, iii., 329. 
Now all you tame gallants, you that have 
the name, And would accounted be COCKS 

OF THE GAME. 

1822. ScpTT, Nigel, xiv. I have 
seen a dung-hill chicken that you meant 
to have picked clean enough ; it will be 
long ere his lordship ruffles a feather with 

a COCK OF THE GAME. 

To MAKE GAME OF, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To turn into ridi- 
cule ; to delude ; to humbug. 

1671. MILTON, Samson, 1331. Do 
they not seek occasion of new quarrels, On 
my refusal, to distress me more ; Or 
MAKE A GAME OF my calamities? 

1690. B. E., New Dictionary. What 
you GAME me? c. do you jeer me, or pre- 
tend to expose me to MAKE A May-GAME 
OF me? 

1745. Hist, of Coldstream Guards, 
25 Oct. If the militia are reviewed to- 
morrow by his Majesty, the soldiers of the 
third regiment of Guards are to behave 
civilly and not to laugh or to MAKE ANY 
GAME OF them. 

To DIE GAME, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To maintain a 
resolute attitude to the last ; to 
show no contrition. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. To 
DIE GAME, to suffer at the gallows without 
showing any signs of fear or repentance. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. liv. 
The ruffian lay perfectly still and silent. 
1 He's gaun to die GAME ony how,' said 
Dinmont. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick (ed. 1857), 
p. 363. I say that the coachman did 
not run away ; but that he DIED GAME 
GAME as pheasants ; and I won't hear 
nothin 1 said to the contrary. 

1869. SPENCER, Study of Sociology, 
ch. viii., p. 183 (gth ed.). Nor should we 
forget the GAME-cock, supplying, as it 
does, a word of eulogy to the mob of 



roughs who witness the hanging of a 
murderer, and who half condone his 
crime if he DIES GAME. 

1871. TimeS) 30 Jan. Critique on 
London, etc. The principal was acquitted, 
and though his accomplices were hung in 
Pall Mall at the scene of their act, they 

DIED GAME. 

TO GET AGAINST THE GAME, 

verb. phr. (American). To take 
a risk ; to chance it. [From 
the game of poker]. 

To PLAY THE GAMK,verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To do a thing 
properly ; to do what is right and 
proper. 

1889. GEOFFREY DRAGE, Cyril, ch. 
vii. I really think he is ... not PI AY- 
ING THE GAME. 

THE FIRSTGAME EVER PLAYED, 

subs. phr. (venery). Copulation. 
For synonyms, set GREENS and 
RIDE. 

GAMECOCK, adj. (old). Hectoring; 
angry ; valiant out of place. 

1838._ LEVER, Handy Andy. Smoke 
and fire is my desire, So blaze away my 
GAMECOCK squire. 

GAM EN ESS, subs, (colloquial). 
Pluck; endurance; the mixture of 
spirit and bottom. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at 
Oxford, ch. xxiv. There was no doubt 
about his GAMENESS. 

1884, Referee, 23 March, p. i, c. 4. 
Carter fought with great GAMENESS, but 
he never had a look in. 

GAMESTER, subs, (old). i. A pros- 
titute. For synonyms, see BAR- 
RACK-HACK and TART. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, All's Well, v. 3. 
She s impudent, my lord, and was a com- 
mon GAMESTEK to the camp. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair 
ii. i. Ay, ay, GAMESTERS, mocke a plain 
soft wench of the suburbs, do. 



Gamey. 



in 



Gammon. 



1620. PERCY, Folio MSS., p. 404. 
Be not att ffirst to nice nor coye when 
GAMSTERS you are courtinge. 

2. (old). A ruffler ; a gallant; 
a wencher ; a man fit and ready 
for anything ; also a player. 

1639-61. Rump, i., 253, 'A Medley.' 
Room for a GAMESTER that flies at all he 
sees. 

1676. ETHEREDGE, Man of Mode, 
v., i. Live it also like a frank GAMESTER, 
on the square. 



GAMEY,O^/. (colloquial). I. High- 
smelling ; offensive to the nose ; 
half-rotten. 

2. (colloquial). Frisky ; 
plucky. 

1843. DICKENS, Martin Chuzzlewit^ 
ch. xi. There's something GAMEY in it, 
young ladies, ain't there. 

1869. S. BOWLES, Our New West, p. 
275. Horses are fresh and fat and GAMEY. 



GAM i NESS, subs, (colloquial). 
The malodorousness proceeding 
from decay and by implication 
filthiness. 



GAMING-HOUSE, subs. (old). A 
house of ill-repute hell, tavern, 
or stews. 

1611. CoTGRAVE,Dicttonarie, Berlan, 
a common tippling house, a HOUSE OF GAM- 
ING, or of any other disorder. 



, subs, (old). An old wife; 
a familiar address ; the correla- 
tive of GAFFER (?.Z/.). 

1551. Gammer Gurton's Needle 
Title). 

1706. Hudibras Redivivus, Part VI. 
And monkey faces, yawns, and stammers, 
Delude the pious dames and GAMMERS To 
think their mumbling guides precation So 
full of heavenly inspiration. 

1842. TENNYSON, The Goose.. Ran 
Gaffer, stumble \ GAMMER. 



GAMMING, subs, (nautical). A 
whaleman's term for the visits 
paid by crews to each other at 
sea. 

1884. G. A. SALA, in Illus. Lon. 
News, July 19, p. 51, c. 2. When two 
or more American whalers meet in mid- 
ocean, and there are no whales in sight, it 
is customary to tack topsails and exchange 
visits. This social intercourse the whale- 
men call GAMMING ... I cannot help 
fancying that ' gam ' is in greater pro- 
bability an abbreviation of the Danish 
'gammen,' sport, or that it has something 
to do with the nautical ' gammoning," the 
lasting by which the bowsprit is bound 
firmly down to the cutwater. 

1890. Century, Aug. To GAM 
means to gossip. The word occurs again 
and again in the log-books of the old 
whalers. 



GAMMON, subs, (colloquial). i. 
Nonsense ; humbug ; deceit. 
Sometimes GAMMON AND 

SPINACH. No GAMMON = no 

error, no lies. 

[SKEAT says from Mid. Eng. Gamen 
=a game ; but R. SHERWOOD (Eng: Diet., 
1660), gives ' a beggar or seller of gammons 
of Bacon ; and in COTGRAVE (1611), 
jambonnier = a beggar, also a seller of 
bacon, or gammons of bacon.'] 

c. 1363. Chester Plays, i. 102. This 
GAMMON shall begin. 

1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
I. 208. I thought myself pretty much a 
master of GAMMON, but the Billingsgate 
eloquence of Mrs. P exceeded me. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
GAMON. What rum GAMON the old file 
pitched to the flat. 

1823. Mod. Flash Diet. GAMMON 
Falsehood and bombast. 

1828-45. HOOD, Poems (ed. 1846), 
vi., p. 96, Behold yon servitor of God and 
Mammon, Who, binding up his Bible with 
his ledger, Blends Gospel texts with 
trading GAMMON. 

183o. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xxvii. 
Lord bless their little hearts, they thinks 
its all right, and don't know no better, but 
they're the wictims o' GAMMON, Samivel, 
they're the wictims o' GAMMON. 



Gammon. 



112 



Gammon. 



1837. BARHAM, I. L. Blasphemers 
Warning. When each tries to humbug 
his dear Royal Brother, in Hopes by such 
GAMMON to take one another in. 

1839. Comic Almanack, Jan. But if 
you wish to save your bacon, Give us less 

GAMMON. 

1849. DICKENS, David Cofiperfield, 
ch. xxii., p. 199. 'Oh, my goodness, how 
polite we are ! ' exclaimed Miss Mowcher. 
. . . . ' What a world of GAMMON AND 
SPINNAGE it is ! ' 

1890. HUME NISBET, Bail up! p. 
92. I'm real grit and no GAMMON. 

2. (thieves'). A confederate 
whose duty is to engage the 
attention of a victim during 
robbery ; a BONNET (q.v.) or 
COVER (q.V.}, 

Verb (colloquial). I. To 
humbug : to deceive ; to take in 
with fibs ; to KID (q.v.). 

1700. Step to the Bath, quoted in 
Ashton's Sac. Life in Reign of Queen 
Anne, v. ii., p. JH. We went to the 
Groom Porters .... there was Palming, 
Hedging, Loaded Dice, Levant, and GAM- 
MONING, with all the Speed imaginable, 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
ii., 6. Vile I can get fifteen bob a day 
GAMMONING a maim, the devil may vor 
for me. 

1825. BUCKSTONE, The Bear 
Hunters, ii. There ! that's just the way 
she GAMMONS me at home. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's Log, 
ch. ii. Why, my lad, we shall see to- 
morrow morning ; but you GAMMONS so 
bad about the rhino that we must prove 
you a bit : so Kate, my dear, to the 
pretty girl who had let me in. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xiii. 
So then they pours him out a glass o' 
wine, and GAMMONS him about his driving, 
and gets him into a reg'lar good humour. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsly Legends, 
' Misadventures at Margate.' And 'cause 
he GAMMONS so the flats, ve calls him 
Veeping Bill ! 

1840. HOOD, Tale of a Trumpet. 
Lord Bacon couldn't have GAMMONED her 
better. 

1890. HUME NISBET, Bail Up! p. 
70. Oh, don't try to GAMMON me, you 
cunning young school-miss. 



ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To bam; 
to bamblustercate ; to bamboozle ; 
to bambosh ; to barney ; to be 
on the job ; to best ; to bilk ; 
to blarney ; to blow ; to bosh ; 
to bounce ; to cob ; to cod ; to 
cog ; to chaff; to come over (or 
the artful, or Paddy, or the old 
soldier over) one ; to cram ; to 
do ; to do brown ; to doctor ; to 
do Taffy ; to fake the kidment ; 
to flare up ; to flam ; to flummox; 
to get at (round, or to windward 
of) one ; to gild the pill ; to give 
a cock's egg ; to gravel ; to gull ; 
to haze : to jimmify ; to jaw ; 
to jockey ; to jolly ; to kid ; to 
make believe the moon is made 
of green cheese (Cotgrave) ; to 
mogue ; to palm off on ; to 
pickle ; to plant ; to plum ; to 
poke bogey (or fun) at ; to pro- 
moss ; to put the kibosh on ; to 
put in the chair, cart, or basket ; 
to pull the leg ; to queer ; to 
quiz ; to roast ; to roorback ; to 
run a bluff, or the shenanigan ; to 
sell ; to send for pigeon's milk ; 
to sit upon ; to send for oil of 
strappum, etc. ; to shave ; to 
slum, or slumguzzle ; to smoke ; 
to snack ; to soap, soft soap, 
sawder, or soft sawder ; to spoof; 
to stick ; to stall ; to string, or 
get on a string ; to stuff ; to saw- 
dust, or get on sawdust and 
treacle ; to suck ; to suck up ; 
to sugar ; to swap off; to take a 
rise out of ; to rot ; to tommy-rot; 
to take in, or down ; to take to 
town ; to take to the fair ; to tip 
the traveller ; to try it on ; to, 
throw dust in the eyes ; to throw 
a tub to a whale ; to pepper ; to 
throw pepper in the eyes ; to use 
the pepper box ; to whiffle ; to 
work the poppycock racket (Irish- 
American). [NOTE. Many of 
the foregoing are used substan- 
tively, e.g.) a bam, a barney, a 



Gammon. 



Gammon. 



sell, bambosh = nonsense ; deceit ; 
a hoax, etc.] 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Donner 
unpont bfattcker(a.]so t thieves' = 
to lay a \x&p)\ dindonner (popular: 
from dindon = & gull, a gobbler) ; 
battte & la Parisienne (thieves' : 
= to cheat ; to come the cockney) ; 
seficher de lafiole, oide labobine, 
de quelqu'ttn (popular : to get on 
with it, i.e., to try to fool) ; 
envoyer chercher le parapluie de 
Fescouade (military : parapluie de 
Fescouade = ihe squad's umbrella : 
to send on a fool's errand ; cf. t 
to send for pigeon's milk, etc. ) ; 
la faire a quelqifun (popular) ; 
faucher (thieves' = to best) ; 
enf oncer ( familiar : to let in : 
also to surpass ) ; cabasser (popu- 
lar) ; monter des couleurs, le 
Job, or un schtosse ( = to do up 
brown) ; faire le coup, or monter 
le coup, cl quelqu?un (popular : = to 
take a rise) ; bouffer la botte (mili- 
tary : to SELL (q. v. ) or BILK, as a 
woman refusing congress after re- 
ceiving the SOCKET-MONEY (q.V.) 
in advance) ; bouler (popular : also to 
WHOP(?.Z>.)); etreTautre (popular: 
= to GET LEFT (q.v.)); mettre 
dans le sac (thieves' : = to bag, 
i.e., to trap) ; caller or poser 
un. Ivpin (popular : = to MAKE A 
HARE OF (q.v.} ; also more gener- 
ally, to BILK (q.v.})', emblemer 
(thieves' : = to stick) ; faire voir le 
tottr (popular : -to show how it's 
done ; connaitre le tour = to 
know the game) ; faire la queue cl 
quelqu'un (popular : = to pull one's 
leg) ; tirer la carotte (thieves') ; 
canarder (popular : = to bring 
down) ; empaler (popular : = to 
stick); passer des curettes (popular : 
= to befool) ; monter une gaffe 
(popular : gaffe-=& joke, a hoax) ; 
jobarder (popular: job simpleton, 
and is the same zsjobelin); mener 



en bateau un pante pour le refaire 
(thieves' : = to take a man on) ; 
monter un bateau (popular) ; pro- 
mener quelqu'un (popular : cf. t 
to take to town) ; compter des 
mistoufles (fam. : mistoujle a 
scurvy trick) ;gottrrer (popular : = 
to bosh) ; ajfluer (from flouer=to 
cheat, to diddle); rouster (popular 
and thieves') ; affutei (thieves' = 
to run down, also to make 
unlawful profits) ; bouler (popu- 
lar) ; juijfer (popular = to 
Jew) ; pigeonner (popular to 
PLUCK A PIGEON (q.v } ) \flancher 
(popular to KID (q.v.) ); faire 
la barbe (popular = to SHAVE 
(q.v.)); monter or kisser un 
gandin (thieves' = literally to 
hoist a swell) ; fourrer or mettrc 
dedans (popular = to take in and 
do for) ; planter un chou (fam. ) ; 
tire marron (popular); interver 
dans !es vannes ( = to let oneself 
be sucked-up) ; monter un godan 
a quelqu'un (popular) ; griller 
qtielqu'un (popular = to cuckold); 
passer en lunette (popular) ; gou- 
jonner (i.e.), to hook like a 
gudgeon); fourguer (thieves' 
= also to FENCE (q.v.)); 
pousser une blague (popular = to 
cram) ; paqueliner (thieves') ; 
se b'aucher (thieves') ; balancer 
popular). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Zin- 
kennen an Almoni peloni ( = to 
send one after Cheeks the Marine 
\_q.v, ,]. Almoni and pe'oni are 
used mockingly in combination 
and also singly for a non-existent 
person) ; anbeulen ( = to fool) ; 
jemanden arbeiten (=r:to haze, to 
cram); bekaspern, or bekaschpern, 
or beschwatzen ( = to fool : from 
Heb. kosaw = io cheat). 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Disparar 
( = also to talk nonsense ; to 
8 



Gammon. 



114 



Gammoner. 



blunder) ; hacer a uno sit doming- 
uillo, or hacer su dominguillo de 
uno (colloquial : dominguillo = 
a figure made of straw and used at 
bull fights to enrage the bulls) ; 
Jreirsela d alguno (freir = to fry : 
to deceive: Cf., to ROAST, or 
have one ON TOAST) ; pegar tina 
tostada d alguno ( = to put one 
on toast : more generally to play 
a practical joke) ; echar de 
baranda(=to EMBROIDER (q.v.)); 
bola (subs. = humbug ; a hoax) ; 
borrufalla (subs. = bombast); 
chicolear ( = to jest in gallatatry) ; 
engatusar ( = to rob, or hurt ; also 
to trick without intention) ; can- 
donguear (also = to jeer); abrir d 
chasco (also to jeer) ; encantar 
( = to enchant). 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Ganezz- 
arre ; dar la stolfa ; traversare 
(cf., TO COME OVER); scamuffare 
= to disguise oneself). 

2. (thieves'). To act as BON- 
NET (q.v.) or COVER (q.v.) to a 
thief. 

Intj. (colloquial). Nonsense ; 
SKITTLES ! (q.v.). 

1827. R. B. PEAKE, Comfortable 
Lodgings, i., 3. SirH. (aside). GAMMON ! 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's 
Log, ch. vii. GAMMON, tell that to the 
marines : you're a spy, messmate. 

1854. THACKERAY, The Rose and 
the Ring, p. 100. Ha ! said the king, 
you dare to say GAMMON to your 
sovereign. 

1861. A. TROLLOPE, Framley Par- 
sonage, ch. iv. GAMMON, said Mr. 
Gpwerby ; and as he said it he looked 
with a kind of derisive smile into the 
clergyman's face. 

GAMMON AND PATTER, subs, 
phr. (thieves'). I. (old). 
The language used by thieves ; 
2. (modern). A meeting; a 
PALAVER. (q.v.). 3. Common- 
place talk of any kind. 



1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 150. GAMMON AND PATTER is the 
language of cant, spoke among them- 
selves : when one of them speaks well, 
another says he GAMMONS well. 

1811. Lex. Bal. s.v. GAMMON 
AND PATTER. Commonplace talk of any 
kind. 

To GIVE (or KEEP) IN GAMMON. 
verb. phr. (thieves'). To engage 
a person's attention' while a con- 
federate is robbing him. 

1719. CAPT. ALEX. SMITH, Thieves' 
Grammar, s.v. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 51. Bagrie 
called the woman of the house, KEPT HER 
IN GAMMON in the back room, while I 
returned and brought off the till. Ibid., 
p. 68. I whidded to the Doctor and he 

GAVE ME GAMMON. 

To GAMMON LUSHY (or 
QUEER, etc.). verb. phr. 
(thieves'). To feign drunken- 
ness, sickness, etc. 

To GAMMON THE TWELVE. 
verb. fhr. (thieves'). To deceive 
the jury. 

1819. VAUX, Life. A man who has 
been tried by a criminal court and by a 
plausible defence has induced the jury to 
acquit him, or to banish the capital part 
of the charge and so to save his life, is said 
by his associates to have GAMMONED THE 
TWELVE in prime twig, alluding to the 
number of jurymen. 

GAMMONER, subs. (old). I. One 
who GAMMONS (q.v.) ', a non- 
sense-monger. Fr., bonisseur de 
loffitudes ; blagueur; mangeur de 
frimes. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry 
\. Fly to the GAMMONERS, and awake to 
everything that's going on. 

2. (thieves'). A confederate 
who covers the action of his 
chief; a BONNET, a COVER, a 
STALL, all which sec. 



Gammy. 



Gamp. 



1821. 



The 



HAGGART, Life, p. 66. 
part of the GAMI 
so well that I made my escape without 
being observed. 

GAMMY, subs, (tramps'). i. Cant. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
Do you stoll the GAMMY? Do you under- 
stand cant ? 

2. (common). A nickname for 
a lameter ; a HOPPING JESUS ; 
(q.v.). 

3. (Australian). A fool. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Siveetheart,p. 191. Well,ofalltheGAMMiES 
you are the gammiest, Slowboy, to go and 
string yourself to a woman, when yon 
might have had the pick of Melbourne. 

Adj. (tramps'). I. Bad ; 
impossible. Applied to house- 
holders of whom it is known that 
nothing can be got. See BEG- 
GARS' MARKS. GAMMY-VIAL = 
a town in which the police will 
not allow unlicensed hawking. 
(ViAL = Fr., Ville). 

1839. BRANDON, Poverty, Mendicity, 
''rime, Glossary, s.v. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab., i., 
466. No villages that are in any way 
GAMMY are ever mentioned in these papers. 
Ibid., i., 404. These are left by one of 
the school at the houses of the gentry, 
a mark being placed on the door post of 
such as are bone or GAMMY, in order 
to inform the rest of ' the school ' where to 
call, and what houses to avoid. 

2. Forged ; false ; spurious : 

as a GAMMY - MONEKER = a 

forged signature; GAMMY-LOUR 
= counterfeit money, etc. 

1839. BRANDON, Poverty, Mendicity, 
and Crime, s.v. 

1852. SNOWDEN, Mag. Assistant 
<3rd. ed.), p. 445. Spurious medicine, 
GAMMY stuff, bad coin, GAMMY LOWER, p, 
446. 

1889. C. T. CLARKSON and J. 
HALL RICHARDSON, Police, p. 321. Bad 
ey (coin). . . . GAMMY LOWER. 



3. (theatrical). Old ; ugly. 

4. (common). Same as 
GAME, sense 3 : e.g., a GAMMY 
arm = an arm in dock. GAMMY- 
eyed = blind; sore-eyed; or 
afflicted with ecchymosis in the 
region of the eyes. GAMMY-leg 
= a lame leg. Also (subs.) a 
term of derision for the halt and 
the maimed, 

GAMP, subs, (common). I. A 
monthly nurse ; a FINGERSMITH 
(q.v.). [After Mrs. Sarah Gamp, 
a character in Martin Chuzzlewit 
(1843).] Also applied to a fussy 
and gossiping busybody. 
1864. Sun, 28 Dec. A regular 

GAMP . . . a fat old dowdy of a monthly 

nurse. 

1868. BREWER, Phr. and Fab. 

auoted from Daily Telegraph). Mr. 
athorne Hardy is to look after the 
GAMPS and Harrises of the Strand. 

2. (ccmmon). An umbrella ; 
specifically, one large and loosely- 
tied ; a LETTUCE (q.v.}. [The 
original Sarah always carried 
one of this said pattern.] Some- 
times a SARAH GAMP. For 
synonyms, see RAIN-NAPPER. 

1870, Lond. Figaro, 15 June. Though 
shattered, baggy, shivered GAMP ! 

1883. G. R. SIMS, Life Boat. He 
donned his goloshes and shouldered his 

GAMP. 

1890. Daily Chron., 5 Mar. 
Sainte-Beuve insisted that though he was 
prepared to stand fire he was under no 
obligation to catch cold, and with his 
GAMP over his head he exchanged four 
shots with his adversary. 

1892 Ally Slower, 2 Apr., p. 106, c. 3. 
I never had a brand new tile, a glossy 
silk or swagger brown, But I left home 
without a GAMP, And rain or hail or snow 
came down 

3. (journalists'). The Standard. 

Adj. (common). Bulging. 
Also GAMPISH. 



Gamut. 



116 



Gang. 



1864. Derby Day, p. 18. I wasn't 
joking, there is an air of long-suffering 
about you, as if you had been mortifying 
the flesh by carrying a GAMPISH UMBRELLA 
up Piccadilly, and back again. 

1881. Mac. Mag., Nov., p. 62. 
Grasping his GAMP umbrella at the middle. 

GAMUT, subs, (artists'). Tone ; 
general scheme ; SWIM (y.v.). 
Thus IN THE GAMUT = a pic- 
ture, a detail, or a shade of colour, 
in tone with its environment. 

3AN (also GANE), subs. (old). The 
mouth. [A.S.,tfmrt = toyawn.] 
Occasionally = throat, lip. For 
synonyms, see POTATO-TRAP. 

1512-13. DOUGLAS, Virgil, 250, 29. 
To behald his ouglie ene twane, His teri- 
bill vissage, and his grislie GANE. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 64. 
GAN, a mouth. 

1610. ROWLAND, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38. (H. Club's Kept., 1874). GAN, a 
mouth. Ibid. A gere peck in thy GAN. 

1656. BROOME, A Jovial Crew, Act 
ii. This bowse is better than rombowse, 
it sets the GAN a giggling. 

1671. R. HEAD, English Rogite, Pt. 
I., ch. v., p. 49. (1874.) GAN, a lip. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew. GANNS, 
the lips. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1881. New York Slang Diet., s.v. 

GANDER, subs, (colloquial). A 
married man ; in America one 
not living with his wife ; a GRASS- 
WIDOWER (q.v.}. 

Verb^ (old). To ramble ; to 
waddle (as a goose). Also, to go 
in quest of women ; TO GROUSE 
(q.v.}. 

1859. H. KINGSLEY, Geoff. Hamblyn, 
ch. x. Nell might come GANDERING back 
in one of her tantrums. 

1861. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, ch. 
xlvii. She GANDERED upstairs to the 
dressing-room again. 

GONE GANDER. See GONE 
COON. 



TO SEE HOW THE GANDER 
HOPS, verb. phr. (American.) 
To watch events. A variant of 
To see how the cat jumps. 

1847. POSTER, Big Bear, p. 96. 
SEEIN' HOW THE GANDER HOPPED I 
jumped up and hollered, Git out, Tromp, 
you old raskel ! 

WHAT'S SAUCE FOR THE 
GOOSE IS SAUCE FOR THE GAN- 
DER, phr. (common). A plea for 
consistency. 

GANDER-MONTH, subs, (common). 
The month after confinement ; 
when a certain license (or so it 
was held) is excusable in the 
male. Also GANDER-MOON, the 
husband at such a period being 
called a GANDER-MOONER. Cf., 
BUCK - HUTCH and GOOSE- 
MONTH. 

1617.. MIDDLETON, A Faire Quarrell, 
iv., 4. Wondering GANDER-MOONERS. 

1653. BROME, English Moor in 
Fiue New Playes. I'le keep her at the 
least this GANDER-MONTH, while my fair 
wife lies-in. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GANDER-PARTY, subs, (common). 
A gathering of men ; a STAG- 
PARTY (q.v. ) ; also BULL-DANCE, 
GANDER-GANG, etc. Cf., HEN- 
PARTY an assembly of women. 

GANDER-PULLING. See GOOSE- 
RIDING. 

GANDER'S WOOL, sitbs. phr. (com- 
mon. ) Feathers. 

GANG, subs, (old : now recognised). 
A troop ; a company. 

1639-61. Rump, i., 228. ' The Scotch 
War.' With his gay GANG of Blue-caps 
all. Ibid ii., 104, 'The GANG; or, the 
Nine Worthies, etc.' 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. GANG, 
an ill knot or crew of thieves, pick- 
pockets or miscreants ; also a society of 
porters under a regulation. 



Ganger. 



Gapes. 



1704. GIBBER, Careless Husband, i., 
i. SirC. Who was that other? More. 
One of Lord Foppington's gang. 

1754. FIELDING, Jonathan Wild, 
bk. i., c. 14. What then have I to do in 
the pursuit of greatness, but to employ a 
GANG, and to make the use of this GANG 
centre in myself? Idem. bk. iii., c. 14. 
Kut in an illegal society or GAMG, as this 
of ours, it is otherwise. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum. GANG, 
company, squad, mob. 

GANGER,jfo. (old: now recognised). 
An overseer or foreman of a 
gang of workmen; one who super- 
intends. For synonyms, see 
GOVERNOR. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab., ii., 
487. The GANGER, or head of the working 
gang, who receives his orders from the 
inspector, and directs the men accordingly. 

1884. Comhill M^., June, p. 614, 
The mother and boy do the work, while 
the father constitutes himself contractor 
for and GANGER over their labour. 

GANYMEDE, subs. (old). i. A 
sodomist. For synonyms, see 
USHER. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes, 
Catamito, a GANIMED, an ingle, a boie 
hired to sinne against nature. [And in COT- 
GRAVE (1611) under GANYMEDES ; Any 
boy that's loved for carnal abuse, an 
Ingle.] 

1598. MARSTON, Satyres, ii. But 
Ho ! What GANIMEDE is it doth grace 
The gallant's heels. 

2. (popular). A pot-boy (i.e., 
a cup-bearer). The masculine of 
HEBE (q.V.). 

1659. FLORIO-TORRIANO, Vocabolario. 
Mescitore, a skinker or filler of wine ; also 
a mingler, a GANIMEDE. 

1841. Punch I., p. 101, c. i. Lo ! 
GANYMEDE appears with a foaming tankard 
of ale. 

GAOL-BIRD, subs, (old : now recog- 
nised). A person who has been 
often in gaol ; an incorrigible 
rogue. Fr., un chevronne. For 
synonyms, see WRONG 'UN. 



^1680. Hist, of Edward I!., p. 146. 
It is the piety and the true valour of an 
army, which gives them heart and victory; 
which how it can be expected out of 
ruffians and GAOL-BIRDS, I leave to your 
consideration. 

1701. DEFOE, True Born English- 
man, part II. In print my panegyrics fill 
the street, And hired GAOL-BIRDS, their 
huzzas repeat. 

1762. SMOLLETT, L. Greaves, vol. II., 
ch. ix. He is become a blackguard 

GAOL-BIRD. 

1857. C. READE, Never Too Late 
ch. xi. The GAOL-BIRDS who piped this 
tune were without a single exception the 
desperate cases of this moral hospital ; they 
were old offenders. 

1882. Pall Malt 'Gaz., 5 Oct. Libera- 
ting the GAOL-BIRDS in Alexandria. 

GAOLER'S COACH, subs. phr. (old). 
A hurdle 4;o the place of 

execution. 

1785. GROSE. Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GAP, subs, (venery). The female 
pudendum-, also SPORTSMAN'S 
GAP and WATER-GAP (q. v. ). For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

d. 1746. ROBERTSON ofStruan.-Aww.r, 
p. 84. O gracious Hymen ! Cure this dire 
Mishap, Sew up this mighty rent, or fill 
the GAP. 

To BLOW THE GAP, verb. phr. 
(old). The same as TO BLOW 

THE GAFF (q.V.]. 

1821. EGAN, Real Life, etc., i., 557 
He should like to smack the bit without 

BLOWING THE GAP. 

GAPER, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. Also, GAPER 
(and GAPE) OVER THE GARTER. 
For synonyms, see MONOSYL- 
LABLE. 

GAPES, subs, (colloquial). A fit of 
yawning ; also the open mouth of 
astonishment. 

1818. AUSTEN, Persuasion. Another 
hour of music was to give delight or th'i 
GAPES. 



Gapeseed. 



118 



Garden. 



1838. HALIBURTON, Clockmaker 
(ed. 1862), p. 373. But what gave me the 
GAPES was the scenes (at the theatre). 



GAPESEED, subs, (common). i. 
A cause of astonishment ; any- 
thing provoking the ignorant to 
stare with open mouth. Also TO 

SEEK A GAPE'S NEST. 

1598. FLORID, IVorlde of Wordes. 
Ansanare ... to go idly loytring vp and 
downe as we say, to go seeking for a 
halfepenie worth of GAPING SEEDE. 

1600. NASHE, Summer's Last Will, 
in wks. (Grosart), vi., 144. That if a 
fellow licensed to beg, Should all his life 
time go from faire to faire, And buyGAPE- 
SEEDE, having no businesse there. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew. GAPE- 
SEED, whatever the gazing crowd idly 
stares and gapes after ; as Puppet-shows, 
Rope-dancers, Monsters and Mountebanks, 
anything to feed the eye. 

1694. Poor Robin. "Tis plainly 
clear, They for their GAPES-SEED do pay 
dear. 

1 856. N. and Q. , 2 S i ., 362. Plenty 
of persons were sowing GAPESEED. 

1870. B. F. CLARK, Mirthfulness"* 
p. 24. Do you wish to buy some GAPE- 
SEED ? 

1884. Daily News, 8 Oct. Title (at 
head of sporting column). 

2. ( common ). An open- 
mouthed loiterer. 

1885. Sportsman, June 23, p. 2, c. 
4. The yearlings bred by Messrs. 
Graham were offered to a rather select 
audience of buyers, though the ring was 
surrounded by a fairly strong crowd of 

GAPESEEDS. 



GAPPED, ppl. adj. (old). Worsted; 
FLOORED (q.v. for synonyms). 

1753. RICHARDSON, Sir Chas. Gran- 
dison. I will never meet at hard-edge 
with her ; if I did ... I should be con- 
foundedly GAPPED. 



GAP-STOPPER, subs. (old). i. A 
whoremaster. For synonyms, 
see MOLROWER. 



2. ( venery ). The penis. 
[GAP = female pudendum}. For 
synonyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK. 

GAR. See BY GAR ! 

GARBLE, TO GARBLE THE COIN- 
AGE, verb. phr. (old). See quot. 
[GARBLED to pick and choose.] 

1875. JEVONS, Money, etc., p. 81. A 
practice amongst money-lenders of pick- 
ing out the newest coins of full weight for 
export or re-melting, and passing the light 
ones into circulation. 

GARDEN, subs. (various). I. 
(greengrocers', fruiterers', etc.) = 
Covent Garden Market ; 2. 
(theatrical) = Covent Garden 
Theatre ; 3. (diamond mer- 
chants') = Hatton Garden. Cf., 
HOUSE, LANE, etc. 

[THE GARDEN (= Covent Garden) was 
frequently used for the whole neighbour- 
hood, which was notorious as a place of 
strumpets and stews. Thus, GARDEN- 
HOUSE=a brothel; GARDEN-GODDESS = a 
woman of pleasure ; GARDEN-GOUT = the 
pox or clap ; GARDEN-WHORE = a low 
prostitute, etc.] 

1733. BAILEY, Erasmus. When 
young men by whoring, as it commonly 
falls out, get the pox, which, by the way 
of extenuation, they call the Common 
GARDEN-GOUT. 

1782. GEO. PARKER, Humorous 
Sketches, p. 90 No more the GARDEN fe- 
male orgies view. 

1851-61. W. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Land. Poor, Vol. I., p. 85. Not only 
is the GARDEN itself all bustle and ac- 
tivity, but the buyers and sellers stream to 
and from it in all directions, filling every 
street in the vicinity. 

1884. JAS. PAYN, in Cornhill Mag., 
Mar., p. 257. She [Miss O'Neill] talked 
of the GARDEN and ' the Lane,' and was 
very fond of recitation. 

1890. Tit-Bits, 29 Mar., p. ^89, c. 
i. Let me describe the GARDEN. A 
long, straight street, stretching almost due 
north and south, from Holborn Circus to 
Clerkenwell Road. Ibid. c. 2. The cut 
stones are chiefly sold to the large dealers 
in the GARDEN. 



Gardener. 



119 



Garn. 



2. (venery). The female pu- 
dendum. [The simile is common 
to all nations, ancient and 
modern. Shakspeare, in Sonnet 
1 6, seems to play upon this 
double meaning ; e.g.^ Now 
stand you on the top of happy 
hours ; And many maiden-GAR- 
DENS, yet unset, With virtuous 
wish would bear you living flow- 
ers.] Also GARDEN OF EDEN. 

For synonyms, see MONO- 
SYLLABLE. 

TO PUT ONE IN THE GARDEN, 
verb. phr. (thieves'). To de- 
fraud a confederate ; to keep back 
part of the REGULARS (q.v.) t or 
SWAG (q.v.). 

GARDENER, subs, (common). I. 
An awkward coachman. [In al- 
lusion to the gardener who on oc- 
casion drives the carriage.] Cf. t 
TEA-KETTLE COACHMAN. 

1859. SALA, Twice Round the Clock, 
Noon : Par. I. He can drive neither to 
the right nor to the left, nor backwards nor 
forwards. ... A sarcastic saloon omnibus 
driver behind jeeringly bids him keep 
moving, accompanying the behest by the 
aggressive taunt of GARD'NER. 

2. (venery). The penis. 
GARDEN (^.z/.)=female puden- 
dum. Also GARDEN-ENGINE. 
For synonyms, see CREAMSTICK 
and PRICK. 

GARDEN-GATE, subs. phr. (rhym- 
ing). i. A magistrate. For syn- 
onyms, see BEAK. 

2. (venery). The labia mi- 
nora. [GARDEN-HEDGE = the 
pubic hair.] 

GARDEN-LATIN ,subs. (colloquial). 
Barbarous or sham Latin. Also 
APOTHECARIES', BOG, DOG, and 
KITCHEN-LATIN. 



GARDEN-RAKE, subs. phr. (com- 
mon). A tooth-comb. Also 

SCRATCHING-RAKE or RAKE. 

GARDY-LOO, subs, (old Scots)* 
A warning cry; 'take care ! ' [Fr. 
garded (vous de] teaul Used 
before emptying slops out of 
window into the street. Hence 
the act of emptying slops itself, 
as in quotation dated 1818.] 

1771. SMOLLET, Humphry Clinker, 
(British Novelists), xxxi., p 57. At ten 
o'clock the whole cargo is flung out of a 
back windore that looks into some street or 
lane, and the maid calls GARDY-LOO to the 
passengers, which signifies 'Lord have 
mercy on you ! ' 

1818. SCOTT, Heart of Midlothian, 
ch. xxvii. She had made the GARDY-LOO 
out of the wrong window. 

GARGLE, subs, (formerly medical 
students', now common). A 
drink; also generic. Cf., LOTION, 
and for synonyms, see Go. 

1889. Sporting Times, 3 Aug., p. 3, 
c. i. We're just going to have a GARGLE 
will you join us ? 

Verb, (common). To drink; 
to 'liquor up.' For synonyms, 
see DRINKS and LUSH. 

1889. Sporting Times, 3 Aug., p. 5. 

C. 5- We GARGLED . . . 

1891. Morning Advertiser, 2 Mar. 
It's my birthday ; let's GARGLE. 

GARGLE-FACTORY, subs, (common). 
A public house. For synonyms, 
see LUSH CRIB. 

GARN, intj. (vulgar). A corruption 
of Go on ! Get away with you ! 

1888. RUNCIMAN, The Chequers, 
p. 80. GARN, you farthin" face ! She 
your neck. 

1892. Ally Sloper, 19 Mar., p. 90, 
C. 3. GAR'N, you men ain't got no sense. 

1892. National Observer, 6 Feb. 
p. 307, c. 2. And so simple is the 
dictum, so redolent of the unlettered Arry 
that we long to add GARN, oo're you 
gettin' at ? 



Garnish. 



120 



Garret-master. 



GARNISH, subs, (old). i. A fee or 
FOOTING (q.v.} ', specifically one 
exacted by gaolers and old 
prisoners from a newcomer. The 
practice was forbidden by 4 Geo. 
IV., c. 43, sec. 12. Also 
GARNISH-MONEY. 

1592. GREENE, Quip, in Works, xi., 
256. Let a poore man be arrested into one 
of the counters [prisons] ... he shall be 
almost at an angel's charge, what with 

GARNISH [etc.]. 

1606. T. DEKKER, Seven Deadly 
Sinnes, p. 28 (Arber's ed.). So that the 
Counters are cheated of Prisoners, to the 
great dammage of those that shoulde have 
their morning's draught out of the 



1632. JONSON, Magnetic Lady, v. 6. 
You are content with the ten thou^a'nd 
pounds Defalking the four hundred 

GARNISH-MONEY? 

1704. STEELE, Lying Lover, Act iv., 
Sc. iv. But there is always some little 
trifle given to prisoners, they call GARNISH. 

1752. FIELDING, Amelia, Bk. I., 
ch. iii. Mr. Booth . . . was no sooner 
arrived in the prison, than a number of 
persons gathered round him, all demand- 
ing GARNISH. 

1759. GOLDSMITH, The Bee, No. 5, 
p. 385 (Globe ed.). There are numberless 
faulty expenses among the workmen 
clubs, GARNISHES, freedoms, and such like 
impositions. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xliv. [Jailor log.} Thirty shillings a 
week for lodgings, and a guinea for 
GARNISH. 

2. (thieves'). Fetters ; hand- 
cuffs. For synonyms, see DARBIES. 

Verb, (thieves'). To fit with 
fetters : to handcuff. 

GARRET, subs, (common). i. The 
head ; COCKLOFT ( q.v. ) ; or 
UPPER STOREY (q.v.). For syn- 
onyms, see CRUMPET. 

1625. BACON, Apothgm, No. 17. My 
Lord St. Albans said that wise Nature did 
never put her precious jewels into a GARRET 



four stories high, and therefore that ex- 
ceeding tall men had ever very empty 
heads. 

1811. Lexicon Balatro nicum. , s.v. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingold. Leg. What's 
called the claret Flew over the GARRET. 



2. (old). The fob-pocket. 

To HAVE ONE'S GARRET UN- 
FURNISHED, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To be crazy, stupid, 
lumpish. For synonyms, see 
APARTMENTS and BALMY. 



GARRETEER, subs, (thieves'). A 
thief whose speciality is to rob 
houses by entering skylights or 
garret - windows. Also DANCER 
and DANCING - MASTER. For 
synonyms, see THIEVES. 



2. (journalists'). An im- 
pecunious author ; a literary 
hack. 



1849-61. MACAULAY, Hist, of Eng., 
ch. xxv. GARRETEERS, who were never 
weary of calling the cousin of the Earls of 
Manchester and Sandwich an upstart. 

1886. SHELLEY (quoted in Dowdens 
Life), i., 47. Show them that we are no 
Grub-street GARRETEERS. 

1892. National Observer, 18 Mar., 
p. 453. Has proclaimed urbi et orbi that 
governments have no business to manufac- 
ture specious sentiment by greasing the 
palms of ignorant and greedy GARRETEERS. 



GARRET-MASTER, subs, (trade). 
A cabinet-maker who works on 
his own account, selling his 
manufacture to the dealers direct. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lend. Lab., ii., 
p. 376. These trading operatives are 
known by different names in different 
trades. In the shoe trade, for instance, 
they are called ' chamber-masters,' in the 
cabinet trade GARRET-MASTERS, and in 
the cooper's trade the name for them is 
' small trading-masters.' 



Garrison-hack. 



121 



Gas. 



GARRISON -HACK, subs, (common). 
I. A woman given to indis- 
criminate flirtation with officers 
at a garrison. 

1889 Daily Telegraph, 14 Feb. 
Lord Normantower, Philip's dearest friend, 
to whom she, when a GARRISON-HACK, 
had been engaged, and whom she had 
thrown over simply because he was poor 
and prospectless. 

1890. Athenaum, 8 Feb., p. 176, c. 
i. The heroine is a GARRISON-HACK, 
but the hero is an Australian. 

2. (common). A prostitute ; 
a soldier's trull. For synonyms, 
see BARRACK HACK and TART. 

GARROTTE, subs, (common). A 
form of strangulation (see verb). 
[From the Spanish la garrota = 
a method of capital punishment, 
which consists in strangulation by 
means of an iron collar.] 

Verb, (common). i, A method 
of robbery with violence, much 
practised some years ago. The 
victims were generally old or 
feeble men and women. Three 
hands were engaged : the FRONT- 
STALL who looked out in that 
quarter, the BACK - STALL at the 
rear, and the UGLY or NASTY- 
MAN who did the work by passing 
his arm round his subject's neck 
from behind, and so throttling 
him to insensibility. 

1869. GREENWOOD, Seven Curses oj 
Land. Committed for trialfor GARROTTING 
and nearly murdering a gentleman. 

1873. TROLLOPE, Phineas Redux, 
ch. xlvi. In those days there had been 
much GARROTTING in the streets. 

2. (cards). To cheat by con- 
cealing certain cards at the back 
of the neck. 

GARROTTER, subs, (common). A 
practitioner of GARROTTING 
(under verb, sense I.) 



1869. GREENWOOD, Seven Curses of 
London, p. 201. The delectable epistle 
was written by GARROTTER Bill to his 
brother. 

GARROTTING, i. See GARROTTE 
(verb, sense i). 

2. (gamblers'). Hiding a 
part of one's hand at the back of 
the neck for purposes of cheating. 

GARTER, subs, (nautical). i. in. 
pi. the irons, or bilboes. For 
synonyms, see DARBIES. 

TO GET OVER THE GARTER, 

verb. phr. (venery). To take 
liberties with a woman. 

To FLY or PRICK THE GAR- 
TER. See PRICK THE GARTER. 

GARVIES, subs. (Scots'). i. Sprats. 
Sometimes GARVIE-HERRING. 

1845. P. ALLOA, Statis. Ace., viii., 
597. They are often very successful in 
taking the smaller fish, such a* herrings, 
GARVIES or sprats, sparlings or smelts. 

2. (military). The Ninety- 
fourth Foot. [From the small 
stature of the earlier recruits. ] 

1869. Notes and Queries, 4 S. iii., 
p. 349. GARVIE. The soubriquet points 
to the low average height of the recruits in 
the Fifeshire regiments, which, however, 
may not now be the case, since recruiting 
has become less local. 

GAS, subs, (common). Empty 
talk ; bounce ; bombast. 

1847. PORTER, Quarter Race, etc., 
p. 120. The boys said that was all GAS to 
scare them off. 

1867. Chambers' Jour., 29 June. 
I've piped off Sabbath GAS in my time I 
don't deny, but under the woods we mostly 
tell the truth. 

1868. Chambers Jour., 15 Feb., p. 
no. I don't, an' never could splice ends 
with them as blow off GAS about gold- 
digging saying it's plunder easy come an' 
easy gone, seeking the root of evil, an' 
other granny talk which hasn't no 
meaning. 



Gas. 



1 22 Gaspipe- crawler. 



a. 1871. EMERSON (quoted in De 
Vere's Amer,). Tis odd that our people 
should have not water on the brain, but a 
little GAS there. 

1889. Globe, 31 Oct., p. 4, c. 4. 
It went on to state that the petitioner's 
talk about a divorce was all GAS, and 
made a further appointment. 

Verb, (common). I. To talk 
idly; to brag; to bounce; to 
talk for talking's sake. Fr., 
faire son cheval de corbillard (in 
American 'to be on the tall 
grass.') See LONG Bow. 

1872. Land. Figaro, 14 Dec. There 
is no good to be got out of GASSING 
about rallying around standards, uniting as 
one man to resist, etc. 

1875. 'American English ' in Chambers' 
Jour,, 25 Sept., p. 610. To GAS is to 
talk only for the purpose of prolonging a 
debate. 

1885. Society, ^ Feb., p. 7. Agita- 
tors and place-seekers may GAS as much 
as they please, but they cannot make black 
appear white. 

2. (common). To impose on 
by 'GAS'; TO PILL (q.v.) ; TO 
SPLASH (q.v.). For synonyms, see 
GAMMON. 

TO TAKE THE GAS OUT OF 
ONE, verb. phr. (common). To 
take the conceit out of; to take 
down a peg. 

TO TURN ON THE GAS, verb, 
phr. (common). To begin bounc- 
ing; also to GAS (q.v.). 

TO TURN OFF THE GAS, verb, 
phr. (common). To cease, or 
cause to cease, from bouncing, 
vapouring, or GAS (q.v.). 

To GAS ROUND, verb. phr. 
(common). To seek information 
on the sly ; also to GAS (q.v.). 

GAS-BAG, subs, (common). A 
man of words or GAS (q.v.); a 



gasconader. Also GASOMETER. 
For synonyms, see MOUTH 
ALMIGHTY. 

1889. Referee, 6 Jan. That great 
GAS-BAG of modern days. 

GASH, suds. (American). i. The 
mouth. For synonyms, see 

POTATO-TRAP. 

1878. H. B. STOWE, Poganuc 
People, ch. xiv., p. 122. Ef Zeph 
Higgins would jest shet up his GASH in 
town-meetin', that air school-house could 
be moved fast enough. 

2. ( venery ). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

GASHLY, adj. (common). A vul- 
garism for GHASTLY. 

GASKINS, subs, (old). Wide hose ; 
wide breeches. [From GALLI- 
GASKINS. Johnson says, ' an old 
ludicrous word.'] 

GASP, subs, (common). A dram 
of spirits. For synonyms, see Go. 

Verb, (common). To drink a 
dram, e.g., 'Will you GASP?' = 
Will you take something neat. 

GASPIPE, subs, (nautical). I. An 
iron steamer, whose length is nine 
or ten times her beam. [At one 
time a ship's length but rarely ex- 
ceeded four and a half to five times 
the beam.] 

2. (printers'). Bad rollers. 

3. (common). A rifle; specifi- 
cally the Snider. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, g July, p. 5, 
col. 7. The old Snider the despair- 
breeding GAS - PIPE of our Volunteers 
continues to be used in many of the 
competitions. 

GASPIPE CRAWLER, subs. phr. 
(common). A thin man. /"., 
LAMP-POST. 



Gasser. 



123 



Gate. 



GASSER, subs. ( common ). A 
braggart. For synonyms, see 
MOUTH ALMIGHTY. 

GASSY (or GASEOUS), adj 

(common). I. Likely to take 
umbrage or to flare-up. 

1863. North American Review, 
cxliii., p. 220. GASSY politicians "in Con- 
gress. 

2. (colloquial). Full of empty 
talk or GAS \q.v. ). 

1872. WHITNEY, Life and Growth of 
Lang., p. 17. As when we call an empty 
and sophistical but ready talker GASSY. 

G ASTER, subs, (nonce-word). A 
fine and curious eater (Thacke- 
ray). In Rabelais = the belly and 
the needs thereof: a coinage 
adopted by Urquhart. 

GAT, s^tbs. ( schoolboys' ). A 
quantity; e.g., a GAT of grub = 
plenty to eat. Also GATS. 
1803. Every-day Life in our Public 

Schools. They are called up in GATS of 

three at a time. 

GATE, subs, (colloquial). I. The 
attendance at a race or athletic 
meeting, held in enclosed grounds; 
the number of persons who pass 
the gate. 

1888. Sportsman, 20 Dec. The Bir- 
mingham man, on account of the large 
GATE that would bej secured, wanted the 
affair to be brought off in that town, 
whereas Regan favoured Wolverhampton. 

2. Money paid for admission 
to athletic sports, race course, 
etc. ; the same as GATE-MONEY 
(?..)- 

1891. Telegraph, 21 Mar. The 
leading clubs are now commercial corpora- 
tions, dependent tor revenue on the GATES 
at the matches. 

3. in. pi. (University). The 
being forbidden to pass outside 
the gate of a college. See verb, 
sense i. 



18(?). BRADLEY, Tales of College 
Life, p. 19. That's the ticket ; that will 
just land me in time for GATES. 

1881. LANG, xxxii. Ballades, 'Of 
Midsummer Term.' When freshmen are 
careless of GATES. 

Verb. (University). To con- 
fine wholly or during certain hours 
within the college gate for some 
infraction of discipline. 

1835. The Snobiad (WHIBLEY, 
Cap and Gown, p. 141). Two proctors 
kindly holding either arm Staunch the 
dark blood and GATE him for the term. 

1853. BRADLEY, Verd. Green, I., 
ch. xii. He won't hurt you much, Gig- 
lamps ! GATE and chapel you ! 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at 
Oxford, ch. xii. Now you'll both be 
GATED probably, and the whole crew will 
be thrown out of gear. 

1865. Comhill Mag., p. 227. He is 
requested to confine himself to college 
after a specified hour, which is familiarly 
termed being GATED. 

1870. Morning Advertiser, 23 May. 
The two least culpable of the party have 
been GATED. 

THE GATE, subs. phr. (various). 
Among fishmongers, Billings- 
gate ; among thieves, Newgate. 
C/., LANE, Row, GARDEN, etc. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 
ch. i., p. 5. The 'steel,' a slang name of 
the large metropolitan prisons, as the GATE 
is tor Newgate. 

To BREAK GATES, verb. phr. 
(University). To stay out of 
college after hours. 

To BE AT GATES, verb. phr. 
(Winchester College). To as- 
semble in Seventh Chamber 
passage, preparatory to going 
Hills or Cathedral. 

1870. MANSFIELD, School Life, p. 149. 
Soon after morning chapel on a holiday or 
a remedy all the boys assembled at GATES. 

ON THE GATE, adv. phT. 
(thieves'). On remand. 



Gate-Bill. 



124 



Gatter. 



GATE- BILL, subs. (University). 
The record of an undergraduate's 
failure to be within the precincts 
of his college at, or before, a spe- 
cified time at night. 

1803. Gradus ad Cant., p. 128. To 
avoid GATE-BILLS he will be out at night 
as late as he pleases . . . climb over the 
college wall, and fee his gyp well. 

GATE-MONEY, subs, (colloquial). 
The charge for admission to a 
race-meeting. See GATE, suds., 
sense I. 

1885. Daily News, 25 May, p. 3, c. 
2. The truth of the matter is, that so far 
as sport goes, open meetings like those at 
Bath and Salisbury cannot stand up 
against GATE-MONEY meetings such as 
Manchester. 

1888. Snorting- Life, 10 Dec. The 
comfort that is brought home at our great 
GATE-MONEY meetings gatherings to every 
visitor. 



fo.jZ^r. (venery). 
The female pudendum. Cf., 
HORN, and for synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE, j 



tbs. (venery). The 
female pudendiim. Also GATE- 
OF-HORN. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

GATER, subs. (Winchester College), 
A plunge head foremost into a 
POT (q.v.). 

GATE-RACE (or -MEETING), subs. 
(sporting). Formerly, a contest 
not got up for sport but entrance 
money ; now a race or athletic 
meeting to which admission is by 
payment. 

1881. Daily News, 14 July. Few of 
these athletics care to compete at GATE- 
MEETINGS. 

GATH, subs, (colloquial). A city or 
district in PHILISTIA (q.v.) ; often 
used, like ASKELON (q.v.) for 



PHILISTIA itself. Hence, TO BE 

MIGHTY IN GATH = tobe a PHILIS- 
TINE (q.v. ) of the first magnitude; 

TO PREVAIL AGAINST GATH = tO 

smite the Philistines hip and 
thigh, as becomes a valiant com- 
panion of the Davidsbund f and 
so forth. 

TELL IT NOT IN GATH, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). An interjection 
of derision, signifying that the 
person exclaimed against has done 
something the knowledge of 
which would bring on him the 
wrath, or the amazement, of his 
friends. 

GATHER. To GATHER UP, verb, 
phr. (American). To lead away. 

1847. Chronicles o/Pineville, p. 182. 
* GATHER him UP, boys,' said the judge, 
' the sentence of the law must be executed.' 

TO GATHER THE TAXES, Verb. 

phr. (tailor's). To go from work- 
shop to workshop seeking employ- 
ment. Hence, TAX-GATHERER 
= a man out of work and looking 
for a job. Cf., INSPECTOR OF 

PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 

OUT OF GATHERS, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). In distress. Cf., 
OUT AT ELBOWS. 

GATHERINGS. See GAGS. 

GATTER, subs, (common). Beer ; 
also liquor generally. SHANT OF 
GATTER = a pot of beer. Fr., la 
moussante. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS. 

1818. MAGINN, Vidocq Versified. 
Lots of GATTER, says she, is flowing. Lend 
me a lift in the family way. 

1841. Punch, I., p. 243, GATTER is 
but threepence a pot, and that's the price 
of a reasonable 'pike ticket. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, Vol. i., p. 232. They 
have a ' shant of GATTER ' (pot of beer) at 
the nearest ' boo/ing-ken ' (alehouse). 



Gaudeamus. 



125 



Gawk. 



GAUDEAMUS, subs, (colloquial). A 
feast ; a drinking bout ; any sort 
of merry - making. [ German 
students', but now general and 
popular. ] From the first word of 
the mediaeval (students') ditty. 
For synonyms, see JAMBOREE. 

GAU DY (or G AU DY- DAY), subs, (com- 
mon). A feast or entertainment : 
specifically the annual dinner of 
the fellows of a college in 
memory of founders or bene- 
factors ; or a festival of the Inns 
of Court. (Lat. gaudere = to 
rejoice.) 

1721. E. COLES, Eng. Diet. GAUDY 
DAYS, college or Inns of Court festivals. 

1754. B. MARTIN, Eng Diet., and 
ed. GAUDIES, double commons, such as 
they have on GAUDY or grand DAYS in col- 
leges. 

1760. FOOTE, Minor, Act i. Dine 
at twelve, and regale, upon a GAUDY DAY, 
with buns and beer at Islington. 

1803. Gradus ad Cantab., p. 122. 
Cut lectures . . . give GAUDIES and 
spreads. 

1820. LAMB, Etta (Oxford in the 
Vacation}. Methought I a little grudged 
at the coalition of the better Jude with 
Simon clubbing (as it were) their sancti- 
ties together, to make up one poor GAUDY- 
DAY between them. 

1822. SCOTT, Fortunes of Nigel, 
ch. xxiii. We had a carouse to your 
honour ... we fought, too, to finish off 
the GAUDY. 

1878. BESANT AND RICE, By Celias 
Arbour, ch. xxxiii. Champagne . . . 
goes equally well with a simple luncheon 
of cold chicken, and with the most 
elaborate GAUDY. 

Adj. (colloquial). Good; 
frolicsome ; festive. Cf. , Shak- 
speare's ' Let's have one other 
GAUDY night.' Ant. and Cleo., 
iii, 13. 

1884. HAWLEY SMART. From Post 
to Finish, p. 176. 'Yes,' answered the 
trainer, slowly, ' he's right enough ; but a 
Leger's a Leger, and I don't think they 
are likely to give him a very GAUDY 
chance.' 



NEAT BUT NOT GAUDY, AS 

THE DEVIL SAID WHEN HE 
PAINTED HIS BOTTOM PINK, AND 
TIED UP HIS TAIL WITH PEA- 
GREEN, phr. (common). A locu- 
tion used to ancient ladies dressed 
in flaming colours. 

GAUGE. See GAGE. 

TO GET THE GAUGE OF. 
verb. phr. ( colloquial ). To 
divine an intention ; to read a 
character ; to SIZE, (or RECKON) 
UP (q.v.). Hence, That's about 
the GAUGE of it = That's a fair 
description. 

GAU LEY. See BY GOLLY. 

GAWF, subs, (costers'). A red- 
skinned apple. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab., i., 
63. A cheap red-skinned fruit, known to 
costers as GAWFS, is rubbed hard, to look 
bright and feel soft, and is mixed with 
apples of a superior description. GAWFS 
are sweet and sour at once, I was told, 
and fit for nothing but mixing. 

GAWK, subs, (colloquial). A sim- 
pleton, especially an awkward 
one, whether male or female. 
For synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. [Scots GOWK = 
a cuckoo ; a fool ; whence, TO 
GOWK = to, play the fool. As in 
the ' Derision of Wanton Women ' 
(Bannatyne, MS., 1567,), 'To 
gar them ga in GUCKING' = to 
make them play the fool.] 

1837. H. MARTINEAU, Soc. in 
America, i., 299. They proved such 
GAWKS that they were unable to learn. 

1882. McCABE, New York, p. 217. 
I wasn't half as awkward as some of the 
GAWKS about me. 

1887. H. FREDERIC, Seth's Brother's 
Wife, ch. iv. Girls brought up to be 
awkward GAWKS, without a chance in 
life. 

Verb, (colloquial). To loiter 
round ; to PLAY THE GOAT. 
[The same verb is used by Joxsos 



Gawkiness. 



126 Gay Tyke Boy. 



(Alagnetic Lady, iii., 4, 1632) in 
the sense of amazed, or bam- 
boozled, i.e., absolutely befooled : 
Nay, look how the man stands, 
as he were GOWKED !] 

1888. F. R. STOCKTON, Rudder 
Grange, ch. xvi. That afternoon we 
GAWKED around, a-lookin' at all the out- 
side shows, for Jone said he'd have to be 
pretty careful of his money now. 

GAWKINESS, subs, (colloquial). 
Awkwardness ; silliness ; GREEN- 
NESS (q.v.}. 

1873. Miss BROUGHTON, Nancy, 
ch. xxxvii. The crude GAWKINESS of the 
raw girl he has drifted into marrying. 

GAWKING, subs, (colloquial). 
Loitering and staring ; GATHER- 
ING HAYSEED (q.V.}. 

GAWKY, subs, (colloquial), An 
awkward booby ; a fool. 'Now 
SQUIRE GAWKY ' = a challenge to 
a clumsy lout. For synonyms, see 
BUFFLE and CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1686-1758. RAMSAY, Poems, ii., 299. 
Or, gentle born ye be ; but youths in love 
you're but a GAWKY. 

1777. SHERIDAN, School for Scandal, 
Act ii., Sc. 2. Crab. Yes, and she is a 
curious being to pretend to be censorious 
an awkward GAWKY, without any one good 
point under heaven. 

1825. NEAL, Bro. Jonathan, ii., 
ch. 18. Great, long, slab-sided GAWKEYS 
from the country. 

1878. C. H. WALL, tr. Moliert, ii., 
197. Our big GAWKY of a viscount. 

Adj. (colloquial). Lanky ; 
awkward ; stupid. 

1759. TOWNLEY, High Life Below 
Stairs i., i. Under the form of a GAWKY 
country boy I will be an eye-witness of my 
servants' behaviour. 

_ 1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. 
xlviii. Even for his cousin Samuel 
Newcome, a GAWKY youth with an erupt 
countenance, Barnes had appropriate wo; 



of conversation. 



ppropriate words 



GAWNEY (or GONEY), subs, (com- 
mon). A fool. For synonyms, 
see BUFFLE and CABBAGE-HEAD. 



GAY, adj. (colloquial). i. Dis- 
sipated ; specifically, given to 
venery : As in the French, avoir 
la cuisse gaie = to be addicted to 
the use of men. Hence GAY 
WOMAN, or GIRL, or BlT = a 
strumpet ; GAY HOUSE = a brothel; 
TO BE GAY = to be incontinent ; 

GAY IN THE LEGS, IN THE 
GROIN, IN THE ARSE = SHORT- 
HEELED (q.V.}\ GAYING INSTRU- 
MENT = the penis [Lexicon Bala- 
tronicum, loll, s.v.] ; GAY MAN 
= a wencher ; GAY LADIE (old) = 
a mistress ; GAYING IT = 
copulating. 

1383. CHAUCER, Canterbury Tales, 
3767. What eyeleth you? Some GAY girl, 
God it wot, Hath brough you thus upon 
the very trot. 

1754. Adventurer, No. 124. The 
old gentleman, whose character I cannot 
better express than in the fashionable 
phrase which has been contrived to palliate 
false principles and dissolute manners, had 
been a GAY man, and was well acquainted 
with the town. 

1854. LEECH, Pictures of Life and 
Character, How long have you been 
GAY? 

1857. J. E. RITCHIE, Night^ Side of 
London, p. 40. Here in Catherine-street 
vice is a monster of a hideous mien. The 
GAY women, as they are termed, are worse 
off than American slaves. 

1868. Sunday Times, 19 July. As 
soon as ever a woman has ostensibly lost 
her reputation, we, with a grim inapposite- 
ness, call her GAY. 

2. (common). In drink. For 
synonyms, see SCREWED. 

ALL GAY (or ALL so GAY). 
adv. phr. (common). All right ; 
first-rate ; ALL SERENE (q.v.). 

To FEEL GAY. verb. phr. 
(colloquial). Inclined for sport, 
venereal or other; To FEEL 

NAUGHTY (q.V.}. 

GAY TYKE BOY, subs. phr. (old). 
A dog fancier. 

1848. DUNCOMBE, Sinks of London, 



Gazebo. 



127 



Gee-gee. 



GAZEBO, subs. (old). A summer- 
house commanding an extensive 
view. [Dog-Latin, GAZEBO = I 
will gaze.] 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GEACH, subs, (thieves'). A thief. 
For synonyms, see THIEVES. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 56. He 
was a tolerable GEACH. 

Verb, (thieves'). To steal. For 
synonyms, see PRIG. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 73. A 
small dross scout . . . which I knew had 
been GEACHED. 

GEAR, subs, (venery). i. The 
piivate parts, both male and fe- 
male. [' Geere, besognes ; aussi les 
parties honteuses' (ROBERT SHER- 
WOOD'S Dictionarie^ English and 
French, appended to COTGRAVE, 
1660). ' Besongner . . . also to 
do or leacher with ' (COTGRAVE). 
Anglo-Saxon : gearwe (strong 
feminine plural) ornaments. 
SKEAT says original sense of 
gear was ' preparation.'] 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes, 
Mozza, a wench, a lasse, a girle. Also a 
woman's GEERE or cunnie. 

1620. PERCY, Folio MSS. ' Ffryar 
and Boye.' I sweare, by night nor day 
thy GEARE is not to borrow. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabulario, s.v. 

2. (obsolete). Work, BUSI- 
NESS (q.v.\ Thus: Here's 
goodly GEAR = Here's fine 
doings; Here's a pretty kettle 
of fish. As in Romeo and Juliet 
(ii., 2, 106). 

GEE, suds, (colloquial). See GEE- 
GEE. 

Verb, (colloquial). I. To go or 
turn to the off-side ; used as a 
direction to horses. Cf. : It. : gio 
= Get on ! 



1480. Dialogus Creaturum. Et 
cum sic gloriaretur, et cogitaret cum 
quanta gloria duceretur ad ilium virum 
super equum, dicendo, 'Gio! Gio!' cepit 
pede percutere terram quasi pungeret 
equum calcaribus. 

2. (colloquial). To move 
faster : as a teemster to his horses, 
' Gee up ! ' 

1824. Blackwooffs Mag., Oct. Mr. 
Babb GE-HUPPED in vain, and strove to 
jerk the rein, Nobbs felt he had his option 
to work or play. 

3. (colloquial). To stop : as 
1 Gee whoa ! ' 

To GEE WITH, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To agree with ; to 
fit ; to be congenial ; to go on all 
fours with ; to do. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, GEARS, s.v. ... It won't GEE, it 
won't hit or go. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GEE, 
it won't GEE, it won't hit or do, it does not 
suit or fit. 

1850. SEAWORTHY, Nag's Head, 
ch. v., p. 35. It don't seem to GEE ! said 
Isaac, as he was trying to adjust the 
stove. 

1888. Missouri Repub., 8 April. He 
and Mrs. Barnay did not GEE. 

GEE-GEE (or GEE). subs, (com- 
mon). i. A horse. See GEE, 
verb, in all senses. For synonyms, 
see PRAD. 

1888. Referee, 15 April, 1/2. In 
nearly all other races they see most of the 
GEES do a canter on their way up the 
course. 

1889. Pall Mall Gaz., 14 April. 
He knows as much about GEE-GEE'S as a 
professional trainer. 

1890. Licensed Viet. Gaz. 8 Feb. 
The GEES were all broken to the stable. 

2. (colloquial). The nick- 
name among journalists (of the 
interviewer, type) of Mr. 
G(eorge) G(rossmith), better 
known, perhaps, as the Society 
Clown. 



Gee-gee Dodge. 



128 



Gemini. 



GEE-GEE DODGE, subs. phr. (trade). 
Selling horseflesh for beef. 

1884. GREENWOOD, Veiled Mysteries. 
The GEE-GEE DODGE . . . was seldom or 
ever practised ... it was impossible . . . 
to bargain for a regular supply. 

GEEKIE, subs. (Scots thieves'). A 
police-station. 

GEELOOT. See GALOOT. 

GEESE, ALL HIS GEESE ARE 
SWANS, phr. (colloquial). He 
habitually exaggerates, or EM- 
BROIDERS (q.v); or, He is 
always wrong in his estimates of 
persons and things. 

THE OLD WOMAN'S PICKING 
HER GEESE (proverbial}. Said 
of a snowstorm. [The other leg 
of the couplet (schoolboys') 
runs : ' And selling the feathers 
a penny a piece. '] 

LIKE GEESE ON A COMMON 
(colloquial). Wandering in a 
body, aggressive and at large : 
e.g., as FADDISTS (q.v.) in pur- 
suit of a FAD ; or members of 
Parliament in recess, when both 
sides go abqut to say the thing 
which is in them. 

GEEWHILIKENS I intj. (Western 
American). An exclamation of 
surprise ; also JEEWHI LIKENS. 

1888. Detroit Free Press. It is 
on time? No? Three hours late? 
GEEWHILIKENS ! 

GEEZER, subs, (popular). An 
appellation, sometimes, but not 
necessarily, of derision and con- 
tempt ; applied to both sexes, 
but generally to women. Usually, 
OLD GEEZER. For synonyms, 
see WITCH. 

1885. Truth about the Stage, p. 16. 
If we wake up the old GEEZERS we shall 
get notice to quit without compensation 



1886. Broadside Ballad. 'Her 
Mother's Got the Hump.' This frizzle- 
headed old GEEZER had a chin on her as 
rough well, as rough as her family, and 
they're rough 'uns. 

1890. A. CHEVALIER, ' Knocked 'Em 
in the Old Kent Road.' Nice old GEEZER 
with a nasty cough. 

1892. ANSTEY, Voces Populi, p. 82. 
Our old GEESER'S perdoocin' the custimary 
amount o' sensation. 

GELDING, subs. (old). A eunuch. 

1380. WYCLIFFE, Trans, of the 
Bible, Acts viii. 39. ... the spirit of the 
Lord ravysched Filip, and the GELDYNGE 
say him no more. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabolario, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicunt, s.v. 

TO ENTER FOR THE GELD- 
INGS* STAKES, verb. phr. (old). 
To castrate a man ; also used to 
describe a eunuch. 

GELT, subs. (old). Money; GILT 
(q.v.). Also GELTER. (DuN- 

COMBE, 1848). 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. There is no GELT to be got, 
Trading is very dull. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicutn, s.v. 

GEMINI! (or GEMINY! or JIMINY !) 

intj. (common). An exclamation 
of surprise ; a mild oath. 
[Generally referred to the Lat. : 
Gemini = the Twins (i.e., Castor 
and Pollux, the objects of an 
old Roman oath) ; but Palmer 
(Folk Etymology), traces the 
interjection to the German, O 
Gemine !; Dutch, Jemy Jemini ! ; 
both abbreviated from the Latin, 
Jesu Domine! ; or merely from 
Jesu meus! ; Italian, Giesu mio! 
It seems to have come in at the 
Restoration.] Also O JIMMINY ! ; 



Gemman. 



129 



Geneva Print. 



O JlMMINY FlGS! O JlMMINY 

GIG ! etc. : for the phrase has 
pleased the cockney mind, and 
been vulgarised accordingly. 

1672. DRYDEN, The Assignation, 
Act ii., Sc. 3. Ben. O GEMINI ! is it you, 
sir? 

1704. STEELE, Lying Lover, Act 
iv., Sc. 3. Sim. I stay with you? Oh 
GEMINI ! Indeed, I can't. 

1731. FIELDING, The Lottery, Sc. 2. 
Lord Lace ! Oh GEMINI ! who's that? 

1780. MRS. COWLEY, The Belle's 
Stratagem, iv., 2. Oh GEMINI ! beg the 
petticoat's pardon. 

1797. M. G. LEWIS, Castle Spectre, 
iii., 3. Oh GEMINI! what would he use 
with me, lady ? 

1798. MORTON, Secrets Worth 
Knowing, i., i. A parcel of lazy chaps, 
I dare say but I'll make them stir their 
stumps. Well, here we are at last. Oh 
GEMINI GIG how my poor bones do ache ! 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's 
Log, ch. i. ' GEMINI ! what is that now?' 
quoth Tip again. 

1863. READS, Hard Cash, I., 125.. 

0, JIMINY ! This polite ejaculation was 
drawn out by the speaker's sudden recog- 
nition of Alfred. 

GEMMAN, subs, (vulgar). A con- 
traction of gentkman. 

1550. Docteur Double- All (the word 
occurs in this play). 

c. 1551. L. SHEPHERD, John Bon 
in Arber's Garner, iv., 107. Ye be the 
jolliest GEMMAN that I ever saw in my life. 

1767. COLMAN, Oxonian in Town, I., 

1. I am glad to see your honour's well. I 
hope you left all the GEMMIN well at 
Oxford. 

1818. BYRON, Beppo, st. 86. At 
home our Bow-street GEMMEN keep the 
laws. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rook-wood, bk. 
iii., ch. v. ... but knock down a 

GEMMAN. 

1851. BORROW, Lavengro, ch>. 26. 
Here the gipsy GEMMAN see. 

GEN, subs, (costers'). A shilling. 
Back slang, but cf. Fr., argent. 
For synonyms, see BLOW. 



1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, vol. i., p. 19. I'll try 
you a GEN (shilling) said a coster. 

1887. Saturday Review, 14 May, 
p. 700. The difficulty of inverting the 
word shilling accounts for 'generalize,' 
from which the abbreviation to GEN is 
natural as well as affectionate. 

GENDER, verb. (old). To copu- 
late. [An abbreviation of EN- 
GENDER.] For synonyms, see 
GREENS and RIDE. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Othello, iv., a. 
A cistern for foul toads To knot and 
GENDER in. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocobolario, s.v, 

1778. BAILEY, Eng. Diet., s.v. 

1816. JOHNSON, Eng. Diet., s.v. 

1892. Bible, Lev. xix., 19. Thou- 
shalt not let thy cattle GENDER with a 
diverse kind. 

FEMININE GENDER, subs, 
pkr. (schoolboys'). The female 
pudendum. [As in the old 
( schoolboys' ) rhyme : Amo, 
amasy I loved a lass, And she was 
tall and slender,. Amas, amat, I 
laid her flat, And tickled her 

FEMININE GENDER. Quoted 

(with modifications) by Marryat 
in Jacob Faithful, 1835.] 

GENERALIZE, subs, (costers'). A 
shilling. See GEN. 

GENERATING PLACE, subs. phr. 
(venery). The female pudendum. 

GENERATION TOOL, subs. phr. 
(venery). The penis. For syn- 
onyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK. 

GENEVA PRINT, subs. phr. (old). 
Gin. For synonyms, see DRINKS 
and SATIN. 

1584-1640. MASSINGER (quoted in 
Slang, Jargon, and Cant). And if you 
meet an Officer preaching of sobriety, 
Unless he read it in GENEVA PRINT, 
Lay him by the heels. 



Gen-net. 



130 



Gentleman. 



GEN -NET, subs. phr. (back slang). 
Ten shillings. 

GENNITRAF, subs, (back slang). 
A farthing. 

GENOL, adj. (back slang). Long. 

GENT, subs, (once literary: now 
vulgar). I. A showily-dressed 
vulgarian. [A contraction of 
' gentleman. '] 

1635. [GLAPTHORNE], Lady Mother, 
in Bullen's Old Plays, ii., 114. Hees not 
a GENT that cannot parlee. I must invent 
some new and polite phrases. 

1785. BURNS, Epistle to J. Lapraite, 
st. n. Do ye envy the city GENT, 
Behint a kist to lie and sklent ? 

1843. THACKERAY, Irish Sketch 
Book, ch. viii. The crowd of swaggering 
GENTS (I don't know the corresponding 
phrase in the Anglo-Irish vocabulary to 
express a shabby dandy), awaiting the 
Cork mail. 

1844. DISRAELI, Coningsby, bk. IV., 
ch. ii. 'Ah, not in business! Hem ! pro- 
fessional?' 'No,' said Coningsby, ' I am 
nothing.' ' Ah ! an independent GENT ; 
hem ! and a very pleasant thing too.' 

1846. Sunday Paper, 24 May. Mr. 
Rawlinson (Magistrate at Marylebone 
Police Court). What do you mean by 
GENT ? There is no such word in our 
language. I hold a man who is called a 
GENT to be the greatest blackguard there 
is. 

1848. Punch, vol. XIV., p. 226. His 
aversion for a GENT is softened by pity. 

1869. Blue Budget. The GENT 
indicates a being who apes the gentility 
without the faintest shadow of a claim to 
it. 

2. (Old Cant). Money. 
[From Fr., argent.] For syn- 
onyms, see ACTUAL and GILT. 

1864. Revue des Deux Mondes, 15 
Sept., p. 470. Lesvoleurs anglais disent 
GENT pour 'argent.' 



3. (colloquial). A sweetheart, 
a mistress : e.g., My GENT = my 
particular friend. 



Adj. (old literary). Elegant 
comely ; genteel. 

1383. CHAUCER, Canterbury Tales. 
' Miller's Tale.' [Skeat, 1878, i., 194]. As 
any wesil her body GENT and small. 

1553-99. SPENSER. He loved as was 
his lot, a lady GENT. Idem. A knight had 
wrought against a lady GENT. 

1704. Mad. Knights Jour., p. 44. 
Law you, sais she, it's right GENT, do you 
take it 'tis dreadfull pretty. 

GENTILE, subs, (colloquial). Any 
sort of stranger, native or 
foreign ; among the Mormons, 
any person not professing the 
Gospel according to Joe Smith. 
Hence, IN THE LAND OF THE 
GENTILES (i) in foreign parts; 
and (2) in strange neighbourhoods 
or alien society. 

GENTLE, subs, (anglers'). A 
maggot ; vulgarly, GENTILE. 

1811. Songs of the Chase. 'The 
Jolly Anglers.' We have GENTLES in our 
horns. 

GENTLE CRAFT, subs. (old). i. 

The trade of shoemaking. [From 

the romance of Prince Crispin, 

who is said to have made shoes.] 

1662. Rump Songs. ' A Hymn to 

the Gentle Craft,' etc., ii. 152. Crispin 

and he were nere akin : The GENTLE 

CRAFT hath a noble kin. 

2. (anglers'). Angling. 
1892. MILLIKEN, 'Any Ballads, 

p. 65. Sez I, GENTLE CRAFT, Said I. 

GENTLEMAN, subs, (thieves'). 
A crowbar. For synonyms, see 
JEMMY. 

To PUT A CHURL (or BEGGAR) 
UPON A GENTLEMAN, verb. phr. 
(old). To drink malt liquor 
immediately after wint. GROSE. 

GENTLEMAN OF THE (THREE, 
or FOUR, or FIVE) OUTS (or 
INS), subs. phr. (old). A 



Gentleman. 



13* Gentleman-ranker. 



varying and ancient wheeze, of 
which the following are repre- 
sentative : 

Out of money, and out of clothes ; Out 
at the heels, and out at the toes ; Out of 
credit, and in debt. 

A man in debt, in danger, and in 
poverty ; or in gaol, indicted, and in danger 
of being hanged. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. iv. 
Paul became A GENTLEMAN OF THREE 
OUTS out of pocket, out of elbows, and 
out of credit. 

1834 H. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, 
Bk. III., ch. v. Jerry Juniper was what 
the classical Captain Grose would designate 

A GENTLEMAN WITH THREE OUTS, and, 

although he was not entirely without wit, 
nor his associates avouched, without 
money, nor certainly, in his own opinion, 
had that been asked, without manners. 

GENTLEMAN OF THE BACK 
(or BACKDOOR), subs. (old). A 
sodomist. For synonyms, see 
USHER. 

GENTLEMAN OF FORTUNE, 
subs. phr. (common). An 
adventurer. 

1890. R. L. STEVENSON, Treasure 
Island, p. 149. c Why, in a place like 
this, where nobody puts in but GENTLE- 
MEN OF FORTUNE, Silver would fly the 
iolly roger, you don't make no doubt of 
that. 

GENTLEMAN OF OBSERVA- 
TION, subs. phr. (turf). A tout. 

GENTLEMAN OF THE ROUND, 
subs. phr. (old). An invalided 
or disabled soldier, making his 
living by begging. 

1596. JONSON, Every Man in, etc., 
2. Your decaied, ruinous, worme- 
eaten GENTLEMEN OF THE ROUND. 

GENTLEMAN OF THE SHORT 
STAFF, subs. phr. (old). A 
constable. 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Sheppard 
(1889), p. 12. In the language of the 



GENTLEMAN OF THE SHORT STAFF an 

important caption could be effected. 

GENTLEMAN OF THE FIST, 
subs. phr. (pugilists'). A prize- 
fighter. 

1819. MOORE, Totn Crit, p. 44. 
Furnish such GENTLEMEN OF THE FIST. 

GENTLEMAN IN BROWN, subs, 
phr. (common). A bed bug. 
For synonyms, see NORFOLK 
HOWARD. 

1885. G. A. SAL A in Daily Telegraph^ 
14 Aug., 5/3. Bed bugs, the convertible 
term for which is ' chintzes,' are the dis- 
agreeable insects known in modern polite 
English as ' Norfolk Howards,' or 

GENTLEMEN IN BROWN. 

THE LITTLE GENTLEMAN IN 
BROWN VELVET, subs. phr. 
(obsolete). A mole. [The Tory 
toast after the death of William 
III., whose horse was said to 
have stumbled over a mole-hill.] 

GENTLEMAN OF THE GREEN 
BAIZE ROAD, subs. phr. (game- 
sters'). A card sharper. 

GENTLEMAN COMMONER, subs. 
phr. (University). I. A privi- 
leged class of commoners at 
Oxford, wearing a special cut of 
gown and a velvet cap. 

2. (common). An empty 

bottle. Also FELLOW-COMMONER 

(q.v.). [A sarcastic allusion to 
the mental capacity of this class 
of student.] For synonyms, see 
DEAD-MAN. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GENTLEMAN-RANKER, subs. 
(military). A broken gentleman 
serving in the ranks. 

1892. KIPLING, Barrack Room Bal- 
lads. ' Gentlemen Rankers.' GENTLE- 
MAN-RANKERS out on th spree, Damned 
from here to eternity, God ha' mercy on 
such as we, Baa ! Yah ! Bah ! 



Gentleman's. 



132 



George. 



GENTLEMAN'S COMPANION, subs, 
phr. (common). A louse. For 
synonyms, see CHATES. 
1785. GBOSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GENTLEMAN'S MASTER, subs. phr. 
(old). A highwayman. GROSE. 

GENTLEMAN'S (or LADIES') PIECE, 

subs. phr. (colloquial). A small 
or delicate portion ; a TIT-BIT. 

GENTLEMAN'S PLEASURE - GAR - 
DEN, subs. phr. (venery). The 
female pudendum. For syn- 
onyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 
[Hence, GENTLEMAN'S PLEA- 
SURE - GARDEN PADLOCK = 
menstrual cloth,] 

GENTLEMEN'S SONS, subs. phr. 
(common). The three regiments 
of Guards. 

GENTLY I intj. (stables' and 
colloquial). An interjection = 
STAND STILL (q.v.) ; hence, collo- 
quially, = don't get into a pas- 
sion, GO SLOW, (q.V.). 



GENTRY COVE (or COFE), subs. 
(old cant). A gentleman ; a 
NIB - COVE (q.v.). Fr,, ^in 
messire de la haute. 
1567. HARMAN, Caveat, s.v. 

1656.. BROME, J<sviall Crew,. Act ii. 
For all this bene Cribbing and Peck let us 
then, Bowse a health to the GENTRY 
COFE of the Ken. 

1654. Witts' Recreations. As priest 
of the game, And prelate of the same. 
There's a GENTRY COVE here. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1822. SCOTT, Fortunes of Nigel, ch. 
Tour the bien mort twiring the GENTRY 
COVE. 

1837. DISRAELI, Venetia, p. 71. The 
GENTRY cove will be ramboyled by his 



GENTRY COVE'S KEN (or GENTRY- 
KEN),^^, phr. (Old Cant). A 
gentleman's house. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 65. 
A GENTRY COKE'S KEN, a noble or gentle- 
man's house. A GENTRY COFE, a noble or 
gentle man. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Rept., 1874). GENTRY 
COVE'S KEN, a gentleman's house. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GENTRY MORT, subs. phr. (old 
cant). A lady. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 65. 
A GENTRY MORT, a noble or gentle woman. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Ma->k-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Rept., 1874). GENTRY 
MORT, a gentlewoman. 

1728. BAILEY, Eng. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GENUINE, subs. (Winchester Col- 
lege). Praise. 

Adj. ( colloquial ). Trust- 
worthy ; not false nor double- 
faced. 

Verb. (Winchester College). 
To praise. ' He was awfully 
quilled and GENUINED my task.' 
[Probably from calling a thing 
genuine. Cf., to blackguard, to 
lord, etc. But fifty years ago it 
was a subs. only. Notions.] 

GEORDIE, subs. (North Country). 
I. A pitman ; also, a Northum- 
brian in general. 

2. ( nautical ). A North 
Country collier. 

3. See GEORGE. 

GEORGE (or Scots' diminutive 
GEORDIE), subs. (old), i. A half 
crown. Also (obsolete), the 
noble = 6j.8t/.,/<?wA, Henry VIII 



George Home. 



Gerrymander. 



1688. SHADWELL, Sq. of Ahatia, 
List of cant words. GEORGE, half-a- 
crown. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. Crew. 
He tipt me Forty GEORGES for my earnest, 
He paid me Five Pounds for my Share or 
Snack. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

2. (old). A guinea; also more 
frequently YELLOW GEORGE. 

1785 GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1787. BURNS, The Twa Dogs. The 
YELLOW-lettered GEORDIE keeks. 

3. (old). A penny. 

1820. REYNOLDS, The Fancy, 
Glossary. A Penny-piece a GEORGY. 

BROWN GEORGE. See Ante. 

BY FORE, or BY GEORGE. 
See BY GEORGE. 

GEORGE HORNE, intj. (printers'). 
A derisive retort on a piece of 
stale news. Also G. H. ! [From 
a romancing compositor of the 
name.] 

GEORGY- PORGY, verb (colloquial). 
To pet ; to fondle ; to be- 
slobber. 

1883. R. L. STEVENSON, The Treas- 
ure of Franchard, ch. iii., in Longman's 
Magazine, April, p. 685. He must be 
spoken to with more respect, I tell you ; 
he must not be kissed and GEORGY-PORGY'D 
like an ordinary child. 

GERMAN. THEGERMAN, subs.phr. 
(New York). A round dance. 

GERMAN DUCK, subs.phr. (obsolete). 
I. Half a sheep's head, stewed 
with onions. GROSE. 

2. (common). A bed bug. For 
synonyms, .^NORFOLK HOWARD. 

GERMAN FLUTES, subs. phr. 
(rhyming). A pair of boots. 



GERMANTOWNER, subs. (American 
billiards'). A pushing shot 
when the balls played with, and 
at, are jarred together. Cf. t 
WHITECHAPELLER. 

GERRY, subs. (Old Cant). Excre- 
ment. 

3567. HARM AN, Caveat, s.v. 

GERRY GAN, intj. (Old Cant). A 
retort forcible. STOW IT ! (q.v.). 
. [From GERRY = excrement + GAN 
= mouth, i.e., literally, Shit in 
your mouth.] The common form 
is : Shit (or a turd) in your teeth ; 
as in BEN JONSON, Bartholomew 
Fair, 1614. Fr., Tais ta gueule 
oufte chie dedans. 

1567. HARM AN, Caveat. GBRRY 
GAN-, the ruffian cly thee. 

GERRYMANDER (pronounced with 
the *g' hard, as in 'get'), verb. 
(political American). To arrange 
the electoral subdivisions of a 
State -to the profit and advantage 
of a particular party. 

[The term, says Norton, is derived 
from the name of Governor Gerry, of 
Massachusetts, who, in 1811, signed a Bill 
readjusting the representative districts so 
as to favour the Democrats and weaken 
the Federalists, although the last-named 
party polled nearly two-thirds of the votts 
cast. A fancied resemblance of a map of 
the districts thus treated led Stuart, the 
painter, to add a few lines with his pencil, 
and say to Mr. Russell, editor of the 
Boston Sentinel, 'That will do for a 
Salamander.' Russell glanced at it: 
' Salamander,' said he, ' call it a GERRY- 
MANDER ! ' The epithet took at once, and 
became a Federalist war-cry, the 
caricature being published as a campaign 
document.^ 

1871. Boston Daily Advertiser, 
6 Dec. GERRIMANDER was the name 
printed under a picture of a pretended 
monster, whose shape was modified from 
the distorted geography which Mr. 
Gerry's friends inflicted on part of the 
State for the sake of economizing, 
majorities. 



Gerrymandering. X 34 



Get. 



GERRYMANDERING, subs, (political 
American). See GERRYMANDER. 

1872. New York Sunday Mercury, 
31 March. The Legislature of Ohio 
intends to prove itself a veritable master 
in the GERRYMANDERING business. 

1890. Athenceum, 22 Feb. p. 23 8, c. 
i. Whatever faults can be found with Sir 
John's administration, it has been good and 
successful enough to afford excuse for all 
the GERRYMANDERING with which he is 
charged by his critics. 

1891. Belforfs Mag., Aug., p. 439. 
The Democrats of Michigan have carried 
the art of GERRYMANDERING to such an ex- 
tent that they have thoroughly disgusted 
their opponents. 

GERUND-GRINDER, subs, (com- 
mon). A schoolmaster, especi- 
ally a pedant. Also GERUND- 
GRINDING. 

1759-67. STERNE Tristam Shandy* 
iv. r 112. Tutors, governors, GERUND- 
GRINDERS, and bear-leaders. 

1788. KNOX, Winter Evenings, 59. 
A pedant, a mere plodder, a petty tyrant, a 

tiERUND-GRINDER. 

1825-7. HONE, Every Day Book, 
?!> P- 33- GERUND-GRINDING and pars- 
ing are usually prepared for at the last 
moment. 

GET,.ft*.r.(old). I. A cheating con- 
trivance ; a HAVE (q.v.\. 

2* (old). A child ; the result, 
that is, of an act of procreation or 
begetting. Thus, ONE OF HIS 
GETS = one of his making ; 
WHOSE GET IS THAT ?= Who's 

the father? It's his GET, any- 
how = At all events he GOT it. 

1570. SCOTTISH TEXT SOCIETY, 
Satirical Poems, I., 171, 'Treason of 
Dumbarton ' (1891). Ganelon's GETS, re- 
licts of Sinon's seed. 

*/1796. BURNS, Merry Muses, Tor 
a 1 that.' O' bastard GETTS some had a 
score, An' some had mair than a' that. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
41. This, again, is unusual for a Chester, 
as his GET are generally quiet and docile, 
but a bit lazy. 



GET ! (or You GET !) intj. 
(American). Short for GET OUT! 
Usually, GlT ! (q.v.}. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 176. None of your 
damned impertinence. Get ! 

To GET AT, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). i. To quiz ; to banter ; 
to aggravate ; to take a rise out 

of. Also TO GET BACK AT. 

1891. Slower* s Half Holiday, 3 Jan. 
'Your family don't seem to get on, missie.' 
l On!' replied the child, with dignity 
flashing from her great blue eyes ; ' on ! 
I've got a father on the booze, a sister on 
the music 'all, an' a brother on the tread- 
mill. On ! who're ye GETTIN' AT ? ' 

2. (racing and colloquial). To 
influence j to bribe ; to nobble 
(of horses), and to corrupt (of 
persons) ; applied to horse, owner, 
trainer, jockey, and vet. alike. 

1870. Spectator, 23 April. That, of 
course, makes it profitable for owners to> 
withdraw horses they have secretly betted 
against, and for scoundrels, to- GET AT 
horses. 

1871. Saturday Review, 9 Sept. It is 
quite clear that some of the foreign, work- 
ing men have been GOT AT. 

1883. Graphic, 17 March, p. 262, c. 
2. The House of Commons . . . can also 
be trusted to decide in local questions 
without any suspicion of being GOT AT, 
as is sometimes the case elsewhere. 

1883. BADMINTON LIBRARY, Steeple- 
chasing, p. 404. Suspicions that the mare 
had been GOT AT, that is to say, drugged, 
were afterwards noised abroad. 

1888. Daily Telegraph, 17 Nov. It 
was strongly suspected that he had been 

GOT AT. 

1890. Globe, n Aug., p. i, c. i. 
Fancy the professional agitator trying to 
GET AT such men as these men who 
gloried in being soldiers and nothing else t 

1892. Pall Mall Gazette, May 10, 
p. 3, c. 3. The scoundrels (verily of the 
lowest foi 



Orme. 



form) who have tried to GET AT 



1892 National Observer, vii. 630, 
If the horse were GOT AT, then a bookie 
who stood heavily to lose is probably 
assumed. 



Get. 



Get. 



TO GET ABOUT. verb, phr. 
(venery). To do the act of intro- 
mission. For synonyms, see 
GREENS and RIDE. 

To GET BACK AT, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To satirise ; to call 
to account. 

1888. Daily Inter-Ocean. The news- 
papers are GETTING BACK at Sam. 

GET BACK INTO YOUR BOX ! 
phr. (American). An injunction 
to silence ; STOW IT ! (q.v. for 
synonyms). 

To GET ENCORED, verb. phr. 
(tailors'). To have a job returned 
for alterations. 

To GET EVEN WITH, verb. phr. 
(common). To take one's re- 
venge ; to give tit for tat. 

To GET IT, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To be punished (morally 
or physically) ; to be called over 
the coals. Also (venery) to catch 
a clap. 

To GET OFF, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To (i) escape punish- 
ment, to be let off ; (2) to utter, 
to deliver oneself of, to perpetrate 
as to get off a joke ; and (3) to 
get married. 

To GET ON, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). i. To back a horse; to 
put a BIT ON (q.v.). 

2. (colloquial). To succeed ; 
or, simply, to fare. Thus, 
HOW ARE YOU GETTING ON? 

may signify (i) To what extent 
are you prospering? or (2) How 
are you doing? 

1871. Pall MallGaz., 29 Dec. That 
great Anglo-Saxon passion of rising in the 
world, or GETTING ON that is, rising 
into the class above him. 

1892. A. W. PINERO, The Times: 
a Comedy, v. i. We used to go very 
early to such places and stay right 
through, now that papa has GOT ON, we 
arrive late everywhere and murmur an 
apology ! 



TO GET ONE IN THE COLD, 
verb. phr. (American). To have 
at an advantage ; to be on the 

WINDWARD SIDE (q*V.) ; TO 
HAVE ON TOAST (q.V. ). 

To GET ONE ON, verb. phr. 
(pugilists'). To land a blow. 

TO GET DOWN FINE (or CLOSE), 

verb. phr. (American). To know 
all about one's antecedents ; and 
(police) to know where to find 
one's man. 

To GET INTO, verb. phr. (ve- 
nery). To OCCUPY (q.v.). Also 
To GET IN and To GET UP. For 
synonyms, see GREENS and RIDE. 
1620. PERCY, Folio MSS., p. 197. 
GETT vp againe, Billy, if that thou louest 
me. 

To GET OVER, verb. phr. (col 
loquial). To seduce, to fascinate, 
to dupe. Also To COME OVER. 
and To GET ROUND. 

To GET OUTSIDE OF, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). I. To eat or 
drink ; also to accomplish one's 
purpose. 

1892. S. WATSON, Wops the Waif, 
p. p. Tickle urged Wops again and 
again to drink, but Wops's only reply was, 
' Yer go on, Tickle ; git OUTSIDE the lot, 
if yer can ; it'll do yer good, Cully.' 

2. (venery). To receive the 
sexual embrace : of women only. 

TO GET OUT OF BED ON THE 
WRONG SIDE, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To be testy or cross- 
grained. [A corruption of an old 
saying, ' To rise on the right side is 
accounted lucky ' ; hence the re- 
verse meant trials to temper, pa- 
tience, and luck.] 

1607. MARSTON, What You Will. 

YOU RISE ON YOUR RIGHT SIDE to-day, 

marry. 

1608. MACHIN, Dumb Knight, iv., i. 
Sure I said my prayers, RIS'D ON MY RIGHT 
SIDE, Wash'd hands and eyes, put on my 



Get. 



Getter. 



girdle last ; Sure I met no splea-footed 
baker, No hare did cross me, nor no 
bearded witch, Nor other ominous sign 

1614. Terence in English. C. What 
doth shee keepe house alreadie? D. Al- 
readie. C. O good God ! ; WE ROSE ON THE 
RIGHT SIDE to-day. 

1647. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, i. 
Women Pleased. You ROSE o' YOUR 

RIGHT SIDE. 

1890. Globe, 15 May, p. 2, col. 2. 
Some of them had if we may employ such 
a vulg.ir expression GOT OUT OF BED ON 

THE WRONG SIDE. 

To GET OUT (or ROUND), verb, 
phr. (racing). To back a horse 
against which one has previously 
laid; to HEDGE ^.7/.). 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, From Post to 
Finish, p. 318. He had an idea Johnson 
was this time cleverly working a very well 
authorised commission, and that he person- 
ally had taken more than one opportunity 
of what is termed GETTING OUT, 

To GET SET, verb, phr, (cricket- 
ing). i. To warm to one's 
work at the wicket, and col- 
lar the bowling ; to get one's eye 
well in. 

To GET THERE, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To attain one's 
object ; to be successful ; TO 
MAKE ONE'S JACK (q.V.) ', TO GET 
THERE WITH BOTH FEET = to 

be very successful. 

1887. FRANCIS, Saddle and Mocassin. 
He said as he'd been gambHng, and was 
two hundred dollars ahead of the town. 
He GOT THERE WITH BOTH FEET at starting. 

1888. New York Herald, 29 July. 
Although not a delegate he GOT THERE all 
the same. 

2. (common). To get druak. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

3. (venery). To enjoy the 
Sexual favour. 



To GET THROUGH, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To pass an exami- 
nation ; to accomplish. 

1853. BRADLEY, Verd. Green, II. 
ch. xii. So you see, Giglamps, I'm safe 

feO GET THROUGH. 

To GET UP AND DUST, verb, 
phr. (American). To depart 
hastily. For synonyms, see SKE^ 
DADDLE and AMPUTATE. 

TO GET UP BEHIND (or GET 

BEHIND) A MAN, verb. phr. 
(common). To endorse or back 
a bill. 

1880. Life in a Debtor's Prisvn, 
p. 87. In other cases he figured as the 
drawer, or simply as endorser, This, Mr, 
Whipper described as GETTING UP BEHIND, 

TO GET UP THE MAIL, verb, 
phi. (thieves'). To find money 
(as counsels' fees,, etc.) for 
defence. 

1889. CLARKSON and RICHARDSON, 
Police, 322, s.v. 

[GET enters into many other combina- 
tions. See RACK TEETH J BAG Or SACK ; 
BEAD J BEANS ; BEAT \ BIG BIRD and 
GOOSE. ; BIG HEAD \ BILLET \ BIT J 
BOAT ', BOLT ; BOOKS J BULGE \ BULLET ; 
BOLL'S FEATHER ; OROCKETTS \ DANDER 

and MONKEY; DARK ; DROP; EYE ; 
FLANNELS J FLINT J GAME ; GRAND" 
BOUNCE J GRAVEL - RASH J GRIND ; 
GRINDSTONE; HAND-; HANG; HAT; 
HEAD J HIP Or HOP ; HOME J HOXN ; 
HOT J JACK J KEEN J LENGTH OF ONE $ 
FOOT J MEASURE J MITTEN J NEEDLE ; 
RELIGION ; RISE ; RUN J. SCOT> SWOT r OF 
SCRAPE ; SET ; SHUT OF ; SILK ; SNUFF; 
STRAIGHT; SUN; TICKET aF LEAVE:; 

WOOL ; WRO-NG BOX. I 

G E T A w A Y > suds. (American 
thieves'). A locomotive or train j 
a PUFFER (q~V.). 



GETTER. A SURE GETTER, subs, 
phr. (Scots). A procreant male 
with a great capacity for fertiliza*-- 
tion. 



Get-tip. 



Ghost. 



GET-UP, subs, (colloquial). i. 
Dress ; constitution and appear- 
ance ; disguise. See GET - UP, 
verb, sense I. 

1856. WHYTE MELVILLE, Kate 
Coventry, ch. xiv. Is that killing GET UP 
entirely for your benefit, John ? I asked. 

1865. G. A. SALA, Trip to Barbary, 
ch. x. Altogether the GET UP of a 
Mauresque en promenade is livelier and 
smarter than that of a Turkish woman. 

1866. G. ELIOT, Felix Holt, ch. xii. 
The graceful, well-appointed Mr. Chris- 
tian, who sneered at Scales about his GET 
UP, having to walk back to the house with 
only one tail to his coat. 

1882. Graphic, g Dec., p. 643, c. 2. 
Comic GETS UP, which will make the 
house roar presently, are elaborated with 
the business air of a judge in bane, or a 
water-rate collector. 

1889. Mirror, 26 Aug., p. 2, c. i. I 
cannot, however, congratulate F. C. G. on 
his sketch of Blowitz ; it isn't much like the 
great man, and the GET UP is quite too 
absurd . 

1890. Daily Telegraph, 25 Feb., p. 7. 
col. 7. Dressed as a copurchic, and, giving 
himself out as an Italian count thinking 
to entrap some Transatlantic heiress by his 
title, fascinating appearance, and gor- 
geous GET UP. 

Verb. phr. (colloquial). (i). 
To prepare (a part, a paper, 
a case) ; (2) to arrange (a 
concert) ^ (3) to dress (as GOT 

UP REGARDLESS, TO THE 
NINES, TO THE KNOCKER, 
TO KILL, WITHIN AN INCH OF 

ONE'S LIFE) ; (4) to disguise (as a 
sailor, a soldier, Henry VIII., a 
butcher, a .nun). See also GET 
INTO. 



in the most unambitious style. 

1856. WHYTE MELVILLE, Kate 
Coventry, ch. xviii. Three very gentleman- 
like, good-looking men, GOT UP to the 
utmost extent of hunting splendour. 

1864. Eton School Days, ch. xviii., 
p. 207. He felt confident in his power of 
GETTING UP so that no one would recog- 
nise him. 



1866. Ne-wYork Home Journal, Jan. 
While that admirable old dame, Nature, 
has been strangely neglectful of much 
which might be conducive to our comfort, 
she has GOTTEN UP, REGARDLESS OF EX- 
PENSE, a few articles which are good for some 
purposes, as the witty Hood has told us. 

1871. London Figaro, n Mar. It is 
GOT UP very much in the style of the Paris 
journals, and is very inferior compared 
with any respectable journal in England. 



Polytechnic Magazine, 24 
, He 
piebald trousers. 



Oct., p. 261. He came specially GOT UP in 

' ' ild f 



1892. CHEVALIER. ' The Little 
Nipper.' I've knowed 'im take a girl on six 
feet tall ; 'E'd GIT 'IMSELF UP dossy, Say 
' I'm goin' out wi' Flossie.' 

G.H. See GEORGE HORNE. 



GHASTLY, adj. and adv. (collo- 
quial). Very: a popular inten- 
sitive; Cf., AWFUL, BLOODY, 
FUCKING. 



GHOST, subs, (common). One 
who secretly does artistic or 
literary work for another person 
taking the credit and receiving 
the price. [The. erm was fre- 
quently used during the trial of 
Lawes v. Belt in i88(?).] Cf., 

DEVIL. 

1890. Daily Telegraph, 8 Feb. The 
sculptor's GHOST is conjured up from the 
vasty deep of byegone lawsuits. 

1892. National Observer, vii., 327 
Would not the unkind describe your 
' practical man ' as a GHOST ? 

Verb, (common). To prowl ; 
to spy upon ; TO SHADOW (q.v.). 

THE GHOST WALKS (or DOES 
NOT WALK) phr. (theatrical). 
There is (or is not) money in the 
treasury. 

1853. Household Words, No. 183. 
When no salaries are forthcoming the 
GHOST DOESN'T WALK. 



Ghoul. 



138 



Gibberish. 



1883. Referee, 24 June, p. 3, c. 2. 
An Actor's Benevolent Fund box placed on 
the treasurer's desk every day when THE 
GHOST WALKS would get many an odd shil- 
ling or sixpence put into it. 

1885. The Stage, p. 112. The rogues 
seldom appear at a loss for a plausible 
story when it is time for the GHOST TO 
WALK. Ibid. The next day THE GHOST 

DECLINES TO WALK. 

1889. J. C. COLMAN (in Slang, 
Jargon, and Cant), p. 405. GHOST- 
WALKING, a term originally applied by an 
impecunious stroller in a snaring com- 
pany to the operation of ' holding the 
treasury,' or paying the salaries, which 
has become a stock facetiae among all 
kinds and descriptions of actors. Instead 
of enquiring whether the treasury is open, 
they generally say ' Has the GHOST 
WALKED?' or 'What, has this thing 
appeared again ? ' (Shakspeare). 

1800. Illustrated Bits, 29 Mar., p. 
n, c. i. And a few nights with empty 
benches LAID THE GHOST completely. It 
could not even WALK to the tune of 
quarter salaries. 

THE GHOST OF A CHANCE, 
subs. phr. (colloquial). The 
faintest likelihood, or the slightest 
trace : e.g., He hasn't THE 

GHOST OF A CHANCE. 

1891. Sportsman, 26 Mar. He did 
not give THE GHOST OF A CHANCE. 

GHOUL, subs. (American.) I. A 
spy ; specifically a man who 
preys on such manied women as 
addict themselves to assignation 
houses. 

2. (journalistic). A news- 
paper chronicler of the smallest 
private tittle-tattle. 

GIB, subs, (colloquial). I. Gib- 
raltar. Once a penal station : 
whence 2. A gaol. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 
ch. iii., p. 221. I did a lagging of seven, 
and was at the GIB three out of it. 

1892. Pall Mall Gazette, 23 Mar., 
p. 6, c. i. 'Stormy Weather at GIB.' 
The weather here has been fearful ; 51 
inches of rain have been registered, and 



the land for miles round Gibraltar is 
submerged. 

To HANG ONE'S GIB, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To pout. See JIB. 

GIBBERISH (or GEBBERISH, GIB- 

BERIDGE, GlBRIGE, etc.), subs. 

(old : now recognised). Origi- 
nally the lingo of gipsies, beggars, 
etc. Now, any kind of inarticulate 
nonsense. [From GIBBER, a 
variant of JABBER.] See CANT, 
SLANG, PEDLAR'S FRENCH, etc. 

1594. NASHE, Unf. Traveller, in 
wks., y., 68. That all cried out upon him 
mightily in their GIBRIGE, lyke a companie 
of beggers. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes. 
Gergare, to speak fustian, pedlers french,. 
or rogues language, or GIBBRISH. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie. 
Jargon, GIBRIDGE fustian language, 
pedler s French, a barbarus jangling. 

1638. H. SHIRLEY, Martyrd 
Souldier, Act iii., Sc. 4. Feele my pulse 
once again and tell me, Doctor, Tell me 
in tearmes that I may understand, I doe 
not love your GIBBERISH, tell me honestly 
Where the Cause lies, and give a Remedy. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabolario, s.v. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.)- GIBBERISH (s.) an unintelligible 
jargon, or confused way of speaking, used 
by the gipsies, beggars, etc., to disguise 
their wicked designs ; also any discourse 
where words abound more than sense. 

1748. SMOLLETT, Rod. Random, 
ch. xxx. He repeated some GIBBERISH 
which by the sound seemed to be Irish. 

1817. SCOTT, Rob Roy, ch. viii. 

Since that d d clerk of mine has taken 

his GIBBERISH elsewhere. 

1850. D. JERROLD The Catspaw 
Act i. Odds and ends . . . writ down in 
such a kind of GIBBERISH that I can't make 
out one of 'em. 

1858. G. ELIOT, Mr. Gilfifs Love 
Story, ch. iv. It'll learn to speak summat 
better nor GIBBERISH, an" be brought up i' 
the true religion. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 129. It was 
Fo'c's'le Jack that piped and drawled his 
ungrammatical GIBBERISH. 



Gibble-Gabble. 



Gibus. 



GIBBLE-GABBLE, subs, (colloquial). 
Nonsense; GIBBERISH (q.v.). 
[A reduplication of GABBLE (q.v.).~\ 

1600. DEKKER, Shoemakers Holiday, 
in wks. (1873) i., 21. Hee'ssome uplandish 
workeman, hire him good master, That I 
may learne some GIBBLE GABBLE, 'twill 
make us worke the faster. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabolario, s.v. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sthed.). 
GIBBLE-GABBLE (s), silly, foolish, idle 
talk. 

GIB-CAT, subs, (old), A tom-cat. 
[An abbreviation of Gilbert = O. 
Fr. : Tibert, the cat in the fable of 
Reynard the Fox.] 

1360. CHAUCER, Rotnaunt of the 
Rose, 6204 (Thibert le Cos is rendered by 
GIBBE, our cat). 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, i Henry IV., 
Act i., Sc. 2. I am as melancholy as a GIB- 
CAT. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair, 
i., i. Before I endure such another day 
with him, I'll be drawn with a good GIB- 
CAT through the great pond at home. 

1663. Rump Songs. ' Rump Car- 
bonadoed,' ii., 71. As if they had less 
wit and grace than GIB-CATS. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
GIBE, verb. (American). To go 
well with ; to be acceptable. See 
GEE. 

GIBEL, verb, (thieves'). To bring. 

1837. DISRAELI, Venetia, bk. i., 

ch. xiv. GIBEL the chive, bring the knife. 

GIB-FACE, subs, (colloquial). A 
heavy jowl ; an UGLY-MUG (q.v.). 

Of., TO HANG ONE'S GIB. 

GIBLETS, subs, (common). i. The 
intestines generally; the MANI- 
FOLD (q.V.). Cf., TROUBLE- 
GIBLETS. 

1864. BROWNING, Dramatis 
Persona ' Flight of the Duchess.' Is 
pumped up briskly through the main 
ventricle, And floats me genially round 
the GIBLETS. 



2. (colloquial). A fat man ; 
FORTY-GUTS (q.V.). Also DUKE 

OF GIBLETS. 

To JOIN GIBLETS, verb. phr. 
(venery) To copulate. Also 

TO HAVE Or DO A BIT OF GIBLET- 

PIE. For synonyms, see RIDE. 
Hence to cohabit as husband and 
wife; TO LIVE TALLY. Cf., 

PLASTER OF WARM GUTS. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1887. Notes and Queries, 7 S., iv., 
511. 'To JOIN GIBLETS.' This expres- 
sion may occasionally be heard in this 
district, among the lowest and vulgarest, 
and has a very offensive meaning. 

To FRET ONE'S GIBLETS, verb, 
^r. See FRET. 



GIBRALTAR, subs. (American). A 
party stronghold: e.g., the GIB- 
RALTAR of Democracy. 
NORTON. 



GIBSON (or SIR JOHN GIBSON), 
subs, (old coach builders'). A rest 
to support the body of a building 
coach. 

GIBUS, subs, (colloquial). i. An 
opera, or crush hat. Fr., un 
accordion. [From the name of 
the inventor.] 

1867. JAS. GREENWOOD, Unsent. 
. West- End aristocrat 
coats and GIBUS hats. 



Journeys, iii., 21. West- End aristocrats, 
with spotless jean c 

1871. Figaro, 2 Sept. Much fun 
may be made by wearing a GIBUS, and 
collapsing it at the moment of contact 
with the funnel. 

1885. Punch, 4 Apr., p. 160. Giving 
his comic, shiny, curly-brimmed hat to 
the swell who couldn't by any possible 
chance have mistaken it for his own 
GIBUS. 

1887. ATKIN, House Scraps, p. 144. 
Their GIBUS hats are cock'd awry. 



Giddy. 



140 



Gig. 



GIDDY, adj. (colloquial). Flighty ; 
wanton : e.g., TO PLAY THE 
GIDDY GOAT = to live a fast life ; 
to be happy-go-lucky. 

1892. Ally Sloper, 19 Mar., p. 91, 
c. 2. Fanny Robinson was flighty ; 
she PLAYED THE GIDDY ox I mean 
heifer. 

GlFFLE-GAFFLE, subs, (old). Non- 

sense ; a variant of GIBBLE - 

GABBLE (q.V.\ 

1787. GROSE, Prov. Glossary. GIFF- 
GAFF, unpremeditated discourse. 

GIF - GAP (or GIFF - GAFF), subs. 
(Scots'). A bargain on equal 
terms. Whence the proverb : 
GIF-GAP maks guid friens. Fr. : 
Passe-moi la casse etje fenverrai 
la senne. 

GIFT, subs, (colloquial). I. Any- 
_ thing, lightly gained or easily won. 

^2. (common).- A white: speck 
on the finger nails, supposed to 
portend a gift. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

J. (printers'). See .GIFT- 
HOUSE. 

As FULL OF GIFTS AS A 
'BRAZEN AHORSE OF FARTS, phr. 
(old). Mean ; miserly ; disin- 
clined to PART (^.fc.). 
1811 Lexicon Balatronicutn, s.v 

GIFT OF THE GAB. See GAB. 

GIFT -HOUSE (or GIFT), subs. 
(printers'). A club; a house of 
call ; specifically for the purpose 
of finding employment, or provid- 
ing allowances for members. 

GIG (GIGG, GIGGE), subs, (old). -a. 
a wanton ; a mistress ; a flighty 
girl. Cf., GIGLET. 



1373. CHAUCER, House of Fame, iii. 
851. This house was also ful of GYGGES. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew. A young GIG, a wanton lass?. 

1780. D'ARBLEY, Diary, etc. ,(1876), i., 

286. Charlotte L called, and the little 

GIG told . . . of the domestic life she led 
in^her family, and made them all ridiculous, 
without meaning to make herself so. 

1825. PLANCHE, Success in Extrava- 
ganzas (1879) L, 26. He! he! What a 
GIG you look in that hat and feather ! 

1832. MACAU LAY in Life, by TRE- 
VELYAN (1884), ch. v., p. 188. Be you 
Foxes, be you Pitts, You must write to 
silly chits, Be you Tories, be you Whigs, 
You must write to sad young GIGS. 

2. (old). A jest ; a piece of 
nonsense ; anything fanciful or 
frivolous. Hence, generally, in 
contempt. 

1590. NASHE, PasquiFs Apologie, in 
wks. Vol. L, p. 234. A right cutte of 
the worde, withoute GIGGES or fancies of 
haereticall and newe opinions. 

1793. BUTT, Poems. . . . Fograms, 
quizzes, treats, and bores, and GIGS, Wer 
held in some account with ancient prigs. 

1856. WHYTE MELVILLE, Kate Cov- 
entry, ch. xiv. Such a set of GIGS, my 
dear, I never saw in my life ; large under- 
bred horses, and not a good-looking man 
amongst them. 

3. (old). The nose. For 
synonyms, see CONK. To 

SNITCHELL THE GIG = tO pull the 

nose. GRUNTER'S Gic=a hog's 
snout. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

4. (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. [Possibly from 
GlG = atop, i.e., a toy; possibly, 
too, from It. giga = -a. FIDDLE 
(q.v.} ; but see post sense 8.] 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. 

1785 GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



Gig. 



141 



Giggles -nest. 



5. (old : now recognised). A 
light two-wheeled vehicle drawn 
by one horse. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1809. WINDHAM, Speech, 25 May. 
Let the former riders in GIGS and whiskeys, 
and one horsed carriages continue to ride 
in them. 

6. (old). A door. See 
GIGGER. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. It is 
all bob, now let's dub the GIGG of the 
case : now the coast is clear, let us break 
open the door of the house. 

7. (Eton). A fool ; an over- 
dressed person. For synonyms, 
see SAMMY-SOFT. 

1797. COLMAN, Heir at Law, iv., 
3. Dick. What a.damn'd GIG you look 
like. Pangloss. A GIG ! umph,! that's an 
Eton phrase the Westminsters call it 
Quiz. 

1870. Athenteum, 16 Apr. He 
would now be what Eton used to call a 
GIG, and Westminster a Quiz. 

8. (old). Fun ; a frolic ; a 
spree. [Possibly from Fr. : 
gigue z. lively dance movement. 

Cf"> gig ue et jon=a. Bacchanalian 
exclamation of sailors. In Florio, 
too, frottolare ' to sing GIGGES, 
rounds, or . . . . wanton verses. '] 
FULL OF GIG = full of laughter, 
ripe for mischief. 

1811. MOORE, Twopenny Post-bag, 
Letter 3. We were all in high GIG Roman 
punch and tokay travelled round, till our 
heads travelled just the same way. 

1820. RANDALL, Diary. In search 
of lark, or some delicious GIG, The mind 
delights on, when 'tis in prime twig. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
i., 3. I hope we shall have many a bit of 
GIG together. 

1888. BESANT, Fifty Years Ago, 
p. 134. A laughter-loving lass of eighteen 
who dearly loved a bit of GIG. 

9. (old). The mouth. For 
synonyms, see POTATO-TRAP. 



1871. Finish to Tom and Jerry, 
p. 175 [ed. 1872). The bit of myrtle in his 
GIG. 

10. (old). A farthing. For- 
merly GRIG (q.V.). 

11. American). See POLICY 
DEALING. 

Verb. (old). To hamstring. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
To GIGG a Smithfield hank, to hamstring 
an overdrove ox. 

BY GIGS ! intj. (old). A 
mild and silly oath. See OATHS. 

1551. Gammer Gurtons Needle, ii.. 
51. Chad a foule turne now of late, chill 
tell it you, BY GIGS ! 

GIGAMAREE, subs. (American). A 
thing of little worth ; a pretty 
but useless toy; a GIMCRACK 
(q.v.). 

1848. JONES, Sketches of Travel, p. 
9. Byin' fineries and northern GIGAMA- 
REES of one kind or another. 

Ibid. I ax'd the captain what sort of 
a GIGAMAREE he had got up there for a 



GIGANTOMACHIZE, verb. (old). 
To rise in revolt against one's 
betters. Gr., Gigantomachia = 
the War of the Giants against the 
Gods. [Probably a coinage of 
Ben Jonson's.] 

1599. JONSON, Every Man Out, Act 
v., 4. Slight, fed with it the whoreson, 
strummeJ-patched, goggle-eyed grumble- 
dores would have GIGANTOMACHIZED their 
Maker. 

GIGGER, subs, (tailors') i. A sew- 
ing machine. (In allusion to noise 
and movement). 

2. See JIGGER. 
GIGGLES-NEST. HAVE YOU FOUND 

A GIGGLES-NEST? phr. (old). 

Asked of a person titterering, or 
one who laughs immoderately 
and senselessly. 



Gig-lamps. 



142 



Giles* Greek. 



GlG- LAMPS, subs, (common). I. 
Spectacles. For synonyms, see 
BARNACLES. 

1848. BRADLEY, in Letter to J. C. H. 
GIG-LAMPS (certainly a university term. 
I first heard it in 1848 or 1849, long before 
Mr. Verdant Green was born or thought of). 

1877. Five Years Penal Servitude, 
ch. ii., p. 140. You with the GIG-LAMPS, 
throw us your cigar. 

1887. Punch, 30 July, p. 45. Jack's 
a straw-thatched young joker in GIG-LAMPS. 

1892. F. ANSTEY, Voces PofulL ' At 
the Tudor Exhibition.' Stop, though, 
suppose she has spotted me ? Never can 
tell withciGLAMPS. 

2. (common). One who wears 
spectacles; a FOUR EYES (q.v.). 
[Popularised by Verdant Green.] 

GlGLER (or GlGLET, GOGLET, 

GIGLE, GIG), subs. (old). A 
wanton ; a mistress. GlGLET 
(West of England) = a giddy, 
romping girl ; and in Salop a 
flighty person is called a GIGGLE. 
Cf. y GIG, sense i. 

1533. UDAL, Floures for Latine 
Spekynge, fo. 101. What is the matter, 
foolish GIGLOTTE? What meanest thou? 
Whereat laughest thou ? 

1567. HARM AN, Caveat, leaf 22, 
back. Therefore let us assemble secretly 
into the place where he hath appoynted to 
meet this GYLEOT that is at your house. 

1603. SHAKSPEARE, Measure for 
Measure, v., i. Let him speak no more : 
away with those GIGLOTS too, and with 
the other confederate companion. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie. Gad- 
rouillette, minx, GIGLE, flirt. 

1620. MASSIENGER, Fatal Dowry, 
Act. iii. If this be The recompence of 
striving to preserve A wanton GIGGLET 
honest, very shortly 'Twill make all man- 
kind pandars. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GIG- 
GLERS, wanton women. 



and GIGLET - WISE = like a 
wanton. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, i Henry IV., Act 
v., Sc. i. Young Talbot was not born 
To be the pillage of a GIGLOT wench. 

1600. FAIRFAX, Jerusalem Delivered, 
vi., 72. That thou wilt gad by night in 
GIGLET-WISE, Amid thine armed foes to 
seek thy shame. 



GILD, verb. (old). To make drunk ; 
to flush with drink. 

1609. SHAKSPEARE, Tempest, Act 
v., Sc. i. This grand liquor that hath 
GILDED them. 

1620. FLETCHER, Chances, iv., 3- 
Is she not drunk, too? A little GILDED 



TO GILD THE PILL, phr. 
(colloquial). To say, or do, un- 
pleasant things as gently as may 
be ; to impose upon ; *~ 
BOOZLE (q.V.'). 



tO BAM 



GILDED ROOSTER, subs. pht. 
(American). A man of impor- 
tance ; a HOWLING SWELL (q.v. ); 
sometimes THE GILDED ROOSTER 

ON THE TOP OF THE STEEPLE. 
Cf., BIG-BUG J BIG DOG OF THE 
TANYARD, etc. 

1888. New York Herald. We admit 
that as a metropolis Chicago is the 

GILDED ROOSTER ON TOP OF THE STEEPLE, 

but even GILDED ROOSTERS have no right 
to the whole corn bin. 

GILDEROY'S KITE. To BE HUNG 

HIGHER THAN GILDEROY'S KITE, 

verb. phr. (old). To be punished 
more severely than the very 
worst criminals. 'The greater 
the crime the higher the gallows ' 
was at one time a practical legal 
axiom. Hence, out of sight ; 
completely gone. 



Adj. (old). Loose in word 
and deed. Also GIGLET-LIKE, 



GILES' GREEK. 
GREEK. 



Set ST. GILES' 



Gilguy. 



143 



Gill-flirt. 



GILGUY, subs, (nautical). Any- 
thing which happens to have 
slipped the memory ; equivalent 
to WHAT'S-HIS-NAME or THINGA- 

MYTIGHT. 



GILKES, subs. (old). Skeleton 
keys. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Rept., 1874). GILKES 
for the Gigger, false keyes for the doore or 
picklockes. 

GILL (or JILL), subs. (old). i. 
A girl; (2) a sweetheart: e.g., 
* every Jack must have his 
GILL ' ; (3) a wanton, a strum- 
pet (an abbreviation of GILLIAN). 
For synonyms, see JOMER and 
TITTER. 

1586-1606. WARNER,^ Ibion's England, 
bk. vii., ch. 37. The simplest GILL or 
knave. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes, 
Palandrina, a common queane, a harlot, 
a strumpet, a GILL. 

1620. PERCY, Folio MSS., p. 104. 
There is neuer a Jacke for GILL. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabolario, s,v. 
2. (common). a drink; a GO 



1785. BURNS, Scots Drink. Haill 
breeks, a scone, and WHISKY GILL. 

3. in. pi. ' g' hard (collo- 
quial). The mouth or jaws ; the 
face. See POTATO-TRAP and 
DIAL. 

1622. BACON, Historia Naturalis. 
Redness about the cheeks and GILLS. 

1632. JONSON, Magnetic Lady, \. 
He . . . draws all the parish wills, 
Designs the legacies, and strokes the GILLS 
of the chief mourners. 

.1738. WOLCOT, Pindar's Works 
(1809), i., 8. Whether you look all rosy 
round the GILLS, Or hatchet-fac'd like 
Starving cats so lean. 

1820. LAMB, Elia (Two Races of 
Men). What a careless, even deportment 
hath your borrower ! what rosy GILLS ! 



1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. 
viii. Binnie, as brisk and rosy about the 
GILLS as chanticleer, broke out in a morn- 
ing salutation. 

1884. Punch. He went a bit red in 
the GILLS. 

4. in. pi. (common). A very 
large shirt collar ; also STICK-UPS 
and SIDEBOARDS. Fr. : cache- 
bonbon-^'liqueur^. stick-up. 

1859. SALA, Twice Round the Clock, 
6 p., in Part 7. With a red face, shaven to 
the superlative degree of shininess, with 
GILLS white and tremendous, with a noble 
white waistcoat. 

1884. Daily Telegraph, July 8, p. 5, 
c. 4. Lord Macaulay wore, to the close 
of his life, ' stick-ups, or GILLS. 

TO GREASE THE GILLS. 

verb phr. (common). To have a 
good meal; TO WOLF (q.v.). 

TO LOOK BLUE (or QUEER, or 

GREEN) ABOUT THE GILLS, verb, 
phr. (common). To be down- 
cast or dejected ; also to suffer 
from the effects of a debauch. 
Hence, conversely, TO BE ROSY 

ABOUT THE GILLS = tO be 
cheerful. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's Log, 
eh. ii. Most of them were very white and 
BLUE IN THE GILLS when we sat down, and 
others of a dingy sort of whitey-brown, 
while they ogled the viands in a most sus- 
picious manner. 

1892. G. MANVILLE FENN, Witness 
to the Deed, ch. ii. You look precious 
seedy. WHITE ABOUT THE GILLS. 

A CANT (or DIG) IN THE GILLS, 
phr. (pugilists'). A punch in 
the face. See BANG. 



GILL-FLIRT, subs. (old). A wanton; 
a flirt. For synonyms, see 
BARRACK HACK and TART. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarit. Gaul- 
tiere, a whore, punke, drab, queane, GILL 



Gilly. 



144 



Gilt. 



1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s,v. A proud minx. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GILLY, subs. (American). A fool. 
For synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. 

GILLY-GAUPUS, subs. phr. (Scots). 
A tall loutish fellow. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GILT, subs, (popular). i. Money. 
[Ger. : Geld. ; Du. : Gelt.} 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Add to 
those under ACTUAL : Charms ; 
checks ; cole or coal ; coliander 
seeds ; corn in Egypt ; crap ; 
darby ; dots ; ducats ; ginger- 
bread; kelter; lowie; lurries; moss; 
oil of palms ; palm-oil ; peck ; 
plums; rhino; rivets; salt; saw- 
dust ; scad ; screen ; scuds ; 
shigs ; soap ; spoon ; Steven ; 
sugar ; tea-spoons ; tinie. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Le 
galtos (popular) ; Podeur de gousset 
(obsolete) ; Fonguent ( = palm 
grease, Sp., ungnento; the simile 
is common to most languages) ; le 
morlingue (thieves'); la menouille 
(popular) ; le michon (thieves' : 
from miche, a loaf, cf. t LOAVER) ; 
les monacos (popular) ; le monarque 
(prostitutes' : primarily a five 
franc piece) ; le ble = corn or 
leaver) ; les ttoffes (thieves'). 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Lalana 
( = wool) ; la morusa (colloquial) ; 
la mosca ( = the flies) ; lo 
numerario ; la pelusa ( = down) ; 
lozurraco (colloquial) ; lounguento 
de Mejico ( = Mexican Grease) ; 
#' toca teja (colloquial : ready 
money) ; caire. 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Cucchi; 
cnchieri ; cucchielli ; lugani. 



GERMAN SYNONYMS. Fuchs 
( fox : an allusion to the ruddy 
hue of gold pieces ; fuxig orfux- 
ern = golden, red ;fuchsmelochener 
= goldsmith) ; gips or gyps (Vien- 
nese thieves', from the Latin, 
gypsum) ; hora ( = ready-money : 
from the Hebrew heren) ; kail 
(Han : especially small change : 
from Heb. kal lowly light); kis y 
kies, kiss (applied both to money 
in general and the receptacle or 
purse in which it is carried) ; lowe> 
love (Han.); mepaie (from the 
Fr., payer) mesumme, linke 
mesumme = counterfeit money) ; 
moos (from Heb., meo = a little 
stone) ; pich> picht, or peek ; 
staub ( = dust). 

1599. SHAKSPEARE, Henry V., Act 
ii. Chorus. These corrupted men . . . 
have for the GILT of France (O guilt, 
indeed) Confirmed conspiracy. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall ( 4 th 
ed.), p. 9. And from thence conducted 
(provided he has GILT) over the way to 
Hell. 

1885. Daily News, 25 May, p. 3, 
c. i. Disputatious like mobs grouped 
together to discuss whether Charrington 
or Crowder had the most GILT. 



2. subs. (old). A thief; a 
pick-lock ; also GILT- or RUM- 

DUBBER, GILTER, etc. 

1669. Nicker Nicked in Harl. 
Misc. (ed. Park), ii., 108 (given in list of 
names of thieves). 

1673. Character of a Quack 
Astrologer. For that purpose he main- 
tains as strict a correspondence with GILTS 
and lifters. 

1676. Warning for Housekeepers, 
p. 3. The GILTER is one that hath all 
sorts of picklocks and false keys. 

1680. COTTON, Complete Gamester, 
p. 333. Shoals of muffs, hectors, setters, 
GILTS, pads, biters, etc. . . . may all pass 
under the general appellation of snobs. 

1785. GKOSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



Gut-dubber. 



145 



Gimcrack. 



1882. McCABE, New York, ch. 
xxxiv., 509. GILT-DUBBER, a hotel thief. 

3. (thieves'). Formerly a 
pick -lock or skeleton key ; now a 
crow-bar. For synonyms, see 
JEMMY. 

1671. R. HEAD, English Rogue, 
Pt. i, ch. v., p. 50 (1874). GILT, a pick- 
lock. 

1724. E. COLES, Eng. Diet. GILT, 
c . a pick-lock. 

1839. W. H. AINSWORTH, Jack 
Sheppard, p. 183 (ed. 1840). We shall 
have the whole village upon us while 
you're striking the jigger. Use the GILT, 
man! 

TO TAKE THE GILT OFF THE 
GINGERBREAD, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To destroy an illusion ; 
to discount heavily. 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, Front Post to 
Finish, p. 171. You see we had a rattling 
good year all round last, bar the Dancing 
Master. He TOOK THE GILT OFF THE 
GINGERBREAD considerably. 

GILT-DUBBER, see GILT, sense 2. 

GILT- EDGED, adj. (American). 
First-class ; the best of its kind ; 
a latter - day superlative. For 
synonyms, see Ai and FIZZING. 

c. 1889. Chicago Tribune (quoted in 
Slang, Jargon, and Cant). He's a GILT- 
EDGED idiot to play the game. 

1891. Standard, 18 June, p. 2, c. i. 
1 GILT-EDGED mutton ' is the latest of glori- 
fied and ' boomed ' American products. 

1891. Tit Bits, 8 Aug., p. 286, c. 
2. Another accomplishment, peculiar to 
the GILT-EDGED academy, is learning to 
eat asparagus, oranges, grapes, etc. 

GILTER, see GILT, sense 2. 

GILT-TICK, subs, (costermongers 5 ). 
Gold. 

GlMBAL- (or GIMBER-) JAWED, 

adj. (common). Loquacious ; 
talking NINETEEN TO THE 
DOZEN (q.v.). [Gimbals are a 
combination of rings for free 



suspension ; hence applied to 
persons the joints of whose jaws 
are loose in speech.] 

GIMCRACK (GINCRACK, or JIM- 
CRACK), subs. (old). i. A 
showy simpleton, male or female ; 

a DANDY (q.V.). 

1618. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Loyal Subject, iv., 3. These are fine GIM- 
CRACKS ; hey, here comes another, a flagon 
full of wine in his hand. 

1637. FLETCHER, Elder Brother, 
iii.,3- You are a handsome and a sweet 
young lady, And ought to have a handsome 
man yoked to ye. An understanding too ; 
this is a GIMCRACK That can get no- 
thing but new fashions on you. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Canting 
Crew. GIMCRACK, a spruce wench. 

1706. MRS. CENTLIVRE, Basset Table, 
II., Works (1872), i., 122. The philo- 
sophical GIMCRACK. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



2. (colloquial). A showy 
trifle ; anything pretty to look 
at but of very little worth. 

1632. CHAPMAN and SHIRLEY. The 
Ball, Act iv. Lu. There remains, To 
take away one- sample. Wi. Another 

GIMCRACK ? 

1678. BUTLER, Hudibras, pt. 3, ch. i. 
Rifled all his pokes and fobs. Cf,, GIM- 
CRACKS, whims, and jiggumbobs. 

1698-1700. WARD, London Sfy, pt. 7, 
p. 148. I suppose there being little else 
to lose except scenes, machines, or some 

SUCh JIM-CRACKS. 

1843. THACKERAY, frisk Sketch 
Book, ch. i. There was the harp of Brian 
Boru, and the sword of some one else, and 
other cheap old GIMCRACKS with their 
corollary of lies. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
63. Such rum-looking GIMCRACKS, my 
pippin. 

3. (provincial). A handy man ; 

a JACK-OF- ALL-TRADES (q.V.). 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
A GIMCRACK also means a person who 
has a turn for mechanical contrivances. 
IO 



Gimcrackery. 



146 



Ginger. 



4. (venery). The female 
pudendum. [A play on sense 2, 
and CRACK, (q.v.).] For syn- 
onym, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

Adj. (colloquial). Trivial; 
showy; worthless. 

1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. 
ix. No shops so beautiful to look at as 
the Brighton GIMCRACK shops, and the 
fruit shops, and the market. 

- 1891. W. C. RUSSELL, An Ocean 
Tragedy, p. 30. Soberly clothed with 
nothing more GIMCRACK in the way of 
finery upon him than a row of waistcoat- 
buttons. 

1892. Tit Bits, 19 Mar., p. 425 
c. 2. A large cabinet or wardrobe, 
beautifully carved, and very substantial, 
no GIMCRACK work. 

GIMCRACKERY, subs, (colloquial). 
The world of GIMCRACK 



... 

1884. A. FORBES, in Eng. Illustr. 
: , Jan., p. 230. The inner life of the 



: , ., . . 
Empire was a strange mixture of rottenness 

and GIMCRACKERY. 

GIMLET-EYE, subs, (common). A 
squint-eye; a PIERCER (q. v. ). Fr. : 
des yeux en trou de pine. 

GIMLET - EYED, adj. (common). 
Squinting, or squinny-eyed ; cock- 
eyed. As in the old rhyme: 
' Gimlet eye, sausage nose, Hip 
awry, bandy toes.' 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GIMMER, subs. (Scots'). An old 
woman. A variant of 'cummer.' 

GIN, subs. (Australian). An 
Australian native woman. 

1857. KINGSLEY, Two Years Ago, 
ch. xiii. An Australian settler's wife 
bestows on some poor slaving GIN a cast- 
off French bonnet. 

1890. HUME NISBET, Bail UJ, p. 30. 

2. (Australian). An old 
woman. For synonyms, see 
GEEZER. 



GlN-AND-GOSPEL GAZETTE, Sttbs. 
phr. (journalists'). The Morning 
Advertiser: as the organ of the 
Licensed Victualling and Church 
of England party. Also the TAP- 
TUB and BEER - AND - BIBLE 
GAZETTE. 

GIN-AND-TIDY, adv. phr. 
(American). Decked out in 
* best bib and tucker.' A pun on 
' neat spirits. ' 

GIN -CRAWL, subs, (common). A 
TIPPLE (q.v.) on gin. 

1892. A. CHEVALIER, ' The Little 
Nipper. ' I used to do a GIN CRAWL ev ry 
night, An' very, very often come 'ome tight. 

GlNGAMBOBS (or JlGGUMBOBS), 

subs, (common). I. Toys; baubles. 

1690. B. E. Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg; Tongue, s.v. 

2. (venery). The testicles ; 
also THINGAMBOBS. For syn- 
onyms, see CODS. 

GINGER, subs, (common). i. A 
fast, showy horse ; a beast that 

looks FIGGED (q.V.). 

1859. Notes and Queries, 17 Dec. 
p. 493. A GINGER is a showy fast horse. 

2. (common). A red-haired 
person; CARROTS (q.v.). 
[Whence the phrase (venery) 
'Black for beauty, GINGER for 
pluck.'] 

1885. Miss TENNANT in Eng. Illus- 
trated Magazine, June, p. 605. The 
policemen are well known to the boys, and 
appropriately named by them. There is 
'Jumbo,' too stout to run; GINGER, the 
red-haired. 

3. (common). Spirit; dash; 

GO (q.V.). TO WANT GINGER = 

to lack energy and PLUCK (q.v.). 

1888.' The World, 13 May. You 
will remark that your spinal column is 
requiring a hinge, and that considerable 
GINGER is departing from your resolution 
to bear up and enjoy yourself. 



Gingerbread. 



147 



Ginger-snap. 



1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody of No- 
where, p. 124. If father objects send him 
to me, I'll take the GINGER out of him in 
short order. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 207. Give 
her GINGER, boys. 

Adj. (common). Red-haired ; 
FOXY (q.V.}\ JUDAS-HAIRED 
(q.V.\ Also GINGER-FATED, 
GINGER-HACKLED, and GINGERY. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
Red-haired ; a term borrowed from the 
cock-pit, where red cocks are called 

GINGERS. 

1839. H. AINSWORTH, Jack Sheppard, 
ch. xii. Somebody may be on the watch 
perhaps that old GINGER-HACKLED Jew. 

1852. DICKENS, Bleak House, ch. 
xix., p. 160. The very learned gentleman 
who has cooled the natural heat of his 
GINGERY complexion in pools and fountains 
of law, until he has become great in knotty 
arguments for term-time. 

1878. M. E. BRADDON, Cloven Foot, 
ch. iv. The landlady was a lean-looking 
widow, with a false front of GINGERY 
curls. 

GINGERBREAD, subs. (old). i. 
Money : e.g. , He has the 
GINGERBREAD ' = he is rich. 

1690. B. E. Diet, of the Cant, 
Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood. Your 
old dad had the GINGERBREAD. 

1864. Standard, 13 Dec. We do 
not find . . . the word GINGERBREAD 
used for money, as we have heard it both 
before and within the last six months. 
The origin of the use of the word may 
probably be the old fairy legends wherein 
the coin obtained over night from the elves 
was usually found in the morning to have 
turned into little gingerbread cakes. 

2. (colloquial). BRUMMAGEM 
(q.v.) ; showy, but worthless 
ware. 

Adj. (colloquial). Showy but 
worthless ; tinsel. Fr. , en pain 
dtpice. GINGERBREAD WORK 
( nautical )= carved and gilded 
decorations j GINGERBREAD 



QUARTERS (nautical) = luxurious 
living. 

1757. SMOLLETT, Compendium o 
Voyages and Travels. The rooms are 
too small and too much decorated with 
carving and gilding, which is a kind of 

GINGERBREAD Work. 

TO TAKE THE GILT OFF THE 
GINGERBREAD. See GILT. 

GINGERLY, adj. and adv. (old: 
now recognised). As adj., deli- 
cate ; fastidious ; dainty j as adv. , 
with great care ; softly. 

1533. UDAL, Floures for Latine 
Spekynge. We stayghe and prolonge our 
goyng, with a nyce or tendre and softe, 
delicate, or GINGERLY pace. 

c. 1563. Jacke Jugeler, p. 40 (ed. 
Grosart). We used to call her at home 
Dame Coye, a pretie GINGERLIE pice 
[piece]. 

1592. NASHE, Pierce Penilesse, in 
Wks., ii., 32. That lookes as simperingly 
as if she were besmeared, and sits it as 
GINGERLY as if she were dancing the 
Canaries. 

1611. CHAPMAN, May-Day, Act iii., 
p. 294 (Plays, 1874). Come, come, 
GINGERLY ? for God's sake, GINGERLY. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabolario, q.v. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. Gently, softly, easily. 

1759-67. STERNE, Tristram Shandy, 
vol. V., ch. v. My mother was going 
very GINGERLY in the dark. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
To go GINGERLY to work, *'.., to attempt a 
thing gently, or cautiously. 

1874. MRS. H. WOOD, Johnny 
Ludlow, i t S. 12, p. 207. The 
Squire went in GINGERLY, as if he had 
been treading on a spiked ploughshare. 

GINGER-POP, subs, (colloquial). 
I. Ginger-beer. 

2. (rhyming). A policeman ; 
a SLOP (q.v.). 

1887. DAGONET, Referee, 7 Nov., 
p. 7, c. 3. Ere her bull-dog I could stop, 
She had called a GINGER-POP. 

GINGER-SNAP, subs. (American). 
A hot-tempered person, especially 
one with carrotty hair. 



Gingham. 



148 



Gin-twist. 



GINGHAM, subs, (common). An 
umbrella ; specifically one of this 
material. For synonyms, see 
MUSHROOM. 

1868. Miss BRADDON, Trail of the 
Serpent, Bk. I., ch. vii. Mr. Peters 
therefore took immediate possession by 
planting his honest GINGHAM in a corner 
of the room. 

1889. Sportsman, 2 Feb. It would 
really put a premium on the many little 
mistakes of ownership concerning GING- 
HAMS at present so common. 

GINGLE-BOY, subs, (old). A coin ; 
latterly a gold piece. Also 
GINGLER. See ACTUAL and 
CANARY. 

1622. MASSINGER and DEKKER, 
Virgin Martyr, ii., 2. The sign of the 
GINGLEBOYS hangs at the door of our 
pockets. 

GINGUMBOBS. See GINGAMBOBS. 

GINICOMTWIG, verb, (venery). To 
copulate. For synonyms, see 
RIDE. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes, 
Scuotere il pellicione. To GINICOMTWIG or 
occupie a woman. 

GIN-LANE (or TRAP), subs (com- 
mon). i. The throat. For 
synonyms, see GUTTER-ALLEY. 
GIN-TRAP, also = the . mouth. 
For synonyms, see POTATO-TRAP. 

1827. EGAN, Anecdotes of the Turf, 
p. 67. Never again could ... he feel his 
ivories loose within his GIN-TRAP. 

2. (common). Generic for 
the habit of drunkenness. 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Sheppard 
[1889], p. 8. Let me advise you on no 
account to fly to strong waters for consola- 
tion, Joan. One nail drives out another, 
it's true ; but the worst nail you can 
employ is a coffin nail. GIN LANE'S the 
nearest road to the churchyard. 

GIN-MILL, subs. (American). A 
drinking saloon. For synonyms, 
see LUSH-CRIB. 



1872. Belgravia, Dec. ' A Presi- 
dential Election.' Then goes off to rejoin 
his comrades, to adjourn to the nearest 
GIN-MILL. 



GINNIFIED, subs. (common). 
Dazed, or stupid, with liquor. 

GINNUMS, subs, (common). An 
old woman : especially one fond 
of drink. 

GIN NY, subs. (old). A house- 
breaker's tool ; see quot., 1754- 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. 

1754. Scoundrels' Diet. An instru- 
ment to lift up a grate or grating, to steal 
what is in the window. ' The ninth is a 
GIN NY, to lift up the grate, If he sees but 
the Lurry, with his Hooks he will bait.' 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GIN -PEN NY, subs, (costermongers'). 
Extra profit, generally spent in 
drink. 

GIN-SLINGER, subs, (common). A 
gin-drinker. For synonyms, see 

LUSHINGTON. 

GIN-SPINNER, subs. (old). A 
distiller ; a dealer in spirituous 
liquors. Cf. 9 ALE-SPINNER. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1827. EGAN, Anecdotes of the Turf, 
p. 179. Just as she was about to toddle 
to the GIN-SPINNER'S for the ould folk and 
lisp out for a quartern of Max. 

1888. F. GREEN, in Notes and 
Queries, 7 S., vi., 153. I have always 
understood that a GIN SPINNER is a dis- 
tiller who makes gin, but could never find 
out why so called. 

GIN-TWIST, subs, (common). A 
drink composed of gin and sugar, 
with lemon and water. 

1841. Comic Almanac, p. 271 
What, for instance, but GIN-TWIST could 
have brought Oliver Twist to light? 



Gin up. 



149 



Give 



GIN UP, verb.( American). To work 
hard ; to make things lively or 
HUM (q.v.). For synonyms, see 
WIRE IN. 

1887. FRANCIS, Saddle and 
Moccassin. They were GINNING her UP, 
that's a fact. 

GlP, subs. (American thieves'). I. 
A thief. 2. Also (Cambridge Uni- 
versity) a college servant. See 
GYP. Forsynonyms, .^THIEVES. 

GIRL, subs, (common). I. A pros- 
titute ; in. pi. the stock in trade 
of a brothel. See BARRACK HACK, 
TART, and GAY. Fr., fille. 

2. (colloquial). A mistress ; a 
MASH (q.v). 

3. In. pi. (venery). The 
sex or that part of it which is 
given to unchastity in general ; 
hence THE GIRLS = lechery. 

AFTER THE GIRLS. HE'S 

BEEN AFTER THE GIRLS, verb. 

phr. (common). Said of one 
with clap or pox. 



GIRL ANDBOY, 
A saveloy. 



. (rhyming). 



GIRLERY, subs, (colloquial). A 
brothel. Also a theatre for bur- 
lesque and comic opera. 

GIRL- GETTER, subs, (colloquial). 
A mincing, womanish male. 

GIRLING. To GO GIRLING, verb. 
phr. (venery). To quest for 
women; to go on the LOOSE 



GlRLOMETER, subs, (venery). The 
penis. Also, GIRL -CATCHER. 
For synonyms, see CR*EAMSTICK 
and PRICK. 

GIRL-SHOP, subs. phr. (common). 
A brothel. 



GIRL-SHOW, subs. phr. (common). 
A ballet, a burlesque, a LEG- 
PIECE (q.v.). 

GIRL STREET. In HAIR COURT, 
GIRL STREET, subs. phr. (com- 
mon). Generic for fornication. 
Also the female pudendum. 

GIRL-TRAP, subs. phr. (common). 
A seducer; a MUTTON-MONGER 
(f-vj. 

GlTl (orYouGlTl),m(/. (American). 
Be off with you ! An injunc- 
tion to immediate departure ; 
WALKER ! (q.v.). Sometimes a 
contraction of GET OUT ! Also 

GET OUT AND DUST ! 

1851. SEAWORTHY, Bertie, p. 78. 
Thrue as the tin commandhers ! GIT 
AOUT ! 

TO HAVE NO GIT UP AND 
GIT, phr. (American). To be 
weak, vain, mean, or slow 
generally deprecatory. 

GIVE, verb, (vulgar). I. To lead 
to ; to conduct ; to open upon : 
e.g., 'The door GAVE upon the 
street.' Cf. the idiomatic use, in 
French, of donner. 

2. (American). An all-round 
auxiliary to active verbs : e.g., TO 
GIVE ON PRAYING = to excel at 

prayer ; TO GIVE ON THE MAKE 
= to be clever at making money, 
etc. 

To GIVE IT TO, verb. pht. 
(old). I. To rob ; to defraud. 
GROSE. 

2. (common). To scold ; to 
thrash. Also TO GIVE WHAT 

FOR ; TO GIVE IT HOT ; TO GIVE 
SOMETHING FOR ONESELF J TO 
GIVE ONE IN THE EYE, etc. 



Give. 



150 



Give. 



Fr., aller en donner. For syn- 
onyms, see WIG and TAN respec- 
tively. 

1612. CHAPMAN, Widow's Tears, 
Act i., p. 312 (Plays, 1874). This braving 
wooer hath the success expected; the 
favour I obtained made me witness to the 
sport, and let his confidence be sure, I'll 
GIVE IT HIM home. 

1835. DICKENS, Sketches by Boss, 

. 134. 'Take that,' exclaimed Mr. 
amuel Wilkins. . . . ' GIVE IT ( HIM,' 
said the waistcoat. . . . Miss J'mima 
Ivins's beau and the friend's young man 
lay gasping on the gravel, and the waist- 
coat and whiskers were seen no more. 

1889. J. M. BARRIE in Time, Aug. 
p. 148. When he said he would tell every- 
body in the street about there being a 
baby, I GAVE HIM ONE IN THE EYE. 
Ibid. If it's true what Symons Tertius 
says, that Cocky has gone and stolen my 
reminiscences about Albert's curls, putting 
it into his reminiscences like as if it was 
his own, I'll GIVE HIM IT HOT. 

To GIVE IN (or OUT), verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To admit 
defeat ; to yield ; to be exhausted; 
TO THROW UP THE SPONGE. 

See FLOORED and CAVE IN. 

1748. SMOLLETT Rod. Random, ch. 
xviii. Strap, after having received three 
falls on the hard stones, GAVE OUT, and 
allowed the blacksmith to be the better 
man. 

1760-1. SMOLLETT, L. Greaves, vol. 
II., ch. viii. By this time the doctor had 
GIVEN OUT, and allowed the brewer to be 
the better man. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 25. 
Poor Georgy GAVE IN. 

1837. LYTTON, Ernest Maltravers, 
bk. IV., ch. ix. Your time is up ... 
you have had your swing, and a long one 
it seems to have been you must now GIVE 
IN. 

1847. ROBE, Squatter Life, p. 99. 
Jest about then both on our pusses GIN 

OUT. 

1850. BUFFUM, Six Months in the 
Gold Mines, p. 73. After working three 
days with the machine, the earth we had 
been washing began to GIVE OUT. 

1852. DICKENS, Bleak House, ch. 
xxiv., p. 217. I am surprised to hear a 
man of your energy talk of GIVING IN. 



To GIVE AWAY, verb. phr. 
(American). To betray or ex- 
pose inadvertently ; TO BLOW 

UPON (q>V.) : TO PEACH 
(q.v. for synonyms). Also TO 
GIVE DEAD AWAY. Largely used 
in combination : e.g. t GIVE- 
AWAY = an exposure ; GIVE- 
AWAY CUE = an underhand revela- 
tion ot secrets. 

1883. F. M. CRAWFORD, Doctor 
Claudius, ch. vi., p. 100. It always 
amused him to see sanguine people angry. 
They looked so uncomfortable, and GAVE 
THEMSELVES AWAY so recklessly. 

1886. A. LANG, Longman's Mag., 
VII., 321. I know not whether the 
American phrase, to GIVE A PERSON 
AWAY, to GIVE YOURSELF AWAY, meaning 
to reveal your own or another's secret, 
is of provincial English origin. Did it cross 
over with the Pilgrim Fathers in the 
May Flower, or is it a recent bit of slang ? 

' Who GIVETH THIS WOMAN AWAY?' asked 

the rural American parson in the wedding 
service. ' I could, came the voice of a 
young man from the gallery, ' but I'd never 
be so mean.' 

1888. Detroit Free Press, Aug. 
Careful what we say, For it will GIVB us 

DEAD AWAY. 

1889. Answers, 20 Apr., p. 326. My 
closely cropped hair, however, GAVE ME 
AWAY. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 195. For the 
sake of the joke I'll GIVE MYSELF AWAY. 

To GIVE ONE BEST, verb. phr. 
(schoolboys'). I. To acknow- 
ledge one's inferiority, a defeat. 
Also (thieves') to leave, TO CUT 
(q.v.]. 

1887. HORSLEY, Jottings from Jail. 
But after a time I GAVE HIM BEST (left him), 
because he used to want to bite my ear 
(borrow) too often. 

TO GIVE THE COLLAR, verb, 
phr. (American). To seize ; to 
arrest; jjp COLLAR (q.v.). For 
synonyms, see NAB. 

TO GIVE THE BULLET (SACK, 
BAG, KICK-OUT, PIKE, ROAD, 

etc.), verb. phr. (common). To 
discharge from an employ. 



Giver. 



Glanthorne. 



GIVE us A REST ! phr. 
(American). Cease talking ! 
An injunction upon a bore. 



TO GIVE NATURE A FILLIP, 

verb. phr. (old). To indulge in 
wine or women. B.E. (1690). 

To GIVE WAY, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To permit the sexual 
embrace : by women only. 

1870. Weekly Times, i May. She 
was sorry to say, she GAVE WAY to him. 
(Laughter.) Mr. Maude remarked she 
was a foolish woman, and, being a 
widow, ought to have known what GIVING 
WAY would come to. Complainant said of 
course she did, but she thought he meant 
to marry her. 

[Other combinations will be found under 
the following ; AUCTIONEER ; BACK CAP 

BAG ; BAIL ; BASTE J BEANS J BEEF J BIFF 
BLACK EYE ; BONE ; BUCKET J BULLET 
BULL'S FEATHER ; CLINCH J DOUBLE ', FIG 
GAS J GO BY J GRAVY J HOIST J HOT BEEF 
JESSE J KENNEDY J KEY OF THE STREET 
LAND J LEG UP ', LIP J MILLER J MITTEN 
MOUTH J NEEDLE J OFFICE J POINTS J PUSSY 

RUB OF THE THUMB ; SACK ; SKY-HIGH 
SLIP; TAIL ; TASTE OF CREAM ; TURNIPS 
WEIGHT J WHITE ALLEY J WORD.] 



GIVER, subs, (pugilistic). A good 
boxer ; an artist in PUNISHMENT 
(<?.*) 

1824. REYNOLDS, (' Peter Corcoran '), 
The Fancy, p. 73. She knew a smart 
blow from a handsome GIVER Would 
darken lights. 

GIXIE, subs, (obsolete). A wanton 
wench ; a strumpet ; an affected 
mincing woman. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes. 
Faina, a mincing, coie, nice, puling, 
squeamish woman, an idle huswife, a 
flurt, a GIXGI. Also as Foina [i.e. , ' a pole- 
cat'; while Foirare* 'to lust for beastly 
leacherie, to be salt as a bitch.'] 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie t s.v. 
Gadrouillette, a minx, gigle, flirt, callet 
GIXIE : (a fained word applyable to any 
such cattell). [See further, gadriller (a 
wench) =' to rump or play the rig']. 



GIZZARD, TO FRET ONE'S GIZZARD, 
verb. phr. (common). To worry 
oneself. See FRET. 

To STICK IN ONE'S GIZZARD, 
zerb phr. (common). To remain 
as something unpleasant, dis- 
tasteful or offensive; to be hard of 
digestion ; to be disagreeable or 
unpalatable. 

c. 1830. Finish of Tom and Jerry, 
p. 241. It had always STUCK IN HIS 
GIZZARD to think as how he had been werry 
cruelly used. 

TO GRUMBLE IN THE GIZZARD, 

verb. phr. (common). To be 
secretly displeased. Hence, 

GRUMBLE-GIZZARD .V.. 



GLADSTONE, subs, (common) i. 
Cheap claret. [Mr. Gladstone, 
when in office in 1869, reduced 
the duty on French wines.] See 
DRINKS. 

1876. BESANT and RICE, Golden 
Butterfly, ch. ix. Claret certainly good, 
too none of your GLADSTONE tap ; sherry 
probably rather coarse. 

1885. A. BIRRELL, OUter Dicta, 
p. 86. To make him unbosom himself 
over a bottle of GLADSTONE claret in a 
tavern in Leicester Square. 

2. colloquial). A travelling 
bag. [So named in honour of 
Mr. Gladstone.] 



GLADSTONIZE, verb (colloquial). 
To talk about and round ; to 
evade or prevaricate ; to speak 
much and mean nothing. 

GLANTHORNE, subs. (old). 
Money. For synonyms, see 
ACTUAL and GILT. 

1789. PARKER Life's Painter, p. 
42. Drop the GLANTHORNE = part with 
money. 



Glasgow Greys. 



Glaze 



GLASGOW GREYS, subs. phr. 
(military). The ;oth Foot. 
[Which in the beginning was 
largely recruited in Glasgow.] 

1886. Tinsley's Mag., Apr., p. 321. 
The yoth were long known as the 
GLASGOW GREYS. 

GLASGOW MAGISTRATE, subs. phr. 
(common). A herring, fresh or 
salted, of the finest. [From the 
practice of sending samples to 
the Baillie of the River for 
approval.] Also GLASGOW 
BAILLIE, 

1855. STRANG, Glasgow and its 
City Clubs. This club. . . . better known 
by the title of the Tinkler's club, par- 
ticularly when the brotherhood changed 
the hour of meeting .... and when the 
steak was exchanged for a ' Welsh rabbit ' 
or GLASGOW MAGISTRATE. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS (for 
herrings generally). Atlantic 
ranger ; Californian ; Cornish 
duck ; Digby chicken ; D unbar 
wether ; gendarme ; Gourock 
ham ; magistrate ; pheasant (or 
Billingsgate pheasant) ; reds ; 
sea - rover ; soldier ; Taunton 
turkey; two-eye'd steak; Yar- 
mouth capon. Fr. : gendarme. 

GLASS, subs. (American thieves'). 
An hour. [An abbreviation of 
'hour-glass.'] 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
The badger piped his Moll about a GLASS 
and a half before she cribbed the flat. 

THERE'S A DEAL OF GLASS 
ABOUT, phr. (common). i. 
Applied to vulgar display = ' IT'S 
THE THING' (q.v.). 

2. (common). Said in answer 
to an achievement in assertion. 
A memory of the proverb, 
' People who live in glass houses 
should not throw stones.' 

WHO'S TO PAY FOR THE 
BROKEN GLASS? verb. hr. 



(colloquial).^ STAND THE 
RACKET. 

BEEN LOOKING THROUGH A 
GLASS, adv. phr. (common). 
Drunk. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

GLASS- EYES, subs. (old). A man 
wearing spectacles ; FOUR-EYES 
(q.V.} ; GIG-LAMPS (q.V.). 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GLASS-HOUSE. To LIVE IN A 
GLASS HOUSE, verb. phr. (col- 
loquial). To lay oneself open to 
attack or adverse criticism. 

GLASS- wo RK,subs. (card-sharpers'). 
An obsolete method of cheat- 
ing at cards. A convex mirror 
the size of a small coin was 
fastened with shellac to the lower 
corner of the left palm opposite 
the thumb, enabling the dealer to 
ascertain by reflection the value 
of the cards he dealt. 

GLAZE, subs. (old). A window. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 

Crew, s.v. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall (4th 
ed.), p. 12. GLAZE, a Window. 

1754. Discoveries of John Poult er, 
p. 43. Undub the Jeger and jump the 
GLAZE. 

1852. SNOWDEN, Mag. Assistant 
(3rd ed.), p. 445. A window, GLAZE. 

c. 1830. Finish to Tom and Jerry 
[1872], p. 82. A random shot milling the 

GLAZE. 

Verb (old). To cheat at cards. 
See quot. and GLASS-WORK. 

1821. P. EGAN, Real Life, I., 297. 
If you take the broads in hand in their 
company, you are sure to be work'd, 
either by GLAZING, that is, putting you in 
front of a looking glass, by which means 
your hand is discovered by your 
antagonist, or by private signals from the 
pal. 



Glazier. 



Glim. 



TO MILL (or STAR A GLAZE), 
verb. phr. (old). To break a 
window. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 

iii., 2. Jerry. What are you about, Tom? 

Tom. I'm going to MILL THE GLAZE 1 11 

(/.y about to break the glass, "when 

Kate and Sue appear as the Miss Trifles.) 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf. 
GLAZE, s.v., TO MILL THE GLAZE, the 
miller may adopt a stick or otherwise, as 
seems most convenient. 

ON THE GLAZE, adv. phr. 
(thieves'). Robbing jewellers' 
shops by smashing the windows. 
See GLAZIER. 

1724-34. C. JOHNSON, Highwaymen 
and Pyrates, q.v. 

1889. Ally Sloper, 4 May. Getting 
a reprieve he went to Dublin ON THE 



G LAZI ER, subs., in. pi. (old). I. The 
eyes. For synonyms, see GLIMS. 
Fr. : les ardents. 
1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 64. 

GLASYERS, eyes. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Kept., 1874). GLASIERS, 
eyes. 

1611. MIDDLETON and DEKKER, 
Roaring- Girl, v., i. These GLASIERS of 
mine, mine eyes. 

1656. BROME, Jovial Crew, ii. You're 
out with your GLAZIERS. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. The cove has rum GLAZIERS, 
c. that Rogue has excellent Eyes, or an 
Eye like a Cat. 

1724. E. COLES, Eng. Diet. 
GLAZIERS, c. eyes. 

1725. New Canting Diet. ' Song. 1 
Her GLAZIERS, too, are quite benighted. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue s.v. 
2. (old). A window thief. Cf. t 
GLAZE. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. Song: ' The 
Twenty Craftsmen.' ... A GLAZIER 
who when he creeps in, To pinch all 
the lurry he thinks it no sin. 

1785. GROSS, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GLEANER, subs, (old). A thief. 
Cf., HOOKER, ANGLER, etc. 
For synonyms, see THIEVES. 



GLIB, subs, (common). I. The 
tongue. SLACKEN YOUR GLIB = 
loose your tongue. For syn- 
onyms, see CLACK. 

2. (old). A ribbon. 

1754. Discoveries of John Poulter, 
p. 42. A lobb full of GLIBBS, a box full of 
ribbons. 

Adj. (old, now recognised). 
Smooth ; slippery ; voluble ; GLIB- 

TONGUKD or GLIB-GABBIT (cf. t 

GAB) = talkative ; ready of speech. 

1605. SHAKSPEARE, Lear, Act i., 
Sc. i. I want that GLIB and oily art, To 
speak and purpose not. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabolario, s.v. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. Smooth, without a Rub. 
GLIB-TONGUED. Voluble or Nimble- 
tongued. 

1890. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 31 Jan. 
The rest who were so GLIB with their 
promises. 



GLIBE, subs. (American thieves'). 
Writing ; specifically, a written 
statement. 

GLIM (or GLYM), subs. (old). i. A 
candle, or dark lanthorn ; a fire or 
light of any kind. To DOUSE THE 
GLIM = to put out the light. Fr. : 
estourbir la cabande. Also short 
for GLIMMER or GLYMMAR 



1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. A Dark Lanthorn used in 
Robbing Houses ; also to burn in the 
Hand. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall (4th 
ed.), p. 12. GLIM, a Candle. 

1728. BAILEY, Eng. Diet. GLIM, 
s.v. A candle or light. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. Bring 
bess and GLYM ; i.e., bring the instrument 
to force the door, and the dark lanthorn. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and ferry, 
ii., 2. Tom. Then catch here's the gen- 
tlemen's tooth-picker, and here's his GLIM- 
(Throws stick and lanthorn to Jerry.) 



Glim. 



Glim. 



1834. AINSWORTH, Rookiiiood } bk. 
III., ch. 5. Every star its GLIM at hiding. 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. 16. 
Let's have a GLIM ... or we shall go 
breaking our necks. 

1837. LYTTON, Ernest Maltravers, 
Bk. I., ch. 10. ' Hush, Jack ! ' whispered 
one ; ' hang out the GLIM and let's look 
about us.' 

1852. JUDSON, Myst., etc., of New 
York, ch. iv. Old Jack bade Harriet 
trim the GLIM. 

1883. R. L. STEVENSON, Treasure 
Island, p. 89. Sure enough, they left their 
GLIM here. 

1884. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Admiral Guinea, ii., 6. Nowhere is my 
little GLIM ; it aint for me because I'm 
blind. 

2. (old). A sham account of 
a fire as sold by FLYING 

STATIONERS (q.V.). 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, i., 233. His papers certify 
any and every ' ill that flesh is heir to ' . . 
. . Loss by fire is a GLIM. 

3. in. pL (common). The 
eyes. 

ENGLISH SYNONMYMS. 
Blinkers ; daylights ; deadlights ; 
glaziers ; lights ; lamps ; ogles 
optics : orbs ; peepers ; sees 
squinters ; toplights ; windows 
winkers. 

FRENCH SYMONYMS. Les 
quinquets (popular = bright eyes, 
Vidocq) ; Its mirettes (popular 
and thieves'; Italian: mira 
sight) ; lesrelutts^hieves' : alsoD AY- 
MANS or LIGHTMANS [q.V.])', les 
calots (thieves' = marbles) ; les 
ch Asses or les chassis (popular 
= hunters' ) ; les lampions 
(thieves' = LAMPS (q.v.) ; Italian: 
lanterna and lampante) ; les apics 
(thieves') ; les ardents (thieves' 
= piercers ) ; les eillets (popular 
= eyelets; les lanternes de cabriolet 
(popular = giglamps ) ; les dig- 



not s ( popular = winkers ) ; les 
carreaux (thieves' -= windows) ; 
les clairs (thieves' = shiners) ; les 
coquards (thieves'). 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Lan - 
terna ( = a lamp) ; calchi; balchi ; 
brunotti ( = brownies ) ; lam- 
pante. 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Fanal 
( lantern); lanterna ( = idem); 
visantes (vulgar) ; vistosos (vulgar). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Dier- 
ling (from stieren = \.o stare); 
Linzer; Sckeinling(hQm Schein 
DAYLIGHTS (q.V.)). 

1824. P. EGAN, Boxiana, iv., 417. 
His GLIMS I've made look like a couple of 
rainbows. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, p. 47 

ted. 1854]. Queer my GLIMS, if that ben't 
ittle Paul ! 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
!!> 339- Harold escaped with the loss of 
a GLIM. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
56. A pooty gal, gentle, or simple, as 
carn't use her GLIMS is a flat. 

4. in. pi. (common). A pair 
of spectacles. For synonyms, see 
BARNACLES. 

5. (common). Gonorrhoea or 
CLAP (q.v.). [From sense 1 = 
fire.] 

Verb (old). To brand or burn 
in the hand. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. As the cull was GLIMM'D, he 
gangs to the Nubb, c., if the Fellow has 
been Burnt in the Hand, he'll be Hang'd 



1714. Memoirs of John Hall, p. 15. 
Profligate women are GLIMM'D for that 
villany, for which, rather than leave it, 
they could freely die martyrs. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

TO PUFF THE GLIMS, verb. 
phr. (veterinary). To fill the 
hollow over the eyes of old 



Glim-Fenders. 



Glistner. 



horses by pricking the skin and 
blowing air into the loose tissues 
underneath, thus giving the full 
effect of youth. 

GLIM-FENDERS, subs. (old). i. 
Andirons, or fire-dogs. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. GLIMFENDERS, c. Andirons. 
RUM GLIMFENDERS, Silver Andirons. 

1728. BAILEY, Eng. Diet. s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

2. (old). Handcuffs. [A 
pun on sense i.] 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of the Turf 
s.v. 

1848. BUNCOMBE, Sinks of London, 



GLIM FLASH LY (or GLIM-FLASH EY), 
adj. (old). Angry. See NAB 
THE RUST and HAIR. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. GLIMFLASHLY, c., Angry, or 
in a Passion. The Cull is GLIMFLASHLY, 
c. the Fellow is in a Heat. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. 
xxxi. No, Captain, don't be GLIM- 
FLASHEY ! You have not heard all yet. 



GLIM-JACK, subs. (old). A link 
boy ; a MOON - CURSER (q.v.} ; 
but, in any sense, a thief. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



GLIMMER (or GLYMMAR), subs. 
(old). Fire. See quot. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat. These 
DEMAUNDERS FOR GLYMMAR be for the 
moste parte wemen. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38. (H. Club's Rept., 1874). GLYMMER, 
Fire. 

1671. R. HEAD, English Rogue, 
pt. I., ch. v., p. 49 (1874). GLYMMER, 
Fire. 

1724. E. COLES, Eng. Diet., s.v. 

1725. New Canting Diet., Song, 
1 The Maunder's Praise of his Strowling 
Mort.' Doxy, Oh ! thy Glaziers shine, As 
GLYMMAR by the Solomon. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GLIMMERER, subs. (old). A beg- 
gar working with a petition 
giving out that he is ruined by fire. 

Also GLIMMERING MORT = a 

female GLIMMERER. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant 
Crew, s.v. GLIMMERER, c., the Twenty- 
second Rank of the Canting Tribe, 
begging with Sham Licences, pretending 
to Losses by Fire, etc. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GLIMSTICK, subs. (old). A candle- 
stick. [From GLIM = a light + 
stick.] Fr. : une occasion. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. GLIMSTICK, c., a Candlestick. 
RUM GLIMSTICKS, c., Silver Candlesticks. 
QUEER GLIMSTICKS, c., Brass, Pewter, or 
Iron Candlesticks. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



GLIM-LURK, subs, (tramps'). A 
beggars' petition, based on a 
fictitious fire or GLIM (sense 2). 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, vol. I., p. 233. The 
patterer becomes a ' lurker,' that is, an 
imposter ; his papers certify any and 
every ' ill that flesh is heir to.' Shipwreck 
is called a SHAKE-LURK ; loss by fire is a 



GLISTER, subs.phr. (thieves'). See 

quot., GLISTER OF FISH-HOOKS. 

1889. CLARKSON and RICHARDSON, 
Police, p. 321. A glass of Irish whiskey 

.... a GLISTER OF FISH-HOOKS. 

GLISTNER, subs, (old). A 
sovereign. For synonyms, see 
CANARY. 



Gloak. 



156 



Gloves. 



GLOAK (or G LOACH), subs. (old). 
A man. For synonyms, see 
CHUM and COVE. 

1821. D. HAGGART, Life, Glossary, 
pp. 48 and 172. GLOACH, a man ; cove. 



GLOBE, subs. (old). i. A pewter 
pot ; pewter. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

2. in. pi. (common). The 
paps. For synonyms, see DAIRY. 

GLOBE-RANGERS, stibs. (nautical). 
The Royal Marines. 

GLOBE-TROTTER, subs, (colloquial). 
A traveller ; primarily one 
who races from place to place, 
with the object of covering ground 
or making a record. Fr. : un 
pacquelineur. 

1886. Graphic, 7 Aug., 147/1. Your 
mere idle gaping GLOBETROTTER will spin 
endless pages of unobservant twaddle, 
and will record his tedious wanderings 
with most painful minuteness. 

1888. Academy, 17 Mar. The 
inevitable steamboat, the world, and the 
omnivorous GLOBE-TROTTER. 

1889. Echo, g Feb. The British 
GLOBE-TROTTER knows Japan as he knows 
England, and English books about Japan 
are turned out by the ton. 

1890. Pall MallGaz., 27 Jan., p. 5, 
c. 2. This popular definition of a quick- 
mover has now become effete. Miss Ely 
is a GLOBE-GALLOPER or she is nothing. 

GLOBE-TROTTING, subs, (colloquial). 
Travelling after the manner of 

GLOBE-TROTTERS (<7.Z>.). 

1888. Academy, 22 Sept. In fact, 
GLOBE-TROTTING, as the Americans some- 
what irreverently term it, is now frequently 
undertaken as a mere holiday trip. 



GLOPE, verb. (Winchester College). 
To spit. (Obsolete). 



GLORIOUS, aaj. (common). 
Excited with drink ; ' in one's 
altitudes ' ; BOOZED. For syn- 
onyms, see DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1791. BURNS, Tarn o' Shanter. 
Kings may be blessed, but Tarn was 
GLORIOUS, O'er a' the ills of life 
victorious. 

1853. THACKERAY, Barry Lyndon, 
ch. xviii.j p. 252. I knew nothing of the 
vow, or indeed of the tipsy frolic which 
was the occasion of it ; I was taken up 
GLORIOUS, as the phrase is, by my servants, 
and put to bed. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., g Feb. 
But as they all began to get GLORIOUS, 
personalities became more frequent and 
very much stronger. 



GLORIOUS SINNER, subs. phr. 
(rhyming). A dinner. 

GLORY, subs, (common). The 
after life; KINGDOM COME 
(q.v.). Usually, THE COMING 

GLORY. 

1841. Punch, 17 July, p. 2. Clara 
pines in secret Hops the twig, and goes 
to GLORY in white muslin. 

IN ONE'S GLORY, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). In the full flush of 
vanity, pride, taste, notion, or 
idiosyncracy. 



GLOVES, TO GO FOR THE GLOVES, 
verb. phr. (racing). To bet reck- 
lessly; to bet against a horse with- 
out having the wherewithal to pay 
if one loses the last resource of 
the plunging turfite. The term 
is derived from the well-known 
habit of ladies to bet in pairs of 
gloves, expecting to be paid if 
they win, but not to be called 
upon to pay if they lose. 

1877. HAWLEY SMART, Play or Pay, 
ch. xi. One of the boldest plungers of the 
day, who had begun badly, was GOING 
FOR THE GLOVES upon this match. 



Glow. 



Glutton. 



1886. Badminton Library, ' Racing,' 
p. 255. Hardly worth mentioning are the 
backers who come in for a hit-or-miss dash 
at the ring TO GO FOR THE GLOVES, as it 
is called in ring parlance. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 3 Apr. 
Although we frequently read in stones 
of the hero backing the right horse 
at a long price, and so getting out of sundry 
monetary difficulties, we rarely find the 
idea realised in practice. Many a book- 
maker has GONE FOR THE GLOVES. 

GLOW, adj. (tailors'). Ashamed. 

GLUE, subs, (common). I. Thick 
soup. (Because it sticks to the 
ribs.) 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. De- 
ferred stock ; belly-gum ; giblets- 
twist ; gut-concrete ; rib-tickler ; 
stick-in-the-ribs. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. La 
menetre (thieves') ; la lavas se ( = 
a mess of pot liquor) ; la laffe 
(thieves') ; la jaffe (popular) ; 
Vordinaire (popular : soup and 
boiled beef at an ordinary) ; le 
fond d'estomac ( = thick soup); 
la mousse ; la mouillante ( = the 
moistener). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Jauche\ 
Polifke. 

2. (common). Gonorrhoea. 

GLUE- POT, subs, (common). A 
parson. [Because he joins in 
wedlock.] For synonyms, see 
DEVIL-DODGER and SKY-PILOT. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GLUM, adj. (old: now recognised). 
Sullen ; down in the mouth ; 
stern. Fr. : faire son nez = to 
look glum ; also, n'en pas mener 
large. 

1712. ARBUTHNOT, Hist, of John Bull, 
pt. IV., ch. vii. Nic. looked sour and GLUM, 
and would not open his mouth. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v 



17(?). Broadside Ballad. 'Sam Hall, 
The parson he will come, And he'll look so 
bloody GLUM. 

1816; JOHNSON, Diet, of the English 
Language. GLUM, s.v., a low cant word 
formed by corrupting ' gloom.' 

1847. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, ii., 
ch. vi. ' I wonder whether Lady South- 
down will go away ; she looked very GLUM 
upon Mrs. Rawdon,' the other said. 

1888. Referee, 21 Oct. Who found 
him looking GLUM and gray, And thought 
his accent e;ruff and foreign. 

1892. A. W. PINERO, The Times, 
v., i. What are you so GLUM about. 

GLUMP, verb, (provincial). To 
sulk. Hence GLUMPY, CLUMP- 
ING, and GLUMPISH = sullen or 
stubborn. 

1787. GROSE, Prov. Glossary. CLUMP- 
ING, sullen, or sour looking. Exm. 

1835. TH. HOOK, Gilbert Gurney. 
He was GLUMPY enough when I called. 

1860. G.^ ELIOT, Mill on the Floss, 
Bk. VI., ch. iy. "An it worrets me as 
Mr. Tom 'ull sit by himself so GLUMPISH, 
a-knittin' his brow, an' a lookin' at the 
fire of a night. 

GLUTMAN, subs. (old). See quot. 

1797. Police of the Metropolis, p. 64. 
An inferior officer of the Customs, and 
particularly one of that class of supernu- 
merary tide waiters, who are employed 
temporarily when there is a press or hurry 
of business. These GLUTMEN are generally 
composed of persons who are without 
employment, and, being also without 
character, recommend themselves princi- 
pally from the circumstance of being able 
to write. 

GLUTTON, subs. (common). I. A 
horse which lasts well ; a STAYER 



2. (pugilists'). A pugilist 
who can take a lot of PUNISH- 
MENT (q.v.). 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, xvi. Thus 
Theocritus, in his Milling- Match, calls 
Amycus a GLUTTON, which is well known 
to be the classical phrase at Moulsey- 
Hurst for one who, like Amycus, takes a 
deal of punishment before he is satisfied. 



Gnarler. 



158 



Go. 



1891. Licensed Viet. Mirror, 30 
Jan., p. 6, c. 3. He was known to be 
an awfully heavy hitter with both hands, a 
perfect GLUTTON at taking punishment. 

GNARLER, subs, (thieves'). A 
watch dog. For synonyms, see 
TIKE. 

GNASP, verb, (old). To vex. For 
synonyms, see RILE. 
1728. BAILEY, English Diet. s.v. 

GNOFF. See GONNOF. 

GNOSTIC, subs, (colloquial). A 
knowing one ; a DOWNY COVE 
(q.v. ); a WHIPSTER (q.v. ). 
[From the Gr., gnosis know- 
ledge.] 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 27. 
Many of the words used by the Canting 
Beggars in Beaumont and Fletcher's 
Masque are still to be heard among the 
GNOSTICS of Dyot Street and Tothill 
Fields. 

adj. (colloquial). Knowing, 

ARTFUL (q.V.). 

GNOSTICALLY, adv. (colloquial). 
Knowingly. 

1825. SCOTT, St. Ronan's Well, ch. 
iv. He was tog'd GNOSTICALLY enough. 

Go, subs, (common). rl. A drink ; 
specifically a quartern of gin. 
(Formerly a GO-DOWN, but Cf. t 
quot. 1811. 

[For other combinations see ABROAD 
ALL FOURS ALOFT AUNT BABY BACK 
ON BAD BAIL BALDHEADED BATH- 
BATTER BEDFORDSHIRE BEGGAR'S BUSH 
BETTER BLAZES BLIND BOARD 
BODKIN BULGE BUNGAY BURY BUST 
BY- BY CALL CAMP CHUMP COLLEGE 
CRACKED DEAD BROKE DEVIL DING 

DING-DONG DOCK DOSS DRAG 
PLOUGH FLUE GAMBLE GLAZE GLORY 

GLOVES GRAIN GRASS GROUND 
HAIRYFORDSHIRE HALL HALVES 
HANG HELL HIGH FLY HIGH TOBY 
HOOKS HOOP JERICHO JUMP KITCHEN 
MAN MAJORITY MILL MURPHY 
PACE PIECES PILE POT QUEEN- 
RAKER RANGE ROPE- WALK SALT 
RIVER SHALLOW SHOP SLOW SMASH 
SNACKS SNOOKS SPOUT STAR-GAZING 
SWEET VIOLETS TOP WALKER'S BUS 



WEST WHOLE ANIMAL WOODBINE 
WOOLGATHERING WRONG. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. 
Bender; caulker; coffin nail; 
common-sewer ; cooler ; crack ; 
cry ; damp ; dandy ; dash ; dew- 
hank ; dewdrop ; dodger ; drain ; 
dram ; facer ; falsh ; gargle ; 
gasp ; go-down ; hair of the dog, 
etc. ; Johnny ; lip ; liquor up ; 
livener ; lotion ; lounce ; modest 
quencher ; muzzier ; nail from 
one's coffin ; night-cap ; nip or 
nipper ; nobbier ; old crow ; a 
one, a two, or a three ; out ; 
peg ; pick - me up ; pony ; 
quencher ; reviver ; rince ; sen- 
sation ; settler ; shift ; shove 
in the mouth; slug; small 
cheque ; smile ; snifter ; some- 
thing damp ; something short ; 
swig ; thimbleful; tiddly ; top up; 
tot ; warmer ; waxer; wet ; white- 
wash ; yard. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
bourgeron (popular = a nip of 
brandy) ; un asticot de cercueil 
(= a coffin-worm, a play on 
verre and biere) ; un coup 
d'arrosoir (popular : a touch of 
the watering pot); un gargarisme 
(popular : = a GARGLE [$.v.]); 
un galopin ( = a PONY [q.v.'} of 
beer; un larme ( = a tear); 
tin mistiche (thieves') ; un 
miserable (popular: a glass of 
spirits costing one sou ; une 
demoiselle = two sous; un 
monsieur '=four sous ; un poisson 
= five sous) ; un mince de chic 
(popular : in contempt) ; un& 
coquille de noix (popular = a 
thimbleful ; a very small GO ; a 
drain) ; un jeune homme 
(familiar = in capacity four litres) ; 
un Kolback (popular = a small 
glass of brandy, or large glass of 
wine) ; une flute (familiar) ; 
un extravagant (popular = a long 
drink); un fil ( = a drain); un 



Go. 



Go. 



distingue (popular) ; une douleur 
(popular = a comforter or PICK- 
ME-UP) ; zm ballon (popular). 

ITALIAN SYNONYM. Schioppa 
( = a long drink : also a large beer 
glass). 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Chis- 
guete (colloquial) ; enjuagadientes 
(also = a mouthful of water or 
wine for rinsing the mouth after 
eating) ; espolada( o. long drink). 

PORTUGUESE SYNONYM. 
Quebrado ( = broken : a small 
glass). 

1690. D'URFEY, Collins Walk, canto 
4. And many more whose quality For- 
bids their toping openly, Will privately, on 
good occasion, Take six GO-DOWNS on 
reputation. 

1793. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
GO-SHOP .... The Queen's Head in 
Duke's Court. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. GO- 
SHOP, s.v. The Queen's Head, in Duke's 
Court, Bow Street, Covent Garden, fre- 
quented by the under players, where gin 
and water was sold in three-halfpenny 
bowls, called GOES ; the gin was called 
Arrack. 

1823. JON. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 
s.v. 

1835. DICKENS, Sketches by Boz, 
The Streets: Night. Chops, kidneys, 
rabbits, oysters, stout, cigars^ and GOES 
innumerable, are served up amidst a noise 
and confusion of smoking, running, knife- 
clattering, and waiter-chattering, perfectly 
indescribable. 

1841. Punch, Vol. I., p. n, c. i. 
Waiter, a GO of Brett's best alcohol. 

1849. THACKERAY, Hoggarty Dia- 
mond, ch. ii. Two more chairs, Mary, 
two more tumblers, two more hot waters, 
and two more GOES of gin ! 

1850. SMEDLEY, Frank Fairleigh, 
p. 54. Drinking alternate GOES of gin and 
water with a dustman for the purpose of 
insinuating myself into the affections of 
Miss Cinderella Smut, his interesting 
sister. 

1853. Diogenes, Vol. II., p. 271. 
Shall I spend it in theatres? shows? In 
numerous alcohol GOES ? 

1870. Figaro, 28 May. Their mu- 
sical performances are evidently inspired 
by GOES of gin. 



1883. Echo, 7 Feb., p. 4, c. 3. 
Witness asked him what he had been 
drinking. He replied, ' Two half-GOES 
of rum hot and a half-pint of beer.' 

2. (colloquial). An incident ; 
an occurrence : e.g., a RUM GO = 
a strange affair, or queer start ; a 
PRETTY GO = a startling busi- 
ness ; a CAPITAL GO = a pleasant 
business. 

1803. KENNEY, Raising the Wind, 
i., 3. Ha ! ha ! ha ! Capital GO, isn't it ? 

1820. Jack Randalfs Diary. Gem- 
men (says he), you all well know The joy 
there is whene'er we meet ; It's what I call 
the primest GO, And rightly named, 'tis 
quite a treat. 

1835. DICKENS, Sketches by Bpz, 
p. 251. A considerable bustle and shuffling 
of feet was then heard upon the stage, 
accompanied by whispers of ' Here's a 
PRETTY GO! what's to be done?' 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends. 
1 Misadventures at Margate.' ' O, Mrs. 
Jones, ' says I, ' look here ! Ain't this a 
PRETTY GO ! ' 

1841. Punch, vol. I., p. 162. Stating 
his conviction that this was rayther a 

RUMMY GO. 

1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. 
Ixxiii. Master Frank Clavering . . . had 
only time to ejaculate the words, ' Here's 
a JOLLY GO ! ' and to disappear sniggering. 

1869. MRS. H. WOOD, Roland 
Yorke, ch. xli. ' I am about to try what a 
month or two's absence will do for me.' 
' And leave us to old Brown ? that will 
be a NICE GO !' 

1876. GEORGE ELIOT, Daniel 
Deronda, ch. vii. A RUM GO as ever I 
saw. 

1880. G. R. SIMS, Three Brass 
Balls, pledge xvi. He . . . exclaimed, 
' Well, I'm dashed if this isn't a RUM GO ! ' 

1883. R. L. STEVENSON, Treasure 
Island, p. 55. A pretty RUM GO if squire 
aint to talk for Doctor Livesey. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
305. ' It was a NEAR GO,' said Jack. 

3. (common). The fashion ; 
THE CHEESE (q.v.) ; the correct 
thing. Generally in the phrase 

ALL THE GO. 



Go. 



160 



Go. 



1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
He is quite the GO, he is quite varment, he 
is prime, he is bang up. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry [ed. 
1891], p. 35. Tom was the GO among the 
GOES. 

1835. HALIBURTON ('Sam Slick'), 
The Clockmaker, 3 S., ch. xiv. Whatever 
is the GO in Europe will soon be the 
cheese here. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
I., 251. It was rather the GO With Pil- 
grims and Saints in the Second Crusade. 

1846. Punch, vol. X., p. 163. From 
lowly Queen's quadrangle, Where muffins 
are the GO. 

1880. G. R. SIMS, Ballads of 
Babylon (Beauty and Beast). And all 
day long there's a big crowd stops To 
look at the lady who's ALL THE GO. 

4. (colloquial). Life ; spirit ; 
energy ; enterprise ; impetus : 
e.g., PLENTY OF GO = full of 
spirit and dash. Fr. : avoir du 
chien. 

1825. The English Spy, i., 178. 
She's only fit to carry a dean or a bishop. 
No GO in her. 

1865. MACDONALD, Alec Forbes of 
How-glen, II., 269. All night Tibbie 
Dyster had lain awake in her lonely 
cottage, listening to the quiet heavy GO of 
the water. 

1882. Daily Telegraph, 9 Oct. Mr. 
Grossmith's music is bright and tripping, 
full of humour and GO, as, under such 
circumstances, music should be ! 

1883. Illustrated London News, 10 
March, p. 242, c. 3. There was any 
amount of dash and GO in their rowing. 

1887. PATON, Down the Islands. 
Barbadian may therefore be said to mean 
a man with GO and grit, energy and v im. 

1889. Sportsman, 19 Jan. It all lent 
a certain zest and GO to the proceedings. 

1890. Pall Mall Gaz., 21 Feb., 
p. 7, c. i. There was so much heartiness 
and GO (so to speak) in the work that it 
reminded me of what I had read about 
peasant proprietors labouring in Switzer- 
land and elsewhere under a Home Rule 
Government. 



5. (colloquial). A turn ; an 
attempt ; a chance. Cf., No GO. 



To HAVE A GO AT, verb. phr. 
to make essay of anything: : as a 
man in a fight, a shot at billiards, 
and (specifically) a woman. 

1836. C. DICKENS, Pickwick Papers 
(about 1827), p. 377 (ed. 1857). Wot do 
you think o' that for a GO? 

1877. Five Yeats' Penal Servitude, 
ch. iii., p. 221. I've twelve this GO. I did 
a lagging of seven, and was at the Gib. 
three out of it. 

1878. JAS. PAYN, By Proxy, ch. iii. 
' I would practise that in the seclusion of 
my own apartments,' observed Pennicuick; 
'and after a few GOES at it, I'll bet a 
guinea I'd shake the right stick out first.' 

1888. HAGGARD, Mr. Meeson's Will, 
ch. x. You have had seven GOES and I 
have only had six. 

6. (American), A success. 
To MAKE A GO OF iT = to bring 
things to a satisfactory termina- 
tion. 

1888. Harper's Mag., vol.'LX.'X.'VU., 
p. 689. Determination to make the venture 
a GO. 

7. (gaming). The last card at 
cribbage, or the last piece at 
dominoes. When a player is 
unable to follow the lead, he 
calls a GO ! 

8. (old.) A DANDY (q.v. for 
synonyms) ; a very heavy swell 
indeed, one in the extreme of 
fashion. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry 
[people's ed.], p. 35- In the parks, Tom 
was THE GO among the GOES. 

Verb (American political). I. 
To vote ; to be in favour of. Cf. , 
Go FOR. 

2. (colloquial). To succeed ; 
to achieve. Cf., Go DOWN. 

1866. Public Opinion, 13 Jan., p. 51, 
c. i. His London-street railway scheme 
didn't GO. 



Go. 



161 



Go. 



1870. H. D. TRAILL, 'On the 
Watch.' Sat. Songs, p. 22. Eh, waddyer 
say ? Don't it GO ? Ho, yes ! my right 
honnerble friend. It's GO and GO over 
the left, it's GO with a hook at the end. 

3. (colloquial). To wager; to 
risk. Hence to stand treat ; to 
afford. 

1768. GOLDSMITH, Good Natnred 
Man, Act iii. Men that would GO forty 
guineas on a game of cribbage. 

1876 BESANT AND RICE, Golden 
Butterfly, Prologue ii. The very dice 
on the counter with which the bar-keeper 
used to GO the miners for drinks. 

1877. S. L. CLEMENS (M. Twain), 
Life on the Mississippi, ch. xliii., p. 390. 
There's one thing in this world which a 
ptrson won't take in pine if he can GO 
walnut ; and won't take in walnut if he 
can GO mahogany. . . . That's a coffin. 

c. 1882. Comic Song, ' The West End 
Boys,' verse 3. Another bitter I really 
can't GO. 

1887. World, 20 Apr., p. 8. While 
making up his mind, apparently whether 
he would GO ' three ' or ' Nap.' 

4. (racing). To ride to 
hounds. 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, From Post 
to Finish, p. 219. There would be far too 
many there who had seen Gerald Rocking- 
ham GO with the York and Ainstey not to 
at once know that he and Jim Forrest 
were identical. 

5. (colloquial). To be preg- 
nant. 

1561-1626. BACON, (quoted by Dr. 
Johnson). Women GO commonly nine 
months, the cow and ewe about six 
months. 

1601. SHAKSPEARE, Henry VIII., 
iv., i. Great bellied women that had not 
half a week to GO. 

Go DOWN, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). i. To be accepted, 
received, or swallowed ; to WASH 
(</.*). 

1609. DEKKER, Lanthorne and 
Candle-Light, in wks. (Grosart), III., 272. 
For the woorst hors-flesh (so it be cheape) 
does best GOE DOWNE with him. 

169. MASSINGER, City Madam, 
i., i. But now I fear it will be spent in 
poultry ; Butcher's - meat will not GO 
DOWN. 



1663. PEPYS, Diary, g Nov. The 
present clergy will never heartily GO 
DOWN with the generality of the commons 
of England. 

1742. FIELDING, Joseph Andrews, 
bk. II., ch. xvii. 'O ho ! you are a pretty 
traveller,' cries the host, 'and not know 

the Levant ! you must not talk of 

these things with me , you must not tip us 
the traveller it won't GO here. 1 

1748. SMOLLETT, Rod. Random, ch. 
xxi. He . . . shook his head, and 
beginning with his usual exclamation 
said, ' That won't GO DOWN with me.' 

1885. W. E. NORRIS, Adrian Vidal, 
ch. vii. In fashion or out of fashion, they 
always pay and always GO DOWN with the 
public. 

2. (University). To be under 
discipline ; to be rusticated. 

1863. H. KINGSLEY, Austin Elliot, 
i., 179. How dare you say 'deuce in 
my presence? You can GO DOWN, my 
Lord. 

3. (common). To become 
bankrupt. Also, TO GO UNDER. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 19. Some 
one had certainly GONE DOWN. 

To GO DUE NORTH, verb. phr. 
(obsolete). To go bankrupt. 
[That is, to go to White-cross 
Street Prison, once situate in 
north London]. See QUISBY. 

TO GO ON THE DUB, verb, 
phr. (old). To go house-break- 
ing ; to pick locks. See DUB. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew. Going upon the DUB, c. Breaking 
a House with picklocks. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

To GO TO THE DOGS, verb. 
t>hr. (colloquial). To go to ruin. 
T-i the Dutch proverb ' Toe 
$j toe de dogs ' = money gone, 
credit gone too.] See DEMNI- 
TION BOW-WOWS. 

1857. A. TROLLOPE, Three Clerks, 
ch. i. The service, he said, would GO 
TO THE DOGS, and might do for anything 
he cared and he did not mind h w soon, 
II 



Go. 



162 



Go. 



1863. H. KINGSLEY, Austin Elliot, 
i, 179. < ' Got a second ! bah ! The 

University is going to the ' ' Deuce ! ' 

suggested Lord Charles, who was afraid of 
something worse. ' DOGS, Sir, DOGS ! 

c. 1879. Broadside Ballad, 'Old 
CloV My line of business is played out, 

it's GOING TO THE DOGS. 

TO GO OFF ON THE EAR, 

verb. phr. (American). To get 
angry ; to fly into a tantrum. 
See NAB THE RUST. 

To GO FOR, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). i. To attempt ; to 
tackle ; to resolve upon ; to MAKE 
FOR(^.Z>.). 

1871. JOHN HAY, Jim Bludso. He 
see'd his duty, a dead-sure thing And he 
WENT FOR it thar and then. 

1890. Athentzum, 22 Mar., p. 366, 
c. i. The authors have spared neither 
their creatures nor the reader one iota ; 
whenever an unpleasant effect was obtain- 
able, they straightway seem to have GONE 
FOR it with unflinching zest. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, 
p. 221. Some men had GONE FOR half a 
dozen, others for two or three, and very 
few for a single. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger's 
Siveetheart, p. 118. We are strong, my 
boy, strong now, and are GOING IN FOR 
the slugging of books also, as well as the 
immorality of trade. 

2. (colloquial). To attack 
with violence and directness, 
whether manually or with the 
tongue. 

1871. Morning Advertiser, 2 Feb., 
'A curtain lecture.' On ... arrival home 
the derelict husband is to be GONE FOR in 
the most approved style of the late lamented 
Mrs. Caudle. 

1883. JAMES PAYN, Thicker than 
Water, ch. xxxvii. There were occasions 
. . . when Charley could hardly help 
GOING FOR the legs of that lofty philosopher, 
for higher he could not hit him. 

1889. Polytechnic Magazine, 24 Oct., 
p. 261. He WENT FOR the jam tarts 
unmercifully. 

1889. Star, 24 Aug., p. 4, c. 2. As 
the enlightened tailor still declined to pay 
the blackmail one of the anti-machinists 
WENT FOR him with a chopper. 

1892. Tit Bits, 19 Mar., p. 424, c. 
i. So it comes to much the same thing, 



with the exception that you cannot indulge 
in the sad delight of GOING FOR Master 
Bertie sometimes as you might do were he 
a member of your own household. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 123. " Well mate, GO FOR 
HIM, and we'll keep the cops off till you 
settle his hash." 

3. (colloquial). To support ; 
to favour ; to vote for. 

4. (theatrical). To criticise ; 
specifically, to run down. [An 
extension of sense 2.] For syn- 
onyms, see RUN DOWN. 

To GO IN FOR (or AT), verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To enter for; 
to apply oneself to (e.g., TO GO 
IN FOR honours). Also to devote 
oneself to (e.g., to pay court); 
to take up (as a pastime, pursuit, 
hobby, or principle). Closely 
allied to GO FOR. 

1836. C. DICKENS, Pickwick Papers, 
p. 18 (ed. 1857). This advice was very 
like that which bystanders invariably give 
to the smallest boy in a street fight ; namely, 
' Go IN, and win ' : an admirable thing to 
recommend, if you only know how to 
doit. 

1849. DICKENS, David Copperfield. 
ch. xviii., p. 162. Sometimes I GO IN AT 
the butcher madly, and cut my knuckles 
open against his face. 

1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend, 

iii., 3. Go IN FOR money Money's the 

article. 

1869. WHYTE MELVILLE, M. or N , 
p. 31. Long before he had reached his 
uncle's house, he had made up his mind to 
GO IN, as he called it, FOR Miss Bruce, 
morally confident of winning, yet troubled 
with certain chilling misgivings, as fearing 
that this time he had really fallen in love. 

1870. Agricultural Jour., Feb. Men 
who COIN FOR bathing, running, etc. 

1872. BESANT AND RICE, My Little 
Girl (in Once a Week, 14 Dec., p. 508). 
He had, after a laborious and meritorious 
career at Aberdeen, GONE IN FOR Scotch 
mission work in Constantinople. 

1873. Miss BROUGHTON, Nancy, ch. 
xlv. His cheeks are flushed ; he is laugh- 
ing loudly, and GOING IN heavily FOR the 
champagne. 



Go. 



163 



Go. 



1883. JAMES PAYN, Thicker than 
Water, ch. xx. This is very nice, but I 
do wonder, Mrs. Tidman, that you never 
GO IN FOR curries. 

1890. H. D. TKAILL, 'A Noble 
Watchword,' Sat. Songs, p. 58. To GO IN 
solid for the cause how noble ! (though, 
'tis true, We must hope at next election 
that you'll GO IN liquid, too). 

To GO IN UNTO, verb. phr. 
( Biblical ). To have sexual 
intercourse with. For synonyms, 
see GREENS and RIDE. 

1892. Bible, Gen. xxx. 3. Behold my 
maid Bilhah, GO IN UNTO her. 

To GO IT, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To act with vigour and 
daring ; to advocate or speak 
strongly ; to live freely. Also to 

GO IT BLIND, FAST, BALD- 
HEADED, STRONG, etc. Cf., 

DASH. 

1689 (in ARBER, Eng, Garner, vol. 
VII., p. 365). When these had shared 
her cargo, they parted company : the 
French with their shares WENT IT for 
Petty Guavas in the Grand Gustaphus. 

1821. EGAN, 7'om and Jerry 
[people's ed.], p. 67. Logic, under the 
domino, had been GOING IT on a few of 
his friends with much humour. 

Ibid., p. 22. To GO IT, where's a place 
like London? 

1837. R. H. BARHAM, The Ingoldsby 
Legends (Ed. 1862), p. 375. For of this 
be assured, if you GO IT TOO FAST, you'll 
be' dished 'like Sir Guy. 

1846-48. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, 
vol. I., ch. 26. 'He's GOING IT PRETTY 
FAST," said the clerk. 

1849. DICKENS, David Copperfield, 
ch. 6. I say young Copperfield, you're 
GOING IT. 

1841. Dow, Sermons, vol. I., p. 176. I 
would have you understand, my dear 
hearers, that I have no objection to some 
of the sons and daughters of the earth 
GOING IT, while they are young, provided 
they don't GO IT TOO STRONG. 

1864. Eraser's Mag., Aug., p. 54. 
But what if that O, brave heart ? Art thou 
a labourer ? Labour on, Art thou a poet ? 
Go IT STRONG. 



1880. MiLLiKEN.in Punch's Almanack 
Apr. Nobby togs, high jinks, and lots o* 
lotion, That s the style to GO IT, I've a 
notion. 

Intj. (common). Keep at 
it ! Keep it up ! a general (some- 
times ironical) expression of 
encouragement. Also GO IT YE 

GRIPPLES, CRUTCHES ARE CHEAP ! 

(or NEWGATE'S ON FIRE) ; GO IT, 

MY TULIP J GO IT MY GAY AND 

FESTIVE cuss ! (Artemus Ward) ; 
or (American) GO IT BOOTS ! GO 

IT RAGS ! I'LL HOLD YOUR 

BONNET ! G'LANG ! (usually to a 
man making the pace on foot or 
horseback.) For similar expres- 
sions see MOTHER. Fr., hardi! 

1840. THACKERAY, Cox's Diary. 
Come along this way, ma'am ! Go IT, YE 
CRIPPLES ! 

1854. THACKERAY, The Rose and 
the Ring, p. 92. ' Go IT, old boy ! ' cried 
the impetuous Smith. 

1868. Miss BRADDON, Trail of the 
Serpent, bk. I., ch. iii. Three cheers for 
red ! Go IT GO IT, red ! 

1890. Tit Bits, i Mar., p. 325. ' Not 
for Joe "... came from a once popular 
song. So did GO IT, YOU CRIPPLES. 

To GO OUT, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To fall into disuse. 

1841. Punch, vol. I., p. 113. 
Pockets, ... to use the flippant idiom of 
the day, are GOING OUT. 

To GO OVER, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). I. To desert from one 
side to another; specifically 
(clerical) to join the Church of 
Rome ; to VERT (q.v.). 

1861. THACKERAY, Lovel the 
Widwer, ch. ii. I remember Pye, of 
Maudlin, just before he WENT OVER, was 
perpetually in Miss Prior's back parlour 
with little books, pictures, medals, etc. 

1878. Miss BRADDON, Open Verdict, 
ch. vi. Mr. Dulcimer is a horrid person 
to tell you such stories ; and after this, I 
shouldn't be at all surprised at his GOING 
OVER to Rome. 

2. (colloquial). To die ; i.e., 
to GO OVER TO join the majority. 
Also tO GO OFF. TO GO OFF 



Go. 



164 



Go. 



THE HOOKS, TO GO UNDER, TO 

GO ALOFT, and TO GO UP. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far West, 
p. 4. 'A sight, marm, this coon's GONE 
OVER.' Ibid., p. 3. Them three's all GONE 
UNDER. 

3. (thieves') To attack, rifle, 
and rob. 

1889. Referee, 2 June. A few who 
had . . . GONE OVER the landlord, left 
him skinned. 

To GO OFF, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). i. To take place ; to 
occur. 

1866. MRS. GASKELL, Wives and 
Daughters, ch. xiv. The wedding WENT 
OFF much as such affairs do. 

2. (colloquial). To be disposed 
of (as goods on sale, or a woman 
in marriage). 

1835. DICKENS, Sketches by Boz, 

E. 208. Miss M alder ton was as well 
nown as the lion on the top of 
. Northumberland House, and had an equal 
chance of GOING OFF. 

3. (colloquial). To deteriorate 
(as fish by keeping, or a woman 
with year's). 

1883. Pall Mall Gazette, 16 Apr., 
p. 3, c. 2 Shotover rather WENT OFF in 
the Autumn, and her Leger preparation 
was not altogether satisfactory. 

1892. Tit-Bits, 17 Sept., p. 422, c. 3. 
To those . . . who are apt to GO OFF 
COLOUR, so to speak, through injudicious 
indulgence at table. 

4. (colloquial). To die. For 
synonyms, see ALOFT. 

1606. SHAKSPEARE, Macbeth, v., 7. 
I would the friends we miss were safe 
arrived : Some must GO OFF. 

1836. C. DICKENS, Pickwick Papers 
(about 1827), p. 368 (Ed. 1857). She's 
dtad, God bless her, and thank him for it ! 
was seized with a fit and WENT OFF. 

Go AS YOU PLEASE, adj. phr. 
(athletics'). Applied to races 
where the competitors can run, 
walk, or rest at will : e.g. , in 
time and distance races. Hence, 
general freedom of action. 



1884. Punch, n Oct. ' 'Arry at a 
Political Picnic.' 'Twas regular GO AS 

YOU PLEASE. 

To GO TO BATH, PUTNEY, 
etc. See BATH, BLAZES, HELL, 
HALIFAX, etc. 

To GO THROUGH, verb. phr. 
(American). I. To rob : i.e. , to 
turn inside out. Hence, to 
master violently and completely ; 
to make an end of. 

1872. Evening Standard, 21 June. 
The roughs would work their will, and, in 
their own phrase, GO THROUGH New 
York pretty effectually. 

1888. Baltimore Sun. He was gar- 
rotted, and the two robbers WENT THROUGH 
him before he could reach the spot. 

Ibid. It was a grand sight to see 
F.irnsworth GO THROUGH him ; he did not 
leave him a single leg to stand upon. 

2. (venery). To possess a 
woman. For synonyms, see 
RIDE. 

To GO UP (or UNDER), verb. 
phr. (colloquial). i. To go to 
wreck and ruin ; to become 
bankrupt ; to disappear from 
society. Also, to die. For syn- 
onyms, see DEADBROKE. 

1864. The Index, June. Soon after 
the blockade, many thought we should GO 
UP on the salt question. 

1879. JAS. PAYN, High Spirits {Find- 
ing His Level). Poor John Weybridge, 
Esq., became as friendless as penniless, and 
eventually WENT UNDER, and was heard 
of no more. 

1890. Pall Mall Gaz., 29 May, p. 5, 
c. i. He asks us further to state that the 
strike is completely at an end, the society 
having GONE UNDER. 

2. (colloquial). To die : Cf. 
Ger. : Tintergehen. For syn- 
onyms, see ALOFT. 

18(?). Hawkeye, The Iowa Chief, p. 
210. Poor Hawkeye felt, says one of his 
biographers, that his time had come, and 



Go. 



165 



Coaler's Coach. 



knowing that he must GO UNDER sooner or 
later, he determined to sell his life dearly. 
1849. RUXTON, Life in the far West, 
p. 2. Them three s all GONE UNDER. 

1888. Daily Inter. Ocean, Mar. 
All solemnly vowed to see that the mine 
should be worked solely for the benefit of 
the girl whether Jim lived or had GONE 
UNDER. 

To GO UP, verb. phr. 

(American). To die ; specifically 

to die by the rope. 

1867. HEP WORTH DIXON, New 
America, i., n. Unruly citizens are 
summarily hung on a cotton tree, and when 
any question is asked about them, the 
answer is briefly given, GONE UP i.e., 
gone up the cotton tree, or suspended from 
one of its branches. 

To GO UP FOR, verb. phr. 
(common). To enter for (as an 
examination). 

1889. Globe, 12 Oct., p. i, c. 4 
Always, it seems likely, there will be men 
GOING UP FOR examinations ; and every 
now and again, no doubt, there will be 
among them a wily ' Heathen Pass-ee ' like 
him of whom Mr. Hilton speaks who had 
cribs up his sleeve, and notes on his cuff. 

To GO WITH, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). I. To agree or 
harmonise with. See GEE. 

2. (colloquial). To share the 
sexual embrace. For synonyms, 
see GREENS and RIDE. 

ON THE GO, adv. phr. (collo- 
. quial). On the move ; restlessly 
active. 

No GO, adv. phr. (colloquial). 
Of no use ; not to be done ; a 
complete failure. Frequently 
contracted to N.G. 

1835. DICKENS, Sketches by Boz, 
p. 18. I know something about this here 
family, and my opinion is, it's NO GO. 

1853. Diogenes, vol. II., p. 271. 
Dear master, don't think of me ill ; If I 
say as the lists are NO GO You've in 
future no fear for the till ! 

1884. Notes and Queries, 6 S., x., 
p; 125. There were on the occasion so 
many rounds and so many NO GOES. 



1888. Puck's Library, May, p. 12. 
He thought a moment, and shook his 
head. It's NO GO was the dictum. 

1890. Punch, 22 Feb., p. 85. He's 
a long-winded lot, is Buchanan, slops over 
tremenjous, he dp ; . . . But cackle and 
splutter ain't swimming ; so Robert, my 
nabs, it's NO GO. 

1892. J. MCCARTHY and MRS. 
CAMPBELL-PRAED, Ladies' Gallery, p. 84. 
She sees it is NO GO with the baronet. 

A LITTLE BIT ON THE GO, 

adv. phr. (old). Slightly ine- 
briated ; elevated. For syno- 
nyms, see DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry 
[peoples' ed.], p. 58. The Corinthian had 
made him A LITTLE BIT ON THE GO. 

GOAD, subs, (old). i. A decoy at 
auctions ; a horse-chaunter ; a 
PETER FUNK (q.v.). [One who 
goads (i.e., sends up) the prices.] 

1609. DEKKER, Lanthorne and 
Candle light, ch. x. They that stand by 
and conycatche the chapman either with 
out-bidding, false praises, etc., are called 
GOADES. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. GOADS, those that wheedle in 
Chapmen for Horse-coursers, 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
2. in. pi. (old). False dice. 
CHAPMAN. For synonyms, see 
IVORIES. 

GOAL, subs. (Winchester College). 
i. At football the boy who 
stands at the centre of each end, 
acting as umpire ; and (2) the 
score of three points made when 
the ball is kicked between his 
legs, or over his head without his 
touching it. 

1870. MANSFIELD, School -Life at 
Winchester College, p. 138. Midway 
between each of the two ends of the line 
was stationed another boy, as umpire 
(GOAL, he was called) who stood with his 
legs wide apart, and a gown rolled up at 
each foot : if the ball was kicked directly 
over his head, or between his legs, without 
his touching it, it was a GOAL, and scored 
three for the party that kicked it. 

COALER'S COACH. See GAOLER'S 
COACH. 



Go-along. 



1 66 



Goatish. 



GO-ALONG, subs, (thieves'). A 
fool; a FLAT {q.v. ). " For syn- 
onyms, jwBuFFLE and CABBAGE 
HEAD. 

1851-61. II. MAYHEW, Lend. Lab. 
and Lonl. Poor, vol. I., p. 460. In four 
days my adviser left me ; he had no more 
use for me. I was a flat. He had me for 
a GO-ALONG, to cry his things for him. 

1853. Household Words, No. 183. 
s.v. ' Slang." 

GOAT, subs, (old). A lecher; a 

MOLROWER (q.V.}. 

1599. SHAKSPEARE, Henry V., iv., 
4. Thou damn'd and luxurious mountain 

GOAT. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s.v. GOAT, a Lecher, a very 
lascivious person. 

1717. CIBP.ER, Nonjuror,\., i. At the 
tea-table I have seen the impudent GOAT 
most lusciously sip off her leavings. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

Verb (common). I. To thrash. 
For synonyms, see TAN. 

1864. Derby Day, p. 70. You 
won't GOAT me ? Not this journey. 

TO PLAY THE GOAT. verb. 
phr. (common). i. To play the 
fool; to MONKEY (q.v.). Fr., 
faire Voiseaii. 

2. (venery). To lead a fast 
life ; to be given to MOLROWING 



To RIDE THE GOAT, verb. phr. 
(common). To be initiated into 
a secret society. [From the vul- 
gar error that a live goat, for 
candidates to ride, is one of the 
standing properties of a Masonic 
lodge.] 

GOATEE, subs, (colloquial). A 
tufted beard on the point of 
a shaven chin. [In imitation 
of the tuft of hair on a goat's 
chin.] 



ENGLISH SYNONYMS (for a 
beard generally). Charley; im- 
perial; Newgate (or sweep's) frill, 
or fringe. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Une 
marmouse (thieves') ; un im~ 
periale (colloquial: formerly une 
royale] ; un bouc or une bouquine 
( = a goatee) ; bacchantes (thieves' : 
the beard, but more especially the 
whiskers, from b&che = awning). 

GERMAN SYNONYM. Soken 
(from the Hebrew ; also = old 
man). 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Bosco 
di berlo (the forest on the face) ; 
settoaa ( = full of hair) ; spinola 
( = thorny). 

SPANISH SYNONYM. Bosque 
( = wood). 

1869. Orchestra, 18 June. Working 
carpenters with a straggling GOATEE on 
the chin, and a mass of unkempt hair on 
the head. 



GOATER, subs. (American thieves'). 
Dress. For synonyms, set 
TOGS. 

GOAT - HOUSE, sttbs. (old). A 
brothel. [From GOAT, sufis., 
sense i.] For synonyms, see 
NANNY-SHOP. 



GOATISH, adj. (old, now recog- 
nised). Lecherous. [As vicing 
with a goat in lust.] Hence 
GOATISHLY, adv., and GOATISH- 
NESS, subs. 

1622. MASSINGER AND DEKKER, 
Virgin Martyr, iii., i. Give your chaste 
body up to the embraces of GOATISH lust. 

1605. SHAKSPEARE, King Lear, \. 
2. An admirable evasion of whoremaster- 
man, to lay his GOATISH disposition to 
tho charge of a star. 



Goat-milker. 



167 



Gobi 



GOAT-MILKER, subs, (venery). i. 
A prostitute. For synonyms, see 
BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

2. (venery). The female ptt- 
dendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 



GOAT'S JIG (or GIGG), subs. (old). 
Copulation. For synonyms, 
see GREENS. GROSE. 

GO-AWAY, subs. (American thieves'). 
A railway-train. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
The knuck was working the GOAWAYS at 
Jersey City. 

GOB (or GOBBETT), suds, (old: now 
vulgar), i. A portion ; a mouth- 
ful ; a morsel. Also a gulp ; a 
BOLT ( q.v. ). [Latin, gob = 
mouth : Old Fr., gob = 3. gulp.] 
Skeat says the shorter form GOB 
is rare. 

1380. WYCLIFFE, Trans, of Bible. 
Thei token the relifis of broken GOBETIS 
tweh e cofres full. 

1542. Apop. of Erasmus [1878], p.' 14. 
A bodie thinketh hymself well emende in 
his substaunce and riches, to whom hath 
happened some good GUBBE of money, 
and maketh a great whinyng if he haue 
had any losse of the same. 

1599. NASHE, Lenten Stuffe* in wks., 
v.. 261. And thrust him downe his 
pudding house at a GOBBE. 

1605. CHAPMAN, All Fools, Act in., 
p. 62 (Plays, 1874). Ri. And do you 
think He'll swallow down the gudgeon? 
Go, O my life, It were a gross GOB would 
not down with him. 

1611, L. BARRY, Ram. Alley, I., i. 
That little land he gave, Throate the 
lawyer swallowed at one GOB For less 
than half the worth. 

1689. SEI.DEN, Table - Talk, p. 50 
(Arber's ed.). The meaning of the Law 
was, that so much should be taken from a 
man, such a GOBBET sliced off, that yet 
notwithstanding he might live in the same 
Rank and Condition he lived in before ; 
but now they Fine men ten times more 
than they are worth. 



1690. B. E., Diet. Canting Crew, 
s.v. GOB(C) . . . also a Bit or Morsel ; 
hence GOBBETS, now more in use for little 
Bits. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.). GOB or GOBBET (s.) a piece just big 
enough, or fit to be put into the mouih at 
once. 

1774. FOOTE, Cozeners, ii., 2. The 
venison was over-roasted, and stunk but 
Doctor Dewlap twisted down such GOBS 
of fat. 

1785. GROSE, Vrdg. Tongue, s.v. 

1816. JOHNSON, Eng. Diet. (i2th 
ed.) GOB, a small quantity, a low word. 

1869. S. L. CLEMENS (M. Twain) 
Innocents Abroad, ch. vii. It is pushed 
out into the sea on the end of a flat, 
narrow strip of land, and is suggestive of 
a GOB of mud on the end of a shingle. 



2. (common). The mouth. 
SHUT YOUR GOB = an injunction 
to silence. See GAB. A SPANK 
ON THE GOB = a blow on the 
mouth. GOB-FULL OF CLARET 
= a bleeding at the mouth. GIFT 
OF THE GAB or GOB, see GAB. 
For synonyms see POTATO-TRAP. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, 
s.v. GOB, the Mouth. 

1819. T. MOORE, Tom Crib's Me* 
morial, p. 18. Home-hits in the bread* 
basket, clicks in the GOB. Ibid, p. 30. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's 
Log, ch. i. ' All right all right,' I then 
exclaimed, as I thrust half a doubled-up 
muffin into my GOB. 

1851-61. H r MAYHEW, Lond. Lab, 
and Lond. Poor, vol. I., p. 469. I 
managed somehow to turn my GOB (mouth) 
round and gnawed it away. 

3. (common), A mouthful of 
spittle. Fr., un copeau ; It,, 
smalzo di cavio ( = gutter-butter). 
For synonyms, see SIXPENCES. 

Verb, (common). i. To 
swallow in mouthfuls ; to gulp 
down. Also GOBBLE (q. v.). 



Gobble. 



168 



Gob -box. 



1692. L/ESTRANGE Fables. Down 
comes a kite powdering upon them, and 
GOBBETS up both together. 

2. (common). To expec- 
torate. Fr. , glavioter (popular) ; 
molarder. 



GOBBIE, subs, (nautical). A coast- 
guardsman ; whence GOBBIE- 
SHIP, a man of war engaged in 
the preventive service. 

1890. Scotsman, 4 Aug. When a 
meeting takes place the men indulge in a 
protracted yarn and a draw of the pipe. 
The session involves a considerable amount 
of expectoration all round, whereby our 
friends come to be known as CORBIES, and 
in process of time the term came to be 
applied to the ships engaged in the 
service. Ibid. There are no fewer than 
three other GOBBIE SHIPS in the channel 
fleet, each of which carries a considerable 
number of coastguardsmen putting in 
their annual period of drill. 

GOBBLE (or GOBBLE UP), verb. 
(vulgar). To swallow hastily or 
greedily ; hence (American) to 
seize, capture, or appropriate. 
Also GOB : e.g., GOB that ! 

1602. DEKKER, Satiro-mastix, in 
wks. (1873) i. 233. They will come to 
GOBBLE downe Plummes. 

1728. SWIFT, Misc. Poems, in wks. 
(1824) xiv. 232. The time too precious 
now to waste, The supper GOBBLED up in 
haste. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. cvi. Summoned in such a plaguy 
hurry from his dinner, which he had been 
fain to GOBBLE up like a cannibal. 

1846-48. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, 

vol. i, ch. v. Mr. Jos helped 

Rebecca to everything on the table, and 
himself GOBBLED and drank a great deal. 

1860. THACKERAY, Philip, ch. xiii. 
There was a wily old monkey who thrust 
the cat's paw out, and proposed to GOBBLE 
up the smoking prize. 



GOBBLE-PRICK, subs. (old). A 
lecherous woman. GROSE. 



GOBBLER, subs. (old). i. A duck. 
HARMAN. 

2. (colloquial). A turkey 
cock; a BUBBLY - JOCK (q.v.). 
Also GOBBLE-COCK. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1851. HOOPER, Widow Rugby's 
Husband, etc., p. 94. Her face was as red 
as a GOBBLER'S snout. 

3. (vulgar). The mouth. For 
synonyms, see POTATO-TRAP. 

4. (colloquial). A greedy 
eater. For synonyms, see 
STODGER. 



GOBBLING, 5fo. (vulgar). Gorging. 

1846-48. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, 
ch. iii., vol. i. His mouth was full of it, 
his face quite red with the delightful 
exercise of GOBBLING ' Mother, it's as 
good as my own curries in India. 1 

GO-BETWEEN, subs, (old). A pimp 
or bawd. Now an intermediary 
of any kind. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives of 
Windsor, Act ii., sc. 2. Even as you 
came into me, her assistant, or GO-BE- 
TWEEN, parted from me. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GOBLIN, subs. (old). A sovereign. 
For synonyms, see CANARY. 

1887. W. E. HENLEY, Villon's 
Straight Tip. Your merry GOBLINS soon 
stravag : Boose and the blowens cop the 
lot. 

GOB-BOX, subs, (common). The 
mouth. [From GOB, subs.~\ For 
synonyms, see POTATO-TRAP. 

1773. FORSTER, Goldsmith, Bk. IV M 
ch. xiv., p. 414 (sth ed.). Shuter pro- 
testing in his vehement odd way that ' the 
boy could patter,' and ' use the GOB-BOX as 
quick and smart as any of them.' 

1819. SCOTT, Bride of Lammermoor, 
ch. i. Your characters .... made too 
much use of the GOB-BOX ; they patter 
too much. 



Gob -stick. 



169 



God. 



GOB-STICK, subs, (old). A silver 
table-spoon. ( In use in Am erica = 
either spoon or fork) ; (nautical), 
a horn or wooden spoon. 

1789. PARKER, Life's Painter, s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

Goe-STRiNG(or GAB-STRING), subs. 
(old). A bridle. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GO-BY, subs, (colloquial). The 
act of passing ; an evasion ; a 
deception. To GIVE ONE THE 
co-BY = to cut; to leave in the 
lurch. C/., CUT (subs, sense 2, 
verb, sense 2). 

1876. HINDLEY, Cheap Jack, p. 214. 
When we came in contact with a travelling 
bookseller we could GIVE HIM THE GO-BY 
with our library. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
ch. ix. She GAVE us THE GO-BY in the 
fog as I wish from the heart that ye 
had done yoursel' ! 

1892. Salas Journal, 25 June, p. 194. 
Now can you understand how it is possible, 
and, I think, expedient, TO GIVE politics 
THE GO-BY, so far as one conveniently can ? 

GO-BY-THE-GROUND, subs. (old). 
A dumpy man or woman. 
GROSE. 

GOD, subs, (common). I. in. //., 
the occupants of the gallery at a 
theatre. [Said to have been first 
used by Garrick because they 
were seated on high, and close to 
the sky-painted ceiling.] Fr., 
paradis = gallery ; also poulailler. 
In feminine, GODDESS. 

1772. CUMBERLAND, Fashionable 
Lover [probably spoken by printer's devil]. 
'Tis odds For one poor devil to face so 
many GODS. 

1812. J. and H. SMITH, Rejected 
Addresses, p. 128 [ed. 1869]. Each one 
shilling GOD within reach of a nod is, And 
plain are the charms of each gallery 
GODDESS. 



1843. THACKERAY, Irish Sketch 
Book, ch. xxvii. The gallery was quite 
full . . . one young GOD, between the 
acts, favoured the public with a song. 

1872. M. E. BRADUON, De.id Sea 
Fruit, ch. xiv. There come occasionally 
actors and actresses of higher repute, 
eager to gather new laurels in these un- 
trodden regions, and not ill pleased to 
find themselves received with noisy rap- 
ture and outspoken admiration by the 
ruder GODS and homelier GODDESSES of a 
threepenny gallery. 

1890. Globe, 7 Apr., p. 2, c. 2. The 
GODS, or a portion of them, hooted and 
hissed while the National Anthem was 
being performed. 

1892. SYDNEY WATSON, Wops the 
Waif, iii., iv. It is only when we have 
paid our ' tuppence ' and ascended to the 
gallery just under the roof, known as 
'among the GODS,' that we begin to under- 
stand what is meant by the lowest classes, 
the 'great unwashed.' 

1892. Pall Mall Gaz., 20 Apr., p. 2, 
c. 3. If theatre managers would only 
give the public the chance of as good a 
seat as can be got at the Trocadero or the 
Pavilion, at the same price, and manage 
the ventilation of their nouses so as not to 
bake the GODS and freeze the ' pitites,' I 
venture to think that fewer people would 
go to the music halls. 

2. in. pi (printers'). The 
quadrats used in JEFFING (q.v.\ 

3. (tailors 1 ). A block pattern. 
GODS OF CLOTH = ' classical 
tailors.' GROSE. See SNIP. 

4. (Eton). A boy in the sixth 
form. 

1881. PASCOE, Life in our Public 
Schools. A GOD at Eton is probably in a 
more exalted position, and receives more 
reverence than will ever afterwards fall to 
his lot. 

A SIGHT FOR THE GODS, phr. 
(common). A matter of wonder- 
ment. 

1892. HUME N is BET, Bushranger's 
Sweetheart, p. 31. Stringy Bark prepared 
to greet his native land, was A SIGHT FOR 
THE GODS to behold with satisfaction, and 
men to view from afar with awed respect. 



Goddess Diana. 



170 



Go- caster. 



GOD PAYS ! phr. (old). An 
expression at one time much in 
the mouth of disbanded soldiers 
and sailors (who assumed a right 
to live on the public charity). 
The modern form is, ' If I don't 
pay you, God Almighty will.' 

1605. London Prodical, ii., 3. But 
there be some that bear a soldier's form, 
That swear by him they never think upon ; 
Go swaggering up and down, from house 
to house, Crying, GOD PAYS. 

1630. TAYLOR, in wks. These 
feather'd fidlers sing, and leape, and play, 
The begger takes delight, and GOD DOTH 
PAY. 

1640. BEN JONSON, Epigr. XII. 
To every cause he meets, this voice he 
brays, His only answer is to all, GOD PAYS. 

GOD (or BRAMAH) KNOWS : I 
DON'T, phr. ( common ). An 
emphatic rejoinder. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Come Iddio vel dica., a phrase, as wee 
would say : GOD HIMSELFE TELL YOU, I 

CANNOT. 

GODDESS DIANA, subs. phr. (rhy- 
ming). A sixpence. For syn- 
onyms, see TANNER. 

1864. The Press, 12 Nov. GODDESS 
DIANA is the rhyming equivalent for a 
tanner which signifies sixpence. 

GOD- DOT I intj. (old). An oath. 
By God ! [A contraction of ' God 
wot ! '] For synonyms, see 
OATHS. 

GODFATHER, subs. (old). A jury- 
man. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, Merchant of 
Venice, iv. i. In christ'ning thou shalt 
have two GODFATHERS, Had I been judge, 
thou should 'st have had ten more, To 
bring thee to the gallows, not the font. 

1616. BEN JONSON, Devils An Ass, 
v., 5. Not I, If you be such a one, sir, I 
will leave you To your GOD-FATHERS IN 
LAW. Let twelve men work. 

1638. RANDOLPH, Muses Looking 
Glass, ix. 251. I had rather zee him 
remitted to the jail, and have his twelve 
GODVATHERS, good men and true, con- 
demn him to the gallows. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



To STAND GODFATHER, verb, 
phr. (common). To pay the 
reckoning. [Godfathers being the 
objects of much solicitude and 
expectation.] 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicutn, s.v. 
Will you stand GODFATHER, and we will 
take care of the brat? = repay you another 
time. 

GO-DOWN, subs. (old). i. A 
draught of liquor ; a GO (q.v. ). 

2. (American). See quot. 

1881. New York Times, 18 Dec., 

quoted in ' N and Q' 6, S.v. 65. Go Down. 

A cutting in the bank of a stream for 

enabling animals to cross or to get to water. 

GOD- PERM IT, subs, (old). A stage 
coach. [Which was advertised 
to start Deo volente,~\ 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
GOD-PERMIT, a stage coach, from 
that affectation of piety, frequently to 
be met with in advertisements of stage 
coaches or waggons, where most of their 
undertakings are promised with if GOD 

PERMIT, or GOD WILLING. 

1825. Modern Flash Diet., s.v. 

GOD'S-MERCY, subs. (old). Ham 
(or bacon) and eggs. ['There's 
nothing in the house but God's 
mercy': at one time a common 
answer in country inns to travel 
lers in quest of provant. ] 

GOD'S-PENNY, subs. (old). An 
earnest penny. 

1690. B. E., Diet, of the Cant. 
Crew, s v. GOD'S PENNY, Earnest Money, 
to Bind a Bargain. 

1765. PERCY, Reliques, ' The heir of 
Linne.' Then John he did him to record 
draw, And John he cast him a GOD'S 

PENNIE. 

Go- EASTER, stibs. (American cow- 
boys'). A portmanteau ; a 
PETER (q.v.\ [Because seldom 
used except in going city- or 
east-wards.] 



Goer. 



171 



Goldarned. 



GOER, subs, (old). i. The foot. 
For synonyms, see CREEPERS. 

1557-1634. CHAPMAN, in Encyclop. 
Diet. A double mantle, cast Athwart his 
shoulders,his faire GOERS grac't With fitted 
shoes. 

2. (colloquial). An expert or 
adept ; as in drawing, talking, 
riding ; one well up to his (or her) 
work : generally with an adjec- 
tive, as e.g., A FAST (or HELL OF 
A) GOER = a good goer. 

1857. G. A. LAWRENCE, Guy Living- 
stone, ch. xx. Nevertheless, she was 
always deeply engaged, and generally to 
the best GOERS in the room. 

GOFF. See MRS. GOFF. 

GOGGLES, subs, (common). i. A 
goggle-eyed person. Also GOG- 
GLER. 

1647. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER, 
Knight of Malta, v., 2. Do you stare, 

GOGGLES ? 

1891. CLARK RUSSELL, Ocean 
Tragedy, p. 51. No use sending blind 
man aloft, GOGGLERS like myself, worse 
luck. 

2. in. pi. (common). The 
eyes : specifically those with a 
constrained or rolling stare ; also 
GOGGLE-EYES. GOGGLE-EYED = 
squint-eyed. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes, 
Strabo, he that looketh a squint or is 
OOGGLE-EIDE. 

c. 1746. ROBERTSON OF STRUAN, 
Poems, 69. An eagle of a dwarfish sue, 
With crooked Beak, and GOGLE EYES. 

1691-1763. BYROM, Dissection of a 
Beau's Head. Those muscles, in English, 
wherewith a man ogles, When on a fair 
lady he fixes his GOGGLES. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg, Tongue, s.v, 
1821. PIERCE EGAN, Life in Lon- 
don, p. 241. Rolling your GOGGLES about 
after all manner of people. 

3. in. pi. (common). Spec- 
tacles. For synonyms, see BAR- 
NACLES, 



Verb (colloquial). GOGGLE = 
to roll the eyes ; to stare. 

1577-87. HOLINSHED, Description of 
Ireland, ch. i. They G~OGGLE with their 
eyes hither and thither. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
GOGGLE, to stare. 

1820-37. WALPOLE, Letters, iii., 174. 
He GOGGLED his eyes. 

1880. MILI.IKIN, Punch's Almanack, 
April. Scissors ! don't they GOGGLE and 
look blue. 

GOGMAGOG, subs, (colloquial). A 
goblin ; a monster ; a frightful 
apparition. HOOD. 

GOING, subs, (colloquial). The 
condition of a road, a piece of 
ground, a cinder-path: i.e., the 
accommodation for travelling. 
E.g., THE GOING is bad. 

1872. Morning Post, 19 Aug. The 
Lamb's starting in the Frankfort steeple- 
chase will depend upon the state of the 
giound, and, avoiding Wiesbaden, where 
the GOING is indifferent. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 23 Nov. 
The GOING was wonderfully clean for the 
time of year. 

GOINGS-ON, subs, (colloquial). 
Behaviour ; proceedings ; con- 
duct. Cf., CARRYINGS ON. 

1845. DOUGLAS JERROLD, Mrs. 
Caudle, Lecture viii. Pretty place it 
must be where they don't admit women. 
Nice GOINGS-ON, I daresay, Mr. Caudle. 

1870. Lloyds Newspaper, n Sept. 
' Review.' Elsie is beloved by Gawth- 
waite, the village schoolmaster, and he 
takes her to task for her GOINGS-ON. 

GOLDARNED(orGOLDURNED, GOL- 

DASTED, etc.), adj. (common). 
A mild form of oath : = BLAMED 
(q.v.) ; BLOODY (g.v.). See 
OATHS. As intj., GOLDARN 
IT ! etc. 

1888. American Humorist. 'Bill, 
are you hurt ? ' ' Yes, by gum ; I've broke 
my GOLDARNED neck.' 



Gold-backed ' Un. ' 72 Goldfinch's Nest 



1888. Cincinnati Enquirer. Finally, 
Deacon Spalding broke out with : ' That 
GOLDASTED St. Louis mugwump has 
made suckers of us again with his cracks 
about coming into the league. I move we 
adjourn.' 

GOLD-BACKED 'UN, subs, (common). 
A louse. Also GREY-BACKED 
'UN. For synonyms, ACHATES. 

GOLD BUG, subs. phr. (American). 
A man of wealth and (inferen- 
tially) distinction ; a millionaire. 
See BUG. 

1888. St. Louis Globe Democrat, 
Mar. 5. I do not think the feeling against 
silver is anything like as strong as it was. 
Of course, a few GOLD BUGS might fight 
him. 

GOLD-DROPPER, subs. (old). A 
sharper. An old-time worker of 
the confidence trick. See quots. 
Also GOLD-FINDER. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 
GOLD - DROPPERS, Sweetners, Cheats, 
Sharpers. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.). GOLD-FINDER (s.) ... also a cant 
name for a cheat, who under the pretence 
of finding a piece of money, and inviting 
a by-stander to partake of a treat, etc., out 
of it, endeavours to get him to play at 
cards, dice, etc., in order to win or cheat 
him of his money ; they are sometimes 
also called guinea-droppers. 

1785. GKOSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
Sharpers who drop a piece of gold, which 
they pick up in the presence of some un- 
experienced person, for whom the trap is 
laid, this they pretend to have found, and, 
as he saw them pick it up, they invite him 
to a public house to partake of it : when 
there, two or three of their comrades 
drop in, as if by accident, and propose 
cards, or some other game, when they 
seldom fail of stripping their prey. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GOLDEN-CREAM, .r&fo. (thieves'). 
Rum. 

1889. CLARKSON and RICHARDSON, 
Police, p. 321, s.v. 

GOLD- END MAN, subs. phr. (old). 
-An itinerant jeweller ; a buyer 
of old gold and silver. [GOLD- 
END = a broken piece of 



jewellery.] Also GOLDSMITH'S 
APPRENTICE. See Eastward Hoe. 

1610. JONSON, Alchemist, ii., i. I 
know him not, he looks like a GOLD-END 

MAN. 

1622. FLETCHER, Beggars Bush, Hi., 
i. Hig. Have ye any ENDS OF GOLD or 
silver ? 

GOLDEN GREASE, subs. phr. (old). 
A fee ; also a bribe. For 
synonyms, see PALM OIL. 

GOLDFINCH, subs. (old). i. A 
well-to-do man ; a WARM 'UN 
(q.v.). 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, 
s.v. GOLDFINCH, c. He that has alwaies 
a Purse or Cod of Gold in his Fob. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1852. JUDSON, Mysteries, etc., of 
New York, ch. iv. ' Was the swell a GOLD- 
FINCH ? ' ' He wasn't nothin' else. Got a 
clean ten times ten out of him." 

Ibid. ' It'll be a great lay, if the 
game's fat. Is it a GOLDFINCH V 'Fifty 
thousand, hard dust.' 

2. (common). A guinea ; a 
sovereign. For synonyms, see 
CANARY. 

1700. FARQUHAR, Constant Couple, 
ii., 2. Sir H. Don't you love singing- 
birds, madam? Angel (aside). That's an 
odd question for a lover ; (aloud) Yes, sir. 
Sir H. Why, then, madam, here is a nest 
of the prettiest GOLDFINCHES that ever 
chirped in a cage. 

1822. SCOTT, The Fortunes of Nigel, 
ch. iv. Put your monies aside, my lord ; 
it is not well to be seen with such GOLD- 
FINCHES chirping about one in the lodgings 
of London. 

1826. BUCKSTONE, Luke the Labourer, 
iii., 4. Good-night, noble captain. Pipe 
all hands at five o'clock, for I've a day's 
work to do. We'll jig it to-morrow, to the 

piping of GOLD-FINCHES. 

1834. W. H. AINSWORTH, Rook-wood, 
p. 101 (ed. 1864). Here's a handful of 
GOLDFINCHES ready to fly. 

GOLDFINCH'S NEST, subs, (venery). 
The female pudendum. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

1827. The Merry Muses, p. 70. And 
soon laid his hand on the GOLDFINCH'S 
NEST. 



Gold-finder. 



i73 



Golgotha. 



GOLD-FINDER, subs. (old). i. An 
' emptier of privies. Also TOM- 
TURD-MAN ; GONG-MAN ; and 
NIGHT-MAN. Fr., un fouille- 
merde ; un fifi. Also passer la 
jambe a Jules = \.Q upset MRS. 
JONES, i.c., to empty the privy 
tub. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie, Ga- 
douard, a GOULD-FINDER, Jakes-farmer. 

1635. FELTHAM, Resolves. As our 
GOLDFINDERS . . . . in the night and 
darkness thrive on stench and excrements. 

1653. MIDDLETON, Sp. Gipsy, ii., 
2, p. 398 (Mermaid series). And if his 
acres, being sold for a maravedii a turf for 
larks in cages, cannot fill this pocket, give 

'em tO GOLDFINDERS. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabolario, s.v. 

1704. Gentleman Instructed, p. 445 
(1732). We will commit the further discus- 
sion of the poet to a committee cf GOLD- 
FINDERS, or a club of rake-kennels. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v 

2. (old). A thief; a GOLD- 
DROPPER (q.v.). 

GOLD HAT -BAND, subs, (old 
University). A nobleman under- 
graduate ; a TUFT (q.v.). 

1628. EARLE, Microcosmography. 
. His companion is ordinarily some stale 
fellow that has been notorious for an ingle 
to GOLD HATBANDS, whom hee admires at 
first, afterwards scornes. 

1889. Gentleman's Mag., June, p. 
598. Noblemen at the universities, since 
known as ' tufts,' because of the gold tuft 
or tas>sle to their cap, were then known as 

GOLD HATBANDS. 



GOLDIE-LOCKS, subs. (old). A 
flaxen-haired woman. GOLDY- 
LOCKED = golden haired. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes. 
Biondella .... a golden-lockt wench, as 
we say a GOLDILOCKS. 

1605. BEN JONSON, The Fox, i., i. 
Thence it fled forth, and made quick trans- 
migration to GOLDY-LOCKED Euphorbus. 



GOLD MINE, subs. phr. (common). 
A profitable investment ; a 
store of wealth, material or 
intellectual. 

1664. H. PEACHAM, Worth of a 
Penny, in Arber's Garner, vol. VI., p. 
249. Some men . . . when they have 
met with a GOLD MINE, so brood over and 
watch it, day and night, that it is im- 
possible for Charity to be regarded, 
Virtue rewarded, or Necessity relieved. 

1330 TENNYSON, Dream of Fair 
Women, p. 274. GOLD-MINES of thought 
to lift the hidden ore. 

1882. THORMANBY, Famous Racing 
Men, p. 81. Mendicant . . . ran nowhere 
in the Cup ... in reality she was destined 
to prove a GOLD MINE, for ten years after- 
wards she brought her owner ^80,000 
through her famous son, Beadsman. 

1883. Sat. Review, 28 Apr. 533/2. 
His victory proved a GOLD MINE to the 
professional bookmakers. 

1887. FROUDE, Eng. in West Indies, 
ch. v. Every one was at law with his 
neighbour, and the.island was a GOLD MINE 
to the Attorney-General. 



GOLGOTHA, subs. (old). i. The 
Dons' gallery at Cambridge ; also 
applied to a certain part of the 
theatre at Oxford. [That is, ' the 
place of skulls ': Cf., Luke xxiii. 
33, and Matthew xxvii. 33, 
whence the pun : Dons being the 
heads of houses. ] 

1730. JAS. MILLER, Humours of 
Oxford, Act ii., p. 23 (2nd ed.). Sirrah, 
I'll have you put in the black-book, 
rusticated, expelled I'll have you coram 
nobis at GOLGOTHA, where you'll be 
bedevilled, Muck-worm, you will. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg, Tongue, s.v. 

1791. G. HUDDESFORD, Salmagundi, 
(Note on, p. 150). GOLGOTHA, ' The 
place of a Scull,' a name ludicrously 
affixed to the Place in which the Heads of 
Colleges assemble. 

1808. J. T. CONYBEARE in C. K. 
Sharpe's Correspondence (1888), i., 324. 
The subject then, of the ensuing section 
is Oxford News ... we will begin by 
GOLGOTHA . . . Cole has already obtained 
the Headship of Exeter, and Mr. Griffiths 
... is to have that of University. 



Golgotha. 



Goll. 



2. (common). Hence, a hat. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Battle 
of the Nile (rhyming, i.e., a 
TILE (q.v.) ; bell-topper; billy- 
cock ; beaver ; box-hat ; cady ; 
canister cap ; castor ; chummy ; 
cathedral ; chimney ; chimney- 
pot ; cock ; colleger ; cock-and- 
pinch ; cowshooter ; David ; deer- 
stalker ; digger's delight ; fantail ; 
felt ; Gibus ; gomer (Winchester); 
goss ; moab ; molocher ; mortar- 
board ; muffin-cap ; mushroom ; 
nab ; nap ; napper ; pantile ; 
pimple - cover ; pill-box ; plug- 
hat ; pot ; shako ; shovel ; sleep- 
less hat ; sou'wester ; stove-pipe ; 
strawer ; thatch ; tile ; topper ; 
truck ; upper-crust ; wash-pot ; 
wee-jee ; wide-awake. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
accordeon (popular : an opera 
hat) ; une ardoise ( = a tile) ; une 
b&che (thieves' : also an awning) ; 
une biscope or viscope (vulgar) ; 
un blocka^is (vulgar : a shako) ; 
un bloumard or une bloume 
(popular) ; une boite d comes (a 
horn case; i.e., a cover for a 
cuckold) ; tm Bolivar (from the 
hero of 1820) ; un boisseau (also 
= a bushel) ; un bosselard (school- 
boys' : from bossele = bruised or 
dented) ; un cabas (popular : = 
old hat ; also basket or bag) ; un 
cadratin (printers' a stove-pipe) ; 
un caloquet (thieves') ; cambriau, 
cambrieux, or cambriot (popular) ; 
un capft (from old French, capel} ; 
une capsule (popular = a percussion 
cap) ; un carbeluche galice (a silk 
hat); une casque ( = helmet); un 
chapska( = o. shako); unecheminee 
(popular : = chimney - pot) ; une 
corniche (popular : = a cornice) ; 
un couvercle (popular : = pot- 
lid) ; une couvtante ; un 
couvre - amour (military) ; un 



cylindre ( = a stove-pipe) ; un Des 
foux (from the maker's name) ; 
un epicephale (students' : from the 
Greek) ; un gadin (an old hat) ; 
un galure or galurin (popular) ; 
un Garibaldi; un Gibus (from the 
inventor's name) ; un lampion 
(thieves' : = grease - pot) ; un 
loubion (thieves') ; tin marquin 
(thieves') ; un monument (popu- 
lar) ; un nid d'hirondelle ; un 
niolle (thieves' : an old hat) ; un 
tromblon (obsolete = blunder- 
buss) ; un tubard, tube, or tube a 
haute pression ( = a cylinder) ; 
une tuile ( = a tile) ; une tuyau 
de po$le ( = a stove-pipe). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Bre 
(Viennese) ; Kowe (from the 
Hebrew, koiva}. 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Bufala; 
baccha or biffacha ; cresta or 
cristiana ( = a cruet) ; fttngo 
( = mushroom). 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Tejado 
or techo ( = tiled roof). 

GOLIATH, subs, (colloquial). I. A 
big man. 

2. A man of mark among the 
PHILISTINES (?.#.). [Mr. Swin- 
burne described the late Matthew 
Arnold as 'David, the son of 
GOLIATH.'] 

GOLL, subs. (old). The hand ; 
usually in. pi. See BUNCH OF 
FIVES and DADDLE. 

1601. B. JONSON, Poetaster, v., 
Bring the whoreson detracting slaves to 
the bar, do ; make them hold vp their 
spread GOLLS. 

1602. DEKKER, Satiro-Mastrix, in 
wks. (1873), i., 203. Holde up thy hand : 
I ha scene the day thou didbt not scorne 
to holde vp thy GOLLES. 

1611. MIDDLETON, Roaring Girl, 
Act i. This is the GOLL shall do't. 



Gollop. 



Gone. 



1620. MIDDLE-TON, Chaste Maid, 
ii., a. What their GOLLS can clutch. 

1634. S. ROWLEY, Noble Souldier, 
Act ii., Sc. 2. Bal. Saist thou me so ? 
give me thy GOLL, thou art a noble girle. 

1659. MASSINGER, City Madam, 
iv., i. All the gamesters are ambitious 
to shake the golden GOLLS of worshipful 
master Luke. 

1661. T. MIDDLETON, Mayor of 
Quinborough, v., i. Down with his 
GOLLS, I charge you. 

1672. DRYDEN, The Assignation, 
Act iii., Sc. i. A simperer at lower end 
of a table, With mighty GOLLS, rough- 
grained, and red with starching. 

1787. GROSE, Prov. Glossary, 
GOLL, a hand or fist ; give me thy GOLL. 

1803. C. K. SHARPE in Correspon- 
dence (1888), i., 179. Miss Reid with her 
silk coat and greasie GOLLS. 

GOLLOP, verb, (common). To 
swallow greedily ; to gulp. For 
synonyms, see WOLF. 

GOLLUMPUS, subs. (old). A 
clumsy lout. GROSE. 

GOLLY I A contraction of BY 
GOLLY ! (q.v.). 

1890. R. L. STEVENSON, The Wrong 
Box, p. 275. GOLLY ! what a paper ! 

GOLOPTIOUS (or GOLOPSHUS), adj. 
(common). Splendid; fine; de- 
licious ; luscious. 

1888. Snorting Life, ^ Dec. It 
would better scoop the situation if it were 
described as GOLOPTIOUS. 

GOLOSHES, subs, (colloquial). 
India rubber overshoes. But see 
GROSE. 

1796. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
GOLOSHES, i.e. Goliah's shoes. Large 
leathern clogs, worn by invalids over their 
ordinary shoes. 

GOMBEEN-MAN, subs. (Irish). A 
usurer ; a money-lender ; a shark- 
ing middleman. For synonyms, 

see SlXTY-PER-CENT. 



GOMER, s^^bs. (Winchester College). 
i. A large pewter dish used in 
college. 

2. (Winchester College). A 
new hat. See GOLGOTHA. 

GOMMY, subs. (old). I. A dandy. 
Fr., gommeux. [Anglo-Saxon, 
guma = a. man; a person: gamme 
=gommer= gammer. Cf., Go- 
MUS. Beaumont has GOM = a 
man.] 

2. (colloquial). See quot. 

1883. Weekly Dispatch, n Mar., 
p. 7, c. 4. There has recently been 
considerable debate as to the meaning of 
the term GOMMIE. It is very simple. A 
COMMIE is one who calls Mr. Gladstone a 
G. O. M. [Grand Old Man], and thinks he 
has made a good joke. 

3. (colloquial). A fool. For 
synonyms, see BUFFLE and CAB- 
BAGE-HEAD. 

GOMUS, subs. (Irish). A fool. P'or 
synonyms, see BUFFLE and CAB- 
BAGE-HEAD. 

GONDOLA, subs. (American). i. A 
railway platform car, sideless or 
low-sided. Also a flat-bottomed 
boat. 

GONDOLA OF LONDON, subs. phr. 
(common). A hansom cab ; a 
SHOFUL (q.v.). [The description 
is Lord Beaconsfield's.] 

GONE, adj. (colloquial). I. Ruined; 
totally undone. Also, adv., 
an expression of completeness, 
e.g., GONE BEAVER, CORBIE, 
COON, GANDER, or GOOSE = a man 
or an event past praying for : Cf. , 
Go UP and Go DOWN. 

1604. SHAKSPEARE, Winter's Tale, 
iv., 3. He must know 'tis none of your 
daughter nor my sister ; we are GONE else. 



Goner. 



176 



Gonof. 



1843-4. HALIBURTON, Sam Slick in 
England, ch. xviii. If a bear comes after 
you, Sam, you must be up and doin', or 
it's a GONE GOOSE with you. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far West, 
p. 40. From that moment he was GONE 
BEAVER ; he felt queer, he said, all over. 

1857. Notes and Queries, 2 S. in., 
519. To call a person a GONE CORBIE, is 
only to say in other words, it's all up with 
him. 

1862. CLOUGH, Poems. He had been 
into the schools ; plucked almost ; all but 
a GONE-COON. 

1863. C. READE, Hard Cash, I., 178. 
I shall meet her again next week ; will you 
come? Any friend of mine is welcome. 
Wish me joy, old fellow ; I'm a GONE 

COON. 

GONE O^,adv.phr. (colloquial). 
Enamoured of; infatuated 
with; MASHED ON (q.v.); SWEET 
ON (q.v. ). Generally in contempt. 
Fr. , aimer comme ses petit s boy aux. 
For synonyms, see SWEET ON. 

1887. JOHN STRANGE WINTER, That 
Imp, p. 44. He was a fine fellow, and 
no mistake. And was GONE ON Lady 
Lorrimor ! 

1890. Illustrated Bits, 29 Mar. p. 10, 
c. 3. He must have been terribly GONE ON 
this woman. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
113. 'Poor chap, he's very far GONE,' 
thought Jack. 

1892. MII.LIKEN, 'Any Ballads, 
p. 31. I'll eat my old boots if she isn't 
dead GONE ON. 

GONER, (or GONES, GONUS, or 
GONEY), subs. (American). I. A 
fool; a simpleton. Also GAUNEY 
(q.v.). For synonyms, see BUFFLE 
or CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1857. Punch, 31 Jan. But the lark's 
when a GONEY up with us they shut, As 
ain't up to our lurks, our flash patter, and 
smut. 

1860. HALiBURTON.SrtwS/zc/fc, 'The 
Season Ticket,' No. X. ' It's only grief, 
Nabby dear, my heart is broke.' ' Is 
that all, you GONEY ? ' says she, ' it's lucky 
your precious neck ain't broke.' 

a. 1871 . The Dartmouth, vol. iv. One 

day I heard a Senior call a fellow a GONUS. 

' GONUS,' echoed I, 'what does that mean?' 

Oh,' said he, ' you're a Freshman, and 



don't understand. A stupid fellow, a dolt, 
a boot-jack, an ignoramus, is here called 
a GONUS. All Freshmen,' he continued 
gravely, ' are GONUSES.' 

2. (colloquial). A person past 
recovery, utterly ruined, or done 
for in any way. 

1876. S. L. CLEMENS (Mark Twain), 
Tom Sawyer, p. 99. ' Yes, but she ain't 
dead ; and, what's more, she's getting 
better too.' ' All right, you wait and see. 
She's a GONER, just as dead sure as Muff 
Potter's a GONER.' 

1888. Cincinnati Enquirer. Fortu- 
nately, she did not see me, or else I should 
have been a GONER. 

1891. N. GOULD. Double Event, 
p. 261. ' Make a noise or follow me, and 
you're a GONER,' said Smirk. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 212. A few more of her 
meddlings and she's a GONER, that's what 
she is. 

GONG (or GONG-HOUSE), subs. 
(old). A privy. For synonyms, 
see MRS. JONES. 

1383. CHAUCER, Canterbury Tales. 
'The Parsons Tale' [Riverside Ed. 
(1880)], ii., 241. Thise fool wommen, 
that mowe be likned to a commune GONG, 
whereas men purgen hire ordure. 

GONG-FARMER (or GONG-MAN), 
subs. (old). An emptier of cess- 
pools ; a GOLD-FINDER (q.V. ). 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of IVordes . 
Curadestri, a iakes, GOONG, or doong 
farmer. 

GONOF (or GONNOF or GONOPH or 
GNOF), subs, (thieves'). i. A 
thief; specifically a pick-pocket, 
and especially an adept. [From 
the Hebrew. Ancient English ; 
a legacy from the old time Jews. 
It came into use again with the 
moderns who employ it commonly. 
Cf.,onov = \.\i\&f'm Ex. xxii, 2 and 
6, viz. , ' if the gonov be found. '] 
See THIEVES. 

1857. DICKENS, On Duty with In- 
spector Field, in ' Reprinted Pieces' p. 256. 
If the smallest GONOPH about town were 
crouching at the bottom of a classic bath 
Inspector Field would nose him. 



Gonophing. 



i77 



Good. 



1849. Morning Chronicle, 2 Nov. 
A burglar would not condescend to sit 
among pickpockets. My informant has 
known a housebreaker to say with a sneer, 
when requested to sit down with the 
GONOFFS, ' No, no, I may be a thief, but at 
least I'm a respectable one.' 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, Vol. III., p. 325. The 
GONAFF (a Hebrew word signifying a 
young thief, probably learnt from the Jew 
' fences ' in the neighbourhood). 

1852. JUDSON, Myst., etc., of New 
York, ch. vii, He next assumed his 
present profession, and became a GNOF or 
pickpocket. 

1876. HINDLEY, Adventures of a 
Cheap Jack, p. 146. Oh, you tief ! you 
cheat ! you GONNOF ! 

1889. Referee, 12 May. GONOPHS 
.... were frequent in Tattersall's on 
Friday. 

1889. C. T. CLARKSON and J. HALL 
RICHARDSON, Police, p. 321. Boys who 
creep into houses . . . Young gunnefls 
or GONOPHS. 

2. (old). A bumpkin ; a churl; 
a clumsy hand ; a shameless 
simpleton. 

1383. CHAUCER, Canterbury Tales, 
3187-8. Whilom there was, dwelling in 
Oxenforde, A rich GNOF, that gertes helde 
to borde. 

c. 1547. SONG (quoted by Hotten). 
The country GNOFFES, Hob, Dick, and 
Hick, With clubbes and clouted shoon, 
Shall fill up Dussin Dale With slaughtered 
bodies soone. 

Verb (old). To wheedle ; to 
cheat ; to steal. 

GONOPHING, subs, (thieves'). 
Picking pockets. 

1857. _ DICKENS, The Detective Police, 
in ' Reprinted Pieces,' p. 240. From the 
swell mob, we diverge to the kindred topics 
of cracksmen, fences .... designing 
young people who go out GONOPHING, 
and other 'schools.' 

Goo BY, subs. (common). A 
simpleton ; a blockhead. For 
synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. 



1892. Ally Slower, 19 Mar., p. 90, c. 3. 
Why, you old GOOBY, Mister Sloper will 
pay us twice as much for the ducks. 

GOOD I subs, (printers'). An ab- 
breviation of ' Good Night ! ' 

Adj. (colloquial). Respon- 
sible ; solvent ; principally now 
with ' for ' ; e.g., He is GOOD for 
any amount. Also, expert. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, Merchant of 
Venice, i., 3. Antonio is a GOOD man : 
my meaning in saying that he is a GOOD 
man, is to have you understand me that he 
is sufficient. 

1824. REYNOLDS, Peter Corcoran, 91 
GOOD with both hands and only ten stone 
four. 

GOOD GOODS, in. //., subs. phr.. 
(sporting). Something worth 
trying for ; a success. In the 
superlative, 'best' GOODS. 

1886. Sporting Times, 17 July, 1/4. 
He was a nice young man for a small tea 
party, And rather GOOD GOODS at a 
Sunday-school treat. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
39. There s Warner in ' Drink ' ; now, 
that's business, GOOD GOODS and no 
error; 

BIT (or PIECE) OF GOODS, 
subs. phr. (common). A woman. 
For synonyms, see PETTICOAT. 

GOOD OLD . . . adj. phr. 
(popular). A familiar address, 
derisive or affectionate according 
to circumstances. See quots. 

1891. Pall Mall Gaz., 16 Sept., p. 6, 
c. i. It was Mephisto's greeting to 
Mary Anne in Marguerite's garden 
' GOOD OLD MARY ANNE ! ' ! ! ! 

Ibid. The famous medico craned 
his neck out of the window, and, sniffing 
in the smoke, cried, GOOD OLD LONDON. 
This is a true story. 

Ibid., 17 Sept. Mr. Chirgwin . . . 
rouses mirth by ... exclaiming GOOD 
OLD SPOT ! as he discloses the large white 
ace of diamonds painted ever his right 
optic. 

12 



Good. 



178 



Good fellow. 



3. Texas Sif tings, 15 Sept. The 
are going Saturday afternoon, and 



1892. CHEVALIER ' The Little 
Nipper.' 'E calls 'is mother ' Sally, 1 And 
'is father ' GOOD OLD pally,' And "e only 
stands about so 'igh, that s all ! 

To FEEL GOOD, verb. phr. 
(American). To be jolly; com- 
fortable ; ' in form ' ; to be on 
perfect terms with oneself. 

1887. PROCTOR [in Knowledge, 
i Dec., rj. 29]. A friend of mine tells me 
a proposition was once invitingly made to 
him which, to say the least, involved no 
virtuous self-abnegation, and he was urged 
to accept it by the plea that it would 
make him FEEL GOOD. 

1888. 

saloons ar _ 

the men FEEL pretty GOOD before they come 
abroad. 

To BE IN ONE'S GOOD BOOKS, 
verb. phr. (colloquial). To be in 
favour ; in good opinion. Con- 
versely, To BE IN ONE'S BAD 
BOOKS = To be in disfavour. See 
BOOK. 

GOOD AT IT (or AT THE GAME), 
adj. phr. (venery). An expert 
bedfellow, male or female. 

TO HAVE A GOOD SWIM. See 

SWIM. 
FOR GOOD (or FOR GOOD AND 

ALL), adv. phr. (colloquial). 
Completely ; entirely ; finally. 

1673. WYCHERLEY, Gent. Dane. 
Master, ii., in wks. (1713), 276. If I 
went, I would go FOR GOOD AND ALL. 

1693. CONGREVE, Old Batchelor, 
Act i., Sc. 3. Sharp. Faith, e'en give 
her over FOR GOOD AND ALL : you can have 
no hopes of getting her for a Mistress. 

1875. OUIDA, Signa, vol. II., ch. 
v., p. 66. So the child went up to the 
hills with Bruno, and stayed there FOR 

GOOD AND ALL. 

GOOD AS WHEAT. See WHEAT. 

GOOD AS EVER PISSED, phr. 

(venery). A qualification of ex- 
treme excellence, 



1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., ii., 260. And 
she is AS GOOD for the game AS E'ER 
PISSED. 

GOOD AS A PLAY. See PLAY. 

GOOD AS GOLD, adv. phr. (col- 
loquial). Very good ; usually of 
children. 

AS GOOD AS THEY MAKE 'EM. 

See MAKE 'EM. 

GOOD-BYE, JOHN ! phr. (Amer- 
ican). It's no go ; all's U.P. 

GOOD CESS, subs. phr. (Irish). 
Good luck. (Probably an ab- 
breviation of 'success.') BAD 
CESS = the reverse. 

1845. BUCKSTONE, Green Bushes, 
i., i. AIL Bravo, Paddy! GOOD CESS 
to ye, Paddy ! Hurrah ! 

GOODFELLOW (or GOOD BOY, or 
GOOD MAN), subs. (old). i. A 
roysterer ; a boon companion. 

1570. ASCHAM, Scholemaster. Sir 
Roger had been a GOOD FELLOW in his 
youth. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, 
s.v. GOOD FELLOW, a Pot companion or 
Friend of the Bottle. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
A word of various imports, according to 
the place where it is spoken ; in the city 
it means a rich man ; at Hockley in the 
Hole, or St. Giles's, an expert boxer ; at 
a bagnio in Covent Garden, a vigorous 
fornicator ; at an alehouse or tavern, one 
who loves his pot or bottle : and some- 
times, though but rarely, a virtuous man. 

1822. SCOTT, Fortunes of Nigel, 
ch. xvii. Rattling Reginald Lowestoffe of 
the Temple I know him ; he is a GOOD 
BOY. 



2. (old). A thief. 
THIEVES. 



See 



1608. MIDDLE-TON, Trick to Catch 
the Old One, ii., i. Luc. Welcome, 
GOOD FELLOW. Host. He calls me thief at 
first sight. [Footnote in ' Mermaid Series ' 
Ed. GOOD FELLOW was then the cant term 
for a thief.] 



Good Girl. 



179 



Good Time. 



1870. Evening Standard, n Feb. 
'Police Report.' Police detective said 
that he believed the two prisoners were 
GOOD MEN. In reply to the magistrate he 
explained that he meant they were old 
thieves. 

GOOD GIRL (or GOOD ONE), adj. 
phr. (old). A wanton. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie. 
Gaultiere A whore, punke, drab, queane, 
gill, flirt, strumpet, cockatrice, mad wench, 
common hackney, GOOD ONE. 

GOODMAN, subs, (old). i. A 
gaoler ; a DUBSMAN (q.v.\ 

1721-2. WOODROW, History, ii., 636. 
The GOODMAN of the Tolbooth came to 
him in his chamber, and told him he might 
save his life, if he would sign the petition. 

2. (colloquial). The devil. 
For synonyms, see SKIPPER. 

GOODMAN -TURD, subs. (old). 
A contemptible fellow ; a BAD- 
EGG (q.v.). 
1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes. 

Donteta, an old worde for a shitten 

fellow, Or GOODMAN-TURDE. 

GOOD NIGHT! intj. phr. (general). 
A retort to an incredible 
statement or a delightful piece of 
news. See CARRY ME OUT ! 

GOOD-PEOPLE, subs, (old collo- 
quial). The fairies. 

1828. G. GRIFFIN, Collegians, ch. v. 
An nothin' shows itself now by night, 
neither spirits nor GOOD PEOPLE. 

1848. FORSTER, Oliver Goldsmith, 
bk. I., ch. i, p. 8 (5th ed.)- A small old 
parsonage house (supposed afterwards to 
be haunted by the fairies, or GOOD PEOPLE 
of the district). 

1891. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
p. 168. 'Did ever ye hear tell of the story 
of the Man and the GOOD PEOPLE ? ' by 
which he meant the fairies. 

GOOD (or GOOD OLD) SORT, subs, 
phr. (popular). A man of social 
and other parts. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger's 
Sweetheart, p. 149. Had we not better 
make a clean breast of it, and trust to his 
generosity ; he seems a GOOD SORT ? 



GOOD THING, subs. phr. (colloquial). 
Something worth having or 
backing ; a bon mot ; GOOD GOODS 
(q.v.). In racing a presumed 
CERT 



1844. Puck, p. 63. Here's to the 
GOOD THING whose neatness we prize. 

1884. Saturday Review, z Aug., 
p. 147, c. 2. The Goodwood Stakes was 
considered a GOOD THING for Florence, 
who has proved herself to be an extra- 
ordinary mare. 

1888. Sporting Life, 10 Dec. In a 
field of four, Livingstone, who was voted 
a GOOD THING, was served up a warm 
favourite. 

1891. Daily Telegraph, 21 Mar. It 
had been generally anticipated that this 
was a GOOD THING for Oxford. 

1892. Ally Sloper, 19 Mar., p. 90, 
c. 3. That them as trades in rags and 
bones Makes more than them as writes 

GOOD THINGS. 

GOOD TIME, subs. phr. (old). A 
carouse ; a friendly gathering ; an 
enjoyable bout at anything. 

TO HAVE A GOOD TIME, verb. 
phr. (old). To be fortunate or 
lucky ; to enjoy oneself; to make 
merry. See COCUM. 

1596. JONSON, Every Man in His 
Humour, i., 2. As not ten housewives 
pewter, again a GOOD TIME, shews more 
bright to the world than he ! [=some 
festival, ' when housewives are careful to 
set out their furniture to the best advan- 
tage. ' Note by Whalley , given in Cunning- 
ham's Gifford'sf onsen (1870)]. 

1863. A. TROLLOPE, Rachel Ray, 
ii., 6., 109. Eating cake and drinking 
currant wine, but not having, on the 
whole, what our American friends call a 
GOOD TIME of it. 

1864. _ YATES, Broken to Harness, 
ch. xxxviii. And what have you been 
doing ? Had a GOOD TIME ? 

1883. BRET HARTE, In the Car- 
quinez Woods, ch. ix. But we must keep 
it dark until after I marry Nellie, don't 
you see. Then we'll have a GOOD TIME 
all round, and I'll stand the drinks. 



Good 'un. 



1 80 



Goodyear. 



1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 14. My idea 

o fman's chief end was to enrich the world 
with things of beauty, and have a fairly 

OOD TIME myself while doing so. 

GOOD 'UN, subs. phr. (colloquial). 
I. A man, woman, or thing of 
decided and undoubted merit. 
Cf., GOOD-GIRL. 

1828-45. T. HOOD, Poems, vi., P' 
254 [ed. 1846]. A GOOD 'UN to look at but 
bad to go. 

1854. MARTIN and AYTOUN, Bon 
Gaultier Ballads. 'The Dirge of a 
Drinker.' Like a GOOD 'UN as he is. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
160. He's a real GOOD UN, and when his 
party plank the stuff down it's generally a 
moral. 

2. (colloquial). An expression 
of derisive unbelief: e.g., a lie. 
See WHOPPER. 

GOOD-WOOLED, adj. phr. 
(American). Of unflinching 
courage ; of the greatest merit ; 
thoroughly dependable. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

GOODY, subs, (popular). i. A 
matron : the correlative of GOOD- 
MAN = husband. (Used like 
AUNTIE, and MOTHER, and GAM- 
MER, in addressing or describing 
an inferior.) (A corruption of 
GOOD-WIFE). 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Mona, . . . Also a nickname for women 
as we say gammer, GOODIE, goodwife, 
such a one. 

1689. Accts. of the Churchwardens 
of Sprowston. Paid GOODY Crabbin 
for washing the surplis and church 
powrch, is. ^d. 

d. 1732. GAY. Swarm'd on a rotten 
stick the bees I spy'd Which erst I saw 
when GOODY Dopon dy'd. 

^.1745. SWIFT. Plain GOODY would 
no longer down: 'Twas Madam in her 
grogram gown. 

1802. BLOOMFIELD, Rural Tales, 
' Richard and Kate. 1 Come, GOODY, stop 
your humdrum wheel. 

1816. JOHNSON. Eng. Diet. s.v. A 
low term of civility used to mean persons. 



1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
' The Witches' Frolic.' Old GOODY Price, 
Had got something nice. 

Hence GOODYSHIP = 'ladyship.' 
1663. BUTLER, Hudibras, pt. i, c. 
3. The more shame for her GOODYSHIP, 
To give so near a friend the slip. 

2. (colloquial). A religious 
hypocrite, male or female ; the 
' unco guid ' of Burns. 

1836. KIDD, London Ambulator, 
p. 14. Clapham is celebrated for GOODIES 
ladies of a certain age, who not having 
succeeded in finessing for husbands, 
betake themselves to a religious life as a 
dernier resort. 

Hence GOODY - GOODYISM = 
sentimental piety. 

1892. Pall Mall Gaz., 23 Nov., p. 
3., c. i. The Christmas tale of adventure 
.... has perhaps cast off its element of 
GOODY-GOODYISM, but the general features 
and cast are as of old. 

3. generally in. pi. (colloquial). 
Sweetmeats; bon-bons; cakes 
and buns. 

1853. MAYHEW, Letters Left at a 
Pastrycook's. Propped up on each side 
with bags of oranges, cakes, and GOODIES. 

1855. H. A. MURRAY, Lands of the 
Slave and the Free, ch. xii. Adjourning 
from time to time to some cafe for the 
purpose of eating ices or sucking GOODIES. 

4. (American). The kernel of 
a nut. 

Adj. (colloquial). Well- 
meaning but petty ; officiously 

pious. Also GOODY-GOODY. 

1864. D. W. THOMPSON, Daydreams 
of a Schoolmaster, p. 230. I would 
rather they were not too good ; or GOODY. 
Let us have a little naughtiness, sprinkled 
in at intervals. 

1892. S. WATSON, Wops the Waif, 
p. 7. He knew well enough the whole of 
this enterprise had sprung from a GOODY- 
GOODY idea of ' doing something,' born of 
impulse and whim. 

GOODYEAR, subs. (old). The 
pox. (A corruption of gougeer, 
from gouge = a soldier's trull). 
For synonyms, see LADIES' 
FEVER. 

1605. SHAKSPEARE, Lear, v., 3. 
The GOODYEARS shall devour them. 



Gook. 



181 



Goose. 



GOOK, subs. (American). A low 
prostitute. For synonyms, see 
BARRACK HACK and TART. 

GOOSE, subs, (common). i. A 
tailor's smoothing iron. (Whose 
handle is shaped like the neck of 
the bird. ) Hence the old ditton, 
4 A taylor be he ever so poor is 
sure to have a goose at his fire. 
GROSE. Fr., un gendarme. 

1606. SHAKSPEARE, Macbeth, ii., 3. 
Come in, taylor ; here you may roast your 
GOOSE. 

1606. DEKKER, Newes from Hell, 
in Wks. (Grosart) ii., 114. Every man 
being armed with his sheeres and pressing 
Iron, which he calls there his GOOSE. 

1638. RANDOLPH. Hey for Honesty. 
. . . Tailor. Oh ! it is an age that, like 
the Ostrich, makes me feed on my own 
GOOSE. 

1703. WARD, London Spy, pt. xii., 
p. 276. He grew as hot as a Botcher's 
GOOSE. 

1748. T. DVCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.). GOOSE (s.) . . . also the large, 
heavy iron used bv taylors, to press clown 
their seams with when heated very hot. 

1766. KENRICK, Falstaff's Wedding, 
in., i. Although they had been hissing 
all the way like a tailor's GOOSE. 

1861. SALA, Twice Round the Clock, 
Noon, Par. 12. An Irish tailor who has 
had a slight dispute with his wife the 
night before, and has corporeally chas- 
tised her with a hot GOOSE a tailor's 
GOOSE, be it understood to the extent of 
all but fracturing her skull. 

1877. Five Years Penal Servitude, 
ch. ii., p. 89. On the return of the 
warders from their own breakfast, the 
tools scissors, sleeve-boards, irons, or 
GEESE are served out. 

2. (common). A simpleton : 
usually only of women. Also 
GOOSECAP (q.v.}. 

1591. SHAKSPEARE, Romeo and 
Juliet, ii., 4. Mercutio. Was I there with 
you for the GOOSE? Rom. Thou wast 
never with me that thou wast not for the 

GOOSE. 

1696. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 



3. (venery). Sw WINCHESTER 
GOOSE. 

4. (colloquial). A reprimand ; 
a WIGGING (g.v.)i </., verb t 
sense i. 

1865. G. F. BERKELEY, My Life 
etc., i., 276. On the adventure reaching 
the ears of the Duke of Wellington, the 
active experimentalist received con- 
siderable GOOSE. 

5. (printers'). See WAYZ 

GOOSE. 

6. (colloquial). A woman : 
whence, by implication, the 
sexual favour. 

Verb, (common). I. To hiss ; 
to condemn by hissing. Also TO 
GET THE GOOSE Or THE BIG 

BIRD (q.v.}. Among Fr. equi- 
valents are : appeler or siffler 
Azor ( = to whistle a dog, Azor 
being a common canine appella- 
tion) ; boire une goutte ( = to be 
goosed) ; attrapper ; reconduire ; 
se faire travailler ; empoigner ; 
ereinter ; polisonner ; egayer. 

1854. DICKENS, Hard Times, ch. vi. 
He was GOOSED last night, he was GOOSED 
the night before last, he was GOOSED to- 
day. 

1858. DICKENS Xmas Stories (Going 
into Sec.), p. 67 (House. Ed.). Which 
makes you grind your teeth at him to his 
face, and which can hardly hold vou from 
GOOSING him audible when he's going 
through his War-Dance. 

1873. Hornet, 29 Jan., p. 211, c. 2. 
Ferdin. Fact ! My soul is sick on't. 
GOOSED last night ; My salary docked. 

1875. T. FROST, Circus Life, p. 281. 
An artiste is GOOSED, or GETS THE GOOSE, 
when the spectators or auditors testify by 
sibillant sounds disapproval or dis- 
satisfaction. 

1886. Graphic, 10 Apr., p. 399. To 
be GOOSED, or, as it is sometimes phrased, 
'to get the big bird,' is occasionally a 
compliment to the actor's power of repre- 
senting villainy, but more often is dis- 
agreeably suggestive of a failure to please. 

2. (colloquial). To ruin; to 
spoil. See COOK ONE'S GOOSE. 



Goose. 



182 



Gooseberry. 



1888. CasselFs Saturday Journal, 
22 Dec., p. 301. We was pretty nigh 
GOOSED. 

3. (cobblers'). To mend 
boots by putting on a new front 
half-way up, and a new bottom ; 
elsewhere called FOOTING boots. 
Cf. t Fox. 

4. ( venery). To go wenching ; 
to WOMANIZE (q.V.). 

5. (venery). To possess a 
woman. 

GOOSE WITHOUT GRAVY, 
subs. phr. (nautical). A severe 
but bloodless blow. See WIPE. 

TO BE SOUND ON THE GOOSE. 
veib. phr. (American). Before 
the civil war, to be sound on the 
pro-slavery question : now, to 
be generally staunch on party 
matters ; to be politically 
orthodox. 

1857. Providence Journal, 18 June. 
To seek for political flaws is no use, His 
opponents will find he is SOUND ON THE 

GOOSE. 

1857. GLADSTONE, Kansas : or 
Squatter Life, p. 43. One of the boys, I 
reckon ? ALL RIGHT ON THE GOOSE, eh ? 
No highfaluten airs here, you know. 

1862. LOWELL, Biglow Papers, II. 
Northern religion works wal North, but 
it's ez suft ez spruce, compar'd to our'n for 
keepin' SOUND, sez she, UPON THE GOOSE. 

1875. American English ia Chamb, 
Journal, 25 Sept., p. 610. A man who 
can be depended upon by his party is said 

tO be SOUND ON THE GOOSE. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
22. He didn't appear quite so SOUND ON 
THE GOOSE as he ought to ha' done. 

TO FIND FAULT WITH A FAT 
GOOSE, verb. phr. (old). To 
grumble without rhyme or reason. 
B.E. (1690). 

TO KILL THE GOOSE FOR THE 
GOLDEN EGGS, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To grasp at more than 
is due ; to over-reach oneself. 
(From the Greek fable.) 



EVERYTHING is LOVELY AND 

THE GOOSE HANGS HIGH, phr. 

See EVERYTHING. 

HE'LL BE A MAN AMONG 
THE GEESE WHEN THE GANDER 
IS GONE, phr. (old). Ironical ; 
= ' He'll be a man before his 
mother. ' 

GO ! SHOE THE GOOSE, phr. 
(old). A retort, derisive or 
incredulous the modern 'To 
hell and pump thunder. ' 

UNABLE TO SAY BOH ! TO A 
GOOSE, phr. (colloquial). Said 
of a bashful person. GROSE. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
76. And now .... he can hardly SAY 

BOH TO A GOOSE. 

See also WILD-GOOSE CHASE. 

GOOSE - AND - DUCK, subs. phr. 
(rhyming). A fuck. 

GOOSE AND GRIDIRON, sub. phr. 
(political American). The 
American eagle, and the United 
States flag. See GRIDIRON. 

1891. Standard, 3 'Jan., p. 3, c. i. 
This is curious, considering the almost 
fetish-like veneration entertained by the 
modern American for his Standard, which, 
coupled with the national bird, tempted 
the Loyalists in the early days of the war 
to vent endless rude witticisms on the 

GOOSE AND GRIDIRON. 

GOOSEBERRY, subs, (common). i. 
A fool. For synonyms, see 
BUFFLE and CABBAGE-HEAD. 
[Perhaps from GOOSEBERRY 
FOOL ; as in GOLDSMITH'S Re- 
taliation : ' And by the same 
rule Magnanimous Goldsmith's a 
GOOSEBERRY FOOL.'J 

2. (common). A chaperon ; 
one who takes third place to save 
appearances or play propriety 
(y.v.) ; a DAISY- or GOOSEBERRY- 
PICKER. 



Gooseberry. 



Gooseberry-picker. 



3. (common). A marvellous 
tale; a MUNCHAUSEN (q.v.} ; a 
flim-flam. Also GIGANTIC, and 
GIANT GOOSBERRY. Hence 
GOOSEBERRY SEASON = the dull 
time of journalism, when the 
appearance of monstrous vege- 
tables, sea serpents, showers of 
frogs, and other portents is 
chronicled in default of news. 
Cf., SILLY SEASON (q.V.). 

1870. Figaro, 7.2 June. If we have 
no big GOOSEBERRIES this season, we have 
at least a big salmon. 

1871. Graphic, 22 Apr. Mr. Tupper 
excited a great deal of incredulity a few 
years ago by announcing in the prodigious 
GOOSBERRY SEASON that he had discovered 
an ancient Roman coin embedded in the 
heart of an oak tree. 

1885. ///. London News, 18 July, 
p. 50, c. 2. Amongst journalists there is 
popularly known what they call ' the GIANT 
GOOSEBERRY season," the meaning of which 
is, that when Parliament has risen and the 
Law Courts are shut and subjects on which 
to write become scarce, adventurous spirits 
are apt to discourse in their newspapers of 
fruit of abnormal size, and other natural 
prodigies, which, according to current 
banter, exist only in their own imagination. 

4. in. pi. (venery). The tes- 
ticles. For synonyms, see CODS. 

TO PLAY (or DO) GOOSEBERRY, 

verb. phr. (common). To play 
propriety ; also to sit third in a 
hansom. 

1877. HAWLEY SMART, Play or Pay. 
ch. vi. To take care of a pretty girl, . . . 
with a sister to DO GOOSEBERRY. 

1880. G. R. SIMS, Jeph, p. 8. 
Mamma always PLAYED GOOSEBERRY on 
these occasions. 

1883. Globe, 6 July, p. i, c. 5. 
They will be compelled in self-defence to 
have a shorthand writer present to PLAY 
GOOSEBERRY, and to be able to furnish 
proof that their discourse was innocent. 

1892. J. MCCARTHY and MRS. 
CAMPBELL-PRAED, Ladies' Gallery, p. 51. 
Well, I am not a good hand at PLAYING 
GOOSEBERRY, and I don't like spoiling 
sport. 



TO PLAY OLD GOOSEBERRY, 
verb. phr. (colloquial). To play 
the deuce ; to upset or spoil ; to 
throw everything into confusion ; 
but see quot. 1811. OLD GOOSE- 
BERRY = The devil (see SKIPPER). 
{See Notes and Queries, 2 S x., 
307, 376; xii., 336.] 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
GOOSEBERRY. He PLAYED UP OLD GOOSE- 
BERRY among them ; said of a person who, 
by force or threats, suddenly puts an end 
to a rict or disturbance. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 22. 

Will PLAY UP OLD GOOSEBERRY SOOn with 

them all. 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf. To 
PLAY UP GOOSEBERRY ; children romp- 
ing about the house or the parent rating 
them over. 

1837. Ingoldsby Legends. 'Bloudie 
Jacke of Shrewsberrie.' There's a pretty to- 
do ! All the people of Shrewsbury PLAY- 
ING OLD GOOSEBERRY With your choice bits 
of taste and virtu. 

1865. H. KINGSLEY, Hillyars and 
the Burtons, ch. Ixii. LAY ON LIKE OLD 

GOOSEBERRY. 

1892. Globe, 12 July, p. 2, c. 2. We 
all know his capacity for playing OLD 
GOOSBERRY with things in general. 



GOOSEBERRY - EYED, adj. (old). 
Grey-eyed. (Lex. Bal., 1811). 

GOOSEBERRY-GRINDER, .wfo. (old). 
The breech. For synonyms, see 
MONOCULAR EYEGLASS. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GOOSE- 
BERRY-GRINDER, s.v. Ask^ Bogey the 
GOOSEBERRY-GRINDER, ask mine a e. 

GOOSEBERRY LAY, subs. phr. 
(thieves'). Stealing linen from 
a line. 

GOOSEBERRY-PICKER, subs, (collo- 
quial). i. A person whose 
labour profits, and is credited to, 
another; a GHOST (q.v.}* 



Gooseberry-pudding. I 4 Goose's Gazette. 



2. (common). A chaperon. 
See GOOSEBERRY, subs, sense 2. 

1884. Cornhill Mag., Dec., p. 578. 
The good host experienced the sensations 
of being GOOSEBERRY-PICKER. He sat 
under a tree, ate, drank, smoked, and 
finally fell asleep, whilst the Prince and 
Ottilie explored the Gaulish city and the 
convent. 

GOOSEBERRY - PUDDING, subs. 
(rhyming). A woman. For 
synonyms, see PETTICOAT. 

GOOSEBERRY-WIG, subs. (old). A 
large frizzled wig. 'Perhaps,' 
says GROSE (s.v.), 'from a 
supposed likeness to a gooseberry 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

GOOSECAP, subs, (common). A 
booby, male or female ; a NOODLE. 
For synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1593. G. HARVEY, Pierce 1 s Super, in 
wks. II., 72. Afoole, an idiot, a dolt, a 
GOOSE-CAPP, an asse, and soe fourth. 

1604. DEKKER, Honest Wh. in 
wks. (1873), ii., 81. Out, you guiles, you 
GOOSE-CAPS, you gudgeon-eaters ! 

1622. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Beggars Bush, iv., 4. Why, what a 
GOOSE-CAP wouldst thou make me! 

1763. FOOTE, Mayor of Garratt, 
Act i. My husband is such a GOOSE-CAP 
that I can't get no good out of him at 
home or abroad. 

1785. GROSE, V'ulg. Tongue, s.v. A 
silly fellow or woman. 

GOOSE- (or GOOSE'S) EGG, subs. 
(American). No score. Also 
GOOSER. See DUCK. 

1886. New York Times, July. With 
nine unpalatable GOOSE-EGGS in their con- 
test. 

1889. Modern Society, 12 Oct., p. 
1264. An enthusiastic lady cricketer has 
just bowled over Mr. Jones in a matri- 
monial match. ' No, Mr. Brown, I cannot 
marry you. You score a GOOSER this 
' 



GOOSE-FLESH (or GOOSE-SKIN), 

subs, (colloquial). A peculiar 
tingling of the skin produced by 
cold, fear, etc. ; the sensa- 
tion described as ' cold water 
down the back ' ; the CREEPS 
(*.), 

1824. Miss FERRIER, Inheritance, 
ch. ii. Her skin began to rise into what is 
vulgarly termed GOOSE-SKIN 

GOOSE-GOG (or GOOSE-GOB), subs. 
(common). A gooseberry. 

GOOSE-GREASE, subs. phr. 
(venery). A woman's SPENDINGS 
(</. v. ). See GOOSE, subs. , sense 6. 

GOOSE- MONTH, subs. (old). The 
lying-in month. Cf. t GANDER- 
MONTH. 

GOOSE-PERSUADER, subs, (com- 
mon). A tailor. For synonyms, 
see SNIP. 

GOOSER, subs, (popular). i. A 

settler ; a knock-out blow ; the 

act of death. See DIG and 
WIPE. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. 
and Land. Poor, vol. III., p. 133. It 
was he who saved my life. If it hadn't 
been for him it would have been a GOOSER 
with me. 

1857. Morning Chronicle, 9 Sept. 
In the event of my getting a GOOSER. 

2. (sporting). No score ; a 
GOOSE-EGG (q.v.}. 

3. (venery). The penis. For 
synonyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK. 

GOOSE - RIDING. See GANDER- 
PULLING. 

GOOSE'S GAZETTE, subs. (old). A 
lying story ; a flim-flam tale ; 
that is, a piece of reading for a 
GOOSE, sense 2. 



Goose-shearer. 



185 



Gorge. 



1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xxxiv. Lieutenant Brown .... told him 
some GOOSE'S GAZETTE about his being 
taken in a skirmish with the land-sharks. 

GOOSE-SHEARER, subs, (common). 
A beggar. For synonyms, see 
CADGER. [From GOOSE = simple- 
ton + SHEARER = a cheater.] 

GOOSE'S-NECK, subs, (venery). 
The penis. For synonyms, see 
CREAMSTICK and PRICK. 

GOOSE-STEP, suds, (common). 
Balancing on one foot and 
moving the other back and 
forwards without taking a step. 
[A preliminary in military drill, 
the pans asinorum of the raw 
recruit.] Also (more loosely) 
' marking time ' : that is, lifting 
the feet alternately without 
advancing. 

1840. Tate's Mag:., Sept., p. 607 
Whether the remarkable evolution [the 
GOOSE STEP] was called . . . from the 
nature of the operation requiring the 
exhibitor to stand on one leg, in imitation 
of the above-named animal, I am totally 
at a loss to say. 

1890, Licensed Viet. Gaz., 7 Nov. 
He won his spurs at Punchestown before 
he had mastered the GOOSE STEP. 

GOOSE-TURD GREEN, adj. (old). 

A light - yellowish green. 

COTGRAVE. 

GOOSEY-GANDER, subs, (common). 
A fool. For synonyms, see 
BUFFLE and CABBAGE-HEAD. 

GOOSING-SLUNI, subs. (American). 

A brothel. [GoosiNG = 
womanizing ; also copulating.] 
For synonyms, see NANNY-SHOP. 

GOPHER, subs. (American). i. 
A young thief; especially a boy 
employed by burglars to enter 
houses through windows, sky- 
lights, etc. [In natural history 
GOPHER = a burrowing squirrel.] 



2. (Southern States). A rude 
wooden plough. 

Go REE, subs. (old). Money ; 
specifically gold or gold - dust. 
From Fort Goree on the Gold 
Coast. For synonyms, see ACTUAL 
and GILT. 

1696. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

GORGE, subs, (vulgar). i. A heavy 
meal; a TUCK - IN (q.v.}\ a 
BLOW-OUT (q.V.). 

1553. WILSON, Arte of Rhetorique, 
p. 112. The counseler heareth causes with 
lesse pain being emptie, then he shal be 
able after a ful GORGE. 

1883. Daily News, March 24, p. 3, 
c. 4. The keeper tries these brutes 
once a week to see whether they are 
ready for a GORGE, and the python has 
been known to devour eight ducks at one 
meal, feathers and all, before signifying 
enough. 

2. (theatrical). A manager ; 
an abbreviation of GORGER (q.v.). 

Verb (vulgar). To eat vora- 
ciously ; also to gulp as a fish 
does when it swallows (or 
gorges) a bait. For synonyms, 
see WOLF. 

1572. Satirical Poems, Scottish 
Text Society? 1889-91, ' Lamentacioun,' 
ii., 232. GORGED waters ever greater 
grows. 

1633. MASSINGER, New Way to Pay 
Old Debts, iii., 2. Mar. Come, have 
patience If you will dispense a little with 
your worship, And sit with the waiting 
women, you'll have dumpling, Woodcock, 
and butter'd toasts too. Greedy. This 
revives me : I will GORGE there sufficiently. 

1654. CHAPMAN, Revenge for Honour, 
Act i., Sc. i. Here men p* th' shop can 
GORGE their musty maws With the delicious 
capon, and fat limbs of mutton. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth ed.). 
GORGE (v.), to eat over-much, to cram, 
glut, or nil unreasonably. 



Gorger. 



1 86 



Gospel. 



1843. DICKENS, Martin Chuzzlewit, 
ch. xxxiv., p. 336. No man had spoken a 
word ; every one had been intent, as usual, 
on his own private GORGING ; and the 
greater part of the company were decidedly 
dirty feeders. 

1853. WH. MELVILLE, Digby Grand, 
ch. iii. Who might be such a fine race, if 
they would only not GORGE their food so 
rapidlj'. 

GORGER, subs, (vulgar). i. A 
voracious eater ; a SCRUNCHER 
(q.v.). ROTTEN GORGER = a lad 
who hangs about Covent Garden 
eating refuse fruit. 

2. (common). A well-dressed 
man; a gentleman. [Gypsy, 
gorgio gentlemen.] Fr., Tin 
gratine. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
Mung the GORGER ; beg child beg, of the 
gentleman. 

3. (common). An employer ; 
a principal : especially the 
manager of a theatre. [Perhaps 
because he takes (or gorges) all 
the FAT (17. z>.).] Also CULLY- 
GORGER. Fr., amendier. 

1872. M. E. BRADDON, Dead Sea 
Fruit, ch. xiv. The GORGEK'S awful 
coally on his own slumming, eh ? ... I 
mean to say that our friend the manager is 
rather sweet upon his own acting. 

4. (old). A neckerchief. 
[From gorge = throat.] 

1320-30. Gawaine, 957. That other 
wyth a GORGER watz gored ouer the svvyre. 

GORGONZOLA HALL, Stibs. phr. 
(Stock Exchange). Formerly 
the New Hall ; now the corpora- 
tion generally. [From the 
colour of the marble.] 

1887. ATKIN, House Scraps, GOR- 
GONZOLA HALL got turned into New 
Billingsgate. 

GORM, verb. (American University). 
To GORGE (q.v.). For syn- 
onyms, see WOLF. 



I'M GORMED, phr. (popular). 

A profane oath. See GAUM. 

1849. DICKENS, David Copperfield, 
ch. iii. If it [his generosity] were ever 
referred to, ... he struck the table a 
heavy blow with his right hand (had split 
it on one such occasion), and swore a 
dreadful oath that HE WOULD BE GORMED 
if he didn't cut and run for good, if it 
was ever mentioned again. 

1883. Punch, May 19, p. 230, c. 2. 
Why, of course I hardly expects to be 
believed, but I'M GORMED if there was 
more than six of one and half-a-dozen of 
the other. 

1884. JULIAN STURGIS, in Long- 
man's Mag,, iii., 623. 'GORMED if there 
ain't that old parson again ! ' cried Henry, 
with enthusiasm. 

GORMAGON, suds. (old). See 
quots. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
A monster with six eyes, three mouths, 
four arms, eight legs, five on one side and 
three on the other, three arses, two tarses, 
and a cunt upon its back ; a man on horse- 
back with a woman behind him. 

1892. FEN NELL, Stanford Diet., 
s.v., GORMAGON .... a member of an 
English Secret Society which existed in 
the second quarter of 18 c. 

GORMY-RUDDLES, sttbs. (common). 

The intestines. 

GORRAM (or GORAM). See By 
GOLDAM 

GORRY. See BY GORRY ! 



^. (Stock Exchange). 
The 2| per cent. Government 
Stock created by Mr. Goschen in 
1888. 

1889. Man of the World, 29 June. 
The nickname GOSCHENS is going out of 
fashion. The new 2f stock is now called 
by the old name. 

1891. Flinch, 4 Apr. Securities 
yielding a larger return than 25 GOSCHENS. 

GOSH, see BY GOSH. 

GOSPEL, subs, (colloquial). i. 
Anything offered as absolutely 
true. Also GOSPEL-TRUTH. 



Gospel-gab. 



187 



Goss. 



1862. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, ch. 
Ix. She is a good young woman, and a 
honest young woman in her way, and what 
she says this night about her brother is 

GOSPEL-TRUTH. 

1864. Derby Day, p. 35. Apparently 
unable to resist the powerful influences 
brought to bear upon him, he replied, in a 
tone which carried the impress of veracity 
with it, ' GOSPEL.' 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
175. It was true as GOSPEL. 

To DO GOSPEL, verb. phr. 
(common). To go to church. 

GOSPEL-GAB, subs, (common). In- 
sincere talk concerning religion ; 
cant. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 146. Yes ; when I saw 
I was in for it, I told them my name and 
all about my father without any reserve ; 
that, with a little GOSPEL-GAB and howling 
penitence, got the church people interested 
in me, and so I was let off easily. 

GOSPEL - GRINDER (-POSTILLION, 
-SHARP, or -SHARK), subs. 
(common). A clergyman or 
missionary. For synonyms, see 
DEVIL-DODGER and SKY- 
PILOT ; 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. La 
foret noire (thieves' = the black 
forest) ; une entonne ramparts 
(thieves'); entonner=\.Q intone) ; 
tine antiffle (thieves') ; une cavee 
( thieves' = a black hole) ; une 
chique (thieves'). 

SPANISH SYNONYM. Salud. 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Baha ; 
bahana. 

1869. S. L. CLEMENS, Innocents at 
Home, p. 19. ' A what ! ' ' GOSPEL- 
SHARP parson.' ' Oh ! why did you not 
say so before? I am a clergyman a 
parson. 1 

1877. BESANT and RICE, Golden 
Butterfly, ch. viii. Else we should be as 
stagnant as a Connecticut GOSPEL- 
GRINDER in his village location. 



GOSPELLER, subs, (colloquial). 
An Evangelist preacher ; in con- 
tempt. Also HOT-GOSPELLER 
= a preaching fanatic.) 

GOSPEL-MILL (or -SHOP), subs. 
(common). A church or chapel. 
Also SCHISM-SHOP and DOXO- 
LOGY- WORKS (q.V.). 

1782. GEO. PARKER, Humorous 
Sketches, p. 88. From Whitfield and Ro- 
maine to Pope John range ; Each GOSPEL- 
SHOP ringing a daily change. 

1791. Life of J. Lackington, Letter 
xix. As soon as I had procured a lodging 
and work my next enquiry was for Mr. 
Wesley's GOSPEL-SHOPS. 

1852. JUDSON, Mysteries of New 
York, pt. II., ch. ii., p. 13. On about 
that ere GOSPEL-SHOP as you was agoin for 
to crack last week. 

1869. S. L. CLEMENS ( Mark Twain) 
Innocents at Home, p. 17, 18. Are you 
the duck that runs the GOSPEL-MILL next 
door. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
35. It's all GOSPEL-SHOP gruel. 

Goss (or GOSSAMER), subs, (com- 
mon) . A hat. (At first a make 
of peculiar lightness called a 
FOUR- AND-NINE (..).) Inquot. 
1836 = a white hat. For syn- 
onyms, see GOLGOTHA. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xii. 
'That's one thing, and every hole lets in 
some air, that's another ventilation 
GOSSAMER I calls it.' On the delivery of 
this sentiment, Mr. Weller smiled agree- 
ably upon the assembled Pickwickians. 

1838. JAS. GRANT, Sketches in 
London, ch. ix., p. 294. Another passenger 
inquired whether the hat was 'a vashmg 
beaver von?' while a fourth inquired 
whether it was 'a GOSSAMER ventilator?' 

1851. H. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, Vol. II., p. 49. 1 have sold hats 
from 6d. to 35. 6d., but very seldom 35. 6d. 
The 35. 6d. ones would wear out two new 
GOSSAMERS, I know. 

1884. A. LANG, Much Darker Days, 
p. 25. Yes, the white hat, lying there 
all battered and crushed on the white 
snow, must be the hat of Sir Runan ! . . . 
who else would wear the gay GOSSAMER of 
July in stormy December? 



Gossoon. 



1 88 Go-to-meeting Bags. 



1888. Harper's Magazine, LXXVII., 
139. Flinging off his GOSSAMER and hang- 
ing it up to drip into the pan of the hat 
rack. 

To GIVE (or GET) GOSS, verb, 
phr. (American). To requite an 
injury ; to kill ; to go strong ; 
to get an opportunity ; to PUT IN 
BIG LICKS (q. v. ). Sometimes ejac- 
ulatory, as ' Give me goss and let 
me rip ! ' 

1847. ROBE, Squatter ^ Life, p. 75. 
GIN HIM GOSS without sweetin. 

1847. DARLEY, Drama inPorterville, 
p. 114. Divers hints passed from one to 
another among the more excitable citizens, 
that ' Old Sol ' was going to GET GOSSj 
sure. 

1847. PORTER, Quarter Race, etc., 
p. 115. Shouts of ' Fair play,' 'Turn 'em 
out,' ' GIVE HIM GOSS,' were heard on all 
sides. 

a. 1852. Traits of A tnerican Hujnour, 
II., 261. Ef I don't, the old man will 
GIVE ME GOSS when I go back. 

GOSSOON, subs, (colloquial Irish). 
A boy. [A corruption of Fr., 
garden a boy.] 

GOTCH-GUTTED, adj. (old). Pot- 
bellied ; ' a gotch in Norfolk, 
signifying a pitcher or large round 
jug.' GROSE. 

GOT 'EM BAD, phr. (common). 
A superlative of earnestness or 
excessiveness : e.g. , anyone doing 
his work thoroughly, a horse 
straining every nerve, a very 
sick person, especially a patient 
in the HORRORS (q.v.), is said to 
have GOT 'EM BAD. 

GOT 'EM ON (or ALL ON), phr. 
(common). Dressed in the height 
of fashion. See RIGGED OUT. 

1880. Punch, 28 Aug., p. 90. 

188(?). Broadside Ballad, "Arry. 1 
Where are you going on Sunday. 'Arry, 
now you've GOT 'EM ON? 



188(?;. Broadside Ballad. 
'EM ON/ 



He's GOT 



GOTH, suds. (common). A 
frumpish or uncultured person ; 
one behind the times or ignorant 
of the ways of society. 

1712. Spectator, No. 367. But I 
shall never sink this paper so far as to en- 
gage with GOTHS and Vandals. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. Ixi. You yourself are a GOTH ... to 
treat with such disrespect a production 
which . . . will, when finished, be a mas- 
terpiece of its kind. 

1865. OUIDA, Strathmore, ch. ii. 
For God's sake don't suppose me such a 
GOTH that I should fall in love with a 
dairymaid, Strath ! 

GOTHAM, subs, (common). New 
York City. GOTHAMITE, a New 
Yorker. [First used by Washing- 
ton Irving in Salmagundi (1807). ] 

1852. JUTSON, Mysteries of New 
York. ch. xiii. One of the vilest of all hells 
in GOTHAM. 



1852. EXISTED, Ujjer Ten Thousand, 
p. 37. The first thing, as a general rule, 
that a young GOTHAMITE does is to get a 
horse. 

GOTHIC, adj. (old). See GOTH. 

1700. CONGREVE, The Way of the 
World, iv. 4. Ah, rustic, ruder than 
GOTHIC ! 

1773. GOLDSMITH, She Stoops to Con- 
quer, ii., 8. Why, with his usual GOTHIC 
vivacity, he said I only wanted him to 
throw off his wig to convert it into a tete 
for my own wearing. 

GO-TO-MEETING BAGS (or 
CLOTHES, DRESS, etc.), subs. 
bhr. (common). Best clothes. 
[As worn on Sundays, or holiday 
occasions.] 

1837-40. HALIBURTON, The Clock- 
maker, p. 243 (Ed. 1862). If he hadn't 
his GO-TO-MEETIN' DRESS and looks on this 
day to the jury, it's a pity. 

1854. BRADLEY, Verdant Green, Pt. 
II., p. 5. Besides his black GO-TO-MEET- 
ING BAGS please to observe the peculiarity, 
etc. 



Gouge. 



[89 



Governor. 



1856. HUGHES, Tom Brown^s School- 
days, pt II., ch. v. I want to give you a 
true picture of what every-day_ school 
life was in my time, and not a kid-glove 
and GO-TO-MEETING-COAT picture. 

1857. KINGSLEY, Two Years Ago. 
Looks right well in her GO-TO-MEETING 

CLOTHES. 

GOUGE, subs. (American). An 
imposture ; a swindle ; a method 
of cheating. 

1845. Neva York Tribune, 10 Dec. 

R and H will probably receive 

from Mr. Folk's administration $100,000 
more than respectable printers would have 
done the work for. There is a clean, 
plain GOUGE of this sum out of the 
people's strong box. 

Verb. (old). I. GROSE says, 
' To squeeze out a man's eye with 
the thumb, a cruel practice used 
by the Bostonians in America.' 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West, p. 49. His eyes having been 
GOUGED in a mountain fray. 

2. (American). To defraud. 

1845. New York Tribune, 26 Nov. 
Very well, gentlemen ! GOUGE Mr. Crosby 
out of the seat, if you think it wholesome 
to do it. 

1874. W. D. HOWELLS, Foregone 
Conclusions, ch. iii. The man's a perfect 
Jew or a perfect Christian, one ought to 
say in Venice ; we true believers do 
GOUGE so much more infamously here. 

1885. BRET HARTE, A Ship of '49, 
ch. i. He's regularly GOUGED me in that 
'ere horsehair spekilation. 

GOUGER, subs. (American). A 
cheat ; a swindler. For syn- 
onyms, see ROOK. 

GOUGING, subs. (American). 
Cheating. 

GOUJEERS, See GOODYEAR. 

GOURD, subs. (old). False dice 
with a cavity within, which in 
FULLAMS (q.v.) was filled with 
lead to give a bias. See also 
HIGH-MEN and LOW-MEN. 



1544. ASCHAM, Toxophylus. What 
false dyse use they ? as dyse stopped with 
quicksilver and heares, dyse of vauntage, 
flaites, GOURDS, to chop and chaunge when 
they liste. 

1596, SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives of 
Windsor, i., 3. Let vultures gripe thy 
guts ! for GOURD and fullam holds, And 
high and low beguiles the rich and poor. 

1616. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Scornful Lady, iv. And thy dry bones 
can reach at nothing now But GOURDS or 
nine-pins ; pray go fetch a trencher, go. 

GOUROCK HAM, subs, (common). 
A salt herring (Gourock was 
formerly a great fishing village). 
For synonyms, see GLASGOW 
MAGISTRATE. 

GOVERNMENT- MAN, subs, (old 
Australian). A convict. 

1864. SMYTHE, Ten Months in Fiji 
Islands, q.v. 

1883. Graphic, 17 Mar., p. 262, c. 
3. They never settle down as thousands 
of our GOVERNMENT MEN cheerfully did in 
Australia after they had their freedom. 

GOVERNMENT -SECURITIES, subs. 
(common). Handcuffs ; fetters 
generally. For 'synonyms, see 
DARBIES. 

GOVERNMENT - SIGNPOST, subs. 

(old). The gallows. For syn- 
onyms, 'see NUBBING-CHEAT. 

1887. A. BARRERE, Argot and Slang, 
p. 272. Montagnedugeant. Fr. (obsolete), 
gallows, scrag, nobbing cheat, or GOVERN- 
MENT SIGNPOST. 

GOVERNOR (or Guv), subs, (com- 
mon). i. A father. Also RE- 
LIEVING OFFICER ; OLD 5 UN ; 
PATER; NIBSO ; and HIS NIBS. 
Applied to elderly people in 
general. Fr. , le geniteur and 
Pancien ( the old 'un). 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xx. 
p. 169. ' You're quite certain it was 
them, GOVERNOR?' inquired Mr. Weller, 
junior. ' Quite, Sammy, quite,' replied 
his father. 



Governor. 



190 



Gown. 



1841. Punch) vol. I., p. 28. But 
mind ! don't tell the GOVERNOR ! 

1852. Comic Almanack, p. ig. 
Your father : Speaking to him, say ' GUV- 
NOR,' or ' Old Strike-a-light : ' of him, 
The old un.' 

1859. Witty Political Portraits, p. 
in. Unconscious of the constitutional de- 
lusions on which his GOVERNOR has 
thrived. 

1889. Answers, 20 Apr., p. 323. To 
call your father ' The GOVERNOR ' is, of 
course, slang, and is as bad as referring to 
him as 'The Boss,' 'The Old Man,' or 
' The Relieving Officer.' 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., o, Jan. 
It was mortifying to be done in that 
manner by a low fellow like Muggins, 
that I had always looked upon as a fool, 
and had made a butt of when the GUV. 
was out of the way. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger's 
Sweetheart, p. 118. The GOVERNOR is in 
an awful funk about him. 

2. (common). A mode of 
address to strangers. Fr., bour- 
geois. 

1892. ANSTEY, Voces Populi (Second 
Series). ' At the Guelph Exhibition.' 
Right, GUVNOR ; we'll come. 

3. ^ (colloquial). A master or 
superior; an employer. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Boss ; 
captain of the waiters ; captain ; 
chief; colonel ; commander ; chief 
bottle-washer; ganger; head-butler; 
head - cook and bottle - washer ; 
gorger; omee ; rum-cull. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Le 
pantriot (popular and thieves' : 
also = a young nincompoop) ; le, 
or la, p&te (popular : properly 
paste or dough) ; le naif (printers' : 
obsolete); le herz or hers 
(thieves' : obviously from the 
German) ; le loncegut (thieves' : 
Fr., back-slang ; = gonce, itself 
a slang term for a man) ; legaleux 
(popular) = one with the itch) ; 
le grtte (popular : specifically a 



master-tailor) ; le singe ( = mon- 
key) ; le troploc ; le nourisseur= 
the grubber); Fogre (specifically a 
FENCE) ; le notaire ( = publican) ; 
le patron (colloquial : = governor). 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Chiel~ 
micro (vulgar). 

GOVERNOR'S-STIFF, Sllbs, 

(American). A pardon. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

QOWER - STREET DIALECT. See 

MEDICAL GREEK. 

GOWK, subs, (prison). A simple- 
ton. (Scots' GOWK = a cuckoo). 
For synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. Also a country- 
man. For synonyms, see JOSKIN. 

1816. SCOTT, Antiquary, ch. x. 
' Hout awa', ye auld GOWK,' said Jenny 
Rintherout. 

To HUNT THE GOWK, verb. 
phr. (common). To go on a 
fool's errand. 

GOWLER, subs. (old). A dog; 
specifically a howler. 



<fc. (Winchester College). 
I. Coarse brown paper. 
(obsolete). 

2. (University). The schools 
as distinguished from the TOWN 
(q.v.)., e.g., TOWN and GOWN. 

1847. THACKERAY, Punch's Prize 
Novelists, ' Codlingsby,' p. 232. From 
the Addenbrooke's hospital to the Blenheim 
turnpike, all Cambridge was in an uproar 
the College gates closed the shops barri- 
caded the shop-boys away in support of 
their brother townsmen the battle raged, 
and the GOWN had the worst of the fight. 

1853. BRADLEY, Verdant Green, II., 
ch. iii. When GOWN was absent, Town 
was miserable. 

1891. Pall Mall Gaz., 30 May, p. 
4, c. 3. Town and GOWN joined in har- 
mony. 



Gownsman. 



191 



Grabble. 



GOWNSMAN (also GOWN), subs. 
(university). A student. 

1800. C. K. SHARPE, in Correspond- 
ence (1888), i., 96. A battle between the 
GOWNSMEN and townspeople .... in 
spite of the Vice-Chancellor and Proctors. 

1850. F. E. SMEDLEY, Frank Fair- 
leigh, ch. xxv. The ancient town of Cam- 
bridge, no longer animated by the countless 
throngs of GOWNSMEN, frowned in its unac- 
customed solitude. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at Ox- 
ford. The townsmen .... were met by 
the GOWNSMEN with settled steady pluck. 

GRAB, subs, (vulgar). I. A sudden 
clutch. 

1835. HALIBURTON, Clockmaker, ist 
S., ch. viii. He makes a GRAB at me, and 
1 shuts the door right to on his wrist. 

2. (American). A robbery ; a 

STEAL (q.V.). Cf., GRAB-GAINS. 

3. (old). A body-stealer ; a 
resurrectionist. 

1830. S. WARREN, Diary of a Late 

Physician, ch. xvJ. Sir 's dressers and 

myself, with an experienced GRAfl that is 
to say, ^professional resurrectionist were 
to set off from the Borough. 

4. (gamesters'). A boisterous 
game at cards. 

Verb (vulgar). i. To PINCH 
(q.v.) ; to seize; to apprehend ; to 
snatch or steal. GRABBED = 
arrested. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. The 
pigs GRABBED the kiddy for a crack. 

1818. MAGINN, Vidocq's Song. 
Tramp it, tramp it, my jolly blowen, Or be 
GRABBED by the beaks we may. 

1837. LYTTON, Etnest Maltravers, 
\Vk. I., ch. x. There, man, GRAB the 
money, it's on the table. 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. 
xiii. Do you want to be GRABBED, stupid ? 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Sheppard 
[1889], p. 39. Don't muddle your brains 
with any more of that Pharaoh. You'll 
need all your strength to GRAB him. 



1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, Hi., 396. I was GRABBED for 
an attempt on a gentleman's pocket. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 
ch. iii., p. 236. I watched a movement, 
till one of the servant girls had brought 
another load of grub out, and as she turned 
her back and went into the house I GRABBED 
the key, and so they couldn't lock it nohow. 

1886. BARING GOULD, Golden Feather, 
p. 23 (S.P.C.K.). There are some folks 
.... so grasping that if they touch a far- 
thing will GRAB a pound. 

2. (thieves'). To hold on ; 
to get along ; to live. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, iii., 149. I do manage to 
GRAB on somehow. 

GRAB-ALL, sufo. (colloquial). i. 
An avaricious person ; a GREEDY- 
GUTS (q.v.). 

1872. Sunday Times, 18 Aug. This 
gentleman, it is well known, has worked 
with indomitable energy on behalf of the 
millions, and has succeeded in wresting 
from the mean and contemptible GRAB- 
ALLS of that government which professes 
to study the people's interest those portions 
of the Embankment which the public 
money has paid for. 

2. (colloquial). A bag to 
carry odds and ends, parcels, 
books, and so forth. 

GRABBER, subs, (common). In. 
//., the hands. For synonyms, 
see DADDLE and MAULEY. 

G RABBLE, verb. (old). I. To seize: 
a frequent form of GRAB (q.v.). 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. To 
GRABBLE the bit ; to seize any one's 
money. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulunt. You 
GRABBLE the goose-cap and I'll frisk his 
pokes. 

2. (venery). To grope ; to 
fumble ; TO FAM (q.v.). 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., 193. When 
Nelly, though he teized her, And GRABBLED 
her and squeezed her. 



Grabby. 



192 



Graft, 



GRABBY, subs, (military). An 
infantry-man. [Used in contempt 
by the mounted arm.] Fr., mart- 
(mnette. 

1868. WHYTE MELVILLE, White 
Rose, ^ch. x 'Is it a good regiment? 
How jolly to dine at mess every day!' 
'I shouldn't like to be a GRABBY though" 
(this from the Dandy) ; ' and after all, I'd 
rather be a private in the cavalry than an 
officer in the regiment of feet ! ' 

GRAB-GAINS, suit, (thieves'). The 
trick of snatching a purse, etc., 
and making off. 

GRAB-GAME (or-coup,or-RACKET), 

sttbs. (old). Amode of swindling: 
the sharpers start by betting among 
themselves ; then the by-standers 
are induced to join ; then stakes 
are deposited ; lastly, there is a 
row, when one of the gang GRABS 
the stakes, and decamps. But see 
quot., 1823. 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, s.v. 
GRAB-COUP, modern practice of gambling, 
adopted by the losers, thus the person 
cheated, or done, takes his opportunity, 
makes a dash at the depository of money, 
or such as may be down for the play, and 
GRABS as much as possible, pockets the 
proceeds, and fights his way out of the 
house. 

18(?). Scenes in the Rocky Mountains, 
p. 282. Til bear you company. What 
d'ye say to that ? ' ' Just as you like,' re- 
sponded his two companions, ' that is pro- 
vided you won't attempt the GRAB GAME 
on us.' 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker^ p. 219. ' Now, 
boss ! ' he cried, not unkindly, ' is this to 
be run shipshape ; or is it a Dutch GRAB- 
RACKET ? 

GRACE-CARD, subs. (Irish). The 
Six of Hearts. [For origin see 
N. and Q., 5th Series, iv., 137]. 

GRACEMANS, s^lbs. (old). Grace- 
church Street Market. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (W. Club's Rept., 1874). GRACE- 
MANS, Gratious Streets market. 



GRADUATE, subs. (turf). i. A 
horse that has been run. 

2. (colloquial). An adept ; an 

ARTFUL MEMBER (q.V.). 

3. (venery). An unmarried 
woman who has taken her degree 
in carnal lore. 

Verb, (colloquial). To seek 
and acquire experience : in life, 
love, society, or trade ; and so on. 

GRADUS, subs, (gamesters'). A 
mode of cheating : a particular 
card is so placed by the shuffler 
that when he hands the pack to 
be cut, it projects a little beyond 
the rest ; the chance being that it 
is the turn-up. Also THE STEP 
(q.v.). [From the Latin.] 

GRADUS - AD - PARNASSUM, subs. 
(old literary). The treadmill. 
For synonyms, see WHEEL-OF- 
LIFE. 

GRAFT, subs, (common). Work; 
employment ; LAY (q.v). : e.g. 
What GRAFT are you on now ? 
GREAT - GRAFT = profitable 
labour; GOOD BIZ (q.v.). Also 
GRAFTING and ELBOW-GREASE. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Le bas- 
timage (thieves') ; le goupinage 
(thieves'); la laine (tailors'); le 
maquillage (thieves') ; le massage 
(popular) ; la masse ; le mhhe 
(printers'). 

1878. Graphic, 6 July, p. 2. Accord- 
ing to the well-known maxim in the build- 
ing trade, 'Scotch masons, Welsh black- 
smiths, English bricklayers, Irish labourers' 
.... Perhaps in a generation or two 
Paddy will fail us. He will have become 
too refined for hard GRAFTING. 

1887. HENLEY, Villon's Straight 
Tip. The merry little dibbs you bag At 
my GRAFT, no matter what. 



Grampus* 



Granger. 



1892. Tit Bits, 19 Mar., p. 417, c. i. 
Millbank for thick shins and GRAFT at the 
pump. 

Verb (common). I. To work. 
Fr., bausser ; membrer. 

2. (American). To steal. 

3. (old). To cuckold ; to 
plant horns. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s v. 

4. (American). To sole old 
boots. C/., GOOSE and TRANS- 
LATE. 

GRAMPUS, subs, (colloquial). A 
fat man. For synonyms, see 
FORTY-GUTS. 

To BLOW THE GRAMPUS. 
(nautical). To drench ; and 
(common), to sport in the water. 

GRAND, subs, (colloquial). Short 
for ' grand piano. ' 

1891. Morning Advertiser, 28 Mar. 
A precocious young relative is now about 
to take the dais. There she stands, violin 
in hand, and there begins the preliminary 
scramble on the hired GRAND. 

Adj. (colloquial). A general 
superlative. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
19. Wot we want in a picter is flavour 
and ' fetch,' and yours give it me GRAND. 

To DO THE GRAND, verb. phr. 
(common). To put on airs. For 
synonyms, see LARDY-DAH. 

GRAND BOUNCE. See BOUNCE. 

GRANDMOTHER. To SEE ONE'S 
GRANDMOTHER, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To have a nightmare. 

To SEE (or HAVE) ONE'S 

GRANDMOTHER (or LITTLE 

FRIEND, or AUNTIE) WITH ONE. 

verb. phr. (common). To have 

the menstrual discharge. See 
FLAG. 



To SHOOT ONE'S GRAND- 
MOTHER, verb. phr. (common). 
To be mistaken ; to have found 
a mare's nest ; to be disappointed. 
Commonly ' You've shot your 
grannie. ' 

To TEACH ONE'S GRAND- 
MOTHER (or GRANNIE) HOW TO 
SUCK EGGS, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To instruct an expert in 
his own particular line of business; 
to talk old to one's seniors. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

1892. Globe, 27 Jan., p. i, c. 5. Evi- 
dently he did not consider, as Englishmen 
seem to do, that GRANDMOTHERS possess 
no more knowledge than is required to effi- 
ciently SUCK EGGS. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 210. ' Confound you stupid, 
what do you take me for, that you try TO 
TEACH YOUR GRANDMOTHER TO SUCK 
EGGS. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, r. 
77. She's a TEACHING 'ER GRAND- 
MOTHER, she is, although she's a littery 
swell. 

MY GRANDMOTHER'S REVIEW. 
subs. phr. (obsolete). The British 
Review. [The nickname was Lord 
Byron's.] 

GRAND-STRUT, subs. (old). The 
Broad Walk in Hyde Park. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
i., 4. We'll start first to the show shop of 
the metropolis, Hyde Park ! promenade it 
down the GRAND STRUT. 

GRANGER ,subs. (American political ). 
i. A member of the Farmers' 
Alliance ; a secret society, nomi- 
nallynon-political, but really tal - 
ing a hand in politics when occa- 
sion offered to favour agricultural 
interests. [During the decade of 
years ending 1870, it attained 
to great numerical strength, and 
extended throughout the United 
States.] See AGRICULTURAL 
WHEEL. 

13 



Grangerize. 



194 



Grape-vine. 



2. (American). Hence, a 
farmer ; a countryman ; anyone 
from the rural districts. For 
synonyms, see JOSKIN. 

GRANGERISE, verb, (literary). To 
fill out a book with portraits, 
landscapes, title-pages, and illus- 
trations generally, not done for it. 

1883. SAL A, Living Wonders, p. 497. 
Mr. Ashton's Social Life in the Reign of 
Queen Anne . . . would be a capital book 

tO GRANGERIZE. 

GRANGERISM, subs, (literary). 
The practice of illustrating a book 
with engravings, etc., from other 
sources. [From the practice of 
illustrating GRANGER'S Biblio- 
graphical History of England. ] 

1883. Saturday Review, Jam 27, 
p. 123, c. 2. GRANGERISM, as the inno- 
cent may need to be told, is the pernicious 
vice of cutting plates and title-pages out of 
many books to illustrate one book. 

GRANGERITE, subs, (literary). A 
practitioner in GRANGERISM (q.v.). 

1890. ' Grangerising,' in Cornhill 
Mag., Feb., p. 139.. Another favourite 
subject, and suitable also for the GRAN- 
GERITE, is ' Boswell's Johnson.' It must 
be admitted that this delightful book may 
gain a fresh chance by being thus treated, 
but ' within the limits of becoming gran- 
gerism.' 

GRAN NAM, ;f. (old}. Corn. [From 
the Latin.] Fr., le grenu, or 
grelu. It., re digranata; staffile ; 
corniole : 



1567. HARM AN, Caveat (1814), p. 65. 
GRANNAM, corne. 

1610. ROWLANDS, M artin Mark-all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Rept., 1874). GRANMER, 
corne. 

1671. R. HEAD, English Rogue, 
pt. I., ch. v., p. 49 (1874). GRANNAM, 
corn. 

1706. E. COLES, Eng. Diet. 
GRANNAM, c. corn. 

1737. Bacchus and Venus. 'The 
Strowling Mort.' GRANNAM ever filled 
my sack. 



GRANNAM'S-GOLD. subs, (old). 
Wealth inherited. [Grannam = 
grandmother : cf., BEAUMONT 
and FLETCHER, Lover's Progress, 
iv., i. 'Ghosts never walk till 
after midnight, if I may believe 
my grannam. '] 

GRANNY, subs, (nautical). i. A 
bad knot with the second tie 
across ; as opposed to a reef 
knot in which the end and outer 
part are in line. Also GRANNY'S 
KNOT or GRANNY'S BEND. 

2. (common). Conceit of 
superior knowledge. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, i., 404. To take the GRANNY 
off them as has white hands. 



^ (thieves'). To know; to 
recognise. Also to swindle. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, i., 461. The shallow got so 
CRANNIED in London. 

Ibid., p. 340. If they GRANNY the 
manley (perceive the signature) of a 
brother officer or friend. 

GRANT. To GRANT THE FAVOUR, 

verb. phr. (venery). To confer 

the sexual embrace ; TO SPREAD 

(q.v.). 

1720. DURFEY, Pills, etc., vi 58. If 

at last she GRANTS THE FAVOUR, And 

consents to be undone. 

1754. FIELDING, Jonathan Wild, iv. 

7. I .... never would GRANT THE 

FAVOUR to any man till I had drunk a 

heavy glass with him. 

GRAPE-SHOT, adj. (common). 
Drunk. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

GRAPE-VINE, subs. (American). A 
hold in wrestling. 

GRAPE-VINE TELEGRAPH, subs. 
phr. (American). News mys- 
teriously conveyed. [During the 
Civil War bogus reports from the 
front were said to be BY THE 
GRAPE-VINE TELEGRAPH.] Also 
CLOTHES-LINE TELEGRAPH. 



Grapple. 



Grass. 



GRAPPLE, subs, (common). The 
hand. Also GRAPPLER. For 
synonyms, see DADDLE and 
MAULEY. 

1852. HAZEL, Yankee Jack, p. 9. 
Give us your GRAPPLER on that, old fellow. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 
ch. iii., p. 246. Anything she once put 
her GRAPI'LES on she slipped inside. 

GRAPPLE-THE- RAILS, subs. (Irish). 
Whiskey. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and OLD MAN'S MILK. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GRAP- 
PLE-THE-RAILS, a cant name used in Ire- 
land for whiskey. 

GRAPPLING-IRONS (or -HOOKS), 

subs. (old). i. Handcuffs. For 
synonyms, see DARBIES. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicnm, s.v. 
1830 BUCKSTONE, Wreck Ashore, i. 
4. I hope the bailiffs have not laid their 
GRAPPLING IRONS on young Miles. 

2. (nautical). The ringers. 
For synonyms, see FORK. Also 
GRAPPLERS and GRAPPLING- 
HOOKS. 

GRASS, subs. (Royal Military 
Academy). i. Vegetables. Cf. t 
BUNNY -GRUB. Fr., gargousses 
de la canonniere. 

2. (American). Fresh mint. 

3. ( common ). Short for 

SPARROW-GRASS ( q.V. ) = 

asparagus. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab and 
Land. Poor, I., 539. He sold GRASS, and 
such things as cost money. 

4. (Australian printers'). A 
temporary hand on a newspaper ; 
hence the proverb, ' A GRASS on 
news waits dead men's shoes.' 
Cf., GRASS - HAND = a raw 
worker, or green hand. 

a. 1889. FITZGERALD, Printers 
Proverbs, quoted in Slang, Jargon, and 
Cant. Why are the GRASS, or casual 
news hands not put on a more comfortable 
footing? 



Verb (pugilistic). To throw 
(or be thrown) ; to bring (or be 
brought) to ground. Hence, to 
knock down ; to defeat ; to kill. 

1818. EGAN, Boxiana, ii., 375. He 
had much the worst of it, and was ulti- 
mately GRASSED. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 57. The 
shame that aught but death should see 
him GRASSED. 

1846. DICKENS, Dombey, xliv. , 
385. The Chicken himself attributed this 
punishment to his having had the misfor- 
tune to get into Chancery early in the pro- 
ceedings, when he was severely fibbed by 
the Larkey One, and heavily GRASSED. 

1881. Daily Telegraph, 26 Nov. The 
Doctor had killed twenty out of twenty- 
five, while his opponent had GRASSED seven- 
teen out of the same number. 

1883. W. BESANT, All in a Garden 
Fair. Intro. It was a sad example of 
pride before a fall ; his foot caught in a 
tuft of grass, and he was GRASSED. 

1888. Sporting Life, n Dec. Just 
on the completion of the minute GRASSED 
his man with a swinging right-hander. 

1891. J. NEWMAN, Scamping Tricks, 
p. 119. I saw I was GRASSED, so I took 
his measurement. 

1892. F. ANSTEY, Voces Populi. 
' The Riding-Class,' p. 108. Didn't get 
GRASSED, did you ? 

To GIVE GRASS, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To yield. 

To GO TO GRASS, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). I. To abscond ; 
to disappear. Also to HUNT 
GRASS. 

2. (common). To fall sprawl- 
ing ; to be ruined ; to die. 

1876. HINDLEY, Cheap Jack, p, 237. 
Elias was SENT TO GRASS to rise no more 
off it. 

3. (common). To waste away 
(as of limbs). 

To HUNT GRASS, verb. phr. 
(common). I. To decamp. 

2. (cricket). To field ; to 

HUNT LEATHER (f.V.), 



Grass. 



196 



Grass-widow. 



3. (American). To fall ; to go 
to ground; hence, to be puzzled or 
bewildered. 

1869. S. L. CLEMENS, Innocents at 
Howe, p. 21. You're most too many for 
me, you know. When you get in with your 
left I HUNT GRASS every time. 

To CUT ONE'S OWN GRASS. 
verb. phr. (thieves'). To earn 
one's own living. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 
c iii.,p.242. 'Cur HER OWN GRASS! 
Good gracious ! what is that ! ' I asked. 
' Why, purvide her own chump earn her 
own living,' the old man replied. 

To BE SENT TO GRASS, verb, 
phr. (University). To be rusti- 
cated J to RECEIVE A TRAVEL- 
LING SCHOLARSHIP (q.V.}. 

1794. dent. Mag:, p. 1085. And was 
very near rustication [at Cambridge] 
merely for kicking up a row after a beaker- 
ing party. ' Soho, Jack ! ' briskly rejoined 
another, ' almost presented with a travel- 
ling fellowship ? very nigh being SENT TO 
GRASS, hey?' 

Go TO GRASS ! phr. (common). 
Be off ! You be hanged ! Go to 
hell! 

1848. DURIVAGE, Stray Subjects, 
p. 95. A gentleman who was swimming 
about, upon being refused, declared that 
he might GO TO GRASS with his eld canoe, 
for he didn't think it would be much of a 
shower, anyhow. 

1865. BACON, Handbook of ' America, 
p. 363. Go TO GRASS ! be off' get out ! 

TO LET THE GRASS GROW 

UNDER ONE'S FEET, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To proceed or 
work leisurely. Fr., limer. 

To TAKE NEBUCHADNEZZAR 
OUT 10 GRASS, subs. phr. 
(venery). To take a man. 
[NEBUCHADNEZZAR = penis.] For 
synonyms, see GREENS. 

GRASS-COMBER, subs, (nautical). 
A countryman shipped as a 
sailor. 

1886. W. BESANT, World Went 
Very Well Then, ch. xxix. Formerly, 
Jack would have icplied to this sally that, 
d'ye see, Luke was a GRASS COMBER and 



a land swab, but that for himself, there 
was no tea aboard ship, and a glass of 
punch or a bowl of flip was worth all the 
tea ever brought from China. 

CRASSER, sttbs. (sporting). A 
fall. 

GRASSHOPPER, sttbs. (common). 
I. A waiter at a tea-garden. 

2. (rhyming). A policeman, 
or COPPER (q.v.). 

3. (thieves'). A thief. See 
GUNNER. 

1893. Pall Mall Gaz., 2 Jan., p. 4., 
c. 3. Quite a '' school ' of youthful GRASS- 
HOPPERS are in possession of one corner of 
the ice, but on the Westminster side of the 
park 'pon bridge there is a good sprinkling 
of old hands. 

GRASSING, subs. (printers'). 
Casual work away from the 
office. See SMOUTING. 

GRASSVILLE, subs. (old). The 
country; cf. t DAISY viLLE. 

GRASS-WIDOW, sttbs. (old). i. An 
unmarried mother ; a deserted 
mistress. See BARRACK-HACK 
and TART. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
Widow's weeds, a GRASS-WIDOW, one that 
pretends to have been married, but never 
was, yet has children. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
Widow's weeds ; a GRASS-WIDOW ; a dis- 
carded mistress. 

2. (colloquial). A married 
woman temporarily separated 
from her husband. 

[The usually accepted derivation that 
grass = Fr., grace is doubtful. Hall (says 
J. C. Atkinson, in Glossary of Cleveland 
Words) gives as the definition of this word 
' an unmarried woman who has had a 
child ' ; in Moor's Suffolk Words and 
Phrases, GRACE-WIDOW, 'a woman who 
has had a child for her cradle ere she has 
had a husband for her bed ' ; and corres- 
ponding with this is the N. S. or Low Ger., 
gras-ivedewe. Again, Sw. D., gras-anka, 
or -enka= GRASS-WIDOW, occurs in the 
same sense as with us : 'a low, dissolute, 
unmarried woman living by herself." The 
original meaning of the word seems to 



Grass-Widow. 



T 97 Gravel-grinder. 



have been 'a woman whose husband 
is away,' either travelling or living 
apart. The people of Belgium call a 
woman of this description haeck-wedewe, 

from haecken, to feel strong desire 

It seems probable, therefore, from the ety- 
mology, taken in connection with the 
Clevel. signification, that our word may 
rather be from the Scand. source than 
from the German; only with a translation of 
the word enka into its English equivalent. 
Dan. D., f-raesenka, is a female whose 
betrothed lover (fastman) is dead ; nearly 
equivalent to which is GQrma.r\,strokwittwe, 
literally straw-widow. See N. and Q. 
6 S viii., 268, 414 : x. 333, 43 6, 526 ; xi. 78, 
178.] 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Cali- 
fornian widow; widow-bewitched; 
wife in water colours. 

1700. CONGREVK, Way of the World, 
Act iii. If the worst come to the 

worst, I'll TURN MY WIFE TO GRASS 

-I have already a deed of settlement of 
the best part of her estate, which I 
wheedl'd out of her. 

1877. Charnb. Journal, 12 Mar., 
p. 173. Mrs. Brittomart was one of those 
who never tolerated a bow-wow a species 
of animal well known in India and never 
went to the hills as a GRASS-WIDOW. 

1878. London, A GRASS-WIDOW. And 
so, you see, it comes to pass That she's a 
WIDOW OUT AT GRASS And happy in her 
freedom. 

1882. Saturday Review, n Feb. 
She is a GRASS-WIDOW, her husband is 
something in some Indian service. 

1885. W. BLACK, White Heather, 
ch. xli. Mrs. Lalor, a GRASS-WIDOW who 
was kind enough to play chaperon to the 
young people, but whose effective black 
eyes had a little trick of roving on their 
own account. 

1889. Daily Telegraph, 12 Feb. She 
had taken up her residence at a house in 
Sinclair-road, Kensington, where she 
passed as a GRASS-WIDOW. She repre- 
sented that her husband was engaged in 
mercantile pursuits. 

GRASS-WIDOWER, subs, (common). 
A man away from his wife. 

1886. New York Evening Post, 22 
May. All the GRASS-WIDOWERS and un- 
married men. 

GRAVEL, verb. (old). i. To con- 
found ; to puzzle ; to FLOOR 



1593. G. HARVEY, Pierus Sitpererog, 
in wks. II., 296. The finest intelli-encer, 
or sagest Politician in a state, would un- 
doubtedly have been GRAVELLED in tl.e 
execution of that rash attempt. 

1597. HALL, Satires, III., vi., 14. 
So long he drinks, till the black caravell 
Stands still fast GRAVELLED on the mud of 
hell. 

1600. SHAKSPEARE, As You Like 
It. When you were GRAVELLED for lack 
ot matter. 

1604. MARLOWE, Faustus, Act i., 
Sc. i. And I, that have with conci e 
syllogisms GRAVELL'D the pastois of the 
German church. 

1659. TORRIANO, Vocabulario, s.v. 

1667. % DRYDEN, Sir Martin Marr- 
all, Act iii. Warn. He's GRAVELLED, 
and I must help him out. 

1663. DRYDEN, An Evening's Love, 
Act ii. A difficult question in that art, 
which almost GRAVELS me. 

1857. A. TSOLLOPE, Three Clerks, 
ch. xxxiv. He was somewhat GRAVELLED 
for an answer to Alaric's earnest supplica- 
tion, and therefore made none till the 
request was repeated. 

1886. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
p. 206. I thought Alan would be GR/- 
VELLED at that, for we lacked the means cf 
writing in that desert. 

1893. National Observer, 1 1 Feb , 
p. 32 r. In truth to talk of Burns as the 
apotheosis of Knox is really to GRAVEL ar d 
confound your readers ; and but for \\ e 
context one might be suspected that the 
innuendo hid a touch of sarcasm. 

2. (American). To go against 
the grain. 

1887. CLEMENS, Life on the 
Mississippi, ch. xiv., p. 138. By long 
habit, pilots came to put all their wishts 
in the form of command 1 ?. It GRAVELS 
me to this day, to put my will in the weak 
shape of a request, instead of launching 
it in the crisp language of an order. 

GRAVEL-CRUSHER,^^, (military). 
A soldier doing defaulter's 
drill. 



GRAVEL-GRINDER, subs, (popular). 
A drunkard. For synonyms, s, 6 
LUSHINGTON. 



Gravel-rash. 



198 



Gray-beard. 



GRAVEL-RASH, subs, (colloquial). 
The lacerations caused by a fall. 

TO HAVE THE GRAVEL RASH, 

verb. phr. (colloquial). To be 
reeling drunk. For synonyms, 
see DRINKS and SCREWED. 

GRAVESEND-BUS, subs, (common). 
A hearse. 

GRAVESEND - SWEETMEATS, subs. 
(popular). Shrimps. 

GRAVESEND-TWINS, subs, (com- 
mon). Solid particles of sewage. 

GRAVE-YARD, subs, (common). i. 
The mouth. For synonyms, see 
POTATO-TRAP. 

TO KEEP A PRIVATE GRAVE- 
YARD, verb. phr. (American). 
To affect ferocity ; to bluster. 

GRAVY, subs. (venery). The 
sexual discharge ; the SPENDINGS 
(q.v.) both male and female. 
[Hence GRAVY-GIVER = the penis 
and the female pudendum ; and 
GRAVY - MAKER = the female 
pudendum. Hence, too, TO GIVE 

ONE'S GRAVY = to SPEND (q.V.). 

Cf., BEEF and MUTTON.] 

d. 1796. BURNS, ' Dainty Davie,' in 
Merry Muses. I wot he cam atween my 
thie, An' creeshed it weel wi' GRAVY. 

GRAVY- EYE, subs, (common) A 
derisive epithet : e.g., Well Old 

GRAVY-EYE. 

CRAWLER, subs. (old). A beggar. 
For synonyms, see CADGER. 

1821. D. HAGGART, Life, Glossary 
p. 62. Not so much as would sweeten a 
CRAWLER in the whole of them. 

GRAY, subs, (thieves'). I. A coin 
showing either two heads or two 
tails; a PONY (q.v.). 

1828. G. SMEETON, Doings in London, 
p. 40. Breslaw could never have done 
more upon cards than he could do with 
a pair of GRAYS (gaffing-coins). 



1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, Vol. II , p. 154. Some, 
if they can, will cheat, by means of a half- 
penny with a head or a tail on both sides, 
called a GRAY. 

18H8. Temple Bar, Vol. XXIV., p. 
539. They have a penny with two heads 
or two tails on it, which they call a GREY, 
and of course they can easily dupe fiats 
from the country. How do they call it a 
GREY, I wonder? I suppose they have 
named it after Sir George Grey because he 
was a two-faced bloke. 

2. (common). .Sw GRAYBACK, 
sense I. 

3. in. pi. (colloquial). Yawn- 
ing ; listlessness. Cf., BLUES. 

G PAYBACK, subs, (common). i. 
A louse. Also SCOTS GREYS. 
Fr., un grenadier. For syn- 
onyms, see CHATES. 

2. (American). A Confederate 
soldier. [Partly from the colour 
of his uniform, and partly because 
of its inhabitants. Cf., sense i.] 
See BLUE-BELLIES. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 9 Feb., p. 5, 
c. 4. The Confederate armies, during 
the great Civil War in America . . . were 
known ... as GREYBACKS, whereas their 
Federal opponents, from the light-azure 
gaberdines which they wore, were d.L'bbed 
' blue-bellies. 

1890. Scribners Mag. Mar., p. 283. 
Mrs. Rutherford stood in such abject fear 
of the GRAYBACKS that she regarded the 
possession of so large a sum as simply in- 
viting destruction. 

GRAY- BEARD, suls. (colloquial). 
i. An old man. Mostly in 
contempt. 

1593. SHAKSPEARE, Taming of the 
Shrew, Act ii., Sc. i. GREY-BEARD, thy 
love doth freeze. 

a. 1845. LONGFELLOW, Luck of Eden 
Hall. The GRAY-BEARD, with trembling 
hand obeys. 

2. (old). Originally a stone- 
ware drinking jug ; now a large 
earthenware jar for holding wine 
or spirits. [From the bearded 
face in relief with which they were 
ornamented.] 



Gray-cloak. 



199- 



Gray-mare. 



smuggling gin on th 
Suffolk, are at this 



1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, GREY- 
BEARD, s.v. Dutch earthen jugs, used for 
the coasts of Essex and 
time called GREY- 
BEARDS. 

1814. SCOTT, Waverley, ch. Ixiv. 
There's plenty of brandy in the GREY- 
BEARD. 

1886. The State, 20 May, p. 217. A 
whisky or brandy which is held in merited 
respect for very superior potency is entitled 
[in America] 'reverent,' from the same 
kind of fancy which led the Scotch to call 
a whisky jar a GREY-BEARD. 

GRAY-CLOAK, subs, (common). 
An alderman above the chair. 
[Because his proper robe is a 
cloak furred with grey amis.] 

GRAY-GOOSE, subs. (Scots'). A 
big field stone on the surface of 
the ground. 

1816. SCOTT, Black Dwarf, ch. iv. 
Biggin a dry-stane dyke, I think, wi' the 
GREY-GEESE as they ca' thae great loose 
stones. 

GRAYHOUND,.y&y. (general). i. A 
fast Atlantic liner ; one especially 
built for speed. Also OCEAN 

GRAYHOUND. 

1887. Scientific American, vol. 
LVL, 2. They [ships] are built in the 
strongest possible manner, and are so 
swift of foot, as to have already become 
formidable rivals to the English GREY 
HOUND. 

2. (CambridgeUniversity). An 
obsolete name for a member of 
Clare College ; a CLARIAN. 

1889. WHIBLEY, Cap and Gown, 
xxviii. The members of Clare .... 
were called GRAYHOUNDS. 



GRAY-MARE, subs, (common). A 
wife ; specifically one who WEARS 
THE BREECHES (q.v.}. [From 
the proverb, 'The gray mare is 
the better horse ' = the wife is 
master : a tradition, perhaps, from 
the time when priests were for- 
bidden to carry arms or ride on a 



male horse : Non cniui liateratc 
pontificeni sacronim vel anna 
ferre, vel practer quatu in 
equtid equitare. 'Btda., Hist. 
Ecd. ii., 13. Fr., mariage 
tfepervier=2(. hawk's marriage: the 
female hawk being the larger and 
stronger bird. Lord Macaulay's 
explanation (quot. 1849) is the 
merest guess-work. ] 

1546. JOHN HAYWOOD, Proverbs 
[Sharman's reprint, 1874]. She is (quoth 
he) bent to force you perforce, To know 
that the GREY MARE is the better horse. 

1550. A Treaty se, Shewing and 
Declaring the Pryde and Abuse of 
Women Now a Dayes (in Hazlitt's Early 
Popular Poetry, iv., 237). What ! shall 
the GRAVE MAYRE be the better horse, 
And be wanton styll at home ? 

1605. CAMDEN, Remains Concern- 
ing Britain [ed. 1870, p. 332]. In list of 
proverbs. (Is said to be the earliest in 
English.) 

1670. RAY, Proverbs, s.v. 

1693-1750. WARD, London Spy, part 
II., p. 40. Another as dull as if the GREY 
MARE was the better Horse ; and deny'd 
himEnterance for keeping late Hours. 

1705-1707. WARD, Hudibras Redi- 
vivus, vol. II., pt. iv., p. 5. There's no 
resisting Female Force, GREY MARE will 
prove the better Horse. 

1717. PRIOR, Epilogue to Mrs. 
Manleys Lucius. As long as we have eyes, 
or hands, or breath, We'll look, or write, or 
talk you all to death. Yield, or she- 
Pegasus will gain her course, And the 
GREY MARE will prove the better horse. 

1719. DuRFEY r Pills, etc., p. 240. 
For the GREY MARE has proved the better 
horse. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Convers., dial. 
3. I wish she were married ; but I doubt 
the GRAY MARE would prove the better 
horse. 

1748. SMOLLETT, Rod. Random, 
ch. xix. By the hints they dropped, I 
learned the GRAY MARE wa~ the better 
horse that she was a matron of a high 
spirit. 



Gray-parson. 



Grease. 



1819. MACAULAY, Hist. England. 
The vu'gar proverb, that the GREY MARE 
is the better horse, originated, I suspect, 
in the preference generally given to the 
GKEY MARES of Flanders over the finest 
coach horses of England. 

1883. G. A. S[ALA], in Illustr. 
London News, 14 Apr., p. 359, c. 2. 
She [Mrs. Romford], did not over- 
accentuate either her strong - mindedriess 
or her jealousy of her flighty husband ; 
but she let him and the audience unmis- 
takably know that she was in all respects 
the GREY MARE in the Romford stable. 

GRAY - PARSON (or GRAY - COAT 
PARSON, subs. (old). A lay im- 
propriator, or lessee of tithes. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GREY 

PARSON, s.v. A farmer who rents the 

tythes of the rector or vicar. 

1830 in COBBETT'S Rural Rides, vol. 

I., p. 123 note (ed. 1886). The late editor 

says, that, having been a large holder of 

lay tithes, the author applied to Mr. 

Nicholls, the name of the GREY-COATED 

PARSON. 

GREASE, subs, (common). I. A 
bribe ; PALM-OIL (or -GREASE). 
(q.v. for synonyms). In America 
BOODLE (q.v.}. GREASING = 
bribing. 
1823. BEE, Diet, of Turf, s.v. A 

bonus given to promote the cause of 

anyone. 

2. (printers'). Well - paid 
work ; FAT (q.v. }. 

3. (common. Fawning ; 
flattery (a figurative use of sense 



Verb (old). I. To bribe; to 
corrupt by presents ; to TIP (q.v.}. 
Also more fully TO GREASE IN 

THE FIST, HAND, Or PALM. Fr., 

coquer la boucanade. For syn- 
onyms, see SQUARE. 

1557. TUSSER, Husbandrie, ch. 68, 
pt. 2, p. 159 (E.D.S.). How husbandrie 
easeth, to huswiferie pleaseth, And manie 
purse GREASETH With silver and gold. 

1578. WHETSTONE, Promoss and 
Cassandra, ii., 3. GREASE them well in 
their hands. 



1592. GREENE, Quip in wks., xi., 261 
That did you not GREASE THE SEALERS of 
Leaden Hall throughly in the fist, they 
should never be sealed, but turned away 
and made forfiet by the statute. 

1619. FLETCHER, Wild Goose Chase. 
Am I GREASED once again ? 

1649. F. QUARLES, Virgin Widom, 
IV., i., p. 40. GREAZE MY FIST with a 
Tester or two, and ye shall find it in your 
penny-worths. 

1678. C. COTTON, Scarronides, Bk. 
IV., p. 70 (ed. 1725). Him she conjures, 
intreats, and prays, With all the Cunning 
that she ha?, GREASES HIS FIST ; nay 
more, engages Thenceforth to mend his 
Quarters-wages. 

1693. DRYDEN, Persius, Hi., 139. 
And after, envy not the store Of the 
GREAS'D advocate, that grinds the poor. 

1698-1700. WARD, London Spy, pt. 
xv. , p. 364. But the Gay Curteyan who 
trades for gold, That can but GREASE A 
PALM when she's in hold, No Justice need 
she dread. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1878. JAS. PAYN, By Proxy, ch. x. 
His Excellency, your master, has given 
orders, I presume, that after I have made 
my compliments as delicate a phrase as 
he could think of for GREASING THE HANDS 
of justice I shall be at liberty to visit my 
friend. 

1879. HORSLEY, in Mactnillans 
Magazine, Oct. When I went to the fence 
he bested (cheated) me because I was 
drunk, and only gave me 8 IDS. for the 
lot. So the next day I went to him and 
asked him if he was not going to GREASE 
MY DUKE (put money into my hand). 

1891. Pall Mall Gaz., 2 Sept., 
p. 7, c. 2. Did other people having 
business with the printing bureau tell you 
that it would be necessary to GREASE 
Sene'cal 1 

2. (common). To fawn ; to 
flatter. Formerly, TO GREASE 
ONE'S BOOTS. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde cf Wordes. 
Onger i stivali, TO GREASE ONES BOOTES, 
id est, to flatter or cog with, to faune vpon 
one. 

3. (old). To gull ; to cheat ; 
to DO. 



Greased L igJi In ing. 20 1 



Great Go. 



TO GREASE A FAT SOW IN 

THE ARSE, verb. fhr. (old). 
To bribe a rich man. GROSE. 

To GREASE ONE'S GILLS, verb, 
phr. (common). To make a 
good or luxurious meal. 

GREASED LIGHTNING, subs. phr. 
(American). An express train. 

1871. DE VERE, Americanisms, 
p. 359. The usual Express Train is not 
half fast enough for the impatient 
traveller ; he must have his Lightning 
Express Train, and in the Far West 
improves stili farther by calling it 
GREASED LIGHTNING, after a favourite 
Yankee term. 

LIKE GREASED LIGHTNING, 
adv. phr. (American). Very 
quick. See BED-POST. 

1848. DURIVAGE, Stray Subjects, 
p. 72. Quicker than GREASED LIGHTNIN', 
My covies, I was dead. 

1890. Globe, 27 Aug., p. 2, c. 5. 
He is drawn along at a rapid rate, or, as 
the correspondent puts it, he is whisked 
all over town like GREASED LIGHTNING. 

1891. J. NEWMAN, Scamping Tricks, 
p. 98. He measured again, and then off 
went his coat LIKE GREASED LIGHTNING, 
and we all followed suit. 

GREASER, subs. (American). i. 
A Mexican in general ; also 
a Spanish American : see 
quots. 1848 and 1888. The term 
originated during the Mexican 
war. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far West, 
p. 3. Note. The Mexicans are called 
Spaniards or GREASERS (from their greasy 
appearance) by the Western people. 

1855. MARRYAT, Mountains and 
Mole Hills, p. 236. The Americans call 
the Mexicans GREASERS, which is scarcely 
a complimentary soubriquet ; although 
the term GREASER CAMP as applied to a 
Mexican encampment is truthfully 
suggestive of filth and squalor. 

1876. BESANT and RICE, Golden 
Butterfly, Prologue i. Behind the leadeis 
followed a little troop of three, consisting of 
one English servant and two GREASERS. 



1883. BRET HARTE, In the Carquin z 
n'oods, footnote to ch. vii. GREASERS, 
Californian slang for a mixed race of Mexi- 
cans and Indians. 

1888. Century Mag., October. To 
avenge the murder of one of their number 
the cowboys gathered from the country 
round about, and fairly stormed the 
GREASER that is, Mexican village where 
the murder had been committed, killing 
four of the inhabitants. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody, ch. 2. 
Don't let the GREASER git his fingers in 
your ha'r. 

2. in. pi. (Royal Military 
Academy). Fried potatoes, as 
distinguished from BOILERS = 
boiled potatoes. 

TO GIVE ONE GREASER, verb. 

phr. (Winchester College). To 
rub the back of the hand hard with 
the knuckles. 

GREASE-SPOT, tubs, (common). 
The imaginary result of a passage 
at arms, physical or intellectual. 

1344. HALIBURTON, The Attache, ch. 
xyi. If he hadn't a had the clear grit in 
him, and showed his teelh and claws, 
they'd a nullified him so you wouldn't see 
a GREASE-SPOT of him no more. 

GREASY-CHIN, subs. (old). A 
dinner. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
' Lay of St. Gengulphus.' And to every 
guest his card had express'd ' Half past ' 
as the hour for a GREASY CHIN. 

GREAT CRY AND LITTLE WOOL. 
See CRY. 

GREAT Go (or GREATS), subs. 
(Cambridge University). The 
final examination for the B.A. 
degree; cf. t LITTLE-GO. At 

Oxford, GREATER. 

1841. Prince of the New made 
Baccalere, Oxford. GREAT-GO is passed. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at 
Oxford, ch. x. Both small and GREAT 
are sufficiently distant to be altogether 
ignored, if we are that way inclined. 



Great Gun. 



202 



Great Scott. 



1 85(5- 7. TH AC K ER AY, King of B) ent- 
ford's Test., st. 7. At college, though not 
fast, Yet his little-go and GREAT-GO, He 
creditably pass'd. 

1871. Morning Advertiser, 28 Apr. 
Yes, Mr. Lowe has been plucked for his 

GREAT GO. 

1883. Echo, 3 May, p. 2, c. 4. But 
few, indeed, are the men who have been 
in for GREATS during the last twenty 
years, and who have not blessed Mr. 
Kitchin for his edition of the Novum 
Organuin. 

GREAT GUN, subs. phr. (common). 
i. A person of distinction; a 
thing of importance. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Big 
bug ; big dog of the tanyard ; big 
dog with the brass collar; big gun ; 
big head ; big one ; big (or great) 
pot ; big wig ; biggest toad in the 
puddle ; cock of the walk ; don ; 
large potato ; nob ; rumbusti- 
cator ; stunner ; swell ; swell- 
head ; topper ; top-sawyer. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
gros bonnet (familiar = big 
wig) ; tin fierot (a stuck-up) ; un 
herr (from the German); Monsieur 
Raidillon or Monsietir Pointu ( = 
Mr. STUCK-UP). 

1835. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringles 
Log, ch. ii. A Spanish Ecclesiastic, the 

Canon of . Plenty of GREAT GUNS, at 

any rate a regular park of artillery. 

1843. HALIBURTON, Saw Slick in 
England, ch. xv. The GREAT GUNS and 
big bugs have to take in each other's 
ladies. 

Ibid., p. 24. Pick out the BIG BUGS 
and see what sort of stuff they're made of. 

1853. WH. MELVILLE, Digby Grand, 
ch. x. The GREAT GUNS of the party, 
the rector of the parish, the member for 
the county. 

2. (pedlers'). A peculiar 
practice ; a trick of particular use- 
fulness and importance ; a favour- 
ite WHEEZE (ff.V.), 



1851. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. c.nd 
Lond. Poor, i., 256. The street-seller's 
GREAT GUN, as he called it, was to make 
up packets, as closely resembling as he 
could accomplish it those which were 
displayed in the windows of any of the 
shops. 

To BLOW GREAT GUNS, verb, 
phr. (nautical). To blow a gale ; 

also TO BLOW GREAT GUNS AND 
SMALL ARMS. 

1839. HARRISON AINSWORTH, Jack 
Sheppard [1889], 23. ' Curse me, if I 
don't think all the world means to cross 
the Thames this fine night ! ' observed 
Ben. ' One'd think it rained fares as well 

as BLOWED GREAT GUNS. 

1854. H. MILLER, Sch. and Schm. 
(1858), 14. It soon began to BLOW GREAT 
GUNS. 

1865. H. KINGSLEY, Hillyars and 
Burton,^.. Ixxvii. It was BLOWING PRETTY 
HIGH GUNS, sou' eastern by east, off shore 
and when we came to the harbour's mouth 
there was Tom Wyatt with his pilot just 
aboard. 

1869. ARTHUR SKETCHLEY, Mrs. 
Broiun on Things in General. I never 
did see such' weather, A-BLOWIN GREAT 
GUNS as the sayin' is. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 340. It BLEW 
GREAT GUNS from the seaward. 



GREAT-HOUSE. See BIG-HOUSE. 

GREAT- JOSEPH, subs. (old). An 
overcoat. 

GREAT SCOTT! intj. (American). 
An exclamation of surprise ; an 
apology for an oath. [Possibly 
a memory of the name of Gen. 
Winfield Scott, a presidential 
candidate whose dignity and style 
weie such as to win him the 
nickname "Fuss-and-Feathers."] 
Also GREAT CESAR. 

1888. New York Mercury. GREAT 
SCOTT ! you don't say so. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody of No- 
where, p. 98. Bob, what's the matter with 
you ? GREAT SCOTT ! the mine hain't give 
out. 



Great Shakes. 



203 



Greedy-gut. 



1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 19 June, 
p. 396, c 2. GREAT SCOTCH ! no, we mean 
Scott well, language worthy of the great 
Harry prevailed for awhile. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, 
p. 305. ' GREAT SCOTT ! what the deuce is 
Wells up to ? ' said the Squire. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 106. GREAT 
CAESAR! 

1892. Tit Bits, 19 Mar., p. 416, c. i. 
He. GREAT C<*:SAR ! There you go 
again ! She. James will you please 
remember that it is your wife to whom you 



are speaking, 



He. No other 



woman could drive me raving, distracted, 
crazy, asking silly questions about 
She. Tames ! 

GREAT SHAKES. See SHAKES. 

GREAT SMOKE, subs, (thieves') 
London. 

GREAT SUN, intj. (common). An 
exclamation. 

1876. BESANT and RICE, Golden 
Butterfly. GREAT SUN ! I think I see it 
now. 

GREAT- UN WASH ED, szibs. (collo- 
quial). The lower classes ; the 
rabble. Also the UNWASHED. 
[First used by Burke ; popularised 
by Scott.] 

1892. SYDNEY WATSON, Wcps the 
Waif, ch. iii., p. 4. We begin to under- 
stand what is meant by the lowest classes, 

THE GREAT UNWASHED. 

GREAT WHIPPER-IN, sttbs. phr. 
(common). Death ; OLD 

FLOORER (q.V.). 

GRECIAN, subs. (old). i. A 
roysterer ; a GREEK (q.v.). 

2. (Christ's Hospital). A 
senior boy. 

3. (popular). An Irishman. 

GRECIAN ACCENT, subs, (popular). 
A brogue. 



GRECIAN-BEND, subs, (common). 
A stoop in walking. [Affected by 
some women c. 1869-80.] Cf., 
ALEXANDRA LIMP, ROMAN 
FALL, ITALIAN WRIGGLE, 
KANGAROO DROOP. 

1821. Etonian, ii., 57. In person he 
was of the common size, with something of 
the GRECIAN BEND, contracted doubtless 
from sedentary habits. 

1869. Daily Telegraph, i Sept. I do 
not, however, think the ' stoop ' our girls 
now have arises from tight-lacing. Some 
affect what is called the GRECIAN BEND. 

1870. Orchestra, 25 Mar. ' Grand 
Comic Concert.' The ladies have their 
GRECIAN BEND, our typical gentleman ex- 
plains a correspondent masculine affecta- 
tion which he dubs ' The Roman Fall The 
Roman Fall.' 

1871. Morning Advertiser, 4 Dec. 
A lady of five feet becomes, say, five feet 
two inches per heels, five feet six inches per 
hair, five feet again, per GRECIAN BEND. 

1876. Chambers Journal, No. 629. 
Your own advocacy for the GRECIAN BEND 
and the Alexandra limp both positive and 
practical imitations of physical affliction. 

1886. CornhillMagazine, Dec., p. 618. 
You ain't nearly fine enough for a wait- 
ress or for 'im, neether. He likes a smart 
young woman with a GRECIAN BEND. 



GREED, subs, (thieves). Money. 
For synonyms, see ACTUAL and 
GILT. 

1857. DUCANGE ANGLICUS, Vulg. 
Tongue, s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

GREEDY - GUT (or -GUTS), subs. 
(old). A voracious eater ; a 
glutton. [As in the old (school- 
boys') rhyme : ' Guy-hi, GREEDY- 
GUT, Eat all the pudding up.'] 
For synonyms, see STODGER. Fr. , 
un glafdtre. 

1598. FLORIO, A WorldeofWordes, 
Edace, an eater, a devourer, aGREEDiGUT. 
Ibid. Putti occhi, greedie eies. 

1772. COLES, Eng. Diet., s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 



Greek. 



204 



Greek Kalends. 



GREEK, subs. (old). i. Slang, or 
FLASH (y.v.) ; usually ST. GILES' 
GREEK (q.v.), Cf., CANT, GIB- 
BERISH, etc. 

2. (colloquial). A card-sharper; 
a cheat. 

152?. ROY and BARLOW, Rede me 
and be not wrothe, p. 117 [ed. Arber, 
1871]. In carde playinge he is a goode 
GREKE And can skyll of post and glycke, 
Also a prayre of dyce to trolle. 

1568. Satirical Poems, ' Scottish Text 
Soc. 1 [1889-91] i., 77. A cowle, a co\vle, 
for such a GREEK were fittter far to wea're. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Grecheggiare .... to play the GREEK. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Troilus and 
Cressida, v. 6. Come, both you cogging 
GREEKS ; have at you both. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, xxviii. 
Most of the cant phrases in HEAD'S 
English Rogue, which was published, I 
believe, in 1666, would be intelligible to a 
GREEK of the present day. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
ii., 5. Come lads, bustle about ; play will 
begin some of the pigeons are here al- 
ready, the GREEKS will not be long fol- 
lowing. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, bk. 
IV., ch. i. Jerry was a GREEK by nature, 
and could land a flat as well as the best of 
them. 

1855. THACKERAY, Neiucomes, ch. 
xxxvi. He was an adventurer, a pauper, a 
blackleg, a regular GREEK. 

1861. Once a Week, 25 May, p. 97. 
As the GREEK places the packet [of cards]on 
the top of the other, he allows it to project 
the least bit in the world. 

1834. Saturday Review, 16 Feb., 
p. 202. Without a confederate the now 
fashionable game of baccarat does not 
seem to offer many chances for the GREEK. 

3. (old). An Irishman. 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf. GREEK, 
s.v. Irishmen call themselves GREEKS. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. 
and Land. Poor,Vo\. i., p. 240. We had 
the GREEKS (the lately arrived Irish) down 
upon us more than once. 



1872. Standard, 3 Sept. ' Melbourne 
Correspondence.' The most noticeable 
point of comparison between the two 
Administrations is the presence or the 
absence of the GREEK element from the 
Cabinet. GREEK, as some of your 
readers are aware, is colonial slang 
for ' Irish.' 

4. (thieves'). A gambler. ALo 
a highwayman. 

MERRY GREEK, subs. phr. 
(old). A roysterer ; a drunkard. 
COTGRAVE. [In Latin, Graecare 
= to play the Greek high-living 
and hard drinking.] 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Troilus and 
Cressida, iv., 4. A woful Cressid 'mongst 
the MERRY GREEKS. 

GREEK FIRE, subs. phr. (thieves'). 
Bad whiskey ; ROTGUT (q.v.\ 

1889. CLARKSON and RICHARDSON, 
Police, p. 321, s.v. 

GREEK KALENDS, subs. phr. 
(colloquial). Never. To defer 
anything to the Greek Kalends is 
to put it offsme die. (The Greeks 
used no kalends in their reckon- 
ing of time.) 

c. 1649. DRUMM. of HAWTH. Con- 
sid. Parlt., wks. (1711) 185 . That gold, 
plate, and all silver, given to the mint- 
house in these late troubles, shall be paid 
at the GREEK KALENDS. 

1653. URQUHART, Rabelais, bk. I., 
ch. xx. The judgment or decree shall be 
given out and pronounced at the next 
GREEK CALENDS, that is, never. 

1823. BYRON, Don Juan, c. xiii., st. 
45. They and their bills, ' Arcadians 
both,' are left To the GREEK KALENDS of 
another session. 

1825. SCOTT, Betrothed. Intro. 
Will you speak of your paltry prose 
doings in my presence, whose great his- 
torical poem, in twenty books, with notes 
in proportion, has been postponed AD 
GR^ECAS KALENDAS ? 

1872. O. W. HOLMES, Poet 
Break/. T. i., 18. His friends looked for 
it only on the GREEK CALENDS, say on 
the 3ist of April, when that should come 
round, if you would modernize the phrase. 



Green. 



205 



Green. 



1882. Macmillaris Mag., 253. So 
we go on ... and the works are sent to 
he GREEK CALENDS. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. In the 
reign of Queen Dick ; when the 
devil is blind ; when two 
Sundays come in a week ; at 
Doomsday ; at Tib's Eve ; one 
of these odd-come-shortly s ; when 
my goose pisses ; when the ducks 
have eaten up the dirt ; when pigs 
fly; in a month of Sundays; once 
in a blue moon. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Mardi 
s'il fait chaud (obsolete) ; 
Dimanche apres la grande messe 
(popular) ; quand les pottles pisse- 
ront ; semaine des quatre jeiidis 
(popular : when four Thursdays 
come in a week). 

GREEN, subs. (common). i. 
Rawness ; simplicity. Generally, 
* Do you see any GREEN in my 
eye'? = Do you take me for a 
fool ? See adj. sense. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, 247. I'm not a tailor, but I 
understands about clothes, and I believe 
that no person ever saw anything GREEN 
in my eye. 

1892. Ally Sloper, 19 Mar., p. 95, 
c. 2. Ally Sloper the 'cute, Ally Sloper 
the sly, Ally Sloper, the cove with no 
GREEN in his eye. 

1892. Illustrated Bits, 22 Oct., p. 14, 
c. 2. Sindin' both shlips is it? How 
wud Oi have a check on ye ? Do ye see 

iliny GKEEN IN ME OI? 

Adj. (colloquial). Simple ; 
inexperienced; gullible; UN- 
SALTED (q.v.}. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Hamlet, Act 
i., Sc. 3. Pol. Affection ! pooh ! you 
speak like a GREEN girl. 

1*505. CHAPMAN, All Fools, Act iv., 
p. 67 (Plays, 1874). Shall I then say you 
want experience? Y'are GREEN, y'are 
credulous ; easy to be blinded. 



1748. T. DVCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.). GREEN (a) . . . so likewise a 
young or unexperienced person in arts, 
sciences, etc., is sometimes said to be 
GREEN, raw. etc. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry. 
Tom. No ; you're GREEN ! Jerry. 
GREEN ! Log. Ah ! not fly ! Tom. 
Yes, not awake ! 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. 
viii. ' My eyes, how GREEN ! ' exclaimed 
the young gentleman. ' Why a beak's a 
madgst'rate.' 

1841. Punch, July 17, p. 6. 
What a GREEN chap you are, after all. A 
public man's consistency ! It's only a 
popular delusion. 

1850. SMEDLEY, Frank Fairleigh, 
p. 19. Eh ! why ! what's the matter with 
you? have I done anything particularly 
GREEN, as you call it ? 

1856. T. HUGHES, Tom Brown's 
School Days, pt. I., ch. ii. You try to 
make us think . . . that you are, even as 
we, of the working classes. But bless 
your hearts, we ain't so GREEN. 

1869. Literary World, 31 Dec., 
p. 129, c. 2. His fellow-passengers laughed 
at him for being so GREEN. 

1879. Punch's A Imanack, p. 7. Season- 
able Slang. For Spring. You be blowed! 
ForSummer. I'll warm yer! For Autumn. 
Not so blooming GREEN ! For Winter 
An ice little game all round. 

1887. Lippincott, July, p. 104. With- 
in the last day or so a young fellow has 
arrived who is in danger of being eaten by 
the cows, so GREEN is he. 

1890. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 7 Nov. 
Being quite GREEN at the time, I rather 
lost my head over my good fortune. 

Verb (colloquial). To hoax ; 
to swindle. At Eton TO GREEN 
UP. For synonyms, see GAMMON. 

1836-41. T.C. BUCKLAND, Eton. I 
was again catechized on many points 
personal to myself, and some mild attempts 
were made to GREEN me, as boys call it. 

1889. Answers, 2 Mar., p. 218, c. i. 
Whereupon the old humbug burst into a 
loud guffaw, as though he were rejoicing 
at having GREENED the toff. 

1892. ANSTEY, Voces Populi (Second 
S"e ies). 'Bank Holiday,' 147. THE 
DAMSEL (giggling). You go on you don't 
GREEN me that w'y- 



Greens. 



206 



Greens. 



GREENS, subs, (old). i. Chlorosis: 
i. e. , the green sickness. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 313. 
The maiden takes five, too, that's vexed 
with he*- GREENS. 

2. in. pL (printers'). Bad or 
worn out rollers. 

TO HAVE, GET, or GIVE ONE'S 
GREENS, verb phr. (venery). To 
enjoy, procure, or confer the 
sexual favour. Said indifferently 
of both sexes. 

Hence, also, ON FOR ONE'S 
GREENS = amorous and willing; 
AFTER ONE'S GREENS = in quest 
of the favour; GREEN-GROVE = the 
pubes ; GREEN-GROCERY = the 
female pudendum ; THE PRICE 
OF GREENS = the cost of an 
embrace ; FRESH GREENS = a new 
PIECE (q.v.). [Derived by some 
from the old Scots' grette to pine, 
to long for, to desire with in- 
sistence : whence GREENS = long- 
ings, desires ; which words may in 
their turn be referred, perhaps, to 
Mid. Eng. , zernen, A. S. , gyrnan, 
Icelandic, girna = to desire, and 
Gothic, gairns = desirous. Mod. 
Ger., begehren = to desire. See 
DALZIEL, Darker Superstitions of 
Scotland, 1835, p. 106 : 'He 
answered that he wald gif the 
sum Spanyie fleis callit cantarides, 
quhilk, gif thou suld move the 
said Elizabeth to drynk of, it 
wold mak hir out of all question 
to GRENE eftir the.' Trial of 
Peter Hay, of Kirklands, and 
others, for Witchcraft , 2$th May, 
1601. But in truth, the expres- 
sion is a late and vulgar coinage. 
It would seem, indeed, to be a 
reminiscence of GARDEN (q.v.'], 
and the set of metaphors as 
KAIL, CAULIFLOWER, PARSLEY 
BED, and so forth (all which see} 
suggested thereby.] 



ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To BE 
all there but the most of 
you ; in Abraham's bosom ; up 
one's petticoats (or among one's 
frills) ; there ; on the spot ; into ; 
up ; up to one's balls ; where 
uncle's doodle goes ; among the 
cabbages. 

To DANCE the blanket horn- 
pipe ; the buttock jig ; the 
cushion dance (see MONO- 
SYLLABLE) ; the goat's jig ; the 
mattress jig ; the married man's 
cotillion ; the matrimonial polka ; 
the reels o' Bogie (Scots') ; the 
reels of Stumpie (Scots') ; to 
the tune of THE SHAKING OF 
THE SHEETS ; with your arse to 
the ceiling, or the kipples 
(Scots'). 

To GO ballocking ; beard-split- 
ting ; bed-pressing (Marston) ; 
belly-bumping (Urquhart) ; bitch- 
ing (Marston); bum - fighting ; 
bum-working ; bum-tickling; bum- 
faking ; bush-ranging ; buttock- 
stirring ( Urquhart ) ; bird's- 
nesting ; buttocking ; cock- 
fighting ; cunny-catching ; dood- 
ling ; drabbing; fleshing it; flesh- 
mongering ; goosing : to Hairy - 
fordshire ; jock-hunting ; jottling ; 
jumming (Urquhart) ; leather- 
stretching ; on the loose ; mot- 
ting ; molrowing ; pile-driving ; 
prick - scouring ; quim - sticking ; 
lumping ; rump-splitting ; strum- 
ming ; twatting ; twat - faking ; 
vaulting (Marston, etc.) ; wench- 
ing ; womanizing ; working the 
dumb (or double, or hairy) oracle, 
twat - raking ; tummy - tickling ; 
tromboning ; quim - wedging ; 
tail-twitching ; button-hole work- 
ing ; under-petticoating. 

TO HAVE, or DO, A BIT OF 

beef (of women) ; business 



Greens. 



207 



Greens. 



(Shakspeare); bum-dancing; cauli- 
flower ; cock; cock-fighting; 
cunt ; curly greens ; fish ; on 
a fork ; fun ; off the chump 
end ; flat ; front - door work ; 
giblet pie ; the gut- (or cream- 
or sugar-) stick (of women) ; 
jam ; ladies' tailoring ; meat ; 
mutton ; pork ; quimsy ; rough ; 
sharp-and-blunt (rhyming slang) ; 
stuff ; split-mutton ; skirt ; sum- 
mer cabbage. 

To HAVE, or DO, or PERFORM, 
the act of androgynation (Urqu- 
hart) ; a ballocking ; a bit ; a 
lassie's by - job (Burns) ; a bed- 
ward bit (Durfey) ; a beanfeast 
in bed ; a belly - warmer ; a 
blindfold bit ; a bottom-wetter 
(of women) ; a bout ; a brush 
with the cue ; a dive in the 
dark ; a drop-in ; a double fight ; 
an ejectment in Love-lane; a four- 
legged frolic ; a fuck ; a futter ; 
a game in the cock-loft ; a goose- 
and-duck (rhyming) ; the cul- 
batizing exercise (Urquhart) ; a 
grind ; a hoist-in ; a jottle ; a 
jumble-giblets ; a jumble-up ; an 
inside worry ; a leap ; a leap up 
the ladder ; a little of one with 
t'other (Durfey) ; a mount ; a 
mow (David Lyndsay, Burns, 
etc. ) ; a nibble ; a plaster of 
warm guts (Grose) ; a poke ; 
a put ; a put-in ; a random push 
(Burns) ; a rasp ; a ride ; a roger ; 
a rootle ; a rush up the straight ; 
a shot at the bull's eye ; a slide 
up the board ; a squirt - and - a 
squeeze ; a touch-off; a touch- 
up ; a tumble-in ; a wet-'un ; a 
wipe at the place ; a wollop-in. 

SPECIFIC. To HAVE, or DO, 

A BACK-SCUTTLE, (q.V.) ; a 
BUTTERED BUN (q.V.) ; a DOG'S 
MARRIAGE (q.V.) ', a KNEE- 
TREMBLER, PERPENDICULAR, or 



UPRIGHT (q.V.) ; a MATRIMONIAL 
(q.V.) ; SPOON-FASHION (q.V.) ', 
a ST. GEORGE 



To PLAY AT, All-fours ; 
Adam - and - Eve ; belly -to -belly 
(Urquhart) ; brangle - buttock 
(Urquhart); buttock -and -leave - 
her ; cherry-pit (Herrick); couple- 
-your-navels ; cuddle-my-cuddie 
(Durfey) ; Hey Gammer Cook (C. 
Johnson) ; fathers-and-mothers ; 
the first-game-ever-played ; Han- 
die-Dandie; Hooper's Hide (q.v.); 
grapple - my - belly ( Urquhart ) ; 
horses - and - mares (schoolboys') ; 
the close - buttock - game (Urqu- 
hart); cock-in-cover ; houghmag- 
andie (Burns) ; in-and-in; in-and- 
out ; Irish-whist (where-the-jACK 
(?.z>.)-takes-the ACE [see MONO- 
SYLLABLE] ) ; the - loose - coat- 
game (Urquhart); Molly's hole 
(schoolboys') ; pickle -me- tickle - 
me (Urquhart) ; mumble - peg ; 
prick - the - garter ; pully - hauly 
(Grose) ; put-in-all ; the-same- 
old - game ; squeezem - close ; 
stable - my - naggie ; thread - the- 
needle ; tops - and - bottoms ; 
two - handed - put (Grose) ; up- 
tails-all. 

GENERAL. To Adam and Eve 
it ; to blow the groundsels ; to 
engage three to one ; to chuck a 
tread ; to do (Jonson) ; to do it ; 
to do ' the act of darkness ' 
(Shakspeare), the act of love, the 
deed of kind, the work of increase, 
' the divine work of fatherhood ' 
(Whitman) ; to feed the dumb- 
glutton ; to get one's hair cut ; to 
slip in Daintie Davie (Scots'), or 
Willie Wallace (idem); to get 
Jack in the orchard ; to get on 
top of ; to give a lesson in simple 
arithmetic (i.e., addition, division, 
multiplication and subtraction) ; 
to give a GREEN GOWN (q.v.) ; to 
go ' groping for trout in a peculiar 



Greens. 



208 



Greens. 



river' (Shakspeare) ; to go face- 
making ; to go to Durham (North 
Country) ; to go to see a sick 
friend; to have it; to join faces 
(Durfey) ; to join giblets ; to 
make ends meet ; to make the 
beast with two backs (Shak- 
speare and Urquhart) ; to make a 
settlement in tail ; to play top- 
sawyer ; to put it in and break 
it ; to post a letter ; to go on 
the stitch; to labor lea (Scots) ; 
to tether one's nags on (idem) ; 
to nail twa wames thegither 
(idem) ; to lift a leg on (Burns) ; 
to ride a post (Cotton) ; to peel 
one's end in ; to put the devil 
into hell (Boccaccio) ; to rub 
bacons (Urquhart) ; to strop 
one's beak ; to strip one's tarse 
in ; to grind one's tool ; to grease 
the wheel ; to take on a split-arsed 
mechanic ; to take a turn in 
Bushey-park, Cock-alley, Cock- 
lane, Cupid s - alley, Cupid's- 
corner, Hair-court, * the lists of 
love ' (Shakspeare), Love-lane, 
on Mount Pleasant, among the 
parsley, on Shooter's-hill, through 
the stubble ; to whack it up ; to 
wollop it in ; to labour leather ; 
to wind up the clock (Sterne). 

OF WOMEN ONLY. To get an 
arselins coup (Burns) ; to catch 
an oyster ; to do the naughty ; to 
do a spread, a tumble, a back- 
fall, what mother, did before me ; 
a turn on one's back, what Eve 
did with Adam ; to hold, or turn 
up one's tail (Burns and Durfey) ; 
to get one's leg lifted, one's ket- 
tle mended, one's chimney swept 
out, one's leather stretched ; to 
lift one's leg ; to open up to ; 
to get shot in the tail ; to get 
a shove in one's bl ; nd eye ; to 
get a wet bottom ; what Harry 
gave Doll (Durfey) ; to suck the 
sugar-stick ; to take in beef; to 



take Nebuchadnezzar out to 
grass; to look at the ceiling 
over a man's shoulder ; to get 
outside it ; to play one's ace ; 
to rub one's arse on (Rochester) ; 
to spread to ; to take in 
and do for ; to give standing 
room for one ; to get hulled 
between wind and water ; to get 
a pair of balls against one's butt ; 
to take in cream ; to show (or 
give) a bit ; to skin the live 
rabbit ; to feed (or trot out) one's 
PUSSY (q.v.) ; to lose the match 
and pocket the stakes ; to get a 
bellyful of marrow pudding ; to 
supple both ends of it (Scots) ; to 
draw a cork ; to get hilt and 
hair (Burns) ; to draw a man's 
fireworks ; to wag one's tail 
(Pope); to take the starch out 
of ; to go star-gazing (or studying 
astronomy) on one's back ; to get 
a GREEN GOWN (Herrick and 
Durfey) ; to have a hot pudding 
(or live sausage) for supper ; to 
grant the favour ; to give 
mutton for beef, juice for jelly, 
soft for hard, a bit of snug for a 
bit of stiff, a hole to hide it in, 
a cure for the HORN (q.v.), a 
hot poultice for the Irish 
toothache ; to pull up one's 
petticoats to ; to get the best and 
plenty of it ; to lie under ; to 
stand the push ; to get stabbed 
in the thigh ; to take off one's 
stays ; to get touched up, a bit 
of the goose's-neck , a go at the 
creamstick, a handle for the 
broom. 

CONVENTIONALISMS. To 
have connection ; to have carnal, 
improper, or sexual intercourse ; 
to know carnally ; to have carnal 
knowledge of; to indulge in 
sexual commerce ; to go to bed 
with ; to lie with ; to go in unto 
(Biblical); to be intimate. 



Greens: 



209 



Green Bag. 



improperly intimate, familiar, on 
terms of familiarity with ; to 
have one's will of; to lavish 
one's favours on ; to enjoy the 
pleasures of love, or the conjugal 
embrace ; to embrace ; to have 
one's way with ; to perform 
connubial rites ; to scale the 
heights of connubial bliss ; to 
yield one's favours (of women) ; 
to surrender, or give one 
the enjoyment of one's person 
(of women) ; to use benevolence 
to ; to possess. For other syn- 
onyms, see RIDE. 

TO SEND TO DR. GREEN, 

verb. phr. (old). To put out 

to grass. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v- 
My horse is not well, I shall send him to 
Doctor GREEN. 

S'ELP ME GREENS ! (or 
TATURS !) intj. (common). A 
veiled oath of an obscene origin ; 
see GREENS. For synonyms, see 
OATHS. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW. Lend. Lab. 
and Land. Poor, vol. iii., p. 144. 
They'll say, too, S'ELP MY GREENS ! and 
' Upon my word and say so ! ' 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 23 
Jan. 'Well, S'ELP ME GREENS,' he 
cried, wiping his eyes and panting for 
breath, ' if you arn't the greatest treat I 
ever did meet ; you'll be the death o' me, 
Juggins, you will. Why, you bloomin' 
idiot, d'ye think if they had'nt been rogues 
we should have been able to bribe 'em ? ' 

JUST FOR GREENS, adv. phr. 
(American). See quot. 

1848. JONES, Sketches of Travel, p. 
7. I^ve made up my mind to make a 
tower of travel to the big North this 
summer, JEST FOR GREENS, as we say in 
Georgia, when we hain't got no very 
pertickefer reason for anything, or hain't 
got time to tell the real one. , 

GREEN-APRON, whs. (old). A lay 
preacher. Also adjtctively. For 
synonyms, see DEVIL-DODGER 
and SKY-PILOT. 



1654. WARREN, Unbelievers, 145. 
It more befits a GREEN-APRON preacher, 
than such a Gamaliel. 

1705. HICKERINGILL, Priestcraft, I. 
(1721) 21. Unbeneficed Noncons. (that 
live by Alms and no Paternoster, no 
Penny, say the GREEN-APRONS). 

1765. TUCKER, Lt. Nat., II., 451 
The gifted priestess amongst the Quaker 
is known by her GREEN APRON. 

GREEN-BACK, subs, (common). I 
A frog. 

2. (University). One of Tod- 
hunter's series of mathematical 
text-books. (Because bound in 
green cloth. Cf., BLUE-RUIN.) 

3. (American). The paper 
issue of the Treasury of the 
United States ; first sent out in 
1862 during the civil war. [From 
the back's being printed in green.] 
Hence GREEN-BACKER = an advo- 
cate for an unlimited issue ot 
paper money. 

1873. Echo, 8 May. This was ac- 
complished by the issue of legal tender 
notes, popularly known as GREENBACKS. 

1877. CLEMENS, Life on the Missis- 
sippi, ch. Ivii., p. 499. Anything in the 
semblance of a town lot, no matter how 
situated, was saleable, and at a figure 
which would still have been high if the 
ground had been sodded with GREENBACKS. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody of 
Nowhere, p. 228. Gussie can near the 
crinkle of the GREENBACKS as he folds 
them up. 



GREEN BAG, subs. (old). A lawyer. 
[From the green bag in which 
robes and briefs were carried. 
The colour is now blue, or, in 
cases of presentation from seniors 
to juniors, red.] 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, I'ulg. Tongue, s.v. 



Green-bonnet. 



210 



Green-gown. 



ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Black 
box ; bramble (provincial); devil's 
own ; gentleman of the long robe ; 
land-shark ; limb of the law ; 
mouth-piece; PHILADELPHIA 
LAWYER (q.v.}\ quitam; six-and- 
eightpence ; snipe ; sublime rascal. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
bavard (pop. =a talker or mouth- 
piece) ; un blanchtsseur ( white- 
washer) ; uh brodancheur a la 
plaque, aux macarons, or a la 
cymbale (thieves' : a notary- 
public) ; 2tn get bier (thieves') ; 
ttn grippemini (obsolete : 
grippeminaud = thief) ; un 
inutile ( thieves' : a notary- 
public) ; une eponge d'or ( = a 
sucker-up of gold: in allusion 
to the long bills); un macaron 
huissier (popular). 

ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Dragon 
del gran soprano ; dragonetto ( = a 
dragon, or SUCK-ALL). 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Reme- 
dio ( = a remedy) ; la letraderia 
( = a body or society of lawyers) ; 
cataribera (jocular). 

GREEN - BONNET, TO HWE (or 

WEAR) A GREEN BONNET, -verb, 
phr. (common). To fail in 
business ; to go bankrupt. [From 
the green cloth cap once worn 
by bankrupts. ] 

GREEN CHEESE. See CREAM 
CHEESE and MOON. 

GREEN CLOTH. See BOARD OF 
GREEN CLOTH. 

GREEN DRAGOONS, subs, (military). 
The fifth Dragoon Guards ; 
also known as the Green Horse. 
[From their green facings..] 

GREENER, subs, (common). A 
new, or raw hand ; specifically 
employed of inexperienced work- 



men introduced to fill the place 
of strikers,; DUNG (q.v.}. Cf., 
FLINT. For synonyms, see 
SNOOKER. 

1889. Pall Mall Gaz., 14 Oct., p. 
6, c. 3. A howling mob of Hebrew men and 
women .... in their own Yiddish jargon 
criticised the new arrivals, or GREENERS, in 
language that was anything but compli- 
mentary. 

GREEN-GOODS, subs. (American). 
i. Counterfeit greenbacks. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody of 
Nowhere, p. 223. In his opinion Stillman 
Myth, and Co., were in the GREEN GOODS 
business. 

2. (venery). A prostitute new 
to the town. ; a FRESH BIT(</.^. ). 



GREEN-GOODS MAN (or 
OPERATOR), subs. (American). 
I. A counterfeiter of spurious 
greenbacks ; a SNIDE-PITCHER 
(q.v.). 

1888. Troy Daily Times, 3 Feb. 
Driscoll was hung, but the GREEN GOODS- 
MAN escaped, for the only proof against 
him was that he sold a quantity of paper 
cut in the shape of bills, and done up in 
packages of that size. 

2. (venery). A FRESH BIT 
{q.v.) fancier. Also an amateur 
of defloration; aMiNOTAUR(^.z\). 

GREEN-GOOSE, subs. (old). i. 
A cuckold. 

2. (old). A prostitute. For 
synonyms, see BARRACK- HACK 
and TART. 

1594. SHAKSPEARE, Loves Labour 
Lost, iv., 3. This is the liver vein, which 
makes flesh a deity ; A GREEN GOOSE, a 
goddess, pure, pure idolatry. 

1607. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER, 
Woman Hater, i., 2. His palace is full of 

GREEN GEESE. 

GREEN-GOWN. To GIVE A GREEN- 
GOWN, verb. phr. (old). To 
tumble a woman on the grass ; 
to copulate. For synonyms, se: 
GREENS and RIDE. 



Green- he ad. 



Greenness. 



1647-8. HERRICK, Hesfierides. 'To 
Corinna To go a Maying.' Many a GREEN 
GOWN has been given. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. GREEN 
GOWN, s. v. A throwing of young lasses on 
the grass and kissing them. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 277. 
Kit GAVE A GREEN GOWN to Betty, and 
lent her his hand to rise. 

1719. SMITH, Lives of Highwaymen, 
\ , 214. Our gallant being disposed to give 
his lady a GREEN GOWN. 

1742. C. JOHNSON, Highwaymen 
and Pyrates. Passitn, 

1785. GROSE, V-ulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GREEN-HEAD, subs. (old). A 
greenhorn. For synonyms, see 
BUFFLE and CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 
GREENHEAD, s.v., A very raw novice or 
inexperienced fellow. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GREENHORN (or GREEN-HEAD, or 
GREENLANDER), subs, (common). 
A simpleton ; a fool ; a GULL 
(q.v.}', also a new hand. For 
synonyms, see BUFFLE and CAB- 
BAGE-HEAD. To COME FROM 
GREENLAND = to be fresh to 
things; RAW (q.v.}. GREEN- 
LANDER sometimes = an Irish- 
man. 

1^53. Adventurer, No. 100. A slouch 
in my gait, a long lank head of hair and 
an unfashionable suit of drab-coloured 
cloth, would have denominated me a 
GREENHORN, or in other words, a country 
put very green. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xljv. 'Why, wha but a crack-brained 
GREENHORN wad hae let them keep up the 
siller that ye left at the Gordon-Arms?" 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist. A 
new pall . . . Where did he come from? 
GREENLAND. 

1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. ix. 
All these he resigned to lock himself into a 
lone little country house, with a simple 
widow and a GREENHORN of a son. 

GREENHOUSE, subs. (London 'bus- 
drivers'). An omnibus. 



GREEN HOWARDS, subs. phr. 
(military). The Nineteenth Foot. 
[From its facings and its^Colonel's 
name (1738-48), and to distinguish 
it from the Third Foot, also 
commanded by a Col. Howard.] 
Also HOWARD'S GARBAGE. 

GREENKiNGSMAN, subs, (pugilistic). 
A silk pocket-handkerchief: 
any pattern on a green ground. 

GREEN LINNETS, stibs. phr. 
(military). The 39th Foot. 
[From the facings.] 

GREEN LY,dwfe/. (old). Like a green- 
horn ; foolishly. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Hamlet, Act 
iv., Sc. 5. King. . . . We have done but 
GREENLY, In hugger-mugger to inter him. 

GREENMANS, subs. (old). i. 
The fields ; the country. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark all, 
p. 38 (H. Club's Rept.) 1 874. GREENEM ANS, 
the fields. 

2. in. sing, (builders'). A 
contractor who speculates with 
other people's money. 

GREEN -ME A DOW, subs, (venery). 
The female pttdendum. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 



GREENNESS, subs, (colloquial). 
Immaturity of judgment ; in- 
experience ; gullibility. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary ( 5 th ed.). 
GREENNESS (s) . . . also the rawness, un- 
skilfulness, or imperfection of any person 
in a trade, art, science, etc. 

1838. JAS. GRANT, Sketches in 
London, ch. vi., p. 205. Instances of such 
perfect simplicity or GREENNESS, as no one 
could have previously deemed of possible 
existence. 



Green-rag. 



Grey. 



GREEN -RAG. See GREENY, sense i. 

GREEN-RIVER. To SEND A MAN 
UP GREFN-RIVER, verb. phr. 
(American). To kill. [From a 
once famous factory on Green 
River, where a favourite hunting- 
knife was made.] For syn- 
onyms, see COOK ONE'S GOOSE. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far West, 
p. 175. A thrust from the keen scalp- 
knife by the nervous arm of a mountaineer 
was no baby blow, and seldom failed to 
strike home UP TO THE GREEN RIVER 
[i.e., the mark] on the blade. 

GREEN-SICKNESS, subs. (old). 
Chlorosis. 

GREEN-TURTLE. To LIVE UP TO 
GREEN - TURTLE, verb. fhr. 
(American). To do, and give, 
one's best. [From the high 
esteem in which the green fat of 
turtle is held.] 

1888. PATON, Down the Islands. 
People who, as hosts, LIVE UP TO THEIR 

GREEN TURTLE. 

GREENWICH BARBER, subs. (old). 
A- retailer of sand from the 
Greenwich pits. [A pun upon 
* shaving' the banks.] 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GREENWICH -GOOSE, subs. (old). 
A pensioner of Greenwich 
Hospital. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GREENY, subs, (old theatrical). 
i. The curtain. [From the colour.] 
Also GREEN-RAG. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry, p. no 
[ed. 1890]. It is far more difficult to 
please the company behind GREENY; I 
beg pardon, sir, I should have said than 
the audience before the curtain. 

2. (University). A freshman. 
For synonyms, see SNOOKER. 



1834. SOUTHEY, The Doctor, ch. i. 
He was entered among the GREENIES of 
this famous University. 

3. (common). A simpleton ; 
a GREENHORN (q.v.). For syn- 
onyms, .swBuFFLE and CABBAGE- 
HEAD. 

1852. JUDSON, Myst., etc., of New 
York, pirt III., ch. 9, p. 58. Anybody 
could know that these was took by a 

GREENY. 

1887. Congregationalist, 7 April. 
Jim said I was a GREENY . . . [and] that 
he had a lot of houses. 

GREETIN' Fu', adv. phr. (Scots'), 
Drunk : literally 'crying drunk.' 
For sjnonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

GREEZE, subs. (Westminster 
School). -r-A crowd ; a PUSH 
(q.v.). 

GREGORIAN, subs, (old). A kind 
of wig worn in the I7th century. 
[After the inventor, one Gregory, 
a barber in the Strand.] 

1658. Honest Ghost, p. 46. Pulling 
a little down his GREGORIAN. 

GREGORIAN-TREE, subs. (old). 
The gallows. [After a sequence 
of three hangmen of the name. ] 
For synonyms, see NUBBING- 

CHEAT. 

1641. Mercurius Pragmaticus. This 
trembles under the black rod, and he 
Doth fear his fate from the GREGORIAN 
TREE. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GREGORINE, subs, (common). A 
louse ; specifically, head vermin. 
[From the Italian.] For syn- 
onyms, see CHATES. 

GRESHAMITE, subs. (old). A Fel- 
low of the Royal Society. B.E. 
[1690.] 

GREY. See GRAY, pa 



Griddle, 



213 



Griffin. 



GRIDDLE, subs, (streets'). To 
sing in the streets. Whence, 
GRIDDLING = street - singing ; 
GRIDDLER = a street-singer. 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor. Got a month for GRIDDLING 
in the main drag. 

1877. BESANT AND RICE, Son of 
Vulcan, pt. I., ch. xii. Cardiff Jacks 
never got so low as to be GRIDDLING on 
the main drag singing, I mean, on the 
high-road. 

1888. W. BESANT, Fifty Years Ago, 
ch. iv., p. 53. They [street singers] have 
not yet invented Moody and Sankey, and 
therefore they cannot sing ' Hold the Fort ' 
or ' Dare to be a Daniel,' but there are 
hymns in every collection which suit the 

GRIDLER. 

1890. Daily Telegraph, 20 May. 
Singing or shouting hymns in the streets on 
Sundays. To this system the name of 
GRiDLiNG has been applied. The GRIDI.EKS, 
it was stated, were known to boast, as they 
returned to their haunts in Deptford and 
Southwark, how much they could make in 
a few hours. 

GRIDIRON, subs. (American). I. 
The United States' flag; the 
STARS AND STRIPES. Also 
STARS AND BARS ; BLOOD AND 
ENTRAILS ; GRIDIRON AND 
DOUGHBOYS ; and, in speaking 
of the Eagle in conjunction with 
the flag, the GOOSE AND GRID- 
IRON. 

2. (common). A County 
Court Summons. [ Originally 
applied to Writs of the West- 
minster Court, the arms of which 
resemble a gridiron.] 

1859. SALA, Gaslight and Daylight, 
ch. xxi. He collects r'ebts for anybody in 
the neighbourhood, .akes out the abhorred 
GRIDIRONS, or County Court summonses. 

3. (thieves'). The bars on a 
cell window. Fr., les gaules de 
Schtard. 

THE GRIDIRON, subs. phr. 
(common). The Grafton Club. 
[Where the grill is a speciality.] 



ON THE GRIDIRON, adv. phr. 
(common). Troubled ; harassed ; 
in a bad way ; ON TOAST (q.v.). 

THE WHOLE GRIDIRON, subs, 
phr. (common). See WHOLE 
ANIMAL. 

GRIEF, To COME TO GRIEF, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To come to 
ruin ; to meet with an accident ; 
to fail. In quot., 1891 = trouble. 

1855. THACKERAY, Neivcomes, ch. x. 
We drove on to the Downs, and we were 
nearly COMING TO GRIEF. My horses are 
young, and when they get on the grass 
they are as if they were mad. 

1888. Cassetfs Saturday Jour., 8 
Dec., p. 249. In the United States he had 
started a ' Matrimonial Agency,' in which 
he had COMB TO GRIEF, and he had been 
obliged to return to this country for a 
similar reason. 

1891. Sportsman, 28 Feb. The flag 
had scarcely fallen than the GRIEF com- 
menced, as Midshipmite and Carlo rolled 
over at the first fence, Clanranald refused 
at the second, and Dog Fox fell at the 
third. 



GRIFFIN (or GR\?f),sut>s. (common). 
I. A new - comer ; a raw 
hand ; a GREENHORN (q.v.} See 
SNOOKER and SAMMY SOFT. 
[Specific uses are (Anglo-Indian) 
= a new arrival from Europe ; 
(military) a young subaltern ; 
(Anglo -Chinese) = an unbroken 
horse. GRIFFINAGE (or GRIF- 
FIN ISM) = the state of green- 
hornism. 

1859. H. KINGSLEY, Geoffry Ham- 
lyn, ch. xxviii All the GRIFFINS ought 
to hunt together. 

1878. BESANT and RICE, By Celia's 
A ibour, ch. xxx. We were in the Trenches ; 
there had been joking with a lot of GRIFFS, 
young recruits just out from England. 

1882. Miss BRADDON, Mount Royal, 
ch. xxii. There was only one of the lads 
about the yard when he left, for it wat, 
breakfast-time, and the little GRIFFIN 
didn't notice, 



Griff-metoll. 



214 



Grin. 



1888. Graphic, 17 March, p. 286, c. 
3. Many a youngster has got on in his 
profession .... by having the good for- 
tune to make a friend of the old Indian 
who took him in as a GRIFF IN or a stranger. 

2. (colloquial). A woman of 
forbidding manners or appear- 
ance ; a GORGON. Also a care- 
taker, chaperon, or SHEEP-DOG 
(q.v. ) [A reflection of the several 
griffins of ornithology and of 
heraldry : the former a feeder on 
birds, small mammals, and even 
children ; the latter (as in 
Milum) a perfection of vigilance.] 

1824. R. B. PEAKE, Americans 
Abroad, i., 2. It is always locked up by 
that she-GRiFFiN with a bunch of keys. 

3. (thieves'). A signal : e.g., 
TO TIP THE GRIFFIN = to warn ; 
TO GIVE THE OFFICE (q.V.\ or 

TIP (q.v.). THE STRAIGHT GRIF- 
FIN = the straight tip. 

1888. CasselFs Sat. Jour., 22 Dec., 
p. 305. Plank yourself at the corner to 
give the GRIFFIN if you hear or see owt. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
22. He's got the STRAIGHT GRIFF for 
something. 

1891. J. NEWMAN, Scamping Tricks, 
p. 95. When he wanted to GIVE the 
chaps in the office THE STRAIGHT GRIFFIN, 
he used to say, ' Nelson's my guide.' 

4. in. pi. (trade). The scraps 
and leavings from a contract 
feast, which are removed by the 
purveyor. 

GRIFF-METOLL, subs. (old). 
Sixpence. For synonyms, see 
TANNER. 

1754. Discoveries of John Poulter, 
s.v. 

GRIG, subs, (old). i. An active, 
lively, and jocose person : as in 
the phrase 'Merry as a GRIG.' 
[An allusion to the liveliness of 
the grasshopper, sand-eel, or to 
GRIG ( = Greek : </., Trot .'its and 
Cressida i. 2 ; iv. 4). 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dsctionarie. Gale- 
bon-temps. A MERRY GRIG. 



1673. WYCHERLEY, Gent. Dane. 
Master,i., i., wks. (1713) 251. Hah, ah, 
ah, cousin, dou art a merry GKIGG ma 
foy. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, GRIG 
s.v. A merry GRIG ; a merry fellow. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 43. 
The statesman that talks on the Woolsack 
so big, Could hustle to the open as MERRY 

AS A GRIG. 

1765. GOLDSMITH, Essays VI. I 
grew as merry as a GRIG, and laughed at 
every word that was spoken. 

1852. DICKENS, Bleak House, ch. 
xi.x , p. 159. The learned gentleman . . . 
is as merry asa GRIG at a French watering- 
place. 

2. (thieves'). A farthing ; a 
GIGG (q.v.). For synonyms, see 
FADGE. 

16PO. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v 
Not a GRIG did he tip me, not a farthing 
would he give me. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1839. HARRISON AINSWORTH, J 
Sheppard [1889], p. 15. ' He shall go 



1839. HARRISON AINSWORTH, Jack 

.], p. 15. 'He shall ., 
through the whole course,' replied Blue- 



skin, with a ferocious grin, 'unless he 
comes down to the last GRIG.' 

Verb. (American). To vex ; 
to worry. 

1855. HALIBURTON [S. Slick], 
Human Nature, p. 83. That word 
' superiors ' GRIGGED me. Thinks I, ' My 
boy, I'll just take that expression, roll it up 
in a ball, and shy it back at you.' 

GRIM, subs. (American thieves'). 
A skeleton. Also GRIN. 

OLD MR. GRIM, subs. phr. 
(common). Death. For syn- 
onyms, see OLD FLOORER. 

GRIN, verb. (American University, 
Virginia). See quot. 

1887. Lippincott, July, p. 99. If 
here are many ' old men ' in the room they 
immediately begin to GRIN HIM ; that is, 
they strike on their plates with their knives 
and forks, beat with their feet, and shout 
at the top of their voices, in the effort to 
make their victim grin. Woe to him if 
they succeed ; for in that event the same 
thing will be repeated three times a day; 
until he ceases to notice it. 



Grinagog. 



215 



Grind. 



To GRIN IN A GLASS CASE. 
verb. phr. (old). To be shown as 
an anatomical preparation. [The 
bodies and skeletons of criminals 
were once preserved in glass 
cases at Surgeon's Hall. GROSE.] 

TO FLASH THE UPRIGHT 
GRIN, verb. phr. (venery). To 
expose the person (of women). 



GRINAGOG, THE CAT'S UNCLE, 

stibs. phr. (old). A grinning 
simpleton. G ROSE. 

GRINCUMS, subs, (old). Syphilis. 
For synonyms, see LADIES' 
FEVER. 

1608. MIDDLETON, Family of Love, 
B. i. I had a receipt for the GRINCOMES 
in his own hand. 

1635. JONES, Adrasta or the Woman's 
Spleen, c. 2. You must know, sir, in a 
nobleman 'tis abusive ; no, in him the 
serpigo, in a knight the GRINCOMES, in a 
gentleman the Neapolitan scabb, and in a 
serving man or artificer the plaine pox. 

1637. MASSINGER, Guardian, iv. The 
comfort is, I am now secure from the 
GRINCOMES, I can lose nothing that way. 



GRIND, subs, (common). i. A 
walk ; a constitutional : e.g. , ' to 
take a GRIND' or (University) 
' to go on the Grandchester (or 
Gog Magog Hills) GRIND.' 



1880. A. TROLLOPE, The Dukes 
Children, ch. xxv. ' Isn't it a great 
GRIND, sir?' asked Silverbridge. ' A very 
great GRIND, as you call it. And there 
may be the GRIND and not the success. 
But ' 

1880. One and All, 27 ^ Mar., p. 
207. Soul-weary of life's horrid GRIND, 
I long to come to thee. 



3. (schools'). Study ; reading 
up for an examination ; also a 
plodding student, i.e., a 

GRINDER. 

1856. HUGHES, Tom Brown's School 
Days, pt. II., ch. v. ' Come along, boys,' 
cries East, always ready to leave the 
GRIND, as he called it. 

1887. Chambers' Jour., 14 May, p. 
310. Smalls made just such a goal as 
was required, and the GRIND it entailed 
was frequently of no slight profit to him. 

4. (medical students'). A 
demonstration : as ( i ) a ' public 
GRIND ' given to a class and free 
to all ; and (2) a ' private GRIND ' 
for which a student pays an in- 
dividual teacher. In America, a 
QUIZ (q.v.). 

5. (Oxford University). 
Athletic sports. Also, a training 
run. 

1872. Chambers' Jour., April. Joe 
Rullock, the mighty gymnasiarch, the hero 
of a hundred GRINDS, the unwearied 
haunter of the palaestra, could never give 
the lie to his whole past life, and deny his 
own gymnastics. 



2. (common). Daily routine ; 
hard or distasteful work. 

1853. BRADLEY, Verdant Green, 
pt. III., ch. xi. To a University 
man, a GRIND did not possess any reading 
signification, but a riding one. In fact, it 
was a steeple-chase, slightly varying in its 
details according to the college that 
patronised the pastime. 

1870. London Figaro, 28 July. The 
world is a weaiisome GRIND, love, Nor 
shirk we our turn at the wheel. 



6. (venery), An act of 
sexual intercourse : e.g., To DO 
A GRIND. [MILL and GRIND. 
STONE (venery) = the female 
pudendum.] For synonyms, see 
GREENS and RIDE. 

1598. FLORIO, A WorldeoflVordes. 
Macinio, the GRINDING of grist. Also 
taken for carnal copulation. 

1647. Ladies Parliament. Digbie's 
lady takes it ill, that her Lord GRINDS not 
at her mill. 



Grind. 



216 



Grinder. 



THE GRIND, suis. phr. 
(Cambridge University). The 
ferry-boat at Chesterton. 

Verb. (University). i. To 
prepare for examination to 
study: to read. 

1856. T. HUGHES, Tom Brown's 
School Days, pt. II., ch. vii. ' The thing 
to find out,' said Tom meditatively, ' is 
how long one ought to GRIND at a sentence 
without looking at the crib. 1 

2. (University). To teach ; 
to instruct ; TO COACH (g.v.}. 

3. (common). To do a round 
of hard and distasteful work ; to 
apply oneself to daily routine. 

1880. Punch, 5 June, p. 253. ' Fred 
on Pretty Girls and Pictures." And the 
pars in the Scanmag he does them are 
proper, and chock full of 'go.' Only 
paper I care to GRIND though. 

4. (venery). To copulate. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. 

GRIND, s.v. 

5. trans. (American). To 
vex ; to 'put out.' 

1879. W. D. HOWELLS, Lady of the 
Aroostook, ch. vii. After all, it does 
GRIND me to have lost that money ! 

Also GRINDING = (i) the act of 
reading or studying hard ; (2) the 
act or occupation of preparing 
students, for an examination ; 
and (3) the act of copulation. 

ON THE GRIND, subs. phr. 
(venery). Said of incontinent 
persons of both sexes. Also of 
prostitutes. 

To GRIND AN AXE. See AXE. 

TO GET A GRIND ON ONE, 

verb. phr. (American). To play 
practical jokes ; to tell a story 
against one ; to annoy or vex. 



To GRIND WIND, verb. phr. 
(old prison). To work the tread- 
mill. See EVERLASTING STAIR- 
CASE. 

1889. CLARKSON and RICHARDSON. 
Police, p. 322. On the treadmill . . . 

GRINDING WIND. 



GRINDER, subs, (college). i. A 
private tutor; a COACH (q.v.). 
Cf., CRAMMER. 

1812. Miss EDGEWORTH, Patronage, 
ch. iii. Put him into the hands of a 
clever GRINDER or crammer, and they 
would soon cram the necessary portion of 
Latin and Greek into him. 

1841. Punch, vol. I., p. 201. Then 
contriving to accumulate five guineas to 
pay a GRINDER, he routs out his old note 
books from the bottom of his box and 
commences to read. 

1841. A. SMITH, 'The London 
Medical Student' in Punch, i., p. 229. 
G was a GRINDER, who sharpen'd the 
the fools. 

1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. 
v. She sent me down here with a 
GRINDER. She wants me to cultivate my 
neglected genius. 

2. Usually in. pi. (common). 
The teeth. 



ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Bones; 
chatterers; cogs; crashing cheats; 
dining-room furniture (or chairs) ; 
dinner-set ; dominoes ; front-rails; 
Hampstead Heath (rhymi'ig) ; 
head rails ; ivories; \ -ark-palings 
(or railings) ; sna-glers ; tushes 
(or tusks) ; tomb-stones. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Les 
soeurs blanches (thieves' = the 
'white sisters' or ivories); les 
chocottes (thieves') ; les cassantes 
( thieves' = grinders) ; les broches 
(popular = head-rails) ; les crocs 
(popular = tusks) ; le clou de 
giro fie (common = a decayed, 
black tooth) ; les branlantes 
(popular = the quakers : specifi- 



Grinder. 



21 7 Grinding-house. 



cally, old men's teeth) ; /? mob i Her 
(thieves' = furniture) ; les meules 
de moulin (popular = millstones) ; 
le jeu de dominos (thieves' = 
dominoes) ; les osanores (thieves'); 
les osselets ( thieves' = bonelets) ; 
les palettes (popular and 
thieves') ; labatterie ( = the teeth, 
throat, and tongue). 



GERMAN SYNONYMS. Krach- 
ling ( = grinderkin ; from krachen 
= to crush). 



ITALIAN SYNONYMS. Merlo 
( = battlement) ; sganascio ; ras- 
ti elliera ( = the rack). 

1597. HALL, Satires, iv., i. Her 
GRINDERS like two chalk stones in a mill. 

1640. HUMPHREY MILL, Nights 
Search, Sect. 39, p. 194 Her GRINDERS 
white, her mouth must show her age. 

1653. URQUHART, Rabelais, bk. 
IV. Author's Prologue. The devil of 
one musty crust of a brown George the 
poor boys had to scour their GRINDERS 
with. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 
GRINDER, s.v. The Cove has Rum 
GRINDERS, the Rogue has excellent 
Teeth. 

1693. DRYDEN, Juvenal, x., 365. 
One, who at sight of supper open'd wide 
His jaws before, and whetted GRINDERS 
tried. 

1740. W ALP OLE, Correspondence. 
A set of gnashing teeth, the GRINDERS very 
entire. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. xlv. Like a dried walnut between 
the GRINDERS of a Templar in the pit. 

1817. SCOTT, Ivanhoe, c. 16. None 
who beheld thy GRINDERS contending 
wi ch these peas. 

1819. MOORE, Torn Crib, p. 23. 
With GRINDERS dislodg'd, and with 
peepers both poach'd. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookivood, bk. 
iv., ch. i. A GRINDER having been dis- 
lodged, his pipe took possession of the 
aperture. 



1836. M. SCOTT, Cruise of the 
ige, p. 83. Every now and then he 
would clap his head sideways on the 



ground, so as to get the back GRINDERS to 
bear on his prey. 

1848. THACKERAY, Book of Snobs 
ch. xiii. Sir Robert Peel, though he 
wished it ever so much, has no power over 
Mr. Benjamin Disraeli's GRINDERS, or any 
means of violently handling that gentle- 
man's jaw. 

1871. Chambers Jour., g Dec., p. 
772. My GRINDERS is good enough for 
all the wittels I gets. 

1888. Sporting Life, 28 Nov. 
Countered heavily on the GRINDERS. 

TO TAKE A GRINDER, verb. 

phr. (common). To apply the 
left thumb to the nose, and 
revolve the right hand round it, 
as if to work a hand-organ or 
coffee-mill ; TO TAKE A SIGHT 

(q.V.) ; TO WORK THE COFFEE- 
MILL (q.v.). [A street boy's 
retort on an attempt to impose on 
his good faith or credulity. ] 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xxxi. 
Here Mr. Jackson smiled once more upon 
the company ; and, applying his left 
thumb to the tip of his nose, worked a 
visionary coffee-mill with his right hand, 
thereby performing a very graceful piece 
of pantomime (then much in vogue, but 
now, unhappily, almost obsolete) which 
was familiarly denominated TAKING A 

GRINDER. 

1870. Athenceum, 8 July. 'Rev. 
of Comic Hist, of United States.' He 
finds himself confronted by a plumed and 
lightly-clad Indian, who salutes him with 
what street-boys term a GRINDER. 



GRINDING-HOUSE, subs. (old). 
i. The House of Correction. 
For synonyms, see CAGE. 

1614. Terence in English. The 
fellow is worthy to be put into the 

GRINDING-HOUSE. 

2. (venery). A brothel. For 
synonyms, see NANNY - SHOP. 
[GRi NDING-TOOL = the penis. ] 



Grindfng-milt. 



218 



Grist. 



GRINDING - MILL, subs, (common). 
The house of a tutor or COACH 
(q.v.) where students are prepared 
for an examination. 

GRIND-OFF (or GRINDO), subs. 
(common). A miller. [From a 
character in The Miller and his 
Men.] 

GRINDSTONE, suds, (common). i. 
A tutor; a COACH (q.v.}. 

2. (venery). The female 
pudendum. 

To BRING (HOLD, PUT, or 
KEEP) ONE'S NOSE TO THE 
GRINDSTONE, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To oppress, harass, or 
punish ; to treat harshly. To 

HAVE ONE'S NOSE KEPT TO THE 

GRINDSTONE = to be held to 

a bargain, or at work. 

1578. NORTH, Plutarch, p. 241. 
They might be ashamed, for lack of 
courage, to suffer the Lacedoemonians TO 

HOLD THEIR NOSES TO THE GRINDSTONE. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HOLD. HOLD HIS NOSE TO THE GRIND- 
STONE, to keep him Under, or Tie him 
Neck and Heels in a Bargain. 

TO HAVE THE GRINDSTONE 

ON His BACK, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). Said of a man going to 
fetch the monthly nurse. GROSE. 

GRINNING-STITCH E s , subs. 
(milliners'). Slovenly sewing ; 
stitches wide apart ; LADDERS 
(q.v.}. 

GRIP (or GRIPSACK), subs. 
(American). A hand - bag or 
satchell. 

To LOSE ONE'S.GRIP, verb. phr. 
(American). To fail; to lose 
one's control. 

GRIPE, subs, (old). i. A miser; 
a usurer. Also GRIPER or 
GRIPE-FIST (q.v.}. For syn- 
unyms, see HUNKS and SIXTY- 
PER-CENT. GRIPING = extortion. 



1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 
GRIPE, or GRIPER, s.v. An old covetous 
wretch. Also a banker, money scrivener, 
or usurer. 

2. in. pi. (colloquial). The 
colic ; the stomach ache ; the 
COLLYWOBBLES. For synonyms, 
see JERRY-GO-NIMBLE. 

1684. BUNYAN, Pilgr. Prog., Pt. II. 
He concluded that he was sick of the 
GRIPES. 

1705. Char, of a Sneake, in Harl. 
Misc. (ed. Park), ii., 356. He never looks 
upon her Majesty's arms but setnpe readetn 
gives him the GRIPES. 

1714. Spectator, No 559. Meeting 
the true father, who came towards him 
with a fit of the GRIPES, he begged him to 
take his son again, and give back his cholic. 

1812. COOMBE ; Tour in Search of 
Picturesque, c. xxvi. That he who daily 
smokes two pipes, The tooth-ache never 
has nor GRIPES. 

GRIPE-FIST, subs, (common). A 
miser ; a grasping broker. For 
synonyms, see HUNKS. Also 
GRIPE-PENNY. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
GRIST, siibs. (American). A large 
number or quantity. [Swift uses 
GRIST = a supply ; a provision.] 

1818. COOPER, Oak Openings. There's 
an unaccountable GRIST of bees, I can tell 
you. 

#1852. Traits of American Humour, 
i., 305. I ... got pretty considerable 
soaked by a GRIST of rain. 

TO BRING GRIST TO THE 

MILL, verb. phr. (colloquial). 
To bring profitable business ; to 
be a source of profit. 

1719. Poor Robin's Almanack, 'May. 
Lawyers pleading do refrain A while, and 
then fall to 't again ; Strife brings GRIST 
unto their MILL. 

1770. FOOTE, Lame Lover, i. Well, 
let them go on, it brings GRIST TO OUR 

MILL. 

1804. HORSLEY, Speech, 23 July. 
A sly old pope created twenty new saints, 

TO BRING GRIST TO THE MILL of the 

London clergy. 

1817. SCOTT, Ivanhoe, c. 16. Some 
three or four dried pease a miserable 
GRIST for such a mill. 



Gristle. 



219 



Grocery. 



1838. DICKENS, Nick. Nickleby, ch. 
xxxiv., p. 268. Meantime the fools BRING 

GRIST TO MY MILL. 

GRISTLE, subs, (venery). The 
penis. For synonyms, see CREAM- 
STICK and PRICK. 

GRIT, subs, (originally American : 
now colloquial). I. Character ; 
pluck ; spirit ; SAND (q.v.\ Also 

CLEAR GRIT. NO GRIT = 

lacking in stamina ; wanting in 
courage. 

1825. NEAL, Bra. Jonathan, bk. II., 
ch. xiv. A chap who was clear GRIT for 
a tussle, any time. 

1848. BURTON, Waggeries, etc., p. 
13. The old folks . . . began to think 
that she warn't the CLEAR GRIT. 

1849. C. KINGSLEY, Alton Locke, 
ch, vi. A real lady fair noble the rael 
genuine GRIT, as Sam Slick says. 

1852. H. B. STOWE, Uncle Toms 
Cabin, ch. vii You're a right brave old 
girl. I like GRIT, wherever I see it. 

1860. THACKERAY, Philip, ch. xxxi. 
If you were a chip of the old block you 
would be just what he called the GRIT. 

1889. Referee, 6 Jan. They never 
did think there was any real GRIT about 
him. 

1890. Scribner, Feb., 242. 'Looks 
like he got GRIT, don't it ?' Lige muttered. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 249. I am 
as full of GRIT and work as ever, and just 
tower above our troubles. 

2. (Canadian political). A 
member of the Liberal party. 

GRITTY, adj. (American). Plucky ; 
courageous ; resolute ; full of 
character. 

1847. ROBB, Squatter Life, p. 106. 
There never was a GRITTYER ciowd con- 
gregated on that stream. 

GRIZZLE, verb, (colloquial). To 
fret. Also To GRIZZLE ONE'S 



1872. Miss BRADDON, To the Bitter 
End, ch. xvi. * If the locket's lost, it's 
lost,' she said philosophically ; ' and 
there's no use in GRIZZLING about it.' 



GRIZZLE-GUTS (or GRIZZLE- or 
GLUM -POT), subs, (common). 
A melancholy or ill - tempered 
person ; a SULKINGTON (q.v.}. 

GROAN ER, subs, (old). A thief 
plying his trade at funerals or 
religious gatherings. 

1848. DUNCOMBE, Sinks of London, 
s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

GROANING, subs. (old). The act 
of parturition. Also, adj., partu- 
rient ; or appertaining to parturi- 
tion : as in GROANING - MALT 
(Scots') = drink for a lying-in ; 
GROANING-PAINS = the pangs of 
delivery j GROANING-WIFE = a 
woman ready to lie-in. 

1594. NASHE, Unfort. Trav. 
(Chiswick Press, 1892), p. 02. As smooth* 
as a GROANING-WIVE'S bellie. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Hamlet, Hi., 2. 
It would cost you a GROANING to take off 
my edge. 

1786. BURNS, The Rantin* Dog the 
Daddie O't. Wha will bring the GROAN- 
ING-MALT? 

GROATS, subs, (nautical). The 
chaplain's monthly allowance. 

To SAVE ONE'S GROATS, verb, 
phr. (old University). To come 
off handsomely. [At the Univer- 
sities nine groats are deposited in 
the hands of an academic officer 
by every person standing for a 
degree, which, if the depositor ob- 
tains, with honour, are returned 
to him. GROSE.] 

GROCERY, subs, (common). i. 
Small change. 
1728. BAILEY, Eng. Diet., s.v. 

2. (American). A drinking 
bar. Also CONFECTIONERY and 
GROGGERY. 

1847. PORTER, Quarter Race, etc. 
104. He went into his favourite GROCERY. 



Grog. 



220 



Groggy. 



3. (common). Sugar. [A re- 
stricted use of a colloquialism. ] 

1841. LYTTON, Night and Morning, 
Bk. V., ch. ii. A private room and a pint 
of brandv, my dear. Hot water and lots 
of the GROCERY. 

GROG, subs (old: now recognised). 
Spirits and water ; strong 
drink generally. [Till Admiral 
Vernon's time (1745) rum was 
served neat, but he ordered it to 
be diluted, and was therefore 
nicknamed ' Old Grog,' in allu- 
sion to his grogram coat : a phrase 
that was presently adapted to the 
mixture he had introduced.] 
GROGGY = drunk. 

Verb, (old). To dilute or adul- 
terate with water. 

1878. Lincoln, Rutland, and Stam- 
ford Mercury, 8 Mar. The defendants 
had GROGGED the casks by putting in hot 
water. 

TO HAVE GROG ON BOARD (or 

TO BE GROGGED), verb, phr* 
(common). To be drunk. For 
synonyms, see SCREWED. 

1842. Comic Almanack, October. 
He stands and listens, sad and dogged, To 
' fined five bob ' for being GROGGED. 

GROG-BLOSSOM, subs, (common). 
A pimple caused by drinking to 
excess. Also COPPER-NOSE and 
JOLLY-NOSE. Fr., unnezculotte 
and un nez de pompettes. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, GROG- 
BLOSSOM, s.v. 

1883. THOS. HARDY, The Three 
Strangers, in Longman's Mag., March, p. 
576. A few GROG-BLOSSOMS marked the 
neighbourhood of his nose. 

1888. W. BESANT, Fifty Years Atro, 
ch. xi., p. 169. The outward and visible 
signs of rum were indeed various. First, 
there was the red and swollen nose, next, 
the nose beautifully painted with GROG- 
BLOSSOMS. 

GROG- FIGHT, subs, (military). A 
drinking party. Cf., TEA-FIGHT. 



1876. R. M. JEPHSON, Girl he Left 
Behind. Him, ch. i. He had been having 
a GROG-FIGHT in his room to celebrate the 
event. 



GROGGERY, subs. (American). A 
public bar ; a grog-shop. 

GROGGY, adj. (colloquial). I. 
Under the influence of drink. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

1829. BUCKSTONE, Billy Taylor, i., 
as a gay young woman, will delude Taylor 
away from Mary, make him GROGGY, then 
press him off to sea. 

1863. Fun, 23 May, p. 98, c. 2. They 
fined drunkards and swearers, and there is 
a record in the parish-books, among others 
of a similar nature, of a certain Mrs. 
Thunder who was fined twelve shillings 
for being, like Mr. Cruikshank's horse at 
the Brighton Review, decidedly GROGGY. 

1872. Echo, 30 July. A model of 
perfection had she not shown more than 
necessary partiality to her elder friend's 
brandy bottle during the journey, despite 
the latter's oft - repeated caution not to 
become GROGGY. 

2. (colloquial). Staggering or 
stupified with drink. Also (stable) 
moving as with tender feet. Also 
(pugilists') unsteady from punish- 
ment and exhaustion. Fr., locker 
= to be GROGGY. 

1831. YOUATT, The Horse, ch. xvi., 
p. 380. Long journeys at a fast pace will 
make almost any horse GROGGY. 

1846-8. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, 
vol. ii., ch. v. Cuff coming up full of 
pluck, but quite reeling and GROGGY, the 
Fig-merchant put in his left as usual on his 
adversary's nose, and sent him down for 
the last time. 

1853. Diogenes, vol. ii., p. 177. The 
anxiety is not confined to the metropolis ; 
as a respectable grazier, who rides a 
GROGGY horse, on hearing of it at a public- 
house the other day, affirmed it to be the 
mysterious cause of the rise in the value of 
horseflesh. 

1888. Sportsman, 28 Nov. In the 
tenth Thompson, who had been growing 
GROGGY, to the surprise of Evans began to 
force the fighting. 



Grogham. 



221 



Ground. 



GROGHAM, subs. (old). A horse ; 

a DAISY-KICKER (q.V.). Now 
mostly in contempt. For syn- 
onyms, see PRAD. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GROG - SHOP, subs, (common). 
The mouth. For synonyms, see 

POTATOE-TRAP. 

1843. THACKERAY, Men's Wives, 
Frank Berry, ch. i. Claret drawn in 
profusion from the gown-boy's GROG-SHOP. 

GROG-TUB, subs, (nautical). A 
brandy bottle. 

GROOM, subs, (gamesters'). A 
croupier. 

GROOMED. See WELL-GROOMED. 

GROOVY, subs. (American). A 
sardine. 

Adj. (popular). Settled in 
habit ; limited in mind. 

GROPE, verb, (venery). To feel a 
woman; to fumble; to FAM (q.v.). 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie. Ma- 
riolement. GROPING of a wench. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 194. 
Smoking, toping, Landlady GROPING. 

GROPER, subs. (old). i. A blind 
man ; HOODMAN (q.v }. 
1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1728. BAILEY, Eng. Diet., s.v. 
1786. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

2. (old). A pocket. For syn- 
onyms, see BRIGH and SKY- 
ROCKET. 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 143. GROPERS. Pockets. 

3. (old). Amidwife; a FINGER- 
SMITH (q.v.}. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



GROTTO, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For synonyms, 
see MONOSYLLABLE. 

GROUND. To SUIT DOWN TO THE 
GROUND, verb. phr. (common). 
To be thoroughly becoming or 
acceptable. 

1878. M. E. BRADDON, Cloven Foot, 
ch. xlv. Some sea coast city in South 
America would SUIT ME DOWN TO THE 
GROUND. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 9 Feb. 
I knows the very bloke that'll SUIT 

YOU DOWN TO THE GROUND. 

1891. Sporting Life, 28 Mar. At 
Knowle he is SUITED DOWN TO THE 

GROUND. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
ii. They SUIT ME RIGHT DOWN TO THE 
GROUND. 



TO WIPE (or MOP) UP THE 

GROUND (or FLOOR) WITH ONE, 
verb. phr. (common). To 
administer the very soundest 
thrashing; to prove oneself 
absolutely superior to one's 
opposite. 

1887. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Deacon Brodie, i., 3. Muck ! that's my 
opinion of him ; . . . I'll MOP THE 
FLOOR UP WITH HIM any day, if so be as 
you or any on 'em '11 make it worth 
my while. 

1888. Detroit Free Press, Aug. 
The Scroggin boy was as tough as a dog- 
wood knot. He'd WIPE UP THE GROUND 
WITH HIM ; he'd walk all over him. 



To GO (or GET) WELL TO THE 
GROUND, verb. phr. (old collo- 
quial). To defalcate; TO REAR 
(q.v.). For synonyms, see MRS. 
JONES. 

1608. MIDDLETON, Family of Love, 

V. 3. Do yOU GO WELL TO THE GROUND? 

1856. Notes and Queries, 2 S., i., p. 
324. To GET TO THE GROUND, in medical 
phraseology, means to have the bowels 
opened. 



Grounder. 



222 



Growler. 



GROUNDER, subs, (cricketers'). 
A ball with a ground delivery ; 
a SNEAK ; a GRUB ; and (in 
America) at base-ball, a ball 
struck low, or flying near the 
ground. 

GROUND-FLOOR. To BE LET IN 
ON THE GROUND-FLOOR, verb. 
phr. (American). To share in 
a speculation on equal terms with 
the original promoters. 

GROUND SQUIRREL, subs, (old). 
A hog ; a GRUNTER Lex. Bal. 
For synonyms, see Sow's BABY. 

GROUND-SWEAT. To HAVE (or 
TAKE) A GROUND-SWEAT, verb. 
phr. (old). To be buried. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 
GROUND SWEAT, s.v., a grave. 

1783. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GROUSE. To DO A GROUSE (or TO 
GO GROUSING), -verb. phr. 
(venery). To quest, or to run 
down, a woman ; TO MOLROW 
(q.v ). GROUSED = MOLLED 



GROUSER, subs, (popular). i. A 
grumbler. For synonyms, see 
RUSTY-GUTS. 

2. (venery). One who goes 
questing after women ; a MOL- 
ROWER (q.V.}. 

3. (sporting). A rowing man ; 

a WET-BOB (q.V.}. 

GROUSING, subs, (venery). Going 
in quest of women ; SPARROW- 
CATCHING (q.V.)', MOLROWING 
(q.V.). 

G ROUTE, verb. (Marlborough and 
Cheltenham Colleges). To work 
or study hard ; to SWOT (q.v.). 
For synonyms, see WIRE IN. 



GROUTY, adj. (common). 
Crabbed ; sulky. 

GROVE OF EGLANTINE, subs. phr. 
(venery). The feMttit jfcwriMkiiaw ; 

also the female pubic hair. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE 
and FLEECE. 

1772. CAREW, Poems. 'A Rapture.' 
Retire into thy GROVE OFEGLANTINE. 

GROVE OF THE EVANGELIST, subs, 
phr. (common). St. John's 
Wood ; also APOSTLE'S GROVE, 
and the BAPTIST'S WOOD. 



GROW, verb, (prison). To be ac- 
corded the privilege of letting 
one's hair and beard grow. Also 
TO GROW ONE'S FEATHERS. 



GROWLER, subs, (common). A 
four-wheeled cab. Cf., SULKY. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Bird- 
cage ; blucher ; bounder ; 
fever-trap ; flounder - and - dab 
(rhyming); four-wheeler; groping 
hutch ; mab (an old hackney) ; 
rattler; rumbler. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
bordd ambulant (common = a 
walking brothel) ; un char 
numerate (popular) ; un flatar 
(thieves') ; tin foutoir ambulant 
( = a fuckery on wheels) ; un 
my lord (popular). 

1870. Orchestra, 21 Mar. A recent 
enigmatical bill-poster on the walls, with 
the device 'Hie, Cabby, Hie!' turns out to 
be a Patent Cab Call an ingenious sort 
of lamp-signal ior remote hansoms and 
GROWLERS. 

1873. Land and Water, 25 Jan. 
The knacker's yard is baulked for a time, 
while the quadruped shambles along in 
some poverty-stricken GROWLER. 



Grown-marfs-dose. 223 



Grub. 



1883. Daily Telegraph, 8 Jan., p. 5, 
c. 3. But while a great improvement 
has been made in hansoms of late years, 
the four-wheeler or GROWLER is still as a 
rule a disgrace to the metropolis. 

1890. Daily Graphic, 7 Jan., p. 14, 
C. i. What with hansom cabs and 
GROWLERS and private broughams ; what 
with bonded carmen's towering waggons. 

1891. Globe, 15 July, p. i, c. 3. 
Adapting the words of Waller to the con- 
dition of many of our GROWLERS -The 
cab's dull framework, battered and decayed, 
Lets in the air through gaps that time has 
made. 

To RUSH (or WORK) THE 
GROWLER, verb. pkr. (American 
workmen's). Seequot. [GROWER 
= pitcher.] 

1888. New York Herald, 29 July. 
One evil of which the inspectors took 
particular notice was that of the employ- 
ment by hands in a number of factories of 
boys and girls, under ten and thirteen 
years, to fetch beer for them, or in other 

Words TO RUSH THE GROWLER. 

GROWN -MAN'S- DOSE, subs, (com- 
mon). A lot of liquor. Also a 
LONG DRINK (q.v.). For syn- 
onyms, see Go. 

GROWN-UP, subs, (colloquial). An 
adult : among undertakers, a 
GROWN. 
1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend, 

Bk. ii., ch. i. I always did like GROWN 

UPS. 



GRUB, subs, (vulgar). I. Food. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Belly- 
cheer (or chere) ; belly-furniture ; 
belly-timber ; Kaffir's tightener 
(specifically, a full meal) ; chuck ; 
corn ; gorge-grease ; manablins 
( = broken victuals); mouth har- 
ness ; mungarly ; peck ; prog ; 
scoff (S. African); scran ; stodge ; 
tack ; tommy (specifically, bread) ; 
tuck; yam. Also, verbally, to 
bung the cask ; to grease the 
gills ; to have thi run of one's 
teeth ; to yam. See also WOLF. 



FRENCH SYNONYMS. La 
becquetance ( popular = peck ); le 
biffre (popular) ; la frigousse 
(popular) ; lafripe (popular, from 
O. r.,fripper=to eat) ; la %rin- 
gue (common) ; les materiaux 
(freemason's = materials); la briffe 
(popular); laboustifaille (popular) ; 
le harnois de gueule (RABELAIS : 
= mouth-harness); lecoton (popu- 
lar, an allusion to a lamp-wick) ; 
les comestaux (popular = comes- 
tibles) ; le tortorage (thieves') ; 
la broute (popular = grazing) ; 
la morfe (O. Fr. Also, in a 
verbal sense = to feed) ; tortiller 
du, bee (popular = to wag a jaw) ; 
se calfater le bee (nautical : also = 
to drink) ; becqueter (popular = to 
' peck ') ; bequiller (popular) ; 
chiquer ( popular = to ' chaw ') ; 
bouffer (popular) ; boulotter (com- 
mon); taper sur les vivres] popular 
= to assault the eatables) ; pitan- 
cher (common : also = to drink) ; 
passer a la tortore (thieves') ; se 
F envoy er; casser la croustille 
(thieves' = to crack a crust) ; tor- 
torer (thieves) ; briffer ; passer 
a briffe ( popular ) ; brouter 
( VILLON = to browse); se caler, 
or se caler les amygdales 
(popular) ; mettre de Fhuile dans 
la lampe (common = to trim the 
lamp); se coller quelque chose dans 
le fanal, dans le fusil, or dans le 
tube (popular = to trim one's 
beacon-light ; to load one's gun, 
etc. ) ; chamailler des dents 
(popular = to 'go it' with the 
ivories ; jouer des badigoinces 
(common : badigoinces chaps) ; 
jouer des domino s (popular : dom- 
inos = teeth ) ; deck irer la cartouche 
(military) ; gobichonner (popular); 
engouler (popular = to bolt); en- 
gueuler (colloquial = to gobble); 
friturer (popular : also = to cook) ; 
gonfler (popular: to blow out); 
morjiaillier (Rabelaisian); mor- 



Grub. 



224 



Grub. 



figner, or morfiler (From O. Fr., 
morfier\ cf.> Ital., morftre or 
morfizzare] ; cacher (popular = to 
stow away) ; se mettre quelque 
chose dans le cadavre (popular = 
to stoke) ; se lester la cale (nautical: 
to lay in ballast) ; se gtaisser les 
balots (thieves' : to grease the 
gills) ; se caresser (to do oneself a 
good turn); effacer ( popular = to 
put away) ; travailler pour M. 
Domange (popular : M. Domange 
was a famous GOLDFINDER 
or GONG FARMER (q.v.} ', dapotet 
(popular) ; debrider la margoulette 
(popular to put one's nose in the 
manger) ; crotistiller (popular) ; 
charger pour laguadaloupe (popu- 
lar) ; travailler pour Jules (com- 
rcion: Jules = Mrs. Jones); sefaire 
lejabot(voy\\\ai*Jabot= stomach) ; 
jouer des osanores (popular : osan- 
ores = teeth) ; casser (thieves') ; 
claquer (familiar = to rattle one's 
ivories) ; klebjer (popular) ; 
faire trinier les mathurins (popu- 
lar = to make the running with 
one's teeth); se coller quelque 
chose dans le bocal (common : 
bocal = paunch ) ; estropier 
(popular = to maim) ; passer a 
galtos ( nautical ) ; bourrer la 
paillasse ( common = to stuff 
the mattress ) ; faire trimer 
le battant (thieves') ; jouer des 
mandibules (popular) ; s'emplir le 
gilet (popular to fill one's waist- 
coat) ; se garnir le bocal (popular : 
to furnish one's paunch); se suiver 
la gargarott sse (nautical : also = to 
drink) ; babowner (popular) ; 
charger la canonniere (popular: 
canonnihe = \he breech) ; gousser 
(popular) ; gouffier (obsolete). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Achile, 
Achelinchen, or Acheliniken (from 
Heb. Ochal) ; Achelputz (from 
Heb. ochal + putzen from O.H.G. 
bizan or pizzan = to eat). 



ITALIAN SYNONYMS. 
Artibrio ; and, verbally, sbattere 
( = to beat, to struggle) ; intappare 
il fusto ( = to bung the cask) ; 
smorfire. 

SPANISH SYNONYMS. Papar 
(colloquial : from papa pap) ; 
hacer el buche (low : buche 
craw or crop) ; echar (colloquial) ; 
manducar ; meter. 

1659. Dialogue betwixt an Exciseman 
and Death, transcribed from a Copy in 
British Museum, printed in London by J. 
C[lark]. I'll pass my word this night Shall 
yield us GRUB before the morning light. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. GRUB, s.v., 
victuals. 

1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
I., 171. How did you procure your GRUB 
and BUB? 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 149. BUB AND GRUB. A mighty low 
expression, signifying victuals and drink. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's Log, 
ch. iii. Poor Purser ! de people call him 
Purser, sir, because him knowing chap ; 
him cabbage all deGRUB, slush, and stuff in 
him own corner. 

d. 1842. MAGINN, Vidocq's Song. Any 
bubby and GRUB, I say? 

1857. THACKERAY, Shabby Genteel 
Story, ch. i., p. 9. He used to ... have 
his GRUB too on board. 

1877. Five Years Penal Servitude, 
ch. i., p. 45. 1 at once congratulated my- 
self on not being a large eater, as there was 
no doubt but my GRUB would run very 
short if it depended on my oakum-picking. 

1889. Star, 3 Dec., p. 2, c. 6. Of 
course it was GRUB. It was for food, the 
food for which they beg, and steal, and go 
willingly to prison, for a certain good 
square meal of meat. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 154. That sad, sad secret 
about Mary would keep him in GRUB for 
the next day or two at 'The Rose in 
Bloom.' 

2. (old). A short thick-set 
man ; a dwarf. In contempt. 
For synonyms, see HOP-O'-MY- 
THUMB. 



Grub. 



225 



G rubbing-crib. 



3. (colloquial). A dirty sloven ; 
generally used of elderly people. 

4. (American). A careful 
student ; a hard reader. 

1856. HALL, College Words and 
Phrases, quoted from Williams' Coll. 
Quarterly, ii., 246. A hard reader or 
student : e.g., not GRUBS or reading men, 
only wordy men. 

5. (American). Foots and 
stumps ; whatever is ' grubbed 
up.' 

6. (cricketers'). A ball 
delivered along the ground ; a 

GROUNDER (q.V.) J a DAISY- 

CUTTKR (q.v.). For synonyms, 
see LOB-SNEAK. 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf. GRUB, 
s.v. 

Verb. (old). I. To take or 
supply with food. For synonyms, 
see subs, sense I. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. GRUB, s.v., 
to eat. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GRUB, 
s.v., to dine. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xxii., 
p. 184. I never see such a chap to eat 
and drink ; never. The red-nosed man 
warn't by no means the sort of person you'd 
like to GRUB by contract, but he was 
nothin' to the shepherd. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 18 May, p. 3, 
c. i. 'They are not bound to GRUB you, 
don't you know,' said Mr. Sleasey, 'and 
they try the starving dodge on you some- 
times.' 

2. (old). To beg ; to ask for 
alms, especially food. 

3. (American). To study, or 
read hard ; to ' sweat. ' 

To RIDE GRUB, verb. phr. 
(old). To be sulky ; CRUSTY 
(q.v.) ; disagreeable. 

1785. GROSE, Vnlg. Tongue. To 
RIDU GRUB, to le sullen or out 01 temper. 



To GRUB ALONG, verb. phr. 
(common). To make one's way 
as best one can ; ' to rub along. ' 

1888. Daily Telegraph, 19 Oct. 
When a youth left school to follow the 
pursuits of life he found that he had to 
GRUB ALONG as best he could. 

GRUBBING, subs, (common). 
Eating. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib. What with 
snoozing, high GRUBBING, and guzzling 
like Cloe. 

GRUBBERY, subs, (common). (i) 
an eating-house. Also (2) a 
dining-room, and (3) the mouth. 

GRUBBING-CRIB, subs, (general). 
i. An eating-house. GRUBBING- 
CRIB FAKER = the landlord of a 
cheap cookshop. Fr., le nour- 
risseur ; Sp., un oitalero. See 
GRUB SHOP, sense 2. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Grub- 
bery ; grubby-, or grubbing-ken ; 
grub-shop ; guttle-shop ; hash- 
house ; mungarly casa ; prog- 
shop ; slap-bang shop ; tuck- 
shop ; waste-butt. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
bourre - boyaux (popular a 
stuff-your-guts) ; un claqiiedents 
(popular, also = a brothel, or 
punting - house) ; une guingttte 
(general) ; une mangeoire (popu- 
lar = a grubbery : manger to 
eat) ; un mattais (popular) ; un 
gargot (thieves'). 

GERMAN SYNONYM. Achile- 
bajes (from Heb., Ochal=to eat). 

SPANISH SYNONYM. 
Ostaleria, or Osteria (also = lush- 
crib). 
Io23. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, s.v. 

2. (tramps'). A workhouse. 
For synonyms, see SPINNIKEN. 
Sometimes GRUBBIKEN. 

15 



G nibble. 



226 



Gruel. 



1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, iii., 416. I know all the 
good houses, and the tidy GRUBBIKKNS 
that's the unions where there's little or 
nothing to do for the food we gets. 

G RUBBLE, verb, (colloquial). (i) 
To feel for at random or in the 
dark ; and (2) (venery) TO 
GROPE (q.V.). 

1684. DRYDEN, The Disappoint- 
ment. ' Prologue. 1 The doughty bullies 
enter bloody drunk, Invade and GRUBBLE 
one another's punk. 

GRUBBY, subs, (thieves'). Food. 
[A diminutive of GRUB (q.v.).~\ 

d. 1842. MAGINN, Vidocq's Song. I 
pattered in flash like a covey knowing, Tol 
Jol, etc. Ay, bub or GRUBBY, I say. 

Adj. (colloquial). Dirly ; 
slovenly. 

d. 1845. HOOD, A Black Job, I .ike a 
GRUBBY lot of sooty sweeps or colliers. 

GRUB-HUNTING, subs, (tramps'). 
Begging for food. 

GRUB-SHITE, verb. (old). To 
make foul or dirty ; to bewray. 
GROSE. 

GRUB-SHOP, (or -CRIB, -TRAP, etc.), 
subs, (common). I. The mouth; 
and (2) a GRUBBERY (q.v.). For 
synonyms, see POTATO-TRAP. 

1840. THACKERAY, Comic Almanack, 
p. 229. 'That's the GRUB SHOP,' said my 
lord, ' where we young gentlemen wot has 
money buys our wittles. 

3. See GRUBBING-CRIB in 
both senses. 

GRUB-STAKE, subs. (American). 
Food and other necessaries 
furnished to mining prospectors 
in return for a share in the ' finds.' 
Hence, TO GRUB-STAKE to 
speculate after this lashion. 

1884. BUTTERWORTH, Zig-zag Jour- 
neys. When miners become so poor 
that they are not able to furnish the neces- 
sary tools and food with which to ' go pros- 
pecting, a third party of sufficient means 



offers to furnish tools and provisions on 
condition that he is to have a certain interest 
in anything that may be found. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody of No- 
ivhere, p. 100. He GRUB-STAKED us and 
we used to work on the Tillie mine to- 
gether. 

GRUB-STREET, sttbs. (colloquial). 

The world of cheap, mean, 

needy authors. [Originally a 

. street near Moorfields, changed in 

1830 to Milton Street. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
GRUB-STREET news, false, forg'd. 

1728. POPE, Dunciad, iii., 135. 
Shall take through GRUB - STREET his 
triumphant round. 

1785. GROSE, Vnlg. Tongue, s.v. A 
GRUB-STREET writer means a hackney 
author, who manufactures books for the 
booksellers. 

1813. J. and H. SMITH, Horace in 
London, 'The Classic Villa.' GRUB- 
STREET, 'tis called. 

1821. EGAN, Life in London, \. 
Few, if any, writers, out of the great mass 
of living scribblers, whether of GRUB- 
STREET fabrication, or of University pass- 
port . . . possess souls above buttons. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 119. We are going it, 
have got our agents in GRUB STREET. 

GRUEL, subs, (common). I. A 
beating; PUNISHMENT (q.v.}. For 
synonyms, see TANNING. Hence, 
TO GET (or GIVE) ONE'S GRUEL 
= to castigate, or be well beaten ; 
also killed. In the prize ring = 
to knock a man out for good. 
GRUELLED = floored; also 
GRUELLING. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xxviii. He gathered in general, that they 
expressed great indignation against some 
individual. 'He shall have his GRUEL,'said 
one. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends. 
' Babes in the Wood." He that was mild- 
est in mood GAVE THE truculent rascal 
HIS GRUEL. 

1849. C. KINGSLEY, Alton Locke, 
ch. xii. They were as well GRUELLED as 
so many posters, before they got to the 
stile. 



Crueller. 



227 



Grunter. 



1888. Sporting- Life, 15 Dec. Pre- 
ferred to be easily knocked out to TAKING 
HIS GRUEL like a man. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 23 Jan. 
Both men were badly punished, but George 
had, of course, the lion's share of the 
GRUEL. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Mirror, 30 
Jan., p. 7, c. 3. All the advantage 
rested with the same side for some little 
time, Paddock getting such a GRUELLING 
t'lat his head swelled out like a pumpkin. 

2. (American thieves'). -- 
Coffee. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

CRUELLER, subs, (common). A 
knock-down blow ; a settler ; a 
FLOORER (q.V.). 

GRUMBLE-GUTS, subs, (popular). 
An inveterate croaker. Also 
GRUMBLE-GIZZARD. 

GRUMBLES. To BE ALL ON THE 
GRUMBLES, verb. phr. (popular). 
To be discontented ; cross ; ON 

THE SNARLY-YOW (q.V.}. 

GRUMBLETONIAN, subs, (common). 
A pattern of discontent : one 
ever on the grumble. [Grumble- 
ton (during the reigns of the later 
Stuarts) an imaginary centre of 
discontent ; hence, GRUMBLE- 
TONIAN, a nickname of the 
County party, distinguished from 
the Court, as being in opposition.] 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 
GRUMBI.ETONIANS, malecontents, out of 
Humour with the Government, for want of 
a Place, or having lost one. 

1705-7. WARD, Hudibras kedivivus, 
vol. I., pt. i, p. 24 (.nd Ed.). But all the 
GXUMBLETONIAN throng Did with such 
violence rush along. 

1773. GOLDSMITH, She Stoops to 
Conquer, Act i. Now, if I pleased, I 
could be so revenged upon the old 

G2UMBLETONIAN. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GRUM- 
BLETONIAN, s.v., a discontented person. 



1 849-61 . MACAU LAY, Hist, of Eng. , 
ch. xix. Who were sometimes nicknamed 
the GRUMBLETONIANS, and sometimes 
honoured with the appellation of the 
County party. 

GRUMMET, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For syn- 
onyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

GRUMPY (or GRUMPISH), adj. 
(colloquial). Surly ; cross ; 
angry. 

1840. MRS. TROLLOPE, Michael 
Armstrong, ch. vi. If you blubber or 
look GRUMPISH. 

1859. SALA, Twice Round the Clock, 
3 a.m., par. 13. Calling you a 'cross, 
GRUMPY, old thing,' when you mildly 
suggest that it is very near bed-time. 

1868. Miss BRADDON, Trail of the 
Serpent, bk. IV., ch. i. A GRUMPY old 
deaf keeper, and a boy, his assistant. 

1883. Punch, 19 May, p. 230, c. 2. 
They all looked GRUMPY and down in the 
mouth. 

GRUNDY, subs. (old). A short fat 
man; a FORTY-GUTS (q.v.). See 
MRS. GRUNDY. 

1563. Fox, Acts and Monuments 
(London, 1844), iii., 1104. For that he 
being a short GRUNDY, and of little 
stature, did ride commonly with a great 
broad hat. 

GRUNTER, subs. (old). i. A pig ; 

a GRUNTING-CHEAT (q.V. ). In 

quot. 1652 = pork. For syn- 
onyms, see Sow's BABY. 

1656. BROME, Jo-vial Crew. Here's 
GRUNTER and bleater, with tib-of-the- 
buttry. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Can.'. Crew. 
GRUNTER, s.v. A sucking pig. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GRUN- 
TER, s.v. 

1841. Comic Almanack, p. 266. And 
the squeaking GRUNTER is loose on the 
green. 

1847-50. TENNYSON, Princess, v. 
26. A draggled mawkin, That tends her 
bristled GRUNTERS in the sludge. 



Grunter* s-gig. 



228 



Guerrilla. 



2. (common). A sixpence. In 
quot. 1785 = 15. Cf., HOG and 
Fir,. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue 
GRUNTER, s.v. A shilling. 

1858. A. MAYHEW, Paved ivith 
Gold, bk. III., ch. iii., p. 267. One of 
the men . . . had only taken three 
' twelvers ' [shillings] and a GRUNTER. 

1885. Household Words, 20 June. 
p. 155. The sixpence ... is variously 
known as a ' pig, 1 a ' sow's baby,' a 
GRUNTER, and ' half a hog.' 

3. (common). A policeman ; 
a TRAP (q.v.} ; a PIG (q.v. sense 
2). For synonyms, see BEAK. 

1820. London Magazine, i., 26. As 
a bonnet against . . . GRUNTERS. 

1859. M A T s E L L, Vocabulum. 
GRUNTER, s.v., a country constable. 

4. (tailors'). An habitual 
grumbler ; a GRUMBLE-GUTS 



GRUNTER'S-GIG, subs. (old). A 
smoked pig's chap. GROSE. 

GRUNTING-CHEAT, subs, (old). A 
pig. See CHETE. For synonyms, 
see Sow's BABY. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat, p. 86. She 
has a cackling-chete, a GRUNTING-CHETE, 
ruff pecke, cassan, and poplarr of yarum. 

1622. FLETCHER, Beggars Bush, v., 
i. Or surprising a boor's ken for GRUNT- 
ING-CHEATS ? Or cackling- cheats ? 

GRUNTING-PECK, subs. (old). 
Pork or bacon. 

1690. E. E., Diet. Cant. Crew 
GRUNTING-PECK, s.v., pork. 

1728. BAILEY, Eng. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1836. SMITH, Individual. 'The 
Thieves' Chaunt.' But dearer to me 
Sue's kisses far Than GRUNTING PECK or 
other grub are. 

GRUTS, subs, (common). Tea; 
For synonyms, see SCANDAL- 
BROTH. 



1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

G. T. T. GONE TO TEXAS, 
fhr. (American). Absconded. 
[Moonshinirg gentry used to 
mark G. T. T. on the doors of 
their abandoned dwellings as 
a consolation for inquiring 
creditors. ] Fr. , aller en Belgique. 
For synonyms, see SWARTWORT. 

1835. HALIBURTON, Clocktnaker, 
5 S., ch. viii. Before this misfortin' came 
I used to do a considerable smart chance 
of business ; but now it's time for me to 
cut dirt, and leave the country. I believe 
I must hang out the G. T. T. sign.' 
'Why, what the plague is that?' says I. 
1 GONE TO TEXAS,' said he.' 

GUAGE. See GAGE. 

GUBBINS, subs. (old). Fish- 
offal. 
1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie, q.v. 

GUDGEON, subs, (old). i. A bait ; 
an allurement. Hence, To 

GUDGEON (or TO SWALLOW A 

GUDGEON) = to be extremely 
credulous or gullible. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, Merchant of 
Venice, i., i. But fish not with this 
melancholy bait, For this fool's GUDGEON, 
this opinion. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes, 
Bersela, s.v. To swallow a GUDGEON 
... to believe any tale. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, 
GUDGEON, s.v. To swallow the bait, or 
fall into a trap, from the fish of that name 
which is easily taken. 

1892. National Observer, 23 July, 
vii., 235. It has educated Hodge into an 
increased readiness to gorge any GUDGEON 
that may be offered him. 

2. (colloquial). - An easy dupe; 
a BUFFLE (q.v.}. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GUERRILLA, subs. (American 
sharpers'). See quot. 



Guff. 



229 



Guinea-pig. 



1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
Th's name is applied by gamblers to 
fellows who skin suckers when and where 
they can, who do not like the professional 
gamblers, but try to beat them, sometimes 
inform on them, and tell the suckers that 
they have been cheated. 

GUFF, subs, (common). Humbug ; 
bluff; jabber. For synonyms, 
see GAMMON. 

1889. Sportsman, 19 Jan. Hereafter 
he can have the newspapers to himself, 
and with that windbag Mitchell fill them 
with GUFF and nonsense, but I won't 
notice them. 

GUFFY, subs, (nautical). A soldier. 
For synonyms, j^MUDCRUSHER. 

GuiDERS,.yw&r. (general). I. Reins; 

RIBBONS (q.V.). 

2. (common). Sinews ; LEAD- 
ERS (q.v.). 

GUINEA. A GUINEA TO A GOOSE- 
BERRY, phr. (sporting). Long 
odds. See LOMBARD STREET TO 
A CHINA ORANGE. 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, Post to 
Finish, ch. vli. What ! old Writson 
against Sam Pearson ? Why, it's a GUINEA 
TO A GOOSEBERRY on Sam ! 

GUINEA - DROPPER, subs. (old). 
A sharper. Specifically one who 
let drop counterfeit guineas in 
collusion with a GOLD-FINDER 
(q.v.). For synonyms, see ROOK. 

1712. GAY, Trivia, iii., 249. Who 
row the GUINEA DROPPER'S bait regards, 
Tricked by the sharper's dice or juggler's 
cards. 

GUINEA HEN, subs. (old). A 
courtezan. For synonyms, see 
BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Othello, \., 3. 
Ere I would say 1 would drown myself 
for the love of a GUINEA-HEN, I would 
change mv humanity with a baboon. 



1630. GLAPTHORNE, A Ibertus 
Wallenstein. Vender's the cock o' the 
game About to tread yon GUINEA-HEN, 
they're billing. 



GUINEA-PIG, subs. (old). i, A 
general term of reproach. 

1748 SMOLLETT, Roderick Random, 
xxiv. A good seaman he is, as ever 
stepp'd on forecastle none of your 
GUINEA-PIGS, nor your freshwater, wishy- 
washy, fair-weather fowls. 

2. ( old ). Any one whose 
nominal fee for professional ser- 
vices is a guinea: as vets., special 
jurymen, etc. Now mainly re- 
stricted to clergymen acting as 
deputies, and (in contempt) to 
directors of public companies. 
Hence GUINEA- TRADE = pro- 
fessional services of any kind. 

1821. COOMBE, Dr. Syntax, Tour 
III., c. iv. ' Oh, oh,' cried Pat, ' how my 
hand itches, Thou GUINEA-PIG [a 'vet.'], 
in boots and breeches, to trounce thee 
well.' 

1871. Temple Bar, vol. xxxi., 
p. 320. A much more significant term is 
that of GUINEA PIGS, the pleasant name 
for those gentlemen of more rank than 
means, who hire themselves out as 
directors of public companies, and who 
have a guinea and a copious lunch when 
they attend board meetings. 

1880. Church Review, 2 Jan. 
GUINEA PIGS . . . are, for the most part, 
unattached or roving parsons, who will take 
any brother cleric's duty for the moderate 
remuneration of one guinea. 

1883. Saturday Review, 25 Aug., 
p. 246, c. 2. A country parson was 
suddenly attacked with diphtheria, late in 
the week. Recourse was had in vain to 
the neighbours, and it was decided at last 
to telegraph to London for a GUINEA ru;. 

1884. Echo, 19 May, p. i, c. 5. 
Let us apply the principle further, and 
imagine . . . limited liability swindlers 
tried by a jury of GUINEA-PIGS and com- 
pany promoters. 



Guise s Geese. 



230 



Gulf. 



1884. Graphic, 29 Nov., p. 562, 
c. 3. And the GUINEA-FIG, whose name 
is on a dozen different Boards, is justly 
regarded with suspicion. 

1886. Chambers s Jour., 24 Apr., 
p. 258. In order to be considered of any 
value as Director of a Company, a 
GUINEA-PIG ought to have a handle to his 
name. 

1887. PAVN, Glow Worm Talcs, 
'A Failure of Justice.' He is best known 
to the public as a GUINEA-PIG, from his 
habit of sitting at boards and receiving for 
it that nominal remuneration, though in his 
case it stands for a much larger sum. 

1889. DRAGE, Cyril, vii. The rector 
has, as usual, got the gout, and we live 
under a regime of GUINEA-PIGS. 

1890. Standard, 26 June, p. 5, c. 4. 
The least attempt to saddle responsibility 
for misleading statements upon Boards of 
Directors would drive prudent, ' respect- 
able ' men out of what is vulgarly called 
the GUINEA-PIG business. 



3. (nautical). See quot. 

1840. MARRYAT, Poor Jack, ch. 
xxvi. While Bramble was questioned by 
the captain and passengers, I was attacked 
by the midshipmen, or GUINEA-PIGS as 
they are called. 

GUISE'S GEESE, subs. phr. (mili- 
tary). The Sixth Foot or ' Saucy 
Sixth.' [From its Colonel's 
name, I735-63-J 

GuiVER, subs. (theatrical). (i) Flat- 
tery, and (2) ARTFULNESS (q.v.}. 
For synonyms, see SOFT SOAP. 

Adj. (common). Smart ; 
fashionable; ON IT (q.v.}. GUIVER 
LAD = a low-class dandy ; also 
an ARTFUL MEMBER (q.V.). 

. 1866. VANCE, Chickaleary Cove. 
The stock around my squeeze of a GUIVER 
colour see. 

Verb (sporting). To hum- 
bug ; TO FOOL ABOUT (q.v.} ; to 
show off. 



1891. Sporting Life, 25 Mar. He 
goes into a ring to fight his man, not to 
spar and look pretty, and run, and dodge, 
and GUIVER. 

GULF, subs, (old). i. The throat ; 
also the maw. For synonyms, 
see GUTTER- ALLEY. 

1579. SPENCER, Shepheardes Calen- 
dar, Sept. That with many a lamb had 
glutted his GULF. 

2. (Cambridge Univ.). The 
bottom of a list of ' passes,' 
with the names of those who 
only just succeed in getting their 
degree. 

1852. BRISTED, Five Years in an 
P.nglish University, p. 205. Some ten or 
fifteen men just on the line, not bad 
enough to be plucked, or good enough to 
be placed, are put into the GULF, as it is 
popularly called (the examiners' phrase is 
' degrees allowed '), and have their degrees 
given them, but are not printed in the 
calendar. 

3. (Oxford Univ.). A man 
who, going in for honours, only 
gets j.pass. 

Verb (Cambridge Univ.). To 
place in the GULF, subs., sense 2 

(q.V.) ', TO BE GULFED = to be 

on such a list. [Men so placed 
were not eligible for the Classical 
Tripos]. C/., PLUCK and 
PLOUGH. 

1853. BRADLEY, Verdant Green, pt. 
iii., p. 89. I am not going to let them 
GULPH me a second time. 

1863. H. KINGSI.EY, Austin Elliot^ p. 
123. The good Professor scolded, pre- 
dicted that they would all be either GULFED 
or ploughed. 

1865. Sporting Gaz., i Apr. A man 
who was GULFED for mathematical honours 
was certainly, in olden time, unable to 
enter for the classical examination ; but 
though the arrangement is altered, the 
term is not obsolete. A man who is GULFED 
is considered to know enough mathematics 
for an ordinary degree, but not enough to 
be allowed his degree in mathematics only; 
he is consequently obliged to pass in all the 
ordinary subjects (except mathematics) for 
the ' poll,' before taking his degree. 



Gulf-spin. 



23* 



Gull. 



1876. TREVELYAN, Life of Macaulay 
(1884), ch. ii., p. 61. When the Tripos 
of 1822 made its appearance, his name did 
not grace the list. In short .... Macaulay 
was GULFED. 

1852. BRISTED, Five Years in an 
English University, p. 297. I discovered 
that my name was nowhere to be found 
that I was GULFED. 

GULF-SPIN, subs. (American cadet). 
A rascal ; a worthless fellow ; 
A BEAT (q.V.} a SHYSTER (q.V.}. 

GULL, subs, (old, now recognised). 
I. A ninny. For synonyms, 
see BUFFLE and CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1593. SIR J. DAVIES, Book of Epi- 
grams. A GULL is he whofeares a velvet 
gowne, And when a wench is brave dares 
not speak to her ; A GULL is he which 
traverseth the towne, And is for marriage 
known a common wooer ; A GULL is he, 
which while he proudly weares A silver- 
hiked rapier by his side. Indures the lye 
and knockes about the eares, While in his 
sheath his sleeping sword doth bide. But 
to define a GULL in termes precise A GULL 
is he which seems, and is not, wise. 

1598. FLORID, A World of Wordes, 
passim. 

1609. JONSON, Case is Altered, 
>V M 3. fun. Tut, thou art a goose to be 
Cupid's GULL. 

Ifi09. SHAKSPEARE, Timon of Athens. 
Lord Timon will be left a naked GULL. 
Which flashes now a phoenix. 

1614. OVERBURV, Characters. 'A 
Roaring Boy.' He cheats young GULS 
that are newly come to town. 

1618. ROWLANDS, Night Raven, p. 
28 CH. C. Rept., 1872). I know the houses 
where base cheaters vse, And note what 
GULLS (to worke vpon) they chuse. 

1661. BROME, Poems, ' The Cure of 
Care: Those GULLS that by scraping and 
toiling. 

1818. S. E. FERRIER, Marriage, ch. 
li. The poor GULL was caught, and is now, 
I really believe, as much in love as it is in 
the nature of a stupid man to be. 

1850. D. TERROLD, The Catspaw, 
Act i. Pshaw ! some rascal that lives on 
simpletons and GULLS. 



1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 231. I was 
a dweller under roofs; the GULL of that 
which we call civilisation. 



2. (old). A cheat ; a fraud ; a 
trick. 

1600. SHAKSPEARE, Much Ado 
about Nothing, ii., 3. I should think this 
a GULL, but that the white-bearded fellow 
speaks it. 

1611. COTGRAVE, Dictionarie, q.v. 

3. (Oxford Univ.). Aswindler; 
a trickster. Cf., GULL-CATCHER, 
of which it is probably an abbre- 
viation. 

1825. The English Spy, \. I., p. 161. 
' You'll excuse me, sir, but as you fcrt/fwA, 
take care to avoid the GULLS.' ' 1 never 
understood that GULLS were birds of prey,' 
said I. 'Only in Oxford, sir, and here, I 
assure you, they bite like hawks.' 

Verb (old : now recognised). 
To cheat ; to dupe ; to victimise ; 
TO TAKE IN (q.v.). in any 
fashion and to any purpose. 

1596. JONSON. Every Man in his 
Humour, v. This is a mere trick, a de- 
vice, you are GULLED in this most grossly. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Twelfth Night, 
ii.,3. Mar. For Monsieur Maluolio, let me 
alone with him ; If I do not GULL him into 
a nayword, and make him a common re- 
creation, do not thinke I haue witte enough 
tc lye straight in my bed ; I know I can 
do it. 

1607. ROWLANDS, Diogenes, his Lan- 
thorne, p. n (H. C. Rept. 1873). He 
promist me good stuffe truly, a great penny- 
worth indeed, and verily did GULL me. 

1610. JONSON, Alchemist, v., 2. 
Hast thou GULLED her of her jewels or her 
bracelets ? 

1639. SELDEN, Table Talk, p. 98 
(Arber's ed.). Presbyters have the greatest 
power of any Clergy in the world, and GULL 
the Laity most. 

1778. Sketches for Tabernacle- 
Frames, p. 25, note. These fanatica 
Preachers frequently squeeze out Tears to 
GULL their Audience. 



G ullage. 



23 2 



Gull-groper. 



1851-61. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, I., 472. It's generally the 
lower order that he GULLS. 

1892. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Deacon Brodie, ix. Pay your debts, and 
GULL the world a little longer. 

Hence GULLIBLE, adj., = 
easily duped. 

1841. THACKERAY, CharacterSketches 
'Fashionable Authoress.' And, gulled them- 
selves, gull the most GULLABLE of publics. 

GULLAGE, subs, (old colloquial). 
The act of trickery ; the state of 
being gulled. 

1605. B. JONSON, Fi>#0, v., 5. Had 
you no quirk To avoid GULLAGE, sir, 
by such a creature ? 

1611. CHAPMAN, May Day, Act II., 
p. 284 (Plays, 1874). For procuring you 
the dear GULLAGE of my sweetheart, 
Mistress Franceschina. 

GULL-CATCHER (or GULLER, GULL- 
SHARPER, etc.), sitbs. (old). A 
trickster ; a cheat. See GULL, 
senses I and 3. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Twelfth Night, 
ii., 5. Here comes my noble GULL- 
CATCHER. 

GULLERY, subs, (old colloquial). 
Dupery ; fraud ; a cheat's device. 
Cf., GULLAGE. 

1596. JONSON, Every Man in His 
Humour, iii., 2. Your Balsamum and 
your St. John's wort are all mere GULLERIES 
and trash to it. 

1608. JOHN DAY, Humour out of 
Breath, Act iv., Sc. 3. I am guild, 
palpably guild . . . and mine owne 
GULLERY grieves me not half so much as 
the Dukes displeasure. 

1630. TAYLOR, Works. Neverthelesse, 
whosoever will but looke into the lying 
legend of golden GULLERY, there they shall 
finde that the poore seduced ignorant 
Romanists doe imitate all the idolatrous 
fornication of the heathen pagans and 
infidels. 

1633. lie of Guls. Upon you both, 
so, so, so, how greedily their inventions 
like beagles follow the sent of their 
owne GULLERY, yet these are no fooles, God 
forbid, not they. 



1(533. MARMION, Fine Companion. 
Lit. What more GULLERIES yet? they 
have cosend mee of my daughters, I hops 
they will cheate me ot my wite too : have 
you any more of these tricks to shew, ha? 

1689. SELDEN, Table Talk, p. 38 
(Arber's ed.). And how can it be proved, 
that ever any man reveal'd Confession, 
when there is no Witness? And no man 
can be Witness in his own cause. A meer 

GULLERY. 

1819. H. MORE, Defence of Moral 
Cabbala, ch. iii. The sweet deception and 
GULLERY of their own corrupted fancy. 

1821. SCOTT, Kenii 'worth, ch. xx. 
Do you think, because I have good- 
naturedly purchased your trumpery goods 
at your roguish prices, that you may put 
any GULLERY you will on me? 

GULLET, su&s. (old: now recog- 
nised). The throat. For syn- 
onyms, see GUTTER- ALLEY. 

1383. CHAUCER, Canterbury Tales, 
12,477. [Quoted in Ency. Diet.} Out of 
the harde bones knocken they The mary, 
for they casten nought away, That may 
go thurgh the GULLET soft and sole. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Cre'v, 
GULLET, s.v. A Derisory Term for the 
Throat, from Gula. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. 15. 
So he puts a pistol to his mouth, and he 
fires it down his GULLET. 

1893. National Observer, x. 168. 
Through sympathetic GULLETS. 

GULL-FINCH, subs. (old). A 
simpleton ; a fool. For syn- 
onyms, see BUFFLE and CAB- 
BAGE-HEAD. 

1630. TAYLOR, Works. For 'tis con- 
cluded 'mongst the wizards all, To make 
thee master of GUL-FINCHES hall. 

GULL-GROPER, subs. (old). A 
gamesters' money-lender. 

1609. DEKKER, Lanthorne and 
Candle-light. The GUL-GROPERI s com- 
monly an old mony - monger, who having 
travaild through all the follyes of the world 
in his youth, knowes them well, and 
shunnes them in his age, his whole felicitie 
being to fill his bags with golde and silver. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 
GULL-GROPER, s.v. A Bystander that 
Lends Money to the Gamesters. 

178f>. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



Gutty. 



233 



Gu in . 



GULLY, subs, (common). i. The 
throat. For synonyms, see GUT- 
TER-ALLEY. 

2. (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 

MONOSYLLABLE. 

3. (old and Scots'). A knife. 
For synonyms, see CHIVE. 

1653. URQUHART, Rabelais, bk. I., 
ch. xxvii. Fair GULLIES which are little 
haulch-backed demi-knives. 

1785. /BURNS, Death and Dr. Horn- 
book. I red ye weel, tak care o' skaith, 
See, there's a GULLY. 

1789. BURNS, Address to Captain 
Grose. The knife that nickit Abel's craig, 
He'll prove ye fully It was a faulding 
jocteleg, Or lang-kail GULLY. 

Verb (common). To GULL 
(q.v.) ; to dupe ; to swindle. For 
synonyms, see STICK. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, bk. 
III., ch. v. I rode about and speechified, 
and everybody GULLIED. 

GULLY- FLUFF, subs, (colloquial). 
Pocket-filth ; BEGGAR'S VELVET 
(g.v.). Also FLUE (q.v.). 

GULLY-GUT, suts. and adj. (com- 
mon). A glutton. For synonyms, 
see STODGER. 

1598. FLORID, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Crapulatore, a surfeiter ; a gormand ; a 
glutton ; a GULLIE-GUT. 

1672. LESTRANGE, Fables. A GULLI- 
GUT friar. 

GULLY - HOLE (or GULLY), subs. 
(common). I. The throat, or 
gullet. For synonyms, see GUT- 

TER-ALLEY. 

2. (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

GULLY-RAKER, subs. phr. (venery). 
I. The penis; and (2) a 
wencher. For synonyms, see 
CREAMSTICK, PRICK, and MOL- 
ROWER. 



2. (Australian). A cattle-whip ; 
a cattle-thief. 

1881. A. C. GRANT, Bush Life in 
Queensland . . . following up his admoni- 
tion by a sweeping cut of his GULLY- 
RAKER, and a report like a musket-shot. 

GULPIN, subs, (common). A 
simpleton; a GAPESEED (q.v.). 
Fr. , un gobemouche ; line eponge. 
For synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1886. W. BESANT, World Went 
Very Well Then, ch. xxix. But Jack 
persisted, and I rose too. ' Go then ! ' the 
Admiral roared, with a great oath. ' Go 
then, for a brace of GULPINS !' 

GULPY, adj. (common). Easily 
duped. 

GULSH. TO HOLD ONE*S GULSH, 
verb. phr. (provincial). To hold 
one's tongue ; to keep quiet. 

GUM, subs. (old). i. Chatter; 
talk ; JAW (q.v.). Also abuse. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. xiv. There's no occasion to bowse 
out so much unnecessary GUM. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
Come let us have no more of your GUM. 

1824. R. B. PEAKE, Americans 
Abroad, i., i. Dou. Come, none of your 
GUM now you are but an underlin', tho' 
you are so uppish and twistical where's 
the chair? 

2. (American). A trick ; a 
piece of dupery ; a SELL (q.v.). 
Also GUMMATION. 

3. (American). A golosh ; 
an india-rubber overshoe. [Short 
for 'gum-shoes.'] 

1872. Morning Post, g Jan. For- 
bidding him again to cross her threshold 
or to leave his GUM-SHOES in her hall. 

Verb (common). To cheat ; 

to TAKE IN (q.V.), tO ROAST (q.V.) 

or quiz. For synonyms, see 
GAMMON. 



Gumntdgy. 



234 



Gum-suck. 



1859. SALA, Twice Round the Clock, 
6 p.m., par. I. I began to think either 
that he was quizzing me GUMMING is the 
proper Transatlantic colloquialism, I think. 

1875. ' American English ' in Chamb. 
Journal, 25 Sept., p. 611. To 'gum-tree' 
is to elude, to cheat [from opossum], and 
this again is shortened into ' to gum,' as 
the phrase, 'Now don't you try to GUM 
me.' 

OLD MOTHER GUM, subs. phr. 
(common). An old woman : in 
derision. 

BY GUM ! intj. (common). 
A mild oath. For synonyms, 
see OATHS. 

1860. HALIBURTON ('Sam Slick'), 
The Season Ticket, No. ix. BY GUM, 
Squire Shegog, we have had the greatest 
bobbery of a shindy in our carriage you 
ever knowed in all our born days. 

BLESS YOUR (or HIS, HER, 
ITS, etc.) GUMS, phr. (common). 
-A piece of banter : a facetious 
way of saying ' Bless your soul ! ' 

GUMMAGY, adj. (common). Snarl- 
ing ; of a scolding habit. 

GUMMED, adj. (billiards). Said 
of a ball close to the cushion. 

GUMMY, subs, (common). i. A 
toothless person ; i.e., with nothing 
but gums to show. Generally, 
OLD GUMMY. 

2. (thieves'). Medicine. Also 
GUMMY-STUFF. MATSELL. 

3. (common). A dullard ; a 
fool. For synonyms, see BUFFLE 
and CABBAGE-HEAD. 

Adj. ( common ). Puffed ; 
swollen ; clumsy. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
GUMMEY, clumsy, particularly applied to 
the ancles of men, or women, and the legs 
of horses. 

To FEEL GUMMY, verb. phr. 
(University). To perspire. 



GUMP, subs, (common). A dolt. 
For synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. 

1825. NEAL, Bro. Jonathan, bk. II., 
ch. xv. He's . . . sort of a nateral too, 
I gues>s ; rather a GUMP, hey? 

GUMPTION, subs, (colloquial). 
Cleverness ; understanding ; 
NOUS (</.'.). Also RUM GUMP- 
TION. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GUMP- 
TION, or RUM GUMPTION, s.v., docility, 
comprehension, capacity. 

1787. GROSE, Prov. Glossary, s.v. 
' Gawm.' Gawm, to understand ; I dinna 
gawm ye, I don't understand you. Hence, 
possibly, gawmtion, or GUMPTION, under- 
standing. 

1834. Atlantic Club-book, I., 33. 
D'ye think I'm a fellow of no more GUMP- 
TION than that ? 

184:3. Comic Almanack. Poor beasts, 
'tis very clear, To any one possess'd of 
GUMPTION, That if they'd not come over 
here, They'd have been carried off by home 
consumption. 

1853. LYTTON, My Novel, bk. IV., 
ch. xii. GUMPTION it means cleverness. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 25 June, p. 
3, c. 2. But poor people leastways, 
those that have got any GUMPTION know 
better than that. 

1890. Notes and Queries, 7 S., x., 303. 
As familiar as the Greek word nous for 
what .... is known ... as GUMPTION. 

GUMPTIOUS, adj. (colloquial). 
Shrewd ; intelligent ; vain. 

1853. LYTTON, My Novel, bk. IV., 
ch. xii. Landlord. There's gumption 
and GUMPTIOUS ! Gumption is knowing, 
but when I say that sum un is GUMPTIOUS, 
I mean though that's more vulgar like 
sum un who does not think small beer of 
hisself. You take me, sir? 

GUM-SMASHER (or TICKLER), subs. 
(common). A dentist. For 
synonyms, see SNAG-CATCHER. 

GUM-SUCK, verb. (American). To 
flatter ; to humbug ; to dupe 
For synonyms, see GAMMON. 



Gum-sucker. 



235 



Gun. 



GUM -SUCKER, subs. (Australian). 
i. See quot. Cf., CORN-STALK. 

1887. All the Year Round, 30 July, 
y. 67. A GUM-SUCKER is a native of 
Tasmania, and owes his elegant nickname 
to the abundance of gum - trees in the 
Tasmanian forests. 

2. (common). A fool. For 
synonyms, see BUFFLE and 
CABBAGE-HEAD. 

GUM-TICKLER, subs, (colloquial). 
I. A drink. Specifically, DROP 
or SHORT, or a dram. For syn- 
onyms, see Go. 
1814. Quarterly Review, vol. X., 

p. 521. A gill, taken fasting, is called 

a GUM-TICKLER. 

1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend, 
b!c. IV., ch. iii. I prefer to take it in the 
form of a GUM-TICKLER. 

2. See GUM-SMASHER. 

GUM-TREE. To BE UP A GUM- 
TREE, verb. phr. (American). 
To be on one's last legs; at the 
end of one's rope. ' He has seen 
his last GUM-TREE ' = It is all up 
with him. 

GUN, subs. (old). i. A lie. New 
Cant. Diet., 1725. For syn- 
onyms, see WHOPPER. 

2. (common). A thief; specifi- 
cally, a MAGSMAN (q.v.) or street- 
artist. Also GUN-SMITH and 
GUNNER. GUNNING = thieving. 
[An abbreviation of GONOF 
(?..).] See AREA-SNEAK and 
THIEVES. 

1858. A. MAYHEW, Paved -with 
Gold, bk. II., ch. i., p. 70. I tell you 
you ain't a-going to make a GUN (thief) of 
this here young flat. 

1868. Temple Bar, xxv., 213. . . . 
returned to his old trade of GUNSMITH, 
GUNNING being the slang term for 
thieving, or going on the cross. 

1882. Cornhill Mag., p. 649. Flats 
graft for GUNS. 

1889.. GLARKSON and RICHARDSON, 
Police. 'GUNNERS and grasshoppers sneak 
about watching their opportunities. 



3. (American). A revolver. 
For synonyms, see MEAT-IN-THE 
POT. 

4. (Irish). A toddy glass. 
See IN THE GUN. 

Verb (American). i. To 
consider with attention. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
GUNNED. The copper GUNNED me as if 
he was fly to my mug. 

2. (American). To strive 
hard ; to make a violent effort : 
e.g., to GUN A STOCK = to use 
every means to produce a 
'break'; when supplies are 
heavy and holders would be 
unable to resist. 

IN THE GUN, phr. (old). 
Drunk. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. GUN, 
s.v., he's IN THE GUN, he is drunk, per- 
haps from an allusion to a vessel called a 
GUN, used for ale in the universities. 

SON OF A GUN. See SON. 

SURE AS A GUN, phr. (com- 
mon). Quite certain; inevitable. 

1633. JONSON, Tale of a Tub, ii., i. 
'Tis right; he has spoke as TRUE AS A GUN, 
believe it. 

1690. B.E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 

1694. CoNGREVE,Z?0w/<? Dealer,^., 20. 
All turned topsy-turvy, as SURE AS A GUN. 

1720. GAY, New Song of New Similes. 
SURE AS A GUN she'll drop a tear. 

1749. FIELDING, Tom Jones, bk. 
xviii., ch. ix. As SURE AS A GUN I have 
hit o' the very right o't. 

1759. STERNE, Tristran Shandy, vol. 
vi., ch. xxvi. Think ye not that, in strik- 
ing these in, he might, peradventure, 
strike something out ? as SURE AS A GUN. 

1825. EGAN, Life of an Actor, iv. By 
gum ! he roared out, sir, AS SURE AS A GUN. 

d. 1842. FATHER PROUT, Reliques, I. 
19. ' Vert-Vert, the Parrot.' Scared at 
the sound, ! LRE AS A GUN, The bird's 
a demon ! ' eried the nun. 



Gundiguts. 



Gushing. 



1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. 
Iviii. In every party of the nobility his 
name's down as SURE AS A GUN. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
141. Nobbed, SURE AS A GUN ! 

1892. MANVILLE FENN, NewMistress, 
xxxv. They were both down there about 
that school-money Betsey, as SURE AS A 

GUN. 

GUNDIGUTS, sttbs. (common) A 

fat man ; a FORTY GUTS (q.v.}. 

1690. B.E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GUNNER'S DAUGHTER. To Kiss 
(or MARRY) THE GUNNER'S 
DAUGHTER, verb. phr. (nauti- 
cal). To be flogged. [GUNNER'S 
DAUGHTER = the gun to which 
boys were lashed for punish- 
ment.] 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, ch. 
xxxii. I don't know what officers are 
made of now-a-days. I'll marry some 
of you young gentlemen to the GUNNER'S 
DAUGHTER before long. Quarter-decks 
no better than a bear-garden. 

GUNPOWDER, subs. (old). An old 
woman. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s. v. 

GUNTER. See COCKER. 

GUP, subs. (Anglo-Indian). Gos- 
sip ; scandal. 

1868. FLORENCE MARRYATT. Gup, 
xix. With regard to my title . . . Gyp 
is the Hindustani for ' Gossip.' Voild 
tout ! 

1883. HAWLEY SMART, Hard Lines, 
ch. xxix. Our Eastern empire is much 
addicted to what they term GUP, whereby 
they mean gossip, scandal, or by whatever 
other equivalent the taking away of one's 
neighbours' characters may be designated. 

To BE A GUP, verb. phr. 
(American). To be easy to lake 
or steal. 

GURTSEY, subs. (American Cadet). 
A fat man; a PODGE (q.v.}. 
For synonyms, see FORTY-GUTS. 



GUSH, subs, (colloquial). The 
expression of affected or extrava- 
gant sentiment. 

1883. Saturday Review, 3 Feb., 
p. 148, c. 2. Mr. Picton's style is 
pleasant and easy, as long as he allows 
himself to be natural, and does not fall 
into GUSH. 

1886. Church Times, 17 Sep. Not 
mere GUSH or oratorical flip-flap. 

Verb (colloquial). To over- 
flow with extravagant or affected 
sentiment. 

1883. Miss BRADDON, Golden Calf, 
ch. vii. ' Yes, and you saw much of each 
other, and you became heart-friends,' 
GUSHED Miss Wolf, beaming benevolently 
at Brian. 

GUSHER, subs, (colloquial). A 
practitioner of GUSH (q.v.}. Also 
GUSHINGTON. 

1864. E. YATES, Broken to Harness, 
ch. vi., p. 66 (1873). The enthusiastic 
GUSHER who flings his or herself upon our 
necks, and insists upon sharing our sorrow. 

1882. Miss BRADDON, Mount Royal, 
ch. viii. ' But, surely there is nothing 
improper in the play, dear Lady Cumber- 
bridge,' exclaimed the eldest GUSHER, too 
long in society to shrink from sifting any 
question of that kind. 

GUSHING, adj. (colloquial). Ex- 
travagant ; affected or irrational 
in expression ; demonstratively 
affectionate. Also GUSHINGLY. 

1864. _ ' The Campaigner ' (No. XVI.), 
in Frasers Mag., p. 627. Donald did not 
belong to what, in the slang of translated 
Cockneys, is called the GUSHING School. 

1864. Punch' s Almanack, 'Our Growl- 
ing Bard.' Some, I admit, are Milingtary 
Dears, As GUSHING ladies say, and some 
are Muffs. 

1872. Sunday Times, 18 Aug. This 
however, was no surprise to the plaintiff, it 
having been understood from the first that 
the parties being past the GUSHING age 
the letters between them should be of a 
business character. 

1880. OUIDA, Moths, ch. viii. Your 
heroics count for nothing. All girls of 
sixteen are GUSHING and silly. 



Gusset. 



237 



Gut. 



1883. HARGRAVE JENNINGS, quoted 
in Saturday Review, 28 Apr., p. 536, 
c. i. Women are not the GUSHINGLY 
credulous creatures that man in his con- 
stant condescension and in his appreciation 
of himself would deem. 

1884. F. ANSTEY, Giant's Robe, 
ch. xx. 'It's not precisely GUSHING,' he 
said to himself, 'but she couldn't very 
well say more just yet.' 

GUSSET, suds, (common). Generic 
for the female sex. Thus, 
BROTHER (or KNIGHT, or 
SQUIRE) OF the GUSSET = a 
pimp; GUSSETTING= wenching; 
GussETEER = a wencher ; etc. 

GUSSET OF THE ARSE, subs, 
phr. (common). The inside edge 
of the buttocks. 

d. 1796. BURNS, Merry Muses, 
pp. 99-100. An' he grippit her fast by 

the GUSSET OF HER ARSE. 

GUT, subs, (vulgar). The vice or 
habit of gluttony ; the belly [as 
opposed to the GROIN (g.v.).] 

2. in. pi. (common). The 
stomach and intestines. 

1609. DEKKER, GuFs Horne-Booke, 
chap. ii. The Neapolitan will (like 
DERICK, the hangman) embrace you with 
one arme, and rip your GUTS with the 
other. 

1640. RAWLTNS, The Rebellion, iii. 
(DODSLEY, Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, xiv., 
48). Thou hast a GUT could swallow a 
peck loaf. 

1661. BROME, Poems, 'A Satire on 
the Rebellion." The grumbling GUTS, the 
belly of the State. 

1713. BENTLEY, On Free Thinking, 
sect. 53. What then was our writer's soul ? 
Was it brain or GUTS ? 

1754. FIELDING, Jonathan Wild, 
"ok. iv., c. i. But so it was that the 
knife, missing these noble parts (the 
noblest of many) THE GUTS, perforated 
only the hollow of his belly. 

1787. BURNS, Death and Dr. Horn- 
book, st. 27. A ccuntra Laird had ta'e n 
the batts, Or some curmurring in his 
GUTS. 



3. in. pi. (old). A fat man ; 

a FORTY - GUTS (q.V.\ Also 
GUTS - AND - GARBAGE. MORE 

GUTS (also MORE BALLS) THAN 
BRAINS = a fool. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, Henry IV., pt. i, 
ii., 2. Peace, ye fat-GUTS. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
GUTTS, a very fat gross Person. 

4. (artists' and colloquial). 
Spirit ; quality ; a touch of force, 
or energy, or fire : e.g., a picture, 
a book, an actor. WITH GUTS 
= a strong thing. Put your 
GUTS into it (aquatic) = Row the 
very best you can. He (or it) 
has NO GUTS in him (or it) = He 
(or it) is a COMMON ROTTER 
(q.v.}. Hence, GUTSY, adj. = 
having GUTS, and GUTSINESS, 
subs. =. the condition of being 
GUTSY. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Conversation, I. 
The fellow's well enough if he had any 
GUTS in his brain. 

1893. Pall Mall Budget. No. 1292 
(June 29), iqo6. The body of the cigar, 
or what might vulgarly be called the GUTS. 

Verb (vulgar). I. To plunder, 
or take out all or most of the 
contents (i.e., intestines) of a 
place or thing ; to drain ; to 
'clean out': e.g., TO GUT A 
HOUSE (thieves') = to rifle it ; 
to GUT AN OYSTER = to eat it; 
TO GUT A BOOK = to empty it 
of interesting matter ; TO GUT 
A QUART POT = to drain at a 
draught. Whence, GUTTED = 
dead-broke. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. i. 
Whether diddling your subjects or 
GUTTING their jobs. 

1849-61. MACAULAY, Hist, of Eng- 
land. The king's printing-house . . . 
was, to use a coarse metaphor, which then 
for the first time came into fashion, com- 
pletely GUTTED. 



Gut-entrance. 



238 



Gutter. 



1S92. R. L. STEVENSON and L. 
OSBOUKNE, The Wrecker, p. 373. Well, 
we've got the GUTS out of you ! 

2. (schools'). To eat hard, 
fast, and badly. For synonyms, 
see WOLF. 

To FRET ONE'S GUTS, verb. phr. 
(common). To worry. 

TO HAVE PLENTY OF GUTS 
BUT NO BOWELS, verb. phr. 
(common). To be unfeeling, 
hard, merciless. 

MY GREAT GUTS ARE READY 
TO EAT MY LITTLE ONES, phr. 

(old). 'I am very hungry.' Also, 
MY GUTS BEGIN TO THINK MY 
THROAT'S CUT ; MY GUTS CURSE 

MY TEETH J and MY GUTS CHIME 
TWELVE. GROSE. 

NOT FIT TO CARRY GUTS TO A 
BEAR, phr. (common). To be 
worthless; absolutely unmannerly; 
UNFIT FOR HUMAN FOOD (q.V.). 

GUT- ENTRANCE, subs, (venery). 
The female pt^dend^i1n. Also 
FRONT-GUT. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

GUT-FOUNDERED, adj. (old). 
Exceedingly hungry. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GUT- PUDDING, subs. (old). A 
sausage. Nomenclator ( 1 696). 
For synonyms, see MYSTERIES. 

GUT-PULLER, subs, (common). A 
poulterer; a CHICKEN-BUTCHER 
(f.tv). 

GUT-SCRAPER, subs, (common). 
A fiddler. Also CATGUT SCRAPER, 

and. TORMENTOR OF CATGUT. 

For synonymns, see ROSIN-THE- 
BOW. 



1719. DURFEY, Pills, ii., 218. 'A 
Song' etc. Strike up, drowsie GUT 

SCRAPERS. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1785. BURNS, Jolly Beggars. Her 
charms had struck a sturdy Caird, As 
weel's a poor GUT-SCRAPER. 

1834. W. H. AINSWORTH, Rook- 
wood, p. 192 (ed. 1864). Make ready 
there, you GUT-SCRAPERS, you shawm- 
shavers ; I'll put your lungs in play for 
you presently. In the mean time charge, 
pals, charge a toast, a toast ! 

1834. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, ch. 
xxxi. ' You may save yourself the trouble, 
you dingy GUT-SCRAPER," replied O'Brien 
[addressing a fiddler]. 

GUT-STICK, subs, (venery). The 
penis. For synonyms, see CREAM- 
STICK and PRICK. To HAVE A 
BIT (or A TASTE) OF THE GUT- 
STICK = to copulate (of women 
only). 

GUT-STICKER, stt&s. phr. (venery). 

A sodomite. Also GUT- 
FUCKER and GUT-MONGER. For 
synonyms, see USHER. 

GUTTER, subs. (American thieves'). 

i. Porter. MATSELL. [Prob- 
ably a corruption of GATTER 



2. (venery). The female pu- 
dendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

Verb (Winchester College).- - 
To fall in the water flat on the 
stomach. Fr., p^q^ler wi plat- 
venire. 

TO LAP THE GUTTER, verb. 

phr. (common). To be in the 
last stage of intoxication. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

CARRY ME OUT AND LEAVE 

ME IN THE GUTTER, phr. 

(American). See CARRY ME 
OUT. 



Gutter-alley. 



239 



Guttle. 



GUTTER-ALLEY (or LANE), subs. 
(common). The throat. ALL 
GOES DOWN GUTTER-LANE = 
* He spends all on his stomach.' 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Beer 
Street ; common sewer ; drain ; 
funnel; Gin Lane ; gulf; gullet ; 
gully-hole ; gutter ; Holloway ; 
Peck Alley ; Red Lane ; the Red 
Sea ; Spew Alley ; swallow ; 
thrapple ; throttle ; whistle. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. La 
carafe (tramps') ; la creuse 
(popular = Holloway) ; le corri- 
dor ; le cornet (popular) ; le 
couloir ; le lampas ; la goule 
(popular) ; le gose (popular : an 
abbreviation of gosier : also 
gesier)', lagargoine (thieves') ; la 
gargarousse (thieves' = Old Gar- 
gles) ; kfour (popular = the oven) ; 
le fanal (popular) ; fentonnoir 
(popular the funnel); Favaloir 
(thieves' = the swallow). 

GERMAN SYNONYM. Kollert 
(Hanoverian). 

SPANISH SYNONYM. La 
gorja. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1787. GROSE, Prov. Glossary, f. 
(1811), p. 8r. All goeth down GUTTER 
LANE. That is, the throat. This proverb is 
applicable to those who spend all their 
substance in eating and drinking. 

2. (common). A urinal. For 
synonyms, see PISSING-POST. 

GUTTER-BLOOD, subs, (common). 
l. See quot. Also (2) a vul- 
garian ; an upstart from the 
rabble. 

1822. SCOTT, The Fortunes of 
Nigel, ch. v. In rushed a thorough Edin- 
burgh GUTTERBLOOD a ragged rascal. 

GUTTER - CHAUNTER, subs, (com- 
mon). A street singer. 



GUTTER-HOTEL, subs, (tramps'). 
The open air. P'or synonyms, 
see HEDGE-SQUARE. 

GUTTER-LITERATURE. See BLOOD- 

AND-THUNDER, and AWFUL. 

GUTTER-MASTER, subs. (old). A 
term of reproach. 

1607. MARSTON, What You Will, iii, 
i. And now my soule is skipt into a per- 
fumer, a GUTTERMASTER. 

GUTTER-PROWLER, subs, (thieves'). 
A street thief. For synonyms, 
see AREA-SNEAK and THIEVES. 

GUTTER-SNIPE, subs, (common). 
I. A street arab. Also GUTTER- 
SLUSH. For synonyms, see MUD- 
LARK. 

2. (American printers'). A 
poster for the kerb. 

3. (American Commercial). 
An ' outside ' broker who does 
business chiefly in the street ; a 

KERBSTONE BROKER (q.V.). Fr., 
un loup-cervier. 

GUTTIE, subs, (golfers') I. A 
gutta-percha ball. 

2. (colloquial). A glutton. 
For synonyms, see STODGER. 

3. (colloquial). A FORTY- 
GUTS, which see for synonyms. 

GUTTLE, vetb. (vulgar). To eat 
greedily ; to GORMANDIZE (q.v.). 
Also to drink : e.g., TO GUTTLE 
A PINT = to take off, or do, a 
pint ; ' He's been GUTTLING 
swipes' he's been drinking beer. 
Hence GUTTLER = a coarse, or 
greedy eater ; a sturdy pot-com- 
panion : a GORGER (q.v.}. Cf. t 
Thackeray's Book of Snobs for 
GuTTLEBURYFair. See GUZZLE. 

1672. LESTRANGE, Fables, p. 260. 
A jolly GUTTLING priest. 



Guttle- *Jiop. 



240 



GUTTLE-SHOP, subs. (Rugby). A 
pastry-cook's ; a TUCK - SHOP 



Guv, subs, (common). An abbrevia- 
tion Of GOVERNOR (q.V.). 

GUY, subs, (colloquial). I. A Fifth 
of November effigy ; whence (2) 
an ill-dressed person. As in the 
old street cry, 'Hollo, boys, there 
goes another GUY ! (an abbrevia- 
tion of Guy Fawkes) = a figure 
of fun ; a fright. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Cau- 
tion ; Captain Queer-nabs; chivey; 
comic bird ; ragamuffin; sight. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Un 
paquet (popular), une hallebarde 
(popular = a clothes-prop ; un 
nippe-mal (popular) ; une becasse 
( = a gaby) ; un carnavale (popu- 
lar = a figure of fun). 

1806. W. BuRRELL.Jn C. K. Sharpe's 
Correspondence (1888), i., 277. A month 
ago there was neither shape nor make in 
use. ... no GUY ever matched me. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends. 
1 The Nurse's Story.' Did you see her, in 
short, that mud-hovel within, With her 
knees to her nose, and her nose to her chin, 
Leering up with that queer, indescribable 
grin, You'd lift up your hands in amazement 
and cry, ' Well ! I never did see such a 
regular GUY ! ' 

1858. G. ELIOT, Janet's Repentance, 
ch. vi. Ned Phipps .... whispered that 
he thought the Bishop was a GUY, and I 
certainly remember thinking that Mr. Pren- 
dergast looked much more dignified with 
his plain white surplice and black hair. 

1871. Morning Advertiser, 26 Jan. 
There is no imperative reason why a con- 
stable should be a GUY. 

3. (common). A dark lantern. 
[Obviously a reminiscence of the 
Gunpowder Plot], 

1811. Lexicon Balatronic urn. GUY, 
s.v. Stow the GUY, conceal the lanthorn. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

4. (streets). A jaunt ; an 
expedition. 



1889. Sporting Times, 3 Aug., p. 5, 
c. 5. There was a gee, there was a buggy, 
but there wasn't a punctual Pitcher. So a 
cheerful GUY to Waterloo was the game. 

Verb (common). I. To quiz ; 
to chaff; TO ROAST (q.v.)', TO 
JOSH (q.V.). 

1889. Detroit Free Press, 26 Jan. 
His advent here created much merriment, 
and the operators GUYED him loud enough 
for him to hear them. 

2. (common). To escape ; TO 
HEDGE (q.v.} ; to run away. 
Also TO DO A GUY (which also = 
to give a false name). For syn- 
onyms, see AMPUTATE and 
SKEDADDLE. 

1879. J.W. HORSLEY, in Macmillaris 
Mag., xl. 500. I planned with another 
boy to GUY (run away). 

1887. Fun, 23 Mar., p. 125. ' Boat- 
race Day, as per usual,' said the clerk to 
the court, ' they'll all be DOING GUYS ' 
(giving false names !). 

1889. CLARKSON and RICHARDSON 
Police, p. 321. To run away. . . . Do A 
GUY. 

1892. Punch, 24 Sept. "Arry at 
Arrygate.' I just DID A GUY. 

3. (American) To spoil ; to 
muddle ; to disfigure or distort. 

1S91. New York Herald, 31 May, 
p. 12, c. 4. Finally, I would remind 
them that they are apt to GUY their cause 
by making ' guys ' of themselves, and that 
the best way of making women a power 
in the land is by encouraging them to be 
womanly women. 

4. (theatrical). To damn ; to 
hiss; TO SLATE (q.V.) OI GIVE 
THE BIRD (q.V.). 

GUZZLE (or GUTTLE), sttbs. (vulgar). 
I. An insatiable eater or 
drinker. For synonyms, see 
STODGER and LUSHINGTON 
respectively. 

2. (vulgar). A debauch. 
1876. HINDLEY, Adventures of 

Cheap Jack, 58. Doing a GUZZLE with 
money he earned. 

3. (common). Drink. 



G uzzle-guts. 



241 



Gybe. 



1653. URQUHART, .ffa-fcAzis, Bk. II., 

ch. i., note. It signifies rum-booze, as 
our gipsies call good-cuzzLE. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1698-1700. WARD, London Spy, 
part III., p. 47. A Pennyworth of burnt 
Bread soften'd in a Mus; of Porter's 

GUZZLE. 

c. 1795. WOLCOT [P. Pindar] Peters 
Pension, in wks. (Dublin, 1795), vol. i., 
p. 4^84. Lo, for a little meat and GUZZLE, 
This sneaking cur, too, takes the muzzle. 

Verb, (vulgar). I. To drink 
greedily, or to excess. 

1607. DEKKER, Westward Ho, 
v., i. My master and Sir Gosling are 
GUZZLING ; they are dabbling together 
fathom-deep. 

1693. DRYDEN, Persius, vi., 51. 
And, lavish of suspense, Quaffs, crams, and 
GUTTLES, in his own defence. 

1698. FARQUHAR, Love anda Bottle, 
Act i. His education could reach no 
farther than to GUZZLE fat ale. 

1727. GAY, Beggars Opera, i., 
3. Tom Tipple, a GUZZLING soaking 
sot, who is always too drunk to stand 
himself. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth ed.). 
GUZZLE (v.) to tipple, to fuddle, to drink 
much and greedily. 

1782. WOLCOT [P. Pindar], Lyric 
Odes, Ode i. The poet might have 
GUTTLED till he split. 

1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. Ixi. 
Are you ... to tell me that the aim of 
life is to GUTTLE three courses and dine off 
silver? 

GUZZLE-GUTS, subs, (common). 
A glutton ; a hard drinker. Lex. 
Bal. (1811). See GUZZLE. 

GUZZLER, subs, (colloquial). A 
hard drinker ; a coarse, voracious 
feeder. See GUZZLE. 

a. 1760. T. BROWN, Works, iii., 
265 [ed. 1760]. Being an eternal GUZZLER 
of wine, his mouth smelt like a vintner's 
vault. 

1841. DICKENS, Bamaby Rudge, 
ch. xiii. To be looked upon as a common 
pipe-smoker beer-bibber, spirit-GUZZLER, 
and toss-pot. 



GUZZLING, subs, (vulgar). Eating 
or drinking to excess ; also eating 
or drinking in a coarse un- 
mannerly fashion. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 28. 
What with snoozing, high-grubbing and 
GUZZLING like Chloe. 

1882. F. ANSTEY, Vice Versa, 
ch. xv. There shall be no pocketing at 
this table, sir. You will eat that pudding 
under my eye at once, and you will stay in 
and write out French verbs for two days. 
That will put an end to any more GUZZLING 
in the garden for a time, at least. 

GUZZUM, subs. (American). 
Chatter ; noise. For synonyms, 
see PATTER. 

1888. Detroit Free Press, 22 Dec. 
' Now, Jerry, if yer don't stop yer 
GUZZUM I'll skin yer alive ! ' she exclaimed 
as she stood in the door and flourished a 
skillet at him. 



G.Y. ALL A G.Y., adv. 
(North Country). Crooked 
on one side ; ' all of a hugh. ' 



all 



GYBE, subs. (old). A written 
paper. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 65 
A GYB, a writing 

1608. DEKKER, Belman of London, 
in wks. (GROSART) III., 104. His office is 
to make counteract licences, which are 
called GYBES. 

1724. E. COLES, Eng. Diet. GYBE, 
any Writing or Pass. 

1818. SCOTT, Heart of Midlothian, 
ch. xxv. He knows my GYBE [pass] as 
well as the jark [seal] of e'er a queer cuffin 
[justice of peace] in England. 

Verb (old). I. To whip ; to 
castigate. E.g., GYBED at the 
cart's arse = whipped at the cart's 
tail. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew 
GYB'D, jerkt or whipt. 

16 



Gybing. 



242 



Gyvel. 



GYBING (also GIBERY), subs, (old : 
now recognised). Jeering. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

GYGER. See JIGGER. 

GYMNASIUM, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For syn- 
onyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

GYP, subs. (Cambridge University). 
I. A college servant. At 
Oxford, a scout, at Dublin, a 
skip. (Etymology doubtful : ac- 
cording to Sat. Rev. an abbrevia- 
tion of Gipsy Joe ; according to 
Cambridge undergraduates from 
the Greek yty ( GUPS ) = a 
vulture ; from the creature's 
rapacity.] 

1794. Gent. Mag., p. 1085. [A Cam- 
bridge college servant is called a JIP.] 

1842. Tait's Map., Oct., 'Reminis- 
cences of Coll. Life.' There is attached to 
colleges and halls a person more useful 
than ornamental, and better known than 
paid, whom Oxonians name GYP, from his 
supposed moral affinity to a vulture (yvty). 
The same is in Dublin denominated a Skip, 
because of the activity which is an indis- 
pensable item in his qualifications. 

1849. C. KINGSLEY, Alton Locke, ch. 
xii. I'll send you in luncheon as I go 
through the butteries ; then, perhaps, 
you'd like to come down and see the race. 
Ask the GYP to tell you the way. 



1850. SMEDLEY, Frank Fairleigh, p. 
254. Fellow you call the GYP wanted to 
make me believe you were out thought I 
looked too like a governor to be let in, I 
suppose. 

1882. F. ANSTEY, Vice Versa, ch. v. 
Who should we see coming straight down 
on us but a Proctor with his bull-dogs (not 
dogs, you know, but the strongest GYPS in 
the college). 

2. (American). A thief. For 
synonyms, see THIEVES. 

GYPSIES OF SCIENCE, subs. phr. 
(literary.) The British Associa- 
tion. 

1846. Times, 5 Sept. On Thursday 
next, the Gipsies of Science (the British 
Association) will have pitched their tents 
at Southampton. 

GYROTWISTIVE, adj. (American). 
Full of evasions and tricks ; a 
' portmanteau word.' 

GYTE, subs, (common). i. A 
child ; in contempt. [A corrup- 
tion of goat.] 

2. (Scots'). A first year's 
pupil in the Edinburgh High 
School. 



GYVEL, subs. (Scots' venery). The 
female pudendum. For syn- 
onyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

d. 1796. BURNS, The Merry Muses, 
' Nine Inches for a Lady,' 33-4. Come 
louse and lug your battering ram, An' 
thrash him at my GYVEL. 





IABERDASHER, 

sttbs. (old collo- 
quial : now re- 
cognised). i. 
A dealer in 
small wares ; 
specifically (i) a 
hatter, and (2, 

humorously) a publican (i.e., 
a seller of TAPE (q.v.}. Now 
restricted to a retail draper. 
1599. MINSHEU, Dictionaries s.v. 
1632. JONSON, The Magnetic Lady, 
' Induction.' Poetaccios, poetasters, 
poetitos. . . . And all HABERDASHERS of 
small wit. 

d. 1680. BUTLER, Rema'ns (1759), ii., 
107. He set up HABERDASHER of a small 
poetry. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Torn and Jerry, 
in., 5. The HABERDASHER is the whistler, 
otherwise the spirit-merchant, Jerry and 
tape the commodity he deals in. 

HABERDASHER OF PRONOUNS, 
subs. phr. (common). A school- 
master. For synonyms, see 

BUMBRUSHER. 

1690. B. E., Cant, Crew, s.v. 

1725. Neiv Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HABIT, subs, (old University). See 
quot. 

1803. Gradus ad Cantabrigiam. 
HABIT. College HABIT, College dress, 
called of old, Livery : the dress of the 
Master, Fellows, and Scholars. 

HAB-NAB(or HOB- NOB (q.V.}}, adv. 
(old). I. At random ; promiscu- 
ously ; helter-skelter ; ding-dong. 



1602. SIIAKSPEARE, Twelfth Night, 
iii., 4. His incensement at this moment 
is so great that satisfaction can be none but 
by pangs of death and sepulchre. HOB- 
NOB is his word ; give't, or take't. 

1664. BUTLER, Hudibras,\\., 3. Al- 
though set down HAB-NAB at random. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HAB-NAB. at a Venture, Unsight, Unseen, 
Hit or Miss. 

1725. New Cant. Diet, s.v. 

2. (old). By hook or by crook ; 
by fair means or foul. 

1581. LILLY, Euphues, iop. Phi- 
lantus determined HABNAB to send his 
letters. 

( Verb (old). To drink with ; 
giving health for health. 

1836. HORACE SMITH, The Tin 
Trumpet. 'Address to a Mummy." Per- 
chance that very hand now pinioned flat 
Has HOB- AND - NOBBED with Pharaoh 
glass for glass. 

HACK (or HACKNEY), subs, (old : 
now recognised). i. A person 
or thing let out for promiscuous 
use : e.g. , a horse, a whore, a 
literary drudge. Whence (2) a 
coach that plies for hire ; (3) 
(stables') a horse for every- 
day use, as offered to one for a 
special purpose hunting, racing, 
polo. (4) (Cambridge Univ.), see 
quot. 1803. Also HACKSTER. 

1333. CHAUCER, Canterbury 7ales, 
16,027. His HAKENEV, which that was a 
pomele gris. 

1540. LYNDSAY, Saiyre of the thri 
Estaits, 3237. I may finds the Earle of 
Rothus best HACKNAY. 



Hack. 



244 



Haddock. 



1582. HAKLUYT, Voyages, i., 400 
There they use to put out their women 
to hire as we do here HAKNEY horses. 

1594. SHAKSPEARE, Loves Labour 
Lost, i\\., i. The hobby-horse is but a 
colt, and your love perhaps a HACKNEY. 

1594. NASHE, UnJ. Traveller, 101 
(Chiswick Press, 1890). Out whore, 
strumpet, sixpenny HACKSTER, away with 
her to prison ! 

1672. RAY, Proverbs. HACKNEY 
mistress, HACKNEY maid. 

1678. BUTLER, Hudibras, pt. iii., 
c. i. That is no more than every lover 
Does from his HACKNEY-LADY suffer. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HACKS, or HACKNEYS, Hirelings. Ibid, 
HACKNEY HORSES. Ibid., HACKNEY 
SCRIBBLERS. Ibid., HACKNEY WHORES, 
Common Prostitutes. 

1738. POPE, Ep. to Sat. Shall each 
spurgall'd HACKNEY of the day, Or each 
new pension'd sycophant, pretend To break 
my windows ? 

1754. FIELDING, Jonathan Wild, iv., 
14. With wonderful alacrity he had ended 
almost in an instant, and conveyed himself 
into a place of safety in a H ACKNEY-coach. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HACKNEY-WRITER, one who writes for 
attornies or booksellers. 

1803. Gradus ad Cantabrigiam. 
HACKS. HACK Preachers ; the common 
exhibitioners at St. Mary's, employed in 
the service of defaulters, and absentees. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib. I first was 
hired to peg a HACK. 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
i., 7. A rattler is a nimbler, otherwise a 
Jarvy ! Better known, perhaps, by the 
name of a HACK. 

1841. LEMAN REDE, Sixteen String 
Jack, ii,, 3. I'll get a HACK, be off in a 
crack. 

Verb (colloquial, football). 
To kick shins. HACKING = the 
practice of kicking shins at 
football. 

1857. G. A. LAWRENCE, Guy 
Livingstone, ch. i. I saw, too, more than 
one player limp out of his path dis- 
consolately, trying vainly to dissemble the 
pain of a vicious HACK. 

1869. SPENCER, Study of Sociology, 
ch. viii. p. 186 (gth ed.). And thus, per- 
haps, the ' education of a gentleman ' may 
rightly include giving and receiving 
HACKING of the shins at foot-ball. 



1872. The Echo, 3 Nov. Some of 
the modern foot ball players have the tips 
of their shoes tipped with iron, and others 
wear a kind of armour or iron plate under 
their knicker-bockers to avoid . . . what 
is called HACKING. 

HACKLE, subs. (common). - 
Pluck; spirit; BOTTOM (q.v.). 

TO SHOW HACKLE = to show 
fight. [Hackle = a long shining 
feather on a cock's neck.] Fr., 
avoir du foie ; n } avoir pas le 
flubart, or avoir du poil au del. 

H ACKSLAVER, verb. (old). To 
stammer ; to splutter ; to hesi- 
tate in speech. 

HACKUM (or CAPTAIN HACKUM, or 
HACKSTER), subs. (old). A 
bully ; a bravo. For synonyms, 
see FURIOSO. 

1657. Lady A limony, i, 3 (DoosLEY, 
Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, xiv., p. 282). 
Vowing, like a desperate HAXTER that he 
has express command to seize upon all our 
properties, 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HACK AM, Fighting Fellow. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HACKUM, Captain Hackum, a bravo, a 
slasher. 

1859. M A T s E L L , Vocabulum. 
HACKUM, a bravado, a slasher, 'Capt. 
Hackum,' a fellow who slashes with a 
bowie-knife. 

HAD. See HAVE. 

HADDOCK, subs, (common). i. A 
purse. HADDOCK OF BEANS = 
a purse of money. [Haddock = 
cod : O. Sw., Rudde ; Ic., Koddi 
= a small bag. Cf., CODPIECE.] 
For synonyms, see POGE. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes. 
Melrusio, the fish we call a HADOCK, or a 
cod. Ibid. Metier la faua nel bacello, 
to put the beane into the cod. 

1834. H. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, 
bk. III., ch. xiii. ' What's here?' cried he, 
searching the attorney's pockets . . . ' a 
HADDOCK, stuffed with nothing, I'm 
thinking.' 



Haddums. 



245 



Haggler. 



2. in. pi. (Stock Exchange). 
North of Scotland Ordinary 
Stock. 

HADDUMS (or HAD 'EM). See 

quots. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew. The 
Spark has been at HADDUMS. He is 
Clapt, or Poxt. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v' 
He has been at HAD'EM and come home 
by Clapham, said of one who has caught 
the venereal disease. 

HAG, subs, (old : now recognised). 
i. A witch. Whence (2) an 
ugly old woman ; a she-monster. 
Also (3) a nightmare. At Char- 
terhouse, a female of any descrip- 
tion ; at Winchester, a matron. 
Hence, HAG-RIDDEN = troubled 
with nightmare. HAG - BORN = 
witch-born. HAG-SEED (Shaks- 
peare, Tempest] = spawned of a 
witch. HAG - FACED = foul-fea- 
tured. In another sense, HAGS 
= spots of firm ground in a moss 
or bog. 

d. 1529. i SKELTON,Z>w&?0/' Albany, 
Lyke a Scottish HAG. 

1606. Wily Beguiled (DODSLEY, Old 
Plays, 4th ed., 1875, ix., 277). Like to 
some hellish HAG or some damned fiend. 

1606. SHAKSPEARE, Macbeth, iv., i. 
How now, you secret, black, and midnight 
HAGS! 

1627. DRAYTON, The Moon-calf 
(CHALMER'S English Poets, 1810, iv., 133). 
The filthy HAG abhoring of the light. 

1632. JONSON, Magnetic Lady, v. 6. 
Out HAG ! 

1637. JONSON, Sad Shepherd, ii., 2. 
As if you knew the sport of witch-hunting, 
Or starting of a HAG. 

1680. COTTON, Poems, etc., ' To 
Poet E.W.' Adulterate HAGS, fit for a 
common stew. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1748. THOMSON, Castle of Indolence, 
i., 73. Fierce fiends and HAGS of hell 
their only nurses were. 



1773-83. HOOLE, Orlando Furioso, 
xliii., 998. But such a HAG to paradise 
conveyed, Had withered by her looks the 
blissful shade. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, xliii. 
Hatteraick himself, and the gypsy sailor, 
and that old HAG. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger's 
Sweetheart, p. 89. Old women were there 
also, with hideous vice-stamped features, 
veritable HAGS all of them. 

YOUR HAGSHIP ! phr. (com 
mon). In contempt (of women). 

HAG- FINDER, subs. (old). A witch 
finder. 

1637 JONSON, Sad Shepherd, ii., 2. 
That I do promise, or I am no good HAG- 
FINDER. 

HAGGED, adj. (old, now [as HAG- 
GARD] recognised). Ugly; gaunt; 
hag-like. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v 
HAGGED, Lean, Witched, Half-starved. 

1716-1771. GRAY, A Long Story. 
The ghostly prudes with HAGGED face. 



HAGGISLAND, subs, (common). 
Scotland. 

HAGGLE, verb, (old, now recognised). 
To bargain keenly ; to stick at, 
or out for, trumpery points ; to 
debate small issues. 
1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1849-61. MACAULAY, Hist. Eng., 
ch. xx. HAGGLING with the greedy, 
making up quarrels. 

HAGGLER, subs. (old). Formerly a 
travelling merchant ; a pedlar : 
now(in London vegetable markets) 
a middleman. Cf., BUMMAREE. 

1662. FULLER, Worthies; Dorset- 
shire. Horses, on which HAGLERS used 
to ride and carry their commodities. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. A 
HAGLER, one that buys of the Country 
Folks, and sells in the Market, and goes 
from Door to Door. 



Hail. 



246 



Hair. 



1697. VANBRUGH, &sop, , i. I se 
no HAGLER, gadswookers and he that 
says I am 'zbud, he lies ! 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW Land. Lab. 
and Land. Poor, vol. I., p. 83. A 
HAGGLER being, as I before explained, 
the middle-man. 

HAIL. To RAISE HAIL (or NED, 
or CAIN, or HELL), verb. phr. 
(American). To make a disturb- 
ance ; to kick up a row. 

1888. Portland Transcript, 7 Mar. 
He is determined that they shall have a 
clear deed to one hundred and sixty acres 
of land when the question is settled, or he 

will RAISE HAIL. 

TO BE HAIL FELLOW WELL 
MET, verb. phr. (colloquial). To 
be on very easy terms : also AT 
HAIL-FELLOW. 

1574-1656. Halts Satires, III., i., 
p. 40. Now man, that erst HAILE-FELLOW 
was with beast, Woxe on to weene him- 
selfe a god at least. 

1665. Homer a la Mode. The cookes 
too, having done, were set At table HAY 
FELLOW WELL MET [Quoted ty Nsris]. 

1667-1745. SWIFT, My Lady's 
Lamentation. HAIL FELLOW, WELL MET, 
all dirty and wet; Find out, if you can, 
who's master, who's man. 

1886. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
p. 108. And at first he sings small, and is 
HAIL-FELLOW-WELL-MET with Sheamus 
that's James of the Glens, my chieftain's 
agent. 

TO BE HAILED FOR THE LAST 
TIME, verb. phr. (nautical). To 
die. For synonyms, see ALOFT. 

1891. W. C. RUSSELL, Ocean- Tra- 
gedy, p. 322. He's BEEN HAILED FOR THE 
LAST TIME. 

HAIR, subs, (venery). i. The 
female pubes. Whence (2) generic 
for the sex : e.g., AFTER HAIR=: 
in quest of a woman ; PLENTY OF 
HAiR=:lots of girls ; HAIR TO 
SELL = a woman with a price ; 
HAIR-MONGER = a wencher ; BIT 
OF HAIR = the sexual favour. 
For synonyms, see FLEECE. 



TO GO AGAINST THE HAIR, 
verb. phr. (old colloquial). To 
go against the grain, or contrary 
to nature. [From the texture of 
furs.] 

1589. N A s H E . Martins Months 
Minde (Grosart), i., 188. For hee euer 

WENT AGAINST THE HAIRE. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives, 
ii., 3. If you should fight, you GO 
AGAINST THE HAIR of your professions. 

1661. MIDDLETON, Mayor of Queen- 
borough, C. P. xi., 122. Books in 
women's hands are as much AGAINST 
THE HAIR, methinks, as to see men wear 
stomachers, Or night-railes. 

BOTH OF A HAIR, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). Very much alike. 
Also, two of a trade, and two in 
a tale. 

NOT WORTH A HAIR, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). Utterly worthless. 
C/!, CENT, RAP, DUMP, etc. 

To A HAIR, adv. phr. (collo- 
quial). Exactly ; to a nicety. 
Cf., To FIT TO A HAIR = to ht 
perfectly. 

1697. VANBRUGH, sEsop, i., i. Here 
was a young gentlewoman but just now 
pencilled me out TO A HAIR. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Conversation. 
Miss. Well I love a Lyar with all my 
Heart ; and you FIT ME TO A HAIR. 

1891. W. C. RUSSELL, Ocean Tra- 
gedy, p. 30. The fellow FITS my temper 

TO A HAIR. 

To SPLIT HAIRS, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To cavil about 
trifles ; to quibble ; to be over- 
nice in argument. 

1693. CONGREVE, Old Bachelor, ii., 
2. Now, I must speak ; it will SPLIT A 
HAIR by the Lord Harry. 

SUIT OF HAIR, subs. phr. 
(American). A HEAD OF HAIR 
(y'.v.). 



Hair. 



Hair. 



To RAISE (or LIFT) HAIR, 
verb. phr. (Amerian). To scalp ; 
hence, idiomatically, to defeat ; 
to kill. To KEEP ONE'S HAIR = 
to escape a danger. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the FarWest, 
p. 194. Kit Carson . . . had RAISED MORE 
HAIR from the red-skins than any two men 
in the Western country. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody, p. 101. 
If you'll take the chances of KEEPING YOUR 

HAIR. 

To COMB ONE'S HAIR, verb, 
phr. (common). To castigate ; 
TO MONKEY (q.v.}. See COMB 
ONE'S HAIR, ante. 

To HOLD (or KEEP) ONE'S 
HAIR (or WOOL) ON, verb. phr. 
(commcn). To keep one's 
temper ; to avoid excitement ; to 
take easily. Also TO KEEP ONE'S 

SHIRT ON, or TO PULL DOWN 

ONE'S JACKET (or VEST). Fr., 
etre calme etinodoie. 

1885. BRET HARTE, A Ship ^of' 49, 
ch. vi. ' But what the devil ' inter- 
rupted the young man impetuously. ' KEEP 
YER HAIR ON ! ' remonstrated the old man 
with dark intelligence. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
78. Do KEEP YOUR 'AIR ON, dear pal. 

1892. Casselfs Sat. Jour., 5 Oct., p. 

45, c. i. ' Who make devil's row like that 

all night?' he asked. ' KEEP YOUR HAIR 

ON, Moses Trinko,' replied the reception 

fficer, cheerily. 

A HAIR OF THE BLACK BEAR 
(or B'AR), subs. phr. (American). 
A spice of the devil. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far West, 
. 6. Thar was old grit in him, too, and 

HAIR OF THE BLACK B*AR at that. 

To GET ONE'S HAIR CUT, 
verb. phr. (venery). To visit a 
woman ; TO SEE A SICK FRIEND 
(q. v. ). For synonyms, see GREENS 
and RIDF. 



1892. ANSTEY, Model Music Hall, 
154. Tommy. What, Uncle, going ? The 
W. U. (with assumed jauntiness). Just 

TO GET MY HAIR CUT. 

To MAKE ONE'S HAIR STAND 
ONT END, ^'2rb. phr. (colloquial). 
To astonish. 

1697. ( VANBRUGH, Provoked ~.Vife, 
lv., 4. It's well you are come : I'm so 
frightened, MY HAIR STANDS ON END. 

1886. J. S. WINTER, Army Society 
ch. iii. If I were to tell you some incidents 
of my life since you and I last met, I should 
make your HAIR STAND ON END. 

A HAIR OF THE DOG THAT 
BIT YOU, subs. phr. (common). 
A ' pick-me-up ' after a debauch. 
[Apparently a memory of the 
superstition, which was and still is 
common, that, being bitten by a 
dog, one cannot do better than 
pluck a handful of hair from him, 
and lay it on the wound. Also 
figuratively, see quot. 1888.] 

1531. BOVILLI, Prov. ii., xvi. siecle, 
t. i., p. iQ2. Du poil de la beste qui te 
mordis, Ou de son sane sera gueris. 

1546. HEYWOOD, Proverbs [1874], 79 
What how fellow, thou knave, I pray thee 
let me and my fellow have A HAIKE OF 
THE DOG THAT BIT us last night. And 
bitten were we bothe to the braine aright. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fayre, I ! 
'Twas a hot night with some of us, last 
night, John : shall we pluck a HAIR OF 
THE SAME WOLF to-day, proctor John ? 

1738. Swi FT, Polite Convers. , Dial 2 
Lady Gur. But, Sir John, your ale is 
terrible strong and heady . . . Sir John 
Why, indeed, it is apt to fox one ; but our 
way is to take a HAIR OF THE SAME DOG 
next morning. 

1841. DICKENS, B. Rudge, ch. Iii. 
Put a good face upon it, and drink again 
Another HAIR OF THE DOG THAT BIT 
YOU, captain ! 

1888. Detroit Free^ Press. ' Talk of 
the Day,' 3 Nov. Travis. ' Hello, 
De Smith ! You're looking better thant 
expected. I understood that you were 
completely crushed by that love affair. 
How did you recover ? ' De Smith ' HAIR 

OF THE DOG THAT BIT ME. Fell in love 

with another girl. 



Hair-butcher. 



248 Half-and-half. 



HAIR- BUTCHER, subs. (American). 
A baiber. For synonyms, see 
NOB-THATCHER. 

1888. Puck's Library, May, p. 15. 
'Oi 'm wullin" thot bloomin' HAIR-BUTCHER 
shud have a fit, av he wants. 

HAIR-COURT, subs, phr. (venery). 
The female piidendum. For 
synonyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. 

TO TAKE A TURN IN HAIR- 
COURT = to copulate. 

HAIR-DIVIDER (or -SPLITTER), subs. 
(venery). The penis. For syn- 
onyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK. Also BEARD-SPLITTER. 

1811. Lexicon Bala.tr onicum, s.v. 
HAIR-SPLITTER, a man's yard. 

HAIR-PIN, subs. (American). An 
individual, male or female: e.g., 
THAT'S THE SORT OF HAIR-PIN 
I AM = that's my style. 

1888. Detroit Free Press, 6 Oct. 
' That's the kind of HAIRPINS we are,' said 
the enthusiastic swain. 

HAIRY, adj. (Oxford University). 
I. Difficult. 

d. 1861. ARTHUR CLOUGH, Long Vaca- 
tion Pastoral. Three weeks hence we 
return to the shop and the wash-hand- 
stand-bason, Three weeks hence unbury 
Thicksides and HAIRY Aldrich. 

1864. The Press, 12 Nov. HAIRY 
for difficult is a characteristic epithet. 

2. (colloquial). Splendid ; 
famous ; conspicuous ; uncom- 
mon. 

1892. RUDYARD KIPLING, Barrack 
Room Ballads. ' The Sons of the Widow. ' 
Did you hear of the Widow of Windsor 
with a HAIRY gold crown on her head ? 

3. (venery). Desirable ; full 
of sex ; FUCK ABLE (g.v.). [Said 
only of women : e.g., HAIRY BIT 
= an amorous and taking wench. ] 
See HAIR. 



TO FEEL HAIRY, Vi'fb. phr. 

(venery). To be inclined for 
coition ; to have a MUST (q.v). 

HAIRYFORDSHIRE, sttbs. (venery). 
The female pudendum. To 
GO TO HAIRYFORDSHIRE to 
copulate. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

HAIRY-ORACLE (or -RING), subs- 
(venery). The female pudendum 
WORKING THE HAIRY-ORACLE= 
wenching. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

HALBERT. To GET THE HAL- 
BERT, verb. phr. (old military). 
To rise to sergeant's rank. 
[The weapon was carried 
by sergeants of foot.] To BE 

BROUGHT TO THE HALBERTS = 

to be flogged ; TO CARRY THE 

HALBERT IN ONE'S FACE = tO 

show that one rose from the ranks 
(of officers in commission). 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HALF. IT'S HALF PAST KISSING 
TIME AND TIME TO KISS AGAIN. 
phr. (common). The retort im- 
pudent (to females) when asked 
the time. A snatch from a 
ballad. [In SWIFT (Polite Con 
versatiori) = an hour pas 
hanging time.] 

HALF-A-CRACK (or JIFFY, or TICK). 

Half a second. 

HALF-AND-HALF, subs, (colloquial). 
Equal quantities of ale and 
porter ; Cf., FOUR-HALF and 
DRINKS. 

1824. REYNOLDS, Peter Corcoran, 
41. Over my gentle HALF-AND-HALF. 

1835. DICKENS, Sketches by Boz, 

S. in. We were never tired of wondering 
ow the hackney - coachmen on the 
opposite stand could . . . drink pots of 
HALF-AND-HALF so near the last drop. 



Half-an-eye. 



2 19 Half-crown Word. 



18H. ALBERT SMITH (in Punch). 
' The Physiology of the London Medical 
Student." HALF-AND-HALF ... is ... 
ale and porter, the proportion of the 
porter increasing in an inverse ratio to the 
respectability of the public house you get 
it Irom. 

18ot. MARTIN and AVTOUN, Bon 
Gaulticr Ballads. ' My Wife's Cousin.' 
HALF-AND-HALF goes down before him, 
Gurgling from the pewter-pot ; And he 
moves a counter motion For a glass of 
something hot. 

1872. Fun, July. ' The Right Tap. 1 
If the lever, meaning a plumper, were 
labelled 'stout,' and those recording a 
split vote HALF AND HALF, the illusion 
would be complete. 

Adj. (common). Half-drunk ; 
HALF-ON (q.v.). For synonyms, 
see DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1S48. DUNCOMBE, Sinks of London. 
HALF AND HALF, half seas over, tipsy. 

HALF -AND -HALF -COVES (or 

MEN, BOYS, etc.), sttbs. (old). 
Cheap or linsey-woolsey dandies ; 
half-BUCKS (q.v.) and half-TiGERS 
(q.v.). 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
i., 7. Jerry. The HALF-AND-HALF coyES 
are somewhat different from the swaddies, 
and gay tyke boys, at the dog pit Eh, 
Tom? 

HALF-AN-EYE. To SEE WITH HALF 
AX EYE, verb. phr. (colloquial). 
To discern readily ; to be quick 
at conclusions. 

HALF-BAKED (or SOFT- BAKED), adj. 
(common). Half wilted; cracked; 
SOFT (q>.t.) ; DOUGHY (q.v.) ; also 
HALF-ROCKED (q.v t ). For syn- 
onyms, see APARTMENTS and 
TILE LOOSE. Fr., if avoir pas 
la tete bien cuite. 

1825. SCOTT, St. Ronan's Well, ii., 
221. He must scheme forsooth, this HALF- 
BAKED Scotch cake ! He must hold off 
and on, and be cautious, and wait the 
result, and try conclusions with me, this 
lump of natural dough ! 

1857. C. KINGSLEV, Two Years Ago, 
ch. iv. 'A sort of HALF-BAKED body,' said 
Kate. 



1886. W. BESANT, Children of 
Gibeon, Bk. II., ch. xiv. A daughter of 
seventeen not quite right in her head 
HALF-BAKED, to use the popular and 
feeling expression. 

1890. Answers, Xmas No., p. ip, 
c. 3. ' You needn't be so crusty,' said 
Tod kins to his better half. ' Better be a 
little crusty than not HALF-BAKED,' was 
the reply of his amiable spouse. 

1892. Pall Mall Gaz., i Nov., p. 2, 
c. 3. Mr. Vane Tempest as serenest of 
HALF-BAKED cynics, and Mr. H. Vincent 
as most credulous of bibulous optimists. 

HALF-BREED, sttbs. (American po- 
litical). A nick-name applied to 
certain New York Republicans, 
who wavered in their allegiance 
during an election to the Senate 
in 1 88 1. NORTON. 

HALF-COCKED, adv. (common). 
Half-drunk. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1887. H. SMART, Saddle and Sabre, 
ch. xvii. 'Black Bill,' as he was called by 
his brother jockeys, was very often HALF- 
COCKED when he got up to ride . . . The 
man could ride as well half-drunk as sober. 

TO GO OFF AT HALF-COCK (or 

HALF-COCKED), verb. phr. i. 
(sporting). To fail through hasty 
and ill considered endeavours ; 
and 2. (venery) = to ejaculate 
before completing erection. 

1848. LOWELL, Big-low Papers [Wk. 
1891], p. 231. Now don't GO OFF HALF- 
COCK : folks never gains By usin' pepper- 
sarse instid o' brains. 

HALF-CRACKED, adv. (common). 
Lacking in intelligence. See 
APARTMENTS and TILE LOOSE. 

1887. W. P. FRITH, Autobiog., i., 
129. Who was what is vulgarly called 

HALF-CRACKED. 

HALF-CROWN WORD, subs. phr. 
(common). i. A difficult or un- 
common vocable; a JAW-BREAKER 
(^.z>.)or crack-jaw. Also (tailors') 
= a SLEEVEBOARD (q.V. ), 



Half-crtiwner. 



Half-seas Over. 



HALF-CROWN ER,.yfo. (booksellers'). 
A publication costing 2s. 6d. 

HALF-CUT, adv. (common). Half- 
drunk. For synonyms, .^DRINKS 
and SCREWED. 

H ALF- FLY FLAT, sttbs.phr. (thieves'). 
A thiefs jackal ; a man (or 
woman) hired to do rough or 
dirty work. 

HALF-GROWN SHAD, subs. phr. 
(American). A dolt. For syn- 
onyms,.^ BuFFLEand CABBAGE- 
HEAD. 

1838. NEAL, Charcoal Sketches. 
No more interlace than a HALF-GROWN 
SHAD. 

HALF LAUGH AND PURSER'S GRIN, 

siibs. phr. (nautical). A sneer ; 
a half-and-half meaning. CLARK 
RUSSELL. 

HALFLINGS, adj. (Scots'). Betwixt 
and between. [Usually said of a 
boy or girl just leaving child- 
hood.] 

1818. SCOTT, Heart of Midlothian, 
xi. In my youth, nay, when I was a 
HAFFLINS callant. 

HALF-MAN, subs, (nautical). A 
landsman rated as A.B. 

H ALF-M ARROW, siibs. (old Scots'). 
I. A faithless spouse ; also a 
parcel husband or wife. 

1600-61. RUTHERFORD, Letters, i., 
123. Plead with your harlot-mother, who 
hath been a treacherous HALF-MARROW to 
her husband Jesus. 

2. (nautical). An incompetent 
seaman. 



HALF-MOON, subs. (old). i. A 
wig ; and (2) the female puden- 
dum. For synonyms, see PERI- 
WINKLE and MONOSYLLABLE. 



1611. LODOWICK BARRY, Ram Alley 
(DODSLEY, OldPlays, vii., 326, ed. 1875). 
Is not her HALF-MOON mine ? 

HALF- MOURNING,' subs, (common). 
A black eye. FULL-MOURNING 
= two black eyes or DEEP GRIEF. 

HALF-NAB (or NAP), adv. (old). 
See quot. 

1791. BAMPFYLDE- MOORE CAREW, 
Life. HALF-NAB at a venture, unsight 
unseen, hit or miss. 

HALF-ON, adj. (colloquial). Half- 
drunk. 

HALF- ROCKED, adv. (common). 
Half-witted ; silly. [From a West 
Country saying that all idiots 
are nursed bottom upwards.] See 
APARTMENTS and TILE LOOSE. 

HALF - SAVED, adv. (common). 
Weak-minded ; shallow-brained. 
See APARTMENTS and TILE 
LOOSE. 

1834. SOUTHEY, The Doctor, ch. 
x. William Dove's was not a case or' 
fatuity. Though all was not there, there 
was a great deal. He was what is called 

HALF-SAVED. 

1874. M. COLLINS, Frances, ch. 
xlii. This groom was what they call in the 
west country HALF-SAVED. 

HALF-SCREWED, adj. (common). 
More or less in liquor. See 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1839. LEVER, Harry Lorrequer, ch. 
ii. He was, in Kilrush phrase, HALF- 
SCREWED, thereby meaning more than 
half tipsy. 

HALF - SEAS OVER, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). Loosely applied to 
various degrees of inebriety. 
Formerly half way on one's 
course, or towards attainment. 
For synonyms, see SCREWED. 



Half -seas Over. 251 



Halifax. 



[In its specific sense Gifford says, "a 
corruption of the Dutch op-zee zober, 
' over-sea beer,' a strong heady beverage 
intoduced into Holland from England." 
' Up-zee Freese ' is Friezeland beer. The 
German zauber means ' strong beer ' and 
4 bewitchment." Thus (1610) in JONSON, 
A Ichemist, iv. ,2. ' I do not like the 
dulness of your eye, It hath a heavy cast, 
'tis UPSEE DUTCH.' Other nautical terms 
= drunk are WATER - LOGGED ; SPRUNG ; 

SLEWED J WITH ONE'S JIB WELL BOWSED J 
THREE SHEETS IN THE WIND ; CHANNELS 

UNDER, but see DRINKS and SCREWED.] 

1631-1701. DRYDEN. I am HALF- 
SEAS OVER to death. 

1690. B. E., Cant, Crew, s.v. 
HALF-SEAS OVER, almost Drunk. 

K97. VANBRUGH, Relapse, iii., 3. 
Good ; that's thinking HALF-SEAS OVER. 
One tide more brings us into poit. 

1714. Spectator, No. 616. The 
whole magistracy was pretty well dis- 
guised before I gave them the slip. Our 
friend the alderman was HALF - SEAS 
OVER before the bonfire was out. 

1738. SWIFT, Pol. Convert., Dial i. 
You must own you had a drop in your 
eye ; when I left you, you were HALF 
SEAS OVER. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. ix. Who, by this time, had entered 
into all the jollity of his new friends, and 
was indeed more than HALF-SEAS-OVER. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1829. J. B. BUCKS-TONE, Billy 

Taylor. The public-houses will not close 
till morn, And wine and spirituous liquors 
are so cheap, That we can all get nicely 
HALF SEAS OVER, And see no sea at all. 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Sneppard 
[1889], p. 40. Mr. Smith, now being more 
than HALF-SEAS OVER, became very 
uproarious. 

1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. 
xxx. It's pay-day with the General . . . 
and he's a precious deal more than HALF- 
SEAS OVER. 

_18i56. G. ELIOT, Felix Holt, ch. 
xxviii. There's truth in wine, and there 
may be some in gin and muddy beer. . . . 
I've got plenty of truth in my time out of 
men who were HALF-SEAS-OVER, but never 
any that was worth a sixpence to me. 

1890. Globe, 16 Apr., p. 2, c. i. 
The familiar phrase HALF-SEAS OVF ; R, for 
example, is wanting, and for this we 
appear K> be indebted to the Dutch. 



1892. The Cosmopolitan, Oct., p. 
724. The fellow HALF-SEAS-OVER every- 
one excuses. 

HALF-SLEWED, adj. (common). 
Parcel drunk. For synonyms, see 
SCREWED. 

HALF-SNACKS (or HALF-SNAGS), 

adv. phr. (colloquial). Half- 
shares. Sec quots. 

1683. EARL OF DORSET, A Faithful 
Catalogue. She mounts the price and 
goes HALF SNACK herself. 

1887. Walfortfs Antiquarian, p. 252. 
HALF-SNAGS is a corrupted form of HALF 
SNACKS, i.e., half shares. If one of a 
party of arabs finds any article it becomes 
his entire property unless his fellows say 
HALF - SNAGS, or 'Quarter -bits,' or 
' Some for your neighbours.' 

HALF-'UN, subs, (common). Half- 
a glass of spirits and water ; 
HALF-A-GO (q.v.). 

HALF-WIDOW, subs. (American). 
A woman with a lazy and thrift- 
less husband. 

[For Half in combination, see 
also BEAN : BORDE ; BULL ; CASE : 
CENTURY ; COUTER ; DOLLAR ; GEORGE ; 
Go ; GRUNTER ; HOG : JACK ; JAMES ; 
NED; OUNCE; QUID; SKIV; STRETCH; 
TUSHEROON ; WHEEL. 

HALIFAX. Go TO HALIFAX, verb, 
phr. (American). Be off! GOTO 
HELL (q.v.). The full text is 
Go TO HELL, HULL, or HALI- 
FAX. Cf., BATH, BLAZES, 
HULL, PUTNEY, etc. 

1 599. N ASHE, Lenten Stuff"e (Grosart, 
1883-84, p. 284). If frier Pendela and his 
fellowes, had any thing to say to him, in 
his admiral court of the sea, let them seek 
him, and neither in HULL, HELL, nor 
HALIFAX. 

1875. Notes and Queries, 5 S., iv., 
p. 66. Go TO HALIFAX. This expression 
is sometimes used in the United States as 
a mild substitute for a direction to go to a 
place not to be named to ears polite. 



Hall. 



252 



Ham. 



HALL, subs, (fishmongers'). i. 
Specifically THE HALL = Leaden- 
hall Market. Cf. t GARDEN, 
LANE, etc. 

2. (Oxford Univ.). Dinner. 
[Which is taken in College 
HALL.] To HALL = to dine. 

Go AND HIRE A HALL. phr. 
(American). A retort upon 
loquacious bores. 

HALL BY THE SEA, subs. phr. 
(medical students'). The Exami- 
nation Hall of the conjoined Board 
of the Royal Colleges of Physicians 
and Surgeons. [Situate on the 
Embankment at the foot of 
Waterloo Bridge.] 

HALL OF DELIGHT, subs, 

phr. (Australian). A music hall. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 

Sweetheart^ p. 53. I thought you coons 

would find your way to this HALL OF 

DELIGHT. 

HALLAN - SHAKER (or HALLEN- 
SHAKER), subs. (old). A vaga- 
bond or sturdy beggar. For 
synonyms, see CADGER and 
MUMPER. 

c. 1503-4. DUNBAR, A General 
Satyre wks. (ed. DAVID LAING, 1834), ii., 
26. Sic knavis and crakkeris to play at 
cartis and dyce, Sic HALLAND-SCH AKKARIS. 

c. 1600. MONTGOMERIE, Poems (Scot- 
tish Text Soc., 1885-7,), Pol wart and 
Montgomerie's Flyting,'p. 85. HALLAND- 
SHAKER, draught-raiker, bannock-baiker, 
ale-beshitten. 

(?)1642. Old Ballad. ' Maggie Lauder. 
Right scornfully she answered him, 
Begone, you HALLAN-SHAKER. 

1724. Journal from London, p. 4. 
Had seen me than staakin about like a 
HALLEN-SHAKER, You w ou'd hae taen me 
for a water-wraith. 

1816. SCOTT, Antiquary, ch. iv. I, 
and a wheen HALLENSHAKERS like 
mysel'. 

HALLIBALLO. See HULLIBALLO. 

HALLION (or HALLYON),^^. (old). 
i, A rogue ; a clod ; a gentle- 
man's servant out of livery ; also 
(2) a shrew. Cf. t HELL-CAT. 



1817. SCOTT, Rob Roy, ch. iv. This 
is a decentish HALLION. 

1847. PORTER, Big Bear, etc., p. 69. 
The scoundrels ! the oudacious little 



HALLOO. To HALLOO WITH THE 
UNDER DOG, verb. phr. (Ameri- 
can). To take the losing side. 

HALO. To WORK THE HALO 
RACKET, verb. phr. (common). 
To grumble ; to be dissatisfied. 
[From the story of the Saint in 
Heaven who got dissatisfied with 
his nimbus.] 

HALTERSACK, subs. (old). A 
gallows-bird ; a general term of 
reproach and contempt. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes, 
Bazaro, a shifter, a conicatcher . . . 

a HALTERSACKE. 

1619. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER 
King and no King, ii., 2. Away, you 

HALTERSACK, yOU. 

HALVES, suds. (Winchester College). 
(pro. Haves.) Half- Wellington 
boots, which were strictly non 
licet (obs.). Notions. 

To GO (or CRY) HALVES, 
verb. phr. (colloquial). To take 
(or claim) a half share cr chance. 
In America, AT THE HALVES. 

1831. NEAL, Down Rasters, ch. iv., p. 
45. ' Lives by preachin' AT THE HALVES a 
sabba'-days.' ' Preaching AT THE HALVES 
how's that ? ' ' Why don't you know ? in 
partnership for what's taken arter the 
sarmon's over.' 

1851-61. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, III., 122. He'll then again 
ask if anybody will GO HIM HALVES. 

HAM, subs, (old). i. (in. pi.} 
Trousers : also HAM-CASES. For 
synonyms, see KICKS. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. HAMS, 
Breeches. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1791. BAMPFYLDE-MOORE CAREW, 
Life. HAMS breeches. 



Hamlet. 



253 



Ha m mer. 



1859. MATSELL, Vocabuluin, s.v. 
HAMS. Pants. 

2. (American). A LOAFER 
(q.v.). Also HAM-FATTER. [The 
American Slang Diet, says ' A 
tenth-rate actor or variety per- 
former.] 

18<<8. Missouri Republican, 27 Mar. 
Connelly ... is a good fighter, but will 
allow the veriest HAM to whip him, if there 
is any money to be made by it. 

1888. New York Herald, 29 July. 
The . . . more prosperous professional 
brother of the HAM FATTER. 

NO HAM AND ALL HOMINY, 
phr. (American). Of indifferent 
quality ; ' no great shakes ' ; 'all 
work and no play ' ; ' much cry 
and little wool.' 

HAMLET, subs, (old and American). 
See quots. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. HAM- 
LET ... a High Constable. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. s.v. HAMLET, 
a High-Constable. 

1785. 
HAMLET, a high const 

1791. BAMPFYLPE-MOORE CAREW. 

HAMLET, a high-constable. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
HAMLET. A captain of police. 

HAM -MATCH, subs, (common). A 
stand-up luncheon. 

1890. Daily Telegraph, 4 Feb. At 
one o'clock they relieve their exhausted 
frames by taking perpendicular refresh- 
ment vulgarly termed a HAM MATCH 
at some City luncheon bar. 

HAMMER, subs, (pugilistic). i. A 
hard-hitter : especially with the 
right hand, like the illustrious 
HAMMER Lane. Also HAM- 
MERER, and HAMMER-MAN. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 33. A 
letter written on the occasion by Henry 
Harmer, the HAMMERER. 



GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
stable (cant). 



1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, 93. 
When a man hits very hard, chiefly with a 
favorite hand, his blows are said to fall 
like those of a sledge-HAMMER. Such 
boxers are HAMMERING fighters, that do 
not defend their own vitals, cannot make 
sure of a blow, and are termed HAM- 
MERERS and HAMMERMEN. 

2. (common). An unblushing 
lie. For synonyms, see WHOPPER. 

Verb (pugilistic). i. To beat; 
to PUNISH (q.v.). 

1887. T. E. BROWN, The Doctor, p. 
159. Andbedad I did, and before herself 
too, And HAMMERED him well. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody, ch. ii. 
'HAMMER him? What with? a club?' 
' No, with my fists. 1 

2. (American) To bate ; to 
drive down (prices, etc.). 

1865. Harper's Magazine, p. 619. 
The chronic bears were amusing them- 
selves by HAMMERING, i.e., pressing down 
the price of Hudsons. 

3. (Stock Exchange). To 
declare one a defaulter. 

1885. Fortnightly Review, xxxviii., 
p. 578. A ' defaulter ' has been declared 
or HAMMERED, as it is technically termed. 

1888. Echo, 28 Dec. If any un- 
fortunate member be HAMMERED to-day 
or to-morrow it will in all probability be a 
bear. 

1890. Daily Telegraph, i Nov. This 
being the third day after the general 
settlement, a defaulter who had been 
unable to provide cash was HAMMERED, 
and private arrangements are reported in 
other quarters without resort to this 
extreme measure. 

1891. Pall Mall Gazette, 25 July, 
p. i, c. 3. But what is an ' outside 
broker?' some (possibly lady) reader may 
ask. Well, he may be, and ofien is, a 
regular, who has been HAMMERED for 
failing to meet his ' differences.' 

1891. Tit Bits, 15 Aug. I need not 
go into the circumstances which led to my 
being expelled from that honourable body, 
or HAMMERED as it is familiarly ca'led, 
owing to the taps with a hammer which 
the head porter gives before he officially 
proclaims the name of a defaulter. 



Hannner-and-Tongs. 2 54 



Hampered. 



DOWN AS A HAMMER, adv. 

phr. (common). I. Wide-awake; 
KNOWING (q.V.}; FLY ((].V.). 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 45. To 
be down to anything is pretty much the 
same as being up to it, and DOWN AS A 
HAMMER is, of course, the intensivum of 
the phrase. 

2. (colloquial). Instant ; 
peremptory ; merciless. Cf. , 

LIKE A THOUSAND OF BRICKS. 
Also TO BE DOWN ON ... LIKE 
A HAMMER. 

AT (or UNDER) THE HAMMER, 
adv. phr. (auctioneers'). For 
sale at auction. 

THAT'S THE HAMMER, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). An expression 
of approval or assent. 

TO BE HAMMERS TO ONE, 

verb. phr. (colloquial. To know 
what one means. 

TO HAMMER OUT (or INTO), 

verb. phr. (colloquial). To be 
at pains to deceive ; to reiterate ; 
to force to hear. 

1596. BEN JONSON, Every Man in 
his Humour, Hi., 3. Now am I, for some 
five and fifty reasons, HAMMERING, HAM- 
MERING revenge. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., iii., 23. 
If any Scholar be in doubt, And cannot 
well bring this matter about ; The Black- 
smith can HAMMER IT OUT. 

1883. J. MCCARTHY and MRS. CAMP- 
REI.L-PRAED, The Ladies' Gallery, ch. i. 
I think the chaps that are always HAMMER- 
ING on about repentance and atonement 
and forgiveness of sin have got hold of the 
wrong end. 

HAMMER-AND-TONGS, adv. phr. 
(common). Very violently ; 
ding-dong. 

1781. G. PARKER, View of Society, 
II., 108. His master and mistress were at 

it HAMMER AND TONGS. 

1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, ch. 
xxxv. Our ships were soon hard at it, 

HAMMER AND TONGS. 



]837. MARRYAT, Snarleymu. Ods 
bobs! HAMMER AND TONGS! long as 
I've been to sea. 

18bl. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, 
ch. Ix. Mr. Malone fell upon them 

HAMMER AND TONGS. 

1862. M. E. BRADDON, Lady Audleys 
Secret, ch. iv. ' I always said the old buffer 
would marry,' he muttered, after about 
half an hour's reverie. ' Alicia and my 
lady, the stepmother, will go at it HAMMER 

AND TONGS. 

1884. JAS. PAYN, Talk of the Tmvn, 
ch. xx. Both parties went at it HAMMER 
AND TONGS, and hit one another anywhere 
and with anything. 

HAMMER-HEADED,^', (common). 
I. Oafish ; stupid. 

1600. NASHE, Summers Last Will 
(Grosart), vi., 169. A number of rude 
Vulcans, vnweldy speakers, HAMMER- 
HEADED clownes. 

2. (colloquial). Hammer- 
shaped : i.e., long and narrow in 
the head. 

1865. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend 
i., 9. Mr. Boffin's equipage consisted of 
a long HAMMER - HEADED old horse, 
formerly used in the business ... a driver 
being added in the person of a long 
HAMMER-HEADED young man. 

HAMMERING, subs, (pugilistic and 
colloquial). i. A beating ; 
excessive PUNISHMENT (q.v.). 

2. (printers'). Over-charging 
time-work (as * corrections '). 

HAMMERING-TRADE, subs, (pugil- 
istic). Pugilism. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 49. The 
other, vast, gigantic, as if made, express, 
by Nature for the HAMMERING trade. 

HAMMERSMITH. To GO TO 
HAMMERSMITH, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To get a sound drubbing. 

HAMPERED, adj. (old: now recog- 
nised). Let or hindered; per- 
plexed ; entangled. [From OLD. 
ENG., hamper = a fetter: see 
quot. 1613]. 



Hampstead Donkey. 2 55 



Hand. 



1613. BROWNE, Britannia's Pas- 
torals,\&.. i., s. 7. Shackles, shacklockes, 
HAMPERS, gives and chaines. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

HAMPSTEAD DONKEY, subs. phr. 
(common). See quot. For syn- 
onyms, see CHATES. 

c. 1870. Daily Paper. The witness 
testified to the filthy state of the linen which 
she wore, and also the state of the sheets. 
Was told not to get into bed until she had 
looked for the HAMPSTEAD DONKEYS. ' Did 
you know what that meant ? ' ' No sir, not 
until I looked on the pillow and saw three' 
(loud laughter). ' Do you mean lice ? ' 
1 Yes, sir, I do.' 

HAMPSTEAD- HEATH, subs. phr. 
(rhyming). The teeth. For 
synonyms, see GRINDERS. 

1887. Referee, ^ Nov., p. 7, c. 3. 
She'd a Grecian 'I suppose,' And of HAMP- 
STEAD HEATH two rows, In her ' Sunny 
South ' that glistened Like two pretty 
strings of pearls. 



HAMPSTEAD-HEATH SAILOR, subs, 
phr. (common). A LANDLUBBER 

(q.V.) ; a FRESHWATER SAILOR 

(q.v.). Fr., un marin cfeau douce 
or tin arniral Stiisse ( = a Swiss 
admiral: Switzerland having no 
seaboard). 

HANGED, adj. (old). In liquor. 
[From HANCE = 'to elevate.'] 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

1630. TAYLOR, Works. I doe finde 
my selfe sufficiently HANGED, and that 
henceforth I shall acknowledge it ; and 
that whensoever I shall offer to bee 
HANGED again, I shall arme my selfe with 
the craft of a fox, the manners of a hogge, 
the wisdom of an asse, mixt with the 
civility of a beare. 

HAND, subs, (colloquial). Properly 
a seaman j now a labourer, a 
workman, an agent. 



1658. PHILLIPS, New World of 
Words, s.v. HAND .... a Word us'd 
among Mariners .... when Men are 
wanted to do any Labour they usually Call 
for more HANDS. 

1632-1704. LOCKE, Wks. A diction- 
ary containing a natural history requires 
too many HANDS, as well as too much 
time. 

1711. Spectator, No. 232. The re- 
duction of the prices of our manufactures 
by the addition of so many new HANDS, 
would be no inconvenience to any man. 

1754. FIELDING, Jonathan Wild, i , 
14. The mercantile part of the world, 
therefore, wisely use the term ' employing 
HANDS,' and esteem each other as they 
employ more or fewer. 

1811. Lexicon Balatroniciun, s.v. 
We lost a HAND, we lost a sailor. 

1871. Chambers' Miscellany, No. 
"3i P- 3- He was admitted as a HAND in 
an establishment already numbering three 
hundred active workers. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
70. The HANDS has all bloomin' well 



1892. National Observer, 22 Oct., 
vol. viii., p. 571. The dispute in the South- 
East Lancashire cotton trade is like to 
result in the stoppage of fourteen or fifteen 
million spindles which will take employ- 
ment from sixty thousand HANDS, a fifth of 
them women and children. 

1893. Fortnightly Review, Jan., p. 62. 
The wages paid to the operatives in our 
woollen industry are, to a marked extent, 
lower than those received by the HANDS 
employed in our cotton mills. 

2. (coachmen's). See quot. 

1856. WHYTE MELVILLE, Kate Co- 
ventry, ch. xv. Lady Horsingham was 
tolerably courageous, but totally destitute 
of what is termed HAND, a quality as ne- 
cessary in driving as in riding, particularly 
with fractious or high-spirited horses. 

A GOOD (or COOL, NEAT, OLD, 
FINE, etc.) HAND, subs. phr. (col- 
loquial). An expert. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth 
ed.), s.v. HAND (v.). 'He is a good 
HAND,' spoke of one that is an artist in 
some particular mechanical art or trade, 
etc. 



Hand. 



256 



Hand. 



1773. GOLDSMITH, She Stoops to 
Conquer, iii., i. When I was in my best 
story of the Duke of Marlborough and 
Prince Eugene, he asked if I had not a 
GOOD HAND at making punch. 

1854. WHYTE MELVILLE, General 
Bounce, xii. A quaint boy at Eton, COOL 
HAND at Oxford, a deep card in the regi- 
ment, man or woman never yet had the 
best of ' Uppy.' 

1877. Five Years Penal Servitude, 
i., p. 33. The new man, the GREEN HAND, 
takes little or no heed of the entrance of the 
officers. . . . Not so the OLD HAND. 

.1886. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnaped, 
p. 195. Ye're a GRAND HAND at the sleep- 
ing! 

1892. W. E. GLADSTONE, Times 
1 Report.' .... This OLD PARLIA- 
MENTARY HAND. 

1892. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Deacon Brodie, i., 7, p. 18. You always 
was a neat HAND with the bones. 

A HAND LIKE A FOOT, phr. 
(common). A large, coarse hand. 
Also a vulgar or uneducated 
handwriting. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Conversation, 
i. Col. Whoe'er writ it with A HAND LIKE 

A FOOT. 

A HAND LIKE A FIST, phr. 
(gamesters'). A hand full of 
trumps. Also (in derision) a 
hand there's no playing. 

TO TAKE A HAND WITH THE 

OUTSIDE MUSIC, verb. phr. 
(American). See quot. 

1892. J. L. SULLIVAN, ,4 19^ 
Century Gladiator, iii. After thirty- 
seven rounds in fifty-five minutes, the 
umpires and seconds got into a fight, and 
Sullivan felt fresh enough TO TAKE A 
HAND IN THE OUTSIDE MUSIC. 

To GET A HAND ON, verb. phr. 
(tailors'). To suspect; to be dis- 
trustful. 



To GET ONE'S HAND IN, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To practise 
with a view to proficiency. 



To GET ONE'S HAND ox IT, 
verb. phr. (venery). To grope a 
woman. 

To BEAR A HAND, verb. phr. 
(old). See quot. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicuin, s.v. 
BEAR A HAND, make haste. 

TO BRING UP BY HAND, verb. 

phr. (venery). To procure erec- 
tion manually. 

TO BRING DOWN (or OFF) BY 
HAND, verb. phr. (venery). To 
masturbate. For synonyms, see 
FRIG. 

To STAND ONE'S HAND, verb. 
phr. (Australian). To TREAT 
(q.v.} ; to STAND SAM (q.v.). 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 58. I used to see her at 
some of the public-houses frequented by 
Mrs. Condon, STANDING HER HAND liber- 
ally to all who happened to be in the bar, 
and therefore being made much of by the 
thirsty loafers whom she treated. 

To HAND IN ONE'S CHIPS (or 
CHECKS). See CASH ONE'S 
CHECKS. 

To HAVE (or GET) THE UPPER 
HAND, verb. phr. (colloquial). 
To have at an advantage ; to get 

to WINDWARD (q.V.}. 

1886. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
p. 173. I was growing impatient to get 
back and HAVE THE UPPER HAND of my 
uncle. 

To HAND UP, verb. (Win- 
chester College). To give in- 
formation against ; to betray. 
Notions. 

HANDS UP ! intj. (common). 
An injunction to desist ; STOW IT! 
(q.v. ). Also (police) = a com- 
mand to surrender. BAIL UP 



1888. J. RUNCIMAN, The Chequers, 
p. 120. HANDS UP ! Jerry. 



Hand-and-Pocket Shop. 257 



Handicap. 



[Amongst other colloquial usages of 
HAND are the following : AT HAND= 
readily, hard by ; AT ANY HAND (Shaks- 
peare)=on any account; AT NO HAND= 
on no account; FOR ONE'S OWN HAND = 
for one's own purpose or interest ; FROM 
HAND TO H AND = from one to another ; IN 
HAND = in a state of preparation, under 
consideration, or control ; OFF ONE'S 
HANDS = finished ; ON HAND=in posses- 
sion; IN ONE'S HANDS = in one's care ; OUT 
OF HAND=completed, without hesitation; 
TO ONE'S HAND=ready ; HAND OVER 
HEAD=negligently, rashly ; HAND TO 
MOUTH = improvident ; HANDS OFF ! = 
stand off; HEAVY ON HAND=hard to 
manage ; HOT AT HAND = difficult to 
manage; LIGHT IN HAND=easy to 
manage ; TO ASK (or GIVE) THE HAND OK 
= to ask (or give) in marriage ; TO BE 
HAND AND GLOVE WITH = to be very 
intimate with; TO BEAR A HAND=IO 

help ; TO BEAR IN (or ON) HAND = tO 

cheat or mock by false promises ; TO 
CHANGE HANDS = to change owners ; TO 
COME TO HAND=tpbe received; TO GET 
HAND = to gain influence ; TO GIVE A 
HAND = to applaud ; TO GIVE THE 
HAND TO=to be reconciled to ; TO HAVE 
A HAND iN=to have a share in ; TO HAVE 
ONE'S HANDS FULL = to be fully occupied ; 

TO HOLD HANDS WITH = tO vie With, tO 

hold one's own ; TO LAY HANDS ON=to 
assault, to seize; TO LEND A HAND = IO 
help ; TO MAKE A HAND = to gain an 
advantage ; TO PUT (or STRETCH) FORTH 

THE HAND AGAINST = tO US6 violence \ 

TO SET THE HAND TO.= to under- 
take ; TO STRIKE HANDS=to make a 
bargain; TO TAKE BY THE HAND=IO 
take under one's guidance ; TO TAKE IN 
HAND = to attempt; TO WASH ONE'S 
HANDS OF = to disclaim responsibility ; 
A HEAVY HAND = severity; A LIGHT 
HAND = gentleness ; A SLACK HAND = 
idleness, carelessness ; A STRICT HAND= 
severe discipline; CLEAN HANDS=freedom 
from guilt ; TO STAND ONE IN HAND=IO 
concern, to be of importance to ; HAND TO 
FIST = tete-a-tete, hip to haunch ; HAND 
OVER HAND = easily ; TO GET A HAND = 
to be applauded.] 

HAND-AND-POCKET SHOP, subs, 
phr. (old). See quot. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
HAND-AND-POCKET-SHOP. An eating 
house, where ready money is paid for 
what is called for. 

HAN DBASKET- PORTION, subs. (old). 
See quot. 



1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
HAND -BASKET- PORTION. A woman 
whose husband receives frequent presents 
from her father, or family, is said to have 

a HAND-BASKET-PORTION. 

HANDBINDER (in.pl.), subs. (old). 
Chains for the wrists. For syn- 
onyms, see DARBIES. 

1696. RAY, Nomenclator, Menotes, 
liens a Her les mains, fers a enferrer les 
mains. Manicls, or HANDBINDERS. 

HANDER, subs, (schoolboys'). A 
stroke on the hand with a cane ; 
A PALMIE (q.v.}. 

1868. JAS. GREENWOOD, Purgatory 
of Peter the Cruel, v., 149. You've been 
playing the wag, and you've got to take 
your HANDERS. 

HANDICAP, subs, (colloquial). An 
arrangement in racing, etc., by 
which every competitor is, or is 
supposed to be, brought on an 
equality so far as regards his 
chance of winning by an adjust- 
ment of the weights to be carried, 
the distance to be run, etc. : extra 
weight or distance being imposed 
in proportion to their supposed 
merits on those held better than 
the others. [A handicap is framed 
in accordance with the known 
performances of the competitors, 
and, in horse-racing, with regard 
to the age and sex of the entries. 
The term is derived from the old 
game of hand-i.n-cap y or handi- 
cap.] 

1660. PEPYS, Diary, 18 Sep. Here 
some of us fell to HANDYCAPP, a sport that 
I never knew before. 

1883. HAWLEY SMART, Hard Lines 
xxi. The race carried so many penalties 
and allowances that it partook somewhat 
of the nature of a HANDICAP. 

Verb (colloquial). i. To 
adjust or proportion weights, 
starts, etc., in order to bring a 
number of competitors as neaily 
as possible to an equality. 

17 



Handie-dandie. 



258 



Handle. 



.1841. LEVER, Charles O'Malley, ch. 
Ixviii. Pleasant and cheerful enough, 
when they're HANDICAPPING the coat off 
your back, and your new tilbury for a 
spavined pony nnd a cotton umbrella ; but 
regular devils if you come to cross them 
the least in life. 

2. To make even or level ; to 
equalise between. 

3. To embarrass, burden, 
hinder, or impede in any way. 

1883. GRENVILLE-MURRAY, People I 
Have Met, 123. He was not HANDICAPPED 
by a title, so that the beautiful ethics of 
hereditary legislation had no claim on his 
attention. 

HANDIE-DANDIE, subs. phr. (old). 
Copulation. 

1490-1554. DAVID LYNDSAY, Kitty's 
Confessioun [LAING], i., 136. Ane plack I 
will gar Sandie, Gie the agane with 
HANDIE-DANDIE. 

HANDLE, subs, (common). i. The 
nose. For synonyms, see CONK. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. The 
cove flashes a rare HANDLE to his physog ; 
the fellow has a large nose. 

1887. Modern Society, 27 Aug., 864. 
A restless, intriguing, and busy old lady, 
with an immense HANDLE to her face. 

2. (colloquial). A title. Fr., 
une queue, as Monsieur Sans- 
queue = ^A\. Nobody. 

1855. THACKERAY Neiucomes, xxiii. 
She .... entertained us with stories of 
colonial governors and their ladies, mention- 
ing no persons but those who had HANDLES 
to their names, as the phrase is. 

1857. DUCANGE ANGLICUS, Vulg. 
Tongue. HANDLE, n. Title. Oh, you 
want a HANDLE to your name. 

1871. London Figaro, 17 June, 'The 
plaint of a poor Parson.' Neither he nor 
his clerical neighbours unless they belong 
to county families, or have HANDLES to 
their names have ever been invited by the 
Dean to partake of the hospitalities of the 
Deanery. 

1886.- J. S. WINTER, A rmy Society, 
ch. ii. That's the worst of having a 
HANDLE to one's name. 



1891. Licensed Viet. Gas., 16 Jan. 
Here's the Honourable Tom Jones, and 
Lord Smith, and Viscount Brown that's 
them, with the HANDLES knocked off their 
names. 

1892. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Deacon Brodie, i., 2. He was aye ettling 
after a bit HANDLE to his name. 

3. (colloquial). Occasion ; 
opportunity ; means. 

1753-77. MELMOTH, Cicero, bk. ii., 
let. 17 (note 5). The defence of Vatinius 
gave a plausible HANDLE for some censure 
upon Cicero. 

Verb (cardsharpers 5 ). i. To 
conceal cards in the palm of the 
hand, or up the sleeves ; TO 
PALM (q.V.\ 

2. (colloquial). To use ; to 
make use of ; to manage. 

1606. CHAPMAN, Gentleman Usher, 
iii., 5. Now let the sport begin: I think 
my love will HANDLE him as well as I have 
done. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
HANDLE. To know how to HANDLE one's 
fists ; to be skilful in the art of boxing. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ii., 7. 
Smart chap that cabman HANDLED his 
fives well. 

1892. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Admiral Guinea, ii., 5. Commander, you 
HANDLED him like a babby, kept the 
weather gauge, and hulled him every shot. 

TO HANDLE THE RIBBONS, 

verb. phr. (common). To drive. 

1857. MONCRIEFF, Bashful Man, ii. 
4. Shouldn't have any objection in life, 
squire, to let you HANDLE THE RIBANDS 
for a stage or two, but four-in-hand, you 
know, requires . 

1872. Evening Standard, 10 Aug. 
The Princess of Wales is expected, and 
her Royal Highness has several times 
during the week driven through the town 
in an open phaeton, drawn by four beautiful 
ponies, and she appears TO HANDLE THE 
RIBBONS in a very skilful manner. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
198. It was agreed Marston should 
HANDLE THE RIBBONS. 



Hand-me-downs. 259 



Handsome. 



1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
32. He 'ANDLED THE RIBBINGS to rights. 

TO FLY OFF THE HANDLE. 

See FLY, to which add the 
following earlier quot. 
1825. NEAL, Brother Jonathan, bk. 

I., Ch. iv. Most OFF THE HANDLE, Some 

o' the tribe, I guess. 

HAND-ME-DOWNS (or HAND-'EM- 
DOWNS), subs. (common). 
Second-hand clothes. HAND-ME- 
DOWN-SHOP, or NEVER-TOO- 
LATE-TO-MEND-SHOP = a repair- 
ing tailors.' Fr., un decrochez* 
moi-fa. 

1878. Notes and Queries, 5, s. ix., 6 
Apr., p. 263. HAND-'EM-DOWN A second- 
hand garment (Northamptonshire). 

1888. New York World, 5 Mar. 
Russell Sage, it is said, walked into a 
Broadway clothing store the other day and 
tried on and purchased a twelve-dollar suit 

Of HAND-ME-DOWNS. 

1889. Sporting _ Times, 29 June. 
Trousers which fit him nowhere in par- 
ticular, and which all over proclaim them- 
selves entitled to the epithet of HAND-ME- 
DOWN. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS Reach- 
me-downs ; translations ; wall- 
flowers. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. La 
musique (popular) ; la mise-bas 
(servants': especially 'perks'). 

HAND-OUT, subs. (American). 
Food to a tramp at the door. 

1887. MORLEY ROBERTS, The West- 
ern Avernus. Some of the boys said it 
was a regular HAND-OUT, and that we 
looked like a crowd of old bummers. 



H AN DPI EC E, subs. (American). A 
handkerchief. For synonyms, 
see WIPE. 

1852. BRISTED, Upper Ten Thousand, 
p. 67. Then .... he tied his white 
HAND-PIECES to an opening made for the 
purpose on one side of the dashboard. 



HANDSAW, subs, (common). A 
street vendor of knives and 
razors; an itinerant CHIVE- 
FENCER (q.v.). 

HANDSOME, adj. and adv. (collo- 
quial, and formerly literary). 
Sharp, severe ; convenient, fit ; 
neat, graceful ; dextrous, skilful, 
ready ; ample, generous, liberal ; 
manageable ; in good or proper 
style ; and (in America) grand 
or beautiful. 

1553. WILSON, Arte of Rhetorique, 
p. 3. Phauorinus the Philosopher did hit 
a yong man ouer the thumbes very 

HANDSOMELY. 

^ 1553-99. SPENSER, Wks. For a thief 
it is so HANDSOME, As it may seem it 
was first invented by him. 

1590. GOLDYNGE, Ccesar, p. 220. They 
had not so HANDSOME horses. 

1593. SHAKSPEARE, Titus Andro- 
nicus, ii., 3. If we miss to meet him 

HANDSOMELY. 

1600. P. HOLLAND, Livy, p. 255. _ A 
light footman's shield he takes with him, 
and a Spanish blade by his side, more 
HANDSOME to fight short and close. 

1604. SHAKSPEARE, Winters Tale, 
iv., 3. His garments are rich, but he 
wears them not HANDSOMELY. 

1614. RALEIGH, History of the 
World, Bk. III., ch. viii., 6. Playing 
their games HANDSOMELY against so nimble 



1672-1719. ADDISON, Wks. An alms- 
house, which I intend to endow very HAND- 
SOMELY. 

1778-79. V. KNOX, Essays, 102. A 
HANDSOME sum of money. 

1798. LODGE, Illust. Brit. Hist., i., 
178. He is very desyrus to serve your 
Grace, and seymes to me to be a very 

HANDSOME man. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far West, 
p. 8. He turned on his back HANDSOME. 

TO DO THE HANDSOME (or 
THE HANDSOME THING, verb, 
phr. (common). To behave 
extremely well ; to be 'civil.' 



Handsome-reward. 



Hang. 



1887. MANVILLE FENN, This Mans 
Wife, ii., 15. Sir Gordon's ready TO DO THE 

HANDSOME THING. 

HANDSOME is THAT HAND- 
SOME DOES, phr. (colloquial). 
' Actions, not words, are the test 
of merit ' ; also ironically of ill- 
favoured persons. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. HAND- 
SOME IS THAT HANDSOME DOES '. a proverb 

frequently cited by ugly women. 

HANDSOME -BODIED IN THE 
FACE, adv. phr. (old). See quot. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HANDSOME BODIED MAN IN THE FACE, a 
eering commendation of an ugly fellow. 

HANDSOME AS A LAST YEAR'S 
CORPSE, adv. phr. (American). 
A sarcastic compliment. 

HANDSOMELY ! intj. (nautical). 
Gently! A cry to signify smartly, 
but carefully. Also HANDSOMELY 

OVER THE BRICKS = Go Cau- 

tiously. 

HANDSOME-REWARD, subs. phr. 
(old). See quot. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. HAND- 
SOME-REWARD. This, in advertisements, 
means a horse-whipping. 

HANDSPRINGS. To CHUCK HAND- 
SPRINGS, verb phr. (common). 
To turn somersaults. 

HANDSTAFF, subs, (venery). The 
penis. For synonyms, see CREAM- 
STICK and PRICK. [From that 
member of the flail which is held 
in the hands]. 

HANDY. HANDY AS A POCKET IN 
A SHIRT, phr. (American). 
Very convenient. 

HANDY-BLOWS, (or CUFFS), subs. 
. (old). Cuffs with the hand; fisti- 
cuffs ; hence close quarters. 



1603. KNOLLES, Hist, of the Turkes. 
If ever they came to HANDY-BLOWS. 

1690. B. E., Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HANDY BLOWS, Fistycuffs. 

1725. New Cant. Diet, s.v. 

HANDY- MAN, subs, (colloquial). A 
servant or workman doing odd 
jobs. 

1847. DE QUINCEY, The Spanish 
Military Nun, Wks. (1890), xiii., 165. 
She was a HANDY GIRL. She could turn 
her hand to anything. 

1872. Times, 27 Aug. ' Autumn 
Manoeuvres.' The result is he cannot be 
called a HANDY-MAN. 

1889. Pall Mall Gaz., 8 Nov., p. 2, 
c. i. Again did Mr. Sambourne's HANDY- 
MAN appear, this time clad in the real 
robes of the Lord Mayor. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger s 
Sweetheart, p. 55. He was a HANDY- 
MAN. 

HANG, subs, (colloquial). i. The 
general drift, tendency, or bent : 

as in TO GET THE HANG OF = tO 

get conversant with ; to acquire 
the trick, or knack, or knowledge 
of. 

1847. DARLEY, Drama in Poker- 
ville, p. 67. The theatre was cleared in 
an instant ... all running to GET THE 
HANG OF the scrape. 

1848. JONES, Sketches of Travel, p. 
70. By this time I began to GIT THE 
HANG OF the place a little better. 

1851. HOOPER, Widow Rugby's 
Husband, etc., p. 64. To be efficient a 
solicitor must GET THE HANG OF his 
customers. 

a. 1871. PRIME, Hist, of Long 
Island, p. 82. If ever you must have an 
indifferent teacher for your children, let it 
be after they have got a fair start and have 

ACQUIRED THE HANG OF the tools for 

themselves. 

1884. MILLIKEN, Punch, n Oct. 
They ain't GOT THE 'ANG OF it, Charlie 
the toffs ain't. 

1890. Daily Chronicle, 4 Apr., p. 7 
c. 2. When the Raw Cadet enters Wool- 
wich Academy, it is sometime before he 
GETS what some call THE HANG OF the 
place. 



Hang. 



261 



Hang. 



1892. Illustrated Bits, Oct. 22, p. 6. 
c. 2. When I GET THE HANG OF them I 
shall be a regular dab at theosophy. 

2. (colloquial). A little bit ; a 
bit ; a DAMN. See CARE. Fr., 
s'en contreficher or s'en tamponner 
le coquard (or coquillard). 

1861. H. KINGSLEY, Ra-venshoe, ch. 
xliii. She looks as well as you by candle- 
light, but she can't ride a HANG. 

Verb (generally HANG IT !). 
An exclamation of vexation, dis- 
gust, or disappointment ; also, 
more forcibly, a euphemism for 
DAMN IT ! Fr., Ah ! mince alors. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV., 
ii., 4. He a good wit ? HANG HIM, baboon ! 

1609. JONSON, Epiccene, ii., 2. A 
mere talking mole, HANG HIM. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair, 
v. 3. Ay, and BE HANGED. 

1694. DUNTON, Ladies' Diet., p. 229. 
Aristaenetus telling a brisk buxom Lass of 
a proper fine Man that would make her a 
good Husband, HANG HIM [reply'd she] 
he has no Mony. 

1772. COLES, Eng.-Lat. Diet., s.v. 
Hanged. Go AND BE HANGED. 

1780. MRS. COWLEY, Belle's Strata- 
gem, iv., i. HANG Harriet, and Charlotte, 
and Maria ! the name your father gave ye ? 

1823. W. T. MONCRIEFF. Tom and 
Jerry, ii., 5. HANG cards! bring me a 
bobstick of rum slim. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Cruise of the 
Afidge, p. 169. 'You BE HANGED, Felix,' 
quoth his ally, with a most quizzical grin. 

1863. CH. READE, Hard Cash, ii., 
218. HANG the grub ; it turns my 
stomach. 

1883. R. L. STEVENSON, Treasure 
Island, p. 161. You can GO HANG ! 

1889. Sporting Times, 6 July. 
Hebrew Scholar : Rub up your Hebrew. 
Or GO AND HANG yourself. 

1890. GRANT ALLEN, Tents ofShem, 
ch. xvii. HANG IT ALL, if that's English 
law, you know, I don't thing very much of 
the wisdom of our ancestors. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, 
p. 164. HANG IT ALL. 



1892. MILL i KEN, Arry Ballads, 
p. 7. But "ANG IT, I can't stand the style 
of the silent and the stare-me-down sort. 

1892. F. ANSTEY, Voces Populi, 'On 
the Ice,' p. 122. Stick by me, old fellow, 

till I begin to feel my Oh, HANG IT 

ALL! 

To HANG AN ARSE, verb. phr. 
(old). To hang back; to hesi- 
tate. 

1598. MARSTON, Satyres, 'Ad 
Rythmum.' But if you HANG AN ARSE 
like Tubered, When Chremes dragged 
him from his brothel bed. 

1637. MASSINGER, Guardian, v, 5 

Nay, no HANGING AN ARSE. 

1639-61. Rump Songs, ii., 86. Nay, 
if it HANG AN ARSE, We'll pluck it from 
the stares, And roast it at hell for its grease. 

1748. SMOLLETT, Roderick Random, 
ch. Ixv. My lads, I'm told you HANG 
AN ARSE. 

1780. TOMLINSON, Slang Pastoral, 
2. My ARSE HANGS behind me as heavy 
as lead. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

To HANG IN, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To get to work; to do 
one's best ; to WIRE IN (q.v.). 

TO HANG IN THE BELLROPES, 
verb. phr. (common). To defer 
marriage after being ' asked ' in 
church. 

TO HANG ON BY ONE'S EYE- 
LASHES, , verb. phr. (colloquial). 
To persist at any cost, and in the 
teeth of any discouragement. 

TO HANG ON BY THE SPLASH- 
BOARD, verb. phr. (common). 
To ' catch' a tram, omnibus, etc., 
when it is on the move ; hence 
to succeed by the ' skin of one's 
teeth.' Fr., arcpincer Fomnibtis. 

TO HANG AROUND (or ABOUT), 

verb. phr. (American). T>o 
loiter ; to loaf ; to haunt. 



Hang. 



262 



Hang, 



To HANG OUT, verb (common). 
To live ; to reside. Also (subs. ), 
a residence ; a lodging ; and 
(American university) a feast ; an 
entertainment. 

1811. Lexicon Balatroniciim, s.v. 
HANG OUT. The traps scavey where we 
HANG OUT ; the officers know where we 
live. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xxx. 
' I say, old boy, where do you HANG OUT ? ' 
Mr. Pickwick replied that he was at present 
suspended at the George and Vulture. 

1852. BRISTED, Five Years in an 
English University, p. 80. The fourth of 
July I celebrated by a HANG-OUT. 

1871. City Press, 21 Jan. 'Curi- 
osities of Street Literature.' He HANGS 
OUT in Monrnouth-coutt. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
14. I should like to go in for blue blood, 
and 'ANG OUT near the clubs and the 
parks. 

TO HANG OUT A SHINGLE, 

verb. phr. (American). To start 
or carry on business. 
1871. Public Opinion, Dec. Tom 

StOWell HUNG OUT HIS SHINGLE ES a 

lawyer at the Tombs, afterwards at Essex- 
market, and eventually in Brooklyn. 

To HANG ONE'S LATCHPAN, 
verb. phr. (common). To be 
dejected; to pout. r.,faire son 
aquilin. 

To HANG IT OUT, verb. phr. 
(common). To skulk; TO MIKE 



To HANG UP, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). I. To give credit ; to 
score (or chalk) up : said of a 
reckoning. Also 'to put on the 
slate ' or (American) ON THE ICE 



1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. HANG- 
IT-UP, speaking of the Reckoning at a 
Bowsing-Ken, when the Rogues are 
obliged, for want of Money, to run on Tick. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

2. (American). To bear in 
mind ; to remember. 



1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
HANG IT UP. Think of it, remember it. 

3. (American). To pawn, 
For synonyms, see For. 

4. (thieves'). To rob with 
violence on the street ; TO HOLD 
UP (q.v.). Fr., la fair e ait pere 
Francois. 

5. (common). To be in 
extremis ; to know not which 
way to turn for relief : e.g. , A 
MAN HANGING = one to whom 
any change must be for the 
better. 

6. (colloquial). To postpone; 
to leave undecided. 

1887. Cornhill Magazine, June, p. 
624. To HANG UP A BILL is to pass it 
through one or more of its stages, and then 
to lay it aside, and defer its further con- 
sideration for a more or less indefinite 
period. 

To HANG ON, verb. - phr. 
(colloquial). (i) To sponge; 
and (2) to pursue an individual or 
a design. 

1601. SHAKSPEARE, Henry VIII., 
iii., 2. Oh, how wretched Is that poor 
man that HANGS ON princes' favours ! 

To HANG OFF, verb. phr. 
(printers'). To fight shy of. 

To HANG UP ONE'S FIDDLE, 
verb. phr. (American). To retire'; 
to desist. To HANG UP ONE'S 

FIDDLE ANYWHERE = To adapt 

oneself to circumstances. 

To HANG UP ONE'S HAT, 
verb. phr. (common). i. To 
die. For synonyms, see ALOFT. 

1854. Notes and Queries, Vol. X., 
p. 203. He has HUNG UP HIS HAT. This 
sentence, which is sometimes used in refer- 
ence to persons deceased, etc. 

1882. Punch, Ixxxii., 185, c. i. 

2. (common) To make one- 
self permanently at home. 



Hang-bluff. 



26 3 Hangman' s-wages. 



HANG- BLUFF, subs, (rhyming). 
Snuff. 

1857. DUCANGE ANGLICUS, Vulg. 
Tongue, s.v. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

HANG- BY, subs. (old). A hanger- 
'on ; a parasite ; a companion. 

1598. JONSON, Every Man in his 
Humour, iv., 2. I am not afraid of you 
nor them neither, you HANG-BYES here. 

HANG-DOG, subs. (old). A pitiful 
rascal, only fit for the rope or the 
hanging of superfluous curs. Cf. , 
GALLOWS-BIRD. 

1732. FIELDING, Mock^ Doctor, i., 4. 
Heaven has inspired me with one of the 
most wonderful inventions to be revenged 
on my HANG-DOG. 

Adj. (old). Vile, or suspicious, 
in aspect ; GALLOWS-LOOKING 



HANG-GALLOWS, adj. (old). 
quot. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HANG-GALLOWS Look, a thievish, or vil- 
lainous appearance. 

HANGER, subs. (old). A side-arm 
short sword or cutlass hanging 
from the girdle. [See HANGERS, 
in. p!., sense I.] 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, x. A 
couteau de chase, or short HANGER. 

In. pi. (old). i. Ornamental 
loops from the girdle to suspend 
the sword and dagger. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Hamlet, v. 2. 
Six French rapiers and poignards, with 
their assigns, as girdle, HANGERS, and 
so on. 

1596. NASHE, Utif. Trav. [Chiswick 
Press, 1891]. Huge HANGERS that have 
half a cowhide in them. 

1599. JONSON, Every Man out of his 
Humour, iv., 4. I had thrown off the 
HANGERS a little before. 



1610. JONSON, Alchemist, v., 2. 
Where be the French petticoats, And 
girdles and HANGERS ? 

2. (common). Gloves ; specifi- 
cally gloves in the hand. 

3. See POTHOOKS. 

HANG-IN-CHAINS,.?^. //fcr. (old). 
See quots. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HANG-IN-CHAINS, a vile desperate fellow. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum. HANG- 
IN-CHAINS. A vile, desperate fellow. 
Persons guilty of murder, or other atro- 
cious crimes, are frequently, after execu- 
tion, hanged on a gibbet, to which they are 
fastened by iron bandages ; the gibbet is 
commonly placed on or near the place 
where the crime was committed. 

HANGING, adj. (colloquial). Fit 
for the halter. 

HANGING-BEE, subs. (American). 
A gathering of lynch-lawmongers, 
bent on the application of the 
rope. See BEE. 

HANGING JOHNNY, subs. phr. 
(venery). The/j: specifically, 
in a condition of impotence or 
disease. For synonyms, see 
CREAMSTICK and PRICK. 

HANGMAN, subs. (old). A jocular 
endearment. 

1600. SHAKSPEARE, Much Ado 
About Nothing, iii., 2. He had twice or 
thrice cut Cupid's bowstring, and the little 
HANGMAN dare not shoot at him. 

HANGMAN'S- DAY, subs. (old). 
Monday, and (in America) Friday. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
HANGMAN'S DAY. Friday is so called 
from the custom of hanging people on a 
Friday. 

HANGMAN'S-WAGES, subs, (old). 
Thirteen-pence-halfpenny. [The 
fee for an execution was a Scots 



Hang-slang about. 26 4 



Hanky-panky* 



mark : the value of which piece 
was settled, by a proclamation of 
James I., at I3^d.] 

1602. DECKER, Honest Whore, Pt. 
II., in Wks. (1873) ii., 171. Why should I 
eate hempe-seed at the HANGMAN'S 

THIRTEENE- PENCE HALFE- PENNY Ordinary? 

1659. Hangman s Last Will (Rump 
Song quoted in Notes and Queries, 2 S. xi., 
316). For half THIRTEEN-PENCE HALF- 
PENNY WAGES, I would have cleared out all 
the town cages, And you should have been 
rid of all the sages. I and my gallows 
groan. 

1678. BUTLER, Hudibras, Pt. III., 
c. 2. To find us pillories and cart's-tails, 
Or HANGMAN'S WAGES. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s v. 
HANGMAN'S WAGES, thirteenpence half- 
penny, which according to the vulgar 
tradition was thus allotted, one shilling for 
the execution, and three halfpence for the 
rope. 

HANG-SLANG ABOUT, verb, phr, 
(common). To abuse ; TO SLANG 
(q.v.) ; TO BILLINGSGATE (q.v.). 

HANK, subs, (old colloquial). I. 
A tie ; a hold ; an advantage ; a 
difficulty. [!N A HANK = in 
trouble]. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
He has a HANK upon him, or the As- 
cendant over him. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. He 
has a HANK upon him ; He .... will 
make him do what he pleases. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. He 
has a HANK on him, t.e., an ascendant 
over him, or a hold upon him : A SMITH- 
FIELD HANK, = An ox rendered furious 
by over driving and barbarous treatment. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabitlum, s.v. 
HANK. To know something about a man 
that is disreputable. He has a HANK on 
the bloke, whereby he sucks honey when 
he chooses, he knows something about the 
man, and therefore induces him to give 
him money when he chooses. 

2. (common). A spell of rest ; 
an easy time. 



1888. Sporting Life, 7 Dec. So quiet 
was the first round that the ire of the com- 
pany was raised, and they called out, ' No 

HANK !' 

Verb (common). To worry ; 
to bait ; to drive from pillar to 
post. 

HANKER, verb (old : now 
recognised). To desire eagerly; 
to fret after ; to long or pine for : 
generally with ' after. ' Also, 
HANKERING (subs.} = 2a\ impor- 
tunate and irritating longing. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HANKER AFTER, to Long or wish much for. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. To 
HANKER AFTER anything, to have a long- 
ing after or for it. 

1847. ROBB, Squatter Life, p. 98. I 
did see a creatur' once, named Sofy 
Mason .... that I tuk an orful HANKER- 
IN' ARTER. 

1878. WHITMAN, Leaves of Grass, 
' Spontaneous Me,' 90 (ed. 1884). The 
hairy wild-bee that murmurs and HANKERS 
up and down. 



HAN KIN, subs, (commercial). The 
trick of putting off bad work for 

good. [Cf., TO PLAY HAN KEY, 
or TO PLAY HANKY-PANKY.] 

HANKTELO, subs. (old). See quots. 

1593. N A s H E , Strange Newes 
(Grosart, Wks., ii., 251). Is the Astrolo- 
gicaall Discourse a better booke than 
Pierce Pennilesse ? Gjtbriel HANGTELOW 
saies it is ? 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v 
HANKTELO, a silly Fellow, a meer Cods- 
head. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1 785. GROSE, Vulg, Tongue, s.v. 

HANKY-PANKY, subs, (common). 
(i) Legerdemain ; whence (2) 
trickery ; UNDERHAND (q.v.} 
work ; cheating ; any manner of 



Hanky-panky-bloke. 265 



Hansel. 



double-dealing or intrigue. HAN- 
KY-PANKY BUSINESS -conjuring; 

HANKY - PANKY WORK (or 

TRICKS) = double-dealing. A 

BIT OF HANKY-PANKY = a trick ; 

a piece of knavery. 
1841. Punch, Vol. I., p. 88. Only a 

little HANKY-PANKY. 

1880. G. R. SIMS, Zeph, ch. xiii. He 
knew that . . . any crime committed on 
his premises would tell against him on 
licensing day, and he kept a pretty sharp 
look out to see that what he was pleased 
to term HANKY PANKY was not carried on 
under his nose. 

1864. E. YATES, Broken to Harness, 
ch. xxxviii. If there was any HANKY 
PANKY, any mystery I mean, he'd always 
swear he was out whenever he called, for 
fear it should be bullied out of him. 

1877. Five Years' Penal Servitude, 

ch. v., p. 323. There's some HANKY 

PANKY business going on among the men 
of No. 2 prison ; the Catholic side is 
ringing changes and it is done in this 
shop. 

HANKY-PANKY-BLOKE, subs. phr. 
(theatrical). A conjuror ; a PILE 
OF MAGS (q.v ). 

HANKY-SPANKY, adj. (common). 
Dashing; NOBBY (q.v.). Speci- 
fically of well-cut clothes. 

HANNAH. THAT'S THE MAN AS 
MARRIEDHANNAH,//^. (streets'). 
' That's the thing ' : used of a 
thing well begun and well ended ; 
or as an expressive of certainty. 
Varied sometimes by THAT'S 
WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH 
HANNAH. 

HANS CARVEL'S RING, subs. phr. 
(venery). The kvaait pudendum, 

For synonyms, see MONOSYL- 
LABLE. [From Poggio (tit. Annu- 
lus) ; Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles 
(xi); Ariosto (Sat. v.) ; the 
Nouvelle of Malespini (89, ii.) ; 
Rabelais (Pantagruel^ iii., 28) ; 
and Matthew Prior. ] 



HANSEL (or HANDSEL) subs, (com- 
mon). The first money taken in 
the morning ; lucky money. 
Hence, earnest money ; first- 
fruits,&c. HANSEL-MONDAY = the 
first Monday in the new year, when 
presents were received by children 
and servants. [A. S., handselen = 
to deliver into the hand.] 

1587. GREENE, Menaphon (Arber), 
p. 71. He should like inough haue had 
first HANDSELL of our new Shepheards 
sheepehooke. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair, 
ii. Bring him a sixpenny bottle of ale : 
They say a fool's HANDSEL is lucky. 

1679. HOLLAND, Ammianus Mar- 
cellinus. With which wofull tidings 
being sore astonied, as if it were the first 
HANSELL and beginning of evils comming 
toward him. 

1787. GROSE, Prov. Glossary, etc. 
(1811), p. 121. It is a common practice 
among the lower class of hucksters, ped- 
lars, or dealers in fruit or fish, on receiving 
the price of the first goods sold that day, 
which they call HANSEL, to spit on the 
money, as they term it, for good luck. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch 
iii. There was a whin bonnie lasses there, 
forbye mysel', and deil ane to gie them 
HANSELS. Ibid, ch. xxxii. Grizzy has 
naething frae me, by twa pair o' new shoon 
ilka year, and maybe a bit compliment at 
HANSEL MONANDAY. 

1821. SCOTT, Kenilworth, ch. xix. 
1 How wears the Hollands you won of me? 
' Why, well, as you may see, Master Gold- 
thred,' answered Mike ; ' I will bestow a 
pot on thee for the HANDSEL.' 

Verb (common). i. To give 
handsel to ; also (2), to use for 
the first time. 

1599. NASHE, Lenten Stuffe, in 
Wks., v., 249. And gather about him as 
flocking to HANSELL him and strike him 
good luck. 

1605. CHAPMAN, etc., Eastward Hoe, 
ii. My lady .... is so ravished with 
desire to HANSELL her new coach. 

1639-61. Rump Songs, i. [1662], 137. 
Belike he meant to HANSELL his New 
Satten. 



Hansdlcr. 



266 



Happy. 



1663. PEPYS, Diary, 12 Apr. Coming 
home to-night, a drunken boy was carrying 
by our constable to our new pair of stocks 
to HANDSEL them. 

1874. {G. A. LAWRENCE], Hagarene, 
ch. xvii. The habit of stout blue cloth 
.... was* Pete Harradine's last and 
crowning extravagance, as they passed 
through town on their way to Fulmerstone, 
and it had never been HANSELLED yet. 

1881. BESANT and RICE, Sweet 
Nelly, in Ten Years Tenant, etc., Vol. I., 
p. 200. I wanted to present her with 
something to HANSEL friendship. 

HANSELLER, subs, (common). A 
street vendor ; a Cheap Jack. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Lend. Lab. 
and Land. Poor, i., 392. The sellers of 
tins, who carry them under their arms, or 
in any way on a round, apart from the use 
of a vehicle, are known as HAND-SELLERS. 

1876. HINDLEY, Ad-ventures of a 
Cheap Jack, p. 10. Cheap-Jacks, as they 
were then as now called by the people, 
although the term HAN'-SELLER is mostly 
used by themselves. 

HANS-EN-KELDER, subs. (old). A 
child in the womb : literally, 
JACK - IN - THE - CELLAR (q.v.). 
[From the Dutch.] 

1647. CLEAVELAND, Character of a 
London Diurnall. The originall sinner in 
this kind was Dutch ; Galliobelgicus, the 
Protoplast ; and the moderne Mercuries, 
but HANS-EN-KELDERS. The countesse of 
Zealand was brought to bed of an almanack; 
as many children as dayes in the yeare. 

1648. Mercurius Pragmaticus, \. 
The birthday of that precious new govern- 
ment which is yet but a HANS-EN-KELDER. 

</.1658. LOVELACE, Poems, p. 63. Next 
beg I to present my duty To pregnant sister 
in prime beauty, Whom [who] well I deem 
(ere few months elder) Will take out HANS 
FROM pretty KELDER. 

1663. DRYDEN, Wild Gallant, v., 
Wks.,\. 6r (1701). Seems you are desirous 
I should Father this HANS EN KELDER 
heere. 

1672. MARVELL, Char, of Holland, 
line 65. More pregnant then their Marg'ret, 
that laid down For HANS-IN-KELDER of a 
whole Hanse town. 



1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HANS-EN-KELDER, Jack in the Box, the 
Child in the Womb, or a Health to it. 

1672. WYCHERLEY, Love in a Wood, 
v. Then I am as it were a grandfather to 
your new Wiffe's, HANS EN KELDER. 



1678. T. BAKER, Tuntridge Wells, 
p. 27. Here's a health to this Lady's 
HANS IN KELDER ! 



1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HANS IN KELDER, a health frequently 
drank to breeding women, or their 
husbands. 

HANSOM, subs, (coster). A chop. 

HAP- HARLOT, subs. (old). A coarse 
stuff to make rugs or coverlets 
with; a rug. Cf., WRAP-RASCAL 
= an overcoat. 

1577-87. HOLINSHED, Description 
of England, bk. ii., ch. xii, A sheet 
vnder couerlets made of dagswain, or HAP- 
HARLOTS (I vse their cwne termes). 

HA' FORTH o' COPPERS, subs. phr. 
(legal). Habeas Corpus. 

HA'PORTH OF LIVELINESS, subs, 
phr. (Coster). I. Music. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, i., p. 21. Or they will 
call to the orchestra, saying, ' Now then 
you catgut-scrapers ! Let's have a 
HA'PORTH OF LIVELINESS.' 

2. (common). A loitering 
Lawrence ; a SLOWCOACH (q.v.). 

HAPPIFY, verb. (American). To 
please. 

1612. SYLVESTER, Lack. Lack., 642. 
One short mishap for ever HAPPJFIES. 

1848. BURTON, Waggeries, etc., p. 
70. For eatin' and drinkin', it HAPPIFIES 
me to say that we bang the bush. 

HAPPY, adj. (common). Slightly 
drunk ; ELEVATED (q.v.}. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 



Happy-despatch. 267 



Hard. 



HAPPY- DESPATCH, subs, (common). 
Death, specifically, a sudden or 
violent end. 



HAPPY-DOSSER. See DOSSER. 



HAPPY ELIZA, subs, (common). 
A female Salvationist [As in the 
Broadside Ballad ( 1887-8), ' They 
call me Happy Eliza, and I'm 
Converted Jane : We've been two 
hot'uns in our time.'] 



HAPPY- FAMILY, subs, (colloquial). 
See quot. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab' 
and Land. Poor, iii., p. 224. HAPPY 
FAMILIES, or assemblages of animals of 
diverse habits and propensities living 
amicably, or at least quietly, in one cage. 

HAPPY - GO - LUCKY, subs, (collo- 
quial). Careless ; thoughtless ; 
improvident. Fr., va commeje te 
pousse and a la flan. 

1856. READE, Never Too Late to 
Mend, ch. xv. In the HAPPY-GO-LUCKY 
way of his class. 

1883. Illust. London News, 8 Dec., 
p. 551, c. i. He dashes off a play in a 
HAPPY-GO-LUCKY style, basing it on theatri- 
cal precedent so far as certain stock situa- 
tions are concerned. 

HAPPY HUNTING-GROUNDS, subs, 
(American). I. The future state ; 
GLORY (q.v.). [From the North- 
American Indian's conception of 
heaven.] 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West, p. 98. After a long journey, they 
will reach the HAPPY HUNTING-GROUNDS. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody of 
Nowhere, ch. v. Old Mescal is now 
keeping a sharp eye out for the child and 
the cowboy, that he may send them to the 

HAPPY HUNTING-GROUNDS also. 

2. (colloquial). A favourable 
place for work or play. 



1892. C assetfs Sat. Journal, 26 Oct., 

p. 119. The HAPPY HUNTING-GROUND of 

the swell mobsman is the opening of some 
Exhibition. 

3. (venery). The female 
pudendum. For synonyms, see 
MONOSYLLABLE. 

HAPPY-LAND, subs, (common). 
The after life; GLORY (q.v.). 

1893. DANVERS, The Grant ham 
Mystery, ch. xiii. The old 'un will soon 
join the young 'un in the HAPPY LAND. 

HAPPY- RETURNS, jw^j. (Australian). 
Vomiting. See FLAY THE Fox. 

HARBOUR, subs, (venery). The 
female pudendum. For synonyms, 
see MONOSYLLABLE. Also HAR- 
BOUR OF HOPE. 

HARD, subs, (prison). i. Hard 
labour. 

1890. Globe, _ 26 Feb., p. i, c. 4. 
Monetary penalties, therefore, do not 
act as deterrents, but the certainty of seven 
days' incarceration, with or without HARD, 
would soon diminish the nuisance. 

2. See HARD-SHELL. 

3. (colloquial). Third-class. 
As opposed to SOFT (q. v. ). Thus : 
* Do you go HARD or SOFT ? ' = 
1 Do you go Third or First ? ' 
An abbreviation of HARD-ARSE. 

Adj. (American). i. Applied 
to metal of all kinds : e.g., HARD 
(COLE or STUFF) =silver or gold 
as compared to cheques or SOFT 
(?.nX 

1825. NEAL, Bro. Jonathan, it., ch. 
18. The bill .... amounted to one 
dollar and a quarter HARD MONEY. 

1844. Puck, p. 146. That cunning 
old file wont let her go with the HARD 
CASH down. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulutn, s.v. 
HARD ; metal. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
HARD COLE. Silver or gold money. 

1863. CHARLES READE, Hard Cash. 
[Title.] 



Hard, 



268 



Hard-barga in. 



2. (old: now recognised). I. 
Sourorsouring; asinHARD-ClDER; 
(2) HARD drinks (American) =- 
intoxicating liquors, as wine, 
ale, etc., while lemonade, soda- 
water, ginger-beer, etc., are SOFT. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HARD DRINK, that is very Stale, or begin- 
ing to Sower. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HARD, stale beer nearly sour, is said to be 

HARD. 

1882. Daily Telegraph, 10 Oct., p. 5, 
c. 3. A fourth defendant, in pleading 
guilty, urged that the month of August 
last ' turned a lot of beer sour,' and that he 
had only used some sugar for the purpose 
of mollifying the HARD or sour porter. 

HARD AS A BONE (NAILS, etc. ), 
adj. phr. (colloquial). Very hard; 
austere ; unyielding. 

1885. Indoor Paupers, p. 79. _ He 
stood it for a week or two without flinch- 
ing being at that date HARD AS NAILS, as 
he expresses it. 

HARD AT IT, adj. phr. (collo- 
quial). Very busy ; in the thick 
of a piece of work. 

To DIE HARD, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To sell one's life dearly ; 
e.g., The DIE-HARDS (q.v.), the 
59th Regiment, so called from their 
gallantry at Albuera. 

TO GIVE HARD FOR SOFT, verb. 

phr. (venery). To copulate. See 
GREENS. 

To BE HARD HIT. See 
HARD-HIT. 

[HARD, adj., is used in many combi- 
nations ; generally with an unpleasant 
intention. Thus, HARD-ARSED (or FISTED, 
or HANDEo)=very niggardly ; HARD-BIT 
(or HARD-MOUTHFUL) = an unpleasant ex- 
perience ; HARD-DRIVEN (or HARD-RUN> = 

sore bested ; HARD-FACED (or FAVOURED, 
or FEATURED)=grum, shrewish, or bony ; 

HARD-HEADED (or HARD-WITTED) = shrewd 

and intelligent, but unimaginative and un- 
sympathetic ; HARD-HEARTED = incapable 
of pity; HARD-LiPPED=obstinate, dour 



HARD-MASTER = a nigger-driver ; HARD- 
NUT =a. dangerous antagonist ; HARD-ON = 
pitiless in severity; HARD-RioiNG^selfish 
and reckless equestration ; HARD-SERVICE 
=the worst kind of employment ; HARD- 
WROUGHT = overworked, etc., etc.] 

HARD-A-WEATHER, adj. (nautical). 
Tough ; weather-proof. 

1891. W. C. RUSSELL, Ocean Tra- 
gedy, p. 44. They were HARD-A-WEATHEK 
fellows. 

HARD-BAKE, subs, (schoolboys'). 
A sweetmeat made of boiled 
brown sugar or treacle with 
blanched almonds. 

1825. HONE, Every-day Bk., I., 51. 
HARDBAKE, brandy-balls, and bull's-eyes. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ii. The 
commodities exposed for sale in the public 
streets are marine stores, HARD-BAKE, 
apples, etc. 

HARD-BAKED, adj. (old). i. Con- 
stipated. 

1823. JON BEE, Diet, of Turf, s.v. 

2. (common). Stern ; un- 
flinching ; strong. 

1847. ROBB, Squatter Life, p. 73. 
It's my opinion, these squirtish kind a 
fellars ain't perticular HARD-BAKED. 

HARD- BARGAIN (or CASE), subs. 
(common). I. A lazy fellow; a 
BAD -EGG (q.v.) ; a skulker. ONE 
OF THE QUEEN'S HARD-BAR- 
GAINS = a bad soldier. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West, p. 71. La Bpnte had lost all traces 
of civilised humanity, and might justly 
claim to be considered as HARD A CASE as 
any of the mountaineers then present. 

1888. LYNCH, Mountain Mystery, 
ch. xliii. A fellow who comes and goes 
between here and Rockville, generally 
considered a HARD CASE, and believed to 
be more outlaw than miner. 

2. (trade). A defaulting debtor. 

3. (nautical). A brutal mate 
or officer. Also HARD-HORSE. 



Hard-bit. 



269 



Hard-neck. 



HARD-BIT (or BIT OF HARD), subs. 
(venery). I. The penis in 
erection ; whence (2), for women, 
the act of connection. 

HARD-BITTEN, adj. (colloquial). 
Resolute ; GAME (q. v. ) ; desperate. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, liii. 
My sooth, they'll be HARD-BITTEN terriers 
will worrie Dandie. 

HARD-CHEESE, subs. (Royal Mili- 
tary Academy). Hard lines; bad 
luck j specifically at billiards. 

HARD-COLE. See HARD and COLE. 

HARD-DOINGS, subs. (American). 
I. Rough fare ; and (2) hard 
work. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West, p. 37. HARD DOINS when it comes 
to that. 

HARD-DRINKING, subs, (old: now 
recognized). Drinking to excess. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HARD-DRINKING, excessive Soking, or 
toping aboundance. 

HARD-HEAD, subs. (American). 
A man of good parts, physical, 
intellectual, or moral. 

1824. R. E. PEAKE, Americans 
Abroad, i., i. Dou. None of your 
flouting, by jumping jigs, I won't stand it 
we Americans have got HARDHEADS ve 
warn't brought up in the woods to be 
scart at by an owl you can't scare me so. 

1848. DURIVAGE, Stray Subjects, p. 
no. Most of the passengers had dis- 
appeared for the night, and only a knot of 
HARD-HEADS were left upon deck. 

HARD-HIT. To BE HARD HIT, verb 
phr. (colloquial). i. To have 
experienced a heavy loss ; as over 
a race, at cards, etc. 

2. (colloquial). To be deeply 
in love ; completely GONE ON 
(q.v.). 



1888. J. MCCARTHY and MRS. 
CAMPBELL-PRAED, Ladies' Gallery, ch. 
xxv. The wound was keen, I had been 

HIT HARD. 

1891. M. E. BRADDON, Gerard, p. 
312. You've been HARD HIT. 

HARD- LINES, sttbs. (colloquial). 
Hardship ; difficulty ; an unfor- 
tunate result or occurrence. 
[Formerly LINE = lot : Cf., Bible 
and Prayer book version of Psalm 
xvi., 5, 6.] 

1855. Notes and Queries, i S. xii., 
p. 287. HARD LINES. Whence is this 
expression, so common, particularly among 
seafaring men, derived ? 

1881. W. BLACK, Beautiful Wretch, 
ch. xxiii. I think it's deuced HARD LINES 
to lock up a fellow for merely humbugging 
an old parson up in Kentish Town. 

1888. Sporting Life, 15 Dec. For the 
Kempton folks it was rather HARD LINES. 

1888. J. MCCARTHY and MRS. 
CAMPBELL - PRAED, Ladies' Gallery, 
ch. xxvi. It's awful HARD LINES, Lady 
Star Strange, that I am only thought good 
enough for you Londoners in the dead 
season. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 3. 
I call it 'ARD LINES, dear old man. 

HARD-MOUTHED, adj. (colloquial). 
Difficult to deal with; wilful ; 
obstinate. Also coarse in speech. 
[From the stable.] 

1686. DURFEY, Commonw. ofWordes, 
i., i. [Speaking of a girl.] I hate your 
young Wechees, Skitish Colts they are so 
HARD MOUTH'D, there's no dealing with 
em. 

1704. SWIFT, Tale of a Tub, Sect. 
ix. I myself, the author of these mo- 
mentous truths, am a person, whose 
imaginations are HARD-MOUTHED, and 
exceedingly disposed to run away with his 
reason. 

1 704. SWIFT, Operation of the Spirit, 
Sect. ii., par. 9. The flesh .... when it 
comes to the turn of being bearer, is 
wonderfully headstrong and HARD- 
MOUTHED. 

HARD-NECK, subs. (tailors'), 
Brazen impudence, MONUMENTAL 
CHEFK (q.V.}. 



Hard-on. 



270 



Hard-tack. 



HARD-ON, culj. phr. (venery). 
Prick-proud. For synonyms, see 
HORN. 

HARD- PAN, subs. phr. (American). 
The lowest point ; BED-ROCK 



1882. BESANT, All Sorts and Con- 
ditions of Men, ch. xxi. And as for 
business, it's got down to the HARD PAN, 
and dollars are skurce. 

1861. HOLMES, Elsie Venner, ch. 
viii. Mr. Silas Peckham had gone a little 
deeper than he meant, and came upon the 
HARD-PAN, as the well-diggers call it, of the 
Colonel's character, before he thought 
of it. 

1888. Missouri Republican, 2 Mar- 
Prices were at HARD-PAN. 



TO GET DOWN TO HARD-PAN, 
verb. phr. (American). i. "To 
buckle to ; to get to business. 

HARD-PUNCH ER,SU&S. (common). 
The fur cap of the London rough ; 
formerly worn by men in training ; 
a modification of the Scotch cap 
with a peak. [From the nick- 
name of a noted pugilist.] 

HARD- PUSH ED, adv. (colloquial). 
In difficulties ; HARD-UP (q.v.}. 

a. 1871. Perils of Pearl Street, p. 
123. As I said, at the end of six months 
we began to be HARD-PUSHED. Our credit, 
however, was still fair. 



HARD PUT To, adj. phr. (collo- 
quial). In a difficulty, monetary 
or other ; e.g. , He'd be HARD 
PUT TO IT to find a sovereign (or 
a word, or an excuse) = It would 
take him all his time, etc. 

HARD-ROW. See Row. 

HARD- RUN, adj. (colloquial). In 
want of money; HARD-UP (q.v.). 



HARD-SHELL, subs. (American). 
A member of an extreme section 
of Baptists holding very strict 
and rigid views. [The SOFT- 
SHELLS are of more liberal mind.] 
Also HARDS and SOFTS. 

1848. ]o-tsES,Sketches oj 'Travel, p. 30. 
The old HARD-SHELL laid about him like 
eath. 

1838. Baltimore Sun. Mr. E., a 
regular member of the HARD-SHELL Baptist 
Church. 

1893. STEVENSON, Island Night's 
Entertainments, p. 35. He's a HARD- 
SHELL Baptist is Papa. 

2. (political American). A 
division of the Democratic Party 
in 1846-48, when the HUNKERS 
(q.v.} received the name of HARDS, 
and their opponents, the BARN- 
BURNERS (q.v.) that of SOFTS. 

1847. ROBB, Squatter Life, p. 91. 
HARDS, softs, whigs and Tylerites were 
represented. 

Adj. (American). Extremely 
orthodox ; unyielding ; hide- 
bound. 

HARD-STUFF, subs. (American). 
I. Money. 

2. (Australian). Intoxicating 
liquors ; see HARD (adj. sense 2). 
For synonyms see DRINKS. 

HARD-TACK, subs, (nautical). i. 
Ship's biscuits ; specifically, ord- 
inary sea-fare as distingushed from 
food ashore, or SOFT-TOMMY 
(?..). 

1841. LEVER, Charles O'Malley, ch. 
Ixxxviii. No more HARD-TACK, thought II , 
no salt butter, but a genuine land break- 
fast. 

1889. Lippincott, Oct., p. 476. They 
have feasted on salt horse and HARD-TACK 
many a day ; but they know a good thing 
when they find it. 

2 (common). Coarse or in- 
sufficient fare. 



Hard-up. 



271 



Hard-iip. 



HARD-UP, subs, (common). i. A 
collector of cigar ends, a TOPPER- 
HUNTER. [Which refuse, un- 
twisted and chopped up, is sold to 
theverypoor.] Sometimes HARD- 
CUT. Fr., un megottier. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, i., p. 5. The cigar-end 
finders, or HARD-UPS, as they are called, 
who collect the refuse pieces of smoked 
cigars from the gutters, and having dried 
them, sell them as tobacco to the very 
poor. 

1838. Tit Bits, 24 March, 373. 
Smoking HARD-UP is picking up the stumps 
of cigars thrown away in the streets, 
cutting them up, and smoking them in the 
pipe. 

1891. Morning Advertiser, 26 Mar. 
A constable on duty on the Embankment 
early in the morning saw the accused 
prowling about, and on asking what he was 
doing, received the reply that he was look- 
ing for HARD CUT. Mr.Vaughan: Looking 
for what ? The Prisoner : HARD-CUT ; 
dropped cigar-ends. 

2. (common). A poor man ; 

a STONY-BROKE (q.V.). 

1857. DUCANGE ANGLICUS, Vulg. 
Tongue, HARD-UP, a poor person. 

Adv. phr. (colloquial). i.Very 
badly in want of money; in urgent 
need of anything. Also HARD- 
RUN and HARD-PUSHED. 

1809-41. TH. HOOK, The Suther- 
lands. He returned, and being HARD UP, 
as we say, took it into his head to break a 
shop-window at Liverpool, and take out 
some trumpery trinket stuff. 

1821. HAGGART, Life, p. 104. There 
I met in with two Edinburgh snibs, who 
were HARD UP. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
' Merchant of Venice.' Who by showing 
at Operas, Balls, Plays, and Court, .... 
Had shrunk his ' weak means, ' and was 
'stump'd' and HARD UP. 

1852. DICKENS, Bleak House, ch. xi. 
He .... was, not to put too fine a point 
upon it HARD-UP. 

1865. New York Herald. This 
anxiety .... shows conclusively that 
they are HARD-UP for political capital. 



1871. Lond. Figaro, 25 Jan. For 
years, England has been a refuge for 
HARD-UP German princelings. 

1887. MANVILLE FENN, This Man's 
Wife, i., 13. I don't look HARD UP do I ? 
No, because you've spent my money on 
your wretched dress. 

1891. Fun, 25 Mar. You're HARD 
UP, ain't you? Stumped? Well, it's 
Threadneedle Street to a frying-pan, that 
if Popsy knew your real name, he'd lend 
you a thousand or two like a shot. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Many 
under FLOORED apply equally to 
HARD-UP ; others are : At low 
water mark ; cracked up ; dead- 
broke ; down on one's luck ; fast ; 
in Queer Street ; in the last of pea 
time ; in the last run of shad ; 
low down; low in the lay: oofless; 
out of favor with the oof-bird ; 
pebble-beached ; seedy ; short ; 
sold-up ; stony-broke ; strapped ; 
stuck ; stumped ; suffering from 
an attack of the week's (or 
month's) end ; tight ; on one's 
uppers ; under a cloud ; on one's 
beam ends. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. -Se mettre 
dans le bceuf (common = to go in 
for BLOCK ORNAMENTS (q.V.})', etre 
en brindezingue (mountebanks = 
gone to smash) ; etre brouille avec 
la monnaie ( familiar = to have had 
a row with one's banker) ; etre 
coupe (printers') ; etre a la cote 
(familiar = on the shelf) ; $tre 
fauche (thieves' = cut down) ; 
etre dans la puree (thieves') ; etre 
molle (thieves') ; etre a lafaridon 
(popular) ; etre en dtche (popular) ; 
etre desargente (thieves' = oofless) ; 
etre bref (popular = short) ; etre a 
fond de cale (popular = down to 
bed-rock) ; i>tre a la manque 
(popular on short commons) ; 
manger de la misere ( popular = 
to sup sorrow) ; etre dans le 
lac (popular = a hole) ; etre pane 
(general) ; panne comme la 
Hollands (general = very hard up). 



Hard-iipness. 



272 



Hare. 



SPANISH SYNONYMS. Estar 
pelado or ser tinpelado( skinned) ; 
tinoso (= scabby). 

ITALIAN SYNONYM. Calcare 
a ventun 'ora. 

2. (common). Intoxicated. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

3. (Winchester College). Out 
of countenance \ exhausted (in 
swimming). 

HARD-UPNESS or HARD-UPPISH- 
N ESS, subs, (colloquial). -Poverty ; 
a condition of impoverishment. 

1876. HINDLEY, Adventures of a 
Cheap Jack. There were frequent .... 
collapses from death or HARD-UPNESS. 

1883. Illust. London News, 26 May, 
P- 5*9, c. 3. These I O U's .... 
do not imply, as might be supposed, com- 
mon HARDUPNESS. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 28. 
Ike's knowledge of some of the bookmakers 
he had met in the old land led him to 
believe that HARD-UPPISHNESS would scare 
any knight of the pencil away. 

HARDWARE (or HARD), subs. 

(American). Counterfeit coin. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

HARDWARE- BLOKE, subs, (thieves'). 
A native of Birmingham ; a 
BRUM (g.v.). 

HARDY- ANN UAL, subs. (Parliamen- 
tary). A bill that is brought in 
every year, but never passed into 
law. Hence (journalistic), any 
stock subject. 

1892. Pall MallGaz., 16 Aug., p. 4, 
c. 2. Signs of the so called ' silly season' 
which has been somewhat delayed this 
year owing to the political crisis, are now 
beginning to appear. The readers of the 
Daily Telegraph are once more filling the 
columns of that journal with ' Is Marriage a 
Failure? ' The HARDY ANNUAL is called 
' English Wives ' this time 



HARE, verb. (old). To dodge; to 
double ; to bewilder. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 92. 
Running, HARING, gaping, staring. 

1672. MARVELL, Rehearsal, Tr. 
(Grosart), iii, 372. They amaze, shatter 
and HARE their people. 

To HARE IT, verb. phr. 
(American thieves'). To retrace 
one's steps ; to double back. 
[From the way of a hare with the 
hounds. ] 

TO MAKE A HARE OF, verb, phi . 
(colloquial). To make ridiculous ; 
to expose the ignorance of any 
person. 

1830-32. CARLETON, Traits and 
Stories, 'The Hedge-School.' What A 
HARE that MADE OF him .... and did 
not leave him a leg to stand on ! 

1844. LEVER, Tom Burke of Ours, 
"> 393' It was Mister Curran MADE A 
HARE OF your Honor that day. 

TO SWALLOW A HARE, Vtrb. 
phr. (old). To get very drunk. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v 
1725. New Cant. Diet. HARE, s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HE HAS SWALLOWED A HARE, he IS 

drunk, more probably a hair which 
requires washing down. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

TO HOLD WITH THE HARE 
AND HUNT WITH THE HOUNDS, 

v&rb. phr. (colloquial). To play 
a double game ; to keep on good 
terms with two conflicting parties. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

To KISS THE HARE'S FOOT. 
verb. phr. (colloquial). To be 
late ; to be a day after the fair ; 
to kiss the post. 



Hare-brained. 



273 



Harmans. 



HARE-BRAIN ED(or HAIR- BRAIN ED), 
adj. (old colloquial : now recog- 
nised). Reckless ; flighty ; im- 
pudent ; skittish. Also, substan- 
tively, HARE-BRAIN = a hare- 
brained person. 

1534. N. UDAL, Roister ; Doister, 
I., iv., p. 27 (Arber). Ah foolish HARE- 
BRAINE, This is not she. 

1592. NASHE, Pierce Penilesse, in 
Wks., ii., 53. A HAREBRAIND little 
Dwarfe it is. 

1621. BURTON, Anat. of Mel., I., 
III., I., ii., 259 (1836). Yet again, many 
of them, desperate HARE-BRAINS. 

1622. BACON, Henry VII. That 
same HAIRE-BRAINE wild fellow, my 
subject. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. xliii. When the government of a 
nation depends upon the caprice of the 
ignorant, HAIR-BRAINED vulgar. 

1870. Chambers' Miscellany, No. 
53, p. 28. The Slater girls are as HARE- 
BRAINED as herself. 

HARED, adj. (old). Hurried. 

HARE-SLEEP, subs. (old). Sham 
slumber ; FOXES' SLEEP (q.v.). 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HARE-SLEEP, with Eies a' most open. 

HARKING, subs, (old). See quots. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HARKING, whispering on one side to 
borrow Money. 

1725. New. Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HARK-VE-ING, whispering on one side to 
borrow money. 

HARLEQUIN, subs, (theatrical). i. 
A sovereign. For synonyms, see, 
CANARY. 

2. (Winchester College). The 
wooden nucleus of a red india- 
rubber ball. 

3. (old). A patchwork quilt. 

HARLEQUIN CHINA, adj. phr. 
(old). Sets composed of several 
patterns and makes. 



HARLOTRY, subs. (old). A wanton. 

d. 1529. SKELTON, Bowge ofCourte. 
He had no pleasure but in HARLOTRYE. 

1672. WYCHERLEY, Love in a Wood, 
iv., i. But O the HARLOTRY, did she 
make that use of it then. 

1695. CONGREVE, Love for Love, 
iii., i. O you young HARLOTRY. 

1893. T. E. BROWN, Old John, p. 
205. That specious HARLOTRY from hell's 
black bosom spewed. 

Adj. (old). Disreputable. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, i Henry IV., 
ii., 4. Oh rare ! he doth it as like one of 
these HARLOTRY players, as ever I see. 

HARMAN-BECK (or HARMAN), subs. 

(old). An officer of justice. For 
synonyms, see BEAK and COPPER. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 66. 
The HARMAN-BECK, the constable. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark- A II. 
With the HARMAN-BEAKE out and alas to 
Whittington we goe. 

1656. RROOME, Jovial Creut,ii. Here 
safe in our skipper let's cly off our peck, 
And bowse in defiance o' th* HARMAN- 
BECK. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HARMAN-BECK, a Beadle. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall(4\h ed.), 
p. 12. HARMINBECK, a Constable. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v 
HARMAN BECK, a beadle (cant). 

1822. SCOTT, Fortunes of Nigel, ch . 
xvii. From the watchmen who skip On 
the HARMAN BECK'S errand. 

1828. LYTTON, The Disowned. The 
worst have an awe of the HARMAN'S claw. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
HARMAN BEAK. The Sheriff. 

HARMANS, subs. (Old Cant). The 
stocks. [The suffix ' MANS ' is 
common ; Cf., LIGHTMANS, 

DARKMANS, ROUGHMANS, etc.] 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat (1814), p. 66. 
The HARMANS, the stockes. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark- A II, 
p. 39 (H. Club's Kept., 1874). HARMONS 
the stockes. 

18 



Harness. 



274 



Harry. 



1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

1714. Memoirs of John Hall (4th 
ed.), p.. 12, s.v. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HARNESS, IN HARNESS, adj. 
phr. (colloquial). In business ; 
at work : as, TO DIE IN HARNESS 
= to die at one's post; TO GET 
BACK INTO HARNESS = to resume 
work after a holiday. [HARNESS 
also = armour.] 

1872. Fun, 10 Aug. ' Over.' Aye ! 
But the sting of it's here, Just as I'm back 
INTO HARNESS, Others are off to sea, 
mountain, and mere. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger's 
Sweetheart, p. 2. My father died IN 



HARP, interject. (Irish). See quot. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HARP .... HARP is also the Irish ex- 
pression for 'woman' or 'tail,' used in 
tossing up in Ireland, from Hibernia -being 
represented with a harp, on the reverse of 
the copper coins of that country, for 
which reason it is in hoisting the copper, 
*".*., ^tossing up, sometimes likewise called 
music. 

To HARP ON, verb. phr. (old, 
now recognised). To dwell per- 
sistently and at any cost upon a 
subject. 

1596. NASHE, Have with yon to 
Saffron Walden. As if I had continually 
HARPED UPON it in every tenth line of my 
book. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Hamlet, ii., 2. 
Still HARPING ON my daughter. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HARP-UPON a business, to insist on it. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1886. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
p, 291. He was back HARPING ON my 
proposal. 

HARPER, subs. (old). A brass coin 
current in Ireland, temp. Eliza- 
beth, value one penny. [From 
the Irish Harp figured upon it.] 



1574-1637. BEN JONSON, The Gipsies 
Metamorphosed. A two-pence I had to 
spend ever and above ; besides the HARPER 
that was gathered amongst us to pay the 
piper. 

HAVE AMONG YOU MY BLIND 

HARPERS, phr. (old). See quot. 
1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. HARPERS- 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HAVE AMONG YOU MY BLIND HARPERS, an 

expression used in throwing or shooting at 
random among a crowd. 

HARRIDAN, subs, (old, now recog- 
nised). See quots. Also (col- 
loquial) a disagreeable old woman. 
[A corruption of O. Fr. haridelle 
= a worn out horse, a jade.] 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HARRIDAN, one that is half Whore, half 
Bawd. 

1705-7. WARD, Hudibras Redivivus, 
vol. II., pt. ii.. p. 27. Old Leachers, 
HARRIDANS, and Cracks. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HARRIDAN, a hagged old woman, a 
miserable scraggy worn out harlot, fit to 
take her bawd's degree. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch., 
xxxix. ' Now what could drive it into tha 
noddle of that old HARRIDAN,' said Pleydell. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

HARRINGTON, subs, (old). A 
brass farthing. [Lord Harrington 
obtained a patent of manufacture 
under James I.] 

1616. B. JONSON, Devil is an Ass, 
ii., i. Yes, sir, it's cast to penny half- 
penny farthing, O' the back side there you 
may see it, read ; I will not bate a 
HARRINGTON o' the sum. 

1632. B. JONSON, Magn. Lady, ii., 
6. His wit he cannot so dispose by legacy 
As they shall be a HARRINGTON the 
better for't. 

HARRY, subs, (old). i. A country- 
man ; a clown. For synonyms, 
see JOSKIN. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
HARRY. A country fellow. 

2. (colloquial). See 'ARRY. 



Harry -bluff. 



275 



Has-been. 



OLD HARRY, subs, (common). 
The devil. For synonyms, see 
SKIPPER. 

1693. CONGREVE, Old Bachelor, ii., 
i. By the LORD HARRY I'll stay no longer. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. iv. 
May OLD HARRY fly off with him. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends 
(1865), p. 406. Shall I summon OLD 
HARRY himself to this spot ? 

HARRY OF THE WEST, mbs. 
phr. (political American). Henry 
Clay. 

To PLAY OLD HARRY, verb, 
phr. (common). To annoy ; to 
ruin ; to play the devil. 

1889. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 18 Jan. 
Otherwise PLAYED OLD HARRY with the 
guardians of the peace. 

TOM, DICK, AND HARRY, phr. 
(common). Generic for any and 
everybody ; the mob. 

1886. R. L STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
p. 287. He rode from public house to 
public house and shouted his sorrows into 

ugofToM, DICK, AND HARRY. 

WHAT HARRY GAVE DOLL, 
verb. phr. (old venery). The 
penis : also generic for fornication. 

HARRY- BLUFF, subs, (rhyming). 
Snuff. 

HARRY-COMMON, subs. phr. (old). 
A general wencher. 

1675. WYCHERLEY, Country Wife, 
v., 4. Well, HARRY COMMON, I hope 
you can be true to three. 

HARRY -SOPH, subs. (Cambridge 
Univ. : obsolete). See quots. 

1795. Gent. Mag., p. 20. A HARRY, 
or ERRANT SOPH, I understand to be 
either a person, four-and-twenty years of 
age, and of an infirm state of health, who 
is permitted to dine with the fellows, ar g 



to wear a plain, black, full-sleeved gown : 
or, else, he is one who, having kept all the 
terms, by statute required previous to his 
law-act, is hoc ipso facto entitled to wear 
the same garment, and, thenceforth, ranks 
as bachelor, by courtesy. 

1803. Gradus ad Cantabrigiam. 
HARI Y SOPH; or HENRY SOPHISTER ; 
students who have kept all the terms 
required for a law act, and hence are 
ranked as Bachelors of Law by courtesy. 
They wear a plain, black, full-sleeved 
gown. 

HARUM-SCARUM, adj. and subs. 
(old colloquial). I. Giddy; care- 
less ; wild ; a thoughtless or reck- 
less fellow. 

1740. Round about our Coal Fire, 
c. i. Peg would scuttle about to make a 
toast for John, while Tom run HARUM 
SCARUM to draw a jug of ale for Margery. 

1780 MAD. D'ARBLAY, Diary, i.. 
358 [ed. 1842]. He seemed a mighty 
rattling HAREM-SCAREM gentleman. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HARUM SCARUM, he was running HARUM 
SCARUM, said of any one running or walk- 
ing carelessly and in a hurry, after they 
know not what. 

1836. MARRYAT, Japhet, ch. xcii. 
I'm not one of those HARUM-SCARUM sort, 
who would make up a fightwhen there's no 
occasion for it. 

1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. v. 
They had a quarrel with Thomas New- 
come's own son, a HARUM-SCARUM lad, 
who ran away, and then was sent to 
India. 

1870. London Figaro, 19 Oct. ' Within 
an inch.' Tom that's my son has 
worked with me in the mine ever since he 
was quite a little chap ; and a HARUM- 
SCARUM young dog he was, when a boy. 

2. (sporting). Four horses 
driven in a line ; SUICIDE (q.v.), 

HAS-BEEN, subs, (colloquial Scots'). 
Anything antiquated ; speci- 
fically in commendation : as ' the 

good Old HAS-BEENS ' J C/., NEVER 

WAS. 

1891. Sportsman, i Apr. Big Joe 
M'Auliffe proved conclusively that he is 
one of the HAS BEENS or else one of the 
NEVER WASERS, as Dan Rice, the circus 
man, always called ambitious counterfeits. 



Hash. 



276 



Hastings. 



HASH, subs, (colloquial). I. A 
mess ; specifically in the phrase 
' to make a HASH of. ' For 
synonyms, see SIXES AND SEVENS. 

1747. WALPOLE, Lett, to Mann, 23 
Feb (1833) Vol. II., p. 274. About as like 
it. as my Lady Pomfret's HASH of plural 
persons and singular verbs or infinitive 
moods was to Italian. 

1836. MICHAEL SCOTT, Cruise of the 
Midge ; p. 115 [Ry. ed.]. Listado never 
could* compass Spanish, because, as he 
said, he had previously learnt French, and 
thus spoke a HASH of both. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends. 
1 M. of Venice.' Don't suppose my affairs 
are at all IN A HASH, But the fact is, at 
present I'm quite out of cash. 

1843. Punch's Almanack, July (q.v.). 

1845. Punch's Guide to Servants, 
'The Cook,' Vol. IX., p. 45. He who 
gives a receipt for making a stew, may 
himself make a sad HASH of it. 

1886. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnaped, 
p. 97. Ye've made a sore HASH of my 
brig. 

1889. Snorting- Life, 30 Jan. Suc- 
cessfully negotiated the tricky entrance to 
the stable-yard of the hotel, at which job 

have been in a mortal funk many a time 
with poor old Jim beside me, for fear of 
making a HASH of it. 

1890. GRANT ALLEN, Tents ofShem, 
ch. xvi. She made a HASH of the proper 
names, to be sure. 

2. (American cadets'). Clan- 
destine preparation for supper 
after hours. 

3. (colloquial). A sloven ; a 
blockhead. 

1785 BURNS, Epistle toj. Lapraik. 
A set o' dull, conceited HASHES. 

Verb (colloquial). I. To spoil; 
to jumble ; to cook up and serve 
again. 

1891. Notes and Queries, 7 S.'xii., 
22 Aug., p. 144. I do not think that 
Earle, a scholar of a high order and a man 
of the most keen wit and judgment, would 
have spoken thus of a thing HASHED UP by 
a hard-headed pedant, however able, such 
as Gauden. 



2. (American). To vomit. 
Also to FLASH THE HASH (q.V.\ 

For synonyms, see ACCOUNTS and 
CAT. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabuhim, s.v. 

3. (Cheltenham School). To 
study hard ; to SWAT (q.v. ). 

To SETTLE ONE'S HASH, verb, 
phr. (common). To defeat one's 
object ; to kill. For synonyms, 
see COOK ONE'S GOOSE. 

1864. BROWNI NG, Dramatis 
Personce. 'Youth and Art." You've to 
settle yet Gibson's HASH. 

c. 1871. BUTLER, Nothing to Wear. 
To use an expression More striking than 
classic, it SETTLED MY HASH. 

1883. Punch, Nov. 3, p. 208, c. i. 
That one stab, with a clasp-knife, which 
SETTLED THE young Squire's HASH in 
less than two seconds. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 123. We'll keep the cops 
off till you SETTLE HIS HASH, the rest 
replied, getting round us. 

TO GO BACK ON ONE'S HASH, 
verb. phr. (American). To turn ; 
to succumb ; to WEAKEN (q.v.}. 

HASH-HOUSE, subs. (American). 
A cheap eating-house ; a GRUB- 
BING crib (q.v.}. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 10 Jan., p. 
5, c. 4. There are [in New York] lunch 
counters, cookshops, 'penny' restaurants, 
fifteen-cent restaurants, commonly called 
HASH-HOUSES and foreign cafes. 

HASLAR-HAG, subs, (nautical). A 
nurse at the Haslar Hospital . Cf. , 
HAG. 

HASTINGS. To BE NONE OF THE 
HASTINGS SORT, verb. phr. (old 
colloquial). To be slow, de- 
liberate, or slothful. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
You are NONE OF THE HASTINGS, of him 
that loses an Opportunity or a Business for 
want of Dispatch 



Hasty. 



277 



Hat. 



1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. HE 

IS NONE OF THE HASTINGS SORT ; 3 

saying of a slow, loitering fellow : an 
allusion to the Hastings pea, which is the 
first in season. 

HASTY, aaj. (old : now recognised). 
Rash ; passionate j quick to 
move. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HASTY, very Hot on a sudden. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HASTY G., subs. (Cambridge 
Univ.). See quot. 

1883. Daily News, 24 Mar., p. 5, 
c. 2. Mr. Weller's own HASTY G (as 
Cambridge men say when they mean a 
1 hasty generalisation '). 

HASTY PUDDING, subs, (common). 
i. A bastard. For synonyms, 
see BLOODY ESCAPE. 

2. (old). A muddy road; a 
quag. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
The way through Wandsworth is quite a 

HASTY PUDDING. 

HAT, subs. (Cambridge Univ.). I. 
A gentleman commoner. [Who 
is permitted to wear a hat instead 
of the regulation mortar-board.] 
Also GOLD HATBAND. 

1628. EARLE, Microcosmographie. 
' Young Gentleman of the Umyersitie ' (ed., 
ARBER, 1868). His companion is ordin- 
arily some stale fellow that has beene 
notorious for an ingle to GOLD HATBANDS, 
whom hee admires at first, afterwards 
scoines. 

1803. Gradus ad Cantabrigiam. 
Hat Commoner ; the son of a Nobleman, 
who wears the gown of a Fellow Com- 
moner with a HAT. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. 
xxxii. I knew intimately all the HATS in 
the University. 

1841. LYTTON, Night and Morning, 
bk. I., ch. i. He had certainly nourished 
the belief that some one of the HATS or 
tinsel gowns i.e., young lords or fellow- 



commoners, with whom he was on such 
excellent terms .... would do something 
for him in the way of a living. 

2. (venery). The female 
pudendum. Generally OLD HAT. 
For synonyms, see MONOSYL- 
LABLE. 

1754. FIELDING, Jonathan Wild, i., 
6 (note). I shall conclude this learned 
note with remarking that the term OLD 
HAT is used by the vulgar in no very 
honourable sense. 

1760. STERNE, Tristam Shandy, ch. 
cxxvi. A chapter of chambermaids, green 
gowns, and OLD HATS. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
[' Because often./*?//.'] .SV* also TOP DIVER. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

3. (Scots'). A prostitute of 
long standing. For synonyms, ee 
BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

To EAT ONE'S HAT ^or HEAD), 
verb.phr. (common). Generally, 
I'LL EAT MY HAT. Used in 
strong emphasis. See EAT. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, xlii., 367. 
' If I knew as little of life as that, I'd EAT 
MY HAT and swallow the buckle whole,' 
said the clerical gentleman. 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver 7wist, ch. 
xiy. Even admitting the possibility of 
scientific improvements being ever brought 
to that pass which will enable a man to 
EAT HIS own HEAD, Mr. Grimwig's head 
was such a particularly large one that the 
most sanguine man alive could hardly 
entertain a hope of being able to get 
through it at a sitting. 

1844. J. B. BUCKSTONE, The Maid 
with the Milking Pail. If you are not as 
astonished as I was, I'll EAT OLD ROWLEY'S 

HAT. 

1876. HINDLEY, Adventures- of a 
Cheap Jack, p. 216. I'll EAT MY HAT. 

1887. E. E. MONEY, Little Dutch 
Maiden, II., viii., 148. And if you don't 
run up against him next day in Bond 
Street, you may EAT YOUR HAT ! 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, 
p. 38. If some of the swells didn't ditto, 

I'll EAT MY OLD HAT, which it's tOUgh. 

To GET A HAT, verb, phr, 
(cricketers'). See HAT-TRICK, 



Hat. 



278 



Hatchet. 



TO GET INTO THE HAT, verb, 
phr. (common). To get into 
trouble. 

TO HAVE A BRICK IN ONE'S 

HAT, verb. phr. (American). To 
be top-heavy with drink. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

To HANG UP ONE'S HAT. See 
HANG. 

To PASS (or SEND) ROUND THE 
HAT, verb. phr. (colloquial). To 
make a collection. 

TO TALK THROUGH ONE'S HAT, 
verb. phr. (American) To rag ; 
to huff; to bluster. 

1888. New York World, 13 May. 
Dis is only a bluff dey're makin' see ! 
Dey're TALKIN' TRU DEIR HATS. 

ALL ROUND MY HAT, phr. 
(streets). A derisive retort. 
[From a Broadside Ballad, popular 
c. 1830 : ' All round my hat I 
wears a green willow, All round 
my hat for a twelvemonth and a 
day, And if any one should ask 
you the reason why I wear it, Tell 
them my true love is gone far 
away ' ; sung to a tune adapted 
from a number in Zampa. ] Also, 
as in quot. = all over ; com- 
pletely ; generally. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arty Ballads, p. 
54. I'm a 'ot un, mate, ALL ROUND MY 'AT. 

SHOOT THAT HAT! phr. 
(streets). A derisive retort. Also 

I'LL HAVE YOUR HAT ! Both 

circa 1860-72. 

WELL, YOU CAN TAKE MY 
HAT ! phr. ( American) = ' Well, 
that beats me,' i.e.. ( that is past 
belief.' 

873. A Yankee in a Planter's 
House. ' What's yer name ? ' ' Name 
Grief, manssa.' ' Name what ? ' ' Name 



Grief.' 'Get out! Yew're jokin'! What's 
yer name, anyhow ? ' ' Name Grief 
manssa.' ' WAL, YEW KIN TAKE MY HAT. 

WHAT A SHOCKING BAD HAT 
phr. (streets). [Said to have 
originated with a candidate for 
parliamentary honours, who made 
the remark to his poorer consti- 
tuents, and promised them new 
head-gear. ] 

1892. ANSTEY, Model Music Hall, 
140. Lord B. Regular bounder ! SHOCK- 
ING BAD HAT ! Ver. Not so bad as his 
boots, and they are not so bad as his face. 

HATCH, verb, (common). To be 
brought to bed with child ; to 
BUST UP (q.V.}. 

TO BE UNDER HATCHES, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To be in a 
state of trouble, poverty or depres- 
sion. Also dead. 

1606. MARSTON, The Fawne, iv. 
Remember hee got his elder brother's wife 
with child .... that will stow him UNDER 
HATCHES, I warrant you. 

1632-1704. LOCKE [quoted in Ency. 
Dict.~\. He assures us how this father- 
hood continued its course, till the captivity 
in Egypt, and then the poor fatherhood 

WAS UNDER HATCHES. 

1639-1661. Rump Songs, i. [1662], 
260. And all her orphans bestowed UNDER 
HATCHES. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
UNDER THE HATCHES, in Trouble, or 
Prison. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. UNDER 
THE HATCHES, in Trouble, or Prison. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
UNDER THE HATCHES, in trouble, distress, 
or debt. 

1789. 4 DIBDIN, Tom Bowling, For 
though his body's UNDER HATCHES his soul 
has gone aloft. 

1835. BUCKSTONE, Dream at Sea. ., 
3. Good-bye, dame, cheer up ; you may 
not always be UNDER HATCHES. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabnlum, s.v. 

HATCHET, subs, (tailors'). i. An 
ill-favoured woman. For general 
synonyms, see UGLY MUG. 



Hatchet-faced. 



279 



Hatter. 



2. (American). A bribe re- 
ceived by Customs officers in New 
York for permitting imported 
dutiable goods to remain on the 
wharf when they ought to go to 
the general store-house. 

TO BURY (or DIG UP) THE 

HATCHET. See BURY. 

TO THROW (or SLING) THE 

HATCHET, verb. phr. (common). 

i. To tell lies, to yarn ; to 

DRAW THE LONG BOW (q.V.}. 

Hence HATCHET FLINGING (or 
THROWING) = lying or yarning. 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 94. This is a fault, which many of 
good understanding may fall into, who, 
from giving way too much to the desire of 
telling anecdotes, adventures, and the like, 
habituate themselves by degrees to a mode 
of the HATCHET-FLINGING extreme. 

1821. P. EGAN, Life in London, p. 
217. There is nothing creeping or THROW- 
ING THE HATCHET about this description. 

1893. EMERSON, Signor Lippo, ch. 
xx. We had to call her mother, and, if any- 
one stopped, she'd SLING THE HATCHET 
to them, and tell them she was a poor lone 
widow left with five children. 

2. (nautical). To sulk. 

HATCHET -FACED, adj. (old collo- 
quial : now recognised). See 
quots. For synonyms, see UGLY- 
MUG. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HATCHET- FAC'D, Hard favor 'd, Homely. 

1725. New. Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongut, s.v. 
HATCHET FACE, a long thin face. 

1865. SALA, Trip to Barbary, p. 130. 
The man in black baize with the felt 
kepi, and who had a HATCHET FACE 
desperately scarred with the small-pox, 
looked from head to heel a bad egg. 

1888. J. RUNCIMAN, The Chequers, 
p. 7. His HATCHET FACE with its pig- 
gish eyes, his thin cruel lips, his square 
jaw, are all murderous. 

HATCH, MATCH, AND DISPATCH 
COLUMN, stibs. phr. (journalistic). 

The births, marriages, and 



deaths announcements. Also 
CRADLE, ALTAR AND TOMB 
COLUMN. 

HATCHWAY, subs, (common). i. 
The mouth. For synonyms, see 
POTATO-TRAP. 

2. (venery). The female 
pudendum. Also FORE-HATCH. 
For synonyms, see MONO- 
SYLLABLE. 

HATE-OUT, verb. (American). To 
boycott ; to send to Coventry. 

18(?). S. KERCHEVAL, History of 
Virginia. The punishment for idleness, 
lying, dishonesty, and ill-fame generally, 
was that of HATING the offender OUT, as 
they expressed it. It commonly resulted 
in the reformation or banishment of the 
person against whom it was directed. If a 
man did not do his share of the public 
service, he was HATED-OUT as a coward. 

HATFIELD, subs, (common). A 
drink, whose chief ingredients 
are gin and ginger-beer. 

1883. Daily News, 5 July, p. 5, c. T 
There are, we believe, all sorts of strong 
waters in the mild-looking and seductive 
HATFIELD, while the majority of 'cups' 
are distinctly ' mixed.' 

HATFUL, subs, (colloquial). A 
large quantity ; a heap. 

1859. Punch, Ixxx., vi., 236. If they 
had trusted their own judgment they would 
have won a HATFUL. 

1864. M. _ E. BRAPDON, Henry 
Dunbar, ch. xxii. He was in a very good 
temper however, for he had won what his 
companions called a HATFUL of money on 
the steeple-chase. 

HATPEG, subs, (common). The 
head. For synonyms, see CRUM- 
PET. 

HATTER, subs. (Australian). A 
gold-digger working alone. 

1881. A. BATHGATE, Waitaruna, 
p. 88. He is what they call a HATTER, 
that is he works alone. 

1885. Chambers Journal, 2 May, p. 
286. Some prefer to travel, and even to 
work, when they can get it, alone, and 
these are known to the rest as HATTERS. 



Hat-trick. 



280 



Have. ' 



1890. Illustrations, p. 158. The 
former occupant was what is known as a 
HATTER, i.e., a digger living by himself. 

1890. MARRIOTT WATSON, Broken 
Billy. He was looked upon as a HATTER, 
that is to say, a man who has lived by him- 
self until his brain has been turned. 

WHO'S YOUR HATTER ? phr. 

(streets). A catch-cry long out 
of vogue. 

MAD AS A HATTER, phr. (col- 
loquial). Very mad. 

1863. MARSHALL [Title, of a farce]. 
MAD AS A HATTER. 

HAT-TRICK, subs, (cricket). Taking 
three wickets with three consecu- 
tive balls : which feat is held to 
entitle the bowler to a new hat at 
the cost of the club. 

1888. Sportsman, 28 Nov. Mr. 
Absolom has performed the HAT TRICK 
twice, and at Tufnell Park he took four 
wickets with four balls. 



1892. Casselfs Sat. Jour. 21 Sept., 

;. 13, c. 2. On one occasion I succeeded 
i doing the HAT TRICK. 



1892. Woolwich Polytechnic Mag., 
20 May. Three of these wickets were 
taken in succession, thus accomplishing the 

HAT-TRICK. 

HAT-WORK, subs, (journalists'). 
Hack work ; such stuff as may be 
turned out by the yard without 
reference to quality. 

1888. H. RIDER HAGCARD, Mr. 
Meeson's Will, c. i. And five-and-twenty 
tame authors (who were illustrated by 
thirteen tame artists) sat at salaries 
ranging from one to five hundred a year 
in vault-like hutches in the basement, and 
week by week poured out that HAT-WORK 
for which Meeson's was justly famous. 

HAULABLE, adj. (University). 
Used of a girl whose society 
authorities deem undesirable for 
the men: e.g., she's HAULABLE 
= a man caught with her will be 
proctorised, 



HAUL- BOWLINE, subs, (nautical).- 
A seaman. For synonyms, see 
STRAWYARDER. 

HAUL- DEVIL, sttbs. (common). A 
clergyman. For synonyms, see 
DEVIL-DODGER and SKY-PILOT. 

HAUL DEVIL, PULL BAKER. 
See DEVIL. 

HAUT-BOY (or Ho - BOY), subs. 
(American). A night scavenger ; 
a jakesman or GOLD -FINDER 

(q.V.}. 

HAVE, subs, (common). i. A 
swindle ; a TAKE-IN (q.v.} ; a DO 
(q.v.). For synonyms, see SELL. 

2. in. pi. (common). The 
moneyed classes ; as opposed to 
the HAVE-NOTS, their antipodes. 

1893. National Observer, Feb. 25, 
ix-j 357- A body whose policy is to make 
the HAVE-NOTS as comfortable and objec- 
tionable as possible at the cost in coin and 
comfort of the HAVES. 

3. (in. pi.} subs. (Winchester 
College). Half -boots. Pro- 
nounced Haves. 

Is THAT A CATCH OR A HAVE ? 
verb. phr. (vulgar). A formula of 
acknowledgment that the speaker 
has been 'had.' [If the person 
addressed be unwise enough to 
answer with a definition, the 
instant retort is 'Then you CATCH 
(or HAVE, as the case may be) 
your nose up my arse.'] 

Verb (colloquial). i. To 
cheat ; TO TAKE-IN ; TO DO. See 
BE. 

1805. G. HARRINGTON, New Lon- 
don Spy (4th Ed.) p. 26. Ten to one but 
you are HAD, a cant word they make use 
of, instead of saying, as the truth is, we 
have cheated him, 



Have. 



281 



Havercake-lads. 



1825. EGAN, Life of an Actor, ch. 
iv. ' He's not to be HAD,' said Gag, in an 
audible whisper. 

1878. HATTON, Cruel London, bk. 
II., ch. v. 'They have HAD me, bless 
you," said Brayford, ' the men who have 
limbed " you.' 

1889. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 8 Feb. 
Not to be HAD so easily, my good man. 

1889. Answers, 23 Feb., p. 196, c. 2. 
But even these fellows, sharp as they are, 
have been caught napping lately in a 
humorous way. Those who have HAD 
them have been young fellows with 
friends inside the Stock Exchange, 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
161. HAD me nicely once at cards. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 23 Jan. 
I never felt so wild in my life. I'm no fool, 
you know, and I began to think I was 
being HAD a bit. 

1891. J. NEWMAN, Scamping Tricks, 
p. 58. I was nearly HAD. 

1892. Illus. Bits, 22 Oct., p. 14. c. 2. 
Oh, mebboy, Oi wasn't t' be HAD that way. 
Oi always kape resales spishully Gov'- 
ment wans. Oi got it safe and cosy in me 
pocket-book. 

2. (venery). To possess car- 
nally. [Said indifferently of, and 
by, both sexes. ] For synonyms, 
see GREENS. 

To HAVE HAD IT, verb. phr. 
(venery). To have been seduced. 

To HAVE (or TAKE) IT OUT OF 
ONE, verb. phr. (colloquial). To 
punish ; to retaliate ; to extort a 
quid pro quo ; to give tit for tat. 

TO HAVE IT OUT WITH ONE, 
verb. phr. (colloquial). To speak 
freely in reproof; to complete an 
explanation ; to settle a dispute 
with either words or blows. 

1886. J. S. WINTER, Army Society, 
ch. xix. Instead of going down to St. 
Eve's and HAVING IT OUT, he fretted, and 
worried, and fumed the six days away. 

1888. Daily News, 8 Dec. There 
was a question as to who struck the first 
blow, but it seemed to him certain that a 
man who crossed the road to HAVE IT OUT 
with another was the most likely to have 
commenced hostilities. 



To HAVE ON, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To secure a person's 
interest, attention, sympathy : 
generally with a view to deceiving 
him (or her). 

TO HAVE TOWARDS (or WITH, 
or AT), verb. phr. (old). I. To 
pledge in drinking ; to toast. 
See HERE. 

1637. CARTWRIGHT, Royal Slave. 
Here's to thee, Leocrates. Leoc. HAVE 
TOWARDS THEE, Philotas. Phil. To thee, 
Archippus. Arch. Here, Molops. Mo I. 
HAVE AT YOU, fidlers. 

1836. M. SCOTT, Tom Cringle's Log, 
ch. ii. 'HAVE WITH YOU, boy have with 
you," shouted half-a-dozen other voices, 
while each stuck his oaken twig through 
the handkerchief that held his bundle, and 
shouldered it, clapping his straw or tar- 
paulin hat, with a slap on the crown, on 
one side of his head, and staggering and 
swaying about under the influence of the 
poteen. 

2. (common). To agree with 

To HAVE ON TOAST, verb. phr. 
(common). i. To take in. 

2. (common). To worst in 
argument. 

To HAVE ON THE RAWS, verb. 
phr. (common). To teaze ; to 
touch to the quick. 

To LET ONE HAVE IT, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To punish severely. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West, p. 8. ' Hurraw, Dick, mind your 
hair,' and I ups old Greaser and let one 
Injun HAVE IT, as was going plum into the 
boy with his lance. 



. (colloquial). 
To bring before the authorities ; 
to SUMMONS (q.V.). 

HAVERCAKE-LADS, subs. phr. (Mili- 
tary). The Thirty-third Foot. 
[From the circumstance that its 
recruiting sergeants always pre- 
ceded their party with an oat- 
cake on their swords.] 



Havcy-cavey. 



282 Hawk-a-mouthed. 



HAVEY-CAVEY, adj. (old). Uncer- 
tain ; doubtful ; shilly-shally. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicujn, s.v. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

HAVIL, subs, (old). A sheep. For 
synonyms, see WOOL- BIRD. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicujn, s.v. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

HAVOCK, subs, (old: now recognised). 
Devastation ; waste. 

1607. SHAKSPEARE, Julius Ccesar, 
iii., i. Cry HAVOCK, and let slip the dogs 
of war. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
They made sad HAVOCK, they Destroy'd 
all before 'em. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

HAWCUBITE, subs. (old). A roy- 
sterer ; a street bully. [After the 
Restoration there was a succession 
of these disturbers of the peace : 
first came the Muns, then followed 
the Tityre Tus, the Hectors, the 
Scourers, the Nickers, the Haw- 
cubites, and after them the 
MOHAWKS (q.v.}.] 

HAWK, subs, (common). i. A 
card - sharper ; a ROOK (g.v.). 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HAWK, c., a Sharper. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. HAWK, 
a Sharper. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HAWK also signifies a sharper, in oppo- 
sition to pigeon. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
HAWK. A Confidence Man ; a swindler. 

1891. New York Herald [London 
ed.], 31 May. These were HAWKS and 
pigeons, and those who are no longer 
pigeons, and never had, or will have, an 
inclination to be HAWKS. 

2. (common). A bailiff ; a 
constable. For synonyms, see 
BEAK. 



1831. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, bk. 
I., ch. iii. ' The game's spoiled this time, 
Rob Rust, anyhow,' growled one, in an 
angry tone ; ' the HAWKS are upon us, and 
we must leave this brave buck to take care 
of himself.' 

Verb (old). See quots. 

1589. NASHE, Anatomic, Whereas, by 
their humming and HAWKING . . . they 
have leisure to gesture the mislike of his 
rudeness. 

1600. SHAKSPEARE, As You Like It, 
v., 3. Shall we clap into 't roundly, 
without HAWKING, or spitting, or saying 
we are hoarse ? 

1604. MARSTON, Malcontent, ii., 2. 
Is he troubled with the cough of the lungs 
still ? Does he HAWKE a night's ? 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant Crew, s.v. 
.... Also spitting difficultly. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
.... HAWKING, an effort to spit up the 
thick phlegm, called oysters, whence it is 
wit upon record, to ask the person so doing, 
whether he has a license, a punning allu- 
sion to the act of HAWKERS and pedlars. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xlvi. This tremendous volley of superla- 
tives which Sampson HAWKED up from the 
pit of his stomach. 

1822. BYRON, 'Vision of Judgment, 
xc. To cough and HAWK, and hem, and 
pitch His voice into that awful note of woe. 

WARE HAWK ! phr. (old). A 
warning ; look sharp ! See subs. 
sense 2. 

d. 1529. SKELTON, Ware Hawk 
(Title). 

1625. JONSON, Staple of News, v. 2. 
See ! the whole covey is scattered ; WARE, 

WARE THE HAWKS ! 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
Hawk, WARE HAWK, the word to look 
sharp, a bye-word when a bailiff passes. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, 
ch. iii. WARE HAWK ! Douse the Glim. 

To HAWK ONE'S MEAT, verb, 
phr. (common). To peddle one's 
charms, i.e., to show a great deal 
of neck and breasts. Yx.,montrer 
sa viande. 

H AWK-A- MOUTH ED, adj. phr. (old). 
See quot. 



Hawker. 



283 



Hay-pitcher. 



c. 1750. Dialogue in the Devonshire 
Dialect (Palmer, 1839) s.v. One that is 
perpetually HAWKING and spitting ; also 
foul-mouthed. 

HAWKER, sttbs. (old : now recog- 
nized). A pedlar. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HAWKERS. Retail News-Sellers. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HAWKERS, licensed itinerant retailers of 
different commodities, called also pedlars ; 
likewise the sellers of newspapers. 



HAWKING, verb. subs, (old : now 
recognised). Peddling ; offering 
small wares for sale from door to 
door. Also see quot. 1690. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HAWKING, going about Town and Country 
with Scotch-Cloth, etc., or News-Papers : 
also Spitting difficultly. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

HAWK-EYE STATE, subs. phr. 
(American). Iowa. [After the 
famous Indian chief.] 

H AWS E . TO FALL ATHWART ONE'S 

HAWSE, verb. phr. (nautical). 
To obstruct ; to fall out with ; to 
counter and check. 



HAWSE-HOLES. To coiME (or 
CREEP) IN THROUGH THE HAWSE- 
HOLES, verb. phr. (nautical). To 
enter the service at the lowest 
grade ; to rise from the forecastle. 

1830. MARRYAT, Kings Own, ch. 
viii. His kind and considerate captain 
'vas aware that a lad who CREEPS IN AT 
THE HAWSE-HOLES, i.e., is promoted from 
before the mast, was not likely to be 
favourably received in the midshipmen's 
mess. 

1889. Chambers Journal, 3 Aug., 
495. A sailor who rose from the ranks was 
formerly said TO HAVE CREPT THROUGH 

THE HAWSE-HOLES. 



HAY. To MAKE HAY, verb. phr. 
(University). To throw into con- 
fusion ; to turn topsy-turvy ; to 
knock to pieces in argument or 
single combat. Also, to kick up 
a row. 

1861. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, ch. 
vii. The fellows were mad with fighting 
too. I wish they hadn't come here and 
MADE HAY afterwards. 

To DANCE THE HAY, verb. phr. 
(old). See quot. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
To Dance the Hay. To MAKE HAY WHILE 
THE SUN SHINES, or make good use of 
one's Time. 

HAY-BAG, subs, (thieves'). A 
woman. [/.., something to lie 
upon.] For synonyms, see PETTI- 
COAT. Fr., tine paillaisse. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab, 
and Lend. Poor, Vol. I., p. 231, q.v. 

HAY- BAND, subs, (common). A 
common cigar. For synonyms, 
see WEED. 

1864. Glasgow Herald, g Nov., q.v. 

HAYMARKET- HECTOR, subs. (old). 
A prostitute's bully. See 
HECTOR. 

c. 1675. MARVELL, Cutting of Sir 
John Coventry's Nose, vi. O ye HAY- 
MARKET HECTORS ! 

HAYMARKET-WARE, subs, (com- 
mon). A common prostitute. 
For synonyms, see BARRACK- 
HACK and TART. 

HAY- PITCHER (or HAY-SEED), subs. 
(American). A countryman. 
Cf. t GAPE-SEED. 

1851. HERMAN MELVILLE, Moby 
Dick, p. 36 (ed. 1 892). Ah ! poor HAYSEED. 

1888. New York World. ' I wouldn't 
hev come into his shop if I had known it,' 
protested the imitation HAY-PITCHER. 



Hays. 



284 



Head. 



1888. Detroit Free Press, Sept. Al. 
(to HAYSEED) Ever read Ouida? H. 
No, but by golly I must get his books. 
The weeds in my garden are raisin' 
eternal tarnation. 

1890. NORTON, Political American- 
isms, p. 53. HAYSEEDS rustics. The 
1 HAYSEED delegation ' in a State legisla- 
ture is supposed to consist of farmers or 
their representatives. 

1890. Judge, 'Christmas No.' p. 31. 
Them two fellers .... has been passin' 
d'rog'tory remarks about that HAYSEED'S 
ears. 

1893. CLARK RUSSELL, Life of the 
Merchant Sailor, in Scribners, xiv, 8. 
Hired by the State to court the HAYSEED 
to the tenders. 

HAYS ! intj. (American). An in- 
junction to be gone ; GIT (q.v.}. 

1851. JUDSON, Mysteries of Neiu 
York, ch. i., p. 12. Cut and run, my dar- 
ling ! HAYS ! is the word, and off you go. 

HAZE, subs. (American). Be- 
wilderment; confusion ; FOG(<f.v. ). 

Verb (American). I. To 
play tricks or practical jokes ; to 
frolic. Hence, HAZING. Also 
to mystify or FOG (q.v.). 

1848. N. Y. Com. Adv., 2 Dec. W. 
had been drinking, and was HAZING about 
the street at night, acting somewhat sus- 
piciously or strangely [when the officer 
arrested him]. 

1887. LippincotfsMag.,]v\y, p. 105. 
This and the Dyke are the only approaches 
to HAZING that I have ever heard of here. 

1888. Philadelphia Bulletin, 27 Feb. 
So woman is completing her conquest of 
the planet. She rows. She smokes. She 
preaches. She HAZES. She shoots. She 
rides. 

1892. R. L. STEVENSON and L. OS- 
BOURNE, The Wrecker, p. 39. In some of 
the studios at that date, the HAZING of new 
pupils was both barbarous and obscene. 

2. (nautical). To harass with 
overwork or paltry orders. Also 
to find fault. 

1840. R. H. DANA, Two Years Be- 
fore the Mast, ch. viii. HAZE is a word of 
frequent use on board ship, and never, I 
believe, used elsewhere. It is very expres- 
sive to a sailor, and means to punish by 



hard work. Let an officer once say ' I'll 
HAZE you,' and your fate is fixed. You 
will be ' worked up,' if you are not a better 
man than he is. 

1852. BRISTED, Upper Ten T/ioti- 
sand, p. 205. Here I have been five days 
.... HAZING what you call slanging 
upholsterers. 

1883. STEVENSON, Treasure Island, 
ch. xi., p. 89 (1886). I've had a' most 
enough o' Cap n Smollett ; he's HAZED me 
long enough, by thunder ! 

1889. Notes and Queries, 7 S. viii., 
31 Aug. My old partner, who served his 
time at sea, always spoke of giving a man 
' a good HAZING ' when he meant he had 
been finding fault with his doings, etc. 

HAZEL-GELD, zw.(old). &;quots. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HAZEL-GELD, to Beat any one with a Hazle- 
Stick or Plant. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HAZLE-GILD, to beat anyone with a hazle 
stick. 

HAZY, adj. (old : now recognised). 
I. See quot. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HAZY Weather, when it is Thick, Misty, 
Foggy. 

2. (common). Stupid with 
drink; MIXED (q.v.}. For syn- 
onyms, .^DRINKS and SCREWED. 

1824. T. HOOK, Sayings and Doings, 
ist. S. ' Friend of the Family,' p. 179. One 
night at a public-house I was foolish 
enough to brag. HAZY, Sir you under- 
stand ? smoking and drinking. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends. 
'Lay of S. Cuthbert." Stamp'd on the 
jasey As though he were crazy, And stag- 
gering about just as if he were HAZY. 

HE, subs. (Charterhouse). A cake. 
A YOUNG HE = a small cake. See 
SHE. 

HEAD, subs, (nautical). I. A man- 
of-war's privy. 

2. (common). The obverse of 
a coin or medal. HEADS OR 
TAILS ? = Guess whether the coin 



Head. 



285 



Head. 



spun will come down with head 
uppermost or not. [The side not 
bearing the Sovereign's head has 
various devices : Britannia, 
George and the Dragon, a harp, 
the Royal arms, an inscription, 
etc. all included in the word 
' tail,' i.e., the reverse of ' head.' 
The Romans said HEADS or 
SHIPS?] 

d. 1680. BUTLER, Remains (1759), 
ii., 431. Let his ehance prove what it will, 
he plays at CROSS YOU LOSE, and PILE YOU 

WIN. 

1871. Observer, 16 Apr. Perhaps for 
the first time Parliament is asked to enjoin 
a settlement of public dispute by means of 
tossing HEADS OR TAILS, ' cross or pile.' 

3. (old). An arrangement of 
the hair ; a coiffure. 

1773. GOLDSMITH, She Stoops to 
Conquer, ii., 10. Pray how do you like 
this HEAD ? . . . I dressed it myself from 
a print in the Ladies' Memorandum Book 
for last year. 

TO HAVE AT ONE'S HEAD, 
verb. phr. (old). To cuckold. 

1640. GOUGH, Strange Discovery. 
Not if you stay at home, and warm my bed ; 
But if you leave me, HAVE AT YOUR HEAD. 

TO TAKE ONE IN THE HEAD, 

verb. phr. (old). To come into 
one's mind. 

1609. HOLLAND, Amenianus Mar- 
cellinus. Now, IT TOOKE HIM IN THE 
HEAD, and incensed was his desires (seeing 
Gaule now quited) to set first upon Con- 
stantius. 

To DO ON HEAD, verb. phr. 
(old). To act rashly. 

1559. ELIOTE, Diet. Abruptum in- 
genium, a rash brayne that dooeth all 
thinges ON HEAD. 

To DO ON ONE'S HEAD, phr. 
(thieves'). To do easily and with 

joy- 
To FLY AT THE HEAD, verb. 
phr. (old). To attack; to GO 
FOR(?.Z>.). 

1614. Terence in English. Fellow 
servant, I can very hardly refraine my 
selfe, but that I must needes FLEE AT 

THE HEAD OF HIM. 



To EAT ONE'S HEAD. See HAT. 

To EAT ONE'S (or IT'S) HEAD 
OFF, verb. phr. (common). To 
cost more than the worth in keep. 

1703. Country Partner's Catechism. 
My mare has EATEN HER HEAD OFF at the 
Ax in Aldermanbury. 

1878. PARKER GILLMORE, Great 
Thirst Land, ch. vii. Our horses were 

EATING THEIR HEADS OFF at livery. 

1893. Casselfs Sat. Jour., i Feb. p. 
384, 2. A lot of raw material in stock 
which, in local parlance, would EAT ITS 
HEAD OFF if kept warehoused. 

To RUN ON HEAD, verb. phr. 
(old). To incite. 

1556. HEYWOOD, Spider and Fly. 
Thirdlie, to set cocke on hope, and RUN ON 

HEADE. 

To GIVE ONE'S HEAD (or 

ONE'S BEARD) FOR WASHING, 
verb. phr. (old). To yield tamely 
and without resistance. Fr., 
laver la tete = \.o reprimand; to 
admonish with point, energy, and 
force. 

1615. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Cupid's Revenge, iv., 3. I'm resolved . . 
. . And so am I, and forty more good 
fellows, That will not GIVE THEIR HEADS 
FOR THE WASHING, I take it. 

1663. BUTLER, Hudibras, I., iii., 
255. For my part it shall ne'er be said, I 

FOR THE WASHING GAVE MY HEAD, Nor 

did I turn my back for fear. 

TO PUT A HEAD (or NEW- 
HEAD) ON ONE, verb. phr. (com- 
mon).!. To change a man's 
aspect by punching his head : 
hence, to get the better of one's 
opponent ; to annihilate. Also 

TO PUT A NEW FACE ON. 

1870. R. GRANT WHITE, Words and 
their Uses. But all his jargon was sur- 
passed, in wild absurdity, By threats, 
profanely emphasised, TO PUT A HEAD ON 
ME. . . . Instead of PUTTING ON A HEAD 
he strove to smite off mine. 

18(?). BRET HARTE, Further Words 
from Truthful James. To go for that 
same party for TO PUT A HEAD ON HIM. 



Head. 



286 



Head. 



1888. RUNCIMAN,- The Chequers, 

p. 80. I'd PUT A NEW HEAD ON YER for 
tuppence. 

2. (colloquial). To froth 
malt liquors. [E.g., 'Put a head 
on it, Miss,' addressed to the bar- 
maid, is a request to work the 
engine briskly, and make the 
liquor take on a CAULIFLOWER 
(?.*.)] 

HEADS I WIN, TAILS YOU 
LOSE, phr. (common). A gage 
of certainty = In no case can I fail : 
I hold all the trumps. 

1890. Welfare, Mar., p. 8., c. i. A 
director holding shares to the extent of 
50 will draw a yearly recognition of his 
patronage to the tune of ^100. It is un- 
necessary to ask whether such a course of 
speculation follows the principle of TAILS 

YOU LOSE, HEADS I WIN. 

TO GET THE HEAD INTO 

CHANCERY, verb. phr. (formerly 

pugilists' : now common). To get 

the other fighter's head under one 

arm and hold it there ; a position 

of helplessness. See CHANCERY. 

1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 18. 

When Georgy, one time, got the HEAD of 

the Bear INTO CHANCERY. 

2. (colloquial). Hence to get, 
or be got, into a posture of absolute 
helplessness. 

TO KNOCK ON THE HEAD, 
verb. phr. (common). To kill ; 
to destroy ; to put an end to. 

1871. Weekly Dispatch, 21 May, 
' Police Report.' The magistrate (Mr. 
Newton) refused the application for bail, 
remarking that the sooner the house was 
done away with the better, and he would 
take care that it and all connected with it 
were KNOCKED ON THE HEAD. 

To GET (or PUT) THE HEAD IN 
A BAG. See BAG. 

To GET (or HAVE) A SWELLING 
IN THE (or A BIG-) HEAD, verb, 
phr. (common). To be or be- 
come conceited ; to put on airs. 



1888. Cincinnatti Enquirer. Anna 
Kelly .... is missing from her home in 
Newport. Somebody has been SWELLING 

HER HEAD. 

1890. Star, 27 Jan. Although he 
received but ,100 for his share, he GOT 
THE BIG HEAD, went to pieces, and ib now 
on the retired list. 

TO HIT THE RIGHT NAIL ON 

THE HEAD, verb. phr. (common). 
To speak or act with precision and 
directness ; to do the right thing. 
[The colloquialism is common to 
most languages. The French say, 
Vous avez frappe ati but ( = You 
have hit the mark). The Italians, 
Havete data in brocca ( = You have 
hit the pitcher : alluding to a game 
where a pitcher stood in the place 
of AUNT SALLY (?..)). The 
Latins, Rem acu *#&&/*(= You 
have touched the thing with a 
needle : referring to the custom of 
probing sores.] 

1719. DUFFEY, Pills, etc., iii., 21. 
The common Proverb as it is read, That a 
Man must HIT THE NAIL ON THE HEAD. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, 
p. 43. That's what I meant when I said 
that that josser, whose name I've forgotten 

'ad 'lT THE RIGHT NAIL ON THE 'BAD. 

To ARGUE (or TALK) ONE'S 
HEAD OFF, verb. phr. (common). 
To be extremely disputative or 
loquacious; to be all JAW (q.v. ). 



1892. 
ARGUE YOUR 'EAD OFF like. 

TO BUNDLE OUT HEAD (or 
NECK) AND HEELS, verb. phr. 
(common). To eject with vio- 
lence. 

To HAVE NO HEAD, verb. phr. 
(common). I. (of persons). To 
lack ballast ; to be crack-brained. 
See APARTMENTS TO LET. 
Hence, TO HAVE A HEAD ox = 
to be cute, alert ; TO HAVE SAND 



Head. 



287 



Head-beetler. 



1888. LYNCH, Mountain Mystery, 
ch. 2. Caledonia was declared to possess a 
Coroner with a HEAD, and a very good one 
ON him, and a messenger was sent to rouse 
him. 

2. (of malt liquors). To be flat. 
See CAULIFLOWER. 

To HAVE A HEAD, verb, phr. 
(common). To experience the 
after-effects of heavy drinking 
(</., MOUTH); also TO HAVE A 
HEAD-ACHE. For synonyms, see 
SCREWED. 

TO GIVE ONE HIS HEAD, verb, 
phr. (common). To give one 
full and free play ; to let go. . 

TO HAVE MAGGOTS IN THE 
HEAD, verb. phr. (common). 
To be crotchetty, whimsical, 
freakish ; TO HAVE A BEE IN ONE'S 
BONNET. For synonyms, see 
APARTMENTS. 

TO HURT IN THE HEAD, verb, 
phr. (old). To cuckold ; to cor- 
nute. 

TO LIE HEADS AND TAILS, 
verb. phr. (common). To sleep 
packed sardine fashion, i.e., heads 
to head-rail and foot-rail alter- 
nately. 

OVER HEAD AND EARS (in 
work, love, debt, etc. ), phr. (com- 
mon). Completely engrossed in; 
infatuated with ; to the fullest 
extent. 

1589. NASHE, Pasqvill of England 
(Grosart), i., 114. Presently he fetcheth 
his seas himselfe, and leaps very boldly 

OUER HEADE AND EARES. 

1735. GRANVILLE (quoted in John- 
son's Diet., s.v. HEAD). In jingling rimes 
well fortified and strong, He fights in- 
trenched o'er HEAD AND EARS IN SONG. 

WITHOUT HEAD OR TAIL, adv. 
phr, (common). Incoherent ; 



neither one thing nor the other. 
E.g. , I can't make head or tail of 
it = I cannot make it out. 

1728. VANBRUGH, Journey to London, 
iv. He had the insolence to intrude into 
my own dressing room here, with a story 

WITHOUT A HEAD OR TAIL 

1736. FIELDING, Pasquin, v. Take 
this play, and bid 'em forthwith act it ; 
there is not in it either HEAD OR TAIL. 

1874. MRS. H. WOOD, Johnny 
Ludlow, ist Series, No. 12, p. 203. Mrs. 
Blair has been writing us a strange 
rigmarole, which nobody can MAKE HEAD 

OR TAIL OF. 

1891. W. C. RUSSELL, Ocean 
Tragedy, p. 22. There is nothing to 

MAKE HEADS OR TAILS OF in it that I 

can see. 

TO HAVE A HEAD LIKE A 
SIEVE, verb. phr. (common). To 
be unreliable ; to be forgetful. 

HEADS OUT ! phr. (American 
university). A warning cry on 
the approach of a master. 

ARSE OVER HEAD. See ARSE 
and HEELS OVER HEAD. 

MUTTON-HEAD (or HEADED). 
See MUTTON-HEAD. 

FAT (or SOFT) IN THE HEAD, 
adv. phr. (common). Stupid. 
For synonyms, see APARTMENTS. 

OFF ONE'S HEAD, adv. phr. 
(common). Stupid ; crazy. For 
synonyms, see APARTMENTS. 

SHUT YOUR HEAD, phr. 
(American). ' Hold your jaw.' 

HEAD-BEETLER, subs, (workmen's). 
I. A bully; and (2) a foreman ; 
a GANGER (q.v.). 

1886. Chambers Journal, 18 Sept., 
p. 599. HEAD-BEETLER is used (in 
Ulster) in the same vulgar sense as ' Head- 
cook and bottle-washer ' in some localities. 
The ' beetle ' was a machine for producing 
figured fabrics by the pressure of a roller, 
and HEAD-BEETLER probably means the 
chief director of this class of work. 



Head-bloke. 



288 



Head-robber. 



HEAD-BLOKE. See HEAD-SCREW. 



or -CULLY). See 



HEAD-BULLY 

quots. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEAD BULLY OF THE PASS OR PASSAGE 
BANK. The Top Tilter of the Gang, 
throughout the whole Army, who Demands 
and receives Contribution from all the Pass 
Banks in the Army. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HEAD-COOK AND BOTTLE-WASHER, 

subs. phr. (common). I. A 
general servant ; in contempt. 

2. (common). One in authority; 
a BOSS (q.v.}. Cf., HEAD- 

BEETLER. 

1876. HINDLEY, Adv. of a Cheap- 
Jack, p. 66. Fred Jolly being the HEAD- 
COOK AND BOTTLE-WASHER. 

HEAD-CLERK. HEAD-CLERK OF 
DOXOLOGY WORKS, subs. phr. 
(American). A parson. See 
DEVIL-DODGER. 

1869. CLEMENS (Mark Twain), 
Innocents at Home, ch. ii. If I've got the 
rights of it, and you are the HEAD CLERK 
OF THE DOXOLOGY WORKS next door. 

HEADER, subs, (tailors'). A nota- 
bility ; a BIG- WIG (q.v.). 

TO TAKE A HEADER, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). I. To plunge, 
or fall, headforemost, into water : 
and (theatrical), to take an 
apparently dangerous leap in 
sensational drama. Hence, to 
go straight and directly for one's 
object. 

1856. Inside Sebastopol, ch. xiv. 
We may surely shut the door and take a 

HEADER. 

1863. Fun, 4 Apr., p. 23. Did the 
chairman commence the proceedings by 

TAKING A TREMENDOUS HEADER ... a 

verbatim report might be interesting. 



1884, W. C. RUSSELL, Jack's 
Courtship, ch. vii. ' Miss Hawke,' said 
I, plucking up my heart for a HEADER 
and going in, so to speak, with my eyes 
shut and my hands clenched. 

HEAD-FRUIT, subs. (old). Horns: 
z'.e., the result of being cuckolded. 

1694. CONGREVE, Double Dealer, ii., 
3. That boded horns : the FRUIT OF THE 
HEAD is horns. 

HEAD-GUARD, subs, (thieves'). A 
hat ; specifically, a billy-cock. 

1889. CLARKSON and RICHARDSON, 
Police, p. 21. A billy-cock, a HEAD-GUARD. 

HEADING, subs. (American cow- 
boys'). A pillow ; any rest for 
the head. 

HEADING 'EM, subs. phr. 
(streets). The tossing of coins 
in gambling. (In allusion to the 
head on the coin.) 

HEAD-MARKED, adj. (venery). 
Horned. To KNOW BY HEAD- 
MARK = to know (a cuckold) by 
his horns. 

HEADQUARTERS, subs, (racing). 
Newmarket. (Being the chief 
racing and training centre. ) 

1888. Sportsman, 28 Nov. Of the 
two-year olds that ran . . . races for them 
are the strong point of that particular 
gathering at HEADQUARTERS. 

HEAD- RAILS, subs, (old nautical). 
The teeth. For synonyms, see 
GRINDERS. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1853. BRADLEY, tCuthbert Bede] 
Verdant Green, Pt. II., ch. iy. He had 
agreeable remarks for each of his opponents 
. . . to another he would cheerfully remark, 
' your HEAD-RAILS were loosened there, 
wasn't they ? ' 



HEAD-ROBBER, subs, (journalists'). 
i. A plagiarist. 



Head-screw. 



289 



Heaped. 



2. (popular). A butler. 

HEAD-SCREW (or BLOKE), subs. 
(prison). A chief warder. 

HEADY, adj. (old : now recognised). 
I. See quot. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEADY, strong Liquors that immediately 
fly up into the Noddle, and so quickly 
make Drunk. 

2. (colloquial). Restive ; full 
of arrogance and airs ; opinionated. 

1864. National Review, p. 535. I 
think it's the novels that make my girls so 



MEADY-WHOP, subs, (streets). A 
person with a preternaturally 
large head. (A corruption of 

WHOPPING-HEAD (q.V.).) 

HEALTH ERIES, subs, (common). 
The Health Exhibition, held at 
South Kensington. [Others of the 
series were nick-named The 
Fisheries, The Colinderies, The 
Forestries, etc.] 

HEAP, subs, (colloquial). A large 
number ; lots ; a great deal. 

1371. CHAUCER, BokeoftheDuchesse, 
iii., 295 (1888, Minor Poems, SKEAT, 
p. 23). Of smale foules a gret HEPE. 

1383. CHAUCER. Canterbury Tales, 
i., 23/575 (Riverside Press). The wisdom 
of an HEEPE of lerned men. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at Ox- 
ford, ch. xxxv. I sha'n't see her again, 
and she wont hear of me for I don't know 
how long ; and she will be meeting HEAPS 
of men. 

1885. Punch, 4 July, p. 4. ' Splendid 
sight,' he goes on, ' HEAPS of people 
people you don't see anywhere else and 
lots of pretty girls.' 

1888. Texas Siftings, 20 Oct. He 
did not encroach on the domain of fa- 
miliarity, but he looked a HEAP. 

1892. GUNTER, Miss Dividends, xi. 
Every one here would do a HEAP for 
Bishop Tranyon's darter. 



Adv. (American). A great 
deal. 

1848. RUXTON, Life in the Far 
West, p. 223. He pronounced himself a 
HEAP better. 

ALL OF A HEAP, phr. (old : 
now colloquial). Astonished ; 
confused; taken aback; FLABBER- 
GAST (q.v.}; and (pugilists') 
' doubled up.' 

1593. SHAKSPEARE, Titus Androni- 
cus, ii., 4. Lord Bassianus lies embrewed 
here, ALL ON A HEAP. 

1775. FIELDING, Tom Jones, bk. 
VIII., ch, ii. My good landlady was (ac- 
cording to vulgar phrase) struck ALL OF A 
HEAP by this relation. 

1775. SHERIDAN, Duenna, ii., 2. 
That was just my case, too, Madam ; I 
was struck ALL OF A HEAP for my part. 

1817. SCOTT, Rob Roy, ch. xxiv. 
The interrogatory seemed to strike the 
honest magistrate, to use the vulgar 
phrase, ALL OF A HEAP. 

1832. EGAN, Book of Shorts, s.v. ALL 
OF A HEAP and all of a lump, unmistakably 
doubled up by a smasher. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick. 'And 
what's the lady's name ? ' says the lawyer. 
My father was struck ALL OF A HEAP. 
' Blessed if I know,' said he. 

1888. J. MCCARTHY and MRS. 
CAMPBELL-PRAED, The Ladies Gallery, 
ch. xiv. The idea seemed to take him 

ALL OF A HEAP. 

1891. Scots Mag., Oct., p. 321. 
Spinks and Durward were struck, as we 
may say, ALL OF A HEAP, when they fully 
realised that Folio had disappeared. 



HEAPED, adj. (racing). i. Hard 
put to it ; FLOORED (q.v.). 

1884. HAWLEY SMART, From Post 
to Finish, p. 158. They've all heard of 
Blackton's accident, and fancy we're fairly 
HEAPED for someone to ride. 



2. (venery). Piled in the act. 

1607. CYRIL TOURNEUR, Revenger's 
Tragedy,\\., i. O, 'twill be glorious to 
kill 'em . . . when they're HEAPED. 

19 



Hear. 



290 



Hearty. 



HEAR. To HEAR A BIRD SING 
(old). To receive private com- 
munication ; in modern parlance, 

A LITTLE BIRD TOLD ME SO. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV., 
v., 5. I will lay odds, that ere this year 
expire, We bear our civil swords and native 
fire As far as France. I HEAR A BIRD so 



HEARING, subs, (common). A 
scolding ; a lecture. For syn- 
onyms, see WIGGING. 

HEARING-CHEATS, subs, (old cant). 
The ears. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat, s.v. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEARING CHEATS, Ears. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Drums; 
flappers ; leathers ; lugs (Scots') ; 
taps ; wattles. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Les plats 
a barbe (popular = large ears) ; 
les oches or laches (thieves') ; les 
isgourdes (popular) ; des feuilles 
de chou (popular = cabbage leaves) ; 
des ecoutes or escoutes ( popular = 
hearing cheats) ; des cliquettes 
(popular). 

GERMAN SYNONYMS. Horcher 
( = the listener); Linzer, Loser, 
(Viennese: also Lo sling t Letts ling, 
Lets ling, or Lauschling) : Os en. 

HEART. NEXT THE HEART, adv. 
phr. (old). Fasting. 

1592. NASHE, Pierce Penilesse 
[Grosart], ii., 37. You may command his 
hart out of his belly, to make you a rasher 
on the coales, if you will NEXT YOUR 

HEART. 

1633. ROWLEY, Match at Midnight, 
i Made drunk NEXT HER HEART. 



[Other colloquial usages are AT HEART 
= in reality, truly, at bottom ; FOR ONE'S 
HEART=for one's life ; IN ONE'S HEART OF 
HEARTS = in the inmost recesses of one- 
self; TO BREAK THE HEART OF = () to 
cause great grief, or to kill by grief, and 
(b) to bring nearly to completion ; TO FIND 
IN ONE'S HEART=to be willing ; TO GET 
or LEARN BY HEART = to commit to memory; 
TO HAVE AT HEART = to feel strongly 
about ; TO HAVE IN THE HEART = to design 
or to intend ; TO LAY or TAKE TO HEART 
= to be concerned or anxious about ; TO 

SET THE HEART AT REST = tO tranquilize ; 
TO SET THE HEART ON = tO be desirOUS of, 

to be fond of; TO TAKE HEART OF GRACE 
=to pluck up courage.] 

HEART-AND-DART, sub's, (rhyming). 
A FART (q.v.). 

HEARTBREAKER, subs. (old). A 
pendant curl; a LOVE-LOCK (q.v.). 
Fr., un crvec<e.ur. 

1663. BUTLER, Hudibras, Ft. I., 
c. i. Like Samson's HEARTBREAKERS, it 
grew In time to make a nation rue. 

1694. Ladies' 1 Diet. A crevecceur, by 
some called HEARTBREAKER, is the curled 
lock at the nape of the neck, and generally 
there are two of them. 

1816. JOHNSON, Eng. Diet, s.v. A cant 
name for a woman's curls, supposed to 
break the hearts of all her lovers. 

HEARTBURN, stibs. (streets). A 
bad cigar. For synonyms, see 
WEED. 

HEARTSEASE, subs, (old). i. Se e 
quot. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEARTSEASE. A twenty-shilling piece. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

2. (old). Gin. For synonyms, 
see WHITE SATIN. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEARTS-EASE. An ordinary sort of strong 
water. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HEARTY, subs. anda^'. (common). 
Drink ; drunk. For synonyms, 
see DRINKS and SCREWED. 



Hearty. 



291 



Heave. 



MY HEARTY, phr. (nautical). 
A familiar address. 

HEARTY - CHOKE. To HAVE A 

HEARTY CHOKE and CAPER SAUCE 

FOR BREAKFAST, verb. phr. (old). 
To be hanged. Cf., VEGE- 
TABLE BREAKFAST, and for 
synonyms, see LADDER. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, ' Nix 
my Doly,' Who cut his last fling with 

great applause To a HEARTY CHOKE WITH 

CAPER SAUCE. 

1893. DANVERS, The Grantham 
Mystery, ch. xiii, I am not particularly 
anxious to run the risk of being compelled 
to have a HEARTY-CHOKE FOR BREAKFAST 
one fine morning. 

HEAT, subs, (racing and colloquial). 
A bout ; a turn ; a trial ; by 
whose means the ' field ' is gradually 
reduced. Cf., HANDICAP. 

1681. DRYDEN, Epil. to Saunderss 
Tamerlane, 25. But there's no hope of 
an old battered jade ; Faint and unnerved 
he runs into a sweat, And always fails you 
at the second HEAT. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. Ixxxviii. Our adventurer had the 
satisfaction of seeing his antagonist dis- 
tanced in the first and second HEATS. 

1753. Adventurer, No. 37. The first 
HEAT I put my master in possession of the 
stakes. 

1819. SCOTT, Bride of Lammermoor, 
ch. xxii. There was little to prevent 
Bucklaw himself from sitting for the 
county he must carry the HEAT must 
walk the course. 

ON HEAT, subs. phr. (venery). 
Amorously inclined, HOT (q.v. ). 
[Said of women and bitches. ] 



HEATHEN-PHILOSOPH ER, subs. 
(old). See quot. 

1^90. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
A sorry poor tatter'd Fellow, whose Breech 
may be seen through his Pocket-holes. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. s.v. 

178-S. GROSE, Diet. Vulg. Tongue, 
s.v. This saying arose from the old 



philosophers, many of whom despised the 
vanity of dress to such a point, as often to 
fall into the excess complained of. 

HEAVE, subs, (old). i. An attempt 
to deceive or cajole : a DEAD- 
HEAVE = a flagrant attempt. 

2. in. pi. (American). An 
attack of indigestion or vomiting. 

Verb (American). I. To 
vomit. 

1862. BROWNE (' Art emus Ward'), 
Artemus Ward, his book. ' Cruise of the 
Polly Ann.' Stickin my hed out of the 
cabin window, I HEV. 

2. (old). To rob: has 
survived, in Shropshire, as a pro- 
vincialism. The heler (hider) is 
as bad as the HEAVER = the 
receiver is as bad as the thief. 

1567. HARMAN, Caveat, p. 66. To 
HEUE a bough, to robbe or rifle a boweth. 

1575. AWDELEY, Fratemitye of 
Vacabondes. But hys chiefest trade is to 
rob bowthes in a faire, or to pilfer ware 
from staules, which they cal HEAVING 
of the bowth. 

1608. DEKKER, Belman of London 
in Wks. (Grosart) III., 102. But the end 
of their land-voiages is to rob Boothes at 
fayres, which they call HEAVING of the 
Booth. 

1671. R. HEAD, English Rogue, Pt. 
I., ch. xlv. p. 319 (1874). I met with an 
old comrade that had lately HEAV'D a 
booth, Anglice broken open a Shop. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEAVE a bough. To rob a house. 

1724. COLES, Eng. Diet., s.v. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary, ($th 
Ed.). HEAVE (v.) . . . and in the 
Canting Language, it is to rob or steal from 
any person or thing. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

To HEAVE ON (or AHEAD), 
verb. phr. (old). To make haste ; 
to press forward. 

1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, ch. 
iv. Come HEAVE AHEAD, my lads, and 
be smart. 



Heaven. 



292 



Heavy-wet. 



HEAVEN, subs, (venery). The 
tema\e pudendum. For synonyms, 
see MONOSYLLABLE. To FEEL 

ONE'S WAY TO HEAVEN = TO 

GROPE (q.v.} a woman. See also, 
ST. PETER. 

HEAVENLY-COLLAR, (or LAPPEL), 
subs, (tailors'). A collar or lappel 
that turns the wrong way. 

HEAVER, subs. (old). i. The 
bosom; the PANTER (g.v.}. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEAVER. A breast. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongtie, s.v. 

2. (American). A person in 
love : i.e., sighing ( = heaving the 
bosom, or making play with the 
HEAVER) like a furnace. 

3. (old). A thief: cf. t HEAVE 
(verbal sense 2). 

H EAVY. See HEAVY-WET. 

Adj. (American). Large: e.g., 
a HEAVY amount = a considerable 
sum of money. 

TO COME (or DO) THE HEAVY, 
verb. phr. (common). To affect 
a vastly superior position ; to put 
on airs or FRILLS (q.v.}. See 
COME and Do. 

THE HEAVIES, subs. phr. (mili- 
tary). The regiments of House- 
holdCavalry, 4th and 5th Dragoon 
Guards, and ist and 2nd Dragoons. 
[From their equipment and 
weight. ] 

1841. LEVER, Chas. O'Malley, ch. 
Iviii. I'm thinking we'd better call out 
THE HEAVIES by turns. 

HEAVY-ARSED (old colloquial), 
adj. phr. Slow to move ; inert ; 
hard to stir See ARSE. 



d. 1091. RICHARD BAXTER. Shove 
to HEAVY-ARSED Christians. [Title.] 

HEAVY-CAVALRY (or DRAGOONS), 
subs, (common). Bugs ; LIGHT- 
INFANTRY = fleas. Also HEAVY 

HORSEMEN, the HEAVY TROOP, 

and THE HEAVIES. 

HEAVY-GROG, subs, (workmen's). 
Hard work. 

HEAVY-GRUBBER, subs, (common). 
I. A hearty eater ; a glutton. 
For synonyms, see STODGER. 

1858. DICKENS, Great Expectations, 
ch. xl., p. 190. ' I'm a HEAVY GRUBBER, 
dear boy,' he said, as a polite kind of 
apology when he had made an end of his 
meal, * but I always was. If it had been 
in my constitution to be a lighter grubber, 
I might ha' got into lighter trouble.' 

HEAVY- PLODDER, subs. (old). A 
stock-broker. , 

1848. BUNCOMBE, Sinks of London, 
s.v. 

HEAVY- (or HOWLING-) SWELL, subs. 
(common). A man or woman in 
the height of fashion : a SPIFF 
(q.V.}. 

1892. ANSTEY, Model Music Hall, 
74. We look such HEAVY SWELLS, you 
see, we're all aristo-crats. 

HEAVY-WET, subs, (common). i. 
Malt liquor ; specifically porter 
and stout. Also HEAVY. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SWIPES. 

1821. _ EGAN, Tom and Jerry, p. 75. 
The soldiers and their companions were 
seen tossing off the HEAVY WET and 
spirits. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. 
vii. I had been lushing HEAVY WET. 

1838. GRANT, Sketches in London, p. 
92. If it be HEAVYWET, the favorite 
beverage . . . of Dr. Wade. 

1849. C. KINGSLEY, Alton Locke, ch. 
ii. Here comes the HEAVY. Hand it here 
to take the taste of that fellow's talk out of 
my mouth. 



Hebe. 



293 



Hector. 



1852. JUDSON, Mysteries of New 
York, bk. II., ch. x. What'll it be, my 
covies ? HEAVY WET, cold or warm ? 

1888. J. RUNCIMAN, The Chequers, 
p. 86. Mother up with your HEAVY WET 
and try suthin' short. 

2. (common). An extraordin- 
arily heavy drinking bout. 

HEBE, subs, (old). i. See quots. 

1648-9. CRASHAW, Poems. 'On the 
Death of Mr. H.' Ere HEBE'S hand had 
overlaid His smooth cheeks with a downy 
shade. 

1778. BAILEY, Eng. Diet., s.v. The 
first Hair appearing about the genital parts ; 
also the Parts themselves ; but more speci- 
fically the Time of Youth at which it first 
appears. 

2. (common). A waiting maid 
at an inn ; a barmaid. 

1603. J. SYLVESTER, Tr. Du BAR- 
TAS, Mag., p. 65 (1608). Heer, many a 
HEBE faire, beer more than one Quick- 
seruing Chiron neatly waits vpon The Beds 
and Boords. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xlix. Shortly after the same HEBE brought 
up a plate of beef-collops. 

1886. Athenceum, g Jan., 63/2. It is 
not with the Colonel's HEBES, however, 
that the manoeuvres of the military quintet 
are carried on. 

1891. Sportsman, 25 Mar. Not even 
thekindlymorning welcome of La Rserdon, 
most pleasant and courteous of deft-handed 
HEBES, could blot out the fact. 

HEBREW, subs, (common). Gib- 
berish; GREEK (q.v.}. To TALK 
HEBREW = to talk nonsense or 
gibberish. 

1705. VANBRUGH, Confederacy, ii., 
i. Man. If she did but know what part 

I take in her sufferings . Flip. 

Mighty obscure. Man. Well, I'll say 

no more ; but . Flip. All HEBREW. 

1823. BEE, Diet, of the Turf, s.v. 
You may as well TALK HEBREW,' said of 
jargon. 

HECTOR, subs. (old). A bully; a 
blusterer. 

1659. Lady Alimony, ii, 6(DoDSLEY, 
Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, xiv. ; 322). 
HECTORS, or champion haxters, pimps or 
palliards. Ibid, iii., I., (p. 326). Levell- 



ing at honour, they declare themselves 
glorious HECTORS, 

b. 1670. J. HACKET, Archbp. Wil- 
liams, ii., 203. One HECTOR, a phrase at 
that time for a daring ruffian, had the ear 
of great ones sooner than five strict men. 

1674. COTTON, Complete Gamester, 
p. 333. Shoals of Huffs, HECTORS, 
Setters, Gilts, Pads .... And these may 
all pass under the general or common 
appellation of Rooks. 

1677. WYCHERLEY, Plain Dealer, 
iv , i. She would rather trust her honour 
with some dissolute debauched HECTOR, 

1679. BUTLER, Hudibras. iii., 2, 108. 
As bones of HECTORS when they differ The 
more th'are Cudgel'd, grow the Stiffer. 

1689. LESTRANGE, Tr. Erasmus, p. 
139. And a Ruffling HECTOR that lives 
upon the Highway. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HECTOR, a Vaporing, Swaggering Coward. 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., ii., 24. 
I hate, she cry'd, a HECTOR, a Dione with- 
out a Sting. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. 

1750. OZELL, Rabelais, iv., Pref. 
xxiii. These roaring HECTORS. 

1757. POPE, Imit. Hor., ii., i, 71. 
I only wear it in a land of HECTORS, 
thieves .... and Directors. 

1778. BAILEY, Eng. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1826. Congress Deb., ii., i., p. 1024. 
He hoped it would invite ... a reply 
from the Southern HECTOR ... of this 
debate. 

Verb (common). To play the 
bully ; to bluster. Also TO PLAY 
THE HECTOR. 

1677. WYCHERLEY, Plain Dealer, 
ii., i. No HECTORING, good Captain. 

1849-61. MACAULAY, Hist, of Eng., 
ch. xvi. To PLAY THE HECTOR at cock- 
pits or hazard tables. 

To WEAR HECTOR'S CLOAK, 
verb. phr. (old). To receive the 
right reward for treachery. [When 
Thomas Percy, Earl of Northum- 
berland, was routed in 1569, he 
hid himself in the house of Hector 
Armstrong, of Harlaw, who be- 
trayed him for hire, and prospered 



Hectoring. 



294 



Hedge. 



so ill thereafter that he died a 
beggar by the roadside.] 

HECTORING, subs, and adj. (old: 
now recognised). Bullying ; 
blustering. 

1677. WYCHERLEY, Plain Dealer, 
ii., i. Thou art soe debauched, drunken, 
lewd, HECTORING, gaming companion. 
Ibid, ii., i. Every idle, young, HECTORING, 
roaring companion, with a pair of turned 
red breeches, and a broad back, thinks to 
carry away any widow of the best degree. 

1893. St. James's Gazette, xxvii, 
4074, p. 3. Mr. Sexton with much unneces- 
sary outlay of HECTORING bluster, repudi- 
ates guilty knowledge. 

HEDGE, siibs. (racing). See verbal 
sense. 

1856. HUGHES, Tom Brown, p. 200. 
Now listen, you young fool, you don't 
know anything about it ; the horse is no 
use to you. He won't win, but I want him 
as a HEDGE. 

1864. Eton Schooldays, ch. vii. He 
took the precaution to take those odds five 
or six times by way of a HEDGE, in case 
anything should happen to Chorley. 

Verb (racing). i. To secure 
oneself against, or minimise the 
loss on a bet by reversing on advan- 
tageous terms ; TO GET OUT 
(q.v.). [Thus, if a man backs A 
to win him ;ioo at 5 to i, he will 
if possible HEDGE by laying (say) 
3 to I to the amount of (say) ^60 
against him. He will then stand 
thus : If A wins he gains on the 
first bet ;ioo, and loses on the 
second ;6o, leaving a net gain of 
^"40; if A loses he loses on the 
first bet 20, and wins on the 
second 20, thus clearing himself.] 
See STANDING ON VELVET and 
Go. 

1616. JONSON, Devil is an Ass, iii., 
i. I must have you do A noble gentleman 
a courtesy here, In a mere toy, some pretty 
ring or jewel, Of fifty or threescore pound. 
Make it a hundred, And HEDGE in the last 
forty that I owe you, And your own price 
for the ring. 



1671. BUCKINGHAM, 7$*? Rehearsal, 
Prol. Now, critics, do your worst, that 
here are met, For, like a rook, I have 
HEDG'D in my bet. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEDGE, to secure a desperate Bet, Wager, 
or Debt. 

1736. FIELDING, Pasquin, Act iii. 
Sneer. That's laying against yourself, Mr. 
Trapwit. Trap. I love a HEDGE, sir. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth ed.). 
HEDGE (v.) . . . also to secure or re-insure 
a dangerous debt, voyage, wager, etc. 

1751. SMOLLETT, Peregrine Pickle, 
ch. Ixix. They changed their note, and 
attempted to HEDGE for their own indem- 
nification, by proposing to lay the odds in 
favour of Gauntlet. 

1754. Connoisseur, No. 15. What- 
ever turn things take, he can never lose. 
This he has effected, by what he has taught 
the world to call, HEDGING a bet. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1854. WHYTE MELVILLE, General 
Bounce, ch. xii. If she says ' Yes,' sell 
out .... If she says ' No ' get second 
leave .... So it's HEDGED both ways. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p- 
201. You'd better HEDGE some of your 
sweep money. 

2. (common). To elude % 
danger. 

TO DIE BY THE HEDGE, verb. 

phr. (common). To die in 
poverty. 

TO HANG IN THE HEDGE, 

verb. phr. (old). See quot. 
1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. IT 

HANGS IN THE HEDGE, of a Lawsuit Or 

anything else Depending, Undetermined. 
AS COMMON AS THE HEDGE 

(or HIGHWAY), phr. (old). Very 
common. 
1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 

AS COMMON AS THE HEDGE OR HIGHWAY, 

said of a prostitute or Strumpet. 
1725. New Cant. Diet. s.v. 

BY HEDGE OR BY CROOK. 

See HOOK. 



Hedge-bird. 



295 



Hedge-priest. 



HEDGE- BIRD, subs. (old). See 
quot. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair, 
ii., i. Out, you rogue, you HEDGE-BIRD, 
you pimp, you panier-man's bastard, you. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew. 
HEDGE-BIRD, a Scoundrel or sorry Fellow 

1725. New Cant. Diet. 

HEDGE- BOTTOM ATTORNEY (or 
SOLICITOR), subs. phr. (legal). 
A person who, being not 
admitted or being uncertificated 
(or, it may be, admitted and 
certificated both, but struck off 
the rolls for malpractice), sets up 
in the name cf a qualified man, 
and thus evades the penalties 
attaching to those who act as 
solicitors without being duly 
qualified. [All the business is done 
in another name, but the hedge- 
bottom is the real principal, the 
partner being only a dummy.] 
SIR PATRICK COLQUHOUN in 
Slang, Jargon and Cant. 

HEDGE-CREEPER, subs. (old). A 
hedge-thief; a skulker under 
hedges ; a pitiful rascal. 

1594. NASHE, Unfortunate Traveller 
p, 32 (Chiswick Press, 1892). Call him a 
sneaking eavesdropper, a scraping HEDGE- 
CREEPER, and a piperley pickthanke. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEDGE-CREEPER ; a pitiful rascal. 
1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HEDGE - DOCKED, adj. (venery). 
Deflowered in the open. 

HEDGE-MARRIAGE (or WEDDING), 

subs. (old). An irregular mar- 
riage performed by a HEDGE- 
PRIEST (q.v. ); a marriage over 
the broom. 

HEDGE-NOTE, sut>s. (old). Low 
writing. [As Dryden : ' They left 
these HEDGE-NOTES for another 
sort of poem. '] 



HEDGE-POPPING, subs, (sporting). 
Shooting small birds about hedges. 
Whence HEDGE-POPPER = a 
trumpery shooter ; and HEDGE- 
GAME = small birds, as sparrows 
and tits, 

HEDGE- PRIEST (or PARSON), s-ubs. 
(old : now recognised). A sham 
cleric ; a blackguard or vagabond 
parson ; a COUPLE BEGGAR. [As 
Johnson notes, the use of HEDGE 
in a detrimental sense is 
common. As HEDGE - begot ; 
HEDGE - born ; HEDGE - brat ; 
HEDGE-found ; HEDGE-DOCKED 
(q.v.} ; HEDGE-tavern ( = a low ale- 
house) ; HEDGE-SQUARE (q.v. ) ; 
HEDGE - reared; HEDGE- 
mustard ; HEDGE - writer ( = a 
Grub - street author) ; HEDGE - 
BUILDING, etc. Shakspeare 
uses the phrase ' HEDGE-born' 
as the very opposite of 'gentle 
blooded' (i Henry VI., iv., 
i).] Specifically, HEDGE-PRIESTS 
= (in Ireland) a cleric admitted to 
orders directly from a HEDGE- 
SCHOOL (q.v.) without having 
studied theology. [Before May- 
nooth, men were admitted to or- 
dination ere they left for the con- 
tinental colleges, so that they 
might receive the stipend for 
saying mass.] 

1588. Marprelates Epistle, p. 30 (Ed. 

Arber). Is it any maruaile that we haue 

so many swine dumbe dogs nonresidents 

with their iourneimen the HEDGE-PRIESTS 

... in our ministry. 

1594. SHAKSPEARE, Love's Labour 
Lost, v., 2. The pedant, the braggart, 
the HEDGE-PRIEST, the fool, and the boy. 

1598. FLORID, Worlde of Wordes. 
Arlotto, the name of amerie priest, a lack- 
latine, or HEDGE-PRIEST. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEDGE PRIEST. A sorry Hackney, Under- 
ling, Illiterate, Vagabond, see Patrico. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785, GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



Hedger. 



296 



Heel. 



^ 1822. SCOTT, Fortunes of Nig el, ch. 1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 



iBzz. SCOTT, Famines oj ivtgei, en. 
xvii. A HEDGE- PARSON, or buckle-beggar, 
as that order of priesthood has been 
irreverently termed. 

HEDGER, See HEDGE, sense 2. 

1828-45. HOOD, Poems (Ed. 1846), 
p. 96. A black-leg saint, a spiritual 

HEDGER. 

HEDGE-SCHOOL, subs. (Irish). A 
school in the country parts of 
Ireland formerly conducted in the 
open air, pending the erection of 
a permanent building to which the 
name was transferred. Hence, 

HEDGE-SCHOOLMASTER. 

HEDGE-SQUARE. To DOSS (or 
SNOOZE) IN HEDGE-SQUARE (or 
STREET), verb. phr. (vagrants'). 
To sleep in the open air. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. To 
skipper it ; to doss with the 
daisies ; to be under the blue 
blanket ; to put up at the Gutter 
Hotel ; to do a star pitch. 

FRENCH SYNONYMS. Coiicher 
a F hotel de la belle etoile (pop. = to 
sleep at the Star Hotel) ; manger 
une soupe aux herbes (popular) ; 
fiier la comete (popular = to nose 
the comet) ; coucher dans le lit 
aux pois verts. 

1877. GREENWOOD, Under the Blue 
Blanket. The vagrant brotherhood have 
several slang terms for sleeping out in a 
field or meadow. It is called ' snoozing in 
HEDGE SQUARB,' etc. 

HEDGE-TAVERN (or -ALE-HOUSE), 

subs. (old). See quot. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEDGE TAVERN or ALEHOUSE, A Jilting, 
Sharping Tavern, or Blind Alehouse. 

1705. FARQUHAR, Twin-rivals, i., i. 
That was ... in the days of dirty 
linen, pit-masks, HEDGE-TAVERNS, and 
beef-steaks. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 



HEDGE-WHORE (or HEDGE-BIT), 
subs, (old : now recognised). A 
filthy harlot working in the open 
air. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde ofWordes, 
s.v., Zambracca, a common - HEDGE- 
WHORE, strumpet, a base harlot. 

1785. GROSE, Vttlg. Tongue, s.v. 

HEDGING, subs, (racing). See 
HEDGE, verbal sense 2. 

1867. A. TROLI.OPE, Claverings, ch. 
xxiy. He would be lessening the odds 
against himself by a judicious HEDGING ot 
his bets. 



HEEL. To BLESS THE WORLD 
WITH ONE'S HEELS, verb. phr. 
(old). To be hanged. For syn- 
onyms, see LADDER. 

1566-7. PAINTER, Palace of Pleasure, 
sign R., 8. And the next daye, the three 
theves were conveied forth to BLESSE THE 

WORLDE WITH THEIR HEELES. 

To COOL (or KICK) THE HEELS, 
verb. phr. (common). To wait a 
long while at an appointed place. 

1014. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair. 
Who forthwith comitted my little hot furie 
to the stockes, where we will leave him to 
COOLE HIS HEELES, whilst we take a fur- 
ther view of the faire. 

1 673. WYCHERLEY, Gentleman 
Dancing Master, iv., i. They ne'er think 
of the poor watchful chambermaid, who 

sitS KNOCKING HER HEELS IN THE COLD, 

for want of better exercise, in some melan- 
choly lobby or entry. 

1752. FIELDING, Amelia. In this 
parlour Amelia COOLED HER HEELS, as the 
phrase is, near a quarter of an hour. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford [Ed. 
1854], p 22. He expected all who KICKED 
THEIR HEELS at his house would behave 
decent and polite to young Mr. Dot. 

1833. MARRYAT, Peter Simple, ch. 
xiii. Tell him that I'll trouble him to 
forget to go to sleep again as he did last 
time, and leave me here KICKING MY 
HEELS contrary to the rules of the ser- 
vice. 



Heel. 



297 



Heeler. 



1879. SALA, Paris Herself Again, i. 
We COOLED OUR HEELS during the ordi- 
nary an intolerable half hour. 

1888. LYNCH, Mountain Mystery, 
ch. xlvi. That young gentleman, who had 
been COOLING HIS HEELS for what seemed 
1 ike half the night. 

TO LAY BY THE HEELS, Verb. 

phr. (common). To confine ; to 
fetter ; to jail. 



1601. SHAKSPEARE, Henry VIII;, 
v., 4. If the king blame me for it, I'll 
LAY ye all BY THE HEELS, and suddenly. 

1614. JONSON, Bartholomew Fair, 
iii. Sir, if you be not quiet the quicklier, 
111 have you CLAPP'D fairly BY THE 
HEELS, for disturbing the Fair. 

16(53-1678. BUTLER, Hudibras, i., 3. 
Th' one half of man, his mind, Is, sui 
juiis, unconfmed, And cannot be LAID BY 

THE HEELS. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
1886. R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 

p. 184. If they LAY ME BY THE HEELS, 

Alan, it's then that you'll be needing the 
money. 

To LIFT ONE'S HEELS, verb* 
phr. (venery). To lie down for 
copulation; to SPREAD (q.v.). 

To TURN (or TOPPLE) UP THE 
HEELS (or TOES), verb. phr. (old). 

To die. For synonyms, see 
ALOFT. 

1592. NASHE, Pierce Penilesse [Gro- 
sart], ii., 77. Our trust is .... you will 
TOURNE UP THEIR HEELES one of these 
yeares together, and prouide them of such 
vnthrifts to their heires, as shall spend in 
one weeke .... what they got .... all 
their lifetime. 

1599. NASHE, Lenten Stuffe. Leaven 
thousand and fifty people TOPPLED UP 

THEIR HEELS. 

TO TAKE TO (or SHOW) A PAIR 
OF HEELS, verb. phr. (colloquial). 

To take to flight ; to run away. 
For synonyms, see AMPUTATE. 

1593. SHAKSPEARE, Comedy of Er- 
rors. Nay . . . Sir, I'll TAKE MY HEELS. 

1864. Chambers' Journal, Dec. Once 
before he had ' found meanes yet at length 
to deceive his keepers, and TOOK HIM TO 
HIS HEELS' to the sea coast. 



His HEELS, verb. phr. (gaming). 
The knave of trumps at cribbage 
or all-fours. Hence ' TWO FOR 
HIS HEELS' two points scored 
(at cribbage) for turning up this 
card. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

TO TREAD UPON (or TO BE AT 
or UPON) THE HEELS, verb. phr. 
(colloquial). To follow close or 
hard after ; to pursue. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Hamlet, iv., 7. 
One woe doth TREAD UPON ANOTHER'S 
HEELS. 

TO GO HEELS OVER HEAD, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To turn a 
somersault; to be hasty; to fall 
violently. Also TOP OVER TAIL. 

1540. LYNDSAY, Satyre of the Thrie 
Estaitis, 3744. This fals warld is turnit 

TOP OUIR TAILL. 

To HAVE (or GET) THE HEELS 
OF, verb. phr. (old). To outrun ; 
to get an advantage. 

1748. SMOLLETT, Roderick Random. 
Thou hast GOT THE HEELS OF me 
already. 

DOWN (or OUT) AT HEEL, adv. 
phr. (colloquial). Slipshod ; 
shabby ; in decay. 

1605. SHAKSPEARE, King Lear, ii., 
2. A good man's future may grow OUT AT 
HEELS. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

1851-6. MAYHEW, Lond. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, iii., 122. He was a little 

DOWN AT HEEL. 

HEELED, adj. (American). Armed. 
[From the steel spur used in cock- 
fighting.] 

HEELER, subs. (American). i. 
Followers or henchmen of a 
politician or a party. 

1888. Denver Republican, 29 Feb. 
The HEELERS and strikers, bummers and 
stuffers, otherwise known as practical 



Heel-taps, 



298 



Hell. 



politicians, who do the work at the 
Democratic polls, and manipulate the 
primaries and local conventions. 

1888. New York Herald, 4 Nov. 
A band succeeded them and preceded a 
lot of ward HEELERS and floaters. 

2. (American). A bar, or 
other loafer ; anyone on the look- 
out for shady work. 

3. (American thieves') An 
accomplice in the pocket-book 
RACKET (q.V.\ [The HEELER 
draws attention, by touching the 
victim's heels, to a pocket-book 
containing counterfeit money 
which has been let drop by a 
companion, with a view to in- 
ducing the victim to part with 
genuine coin for a division of the 
find.] 

4. (Winchester College). A 
plunge, feet foremost, into water. 
Fr. , une chandelle. 

HEEL-TAPS, subs, (common). i. 
Liquor in the bottom of a glass. 
BUMPERS ROUND AND NO HEEL 
TAPS = Fill full, and drain dry ! 
See DAYLIGHT. Fr., la musique. 

1795. Gent. Mag., p. 118. Briskly 
pushed towards me the decanter containing 
a tolerable bumper, and exclaimed, ' Sir, 
I'll buzz you : come, NO HEEL-TAPS ! ' 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick (Ed. 1857;, 
p. 10. No HEEL-TAPS, and he emptied 
the glass. 

1838. DICKENS, Nicholas Nickleby, 
ch. xxxii. There was a proper objection 
to drinking her in HEELTAPS. 

1841. Punch, i., 117. Empty them 
HEELTAPS, Jack, and fill out with a fresh 
jug. 

1844. BUCKSTONE, The Maid with 
the Milking Pail. Added to which, she's 
a termagant, and imbibes all the HEEL- 
TAPS. 

1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. 
xiv. The relics of yesterday's feast the 
emptied bottles .... the wretched HEEL- 
TAPS that have been lying exposed all 
night to the air. 



2. (common). A dance 
peculiar to London dustmen. 

HEIFER, subs, (common). A 
woman ; OLD HEIFER (in 
Western America) = a term of 
endearment. For synonyms, 
see PETTICOAT. 

18(?). In the Back Woods, p. 71. Now, 
git out, I says, or the ol' HEIFER '11 show 
you whar the carpenter left a hole for you 
to mosey. 

HEIFER- PADDOCK, subs. (Aus- 
tralian). A ladies' school. 

1885. MRS. CAMPBELL-PRAED, Aus~ 
trail an Life. The cattle (women) here- 
abouts are too scattered .... Next year 
I shall look over a HEIFER-PADDOCK in 
Sydney, and take my pick. 

HEIGH-HO, subs. (thieves'). - 
Stolen yarn. [From the expres- 
sion used to apprise the fence 
that the speaker had stolen yam 
to sell.] 

HEIGHTS. To SCALE THE HEIGHTS 
OF CONNUBIAL BLISS, verb. phr. 
(venery). To copulate. For 
synonyms, see GREENS and RIDE. 

HELBAT, subs. (back). A table. 

HELL, subs. (old). i. Generic for 
a place of confinement, as in some 
games (Sydney), or a cell in a 
prison : specifically, a place 
under the Exchequer Chamber, 
where the king's debtors were 
confined. 

1593. SHAKSPEARE, Comedy of Errors, 
iv., 2. A hound that runs counter, and yet 
draws dry-foot well, One that before the 
judgement, carries poor souls to HELL. 

1658. Counter-Rat. In Wood Street's 
hole, or counter's HELL. 

1598. FLORIO, Worlde of Wordes, 
s.v. Secret a .... Also the name of a 
place in Venice where all their secret 
records and ancient evidences be kept, as 
HELL is in Westminster Hall. 



Hell. 



299 



Hell. 



2. (old). A workman's re- 
ceptacle for stolen or refuse pieces, 
as cloth, type, etc. ; ONE'S EYF. 
Also HELL-HOLE and HELL-BOX. 
See CABBAGE. HELL-MATTER = 
(printers') old and battered type. 

(?). Newest Academy of Compli- 
ments. When taylors forget to throw cab- 
bage in HELL, And shorten their bills, that 
all may be well. 

1589. NASHE, Martin's Months 
Minde (Grosart), i. 185. Remember the 
shreddes that fall into the Tailors HELL, 
neuer come backe to couer your backe. 

1592. Defence of Conny Catching, in 
GREENE'S Wks., xi., 96. This HEL is a 
place that the tailors haue vnder their 
shopboord, wher al their stolne shreds is 
thrust. 

1606. DAY, lie of Gulls. That fel- 
lowes pocket is like a tailors HELL, it eats 
up part of every mans due ; 'tis an execu- 
tioner, and makes away more innocent 
petitions in one yeere, than a red-headed 
hangman cuts ropes in an age. 

1625. JONSON, Staple of News, i., 
i. That jest Has gain'd thy pardon, thou 
hadst lived Condemn'd To thine own HELL. 

1663. T. KILLEGREW, Parson's Wed- 
ding, iii., 5., in Dodsley, O.P. (1780) xi., 
452. Careless [addressing a tailor]. Why 
then, thou art damned. Go, go home, and 
throw thyself into thine own HELL ; it is 
the next way to the other. 

1663-1712. KING, Art of Cookery. 
In Covent Garden did a taylor dwell, Who 
might deserve a place in his own HELL. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HELL, the Place where the Taylers lay up 
their Cabbage, or Remnants, which are 
sometimes very large. 

1698. Money Masters All Things, 
p. 56. The Cheating Knave some of the 
clues does throw Into his HELL-HOLE ; and 
then lets her know That he her web cannot 
work out o' th' Loom. 

1704. SWIFT, Tale of a Tub, Sec. iii. 
The tailor's HELL is the type of a critic's 
common-place book. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1814. C. ^w&, Melancholy oj Tailors 
in Poems, etc. (Ed. Ainger), p. 333. The 
tailor sitting over a cave or hollow place, 
in the cabalistic language of his order, is 
said to have certain melancholy regions 
always open under his feet. 



1853. Notes and Queries, i S., viii., 
313, c. 2. The term cabbage, by which 
tailors designate the cribbed pieces of 
cloth, is said to be derived from an old 
word ' cablesh,' i.e., wind-fallen wood. 
And their HELL where they store the 
cabbage, from helan, to hide. 

3. (common). A gambling 
house. [Whence SILVER-HELL 
= a gambling house where only 
silver is played for ; DANCING- 
HELL = an unchartered hall ; and 
so forth.] 

1823. MONCRIEFF, Tom and Jerry, 
ii., 4. Jerry. A HELL, Tom ? I'm at 
fault again! Log. A gambling house, 
Jerry! 

1841. Comic Almanack, p. 280. A 
man at a HELL, Playing the part of a Bon- 
netter well. 

1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. 
xxxix. He plays still ; he is in a HELL 
every night almost. 

1890. Saturday Review, i Feb , p. 
134, c. 2. These private HELLS neverthe- 
less exist, and as all money found on the 
premises is seized by the police, the players 
have to resort to all kinds of subterfuge 
when the three loud knocks are heard 
which indicate the presence of the com- 
ntissaire. 

4. (venery). Thefemale/^afcw- 
dum ; cf., HEAVEN. For syn- 
onyms, see MONOSYLLABLE. [See 
BOCCACCIO, Decameron.'} 

HEAVEN, HELL AND PURGA- 
TORY, subs. phr. (old). Three 
ale-houses formerly situated near 
Westminster Hall. 

1610. JONSON, Alchemist, v., 2. He 
must not break his fast In Heaven or HELL. 

HELL BROKE LOOSE, subs. phr. 
(common). Extreme disorder ; 
anarchy. 

1632. HAUSTED, Rivall Friends, v., 
10. Fye, fye, HELL is BROKE LOOSE upon 
me. 

1672. MARVELL, Rehearsal (Gro^rt), 
iii, 212. War broke out, and then to be 
sure HELL'S BROKE LOOSE. 

1703. FARQUHAR, Inconstant, iv., 4. 
HELL BROKE LOOSE upon me, and all the 
furies fluttered about my ears. 



Hell. 



300 



Hell. 



1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 96. 
Tho' HELL'S BROKE LOOSE, and the Devils 
roar abroad. 

HELL OF A (LARK, GOER, ROW, 
and so forth), adj. phr. (common). 
Very much oi a ; a popu- 
lar intensitive. 

ALL TO HELL (or GONE TO 
HELL), adj. phr. (colloquial). 
Utterly ruined. 

To HOPE (or WISH) TO HELL, 
verb. phr. (common). To desire 
intensely. 
1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 

229. I HOPE TO H the horse will 

break his neck and his rider's too. 

TO PLAY (or KICK UP) HELL 
AND TOMMY, verb. phr. (com- 
mon). To ruin utterly. Also, 
TO PLAY HELL AND BREAK 
THINGS ; TO RAISE HELL ; TO 
MAKE HELL'S DELIGHT. 

1837-40. HALIBURTON, The Clock- 
maker, p. 287 (Ed. 1862). And in the 
mean time rob 'em, plunder 'em, and tax 
em ; hang their priests, seize their galls, 
and PLAY HELL AND TOMMY with them, 
and all because they speak French. 

1859. DE QUINCEY, Wks. (14 vol., 
ed. vi., 336). About a hundred years 

earlier Lord Bacon PLAYED H AND 

TOMMY when casually raised to the 
supreme seat in the Council by the brief 
absence in Edinburgh of the King and 
the Duke of Buckingham. 

1867. Lahore Chronicle, 20 May. The 
Sepoys are burning down the houses, and 

PLAYING H AND TOMMY with the 

station. 

1879. JUSTIN M'CARTHY, Donna 
Quixote, ch. xxxii. We'll have a fine bit 
of fun, I tell you. I've PLAYED HELL-AND- 
TOMMY already with the lot of them. 

TO LEAD APES IN HELL, Verb. 

bhr. (old). To die an old maid. 

[From a popular superstition. ] 

1599. HENRY PORTER, The Two 
Angry Women of Abingdon. (DoDSLEY, 
Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, vii., 294-5). For 
women that are wise will not LEAD APES 
IN HELL. . . . Therefore, come husband : 
maidenhead adieu. 



1600. SHAKSPEARE, Much Ado at out 
Nothing, ii., i. He that is more than 
youth is not for me, and he that is less than 
man I am not for him ; therefore I will 
. . . even LEAD his APES INTO HELL. 

1605. London Prodigal, ii. But 'tis 
an old proverb, and you know it well, that 
women, dying maids, LEAD APES IN HELL. 

1611. CHAPMAN, May-day, v. 2. I 
am beholden to her ; she was loth to have 

me LEAD APES IN HELL. 

1659. The London Chanticleers, i., 2. 
I'll always live a virgin ! What ! and 

LEAD APES IN HELL ? 

1719. DURFEY, Pills, etc., i., 179. 
Celladon at that began To talk of APES IN 
HELL. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsly Legends, 
'Bloudie Jacke.' They say she is now 
LEADING APES . . . And mends Bachelors' 
small clothes below. 

TO PUT THE DEVIL INTO HELL, 
verb. phr. (old). To copulate. 
BOCCACCIO. [HELL = female 
pudendum.'] For synonyms, see 
GREENS and RIDE. 

To GIVE HELL, verb. phr. 
(common). To trounce ; abuse ; 
or punish severely. Also (Ameri- 
can), TO MAKE ONE SMELL HELL 
(or A DAMN PARTICULAR SMELL). 

HELL-FOR-LEATHER, adv. phr. 
(common). With the utmost 
energy and desperation. 

1892. R. KIPLING, Barrack Room 
Ballads. When we rode HELL-FOR-LEA- 
THER, Both squadrons together, Not caring 
much whether we lived or we died. 

LIKE HELL, adv. phr. (com- 
mon). Desperately ; with all 
one's might. 

1855. THACKERAY, Newcomes, ch. 
xxix. I tried every place, everything ; 
went to Ems, to Wiesbaden, to Hombourg, 
and played LIKE HELL. 

Go TO HELL \phr. (common) 
An emphatic dismissal : the full 
phrase is, ' Go to hell and help 
the devil to make your mother 
into a bitch pie.' [A variant is, 



Hell-bender. 



301 



Hemp. 



' Go to hell and pump thunder.'] 
For analagous phrases, see OATHS. 

1836. MICHAEL SCOTT, Cruise of the 
Midge, p. 72. So, good men, GO TO HELL 
all of you do very mosh go to hell 
do. 

1889. Daily News, 21 Dec., p. 7,0. 
i. He was asked to see somebody about 
his evidence, and told him TO GO TO HELL. 

1892. KIPLING, Barrack Room~ Bal- 
lads. ' Ford o' Kabul River.' Kabul 

tOWn'll GO TO HELL. 

HELL AND SCISSORS I intj. 
(American). An ejaculation of 
surprise and ridicule. In England, 
SCISSORS ! 

HELL-BENDER, subs. (American). 
A drunken frolic; a tremendous 
row. Also HELL-A-POPPING and 
HELL'S DELIGHT. 

HELL- BROTH, subs, (common). 
Bad liquor. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS. 

HELL-CAT (-HAG, -HOUND, -KITE, 

etc.), subs, (old: now recognised). 
A man or woman of hellish dis- 
position ; a lewdster of either sex ; 
cf. t HALLION. 

1606. SHAKSPEARE, Macbeth, v., 7. 
Macd. Turn, HELL-HOUND, turn ! Macb, 
Of all men else I have avoided thee. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HELL- DRIVER, subs. (old). A 
coachman. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

HELLITE, subs, (gaming). A pro- 
fessional gambler. DUCANGE. 

1838. GRANT, Sketches in London. 
Prosecuting the HELLITES for assault. 

HELLOPHONE, subs. (American). 
The telephone. [From HALLOO ! 
+ PHONE.] 



HELP, subs, (colloquial : once 
literary). A hired assistant. 
LADY-HELP = a woman acting as 
a companion, and undertaking the 
lighter domestic duties with or 
without wages. 
1824. PEAKE, Americans Abroad, 

i., i. Have you seen my HELP my 

nigger. 

1839. DB QUINCEY, Murder^ as one 
of the Fine Arts, \\. For domestic HELPS 
are pretty generally in a state of transition . 

1848. BURTON, Waggeries, p. 77. 
A bevy of ready HELPS rushed upon him 
and tore him from the seat of honour. 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at 
Oxford, ch. vi. ' Well, you've had a 
pretty good day of it,' said Tom, who had 
been hugely amused; 'but I should feel 
nervous about the HELP, if I were you.' 

So HELP (or S'ELP or S'WELP) 

ME GOD (BOB, NEVER, or SAY-SO, 

etc.), phr. (common). An em- 
phatic asseveration. 

1888. J. RUNCIMAN, The Chequers, 
p. 86. I'll pay it back, S'ELP ME GORD. 

1892. A. CHEVALIER, 'Mrs. 'Enery 
'Awkins.' SELF ME BOB I'm crazy, Liza, 
you're a daisy. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, 
p. 62. 'SELF ME NEVER, old pal, it's a 
scorcher. 

1893. EMERSON, Signor Lippo, ch. 

xiv. Well, SO HELP MY BLESSED TATER, 

if this isn't our old Jose turned up again. 

HELPA, subs. (back). An apple. 

HELPLESS, adj. (colloquial). 
Drunk. For synonyms, see 
DRINKS and SCREWED. 

HEMISPHERES, subs, (venery). 
The paps. For synonyms, see 
DAIRY. 

HEMP (or HEMP-SEED, STRETCH- 

H EM P, H EM P-STRI NG,Or H EM PY), 

subs. (old). i. A rogue ; a 
candidate fit for the gallows. 
Frequently used jocularly. A 
CRACK-HALTER (q.V.). Fr., UH6 

graine de bagne. 



Hempen-bridle* 3 2 Hempen-fortune. 



1532. SIR T. MORE, Wks. [1557], 
folio 715. [He] feareth [not] to mocke the 
Sacrament, the blessed body of God, and 
ful like a STRETCH HEMPE, call it but cake, 
bred, or starc\ 

1566. GASCOIGNE, Supposes, iv., 3. 
If I come near you, HEMPSTRING, I will 
teach you to sing sol fa. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV., ii., 
i. Do, do, thou rogue, thou HEMP-SEED. 

1606. CHAPMAN, Mons. D'Olive, 
Act v., p. 135. (Plays, 1874). Van. A 
perfect young HEMPSTRING. Vu. Peace, 
least he overhear you. 

1659. Lady Alimony, iv., 6. (Doos- 
LEY, Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, xiv.,p. 350). 
Now, you HEMPSTRINGS, had you no other 
time to nun us but when we were upon our 
visits ? 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HEMP, YOUNG-HEMP, An appellation for a 
graceless boy. 

1817. SCOTT, Rob Roy, ch. xxxiv. 
She's under lawfu' authority now ; and full 
time, for she was a daft HEMPIE. 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Sheppard, 
[Ed. 1840], p. 130. 'We'll see that, young 
HEMPSEED,' replied Sharpies. 

2. (old). A halter. 

1754. FIELDING, Jonathan Wild, iv. 
14. Laudanum, therefore, being unable 
to stop the health of our hero, which the 
fruit of HEMPSEED, and not the spirit of 
poppy-seed, was to overcome. . . . 

Verb (American). To choke or 
strangle. 
1859. MATSELL, Vccabulum, s.v. 

TO WAG HEMP IN THE WIND, 
verb. phr. (old). To be hanged. 
See HEMPEN FEVER and LADDER. 

1532. SIR T. MORE, Wks. [1557]- 
folio 715. Tindall caileth blessing and 
crossynge but wagging of fplkes fingers in 
the aeyre, and feireth not (like one yt would 
at length WAGGE HEMPE IN THE WINDE) to 
mocke at all such miracles. 

HEMPEN-BRIDLE, subs, (old). A 
ship's rope or rigging. See HORSE 
and TREE. 

HEMPEN COLLAR (CANDLE, 
CIRCLE, CRAVAT, CROAK, 

GARTER, NECKTIE, or HABEAS), 



subs. (old). The hangman's 
noose; a halter. Also HEMP, 
and the HEARTY-CHOKE. Cf., 
ANODYNE NECK - LACE. See 
quot. 1595. 

1530-95. TURBERVILE, Of Two 
Desperate Men. A man in deepe des- 
paire, with HEMPE in hand, Went out in 
haste to ende his wretched dayes. 

c. 1586. MARLOWE, Jew of Malta, 
iv, 4. When the hangman had put on his 

HEMPEN. 

1594. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry VI., 
iv., 7. Ye shall have a HEMPEN CANDLE 
then, and the pap of a hatchet. 

c. 1785. WOLCOT [P. Pindar], Rights 
of Kings, Ode xviii. Your HEMP 
CRAVATS, your pray'r, your Tyburn miser. 

1819 SCOTT, Bride of Lammermoor, 
ch. xvi. I wad wager twa and a plack 
that HEMP plaits his CRAVAT yet. 

1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s v. HEM- 
PEN HABEAS. He will get over it by a 

HEMPEN HABEAS. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, ch. iv- 
If ever I know as how you makes a flat 
of my Paul, blow me tight, but I'll weave 
you a HEMPEN COLLAR : I'll hang you, 
you dog, I will. 

1886. MiSs BRADDON, Mohawks, ch. 
xxviii. A full confession were perhaps too 
much to expect. Nothing but the imme- 
diate prospect of a HEMPEN NECKLACE 
would extort that. 



HEMPEN FEVER. To DIE OF A 

HEMPEN FEVER, verb. phr. (old). 
To be hanged. For synonyms, 
see LADDER. 

1785. GROSE, Vul%. Tongue, s.v. 
HEMPEN FEVER, a man who was hanged, is 
said to have DIED OF A HEMPEN FEVER ; 
and in Dorsetshire to have been stabbed 
with a Bridport dagger ; Bridport being a 
place famous for manufacturing hemp into 
cords. 

1839. AINSWORTH, Jack Sheppard 
[1889], p. 76. She had been married four 
times; three of her husbands died of HEM- 
PEN FEVERS. 

HEM PEN- FORTUNE, subs. (old). 
Bad luck ; a term for the gallows. 



Hempen-squincy, 33 



Hen-hearted. 



1705. VANBRUGH, The Confederacy, 
v., T. If ever I see one glance of your 
HEMPEN FORTUNE again, I'm off your 
partnership for ever. 

HEMPEN - SQUINCY, subs. (old). 
Hanging. For synonyms, see 
LADDER. 

1646. RANDOLPH'S Jealous Lovers. 
Hear you, tutour, Shall not we be suspected 
for the murder, And choke with a HEMPEN 

SQUINCY. 

HEM PEN -WIDOW, subs. (old). A 
woman widowed by the gallows. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HEMPEN WIDOW, One whose Husband was 
Hanged. 

1725. New Cant Diet., s.v. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth Ed.). 
HEMPEN-WIDOW (s.), a woman whose 
husband was hanged. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg.Tongue,s.v. 

1834. HARRISON AINSWORTH, Rook- 
ivood, p. 89. In a box of the stone-jug I 
was born, Of a HEMPEN-WIDOW the kid 
forlorn Fake away. 



H EH, subs, (common). I. A woman. 
Specifically, a wife or mistress. 
For synonyms, see PETTICOAT. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s.v. HEN. 
In Black-boy Alley I've a ken, A tyke 
and fighting cock ; A saucy, tip-slang moon- 
eyed HEN, Who is oft mill-doll at block. 

2. (common). Drink money. 
See HEN DRINKING. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, 
p. 20. Whenever there's HENS on the 
crow, 'Arry's good for a hinnings, no 
fear ! 

Verb (Scots'). To funk ; to 
turn tail ; TO HEN ON = to fear to 
attempt. 

COCK AND HEN CLUB, subs. 

phr. (common). Aclubcomposed 
of men and women. 
1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 



HENS AND CHICKENS, subs, 
phr. (thieves'). Pewter measures; 
quarts and pints. Cf. y CAT AND 
KITTENS. 

1851. H. MAVHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Lond. Poor, Vol. i., p. 276. The HENS 
AND CHICKENS of the roguish low lodging- 
houses are the publicans' pewter measures; 
the bigger vessels are ' hens,' the smaller are 
'chickens.' 

HEN-DRINKING, subs, (provincial). 
See quot. 

1859. Notes and Queries, 2 S. viii., 
239. There is yet another [Yorkshire 
marriage-custom], viz., the HEN-DRINKING. 
On the evening of the wedding day the 
young men of the village call upon the 
bridegroom for a hen meaning money 
for refreshments .... should the hen be 
refused, the inmates may expect some 
ugly trick to the house ere the festivities 
terminate. 

HEN FRIGATE, subs, (nautical). A 
ship commanded by the captain's 
wife. Cf., HEN-PECKED. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1883. CLARK RUSSELL, Sailors 
Language, s.v. 

HEN-FRUIT, subs. (American). 
Eggs. 

HEN (or CHICKEN)-HEARTED, adj. 
(old : now recognised). Timor- 
ous ; cowardly. 

d. 1529. SKELTON, Why Come Ye 
not to Courte. They kepe them in their 
holdes Lyke HEN-HEARTED cuckoldes. 

1506-56. UDAL, James I. He is 
reconed a lowte and a HENNE-HEARTED 
rascall. 

1639-61. Rump Songs, i., [1662] 319. 
Let the HEN-HEARTED (_it diink whey. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionary (sth 
Ed.). HEN-HEARTED, of a cowardly, 
fearful, or timorous disposition. 

1754. B. MARTIN, Eng. Diet. (2nd 
Ed.), s.v. ' Poltron.' A coward, or HEN- 
HEARTED fellow. 

1762. FOOTE, Liar, Hi., 2. Why, 

what a dastardly, HEN-HEARTED But 

come, Papillion, this shall be your last 
campaign. 



Hen-house. 



34 Here- and- T/iereian. 



1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1812. JOHNSON, Eng. Dict. t s.v. 
HEN-HEARTED . . . a low word. 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
xxviii. Are you turned HEN-HEARTED, 
Jack? 

HEN-HOUSE, subs. (old). ^quot. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg, Tongue, s.v. 
HEN-HOUSE, a house where the woman 
rules, called also a she-house. 



HEN OF THE GAME. 
GAME. 



See 



HEN - PARTY (CONVENTION - or 
TEA-), subs, (common). An 
assemblage of women for political 
or social purposes. Cf., BULL 
or STAG-PARTY. Also, BITCH-, 
TABBY-, and CAT-PARTY. 

HEN-PECKED, adj. (old : now 
recognised). Petticoat govern- 
ment ; ruled by a woman. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HENPECKT Friggat, whose Commander and 
Officers are absolutely pway'd by their 
Wives. Ibid. HENPECKT Husband, 
whose Wife wears the Breeches. 

1695. CONGREVE, Love for Love, iv., 
13. I believe be that marries you will go 
to sea in a HEN-PECKED FRIGATE. 

1712. ARBUTHNOT, History of John 
Bull, Pt. I., ch. v. He had a termagant 
wife, and, as the neighbours said, was 
playing HENPECKED ! 

1712. Spectator, No. 479. Socrates, 
who is by all accounts the undoubted head 
of the sect of the HEN-PECKED. 

1748. T. DYCHE, Dictionaty (sth 
Ed.). HEN-PECKED, a man that is over- 
awed by his wife, and dares do nothing 
disagreeable to her inclinations. 

1771. SMOLLETT, Humphry Clinker, 
1. 27. I shall never presume to despise or 
censure any poor man for suffering himself 
to be HENPECKED, conscious how I myself 
am obliged to truckle to a domestic 
demon. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1837. DICKENS, Oliver Twist, ch. 
xxxvii. He had fallen from all the height 
and pomp of beadleship, to the lowest 
depth of the most snubbed HEN-PECKERY. 



1857. A. TROLLOPE, Barchester 
Towers, ch. iii. But Mrs. Proudie is not 
satisfied with such home dominion, and 
stretches her power over all his movements, 
and will not even abstain from things 
spiritual. In fact, the bishop is HEN- 
PECKED. 

HEN'S-ARSEHOLE. See MOUTH. 

HEN-SNATCHER, subs. (American). 
A chicken thief. 

1888. Bulletin, 24 Nov. All the 
dead-beats and suspected HEN-SNATCHERS 
plead when before the Bench that they 
were only 'mouching round," etc. 

HENS'- RIGHTS, subs. (American). 
Women's rights. 

HEN-TOED, adj. phr. (common). 
To turn the toes in walking like a 
fowl. 

HERE. HERE'S TO YOU (AT YOU, 

UNTO YOU, NOW, Or LUCK), phr. 

(common). An invitation to 
drink ; here's a health to you. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS. 

1651. CARTWRIGHT, Royal Slave. 
HERE'S TO THEE, Leocrates. 

1717. NED WARD, Wks. ii., 71. Then 
we were fain To use Hertfordshire kind- 
ness, HERE'S TO YOU again. 

1853. Diogenes ii., 46. Each a pot 
in his hand .... Observed in a style of 
remarkable ease, ' Old Buck HERE'S LUCK,' 
And then at the pewter proceeded to suck. 

HERE'S LUCK, phr. (tailors'). 
I don't believe you. 

I AM NOT HERE, phr. 
(tailors'). ' I don't feel inclined 
to work ' ; 'I wish to be left alone. ' 

HERE'S TO IT, phr. (common). 
An obscene toast. See IT, 
sense 2. 

HERE-AND-THEREIAN, subs. phr. 
(old). A rolling stone ; a person 
with no permanent address. Lex. 
Bal. y 1811. 



Hereford. 



305 



Herring-pond. 



HEREFORD, adj. (American cowboy). 
White. [Herefords are white- 
faced.] 

HEREFORDSHIRE-WEED, subs. 
(old). An oak. 

HER MAJESTY'S CARRIAGE, subs, 
phr. (common). A prison van ; 
the Queen's 'bus. See BLACK 
MARIA. Fr., V omnibus a pegres. 

HER MAJESTY'S TOBACCO PIPE, 

subs, (common). The furnace 
where the forfeited tobacco from 
the Customs House is burnt. 
[Now a thing of the past : the 
tobacco being distributed to work- 
houses, etc.] 

1871. Echo, 27 Jan. All that was 
not sold will be burnt, according to 
custom, in HER MAJESTY'S TOBACCO PIPE, 
We cannot think such waste justifiable. 

HERMIT(orBALDHEADED HERMIT), 

subs, (venery). The penis. For 
synonyms, see CREAMSTICK and 
PRICK. 

HEROD. To OUT-HEROD HEROD, 
verb. phr. (colloquial). To out- 
do ; specifically (theatrical) to 
excel in rant. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Hatnlet, iii., 2. 
Oh, it offends me to the soul to hear a 
robustious, perriwig-pated fellow tear a 
passion to tatters, to very rags, to split the 
ears of the groundlings .... it OUT- 
HERODS HEROD. 

H ERRING. NEITHER FISH, FLESH, 

FOWL, NOR GOOD RED HERRING, 

phr. (old). Neither one thing nor 
the other. 

1682. DRYDEN, Duke of Guise, 
Epil. (6th line fiom end). Neuters in their 
middleway of fleering, Are NEITHER FISH, 

NOR FLESH, NOR GOOD RED HERRING. 

TO THROW A SPRAT TO CATCH 
A HERRING (or WHALE), verb, 
phr. (old). To forego an advan- 
tage in the hope of greater profit. 



1826. BUCKSTONE, Luke the Labourer, 
i., 2. I give dat like THROWING AWAY A 

SPRAT TO CATCH A HERRING, though I 

hope on this occasion to catch a bigger fish. 

1890. GRANT ALLEN, Tents ofShem, 
ch. xix. He's CASTING A SPRAT TO CATCH 
A WHALE. 

DEAD AS A HERRING (or SHOT- 
TEN HERRING), adv. phr. (old). 
Quite dead. [Herrings die sooner 
on leaving the water than most 
fish.] See DEAD. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives of 
Windsor, ii., 3. By gar de HERRING is NO 
DEAD as I vill kill him. 

1785. BURNS, Death and Dr. Horn- 
book. I'll nail the self- conceited sot As 
DEAD'S A HERRIN'. 

1790. RHODES, Bombastes Furioso, 
Sc. 4. Ay, DEAD AS HERRINGS herrings 
that are red. 

LIKE HERRINGS IN A BARREL, 

adv. phr. (common). Very 
crowded. 

1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, 
p. 117. People jammed inside like HER- 
RINGS IN A BARREL. 

THE DEVIL A BARREL THE 
BETTER HERRING, phr. (old). 

All bad alike Lex. Bal. In 
modern American, all alike ; in- 
distinguishable. Cf., SARDINE, 

HERRING - GUTTED, adj. (old). 
Lanky ; thin. GROSE. 

HERRING-POND, subs, (common). 
The sea ; specifically, the North 
Atlantic Ocean. See BRINY and 
PUDDLE. To BE SENT ACROSS 
THE HERRING-POND = to be trans- 
ported. 

1722. England's Path to Wealth. 
"Pis odds but a finer country, cheaper and 
better food and raiment, wholesomer air, 
easier rents and taxes, will tempt many of 
your countrymen to cross the HERRING- 
POND. 

1729. GAY, Polly, i., i. Bless us 
all ! how little are our customs known 
on this side the HERRING POND ! 

20 



Hertfordshire-kindness. 36 Hiccius Doccius. 



1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1823. BEE, Diet. 'lurf, etc., s.v. 
HERRING-POND the sea, the Atlantic ; 
and ha who is gone across it is said to be 
lagged, or gone a Botanizing. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, p. 256, 
ed. 1854. You're too old a hand for the 

HERRING-POND. 

1864. M. E. BRADDON, Henry 
Dunbar, ch. xxv. You're not going to 
run away? You're not going to renounce 
the pomps and vanities of this wicked 
world, and make an early expedition across 
the HERRING-POND eh? 

1884. PHILLIPPS - WOOLLEY, Trot- 
tings of a Tenderfoot. Everyone nowadays 
has read as much as he or she cares to 
about the voyage across the HERRING- 
POND. 

1889. Notes and Queries, 7 S., vii., 
p. 36, c. 2. Terms which have lived in 
America, and again crossed the HERRING- 
POND with modern traffic. 

1890. Punch, 6 Feb. Saturday. 
My connection with war ended. Calculate 
I start to-morrow with the Show across the 
HERRING-POND, to wake up the Crowned 
Heads of Europe ! 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody, ch. xvii. 
If so, I'll I'll cut him, when I cross the 
er HERRIN' POND. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger's 
Sweetheart, p. 119. I guess we have 
ruined one or two well-known authors, on 
the other side of the HERRING POND. 



HERTFORDSHIRE-KINDNESS, subs. 

(old). An acknowledgment, or 

return, in kind, of favours received. 

(But see quots., 1662, 1690, and 

1738). 

1662. FULLER, Worthies. This is 
generally taken in a good and grateful 
sense, for the mutual return of favours 
received : it being (belike) observed that 
the people in this county at entertainments 
drink back to them who drank to them. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HERTFORDSHIRE-KINDNESS, Drinking to 
the same Man again. 

1717. NED WARD, Wks., ii., 7. 
Then we were fain To use HERTFORDSHIRB- 
KINDNESS, Here's to you again. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Conversations. 
Neverout. My Lord, this moment I did 



myself the honour to drink to your Lord- 
ship. Lord Smart. Why then that's 
HERTFORDSHIRE KINDNESS. Ne-verout. 
Faith, my Lord, I pledged myself ; for I 
drank twice together without thinking. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HERTFORDSHIRE KINDNESS, drinking 
twice to the same person. 



HEWGAG. THE HEWGAG, subs. 
(American). A name for an 
undeterminate, unknown, mythi- 
cal creature. Slangy Jargon, and 
Cant. 

HEY-GAMMER-COOK. To PLAY AT 
HEY-GAMMER-COOK, verb. phr. 
(venery). To copulate. For 
synonyms, see GREENS and RIDE. 



1720. C. JOHNSI 
and Py rates, ' Margare 



ON, Highwaymen 
t Simpson ' (q.v.). 



Hiccius Doccius, subs. phr. (Old 
Cant). A juggler; also a shifty 
fellow or trickster. 

1676. SHADWELL, Virtuoso, ii., p. 
19. I shall stand here till one of them has 
whipt away my Mistris about business, 
with a HIXIUS Doxius, with the force of 
Repartee, and this, and that, and Every- 
thing in the world. 

1678. BUTLER, Hudibras, iii., 3, 579. 
At Westminster, and Hickses-Hall, And 
HICCIUS DOCKIUS play'd in all. 

1688. WYCHERLEY, Country Wife, 
iii. That burlesque is a Hocus-pocus 
trick they have got, which by the virtue 
of HICTIUS DOCTIUS, topsey-turvey, etc. 

1812. JOHNSON, Eng. Diet., s.v. 
HICCIUS DOCCIUS .... a cant word for a 
juggler ; one that plays fast and loose. 

Adj. (old). Drunk; slovenly. 
Also, HICKEY (q.v.). For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

1733. NORTH, Examen, L, 3, 137 
(1740). The author with his HICCIUS- 
DOXIUS delivery. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HICKSIUS Doxius, Drunk. 



Hie J ace t. 



307 



Hiding. 



Hie JACET, subs. phr. (common). 
A tombstone ; also a memorial 
inscription. [From the opening 
words. ] 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, Alts Well, etc., 
iii., 6. The merit of service is seldom 
attributed to the true .... performer. I 
would have that drum . ... or HIC 
JACET. 

1858-59. TENNYSON, Idylls of the 
King ('Vivien')- Among the cold HIC 
JACKTS of the dead. 

HICK, subs. (Old Cant). I. Aman; 
specifically a countryman ; a 
booby. Also (American thieves') 
HICKJOP and HICKSAM. For 
synonyms, see JOSKIN. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HICK, any Person of whom any Prey can 
be made, or Booty taken from ; also a silly 
Country Fellow. 

1720. SMITH, Lives of Highwaymen 
and Pyrates, ii., 39. Among whom was 
* country farmer .... which was not 
missed at all by the Country HICK. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. Song 3. 'Th 
Thief-catcher's Prophesy.' The Eighth is 
a Bulk, that can bulk any HICK. 

1754. ScoundreFs Diet. The 
fourteenth, a gamester, if he sees the HICK 
sweet He presently drops down a cog in 
the street. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HlCKETY-SPLiT, adj. (American). 
With all one's might ; at top 
speed ; HAMMER AND TONGS 

(q.V.) ; FULL CHISEL (q.V.). 

HICKEY, adj. (old). See quot. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.r. 
HICKEY, Tipsy; not quite drunk; elated. 

HICKORY-SHIRT, subs. (American). 
A checked shirt, cotton or 
woollen. 



HIDE, subs, (common). The human 
skin. Once literary ; now collo- 
quial and vulgar. 



1568. Bannatyne, MSS., ' When 
Flora, etc.' (Hunterian Club, 1879-88). 
Sche is so brycht of HYD and hew, I lufe 
hot hir allane I wene. 

1607. MARSTON, What You Will, 
ii., i. A skubbing railer, whose course 
harden'd fortune, Grating his HIDE, gauling 
his starued ribs, Sittes hauling at Deserts 
more battle fate. 

1731. C. COFFEY, The Devil io Pay, 
Sc. 5. Come, and spin, you drab, or I'll 
tan your HIDE for you. 

1892. KIPLING, Barrack-Room Bal- 
lads. 'Gunga-Din.' An' for all 'is dirty 'IDB 
'e was white, clear white, inside. 

Verb (common). To flog. 
For synonyms, see TAN. 

1868. Cassell's Mag., May, p. 80. 
This was carried across the yard to Jacky 
as a regular challenge, and some said that 
Kavanagh and his friends were coming 
over to HIDE Jacky after dinner. 

1885. Punch, 29 Aug. p. 98. And 
the silver-topped rattan with which tha 
boys I used to HIDE. 

HIDEBOUND, adj. (old : now recog- 
nised). Barren ; intractable ; 
niggardly ; pedantic ; utterly im- 
movable. 
1606. Return from Parnassus, ii., 4 

(DODSLEY, Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, ix., 

125). Any of the HIDEBOUND brethren of 

Oxford or Cambridge. 

1672. WYCHERLEY, Love in a Wood, 
i., 2. I am as barren and HIDEBOUND as 
one of your scribbling poets, who are sots 
in company for all their wit. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HIDEBOUND HORSE, whose Skin sticks 
very close, and tite like a Pudding Bag, 
usually when very Fat. Ibid. HIDEBOUND 
MUSE, Stiff, hard of Delivery, Sir J. 
Suckling call'd Ben Johnson's so. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1893. Pall Mall Gaz., 24 Feb. 
' High Time to Get Up.' The most dragging 
inertness and the most HIDE-BOUND celerity. 

HIDING, subs, (common). A thrash- 
ing. For synonyms, see TAN- 
NING. 

1853. BRADLEY, Verdant Green, ii., 
p. 23. May the Gown give the Town a 
jolly good HIDING. 



Higgledy-piggledy. 308 



High. 



1864. MARK LEMON, Jest Book, p. 
236. Some peoole have a notion that vil- 
lany ought to be exposed, though we must 
confess we think it a thing that deserves a 
HIDING. 

1871. All the Year Round, 18 Feb. 
p. 288. Served me right if I'd got a 
HIDING. 

1883. Pall Mall Gaz., 16 Apr., p. 
7, c. 2. They should stone all boys they 
met who were not members of the society, 
or in default themselves receive a good 
HIDING. 

1888. Sportsman, 22 Dec. The 
Chairman told Deakin he could scarcely 
expect anything but a HIDING for being 
connected with such a scurrilous publica- 
tion. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Mirror, 30 
Jan., p. 7, c. i. Before Paddock could 
claim the victory, which cost the Redditch 
fighter one of the severest HIDINGS he ever 
had to put up with. 



HlGGLEDY - PIGGLEDY, adj. (Old 

Cant : now recognised). In con- 
fusion ; lopsy-turvy ; at sixes and 
sevens. 

1598. FLORID, Worlde of Wordes^ 
s.v. Alia rappa, snatchingly, HIGLEDI- 
PIGLEDIE, shiftingly, rap and run. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HiGGLEDE-PiGGLEDY.all together,as Hoggs 
and Piggs lie Nose in Arse. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1758. A. MURPHV, The Upholsterer, 
\\ . Ambassadors and Hair-Cutters, all HIG- 
GLEDY-PIGGLEDY together. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1812. JOHNSON, Eng. Diet., s.v. 
HIGGLEDY-PIGGLEDY, a cant word, cor- 
rupted from higgle, which denotes any con- 
fused mass, as higglers carry a huddle of 
provisions together. 

1849. DICKENS, David Copperfield, 
ch. xxii., p. 199. His name's got all the 
letters in it, HIGGLEDY-PIGGLEDY. 

1873. Miss BROUGHTON, Nancy, ch. 
ii. We are all HIGGLEDY-PIGGLEDY at 
sixes and sevens ! 



gard, 



1876. M. E. BRADDON, Joshua Hag- 
i, ch. xvi. 'If some of you will sit 



down,' remonstrated Judith, ' I'll pour out 
the tea. But I don't feel as if anybody 
wanted it while you're standing about HIG- 
GLEDY-PIGGLEDY.' 



HIGGLER, subs, (old). A hawker. 

HIGH, adj. (American). - Drunk. 
For synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

2. (colloquial). Stinking ; 
GAMEY (q.v.). ; whence, by impli- 
cation, diseased (as a prostitute) ; 
obscene in intention and effect. 

THE HIGH AND DRY, subs. phr. 
(clerical). The High Church or 
Anglo-Catholic party in the Estab- 
lishment, as opposed to the LOW 
AND SLOW (q.v.), or Evangelical 
section. Cf., BROAD AND SHAL- 
LOW, 

1854. CONYBEARE, Church Parties, 
74. Its adherents [of the High Church] 
are fallen from their high estate, and are 
contemptuously denominated THE HIGH 
AND DRY, just as the parallel development 
of the Low Church is nicknamed ' low and 
slow.' 

1857. ANTHONY TROLLOPE, Bar- 
Chester Towers, ch. liii. Who belongs to 
THE HIGH AND DRY church, the High 
Church as it was some fifty years since, 
before tracts were written and young cler- 
gymen took upon themselves the highly 
meritorious duty of cleaning churches ? 

1886. Graphic, 10 Apr., 399. In the 
Church have we not the three schools of 
HIGH AND DRY, Low and blow, and 
Broad and Shallow? 

HIGH AND DRY, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). Stranded ; aban- 
doned ; irrecoverable. 

1889. Pall Mall Gaz., 1 8 Oct., 6, i. 
It seems to me that Mr. Chamberlain must 
really look out or he will find himself, as 
the result of that insidious ' mellowing 
process' to which Mr. Matthews has 
testified, landed HIGH AND DRY in a Tory- 
ism compared to which Sir Walter 
Barttelot will show in Radical colours. 

HIGH AND MIGHTY, adv. phr. 
(colloquial). Arrogant ; im- 
perious ; proud ; ' on the high 
horse,' or the ' HIGH ROPES ' 
(q.v.) ; full of SIDE (q.v.). 



High-bellied. 



309 



High-fly. 



1891. N. GOULD, Double Event, p. 
131. None of your HIGH and MIGHTY 
games with me. 

1892. HENLEY and STEVENSON, 
Deacon Brcdie, i., 2. Ye need na be sae 
HIGH AND MIGHTY onyway. 

1892. HUME NISBET, Bushrangers 
Sweetheart, p. 49. 'MIGHTY HIGH some 
people are, ain't they ? ' the man observed 
loudly, straightening himself, and ordering 
a nobbier for himself. 

Too HIGH FOR ONE'S NUT, adv. 
phr. (American). Out of one's 
reach ; beyond one's capacity ; 
OVER ONE'S BEND (q.V.\ 

You CAN'T GETHIGH ENOUGH, 
verb. phr. (common;. A derisive 
comment on any kind of failure. 
[Probably obscene in origin.] 

HOW IS THAT FOR HIGH ? phr. 

(American). 'What do you think 
of it ? ' [Once a tag universal ; 
common wear now.] 

1860. BARTLETT, Americanisms, s.v, 
HIGH. For when he slapped my broad- 
brim off, and asked, How's THAT FOR 
HIGH? It roused the Adam in me, and 
I smote him hip and thigh ! 

1872. CLEMENS (Mark Twain), 
Roughing It, 334. We are going to get 
it up regardless of expense. [He] was 
always nifty himself, and so you bet his 
funeral ain't going to be no slouch, solid 
silver door-plate on his coffin, six plumes 
on the hearse, and a nigger on the box in a 
biled shirt and a plug hat, HOW'S THAT 
FOR HIGH ? 

1889. Pall Mall Gaz., 23 Sep., p. 2, 
c. i. 'Cricket' stories are the thing just 

nOW. HOW IS THIS FOR HIGH? 

HIGH-BELLIED (or HIGH IN THE 
BELLY), adj. phr. (colloquial). 
Far gone in pregnancy. Also 
HlGH-WAISTED. 



HIGHBINDER, subs. (American). I. 
A Chinese blackmailer. 

2. (political American). A 
political conspirator. NORTON. 



HIGH-BLOKE, subs. (American). i. 
A judge. 

2. (American). A well-dressed 
man; aspLAWGER(^.z/.). MAT- 
SELL. 

HIGHER - MALTHUSIANISM, subs, 
phr. (colloquial). Sodomy. 

HIGHFALUTE, verb. (American). 
To use fine words. Also TO YARN 
(q.V.}. See HlGHFALUTING. Fr., 
faire Vetroite. 

HlGHFALUTING, subs. (formerly 
American : now general). Bom- 
bast ; rant. 

1865. Orchestra. We should not 
think of using HIGH-FALUTIN on ordinary 
serious occasions, and that we never shall 
use it in future, unless we happen to speak 
of the Porcupine critic. 

1886. Pall Mall Gaz., 3 May, 6, 2. 
A glib master of frothy fustian, of 
flatulent HIGH-FALUTIN', and of oratorical 
bombast. 

Adj. (general). Bombastic ; 
fustian ; thrasonical. 

1870. FRISWELL, Modern Men of 
Letters. A driveller of tipsy, high-flown, 
and HIGH-FALUTIN' nonsense. 

1884. Echo, 17 Mar., p. i, c. 4. It is 
the boast of HIGH-FALUTIN' Americans 
that theirs is a country ' where every man 
can do as he darn pleases.' 

HIGH-FEATHER. IN HIGH 
FEATHER, adv. phr. (colloquial). 
In luck ; on good terms with 
oneself and the world. 

HIGH-FLY. To BE ON THE HIGH- 
FLY, verb. phr. (thieves'). Speci- 
fically, to practise the begging- 
letter imposture, but (generally) 
to tramp the country as a beggar. 

1839. BRANDON, Poverty, Mendicity, 
and Crime, 163. The HIGH-FLY 
beggars, with letters, pretending to be 
broken-down gentlemen, captains, etc. 



Highflyer. 



310 



High-gig. 



1857. SNOWDEN, Ma^. Assistant, 
(3rd ed.), p. 445. Begging letters THE 

HIGHFLY. 



HIGHFLYER, subs. (old). I. Any- 
thing or anybody out of the com- 
mon, in opinion, pretension, 
attire, and so forth : as a prostitute 
(high - priced and well - dressed) ; 
an adventurer (superb in impu- 
dence and luck). 2. A dandy, 
male or female, of the first water 
3. A fast coach. 

1690 DRYDEN. Prol. to Mistakes in 
Wks., p. 473 (Globe). He's no HIGH- 
FLYER he makes no sky-rockets, His 
squibs are only levelled at your pockets. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HIGH-FLYERS, Impudent, Forward, Loose, 
Light Women. Also, bold adventurers. 

1693. CONGREVE, Old Bachelor, i., i. 
Well, as HIGH a FLYER as you are, I have 
a lure may make you stoop. 

1706. R. ESTCOURT, Fair Example, 
Act i., p. 10. You may keep company 
with the HIGHEST FLYER of 'em all. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1818. SCOTT, Heart of Midlothian, 
i. Mail-coach races against mail-coach, 
and HIGH - FLYER against HIGH - FLYER, 
through the most remote districts of 
Britain. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry, v. As 
you have your HIGH-FLIERS at Almack's, 
at the West End, we have also some ' choice 
r eatures at our All Max in the East. 

1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s.v. HIGH- 
FLYERS women of the town, in keeping, 
who job a coach, or keep a couple of 
saddle-horses at least. 

1830. LYTTON, Paul Clifford, (Ed. 
1854) p. 75. Howsomever, the HIGH- 
FLYERS doesn't like him ; and when he 
takes people's money, he need not be quite 
so cross about it ! 

1860 DICKENS, Uncommercial 
Traveller, xxii., p. 131. The old room on 
the ground floor where the passengers of 
the HIGH-FLYERS used to dine. 

1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend, 
i., 5. Mrs. Boffin, Wegg ... is a 
'IGHFLYER at fashion. 



1892. MILLIKEN, ' 'Arry Ballads, p. 
40. Foller yer leader, .... all who can 
carry sufficient skyscrapers to keep in the 
'unt, with that 'IGHFLYER 'Arry. 

4. (thieves'). A beggar with a 
certain style ; a begging-letter 
writer ; a broken swell. 

1851-61. H. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. 
and Lond. Poor, vol. I., p. 268. While 
pursuing the course of a HIGH-FLYER 
(genteel beggar) 

1858. A. MAYHEW, Paved with Gold, 
bk. III., ch. iii., p. 268. He was a HIGH- 
FLIER, a genteel beggar. 

1887. Standard, 20 June, p. 5, c. 2. 
The pretended noblemen and knights who 
1 say they have suffered by war, fire, or 
captivity, or have been driven away, and 
lost all they had,' are still represented by 
the HIGH - FLYERS or broken-down 
gentlemen. 

5. (circus). A swing fixed in 
rows in a frame much in vogue 
at fairs. 

HIGH-FLYING, subs. (old). i. Ex- 
travagance in opinion ; pretension 
or conduct. 

1689. DRYDEN, Epil. to Lee's 
Princess of Cleves, 6. I railed at wild 
young sparks ; but without lying Never 
was man worse thought on for HIGH- 
FLYING. 

2. (thieves'). Begging; THE 

HIGH-FLY (j'.Z'.); STILLING (q.V.). 

HIGH -GAG, subs. (American). A 
whisperer. M ATSELL. 

THE HIGH- GAG, subs. phr. 
(American). Telling secrets. 
MATSELL. 

HIGH -GAME, subs, thieves'). Set 
quot. 

1889. C. T. CLARKSON and J. HALL 
RICHARDSON, Police, p. 321. A mansion 

.... a HIGH GAME. 

HIGH-GIG. IN HIGH -GIG, adv. 
phr. (old). In good fettle ; lively. 
Cf., GIG. 



High-go. 



High-jinks. 



1819. MOORE, Tom Crib, p. 15. 
Rather sprightly the Bear IN HIGH-GIG. 

HIGH-GO, subs, (common). A 
drinking bout ; a frolic. 

HIGH-HEELED SHOES. To HAVE 

HIGH-HEELED SHOES ON, verb. 

pkr. (American). To set up as a 
person of consequence ; to DO THE 
GRAND (q.v.). 

HIGH HORSE. To BE (or GET) ON 
(or RIDE) THE HIGH HORSE, verb, 
phr. (colloquial). To give one- 
self airs ; to stand on one's dignity ; 
to take offence. [Fr. montcr sur 
ses grands chevaux. The simile 
is common to most languages,] 

1716. ADDISON, Freeholder, 5 Mar. 
He told me, he did not know what travel- 
ling was good for, but to teach a man to 
RIDE THE GREAT HORSE, to jabber French, 
and to talk against passive obedience. 

1836. MARRYAT, Midshipman Easy, 
ch. xii. He was determined to RIDE THE 
HIGH HORSE and that there should be no 
Equality Jack in future. 

1842. Comic Almanack, p. 327. Yet 
Dublin deems the foul extortion fair, And 
swears that, as he's RIDDEN THE HIGH 
HORSE, So long and well, she now will 
make him mayor. 

1864. Times, 5 July. Mr. Gladstone 
in the Dano-German Debate. The right 
hon. gentleman then GOT ON what I may 
call HIS HIGH HORSE, and he would not 
give us the slightest opinion upon any 
matter of substantive policy, because that, 
he said, would be accepting office upon 
conditions. 

1868. WILKIE COLLINS, The Moon- 
stone, 2nd Period, 3rd Narr., ch. ii. Miss 
Rachael has her faults 'I've never denied 
it,' he began. ' And RIDING THE HIGH 
HORSE now and then is one of them.' 

HIGH -JINKS, subs. (old). i. An 
old game variously played. [Most 
frequently dice were thrown by 
the company, and those upon 
whom the lot fell were obliged to 
assume and maintain for a time a 
certain fictitious character, or to 



repeat a certain number of fescen- 
nine verses in a particular order. 
If they departed from the charac- 
ters assigned . . . they incurred 
forfeits, which were compounded 
for by swallowing an additional 
bumper. Guy Mannering^ 1836. 
Note to ch. xxxii.] 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HIGHJINKS, a Play at Dice who Drinks. 

1780. RAMSAY, Maggy Johnston, i., 
25. The queff or cup is filled to the brim, 
then one of the company takes a pair of 
dice, and after crying HY-JINKS, he 
throws them out ; the number he casts out 
points out the person that must drink ; he 
who threw beginning at himself number 
one, and so round till the number of the 
person agree with that of the dice (which 
may fall upon himself if the number be 
within twelve) ; then he sets the dice to 
him, or bids him take them ; he on whom 
they fall is obliged to drink, or pay a small 
forfeiture in money, then throws, and so 
on. But if he forgets to cry 'Hy-jinks' 
he pays a forfeiture into the bank. Now, 
he on whom it falls to drink (if there be 
anything in the bank worth drawing) gets 
it all if he drinks ; then with a great deal of 
caution he empties his cup, sweeps up the 
money, and orders the cup to be filled 
again, and then throws ; for if he errs in 
the articles he loses the privilege of draw- 
ing the money. The articles are (i) 
Drink, (2) Draw, (3) Fill, (4) Cry 'Hy- 
jinks,' (5) Count just, (6) Chuse your 
doublet, man viz., when two equal num- 
bers of the dice is thrown, the person whom 
you chuse must pay a double of the common 
forfeiture, and so must you when the dice 
is in his hand (j/c). 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Manneiing, ch. 
xxxvi. The frolicsome company had 
begun to practise the ancient and now 
forgotten pastime of HIGH JINKS. 

1861. H. KINGSLEY, Ravenshoe, Iv. 
He had made an engagement to drive Lord 
Saltire, the next morning, up to Wargrave 
in a pony-chaise, to look at Barrymore 
House, and the place where the theatre 
stood, and where the game of HIGH JINKS 
had been played so bravely fifty years 
before. 

2. See quot., and cf. sense I. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue. A 
gambler at dice, who, having a strong 
head, drinks to intoxicate his adversary, or 
pigeon. Under this head are also classed 



High-kicker. 



312 



High-men. 



those fellows who keep little goes, take in 
insurances ; also, attendants at the races, 
and at the E O tables ; chaps always on 
the look out to rob unwary countrymen at 
cards, etc. 

3. (common). A frolic ; a row. 
[From sense I.] 

1861. HUGHES, Tom Brown at Ox- 
ford, i. All sorts of HIGH JINKS go on on 
the grass plot. 

1872. Daily Telegraph, 13 Sept. 
' Filey the Retired.' Frisky Filey cannot 
assuredly be called. There are no HIGH 
JINKS on her jetty; and, besides, she 
hasn't got a jetty, only a ' Brigg.' 

1890. Pall Mall Gaz., 24 July, 4, 2. 
Yesterday and to-day there have been HIGH 
JINKS in Petworth Park, rich and poor for 
miles round being invited, and right royally 
feasted on the coming of age of Lord and 
Lady Leconficld's eldest son. 

1891. Licensed Viet. Gaz,, 3 Apr. 
While Bank Holiday was being celebrated 
with such eclat at Kempton, they were 
carrying on HIGH JINKS over hurdles and 
fences at Manchester. 

1892. Salas Journal, 2 July, p. 223. 
HIGH JINKS with the telephone have been 
the order of the day at Warwick Castle ; 
taps and wires have been turned on and off, 
and floods of melody of various kinds have 
delighted listening ears. 

1893. National Observer, 25 Feb., 
i x> > 357- Time was when there were HIGH 
JINKS in that vast quadrangle. 

TO BE AT HIS HIGH JINKS, phr. 
(common). To be stilted and 
arrogant in manner ; to RIDE THE 
HIGH HORSE (q.v.}. Fr., faire 
sa merde or sa poire. 

HIGH-KICKER, subs, (colloquial). 
Specifically, a dancer whose speci- 
ality is the high kick or the porte 
(farmes ; whence, by metaphor, 
any desperate SPREESTER (q.v.}, 
male or female. 

HIGH -KILT ED, adj. (Scots'). 
Obscene or thereabouts ; FULL 
FLAVOURED (>.V.. 



HIGHLAND-BAIL, subs. (Scots'). 
The right of the strongest ; force 
majeure. 

1816. SCOTT, Antiquary, ch. xxix. 
The mute eloquence of the miller and 
smith, which was vested in their clenched 
fists, was prepared to give HIGHLAND BAIL 
for their arbiter. 

HIGH LAWYER, subs. (old). A 
highwayman. For synonyms, see 
ROAD AGENT. 

1592. JOHN DAY, Blind Beggar, p. 
2i (Ed. Bullen). He wo'd be your prigger, 
your prancer, your HIGH-LAWYER. 

1610. ROWLANDS, Martin Mark-all, 
p. 50 (H. Club's Rept., 1874). He first 
gaue termes to robbers by the high-way, 
that such as robbe on horse-backe were 
called HIGH LAWYERS, and those who 
robbed on foote, he called Padders. 

HIGH-LIVER, subs. (old). A gar- 
retteer ; a thief housed in an attic. 
Hence, HIGH - LIVING = lodging 
in a garret. Lex. Bal. 

HIGH -MEN, subs. (old). Dice 
loaded to show HIGH numbers. 
Also, HIGH-RUNNERS. See FUL- 
HAMS and LOW-MEN. 

1594. NASHE, Unf. Traveller in 
Wks. [GROSART], v., 27. The dice of late 
are growen as melancholy as a dog, HIGH 
MEN and low men both prosper alike. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives, i., 
3. Let vultU'es gripe thy guts ! for gourd 
and fullam holds, And HIGH and low be- 
guiles the rich and poor. 

1598. FLORIO, A Worlde of Wordes. 
Pise, false dice, HIGH MEN or low men. 

1605. London Prodigal, i., i. I be- 
queath two bale of false dice, videlicet, 
HIGH MEN and low men, fullams, stop- 
catertraies, and other bones of function. 

1615. HARINGTON, Epigrams, i., 79. 
Your HIGH And low MEN are but trifles. 

1657-1733. JOHN DENNIS, Letters, ii., 
407. Shadwell is of opinion, that your 
bully, with his box and his false dice, is 
an honester fellow than the rhetorical au- 
thor, who makes use of his tropes and 
figures, which are his HIGH and his low 
RUNNERS, to cheat us at once of our money 
and of our intellectuals. 



High-nosed. 



3'3 



High-ropes. 



1822. SCOTT, Fort, of Nigel, ch. 
xxiii. Men talk of HIGH and low DICE. 

HIGH-NOSED, adj. phr. (colloquial). 
Very proud in look and in fact ; 
supercilious in bearing and speech; 
SUPERIOR (q.V.). 

HIGH- [or GAY-] OLD (TIME, GAME, 
LIAR, etc.], adj. phr. (common). 
A general intensitive : e.g., 
HIGH OLD TIME = a very merry 
time indeed ; HIGH OLD LIAR = 
a liar of might; HIGH OLD DRUNK 
=an uncommon BOOZE (q.v.). 

1883. Referee, n Mar., p. 3, c. 2. 
All the children who have been engaged in 
the Drury Lane pantomime took tea on the 
stage, and had a HIGH OLD TIME (while it 
lasted). 

1888. J. MCCARTHY and MRS. CAMP- 
BELL-PRAED, Ladies Gallery, ch. xxxv. 
I went down to Melbourne, intending to 
have a HIGH OLD TIME. 

1891. Murray's Mag,, Aug., p. 202. 
There will be a Want of Confidence Mo- 
tion, and a HIGH OLD debate. 

1891. J. NEWMAN, Scamping Tricks, 
p. 7, You are a big fraud and a HIGH OLD 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
35, We'd the HIGHEST OLD game. 

1892. F. ANSTEY, Voces Populi, 
'The Riding Class,' p. 108. We've bin 
haying a GAY OLD time in 'ere, 

HIGH-PAD (or TOBY, or HIGH-TOBY- 
SPLICE), subs. (old). i. The 
highway. Also, HIGH - SPLICE 
TOBY. For synonyms, see DRU M, 
1567. HARMAN, Caveat, p, 86. Roge, 

Novve bynge we a waste to the HYGH PAD, 

the ruffmanes is by. 

c. 1819. Slang Song (quoted in notes to 
Don Juan, x., 19). On the HIGH-TO#Y- 
SPLICE flash the muzzle In spite of each 
gallows old scout. 

1836. H. M. MILKER, Turf ins Ride 
to York, i., sc. 2. Come, lads a stirrup- 
cup at parting, and then hurrah for the 
game of HIGH-TOBY. 

1876. HINDLEY, Adventures of a 
Cheap Jack, p. 4. Halting for a few hours 
at mid-day during the heat in the HIGH 
SPICE-TOBY, as we used to call the main 
road. 



2. (old). A highwayman. 

Also, HIGH-TOBYMAN (or -GLOAK). 

For synonyms, see ROAD AGENT. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HIGH PAD, a Highwayman, Highway 
Robber well Mounted and Armed. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s.v. HIGH 
TOBY-GLOAK, a highway robber well 
mounted. 

1834. ArNswoRTH, Rookivood, bk. 
IV., ch i. Tom King, a noted HIGH-TOBY 
GLOAK of his time. 

1857. Punch, 31 Jan. (from slang 
song). That long over Newgit their Wor- 
ships may rule, As the HIGH-TOBY, mob, 
crack, and screeve model school. 

3. (old). Highway robbery. 

1819, VAUX, Cant. Diet. HIGH- 
TOBY, the game of highway robbery, that 
is exclusively on horseback. 

HIGH-POOPED, adj. (colloquial). 
Heavily buttocked. 

HIGH-RENTED, adj. (popular). i. 
Hot. 



2. (thieves'). Very well known 
to the police ; HOT (q.v.). 

HIGH-ROLLER, suds. (American). 
A GOER (q.v.); a fast liver; a 
heavy gambler ; a HIGHFLYER 



1887. FRANCIS, Saddle and Moccasin, 
He's a HIGH-ROLLER, by gum ! 

HIGH - ROPES. To BE ON THE 

HIGH ROPES, verb. phr. (common). 
To be angry or excited. Also to 
put on airs ; to stand on one's 
dignity ; to ride the HIGH-HORSE 
(q.v.). 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
To BE ON THE HIGH ROPES, to be in a 
passion. 



1869. 



MATSELL, Vocabutum, s.v. 



High-seasoned. 3 T 4 



High-toned. 



1866. YATES, Land at Last, ii. He's 
ON THE HIGH ROPES, is Master Charley ! 
Some of you fellows have been lending him 
half a-crown, or that fool Caniche has 
bought one of his pictures for seven-and- 
six ! 

HIGH - SEASONED (or HIGHLY- 
SPICED), adj. (colloquial). 
Obscene. For synonyms, see 
SPICY. 

HIGH- (or CLOUTED-) SHOON, suls. 
(old). A countryman. For syn- 
onyms, see JOSKIN. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s..v. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

HIGH-SNIFFING, adj. phr. (collo- 
quial). Pretentious ; supercilious; 
very obviously better than one's 
company; HIGH-NOSED (q.v.). 

HIGH-STEPPER, subs, (common). 
An exemplar, male or female, of 
what is fashionable in conversa- 
tion, conduct, or attire ; a 
SWELL (q.v. ). Also, a person of 
spirit. Whence, adj., HIGH- 
STEPPING (or HIGH-PACING) = 
conspicuously elegant or gallant 
in dress, speech, manner, con- 
duct, anything. 

1891. GUNTER, Miss Nobody of 
Nowhere, ch. ix. From her actions and 
style I'm pretty certain she's English and 

a HIGH-STEPPER. 

HIGH-STOMACHED, adj. (colloquial). 
Proud ; disdainful ; very valiant. 

HIGH-STRIKES, subs, (common). 
A corruption of ' hysterics.' 

1838. SELBY, Jacques Strop, ii., 4. 
Capital! . . . didn't I do the HIGH-STRIKES 
famously. 

1860. Miss WETHERELL, Say and 
Seal, ch. vii. She wants you to come. I'm 
free to confess she's got the HIGH-STRIKES 
wonderful. 



HIGH -TEA, subs, (colloquial). A 
tea with meat, etc. In Lancashire 
BAGGING (q.v.). 

1888. Snorting Life, 15 Dec. 
Following run there will be HIGH TEA and 
a grand smoking concert, to which visitors 
are cordially invited. 

HIGH-TI, subs. (American : Williams 
Coll.). A showy recitation; at 
Harvard = a SQUIRT (q.v.). 

HIGH -TIDE (or WATER) subs, (collo- 
quial). Rich for the moment ; 
The state of being FLUSH (q.v.). 
For synonyms, see WELL BAL- 
LASTED. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HIGH TIDE when the Pocket is full of 
Money. 

1725. New Cant. Diet. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s.v. HIGH- 
TIDE plenty of the possibles ; whilst ' low- 
water ' implies empty clies. 

UP TO HIGH-WATER MARK, 

adv. phr. (colloquial). In good 
condition ; a general expression 
of approval. 

HIGH -TO BY. See HIGH PAD. 

1834. AINSWORTH, Rookwood, bk. 
III., ch. v. Oh ! the game of HIGH-TOBY 
for ever 

HIGH-TONED, adj. (American). 
Aristocratic ; also, morally and 
intellectually endowed ; spiritually 
beyond the common. HIGH- 
SOU LED = cultured; fashionable. 
HIGH-TONED NIGGER = a negro 
who has raised himself in social 
position. [Once literary ; now 
utterly discredited and never used, 
save in ignorance or derision.] 
Stokes, the maniac who shot 
Garfield, described himself as a 
' HIGH-TONED Lawyer.' 

1884. PHILLIPS WOOLLEY, Trotting* 
of a Tender Foot. I never saw any so- 
called HIGH-TONED NIGGERS. 



Highty-tighty. 3'5 



Hind-leg. 



1893. Casselts Sat. Jour., i Feb., 
p. 389, t. One day a fashionably-dressed 
young man, giving an address in a HIGH- 
.burb, called upon Messrs. 



TONED 
Glitter. 



HIGHTY-TIGHTY (or HOITY-TOITY), 
subs. (old). A wanton. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, I.T. 
HIGHTETITY, a Ramp, or Rude Girl. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

Adj. (colloquial). Peremp- 
tory ; waspish ; quarrelsome. 

1848. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, ch. 
xviii. La, William, don't be so HIGHTY- 
TIGHTY with us. We're not men. 

HIGH WOOD. To LIVE IN HIGH 
WOOD, verb. phr. (common). 
To hide ; to dissemble of pur- 
pose ; to lie low and keep quiet. 

HIGULCION-FLIPS, subs. (Texas). 
An imaginary ailment. 

HIKE, -verb. (old). To move about. 
Also to carry off ; to arrest. 

1811. Lexicon Balrtronicum, s.v. 
HIKE. To HIKE OFF ; to run away. 

1884. Daily Telegraph, 2 Feb., p. 3, 
c. i. We three, not having any regler 
homes nor a steady job of work to stick to, 
HIKE ABOUT for a living, and we live in 
the cellar of a empty house. 

HiLDlNG, subs. (old). A jade; a 
wanton ; a disreputable slut. 

1593. SHAKSPEARE, Taming of the 
Shrew, ii., I. For shame thou HILDING of 
a devilish spirit. 

1595. SHAKSPEARE, Romeo and 
Juliet, ii. t 4. HILDINGS and harlots. 

HILL. NOT WORTH A HILL OF 
BEANS, phr. (American). Abso- 
lutely worthless. 



HILLS, subs. (Winchester Coll.). 
I. St. Catharine's Hill. 



1870. MANSFIELD, School Life, p. 
28. Some of his principal duties were to 
take the boys 'on to HILLS,' call names 
there, etc. 

2. (Cambridge Univ.). The 
Gogmagog Hills; a common 
morning's ride. Gradus ad 
Cantab. 

HiLLY, adj. (colloquial). Difficult : 
e.g., HILLY READ i NG = hard to 
read; HILLY GOING = not easy to 
do ; etc. 

HILT. LOOSE IN THE HILT, adv. 
phr. (old). Unsteady ; ROCKY 
(q.v.} ; lax in the bowels. 

1639-61. Rump Songs. 'Bum-fodder,' 
ii., 56. If they stay longer, they will us 
beguilt With a Government that is LOOSE 

IN THE HILT. 

HIND- BOOT, subs, (common). The 
breech. For synonyms, see MONO- 
CULAR EYEGLASS. 

HlND-COACHWHEEL, subs, (com- 
mon). A five shilling piece. Fr. , 
roue de derrire y thune, or palet^ 
= a five-franc piece. For syno- 
nyms, see CAROON. 

HINDER - BLAST, subs. (old). 
Crepitation. 

1540 LINDSAY, Thrie Estaitis [in 
Bannatyne MSS., Hunterian Club, ed., 
1879-88), p. 511] line 1429-30. Scho hes 
sic rumling in her wame, That all the 
nycht my hairt ouercastis With bokking 
and with HINDER BLASTIS. 

HINDER-END, subs. phr. (common). 
The breech. Also, HINDER- 
FARTS and HINDER-WORLD. 

Hi N DER- ENTRANCE, subs. phr. 

(common). The fundament. 

H I N D L E G . TO KICK OUT A 
HIND LEG, verb. phr. (old). To 
lout ; to make a rustic bow. 



Hindoo. 



316 



"Hipe. 



TO TALK THE HIND LEG OFF 

A HORSE (or DOG). See TALK. 

To sir UPON ONE'S HIND LEGS 
AND HOWL, verb.phr. (American). 
To bemoan one's fate ; to make 
a hullabaloo. 

HINDOO, subs. (American). See 
KNOW NOTHING. 

HINDOO PUNISHMENT, stibs. 
phr. (circus). See quot. 

1875. FROST, Circus Life, ch. xviii. 
The HINDOO PUNISHMENT is what is more 
often called the muscle grind, a rather 
painful exercise upon the bar, in which 
the arms are turned backward to embrace 
the bar, and then brought forward upon 
the chest, in which position the performer 
revolves. 

HIND-SHIFTERS, subs. (old). 
The feet. For synonyms, see 
CREEPERS. 

1823. LAMB, Elia, Wks., (Ed. 1852), 
p. 311. They would show as fair a pair of 
HIND-SHIFTERS as the expertcst loco-motor 
in the colony. 

HINGES. OFF THE HINGES, adv. 
phr. (common) In confusion; 
out of sorts ; ' not quite the thing.' 

HINTERLAND, subs, (old). The 
breech. 

HlP, (in. //.), subs, (colloquial). 
Conventional as in the pro- 
verb, ' Free of her lips ; free 
of her hips' for the buttocks. 
Hence, to WALK WITH THE 
HIPS = to make play with the 
posteriors in walking ; LONG IN 
THE HIPS ; and HIPS TO SELL = 
broad in the beam ; NIMBLE- 
HIPPED = active in copulation. 
c. 1508. DUN BAR ; Poems, ' Of a Dance 

in the Quenis Chalmer' ('836), i., 119. 

His HIPPIS gaff mony a hiddouss cry. Ibid. 

i., 124. 'Of Ane Blak-moir.' . . . Sail 

cum behind and kiss hir HIPPIS. 

1540. LINDSAY, Thrie Estaits, line 

3227. My craig will wit quhat weyis my 

HIPPIS. Ibid., line 4424. Ye wald not 

stick to preise my graith With hobbling of 

your HIEPIS. 



c. 1580. Collier of Croydon, iv., I. 
(DoosLEY, Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, 459). 
I keep her lips and her HIPS for my own 
use. 

d. 1607. MONTGOMERIE, Poems, ' Pol- 
wart and Montgomerie's FJyting,' p. 85, 
line 779 (Scottish Text Soc., 1885-6). 
Kailly hppes, kiss my HIPS. 

To HAVE (GET, or CATCH) ON 
THE HIP, verb. phr. (old). To 
have (or get) an advantage. 
[From wrestling.] 

1591. HARINGTON, Orlando Furioso, 
bk, xlvi., st. 117. In fine he doth apply 
one speciall drift, Which was to GET the 
pagan ON THE HIP, And having caught 
him right, he doth him lift By nimble 
sleight, and in such wise doth trip That 
down he threw him. 

1598. SHAKSPEARE, Merchant of 
Venice, i. 3. If I can CATCH him once 
UPON THE HIP. I will feed fat the ancient 
grudge I bear him. 

1605. MARSTON, Dutch Courtezan. 
iii., i. He said he had you A THE HYP. 

1617. ANDREWES, Sermons (' Library 
of Ane.-Cath. Theology'), Vol. IV., p. 
365. If he HAVE us at the advantage, ON 
THE HIP as we say, it is no great matter 
then to get service at our hands. 

1635. D. DIKE, Michael and the 
Dragon, in Wks., p. 328. The Divell 
HATH them ON THE HIP, he may easily 
bring them to anything. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.y. 
UPON THE HIP .... at an Advantage in 
Wrestling, or Business. 

1697. VANBRUGH, Relapse, iv., i. 
My lord, she has had him UPON THE HIP 
these seven years. 

1812. JOHNSON, Eng, Diet. HIP, 
s.v., A low phrase. 

1836. MICHAEL SCOTT, Cruise of the 
Midge, p. 226. 'Ha! ha! I HAVE you 
ON THE HIP now, my master,' shouted 
Peter. 



HIRE, subs, (wrestling). A throw 
over the hip. Hence HIPE, verb 
== to get across the hip before the 
throw. 



Hip-hop. 



Historical- Shirt. 



HlP- HOP, verb (old). To skip or 
move on one leg ; to hop. ' A 
cant word framed by the redupli- 
cation of hop. ' JOHNSON, 1812. 

1670-1729. CONGREVE [Quoted in 
JOHNSON'S Eng. Did.]. Like Volscius 
HIP-HOP in a single boot. 

HIP-INSIDE, subs, (thieves'). An 
inner pocket. HIP-OUTSIDE = 
an outer ditto. 



Assistant 



1857. SNOWDEN, Mag, 
( 3 rd Ed.), p. 445, s.v. 



HIPPED (or HIPPISH), adj. (com- 
mon). Bored ; melancholical ; 
out of sorts. [From HYPochon- 
dria.] 

1710. GAY, Wine in Wks. (rSn) ^ 
348. By cares depress'd, in pensive 
HIPPISH mood. 

1712. Spectator, No. 284. I cannot 
forbear writing to you, to tell you I have 
been to the last degree HIPPED since I saw 
you. 

1837. BARHAM Ingoldsby Legends, 
' Babes in the Wood.' The wicked old 
Uncle, they say, In spite of his riot and 
revel, Was HIPPISH and qualmish all day, 
And dreamt all night long of the devil. 

1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend^ 
bk. III., ch. x. 'You are a little HIPPED, 
dear fellow,' said Eugene; you have been 
too sedentary. Come and enjoy the 
pleasures of the chase.' 



HlPPEN, Jttfo.( Scots' : colloquial)* 
A baby's napkin (i.e., HIPPING 
cloth). Also (theatrical), the 
green curtain. 

Hi REN, subs. (old). J. A pros- 
titute. [A corruption of ' Irene,' 
the heroine in Poole's play : see 
quot. 1584.] For synonyms, see 
BARRACK-HACK and TART. 

1584. POOLS, The Turkish Mahomet 
and Hynn the Fair Greek. Note. In 
Italian called a courtezan ; in Spaine a 
margarite; in English .... a punk. 



1598. SHAKSPEARE, 2 Henry IV., ii., 
4. Have we not HIREN here? 

1615. ADAMS, Spiritual Navigator. 
There be sirens in the sea of the world. 
Syrens ? Hirens, as they are now called. 
What a number of these sirens [HiRENs], 
cockatrices, courteghians, in plain English, 
harlots, swimme amongst us ! 

d. 1618. SYLVESTER, Trans. Du 
Bartas' Week of Creation, ii., 2, pt. 3. 
Of charming sin the deep-inchaunting 
syrens, The snares of virtue, valour- 
softening HYRENS 

2. (old). A sword. Also a 
roaring bully ; a fighting hector. 
[From Irene = the Goddess of 
Peace, a lucus a non lucendo.] 

HlSHEE-HASHEE. See SOAP-AND- 
BULLION. 



His NIBS (or NABS). See NIBS. 

Hiss. THE HISS, sttbs. phr. (Win- 
chester College). The signal of 
a master's approach. 

HISTORICAL- (WROUGHT, or IL- 
LUSTRATED-) SHIRT, subs. (old). 
A shirt or shift worked or 
woven with pictures or texts. 

]596, BEN JONSON, Every Man out 
of his Humour, iy., 6. I wonder he 
speaks not of his WROUGHT-SHIRT. 

1639, MAYNE, City Match, ii., 2. 
My smock sleeves have such holy imbroi- 
deries, And are so learned that I fear in 
time, All my apparel will be quoted by 
Some pure instructor. 

1647. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Custom of the County, ii., i. Having a 
mistress, sure you should not be Without a 
neat HISTORICAL-SHIRT. 

1848. Punch, XIV., 226. He never 
broke a bank, He shuns cross-barred trou- 
sers, His linen is not ILLUSTRATED, but 
beautifully clean. 

1851. MAYHEW, Land. Lab. and 
Land. Poor, I., 51. Colored, or ILLUS- 
TRATED SHIRTS, as they are called, are es- 
pecially objected to by the men. 



Hist, of Four Kings. 



Hit. 



1889. Puck's Library, Apr., p. 12. 
Being an educated man, I feel ten thou- 
sand woes, Cavorting for the populace In 

ILLUSTRATED CLOTHES. 



HISTORY OF THE FOUR KINGS. 

See FOUR KINGS. 

HIT, subs, (common). A success; 
e.g., To MAKE A HIT = to score ; 
to profit ; to excel. 

1602. MARSTON, Antonio and 
Mellida. Induction. When use hath 
taught me action to HIT the right point of 
a ladie's part. 

1700. CONGREVE, Way of the World, 
ii., 5. A HIT, a HIT! a palpable hit! I 
confess it. 

1821. EGAN, Tom and Jerry, bk. I., 
ch. i. Teach me to make a HIT of so Kean 
a quality that it may not only ' tell,' but be 
long remembered in the metropolis. 

1822-36. JNO. WILSON, Nodes Amb., 
Wks. II., 210. Mr. Peel seems to have 
MADE A HIT in the chief character of 
Shiel's play, The Apostate. 

1828-45. T. HOOD, Poems, v. , p. 
197, (Ed. 1846). Nor yet did the heiress 
herself omit The arts that help TO MAKE A 



1870. Figaro, 10 June. To MAKE A 
GREAT HIT is, after all, more a matter of 
chance than merit. 

1889. Pall Matt Gaz., 3 July. 
Madam Melba MAKES AN ESPECIAL HIT 
in the valse from Romo et Juliette. 

1889. Referee, 6 Jan. Quite A HIT 
HAS BEEN MADE by the clever juvenile, La 
Petite Bertoto. 



Adj. (Old Bailey). Convicted. 

HARD-HIT, adj. phr. (collo- 
quial). Sore beset ; HARD-UP 
(q.v.). Also deep in love (or 
grief, or anger). 

1890. Licensed Viet. Gaz., 7 Nov. 
It was pretty generally known that he had 
been HARD HIT during the season. 



Verb (American). To arrive 
at ; to light upon. 

1888. Detroit Free Press, Oct. Pro- 
fessor Rose, who HIT this town last 
spring, is around calling us a fugitive 
from justice. 

To HIT IT, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To attain an object ; to 
light on a device ; to guess a 
secret. 

1594. SHAKSPEARE, Lome's Labour 
Lost, iv., i. Thou cans't not HIT IT, HIT 
IT, HIT IT, Thou can'st not HIT IT, my 
good man. 

1596. SHAKSPEARE, Merry Wives, 
iii., 2. I can never HIT one's name. 

1773. O. GOLDSMITH, She Stoops to 
Conquer. Ecod, I have HIT IT. It's here. 
Your hands. Yours and yours, my poor 
sulky ! My boots there, ho ! Meet me 
two hours hence at the bottom of the 
garden. 

1880 A. TROLLOPE, The Duke's 
Children, ch. Hi. He dressed himself in 
ten minutes, and joined the party as they 
had finished their fish. ' I am awfully 
sorry, 1 he said, rushing up to his father, 
'but I thought that I should just HIT IT.' 

To HIT OFF, verb. phr. (collo- 
quial). To agree together ; to 
fit ; to describe with accuracy and 
precision. 

1857. A. TROLLOPE, Barchester 
Towers, ch. xxxiv. It is not always the 
case that the master, or warden, or pro- 
vost, or principal can HIT IT OFF exactly 
WITH his tutor. A tutor is by no means 
indisposed to have a will of his own. 

1880. A. TROLLOPE, The Duke's 
Children, ch. xxxvi. ' One gentleman with 
another, you mean-?' 'Put it so. It don't 
quite HIT IT OFF, but put it so.' 

1886. J. S. WINTER, Army Society. 
'Sidelight, 1 ch. xiv. ' Hey !' said Orford. 
'Didn't you and he HIT IT OFF?" 

1889. Daily News, 22 Oct., p. 5. 
The nations that quarrel are the nations 
that do not HIT IT OFF ON some point of 
feeling or taste. 

To HIT THE FLAT, verb. phr. 
(American cowboy). To go out 
on the prairie. 



Hitch. 



319 



Hoaky. 



To HIT THE PIPE, verb. phr. 
(American). To smoke opium. 

TO HIT ONE WHERE HE LIVES, 

verb. phr. (American). To touch 
in a tender part ; to hurt the 
feelings; TO TOUCH ON THE 
RAW (q.v.). 

HIT (or STRUCK) WITH, adv. 
phr. (colloquial). Taken ; 
enamoured ; prepossessed. Also, 
HIT UP WITH. 

1891. Tales from Town Topics. 
1 Count Candawles,' p. 28. She is very 
amusing, but the Count cannot be really 
HIT WITH such a little mountebank. 

HIT ON THE TAIL, verb. phr. 
(old venery). To copulate. For 
synonyms, see GREENS and RIDE. 

d. 1529, SKELTON, Bcnvge ofCourte. 
How oft he HIT Jonet ON THE TAYLE. 

HIT IN THE TEETH, verb, 
phr. (old). To reproach; to 
taunt ; to fling in one's face. 

1663. KILI.IGREW, The Parson's Wed- 
ding, ii., 6 (DODSLEY, Old Plays, 4th 
ed., 1875, xiv., 431). They are always 

HITTING ME IN THE TEETH with amanof 

my coat. 

HITCH, verb (American). I. To 
marry. HITCHED = married. 

1867. BROWNE, Artemus Ward's 
Courtship, People's ed., p. 23. If you 
mean getting HITCHED, I'm in. 

1883. L. OLIPHANT, Altiora Peto, 
II., xxix., 156. ' How long is it since we 
parted, Ned ? ' 'A matter of five years ; 
and it wasn't my fault if we didn't stay 
HITCHED till now.' 

1892. Tit-Bits, 17 Sept., p. 419, c. i. 
'We've come to get HITCHED,' said the 
man, bashfully. 

2. (American). To agree. 

Also TO HITCH HORSES. 

To HITCH ONE'S TEAM TO THB 
FENCE, verb. phr. (American). 
To settle down. 



HITTITE, subs, (pugilists'). A prize 
fighter. 

ENGLISH SYNONYMS. Basher; 
bruiser ; dukester ; fistite ; knight 
of the fist ; gemman of the fancy ; 
milling-cove ; pug ; puncher ; 
scrapper ; slasher ; slogger ; slug- 
ger ; sparring-bloke. 

1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s.v. 
HITTITES boxers and ring-goers as- 
sembled. 

1860. THE DRUID, Post and Paddock. 
'The Fight for the Belt.' And the 
Sherwood Ranger, bold Bendigo, Is on 
training no more intent ; But the trout 
full well that ex-HiTTiTE know On a 
Summer's eve in the Trent. 



HIVE, subs, (venery). The female 
pudendum. Cf. HONEY. Hence, 
verbally, TO HIVE IT = to effect 
intromission. 

Verb (American cadet). To 
steal. For synonyms, see PRIG. 

To GET HIVED, verb. phr. 
(American Cadets' and popular). 
I. To be caught out in a scrape. 
Also, to be hidden. To BE 

HIVED PERFECTLY FRIGID = to 

be caught inflagrante delicto. 

HIVER, subs. (Western American). 
A travelling bawd. 

HIVITE, subs, (school). A student 
of St. Bees' (Cumberland). 

1865. John Bull, n Nov. To be a 
HIVITE has long been considered a little 
worse than a ' literate ' . . . . Of the 
value of some St. Bees testimonials we 
may form an estimate, etc., etc. 

HOAKY. BY THE HOAKY, intj. 
(nautical). A popular form 
of adjuration. 



Hoax. 



320 



Hob and Nob. 



HOAX, subs, (old : now recognised). 
A jest ; a practical joke ; a 
TAKE-IN. Originally (GROSE) 
University cant. [Probably from 
Hocus (q.v.).] 

1796. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue (3rd Ed.), 



1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 
HOAXING. Bantering, ridiculing. HOAX- 
ING a quiz ; joking an odd fellow. Uni- 
versity witt 

1815. SCOTT, Guy Mannering, ch. 
iii. Whose humble efforts at jocularity 
were chiefly confined to what were then 
called bites and bams, since denominated 
HOAXES and quizzes. 

1835-7. RICHARDSON, Diet. Eng. 
Lang., s.v. HOAX. Malone considers 
the modern slang HOAX as derived from 
hocus, and Archdeacon Nares agrees with 



1772. GRAVES, Spiritual Quixote, 
bk. VIII., ch. xxi. (new Ed., 1808). 
Having drunk HOB OR NOB with a young 
lady in whose eyes he wished to appear a 
man of consequence, he hurried out into 
the summer-house. 

1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s.v. HOB 
NOB two persons pledging each other in a 
glass. 

1836. HORACE SMITH, Tin Trumpet, 
'Address to a Mummy.' Perchance that 
very hand now pinioned flat, Has HOBAN- 
NOBBED with Pharoah glass for glass. 

1849. THACKERAY, Pendennis, ch. 
xxx. He would have liked to HOB AND 
NOB with celebrated pick-pockets, or drink 
a pot of ale with a company of burglars 
and cracksmen. 

1886, R. L. STEVENSON, Kidnapped, 
p. 68. So the pair sat down and HOB-A- 

NOBBED. 



Verb. To play a practical joke ; 
to 'take-in'; to BITE (q.v.}. See 
subs, sense. For synonyms, see 
GAMMON. 

1812. COMBE, Syntax^ Picturesque^ 
xix. An arch young sprig, a banker's 
clerk, Resolv'd to HOAX the rev'rend 
spark. 

1854. F. E. SMEDLEY, Harry Cover- 
dale, ch. viii. I thought you were HOAX* 
ING us, and I sat down to play the duet 
for the amiable purpose of exposing your 
ignorance* 



HOB (or HOBBINOL), subs (old). 
A clown. GROSE. 



HOB AND NOB (or HOB NOB), 
verb. (old). I. To invite to 
drink j to clink glasses. 

1756. FOOTE, Englishman front 
Paris, i. With, perhaps, an occasional 
interruption of ' Here's to you, friends,' 
' HOB OR NOB,' ' Your love and mine.' 

1759. TOWNLEY, High Life Below 
Stairs, ii. Duke. Lady Charlotte, HOB OR 
NOB. Lady Char. Done, my lord ; in 
Burgundy, if you please. 



2. (old). To give or take ; to 
hit or miss at random. [Saxon, 
habban, to have ; nabban, not to 
have,] 

1577-87. HOLINSHED, Chroncles of 
Englande, Scotlande, and Irelande(\%oj) 
p. 317. The citizens in their rage shot 
HABBE OR NABBE (hit or miss) at random. 

1602. SHAKSPEARE, Twelfth Night, 
iii., 4. HOB-NOB is his word, give 't or 
take 't. 

1615. HARINGTON, Epigrams, 5v. 
Not of Jack Straw, with his rebellious 
crew, That set king, realm, and laws, at 

HAH OR NAB. 

1673. Quack Astrologer. He writes 
of the weather HAB NAB, and as the toy 
takes him, chequers the year with foul and 
fair. 



3. (colloquial) To be on 
terms of close intimacy ; to con- 
sort familiarly together. 

1870. MARK TWAIN, Innocents 
Abroad, ch. i. They were to HOB-NOB 
with nobility and hold friendly converse 
with kings and princes. 



Hobbes's-voyage. 3 21 



Hobbledehoy. 



1892. HUME NISBET, Bushranger's 
Sweetheart, p. 109. I had HOB-NOBBED 
for the last two hours with the most 
notorious bushranger in the colony. 

1892. A. K. GREEN, Cynthia Wake- 
ham's Money, p. 5. Each tree looks like a 
spectre HOB-NOBBING with its neighbour. 



HOBBES'S-VOYAGE, subs, (old). A 

leap in the dark. 

1697. VANBRUGH, Provoked Wife, 
v., 6. So, now, I am in for HOBBES'S 
VOYAGE ; a great leap in the dark. 



HOBBINOL, subs, (old). A country- 
man. For synonyms, see JOSKIN. 

1663. KILLIGREW, The Parson's 
Wedding, ii., 3 (DoosLEY, Old Plays, 4th 
ed., 1875, xiv., 396). Who, Master 
Jeffrey? HOBBINOL the second ! By this 
life, 'tis a very veal, and licks his nose like 



HOBBLE. IN A HOBBLE (or HOB- 
BLED), adv. phr. (colloquial). 
In trouble ; hampered ; puzzled. 
Also (thieves), committed for 
trial. Fr., tomberdans la melasse 
( = to come a cropper), vcAfaitrl 
(-BOOKED (q.V.)). HOBBLED 
UPON THE LEGS = transported, 
or on the hulks. 

1777. FOOTE, Trip to Calais (1795), 
ii., p. 39. But take care what you say ! you 
see what a HOBBLE we had like to have got 
into. 

1789. GEO. PARKER, Life's Painter, 
p. 163. A term when any of the gang is 
taken up and committed for trial, to say, 
such a one is HOBBLED. 

1811. POOLE, Hamlet Travestie, 
iii., 5. Horatio, I am sorry for this 
squabble ; I fear 'twill get me in a 
precious HOBBLE. 

1819. VAUX, Cant. Diet., s.v. 
HOBBLED, taken up, or in custody ; to 
HOBBLE a plant, is to spring it. 



1838. HALIBURTON, Clockniaker, 2nd 
S., ch. xvii. A body has to be cautious 
if he don't want to get into the centre of a 
HOBBLE. 

1849. Punch, Fortune Tellers 
A Imanack. To dream that you are lame 
is a token that you will get into a HOBBLE. 

1892. MILLIKEN, 'Arry Ballads, p. 
44. I got into a 'OBBLE. 



Verb (venery). See quot. 

1688. SEMPILL, ' Crissell Sandilands' 
in Bannatyne MSS. (Hunterin Club, 
1879-88), p. 354, lines 21-2. Had scho 
bene undir, and he HOBLAND above, That 
were a perellous play for to suspect them. 



HOBBLEDEHOY, subs, (old, now col- 
loquial). A growing gawk : as 
in the folk-rhyme, ' Hobbledehoy, 
neither man nor boy. * [For deri- 
vation, see Notes and Queries, i 
S., v., 468, vii., 572; 4 S., ii., 
297, viii., 451, ix., 147 ; 78., iv., 
523, and v., 58.] 

1557. TUSSER, Husbandrie, ch. 60, 
st 3, p. 138 (E. D. 8.). The first seuen 
yeers bring vp as a childe, The next to 
learning, for waxing too wilde. The next 
keepe vnder sir HOBBARD DE HOY, The 
next a man no longer a boy. 

1738. SWIFT, Polite Convers., Dial 
i. Why, he is a mere HOBBLEDEHOY, 
neither a man nor a boy. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1837. BARHAM, Ingoldsby Legends, 
'Aunt Fanny. 1 At the epoch I speak 
about, I was between a man and a boy, A 
HOBBLE-DE-HOY, A fat, little, punchy con- 
cern of sixteen. 

1848. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, ch. 
iv. He remembered perfectly well being 
thrashed by Joseph Sedley, when the 
latter was a big, swaggering, HOBBADY- 
HOY, and George an impudent urchin of 
ten years old. 



Hence HOBBLEDEHOYISH and 

HOBBLEDEHOYHOOD. 

21 



Hobbledejee. 



322 



Hob-nail. 



1812. COLMAN, Poetical Vagaries, 
p. 12 (and Ed.). When Master Daw full 
fourteen yea~s had told, He grew, as it is 
term'd, HOBBEUYHOYISH ; For Cupidons 
and Fairies much too old, For Calibans 
and Devils much too boyish. 

1839. THACKERAY, Fatal Boots, Apr. 
From boyhood until HOBBADYHOYHOOD 
(which I take to be about the sixteenth 
year of the life of a young man). 

1848. THACKERAY, Book of Snobs, 
ch. xlii. A half-grown, or HOBBADE- 
HOYISH footman, so to speak, walked after 
them. 



HOBBLEDEJEE, subs. (old). A pace 
between a walk and a run ; a 
jog-trot. 

1811. Lexicon Balatronicum, s.v. 

HOBBLER, subs, (nautical). A 
coast-man, half smuggler, half 
handyman ; an unlicensed pilot. 
Also a landsman acting as tow- 
Jack. SMYTH. ALSO (Isle of 
Man), a boatman. 

1887. T. E. BROWN, The Doctor, p. 
226. An' the HOBBLERS there was terr'ble 
divarted. 



HOBBY, subs. (old). A hackney ; 
a horse in common use. 

1606. Return from Parnassus, ii., 6 
( DODSLEY, Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, ix., 
151). An't please you, your HOBBY 
will meet you at the lane's end. Idem (p. 
154). Is not my master an absolute 
villain that loves his hawk, his HOBBY. 
and his greyhound more than any mortal 
creature? Idem (p. 145). Sirrah, boy, 
hath the groom saddled my hunting 
HOBBY? 



HOBBY-HORSE, subs, (old : now 
recognised). i. A whim ; a 
fancy ; a favourite pursuit. Hence 
HOBBYHORSICAL = strongly 
attached to a particular fad. 

1759. STERNE, Tristam Shandy 
(1793), ch. vii., p. 18. Have they not had 
their HOBBY-HORSES? 

d. 1768. STERNE, Letters (1793), letter 
19, p. 65. 'Tis in fact my HOBBY-HORSE. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HOBBY HORSE, a man's favourite amuse- 
ment, or study, is called his HOBBY HORSE. 

1893. Westminster Gaz., 15 Mar., 
p. 9, c. i. We quarrel a bit he is so 
HOBBY-HORSICAL, you can't avoid it and 
then we make friends again. 

2. (colloquial). A rantipole 
girl ; a wench ; a wanton. 

1594. SHAKSPEARE, Love's Labour 
Lost, iii., i. Call'st thou my love HOBBY- 
HORSE ? Moth. No, master ; the HOBBY- 
HORSE is but a colt, and your love, per- 
haps a hackney. 

1604. SHAKSPEARE, Winter's Tale, 
i., 2. They say my wife's aHOBBY-HORSE. 

3. (old). A witless and un- 
mannerly lout. 

1609. JONSON, Eptccene,\v., 2. Daw. 
Here be in presence have tasted of her 
favors. Cler. What a neighing HOBBY- 
HORSE is this L 

Verb (old). To romp. 

HOB-COLLINGWOOD, subs. phr. 
(North Country). The four of 
hearts, considered an unlucky 
card. 



2. (university). A translation. 

TO RIDE HOBBIES = to USC CRIBS 
(q.v.}. 

SIR POSTHUMOUS HOBBY, 
subs. phr. (old). One nice or 
whimsical in his clothes. 



HOB- JOBBER, subs, (streets). A 
man or boy on the look out for 
small jobs holding horses, carry- 
ing parcels, and the like. 

HOB-NAIL, subs. (old). A country- 
man. For synonyms, see JOSKIN. 



Hobnailed. 



323 



Hock-dockies. 



1647. BEAUMONT and FLETCHER, 
Women Pleased, ii., 6. The HOB-NAIL 
thy husband's as fitly out o' th' way now. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.r. 
HOBNAIL, a country clodhopper, from the 
shoes of country farmers and ploughmen 
being commonly stuck full of HOBNAILS, 
and even often clouted, or tipped with iron. 

HOBNAILED, adj. (colloquial). 
Booribh ; clumsy ; coarse ; ill- 
done. 

1599. JONSON, Every Man out of 
his Humour. Sog. A wretched HOB- 

NAILED Chuff. 

HoBSON's-CHOiCE,.y#fo. (common). 
That or none : i.e., there is no 
alternative. [Popularly derived 
from the name of a Cambridge 
livery stable keeper, whose 
rule was that each customer 
must take the horse next the 
door, or have no horse at all. 
That old Hobson existed is clear 
from Milton's epitaph, but Bel- 
lenden Ker (Archeology of 
Popular Phrases) affirms the 
story to be a Cambridge hoax, 
and maintains the proverb to be 
identical in sound and sense as the 
Low Saxon, Op soens schie ho 
fyscfo = v?hen he had a kiss he 
wanted something else.] 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Crew, s.v. 
HOBSON'S CHOICE, that or None. 

1710. WARD, England's Reformation, 
ch. iv. 'Tis HOBSON'S CHOICE, take that or 



1712. STEELE, Spectator, No. 500, p. 
191. I shall conclude this discourse with an 
explanation of a proverb [HOBSON'S 
CHOICE], which by vulgar error is taken 
and used when a man is reduced to an 
extremity, whereas the propriety of the 
maxim is to use it when you would say 
there is plenty, but you must make such a 
choice as not to hurt another who is to come 
after you. Ibid He [H OBSON] kept a stable 
of forty good cattle, always ready and fit for 
travelling ; but when a man came for a 
horse he was led into the stable, where 
there was great choice, but was obliged to 
take the horse which stood nearest to the 



stable-door ; so that every customer was 
alike well served, according to his chance, 
and every horse ridden with the same 
justice. 

1717. GIBBER, Non- Juror, i. Can 
any woman think herself happy that's 
obliged to marry only with a HOBSON'S 

CHOICE? 

1 725. New Cant. Diet. , s. v. 
1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 

1820. REYNOLDS [Peter Corcoran], 
The Fancy. Black men now are HOBSON'S 

CHOICE. 

1851. F. E. S M E D L E Y, Lewis 
Arundel, ch. liii. 'When shall we go?' 
inquired Laura. 'Why, it's a case of 
HOBSON'S CHOICE,' returned Leicester. 

1854. Notes and Queries, 21 Jan., 
p. 51. It was clear a choice had been 
given to him, but it was a HOBSON'S 
CHOICE. 



HOCK, subs. (American). I. The 
last card in the dealer's box at 
faro. [From SODA (q.v.) TO 
HOCK = from beginning to end. 

2. In.pl. (common). The feet. 
CURBY HOCKS = clumsy feet. 
For synonyms, see CREEPERS. 
[From the stable.] 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
HOCKS .... you have left the marks of 
your dirty HOCKS on my clean stairs. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

OLD HOCK, subs. phr. (com- 
mon). Stale beer; SWIPES (q.v.}. 
See HOCKEY. 

IN HOCK, adv. phr. (general). 
Laid by the heels ; fleeced ; 
BESTED (q.v.}. ; and (thieves'), in 
prison. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum. ' If 
the cove should be caught IN THE HOCK he 
won't snickle,' if the fellow should be 
caught in the act, he would not tell. 

HocK-DOCKiES,.rfo. (old). Shoes. 
For synonyms, see TROTTER- 
CASES. 

1789 GEO. PARKER, Life's Pointer, 
p. 173. Shoes. HOCKEY-UOCK.BYS. 






Hockey. 



324 



Hocus-pocus. 



HOCKEY, adj. (old). Drunk, es- 
pecially on stale beer. For syn- 
onyms, see DRINKS and SCREWED. 
1796.GROSE, Vulg. Tongue (srd Ed.), 



Hocus, subs, (old: now recognised). 
i. A cheat ; an imposter. [An 
abbreviation of HOCUS - FOCUS 



1654. Witts Recreations. Here 
HOCAS lyes with his tricks and his knocks, 
Whom death hath made sure as a juglers 
box ; Who many hath cozen'd by his 
leiger-demain, Is presto convey'd and here 
underlain. Thus HOCAS he's here, and 
here he is not, While death plaid the 
HOCAS, and brought him to th' pot. 

2. (old : now recognised). 
Drugged liquor. 

1823. BEE, Diet. Turf, s.v. Hocus 
or Hocus Pocus .... A deleterious drug 
mixed with wine, etc., which enfeebles the 
person acted upon. 

Adj. (old). See quots. For 
synonyms, see DRINKS and 
SCREWED. 

1725. New. Cant. Z>zV/.,s.v. Hocus, 
disguised in Liquor ; drunk. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.y. 
Hocus Pocus, he is quite HOCUS, he is 
quite drunk. 

Verb (old: now recognised). 
I. To cheat ; to impose upon. 

2. (old: now recognised). To 
drug ; TO SNUFF (q.v.}. 

1836. DICKENS, Pickwick, ch. xiii., 
p. 104. ' What do you mean by HOCUSSING 
brandy and water?' inquired Mr. Pick- 
wick. ' Puttin' laund'num in it, ' replied 
Sam. 

1836. Comic Almanack, p. i. For 
that we HOCUSS'D first his drink. 

1848. THACKERAY, Vanity Fair, II., 
ch. xxix. Mr. Frederick Pigeon avers 
that it was at her house at Lausanne that 
he was HOCUSSED at supper and lost eight 
hundred pounds to Major Loder and the 
Honourable Mr. Deucease. 

1 54. DE QUINCEY, Murder as one 
of the Fine Arts, Wks., xiii., 119. Him 



they intended to disable by a trick then 
newly introduced amongst robbers, and 
termed HOCUSSING, i.e., clandestinely 
drugging the liquor of the victim with 
laudanum. 

1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 
Hocus . . . ' Hocus the bloke's lush, and 
then frisk his sacks,' put something into the 
fellow's drink that will stupify him, and 
then search his pockets. 

1859. The Bulletin, 21 May. An 
offence which goes by the name of 
HOCUSSING, and which consists of an evil 
doer furtively introducing laudanum or 
some other narcotic into beer or spirits, 
which the victim drinks and, becoming 
stupified thereby, is then easily robbed. 

1864. DICKENS, Our Mutual Friend, 
bk. II., ch. xii. I will not say a HOCUSSED 
wine, but fur from a wine as was 'elthy for 
the mind. 



HOCUS-POCUS, subs, (old : now 
recognised). i. A juggler's 
phrase. Hence a juggler's (or 
impostor's) stock in trade. Also 

HOCUS-TRADE. 

1639-61. Rump Songs. 'Vanity of 
Vanities.' A HOCUS - POCUS, juggling 
Knight. 

1639-61. Rump Songs, ii., 156. 
1 The Rump Ululant.' Religion we made 
free of HOCUS TRADE. 

1646. RANDOLPH, Jealous Lovers, 
If I do not think women were got with 
riddling, whip me ! HOCAS POCAS, here 
you shall have me, and there you shall 
have me. 

1654. GAYTON, Test. Notes Don. 

guix., 46. This old fellow had not the 
OCAS POCAS of Astrology. 

1675. WYCHERLEY, Country Wife, 
iii., 2. That burlesque is a HOCUS-POCUS 
trick they have got. 

d. 1680. BUTLER, Remains (1759), ii., 
122. With a little heaving and straining, 
would turn it into Latin, as Mille HOCO- 
POKIANA, and a thousand such. 

1689. MARVELL, Historical Poem, 

line 90. With HOCUS POCUS They 

gain on tender consciences at night. 

c. 1755. ADEY, Candle in the Dark, p. 
29. At the playing of every trick he used 
to say, HOCUS POCUS, tontus, talontus, vade 
celeriter jubeo. 

1785. GROSE, Vulg: Tongue, s.v. 



Hod. 



325 



Hoddy-peak. 



1824-28. LANDOR, Imaginary Con- 
v ersations [2nd Ed., ii., 275]. Torke. What 
think you, for instance, of Hocus ! 
Pocus ! Johnson. Sir, those are ex- 
clamations of conjurors, as they call them- 
selves. 

1883. Daily Telegraph, 26 Mar., 
p. 5, c. 3. The lock of hair, the dragon's 
blood, and the stolen flour were only the 
HOCUS-POCUS of her sham witchcraft like 
the transfixed waxen puppets of the 
sorcerers of the past. 

2. (old). A trickster ; a jug- 
gler ; an impostor. 

1625. JONSON, Staple of News, ii. 
That was the old way, gossip, when Iniquity 
came in [on the stage] like HOKOS POKOS, 
in a juggler's jerkin, with false skirts, like 
the knave of clubs. 

1634. Hocus Pocus JUNIOR, The 
Anatomie of Leger de main. [Title]. 

1656. BLOUNT, Glossographia. s.v. 
Hocus Pocus, a juggler, one that shows 
tricks by sleight of hand. 

1690. B. E., Diet. Cant. Cre-w, s.v. 
HOCUS-POCUS, a Juggler that shews Tricks 
by SKght of Hand. 

1725. New Cant. Diet., s.v. 

3. (old). A cheat ; an im- 
position ; a juggler's trick. 

1713. BENTLEY, Free Thinking, 12. 
Our author is playing HOCUS-POCUS in the 
very similitude he takes from that juggler. 

4. (old). See Hocus, sense 2. 

Adj. (old). Cheating; fraudu- 
lent. 

1715. ADDISON, The Drummer. If 
thou hast any HOCUS-POCUS tricks to play, 
why can'st not do them here ? 

1725-29. MASON, Horace, iv., 8. 
Such HOCUS-POCUS tricks, I own, Belong 
to Gallic bards alone. 

1759. MACKLIN, Love a la Mode, 
ii. ; i. The law is a sort of HOCUS-POCUS 
science that smiles in yer face while it picks 
your pocket. 

Verb (old). To cheat; to trick. 

HOD (or BROTHER HOD), subs. 
(common). A bricklayer's la- 
bourer. 



1785. GROSE, Vulg. Tongue, s.v. 
1859. MATSELL, Vocabulum, s.v. 

HOD OF MORTAR, subs. phr. 
(rhyming). A pot of porter. 

HODDY-DODDY (or HODDIE-DOD- 

D\E),suds. (old). A short thick- 
set man or woman. The full ex- 
pression is ' Hoddy Doddy, all 
arse and no body.' GROSE. For 
synonyms, see FORTY-GUTS. Also 
a fool. 

c. 1534. UDALL, Roister Doister, i., 
I. (DODSLEY, Old Plays, 4th ed., 1875, iii., 
58). Sometimes I hang on Hankyn HODDY- 
DODDY'S sleeve. 

1596. BEN JONSON, Every Man in 
his Humour, iv., 8. Well, good wife 
bawd, Cob's wife, and you, That make 
your husband such a HODDY-DODDY. 

1639-61. Rump Songs, ii. [1662], 55. 
Every noddy .... will .... cry HODDY- 
DODDY Here's a Parliament all arse and 
no body. 

1723. SWIFT, Mary the Cookm aid's 
Letter (CHALMERS, Eng. Poets, 1810, xi., 
433). My master is a personable man, and 
not a spindle-shanked HODDY-DODDY. 

HODDY - PEAK (or -PEKE), subs. 
(old). A fool ; a cuckold. 

d. 1529. SKELTON, Poems, 'Duke of 
Albany.' Gyue it up, And cry creke Lyke 
an HUDDY PEKE. 

1551. Gammer Gurton, O. P., ii., 
45. Art here again, thou HODDYPEKE ? 

1554. CHRISTOPHERSON, Exh. ag. 
Rebel. They counte peace to be cause of 
ydelnes, and that it maketh men HODI- 
PEKES and cowardes. 

d. 1555. LATIMER, Sermons, fol. 44, b. 
What, ye brainsicke fooles, ye HODDY- 
PEAKES, ye doddy poules. 

1560. Nice Wanton (DODSLEY, Old 
Plays, 4th ed., 1875, ii., 164). Yea, marry, 
I warrant you, master HODDY-PEAK. 

1589