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«l> SMITH COLLEGE 

■ 2008*0, ■ 
Catalogue 

Bulletin 





Notice of Nondiscrimination 



Campus Security Act Report 



Smith College is committed to maintaining a 
diverse community in an atmosphere of mutual 
respect and appreciation of differences. 

Smith College does not discriminate in its 
educational and employment policies on the bases 
of race, color, creed, religion, national/ethnic 
origin, sex, sexual orientation, age, or with 
regard to the bases outlined in the Veterans 
Readjustment Act and the Americans with 
Disabilities Act. 

Smith's admission policies and practices are 
guided by the same principle, concerning women 
applying to the undergraduate program and all 
applicants to the graduate programs. 

For more information, please contact the 
Office of Institutional Diversity, (413) 585-2141. 



The annual Campus Security Act Report contains 
information regarding campus security and personal 
safety on the Smith College campus, educational 
programs available and certain crime statistics 
from the previous three years. Copies of the annual 
Campus Security Act Report are available from 
the Department of Public Safety, Tilly Hall, Smith 
College, Northampton, Massachusetts 01063. 
Please direct all questions regarding these matters 
to Paul Ominsky, director of public safety, at 
(413) 585-2490. 



SMITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 

(USPS 499-020) Series 101 September 2008 
Number III 

Printed monthly during January, April, September 
(two issues). Office of College Relations, Garrison 
Hall, Smith College, Northampton, Massachu- 
setts 01063. Periodical postage paid at 
Northampton, Massachusetts. Postmaster: send 
address changes to Smith College, Northampton, 
Massachusetts, 01063 

All announcements herein are subject to revision. 
Changes in the list of Officers of Administration 
and Instruction may be made subsequent to the 
date of publication. 

The course listings on pp. 67^*27 are maintained 
by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty. 
For current information on courses offered at 
Smith, visit www.smith.edu/catalogue. 

8M3985-8/08 



Smith College 

Northampton, Massachusetts 01063 

(413) 584-2700 



SMITH COLLEGE BULLETIN 



2008-09 CATALOGUE 



Smith College 

Northampton, Massachusetts 01063 

(413) 584-2700 



Contents 



How to (Jet to Smith iv 

Inquiries and Visits v 

Academic Calendar vi 

The Mission of Smith College 1 

History of Smith College 1 

The Academic Program 7 

Smith: A Liberal Arts College 7 

The Curriculum 7 

The Major 9 

The Minor 9 

Student-Designed Interdepartmental Majors and Minors 10 

Five College Certificate Programs 10 

Advising 10 

Academic Honor System 11 

Special Programs 11 

Accelerated Course Program 11 

The Ada Comstock Scholars Program 12 

Community Auditing: Nonmatriculated Students 12 

Five College Interchange 12 

Departmental Honors Program 12 

Independent Study Projects/Internships 12 

Smith Scholars Program 13 

Study Abroad Programs 13 

Smith College Junior Year Abroad Programs 13 

Smith Consortial and Approved Study Abroad 15 

Off-Campus Study Programs in the U.S 15 

The Campus and Campus Life 17 

Facilities 17 

Student Residence Houses 21 

Intercollegiate Athletics, Intramurals and Club Sports 21 

Career Development 22 

Health Services 22 

Religious Expression 23 

The Student Body 24 

Summary of Enrollment 24 

Geographical Distribution of Students by Residence 25 

Majors 2b 

Recognition for Academic Achievement 2^ 

Prizes and Awards 28 

Fellowships 32 

Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 33 

Your Student Account 

Fees 34 

Institutional Refund Policy 35 

Contractual Limitations 36 

Payment Plans and Loan Options 3b 

Financial Aid 3b 

Admission 41 

Secondary School Preparation 4l 

Entrance Tests 4l 

Applying for Admission 42 

Advanced Placement 42 

International Baccalaureate 42 

Interview 42 



ii Contents 

Deferred Entrance 42 

Deferred Entrance for Medical Reasons 42 

Transfer Admission 43 

International Students 43 

Visiting Year Programs 43 

Readmission 43 

Ada Comstock Scholars Program 43 

Academic Rules and Procedures 45 

Requirements for the Degree 45 

Academic Credit 48 

Academic Standing 51 

The Age of Majority 52 

Leaves, Withdrawal and Readmission 52 

Graduate and Special Programs 54 

Admission 54 

Residence Requirements 54 

Leaves of Absence 55 

Degree Programs 55 

Nondegree Studies 57 

Housing and Health Services 58 

Finances 59 

Financial Assistance 59 

Changes in Course Registration 60 

Policy Regarding Completion of Required Course Work 60 

Courses of Study 6l 

Deciphering Course Listings 63 

African Studies 67 

Afro-American Studies 69 

American Ethnicities 73 

American Studies 76 

Ancient Studies 81 

Anthropology 83 

Archaeology 90 

Art 92 

Astronomy 106 

Biochemistry 110 

Biological Sciences 116 

Chemistry 131 

Classical Languages and Literatures 136 

Comparative Literature 140 

Computer Science 147 

Dance 155 

East Asian Languages and Literatures 164 

East Asian Studies 171 

Economics 176 

Education and Child Study 183 

Engineering 192 

English Language and Literature 200 

Environmental Science and Policy 212 

Ethics 215 

Exercise and Sport Studies 216 

Film Studies 226 

First-Year Seminars 231 

Foreign Language Literature Courses in Translation 238 

French Studies 239 

Geology 246 

German Studies 252 

Government 259 



Contents iii 

History 

Program in the History of Science and Technology 278 

International Relations 

Intertenn Courses Offered for Credit 

Italian Language and Literature 284 

Jewish Studies 290 

Landscape Studies 296 

Latin American and Latino/a Studies 299 

Linguistics 303 

Logic 305 

Marine Science and Policy 307 

Mathematics and Statistics 308 

Medieval Studies 316 

Middle East Studies Minor 318 

Music 323 

Neuroscience 330 

Philosophy 335 

Physics 341 

Political Economy 345 

Presidential Seminars 346 

Psychology 348 

Public Policy 357 

Quantitative Courses for Beginning Students 360 

Religion 366 

Russian Language and Literature 373 

Science Courses for Beginning Students 376 

Sociology 377 

Spanish and Portuguese 383 

Statistics 392 

Theatre 393 

Third World Development Studies 400 

Urban Studies 402 

Study of Women and Gender 403 

Interdepartmental and Extradepartmental Course Offerings 411 

Five College Course Offerings by Five College Faculty 415 

Five College Certificate in African Studies 429 

Five College Certificate in Asian/Pacific/American Studies 430 

Five College Buddhist Studies Certificate Program 432 

Five College Coastal and Marine Sciences Certificate Program 433 

Five College Certificate in Cognitive Neuroscience 434 

Five College Certificate in Culture, Health and Science 435 

Five College Certificate in International Relations 436 

Five College Certificate in Latin American Studies 437 

Five College Certificate in Logic 438 

Five College Certificate in Middle East Studies 440 

Five College Certificate in Native American Indian Studies 441 

Five College Certificate in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies 442 

Five College Film Studies 443 

Five College Self-Instructional Language Program 444 

The Athletic Program 445 

Directory 447 

The Board of Trustees 447 

Faculty 452 

Administration 474 

Standing Committees 477 

Alumnae Association 478 

Index 479 

Class Schedule inside back cover 



How to Get to Smith 



By Air: Bradley International, located about 35 miles 
south of Northampton in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, 
is the nearest airport and is served by all major airlines. 
Limousines, buses and rental cars are available at the 
airport. Flying into Bradley rather than into Boston's 
Logan Airport gives you a shorter drive to Northampton 
and spares you city traffic congestion. 

By Train: Amtrak serves Springfield, Massachusetts, 
which is 20 miles south of Northampton. From the 
train station, you can reach Northampton by taxi, 
rental car or bus. The Springfield bus station is a short 
walk from the train station. 



By Bus: Greyhound, Vermont Transit and Peter Pan 
bus lines serve the area. Most routes go to the main bus 
terminal in Springfield, where you can catch another 
bus to Northampton. Buses run almost hourly between 
Springfield and Northampton. Smith is a 10-minute 
walk or a short taxi ride from the bus station. 

By Car: Northampton is on Route 1-91. Take Exit 18, 
and follow Route 5 north into the center of town. 1\irn 
left onto Route 9- Go straight through four sets of traffic 
lights, turning left into College Lane shortly after the 
third set. The Office of Admission is on your right, over- 
looking Paradise Pond. Parking is available next to the 
office and along Route 9- 



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Smith College is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges, Inc. through its Commission on 
Institutions of Higher Education. Accreditation of an institution of higher education by the New England Association 
indicates that it meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment of institutional quality periodically applied through a 
peer review process. 



Inquiries and Visits 



Visitors are always welcome at the college. Student 
guides are available to all visitors for tours of the cam- 
pus; arrangements can be made through the Office 
of Admission. Administrative offices are open Monday 
through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. during the 
academic year. (Refer to the college calendar, p. vii, for 
the dates that the college is in session.) In the summer, 
offices are open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. You may be able 
to make appointments to meet with office staff at other 
times, including holidays. Any questions about Smith 
College may be addressed to the following officers and 
their staffs by mail, telephone, e-mail or appointment. 

Admission 

Audrey Smith, Dean of Enrollment 

Debra Shaver. Director of Admission 

7 College Lane, (413) 585-2500; (800) 383-3232 

We urge prospective students to make appointments 
for interviews in advance with the Office of Admission. 
The Office of Admission schedules these appointments 
from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday. From 
mid-September through January, appointments can 
also be made on Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. Gen- 
eral information sessions are also held twice daily and 
on Saturdays from mid-July through January. Please 
visit vuvw.smith.edu/admission for details. 

Financial Aid, Campus Jobs and Billing for 

Undergraduates 

David Belanger. Acting Director ofStudetit 

Financial Services 

College Hall 
(413) 585-2530 
E-mail: sfsCe'smith.edu 

Academic Standing 

Maureen A. Mahoney, Dean of the College 

College Hall, (413)585-4900 

Tom R\dde\l Associate Dean of the College and Dean 
of the First -Year Class 

Margaret Bruzelius, Dean of the Sophomore Class 

Margaret Zelljadt, Dean of the Senior Class 
College Hall, (413) 585-4910 



ErikaJ. Laquer, Dean of the Junior Class and Ada 

Comstock Scholars 
College Hall, (413) 585-3090 

Advancement 

Patricia Jackson, Vice President for Advancement 

Alumnae House. (413)585-2020 

Alumnae Association 

Carrie Cadwell Brown. Executive Director 

Alumnae House, (413) 585-2020 

Career Planning and Alumnae References 
Stacie Hagenbaugh, Director of Career 

Development Office 
Drew Hall, (413) 585-2570 

College Relations 

Laurie Fenlason, Executive Director of Public 

Affairs and Special Assistant to the President 
Garrison Hall, (413)585-2170 

Graduate Study 

Danielle Carr Ramdath, Director 
College Hall, (413) 585-3000 

Medical Services and Student Health 

Leslie R. Jaffe, College Plyysician and Director 

of Health Services 
Elizabeth Mason Infirmary, (413) 585-2800 

Religious Life 

Jennifer Walters, Dean of Religious Life 
Helen Hills Hills Chapel, (413) 585-2750 

School for Social Work 

Carolvn Jacobs, £to 
l.illv Hall, (413) 585-7950 

Student Affairs 

Julianne Ohotnickv, Dean of Students 
College Hall, (413) 585-4940 

Transcripts and Records 
Patricia O'Neil, Registrar 
College Hall, (413) 585-2550 



Academic Calendar 2008-09 



Fall Semester 2008 

Tuesday, August 26-Wednesday, September 3 

Orientation for entering students 

Friday, August 29, and Saturday, August 30 

Central check-in for entering students 

Tuesday, September 2, and Wednesday, 

September 3 

Central check-in for returning students 

Wednesday, September 3, 7:30 p.m. 

Opening Convocation 

Thursday, September 4, 8 a.m. 
Classes begin 

To be announced by the president 

Mountain Day (holiday) — Classes scheduled before 
7 p.m. are canceled. 

Saturday, October 1 1 -Tuesday, October 14 

Autumn recess 

Friday, October 24-Sunday, October 26 

Family Weekend 

Thursday, November 6 

Otelia Cromwell Day — Afternoon and evening classes 
are canceled. 

Monday, November 10-Friday, November 21 

Advising and course registration for the second 
semester 

Wednesday, November 26-Sunday, November 30 
Thanksgiving recess (Houses close at 10 a.m. on 
November 26 and open at 1 p.m. on November 30.) 

Thursday, December 1 1 

Last day of classes 

Friday, December 12-Monday, December 15 

Pre-examination study period 

Tuesday, December 16-Friday, December 19 

Examinations 

Saturday, December 20-Sunday, January 4 

Winter recess (Houses and Friedman apartments close 
at 10 am. on December 20 and open at 1 p.m. on 
January 4.) 



Interterm 2009 



Monday, January 5-Saturday, January 24 

Spring Semester 2009 

Thursday, January 22-Sunday, January 25 

Orientation for entering students 

Monday, January 26, 8 a.m. 

Classes begin 

Wednesday, February 18 

Rally Day — All classes are canceled. 

Saturday, March 14-Sunday, March 22 

Spring recess (Houses close at 10 a.m. on March 14 and 

open at 1 p.m. on March 22.) 

Monday, April 6-Friday, April 17 

Advising and course registration for the first semester 
of 2009-10 

Friday, May 1 

Last day of classes 

Saturday, May 2-Monday, May 4 

Pre-examination study period 

Tuesday, May 5-Friday, May 8 

Final examinations 

Saturday, May 9 

Houses close for all students except '09 graduates, 

Commencement workers and those with Five College 

finals. 

Sunday, May 17 
Commencement 

Monday, May 18 

All houses close at noon. 

The calendar for the academic year consists of two 
semesters separated by an interterm of approximately 
three weeks. Each semester allows for 13 weeks of 
classes followed by a pre-examination study period and 
a four-day examination period. Please visit wwwsmith. 
edu/academiccalendar for further details. 



Smith College 
Mission and History 



Mission 



Smith College educates women of promise for lives of distinction. A college of and for the world. Smith links the 
power of the liberal arts to excellence in research and scholarship, developing leaders for society's challenges. 

Values 

• Smith is a community dedicated to learning, teaching, scholarship, discovers', creativity and critical thought. 

• Smith is committed to access and diversity, recruiting and supporting talented, ambitious women of all 
backgrounds. 

• Smith educates women to understand the complexity of human history and the variety of the world's cultures 
through engagement with social, political, aesthetic and scientific issues. 

• Smith prepares women to fulfill their responsibilities to the local, national and global communities in which 
they live and to steward the resources that sustain them. 

History of Smith College 

Smith College is a distinguished liberal arts college committed to providing the highest quality undergraduate educa- 
tion for women to enable them to develop their intellects and talents and to participate effectively and fully in society. 

Smith began in the nineteenth century in the mind and conscience of a New England woman. In her will. 
Sophia Smith articulated her vision of a liberal arts college for women, with the purpose that "women's wrongs' 
will be redressed, their wages adjusted, their weight of influence in reforming the evils of society* will be greatly 
increased as teachers, as writers, as mothers, as members of society, their power for good will be incalculably en- 
larged." Through its commitment to academic excellence and its active engagement with the issues of our time, 
Smith remains faithful to its founder's ideals. 

The college envisioned by Sophia Smith and her minister, John M. Greene, resembled many other old New 
England colleges in its religious orientation, with all education at the college "pervaded by the Spirit of Evangelical 
Christian Religion" but "without giving preference to any sect or denomination." 

Smith has changed much since its founding in 1871. But throughout its history there have been certain en- 
during constants: an uncompromising defense of academic and intellectual freedom, an attention to the relation 
between college education and the larger public issues of world order and human dignity, and a concern for the 
rights and privileges of women. 

Indeed, at a time when most people had narrow views of women's abilities and their proper role in society. Sophia 
Smith showed not only concern with the particular needs of young women but also faith in their still underdeveloped 
powers. After enumerating the subjects that continue to be a vital part of the college's curriculum, she added: 

And in such other studies as coming times may develop or demand for the education of 
women and the progress of the race. I would have the education suited to the mental and physi- 
cal wants of women. It is not my design to render my sex any the less feminine, but to develop 
as fulh as may be the powers of womanhood, and furnish women with the means of usefulness, 
happiness and honor now withheld from them. 

In the fall of 1875, Smith College opened with 14 students and six faculty under the presidency of Laurenus 
Clark Seelve. Its small campus was planned to make the college part of what John M. Greene called "the real prac- 



History of Smith 



tical life" of a New England town, rather than a sequestered academic preserve. College Hall, the Victorian Gothic 
administrative and classroom building, dominated the head of Northampton's Main Street. For study and worship, 
students used the town's well-endowed public library and various churches. Instead of a dormitory, students lived 
in a "cottage," where life was more familial than institutional. Thus began the "house" system that, with some 
modifications, the college still employs today. The main lines of Smith's founding educational policy, laid down in 
President Seelye's inaugural address, remain valid today: then as now, the standards for admission were as high as 
those of the best colleges for men; then as now, a truly liberal education was fostered by a broad curriculum of the 
humanities, the fine arts and the natural and social sciences. 

During the 35 years of President Seelye's administration, the college prospered mightily. Its assets grew from 
Sophia Smith's original bequest of about $400,000 to more than $3,000,000; its faculty to 122; its student body 
to 1,635; its buildings to 35. These buildings included Alumnae Gymnasium, site of the first women's basketball 
game, which now houses the College Archives and is connected to the William Allan Neilson Library, one of the 
best-resourced undergraduate libraries in the country. 

Smith's second president, Marion LeRoy Burton, took office in 1910. President Burton, a graduate of Yale Di- 
vinity School, was a gifted public speaker with an especially acute business sense. He used these talents to help the 
college raise the amazing sum of $1,000,000 — a huge endowment campaign for any college at that time. With the 
college's increased endowment, President Burton was able to increase faculty salaries substantially and improve the 
faculty-to-student ratio. President Burton's fund drive also invigorated the alumnae, bringing them closer to the 
college than ever before and increasing their representation on the board of trustees. 

Along with improving the financial state and business methods of the college, President Burton contributed to a 
revision of the curriculum and initiated college honors programs to recognize outstanding students. He also helped 
to organize a cooperative admission system among Smith, Mount Holyoke, Wellesley and Vassar, the finest women's 
colleges of the day. President Burton's accomplishments are commemorated today by Burton Hall, the science 
building that his fund drive helped to finance. 

When William Allan Neilson became president in 1917, Smith was already one of the largest women's colleges 
in the world. President Neilson shrewdly developed the advantages of large academic institutions while maintain- 
ing the benefits of a small one. Under his leadership, the size of the faculty continued to increase while the number 
of students remained at about 2,000. The curriculum was revised to provide a pattern still followed in many Ameri- 
can colleges — a broad foundation in various fields of knowledge, later complemented by the more intensive study 
of a major subject. The college expanded honors programs and initiated interdepartmental majors in science, 
landscape architecture and theatre. The School for Social Work, a coeducational graduate program, was founded. 
And more college houses were built, mainly in the Georgian complex called "the Quad," so that every student 
could live on campus. 

Not only did President Neilson help make Smith College one of the leading colleges in the United States, 
whether for men or women, but he also developed it into an institution of international distinction and concerns. 
President Neilson, himself a Scotsman, married to a well-educated German woman, transformed the college from 
a high-minded but provincial community in the hinterland of Massachusetts into a cosmopolitan center constant- 
ly animated by ideas from abroad. Between the two world wars, he brought many important exiled or endangered 
foreign teachers, scholars, lecturers and artists to the college. Meanwhile, as long as peace lasted, Smith students 
went to study in France, Italy and Spain on the Junior Year Abroad Program instituted by the college in 1924. 

President Neilson retired in 1939, just before the outbreak of World War II, and for one year Elizabeth Cutter 
Morrow, an alumna trustee, served as acting president. Herbert Davis took office as Smith's fourth president in 
1940 and reaffirmed the contributions that a liberal arts college could make to a troubled world. Already during 
World War I a group of Smith alumnae had gone to France to do relief work in the town of Grecourt; a replica of 
Grecourt's chateau gates is now emblematic of the college. 

Soon after the 1941 bombing of Pearl Harbor, the college agreed to provide facilities on its campus for the first 
Officers' Training Unit of the Women's Reserve, or WAVES. The college added a summer term from 1942 to 1945 
so some students could graduate more quickly and go on to government, hospital or military service. Though 
physically isolated by travel restrictions, the college retained its cosmopolitan character as refugees came to lecture, 
teach and study. And foreign films were shown regularly in Sage Hall — a practice that would give generations of 



History of Smith 



students their sensitivity both to other cultures and to an important, relatively new art. President Davis' administra- 
tion was marked by intensified academic life, reflecting his belief that serious study was a way of confronting the 
global threat to civilization. 

Benjamin Fletcher Wright came from Harvard to become Smith's fifth president in P-M9. The college had by 
then resumed its regular calendar and completed several much-needed building projects, including a new heating 
plant and a student recreation center named for retiring President Davis. The most memorable achievements of 
President Wright's administration were the strengthening of Smith's financial position and the defense of academic 
freedom during the 1950s. 

In 1950. the $7 Million Fund Drive was triumphantly completed, enabling the college to improve facilities and 
increase faculty salaries. In 1955, the Helen Hills Hills Chapel was completed, giving Smith its own place of wor- 
ship. The early 1950s were not, though, easy years for colleges; McCarthyism bred a widespread suspicion of any 
writing or teaching that might seem left of center. In defending his faculty members' right to political and intellec- 
tual independence. President Wright showed great courage and statesmanship. Complementing his achievements 
was the financial and moral support of Smith's Alumnae Association, by now the most devoted and active group of 
its kind in the country. Before President Wright's term ended, the college received a large gift for constructing a new 
faculty office and classroom building to be named for him. 

When Thomas Corwin Mendenhall came from Yale in 1959 to become Smith's sixth president, both the college 
and the country at large were enjoying peace and prosperity. During the 1960s, social and cultural changes stirred 
the college profoundly, and a series of powerful movements influenced the larger society and the academic world 
alike. In response to the needs of increasingly independent and ambitious students, the curriculum was thoroughly 
revised. Collegewide requirements were set aside and independent study encouraged. The college made more varied 
educational experiences available to Smith undergraduates by extending cooperation with its neighbors — Am- 
herst, Hampshire and Mount Holyoke colleges and the University of Massachusetts. And Smith joined other private 
colleges in the Northeast to develop the TVvelve College Exchange Program. The college added buildings with the 
most modern facilities for the study of the natural sciences, performing arts and fine arts. The new fine arts center 
included the Smith College Museum of Art, now one of the most distinguished college museums in the country. 

The 1960s saw the civil rights, the students' rights and the anti-war movements take root and grow at many of 
the country's universities and colleges, including Smith. Thanks to these movements and to the wisdom, tact and 
humor of President Mendenhall, the college emerged from the 1960s with a more precise awareness of student 
needs and an active, practical sense of social responsibility-. 

Meanwhile, life in the college houses was changing. The old rules governing late evenings out and male visi- 
tors were relaxed, then abandoned. Not surprisingly, when Vassar began to admit men, and Yale, Princeton and 
Dartmouth to admit women as candidates for degrees, some members of the college community wondered whether 
Smith should also become coeducational. In 1971, a committee of trustees, faculty, administration, students and 
alumnae studied the question in detail. The committee concluded that admitting men as candidates for the Smith 
degree would detract from the founding purpose of the college — to provide the best possible education for women. 

In the late 1960s and early 1970s another important movement — the women's movement — was gathering 
momentum. This was to have a profound effect on American society and to confirm the original purpose of Smith 
College. The college began its second century in 1975 by inaugurating its first woman president, Jill Ker Conway, 
who came to Smith from Australia by way of Harvard and the University of Toronto. She was a charismatic and 
energetic leader with a vision for women's education, and her administration was marked by three major accom- 
plishments: a large-scale renovation and expansion of Neilson Library, evidence of Smith's undiminished concern 
for the heart of the liberal arts; the rapid growth of the Ada Comstock Scholars Program, through which women be- 
yond the traditional college age could earn a Smith degree; and exceptionally successful fund-raising efforts. Also 
during President Conway's administration, the Career Development Office was expanded to better counsel Smith 
students and alumnae about career opportunities and graduate training for women. Recognizing the rapidly gn m 
ing emphasis on fitness and athletics for women, Smith built the Ainsworth Gymnasium and broke ground for new 
indoor and outdoor track and tennis facilities. President Conway's contributions underscored her commitment to 
women's colleges and a liberal arts education in today's society. 



4 History of Smith 

The college that President Conway left to her successor was in some ways very different from the college served 
by Presidents Seelye, Burton and Neilson. When Mary Maples Dunn came to Smith in 1985 after many years as a 
professor of history and then as dean of Bryn Mawr College, Smith's student body had diversified. During its early 
decades the student body had been overwhelmingly Protestant, but by the 1970s, Roman Catholic and Jewish col- 
lege chaplains served alongside the Protestant chaplain. All racial, ethnic and religious groups are now well repre- 
sented on campus, evidence of Smith's continuing moral and intellectual commitment to diversity. 

In her decade as president, Mary Maples Dunn led the college through exciting and challenging times. The 
college raised more than $300 million, constructed two major buildings and renovated many more, enhanced 
communication on and off campus, attracted record numbers of applicants (while upholding the same academic 
standards) and doubled the value of its endowment. Computer technology transformed the way Smith conducted 
its business. And the curriculum became broader in scope, with five new majors and increased course offerings in 
non-Western and neglected American cultures. 

In 1995 Ruth Simmons became Smith's ninth president, the first African-American woman to head any 
top-ranked American college or university. Simmons galvanized the campus through an ambitious campuswide 
self-study process that resulted in a number of landmark initiatives, including Praxis, a program that allows every 
Smith student the opportunity to elect an internship funded by the college; an engineering program, the first at a 
women's college; programs in the humanities that include a poetry center and a peer-reviewed journal devoted to 
publishing scholarly works by and about women of color; and curricular innovations that include intensive semi- 
nars for first-year students and programs to encourage students' speaking and writing skills. 

A number of building projects were launched during Simmons' administration; most significant was a $35-mil- 
lion expansion and renovation of the Smith College Museum of Art, art department and art library. Construction of 
the Campus Center began, and the Lyman Conservatory was renovated. Simmons left Smith in June 2001, assuming 
the presidency of Brown University. John M. Connolly, Smith's first provost, served as acting president for one year, 
skillfully guiding the college through the national trauma of September 1 1, 2001, and its aftermath. 

A widely respected scholar of Victorian literature, Carol T. Christ took up her duties as Smith's 10th president in 
2002. In the early years of her administration, Christ launched an energetic program of outreach, innovation and 
long-range planning, including capital planning. She encouraged the development of coursework emphasizing 
fluency in the diversity of American cultures and launched a review to determine Smith's distinctive intellectual 
traditions. Under her leadership, hundreds of alumnae, students, faculty and staff participated in presidential 
dialogues, as part of the development of the Smith Design for Learning, the college's strategic plan for the com- 
ing decade. Major building projects have come to fruition: the renovation of and addition to the Brown Fine Arts 
Center; a dramatic new Campus Center; a renovated Lyman Conservatory; the impressive Olin Fitness Center; new 
homes for the Poetry Center and Mwangi Cultural Center; the renovation of Lilly Hall, home of the college's School 
for Social Work; and the construction of Conway House, an apartment building for Ada Comstock Scholars with 
children. Construction is underway for Ford Hall, a state-of-the-art, sustainably designed classroom and laboratory 
facility for the college's pioneering Picker Engineering Program and the sciences. Under Christ's leadership, Smith 
has made significant commitments to environmental sustainability in its curriculum and campus operations, 
including the construction of a co-generation facility for power and heat and the dedication of the MacLeish Field 
Station, a 200-acre woodland tract in Whately, Mass., for environmental education and research. 

Today the college continues to benefit from a dynamic relationship between innovation and tradition. Smith 
is still very much a part of Northampton, a vibrant and sophisticated cultural center. The majority of students still 
live in college houses with their own common rooms, in accord with the original "cottage" plan. The faculty and 
administration are still composed of highly accomplished men and women who work together in a professional 
community with mutual respect. And while Smith's curriculum of the humanities, arts and sciences still flourishes, 
the college continues to respond to the new intellectual needs of today's women — offering majors or interdepartmen- 
tal programs in computer science, engineering, environmental science and policy, the study of women and gender, 
Third World development, neuroscience, film studies, Latin American and Latino/a studies, Jewish studies, history of 
science and technology, and other expanding and emerging fields. Were Sophia Smith to visit Northampton today, 
she would no doubt find her vision realized, as students at her college — young women of extraordinary promise and 
ambition — prepare themselves for exemplary lives of leadership and distinction. 



William Allan Neilson Professorship 



The William Allan Neilson Chair 
of Research 

The William Allan Neilson Professorship, commemo- 
rating President Neilson s profound concern for schol- 
arship and research, has been held by the following 
distinguished scholars: 

Kurt Koffka. Ph.D. 
Psychology, 1927-32 

G. Antonio Borgese, Ph.D. 

Comparative Literature, 1932-35 

Sir Herbert J. C. Grierson, MA., LL.D., Litt.D. 

English, second semester, 1937-3$ 

Alfred Einstein, Dr. Phil. 

Music, first semester, 1939-40; 1949-50 

George Edward Moore, D.Litt., LL.D. 

Pbilosoph } '. first semester, 1940-41 

Karl Kelchner Darrow, Ph.D. 
Physics, second semester, 1940-41 

Carl Lotus Becker, Ph.D., Litt.D. 

History, second semester, 1941-42 

Albert F. Blakeslee, Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.) 
Botany, 1942-43 

Edgar Wind, Ph.D. 

Art. 1944-48 

David Nichol Smith, M.A, D.Litt. (Hon.), LL.D. 

English, first semester, 1946-47 

David Mitrany, Ph.D., D.Sc. 

International Relations, second semester, 1950-51 

Pieter Geyl, Litt.D. 

History, second semester, 1951-52 

Wystan Hugh Auden, B.A. 
English, second semester, 1952-53 

Alfred Kazin, M.A. 
English, 1954-55 

Harlow Shapley, Ph.D., LL.D., Sc.D., Litt.D., Dr. (Hon.) 

Astronomy, first semester, 1956-57 

Philip Ellis Wheelwright, Ph.D. 

Philosoplyy, second semester, 1957-58 

Karl Lehmann, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester. 1958-59 

Alvin Harvey Hansen, Ph.D., LL.D. 

Economics, second semester. 1959-60 

Philippe Emmanuel Le Corbeiller, Dr.-es-Sc., A.M. (Hon.) 
Physics, first semester, 1960-61 

EudoraWelty,B.A,Litt.D. 

English, second semester, 1961-62 



Denes Bartha, Ph.D. 

\lasn : second semester 1 96 j-64 

Dietrich Gerhard, Ph.D. 

History, first semester. 1967-68 

Louis Frederick Fieser, Ph.D., Sc.D. (Hon.), 

D.Pharm. (Hon.) 

Chemistry, second semester, 1967-68 

Wolfgang Stechow, Dr. Phil., L.H.D, D.F.A. (Hon.) 
Art, second semester, 1968-69 

Robert A. Nisbet, Ph.D. 

Sociology and Anthropology, first semester, 1971-72 

Louise Cuyler, Ph.D. 

Music, second semester, 1974-75 

Herbert G. Gutman, Ph.D. 

American Studies, 1977-78 

Renee C. Fox, Ph.D., Litt.D. (Hon.) 

Sociolog)' and Anthropology, first semester, 1980-81 

Auguste Angles, Docteur es Lettres 

French, first semester, 1981-82 

Victor Turner, Ph.D. 

Religion and Biblical Literature, first semester, 
1982-83 

Robert Brentano, D. Phil. 

History, first semester, 1985-86 

Germaine Bree, Ph.D. 

Comparative literature, second semester, 1985-86 

Carsten Thomassen, Ph.D. 

Mathematics, first semester, 1987-88 

Charles Hamilton, J.D., Ph.D. 

Government, second semester, 1988-89 

Triloki Nath Madan, Ph.D. 

Anthropology, first semester, 1990-91 

Armstead L. Robinson, Ph.D. 

Afro-American Studies, first semester, 1991-92 

Sheila S.Walker, Ph.D. 

Afro-American Studies, second semester, 1991-92 

Roy S. Bryce-Laporte, Ph.D. 

Sociology, first semester, 1993-94 

Trinh T. Minh-ha, Ph.D. 

Women's Studies, second semester, 1993-94 

Rev Chow, Ph.D. 

Comparative Literature, second semester, 1995-96 

June Nash, Ph.D. 

Latin American Studies, first semester, 1996-97 

Judith Plaskow, Ph.D. 

Women s Studies and lavish Studies, second 
semester, 1996-97 



William Allan Neilson Professorship/Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship 



Irwin P. Ting, Ph.D. 

Biological Sciences, first semester, 1997-98 

Ruth Kliiger, Ph.D. 

German Studies, first semester, 1998-99 

Romila Thapar, Ph.D. 

Religion and Biblical Literature, second 
semester, 1998-99 

Margaret Lock, Ph.D. 

Anthropology, first semester, 1999-2000 

Thomas Greene, Ph.D. 

English Language and Literature first semester, 
2000-01 

Carolyn Cohen, Ph.D. 

Biochemistry/Biological Sciences, second semester, 
2001-02 " 

Nuala Ni DhombnaiU 

Comparative Literature, first semester, 2002-03 

Lauren Berlant, Ph.D. 

Women's Studies, first semester, 2003-04 

Nawal El Saadawi, M.D. 

Comparative Literature, first semester, 2004-05 

Frances Fox Piven, Ph.D. 

Political Science and Sociology, second semester, 
2006-07 

MohdAnisMd Nor, Ph.D. 

Music, Dance and Theatre, first semester, 2007-08 

Janos Pach, Ph.D. 

Mathematics and Statistics, first semester, 2008-09 

The Ruth and Clarence Kennedy 
Professorship in Renaissance 
Studies 

The Ruth and Clarence Kennedy Professorship in the 
Renaissance, commemorating the Kennedys' commit- 
ment to the study of the Renaissance and their long- 
standing devotion to Smith College, has been held by 
the following distinguished scholars: 

Charles Mitchell, M.A. 

Art, 1974-75 

Felix Gilbert, Ph.D. 

History, 1975-76 

Giuseppe Billanovich, Dottore di Letteratura Italiana 

Italian Humanism, second semester, 1976-77 

Jean J. Seznec, Docteur es Lettres 

French, second semester, 1977-78 

Hans R. Guggisberg, D.Phil. 

History, first semester, 1980-81 



Alistair Crombie, Ph.D. 

History; of Science, second semester, 1981-82 

John Coolidge, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1982-83 

Howard Mayer Brown, Ph.D. 

Music, first semester, 1983-84 

HendrikW. van Os, Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 1987-88 

George Kubler, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1989-90 

Susan Donahue Kuretsky, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1991-92 

Diane De Grazia, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1993-94 

Larry Silver, Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 1994-95 

Andree Hayum, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 1994-95 

Mark P. 0. Morford, Ph.D. 

Classical Languages and Literatures, 1995-96 

Kenneth R. Stow, Ph.D. 

Jewish Studies, 1996-97 

AnnaMaria Petrioli Tofani, Dottore in Lettere 

Art and Italian Language and Literature, 
first semester, 1997-98 

Nancy Siraisi, Ph.D. 

History of Sciences, first semester, 1998-99 

Keith Christiansen, Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 1999-2000 

Phvllis Pray Bober, Ph.D. 

Art, first semester, 2001-02 

Alison Brown, M.A. 

History, first semester) 2001-02 

Harry Berger, Jr., Ph.D. 

Comparative Literature, first semester, 2002-03 

James M. Saslow, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 2003-04 

Richard Cooper, Ph.D. 

French, first semester, 2004-05 

Deborah Howard, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 2005-06 

Andreas Kleinert, Ph.D. 

History of Science, first semester, 2006-07 

Caroline Elam, Hon.D.Arts. 

Art, second semester, 2007-08 

Rosemarie Mulcahy, Ph.D. 

Art, second semester, 2008-09 



The Academic Program 



Smith: A Liberal Arts College 

The tradition of the liberal arts reaches back 
into classical antiquity. Training the mind 
through the stud\' of languages, literature, 
history, culture, society, mathematics, 
science, the arts and philosophy has for 
centuries been the favored approach in Europe and 
America for educating leaders. It is a general training, 
not intended as a preparation for any one profession. In 
the 19th century the liberal arts were characterized as 
providing "the discipline and furniture of the mind: 
expanding its powers, and storing it with knowledge," 
to which was added, "The former of these is, perhaps, 
the more important of the two." At many liberal arts 
colleges today this ideal is understood as implying both 
breadth and depth in each student's course of studies, 
as well as the acquisition of crucial skills in writing, 
public speaking and quantitative reasoning. 

From its foundation in 1871 Smith has taken a pro- 
gressive, expansive and student-oriented view of its role 
as a liberal arts college. To the studies of the humanities 
and sciences the college early added courses in art and 
music, a substantial innovation for its time. In the same 
spirit the faculty has continued to integrate the new and 
the old, respecting all the while the individual needs of, 
and differences among, its students. As an early dean 
of the faculty wrote, it "is always the problem of educa- 
tion, to secure the proper amount of system and the due 
proportion of individual liberty, to give discipline to the 
impulsive and wa\ward and largeness of opportunity to 
those who will make good use of it." 

In the spirit of "individual liberty [and] largeness 
of opportunity" Smith College has since 1970 had no 
distribution requirements for graduation. In the interest 
of "discipline" each student must complete a major, to 
give depth to her studies, while to guarantee breadth 
she must take at least 64 credits outside the department 
or program of her major. As for "system," the college 
assigns each beginning student a faculty member as 
academic adviser; each student later chooses a major 
adviser. Students, in consultation with their advisers, are 
expected to select a curriculum that has both breadth 
and depth, engages with cultures other than their own, 



and develops critical skills in writing, public speaking. 
and quantitative reasoning. 

The Smith faculty strongly recommends that 
students "pursue studies in the seven major fields of 
knowledge" listed below. Completion of a course in 
each of these areas is a condition for Latin Honors at 
graduation: to be eligible each student must take at 
least one course in each of the seven areas (see follow- 
ing, and Latin Honors on p. 27). Students who complete 
a course in each area will receive Liberal Arts Commen- 
dation and this will be noted on their transcripts. 



The Curriculum 



Each discipline within the liberal arts framework offers 
students a valid perspective on the world's past, present 
and future. Therefore, we recommend that students 
pursue studies in the following seven major fields of 
knowledge: 

1) Literature, either in English or in some other 
language, because it is a crucial form of expression, 
contributes to our understanding of human experi- 
ence and plays a central role in the development of 
culture; 

2) Historical studies, either in history or in historical- 
ly oriented courses in art, music, religion, philoso- 
phy and theatre, because they provide a perspective 
on the development of human society and culture 
and free us from the parochialism of the present; 

3) Social science, because it offers a systematic and 
critical inquiry into human nature, social institu- 
tions and human relationships; 

4) Natural science, because of its methods, its contri- 
bution to our understanding of the world around us 
and its significance in modem culture; 

5) Mathematics and analytic philosophy, because 
they foster an understanding of the nature and use 
of formal, rational thought; 

6) The arts, because they constitute the media through 
which people have sought, through the ages, to ex- 
press their deepest feelings and values; 

7) Afireign language, because it frees one from the 
limits of one's own tongue, provides access to another 
culture and makes possible communication outside 
one's own society. 



The Academic Program 



We further recommend that students take performance 
courses offered in exercise and sport studies, because 
they provide opportunities for recreation, health and 
the development of skills for the complete person. 

Curricular Expectations and 
Requirements 

In the course of their educations, Smith students are 
expected to become acquainted with — to master, as 
far as they are able — certain bodies of knowledge, but 
they are also expected to learn the intellectual skills 
necessary for using and extending that knowledge. The 
list below summarizes those expectations. While ac- 
knowledging that education can never be defined by a 
listing of subjects or skills, the faculty believes that such 
a listing may usefully contribute to the planning of 
an education, and it offers the list below in that spirit, 
as an aid to students as they choose their courses and 
assess their individual progress, and to advisers as they 
assist in that process. 

In order to put their knowledge to use, to lay a 
foundation for further study, and to make effective con- 
tributions to the work of their communities, students 
should, by the time they graduate: 

I. Develop the ability to think critically and analyti- 
cally and to convey knowledge and understanding, 
which require 

• writing clearly 

• speaking articulately 

• reading closely 

• evaluating and presenting evidence accurately 

• knowing and using quantitative skills 

• applying scientific reasoning 

• engaging with artistic creation and expression 

• working both independently and collabora- 
tively 

II. Develop a historical and comparative perspective, 
which requires 

• learning foreign languages 

• studying the historical development of societies, 
cultures, and philosophies 

• understanding multi- and inter-disciplinary 
approaches 

III. Become an informed global citizen, which requires 

• engaging with communities beyond Smith 

• learning tolerance and understanding diversity 



• applying moral reasoning to ethical problems 

• understanding environmental challenges 

The Writing Requirement 

Each first-year student is required, during her first or 
second semester at Smith, to complete with a grade of 
C- or higher at least one writing-intensive course. Based 
on their level of proficiency, students will be directed 
toward appropriate intensive writing courses. Writing 
intensive courses will devote a significant amount of 
class time to teaching students to write with precision, 
clarity, economy and some degree of elegance. That is 
to say, 

1) to articulate a thesis or central argument, or to cre- 
ate a description or report, with an orderly sequence 
of ideas, apt transitions, and a purpose clear to the 
intended audience; 

2) to support an argument and to enrich an explana- 
tion with evidence; 

3) when appropriate, to identify and to evaluate suit- 
able primary and secondary sources for scholarly 
work, demonstrating awareness of library cata- 
logues and databases and of the values and limita- 
tions of Internet resources; 

4) to incorporate the work of others (by quotation, 
summary or paraphrase) concisely, effectively 
and with attention to the models of citation of the 
various disciplines and with respect for academic 
integrity; 

5) to compose paragraphs that are unified and coher- 
ent; 

6) to edit work until it is orderly, clear and free of 
violations of the conventions of standard written 
English (grammar, usage, punctuation, diction, 
syntax). 

For the bachelor of arts degree, there are no further 
required courses outside the student's field of concen- 
tration. The college does, however, make two demands 
of the student: that she complete a major and that 
she take at least 64 credits outside the department or 
program of her major. The curricular requirements 
for the bachelor of science degree in engineering are 
listed in the courses of study section under Engineer- 
ing. Furthermore, students who wish to become eligible 
for Latin Honors (see p. 27) at graduation or who wish 
to have Liberal Arts Commendation indicated on their 
transcripts must elect at least one course (normally 
four credits) in each of the seven major fields of knowl- 



The Academic Program 



edge listed previously. Each student has the freedom 
and responsibility to choose, with the help of her aca- 
demic advisers, a course of studies to fit her individual 
needs and interests. The curricular expectations and 
requirements for the degree therefore allow great flex- 
ibility in the design of a course of study leading to the 
degree. 



The Major 



A student's program requires a minimum of 36 credits 
in a departmental or interdepartmental major. For the 
bachelor of arts degree, one-half of a student's total 
program, or at least 64 credits, shall be taken outside 
the department or program of the major. Any course 
(including prerequisites) which is explicitly listed 
in the catalogue as required for, or counting toward, 
fulfilling the requirements of the major shall be con- 
sidered to be inside the major for the purposes of this 
rule. The sole exception to the 64-credit rule is that in 
the case of a major requiring study of two foreign lan- 
guages taught within a single department or program, 
no fewer than 56 credits shall be taken outside the 
department or program of the major. The requirements 
for each major are described at the end of the course 
listings for each major department and program. 
Cross-listed and dual-prefixed courses are also consid- 
ered to be inside the major. 

Students declare their majors no later than the 
registration period during the second semester of the 
sophomore year but may declare them earlier. Once the 
major is declared, a member of the faculty in the major 
department, either chosen or assigned, serves as the 
student's adviser. 

Major programs are offered by the following depart- 
ments: 



Afro-American Studies 

Anthropology 

Art 

Astronomy 

Biological Sciences 

Chemistry 

Classical Languages and 

Literatures 
Computer Science 
Dance 
East Asian Languages 

and Literatures 
Economics 



Education and Child 

Study 
Engineering 
English Language and 

Literature 
French Studies 
Geology 
German Studies 
Government 
History 
Italian Language 

and Literature 
Italian Studies 



Jewish Studies 


Religion 


Mathematics and 


Russian Language 


Statistics 


and Literature 


Music 


Sociology 


Philosoph) 


Spanish and 


Physics 


Portuguese 


Psychology 


Theatre 


Interdepartmental majors 


are offered in the 


following areas: 




American Studies 


Latin American and 


Biochemistry 


Latino/a Studies 


Comparative Literature 


Medieval Studies 


East Asian Studies 


Neuroscience 


Film Studies 


Study of Women and 




Gender 



If the educational needs of the individual student 
cannot be met by a course of study in any of the speci- 
fied majors, a student may design and undertake an 
interdepartmental major sponsored by advisers from 
at least two departments, subject to the approval of the 
Committee on Academic Priorities. The guidelines for 
proposed student-designed interdepartmental majors 
are available in the class deans' office, College Hall. 

Students in departmental majors or in student-de- 
signed interdepartmental majors may enter the honors 
program. A description of the honors program can be 
found on page 12. 

On its official transcripts, the college will recognize 
the completion of no more than two majors, or one 
major and one minor, or one major and one Five Col- 
lege Certificate for each student, even if the student 
chooses to complete the requirements for additional 
majors, minors or certificates. No minor or second 
major may be in the same department or program as 
the first major. 



The Minor 



Students may consider the option of a minor in ad- 
dition to a major. A minor consists of a sequence, des- 
ignated by the faculty, of 20 to 24 credits from one or 
more departments. The minor may not be in the same 
department or program as the student's major. 

In addition to minors in many departments and 
programs offering majors, the following interde- 
partmental minors are offered: 



10 



The Academic Program 



Linguistics 

Logic 

Marine Science and 

Policy 
Medieval Studies 
Middle East Studies 
Neuroscience 
Political Economy 
Public Policy 
Statistics 
Study of Women and 

Gender 
Third World Development 

Studies 
Urban Studies 



African Studies 
Ancient Studies 
Archaeology 
Astrophysics 
Digital Art 
Digital Music 
East Asian Studies 
Environmental Science 

and Policy 
Ethics 

Exercise and Sports Studies 
History of Science 

and Technology 
International Relations 
Landscape Studies 
Latin American and 

Latino/a Studies 

Student-Designed 
Interdepartmental 
Majors and Minors 

This course of study must differ significantly from an 
established major or minor and must include concen- 
trated work in more than one department. For majors, 
at least one of the departments or programs must itself 
offer a major. Majors are expected to include 36 to 48 
credits in related courses in more than one department. 
Normally, a minimum of 24 credits are at the 200 level 
or higher and a minimum of eight are at the 300 level. 
One of the 300-level courses may be the integrating 
project. Examples of self-designed majors include lin- 
guistics, exercise science and logic. 

Minors are expected to include 20 to 24 credits in 
related courses in more than one department, of which 
no more than eight credits should be at the 100 level and 
at least four should be at the 300 level. 

Proposals for majors may be submitted no earlier 
than the first semester of the sophomore year and no 
later than the end of advising week of the second se- 
mester of the junior year. The deadlines for submission 
of proposals are November 15 and April 15. Proposals 
for minors may be submitted to the Subcommittee on 
Honors and Independent Programs at any time after 
the major has been declared but no later than the end 
of the first semester of the senior year. 

The major or minor proposal must include a state- 
ment explicitly defining the subject matter and method 



of approach underlying the design of the major or 
minor; course lists; and, for the major, a clearly for- 
mulated integrating course or piece of work. Proposals 
must include letters of support from all advisers repre- 
senting the areas of study central to the major and writ- 
ten recommendations signed by the chairs indicating 
approval of the departments or programs in the major. 

Information about student-designed interdepart- 
mental majors and minors is available from the dean 
of the senior class. 

Five College Certificate 
Programs 

Five College Certificate Programs provide a directed 
course of study in various interdisciplinary fields 
through the resources available at the five area col- 
leges. Certificate programs are offered in addition to 
or in conjunction with the student's major. Certificates 
are awarded upon successful completion of a program 
by the appropriate Five College faculty councils on 
the recommendation of designated faculty advisers 
from the students home institution. Current certificate 
programs require that the student earn a grade of B 
or above in all courses counting for the certificate and 
many require students to demonstrate competence in 
a language other than English. Each institution deter- 
mines the method by which competence will be mea- 
sured. (See pages 429-442 for individual Five College 
Certificate offerings). 

Advising 

Premajor and Major Advisers 

Each student has a faculty adviser who helps her select 
and register for courses that will satisfy' the broad ex- 
pectations of the college and will further her personal 
goals and aspirations. The dean of the first-year class 
assigns a premajor faculty adviser to each first-year stu- 
dent. This faculty member will continue to advise her 
until she chooses a major. The names of major advisers 
appear after each department s course listings. 

Together the adviser and student devise a balanced 
academic program, making full use of the courses and 
programs available. The adviser approves all registra- 
tion decisions, including changes made to the course 
program after the beginning of a semester. An adviser 



The Academic Program 



11 



can help a student find academic and personal resourc- 
es and can help her select and pursue various optional 
programs. It is the joint responsibility of both student 
and adviser to plan a course program that will lead to 
successful completion of all degree requirements. 

In addition to aiding in the selection of courses, 
major advisers often counsel students about prepara- 
tion for graduate schools or careers. The more clearly 
a student can articulate her own vision and goals, the 
more productive will be her relationship with her ad- 
viser. 

Minor Advisers 

A student electing a minor will have the guidance of 
a faculty adviser who represents the discipline, in ad- 
dition to the help of her major adviser. She normally 
must consult with her minor adviser at the time she 
initially elects the minor, and again when she needs to 
certify that the minor has been completed. 

Engineering Advising 

Students who are interested in engineering should 
consult the faculty listed on page 192. 

Prebusiness Advising 

Students who are interested in pursuing a graduate 
program in business should consult with the Career 
Development Office, which provides information and 
advice about all career fields and graduate training. 
Juniors and seniors who wish further advice on admis- 
sions criteria may consult a member of the Prebusiness 
Advisory Group. Please contact the Career Development 
Office for the names of faculty- and staff members who 
are members of this group. 

Premedical and Prehealth 
Professions Advising 

Students who wish to prepare for careers in the health 
professions have special advising needs. They may 
major in any subject, provided their program includes 
courses that will satisfy the minimum entrance re- 
quirements for health professions schools. 

Students interested in a premedical or other health- 
related program should consult page 130 for important 
information. 



Prelaw Advising 

Law schools accept students from any major; there is 
no prelaw curriculum. Students interested in pursuing 
a law degree are encouraged to pick up or print off a 
copy of the Career Development Office (CDO) handout 
on "Law School," and bring their questions to the 
prelaw adviser (Daryl Gehman, in the CDO). 

Academic Honor System 

In 1944, the students of Smith College voted to estab- 
lish the Academic Honor System in the belief that each 
member of the Smith community has an obligation 
to uphold the academic standards of the college. The 
basic premise on which the code is based is that the 
learning process is a product of individual effort and 
commitment accompanied by moral and intellectual 
integrity. The Academic Honor Code is the institutional 
expression of these beliefs. The code requires that each 
individual be honest and respect and respond to the 
demands of living responsibly in an academic com- 
munity. 

Special Programs 

Accelerated Course Program 

With permission of the administrative board, students 
having a cumulative average of at least B (3.0) may 
complete the requirements for the degree in six or 
seven semesters. Four semesters, including two of these 
in the junior or senior year, must be completed in resi- 
dence at Smith College in Northampton. A student who 
intends to study away from campus during the junior 
year should file her acceleration proposal by the end of 
the first year. 

A maximum of 32 credits can be accumulated 
toward the degree through a combination of Advanced 
Placement (or similar), pre-matriculation, Intertenn 
and summer school credits. Students whose accelera- 
tion plans include courses to be taken during Intertenn 
should be aware of the fact that these courses are lim- 
ited both in number and in enrollment and cannot be 
guaranteed as part of the acceleration plan. Requests 
for permission to accelerate should be filed with the 
student's class dean at least two full semesters before 
the proposed date of graduation. 



\1 



The Academic Program 



The Ada Comstock Scholars 
Program 

The Ada Comstock Scholars Program at Smith com- 
bines the rigorous academic challenges of the under- 
graduate program with flexibility for women beyond 
traditional college age. 

Many women choose to work or raise a family 
rather than complete an education, but later wish to 
return to earn a degree. Established in 1975, the Ada 
Comstock Scholars Program allows nontraditional 
students to complete a bachelor's degree either part- 
time or full-time. Each Ada Comstock student attends 
the same classes and fulfills the same requirements 
as do all other Smith students. The program provides 
academic advising, orientation programs, peer advis- 
ing, a center for the exclusive use of participants in the 
program and some housing. Career counseling and 
academic assistance are provided through specialized 
offices available on campus. Financial aid is available 
to all admitted students based on demonstrated need. 

Reasons for becoming an Ada Comstock Scholar 
differ as widely as each woman's history, age, marital 
status, parenting circumstances and socioeconomic 
level. Each Ada Comstock Scholar has a high level of 
ability, strong motivation and at least a year of trans- 
ferable liberal arts credit. This widely disparate group 
of women contributes vigor, diversity of perspective, 
intellectual ability and enthusiasm to all aspects of 
Smith life. Their achievements confirm the academic 
standard of the college. 

A student admitted as a traditional first-year or 
transfer student normally will not be permitted to 
change her class status to Ada Comstock Scholar. A 
candidate's status as an Ada Comstock Scholar must be 
designated at the time of application. 

For information about application procedures, see 
pages 43^4. Information about expenses and how to 
apply for financial aid can be found on pages 34 and 
38. For more information about the Ada Comstock 
Scholars Program, contact the Office of Admission at 
(413) 585-2523; e-mail, admission@smith.edu; or fax 
(413) 585-2527. 

Community Auditing: 
Nonmatriculated Students 

Members of the local community who have earned 
a high school diploma are eligible to audit a lecture 
course at Smith on a space-available basis with the 



permission of the instructor and the registrar. Forms 
for the faculty member's signature and more infor- 
mation about auditing are available at the Office of the 
Registrar. A fee is charged and is determined by the type 
of course. Normally studio art courses are not open to 
non-matriculated students. Auditors are invited to at- 
tend classes, but they do not participate in other aspects 
of college life. Records of audits are not maintained. 

Five College Interchange 

A student in good standing may take a course without 
additional cost at Amherst, Hampshire and Mount 
Holyoke colleges or the University of Massachusetts, if 
the course is appropriate to the educational plan of the 
student and approved by Smith College. A first-semester 
first-year student must obtain the permission of the 
class dean before enrolling in a Five College course. 
A list of Five College courses approved for Smith Col- 
lege degree credit is available at the registrar's office. 
Requests for approval of courses not on the list may be 
submitted to the registrar's office. However, Smith Col- 
lege does not accept all Five College courses for credit 
toward the Smith degree. 

Departmental Honors Program 

The Departmental Honors Program is for qualified stu- 
dents who want to study a particular topic or undertake 
research that results in a significant thesis or project 
within their major department or program. Interested 
students should consult the director of honors in the 
major department or program about application cri- 
teria, procedures and deadlines. Students must have 
permission of the major department or program to 
enter the Departmental Honors Program. Information 
regarding the Departmental Honors Program may also 
be obtained from the dean of the senior class. 

Independent Study Projects/ 
Internships 

Independent study projects may be proposed by juniors 
and seniors who wish to complete a special project of 
work or study on or off campus. All projects must be 
approved by the Committee on Academic Priorities 
and are under the direct supervision of Smith College 
faculty members. The maximum that may be granted 
for an off-campus project is eight credits. The maxi- 
mum that may be granted for an on-campus project 



The Academic Program 



13 



is 16 credits. Any independent study project must be 
completed within a single semester. The deadline far 
submission of proposals is November 15 for a second- 
semester program and April IS for a first-semester 
program. Information about the Independent Study 
Program is available in the office of the class deans. No 
independent study project may be undertaken during 
the summer or January. 

All internships for credit must be approved in 
advance by the Committee on Academic Priorities and 
are under the direct supervision of a member or mem- 
bers of the faculty of Smith College. A maximum of 
eight credits can be granted for approved internships. 
Credit is not given for internships undertaken during 
January. For summer internships, tuition is charged by 
the credit. The deadline for submission of proposals is 
November 15 for a second-semester program and April 
1 5 for a summer or first-semester program. Infor- 
mation and applications for internships are available 
in the class deans' office. A maximum of 16 credits for 
independent study projects and internships combined 
is allowed. 

Smith Scholars Program 

The Smith Scholars Program is designed for highly 
motivated and talented students who want to spend two 
to four semesters working on projects of their own de- 
vising, freed (in varying degrees) from normal college 
requirements. A student may apply at any time after the 
first semester of her sophomore year and must submit 
a detailed statement of her program, an evaluation of 
her proposal and her capacity to complete it from those 
faculty who will advise her and two supporting recom- 
mendations from instructors who have taught her in 
class. The deadlines for submission of proposals for the 
Smith Scholars Program are November 15 and April 
15 of the student's junior year. The proportion of work 
to be done in normal courses will be decided jointly by 
the student, her adviser(s) and the Subcommittee on 
Honors and Independent Programs. Work done in the 
program may result in a group of related papers, an 
original piece of work, such as a play, or some combi- 
nation of these. 

A Smith Scholar may or may not complete a regu- 
lar departmental major. Further details, guidelines and 
applications are available from the dean of the senior 
class. 



Study Abroad Programs 

Smith College offers a wide variety of study abroad pro- 
grams, from Smith's own programs in Western Europe 
to Smith consortia] and other approved programs all 
over the world. For the Smith Junior Year Abroad (JYA) 
programs in Florence, Hamburg, Geneva and Paris, a 
JYA program application must be filed by February 1 in 
the Office for International Study. For all other study- 
abroad programs, students must submit a plan of study 
for college approval by February 15 for fall, full year or 
spring semester study. Students should contact the Office 
for International Study for information on deadlines 
and procedures since some programs allow for a fall 
application deadline. 

For all programs, the Smith College comprehensive 
fee is charged. The comprehensive fee, covering tuition, 
room and board when classes are in session, is the same as 
the comprehensive fee for a year's study in Northampton. 
Smith pays tuition, room and board on behalf of the stu- 
dent to the study abroad program or the host institution. 

Students are responsible for all expenses and all 
travel during program breaks or vacations. Incidental 
expenses vary according to individual tastes and plans, 
and funds for such expenses are not covered by the 
comprehensive fee. 

All students who wish to study abroad must obtain 
approval from the Office for International Study. Stu- 
dents must be in good standing in academic and stu- 
dent conduct matters with a minimum GPA of 3.0, have 
a declared major and no shortage of credit at the time 
of application to be approved for study abroad. Students 
should note that a year or semester abroad does not 
count toward the required two years in residence at 
Smith College. Any student wishing to spend any part of 
the senior year abroad on a Smith or non-Smith pro- 
gram must petition the Administrative Board through 
the class dean. 

Students attending programs with yearlong courses 
(LSE, Trinity) receive credit only if they have taken the 
final exams and final grades have been issued by the 
host institution. 

In all instances, Smith reserves the right to approve. 
retract or deny a student's participation on study abroad. 

Smith College Junior Year Abroad 
Programs 

The Smith College Junior Year Abroad Programs provide 
students in a variety of disciplines the opportunity for 



14 



The Academic Program 



study, research, internships and residence in foreign 
countries. Smith faculty direct the four programs in Eu- 
rope: France (Paris), Germany (Hamburg), Italy (Flor- 
ence) and Switzerland (Geneva). The programs provide 
a rich opportunity to observe and study the countries 
visited. Students are encouraged to enjoy the music, 
art and theatre of each country; meetings are arranged 
with outstanding scholars, writers and leaders. During 
the academic year students board with local families 
(Paris and Florence) or live in student residence halls 
(Geneva and Hamburg). During vacations the college 
assumes no responsibility for participants in the JYA 
programs, and students are free to travel, although by 
special arrangements in some programs they may stay 
in residence if they prefer. 

Each Smith JYA program lasts a full academic year; 
students are not accepted for a single semester except 
for the Hamburg program, which also offers a one- 
semester option in the spring term. A student studying 
on a Smith College Junior Year Abroad Program will 
normally receive 34 credits for the academic year. 

To be eligible to apply, students must have a mini- 
mum cumulative grade point average of 3-0 (B), a 
declared major and a minimum of one to two years of 
college-level instruction in the appropriate language, 
depending upon the program requirements, before they 
can be considered for selection to spend the semester or- 
year abroad. All prospective candidates are urged to seek 
advice, beginning in their first year, concerning the best 
sequence of courses in the language of the country in 
which they wish to study. Students who spend the junior 
year abroad may apply for admission to the departmen- 
tal honors program at the beginning of the senior year. 

Each year, interested students for the Junior Year 
Abroad programs are chosen by a selection committee, 
which reviews the applications in detail. The selection 
process is competitive. Participants are selected from 
both Smith College and other colleges. All applications 
for the Smith College Junior Year Abroad Programs, 
including recommendations, must be filed with the 
Office for International Study by February 1. 

If a student should withdraw from a Junior Year 
Abroad Program during the course of the year, it is col- 
lege policy not to grant credit for less than a full year's 
work and to refund only those payments for board and 
room which may be recovered by the college. Tuition 
charges for the year are not refundable. Normally, 
students who withdraw from a Junior Year Abroad Pro- 
gram are withdrawn from Smith and may not return to 
the college the following semester. 



Florence 

The year in Florence begins with three weeks of intensive 
work in die Italian language and culture, history and art 
history. Students take courses offered especially for Smith 
by university professors at the Smith Center. During the 
spring semester, students enroll in one or two courses 
at the Universita di Firenze in the humanities, political 
science and education. Limited course options are also 
available in other subjects. The students live in private 
homes selected by the college. Since classes in Florence 
are conducted entirely in Italian, students are expected 
to have an excellent command of the language. 

Geneva 

The year in Geneva offers unique opportunities to 
students of government, economics, economic history, 
European history, international relations, comparative 
literature, French studies, anthropology, psychology, 
sociology, history of art, and religion. Students are fully 
matriculated at the Universite de Geneve and may take 
courses at its associate institutes as well. Exceptional 
opportunities include internships in international 
organizations, the faculty of psychology and education 
that continues the work of Jean Piaget, and the rich 
holdings of the museums of Geneva in Western and 
Oriental art. 

Students in the program attend a preliminary 
three-week session of intensive language training. The 
academic year in Geneva begins in mid-September and 
continues until early July. Since classes in Geneva are 
conducted in French, students are expected to have an 
excellent command of the language. 

Hamburg 

The academic year in Germany consists of two semes- 
ters (winter semester from mid-October to mid-Febru- 
ary and summer semester from the beginning of April 
to mid-July) separated by a five-week vacation during 
which students are free to travel. The yearlong program 
begins with a five-week orientation program in Ham- 
burg providing language review, an introduction to 
current affairs and to the city of Hamburg, and excur- 
sions to other places of interest in Germany. During the 
academic year, the students are fully matriculated at 
the Universitat Hamburg. They attend regular courses 
offered by the university, special courses arranged by 
Smith and tutorials to support their university course 
work. The program is open to students in every major 
field of study, and a wide variety of courses is available, 
including art (studio and history), biology, economics, 
history, history of science and technology; literature. 



The Academic Program 



15 



mathematics, music history, philosophy, physics, psy- 
chology, religion and sociology. Since classes in Ham- 
burg are conducted in German, students are expected 
to have an excellent command of the language; 

The program offers a one-semester study option for 
the spring semester for students with one to two years 
of college German. A core course on environmental 
studies, taught in English by a University of Hamburg 
professor, will be offered in Spring 2009. The application 
deadline for the spring semester program is October 15. 

Paris 

The program in France begins with a three-week 
orientation devoted to intensive work in the language, 
supplemented by courses, lectures and excursions. 
In mid-September, each student selects a program of 
courses suited to her particular major. A wide variety 
of disciplines can be pursued at the Universite de 
Paris; for example, art history at the Institut d'Art et 
d'Archeologie; history, literature, philosophy, religion 
and many other subjects at the Sorbonne (Paris I\ ); 
natural sciences at Paris VII; and political science at 
Institut d'etudes politiques. University courses may 
be supported with tutorials. Courses and seminars are 
also arranged exclusively for Smith students and of- 
fered at the Smith Center. The students live in private 
homes selected by the college. Since classes in Paris are 
conducted in French, students are expected to have an 
excellent command of the language. 

Smith Consortial and Approved 
Study Abroad Programs 

Smith consortial and other approved programs 
are available in all regions of the world, including 
Latin America, Mia, the Middle East, Oceania, Africa, 
English-speaking countries, and countries in Europe 
not served by Smith programs. Smith consortial and 
approved study- abroad programs are selective but gen- 
erally open to students with a strong academic back- 
ground and sufficient preparation in the language and 
culture of the host country and a minimum GPA of 3-0. 

Faculty at Smith advise students about study- 
abroad course selection, and several academic depart- 
ments have a special affiliation with specific Smith 
consortial programs. Consult the Web page of the Office 
for International Study, www.smith. edu/studyabroad, 
for the complete list of consorital and approved pro- 
grams. Programs with a Smith consortial affiliation 
include the following: 



Associated Kyoto Program (AKP) 
Smith is one of the 16 institutional sponsors of the 
yearlong AKP program in Japan and conducts the 
selection process. Interested students should consult the 
faculty in East Asian languages and cultures and East 
Asian studies. 

Programa de Estudios Hispanicos In Cordoba (PRESCHO) 
Smith is one of the sponsors of the semester or year- 
long program in Cordoba, Spain, and conducts the 
selection process. Interested students should consult 
faculty in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. 

South India Term Abroad (3ITA) 
Smith is one of the sponsors of this fall, spring or year- 
long semester program. Interested students should 
consult the Office for International Study. 

Program for Mexican Culture and Society in Puebla (PMCSP) 
This semester or yearlong residential study program is 
offered in collaboration with the Benemerita Iniver- 
sidad Autonoma de Puebla (BUAP), one of Mexico's 
leading public universities. It offers an extensive and 
strong focus in the humanities and social sciences. 
Smith conducts the selection process. Interested 
students should consult faculty in the Department of 
Spanish and Portuguese. 

Off-Campus Studv Programs 
in the U.S. 

Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington 
Program 

The Department of Government offers the Jean Picker 
Semester-in-Washington Program during the fall 
semester to provide juniors and seniors in government 
or related majors an opportunity to study the process by 
which public policy is made and implemented at the 
national level. The program is described in detail on 
page 253- Students participating in this program are 
not considered to be in residence at Smith College. 

Internship at the Smithsonian 
Institution 

The American Studies Program offers a one- 
semester internship at the Smithsonian Institution In 
Washington, D.C. Under the supervision of outstanding 
scholars, qualified students may examine some of the 



16 



The Academic Program 



finest collections of materials relating to the develop- 
ment of culture in America. The program is described 
in detail on page 79- Students participating in this 
program are not considered to be in residence at Smith 
College. 

Twelve College Exchange Program 

Smith College participates in an exchange program 
with the following colleges: Amherst. Bowdoin. Con- 
necticut, Dartmouth. Mount Holyoke. Trinity. Vassar, 
Welleslev. \\ esleyan and Wheaton. The exchange is 
open to a limited number of students with a minimum 
3.0 average and is intended primarily for the junior 
year. Normally, students participating in die program 
may not transfer to the host institution at the end of 
their stay there. Students should be aware that the 
member colleges may limit or eliminate their partici- 
pation in the exchange in any particular year, due to 
space constraints. 

A limited pool of financial aid is available for 
students studying in the Twelve College Exchange. Inter- 
national students may apply for the exchange; however, 
Smith financial aid does not carry to the host institution. 

One-semester programs associated with the Twelve 
College Exchange are the National Theater Institute 
in Waterford, Connecticut, sponsored by Connecticut 
College, and the Williams-Mystic Seaport Program in 
American Maritime Studies, in Mystic, Connecticut, 
sponsored by Williams College. 

Students accepted into the program are expected 
to pay the fees set by the host institution and to comply 
with the financial, social and academic regulations of 
that institution. The course of study to be followed at 
the host institution must have the approval of the stu- 
dent's major adviser at Smith College. All grades earned 
through exchange programs are recorded on the Smith 
transcript but are not included in the Smith GPA and 
therefore are not included in the calculation of honors. 

Application forms are available in the class deans' 
office. 

Pomona-Smith Exchange 

The college participates in a one-to-one student ex- 
change with Pomona College in Claremont, California. 
Sophomores and juniors in good standing, with a 
minimum 3.0 (B) average, are eligible to apply. Appli- 
cations are available in the class deans' office. 



Spelman-Smith Exchange 

The college participates in a one-to-one student 
exchange with Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia. 
Sophomores and juniors in good standing, with a 
minimum 3.0 (B) average, are eligible to apply. Appli- 
cations are available in the class deans' office. 

Princeton-Smith Engineering 
Exchange 

An exchange program between Princeton University 
and Smith College permits students from Smith's 
Picker Engineering Program to study at Princeton and 
engineering students from Princeton to study at Smith. 
Both programs share the goal of producing leaders for 
the 21st century and the belief that successful engineers 
can identify the needs of society and direct their talents 
toward meeting them. This program is available to 
students in the spring semester of their sophomore 
or junior year. Interested students should contact the 
Smith engineering department. 



17 



The Campus and Campus Life 




mith's 147-acre campus is a place of physi- 
cal bcaut\ and interesting people, ideas and 
events. Students enjoy fine facilities and 
services in a stimulating environment 

We continually improve our library and 
museum holdings, which are already among the fin- 
est in the country, and upgrade our equipment to give 
students here even technological advantage. 

Smith attracts faculty members and students who 
are intellectually energetic and highly motivated. To- 
gether, we form a community with diverse talents and 
interests, skills and training, and religious, cultural, 
political, geographic and socioeconomic backgrounds. 
Main groups, activities and events arise from our 
broad range of interests. Members of the Five College 
community are welcome in classes and at most cam- 
pus events. Their participation expands even further 
the perspectives and experiences we represent. 

All undergraduate students at Smith are part of 
the Student Government Association, which supports 
approximately 130 student organizations and their 
projects and programs. These organizations enrich 
the lives of their participants and of the general com- 
munity through a wealth of concerts, presentations, 
lectures, readings, movies, workshops, symposia, 
exhibits and plays that enhance the rhythm of campus 
life. Academic and administrative departments and 
committees, resource centers, individual faculty mem- 
bers and alumnae also contribute to the already full 
schedule. 

The pace and style of campus life vary greatly, as 
each woman creates the academic and social lifestyle 
best suited to her taste. Daily campus life includes 
periods both of great activity and movement and of 
quiet and intense concentration. There is time for 
hard work, for listening and speaking, for learning 
and teaching and for friends, fun and relaxation. The 
extracurricular social, athletic and cultural events on 
campus, in Northampton, and in the Five College area 
keep this an exciting center of activity. Each student 
learns through the overwhelming choices open to her 
how to develop and sustain a pace of life that is bal- 
anced and fulfilling. 



Facilities 

Much of the daily campus activity at Smith occurs in 
the following centers. 

Smith College Libraries 

With a collection of more than 1.4 million books, 
periodicals, microforms, maps, scores, recordings, rare 
books, archives, manuscripts and computer databases, 
the Smith College Libraries rival many university li- 
braries. We are committed to providing undergraduates 
with firsthand research opportunities not only through 
our extensive resources but also through specialized 
services. We maintain open stacks, provide individual 
research assistance, collaborate with faculty in teaching 
classes on research tools and techniques and borrow 
materials from other libraries worldwide through our 
interlibrary loan service. The libraries' Web site (www. 
smith.edu/libraries) links students to the Five College 
Library catalog, with the holdings of Smith, Amherst, 
Mount Holyoke and Hampshire colleges and the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts at Amherst, to general and 
subject databases, and to full-text resources. 

The William Allan Neilson library, named after 
Smith's third president, serves as the main social 
sciences and humanities library and includes the 
library administrative offices. On the third floor, the 
Mortimer Rare Book Room showcases nearly 40,000 
printed books in all subjects from the 15th through 
20th centuries plus the Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath 
manuscript collections. The Rare Book Room is open 
to all undergraduates for browsing and in-depth study 
of these specialized materials. 

The Alumnae Gymnasium, connected to Neilson 
Library, houses the internationally renowned Sophia 
Smith Collection, the oldest national repository for 
primary sources in women's history; and the College 
Archives, which documents the history of Smith. 

Strong branch libraries help set Smith apart from 
other undergraduate colleges by providing specialized 
resources and services in specific subject areas. The 
three branches, described in sections below, are the 
Hillyer Art library in the Brown Fine Arts Center, the 
Young Science library in Bass Hall (Clark Science 



18 



The Campus and Campus Life 



Center) and the Werner Josten Library for the Perform- 
ing Ails in the Mendenhall Center. 



are an arboretum, with plants and trees labeled for easy 
identification. 



Neilson Library hours (Academic Year) 

Monday-Thursday 7:30 a.m.-l am 

Friday 7:30 am-9 p.m. 

Saturday 10 am-9 pm 

Sunday 10 a.m.-l am. 

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interses- 
sion, summer, vacations and holidays. 

Clark Science Center 

The Clark Science Center is composed of six intercon- 
nected buildings housing eight academic departments 
(astronomy, biological sciences, chemistry, computer 
science, geology; mathematics, physics and psychology) 
and four programs (biochemistry, engineering, envi- 
ronmental science and policy, and neuroscience), with 
approximately 85 faculty and 20 staff. 

The center, which includes Burton, Sabin-Reed, Mc- 
Connell and Bass halls, the temporary engineering build- 
ing and Young Science Library, meets the most exacting 
specifications for modem scientific experimentation and 
equipment. Science center facilities include traditional 
and computer classrooms, seminar rooms, a large lecture 
hall, a computer resource center, student laboratories and 
faculty offices and research space. 

The educative mission in the sciences is supported 
by an administrative office, stockroom, technical shop, 
environmental health and safely 7 services, science inreach 
programming and an animal-care facility. The Young 
Science Library, a state-of-the-art science library and one 
of the largest science libraries at a liberal arts college in 
the United States, houses more than 163,000 volumes, 
22,500 microforms, 700 periodical subscriptions, and 
1 54,000 maps, and provides a wide array of electronic 
resources including access to the Internet. Student labora- 
tories customarily enroll between 12 and 20 students and 
are faculty taught. Summer student research opportuni- 
ties are available. 

A new engineering and science complex is currently 
under construction. The much anticipated opening of 
Ford Hall in fall 2009 will mark the beginning of an 
exciting new chapter of science center development at 
Smith College. 

Adjacent to the Clark Science Center are the Botanic 
Gardens and Lyman Plant House, with greenhouses 
illustrating a variety of climates. The campus grounds 



Young Science Library hours (Academic Year) 

Monday—Thursday 7:45 am-midnight 

Friday 7:45 a.m.-l 1 p.m. 

Saturday ... 10a.m.-llp.m. 

Sunday 10 a.m.-midnight 

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interses- 
sion, summer, vacations and holidays. 

Brown Fine Arts Center 

The three portions of the Fine Arts Center serve different 
functions. Hillyer Hall, which houses the art depart- 
ment, is a center for the creative endeavors of students 
and faculty. Its studios for students of drawing, paint- 
ing, design, sculpture, print-making and photography 
are supplemented by darkroom facilities, faculty offices 
and classrooms. 

Hillyer Art Library houses collections of more than 
1 10,000 volumes, 38,000 microforms, 250 current 
periodicals, and a broad range of biliographic data- 
bases and full-text electronic resources. The art library 
facilities provide a variety of spaces for individual and 
group study with power and data connectivity available 
at all seats. 

Tryon Hall is home to the Smith College Museum 
of Art, known as one of the nation's outstanding 
museums affiliated with a college or university. Its 
collection, numbering approximately 24,000 objects, 
represents works dating from the 25th century B.C.E. 
to the present. 



Art library hours 




Monday-Thursday 


9 a.m.-l 1 p.m. 


Friday 


9 am-9 p.m. 


Saturday 


10 am-9 p.m. 


Sunday 


noon-midnight 



Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interses- 
sion, summer, vacations and holidays. 

Museum hours 

The museum hours from July 1, 2008, through June 

30, 2009, are as follows: 

Tliesday-Sunday, 10 a.m.^4 p.m. 

Sunday, noon-4 p.m. 

Closed Mondays and major holidays 



The Campus and Campus Life 



19 



Mendenhall Center for the 
Performing Arts 

Named for Thomas Mendenhall, president of the col- 
lege from 1959 to 1975, the Center for the Performing 
Arts celebrates music, theatre and dance. Three sides of 
the quadrangle were completed in 1968, joining Sage 
Hall to complete the college's commitment to modem 
and comprehensive facilities for the performing arts. 
Berenson Studio for dancers accommodates both in- 
dividual and class instruction in two mirrored studios. 
The theatre building has extensive rehearsal space, 
shops and lounges that support productions in Theatre 
14, which holds an audience of 458; the versatile Hallie 
Flanagan Studio Theatre, with its movable seats for 
200; and the IV studio, which has flexible seating 
for 80. The Werner Josten Library' welcomes students, 
making available more than 99,000 books and scores, 
2,000 video recordings, 237 current periodical titles 
and 58.000 recordings to enjoy in comfortable read- 
ing rooms and in listening rooms for individuals and 
groups. Sage Hall allows students to practice their 
music at one end and perform it m a gracious 750-seat 
auditorium at the other. In between are faculty offices 
and classrooms. The Mendenhall Center for the Per- 
forming Arts is crowned by a tower with a peal of eight 
bells hung for change ringing. 



Werner Josten Library hours 
Monday-Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 

Sundav 



8a.m.-llp.m. 
8 a.m.-9 p.m. 
10 a.m.-9 p.m. 
noon— 11p.m. 

Hours vary during reading and exam periods, interces- 
sion, summer, vacations and holidays. 



Poetry Center 

Located on the first floor of Wright Hall, the Poetry 
Center is a bright, serene reading room, with a library 
that includes signed copies of books by all the poets 
who have visited Smith since 1997. It also features a 
rotating display, often including poetry materials bor- 
rowed from the Mortimer Rare Book Room. The cur- 
rent display features poetry books by alumnae. While 
the room mainly provides a space in which to read, 
write and meditate, it can also be reserved for appro- 
priate events by Smith faculty, academic departments 
and administrative offices. 



Reading room hours: 

Monday-Frida) 8 ajiL-4 p.m. 

except when booked for events 

Wright Hall 

Wright Hall supports many activities of learning in a 
variety of ways. The 400-seat Leo Weinstein Auditorium; 
seminar rooms; the Wright Student Computer Center, 
comprising the Center for Foreign Languages and Cul- 
tures and the Jahnige Center for collaborative work and 
emerging technologies, with an electronic classroom 
supporting social science courses; the Poetry Center; 
and the 51 faculty offices draw students for formal 
classroom study, for lectures and special presentations, 
for informal discussions and for research. 

Center for Foreign Languages and 
Cultures (CFLAC) 

The Center for Foreign Languages and Cultures main- 
tains a multimedia resource center (Wright Hall 7) 
and media classroom (Wright Hall 233). Together they 
provide access to multimedia applications that allow 
students to practice reading, writing, listening and 
speaking and to engage in authentic, native language 
materials. Each student may work at her own pace, 
while the dedicated media classroom allows entire 
classes to use the technology at once. The center sup- 
ports more than 30 courses in 1 1 languages through 
computer workstations, video viewing stations with ac- 
cess to a variety of international channels, and digital 
audio and video files delivered via our course manage- 
ment system, Moodle. Faculty members may receive 
assistance in evaluating existing and creating original 
course materials as well as in coordinating resources 
related to research projects in the field of second lan- 
guage acquisition. 



Center Hours 




Mondav-Thursdav 


8 a.m.-midnight 


Fridav 


8 a.m-9 p.m. 


Saturday 


10 a.m-5 p.m. 


Sunday 


10 a.m.-midnight 



Information Technology Services 

Information Technology Services' academic facilities 
span the campus, with public computing labs in several 
buildings and a campuswide fiber-optic network allow- 



20 



The Campus and Campus Life 



ing computer access from all buildings and residential 
houses. Resources, which are continually expanding, 
include more than 600 Windows and Macintosh com- 
puters used for word processing, graphics, numerical 
analysis, electronic mail and access to the Internet; and 
numerous UNIX computers, used for statistical analysis, 
computer programming, electronic communications 
and other class assignments. In addition, Information 
Technology Services administers the Smith College 
Computer Store, through which a student may purchase 
a personal computer at a discounted price. There are 
no fees for the use of computers in the resource centers, 
but there is a small fee for printing. Smith students may 
need to be enrolled in a course to have access to some 
specialized computer facilities. Students living on cam- 
pus also have access to Smith's computer resources and 
the Internet through CyberSmith, the residential house 
network, and through a growing number of campus 
locations providing wireless access. 

Office of Disability Services 

Smith College is committed both philosophically and 
legally to assuring equal access to all college programs 
and services. The college pursues the goal of equal 
access through proactive institutional planning and 
barrier removal, as well as through the provision of rea- 
sonable and appropriate accommodations to students, 
staff and faculty with documented disabilities. The 
Office of Disability 7 Services coordinates accommoda- 
tions and facilitates the provision of services to students 
with documented disabilities. A student may voluntarily 
register with the Office of Disability Services by complet- 
ing the disability identification form and providing 
documentation of her disabilities, after which proper 
accommodations will be determined and implemented 
by the college. 

Jacobson Center for Writing, 
Teaching and Learning 

The Jacobson Center, located in Seelye 307, offers a 
variety of services and programs to help students develop 
skills in writing, public speaking and effective learning. 
Professional writing counselors are available to review 
student drafts, point out strengths and weaknesses, 
and offer suggestions for improvement. Similar help is 
provided by student writing tutors in the evenings and 
on weekends. 



Academic coaching and workshops on time man- 
agement and study skills are available to reinforce 
learning strategies. The tutorial program provides 
help by matching students with master tutors in most 
languages, or peer tutors in all other non-quantitative 
subjects. In addition, the center sponsors the Working 
Writers series on popular nonfiction, interterm courses 
on popular nonfiction, and interterm workshops on 
good writing. These services are free and well utilized 
by Smith students, ranging from the first-year student 
in an introductory course to the senior completing an 
honors thesis. 

Lastly, the center offers pedagogical resources and 
colloquia on teaching issues for faculty. Full informa- 
tion on the Jacobson Center is available at www.smith. 
edu/jacobsoncenter. 

Quantitative Learning Center 

The Quantitative Learning Center (QLC), located on 
Level 2 of Neilson Library; offers tutoring, provides space 
to study, and has computers with software for both the 
natural sciences and for statistics in the social sciences 
(SPSS). 

Students can find support for working with quanti- 
tative material through both appointments and drop-in 
tutoring. For students who need more help than the 
teaching assistant from the math department can 
provide, the quantitative skills counselor is available for 
appointments. If the QS counselor sees a need for it, the 
student may receive a peer-tutor. Students employed as 
master tutors for chemistry, economics and physics are 
located in the QLC, and master tutors in engineering are 
administrated by the QLC. The social sciences Q-TUtor 
can help with statistics for social sciences, with using 
Excel or with SPSS. 

The QLC has five large tables where individuals 
or small groups can study, three whiteboards and a 
blackboard, and six computers that dualboot both Mac 
and Windows operating systems in a bright, welcoming 
space. For more information, see www.smith.edu/qlc. 

The Louise W. and Edmund J. Kahn 
Liberal Arts Institute 

The Kahn Liberal Arts Institute is an innovative research 
institute that supports multidisciplinary, collaborative 
research at Smith College. Located on the third floor of 
the Neilson Library, the institute enhances intellectual 
life on the campus by bringing together students, faculty 



The Campus and Campus Life 



21 



and distinguished visiting scholars to work on yearlong, 
multidisciplinarv projects of broad scope. Each of these 
collaborative projects spawns a broad range of intellec- 
tual and artistic events that are open to the entire Smith 
College community, while providing the space and the 
resources for organized research colloquia for desig- 
nated groups of faculty and student fellows. In these 
intensive weeklv meetings, Kahn fellows discuss and 
debate the issues and problems arising out of their com- 
mon research interests, generating a level of intellectual 
exchange that exemplifies the best of what a liberal arts 
education can offer. For more information, \isit the 
Kahn Institute Web site at www5mim.edu/kahninstitute. 

Athletic Facility Complex 

Just as Alumnae Gymnasium was the "state of the art" 
gymnasium back in 1892 when women's basketball 
was first introduced, today's four-building athletic com- 
plex is equally impressive. Scott Gymnasium is home 
to a dance studio, gymnasium, training room and the 
Human Performance Laboratory. Ainsworth Gymna- 
sium provides a swimming pool with one- and three- 
meter diving boards, five international-sized squash 
courts, a fitness studio with a 24-foot-high climbing 
wall and an intercollegiate gymnasium. The indoor 
track and tennis building, the site of three national 
NCAA track meets, includes four tennis courts and a 
200-meter track resurfaced in February 2004. 

The 6,500-plus square foot Olin Fitness Center 
features 40 pieces of aerobic machines, each with 
individual TV screens as well as 50-plus weight-lifting 
stations. The facilities of the sports complex are aug- 
mented by 30 acres of athletic fields. Soccer, lacrosse, 
field hockey, rugby and softball fields are encircled by a 
3/4-mile cinder jogging track. For the serious runner. 
there is a 400-meter all-weather track, and for those 
who enjoy the peaceful solitude of a run through the 
woods, there is a 5, 000-meter cross-country course. 
Equestrians can enjoy the indoor riding ring while the 
avid tennis competitor will find the 12 lighted outdoor 
courts a pleasure. The boathouse on Paradise Pond is 
home to the Smith Outdoors Program and is open for 
novice rowers or canoe paddlers. 

Ainsworth/Scott Gymnasium, Olin Fitness Center, and 
Indoor Track and Tennis Facility 

.Mondav-Thursday 6 a.m.-10 p.m. 

Friday 6 a.m.- 7 p.m. 

Saturday-Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 



Campus Center 

The Campus Center is the community center of the 
college, providing services, programs and conveniences 
for all members of the Smith College community. The 
center provides space for informal socializing, reading 
and relaxing, and is a lively and dynamic atmosphere 
for activities and entertainment. Informal and formal 
meetings spaces, recreation and dining spaces, lounges, 
work space for student organizations, the college book- 
store, student mailboxes and a cafe are all housed in 
the center. 



Campus Center Hours 

Monday-Thursday 
Friday 
Saturday 
Sundav 



7 a.m.-midnight 
7 a.m-2 a.m. 
9 a.m.-2 am 
9 a.m.-midnight 



Student Residence Houses 

Smith is a residential college, and students are expected 
to reside on campus during their academic studies at 
Smith. Students live in 36 residence buildings with 
capacities of 12 to 100 students. The houses range in 
architectural style from modem to Gothic to classic 
revival. Each house has a comfortable living room, a 
study or library, and laundry facilities. Students at all 
levels, from first-years to seniors, live together in each 
house, advising, supporting and sharing interests with 
one another. Smith provides many dining options and 
plenty of variety, including vegetarian and vegan meals. 
The 15 dining rooms offer different menus, themes and 
types of food, and no matter which house a student lives 
in, she may choose to eat wherever she wishes. A variety 
of specialty living options are also available for students: 
apartments for Ada Comstock Scholars, two small coop- 
erative houses and an apartment complex for a limited 
number of juniors and seniors offer additional alterna- 
tive living arrangements to students. 

Intercollegiate Athletics, 
Recreation and Club Sports 

A three-tier system of intercollegiate athletics, recre- 
ational activities and club sports provides satisfying and 
successful experiences that will develop in the Smith 
student a desire to participate in activity regularly 
throughout life. Our broad-based athletic program 



22 



The Campus and Campus Life 



invites students to participate on one of 14 intercol- 
legiate teams. Recreational activities provide fitness 
opportunities as well as special events, while our club 
sports introduce training in several sports. Visit www. 
smith.edu/athletics/facilities for a current listing of 
activities and opportunities. 

Smith Outdoors 

Smith Outdoors is the outdoor adventure program 
offered through Smith's athletics department. Based 
out of the Paradise Pond boathouse, Smith Outdoors 
offers a variety of clinics, presentations and off-campus 
trips throughout the year. The focus is on providing an 
outdoor setting for recreation, socialization, self-em- 
powerment and education. Activities vary from foliage 
hikes and ice-skating to more adventurous trips like 
rock climbing, backpacking and Whitewater rafting. 
Also included are open hours for recreational paddling 
on Paradise Pond and rock climbing at the indoor 
climbing wall located in Ainsworth Gym. For more 
information, send e-mail to smithoutdoors@smith.edu 
or visit the Web site at www.smith.edu/athletics/club- 
sports/smithoutdoors.html. 

Career Development 

The Career Development Office provides assistance to 
students and alumnae preparing for changing career 
environments and climates. We work with Smith wom- 
en to help them develop global and personal foresight 
so that they can direct the change in their lives. 

Our professional staff offers advising, both individu- 
ally and in groups, and our services are available 52 
weeks a year. We hold seminars, workshops and panel 
discussions that cover internships, industry panels, 
career choice and decision making, resume writing, 
interviewing and job search techniques, alumnae net- 
working, career presentations, applying to graduate and 
professional schools, and summer jobs. We teach stu- 
dents how to assess their individual interests, strengths 
and weaknesses; how to establish priorities and make 
decisions; and how to present themselves effectively. Our 
extensive career resource library and Web site support 
students in their research. 

The CDO is a service that allows students to translate 
their academic and extra-curricular pursuits and their 
hopes and expectations into fruitful plans. We also sup- 
port alumnae as they undertake their plans and ask 
them to support the students yet to come by participat- 



ing as informal advisers in the Alumnae Career Advising 
Service. Students and alumnae are encouraged to visit 
the CDO home page at www.smith.edu/cdo for updated 
calendar and career resource connections. Check us out. 
See the possibilities for your future. 

Praxis Summer Internship Funding Program 

"Praxis: The Liberal Arts at Work," administered 
through the Career Development Office, funds students 
to work at substantive, unpaid summer internships 
related to their academic and/or career interests. By of- 
fering financial support, the college acknowledges the 
importance of internships in helping students explore 
careers, observe the practical applications of their aca- 
demic studies, and gain work experience that enhances 
their marketability to employers and graduate schools. 
Since the majority (about 70 percent) of internships 
are unpaid, Praxis stipends are intended to make it 
financially possible for students to work at substantive 
summer internships. Praxis funding is a one-time 
opportunity. A student may use a Praxis stipend for 
an approved internship in the summer following her 
sophomore or junior year. CDO staff and resources 
offer guidance and assistance to students in locating 
opportunities that meet their individual interests. 
Proposed internships are reviewed by a member of the 
faculty and by CDO staff. Each year approximately 500 
students work at summer internships funded through 
Praxis. 



Health Services 



www.smith.edu/health 

Health Services provides medical and psychological 
services for all Smith students. Through outpatient 
services located in the Elizabeth Mason Infirmary, stu- 
dents see physicians, nurse practitioners and nurses for 
medical problems and questions, just as they would see 
their own providers at home. For psychological issues, 
students see social workers, clinical nurse specialists 
and graduate social work interns. A psychiatrist is also 
available. Health education is provided on relevant 
topics. 

Health Service 

The same standards of confidentiality apply to the 
doctor-patient relationship at Smith as to all other 
medical practitioners. We offer a full range of outpatient 
services to our patient population, including gyneco- 
logical exams and testing; nutrition counseling; routine 
physicals for summer employment and graduate school; 



The Campus and Campus Life 



23 



immunizations for travel, flu and allergies; and on-site 
I laboratory services. 

In case of unusual or serious illness, specialists in 
the Northampton and Springfield areas are available for 
consultation in addition to service provided at a nearby 
hospital. 

Counseling Service 

The Counseling Service provides consultation, in- 
dividual and group psychotherapy and psychiatric 
evaluation and medication. These services are strictly 
confidential. The Counseling Service is available to all 
students, free of charge. It is staffed by licensed mental 
health professionals and supervised graduate interns. 

College Health Insurance 

The college offers its own insurance policy; underwrit- 
ten by an insurance company, that covers a student 
in the special circumstances of a residential college. 
It extends coverage for in- and outpatient services not 
covered by many other insurance plans. However, this 
policy does have some distinct limitations. Therefore, 
we strongly urge that students having a pre-existing or 
recurring medical or psychiatric condition continue 
their precollege health insurance. A student electing 
to waive the college insurance plan must do so before 
the beginning of the first semester and must give her 
membership number and the name and address of the 
insurance carrier to the treasurer's office. Failure to do 
so will result in automatic enrollment in the college 
health plan. 

We maintain certain regulations in the interest of 
community health as outlined in the college handbook 
and expect all students to comply. Before arriving at the 
college, each student must complete her Health Pre- 
i Admission Information Form and send it to the Health 
Services. It is important to note that Massachusetts law 
now mandates that students must get the required im- 
munizations before registration. Students accepted for a 
Junior Year Abroad Program or who plan to participate 
in intercollegiate sports or certain exercise and sport 
programs may be required to have a physical exam by a 
college practitioner first. 



Religious Expression 



The dean of religious life encourages and develops the 
many expressions of spirituality, religious faith, and 
ethical reflection that characterize a diverse community 
like Smith's. Assisting the dean are the chaplains to the 



college and the director of voluntary services. The chap- 
lains are dedicated to promoting a spirit of mutual re- 
spect and Interfaith collaboration. They organize weekly 
gatherings in the Jewish, Muslim, Protestant. Buddhist, 
and Catholic traditions and act as liaisons and advisers 
to other religious groups on campus. They work to facili- 
tate the activities of student religious organizations on 
campus including: Om, the Hindu student organization; 
Al-Iman, the Muslim student organization; the New- 
man Association; the Protestant Ecumenical Christian 
Church; several meditation groups; Smith Christian Fel- 
lowship; the Baha'i Fellowship; the Episcopal-Lutheran 
Fellowship; the Eastern Orthodox student group; the 
Unitarian student group; and the Association of Smith 
Pagans. A multi-faith council of representatives of stu- 
dent religious organizations meets six times a year with 
the dean and chaplains to discuss the spiritual needs of 
students and how to foster a climate supportive of reli- 
gious expression on campus. 

The chapel is home to a robust musical program 
as well. The College Choirs, the Handbell Choir, the 
College Glee Club and many visiting musical groups as 
well as faculty and staff musicians offer concerts and 
occasionally perform at worship services. The college 
organist uses the chapel's Aolian-Skinner organ for 
teaching as well as performances. 

The college recognizes that meals are an important 
part of religious observance and practice for some stu- 
dents. Kosher and halal meals are available to students 
in the Cutter-Ziskind dining room. The student co-op 
in Dawes House prepares a kosher Shabbat meal and 
community gathering each week. In addition, religious 
holidays such as Ramadan, Passover, Easter and Diwali 
are often marked with lively celebrations open to the 
whole campus. 

The director of voluntary services and Community 
Service Office (C.S.O.) provide long- and short-term 
community service opportunities and internships with 
local agencies. 

College policy states that any student who is un- 
able because of religious observances to attend classes 
or to participate in an examination, study or work on 
a particular day will be excused from such activities 
without prejudice and will be given an opportunity to 
make them up, provided such make-up examinations 
or work does not create an unreasonable burden on 
the college. No fees will be charged for rescheduling an 
examination. 



24 



The Student Body 

Summary of Enrollment, 2007-08 



Undergraduate Students 


Class of 
2008 


Class of 
2009 


Class of 
2010 


Class of 
2011 


Ada 
Comstock 
Scholars Totals 


Northampton area 1 
Not in residence 


673 
33 


391 
263 


665 

17 


661 
1 


125 2,515 
5 319 


Five College course enrollments at Smith: 
First semester 569 
Second semester 678 










Graduate Students 


Full-time 
degree candidates 




Part-time 

degree candidates 


Special students 



In residence 



63 



28 



Smith students studying in off-campus programs 



Florence 



Geneva 



Hamburg 



Paris 



Smith students 
guest students 



23 




1 . Guest students are included in the above counts. 



In accordance with the Student Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act, the graduation rate for students who 
entered Smith College as first-year students in September 2001 was 86 percent by May 2007. (The period covered is 
equal to 150 percent of the normal time for graduation.) 



The Student Bodv 



25 



Geographical Distribution of Students by Residence, 2007-08 



United States 




Vlrgii] Islands 


Alabama 


3 


Virginia 


Alaska 


6 


Washington 


Arizona 


21 


West Virginia 


Arkansas 


3 


Wisconsin 


California 


218 


Wyoming 


Colorado 


26 




Connecticut 


168 


Foreign Countries 


Delaware 


8 


Afghanistan 


District of Columbia 


13 


Austria 


Florida 


46 


Bahrain 


Georgia 


19 


Bangladesh 


Guam 


1 


Bolivia 


Hawaii 


9 


Bosnia-Herzegovina 


Idaho 


2 


Botswana 


Illinois 


46 


Brazil 


Indiana 


15 


Bulgaria 


Iowa 


4 


Canada 


Kansas 


6 


Czech Republic 


Kentucky 


12 


Denmark 


Louisiana 


4 


England 


Maine 


70 


Finland 


Maryland 


61 


France 


Massachusetts* 


604 


Georgia 


Michigan 


23 


Germany 


Minnesota 


40 


Ghana 


Mississippi 


1 


Greece 


Missouri 


8 


Grenada 


Montana 


4 


Guatemala 


Nebraska 


3 


Hong Kong 


Nevada 


1 


India 


New Hampshire 


63 


Israel 


New Jersey 


136 


Italy 


I New Mexico 


9 


Jamaica 


! New York 


336 


Japan 


! North Carolina 


29 


Kenya 


Ohio 


36 


Latvia 


Oklahoma 


7 


Lebanon 


1 Oregon 


23 


Lesotho 


| Pennsylvania 


86 


Malaysia 


! Puerto Rico 


2 


Mauritius 


| Rhode Island 


18 


Morocco 


, South Carolina 


4 


Mvanmar 


Tennessee 


8 


Nepal 


i Texas 


52 


Netherlands 


Utah 


7 


Nigeria 


Vermont 


64 


Norway 



Pakistan 12 

Paragua) 1 

People's Republic of China 18 

Philippines 3 

Republic of Korea (South ) 4 1 

Romania 2 

Saint Lucia 1 

Singapore 2 

Slovakia 1 

South Africa 1 

Spain 1 

Sri Lanka 3 

Surinam 1 

Sweden 1 

Switzerland 3 

Syria 1 

Taiwan 6 

Thailand 1 

The Bahamas 1 

Tunisia 1 

Turkey 3 

Uganda 1 

Ukraine 1 

United Arab Emirates 3 

United Kingdom 5 

United Republic of Tanzania 1 

Uruguay 1 

Uzbekistan 2 

Vietnam 4 

Zimbabwe 2 



This includes Ada Comstock 
Scholars and graduate students 
who move to Northampton for 
the purpose of their education. 



26 



The Student Body 



Majors 



Class of 2008 Class of AdaComstock 

(Seniors) (Honors) 2009 Scholars 



Totals 



Psychology 


64 


5 


67 


13 


149 


Art 












Art: Studio 


24 


4 


24 


4 


56 


Art: History 


31 


1 


22 





54 


Art: Architecture and Urbanism 


6 





12 


1 


19 


Government 


66 


8 


64 


4 


142 


Economics 


55 


2 


54 





111 


English Language and Literature 


49 


4 


43 


2 


98 


American Studies 


26 


5 


30 


10 


71 


Anthropology 


28 


1 


26 


10 


65 


Biological Sciences 


30 


4 


30 


1 


65 


Neuroscience 


25 


3 


31 


1 


60 


History 


21 


2 


28 


3 


54 


Sociology 


28 


2 


21 


2 


53 


Study of Women and Gender 


23 


1 


18 


3 


45 


Spanish 


12 


1 


21 





34 


Portuguese-Brazilian Studies 


4 





5 





9 


Italian Studies 


17 


1 


7 





25 


Italian Language and Literature 


5 





4 





9 


Mathematics 


24 


2 


14 





40 


Theatre 


19 


1 


14 


3 


37 


Engineering 


13 


2 


20 





35 


French Studies 


18 


1 


16 





35 


Education & Child Study 


21 





9 


4 


34 


Biochemistry 


12 


2 


8 





22 


Geology 


8 


2 


10 


1 


21 


Philosophy 


6 


3 


8 


2 


19 


Classical Languages and Literature 












Classical Studies 


9 


1 


2 





12 


Classics 


2 


2 


2 





6 


Computer Science 


12 





5 


1 


18 


Comparative Literature 


7 


3 


8 





18 


Religion 


4 


o 


5 


1 


10 


Religion and Biblical Literature 


4 


l 


2 


7 




Chemistry 


5 


5 


6 





16 


Film Studies 


8 





6 


1 


15 


East Asian Languages and Culture 


8 





6 





14 


Afro-American Studies 


10 


1 


3 





14 


East Asian Studies 


9 





5 





14 


German Studies 


9 





5 





14 


Latin American Studies 


3 





9 


1 


13 


Russian Language and Literature 












Russian Literature 


3 





4 





7 


Russian Civilization 


3 


1 


1 





5 


Music 


6 


2 


3 





11 


Dance 


5 





5 





10 


Liberal Studies 


7 





2 





9 


Physics 


1 





6 





7 


Astronomy 


3 





3 





6 


Medieval Studies 


4 





2 





6 


Jewish Studies 


3 





1 





4 


African Studies 


2 











2 


Logic 





1 


1 





2 


Economics and Ethics 





1 










Exercise Science 


1 













International Political Economy 


1 













British Studies 


1 













Romance Languages 








1 








r 



Recognition for 
Academic Achievement 



Academic Achievements 

Each year approximately 25 percent of the graduating 
class is awarded the bachelor of arts degree with Latin 
Honors and/or departmental honors. 

Latin Honors 

Latin Honors are awarded to eligible graduating seniors 
on the basis of the cumulative grade point average for 
a minimum of 48 graded credits earned during the 
sophomore, junior and senior years. Only grades from 
Smith College courses and courses taken on the Five 
College Interchange are counted; Smith Junior Year 
Abroad grades are considered Smith grades. No grades 
from exchange programs in this country or abroad are 
counted. Pluses and minuses are taken into account; 
grades of P/F (Pass or Fail) or S/U (Satisfactory or 
Unsatisfactory) do not enter into the calculations. 

If a student spends one of her sophomore through 
senior years away from Smith (with the exception of 
the Smith Junior Year Abroad Program), the grades 
from the remaining two years will be used. Grades from 
the first year are never counted. The minimum grade 
point average for Latin Honors varies each year depend- 
ing on the overall grade distribution in the senior class 
and is not published. The degree may be awarded cum 
laude, magna cum laude orsumma cum laude on 
the basis of meeting eligibility requirements and of a 
very high level of academic achievement. 

Students who wish to become eligible for Latin 
Honors at graduation must elect at least one course 
(normally four credits) in each of the seven major 
fields of knowledge listed on pp. 7-8 (applies to those 
students who began at Smith in September 1994 or 
later and who graduated in 1998 or later). Course 
listings in this catalogue indicate in curly brackets 
which area(s) of knowledge a given course covers (see 
p. 65 for a listing of the designations used for the major 
fields of knowledge). 



Please note that one year of an introductory 
language course or one course at a higher level satis- 
fies the foreign language Latin Honors requirement. 
Students who are non-native speakers of English may, 
with the pennission of a class dean, offer any two 
courses in the English department at the 100 level (or 
one course at a higher level in the English department, 
the comparative literature program or in classics in 
translation) to satisfy the "foreign language" part of 
the Latin Honors requirement. The class dean will 
notify the registrar that such an arrangement has been 
approved. Any appeals should be sent to the dean of the 
faculty. Non-native speakers of English are considered 
to be those who indicated on their advising form that 
English was not their first language, have had several 
years of education in a school where the language of 
instruction was other than English, and can read, write 
and speak this language. 

Departmental Honors 

A departmental honors program allows a student with 
a strong academic background to do independent and 
original work in her major. The program provides rec- 
ognition for students who do work of high quality in the 
preparation of a thesis and in courses and seminars. See 
page 12. Departmental honors students must also fulfill 
all college and departmental requirements. 

Successful completion of work in the honors 
program (an honors thesis and at least one honors 
examination) leads to the awarding of the bachelor of 
arts degree with the added notation "Honors," "High 
Honors" or Highest Honors" in the student's major 
subject. 

First Group Scholars 

Students whose records for the previous year include 
at least 28 credits graded A- or better and who haw 
no grades below B- are named First Group Scholars. 
Those named generall) represent the top lo percent of 
the class. 



2<S 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 



The Dean's List 

The Dean's List for each year names those students 
whose total records for the previous academic year aver- 
age 3-333 or above and include at least 24 credits for 
traditional-aged undergraduates or 16 credits for Ada 
Comstock Scholars. Students must be enrolled at Smith 
for the full year to be named to the Dean's List. 

Society of the Sigma Xi 

In 1935 Smith College became the first women's col- 
lege to be granted a charter for the establishment of a 
chapter of the Society of the Sigma Xi. Each year the 
Smith College Chapter elects to membership promising 
graduate students and seniors who excel in science. 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and most widely recognized 
undergraduate honor society in the United States. The 
Greek initials stand for the society's motto "Love of 
learning is the guide of life." Since 1776, the mission of 
the society has been to foster and recognize excellence 
in the liberal arts and sciences. The Zeta of Massachu- 
setts Chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society was estab- 
lished at Smith College in 1905. The rules of eligibility 
are set by the chapter in accordance with the national 
society; election is made on the breadth and excellence 
of overall academic achievement. 

To be eligible for election, a student must have 
satisfied the Latin Honors distribution requirements and 
completed 58 graded credits of Smith course work, not 
counting the first year. Junior year abroad programs 
count for Smith credit only if they are Smith programs. 
Courses taken in the Five College consortium count as 
Smith credits. All other courses including those taken 
S/U may count for distribution requirements, but not as 
credits in the calculation of the GPA nor as part of the 
total credit requirement. 

Elections are held twice a year. In late fall of their 
senior year, "junior" Phi Beta Kappa members are 
elected on the basis of their academic records through 
the junior year. At the end of the spring semester, more 
seniors are elected based on their complete academic 
record. For questions about election criteria, students 
and faculty are urged to consult with the president or 
secretary of the chapter. More information about the 
Phi Beta Kappa Society, its history, publications and 
activities can be found at www.pbk.org. 



Psi Chi 

The Smith College Chapter of Psi Chi was established 
in 1975. Students majoring or minoring in psychology 
who demonstrate academic excellence in both that 
field and their overall program of study are inducted 
into this national honor society. According to the char- 
ter, those honored are enjoined to develop programs 
that enhance student opportunity to explore the field of 
psychology. 

Prizes and Awards 

The following prizes are awarded at the Last Chapel 
Awards Convocation on Ivy Day. 

The Anne Bradstreet Prize from the Academy of 
American Poets for the best poem or group of poems 
submitted by an undergraduate 

An award from the Connecticut Valley Section of the 
American Chemical Society to a student who has 
done outstanding work in chemistry 

The American Chemical Society/Division of Analyti- 
cal Chemistry Award to a junior chemistry major who 
has excelled in analytical chemistry 

The American Chemical Society/Polymer Education 
Division Organic Chemistry Award for Achievement 
in Organic Chemistry to a student majoring in chem- 
istry who has done outstanding work in the organic 
chemistry sequence 

An award from The American Institute of Chemists/ 
New England Division to an outstanding chemist or 
chemical engineer in the graduating class 

The Newton Arvin Prize in American Studies for the 
best long paper in the introductory course on the study 
of American Society and Culture 

The Anita Luria Ascher Memorial Prize to a senior 
non-major who started German at Smith and has 
made exceptional progress; to a senior major who start- 
ed German at Smith, has taken it for four years and 
made unusual progress; and to a student who knew 
some German when she arrived at Smith and whose 
progress in four years has been considerable 

The Elizabeth Babcock Poetry Prize for the best 
group of poems 

The Sidney Balman Prize for outstanding work in the 
Jewish Studies Program 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 






The Harriet Dey Bamum Memorial Prize tor out- 
standing work in music to the best all-around student 
of music in the senior class 

The Gladys tamper! '28 and Edward Beenstock 
Prize for the best honors thesis In American studies or 
American history 

The Su/an Rose Benedict Prize to a sophomore for 
excellence In mathematics 

The Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper on an 
anthropological subject 

The Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper in eco- 
nomics 

The Samuel Bowles Prize for the best paper on a so- 
ciological subject 

The Kathleen Bostwick Boyden Prize awarded to a 
member of the Service Organizations of Smith who has 
demonstrated the best initiative in her volunteer contri- 
butions to the Smith College community 

The John Everett Brady Prize for excellence in the 
translation of Latin at sight; and for the best perfor- 
mance in the beginning Latin course 

The Margaret Wemple Brigham Prize to a senior for 
excellence in the study of microbiology or immunology 

The Amey Randall Brown Prize awarded for the best 
essay on a botanical subject 

The Vera Lee Brown Prize for excellence in history to 

a senior majoring in history in regular course 

The Yvonne Sarah Bernhardt Buerger Prize to the 

students who have made the most notable contribution 
to the dramatic activities of the college 

The David Burres Memorial Law Prize to a senior or 
an alumna accepted at law school intending to practice 
law In the public interest 

The C. Pauline Burt Prize to a senior majoring in 
chemistry or biochemistry who has an excellent record 
and who has shown high potential for further study in 
science 

The James Gardner Buttrick Prize for the best essay 
in the field of religion and biblical literature 

The Marilyn Knapp Campbell Prize to the student 
excelling in stage management 



The Michele Cantarella Memorial "Dante Prizi 
Smith College senior for the best essay in Italian on any 
aspect of The Divine Comedy 

The Carlile Prize for the best original composition for 
carillon; and for the best transcription tor carillon 

The Esther Carpenter Biology Prize in general biol- 
ogj to a first-year woman graduate student 

The Julia Harwood Caverno Prize for the best perfor- 
mance in the beginning Greek course 

The Eleanor Cederstrom Prize for the best poem by an 
undergraduate written in traditional verse form 

The Cesaire Prize for excellence in an essay or other 
project in French by a junior or senior on campus 

The Sidney S. Cohen Prize for outstanding work in the 
field of economics 

The Susan Cohen '62 and Paula Deitz '59 Prize in 

Landscape Studies for excellence in a thesis, paper or 
project that examines the science, design or culture of 
the built environment 

The Ethel Olin Corbin Prize to an undergraduate for 
the best original poem or informal essay in English 

The CRC Press Introductory Chemistry Achievement 
Award in introductory chemistry 

The Dawes Prize for the best undergraduate work in 
political science 

The Alice Hubbard Derby Prize to a member of the 
junior or senior class for excellence in the translation 
of Greek at sight; and to a member of the junior or se- 
nior class for excellence in the study of Greek literature 
in the year in which the award is made 

The George E. Dimock Prize for the best essay on a 
classical subject submitted by a Smith College under- 
graduate 

The Elizabeth Drew Prize in the Department of 
English Language and Literature for the best fiction 
writing; for the best honors thesis; for the best first-year 
student essay on a literary subject; and for the best 
classroom essay 

The Hazel L. Edgerly Prize to a senior honors history 

student for distinguished work in that 

subject 



30 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 



The Constance Kambour Edwards Prize to the stu- 
dent who has shown the most progress during the year 
in organ 

The Ruth Forbes Eliot Poetry Prize for the best poem 
submitted by a first-year or sophomore 

The Samuel A. Eliot Jr/fulia Heflin Award for distin- 
guished directing in the theatre 

The Settie Lehman Fatman Prize for the best composi- 
tion in music, in large form; and in small form 

The Heidi Fiore Prize to a senior student of singing 

The Eleanor Flexner Prize for the best piece of work 
by a Smith undergraduate using the Sophia Smith 
Collection and the Smith College Archives 

The Harriet R. Foote Memorial Prize for outstanding 
work in botany based on a paper, course work, or other 
contribution to the plant sciences at Smith 

The Henry Lewis Foote Memorial Prize for excel- 
lence in course work in biblical courses 

The Clara French Prize to a senior who has advanced 
furthest in the study of English language and literature 

The Helen Kate Furness Prize for the best essay on a 
Shakespearean theme 

The Nancy Boyd Gardner Prize for an outstanding 
paper or other project in American studies by a Smith- 
sonian intern or American studies major 

The Ida Deck Haigh Memorial Prize to a student of 
piano for distinguished achievement in performance 
and related musical disciplines 

The Sarah H. Hamilton Memorial Prize awarded for 
an essay on music 

The Arthur Ellis Hamm Prize awarded on the basis of 
the best first-year record 

The Elizabeth Wanning Harries Prize to a graduating 
Ada Comstock Scholar who has shown academic dis- 
tinction in the study of literature in any language 

The Vernon Harward Prize awarded annually to the 
best student scholar of Chaucer 

The James T. and Ellen M. Hatfield Memorial Prize 

for the best short story by a senior majoring in English 

The Hause-Scheffer Memorial Prize for the senior 
chemistry major with the best record in that subject 



The Hellman Award in Biochemistry for outstanding 
achievement in the second semester of biochemistry 

The Nancy Hellman Prize, established in 2005, to the 
Smith engineering student who has made extraordi- 
nary contributions to the advancement of women in 
engineering 

The Ettie Chin Hong '36 Prize to a senior majoring or 
minoring in East Asian Languages and Literatures who 
has demonstrated leadership and academic achieve- 
ment and who intends to pursue a career in education 
or service to immigrant and needy communities 

The Denis Johnston Playwriting Award for the best 
play or musical written by an undergraduate at Am- 
herst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, or Smith colleges, or 
the University of Massachusetts 

The Megan Hart Jones Studio Art Prize for judged 
work in drawing, painting, sculpture, photography, 
graphic arts or architecture 

The Barbara Jordan Award to an African-American 
senior or alumna undertaking a career in law or public 
policy, after the example of Texas Congresswoman 
Barbara Jordan (1936-1996) 

The Mary Augusta Jordan Prize, an Alumnae Associa- 
tion Award, to a senior for the most original piece of 
literary work in prose or verse composed during her 
undergraduate course 

The Peggy Clark Kelley Award in theatre for a student 
demonstrating exceptional achievement in lighting, 
costume or set design 

The Martha Keilig Prize for the best still life or land- 
scape in oils on canvas 

The John and Edith Knowles Memorial Award to a 

student of outstanding merit who has elected to pursue 
a medical career and who has displayed qualities that 
might lead her to become a thoughtful and humane 
critic of her chosen profession 

The Florence Corliss Lamont Prize, a medal awarded 
for work in philosophy 

The Norma M. Leas, Class of 1930, Memorial Prize 

to a graduating English major for excellence in written 
English 

The Phyllis Williams Lehmann Travel Award 

to a graduating senior majoring in art, with preference 
given to students interested in studying art history, 
especially classical art, at the graduate level 



Recognition tor Academic Achievement 



31 



The Ruth Alpern Leipziger Award to an outstanding 
French major participating in the Junior Year Abroad 
Program in Paris 

Thi' Jill Cummins Maclean Prize to a drama major 
for outstanding dramatic achievement with a comic 
touch in writing, acting or dance 

The Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize for the best 

saj on a literary subject written by a first-year student; 
and the best honors thesis submitted to the Department 
of English Language and Literature 

The Emogene Mahony Memorial Prize for profi- 
ciency at the organ 

The Jeanne McFarland Prize for excellent work in 
women's studies 

The John S. Mekeel Memorial Prize to a senior for 
outstanding work in philosophy 

The Bert Mendelson Prize to a sophomore for excel- 
lence in computer science; and to a senior majoring in 
computer science for excellence in that subject 

The Thomas Corwin Mendenhall Prize for an essay 
evolving from any history course, excluding special 
studies, seminars and honors long papers 

The Samuel Michelman Memorial Prize, given in his 
memory by his wife, to a senior from Northampton or 
Hatfield who has maintained a distinguished academic 
record and contributed to the life of the college 

The Mineralogical Society of America Undergradu- 
ate Award for excellence in the field of mineralogy 

The Elizabeth Montagu Prize for the best essay on a 
literar\ subject concerning women 

The Juliet Evans Nelson Award to graduating seniors 
for their contributions to the Smith community and 
demonstrated commitment to campus life 

The Newman Association Prize for outstanding lead- 
ership, dedication and service to the Newman Associa- 
tion at Smith College 

The Josephine Ott Prize, established in 1992 by for- 
mer students and friends, to a Smith junior in Paris or 
Geneva for her commitment to the French language 
and European civilization 

The Adelaide Wilcox Bull Paganelli '30 Prize award- 
ed by the physics department to honor the contribution 
of Adelaide Paganelli '30. to a senior majoring in phys- 
ics with a distinguished academic record 



The Arthur Shattuck Parsons Memorial Prize to 
the student with the outstanding paper in sociological 
theory or its application 

The Adeline Devor Penberth) Memorial Prize, 
established in 2002 b\ the Penberthy family, to an 
undergraduate engineering major for her academic 
excellence in engineering and outstanding contribu- 
tions toward building a community of learners within 
the Picker Engineering Program 

The Ann Kirsten Pokora Prize to a senior with a dis- 
tinguished academic record in mathematics 

The Sarah Winter Pokora Prize to a senior who has 
excelled in athletics and academics 

The Meg Quigley Prize for the best paper in the Intro- 
duction to Women's Studies course 

The Judith Raskin Memorial Prize for the outstand- 
ing senior voice student 

The Elizabeth Killian Roberts Prize for the best draw- 
ing by an undergraduate 

The Mollie Rogers/Newman Association Prize to a 
student who has demonstrated a dedication to human- 
ity and a clear vision for translating that dedication 
into service that fosters peace and justice among people 
of diverse cultures 

The Rosenfeld Prize in Organic Chemistry for excel- 
lence in the first semester of organic chemistry 

The Eleanor B. Rothman Prize to a graduating Ada 
Comstock Scholar who will pursue a graduate degree 
and who has shown an interest in the Ada Comstock 
Scholars Program and in Smith College 

The Rousseau Prize for academic excellence is award- 
ed annually to a Smith or non-Smith student studying 
with the Smith College Junior Year Abroad Program 
in Geneva. The prize was established in 2006 by the 
members of the Department of French Studies in honor 
of Denise Rochat. 

The Department of Russian Prize for the best es 
Russian literature by a senior majoring in Russian 

The Victoria Louise Schrager Prize to a senior who 
has maintained a distinguished academic record and 
has also taken an important part in student activities 

The Larry C. Selgelid Memorial Prize for outstanding 

work in the field of economics by a Smith senior 



32 



Recognition for Academic Achievement 



The Donald H. Sheehan Memorial Prize for out- 
standing work in American studies 

The Rita Singler Prize for outstanding achievement in 
technical theatre 

The Andrew C. Slater Prize for excellence in debate; 
and for most improved debater 

The Denton M. Snyder Acting Prize to a Smith senior 
who has demonstrated distinguished acting in the 
theatre 

The Deborah Sosland-Edelman Prize to a senior 
for outstanding leadership in the Jewish community 
at Smith and valuable contribution to Smith College 
campus life 

The Gertrude Posner Spencer Prize for excellence in 
writing nonfiction prose; and for excellence in writing 
fiction 

The Nancy Cook Steeper '59 Prize to a graduating 
senior who, through involvement with the Alumnae 
Association, has made a significant contribution to 
building connections between Smith alumnae and 
current students 

The Valeria Dean Burgess Stevens Prize for excellent 
work in women's studies 

The William Sentman Taylor Prize for significant 
work in human values, a quest for truth, beauty and 
goodness in the arts and sciences 

The Rosemary Thomas Poetry Prize for the best 
group of poems; and for the best individual poem 

The Tryon Prize to a Smith undergraduate for a piece 
of writing or work in new media (digital, performance 
or installation art) inspired by, or related to, artwork or 
an exhibition at the Smith College Museum of Art 

The Ruth Dietrich TUttle Prize to encourage further 
study, travel or research in the areas of international 
relations, race relations or peace studies 

The Unity Award of the Office of Multicultural Affairs 
to the student who has made an outstanding contribu- 
tion toward promoting diversity and multiculturalism 
in the Smith College community 

The Anacleta C. Vezzetti Prize to a senior for the best 
piece of writing in Italian on any aspect of the culture 
of Italy 



The Voltaire Prize to a sophomore at Smith College for 
an essay or other project in French that shows original- 
ity and engagement with her subject 

The Ernst Wallfisch Prize to a student of music for 
outstanding talent, commitment and diligence 

The Louise M. Walton Prize to an Ada Comstock 
Scholar studying art history or studio art whose dedica- 
tion to the field is notable 

The Frank A. Waterman Prize to a senior who has 
done excellent work in physics 

The Jochanan H. A. Wijnhoven Prize for the best es- 
say on a subject in the area of Jewish religious thought 
written for a course in the Department of Religion and 
Biblical Literature or in the Program for Jewish Studies 

The Enid Silver Winslow '54 Prize in art history for 
the best student paper written in an art history course 
taught at Smith 

Fellowships 

Major International and Domestic 
Fellowships 

Students with high academic achievement and strong 
community service or leadership experience are en- 
couraged to apply for international and domestic fel- 
lowships through the college. The Fellowships Program 
administers a support service for students applying for 
more than 15 different fellowships. 

There are at least eight graduate fellowships that 
the college supports. Six are for university study: Rhodes 
(Oxford), Marshall (Britain), Gates (Cambridge), 
Mitchell (Ireland and Northern Ireland) and DAAD 
(Germany). The Fulbright is for yearlong research, 
study or teaching in one of 120 countries and the Luce 
for a year interning in Asia. There are two further pres- 
tigious graduate fellowships for which students must 
apply in earlier undergraduate years: the Truman and 
the Beinecke. 

For undergraduates, the college facilitates inter- 
national opportunities through the Boren, DAAD and 
Killam fellowships in conjunction with its Study Abroad 
Program. Another undergraduate fellowship for which 
Smith offers sponsorship is the Udall for those inter- 
ested in preserving the environment. 

Fellowship information and application assistance 
for eligible candidates are available from the fellow- 
ships adviser in the Class Deans' office. 



33 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



A Smith College education is a lifetime 
investment It is also a financial challenge 
for main families. At Smith, we encourage 
all qualified students to apply for admis- 
sion, regardless of family financial resourc- 
es. Our students come from a variety of socioeconomic 
backgrounds. The Office of Student Financial Sen ices 
has an experienced staff to assist students and parents 
in both the individual financial aid application process 
and the educational financing process in general. We 
work with families to help them manage the financial 
challenge in a variety of ways, through financial aid, 
loans and payment plan options. 

Many Smith students receive financial assistance 
to pay for college expenses. Smith College participates 
in all the major federal and state student aid programs 
while funding a substantial institutional grant and 
scholarship program from its endowment 

We realize that financing a college education is 
a complex process, and we encourage applicants and 
their families to communicate directly with us. Our 
experienced educational financing staff in the Office 
of Student Financial Services is available to work with 
you. Inquiries may be made by calling (413) 585-2530 
between 8:30 am. and 4 p.m. weekdays; 10 am. to 
4 p.m. on Wednesdays (Eastern time). Send e-mail to 
SFS@smith.edu or visit their Web site at www.smith. 
edu/finaid. 

Your Student Account 

Smith College considers the student to be responsible for 
ensuring that payments — whether from loans, grants, 
parents, or third parties — are received in a timely man- 
ner. All student accounts are managed by the Office of 
Student Financial Services. Initial statements detail- 
ing semester fees are mailed on or about July 15 and 
December 15. Monthly statements will be mailed to the 
student's permanent mailing address on or about the 
15th of each month. 

The college's comprehensive fees associated with 
the beginning of the semester are due and payable in 
full by specific deadline dates, well in advance of the 
beginning of classes. The payment deadline for fall 



2008 is August 10. 2008. For spring 2009, the payment 
deadline Is January 10. 2009. Payment must be made 
b\ these dates to avoid late payment fees being assessed. 
Checks should be made payable to Smith College and 
include the student's name and ID number on the 
front. 

Beginning on the next business day after any pay- 
ment is due, monthly late payment fees, which are 
based on the outstanding balance remaining after any 
payment due date, will be assessed at the rate of $1.25 
on every $100 (1.25%) that remains unpaid until the 
payment is received in full, on or before the next billing 
month in which the student is invoiced. If you have 
questions regarding any charges or credits on your bill, 
contact the Office of Student Financial Services. 

In cases where students default on financial obli- 
gations, the student is responsible for paying the out- 
standing balance including all late payment fees, col- 
lection costs and any legal fees incurred by the college 
during the collection process. Transcripts and other 
academic records will not be released until all financial 
obligations to the College have been met. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Payments for each month's 
bill must be received by the Office of Student Financial 
Sen ices by the payment due date. If paying by mail, 
please allow at least 5 to 7 business days for mail and 
processing time. If paying in person, payment should 
be made before 4 p.m. on the payment due date. 

The college expects the student to fulfill her fi- 
nancial responsibility and reserves the right to place 
limitations on the student for failure to do so. The 
consequences of nonpayment include being prevented 
from participating in the house decision/room lottery- 
process, registering for future semester courses, re- 
ceiving academic transcripts and receiving a diploma 
at commencement or approval for a leave of absence. 
The college also reserves the right to have the student 
administratively withdrawn and may refer such 
account for collection in her name. Students and 
parents are welcome to contact the Office of Student 
Financial Services for assistance in meeting payment 
responsibilities. 

Most credit balance refunds are issued directh b) 
check in the student's name; those that result from a 



54 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



PLUS or Parent MEFA loan are issued to the parent bor- refunds may be issued to the parent or the designee of 
rower. With the student's written release, credit balance the student. 



Fees 

2008-09 Comprehensive Fee (required institutional fees) 





Fall Semester 


Spring 


Semester 


Total 


Tuition 

Room and Board* 

Student activities fee 


$17,905 

6,025 

124 




$17,905 

6,025 

124 


$35,810 

12,050 

248 


Comprehensive fee 


$24,054 




$24,054 


$48,108 



Room and board will be billed as a combined charge. 



As part of her expenses, a student should be prepared to spend a minimum of $800 per year on books and academic 
supplies. In addition, a student will incur additional expenses during the academic year that will vary according to 
her standard of living, personal needs, recreational activities and number of trips home. 



Fee for Nonmatriculated Student 

Per credit $1,120 

Fees for Ada Comstock Scholars 

Application fee $60 

Transient Housing (per semester) 

Room only (weekday nights) $400 

Room and full meal plan 

(weekday nights) $850 

TUition per semester 

1-7 credits $1,1 20 per credit 

8-11 credits $8,960 

12-15 credits $13,440 

16 or more credits $17,905 

Student Activities Fee 

The $248 student activities fee is split between the two 
semesters and is used to fund chartered student orga- 
nizations on campus. The Student Government As- 
sociation allocates the monies each year. Each spring, 
the Senate Finance Committee of the SGA proposes a 
budget that is voted on by the student body. 



2008-09 Optional Fees 

Student Medical Insurance— $2,054 

The $2,054 Student Medical Insurance fee is split 
between the two semesters and covers the student from 
August 15 through the following August 14. Massachu- 
setts law requires that each student have comprehensive 
health insurance; Smith College offers a medical insur- 
ance plan through Koster Insurance (www.kosterweb. 
com) for those students not otherwise insured. Details 
about the insurance are mailed during the summer. 
Students are automatically billed for this insurance 
unless they follow the waiver process outlined in the 
insurance mailing. Students must waive the insurance 
coverage by August 10 in order to avoid purchasing the 
annual Smith Plan. If a student is on leave on a Smith- 
approved program that is billed at home-school fees, a 
reduced charge may apply. The Student Health Insur- 
ance is mandatory for all students who are enrolled 
in the Smith JYA programs (Paris, Hamburg, Geneva, 
Florence). For students who are admitted for spring 
semester, the charge will be $1,324 for 2008-09. 



Fees. Kxpenses and Financial Aid 



35 



Other Fees and Charges 

Application for Admission— $60 
Tin' application fee of $60, which helps defray the cost 
of handling the paperwork and administrative review 
of applications, must accompany a paper version of the 
application. The fee is waived if applying online. 

Enrollment Deposit— $300 

Upon admittance, a new student pays an enrollment 
deposit which serves to reserve her place in class and a 
room if she will reside in campus housing. $100 repre- 
senting a general deposit component is held until six 
months after the student graduates from the college. 
The $100 is refunded only after deducting any unpaid 
fees or fines and is not refunded to a student who 
withdraws (including an admitted student who does 
not attend); $200 representing a room deposit compo- 
nent is credited $100 in July toward her fall semester 
charges; and $100 in December toward her spring 
semester charges. 

Fee for Musical Instruction— $625 per semester (one-hour 
lesson per week) 

Practice rooms are available to Smith College students 
with first preference given to those registered for music 
instruction. Other Five College students may apply 
to the chair of the music department for permission 
to use the facilities. Practice rooms may be available 
for use by other individuals in last order of preference 
upon successful application to the chair of the music 
department. 

There is no charge for Five College students, faculty 
and staff for use of the practice rooms. For other indi- 
viduals, the following schedule of fees will apply. 
Use of a practice room, one hour daily 
$25 per year 

Fee for Riding Classes per Semester 

Adjacent to the Smith campus is Fox Meadow Farm, 
where riding lessons are available to all students at the 
college. Fox Meadow Farm will also board horses for 
students, at a cost of $510 per month. Inquiries about 
boarding should be addressed to Sue Payne, c/o Smith 
College Riding Stables. The Smith intercollegiate rid- 
ing team uses their facilities for practice and for horse 
shows. The fees listed below are per semester and are 
payable directly to Fox Meadow Farm when a student 
registers for lessons each semester. 

1\vo lessons per week $495 



Studio Art Courses per Semester 
Certain materials and supplies aiv required for studio 
art courses and will be provided to each student. Stu- 
dents may require additional supplies as well and will 
be responsible for purchasing them directly. The ex- 
penses will vary from course to course and from student 
to student. 

Required materials $20— $150 

Additional supplies $15— $100 

Chemistry Laboratory Course per Semester 

S25 plus breakage 

Continuation Fee 

$60 per semester 

Students on leave of absence or attending other institu- 
tions on exchange or junior year abroad programs will 
be assessed a continuation fee to maintain enrollment 
status at the college. 

Late Payment Fee 

Any payment made after August 10 for fall or January 

10 for spring will be considered late. Late payments 

may be assessed a late fee at the rate of $1.25 on every 

$100(1.25%). 

Early Arrival Fee— $35 per Day 

Late Central Check-In Fee— $60 

Returning students who do not participate in Central 
Check-In will be assessed a fee. 

Late Registration Fee— $35 

Students who make registration changes after the regis- 
tration period will be assessed a fee for each change. 

Bed Removal Fee— $100 

Students who remove their beds from their campus 

rooms will be charged a bed removal fee. 

Health/Fire/Safety Violation— $5 per Item 

A minimum fine of $5 per item will be charged for 
items left in public areas such as corridors, stairways 
or entrances. These items create a hazard and violate 
compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. as 
well as city and state building, fire, and safety codes. 

Institutional Refund Policy 

A refund must be calculated if a student has withdrawn 
on or after the first day of classes, but before the point 
when the college is considered to have earned all the 



36 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



tuition, room, board and mandatory fees (hereinafter 
called institutional charges) for which the student was 
charged. A withdrawal fee of $100 will be charged in 
addition to any refund calculation made. Credit bal- 
ances remaining on any account will be refunded to 
the appropriate person or agency. 

Adjustment of Institutional Charges and Institutional Aid 

Any student who withdraws prior to the first day of 
classes will receive a 100 percent adjustment of institu- 
tional charges and insurance. All disbursed Title IV aid, 
institutional aid, state and other aid will be returned to 
the appropriate account by the college. 

A student who withdraws after the first day of 
classes, but before the time when she will have com- 
pleted 60 percent of the period of enrollment, will have 
her institutional charges and institutional aid adjusted 
based on the percent of attendance. 

If a student should withdraw from a Junior Year 
Abroad Program during the course of the year, it is col- 
lege policy not to grant credit for less than a full year's 
work and to refund only those payments for room and 
board which may be recovered by the college. TUition 
charges for the year are not refundable. Normally, 
students who withdraw from a Junior Year Abroad Pro- 
gram are withdrawn from Smith and may not return to 
the college the following semester. 

Students Receiving Title IV Federal Aid 

Per federal regulations, a student earns her aid based 
on the period of time she remains enrolled. Unearned 
Title IV funds, other than Federal Work Study, must 
be returned to the appropriate federal agency. During 
the first 60 percent of the enrollment period, a student 
earns Title IV funds in direct proportion to the length 
of time she remains enrolled. A student who remains 
enrolled beyond the 60 percent point earns all the aid 
for the payment period. For example, if the period of 
enrollment is 100 days and the student completes 25 
days, then she has earned 25 percent of her aid. The 
remainder of the aid must be returned to the appropri- 
ate federal agency. 

Other Charges 

If a student has not waived the medical insurance and 
withdraws from the college during the first 31 days of 
the period for which coverage is purchased, she shall 
not be covered under the Plan and a full refund of the 
premium will be made. Insured students withdrawing 
after 31 days will remain covered under the Plan for the 



full period for which the premium has been paid and 
no refund will be made available. 

Other charges, such as library fines, parking fines, 
and infirmary charges are not adjusted upon the 
student's withdrawal. 

Contractual Limitations 

If Smith College's performance of its educational ob- 
jectives, support services, or lodging and food services 
is hampered or restrained on account of strikes, fire, 
shipping delays, acts of God, prohibition or restraint of 
governmental authority, or other similar causes beyond 
Smith College's control, Smith College shall not be li- 
able to anyone, except to the extent of allowing in such 
cases a pro-rata reduction in fees or charges already 
paid to Smith College. 



Payment Plans and Loan 
ions 



Opt 



Smith offers a variety of payment plan and loan op- 
tions to assist you in successfully planning for timely 
payment of your college bill. 

Smith's payment plans allow you to distribute pay- 
ments over a specific period. 

• the Semester Plan 

• the TuitionPay Monthly Plan (administered by 

SallieMae) 

• Prepaid Stabilization Plan 

Smith also offers some parent loan options. 

Details on loan options and payment plans can be 
found in Financing Your Smith Education, which is 
available from the Office of Student Financial Services. 

This information is also available on the Web at 
www.smith.edu/finaid. 



Financial Aid 



We welcome women from all economic backgrounds. 
No woman should hesitate to apply to Smith because of 
an inability to pay the entire cost of her education. We 
make every effort to fully meet the documented finan- 
cial need of all admitted undergraduates who have met 
the published admission and financial aid deadlines. 
Awards are offered to applicants on the basis of need, 
and calculated according to established college and 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



37 



federal policies. An award is usually a combination of a 
grant, a loan, and a campus job. 

Smith College is committed to a financial aitl 
policy that guarantees to meet the full financial need, 
as calculated by the college, of all admitted students 
who meet published deadlines. The college does operate 
under a need-sensiti\e admission policy that typically 
affects less than 8 percent of our applicant pool. Each 
applicant for admission is evaluated on the basis of her 
academic and personal qualities. However, the college 
may choose to consider a student's level of financial 
need when making the final admission decision. Appli- 
cants are advised to complete the financial aid process 
if they will need financial help to enroll at Smith. 
Entering first-year students who fail to apply for finan- 
cial aid before the admission decision is issued will be 
ineligible to receive college-funded assistance until they 
haw completed 64 credits earned at Smith. Transfer 
students and Ada Comstock Scholars who do not apply 
for financial aid at the time of admission are eligible to 
apply after completing 32 credits earned at Smith. Note 
that institutional financial aid may not be available to 
students who do not meet the published deadlines. 

To enable the college to determine a student's need, 
a family completes both the Free Application for Fed- 
eral Student Aid (FAFSA) and the College Scholarship 
Service PROFILE form, requesting that data be sent 
to Smith. Both fonns may be completed on-line. The 
FAFSA can be accessed at www.fafsa.ed.gov (Smith Col- 
lege code is 002209) and the PROFILE can be accessed 
atwww.collegeboard.com (Smith College code is 3762). 

We also require a signed copy of the family's most 
recent federal tax returns, including all schedules 
and W-2's. Once we receive the applicant's completed 
FAFSA and PROFILE, we review each student's file 
Individually. We take into consideration the number of 
dependents, the number of family members in college, 
divorced parents and other special circumstances. We 
require signed copies of parents' and students' most 
recent federal income tax returns to verify' all the finan- 
cial information before we credit awards to a student's 
account. International students should complete the 
Smith College Financial Aid Application for Students 
Living Abroad, and an official government statement or 
income tax return will be required to verify income. 

The college makes the final decision on the level of 
need and awards. Financial aid decisions to entering 
students are announced simultaneously with admis- 
sion notifications. College policy limits the awards of 
Smith funds to the level of billed fees. 



Astudentwho is awarded aid at entrance will have 
it renewed each year she attends according to her need. 
as calculated by the college, if she is in good academic 
standing. She and her family appl) for aitl annually 
with Smith College forms. FAFSA and PROFILE forms, 
and tax returns The amount of aid ma\ \ar\ from year 
to war depending on changes in college lees and in the 
family's financial circumstances. The balance of loan 
and grant also changes, based on federal loan limits. 
Instructions for renewing aid are made available to all 
students in early December. Students are expected to 
complete their undergraduate studies in eight semes- 
ters, and grant aid is limited to that period, except for 
special programs. 

Ada Comstock Scholars receiving financial aid are 
required to make satisfactory progress toward the de- 
gree in order to continue receiving aid — that is, com- 
pletion of at least 75 percent of all credits attempted in 
any academic year. Students not meeting this criterion 
are put on financial aid probation and may become 
ineligible for aid if the probationary period exceeds 
one year. 

Unless the administrative board decides that miti- 
gating circumstances warrant an exception, no federal 
student aid may be made available to a student who is 
not making satisfactorv progress toward the degree (see 
p. 51). 

First-Year Applicants 

Any student who needs help in financing her education 
should apply for financial aid at the time she applies 
for admission. The financial aid application require- 
ments are sent to all applicants for admission. Students 
must not wait until they have been accepted for admis- 
sion to apply for aid. Each student's file is careful ly 
reviewed to determine eligibility for need-based aid. 
Since this is a detailed process, the college expects 
students to follow published application guidelines and 
to meet the appropriate application deadlines. Students 
and parents are encouraged to contact Student Finan- 
cial Services via e-mail at sfs@smith.edu or by phone 
(413-585-2530) with questions. Detailed information 
on the application process and deadlines is available on 
our Web site at \vw Av.smith.edu/finaid. 

The consequences of not applying for aid pm ir 
to being accepted for admission include a 64-credit 
waiting period before becoming eligible to receive 
college grant aid. This means that only federal, state 
and private assistance would be available for the first 



38 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



two years of undergraduate enrollment at Smith. The 
college will consider exceptions to this policy only 
if you experience and can document an unexpected 
family emergency. Please note that this policy does 
not pertain to students who, at the time of admission 
to Smith, applied for but were not granted need-based 
financial aid. 

If an entering student applied for but did not qual- 
ify for need-based aid in her first year, that student may 
reapply for aid in subsequent years. This is particularly 
important for families that experience changes in fam- 
ily circumstances such as a sibling entering college, 
reductions in parent income or unanticipated medical 
expenses. Returning students who want to apply for 
federal aid only have a modified application process. If 
there are major changes to the financial resources of 
the family, Student Financial Services will consider a 
new request for aid or a review of a previous denial at 
any time. 

The college cannot assume responsibility for family 
unwillingness to contribute to college expenses. There 
are limited circumstances that qualify 7 a student for 
consideration as an independent aid applicant. Women 
over the age of 24, orphans and wards of the court are 
always considered self-supporting for federal financial 
aid purposes. 

Transfer Students 

Transfer students should follow the same application 
procedures detailed on their specific financial aid ap- 
plications. Transfer students who do not apply for aid 
at the time of admission cannot apply for college aid 
until they reach junior standing and complete at least 
32 credits at Smith. 

Ada Comstock Scholars 

Women of nontraditional college age can apply to the 
Ada Comstock Scholars Program. Applicants for aid 
should complete a Free Application for Federal Student 
Aid (FAFSA), a Smith Application for Financial Aid, and 
send us a signed copy of their most recent federal tax 
return, complete with all schedules and W-2's. 

An Ada Comstock Scholar who does not apply for 
aid at the time of admission cannot apply for institu- 
tional grant aid until she has completed 32 credits at 
Smith, although she may qualify for federal and state 
grants and loans before she has completed 32 credits. 



This policy 7 does not apply to women who applied for, 
but were not granted, aid at the time of admission. 

International Applicants and Non- 
U.S. Citizens 

Smith College awards need-based aid to non-U.S. 
citizens, both first-year and transfer applicants. There 
is a great deal of competition for these funds, and the 
level of support provided from the college range widely, 
depending on particular family circumstances. Aid is 
determined based on the information provided by the 
family on the Smith College Financial Aid Application 
for Non-U.S. Citizens, along with translated tax or 
income statements. 

The application deadline is the same as the appli- 
cation deadline for admission: February 1. 

A non-U.S. citizen (Canadian citizens excepted) 
eligible for aid is offered a grant award in the first year 
that will remain at the same level for her sophomore 
and junior years. In her senior year, any increase in 
tuition and fees that is not covered by the increased 
loan will be covered by an increase in the grant so that 
her family contribution will remain the same as it was 
in her junior year. (Loan and campus job amounts, 
which are part of the total aid package, may increase 
each year to partially offset increases in billed expens- 
es.) Cost increases not covered by aid increases are the 
responsibility of the student and her family. 

For application deadlines and details, please check 
www.smith.edu/finaid. 

Non-U.S. Citizens Living in the U.S. 
If you are a non-U.S. citizen whose parents are earning 
income and paying taxes in the United States, you will 
need to complete a CSS PROFILE form as well as the 
Smith Financial Aid Application for Non-U.S. Citizens 
and provide a complete and signed U.S. federal income 
tax return. 

U.S. Citizens Living Outside the U.S. 

Follow procedures for applicants residing in the United 
States. However, if your parents are living and earning 
income outside the United States and do not file U.S. 
tax returns, you should also fill out the Smith Finan- 
cial Aid Application for Non-U.S. Citizens so that we can 
consider the actual expenses incurred by your family. 

U.S. citizens and permanent residents must reapply 
for aid each year. 



Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 



39 



Financial Aid Awards 

Smith's resources for financial aid include loans, cam- 
pus jobs and grants; a student's financial aid package 
will include one or more of these. A loan and job. both 
considered self-help, are usualh the first components 
of an aid package, with any remaining need being met 
with grant aid. 

Loans 

Most students borrow through the Federal Direct Ford 
Loan Program. Some awards may also include a Smith 
College loan. Federal Perkins Loans are offered to 
students to the extent of available federal funding. Most 
parents are eligible to borrow under the Federal Par- 
ent Loan Program and/or may make use of one of the 
plans described in Financing Your Smith Education. 
Students who receive aid of any sort from federal funds 
are subject to the statutes governing such aid. 

Campus Jobs 

Student Financial Services administers campus jobs. 
All students may apply, but priority is given to those 
students (about one-half of our student body) who 
received campus job offers as part of their aid packages. 
First-year students work an average of eight hours a 
week for 32 weeks, usually for Dining Services. Students 
in other classes hold regular jobs averaging ten hours 
a week for 32 weeks. These monies are paid directly 
to each student as she earns them. They are intended 
primarily to cover personal expenses, but some students 
use part of their earnings toward required fees. Short- 
term jobs are open to all students. Additionally, a term- 
time internship program is administered by the Career 
Development Office. The college participates in the 
federally funded College Work-Study Program, which 
funds a portion of the earnings of eligible students, 
some of them in nonprofit, community service posi- 
tions and in the America Reads tutorial program. 

No student, whether on federal work-study or not, 
is permitted more than the maximum 12-hours a week 
or one "full-time" position. First-year students work a 
maximum of nine hours per week. Students receiving a 
stipend for positions such as STRIDE, HCA, etc. are not 
eligible for a second job. This policy attempts to offer 
all students an equal opportunity to work. 

Grants 

Grants are funds given to students with no requirement 
of repayment or work time in exchange. Most Smith 
College grants come from funds given for this purpose 



by alumnae ;md friends of the college and by founda- 
tions and corporations. The federal and state govern- 
ments also provide assistance through need-based 
grants such as the Federal Pell Grant and state scholar- 
ships. Smith receives an allocation each year for Federal 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants and for 
state-funded Gilbert Grants for Massachusetts residents. 

Outside Aid 

If you receive any assistance from an organization 
outside of the college, this aid must be taken into con- 
sideration in calculating your financial aid award. For 
this reason, you are required to report such aid. 

Most outside scholarships are given to recognize 
particular achievement on the part of the recipient. 
These awards are allowed to reduce the suggested loan, 
job or institutional family contribution. However, in no 
case will the family contribution be reduced below the 
federally calculated family contribution. When outside 
awards have replaced the suggested loan and job, and 
the family contribution has been reduced to the feder- 
ally calculated level, Smith grant aid will be reduced 
dollar for dollar. 

Educational benefits from state and federal agen- 
cies are treated in the same way that outside merit- 
based scholarships are. 

Non-merit awards include tuition subsidies based 
on parent employment. These awards are not based on 
merit and reduce Smith grant eligibility dollar for dollar. 

Student Financial Services must be notified of all 
outside awards. If you notify us by July 1, the aid will be 
reflected in your official award and on your first bill. If 
you notify us after September 1, the outside aid may be 
used to reduce the Smith grant dollar for dollar. 

Music Grants 

Each year the college awards grants equal to $200 per 
semester for the cost of lessons in practical music to 
students who have financial need and who are accepted 
by the Department of Music. 

Ernst Wallfisch Scholarship in Music 

A full-year music performance scholarship (vocal or 

instrumental), based on merit and commitment, may 
be granted by the Music Department to a Smith student 
(first-year, sophomore or junior) enrolled in a perfor- 
mance course at Smith College. 



40 Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid 

Scholarships for Northampton and 
Hatfield Residents — The Trustee 
Grant 

At the discretion of the trustees, partial tuition grants 
may be awarded to accepted applicants who have been 
residents of Northampton or Hatfield with their parents 
for at least five years directly preceding the date of 
their admission to college. Such grants are continued 
through the four college years if the student maintains 
diploma grade, conforms to the regulations of the col- 
lege, and continues to be a resident of Northampton or 
Hatfield. The Trustee Grant may only be used for study 
at the Northampton campus. 

ROTC 

Air Force ROTC is available at most colleges and 
universities in western Massachusetts, including 
Smith College. Air Force ROTC offers two-, three- and 
four-year enlistment scholarships to qualified new and 
continuing college students. For more information, call 
(413) 545-2437, send e-mail to afrotc@acad.umass. 
edu or visit www.umass.edu/afrotc. 



I] 



Admission 



From the college's beginning, students at 
Smith have been challenged by rigorous 
academic standards and supported by rich 
resources and facilities to develop to their 
fullest potential and define their own terms 
of success. Admitting students who will thrive in the 
Smith environment remains the goal of our admission 
efforts. We seek students who will be productive mem- 
bers of the Smith community, who will be challenged 
by all that is offered here, and who will challenge their 
faculty members and peers to sharpen their ideas and 
perspectives of the world. 

Each year we enroll a first-year class of approxi- 
mately 640 able, motivated, diverse students whose 
records show academic achievement, intellectual 
curiosity and potential for growth. Because our students 
come from every state and 60 countries, their edu- 
cational and personal experiences and opportunities 
vary tremendously. In selecting a class, the Board of 
Admission, which is made up of faculty members as 
well as members of the admission staff, considers each 
student in the light of the opportunities available to 
her. Included in the board's review are her secondary 
school record, the recommendations from her school, 
her essay and any other available information. 

Smith College meets fully the documented finan- 
cial need, as calculated by the college, of all admitted 
students. Two-thirds of our students receive some form 
of financial assistance through grants, loans and/ 
or campus jobs. Further information about financial 
planning for a Smith education and about financial 
aid is available in the section on Fees, Expenses and 
Financial Aid, pages 33-40. 

Secondary School 
Preparation 

There is no typical applicant to Smith and no typical 
academic program, but we strongly recommend that 
a student prepare for Smith by taking the strongest 
courses offered by her high school. Specifically this 
should include the following, where possible: 



• four years of English 

• three years of a foreign language (or two years in 
each of two languages) 

• three years of mathematics 

• three years of science 

• two years of history 

Beyond meeting the normal minimum require- 
ments, we expect each candidate to pursue in greater 
depth academic interests of special importance to her. 
Candidates who are interested in our engineering 
major should pursue coursework in calculus, biology, 
chemistry and physics. 

Smith College will accept college-level work 
completed prior to matriculation as a degree student, 
provided that the relevant courses were completed at an 
accredited college or university and were not applied 
to the requirements for high school graduation. We 
also give credit for excellent performance in Advanced 
Placement. International Baccalaureate and equivalent 
foreign examinations. Please refer to the Academic 
Rules and Procedures section for further information 
regarding eligibility for and use of such credit. 

Entrance Tests 

SAT I or ACT scores are optional for U.S. citizens and 
U.S. permanent residents. Standardized tests (SAT I, 
ACT, TOEFL or IELTS as appropriate) are required for 
international students. SAT II subject tests are not re- 
quired for any applicant. If a student wishes to submit a 
score or is required to do so, she should take the exams 
in her junior year to keep open the possibility of Early 
Decision. All examinations taken through December 
of the senior year are acceptable. The results of exami- 
nations taken after December arrive too late for us to 
include them in the decision-making process. 

Whether required or optional, scores must come 
directly from the testing agency Scores will not be ac- 
cepted from the secondary school transcript. The Col- 
lege Board code number for Smith College is 3762. The 
ACT code is 1894. 



il 



Admission 



Applying for Admission Advanced Placement 



A student interested in Smith has three options for ap- 
plying — Fall Early Decision, Winter Early Decision and 
Regular Decision. Visit www.smith.edu/admission for 
information about requirements and deadlines. 

Early Decision 

Fall and Winter Early Decision Plans are designed for 
students with strong qualifications who have selected 
Smith as their first choice. The plans differ from each 
other only in application deadline, recognizing that 
students may decide on their college preference at 
different times. In making an application to her first- 
choice college, a candidate eliminates much of the 
anxiety, effort and cost of preparing several college 
applications. Candidates under this plan may initiate 
applications to other colleges, but may make an Early 
Decision application to one college only. It is important 
to note that if accepted under Early Decision, a candi- 
date must withdraw all other college applications and 
may not make any further applications. 

Applicants deferred in either Early Decision plan 
will be reconsidered in the spring, together with ap- 
plicants in the Regular Decision Plan. Offers of admis- 
sion are made with the understanding that the high 
school record continues to be of high quality through 
the senior year. If they have applied for financial aid by 
the published deadlines, candidates will be notified of 
financial aid decisions at the same time as the admis- 
sion decision. 

Regular Decision 

The Regular Decision Plan is designed for students who 
wish to keep open several college options during the 
application process. Candidates may submit applica- 
tions anytime before the January 15 deadline. 

A student interested in Smith should complete the 
Common Application online at www.commonapp.org. 
Included with the application are all the forms she will 
need, and instructions for completing each part of the 
application. A Common Application Supplement is also 
required. 

We realize that applying to college involves a lot of 
time-consuming paperwork for the applicant. It is work 
that we review carefully and thoroughly, and we suggest 
that applicants do not leave it to the last moment. 



Smith College participates in the Advanced Placement 
Program administered by the College Entrance Exami- 
nation Board. Please refer to the Academic Rules and 
Procedures section (p. 50) for information governing 
eligibility for and use of Advanced Placement credit. 

International Baccalaureate 

The amount of credit will be determined as soon as an 
official copy of results has been sent to the registrar's 
office. Guidelines for use are comparable to those for 
Advanced Placement. 

Interview 

We recommend an interview for all candidates. For 
those who live or attend school within 200 miles of the 
college an on-campus interview is encouraged. Oth- 
ers should visit our Web site to obtain the name of an 
alumna interviewer in their area. The interview allows 
each candidate to become better acquainted with Smith 
and to exchange information with a member of the 
staff of the Office of Admission or a trained alumna 
volunteer. 

Deferred Entrance 

An admitted first-year or transfer applicant who has ac- 
cepted Smith's offer and paid the required deposit may 
defer her entrance for one year to work, travel or pursue 
a special interest if she makes this request in writing to 
the director of admission by June 1 who will review the 
request and notify the student within two weeks. 

Deferred Entrance for 
Medical Reasons 

An admitted first-year or transfer applicant who has 
accepted Smith's offer and paid the required deposit 
may request to postpone her entrance due to medical 
reasons if she makes this request in writing, explaining 
the nature of the medical problem, to the director of 
admission prior to the first day of classes. At that time, 
the college will outline expectations for progress over 
the course of the year. A Board of Admission subcom- 
mittee will meet the following March to review the 
student's case. Readmission is not guaranteed. 



Admission 






Transfer Admission 

A student may apply for transfer to Smith College in 
January or September after the completion of one or 
more semesters at another institution. 

Forjanuarj entrance, she must submit her applica- 
tion and send all credentials by November 15. Decisions 
will be mailed by mid-December. The suggested filing 
date for September entrance is February 1 , especially 
for students applying for financial aid. The application 
deadline is May 15. Candidates whose applications are 
complete by March 1 will receive admission decisions 
by the first week in April. Students whose applications 
are complete by May 15 will receive decisions by June 
1. Letters from the financial aid office are mailed at the 
same time as admission letters. 

We expect a transfer student to have a strong aca- 
demic record and to be in good standing at the institu- 
tion she is attending. We look particularly for evidence 
of achievement in college, although we also consider 
her secondary school record. Her program should cor- 
relate with the general Smith College requirements 
given on pages 4M2 of this catalogue. 

We require a candidate for the degree of bachelor 
of arts to spend at least two years in residence at Smith 
College in Northampton, during which time she nor- 
mally completes 64 credits. A student may not transfer 
to the junior class and spend any part of the junior or 
senior year studying in off-campus programs. 

International Students 

We welcome applications from qualified international 
students and advise applicants to communicate with 
the Office of Admission at least one year in advance 
of their proposed entrance. The initial e-mail or let- 
ter should include information about the students 
complete academic background. If financial aid is 
needed, this fad should be made clear in the initial 
correspondence. 

Visiting Year Programs 

Smith College welcomes a number of guest students 
for a semester or a year of study. In the Visiting Student 
Program, students enrolled in accredited, four-year 
liberal arts colleges or universities in the United States 
may apply to spend all or part of their sophomore, 
junior or senior year at Smith. 



International students ma\ apph to spend a year 
at Smith under the International Visiting Program. 
( Exceptions ma\ he made if a student wishes to visit for 
onl\ one semester. ) Applicants must he in their final 
year of studies leading to mmersih entrance in their 
own country or currently enrolled in a university pro- 
gram abroad. If accepted, candidates will he expected 
to present examination results — Baccalaureate, Abitnr 
or GCSK, for example — before enrolling. Evidence of 
English fluency will be required of applicants whose 
first language is not English. 

Applicants to the visiting programs must furnish 
a transcript of their college work (or secondary school 
work, where applicable) to date, faculty recommenda- 
tion, an adviser's or dean's reference and a completed 
application. Applications must be completed by July 1 
for September entrance and by December 15 for Janu- 
ary entrance. Financial aid is not available for these 
programs except the visiting program in mathematics. 

Infomiation and application material may be ob- 
tained by visiting www.smith.edu/admission or sending 
e-mail to admission@smith.edu. 

Readmission 

See Withdrawal and Readmission, page 53- 

Ada Comstock Scholars 
Program 

The admission process for Ada Comstock Scholars is 
competitive. Particular emphasis is placed on aca- 
demic achievement, an autobiographical essay and an 
exchange of infomiation in the interview. A candidate 
should schedule her interview appointment before 
submitting her application prior to the deadline, Febru- 
ary 1. It is recommended that an applicant bring copies 
of her college transcripts to her interview appointment. 

Ada Comstock Scholars are expected to have com- 
pleted a minimum of 32 transferable liberal aits credits 
before matriculation at Smith. The average number 
of transfer credits for an admitted student is 50. Those 
students who offer little or no college-level work are 
advised to enroll elsewhere to fulfill this requirement 
before initiating the application process. 

A candidate's status as an Ada Comstock Scholar 
must he designated at the time of application. Normal- 
ly, an applicant admitted as a student of traditional age 
will not be pemiitted to change her class status to Via 



44 Admission 

Comstock Scholar until five years after she withdraws 
as a student of traditional age. A woman who meets the 
transfer credit guideline must apply as an Ada Com- 
stock Scholar if 'she also meets the federal government's 
guidelines defining independent students: 

• at least 24 years old 

• a veteran 

• responsible for dependent(s) other than a spouse 
A brief description of the program can be found on 

page 11. Information about expenses and procedures 
for applying for financial aid can be found in the sec- 
tion entitled Fees, Expenses and Financial Aid. Inqui- 
ries in writing, by phone or by e-mail may be addressed 
to the Office of Admission. 



45 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



Requirements for the Degree 

The requirements for the degree from Smith College 
are completion of 1 28 credits of academic work and 
satisfactory completion of a major For graduation the 
minimum standard of performance is a cumulative 
average of 2.0 in all academic work and a minimum 
average of 2.0 in the senior year For those entering as 
first-year students, satisfactory completion of a writing 
intensive course in the first year is required. 

Students earning a bachelor of arts degree must 
complete at least 64 credits outside the department or 
program of the major ( S6 credits for majors requiring 
the study of two foreign languages taught within a 
single department or program). The requirements for 
the bachelor of science degree in engineering are listed 
in the courses of study section under Engineering. 

Candidates for the degree must complete at least 
four semesters of academic work, a minimum of 64 
credits, in academic residence at Smith College in 
Northampton; two of these semesters must be com- 
pleted during the junior or senior year. (For accelerated 
programs, see p. 1 1.) A student on a Smith Junior 
Year Abroad Program, the Jean Picker Semester-in- 
Washington Program or the Internship Program at the 
Smithsonian Institution is not in academic residence 
in Northampton. 

Each student is responsible for knowing all regula- 
tions governing the curriculum and course registration 
and is responsible for planning a course of study in ac- 
cordance with those regulations and the requirements 
for the degree. Normally, students may not change the 
designated number of credits for a variable credit spe- 
cial studies. 

Course Program 

The nomial course program for traditional-aged 
undergraduates consists of 16 credits taken in each of 
eight semesters at Smith. Only with the approval of the 
administrative board may a student complete her de- 
gree requirements in fewer or more than eight semes- 
ters. The minimum course program for a traditional- 
aged undergraduate in any semester is 12 credits. A 



traditional-aged student who is enrolled in fewer than 
12 credits in any semester is required to withdraw at the 
end of that semester. Thestudenl must remain away 
from the college for at least one semester and then ma\ 
request readmission for the following semester. 

Approved summer-school or intertenn credit ma\ 
be used to supplement a minimum 12-credit program 
or to make up a shortage of credits. Smith students 
may accrue a maximum of 1 2 summer-school credits 
and 12 interterm credits at Smith or elsewhere toward 
their Smith degree. An overall maximum of 32 credits 
of combined summer, interterm, AP and pre-matric- 
ulation credits may be applied toward the degree. See 
Academic Credit, pages 48-51. 

A student enters her senior year after completing 
a maximum of six semesters and earning at least 96 
Smith College or approved transfer credits. A student 
may not enter the senior year with fewer than 96 cred- 
its: exceptions require a petition to the administrative 
board prior to the student's return to campus for her 
final two semesters. A student in residence may earn no 
more than 24 credits per semester unless approved by 
the administrative board. 

Admission to Courses 

Instructors are not required to hold spaces for students 
who do not attend the first class meeting and may re- 
fuse admittance to students seeking to add courses who 
have not attended the first class meetings. 

Permissions 

Some courses require written permission of the instruc- 
tor and/or chair of the department concerned before 
the course is elected. 

A student who does not have the prerequisites for 
a course may elect it only with the pennission of the 
instructor and the chair of the department in which the 
course is offered. 

A student must petition the administrative board 
for pennission to enter or drop a yearlong course with 
credit at midyear The petition must be signed b\ the 
instructor of the course, the student's adviser and the 
chair of the department concerned before it is submit- 
ted to the class dean. 



46 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



Seminars 

Seminars are limited to 12 students and are open, by 
permission of the instructor, to juniors, seniors and 
graduate students only. At the discretion of the instruc- 
tor and with the approval of the department chair or 
the program director, 15 students may enroll. If enroll- 
ment exceeds this number, the instructor will select the 
best-qualified candidates. 

Special Studies 

Permission of the instructor, the department chair and 
in some cases the department is required for the elec- 
tion of Special Studies. Special Studies are open only 
to qualified sophomores, juniors and seniors. A maxi- 
mum of 16 credits of special studies may be counted 
toward the degree. 

Normally students may not change the designated 
number of credits for a variable credit special studies. 

Independent Study 

Independent study for credit may be proposed by 
qualified juniors and seniors. Approval of the appropri- 
ate department (s) and the Committee on Academic 
Priorities is required. Time spent on independent study 
off campus cannot be used to fulfill the residence re- 
quirement. The deadline for submission of proposals is 
November 15 for a second-semester program and April 
15 for a first-semester program. 

Internships 

An internship for credit, supervised by a Smith faculty 
member, may be proposed by qualified sophomores, 
juniors and seniors. Approval of the appropriate 
department(s) and the Committee on Academic Priori- 
ties is required. The deadline for submission of propos- 
als is November 15 for a second-semester program and 
April 15 for a first-semester program. 

Auditing 

A degree student at Smith or at the Five Colleges may 
audit a course on a regular basis if space is available 
and the pennission of the instructor is obtained. An 
audit is not recorded on the transcript. 

Auditing by Nonmatriculated Students 

A nonmatriculated student who has earned a high 
school diploma and who wishes to audit a course may 
do so with the permission of the instructor and the reg- 
istrar. An auditor must submit a completed registration 
form to the registrar's office by the end of the second 



week of classes. A fee will be charged and is determined 
by the type of course. Studio classes may not be audited 
except by permission of the art faculty following a writ- 
ten request to the department. Records of audits are not 
maintained. 

Changes in Course Registration 

Adding and Dropping Courses 

During the first 10 class days, a student may enter or 
drop a course with the approval of the adviser and 
after consultation with the instructor. From the 11th 
through the 1 5th day of class, a student may enter a 
course with the permission of the instructor, the adviser 
and the class dean. 

After the 10th day of classes a student may drop a 
course up to the end of the fifth week of the semester: 

1 . after discussion with the instructor; 

2. with the approval of the adviser and the class dean; 
and 

3. if, after dropping the course, she is enrolled in at 
least 12 credits. (This provision does not apply to 
Ada Comstock Scholars.) 

After the end of the fifth week of the semester a stu- 
dent may not drop a course. However, on two and only 
two occasions during her years at the college — once 
during her first year; once during any subsequent 
year — a student may drop a course at any time up to 
the end of the ninth week of classes, for any reason, 
without penalty. The drop form requires the signatures 
of the instructor, adviser and class dean. 

A student who wishes to drop a seminar or course 
with limited enrollment should do so at the earliest 
possible time so that another student may take ad- 
vantage of the opening. Because the organization and 
operation of such courses are often critically dependent 
on the students enrolled, the instructor may refuse 
permission to drop the course after the first 10 class 
days. 

A course dropped for reasons of health after the fifth 
week of classes will be recorded on the transcript with a 
grade of "W," unless the student has the option of a free 
drop. 

A student registers for an Interterm course in No- 
vember, with the approval of her adviser. In January, a 
student may drop or enter an Interterm course within 
the first three days with a class dean's signature. Other- 
wise, the student who registers but does not attend will 
receive a "U" (unsatisfactory) for the course. 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



r 



Regulations governing changes in enrollment for 

courses in one of the other four colleges may be more 
restrictive than the above. Instructions and deadlines 
tor registration in Five College courses are published 
online by the registrar's office. 

Fine for Late Registration 

A student who has not registered lor courses by the end 
of the first 10 days of classes will be fined $35, payable 
at the time of registration. In addition, a fine of $35 
will be assessed for each approved petition to add or 
drop a course after the deadline. A student who has 
not registered by the end of the first four weeks of the 
semester will be administratively withdrawn. 

Class Attendance and Assignments 

Students are expected to attend all their scheduled 
classes. Any student who is unable, because of religious 
beliefs, to attend classes or to participate in any exami- 
nation, study or work requirement on a particular day 
shall be excused from such activities without prejudice 
and shall be given an opportunity to make them up. 

Students are expected to spend at least two hours 
per week in preparation for every class hour. 

Students are asked to introduce guests to the in- 
structor of a class before the beginning of the class if 
there is an opportunity and at the end if there is not. 

Absence does not relieve the student from respon- 
sibility for work required while she was absent. The 
instructor may require her to give evidence that she has 
done the work assigned. In courses in which the writ- 
ten examinations can test only a part of the work, the 
instructor may rule that a student who does not attend 
class with reasonable regularity has not presented evi- 
dence that she has done the work. 

The due date for final papers in each semester can 
be no later than the end of the examination period. 
Instructors must specify the acceptable format, exact 
deadline and place of delivery for final papers. If a 
paper or other course work is mailed to an instructor, it 
must be sent by certified mail, return receipt requested, 
and the student must keep a paper copy. It is the 
student's responsibility to check that work submitted by 
e-mail or fax has been received by the professor. 

Deadlines and Extensions 

Only the class dean may authorize an extension for 
an) reason beyond the end of the final examination 



period Such extensions, granted for reasons ol illness, 
emergency or extenuating personal circumstances, will 
always he confirmed in writing with the facultj mem- 
ber, the registrar and the student An Individual faculty 
member, without authorization by the class dean, may 
grant extensions on work due during the semester 
through the last day of final exams. 

Pre-examination Period 

The pre-examination study period, between the end of 
classes and the beginning of final examinations, is set 
aside for students to prepare for examinations. There- 
fore, the college does not schedule social, academic 
or cultural activities during this time. Deadlines for 
papers, take-home exams or other course work cannot 
be during the pre-examination study period. 

Final Examinations 

Most final exams at Smith are self-scheduled and 
administered by the registrar during predetermined 
periods. A student may choose in which period she 
wants to take each exam. Exams are picked up at 
distribution centers after showing a picture ID and 
must be returned to the same center no more than two 
hours and 20 minutes from the time they are received 
by the student. Extra time taken to write an exam is 
considered a violation of the Academic Honor Code and 
will be reported to the Academic Honor Board. A student 
who is late for an exam may write for the remaining 
time in the examination period but may not have ad- 
ditional time. Exams which involve slides, dictation or 
listening comprehension are scheduled by the registrar. 
Such examinations may be taken only at the scheduled 
time. 

For information regarding illness during the 
examination period, call Health Sen ices at extension 
2800 for instructions. Students who become ill during 
an examination must report directly to Health Sen ices. 

Further details of the Academic Honor Gxle as they 
apply to examinations and class work are given in the 
Smith College Handbook (wAuv.smith.edu/sao hand- 
book). Regulations of the faculty and the registrar 
regarding final examination procedures are published 
online at the registrar's office Web site prior to the final 
examination period 

No scheduled or self-scheduled examination may 
be taken outside the regular examination period 
without prior permission of the administrative board 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



Written requests must be made to the administrative 
board through the class dean (not to individual faculty 
members). Requests to take final examinations early 
will not be considered; therefore, travel plans must be 
made accordingly. 

Five College Course Enrollments 

Students planning to enroll in a course at one of the 
other four institutions may submit their requests online 
through BannerWeb. Five College course requests should 
be submitted during the period for advising and election 
of courses for the coming semester. Course informa- 
tion is available online through the Five College online 
course guide or at the individual Web sites of the other 
four institutions. Free bus transportation to and from 
the institution is available for Five College students. 
Students in good standing are eligible to take a course 
at one of the other institutions: first-semester first-year 
students must obtain the permission of the class dean. 
A student must: a) enroll in a minimum of eight credits 
at Smith in any semester, or b) take no more than half 
of her course program off campus. A student must 
register for an approved course at one of the other four 
institutions by the end of the interchange deadline (the 
first two weeks of the semester) . Students must adhere to 
the registration procedures and deadlines of their home 
institution. 

Five College courses are those taught by special Five 
College faculty appointees. These courses are listed on 
pages 388-396 in this catalogue. Cooperative courses 
are taught jointly by faculty members from several 
institutions and are usually approved and listed in the 
catalogues of the participating institutions. The same 
registration procedures and approvals apply to Five 
College courses and cooperative courses. A list of Five 
College courses approved for Smith College degree 
credit is available at the registrar's office. Requests for 
approval of courses not on the list may be submitted 
to the registrar's office for review; however, Smith Col- 
lege does not accept all Five College courses for credit 
toward the Smith degree. Courses offered through the 
UMass Continuing Education Department are not part 
of the Five College Interchange. Students may not 
receive transfer credit for Continuing Education courses 
completed while in residence at Smith College, but may 
receive credit for those offered during Interterm and 
summer. 

Students taking a course at one of the other in- 
stitutions are, in that course, subject to the academic 



regulations, including the calendar, deadlines and 
academic honor system, of the host institution. It is 
the responsibility of the student to be familiar with the 
pertinent regulations of the host institution, includ- 
ing those for attendance, academic honesty, grading 
options and deadlines for completing coursework and 
taking examinations. Students follow the registration 
add/drop deadlines of their home institution. Regula- 
tions governing changes in enrollment in Five College 
courses are published online at the beginning of each 
semester at the registrar's office Web site. 



Academic Credit 

Grading System 

Grades are recorded by the registrar at the end of each 
semester. Grade reports are made available online 
through BannerWeb at that time. 

Grades at Smith indicate the following: 



A (4.0) C- (1.7) 

A- (37) D+ (1.3) 

B+ (3.3) D (1.0) 

B (3.0) D- (0.7) 

B- (2.7) E (0.0) 

C+ (2.3) S: satisfactory (C- or better) 

C (2.0) U: unsatisfactory 

X: official extension authorized by 

the class dean 
M: unreported grade calculated as 

a failure 

Grades earned in Five College courses are recorded 
as submitted by the host institution. A Five College 
incomplete grade is equivalent to a failing grade and is 
calculated as such until a final grade is submitted. An 
incomplete grade will be converted to a failing grade 
on the student's official record if coursework is not 
completed by the end of the following semester. 

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option 

Coursework in any one semester may be taken for a 
satisfactory (C- or better)/unsatisfactory grade, provid- 
ing that: 

1 ) the instructor approves the option; 

2) the student declares the grading option for Smith 
courses by the end of the ninth week of classes. 
Students enrolled in Five College courses must de- 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



49 



dare the option at the host campus and follow the 
deadlines of that institution. The fall deadline also 
applies to yearlong courses designated by a "D" in 
the course number In vearlong courses designated 
by a "V" students ma\ elect a separate grading 
option for each semester. Students electing the S/U 
option for both semesters of a yearlong course must 
do so each semester. 

Within the 1 28 credits required for the degree, a 
maximum of 16 credits (Smith or other Five College) 
may be taken for the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading 
option, regardless of how many graded credits students 
are enrolled in per semester. Some departments will not 
approve the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading option 
for courses counting toward the major. 

Satisfactory/unsatisfactory grades do not count in 
the grade point average. 

An Ada Comstock Scholar or a transfer student may 
elect the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading option for 
four credits out of even' 32 that she takes at Smith 
College. 

Repeating Courses 

Normally, courses may not be repeated for credit. In 
a few courses, the content of which varies from year 
to year, exceptions to this rule may be made by the 
instructor and the chair of the department. A student 
who has failed a course may repeat it with the original 
grade remaining on the record. The second grade is 
also recorded. A student who wants to repeat a course 
she has not failed may do so for no credit. The second 
grade is recorded but does not count in the grade point 
average. 

Performance Credits 

Students are allowed to count a limited number of 
performance credits toward the Smith degree. The 
maximum number allowed is indicated in the Courses 
of Study section under the appropriate departments. 
Excess perfonnance credits are included on the tran- 
script but do not count toward the degree. 

Shortage of Credits 

A shortage of credits incurred by failing or dropping a 
course may be made up by an equivalent amount of 
work carried above the normal 16-credit program, or 
with approved summer-school or Interterm courses 



accepted for credit toward the Smith College degree. 
In the case of failure in a course or dropping a course 
for reasons of health, a shortage may I* filled with a 
student's available Advanced Placement or other pre- 
matriculation credits. Any student with more than a 
two-credit shortage may be required to complete the 
shortage before returning for classes in September. 

A student enters the senior year after completing 
a maximum of six semesters and earning at least 96 
Smith College or approved transfer credits. A student 
may not enter her senior year with fewer than 96 cred- 
its; exceptions require a petition to the administrative 
board prior to the student's return to campus for her 
final two semesters. A student may not participate in 
a Smith-sponsored or affiliated Junior Year Abroad or 
exchange program with a shortage of credit. 

Transfer Credit 

A student who attends another accredited college or 
university and requests credit toward a Smith College 
degree for the work done there: 

a) should make her plans in accordance with the 
regulations concerning off-campus study and, in 
the case of seniors, in accordance with the regula- 
tions concerning academic residence: 

b) should obtain, from the class deans office, the 
guidelines for transferring credit. Official tran- 
scripts should be sent directly to the registrar from 
the other institution; 

c) must, if approved to study abroad, have her pro- 
gram approved in advance by the Committee on 
Study Abroad. 

Final evaluation of credit is made after receipt of the 
official transcript showing satisfactory completion of 
the program. 

A student may not receive credit for work completed 
at another institution while in residence at Smith Col- 
lege, except for Interterm courses and courses taken on 
the Five College interchange. Credit is not granted for 
online courses. 

Transfer credit policies and guidelines are pub- 
lished online at the registrar's office Web site and are 
available at the class deans' office. 

Summer-School Credit 

Students may accrue a maximum of 12 approved sum- 
mer-school credits toward their Smith degree with an 
overall maximum of 32 credits of combined summer. 



5< 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



interterm. AP and pre-matriculation credits. With the 
prior approval of the class dean, summer credit may be 
used to allow students to make up a shortage of credits 
or to undertake an accelerated course program. For 
transfer students and Ada Comstock Scholars, summer 
school credits completed prior to enrollment at Smith 
College are included in the 12-credit maximum. 

Interterm Credit 

The college may offer courses for credit during the 
interterm period. Such courses will carry one to four 
credits and will count toward the degree. The college 
will consider for-credit academic interterm courses 
taken at other institutions. The number of credits ac- 
cepted for each interterm course (normally up to 3) 
will be determined by the registrar upon review of the 
credits assigned by the host institution. Any interterm 
course designated as 4 credits by a host institution 
must be reviewed by the class deans and the registrar to 
determine whether it merits an exception to the 3-credit 
limit. Students may accrue a maximum of 12 approved 
interterm credits at Smith or elsewhere toward their 
Smith degree with an overall maximum of 32 credits of 
combined summer, interterm. AP and pre-matricula- 
tion credits. Students may not take more than 4 credits 
during any one interterm at Smith or elsewhere. For 
transfer students, interterm credits completed prior to 
enrollment at Smith College are included in the 12- 
credit maximum. 

The interterm may also be a period of reading, 
research or concentrated study for both students and 
faculty Faculty, students or staff may offer noncredit 
instruction or experimental projects in this period. 
Special conferences may be scheduled and field trips 
may be arranged at the discretion of individual mem- 
bers of the faculty. Libraries, the Center for Foreign 
Languages and Cultures, practice rooms and physical 
education facilities will remain open at the discretion 
of the departments concerned. This period also provides 
time for work in libraries, museums and laboratories at 
locations other than Smith College. 

College Credit Earned Before 
Matriculation 

Smith College will accept college credit with a grade 
of B- or better earned at an accredited college or 
university before matriculation as a first-year student. 
Such credit must be approved according to Smith Col- 



lege guidelines for transfer credit and submitted on an 
official college or university transcript. Such credits 
must be taken on the college or university campus with 
matriculated degree students and must be taught by a 
college or university professor. The course may not be 
listed on the high school transcript as counting toward 
high school graduation. Note that the restriction of 32 
credits holds for any combination of AP and/or col- 
lege credit earned before matriculation. Credits earned 
before matriculation may be used in the same manner 
as AP credits toward the Smith degree and may not be 
used to fulfill the distribution requirements for Latin 
Honors. Summer credits earned before matriculation 
will be counted in the 12-credit limit of summer credit 
applicable to the Smith degree. 

Advanced Placement 

Smith College participates in the Advanced Placement 
Program administered by the College Entrance Ex- 
amination Board. Advanced Placement credit may be 
used with the approval of the administrative board only 
(1) to make up a shortage of credits incurred through 
failure; (2) to make up a shortage of credit incurred as 
a result of dropping a course for reasons of health; or 
(3) to undertake an accelerated course program. 

Credits are recorded for scores of 4 or 5 on most 
Advanced Placement examinations. The credits to be 
recorded for each examination are determined by the 
individual department. A maximum of one year (32 
credits) of Advanced Placement credit may be counted 
toward the degree. Students entering with 24 or more 
Advanced Placement credits may apply for advanced 
standing after completion of the first semester's work. 

Students who complete courses that cover substan- 
tially the same material as those for which Advanced 
Placement credit is recorded may not then apply that 
Advanced Placement credit toward the degree require- 
ments. The individual departments will determine what 
courses cover the same material. 

The individual departments will determine place- 
ment in or exemption from Smith courses and the use 
of Advanced Placement credit to fulfill major require- 
ments. No more than eight credits will be granted 
toward the major in any one department. 

Advanced Placement credit may be used to count 
toward the 64 credits outside the major department or 
program but may not be used to fulfill the distribution 
requirements for Latin Honors. 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



SI 



International Baccalaureate and 
Other Diploma Programs 

Credit may be awarded for the International Baccalau- 
reate and 13th year programs outside the United States. 
The amount of credit is determined by the registrar 
upon review of the final results. Such credits may be 
used toward the Smith degree in the same manner as 
AP credits and may not be used to fulfill the distribu- 
tion requirements for Latin Honors. 

Academic Standing 

A student is in good academic standing as long as 
she is matriculated at Smith and is considered by the 
administrative board to be making satisf actor)' progress 
toward the degree. The academic standing of all stu- 
dents is reviewed at the end of each semester. 

Academic Probation 

A student whose academic record is below 2.0, either 
cumulatively or in a given semester, will be placed 
on academic probation for the subsequent semester. 
Probationary status is a warning. Notification of 
probationary status is made in writing to the student, 
her family and her academic adviser. Instructors of a 
student on probation may be asked to make academic 
reports to the class deans' offices during the period 
of probation. The administrative board will review a 
students record at the end of the following semester to 
determine what action is appropriate. The administra- 
tive board may require such a student to change her 
course program, to complete summer study or to with- 
draw from the college. 

In general, a student on probation is advised to take 
no more than 16 credits. She may not enroll in courses 
through the Five College interchange, and may not run 
for or hold elected or selected office, either campuswide 
or within her house. Students whose grade point average 
is below 2.0 may not compete in intercollegiate athletics 
or club sports. 

Standards for Satisfactory Progress 

A student is not making satisfactory progress toward 
the degree if she remains on academic probation for 
more than two consecutive semesters. In addition: (1) 
for students of traditional age, the record cannot have 
more than an eight-credit shortage for more than two 



consecutive semesters. (2) for Ada Comstock Scholars, 
at least 75 percent of all credits attempted in am aca 
demic year must be completed satisfactorily. Students 
not meeting this criterion may be placed on academic 
probation or required to withdraw; if students are re- 
ceiving financial aid. they will be placed on financial 
aid probation and may become ineligible for financial 
aid if the probationary period exceeds one year. Fur- 
ther information is available from the Dean of Ada 
Comstock Scholars and the Office of Student Financial 
Services. 

Absence from Classes 

A student who is absent from classes for more than 
four weeks in any semester will not receive credit for 
the work of that semester and will be administratively 
withdrawn from the college. 

Separation from the College 

A student whose college work or conduct is deemed 
unsatisfactory is subject to separation from the college 
by action of the administrative board, the honor board, 
the college judicial board or the dean of the college. 
There will be no refund for tuition or room fees. 

Administrative Board 

The administrative board administers the academic 
requirements defined by faculty legislation. In general, 
academic matters affecting students are referred to this 
board for action or recommendation. The board con- 
sists of the dean of the college (chair), the class deans, 
the dean of the Ada Comstock Scholars, the registrar 
and three faculty members appointed by the president. 

Petitions for exceptions to academic regulations 
are submitted in writing to the administrative board 
through the class dean, with appropriate faculty ap- 
provals. The administrative board will reconsider a 
decision only if new information is presented. 

The board has the authority to take action with 
respect to the academic performance of individual 
students, including the requirement that a student 
must leave the college. 

Student Academic Grievances 

The Smith College community has always been dedi- 
cated to the advancement of learning and the pursuit 
of truth under conditions of freedom, trust, mutual 



S2 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



respect and individual integrity. The learning experi- 
ence at Smith is rooted in the free exchange of ideas 
and concerns between faculty members and students. 
Students have the right to expect fair treatment and 
to be protected against any inappropriate exercise of 
faculty authority. Similarly, instructors have the right to 
expect that their rights and judgments will be respected 
by students and other faculty members. 

When differences of opinion or misunderstand- 
ing about what constitutes fairness in requirements 
or procedures leads to conflict, it is hoped that these 
differences will be resolved directly by the individuals 
involved. When disputes cannot be resolved informally 
by the parties involved, procedures have been estab- 
lished to achieve formal resolution. These procedures 
are explained in detail in the Smith College Handbook 
(www.smith.edu/sao/handbook) . 

The Age of Majority 

Under Massachusetts law, the age of majority is 18 and 
carries full adult rights and responsibilities. The college 
normally communicates directly with students in mat- 
ters concerning grades, academic credit and standing. 

However, the regulations of the federal Family Edu- 
cational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 make clear that 
information from the educational records of students 
who are dependents of their parents for Internal Rev- 
enue Service purposes, may be disclosed to the parents 
without the student's prior consent. It is the policy of 
the college to notify both the student and her parents 
in writing of probationary status, dismissal and certain 
academic warnings. Any student who is not a depen- 
dent of her parents, as defined by the Internal Revenue 
Code, must notify the registrar of the college in writing, 
with supporting evidence satisfactory to the college, by 
October 1 of each academic year. 

In communications with parents concerning other 
matters, it is normally college policy to respect the 
privacy of the student and not to disclose information 
from student educational records without the prior 
consent of the student. At the request of the student, 
such information will be provided to parents and 
guardians. Students may authorize the release of in- 
formation from their education records to their parents 
by completing the appropriate form at the registrar's 
office. 



Leaves, Withdrawal and 
Readmission 

Off-Campus Study or Personal Leaves 

A student who wishes to be away from the college for 
a semester or academic year must submit a request 
for approved off-campus study or personal leave. The 
request must be filed with the student's class dean by 
May 1 for a fall semester or academic year absence; by 
December 1 for a second semester absence. Students in 
good academic standing who miss these deadlines and 
need to be away from campus for a semester or year 
may request a late leave through their class dean. A 
student who wants to be away from the college for more 
than one year must withdraw. 

A student going on a Smith College Junior Year 
Abroad program or other approved study abroad pro- 
gram must file a request for approved off-campus study 
by the appropriate deadline. 

A student who wishes to complete part or all of her 
senior year away from campus on a Smith or non- 
Smith program or at another undergraduate institution 
must petition the administrative board. The petition 
must include a plan for the satisfactory completion of 
the major and degree requirements, and must have the 
approval of the department of the major. The petition 
must be filed in the Office of the Class Deans by the 
deadline to request approval of off-campus study. 

A student who expects to attend another college 
and request transfer credit on her return must abide 
by published guidelines (available in the class deans 
office) for transferring credit. A student may request 
provisional approval of transfer credit through the class 
deans' office. For final evaluation of credit, an official 
transcript must be sent directly from the other institu- 
tion to the registrar at Smith College. 

A student on approved off-campus study or personal 
leave is expected to adhere to the policies regarding 
such absences (available in the class dean's office). 
A student's account must be in good standing or the 
request will not be approved. 

Medical Leave 

If a student leaves the college on the advice of health 
services, confirmation will be sent to the student and 
her family by the registrar. Any student who leaves the 



Academic Rules and Procedures 



53 



college for medical reasons is considered withdrawn 
and must request readmission through the registrar. 
The director of health services (or the associate direc- 
tor when specified) will request a full report from the 
students health care provider and may also request 
documentation of improved functioning and a per- 
sonal interview. Clearance by health services does not 
automatically guarantee readmission. The administra- 
tive board, which makes the final decision on readmis- 
sion. will also consider the student's college record in 
the readmission process. 

Short-Term Medical Leave 

A student who is away from campus for an extended pe- 
riod of time (i.e., a week or more) for medical reasons 
may be placed on a short-term medical leave by health 
services. Instructors will be notified of the student's 
status by the class deans office. 

Any student who is placed on short-term medical 
leave, whether by health services or through her class 
dean, must receive clearance from health services be- 
fore returning to campus. Health services may require 
documentation from her health care provider before 
the student can return. The student must notify her 
class dean of her intention to return to classes. 



sent to the registrar before March 1; for readmission in 
January, before November 1. The administrative board 
acts upon all requests for readmission and may require 
that applicants meet with the class dean or director of 
Health Services before considering the request. Nor- 
mally, students who have withdrawn from the college 
must be withdrawn for at least one full semester. 

A student who was formerly enrolled as a tradition- 
al student may not return as an Ada Comstock Scholar 
unless she has been away from the college for at least 
five \ears. Any student who has been away from Smith 
College for five or more years should make an appoint- 
ment to speak with the dean of Ada Comstock Scholars 
before applying for readmission. 



Mandatory Medical Leave 

The college physician or the director of the counseling 
service may require the withdrawal of a student who 
has any illness or condition that might endanger or 
be damaging to the health or welfare of herself or any 
member of the college community, or whose illness or 
condition is such that it cannot be effectively treated or 
managed while the student is a member of the college 
communitv. 



Withdrawal and Readmission 

A student who plans to withdraw from the college 
should notify her class dean. When notice of with- 
drawal for the coming semester is given before June 30 
or December 1, the student's general deposit ($100) is 
refunded. Official confirmation of the withdrawal will 
be sent to the student by the registrar. 

A withdrawn student must submit a request for 
readmission to the registrar. Readmission procedures 
and forms are available at the registrar's office Web site. 
Readmission requests for return in September must be 



54 



Graduate and Special Programs 



Smith College offers men and women gradu- 
ate work leading to the degrees of master 
of arts in teaching, master of fine arts, 
master of education of the deaf and master 
of science. In addition, master of arts and 
doctoral programs are offered in the School for Social 
Work. In special one-year programs, international 
students may qualify for a certificate of graduate stud- 
ies or a diploma in American studies. 

Each year more than 100 men and women pursue 
such advanced work. Smith College is noted for its su- 
perb facilities, bucolic setting and distinguished faculty 
who are recognized for their scholarship and interest 
in teaching. Moreover, graduate students can expect to 
participate in small classes and receive personalized 
attention from instructors. 

Most graduate courses, which are designated as 
500-level courses in the course listings, are planned for 
graduate students who are degree candidates. The de- 
partments offering this work present a limited number 
of graduate seminars, advanced experimental work or 
special studies designed for graduate students. Gradu- 
ate students may take advanced undergraduate courses, 
subject to the availability and according to the provi- 
sions stated in the paragraphs describing the require- 
ments for the graduate degrees. Departmental graduate 
advisers help graduate students individually to devise 
appropriate programs of study. 



Admission 



To enter a graduate degree program, a student must 
have a bachelor's degree or its equivalent, an under- 
graduate record of high caliber and acceptance by the 
department concerned. All domestic applicants who 
wish to be considered for financial aid must submit 
all required application materials before January 15 
of the proposed year of entry into the program, and all 
financial aid forms before February 15 (refer to Finan- 
cial Aid, page 58). The deadline for admission without 
financial aid to most graduate programs is April 1 of 



the proposed year of entry for the first semester, and 
November 1 for the second semester. (For the master 
of fine arts in dance, the only deadline is January 15.) 
All international applications for a master's degree or 
for the Diploma in American Studies Program must be 
received on or before January 15 of the proposed year of 
entry into the program. 

Applicants must submit the following: the formal 
application, the application fee ($60), an official 
transcript of the undergraduate record, letters of 
recommendation from instructors at the undergradu- 
ate institution and scores from the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE). For the master of arts in teaching 
elementary education and the master of education of 
the deaf (M.E.D.) only, the Miller Analogies Test is an 
acceptable alternative to the GRE. Applicants from non- 
English-speaking countries must submit official results 
of the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). 
Applicants from English-speaking countries must 
submit the Graduate Record Examination. Candidates 
must also submit a paper written in an advanced 
undergraduate course, except for MFA playwriting can- 
didates, who must also submit one or more full-length 
scripts or their equivalent. Address correspondence and 
questions to the address below. 

Smith College is committed to maintaining a di- 
verse community in an atmosphere of mutual respect 
and appreciation of differences. 

Residence Requirements 

Students who are registered for a graduate degree 
program at Smith College are considered to be in resi- 
dence. A full-time graduate student takes a minimum 
course program of 12 credits per semester. A half-time 
student takes a minimum course program of eight 
credits per semester. With the approval of his or her ac- 
ademic adviser and the director of graduate programs, 
a student may take a maximum of 12 credits for degree 
credit at Amherst, Hampshire or Mount Holyoke col- 
leges or the University of Massachusetts. No more than 



Graduate and Special Programs, College Hall 307, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 
Telephone: (413) 585-3050 E-mail: gradstdy@smith.edu 



Graduate and Special Programs 



ss 



two courses (eight credits) will be accepted in transfer 
from outside of the Five Colleges. We strongly recom- 
mend that work for advanced degrees be continuous; if 
it is interrupted or undertaken on a part-time basis, an 
extended period is permitted, but all work for a master's 
degree normally must be completed within a period of 
four years. Exceptions to this policy will be considered 
by petition to the Administrative Board. During this 
period a continuation fee of $60 will be charged for 
each semester during which a student is not enrolled at 
Smith College in course work toward the degree. 

Leaves of Absence 

A student who wishes to be away from the college for 
a semester or academic year for personal reasons may 
request a leave of absence. The request must be filed 
with the director of graduate programs by May 1 for a 
fall semester or academic-year leave; by December 1 for 
a second-semester leave. No leaves of absence will be 
approved after May 1 for the following fall semester or 
academic year and December 1 for the spring semester, 
and the student must withdraw from the college. 

A leave of absence may not be extended beyond one 
full academic year, and a student who wants to be away 
from the college for more than one year must withdraw. 

A student on a leave of absence is expected to ad- 
here to the policies regarding such leaves. A student's 
tuition account must be in good standing or the leave 
of absence will be canceled. 

Degree Programs 

For all degree programs, all work to be counted toward 
the degree (including the thesis), must receive a grade 
of at least B-, but the degree will not be awarded to a 
student who has no grade above this minimum. Cours- 
es for graduate credit may not be taken on a satisfac- 
tory/unsatisfactory basis. The requirements described 
below are minimal. Any department may set additional 
or special requirements and thereby increase the total 
number of courses involved. 

Master of Science in Biological 
Sciences 

The Department of Biological Sciences maintains an 
active graduate program leading to the master of sci- 
ence in biological sciences. The program of study em- 



phasizes independent research supported by advanced 
course work. Candidates are expected to demonstrate a 
strong background in the life sciences and a clear com- 
mitment to independent laboratory, field and/or theo- 
retical research. The department offers opportunities 
for original work in a wide variety of fields, including 
animal behavior, biochemistry, cell and developmental 
biology, ecology, environmental science, evolutionary 
biology; genetics, marine biology, microbiology, mo- 
lecular biology, neurobiology, plant sciences and physi- 
ology. Students pursuing the M.S. degree are required 
to participate in the Graduate Seminar (BIO 507) and 
are expected to undertake a course of study, designed in 
conjunction with their adviser, that will include appro- 
priate courses both within and outside the department 
A thesis is also required of each candidate for this 
degree. It may be limited in scope but must dem- 
onstrate scholarly competence; it is equivalent to a 
two-semester, eight-credit course. TVvo copies must be 
presented to the committee for deposit in the library: 
The thesis may be completed in absentia only by spe- 
cial permission of the department and of the director of 
graduate programs. 

Master of Science in Exercise and 
Sport Studies 

The graduate program in exercise and sport studies 
focuses on preparing coaches for women's intercol- 
legiate teams. The curriculum blends theory courses 
in exercise and sport studies with hands-on coaching 
experience at the college level. By design, the pro- 
gram is a small one, with only 12 to 16 candidates in 
residence. This makes it possible for students to work 
independently with faculty and coaches. Smith has a 
history of excellence in academics and a wide-ranging 
intercollegiate program composed of 14 varsity sports. 
Entrance into the two-year program requires a strong 
undergraduate record and playing and/or coaching 
experience in the sport in which a student will be 
coaching. Individuals who do not have undergraduate 
courses in exercise physiology 7 and kinesiology should 
anticipate work beyond the normal 48 credits. For more 
infonnation, contact Michelle Finley, Department of 
Exercise and Sport Studies, Smith College, Northamp- 
ton, MA 01063, (413) 585-3971; e-mail: mfinley® 
smith.edu; www.smith.edu/ess. 



56 



Graduate and Special Programs 



Master of Arts in Teaching 

The program leading to the degree of master of arts in 
teaching is designed for students who are planning to 
teach in elementary, middle or high schools and those 
wishing to do advanced study in the field of education. 
The M.A.T. program combines study in the field of the 
student's academic interest; the specific teaching field 
for students preparing to teach at the secondary or 
middle school levels, broader liberal arts and sciences 
subjects for students preparing to teach at the elemen- 
tary level; with experience in teaching and the study 
of education theory. The departments of biological 
sciences, chemistry, English, French, geology, history, 
mathematics, physics and Spanish actively cooperate 
with the Department of Education and Child Study in 
administering the various graduate programs. 

The Department of Education and Child Study uses 
a variety of schools and settings to provide opportuni- 
ties for observation, service learning and classroom 
teaching experiences. These include the laboratory 
elementary school operated by the college, the public 
schools of Northampton and other area communities, 
as well as several private schools. 

Students who follow the Master of Arts in Teaching 
program will, in the course of an intensive five-week 
summer session and a full-time academic year, be able 
to complete the state-approved program in teacher 
education enabling them to meet requirements for 
licensure in various states. 

Admission prerequisites and course requirements 
vary depending upon the specific program; more de- 
tailed information may be obtained from the director of 
graduate programs. 

Prospective candidates should have a superior 
undergraduate record and should present evidence 
of personal qualifications for effective teaching. 
Those interested in the MAT in secondary or middle 
school teaching should also possess an appropriate 
concentration — normally a major — in the subject of 
the teaching field. Applicants are asked to submit scores 
for the Graduate Record Examination. (The Miller 
Analogies Test is an acceptable substitute for applicants 
applying to the elementary school program.) All appli- 
cants should submit a paper or other piece of work that 
is illustrative of their writing. Applicants with teaching 
experience should include a letter of recommendation 
concerning their teaching. 



To qualify for a degree, the candidate must obtain 
a grade of B- or better in all courses or seminars, 
although a grade of C in one 4-credit course may be 
permitted on departmental recommendation. Courses 
for graduate credit may not be taken on a satisfactory/ 
unsatisfactory basis. 

Master of Education of the Deaf 

The Clarke School for the Deaf, in Northampton, and 
Smith College offer a cooperative program of study 
(one academic year and one summer) leading to the 
degree of master of education of the deaf. Rolling 
admissions for this program for entry in summer 2009 
will begin after December 1, although applications will 
be accepted as late as April 1 of that year. Further infor- 
mation can be found at www.clarkeschool.org/content/ 
professional. 

Master of Fine Arts in Dance 

The Department of Dance offers a two-year program 
of specialized training for candidates who have strong 
ability and interest in pursuing dance at the graduate 
level. Choreography and performance are the focus 
of the program with additional work in production, 
study of history and literature of dance, and scientific 
principles applied to the teaching and performance 
of dance. All MFA students are also Teaching Fellows 
and teach the equivalent of three studio courses at the 
undergraduate level each year. To count toward the 
degree, all work must earn a grade of at least B-, but 
the degree will not be awarded to a student who has no 
grade above this minimum. The thesis requires a pub- 
lic presentation of original choreography along with 
supporting production elements and a paper in suppot 
of the work. 

Interested students may consult the Department of 
Dance, Berenson Studio, Smith College, Northampton, 
Massachusetts 01063; phone (413) 585-3232. 

Master of Fine Arts in Playwriting 

This program, offered by the Department of Theatre, 
provides specialized training to candidates who have 
given evidence of professional promise in playwriting. 
The Department of Theatre places great emphasis on 
collaborative work among designers, performers, direc- 
tors and writers, thus offering a unique opportunity for 



Graduate and Special Programs 



57 



playwrights to have their work nurtured and supported 
by others who work with it at various levels. 

Sixty-four credit hours, including a thesis, and two 
years of residence are required. In a two-year sequence, 
a student would have eight required courses in direct- 
ing, advanced playwriting and dramatic literature 
and a total of eight electives at the 500 level or above, 
with the recommendation that half he In dramatic 
literature. Klectives may be chosen from acting, direct- 
ing and design/tech courses and from courses outside 
the department and within the Five Colleges. To count 
toward the degree, all work must receive a grade of at 
least B-, but the degree will not be awarded to a stu- 
dent who has no grade above this minimum. 

Interested students may consult the graduate ad- 
viser, Leonard Berkman, Department of Theatre, Smith 
College, Northampton, MA 01063; (413) 585-3206; 
e-mail: lberkman@smith.edu. 

Cooperative Ph.D. Program 

A cooperative doctoral program is offered by Amherst, 
Hampshire, Mount Holyoke and Smith colleges and the 
University of Massachusetts in the fields of astronomy, 
biological sciences, chemistry, geology, history and 
physics. The degree is awarded by the university in 
cooperation with the institution in which the student 
has done the research for the dissertation. Students in- 
terested in this program should write to the dean of the 
graduate school, University- of Massachusetts, Amherst, 
Massachusetts 01003, (413) 545-0721. 

Master/Ph.D. of Social Work 

The School for Social Work offers a master of social 
work (M.S.W.) degree, which focuses on clinical social 
work and puts a heavy emphasis on direct field work 
practice. The program stresses the integration of clini- 
cal theory and practice with an understanding of the 
social contexts in which people live. It also emphasizes 
an understanding of the social policies and organiza- 
tional structure which influence our service delivery 
system. In addition, the school offers a Ph.D. program 
designed to prepare MSWs for leadership positions in 
clinical research education and practice. It also has ex- 
tensive postgraduate offerings through its Continuing 
Education Program. For more information on admis- 
sion or program detail, call the School for Social Work 
Office of Admission at (413) 585-7960 ore-mail at 
sswadmis@smith.edu. Information can also be found 
at the schools Web site at www.smith.edu/ssw. 



Nondegree Studies 

Certificate of Graduate Studies 

Under special circumstances we may award the Certifi- 
cate of Graduate Studies to international students who 
have received undergraduate training in an institution 
of recognized standing and who have satisfactorily 
completed a year's program of study under the direc- 
tion of a committee on graduate study. This program 
must include at least 24 credits completed with a grade 
of B- or better. At least five of these courses should be 
above the intermediate level. 

Diploma in American Studies 

This is a highly competitive one-year program open 
only to international students of advanced undergradu- 
ate or graduate standing. It is designed primarily, 
although not exclusively, for those who are teaching 
or who plan to teach some aspect of American culture 
and institutions. Candidates should have a bachelor's 
degree or at least four years of university-level work or 
the equivalent in an approved foreign institution of 
higher learning, and must furnish satisfactory evidence 
of master}' of spoken and written English. The closing 
date for application is January 15. 

The program consists of a minimum of 24 credits: 
American Studies 555 (a special seminar for diploma 
students), 16 other credits in American studies or in 
one or more of the cooperating disciplines, including 
American Studies 570, the diploma thesis or an ap- 
proved equivalent. A cumulative grade average of B in 
course work must be maintained. 

Post-Baccalaureate Program: The 
Center for Women in Mathematics at 
Smith College 

Supported by NSF Grant 0611020 and Smith College 

The Center for Women in Mathematics is a place for 
women to get intensive training in mathematics at the 
advanced undergraduate level. It is an opportunity to 
do math in a community that is fun. friendly and seri- 
ous about mathematics. The experience should also 
help build the skills and confidence needed to continue 
to graduate school in the mathematical sciences. The 
Post-Baccalaureate Program is for women with bach- 
elor's degrees who did not major in mathematics or 
whose mathematics major was light 



58 



Graduate and Special Programs 



This program is designed to improve students' 
preparation and motivation to help them determine 
if they want to continue to graduate school in the 
mathematical sciences. Students take at least three 
math courses each semester. They have the opportunity 
to join a research team, working on a project with a 
Smith faculty member. There are seminars on applying 
to graduate school and taking the GREs to supplement 
individual mentoring. The program is competitive 
but open to all women who have graduated from col- 
lege with some course work in mathematics above the 
level of calculus and an interest in pursuing it further. 
Full tuition and a living stipend is available to U.S. 
citizens and permanent residents who are admitted to 
the program. 

The program consists of a minimum of 24 credits 
in mathematics. Each student must pass or place out of 
at least one course in algebra, one in analysis and one 
at the level of 310 or higher. Only grades of B- or better 
are counted. A student completing these requirements 
will earn a Certificate of Completion. A student failing 
to make satisfactory progress in one semester will not 
be funded for a second semester. 

Applications & Contact Information 
For more information, or to request application materi- 
als, please contact Ruth Haas, Department of Math- 
ematics and Statistics, Smith College, Northampton, 
MA 01063, telephone: (413) 585-3872, e-mail: math- 
chair@email.smith.edu 

Financial Aid 

Post-baccalaureate students (American citizens or 
permanent residents) are eligible for a fellowship 
which includes full tuition and a stipend of $12,500 for 
the academic year. 

To apply 

All applicants should include letters of recommenda- 
tion from at least two mathematics professors, and a 
personal statement that describes how this program fits 
with the applicant's background and goals. Applicants 
for the post-baccalaureate program should have taken 
at least one course beyond the level of calculus. 

Applications are reviewed on a rolling basis. The 
preferred deadline for January entrance is October 
15, but applications are accepted through December 
15. For September entrance, the preferred deadline is 
March 15, but applications are accepted through July 
1. Students applying for financial aid are encouraged 
to apply by the preferred deadlines as funds are limited. 



Applications are processed through the Office of Gradu- 
ate and Special Programs. 

Nondegree Students 

Well-qualified students who wish to take courses are 
required to file a nondegree student application along 
with an official undergraduate transcript showing their 
degree and date awarded. Applications can be obtained 
from the Graduate and Special Programs office. The 
application deadline is August 1 for the fall semester 
and December 1 for the spring semester. TUition must 
be paid in full before a nondegree student is allowed 
to register. The permission of each course instructor is 
necessary- at the time of registration, during the first 
week of classes each semester. Nondegree students are 
admitted and registered for only one semester and are 
not eligible for financial aid. Those wishing to take 
courses in subsequent semesters must reactivate their 
application each semester by the above deadlines. 

Students who later wish to change their status to 
that of a part-time or full-time student working for a 
degree must apply for admission as a degree candidate. 
Credit for Smith course work taken as a nondegree 
student may count toward the degree with the approval 
of the department concerned. 

Housing and Health Services 

Housing 

A very limited amount of graduate student housing is 
available on campus. Smith offers a cooperative gradu- 
ate house with single bedrooms, large kitchen and no 
private bathrooms. Included is a room furnished with a 
bed, chest of drawers, mirror, desk and easy chair. Stu- 
dents provide their own board. For further details, send 
e-mail to gradstdy@email.smith.edu. 

For individuals wishing to check the local rental 
market, go to www.gazettenet.com/classifieds to find 
"Real Estate for Rent" andwww.cshrc.org. It is advis- 
able to begin looking for housing as soon as you have 
decided to enroll. 

Health Services 

Graduate students, both full-time and part-time, are 
eligible to use Smith's health services and to participate 
in the Smith College health insurance program (see 
pp. 22 and 23 for complete information). 



Graduate and Special Programs 



59 



Finances 

Tuition and Other Fees 

Application fee $60 

Full tuition, for the year $35,810 

16 credits or more per semester 
Part-time tuition 

Fee per credit $1,120 

Summer Intern Teaching Program tuition for 

degree candidates $2,500 

Continuation fee, per semester $60 

Room only for the academic year $6,030 

Health insurance estimate 

(if coverage will begin August IS) $2,054 

(if coverage will begin June 15) $2,301 

For additional information concerning fees for 
practical music and studio art see p. 35. 

Statements for semester fees are mailed in July and 
December from the Office of Student Financial Services. 
Payment of charges for the first semester is due in early 
August and for the second semester in early January. 

Deposit 

A general deposit of $100 is required from each student 
upon admittance. This is a one-time deposit that will 
be refunded in October, or approximately six months 
following the student's last date of attendance, after 
deducting any unpaid charges or fees, provided that the 
graduate director has been notified in writing before 
July 1 that a student will withdraw for first semester or 
before December 1 for second semester. The deposit is 
not refunded if the student is separated from the college 
for work or conduct deemed unsatisfactory. It is not 
refunded for new students in the case of withdrawal 
before entrance. 

Refunds 

Please refer to page 35 and 36 for full information on 
refunds. 



Financial Assistance 

Financial assistance for graduate students at Smith 
1 College consists of fellowships, tuition scholarships, 
and federal loans. Students interested in applying for 



an) type of financial aid should read this section care- 
fully in its entirety; required materials and deadlines 
for application varj with the type of financial assistance 
requested. 

All applicants for financial assistance (fellowships, 
scholarships) must complete their applications for 
admission by January 15 (new applicants). Applicants 
interested in federal student loans must complete an 
application for financial assistance by February 15, 
including all supplementary materials (required of 
both returning students and new applicants). 

Fellowships 

Teaching Fellowships: Teaching fellowships are avail- 
able in the departments of biological sciences, educa- 
tion and child study, exercise and sport studies and 
dance. For the academic year 2008-09, the stipend for 
full teaching fellows is $1 1,910 for a first-year fellow 
and $12,450 for a second-year fellow. Teaching fellows 
also receive assistance to reduce or eliminate tuition 
expenses. 

Research Fellowships: Research fellowships are 
granted for work in various science departments as 
funds become available; stipends vary in accordance 
with the nature and length of the appointment. During 
the academic year, the research fellow usually carries a 
half-time graduate program. 

The teaching and research fellowships are of particular 
value to students who are interested in further study 
or research, since they combine fellowship aid with 
practical experience and an opportunity to gain com- 
petence in a special field of study. In accepting one of 
these appointments, the student agrees to remain for 
its duration. 

The number of fellowships is limited, and all ap- 
plicants are strongly urged also to apply for tuition 
scholarships and loans, as described below. 

Scholarships 

The college offers a number of tuition scholarships for 
graduate study. Amounts vary according to circum- 
stances and funds available. Applicants for scholarships 
must meet the January 15 deadline for submitting all 
materials for the admission application. 



60 



Graduate and Special Programs 



Loans 

Loans are administered by Student Financial Services. 
Federal William D. Ford Direct Loans may be included 
in aid offered to graduate students on admission. Ap- 
plicants for loans must meet all federal guidelines and 
must agree to begin monthly payments on loans soon 
after completion of their work at Smith College. 

In addition, the application for financial assis- 
tance, with all materials described on that form, is due 
by February 15 for both new applicants and returning 
students. 

In an effort to encourage liberal arts graduates 
to enter the teaching professions, Smith College has 
instituted a forgivable loan program for M.A.T. candi- 
dates in the field of mathematics. Under this program, 
prospective students can apply for loans to meet tuition 
expenses not covered by scholarships. For each of the 
graduate's first three years of teaching, the college will 
forgive a portion of that loan up to a total of 65 percent. 

Applications for loans received by February 15 will 
be given top priority. The processing of later applica- 
tions will be delayed. 



Policy Regarding Completion 
of Required Course Work 

A graduate student who is unable to complete required 
course work on time must submit to the director of 
graduate programs a written request for an extension 
before the end of the semester in which the grade is due. 
The request should include the reason the extension is 
needed and a specific date by which the student proposes 
to complete the work. The instructor of the course should 
also submit a statement in support of the extension. If 
the extension is granted, the work must be completed by 
the date agreed on by the director, instructor and student. 
No extensions may exceed one calendar year from the 
time of initial enrollment in the course. The initiative in 
arranging for the completion of course work rests with 
the student. 



Changes in Course 
Registration 

During the first 10 class days (September in the first 
semester and February in the second semester), a stu- 
dent may drop or enter a course with the approval of 
the adviser. 

From the 1 1th through the 15th day of class, a 
student may enter a course with the permission of the 
instructor, the adviser and the director of graduate 
programs. 

After the 10th day of classes, a student may drop a 
course up to the end of the fifth week of the semester 
(October in the first semester and February in the sec- 
ond semester): 1) after consultation with the instructor; 
and 2) with the approval of the adviser and the director 
of graduate programs. 

Instructions and deadlines for registration in Five 
College courses are distributed by the registrar's office. 



61 



Courses of Study, 2008-09 



Key: Division I The Humanities 

Division 1 1 The Social Sciences and History 
Division III The Natural Sciences 

♦Currently includes Chinese (CHI), Japanese (JPN) and Korean (KOR) 



Academic 
Designation Division 



Interdepartmental Minor in African Studies 


AFS 


I/II 


Major and Minor in the Department of Afro-American Studies 


AAS 


I 


Interdepartmental Major in American Studies 


AMS 


II 


Interdepartmental Minor in Ancient Studies 


ANS 


I/II 


Majors and Minor in Anthropology 


ANT 


II 


Interdepartmental Minor in Archaeology 


ARC 


I/II 


Majors and Minors in the Department of Art 


ART 


I 


Minors: Architecture and Urbanism 


ARU 


I 


Art History 


ARH 


I 


Graphic Art 


ARG 


I 


Studio Art 


ARS 


I 


Major and Minor in the Five College Department of Astronomy 


AST 


III 


Interdepartmental Minor in Astrophysics 


APH 


III 


Interdepartmental Major in Biochemistry 


BCH 


III 


Major and Minor in the Department of Biological Sciences 


BIO 


III 


Major and Minor in the Department of Chemistry 


CHM 


III 


Majors and Minors in the Department of Classical Languages 






and Literatures 


CLS 


I 


Major: Classical Studies 


CST 


I 


Majors and Minors: Greek 


GRK 


I 


Latin 


LAT 


I 


Classics 


CLS 


I 


Interdepartmental Major in Comparative Literature 


CLT 


I 


Major and Minors in the Department of Computer Science 


CSC 


III 


Minors: Digital Art 


CDA 


III 


Digital Music 


CDM 


III 


Systems Analysis 


CSA 


III 


Computer Science and Language 


CSL 


III 


Mathematical Foundations of Computer Science 


CSF 


III 


Major and Minor in the Five College Dance Department 


DAN 


I 


1 Major and Minor in the Department of East Asian Languages and 






Literatures* 


EAL 


I 


Major: East Asian Languages and Cultures 


EAC 




Minor: East Asian Languages and Literatures 






Interdepartmental Major and Minor in East Asian Studies 


EAS 


I/II 


Major and Minor in the Department of Economics 


ECO 


II 


! Major and Minor in the Department of Education and Child Study 


EDC 


II 


Major and Minor in the Department of Engineering 


EGR 


III 



62 



Major and Minor in the Department of English Language and 

Literature 
Interdepartmental Minor in Environmental Science and Policy 
Interdepartmental Minor in Ethics 
xMinor in the Department of Exercise and Sport Studies 
Interdepartmental Minor in Film Studies 
Major in the Department of French Studies 
First-Year Seminars 

Major and Minor in the Department of Geology 
Major and Minor in the Department of German Studies 
Major and Minor in the Department of Government 
Major and Minor in the Department of History 
Interdepartmental Minor in History of Science and Technology 
Interdepartmental Minor in International Relations 
Major and Minor in the Department of Italian Language and 

Literature 

Major: Italian Studies 
Interdepartmental Major and Minor in Jewish Studies 
Minor in Landscape Studies 
Interdepartmental Major and Minor in Latin American 

and Latino/a Studies 

Major: Latino/a Studies 
Interdepartmental Minor in Linguistics 
Interdepartmental Minor in Logic 
Interdepartmental Minor in Marine Science and Policy 
Major and Minor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics 
Interdepartmental Major and Minor in Medieval Studies 
Interdepartmental Minor in Middle East Studies 
Major and Minor in the Department of Music 
Interdepartmental Major and Minor in Neuroscience 
Major and Minor in the Department of Philosophy 
Major and Minor in the Department of Physics 
Interdepartmental Minor in Political Economy 
Presidential Seminars 

Major and Minor in the Department of Psychology 
Interdepartmental Minor in Public Policy 
Major and Minor in the Department of Religion 
Majors in the Department of Russian Language and Literature 

Majors: Russian Literature 
Russian Civilization 
Major and Minor in the Department of Sociology 
Majors and Minors in the Department of Spanish and 

Portuguese* 

Majors: Spanish 

Portuguese-Brazilian Studies 
Latin American Area Studies 

Minors: Spanish 

Portuguese-Brazilian Studies 
Latin American Area Studies 





Courses of Study 


ENG 


I 


EVS 


III 


ETH 


I/II/III 


ESS 


III 


FLS 


I/II 


FRN 


I 


FYS 


I/II/III 


GEO 


III 


GER 


I 


GOV 


II 


HST 


II 


HSC 


I/II/III 


IRL 


II 


ITL 


I 


ITS 


I 


JUD 


I/II 


LSS 


I 


LAS 


I/II 


LATS 


I/II 


LNG 


I/II/III 


LOG 


I/III 


MSC 


III 


MTH 


III 


MED 


I/II 


MES 




MUS 


I 


NSC 


III 


PHI 


I 


PHY 


III 


PEC 


II 


PRS 


I/II/III 


PSY 


III 


PPL 


Will 


REL 


I 


RUS 


I 


RUL 


I 


RUC 


I 


SOC 


II 


SPP 


I 


SPN 


I 


SPB 


I 


SLS 




SPN 


I 


SPB 


I 


SLS 





'Portuguese language courses are designated POR. 



Courses of Stuch 



63 



Interdepartmental Minor in Statistics 

Major and Minor in the Department of Theatre 

Interdepartmental Minor in Third World Development Studies 

Interdepartmental Minor in Urban Studies 

Interdepartmental Major and Minor in Study of Women and Gender 

Kxtradepartmental Course in Accounting 

Interdepartmental Courses in Philosophy and Psychology 

Other Extradepartmental Courses 

Other Interdepartmental Courses 

Five College Course Offerings by Five College Faculty 

Five College Film Studies Major 

Five College Certificate in African Studies 

Five College Asian/Pacific/American Certificate Program 

Five College Certificate in Buddhist Studies 

Five College Certificate in Coastal and Marine Sciences 

Five College Certificate in Cognitive Neuroscience 

Five College Certificate in Culture, Health and Science 

Five College Certificate in International Relations 

Five College Certificate in Latin American Studies 

Five College Certificate in Logic 

Five College Certificate in Middle East Studies 

Five College Certificate in Native American Indian Studies 

Five College Certificate in Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies 

Five College Self-Instructional Language Program 

Foreign Language Literature Courses in Translation 

Interterm Courses Offered for Credit 

Science Courses for Beginning Students 

American Ethnicities Courses 

Quantitative Courses for Beginning Students 



STS 


III 


THE 


I 


TWD 


I/I I 


1 RS 


I/I I 


SWG 


I/I I/I 1 1 


ACC 


II 


PPY 


I/I 1 1 


EDP 




IDP 




FLS 




AFC 




APA 




BDHC 




MSCC 




CNC 




CHS 




IRC 




LAC 




LOGC 




MEC 




NAIS 





SIL 



Deciphering Course Listings 



Course Numbering 

Courses are classified in six grades indicated by 
the first digit of the course number. In some cases, sub- 
categories are indicated by the second and third digits. 

100 level Introductory courses (open to all 
students) 

200 level Intennediate courses (may have 
prerequisites) 

300 level Advanced courses (have prerequisites) 

400 level Independent work — the last digit 
(with the exception of honors) 
represents the amount of credit 
assigned. Departments specif} the 
number of credits customarily 
assigned for Special Studies. 



400 


Special Studies (variable credit, 




as assigned) 


408d 


(full year, eight credits) 


410 


Internships (credits as assigned) 


420 


Independent Study (credits as assigned) 


430d 


Honors Thesis (full year, eight credits) 


431 


Honors Thesis (first semester only, eight 




credits) 


432d 


Honors Thesis (full year, 1 1 credits) 


500 level 


Graduate courses — for departments 




that offer graduate work, independent 




work is numbered as follows: 


580 


Special Studies 


590 


Thesis 


900 level 


Reserved for courses (e.g., music 




performance) that are identifiablv 




distinct from the other offerings of a 




department. 



64 



Courses of Study 



A "j" after the course number indicates a course 
offered for credit during Interterm, and a "d" or "y" 
indicates a full-year course in which credit is granted 
after two consecutive semesters. In "d" courses, the final 
grade assigned upon completion of the second semester 
is cumulative for the year. 

A course in which the spring semester is a continu- 
ation of the fall semester is given the next consecutive 
number and listed separately with the prerequisite 
indicated. 

Full-year courses are offered when it is not permis- 
sible for a student to receive credit for one semester 
only. 

Language courses are numbered to provide consis- 
tency among departments. 

• The introductory elementary course in each lan- 
guage is numbered 100. 

• The intensive course in each language is numbered 
1 10 or 1 1 1 and normally is a full-year course. 

• Intermediate language courses are numbered 120 
for low intermediate and 220 for high intermediate. 

Introductory science courses are numbered to pro- 
vide consistency among departments. 

• The introductory courses that serve as the basis for 
the major are numbered 1 1 1 (and 1 12 if they con- 
tinue into a second semester). "Fast track" courses 
are numbered 115 (and 116 when appropriate). 

• Courses at the introductory or intermediate level 
that do not count toward the major are numbered 
100-109 and 200-209. 

• Courses approved for listing in multiple depart- 
ments and programs are identified by the three-let- 
ter designation of the home department and are 
described fully in that department's course listings. 

Courses with Limited Enrollment 

Seminars are limited to 12 students and are open only to 
juniors, seniors and graduate students, by permission of 
the instructor. At the discretion of the instructor and with 
the approval of the department chair or the program 
director, 15 students may enroll. The designation that a 
course is a seminar appears in the title unless all semi- 
nars appear as a separate and clearly designated group 
in the department's course listing. The current topic, if 
applicable, immediately follows the title of the seminar. 



Colloquia, primarily reading and discussion 
courses with an enrollment limit of 20, are also clearly 
designated. 

Proseminars are directed courses of study con- 
ducted in the manner of a graduate seminar but open 
to undergraduate students. 

Instructors 

The symbols before an instructor's name in the list of 
members of a department indicate the following: 

* 1 absent fall semester 2008-09 

*2 absent fall semester 2009-10 

** 1 absent spring semester 2008-09 

**2 absent spring semester 2009-10 

f 1 absent academic year 2008-09 

t2 absent academic year 2009-10 

§ 1 director of a Junior Year Abroad Program, 
academic year 2008-09 

§2 director of a Junior Year Abroad Program, 
academic year 2009-10 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally 
appointed for a limited term. The phrase "to be an- 
nounced" refers to the instructor's name. 

Meeting Times 

Course meeting times are listed in the "Schedule 
of Classes" distributed by the registrar before 
each semester. Students may not elect more than one 
course in a time block (see chart inside back cover), 
except in rare cases that involve no conflict. Where 
scheduled hours are not given, the times of meeting are 
arranged by the instructor. 

Other Symbols and Abbreviations 
dem: demonstration course 



lab.: 


laboratory 


Lee: 


lecture 


sec: 


section 


dis.: 


discussion 



( ) : A department or college name in parentheses 
following the name of an instructor in a course 
listing indicates the instructor's usual affilia- 
tion. 



Courses of Stuck 



65 



(E): An "K "in parentheses at the end of a course 
description designates an experimental course 
approved by the Committee on Academic Pri- 
orities to be offered not more than twice. 

(C): The history department uses a "C" in parenthe- 
ses after the course number to designate collo- 
quia that are primarily reading and discussion 
courses limited to 20 students. 

(L): The history department uses an "L" in 
parentheses after the course number to 
designate lectures that are unrestricted in size. 
Lectures and colloquia are open to all students 
unless otherwise indicated. 

(MI): The anthropology department uses "MI" 
in parentheses after the course number to 
designate a course that is method intensive. 

(TI): The anthropology department uses TI" 
in parentheses after the course number to 
designate a course that is theory- intensive. 

L: The dance and theatre departments use an "L" 
to designate that enrollment is limited. 

P: The dance and theatre departments use a "P" 
to designate that permission of the instructor is 
required. 

Advanced Placement. See p. 50. 

Satisfactory/unsatisfactory. See p. 48. 

Writing intensive. Each first-year student is 
required, during her first or second semester 
at Smith, to complete at least one writing- 
intensive course. See page 8 for a more 
complete explanation. 

[ ] Courses in brackets will not be offered during 
the current vear. 



Course listings in this catalogue indicate in 
curly brackets which area(s) of knowledge a 
given course covers (see pp. 7-8 for a fuller 
explanation). Please note that certain courses 
do not indicate any designation as decided 
by the department, program or instructor 
involved, e.g., English 101. Students who 
wish to become eligible for Latin Honors at 
graduation must elect at least one course 
(normally four credits) in each of the seven 
major fields of knowledge; see page 7. (If a 
course is fewer than four credits but designated 
for Latin Honors, this will be indicated. This 
applies to those students who began at Smith 
in September 1994 or later and who graduated 
in 1998 or later.) Following is a listing of the 
major fields of knowledge as described on 
pages 7-8; multiple designations are separated 
byaslash, e.g..{L/H/F}: 



L 


Literature: 


H 


Historical studies 


S 


Social science 


N 


Natural science 


M 


Mathematics and analytic philosophy 


A 


The arts 


F 


A foreign language 



The course listings on pp. 67-446 are maintained by the Office of the Provost/Dean of the Faculty. 
For current information on courses offered at Smith, visit www.smith.edu/catalogue. 



66 




67 



African Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers and Members of the African Studies 
Committee: 

' j Elliot Fratkin, Professor of Anthropology 
Albert Mosley. Professor of Philosophy 
Katwiwa Mule, Associate Professor of Comparative 
Literature 



Catharine Newbury; Professor of Government 
David Newbury, Professor of African Studies and of 

History 
Gregory White, Professor of Government, Director 
Louis Wilson, Professor of Afro-American Studies 
Caroline Melly, Instructor in Anthropology 



300 Capstone Colloquium in African Studies 
This interdisciplinary Capstone Colloquium allows 
students to share their interests in Africa through prob- 
ing readings and vibrant discussions. Incorporating 
African studies faculty from across the Five Colleges, the 
course will explore both Western perceptions and lived 
experience in Africa through such themes as African 
Historiographies, Governance and Political Conflict, 
Development and Environmental Issues, Health and 
Society, African Literature and the Arts, and Youth 
and Popular Culture. Students will be asked to write 
frequent short papers summarizing the different disci- 
plinary approaches to the field. Prerequisites: at least 
three FC courses in African studies and junior/senior 
standing; or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 20. (E) 4 credits 
Dai id Newbury (History) 
Offered Spring 2009 at UMass with Mwangi wa 
Githinji 

Offered Spring 2010 at Smith College withjoye 
Bowman 

The African Studies Minor 

The African studies minor at Smith allows students to 
i complement their major with a program that provides 
a systematic introduction to the complex historical, 
political and social issues of the African continent. The 
minor is structured to give the student interdisciplinary 
training within key fields of knowledge: literature and 
the arts, social science, and historical studies. 



Requirements: Six semester courses on Africa are 
required. One course must be drawn from each of the 
following three fields: 

Arts and Literature 

Historical Studies 

Social Sciences 

No more than two courses from a student's major may 
be counted toward the minor. At the discretion of the 
adviser, equivalent courses at other colleges may be 
substituted for Five College courses. 

Language. Students interested in African studies are 
encouraged to study French or Portuguese. In addition, 
a student who has achieved intermediate level compe- 
tence in an African language may petition for this to 
count as one of the required courses in the field of arts, 
literature and humanities. 

Students with required language component may ap- 
ply for the Five College African Studies Certificate (see 
page 429). 

Study Abroad. Students are encouraged to spend a 
semester or more in Africa. Information on current 
programs may be obtained from the African studies di- 
rector and should be discussed with the minor adviser. 

Courses: 

AFS 300 Capstone Colloquium in African Studies 



68 African Studies 

Arts, Literature and Humanities 

ARH 130 Introduction to Art History: Africa, Oceania, 

and Indigenous Americas 
CLT 205 Twentieth-Century Literatures of Africa 
CLT 266 South African Literature and Film 
CLT 267 African Women's Drama 
CLT 271 Writing in Translation: Bilingualism in the 

Post Colonial Novel 
CLT 305 Studies in the Novel: The Modern African 

Novel — Texts and Issues 
CLT 3 1 5 The Feminist Novel in Africa 
DAN 377 Interpretation and Analysis of African 

Dance 
FYS 165 Childhood in the Literature of Africa and 

the African Diaspora 
MUS 220 Topics in World Music: African Popular 

Music 

Historical Studies 

AAS 218 History of Southern Africa (1600-1900) 

AAS 370 Seminar: Modern Southern Africa 

HST 101 Biography and History in Africa 

HST 256 Introduction to West African History 

HST 257 East Africa in the 19th and 20th Centuries 

HST 258 History of Central Africa 

Social Sciences 

AAS 202 Topics in Black Studies: Anthropology of the 
African Diaspora 

ANT 230 Africa: Population, Health and Environ- 
ment Issues 

ANT 27 1 Globalization and Transnationalism in 
Africa 

ANT 272 Women in Africa 

ANT 348 Seminar: Health in Africa 

ANT 2XX Women in Africa (pending CAP approval) 

ANT 2XX African Migrations (pending CAP approval) 

ECO 214 Economies of the Middle East and North 
Africa 

GOV 227 Contemporary African Politics 

GOV 232 Women and Politics in Africa 

GOV 233 Problems in Political Development 

GOV 32 1 Seminar: The Rwanda Genocide in Com- 
parative Perspective 

GOV 347 Seminar: North Africa in the International 
System 



69 



Afro-American Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

*' PaulaJ. Giddings, B.A. 

Andrea Hairston, M.A. (Theatre and Afro-American 

Studies) 
Louis E.Wilson, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

Kevin E. Quashie, Ph.D., Chair 



Assistant Professor 

n Daphne Lamothe, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Riche Barnes, M.A. 
Adrianne Andrews, Ph.D. 
Lynda J. Morgan 



111 Introduction to Black Culture 

An introduction to some of the major perspectives, 
themes and issues in the field of Afro-American studies. 
Our focus will be on the economic, social and political 
aspects of cultural production, and how these inform 
what it means to read, write about, view and listen to 
black culture. {8} 4 credits 
Kevin Quashie 
Offered Fall 2008 

112 Methods of Inquiry 

This course is designed to introduce students to the 
many methods of inquiry used for research in interdis- 
ciplinary fields such as Afro-American studies. Guided 
by a general research topic or theme, students will be 
exposed to different methods for asking questions and 
gathering evidence. {S} 4 credits 
Adrianne Andrews 
Offered Spring 2009 

113 ENG 184 Survey of Afro-American Literature: 1746 
to 1900 

An introduction to the themes, issues, and questions 
that shaped the literature of African Americans during 
its period of origin. Texts will include poetry, prose, and 
works of fiction. Writers include Harriet Jacobs, Frances 
Harper and Charles Chesnutt, Frederick Douglass, 
Phillis Wheatley. {L} 4 credits 
Daphne Lamothe 
Offered Spring 2009 



117 History of Afro-American People to 1960 

An examination of the broad contours of the history 
of the Afro-American in the United States from ca. 
1 600- 1960. Particular emphasis will be given to: how 
Africans influenced virtually every aspect of U.S. society; 
slavery and constitutional changes after 1865; the 
philosophies of W.E.B. DuBois, Booker T. Washington, 
Marcus Garvey; and the rise and fall of racial segrega- 
tion in the U.S. {H} 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Fall 2008 

202 Topics in Black Studies 

Segregation: Origins and Legacies 
This colloquium will explore the historical debates 
about the causes and timing of racial segregation, its 
effects on African Americans and social inequality, and 
its more resistant legacy in the 20th century, residential 
segregation. Violence against blacks, the use of gen- 
der to bolster segregation, biracial alliances and the 
onset of disfranchisement, the nationalist character of 
segregation, and black resistance to segregation will 
be prominent themes. Weekly readings will include 
primary and secondary works, documentary films and 
historical films. (E) {H} 4 credits 
Lynda], Morgan 
Offered Spring 2009 



70 



Afro-American Studies 



Death and Dying in Black Culture 
Using a cultural studies perspective, this course will 
look at the distinction between and representational 
meanings of death and dying in black culture. The 
course will explore how representations of death and 
dying manifest in various historical periods and cul- 
tural forms. It will also consider how gender, national- 
ism, sexuality, class and religion impact the discourse 
of death and dying. Finally and necessarily, we will 
consider death and dying's not-too-distant relatives: 
memory, agency, loss, love. {L/H} 4 credits 
Kevin Quashie 
Offered Spring 2009 

Anthropology of the African Diaspora 
This course covering an expansive global distance, his- 
torical period and intellectual tradition will be divided 
into two parts. The first half of the course will locate 
and define the African diaspora and will provide a bio- 
cultural, historical, political and economic overview of 
their descendants' origins and major movements. The 
second half of the course will explore how members of 
the African Diaspora negotiate identity, construct citi- 
zenship, and develop nation within the diaspora and in 
relation to Africa. African diaspora cultures considered 
may include those residing in North America (includ- 
ing the U.S., Mexico and Canada), Brazil, Cuba and 
parts of Europe. {S} 4 credits 
Riche Barnes 
Offered Spring 2009 

218 History of Southern Africa (1600 to about 1900) 

The history of Southern Africa, which includes a num- 
ber of states such as South Africa, Zimbabwe, Nambia, 
Angola and Lesotho, is very complex. In addition to 
developing a historical understanding of the Khoisan 
and Bantu-speaking peoples, students must also know 
the history of Europeans and Asians of the region. The 
focus of this course will therefore be to understand the 
historical, cultural and economic inter-relationships 
between various ethnic groups, cultures, and political 
forces that have evolved in Southern Africa since about 
1600. {H} 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Spring 2009 

243 Afro-American Autobiography 

From the publication of "slave narratives" in the 18th 
century to the present, African Americans have used 
first-person narratives to tell their personal story and 



to testify about the structures of social, political and 
economic inequality faced by black people. These au- 
tobiographical accounts provide rich portraits of indi- 
vidual experience at a specific time and place as well as 
insights into the larger sociohistorical context in which 
the authors lived. In addition to analyzing texts and 
their contexts, we will reflect on and document how our 
own life history is shaped by race. {L} 4 credits 
Riche Barnes 
Offered Fall 2008 

245/ENG 282 The Harlem Renaissance 

This course is a study of one of the first cohesive cultur- 
al movements in African-American history. It will focus 
on developments in politics and civil rights (NAACP, 
Urban League, UNIA), creative arts (poetry, prose, 
painting, sculpture) and urban sociology (modernity, 
the rise of cities). Writers and subjects will include 
Zora Neale Hurston, David Levering Lewis, Gloria Hull, 
Langston Hughes and Nella Larsen. Enrollment limited 
to 40. {L} 4 credits 
Daphne Lamothe 
Offered Fall 2008 

278 The '60s: A History of Afro-Americans in the 
United States from 1954 to 1970 

An interdisciplinary study of Afro-American history 
beginning with the Brown Decision in 1954. Particular 
attention will be given to the factors that contributed 
to the formative years of "Civil Rights Movements," 
black films and music of the era, the rise of "Black 
Nationalism," and the importance of Afro-Americans 
in the Vietnam War. Recommended background: survey 
course in Afro-American history, American history or 
Afro-American literature. Not open to first-year stu- 
dents. Prerequisite: 1 17 and/or 270, or permission of 
the instructor. Enrollment limited to 40. {H} 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Spring 2009 

PRS 305 Cultural Literacy 

This seminar investigates the interdisciplinary 7 knowl- 
edge and critical skills that we need in order to under- 
stand the cultures we inhabit. The heart of our work is 
to consider a selection of resonant artifacts and icons 
from U.S. cultural history 7 and learn, as a result, how 
shared social meanings are created, commodified and 
contested. Prerequisites: an introductory or methods 
course in AAS, AMS, SWG and/or coursework in any 
department focusing on race, gender and culture. En- 



Afro-American Studies 



71 



rollment limited to 15 juniors and seniors. (E) {H/L/S} 
4 credits 

Kevin Quasbie (Afro-, \merican Studies) and Susan 
Van Dyne (Study of Women and Gender) 
Offered Spring 2009 

366 Seminar: Contemporary Topics in Afro-American 
Studies 

Classic Black texts (Capstone Course) 
This seminar will study closely a dozen or so classic 
texts of the black canon. The intent here will be to 
look at each text in its specific historical context, in its 
entirety and in relation to various trajectories of black 
history and intellectual formation. Though this course 
will necessarily revisit some works that a student might 
have encountered previously, its design is intended to 
consider these works in a more complete context than 
is possible in survey courses. Authors might include 
W.E.B. DuBois, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Ralph 
Ellison, Alice Walker, Toni Morrison, Rita Dove, Patricia 
Hill Collins, bell hooks, Lorraine Hansberry, Malcolm X, 
Marlon Riggs and Audre Lorde. This seminar serves as 
the capstone course required for all majors including 
honors thesis students. {L} 4 credits 
Daphne Lamothe 
Offered Spring 2009 

Black Feminist Theories 

This course will examine historical, critical and theo- 
retical perspectives on the development of black femi- 
nist theory/praxis. The course will draw from the 19th 
century to the present but will focus on the contempo- 
rary black feminist intellectual tradition that achieved 
notoriety in the 1970s and initiated a global debate on 
"Western" and global feminisms. Central to our explo- 
ration will be the analysis of the intersection al relation- 
ship between theory and practice and between race, 
gender and class. We will conclude the course with the 
exploration of various expressions of contemporary 
black feminist thought around the globe as a way of 
broadening our knowledge of feminist theory. {L} 
4 credits 
Riche Barnes 
Offered Fall 2008 

Black Women, Work and Family 

Black women have always been in a precarious position 

as it pertains to work and family. They have been por- 



trayed as hard workers and "lazy" welfare queens. Thej 
have held the position of cold, callous mothers to their 
own children, and loving mamims to white children. 
They have been hyper-sexualized erotic Jezebels and 
domineering, unfeminine matriarchs. And when the 
work and family sociological literature seeks answers 
to the ways in which Americans balance the chal- 
lenges of work and family in the contemporary global 
economy, African American women and their families 
are invisible. This seminar will provide students with 
an analytic framework to understand the ways gender, 
race and class intersect in defining the world of work 
in our society and affect the available choices African 
American women have to best support their families. 
Utilizing ethnography, fiction, film and forms of popu- 
lar culture, we will explore policies that affect both the 
family and institutions of work, explore the ways that 
black men and women balance the demands of fam- 
ily, and pay particular attention to the development of 
gender roles and strategies that affect African American 
women's work and family decisions. {L/S} 4 credits 
Riche Barnes 
Offered Spring 2009 

370 Seminar: Modern Southern Africa 

In 1994 South Africa underwent a "peaceful revolu- 
tion" with the election of Nelson Mandela. This course 
is designed to study the historical events that led to this 
dramatic development in South Africa from 1948- 
2000. {H/S} 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Fall 2008 

400 Special Studies 

By permission of the department, for junior and senior 

majors. 1-4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

Additional Courses Related 
to Afro-American Studies 

As an interdisciplinary department, we encourage 
students to explore course opportunities in other de- 
partments and in the Five Colleges. Some examples 
are listed below. Students should check departmental 
entries to find out the year and semester particular 
courses are being offered. 



~1 



Afro-American Studies 



AMS 102 Race Matters 

ANT 232 Third World Politics: Anthropological 

Perspectives 
CLT 305 Studies in the Novel: The Making of the 

African Novel 
DAN 142 Comparative Caribbean Dance I 
DAN 375 The Anthropology of Dance 
ECO 230 Urban Economics 
ENG 120 Growing Up Caribbean* 
ENG 289 Trauma, Mourning and Memory in Black 

Literature* 
GOV 311 Seminar in Urban Politics 
HST 266 The Age of the American Civil War 
HST 267 The United States Since 1890 
HST 273 Contemporary America 
HST 275 Intellectual History of the United States 
MUS 206 Improvising History: The Development of 

Jazz* 
PHI 210 Issues in Recent and Contemporary 

Philosophy 
PHI 254 African Philosophy 
PSY 247 Psychology of the Black Experience* 
SOC 213 Ethnic Minorities in America* 
SOC 218 Urban Politics* 
THE 214 Black Theatre* 
THE 215 Minstrel Shows* 
*These courses are cross-listed with Afro-American 
Studies 



The Minor 



The Major 



Requirements for the Major 

Eleven four-credit courses as follows: 

1 . Three required courses: 111,112 and 1 17. 

2. General concentration: four 100- and 200-level 
courses at least one of which must have a primary 
focus on the African diaspora. Courses at the 300- 
level may also be used when appropriate. 

3. Advanced concentration: three courses organized 
thematically or by discipline. Of the three courses, at 
least one must be at the 300-level; and at least one 
must have a primary focus on the African diaspora. 

4. The designated capstone seminar in the junior or 
senior year. The course is required of all majors 
including honors thesis students. 



Requirements for the Minor 

Six four-credit courses as follows: 

1 . Two of the three required courses: 111,112,117. 

2. Four elective courses, at least one of which must 
be a seminar or a 300-level class; and at least one 
of which must have a primary focus on the African 
diaspora. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Louis Wilson 



Honors 

Director: Kevin Quashie 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered each Fall 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



American Ethnicities 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



73 



The following courses have been revised or added to 
the curriculum as a result of the American Ethnici- 
ties (Diversity) Seminar held in the summers of 2003 
and 2004. They represent a sampling of courses in the 
curriculum that focus on ethnic diversity in the United 
States. 

AAS 245 ENG 282 The Harlem Renaissance 
This course is a study of one of the first cohesive cultur- 
al movements in African-American history. It will focus 
on developments in politics and civil rights (NAACP, 
Urban League, UNIA), creative arts (poetry, prose, 
painting, sculpture) and urban sociology (modernity 
the rise of cities). Writers and subjects will include 
Zora Neale Hurston, David Levering Lewis, Gloria Hull, 
Langston Hughes and Nella Larsen. Enrollment limited 
to 40. {L} 4 credits 
Daphne Lamothe 
Offered Fall 2008 

ANT 240 Anthropology of Museums 
This course critically analyzes how the museum enter- 
prise operates as a social agent in both reflecting and 
infonning public culture. The relationship between the 
development of anthropology as a discipline and the 
collection of material culture from colonial subjects 
will be investigated and contemporary practices of 
self-representation explored. Topics include the art/ 
artifact debate, lynching photography, plantation 
museums, the formation of national and cultural 
identity, commodification, consumerism, repatriation, 
and contested ideas about authenticity and authority. 
The relationship of the museum to a diverse public 
with contested agendas will be explored through class 
exercises, guest speakers, a podcast student project, field 
trips and written assignments. Effective Spring 2008: 
Prerequisite: 130 or pemiission of the instructor (Th 
{S/H} 4 credits 
Not offered 2008-09 



ARH 101 Approaches to Visual Representation (C) 
Tofuc: Advertising and I Jsual Culture 

By analyzing advertisements — from ancient Pompeian 
shop signs and graffiti to contemporary multi-media 
appropriations — this course will seek to understand 
how images function in a wide array of different cul- 
tures. In developing a historical sense of visual literacy, 
we'll also explore the shifting parameters of "high" ail 
and "low" art, the significance of advertising in con- 
temporary art, and the structuring principles of visual 
communication. {H/A} 4 credits 
Not offered during 2008-09 

ARH 289/LAS202 Talking Back to Icons: Latino/a 
Artistic Expression 

This class focuses upon Latino/a artistic cultures and 
the role of icons in representation. We examine visual 
images, poster and comic book art, music, poetry, short 
stories, theatre, performance art and film, asking: What 
is a cultural icon? Our perspective stretches across time, 
addressing the conquest of the Americas, the Treaty of 
Guadalupe Hidalgo, the annexation of Puerto Rico, the 
Chicano/a movement and contemporary transmigra- 
tion of peoples from the Caribbean. Among the icons 
we discuss: Che Guevara, the Virgin of Guadalupe and 
Selena. Prerequisite: one course in Latino a or Latin 
American Art, or pennission of the instructors. Reading 
knowledge of Spanish recommended. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 35. {A/L} ^ credits 
Dana heibsobn and Nancy Sternbacb 
Not offered during 2008-09 

EDC 200 Education in the City 

The course explores how the challenges facing schools 

m America's cities an' entwined with social, economic 

and political conditions present within the urban envi- 
ronment Our essential question asks how have urban 
educators and policy makers attempted to provide a 
quality educational experience for youth when issues 
associated with their social environment often present 
significant obstacles to teaching and learning? I sing 



~4 



American Ethnicities 



relevant social theory to guide our analyses, we'll 
investigate school reform efforts at the macro-level by- 
looking at policy-driven initiatives such as high stakes 
testing, vouchers and privatization and at the local 
level by exploring the work of teachers, parents, youth 
workers and reformers. There will be fieldwork opportu- 
nities available for students. Enrollment limited to 35. 
{S} 4 credits 
Sam Intrator 
Offered Fall 2008 

ENG 239 American Journeys 

A study of American narratives, from a variety of ethnic 
traditions and historical eras, that explore the forms 
of movement — immigration, migration, boundary 
crossing — so characteristic of American life. Emphasis 
on each author's treatment of the complex encounter 
between new or marginalized Americans and an es- 
tablished culture, and on definitions or interrogations 
of what it might mean to be or become "American." 
Works by Willa Cather, Anzia Yezierska, Ralph Ellison, 
Frank Chin, Richard Rodrigues, Leslie Marmon Silko, 
Joy Kogawa, Junot Diaz, Tony Kushner and the film- 
makers John Sayles and Chris Eyre. {L} 4 credits 
Richard Millington 
Not offered during 2008-09 

MUS 205 Topics in Popular Music 

Topic: Ethnicity, Race and Popular Song in the Unit- 
ed States from Stephen Foster to Elvis Presley. 
From the early 19th century Irish Melodies of Thomas 
Moore to contemporary hip hop, popular vocal music 
in the United States has been tied to processes of ethnic 
and racial formation. This course will examine how 
some ethnic and racial minorities in America (African, 
Jewish, Chinese, Latino) were portrayed through the 
medium of commercially published popular song in 
the period c. 1850-1950. Questions of historical and 
cultural context will be considered but the emphasis 
will be on the relationship (or non-relationship) be- 
tween music and text. Readings in history, sociology 
and cultural studies as well as music history. Listening, 
viewing videos and consultation of online resources. A 
reading knowledge of music is not required. {A/H} 
4 credits 
Richard Sherr 
Not offered during 2008-09 



PHI 246 Race Matters: Philosophy, Science and Politics 

This course will examine the origins, evolution and 
contemporary status of racial thinking. It will explore 
how religion and science have both supported and 
rejected notions of racial superiority, and how preexist- 
ing European races became generically white in Africa, 
Asia and the Americas. The course will also examine 
current debates concerning the reality of racial differ- 
ences, the role of racial classifications and the value of 
racial diversity. {H/S} 4 credits 
Albert Mosley 
Offered Spring 2009 

PSY 313 Research Seminar in Psycholinguistics 

Topic: Assessing Pragmatics in Child Language. The 
seminar will explore the topic of pragmatics in child 
language: how language is used in the service of social 
discourse. How do children learn to take others' point 
of view, to use language for different communicative 
purposes, to understand nonliteral language such as 
sarcasm? We will explore a variety of topics, including 
new methods of assessment, and discuss throughout 
the special challenges of pragmatics in children with 
autism. Prerequisites: One of: PSY/PHI 213, PHI 236, 
PSY 233, EDC 235 or permission of instructor. {N} 
4 credits 
Jill de Villiers 
Offered Spring 2009 

REL 266 Buddhism in America 

Almost fifty different Buddhist groups can be found 
within a twenty-mile radius of the Smith campus. This 
class will explore the way Buddhism is practiced and 
conceptualized by some of the more prominent and 
representative groups in the area as a perspective from 
which to reflect on the broader phenomenon of Bud- 
dhism in America. It will involve participant observa- 
tion, field trips and class visits from some of the area 
teachers. Enrollment limiuted to 25 students. 4 credits 
Peter N. Gregory 
Offered Spring 2009 

S0C 213 Ethnic Minorities in America 

The sociology of a multiracial and ethnically diverse 

society. Comparative examinations of several American 

groups and subcultures. {S} 4 credits 

Ginetta Candelario 

Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 



American Ethnicities 



75 



SOC 314 Seminar in Latina/o Identity 
Topic: Latina/o Racial Identities in the I totted States. 
Tins seminar will explore theories o\ race and ethnic- 
ity and the manner in which those theories have been 
confronted, challenged and/or assimulated by l.atina/ 
os in the I fnited Slates. Special attention will be paid 
to the relationship of Latina/os to the white/black 
dichotomy A particular concern throughout the course 
will be the theoretical and empirical relationship 
between Latina/o racial, national, class, gender and 
sexual identities. Students will be expected to engage in 
extensive and intensive critical reading and discussion 
of course texts. 4 credits 
Guietta Caiulelurio 
Offered Spring 2010 



THE 141 Acting I 

Introduction to physical, vocal and interpretative as- 
pects of performance, with emphasis on creativity con- 
centration and depth ol expression. Enrollment limited 
to 1 4. {A} 4 credits 
Sec [.Don Jordan, Fall 2008 
Sec l\HoUy Derr, Fall 2008 
Sec$.Daniek Varon, Fall 2008 
Sec [-.NormiNoel, Spring 2009 
Sec 2: Daniela Varon, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 



SWG 260 The Cultural Work of Memoir 

This course will explore how queer subjectivity inter- 
sects with gender, ethnicity, race and class. How do 
individuals from groups marked as socially subordinate 
or non-normative use life writing to claim a right to 
write? The course uses life writing narratives, published 
in the U.S. over roughly the last 30 years, to explore the 
relationships between politicized identities, communi- 
ties and social movements. Students also practice writ- 
ing memoirs. Prerequisites: SWG 150, and a literature 
course. {L/H} 4 credits 
Susan Van Dyne 
Offered Spring 2009 

THE 213 American Theatre and Drama 

A survey of theatre history and practices, as well as 
dramatic literature, theories and criticism, and their 
relationship to the cultural, social and political envi- 
ronment of the United States from the beginning of 
colonial to contemporary theatre. Lectures, discussions 
and presentations will be complemented by video 
screenings of recent productions of some of the plays 
under discussion. {L/H/A} 4 credits 
Holly Deir 
Offered Spring 2009 



-6 



American Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

and Child Study 
fl Daniel Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of American 

Studies and of History 
+1 Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of 

American Studies and of History 
Richard Millington, Ph.D., Professor of English 

Language and Literature, Director 
*' Floyd Cheung, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Language and Literature 
+2 Kevin Rozario, Ph.D., Associate Professor of American 

Studies 
*' Steve Waksman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music 
Richard Chu, Five College Assistant Professor of History 
Nan Wolverton, Adjunct Assistant Professor 
Kerry Buckley, Ph.D., Lecturer 
Rebecca D'Orsogna, M.A., Lecturer 
Laura Katzman, Ph.D., Lecturer 
W.T. Lhamon, Jr., Ph.D., Lecturer 
Sherry Marker, M.A., Lecturer 
Sujani Reddy, Lecturer 

Joan Leiman Jacobson Visiting Nonfiction Writer 

Hilton Als 

American Studies Committee 

Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Ed.D., Professor of Education 

and Child Study 
11 Daniel Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of American 

Studies and of History 
fl Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Ph.D., Professor of 

American Studies and of History 
Richard Millington, Ph.D., Professor of English 

Language and Literature 



n Christine Shelton, M.S., Professor of Exercise and 

Sport Studies 
+2 Susan R. Van Dyne, Ph.D., Professor of the Study of 

Women and Gender 
Louis Wilson, Ph.D., Professor of Afro-American Studies 
Ginetta Candelario, Associate Professor of Sociology 

and of Latin American and Latino/a Studies 
*' Floyd Cheung, Ph.D., Associate Professor of English 

Language and Literature 
Alice Hearst, J.D., Associate Professor of Government 
Alexandra Keller, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Film 

Studies and Literature 
t2 Kevin Rozario, Ph.D., Associate Professor of American 

Studies 
* l Michael Thurston, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 

English Language and Literature 
*' Steve Waksman, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Music 

and Literature 
n Nina Antonetti, Assistant Professor of Landscape 

Studies 
Justin D. Cammy, Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies 

and Literature 
+2 Jennifer Guglielmo, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

History and Literature 
' 2 Daphne Lamothe, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of 

Afro-American Studies 
Frazer Ward, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Art 
Sherrill Redmon, Director of the Sophia Smith 

Collection 
James Hicks, Ph.D., Director, American Studies Diploma 

Program 



FYS 168 Scribbling Women 

With the help of the Sophia Smith Collection and the 
Smith College Archives, this writing intensive course 
looks at a number of 19th and 20th century American 
women writers. All wrestled with specific issues that 
confronted them as women; each wrote about impor- 



tant issues in American society. Enrollment limited to 
15. Priority given to first year students. {L/H} WI 
4 credits 
Sherry Marker 
Offered Fall 2008 



American Studies 



" 



201 Introduction to the Study of American Society and 
Culture 

An introduction to the methods and concerns of Ameri- 
can studies through the examination of a critical pe- 
riod of cultural transformation: the 1890s. We will draw 
on literature, painting, architecture, landscape design, 
social and cultural criticism, and popular culture to 
explore such topics as responses to economic change, 
ideas of nature and culture. America's relation to Eu- 
rope, the question of race, the roles of women, family 
structure, social class and urban experience. Open to 
all first- and second-year students, as well as to junior 
and senior majors. {L/H} 4 credits 
Floyd Cheung, Rebecca D'Orsogna. Kevin Rozario, 
Spring 2009 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

202 Methods in American Studies 

A multidisciplinary exploration of different research 
methods and theoretical perspectives (Marxist, feminist, 
myth-symbol, cultural studies) in American studies. 
Prerequisite: .VMS 201 or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to American studies majors. {H/S} 
4 credits 

Kevin Rozario, Fall 2008 
Steve Waksman, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters each year 

220 Colloquium 

Enrollment limited to 20. 4 credits 

Asian-Pacific American History: 1850 to Present 
This is an introductory survey course on Asian Pacific 
American history- within the broader historical context 
of imperialism in the Asian-Pacific region. We will 

I examine the historical experiences of the Chinese, 
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Southeast Asians, Asian 

, Indians and Pacific Islanders living in the U.S. The 
objective of the course is to provide students with a 
fundamental understanding of the A/P/A history that 
is inextricably linked to the goal of the United States to 
establish military, economic, and cultural hegemony in 

( the world through its colonial and neo-colonial poli- 
cies both in the U.S. and abroad. {H} 
Richard Chu 
Offered Fall 2008 



221 Colloquium 

Enrollment limited to 20. 4 credits 

New England Material Culture, I860 1940 

Students will acquire a vocabulary and syntax for 
reading and interpreting the texts of material culture 
objects. They will study architecture, artifacts, clothing 
and textiles, furniture, photographs and paintings. 
Students will also research photographs, letters and 
diaries of contemporaries to interpret articles of cloth- 
ing and accessories in terms of the shifts in social and 
economic roles during this period. They will identify, 
research and interpret material culture objects in light 
of their historical documentation and the conventions 
of current practice. The course will use the holdings of 
Historic Northampton Museum and Education Center, 
a collection of 50,000 objects and three historic build- 
ings. {H} 
Kerry Buckley 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

230 Colloquium: The Asian American Experience 

Through the course of the semester, students will con- 
sider the many histories, experiences, and cultures that 
shape and define the ever-changing, ever-evolving field 
of Asian American Studies, an interdisciplinary space 
marked by multiple communities, approaches, voices, 
issues and themes. The course will cover the first wave 
of Mian immigration in the 19th century, the rise of 
anti-Asian movements, the experiences of Asian Ameri- 
cans during World War II, the emergence of the Asian 
American movement in the 1960s, and the new wave 
of post-1965 Asian immigration. Topics will include 
but are not limited to racial formation, immigration, 
citizenship, transnationalism, gender and class. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. {L} 4 credits 
Sujani Redely 
Offered Spring 2009 

235 American Popular Culture 

An analytical history of American popular culture since 
1865. We start from the premise that popular culture, 
far from being merely a frivolous or debased alterna- 
tive to high culture, is an important site of popular 
expression, social instruction and cultural conflict. 
We examine theoretical texts that help us to "read" 
popular culture, even as we study specific artifacts from 
television shows to Hollywood movies, the pornography 
industry to spectator sports, and popular music to 
theme parks. We pay special attention to questions of 



78 



American Studies 



desire, and to the ways popular culture has mediated 
and produced pleasure, disgust, fear and satisfaction. 
Alternating lecture/discussion format. Enrollment 
limited to 25. Admission by permission of the instruc- 
tor. {H/S} 4 credits 
Kevin Rozario 
Offered Fall 2008 

302 Seminar: The Material Culture of New England, 
1630-1860 

Using the collections of Historic Deerfield, Inc., and 
the environment of Deerfield, Massachusetts, students 
explore the relationship of a wide variety of objects 
(architecture, furniture, ceramics and textiles) to New 
England's history. Classes are held in Old Deerfield, MA. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. {H/A} 
4 credits 
Nan Wolverton 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

340 Symposium in American Studies 

Limited to senior majors. 



did the underground idea come from? What happens 
to politics and art when it is imagined as an "under- 
ground" (as opposed to mainstream) activity? This 
course offers a critical history of "The Underground" 
from the underground slave railroad of the early 19th 
century to the punk and hip hop undergrounds of our 
own time. {H/A} 
Kevin Rozario 
Offered Spring 2009 

America in 1925 

Readings, discussions and student research projects will 
explore the transformation of a "Victorian" American 
culture into a "modernist" one by focusing on forms 
of expression and sites of conflict in 1925 — the year 
of Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Bessie Smith's "St. 
Louis Blues," Alain Locke's The New Negro, Chaplin's 
The Gold Rash, the Scopes trial, and the expression of 
powerful new ideas in the social sciences — to cite just 
a few examples. {H/L} 
Richard Millington 
Offered Spring 2009 



Things Come Together: Toward an interdisciplinary 
cultural history 

How might students and scholars of American studies 
conceive and practice a genuinely interdisciplinary cul- 
tural history? Members of the symposium will explore 
this question by examining some important models 
of such scholarship; by working with two case studies 
in cultural transmission and transformation (one on 
changing graphic images of black musical perfor- 
mance, one on Lotte Lenya and Kurt Weill's influence 
on Bob Dylan); and by engaging in and presenting 
their own independent research projects. {H/A} 4 credits 
W.TLhamon 
Offered Fall 2008 



351/ENG 384 Writing About American Society 

An examination of contemporary American issues 
through the works of literary journalists ranging from 
Elizabeth Hardwick to Joan Didion; Frances Fitzgerald 
to Adrian Nicole Le Blanc. Intensive practice in ex- 
pository writing to develop the student's own skills in 
analyzing complex social issues and expressing herself 
artfully in this form. May be repeated with a different 
instructor and with the permission of the director of 
the program. Enrollment limited to 15. Admission by 
permission of the instructor. Sample writing must be 
submitted to be considered. {L/S} 4 credits 
Hilton Als 
Offered Spring 2009 



341 Symposium in American Studies 

Limited to senior majors. 

American Undergrounds 
Since the 1960s, "The Underground" has been imag- 
ined as a privileged space of artistic innovation, politi- 
cal radicalism and authentic selfhood. Even today, 
hip hop and punk musicians describe themselves as 
"underground" if they wish to emphasize their integ- 
rity; it is the place to go to keep things real, to avoid 
"selling out," to evade being co-opted by the dominant 
order. But what does it mean to be underground? Where 



400 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the instructor and the di- 
rector. 1 to 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the instructor and the 

director. 8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 



American Studies 



79 



Internship at the 
Smithsonian Institution 

To enable qualified students to examine, under the 
tutelage of outstanding scholars, some of the finest 
collections of materials relating to the development 
of culture in America, the American Studies Program 
offers a one-semester internship at the Smithsonian 
Institution in Washington, D.C. The academic program 
consists of a seminar taught by a scholar at the Smith- 
sonian, a tutorial on research methods and a research 
project under the supervision of a Smithsonian staff 
member. The project is worth eight credits. Research 
projects have dealt with such topics as the northward 
migration of blacks, women in various sports, a his- 
tory of Western Union, Charles Willson Peale's letters, 
the rise of modernism in American art and the use of 
infant baby formula in the antebellum South. 

Interns pay tuition and fees to Smith College but 
pay for their own room and board in Washington. 
Financial aid, if any, continues as if the student were 
resident in Northampton. 

The program takes place during the fall semester. 
It is not limited to American studies majors. Students 
majoring in art, history, sociology, anthropology, 
religion, and economics are especially encouraged to 
apply. Those in project-related disciplines (e.g., art his- 
tory) may consult their advisers about the possibility of 
earning credit toward the major for work done on the 
internship. Applications will be available at the begin- 
ning of the second semester. 

410 Tutorial on Research Methods at the Smithsonian 

Individual supervision by a Smithsonian staff member. 
I Given in Washington, D.C. {H/S} 4 credits 
i Rosetta Marantz Cohen. Director 

Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

411 Seminar: American Culture— Conventions and 
Contexts 

Exhibiting Culture: An Introduction to Museum 

\ Studies in America. This seminar examines the his- 

j tory, functions, and meanings of museums in society, 

' focusing primarily on the art museum in the United 

States. Drawing on the ever-growing literature on 

museology, we will look critically at the ways that 

museums — through their policies, programs, ar- 



chitecture and exhibitions — can define regional or 
national values, shape cultural attitudes ami identities, 
and influence public opinion about both current and 
historical events, tethecouise is concerned with both 
theory and practice, and the intersection of the two, we 
will make use of the rich resources of the Smithsonian 
as well as other museums in Washington, D.C. Class 
discussion will be balanced with behind-the-scenes 
visits/field trips to museums, where we will speak with 
dedicated professionals who are engaged in innovative 
and often challenging work in the nation's capital. 
(Open only to members of the Smithsonian Internship 
Program. Given in Washington, D.C). {H} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

412 Research Project at the Smithsonian Institution 
Tutorial supervision by Smithsonian staff members. 
Given in Washington, D.C. {H/S} 8 credits 
Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Director 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

Requirements for the 
American Studies Major 

Advisers: Nina Antonetti, Justin Cammy, Floyd Cheung, 
Rosetta Cohen, Jennifer Guglielmo, Alice Hearst, Daniel 
Horowitz, Helen Horowitz, Alexandra Keller, Daphne 
Lamothe, Richard Millington, Nancy Marie Mithlo, 
Kevin Rozario, Christine Shelton, Michael Thurston, 
Susan Van Dyne, Steve Waksman, Frazer Ward, Louis 
Wilson 

Because of the wide-ranging interests and methods 
included within the interdisciplinan 7 American Studies 
Program, careful consultation between a student and 
her adviser is crucial to the planning of the major. 

In order to structure their studies of American so- 
ciety and culture, majors will select a focus — such as 
an era (e.g. antebellum America, the 20th century) or 
a topical concentration (e.g. ethnicity and race, urban 
life, social policy, material culture, the family, industri- 
alization, the arts, the media, popular culture, compar- 
ative American cultures) — which they will explore in 
at least four courses. It is expected that several courses 
in the major will explore issues outside the theme. 

Because American Studies courses are located 
primarily in two divisions, Humanities and Social Sci- 



American Studies 



ences, students are to balance their studies with courses 
in each. Courses taken S/U may not be counted toward 
the major. 

Requirements: 12 semester courses, as follows: 

1. 201 and 202; 

2. Eight courses in the American field. At least four 
must be focused on a theme defined by the student. 
At least two courses must be in the Humanities and 
two in the Social Sciences. At least two must be 
devoted primarily to the years before the twentieth 
century. At least one must be a seminar, ideally in 
the theme selected. (340/341 does not fulfill the 
seminar requirement). Students writing honors 
theses are exempt from the seminar requirement; 

3. International comparison. In order to foster inter- 
national perspectives and to allow comparisons with 
the American experience, all majors must take a 
course dealing with a nation or society other than 
the United States, a course preferably in the area of 
the student's focus; 

4. 340 or 341. 



Adviser for Study Abroad: Richard Millington 
Honors Director: Kevin Rozario 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



Diploma in American 
Studies 

Director: James Hicks 

A one-year program for foreign students of advanced 
undergraduate or graduate standing. 

Requirements: American Studies 555; five additional 
courses in American Studies or in one or more of the 
related disciplines. Students who choose to write a 
thesis, and whose projects are approved, will substitute 
American Studies 570, Diploma Thesis, for one of the 
additional courses. 

555 Seminar: American Society and Culture 

Topic: The Unexceptional U.S.: Global Readings in 
U.S. Culture. One of the most important trends in 
recent American historiography has been the growing 
movement to see U.S. history as part of world history. 
In this course, we will read and interpret in ways that 
move beyond national, and nationalist, readings of U.S. 
history. The course is divided into four clusters, each 
representing a different period and focusing on differ- 
ent aspects of U.S.-American society and culture in 
relation to world history. Each cluster will be organized 
around an interdisciplinary investigation of a single 
text: Mary Rowlandson's captivity narrative, Benjamin 
Franklin's autobiography, Nella Larsen's Quicksand 
and Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried. Normally 
for Diploma students only. 4 credits 
James Hicks 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

570 Diploma Thesis 

4 credits 

James Hicks 

Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 



si 



Ancient Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers 
' Scott Bradbury, Professor of Classical 

Languages and Literatures 
Patrick Coby, Professor of Government, Director. 

Spring 2009 



12 Joel Kaminsky, Professor of Religion 

1-2 Barbara Kellum, Professor of Art 

"' Susan Levin, Associate Professor of Philosophy, 

Director, Fall 2008 
1 Richard Lim, Professor of History 
Suleiman Mourad, Associate Professor of Religion 



The minor in ancient studies provides students with the 
opportunity to consolidate a program of study on the 
ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds based 
on a variety of disciplinary perspectives. Courses in 
history, art, religion, classics, government, philosophy 
and archaeology make up the minor. Students shape 
their own programs, in consultation with their advisers, 
and may concentrate on a particular civilization or 
elect across-civilizational approach. No languages are 
required. 



ARH 212 Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries 
Barbara Kellum 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 216 The Art and Architecture of the Roman World 

Barbara Kellum 
Not offered 2008-09 

ARH 228 Islamic Art and Architecture 

(Mellon Post-doctorate Fellow ) 
Offered Fall 2008 



The Minor 



Requirements: Six courses, in no fewer than three 
j departments, selected from the list of related courses 
' below 

1 (Other courses may count toward the minor with per- 
I mission of the students adviser.) 

Related Courses 

Please see home department for complete course de- 
scriptions. 

ARC 211 Introduction to Archaeology 
Susan Allen 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 208 The Art of Greece 

Rebecca Situs 

Not offered 2008-09 



ARH 285 Great Cities: Pompeii 

Barbara Kellum 
Not offered 2008-09 

ARH 315 Studies in Roman Art 
Tbpic: Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries 
Barbara Kellum 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 352 Hellenistic Art and Architecture 

Barbara Kellum 
Not offered 2008-09 

CLS 190 The Trojan War 

justina Gregory 

Offered Spring 2009 (at UMass) 

CLS 227 Classical Mythology 
Scott Bradbury 

Offered Fall 2008 



82 



Ancient Studies 



CLS 233 Gender and Sexuality in Greco-Roman Culture 

Nancy Shumate 
Offered 2009-10 



REL 210 Introduction to the Bible I 

Joel Kaminsky 
Offered Fall 2008 



CLS 235 Life and Literature in Ancient Rome 

Maureen Ryan 
Offered Fall 2008 

CLS 236 Cleopatra: Histories, Fictions, Fantasies 

Nancy Shumate 
Offered Spring 2009 

FYS 163 The Holy Land 

Suleiman Mourad 
Offered Fall 2008 

GOV 261 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory 

Patrick Coby 
Offered Fall 2008 

HST 202 Ancient Greece 

Richard Lim 
Offered Fall 2010 

HST 203 Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic World 

Richard Lim 
Offered Spring 2011 

HST 204 The Roman Republic 

Richard Lim 
Offered Fall 2009 



REL 211 Wisdom Literature and Other Books in the 
Bible 

Joel Kaminsky 
Offered Spring 2009 

REL 213 Prophecy in Ancient Israel 

Joel Kaminsky 
Offered Spring 2010 

REL 215 Introduction to the Bible II 

Scott Brand 
Offered Spring 2009 

REL 219 Christian Origins: Archaeological and Socio- 
Historical Perspectives 

Elizabeth Penland 
Not offered 2008-09 

REL 310 Seminar: Hebrew Bible 

Joel Kaminsky 
Offered Fall 2010 

REL 345 The Making of Muhammad 

Suleiman Mourad 
Offered Spring 2009 



HST 205 The Roman Empire 

Richard Lim 
Offered Spring 2010 

HST 206 Aspects of Ancient History 

To be announced 
Not offered 2008-09 

PH1 124 History of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 

Susan Levin 
Offered Fall 2008 



PHI 324 Seminar in Ancient Philosophy 

Susan Levin 

Not offered 2008-09 



83 



Anthropology 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Donald Joralemon, Ph.D., Chair 
- Elliot Fratkin, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors 

'RavinaAggarwal, Ph.D. 
" : Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 

Fernando Armstrong-Fumero, Ph.D. 



Instructor 

Caroline Melly 

Lecturer 

Joan than Shapiro Anjaria 

Associated Faculty 
Adrianne Andrews, Ph.D. 
Margaret Sarkissian, Ph.D. 



Students are strongly encouraged to complete ANT 130 
before enrolling in intermediate courses. First-year 
students must have the permission of the instructor for 
courses above the introductory level. 

130 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 

The exploration of similarities and differences in 
the cultural patterning of human experience. The 
comparative analysis of economic, political, religious 
and family structures, with examples from Africa, the 
Americas, Asia and Oceania. The impact of the modern 
world on traditional societies. Several ethnographic 
films are viewed in coordination with descriptive case 
studies. Total enrollment of each section limited to 25. 
{S} 4 credits 

Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Fernando Armstrong- 
Fumero, Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria, Fall 2008 
Elliot Fratkin, Caroline Melly, Spring 2009 
Suzanne Z. Gottschang, Fernando Armstrong- 
Fumero, Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria, Fall 2009 
Elliot Fratkin, Caroline Melly. Spring 2010 
Offered both semesters each year 

ANT 200 Colloquium in Anthropology 

This course introduces students to the variety of 
methods of inquiry used for research in the field of 
anthropology: In the course of the semester, students 
will be introduced to methods of locating and analyz- 



ing information and sources, developing research ques- 
tions, and writing. Normally taken in the sophomore 
or junior year. Prerequisite: ANT 130 or permission of 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. 4 credits 

Humans and Nature: The Case of China 
Recent reports of dramatic environmental destruction 
resulting from rapid economic development, a large 
population and limited availability of arable land have 
incited global alarm about human impact on the envi- 
ronment in China. The human challenge to environ- 
mental health in China today must take into account 
a range of forces — philosophical, cultural, historical, 
political and economic — that together shape Chinese 
ideas about nature and the relationship between hu- 
man "progress" and the environment. This course 
examines these forces as a way to understand past and 
present Chinese society. {8} 4 credits 
Suzanne Gottschang 
Offered Spring 2009 

Pets 

The relationship between humans and select animals 
treated as companions is explored, with attention to 
the evolutionary history of domestication, the cultural 
variability in how human/animal relationships are 
defined, and contemporary American pet culture. The 
class will develop a collective ethnograph) of pets in 



Anthropology 



the vicinity of Northampton, applying a full range of 
research methods. Limited to anthropology majors and 
minors. {S} 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Spring 2010 

230 Africa: Population, Health and Environment Issues 

This course looks at peoples and cultures of Africa with 
a focus on population, health and environmental is- 
sues on the African continent. The course discusses the 
origin and growth of human populations; distribution 
and spread of language and ethnic groups; the variety 
in food production systems (foraging, fishing, pastoral- 
ism, agriculture, industrialism); demographic, health, 
environmental consequences of slavery, colonialism, 
and economic globalization; and contemporary prob- 
lems of drought, famine, and AIDS in Africa. Permis- 
sion of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to 
30. {S/N} 4 credits 
Elliot Fratkin 
Offered Fall 2009 

233 History of Anthropological Theory 

This course reviews the major theoretical approaches 
and directions in cultural anthropology from late 19th 
century to the present. These approaches include social 
organization and individual agency, adaptation and 
evolution of human culture, culture and personality, 
economic behavior, human ecology, the anthropology 
of development and change, and post-modern interpre- 
tation. The course explores the works of major anthro- 
pologists including Franz Boas, Bronislaw Malinowski, 
Margaret Mead, Evans-Pritchard, Claude Levi-Strauss, 
Marvin Harris, Eric Wolf, Clifford Geertz, Sherry Ortner 
and others. Prerequisite: ANT 130 or permission of the 
instructor. (TI) 4 credits 
Fernando Armstrong-Fumero 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

234 Culture, Power and Politics 

This course is a general introduction to anthropologi- 
cal analysis of politics and the political. Through a 
broad survey of anthropological texts and theories, we 
will explore what an ethnographic perspective can offer 
to our understandings of power and government. Spe- 
cial emphasis is placed on the role of culture, symbols 
and social networks in the political life of local com- 
munities. Examples will be drawn from a number of 
case studies in Africa, East Asia, Latin America and the 
United States, and range in scale from studies of local 



politics in small-scale societies to analyses of national- 
ism and political performance in modern nation-states. 
Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 30. {S} 4 credits 
Fernando Armstrong-Fumero 
Offered Fall 2009 

237 Native South Americans: Conquest and Resistance 

The differential impact of European conquest on 
tropical forest, Andean, and sub-Andean Indian societ- 
ies. How native cosmologies can contribute to either 
cultural survival or extinction as Indians respond to 
economic and ideological domination. {H/S} 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Spring 2010 

241 Anthropology of Development 

The Anthropology of Development compares three ex- 
planatory models — modernization theory, dependency 
theory, and indigenous or alternative development — to 
understand social change today. Who sponsors develop- 
ment programs and why? How are power, ethnicity, 
and gender relations affected? How do anthropologists 
contribute to and critique programs of social and eco- 
nomic development? The course will discuss issues of 
gender, health care, population growth, and economic 
empowerment with readings from Africa, Asia, Oceania 
and Latin America. Enrollment limited to 30. Prefer- 
ence given to anthropology majors and minors. Not 
open to first-year students. Enrollment limited to 30. 
{8} 4 credits 
Elliot Fratkin 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

248 Medical Anthropology 

The cultural construction of illness through an exami- 
nation of systems of diagnosis, classification, and ther- 
apy in both non-Western and Western societies. Special 
attention given to the role of the traditional healer. The 
anthropological contribution to international health 
care and to the training of physicians in the United 
States. Enrollment limited to 30. {S/N} 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

249 Visual Anthropology 

This course considers the unique perspectives, tech- 
niques and theories that anthropology offers for 
understanding the visual world. We focus both on the 
production of visual materials (photographs and films, 



Anthropology 



85 



in particular) h\ anthropologists, as well as the anthro- 
pological analysis of visual artifacts produced by other 
people. We will consider the historical (particularly 
colonial) legacies of visual anthropologj as well as 
its current manifestations and contemporary debates. 
Particular attention will be paid to issues of representa- 
tion, authority, authenticity, and circulation of visual 
materials. Enrollment limited to 30. (MI) {8} 4 credits 
Caroline Mel I v 
Offered Fall 2008 

251 Women and Modernity in East Asia 

This course explores the roles, representations and 
experiences of women in 20th-century China, Korea, 
Vietnam and Japan in the context of the modernization 
projects of these countries. Through ethnographic and 
historical readings, film and discussion, this course 
examines how issues pertaining to women and gender 
relations have been highlighted in political, economic 
and cultural institutions. The course compares the 
ways that Asian women have experienced these pro- 
cesses through three major topics: war and revolution, 
gendered aspects of work, and women in relation to the 
family. This course is co-sponsored by, and cross-listed 
in, the East Asian Studies Program. {S} 4 credits 
Suzanne Gottschang 
Offered Fall 2009 

253 Introduction to East Asian Societies and Cultures 

This course provides a survey of the anthropology of 
contemporary East Asian societies. We will examine 
the effects of modernization and development on the 
cultures of China, Japan and Korea. Such topics as the 
individual, household and family; marriage and re- 
production; religion and ritual; and political economic 
systems are introduced through ethnographic accounts 
of these cultures. The goal of this course is to provide 
students with sufficient information to understand 
important social and cultural aspects of modern East 
Asia, {S} 4 credits 
Suzanne Gottschang 
Offered Fall 2008 

255 Dying and Death 

Death, the "supreme and final crisis of life" (Mal- 
inowski), calls for collective understandings and com- 
munal responses. What care is due the dying? What 
indicates that death has occurred? How is the corpse to 
be handled? The course uses ethnographic and histori- 
cal sources to indicate how human communities have 



answered these questions, and to determine just how 
unusual are the circumstances surrounding dying in 
the contemporary Western world. Enrollment limited to 
30. Prerequisite: 130. limited to anthropologj majors 
and minors or by permission of the instructor. Prereq- 
uisite: 1 30 or permission of the instructor. {H/S} 
4 credits 

Donald Joralemon 
Offered Spring 2009 

257 Urban Anthropology 

This course considers the city as both a setting for an- 
thropological research and as an ethnographic object 
of study in itself. We aim to think critically about the 
theoretical and methodological possibilities, challenges 
and limitations that are posed by urban anthropology. 
We will consider concepts and themes such as urban- 
ization and migration; urban space and mobility; gen- 
der, race and ethnicity; technology and virtual space; 
markets and economies; citizenship and belonging; 
and production and consumption. Enrollment limited 
to 30. {8} 4 credits 
Caroline Melly 
Offered Fall 2009 

258 Performing Culture 

This course analyzes cultural performances as sites for 
the expression and formation of social identity. Stu- 
dents study various performance genres such as rituals, 
festivals, parades, cultural shows, music, dance and 
theater. Topics include expressive culture as resistance; 
debates around authenticity and heritage; the perfor- 
mance of race, class and ethnic identities; the construc- 
tion of national identity; and the effects of globalization 
on indigenous performances. Enrollment limited to 30. 
Prerequisite: 130 or permission of the instructor. {A/S} 
4 credits 

Margaret Sarkissian 
Offered Spring 2010 

259 Writing Cultures 

Ethnography, the fundamental component of the 
discipline of anthropology, consists of two equally 
important parts: participant observation research, and 
the written account of this research. The goal of this 
course is to develop students' skills in writing about 
culture through a close study of the process of ethnog- 
raphy from the fieldnote to the initial analysis to the 
ethnographic monograph. Moreover, an essential part 
of this course will be to develop skills in interpreting 



86 



Anthropology 



ethnography, as well as to explore the key issues and 
dilemmas that have emerged in the written representa- 
tion of culture. Throughout the semester students will 
work on individual ethnographic research projects that 
incorporate the ideas and methods discussed in class. 
Prerequisites: ANT 130 or permission of the instructor. 
(E) {S} 4 credits 
Jonathan Anjaria 
Offered Spring 2009 

267 Power, History and Communities in South Asia 

This course introduces students to the culture, politics 
and everyday life of India. Topics covered will include 
religion, caste, gender and development, as well as 
some of the key conceptual problems in the study 
of India, such as the colonial construction of social 
scientific knowledge, and debates over "tradition" and 
"modernity." In this way, we will both study topics in 
Indian culture and address the key scholarly, popular 
and political debates that have constituted the terms 
through which we understand Indian culture. Along 
with ethnographies, we will study and discuss novels, 
historical analysis, primary historical texts and popular 
(Bollywood) and documentary film. {S} 4 credits 
Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria 
Offered Spring 2009 

269 Indigenous Cultures and the State in Mesoamerica 

This course is a general introduction to the relationship 
between indigenous societies and the state in Meso- 
america. Taking a broad historical perspective, we will 
explore the rise of native state-level societies, the trans- 
formations that marked the process of European colo- 
nization, and of the relationship of local indigenous 
communities to post-colonial states and transnational 
social movements. Texts used in the course will place 
special emphasis on continuities and changes in lan- 
guage, social organization, cosmology and identity that 
have marked the historical experience of native groups 
in the region. {S} 4 credits 
Fernando Armstrong-Fumero 
Offered Fall 2008 

271 Globalization and Transnationalism in Africa 

This course examines how migrants move within, be- 
tween and beyond African countries. Our goal will be to 
think critically about these contemporary movements 
and the shifting notions of home, nation, community, 
and participation that they produce. We will pay close 
attention to the economic, political and social impe- 



tuses and impacts of rural-urban, intra-African, and 
transnational migration from the perspective of Africa 
and the diaspora. Of central concern are the gendered 
dynamics of migration, the transformation of identi- 
ties, national and international regulation of migra- 
tion, the contesting and policing of borders, forced 
migration and refugees, and the impact of remittances. 
Enrollment limited to 30. {S} 4 credits 
Caroline Melly 
Offered Spring 2009 

272 Women in Africa 

This course will focus on the experiences and situations 
of women in contemporary Africa. We aim to interro- 
gate and complicate both popular and scholarly rep- 
resentations that present African women as the West's 
"other." The course will be organized around various 
topics — such as marriage and family, economy and 
markets, health and reproduction, and politics and 
participation — and will present ethnographic insights 
from various locations on the African continent. En- 
rollment limited to 30. {S} 4 credits 
Caroline Melly 
Offered Spring 2010 

Seminars 

340 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 

Topic: Anthropology of Contemporary Issues. This 
course explores how anthropology helps us understand 
current events in the U.S. and around the world. The 
topics of this course are shaped by the key national and 
global conflicts, events and processes that are taking 
place now. Thus, a major component of the course will 
be to use cultural analysis to investigate the way news- 
papers and other media represent contemporary issues. 
In order to enhance this analysis, we will conduct 
rigorous study — both historical and ethnographic — 
of contemporary conflicts and controversies (such as 
Darfur, Iraq, and the "head scarf affair" in Europe). 
{S} 4 credits 

Jonathan Shapiro Anjaria 
Offered Fall 2008 

342 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 

Topic: The Anthropology of Food This seminar 
employs anthropological approaches to understand 
the role of food in social and cultural life. Using eth- 
nographic case studies from East Asia, Latin America, 



Anthropology 



87 



Africa and the I fnited States, the course will examine 

topics such as bio-cultural dimensions of food and 
nutrition, food and nationalism, symbolic value of 
food, food and identity, food taboos and restrictions, 
etiquette and manners in eating, body image and 
eating, transnationalism and global food industries, 
famine and food policy Through the Investigation of 
these topics, students will also gain an understanding 
of major theoretical trends and debates in anthropol- 
ogy. Students will conduct small field-based research 
projects as a part of their participation in the seminar. 
{S} 4 credits 
Suzanne Gottschang 
Offered Spring 2009 

344 Seminar: Topics in Medical Anthropology 

Topic: Theory in the Social Sciences of Medicine. A 
selective review of social science theory applied to sick- 
ness and healing, drawing material from anthropology 
and sociology*. Key themes include the impact of class 
and ethnicity on disease patterns, the social structure 
of medical systems, medical ecology, and world systems 
models applied to health and disease. Prerequisite: ANT 
248 or permission of the instructor 
(TI){S) 4 credits 
Donald Joralemon 
Offered Spring 2009 

348 Seminar: Topics in Development Anthropology 

Anthropology and Non-Government Organizations 
This course looks at the roles anthropologists play in 
the development practices of government and non- 
government organizations. Particular experiences and 
contributions of anthropologists to projects in health, 
women and development, food and humanitarian 
relief, human rights and advocacy are read and dis- 
cussed. Students will conduct independent research 
projects investigating and critiquing particular projects 
anthropologists have engaged in with organizations 
such as Oxfam International, United Nations De- 
velopment Program, or the United States Agency for 
International Development. Prerequisite: ANT 241 or 
permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Elliot Fratkin 
Offered Spring 2009 

Health m Africa 

This seminar focuses on issues of demography, health. 

nutrition and disease on the African continent, contex- 



tuali/.ed in the social, economic, and political activi- 
ties of human populations. The course discusses the 
distribution and food production systems of human 

groups in particular environments, the incidence and 
prevalence of infectious diseases including malaria, tu- 
berculosis, river blindness, measles, and HIV/AIDS, and 
varying approaches to health care including traditional 
medicine and the availability of western treatment. 
Background in African studies or medical anthropology 
preferred. {S} 4 credits 
Elliot Fratkin 
Offered Spring 2010 

352 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 

Cannibalism and Capital: Topics in Colonialism. 
Race and Political Economy 
This course explores the interconnected histories of 
coloniality, race relations and modernity. The unify- 
ing thread will be a series of folklore traditions that 
ascribe cannibalistic or vampiric practices to the social 
systems through which agrarian and hunter-gatherer 
populations are incorporated into wage labor and the 
global economy. Major topics include: the cultural 
roots of modernity, Marxian anthropology, dependency 
theory, cultural resistance, narratives of conquest and 
colonization, globalization, and notions of personhood 
and the body. Specific ethnographic examples include 
studies of several populations from highland Bolivia, 
Toba hunter-gatherers from northern Argentina, Afro- 
Columbian peasants, medical stations on the U.S./ 
Mexico border, and urban slums in Brazil. Permission 
of the instructor required. Enrollment limited to 30. {S} 
4 credits 

Fernando Armstrong-Fumero 
Offered Spring 2009 

Anthropology and History 
This course explores the intersections between an- 
thropology and history. The interdisciplinary reading 
list will consist of historical and ethnohistorical texts 
written by anthropologists, social and cultural analyses 
written by historians, and theoretical discussions that 
explore the intersections between the two disciplines. 
Special emphasis will be placed on how we can under- 
stand culture in historical terms, or on how we can use 
insights from anthropology to understand the cultures 
of the past. Other topics will include the relationship 
between oral and written forms of history, processes of 
cultural change, and how material culture and other 



Anthropology 



non-linguistic symbols can serve as a means of preserv- 
ing collective memory. {S} 4 credits 
Fernando Armstrong-Fumero 
Offered Spring 2010 

353 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 

Citizenship and Belonging 
What does it mean to belong — to a city, a nation, a 
global community — from an anthropological perspec- 
tive? How do passports, blood tests, border checkpoints, 
and voting ballots produce and reinforce ideas about 
citizenship? How are global movements of people and 
capital transforming notions of belonging? How does 
globalization challenge conventional understandings 
of citizenship as a particular relationship to a nation- 
state? This seminar will consider the political, cultural, 
and economic dimensions of citizenship and belong- 
ing. Our perspective will be global and will take into 
account both national and transnational identities and 
practices. {8} 4 credits 
Caroline Melly 
Offered Fall 2008 

Internet Connections and Digital Divides 
The seminar will critically examine the transforma- 
tive impact of the Internet and related technological 
innovations from an anthropological perspective. We 
will explore these issues from various geographical 
locations in order to better understand how the Internet 
is reshaping ideas about participation, geography and 
space, global access to information and mobility. We 
will pay particular attention to the emergent inequali- 
ties, opportunities and identities that are created as 
certain people and places become "wired." {S} 4 credits 
Caroline Melly 
Offered Fall 2009 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

AAS 202 Topics in Black Studies 

Topic: Anthropology of the African Diaspora 
Riche Barnes 
Offered Spring 2009 



MUS 220 Topics in World Music 

Topic: Popular Music of the Islamic World 
Margaret Sarkissian 
Offered Fall 2008 

MUS 220 Topics in World Music 

Topic: African Popular Music 
Bode Omojola 
Offered Spring 2009 



General Courses 

400 Special Studies 

By permission of the department, for junior and senior 

majors. 2 to 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

The Major in Anthropology 

Advisers: Elliot Fratkin, Donald Joralemon, Suzanne 
Gottschang, Fernando Armstrong-Fumero 

Advisers for Study Abroad: Africa and other areas: El- 
liot Fratkin; Asia: Suzanne Gottschang; Latin America: 
Donald Joralemon and Fernando Armstrong-Fumero 

Requirements: Eight (8) courses in anthropology 
including "Introduction to Cultural Anthropology" 
(130), "History of Anthropological Theory" (233), and 
"Colloquium in Anthropology" (200), preferably taken 
in the sophomore year, and a Smith anthropology 
seminar. The remaining three (3) courses for the major 
may be more anthropology classes or courses in related 
fields, including language, math or science (if these 
are linked to the student's anthropological interests). 
Students must show either a) competency in a foreign 
language equivalent to four semesters of college level, 
or b) two courses in a mathematical (M) and/or natu- 
ral science (N) category above the 100 level, chosen in 
consultation with the student's adviser. A maximum of 
two language courses or quantitative/science courses 
may count towards the three related courses category 
for the major. 



Anthropology 



Students majoring In anthropologj are encouraged 
to consider an academic program abroad (luring their 
junior year. In the past, majors haw spent a term or 

year in Chile. China. Costa Rica, Ecuador, India. Ke- 
nya, Mexico, Nepal, Senegal and South Africa. Students 
planning to spend the junior war abroad should take 
at least one but preferabrj two courses in anthropology 
during the sophomore year. Students should discuss 
their study abroad plans with advisers, particularly if 
they wish to do a special studies or senior thesis upon 
their return. 

Majors interested in archaeology or physical 
anthropology may take advantage of the excellent 
resources in this area at the University of Massachusetts 
or enroll in a fieldwork program at a training univer- 
sity during their junior year. 

The Minor in Anthropology 

Advisers: Elliot Fratkin, Donald Joralemon, Suzanne 
Gottschang, Fernando Annstrong-Fumero 

Requirements: Six (6) courses in anthropology includ- 
ing: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (130). 

Honors 

Director: Fernando Annstrong-Fumero 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered each Fall 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



90 



Archaeology 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisory Committee 

n Scott Bradbury, Professor of Classical Languages and 

Literatures 
Bosiljka Glumac, Associate Professor of Geology 
t2 Joel Kaminsky, Professor of Religion, Director 
12 Barbara Kellum, Professor of Art 
Dana Leibsohn, Associate Professor of Art 
+1 Richard Lim, Professor of History 



Christopher Loring, Director of Libraries 
Suleiman Mourad, Assistant Professor of Religion 
+1 Thalia Pandiri, Professor of Classical Languages and 
Literatures and of Comparative Literature 

Lecturer 

Susan Allen, Ph.D. 



The interdepartmental minor in archaeology is a com- 
plement to any one of several departmental majors. 
Archaeological methods and evidence can be used to 
illuminate various disciplines and will aid the student 
in the analysis of information and data provided by 
field research. 

211 Introduction to Archaeology 

An interdisciplinary introduction to archaeological 
inquiry. Students learn about the history of the field 
and Smith's own pioneers. This class explores all 
aspects of archaeology. Students practice survey and 
illustration techniques and learn methods of excava- 
tion, analysis and interpretation of artifacts, skeletal 
and environmental remains. In addition, we investigate 
issues of archaeological ethics and the political uses 
of archaeology. How does archaeological theory and 
investigator's perspective affect our reconstruction of 
the past? Sites around the globe enrich our classroom. 
Enrollment limited to 30. {H/S} 4 credits 
Susan Allen 
Offered Fall 2008 

GE0 112 Archaeological Geology of Rock Art and Stone 
Artifacts 

What makes a mineral or a rock particularly useful as 
a stone tool or attractive as a sculpture? Students in this 
course will explore this and other questions by applying 
geological approaches and techniques in studying vari- 
ous examples or rock art and stone artifacts to learn 
more about human behavior, ecology and cultures in 



the past. This exploration across traditional boundaries 
between archaeology and earth science will include 
background topics of mineral and rock formation, 
weathering processes, and age determination, as well 
as investigations of petroglyphs (carvings into stone 
surfaces), stone artifacts and other artifactual rocks 
(building stone and sculptures) described in the litera- 
ture, displayed in museum collections and found in the 
field locally. {N} 4 credits 
Bosiljka Glumac 
Offered Spring 2009 

CLS 215 Discovering Greece Through Material Culture: 
From the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic East 

This class will examine the archaeology and material 
culture of the Greek world from the Late Bronze Age 
through the Hellenistic period. Through the examina- 
tion of burial form and other evidence of the Iron Age, 
we will explore the emergence of concepts of citizenship 
and social identity associated with the rise of the polis. 
Through the lenses of sculpture, vase painting and 
architecture we will consider evidence of political and 
social competition. Using the instruments of archaeol- 
ogy to examine political structures and economics, 
we will attempt to gain a better understanding of the 
position of women, non-citizens, and slaves within the 
Classical Greek city state. Enrollment limited to 35. (E) 
{H} 4 credits 
Anthony Tuck 
Offered Spring 2009 



Archaeology 



91 



PRS 306 Beowulf and Archaeology 
The Old English poem Beowulj may be the most 
expressive document we possess tor the cultural world 
of Europe from the 5th through 8th centuries AD, 
even though it survives in a single copy from c. 1000. 
Our interpretation of this poem hits been enhanced 
by discoveries of the Sutton Hoo ship-burial in K ast 
Anglia, a huge 6th-century hall in Denmark, and other 
significant finds. This seminar will examine the way 
archaeological investigation, historical research and 
literary criticism all combine to create a more reveal- 
ing, though still controversial "assemblage of texts" 
from this formative phase of early European society. 
Enrollment limited to 12 juniors and seniors. (E) 
{L/H/A} 4 credits 
Craig R. Davis (English) 
Offered Spring 2010 



Four additional courses (il the archaeological project 
carries academic credit I or five I it the archaeologi- 
cal project does not carry academic credit) are to be 
chosen, in consultation with the student's adviser for 

the minor, from the various departments represented 
on the Advisory Committee (above) or from suitable 
courses offered elsewhere in the Five Colleges. A list of 
approved courses is available on the Program Web site 
at www.smith.edu/arch. 

No more than two courses counting toward the 
student's major program may be counted toward the 
archaeology minor. Only four credits of a language 
course may be counted toward the minor. 



400 Special Studies 

By |)ermission of the Archaeology Advisory Committee, 
for junior or senior minors. 2 or 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 



The Minor 



Requirements: 

1. ARC 211. 

2. A project in which the student works outside of a 
conventional classroom but under appropriate 
supervision on an archaeological question approved 
in advance by the Advisory Committee. The project 
may be done in a variety of ways and places; for 
example, it may be excavation (field work), or work 
in another aspect of archaeology in a museum or 
laboratory, or in an area closely related to archaeol- 
ogy such as geology or computer science. Students 
are encouraged to propose projects related to their 
special interests. 

This project may be, but does not need to be, one for 
which the student receives academic credit. If the 
project is an extensive one for which academic credit is 
approved by the Registrar and the Advisory Committee, 
it may count as one of the six courses required for this 
minor. 



92 



Art 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

*' Marylin Martin Rhie, Ph.D. (Art and East Asian 

Studies) 
Dwight Pogue, M.F.A. 
Gary L. Niswonger, M.Ed., M.EA. 
Craig Felton, Ph.D. 
* 2 Susan Heideman, M.EA. 
John Davis, Ph.D. 
n Barbara A. Kellum, Ph.D., Chair 
" 2 A. Lee Burns, M.S., MSA., Associate Chair 
fl Brigitte Buettner, Ph.D. 
John Moore, Ph.D. 

Kennedy Professor in Renaissance Studies 

Rosemarie Mulcahy, Ph.D. 

Professor-in-Residence 

Barry Moser, B.S. 

Associate Professors 

Dana Leibsohn, Ph.D. 
Lynne Yamamoto, M.A. 

Harnish Visiting Artist 

Paola Ferrario, M.EA. 



Assistant Professors 

Frazer Ward, Ph.D. 
+1 Fraser Stables, M.EA. 
"'Andre Dombrowski, Ph.D. 
John Slepian, M.EA. 

Visiting Assistant Professor 

Linda Kim, Ph.D. 

Senior Lecturer 

"'John Gibson, M.EA. 

Lecturers 

Carl Caivano, M.EA. 

Katherine Schneider, M.EA. 

§2 Martin Antonetti, M.S.L.S. 

AjaySinha,Ph.D. 

Christine Geiler Andrews, Ph.D. 

Eric Poehler, MA 

Jessica Nicholl, Ph.D. 

Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow and Lecturer 

Saleema Waraich, Ph.D. 



The Department of Art believes that visual literacy is 
crucial to negotiations of the contemporary world. Con- 
sequently, equal weight is given to studio practice and 
historical analysis. Courses focus on images and the 
built environment and seek to foster an understanding 
of visual culture and human expression in a given time 
and place. 

Students planning to major or to do honors work in 
art will find courses in literature, philosophy, religion, 
and history taken in the first two years valuable. A 
reading knowledge of foreign languages is useful for 
historical courses. Each of the historical courses may 
require one or more trips to Boston, New York or other 
places in the vicinity for the study of original works of 
art. 

Courses in the history of art are prefixed ARH; 
courses in studio art are prefixed ARS. 



A. The History Of Art 

Introductory Courses 

Courses at the 100 level are open to all students; there 
are no prerequisites. 

ARH 101 Approaches to Visual Representation (G) 

Emphasizing discussion and short written assignments, 
these colloquia have as their goal the development of 
art historical skills of description, analysis and inter- 
pretation. Unless otherwise indicated, each section is 
limited to 18, normally first years and sophomores. 

'the Home as a Work of Art 

I ising examples of domestic design throughout the 



Art 



93 



world and the ages, we will examine in detail various 
facets of the setting and the building, its spatial orga- 
nization, materials, and accoutrements, and the wa\ it 
serves and represents ideas about gender, the family as 
asocial and productive unit, and moral and aesthetic 
values. Enrollment limited to in. {H/A} 4 credits 
inula Kim 
Offered Fall 2008 

Writing Art/Art Writing 

In this museum-based, writing- in tensive class, students 
will encounter at firsthand a range of art objects from 
different periods and cultures, primarily in the Smith 
College Museum of Art. Students will be introduced 
to a variety of ways of writing about these objects — 
descriptive, contextual, interpretive — considering 
especially their setting in the museum. You will work 
closely with objects in the museum and will learn how 
they circulate through different institutional contexts. 
We will assess what is at stake in different ways of writ- 
ing about art, in relation to the contexts in which both 
the art and the writing appear. \VI {A/H} 4 credits 
Frazer Ward 
Offered Fall 2008 

Cities 

Characteristic forms and building types, and the ritual, 
symbolic, political, economic, and cultural significa- 
tion of cities. Examples drawn from different historical 
periods, with primary focus on Europe and the Ameri- 
cas. We shall examine the multiple, competing forces 
that encouraged, effected, constrained or thwarted 
change in the layout and life of cities. {H/A} 4 credits 
John Moore 
Offered Fall 2008 

Realism: The Desire to Record the World 
Throughout history, artists have sought to re-create 
the natural world; indeed "Realism" has been a 
driving force behind representation from the earliest 
human-made images to the invention of photography 
to computer-generated pictures. In some cases, this 
Realist intention has meant designing the built envi- 
ronment to human scale: in others it has meant trying 
to record seasonal changes and simple human activi- 
ties; in others still Realism has been used to suggest 
the presence of the divine in everyday objects. Whether 
accurately or symbolically, through the blatant use of 
materials or through virtuoso trickery, artists have con- 
sistently tried to transfer scenes from the "real world" 



onto other surfaces or sites This course will explore the 
artistic motivation of Realism formally, thematicalh 
and contextually from ancient tunes to the present 
{H/A} 4 credits ' 
Christine Andrews 
Offered Spring 2009 

Negotiating Difference m Image and pace 
Differences in belief systems, communal affiliations, 
and individual identities have been expressed through 
visual media for millennia. This course will explore 
the strategies by which self-identity and otherness have 
been framed in visual terms over the course of many 
centuries, with a particular focus on constructions of 
race, religious affiliation, ethnicity, gender and sexual- 
ity. {H/A} 4 credits 
Saleem Waraicb 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 120 Introduction to Art History: Asia 

This course presents a survey of the art of Mia by 
exploring the major periods, themes, monuments of 
architecture, painting and sculpture and the philo- 
sophical and religious underpinnings from the earliest 
times to the 18th century. Study will be centered on 
the art of India, China and Japan with some attention 
given to Central Asia, Tibet, Sri Lanka. Indonesia and 
Korea. Enrollment limited to 40. {H/A} 4 credits 
AjaySinha 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 140 Introduction to Art History: Western 
Traditions 

This course examines a selection of key buildings, 
images and objects created from the prehistoric era, 
the ancient Mediterranean and medieval times, to 
European and American art of the last 500 years. ' toer 
the semester we will study specific visual and cultural 
traditions at particular historical moments and become 
familiar with basic terminology, modes of analysis and 
methodologies in art history. Enrollment limited to 40. 
{H/A} 4 credits 
Craig Fetion 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 20(H) 

ARH 150 Introduction to Art History: Architecture and 
the Built Environment 
Pending cap approval. 

What kinds of places do people call home, and when' 
do the\ choose to bun their dead' How have com- 



94 



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munities marked their territories or cities reshaped 
landscapes? What does it mean to enshrine the sacred, 
nurture civic gardens or create a consumer paradise — 
in 8th-century Spain or 1 lth-century New iMexico, 
19th-century Beijing or contemporary Dubai? Working 
across cultures, and from antiquity to the present, this 
class highlights both global and distinct, local perspec- 
tives on the history of architecture and the built envi- 
ronment. {H/A} 4 credits 
Dana Leibsohn 
Offered Spring 2009 

Lectures and Colloquia 

Group I 

ARH 212 Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries (L) 

This course explores many different aspects of life in 
the cities and sanctuaries of the ancient Near East, 
Egypt, Greece, Etruria and Rome. Recurrent themes 
will include urbanism, landscapes and patterns of wor- 
ship, including initiation, sacrifice and pilgrimage. 
We'll probe how modern notions of the secular and the 
sacred influence interpretation and how sometimes the 
seemingly most anomalous features of the worship of 
Isis or of the juxtaposition of commercial and domestic 
space within a city can potentially prove to be the most 
revealing about life in another place and time. {H/A} 
4 credits 

Barbara Kellum 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 216 The Art and Architecture of the Roman World 
(D 

From North Africa to Gaul, from the Pillars of Hercules 
(Straits of Gibraltar) to Asia Minor, the interrelation- 
ships of art and power in the visual culture of the 
ethnically diverse Roman empire, from the first century 
B.C.E. through the fourth century C.E., will be the 
subject of study. We will also examine works of art from 
later periods as well as literature and film that structure 
our perception of the Roman world. {H/A} 4 credits 
Eric Poehler 
Offered Spring 2009 

Group II 

ARH 224 The Art of Japan (L) 

The art of Japan, especially painting, sculpture, archi- 
tecture and color prints. Particular attention given to 



the roles of native tradition and foreign influences in 
the development of Japanese art. {H/A} 4 credits 
Marylin Rhie 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 228 Islamic Art and Architecture (L) 

This course surveys the architecture, landscape, book 
arts and luxury objects produced in Islamic contexts 
from Spain to India, and from the 7th through the 
20th centuries. Attention will be focused upon the rela- 
tionships between Islamic visual idioms and localized 
religious, political and socioeconomic circumstances. 
In particular, lectures and readings will examine the 
vital roles played by theology, royal patronage, cer- 
emonial, gift exchange, trade and workshop practices 
in the formulation of visual traditions. Recommended 
background ARH 101 or 140. {H/A} 4 credits 
Salema Waraich 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 240 Art Historical Studies (C) 

Illuminated Manuscripts of the Later Middle Ages 
The decorated book was one of the most important 
forms of art making in the middle ages. This course 
presents an integrative approach to the study of these 
objects, taking into consideration their structure, text, 
pictorial and decorative programs, and bindings. We 
will investigate the patronage, production, use, and 
after-life of a range of illuminated manuscripts in 
the later middle ages made in Europe, including the 
continuous traditions of monastic and courtly book 
production, as well as the new development of urban 
manuscript industries by lay artisans. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 18. {H/A} 4 credits 
Christine Andrews 
Offered Spring 2009 

Group III 

ARH 240 Art Historical Studies (G) 

The Age of Louis W(C) 

An examination of the fundamental role of the visual 
arts in fashioning an extraordinary and indelible image 
of rulership. Ensembles and individual objects in many 
media (painting, sculpture, architecture, landscape de- 
sign, printmaking, furniture and tapestries, numismat- 
ics, works commissioned in Rome, and literary produc- 
tion) will be related to the centralized bureaucracy that 



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95 



came to define the French state. Some consideration of 
the impact of Versailles on European courts of the late 
17th and ISth centuries. {H/A} 4 credits 
John Moore 
Offered Spring 20(H) 

Art in Spain During the Reigns of Philip 11 and Philip 
Ill(C) 

During the forty-two years of his reign. Philip II 
( 1527-98) transformed the arts in Spain. The build- 
ing of the Escorial and other royal residences attracted 
painters and sculptors. Philip III has tended to be over- 
shadowed by his illustrious father and consequenth 
the art of his reign (1598-1621) is less well known. 
Nevertheless, the period is rich in artistic talent and 
includes painters and sculptors as well as two of the 
most celebrated artists. El Greco and Velazquez. This 
course will provide the opportunity for a close study of 
art and patronage in Spain during the period 1556 to 
1621. Enrollment limited to 18. {H/A} 4 credits 
Rosemarie Mulcahy. Kennedy Professor 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 246 Renaissance Architecture (L) 

Architectural, urban and landscape design in Western 
Europe, from the central Italian communes of the 
14th century to the villas of Andrea Palladio. Focus on 
the mechanisms of patronage; the interest in Roman 
antiquity; principles of design; the symbolic import of 
articulated, decorated space; and the cultural implica- 
tions of the ultramontane transmission (and transfor- 
mation) of Italianate patterns in Spain, France, central 
Europe and England. {H/A} 4 credits 
John Moore 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 254 Baroque Art (L) 

During this age of the consolidation of power — that of 
Roman Catholicism and European national states — 
explorations around the globe, investigations in science 
and innovations in the concepts of artistic design led 
to an explosion of styles, innovative and often revolu- 
tionary, in art. Post Counter Reformation Italy and the 
reconsideration of art theory and design at the Academy 
of the Carracci in Bologna beginning about 1580, the 
emergence of a new artistic interpretation brought 
about by Caravaggio and his followers — first in Rome 
and then across Europe, and the subsequent change 
in styles to meet various political and regional needs 
will be examined through painting and sculpture in 



Italy. The class examines such artists as Annibale and 
Ludovico Carracci. Caravaggio, Gian Lorenzo Bernini, 

Pietro da Cortona. (inido Rem; France; Simon Youet. 
Poussin, Claude and Georges de La Tour; and Spam: El 
Greco, Ribera, Velazquez, and Zurbanin. {H/A} 4 credits 
Craig l-'elton 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 260 Art Historical Studies 

topic: Current Issues m Latin American . \rt (L) 
This course examines recent scholarship and criticism 
written in, and about Latin America, focusing upon 
visual culture from 1 520— present. Among the works we 
will consider: colonial paintings and festivals: urban 
planning; representations of Frida Kahlo and Karl 
Marx: Brazilian film; contemporary photograph} and 
museum exhibitions. Of particular interest will be the 
theoretical and methodological issues that characterize 
writing on visual culture since 1980. and the ways they 
challenge our response to the question "What is Latin 
American art?" Prerequisite: one class in art history, or 
the anthropology, history or literature of Latin America. 
All classes will be taught in English, with written work 
accepted in English and Spanish. {H/A} 4 credits 
Dana Leibsohn 
Offered Fall 2008 

PRS 301 Translating New Worlds 

This course investigates how New World explorations 
were translated into material culture and patterns of 
thought in early modern Europe and the Americas 
(1500-1750). Focusing upon geographies, "anthro- 
pologies," material objects, and pictorial and written 
records, students analyze how travel to and through the 
Americas reshaped the lives of consumers and think- 
ers — from food and finery (chocolate and silver, sugar 
and feathers) to published narratives and collections 
of objects made in New Spain, New England and New 
France. In addition to initial 16th-century contacts, we 
discuss cultural practices — material, imagined, factual 
or fantastical — that arose from the first encounters, 
conquests and settlements. This seminar welcomes 
students who are interested in art history, literature, 
history, anthropology or the history of science and who 
can read one relevant European language (French, 
German, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish). Enrollment 
limited to 15 juniors and seniors. (E) {A/H/L} 4 credits 
Dana Leibsohn (Art) and. \nn Jones (Comparative 
Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 



96 



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Group N 

ARH 260 Art Historical Studies (C) 

Topic: Museums by Artists. The experience of art does 
not take place in a vacuum: the museum, among other 
institutions, bestows value upon the objects inside it. 
In this class, we will examine an important body of art 
since the 1950s, which has engaged critically with the 
architectural, institutional and discursive frameworks 
that are conditions for the experience of art. We will 
examine works by artists including Michael Asher, 
Marcel Broodthaers, Daniel Buren, Andrea Fraser, Hans 
Haacke, Louise Lawler and Fred Wilson in terms of the 
ways in which they reflect upon the contexts in which 
they appear. We will also consider the current trend 
toward the spectacularization of museum architecture 
and the museum's status as a mass medium, and we 
will look for future possibilities in the practice of insti- 
tutional critique. Prerequisite: One 100-level art history 
course, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 18. {H/A} 4 credits 
Frazer Ward 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 264 North American Art: Pre-Colonial to Civil 
War (L) 

Art and architecture of the English colonies, the early 
U.S. republic and the antebellum period. Emphasis on 
the cultural significance of portraiture, the develop- 
ment of national and regional schools of genre and 
landscape painting and the changing stylistic modali- 
ties in architecture. Prerequisite: one 100-level art his- 
tory course, or permission of the instructor. {H/A} 
4 credits 
Linda Kim 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 265 Arts in the United States after the Civil War 
(L) 

Art and architecture of the late 19th and early 20th 
centuries. Exploration of the cultural legacy of the 
Civil War, the cosmopolitan arts of the Gilded Age, the 
development of early modernism and the expansive 
years during and after World War II. Recommended 
background: ARH 101 or 140. {H/A} 4 credits 
Linda Kim 
Offered Spring 2009 



ARH 278 History of Photography (L) 

A survey of photography, photographers and the litera- 
ture of photography. Consideration of the formal, tech- 
nical, historical and social factors in the development 
and practice of photography since 1839- Recommended 
background: ARH 101. {H/A} 4 credits 
Linda Kim 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 280 Film and Art History (C) 

Topic: Bollywood: Cinema of Interruptions. How 
should we respond to Indian popular films, which are 
notorious for their distracting song and dance num- 
bers, meandering storylines, and visually overblown 
spectacles? This colloquium will approach Indian 
films as what film scholar Lalitha Gopalan has called 
a "constellation of interruptions." Through critical 
responses to scholarly articles, close analysis of feature 
films, group projects and written assignments, we 
will develop historical and theoretical perspectives for 
understanding the visual as a major "interruption" 
distinguishing these films in the context of world cin- 
ema. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment 
limited to 18. (E) {H/A} 4 credits 
Ajay Sinha 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 282 Art Since the 1960s (L) 

This course surveys important global artistic tendencies 
since the late 1960s, in their art-historical and socio- 
historical contexts. The class considers such develop- 
ments as postminimalism, earthworks, the influence 
of feminism, postmodernism, the politics of identity, 
contemporary conceptions of the site (and center/ 
periphery debates), postcolonialism, global publics and 
the global culture of art, and the theoretical issues and 
debates that help to frame these topics. Prerequisite: 
One 100-level art history course or permission of the 
instructor. {H/A} 4 credits 
Frazer Ward 
Offered Spring 2009 

Other 200-Level Courses 

ARH 293 The Artist's Book in the 20th Century (C) 

A survey of the genre from its beginnings in the politi- 
cal and artistic avant-garde movements of Europe at 
the turn of the 20th century through contemporary 
American conceptual bookworks. In particular, the 
course will examine the varieties of form and expres- 



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sion used by book artists and the relationships between 
these artists and the socio-ciiltural, literary and graphic 
environments from which thev emerged In addition 
to extensive hands-on archival work in the library's 
Mortimer Rare Book Room and the museum's Selma 
Erving Collection of Livres d'Artistes, students will read 
extensively in the literature of artistic manifestos and of 
semiotics, focusing on those critics who have explored 
the complex relationship of word and image. Permis- 
sion of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. {H/A} 
4 credits 

Martin AntonetH 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 294 Art History— Methods, Issues, Debates (C) 

The meanings we ascribe to art works of any culture or 
time period are a direct result of our own preoccupa- 
tions and methods. This colloquium will give both a 
broad overview of contemporary debates in the history 
of art — including such issues as technologies of vision, 
feminism, sexuality studies, globalism or material 
culture — and locate these methods within art history's 
own intellectual history. The course will consist of wide- 
ranging weekly readings and discussion, and clarify 
such key terms as iconography, formalism, connois- 
seurship, and the Frankfurt and Vienna Schools. Rec- 
ommended for junior and senior majors. Prerequisites: 
One 200-level art history course, or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 18. {H/A} 4 credits 
Dana l£ibsohn 
Offered Spring 2009 

Seminars 

Seminars require advanced-level research and students 
are expected to bring to class a solid and relevant 
background in the general field and period of study. All 
seminars require an oral presentation and a research 
paper. Enrollment limited to 12 students. 

ARH 350 The Arts in England, 1485-1714 (S) 

Constitutional limits on monarchical power, the em- 
brace of Protestantism, religious intolerance and fa- 
naticism, revolution and regicide, and a much-vaunted 
(when not exaggerated and misleading) insularity, 
set the stage in England for patterns of patronage and 
a relationship to the visual arts both similar to and 
significantly different from modes established in Conti- 
nental absolutist courts. While critically examining the 
perennial notion of "the Englishness of English art." 



we shall study the careers of the painters, printmakers, 

sculptors, architects and landscape designers whose 
collective efforts made English art, at long last, one to 
be reckoned with. {H/A} 4 credits 
John Moore 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARH 352: Studies in Art History (S) 

Ancient Cities and Sanctuaries 
The fabled cities of the ancient Mediterranean world — 
Alexandria, Rome, Athens — and the sanctuaries which 
drew worshipers from across the known world — the 
Temple of Aphrodite at Ephesus, the Temple of Fortuna 
Primigenia at Praeneste, the panhellenic sanctuary of 
Zeus at Olympia or Apollo at Delphi — will be among 
the subjects of this seminar. We'll study everything from 
ground plans to the tourist goods produced at each site 
to develop a multidimensional understanding. Each 
student will select and research a particular city or 
sanctuary, become the class expert on that site, present 
it, and write a seminar paper on it. {H/A} 4 credits 
Barbara Kellum 
Offered Spring 2009 

Science, Poetry. Prose 

This seminar will provide a close study of the major 
stylistic, artistic and aesthetic expressions in painting 
and sculpture in Florence during the dynamic and ver- 
satile flowering of the Renaissance between 1450 and 
1500, the later Quattrocento, with a particular focus 
on the patronage of the Medici family and their as- 
sociates. Works by such artist as Donatello, Verrocchio, 
Pollaiuolo, Botticelli, Fillipino Lippi and Ghirlandaio 
will establish a foundation for our understanding of the 
pursuits and achievements defining this era, to which 
later artists and societies turned for inspiration. Our 
goal is to understand why this is so. {H/A} 4 credits 
Craig Helton 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARH 374 Studies in 20th-century Art 

Topic: Sculpture Since 1945. This seminar investigates 
the status of sculpture from the end of WW] 1 into the 
21st century, from modernist three-dimensional objects 
that operated within a relatively clearly defined realm, 
through the "'expanded field" after minimalism, to 
installations involving media that seem tenuously 
connected to any stable category. Beginning with 
post-war modernist sculpture, we will examine the 



Art 



dissemination of sculpture as an object as well as a 
category, in developments including minimalism, 
"earth" art, installation and "relational aesthetics." 
{H/A} 4 credits 
Frazer Ward 
Offered Spring 2009 

Cross Listed and Interdepartmental 
Courses 

The following courses in other departments, are par- 
ticularly good supplements to the art major and minor. 

AMS 302 The Material Culture of New England 
1630-1860 

Not for seminar credit. 

ARC 211 Introduction to Archaeology 

EAS 279 The Art and Culture of Tibet 

GER 227 Topics in German Studies: What Color is the 
Earth? What Color is the Sky? 

HST/EAS 218 Thought and Art of Medieval China 

LSS 105 Introduction to Landscape Studies 

MTH 227 Topics in Modern Mathematics: Mathematical 
Sculptures 

Special Studies 

ARH 400 Special Studies 

Written project description required. 

1 to 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

ARH 408d Special Studies 

Written project description required. 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 



The department reserves the right to retain examples of 
work done in studio courses. 

All studio courses require extensive work beyond the 
six scheduled class hours. 

Please note that all studio art courses have limited 
enrollments. 

Introductory Courses 

Studio courses at the 100 level are designed to accept 
all interested students with or without previous art 
experience. Enrollment is limited to 18 per section, 
unless otherwise indicated. Two 100-level courses are 
generally considered the prerequisites for 200 and 300- 
level courses, unless otherwise indicated in the course 
description. However, the second 100-level course may 
be taken during the same semester as an upper-level 
course, with the permission of the instructor. Priority 
will be given to entering students and plan B and C 
majors. 

ARS 161 Design Workshop I 

An introduction to visual experience through a study of 
the basic principles of design. {A} 4 credits 
A. Lee Burns 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 162 Introduction to Digital Media 

An introduction to visual experience through a study of 
basic principles of design. All course work will be devel- 
oped and completed using the functions of a computer 
graphics work station. Enrollment limited to 14. {A} 
4 credits 

Lynne Yamamoto, Paola Ferrario 
Offered both semesters 

ARS 163 Drawing I 

An introduction to visual experience through a study of 

the basic elements of drawing. {A} 4 credits 

Carl Caivano, Dwight Pogue, Katherine Schneider, 

Gary Niswonger, To be announced 

Offered both semesters 



B. Studio Courses 

A fee for basic class materials is charged in all studio 
courses. The individual student is responsible for the 
purchase of any additional supplies she may require. 



ARS 164 Three-Dimensional Design 

An introduction to design principles as applied to three- 
dimensional form. {A} 4 credits 
Lynne Yamamoto 
Offered Spring 2009 



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99 



ARS 166 Introduction to Media Arts and Technology 
This introductory course will explore the intersections 
of art and technology across a wide range of experi- 
mental / interdisciplinary practices. Through readings. 
viewings, group discussion, projects, critiques and guest 
artist visits, we will examine a range of technologically 
mediated art practices, including digital imaging, sonic 
art, interactive installations, physical / tactile comput- 
ing, digital writing, computer mediated performance, 
as well as emergent new media art and research topics. 
Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
Thomas Ciufo 
Offered Fall 2008 

Intermediate Courses 

Intermediate courses are generally open to students 
who have completed two 100-level courses, unless 
otherwise stated. Priority will be given to plan B & 
C majors. Students will be allowed to repeat courses 
numbered 200 or above provided they work with a 
different instructor. 

ARS 261/ MUS 261 Sonic Art: Theory and Practice 

Through readings, group discussion, listening sessions, 
projects and critiques, we will examine and engage a 
wide range of sonic art theory and practice. We will ex- 
plore conceptual, theoretical and compositional aspects 
of sound and listening, acoustics / psychoacoustics, 
social-cultural contexts of sound and recording, sound 
aesthetics and symbolism, soundscapes and acoustic 
ecology, as well as sound in relationship to other 
media. Prerequisites: at least one previous creative 
production / project based class (from any department) 
or permission of instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. 
(E) {A} 4 credits 
nomas Ciufo 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 263 Intermediate Digital Media 

This course will build working knowledge of multime- 
dia digital artwork through experience with multime- 
dia authoring, Web development, sound and animation 
software. Prerequisite: ARS 162. {A} 4 credits 
John Slepian 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 264 Drawing II 

Advanced problems in drawing, including study of the 
human figure. Prerequisite: 163 or permission of the 



instructor Enrollment limited to IS. {A} i credits 
lb be announced 

Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 266 Painting I 

Various spatial and pictorial concepts arc Investigated 
through the oil medium. Prerequisite: 16.S or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Enrollment limited to IS. {A} 
4 credits 

{Catherine Schneider 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 269 Offset Printmaking I 

Introduction to the printmaking technique of hand- 
drawn lithography, photographic halftone lithography 
through Adobe Photoshop and linocut. May be repeated 
once for credit. Prerequisites: l6l, or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
DuigbtPogue 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 270 Offset Monoprinting 

Printmaking using the flat-bed offset press with emphasis 
on color monoprinting. Prerequisites: l6l or permission 
of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
DuigbtPogue 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 272 Intaglio Techniques 

An introduction to intaglio techniques, particularly 
etching and engraving. Prerequisites: 161 or 162 or 
163, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited 
to 15. {A} 4 credits 
Gary Niswonger 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 273 Sculpture I 

The human figure and other natural forms. Work in 
modeling and plaster casting. Prerequisites: l6l and 
163, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited 
to 16. {A} 4 credits 
A. Lee Bums 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 274 Projects in Installation I 

This is a course that introduces students to different 
installation strategies (e.g., working with multiples, 
found objects, light, site-specificity, among others). 
Coursework includes a series of projects, critiques, read- 
ings and a paper. Prerequisite: ARS 164, or permission 



100 



Art 



of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 

4 credits 

Lynne Yamamoto 

Offered both semesters 

ARS 275 The Book: Theory and Practice I 

Investigates (1) the structure and history of the Latin 
alphabet, augmenting those studies with brief lessons 
in the practice of calligraphy, (2) a study of typogra- 
phy that includes the composing of type by hand and 
learning the rudiments of printing type, and (3) an 
introduction to digital typography. Prerequisite: Design 
(ARS l6l or equivalent) or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
Barry Moser 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 281/LSS 250 Landscape Studies Introductory 
Studio 

This hands-on studio will ask students to consider the 
landscape a location of evolving cultural and ecologi- 
cal patterns, processes and histories. Beginning from 
this set of assumptions, students will work through a 
series of projects (research, interpretive, documentary, 
as well as proposal-based), that encourage an engage- 
ment with the landscape, prodding us to critically 
consider the environment as a socially and culturally 
constructed space/place as well as a manageable re- 
source. We will work in a variety of media including 
drawing, writing, photography and digital image ma- 
nipulation. Prerequisites: LSS 100 and 105. Admission 
by permission of the instructor. Priority given to LSS 
minors (starting with seniors), and then to students 
with one or no previous studios. Enrollment limited to 
12. {A/S} 4 credits 
Reid Bertone-Johnson 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 282 Photography I 

An introduction to visual experience through a study 
of the basic elements of photography as an expressive 
medium. Recommended: l6l, 163 or 164. Each sec- 
tion will be either traditional film darkroom practice, 
or digital output from scanned negatives. Enrollment 
limited to 15 per section. {A} 4 credits 
Paola Ferrario, Fraser Stables 
Offered both semesters 



ARS 283 Introduction to Architecture: Site and Space 

The primary goal of this studio is to engage in the 
architectural design process as a mode of discovery and 
investigation. Design does not require innate spontane- 
ous talent. It is a process of discovery based on per- 
sonal experience, the joy of exploration and a spirited 
intuition. Gaining skills in graphic communication 
and model making, students will produce projects to 
illustrate their ideas and observations in response to 
challenging questions about the art and craft of space- 
making. Overall, this course will ask students to take 
risks intellectually and creatively, fostering a keener 
sensitivity to the built environment as something con- 
sidered, manipulated and made. Prerequisite: one art 
history course at the 100 level. Enrollment limited to 
12. {A} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 285 Introduction to Architecture: Language and 
Craft 

The primary goal of this studio is to gain insight into 
the representation of architectural space and form as 
a crafted place or object. Students will gain skills in 
graphic communication and model making, work- 
ing in graphite, pen, watercolor and other media. We 
will look at the architecture of the past and present for 
guidance and imagine the future through conceptual 
models and drawings. Overall, this course will ask stu- 
dents to take risks intellectually and creatively, fostering 
a keener sensitivity to the built environment as some- 
thing considered, manipulated and made. Prerequisite: 
one art history course at the 100 level. Enrollment 
limited to 12. Note: LSS 255 can substitute for ARS 285 
in the studio art major. {A} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2009 

Advanced Courses 

Advanced courses are generally open to students who 

have completed one intermediate course, unless stated 

otherwise. 

Priority is given to Plan A, B and C majors. 

ARS 361 Interactive Digital Multimedia 

This art studio course emphasizes individual and 
collaborative projects in computer-based interactive 
multimedia production. Participants will extend their 



Art 



101 



individual experimentation with time-based processes 
and development of media production skills (3D ani- 
mation, video and audio production) — developed In 
the context of interactive multimedia production for 
performance, installation. CD-ROM or Internet. Critical 
examination and discussion of con tempo ran examples 
of new media art will augment this studio course. 
Prerequisites: ARS 162 and permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 14. {A} 4 credits 
John Slepian 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 362 Painting II 

Painting from models, still-life, and landscape using 
varied techniques and conceptual frameworks. Prereq- 
uisites: 266 and permission of the instructor. Enroll- 
ment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
Susan Heideman, Katherine Schneider 
Offered both semesters 

ARS 363 Painting III 

Advanced problems in painting. Emphasis on thematic 

self-direction and group critical analysis. Prerequisite: 

ARS 362 and permission of the instructor. Enrollment 

limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 

Susan Heideman 

Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 369 Offset Printmaking II 

Advanced study in printmaking. Emphasis on color 
printing in lithography block printing and photo- 
printmaking. Prerequisite: 269 or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
I height Pogue 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 374 Sculpture II 

Advanced problems in sculpture using bronze casting, 
welding and various media. Prerequisites: 273 and 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. 
{A} 4 credits 
A. Lee Burns 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 375 The Book: Theory and Practice II 

An opportunity for a student already familiar with the 
basic principles of the book arts and the structure of the 
book to pursue such as a manuscript or printed book 
based on the skills learned in The Book: Theory and 
Practice I or commensurate studies elsewhere. All stud- 



ies will be thorough!) augmented with study oi original 
historical materials from the Mortimer Rare Book 
Room. Prerequisite ARS 275 and/or permission oi the 

instructor. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} \ credits 
Barry Moser 

Offered Spring 20(H) 

ARS 383 Photography II 

Advanced exploration of photographic techniques and 
visual ideas. Examination of the work of contemporary 

artists and traditional masters within the medium. 
(Varying topics for 2008-09 to include digital pho- 
tography and digital printing). Prerequisites: 282 and 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to IS. 
{A} 4 credits 

Paola Ferrario, Fraser Stables 
Offered both semesters 

ARS 384 Advanced Studies in Photography 

Advanced exploration of photography as a means 
of visual expression. Lectures, assignments and self- 
generated projects will provide a basis for critiques. 
Prerequisites: 282 and permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
Paola Ferrario 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 385 Seminar in Visual Studies 

An intensive examination of a theme in studio work. 
Students will work within the medium of their area of 
concentration. Each class will include students work- 
ing in different media. Group discussion of readings. 
short papers and oral presentations will be expected. 
The course will culminate in a group exhibition. 
Enrollment limited to 15 upper-level studio majors. 
Prerequisites: T\vo or more courses in the students cho- 
sen sequence of concentration and permission of the 
instructor. Tbpic: Working in Series. Looking at artists 
who have used the series approach in their work as a 
model for developing our own rationale. {A} 4 credits 
Gary Niswonger 
Offered both semesters 

ARS 386 Topics in Architecture 

This course will explore a rotating selection of themes 
in the built environment, with strong emphasis on 
interdisciplinary work. Topics may include preservation 
and nostalgia, vernacular architecture and landscapes. 
urban design and planning, architectural theory and 
practice, material culture methods or other themes. 



102 



Art 



Prerequisites: ARS 163, 283, 285, (or equivalent LSS 
studio) and two art history courses, or permission of the 
instructor. This course may be repeated for credit with a 
different topic. Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 388 Advanced Architecture: Complex Places, 
Multiple Spaces 

This course considers architecture as a socially con- 
structed place. We will examine the built environment 
through readings, slide presentations and film. A final 
project, involving either the manipulation/examina- 
tion/interpretation of place and space through model- 
ing and graphic communication or a multimedia 
research project exploring a socially constructed place 
will be required. Prerequisites: ARS 163, 283, 285, and 
two art history courses, or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 12. {A} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 390 Five College Drawing Seminar 

This course, limited to junior and senior art majors 
from the five colleges, is based on the assumption that 
drawing is central to the study of art and is an ideal 
way to investigate and challenge that which is impor- 
tant to each student. Particular emphasis will be placed 
on thematic development within student work. Sketch 
book, written self-analysis and participating in critique 
sessions will be expected. Prerequisites: selection by 
faculty; junior and senior art majors, advanced-level 
ability. Enrollment limited to 15, three students from 
each of the five colleges. (E) {A} 4 credits 
To be announced 
To be arranged 

ARS 398 Senior Exhibition Workshop Development 

This is a two-semester (see also ARS 399) capstone 
course for senior Plan B majors. It helps students 
develop the skills necessary for presenting a cohesive 
exhibition of their work in the second semester of their 
senior year, as required by the Plan B Major. It helps 
students develop the critical judgment necessary for 
evaluating the art work they have produced to date in 
their selected studio sequence, and to cull and augment 
this work as necessary. Course material will include 
installation or distribution techniques for different me- 
dia, curation of small exhibitions of each others' work 



and development of critical discourse skills through 
reading, writing and speaking assignments. In addition 
to studio faculty, Smith museum staff may occasionally 
present topics of conceptual and/or practical interest. 
Prerequisites: ARS 163, ARS l6l or ARS 162 or ARS 
164, ARS 385; two 100-level art history courses; and at 
least two courses in selected area of concentration. Both 
courses (ARS 398 and ARS 399) required to graduate. 
Students should plan on one early evening meeting per 
week, to be arranged. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory 
only. {A} 1 credit 
Members of the department 
Offered Fall 2008 

ARS 399 Senior Exhibition Workshop 

The second course of the two-semester sequence re- 
quired to complete the Plan B Major. See description of 
ARS 398. Prerequisite: ARS 398. Both courses (ARS 398 
and ARS 399) required to graduate. Students should 
plan on one early evening meeting per week, to be 
arranged. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory only. {A} 
1 credit 

Members of the department 
Offered Spring 2009 

ARS 400 Special Studies 

Normally for junior and senior majors. Written project 
description required. 1 to 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

ARS 408d Special Studies 

Written project description required. 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Cross-listed and Interdepartmental 
Courses 

The following courses in other departments, are par- 
ticularly good supplements to the art major and minor. 

FLS 280 Introduction to Video Production 



Honors 



Co-directors of the Honors Committee: 

Art History: Dana Leibsohn; Studio Art: Lynne Yama- 
moto 



Art 



103 



ARH 430d Thesis 

(S credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

ARS 430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Requirements and Presentation: ARH 294 is recom- 
mended for art historj majors. All candidates will pres- 
ent their work to the art department, in a public presen- 
tation, late in April or early May. Guidelines and further 
details can be found at the art department Web site. 



The Major 



Advisers: Martin Antonetti. Brigitte Buettner, Lee Bums, 
John Davis, Andre Dombrowski, Craig Felton, John 
Gibson, Susan Heideman, Barbara Kellum, Linda Kim, 
Dana Leibsohn, John Moore, Gary Niswonger, Dwight 
Pogue, Marylin Rhie, John Slepian, Fraser Stables, 
Frazer Ward, Lynne Yamamoto 

Art History Adviser for Study Abroad: John Moore 

Art Studio Adviser for Study Abroad: A. Lee Bums 

There is one art major, which may be taken in one of 
three variations: Plan A (history of art), Plan B (studio 
art) or Plan C (architecture). 

Areas of Study 

Courses in the history of art are divided into areas that 
reflect various general time periods. These divisions are: 

• Group I: 200, 202, 204, 205, 206, 208, 210, 212, 214, 
216, 285 

Group II: 220, 222, 224, 226, 228, 230, 232, 234 

Group III: 240, 242, 244, 246, 250, 252, 254, 255, 258 

Group IV: 260, 26l, 263, 264, 265, 270, 272, 273, 274, 
276,278,280,281,282,283 

No course counting toward the major or minor may be 
taken for an S/U grade, except ARS 398 and ARS 399- 



Students entering Smith College in the Fall 2004 
semester (or after) are subject to the following require- 
ments. All others have the option of following this set of 
requirements, or the one in effect when they arrived at 
the college or declared their major 

Plan A, The History of Art 

Requirements: Eleven courses, which will include: 

1. Two 100-level courses selected from two of the 
following categories: 

a: colloquia (ARH 101) 

b: non-Western survey (ARH 120 or 130) 

c: Western survey (ARH 140) 

2. One course in studio art 

3. Seven additional history of art courses. Students 
must take at least one course in each of four areas 
of study (Groups I— IV). Normally, five of the history 
of art courses counted toward the major must be 
taken at Smith. No more than three of these seven 
may be in a single distribution group. 

4. One seminar in the history of art in a field in which 
the student has relevant expertise. The seminar is 
to be taken at Smith and does not count toward the 
distribution. 

Plan B, Studio Art 

Requirements: Fourteen courses, which will include: 

1. ARS 163 

2. One of the following introductory design courses: 
ARS 161 orARS 162 or ARS 164' 

3. 1\vo 100-level art history courses selected from two 
of the following categories: 

a: colloquia (ARH 101) 

b: non-Western survey (ARH 120 or 130) 

c: Western survey (ARH 140) 

4. Two additional art history 7 courses, at least one of 
which must be in Group I, II or III. 

5. Five additional studio art courses, which must nor- 
mally include the full sequence of courses available 
(usually three) in one of the following five areas of 
concentration: 

a: electronic media. Smith or Five-College digital or 
video production may count as upper-level digital 
courses. 

b. graphic arts 

c. painting 

d. photography 

e. sculpture 

f. drawing 



104 



Art 



6. ARS 385 

7. ARS 398 and ARS 399 

In addition, in their senior year studio art majors will 
be required to install an exhibition during the last half 
of the spring semester, or the fall semester for J-term 
graduates. 

To fulfill this requirement, Plan B majors will enroll in 
ARS 398-399- 

Declaring the Plan B major 

A student may declare a Plan B major anytime after 
she has completed the introductory (100 level) studio 
art requirements and one additional studio art course. 
She must submit a portfolio of work to the Portfolio 
Review Committee. Portfolios will be reviewed each 
semester, just before the advising period. Students who 
receive a negative evaluation will be encouraged to take 
an additional studio course or courses, and resubmit 
their portfolio at a subsequent review time. Students 
who receive a negative evaluation may resubmit their 
portfolios in subsequent reviews up to and including 
the last portfolio review available during their sopho- 
more year. These students will be offered suggestions for 
strengthening their portfolios through additional studio 
coursework in the same or other media represented in 
the portfolio. The additional studio courses will count 
toward fulfilling the major requirements. 

Mapping the Plan B major 

Upon receiving a positive portfolio evaluation, a student 
should select and meet with a Plan B adviser. Together 
they will discuss her interests and review her studio 
work to date, and select an area of studio in which she 
will concentrate. In exceptional cases, the student and 
her adviser may design a sequence of studio courses 
that draws from several areas of concentration. 

Plan C, Architecture 

Requirements: Twelve courses, which will include: 

1. Two 100-level courses selected from two of the 
following categories: 

a: colloquia (ARH 101) 

b: non-Western survey (ARH 120 or 130) 

c: Western survey (ARH 140) 

2. ARS 163, 283, 285 and 388 (or their equivalent) 

3. One other upper-level course in three-dimensional 
architectural design, such as ARS 386. 



4. One studio course in another medium. 

5. Three 200-level courses in history of art that focus 
on architectural monuments, urban environments 
or spatial experience. Students must take one course 
in at least two areas of study (Groups I-IV). For 
2007-08, the 200-level courses that focus on archi- 
tecture are for the Fall semester: ARH 250, 264, 283, 
285. For the Spring semester: ARH 205, 222, 265. 

6. One seminar in the history of art normally taken at 
Smith, with the research paper written on an archi- 
tectural topic. 

Students who contemplate attending a graduate pro- 
gram in architecture should take one year of physics 
and at least one semester of calculus. 



The Minors 



Plan 1, History of Art 

Designed for students who, although majoring in an- 
other department, wish to focus some of their attention 
on the history of art. With the assistance of their advis- 
ers, students may construct a minor as specific or com- 
prehensive as they desire within the skeletal structure of 
the requirements. 

Advisers: Martin Antonetti, Brigitte Buettner, John 
Davis, Andre Dombrowski, Craig Felton, Barbara Kel- 
lum, Linda Kim, Dana Leibsohn, John Moore, Marylin 
Rhie, Frazer Ward 

Requirements: Six courses, which will include two 
100-level courses, three additional courses in history 
of art (two of which must be in different areas of study 
[Groups I-IV]); and one seminar (to be taken at 
Smith). 

Plan 2, Studio Art 

Designed for students who wish to focus some of their 
attention on studio art although they are majors in 
another department. With the assistance of her adviser, 
a student may construct a minor with primary em- 
phasis on one area of studio art, or she may design a 
more general minor which encompasses several areas 
of studio art. 



Art 105 

Advisers: A. Lee Burns, John Gibson, Susan Heideman. 
Gary Niswonger. Dwight Pogue,John Slepian, Fraser 
Stables, Lynne Yamamoto. 

Requirements: 163 and five additional courses in studio 
art. of which at least three must be at the 200 level and 
at least one must be at the 300 level. 

Plan 3, Architecture 

Designed for students who wish to focus some attention 
on architecture although they are majors in another 
department. Seeks to introduce students to the history, 
design, and representation of the built environment. 

Advisers: Brigitte Buettner, John Davis, Barbara Kel- 
lum. Dana Leibsohnjohn Moore, FrazerWard 

Requirements: 

1. One 1 00- level art history course 

2. ARS 163, 283, and 285 ' 

3. two art history courses above the 100-level that focus 
on architectural monuments, urban environments 
or spatial experience: ARH 202, 204, 206, 208, 212, 
214, 216, 222, 224, 226, 228, 232, 234, 246, 250, 
264, 265, 270, 272, 274, 276, 283, 285, 288, 359- 
lor 2007-2008, the 200-level courses that focus on 
architecture are for the Fall semester: ARH 250, 264, 
283, 285. For the Spring semester: ARH 205, 222, 
265. 

Plan 4, Graphic Arts 

Advisers: Dwight Pogue, Gary Niswonger 

Graphic Arts: seeks to draw together the department's 
studio and history offerings in graphic arts into a cohe- 
sive unit. The requirements are: (1) ARS 163 (basis); 
(2) ARH 292 or 293; and (3) any four ARS from: 269, 
270, 272, 275, 369, 372, 375 of which one should be at 
the 300 level or a continuation of one medium. 



106 



Astronomy 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professor 

*1 Suzan Edwards, Ph.D, Chair 

Associate Professor 

**2 James Lowenthal, Ph.D. 

Laboratory Instructor 

MegThacher,M.S. 

Five College Faculty teaching in the undergraduate 
program 

Tom R. Dennis, Ph.D. (Professor, Mount Holyoke 

College) 
M. Darby Dyar, Ph.D. (Professor Mount Holyoke 

College) 



George S. Greenstein, Ph.D. (Professor, Amherst 

College) 
Salman Hameed, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor, Hampshire 

College) 
Houjun Mo, Ph.D. (Associate Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Stephen E. Schneider, Ph.D. (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Ronald L. Snell, Ph.D. (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Grant Wilson, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 



Students who are considering a major in astronomy 
should complete PHY 1 15 or 1 17 and 1 18 and the 
mathematics sequence up to Calculus II (MTH 112) at 
their first opportunity. 

Good choices for first-year astronomy courses for 
science majors are AST 1 1 1 and AST 1 13. Courses de- 
signed for nonscience majors who would like to know 
something about the universe are AST 100, AST 102, 
AST 103, AST 109, AST 220. 

The astronomy department is a collaborative Five 
College department. Courses designated FC (Five Col- 
lege) are taught jointly with Amherst College, Hamp- 
shire College, Mount Holyoke College and the University 
of Massachusetts. Because of differences among the 
academic calendars of each school, courses designated 
"FC" may begin earlier or later than other Smith cours- 
es. Students enrolled in any of these courses are advised 
to consult the Five College Astronomy office (545-2194) 
for the time of the first class meeting. 

100 A Survey of the Universe 

Discover how the forces of nature shape our under- 
standing of the cosmos. Explore the origin, structure, 
and evolution of the earth, moons and planets, comets 
and asteroids, the sun and other stars, star clusters, 
the Milky Way and other galaxies, clusters of galaxies, 



and the universe as a whole. Designed for nonscience 
majors. {N} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 

102 Sky I: Time 

Explore the concept of time, with emphasis on the 
astronomical roots of clocks and calendars. Observe 
and measure the cyclical motions of the sun, the moon 
and the stars and understand phases of the moon, 
lunar and solar eclipses, seasons. Designed for non- 
science majors. Enrollment limited to 25 per section. 
{N} 3 credits 

James Lowenthal, Meg Thacher' 
Offered Fall 2008 

103 Sky II: Telescopes 

View the sky with the telescopes of the McConnell 
Rooftop Observatory, including the moon, the sun, the 
planets, nebulae and galaxies. Learn to use a telescope 
on your own, and find out about celestial coordinates 
and time-keeping systems. Designed for nonscience 
majors. Enrollment limited to 20 students per section. 
{N} 2 credits 
Not offered in 2008-09 



Astronomy 



107 



AST 109/PHY 109 The Big Bang and Beyond 
According to modem science, the universe as \\v know- 
it began expanding about 14 billion years ago from an 
unimaginably hot, dense fireball. Win was the universe 
in that particular state? How did the universe get from 
that state to the way it is today, full of galaxies, stars 
and planets? What evidence supports this "big bang 
model"? Throughout this course we will focus not 
simply on what we know about these questions, but 
also on how we know it and on the limitations of our 
knowledge. Designed for nonscience majors. Enroll- 
ment limited to 25. (E) {N} 4 credits 
GatyFekkr 
Offered Spring 2009 

111 Introduction to Astronomy 
A comprehensive introduction to the study of modern 
astronomy, covering planets — their origins, orbits, 
interiors, surfaces and atmospheres; stars — their for- 
mation, structure and evolution; and the universe — its 
origin, large-scale structure and ultimate destiny. This 
introductory course is designed for students who are 
comfortable with mathematics. Prerequisite: MTH 102 
or the equivalent. {N) 4 credits 
James bowentbal 
Offered Fall 2008 



communicate astronomj to general public. Prerequi- 
site: one science course in any field {H/N} -\ credits 
Salman Hameed, at Hampshire 

Offered Spring 2009 

223 FC23 Planetary Science 

An introductory course for physical science majors. 

Topics include planetary orbits, rotation and preces- 
sion: gravitational and tidal interactions; Interiors and 
atmospheres of the Jovian and terrestrial planets; sur- 
faces of the terrestrial planets and satellites; asteroids, 
comets and planetary rings; origin and evolution of the 
planets. Prerequisites: one semester of calculus and one 
semester of a physical science. {N} 4 credits 
Daarby Dyar at Mount Holyoke 
Offered Fall 2008 

224 FC24 Stellar Astronomy 

Discover the fundamental properties of stars from the 
analysis of digital images and application of basic laws 
of physics. Extensive use of computers and scientific 
programming and data analysis. Offered in alternate 
years with 225. Prerequisites: PHY 1 IS, MTH 111, plus 
one astronomy class. {N} 4 credits 
Suzan Edwards 
Offered Spring 2009 



113 Telescopes and Techniques 

A beginning class in observational astronomy for stu- 
dents who have taken or are currently taking a physical 
science class or the equivalent. Become proficient using 
the telescopes of the McConnell Rooftop observatory to 
observe celestial objects, including the moon, the sun, 
the planets, stars, nebulae and galaxies. Learn celestial 
coordinate and time-keeping systems. Find out how 
telescopes and digital cameras work. Take digital im- 
ages of celestial objects and learn basic techniques of 
digital image processing. Become familiar with mea- 
suring and classification techniques in observational 
astronomy. Enrollment limited to 20 students. {N} 
3 credits 

James Lowentbal, Meg Thacher 
Offered Spring 2000 

220 FC20 Topics in Astronomy 

Topic: Bringing Astronomy Down to Earth — The Art 
of Communicating Science through Electronic Media. 
Integrating creative science writing with \ isuali/.ation 
through various forms of electronic media (podcasts/ 
vodcasts, animated gits, interactive Java applets, etc.) to 



225 FC25 Galactic and Extragalactic Astronomy 

The discovery of dark matter and the role of gravity in 
determining the mass of the universe will be explored 
in an interactive format making extensive use of com- 
puter simulations and independent projects. Offered in 
alternate years with 224. Prerequisites: PHY 1 IS. MTH 
111, plus one astronomy class. {N} 4 credits 
Suzan Edwards 
Not offered in 2008-09 

226 FC26 Cosmology 

Cosmological models and the relationship between 
models and observable parameters. Topics in current 
astronomy that bear upon cosmological problems, 
including background electromagnetic radiation. 
nucleosynthesis, dating methods, determinations of the 
mean density of the universe and the Hubble constant 
and tests of gravitational theories. Discussion of the 
foundations of cosmology and its future ;i> a science. 
Prerequisites: MTH 1 1 1 and one physical science 
course. (M) 4 credits 
George Greenstem at Amherst 
Offered Fall 2008 



108 



Astronomy 



229 FC29 Astrophysics of Stars and Galaxies 

A calculus-based introduction to the properties, struc- 
ture, formation and evolution of stars and galaxies. 
The laws of gravity, thermal physics and atomic physics 
provide a basis for understanding observed properties of 
stars, interstellar gas and dust. We apply these concepts 
to develop an understanding of stellar atmospheres, 
interiors and evolution, the interstellar medium, and 
the Milky Way and other galaxies. Prerequisites: two 
semesters of college-level physics (concurrent enroll- 
ment is acceptable) and second-semester calculus. {N} 
4 credits 

Instructor to be determined at Mt. Holyoke 
Offered Spring 2009 

330 FC30a Seminar: Topics in Astrophysics 

Topic: Mars. An interactive seminar, reading literature 
and addressing unresolved questions about the Red 
Planet, such as: water on Mars, the Martian atmo- 
sphere, surface composition and geomorphic features, 
life on Mars. Prerequisite: any intermediate level 
astronomy or geology course; AST 223 recommended. 
{N} 4 credits 

Darby Dyar at Mount Holyoke 
Offered Fall 2008 

335 FC35 Astrophysics II: Stellar Structure 

How astronomers determine the nature and extent 
of the universe. Following the theme of the "Cosmic 
Distance Ladder," we explore how our understanding of 
astrophysics allows us to evaluate the size of the observ- 
able universe. Topics include direct distance determina- 
tions in the solar system and nearby stars, spectroscopic 
distances of stars; star counts and the structure of our 
galaxy; Cepheid variables and the distances of galaxies; 
the Hubble Law and large-scale structure in the uni- 
verse, and quasars and the Lyman-alpha forest. Prereq- 
uisites: at least one physics course and one astronomy 
course at the 200-level or above. {N} 4 credits 
Grant Wilson at UMass 
Offered Fall 2008 

337 FC37 Observational Techniques in Optical and 
Infrared Astronomy 

An introduction to the techniques of gathering and 
analyzing astronomical data, with an emphasis on 
observations related to determining the size scale of the 
universe. Telescope design and optics. Instrumentation 
for imaging, photometry and spectroscopy. Astronomi- 
cal detectors. Computer graphics and image process- 



ing. Error analysis and curve fitting. Prerequisites: one 
astronomy and one physics course at the 200-level. {N} 
4 credits 

James Lowenthal 
Offered Spring 2009 

352 FC52 Astrophysics III: Galaxies and the Universe 

The application of physics to the understanding of 
astrophysical phenomena. Physical processes in the 
gaseous interstellar medium: photoionization in HII 
regions and planetary nebulae; shocks in supernova 
remnants and stellar jets; energy balance in molecular 
clouds. Dynamics of stellar systems: star clusters and 
the virial theorem; galaxy rotation and the presence of 
dark matter in the universe; spiral density waves. Qua- 
sars and active galactic nuclei; synchroton radiation; 
accretion disks; supermassive black holes. Prerequisites: 
four semesters of physics beyond PHY 1 18. {N} 4 credits 
Houjun Mo 
Offered Spring 2009 

400 Special Studies 

Independent research in astronomy. Admission by per- 
mission of the department. The student is expected to 
define her own project and to work independently, un- 
der the supervision of a faculty member. 1 to 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal 

The astronomy major is designed to provide a good 
foundation in modern science with a focus on astron- 
omy. Taken alone, it is suited for students who wish to 
apply scientific training in a broad general context. If 
coupled with a major in physics, the astronomy major 
or minor provides the foundation to pursue a career as 
a professional astronomer. Advanced courses in math- 
ematics and a facility in computer programming are 
strongly encouraged. 

Requirements: 44 credits, including 111 or the equiva- 
lent; 1 13; three astronomy courses at the 200 level, 
including 224 or 225; one astronomy course at the 300 
level; PHY 115 or 117 and 118. In advance consultation 
with her adviser, a student may select the remaining 
credits from 200 or 300 level courses in astronomy or 
from an appropriate selection of intermediate-level 



Astronomy 



109 



courses in closely related fields such as mathematics. 
physics, engineering, geology, computer science, or the 
history or philosophy of science. 



The Minor 



Advisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal 

The minor is designed to provide a practical introduc- 
tion to modem astronomy. If combined with a major in 
another science or mathematics-related field, such as 
geology, chemistry or computer science, it can provide 
a versatile scientific background, which would prepare 
a student for future work as a scientist or technical 
specialist. Alternatively, the minor may be combined 
with a major in a nonscientific field, such as history, 
philosophy or education, for students who wish to apply 
their astronomical backgrounds in a broader context, 
that could include history of science, scientific writing 
or editing, or science education. 

Requirements: 24 credits, including 111; 224 or 225; 
and PHY 115. The remaining courses may be selected 
from at least one more astronomy course plus any 
astronomy or physics offerings. 



Honors 

Director: James Lowenthal (Fall 2008), Suzan Edwards 
(spring 2009) 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Available to qualified students 

ready for rigorous independent work. 



Minor in Astrophysics 

Advisers: Suzan Edwards, James Lowenthal 

The astrophysics minor is designed for a student who 
is considering a career as a professional astronomer. 
Central to this approach is a strong physics back- 
ground, coupled with an exposure to topics in modem 
astrophysics. Students are advised to acquire a facility 
in computer programming. Especially well-prepared 
students may enroll in graduate courses in the Five 
College Astronomy Department. 

Requirements: completion of physics major plus any 
three astronomy classes except AST 100, 102, 103. 



110 



Biochemistry 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Christine White-Ziegler, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences), 
Director 

Professors 

** 2 Stylianos P. Scordilis, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences) 
Steven Williams, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences) 

Associate Professors 

* ] David Bickar, Ph.D. (Chemistry) 
** l * 2 CristinaSuarez, Ph.D. (Chemistry) 
Adam Hall (Biological Sciences) 



Assistant Professor 

Elizabeth Jamieson (Chemistry) 

Carolyn Wetzel, Ph.D. (Biological Sciences) 

Senior Lecturer 

* l Lale Aka Burk, Ph.D. (Chemistry) 

Laborataory Instructor 

Amy Bumside (Biochemistry) 



Exemption from required introductory courses may be 
obtained on the basis of Advanced Placement or 
departmental examinations. 

Students are advised to complete all introductory 
courses (BIO 150 and 151, CHM 111 or 118, 222, 223) 
as well as BIO 202, 203 and CHM 224 before the junior 
year. 

252 Biochemistry I: Biochemical Structure and 
Function 

Structure and function of biological macromolecules: 
proteins and nucleic acids. Mechanisms of conforma- 
tional change and cooperative activity; bioenergetics, 
enzymes and regulation. Prerequisites: BIO 202 and 
CHM 223. Laboratory (253) must be taken concur- 
rently by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N} 
3 credits 
David Bickar 
Offered Spring 2009 

253 Biochemistry I Laboratory 

Techniques of modem biochemistry: ultraviolet spec- 
trophotometry and spectrofluorimetry, SDS polyacryl- 
amide gel electrophoresis, Scatchard analysis, and a 
project lab on linked enzyme kinetics. Prerequisite: BIO 
203. BCH 252 is a prerequisite or must be taken con- 
currently. {N} 2 credits 
Amy Burnside 
Offered Spring 2009 



352 Biochemistry II: Biochemical Dynamics 

Chemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme mecha- 
nisms, metabolism and its regulation, energy produc- 
tion and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 252 and CHM 
224. Laboratory (BCH 353) must be taken concurrently 
by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N} 
3 credits 

Elizabeth Jamieson, Fall 2008 
Offered Fall 2008 

353 Biochemistry II Laboratory 

Investigations of biochemical systems using experi- 
mental techniques in current biochemical research. 
Emphasis is on independent experimental design and 
execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken 
concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
Amy Burnside 
Offered Fall 2008 

380 Seminar: Topics in Biochemistry 

Molecular Pathogenesis of Emerging Infectious 
Diseases 

This course will examine the impact of infectious dis- 
eases on our society. New pathogens have recently been 
identified, while existing pathogens have warranted 
increased investigation for multiple reasons, including 
as causative agents of chronic disease and cancer and 
as agents of bioterrorism. Specific emphasis on the 



Biochemistry 



111 



molecular basis of virulence in a variety of organisms 
will be addressed along with the diseases they cause 
and the public health measures taken to address then' 
pathogens. Prerequisites: BIO 202 or Bio 204. Recom- 
mended: BIO 306. {N} 3 credits 
Christine Wbite-Ziegler 
Offered Spring 20(H) 

Biochemical liases of Neurological Disorders 
Following the decade of the brain there has been a 
surge in understanding of the biochemical and mo- 
lecular bases of neurological disorders. This seminar 
will explore how protein misfolding relates to a number 
of neuronal diseases including spongiform encephal- 
opathies (e.g. "mad cow"). Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's 
and Parkinson's. Prerequisite: Cell Biology. BIO 202. 
{N} 3 credits 
Adam Hall 
Offered Spring 2010 

400 Special Studies 

Variable credit (1 to 5) as assigned 
Offered both semesters each year 

400d Special Studies 

Variable credit (2 to 10) as assigned 
Full-year course; Offered each year 

Other required courses: 

BI0 150 Cells, Physiology and Devlopment 

Students in this course will investigate the structure, 
function and physiology of cells, the properties of 
biological molecules, information transfer from the 
level of DNA to cell-cell communication, and cellular 
energy generation and transfer. The development of 
multicellular organisms and the physiology of selected 
organ systems will also be explored. Laboratory (BIO 
1 5 1 ) is recommended but not required. Enrollment 
limited to 80. {N} 4 credits 
Michael Barresi, Richard Briggs, Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

BI0 151 Cells, Physiology and Development Laboratory 

Laboratory sessions in this course will combine ob- 
servational and experimental protocols. Students will 
examine cellular molecules, monitor enzymatic reac- 
tions, photosynthesis and respiration to study cellular 
function. Students will also examine embryology and 
the process of differentiation, the structure and func- 



tion of plant systems, and the physiology of certain 
animal systems. Prerequisite: BIO ISO, (normally taken 
concurrently). {N} l credit 
Members ol the department 
Offered Fall 2008. Spring 2009 

BIO 202 Cell Biology 

The structure and function of eukaryotic cells. This 
course will examine contemporary topics in cellular 
biology: cellular structures, organelle function, mem- 
brane and endomembrane systems, cellular regula- 
tion, signaling mechanisms, motility, bioelectricity, 
communication and cellular energetics. This course is 
a prerequisite for Biochemistry I (BCH 252). Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 150/151 and CHM 222. Laboratory (BIO 203) 
is recommended but not required. {N} 4 credits 
Stvlianos Scordilis 
Offered Fall 2008 

BIO 203 Cell Biology Laboratory 

Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as 
spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and 
fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron 
microscopy. There will be an emphasis on student- 
designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for 
Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 
202, (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 credit 
Graham Kent 
Offered Fall 2008 

BIO 230 Genomes, Transciptomes, and Proteomes 

An exploration of genes and genomes that highlights 
the connections between molecular biology genetics, 
cell biology and evolution. Topics will include DNA and 
RNA, and protein structure and function, gene orga- 
nization, mechanisms and control of gene expression, 
origins and evolution of molecular mechanisms, and 
gene networks. The course will also deal with the prin- 
cipal experimental and computational tools that have 
advanced relevant fields, and will introduce students to 
the rapidly expanding databases at the core of contem- 
porary biology. Relying heavily on primary literature. 
we will explore selected topics including the molecular 
biology of infectious diseases, genetic underpinnings of 
development, the comparative analysis of whole genom- 
es and the origin and evolution of genome structure and 
content. Prerequisites: BIO 1 10 or 152. Laboratory (BIO 
231) is recommended but not required. {N} -4 credits 
Steven Williams 
Offered Spring 2000 



112 



Biochemistry 



BIO 231 Genomes, Transciptomes, and Proteomes 
Laboratory 

A laboratory designed to complement the lecture ma- 
terial in 230. Laboratory and computer projects will 
investigate methods in molecular biology including 
recombinant DNA, gene cloning and DNA sequencing 
as well as contemporary bioinformatics, data mining 
and the display and analysis of complex genome data- 
bases. Prerequisite: BIO 230 (should be taken concur- 
rently). {N} 1 credit 
Lori Saunders 
Offered Spring 2009 

CHM 111 Chemistry I: General Chemistry 

The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum 
introduces the language (s) of chemistry and explores 
atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered 
include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape 
and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiom- 
etry. Enrollment limited to 60 per lecture section, 16 per 
lab section. {N} 5 credits 
Members of the department 
Laboratory Coordinator: Maria Bickar 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

CHM 118 Advanced General Chemistry 

This course is designed for students with a very strong 
background in chemistry. The elementary theories of 
stoichiometry, atomic structure, bonding, structure, 
energetics and reactions will be quickly reviewed. The 
major portions of the course will involve a detailed 
analysis of atomic theory and bonding from an orbital 
concept, an examination of the concepts behind ther- 
modynamic arguments in chemical systems, and an 
investigation of chemical reactions and kinetics. The 
laboratory deals with synthesis, physical properties, and 
kinetics. The course is designed to prepare students for 
CHM 222/223 as well as replace both CHM 1 1 1 and 
CHM 224. A student who passes 1 18 cannot take either 
1 1 1 or 224. Enrollment limited to 32. {N} 5 credits 
Robert Linck 

Laboratory Coordinator: Heather Shafer 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

CHM 222 Chemistry II: Organic Chemistry 

An introduction to the theory and practice of organic 
chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomen- 
clature, physical and chemical properties of organic 
compounds and alkenes, and infrared and nuclear 
magnetic resonance spectroscopy for structural analy- 



sis. Reactions of carbonyl compounds will be studied in 
depth. Prerequisite: 111 or 118. Enrollment limited to 
16 per lab section. {N} 5 credits 
Members of the department 
Laboratory Coordinator: Maria Bickar 
Offered Spring 2009 

CHM 223 Chemistry III: Organic Chemistry 

Material will build on introductory organic chemistry 
topics covered in 222 and will focus more heavily on 
retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic plan- 
ning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, 
alcohols, ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; 
and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder 
reaction. Prerequisite: 222 and successful completion 
of the 222 lab. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. 
{N} 5 credits 

Members of the department 
Laboratory Coordinator: Rebecca Thomas 
Offered Fall 2008, Faff 2009 

CHM 224 Chemistry IV: Introduction to Inorganic and 
Physical Chemistry 

This final course in the chemistry core sequence pro- 
vides a foundation in the principles of physical and 
inorganic chemistry that are central to the study of 
all chemical phenomena. Topics include coordina- 
tion chemistry of transition metals and quantitative 
treatment of thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, 
Electrochemistry and kinetics of reactions. Prerequisite: 
1 1 1 and 223; MTH 1 1 1 or equivalent; or permission of 
the instructor. Enrollment limited to 1 6 per lab section. 
{N} 5 credits 

Members of the department 
Laboratory Coordinator: Heather Shafer 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 



One 
cours* 



physiology 
sefrom: 



lecture and lab 



BIO 200 Animal Physiology 

Functions of animals, including humans, required 
for survival (movement, respiration, circulation, etc.); 
neural and hormonal regulation of these functions; 
and the adjustments made to challenges presented by 
specific environments. Prerequisites: BIO 150/151 and 
CHM 1 1 1 or CHM 1 18. Laboratory (BIO 201) is optional 
but strongly recommended. {N} 4 credits 
Margaret Anderson 
Offered Fall 2008 



Biochemistry 



113 



BIO 201 Animal Physiology Laboratory 
Experiments will demonstrate concepts presented in 
BIO 200 and illustrate techniques and data analysis 
used in the study of physiology. BIO 200 must be taken 
concurrently. {N} l credit 
Margaret Anderson 
Offered Fall 2008 

BIO 204 Microbiology 

This course examines bacterial morphology, growth, 
biochemistry, genetics and methods of controlling bacte- 
rial activities. E mphasis is on bacterial physiology and 
the role of the prokaryotes in their natural habitats. The 
course also covers viral life cycles and diseases caused by 
viruses. Prerequisites: BIO 1 50 or 1 1 1 and CHM 1 1 1 or 
equivalent advanced placement courses. Laboratory (BIO 
205) must be taken concurrently. {N} 3 credits 
Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Spring 2009 

BIO 205 Microbiology Laboratory 

Experiments in this course explore the morphology, 
physiology; biochemistry, and genetics of bacteria using 
a variety of bacterial genera. Methods of aseptic tech- 
nique; isolation, identification and growth of bacteria 
are learned. An individual project is completed at the 
end of the term. BIO 204 must be taken concurrently. 
{N} 2 credits 
Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Spring 2009 

BIO 312 Plant Physiology 

Plants as members of our ecosystem; water economy; 
photosynthesis and metabolism; growth and develop- 
ment as influenced by external and internal factors, 
survey of some pertinent basic and applied research. 
Prerequisites: BIO 150, and CHM 111 or CHM 118. 
Laboratory (BIO 313) is recommended but not re- 
quired. {N} 4 credits 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Spring 2009 

BIO 313 Plant Physiology Laboratory 
Processes that are studied include plant molecular biol- 
ogy, photosynthesis, growth, uptake of nutrients, water 
balance and transport, and the effects of hormones. 
Prerequisite: BIO 312 (should be taken concurrently ). 
{N} 1 credit 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Spring 2009 



One physical chemistry' course from: 

CHM 332 Physical Chemistry II 

Thermodynamics and kinetics: will the contents of this 
flask react, and if so, how fast? Properties that govern 
the chemical and physical behavior of macroscopic 
collections of atoms and molecules (gases, liquids, 
solids and mixtures of the above). Prerequisite: MTH 
112 or MTH 114. W 5 credits 
Shizuka llsieh. KateQueeney, Spring 2009 
Members of the department. Spring 2010 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

CHM 335 Physical Chemistry of Biochemical Systems 

A course emphasizing physical chemistry of biological 
sj stems. Topics covered include chemical thermo- 
dynamics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics, and 
biochemical transport processes. The laboratory focuses 
on experimental applications of physical -chemical 
principles to systems of biochemical importance. Pre- 
requisites: 224 or permission of the instructor, and MTH 
112. {N} 4 credits 
Cristina Suarez 
Offered Fall 2008 

One elective from: 

BIO 306 Immunology 

An introduction to the immune system covering the 
molecular, cellular and genetic bases of immunity to in- 
fectious agents. Special topics include immunodeficien- 
cies, transplantation, allergies, immunopathology and 
immunotherapies. Prerequisite: BIO 202. Recommended: 
BIO 152 or 230 and/or BIO 204. Laboratory (BIO $ 17 1 is 
recommended but not required. {N} 4 credits 
Christine White-Ziegler 
Offered Fall 2008 

BIO 310 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience 

Molecular-level structure-function relationships in the 
nervous system. Topics include: development of neu- 
rons, neuron-specific gene expression, mechanisms of 
neuronal plasticity in learning and memory, synaptic 
release, molecular biology of neurological disorders, 
and molecular neuropharmacology. Prerequisites: BIO 
202, or BIO 230, or permission of the instructor. Labo- 
ratory (BIO 311) must be taken concurrently Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. {N} 4 credits 
Adam C Hall 
Offered Fall 2008 



114 



Biochemistry 



BIO 332 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotes 

Advanced molecular biology- of eukaryotes and their 
viruses. Topics will include genomics, bioinformat- 
ics. eukaryotic gene organization, regulation of gene 
expression, R\A processing, retroviruses, transposable 
elements, gene rearrangement, methods for studying 
human genes and genetic diseases, molecular biol- 
ogy of infectious diseases, genome projects and whole 
genome analysis. Reading assignments will be from 
a textbook and the primary literature. Each student 
will present an in-class presentation and write a paper 
on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisite: BIO 230. Labo- 
ratory (BIO 333) is recommended but not required. {N} 
4 credits 

Steven A Williams 
Offered Spring 2009 

CHM 328 Bio-Organic Chemistry 

This course deals with the function, biosynthesis, struc- 
ture elucidation and total synthesis of the smaller mol- 
ecules of nature. Emphasis will be on the constituents 
of plant essential oils, steroids including cholesterol 
and the sex hormones, alkaloids and nature's defense 
chemicals, molecular messengers and chemical com- 
munication. The objectives of the course can be sum- 
marized as follows: To appreciate the richness, diversity 
and significance of the smaller molecules of nature, to 
investigate methodologies used to study and synthesize 
these substances; and to become acquainted with the 
current literature in the field. Prerequisite: 223. Offered 
in alternate years. {N} 3 credits 
bale Burk 
Offered Spring 2009 



CHM 347 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

A laboratory-oriented course involving spectroscopic, 
chromatographic, and electrochemical methods for the 
quantitation, identification and separation of species. 
Critical evaluation of data and error analysis. Prerequi- 
site: 224 or permission of the instructor. {N/M} 
5 credits 

To be announced 

Laboratory Coordinator: Smita Jadhav 
Offered Fall 2008 

CHM 357 Selected Topics in Biochemistry 

Topic: Pharmacology and Drug Design. An introduc- 
tion to the principles and methodology of pharmacol- 
ogy, toxicology, and drug design. The pharmacology of 
several drugs will be examined in detail, and compu- 
tational software used to examine drug binding and to 
assist in designing a new or modified drug. Some of the 
ethical and legal factors relating to drug design, manu- 
facture, and use will also be considered. Prerequisite: 
BCH 352, or permission of the instructor. Offered in 
alternate years. {N} 3 credits 
David Bickar 
Offered Fall 2009 

CHM 369 Bioinorganic Chemistry 

This course will provide an introduction to the field of 
bioinorganic chemistry. Students will learn about the 
role of metals in biology as well as about the use of 
inorganic compounds as probes and drugs in biologi- 
cal systems. Prerequisites: CHM 223 and 224. Offered in 
alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
Elizabeth Jamieson 
Offered Spring 2009 



CHM 338 Bio-NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging 1 

This course is designed to provide an understanding of [ flg iVl 3,1 OF 

mathematical formulations, electronic elements and 
experimentally determined parameters related to the 
study of molecular systems. We will focus on Nuclear 
Magnetic Resonance as the spectroscopic technique of 
choice in chemistry and biology. Prerequisites: A knowl 
edge of NMR spectroscopy at the basic level covered in 
CHM222 and 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 
4 credits 
Cristina Suarez 
Not offered in 2008-09 or Fall 2009 



Requirements: BCH 252 and 253. 352 and 353; BIO 150 
and 151, 202 and 203, 230 and 231; CHM 111. 222 and 
223. 224. or 118, 222 and 223. 

One physiology course from: BIO 200 and 201. 204 and 
205 or 312 and 313- 

One physical chemistry course from: CHM 332 or 335. 



One elective from: BCH 380; BIO 306, 310, 332; CHM 
328,338,347,357,369- 



Biochemistry 115 

Students planning graduate stuck In biochemist^ are 

advised to include a year of calculus and a year of phys- 
ics in their program of study. 

The S/IJ grading option is not allowed for courses 
counting toward the biochemistry major. 

Exemption from required introductory courses may be 
obtained on the basis of Advanced Placement or depart- 
mental examinations. 

Students are advised to complete all introductory cours- 
es (BIO 150, 151, CHM 111 or 118, 222, 223) as well as 
BIO 202, 203 and CHM 224 before the junior year. 

Advisers: lile Burk, David Bickar, Adam Hall, Eliza- 
beth Jamieson, Stylianos Scordilis, Cristina Suarez, 
Carolyn Wetzel, Christine White-Ziegler, Steven Wil- 
liams 

Honors Director: Elizabeth Jamieson 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Requirements: Same as for the major, with the addition 
of a research project in the senior year culminating in 
a written thesis, an oral examination in biochemistry, 
and an oral presentation of the honors research. Please 
consult the director of honors or the departmental Web 
site for specific requirements and application proce- 
dures. 



116 



Biological Sciences 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Stephen G. Tilley, Ph.D., Chair 
" l Robert B.Merritt, Ph.D. 
* 2 Margaret E. Anderson, Ph.D. 
" 2 Richard F.Olivo, Ph.D. 
" 2 Stylianos P. Scordilis, Ph.D. 
Steven A. Williams, Ph.D. 
" 2 Paulette Peckol, Ph.D. 
n Richard T.Briggs, Ph.D. 
* 2 Virginia Hayssen, Ph.D. 
1 Michael Marcotrigiano, Ph.D. 
Laura A. Katz, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors 

§2 Robert Dorit, Ph.D. 
Christine White-Ziegler, Ph.D. 
L. David Smith, Ph.D. 
Adam Hall, Ph.D. 

Adjunct Associate Professors 

Thomas S. Litwin, Ph.D. 
Leslie R.Jaffe,M.D. 



Assistant Professors 

Carolyn Wetzel, Ph.D. 
Michael Barresi, Ph.D. 

Adjunct Assistant Professor 

Gail E. Scordilis, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Esteban Monserrate, Ph.D. 
DeniseLello,Ph.D. 
Lori Saunders, Ph.D. 
Robert Nicholson, M.A. 

Lecturer and Research Associate 

Paul Wetzel, Ph.D. 

Lecturer and Professor Emeritus 

C.JohnBurk,Ph.D. 

Senior Laboratory Instructor 

Graham R. Kent, M.Sc. 

Laboratory Instructors 

Esteban Monserrate, Ph.D. 
Gabrielle Immerman, B.A. 
Lori Saunders, Ph.D. 
Judith Wopereis, M.Sc. 



Courses in the biological sciences are divided into five 
main sections. 

1) Introductory and non-majors courses 
(See pp. 116-18) 

2) Core courses, required of all biology majors 
(See pp. 119) 

3) 200 and 300 level courses, organized by core area 
(See pp. 120-127) 

4) Independent research 
(See pp. 127-129) 

5) Graduate courses 
(See pp. 129-130) 



Prospective majors are encouraged to refer to the 
description of the major in this catalog and to contact 
biology faculty to discuss appropriate paths through 
these courses. 

Introductory and non-major 
courses 

101 Modern Biology for the Concerned Citizen 

A course dealing with current issues in biology that 
are important in understanding today s modem world. 
Many of these issues present important choices that 
must be made by individuals and by governments. 



Biological Sciences 



117 



Topics will include cloning of plants and animals. 
human cloning, stem cell research, geneticallv modi- 
fied foods, bioterronsm. emerging infectious diseases 
such as Ebola, SAKS and West Nile, gene therapy, DNA 
diagnostics and forensics, genome projects, human 
origins, human drversit) and others. The course will 
include guest lectures, outside readings and in-class 
discussions. {N} 4 credits 
Steven Williams 
Offered Fall 2008 

103 Economic Botany: Plants and Human Affairs 

A consideration of the plants which are useful or 
harmful to humans; their origins and history, bo- 
tanical relationships, the chemical constituents that 
make them economically important, and their roles 
in prehistoric and modem cultures, civilizations and 
economies. Classes of plants surveyed include those 
that provide food, timber, fiber, spices, essential oils, 
medicines, stimulants and narcotics, oils and waxes, 
and other major products. Topics include the history of 
plant domestication, ethnobotany. biodiversity 7 issues, 
genetic engineering and biotechnology. No prerequi- 
sites. Enrollment limited to 25. (E) 3 credits 
Robert Nicholson 
Offered Spring 2009 

110 Introductory Colloquia: Life Sciences for the 21st 
Century 

These colloquia provide entering and non-majors stu- 
dents with interactive, small group discussion courses 

: focused on particular topics and areas of current rel- 
evance in the life sciences. Their writing-intensive and/ 
or quantitative-intensive small class formats are meant 

| to foster discussion and encourage active participation. 

I Students engage with the topic of the colloquium us- 
ing the many styles of inquiry and tools available to 
contemporary biologists. While the emphasis will be on 
subject matter, we will also be concerned with develop- 
ing the fundamental skills necessary for success in the 
sciences, including reading and analysis of primary 
literature, writing about science, data presentation and 
analysis, and hypothesis construction and testing. A 
number of concepts introduced in these colloquia are 
relevant to the 200-level courses intended for majors 
in the biological sciences. Individual colloquia are 
designed to emphasize a variety of skills; the designa- 
tions listed after the title of the colloquium indicate if 
the course will emphasis quantitative work (0). written 



work (W). laboratory exercises (L) and/or reading of 
primary literature (R). Certain of these colloquia will 
also fulfill the college requirement for a "writing-in- 
tensive" course indicated by the Wl designation. May be 
repeated for credit with a different subject. Enrollment 
limited to 20 unless otherwise indicated. {N} 4 credits 

Women and Exercise — What Is Really Going On hi 
Our Muscles (Q,R,L) 

Muscle is a very plastic tissue and responds to envi- 
ronmental changes and stresses in ways we don't even 
notice. It atrophies from disuse, hvpertrophies from 
weight lifting and is constantly changing in response to 
daily exercise. In this course we will explore the effects 
of exercise on ourselves. With the aid of various micros- 
copies, we will examine different muscle cell types. We 
will carry out biochemical analyses of metabolites such 
as glucose and lactate, and enzymes such as creatine 
kinase and lactate dehydrogenase, to elucidate changes 
due to exercise. We will also explore some physiological 
and molecular alterations that help our bodies com- 
pensate for new exercise patterns. Enrollment limited 
to 15. {N} 

Stylianos Scordilis 
Offered Fall 2009 

Your Genes, Your Chromosomes (Q. R. L) 
A study of human genetics at the level of molecules, 
cells, individuals and populations. Topics covered 
will include Mendelian genetics, sex determination, 
pedigree analysis, genetic diseases, genetic counseling 
and screening, inheritance of complex characters and 
population genetics. Students will have the opportunity 
to study their own genes and chromosomes in a week 
devoted to laboratory exercises. Laboratories will meet 
in alternate weeks. {N} 
Robert Merritt 
Offered Fall 2008 

Island Biology (W,Q,R) 

Islands represent hospitable environments surrounded 
by areas that challenge living organisms. Using islands 
as the context, we will explore several topics in basic 
biology including evolution, genes and gene flow. 
reproduction, physiology, biogeochemical cycles of 
nutrients and energy and ecology. Three island contexts 
will be covered: classical oceanic islands (the Hawaiian 
archipelago), islands of specific environments (frag- 
mented landscapes), and islands in outer space (space 



118 



Biological Sciences 



stations and spaceships). Class time will be spent on a 
combination of discussion, lecture, activities and short 
field trips. {N} 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Spring 2010 

Tide Biology and Policy of Breast Cancer (W, Q, R) 
This colloquium examines the genetic and environ- 
mental causes of cancer, focusing on the molecular 
biology and epidemiology of this suite of diseases. We 
will pay particular attention to the health and policy 
implications of recent discoveries concerning the genet- 
ic causes of predisposition to breast cancer. We will also 
examine the social and political context of this illness, 
and the ways in that context shapes our understanding 
of this disease. {N}WI 
Robert Dorit 
Offered Fall 2011 

Origins (W, Q, R) 

This course focuses on (1) the origin of life; (2) the 
origin of modern humans; and (3) the genetic basis, 
if any, of human races. The first part of the course will 
focus on the diverse theories (scientific, Christian, etc.) 
to explain the origin of life, with discussion of the evi- 
dence and philosophy behind each theory. Parts 2 and 
3 will cover theories and evidence relating to the origin 
and diversification of humans. We will end with discus- 
sion on race and intelligence. Readings will combine 
primary literature with sections from biology textbooks. 
Students will be required to research topics and to pro- 
duce several written works. WI {N} 
Laura Katz 
Offered Fall 2008 



Conservation Biology (W, Q, R) 
Conservation biology integrates ecological, genetic and 
evolutionary knowledge to address the global crisis of 
biodiversity loss and environmental degradation. Topics 
include threats to biodiversity, the value of biodiversity, 
and how populations, communities and ecosystems 
can be managed sustainably. {N} 
L. David Smith 
Offered Spring 2009 

Bacteria: The Good, the Bad and the Absolutely Nec- 
essary (W, Q, L) 

This course will focus on topics of disease, on bacteria 
involved in biogeochemical cycles, and the use of bac- 



teria in bioremediation and industry. Some of the con- 
cepts will include prokaryotic cell structure, diversity, 
metabolism and growth. {N} 
Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Spring 2009 

120 Horticulture: Landscape Plants and Issues 

Survey of the plant materials used in the landscape 
including interior, annual, perennial, woody plants and 
turf. Identification, natural biology, culture and use. 
Introduction to landscape maintenance and design, 
regional planning and garden history. Lab and presen- 
tation, field trips. Laboratory (BIO 121) must be taken 
concurrently Enrollment limited to 30. {N} 3 credits 
Not offered 2008-09 

121 Horticulture: Landscape Plants and Issues 
Laboratory 

Identification, morphology and use of landscape plants 
including annuals, biennials, perennials, tropicals, 
woody shrubs and trees, vines and aquatics. Bulb 
planting, pollinations. Design and planning labs and 
presentations. BIO 120 must be taken concurrently. 
Enrollment limited to 15 per section. {N} 1 credit 
Not offered 2008-09 

122 Horticulture 

An overview of the field of horticulture. Students learn 
about plant structure, growth and function. Methods 
for growing plants, identification and management of 
plant pests, plant propagation, plant nutrition, garden 
soils and plant biotechnology. Class presentation. Labo- 
ratory (BIO 123) must be taken concurrently. Enroll- 
ment limited to 30. {N} 3 credits. 
Michael Marcotrigiano 
Offered Spring 2009 

123 Horticulture Laboratory 

Practical lab experiences including an analysis of plant 
parts, seed sowing, identification of diseases and insect 
pests, plant propagation by cuttings and air layering, 
transplanting and soil testing. BIO 122 must be taken 
concurrently. Enrollment limited to 15 per section. {N} 
1 credit 

Gabrielle Immerman 
Offered Spring 2009 



Biological Sciences 



119 



Core Courses 

BIO 150, 152 and 154 are all required for the Biological 
Sciences major, and may be taken in any order. 

150 Cells, Physiology and Devlopment 

Students in this course will investigate the structure, 
function and physiology of cells, the properties of bio- 
logical molecules, information transfer from the level 
of DNA to cell-cell communication, and cellular energy 
generation and transfer. The development of multicel- 
lular organisms and the physiology of selected organ 
systems will also be explored. Laboratory (BIO 151) is 
recommended but not required. Enrollment limited to 
80. {M) 4 credits 

Michael Barresi, Carolyn Wetzel Christine White- 
Ziegler 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

151 Cells, Physiology and Development Laboratory 

Laboratory sessions in this course will combine ob- 
servational and experimental protocols. Students will 
examine cellular molecules, monitor enzymatic reac- 
tions, photosynthesis and respiration to study cellular 
function. Students will also examine embryology and 
the process of differentiation, the structure and func- 
; tion of plant systems, and the physiology of certain 
animal systems. Prerequisite: BIO 150, (normally taken 
concurrently). {N} 1 credit 
Members of the department 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

152 Genetics, Genomics and Evolution 

Students in this course will achieve a basic knowledge 
of genetics, genomics and evolution. Principles to be 
covered include RNA world, Central Dogma, prokary- 
otic genetics and genomics, molecular techniques, 
eukaryotic cell cycle, eukaryotic genomics, transmission 
genetics, population genetics. These principles will be 
illustrated using four central themes: 1) HIV and AIDS; 
2) The making of a fly; 3) A matter of taste; 4) Origin of 
Species. In addition to attending lectures, each student 
will participate in discussion sections that will focus on 
reading primary literature and mastering genetics prob- 
lems. Laboratory (BIO 153) is recommended but not 
required. Enrollment limited to 60. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Don't. Laura Katz. Robert Merrill. Steven 
Williams 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 



153 Genetics, Genomics and Evolution Laboratory 
Laboratorj sessions in this course will combine experi- 
ments in genetics and genomics with exposure to basic 
techniques in molecular biology. Laboratories will 
include computer simulations. PCR, cloning, karyotyp- 
ing. Prerequisite: BIO 152 (normall) taken concur- 
rently). {N} 1 credit 

ion Saunders 
Offered Spring 2009 

154 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation 

Students in this course will investigate the origin, 
nature and importance of the diversity 7 of life on Earth; 
key ecological processes and interactions that create 
and maintain communities and ecosystems; principle 
threats to the biodiversity; and emerging conserva- 
tion strategies to protect the elements and processes 
upon which we depend. Throughout the semester, we 
will emphasize the relevance of diversity and ecologi- 
cal studies in conservation. Assessment is based on a 
combination of quizzes, exams and a short writing 
assignment. Laboratory (BIO 155) is recommended 
but not required. Enrollment limited to 40 students. {N} 
4 credits 

Stephen Tilley, L David Smith, Laura Katz 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

155 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation Laboratory 

Laboratory sessions in this course will combine obser- 
vational and experimental protocols both in the lab 
and in the field. Students will gain familiarity with the 
diverse lineages of life and will design and conduct 
research to address specific fnpotheses about a subset 
of lineages. There will also be field trips to local sites 
where students will engage in observations of organ- 
isms in their natural habitats and in experimental 
exploration of ecological interactions. Prerequisite: BIO 
154 (nomrally taken concurrently). {N} 1 credit 
Members of the department 
Offered Faff 2008, Spring 2009 

Upper-level offerings in the Biological Sciences are 
classified into three categories on the following pages, 
corresponding to the areas treated by the core courses 
listed above. 



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Courses on Cells, Physiology 
and Development 

200 Animal Physiology 

Functions of animals, including humans, required 
for survival (movement, respiration, circulation, etc.); 
neural and hormonal regulation of these functions; 
and the adjustments made to challenges presented by 
specific environments. Prerequisites: BIO 150/151 and 
CHM 1 1 1 or CHM 1 18. Laboratory (BIO 201) is optional 
but strongly recommended. {N} 4 credits 
Margaret Anderson 
Offered Fall 2008 

201 Animal Physiology Laboratory 

Experiments will demonstrate concepts presented in 
BIO 200 and illustrate techniques and data analysis 
used in the study of physiology. BIO 200 must be taken 
concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
Margaret Anderson 
Offered Fall 2008 

202 Cell Biology 

The structure and function of eukaryotic cells. This 
course will examine contemporary topics in cellular 
biology: cellular structures, organelle function, mem- 
brane and endomembrane systems, cellular regula- 
tion, signaling mechanisms, motility, bioelectricity, 
communication and cellular energetics. This course is 
a prerequisite for Biochemistry I (BCH 252). Prerequi- 
sites: BIO 150/151 and CHM 222. Laboratory (BIO 203) 
is recommended but not required. {N} 4 credits 
Stylianos Scorditis 
Offered Fall 2008 

203 Cell Biology Laboratory 

Inquiry-based laboratory using techniques such as 
spectrophotometry, enzyme kinetics, bright field and 
fluorescence light microscopy and scanning electron 
microscopy. There will be an emphasis on student- 
designed projects. This course is a prerequisite for 
Biochemistry I Laboratory (BCH 253). Prerequisite: BIO 
202, (should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 credit 
Graham Kent 
Offered Fall 2008 



204 Microbiology 

This course examines bacterial morphology, growth, 
biochemistry, genetics and methods of controlling 
bacterial activities. Emphasis is on bacterial physiology 
and the role of the prokaryotes in their natural habi- 
tats. The course also covers viral life cycles and diseases 
caused by viruses. Prerequisites: BIO 150 and CHM 111 
or equivalent advanced placement courses. Laboratory 
(BIO 205) must be taken concurrently. {N} 3 credits 
Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Spring 2009 

205 Microbiology Laboratory 

Experiments in this course explore the morphology, 
physiology, biochemistry, and genetics of bacteria using 
a variety of bacterial genera. Methods of aseptic tech- 
nique; isolation, identification and growth of bacteria 
are learned. An individual project is completed at the 
end of the term. BIO 204 must be taken concurrently. 
{N} 2 credits 
Esteban Monserrate 
Offered Spring 2009 

206 Cell Physiology 

Survey of fundamental cell processes with a medical 
and disease pathology perspective. Topics will include, 
but are not limited to, cellular diversity, structure and 
function of cellular compartments and components, 
and regulation of cellular processes such as energy 
generation, information transfer (transcription and 
translation), protein trafficking, cell signaling and 
cell movement. Particular emphasis will be placed on 
how misregulation of these cellular processes leads to 
disease. Prerequisite: BIO 1 10 or 150 and CHM 1 1 1 or 
CHM 1 18. This course does not serve as a prerequisite 
for BCH 252. Laboratory (BIO 207) is recommended 
but not required. {N} 4 credits 
Michael Barresi 
Not offered 2008-09 

207 Cell Physiology Laboratory 

Instructed and self-designed experimentation of single 
cells and multicellular tissues focused on investigating 
how cells are structured and function. During the first 
half of the semester, students will be introduced to a 
variety of microscopy techniques such as bright field, 
darkfield, phase contrast, epifluorescence, confocal and 
scanning electron microscopy and time-lapse video 



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L21 



microscopy. For the remaining semester, students will 
focus on visualizing the molecular components of 
single cells using direct immunofluorescence, and test 
how those components regulate cell function using the 
cell culture model system. Students will learn the valu- 
able methodology of cell culture and sterile techniques. 
Prerequisites: BIO 151 and BIO 236 (normally taken 
concurrently). 
{N} 1 credit 

Michael Barresi, Graham Kent 
Not offered 2008-09 

300 Neurophysiology 

The function of nervous systems. Topics include elec- 
trical signals in neurons, synapses, the neural basis 
of form and color perception, and the generation of 
behavioral patterns. Prerequisites: BIO 200 or 202. 
Laboratory (BIO 301) must be taken concurrently. {N} 
4 credits 
Richard Ol iro 
Offered Spring 2009 

301 Neurophysiology Laboratory 

Electrophysiological recording of signals from neurons, 
including an independent project in the second half of 
the semester. BIO 300 must be taken concurrently. {N} 
1 credit 

Richard Olivo 
Offered Spring 2009 

302 Developmental Biology 

The field of developmental biology tries to address the 
i age-old question of how a single cell can give rise to 
'the complexity and diversity of cells and forms that 
make us the way we are. Developmental biology spans 
all disciplines from cell biology and genetics to ecology 
and evolution. Therefore, this course should appeal to a 
wide range of student interests and serve as a chance to 
unity many of the principles discussed in other courses. 
Observations of the remarkable phenomena that occur 
during embryonic development will be presented in 
, concert with the experiments underlying our current 
Knowledge. In addition to reading textbook assign- 
ments, students will learn to read and present primary 
: 'iterature, design visual representations of developmen- 
al processes and compose an abbreviated grant propos- 
il. In order to fully engage students with the research 
">eing presented in class, prominent developmental 
biologists will web conference with our class. 
Prerequisites: All three core courses are suggested, at 



least BIO ISO and BIO 152 are required An upper level 
course in cell biology (BIO 202 or 206) or genetics 
(BIO 230 or BIO 234) is required. {N} 4 credits 
Michael Barresi 
Offered Spring 2009 

303 Developmental Biology Laboratory 

Students will design and earn' out their own experi- 
ments focused on neural and muscle development 
using zebrafish as a model system. Techniques covered 
will be embryology, indirect immunocytochemistry. 
in situ hybridization, microinjection of RNA for gain 
or loss of function studies, pharmacological analysis, 
GFP-transgenics, an array of microscopy techniques. 
This laboratory is designed as a true research experi- 
ence and thus will require time outside of the normally 
scheduled lab period. Your data will be constructed into 
a poster that will be presented at Smith and may be 
presented at an undergraduate developmental biology 
conference with participating local colleges and uni- 
versities. Prerequisite: BIO 302 (must be taken concur- 
rently). Enrollment limited to 12. {N} 1 credit 
Michael Barresi 
Offered Spring 2009 

304 Histology 

A study of the microscopic structure of animal tissues, 
including their cellular and extracellular composition, 
function and arrangement into organs. Structural 
organization and structure-function relationships will 
be emphasized. Prerequisite: BIO 202. Laboratory (BIO 
305) is strongly recommended but not required. {N} 
4 credits 
Not offered 2008-09 

305 Histology Laboratory 

An introduction to microtechnique: the preparation 
of tissue and organs for light microscopic examina- 
tion, including fixation, embedding and sectioning, 
different staining techniques and cytochemistry and 
photomicrography. Also includes the study of cell, tis- 
sue and organ morphology through examination of 
prepared material. Minimum enrollment: 6 students. 
Prerequisite: BIO 304 (should be taken concurrently). 
{N} 1 credit 
Not offered 2008-09 

306 Immunology 

An introduction to the immune system covering the 
molecular, cellular and genetic bases of immunity to 



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infectious agents. Special topics include immunodefi- 
ciencies, transplantation, allergies, immunopathology 
and immunotherapies. Prerequisite: BIO 202. Recom- 
mended: BIO 152 or 230 and/or BIO 204. Laboratory 
(BIO 307) is recommended but not required. {N} 
4 credits 

Christine White-Ziegler 
Offered Fall 2008 

307 Immunology Laboratory 

This course focuses on the use of immunological tech- 
niques in clinical diagnosis and as research tools. Ex- 
perimental exercises include immune cell population 
analysis, immunofluoresence, Western blotting, ELISA, 
and agglutination reactions. An independent project is 
completed at the end of the term. Prerequisite: BIO 306 
(may be taken concurrently). Enrollment limited to 16 
students. {N} 1 credit 
Christine White-Ziegler 
Offered Fall 2008 

308 Introduction to Biological Microscopy 

This course will focus on theory, principles and tech- 
niques of light (fluorescence, confocal, DIC) microsco- 
py and scanning and transmission electron microscopy 
in biology, including basic optics, instrument design 
and operational parameters. Associated equipment and 
techniques for specimen preparation and image record- 
ing will also be considered, along with discussions of 
elucidating biological structure/function relationships. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: 
BIO 202. Laboratory (BIO 309) must be taken concur- 
rently. Enrollment limited to 6. {N} 3 credits 
To be announced 
Not offered 2008-09 

309 Introduction to Biological Microscopy Laboratory 

The laboratory includes practical techniques for light 
(fluorescence, confocal, DIC) microscope operation 
and a more thorough introduction to the scanning 
and transmission electron microscopes. Selected tech- 
niques of biological specimen preparation (fixation, 
embedding, sectioning and staining) for the different 
microscopies, as well as associated data recording 
processes, will also be emphasized. In addition to the 
formal laboratory period, students will need to arrange 
blocks of time to practice the techniques and work on 
self-designed investigations. BIO 308 must be taken 



concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
Judith Wopereis 
Not offered 2008-09 

310 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience 

Molecular level structure-function relationships in the 
nervous system. Topics include: development of neu- 
rons, neuron-specific gene expression, mechanisms of 
neuronal plasticity in learning and memory, synaptic 
release, molecular biology of neurological disorders 
and molecular neuropharmacology. Prerequisites: BIO 
202, or BIO 230, or permission of the instructor. Labo- 
ratory (BIO 311) must be taken concurrently. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. {N} 4 credits 
Adam C Hall 
Offered Fall 2008 

311 Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience Laboratory 

This laboratory initially uses tissue culture techniques 
to study the development of primary neurons in culture 
(e.g., extension of neurites and growth cones). This 
is followed by an introduction to DNA microarray 
technology for studying gene expression in the brain. 
The rest of the laboratory uses the Xenopus oocyte ex- 
pression system to study molecular structure-function. 
Oocytes (frog eggs) are injected with DNA encoding for 
a variety of ion channels. The second half of the semes- 
ter involves a lab project using the expression system to 
investigate channel characteristics or pharmacology. 
BIO 310 must be taken concurrently. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 20 {N} 1 credit 
Adam C Hall 
Offered Fall 2008 

312 Plant Physiology 

Plants as members of our ecosystem; water economy; 
photosynthesis and metabolism; growth and develop- 
ment as influenced by external and internal factors, 
survey of some pertinent basic and applied research. 
Prerequisites: BIO 150, andCHM 111 or CHM 118. 
Laboratory (BIO 313) is recommended but not re- 
quired. {N} 4 credits 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Spring 2009 

313 Plant Physiology Laboratory 

Processes that are studied include plant molecular biol- 
ogy, photosynthesis, growth, uptake of nutrients, water 
balance and transport, and the effects of hormones. 



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123 



Prerequisite: BIO 312 (should be taken concurrent l\ ). 
{N} 1 credit 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Spring 2009 

320 Colloquium on Molecular Medicine 

A study of cells and their diseased states in humans. 
The cellular, molecular, metabolic and physiological 
bases of selected diseases will be analyzed. Topics will 
include gross and cellular pathology, inflammation, 
metabolic, musculoskeletal and neurological disorders, 
as well as the clinical symptomology and therapeutic 
possibilities. Several topics will be given by pathologists 
at Bavstate Medical Center. Prerequisite: BIO 202. {N} 
4 credits 

Sfylianos ScordUis 
Offered Fall 2010 

321 Seminar: Topics in Microbiology 

Topic. Molecular Pathogenesis of Emerging Infec- 
tions Diseases. This course will examine the impact of 
infectious diseases on our society. New pathogens have 
recently been identified, while existing pathogens have 
warranted increased investigation for multiple reasons, 
including as causative agents of chronic disease and 
cancer and as agents of bioterrorism. Specific emphasis 
on the molecular basis of virulence in a variety of or- 
ganisms will be addressed along with the diseases they 
cause and the public health measures taken to address 
these pathogens. Prerequisites BIO 202 or BIO 204. 
Recommended: BIO 306. {N} 3 credits 
Christine White-Ziegler 
Offered Spring 2009 

322 Seminar: Topics in Cell Biology 

Topic: Cancer: Cells Out of Control. Known since the 
ancient Egyptians, cancers may be considered a set of 
normal cellular processes gone awry in various cell 
types. This seminar will consider chemical and radia- 
tion carcinogenesis, oncogenesis, growth factor signal- 
ing pathways and the role of hormones in cancers, as 
well as the pathologies of the diseases. Prerequisites: 
BIO 202 and BIO 203. {M} 3 credits 
Stylianos Scon til is 
Offered Spring 2011 



Courses on Genetics, 
Genomics and Evolution 

230 Genomes and Genetic Analysis 

An exploration of genes and genomes that highlights 
the connections between molecular biology, genetics, 
cell biology and evolution. Topics will include DNA 
and RNA, and protein structure and function, gene 
organization, mechanisms and control of gene expres- 
sion, origins and evolution of molecular mechanisms 
and gene networks. The course will also deal with 
the principal experimental and computational tools 
that have advanced relevant fields, and will introduce 
students to the rapidly expanding databases at the core 
of contemporary biology. Relying heavily on primary 
literature, we will explore selected topics including the 
molecular biology of infectious diseases, genetic un- 
derpinnings of development, the comparative analysis 
of whole genomes and the origin and evolution of 
genome structure and content. Prerequisites: BIO 110 
or 152. Laboratory (BIO 231) is recommended but not 
required. {N} 4 credits 
Steven Williams 
Offered Spring 2009 

231 Genomes and Genetic Analysis Laboratory 

A laboratory designed to complement the lecture ma- 
terial in 230. Laboratory and computer projects will 
investigate methods in molecular biology including 
recombinant DNA, gene cloning and DNA sequencing 
as well as contemporary bioinformatics, data mining 
and the display and analysis of complex genome data- 
bases. Prerequisite: BIO 230 (should be taken concur- 
rently). {N} 1 credit 
Lori Saunders 
Offered Spring 2009 

232 Evolutionary Biology: The Mechanisms of 
Evolutionary Change 

The processes of organic evolution are central to un- 
derstanding the attributes and diversity of living things. 
This course deals with the mechanisms underlying 
change through time in the genetic structures of 
populations, the nature of adaptation, the formation of 
species, and methods of inferring evolutionary relation- 
ships. Prerequisite: BIO 152 and a course in statistics, 
or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Stephen Tiller 
Offered Spring 2009 



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Biological Sciences 



234 Genetic Analysis 

This course explores central concepts in transmission, 
molecular and population genetics. Topics covered will 
include nuclear and cytoplasmic inheritance; gene 
structure, DNA replication and gene expression; re- 
combination, mutation and repair; manipulation and 
analysis of nucleic acids; dynamics of genes in popula- 
tions, mutation, natural selection and inbreeding. 
Discussion sections will focus on analysis of complex 
problems in inheritance, molecular biology and the 
genetic structure of populations. Prerequisites: BIO 110 
or 152. Laboratory (BIO 235) is recommended but not 
required. {N} 4 credits 
Robert MerrUt 
Not offered in 2008-09 

235 Genetic Analysis Laboratory 

A laboratory course designed to complement the lec- 
ture material in BIO 234. Investigations include an 
extended, independent analysis of mutations in Droso- 
phila, and several labs devoted to human genetics. 
Prerequisite: BIO 234 (should be taken concurrently). 
{N} 1 credit 
Robert Menitt 
Not offered in 2008-09 

332 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotes 

Advanced molecular biology of eukaryotes and their 
viruses. Topics will include genomics, bioinformat- 
ics, eukaryotic gene organization, regulation of gene 
expression, RNA processing, retroviruses, transposable 
elements, gene rearrangement, methods for studying 
human genes and genetic diseases, molecular biol- 
ogy of infectious diseases, genome projects and whole 
genome analysis. Reading assignments will be from 
a textbook and the primary literature. Each student 
will present an in-class presentation and write a paper 
on a topic selected in consultation with the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisite: BIO 230. Labo- 
ratory (BIO 333) is recommended but not required. {N} 
4 credits 

Steven A. Williams 
Offered Spring 2010 

333 Molecular Biology of Eukaryotes Laboratory 

A laboratory course designed to complement the lecture 
material in 332. Advanced techniques used to study the 
molecular biology of eukaryotes will be learned in the 
context of a semester-long project. These methods will 
include techniques for studying genomics and gene 



expression including: cDNA library construction, DNA 
sequence analysis, Northern blot analysis, RT-PCR, 
bioinformatics and others. Enrollment limited to 16. 
Prerequisite: BIO 332 (should be taken concurrently) 
and BIO 231. {N} 1 credit 
Lori Saunders 
Offered Spring 2010 

334 Bioinformatics and Comparative Molecular Biology 

This course will focus on methods and approaches in 
the emerging fields of bioinformatics and molecular 
evolution. Topics will include the quantitative exami- 
nation of genetic variation; selective and stochastic 
forces; shaping proteins and catalytic RNA; data 
mining; comparative analysis of whole genome data 
sets; comparative genomics and bioinformatics; and 
hypothesis testing in computational biology. We will 
explore the role of bioinformatics and comparative 
methods in the fields of molecular medicine, drug 
design and in systematic, conservation and population 
biology. Prerequisite: BIO 152, or BIO 230, or BIO 232, 
or permission of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 335) is 
strongly recommended but not required. {N} 3 credits 
Robert Dorit 
Offered Spring 2009 

335 Bioinformatics and Comparative Molecular Biology 
Laboratory 

This lab will introduce the computational and quan- 
titative tools underlying contemporary bioinformatics. 
We will explore the various approaches to phylogenetic 
reconstruction using molecular data, methods of data 
mining in genome databases, comparative genomics, 
structure-function modeling, and the use of molecular 
data to reconstruct population and evolutionary his- 
tory. Students will be encouraged to explore datasets 
of particular interest to them. Prerequisite: BIO 334 
(normally taken concurrently), or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 2 credits 
Robert Dorit 
Offered Spring 2009 

350 Topics in Molecular Biology 

Topic: Application of New Molecular Technologies 
to the Study of Infectious Disease. The focus of this 
seminar will be on the study of newly emerging infec- 
tious diseases that are of great concern in the public 
health community. The bird flu (H5N1) is currently 
causing the greatest apprehension, however, the spread 
of diseases such as SARS, Ebola, Dengue Fever, West 
Nile, malaria and many others is also a worrisome 



Biological Sciences 



L25 



trend. What can we learn from the great pandemics of 
the past (the great influenza of 1918. the Black Death 
of the Middle Ages, the typhus epidemic of 1914-1921 
and others?) How can modem biotechnology be ap- 
plied to the development of new drugs and vaccines to 
prevent such pandemics in the future? In addition to 
natural infections, we now must also be concerned with 
rare diseases such as anthrax and smallpox that may 
be introduced to large populations by bioterrorism. The 
challenges are great but new tools of molecular biology 
(genomics, proteomics, RNA interference, microarrays 
and others) provide unprecedented opportunity to un- 
derstand infectious diseases and to develop new strate- 
gies for their elimination. {N} 3 credits 
Steven A Williams 
Offered Fall 2008 

351 Topics in Evolutionary Biology 

Antibiotics and Antibiotic Resistance 
This seminar will focus on a) The molecular biology of 
antibiotics; b) the role of antibiotics and antimicrobials 
in microbial ecosystems; c) the history and future of 
antibiotic design and use and d) the evolution, mecha- 
nisms and medical implications of emerging antibiotic 
resistance. The course will rely on primary literature 
in various fields and will take an explicitly multidisci- 
plinary approach (molecular and evolutionary biology, 
genetics, ecology, epidemiology and biochemistry) as 
we address this critical public health threat. Prerequi- 
site: BIO 152 or permission of the instructor. {N} 
3 credits 
Robert Don't 
Offered Fall 2008 

Epigenetics 

There is increasing evidence of epigenetic phenomena 

influencing the development of organisms and the 

i transmission of information between generations. 
These epigenetic phenomena include the inheritance of 
acquired morphological traits in ciliates and the appar- 
ent transmission of RNA caches between generations in 

; plants, animals and microbes. This seminar explores 
emerging data on epigenetics and discusses the impact 

i of these phenomena on evolution. Participants will also 
produce an independent research paper on a topic of 
their choice. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or permission of the 
instructor. {N} 3 credits 

; Laura A?//: 

. Offered Spring 2010 



Courses on Biodiversity, 
Ecology and Conservation 

260 Invertebrate Diversity 

Invertebrate animals account for the vast majority of 
species on earth. Although sometimes inconspicuous, 
invertebrates are vital members of ecological commu- 
nities. They provide protein, important ecosystem ser- 
vices, biomedical and biotechnological products, and 
aesthetic value to humans. Today, many invertebrate 
populations are threatened by human activities. To 
protect and manage invertebrate diversity; we must un- 
derstand its nature and scope. This course is designed 
to survey the extraordinary diversity of invertebrates, 
emphasizing their form and function in ecological and 
evolutionary contexts. Prerequisite: BIO 154. orpennis- 
sion of the instructor. One required weekend field trip to 
the New England coast. {N} 4 credits 
L David Smith 
Offered Fall 2008 

262 Plant Biology 

Plants are a significant presence on the planet and 
contribute to our biological existence as well as our 
enjoyment of life. This course is an exploration of the 
diversity and evolution of plants, including compara- 
tive morphology; reproduction, physiology and develop- 
ment. Plants will be examined at the cell, organismal 
and community levels. Prerequisite: BIO 154 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Laboratory (BIO 263) is strongly 
recommended but not required. {N} 4 credits 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Fall 2008 

263 Plant Biology Laboratory 

Hands-on examination of plant anatomy, morphology, 
development, and diversity- using living and preserved 
plants. An emphasis on structure/function relation- 
ships, life cycles, plant interactions with the environ- 
ment (abiotic and biotic). and use of model plant 
systems for experimentation. Prerequisite: BIO 262 
(should be taken concurrently). {N} 1 credit 
Carolyn Wetzel 
Offered Fall 2008 

264 Plant Systematics 

Classical and modern approaches to the taxonomy of 
higher plants, with emphasis on evolutionary trends 



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Biological Sciences 



and processes and principles of classification. Laborato- 
ry (BIO 265) must be taken concurrently. {N} 3 credits 
John Burk 
Offered Spring 2009 

265 Plant Systematics Laboratory 

Field and laboratory studies of the identification and 
classification of higher plants, with emphasis on the 
New England flora. BIO 264 must be taken concur- 
rently. {N} 1 credit 
John Burk 
Offered Spring 2009 

266 Principles of Ecology 

Theories and principles pertaining to population 
growth and regulation, interspecific competition, 
predation, the nature and organization of communi- 
ties and the dynamics of ecosystems. Prerequisites: 
BIO 154 and a course in statistics, or permission of the 
instructor. Laboratory (BIO 267) recommended but not 
required. A weekend field trip will be included. {N} 
4 credits 
Stephen Tilley 
Offered Fall' 2008 

267 Principles of Ecology Laboratory 

Introduction to ecological communities of southern 
New England, and to the investigation of ecological 
problems via field work and statistical analysis. Prereq- 
uisite: BIO 266 (normally taken concurrently). {N} 
1 credit 
Stephen Tilley 
Offered Fall 2008 

268 Marine Ecology 

The oceans cover over 75 percent of the Earth and 
are home to enormous biodiversity. Marine Ecology 
explores a variety of coastal and oceanic systems, 
focusing on natural and human-induced factors that 
affect biodiversity and the ecological balance in ma- 
rine habitats. Using case studies, we will study some 
successful conservation and management strategies, 
including Marine Protected Areas. This course uses a 
variety of readings, group activities and short writing 
assignments to develop vital skills such as effective oral, 
graphical and written communication; critical think- 
ing; and problem solving. Prerequisite: BIO 151 or 154 
or GEO 108, or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 24. Laboratory (BIO 269) must be taken 



concurrently and includes two field trips. {N} 3 credits 
Paulette Peckol 
Offered Fall 2008 

269 Marine Ecology Laboratory 

The laboratory applies concepts discussed in lecture, 
and uses several small-group projects in the field and 
laboratory to develop relevant skills for conducting 
marine-related research. Students will learn to design 
and analyze experiments and to write in the scientific 
style. Field trips to Maine and Cape Cod, MA, provide 
hands-on experience with marine organisms in their 
natural habitats. Prerequisite: BIO 268, which must be 
taken concurrently. {N} 2 credits 
Paulette Peckol 
Offered Fall 2008 

272 Vertebrate Biology 

A review of the evolutionary origins, adaptations and 
trends in the biology of vertebrates. Laboratory (BIO 
273) is recommended but not required. {N} 4 credits 
Virginia Hayssen 
Offered Spring 2009 

273 Vertebrate Biology Laboratory 

A largely anatomical exploration of the evolutionary 
origins, adaptations and trends in the biology of ver- 
tebrates. Enrollment limited to 20 students. BIO 272 is 
normally taken with or prior to BIO 273. {N} 1 credit 
Virginia Hayssen 
Offered Spring 2009 

362 Animal Behavior 

Examination of the many approaches to the study of 
animal behavior. Topics include history of the field, 
physiological bases of behavior and behavioral ecology 
and evolution. Prerequisite: one of the following: BIO 
260, 272, 363, a statistics course or permission of the 
instructor. {N} 3 credits 
Virginia Hayssen 
Offered Fall 2008 

363 Animal Behavior: Methods 

Research design and methodology for field and labora- 
tory studies of animal behavior. Prerequisite, one of 
the following: BIO 260, 272, 362, a statistics course, or 
pemiission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15 
students. {N} 3 credits 
Virginia Hayssen 
Offered Fall 2009 



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127 



364 Plant Ecology 

\\c often take plants for granted Their ubiquity under 

foot and overhead, on our breakfast table and in phar- 
maceuticals reflects their fundamental importance to 
life on earth. This class examines current approaches 
to studying plant involvement in ecological processes 
that contribute to the plant assemblage patterns 
and dynamics that we observe. These include plant- 
microbe, plant-herbivore and plant pollinator interac- 
tions, succession, plant invasions, plant responses to 
climate change and genetic engineering of agricultural 
plants. Prerequisite: a course in plant biology, ecology 
or environmental science, or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Laboratory (BIO 365) must be taken concurrently. 
{N} 4 credits 
Denise Idlo 
Offered Fall 2008 

365 Plant Ecology Laboratory 

This course involves field and laboratory investigations 
of the ecology of higher plants, with emphasis on New 
England plant communities and review of current 
literature. The class will visit bogs, salt and fresh water 
marshes and riparian wetlands, old growth forests, ag- 
ricultural sites and research stations at Harvard Forest 
and on Cape Cod. BIO 364 must be taken concurrently. 
{N} 1 credit 
Denise Lello 
Offered Fall 2008 

366 Biogeography 

A study of major patterns of distribution of life and of 
the environmental and geological factors underlying 
these patterns. The role of phenomena such as sea level 
fluctuations, plate tectonics, oceanic currents, biologi- 
cal invasions, and climate change in determining past, 
present, and future global patterns of biodiversity will 
be considered. Fundamental differences between terres- 
trial and marine biogeography will be highlighted. Pre- 
requisite: a course in ecology; evolution or organismal 
biology; or permission of the instructor. (N) 4 credits 
Pauktte Peckol 
Offered Spring 2009 

370 Microbial Diversity 

This course focuses on the origin and diversification 
of microorganisms, with emphasis on eukaryotic cells 
(cells with nuclei). To provide context, the first weeks 



of lecture will cover the basics of evolutionary an 

and the origin and diversification of prokaryotic mi- 
crobes. From there, we wi II focuson the diversification 
of microbial eukaryotes, with specific lectures on topics 
such as microbes and ADS, and the Origins ol plants. 
animals and fungi. Evaluation is based on a combina- 
tion of tests, discussions and a research paper on a 
topic chosen by each student. Prerequisite: BIO 152 or 
154. Laboratory (BIO 271) is recommended bul not 
required. {N} 4 credits 
Laura Kati 
Offered Spring 2009 

371 Microbial Diversity Laboratory 

The laboraton assignments allow students to observe 
microorganisms from diverse habitats. Students use 
microscopy and molecular techniques for experimenta- 
tion with these organisms. Emphasis is on completion 
of an independent project. A one-day field trip is sched- 
uled. BIO 370 must be taken concurrently. {N} 1 credit 
Judith Wopereis 
Offered Spring 2009 

390 Seminar: Topics in Environmental Biology 

Topic: Ecology of Coral Reefs-Pas/. Present and Fu- 
ture. Coral reefs occupy a relatively small portion of 
the earth's surface, but their importance to the marine 
ecosystem is great. This seminar will examine coral 
reefs in terms of their geologic importance, both past 
and present, and their ecological interactions. Empha- 
sis will be placed on the status of modem coral reefs 
worldwide, with a focus on effects of environmental 
and anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., sedimentation, 
eutrophication, overfishing). Prerequisite: permission 
of the instructor. {N} 3 credits 
Paulette Peckol 
Offered Spring 2009 



Independent Study 

400 Special Studies 

Independent investigation in the biological sciences. 
Variable credit (1 to 5) as assigned 
Offered both semesters each year 



128 



Biological Sciences 



The Major 



Advisers: Students should choose their advisers, ac- 
cording to their interests, from the department faculty, 
with the exception that the chair of the Board of Pre- 
Health Advisers does not serve as a major adviser. 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Paulette Peckol 

The major in biological sciences is designed to provide 
1) a strong basis for understanding biological perspec- 
tives on various issues, 2) conceptual breadth across 
several major disciplines in biology, 3) depth in one or 
more specialized fields in biology, 4) experience with 
modern tools and techniques of biological research and 
5) the opportunity to personally experience the excite- 
ment and process of scientific investigation. Within 
this general framework, students can construct course 
programs that serve their individual interests and plans 
after graduation, while insuring that they acquire a 
broad background in the biological sciences and expo- 
sure to related fields such as chemistry, physics, geology, 
engineering, mathematics and computer science. 

Prospective majors should consult with biology faculty 
in choosing their courses. In their first semesters, stu- 
dents are encouraged to enroll in one of the introduc- 
tory courses (BIO 100-149) and/or an appropriate core 
course (BIO 150-156) as well as chemistry (CHM 111 
or 118). 

The following requirements for the major apply to stu- 
dents declaring their major in the spring of 2007 and 
beyond. Students from other class years should consult 
with their advisers concerning major requirements. 

The major requires 56 credits. 

The core course requirement: 

BIO 150/151: Cells, Physiology and Development/lab 

BIO 152/153: Genetics, Genomics and Evolution/lab 

BIO 154/155: Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation/ 
lab 



CHM 1 1 1/1 18 and a course in statistics are also re- 
quired. MTH 245 is strongly recommended for Biologi- 
cal sciences majors. 

The distribution requirement: 

All majors must take at least one upper-level course in 
each of the following three core areas: 

Cells, Physiology and Development: 
BIO 200-207, 300-322 

Genetics, Genomics and Evolution: 
BIO 230-235, 332-351 

Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation: 
BIO 260-273, 362-390 

The advanced course requirement: 

At least three 300-level courses are required, one of 
which must be a laboratory course; courses from other 
departments/programs may be counted, with approval 
of the adviser. 

The laboratory course requirement: 

At least six laboratory courses are required, two of 
which must be core courses laboratories (BIO 151, 153 
or 155) and one of which must be at the 300 level. The 
remaining three laboratories must be chosen from 
among 200- and 300-level offerings. 
With the adviser's approval, a semester of special studies 
(400) may count as a 200-level laboratory course, and 
a semester of Honors research (430, 431 or 432) may 
fulfill the 300-level laboratory requirement. 

Elective courses: 

Any departmental course at the 200-level or above may 
be used for elective credit. Students may also count one 
introductory-level course (BIO 100-149). 

Up to two courses from other departments or 
programs may be counted as electives, provided that 
these relate to a students particular interests in biology 
and are chosen in consultation with her adviser. Such 
courses might include, but are not limited to BCH 252 
and 253; CHM 222 and 223; ESS 215; EVS 300; GEO 
231; NSC 200; NSC 311. 

Independent research: 

Independent research is strongly encouraged but not 
required for the biological sciences major. Up to two 



Biological Sciences 



129 



semesters of special studies (400) or honors research 
(430, 431 or 432) may be counted toward completion 
of the major. 

Options for majors with Advanced Placement credit: 

Majors with scores of 4 or 5 on the Advanced Place- 
ment examination in biology may receive four credits 
toward the major in lieu of one core course (BIO 150, 
152 or 154). Students should choose the appropriate 
core course in consultation with their major advisers or 
other members of the department. 



The Minor 



Advisers: Members of the department also serve as 
advisers for the minor. 

The requirements for the minor in biological sciences 
comprise 24 credits chosen in consultation with an 
adviser. These courses usually include at least one core 
course and must include one 300-level course. No more 
than one course designed primarily for non-majors 
may be included. One course from another department 
or program may be included provided that course is 
related to a students particular interest in biology and is 
chosen in consultation with her adviser. 



Honors 

Director: Virginia Hayssen 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered Fall 2008 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full-vear course; Offered each vear 



Biochemistry 

See pp. 110-115 

Environmental Science and 
Policy 

Seep. 212-214 

Marine Science and Policy 

See pp. 307 

Neuroscience 

See pp. 330-334 

Graduate 



The Department of Biological Sciences maintains an 
active graduate program leading to the Master of Sci- 
ence Degree in Biological Sciences. The program of 
study emphasizes independent research supported by 
advanced course work. Candidates are expected to dem- 
onstrate a strong background in the life sciences and 
a clear commitment to independent laboratory, field 
and/or theoretical research. The department offers op- 
portunities for original work in a wide variety of fields, 
including animal behavior, biochemistry', cell and 
developmental biology, ecology, environmental science, 
evolutionary biology, genetics, marine biology, micro- 
biology, molecular biology, neurobiology, plant sciences 
and physiology. Students pursuing the M.S. degree are 
required to participate in the Graduate Seminar (BIO 
507); and are expected to undertake a course of study, 
designed in conjunction with their adviser, that will 
include appropriate courses both within and outside 
the department. 

Adviser: Robert Dorit 



130 



Biological Sciences 



507 Seminar on Recent Advances and Current 
Problems in the Biological Sciences 

Students in this seminar discuss articles from the 
primary literature representing diverse fields of biolog> r 
and present on their own research projects. Journal 
articles will be selected to coordinate with departmental 
colloquia. In alternate weeks, students will present talks 
on research goals, data collection and data analysis. 
This course is required for graduate students and must 
be taken in both years of graduate residence. 2 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered Fall 2008 

510 Advanced Studies in Molecular Biology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the department 

Offered both semesters each year 

520 Advanced Studies in Botany 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the department 

Offered both semesters each year 

530 Advanced Studies in Microbiology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the department 

Offered both semesters each year 

540 Advanced Studies in Zoology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the department 

Offered both semesters each year 

550 Advanced Studies in Environmental Biology 

3 to 5 credits 

Members of the department 

Offered both semesters each year 



Prehealth Professional Programs 

Students may prepare for health profession schools by 
majoring in any area, as long as they take courses that 
meet the minimum requirements for entrance. For 
most schools, these are two semesters each of English, 
general chemistry, organic chemistry, physics and biol- 
ogy. The science courses must include laboratories. 
Biology courses should be selected in consultation with 
the adviser, taking into consideration the student's 
major and specific interests in the health professions. 
Other courses often recommended include biochemis- 
try, mathematics including calculus and/or statistics, 
and social or behavioral science. Because health profes- 
sion schools differ in the details of their requirements, 
students should confer with a prehealth adviser as early 
as possible about specific requirements. 

Preparation for graduate study in the 
biological sciences 

Graduate programs that grant advanced degrees in 
biology vary in their admission requirements, but often 
include at least one year of mathematics (preferably 
including statistics), physics and organic chemistry. 
Many programs stress both broad preparation across 
the biological sciences and a strong background in a 
specific area. Many institutions require scores on the 
Graduate Record Examination, which emphasizes a 
broad foundation in biology as well as quantitative 
and verbal skills. Students contemplating graduate 
study beyond Smith should review the requirements of 
particular programs as early as possible in the course 
of their studies and seek advice from members of the 
department. 



590d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 



131 



Chemistry 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professor 

Robert G.Iinck.Ph.D. 



Senior Lecturer 

''LaleAkaBurk, Ph.D. 



Associate Professors 

David Bickar. Ph.D. Chair (spring semester) 
"' '- Cristina Suarez, Ph.D., Chair (fall semester) 
Kate Queeney, Ph.D. 
*' Kevin Shea, Ph.D. 
^ShizukaHsiel^Ph.D. 



Laboratory Instructors 

Maria Bickar. M.S. 
Rebecca Thomas, Ph.D. 
Heather Shafer, Ph.D. 
Smita Jadhav, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professors 

Elizabeth Jamieson, Ph.D. 
* 2 Maureen Fagan, Ph.D. 



Students who are considering a major in chemistry 
should consult with a member of the department 
early in their college careers. They are advised to take 
General Chemistry (CHM 1 1 1 or 1 18) as first-year 
students and to complete MTH 1 12 or MTH 1 14 as early 
as possible. 

All intermediate courses require as a prerequisite CHM 
1 1 1 or 1 18 or an Advanced Placement score of 4 or 5. 
Students who begin the chemistry sequence in their 
second year can still complete the major and should 
work with a department member to chart an appropri- 
ate three-year course. 

100 Perspectives in Chemistry 

Topic: Chemistry of Art Objects. In this museum-based 
course, chemistry will be discussed in the context of art. 
We will focus on materials used by artists and how the 
chemistry of these materials influences their longevity. 
Current analytical methods as well as preservation and 
conservation practices will be discussed with examples 
from the Smith College Museum of Art. Three hours of 
lecture, discussion and demonstrations. Class meetings 
will take place in the Museum and in the Clark Science 
Center. {A/N} 4 credits 
LdleAka Bark. David Dempsey 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 



108 Environmental Chemistry 

An introduction to environmental chemistry, apply- 
ing chemical concepts to topics such as acid rain, the 
greenhouse effect, the ozone layer, photochemical 
smog, pesticides and waste treatment. Chemical con- 
cepts will be developed as needed. {N} 4 credits 
Shizuka Hsieh. Spring 2009 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

111 Chemistry I: General Chemistry 

The first semester of our core chemistry curriculum 
introduces the language(s) of chemistry and explores 
atoms, molecules and their reactions. Topics covered 
include electronic structures of atoms, structure shape 
and properties of molecules; reactions and stoichiom- 
etry. Enrollment limited to 60 per lecture section. 16 per 
lab section. {N} 5 credits 
Members of the department 
Laboratory Coordinator: Maria Bickar 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

118 Advanced General Chemistry 

This course is designed for students with a very strong 
background in chemistry. The elementary theories of 
stoichiometry. atomic structure, bonding, structure, 
energetics and reactions will be quickly reviewed. The 
major portions of the course will involve a detailed 



132 



Chemistry 



analysis of atomic theory and bonding from an orbital 
concept, an examination of the concepts behind ther- 
modynamic arguments in chemical systems, and an 
investigation of chemical reactions and kinetics. The 
laboratory deals with synthesis, physical properties and 
kinetics. The course is designed to prepare students for 
CHM 222/223 as well as replace both CHM 1 1 1 and 
CHM 224. A student who passes 1 18 cannot take either 
1 1 1 or 224. Enrollment limited to 32. {N} 5 credits 
Robert Linck 

Laboratory Coordinator: Heather Shafer 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

222 Chemistry II: Organic Chemistry 

An introduction to the theory and practice of organic 
chemistry. The course focuses on structure, nomencla- 
ture, physical and chemical properties of organic com- 
pounds and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance 
spectroscopy for structural analysis. Reactions of carbo- 
nyl compounds will be studied in depth. Prerequisite: 
1 1 1 or 1 18. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. 
{N} 5 credits 

Members of the department 
Laboratory Coordinator: Maria Bickar 
Offered Spring 2009 



1 1 1 and 223; MTH 1 1 1 or equivalent; or permission of 

the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. 

{N} 5 credits 

Members of the department 

Laboratory Coordinator: Heather Shafer 

Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

321 Organic Synthesis 

An examination of modern methods of organic synthe- 
sis and approaches to the synthesis of complex organic 
compounds with a focus on the current literature. Pre- 
requisite: 223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
Kevin Shea 
Offered Spring 2009 

324 Organometallics 

Structure and reactivity of transition metal organome- 
tallic complexes. General organometallic and organic 
mechanistic principles will be applied to transition- 
metal catalyzed reactions from the current literature, 
such as olefin polymerization and metathesis. Prereq- 
uisite: 224 or permission of the instructor. Offered in 
alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
Maureen Fagan 
Offered Fall 2008 



223 Chemistry III: Organic Chemistry 

Material will build on introductory organic chemistry 
topics covered in 222 and will focus more heavily on 
retrosynthetic analysis and multistep synthetic plan- 
ning. Specific topics include reactions of alkyl halides, 
alcohols, ethers; aromaticity and reactions of benzene; 
and cycloaddition reactions including the Diels-Alder 
reaction. Prerequisite: 222 and successful completion 
of the 222 lab. Enrollment limited to 16 per lab section. 
{N} 5 credits 

Members of the department 
Laboratory Coordinator: Rebecca Thomas 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

224 Chemistry IV: Introduction to Inorganic and 
Physical Chemistry 

This final course in the chemistry core sequence pro- 
vides a foundation in the principles of physical and 
inorganic chemistry that are central to the study of 
all chemical phenomena. Topics include coordina- 
tion chemistry of transition metals and quantitative 
treatment of thermochemistry, chemical equilibria, 
Electrochemistry and kinetics of reactions. Prerequisite: 



326 Synthesis and Structural Analysis 

Synthetic techniques and experimental design in the 
context of multistep synthesis. The literature of chem- 
istry, methods of purification and characterization with 
a focus on NMR spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy and 
chromatography. Recommended especially for sopho- 
mores. Prerequisite: 223. {N} 3 credits 
Kevin Shea, Maureen Fagen, Rebecca Thomas, 
Spring 2009 

Members of the department, Spring 2010 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

328 Bio-Organic Chemistry 

This course deals with the function, biosynthesis, struc- 
ture elucidation and total synthesis of the smaller mol- 
ecules of nature. Emphasis will be on the constituents 
of plant essential oils, steroids including cholesterol 
and the sex hormones, alkaloids and nature's defense 
chemicals, molecular messengers and chemical com- 
munication. The objectives of the course can be sum- 
marized as follows: To appreciate the richness, diversity 
and significance of the smaller molecules of nature, to 
investigate methodologies used to study and synthesize 
these substances, and to become acquainted with the 



Chemistn 



133 



current literature in the field Prerequisite: 223. ottered 

in alternate years. {N} 3 credits 

Wile Burk 

Not offered in 2008-09 

331 Physical Chemistry I 

Quantum chemistry: the electronic structure of atoms 
and molecules, with applications in spectroscopy. An 
introduction to statistical mechanics links the quan- 
tum world to macroscopic properties. Prerequisites: 224 
and MTH H2orMTH 1 1 4. MTH 212 or PHY 210 and 
PHY 1 15 or 117 are strongly recommended. {N} 
4 credits 

Robert Lmck. Fall 2008 
Members of the department. Fall 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

332 Physical Chemistry II 

Thermodynamics and kinetics: will the contents of this 
flask react, and if so, how fast? Properties that govern 
the chemical and physical behavior of macroscopic 
collections of atoms and molecules (gases, liquids, 
solids and mixtures of the above). Prerequisite: MTH 
1 12 or MTH 1 14. {N} 5 credits 
Sbizuka Hsieh. Kate Queeney. Spring 2009 
Members of the department. Spring 2010 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

335 Physical Chemistry of Biochemical Systems 

A course emphasizing physical chemistry of biological 
systems. Topics covered include chemical thermo- 
dynamics, solution equilibria, enzyme kinetics and 
biochemical transport processes. The laboratory focuses 
on experimental applications of physical-chemical 
principles to systems of biochemical importance. Pre- 
requisites: 224 or permission of the instructor and MTH 
1 12. {N} 4 credits 
Cristina Saarez 
Offered Fall 2008 

336 Light and Chemistry 

The interaction of light with molecules is central to 
studies of molecular structure and reactivity. This 
course builds on students" understanding of molecular 
structure from the core sequence (CHM 1 1 1-CHM 
224) to show how many types of light can be used to 
interrogate molecules and to shed some light on their 
behavior. The combined classroom/laboratory format 
allows students to explore light-based instruments in 



short, in-class exercises as well as in longer, more tradi- 
tional labs. The course culminates with an independent 
project that allows students to explore some of the 
ways light is used in cutting-edge chemical research. 
Prerequisites: CHM 224 or permission of the instructor. 
{N} 3 credits 

Members of the department 
Offered Spring 2009 

338 Bio-NMR Spectroscopy and Imaging 

This course is designed to provide an understanding of 
the general principles governing ID and 2D Nuclear 
Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Examples 
from the diverse use of biological NMR in the study of 
protein structures, enzyme mechanisms, DNA, RN A. 
etc., will be analyzed and discussed. A basic introduc- 
tion to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will 
also be included, concentrating on its application to 
biomedical issues. Prerequisite: A knowledge of N.MR 
spectroscopy at the basic level covered in CHM 222 and 
223. Offered in alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
Cristina Suarez 
Not offered in 2008-09 

347 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

A laboratory-oriented course involving spectroscopic, 
chromatographic, and electrochemical methods for the 
quantitation, identification and separation of species. 
Critical evaluation of data and error analysis. Prerequi- 
site: 224 or permission of the instructor. {N/M} 
5 credits 

To be announced 

Laboratory Coordinator: Smitha Jadhav 
Offered Fall 2008 

357 Selected Topics in Biochemistry 

Topic: Pharmacolog}' and Drug Design. An introduc- 
tion to the principles and methodology of phannacol- 
ogy. toxicology' and drug design. The pharmacology of 
several drugs will be examined in detail, and compu- 
tational software used to examine drug binding and 
to assist in designing a new or modified drug. Some of 
the ethical and legal factors relating to drug design, 
manufacture and use will also be considered. Prerequi- 
site: BCH 352, or permission of the instructor. Offered in 
alternate years. {N} 3 credits 
David Bickar 
Offered Fall 2009 



134 



Chemistry 



363 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Topics in inorganic chemistry. Application of group 
theory to coordination compounds, molecular orbital 
theory of main group compounds and organometallic 
compounds. Prerequisite: 331- {N} 4 credits 
Elizabeth Jamieson 
Offered Spring 2009 



369 Bioinorganic Chemistry 

This course will provide an introduction to the field of 
bioinorganic chemistry. Students will learn about the flg Mai* Of 

role of metals in biology as well as about the use of ' 

inorganic compounds as probes and drugs in biologi- 
cal systems. Prerequisites: CHM 223 and 224. Offered in 
alternate years. {N} 4 credits 
Elizabeth Jamieson 
Offered Spring 2009 



execution. BCH 352 is a prerequisite or must be taken 

concurrently. {N} 2 credits 

Amy Burnside 

Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

400 Special Studies 

1 to 4 credits as assigned 

Offered both semesters each year 



Advisers: Members of the department 
Adviser for Study Abroad: Lale Burk 



395 Advanced Chemistry 

A course in which calculational techniques are illus- 
trated and used to explore chemical systems without 
regard to boundaries of subdisciplines. Topics include 
molecular mechanics, semi-empirical and ab initio 
computations. Prerequisite: 331. Offered in alternate 
years. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Linck 
Not offered in 2008-09 



Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 



BCH 352 Biochemistry II: Biochemical Dynamics 

Chemical dynamics in living systems. Enzyme mecha- 
nisms, metabolism and its regulation, energy produc- 
tion and utilization. Prerequisites: BCH 252 and CHM Thp M j nnf 
224. Laboratory (BCH 353) must be taken concurrently A 1 1C iViil 1U1 
by biochemistry majors; optional for others. {N} 
3 credits 

Elizabeth Jamieson, Fall 2008 
David Bickar, Fall 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 



Students planning graduate study in chemistry are 
advised to include PHY 1 1 5 or 1 17 and 1 18 and MTH 
212 or 211 in their programs of study. A major program 
that includes these courses, one semester of biochemis- 
try and additional laboratory experience in the form of 
either (a) two semesters of research (400, 430 or 432), 
or (b) one semester of research and one elective course 
with laboratory, or (c) three elective courses with labo- 
ratory meets the requirements of the American Chemi- 
cal Society for eligibility for professional standing. 

Required courses: 111 and 224 or 118, 222, 223, 326, 
331, 332, 347, 363, and a further 6 credits in chemistry, 
above the 200 level. Four of the six credits may be 
counted from the research courses 400, 430 or 432, or 
from BCH 252, BCH 352, GEO 301, PHY 332, PHY 340 
or PHY 348. Courses fulfilling the major requirements 
may not be taken with the S/U option. 



Advisers: Members of the department 



BCH 353 Biochemistry II Laboratory 

Investigations of biochemical systems using experi- 
mental techniques in current biochemical research. 
Emphasis is on independent experimental design and 



The specified required courses constitute a four- 
semester introduction to chemistry. The semesters are 
sequential, giving a structured development of chemi- 
cal concepts and a progressive presentation of chemical 
information. Completion of the minor with at least one 
additional course at the intermediate or advanced level 
affords the opportunity to explore a particular area in 
greater depth. 



Chemistry [35 

Required courses: l\ credits in chemistry that must 
include 1 1 . :id 224. Students who take 

1 18 are required to include 1 18. 222 and 223. Special 
Studies 400 normally may not be used to meet the 
requirements of the minor Courses fulfilling the minor 
requirement may not be taken with the S/l' option. 

Honors 

Director: Kevin Shea 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course: Offered each year 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full-year course: Offered each year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 

Lab Fees 

There is an additional fee for all chemistry courses with 
labs. Please see the Fees. Expenses and Financial Aid 
section in the beginning of the catalogue for details. 






Classical Languages and Literatures 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

JustinaW. Gregory. Ph.D. 

"" Thalia A. Pandiri. Ph.D. (Classical Languages and 

Literatures and Comparative Literature) 
t: Scott A. Bradbury, PhD. 
Nancy J. Shumate, Ph.D. Chair 



Lecturer 

Maureen B. Ryan. Ph.D. 
Xonna Quesada. MA. 



Majors are offered in Greek. Latin, classics and classi- 
cal studies. Qualified students in these majors have the 
opportunity of a semester's stud}' at the Intercollegiate 
Center for Classical Studies in Rome. 

Students planning to major in classics are advised 
to take relevant courses in other departments such as 
art English, history, philosophy and modem foreign 
languages. 

Students who receive scores of 4 and 5 on the 
Advanced Placement test in Virgil may not apply that 
credit toward the degree if they complete LAT 2 13 for 
credit. 

Credit is not granted for the first semester only of an 
introductory language course. 



Greek 



GRK 100y Elementary Greek 

A yearlong course that will include both the fundamen- 
tals of grammar and, in the second semester, selected 
readings. {¥] 8 credits 
Justina Gregory 
Full-year course; offered each year 

GRK 212 Attic Prose and Drama 
Prerequisite: 100}-. {L/F} 4 credits 
Xonna Quesada 
Offered Fall 2008 



GRK 213 Homer, Iliad or Odyssey 

Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 
4 credits 

Norma Quesada 
Offered Spring 2009 

GRK 310 Advanced Readings in Greek Literature I & II 

Authors read in GRK 310 van- from year to year, but 
they are generally chosen from a list including Plato. 
Homer. .Aristophanes, lyric poets, tragedians, historians 
and orators, depending on the interests and needs of 
the students. GRK 310 may be repeated for credit, pro- 
vided that the topic is not the same. Prerequisite: GRK 
2 13 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits 

Demeter and Dionysus in Greek Religion 
A study of two important divinities and their place in 
Greek religion through readings of the Homeric Hymn 
to Demeter and Euripides' Baccbae. the two principal 
literary sources for study of these gods. The Hymn is our 
major source for knowledge of Demeter and the Eleusin- 
ian Mysteries, the oldest mystery cult in the Greek world. 
Euripides" play is a deep and far-ranging meditation on 
the nature of the most complex of all Greek gods. Our 
approach will be both literary and historical. 
Scott Bradbun 
Offered Fall 2008 

GRK 404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department, for majors 
and honors students who have had four advanced 
courses in Greek. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each vear 



Classical Languages and Literatures 



137 



Graduate 



GRK 580 Studies in Greek Literature 

This will ordinarily be an enriched version of the 300- 

level course currently offered. 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

Adviser for Graduate Study: Justina Gregory 



Latin 



LAT 100y Elementary Latin 

Fundamentals of grammar, with selected readings from 

Latin authors in the second semester. {F} 8 credits 

Maureen Ryan. Fall 2008 

Scott Bradbury, Spring 2009 

Full-year course; offered each year 

LAT 212 Introduction to Latin Prose and Poetry 

Practice and improvement of reading skills through the 
study of a selection of texts in prose and verse. System- 
atic review of fundamentals of grammar. Prerequisite: 
LAT lOOy or the equivalent. {L/F} 4 credits 
Maureen Ryan 
Offered Fall 2008 

LAT 213 Introduction to Virgil's Aeneid 

Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 
4 credits 

Nancy Shumate 
Offered Spring 2009 

LAT 330 Advanced Readings in Latin Literature I & II 

Authors read in LAT 330 vary from year to year, but they 
are generally chosen from a list including epic and 
lyric poets, historians, orators, comedians and novelists, 
depending on the interests and needs of students. LAT 
330 may be repeated for credit, provided that the topic 
is not the same. Prerequisite: Two courses at the 200- 
level or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits 

The Age of Nero 

A study of the literary culture of the court of Nero 
through readings from Tacitus' Annals. Petronius' 
Satyricon, Lucan's DeBello Cirili and Seneca's Letters. 
Attention to the social and political background, and 



to the aesthetic sensibilities that distinguish this period 
from the Augustan Age. 
Nancy Shumate 
Offered Fall 2008 

Lyric and Elegiac Lore Poetry 
What are the conventions of Latin love poetry? What 
meters are appropriate to this genre, what attitudes does 
it take toward Roman social and political life, and how 
does it construct the poet/lover, the beloved and love 
itself? Selected readings from Catullus, Horace, Tibul- 
lus, Propertius, Sulpicia and Ovid. {L/F} 4 credits. 
Scott Bradbury 
Offered Spring 2009 

LAT 404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department, for majors 
and honors students who have had four advanced 
courses in Latin. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each vear 



Graduate 



LAT 580 Studies in Latin Literature 

This will ordinarily be an enriched version of the 300- 

level courses currently offered. 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

Adviser for Graduate Study: Justina Gregory 

Classics in Translation 

FYS 129 Rites of Passage 

How does Western literature represent the passage to 
adulthood of young women and young men? What are 
the myths, rituals, images and metaphors associated 
with this passage, and how do historical representa- 
tions intersect with modern lived experience? We will 
read narratives of transition from archaic and classical 
Greece and 20th-century Europe and North America, 
including Homer's Odyssey, the Homeric Hymn to 
Demeter. the poems of Sappho, and novels by Alain- 
Fournier, Thomas Mann and Willa Cather. Enrollment 
limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 4 credits 
Justina Gregory 
Offered Fall 2008 



138 



Classical Languages and Literatures 



GLS 215 Discovering Greece Through Material Culture: 
From the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic East 

This class will examine the archaeology and material 
culture of the Greek world from the Late Bronze Age 
through the Hellenistic period. Through the examina- 
tion of burial form and other evidence of the Iron Age, 
we will explore the emergence of concepts of citizenship 
and social identity associated with the rise of the polis. 
Through the lenses of sculpture, vase painting and 
architecture we will consider evidence of political and 
social competition. Using the instruments of archaeol- 
ogy to examine political structures and economics, 
we will attempt to gain a better understanding of the 
position of women, non-citizens, and slaves within the 
Classical Greek city state. Enrollment limited to 35. (E) 
{H} 4 credits 
Anthony Tuck 
Offered Spring 2009 

CLS 227 Classical Mythology 

The principal myths as they appear in Greek and Ro- 
man literature, seen against the background of ancient 
culture and religion. Focus on creation myths, the 
structure and function of the Olympian pantheon, the 
Troy cycle and artistic paradigms of the hero. Some at- 
tention to modern retellings and artistic representations 
of ancient myth. {L/A} 4 credits 
Scott Bradbury 
Offered Fall 2008 

CLS 235 Life and Literature in Ancient Rome 

A study of the literature of Ancient Rome from its 
legendary beginnings to the triumph of Christianity. 
Emphasis on how literary culture intersects with its 
social and historical context. Topics will include: popu- 
lar entertainment; literature as propaganda; Roman 
virtues — and vices; the Romans in love. 
{L/H} 4 credits 
Maureen Ryan 
Offered Fall 2008 

CLS 236 Cleopatra: Histories, Fictions, Fantasies 

A study of the transformation of Cleopatra, a competent 
Hellenistic ruler, into a historical myth, a staple of 
literature, and a cultural lens through which the politi- 
cal, aesthetic and moral sensibilities of different eras 
have been focused. Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, 
Orientalist, Postcolonial, Hollywood Cleopatras; read- 
ing from, among others, Plutarch, Virgil, Boccaccio, 
Shakespeare, Dryden, Gautier, Shaw, historical novel- 



ists; some attention to Cleopatra in the visual arts. 
{L/H} 4 credits 
Nancy Shumate 
Offered Spring 2009 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

CLT 202/ENG 202 Western Classics in Translation, from 
Homer to Dante 

Offered Fall 2008 

CLT 203/ENG 203 Western Classics in Translation, from 
Chretien de Troyes to Tolstoy 

Offered Spring 2009 

The Major in Greek, Latin 
or Classics 

Advisers: Members of the department 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Scott Bradbury 

Basis: in Greek, lOOy; in Latin, lOOy; in classics, Greek 
lOOy and Latin lOOy. 

Requirements: In Greek, eight four-credit courses in the 
language in addition to the basis; in Latin, eight four- 
credit courses in the language in addition to the basis; 
in classics, eight four-credit courses in the languages in 
addition to the basis and including not fewer than two 
in each language. 

The Major in Classical 
Studies 

Advisers: Members of the department 

Basis: GRK lOOy or LAT lOOy (or the equivalent). 
Competence in both Greek and Latin is strongly recom- 
mended. 

Requirements: Nine semester courses in addition to the 
basis. Four chosen from GRK (200-level or above) or 
LAT (200-level or above); at least two from classics in 



Classical Languages and Literatures 



139 



translation ((IS); and at Least two appropriate courses 
in archaeology (ARC), art history (ARH), government 
(GOV), ancient history (HST), philosophy (PHI) and/ 
or religion (RID. chosen in accordance with the inter- 
ests of the student and in consultation with the adviser 
With the approval of the adviser, courses in other de- 
partments and programs may count toward the major. 

The Minor in Greek 

Advisers: Members of the department 

Requirements: Six four-credit courses, of which at least 
four must be courses in the Greek language and at least 
three must be at or above the 200 (intemiediate) level. 
The remaining courses may be chosen from Greek 
history, Greek art. ancient philosophy ancient political 
theory, ancient religion or classics in translation. At 
least one course must be chosen from this category. 



The Minor in Latin 

Advisers: Members of the department 

Requirements: Six four-credit courses, of which at least 
four must be courses in the Latin language and at least 
three must be at or above the 200 (intermediate) level. 
The remaining courses may be chosen from Roman 
history, Roman art, ancient political theory ancient 
religion or classics in translation. At least one course 
must be chosen from this category. 



Honors in Greek, Latin, 
Classics or Classical Studies 

Director: Justina Gregory 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 

Greek, Latin or Classics 



Graduate 

590d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

590 Research and Thesis 

4 or 8 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



The Minor in Classics 

Advisers: Members of the department 

Requirements: Six four-credit courses in Greek or Latin 
languages and literatures at or above the level of 212, 
including not fewer than two in each language. One of 
these six courses may be replaced by a course related 
to classical antiquity offered either within or outside 
the department, and taken with the department's prior 
approval. 



140 



Comparative Literature 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Katwiwa Mule, Ph.D. (Comparative Literature), Director 

Professors 

* 2 Maria Banerjee, Ph.D. (Russian Language and 

Literature) 
Ann Rosalind Jones, Ph.D. 
fl Thalia Alexandra Pandiri, Ph.D. (Classical Languages 

and Literatures and Comparative Literature) 
Janie Vanpee, Ph.D. (French Studies), 
* 2 Craig R. Davis, Ph.D. (English Language and 

Literature) 
Anna Botta, Ph.D. (Italian Language and Literature and 

Comparative Literature) 



Associate Professors 

Reyes Lazaro, Ph.D. (Spanish and Portuguese) 
Luc Gilleman, Ph.D. (English Language and 

Literature) 
Sabina Knight, Ph.D. (Chinese and Comparative 

Literature) 
fl Dawn Fulton, Ph.D. (French Studies) 
Ambreen Hai, Ph.D. (English Language and Literature) 

Assistant Professors 

Justin Cammy, Ph.D. (Jewish Studies) 

" 2 Nicolas Russell, Ph.D. (French Studies) 

Joel Westerdale, Ph.D. (German Studies) 

Malcolm K. McNee, Ph.D. (Spanish and Portuguese) 

Lecturer 

Margaret Bruzelius, Ph.D. 



A study of literature in two or more languages, one of 
which may be English. In all comparative literature 
courses, readings and discussion are in English, but 
students are encouraged to read works in the original 
language whenever they are able. Comparative litera- 
ture courses are open to all first-year students unless 
otherwise noted. 300-level courses require a previous 
literature course at the 200-level or above. 



Introductory Courses 

FYS 129 Rites of Passage 

How does Western literature represent the passage to 
adulthood of young women and young men? What are 
the myths, rituals, images and metaphors associated 
with this passage, and how do historical representa- 
tions intersect with modern lived experience? We will 
read narratives of transition from archaic and classical 
Greece and 20th-century Europe and North America, 
including Homer's Odyssey, the Homeric Hymn to 
Demeter, the poems of Sappho and novels by Alain- 
Fournier, Thomas Mann and Willa Gather. Enrollment 



limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 4 credits 
Justina Gregory (Classics) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 157 Literature and Science: Models of Time and 
Space 

Though science and art are often presented as mutu- 
ally exclusive fields of knowledge, scientific and liter- 
ary discourses cross in many ways. We'll read across 
the conventional boundaries of literary and scientific 
discourse, focusing on texts by scientists, fiction writers 
and playwrights that present new models of time and 
space. Texts may include work by scientists such as 
Lyell, Darwin, Einstein and Heisenberg, as well as by 
such writers of fiction and drama as Wells, Vonnegut, 
Stoppard, Brecht and McEwan. Key terms: deep time, 
time travel, multiple or parallel universes, deep space, 
wormholes, entropy. 

Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 
4 credits 

Luc Gilleman (English Language and Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 



Comparative Literature 



141 



FYS 165 Childhood in the Literatures of Africa and the 
African Diaspora 

A study of childhood as an experience in the present 
and a transition into adulthood and the way's in which 
it is intimately tied to social, political and cultural 
histories and identities. In Africa and the African 
diaspora, such issues entail specific crises focused on 
cultural alienation, economic deprivation, loss of lan- 
guage, exile and memory: The course focuses on four 
key questions: How does the enforced acquisition of a 
colonizer's language affect children as they attempt to 
master the codes of an alien tongue and culture? How 
do cultural values and expectations shape narratives of 
childhood in different contexts? How do narratives told 
from the point of view of children represent and deal 
with various forms of alienation? What are the relation- 
ships between recollections of childhood and published 
autobiography? Enrollment limited to 16 first-year 
students. WI {L} 4 credits 
KativiwaMule 
Offered Fall 2008 

GLT 150 The Art of Translation: Poetics, Politics, 
Practice 

We hear and read translations all the time: on televi- 
sion news, in radio interviews, in movie subtitles, in 
international bestsellers. But translations don't shift 
texts transparently from one language to another. 
Rather, they revise, censor and rewrite original works, 
to challenge the past and to speak to new readers. We'll 
explore translation by hearing talks by translators and 
experts in the history and theory of translation. Stu- 
dents will look at translations from around the world 
and experiment with translating themselves. Knowl- 
edge of a foreign language useful but not required. 
Graded S/U only. (E) {L} 2 credits 
KatwiwaMule 
Offered Spring 2009 

GLT 202 ENG 202 Western Classics in Translation, from 
Homer to Dante {L} WI 

Ann R. Jones, Luc (iilleman, Nancy Shumate. 
Robert Hosmer 
Offered Fall 2008 

An interdepartmental course, CLT 202/ENG 202 is a 
requirement for the CLT major. Students interested in 
comparative literature should take it as early as pos- 
sible, if they are ready for a fast-paced, challenging 
course that includes a lot of reading and writing. 



CLT 203 ENG 203 Western Classics in Translation, from 
Chretien de Troyes to Tolstoy {L} \\ I 
Maria Banerjee, William Oram 
Offered Spring 2009 

Intermediate Courses 

204 Writings and Rewritings 

Mediterraneans 

Three continents, Africa, Asia and Europe, share coast- 
lines on the Mediterranean — literally, "the sea between 
lands." Linked to the origins of Western civilization and 
to imperialism and orientalism, the Mediterranean has 
given its name to a stereotypical landscape (sunshine, 
olive trees, vineyards) and to a social type (Southerners 
seen as passionate, cunning and slow). What do Club 
Meds, the Mafia and Balkanization have in common? 
Can a Mediterranean identity not defined by the North 
exist? This region will focus our discussion on issues 
central to comparative literature today: competing 
nationalisms, Eurocentrism, orientalism, tradition vs. 
modernization, globalization. Literary texts by Homer, 
Goethe, Lawrence, Amin Maalouf and Orhan Pamuk; 
history 7 and theory from Hesiod, Plato, Braudel, Natalie 
Zemon Davis. Open to first-year students by permission 
of the instructor. {L} 4 credits 
Anna Botta 
Offered Fall 2008 

Antigones 

A study of how literary texts written in a particular 
historical and cultural moment are revised and trans- 
formed in new geographies, ideological frameworks 
and art forms. Oedipus' daughter Antigone, executed 
for burying her brother against the decree of the tyrant 
Creon, has been read as a sister defending family bonds 
against state power, as a woman supporting private good 
over civic law, and as a feminist resisting male domina- 
tion. Why has she been interpreted in such different ways 
in different times and places? We'll analyze her trans- 
formations from ancient Greece to the 21st century in 
drama and film from Sophocles to Anouilh. Brecht, the 
Congolese dramatist Sylvain Bemba, and the modem 
American playwright Martha Boesing. and in theorists 
from Hegel to Levi-Strauss, Lacan, Derrida. Gayle Rubin. 
Seyla Benhabib and Judith Butler. {L} 4 crediits 
Ann R. Jones 
Offered Spring 2009 



142 



Comparative Literature 



205 Twentieth-Century Literatures of Africa 

A study of the major writers of contemporary Africa, fo- 
cusing on the relationship between traditional oral cul- 
tures and written literatures. We will seek to understand 
how African writers confront over a century of European 
colonialism on the continent, and represent contempo- 
rary postcolonial realities. Texts will include Achebe's 
Wings Fall Apart, Ngugi's The River Between, Bessie 
Head's Maru, Nawal el Saadawi's God Dies by the 
River Nile, Mariama Ba's So Long A Letter, Soyinka's 
Death and the King's Horseman and The Cry of Win- 
nie Mandela. Open to students at all levels. {L} 
Katwiwa Mule 
Offered Fall 2008 

218 Holocaust Literature 

Creative responses to the destruction of European Jewry, 
differentiating between literature written in extremis 
in ghettos, concentration/extermination camps, or in 
hiding, and the vast post-war literature about the Holo- 
caust. How to balance competing claims of individual 
and collective experience, the rights of the imagination 
and the pressures for historical accuracy. Selections 
from a variety of artistic genres (diary, reportage, poetry, 
novel, graphic novel, film, monuments, museums), 
and critical theories of representation. All readings in 
translation. {L/H} 4 credits 
Justin Cammy 
Offered Fall 2008 

GLS 227 Classical Mythology 

The principal myths as they appear in Greek and Ro- 
man literature, seen against the background of ancient 
culture and religion. Focus on creation myths, the 
structure and function of the Olympian pantheon, the 
Troy cycle and artistic paradigms of the hero. Some 
attention to modern retellings and artistic representa- 
tions of ancient myth. Enrollment limited to 30. {L/A} 
4 credits 
Scott Bradbury 
Offered Fall 2008 

229 The Renaissance Gender Debate 

In "La Querelle des Femmes" medieval and Renais- 
sance writers (1350-1650) took on misogynist ideas 
from the ancient world and early Christianity: woman 
as failed man, irrational animal, fallen Eve. Writers 
debated women's sexuality (insatiable or purer than 
men's?), marriage (the hell of nagging wives or the 
highest Christian state?), women's souls (nonexistent 



or subtler than men's?), female education (a waste of 
time or a social necessity?). In the context of the social 
and cultural changes fuelling the polemic, we will 
analyze the many literary forms it took, from Chaucer's 
Wife of Bath to Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew, 
women scholars' dialogues, such as Moderata Fonte's 
The Worth of Women, and pamphlets from the popular 
press. Some attention to the battle of the sexes in the 
visual arts. Recommended: a previous course in clas- 
sics, medieval or Renaissance studies or the study of 
women and gender. {L} 4 credits 
Ann R. Jones 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAL 232 Modern Chinese Literature 

Selected readings in translation of Chinese literature 
from the late-Qing dynasty to contemporary Taiwan 
and the People's Republic of China. This course will 
offer (1) a window on 20th-century China (from the 
Sino-Japanese War of 1895 to the present) and (2) an 
introduction to the study of literature: (a) why we read 
literature, (b) different approaches (e.g., how to do 
a close reading) and (c) literary movements. We will 
stress the socio-political context and questions of politi- 
cal engagement, social justice, class, gender, race and 
human rights. All readings are in English translation 
and no background in China or Chinese is required. 
{L} 4 credits 
Sabina Knight 
Offered Spring 2009 

CLS 236 Cleopatra: Histories, Fictions, Fantasies 

A study of the transformation of Cleopatra, a competent 
Hellenistic ruler, into a historical myth, a staple of 
literature, and a cultural lens through which the politi- 
cal, aesthetic and moral sensibilities of different eras 
have been focused. Roman, medieval, Renaissance, 
Orientalist, postcolonial, Hollywood Cleopatras; read- 
ing from, among others, Plutarch, Virgil, Boccaccio, 
Shakespeare, Dryden, Gautier, Shaw, historical novel- 
ists; some attention to Cleopatra in the visual arts. 
{L/H} 4 credits 
Nancy Shumate 
Offered Spring 2009 

237 Travellers' Tales 

How do we describe the places we visit? In what way do 
guidebooks and the reports of earlier travellers struc- 
ture the journeys we take ourselves? Can we ever come 
to know the "real Italy," the "real India," or do those 



Comparative Literature 






descriptions finally provide only metaphors for the self? 
A study of classic travel narratives b\ such writers as 
Calvino, T\vain, Goethe, Stendhal, Henry James, Paul 
Theroux, Rebecca West, Isak Dinessen and others. {L} 
4 credits 
Michael Gorra 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAL 245 Writing, Japan and Otherness 

An exploration of representations of "otherness" in 

Japanese literature and film from the mid- 19 th century 
until the present. How was (and is) Japan's identity as 
a modern nation configured through representations 
of other nations and cultures? How are categories of 
race, gender, nationality, class and sexuality' used in the 
construction of difference? This course will pay special 
attention to the role of "otherness" in the development 
of national and individual identities. In conjunction 
with these investigations, we will also address the varied 
ways in which Japan is represented as "other" by writ- 
ers from China, England, France, Korea and the United 
States. How do these images of and by Japan converse 
with each other? All readings are in English transla- 
tion. {L} 4 credits 
Kimberly Kono 
Offered Spring 2009 

JUD 258 ENG 230 American Jewish Literature 

Jewish literary engagement with America, from Yiddish 
writing on the margins to the impact of native-born 
authors and critics on the post-war literary scene. 
Topics include narratives of immigration; the myth of 
America and its discontents; the Yiddish literary world 
on the Lower East Side and the New York Intellectuals; 
ethnic satire and humor; crises of the left involving 
Communism, Black-Jewish relations and '60s radical- 
ism; the Holocaust in American culture; tensions be- 
tween Israel and America as "promised lands"; and the 
creative betrayal of folklore in contemporary fiction. 
Must Jewish writing in America remain on the margins, 
"too Jewish" for the mainstream yet "too white" for the 
new multicultural curriculum? {L} 4 credits 
Justui I). Cam my 
Offered Spring 2009 

260 Health and Illness: Literary Explorations 

How do languages, social norms and economic con- 
texts shape experiences of health and illness? How 
do conceptions of selfhood, sexuality belonging and 
spirituality inform ideas about well-being, disease, 



intervention and healing? This cross-cultural literary 
Inquiry into bodily and emotional experiences will also 
explore Western biomedical and traditional Chinese 
diagnosis and treatment practices From despair and 
chronic pain to cancer, aging and death, how do suf- 
ferers and their caregivers adapt in the face of infirmity 
or trauma? Our study will also consider how stories and 
other genres can help develop resilience, compassion 
and hope. Enrollment limited to l c j. {L} 4 credits 
sabma Knight 
Offered Fall 2008 

268 Latina and Latin American Women Writers 

This course examines the last twenty years of Latina 
writing in this country while tracing the Latin Ameri- 
can roots of many of the writers. Constructions of eth- 
nic identity, gender. Latinidad, "race," class, sexuality 
and political consciousness are analyzed in light of the 
writers' coming to feminism. Texts by Esmeralda San- 
tiago, Gloria Anzaldua, Sandra Cisneros, Judith Ortiz 
Cofer, Denise Chavez, Demetria Martinez and man) 
others are included in readings that range from poetry 
and fiction to essay and theatre. Knowledge of Spanish 
is not required, but will be useful. First-year students 
must have the permission of the instructor. {L} 4 credits 
Nancy Saporta Sternbach 
Offered Spring 2009 

275 Israeli Literature and Film in International Context 

What role have writers and filmmakers played in 
imagining, then challenging and refashioning Zionist 
dreams and Israeli realities? Topics include tensions 
between the universalizing seductions of exile and the 
romantic appeal of homeland; varying landscapes in 
the consolidation of a revolutionary culture (the desert, 
the socialist kibbutz, cosmopolitan Tel Aviv, Jerusalem 
of heaven and earth); ongoing conflicts between Arabs 
and Jews; postmodern (and post-Zionist) anxieties 
and transformations in contemporary Israeli society. 
Hebrew novels, short stories, memoirs, poetry and films, 
from the early 20th century until today, with counter- 
texts from European, American and Palestinian au- 
thors. All readings in translation. {L} 4 credits 
Justin Cam my 
Offered Fall 2009 

ENG 277 Postcolonial Women Writers 
A comparative study of primarily 20th-century women 
writers in English from Africa, the Caribbean, South 
Asia and Australia. We will read novels, short stories. 



144 



Comparative Literature 



poetry, plays and autobiography in their historical, cul- 
tural and political contexts as well as theoretical essays 
to address questions such as: how have women writers 
challenged both colonial and postcolonial assumptions 
about gender, identity or nationhood, diaspora? How do 
they call attention to or address issues often ignored by 
their male contemporaries or forebears, such as sexual- 
ity, desire, motherhood, childhood, sickness, poverty, 
relations among women? Writers may include Attia 
Hosain, Anita Desai, Kamala Das, Thrity Umrigar, Ama 
Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, Nawal-el-Saadawi, Jamaica 
Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, Shani Mootoo, Zadie Smith, 
Sally Morgan. Prerequisite: a WI course. {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hai 
Offered Fall 2008 

285/HSC 285 Mnemosyne: Goddess or Demon 

For the ancient Greeks, Mnemosyne (the Greek word 
for memory) was a goddess who gave them control over 
time and truth. More recently, the Western tradition 
has described memory rather as a source of uncertainty 
and chaos. But whether in fear or in awe, the West has 
always described memory as central to human experi- 
ence. This course will explore literary 7 and scientific 
descriptions of memory in several periods from antiqui- 
ty to the present. Texts by Hesiod, Pindar, Plato, Augus- 
tine, Aquinas, Petrarch, Marguerite de Navarre, Freud, 
Proust, Borges and Kis, among others. {L} 4 credits 
Nicholas Russell 
Offered Fall 2008 

288 Bitter Homes and Gardens: Domestic Space and 
Domestic Discord in Three Modern Women Novelists 

We will analyze the ways Edith Wharton, Colette and 
Elizabeth von Arim depict domestic discord — loss, 
rage, depression — through local landscapes and do- 
mestic spaces: houses, rooms and gardens. Texts will 
include Wharton's essays on landscape and domestic 
design and novels, short stories, letters and autobio- 
graphical writings by all three authors. {L} 4 credits 
Ann Leone 
Offered Spring 2009 

Advanced Courses 

PRS 301 Translating New Worlds 

This course investigates how New World explorations 
were translated into material culture and patterns of 
thought in early modern Europe and the Americas 



(1500-1750). Focusing upon geographies, 'anthro- 
pologies,' material objects, and pictorial and written 
records, students analyze how travel to and across the 
Americas reshaped the lives of consumers and think- 
ers — from food and finery (chocolate and silver, sugar 
and feathers, corn and cochineal) to published narra- 
tives and collections of objects made in New Spain, New 
England and New France. In addition to 16th-century 
initial contacts, we discuss cultural practices — be they 
material, imagined, factual or fantastical — that arose 
from the first encounters, conquests and settlements. 
Students with strong interests in history, anthropology, 
art history or the history of science are welcome. Read- 
ing knowledge of French, German, Italian, Portuguese 
or Spanish is required. Enrollment limited to 15 juniors 
and seniors. (E) {A/H/L} 4 credits 
Dana Leibsohn (Art) and Ann Jones (Comparative 
Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 

305 Studies in the Novel 

Topic: The Postmodern Novel: Open Encyclopedias. 
Twentieth-century fictions began to present themselves 
as open encyclopedias — a contradictory genre, given 
that "encyclopedia" etymologically suggests an attempt 
to enclose knowledge within a circle. Postmodernism, 
even more, sees the totality of what can be known as 
potential, conjectural and manifold; postmodern writ- 
ers value skepticism and unresolvable heterogeneity. Yet 
they still attempt to establish observable relationships 
between worldly codes and methods of knowledge. We'll 
read fictions by Borges, Calvino, Matvejevie, Perec, 
Pynchon, Queneau and Vila-Matas as examples of open 
encyclopedias, exhilarating voyages through a puzzling 
cosmos that includes missing pieces. Theoretical texts 
by writers such as d'Alembert, Deleuze and Guattari, 
Eco, Foucault, Lyotard will help us to map the precon- 
ditions of our postmodernity. {L} 4 credits 
Anna Botta 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages and 
Literatures 

Writing Empire: Images of Colonial andPostcolo- 
nialjapan. 

This seminar will address the diverse reactions to Ja- 
pan's colonial project and explore the ways in which 
empire was manifest in a literary form. Examining lit- 
erary texts produced in and about the Japanese empire 



Comparative Literature 






during the first half of the 20th century, we will discuss 
concepts such as assimilation, mimicry, hybridity. race, 
and transculturation in the context of Japanese colo- 
nialism. Through encounters with different voices from 
inside and outside of Japan's empire, students will gam 
a deeper understanding of the complexities of colonial 
hegemony and identity Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor {L} 4 credits 
Kimberly Kom 
Offered Spring 2009 

JUD 362 Seminar in Modern Jewish Literature 
Topic: Punchline: The Jewish Comic Tradition. What 
makes a Jewish joke? Is Jewish humor self-deprecating, 
or is it a minority's means to challenge and reshape 
majority culture? From Yiddish folktales and types of 
Eastern Europe (the wise fools of Chelm: shlemiels and 
shlimazls) through the Jewish influence on 20th-cen- 
tury American comedy. Focuses on Sholem Aleichem 
( the Yiddish master of laughter through tears). Philip 
Roth and Woody .Mien, with pauses to consider theories 
of Jewish humor (beginning with Freud), immigrant 
comedy, political satire and Jewish stand-up. How do 
contemporary manifestations of popular culture (Curb 
Your Enthusiasm: '/he Simpsons: Borat: The Daily 
Show) draw on this broader Jewish tradition? {L} 
4 credits 
Justin Cam my 
Offered Spring 2009 

364 Tradition and Dissent: Don Juan, World/s Traveler 

Don Juan is the quintessential myth of patriarchy. He 
has been called a scoundrel, a hero, a macho, a homo- 
sexual, a modem rebel. Different attitudes towards him 
illustrate how countries and ages interpret conquest, 
power, freedom, morals, masculinity, sex. This course 
traces the reinterpretations of this character in plays, 
opera, novels and films: from sinner and philosopher 
in the 17th century (Tirso and Moliere), to monstrous 
precursor of modernity (Mozart), and icon of nations 
such as Spain (Zorrilla, Azorin) and contemporary 
America (Levin, Jarmusch). The optional one-credit 
course SPN 356 offers students the possibility to read 
the Spanish texts in the original. {L} 4 credits 
Reyes Ldzaro 
Offered Fall 2008 



SPN 356 Close-Reading Translation and Performance: 
Don Juan 
1 credit 
Reyes Ldza 

Offered Fall 2008 

POR 381 Seminar in Portuguese and Brazilian Studies 

To/tic: Angola. Brazil and Cuba: Race. Saturn and 
Narrative. This course considers the formation and in- 
terrogation of national identities in three post-colonial 
settings: Angola, Brazil and Cuba. Our readings and 
discussion will focus on notions of race, culture and 
hybridity in the narration of these national identities. 
How do different artists and intellectuals respond to the 
urge for national, cultural and racial unity in the face 
of dramatic diversity? How do they respond to the ra- 
cialized legacies of colonialism and Eurocentrism? How 
does privileging the hybrid, mulatto, Creole or mestizo/ 
mestico identity* both subvert and reinvent socio- 
cultural and aesthetic hierarchies? The focus will be on 
fiction and poetry but will also include film, music and 
visual culture, as well as readings on socio-historical 
contexts. Course taught in English. Students will have 
the option of doing selected readings and written work 
in Spanish and/or Portuguese. Enrollment limited to 
12. {L} 4 credits 
Malcolm K McNee 
Offered Fall 2008 



Critical Theory and Method 

300 Foundations of Contemporary Literary Theory 

The interpretation of literary and other cultural texts 
by psychoanalytic. Marxist, structuralist and post- 
structuralist critics. Emphasis on the theory as well as 
the practice of these methods: their assumptions about 
writing and reading and about literature as a cultural 
formation. Readings include Freud, Lacan. Barthes. 
Derrida and Foucault. Enrollment limited to 25. [I] 
•i credits 
lame Yanpee 
Offered Fall 2008 

301/FRN 301 Contemporary Theory in French 

For students concurrently enrolled in CLT 300. wishing 
to read and discuss in French the literary theory at the 
foundation of contemporary debates. Readings of such 
seminal contributors as Saussure. Levi-Strauss. Barthes. 



146 



Comparative Literature 



Foucault, Derrida, Lacan, Cixous, Kristeva, Irigaray, 
Fanon, Deleuze, Baudrillard. Optional course. Graded 
S/U only. (E) {L/F} 1 credit 
Janie Vanpee 
Offered Fall 2008 

340 Problems in Literary Theory 

A final seminar required of senior majors, designed to 
explore one broad issue (e.g., the body, memory and 
writing; exile; art about art) defined at the end of the 
fall semester by the students themselves. Prerequisites: 
CLT 202 and CLT 300, or permission of the instructor. 
{L} 4 credits 
Janie Vanpee 
Offered Spring 2009 

404 Special Studies 

Offered both semesters, with the permission of the in- 
structor and of the program director. 
4 credits 



The Major 



Requirements: 13 semester courses as follows: 

1. CLT 202, CLT 204, CLT 300, CLT 340 (Note: CLT 202 
is a prerequisite for 340 and should be taken as early 
as possible; 

2. Three comparative literature courses (only courses 
with a primary or cross-listing in Comparative Lit- 
erature count as comparative literature courses); 

3. Three intermediate or advanced courses that focus 
on literary or cultural analysis in a foreign lan- 
guage approved by the major adviser. If a student 
takes both semesters of a year-long literary survey 
in a foreign language (e.g., FRN 253, 254) she may 
count the two courses as one advanced literature 
course; 

4. Three literature courses in an additional language, 
which may be English. (ENG 200 and above). In 
certain cases a student may take up to three upper- 
level courses of literature in translation, in a distinct 
language or regional or national literature, such 

as the literature of a seldom taught language, in- 
cluding Old Norse or Basque, or in African, Middle 
Eastern, Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Jewish (Yiddish, 
Hebrew or Ladino) or Russian literature. A student 
who wants to pursue this option must present her 



adviser with a plan for the courses she intends to 
take and a rationale for her choice; 
Of these thirteen courses taken for the major, one 
course must focus on texts from cultures beyond the 
European/American mainstream: e.g., East Asian, 
African or Caribbean writing, or minority writing 
in any region. One course must focus on literature 
written before 1800. (CLT 203 fulfills this require- 
ment.) One course must include substantial selec- 
tions of poetry. Each student will consult with her 
adviser to make sure her courses meet these require- 
ments. 



Honors 

Requirements: The same as those for the major, with 
the addition of a thesis (430), to be written in both 
semesters of the senior year. 

Director: Sabina Knight 

430d Honors Thesis 

Requirements: The same as those for the major, with 
the addition of a thesis to be written in both semesters 
of the senior year. The first draft is due on the first day 
of the second semester and will be commented on by 
both the adviser and a second reader. The final draft is 
due on April 1, to be followed in early May by an oral 
presentation and discussion of the thesis. For more 
detailed requirements, see the CLT Web site, at the end 
of the list of courses. 8 credits 
Full-year course; offered each year 

Director of Study Abroad: Janie Vanpee 



147 



Computer Science 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Michael 0. Albertson, Ph.D. (Mathematics and 

Statistics) 
Joseph O'Rourke, Ph.D., Chair 
Ileana Streinu, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors 

' : Dominique F. ThieTiaut, Ph.D. 



''Judy Franklin, Ph.D. 

Judith Cardell, Ph.D. (Clare Booth Luce Associate 

Professor of Computing Engineering) 
"'Nicholas Howe, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors 

Eitan Mendelowitz 



Five computer science courses have no prerequisites. 
These are CSC 102 (How The Internetworks), CSC 103 
(How Computers Work), CSC 104/FYS 164 Issues in 
Artificial Intelligence, CSC 106 (Introduction to Com- 
puting and the Arts) and CSC 1 1 1 (Computer Science 
I). Students who contemplate a major in computer 
science should consult with a major adviser early in 
their college career. 

102 How The Internet Works 

An introduction to the structure, design, and operation 
of the Internet, including the electronic and physical 
structure of networks; packet switching; how email and 
web browsers work, domain names, mail protocols, en- 
coding and compression, http and HTML, the design of 
web pages, the operation of search engines, beginning 
JavaScript; CSS. Both history and societal implications 
are explored. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with word 
processing. Enrollment limited to 30. The course will 
meet for half of the semester only. {M} 2 credits 
Nicholas Howe. Fall 2008 
Joseph O'Rourke. Spring 2009 
Offered second half of the semester in the fall, first 
half of the semester in the spring 

103 How Computers Work 

An introduction to how computers work. The goal of the 
course is to provide students with a broad understanding 
of computer hardware, software and operating systems. 
Topics include the history of computers; logic circuits; 
major hardware components and their design, includ- 
ing processors, memory, disks and video monitors; 
programming languages and their role in developing 



applications; and operating system functions, including 
file system support and multitasking, multiprogram- 
ming and timesharing. Weekly labs give hands-on 
experience. Enrollment limited to 30. {M} 2 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered first half of the semester, Fall 2008 

105 Interactive Web Documents 

A half-semester introduction to the design and creation 
of interactive environments on the World Wide Web. 
Focus on three areas: 1) Web site design; 2) JavaScript; 
3) Embedded multimedia objects. Enrollment limited 
to 30. Prerequisites: CSC 102 or equivalent competency 
with HTML. {M} 2 credits 
Joseph O'Rourke 
Offered second half of the semester, Spring 2009 

106 Introduction to Computing and the Arts 

This introductory course will explore computation 
as an artistic medium, with creative approaches to 
computer programming as the central theme. Through 
readings, viewing, group discussion, labs, projects, 
critiques, and guest artist/researcher presentations, we 
will examine a range of computational art practices, 
while developing a solid foundation in basic computer 
programming approaches and techniques. Enrollment 
limited to 15. (E) {A} 4 credits 
Eitan Mendelowitz 
Offered Spring 2009 

111 Computer Science I 

Introduction to a block-structured object oriented high- 
level programming language. Will cover language 



148 



Computer Science 



syntax and use the language to teach program design, 
coding, debugging, testing and documentation. Proce- 
dural and data abstraction are introduced. Enrollment 
limited to 48; 24 per lab section. {M} 4 credits 
Eitan Mendelowitz, Fall 2008 
Dominique Thiebaut and 'Judy Cardell, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters each year 

112 Computer Science II 

Elementary data structures (linked lists, stacks, queues, 
trees) and algorithms (searching, sorting) are covered, 
including a study of recursion and the object-oriented 
programming paradigm. The language of instruction 
is Java. The programming goals of portability, efficiency 
and data abstraction are emphasized. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 
or equivalent. Enrollment limited to 30. {M} 4 credits 
Nicholas Howe, Fall 2008 
Ileana Streinu, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters each year 

220 Advanced Programming Techniques 

Focuses on several advanced programming environ- 
ments, with a project for each. Includes object-oriented 
programming, graphical user interfaces (GUIs) under 
Windows and/or Linux, and principles of software engi- 
neering. Topics include Java's GUI swing package, and 
its methods for listening for events and creating threads 
to dispatch events, tools for C++ code development, 
and programming in the Python language. Prerequi- 
site: 112. {M} 4 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered Spring 2010 

231/EGR 250 Microprocessors and Assembly Language 

An introduction to the architecture of the Intel Pentium 
class processor and its assembly language in the Linux 
environment. Students write programs in assembly 
and explore the architectural features of the Pentium, 
including its use of the memory, the data formats 
used to represent information, the implementation of 
high-level language constructs, integer and floating- 
point arithmetic, and how the processor deals with I/O 
devices and interrupts. Prerequisite: 112 or permission 
of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered every Fall 

240 Computer Graphics 

Covers two-dimensional drawings and transformations, 
three-dimensional graphics, lighting and colors, game 



design, perspective, curves and surfaces, ray tracing. 
Employs Postscript, C++, GameMaker, POV-ray and 
radiosity. The course will accommodate both CS majors, 
for whom it will be programming intensive, and other 
students with less technical expertise, by having two 
tracks of assignments. Prerequisites for CSC major credit: 
112, MTH 1 1 1 or permission of the instructor; otherwise, 
CSC 1 1 1 or permission of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Joseph O'Rourke 
Offered every Fall 

249 Computer Networks 

This course introduces fundamental concepts in the de- 
sign and implementation of computer communication 
networks, their protocols and applications. Topics to be 
covered include layered network architecture, physical 
layer and data link protocols, and transport protocols, 
routing protocols and applications. Most case studies 
will be drawn from the Internet TCP/IP protocol suite. 
Prerequisites: CSC 1 1 1 and MTH 153- {M} 4 credits 
Judith Cardell 
Offered Spring 2010 

250 Foundations of Computer Science 

Automata and finite state machines, regular sets and 
regular languages; push-down automata and context- 
free languages; linear-bounded automata; computabil- 
ity and Turing machines; nondeterminism and unde- 
cidability. Perl is used to illustrate regular language 
concepts. Prerequisites: 111 and MTH 153- {M} 4 credits 
Judy Franklin 
Offered Spring 2009 

252 Algorithms 

Covers algorithm design techniques ("divide-and-con- 
quer," dynamic programming, "greedy" algorithms, 
etc.), analysis techniques (including big-0 notation, 
recurrence relations), useful data structures (including 
heaps, search trees, adjacency lists), efficient algo- 
rithms for a variety of problems and NP-completeness. 
Prerequisites: 112, MTH 111, MTH 153- {M} 4 credits 
Ileana Streinu 
Offered Spring 2010 

260 Advanced Computing and the Arts 

Through analysis of existing computational art and 
synthesis of original works, this course will expose 
students to real-time graphics, data-visualization, 
human-computer interaction, sensor networks, per- 
vasive computing and physical computing. Weekly 



Computer Science 



L49 



programming exercises will serve to reinforce concepts 

from lectures and build a personal aesthetic. Students 
will also be required to complete readings, a presenta- 
tion and a final project. This project will challenge 
the student conceptually, technically and aesthetically 
Prerequisites: CSC 1 1 1 and either of CSC 1 12 or CSC 
240 or pennission of instructor. Students majoring in 
thi' \ isual or performing aits who haw programming 
experience are encouraged to enroll, pending instruc- 
tors pennission. {M} 4 credits 
Eitan Menddowitz 
Offered Spring 2009 

262 Introduction to Operating Systems 

An introduction to the functions of an operating system 
and their underlying implementation. Topics include 
file systems, CPU and memory management, concur- 
rent communicating processes, deadlock and access 
and protection issues. Programming projects will 
implement and explore algorithms related to several of 
these topics. Prerequisite: 23 1 . {M} 4 credits 
Trek Palmer 
Offered Fall 2008 

270 EGR 251 Digital Circuits and Computer Systems 

This class introduces the operation of logic and sequen- 
tial circuits. Students explore basic logic gates (and, or, 
nand, nor), counters, flip-flops, decoders, microproces- 
sor systems. Students have the opportunity to design and 
implement digital circuits during a weekly lab. Prereq- 
uisite: 231. Enrollment limited to 12. {M} 4 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered Spring 2009 

290 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 

An introduction to artificial intelligence including an 
introduction to artificial intelligence programming. 
Topics covered include game playing and search strate- 
gies; machine learning: natural language understand- 
ing; neural networks; genetic algorithms; evolutionary 
programming; philosophical issues. Prerequisites for 
CSC major credit: CSC 112. MTH 111 or pennission of 
the instructor; otherwise, CSC 1 1 1 or pennission of the 
instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Joseph o 'Rourbe 
Offered Spring 2010 

300 Research Methods in Computer Science 

This course gives students the opportunity to explore 

current topics in computer science, and experience how 



research isconductfid in this field. The class will in- 
clude lectures In students, (acuity and visitors on a wide 
range of topics We will discuss a variety of computa- 
tional problems and strive to understand the methods 
used In solving them, connections with previous work 
and the authors original contribution. The lectures 
will be open to all students anil faculty; other meet- 
ings are open onl) to students registered m the COUTSe. 

Required course work includes an oral presentation. 
Prerequisites: CSC 11 1, MTH 153 or CSC 250, and two 
additional compi iter science or mathematics courses at 
or above the 200 level, or permission of the instructor 
Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory Enrollment limited 
to 15 students. {M} 2 credits 
Ueana Streinu 
Offered Spring 2009 

334 Seminar: Topics in Computational Biology 
Topic: Bio-Geometry of Proteins. Computational biolo- 
gy is a rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field that uses 
techniques from computer science, applied mathemat- 
ics and statistics to address problems inspired by biology. 
This seminar will expose the students to a variety of 
topics of current interest in molecular computing and 
bioinfonnatics. The focus of the Fall 2008 offering of 
this course is the bio-geometry of proteins. Proteins are 
the building blocks of life, as well as marvelous objects 
to study mathematically and computationally Top- 
ics covered include modeling, visualization, structure 
determination, flexibility, motion, folding and evolution 
of proteins, using geometric, algorithmic and physical 
simulation methods. Background in molecular biology 
is not a prerequisite. Prerequisites: CSC 1 1 1, 1 12, Calcu- 
lus or permission of the instructor for computer science 
majors. Biochemistry majors are encouraged to partici- 
pate. Enrollment limited to 12. {M/N} 4 credits 
Ueana Streinu 
Offered Fall 2008 

353 Seminar in Robotics 

A seminar introduction to robotics. Topics include basic 
mechanics, electronics ami sensors, basic kinematics 
and dynamics, configuration space, motion planning. 
robot navigation and self-reconfiguring robots. Projects 
will include computer simulations and programming 
existing and student-built robots. Prerequisites; CSC 
112.251. Calculus. 1 Hscrete Math or permission of the 
instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Ueana Streinu 
Offered Spring 2010 



150 



Computer Science 



354 Seminar in Digital Sound and Music Processing 

Focuses on areas of sound/music manipulation that 
overlap significantly with computer science disciplines. 
Topics are digital manipulation of sound; formal 
models of machines and languages to analyze and 
generate sound and music; algorithms and techniques 
from artificial intelligence for music composition and 
music database retrieval; and hardware aspects such as 
time-dependence. This is a hands-on course in which 
music is actively generated via programming projects 
and includes a final installation or demonstration. 
Prerequisites are 1 1 1, 1 12 and 250 or permission of the 
instructor. 4 credits 
Judy Franklin 
Offered Spring 2009 

364/EGR 354 Computer Architecture 

Offers an introduction to the components present inside 
computers, and is intended for students who wish to 
understand how the different components of a com- 
puter work and how they interconnect. The goal of the 
class is to present as completely as possible the nature 
and characteristics of modern-day computers. Topics 
covered include the interconnection structures inside a 
computer, internal and external memories, hardware 
supporting input and output operations, computer 
arithmetic and floating point operations, the design of 
and issues related to the instruction set, architecture of 
the processor, pipelining, microcoding and multipro- 
cessors. Prerequisites: 270 or 231. {M} 4 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered Fall 2010 

370 Computer Vision and Image Processing 

Explores the challenge of computer vision through 
readings of original papers and implementation of 
classic algorithms. This seminar will consider tech- 
niques for extracting useful information from digital 
images, including both the motivation and the math- 
ematical underpinnings. Topics range from low-level 
techniques for image enhancement and feature detec- 
tion to higher-level issues such as stereo vision, image 
retrieval and segmentation of tracking of objects. 
Prerequisites: CSC 112, MTH 153- {N} 4 credits 
Nicholas Howe 
Offered Fall 2009 



Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

FYS 164 Issues in Artificial Intelligence 

An introduction to several current issues in the area of 
artificial intelligence, and their potential future impact 
on society. We start by exploring the nature of intel- 
ligent behavior, and whether it is equivalent to rational 
thought. Deep philosophical questions are explored 
through the increasingly sophisticated game-playing 
capabilities of computers. Next we turn to learning and 
discovery by computers, and investigate fuzzy logic, neu- 
ral networks and genetic algorithms. Finally we discuss 
embodied intelligence, and in particular, robotics: its 
current state and its future prospects. Here there are 
serious implications for laborers as well as deep ethical 
issues. Prerequisites: Fluency with computers, including 
basic Web searching skills. Four years of high school 
mathematics recommended. No programming experi- 
ence necessary. Enrollment limited to 16. {M} 4 credits 
Joseph O'Rourke 
Offered Fall 2008 

MTH 353 Advanced Topics in Discrete Applied 
Mathematics 

Topic: Computational Complexity. Good versus bad 
algorithms, easy versus intractable problems. The 
complexity classes P, NP and a thorough investigation 
of NP-Completeness. Connections with Graph Theory, 
Number Theory, Logic and Computer Science. Prereq- 
uisites: MTH 254, MTH 255 or CSC 252 or permission of 
the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Not offered in 2008-09 

400 Special Studies 

For majors, by arrangement with a computer science 
faculty member. 
Variable credit as assigned 
Offered both semesters each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Judith Cardell, Judy Franklin, Nicholas Howe, 
Eitan Mendelowitz, Joseph O'Rourke, Ileana Streinu, 
Dominique Thiebaut 

Requirements: At least 1 1 semester courses (44 graded 
credits) including: 



Computer Science 



151 



1. 111. 112,231,250; 

2. a. One of MTI 1111. MTH 1 12, MTH 1 14; or MTH 
125; 

b.MTHlS.Y 

c. One 200-level or higher math course, 

3. Three distinct 200- or 3<>()-level courses: designated 
according to the table below, as follows: 

a. At least one designated Theory; 

b. At least one designated Programming; 

c. At least one designated Systems; 

4. At least one CSC 300-level course (not among those 
satisfying previous requirements. 

Course Theory Programming Systems 

CSC 220 (Adv. Prog) X 

CSC 240 (Graphics) X X 

CSC 249 (Networks) X 

CSC 252 (Algorithms)) X 

CSC 262 (Op Sys) X X 

CSC 270 (Circuits) X 

CSC 274 (Comp Geom) X X 

CSC 290 (AI) X X 

CSC 249 (Networks) X 

CSC 293 (Compilers) X X 

ENG321 (Dig. Sig. Proc.) X 

CSC 334 (Comp. Bio.) X X 

CSC 352 (Parallel Prog.) X X 

CSC 353 (Robotics) X X 

CSC 364 (Architecture) X 

CSC 390 (AI seminar) X 

CSC 354 (Music) X X 

CSC 370 (Vision) X X 



The Minor 



Students may minor in computer science by fulfilling 
the requirements for one of the following concentra- 
tions or by designing, with department approval, their 
own sequence of six courses, which must include 1 1 1 
and 1 12, and one 300-level course. 

1. Theory (six courses) 

Advisers: Nick Howe, Judy Franklin, Joseph O'Rourke, 
Ileana Streinu 

This minor is appropriate for a student with a strong 
interest in the theoretical aspects of computer science. 



Required courses: 

111 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science II 

T\vo distinct 200- or 300-level courses designated as 

Theory 
One other 200- or 300-level course 
One CSC 300-level course designated Theory (and not 

among those satisfying the previous requirements). 

2. Programming (six courses) 

Advisers: Judith Cardell, Judy Franklin, Eitan Mende- 
lowitz, Nick Howe, Ileana Streinu, Dominique ThieT)aut 

This minor is appropriate for a student with a strong 
interest in programming and software development. 

Required courses: 

1 1 1 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science II 

Two distinct 200- or 300-level courses designated as 
Programming 

One other 200- or 300-level course 

One CSC 300-level course designated Programming 
(and not among those satisfying the previous re- 
quirements). 

3. Systems (six courses) 

Advisers: Judith Cardell, Judy Franklin, Dominique 
Thiebaut 

This minor is appropriate for a student with a strong 
interest in computer systems, computer engineering 
and computing environments. 

Required courses: 

1 1 1 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science II 

1\vo distinct 200- or 300-level courses designated as 

Systems 
One other 200- or 300-level course 
One CSC 300-level course designated Systems (and not 

among those satisfying the previous requirements). 

4. Computer Science and Language 
(six courses) 

Adviser: Eitan Mendelowitz, Joseph O'Rourke 



152 



Computer Science 



The goal of this minor is to provide the student with an 
understanding of the use of language as a means of 
communication between human beings and computers. 

Required courses: 

1 1 1 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science II 

250 Foundations of Computer Science 
Two of: 

280 Topics in Programming Languages 
290 Introduction to Artificial Intelligence 

293 Introduction to Translators and Compiler Design 

294 Computational Linguistics 
One of: 

390 Seminar in Artificial Intelligence 

354 Seminar in Digital Sound and Music Processing 

5. Mathematical Foundations of 
Computer Science (six courses) 

Adviser: Michael Albertson 

The goal of this minor is the study of algorithms, from 
the points of view of both a mathematician and a com- 
puter scientist, developing the correspondence between 
the formal mathematical structures and the abstract 
data structures of computer science. 

Required courses: 

111 Computer Science I 

112 Computer Science II 

250 Foundations of Computer Science 
One of: 

252 Algorithms 
274 Computational Geometry 
MTH 254 Combinatorics 

MTH 353 Advanced Topics in Discrete Applied Math- 
ematics 

6. Digital Art (six courses equally 
balanced between Computer 
Science and Art) 



Adviser: Judy Franklin, Eitan Mendelowitz, Joseph 
O'Rourke 

This minor is designed to accommodate students who 
desire both grounding in studio art and the technical 



expertise to express their art through digital media 
requiring mastery of the underlying principles of com- 
puter science. 

Three Computer Science courses are required. The CSC 
102+105 sequence on the Internet and Web design 
provide the essentials of employing the Internet and the 
Web for artistic purposes; CSC 111 Computer Science I 
includes a more systematic introduction to computer 
science, and the basics of programming; and CSC 
240 Computer Graphics gives an introduction to the 
principles and potential of graphics, 3D modeling and 
animation. (Students with the equivalent of CSC 1 1 1 
in high school would be required to substitute CSC 112 
instead). 

Three art courses are required. ARH 101 will provide the 
grounding necessary to judge art within the context of 
visual studies. ARS 162 Introduction to Digital Media 
introduces the student to design via the medium of 
computers, and either ARS 263 Intermediate Digital 
Media or ARS 36 1 Digital Multimedia provides more 
advanced experience with digital art. 

# Dept Number Title Credits Preq. 

1 CSC 102 How the Internet 

Works 2 none 

CSC 105 Interactive Web 

Documents 2 CSC 102 

2 CSC 111 Computer 

Science I 4 none 

CSC 112 Computer 

Science II 4 CSC 111 

3 CSC 240 Computer 

Graphics 4 CSC 102 

or CSC 111 

4 ARH 101 Approaches to 

Visual 

Representation 4 none 

5 ARS 162 Introduction to 

Digital Media 4 none 
IDP 130 Introduction to 

Media Arts and 
Technology 4 none 

6 ARS 263 Intermediate 

Digital Media 4 ARS 162 or 
ARS 361 Interactive Digital 

Multimedia 4 ARS 162 



Computer Science 



153 



On an ad hoc approval basis, substitution for one or 
more of the required courses would be pennitted by 
various relevant Five-College courses, including those 
in the partial list below. 



School 


Number 


Title 


Smith 


DAN 377 


Expressive Technology and 

Movement 


Hampshire 


CS 0174 


Computer Animation I 


Hampshire 


CS 0334 


Computer Animation II 


Mount Holyokt 


3CS331 


Graphics 


UMass 


ART397F 


Digital Imaging: Offset Litho 


UMass 


ART397F 


Digital Imaging: Photo Etchg 


UMass 


ART397L 


Digital Imaging: Offset Litho 


UMass 


ART697F 


Digital Imaging: Photo Etchg 


UMass 


EDUC 591A 


3D Animation and Digital Editing 


UMass 


CMPSCI391F Graphic Communications 


UMass 


CMPSCI 397C Interactive Multimedia 






Production 


UMass 


CMPSCI397D Interactive Web Animation 



7. Digital Music (six courses equally 
balanced between Computer 
Science and Music) 

Adviser: Judy Franklin, Eitan Mendelowitz, Joseph 
O'Rourke 

This minor is designed to accommodate students who 
desire both grounding in music theory and composi- 
tion and the technical expertise to express their music 
through digital media that require mastery of the un- 
derlying principles of computer science. 

Three computer science courses are required. CSC 1 1 1 
Computer Science I includes a systematic introduction 
to computer science, and the basics of programming 
concepts. CSC 1 12 Computer Science II includes study 
of data structures, algorithms and a study of recursion 
and the object-oriented programming paradigm The 
programming goals of portability, efficiency and data 
abstraction are emphasized. One of CSC 220 or CSC 
250. CSC 220 Advanced Programming Techniques fo- 
cuses on several advanced programming environments 
and includes object-oriented programming, graphical 
user interfaces (GUIs) and principles of software en- 
gineering. CSC 250 Foundations of Computer Science 
concerns the mathematical theory of computing and 
examines automata and finite state machines, regular 
sets and regular languages; push-down automata and 



context-free languages; computability and Hiring 

machines. 

Three music courses are required. Ml S 110 Analysis 
and Repertory is an introduction to formal analysis 
and tonal harmony, and a stud) of familiar pieces in 
the standard musical repertory. Regular written exer- 
cises in harmony and critical prose. MUS 1 1 1 may be 
substituted for students entering with the equivalent of 
1 10. One of MUS 233 or MUS 212. MUS 233 Composi- 
tion covers basic techniques of composition, including 
melody, simple two-part writing and instrumentation. 
The course includes analysis of representative litera- 
ture. MUS 212 20th-century Analysis is the study of 
major developments in 20th-century music. Writing 
and analytic work including non-tonal harmonic prac- 
tice, serial composition and other musical techniques. 
(Prerequisite: MUS 1 1 1 or permission of the instruc- 
tor) . One of MUS 345 or CSC 354 (cross-listed in the 
music department). MUS 345 Electro-Acoustic Music is 
an introduction to musique concrete, analog synthesis, 
digital synthesis and sampling through practical work, 
assigned reading and listening. CSC 354 Seminar on 
Digital Sound and Music Processing includes areas 
of sound/music manipulation such as digital ma- 
nipulation of sound, formal models of machines and 
languages used to analyze and generate sound and 
music, and algorithms and techniques from artificial 
intelligence for music composition. 

These requirements are summarized in the table below: 



# 


Dept 


Number 


Title Credits 


: Preq. 


1 


CSC 


111 


Computer Science I 


4 


none 


2 


CSC 


112 


Computer Science II 


4 


CSC 111 


3 


CSC 


220 


Advanced Programming 


4 


CSC 112 or 




CSC 


250 


Foundations of Compute] 
Science 


-4 


CSC 111 
MTH153 


4 


MUS 


110 


Analysis and Repertory 


5 


none 


5 


MUS 


233 


Composition 


4 


Ml SI 10 or 




MUS 


212 


20th-century Analysis 


4 


MI'S 111 


6 


MUS 


345 


Electro-Acoustic Music 


4 


MUSllO 
MUS 233 
Permission 
or 




CSC 


354 


Seminar on Digital Sound \ 


CSC 112 








and Music Processing 




CSC 250 
or 231 

Permission 



154 Computer Science 

On an ad hoc approval basis, substitution for one or 
more of the required courses would be permitted by 
various relevant Five-College courses, including those 
in the partial list below. 

School Number Title 

Amherst Mus 65 Electroacoustic Composition 

Hampshire HACU-0290-1 Computer Music 

Mount Holyoke Music 102f Music and Technology 

UMass Music 585 Fundamentals of Electronic 

Music 

UMass Music 586 MIDI Studio Techniques 

Honors 

Director: Joseph O'Rourke 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered Fall 2008 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



155 



Dance 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Susan Kay Waltner, M.SL, Graduate Adviser 
Rodger Blum, M.F.A., Chair 

Visiting Artist-in-Residence 

Donna Mejia, B.Sc. 

Five-College Lecturer in Dance 

Marilyn Middleton-Svlla 

Musician/Lecturer in Dance Technique and 

Performance 

Mike Vargas, BA 

Instructors in Dance 

Candice Salvers, M.F.A. 
Cathy Nicoli, M.F.A. 

Five College Faculty 

Paul Arslanian (Lecturer in Dance, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Billbob Brown, MA (Associate Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Jim Coleman. M.F.A., Five College Dance Department, 

Chair (Professor, Mount Holyoke College) 
RanjanaDevi (Lecturer, University of Massachusetts, 

Fine Arts Center) 



Charles Flachs., M.A. (Associate Professor, 

Mount Holyoke College) 
Rose Flachs (Associate Professor, Mount Holyoke 

College) 
Terese Freedman, B.A. (Professor, Mount Holyoke 

College) 
Constance Valis Hill, Ph.D. (Five College Associate 

Professor, Hampshire College) 
Peter Jones (Lecturer/Accompanist, Mount Holyoke 

College) 
Daphne Lowell, M.F.A., sabbatical 2008-09, (Professor, 

Hampshire College) 
Rebecca Nordstrom. M.F.A. (Professor, Hampshire 

College) 
Peggy Schwartz, MA (Professor, University of 

Massachusetts) 
Wendy Woodson, M.A. (Professor, Amherst College) 

Teaching Fellows 

Audra Carabetta 
Jillian Grunnah 
Caitlin Johnson 
Nicole Kedaroe 
Lona Lee 

Michelle Marroquin 
Katie Martin 



The Five College Dance Department combines the pro- 
grams of Amherst College, Hampshire College, Mount 
Holyoke College, Smith College and the University of 
Massachusetts. The faculty operates as a consortium, 
coordinating curricula, performances and services. The 
Five College Dance Department supports a variety of 
philosophical approaches to dance and provides an op- 
portunity for students to experience a wide spectrum of 
performance styles and techniques. Course offerings are 
coordinated among the campuses to facilitate registra- 
tion, interchange and student travel; students may take 
a dance course on any of the five campuses and receive 
credit at the home institution. 



Students should consult the Five College Course 
Schedule (specifying times, locations and new course 
updates) online at www.fivecolleges.edu/sites/dance. 



A. Theory Courses 

Preregistration for dance theory courses is stronglv 
recommended. Enrollment in dance composition 
courses is limited to 20 students, and priority is given 
to seniors and juniors. "P" indicates that pemiission of 
the instructor is required. "L" indicates that enrollment 
is limited. 



156 



Dance 



Dance Composition: Introductory through advanced 
study of elements of dance composition, including 
phrasing, space, energy, motion, rhythm, musical 
forms, character development and personal imagery. 
Course work emphasizes organizing and designing 
movement creatively and meaningfully in a variety of 
forms (solo, duet and group), and utilizing various 
devices and approaches, e.g. motif and development, 
theme and variation, text and spoken language, col- 
lage, structured improvisation and others. 

All Dance Theory Courses: L {A} 4 credits 

151 Elementary Dance Composition 

L {A} 4 credits 
Candice Salyers 
Offered Spring 2009 

252 Intermediate Dance Composition 

Prerequisite: 151. L. {A} 4 credits 

Susan Waltner 

Offered Fall 2008 

B. Scripts and Scores 

To be announced 

To be arranged 

353 Advanced Dance Composition 

Prerequisite: 252 or permission of the instructor. L. {A} 

4 credits 

A. Performance Studio 

Not offered 2008-09 

171 Dance in the 20th Century 

This course is designed to present an overview of dance 
as a performing art in the 20th century; focusing espe- 
cially on major American stylistic traditions and artists. 
Through readings, video and film viewing, guest per- 
formances, individual research projects and class dis- 
cussions, students will explore principles and traditions 
of 20th-century concert dance traditions, with special 
attention to their historical and cultural contexts. Spe- 
cial topics may include European and American bal- 
let, the modern dance movement, contemporary and 
avant-garde dance experimentation, African-American 
dance forms, jazz dance and popular culture dance 
traditions. L {A} WI 4 credits 
Candice Salyers 
Offered Fall 2008 



241 Scientific Foundations of Dance 

An introduction to selected scientific aspects of dance, 
including anatomical identification and terminology; 
physiological principles and conditioning/strengthen- 
ing methodology: These concepts are discussed and 
explored experientially in relationship to the movement 
vocabularies of various dance styles. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 20. {A} 4 credits 
MHC (Freedman) 
Offered Fall 2008 

272 Dance and Culture 

Through a survey of world dance traditions from both 
artistic and anthropological perspectives, this course 
introduces students to dance as a universal human 
behavior, and to the many dimensions of its cultural 
practice — social, religious, political and aesthetic. 
Course materials are designed to provide students with 
a foundation for the interdisciplinary study of dance 
in society and the tools necessary for analyzing cross- 
cultural issues in dance; they include readings, video 
and film viewing, research projects and dancing. (A 
prerequisite for Dance 375, Anthropology of Dance). 
L. {A} 4 credits 
Donna Mejia 
Offered Spring 2009 

285 Laban Movement Analysis I 

Laban Movement Analysis is a system used to describe 
and record quantitative and qualitative aspects of 
human movement. Through study and physical ex- 
ploration of concepts and principles involved in body 
articulation, spatial organization, dynamic exertion 
of energy and modes of shape change, students will 
examine their own movement patterns and preferences. 
This creates the potential for expanding personal reper- 
toire and developing skills in observation and analysis 
of the movement of others. 
HC (Nordstrom) 
Offered Spring 2009 

287 Analysis of Music from a Dancer's Perspective 

This course provides an overview of essential issues in 
music and sound as they relate to dancers and chore- 
ographers. Particular attention will be paid to rhythm 
in all its guises, music terminology and categories, 
personal versus cultural meaning in music and sound, 
and strategies for finding and making music. There 
will be a strong emphasis on listening, formulation of 



Dance 



157 



clear statements about music, ethical questions regard- 
ing collaborating and communicating with musicians, 
and the differences between working with recorded and 
live music. The goal will be to develop an open-minded 
and detailed intelligence about the various relation- 
ships between dance and music. Prerequisite: one year 
of dance technique (recommended for sophomore year 
or later). Enrollment limited to 15. {A} 4 credits 
UM (Arslanian), Fall 2008 
Ml IC (Jones), Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

305 Advanced Repertory 

This course offers an in-depth exploration of aesthetic 
and interpretive issues in dance performance. Through 
experiments with improvisation, musical phrasing, 
partnering, personal imagery and other modes of 
developing and embodying movement material, danc- 
ers explore ways in which a choreographer's vision is 
formed, altered, adapted, and finally presented in per- 
formance. Audition required. {A} 2 credits 

Ballet Repertory 
Rodger Blum, Fall 2008 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

Modern Repertory 
Candice Salyers, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

309 Advanced Repertory 

This course offers an in-depth exploration of aesthetic 
and interpretive issues in dance performance. Through 
experiments with improvisation, musical phras- 
ing, partnering, personal imagery and other modes 
of developing and embodying movement material, 
dancers explore ways in which a choreographer's vi- 
sion is formed, altered, adapted and finally presented 
in performance. In its four-credit version, this course 
also requires additional readings and research into 
broader issues of historical context, genre and technical 
style. Course work may be developed through exist- 
ing repertory or through the creation of new work(s). 
Prerequisite: advanced technique or permission of the 
instructor. Audition required. {A} 4 credits 
Modern Repertory 
Cathy Nicoli 
Offered Fall 2008 



377 Advanced Studies in History and Aesthetics 
4 credits 

Integrity in Ethnic/Global Dance Fusion 

Cultural misappropriation has an unfortunate and 
extensive history in dance. The exploration of ethnic/ 
cultural dance fusion mandates that artists reconcile 
the values and context of indigenous dance traditions 
with agendas of the entertainment world. This course 
will explore the inevitable transformation of old and 
new dance traditions in performance, and seek to 
define what responsibility choreographers/performers 
have as cultural ambassadors in a "cut and paste" 
environment. Class will include films, readings and 
discussions. Enrollment limited to 25. Prerequisite: 
DAN 171 Dance in the 20th Century. (E) {A}. 
Donna Mejia 
Offered Fall 2008 

400 Special Studies 

For qualified juniors and seniors. A four-credit special 
studies is required of senior majors. Admission by per- 
mission of the instructor and the chair of the depart- 
ment. Departmental permission forms required. {A} 
1 to 4 credits 

Members of the department 
Offered both semesters each year 

B. Production Courses 

200 Dance Production 

A laboratory course based on the preparation and 
performance of department productions. Students may 
elect to fulfill course requirements from a wide array 
of production-related responsibilities, including per- 
formance, choreography and stage crew. May be taken 
four times for credit, with a maximum of two credits 
per semester. There will be one general meeting on 
Monday, September 8, 2008 at 4: 10 p.m. in the Green 
Room, Theatre Building. Attendance is mandator}. 
{A} 1 credit 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 

200 Dance Production 

Same description as above. There will be one general 
meeting on Monday. January 26. 2009 at 4: 10 p.m. 
in the Green Room, Theatre Building. Attendance is 



158 



Dance 



mandatory. May be taken four times for credit, with 
maximum of two credits per semester. {A} 1 credit 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2009 



ballet or modem dance technique. Enrollment limited 
to 20. {A} 2 credits 
Rodger Blum 
Offered Spring 2009 



C. Studio Courses 

Students may repeat studio courses two times for credit. 
For a complete list of studio courses offered on the 
other four campuses, please consult the Five College 
Dance Department schedule available online at www. 
fivecolleges.edu/sites/dance 

Studio courses receive two credits. Preregistration 
for dance technique courses is strongly recommended. 
Enrollment is often limited to 25 students, and priority 
is given to seniors and juniors. Normally, students must 
take these two-credit courses in addition to a full course 
load. Studio courses may also require outside reading, 
video and film viewings and/or concert attendance. 
No more than 12 credits may be counted toward the 
degree. "P" indicates that permission of the instructor 
is required. "L" indicates that enrollment is limited. 
Placement will be determined within the first two 
weeks. 

Repetition of studio courses for credit: The Five Col- 
lege Dance Department faculty strongly recommends 
that students in the Five Colleges be allowed to take 
any one level of dance technique up to three times for 
credit, and more with the permission of the academic 
adviser. 

119 Beginning Contact Improvisation 

A duet form of movement improvisation. The tech- 
nique will focus on work with gravity, weight support, 
balance, inner sensation and touch, to develop spon- 
taneous fluidity of movement in relation to a partner. 
Enrollment limited to 20. May be repeated once for 
credit. Alternates with DAN 217. {A} 2 credits 
Lona Lee 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

218 Floor Barre Movement Technique 

This course combines classical and modem principles 
in a basic series performed on the floor. It is designed to 
help dance students achieve a more consistent techni- 
cal ability through added strength, stretch and develop- 
ment of fluid transition. Prerequisite: two semesters of 



219 Intermediate Contact Improvisation 

A duet form of movement improvisation. The technique 
will focus on work with gravity, weight support, bal- 
ance, inner sensation and touch, to develop spontane- 
ous fluidity of movement in relation to a partner. Pre- 
requisite: at least one previous dance technique course 
or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 
20. (E) {A} 2 credits 
Lona Lee 
Offered Spring 2009 

Techniques 

Modern: Introductory through advanced study of mod- 
em dance techniques. Central topics include refining 
kinesthetic perception, developing efficient alignment, 
increasing strength and flexibility, broadening the 
range of movement qualities, exploring new vocabular- 
ies and phrasing styles, and encouraging individual 
investigation and embodiment of movement material. 

113 Modern Dance I 

L. {A} 2 credits 

Susan Waltner 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

114 Modern Dance II 

For students who have taken Modem Dance I or the 
equivalent. L. {A} 2 credits 
Katie Martin, Fall 2008 
Audra Carabetta, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

215 Modern Dance III 

Prerequisite: 1 13 and a minimum of one year of mod- 
em dance study. L. {A} 2 credits 
Candice Salyers 
Offered Fall 2008 

216 Modern Dance IV 

Prerequisite: 215. L. {A} 2 credits 
Audra Carabetta 
Offered Spring 2009 



Dance 



159 



317 Modern Dance V 

By audition/permission only. Prerequisite: 216. L and R 
{A} 2 credits 
Catby Nicoli 

Offered Fall 2008 

318 Modern Dance VI 

Audition required. Prerequisite: 317. L and R 
{A} 2 credits 
Catby Nicoli 

Offered Spring 2009 

Ballet: Introductory through advanced study of the 
principles and vocabularies of classical ballet. Class is 
comprised of three sections: Barre, Center and Allegro. 
Emphasis is placed on correct body alignment, develop- 
ment of whole body movement, musicality, and em- 
bodiment of performance style. Pointe work is included 
in class and rehearsals at the instructor's discretion. 

120 Ballet I 

L {A} 2 credits 

Section 1: Nicole Keaaroe, Fall 2008 
Section 2: Michelle Marroquin, Fall 2008 
jilluin Grunnab, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters each year 

121 Ballet II 

For students who have taken Ballet I or the equivalent. 

L. {A} 2 credits 

Audra Carabetta, Fall 2008 

To be an n< ni) iced. Spring 2009 

Offered both semesters each year 

222 Ballet III 

Prerequisite: 121 orpermission of the instructor. L. 
{A} 2 credits 
Rodger ttlum 
Offered Fall 2008 

223 Ballet IV 

L {A} 2 credits 
Rodger Hlum 
Offered Spring 2009 



325 Ballet VI 

By audition/permission only L {A} 2 credits 
Rodger Blum 
Offered Spring 2009 

Jazz: Introductory through advanced jazz dance tech- 
nique, including the Study of body isolations, move- 
ment analysis, syncopation and specific jazz dance 
traditions. Emphasis is placed on enhancing musical 
and rhythmic phrasing, efficient alignment, perfor- 
mance clarity in complex movement combinations, 
and the refinement of performance st) le. 

130 Jazz I 

L {A} 2 credits 

Caitlin Johnson, Fall 2008 

Lona tee, Spring 2009 

Offered both semesters each year 

131 Jazz II 

For students who have taken Jazz I or the equivalent. L. 

{A} 2 credits 

Nicole Kedaroe 

Offered both semesters each year 

232 Jazz III 

Further examination of jazz dance principles. L. 

{A} 2 credits 

To be announced 

Offered Fall 2008 

233 Jazz IV 

Emphasis on extended movement phrases, complex 

musicality, and development of jazz dance styles. L. 

{A} 2 credits 

Donna Mejia. Fall 2008 

jillian Grunnab, Spring 2009 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

334 Jazz V 

Advanced principles of jazz dancing. L. By audition/ 
pemiission only. {A} 2 credits 
Donna Mejia 
Offered Fall 2008 



324 Ballet V 

By audition/pennission only. L {A} 2 credits 
Rodger Blum 
Offered Fall 2008 



335 Jazz VI 

Advanced principles of jazz dancing. L Bj audition 

pemiission only. {A} 2 credits 
fillian Grunnab 

Offered Spring 2009 



160 



Dance 



Cultural Dance Forms I And n 



.- 


~ng dance tradi- 


- - 


: distinct 


move: at foe 


re based on the fusion of two 


- t 


es.Thr • ~ arfude social. 


conceit theatrical and i 


itual dance and are framed in 


: 


be identified dance form. These 


■ 


ie: beginning and 



r :: ate and advanced (II) . 
n movement fundamentals. 
: and movemeni basic through com- 
ic, ensemble and solo 
plicable Some classes include 
-omiance and therefore vary in credits. 

142 Cultural Dance Forms I 

.Dance 

.-.traduces African dance, music and song 
as a t: . . -ssion in various African 

es appreciation and respect for 
African culture and its profound influence on American 
culture and art. Enrollment limited to 30. {A} 2 credits 
Marilyn Svlla 
MHCAC'fSyllaj 
Offered Fall 2008. Spring 2009 

Tribal Fusion 

TrM .ted in die nomadic dance tradition 

a. the Middle East and Asia. The form has 

strong • Men's styles of Arabic folk dance and 

: . ides the influences of Rom (Gypsy) 

:rom India to Europe, Spanish, Flamenco, 

Tribal forms, and more recently. American Hip 

Hop. Punk and Gothic cultures. Enrollment limited to 

k) 2 credits 
Donna Mejia 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

Latin Ballroom 
Catilinjobn 
Offered Spring 2009 

243 Cultural Dance Forms II 

West African 

This c exploration of the various dance 

orms and symbols attributed to the classical 
Africa. The course will focus on 



those dances whose origins are (historically) found in 
the Old Mali Empire. i.e. (Mali. Senegal, the Gambia 
Guinea) as well as Nigeria and Ghana. It will specifi- 
cally examine the dance styles of the Serer. Lebou. 
Djiolla Bambara, Wolof. Sauce, Malinke, Manding, 
Yoruba and Twi peoples of these regions. Enrollment 
limited to 30. {A} 2 credits 
Marilyn Sylla 
Offered Fall 2008. Spring 2009 

Tribal Fusion 

Tribal Fusion is rooted in the nomadic dance tradition 
of North Africa, the Middle East and Asia. The form has 
strong roots in women's styles of Arabic folk dance and 
the vocabulary includes the influences of Rom (Gypsy) 
dance styles from India to Europe. Spanish. Flamenco, 
African Tribal forms, and more recently American Hip 
Hop. Punk and Gothic cultures. Level II focuses on 
increasing precision, complexity: speed and layering 
of multiple movements. Enrollment limited to 30. 
Permission of the instructor required. Prerequisite: DAN 
142 Tribal Fusion I P. {A} 2 credits 
Donna Mejia 
Offered Fall 2008. Spring 2009 



C. The Major 

Advisers: Rodger Blum, Susan Waltner 

The dance major at Smith is offered through the Five 
College Dance Department and culminates in a bach- 
elor of arts degree from Smith College. It is designed 
a student a broad view of dance in preparation 
for a professional career or further study Students are 
exposed to courses in dance history and anthropology, 
creative and aesthetic studies, scientific aspects of dance, 
the language of movement (labanotation and Laban 
Movement Analysis), and dance technique and perfor- 
mance. For studio courses, no more than four courses in 
a single idiom will be counted toward the major. At least 
two of these courses must be at the advanced level and 
within the requirements of Emphasis I or II (see below). 

History Dance in the 20th Century (DAN171) and 
Dance and Culture (DAN Z 1 !) serve as the introduction 
to the major At the advanced level there is the Anthro- 
pological Basis of Dance (DAN 375) and more special- 
ized period courses or topics. These courses all examine 
the dance itself and its cultural context. 



Dance 



161 



Creative and Aesthetic Studies (DAN 151,252,353 
and 377) This sequence oi courses begins with the most 
basic study of dance composition— space, time, ener- 
gy — and focuses on tools for rinding and developing 
movement The second and third level courses develop 
the fundamentals of formal choreograph] and expand 
work in the manipulation of spatial design, dynamics, 
phrasing, rhythm, content and accompaniment The 
movement materials that a student explores are not 
limited to any particular style. 

Scientific Aspects of Dance (DAN 241, 342) These 
courses are designed to develop the student's personal 
working process and her philosophy of movement. The 
student studies selected aspects of human anatomy, 
physiology, bio-mechanics, and their relationships to 
various theories of technical study 

Language of Movement (DAN 285) Courses in this area 
train students to observe, experience and notate quali- 
tative aspects of movement (Laban Movement Analysis) 
and to quantitatively perceive and record movement 
(Labanotation). 

Music for Dancers (DAN 287) Sharpens understanding 
of music fundamentals and makes these applicable to 
dance. 



7. DAN 4(H) (4 credit) must Iv taken in the senior 
year 

Emphasis II: Theoretical Practices Dance students ma) 
prefer to concentrate on an academic emphasis instead 
of dance performance. These students are also encour- 
aged to stud) several dance tonus and styles, and they 

are expected to reach intermediate level in one or more 

tonus. 

Requirements in Theoretical Practices of Dance: 

1. 171 and 272 

2. 241 

3. 285 or 287, or a 200-level course in another disci- 
pline 

4. 151,200 (2 credits) and 375 

5. Five technique courses are required in the dance 
theory emphasis of the major Dance Theory stu- 
dents should explore at least two courses in two 
technique forms. Students should reach intermedi- 
ate level in at least one form. A single level of tech- 
nique courses may be taken for credit up to three 
semesters. 

6. Two courses from the following: 309, 342, 577. 

7. DAN 400 (4 credits) must he taken in the senior 
year 



Emphasis I: Technique and Performance A dancers 
instrument is her body and it must be trained con- 
sistently. Students are encouraged to study several 
dance forms and styles. Students who will emphasize 
performance and choreography are expected to reach 
the advanced level in one or more forms. Public perfor- 
mance, while optional and without additional credit, is 
encouraged to realize dance skills before an audience 

Requirements in Technique and Performance Emphasis: 



D. The Minor 



6. 



171 and 272 

241 

285 or 287 

151, 200 (2 credits) and 252 

Five courses are required in dance technique for the 

major. Students can explore up to four courses in 

a single form. At least two semesters must be at the 

advanced level. A single level of technique courses 

may be taken for credit up to three semesters. 

Two courses from the following: 309, 342, 353, 375, 

377. 



Advisers: Members of the Smith College department 
of Dance 

Students ma\ fulfill the requirements for the minor in 
dance in either of the following concentrations: 

1. Minor in Dance with an Emphasis 
in Theatrical Forms 

Requirements: Three core courses: 151, 171 and272. 
Three 2-credit studio courses; one in dance production: 
200: and one other dance theory course chosen with the 

adv iser. to fit the interests of the students 

2. Minor in Dance with an Emphasis 
in Cultural Forms 

Requirements: Three core courses: 151,272 and 375 

Three 2-credit studio courses in cultural dance forms. 



162 



Dance 



one course in dance production: 200; and one other 
dance theoiy course chosen with the adviser, to fit the 
interests of the student. 

Studio Courses: Studio courses receive two credits. Pre- 
registration for dance technique courses is strongly rec- 
ommended. Enrollment is often limited to 25 students, 
and priority is given to juniors and seniors. Normally 
students must take partial-credit courses in addition 
to a full-course load. No more than 12 credits may be 
counted toward the degree. "P'"indicates that permis- 
sion of the instructor is required. "L" indicates that 
enrollment is limited. Placement will be determined 
within the first two weeks of classes. Within limits, stu- 
dents may repeat studio courses for credit. 

Studio Courses: 

142 Beginning/Intermediate Cultural Dance Forms 

A. West African 

B. Comparative Caribbean Dance 

C. Cuban 

D. Haitian 

E. Introduction to Flamenco 
F.Javanese 

G. Afro-Brazilian 

H. Middle Eastern 

I. Tribal Fusion 

Intermediate/Advanced Cultural Dance Forms 

A. West African II 

B. Comparative Caribbean Dance II 
Modem Dance I 
Modem Dance II 
Modem Dance III 
Modem Dance IV 
Modem Dance V 
Modem Dance VI 
Ballet I 
Ballet II 
Ballet III 
Ballet IV 
Ballet V 
Ballet VI 
Jazz I 
Jazz II 
Jazz III 
Jazz IV 
Jazz V 
Jazz VI 
Tap I 
Tap II 



243 



113 
114 
215 
216 
317 
318 
120 
121 
222 
223 
324 
325 
130 
131 
232 
233 
334 
335 
136 
137 



Honors 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered each fall 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 

E. Five College Courses 

Students should consult the Five College Dance Depart- 
ment course schedule (specifying times, locations and 
new course updates) online at www.fivecolleges.edu/ 
dance/schedule.html 

Adviser: Rodger Blum 



F. Graduate: M.F.A. Program 

Adviser: Susan Waltner 

"P" indicates that permission of the instructor is re- 
quired. 



510 Theory and Practice of Dance IA 

Studio work in dance technique, including modem, 
ballet, tap, cultural dance and jazz. Eight to 10 hours 
of studio work and weekly seminars. P. 5 credits 
To be announced 
Offered both semesters each year 

520 Theory and Practice of Dance HA 

Studio work in dance technique and weekly seminars. 

Prerequisite: 510. P. 5 credits 

To be announced 

Offered both semesters each year 

521 Choreography as a Creative Process 

Advanced work in choreographic design and related 
production design. Study of the creative process and 
how it is manifested in choreography. Prerequisite: two 



Dance 



163 



semesters of choreography. 5 credits 
Susan Waltner 
Offered Fall 2009 

540 History and Literature of Dance 

Emphasis will include in-class discussion and study 
of dance history and dance research, current research 
methods in dance, the use of primary and secondary 
source material. Students will complete a dance history 
research paper on a topic of their choice. Prerequisite: 
two semesters of dance history. 5 credits 
Constant ValisHill 
Offered Spring 2009 

553 Choreography by Design 

This class will examine and engage the choreographic 
process through a study of the interaction of expressive 
movement with concrete and abstract design ideas. 
Music and sound, lighting, costuming, projected video 
and set/sculpture installations may all be analyzed as 
design elements to deepen the choreography of human 
movement. Choreographic ideas developed in this class 
will be based on the premise that design elements can 
be used as source material for choreographic intent. 
Choreography and theatrical design will be examined 
as art forms that merge to create a unified vision of 
texture, color, gesture, shape and movement. In addi- 
tion to working on studies and projects, students will 
be assigned weekly writing. Prerequisites: two semesters 
of choreography (or equivalent), familiarity with basic 
music theory, coursework in theatrical production (or 
equivalent). 5 credits 
Rodger Blum 
Offered Fall 2008 



principles and body mechanics that are observed within 
dance performance as well as in excellent teaching of 
dance. Prerequisite: DAN 241 or the equivalent. {A} 
5 credits 
Susan Waltner 
Offered Spring 2010 

590 Research and Thesis 

Production project. 

5 credits 

Susan Waltner 

Offered both semesters each year 

591 Special Studies 

5 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



560 Scientific Principles in the Teaching of Dance 

This course is designed to assist graduate students as 
they teach dance technique. The principles of anatomy, 
injury prevention and rehabilitation, and nutrition 
are examined in relation to fundamentals of dance 
pedagogy; expressive dance aesthetics are examined 
formally within a context of current body science. 
Through analysis of body alignment, safe and efficient 
movement patterns, and proper nutritional needs, 
students learn methods that increase efficiency, clarity, 
strength and coordination and that ultimately achieve 
desired aesthetic goals. Class work includes lectures, 
experiential application, and computer analyses to 
reinforce a rigorous understanding of the scientific 



164 



East Asian Languages and 
Literatures 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professor 

t2 Thomas Rohlich, Ph.D., Chair 

Associate Professors 

Maki Hirano Hubbard, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professors 

Kimberly Kono, Ph.D. 
*'SujaneWu,Ph.D. 

Visiting Assistant Professor 

Yuri Kumagai, Ed.D. 



Lecturers 

Jing Hu, MA 
Wenjie Liu, M.A. 
SukMassey,C.A.G.S. 
AtsukoTakahashi,M.S.Ed. 
Ling Zhao, M.A. 

Teaching Assistants 

Reiko Kato, MA 
Keiko Konoeda, M.A. 



The Department of East Asian Languages and Lit- 
eratures offers a major in East Asian languages and 
cultures with concentrations in China or Japan, and 
a minor in East Asian languages and literatures with 
concentrations in China, Japan or Korea. Students 
planning on spending their junior year abroad should 
consult the department concerning the list of courses to 
be credited toward the major or minor and must seek 
final approval for the courses upon their return. 



Courses in English 



FYS 116 Kyoto Through the Ages 

Kyoto is acclaimed by Japanese and foreigners alike as 
one of the world's great cities, the embodiment in space 
and spirit of Japan's rich cultural heritage. It is also a 
thriving modern metropolis of over a million people, 
as concerned with its future as it is proud of its past. In 
this course, students will study Kyoto past and present, 
its culture and people, so as to better understand how 
it became the city it is today. Students who complete 
the first-year seminar successfully may enroll in the 
Interterm course in Kyoto (when it is offered) following 
completion of the FYS course. Enrollment limited to 15 



first-year students. {H} WI 4 credits 
Thomas H. Rohlich 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAL 115j Kyoto Then and Now 

This course is an on-site study of the city of Kyoto, 
Japan. During a two-week stay in Kyoto students will 
examine the spaces and places of one of Japan's most 
famous cities, considered by many the cultural heart 
of the country. Based on their work in the prerequisite 
First-Year Seminar course, students will take rums 
leading the group to selected museums, temples and 
shrines, craft and entertainment centers, and other cul- 
tural sites. Prerequisite: successful completion of FYS 
116, "Kyoto Through the Ages." Enrollment limited to 
15. Graded S/U only (E) 2 credits 
Thomas H. Rohlich 
Offered Interterm 2009 
Three days at Smith and up to two weeks in Kyoto, 
Japan during January 2009 

EAL 232 Modern Chinese Literature 

Selected readings in translation of Chinese literature 
from the late-Qing dynasty to contemporary Taiwan and 
the People's Republic of China. This course will offer (1) 
a window on 20th-century China (from the Sino-Japa- 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 



165 



nese War of 1895 to the present) and (2) an introduction 
to the study of literature: (a) whywe read literature, (b) 

different approaches (e.g., how to do a close reading) and 
(c) literary movements. We will stress the socio-political 
context and questions of political engagement, social 
justice, class, gender, race and human rights. All readings 
are in English translation and no background in China 
or Chinese is required. {L} 4 credits 
Salwui Knight 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAL 237 Chinese Poetry and the Other Arts 

Poetry, painting, calligraphy, music, dance and other 
visual and plastic arts are ways of telling living experi- 
ences and forms of presenting Chinese aesthetics. 
Chinese literati tend to view all of these arts as parts of 
a whole. Through comparative study of the theoretical 
and practical interaction of Chinese poetry with other 
arts, we will explore the issues such as how poetry 
and other arts are inextricably linked; what makes a 
painting a poem — a silent poem, and a poem a lyrical 
painting, and why a particular script of calligraphy 
is chosen for a poem and a painting. All readings in 
English translation and no background in Chinese 
literature is required. {L} 4 credits 
Sujane Wu 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAL 238 Literature from Taiwan 

How do works from Taiwan contend with legacies of po- 
litical trauma and the social consequences of modern- 
ization and democratization? In the face of dislocation, 
marginality and materialism, how does writing nurture 
memory, belonging, social repair or change? Close read- 
ings of stories and, in some semesters, essays, poetry, 
novels or films will explore traditional aesthetics; the 
modernist, nativist and localist movements of the 1960s 
to 1980s; and the pluralism of the 1990s and since, with 
special attention to feminist and queer fiction. Class 
participation will include student-centered contempla- 
tive and collaborative exercises, including short written 
meditations and dramatizations. No background in Chi- 
nese required. Enrollment limited to 19- {L} 4 credits 
Sabina Knigbt 
\ Offered Fall 2008 

EAL 241 Literature and Culture in Premodern Japan: 
Court Ladies, Wandering Monks and Urban Rakes 

A study of Japanese literature arid its cultural roots from 
the 8th to the 19th centuries. The course will focus on 



enduring works of the Japanese literary tradition, along 
with the social and cultural conditions that gave birth 
to the literature. All readings are in English translation. 
{L} 4 credits 
Thomas RoUkb 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAL 242 Modern Japanese Literature 

A survey of Japanese literature from the late 19th 
century to the present. In the past 150 years Japan has 
undergone tremendous change: rapid industrialization, 
imperial and colonial expansion, occupation follow- 
ing its defeat in the Pacific War, and emergence as a 
global economic power. The literature of modem Japan 
reflects the complex aesthetic, cultural and political 
effects of such changes. Through our discussions of 
these texts, we will also address theoretical questions 
about such concepts as identity, gender, race, sexuality, 
nation, class, colonialism, modernism and translation. 
All readings are in English translation. {L} 4 credits 
Kimberly Kono 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAL 243 Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 

A study of Japanese poetry from earliest times to the 
modem era, focussing on the two major verse forms, 
the thirty-one-syllable waka and the seventeen-syllable 
haiku. The tradition of Japan poetry reaches back over 
a thousand years, with its first appearance as sacred 
songs in national myths and histories. Relatively un- 
complicated in form, Japanese poetry has long been 
practiced by people of all social classes and occupa- 
tions: court nobles and ladies, wandering Buddhist 
monks, professional haiku masters, and in modem 
times everyone from high school students to house- 
wives and businessmen. This course will examine the 
formal and social characteristics of Japanese poetry, 
with particular attention to how it responded to chang- 
ing historical and cultural circumstances. Taught in 
English, with no Japanese required. {L} <* credits 
Thomas Rohlich 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAL 244 Construction of Gender in Modern Japanese 
Women's Writing 

This course will focus on the construction of gender 
in the writings of Japanese women from the mid- 19th 
century until the present. How does the existence of 
a "feminine literary tradition" in premodern Japan 
influence the writing of women during the modem 



166 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 



period? How do these texts reflect, resist and reconfigure 
conventional representations of gender? We will explore 
the possibilities and limits of the articulation of femi- 
nine and feminist subjectivities, as well as investigate 
the production of such categories as race, class and 
sexuality in relation to gender and each other. Taught 
in English, with no knowledge of Japanese required. {L} 
4 credits 
Mmberly Kono 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAL 245 Writing, Japan and Otherness 

An exploration of representations of "otherness" in 
Japanese literature and film from the mid- 19th century 
until the present. How was (and is) Japan's identity as 
a modern nation configured through representations 
of other nations and cultures? How are categories of 
race, gender, nationality, class and sexuality used in the 
construction of difference? This course will pay special 
attention to the role of "otherness" in the development 
of national and individual identities. In conjunction 
with these investigations, we will also address the varied 
ways in which Japan is represented as "other" by writ- 
ers from China, England, France, Korea and the United 
States. How do these images of and by Japan converse 
with each other? All readings are in English transla- 
tion. {L} 4 credits 
KimberlyKono 
OfferedSpring 2009 

EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages and 
Literatures 

The Dream of the Red Chamber 
Tlie Dream of the Red Chamber is the most studied 
of all the novels in Chinese literature, and scholar- 
ship on the novel now forms its own "Red School." 
In modern times, the novel has also been frequently 
transformed into TV drama series, movies, plays, operas 
and dance performances. In this seminar, we will finish 
reading the novel's 120 chapters and study the novel's 
representations of both popular and high culture, from 
traditional society, arts and poetry to garden, clothing, 
food and other everyday customs. We will particularly 
explore the interplay of illusion (dream) and reality, 
love and enlightenment displayed in the novel. Prereq- 
uisite: permission of the instructor. {L} 4 credits 
Sujane Wu 
Offered Spring 2009 



Writing Empire: Images of Colonial andPostcolo- 
nialjapan 

This seminar will address the diverse reactions to Ja- 
pan's colonial project and explore the ways in which 
empire was manifest in a literary form. Examining lit- 
erary texts produced in and about the Japanese empire 
during the first half of the 20th century, we will discuss 
concepts such as assimilation, mimicry, hybridity, race, 
and transculturation in the context of Japanese colo- 
nialism. Through encounters with different voices from 
inside and outside of Japan's empire, students will gain 
a deeper understanding of the complexities of colonial 
hegemony and identity. Prerequisite: Permission of the 
instructor. {L} 4 credits 
Kimberly Kono 
OfferedSpring 2009 

EAL 400 Special Studies 

For students engaged in independent projects or re- 
search in connection with Japanese, Chinese or Korean 
language and literature. 
2 to 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

East Asian Language 
Courses 

A language placement test is required prior to regis- 
tration for students who have previously studied the 
language. With the instructor's permission, advanced 
language courses (CHI 350, CHI 351, JPN 350, JPN 
351, KOR 350 and KOR 351) may be repeated when the 
content changes. 

A grade of C or higher in the preceding level is required 
to enter a second-level East Asian language course. 

Chinese Language 

GH1 110 Chinese I (Intensive) 

An intensive introduction to spoken Mandarin and 
modem written Chinese, presenting basic elements of 
grammar, sentence structures and active mastery of the 
most commonly used Chinese characters. Emphasis on 
development of oral/aural proficiency, pronunciation, 
and the acquisition of skills in reading and writing 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 



167 



Chinese character. 5 credits 
Jing Hu 
Offered each Fall 

CH1 111 Chinese I (Intensive) 

A continuation of 1 10. Prerequisite: CHI 1 10 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {F) 5 credits 
Jing Hu 
Offered each Spring 

CHI 220 Chinese II (Intensive) 

Continued emphasis on the development of oral pro- 
ficiency and functional literacy in modem Mandarin. 
Conversation and narrative practice, reading exercises, 
short composition assignments, and work with audio- 
visual materials. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 or permission of the 
instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Wenjie Liu. ling Zhao 
Offered each Fall 

CHI 221 Chinese II (Intensive) 

A continuation of 220. Prerequisite: CHI 220 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Wenjie Liu 
Offered each Spring 

CHI 301 Chinese III 

Building on the skills and vocabulary acquired in 
Chinese II, students will learn to read simple essays on 
topics of common interest and will develop the ability 
to understand, summarize and discuss social issues in 
contemporary China. Readings will be supplemented 
by audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 221 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Wenjie Liu 
Offered each Fall 

CHI 302 Chinese III 

Introduction to the use of authentic written and visual 
documents commonly encountered in China today, 
with an emphasis on television news broadcasts and 
newspaper articles. Exercises in composition as well as 
oral presentations will complement daily practice in 
reading and listening comprehension. Prerequisite: 301 
or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
ling Zhao 
Offered each Spring 



CHI 350 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern 
Literary Texts 

Development of advanced oral and reading proficiency 
through the study and discussion of selected modem 
Chinese literal) texts. Students will explore literary 
expression in original works of fiction, including short 
stories, essays, novellas and excerpts of novels. Prereq- 
uisite': 302 or permission of the instructor. With the in- 
structor's permission, advanced language courses may 
be repeated when the content changes. {F} 4 credits 
ling Zhao 
Offered each Fall 

CHI 351 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern and 
Contemporary Texts 

In contrast with CHI 350, this course focuses on 
readings of political and social import. Through the 
in-depth study and discussion of modem and con- 
temporary texts and essays drawn from a variety of 
sources, students will develop advanced reading, writ- 
ing and discussion skills in Chinese and increase their 
understanding of modem and contemporary China. 
Prerequisite: 302 or permission of the instructor. With 
the instructor's permission, advanced language courses 
may be repeated when the content changes. {F} 4 credits 
ling Zhao 
Offered each Spring 



Japanese Language 

JPN 110 Japanese I (Intensive) 

An introduction to spoken and written Japanese. Em- 
phasis on the development of basic oral proficiency, 
along with reading and writing skills. Students will 
acquire knowledge of basic grammatical patterns, 
strategies in daily communication, hiragana, katakana 
and about 90 Kanji. Designed for students with no 
background in Japanese. 5 credits 
YuriKumagai 
Offered each Fall 

JPN 111 Japanese I (Intensive) 

A continuation of 1 10. Development of utilization of 
grammar and fluency in conversational communica- 
tion. About 150 more kanji will be introduced for read- 
ing and writing. Prerequisite: JPN 1 10 or permission of 
the instructor {F} 5 credits 
Maki Hubbard. Yuri Kumagai 
Offered each Spring 



168 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 



JPN 220 Japanese II (Intensive) 

Course focuses on further development of oral profi- 
ciency, along with reading and writing skills. Students 
will attain intermediate proficiency while deepening 
their understanding of the social and cultural context 
of the language. Prerequisite: 111 or permission of the 
instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Maki Hubbard 
Offered each Fall 

JPN 221 Japanese II (Intensive) 

A continuation of 220. Prerequisite: JPN 220 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {F} 5 credits 
Atsuko Takahashi 
Offered each Spring 

JPN 301 Japanese III 

Development of high intennediate proficiency in 
speech and reading through study of varied prose pieces 
and audio-visual materials. Prerequisite: 221 or per- 
mission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Atsuko Takahashi 
Offered each Fall 

JPN 302 Japanese III 

A continuation of 301. Prerequisite: 301 or permission 
of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Atsuko Takahashi 
Offered each Spring 

JPN 350 Contemporary Texts 

Study of selected contemporary texts including litera- 
ture and journalism from print and electronic media. 
Focus will be on developing reading and discussion 
skills in Japanese using original materials, and on un- 
derstanding various aspects of modern Japan through 
its contemporary texts. Prerequisite: JPN 302 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. With the instructor's permission, 
advanced language courses may be repeated when the 
content changes. {F} 4 credits 
Atsuko Takahashi 
Offered Fall 2008 

JPN 351 Contemporary Texts II 

Continued study of selected contemporary texts includ- 
ing fiction and short essays from print and electronic 
media. This course further develops advanced read- 
ing, writing and discussion skills in Japanese, and 
enhances students' understanding of various aspects of 



contemporary Japanese society. Prerequisite: JPN 302 or 
permission of the instructor. With the instructor's per- 
mission, advanced language courses may be repeated 
when the content changes. {F} 4 credits 
Maki Hubbard 
Offered Spring 2009 



Korean Language 

K0R 110 Korean I 

An introduction to spoken and written Korean. Em- 
phasis on oral proficiency with the acquisition of basic 
grammar, reading and writing skills. This course is 
designed for students with little or no background in 
Korean. 4 credits 
Suk Massey 
Offered each Fall 

K0R 111 Korean I 

A continuation of 1 10. Prerequisite: 1 10 or permission 
of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {F} 4 credits 
Suk Massey 
Offered each Spring 

K0R 220 Korean II 

This course places equal emphasis on oral/aural 
proficiency, grammar, and reading and writing skills. 
Various aspects of Korean society and culture are pre- 
sented with weekly visual materials. Prerequisite: 1 1 1 
or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Suk Massey 
Offered each Fall 

K0R 221 Korean II 

A continuation of 220. Prerequisite: 220 or permission 
of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 15. {F} 4 credits 
Suk Massey 
Offered each Spring 

K0R 301 Korean III 

Continued development of speaking, listening, reading 
and writing, with more advanced grammatical points 
and vocabulary. Korean proverbs and Chinese charac- 
ters are introduced. Prerequisite: 221 or permission of 
the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Suk Massey 
Offered Spring 2009 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 



169 



Cross-listed courses 

CLT 260 Health and Illness: Literary Explorations 

How do languages, social norms and economic con- 
texts shape experiences of health and illness? How 
do conceptions of selfhood, sexuality, belonging and 
spirituality inform ideas about well-being, disease, 
intervention and healing? This cross-cultural literary 
inquiry- into bodily and emotional experiences will also 
explore Western biomedical and traditional Chinese 
diagnosis and treatment practices. From despair and 
chronic pain to cancer, aging and death, how do suf- 
ferers and their caregivers adapt in the face of infirmity 
or trauma? Our study will also consider how stories and 
other genres can help develop resilience, compassion 
and hope. Enrollment limited to 10. {L} 4 credits 
Sabma Knight 
Offered Fall 2008 

The Major in East Asian 
Languages and Cultures 

Prerequisites 

The first year of Chinese (CHI 1 10 and 1 1 1) or Japanese 
(JPN 1 10 and 1 1 1) is a prerequisite for admission to 
the major. A language placement test is required prior 
to registration for students who have previously studied 
the language. 

Advisers: Members of the department 

Requirements: Students are expected to concentrate in 
China or Japan and take a total of 1 1 courses (46 cred- 
its), distributed as follows: 

1. Language: 

a. Second-year language courses (10 credits): JPN 
220 and 221 or CHI 220 and 221 (2 courses). 

b. Third-year language courses (8 credits): JPN 301 
and 302 or CHI 301 and 302 (2 courses). Stu- 
dents whose proficiency places them beyond the 
third year should substitute advanced language 
or literature courses for this requirement. 

With the permission of her adviser, a student who be- 
gins her college-level study of an East Asian language 
above the second-year level may fulfill the language 



requirement b\ taking additional advanced language 
or literature courses. 

2. Literature: 

a. At least three EAL courses (12 credits) in the lit- 
erature or culture of the student's concentration, 
including a departmental seminar. Students 
concentrating on China are encouraged to take 
EAL 231 and 232, and they must take at least 
one of these two courses. Students focusing on 
Japan are encouraged to take EAL 241 and 242, 
and they must take at least one of these courses. 

b. At least one course (4 credits) focusing prin- 
cipally on the literature of another East Asian 
country. 

Electives: 

Three additional courses (12 credits) may be chosen 
from other advanced language or literature courses in 
the department, or, at the recommendation of the ad- 
viser, from related courses in other departments. 

Of the eleven required courses, no more than five 
normally shall be taken in other institutions, such as 
Five Colleges, Junior Year Abroad programs or summer 
programs. Students should consult their advisers prior 
to taking such courses. S/U grading options are not 
allowed for courses counting toward the major. Native 
speakers of a language are encouraged to take another 
East Asian language. 

Advanced Language Courses: 

CHI 310 Readings in Classical Chinese Prose and 

Poetry 
CHI 350 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modem 

Literary Texts 
CHI 35 1 Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modem 

and Contemporary Texts 
JPN 350 Contemporary Texts I 
JPN 351 Contemporary Texts II 
KOR 35 1 Advanced Studies in Korean Language 

and Literature 

Courses taught in English: 

FYS 1 16 Kyoto Through the Ages 

EAL 23 1 The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 

China 
EAL 232 Modern Chinese Literature 
EAL 236 Modernity: East and West 
EAL 237 Chinese Poetrv and the Other Arts 



170 



East Asian Languages and Literatures 



EAL 238 Literature from Taiwan 

EAL 240 Japanese Language and Culture 

EAL 24 1 Court Ladies, Wandering Monks and Urban 

Rakes: Literature and Culture in Premodern 

Japan 
EAL 242 Modern Japanese Literature 
EAL 243 Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 
EAL 244 Construction of Gender in Modern Japanese 

Women's Writing 
EAL 245 Writing the "Other" in Modern Japanese 

Literature 
EAL 248 The Tale ofGenji and The Pillow Book 
EAL 26l Major Themes in Literature: East-West 

Perspectives (topic course) 
EAL 360 Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages 

and Literatures (topic course) 
CLT 260 Health and Illness: Literary Explorations 

Honors 

Director: Thomas Rohlich 

430d Thesis 

(8 credits) 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered each Fall 

Please consult the director of honors for specific re- 
quirements and application procedures. 

The Minor in East Asian 
Languages and Literatures 

Advisers: Members of the department 

The course requirements are designed so that a student 
will concentrate on one of the East Asian languages 
but will have the option of being exposed to the other 
courses in the department. 



Requirements: 

A total of six courses (26 credits) in the following distri- 
bution, no more than three of which shall be taken in 
other institutions. Students should consult the depart- 
ment prior to taking courses in other institutions. 

1. Chinese II (CHI 220 and 221), Japanese II (JPN 
220 and 221) or Korean II (KOR 220 and 221). (10 
credits) 

2. Four courses, at least two of which must be EAL 
courses, chosen from the following: 



The first year of Chinese (CHI 1 10 and 1 1 1), Japanese 
(JPN 1 10 and 1 1 1) or Korean (KOR 1 10 and 1 1 1) is a 
prerequisite for admission. 



FYS 116 


Kyoto Through the Ages 


EAL 231 


The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 




China 


EAL 232 


Modern Chinese Literature 


EAL 236 


Modernity: East and West 


EAL 237 


Chinese Poetry and the Other Arts 


EAL 238 


Literature from Taiwan 


EAL 240 


Japanese Language and Culture 


EAL 241 


Court Ladies, Wandering Monks and Urban 




Rakes: Literature and Culture 




in Premodern Japan 


EAL 242 


Modern Japanese Literature 


EAL 244 


Construction of Gender in Modern Japanese 




Women's Writing 


EAL 245 


Writing, Japan and Otherness 


EAL 248 


The Tale ofGenji and The Pillow Book 


EAL 261 


Major Themes in Literature (topic course) 


EAL 360 


Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages 




and Literatures 


EAL 400 


Special Studies 


CHI 301 


Chinese III 


CHI 302 


Chinese III (A continuation of 301) 


CHI 310 


Readings in Classical Chinese Prose and 




Poetry 


CHI 350 


Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modern 




Literary Texts 


CHI 351 


Advanced Readings in Chinese: Modem 




and Contemporary Society 


JPN 301 


Japanese III 


JPN 302 


Japanese III (A continuation of 301) 


JPN 350 


Contemporary Texts I 


JPN 351 


Contemporary Texts II 


KOR 301 


Korean III 


KOR 302 


Korean III (A continuation of 301) 


KOR 351 


Advanced Studies in Korean Language and 




Literature 


CLT 260 


Health and Illness: Literary Explorations 



171 



East Asian Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



East Asian Studies Advisory Committee 

*' Daniel K. Gardner. Professor of History 

*' Marylin Rhie, Professor of Art and of East Asian 

Studies 
Peter N.Gregory, Professor of Religion 
t2 Dennis Yasutomo, Professor of Government 
" J Suzanne Z. GotLschang, Associate Professor of 

Anthropology and East Asian Studies, Director 
Mamie Anderson, Assistant Professor of History 
Kimberly Kono. Assistant Professor of East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 
Jina Kim, Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies 



Participating Faculty 

" 2 Steven M. Goldstein. Professor of Government 
Jamie Hubbard, Professor of Religion and Yehan 

Numata lecturer in Buddhist Studies 
Maki Hirano Hubbard, Associate Professor of East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 
2 Sabina Knight, Associate Professor of Chinese and 

Comparative Literature 
' 2 Thomas Rohlich, Professor of East Asian Languages 

and Literatures 
*' Sujane Wu, Assistant Professor of East Asian 

Languages and Literatures 



The Major 



The major in East Asian studies offers students an op- 
portunity to develop a coherent and comprehensive un- 
derstanding of the great civilizations of the Asia Pacific 
region. The study of East Asia should be considered an 
integral part of a liberal arts education. Through an In- 
terdisciplinary stud\' of these diverse cultures, students 
engage in a comparative study of their own societies 
and values. The major also reflects the emergence of 
East Asia politically, economically and culturally onto 
the world scene, especially during the last century, and 
anticipates the continued importance of the region in 
the future. It therefore helps prepare students for post- 
graduation endeavors ranging from graduate training 
to careers in both the public and private sectors dealing 
with East Asia. 

Requirements for the Major 

I. Basis Courses 

1 An East Asian language: The second year of an East 
Asian language, which can be fulfilled by Chinese 
220 and 221. Japanese 220 and 22 1 , or Korean 220 
and 221 or higher level courses. Extensive language 



study is encouraged, but only two courses at the 
second-year level or higher will count toward the 
major. Normally, language courses will be taken at 
Smith. Students with native or near-native fluency 
in an East Asian language must take a second East 
Asian language. Native and near-native fluency is 
defined as competence in the language above the 
fourth-year level. 

II. Survey Courses 

1 . One survey course on the pre-modem civilization of 
an East Asian country: EAS 215, HST211, HST212 
orHST220 

2. EAS 100 Introduction to Modem East Asia 

(normally by the second year). 

3. EAS 200 Colloquium: Topics in East Asian Studies 
open to sophomores and juniors (normally taken in 
the sophomore year). 

III. Electives 

1. Five elective courses, which shall be determined In 
consultation with the adviser from me list of ap 

proved courses. 



172 



East Asian Studies 



a) Four of the elective courses shall constitute an 
area of concentration, which can be an empha- 
sis on the civilization of one country (China, 
Japan or Korea) or a thematic concentration 
(e.g., comparative modernization, religious tra- 
ditions, women and gender, political economy, 
thought and art). Other concentrations may be 
formulated in consultation with an adviser. 

b) Electives must include courses in both the Hu- 
manities and social sciences. 

c) Electives must include courses on more than 
one East Asian country. 

d) One of the elective courses must be a Smith 
seminar on East Asia. 

e) At least half of the course credits toward the 
major must be taken at Smith. 

f) No more than one 100-level course shall count 
as an elective. 

2. Smith courses not included on the approved list 
may count toward the major under the following 
conditions: 

a) The student obtains the approval of her adviser 

b) No more than one such course shall be applied 
toward the major. 

3. Please consult the director of honors or the depart- 
mental Web site for specific requirements and ap- 
plication procedures. 

4. Junior Year Abroad programs are encouraged at col- 
lege approved institutions in East Asia. EAS recom- 
mends the Associated Kyoto Program for Japan, ACC 
for China and Ewha Woman's University for Korea. 
Courses taken at JYA programs, as well as courses 
taken away from Smith at other institutions, may 
count toward the major under the following condi- 
tions: 

a) The courses are reviewed and approved by the 
East Asian Studies Advisory Committee upon 
completion. 

b) Courses taken away from Smith must not total 
more than half of the credits counted toward the 
Major. 

Advisers: Mamie Anderson, Daniel K. Gardner, Peter 
Gregory, Marylin Rhie, Dennis Yasutomo, Suzanne Z. 
Gottschang, Kimberly Kono, Jina Kim 



EAS 100 Introduction to Modern East Asia 

This course looks comparatively at the histories of 
China, Japan, Korea from the late 18th century to the 
present. It examines the struggles of these countries 
to preserve or regain their independence and establish 
their national identities in a rapidly emerging and 
often violent modem world order. While each of these 
countries has its own distinctive identity, their over- 
lapping histories (and dilemmas) give the region a 
coherent identity. We also will look at how individuals 
respond to and are shaped by larger historical move- 
ments. {H} 4 credits 
Marnie Anderson 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAS 200 Colloquium: Topics in East Asian Studies 

Focusing on a theme of significance to the region, this 
course is designed to introduce students to the variety 
of methods of inquiry used for research in the inter- 
disciplinary field of East Asian studies. Students will be 
introduced to methods of locating and analyzing in- 
formation and sources, developing research questions, 
and writing in the course of the semester. Normally 
taken in the sophomore or junior year. Also open to 
non-EAS majors. 

Korean Diaspora: Korea Inside and Outside 
Modem Korea has had more than a century-long his- 
tory of immigration and emigration. We will study 
Korean emigrants and their communities around the 
world as well as the new immigrant population now 
being formed inside Korea. How has Korean diaspora 
changed the landscape of Korean and world culture; 
what are some new social problems of immigrants 
inside and outside Korea; how can we begin to re- 
conceptualize multicultural and multiracial identities? 
We will explore this topic through our study of theories 
of migration and demographics, history of immigra- 
tion and law, theories of cultural adaptation and oral 
histories. Prerequisite: EAS 100. Enrollment limited to 
18. {S} 4 credits 
jina Kim 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

EAS 210 Colloquium: Culture and Diplomacy in Asia 

The course explores the influence of Asian cultures 
on the diplomacy and negotiating styles of East and 
Southeast Asian countries. Specific countries include 
Japan, China, North Korea and the Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations. Case studies will be based on 



East Asian Studies 



173 



current, on-going regional and global issues. 
Enrollment limited to 18. (E) {S} 4 credits 
Dennis Yasutomo 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAS 214 Korean Film and Culture 

Topic Extreme Emotions. We will study Korean films 
to think about expressions of and contemporary uses 
of emotion. We will consider how these cinematic texts 
serve as a site for theorizing and historicizing emo- 
tion in modem Korea. In particular, we will explore 
the most extreme, but also the most basic, human 
emotions such as fear, pain, love and sadness. In addi- 
tion, we will ask how Korean films produce versions of 
emotional life that address various aspects of Korean 
history, class, gender, sexuality and culture. Films will 
be supplemented with theory, history, and popular 
culture texts and draw on writings by both Eastern and 
Western thinkers such as Confucius, Yi Sang, Foucault 
and Sartre. {A/H} 4 credits 
Jina Kim 
Offered Fall 2009 

EAS 215 Pre-modern Korean History: Public Lives, 
Private Stories 

This course is a survey of cultural, social, and political 
history of Korea from early times to the 19th century. 
We will explore major cultural trends, intellectual 
developments, and political shifts during Korea's long 
dynastic history. Some of the topics include literati 
culture; nativism and folk culture; gender in traditional 
Korean society; foreign relations; and Confucian- 
ism and kingship. All of these topics will be explored 
through the lens of changing perceptions of public 
and private lives of those who had become part of both 
public and private histories and stories of Korea. {H} 
4 credits 
Jina Kim 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAS 216 Urban Modernity in Colonized Korea 
With a population of 12 million, congested streets and 
soaring skyscrapers, Seoul has become an important 
! socioeconomic, political and cultural center. This 
\ course explores the colonial history of the city begin- 
ning with Japanese colonization of Korea during the 
j first half of the 20th century. It moves on to a consider- 
: ation of the postwar U.S. military occupation of South 
Korea during the latter half of the 20th century and 



traces changes in the city's culture, people, polil 
commerce and industry Attention will be given to the 

entrance of new technology, rise of new architectural 

spaces, emergence of new subjectivities and migration 

of people. (E) {H} 4 credits 

Jina Kim 

Offered Spring 2010 

EAS 217 Colloquium: Korean Popular Culture- 
Translating Tradition Into Pop Culture 

This course investigates and evaluates contemporary 
South Korean popular culture and the 21st century cul- 
tural phenomenon called hallyu (Korean Wave). It will 
consider the popularity* of the Wave and the backlash 
against it both in East Asia and globally. It will raise the 
issue of how film, television, music, manhwa (comic 
books), sports and the Internet participate in the trans- 
national production and circulation of culture, identity, 
modernity, tradition, ideology and politics. The course 
aims to equip students with analytical tools to critically 
think about and understand popular culture. Enroll- 
ment limited to 18. (E) {H} 4 credits 
Jina Kim 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAS 219 Modern Korean History 

This course is a general survey of Korean political, 
social, economic and cultural histories from the mid- 
19th century through the present. We will examine 
major events such as the 1876 opening of ports, 1910 
colonization by Japan, the March First movement of 
1919, liberation and division in 1945, the Korean War, 
democratization since 1987, the 1997 financial crisis 
and the 2000 Inter-Korea Summit. We will also consid- 
er modernization, nationalism, industrialization and 
urbanization, changing gender relations, the nuclear 
issue and the Korean culture industry. {H} 4 credits 
Jina Kim 
Offered Fall 2009 

EAS 270 Colloquium in East Asian Studies 

Art of Korea 

Architecture, sculpture, painting and ceramic art of 

Korea from Neolithic times to the 18th century. {A/H} 

4 credits 

Marylin Rhie 

Offered Fall 2009 



174 



East Asian Studies 



Japanese Buddhist Art 

Study of the Japanese Buddhist art traditions in archi- 
tecture, sculpture, painting, gardens and the tea cer- 
emony from the 6th to the 19th centuries. {A/H} 
4 credits 
Marylin Rhie 
Offered Spring 2010 

EAS 279 Colloquium: The Art and Culture of Tibet 

The architecture, painting, and sculpture of Tibet are 
presented within their cultural context from the period 
of the Yarlung dynasty (seventh century) through the 
rule of the Dalai Lamas to the present. {A/H} 4 credits 
Marylin Rhie 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAS 350 Seminar: Modern Girls and Marxist Boys: 
Consumerism, Colonialism and Gender in East Asia 

This course explores discourses of modem "femininity' 1 
and modem "masculinity" through the study of the 
two iconic figures to emerge in the early 20th century: 
Modem Girls and Marxist Boys. Through these figures, 
the course seeks to enrich our understanding of gen- 
dered politics, consumer culture, colonial modernity 
and international relations, and the important histori- 
cal relationship between modernity and Marxism in 
East Asia. Enrollment limited to 18. (E) {H} 4 credits 
Jina Kim 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAS 404 Special Studies 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

EAS 408d Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

EAS 430d Honors Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Approved Courses in the 
Humanities 

ARH101 Buddhist Art 

ARH 1 20 Introduction to Art History: Asia 

ARH222 The Art of China 



ARH 224 


The Art of Japan 


EAL231 


The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 




China 


EAL232 


Modem Chinese Literature 


EAL236 


Modernity: East and West 


EAL237 


Chinese Poetry and the Other Arts 


EAL238 


Literature from Taiwan 


EAL240 


Japanese Language and Culture 


EAL241 


Court Ladies, Wandering Monks and Urban 




Rakes: Literature and Culture in Premodem 




Japan 


EAL242 


Modem Japanese Literature 


EAL243 


Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 


EAL244 


Construction of Gender in Modem 




Japanese Women's Writing 


EAL245 


Writing, Japan and Otherness 


EAL248 


The Tale of the Genji and The Pillow Book 


EAL261 


Major Themes in Literature: East-West 




Perspectives (topics course) 


EAL360 


Seminar: Topics in East Asian Languages 




and Literatures (topics course) 


EAS 218 


Thought and Art in China 


EAS 270 


Colloquium in East Asian Studies 


EAS 279 


Colloquium: The Art and Culture of Tibet 


REL110 


Politics of Enlightenment 


REL260 


Buddhist Thought 


REL263 


Zen 


REL 266 


Buddhism in America 


REL270 


Japanese Buddhism 


REL 271 


Japanese Buddhism in the Contemporary 




World 


REL 360 


Seminar: Problems in Buddhist Thought 



Approved Courses in the 
Social Sciences 

ANT 200 Topics in Anthropology: Humans and 

Nature in China 
ANT 2 5 1 Women and Modernity in East Asia 
ANT 252 The City and the Countryside in China 
ANT 253 Introduction to East Asian Societies and 

Cultures 
ANT 342 Seminar: Topics in Anthropology 
EAS 200 Colloquium: Topics in East Asian Studies 
EAS 215 Pre-Modem Korean History 
EAS 219 Modem Korean History 
EAS 270 Colloquium in East Asian Studies 
EAS 279 Colloquium: The Art and Culture of Tibet 



East Asian Studies 



175 



(i( )\ 228 The Government and Politics of Japan 
GOV 230 The Government and Politics of China 
GOV 25 1 Foreign Policy of Japan 
GOV 344 Seminar on Foreign Policy of the Chinese 

People's Republic 
GOV 348 Seminar in International Politics: Conflict 

and Cooperation in Asia 
HST211 The Emergence of China 
HST 212 China in Transformation, A.D. 750-1900 
HST 2 14 Aspects of Chinese History: 

Topic: The World of Thought in Early 

China 
HST 2 16 Women in Chinese History 
HST 217 World War TWo in East Asia 
HST 218 Thought and Art in China 
HST 220 Colloquium: Japan to 1600 
HST 22 1 The Rise of Modern Japan 
HST 222 Aspects of Japanese History: The Place of 

Protest in Early Modern and Modem Japan 
HST 223 Women in Japanese History 7 : From Ancient 

Times to the 19th Century 
PRS 304 Presidential Seminar: Happiness — 

Buddhist and Psychological Understandings 

of Personal Well-Being 



a. One year of an East Asian language is strongly 

encouraged and may constitute two elective 
courses. (One semester of a language may not k j 
counted as an elective). 

b. At least three elective courses may be at the 200- 
or300-level 

c. Courses may not be taken pass/fail. 

Advisers: Mamie Anderson, Daniel K. Gardner, Peter 
Gregory, Marylin Rhie, Dennis Yasutomo, Suzanne Z. 
Gottschang, Kimberly Kono, Jina Kim 



The Minor 



The interdepartmental minor in East Asian studies is a 
program of study designed to provide a coherent under- 
standing of and basic competence in the civilizations 
and societies of China, Japan and Korea. It may be 
undertaken in order to broaden the scope of any major; 
to acquire, for comparative purposes, an Asian perspec- 
tive within any of the humanistic and social-scientific 
disciplines; or as the basis of future graduate work and/ 
or careers related to East Asia. 

Requirements: The minor will consist of a total of six 
courses, no more than three of which shall be taken 
at other institutions. Courses taken away from Smith 
require the approval of the East Asian Studies Advisory 
Committee. 

1. EAS 100 Introduction to Modem East Asia (nor- 
mallv bv the second vear) 



2. Five elective courses, which shall be determined in 
consultation with the adviser. 



176 



Economics 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

fl Frederick Leonard, Ph.D. 
n Andrew Zimbalist, Ph.D. 
" l Randall Bartlett, Ph.D. 
"' Robert Buchele, Ph.D. 
n Roger T.Kaufman, Ph.D. 
Karen Pfeifer, Ph.D. 
Elizabeth Savoca, Ph.D. 
n Deborah Haas-Wilson, Ph.D. 
Charles P. Staelin, Ph.D., Chair 
Nola Reinhardt, Ph.D. 
Mahnaz Mahdavi, Ph.D. 



Associate Professors 

Thomas A. Riddell, Ph.D. 
James Miller, Ph.D.J.D. 

Assistant Professor 

Roisin O'Sullivan, Ph.D. 

Instructor 

Susan Stratton, M.S. 

Lecturers 

Charles Johnson, A.B., M.B.A. 
Thomas L. Bernardin, M.A. 

Lecturer and Professor Emeritus 

Mark Aldrich, Ph.D. 



First-year students who are considering a major in the 
department and who hope to spend their junior year 
abroad are strongly advised to take 150 and 153 in the 
first year and to take additional courses in econom- 
ics in the sophomore year. Majors in economics are 
strongly advised to take 250, 253 and 190 as soon after 
the introductory courses as possible. Students consider- 
ing graduate study in economics are advised to master 
the material in ECO 255 and 240 as well as MTH 1 1 1, 
112, 211, 212, 225 and 243. 

A. General Courses 

123 Cheaper by the Dozen: Twelve Economic Issues for 
Our Times 

This course for the concerned non-economist addresses 
pressing issues in contemporary U.S. and global society, 
including poverty and inequality; education; health- 
care; social security; the environment; the national debt 
and global economic integration. Economic concepts 
presented in lay English and elementary math are used 
to help explain each social problem and to illuminate 
the core debates on appropriate solutions. May not 
be counted toward the major or minor in economics. 



Open only to junior and senior non-economics majors. 

{8} 4 credits. 

Karen Pfeifer 

Not offered in 2008-09 

125 Economic Game Theory 

An examination of how rational people cooperate and 
compete. Game theory explores situations in which 
everyone's actions affect everyone else, and everyone 
knows this and takes it into account when determining 
their own actions. Business, military and dating strate- 
gies will be examined. No economics prerequisite. Pre- 
requisite: at least one semester of high school or college 
calculus. {8} 4 credits 
James Miller 
Offered Spring 2009 

127 The Magic of the Marketplace 

An introduction to capitalism. Markets have made the 
average American richer than any medieval king. Take 
this course to find out why. Other topics covered include 
innovation, discrimination, prostitution, environmen- 
tal economics, international trade, affirmative action, 
business competition, price gouging, illegal drugs, 
Internet piracy, baby auctions, inequality and IQ, the 



Economics 



177 



stock market, the minimum wage, an economic love 
story, the economics of government and why Africa is 
poor. This course is less mathematical than Economics 
150. Open only to junior and senior non-economics 
majors who will never take ECO 150. (E) {S} 4 credits 
James I). Miller 
Offered Fall 2008 



ability, sampling distributions, estimation, hypothesis 
testing and regression. Assignments include use of 
statistical software and micro computers to analyze 
labor market and other economic data. Prerequisite: 
150 and 153 recommended. {S/M} 4 credits 
Robert Buchele, Elizabeth Savoca 
Offered both semesters each year 



150 Introductory Microeconomics 

How and how well do markets work? What should gov- 
ernment do in a market economy? How do markets set 
prices, determine what will be produced and decide who 
will get the goods? We consider important economic 
issues including preserving the environment, free trade, 
taxation, (de) regulation and poverty. {S} 4 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered both semesters each year 

153 Introductory Macroeconomics 

An examination of current macroeconomic policy is- 
sues, including the short and long-run effects of budget 
deficits, the determinants of economic growth, causes 
and effects of inflation, and the effects of high trade 
deficits. The course will focus on what, if any, govern- 
ment (monetary and fiscal) policies should be pursued 
in order to achieve low inflation, full employment, high 
economic growth and rising real wages. {8} 4 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered both semesters each year 

ACC 223 Financial Accounting 

The course, while using traditional accounting tech- 
niques and methodology, will focus on the needs of 
external users of financial information. The emphasis 
is on learning how to read, interpret and analyze fi- 
nancial information as a tool to guide investment deci- 
sions. Concepts rather than procedures are stressed and 
class time will be largely devoted to problem solutions 
and case discussions. A basic knowledge of arithmetic 
and a familiarity with a spreadsheet program is sug- 
gested. Cannot be used for credit towards the economics 

; major and no more than four credits in accounting 
may be counted toward the degree. {8} 4 credits 

I Charles Johnson 

\ Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

190 Introduction to Statistics and Econometrics 

Summarizing, interpreting and analyzing empirical 
data. Attention to descriptive statistics and statistical 
inference. Topics include elementary sampling, prob- 



B. Economic Theory 

240 Econometrics 

Applied regression analysis. The specification and 
estimation of economic models, hypothesis testing, 
statistical significance, interpretation of results, policy 
implications. Emphasis on practical applications and 
cross-section data analysis. Special issues in time-series 
analysis. Prerequisites: 150, 153 and 190, and MTH 
111. {S/M} 4 credits 
Robert Buchele, Elizabeth Savoca 
Offered Fall 2008 

250 Intermediate Microeconomics 

Focuses on the economic analysis of resource al- 
location in a market economy and on the economic 
impact of various government interventions, such as 
minimum wage laws, national health insurance, and 
environmental regulations. Covers the theories of con- 
sumer choice and decision making by the firm. Exam- 
ines the welfare implications of a market economy, and 
of federal and state policies which influence market 
choices. Prerequisite: 150, MTH 111 or its equivalent. 
{8} 4 credits 

To be announced, Charles Staelin 
Offered both semesters each year 

253 Intermediate Macroeconomics 

Builds a cohesive theoretical framework within which 
to analyze the workings of the macroeconomy. Current 
issues relating to key macroeconomic variables such 
as output, inflation and unemployment are examined 
within this framework. The role of government policy, 
both in the short run and the long run, is also assessed. 
Prerequisite: 153- MTH 1 1 1 or its equivalent. {S} 4 credits 
Roger Kaufman, Roisin O'SuUwan 
Offered both semesters each year 

255 Mathematical Economics 

The use of mathematical tools to analyze economic 
problems, with emphasis on linear algebra and differ- 



178 



Economics 



ential calculus. Applications particularly in compara- 
tive statics and optimization problems. Prerequisites: 
MTH 111, 112, 211, 212, ECO 250 and 253 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {S/M} 4 credits 
Roger Kaufman 
Not offered in 2008-09 



mental Economics: selfishness, altruism and reciproc- 
ity. Fairness and the dogma of economic rationality. 
Does having more stuff make us happier? Prerequisites: 
190, 150 and 250. {S} 4 credits 
Robert Buchele 
Not offered in 2008-09 



272 Law and Economics 

An economic analysis of legal rules and cases. Topics 
include contract law, accident law, criminal law, the 
Coase theorem and the economics of litigation. Prereq- 
uisite: 250. {S} 4 credits 
James Miller 
Offered Spring 2009 

333 Seminar: Free Market Economics 

Compare and contrast the philosophical theories of 
justice of Robert Nozick and John Rawls. A research 
project involving a long paper and an oral presenta- 
tion concerning an issue or an area of interest to a free 
market economy of your choosing. Prerequisite: 233 or 
either 250 or 253- {S} 4 credits 
Frederick Leonard 
Not offered in 2008-09 

362 Seminar: Population Economics 

Topic: The Economics of Aging. Many countries today 
face rapidly aging populations. The economic conse- 
quences will pose enormous challenges to policymak- 
ers. What are the implications of an aging population 
for the sustainability of pension funds and health 
care systems? for labor force growth and productivity 
growth? for savings and asset markets? for the demand 
for public and private goods? What policy options have 
economists offered to deal with these issues? In this 
seminar we will study these questions and more from 
both microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives. 
Prerequisites: ECO 250, 253 andl90. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 15. {S} 4 credits 
Elizabeth Savoca 
Offered Fall 2008 

363 Seminar: Inequality 

The causes and consequences of income and wealth 
inequality. Social class and social mobility in the 
U.S. The role of IQ and education. The distributional 
impact of technical change and globalization. Is there 
a "trade-off" between equality and economic growth? 
The benefits of competition and cooperation. Expert- 



C. The American Economy 

230 Urban Economics 

Economic analysis of the spatial structure of cities — 
why they are where they are and look like they do. How 
changes in technology and policy reshape cities over 
time. Selected urban problems and policies to address 
them, include housing, transportation, concentrations 
of poverty, and financing local government. Prerequi- 
site: 150. {S} 4 credits 
Randall Bartlett 
Not offered in 2008-09 

231 The Sports Economy 

The evolution and operation of the sports industry in 
the United States and internationally. The course will 
explore the special legal and economic circumstances 
of sports leagues, owner incentives, labor markets, gov- 
ernance, public subsidies and other issues. Prerequisite: 
ECO 150; ECO 190 is recommended. {S} 4 credits 
Andrew Zimbalist 
Offered Spring 2009 

233 Free Market Economics 

Meaning and nature of economic freedom; structure 
and institutions of a free market economy; philosophi- 
cal foundation underlying freedom; macro- and mi- 
croeconomic performance of a free market economy; 
foundations, performance and critique of alternatives 
to freedom offered by the American political left and 
right; analysis of economic and political issues such 
as the "fair" distribution of income and wealth, social 
security, smoking in public places and abortion, among 
many others. Prerequisite: 150 or 153- {S} 4 credits 
Frederick Leonard 
Not offered in 2008-09 

265 Economics of Corporate Finance 

An investigation of the economic foundations for 
investment, financing and related decisions in the 
business corporation. Basic concerns and responsi- 



Economics 



179 



bilities of the financial manager, and the methods of 
analysis employed by them is emphasized. This course 
is designed to offer a balanced discussion of practi- 
cal as well as theoretical developments in the field of 
financial economics. Prerequisites: 1 ( )(), 250, MTH 111. 
{S} 4 credits 
Mabnaz Mabdavi 
Offered Fall 2008 



sports; academic entrance and progress toward degree 
requirements; racial equity; coach compensation; pay 
for play; antitrust and tax treatment; commercializa- 
tion: financial outcomes: progress toward gender 
equity; efforts to impede gender equity, among others. 
Prerequisites: ECO I50and 190 {8} 4 credits 
Andrew Zimbalist 
Not offered in 2008-09 



275 Money and Banking 

An investigation of the role of financial instruments 
and institutions in the economy Major topics include 
the determination of interest rates, the characteristics 
of bonds and stocks, the structure and regulation of the 
banking Industry, the functions of a modem central 
bank and the formulation and implementation of 
monetary policy Prerequisite: 253- {8} 4 credits 
Thomas Bernardm 
Offered Spring 2009 

284 Environmental Economics 

The causes of environmental degradation and the role 
that markets can play In both causing and solving pol- 
lution problems. The efficiency equity and impact on 
economic growth of current and proposed future envi- 
ronmental legislation. Prerequisite: 150. {S} 4 credits 
Not offered 2008-09 

314 Seminar: Industrial Organization and Antitrust 
Policy 

An examination of the latest theories and empirical 
evidence about the organization of firms and indus- 
tries. Topics include mergers, advertising, strategic 
behaviors such as predatory pricing, vertical restrictions 
such as resale price maintenance or exclusive dealing, 
and antitrust laws and policies. Prerequisite: 250. {S} 
4 credits 

Deborah Haas-Wilson 
Offered Spring 2009 

331 Seminar: The Economics of College Sports and 
Title IX 

This seminar will explore the similarities and differ- 
ences between professional and college sports. The 
economic factors that condition the evolution of 
college spoils will be examined in detail, as will the 
relationship between gender equity ( as prescribed by 
Title IX) and overall intercollegiate athletic programs. 
Topics will include: history of college sports; the role of 
| the NCAA; efforts at reform; cross subsidization among 



341 Economics of Health Care 

An examination of current economic and public policy 
issues in health care. Topics include markets for health 
insurance, physician services and hospital services; 
public policies to enhance health care quality and 
access; the economics of the pharmaceutical industry; 
and alternatives for reforming the U.S. health care 
system. Prerequisites: 250 and 190 or permission of the 
instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Deborah Haas-Wilson 
Not offered 2008-09 

342 Seminar: Economic Issues in the Presidential 
Election 

An in-depth examination of several of the principal 
economic issues in the 2008 Presidential Election. 
Although the specific topics will depend upon which 
candidates are nominated, they are likely to come from 
the following list: (1) Extension of the Bush tax cuts; 
(2) Health Care Reform; (3) Immigration Reform; and 
(4) Economic Solutions to Global Climate Change. 
Prerequisites: ECO 250, 253 and 190. (E) {S} 4 credits 
Roger Kaufman 
Offered Fall 2008 

D. International and 
Comparative Economics 

211 Economic Development 
\n overview of economic development theory and 
practice since the 1950s. Why have global economic 
inequalities widened? What economic policies have 
been implemented in the developing countries of Asia, 
Latin America. Africa and the Middle East in search of 
economic development, what theories underlie these 
policies, and what haw been the consequence's for 
economic welfare these regions? Topics include trade 
policy (protectionism versus free trade), financial 
policy industrial development strategies, formal and 



180 



Economics 



informal sector employment, women in development, 
international financial issues (lending, balance of 
payments deficits, the debt and financial crises), struc- 
tural adjustment policies and the new globalization of 
production and finance. Prerequisites: 150 and 153- {S} 
4 credits 

Nola Reinhardt 
Not offered in 2008-09 

213 The World Food System 

Examination of changing international patterns of 
food production and distribution to shed light on the 
paradox of world hunger in the face of global food 
abundance. Explores the rise of modern agriculture 
and its advantages and disadvantages compared to 
traditional farming methods. Considers the transfor- 
mation of third-world agriculture in the context of 
increasing concentration in agricultural production 
and marketing, the debate over food aid, technology 
transfer to developing countries, GATT/WTO agricultur- 
al agreements, and structural adjustment/globalization 
policies. Prerequisite: 150. {S} 4 credits 
Nola Reinhardt 
Offered Fall 2008 

214 Economies of the Middle East and North Africa 

An economic survey of the MENA region, applying 
development concepts such as the "rentier state," 
the "watchmaker" economy, export-led growth and 
import-substitution industrialization. Examples from 
countries across the region illustrate the themes of 
interaction with Western capitalism and the global 
economy and variations among patterns of economic 
transformation and growth. Topics include the impor- 
tance of oil and capital flows, industrial and agrarian 
trends, the economic role of government, employment 
and the export of labor, human development, the Euro- 
Mediterranean and Gulf Cooperation Council initia- 
tives, and the impact of Islamism. Prerequisite: either 
ECO 150 or 153- {S} 4 credits 
Karen Pfeifer 
Offered Fall 2008 

226 Economics of European Integration 

Why would countries give up their own currencies 
to adopt a common new one? Why can citizens of 
Belgium simply move to France without any special 
formalities? This course will investigate such questions 
by analyzing the ongoing integration of European 



countries from an economic perspective. While the 
major focus will be on the economics of integration, 
account will be taken of the historical, political and 
cultural context in which this process occurred. Major 
topics include the origins, institutions and policies of 
the European Union, the integration of markets for 
labor, capital and goods and monetary integration. 
Prerequisites: ECO 150 and 153. {S} 4 credits 
Roisin O'Sullivan 
Offered Spring 2009 

295 International Trade and Commercial Policy 

An examination of the trading relationships among 
countries and of the flows of factors of production 
throughout the world economy. Beginning with the 
theories of international trade, this course moves on 
to examine various policy issues in the international 
economy, including commercial policy, protectionism 
and the distribution of the gains from trade, multilat- 
eral trade negotiations, preferential trade agreements, 
the impact of transnational firms and globalization, 
immigration, and trade and economic development. 
Prerequisite: 250. {S} 4 credits 
Charles Staelin 
Offered Fall 2008 

296 International Finance 

An examination of international monetary theory and 
institutions and their relevance to national and inter- 
national economic policy. Topics include mechanisms 
of adjustment in the balance of payments; macro- 
economic and exchange-rate policy for internal and 
external balance; international movements of capital; 
and the history of the international monetary system: 
its past crises and current prospects; issues of currency 
union and optimal currency area; and emerging mar- 
kets. Prerequisite: 253- {8} 4 credits 
Mahnaz Mahdavi 
Offered Spring 2009 

309 Seminar: Topics in Comparative Economic Systems 

Does the neoliberal paradigm rule the world? In the 
1980s, "supply-side" and monetarist policies in Britain 
and the United States aimed to restore the free-market 
paradigm to "first world" capitalist countries. Then the 
"second world" was transformed by the demise of the 
U.S.S.R. and the absorption of East and Central Euro- 
pean socialist economies into western Europe's orbit, 
while the "third world" witnessed the dizzying growth 



Economics 



181 



of China and India and, elsewhere, structural adjust- 
ment and economic "reform." Are there common pat- 
terns among these three transfonuations and how do 
they fit in the global economy today? Prerequisites: ECO 
250 or 253 and one 200-level course in international 
economics. {8} 4 credits. 
Karen Pfeifer 
Offered Spring 2009 

310 Seminar: Comparative Labor Economics 
"topic: Labor Economics and Compensation Systems. 
Why do lawyers and doctors make so much more than 
college professors? Are corporate executives paid too 
much or too little? How much of the male-female 
wage gap is due to discrimination? Is education an 
investment in human capital, a signal, or a means of 
reproducing the class structure? How has trade with de- 
veloping countries affected wages in the United States? 
In this seminar we shall apply and extend economic 
theory to analyze these and other questions in labor 
economics. Prerequisites: Eco 250, 190 and MTH 111 
(calculus). {S} 4 credits 
Roger Kaufman 
Not offered in 2008-09 

318 Seminar: Latin American Economies 

The Latin American economies have undergone a dra- 
matic process of economic collapse and restructuring 
since 1980. We examine the background to the collapse 
and the economic reforms implemented in response. 
We consider the current status and future prospects of 
the regions economies. Prerequisites: 211 and 250 or 
253, or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Nola Reinhardt 
Offered Fall 2008 

375 Seminar: The Theory and Practice of Central 
Banking 

What role do central banks play in the management of 
short-run economic fluctuations? What has driven the 
recent global trend towards more powerful and inde- 
pendent central-banking institutions? This course will 
explore the theoretical foundations that link central 
bank policy to real economic activity: Building on this 
theoretical background, the monetary policy frame- 
works and operating procedures of key central banks 
will then be examined. Much of the analysis will focus 
on the current practices of the US Federal Reserve and 
the European Central Bank, with a view to identifying 
the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two institu- 



tions. Prerequisite: ECO 253. {S} 4 credits 

h'oisin O Si ill i ra)i 
Offered Spring 2009 

404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department, normally 
for majors who have had four semester courses in eco- 
nomics above the introductory level. 
4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department, normally 
for majors and minors who have had four semester 
courses in economics above the introductory level. 
Students contemplating a special studies should read 
the guidelines for special studies in the department's 
"Handbook for Prospective Majors" on the depart- 
ment's Web page: www.smith.edu/economics. 8 credits 
Full-year course; Offered each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Randall Bartlett, Robert Buchele, Deborah 
Haas-Wilson, Roger Kaufman, Frederick Leonard, 
Mahnaz Mahdavi, James Miller, Roisin O'Sullivan, 
Karen Pfeifer, Nola Reinhardt, Thomas Riddell, Eliza- 
beth Savoca, Charles Staelin, Andrew Zimbalist 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Karen Pfeifer 

Basis: 150 and 153- 

Requirements: ECO 150 and 153 or their equivalent, 
ECO 190 (or MTH 245 and MTH 247 taken together), 
ECO 250, ECO 253, and five other courses in econom- 
ics. One of these five must be a 300-level course (or 
honors thesis) taken at Smith that includes an eco- 
nomics research paper and an oral presentation. MTH 
1 1 1 or its equivalent is a prerequisite for ECO 250 and 
ECO 253. 

A student who passes the economics placement 
exam for ECO 150 or ECO 153, or who passes the AP 
examination in Microeconomics or Macroeconomics 
with a score of 4 or 5. may count this as the equivalent 
of ECO 150 or ECO 153, with course credit toward the 
major in economics. Students with AP or IB credit are 
urged to take the placement exams to ensure correct 
placement. 



182 ^ Economics 

Economics credit will be given for public policy 
courses when taught by a member of the economics 
department. 

The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses 
counting toward the economics major. An exception 
may be made in the case of 150 and 153- 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they 
meet the college's requirements. 

Majors may participate in the Washington Eco- 
nomic Policy semester at American University. See 
Thomas Riddell for more information. 

Majors may also participate in the Semester-in- 
Washington Program and the Washington Summer 
Internship Program administered by the Department 
of Government and described under the government 
major. 

The Minor 

Advisers: Same as for the major 

Requirements: Six courses in economics, consisting of 
150, 153, 190, and three other courses in economics; or 
150, 153, a statistics course taken outside of the depart- 
ment, and four other courses in economics. Crediting 
procedures are the same as for the major. 

Honors 

Director: Robert Buchele 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 
Offered Fall 2008 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



Education and Child Study 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



183 



Professors 

t, AlanLMarvelli.Ed.D. 
Sue J. M. Freeman, Ph.D. 
Alan N.Rudnitsky, Phi)., Chair 

Rosetta Marantz Cohen, Ed.D. 

Associate Professors 

Susan M. Etheredge. Ed.D. 
Sam Intrator. Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor 
Lucy Mule. Ph.D. 



Lecturers 

Cathy HoferReid, Ph.D. 
Cath) Weisman Topal, MAT. 

Janice Gam; Ed.D. 
Glenn Ellis, Ph.D. 
Catherine Swift. Ed.M. 
Carol B. Berner. M.S.Ed. 

Lecturer and Professor Emeritus 

Raymond A. Ducharme.Jr. 

Director of Teacher Education 

JohnJ.Czajkowski.Jr., M.Ed. 



Teaching Fellows 
Marielle L Emond. BA 
Deanna L. Gagnon. BA 
Linda D. McEvoy. B.A. 
Cynthia Lee Oldenberg, BA 
Michael A. Von Stange, BA 
Anna E. Walton. A.B. 

Advisory Committee 

GwenAgna, M.Ed. 
Carol Gregory. MA. 
Johanna M. McKenna. MA 
Suzanne Scallion, M.Ed. 



Students who, irrespective of major, desire to comply 
with the varying requirements of different states for 
licensure to teach in public schools are urged to consult 
the department as early as possible during their college 
career. 



observation in school settings. Not open to students 
who have had two or more courses in the department. 
Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
Lucy Mule 
Offered Spring 2009 



340 Historical and Philosophical Perspectives and the 
Educative Process 

A colloquium integrating foundations, the learning 
process, and curriculum. Open only to senior majors. 
{S} 4 credits 
Sue Freeman 
Offered Spring 2009 



222 Philosophy of Education 

The Western conception of the educated person. A close 
examination of the works of Rousseau. Montessori, 
Dewey, Whitehead, and other modem philosophers of 
education. {S} 4 credits 
Rosetta Cohen 
Offered Spring 2009 



Historical and Philosophical 
Foundations 

110 Introduction to American Education 

This course is an introduction to educational founda- 
tions. This course is designed to introduce you to the 
basic structure, function, and history of .American 
education, and to give you perspective on important 
contemporary issues in the field. Includes directed 



342 Growing Up American: Adolescents and Their 
Educational Institutions 

The institutional educational contexts through which 
our adolescents move can powerfully influence the 
growth and development of our youth. I sing a cross- 
disciplinary approach, this course will examine those 
educational institutions central to adolescent life: 
schools, classrooms, school extracumculais, arts-based 
organizations, athletic programs, community youth 
organizations, faith-based organizations, and cvber- 
communities. Three issues will be investigated Rist, 



184 



Education and Child Study 



what theoretical and socio-cultural perspectives shape 
these educational institutions? Second, how do these 
institutions serve or fail the diverse needs of American 
youth? Lastly, how and under what conditions do these 
educational institutions matter to youth? This course 
includes a service learning commitment and several eve- 
ning movie slots. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
Sam Intrator 
Offered Spring 2009 

552 Perspectives on American Education 

Required of all candidates for the MA, the Ed.M., and 
the MAT. degrees. 4 credits 
Raymond Ducharme 
Offered Spring 2009 

Sociological and Cultural 
Foundations 

200 Education in the City 

The course explores how the challenges facing schools in 
America's cities are entwined with social, economic and 
political conditions present within the urban environ- 
ment. Our essential question asks how have urban edu- 
cators and policy makers attempted to provide a quality 
educational experience for youth when issues associated 
with their social environment often present significant 
obstacles to teaching and learning? Using relevant social 
theory to guide our analyses, we'll investigate school 
reform efforts at the macro-level by looking at policy- 
driven initiatives such as high stakes testing, vouchers, 
and privatization and at the local level by exploring the 
work of teachers, parents, youth workers and reformers. 
There will be fieldwork opportunities available for stu- 
dents. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
Sam Intrator 
Offered Fall 2008 

210 Literacy in Cross-Gultural Perspective 

This course will address issues in literacy and literacy 
education among special populations, specifically 
culturally and linguistically diverse learners. We will 
closely examine the multiple contexts for literacy edu- 
cation including school, home and community. Special 
topics include a sociocultural theory of literacy and 
literacy education; role of language in literacy educa- 
tion; role of culture in literacy and learning; literacy 



instruction in multilingual/multicultural classroom 
contexts; language, culture and the politics of school- 
ing; and critical literacy in school and community. 
This course has a field component. Enrollment limited 
to 35. {8} 4 credits 
Lucy Mule 
Offered Fall 2008 

232 The American Middle School and High School 

A study of the American secondary and middle school 
as a changing social institution. An analysis of the 
history and sociology of this institution, modern school 
reform, curriculum development, and contemporary 
problems of secondary education. Directed classroom 
observation. Not open to first-year students. Enrollment 
limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
Carol Berner 
Offered Fall 2008 

343 Multicultural Education 

An examination of the multicultural approach, its roots 
in social protest movements and role in educational 
reform. The course aims to develop an understanding 
of the key concepts, developments and controversies in 
the field of multicultural education; cultivate sensitivity 
to the experiences of diverse people in American society; 
explore alternative approaches for working with diverse 
students and their families; and develop a sound philo- 
sophical and pedagogical rationale for a multicultural 
education. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
Lucy Mule 
Offered Spring 2009 

Learners and the Learning 
Process 

235 Child and Adolescent Growth and Development 

A study of theories of growth and development of chil- 
dren from prenatal development through adolescence; 
basic considerations of theoretical application to the 
educative process and child study. Directed observations 
in a variety of child-care and educational settings. 
Enrollment limited to 55. {S} 4 credits 
Janice Gatty To be announced 
Offered Fail 2008, Spring 2009 



Education and Child Study 



ISS 



238 Educational Psychology 
This course combines perspectives on cognition and 
learning to examine the teaching-learning process in 
educational settings. In addition to cognitive factors 
the course will incorporate contextual factors such as 
classroom structure, teacher belief systems, peer rela- 
tionships and educational policy. Consideration of the 
teaching-learning process will highlight subject matter 
instruction and assessment. Prerequisite: a genuine 
interest in better understanding teaching and learning. 
Priority given to majors, minors, first-year and second- 
year students. Enrollment limited to 55. {S/NJ 4 credits 
Alan Rudnitsky 
Offered Fall 2008 

240 How Do We Know Students Are Learning? 

Assessment has become increasingly important in our 
educational system. The "No Child Left Behind - ' Act 
is one example of a national move to determine the 
effectiveness of our schools. This course will focus on 
ways assessment is being done around the country 
and how we might interpret the results of the ensuing 
studies. Some of the questions to be discussed in this 
course include: what is assessment? How is assessment 
conducted? What are the limits of assessment? How do 
we interpret assessment results? What are ways results 
can be manipulated? Students will examine assessment 
efforts underway and develop and interpret their own 
research studies. Enrollment limited to 12. (E) 4 credits 
Thomas C. Laughner 
Offered Spring 2009 

248 Individuals With Disabilities 

A study of current ideas and trends in the educational, 
political and social community of exceptional children 
and adults. Focus on issues and experiences that tran- 
scend specific disabilities through examination of case 
studies. {S} 4 credits 
Sue Freeman 
Offered Fall 2008 

548 Student Diversity and Classroom Teaching 

An examination of diversity in learning and back- 
ground variables, and their consideration in promoting 
educational equity. Also, special needs as factors in 
classroom teaching and student learning. Research 
and pre-practicum required. {S} 4 credits 
Sue Freeman 
Offered Fall 2008 



554 Cognition and Instructional Design 
A course focusing on the latesl developments in cogni- 
tiu' science and the potential impact of these develop- 
ments on classroom instruction. Open to seniors by 
permission of the instructor. 4 credits 
Alan Rudnitsky 
Offered Fall 2008 



Curriculum and Instruction 

ESS 225 Education Through the Physical: Youth Sports 

This course is designed to explore how youth sports 
impacts the health, education, and well-being of chil- 
dren. Class components will include an examination 
of youth sport philosophies, literature on cognitive and 
physical growth, approaches to coach and parent edu- 
cation, and an assessment of school and community- 
based programs. Students will be required to observe, 
analyze and report on a local children's sports pro- 
gram. {S} 4 credits 
Donald Siegel 
Offered Spring 2009 

231 Foundations and Issues of Early Childhood 
Education 

The purpose of this course is to explore and examine 
the basic principles and curricular and instructional 
practices in early childhood education. Students begin 
this examination by taking a close look at the young 
child through readings and discussion, classroom 
observations, and field-based experiences in an early 
childhood setting. The course also traces the historical 
and intellectual roots of early childhood education. 
This will lead students to consider, compare and con- 
trast a variety of programs and models in early child- 
hood education. {S} 4 credits 
Susan Etheredge 
Offered Spring 2009 

305 The Teaching of Visual Art in the Classroom 

We live in a visual culture and children are visual 
learners. The visual arts offer teachers a powerful 
means of making learning concrete, visible and excit- 
ing. In this class students explore multiple teaching/ 
learning strategies as they experience and analyze 
methods and materials for teaching visual arts and 
art appreciation. The class is designed for education 
majors seeking experience in and understanding of 



Education and Child Study 



the visual arts. Studio work is part of each class. Since 
a practicum involving classroom teaching is required, 
this class works well for students who will be student 
teaching. Students who are not student teaching can 
expect to spend an additional hour each week working 
in an art class. Admission by permission of the instruc- 
tor. {8/A} 4 credits 
Cathy Topal 
Offered Fall 2008 

334 Creating and Analyzing Case Studies of Teaching 

The strategic knowledge teachers use to inform in- 
structional decision making is tightly woven to the 
context of the teaching and rarely able to be stated as 
a set of rules or propositions. Case studies have become 
a powerful methodology for studying teaching. In this 
course, students will create and present a case study of a 
teaching episode. The case will include a video, teacher 
commentary, evidence from students and theoretical 
analysis. All of these elements will work together to 
explicate the strategic knowledge underlying the teach- 
ing. Each semester a theme providing the theoretical 
focus will be selected. Permission of the instructor is 
required. Enrollment limited to 12. {S} 4 credits 
Al Rudnitsky 
Offered Spring 2009 

336 Seminar in American Education 

Topic: Youth Development and Social Entrepreneur- 
ship. Designed for students who aspire to study the 
theory and practice of programs devoted to serving 
youth and how they are founded, funded and sustained. 
We will examine theories that explain the factors that 
perpetuate the achievement gap and explore programs 
developed to redress these inequalities. This is a course 
with a service learning commitment. Students will work 
with youth in Springfield on a youth media project from 
2-4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 4 credits 
Sam Intrator and Donald Siegel 
Offered Fall 2008 

338 Children Learning to Read 

This course examines teaching and learning issues 
related to the reading process in the elementary class- 
room. Students develop a theoretical knowledge base 
for the teaching of reading to guide their instructional 
decisions and practices in the classroom setting. Under- 
standing what constitutes a balanced reading program 
for all children is a goal of the course. Students spend 



an additional hour each week engaged in classroom 
observations, study group discussions, and field-based 
experiences. Prerequisite: EDC 238. Open to juniors and 
seniors only with permission. {S} 4 credits 
Susan Etheredge 
Offered Fall 2008 

345d Elementary Curriculum and Methods 

A study of the curriculum and the application of 
the principles of teaching in the elementary school. 
Two class hours and a practicum involving directed 
classroom teaching. Prerequisite: three courses in the 
department taken previously, including 235 and 238, 
grade of B- or better in education courses. Admission by 
permission of the department. Preregistration meeting 
scheduled in April. {S} 12 credits 
Cathy Swift (Ml), Alan Rud?iitsky (Spring) 
Full-year course; Offered each year 

346 Clinical Internship in Teaching 

Full-time practicum in middle and high schools. Re- 
quired prerequisite: EDC 232. Open to seniors only. {S} 
8 credits 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

347 Individual Differences Among Learners 

Examination of research on individual differences and 
their consideration in the teaching-learning process. 
Research and pre-practicum required. Prerequisites: 
235 or 342 and 238 and permission of the instructor. 
{S} 4 credits 
Sue Freeman 
Offered Spring 2009 

352 Methods of Instruction 

Examining subject matter from the standpoint of 
pedagogical content knowledge. The course includes 
methods of planning, teaching and assessment ap- 
propriate to the grade level and subject matter area. 
Content frameworks and standards serve as the orga- 
nizing themes for the course. This course is designed 
for students who are planning to teach in the middle or 
high school. The specific subject matter sections of this 
course offered in a particular semester depend upon 
the level and subject matter of students in the educator 
preparation program. 4 credits 
Lucy Mule, Sam Intrator 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 



Education and Child Study 



187 



390 Colloquium: Teaching Science, Engineering and 

Technology 

Breakthroughs in science, technology and engineering 

are occurring at an astounding rate. This course will 
focus on providing you with the skills and knowledge 
needed to bring this excitement into the classroom. 
We will explore theories on student learning and 
curriculum design, investigate teaching strategies 
through hands-on activities, and discuss current issues. 
Although the focus of the course is to prepare middle 
and secondary school teachers, other participants are 
welcome: the ideas we will examine will help develop 
communication and learning skills that can prepare 
you for a variety of careers. Not open to first-year stu- 
dents. Enrollment limited to 20. {S} 4 credits 
Glenn Ellis 
Offered Spring 2009 

HST 390 Teaching History 

A consideration of how the study of history, broadly con- 
ceived, gets translated into curriculum for middle and 
secondary schools. Addressing a range of topics in Amer- 
ican history, students will develop lesson and unit plans 
using primary and secondary resources, films, videos 
and internet materials. Discussions will focus on both 
the historical content and on the pedagogy used to teach 
it. For upper-level undergraduate and graduate students 
who have an interest in teaching. Does not count for 
seminar credit in the history major. {H} 4 credits 
Peter Gunn 
Offered Fall 2008 

ENG 399 Teaching Literature 

Discussion of poetry, short stories, short novels, essays 
and drama with particular emphasis on the ways in 
which one might teach them. Consideration of the uses 
of writing and the leading of discussion classes. For 
upper-level undergraduate and graduate students who 
have an interest in teaching. {L} 4 credits 
Samuel Scheer 
Offered Fall 2008 



Smith College and Clarke 
School for the Deaf 
Graduate Teacher Education 
Program 

Foundations of Education of the 
Deaf 

568 Psychology of Exceptional Children 

Growth and development of children, significance of 
early experiences. Personality development and its rela- 
tion to problems of formal learning for both hearing 
children and the deaf and hard of hearing. 2 credits 
Cynthia Forsyihe 
Offered Spring 2009 

Speech Science and Audiology 

565 Hearing, Speech and Deafness 

4 credits 

Parti. Nature of Sound 

Anatomy and physiology of hearing. Processes of audi- 
tor} 7 perception. Anatomy, physiology and acoustics of 
speech. TVpes, causes and consequences of hearing im- 
pairment. Characteristics of the speech of deaf children. 

Part II. Nature of Communication 
Speech as a code for language. Speech perception and 
the effects of sensorineural hearing loss. Auditor}' train- 
ing and lip-reading instruction. Use of hearing in the 
development of speech-production skills. 4 credits 
Hollis Altman and Danial Sail itcci 
Offered Summer 2008 

566 Audiometry, Hearing Aids and Auditory Learning 

Sound perception in hearing, hard of hearing and deaf 
individuals. Methods and equipment for testing and 
developing sound perception skills. 2 credits 
Hollis Altman and Danial Salrucci 
Offered Fall 2008 



573 Audiometry, Acoustics and the Role of the Teacher 

(A) Auditory feedback loop, from speech production 
to perception. (B) Cochlear Implants: Introduction — 



188 



Education and Child Study 



History of cochlear implant development. Biological 
implications. Candidacy. Ethical issues. Surgical 
preparation. Hardware, programming, troubleshoot- 
ing. Habilitation and classroom application — signal 
processing, speech perception, speech production, lan- 
guage, evaluation. (C) Communication Access Assistive 
Devices. (D) Audiograms, amplification, classroom 
acoustics, IEP's — putting it all together. Prerequisites: 
EDC 565 and 566. Limited to candidates for the M.Ed, 
degree. (E) 2 credits 
Hollis Altman and Danial Salvucci 
Offered Spring 2009 

Language and Communication 

561 Developing Auditory/Oral Communications in Deaf 
Children 

A detailed analysis of speech production covering 
phonetic transcription and developing and improv- 
ing speech readiness, voice quality speech breathing, 
articulation, rhythm, phrasing, accent and fluency. 
Demonstration plus extensive speech lab and classroom 
teaching experiences. 6 credits 
Allison Holmberg 
Full-year course. Offered both semesters 

562 Developing Language Skills in Deaf Children 

Principles and techniques used in development of 

language with deaf children. Study of linguistics and 

psycholinguistics. Consideration is given to traditional 

and modem approaches to language development. 

4 credits 

Joyce Fitzroy and Linda Findlay 

Full-year course, Offered both semesters 

567 English Language Acquisition and Deafness 

A psycholinguists account of English language acqui- 
sition of hearing and deaf children. Both theory and 
empirical research are stressed, and links are made to 
contemporary developments in language assessment 
and intervention. 4 credits 
Peter A. de Villiers 
Offered Fall 2008 

Curriculum and Instruction 

563 Elementary School Curriculum, Methods and 
Media for the Deaf 

Principles and methods of the teaching of reading; 
classroom procedures for the presentation of other 



school subjects. Uses of texts and reference materials, 
plus summer sessions devoted to media development 
and utilization, microcomputer operations and word 
processing. 4 credits 

Judith Sheldon and Michael O'Connell 
Full-year course, Offered both semesters 



Student Teaching 



569 Observation and Student Teaching 

A minimum of 400 hours of observation and student 
teaching of deaf children in educational levels from 
preschool through eighth grade, in self-contained resi- 
dential and day settings, plus integrated day classes. 
8 credits 

Members of the faculty 
Full-year course, Offered both semesters 

Education of the Deaf Electives 

571 Introduction to Signing and Deaf Culture 

Development of basic receptive and expressive skills in 
American Sign Language and fingerspelling. Consid- 
erations of issues related to deafness and deaf culture. 
Participation in activities of the deaf community. 4 
credits 

Ruth P. Moore 
Offered Spring 2009 

572 The Deaf Child: 0-5 Years 

The effects of deafness on the development of children 
and their families during the first five years of life. 
Topics such as auditory, cognitive, language, speech, 
social and emotional development in deaf infants and 
young children are discussed. Parent counseling issues 
such as emotional reactions to deafness, interpretation 
of test results and making educational choices are also 
presented. 4 credits 
Janice Gattr 
Offered Spring 2009 



Special Studies 

400 Special Studies 

1 to 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 



Education and Child Studv 



189 



The Major 



Requirements: Ten semester courses selected in consul- 
tation with the major adviser usually these will consist 
of one course in the Historical and Philosophical Foun- 
dations; one course in the Sociological and Cultural 
Foundations; two courses in The Learning Process; one 
course in Curriculum and Instruction; EDC 345d; two 
additional courses, one of which must be an advanced 
course; EDC 340 taken during the senior year. The fol- 
lowing courses, when applied toward the major, cannot 
be taken with the S/U option: 235, 238, 342, 345, 346, 
340. 

Students may elect to major without preparing to 
teach by fulfilling an alternative course of study devel- 
oped in consultation with the major adviser and with 
approval of the department. 

Advisers: Members of the department 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Lucy Mule 

Director of Teacher Education: Jack Czajkowski 

Teacher/Lecturers-Elementary Program 

Tiphareth Ananda, Ed.M. 
Margot R. Bittell, M.S.Ed. 
Penny Block, Ed.M. 
Gina Bordoni-Cowley, M.Ed. 
Elizabeth Cooney, A.B. 
Elisabeth Grams Haxby, Ed.M. 
Janice Henderson, Ed.M. 
Roberta E. Murphy, M.Ed. 
Lara Ramsey, Ed.D. 
Janice Marie Szmaszek, Ed.M. 
Gary A. Thayer, B.A. 
BarryJ.WadsworthJr.MAT. 
Thomas M. Weiner, M.Ed. 



The Minor 



Required courses: EDC 235, Child and Adolescent 
Growth and Development; EDC 238, Educational Psy- 
chology. 

Areas of concentration: four courses from an area of 
concentration. Courses accompanied by an (e) on the 



following list are electives. The specific courses taken by 
a student are worked out with a faculty adviser. 

a. Special Needs 

Adviser: Sue Freeman 

EDC 239 Counseling Theory and Education (e) 

EDC 248 Individuals with Disabilities 

EDC 249 Children With Hearing Loss (e) 

EDC 347 Individual Differences Among Learners (e) 

EDC 350 Learning Disabilities (e) 

b. Child Development/Earlv 
Childhood 

Adviser: Janice Gatty 

EDC 23 1 Foundations and Issues of Early Childhood 

Education 
EDC 341 The Child in Modern Society (e) 
EDC 345d Elemental} 7 Curriculum and Methods (e) 
EDC 347 Individual Differences Among Learners (e) 

c. Learning and Instruction 

Advisers: Sam Intrator, Rosetta Cohen, Al Rudnitsky 

EDC 232 The American Middle School and High 

School (e) 
EDC 333 Information Technology and Learning (e) 
EDC 338 Children Learning to Read (e) 
EDC 343 Multicultural Education (e) 
EDC 345d Elementary Curriculum and Methods (e) 
EDC 356 Curriculum Principles and Design (e) 
EDC 540 Critical Thinking and Research in 

Education (e) 
EDC 554 Cognition and Instruction (e) 

d. Middle School or High School 

Advisers: Rosetta Cohen, Sam Intrator, Lucy Mule 

EDC 232 The American Middle School and High 

School 
EDC 342 Growing Up American 
EDC 346 Clinical Internship in Teaching 
EDC 347 Individual Differences Among Learners e) 
EDC 352 Methods of Instruction 



190 



Education and Child Study 



One course from Historical and Philosophical 
Foundations or Sociological and Cultural Foundations 

e. Education Studies 

Advisers: Sam Intrator, Lucy Mule 

This minor does not require EDC 235 and EDC 238. 

Six courses from: 

EDC 200 Education in the City 

EDC 2 1 Literacy in Cross-Cultural Perspective (e) 

EDC 222 Philosophy of Education 

EDC 232 The American Middle School and High 

School 
EDC 234 Modern Problems of Education 
EDC 236 American Education 
EDC 237 Comparative Education 
EDC 336 Seminar in American Education 
EDC 342 Growing Up American 
EDC 343 Multicultural Education (e) 

Student-Initiated Minor 

Requirement: The approval of a faculty adviser, and 
permission from the members of the department in the 
form of a majority vote. 



Honors 

Director: Al Rudnitsky 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered first semester each year 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



Graduate 



Advisers: Members of the department 

510 Human Development and Education 

540 Critical Thinking and Research in Education 

552 Perspectives on American Education 

554 Cognition and Instruction 

548 Student Diversity and Classroom Teaching 

559 Clinical Internship in Teaching 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

567 English Language Acquisition and Deafness 

580 Advanced Studies 

Open to seniors by permission of the department. 

4 credits 

Members of the department 

Requirements for Programs 
Leading to Educator 
Licensure 

Smith College offers programs of study in which stu- 
dents may obtain a license enabling them to become 
public school teachers. Programs of study include the 
following fields and levels: 

Elementary 1-6 Baccalaureate and Post-Baccalaureate 
Middle School Baccalaureate and Post-Baccalaureate 

Integrated English/History 

Integrated Science/Mathematics 
Visual Art PreK-8 Baccalaureate 
Subject Matter Educator Baccalaureate and Post- 
Baccalaureate 

Biology 5-8, 8-12 

Chemistry 5-8, 8-12 

Earth Science 5-8, 8-12 

English 5-8, 8-12 



Education and Child Study 191 

History 5-8, 8-12 

Foreign Language 5 1 2 French 

Foreign Language 5 1 2 Spanish 

Mathematics 5-8, 8-12 

Physics 5-8, 8-12 

Political Science 5-8, 8-12 
Subject Matter Educator Baccalaureate 

Technology/Engineering 5-12 
Post- Baccalaureate Teacher of the Deaf and Hard-of- 
HearingPre-K-8 

All students seeking Educator Licensure must have a 
major in the liberal arts and sciences. Students must 
also meet specific requirements including subject 
matter appropriate for the teaching field and level, 
knowledge of teaching, pre-practicum fieldwork and a 
practicum experience. Students who are anticipating 
licensure at the elementary level should take two math 
courses. All students seeking Educator Licensure must 
take and pass the Massachusetts Tests for Educator 
Licensure (MTEL). Smith College's pass rate for 2007 
was 90 percent. 

Students interested in obtaining Educator Licensure 
and in preparing to teach should contact a member of 
the Department of Education and Child Study as early 
in their Smith career as possible. Students can obtain 
a copy of the program requirements for all fields and 
levels of licensure at the department office in Morgan 
Hall. 



192 



Engineering 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Director, Picker Engineering Program 

Linda E.Jones, Ph.D., Rosemary Bradford Hewlett '40 
Professor, Chair 

Director of the Design Clinic and Lecturer 

Susannah Howe, Ph.D. 

Professor 

" l * 2 Ruth Haas, Ph.D. (Mathematics and Statistics and 
Engineering) 



Associate Professors 

Tl BorjanaMikic, Ph.D. 
Glenn Ellis, Ph.D. 
" l * 2 Susan Voss, Ph.D. 
Andrew Guswa, Ph.D. 
t2 Donna Riley, Ph.D. 

Judith Cardell, Ph.D., Clare Booth Luce Associate 
Professor of Computer Engineering 

Assistant Professors 

"'Paul Voss, Ph.D. 



A liberal arts education involves the acquisition of 
general knowledge to develop the ability for reasoned 
judgment and to prepare graduates to live full and 
rewarding lives. In a technologically rich era, engineer- 
ing must become an integral part of the liberal arts 
environment. Engineering, often referred to as the 
application of scientific and mathematical principles in 
the service of humanity, is the bridge that connects the 
basic sciences and mathematics to the humanities and 
social sciences. 

Students who major in engineering receive a 
bachelor of science degree, which focuses on the funda- 
mentals of all the engineering disciplines. With rigor- 
ous study in three basic areas — mechanics, electrical 
systems and thermochemical processes — students 
learn to structure engineering solutions to a variety of 
problems using first principles. 

Prior to graduation, all students majoring in 
engineering are strongly encouraged to take the Fun- 
damentals of Engineering Exam (the "FE") distributed 
by the national council of Examiners in Engineering 
and Surveying. 

100 Engineering for Everyone 

EGR 100 serves as an accessible course for all students, 
regardless of background or intent to major in engi- 
neering. Engineering majors are required to take EGR 
100 for the major, however. Those students considering 



majoring in engineering are strongly encouraged to 
take EGR 100 in the fall semester. Introduction to en- 
gineering practice through participation in a semester- 
long team-based design project. Students will develop 
a sound understanding of the engineering design 
process, including problem definition, background 
research, identification of design criteria, development 
of metrics and methods for evaluating 
alternative designs, prototype development and proof of 
concept testing. Working in teams, students will present 
their ideas frequently through oral and written reports. 
Reading assignments, in-class discussions, will chal- 
lenge students to critically analyze contemporary issues 
related to the interaction of technology and society. {N} 
4 credits 

Susan Voss, Paul Voss, Fall 2008 
To be announced, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

191D Engineering Forum 

This forum series provides scholarly talks on a broad 
range of topics related to engineering with the goal of 
introducing students to types of research activities that 
are available at Smith College and other locations. 
Students will prepare for the talks by reading relevant 
papers and come prepared with written questions. Each 
presentation will include substantial time for discus- 
sion and questions. Each student will have the chance 



Engineering 



193 



to go to lunch with one of the speakers. An additional 
goal of the forum is to provide an atmosphere for engi- 
neering students at all levels to interact and learn from 
one another. 1 credit 
To be announced 
Offered 2008-09 (full-year course) 

201 PHY 210 Mathematical Methods of Physical 
Sciences and Engineering I 

Choosing and using mathematical tools to solve 
problems in physical sciences. Topics include complex 
numbers, multiple integrals, vector analysis. Fourier 
series, ordinary differential equations, calculus of 
variations. Prerequisites: MTH 1 1 1 and 1 12 or the 
equivalent. Enrollment limited to 20. {N/M} 4 credits 
Malgorzata Zielinska-Pfabe 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

202 PHY 211 Mathematical Methods of Physical 
Sciences and Engineering II 

Mathematical tools to solve advanced problems in 
physical sciences. Topics include special functions, 
orthogonal functions, partial differential equations, 
functions of complex variables, integral transforms. 
Prerequisites: 2 10 or MTH 111, 112, 211, and 212 or 
permission of the instructor. {N/M} 4 credits 
. Malgorzata Zielinska-Pfabe 
Offered even Spring 

MTH 204 Differential Equations and Numerical 
Methods in Engineering 

An introduction to the computational tools used to 
solve mathematical and engineering problems such 
as error analysis, root finding, linear equations, opti- 
mization, ordinary and partial differential equations. 
Prerequisites: CSC 1 1 1, MTH 1 12 or MTH 1 14 or per- 
mission of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Pau Atela. Christophe Gole 
Offered every Spring 

220 Engineering Circuit Theory 

Analog and digital circuits are the building blocks of 
computers, medical technologies and all things electri- 
cal. This course introduces both the fundamental prin- 
ciples necessary to understand how circuits work and 
mathematical tools that have widespread applications 
in areas throughout engineering and science. Topics 
include Kirchhoff's laws, The'venin and Norton equiva- 
lents, superposition, responses of first-order and second- 
order networks, time-domain and frequency-domain 



analyses, frequency-selective networks. Prerequisites (or 
(©requisites): PHY 1 18 and PHY 210 (or equivalents) or 
permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 

ludith Cardell 
Offered Fall 2008 

MTH 241 Probability and Statistics for Engineers 

This course gives students a working knowledge of 
basic probability and statistics and their application 
to engineering. Analysis of data and simulation using 
computer software are emphasized. Topics include 
random variables, probability distributions, expecta- 
tion, estimation, testing, experimental design, quality 
control and multiple regression. Limited to 25 students. 
Prerequisites: PHY' 210 or MTH 212 as well as CSC 1 1 1 
(may be taken concurrently) Students will not be given 
credit for both MTH 241 and MTH 245 or MTH 190. {M} 
Nicholas Horton, Katherine Halvorsen 
Offered every Fall 

250 CSC 231 Microprocessors and Assembly Language 

An introduction to the architecture of the Intel Pentium 
class processor and its assembly language in the Linux 
environment. Students write programs in assembly 
and explore the architectural features of the Pentium, 
including its use of the memory, the data formats 
used to represent information, the implementation of 
high-level language constructs, integer and floating- 
point arithmetic, and how the processor deals with I/O 
devices and interrupts. Prerequisite: 1 12 or permission 
of the instructor. {M} 4 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered every Fall 

251 CSC 270 Digital Circuits and Computer Systems 

This class introduces the operation of logic and sequen- 
tial circuits. Students explore basic logic gates (and, or, 
nand, nor), counters, flip-flops, decoders, microproces- 
sor systems. Students have the opportunity to design and 
implement digital circuits during a weekly lab. Prereq- 
uisite: 231. Enrollment limited to 12. {M} 4 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Not offered in 2008-09 

260 Mass & Energy Balances 

This course provides an introduction to fundamental 
principles that govern the design and analysis of chem- 
ical processes. The conversion of mass and energy will 
serve as the basis for the analysis of steady-state and 
transient behavior of reactive and non-reactive systems. 



194 



Engineering 



Specific topics covered will include a review of basic 
thermodynamics, behavior of ideal and real gases, 
phase equilibria and an application of these principles 
to the concept of industrial ecology. Prerequisites: MTH 
112, GHM 111. (H) 4 credits 
Donna Riley 
Offered every- Spring 

270 Continuum Mechanics I 

This is the first course in a two-semester sequence de- 
signed to introduce students to fundamental theoretical 
principles and analysis of mechanics of continuous 
media, including solids and fluids. Concepts and topics 
to be covered in this course include conservation laws, 
static and dynamic behavior of rigid bodies, analysis of 
machines and frames, internal forces, centroids, mo- 
ment of inertia, vibrations and an introduction to stress 
and strain. Prerequisite: PHY 1 17, MTH 1 12 (or the 
equivalent) or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Glenn Ellis 
Offered every Fall 

271 Continuum Mechanics II 

This is the second course in a two-semester sequence 
designed to introduce students to fundamental theoreti- 
cal principles and analysis of mechanics of continuous 
media, including solids and fluids. Concepts and top- 
ics to be covered in this course include intensive and 
extensive thermophysical properties of fluids; control- 
volume and differential expressions for conservation of 
mass, momentum, and energy; dimensional analysis; 
and an introduction to additional topics such as vis- 
cous and open-channel flows. Prerequisite: EGR 270. 
{N} 4 credits 
Andrew Guswa 
Offered Spring 2009 

272 The Science and Mechanics of Materials 

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of 
mechanics of materials from a static failure analysis 
framework. Structural behavior will be analyzed, along 
with the material and geometric contributions to this 
behavior. Lecture topics will be complemented with 
hands-on laboratory work designed to help students 
make connections between the theoretical and experi- 
mental behavior of materials. Prerequisite: EGR 270. 
Co-requisite: EGR 273- {N} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered every Spring 



273 Mechanics Laboratory 

This is a required noncredit laboratory course that meets 
once a week. Co-requisites: EGR 271 and/or EGR 272. 
To be announced 
Offered every Spring 

274 PHY 220 Classical Mechanics 

Newtonian dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, os- 
cillations. Prerequisite: 115, 116, 210 or permission of 
the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Malgorzata Zielinska-Pfabe 
Offered every Spring 

290 Engineering Thermodynamics 

Modem civilization relies profoundly on efficient 
production, management and consumption of energy. 
Thermodynamics is the science of energy transforma- 
tions involving work, heat and the properties of mat- 
ter. Engineers rely on thermodynamics to assess the 
feasibility of their designs in a wide variety of fields 
including chemical processing, pollution control and 
abatement, power generation, materials science, engine 
design, construction, refrigeration and microchip pro- 
cessing. Course topics include first and second laws of 
thermodynamics, power cycles; combustion and refrig- 
eration; phase equilibria; ideal and non-ideal mixtures; 
conductive, convective and radiative heat transfer. 
Prerequisites (or co-requisites): EGR 260 and PHY 210 
(or the equivalents) or permission of the instructor. {N} 
4 credits 
Donna Riley 
Offered every Fall 

302 Materials Engineering Science 

Materials science and engineering is at the forefront 
of technologies addressing elder care, manipulating 
weather, walking robots, plastic bridges, the body as a 
network, photonics, biomimetics and fashion. At the 
heart of this conversation is the need to understand the 
material's structure (defect chemistry) and the manip- 
ulation of this structure. Topics include the influence of 
structure on electrical, optical, thermal, magnetic and 
thermomechanical behavior of solids. An emphasis will 
be placed on ceramics and glass. Students will address 
materials selection with respect to thermomechanical 
design. {N} 4 credits 
Lindajones 
Offered everv Fall 



Engineering 



195 



311/GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry 
This project-based course examines the geochemical 
reactions that result from interaction of water with the 
natural system. Water and soil samples collected from a 
weekend field trip will serve as the basis for understanding 
principles of pH, alkalinity, equilibrium therm<xlynamics, 
mineral solubility, soil chemistry, redox reactions, acid 
rain and acid mine drainage. The laboratory will em- 
phasize wet-chemistry analytical techniques. Participants 
will prepare regular reports based on laboratory analyses, 
building to a final analysis of the project study area. One 
weekend field trip. Prerequisite: One geology course and 
CUM 111. Enrollment limited to 9- {N} 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes 
Offered Fall 2009 

312 Thermochemical Processes in the Atmosphere 

Air pollution is a problem of local, regional and global 
scale that requires an understanding of the sources of 
pollutants in the atmosphere, their fate and transport, 
and their effects on humans and the environment. 
This course provides the technical background for 
understanding and addressing air pollution in both 
engineering and policy terms, with an emphasis on 
engineering controls. Prerequisites: CHM 111, PHY 210 
and EGR 210 (or equivalents) or EGR 260 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. 4 credits 
Paul Voss 
Offered Fall 2009 

315 Ecohydrology 

This course focuses on the measurement and modeling 
of hydrologic processes and their interplay with ecosys- 
tems. Material includes the statistical and mathematical 
representation of infiltration, evapotranspiration, plant 
uptake and runoff over a range of scales (plot to water- 
shed). The course will address characterization of the 
temporal and spatial variability of environmental pa- 
rameters and representation of the processes. The course 
includes a laboratory component and introduces students 
to the Pioneer Valley, the cloud forests of Costa Rica, Afri- 
can savannas and the Florida Everglades. Prerequisites: 
MTH 112 or 114 and MTH 245 or24l. 4aedits 
Andrew Guswa 
Offered Fall 2009 

319/GE0 309 Groundwater Geology 

A study of the occurrence, movement, and exploitation 
of water in geologic materials. Topics include well hy- 
draulics, groundwater chemistry, the relationship of ge- 



ology to groundwater occurrence, basin-wide ground- 
water development and groundwater contamination. A 
class project will involve studying a local groundwater 
problem. Prerequisites: 111, 121 or FYS 134 and MTH 
111. Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Newton 
Offered Fall 2008 

320 Signals and Systems 

The concepts of linear system theory (e.g., Signals and 
Systems) are fundamental to all areas of engineering, 
including the transmission of radio signals, signal pro- 
cessing techniques (e.g., medical imaging and speech 
recognition), and the design of feedback systems (e.g., 
in automobiles, power plants, etc.). This course will 
introduce the basic concepts of linear system theory, 
including convolution, continuous and discrete time 
Fourier analysis, Laplace and Z transforms, sampling, 
stability, feedback, control and modulation. Examples 
will be utilized from electrical, mechanical, biomedi- 
cal, environmental and chemical engineering. Prereq- 
uisites: EGR 220 and PHY 210. {M} 4 credits 
Susan Voss 
Offered every Spring 

322 Acoustics 

Acoustics describes sound transmission through solids 
and fluids; the focus of this course is sound transmis- 
sion through air. This course provides an overview of 
the fundamentals of acoustics, including derivation of 
the acoustic wave equation, the study of sound wave 
propagation (plane and spherical waves), the study of 
sound transmission through pipes, waveguides, and 
resonators impedance analogies, an overview of the 
acoustics related to the human auditory system and an 
introduction to room acoustics. The course includes 
several short hands-on experiments to help understand 
the relevant concepts. Prerequisite: EGR 220 Enroll- 
ment limited to 12. {N/M} 4 credits 
Susan Voss 
Offered Fall 2009 

324 PHY 314 Advanced Electrodynamics 

A continuation of PHY 214. Electromagnetic waves in 
matter; the potential formulation and gauge transfor- 
mations; dipole radiation; relativistic electrodynamics. 
Prerequisite: PHY 21 1 or permission of the instructor. 
{N} 2 or 4 credits 
Doreen Weinberger 
Not offered in 2008-09 



196 



Engineering 



325 Electric Energy Systems 

The course introduces students both to a variety of 
energy conversion technologies (renewable, hydro, 
nuclear and fossil), and to the operation of electric 
power systems. Coursework includes broad analyses of 
the conversion technologies and computer simulation 
of power systems. Engineering, policy, environmental 
and societal aspects of energy conversion and energy 
use are discussed. A team-based project will analyze 
the system and societal impacts of different energy 
technologies for meeting a region's electricity needs. 
Prerequisite: EGR 220. {N} 4 credits 
Judith Cardell 
Not offered in 2008^09 

330 Engineering and Global Development 

This course examines the engineering and policy issues 
around global development, with a focus on appropri- 
ate and intermediate technologies. Topics include water 
supply and treatment, sustainable food production, 
energy systems, and other technologies for meeting 
basic human needs. Students will design and build a 
prototype for an intermediate technology. Restricted to 
students with junior standing in engineering or those 
who have obtained the instructor's permission. (E) {N} 
4 credits 
Donna Riley 
Offered Spring 2009 

333 Technological Risk Assessment and Communication 

Risk abounds in our everyday life; technology can play 
a central role in both inducing and reducing risk. This 
course covers topics in risk analysis including risk as- 
sessment (modeling and estimating risks), risk abate- 
ment (strategies and technologies for reducing risk), 
and risk management (public or private processes for 
deciding what risk levels are acceptable). We will ex- 
amine the psychology of risk perception, judgment and 
decision making, and human factors issues in engi- 
neering design that increases or reduces risk. Students 
will develop an understanding of the complex relation- 
ships between risk and benefit, and learn to design and 
evaluate risk communication materials. Prerequisites: 
MTH 241 or some other introduction to probability or 
permission of the instructor. The course relies upon 
some knowledge of basic probability. {S/N} 4 credits 
Donna Riley 
Offered Fall 2008 



340 Mechanics of Granular Media 

An introduction to the mechanical properties of materi- 
als in which the continuum assumption is invalid. 
Topics include classification, hydraulic conductivity, ef- 
fective stress, volume change, stress-strain relationships 
and dynamic properties. While soil mechanics will be a 
major focus of the class, the principles covered will be 
broadly applicable. Prerequisite: EGR 272 or GEO 241. 
{N} 4 credits 
Glenn Ellis 
Not offered in 2008-09 

346 Hydrosystems Engineering 

Through systems analysis and design projects, this 
course introduces students to the field of water re- 
sources engineering. Topics include data collection 
and analysis, decision-making under uncertainty, the 
hydrologic cycle, hydropower, irrigation, flood control, 
water supply, engineering economics and water law. 
Prerequisites: MTH 112 or 114, EGR 271 (or permission 
of the instructor). 4 credits 
Andrew Guswa 
Offered Fall 2008 

354/GSG 364 Computer Architecture 

Offers an introduction to the components present inside 
computers, and is intended for students who wish to 
understand how the different components of a com- 
puter work and how they interconnect. The goal of the 
class is to present as completely as possible the nature 
and characteristics of modem-day computers. Topics 
covered include the interconnection structures inside a 
computer, internal and external memories, hardware 
supporting input and output operations, computer 
arithmetic and floating point operations, the design of 
and issues related to the instruction set, architecture of 
the processor, pipelining, microcoding and multipro- 
cessors. Prerequisites: 270 and 231. {M} 4 credits 
Dominique Thiebaut 
Offered Fall 2008 

363 Mass and Heat Transfer 

This course covers mass transport phenomena and unit 
operations for separation processes, with applications in 
both chemical and environmental engineering. Topics 
covered in the course include mechanical separations, 
distillation, gas absorption, liquid extraction, leaching, 
adsorption and membrane separations. Prerequisites: 



Engineering 



197 



EGR 260 and either EGR 271 or EGR 290.orpemiis- 
sion of the instructor. 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 

372 Advanced Solid Mechanics and Failure Analysis 

Building on the fundamentals of solid mechanics and 
materials science introduced in EGR I'll, this course 
provides students with an advanced development of 
techniques in failure analysis, including static failure 
theories, fatigue life prediction and linear elastic frac- 
ture mechanics. These techniques are used in many 
aspects of mechanical design and the evaluation of 
structural integrity. Prerequisites: EGR 270 and EGR 
272 or equivalent statics and introductory solid me- 
chanics. {N} 4 credits 
Borjana Mikic 
Offered Fall 2009 

373 Skeletal Biomechanics 

Knowledge of the mechanical and material behavior of 
the skeletal system is important for understanding how 
the human body functions and how the biomechanical 
integrity of the tissues composing the skeletal system 
are established during development, maintained dur- 
ing adulthood, and restored following injury. This 
course will provide a rigorous approach to examining 
the mechanical behavior of the skeletal tissues, includ- 
ing bone, tendon, ligament and cartilage. Engineering, 
basic science and clinical perspectives will be integrated 
to study applications in the field of Orthopaedic Bio- 
mechanics. Enrollment limited to 16. Prerequisites 
include EGR 272 and BIO 1 1 1 , or permission of the 
instructor. [H] 4 credits 
Borjana Mikic 
Offered Spring 2010 

389 Techniques for Modeling Engineering Processes 

The goal of this course is to introduce students to sev- 
eral approaches used to model, understand, simulate 
and forecast engineering processes. One approach to 
be covered is the use of artificial neural networks — a 
branch of artificial intelligence (AI) with connections 
to the brain. Other approaches to be covered are based 
upon probability and statistics and will include auto-re- 
gressive moving average (ARIMA) processes. Although 
students will leam about the theory behind these ap- 
proaches, the emphasis of the course will be on their 
application to model processes throughout the field 



ol engineering. Some examples include earthquake 
ground motion, financial markets, water treatment 
and electrical systems, \cknowledging the interdisci- 
plinary nature of AI, students will also investigate the 
possibilities of machine consciousness. Prerequisite or 
co-requisite: MTH 241. {N} 4 credits 
Glenn Ellis 
Offered Fall 2008 

Special Studies 

Available to sophomore students with permission of 
their major adviser and engineering department. 
Variable credit 1-4 as assigned 

410D Engineering Design Clinic 

This two-semester course leverages students' previous 
coursework to address an actual engineering design 
problem. Students collaborate in teams on real-world 
projects sponsored by industry' and government. These 
projects are supplemented by course seminars to pre- 
pare students for engineering design and professional 
practice. Seminars include such topics as the engineer- 
ing design process, project management, team dynam- 
ics, engineering economics, professional ethics and 
responsibility; regulations and standards, technical and 
professional communication, universal design, work/ 
life balance and sustainability. Regular team design 
meetings, weekly progress reports, interim and final 
reports, and multiple presentations are required. Pre- 
requisite: EGR 100 and senior standing in engineering 
or permission of the instructor. 8 credits 
Susannah Howe 
Offered Fall and Spring semester each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Members of the department 

The value of more liberally educated engineers, who 
typically bring strong communication and abstract rea- 
soning skills to their work, has recently been acknowl- 
edged by the national engineering accrediting board, 
which has moved to give greater weight to the liberal 
arts in designing curricular standards. Consequently, 
the engineering major is based on a rigorous plan of 
study integrated with the liberal arts. 

Smith offers an undergraduate curriculum lead- 
ing to an accredited degree in engineering science, the 



Engineering 



broad study of the theoretical scientific underpinnings 
that govern the practice of all engineering disciplines. 
The American Society for Engineering Education, iden- 
tifying the critical need for broadly educated engineers, 
points out that the design of an engineering curricu- 
lum should "recognize the pitfalls of overspecialization 
in the face of an increasing demand for graduates who 
can demonstrate adaptability to rapidly changing tech- 
nologies and to increasingly complex multinational 
markets." 

An integral component of the program is the con- 
tinuous emphasis on the use of engineering science 
principles in design. This culminates in a final design 
project that incorporates broad-based societal aspects. 
Students are encouraged to pursue a corporate and/ 
or research internship to supplement their classroom 
instruction. 

Engineers must be able to communicate effectively 
and work in team settings. Smith's highly regarded 
writing intensive first-year curriculum will ensure that 
engineering students begin their engineering cur- 
riculum with appropriate communication skills that 
will be refined during the remainder of their studies. 
Virtually every engineering course offered at Smith 
incorporates elements of team work and oral and 
written communication. 



Liberal Arts Breadth 

Students are required to demonstrate breadth in their 
curriculum by either: 

1. fulfilling the Latin Honors distribution require- 
ments; 

2. fulfilling the requirements for another major or 
minor within Div I or Div II; or 

3. by submitting a cogent proposal describing an 
alternative approach including all courses that the 
student will take to acquire curricular breadth for 
consideration and approval by the engineering fac- 
ulty and program chair. 

Students are strongly encouraged to take an additional 
course in the natural sciences (e.g., biology, geology). 

Mathematical Skills 

Students will be assessed during their first semester for 
their mathematical skills and comprehension. A j-term 
math skills studio is required for students whose math 
assessment scores are low 

Additionally, an engineering-physics problem solving 
course is offered during orientation period each fall. 
Students requiring the additional problem solving 
skills needed to complete the physics requirements are 
required to take this one-week course. 



Requirements of the Major 

Math: MTH111&1 12 (or 1 14), MTH 204, MTH 241 

Physics: PHY 117, PHY 118*, PHY 210 

Chemistry: CHM 1 1 1 or higher 

Computer Science: CSC 111 

Engineering Core: 100, 220, 260, 270, 271, 272, 273, 

290, 320, 410 (8-credit Design Clinic) 

*Normally students will take PHY 1 18. However, stu- 
dents may petition to substitute an upper-level science 
course in order to achieve a specific educational objec- 
tive. This petition must be approved by their adviser 
and program director. 

Technical Electives 

Students are required to demonstrate reasonable tech- 
nical depth by developing a sequence of three themati- 
cally related engineering electives (two of which must 
be at the 300 level or higher) selected in consultation 
with the student's adviser and with a short proposal 
outlining the rationale. 



The Engineering Minor 

Some students may wish to minor in engineering as a 
way to complement their major and supplement their 
education. 

Major advisers also serve as advisers for the minor. 
The requirements for the minor in engineering com- 
prise a total of five (5) courses. These courses must 
include: 

1. EGR 100 

2. PHY 117 

3. One course from PHY 210 (EGR 201), MTH 204, 
MTH 241, EGR 220, EGR 260, EGR 270, EGR 271, 
EGR 272, EGR 290 

4. One course from EGR 220, EGR 260, EGR 270, 
EGR 271, EGR 272, EGR 290 (not the same as in 3 
above) 

5. One course from EGR 302, EGR 312, EGR 315, EGR 
320, EGR 321, EGR 325, EGR 330, EGR 340, EGR 
346, EGR 372, EGR 373, EGR 380, EGR 390, EGR 
410D and other 300-level EGR courses as they are 
added by EGR faculty. 



Engineering 199 

Princeton-Smith Exchange 

Engineering Exchange Program 

An exchange program between Princeton I niveisit) 

and Smith College permits students from Smith's 
Picker Engineering Program to study at Princeton and 
engineering students from Princeton to study at Smith. 
Both programs share the goal of producing leaders for 
the 21st centurj and the belief that successful engineers 
can identify the needs of society and direct their talents 
toward meeting them. This program is available to 
student in the spring semester of their sophomore or 
junior year 

Before applying for admission to the program, a 
student will discuss the course and research opportuni- 
ties with her academic adviser. Applications must be 
submitted to the director of engineering by October 20, 
and the candidates will be notified by November 15. 
If accepted, the Smith student must submit a leave of 
absence form to the junior class dean by December 1. 



Honors 

Director: Linda E.Jones 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

432d Thesis 

1 1 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



200 



English Language and Literature 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Carol Christ, Ph.D. 

Dean Scott Flower, Ph.D. 

William Allan Oram, Ph.D. 

"'Jefferson Hunter, Ph.D. 

Douglas Lane Patey, Ph.D. 

Charles Eric Reeves, Ph.D. 

* 2 Sharon Cadman Seelig, Ph.D. 

Michael Gorra, Ph.D. 

Richard Millington, Ph.D. 

"' Nora E Crow, Ph.D. 

* 2 Craig R. Davis, Ph.D. 

" 2 Patricia Lyn Skarda, Ph.D. 

Naomi Miller, Ph.D. 

Nancy Mason Bradbury, Ph.D., Chair 

Professor-in-Residence 

Paul Alpers, Ph.D. 

Elizabeth Drew Professor 

Sue Miller, MA 

Grace Hazard Gonkling Writer-in-Residence 

Nikky Finney, B.A. 

Joan Leiman Jacobson Visiting Nonfiction Writer 

Hilton Awls (English and American Studies) 



Joan Leiman Jacobson Visiting Nonfiction Writer 

Hilton Als (English and American Studies) 

Associate Professors 

n Gillian Murray Kendall, Ph.D. 

Cornelia Pearsall, Ph.D. 

Luc Gilleman, Ph.D. 

*' Michael Thurston, Ph.D. 

Ambreen Hai, Ph.D. 

n Floyd Cheung, Ph.D. 

Senior Lecturers 

Robert Ellis Hosmer, Jr., Ph.D. 
" l * 2 Ann E.Boutelle, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Julio Alves, Ph.D. 
Debra L. Carney, M.F.A. 
Holly Davis, M.A. 
Mary Koncel, M.F.A. 
Brian Turner, M.F.A. 
Ellen Dore Watson, M.F.A. 
Samuel Scheer, M.Phil. 
Sara Eddy, Ph.D. 

Mendenhall Fellow 

Maria C. Ramos 



The purpose of the English major is to develop a 
critical and historical understanding of the English 
language and of the literary traditions it has shaped 
in Britain, in the Americas and throughout the world. 
During their study of literature at Smith, English ma- 
jors are also encouraged to take allied courses in clas- 
sics, other literatures, history, philosophy, religion, art 
and theatre. Fuller descriptions of each term's courses, 
faculty profiles and other important information for 
majors and those interested in literary study can be 
found on the department's Web page, accessible via the 
Smith College home page. 

Most students will begin their study of literature 
at Smith with English 120 before proceeding to one of 



the courses— 199, 200, 201, and 231— that serve as a 
gateway for the major. First-year students who have an 
English Literature and Composition AP score of 4 or 5, 
or a score of 710 on the Critical Reading portion of the 
SAT, may enter one of the gateway courses in the fall se- 
mester. In 2008-09, English 120, 199, 200 (seel) and 
201 will be taught as writing intensive courses. Those 
first-year students who have taken a gateway course in 
the fall may, after consultation with the instructor, elect 
a 200-level class beyond the gateway in the spring. 

To assist students in selecting appropriate courses, 
the department's offerings are arranged in Levels I-V, 
as indicated and explained in the following pages. 



English Language and literature 



201 



Level I 



Courses numbered 100-199: Introductory Courses, 
open to all students. In English 1 18 and 120, incoming 
students have priority in the fall semester, and other 
students are welcome as space permits. 

First-Level Courses in Writing 

ENG 1 18 may be repeated, but only with a different 
instructor and with the permission of the director. Stu- 
dents who received scores of 4 and 5 on the Advanced 
Placement tests in English Language and Literature 
and English Language and Composition may receive 4 
credits each, providing they do not take English 1 18. 

118 Colloquia in Writing 

In sections limited to IS students each, this course 
primarily provides systematic instruction and practice 
in reading and writing academic prose, with emphasis 
on argumentation. The course also provides instruc- 
tion and practice in conducting research and in public 
speaking. Bilingual students and non-native speakers 
are especially encouraged to register for sections taught 
by Melissa Bagg. Priority' will be given to incoming 
students in the fall-semester sections. 4 credits 
Director: Julio Aires 
Sections as listed below: 

Writing, Identity, and Culture 
Practice in writing essays of observation, analysis and 
argument. Readings cover a range of subjects from 
questions of personal identity to public issues of culture 
and politics. A strong focus on working with sources 
and developing research skills. WI 
Brian Turner 
Offered Fall 2008 

Mixing Memory and Desire: Language and the Con- 
struction of Experience 
How does language construct what it attempts to 
describe? What is the connection between words and 
worlds? Readings will focus on the delights and dangers 
of language's transfigurative power, with a particular 
emphasis on the way words define social, cultural and 
individual identities. Assignments include three short 
analytical essays, an oral report, and a research paper 
on a memoirist of your choice. WI 
Melissa Bagg 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 



The Politics of Language 

Reading, thinking and writing about the forces that 
govern and shape language. A series of analytical es- 
says will focus on issues such as political correctness, 
obscenity, gender bias in language and censorship. WI 
Holly Davis 
Offered Fall 2008 

Aspects of Blackness 

Reading and writing about aspects of black history, 

identity and politics. WI 

Julio Alves 

Offered Fall 2008 

Riding the Wave: The Women s Movement, 1968-79 
Reading and writing about the women's movement 
of the late 1960s and 1970s, often called Second Wave 
Feminism. Readings will include primary documents, 
secondary sources and statistical data. Writing will 
include scholarly essays, biography and mixed genres. 
Regular library research and oral presentations. (E) WI 
4 credits 
Julio Alves 
Offered Spring 2009 

Clearing Customs: Locations and Dislocations in 
Travel Literature 

The readings for this course include a variety of texts 
by writers exploring and reacting to unfamiliar lands, 
cultures and customs. Students will respond to the 
challenges posed by these texts and analyze the ideas 
they contain. Four short essays, a research paper and 
an oral report are required. WI 
Debra Carney 
Offered Fall 2008 

The Last Laugh: Writing About Humor 
Reading and writing about humor and its significance 
in our lives. Several informal and formal analytical 
and argumentative essays will explore topics such as 
the definition of humor; the forms of humor; and the 
cultural, political, and social functions of humor. WI 
Mary A. Koncel 
Offered Fall 2008 

First-Year Seminars 

For course descriptions, see First-Year Seminar section 



202 



English Language and Literature 



FYS 118 Groves of Academe 

Patricia Skarda 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 128 Ghosts 

Cornelia Pearsall 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 157 Literature and Science: Models of Time and 
Space 

Luc Gilleman 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 158 Reading the Earth 

Sharon Seelig 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 160 The End of the World as We Know It: The Post- 
Apocalyptic Novel 

Gillian Kendall 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 162 Ambition and Adultery: Individualism in the 
19th-century Novel 

Michael Gorra 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 167 Icelandic Saga 

Craig Davis 
Offered Fall 2008 

First-Level Courses in Literature 

112 Reading Contemporary Poetry 

This course offers the opportunity to read contemporary' 
poetry and meet the poets who write it. Class sessions 
alternate with readings by visiting poets. Graded Sat- 
isfactory/Unsatisfactory only. Course may be repeated. 
{L} 2 credits 
Marshajanson 
Offered Fall 2008 

120 Colloquia in Literature 

Each colloquium is conducted by means of directed 
discussion, with emphasis on close reading and the 
writing of short analytical essays. Priority will be given 
to incoming students in the fall-semester sections of 
the colloquia. Other students should consult the course 
director about possible openings. Enrollment in each 
section limited to 18. 4 credits 



Fiction 

A study of the novel, novella and short story, stressing 

the formal elements of fiction, with intensive analysis 

of works by such writers as Austen, Dickens, James, 

Faulkner, Joyce, Lawrence and Woolf. WI {L} 

To be announced 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

The Gothic in Literature 

Terror, guilt, and the supernatural in novels, tales and 

poems from the 18th to the 20th centuries. Authors 

include Walpole, Lewis, Austen, Coleridge, Mary Shelley, 

Byron, Charlotte Bronte and James. WI {L} 

Nora F. Crow 

Offered Fall 2008 

Reading and Writing Short Poems 
A course in the nuts and bolts of poetry. We will look at 
poems and study their techniques (e.g., sound patterns, 
image developmenet, form). We will write and revise 
our own poems, using these techniques. Poets include 
Basho, Christopher Smart, Walt Whitman, Gwendolyn 
Brooks, Eavan Boland, Li-Young Lee. WI {L} 
Ann Boutelle 
Offered Fall 2008 

Modern Irish Writing 

An introduction to the major Irish poets and storytellers 
of the 20th century, with some attention to drama and 
autobiography. Readings in Joyce, Yeats, Beckett, Frank 
O'Connor, Edna O'Brien, Heaney, Kavanaugh and oth- 
ers. WI{L} 
Dean Flower 
Offered Fall 2008 

Writing American Lives 

A study of autobiographical writings that explore the 
possibilities and limitations involved in being and be- 
coming American. Authors include Benjamin Franklin, 
Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Zitkala-Sa, James 
Weldon Johnson, Mitsuye Yamada, Richard Rodriguez, 
Sara Vowell, Monique Thuy-Dung Truong, Geeta 
Kothari and others. WI {L} 
Sara Eddy 
Offered Fall 2008 

Literature of the Fantastic 
A study of fantasy — the nonreal, surreal, strange and/ 
or eccentric in literature, focusing particularly on texts 
that cross boundaries between life and death, male 



English Language and Literature 






and female, human and inhuman. Authors to include 
Shakespeare, Swift, Woolf, Malamud, Hong Kingston. 
Morrison and others. \\ I {L} 
Gillian Kendall 
Offered Spring 2009 

Mysteries and Investigations 

A study of fiction, plays and poetry about the investiga- 
tion of mysteries, the ciphering and deciphering of 
plots, the guilt of investigators and dubious solutions. 
Fiction by Poe, Dickens. Doyle, Faulkner and others. 
Plays bj Sophocles. Shakespeare and Stoppard and a 
film ortwo. Wl {L} 
Nancy Bradbury 
Offered Spring 20(H) 

Contemporary Coming-of-Age Stories 
Analysis of recent forms taken by the coming-of-age 
story, emphasizing novels, short stories, and memoirs 
written in the past thirty years, chiefly in America. 
Emphasis on the diversity and individuality of each 
coming-of-age experience and on how the forms and 
techniques of these stories shape their meanings. 
Discussion of such questions as what "growing up" 
means in different families, individuals, genders, social 
classes, ethnicities and cultures; whether coming of age 
is a rite of passage that everyone experiences; and how 
writing about the experience changes it. Wl {L} 
Dean Flower 
Offered Spring 2009 

170 The English Language 

An introductory exploration of the English language, 
its history, current areas of change and future. Related 
topics such as how dictionaries are made and the struc- 
ture of the modem publishing industry. Students will 
learn about editing, proofreading and page layout; the 
course will also entail a comprehensive review of gram- 
mar and punctuation. {L} Wl 
Douglas Patey 
Offered Spring 2000 



Level II 

Courses numbered 199-249. Open to all sophomores, 
juniors and seniors, and to qualified first-year students. 



Gateway Courses 

Ttiese four classes serve as entrj points to the major, 
introductions to the critical, historical and method- 
ological issues and questions that underlie the study 
of literatures in English. English majors must select at 
least two courses from this menu. Fall gateway courses 
are open to first-year students with the English Litera- 
ture and Composition AP score of 4 or 5, or a score oi 
710 on the Critical Reading portion of the SAT. 

199 Methods of Literary Study 

This course teaches the skills that enable us to read 
literature with understanding and pleasure. By study- 
ing examples from a variety of periods and places. 
students will learn how poetry, prose fiction and drama, 
work, how to interpret them, and how to make use of 
interpretations by others. English 1 99 seeks to produce 
perceptive readers who are well-equipped to take on 
complex texts. This gateway course for prospective 
English majors is not recommended for students 
simply seeking a writing-intensive course. Readings in 
different sections will van; but all will involve active 
discussion and frequent writing. Wl {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hai. William Oram. Robert Hosmer. Fall 
2008 

Michael Gorra. Floyd Cheung Richard Millington, 
Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters each year 

200 The English Literary Tradition I 

A study of the English literary tradition from the Middle 
Ages through the eighteenth century Recommended 
for sophomores. {L} 4 credits 
Douglas Patew Sharon Seelig 
Offered Fall 2008 

201 The English Literary Tradition II 

A study of the English literary tradition from the nine- 
teenth centUTJ to modern times. \\ I {L} \ credits 

Cornelia Pcarsall. Lac Gilleman 
Offered Spring 2000 

231 American Literature before 1865 

Astudv of American writers as the) seek to define a 
role for literature in their changing societj Emphasis 
on the extraordinary burst of creativity thai took place 
between the 1820s and the Civil War. Works by Cooper, 
Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Melville. Douglass. 



204 



English Language and Literature 



Stowe, Whitman, Dickinson and others. {L} 4 credits 
Richard Millington 
Offered Fall 2008 

Level Two Electives 

These courses in particular are designed to interest 
non-majors as well as minors. 

202/CLT 202 Western Classics in Translation, from 
Homer to Dante 

Texts include the Iliad; tragedies by Aeschylus, Sopho- 
cles and Euripides; Plato's Symposium; Virgil's Aeneid; 
Dante's Divine Comedy. WI {L} 4 credits 
Lecture and discussion 
Ann R. Jones (Comparative Literature) 
Luc Gilleman (English Language and Literature) 
Robert Hosmer (English Language and Literature) 
Nancy Shumate (Classics) 
Offered Fall 2008 

203/CLT 203 Western Classics in Translation, from 
Chretien de Troyes to Tolstoy 

Chretien de Troyes's Yvain; Shakespeare's Antony and 
Cleopatra; Cervantes' Don Quixote; Lafayette's The 
Princesse of Cleves; Goethe's Faust; Tolstoy's War and 
Peace. Prerequisite: ENG 202/CLT 202. Wl {L} 4 credits 
Lecture and Discussion 
Maria Banerjee (Russian) 
William Oram (English Language and Literature) 
Offered Spring 2009 

205 Telling and Retelling 

A study of recent novels and their famous antecedents. 
What are the pleasures of reading? What do we need 
to know to be good readers of contemporary fictions 
that revise or at least allude to work of the past? Texts 
include Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and Mary Reilly; 
Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea; King Lear and^ 
Tloousand Acres; Tess of the d'Urbervilles and The 
French Lieutenant's Woman; Pride and Prejudice 
and Presumption: An Entertainment; Possession. 
Recommended for non-majors. {L} 4 credits 
Patricia Skarda 
Offered Spring 2009 

207/HSC 207 The Technology of Reading and Writing 

An introductory exploration of the physical fonns that 
knowledge and communication have taken in the West, 



from ancient oral cultures to modern print-literate 
culture. Our main interest will be in discovering how 
what is said and thought in a culture reflects its avail- 
able kinds of literacy and media of communication. 
Topics to include poetry and memory 7 in oral cultures; 
the invention of writing; the invention of prose; lit- 
erature and science in a script culture; the coming of 
printing; changing concepts of publication, authorship 
and originality; movements toward standardization in 
language; political implications of different kinds and 
levels of literacy. {L} 4 credits 
Douglas Patey 
Offered Spring 2009 

212 Old Norse 

An introduction to the language and literature of medi- 
eval Iceland, including the mythological texts and the 
family sagas. {L} 4 credits 
Craig R. Davis 
Offered Fall 2008 

230/JUD 258 American Jewish Literature 

Jewish literary engagement with America, from Yiddish 
writing on the margins to the impact of native-born 
authors and critics on the post-war literary scene. 
Topics include narratives of immigration; the myth of 
America and its discontents; the Yiddish literary world 
on the Lower East Side and the New York Intellectuals; 
ethnic satire and humor; crises of the left involving 
Communism, Black-Jewish relations, and '60s radical- 
ism; the Holocaust in American culture; tensions be- 
tween Israel and America as "promised lands"; and the 
creative betrayal of folklore in contemporary fiction. 
Must Jewish writing in America remain on the margins, 
"too Jewish" for the mainstream yet "too white" for the 
new multicultural curriculum? {L} 4 credits 
Justin D. Cammy 
Offered Spring 2009 

233 American Literature from 1865 to 1914 

A survey of American writing after the Civil War, with 
an emphasis on writers who criticize or stand apart 
from their rapidly changing society. Fiction by Twain, 
James, Howells, Dreiser, Crane, Chopin, Chesnutt, Jewett 
and Sui Sin Far, along with a selection of the poetry of 
the era. {L} 4 credits 
Dean Flower 
Offered Spring 2009 



English Language and Literature 



205 



235 Modem American Writing 

American writing in the first half of the 20th century, 
with emphasis on modernism Fiction by Gather, Hem- 
ingway, Fitzgerald, Hurston, Faulkner; poetry by Frost. 
Stevens, Eliot, Pound and Bishop. {L} 4 credits 
Michael Thurston 
Offered Spring 2009 

CLT 237 Travellers' Tales 

How do we describe the places we visit? In what way do 
guidebooks and the reports of earlier travellers struc- 
ture the journeys we take ourselves? Can we ever come 
to know the "real Italy," the "real India," or do those 
descriptions finally provide only metaphors for the self? 
A study of classic travel narratives by such writers as 
Calvino, 1\vain, Goethe, Stendhal, Henry James, Paul 
Theroux, Rebecca West, Isak Dinessen and others. {L} 
4 credits 
Michael Gorra 
Offered Fall 2008 

240 Modern British and American Drama 

A study of recent developments in British and American 
drama, emphasizing interconnectedness and cross- 
fertilization: theatre of passion; absurdism; language- 
oriented realism; talk drama; and postmodern, 
performance-oriented plays. Works by Williams, Miller, 
Beckett, Osborne, Pinter, Albee, Shepard, Mamet, Rabe, 
Shaffer, Churchill, Hwang. Occasional screenings of 
plays. {L} 4 credits 
Luc Gilleman 
Offered Spring 2009 

244 The Novel Now 

Representative works of recent fiction, chosen from 
across the English-speaking world with an eye to 
suggesting the range, variety and possibilities of the 
contemporary novel. Readings will vary from year 
to year, but likely suspects include Salman Rushdie, 
Nadine Gordimer, Philip Roth, J. M. Coetzee, Toni Mor- 
rison, Pat Barker, Michael Ondaatje, Alice Munro, Don 
DeLillo, Peter Carey and Cormac McCarthy, along with 
a selection of younger figures. {L} 4 credits 
Michael Gorra 
Offered Spring 2009 



Level III 

Courses numbered 250-299- Open to sophomores, 
juniors and seniors; first-year students admitted only 
with the permission of the instructor. Recommended 
background: at least one English course above the 100 
level, or as specified in the course description. 

250 Chaucer 

His art and his social and literary background. Empha- 
sis on the Canterbury Tales. Students should have had 
at least two semester courses in literature. {L} 4 credits 
Nancy Mason Bradbury 
Offered Fall 2008 

255 Seventeenth-Century Poetry 

An exploration of the remarkable variety of seven- 
teenth-century lyric poetry, which includes voices 
secular and sacred, witty and devout, bitter and sweet, 
male and female. Attention to poetic forms, conven- 
tions and imagery, to response and adaptation of those 
forms. Particular emphasis on Donne, Jonson, Herbert 
and Marvell, set in the context of their time and their 
contemporaries. {L} 4 credits 
Gillian Kendall 
Offered Spring 2009 

256 Shakespeare 

A Midsummer Night's Dream, As You Like It, I Henry 
N, Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Corio- 
lanus, The Tempest. Enrollment in each section lim- 
ited to 25. Not open to first-year students. {L} 4 credits 
William Oram, Naomi Miller 
Offered Fall 2008 

257 Shakespeare 

Romeo and Juliet. Richard II, Hamlet. Twelfth Night, 
Troilus and Cressida, Othello, Antony and Cleopatra. 
The Winter's Tale. Not open to first-year students. {L} 
4 credits 
William Oram 
Offered Spring 2009 

259 Pope, Swift and Their Circle 

Discussion of the major figures, Pope and Swift, to- 
gether with their contemporaries Defoe, Prior, Addison 
and Gay. {L} 4 credits 
Nora F. Crow 
Offered Fall 2008 



206 



English Language and Literature 



260 Milton 

A study of the major poems and selected prose of John 
Milton, radical and conservative, heretic and defender 
of the faith, apologist for patriarchy and advocate of 
human dignity, the last great Renaissance humanist, 
a poet of enormous creative power and influence. {L} 
4 credits 
Sharon Seelig 
Offered Spring 2009 

263 Romantic Poetry and Prose 

Concentration on selected poems of the major Ro- 
mantics (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, 
Keats), with prose writings by the poets themselves and 
by Austen and Mary Shelley. {L} 4 credits 
Patricia Skarda 
Offered Fall 2008 

265 The Victorian Novel 

The English novel from Dickens and Thackeray to Con- 
rad. Emphasis on the genre's formal development — 
narrative voice and perspective, the uses of plot, the rep- 
resentation of consciousness — but with some attention 
to social-historical concerns. {L} 4 credits 
Margaret Bruzelius (Comparative Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 

270 The King James Bible and Its Literary Heritage 

A study of language and narrative technique in selected 
parts of the King James Bible with attention to its influ- 
ence on subsequent writing in English. Selections from 
the Old and New Testaments and works by Milton, 
Wordsworth, Hawthorne, Hardy, Frost and MacLeish. 
Recommended background: REL 210 and 220. {L} 
4 credits 

Patricia Skarda 
Offered Spring 2009 

275/REL 203 Reading and Rereading the American 
Puritans 

The course combines close study of the 17th-century 
writings of Pilgrim Separatists and Puritan settlers 
in North America with study of texts in later periods 
(1820-1850, 1920-1950 and after) that use the Pil- 
grims and Puritans to dramatize and imagine resolu- 
tions to the crises of their own historical moments. 
Prerequisite: a course in American literature, American 
history or American studies. {L} 4 credits 
Michael Thurston 
Offered Spring 2009 



276 Contemporary British Women Writers 

Consideration of a number of contemporary women 
writers, mostly British, some well-established, some not, 
who represent a variety of concerns and techniques. 
Emphasis on the pleasures of the text and significant 
ideas — political, spiritual, human and esthetic. Efforts 
directed at appreciation of individuality and diversity 
as well as contributions to the development of fiction. 
Authors likely to include Anita Brookner, Angela Carter, 
Isabel Colegate, Eva Figes, Penelope Fitzgerald, Molly 
Keane, Penelope Lively, Edna O'Brien, Barbara Pym, 
Jean Rhys, Muriel Spark and Jeanette Winterson; some 
supplementary critical reading. {L} 4 credits 
Robert Hosmer 
Offered Spring 2009 

277 Postcolonial Women Writers 

A comparative study of primarily twentieth-century 
women writers in English from Africa, the Caribbean, 
South Asia and Australia. We will read novels, short 
stories, poetry, plays and autobiography in their histori- 
cal, cultural and political contexts as well as theoretical 
essays to address questions such as: How have women 
writers challenged both colonial and postcolonial 
assumptions about gender, identity or nationhood, 
diaspora? How do they call attention to or address 
issues often ignored by their male contemporaries 
or forebears, such as sexuality, desire, motherhood, 
childhood, sickness, poverty, relations among women? 
Writers may include Attia Hosain, Anita Desai, Kamala 
Das, Thrity Umrigar, Ama Ata Aidoo, Bessie Head, 
Nawal-el-Saadawi, Jamaica Kincaid, Michelle Cliff, 
Shani Mootoo, Zadie Smith, Sally Morgan. Prerequisite: 
a WI course. {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hai 
Offered Fall 2008 

279 American Women Poets 

A selection of poets from the last 50 years, including 
Sylvia Plath, Diane Gilliam Fisher, Elizabeth Bishop, 
Adrienne Rich, Audre Lorde, Sharon Olds, Cathy Song, 
Louise Gliick and Rita Dove. An exploration of each 
poet's chosen themes and distinctive voice, with atten- 
tion to the intersection of gender and ethnicity in the 
poet's materials and in the creative process. Not open 
to first-year students. Prerequisite: at least one college 
course in literature. {L} 4 credits 
Susan Van Dyne (Study of Women and Gender) 
Offered Fall 2008 



English Language and Literature 



207 



282/AAS 245 The Harlem Renaissance 

A stud\- of one of the first cohesive cultural movements 
in African-American history. This class will focus on 
developments in politics and civil rights (NAACP, Urban 
League, UNIA), creative arts (poetry, prose, painting, 
sculpture) and urhan sociology (modernity, the rise 
of cities). Writers and subjects will include: Zora Neale 
Hurston, David Levering Lewis, Gloria Hull, Langston 
Hughes and Nella Larsen among others. Enrollment 
limited to 40. {S} 4 credits 
Daphne Lamothe (Afro-American Studies) 
Offered Fall 2008 

284 Victorian Sexualities 

The Victorians have long been viewed as sexually 
repressed, but close attention reveals a culture whose 
inventiveness regarding sexual identity, practice and 
discourse knew few bounds. This course explores a 
range of literary, visual and scientific representations 
of Victorian sexuality. We read novels, nonfiction prose 
and poetry by authors such as Darwin, Dickens, H. 
Rider Haggard, Christina Rossetti and Oscar Wilde. 
Literary readings are informed by Victorian sexologists 
such as Freud, Krafft-Ebing and Havelock Ellis, as 
well as contemporary historical and theoretical writ- 
ings. We also make use of visual materials, including 
Pre-Raphaelite paintings, Aubrey Beardsley illustra- 
tions and photographs. Prerequisite: ENG 120, 199 or 
equivalent writing-intensive course. {L} 4 credits 
Cornelia Pearsall 
Offered Fall 2008 

285 Introduction to Contemporary Literary Theory 

What is literature? Why and how should it be studied? 
How does literature function in culture and society? 
Does the meaning of a text depend on the author's in- 
tention or on how readers read? What counts as a valid 
interpretation? How do changing understandings — of 
language, the unconscious, history, class, gender, 
race or sexuality — change how we read? This course 
introduces some of the major 20th-century philosophi- 
cal questions that have shaped literary studies today, 
drawing upon a variety of disciplines, and influential 
movements or approaches such as the New Criticism, 
structuralism, poststructuralism, Marxism, psycho- 
analysis, postcolonialism, gender and cultural stud- 
ies. Strongly recommended for students considering 
graduate studies. Prerequisite: ENG 199 or a 200-level 



literature course. {L} 4 credits 
Ambreen Hoi 
Offered Spring 2009 

299 Green Victoria 

Drawing on the resources of the Smith Botanic Garden 
and library collections, this course explores a variety 
of landscapes Victorians created or imagined, designed 
or desired. Topics include the Victorian language of 
flowers, transplantation of the seeds and fruits of the 
Empire, and fascination with the process of decomposi- 
tion. Readings include theoretical writings of Charles 
Darwin and John Ruskin, as well as literary and visual 
representations of botanical longing or dislocation by 
such authors and artists as Lewis Carroll, Charles Dick- 
ens, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Beatrix Potter, Christina 
Rossetti, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Virginia Woolf. 
Prerequisite: a Wl course; enrollment limited to 25. {L} 
4 credits 

Cornelia Pearsall 
Offered Spring 2009 

Advanced Courses in Writing 

Only one course in writing may be taken in any one 
semester except by permission of the chair. 

Courses in writing above the 100 level may be 
repeated for credit only with the permission of the 
instructor and the chair. For all writing courses above 
the 100 level, no student will be admitted to a section 
until she has applied at the English office in Pierce Hall 
105, submitted appropriate examples of her work, and 
received permission of the instructor. Deadlines will be 
posted. 

216 Intermediate Poetry Writing 

Students gain reading mastery by close attention to 
poems of diverse sensibilities and intentions and are 
given practice creating poetic effects through tone, 
diction, rhythm, image, lineation, anaphora, allitera- 
tion, assonance, syllables and irregular rhyme. They 
create a portfolio of original poems and develop the 
skills of critique and revision. Poems and craft essays 
are assigned for each class, as well as packets of poems 
by visiting writers. Students will be expected to attend 
Poetry Center readings and Q&A's. Recommended 
background: ENG 120 Reading and Writing Short Po- 
ems. (E) 4 credits 
Ellen Dore Watson 
Offered Spring 2009 



208 



English Language and Literature 



290 Crafting Creative Nonfiction 

A writers' workshop designed to explore the complexi- 
ties and delights of creative nonfiction. Constant read- 
ing, writing and critiquing. Admission by permission of 
the instructor. {L} 4 credits 
Hilton Als 
Offered Fall 2008 

292 Crafting the Memoir 

In this workshop, we will explore, through reading and 
through writing, the presentation of self in the memoir. 
A major focus will be on the interweaving of voice, 
structure, style and content. As we read the work of 
ourselves and of others, we will be searching for strate- 
gies, devices, rhythms, patterns and approaches that 
we might adapt in future writings. The reading list will 
consist of writings by 20th-century women. Admission 
by permission of the instructor. {L} 4 credits 
Ann Boutelle 
Offered Fall 2008 

295 Advanced Poetry Writing 

Admission by permission of the instructor. {L} 4 credits 

Nikky Finney 

Offered Faff 2008, Spring 2009 

296 Writing Short Stories 

Admission by permission of the instructor. {L} 4 credits 

Sue Miller 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

384/AMS 351 Writing About American Society 

An examination of contemporary 7 American issues 
through the works of literary journalists ranging from 
Elizabeth Hardwick to Joan Didion; Frances Fitzgerald 
to Adrian Nicole Le Blanc. Intensive practice in ex- 
pository writing to develop the student's own skills in 
analyzing complex social issues and expressing herself 
artfully in this form. May be repeated with a different 
instructor and with the permission of the Director of 
the Program. Enrollment limited to 15. Admission by 
permission of the instructor. Sample writing must be 
submitted to be considered. {L/S} 4 credits 
Hilton Als 
Offered Spring 2009 



Level IV 



30-level courses, but not seminars. These courses are 
intended primarily for juniors and seniors who have 
taken at least two literature courses about the 100-level. 
Other interested students need the permission of the 
instructor. 

399 Teaching Literature 

Discussion of poetry; short stories, short novels, essays 
and drama with particular emphasis on the ways in 
which one might teach them. Consideration of the uses 
of writing and the leading of discussion classes. For 
upper-level undergraduates and graduate students who 
have an interest in teaching. {L} 4 credits 
Samuel Scheer 
Offered Fall 2008 



Level V 



Seminars 

Seminars are open only to juniors and seniors, and 
admission is by permission of the instructor. 

Seminars in the English department stand as the cap- 
stone experience in the major. They bring students into 
the public aspects of intellectual life, and the papers 
they require are not only longer but also different in 
kind from those in 200-level classes. These papers re- 
quire a research component in which students engage 
the published arguments of others, or at least demon- 
strate an awareness of the ongoing critical conversa- 
tion their work is entering. But such work proves most 
useful when most available, and so we also require 
that students present their thinking in some way to the 
semi-public sphere of the seminar itself. 

All students who wish to take a seminar must apply 
at the English department office by the last day of the 
pre-registration period. The instructor will select the 
students admitted from these applicants. 

PRS 306 Beowulf and Archaeology 

The Old English poem Beowulf 'may be the most 
expressive document we possess for the cultural world 
of Europe from the 5th through 8th centuries AD, 
even though it survives in a single copy from c. 1000. 



English Language and Literature 



209 



Our interpretation of this poem has been enhanced 
by tliscoveries of the Sutton Hoo ship-burial in East 
Anglia, a huge 6th-century hall in Denmark, and other 
significant finds. This seminar will examine the way 
archaeological investigation, historical research and 
literary criticism all combine to create a more reveal- 
ing, though still controversial "assemblage of texts" 
from this formative phase of early European society. 
Enrollment limited to 12 juniors and seniors. (E) 
{L/H/A} 4 credits 
Craig R. Davis (English) 
Offered Spring 2010 

310 Early Modern Women: "The Life of Me': Early 
Modern Women's Lives" 

Beginning with the early diaries and autobiographies 
of some remarkable women writers, moving to more 
imaginative narrative and dramatic forms, and finally 
to an early novel, we will consider the developing 
modes of self-understanding and self-representation, 
from fact to fantasy, record-keeping to romance, in the 
17th and early 18th centuries. Admission by permis- 
sion. Enrollment limited to 12. 4 credits 
Sharon Seelig 
Offered Spring 2009 

333 Seminar: A Major British or American Writer 

Stoppard and Bennett 

Comparative study of the plays, films and television 
dramas of Tom Stoppard and Alan Bennett, in their 
roles as intellectual entertainers, experimenters in 
different media and transmitters of English tradition. 
The works to be read or viewed include rewritings of 
Shakespeare (Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead) 
and Oscar Wilde (Travesties); films and dramas about 
espionage (Enigma, A Question of Attribution, An 
Englishman Abroad); a series of television mono- 
logues (Talking Heads); reassessments of history, both 
private (The Invention of Love) and public (The Mad- 
ness of George III); plays and films about school life 
(Forty Years On and The History Boys); drama about 
actors (The Real Thing): drama about a slightly de- 
ranged street person (The Lady in the Van). Admission 
by permission. Enrollment limited to 12. {L/A} 4 credits 
Jefferson Hunter 
Offered Fall 2008 



Evelyn Waugb 

Reading and discussion of all Waugh's novels (and 
some of his travel-books and journalism), from Ins 
earl) satires of the 1920s and '30s such as Decline 
and Fall and I lie Bodies, through his turn to explicit 
religious polemic in Brideshead Revisited and Helena, 
to his recreation of the Second World War in the trilogy 
Sword of Honour. {LH} 4 credits. 
Admission by permission. Enrollment limited to 12. 
Douglas Pater 
Offered Fall 2008 

Virginia Woolf 

A close study of representative texts from the rich 
variety of Woolf s work: novel, essay, biography and 
short story. Preliminary; essential attention to the life, 
with particular concern for the Victorian/Edwardian 
world of Woolf s early years and the Bloomsbury Group. 
Works to be studied will include Mrs. Dalloway To the 
Lighthouse. Orlando, r The Waves, Between the Acts, 
A Room of One's Own and Three Guineas, as well as 
essays drawn from The Common Reader and stories. 
Supplementary readings from biographies of Woolf 
and her own letters, journals and diaries. Admission by 
permission. Enrollment limited to 12. {L} 4 credits 
Robert Hosmer 
Offered Spring 2009 

350 Literature, Folklore and Fakelore 

This seminar asks how and why writers have collected, 
published, adapted and fabricated oral traditions. 
Readings include theoretical backgrounds; field studies 
of living traditions; historical scholarship on the collec- 
tion of folktales and ballads (including scandals and 
forgeries); and powerful literary recreations of legends, 
folktales and folksongs. Admission by permission. En- 
rollment limited to 12. {L} 4 credits 
Nancy Bradbury 
Offered Spring 2009 

353 Seminar: Advanced Studies in Shakespeare 
Topic: Unnatural Shakespeare: The Eerie and the 

Strange. Ghosts, darkness, a forest that moves, gods 
who usurp the stage, more ghosts, uncanny doubles, 
statues that come alive, a magic handkerchief. Eerie 
and strange elements penneate Shakespeare's plays, 
making them places of deep enchantment. In a num- 
ber of Shakespeare's plays, we will explore his use of the 



210 



English Language and Literature 



uncanny, and we will attempt to uncover its function in 
plays that would seem to have little place for the en- 
thrallments of magic. We may look at 4 Midsummer 
Night's Dream, Antony and Cleopatra, Macbeth, 
Cymbeline, The Winter's Tale, Richard III and/or The 
Tempest, Hamlet, Othello. {L} 4 credits 
Admission by permission. Enrollment limited to 12. 
Gillian Kendall 
Offered Fall 2008 

382 Readings in American Literature 

Topic: Hemingway and His Heirs. The powerful influ- 
ence of Ernest Hemingway's fiction on contemporary 
writers prompts the inquiry of this seminar. What is 
there about Hemingway's innovative style or obses- 
sive themes or mythologized persona that generates 
such strong, sometimes hostile but always productive 
reactions? In the first eight weeks, we will study Hem- 
ingway's early achievement: the emergence of his style; 
problems of masculinity and gender; obsessions with 
war, love and death; and his treatment of marriage and 
identity. Biographical interpretation will come into play 
as the discussion moves into Hemingway's later career, 
when the "Papa Hemingway" persona emerged. In the 
latter stages of the seminar we will read a series of con- 
temporary works — by such writers as Raymond Carver, 
Annie Proulx, Cormac McCarthy and Ann Beattie — 
who have been deeply influenced by Hemingway. The 
final essay will be an exploration of some facet of the 
seminar's theme, involving one recent writer's work. 
Admission by permission. Enrollment limited to 12. {L} 
4 credits. 
Dean Flower 
Offered Fall 2008 

Cross-listed and 
Interdepartmental Courses 

CLT 205 Twentieth-Century Literature of Africa 
CLT 237 Traveller's Tales 
CLT 300 Contemporary Literary Theory 
THE 261 Writing for the Theatre 



400 Special Studies 

1 to 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Members of the department 

Major Requirements 

Twelve semester courses are required for the major. In 
December 2005, the Department voted in a new set of 
requirements; students in the class of 2009 may choose 
either the old or the new requirements. Students in the 
class of 2010 and after must complete the new ones. 

Old Requirements: 

1. 199; 

2. Two courses concentrating on literature written 
before 1832; 

3. Semester courses on two of three early canonical 
authors: Chaucer (250), Shakespeare (256 or 257) 
and Milton (260); 

4. A seminar; 

5. Six additional courses. 

New Requirements: 

1. Two of the following: 199, 200, 201 or 231; 

2. Two courses concentrating on literature written 
before 1832; 

3. Semester courses on two of three early canonical 
authors: Chaucer (250), Shakespeare (256 or 257) 
and Milton (260); 

4. A seminar; 

5. Five additional courses 

In 2008-09 the following courses fulfill requirement 
#2: 200, 202, 203, 212, 231, 238, 250, 255, 256, 257, 
259, 260, 263, 270, 350 and 353. 

No course may be used to fulfill more than one require- 
ment. 

Up to two courses in film, a foreign or comparative 
literature, or dramatic literature offered through the 



English Language and Literature 



211 



theater department may count toward the major. Up to 
three advanced writing courses may count toward the 
major. Only one colloquium (120) may count toward 
the major. English 1 18 does not count. No course 
counting toward the major may be taken for an S/U 
grade. 

We strongly recommend that all students take at 
least one historical survey sequence: English 200, 201; 
English 202, 203; or English 231, 233- We recommend 
that students interested in graduate school in English 
literature or in high school English teaching take both 
the British (200, 201) and the American (231, 233) 
surveys. Those considering graduate school should be 
aware that most doctoral programs in English require a 
reading knowledge of two foreign languages, and that 
preparation in literary theory will be extremely useful. 



In exceptional circumstances the department will 
permit a student to submit a work of fiction, poetry or 
creative nonfiction for honors. 



Graduate 



580 Graduate Special Studies 

Independent study for graduate students. Admission by 
permission of the chair. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

580d Graduate Special Studies 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 



The Minor 



The minor in English consists of six courses: English 
199; a two-semester survey (ENG 200, 201 ENG 202, 
203 or ENG 231, 233); plus three additional English 
courses chosen in consultation with the minor adviser, 
two of which must be above the 100 level. 



Honors 

Director: Ambreen Hai (2008-09) 



430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Applicants to honors (which is done in addition to the 
requirements of the major) must have an average of 
B+ or above in the courses they count toward the ma- 
jor, and an average of B or above in all other courses. 
During the senior year they will present a thesis, of 
which the first complete formal draft will be due on the 
first day of the second semester. After the readers of the 
thesis have provided students with their evaluations of 
this draft, the student will have time to revise her work 
in response to their suggestions. The final completed 
version of the thesis will be due after spring vacation, to 
be followed during April by the student s oral presenta- 
tion and discussion of her work. Students in honors will 
normally be given priority in seminars. 



212 



Environmental Science and Policy 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Director 

L. David Smith, Associate Professor of Biological 
Sciences 

Program Coordinator 

Joanne Benkley 

Spatial Analysis Lab Coordinator 

Jon Caris 

Advisers 

* 2 Elliot Fratkin, Professor of Anthropology 
* 2 Virginia Hayssen, Professor of Biological Sciences 
" 2 Paulette Peckol, Professor of Biological Sciences 
L. David Smith, Associate Professor of Biological 
Sciences 



* 2 Maureen Fagan, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

n Shizuka Hsieh, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Andrew J. Guswa, Associate Professor of Engineering 

**' Paul Voss, Assistant Professor of Engineering 

Robert M. Newton, Professor of Geology 

Amy Larson Rhodes, Associate Professor of Geology 

Donald C. Baumer, Professor of Government 

Gregory White, Professor of Government 

n David Newbury, Professor of History and of African 

Studies 
Jeffry Ramsey, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
Nathanael Fortune, Associate Professor of Physics 
**' Leslie King, Associate Professor of Sociology 
Michelle Joffroy, Associate Professor of Spanish and 

Portuguese 



The environmental science and policy (ES&P) minor 
is designed for students with a serious interest in envi- 
ronmental issues and sustainability and a commitment 
to scientifically-based problem solving and policy 
analysis. The minor consists of six courses chosen with 
the guidance and approval of an ES&P minor adviser. 
Interested students are urged to meet with the direc- 
tor, coordinator and/or an ES&P adviser early in their 
academic planning. 

Requirements: Six courses including one course from 
each of the following groups: chemistry, ecology, 
geology and environmental policy, plus an elective in 
consultation with the minor adviser. The senior semi- 
nar, EVS 300, or the special studies, EVS 400 (4-credit 
option), is also required. A course in statistics (e.g. MTH 
245 or the equivalent) and geographic information sys- 
tems (e.g., EVS/GEO 150) are recommended. Appropri- 
ate Smith courses not listed below, Five College courses, 
or courses taken at other institutions and through sum- 
mer and/or semester-away programs may be counted 
toward the minor with preapproval of the adviser. 
Students must satisfy the prerequisites for all courses 



included in their minor program. No more than three 
of the six courses may be taken at other institutions. No 
more than one course may be taken S/U; EVS 300 may 
not be taken S/U. 

EVS 150/GE0 150 Modeling Our World: An Introduction 
to Geographic Information Systems 

A geographic information system (GIS) manages loca- 
tion-based (spatial) information and provides the tools 
to display and analyze it. GIS provides the capabilities 
to link databases and maps and to overlay, query, and 
visualize those databases in order to analyze and solve 
problems in many diverse fields. This course provides 
an introduction to the fundamental elements of GIS 
and connects course activities to GIS applications in 
landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, 
archeology, flood management, sociology, coastal stud- 
ies, environmental health, oceanography, economics, 
disaster management, cultural anthropology and art 
history. Enrollment limited to 20. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Burger 
Offered Spring 2009 



Environmental Science and Polio 



213 



EVS 300 Seminar in Environmental Science and Policy 

Current patterns of human resource consumption 
and waste generation are not ecologically sustainable. 
Effective solutions require a working knowledge of 
the scientific, social, political, and economic factors 
surrounding environmental problems. This seminar 
examines the impact of human activities on natural 
systems; the historical development of environmental 
problems; the interplay of environmental science, 
education and policy; and efforts to build a sustainable 
society. Discussions will center on conflicting views of 
historical changes, ecological design and sustainability, 
biodiversity; environmental policy, media coverage 
of environmental issues, ecological economics and 
environmental justice. An extended project will involve 
active investigation, analysis, and presentation of an 
environmental issue of local or regional importance 
with the explicit goal of identifying sustainable alter- 
natives. May not be taken S/U and count towards the 
minor. Prerequisite: all courses completed or concur- 
rent for the environmental science and policy minor or 
by permission of the instructor. {S/N} 4 credits 
L David Smith 
Offered Spring 2009 

EVS 400 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the instructor, the program 
director and ES&P's curricular subcommittee. Special 
studies are open only to qualified juniors and seniors, 
and in appropriate cases, to sophomores. 1-4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

FYS 147 Science and Politics of Food, Water and Energy 

A bottle of water sits on the shelf at the supermarket. 
Looking at this bottle, a geologist might wonder about 
j the underground aquifer where the water originated. A 
' chemist might muse on its chemical composition or the 
, process through which petroleum products were turned 
into the plastic used to make the bottle. And a sociologist 
might ask who benefits from the sale of a 'product' that 
was formerly a public good. This interdisciplinary course 
will examine environmental issues from the diverse 
disciplinary perspectives. Through scholarly articles, field 
trips, guest lectures, films and "real-world" exercises, 
we will explore how disciplinary lenses frame the way 
economists, geologists, historians, biologists, chemists, 
engineers and others think about food, water and energy. 
Enrollment limited to 18 students. (E) Wl 4 credits 
Leslie Ymg and Paul Wetzel 
Offered Fall 2008 



S0C 332 Seminar in Environmental Sociology 

This class will explore the relationship between people 
and their natural environments. Using sociological 
theories, we will examine how environmental issues are 
constructed and how they are contested. In examining 
a series of particular environmental problems, we will 
consider how social, political and economic structures 
are related to environmental degradation. 
{S} 4 credits 
Leslie King 
Offered Spring 2009 

Chemistry 

CHM 108 Environmental Chemistry 
GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistn 
EGR 260 Mass and Energy Balances 
EGR 3 1 2 Thermochemical Processes in the 
Atmosphere 

Ecology 

BIO 1 10 Introductory Colloquia: Life Sciences for 
the 21st Century: Conservation Biology 

BIO 154 Biodiversity, Ecology and Conservation 

BIO 266 Principles of Ecology 

BIO 268 Marine Ecology and lab 

BIO 364 Plant Ecology and lab 

BIO 390 Topics in Environmental Biology: Coral 
Reefs: Past, Present and Future 

Geology 

GEO 104 Global Climate Change: Exploring the Past, 
the Present and Options for the Future 

GEO 105 Natural Disasters: Confronting and Coping 

GEO 108 Oceanography: An Introduction to the 
Marine Environment 

GEO 109 The Environment 

GEO 1 1 1 Introduction to Earth Processes and History 

GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry* 

GEO 309 Groundwater Geology 

EGR 315 Ecohydrology 

Environmental Policy 

ANT 230 Africa: Population, Health and Enviro- 

mental Issues 
ANT 236 Economy. Ecology and Society 
ANT 24 1 Anthropology of Development 
ECO 284 Environmental Economics 
GOV 254 Politics of the Global Environment 
GOV 306 Politics and the Environmenl 



214 



Environmental Science and Policy 



PPL 222 Colloquium: U.S. Environmental History 

and Policy 
SOC 332 Seminar in Environmental Sociology 

Electives 

Elective courses can be chosen from courses listed for 
the environmental science and policy minor, and out- 
side the minor with consultation and approval of the 
minor adviser. Examples are: 



BIO 103 



Economic Botany: Plants and Human 

Affairs 

Introductory Colloquia: Bacteria: The Good, 

The Bad and the Absolutely Necessary 

Introductory Colloquia: Island Biology 

Invertebrate Diversity and lab 

Plant Systematics and lab 

Vertebrate Biology 

Biogeography 

Engineering and Global Development 

Hydrosystems Engineering 

Seminar: Advanced Topics in Engineering: 

Science, Technology and Ethics 
EVS 150/GEO 150 Modeling our World: An Introduc- 
tion to Geographic Information Systems 

The Science and Politics of Food, Water 

and Energy 

Politics of Public Policy 

Ecology and History in Africa 

Environmental Ethics 

Colloquium in Applied Ethics: Sustain- 

ability 

Solar Energy and Sustainability 

Public Policy Analysis 

World Population 

Topics in Latin American and Iberian 

Studies: Women, Environmental 

Justice and Social Action 
SWG 230 Feminisms and the Fate of the Environment 



BIO 110 

BIO 110 
BIO 260 
BIO 264 
BIO 272 
BIO 366 
EGR330 
EGR346 
EGR390 



FYS 147 

GOV 207 
HST299 
PHI 238 
PHI 304 

PHY 100 
PPL 220 
SOC 232 

SPN372 



Off-Campus Programs 

Students may elect to take two to three of their courses 
for the minor outside Smith College by participation 
in an environmentally oriented, off-campus program. 
Relevant Smith-approved programs include, but are 
not limited to, Duke University's Organization for 
Tropical Studies, The School for Field Studies, The 
School for International Training, SEA Semester and 
the Maritime Studies Program of Williams College 
and Mystic Seaport. Courses from other programs may 
also be eligible for credit with approval from the minor 
adviser. 



*GEO 301 Aqueous Geochemistry fulfills the require- 
ments in both chemistry and geology (one course cov- 
ers two requirements) 



215 



Ethics 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers 

John M. Connolly, Professor of Philosophy', Director 
' 2 Elizabeth V. Spelman, Professor of Philosophy 
Donald Joralemon, Professor of Anthropology 



Albert Mosley, Professor of Philosophy 
"' Susan Levin, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
n Donna Riley, Associate Professor of Engineering 
Ernest Alleva, lecturer of Philosophy 



This minor offers students the opportunity' to draw 
together courses with a major focus on ethics, and so 
to concentrate a part of their liberal arts education on 
those questions of right and wrong residing in nearly 
even field of inquiry. Background in the history and 
methods of ethical reasoning will be completed by the 
study of normative and applied ethics in selected areas 
of interest. 

Requirements: PHI 222, and any four other courses 
offered in various departments and programs at Smith 
and the Five Colleges. The list tends to vary from year to 
year, so be sure to consult one of the advisers. 



In recent years, courses at Smith, for example, have 
included 



ANT 255 


Dying and Death 


EGR 390 


Topics in Engineering: Science. 




Technology and Ethics 


PHI 221 


Ethics and Society 


PHI 235 


Morality, Politics and the Law 


PHI 238 


Environmental Ethics 


PHI 241 


Business Ethics: Moral Issues in the 




Boardroom and the Classroom 


PHI 242 


Topics in Medical Ethics 


PHI 304 


Colloquium in Applied Ethics 


PHI/PSY 275 Topics in Moral Psychology 


SOC 203 


Qualitative Methods 



However, be sure to check the availability of courses 
each semester or consult with the director of the pro- 
gram. 



216 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Donald Steven Siegel, Ed.D. 
James H.Johnson, Ph.D., Chair, Spring 
** 1 Barbara Brehm-Curtis, Ed.D, Chair, Fall 
t2 Christine M.Shelton, M.S. 

Lecturers 

Jane M. Stangl, Ph.D. 
Lynn Oberbillig, M.BA 
Tim Bacon, MA 
Jacqueline Blei, M.S. 

Performance Instructors 

Kim Bierwert, B.S. 
Christine Davis, M.S. 
Bonnie May, M.S. 
Suzanne Payne, M.Ed. 
Judith Strong, B.S. 
Carla Coffey, MA 
Karen Klinger, M.S. 
Phil Nielsen, M.A. 
Scott Johnson, B.S. 
Wendy Walker 
Ellen O'Neil, M.S.T. 
David Stillman 
Richard Cesario 
Rosalie Peri, RN.CPT 



Craig Collins 

Nancy Rothenberg, 3rd degree black belt 

Lisa Thompson, B.A. 

Lynne Paterson 

Jennifer Good-Schiff 

Jean Ida Hoffman, M.S. 

Judy B. Messer 

Jo Schneiderman, M.Ed. 

Rachel Hackett, B.A. 

Cindy Schmelpfenig 

Dorothy Steele 

Katrina O'Brien 

Jaime Ginsberg 

Lynn Hersey 

Julie Perrelli 

Teaching Fellows 

Kathleen Boucher 
Lacee Carmon 
Sarah Cox 
Sheila Gisbrecht 
EricaHollot,BA 
Jeremy Ivey, B.S. 
David Senary 
Hannah Shalett, B.A. 
Jennifer Williams, B.A. 
Laura Williamson, BA 



A. Theory Courses 

100 Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Exercise and 
Sport 

An overview of the disciplines that address physical ac- 
tivity and sport. The course takes into account the gen- 
eral effects of physical activity and how one studies and 
analyzes these experiences. Course content includes an 
examination of behavioral, sociocultural, biophysical 
experiences and professional possibilities. 4 credits 
Jane Stangl and Tim Bacon 
Offered Fall 2008 



107 Emergency Care 

The ultimate goal is to teach emergency medical care 
that will enable the student to a) recognize symptoms 
of illness and/or injuries; b) implement proper proce- 
dures; c) administer appropriate care; d) achieve and 
maintain proficiency in all skills; e) be responsible and 
behave in a professional manner; f) become certified in 
Community First Aid/AED and CPR for the Professional 
Rescuer. Enrollment limited to 14. 2 credits 
Craig Collins 
Offered both semesters 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



217 



110 Introduction to Coaching 

This course will introduce students to the principles of 
coaching that are applicable to all sports. Content will 
include the following areas of sport science: Pedagogy, 
Leadership, Psychology, Biomechanics. Physiology, 
Growth and Development and areas of Health and 
Wellness related to the well-being of athletes. This 
course will be of particular interest to education stu- 
dents or those intending to pursue a career in teach- 
ing as the course will prepare students to obtain the 
American Sport Education Program (ASEP) Coaching 
Certification which is now or will be mandatory for 
public high school coaches in many states including 
Massachusetts. Enrollment limited to 20. {S} 4 credits 
Tim Bacon 
Offered Spring 2009 

130 Stress Management 

The physical and psychological components of stress, 
identification of personal stress response patterns, and 
techniques for daily stress management. Enrollment 
limited to 20. 2 credit 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2009 

150 Nutrition and Health 

An introduction to the science of human nutrition. We 
: will study digestion, absorption and transportation of 

nutrients in the body, and the way nutrients are used to 
. support growth and development and maintain health. 

We will also examine how personal dietary choices 
i affect nutritive quality of the diet and health of an 
( individual. The relationship between diet and health 
i will be explored throughout this course. Special topics 
: will include diet and physical fitness, weight control, 
| vegetarianism and women's nutrition concerns. High 

school chemistry recommended but not required. {N} 

4 credits 
| Barbara Brehm-Curtis 

Offered Fall 2008 

175 Applied Exercise Science 

An experiential course designed to introduce students to 
applied exercise physiology and kinesiology. Energy ex- 
penditure, energy systems, aerobic power, exercise fuels, 
effort perception, applied anatomy and training princi- 
ples are studied using a system of lecture and laboratory 
sessions. Enrollment limited to 20. {N} 2 credits 
James Johnson 
Offered Fall 2008 



175j Applied Exercise Science 

Same description ;is 175 above. 
Jennifer Williams and Lacee Carmon 
Offered during Interterm 

IDP 208 Women's Medical Issues 

A stud) of topics and issues relating to women's health. 
including menstrual cycle, contraception, sexual 1\ 
transmitted diseases, pregnane}, abortion, menopause. 
depression, eating disorders, nutrition and cardiovascu- 
lar disease. While the course focus will primarily be on 
the physiological aspects of these topics, some social, 
ethical and political implications will be considered 
including the issues of violence and the media's repre- 
sentation of women. {N} 4 credits 
Lesliejajfe 
Offered Spring 2009 

215 Physiology of Exercise 

Exercise, sport and outdoor activities all require energy 
to perform. The study of these energetic events is the 
basis of this course. We study how the body adapts to re- 
peated bouts of physical activity and how the body can 
perform a single event. This course is highly applied. 
Short lectures accompanied by relevant laboratory 
experiences are the methodology. Prerequisite: BIO 1 14, 
1 1 1 or permission of the instructor. This course also 
counts toward the major in biology. {N} 4 credits 
Jamesjohnson 
Offered Spring 2009 

225 Education Through the Physical: Youth Sports 

This course is designed to explore how youth sports 
impact the health, education and well-being of chil- 
dren. Class components will include an examination 
of youth sport philosophies, literature on cognitive and 
physical growth, approaches to coach and parent edu- 
cation, and an assessment of school and community 
based programs. As a class we will design, organize and 
implement a series of youth sport days at Smith Col- 
lege. {S} 4 credits 
Donald Siegel 
Offered Spring 2009 

230 Mediated Images of Sport and Physical Activity 

An exploration of sporting images as projected through 
the media with primary emphasis on print and elec- 
tronic journalism — to include written narratives, 
photography, television, film and digital images. The 
course will examine the (re) presentation and (re)pro- 



218 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



duction of the athletic or healthy body as the standard 
for fitness. The topic will include issues on embodi- 
ment, cultural symbolism, political and moral ideolo- 
gies, as well as commercialization. {S} 4 credits 
jane Stangl 
Offered Spring 2009 

EDG 336 Seminar in American Education 

Topic: Youth Development and Social Entrepreneur- 
ship. Designed for students who aspire to study the 
theory and practice of programs devoted to serving 
youth and how they are founded, funded and sustained. 
We will examine theories that explain the factors that 
perpetuate the achievement gap and explore programs 
developed to redress these inequalities. This is a course 
with a service learning commitment. Students will work 
with youth in Springfield on a youth media project from 
2-4:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays. 4 credits 
Sam Intrator and Donald Siegel 
Offered Fall 2008 

340 Women's Health: Current Topics 

A seminar focusing on current research papers in wom- 
en's health. Recent topics have included reproductive 
health issues, eating disorders, heart disease, depres- 
sion, autoimmune disorders and breast cancer. Prereq- 
uisites: 140 or a strong biological sciences background, 
and permission of the instructor. Open to juniors and 
seniors. This course may not be taken for the S/U grad- 
ing option. Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 4 credits 
Barbara Brehm-Curtis 
Offered Fall 2008 

400 Special Studies 

1 to 4 credits 

Members of the department 

Offered both semesters 



B. Performance Courses 
Credit 

Performance courses are offered for credit in a wide va- 
riety of activities. Each class is designed to enhance the 
student's physical skills, fitness, knowledge of human 
movement, and understanding of the role of physical 
activity in a healthy lifestyle. Each course encompasses 
a combination of instruction in technique, read- 
ings, lecture and discussion. In general, each section 



involves an average of two scheduled hours per week. 
Students may count no more than four performance 
course credits toward the degree. Courses with multiple 
sections may be repeated for credit, but individual 
course sections may not be repeated for credit. 

901 Aquatic Activities 

Beginning Swimming 

A course in the development of basic swimming skills 
and the conquering of fear of the water. Priority will be 
given to establishing personal safety and enhancing 
skills in the water. Persons enrolling in this course will 
learn about the basic principles of swimming in terms 
of buoyancy and propulsion. The primary performance 
goals are survival swimming skills and comfort in the 
water. A person who can swim at least one length of the 
pool is not eligible for this course. Limited to 12 novice 
or non-swimmers. 1 credit 
Karen KLinger, Fall 2008 
Diane Williams, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

Advanced Beginning Swimming 
This course will focus on the improvement of swim- 
ming skills. Performance goals include being able to 
swim all four strokes and the turns associated with 
those strokes at a level that surpasses initial perfor- 
mance by the end of the semester. Students are assessed 
at the beginning and end of the semester with the aid of 
video feedback. Prerequisite: ability to swim at least one 
length of the pool. Enrollment limited to 12. 1 credit 
Craig Collins 
Offered both semesters 

Intermediate Swimming 

This course will focus on improving swimming tech- 
niques in all four strokes and introducing the use of 
the pool as a fitness medium in preparation for swim 
conditioning. Enrollment limited to 18. 1 credit 
Craig Collins 
Offered Fall 2008 

Springboard Diving 

The understanding of the principles and development 

of diving skills necessary to perform at least 10 different 

dives from five categories. Enrollment limited to 8. 

1 credit 

Kim Bierwert 

Offered both semesters 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



219 



Scuba Diving 1 

The use and care of equipment, safety, and the physiol- 
ogy and techniques of SCI IBA diving. A series of open- 
water dives leading to N \t I certification is available. 
Prerequisite: satisfactory swimming skills and permis- 
sion of the instructor. There is a fee. Enrollment limited 
to 17. 1 credit 
David SHU nun i 
Offered both semesters 

Swim Conditioning 

Swimming workouts to improve physical fitness. Stroke 
improvement, exercise program design, and a variety 
of aquatic training modalities will also be included. 
Intermediate swimming ability required. Enrollment 
limited to 20. 1 credit 
To be an flounced 
Offered Spring 2009 

Aqua-Aerobics 

This fun-filled class teaches the value of vertical ex- 
ercise in the water while shattering the myth that it is 
primarily for senior citizens or people with injuries. All 
exercises are choreographed to music that is upbeat 
and motivating. Designed for fun and education, this 
class is a great way to start your day. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 20. 1 credit 
Craig Collins 
Offered both semesters 

905 Water Safety 

Lifeguard Training 

American Red Cross Certification in Lifeguard Training 
and Basic First Aid/AED (Automated External Defribril- 
lator) and CPR for the Professional Rescuer. The Water- 
front Lifeguard Module will also be taught if time per- 
mits. Prerequisites: 500 yard swim using crawl, breast 
and side strokes, and retrieval of 10 lb. brick from 8 ft. 
depth. Enrollment limited to 10. 2 credits 
Craig Collins 
Offered both semesters 

Water Safety Instructor 
• Instruction in techniques, theory and teaching meth- 
ods of swimming to prepare participants to teach swim- 
ming. American Red Cross certification upon successful 
completion of the course. Prerequisites: Rescue and 
safety skills, and swimming skills (crawl stroke, el- 



ementary backstroke, sidestroke. breaststroke, survival 
stroke and surface dive) at ARC Level VI proficiency 

Enrollment limited to 10. 2 credits 
Kim Bierwert 
Offered Spring 2009 

910 Badminton 

The development of badminton skills, strokes and strat- 
egy. Students will learn to play singles and doubles in 
this fast indoor sport. Enrollment limited to 12. Course 
will meet first 8 weeks of the semester. 1 credit 
Phil Nielsen 
Offered Spring 2009 

920 Fencing 

Fencing I 

The basic techniques of attack and defense, footwork, 
rules, equipment, strategies and techniques involved in 
foil fencing. A brief historical background of the tradi- 
tion and origins of fencing. Enrollment limited to 16 
per section. 1 credit 
Jacqueline Blei 
Offered both semesters 

Fencing II 

A review of footwork, simple attacks and lateral par- 
ries progressing to compound attacks and strategies. 
Circular Parries, Riposte and In-Direct Riposte will be 
included in the defense. The course will conclude with 
a tournament at a neighboring school or club. Pre- 
requisite: Foil Fencing or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 16. 1 credit 
Jacqueline Blei 
Offered Spring 2009 

925 Golf 

Golf I — Beginner 

An introduction to the game of golf. Taught from 
"green to tee," this course will teach the basic mechan- 
ics of the swing as well as correct club selection. The 
initial focus of the course will be directed to the "short 
game" and develop toward appropriate use of mid-, 
and long irons, concluding with woods/metals. Applied 
rules of golf and etiquette will also be addressed. Pend- 
ing weather, field trip experience may be scheduled at 
the end of the term. Equipment is provided. Class meets 
first seven weeks of the fall semester. In the spring 



220 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



semester, class meets last six weeks. Enrollment limited 

to 10 per section. 1 credit 

Wendy Walker, Sarah Cox, Fall 2008 

Lynn Hersey, Sarah Cox, Spring 2009 

Offered both semesters 

Golf II— Advanced Beginner 
Designed to further develop the student's golf swing, 
this course will follow a "green to tee" approach with 
emphasis on the mid- to long irons, woods/metals and 
shot-making. Applied rules of golf etiquette will be in- 
corporated with the intent to apply course management 
strategies. Field trips to local ranges and courses are an- 
ticipated. Equipment is provided. Class is designed with 
the continuing Golf I student in mind. Prerequisite: Golf 
I or an entry-level skills test. Class meets first seven weeks 
of the fall semester. Spring semester, class meets last six 
weeks. Enrollment limited to 10 per section. 1 credit 
Wendy Walker 
Offered Fall 2008 

930 Equitation 

A series of courses in hunter seat equitation and basic 
dressage. Attention also given to safety, use and care 
of equipment, equine health and stable management. 
Students must attend registration session to be an- 
nounced in Student Notices. 
All sections are to be arranged. There is a fee. 

Equitation I 

For students in their first semester of riding at Smith. 

Sections range from beginner to advanced levels on the 

flat and over fences. 1 credit 

Suzanne Payne, Rachel Hackett, Cindy Schmelpfenig 

Offered both semesters 

Equitation II 

For students in their second semester of riding at 
Smith. Sections range from advanced beginner to ad- 
vanced levels on the flat and over fences. Prerequisite: 
Equitation 1. 1 credit 

Suzanne Payne, Rachel Hackett, Cindy Schmelpfenig 
Offered both semesters 

Equitation III 

For students in their third semester of riding at Smith. 
Low intenriediate to advanced levels on the flat and 
over fences. Prerequisite: Equitation II. 1 credit 
Suzanne Payne, Rachel Hackett, Cindy Schmelpfenig 
Offered both semesters 



Equitation IV 

For students in their fourth semester of riding at Smith. 

Intermediate to advanced levels on the flat and over 

fences. Prerequisite: Equitation III. 1 credit 

Suzanne Payne, Rachel Hackett, Cindy Schmelpfenig 

Offered both semesters 

935 Introduction to Wilderness Skills 

A course designed to teach the fundamentals of outdoor 
travel and camping in a variety of wilderness environ- 
ments. We will study many outdoor skills including 
backcountry camping techniques, outdoor cooking and 
fire making, wilderness first aid, orienteering, some 
classic woodcraft skills as well as trends in outdoor rec- 
reation. Although the class will focus on backpacking 
techniques, it will also include other seasonal activities 
such as paddling, snowshoeing, etc. Upon successful 
completion of the course students should begin to 
achieve sufficient outdoor skills to be comfortable and 
safe when traveling on wilderness trips. Students should 
plan for at least one overnight weekend trip. Enroll- 
ment limited to 10. 2 credits 
Scott Johnson, Fall 2008 
Katrina O'Brien, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

940 Outdoor Skills 

Canoeing 

An introduction to solo and tandem canoeing. Students 
progress from flatwater lake paddling to faster river 
running in this adventure class. Students are also 
taught how to take a multi-day canoe trip and learn 
such touring skills as map reading, portaging, cooking 
and planning. Class meets the first seven weeks of the 
fall semester. Prerequisite: satisfactory 7 swimming skills. 
Enrollment limited to 10. 1 credit 
Katrina O'Brien 
Offered Fall 2008 

Whitewater Kayaking 

An introduction to solo Whitewater kayaking. This more 
adventurous class begins in the pool and pond with 
basic paddling skills, and progresses to local fast water 
rivers. Students should expect to run Class II rapids. In 
the spring semester, class meets last 10 weeks. Prerequi- 
site: satisfactory swimming skills. Enrollment limited to 
8 per section. 1 credit 
Scottjohnson 
Offered Spring 2009 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



221 



Whitewater Canoeing 

An introduction to solo and tandem Whitewater canoe- 
ing. This exciting class is taught on local rivers offering 

Class I and II rapids during the spring. Class meets the 
last 6 weeks of the semester. Prerequisite: Canoeing 
experience or permission of the instructor; plus satisfac- 
tory swimming skills. Enrollment limited to 10. 1 credit 
Katriua o 'Brien 
Offered Spring 2009 

Sea Kayaking 

This course is designed to introduce sea kayaking to 
the novice. Ocean paddling, navigation, safe exiting, 
equipment and paddle techniques are covered. Stu- 
dents should expect one weekend day trip to the coast. 
Prerequisite: satisfactory swimming skills. Enrollment 
limited to 10. (burse will meet the first seven weeks of 
the fall semester. In the spring semester, class meets last 
six weeks. 1 credit 
Jennifer Good-Schi/J 
Offered both semesters 

Rock Climbing I 

The objective of this course is to teach students the 
fundamentals of rock climbing. This will include 
familiarity with the equipment, climbing technique, 
various knots and belaying. Top-rope anchor building 
will also be introduced. Safety issues will be a strong 
emphasis in this course. The majority of class time will 
take place on the Ainsworth Gym Climbing Wall. Please 
note that this class will serve only as a basic introduc- 
tion and will not "certify" or prepare the student for 
the full range of outdoor climbing scenarios. For this, 
additional instruction is recommended. Enrollment 
limited to 12. 1 credit 
Scott Johnson 
Offered both semesters 

Rock Climbing II 

This course will review the fundamentals of rock climb- 
ing, then introduce more advanced skills with a greater 
emphasis on gaining proficiency with outdoor climbing 
techniques and top-rope anchor building. Safety issues 
will remain a strong emphasis in this course. The ma- 
jority of class time will take place off-campus at nearby 
cliffs. Prerequisite: Rock Climbing I or permission of the 
instructor. Class meets for the first seven weeks of the fall 
semester. Enrollment limited to 8. 1 credit 
Scott Johnson 
Offered Fall 2008 



945 Physical Conditioning 

. \erobics 

Exercise to music. Various exercise styles will be 

introduced. This class will also cover basic exercise 
principles, injury prevention and the fundamentals ol 
exercise program design. The goal of this course is to 
enable students to enter any group fitness setting with 
confidence. Enrollment limited to 35. 1 credit 
Rosalie Pen 
Offered both semesters 

hickboxing I 

This class is recommended for both the curious begin- 
ner and the experienced kickboxer. It incorporates 
martial art forms, a variety of strength/fitness drills, 
as well as standard boxing techniques. Students start 
by learning proper form of the basic techniques before 
progressing to more complicated combinations. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20 per section. 1 credit 
Judy B. Messer 
Offered both semesters 

Self-Paced Fitness 

An introduction to the principles and methods of train- 
ing to improve and maintain fitness. Each student 
designs and follows an individualized conditioning 
program. Programs are tailored to the needs of the 
student. Each individual is monitored throughout the 
semester and students are expected to do most of their 
exercise out of class. Enrollment limited to 20. 1 credit 
Cork Coffey, Fall 2008 
Sheila Gisbrecht. Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

Physical Conditioning 

A course designed to teach the basics of functional fit- 
ness. Aerobic and anaerobic exercises are emphasized. 
Students learn the fundamentals of exercise training. 
Strong emphasis is placed on multiple tonus of exercise 
and how to design an individualized exercise program. 
Students are expected to exercise outside of class. 
Enrollment limited to 14. 1 credit 
Jennifer Williams. Kathleen Boucher. Fall 2008 
Sarah Cox, David Scbary, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

Athletic Pitney 

A vigorous fitness course designed for students inter- 
ested in high level training. Individual assessments are 



222 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



made to assess aerobic and anaerobic power. We will 
assess V02 max, lactate threshold, power, speed and 
agility. Individualized training programs will be devel- 
oped and administered. Class meets first eight weeks of 
the semester. Enrollment limited to 12. 1 credit 
James Johnson 
Offered, Fall 2008 

Resistance Training for Women 
This course introduces students to multiple methods of 
resistance training. There is a strong emphasis on un- 
derstanding anatomical structure and how to stress and 
train specific parts of the body. Students will participate 
in a structured, periodized, resistance training program 
designed to improve body function. Class limited to 14. 
Lacee Carmon and Sheila Gisbrecht 
Offered Spring 2009 

Pilates Mat Training I 

A course designed to teach the mat exercises of Joseph 
Pilates. These exercises are designed to increase core 
strength, increase joint mobility and stability, and 
increase muscle tone and flexibility. By the end of this 
course the student will be able to develop and maintain 
their own Pilate's matwork program. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 25. 1 credit 
Rosalie Peri, Jean Hoffman 
Offered both semesters 

Pilates Mat Training II 

A course designed to teach intermediate to advanced 
mat exercises developed by Joseph Pilates. This course 
will explore the history of Pilates, the benefits of Joseph 
Pilates Matwork and the six main Pilates principles. 
Prerequisite: Pilates Mat Training I or permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 25. 1 credit 
Rosalie Peri 
Offered Spring 2009 

945j Physical Conditioning 

A repetition of 945. 1 credit 
To be announced 
Offered during Interterm 

950 Sculling 

An introduction to sculling techniques. A variety of 
boats are utilized to teach this great lifetime sport, in- 
cluding singles and doubles. Classes will be taught on 
Paradise Pond and the Connecticut River. Course will 



meet the first seven weeks of the fall semester. In the 
spring semester, class meets last 6 weeks. Prerequisite: 
satisfactory swimming skills. Enrollment limited to 10 
per section. 1 credit 
David Schary 
Offered both semesters 

955 Self-Defense 

Self -Defense I 

Progressive development of physical and mental self- 
defense skills and strategies. Personal protection aware- 
ness, situation evaluation and effective communication 
will be emphasized. Other topics include assertiveness 
training, date rape and personal defense weapons. 
Enrollment limited to 20. 1 credit 
Nancy Rothenberg 
Offered both semesters 

KungFu 

Indonesian Kung-Fu is a traditional martial art that 
offers students physical fitness, coordination, increased 
focus, energy and awareness, self-discipline and per- 
sonal growth. This course includes meditation, breath 
and energy awareness, physical conditioning, stretch- 
ing, self-defense, choreographed sparring combinations 
and forms. Enrollment limited to 20. 1 credit 
Nancy Rothenberg 
Offered both semesters 

960 Squash 

Squash I 

Instructions in basic strokes, rules, tactics and strategy 

designed to allow the student to progress to a USSRA 

level 2.0 to 2.5 (Beginner). Enrollment limited to 10 

per section. 1 credit 

Judith Strong 

Offered both semesters 

Squash II 

Development in accuracy and skill in executing shots, 
tactics, strategy, marking and refereeing, designed to 
allow the student to progress to a USSRA level 2.5 to 
3.0 (Intermediate). Prerequisite: Beginning Squash or 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 10. 
1 credit 

Donald Siegel 
Offered Spring 2009 



Exercise and Sport Studies 






965 Tai Chi 

Ten CM I 

An introduction to the Chinese martial art that was de- 
veloped over 300 years ago. Emphasis will be on learn- 
ing and understanding the unique movements of Chen 
Taijiquan, proper practice for health and self-defense 
applications. No prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 26 
per section. 1 credit 
Richard Cesario 
Offered both semesters 

Ten Chi 11 

Twenty-four posture Tai chi, a standardized form from 

mainland China. Prerequisite: Tai chi I or permission 

of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 26 per section. 

1 credit 

Richard Cesario 

Offered Spring 2009 

970 Tennis 

Tennis I — Beginning 

Students will be introduced to the basic strokes of ten- 
nis (forehand, backhand, volleys, serves). Singles and 
doubles play and basic positioning will be presented. 
Tennis rules and etiquette will be included in the cur- 
riculum. Enrollment limited to 16 per section. 1 credit 
Erica Hollot. Dorothy Steele, Fall 2008 
Erica Hollot. Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

Tennis II — Advanced Beginning 
Students must have a working knowledge of the four 
basic tennis strokes (forehand, backhand, volleys, 
serves). The format for Tennis II is a "play and learn" 
environment. There will be emphasis on positioning 
and basic strategies for singles and doubles. Lobs and 
overheads will be introduced. In addition, tennis drills 
will be presented to help students refine and practice 
the four basic strokes. Prerequisite: Tennis I or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 16 per 
section. 1 credit 
Dorothy Steele, Fall 2008 
Christine Davis. Dorothy Steele. Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

Tennis III — Intermediate 

Students must have a working knowledge of the follow- 
ing tennis strokes: forehand, backhand, volleys, serves, 



lobs and overheads. Tennis stroke direction, height and 
depth variations will be included in the curriculum. 
Appropriate spins will be introduced for each stroke. 
The "play and learn" structure will focus on developing 
singles and doubles strategies in a competitive setting. 
Prerequisite: Tennis II or pemiission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 16 per section. 1 credit 
Christine Davis. Fall 2008 
Erica Hollot, Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

Tennis IV— Advanced 

Students must be able to execute tennis strokes utiliz- 
ing direction, height and depth variations. Students 
should understand basic singles and doubles position- 
ing. Mastery of topspin and slice groundstroke and slice 
serves will be part of the curriculum. Speciality shots 
including approach volleys, swinging volleys and half 
volleys will be introduced and practiced. Prerequisite: 
Tennis III or permission of the instructor. Enrollment 
limited to 16 per section. 1 credit 
Dorothy Steele 
Offered Spring 2009 

975 Yoga 

Yoga I 

An introduction to basic hatha yoga poses, breath tech- 
niques, meditation and yoga philosophy. Designed to 
give students an opportunity to explore movement and 
breathing patterns in an effort to strengthen the mind/ 
body connection. Enrollment limited to 26 per section. 
1 credit 

Elizabeth Thompson, Lynne Paterson, Jo Schneider- 
man. Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 
Offered both semesters 

Yoga II 

The yoga of B. K. S. Iyengar — continuing level. Refine- 
ment of postures and breathing techniques taught in 
Yoga I. Introduction of new postures along with contin- 
ued discussions of yoga philosophy. Prerequisite: Yoga I. 
Enrollment limited to 26. 1 credit 
Lynne Paterson 
Offered Spring 2009 

Riding 

In addition to riding classes for credit, noncredit riding 
instruction and participation in competitive riding are 



224 



Exercise and Sport Studies 



available at Smith College. A fee is charged for these 
courses, payable at registration each semester. Further 
information may be obtained from Suzanne Payne, 
Director of Riding/Team Coach, extension 2734. 

The Minor in Exercise and 
Sport Studies 

Advisers: Barbara Brehm-Curtis, James H.Johnson 

The minor is designed to provide students with a com- 
prehensive introduction to exercise and sport studies. 
This course of study would be useful for students with 
an interest in exercise and sport and for those consider- 
ing graduate study and/or a career in exercise science; 
community, worksite or other fitness programs; and the 
health sciences such as physical therapy and medicine. 

Requirements: Six courses including 100 and either 
210 or 215. The other courses (16 credits) may be 
selected from ESS departmental offerings. In addition, 
one appropriate course from another department may 
be substituted with the adviser's permission. Only four 
performance course credits may be counted toward the 
minor. Course selection for the minor must be approved 
by a faculty adviser. 

D. Graduate Courses 

Adviser: Jane M. Stangl 

502 Seminar in Philosophy & Ethics 

This course will introduce selected topics in ethics 
and philosophy of sport as they relate to coaching and 
the broader conception of sport in a democratic and 
capitalist culture. Drawing on case studies and contem- 
porary sources, the course will examine beliefs about 
the value of competitive sport, its relationship to higher 
education and its implication for coaches. This class 
meets for the last seven weeks of the semester. 2 credits 
Jane Stangl 
Offered Fall 2008 

503 Legal Issues in Sport 

Legal concepts in the context of sport. Selected legal is- 
sues as they relate to coaching including topics such as 
negligence, contract law, statutory and constitutional 



law, and defamation and risk analysis/management 
will be examined. Appropriate case studies and related 
contemporary sources will provide the platform for 
discussion. This class meets for the first six weeks of the 
semester. 2 credits 
Julie Perrelli 
Offered Fall 2008 

505d Theoretical and Practical Foundations of 
Coaching 

Assisting in the coaching of an intercollegiate team. 
Weekly conferences on team management, coach re- 
sponsibilities and coaching aids. 4 credits 
Christine Shelton, Jacqueline Blei, Ellen O 'Neil, 
Bonnie May, Jane Stangl, Don Siegel 
Full-year course; Offered each year 

506d Advanced Practicum in Coaching 

Independent coaching and the study of advanced 
coaching tactics and strategy in a specific sport. Prereq- 
uisite: 505d. 4 credits 

Christine Shelton, Jacqueline Blei, Ellen O 'Neil, 
Bonnie May Jane Stangl, Don Siegel 
Full-year course; Offered each year 

507 Colloquium in Critical Thinking and Research in 
Coaching 

A colloquium on current research in coaching. Gradu- 
ate students, ESS faculty and the coaching staff of the 
Athletic department will meet to discuss and share work 
in progress as well as analyze coaching experiences and 
problems. May be repeated for credit. 1 credit 
Jane Stangl 
Offered Spring 2009 

515 Physiology of Exercise and Sport 

An advanced course in the energetics of participation in 
various sports. The emphasis in this course is the ap- 
plication of exercise physiology to sport. Students study 
bioenergetics, exercise fuels, training, environmental 
concerns and overtraining. A major emphasis is the 
development of an annual training plan for athletes. 
{N} 4 credits 
James Johnson 
Offered Spring 2009 

520 Seminar in Sport Leadership for Coaches 

This course provides the opportunity to explore the 
dynamic world of sports leadership through a national 
and international lens. Students will be exposed to 



Exercise and Sport Studies 225 

alternative perspectives of leadership including some 590d Thesis 
contemporary collaborative models and students will 8 credits 
build a personal model and philosophy of leadership Full-year course 
that they can put to immediate use in their coaching. 

(E) 3 credits 
Christine Shelton 
Offered Fall 2008 

550 Women In Sport 

A course documenting the role of women in sport as 
parallel and complementary to women's place in so- 
ciety. Contemporary trends will be linked to historical 
and sociological antecedents. Focus is on historical, 
contemporary and future perspectives and issues in 
women's sport. ( H'tered in alternate years. Admission of 
undergraduates by permission of the instructor. {S} 
4 credits 

Christine Shelton 
Offered Spring 2009 

565 Seminar in Skill Acquisition and Performance 
Survey of topics relevant to skill acquisition and per- 
formance, including detailed analysis of perceptual, 
decision-making and effector processes. Independent 
research required. {N} 4 credits 
Don Siei>el. Christine Shdton, Lynn Oberbilli^ 
Offered Fall 2008 

575 Sports Medicine: Concepts in Care and Prevention 
of Athletic Injury 

Theory and practice of sports medicine with emphasis 
on injury prevention, protection and rehabilitation. 
Prerequisite: 210 or the equivalent. Enrollment is lim- 
ited. {N} 2 credits 
Kelt i Steele 
Offered Spring 2009 

580 Special Studies 

Adapted physical education, administration, current 
problems, exercise physiology, kinesiology, motor learn- 
ing or other approved topics. Hours scheduled individu- 
ally. 1 to 4 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered both semesters 

590 Thesis 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters 



226 



Film Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Associate Professor 

Alexandra Keller, Ph.D., Director 

Assistant Professor 

Jenny Perlin (Five College Visiting Artist in Film 
Studies) 

Lecturers 

Margaret Bruzelius, Ph.D. 
Lucretia Knapp, M.F.A. 

Advisers 

Anna Botta, Professor of Italian Language and 
Literature 



fl Darcy Buerkle, Assistant Professor of History 

fl Dawn Fulton, Associate Professor of French Studies 

"'Jefferson Hunter, Professor of English Language and 

Literature 
Alexandra Keller, Associate Professor of Film Studies 
n Barbara Kellum, Professor of Art 
Richard Millington, Professor of English Language and 

Literature 
Frazer Ward, Assistant Professor of Art 
Joel Westerdale, Assistant Professor of German Studies 



200 Introduction to Film Studies 

This course offers an overview of cinema as an artis- 
tic, industrial, ideological and social force. Students 
will become familiar with the aesthetic elements of 
cinema (visual style, editing, cinematography, sound, 
performance, narration and formal structure, etc.), 
the terminology of film production, and the relations 
among industrial, ideological, artistic and social issues. 
Films (both classic and contemporary) will be dis- 
cussed from aesthetic, historical and social perspectives, 
enabling students to approach films as informed and 
critical viewers. Enrollment limited to 60. Priority given 
to Smith College film studies minors and Five College 
film studies majors. {A} 4 credits 
Alexandra Keller 
Offered Fall 2008 

241 Genre/Period 

Topic: American Cinema and Culture from the De- 
pression to the Sixties 

This course explores the relationship between film and 
culture during some of the most crucial decades of 
"The American Century." It looks at the evolving con- 
nection between films and their audiences, the extent 
to which films are symptomatic of as well as influential 
on historical periods, major events and social move- 
ments, and the ways in which film genres evolve in 



relation to both cultural change and the rise and fall 
of the Hollywood studio system. Among the questions 
we'll consider: How did the Depression have an impact 
on Hollywood film style and form? How were evolv- 
ing ideas about American motherhood puzzled out in 
American cinema of the period? What were some of 
the important differences between the way mainstream 
U.S. cinema and European film represented World War 
II? How did Civil Rights and the Red Scare become 
appropriate topics for Westerns? Did the lighthearted 
veneer of the fluffy sex comedies of the sixties actually 
hide some serious questions about labor, independent 
female subjectvitity and heteronormativity? Particular 
and sustained attention will be paid to relations among 
gender, genre, race and class. {A/H} 4 credits 
Alexandra Keller 
Offered Spring 2009 

Topic: Screwball Comedy 

Classic screwball comedies were produced in a ten-year 
period, from Capra's // Happened One Night (1934) 
to Sturges's Miracle at Morgan's Creek (1944). The 
class will screen 20 films from these years, although 
it will include a few later films: Wilder's Some Like It 
Hot (1959), Mann's Zwer Come Back (1962) and the 
Coen Brothers' Intolerable Cruelty (2003). We will 
examine the genre in its historical context and exam- 
ine elements of the system — studios, writers, produc- 



Film Studies 



227 



ers, clothes and set designers, actors — that produced 
this astonishingly witty and short-lived film genre. (E) 
{A} 4 credits 
Margaret Bruzelius 
Offered Spring 2009 

280 Introduction to Video Production 

This course involves both an introduction to the history 
and contemporary practice of experimental video and 
video art, as well as the acquisition of the technical. 
analytical and conceptual skills to complete individual 
video projects. Students will be engaged in screenings 
and discussion and class exercises and will produce 
three to four (short) individual video projects. Projects 
are designed to develop basic technical proficiency in 
the video medium as well as practical skills for the 
completion of the video projects. This is a beginning 
course that will cover the basics of shooting, lighting, 
audio and digital editing. Prerequisite: 200 (which may 
be taken concurrently). Priority given to Smith College 
film studies minors and Five College film studies ma- 
jors. Permission of the instructor required. Enrollment 
limited to 13. {A} 4 credits 
Lucretia Knapp 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

282 Advanced Video Seminar 

Topic: Duration, Space and Memory-Advanced 
Production. 

According to Henri Bergson, duration, not time, best 
describes how we experience the world. Duration is a 
continuous flow stretching and contracting. Time, on 
the other hand, is an artificial construction, measured 
and formal. Duration will be the focus of this advanced 
production seminar. Screenings/viewings will include 
works by Akerman, Atget, Douglas, Export, Huyghe, 
Jarman, Jonas, Kentridge, Kiarostami, Lockhart, Lumi- 
ere Brothers, Marker, Nauman, Porter, Sander, Snow, 
Warhol, Weerasethakul, Vertov and more. Readings will 
come from Benjamin, Bergson, Borges, Chion, Davis, 
Deleuze, Doane, Proust, Smithson, Stein and more. 
This course is an advanced production seminar and 
requires a commitment to the work both in and outside 
of class time. Students may work towards final projects 
in film, video, installation, new media and other forms. 
In addition to the final project, readings, screenings, 
presentations, papers and collaborative assignments are 
required. Students must have prior experience in film/ 
video production and digital video editing. Registration 



by application to the Film Studies office. {A} 4 credits 
Jenny Perlvn, Five College \ Ming Artist in FUm 

Studies 

Offered Fall 2008 

Ibpic: Smoke and Mirrors, Paper Plates and Dry Ice: 
Special affects in FUm, 1 ideo and Television Produc- 
tion. 

This advanced video seminar focuses on the moving 
image as it relates to illusion, special effects and their 
antecedents. We will screen films that are low budget, 
as well as those that are high-end and effects-driven. 
Discussion and screenings will include early in-camera 
effects, stop-motion animation, chroma-keying and 
present-day digital compositing, including the films 4 
Trip to the Moon, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Jason and 
the Argonauts, Eraserhead, Ed Wood, Waking Life 
and Ihe Science of Sleep. In addition to his narrative 
film work, we will consider the music videos of Michel 
Gondry and the compressed world of visual shorts. 
(In addition we will briefly engage with the virtual 
landscape of New Media.) Readings will examine the 
relationship between the development of selected im- 
agery/special effects and contemporaneous historical 
or political events. This course also involves hands-on 
examination of visual manipulation. There will be 
group exercises as well as individual experimentation 
and projects. A significant part of the class will involve 
shooting and editing, animating and compositing in 
Final Cut Pro. Prerequisite: FLS 280 or permission of 
the instructor. Enrollment limited to 13. {A} 4 credits 
Lucretia Knapp 
Offered Spring 2009 

351 Film Theory 

This seminar will explore central currents in film the- 
ory, including formalist, realist, auteurist, structuralist, 
psychoanalytic, feminist, poststructuralist, genre stud- 
ies, queer studies and cultural studies approaches to 
questions regarding the nature, function and possibili- 
ties of cinema. Film theory readings will be understood 
through the socio-cultural context in which they are 
developed. Particular attention will also be given to the 
history of film theory: how theories exist in conversa- 
tion with each other, as well as how other intellectual 
and cultural theories influence the development, 
nature and mission of theories of the moving image. 
We will emphasize written texts (Bazin. Eisenstein, 
Kracauer, Vertov, Metz, Mulvey. DeLauretis, Doty, Hall. 
Coiners du Cinema, the Dogme Collective, etc.), but 



228 



Film Studies 



will also look at instantiations of film theory that are 
themselves acts of cinema (Man with a Movie Cam- 
era, Rock Hudson 's Home Movies, The Meeting of 
Two Queens). The course is designed as an advanced 
introduction and assumes no prior exposure to film 
theory. Fulfills film theory requirement for the major 
and minor. Enrollment limited to 12. Prerequisite: 200 
or the equivalent. Priority given to Smith College film 
studies minors and Five College film studies majors. 
Priority given to seniors, then juniors. {A} 4 credits 
Alexandra Keller 
Offered Spring 2009 

400 Special Studies 

1-4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

Crosslisted Courses 

ARH 280 South Asian Film and Art History 

Topic: Bollywood: Cinema of Interruptions. 
Ajay Sinha 
Offered Spring 2009 

ENG 333 Seminar: A Major British or American Author 

Topic: Stoppard and Bennett. 
Jefferson Hunter 
Offered Fall 2008 

FRN 244 French Cinema 

Topic: "On The Move: " Restlessness in French Cinema. 
Marline Gantrel 
Offered Spring 2009 

FYS 127 Adaptation 

Jefferson Hunter 
Offered Fall 2008 

GER 230 Topics in German Cinema 

Topic: Weimar Film 
Joel Westerdale 
Offered Fall 2008 

ITL 280 Italian Cinema 

Topic: Style Matters: The Power of the Aesthetic in 
Italian Cinema. 
Anna Botta 
Offered Spring 2009 



ITL 281 Italian Cinema (Discussion Session in Italian) 

Topic: Style Matters: The Power of the Aesthetic in 
Italian Cinema. 
Anna Botta 
Offered Spring 2009 

P0R 221 Topics in Portuguese and Brazilian Literature 
and Culture 

Topic: Envisioning Lusofonia — A Focus on Film 
from the Portuguese-Speaking World. 
Malcolm K McNee 
Offered Spring 2009 

SPN 245 Topics in Latin American and Peninsular 
Studies 

Topic: Teledictadura — Historical Narrative in 
Spanish TV. 
Reyes Ldzaro 
Offered Fall 2008 

THE 261 Writing for the Theatre 

Leonard Berkman, Andrea Hairston, Fall 2008 
Leonard Berkman, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

THE 262 Writing for the Theatre 

Leonard Berkman, Andrea Hairston, Fall 2008 
Leonard Berkman, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

THE 361/ 362 Screenwriting 

Andrea Hairston 
Offered Spring 2009 

Five College Film Studies 
Major 

The Five College film studies major is in film studies 
as opposed to film production. While the film faculty 
believes that all students should be familiar with 
film and video production, the major is not designed 
to train students to enter the film industry without 
further training. As with all liberal arts majors, film 
is studied in relation to all the arts, humanities and 
social sciences, and can lead to careers in teaching, arts 
administration, Web design or freelance work in non- 
industry venues. The major comprises ten courses, one 
of which may be a component course. (A core course 



Film Studies 






is one in which film is the primary object of study; a 
component course is one in which film is significant 
but not the focus of the course.) Of these ten courses, at 
least two (but no more than five) must be taken outside 
the home institution. In addition, each student must 
have an adviser on the home campus and the require- 
ments for the major may vary slightly from campus to 
campus. 

Program of Study: 

1. One introduction to film course (normally taken on 
the home campus) 

2. One film history course (either a general, one- 
semester survey or a course covering approximately 
fifty years of international film history) 

3. One film theory course 

4. One film genre or authorship course (generally on a 
single director or group of directors) 

5. One national or transnational cinema course 

6. One special topics course (may be a component 
course) 

7. One advanced seminar in a special topic 

8. One film, video, or digital production course, or a 
screenwriting course; but no more than two such 
courses may be counted toward the major. 

9. TWo electives from any of the above categories 

A thesis is optional; students should check with their 
home campus adviser. 

In the course of fulfilling the program of study, at least 
one course must focus on nonnarrative film (docu- 
mentary or experimental) and at least four courses 
should be at the advanced level. Courses can fit into 
more than one category, but a single course may not 
be used to satisfy two of the numbered requirements 
above. 



The Minor 



Advisers: Anna Botta, Darcy Buerkle, Dawn Fulton, 
Jefferson Hunter, Alexandra Keller, Barbara Kellum, 
i Richard Millington, Frazer Ward, Joel Westerdale 

The Film Studies Program offers the opportunity for in- 
depth study of the history, theory and criticism of film 
and other forms of the moving image. The program's 



primary goal is to expose students to a wide range 
of cinematic works, styles and movements in order 
to cultivate critical understanding of the medium's 
significance as an art form, as a means of cultural and 
political expression, and ;is a reflection of social ideolo- 
gies and mentalities. 

Requirements: Six semester courses to be taken at 
Smith or. by permission of the director, elsewhere 
among the Five College institutions. 

Required courses: 

IIS 200 Introduction to Film Studies 
FLS351 Film Theory 

Electives: 

ENG 120 Colloquia in Literature: 

Shakespeare and Film 
FLS 240 Film and Music 
IIS 24 1 Genre/Period 
FLS 245 British Film and Television 
FLS 280 Introduction to Video Production 
FLS 282 Advanced Video Seminar 
FLS 350 Questions of Cinema 
FRN 244 French Cinema 
FYS 127 Adaptation 

FYS 146 Contemporary Theatre and Film in China 
GER 230 German Cinema 
ITL342 Italian Cinema 
SPN 245 Topics in Latin American and Peninsular 

Studies 

Topic: Latin American Film as \ isual 

Narrative 
SPN 246 Topics in Latin American Literature 

Topic: Reinterpreting Magical Realism in 

literature and Film 
SPN 246 Topics in Latin American Literature 

Topic: Negotiating the Borderlands: Text 

Film. Music 
THE 318 Movements in Design: Production Design 

for Feature Films 

Smith College Advisers 

Anna Botta, Professor of Italian Language and 

Literature 
Darcy Buerkle. .Assistant Professor of History 
Dawn Fulton. Associate Professor of French Studies 
Jefferson Hunter. Professor of English Language and 

Literature 



230 Film Studies 

Alexandra Keller, Associate Professor of Film Studies, 

Director 
Barbara Kellum, Professor of Art 
Richard Millington, Professor of English Language 

and Literature 
Frazer Ward, Assistant Professor of Art 
Joel Westerdale, Assistant Professor of German Studies 

Honors 

Director: Alexandra Keller 

430d Thesis 

A thesis on a film studies topic or a creative project. 

8 credits 

Members of the department 

Full-year course; offered every year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



First-Year Seminars 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



231 



First-Year Seminars (FYS) are inter- or multi-disciplin- 
ary courses that enable faculty and first-year students 
to engage in extensive inquiry about an issue, topic or 
problem that is of special interest to the instmctor(s). 
First-Year Seminars are focused on the seminar-style of 
investigation; they are not survey courses or introduc- 
tions to a specific discipline. They afford the faculty and 
students an opportunity to explore a subject broadly 
and intensively. 

First-Year Seminars are voluntary, but we encourage 
students to enroll in them since they aim to give new- 
students a unique introduction to college-level learn- 
ing. First-Year Seminars are small in size (16 students, 
20 if team-taught) and are restricted to first-year 
students. They incorporate training in the use of intel- 
lectual capacities that form the foundation of a suc- 
cessful liberal arts education. These capacities include 
some or all of the following: writing, speaking, library- 
research, accessing databases, working in small groups, 
quantitative reasoning and critical thinking. First-Year 
Seminars are also effective in showing students how to 
integrate student support sendees into their academic 
pursuits. 

FYS 112 The Work of Repair 

Human beings appear to spend a great deal of time on 
projects of repair — fixing objects, mending relation- 
ships, repairing the social and political damage left in 
the wake of past events. What do such projects require 
of the mender'-' What changes take place in the mend- 
ed? When is repair desirable? When is it inappropriate 
or impossible? Among the topics for examination: the 
restoration of works of art; repair of the environment; 
the function of criticism and revision; the place of legal 
reparations; the meaning of apology and reconcilia- 
tion; pleasure in Ruins. Enrollment limited to 16 first- 
year students. Wl {S} 4 credits 
Elizabeth V. Spelman (Philosophy) 
Offered Fall 2008 



FYS 113 Meanings and Values in the World of Work 

This course examines diverse issues regarding work: 
What significance does work have in our lives? How 
does it van' across communities, classes and profes- 
sions? How is it related to individual and group iden- 
tity? Mow is it related to family life and individual well- 
being''' What makes work desirable or undesirable and 
meaningful or meaningless? What rights, interests, and 
obligations does or should it involve? Is there a right or 
obligation to work? How should various opportunities, 
benefits and burdens associated with work be distrib- 
uted? How are work and education related? How should 
work be organized and controlled? What forms of coop- 
eration and conflict exist in work? How are notions of 
play and leisure related to work? Enrollment limited to 
16 first year students (E) WI {S} 4 credits 
Ernest 'Altera (Philosophy) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 116 Kyoto Through the Ages 
Kyoto is acclaimed by Japanese and foreigners alike as 
one of the worlds great cities, the embodiment in space 
and spirit of Japan's rich cultural heritage. It is also a 
thriving modern metropolis of over a million people, 
as concerned with its future as it is proud of its past. In 
this course students will study Kyoto past and present, 
its culture and people, so as to better understand how 
it became the city it is today. Students who complete 
the first-year seminar successfully may enroll in the 
Interterm course in Kyoto (when it is offered) following 
completion of the FYS course. Enrollment limited to 15 
first-year students. {H} WI 4 credits 
Thomas H. Rohlich (East Asian Languages and 
Literatures) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 118 The Groves of Academe 

A study of short stories, novels, memoirs and films that 
describe and interpret the postsecondary academic 
experience of the 20th century. Many of the selections 

are set at Smith. By reading about the real and fictional 
experiences of others, students may come to understand 



232 



First-Year Seminars 



their own. In addition to generating some serious ana- 
lytical essays, students will make presentations (alone 
and with others) on the works material in the Smith 
archives, and the issues under consideration. Enroll- 
ment limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 4 credits 
Patricia Skarda (English) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 124 African-American Folk Culture 

"Who are the folk?" and "What is culture?" This course 
will provide students with an opportunity to discover 
the multiple answers to these questions in the process 
of exploring African-American non-elite cultural ex- 
pressions; through an investigation of folk art, music, 
dance, theatre, literature, humor, material culture and 
religious belief systems, for example. Particular atten- 
tion will be given to the role of folklore in the percep- 
tion and transmission of shared values, beliefs, and 
attitudes among Americans of African descent. Students 
will be introduced to the role of ethnographic fieldwork 
and the collection of folklore through an analysis of 
selected publications of anthropologist and literary fig- 
ure, Zora Neale Hurston. Through in-depth discussion 
and analysis of assigned readings and the development 
of individual and/or group research projects, students 
will gain a greater understanding of anthropological 
fieldwork and ethnographic writing, the dynamics of 
culture (s) in general, and of African-American non- 
elite cultures in particular. WI 4 credits 
Adrianne Andrews (Anthropology) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 125 Midwifery in Historical and Cross-Cultural 
Perspective 

While most births worldwide are still attended by 
midwives, the midwife in the U.S. today is a rare birth 
attendant. Alternately feared and revered, the midwife 
has often served as a bellwether to how a society values 
its women and children. The course will also examine 
the history of midwives and midwifery in the European 
and American traditions, with particular attention 
to the manuals written by midwives to instruct other 
women about birth and women's health. The course 
will also study the varieties of birth experiences in other 
societies from cross-cultural perspectives, with special 
emphasis on health for women in the developing world 
today. Because the Pioneer Valley is an area with par- 
ticularly active groups of professional and direct-entry 
(lay) midwives, there will be opportunities to meet and 



discuss these issues with current practitioners. WI {H/S} 

4 credits 

Erika Laquer (History) 

Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 127 Adaptation 

How is something written turned into something 
filmed? What are the inevitable losses and possible 
gains in the process of screen adaptation? How is adap- 
tation a form of interpretation? What are, finally, some 
essential differences between texts and films, reading 
and viewing? We'll examine these questions and others 
by reading short stories by Ernest Hemingway, Cornell 
Woolrich, Guy de Maupassant, Ernest Haycox and 
Ryunosuke Akutagawa; Henry James's The Turn of 
the Screw; Kazuo Ishiguro's The Remains of the Day; 
and Susan Orlean's The Orchid Thief; and by viewing 
films by Tony Richardson, John Ford, Alfred Hitchcock, 
Jack Clayton, Akira Kurosawa, James Ivory and Spike 
Jonze. Practice in class discussion, in doing on-line 
and in-print research, and in giving short oral reports; 
frequent short papers in analysis and criticism, one of 
which will include embedded film clips; and a final 
creative project — a detailed proposal for adapting a 
written work chosen by the student. Enrollment limited 
to 16 first-year students. WI {L/A} 4 credits 
Jefferson Hunter (English) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 128 Ghosts 

This course explores what Toni Morrison in Beloved 
calls "the living activity of the dead": their ambitions, 
their desires, their effects. Often returning as figures of 
memory or history, ghosts raise troubling questions as 
to what it is they, or we, have to learn. We shall survey a 
variety of phantasmagorical representations in poems, 
short stories, novels, films, spiritualist and scientific 
treatises and spirit photography. This course counts 
towards the English major. WI {L} 4 credits 
Cornelia Pearsall 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 129 Rites of Passage 

How does Western literature represent the passage to 
adulthood of young women and young men? What are 
the myths, rituals, images and metaphors associated 
with this passage, and how do historical representa- 
tions intersect with modern lived experience? We will 
read narratives of transition from archaic and classical 



First- Year Seminars 






Greece and 20th-century Europe and North America, 
including Homer's Odyssey, the Homme Hymn to 
Demeter. the poems of Sappho and novels by Alain- 
Fournier, Thomas Mann and Willa (lather. Enrollment 
limited to 16 first-year students. \\ I {L} 4 credits 
lustina Gregory (Classics) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 130 Lions: Science and Science Fiction 

This seminar will explore lions from many perspec- 
tives. We will look at how lions are viewed b\ artists, 
scientists, science fiction writers, directors of documen- 
tary films and movie producers. We will also compare 
different kinds of science fiction and different kinds 
of mammals, exploring the science of fiction and the 
fiction of science. Readings will be by OS Card, CJ 
Cherryh. J Crowley, G Schallar and others. Enrollment 
limited to 16 first-year students. \VI Quantitative Skills, 
{N} 4 credits 

l trginia Hayssen (Biological Sciences) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 134 Geology in the Field 

Clues to over 500 million years of earth history can be 
found in rocks and sediments near Smith College. Stu- 
dents in this course will attempt to decipher this history 
by careful examination of field evidence. Class meet- 
ings will take place principally outdoors at interesting 
geological localities around the Connecticut Valley. 
Participants will prepare regular reports based on their 
observations and reading, building to a final paper on 
the geologic history of the area. The course normally 
includes a weekend field trip to Cape Cod. Enrollment 
limited to P.{N}WI 4 credits 
John Brady (Geology) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 135 Women of Discovery 

Women have set forth on journeys of exploration across 
the centuries, stepping into the unknown, challenging 
tradition, expanding the world. The story' of women's 
exploration is largely unknown. Who were these wom- 
en? What does it feel like to go into the unknown? How 
did they plan their trips, find their way? What dangers 
did they encounter? In this seminar we will survey 
several famous explorations and some not so famous 
ones. Students will work with historical documents, 
study navigation (including celestial), and develop 
their ability' to make oral and written presentations. 



Enrollment limited to 16 first-year students. \\ I Quanti- 
tative Skills 4 credits 

James Johnson (Exercise and Sport Studies) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 136 People and the American City: Visual Display 
of Complex Information 

An introduction to the graphical representation of 
quantitative ideas. Jane Jacob's classic conception of 
the way cities affect people and William H. White's 
pioneering approach to capturing information about 
the behavior of people in urban spaces will guide our 
exploration of the dynamic processes and relationships 
involving people in cities. Lecture, computing labs, 
field observation and discussion. Enrollment limited to 
16 Quantitative Skills. 4 credits 
Fletcher Blanchard (Psychology) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 141 Reading, Writing and Placemaking: Landscape 
Studies 

Landscape studies is the interdisciplinary consideration 
of how we view, define, and use the land, whether it be 
our backyard, a moonscape, or a national park. How 
does land become a landscape? How does space become 
a place? Scientists study and manipulate landscapes, 
and so do politicians, builders, hunters, children, 
artists and writers, among others. In this course, we 
will examine how writers, in particular, participate in 
placemaking, and how the landscape influences and 
inhabits literary texts. The course will include some 
landscape history and theory, visits by people who study 
landscape from nonliterary angles, and the discovery 
of how landscape works in texts in transforming and 
surprising ways. {L} Wl 4 credits 
Ann Leone (French Studies) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 142 Reacting to the Past 

Reacting to the Past is an interdepartmental, first-year 
seminar based on historical role-playing. In it students 
enact moments of high drama from the distant and 
not-so-distant past, and from cultures strange and 
engrossing. The seminar consists of two or three com- 
petitive games, with subjects varying depending on 
the section. These games include: "The Threshold of 
Democracy: Athens in 403 B.C."; "Confucianism and 
the Succession Crisis of the Wanli Emperor": "The Trial 
of Anne Hutchinson"; Henn VIII and the Reformation 



234 



First-Year Seminars 



Parliament"; "Rousseau, Burke, and the Revolution 
in France, 1791"; "The Trial of Galileo"; "Kansas 
1999, Evolution and Creationism"; and "Defining a 
Nation: Gandhi and the Indian Subcontinent on the 
Eve of Independence, 1945." In the "Athens" game, for 
example, students constitute themselves as the Athe- 
nian Assembly after the Peloponnesian War; assigned 
roles corresponding to the factions of the day, they 
quarrel about such issues as the democratic character 
of the regime, the resumption of an imperial foreign 
policy 7 , the fate of Socrates, etc. In the "Wanli" game 
they are the Hanlin Academy of 16th-century China, 
where a succession struggle inside the Ming dynasty 
is underway. In the "Hutchinson" game, they are the 
General Court of Massachusetts, conducting the trial of 
Anne Hutchinson, accused of heresy. Similarly in the 
other games, students are members of a court of law or 
legislative body. Class sessions are run by students; the 
instructor sets up the games and functions as an ad- 
viser. Students work in groups, debate issues, negotiate 
agreements, cast votes, and strive to achieve the group's 
objectives. Some students take on individual roles, such 
as Thomas More in the "Henry VIII" game, Lafayette in 
the "French Revolution" game, or Mahatma Gandhi 
in the "India" game. Course materials include game 
rules, historical readings, detailed role assignments 
and classic texts (e.g., Plato's Republic, the Analects of 
Confucius, Machiavelli's The Prince, Rousseau's Social 
Contract). Papers are all game- and role-specific; there 
are no exams. WI {H} 4 credits 
Sections: 

Section: Patrick Coby (Government) 
Section: David Cohen (Mathematics) 
Section: Daniel Gardner (History) 
Section: Richard Sherr (Music) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 147 Science and Politics of Food, Water and Energy 

A bottle of water sits on the shelf at the supermarket. 
Looking at this bottle, a geologist might wonder about 
the underground aquifer where the water originated. 
A chemist might muse on its chemical composition or 
the process through which petroleum products were 
turned into the plastic used to make the bottle. And a 
sociologist might ask who benefits from the sale of a 
product that was formerly a public good. This course 
will examine environmental issues from interdisciplin- 
ary perspectives. Through scholarly articles, field trips, 
case studies and "real-world" exercises, we will explore 
how disciplinary lenses frame the way economists, ge- 



ologists, historians, biologists, chemists, engineers and 
others think about food, water and energy. Enrollment 
limited to 18 students. (E) WI 4 credits 
Leslie King and Paul Wetzel 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 148 Black Culture and Identity in Motion 

African peoples arrived in the "New World" as captives 
of the transatlantic slave trade. This historical event 
was devastating yet it was also an occasion for new 
cultures and identities to be formed. This course will 
explore how histories of migration continue to shape 
the formation of the black cultures and subjectivity. 
Migration has enabled black peoples to refashion their 
identities, transform the often hostile environments 
they enter and make their mark on the art and cultures 
of their new societies. Among the topics for examina- 
tion will be the transatlantic and domestic slave trades, 
fugitivity, the Great Migration from the South, the post- 
Civil Rights era "reverse migration," and more recent 
immigrations by people from the Caribbean and Africa. 
We will use literature, history and journalistic accounts, 
as well as narrative and documentary films to ask how 
these stories help us understand the intricacies of this 
rich history. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year stu- 
dents. WI {L} 4 credits 
Dapfoie Lamothe 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 149 An Even Playing Field? Women, Sport and 
Equity 

This first-year seminar offers a survey of women's 
past and present involvement with sport and physical 
activity. What are the issues and debates surrounding 
gender in sport? How has the interpretation of Title IX 
supported and hindered full access to participation and 
leadership in sport for girls and women? This course 
is intended to help develop and foster critical thinking 
skills, to learn and understand the historical and social 
context underlying the current state of women's partici- 
pation in sport. Field trips to local sporting events and 
venues will be part of this seminar. Enrollment limited 
to 16. (WI) 
Christine Shelton 
Offered Spring 2009 

FYS 150 Sherlock Holmes and the Scientific Method 

If it were not for murder and other dastardly deeds, 
Sherlock Holmes probably would have been a scientist, 
based upon his classic method involving observations, 



First-Year Seminars 



235 



hypotheses, tests of hypotheses and finally conclusions. 
We will read a variety of Sherlock Holmes stories; learn 
to make geological observations; take field trips to 
observe natural settings, rivers, cemeteries; and then 
write our own Sherlock Holmes stones illustrating the 
scientific method. This is a writing intensive course that 
requires creativity' and the ability to observe and reason, 
but has no other prerequisites. Enrollment limited to 
U first-year students. WI {L/N} 4 credits 
Larry Meinert 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 153 Excavating Women 

The interdisciplinary seminar will explore a little- 
known area in the history of archaeology: the partici- 
pation and legacy of women from the time of Thomas 
Jefferson to today. Students will learn by analyzing 
the lives, achievements and experiences of women 
who devoted themselves to this pursuit or advanced it 
through their support of those who did. The class in- 
volves students in the professor's innovative methodol- 
ogy, archival archaeology and current area of research. 
Enrollment limited to 15. (E) WI {H/8} 4 credits 
Susan Heuck Allen 
Offered Fall 2008 



flies, SNL and others), the print media and advertising 
industry, and will conduct their own original research 
into the creation and uses of "German-ness" in the 21st 
century. Counts toward German studies major. Enroll- 
ment limited to 16 first-year students. WI {A} 4 credits 
Joseph McVeigh (German studies) 
Offered Spring 2009 

FYS 157 Literature and Science: Models of Time and 
Space 

Though science and art are often presented as mutu- 
ally exclusive fields of knowledge, scientific and liter- 
ary discourses cross in many ways. We'll read across 
the conventional boundaries of literary and scientific 
discourse, focusing on texts by scientists, fiction writers 
and playwrights that present new models of time and 
space. Texts may include work by scientists such as 
Lyell, Darwin, Einstein and Heisenberg, as well as by 
such writers of fiction and drama as Wells, Vonnegut, 
Stoppard, Brecht and McEwan. Key terms: deep time, 
time travel, multiple or parallel universes, deep space, 
wormholes, entropy. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year 
students. WI {L} 4 credits 

Luc Gilleman (English Language and Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 



FYS 154 Law, Community and Belonging 

This course explores the role of the law in policing the 
boundaries of belonging. How do communities invoke 
the law to classify insiders and outsiders, and with 
what consequences? How does this function of the law 
affect how individuals live their lives? Drawing on a 
diverse range of sources, from cases and statutes to the 
literature of mobility and displacement, this first year 
seminar will explore a variety of questions associated 
with the politics of belonging. (E) WI {S} 4 credits 
Alice Hearst (Government) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 156 Beyond the Hitler Channel: Fantasies of 
German-ness in American Popular Culture 

This seminar will explore the evolution and construc- 
; tion of "German-ness" — or those characteristics as- 
sociated in the American mind with German ethnicity 
and culture, in the American popular media since 
World War II. Participants will examine this evolution 
in a variety of media, including motifs from films {Tl)e 
Great Lebowski, The Producers, Dr. Strangelove 
Marathon Man, Indiana Jones and others), television 
series {The Simpsons, Frasier, South Park, TheX- 



FYS 158 Reading the Earth 

This course focuses on natural observation, to be 
practiced on the Smith campus and in the Connecticut 
River Valley; on recording what we see; and asking 
questions about how and why we see. About half our 
time will be given to noticing and recording and the 
rest to consideration of other observers, such as Darwin, 
Thoreau, Aldo Leopold, Barry Lopez, Edward Abbey. 
Students will keep journals of their observations, present 
these in a variety of forms, and prepare a final project 
that may involve other media besides the written word 
and engage other periods besides the present. Enroll- 
ment limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 4 credits 
Sharon Seelig (English Language and Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 159 What's in a Recipe? 

What stories do recipes tell? What cultural and familial 
information is embedded in a recipe? Who wrote the 
recipe? Why? How does it reflect her or his life and 
times? What do we learn about the geography, history 
and political economy of a location through recipes? 
Are recipes a way for an underrepresented group to tell 
its story? Does a recipe bolster or undemiine national 



236 



First-Year Seminars 



cooking? This seminar will look at recipes and cook- 
books from the Spanish-speaking world (in English) 
and theories of recipes from a variety of different 
sources. Our reading will inform our writing as we try 
to establish such connections as the politics of choco- 
late, olive oil cooperatives, avocado farms, the traveling 
tomato, potatoes and the cultural milieu from which 
each recipe emerged. Knowledge of Spanish is useful 
but not required. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year 
students. WI {L} 4 credits 

Nancy Saporta Sternbach (Spanish and Portuguese) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 160 The End of the World as We Know It: The Post- 
Apocalyptic Novel 

We will be exploring a wide range of literary scenarios 
that depict the collapse of civilization in the wake of 
plague-like disease and/or nuclear war. The motif of 
the post-Apocalyptic novel has become common, yet its 
roots go back as far (and farther than) Jack London's 
The Scarlet Plague and Mary Shelley's The Last Man. 
In the works we will be examining, we will witness the 
attempts of the few survivors of catastrophe to create 
a new world or merely to live in a world in which the 
past casts a vast shadow over the present. The society 
that comes forth from these worlds can be anarchic, 
dystopic, Utopian or a combination of these. Some 
works we will explore included/toy, Babylon, On the 
Beach, Riddley Walker, The Postman, A Canticle for 
Leibowitz, The Chrysalids, The Road and others. Film 
adaptations will be shown as part of the course. Enroll- 
ment limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 4 credits 
Gillian Kendall (English Language and Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 161 Immigration and the New Multiethnic 
Societies: From the Italian-American Experience to 
the Multicultural Italy of Today 

The first part of this course traces the histoiy of 
emigration from Italy to the United States. Students 
will read historical, literary and sociological texts, 
and study the representation of Italian Americans in 
movies and on television. The second part of the course 
studies contemporary Italy. In the last twenty years 
Italy has become a country of immigration. Questions 
of race, ethnicity, color, religion, gender, language 
and nationality are at the center of the formation of 
a new Italian identity. Some immigrants are starting 
to express their opinions on these issues. We will read 



some of their writings and compare them to the writings 
of Italian Americans. Are there experiences shared 
by all immigrants across the boundaries of time and 
culture? Can past migrations teach us something about 
stereotypes and intolerance? Do globalization and 
modem society, along with technological advances in 
communication, change the immigrant experience? En- 
rollment limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 4 credits 
Giovanna Bellesia (Italian) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 162 Ambition and Adultery: Individualism in the 
19th-century Novel 

We will use a series of great 19th-century novels to 
explore a set of questions about the nature of individual 
freedom, and of the relation of that freedom — 
transgression, even — to social order and cohesion. 
The books are paired — two French, two Russian; two 
that deal with a woman's adultery, and two that focus 
on a young man's ambition — Balzac, Pere Goriot; 
Flaubert, Madame Bovary; Dostoevsky, Crime and 
Punishment; Tolstoy, Anna Karenina (there are some 
additional readings in history, criticism and political 
theory). Enrollment limited to 16. WI {L} 4 credits 
Michael Gorra (English) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 163 The Holy Land 

This course will examine the concept of the "Holy 
Land" according to the religious traditions of Juda- 
ism, Christianity and Islam. It will explore the way the 
Holy Land as defined and sanctified in scripture and 
religious literature and in works of art, architecture, 
poetry, novel and film. The course will also explore 
the many attempts through the centuries by political 
monarchs to tap into the sanctity of the Holy Land in 
order to promote their own legitimacy. The objective is 
to emphasize the significance of this common heritage 
shared by Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and yet how 
it has inspired, at times of tension, religious and politi- 
cal conflict among followers of the three monotheistic 
traditions. Enrollment limited to 16. WI {H} 4 credits 
Suleiman Mourad (Religion) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 164 Issues in Artificial Intelligence 

An introduction to several current issues in the area of 
Artificial Intelligence, and their potential future impact 
on society. We start by exploring the nature of intel- 



First-Year Seminars 



237 



ligent behavior, and whether it is equivalent to rational 
thought. Deep philosophical questions are explored 
through the increasingly sophisticated game-playing 
capabilities of computers. Next we turn to learning and 
discovery by computers, and investigate fuzzy logic, 
neural networks and genetic algorithms. Finally we dis- 
cuss embodied intelligence, and in particular, robotics: 
its current state and its future prospects. Here there are 
serious implications for laborers as well as deep ethical 
issues. Prerequisites: Fluency with computers, includ- 
ing basic Web-searching skills. Four years of high 
school mathematics recommended. No programming 
experience necessary. Enrollment limited to 16. {M} 
4 credits 

Joseph O'Rourke (Computer Science) 
Offered Fall 2008 



grim humor and desperate religion that expresses the 
distinctive saga view of the world. \\ I {L} i credits 
Craig Davis (English) 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 168 Scribbling Women 

With the help of the Sophia Smith Collection and the 
Smith College Archives, this writing intensive course 
looks at a number of 19th- and 20th-century American 
women writers. All wrestled with specific issues that 
confronted them as women; each wrote about impor- 
tant issues in American society. Enrollment limited to 
15. Priority given to first year students. {L/H} WI 
4 credits 

Sherry Marker (American Studies) 
Offered Fall 2008 



FYS 165 Childhood in the Literatures of Africa and the 
African Diaspora 

A study of childhood as an experience in the present 
and a transition into adulthood and the ways in which 
it is intimately tied to social, political and cultural 
histories and identities. In Africa and the African 
diaspora, such issues entail specific crises focused on 
cultural alienation, economic deprivation, loss of lan- 
guage, exile and memory. The course focuses on four 
key questions: How does the enforced acquisition of a 
colonizer's language affect children as they attempt to 
master the codes of an alien tongue and culture? How 
do cultural values and expectations shape narratives 
of childhood in different contexts? How do narratives 
told from the point of view of children represent and 
deal with various forms of alienation? What are the 
relationships between recollections of childhood and 
published autobiography? Enrollment limited to 16.WI 
{L} 4 credits 

Katwiwa Mute (Comparative Literature) 
Offered Fall 2008 



FYS 169 Women and Religion 

An exploration of the roles played by religion in 
women's private and public lives, as shaped by and 
expressed in sacred texts, symbols, rituals and insti- 
tutional structures. Experiences of Christian, Hindu, 
Jewish, Muslim and Wiccan women facing religious 
authority and exercising agency. We will consider topics 
such as feminism and gender in the study of religion; 
God-talk and goddesses; women's bodies and sexual- 
ity; family, motherhood and celibacy; leadership and 
ordination; critiques of traditions, creative adaptations 
and new religious movements. Sources will include 
novels, films, poetry, and visual images in addition to 
scriptural and religious texts. WI {L/H} 4 credits 
Lois Dubin and Vera Shevzov (Religion) 
Offered Spring 2009 



FYS 167 Icelandic Saga 

A reading in translation of the classic sagas of medieval 
Iceland, including prose retellings of myths of the old 
gods; accounts of the Viking Age in the North Atlantic; 
the Norse settlement of Iceland and Greenland; the 
foundation of the kingless Icelandic Commonwealth 
(c. 930-1262 AD); the discover of the New World and 
conversion to Christianity c. 1000; the blood feuds of 
founding families and the powerful role of women in a 
society of limited resources and scarce honor; and the 



238 



Foreign Language Literature 
Courses in Translation 





Visiting faculty and some lecturers are 


generally appointed for a limited term. 


The courses 


listed below are fully described in the origi- 


EAL 261 


Major Themes in Literature: East-West 


nating department or program, shown by the initial 




Perspectives 


three-letter designation. (See pages 63-65 for the key 


EAL 360 


Seminar: Topics on East Asian 


to department/program designations.) 




Languages and Literatures 


For other courses that include literature in transla- 


GER 227 


Topics in German Studies 


tion, see the 


listings in comparative literature and film 


GER 230 


Topics in German Cinema 


studies. 












ITL 252 


Italy "La Dolce Vita" 


CLS 190 


The Trojan War 






CLS 227 


Classical Mythology 


RUS 126 


Readings in 19th-century Russian 


CLS 232 


Paganism in the Greco-Roman World 




Literature 


CLS 233 


Gender and Sexuality in Greco-Roman 


RUS 127 


Readings in 20th-century Russian 




Culture 




Literature 


CLS 234 


Rites of Passage 


RUS 235 


Dostoevsky 


CLS 235 


Life and Literature in Ancient Rome 


RUS 237 


The Heroine in Russian Literature from 


CLS 236 


Cleopatra: Histories, Fictions, Fantasies 




The Primary Chronicle to Tlirgenev's 
On the Eve 


CLT/ENG 202 Western Classics: Homer to Dante (WI) 


RUS 238 


Russian Cinema 


CLT/ENG 203 Western Classics: Chretien de Troyes to 


RUS 239 


Major Russian Writers 




Tolstoy (WI) 






CLT260 


Health and Illness: Literary Explorations 


POR 280 


Portuguese and Brazilian Voices in 


CLT 275 


Israeli Literature in International 
Context 




Translation 


EAL 231 


The Culture of the Lyric in Traditional 
China 






EAL 232 


Modern Chinese Literature 






EAL 236 


Modernity: East and West 






EAL 237 


Chinese Poetry and the Other 






EAL 238 


Literature from Taiwan 






EAL 240 


Japanese Language and Culture 






EAL 241 


Literature and Culture in Premodern 
Japan 






EAL 242 


Modem Japanese Literature 






EAL 243 


Japanese Poetry in Cultural Context 






EAL 244 


Construction of Gender in Modem 
Japanese Women's Writing 






EAL 245 


Writing, Japan, and Otherness 







239 



French Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Mary Ellen Birkett, Ph.D., Chair 

Ann Leone, (Professor of French Studies and Landscape 

Studies), Ph.D. 
Janie Yanpee, Ph.D. 
EglalDoss-Quinby,Ph.D. 
*' Martine Gantrel, Agre'ge'e de l'Universite, Docteur en 

Litterature Frangaise, Chair 

Associate Professors 
Jonathan Gosnell, Ph.D. 

'-Helene Visentin, M.A., D.E.A, Docteur de L'Universite 
'Dawn Fulton, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professor 

" 2 Nicolas Russell, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Christiane Metral, Lie. es. L. 

Fabienne Bullot, M.A. Lettres modernes, D.E.A. Arts du 

spectacle 
Anouk Alquier, M.A. 

Visiting Lecturer from the Ecole Normale Superieure 
in Paris 

Adeline Desbois, Agregee de l'Universite 



All classes and examinations in the department are 
conducted in French, with the exception of cross-listed 
courses, unless otherwise indicated. In all language 
courses, multimedia and work in the Center for Foreign 
Languages and Cultures (CFLAC) will supplement 
classroom instruction. 

Students who receive scores of 4 or 5 on the Ad- 
vanced Placement tests in French Language and Litera- 
ture may not apply that credit toward the degree if they 
complete any course in the sequence prior to 230. 

Qualified students may apply for residence in La 
Maison Frangaise, Dawes House. 



Language 



101 Accelerated Elementary French 

An accelerated introduction to French, based on the 
video method French in Action. Emphasis on the 
acquisition of listening, speaking and writing skills, 
as well as cultural awareness. Four class meetings per 
week and daily video and audio work. Students com- 
pleting the course normally enter FRN 102. First-year 
students who complete both 101 and 102 may qualify 
for study in Paris or Geneva by taking three courses 
at the 220 level and higher in their sophomore war. 



Students must complete both 101 and 102 to fulfill 
the honors distribution requirement for a foreign lan- 
guage. Enrollment limited to 20 per section. No spring 
preregistration allowed. {F} 5 credits 
Anouk Alquier, Eglal Doss-Quinby, Ann Leone 
Offered each Fall 

102 Accelerated Intermediate French 

Emphasis on the development of oral proficiency, with 
special attention to reading and writing skills using 
authentic materials such as poems and short stories. 
Students completing the course normally enter FRN 
220. Prerequisite: FRN 101. Enrollment limited to 20 
per section. Priority will be given to first-year students. 
{F} 5 credits 

Anouk Alquier, Ann Leone, Nicolas Russell 
Offered each Spring 

120 Intermediate French 

Review of basic grammar and emphasis on oral 
expression through role plays and discussions. Materi- 
als include a film, video clips, poems, articles, songs. 
Prerequisite: two or three years of high school French. 
Students completing the course normally go on to FRN 
220. Enrollment limited to 20 per section. Four class 
hours per week plus work in the Center for Foreign 



240 



French Studies 



Languages and Cultures (CFLAC). {F} 4 credits 
Christiane Metral 
Offered each Fall 

121 Conversation Section for French 120 

Optional for students concurrently enrolled in FRN 
120. Discussion of contemporary French issues, with 
emphasis on conversational strategies and speech acts 
of everyday life. Normally, activities will be based on the 
grammar and vocabulary studied in class each week. 
Enrollment limited to 15. Graded S/U only. {F} 1 credit 
To be announced 
Offered each Fall 

220 High Intermediate French 

Comprehensive review of language skills through weekly 
practice in writing and class discussion. Materials may 
include a movie or video, a comic book, a play and a 
novel. Prerequisite: three or four years of high school 
French, FRN 102 or 120 or permission of the department. 
Students completing the course normally go on to FRN 
230. Enrollment limited to 25 per section. {F} 4 credits 
Anouk Alquier, Mary Ellen Birkett, Adeline Desbois 
Offered each Fall 

220 High Intermediate French 

A continuation of FRN 120. Review of language skills 
through weekly practice in writing and class discussion. 
Materials may include a movie or video, a comic book, 
a play and a novel. Prerequisite: FRN 120, or permis- 
sion of the department. Students completing the course 
normally go on to FRN 230 or above. Enrollment lim- 
ited to 25 per section. {F} 4 credits 
Mary Ellen Birkett, Jonathan Gosnell 
Offered each Spring 

221 Conversation Section for French 220 

Optional for students concurrently enrolled in French 
220. Discussion of contemporary French and Franco- 
phone issues, with emphasis on conversational strate- 
gies and speech acts of everyday life. Activities will in- 
clude role playing and group work. Enrollment limited 
to 15. Graded S/U only. {F} 1 credit 
To be announced, Fall 2008 
To be announced, Spring 2009 
Offered each Fall and Spring 

240 Qa parle drolement: French Theatre Workshop 

The study and performance of contemporary Fran- 
cophone texts, including theatrical texts as well as 



poems, songs, scenes from films and other forms of 
discourse. By embodying a variety of roles and entering 
into dialogue with an array of characters, students will 
experiment with different ways of speaking and using 
language and become familiar with the many facets of 
contemporary French culture. Our work will culminate 
with a performance of scenes. In French. Prerequisite: 
FRN 230 or above. {L/A/F} 2 credits 
Fabienne Bullot 
Offered Spring 2009 

300 Advanced Grammar and Composition 

Emphasis on some of the more difficult points of 
French grammar and usage. Discussions of some basic 
concepts in linguistics. Some work on phonetics. A 
variety of writing assignments and writing exercises. 
Prerequisite: normally, one course in French at the 250 
level or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Nicolas Russell 
Offered Fall 2008 

385 Advanced Studies in Language 

Topic: Global French: The Language of Business and 
International Trade 

An overview of commercial and financial terminology 
against the backdrop of contemporary French business 
culture, using case studies, French television and news- 
papers and the internet. Emphasis on the acquisition of 
essential technical vocabulary, the development of skills 
in reading and writing business documents, and oral 
communication in a business setting. Prepares students 
for the Diplome du Francais des Affaires, lerdegre 
(DFA1) granted by the Paris Chamber of Commerce 
and Industry and administered at Smith College. Pre- 
requisite: a 300-level French course, a solid foundation 
in grammar, and excellent command of everyday vo- 
cabulary or permission of the instructor. {F} 4 credits 
Eglal Doss-Quinby 
Offered Spring 2009 

Intermediate Courses in 
French Studies 

230 Colloquia in French Studies 

A transition from language courses to more advanced 
courses in literature and culture. This course is de- 
signed to develop skills in expository writing and oral 
expression and to provide tools and vocabulary for criti- 



French Studies 



241 



cal thinking in French. Materials studied in the course 
include novels, films, essays and cultural documents. 
Students ma\ receive credit tor only one section of FRN 
230. Enrollment limited to 18. Prerequisite: FRN 220, 
or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits 
Offered each Fall and Spring 

Sections as follows: 

Fantasy and Madness 

A study of madness and its role in the literary tradi- 
tion. Such authors as Maupassant, Flaubert, Myriam 
Warner- Yieyra. J. -P. Sartre, Marguerite Duras. The 
imagination, its powers and limits in the individual 
and society. 
Adeline Desbois 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

A Reader's Romance with Paris 

Visions of contemporary Paris, both mythical and real, 

through novels, poetry, short stories, popular songs and 

images. 

Helene \ isentin 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

Voices of/from the Outskirts 

An examination of "les banlieues," or French suburbs 

through novels, diaries, popular songs and films from 

the 1980s to the present. 

Anoak Alquier 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

244 French Cinema 

"On the More ": Restlessness in French Cinema 
Even before the "road movie" became a cinematic 
genre, the French NewWave made restlessness its 
signature theme. In the first half of the term, we will 
explore how the French New Wave used restlessness 
both as a theme and a narrative device to frame the ex- 
istential quest and the crisis of meaning experienced by 
its young and attractive protagonists. In the second half 
of the semester, we will investigate the new meanings 
today's cinema has put on restlessness and the various 
ways in which it has built upon the formal innovations 
of the New Wave. Works by directors such as Frangois 
Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Agnes Varda, Claire Denis 
and Manuel Poirier. Readings in film criticism and 
film history. Students will be encouraged to develop a 
specifically cinematic discourse through close analysis 



of individual films. Papers and weekly screenings re- 
quired. Course taught In French. Prerequisite: FRN 230 

or permission of the instructor. {A/F} 4 credits 

Martinedantrel 
Offered Spring 20(H) 

251 France on Line 

Prerequisite: FRN 230 or higher. Students ma\ receive 
credits tor only one topic of FRN 251. Topics as follows: 

Speaking it ith the French — Cross-Cultural Connec- 
tions 

In this course, students will discuss "Frenchness" and 
"American-ness" in real time with real French students 
from a partner school in Paris. Using a customized on- 
line forum, as well as webcam and videoconferencing 
technology, students will exchange their views orally 
and in writing on a variety of issues such as cultural 
attitudes, social values and youth culture. Additional 
material includes films, songs and related readings in 
primary and secondary sources. Enrollment limited to 
16. {S/F} 4 credits 
Christiane Metral 
Offered Spring 2009 

The French Press on Line 
A study of contemporary French social, economic, 
political and cultural issues through daily readings of 
French magazines and newspapers on-line such asLe 
Monde. Le Figaro, Liberation. LeNouvel, Qbserva- 
teur. L Express. {S/F} 4 credits 
Jonathan Gosnell 
Offered Spring 2009 

253 Medieval and Renaissance France 

An introduction to the main historical, socio-political, 
artistic and intellectual currents that shaped pre- 
modem France, a period whose values and concept of 
"literature" were dramatically different from our own. 
Close readings of the major literary forms of the 12th 
through l6th centuries, such as Arthurian romance, 
lyric, farce, mock epic and essay, viewed in their cultur- 
al context. Students will acquire a critical framework 
and a vocabulary for discussing and analyzing these 
texts in French. We will also consider manuscript imag- 
es, architecture and modem films. Topics may include 
chivalry and the courtly code, love in the Western tradi- 
tion, oral culture and the rise of literacy humanism. 
scientific inquiry, religious refonn. Basis for the major. 
Prerequisite: a course of higher level than FRN 220 or 



242 



French Studies 



permission of the instructor. {L/S/F} 4 credits 
Eglal Doss-Quinby, Fall 2008 
Nicolas Russell, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

254 France Before the Revolution 

Topic: Power and Resistance in theAncien 
The 17th and 18th centuries gave rise to new social 
dynamics in France. The "honnete homme," the 
"precieuse," the "courtisan," and the "philosophe" co- 
exist with — and often contest — the established social 
order. We will examine the tension between these new 
social categories and official power, expressed through 
satire, literary and intellectual battles and other literary 
genres. Basis for the major. Prerequisite: a course above 
220 or permission of the instructor. {L/S/F} 4 credits 
Helene Visentin, Fall 2008 
Janie Vanpee, Spring 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

255j Speaking (Like The) French: Conversing, 
Discussing, Debating, Arguing 

A total immersion course in French oral expression. 
Using authentic cultural materials — French films and 
television programs such as round table discussions, 
formal interviews, intellectual exchanges and docu- 
mentary reporting — students will analyze and learn 
how the French converse, argue, persuade, disagree and 
agree with one another. Intensive practice of interactive 
multimedia exercises, role-playing, debating, present- 
ing formal exposes, and correcting and improving 
pronunciation. Prerequisite: one course above FRN 220 
or permission of the instructor. Admission by interview 
with instructor during advising week. Normally, this 
course does not count as preparation for Smith Junior 
Year Abroad programs in Paris and Geneva. Enrollment 
limited to 14. {F} 4 credits 
Christiane Metral 
Offered Interterm 2009 

256 From Revolution to Revolution: 1789 to 1968 

An introduction to important transformations in 19th- 
and 20th-century French society. We will examine 
various historic events and analyze their impact on 
political, social and cultural developments. We will 
gain a sense of how these symbolic moments have 
transformed French language and political thought, 
and how they are reflected in cultural forms such as 
literature, music, art and film. Prerequisite: a course 



above FRN 220 or permission of the instructor. {F/H/S} 
4 credits 

Jonathan Gosnell 
Offered Fall 2008 

260 Literary Visions 

Topic: Daily Life in 19th- and 20th-century France. 
A portrait of post-revolutionary France as Balzac, Flau- 
bert, Proust, and others have depicted it in their novels. 
Close readings of literary texts viewed in their cultural 
context. Special attention will be given to the evolution 
of the novel as a genre, from realism and naturalism 
to modern narratives. Prerequisite: FRN 253 or higher 
(excluding FRN 255j) or permission of the instructor. 
{L/F} 4 credits 
Martine Gantrel 
Offered Spring 2009 

Advanced Courses in French 
Studies 

Prerequisite: Two courses in French studies at the 200 
level or permission of the instructor. 

FRN 301/CLT 301 Readings of Contemporary Literary 
Theory in French 

For students concurrently enrolled in CLT 300 wishing 
to read and discuss in French the literary theory at the 
foundation of contemporary debate. Readings of such 
seminal contributors as Saussure, Iivi-Strauss, Barthes, 
Foucault, Derrida, Lacan, Cixous, Kristeva, Irigaray, 
Fanon, Deleuze, Baudrillard. Optional course. Graded 
S/U only. (E) {L/F} 1 credit 
Janie Vanpee 
Offered Fall 2008 

320 Women Writers of the Middle Ages 

What genres did women practice in the Middle Ages 
and in what way did they transfonn those genres for 
their own purposes? What access did women have to 
education and to the works of other writers, male and 
female? To what extent did women writers question the 
traditional gender roles of their society? How did they 
represent female characters in their works and what 
do their statements about authorship reveal about 
their understanding of themselves as writing women? 
What do we make of anonymous works written in the 
feminine voice? Reading will include the love letters 



French Studies 



243 



of Ileloise. the lais and fables of Marie de Prance, the 

songs of the trobairitz and women troitrcrcs. and the 
writings of Christine de Pi/an. {L/F} 4 credits 
Eglal Doss-Qumby 
Offered Spring 2009 

343 Cultural Wars at the Theater 

What effects does theater have on its audience and 
society at large? Does it corrupt the public and society; 
asJ.-J. Rousseau argued, or on the contrary, can it 
morally reform its audience and society, as Diderot 
believed? The debate about the moral and political 
uses and misuses of theater animated the public, the 
pbilosophes and their critics, as well as the state, from 
the mid-17th century until the Revolution and on to 
today. We will study the way authors, critics and the 
theater itself responded to the debate, from the classical 
drama of Racine and Moliere, to the street theater of 
the Paris fairs and the influence of the Comedie itali- 
enne, from the new genres of the drame bourgeois to 
the liberation of the theater during the Revolution, and 
in the 20th and 21st centuries from the uses of theatre 
to resist the German occupation during WWII to the 
recent debate about the censoring of a new staging of 
Voltaire's he Fanatisme, ou Mahomet le Prophete, and 
the contemporary theatre of Ariane Mnouchkine which 
aims to raise the political consciousness of an audience 
to the crisis of global migration today. There will be a 
number of film screenings. {L/F} 4 credits 
I Janie Vanpee 
Offered Fall 2008 

360 The Year 1830 

After more than three decades of conflict with prevail- 
ing traditions, a new generation of French men and 
women came into its own in an astonishingly rich 
12-month span — and they changed the face of France. 
By following the "headlines" throughout the year 
1830, we will encounter the political revolution of "Les 
Trois Glorieuses," the triumph of Romantic esthetics, 
the creation of French colonialism in Algeria, grow- 
ing awareness of the need for social action at home, 
and intensified longings for escape into exoticism and 
fantasy. We will study authors such as Hugo, Stendhal, 
Balzac as well as representative works of artists, musi- 
cians, journalists; and historians. {L/F} 4 credits 
Mary Ellen Birkett 
Offered Spring 2009 



"La France des 5 continents": Colonial or Post- 
colonial France? 

Can France be reproduced outside its geographic bor- 
ders, far beyond European shores? What manifestations 
of French culture, identity and language can be found 
in the world toda\ and why? This course will examine 
the objectives and consequences of French colonial 
activity on three different continents — North America, 
Asia and Africa — through a close reading of historical, 
political, cultural and literary texts. {H/S/F} 4 credits 
Jonathan GosneU 
Offered Fall 2008 



Seminars 



Prerequisite: One course in French studies at the 300 
level. 

393 French Intellectuals: Observing and Contesting 
Social-Order 

We will study the figure of the intellectual from the 
17th to the 20th century as well as some of the debates, 
polemics, intellectual activism in each period concern- 
ing subjects such as political power, intolerance, rac- 
ism, fanaticism, feminism and the death penalty. We 
will discuss how these debates have transformed French 
society, intellectual life and political thought; and we 
will examine the emergence of the public intellectual 
('Tintellectuel engage") and the antecedents of this 
recent concept by reading relevant scholarship and 
analyzing controversal ideas expressed through satire, 
philosophical texts and intellectual battles by authors 
such as La Bruyere, Moliere, Voltaire, Hugo, Zola, Sar- 
tre, Beauvoir, Bourdieu and Halimi. {L/F} 4 credits 
Helene Vise? it in 
Offered Spring 2009 

404 Special Studies 

Admission by permission of the department; normalK 
for junior and senior majors and for qualified juniors 
and seniors from other departments. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each vear 



244 



French Studies 



Cross-Listed Courses and 
Recommended Courses 
from Other Departments 
and Programs 

CLT 253 Literary Ecology 

Anne Leone 
Offered Spring 2009 

CLT 300 Foundations of Contemporary Literary Theory 

Janie Vanpee 
Fall 2008 

Study Abroad in Paris or 
Geneva 

Advisers: Paris: Eglal Doss-Quinby 
Geneva: Helene Visentin 

Majors in French studies who spend the year in Paris or 
Geneva will normally meet certain of the requirements 
during that year. 

Recommendations for study abroad: 

Normally, students going on Smith College Junior Year 
Abroad programs to Paris or Geneva should have com- 
pleted a minimum of four four-credit courses of college 
French, of which at least one should be taken in the 
spring semester preceding study abroad. Students be- 
ginning French with FRN 101 and 102 must take three 
more four-credit French courses in their sophomore 
year. Students should take one of the following: FRN 
251, 253, 254, 256, 260 or a course at a higher level. 
FRN 255j normally will not count as preparation for 
Smith College study abroad programs. 



The Major 



Requirements 

Ten four-credit courses at the 230 level or above, in- 
cluding: 

1. The basis for the French Studies major: FRN 230; 

2. The language requirement: two four-credit, 300- 
level language courses; 

3. Seven additional four-credit courses, as detailed 
below, two of which must be taken at the advanced 
level in the senior year. 

Students majoring in French studies must have a 
minimum of five 300-level French courses, including 
the language requirement. Majors must take at least 
three courses covering periods before the 20th century; 
FRN 253 and above may count toward this distribution 
requirement. In consultation with the major adviser, 
a student may take up to two four-credit courses from 
appropriate offerings in other departments; the focus of 
approximately one-third of each course should be on 
France and/or the Francophone world for the course to 
count toward the French major. Only one course count- 
ing toward the major may be taken for an S/U grade. 
Students considering graduate school in French studies 
are encouraged to take CLT 300/FRN 301, Contempo- 
rary Literary Theory. 

Honors 

Director: Eglal Doss-Quinby 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered Fall semester each year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



Advisers: Mary Ellen Birkett, Eglal Doss-Quinby, Dawn 
Fulton, Martine Gantrel, Jonathan Gosnell, Ann Leone, 
Nicolas Russell, Janie Vanpee 



Graduate 

Adviser: Mary Ellen Birkett 



French Studies 245 

580 Advanced Studies 

Arranged in consultation with the department 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

580d Advanced Studies 

8 credits 

Full-year course; offered each year 

590 Research and Thesis 

4 or 8 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

590d Research and Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; offered each year 



246 



Geology 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

H.Robert Burger, Ph.D. 
John B.Brady, Ph.D. 
Robert M. Newton, Ph.D. 

Professor-in-Residence 

Lawrence Meinert, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 

Bosiljka Glumac, Ph.D., Chair 
Amy Larson Rhodes, Ph.D. 



Assistant Professor 

Sara B. Pruss, Ph.D. 

Lecturer 

MarkE.Brandriss,Ph.D. 

Lecturer and Professor Emeritus 

H. Allen Curran, Ph.D. 

Laboratory Instructor 

Steven Gaurin, M.S., M.Phil. 



Students contemplating a major in geology should 
elect 1 1 1, 108, FYS 134 or l6l in conjunction with a 
non-lab 100-level geology course, and see a depart- 
mental adviser as early as possible. All 100-level courses 
may be taken without prerequisites. 

104 Global Climate Change: Exploring the Past, the 
Present and Options for the Future 

This course seeks to answer the following questions: 
What do we know about past climate and how do we 
know it? What causes climate to change? What have 
been the results of relatively recent climate change on 
human populations? What is happening today? What 
is likely to happen in the future? What choices do we 
have? {N} 4 credits 
Robert Newton 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

105 Natural Disasters: Confronting and Coping 

An analysis of earthquakes, tsunami, floods, hurricanes 
and tornadoes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, asteroid 
impacts and wildfires. Topics include the current status 
of predicting disasters, how to minimize their impacts, 
public policy issues, the effect of disasters on the course 
of human history, and the record of past great disasters 
in myth and legend, rapid climate change and what 
the future holds. Discussion sections will focus on uti- 
lizing GIS (geographic information systems) to investi- 



gate disaster mitigation. {N} 4 credits 

H. Robert Burger 

Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

106 Extraordinary Events in the History of Earth, Life 
and Climate 

A journey through the 4.6 billion-year history of global 
change focuses on the extraordinary events that shaped 
the evolution of the Earth and life. Some of these events 
include the origin of life, the buildup of oxygen in the 
atmosphere, mass extinctions of dinosaurs and other 
organisms, continental glaciations, profound changes 
in climate, and the evolution of humans. Discussion 
topics also include the changes that humans have been 
making to their environments, and the possible con- 
sequences and predictions for the future of our planet. 
{N} 4 credits 

Mark Brandriss, Spring 2009 
Bosiljka Glumac, Spring 2010 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

108 Oceanography: An Introduction to the Marine 
Environment 

An introduction to the global marine environment, 
with emphasis on the carbon cycle, seafloor dynam- 
ics, submarine topography and sediments, the nature 
and circulation of oceanic waters, ocean-atmosphere- 
climate interactions and global climate change, coastal 



Geology 



247 



processes, marine biologic productivity, and issues 

of ocean pollution and the sustainable utilization of 

marine resources by humans. At least one weekend 

field trip. Lab sections meet Monday and Tuesday. {N} 

4 credits 

Sara Pruss 

Offered Spring 2009. Spring 2010 

109 The Environment 

An investigation of the earth's environment and its 
interrelationship with people, to evaluate how hu- 
man activity impacts the earth and the sustainability 
of natural resources. We will study various natural 
processes important for judging environmental issues 
currently faced by citizens and governments. Topics 
include land-use planning within watersheds, water 
supply, nonrenewable and renewable energy, air pollu- 
tion and global climate change. {N} 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

111 Introduction to Earth Processes and History 

An exploration of the concepts that provide a unifying 
explanation for the causes of earthquakes and volcanic 
eruptions and the formation of mountains, continents 
and oceans. A discussion of the origin of life on earth, 
the patterns of evolution and extinction in plants and 
animals, and the rise of humans. Labs and field trips 
in the local area will examine evidence for ancient 
volcanoes, earthquakes, rivers, ice ages and dinosaur 
habitats. {N} 4 credits 
Amy Rhodes. Fall 2008 
Robert Newton, Fall 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

112 Archaeological Geology of Rock Art and Stone 
Artifacts 

What makes a mineral or a rock particularly useful as 
a stone tool or attractive as a sculpture? Students in this 
course will explore this and other questions by applying 
geological approaches and techniques in studying vari- 
ous examples or rock art and stone artifacts to learn 
more about human behavior; ecology and cultures in 
the past. This exploration across traditional boundaries 
between archaeology and earth science will include 
background topics of mineral and rock formation, 
weathering processes and age determination, as well 
as investigations of petroglyphs (carvings into stone 
surfaces), stone artifacts and other artifactual rocks 
(building stone and sculptures) described in the litera- 
ture, displayed in museum collections and found in the 



field locally. {10 4 credits 
Bosiljka Glumac 

Offered Spring 2009 

FYS 134 Geology in the Field 

Clues to over 500 million years of earth history can be 
found in rocks and sediments near Smith College. Stu- 
dents in this course will attempt to decipher this history 
by careful examination of field evidence. Class meet- 
ings will take place principally outdoors at interesting 
geological localities around the Connecticut Valley. 
Participants will prepare regular reports based on their 
observations and reading, building to a final paper on 
the geologic history of the area. The course normally 
includes a weekend field trip to Cape Cod. Enrollment 
limited to 17. WI{N} 4 credits 
John Brady 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

150/EVS 150 Modeling Our World: An Introduction to 
Geographic Information Systems 

A geographic information system (GIS) manages loca- 
tion-based (spatial) information and provides the tools 
to display and analyze it. GIS provides the capabilities 
to link databases and maps and to overlay, query and 
visualize those databases in order to analyze and solve 
problems in many diverse fields. This course provides 
an introduction to the fundamental elements of GIS 
and connects course activities to GIS applications in 
landscape architecture, urban and regional planning, 
archeology, flood management, sociology, coastal stud- 
ies, environmental health, oceanography, economics, 
disaster management, cultural anthropology and art 
history. Enrollment limited to 20. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Burger 
Offered Spring 2009 

FYS 150 Sherlock Holmes and the Scientific Method 
[fit were not for murder and other dastardly deeds, 
Sherlock Holmes probably would have been a scientist, 
based upon his classic method involving observations. 
hypotheses, tests of hypotheses and finally conclusions. 
We will read a variety of Sherlock Holmes stories; leani 
to make geological observations; take field trips to 
observe natural settings, rivers, cemeteries; and then 
write our own Sherlock Holmes stories illustrating the 
scientific method. This is a writing intensive course that 
requires creativity and the ability to observe and reason. 
but has no other prerequisites. \\ I {L/N} 4 credits 
Larry Memert 
Offered Fall 2008. Fall 2000 



248 



Geology 7 



161 Exploring the Local Geologic Landscape 

The Connecticut Valley region is rich with geologic 
formations and features that can be reached by a short 
van ride from Smith. This is a field-based course that 
explores that geology through nine weekly trips and 
associated assignments. Evidence for volcanoes, dino- 
saurs, glaciers, ancient lakes, rifting continents and 
Himalayan-size mountains in Western Massachusetts 
will be explored. A required course textbook will pro- 
vide important background information for the field 
trips. Students who have taken GEO 1 1 1 Introduction 
to Earth Processes and History or GEO 121/FYS 134 
Geology in the Field are not eligible to take GEO 161. 
This class, when taken in conjunction with a non-lab 
100-level course, can serve as a pathway to the geology 
major. Enrollment limited to 17. {N} 2 credits 
Steve Gaurin 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

221 Mineralogy 

A project-oriented study of minerals and the informa- 
tion they contain about planetary 7 processes. The theory 
and application to mineralogic problems of crystallog- 
raphy, crystal chemistry, crystal optics, x-ray diffraction, 
quantitative x-ray spectroscopy and other spectroscopic 
techniques. The course normally includes a weekend 
field trip to important geologic localities in the Adiron- 
dack Mountains. Prerequisite: 111, 108 or FYS 134. {N} 
4 credits 

John Brady, Fall 2008 
Mark Brandriss, Fall 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

222 Petrology 

An examination of typical igneous and metamorphic 
rocks in the laboratory and in the field in search of 
clues to their formation. Lab work will emphasize the 
microscopic study of rocks in thin section. Weekend 
field trips to Cape Ann and Vermont are an important 
part of the course. Prerequisite: 221. {N} 4 credits 
John Brady 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

223j Geology of Hawaiian Volcanoes 

A field-based course to examine volcanic materials 
and processes on the island of Hawaii. Eruptive styles 
and cycles, magmatic evolution, lava fountains, flows, 
lakes and tubes, normal faulting, crater formation, 
landscape development and destruction are among 



the topics to be considered. Participants must be physi- 
cally fit and prepared for considerable hiking in rough 
terrain. Each student will complete a field report on a 
geologic site in Hawaii. Prerequisites: completion of an 
introductory-level geology' course and permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 14. (E) {N} 1 credit 
John Brady and Mark Brandriss 
Offered January 2009 

231 Invertebrate Paleontology and Paleoecology 

A study of the major groups of fossil invertebrates 
including their phylogenetic relationships, paleoecol- 
ogy, and their importance for geologic-biostratigraphic 
problem-solving. Special topics include speciation, 
functional adaptations, paleoenvironments, consid- 
eration of the earliest forms of life, and the record of 
extinctions. At least one weekend field trip. Prerequisite: 
1 1 1, 108 or FYS 134; open without prerequisite to ma- 
jors in the biological sciences. {N} 4 credits 
Sara Pruss 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

232 Sedimentology 

A project-oriented study of the processes and products of 
sediment formation, transport, deposition and lithifica- 
tion. Modem sediments and depositional environments 
of the Massachusetts coast are examined and compared 
with ancient sedimentary rocks of the Connecticut 
River Valley and eastern New York. Field and laboratory 
analyses focus on the description and classification of 
sedimentary rocks and on the interpretation of their 
origin. The results provide unique insights into the 
geologic history of eastern North America. Two weekend 
field trips. Prerequisite: 1 1 1, 108 or FYS 134. {N} 4 credits 
Bosiljka Glumac 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

241 Structural Geology 

The study and interpretation of rock structures, with 
emphasis on the mechanics of deformation, behavior 
of rock materials and methods of analysis. Prerequisite: 
108, 1 1 1 or FYS 134 and 232 or 222. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Burger 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 201 1 

251 Geomorphology 

The study of landforms and their significance in terms 
of the processes that form them. Selected reference is 
made to examples in the New England region and the 



Geology 



249 



classic landforms of the world. During the first part 
of the semester laboratories will involve learning to 
use geographic information system (GIS) software 
to analyze landforms. During the second part of the 
semester laboratories will include held trips to examine 
landforms in the local area. Prerequisite: 1 11. 108 or 
FYS 134. {11} 4 credits 
Robert Newton 
Offered Spring 2000. Spring 2010 

270j Carbonate Systems and Coral Reefs of the 
Bahamas 

A field-oriented course to examine the diverse carbon- 
ate sediment-producing, modem environments typical 
of the Bahama Islands, including a variety of shallow 
subtidal shelf environments, coral reefs, lagoons, 
beaches, dunes and lakes. The Quaternary rocks that 
cap the islands will be studied to establish paleoen- 
vironmental analogues to the modem environments 
and to understand better the processes that modify 
sediments in the transition to the rock record. Students 
will conduct an individual or small group project. Pre- 
requisites: completion of an introductory-level geology 
course and permission of the instructors. Enrollment 
limited to 16. {N} 3 credits 
Bosiljka Gliimac and Paulette Peckol 
Offered January 2010 

301 EGR 311 Aqueous Geochemistry 

This project-based course examines the geochemical 
reactions between water and the natural system Water 
and soil samples collected from a weekend field trip 
will serve as the basis for understanding principles of 
pH, alkalinity, equilibrium thermodynamics, mineral 
solubility, soil chemistry, redox reactions, acid rain and 
, acid mine drainage. The laboratory will emphasize 
I wet-chemistry analytical techniques. Participants will 
prepare regular reports based on laboratory analyses, 
: building to a final analysis of the project study area. 
One weekend field trip. Prerequisite: One geology 
course and CHM 111. Enrollment limited to 9. {N} 
4 credits 
Amy Rhodes 
Offered Fall 2009 

309 EGR 319 Groundwater Geology 

A study of the occurrence, movement and exploitation 
of water in geologic materials. Topics include well 
hydraulics, groundwater chemistry, the relationship 
of geology to groundwater occurrence, basin-wide 



groundwater development and groundwater contami- 
nation. A class project will involve studying a local 
groundwater problem. Prerequisites: 111. FYS 134 and 
MTH 111. Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Newton 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2010 

311 Environmental Geophysics 
Theory and environmental applications of geophysical 
techniques including reflection and refraction seismol- 
ogy, gravimetry, electrical resistivity and magnetics. 
Extensive fieldwork including delineating aquifer 
geometries, determining buried landfill boundaries and 
mapping leachate plumes. Prerequisites: two geology 
courses at the intermediate level and MTH 111. Enroll- 
ment limited to 12. {N} 4 credits 
Robert Burger 
Offered Fall 2008 

AST 330 FG30a Seminar: Topics in Astrophysics: 
Asteroids 

334 Carbonate Sedimentology 
A detailed study of the formation, deposition, lithifica- 
tion and diagenesis of carbonate sediments. Topics 
include modem carbonate-producing environments 
and the history of carbonate rocks from the Precam- 
brian to the present. Class meetings will include faculty 
and student presentations and practical work with thin 
sections and hand samples. One weekend field trip to 
classic carbonate localities in New York State. Prerequi- 
site: 232. Enrollment limited to 14. {N} 4 credits 
Bosiljka Glumac 
Offered Spring 2009 

361 Tectonics and Earth History 

A study of the interactions between global tectonic pro- 
cesses, continental growth and evolution, the formation 
and destruction of marine basins, and the history of 
life as revealed from the rock and fossil record of planet 
Earth. Student presentations and discussions about re- 
cent developments in geology are central to the course. 
Prerequisites: all intermediate-level required courses 
in geology, any of which may be taken concurrently; 
geology minors with permission of the instructor. {N} 
4 credits 

Mark Brandriss, Spring 2009 
Bosiljka Glumac, Spring 2010 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 



250 



Geology 



370 Economic Geology 

Since pre-history all civilizations have used natural 
resources for food, shelter and clothing. Economic 
geology focuses on the discovery and understanding 
of natural resources, particularly metals such as cop- 
per, iron, gold and silver. This course focuses upon the 
geological and geochemical processes that concentrate 
elements to economic levels. Since ore deposits can 
occur in almost all rock types, this course builds on 
other geology courses to better understand how ore 
deposits have formed in the past and how we can use 
knowledge of existing deposits to make new discoveries. 
Prerequisite: GEO 222 (may be taken concurrently), or 
permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Lawrence Meinert 
Offered Spring 2010 

400 Advanced Work or Special Problems in Geology 

Admission by permission of the department. Proposals 
must be submitted in writing to the project director by 
the end of the first week of classes. 1 to 4 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered both semesters each year 

The following two engineering courses are considered 
equivalent to a 300-level geology course and can be 
used to satisfy the elective advance level course require- 
ment. 



effective stress, volume change, stress-strain relation- 
ships and dynamic properties. While soil mechanics 
will be a major focus of the class, the principles covered 
will be broadly applicable. Students will apply these 
basic principles to explore an area of interest through 
an in-depth project. Prerequisite: EGR 272 or GEO 241. 
{N} 4 credits 
Glenn Ellis 
Not offered in 2008-09 

For additional offerings, see Five College Course Offer- 
ings by Five College Faculty. 



The Major 



Advisers: for the class of 2009, Amy Rhodes; for the 
class of 2010, Robert Newton; for the class of 2011, John 
Brady; for the class of 2012, Sara Pruss 

Advisers for Study Abroad: John Brady, 2008-09; Sara 
Pruss, 2009-10 

Basis: 1 1 1, or 108, or FYS 134, or l6l in conjunction 
with a non-lab 100-level geology course. 

Alternative Basis: GEO 161 (2 credits) plus one of GEO 
104, 105, 106 or 109 (4 credits each); total of 6 credits. 



EGR 315 Ecohydrology 

This course focuses on the measurement and modeling 
of hydrologic processes and their interplay with ecosys- 
tems. Material includes the statistical and mathemati- 
cal representation of infiltration, evapotranspiration, 
plant uptake and runoff over a range of scales (plot to 
watershed). The course will address characterization of 
the temporal and spatial variability of environmental 
parameters and representation of the processes. The 
course includes a laboratory component and introduces 
students to the Pioneer Valley, the cloud forests of Costa 
Rica, African savannas and the Florida Everglades. 
Prerequisites: MTH 112 or 114 and MTH 245 or 241. 
4 credits 
Andrew Guswa 
Offered Fall 2009 

EGR 340 Mechanics of Granular Media 

An introduction to the mechanical properties of materi- 
als in which the continuum assumption is invalid. 
Topics include classification, hydraulic conductivity, 



Requirements: Eight semester courses above the basis 
and including the following: 221, 222, 231, 232, 241, 
251, 36l and one additional course at the advanced 
level. Majors planning for graduate school will need 
introductory courses in other basic sciences and math- 
ematics. Prospective majors should see a departmental 
adviser as early as possible. 

A summer field course is strongly recommended for 
all majors and is a requirement for admission to some 
graduate programs. Majors may petition the depart- 
ment to have a summer field course substitute for the 
requirement of a second advanced-level course. 

The Minor 

Advisers: same as for the major. 

Many emphases are possible within the geology minor. 
For example, a student interested in earth processes 
and history might take 106, 111, FYS 134, 231, 232, 



Geology 



251 



251, 361 and an elective course. A student ooncemed 
about environmental and resource issues might take 
105, 111, 108, 109, 221, 232 and 309- Students contem 
plating a minor in geologj should sir a departmental 
adviser as early as possible to develop a minor course 
program. This program must be submitted to the de- 
partment for approval no later than the beginning of 
the senior year 

Requirements: Six semester courses including 111, 
or 108, or FYS 134 and a total of no more than three 
courses at the 100 level. 



Honors 



Director: Amy Rhodes, 2008-09 
Robert Newton, 2009-10 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

432d Thesis 

12 credits 

Full -year course; Offered each year 



Field Experiences 

The department regularly sponsors an off-campus 
field-based course for geology students. This course 
ma\ be entirely during Intertenn. such ;ls recent 
courses in the Bahamas and Hawaii. Or it may be a 
spring semester course with a field trip during spring 
break or during the following summer, such as recent 
courses in Death Valley. Iceland and Greece. Because 
there are many important geologic features that are not 
found in New England, geology majors are encouraged 
to take at least one of these courses to add breadth to 
their geologic understanding. 

The geology department is a member of the Keck 
Geology Consortium, a group of eighteen colleges 
funded by the National Science Foundation to sponsor 
cooperative student/faculty summer research projects 
at locations throughout the United States and abroad. 



Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



252 



German Studies 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

" 1 JocelyneKolb,Ph.D. 

Joseph George McVeigh, Ph.D., Chair 

Visiting Assistant Professor 

Joel Westerdale, Ph.D. 

Senior Lecturer 

Judith Keyler-Mayer, MA 



Lecturer 

Anca Holden, MA 

Professor Emerita 

§1 Gertraud Gutzmann, Ph.D, Director, HamburgJYA 
2008-09 



Students who plan to major in German studies or who 
wish to spend the junior year in Hamburg should take 
German in the first two years. Students enrolled in 
220, 222 or higher course should consider taking the 
Zertifikat Deutsch examination administered by the 
Goethe Institute and offered each spring on campus. 
The Zertifikat Deutsch is highly regarded by private and 
public sector employers in all German-speaking coun- 
tries as proof of well-developed communicative skills in 
basic German. Students are also recommended to take 
courses in other departments that treat a German topic. 

Students who enter with previous preparation in 
German will be assigned to appropriate courses on the 
basis of a placement examination. 

Students who receive a score of 4 or 5 on the Ad- 
vanced Placement test may not apply that credit toward 
the degree if they complete for credit 1 lOy, 1 1 ly, 1 1 5, 
200 or 220. 



A. German Language 

Credit is not granted for the first semester only of the 
yearlong elementary language courses. 



110y Elementary German 

An introduction to spoken and written German, and 
to the culture and history of German-speaking people 
and countries. Emphasis on grammar and practical 
vocabulary for use in conversational practice, written 
exercises, and listening and reading comprehension. 



By the end of the year, students will be able to read 

short edited literary and journalistic texts as a basis 

for classroom discussion and compose short written 

assignments. Students who successfully complete this 

yearlong course and take GER 200 and GER 220 will 

be eligible for the Junior Year Abroad in Hamburg. {F} 

10 credits 

Section I: Joel Westerdale 

Section 2: Anca Holden 

Section 3: Judith Keyler-Mayer 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

103 Conversation Practice for German 110 

Guided practice in basic conversational situations 
using everyday German. Discussion activities and role- 
playing using topics and themes coordinated with in- 
dividual short video units. Some short written exercises 
based on listening comprehension. Optional course 
only for students currently enrolled in German 1 lOy 
and Illy. Graded S/U only. (E) {F} 1 credit 
Margaret Zelljadt 
Offered Fall 2008 

104 Conversation Practice for German 110 

Guided practice in basic conversational situations 
using everyday German. Discussion activities and 
role-playing using topics and themes coordinated with 
individual 20-minute video units to be watched outside 
of class. Some short written exercises based on listening 
comprehension and classroom discussion. Optional 
course available only to students currently enrolled in 



German Studies 



253 



German I lOy and Illy. Graded S/U only. (E) {F} 

1 credit 

Margaret '/.elljadt 
Offered Spring 2009 

200 Intermediate German 

A review of basic grammatical concepts mid the study 

of new ones, with emphasis on vocabularj building. An 

exploration of contemporary German culture through 
literary and journalistic texts, with regular practice in 
written and oral expression. Prerequisite: HOy, permis- 
sion of the instructor, or by placement. {F} 4 credits 
Sec. I. Joseph McVeigh 
Sec. 1: Judith Kevler- Mayer 
Offered Fall 2008 

203 Intermediate Conversation Practice I 

Guided practice in intermediate-level conversational 
situations in everyday German. Through the use of 
audio-visual and printed materials taken from contem- 
porary German media, students will be able to practice 
the grammatical structures, idioms and conversational 
strategies commonly used in German-speaking Europe 
today. Optional course only for students currently en- 
rolled in GER 200. Graded S/U only. {F} 1 credit 
Jocelyne Mb. Judith Keyler-Mayer, Joseph McVeigh, 
Anca Holden 
Offered Fall 2008 

204 Intermediate Conversation Practice II 

! A continuation of the intermediate-level conversational 
. practice begun in GER 203. Optional course only for 

students, currently enrolled in GER 220. Graded S/U 

only. {F} 1 credit 

Judith Keyler-Mayer, Joseph McVeigh, Anca Holden 

Offered Spring 2009 

220 Advanced Intermediate German 

Introduction and practice of more advanced elements 
of grammar, with an emphasis on expanding vocabu- 
laiy, Discussion of topics in modern German culture; 
development of reading skills using unedited literary 
and journalistic texts; weekly writing assignments. 
Students in this course are eligible to take the exami- 
nation for the Zertifikat Deutsch that is administered 
at Smith each spring by the Goethe Institute. The Zer- 
tifikat Deutsch is highly regarded by private and public 
sector employers in all German-speaking countries as 
proof of well-developed communicative skills in basic 
German. Students who successfully complete GER 220 



will be eligible for the Junior Year Abroad in Hamburg. 

Prerequisite: 200, permission of the instructor, or In 
placement. {F} 4 credits 

Judith Keyler-Mayer 
Offered Spring 20(H) 

341 Language and Power 

Language as the transmission of politics and culture: 
a study of the German-language media (newspapers, 
magazines, internet, television, supplemented by a va- 
riety of films and texts to be chosen in accordance with 
the interests and academic disciplines of students in the 
class). Active and intense practice of written and oral 
German through weekly compositions and linguistic 
exercises, as well as discussions and presentations ana- 
lyzing the manner in which linguistic nuances reflect 
cultural and political practices. Conducted in German. 
Prerequisite: GER 222, 229 or permission of the in- 
structor or by placement. {F/L} 4 credits 
Jocelyne Mb 
Offered Fall 2008 

B. German Literature 
and Society (Taught in 
German) 

222 Topics in German Culture and Society 

Pending Cap Approval. 

Topic: Growing Up in Germaii-Speaking Europe. 
This course will focus on the concept and the reality of 
growing up in German-speaking Europe at different 
points in the past and in the present. Participants will 
examine texts and films for and about children and 
analyze the societal role of children and young adults 
and their education through the centuries. Readings of 
texts by Pestalozzi, Goethe, Sigmund Freud, Thomas 
Mann, Ludwig Thoma, Johanna Spyri, Waldemar 
Bonsels, Erich Kastner and others. Taught in German. 
Prerequisite: GER 220, permission of the instructor or 
by placement. {F/L} 4 credits 
Judith Keyler-Mayer 
Offered Spring 2009 

229 Topics in Literary Forms and Genres 

A study of the form, function and fashions of literature 
through a consideration of one particular literary 
genre, lor example: lyric poetry; drama (comedy, trag- 



254 



German Studies 



edy, Geschichtsdrama); short prose fiction; the novel 
(epistolary novel, Bildungsroman, historical novel). 
Through close reading, literary analysis and attention 
to the historical and aesthetic context of the works in 
question, students will gain intense practice in spoken 
and written German. Prerequisite: 220, 222, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. In German. 

Topic: Lyric Poetry From Minnesang to Pop Song 
From Medieval love lyrics (Minnesang ) to the seduc- 
tive verses sung by Marlene Dietrich and beyond, we 
will read closely, analyze and discuss a wide selection of 
poetry including sonnets, ballads, Volkslieder, elegies, 
forms of free verse and parodies of various kinds. We 
will also study the musical settings of poems, classic 
and popular. Among the poets discussed will be Goethe, 
Heine, Annette von Droste-HuTshoff, Hugo von Hof- 
mannsthal, Rilke, Gottfried Benn, Else Lasker-Schiiler, 
Bertolt Brecht, Ernst Jandl and Ingeborg Bachmann. 
{F/L} 4 credits 
Jocelyne Mb 
Offered Fall 2008 

238 Topics in Media Studies 

Topic: Media and Society in German-Speaking Eu- 
rope From the Middle Ages to the Present. This course 
will introduce the student to the basic principles and 
methodologies of media studies and examine the evo- 
lution of communications media from the Middle Ages 
to the present in German-speaking Europe. The effect 
of the media on the political, societal and economic de- 
velopment of Central Europe will be a particular focus 
of the course. Prerequisite: GER 220, 222 or permission 
of the instructor. In German. {L/H/F} 4 credits 
Joseph McVeigh 
Offered in 2009-10 

351 Advanced Topics in German Studies 

Each topic will focus on a particular literary epoch, 
movement, genre or author from German literary cul- 
ture. All sections taught in German. 

Topic: Ingeborg Bachmann 
Ingeborg Bachmann (1926-73) has been recognized 
as one of the leading writers of the postwar decades in 
German-speaking Europe. This seminar will examine a 
cross-section of her writings, including her poetry, radio 
plays, short prose and critical writings and set them in 
the historical, political and intellectual context of the 



times. Prerequisite: GER 222, 229 or permission of the 
instructor. 4 credits {L/F} 
Joseph McVeigh 
Offered Spring 2009 

400 Special Studies 

Arranged in consultation with the department. Admis- 
sion for junior and senior majors by permission of the 
department. 
1-4 credits 
Offered both semesters each year 

C. Courses in English 

FYS 156 Beyond the Hitler Channel: Fantasies of 
German-ness in American Popular Culture 

This seminar will explore the evolution and construc- 
tion of "German-ness" — or those characteristics as- 
sociated in the American mind with German ethnicity 
and culture, in the American popular media since 
World War II. Participants will examine this evolution 
in a variety of media, including motifs from films (The 
Big Lebowski, The Producers, Dr. Strangelove, Mara- 
thon Man, Indiana Jones and others), television series 
(Tide Simpsons, Frasier, South Park, TheX-files, SNL 
and others), the print media, and advertising industry, 
and will conduct their own original research into the 
creation and uses of "German-ness" in the 21st cen- 
tury. Counts toward German studies major. Enrollment 
limited to 16 first-year students. WI {A} 4 credits 
Joseph McVeigh (German Studies) 
Offered Spring 2009 

160 The Cultures of German-Speaking Europe 

This course provides curious students with a practical 
guide to the culture of German-speaking Europe from 
Teutonic barbarians to Teutonic rap. The main focus 
of this course will rest upon the interconnectedness of 
many diverse areas of German culture through the 
centuries (literature, art, philosophy, music, domestic 
culture, popular culture) and their relationship to con- 
temporary life and society. Class discussions and practice 
sessions will emphasize the integration of this knowledge 
into a wide variety of communicative settings from 
casual conversation to more formal modes of address. 
Conducted in English. No previous knowledge of Ger- 
man culture or language required. {L/H} 4 credits 
Joseph McVeigh 
Offered Fall 2008 



German Studies 






230 Topics in German Cinema 

Topic: Weimar Film, During the brief period between 

the tall of the Kaiser and the rise of the Nazis, Germany 

was a hotbed of artistic and intellectual innovation, 
giving rise to an internationally celebrated film in- 
dustry. With an eye to industrial, political and cultural 
forces, this course explores the aesthetic experience of 
modernity and modernization through formal, nar- 
rative and stylistic analyses of feature films from the 
"Golden Age" of German cinema. Films by W'iene, 
Lang. Murnau. Pabst. Kuttmann. Sternberg. Sagan, 
Riefenstahl. No knowledge of German required. {L/H/A} 
4 credits 
Joel Westerdale 
Offered Fall 2008 

248 Topics in the Culture of Science and Technology of 
German-Speaking Europe 

Tbpk: Laboratories of Modernity: 1800/1900. This 
course investigates the interchange of ideas between 
the realms of natural science, pseudo-science, philoso- 
phy and literature at the turns of the 19th and 20th 
centuries. We will examine the important influence 
scientific developments played in cultural production 
during these pivotal periods, while at the same time 
■ exploring the cultural environments that fostered these 
scientific innovations. We will consider issues that 
continue to plav a central role in today's discourse — 
' identity, sexuality, cognition — in terms of contempo- 
rary developments in chemistry, biology and physics, 
•■ as well as psychology and mathematics. To this end, 
. scientific works from Mach, Weininger, Einstein and 
1 Darwin, among others, will be brought into dialogue 
with literary texts from writers such as Kafka, Goethe, 
Lichtenberg and Musil, as well as theoretical texts from 
Nietzsche and Freud. Readings and discussion in Eng- 
lish. {L} 4 credits 
Joel Westerdale 
Offered Spring 2009 

298 Nexus-Topics in German Culture 

The two-credit courses are designed to bring together 
thematically disparate courses from diverse disciplines 
; through a unifying topic based in the culture of 
' German-speaking Europe. Each topic will draw upon 
1 specific aspects of each connected course in order to 
amplify the intellectual experience of students in those 
courses in an interdisciplinary environment. May be re- 
peated for credit when the topic changes. (E) 2 credits 



Topic: Cigarette Albums and Popular Education in 
the Third Reich 

Germany in the 1930s witnessed not only the rise of the 
Nazis but also the massive manipulation of popular 
culture in the service oi politics. Among the more 
powerful propaganda tools of this era were the wildly 
popular illustrated stickers in cigarette packs that 
could be collected in a special album. Drawing upon 
an extensive private collection of such albums, this 
course will examine certain recurring themes of Nazi 
propaganda presented in this form that relate to the fol- 
lowing courses in other departments: Early Germanic 
and medieval historj 1 1 1ST 227, ENG 21 8, PRS 306), 
German colonies in Southern Africa (AAS 218), and 
20th-century European history 7 (HST 255). Conducted 
in English. (E) {H} 2 credits 
Joseph McVeigh 
Offered Spring 2009 

Cross-Listed Courses 

CLT 218 Holocaust Literature 

Creative responses to the destruction of European Jewry, 
differentiating between literature written in extremis 
in ghettos, concentration/extermination camps, or in 
hiding, and the vast post-war literature about the Holo- 
caust. How to balance competing claims of individual 
and collective experience, the rights of the imagination 
and the pressures for historical accuracy. Selections 
from a variety of artistic genres (diary, reportage, poetry, 
novel, graphic novel, film, monuments, museums) 
and critical theories of representation. All readings in 
translation. {L/H} 4 credits 
Justin Gammy 
Offered Fall 2008 

JUD 110j Elementary Yiddish 

An introduction to Yiddish language in its cultural 
context. Fundamentals of grammar and vocabulary 
designed to facilitate reading and independent work 
with Yiddish texts. The course is divided into diree 
parts: intensive language study every morning; a col- 
loquium on aspects of Yiddish cultural history every 
other day; and an afternoon service internship with the 
collection of the National Yiddish Book Center, the larg- 
est depositor.' of Yiddish books in the world. Admission 
by permission of the instructor: contact Justin Camm) 
prior to the November registration period. Smith enroll- 
ment limited to 9. {H} 4 credits 



256 



German Studies 



Taught on site at the National Yiddish Book Center. Of- 
fered jointly with Hampshire College and the National 
Yiddish Book Center. 

Justin Cammy (Smith College), Rachel Rubinstein 
(Hampshire College) and staff of the National Yid- 
dish Book Center 
Offered Interterm 2009 



D. Courses Offered on 
the Junior Year Abroad 
Program in Hamburg 



260 Orientation Program in Hamburg 

The Orientation Program has three main goals: 1) to 
ensure daily practice in spoken and written German 
needed for study at the University of Hamburg; 2) to 
offer a comprehensive introduction to current affairs in 
Germany (political parties, newspapers and magazines, 
economic concerns); 3) to offer extensive exposure 
to the cultural and social life of Hamburg and its 
environs. Students are also introduced to German ter- 
minology and methodology in their respective majors, 
to German academic prose style, and to a characteristic 
German form of academic oral presentation, the 
Referat. The Orientation Program culminates in the 
presentation of a Referat on a topic in each student's 
academic area of concentration. 2 credits 
Manfred Bonus, Andreas Stuhlmann and staff 
Offered Fall 2008 for five weeks on the Junior Year 
in Hamburg 

270 German History and Culture from 1871 to 1945 

This course covers the Wilhelminian Empire, the 
Weimar Republic and the Third Reich. For the Weimar 
Republic, the focus will be on the political, economic, 
social and cultural issues the republic was facing. For 
the Third Reich, we will focus on the establishment of 
dictatorship; the persecution of Jews; everyday life in 
Hitler Germany; World War II; resistance and opposi- 
tion; the end of the Third Reich. Limited to students 
enrolled in the JYA program. (H/F) 4 credits. 
Rainer Nicolaysen 
Offered Fall 2008 on the Junior Year in Hamburg 



280 Theater in Hamburg: Topics and Trends in 
Contemporary German Theater 

This course offers an introduction to the German the- 
ater system; through concentration on its historical and 
social role, its economics and administration. We will 
study the semiotics of theater and learn the technical 
vocabulary to describe and judge a performance. Plays 
will be by German authors from different periods. The 
JYA program will cover the cost of the tickets. Atten- 
dance at four or five performances is required. Limited 
to students enrolled in the JYA program. {L/A/F} 
4 credits 
Jutta Gutzeit 
Offered Fall 2008 on the Junior Year in Hamburg 

290 Studies in Language II 

The objective of this course is to improve written and 
oral skills by building on work done during the orienta- 
tion program. Emphasis in class will be on treatment of 
complex grammatical structures as well as dictations, 
grammar and listening comprehension. Students will 
be taught how to compose a term paper (Hausarbeit) 
in the German fashion. In addition, there will be an 
optional weekly phonetics tutorial. {F} 4 credits 
Jutta Gutzeit 

Offered Fall 2008 and Spring 2009 on the Junior 
Year in Hamburg 

310 Studies in Language III 

The objective of this course is to improve written and 
oral skills by building on work done during the ori- 
entation program or the winter semester. Emphasis 
in class will be on treatment of complex grammatical 
structures as well as dictations, grammar and listen- 
ing comprehension. Students taking the course in the 
winter semester will be taught how to compose a term 
paper (Hausarbeit) in the German fashion. In addition, 
there will be an optional weekly phonetics tutorial. 
Preparation for the qualifying exam "Deutsch als 
Fremdsprache" at the University of Hamburg. Prerequi- 
site: 290 or by placement. {F} 4 credits 
Jutta Gutzeit 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 on the Junior Year 
in Hamburg 

320 Germany 1945-1990: Politics, Society and Culture 
in the Two German States 

This course, which provides a continuation of 270, will 
cover the post-war period of occupation; the founding 



German Studies 



257 



of two German states; German-German relations dur 

ing the Cold War; and the reunification of Germany. 

Historical analysis; reading of selected Literary works; 

screening of films. Prerequisite: 270, or permission of 

the instructor. Limited to students enrolled in the JYA 

program. {L/H/F} 4 credits 

Rainer Nicolaysen 

Offered Spring 2009 on the Junior Year in Hamburg 



The Major 



Advisers: Judith Ke\ ler-Mayer, Jocelyne Kolb (Fall). 
Joseph Veigh, Joel Westerdale 

Adviser for Study Abroad: Jocelyne Kolb (Fall); Joseph 
McVeigh (Spring) 

Courses other than those in the Smith catalogue taken 
during the Junior Year Abroad in Hamburg will be 
numbered differently and will be considered equivalent 
to (and upon occasion can be substituted for) required 
courses offered on the Smith campus, subject to the 
approval of the department. 

Basis: GER 200 (Intermediate German) 

Requirements: Ten courses (or 40 credits) beyond the 
basis. 



Required Courses: 

GER 160 The Cultures of German-Speaking Europe 
Advanced Intermediate German 
Topics in German Culture and Society 
( may be repeated as an elective with a 
different topic) 

Language and Power (must be taken at 
Smith) 

Advanced Topics in German Studies (must 
be taken at Smith) 



GER 220 

GER 222 



GER 341 



GER 351 



One of the following courses: GER 229, 238, 248, 258 or 
two 298 courses (varied topics) 

Electives: 

Five courses (or 20 credits) from the following: 
GER 170 America and the Germans 
GER 190 Jews in German Culture 
GER 227 Topics in German Studies 
GER 229 Literary Forms 



GER 230 Topics in German Cinema 

GER238 Topics in MediaStudies 

GER 248 Topics in the Culture of Science and 

Technologj 
GER 258 The Culture and Language of Economic Life 

in German-speaking Europe 
GER 298 NEXl S courses, 2 credits, varied topics 
CLT 214 Literary Anti-Semitism 
CLT 296 Enlightenment 



Courses Available only on the 
Hamburg JYA Program: 

GER 260 Orientation Program in Hamburg 

GER 270 German Historv and Culture from 1871 to 

1945 
GER 280 Contemporary German Theater 
GER 290 Studies in Language II 
GER 310 Studies in Language III 

Students may count FYS 156 or GER 170 toward the 
major, but not both. 

Period Requirements: Students must take at least one 
course representing each of the following periods: be- 
fore 1832; 1832-1933; 1933-present 

For any of the three periods a 10-page paper on a 
specifically German topic may serve as fulfillment of 
the requirement provided that: 

1) students gain prior approval of the chair of the De- 
partment of German Studies 

2) the course for which the paper is written deals with 
some aspect of European culture, history or society, 
and 

3) the paper substantially conforms to the topic of the 
course. 

Courses outside the Department of German Studies 
may count toward the major with prior approval of the 
department chair. 



The Minor 



Advisers: Judith Keyler-Mayer and Joel Westerdale 
Baste: GER 200 (Intermediate German) 



258 German Studies 

Requirements: Six courses (or 24 credits) beyond the 
basis 

Required Courses: 

Three courses are required: 
GER 160 The Cultures of German-Speaking Europe 
GER 220 Advanced Intermediate German 
GER 341 The Politics of Language or GER 35 1 
Advanced Topics on German Studies 

Electives: 

Three additional courses from those listed under the 
major. 

Honors 

Directors: Jocelyne Kolb (Fall); Joseph McVeigh 
(Spring) 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 



259 



Government 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

Susan C. Bourque, Ph.D. 

" : Steven Martin Goldstein, Ph.D. 

Donna Robinson Divine, Ph.D. 

Martha A. Ackelsberg, Ph.D. (Government and Study 
of Women and Gender) 
Donald C.Baumer, Ph.D. 

: Dennis Yasutomo, Ph.D. 
Patrick Cobv. Ph.D.. Chair 
Catharine Newbury, Ph.D. 
Howard Gold, Ph.D. 
Gregory White, Ph.D. 

Associate Professors 
Velma E. Garcia, Ph.D. 
Alice L. Hearst, J.D., Ph.D. 
Can I^hring, Ph.D. 



Mlada Bukovansky, Ph.D. 
Marc Lendler, Ph.D. 

Adjunct Associate Professor 

Robert Hauck, Ph.D. 

Associated Faculty 

Gwendolyn Mink, Ph.D. (Study of Women and Gender) 

Alumna Coordinator, Picker Semester in Washington 

Annie Russo Bellavia 

Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow 

Christina Greer 

Research Associate 

Michael Clancv 



For first-year students in their first semester, admis- 
sion to 200-level courses is only by permission of the 
instructor 

Seminars require the permission of the instructor 
and ordinarily presume as a prerequisite a 200-level 
course in the same field. 

100 Introduction to Political Thinking 

A study of the leading ideas of the Western political 
tradition, focusing on such topics as justice, power, 
legitimacy, revolution, freedom, equality and forms of 
government — democracy especially. Lecture/discus- 
sion format taught in independent sections, with one or 
more sections designated Writing Intensive (WI). Open 
to all students. Entering students considering a major 
in government are strongly encouraged to take the 
course in their first year. Enrollment limited to 30 per 
section. {S} 4 credits 

Donna Divine. Steven Goldstein, lb be announced. 
Fall 2008 
Patrick Cobv. Donna Divine. Spring 2009 



Martha Ackelsberg, Donna Divine. Gary Letting, 

Fall 2009 

Patrick Cob}\ To be announced. Spring 2010 

190 Empirical Methods in Political Science 

The fundamental problems in summarizing, inter- 
preting and analyzing empirical data. Topics include 
research design and measurement, descriptive statistics, 
sampling, significance tests, correlation and regression. 
Special attention will be paid to survey data and to data 
analysis using computer software. {S/M} 4 credits 
Howard Gold 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

American Government 

200 is suggested preparation for all other courses in 
this field. 

200 American Government 

A study of the politics and governance in the I nited 
States. Special emphasis is placed on how the major 



260 



Government 



institutions of American government are influenced 
by public opinion and citizen behavior, and how all 
of these forces interact in the determination of gov- 
ernment policy. The course will include at least one 
internet-based assignment. {S} 4 credits 
Donald Baumer 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

201 American Constitutional Interpretation 

The study of Supreme Court decisions, documents and 
other writings dealing with Constitutional theory and 
interpretation. Special attention is given to understand- 
ing the institutional role of the Supreme Court. Not 
open to first-year students. {8} 4 credits 
Alice Hearst 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

202 American Constitutional Law: The Bill of Rights 
and the Fourteenth Amendment 

Fundamental rights of persons and citizens as inter- 
preted by decisions of the Supreme Court, with empha- 
sis on the interpretation of the Bill of Rights and the 
Fourteenth Amendment. {8} 4 credits 
Alice Hearst 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

206 The American Presidency 

An analysis of the executive power in its constitutional 

setting and of the changing character of the executive 

branch. {8} 4 credits 

MarcLendler 

Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

207 Politics of Public Policy 

A thorough introduction to the study of public policy 
in the United States. A theoretical overview of the policy 
process provides the framework for an analysis of sev- 
eral substantive policy areas, to be announced at the 
beginning of the term. {S} 4 credits 
Donald Baumer 
Offered Fall 2009 

208 Elections in the Political Order 

An examination and analysis of electoral politics in 
the United States. Voting and elections are viewed in 
the context of democracy. Topics include electoral par- 
ticipation, presidential selection, campaigns, electoral 
behavior, public opinion, parties and Congressional 



elections. Special attention will be paid to the 2000 
presidential election. {8} 4 credits 
Howard Gold, MarcLendler 
Offered Fall 2008 

209 Colloquium: Congress and the Legislative Process 

An analysis of the legislative process in the United 
States focused on the contemporary role of Congress in 
the policy-making process. In addition to examining 
the structure and operation of Congress, we will explore 
the tension inherent in the design of Congress as the 
maker of public policy for the entire country while 
somehow simultaneously representing the diverse and 
often conflicting interests of citizens from 50 different 
states and 435 separate Congressional districts. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. {8} 4 credits 
Donald Baumer 
Offered Fall 2008 

210 Public Opinion and Mass Media in the United 
States 

This course examines and analyzes American public 
opinion and the impact of the mass media on politics. 
Topics include political socialization, political culture, 
attitude formation and change, linkages between 
public opinion and policy, and the use of surveys to 
measure public opinion. Emphasis on the media's role 
in shaping public preferences and politics. {8} 4 credits 
Howard Gold 
Offered Fall 2009 

214 Colloquium: Free Speech in America 

An examination of the application of the First Amend- 
ment in historical context. Special attention to contem- 
porary speech rights controversies. Limited enrollment. 
{S} 4 credits 
MarcLendler 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

215 Colloquium: The Clinton Years 

This course examines the eight years of the Clinton 
Presidency. It will cover the elections, policy debates, 
foreign policy, battles with the Republican Congress 
and impeachment. The purpose is to begin the task of 
bringing perspective to those years. Prerequisites: One 
American government course and permission of the 
instructor. Enrollment limited to 20. {8} 4 credits 
Marc Lendler 
Offered Spring 2010 



Government 



261 



216 Minority Politics 

An examination of political issues facing the minority 

communities of American society. Topics include social 

movements, gender and class issues. {S} 4 credits 

l elma Garcia 

Offered Fall 2009 

304 Seminar in American Government 

Communism and Anti-Communism in America 
A look at the controversies surrounding the American 
Communist Party and the reaction to it. We will study 
the party's creation, its relationship to the Soviet Union, 
its various phases, the issue of espionage and its response 
to the Cold War. We will look at the intertwined issue of 
anti-Communism, including Congressional investiga- 
tions, the McCarthy era and presidential responses. Read- 
ings will include overviews of Communist Party history, 
including material from newly opened Soviet archives, 
memoirs and primary documents. {S} 4 credits 
Marc Lendler 
Offered Spring 2009 

Revolution to Consolidation 
A look at how American political thinkers and activists 
justified a war for independence, puzzled through the 
construction of a new political order, thought about 
creating a democratic nation state, and argued over is- 
sues such as individual rights, the role of political par- 
ties and the capabilities of citizens for self-government. 
We will look at specific debates between 1776 and 1800 
and also an overview of the most important contribu- 
tors: Jefferson, Madison, Hamilton and John Adams. 
Prerequisite: Some previous course on American gov- 
ernment or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Marc Lendler 
Offered Fall 2009 

305 Seminar in American Government 

Topic Topics in the Black Experience- Black Politics, 
Ethnicity and Identity. What is the future of black 
politics in the U.S.? What is the definition of an "Afri- 
can American" at the turn of the century? The primary 
goal of this seminar is to provide an introduction to 
the major theoretical frameworks on black racial and 
ethnic identity to better understand how incorporation, 
concepts of identity and participation shape the multi- 
faceted political identities of blacks currently residing 
in the U.S. This course builds upon the literature that 
explores immigration, changes in group public opin- 



ion, tensions that exist between diversifying popula- 
tions, the intersection oi race and ethnicity for black 

populations in America, and what the changing African 
diaspora in America means for the future of black in- 
corporation and participation. {S} 4 credits 
Christina Greer 
Offered Fall 200S 

306 Seminar in American Government 

Topic: Politics and the Environment. An examination 
of environmental policy making within the federal 
government, with special emphasis on how Congress 
deals with environmental policy issues. A variety of 
substantive policy areas from clean air to toxic waste 
will be covered. Students will complete research papers 
on an environmental policy topic of their choice. Pre- 
requisite: a 200-level course in American government. 
{S} 4 credits 
Donald Baumer 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

307 Seminar in American Government 

Topic: Latinos and Politics in the U.S. An examination 
of the role of Latinos in society and politics in the U.S. 
Issues to be analyzed include immigration, education, 
electoral politics and gender. {S} 4 credits 
Velma Garcia 
Offered Fall 2008 

310 Seminar in American Government 

Topic: Quantitative and Qualitative Research 
Methods. There are several ways to develop, interpret 
and explain one's research. This seminar course will 
introduce students to basic concepts of statistics and 
statistical analysis and software. It will also introduce 
varying research methods such as survey techniques, 
ethnographic interviews, and ways of conducting pri- 
mary and secondary research. Students will be expected 
to develop questions and research topics related to 
American politics and use quantitative and qualitative 
tools to expound upon that research during the course 
of the semester. No prior statistics courses are necessarj 
for this course. {S} 4 credits 
Christina Greer 
Offered Spring 2009 

312 Seminar in American Government 
Topic: Political Ikhavior in the I nited States. An 
examination of selected topics related to American 
political behavior. Themes include empirical analysis, 



262 



Government 



partisanship, voting behavior and turnout, public opin- 
ion, and racial attitudes. Student projects will involve 
analysis of survey data. {S} 4 credits 
Howard Gold 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

411 Washington Seminar in American Government 

Policy-making in the national government. Open only 

to members of the Semester-in-Washington Program. 

Given in Washington, D.C. 4 credits 

Robert Hauck 

Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

412 Semester-in-Washington Research Project 

Open only to members of the Semester-in-Washington 

Program. 8 credits 

Donald Baumer 

Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

413 Washington Seminar: The Art and Craft of Political 
Science Research 

This seminar is designed to provide students partici- 
pating in the Washington Internship Program with 
an overview of the various approaches to conducting 
research in the discipline of political science. Students 
will be introduced to methods of quantitative and 
qualitative research, data acquisition and hypothesis 
testing. The seminar's more specific goal is to help 
students understand the process of planning, organiz- 
ing and writing an analytical political science research 
paper. Enrollment limited to juniors and seniors in the 
Washington Internship Program. {S} 2 credits 
Robert]. P. Hauck 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

Comparative Government 

220 Introduction to Comparative Politics 

This course introduces the study of comparative 
political analysis through the comparative study of 
democratization. It weaves conceptual approaches with 
case studies of historic as well as contemporary politi- 
cal systems. The focus is on the major approaches and 
controversies in the study of democratization as well 
as the manner in which this conceptual literature has 
been applied to — but also reshaped by — the evolution 
of specific political systems. {S} 4 credits 
Velma Garcia 
Offered Fall 2008 



221 European Politics 

This course focuses on the development of European 
democratic institutions in the context of military and 
economic conflict and cooperation. Includes an intro- 
duction to the process of European integration. {S} 
4 credits 

Mlada Bukovansky 
Offered Spring 2010 

223 Russian Politics 

After a brief discussion of the origins, evolution and 
collapse of the Soviet system, this course will focus on 
the politics of contemporary Russia. Issues to be ad- 
dressed include constitutional change, electoral behav- 
ior, the role of civil society and the course of economic 
reform. {S} 4 credits 
Steven Goldstein 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

224 Islam and Politics in the Middle East 

An analysis of traditional Muslim political societies in 
the Middle East and of the many ways in which they 
were transformed into nation states. Issues addressed 
include nationalism, religious political activism, co- 
lonialism and globalization. Readings will also cover 
such topics as regional conflicts, revolutions as well as 
the impact of these disparate developments on the posi- 
tion of women. {S} 4 credits 
Donna Robinson Divine 
Offered Fall 2009 

226 Latin American Political Systems 

A comparative analysis of Latin American political 
systems. Emphasis on the politics of development, the 
problems of leadership, legitimacy and regime conti- 
nuity. A wide range of countries and political issues will 
be covered. {S} 4 credits 
Velma Garcia 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

227 Contemporary African Politics 

This survey course examines the ever-changing 
political and economic landscape of the African con- 
tinent. The course aims to provide students with an 
understanding of the unique historical, economic and 
social variables that shape modem African politics, 
and will introduce students to various theoretical and 
analytical approaches to the study of Africa's political 
development. Central themes will include the ongoing 
processes of nation-building and democratization, the 



Government 






constitutional question, the international relations of 
Africa, issues of peace and security, and Africa's political 
economy. Enrollment limited to 35. {S} 4 credits 
Catharine Newbury 
Offered Spring 2009 

228 Government and Politics of Japan 

An introductory survey and analysis of the development 
of postwar Japanese politics. Emphasis on Japanese 
political culture and on formal and informal political 
institutions and processes, including political parties, 
the bureaucracy, interest groups and electoral and 
factional politics. {S} 4 credits 
Dennis Yasutomo 
Offered Fall 2008 

229 Government and Politics of Israel 

A historical analysis of the establishment of the State 
of Israel and the formation of its economy, society and 
culture. Discussions will focus on the Zionist move- 
ment in Europe and the United States, the growth and 
development of Jewish economic and political institu- 
tions in the land of Israel, and the revival of the Hebrew 
language. {S} 4 credits 
Donna Robinson Divine 
Offered Fall 2008 

230 Government and Politics of China 

Treatment of traditional and transitional China, fol- 
lowed by analysis of the political system of the People's 
Republic of China. Discussion centers on such topics 
as problems of economic and social change, policy 
formulation, and patterns of party and state power. {S} 
4 credits 

Steven Goldstein 
Offered Fall 2008 

232 Women and Politics in Africa 

This course will explore the genesis and effects of politi- 
cal activism by women in Africa, which some believe 
represents a new African feminism, and its implications 
for state/civil society relations in contemporary Africa. 
Topics will include the historical effects of colonialism 
on the economic, social and political roles of African 
women, the nature of urban/rural distinctions, and the 
diverse responses by women to the economic and politi- 
cal crises of postcolonial African polities. Case studies 
of specific African countries, with readings of novels 



and women's life histories as well as analyses b) social 
scientists. {S} -\ credits 
Catharine Newbury 
Offered Fall 2008 

233 Problems in Political Development 
Why are so man) states of the world poor and "under- 
developed?" What in the meaning of development, and 
how can it be achieved? Focusing on areas of Africa, 
Latin America and Asia, this course will explore the 
role of the state in development, institutions, actors and 
social movements that structure political interaction, 
and the relationship between democratization and 
development. {S} 4 credits 
Catharine Newbury 
Offered Spring 2010 

237 Colloquium: Politics and the U.S. Mexico Border 
This course examines the most important issues facing 
the U.S./Mexico border: NAFTA, industrialization, and 
the emergence of the maquiladoras (twin plants); labor 
migration and immigration; the environment; drug 
trafficking; the militarization of the border; and border 
culture and identity. The course begins with a compari- 
son of contending perspectives on globalization before 
proceeding to a short overview of the historical litera- 
ture on the creation of the U.S./Mexico border. Though 
at the present time the border has become increasingly 
militarized, the boundary dividing the U.S. and Mexico 
has traditionally been relatively porous, allowing 
people, capital, goods, and ideas to flow back and forth. 
The course will focus on the border as a region histori- 
cally marked both by conflict and interdependence. 
Open to majors in government and/or Latin American 
studies; others by permission of the instructor. Enroll- 
ment limited to 20. {S} 4 credits 
Velma Garcia 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

321 Seminar in Comparative Government 

Topic: The Ruanda Genocide in Comparative Per- 
spective In I9 c )4. Rwanda was engulfed by violence 
that caused untold human suffering, left more than 
half a million people dead, and reverberated through- 
out the Central African region. Using a comparative 
perspective, this seminar explores parallels and con- 
trasts between Rwanda and other cases of genocide and 
mass murder in the 20th century Topics include the 



264 



Government 



nature, causes, and consequences of genocide in Rwan- 
da, regional dynamics, the failure of the international 
community to intervene, and efforts to promote justice 
through the U.N. International Criminal Tribunal for 
Rwanda. We will also consider theories of genocide and 
their applicability 7 to Rwanda, exploring comparisons 
with other cases such as the Armenian genocide, the 
Holocaust, the destruction of the Herero, and war in 
Liberia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. {S} 
4 credits 

Catharine Newbury 
Offered Fall 2009 

322 Seminar in Comparative Government 

Topic: Mexican Politics from 1910-Present. An 
in-depth examination of contemporary political and 
social issues in Mexico. The country, once described as 
the "perfect dictatorship," is in the process of undergo- 
ing a series of deep political and economic changes. 
This seminar provides an examination of the historical 
foundations of modern Mexican politics, beginning 
with the Revolution. In addition, it examines a series of 
current challenges, including the transition from one- 
party rule, the neo liberal economic experiment and 
NAFTA, border issues, the impact of drug trafficking, 
and rebellion in Chiapas. {8} 4 credits 
Velma Garcia 
Offered Fall 2009 

323 Seminar in Comparative Government and Political 
Theory 

Topic: Warring for Heaven and Earth: Jewish and 
Muslim Political Activism in the Middle East. This 
seminar explores the rise and spread of Jewish and 
Muslim political activism in the Middle East with a spe- 
cial focus on those which operate in Egypt, Lebanon, 
Israel, the Palestinian territories and in Saudi Arabia. 
The particular groups addressed include Gush Emu- 
nim, Kach, Israel's Redemption Movements, Hamas 
Hizbullah, Islamic Jihad in both the Palestinian terri- 
tories and in Egypt and al-Queda. The reading material 
focuses on the conditions giving rise to these various 
activist groups and examines their political objectives. 
The social organization of these movements will also 
be explored particularly with regard to gender and the 
consequences of globalization. {S} 4 credits 
Donna Robinson Divine 
Offered Spring 2010 



International Relations 

241 is suggested preparation for all other courses in 
this field. 



241 International Politics 

An introduction to the theoretical and empirical analy- 
sis of the interactions of states in the international 
system. Emphasis is given to the historical evolution 
of the international system, security politics, the role 
of international norms in shaping behavior, and the 
influence of the world economy on international 
relations. Not a course in current events. Enrollment 
limited to 70. {S} 4 credits 
Mlada Bukovansky, Fall 2008 
Gregory White, Spring 2009 
To be announced, Fall 2009, Spring 2010 
Offered both semesters each year 

242 International Political Economy 

This course begins with an examination of the broad 
theoretical paradigms in international political 
economy (IPE), including the liberal, economic na- 
tionalist, structuralist and feminist perspectives. The 
course analyzes critical debates in the post-World War 
II period, including the role of the Bretton Woods in- 
stitutions (World Bank group and IMF), international 
trade and development, the debt question, poverty and 
global inequality, and the broad question of "globaliza- 
tion." Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instructor. 
Enrollment limited to 40. {S} 4 credits 
Gregory White 
Offered Fall 2008 

244 Foreign Policy of the United States 

In this course we ask and answer the following ques- 
tions: Just what is "United States foreign policy?" By 
what processes does the U.S. define its interests in the 
global arena? What instruments does the U.S. possess 
to further those interests? Finally, what specific foreign 
policy questions are generating debate today? Prerequi- 
site: 241 or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 

248 The Arab-Israeli Dispute 

An analysis of the causes of the dispute and of efforts 
to resolve it; an examination of Great Power involve- 
ment. A historical survey of the influence of Great 
Power rivalry on relationships between Israel and the 



Government 



265 



Arab States and between Israelis and Palestinian Arabs. 
Consideration of the several Arab-Israeli wars and the 
tensions, terrorism and violence unleashed by the dis- 
pute. No prerequisites. {S} 4 credits 
Donna Robinson Din fie 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

251 Colloquium: Foreign Policy of Japan 

A comparative analysis of Japanese and German 
foreign policies, focusing especially on the apparent 
evolution from pacifism and anti-militarism toward a 
"civilian power" or "nonnal nation" status since World 
War II. Special focus will be on the expansion of out- 
of-area, nation-building/peace-building civil-military 
operations from the 1990s to the present. Case studies 
will include Japan and Germany in Afghanistan, and 
Japan in Iraq. Enrollment limited to 20. {8} 4 credits 
Dennis Yasutomo 
Offered Spring 2009 

252 International Organizations 

What role do international organizations play in world 
politics, and what role should they play? Do inter- 
national organizations represent humanity's higher 
aspirations, or are they simply tools of the wealthy 
and powerful? This course explores the problems and 
processes of international organizations by drawing on 
theoretical, historical and contemporary sources and 
perspectives. We focus on three contemporary organiza- 
tions: the United Nations, the World Trade Organization 
and the European Union. Prerequisite: 241 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
Mlada Bukovansky 
Offered Spring 2009 

254 Colloquium: Politics of the Global Environment 

An introductory survey of the environmental implica- 
tions of the international political economy. The focus 
is on the changing role of the state and the politics of 
industrial development. Special emphasis is devoted to 
the controversies and issues that have emerged since 
the 1950s, including the tragedy of the commons, 
sustainable development, global warming and envi- 
ronmental security. Special attention is also accorded 
to North-South relations and the politics of indigenous 
peoples. Prerequisite: 241 or permission of the instruc- 
tor. Enrollment limited to 20. {S} 4 credits 
Gregory White 
Offered Spring 2009 



259 Colloquium: Theories of International Relations 
An in-depth exploration of diverse theoretical ap- 
proaches to world politics. The course critically reviews 
the major schools of thought in international relations, 
such as realism, literalism and Marxism, paving close 
attention to their philosophical roots, the historical 
context in which they emerged, the problems the theo- 
ries address, and the manner in which they were modi- 
fied and updated in response to world events. Vie also 
explore more contemporary and critical approaches to 
world politics and evaluate the competing explanatory 
claims put forth. Government majors and international 
relations minors with strong interest in theory may 
substitute this course for GOV 241. Enrollment limited 
to 20. {S} 4 credits 
To be announced. Fall 2008 
Mlada Bukovansky, Spring 2010 
Offered Fall 2008* Spring 2010 

343 Seminar in International Politics and Comparative 
Politics 

Topic: Corruption and Global Governance. What 
can international institutions such as the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund and the World Bank do about 
corruption? This seminar explores the theoretical and 
practical dimensions of the problem of corruption and 
analyzes how states and international organizations 
have attempted to combat the problem. {S} 4 credits 
Mlada Bukovansky 
Offered Spring 2009 

344 Seminar on Foreign Policy of the Chinese People's 
Republic 

After examining the historical roots of the foreign 
policy of the People s Republic of China both before 
and after its establishment in 1949, the seminar will 
focus on the process and substance of the nation's con- 
temporary international behavior. {S} 4 credits 
Steven Goldstein 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

347 Seminar in International Politics and Comparative 
Politics 

Topic: North Africa hi the International System. This 
seminar examines the history and political economy 
of Morocco, Tbnisia and Algeria — the Maghreb — 
focusing on the post-independence era. Where relevant, 
Mauritania and Libya will be treated. The seminar sets 
Maghrebi politics in the broader context of its regional 
situation within the Mediterranean (Europe and the 



266 



Government 



Middle East), as well as its relationship to sub-Saharan 
Africa and North America. Study is devoted to: 1) the 
independence struggle; 2) the colonial legacy; 3) 
contemporary political economy; and 4) post-colonial 
politics and society. Special attention will be devoted 
to the politics of Islam, the "status" of women, and 
democratization. {S} 4 credits 
Gregory White 
Offered Fall 2008 

348 Seminar in International Politics 

Topic: Conflict and Cooperation in Asia. The seminar 
will identify and analyze the sources and patterns of 
conflict and cooperation among Asian states and be- 
tween Asian and Western countries in the contemporary 
period. The course will conclude by evaluating pros- 
pects for current efforts to create a new "Asia Pacific 
Community." Permission of the instructor is required. 
{S} 4 credits 
Dennis Yasutomo 
Offered Fall 2008 

Political Theory 

261 Ancient and Medieval Political Theory 

An examination of the classical polis and the Christian 
commonwealth as alternatives to the nation-state 
of the modern world. Topics considered include: the 
moral effects of war and faction, the meaning of jus- 
tice, citizenship, regimes and natural law; the relation 
of politics and philosophy; and the contest between 
secular and religious authority. Readings from Plato, 
Aristotle, Cicero, Augustine, Aquinas, Marsilius and 
others. {S} 4 credits 
Patrick Coby 
Offered Fall 2008 

262 Early Modern Political Theory, 1500-1800 

A study of Machiavellian power-politics and of efforts 
by social contract and utilitarian liberals to render that 
politics safe and humane. Topics considered include 
political behavior, republican liberty, empire and war; 
the state of nature, natural law/natural right, sover- 
eignty and peace; limitations on power, the general will 
and liberalism's relation to moral theory, religion and 
economics. Readings from Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, 
Rousseau, Hume, Smith and others; also novels and 
plays. {S} 4 credits 
Patrick Coby 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 



263 Political Theory of the 19th Century 

A study of the major liberal and radical political theo- 
ries of the 19th century, with emphasis on the writings 
of Hegel, Marx, Tocqueville, Mill and Nietsche. Not 
open to first-year students. {8} 4 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Spring 2009 

264 American Political Thought 

An examination of political thought in America from 
the colonial period to the present. Prominent themes 
include politics and religion, constitutional structures, 
political parties, slavery, industrialization, welfare, for- 
eign policy and liberalism-conservatism. {S} 4 credits 
Patrick Coby 
Offered Fall 2009 

266 Political Theory of the 20th Century 

A study of major ideas and thinkers of the 20th century. 
Possible thinkers include Weber, Freud, Althusser, Ar- 
endt, Foucault, Irigaray, Gramsci, Habermas, Adorno, 
Horkheimer, Rawls and Wells. Topics addressed may 
include Neo-Marxism, Feminism, Ideology, Postmod- 
ernism and Multiculturalism. Successful completion of 
GOV 100 and/or other political theory course is strongly 
suggested. {S} 4 credits 
Gary Lehring 
Offered Fall 2009 

269 Politics of Gender and Sexuality 

An examination of gender and sexuality as subjects of 
theoretical investigation, historically constructed in 
ways that have made possible various forms of regula- 
tion and scrutiny today. We will focus on the way in 
which traditional views of gender and sexuality still 
resonate with us in the modern world, helping to shape 
legislation and public opinion, creating substantial 
barriers to cultural and political change. {S} 4 credits 
Gary Lehring 
Offered Spring 2010 

366 Seminar in Political Theory 

Topic: The Political Theory of Michel Foucault. This 
course will examine the work of Michel Foucault 
(1926-84), French philosopher, social critic, historian 
and activist, and generally acknowledged as one of the 
most influential of the thinkers whose work is catego- 
rized as post-structuralist. Foucault 's various inquiries 
into the production of knowledge and power have 
formed the paradoxically destabilizing foundation for 



Government 



267 



much of the work on the status of the human subject 
in post-modemit\. We will explore the theoretically 
rich and dense approaches undertaken b) Foucault, as 
well as illuminate his central ideas that seem to chal- 
lenge much of what political theory accepts as a given. 
From The Birth of the Clinic. Ifje Order of Things, and 
Discipline and Punish to his later works including 
The History of Sexuality. The Use of Pleasure, and The 
Care of the Self attention will he given to how his works 
simultaneously advance and critique much of the 
canon of political theory. Prerequisite: Completion of 
Gov 100 and one other upper division political theory 
course or permission of the instructor. {S} 4 credits 
GaryLebring 
Offered Spring 2010 

367 Seminar in Political Theory 

Topic: Queer Theory. This course introduces students 
to the emerging interdisciplinary field of queer theory. 
This is often a perplexing task as there is no real con- 
sensus on the definitional limits of queer. Indeed, many 
scholars believe the inability to define these limits is 
one of queer theory's greatest strengths. "Queer" can 
function as a noun, an adjective or a verb, but in each 
case it is defined against the 'normal' or normalizing. 
Queer theory is not a singular or systematic conceptual 
or methodological framework. Rather it is a collection 
of intellectual engagements with the relations between 
sex, gender and sexual desire. As such, it is hard to call 
queer theory a school of thought, as it has a very un- 
orthodox and often disrespectful view of "discipline." 
Queer theory, then, describes a diverse range of critical 
practices and priorities: analyses of same-sex sexual 
desire in literary texts, film or music; exploration of the 
social and political power relations of sexuality; cri- 
tiques of the sex-gender system; studies of transgender 
identification, or sadomasochism and of transgressive 
desire. {S} 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 



Cross-listed Courses 

EAS 210 Colloquium: Culture and Diplomacy in Asia 
(E) {S} 4 credits 

Dennis Yasutomo 
Offered Spring 2009 



SWG 222 Gender, Law and Society 

{S} 4 credits 

Carrie Baker 

Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 

404 Special Studies 

Admission for majors by permission of the department. 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

408d Special Studies 

Admission for majors by pennission of the department. 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 



The Major 



Advisers: Martha Ackelsberg, Donald Baumer, Mlada 
Bukovansky, Patrick Coby, Donna Robinson Divine. 
Velma Garcia, Howard Gold, Steven Goldstein, Alice 
Hearst, Marc Lendler, Catharine Newbury, Gregory 
White, Dennis Yasutomo 

Graduate School Adviser: Steven Goldstein 

Director of the Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington 
Program: Donald Baumer 

Basis: 100. 

Requirements: 10 semester courses, including the fol- 
lowing: 

1. 100; 

2. One course at the 200 level in each of the following 
fields: American government, comparative govern- 
ment, international relations and political theory; 

3. Ttoo additional courses, one of which must be a 
seminar, and both of which must be related to one 
of the courses taken under (2); they may be in the 
same subfield of the department, or they may be in 
other subfields, in which case a rationale for their 
choice must be accepted by the student and her 
adviser: and 

4. Three additional elective courses. Majors are en- 
couraged to select 190 as one of their electives. 

Majors may spend the junior year abroad if they meet 
the college requirements. 



268 



Government 



The Minor 



Advisers: Same as those listed for the major. 

Based on 100. The minor consists of six courses, which 
shall include five additional courses, including at least 
one course from two of the four fields identified as 
requirements for the major. 



Honors 

Director: Howard Gold 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

Please consult the director of honors or the departmen- 
tal Web site for specific requirements and application 
procedures. 

Jean Picker Semester-in- 
Washington Program 

The Jean Picker Semester-in-Washington Program is a 
first-semester program open to Smith junior and senior 
government majors and to other Smith juniors and 
seniors with appropriate background in the social sci- 
ences. It provides students with an opportunity to study 
processes by which public policy is made and imple- 
mented at the national level. Students are normally 
resident in Washington from the June preceding the 
semester through December. 

Applications for enrollment should be made 
through the director of the Semester-in-Washington 
Program no later than November 1 of the preceding 
year. Enrollment is limited to 12 students, and the pro- 
gram is not mounted for fewer than six. 

Before beginning the semester in Washington, the 
student must have satisfactorily completed at least one 
course in American national government at the 200 
level selected from the following courses: 200, 201, 
202, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210 and 21 1. In addition, a 



successful applicant must show promise of capacity for 
independent work. An applicant must have an excess 
of two credits on her record preceding the semester in 
Washington. 

For satisfactory completion of the Semester-in- 
Washington Program, 14 credits are granted: four cred- 
its for a seminar in policymaking (41 1); two credits for 
GOV 413, seminar on political science research; and 
eight credits for an independent research project (412), 
culminating in a long paper. 

No student may write an honors thesis in the same 
field in which she has written her long paper in the 
Washington seminar, unless the department, upon 
petition, grants a specific exemption from this policy. 

The program is directed by a member of the Smith 
College faculty, who is responsible for selecting the 
interns and assisting them in obtaining placement in 
appropriate offices in Washington, and directing the 
independent research project through tutorial sessions. 
The seminar is conducted by an adjunct professor resi- 
dent in Washington. 

Students participating in the program pay full 
tuition for the semester. They do not pay any fees for 
residence at the college, but are required to pay for their 
own room and board in Washington during the fall 
semester. 



269 



History 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

''Daniel K.Gardner. Ph.D. 

David Newbury, Ph.D. (History and African Studies) 
*' Ann Zulawski, Ph.D. (History and Latin American 

Studies) 

Richard I.im. Ph.D. 

Associate Professor 
Ernest Benz, Ph.D., Chair 

Assistant Professors 

fl DarcyBuerkle,Ph.D. 
- Jennifer Guglielmo, Ph.D. 
Mamie Anderson, Ph.D. 
Nadya Sbaiti, Ph.D. 

Five College Assistant Professor of Russian History 

: Sergey Glebov, Ph.D. 

Associated Faculty 

: ' Daniel Horowitz, Ph.D. (American Studies and 

History) 
fl Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Ph.D. (American Studies 

and History) 



Lecturer and Professor Emeritus 
NeaJ Salisbury, Ph.D. 

Lecturers 

Kelly Anderson. M.A. 
Jessica Delgado, M.A. 
Peter Gunn, M.Ed. 
Jennifer Hall-Witt, Ph.D. 
W.Lane Hall-Witt. M.A. 
Michelle Herder, Ph.D. 
Jonathan Lipman, Ph.D. 
Robert Weir Ph.D. 

Research Associates 

Daniel Brown, Ph.D. 
Sean Gilsdorf, M.A. 
Erika Laquer, Ph.D. 
Ann Ramsey, Ph.D. 
Samuel Roberts, Ph.D. 
Marvlvnn Salmon, Ph.D. 
Revan Schendler, Ph.D. 



History courses at the 100- and 200-levels are open to 
all students unless otherwise indicated. Admission to 
seminars (300-level) assumes prior preparation in the 
field and is by permission of the instructor. 

A reading knowledge of foreign languages is highly- 
desirable and is especially recommended for students 
planning a major in History. 

Cross-listed courses retain their home department 
or program designations. 

101 Introduction to Historical Inquiry 

Colloquia with a limited enrollment of 18 and surveys 
both designed to introduce the study of history to stu- 
dents at the beginning level. Emphasis on the sources 
and methods of historical analysis. Recommended for 
all students with an interest in history and those con- 
sidering a history major or minor. 



Topic: Soviet History' Through Film 
The course treats films produced during the Soviet 
era as cultural artifacts. Studying these films in their 
proper contexts introduces basic tools for historians: 
how to approach a historical artifact, how to read 
sources critically, and how to reconstruct intended 
and unintended meanings. The course follows the 
traditional outline of Soviet history, beginning with 
the Bolshevik takeover in October 1917 and ending 
with the post-Soviet period. Topics include the cultural 
experimentation of the 1920s, collectivization, indus- 
trialization, the Great Terror, World War II. the Cold 
War, and the rise of the Soviet middle class in the 
1960s and 1970s. Enrollment limited to first-years and 
sophomores. {H} 4 credits 
Sergey Glebov 
Offered Fall 2008 



270 



History 



Topic: Biography and History in Africa 
Fascinating in themselves, biographies also serve as a 
foundation to history. This course looks at biographies 
from Africa, both in print and in film presentations, as- 
sessing the lives represented as reflections of history in 
practice. Examples from many regions of Africa; from 
precolonial, colonial and more recent periods; from 
women as well as men; and from common people as 
well as leaders. The course stresses writing skills as well 
as careful reading; writing includes short essays on the 
books read and critical reflections on the relationship 
of biography and history. Enrollment of 15 limited to 
first-years and sophomores. WI {H} 4 credits 
David Newbury 
Offered Fall 2008 

EAS 100 Introduction to Modern East Asia 

This course looks comparatively at the histories of 
China, Japan, Korea from the late 18th century to the 
present. It examines the struggles of these countries 
to preserve or regain their independence and establish 
their national identities in a rapidly emerging and 
often violent modern world order. While each of these 
countries has its own distinctive identity, their over- 
lapping histories (and dilemmas) give the region a 
coherent identity. We also will look at how individuals 
respond to and are shaped by larger historical move- 
ments. {H} 4 credits 
Mamie Anderson 
Offered Fall 2008 



Lectures and Colloquia 

Lectures (L) are normally limited to 40 students. Collo- 
quia (C) are primarily reading and discussion courses 
limited to 18. Lectures and colloquia are open to all 
students unless otherwise indicated. In certain cases, 
students may enroll in colloquia for seminar credit 
with permission of the instructor. 

Antiquity 

204 (L) The Roman Republic 

A survey of the developing social, cultural and political 
world of Rome as the city assumed dominance in the 
Mediterranean. Achievements of the Roman state, ple- 
beians and patricians, the Roman family and slavery; 



encounters with local cultures in North Africa, Gaul 
and the Greek East; problems of imperial expansion 
and social conflicts. {H} 4 credits 
Richard Lim 
Offered Fall 2009 

205 (L) The Roman Empire 

A survey of the history and culture of the Roman Em- 
pire from the principate of Augustus to the rise of Chris- 
tianity in the fourth century. The role of the emperor in 
the Roman world, Rome and its relationship with local 
cities, the maintenance of an imperial system; rich 
and poor, free and slave, Roman and barbarian; the 
family, law and society; military monarchy; persecu- 
tion of Christians; pagans, Christians and Jews in late 
Antiquity. {H} 4 credits 
Richard lim 
Offered Spring 2010 

Islamic Middle East 

208 (L) The Making of the Modern Middle East 

Survey of the principal factors shaping political, eco- 
nomic and social life in the Middle East and North 
Africa from the 18th through the 20th centuries. Exam- 
ines multiplicity of societies, customs and traditions; 
British, French and United States imperialism; the 
creation of modern states; development of nationalist, 
socialist and Islamist ideologies; the emergence and 
impact of Zionism; the Islamic revolution in Iran; the 
Gulf wars and the geopolitics of oil. Special attention to 
social changes affecting individuals and groups such as 
women, workers and peasants. {H} 4 credits 
Nadya Sbaiti 
Offered Spring 2010 

209 (C) Aspects of Middle Eastern History 

Topic: Women and Gender in the Middle East. 
Development of discourses on gender as well as lived 
experiences of women from the rise of Islam to the 
present. Topics include the politics of marriage, divorce 
and reproduction; women's political and economic 
participation; masculinity; sexuality; impact of Islamist 
movements. Provides introduction to main themes, 
and nuanced historical understanding of approaches to 
the study of gender in the region. {H/S} 4 credits 
Nadya Sbaiti 
Offered Spring 2009 



Historj 



271 



East Asia 

211 (L) The Emergence of China 

Chinese society and civilization from c. 1000 B.C. to 
A.I). 750. Topics include neolithic cultures of China. 
Bronze Age, formation of a Chinese state. Golden Age 
of Chinese philosophy, creation of a centralized empire, 
relations with non-Chinese, family structure, roles of 
women and introduction of Buddhism. {H} 4 credits 
Daniel Gardner 
Offered Fall 2009 

212 (L) China in Transformation, A.D. 750-1900 
Chinese society and civilization from the Tang dynasty 
to the Taiping rebellion. Topics include disappearance 
of the hereditary aristocracy and rise of the scholar- 
official class, civil service examination system, Neo- 
Confucian orthodoxy, poetry and the arts, Mongol con- 
quest, popular beliefs, women and the family, Manchus 
in China, domestic rebellion and confrontation with 
the West. {H} 4 credits 

Daniel Gardner 

Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 

214 (C) Aspects of Chinese History 

Tbpic: The World of Thought in Early China 

Readings from the major schools of Chinese thought, 
such as Confucianism, Monism, Daoism, Legalism and 
Buddhism. Open to first-year students. {H/L} 4 credits 
Daniel Gardner 
Offered Spring 2009 

Topic: Elite Culture in China: The Arts and Letters of 
the Literati 

An examination of the artistic, literary, philosophical, 
religious, and scholarly expression of the Chinese be- 
fore the 20th century. {H} 4 credits 
Daniel Gardner 
Offered Spring 2010 

216 (C) Women in Chinese History 

The history of Chinese women from early classical texts 
to the present: their places and behaviors in society and 
culture, their relationships with one another and with 
men, and the evolution of gender roles and attitudes in 
China's long and complex story. Topics include ideals 
of femininity and beauty, sexuality, women's place in 
family life, life-cycles and rites of passage, the partici- 
pation of women in the revolutions of the 20th century, 



and contemporary women's lives. (E) {H} 4 credits 
Jonathan Upman 
Offered Fall 2008 

217 (L) World War Two in East Asia: History and 
Memory 

Examination of the factors leading to the war in Asia, 
the nature of the conflict, and the legacy of the war 
for all those involved. Topics include Japan's seizure 
of Korea, the invasion of China, the bombing of Pearl 
Harbor, the war in the Pacific, the racial dimensions 
of the Japanese empire, the comfort women, biological 
warfare, the dropping of the atomic bombs, and the 
complicated relationship between history and memory. 
{H} -4 credits 
Mamie Anderson 
Offered Spring 2009 

223 (C) Women in Japanese History: from Ancient 
Times to the 19th Century 

The dramatic transformation in gender relations is a 
key feature of Japan's premodern history 7 . How Japanese 
women and men have constructed norms of behavior 
in different historical periods, how gender differences 
were institutionalized in social structures and practices, 
and how these norms and institutions changed over 
time. The gendered experiences of women and men 
from different classes from approximately the seventh 
through the 19th centuries. Consonant with current 
developments in gender history, exploration of variables 
such as class, religion and political context, which have 
affected women's and men's lives. (H/S) 4 credits 
Mamie Anderson 
Offered Spring 2009 

EAS 215 Pre-modern Korean History: Public Lives and 
Private Stories 

This course is a survey of cultural, social and political 
history of Korea from early times to the 19th century We 
will explore major cultural trends, intellectual develop- 
ments and political shifts during Korea's long dynastic 
history. Some of the topics include literati culture; 
nativism and folk culture; gender in traditional Korean 
society; foreign relations: and Confucianism and king- 
ship. All of these topics will be explored through the lens 
of changing perceptions of public and private lives i »t 
those who had become part of both public and private 
histories and stories of Korea. {H} 4 credits 
Jina Kim 
Offered Fall 200S 



272 



History 



Europe 

225 (L) The Making of the Medieval World, 1000-1500 

From the High Middle Ages through the 15th century. 
Topics include cathedrals and universities, struggles 
between popes and emperors, pilgrimage and popular 
religion, the Crusades and Crusader kingdoms, heresy 
and the Inquisition, chivalry and Arthurian romance, 
the expansion and consolidation of Europe, and the 
Black Death and its aftermath. {H} 4 credits 
Michelle Herder 
Offered Spring 2009 

227 (C) Aspects of Medieval European History 

Topic: Outcasts: Minorities in Medieval Society. The 
emergence of a persecuting society. The experiences of 
heretics, Jews, Muslims, homosexuals, lepers and other 
groups on the margins of a Europe that increasingly 
defined itself as Christian. Differences in the treatment 
of these various outcast groups, their depiction in art, 
their legal segregation and their presumed association 
with demonic activity. (E) {H} 4 credits 
Michelle Herder 
Offered Fall 2008 

233 (L) A Cultural History of Britain and its Empire, 
1688-1914 

Rethinking British history by centrally incorporating 
the British Empire and by employing the methods of 
cultural history. Themes include the changing nature 
of Britain's national and imperial identities; the trans- 
formation of Britain's political, class and commercial 
cultures; the experiences of the colonizers and of those 
who were incorporated into Britain and the Empire, 
including those from Scotland, Ireland, Africa, the West 
Indies and India; and the ways in which literature, the 
arts and material culture participated in these phe- 
nomena. {L/H} 4 credits 
Jennifer Hall-Witt 
Offered Spring 2009 

245 (L) Empire in the North: Native Peoples in Siberia 
and Alaska under Russian and Soviet Rule 

Over 500 years, Muscovy and the Russian Empire 
expanded across Northern Asia and (from the 1780s to 
the 1860s) North America, bringing into one continen- 
tal state diverse populations stretching from Central 
Asia to Beringia. The course explores the ways imperial 
rule, the pressures of Socialist Modernity, and relentless 
exploitation of natural resources affected the lives of 



the native peoples. How can one discern the voices of a 
scriptless culture beneath layers of documents written 
by colonial administrators? {H} 4 credits 
Sergey Glebov 
Offered Spring 2009 

246 (G) Memory and History 

Contemporary debates among European historians, 
artists and citizens over the place of memory in politi- 
cal and social history. The effectiveness of a range of 
representational practices from the historical mono- 
graph to visual culture, as markers of history and as 
creators of meaning. Can it be more dangerous to re- 
member history than to forget it? Not open to students 
who have taken HST 101 Memory and History. {H} 
4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Fall 2008 

251 (L) Europe in the 20th Century 

Ideological and military rivalries of the contemporary 
era. Special attention to the origin, character, and 
outcome of the two World Wars and to the experience of 
Fascism, Nazism and Communism. {H} 4 credits 
Ernest Benz 
Offered Fall 2008 

252 (L) Women and Gender in Modern Europe, 
1789-1918 

A survey of European women's experiences and 
constructions of gender from the French Revolution 
through World War I, focusing on Western Europe. 
Gendered relationships to work, family, politics, society, 
religion and the body, as well as shifting conceptions 
of femininity and masculinity, as revealed in novels, 
films, treatises, letters, paintings, plays and various 
secondary sources. {H} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

253 (L) Women and Gender in Contemporary Europe 

Women's experience and constructions of gender in 
the commonly recognized major events of the 20th 
century. Introduction to major thinkers of the period 
through primary sources, documents and novels, as 
well as to the most significant categories in the growing 
secondary literature in 20th-century European history 
of women and gender. {H} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Spring 2009, Spring 2010 



History 



273 



255 (C) 20th-century European Thought 

The cultural context of fascism. Readings from Nietz- 
sche, Sorel, Wilde, Pareto, Marinetti. Mussolini and Hit- 
ler, as well as studies of psychology, degenerate painting 
and music. Both politicians and artists claimed to be 
Nietzschean tree spirits. Who best understood his call to 
ruthless creativity? {H/S/A} 4 credits 
Ernest Bern 
Offered Spring 2009 

Africa 

256 (L) Introduction to West African History 

The political, economic, cultural, religious and colo- 
nial histories of Africa west of Lake ('had and south of 
the Sahara desert, a region nearly as large ;is the conti- 
nental U.S. Draws on articles, films, biographies, novels 
and plays, and explores broad cultural continuities, 
regional diversity and historical change, from AD 1000 
to the present. Topics include the Sudanic empires; 
slavery and the Atlantic slave trade; Islam; colonial 
conquest, African initiatives under colonial rule; and 
post-colonial problems in West Africa. {H/8} 4 credits 
David Newbury 
Offered Fall 200S 

258 (L) History of Central Africa 

Focusing on the former Belgian colonies of Congo, 
Rwanda, and Burundi from the late 1800s, this course 
seeks to explore, and then transcend, the powerful 
myths that adhere to this area of the world, the setting 
for Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness." Topics include 
precolonial cultural diversities; economic extraction 
in the Congo Free State; the colonial encounter and 
colonial experiences; decolonization and the struggles 
over defining the state; and postcolonial catastrophes. 
{H/S} 4 credits 
David Newbury 
Offered Spring 2009 

AAS 218 History of Southern Africa (1600 to about 
1900) 

The history of Southern Africa, which includes a num- 
ber of states such as South Africa, Zimbabwe. Nainbia, 
Angola and Lesotho, is verj complex. In addition to 
developing a historical understanding of the Khoisan 
and Bantu-speaking peoples, students must also know 
the history of Europeans and Asians of the region. The 
focus of this course will therefore be to understand the 
historical, cultural and economic interrelationships 



between various ethnic groups, cultures and political 

forceswhich have evolved in Southern Africa since 
about 1600. (H) 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 

Offered Spring 2009 

AAS 370 Modern Southern Africa 

in l ( ) ( )4 South Africa underwent a "peaceful revolution" 

with the election of Nelson Mandela. This course is de- 
signed to Stud) the historical events that led to this dra- 
matic development in South Africa from 1948 to 2000. 
Louis it ilsoti 
Offered Fall 2008 

Latin America 

260 LAS 260 (L) Colonial Latin America, 1492-1825 

The development of Latin American society during 
the period of Spanish and Portuguese rule. Social and 
cultural change in Native American societies as a result 
of colonialism. The contributions of Africans, Europeans 
and Native Americans to the new multi-ethnic societies 
that emerged during the three centuries of colonization 
and resistance. The study of sexuality; gender ideologies 
and the experiences of women are integral to the course 
and essential for understanding political power and 
cultural change in colonial Latin America. {H} 4 credits 
Jessica Delgado, Fall 2008 
AnnZulawski, Fall 2009 
Offered Fall 2008, Fall 2009 

261 LAS 261 (L) National Latin America, 1821 to the 
Present 

A thematic survey of Latin American history focusing 
on the development of export economies and the con- 
solidation of the state in the 19th century, the growth of 
political participation by the masses after 1900, and the 
efforts of Latin Americans to bring social justice and 
democracy to the region. {H} 4 credits 
Ann Zulawski 
Offered Spring 2009 

United States 

266 (L) The Age of the American Civil War 
Origins, course and consequences of the war of 1861- 
65. Major topics include the politics and experience of 
slavery; religion and abolitionism; ideologies of race; 
the role of African Americans in ending slavery, the 
making of Union and Confederate myths; Reconstruc- 



274 



History 



tion; white Americans' final abandonment of the cause 
of the freed people in the 1880s and 1890s. {H} 4 credits 
Robert Weir 
Offered Fall 2008 

267 (L) The United States since 1877 

Survey of the major economic, political and social 
changes of this period, primarily through the lens 
of race, class and gender, to understand the role of 
ordinary people in shaping defining events, including 
emancipation from slavery, racial formation, industrial 
capitalism, colonialism and imperialism, mass im/rni- 
gration, urbanization, the rise of mass culture, nation- 
alism, world war, and liberatory movements for social 
justice. Emphasis on class discussion and analysis of 
original documents, with short lectures. {H} 4 credits 
W. Lane Hall-Witt 
Offered Spring 2009 

278 (L) Women in the United States, 1865 to Present 

Survey of women's and gender history with focus on 
race, class and sexuality. Draws on feminist methodolo- 
gies to consider how study of women's lives changes our 
understanding of history, knowledge, culture and the 
politics of resistance. Topics include labor, racial forma- 
tion, empire, im/migration, popular culture, citizen- 
ship, education, religion, science, war, consumerism, 
feminism, queer cultures and globalizing capitalism. 
How have women contested and contributed to systems 
of inequality? Emphasis on class discussion and analysis 
of original documents, with short lectures. {H} 4 credits 
Jennifer Guglielmo 
Offered Fall 2008 

280 (C) Inquiries into United States Social History 

Topic: Globalization, Im/migration and the Trans- 
national Imaginary. Historicizes globalization by 
investigating the significance of im/migration and 
transnational social movements to the 20th-century 
United States. How have people responded to experi- 
ences of displacement and labor migration by creating 
alternative meanings of home and citizenship? What 
are the histories of such cross-border social movements 
as labor radicalism, Black Liberation, feminism and 
anti-colonialism? How do contemporary diasporic and 
post-colonial movements in music, art and literature, 
emerge out of a long history of transnational activism? 
{H} 4 credits 
Jennifer Guglielmo 
Offered Spring 2009 



AAS 202 Topics in Black Studies 

Topic: Segregation: Origins and Legacies. This col- 
loquium will explore the historical debates about the 
causes and timing of racial segregation, its effects on 
African Americans and social inequality, and its more 
resistant legacy in the 20th century, residential segre- 
gation. Violence against blacks, the use of gender to 
bolster segregation, biracial alliances and the onset of 
disfranchisement, the nationalist character of segrega- 
tion, and black resistance to segregation will be promi- 
nent themes. Weekly readings will include primary and 
secondary works, documentary films and historical 
films. (E){H} 4 credits 
Lynda J. Morgan 
Offered Spring 2009 

AAS 278 The '60s: A History of Afro-Americans in the 
United States from 1954 to 1970 

An interdisciplinary study of Afro-American history 
beginning with the Brown Decision in 1954. Particular 
attention will be given to the factors that contributed 
to the formative years of "Civil Rights Movements," 
Black films and music of the era, the rise of "Black 
Nationalism," and the importance of Afro-Americans 
in the Vietnam War. Recommended background: 
survey course in Afro-American history, American his- 
tory or Afro-American literature. Not open to first-year 
students. Prerequisite: AAS 117 and/or AAS 270, or 
permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to 40. 
{H} 4 credits 
Louis Wilson 
Offered Spring 2009 

AMS 220 Golloquia 

Topic: Asian-Pacific American History: 1850 to Pres- 
ent. This is an introductory survey course on Asian 
Pacific American history within the broader historical 
context of imperialism in the Asian-Pacific region. We 
will examine the historical experiences of the Chinese, 
Filipinos, Japanese, Koreans, Southeast Asians, Asian 
Indians and Pacific Islanders living in the U.S. The 
objective of the course is to provide students with a 
fundamental understanding of the A/P/A history that 
is inextricably linked to the goal of the United States to 
establish military, economic and cultural hegemony in 
the world through its colonial and neo-colonial poli- 
cies both in the U.S. and abroad. Enrollment limited to 
20. 4 credits 
Richard Chu 
Offered Fall 2008 



listorv 



275 



AMS 302 The Material Culture of New England, 
1630-1860 

Using the collections of Historic Deerfield, Inc.. and 
the environment of Deerfield, Massachusetts, students 
explore the relationship of a wide variety of objects 
(architecture, furniture, ceramics and textiles) to New 
England's history. (Masses are held in Old Deerfield. MA. 
Admission by permission of the instructor. {H/A} 
4 credits 
Nan Wolverton 
Offered Spring 2009 



relationships between women and the Great War. Be- 
tween 1917 and the late 1920s, 47 Smith alumnae led 
reconstruction efforts in the Somme valley in France. 
one of the areas most devastated bv the war. Drawing 
on materials in the Sophia Smith Collection — diaries. 
letters, photograph albums, newspaper clippings and fi- 
nancial records — the class compares this Bis! women's 
college relief unit with other Americans and Europeans 
who contributed to the war effort. {H/S} 4 credits 
Jennifer Hall- Witt 
Offered Fall 2008 



SWG 205 Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender 
History in the United States, 1945-2003 

This course offers an overview of LGBT culture and his- 
tory in the United States from 1945 to 2003. We will use 
a variety of historical and literary sources, including 
films and sound clips, to examine changes in lesbian, 
gay, bisexual and transgendered lives and experiences 
during the last half of the 20th century. The course will 
encourage the students to think about intersections 
of race, sexuality and class, and how these categories 
have affected sexual minority communities. The course 
will also explore the legal and cultural impact sexual 
minority communities have had in the United States. 
Prerequisite SWG 150 or permission of the instructor. 
{H} (E) 4 credits 
Daniel Rivers 
Offered Spring 2009 

Seminars 

350 Modern Europe 

Topic: Historiography. How do historians do history? 
How have they done so in the past? The development 
of historical writing in the modem period as well as 
interpretive problems and debates in contemporary 
historiography. Readings include primary source mate- 
rials and historical monographs. Students will become 
familiar with major historical journals and develop 
the interpretive skills necessary to identify and engage 
historiographic trends. {H} 4 credits 
Darcy Buerkle 
Offered Spring 2009 

355 Topics in Social History 

Topic: Women and World War T. The Smith College 
Relief Unit. Students undertake archival research in 
the papers of the Smith College Relief Unit to explore 



361 Problems in the History of Spanish America and 
Brazil 

Tbpic Public Health and Social Change in Latin 
America, 1850-Present. The relationship between sci- 
entific medicine and state formation in Latin America. 
Topics include Hispanic, Native American and African 
healing traditions and 19th-century politics; medicine 
and liberalism; gender, race and medicine; eugenics 
and Social Darwinism; the Rockefeller Foundation's 
mission in Latin America; medicine under populist and 
revolutionary governments. {H/S} 4 credits 
Ann Zulawski 
Offered Spring 2009 

372 Problems in American History 

Topic: Oral History and Women's Activism. 
Women's activism over the past fifty years, with an 
emphasis on second-wave feminisms. Texts include 
secondary literature as well as primary sources from the 
Sophia Smith Collection, including oral histories. Stu- 
dents are introduced to the techniques of oral history, 
and conduct, transcribe, edit and analyze their own 
interviews for their final projects. {H/S} 4 credits 
Kelly Anderson 
Offered Fall 2008 

Topic: Cross-Cultural Captivity in North America. 
1500-1860. 

The captivity of Europeans and European Ameri- 
cans — especially women — by Native Americans has 
been a persistent theme in mainstream literary and 
popular culture since early colonial times. This course 
examines several cases of such captivity in historical 
and cross-cultural context as well as some of the main 
more instances in which Native Americans and other 
non-Europeans were captives. Topics include captivity 
in pre-colonial indigenous societies, the purposes and 



rt 



History 



meanings of captivity for captors and captives, the uses 
of captivity narratives as historical evidence, captivity 
and cultural and ethnic identity, captivity and gender, 
Xauve-American-African American relations and the 
colonial-era slave trade in Native Americans. {H} 
4 credits 
Ned Salisbury 
Offered Spring 2009 

383 Research in United States Women's History: The 
Sophia Smith Collection 

A research and writing workshop in 19th- and 20th- 
century U.S. women's history 7 . Provides the opportunity 
to work with archival materials from the Sophia Smith 
Collection (letters, diaries, oral histories, newspaper 
articles, government documents, etc.) and historical 
scholarship, to research, analyze and write a paper on a 
topic of the student's own choosing. {H} 4 credits 
Jennifer Guglielmo 
Offered Spring 2009 

390 Teaching History 

A consideration of how the study of history, broadly 
conceived, gets translated into curriculum for middle 
and secondary schools. Addressing a range of topics 
in American history, students develop lesson and unit 
plans using primary and secondary resources, films, 
\ideos and internet materials. Discussions focus on 
both the historical content and the pedagogy used 
to teach it. Open to upper-level undergraduates and 
graduate students. Does not count for seminar credit in 
the history major. {H} 4 credits 
Peter Gunn 
Offered Fall 2008 

404 Special Studies 

By permission of the department. 4 credits 
Offered both semesters each vear 



The Major 



Advisers: Mamie Anderson, Ernest Benz, Darcy Buerk- 
le, Daniel Gardner, Sergey Glebov, Jennifer Guglielmo, 
David Newbury, Nadya Sbaiti, Ann Zulawski 

The history major comprises 1 1 semester courses, at 
least six of which shall normally be taken at Smith, 
distributed as follows: 



1. Field of concentration: five semester courses, at least 
one of which is a Smith history department seminar. 
Two of these may be historically oriented courses at 
the 200-level or above in other disciplines approved 
by the student's adviser. 

Fields of concentration: Antiquity: Islamic Middle 
East; East Asia; Europe, 300-1650; Europe, 1650 
to the present: Africa: Latin America; United States; 
Women's History: Comparative Colonialism. 
Sole: A student may also design a field of concen- 
tration, which should consist of courses related 
chronologically, geographically, methodologically 
or thematically and must be approved by an adviser. 

2. Additional courses: six courses, of which four must 
be in two fields distinct from the field of concentra- 
tion. 

3. No more than two courses taken at the 100-level 
may count toward the major. 

4. Geographic breadth: among the 1 1 semester courses 
counting towards the major, there must be at least 
one course each in three of the following geographic 
regions. 

Africa 

East Asia and Central Asia 

Europe 

Latin America 

Middle East and South Asia 

North America 
Courses both in the field of concentration and outside 
the field of concentration may be used to satisfy this 
requirement. AP credits may not be used to satisfy- this 
requirement. 

Courses cross-listed in this history department sec- 
tion of the catalogue count as history courses toward 
all requirements. 

A student may count one (but only one) AP ex- 
amination in United States, European or world history- 
with a grade of 4 or 5 as the equivalent of a course for 4 
credits toward the major. 

The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses 
counting toward the major. 



Study Away 



A student planning to study away from Smith during 
the academic year or during the summer must consult 
with a departmental adviser concerning rules for grant- 



History 



277 



ing credit toward the major or the degree. Students 
must consult with the departmental adviser for study 
away both before and after their participation in study 
abroad programs. 

Adviser for Study Away: Nadya Sbaiti 



The Minor 

Advisers: same as those listed for the major. 

The minor comprises five semester courses. At least 
three of these courses must be related chronologically, 
geographically, methodologically, or thematically. At 
least three of the courses will normally be taken at 
Smith. Students should consult their advisers. 

The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses 
counting toward the minor. 



Honors 

Director: Jennifer Guglielmo 

430d Thesis 

8 credits 

Full-year course; Offered each year 

431 Thesis 

8 credits 

Offered Fall semester each year 

The honors program is a one-year program taken dur- 
ing the senior year. Students who plan to enter honors 
should present a thesis project, in consultation with an 
adviser, during the spring semester of their junior year. 
Students must apply no later than the second week of 
classes of the fall semester of their senior year. Please 
consult the Director of Honors or the departmental Web 
site for specific requirements and application procedures. 

The central feature of the history honors program 
is the writing of a senior thesis. Each honors candidate 
defends her thesis at an oral examination in which she 
relates her thesis topic to a broader field of historical 
inquiry; defined with the approval of the director of 
honors. 

The history honors major comprises 1 1 semester 
courses, at least six of which shall normally be taken at 
Smith, distributed as follows: 



1 . Field of concentration: four semester courses, at 
least one of which is a Smith history department 
seminar. Two of these may be historical ly oriented 
courses at the 200-level or above in other disci- 
plines, approved by the student's adv isec 

2. The thesis counting for two courses (8 credits). 

3. Five history courses or seminars, of which four are 
outside the field of concentration. 

4. No more than two courses taken at the 100-level 
may count toward the major. 

5. Geographic breadth: among the 1 1 semester courses 
counting towards the major there must be at least 
one course each in three of the following geographic 
regions. 

Africa 

East Asia and Central Asia 

Europe 

Latin America 

Middle East and South Asia 

North America 
Courses in the field of concentration and outside the 
field of concentration may be used to satisfy' this re- 
quirement. AP credits may not be used to satisfy this 
requirement. 

Courses cross-listed in this history department sec- 
tion of the catalogue count as history courses toward 
all requirements. 

A student may count one (but only one) AP ex- 
amination in United States, European or world history 
with a grade of 4 or 5 as the equivalent of a course for 4 
credits toward the major. 

The S/U grading option is not allowed for courses 
counting toward the major. 



Graduate 



580 Special Problems in Historical Study 

Arranged individually with graduate students. {H} 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

590 Research and Thesis 

{H} 4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

590d Research and Thesis 

{H} 8 credits 

Full-year course; offered each year 



278 



Program in the History of Science 
and Technology 

Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Advisers 

*' Lale Aka Burk, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry 

David Dempsey, Museum of Art 

§2 Robert Dorit, Associate Professor of Biological 

Sciences 
Craig Felton, Professor of Art 
Nathanael Fortune, Associate Professor of Physics 
Laura Katz, Associate Professor of Biological Sciences 



Albert Mosley, Professor of Philosophy 

J Douglas Lane Patey, Professor of English Language 

and Literature 
Jeffry Ramsey, Associate Professor of Philosophy, 

Director 
" 2 Nicolas Russell, Assistant Professor of French Studies 
Gregory Young, Instructor, Science Center Machine 

Shop 



Smith's Program in the History of Science and Technol- 
ogy is designed to serve all Smith students. Courses in 
the program examine science and technology in their 
historical, cultural and social contexts, and the ways in 
which they have shaped and continue to shape human 
culture (and vice versa). Linking many disciplines and 
cultures, the minor complements majors in the hu- 
manities, social sciences and the natural sciences. 

112 Images and Understanding 

Topic: The Century of the Gene. We are not solely or 
only our genes, but we are not without them either. 
How do we understand talk of genes? This course is a 
historical, philosophical and sociological examination 
of the power, promises and perils of genetic research 
during the past 100 or so years. We will explore the 
changing relation of the gene concept, genetic theories 
and genetic experimental practices to other biological 
disciplines such as evolutionary theory, cytology, devel- 
opment and other biological practices such as genetic 
engineering. We will also examine the influence of 
genetic theories and perspectives in the larger culture. 
{H/N} 4 credits 
Jeffry Ramsey 
Offered Spring 2009 

207/ENG 207 The Technology of Reading and Writing 

An introductory exploration of the physical forms that 
knowledge and communication have taken in the West, 



from ancient oral cultures to modern print-literate 
culture. Our main interest will be in discovering how 
what is said and thought in a culture reflects its avail- 
able kinds of literacy 7 and media of communication. 
Topics to include poetry and memory in oral cultures; 
the invention of writing; the invention of prose; lit- 
erature and science in a script culture; the coming of 
printing; changing concepts of publication, authorship 
and originality; movements toward standardization in 
language; political implications of different kinds and 
levels of literacy. {L} 4 credits 
Douglas Patey 
Offered Spring 2009 

285/GLT 285 Mnemosyne: Goddess or Demon 

For the ancient Greeks, Menmosyne (the Greek word 
for memory) was a goddess who gave them control over 
time and truth. More recently, the Western tradition 
has described memory rather as a source of uncertainty 
and chaos. However, whether in fear or in awe, the 
West has always described memory as central to the 
human experience. This course will explore literary 
and scientific descriptions of memory in several periods 
from antiquity to the present. Texts by Hediod, Pindar, 
Plato, Augustine, Aquinas, Petrarch, Marguerite de 
Navarre, Freud, Proust, Borges and Kis, among others. 
{L} 4 credits 
Nicolas Russell 
Offered Fall 2008 



Program in the History of Science and Technology 



279 



404 Special Studies 

4 credits 

Offered both semesters each year 

Cross-Listed Courses 

ANT 248 Medical Anthropology 

The cultural construction of illness through an exami- 
nation of systems of diagnosis, classification and ther- 
apy in both non-Western and Western societies. Special 
attention given to the role of the traditional healer. The 
anthropological contribution to international health 
care and to the training of physicians in the I'nited 
States. Enrollment limited to 30. {S/N} 4 credits 
Donald Jorcdemon 
OfferedFall 2008 

ARC 211 Introduction to Archaeology 

An interdisciplinary introduction to archaeological 
inquiry. Students learn about the history of the field 
and Smith's own pioneers. This class explores all 
aspects of archaeology. Students practice survey and 
illustration techniques and learn methods of excava- 
tion, analysis and interpretation of artifacts, skeletal 
and environmental remains. In addition, we investigate 
issues of archaeological ethics and the political uses 
of archaeology. How does archaeological theory and 
investigator's perspective affect our reconstruction of 
the past? Sites around the globe enrich our classroom. 
Enrollment limited to 30. {H/S} 4 credits 
Susan Allen 
Offered Fall 2008 

AST 102 Sky I: Time 

Explore the concept of time, with emphasis on the as- 
tronomical roots of clocks and calendars. Observe and 
measure the cyclical motions of the sun, the moon, 
and the stars and understand phases of the moon, 
lunar and solar eclipses, seasons. Enrollment limited to 
25 per section. {N} 3 credits 
James Lowentbal, Meg Thacher 
Offered Fall 2008 

CHM 100 Perspectives in Chemistry 

Topic: Chemistry of Art Objects. In this museum-based 
course, chemistry will be discussed in the context of art. 
We will focus on materials used by artists and how the 
chemistry of these materials influences their longevity. 
Current analytical methods as well as preservation and 



conservation practices will be discussed with examples 
from the Smith College Museum of Art. Three hours of 
lecture, discussion and demonstrations. Class meetings 
will take place in the museum and in the Clark Science 
Center. {A/N} 4 credits 
IMeAka Bark. David Dempsej 
Offered Spring 2009, tyring 2010 

FYS 153 Excavating Women 

The interdisciplinary seminar will explore a little- 
known area in the history of archaeology: the partici- 
pation and legacy of women from the time of Thomas 
Jefferson to today. Students will learn by analyzing 
the lives, achievements, and experiences of women 
who devoted themselves to this pursuit or advanced it 
through their support of those who did. The class in- 
volves students in the professor's innovative methodol- 
ogy, archival archaeology and current area of research. 
Enrollment limited to 15. (E) (WI) {H/S} 4 credits 
Susan Heuck Allen 
Offered Fall 2008 

FYS 157 Literature and Science: Models of Time and 
Space 

Though science and art are often presented as mutu- 
ally exclusive fields of knowledge, scientific and liter- 
ary discourses cross in many ways. We'll read across 
the conventional boundaries of literary and scientific 
discourse, focusing on texts by scientists, fiction writers 
and playwrights that present new models of time and 
space. Texts may include work by scientists such as 
Lyell, Darwin, Einstein and Heisenberg, as well as by 
such writers of fiction and drama as Wells, Yonnegut, 
Stoppard, Brecht and McEwan. Key terms: deep time, 
time travel, multiple or parallel universes, deep space, 
wormholes, entropy. Enrollment limited to 16 first-year 
students. WI {L} 4 credits 

Luc dilleman (English language and Literature ) 
Offered Fall 2008 

GER 248 Topics in the Culture of Science and 
Technology of German-Speaking Europe 
Topic: Laboratories of Modernity: 1800/1900. This 
course investigates the interchange of ideas between the 
realms of natural science, pseudo-science, philosophy 
and literature at the turns of the 19th and 20th centu- 
ries. We will examine the important influence scientific 
developments played in cultural production during 
these pivotal periods, while at the same time exploring 
the cultural environments that fostered these scientific 



280 Program in the History of Science and Technology 

innovations. We will consider issues that continue to 
play a central role in today's discourse — identity, sexu- 
ality, cognition — in terms of contemporary develop- 
ments in chemistry, biology and physics, as well as psy- 
chology and mathematics. To this end, scientific works 
from Mach, Weininger, Einstein and Darwin, among 
others, will be brought into dialogue with literary texts 
from writers such as Kafka, Goethe, Lichtenberg and 
Musil, as well as theoretical texts from Nietzsche and 
Freud. Conducted in English. {L} 4 credits 
Joel Westerdale 
Offered Spring 2009 

PHI 213/PSY 213 Language Acquisition 

The course will examine how the child learns her first 
language. What are the central problems in the learn- 
ing of word meanings and grammars? Evidence and 
arguments will be drawn from linguistics, psychology 
and philosophy, and cross-linguistic data as well as 
English. Prerequisite: either PSY 1 1 1, PSY 233, PHI 100 
or PHI 236, or permission of the instructor. {N} 4 credits 
Jill de Villiers 
Offered Spring 2009 



The Minor 



Requirements: Two courses in the natural or math- 
ematical sciences and two courses in history, chosen in 
consultation with the student's minor adviser, and two 
courses in (or cross-listed in) the history of science and 
technology program. Normally one of the history of 
science and technology courses will be special studies, 
404a or 404b, but another course may be substituted 
with the approval of the adviser. Work at the Smithso- 
nian Institution in the Picker Program counts as one 
course toward the minor. Students considering a minor 
in the history of the science and technology are urged 
to consult with their advisers as early as possible. 



International Relations 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



281 



Advisers 

'Steven Martin Goldstein, Professor of Government 
'-Elliot Fratkin. Professor of Anthropology 
Gregory White, Professor of Government 
Mahnaz Mahdavi, Professor of Economics 



Nola Reinhardt, Professor of Economics 
*' Mlada Bukovansky, Associate Professor of 
Government. Director 



The international relations minor offers an opportunity 
for students to pursue an interest in international af- 
fairs as a complement to their majors. The program 
provides an interdisciplinary course of study designed 
to enhance the understanding of the complex interna- 
tional processes — political, economic, social, cultural 
and environmental — that are increasingly important 
to all nations. 

In keeping with the interdisciplinary nature of the 
minor, beyond completion of GOV 241, students may 
take no more than two courses in any one department 
to count toward the minor. 

Requirements: Six semester courses including GOV 241, 
plus one course from each of the following five groups: 

1. One course in global institutions or problems, such 
as international law or organizations, economic 
development, arms control and disarmament, the 
origins of war, resource and environmental issues, 
or world food problems. Among courses at Smith 
would be the following: 

ANT 230 Africa: Population, Health, and 

Environmental Issues 
ANT 24 1 Anthropology of Development 
ANT 348 Seminar: Topics in Development 

Health in Africa 
ANT 352 Cannibalism and Capitol: Topics in 

Colonialism, Race and Political Economy 
ECO 2 1 1 Economic Development 
ECO 213 The World Food System 
ECO 214 The EU, the Mediterranean and the 

Middle East: Hellenism or Bonapartism 
EGR 330 Engineering and Global Development 



GEO 105 
GEO 109 
GOV 233 
GOV 246 
GOV 252 
GOV 254 
GOV 341 



HST238 



Natural Disasters: Confronting and Coping 

The Environment 

Problems in Political Development 

Perspectives on War 

International Organizations 

Politics of the Global Environment 

Seminar in International Politics: 

International Perspectives on 

Contemporary Security Issues 

Gender and Empire 



2. One course in international economics or finance: 

ECO 209 Comparative Economic Systems 

ECO 295 International Trade and Commercial Policy 

ECO 296 International Finance 

ECO 375 Seminar: Theory and Practice of Central 

Banking 
GOV 242 International Political Economy 

3. One course in contemporary American foreign 
policy: 

GOV 244 Foreign Policy of the United States 
HST 273 Contemporary America 

4. One course in modem European history or govern- 
ment with an international emphasis: 

ECO 226 Economics of European Integration 

GOV 221 European Politics 

GOV 223 Russian Politics 

GOV 352 Seminar in Comparative Government and 

International Relations: European 

Integration 
HST239 Empire-building in Eurasia, 1552 Nit 



282 



International Relations 



HST 247 Aspects of Russian History 
HST 249 Early Modern Europe, 1618-1815 
HST 250 Europe in the 19th Century 
HST 25 1 Europe in the 20th Century 
HST 253 Women and Gender in Contemporary 
Europe 

5. One course on the economy, politics, or society of 
a region other than the United States and Europe: 



Africa 

MS 370 
GOV 227 
GOV 232 
GOV 321 

GOV 345 

GOV 346 

GOV 347 

HST 258 

Asia 

ANT 251 

ANT 252 
ANT 253 

ANT 267 

EAS100 
EAS219 
EAS230 

ECO 311 

GOV 224 
GOV 228 
GOV 230 

GOV 344 



GOV 348 



Modem Southern Africa 
Contemporary African Politics 
Women and Politics in Africa 
Rwanda Genocide in Comparative 
Perspective 

Seminar in International Politics: 
South Africa in the Globalized Context 
Seminar in International Relations: 
Regionalism and the International System 
Seminar in International Politics and 
Comparative Politic 19th and 20th Centuries 
History of Central Africa 



Women and Modernity in East Asia 

City and Countryside in China 

Introduction to East Asian Societies 

and Cultures 

Power, History and Communities in South 

Asia 

Introduction to Modem East Asia 

History of Modern Korea 

Women of Korea from the Three 

Kingdoms to the Present 

Seminar: Topics in Economic Development: 

Topic: Economic Development in East Asia 

Islam and Politics in the Middle East 

Government and Politics of Japan 

Government and Politics of China 

Seminar on Foreign Policy of 

the Chinese People's Republic: 

The Cross-Strait Controversy — 

Taiwan, the United States and the 

People's Republic of China 

Seminar in International Politics: 

Conflict and Cooperation in Asia 



GOV 349 



HST 212 
HST 213 
HST 216 
HST 217 
HST 218 



HST 221 
HST 222 
HST 223 
HST 242 
REL260 
REL275 

REL276 

REL282 



Seminar in International Relations and 

Comparative Politics: 

The Political Economy of the Newly 

Industrializing Countries of Asia 

China in Transformation A.D. 700-1900 

Modernity with Chinese Characteristics 

Women in Chinese History 

World War Two in East Asia 

Thought and Art in China: Confucian and 

Taoist 

Thought and Art 

The Rise of Modem Japan 

Aspects of Japanese History 

Women in Japanese History 

Modem Central Asia 

Buddhist Thought 

Religious History of India (Ancient & 

Classical) 

Religious History of India (Medieval & 

Modern) 

Violence and Nonviolence in Religious 

Traditions of South Asia 



Middle East 

GOV 224 Islam and Politics in the Middle East 

GOV 229 Government and Politics of Israel 

GOV 248 The Arab-Israeli Dispute 

HST 208 The Making of the Modem Middle East 

HST 209 Aspects of Middle Eastern History 

REL245 The Islamic Tradition 

Latin America 

ANT 237 Native South Americans: Conquest and 

Resistance 
ANT 269 Indigenous Cultures and the State in 

Mesoamerica 
ECO 318 Seminar: Latin American Economics 
GOV 226 Latin American Political Systems 
GOV 237 Politics and the U.S./Mexican Border 
GOV 322 Seminar in Comparative Government: 

Mexican Politics from 1910 to the Present 
HST 261 National Latin America, 1821 to the Present 
HST 263 Continuity and Change in Spanish America 

and Brazil 

At the discretion of the adviser, equivalent courses may 
be substituted. 



283 



Interterm Courses Offered for Credit 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



EAL 115 Kyoto Then and Now (2 credits) 

ESS 175 Applied Exercise Science (2 credits) 
ESS 945 Physical Conditioning (1 credit) 

FRN 240 £a parle drolement: French Theatre 

Workshop (2 credits) 
FRN 255 Speaking (Like the) French: 

Conversing, Discussing, Debating, 

Arguing (4 credits) 

GEO 223 Geology of Hawaiian Volcanoes 

(1 credit) 
GEO 270 Carbonate Systems and Coral Reefs of 

the Bahamas (3 credits) 

GRK 101 Readings in the Greek New Testament 
(1 credit) 

IDP 100 Critical Reading and Discussion: 
"Book title" (1 credit) 

Sectioned course 

Margaret Bruzelius, Course Director 

JUD 110 Elementary Yiddish (4 credits) 

MTH/QSK 103 Math Skills Studio (2 credits) 
MTH 289 The Mathematics of Knitted Objects 
(2 credits) 

MUS 905 Five College Opera Production 
(1 credit) 



SPN 218j Speaking Spanish in Context (4 credits) 

THE 140 Commedia dell' Arte Workshop 
(2 credits) 

WTG 100 Popular Nonfiction(l credit) 

Note: courses may not be offered every Interterm 

A schedule of important dates and information ap- 
plicable to January Interterm courses is issued by the 
Registrar's Office prior to pre-registration in the fall. 



PHI 253 Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy and 
Hermeneutics (3 credits) 



284 



Italian Language and Literature 



Visiting faculty and some lecturers are generally appointed for a limited term. 



Professors 

fl Alfonso Procaccini, Ph.D. 
t2 Giovanna Bellesia, Ph.D. 
Anna Botta, Ph.D., Chair (Italian and Comparative 
Literature) 



Lecturers 

§1 Serena Grattarola, M.A. 
Maria Succi-Hempstead, M.A. 
Bruno Grazioli, M.A. 

Assistant 

Giulia Benghi, Laurea 



Students planning to major in Italian and/or intending 
to spend their Junior Year in Italy should start study- 
ing Italian in their first semester in order to meet all 
requirements. ITL HOy, the Elementary Italian course, 
carries 10 credits and meets for the full year. No credits 
will be assigned for one semester only. 

All students going to Florence for their Junior Year 
Abroad must take ITL 250 in the spring of their sopho- 
more year. Those students who decide belatedly to begin 
their study of Italian in the second semester, must take 
ITL 1 1 1 in the spring of their first year. 

Students who did not take Italian in their first year 
and wish to apply to the JYA program in Florence must 
successfully complete an intensive summer program 
approved by the Italian department in the summer 
before their sophomore year. 



A. Language 



Credit is not granted for the first semester only of our 
introductory language course ITL HOy. No satisfac- 
tory/unsatisfactory grades allowed in Italian language 
courses. 

110y Elementary Italian 

One-year course that covers the basics of Italian lan- 
guage and culture and allows students to enroll in ITL 
220, ITL 230 and ITL 231 (in exceptional cases) the 
following year. Preference given to first-year students. 
Three class meetings per week plus required weekly 



multimedia work and a discussion session. Enroll- 
ment limited to 18 per section. Students entering in the 
spring need permission of the department and must 
take a placement exam. Students must stay in the same 
section all year. {F} 10 credits 
Bruno Grazioli, Maria Succi-Hempstead 
Full-year course; offered each year 

111 Accelerated Elementary Italian I 

One-semester course designed for students who might 
have missed the opportunity to take our highly recom- 
mended yearlong ITL 1 lOy course. It will cover the ma- 
terial of ITL 1 lOy in one semester. Three class meetings 
per week plus required weekly multimedia work and a 
discussion session. Preference is given to all first-year 
students planning to go to Italy for their Junior Year. 
Enrollment limited to 18 per section. Students should 
enroll in ITL 220 (or ITL 230 in exceptional cases) the 
following semester. 5 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered each Spring 

220 Intermediate Italian 

Comprehensive review through practice in writing and 
conversation. Discussion, compositions and oral reports 
based on Italian literary texts and cultural material. 
Weekly conversation meetings and multimedia work 
required. Prerequisite: ITL HOyorlTL 111 or permis- 
sion of the department. {F} 5 credits 
To be announced 
Offered Fall 2008 



Italian Language and Literature 



285 



230 High Intermediate Italian 

Readings of contemporary literary texts. Review of 
grammar, regular practice to improve oral and written 
expression. Open bypermission only. Prerequisite: ITL 
220 or ITL 1 lOv or 1 1 1 with permission of the depart- 
ment. {F} 5 credits 
Maria SuccirHempstead 
Offered each Fall 

231 Advanced Italian 

A continuation of 220 or 250. with emphasis on refin- 
ing linguistic expression. Speaking and writing are 
strongly emphasized. Prerequisite: 220, 230 or HOy, or 
1 1 1 with permission of the department. {F} 5 credits 
Bruno Grazioli 
Offered Fall 2008 

235 Advanced Conversation 

Practice in conversation, using a variety of materials 
including newspaper articles, films, television broad- 
casts and Web sites. This course is designed to develop 
oral proficiency. There is no written work. All exams 
will be oral. Prerequisite: ITL 220 or 230 or 231, or 
placement exam to assure correct language level has 
been reached. In the fall semester section 02 is open 
only to seniors returning from JYA in Florence and to 
very advanced students. Please check course schedule 
for details. {F} 2 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered Fall 2008, Spring 2009 



B. Literature and Culture 

The prerequisite for ITL 250 is ITL 220 or ITL 230 or 
ITL 231. There is no prerequisite for ITL 252 because it 
is conducted in English. 

The prerequisite for 300-level courses conducted in 
Italian is fluency in written and spoken Italian, and 
permission of the instructor. There is no prerequisite for 
ITL 342 because it is conducted in English. 



movies and on television. The second part of the course 
studies contemporary Italy. In the last twenty years 
ltal\ has become a country of immigration. Questions 
of race, ethnicity, color, religion, gender, language 
and nationality are at the center of the formation of 
a new Italian identity Some immigrants are starting 
to express their opinions on these issues. We will read 
some of their writings and compare them to the writings 
of Italian Americans. Are there experiences shared 
by all immigrants across the boundaries of time and 
culture? Can past migrations teach us something about 
stereotypes and intolerance? Do globalization and 
modem society, along with technological advances in 
communication, change the immigrant experience? En- 
rollment limited to 16 first-year students. WI {L} 4 credits 
Oiovanna Eellesia (Italian) 
Offered Fall 2008 

205 Savoring Italy: Recipes and Thoughts on Italian 
Cuisine and Culture 

The course will examine Italy's varied geography, his- 
tory and artistic tradition to further appreciate Italy's 
rich, delicious, yet simple cuisine. In our travels we will 
move from the cage to ^pizzeria, to the trattoria. 
to ihepasticceria, to the enoteca to probe the cultural 
impact Italian cuisine has on promoting a holistic 
philosophy for eating/drinking/speaking best reflected 
by the now renowned Italian '"slow food" movement. 
Taught in English. Graded S/U only. {L} 2 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered each Spring 

250 Survey of Italian Literature I 

Prerequisite for students applying for Junior Year 
Abroad in Florence. Reading of outstanding works and 
consideration of their cultural and social backgrounds 
from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. One class a 
week is dedicated to linguistic preparation of the text 
studied. Prerequisite: ITL 220, and/or 230, and/or 231 
or permission of the instructor. {L/F} 4 credits 
Members of the department 
Offered each Spring 



FYS 161 Immigration and the New Multiethnic 
Societies: From the Italian-American Experience to 
the Multicultural Italy of Today 

The first part of mis course traces the history of 
emigration from Italy to the United States. Students 
will read historical, literary and sociological texts, 
and study the representation of Italian Americans in 



251 Survey of Italian Literature II 

A continuation of ITL 250, concentrating on representa- 
tive literary works from the High Renaissance to the 
Modem period. Normally to be taken duringjunior Year 
in Florence. Maybe taken in Northampton as a special 
studies with the pennission of the chair of the depart- 
ment. Prerequisite: ITL 250 or pennission of the chair. 









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