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Full text of "The Smith family, being a popular account of most branches of the name--however spelt--from the fourteenth century downwards, with numerous pedigrees now published for the first time"

BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 

PROVO. UTAH 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2010 with funding from 
Brigham Young University 



http://www.archive.org/details/smithfamilybeingOOread 



^5 

.9* ■ 

THE SMITH FAMILY 

BEING A POPULAR ACCOUNT OF MOST 

BRANCHES OF THE NAME— HOWEVER 

SPELT— FROM THE FOURTEENTH 

CENTURY DOWNWARDS, WITH 

NUMEROUS PEDIGREES NOW 

PUBLISHED FOR THE 

FIRST TIME 



COMPTON READE, M.A. 

MAGDALEN COLLEGE, OXFORD \ RECTOR OP KZNCHESTER 

AND VICAR Or BRIDGE 50LLARS. AUTHOR OP 

"A RECORD OP THE REDEt," " UH8RA CCELI, 

" CHARLES READS, D.C.L. I A MEMOIR," 

ETC ETC 



*w 



POPULAR EDITION 



LONDON 

ELLIOT STOCK 

62 PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C. 

1904 



OLD 8. LEE LIBRARY 
6KIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY 
PROVO UTAH 



TO 

GEORGE W. MAR SHAL L, ESQ., LL.D. 

ROUGE CROIX PURSUIVANT-AT-ARM3, 

LORD OF THE MANOR AND PATRON 

OP SARNESFIELD, THE ABLEST 

AND MOST COURTEOUS OP 

LIVING GENEALOGISTS 

WITH THE 

CORDIAL ACKNOWLEDGMENTS OP 

THE COMPILER 



CONTENTS 



CHAPTER 

I. MEDLEVAL SMITHS 

II. THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 

III. THE ELKINGTON LINE . . . . 

IV. THE WEST COUNTRY SMITHS — THE SMITH- 

MARRIOTTS, BARTS 

V. THE CARRINGTONS AND CARINGTONS — EARL 
CARRINGTON — LORD PAUNCEFOTE — 
SMYTHES, BARTS. — BROMLEYS, BARTS., 
ETC 

VI. ENGLISH PEDIGREES . 

vii. English pedigrees — continued 

VIII. SCOTTISH PEDIGREES 
IX IRISH PEDIGREES 
X. CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 

INDEX (1) TO PEDIGREES .... 
INDEX (2) OF PRINCIPAL NAMES AND PLACES 



1 

9 
46 

53 



66 

96 
123 

176 
182 
200 

265 

268 



PREFACE 

I lay claim to be the first to produce a popular 
work of genealogy. By "popular" I mean one 
that rises superior to the limits of class or caste, 
and presents the lineage of the fanner or trades- 
man side by side with that of the nobleman or 
squire. As a matter of history, much ancient 
Norman blood has descended to the lower social 
stratum, and I have met thereabouts such chivalrous 
names as Quatremain, Turberville, and Louches, 
while in high places may be found the descendants 
of men who were serfs to those followers of 
"William the Conqueror. Apart from that, Geneal- 
ogy, a science which should by rights be the hand- 
maid of history, will never escape the reproach 
of snobbishness, until it broadens downward. An 
eminent American aphorised, that " The History of 
England is the history of the families " ; but this is 
only true, if we exclude artificial limitations, and 
endeavour to follow up, not merely the leading, 
but the minor strains also. And while in this 
research we often enough discover the wearer of a 
coronet to have sprung from proletarian ancestors, 
we also occasionally carry back the lineage of the 
man in the street to that of the man at the helm- 
Genealogy, therefore, ought to be an open book, 
and in this volume an attempt has been made to 
disclose some of its hitherto uncut pages. 

Among the ■ vast multitude of Smiths, I cannot 
pretend to cover the entire ground. The principle 
of arrangement, dominating this volume, may be 

b iz 



x PREFACE 

thus stated : where a descent is given, which 

already has appeared in one or more of the 

ordinary genealogical works of reference, it has 

been necessary, owing to the exigencies of space, 

to condense as far as has been compatible with 

perspicuity; where, on the other hand, a pedigree 

is presented for the first time, the fullest obtainable 

details have been appended. To have omitted 

pedigrees already published would have been to 

render the work lopsided ; but the genealogical 

value of the book rests mainly on those descents 

which have not appeared elsewhere. I could wish 

there were more of them, or that I had been able to 

research further, where a clue has been afforded. 

But genealogy to me is of necessity a parergon, and 

there are only twenty- four hours in the day. 

The book professes to review the great Fabrician 

family, whether crisped as Smith, " smoothed into 

Smyth," or "smidged into Smijth." To have given 

pedigrees only would have been to present a flat 

surface. I have therefore added a precis of such of 

the "name as have attained celebrity, and here the 

practical character of the gens goes far towards 

proving the doctrine of inherited characteristics. 

For these descendants of primitive iron-workers 

include scarcely a poet or an idealist, while in 

matters practical they stand pre-eminent. 

Whatever we are we were, 

And whatever we were are we, 

And whatever we are, and whatever we were 

That same shall we always be. 

I have to acknowledge indebtedness to a very 
great number of courteous and patient correspond- 
ents — among them George W. Marshall, Esq., LL.D., 
Rouge Croix Pursuivant, and Squire of Sarnesfield, 
with his son, Mr George Marshall of the Batch ; 
Rev. W. D. Macray, Fellow of Magdalen; H. V. Reade 
of Ipsden, Esq. ; The Hon. Mrs Stapleton ; H. 



PREFACE 2ri 

Baskerville, Esq. of Oriel ; H. F. J. Vaughan of 
Humphreston, Esq. ; H. Staffurth, Esq. of Bowdon 
Sir J. S. Purcell ; Lionel Horton Smith, Esq. 
Dr Last Smith of Torquay ; Hamilton Faber, Esq. 
W. F. Ecroyd, Esq., late M.P. for Preston; W. H. 
Smyth, Esq., Elkington Hall; Colonel Smyth of 
Annables ; F. Hawkins, Esq., J.P., C.C., Sugwas ; 
J. W. Smith, Esq., J.P., C.C., of Thinghill Court; 
Alderman W. Smith of Chichester ; Rev. Kenelm 
H. Smith ; Rev. C. E. Butler ; Mrs Chambers of 
Ludlow ; Mrs M. E. Smith of Southfield House ; 
J. U. Smith- Dorrien, Esq. of Tresco ; Mr Abel 
Smith of "Woodhall; W." Maxwell Smyth, Esq. of 
Drumcree ; Arthur M. Smith, Esq. of Lincoln's 
Tnn Fields, the learned historian of the Smiths of 
Exeter ; the Rev. E. U. Smith, also author of an 
able pedigree of the same lines ; J. W. Smith, Esq., 
J. P., Thinghill Court ; Joseph Smith, Esq. of Great 
Saling, and Miss S. Smith ; F. Smith, Esq., Mount 
Park, Coggeshall; Sir S. Maryon Wilson of East- 
bourne, Bart. ; A F Herford, Esq., Macclesfield ; 
J. Dixon, Esq., Barrow-in-Furness ; Miss E. Percy 
Smith, The Holt, Ledbury ; Sir George Smith of 
Treliske ; Ernest S. Pink, Esq. ; James Ward, Esq. , 
the widely-known antiquarian of Nottingham ; Mrs 
J. M. Smith of St Mary's Mount, Leeds ; Miss L. 
M. Sidnell ; Major Villiers Downes of Aspley ; Mrs 
Giles, Ashby Folville ; Miss Lucy F. Smith of 
Beccles ; A. Holland Hibbert, Esq. ; George A. 
Smith, Esq., of Helmshore ; Edward Smith, Esq., 
of Wribbenhall ; Rev. Irton Smith of Ilkley ; Rev. 
N. H. Smith, Belfast; H. L. Norton Smith, Esq., 
of Edinburgh; John Yarker, Esq., of Didsbury; 
Dr George Smith, CLE., Edinburgh ; H. Arthur 
Smith, Esq., Elm Court Temple ; Mrs Rooke, 
•Thorpsfield, Thirsk ; W. Macadam Smith, Esq., 
of Wiveliscombe ; Rev. W. H. Rusby of Felton ; 



xii PREFACE 

J. Hasley Smith, Esq. of W. Bridgeford ; Miss 
F. H. Haines of Bangor, co. Down ; Charles J. 
Smith, Esq., of Charmouth ; W. H. Smyth, Esq., 
of Hillsborough; Mrs Willcocks, The School, 
Warrington ; B. P. Scattergood, Esq., of Leeds ; 
Rev. A. E. Aldworth, Dover ; Rev. Father Morrall, 
O.S.B., Downside Abbey, Bath ; Miss E A Smith, 
Monaghan ; Miss Morris, Hereford ; the Rev. C. H. 
Bulmer, R. of Credenhill, for permission to search his 
Parish Registers ; Mrs Harrison of Windermere ; Mrs 
Leah Smith ; Alderman C. T. Smith of Rochester ; 
C. M. Smith, Esq., FirdalL Bowdon; A C. Godden 
Smith, Esq., of Wick ; Miss B. A Clough, Principal 
of Newnham College, Cambridge ; Miss M. B. 
Percival Smith of Brighton ; Sir Edmund Verney, 
Bart. ; Captain Frederick Verney ; J. L Travers, 
Esq. of Warlingham ; L. H. Shore Nightingale, Esq. ; 
Willoughby Gardner, Esq. ; and Lord Carrington. 

And last, but by no means least, I have to express 
my grateful acknowledgments to Mr Elliot Stock, 
for his kindness in lending me books and in verify- 
ing references. Residing at a distance remote from 
London, Oxford, and libraries generally, this assist- 
ance to me has proved invaluable, all the more so 
because accorded so readily and ungrudgingly. 

One word more. Several correspondents have 
inquired whether I am Smith disguised as Reade, 
or failing that hypothesis, if I happen to be blessed 
with a powerful strain of Smithish ichor? I can 
only reply, that, so far as I know, I cannot boast 
a single drop of Smith blood, and indeed, the only 
link between myself and the Smyths is through the 
Annables line, Judith, niece of my ancestress, Helen 
Lytton of Knebworth, having married Sir George 
Smyth of Annables. 

COMPTON READE. 

KZKCHZSTXK RECTORT. 



INTRODUCTION 

" The history of the name and race of Smith has 
yet to be written. It would be too gigantic a task 
for any author to undertake ; but there are numerous 
pedigrees of families of this name, as well in print 
as in MS., which, if collected, would form a most 
curious and interesting volume." 

Thus Mr Grazebrook, author of that excellent and 
most instructive treatise, "The Heraldry of Smith," 
his own family being allied to that of the Lea-Smiths 
of Halesowen, senior co-heirs of the Barony of Dudley. 
It is, as he urges, absolutely true that a lifetime 
and the fortune of an American billionaire would 
not suffice for an exhaustive history of all the Smiths 
in all four quarters of the globe. Even as regards 
England, it would require a special Heralds' Visita- 
tion to catalogue the pedigrees of Smiths in each 
county, city, and township, while the visitant heralds 
would have to be armed with powers to investigate 
every parish register, every diocesan register, and 
the entire corpus of archives and muniments, whether 
public or private. For an individual destitute of 
authority to attempt anything so supremely heroic 
would be futile. Enough, therefore, if in these pages 
Mr Grazebrook's suggestion of a collection, or com- 
pilation, of Smith pedigrees may have assumed, 
however imperfectly, a concrete form. The example 
of Prometheus has been followed, so far as circum- 
stances permit, and the reader will find herein : 

"particulam undique dissectam," 
for the net has been broadcast, and thereinto have 



xiv INTRODUCTION 

been swept the records alike of illustrious, or 
reputable, houses — mostly already known per the 
recognised channels of genealogical information — 
and also of humbler folk. Here will be found the 
lineage, not merely of such ennobled Smith families 
as Carrington, Pauncefote, Lyveden, and Hambledon, 
not merely of those that have won a niche in the 
Walhallas of Burke and "Walford, but of numerous 
others also appearing now in print for the first time. 
Many, if not all of these, to the genealogist, will 
prove at least as interesting as, say, " The Familiae 
Minorum Gentium," while to the general reader 
they may serve as apt illustrations of the ratio of 
progress, which during the past century has been 
upraising the status of the middle and lower middle 
orders. Others — a few only — represent no more 
than the descent of families who have neither ad- 
vanced nor receded — e.g. farmers who were farmers 
when Farmer George was king ; keepers who have 
never lost their congenital love of the covert ; 
Smiths who have been so by trade as well as in 
name. These samples show the conservatism of 
the Shires ; for, be it remarked, the tendency of 
trade is to mount one step higher, per the leverage 
of banking, brewing, manufacture, the law, arms, and 
other avenues of success. 

It may be noticed generally, that as regards the 
great gens Smith, the prime foundations of opulence 
have been laid in some one of the forms of Protestant 
dissent. Upon this phenomenon I make no comment. 
Simply these pages attest the fact. No doubt the 
self-contained and ascetic habit of the sects has 
proved ancillary to the accumulation of wealth. The 
aims of society have always been more or less hed- 
onistic, and a refined sestheticism, almost as much 
as luxury, ostentation, and the gambling craze, has 
proved in effect a leakage. Where there existed 



INTRODUCTION xv 

neither the desire, nor indeed the temptation, to 
spend even the surplus of a penuriously- earned 
increment, saving, and hoarding, and re-duplication 
have followed as the necessary corollary of industry 
and a quickened commercial intelligence. These 
tradesmen Smiths, whose patient labour and willing 
self-denial so largely assisted in the creation of a 
reserve of national wealth, have often been accused 
of serving mammon rather than God, while their 
phase of religion has been denounced as hypocrisy. 
Consistent lives, philanthropic zeal, above all, the 
blessing which has attended them to the third and 
fourth generation, afford a rejoinder to any such 
calumnies. So far as the Smiths represent a type, 
one may affirm, that without them England would 
have been small indeed. 

It is curious, but true in the main, that the little 
letter "y" has proved a huge differentia. For 
whereas the Smiths, as a rule, have been money- 
making, the Smyths have shown themselves, on 
the contrary, chivalrous and aristocratic. While 
Smiths were Roundhead, Smyths were Cavalier; 
while Smiths were evangelical, Smyths were — out- 
side Ireland, and in a degree, Scotland — high 
Churchmen or Roman Catholics ; while Smiths 
flourished as Whigs, Liberals, Radicals, Smyths 
suffered for Tory and Jacobite principles. The late 
Mr Smith of Tresco, in his " Stemmata Fen-aria," 
crows loudly over the rapid evolution of his yeoman 
Smiths — Cromwellians ; in contrast to the devolution 
of the Carington Smyths — Cavaliers. The phenome- 
non indeed is obvious enough — painfully so ; but the 
cry vce victis ! was scarcely generous. 

A notion prevails that for reasons more or less 
snobbish, the Smyths, Smythes, and Smijths, have 
essayed by a variation of spelling to lend an 
aristocratic flavour to a homely name. Nothing 



xvi INTRODUCTION 

can be further from the truth. The original form, 
as I have shown in these pages, was " Smyth," just 
as the modern " cider " is a corruption of the ancient 
"cyder." So far from the Smiths having Smythed 
themselves, I can discover barely one notable 
instance of the change from "i" to "y," but I can 
trace numberless instances of Elizabethan Smyths 
having become Victorian Smiths. Even the old 
democratic Cropwell Boteler strain passed from the 
latinised Faber to the Smyth of mediaeval days, and 
thence to Smithe and Smith. The earliest Smithe I 
have come across was in Devon, the truth being, that 
up to the Reformation the letter "i," following Norman 
French, was the equivalent of our " ee," and accord- 
ing to the Devon- dialect a Smith is a "Smeeth." 
That will account for the " i." It was phonetic. 

As for Smijth, which has always provoked a 
smile, the rococo spelling is simply a variant of 
Smyth. In writing Smyth, some ingenious clerk 
must have taken upon himself to dot both the 
strokes of the letter "y," thus changing it into 
Smijth. But this is no modern conceit. True, 
the name was originally Smyth, but we find Smijth 
in the reign of Henry VIII., when the family were 
of the highest social consideration, as is evidenced 
by their alliances and opulence. 

My former colleague in ancient days at beautiful 
Magdalen, Mr Macray, remarks that " to write a 
history of the Smiths is to count the grains of sand 
on the seashore ! " Most true, for it cannot now be 
said, that there is no Smith in the land; indeed, 
inasmuch as in the course of my researches I 
have stumbled across a prolific Smith with a progeny 
of twenty-two, the marvel is that England itself has 
not been transmuted into Smithland. Half-a-century 
ago, some pragmatical statistician calculated that the 
Smith population of London exceeded the total 



INTRODUCTION xvii 

population of Liverpool. Credat Judceusl Fortun- 
ately, as a sort of check to this monotonous uni- 
formity of nomenclature, the Smiths generally — I 
except the Smyths, whose ethos seems rather loftier 
— jump at any and every chance to merge their 
patronymic in some other. Thus scions of the 
ancient Cropwell Boteler line, who, according to the 
late Mr Tresco Smith, ought to have been more than 
proud of their plebeian patronymic, have cheerfully 
disguised themselves under such grandisonant aliases 
as Carrington, Pauncefote, Bromley, and Dorrien — in 
short, when a man is born into the world Smith, his 
first thought would appear to be how to rectify that 
error in generic nomenclature ! 

Quod non est simulat, dissimulatqiie quod est. 

Inasmuch as, thanks to the unrestricted licence 
of this free country, a butler can assume the 
name and arms of his master, a baronet, and 
a Bug can blossom into a Norfolk Howard, there 
exists no valid reason why John Smith should 
not be metamorphosed into Aylmer De Valence 
or Eustace De Montmorency. On the stage they 
have already exchanged freely the homely Juggins 
for De Vere, and the lists of lofty-named players 
in The Era, if analysed, would probably dis- 
close a fair contingent of Smiths. Against this 
arrangement I am by no means entering a protest. 
It is all a matter of business. What I do take 
grave objection to is the snobbishness of too many 
Smiths — the pride which apes humility. 

To explain. At the inception of this work I made 
an appeal, through the provincial press, for an 
account of every Smith family. The response was 
only partly encouraging, and when I personally 
canvassed several persons of the name holding 
prominent positions, I was confronted by an im- 



xviii INTRODUCTION 

passive unwillingness, ■which I could only refer to 
one cause — viz. that ihe parties were ashamed of 
their grandfather. Had I printed the true fact, 
that the grandsire of the alderman and county 
councillor, the candidate for municipal or parlia- 
mentary honours, was a shoeblack, it would have 
raised an unworthy blush to the grandson's cheek. 
This type of egotist, if you could arrive at his real 
meaning, would say : " Had my grandfather been a 
banker I should have bragged about him ; as he hap- 
pened to be a blacksmith or a butcher, I'm ashamed 
of him, and prefer to ignore any such connection 
with Me ! " The greatest of miscreants is he who 
repudiates his benefactor, and the fellow who thinks 
scorn of the honest blood in his veins proves him- 
self an unworthy descendant of a worthy man. 
Why? Is honest toil — the work of the world — 
shameful ? I pressed a gentleman, universally and 
deservedly popular, and that not merely because of 
his wealth, which was great, but rather because of 
his sterling qualities, to reveal to me the mystery 
of his origin. He point-blank refused. And yet 
I have reason to believe that the only fault of 
his grandfather consisted in keeping a shop. To 
that antecedent the big and bettered man could 
not bring himself to own. Surely, to think scorn 
of one's own flesh and blood amounts to con- 
temptible hypocrisy ! If only he could have grasped 
the truth, many of us bitterly regret that our grand- 
fathers, in lieu of hound-keeping, did not take to 
shop-keeping, and instead of wasting, had earned 
money. 

On the other hand, I have been favoured with not 
a few pedigrees of Smiths proud of their trading 
and toiling forbears, and these family records to me 
have proved replete with interest. Suffice it, that 
but for the silly shamefacedness of Smiths lacking 



INTRODUCTION xix 

in due respect for those to whom, under Providence, 
they owe their existence, this type of pedigree could 
have been trebled or quadrupled. With a name so 
ubiquitous I a dmi t the difficulty of tracing far back 
any family not connected with the land ; but three or 
four generations duly verified would have answered 
my purpose ; and, after all, in the Heralds' Visita- 
tions that seems to have been the normal limit of 
descents. 

In the eighteenth century a grand banquet was 
held in the city. The cooks were Smiths ; the 
waiters also : a Smith said grace ; the guests to a 
man were Smiths, and the president was one Captain 
Smith, Governor of Virginia. The feast was also 
graced by a poet Smith, whose claims to immortality 
rest solely on the ode composed for the occasion, 
the publisher being one James Smith. As there is 
no Smith Hall among the City Companies — why 
not? — the Drapers' was borrowed for the occasion, 
and a collection made for poor people of the name 
— possibly the descendants of Cavaliers and Legiti- 
mists ; the grandsons of Roundheads and Whigs 
for the most part rolling in riches. 

This latter charitable incident proves suggestive. 
The number of Smith benefactors to poor parishes 
from Land's End to Berwick's bounds is legion. 
Apart from such exemplars as the Episcopal co- 
founder of B.N.C., the munificent " Dog " Smith of the 
county of Surrey, and the donor of the Smith prize 
at Cambridge, the hand of Smith has verified the 
proverb, " there is that scattereth and yet in- 
creaseth " — a paradox divine in respect of inspiration, 
yet splendidly human. I have before me so many 
examples of this helpful spirit, not merely in London 
but in remote country towns and obscure villages, 
as to constitute a colossal tribute to the good heart 
of the Smiths — reminding one indeed of the noble 



xx INTRODUCTION . 

aphorism contained in the funeral oration of Pericles, 
which I might thus paraphrase : 

"Of generous Smiths the whole land is a monument." 

Perhaps the most eccentric and yet practical 
bequest was that of Henry Smith in 1717 to St 
Sepulchre's — " to help poor maides for husbands ! " 
Clearly when George was king a spouse must have 
been a purchasable commodity, and at a moderate 
price. 

" The Smith a mighty man is he," sings Longfellow. 
That was true in something more than a physical 
sense in the principality of Wales, where the Smith 
sat on the right hand of the king, and was the chief 
subject in his realm, just as in Olympus Vulcan held 
a prominent place, and the first brevet the shepherd 
boy David received, was to be armourer to King 
Saul 

As to the antiquity of the nomenclature, not being 
a comparative philologist, I should hesitate to hazard 
an opinion concerning its possible Grecian, or even 
Egyptian * origin. According to one eminent author- 
ity, the Smith-Marriott baronets enjoy a descent of 
almost interminable duration, not only as being qua 
Smiths Egyptian, but Greek also qua Marriott, in 
having hailed from the Palus Mareotis. With that 
I can scarcely concur, inasmuch as Smith appears 
to be the noun substantive of the verb "to smite," 
while Marriott, under the form Merriott, happens 
to be a village in Somerset ; and as regards the 

* Professor Mahaffy has made an extraordinary discovery in the Petrie 
papyri. These contain a list of names, and he says : "There is one which 
appears regularly in the same form, and of which we can give no further 
explanation. It is the name Smith— unmistakably written. We have never 
found anything like it before, and it is surely worth telling the many 
distinguished bearers of the name, that there was a man known as Smith in 
the twentieth year of the third Ptolemy, - 227 B.C., and that he was occupied 
in brewing beer or in selling it. Is there any other English name comparable 
to this in antiquity ? " 



INTRODUCTION xxi 

termination " ot " or " ott " we "have it in the parallel 
instances of Elliot, and Folliot. I have never yet 
heard that the Elliots were originally citizens of 
His.* 

To revert to "Smith." In the days when the 
Norsemen wielded the hammer of Thor, which none 
but the strongest could handle, in the romantic 
period when physical force meant moral superi- 
ority, — he was a cynosure. Presently, when mind — 
thanks to the influence of the Church in the first 
instance — had begun to assert itself over matter, 
the artificer was awarded the second place. Once 
in a way a genius, like Quentin Matsys, arose to deify 
his craft, but he, like our own Grinling Gibbons in 
another department of art, stood alone. The Smith 
in the lapse of centuries became a mechanic pure 
and simple, while a world prone to look at the 
present rather than at the past has forgotten his 
high estate in primaeval ages. Hence the satiric 
couplet : 

" Whence cometh Smith, be he knight or be he squire, 
But from the smith that forgeth at the fire ? " 

Good old "Customer" Smith, goldsmith in the 
Tudor days, and ancestor of the Viscounts Strangford 

* In " Zanoni," Book II., chap. 6, Lytton puts words into the mouth of 
a not very wise personage in ridioule of sham philology. Here is the passage : 
"Mervale . . . observed that he now ventured to announce an erudite discovery 
he himself had long since made — viz. that the numerous family of Smiths 
in England were undoubtedly the ancient priest3 of the Phrygian Apollo. 
' For,' said he, ' was not Apollo's surname, in Phrygia, Smintheus ? How 
clear all the ensuing corruptions of the august name— Smintheus — Smitheus — 
Smiths — Smith ! And even now, I may remark, that the more ancient 
branches of that illustrious family, unconsciously anxious to approximate at 
least by a letter nearer to the true title, take a pious pleasure in writing 
their names Smythe ! ' " 

It is asserted that "The abbreviation oyxS is probably a form of ayivioi, 
the Cretan Apollo, de-nasalised ; thus we have iiroXXwvo* (ru^us. We have 
also o>i8i«, a common form of Hathor, a purely Egyptian form." But surely 
this is comparative philology run riot ? 



xxii INTRODUCTION 

— who spelt themselves Smythe — must have had 
an inherited metallurgical scent, for not only did he 
discover gold and silver in Cardiganshire, but also 
brought his nuggets to the Mint and coined broad 
pieces with them. He was a publican in the Biblical 
sense, contracting for the dues of the realm and 
amassing thereby enormous wealth.* 

Later on, goldsmith was used as a synonym for 
banker. Thus in wills of the reign of Queen Anne 
we find such items as, "money lying at the gold- 
smith's " — i.e. at interest. The Goldsmiths' Hall and 
Company testifies to the power of that guild in the 
Middle Ages. In its inception it would appear to 
have been a confraternity of craftsmen skilled in the 
mystery of working precious metals, but the transi- 
tion to money -dealing followed imperceptibly, and 
the goldsmith ceased to be a craftsman, and became a 
financier. He retained, however, the old designation 
long after the foundation of the Bank of England. 

Although the blood of Smiths and Smyths flows 
in the veins of a very considerable proportion of the 
Peerage and Baronetage, the penny-a-lining sneer 
at "the gentleman of the name of Smith" seems 
perennial, while the gibe at the Smyths, for the 
harmless " y " in their patronymic, serves in the stead 
of wit — e.g. I came across this ineptitude recently : 
A mansion with ancient rookery was purchased by 
a man supposed to be named Smith, and the rooks, 
whose tenure of the Elizabethan elms was as ancient 
as the mansion, met in conclave and decided that it 
would be beneath their dignity to adorn the demesne 
of any one with so plebeian a patronymic. Thev 
were in fact about to. migrate, when one of their tribe 
arrived post haste to assure them that the name was 

* The last contractor of customs was Sir John Bncknall of Oxhey, Herts- 
temp : Jac. IL — whose son married Mary, daughter of Sir John Reade, Bart, of 
Brocket Hall. The family merged in the Bucknall-Estcourta. 



INTRODUCTION xxiii 

Smythe and not Smith. That of course altered the 
case, and they unanimously decided to remain. 

Whereupon I have to remark, that if, as I have 
found, Messieurs les Smiths choose to regard their 
name and parentage as a byword and a reproach, 
they need scarcely feel surprised if the world takes 
them at their own valuation. One may safely assert 
that there are Smiths scattered broadcast over the 
face of the world, who, if only they cared to take 
the trouble, could prove themselves real — not sham 
— Caringtons, as did the late Mr Carington Smith, 
nursery gardener of Worcester ; and others also who 
could go back to the mediaeval Smiths or Smyths 
of Exeter, Cuerdesley, and Lincolnshire. It may be 
urged by the Philistine that these people, now in 
ignorance of their birthright, would be no better for 
becoming enlightened. Query? The moral effect 
of a verified pedigree consists in the sense of balance 
it imparts. The Radical thereby becomes mollified 
into a subdued optimism, and his son washes his 
hands of an atavistic pessimism. The Sectarian, 
while retaining his belief, finds an alkali to its acid. 
In short, an honest pedigree makes good men better, 
and in obliterating the false pride that apes humility, 
raises its possessor to a due sense of his dignity as 
a true citizen of no mean city, having a personal and 
lasting interest in the sacred soil of mother England. 

My contention is, that in a land of ancient civilisa- 
tion, whose Parish Registers cover more or less 
imperfectly three centuries and a half, the origin of 
every reputable citizen need not be obscure. And 
further, that our system of registration should be 
enlarged and improved. Since 1836 the Marriage 
Registers have been explicit. Not only are the 
names of the principals recorded, but of their male 
parents also, with their place of abode. The same 
principle should be applied to the- Registers of 



xxiv INTRODUCTION 

Baptisms and Burials. The latter more particularly 
can only be termed miserably jejune, giving nothing 
more in respect of identification than name, abode, 
and age. Again, the Parish Registers (1) of each 
county, (2) of each borough should be transcribed 
and codified. That would involve some small ex- 
pense to Government, but the convenience to the 
public would amply justify such outlay. Lastly, 
fees for search might advantageously be abolished, 
and in their stead the parochial clergy should be 
allowed a fee for baptisms and for burials on the same 
scale as the existing marriage fees. If this reform, 
or rather reorganisation, could be accomplished, the 
task of pedigree-tracing, even in the instance of so 
myriad -headed a race as that of Smith, would be in- 
definitely facilitated. " Efferor studio patres vestros 
videndi ! " exclaims Cicero in the " De Senectute," 
and the thought of tracing the ancestors of a vagrom 
Smith would afford a pleasurable anticipation to the 
researchful genealogist. As things are, even the 
learned Herald too often encounters an impasse, 
while the illusive vindex nodi reposes perdu in the 
registers of the next parish. Had a perfect system of 
registration prevailed, it would have been possible to 
prove that every other Englishman one meets has a 
strain of Smith blood in his veins. 

I will conclude by quoting the lines of a con- 
tributor, who pleads a cosmopolitan origin for the 
family, whereof he is evidently a reputable scion : 

" Of all the ancient families that dwell upon the earth, 
The most antique, if not unique, 
Is that which gives us birth. 
In every clime from dawn of time 
Have dwelt our ancestors ; 
For on Egyptian obelisk, 
And on the Grecian monolyth, 
You '11 find enrolled in letters bold 
The honoured name of Smith." 



THE SMITH FAMILY 
CHAPTER I 

MEDIEVAL SMITHS 

The earliest record we have of the gentlemen of 
England as distinguished from the Norman nobility, 
is furnished by the reports the Commissioners 
appointed by Henry the Sixth returned in 1433. 
Unfortunately this catalogue is alike imperfect, in- 
congruous, and biassed. The names of those land- 
owners who favoured the Yorkist cause, of steady 
purpose were omitted. From twelve counties no 
return was made. In some others the list of gentry 
is so swollen as to suggest the inclusion of the 
yeoman class, while in others it has been so restricted 
as to demonstrate either the incompetence or the 
partiality of the Commissioners. This is notable 
especially in the tripartite shire of York, whose 
return is less than that of Cambridge — albeit all 
three Ridings were professedly included. The lists 
therefore represent probably not more than one-half 
of the landowning gentry of England, together with 
some, if not many, names that would have been 
designated by the Heralds a century later ignobiles. 
As an evidence of the slatternly way wherein the 
Commissioners performed their duties, it may be 
mentioned that many families, which both before and 
shortly after 1433 supplied sheriffs and knights of 
the shire, are omitted — presumably because they 
were identified with the Yorkist cause, the space 
which their names would have filled being supplied 
by ecclesiastics and yeomen. 

A 



2 THE SMITH FAMILY 

At the same time the returns, such as they are, 
demonstrate the social status of most families 
actually named. In a few instances old Fuller has 
assigned a local habitation, and with that their 
armorial bearings. As regards the latter, he is too 
often at fault, and the lists of 1433 may be profit- 
ably read side by side with those of sheriffs of the 
various counties, and with the Heralds' Visitations. 
Taking, however, as our starting-point the Commis- 
sioners' return of 1433, we find the name Smith, or 
Smyth, occupying a place among gentry. Even at 
that remote date it was not wholly bourgeois, but 
rooted in the land. It is of course Saxon, and its 
bearers, with numerous others of Saxon origin, had 
slowly but surely broken through the monopoly of 
the soil enjoyed from the Conquest by the Norman 
barons. The name connoted craftsmanship. In its 
inception it must have been peculiar to the burgher ; 
on the other hand, if you analyse the history of 
many among the noblest and most ancient of English 
families, they will be found to have emerged by 
force of character or special talents from the ranks 
of burghers — i.e. from precisely the same stratum 
whence emanated such of the great gens Smith 
as have dignified the common name. 

In the 1433 lists we find the name Smith absent 
from the counties of Berks, Beds, and Bucks. In 
the county of Cambridge, where the list is unusually 
long, the names occur of 

John Smith of Hyston. 
John Smith of Gamlingay. 
John Smith, Parson of Brynkle. 

In Cheshire, Cornwall, and Cumberland, there 
were no returns ; and there may have been Smiths 
freeholders of those shires ; but in Derby we meet 
with 



MEDLEVAL SMITHS 3 

Robert Carington, (later Smyth). 
John Smith, ferrour. 
John Smith, baker. 
These were probably members of the guilds of 
farriers and bakers respectively, and not actually 
engaged in trade — trade being obviously extraneous 
to the scope of the Co mmis sion. 

In Devon and Dorset the name is absent, as also 
in Durham, Essex, Gloucester, Hants, Herts, — where 
there was no return — but in Hereford the names 
occur of 

Thomas Smith of Weobley. 
William Smith of Tyberton. 
John Smith (query, of Credenhill ?) 
Huntingdon returned no Smith, but in Kent was 

Richard Smith de Schorne. 
Lancashire was one of the twelve counties making 
no return, otherwise we might have anticipated a 
contingent of Smiths favouring the Red Rose. 
Leicester appears to have been Yorkist ; but in 
Lincoln we find, 

John Smith of Elkington. 
Middlesex returned no Smith — albeit a Smith 
served as sheriff in the ensuing reign. In Mon- 
mouthshire there was no return, as also in Northants, 
while Norfolk and Notts produced none of the 
name, and Northumberland only a John Carington. 
Oxon, however, was rich in Smiths — e.g. 

William Smith of Chippingnorton. 

John Smith de Mellington. 

Thomas Smith de Eadem. 

John Smith. 

The list of the county of Oxford is not only over- 
loaded with names, but also is remarkable for some 
conspicuous omissions. 



4 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Rutland, Salop, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk, 
Surrey, Sussex, Warwickshire, Westmoreland, Wilts, 
Worcester, and York, all are destitute of Smiths ; 
and of those cited in other Shires, if the Caringtons 
be excepted, who were the progenitors of Smyths, 
which Smyths do not seem to have had a true 
Smyth origin, the majority may fairly be relegated 
to the squireen or yeoman class. I venture to 
assign more particularly the status of armiger or 
squire to 

John Smith of Hyston, Camb. 

William Smith of Tyberton, Herefordshire. 

John Smith, if of Credenhill, Herefordshire. 

Richard Smith of Schorne, Kent. 

John Smith of Elkington, Lincolnshire ; 

and to John and Thomas Smith of Mellington, Oxon. 
To which I might add Simon Smith, whose name is 
omitted, but who was sheriff for London and Middle- 
sex, 9 Edward IV. 

The early records of sheriffs commence circa the 
Conquest, and terminate with the reign of Charles L 
These lists afford a very accurate estimate of the 
social position held by each individual sheriff, the 
shrievalty being confined to owners of acreage, and 
the heavy expenses wherewith the office was saddled 
restricting its tenure to men of opulence. Here we 
first meet with gentlemen bearing the name of Smith 
or Smyth of .definite and assured status, many being 
knights, as well as men of estate. The returns 
withal are complete. 

In the counties of Berks, Beds, Bucks, and 
Cambs, there is no Smith sheriff recorded up to 
the last year of Charles I. In Cheshire, however, 
the most aristocratic of all shires, there served 

Laurence Smith, 9 Queen Elizabeth. 
Sir Thomas Smith, 42 Queen Elizabeth. 



MEDIAEVAL SMITHS 5 

In Cornwall, Cumberland, and Derby the name is 
absent. In Devon we have 

Sir George Smith, 11 James L 
Dorset is blank, but Essex proves prolific — e.g. 
John Smith (Smijth), 30 Henry VIII. (and of 

Herts). 
Henry Smith, 3 Elizabeth. 
William Smith, 13 James I. 
Sir William Smith, 17 James I. 
Henry Smith, 8 Charles I. 
Robert Smith, 17 Charles I. 
In Gloucestershire we find 

Thomas Smith, 13 and 25 Elizabeth (of Nibley). 
Hants gives no sheriff of the name, neither do 
Hereford and Hunts. In Kent, however, we have 
John Smith of Ostenhanger, 42 Elizabeth. 
Lancashire is blank. Leicestershire gives 
Francis SmitlLof Ashby, 8 Elizabeth. 
Roger Smith of Withcock, 42 Elizabeth. 
Lincolnshire has no sheriff Smith, but among the 
sheriffs of London and Middlessex are 
Simon Smith, 9 Edward IV. 
Humfrey Smith, 5 Charles I. 
Monmouth, Norfolk, Northants, and Notts are 
blank. In Northumberland John Carrington appears 
as M.P. for the county. 

Oxfordshire yields no sheriff, but the same Roger 
Smith who was sheriff of Leicestershire, served also 
as sheriff for Rutland, 24 and 34 Elizabeth. Salop 
is blank. Somerset gives 

Hugo Smith, 9 James I. 
In Staffordshire we find an early entry in 

William Smith, 20, 21 Henry VII., and again in 
14 Henry VEIL 



6 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Suffolk is blank. Surrey gives 

Thomas Smith, 16 Charles I. 

Sussex, Warwickshire, Westmoreland, Worcester, 
Wilts, and Yorkshire are all blank 

Among the valuable publications of the Royal 
Historical Society, Leadam's "Domesday of In- 
closures, 1517-18," affords some evidence as to the 
tenures of certain Smyths — the name being uniformly 
given with a "y." This work presents verbatim the 
Chancery returns for Berks, Beds, Bucks, Cheshire, 
Essex, Leicester, Lincoln, Northants, Oxon, and 
Warwick, with Dugdale's Notes on the Inquisition 
for Warwickshire. A large body of Commissioners 
was appointed, with sub-committees for each shire, 
the main object being apparently to check the 
conversion of arable land into pasture, as well as 
the eviction of tenants and destruction of cottages 
in order to create deer parks, the offenders 
being cited by name with their tenures. Among 
those appointed Edward Smyth served as Com- 
missioner for Cheshire, and Richard Smyth of 
Nuneaton for Warwickshire, while a Robert Smyth 
was sworn as juror before the Commissioners for 
Lincolnshire. 

In these returns we find that Henry Smyth 
enclosed one hundred and twenty acres of land in 
Fletchamstead, then a hamlet of Stoneleigh, Warwick- 
shire. According to Dugdale, this Henry was son 
of John Smyth of Coventry, and made a park with 
a pool therein Dugdale quotes from a later Inquisi- 
tion of 1548. The son of Henry was Sir Walter 
Smyth, who was murdered by his wife in 1554. 
[Vide Dugdale's "Warwick," pp. 40, 41.] This same 
Henry Smyth held 40 acres in Stretton-super-Strete, 
value annually £35, but allowed the cottages to 
become ruinated, and enclosed the land. Not only 



MEDIAEVAL SMITHS 7 

was there a large eviction of poor hinds in this shire 
by the Smyths, resulting in several deaths, but the 
churches became also ruins, and animals trampled 
on the graves. [Vide preamble of an Act, 7 Henry 
YELL, for " avoidyng pullyng doune of Tounes, wher'- 
by husbandry is decay'd, Churches destrued, and the 
service of God withdrawn."] Henry Smyth further 
"imparcavit" one hundred and thirty acres in 
Shyrford, and altogether one half of Fletchamstead 
parish. 

We find, moreover, that John Smyth was tenant of 
John Morys at Compton, Berks, and that Richard 
Smyth owned 30 acres in Ludgershall, Bucks, while 
a Thomas Smyth held lands in Crookham, Berks, 
under the Abbot of Reading. 

In the same volume mention is made of "William 
Smyth, Rector of Gawcott, Bucks, Prebendary of 
Sutton -cum -Buckingham, Archdeacon of Lincoln, 
and nephew, as well as exor, of Bishop William 
Smyth, co-founder of B.KC. A William Smyth 
also was Chaplain of the Chantry of Chippingnorton, 
Oxon, in 1517 — possibly the same William as the 
above pluralist. 

Mention is further made of Robert Smyth of 
Lower Toynton, Lincolnshire, and of a William 
Smyth of Alseley, or Allesley, Warwickshire, a tenant 
of Lord Abergavenny. 

The above represent the total of the name 
mentioned in the "Domesday of Enclosures." It 
may be safely assumed that the two selected Com- 
missioners were either distinguished lawyers, or else 
prominent landowners in their respective shires — 
probably the latter. The Warwickshire Smyths 
were evidently burgesses of Coventry, whose park 
at Stoneleigh, with the aforesaid pool, i.e. lake, is 
now the property of Lord Leigh. The first Leigh 
of Stoneleigh appears to have been .Sir Thomas, who 



8 THE SMITH FAMILY 

was Lord Mayor when The Red Queen Mary died. 
Inasmuch as his wife was a Warwickshire lady, it 
may be presumed that he held Stdneleigh in her 
right. The name Stoneleigh has apparently no con- 
nection with that of the Leigh family, who were 
seated originally at High Leigh, or Legh, in Cheshire. 



CHAPTEE II 

THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 

The object in view which the Tudors had in scrutin- 
ising the ancestry of such among the gentry as 
were assigned the status " nobilis," appears to have 
been mercenary. So far as the science of genealogy 
is concerned, these official visitations have proved 
most helpful, while among those families which were 
stigmatised by the heralds as ignobiles, not a few 
may have merited the contrary designation, and 
probably a little palm oil, judiciously administered, 
would have neutralised the obnoxious negative — 
indeed, among those entered as nobiles, some appear 
to have acquired the title very late in their pedigree. 
These Visitations, covering what may be termed the 
Reformation period, are mainly reliable, and at all 
events inform us concerning the leading gentry or 
minor nobility of the shires. Incidentally they throw 
a strong light on certain among the more ancient and 
honourable of those houses which bore the name of 
Smyth or Smith. For the sake of perspicuity, we will 
deal with each county seriatim, but only where the 
returns appear to be serviceable for the end we have 
in view. The list does not pretend to absolute com- 
pleteness. 

Visitation of Behks, 1634 
SMYTH OF ABINGDON 

Richard Smyth of Abingdon, Berks = Barbara, dau. ... Jawtherell of 
Derbyshire, and by her had : — 

1. Richard of Abingdon = Mary, dau. of Pawle Dayrell of Livingstone 
DayrelL Issue:— (a) Richard, living in 1634= Elizabeth, dau. of Geo. Deane 
of Stepney, and had, John, Thomas, Martha, Anne ; (b) Thomas ; (c) Edward ; 
(d) Anthony; (e) Michael; (/) Walter = Anne, dau. of Dr Thos. Edwards, 
Chancellor of the Diocese of London. 



10 



THE SMITH FAMILY 






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4 S:ql 



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THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 11 



SMITH OF OLDHAUGH 

Asms -.—Quarterly 1 and 4, per pah or and gules, 3 fleurs-de-lis counterehangtd 

2 and 3 ax. a fret or. 
Chest :— A fleur-de-lis per pale or and gules. 

John of Oldhaugh, = ... Oldhaugh. 
descended from 
a younger son 
of Sir Thomas 
of Cuerdley. 



John = ... Page of Alpram. 



John = Elizabeth, base dau. of Sir Andrew 
Brsreton, ob. 1549. 



With others. Randoll Smith of Old- = Jane, dau. of Ralph Bostocke of 

haugh, ob. 1589. Norcroft, ob. 1562. 



Alice, dau. of Otwell=Rafe of Oldhaugh = Margery, dau. of W. Sutton, 



Shawcross. 



and widow of W. Minshull. 



Randoll = Amy, dau. of Leonard Shalcross. 

i '' ! 

William Smith, Rouge Dragon = Veronica, dau. of Frank Others. 

Alstensteig of N urem- 
berg. 



Visitation of Cornwall, 1620 
SMYTH OF TREGONAKE ST GEEMAYNS 

Robert Smyth = Joane, dau. of Robert Killigrew. 

Wilmot, dau. of Roger = Thomas =Mary, dau. of Sir ... U-uthall of 
Tremayne. I Latchtord, Oxon. 



John Smyth of Robert Smyth of Trewvnt, in 

Tregonnock. Blysland. 

ARM3 :—B. a saltire arg. between 4 martlets or. 

In this Visitation we further dnd that Ellinor, daughter of Bernard Smith 
of Totness. and widow of Sir John Fulford = John Wrey of X. Russel. And 
th»t William Smith of Newton was disclaimed as tgnobilis. 



12 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Visitation of Devon, 1620 
■SMYTH OF DARTMOUTH 

Arms. — Barry wavy of six arg. and az. on a chief gu. three pairs of barnacles. 
John Smyth of D. = the widow of John Anthonie 



of Exeter. 



John, living in 1620 = Elizabeth, dan. of Rich. Dyer of Barnstaple. 
Issue. 

SMYTH OF EXETER (latee SMITH) 

John Smyth of Borage = Alice Muttleberrie. 

Joane, dau. of James Walker = Sir George = Grace, dau. of Win. Viell, by 
I (ob. 1619). I Jane, dau. of Arondell of 

Trevize. 

I 
Grace = Bevill, son of 
Sir Barnard 
I GrenvilL 

I i I 

Elizabeth = Sir Thoa. Monke Sir Nicholas = Dorothea, dan. Jane = Richard 
of Powdendge. of Sir Ralph Henning 

Horsey of of Dorset. 

Dorset. 

5 sons, 2 dau. 

Sir Nicholas Smvth is described as of Larkbeare. [Vide Chapter IV., 
'* The West Country Smiths."] 

Visitation of Dorset, 1623 

Angell Smith of Stratton had a daughter who married ... Meller of Came. 
Jane, dau. of Sir George Smith of Motford, Devon = Richard Hemminge of 
PorwelL [ Vide supra, Visitation of Devon. ] 

Visitation of Durham, 1615 
SMITH OF DURHAM 

ARM S : — Arg. on a bend az., 3 lozenges erminois between S unicorns' heads 

erased az. , armed and maned or. 
Crest: — A dexter hand embowed erminois cuffed arg., grasping a broken 

sword ppr. , hilt or. 

Thomas S. = Elizabeth, dau. of ... Layton of West Layton. 

John S. = Jane, dau. of ... Layton of Sproxton, 
I Lord of the Manor of West Layton. 



I ~ I 



I I I 

Thomas S. = Margaret, eldest John, parson of William, parson 
I dau. of Simon Normanby, co. of Hargrave, co. 
I Lightfoot of York. Northumberland. 

I West Layton. 

. i i n 

Symon. John, William S. of Duresme, =Mary, dau. of Lyonell 

s.p. Councellor " of Law, I Heron of Chipchase, 

1615. co. Northumberland. 



Henry, son and heir, set. 6, 1615. Margaret. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 



13 



Visitation of Essex, 1612 
CAEIN'GTON-^s SMITH 

Arms : — Arg. a croat gules between 4 peacocks az. 

Crest: — A peacock's head erased gules, ducal! y gorged or. 

Sir. Wm. C, Knights Anne, dan. of Edmond Far well. 

Arms — Arg. on a 

bend sable 3 faw- 

chens in Salter arg. 

hilted or. Poynts 

downward. 



Sir Edward = Ca therm, heir 
to Sir Thos. 
Herriett. 
(Issue). 



Sir William = Catherin, syster to 
Wm. Mountacute, 
Erie of Sales berv. 



Sir Thos., son and heir, = Margaret, dau. of Sr. Robert Roose. 

obt. 4 Richd. H, 1378. I 



Edmond = Joan, dr. of Sir 

ob. 

1397. 





J. Ferrers. 


fled abroad and 
called himself 
Smith. Arms — 


Isabels Thomas 


Arg. a crosse 


NevelL 


gules enter 4 




peacockes azure. 






Obt. 1446. 



John Carington, = Elizabeth, heiress of 

Robert Lainham and of 
Alice, heiress of John 
Hende, Lord Mayor, 1392. 



Hamond = Thomas Smith of Rivenhall=Isabell, heiress of William Foster, 
(Issue). i of Littell Badow. 



Sir Clement = Dorathie, dau. of Edward 
| Seymer, D. of Somersett. 

John, a. p. 

Visitation of Essex, 166-i 
SMITH OF WEST HAM 

Robert Smith = ... 



I 
Others. 



Sir Roberts Judith Walmsley. 

I 



James = Mary, dau. of Sir Robert = Jane Trafford. Anthony. 

Wm. Peake. ! — 

Hester. 



Robert. John. James. Jane, 
(heir) 



Anne. 

Judith. 

Rebecca. 



14 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Visitation of Essex, 1664 
SMITH OF BLACKMORE 

Arms: — Arg. a cross (sic) between 4 peacocks close az. 
Crest : — A peacock's head erased ppr., ducally gorged or. 

Thomas Smith = Margaret, dan. of Thos. Turner 
of Creasing Hall. 

Arthur = Anne Mil ward. 



I 
Major Stephen, living in 1664= Joan, dan. of Alderman Bennet. 
| 

I I 

Arthur, xt. 22, 1664. Others. 

SMITH OF BROXTED 

Thomas Smith of Sudbury. 



Thomas of Broxted = Elen, dau. of Robt. Poole of Belsham. 



Thomas, living in 1664= Kathenne, dan. of Win. Howe of Farnham. 

SMITH OF HARWICH 

William Smith of Walton = Anne Culfe. 

| 

I 
Daniel = Bridget Mannock. 



Daniel = Elizabeth, dau. of Thos. Pitt of Trimley. 

I 

Daniel, living in 1664. Others. 

Visitation of Essex, 1634 
NEVTLE 

Asms :— Quarterly — 1 and 4, gules a taltire ermine ; 2 and 3, Smith as under 

Carington. V. 1612. 
Ceest : — A bull's head ermine. 

Hugh Smyth of Witham, Essex. 



Sir John Smyth of Creasing Temple = Anne, d. of Edwd. Wood of London. 



Edmond. Thomas = Mary, heiress of Sir Thos. Nevile of Holte. 



Sir Thomas Nevile, = Jane, d. of Toby Houghton Others, 
alias Smyth. of Houghton Tower. 

* (Issue. ) 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 



15 



Farther information ia supplied by 

Berry's Essex Pedigrees (HarL Soc Publications) 

SMYTH, SMIJTH (No. 1) 

ASUS : — Sable, a fete daneettie arg. ; bUletie of the field, between three lionr.elt 
rampant yardant of the leeond, each supporting an altar or, funning proper. 
Cassr :—A Salamander regardant infiamet proper, dttcally gorged. 

This crest was adopted by Sir Thomas Smijth, Sec of State to Queen 
Mary (1) in allusion to his escape from fire. The earlier crest was an eagle 
holding a burning pen. 

Edward HL 
I 
The Black Princes 

Sir Roger Do Clarendon. 

From ■whom 

Agnes Chamock=Jobji Smijth, Sheriff of Essex =2nd wife, 3. p. 

1 and Herts, 30 Hen. VTH. 



Sir Thomas, Secretary of State to Q. Eliza- 
beth, Amb. to France, d. s.p. low. 



George =... 
ob. 1577. I 



Others. 



Sir William (1560- 1626) = Bridget, dau. of Thomas Fleet- 
I wood of The Vache, Bucks. 



Others. 



Helligaurth, = Sir 



dau. of Ed- 
ward Con- 
way, Baron 
of Ragley, 
Sea. to 
James L and 
Charles L 



William = 



(1599-1631). 

Edward, 
died a. p. 



Anne, Others. Sir Thomas, created = Johanna 



dau. of 
Croft of 
Hertford 
(Query, 
Here- 
ford?) 



Bart. 1661. He m., 
2ndly, Beatrice, 
dau. of Viscount 
Valentia, and 
widow of Sir John 
Lloyd, d. s.p. 1668. 



dau. of 
Sir E. 

Altham. 
Knt. 



Sir Edward= Jane Vandeput. 



Anne, dau. of Right Hon. Sir Charles = Sir Edward, = Elizabeth Wood. 
Hedges, Secretary of State to King I 3rd Bart. 
William and Queen Anne. (1686-1744). 



•Edt 



Sir Edward, 
4th Bart. 
(1710-60), a. p. 



Sir Charles, = Elizabeth Rev. Sir William = Abigail Wood of 



5th Bart. 
(1712-73). 



Burgess, 
d. 1776. 



(1720-77). 



Salop, d. 1787. 



7illi 



Sir William (1746-1823) = Anne Windham (Bowyer). 



Sir Thomas 
(1781-1823). 



I 
Sir John 
(d. 1838). 



Rev. Sir Edward = LetitiaC, dau. of J. Weyland 
I of Woodeaton, Oxon. 



niiis 



William, b. 1814= Marianne F., dau. of Sir 
H. Meux, Bart. 



Alfred John Edward, 
b. 1825. 



16 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



Berry's Essex Pedigrees 
(HarL Soc. Publications) 

SMYTH (No. 2) 

A-n\t« -.—Azure two ban wavy ermine on a chief or a dtmilion rampant 

istuant sabit. 
Crest : An ostrich htad quarterly arrj. and so. bttwun two wings gu., in tht 

beak a horseshoe or. 
Motto : — Sustine et abttine. 



Judith, niece of Chief- = Robert Smyth of Upton, = Rebecca, dan. of Sir W. 



Justice Walmesly. 



created Bart. 1665. 



Romney. 
2 daughters. 



Sir Roberta Jane Trafford. 



James, ancestor of the 
Smvtha of Istield. 



Sir Robert, U P ,» Ab» , dan. of H. Whitehead 
3rd Bart of Tytherley. 



Others. 



Conway, dan. of Dr = Trafford = Anne, niece of Rev. Robert, V. of = Dorothy 



Hackett, Bishop d. 1732. I SirJ.What- 
of Down. I ton, Knt. 



Woolavington. 



Sir Trafford, died, s.p. 
1765. 



Llovd. 



Sir Robert, 5th Bart., = Charlotte S. Blake, 
M.P., d. 1802. d. 1823. 



Sir George EL, 6th Bart., = Eva, dan. of Geo. Elmore, Esq. of 
M.A., M.P., b. 1734. Panton, Hants. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 17 



Bessy's Essex Pedigrees (HarL Soc. Publications) 



SMITH (2Tb. 1) 



AR.X3 :— Ermine, a -laitirt ax. charged with an escalop or, in base a dolphin 
naiant, embowed of the second. 

Cb£ST :— Between a pen in bend or, feathered argent, surmounted by a sword 
proper, pomei and hilt gold, an escutcheon azure, charged with an 
escalop of the first, pendent by a ribbon gules. 

Motto :— Morte et ingenio. 

James of Camno, N.B. 



John London— merchant, =Mary, dan. of Griffen Ransom 
d. July 1827. ! of Lambeth. 



Sir Drnmmond, created a Bart. Thomas of Elizabeth: 

11 Jane 1804 (with remainder Font hill, Jamaica. 
to Charles Smith of Sutton in 
right of his niece, Augusta). 
=(1) Mary, eldest dan. of Sir 
Ellis Cunliffe, Bart. ; (2) Eliza- 
beth, dan. of William, Vis- 
count Galway, and widow of 
Sir Francis Sykes. Died, 
a. p., Jan. 22, 1816. 



i Andrew 
Telfe of 
PenhilL 



Joshua of Stoke Park, = Sarah, dan. of Sir John of Harering = Margaret, only 



Wilts, MP. 



Gilbert, Esq. assumed the name dau. of Ynyr 
and arms of Burges, B urges, Esq. 
createdaBart. 1763; 
ob. 1303, s.p. 



I iil 

Maria=Charles,Mar- Elizabeth = William Emma = Aug. Augusta = Charles 

quess of Northamp- Chute of the Vine. 7, 1800, Ran- Smith 

er*n rial! TymJ rvf Qi,*- 



dall, Lord 
D u n s a n y, 
and died a 
widow, June 
1823. 



Smith 
of Sut- 
tons. 



Spencer Smith, Esq. 



Belinda, dau. of = Sir Charles 
Colebrooke, 
Esq., Oct. 1323. 



Mary, 2nd dau. of Chas. 
Gosling of Rockarap- 
ton; m. July 20, 1326. 



Sir Charles Cunliffe Smith, Bart, 
of Tring Park, Herts, b. Sept. 
15, 1827. 



18 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



♦ Bessy's Essex Pedigrees 

(HarL Soc Publications ) 

SMITH (No. 2) 

Charles of 'RarHiig (of Dorset) = Co- heiress of Captn. Marnner. 



Ann* RiceaCharles of Stratford » Judith, dan. of Isaac Lefevre of Old 
(1713-77). Ford, m. 1748. 



Judith, num., Susanna Deval, = Charles of Sat tons, = Augusta, 3rd dau. of 



d. 1832. 



s.p. 



M.P. (1757-1814). 



Joshua Smith of Erl- 
stoke, Wilts, M.P. 



Augmta = Rev. H. W. Wilder, Emma = Rev. J. E. Francos = Rot. R. Sey- 
Purley F* 11 , d. Aug. Austen moor, son of Admiral 

3, 1838. Leigh of Sir Michael Seymour, 

Scarletts, Bart., K.C.B., Rector 
Berks. of Kinwarton. 



ria Los 



Sarah Elizas Denis La Marchant Charlottes Arthur Currie. Maria Louisa, 
of Chobham, Judith. 



Sir Charles Joshua of = (2) Mary, dau. of Spencer = Frances A., 



Suttons, heir to his 
maternal uncle. Sir 
Drummond. He d. 
Jan. 14, 183 . 
= (1) Belinda Cole, 
brooke, who died s. p. 
1825. 



W. Gosling 
Hassobury. 



dau. of Ad' 
miral Sir 
M. Seymour, 
Bart. 



Drummond, 

B.C.L., 

(1812-32). 



Sir Charles Cunliffe of 
Suttons, b. 1827. 



3 dau*. Spencer. Drummond. A dan. 



* Since the MS. of this volume was completed, exception has been taken by 
the Herald's College to Berry as an authority. The above pedigrees seem, 
howerer, to be free from error. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 



19 



(Haul. MSS.) 

Visitation of Gloucesteeshtrb, 1624 

SMYTH 

Arms : — Sa. a ftsst between 3 aaltires or — sometimes charged with 3 fleurs-de- 
lis gu. 
Crest : — 3 serpent* nowed and intertwined as. 
Motto : — Chastm sa parte. 

Thomas S myth = Catherine, dau. of Sir Geo. Throckmorton, 
of Campden. I widow of Robert Winter. 



Richard. = Mariam, dan. of 
Hugh Elston. 



Catherine = Sam we 11 Tracie. 



Sam well 



Catherine. 



rThi 



Silvanus. Mary. Paule, Sir Thomas, Anne = ... Ash- Anthony =Joane, dan. 



s-p. Knt., s.p. 



field. 



of Sir Roger 
Martin, 
Lord Mayor. 



Thomas. = Elizabeth, dan. of Eustace Eitzherbert, 
widow of Edward Smyth of Cressing 
Temple, Essex. [See vn. of Essex.] 



John, 
s.p. 



Grisegond. 



Edward, son of Sir John Smyth =Grisegon= Andrew Jennor of Bi- 
of Cressing Temple, a. p. I gotts in Much Dunmow. 

Sir Eenelm Jennor, Bart. 



SMYTH 

Aems :—Or, a chevron cotised sa., between 3 roses gu., slipped vert, impaling or 
on a chevron between 3 cinque/oils ax. as many escalops arg., on a 
chief per pale gu. and so. a gnrfin passant erm. — Hawkins. 

Maria Hawkins = MUo, Bishop of Gloucester = Elizabeth, dan. of 
of Cardiff. 1623. Richard Lygon of 

Madresrieid, s.p. 



Edward. Robert. 



Gervase, 
of the 
Middle 
Temple. 



I I 

Milo= Margerys 
Eliza- Clint of 
beth Gloucester. 

Williams 
of Cardiff. 



Catherines Margaret. 
= Morgan. 
[Compare 
the pedi- 

Ce of 
ith (sic) 
of Camb- 
den in the 
Visitatiou 
of War- 
wickshire. 
1619.] 



Win. 

Sutton, 
Chancellor 
of Glouces- 
ter. 



20 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Visitation of Gloucestershire (HarL MSS.) 
SMYTH 

Arjis : — On a chevron engrailed between 6 crosses formientchie or as many fenrs- 

dt-lis az. 

William Smyth of Hombertone (Linc)= ... Emoct. 



Tlioraas Smrth of Hoby (Leic. ) = Joan, dau. of Richard Allayne Richard. 

of Derbv. 



John of Niblev^Mary, dau. of John Browning of Cowley. 



i ! I 

John of The MiddleaAnne, dau. of Sir Edward Thomas Smyth, Others. 
Temple. Bromfeld, Lord Mayor. Commoner of 

Lincoln ColL, 
Oxford. 

Joseph Baynham of Westbere = Joane, dau. of William^Smyth of Brownshill, 
Gloucestershire, wid w of Thomas Becke. 

[See alsi Visitation 1683, Smtth of Farmlngton.] 



VISITATION OF Heeefobdshihe, 1569 
SMITH OF CREDEXHILL 

Arsis :— Arg. a mount vert, a lion passant regvardant proper. 
Ceest :— A hone's head so., bridled or. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 21 

Richard Smith. 

Thoraaa (21 Hen. VL). 



William = All ice, dan. of David Boy*, by Joanne, dan. of Riuaell 
| of BythelL 

* John Smyth of Wears in Kenchester = Maud Hopwood. 



Richards Anne Stephen*. 



RichardaSybil BarrolL Thomas t of CredenhillaElizth. Welsh. 



(1) Hugh = d. of Wm. (2) Richard = Mary Osborne. (3) Thomaa=dau. of 



Havard . of the 

(Issue.) Exche- 

quer. 



of I Smyth ot 
Weston the 

Wear*. 



Peter. Francis. John. Anne at Roger Elixth. = Thos. Rogers Anne 



Dansey 
Peter of Dyffryn. of Brinsop. 



Powys of Plnmptre 
Sutton. of Notts. 



Thos. Powys of Henley, Salop. 



(4) William (5) Root, of = Anne Wei- (6) James of=Susan (7) Symon, 



ofDern- Gard- ford. Overton. 

dalL wey. (Issue.) 



Davis of Chan* 

Red- cellor 

castelL of St 

David's, 
Coilebs. 



John Smyth of = Prudence, dan. of Reginald Others. 

Overton, Salop. I Davis of The Marsh. 

Thomas = Elizabeth Marshal. 
(Issue.) 

John Smyth •was "ffeffeyd" of The Weare by James Baskerville and John 
Walwyn, being infeffyd thereof before. 

John Breynton of St rat ton, base son to Symonde = Elizth., dau. of Thos. 
Smyth of CredenhilL 

Rachel Smith of Upton, Wore = Richard Blount. 



• In the reign of Hen. VTH. Thomas Wenland sued John Smith (Smyth), 
Maud his wife, and Thomas and Alsen Smith for an assault committed in 
Kenchester church. This waa probably occasioned by odium theoiogicum, 

+ Banco Roll — temp. Eliz.— no date. George Ap Harry, gent., sued 
Thomas Smyth, gent., of Credenhill to recover an estate in Newton and 
Michaelchurch granted to his ancestor, An Gwillim, Eva his wife, and the 
heirs of their bodies, temp. Edw. ILL, ana which hod descended in tail male 



22 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



Visitation of Herts 

Harl. MSS. Appendix I. (Under Watebhouse of 
Berkhamstead) 

Richard Smyth ■ Mary, dau. of Nich. Bonevyle. (Erm. 3 torteaux. 

John Smyth = Elizabeth, dau. of Henry Wake. 
{Gu. a ctom« erm. ) 

Mary = James Water-house. 



SMYTH OF ARABLES 

Asms:— Quarterly (1) per bend indented or and az. 2 crosses molint counter- 
changed ; (2) Gu. a cross arg. over ail a bend sa. (Willaby) ; 
(3) Gu. 3 bars arg. in chief 3 plates (Coteby) ; (4) Sa. a rose between 
3 lions rampant org. 

C&EST :—OuL of a ducal coronet or, a falcon volant proper. 

Robert Smyth of Waltham, Line = Ellinor, dau. of Wm. Lilborne. 
(Visn. of Line, 1562-4) 



Christopher = Margaret, dau. of 



of Annables, 
Clerk of the 
Pipe. 



John Hyde. 



Others. 



Elizabeth Jane = Alice = Magdalen 

= SirE. George (1)— = Sir E. Clerkof 

Rawle. Rotherham. Robinson ; Anderson, the 
(2) Sir John Chief- Pipe. 

Fortescue Justice, 
of Salden. 



Thomas, = Margery, Nicholas 
dau. of =... Gar- 
William dener. 
Stooke. | . 

Issue. 



Sir George Smyth = dau. of Sir 
of Annables. Rowland 

Lvtton 
of Kneb- 
worth. 



Rowland. 



George. 



until 50 years prior to the suit. The said Thomas Smyth called to warranty 
Lewis Ap Harry of Wormbridge, and denied that the plaintiff's ancestors 
were seized in tail. The plaintiff won the case, and the sheriff gave defendant 
an extent of Lewis Ap Harry's lands in Wonpbridge. 

In the Probatio atatis of Richard Parry — temp. Hen. VL — Simon Smyth 
with William Rowden deposed that they accompanied Anna De la Weare to 
Turnaston church at Richard's baptism In 1409, when she was godmother, and 
saw the walls of the church hung with banners of red and black. 

Special Exchequer Commission — temp. Eliz. — Thomas Smyth of Madley 
gave evidence as to Dame Parry's obstruction of the Crown Commissioners. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 23 

Visitation of Kent, 1619 
SMITH 

Anw :—Erm. 3 bexanU, a crtteent on a muB.it far diferenee. 
Cswt-Otrt of a ducal coronet a plume of ostrich feathers alternately vert 
and org, 
Saa.— This Edward Smith (vide infra) beareth the not co»te with Mr 
Serjeant Smith of Greenwich— with difference. 

William Smith. 



William-Margaret., dan. oi Edward=Eh^ dau. of S r 

Richard De Stif- Robert Bornlle 

ford, Essex. deAgneaJud. 

Edward. Thomae. Humphry. Maria. 

SMITH • 
Abms at above. Crest alto. 
John Smith of Watton at Stone, Herts. 

I 



William of Greenwich. =Cath., datu of Edw. Boughton of Plumstead. 
Ob. 1621. S 



William of Greenwich = Alice, dan. of Walter Duppa of 



{servient ad legem. 
Query Serjeant?) 



Greenwich, sister of the Bishop 
of Sarum. S'ae married, 2ndly, 
John Bettenham of Plnckley. 



France*. William. Maria. Catherine. Etobeth = A ^ o Y wl ^ 8- Lucretia. 

SMITH OF BUCKLAND PEOPE MAIDSTONE 

Amm .—Or S ban and in chief at many crosses pateeft tehee all so. 
Cms* .—On a mount vert a talbot sejeant erm. .co llared and ringed or, eared 
gv,, regarding a branch of lawrel proper. 

Symon de Bucklande 



Join, juris peritua, Symon de Boughton Monchelsey. 

s.p. 



J 



Symonde Chart, juxta Sutton=Maria, daughter of Wm. Hales of Tenterden. 

I - - I 

Edward. John. Anna Maria. Alicia Margareta. Elizabeth (eldest dau. ). 



24 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



Hasted carries this line forward from John, second 
son of Symon de Chart; thus :— 



John (1629)= Mary, dau. of Dean Bargrave of Canterbury, by 
Elizabeth, dan. of John Dering, who died 1667. 
The Dean died 1642. 



Johns 
A son: 



Rev. John, vicar of: 
Lested and (1637-1732) 
rector of Hastingleigh. 



Others. 



I 
John = Elizabeth, dan. of Major 
ob. j Whitfield, living in 1782, 
<inte and seized of Bonghton 
1752. I Monchelsey. 



-J i ' L J 

Felicia. Elizabeth. Anna Maria. Dorothea. 

Arms confirmed by Camden Clarencieux, 1605. 

[See also an extended pedigree of this line by Berry.] 



SMYTH OF MUCH WABLDTGITELD 

John of M. W. m Leticia. 



Jeremias of the City of Canterbury = Katherine, dau. of Daniel Wilkinson 

of the same Citv. 



William. Thomas Jeremias. Manilla. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 25 
SMITH OF OSTENHAHTCKEB 

Arms :— Quarterly of 12: (1) Az. a chevron engraxkd, between 3 lions passant — 
guardant or; (2) Ov. a /esse embattled raguly, counter embattled 
between 3 boar*' heads erased org. ; (3) ax. 3 Koneels rampant within 
• bordure org. ; (4) or, 2 ekevronel* and a canton go. ; (5) or, a erase 
voided gu. ; (6) or, S chevronels go. ; (7) go. a chevron between 3 
cinque/oils or; (8) so. a cross voided or; (9) Erm. a /esse voire or 
and go. ; (10) or, on a chevron so. a mullet org. ; (11) az. a unicorn 
salient org. ; (12) vert, a chevron between 3 eagles displayed or. 

Caesr:— A leopard's head erased org. ptlltUe, collared, lined, and double- 
ringed or. 

John Smith= Alice ... 



John Smyth da Corsham, Wilts = Agnes or Joan B ranker. 
(oh. 1639) J 



Eliata. 



.Honpoole. Thorns* of Ostenhanger, = Alicia, heiress of Sir Andrew 
known as " Customer," I Jndd, Lord Mayor. 

ob. 1591, buried at | 
Aahford. 



I 1 I 

Maria=Davis. Adau.=(l) Harding. Cath.=(l) Sir Row- Alices Harris of 
(2) Butler. land Hay- Wood- 

ward of hay. 

London. 
(2) John Scott 
of Scots Hall. 



Sir John of Ostenhanger, 
Eques auratus. 



Elizth., dau. 
of John 
Fineux of 
Heme. 



Sir Thomas of =>(!) Judith, dau. of 



Budborough, 
Eques auratus, 
Ambassador 
to Russia. 



Cath,= 
(DSir 
Henry 
Baker of 
Sissing- 
hurst. 
(2) Geo. 
Lowe, ob. 
1629. 



Cath. a 

Sir H. 
Neville 
of Billing. 
beare. 



Thomas of 
Ostr. = 
Barbara, 
dau. of the 
Earl of Lei- 
cester of 
Penetrant. 



3ir John = I 



Riohd. Culrerwell. 
(2) Sara, dan. of 
Sir William Blunt. 



Sir John = Lady Isabella, dau. of the 
Smyth Earl of Warwick. 



Other children of the above Thomas of Ostenhanger who died in 1591 : 
(1) Henry Smyths Elizth., dan. (2) Elizth. = Henry (3) Syraon, killed at 
of Corsham. of Judge Thos. Fanahaw. the Siege of Cadiz. 

Owen. 

We note also in this Visitation that Dorothea Walker or Waller of Fawkham 
married Michael Smith, also of Fawkham. 



26 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



'3 o 


_2 * = « 

S -3 O 




•9 « 






s 5 






»i 






2 d 












"oS 


>*>-J 




*»_ 


JT5 




5 a £ 
J |J 


aj 






< 5 






t 1 




iS"|2 




"'- 2 


— 1 




c u i 


9 




S x-= 


s3 — - S 




S ^< 

< H - 

2 i« 


s^ ■ S * i» 


—4 4 


c'" ; 


.ST ;=;»•§ 3 


B 




BooJ-o >« 




Jjl 


2£> 






■5 SS 




5i"3 , 


11 



*' J — 

Vi! 



s _ ° 
ill 



1 SO 



S W 3 



<£- § 



joa 

SO y 

Ma 
.- e 

*3 



I 3 
a . 



.2 S 

" 9 



22 



2* 3 .— £ 









u 8 
sa o 

a 



£ 1—2 3 
"3 ~ 

on ^-5 



■sS 1 gSQ 

u.s.2 4 2 5 



*&2 



=a^ 



~ .5 



_ X — a ~* X .- ^. 



IS 



Jd 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 27 



Visitation of Leicestershire, 1624 
SMITH OF WITHCOTE 

Atiw ;—Gu. on a chevron or between 3 bezante as many crouea 
patie fitchet sa. 

John Smith aU Harris of Withcote = Dorothy Cave. 



Roger = Frances, dau. of Francis. Anthony. Erasmus = Margaret, sister 



Sir T. Griffin of 
Dingley. 



of Lord Burgh- 
ley. 



3 daus. 



Margaret = Gilbert Bery. Ambrose = ... Coo. George = Mary Alles. Others 



Sir Wm., Knighted = Elizabeth, dau of 4 sons. 

1601. Alderman Simms. 



4 sons. 



2 daus. 



This pedigree has been styled Smith of Withcock, but Withcote would seem 
to be the correct reading. For a fuller account of the family, whose real name 
was Heriz, see " English Pedigrees," Chapter VI. 



[Vid* infra, Visitation of London, 1568.] 



28 THE SMITH FAMILY 



Visitation of LmcoLNsmEE, 1562 

SMYTH OF HACKTHOEPE 
[m. ELKINGTON] 

Sir Kandnlfe OUley Smyths ... 



I 
John Oteley= . 



Robert Pelsham, Willaby ala = Isabel, daughter and 
WUlarby. I heir to John Oteley. 

John Smyth of Hackthorpe ins Jane, dan. and heir to 
Lincoln. I Robert Willabye. 



John Smyth = . 



John Smith = ... 



William Smith= ... 
William Smith = ... 

1 



Thomas Smith, uxor to William Smith = ... uxor to uxor to uxor to 
eldest eon. Rosse. 2 sons. Manby. Lyanby. Gilby. 



Robert Smiths Elinor, dau. and heir to 
I William Lylbourne. 

I I I 

Henrey Smith, Christopher Smith, = Margaret, dau. Elizabeth, uxor 
2 sons. Esq., son and heir. I to John Hide. Willm. Csthwait. 

J I [ 1 I 

Ahce, (11 mar. to Thomas Smith Maudlyn, uxor Elizabeth, uxor Others. 

Robinson of Lon- of Annas in to Edward An- to Edward Faw- 

don, (2) to Jo. Lincolnshire. derson. Miles. ley, Miles. 

Forteeoue, 

Knigh t and 

Councillor. 

For the full pedigree of Smyth of Elkington, see Chapter III. 



Visitation of Middlesex, 1663 

See Smith of Hammersmith and Smith of St Gnu Cbifflmatx. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 29 

Visitation of London, 1633 
SMIJTH OF NOEBOENE 

Leonard Smijth. 

I 

Harry. 

j I i i I , 

John. William. Elizabeth = Richard Castlenau, Margaret. Thomasin. 
merchant. 

SMYTH OF NOETHANTS 

James Smyth. 

' I 



John of Spoford Yorke = Kath., dan. of Robt. Thompson of Weatherby. 
Robert, grocer =Thomazin, dau. of Oswald, grocer = Anne, dau. of Edw. 



Ford of Keldon 1633. 

Hall, Essex. 



Bene of Great 

Missenden. 



James, set. 26, in 1633. 



J I I 

Henry, = Magdalen, dau. Susan = Francis Clark. Katherin = Richard 

grocer, of William Longfield of Lon- 

1633. Morley of Chi- don, draper. 
Chester. 

SMITH 

Peter, of London, fishmonger. 

| 

™ I III 

Thomas, mer-=Jane, dau. of John Anthony. Richard. Mary, 

chant, 1631. I Robinson of London. 



ohn = I 



John = Mary, dau. of Edmund Wright, Henry. Thomas. 

Alderman. 

Mary = Humfry, 3rd son Jane = William, 2nd son Martha = Archdall 
of Alderman of Sir John Gore. Palmer of 

Bennett. London. 

SMYTH 

Robert, of London, draper, ob. at Stoke Prior, Wore. 



Robert, drapers Mary, dau. of ... Baines, merchant. 



Robert, draper, living in 1633= Judith, dau. of Nicholas Wansley, draper. 

| | | 

Robert. James. Ester. 



30 THE SMITH FAMILY 

SMYTH 

Roger of Holborne, a courseter. 

Martin, one of ye cursi tors = Audrey , dau. of Richard Edlin of Pinner. 



Richard (cursetor), living 1634 = Mary, dan. of Thomas Motham. 

SMYTH* 

Randolfe Smyth of Rochdale, Lane. 



Richard, fishmonger, ob. 1591 = Margaret, dan. of Anthony Creed of Wilts. 



I 
Thomas of Bow Lane, living 1634, oet. 67. 

SMYTH 

Quartering 9 coats — i.e. Smith, Jude, Chiche, Chicheley, Appulderfield, 
Criall, Creneure, Auvranches, Marfen. 

[Vide Visitation of Kent.] 
Thomas of Ostenhanger = Alice, dau. of Sir Andrew Jude. 

I i I | [ i 

Sir John. Sir Thomas. Henry of = Elizabeth, dau. SirRichd. Robt. Simon. 
Cossam, I of Serjeant 
Wilts. Owen. 



Thomas, Receiver of the Duchy of = Isabel, dau. of John Ayliffe of 
Lancaster, 1634. Grittercham, Wilts. 



ohn. 



John. Thomas. Richard. Simon. 

SMITH 

John Smith of Church Lawford, Warw. 



Thomas of S. Mary Magd. =Jane, dau- of Leonard Lister, of 
Milk St. Living 1634. I Little Willaston, Salojj. 



Thomas of Westerham = Thoraasina, dau. of Xpofer Loveday of London. 



* The Visitation of London, 1568, gives the following version of this 
pedigree : — 

Or, on a chief sa. a lion passant of the first. 
Randolf Smyth of Ratsdale Lane = Margt. Hames. 



Richard, fishmonger = Margaret, dau. of Anthony Creede of Wilts. 

1 
Thomas. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 31 



Visitation of London, 1568 

Arg. on a cross company countercompony or and az. betwten 4 lions passant so. 
John Smyth of Staffordshire. 



Humphrey of Southampton = Alice Case of Somerset. 



John of London = Magdalen, dan. of Sir John Hawes. 



SMTTHE 

Ou. on a chevron or between 3 bezants, 3 crosses pate'e jitchee, in chief a martlet 
of the second. 

John Hares als Smyth = Dorothy, dau. of R. Cave 
of Withcock j of Stanford. 

Roger. Francis. Clement. Ambrose =Joane, Eras- Robert. Anthony. George, 
dan. of mus. 
John 
Coo of 
CoxalL 



i I i l i i 

Henry. Frances. Margaret. Ellen. Dorothy. Ann. 
[Vide Visitation of Leicoster.] 



"Visitation of Norfolk, 1612 
SMYTH 

ABM3 : — On a fesse between 3 crosses J'ormee jitchee or as many eagles dis- 
played sa. 

CREST: — An arm emboiced proper, tied round the wrist with a riband az., and 
holding the butt end of a tilting spear or. 

John Smyth of Nedginge, Suft =dau. of Smyth of Higham. 

i 
Hugh of Leynham = Alice Donne. 

I I I 

Elizth. = R. Tyll. John of Garbesham = Elizth., dau. of Alice = Thos. 

and Hondon. I Wm. Clapton of Hervye 

KentwelL of Clare. 



1 

Thos. 


1 
Francis, 


1 
Frances = Thos. 


1 
Elizth. = 


„ 1 
busan = 


1 
Anne = 


unmar- 


3. p. 


Warren ot (it. 


(1) John 


.Vere of 


Richard 


ried, 




Thurloe. 


Colville, 


Ketton. 


Peede of 


1612. 






(2) John 
Page. 




Berry, 
Suff. 



32 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMYTH OF WALSHAM 

Arms : — Per chevron nebulit sa. and or 3 panthers' heads erased, counter- 
changed. A horse's head erased per chevron nebulie and so. 



John Smyth of WaLaham, Suit = Alice Halys of Walsh am. 



Katherine, dau. of = Thomas of Walaham = Jone, dan. of John. 



John Paske. 



We Leggatt. 



Isabel = 

Win. 

HowelL 



8 dans. 



Thomas, 
heir. 



I 
John of = Elizth., dan. of Hugh Wilkenson 



Owlde 

Bucken- 

ham. 



of Owlde B. 



Kath. = Stephen 
Taylor of 
Eccles. 



Thomas of = Dorothy, dan. of Hugh W ilk en eon 



Owlde 

Bucken- 

ham. 



of O.B. 



Others — i.e. 
4 sons. 2 dans. 



Thomas = Mary, dan. of John Mynors 
of BaldshalL, Herts., whose 
wife was Awfield of Glou- 
cester. 



John. 



Elizth.= 
Nich. Edgar 
of Ashe. 



Job 



4 daus. 



SMYTH 



Asms : — At. a bend erm. between IS billets or. 

Crest: — On a chapeau gu., turned up erm., t wings expanded ax., each 
chargtd with a bend erm. between 6 billets or. 

Nicholas Smyth of Suffolk. 



John Smyth of Hal vb worth, Suff. = Agnes, dan. of Robert Crane 

of Chilton, Suft 



John Smyth of Gun ton, Norl = Amye, dan. of Martin Sidley of 

Morley, Norf. 



Agnes. Jane. Dorothy. 

Awdrey Thwaites married secondly John Smyth of Wall Sutton in Mershland. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 33 



A SMYTH OF CAVENDISH 

Asms : — Quarterly 1 and 4 org., a chevron gu. between 3 crosses crosslet «*. ; S 
and 3 org. an a chevron between 3 lion's gambs crated to. an annulet. 
Over all/our a crescent for difference. 



John Smyth of Cavendish, 2nd son of John = a dau. of Brecknok, Bucks. 



John of 



Cavendish = Agnes, dan. of John Way, 
I or Raye, of Deverston. 



Margaret = Barnard. 



(1) Barbara, m Thomas = (2) Elizth, (3) Frances, John. Henry. Loare Other 



dan. of 
Thoa. Ben- 
dish of 
Bnmstead, 
Essex. 



of 
Mersh 
land, 
Nor- 
folk. 



dan. of dan. of 
Jasper Thos.Digby, of 
Pryce of Welby, Leic, s.p. 
Godman- 
chester. 



(Laura), daua. 



4 sons. 1 dan. 1 son. 



1 dan 



SMITH OF CAVENDISH 

Asms :—Arg. a chevron gu. between 3 crosses crosslet sa., a crescent for difference. 
John Smith. 



ohn of 



John of Cavendish, Suif. = dau. of Thos. Cavendish of Lingford. 



ohn 1 



John a quo Smyth of Symon, a. p. 

Cavendish. 



Thomas = Elizth., dau. of Peter 
I Payne of Rowdham. 



Richard of Bawton= Elizth., dan. of John, and sister of Sir 
j Robert, Chester of Royston. 

- I I i I 

Thomas. Richard of a Elizth., dan. of Margery=Wm. Anne = Ellis of 



— Carlton 
John. Rode. 



William. I 

— 6 sons. 

Robert. 



John Long of 
Gt. Levermere 



4 daua. 



Curtys of 
Lorn 



rtysol 
ndon. 



Long 

Melford- 



34 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF WTGHTON 

Asms . Paly of six arg. and icons chief or 3 grtyhtnmdt' head* erased so. , 

collared or, ringed gu. 
Cbsst : An heraldic antelope's head, erased or, attired, maned and tusked so., 

collared gu., studded, lined, and ringed or. 

John Barnesdale of = Marv, dau. of Thomas Gaytonthorpe 
. Barwyk, Norf. I of Gaytonthorpe. 

Catherine, clau. of John Barnesdale = John Smyth of Wyghton. 



s.p. 



George, John = Mary, dau. Agnes = Win. Margery Alice = Wm. Mary = 

I of Thos. Baiter of = Root. Pepys of Root. 

| Goddard Kings Lynn. Baiter of Cotnam, Joyce of 

I of Overton, Stannow. Camb. Grundis- 

Wilts. boro', Soft 



John = Mary, dan. of Sir George. 

I Anthony Hevinghain. 



Gregory ot'= ...Lound of 
London. I Essex. 



Others. 



Roger. 



John = dan. of Thos. Cord all. 



SMYTH OF ETVENHALL 



Asms :— Quarterly 1 and i arg. a cross gu. between 4 peacocks close az. S. 
Quarterly 1 and .'*■ Quarterly arg. and sa~, in first quarter a fleur- 
de-lis gu., and in 4&h an erm. spot. 2 and 3. Arg. on a chevron az. 
3 escalops of the first, on a chief of the second a lion passant arg. S. 
Gu., 3 garis arg. banded or ; over all the quarterings a martlet, or 
annulet, for difference. CasST : — A peacocks head erased sa. 

(1) Ann , dau. of Gernon, rind = John Smyth =(2) Mylecent, dau. of Root. 
widow of Bavnard. I of RirennalL I Laynham of Laynham. 



(1) Hamond = Thomas of Rivenhall = (2) Elizth., sister of Sir John, Baron of 

Henry Toffte of The Exchequer. 

Little Baddow. 

Thomas. John. Mvlecent = *idau.= 

W. Bromp- Hawkes. 

ton. 

Nicholas of 

Lavnham. 

I 
Reignold. 



Anne= Sir John 

We Clement of djiu. of 

Tusser. of Little Blacka- Celt. 
Baddow. more. 

I 
Sir John. 



£" izth. , = Leonard = Rath. Mary = John Kath- 
of Shuld- Hast- SkylL erine, a 

ham ing n rni 



Jane. Leonard. Henry. Ed- John, Attorney = Jane, dau. of Henry Elizth. 
ward ■ of the King's I Lyght of Lyghtslary, 
Bench. Somerset. 



4 sons and 2 daus. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 35 

Visitation of Nobthants, 1618 
SMITH OF POTTEESPXJET 

Arm s : — Sa. a chevron between 3 cinque/oils "pierced erm. 

Ckest: — .4 taibot's head gu., charged on the neck with a cinque/oil pierced 
erm. 

William Smith als Kent = Mary Marsey of Berwood. 



Joyce=Thoa. Addington. Suaan=(l) W. Illing. Thomas = Elizabeth 

(2) Hercules (living | Saunders of 
Wincot. 1618).' I Longniarsron. 



William, Thomas. Anthony. Margaret, Susan. 
at. 6, 1613. 



Visitation of aTorthants, 1618 
SMYTH OF KELMAESH 

ABM3: — <?u. on a chevron or between 3 bezants, at many crosses patee jitchee 
sa. 

CaEST : — An arm erect, vested per pale or and gii., the hand ppr., grasping a 
griffin's head, erased az. beaked or. 

John S. of Withcote, = Dorothy, dau. of Richard = Henry Poole, Knt. 
Leic, 1546. I Cave'of Stanford, Nor- of the Rhodes, 

thants. 

I I 1 

Roger of With- Margaret, dau. of = Erasmus S. = ..., dau. of ... Francis. 



cote, ob. 1603. Richard Cecill, of Bos- 
[ Vide Leicester. ] widow of Roger worth, 
Care of Stanford. Leic. 



Baiard 
(Visn. 
Leic. ), 
widow of 
... Wye. 



I I 

James of Kelmarsh, Jane, dau. of = Roger of Kelmarsh, =Ann, dau. of 



1618. Sir Edward 

Heron, Knt., 
Baron of the 
Exchequer. 



Northants, 1618. 



Goodman 
of London. 



Alithea. Edw. Smith, son and John S. Erasmus. Ann Dorothv. 

[ Vide Visn. heir, set. 19, 1618. — — 

Leic] Roger. Mary. 



36 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Visitation of Notts, 1569-1614 . 
SMYTH 

Anne Markham of Alberton = Sir Thomas or Sir Francis Smyth. 
Robert Eyre of Hodloke = Katherine, dau. of Giles Smith of Tirknill, York. 
Henry Cressy of Oldcotes = Catherine, dau. of Sir Richard Smyth of 
Walkeringham, Notts. 
Adam Leeke of Hallom = Elizabeth, dau. of Martin Smith of Carlton, Notts. 
John Sandford of Bake well, Derby = Joan, dau. of Roger Smyth. 



Visitation of Oxford, 1624 

Robert Smyth of Prescot, Lancashire, had issue — (1) Robert, (2) William, 
Bishop of Lincoln and Founder of B.N.C. Robert, the elder son, of Curdesley 
(Cuerdley), Lanes., had issue — (1) Richard, (2) William, Archdeacon of Stowe, 
Lincolnshire. Richard Smyth, the eider son = Alice, dau. of Richard Denton 
(of Ambrosden), and had issue, with others — Thomas Smyth of Oxford = 
Rose, dau. of William Buckner of Botley, by whom he had a numerous issue, 
entries whereof occur in the Registers of St Aldate's Church in the City 
of Oxford. 



Visitation of Salop, 1623 
SMITH OF MORVILL 

Arm s ■ — So., a bend between 6 martlets arg. 

Richard of Morvell = Mary Gery of Ciff Prope Weme. 

I 

I 
Roger = Frances, dau. of Rd. Cressett of Upton Creisett. 

I 

I 
George of Morrell = Mary, dau. of Robt. Piggott of Chetwyn. 



Elizth., widow of John = Richard Smyth of Bridgenorth = Mary, dau. of Chas. 
Kelpos of Watergate, I Hi Loins de Weo. 

Staff. 



2 sou and 4 daus. John of Mom 11 = ... dau. of Thos. Vernon 

of Hartington. 



Jane Weaver, widow = George of Morvill = Jane, dau. of Sir Hugh 

Browne, Km. 



I 
George. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 37 

SMITH OF OVERTON 

(Cow/part Visitation of Herefordshire) 

Arms : — Sari. 1396. Arg. on a mount vert a lion passant reguardant proper, 

granted 1590. 
CazST: — A horse's head erased chestnut, maned sable. 

Thomas Smith of Credenhill = Elizabeth Welshe. 



1 

Thomas 


1 

Richard 


1 
Thomas, 


1 
William de 


1 
Simon, 


1 1 
Robert Jacob = 


= Susan, 


or Hugo 


de Sca- 


3rd 


son. 


Derndell, 


Cancel- 


de Good- de 


dau. of 


of Fox- 


cano, 






4th son. 


larins 


way, Over- 


John 


ley =... 


2nd son 








Menin- 


5th son ton, 


Davies 




= ... Os- 










ensis. 


= Anna Sth 


of 


I 


borne. 

I 












Welford. son. 

1 


Rich- 
ards 


3 30DS. 


3 sons and 
2 daus. 


1 




3 sons and 
1 dan. 




3 sons and 
2 daus. 


Castle. 















Others. (1) Jacob de = Prudence, dau. 



Overton, 
1623, 



of Reginald 
Davies de la 
Marche. 



(2) Thomas Smith = 
Elizabeth, dan. of 
Thomas Mascall. 



1 son and 2 daus. 



Visitation of Somerset, 1623 
SMITH 

[The griffin'3 head, their crest, was granted by Hawlev, Clarencieux, 
36 Hen. VIIL] 

John Smith of Alberton, Glos. , living 14 Hen. VI. 
I 
Robert 



John 

I 
Mathew 

John of Long Ashton. 3£ Hen. VIII. 



Hugh Smith of L. Ashton. His 
dan. = Morgan of Llanterner. 



Mathew of L. = Widow Skerne. 
Ashton I 



Adau.=Sir Geo. Adau. =Gitfard Jane = Mat- SirHugh = Elizth.,dau.of 



Rodney. 



of Salop. 



hewes of 
Radnor. 



living 
1623. 



Sir Thomas 
Gorge, and 
sister to 
Lord Gorge. 



Helena=Sir Francis Rogers of Mary = Sir Thos. Smith of Thomas, aet. 14, 
Cannington, Somerset. West Chester. 1623. 



38 THE SMITH FAMILY 

SMITHES OF WEENTON 

John, living in 1623 = Joane Dorington. 

I I I [ I I 

Jane = Ed w. A dau. =BU- Adau.=Fanvy Judith = John (25 Elizth. = 

Barnett of set of Bat- of Brockley. ...Taver- in 1623) Robert 

DownshilL comb. nor. = A dan. Godwyn 

ofFowen of Ow- 

of Bristol, key. 

Visitation of Stafford, 1583 

See Smith of Newcastle, and 1614, 1663, Smith of Hanley. 

Visitation of Suffolk, 1612 
SMITH OF GORLESTON 

Thomas Smith = a dau. of Robert Hart. 

I 



I I 

John. 7 other sons. 

[See also in Visitations 1561, 1577, 1612, Smith of Nettlzstkad and 
Smtth of Denston.] 



Visitation of Subset, 1623 
SMTTH OF PEPEEHAEOW 

Abms : — Per pale or and az. a chevron between S lions pastant-guardant 
counterchanged, a crescent for difference. 

Christopher Smyth of Hagthorpe, Line. (i.e. Hackthorpe. ) 
Thomas Smyth of London. 



Henery of Peperharow 


= Jane, sister 


3f Sir Walter Covert of Slaugham. 


1 
William = Anne, sister 


1 
Jane = ( 1 ) 


1 
Richard Smyth 


1 
Elizabeth = 


Smyth 


ofWm. ... 


Ninian Bur 


of Peperharow 


James 


of Ryall 


doctor to 


reUofCock 


= Anne, dau. 


Franklin of 




Queen 


field; (2) 


of Richard 


Maidstone. 




Elizabeth. 


Peter Cou- 
thop of 


Robinson of 
London. 




John Smyth. 


Cambrook, 










Kent. 







THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 



39 



SMYTH OF SOUTHWAKK 



Asms : — A lion passant. 

Crbst : — A sleeved arm embowed, holding a broken tilting spear. 
= Thomas Smyth of Layham, Su£t=Joane Downes. 



Thomas. 



John of Sudbury = Mary Syday of 
I Lenham, Surf. 



Elizabeth, daughter of = Robert Smyth, = Elizabeth, dau. of Oliffe 
Thos. Ball of Hadley, J. P. for South- Burgh of South wark, 
Suft and widow of wark. and widow of John 

Oliver Ailward. Burgh. 



SMYTH OF MITCHAM 

Asms i—Arg. on a chevron engrailed az., between 3 greyhounds' heads erased 

so., collared gu., as many estoiles or. 
C&SST :—A buck's head and neck couped gu., attired arg. 



Mary Cely=Thomas Smyth = Ellinor Haaelrigge of Leicester, 
of Mieham who re-married Bart. Clarke. 



Ellinor Smyth 
= Dr Gilbert 
Bourne. 



Mary Smyth George Smyth Thomas = Sara, dau. Others 



= Sir John 
Leigh of 
Mieham. 



ofMycham(a-Vc 
= Rose Wor 
sop of Clap- 
ham. 



of 
Mycham 



of Alder- 
man Sir 
Humphrey 
Handford, 
Knt. 



George. 



Sara. 



Rose. 



40 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



Visitation of Surrey, 1623 

Elizabeth Offley [Offley of Maresley] = Sir John Smyth of Thetford. 

SMYTH OF MERKOW 

Asms : — Arg. on a bende between 2 unicorns' heads erased az. 5 lozenge* or. 
Crest : — Out of a coronet a demi-bull differenced with a mullet. ■ 

Anthony Smyth of Merrow, = Joane, dan. of Thomas Herwood 
Steward to Lady Knevett, I of Hail Place in Merrow. 

born at Escnck, York. 



Thomas, Mayor of Guildford. 



Nicholas. Henery, = Jane, dau. of John 



Mayor 

ofGuild- 

ford. 



Weston of Oke- 
ham. 



John of Merrow = Rose, dan. of 
Stevens of 
Horsley, 
Surrey. 



Henery. 



Thomas. 



Anthony Smyth. 



Rev. Richard 
Smyth, B.D., 
of Sheere. 

Note. — Arms of Smyth in this Visitation not assigned to any particular 
family ; Arg. a chevron cotised between 3 crosses patie gules. 



SMYTH 

Akms : — Sa. a cross proper. 

Cbest : — A greyhound couchant or, collared and lined sa. 

Robert Smith, als Hovel, of Badwell, Norf. 



Robert of = Elizabeth, dau. Thomas John = . 



Badwell 



of Robert Smyth of Ash- 
of Walsam in the field = 
Willows, Suff. Anne 

Anstey, 
s.p. 



I I 

Arthur of Elizabeth 
Hunston =...How- 
= ...An- lett. 
stey. 



John. Richard. 



Thomas Smyth of Robert, = Elizabeth... 

Chertsey, Serjeant Leather- I 

of the Carriages = seller. 

Elizabeth, dau. of 

Sir John Watts, Robert. 

Lord Mayor. 



John of = Priscilla, Elizabeth 



Ash- 

tield. 



dau. of =... Mor- 
Walter ris. 
Brampton. 



I l I I I 

John. Walter. X'poffer. Priscilla. Anne, 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 41 

Visitation of Wabwickshike, 1619 
CAEINGTON, ALS SMITH 

Sir William Carington=Anne, dau. of Sir Edm. Farwell 
I by the dau. of Robert Coventry. 



Sir Wb. Carington=Katherine, dan. of Wm. Montague of Sarnrn. 

Sir Thos. Carington = Margaret, dau. of Sir Robert Roose. 

John Carington ais Smith, = Milecencia. 
ob. 1446. | 



Thomas Smith of Rivenhall = Hamond. 
I 



| I • I I 

Thomas of Rivenhall = Isabel, dau. of Wm. Hugh of Robert. John. 

I Toffte of Little Bedow. Witham. 

| I 

(1) Thomas. ...Wood = (Sir) John (of Cress- = Agnes, dau. of John 



ing Temple). I Harwell of Wootton 
in Warw. 



(2) Sir Clement. 

Sir John, 1593. 

(3) Leonard.. 

(4) John of Blackmore. Thomas of Cressing Francis = Mary, dau. of 

Temple 

I 

Hugh. 



John Moreton of 
Ashley.* 



George t = Mary,i dau. of Sir Thos. Giffard, by Ursula, 
dau. of Robt. Throckmorton. 



George. Thomas. John. Robt. Edw. Francis = Anne, dau. of Thos. 

I Markham of Notts. 



I III 

Thomas Charles § Mary. 

(2nd son). (eldest son). 



* i.e. Ashby Folville. 

t According to one version, Francis. 

J According to one version, Anne. 

§ Another version gives two other sons — viz. Francis and John. 



42 THE SMITH FAMILY 

SMITH OF CAMBDEN 
( Vide Visitation of Gloucester) 

Asms : — Sa. on a /esse between 3 saitiris eusped or as many JUurs-de-lis gu. 

Thomas Smith of Cambden = Kath. , dau. of Sir George Throgmorton, 
and widow of Robert Winter. 



Paul us. Sir Thos., a. p. Ant ho me be Carapden, = Joanne, dau. of 

— living in 1593. I Sir Roger Martin 

Lucas. 



Darnell. Thomas. Grisegonda. 



I [ I I 

Elizabeth = Walsh of Richard = Maria, dau. of Anne. Cath. = Sam well 
Hereford. I Hugh Elston. I Tracie. 



I I I 1 

Silvanus. Mary. Samwell. Catherine. 



Visitation of Wilts 

See Smith of Baydon. 

Visitation of Worcestershire, 1620 
SMYTH 

Arms : — Az. two bars wavy erm. on a chief or a demUion issvant erm. 
Crest : — Between 2 wings expanded gu. an ostrich head cowped quarterly sa. and 
arg. holding in the beak a horseshoe or. 

Edward Smyth of Stoke Prior, Wore. = Dorathey, dau. of Edw. Denton 

of Ambrosden, Oion. 



I I 

Edward. Joyce. 



SMYTH OF COPCOTE 

Arms : — So. a bend between S mullets 0/6 points pierced arg. 

John Smyth of Copcote = Allice Pyrrday of Martin Hussintree. 
I 
Robert. 

I 
Edmond. 

I 
John = ... Harding. 

I 
Thomas, s.p. 

Agnes Hare well of Wootten, Warw. =Sir John Smyth, Knight, of Wootten, 
jure uxoris. 

Elizabeth Compton of Hart bury = William Smyth. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 43 

Visitation of Yokes 

No Pedigree of Smith 

Noras.— George, 2nd son of Sir John Lyttelton of Frankley (Worc.) = 
Margaret, dan. of Sir Richard Smyth. 
Mary Pudsey of Bart'orth=Ry chard Smyth of Caton. 
Agnes Clysby = Thomas Smyth. 
Thomas or Anthony Smith of Ketton or Sketton=Anne Margaret Bellasya. 

Among the publications of the Harl. Soc. we 
find a number of later pedigrees styled Familice 
Minorum Gentium. The name of Smith or Smyth 
occurs as follows : — 



Smith, or Wakefield, of Rotherham. 



Thomas = Anne Wordsworth. 



Thomas of = Bettie. Wm. =Shuldham. John, James = Frances Kinderley. 
Sheffield. I 3 -P- 

(issue.) 



Richard. Frances J. = J. Martin. Sarah M. = Chas. Lloyd, Esther=C. Western. 

LL.D. 



Sir James E. = Pleasaunce, Francis = Sarah John F. = E. T. A. , dau. of 



dau. of Robt 
Reeve of 
Lowestoft 



Marsh. Captain 

Howarth, R.N. 



Frances C.=Alf. Bar- Harriett = C. Edwards. James K. =Stanford. Other 
nard. aona - 



44 THE SMITH FAMILY 

SMITH OF NEWARK 

... Smith = Sister of Alderman Wilson. 

I 



John, Mavor=Anne Chambers. William, Mary = Henry Ann = Hatfield, 
of N., 1760. | g.p. Walker of Lin- 
- coin. 

I I i 

T. of Line, =Eliz. Bennett. K. of Kelham. Anne = S. Haywood. 
May or. 1811. | " 

I I 

Avsgough. 3 daus. 



Thomas, ob. 1715, = Hannah, dau. of Wm. Rosamund, s. p. Cath.= Field. 
| Wood. 

Wm. of Newark = Sarah, dan. of John. Anne = Isaac Wylde. 
| Hardwick 
I Tavlor. 

^ ! I r I I " 

Thomas. John. Wm. Mary = Wm. Eyres Cath. = Thos. Gilby of Bath, 
of Bath. now of London, 1822. 

(Families Min. Gen.) 
SMITH OF CAWOOD 

William of C. = Ann, dau. of Thos. Hewley, annt to 
| Sir John H, M.P. for York. 
James = Ash ton. 



I 
Jonas = Ann, dau. of Nicholas Sager of York. 

I I i I 

Nich. of = Wilkins of Eliz. William, = ... HalL Jas. of Cawood = Ann, dan. 



Selby. I Cawood. Rectorof I 

Ryther. 
Nicholas = Eleanor | 

I Coupland. j I I 

_ __ J Nichs. of London, Jas. Others. 

Jas. Waterhouse Smith. apoth. 



of Ja 
Torre of 
SvdaL 



Anne, b. 1716 = Stephen Buckle James, Nichs. of = Elizth., dan. of Rev. R. 
of York, silver- b. 1720. Leeds, I Halsted, V. of Hutton 
smith. attorney. PaynelL 

| I 

Nichs-ofGowerSt., W.C. =Frances, dau. of Sir Edmund Eliza. 
Aocnt. Geni. in Court of Anderson, Bart. , of Kildwick. 
Chancery H752-1819). 



I i I 

James. Sarah = Nicholson of Cawood. Eliza = Stavely of York. Jane. 



I I 

Eliza Stavely = E. Prest of York. Ann = Wm. Barff 

of Carlton, 
Edward Prest. 



THE HERALDS' VISITATIONS 45 

(Familice Min. Gent.) 
SMYTH 



Samuel of Colkirk, Norf. = Urith, d. of Sir John Palgrave of 
Barrister. Ob. 1664. I Norwood. Ob. 1630. Bur. at 
Oxwick. 



Rebecca = Sir Samuel Smyth of Co ikir k, = Oath. Eliz. d. of Sir Jamea 



Knt. Ob. 


1699. Bur. Orwick. 


Harington of 


Ridlington, 






Bart. Ob. 1680. Bur. at 






Oxwick. 


= Thos. Bendyshe, 


1 1 
Lucy, 2nd dau. Urith, 


1 
3rd Theodosia, 4th 


! 
Catherine = 


= (1) John Pett dau. = 


dau. = ( 1 ) Sam 


Smyth, 


son of Thos. B. 


of Colkirk; (2) OfHey. 


Sparrow of 


1673-1747 


of Gray's Inn, by 


Jonas Rolfe, 


Lavenham; is- 




Bridget, d. of 


(Town-Clerk of 


sue ; (2) Samuel 




Hen. Ireton. 


Lynn). 


Freeman of 
Beverley. s.p. 




(1671-1722.) 








Ireton B. 



Through Thomas Bendyshe this line possesses a descent from Oliver Crom- 
well. Vide Noble's History of Oliver Cromwell. 



CHAPTEE in 

THE ELKINGTON LINE 

In presenting the following pedigrees I have to 
avow my dependence, first, on certain published 
family records, including not merely the. familiar 
pages of Burke, but also of such less known works 
as — e.g. Mr Augustus Smith's " Stemmata Ferraria," 
and others of a similar type printed for the behoof 
of particular families and compiled with great care 
and large research ; and next, on MSS. supplied 
by the kindness of correspondents, and in many 
instances amplified in accordance with my sugges- 
tions. Unfortunately there remain other MSS. 
too fragmentary or inconsecutive to be available. 
Among them I may mention especially the Smiths 
of Credenhill, who until lately held lands which 
had been theirs at the time of the Visitation. 
Notwithstanding, although I searched the parish 
registers, which afforded entries as far back as 
1686, I could neither connect Joan, wife of "Walter 
•Smith, buried in that year, with the Smyths of the 
Visitation, nor with later Smyths of the parish. 
Again, although Miss Morris of Lulham Court 
courteously placed at my disposal certain documents 
referring to the Smiths of Tarrington, who being 
then of Holme Lacey were empowered by Royal 
Licence, in 1825, to change their name to Edwards, 
I have not succeeded in evolving a pedigree of the 
family, who were for generations stewards to the 

46 



THE ELKINGTON LINE 47 

Foleys at Stoke Edith. I was equally at fault 
with the Smiths of Beccles and of Buckenhill in 
Woolhope, while I am conscious that the pedigree 
of Smith of Buckton, in Leintwardine, is simply a 
fragment of what might be a lengthened record, 
and I have to confess to other failures — notably as 
regards the descent of that enterprising gentleman, 
Alderman C. T. Smith of Chatham, High Constable 
of Gillingham, a native of "Wareham. As it is, 
though only a compiler, and not a member of the 
Herald's College, I have done Herald's work for 
some Smiths in the way of research, but that was 
outside my proper province, and I can only trust — 
not without diffidence — that the following pedigrees*, 
may be found approximately accurate, besides add- 
ing to the general corpus of information, concern- 
ing the multitudinous Smith families. 

Smyth of Elkington, Linc., and of Annables, 
Herts. 

[Vide supra Visitations of Herts, 1612 ; Lincoln, 1562 ; and Surrey, 1623.] 

Although we find a Smyth, or Le Smyth, M.P. 
for Chard, as far back as 1320, he has not been 
linked with the Exeter Smithes or with any other 
line. The honour, therefore, of being the proto- 
Smyth falls to the ancient line, mentioned in the 
Visitation of 1433 as of Elkington, and represented 
at Elkington Hall by the lineal descendant of that 
ancestor. Very few houses can boast so prolonged 
a tenure, and the association of the same blood 
with the old acres, to the genealogist appears alike 
honourable and interesting. True, the Elkington 
estate passed temporarily in the female line to 
Lord Glastonbury, to be restored, however, to its 
legitimate owners under the will of that conscientious 

The pedigrees have been printed neither in chronological nor in alpha- 
betical sequence. This, unavoidably, owing to some having been completed 
while the sheets have passed through the press. The reader, however, will 
be able to discover any particular line without difficulty. 



48 THE SMITH FAMILY 

nobleman. The divorce of an ancient name from its 
hereditary acres is at least as painful and unnatural 
as that which annuls the sacred tie of wedlock, and 
reduces the offspring to the level of orphans. 

Like the coat of the vast majority of mediaeval 
families, that of the Elkington Smyths excels in a 
dignified simplicity — viz. per bend indented or and 
az., two crosses moline counterchanged : with for 
crest, on a ducal coronet or a falcon with wings 
expanded, proper. 

From Sir Ealph De Ottely, living 30 Ed. L, 
descended Isabella, who by Robert De Willerby 
had a daughter, Joan, who married Smyth, styled 
of Acthorpe, the mother parish of Elkington. This 
Smyth apparently had two brothers, John, desig- 
nated in contemporary deeds Le Faber, and 
Andrew, whose son John was a priest. By Joan 
"Willerby, who was living in 1421, he had a son 
John of Acthorpe, or Elkington, probably the John 
of the Visitation of 1433. His son "William died 
in 1467, leaving a numerous issue, of whom the 
second son, Thomas of South Elkington, had a son 
George, and a grandson James ; while the fourth 
son, "William of Parkthorpe, had (1) William of 
Hammerton, whose line ended in Christopher,* 
living in 1631 : and (2) Robert of Waltham, living 
in 1530, who by Eleanor Lilbourn of Fenby, had, 
with others, Christopher, Clerk of the Pipe, who 
married Margaret, daughter of John Hide, or Hyde, 
of Albury, Herts, and assigned the estate of 
Annables to his son Thomas on his marriage with 
Joane Collett, who re-married Sir John Luke. Of 
the issue of his second son Nicholas we will treat 
presently. By Joane Collett, Thomas Smyth had 

* I accept this from the printed pedigree of Smyth of Elkington ; other- 
wise the Visitation of Surrey, 1623 — Smyth of Peperharow — would lead to 
an opposite conclusion. 



THE ELKINGTON LINE 49 

Sir George, who purchased the manorial rights of 
Annables. He succeeded his father as Clerk of 
the Pipe, and married Judith, daughter of Sir 
Rowland Lytton of Knebworth, and niece of Helen 
Lytton, wife of Sir John Brocket, whose fifth 
daughter, Mary, married Sir Thomas Eeade, jure 
uxoins, of Brocket Hall. Neither of the sons of Sir 
George Smyth by Judith Lytton — viz. Rowland 
(died 1639), and George, left issue, and this branch 
thus terminating, the Line, and Herts estates 
devolved on Edmund, son of Nicholas afore- 
mentioned. 

This Nicholas, described as of Westminster, 
married Katherine Gardiner of Southwark, and by 
her had Edmund, as above stated, who married 
Grace, daughter of John Percival of Kingsale. He 
died in 1684, leaving a numerous issue ; of these 
the Eev. William, of whom anon, transmitted the 
old blood, but his elder brother, James, who in- 
herited the Elkington estates, by Anne Jenkins 
of Harpenden had a daughter, Mary, who married 
the Hon. James Grenville, uncle to George, first 
Marquess of Buckingham. Their son, who was 
raised to the peerage as Baron Glastonbury, dying 
s.p., bequeathed the Elkington property to his 
maternal cousin, the Eev. William, great-grandson 
of the above mentioned Rev. William, son of 
Nicholas of Westminster. This younger Eev. 
William, vicar of South Elkington, by Mary, 
daughter of Samuel Eay of Tannington, Suffolk, 
had (1) William Henry Smyth, Esq., of Elkington 
Hall, b. March 21, 1821 ; married, April 19, 1849, 
Sarah Anna, daughter of Eev. John Sergeant, 
Eector of Stan wick, and has issue, {a) William 
Grenville, J.P. for Lincoln, b. October 6, 1857, 
(b) George Edmund, b. June 28, 1859, (c) Charles 
Glastonbury, b. September 7, 1862. Mr W. H. 



50 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Smyth is J.P. and D.L. for Lincolnshire, of which 
he served as High Sheriff in 1882, also J.P.. for 
York, and High Steward of Louth. 

The second son is Colonel Edmund Smyth of The 
Grange, Welwyn, who is Lord of the Manor of 
Annables ; b. Dec, 1823, J.P. for Herts, married at 
Almora, N.W.P., 1866, Frances Maria, daughter of 
Dr John Gardner. 

The third son, James Grenville Smyth of S. 
Elkington, b. June 1, 1825 ; married July 14, 
1858, Emily Royds of Brereton, who died Nov. 
23, 1859. 

The fourth son, Christopher of Woodford, 
Northants, b. Jan. 17, 1827 ; married at Rochdale 
July 7, 1S57, Clementine, daughter of Clement Royds 
of Fallinge. 

Of the daughters, Emily Jane, b. Oct. 7, 1822, 
married at S. Elkington, Sept. 7, 1852, The Right 
Hon. Stephen Cave, F.S.A, MP., sometime President 
of the Board of Trade ; Frances, was born May 26, 
1828 ; and Ellen Mary, b. Sept. 16, 1829, married, 
April 25, 1861, Edw. Wrey Whinfield of Severn 
Grange, Worcester. Mr and Mrs Smyth of Elking- 
ton celebrated their golden wedding in 1899. 

As may be expected in a family of so great 
antiquity, Elkington possesses a large collection of 
ancient deeds, including one bearing the date 1284. 
For the sake of safety, it might be well if such 
priceless treasures were to be fac-similed, and the 
originals deposited in the Bodleian or British 
Museum, the former for preference, because of the 
rigid rule prohibiting lights of any kind within the 
four corners of the building. The author is able 
to cite an instance where this precaution has been 
taken, and very much to the satisfaction of all 
concerned. 

Historically, the Elkington Smyths have but a 



THE ELKINGTON LINE 51 

minor record A William Smyth of Louth, pre- 
sumably of this line, was executed in 1536 for 
complicity in the Lincolnshire rising against the 
new learning. He joined the vicar of Louth and 
the Roman Catholic gentry, sharing their fate. 
"With him was another William Smyth of 
Donington, about six miles from Elkington, and a 
John Smythe. 

Sir George Smyth, the Clerk of the Pipe, must 
have been a man of mark, and probably — unlike his 
Lincolnshire relatives — a Protestant, for his con- 
nections, the Lyttons of that era, were strongly 
Puritanical, while Sir John Brocket showed much 
sympathy for the Princess, afterwards Queen, 
Elizabeth during her confinement at Ashridge as 
her sister's prisoner, and she was actually his and 
his wife's (Helen Lytton's) guest at Brocket Hall 
when the Lord Mayor came in state to carry her 
to Westminster for her coronation. It may be 
noted that Judith Lytton, after Sir George's death, 
married, as her second husband, Sir Thomas 
Barrington* of Hatfield Broadoak, Essex ; and that 
one of Sir George's aunts married Chief-Justice 
Anderson, another Sir John Fortescue, Master 
of the Great Wardrobe, and a third one of the 
Raleighs. These alliances will give a fair indication 
of the high social position assumed by the Smyths 
of Annables throughout the Elizabethan period ; 
and it may be added that during the past three 
centuries the family has been even more closely 
associated with Herts than with their more atavistic 
home at Elkington, to which, however, they have 
reverted, having built for themselves a new Elking- 
ton HalL Stet/ortuna domils! 

The family boasts one royal descent, which may 
be formulated as follows : — 

* The Barrington family were related to the Brockets. 



52 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Edward L = Eleanor of Castile. 



Joan of Acre = (l) Gilbert De Clare, E. of Gloucester and Herts. 
Elizabeth De Clare = (3) Roger, Lord D'Amory. 

Elizabeth D'Amory = John, Lord Bardolph (1313-63). 



! 

William, Lord Bardolph = Agnes, dau. of Michael, Lord Poynines. 
(1350-86) I 

Cecilia Bardolph = Sir Brian Stapylton. 



Sir Miles Stapylton = Katherine, dau. of Sir Thos. De La Pole. 

Elizabeth Stapvlton = Sir William Calthorpe (1410-94). 
I 
Anne Calthorpe = Sir Robert Drury, Speaker of the 
House of Commons. 
Elizabeth Drury = Sir Philip Boteler. 



Sir John Boteler = Grizel, dau. of Lord Mavor Sir W. Roche. 
I 
Sir Henry Boteler = Catherine, great-aunt of Edmund Waller, the poet. 

Elizabeth Boteler = Sir Anthony Chester, Bart. 



Sir Anthony Chester, 2nd Bart. = Elizabeth, dau. of Sir John Peytoo. 
Sir Anthony Chester, 3rd Bart. = Mary Cranmer. 

! 

Diana Chester (1660-95) = Rev. Thos. Remington, V. of Easton Maudit. 
Barbara Remington = Rev. J. Shann, V. of Chicheley. 



Dorothea Shann = Rev. E. Smyth, V. of Gt. Linford. 
! 
Rev. W. Smyth = Susanna Rav. 

Rev. W. Smyth = Mary Ray. 



William H. Smyth of Elkington Hall = Sarah, dau. of Rev. J. Sargeant, 

R. of Stanwick. 



William Grenville Smyth (b. 1857)= Anna Lily, dau. of Cosmo W. Gordon. 
William H. Gordon Smyth (b. 1893). 



CHAPTER IV 

THE WEST COUNTRY SMITHS — THE SMITH-MARRIOTTS, 

BARONETS 

[See Visitations of Devon, 1620, and Dorset, 1623 ; also "Familia 
Min. Gentium."] 

John le Smythe was Member for Chard in 1327, 
and probably the first of his name in England to 
acquire social distinction, albeit we find the name 
Faber among early lists of Knights, but in connection 
with the North and Midlands rather than with the 
West. Of his blood is assumed to be Robert, Mayor 
of Exeter in 1469, who had the honour of entertain- 
ing King Edward IV. during his year of office. 
Between 1469 and 1553, when William Smith was 
Mayor, there are no traceable family links, but 
inasmuch as they were woolstaplers in the chief 
towns of Devonshire and Dorset, from whose ports 
the wool was shipped to Flanders, the probabilities 
are in favour of the Smiths holding a commanding 
position in the trade. The Flemish merchants in the 
later middle ages were paying such large prices for 
English wool, that men of the highest social status, 
such as the Dormers and Grevilles, embarked in that 
trade. At all events we note about the Reformation 
period that the Smiths of the West, while retaining 
their connection with Exeter, had already advanced 
from being mere yeomen to become large and in- 
fluential landowners. Wool indisputably was the 
source from whence their wealth accumulated, and 
it is affirmed that already they had begun to manu- 
facture cloth on their own account. This may be ; 
but a profitable and extensive export trade was the 
53 



54 THE SMITH FAMILY 

making of the West, and incidentally of its notable 
manufacturers, the Smiths. 

Robert Smith, the Mayor of Exeter, had the honour 
of entertaining Edward IV. with his consort ; and 
Isacke, in his " History of Exeter," states that in 
return for his hospitality the King presented a sword, 
to be borne ever after before the Mayor and his 
successors. Inasmuch as the little western city had 
propitiated His Majesty with a. douceur of 100 nobles, 
the royal favour represented no more than so much 
discount off, but the Devonians must have felt 
flattered, for they further presented the Queen and 
Prince with £20 apiece in gold. The Mayor, 
however, was not accorded the honour- of the 
accolade, which his largesse and liberality would 
seem to have honestly earned. Autres temps, autres 
mceurs ! 

In his pedigree of the family Mr Arthur M. Smith, 
whose researches deserve high praise — albeit he 
elects to be severe on the human fallibility of the 
Heralds — makes Robert the Mayor prime ancestor. 
But although thus formulating his pedigree, in the 
text of his work he states that the link (query, 
links ?) between Robert the Mayor in 1469 and 
William, Mayor in 1553, is wanting — in other words, 
two generations rest upon the basis of hypothesis, 
a very dangerous foundation in any case, doubly so 
in that of a family bearing a name so widely diffused 
as that of Smith. 

This line boasts a royal descent, which, like most 
others, teste Mr Foster, is a trifle circuitous — e.g. 
through the families of Monthermer, Montague, 
Bevin, and Muttleberie. Other royal descents — or 
connections — might probably be traced as satis- 
factorily. The following appears to have been com- 
piled by, or for, Sir Nicholas Smithe of Larkbear, 
circa 1624, possibly as the result of the Heralds' 



THE WEST COUNTRY SMITHS 55 

Visitation of Devon. I may add that " Muttleberie " 
is the local phonetic of " Myrtleberry "— a form of 
nomenclature as prettily poetic as " Muttleberie " is 
the reverse. 

Edward L = Eleanor of Castile. 

Joan Plantagenet = (2) Ralph de Monthermer. 

Thomas, Lord Monthermer = . . . 

I 

Margaret Monthermer = Sir John Montague. 

Robert Montague =... 

John Montague = Agnes More. 
I 
William Montague = ... 

" William Montague = . . . PeverelL 

Elianor Montague = John Bavin. 



Katherine Bevin= Alexander Muttleberie. 

Alice Muttleberie = John Smithe. 

Sir George Smithe. 
(Father of Sir Nicholas Smithe. ) 

Of the above, Sir John Montague, who died 12 
Rich. II., was son of William Montague, Earl of 
Salisbury. Robert was the second son, and John 
Montague, the elder, succeeded his uncle as Earl 
of Salisbury. Their son Thomas, Earl of Salisbury. 
married Elianna, daughter of Thomas Holland, Earl 
of Kent, and their daughter and heiress married^ 
Richard Nevill, who became, jure uxoris, Earl of 
Salisbury, an arrangement which would not now be 
sanctioned without a fresh patent. 

For the early items in the pedigree which com- 
mences with Smith of Borage, the reader is referred 
to the Visitation of Devon 1623. Here, however, we 
find a ci-ucc in limine, for Mr A. M. Smith denies that 
John Smith, from whom the descent starts, was 
of Borage, but styles him of Holdich in Thorncomb, 



56 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



albeit bis son Tbomas was of Borage or Burridge. 
Tbis detail is verified by tbe said Jobn's will, and 
fortunately does not affect the pedigree itself: where- 
of the earlier portion stands thus : 



John Smiths a Alice Muttleberie. 

or Smythe I 



Richard. 



William, Major 
of Exeter. 



I 

(1) John Smith of Yar- 
combe (queried)? 

(2) Robert. 

(3) Nicholas. 

(4) Thomas. 

(6) Thomas. 

(7) Aron. 



Jane, dau. =(5) Sir George, = Grace Viell (de- 



of James 

Walker. 



Major of Exe- 
ter, Sheriff of 
Devon, 1615. 



scended from Anne, 
dan. of the Earl of 
Wilts and Or- 
monde), dan. of 
William Viell by 
Jane Arundell of 
Trevise. 



Grace = Sir Bevill Gren- 

ville, the Cavalier. 
( Whence the Earls and 
Marquesses of Bath, etc. ) 



Sir Nicholas of = Dorothy Horsey. 
Larkbeare 



I 
Elizabeth = Sir Thomas 
Monck, whence General 
Monck, D. of Albe- 
marie. 



Jane = Richard 
Henning, 
whence the 
Trenchards. 



I I I I I I I 

Nicholas = Hon. John= George, Edw. Ralphe, Right Hon. = Anne, 2 dans. 



Rose (ances- 
La.ru- tor of 
bait. tbe 
Land- 
graves of 
Carolina). 



ob. 
1642. 



ob. 


ob. 


1639, 


1635, 


s.p. 


s.p. 



George, 
s.p. ob. 1631. 



Sir James widow 
(ob. 1681), ofWm. 
s.p. Boevey. 



I 
Mary Boevey = Sir Francis Courtenay, who 
thus succeeded to Sir George 
Smithe's vast estates in 
Devon. 



Robert, tbe second son of John by Alice Muttleberie 
(ob. 1590), had Aron of Crediton (ob. 1631). Nicholas 
of Holditch, the third son (ob. 1597), had George, who 
by Margerie ... had (1) William of Ilminster, (2) Ed- 
ward of Chard, (3) George of Ilchester (ob. 1651), (4) 
John of Taunton, (5) Rev. Richard of Whitstanton. 

Of these (1) "William of Ilminster, by his wife 
Elizabeth, had (1) John of Forton, clothier (ob. 1667), 
who had five sons and four daughters, of whom Aron, 



THE WEST COUNTRY SMITHS 57 

bapt. 1653, may have been the Aron Smith who was 
Solicitor to the Treasury, (2) Robert of Hminster, of 
whose issue we treat at length below, and with two 
daughters, three other sons. 

Thomas, fourth son of John Smithe by Olive Muttle- 
berie, is described as of South Chard. By Alice 
Atkins he had Richard Burridge of Crimchard, 
who by Agnes Cogan had, with others, Richard of 
S. Chard (ob. 1680), whose son Richard was executed 
by Judge Jeffreys, while William, another son, had 
a numerous issue. 

Aron, the youngest son of John Smithe and Alice 
aforesaid (ob. 1629), by his wife Judith; had John 
of- Combe, and Nicholas, whose grandson Aron may 
also have been the Aron, Solicitor to the Treasury 
(vide supra). Of his other progeny nothing is known. 

I pause here to remark that in the extensive 
pedigrees, compiled with remarkable diligence by 
Mr A M. Smith and Rev. E. F. N. Smith, occur 
numerous names culled from parish registers, but 
of no personal value. For the sake of condensation 
I omit these nomina inutilia, referring the reader to 
the above able works. The ancestor-hunter indeed, 
so far as the Smith families are concerned, will find 
himself overwhelmed by an embarras de richesses ; 
it seems desirable, therefore, to focus the eye as 
far as possible on the main threads. To the lucidus 
ordo of Mr A. M. Smith, I avow myself especially 
indebted. He has tabulated separately each principal 
descent — in felicitous contrast to the method of Mr 
Augustus Smith whose tree, formulated on 12 sheets, 
each 2 feet long by l'deep, necessitates a table or 
trestle of 24 feet in longitude for the hapless student. 
Divide et impera is an excellent rule for the tree-builder. 

We now come to the descendants of Robert Smith 
of Hminster, second son of William of Ilminster, by 
his wife Elizabeth. They had issue (A) Captain 



58 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Edmond Smith, R.K, born 1619, (B) George of 
Moolham, ancestor of the Smith Marriots — vide 
infra, (c) Another son and two daughters. 

(A.) Captain Edmond, by his wife Eleanor (ob. 1695) 
had (1) Robert, (2) William (born 1652), (3) Edmund, 
born 1658, of whom presently, (4) Captain James of 
Poplar. 

Robert of Rotherhithe, living 1712, by Joyce had 
(1) Robert of Barking (1658-1747) = Susannah Shippy, 
and had issue. (2) Charles of Waddon (1690-1761), 
who by Rebecca, daughter of Captain Marriner, 
had (1) Charles of Stratford (1713-77), who by 
Judith, daughter of Isaac Lefevre of. Stepney, 
had Charles of Suttons (1757-1814), M.P. for West- 
bury and Saltash, who married Augusta, daughter 
and co-heir of Joshua Smith of Erlestoke, Wilts, 
niece of Sir Drummond Smith, first Bart., and by her 
had (1) Sir Charles Joshua Smith, second Bart, of 
Suttons (ob. 1831), who by Mary, daughter of William 
Gosling, Esq. of Rockhampton, had Sir Charles C. 
Smith (b. 1S27), who married Agnes F. Cure, 
and by her had Drummond Cunliffe, Reginald 
Cunliffe = Maud Gosling, Frederica M., and Rev. 
C.B.H. ; (2) Spencer Smith of Brooklands, who 
by Frances, daughter of Sir Michael Seymour, Bart., 
had Captain T. S. Smith, R.X., (ob. s.p., 1893) ; 
Rev. Spencer C. S. (b. 1842) = Mary B. Hamilton, 
and has issue ; Rev. Orlando S., Langford Lodge, 
Salisbury (b. 1843) = Theodosia, daughter of Sir 
R. England; Captain Gilbert S. (b. 1843) = Edith C, 
daughter of A. Pelham, Esq. ; and 4 daughters ; (3) 
Drummond, s.p. ; (4) Frederick = Augusta Wilder ; 
(5) Emma = Rev. Austen Leigh; (6) Frances = Rev. 
R. Seymour; (7) Eliza = Sir D. Le Marchant, Bart.; 
(8) Maria = Sir John Seymour. 

The second son of Charles of Waddon, by Rebecca 
Marriner, was William of Camer, Kent (1719-64). 



THE WEST COUNTRY SMITHS 59 

He married Katherine, daughter and heiress of 
George Masters, Esq., Squire of Camer, and by 
her had (1) George of Camer (1757-1831) = Rebecca, 
daughter of Nicholas Brett, and by her had (1) 
William Masters Smith of Camer, MP. (1802-61) = 
Frances, daughter of Sir Howard Elphinstone, Bart. ; 
(2) William Cowburn (d. 1854) who was succeeded 
at Camer by Rev. A. Smith Masters (1820-75), who 
by R. M., daughter of Archdeacon Randall, had 
Rev. J. E. Smith Masters = Eliza M., daughter of S. 
Melville ; (3) Edward Twopeny = Elizabeth .... The 
younger brother of Mr George Smith of Camer was 
William Smith of Fairy Hall (1760-1830) = Catherine, 
daughter of John Manby, Esq. of Holbrook, and by her 
had(l)Edward F.,Q.C, Bencher of the Middle Temple, 
ob. s.p. 1877 ; (2) Charles Manby, b. 1819, Master 
of the Q.B., and afterwards Judge of the Supreme 
Court = Georgina F., daughter of Governor Ibbetson, 
and had issue : Reginald M. of Bifrons ; Arthur 
Mortan (author of the Smiths of Exeter) ; Ernest 
Manby ; Bertram Robert ; Gertrude M. ; William 
W. = Florence Elvira, and had issue : Amy Georgina ; 
Walter M. G. = Katherine Maud, and has issue. 

We now come to Edmund Smith, Consul at Teneriffe, 
who is said to have been buried at Christ Church. 
Newgate, in 1705. By his wife Isabel he had a son 
Ralph, who, dying in 1748, left with other issue Robert 
(1741-1810), who by Martha Davis had, with other 
issue — (a) Robert of Carey's, Brockenhurst (1769- 
1849), who by Ann Bowden had a very numerous 
issue: (1) Nathaniel Bowden Smith (1797-1886) = 
Emily M. Ripley, and had, by her with others, Philip 
Bowden (1828-95), who by Emily Robertson had a 
large family; Nathaniel Bowden (b. 1838) = Emily 
Cecilia Sandeman, and by her had three daughters ; 
and Rev. Frederic H. Bowden (b. 1S41) = Harriet 
Hardis, and has six children. (2) Richard Bowden 



60 THE SMITH FAMILY 

(1800-81) = Georgina E, daughter of "Walter Long, 
Esq., and had issue, Walter B. B. of Vernalls (b. 
1850) = Julia Humphreys. (/S) Henry Bates Smith 
(1776-1834) = Martha Ferris, and by her had, with 
others, Henry Goodenough (1814-78) = Jane Cooper, 
and by her had, with others, Rev. H. R. Cooper 
Smith "(b. 1851). 

"We must now, following the order of what 
Aristotle terms priority and posteriority, revert to 
(B.) George Smith of Moolham, W. Dowlish (1624- 
1700). His son John (1659-1729) by his wife Mary 
(1653-1729) had, with others, George (d. 1730), who, 
by Elizabeth his wife, had Henry of New Windsor, 
(1714-68), who by Mary Hill (d. 1757) had, with 
others, including Rev. Doctor Edmund, Rector of 
Godmanston and Fellow of Magd. Coll., Camb. (1747- 
1814), Sir George Smith, first Bart, of Sydling (1744- 
1807). He was F.RS. and Sheriff of Dorset, 1773. 
By his first wife, Elizabeth Carter of "Wilsthorpe, he 
had, with others, including Amelia = Hon. R. Quin, son 
of the Earl of Dunraven, Sir John Wyldbore Smith, 
second Bart., Sheriff of Dorset, 1814 (1770-1852). He 
married Elizabeth A, daughter of Rev. Dr Marriott 
of Horsmonden (1770-1847), and by her had (1) Sir 
John James Smith, third Bart, of Sydling (1800-62) 
= Frances Penney of Somerton Erleigh, and died 
s.p. ; (2) Rev. Sir "William M. Smith-Marriott, Rector 
of Horsmonden, who assumed the name of Marriott 
(1801-64). By his first wife Julia E, daughter of T. 
L. Hodges, M.P., he had Sir William Smith Marriott, 
fifth Bart., Sheriff of Dorset, 1876 = Elizabeth D., 
daughter of Hon. R. Cavendish, son of Lord Water- 
park, and by her had with others his heir, William 
J. Smith Marriott (b. 1870) ; John Bosworth, 4th 
Dragoon Guards (b. 1837) = Julia F., daughter of C. 
J. Redclyffe (issue, William (b. 1865) = C. M. Austen; 
Charles E. ; Rev. W. N. P. = Hilda) ; Hugh Forbes, R. 



THE WEST COUNTRY SxMITHS 61 

of Horsmonden = Frances, daughter of Admiral Hon. 
J. G. Cavendish (issue, Hugh R. C. ; George R W. ; 
Frances J. E.). Rev. Horace Meeres = Charlotte 
L. Peareth — issue ; and two daughters. (3) Henry 
C Smith (1806-34), R of Rushton, s.p. (4) Reginald 
Southwell (1809-95) = Emily G., daughter of H. H. 
Simpson of Bath (issue, with others, Reginald Bos- 
worth, Fellow of Trin. Coll., Oxford, author of a 
Life of Lord Laurence, etc. = Flora, dau. of Rev. E. 
D. Wickham, and had issue ; Walter W. Marriott, 
R. A. = Alice Ley of Trehill, and had issue ; Rev. E. 
Floyer Noel, M.A., Vicar of St Mary, Tottenham ; 
Caledon E., Colonel of the Dorset Regiment ; others. 
(5) Rev. Francis R. of Rushton (1816-51) = Mary 
Bogue, and had issue, with others, Rev. Francis A, 
R of Rushton. (6) Major Edward Heathcote (1813- 
69) = Christina, daughter of Edward Mackintosh, 
Esq., of Geddes, and had issue. (7) Ann Eliza (1803- 
59) = Rev. John D. Wingfield Digby, nephew of 
Earl Digby, and left issue. 

It may be added that Susanna, sister of the first 
Bart., had by Captain Bechinoe, R.N., a daughter 
Mary, who married (1) the fourth Duke of Roxburgh, 
(2) the Hon. John Tollemache, son of the E. of 
Dysart, but had issue by neither husband. Also 
that the Rev. E. Floyer Noel Smith of Trinity Coll., 
Oxford, is author of " The Pedigree of Smith " — a 
work of considerable research, to which I avow my- 
self indebted. He ?ives the following: Marriott tree : 



Hugh Marriott of Spelmonden = Lydia, grand-dau. of Sir 
(d. 1753). Vivian Pearson. 



I 
Rev. J. Marriott, LL. D. = Catharine, dau. of Sir John Bos-worth, 
(b. 1743). 

Elizabeth = Sir J. Wyldbore Smith, Bart. 

Anns of Sir George Smith, Smyth, or Smithe, 1615 :—Sa. a feue and -' 
barrulett between 5 martlet* or. 



62 THE SMITH FAMILY 

We now revert to Robert Smith of Ilminster, who 
died in 1656. By his second wife, Elizabeth, he had 
(1) Robert of Ilminster (1629-95), who by Elizabeth... 
had Robert of Bishopshull (1659-1714) = Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Lucas of Sherborne, widow of 
John Bind on, issue, three daughters ; Thomas of 
Ilminster, (ob. s.p. 1727) ; "William of the Tower of 
London (ob. 1737), who by Mary Sawtell, had, with 
others, Edmund of London (1707-79), who by Eliza- 
beth Blunkett, had William Smithe of Horsham 
Park (ob. 1788) = Sarah, daughter of Simon Forster 
of Aldermaston, and by her had Edmund of Horsham 
Park (1772-1845) = Mary, daughter of Peter Du 
Cane, Esq., of Braxted, and had Rev. Percy (1804- 
76), who by Mary, daughter of Rev. L. Kenrick 
had Rev. W. H. G. Vicar of Horton, Northants ; 
Frederick (1806-69) = Isabella 0., daughter of Rev. 
Dr James, Preb. of Worcester, and had Percy S. G. 
of Shermanbury ; William Forster of Staplefield Place 
(1813-68) = Lilla R, daughter of A. S. Greene, Esq. 
of Lewes, and had Edmund Du Cane (b. 1853), Forest 
Service of India ; Arthur D'Orville ; Percy B. ; Bel- 
ville G. ; Alexander EL. G. = Amy Redcroft ; Lilla L. ; 
Joseph Godman of Park Hatch, Surrey = Caroline . . . 

The second son of Robert of Ilminster was William, 
Mayor of Lyme Regis (1631-77). By Dorothy Cars- 
well he had, with others, Robert of Langham (ob. 
1791), who = (1) Rebecca Tin-ell, and by her had 
John Smith of Honiton. He married (2) Mary 
Woolmington, and by her had Alderman Sir William 
Smith. Sheriff of Middlesex and Dorset (ob. 1752), 
who, by Elizabeth '..., had a daughter, Susanna 
(ob. s.p. 1742). The third son of Robert of Ilminster 
was Thomas of Exeter (1634-1709), who, by Anne, 
had Thomas, Eleanor (ob. 1713), and Margaret = 
Richard Knight of Deal, nephew of Morgan Lodge 
of Eastrv, and left issue. 



THE WEST COUNTRY SMITHS 63 

For the voluminous pedigree of the American 
Smiths, descending from John Smith of Exeter (b. 
1611), I must refer the reader to the valuable work 
of Mr A. M. Smith, entituled, " Some Account of the 
Smiths of Exeter. By One of them" He has added 
the pedigree of the Ashstead Smiths, who claim de- 
scent from Sir Nicholas of Larkbeare (vide sicpra), 
but whose first verified ancestor is Captain John 
Smith, buried at St Mary Magdalene, Bermondsey, 
1714. Of his issue, Captain Nathaniel (ob. 1730) of 
St Giles, Cripplegate, by Ann, daughter of James 
Gould, had Nathaniel of Ashstead, a posthumous 
son (ob. 1794). He was M.P. for Rochester and 
Chairman of the E.I.C. By Hester, daughter of 
George Dance, City Architect, and sister of George 
Dance, R.A., he had, with others, George, Chief- 
Justice of the Mauritius - Sarah, daughter of J. 
Hardman, Esq., of Manchester, and by her had (1) 
Nathaniel of Ashstead = Eliza, daughter of General 
Auchmuty ; (2) Felix Vaughan (ob. 1876) = Charlotte, 
heiress of Sir Hugh Massey, Bart., and by her had 
Frances M. ; Watkin Wingfield (ob. 1886) ; (3) 
Edmund Loman = Hester ... ; (4) Sarah = Robert, 
Lord Abinger. Their daughter Frances = Rev. S. 
Lidderdale Smith, Canon of Hereford, and has 
issue. 

Mr A. M. Smith further appends the pedigree of 
Smith of Cawood, who may, like the Ashstead 

Smiths, descend from Sir Nicholas of Larkbeare 

in any case this tree is of interest, inasmuch as it 
includes among its scions that gallant General, Sir 
Harry Smith, of whom more particularly amon°- 
Celebrities of the name. 

At. the close of the seventeenth century we find the 
names of James and Richard Smith of Cawood, the 
latter apparently being the senior, possibly father or 
uncle of the former. "We will treat them separately. 



64 THE SMITH FAMILY 

First, James (ob. 1692, set. 54). By his wife 
Martha he had, with others, Jonah, whose son James 
(1695-1755) by Anne Torre had Nicholas of Cawood 
(ob. 1 794) = Elizabeth, daughter of Rev. R Halstead, 
and by her had Nicholas, of the Middle Temple, 
Accountant- General of the Court of Chancery (buried 
at Stanmore, 1819) = Elizabeth D. F, daughter of Sir 
Edmund Anderson, Bart. 

Richard Smith of Cawood had Ashton (ob. 1689, 
aet. 22), and a second son. [His cousin, Rev. W. J. 
Smith of Cawood had a son, Peter of Ely (ob. 1796).] 
The above second son left John of Worboys, who, by 
Martha, daughter of John Wakelyn of Whittlesey, 
had Wakelyn (ob. 1759), who = his first cousin, 
Susanna (ob. 1804), and by her had John, surgeon, of 
Whittlesey (1756-1843) = Eleanor, daughter of Rev. 
Minor Canon Moore of Peterborough. Their issue 
was numerous — e.g. (1) William G. (1790-1830) = 
Sophia Fothergill, and by her had George (ob. 1877) 
= Elizabeth Brewster; (2) John S. (1792-1819) = 
Anne Maydwell, and had John S. = Mary Wells ; 
(3) William F. ; (4) Sir Harry G. W., of Aliwal, 
Bart., G.C.B. (ob. 1860) = Juana Maria De Los 
Dolores De Leon, s.p. ; (5) Colonel Thomas Laurence, 
C.B. = (1) Catherine Maydwell, and by her had Harry, 
who assumed his mother's name, and was father of 
Colonel R L. W. M. Maydwell ; Colonel Hugh, s.p. ; 
Captain R L., of Thames Ditton = his cousin Alice; 
Colonel T. L. Smith ; = (2) Elizabeth Morris, and by 
her had Alice = Captain R. L. (vide supra) ; Harriet 
(ob. 1866), author of a Memoir entituled " Home- 
wards"; Colonel Wellesley, K.C.B. ; and Charles, 
RN. (ob. s.p.) ; (6) Samuel, surgeon, of Whittlesey, 
whose son, Henry Terry Smith of Northampton = 
Louisa ... ; (7) Daniel S. = Jane Alice ... ; (8) George 
Hardy of St Ives = Elizabeth ...; (9) Charles, J.P., 
D.L., of Whittlesey (ob. 1854), by Mary, daughter of 



THE WEST COUNTRY SMITHS 65 

Abraham Smith, Esq. of Eastrea Hall, Cambridge- 
shire, had Anne Agnes (ob. 1885) = Staff-Surgeon 
Ford; John A=Jennetta H, daughter of W. M. 
Ford, and by her had, with others, Arthur Ford 
(ob. 1895, s.p.), B.A., Cambridge ; George Moore (ob. 
1870), solicitor, of Whittlesey = Elizabeth, daughter of 
Eev. J. C. Franks (and had issue, with others, George 
M, M.A, Cambridge; Harry Wakelyn, M.A, Cam- 
bridge; Wilfrid H. M., Lieut. RM.L.I); Captain 
Harry (ob. 1857) = Mary Lambarde, and had 
Harry St Lawrence, Eastern Telegraphs Company. 



CHAPTER V 

THE CARRINGTONS AND CARINGTONS — EARL CAR- 
RINGTON — LORD PAUNCEFOTE — SMTTHES, BARTS. — 
BROMLEYS, BARTS., ETC. 

[Vide Visitations of Essex, 1612, 1634; Norfolk, 1612; and Warwick, 1619.] 

Starting from the Horatian maxim, "fortes creantur 
fortibus et bonis," the late Mr Augustus Smith, M.P., 
of Tresco, set to work, and in masterly fashion, to 
demonstrate that the Smiths of Cropwell Boteler 
were not descended from the Cavalier Smyths, als 
Carington, but from a humble yeoman who could 
not so much as sign his name. So far so good. 
Unfortunately, this gentleman being an alumnus of 
the Manchester school, imported into his otherwise 
admirable tractate a quantity of fustian concerning 
civil and religious liberty, assuming as self-evident 
that the Cavalier nobleman was the enemy, and the 
illiterate yeoman's son the enlightened friend, of these 
priceless boons. Had he not perused English his- 
tory through the prejudiced medium of Manchester 
doctrinaires, had he not been fascinated by the lurid 
colouring imparted by the Philistine Carlyle to the 
character of Cromwell, he might have written other- 
wise, because these very Cavaliers who took up arms 
for the King had been among the first to resist ship- 
money ; and to pourtray a military despot as champion 
of liberty is to outrage common-sense. Besides, if one 
reads Mr Augustus Smith between the lines, it seems 
pretty evident that his cool assumption as to the super- 
iority of a boor to a man of refinement amounts to 
nothing less than an apt illustration of the fable of the 
fox and the grapes. If this exponent of Manchester 

66 



CAERINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 67 

politics could have proved his descent from noble 
Carington and his illustrious ancestors, the Crusaders, 
we should have been spared the apotheosis of the boor. 
No doubt, with a feeling of infinite sorrow, the laird 
of Tresco would have resigned himself to a hard fate 
which had made him — of course against his will ! — 
sharer of the blood that flowed in the veins of a 
Cavalier. But he would have lost the opportunity 
of thanking God that he was not as other gentlemen 
are — loyalists, churchmen — even as this Carington. 

Setting aside political animus, one may bestow 
the highest praise on Mr Augustus Smith's genea- 
logical honesty. When a man goes ancestor-hunting, 
and tells you, in limine, that his loftiest ambition 
is to discover a link with a chimney-sweep or a 
ploughboy, simply you cannot believe him ; but if 
in the course of his quest he learns that previous 
attempts to link his line with positive ancestry have 
no firmer basis than the manipulations of some inter- 
ested Ananias, and if he resolutely determines to 
quash the lie, he is entitled to the highest respect, 
and, indeed, to the gratitude of those who, like the 
present Lord Carrington, repudiate a mythical preten- 
sion. Let us briefly glance .at the situation as exposed 
by Mr Augustus Smith. 

Sir Michael Carington was standard-bearer to 
Eichard I., and for that reason doubtless an object 
of loathing to all Manchester. A descendant of his 
— according to "The Visitation of Essex" — having 
espoused the losing side in the "Wars of the Eoses, 
fled the country, but reappeared under the name 
Smith. For reasons more or less intelligible, his 
descendants foreswore their ancient and honourable 
patronymic, and were known simply as Smiths, or 
rather, to be exact, as Smyths. By an alliance 
with the elder co-heiress of the Warwickshire Hare- 
wells — her younger sister married, as his second 



68 THE SMITH FAMILY 

wife, Leonard Eede of Boarstal — they obtained 
Wootton "Wawen, and again, by annexing another 
Midland heiress, in the succeeding generation, Ashby 
Folville, in Leicestershire, where are monuments to their 
memory, restored by the late Lord Carrington, under 
the impression, for which Sir "William Betham must be 
held responsible, that he was thereby honouring his 
ancestors. When Charles I. created the Carington 
viscountcy the family resumed their true patronymic. 

The first of the Caringtons, alias Smyth, to reside 
at Ashby Folville was Francis, son of Sir John Smyth 
of Wootton Wawen by Agnes, daughter and co- 
heiress of John Harewell. He married Mary, 
daughter and heiress of John Moreton, and by her, 
who died in 1563, had a son George, stated to have 
died in 1607, aet. 30. These dates are obviously 
erroneous, inasmuch as they make the said George 
to have been born in 1577 — i.e. fourteen years after 
his mother's decease. He married Anne, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Giffard of Chillington, and although only 
thirty at his death, by her had twelve children ! 

All of this is, to say the least, confused, albeit 
certified by Sir William Betham. Anyhow, George's 
eldest son married a Nottinghamshire lady, Miss 
Markham. Called Francis, after his grandsire, he 
was knighted, and died in 1629, leaving one son, Sir 
Charles, who became, by favour of King Charles, 
Lord Carington, and was killed in France in 1664. 
The fifth son of George, by Anne Giffard, was John 
Smyth, alias Carington, and Sir William Betham 
identified him with another John Smith, a yeoman 
of Cropwell Boteler, the ancestor of the existing Lord 
Carrington and of the late Mr Augustus Smith, M.P. 

It will be remembered that George Smith, alias 
Carington, of Ashby Folville, died in 1607, aet. 30. 
John Smith — minus the Carington alias — of Cropwell 
Boteler, was born in 1593, when his alleged sire, 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 69 

according to Betham's hopelessly muddled figures, 
was sixteen, and as, ex hypothesi, he was the fifth 
son, George must have begun to reproduce his. species 
very early in life. That, of course, is a detail capable 
of emendation, if the dates could be brought into 
harmony with the true Carington pedigree. As the 
tree stands it is simply inexplicable. 

Betham, and the champions of the Carington 
descent of the present Smiths, who come undoubtedly 
from John of Cropwell, urge that this John had 
abjured the Eoman creed, to which the true Caring- 
tons had adhered in the teeth of Protestant perse- 
cution ; also, that by his marriage with Elizabeth 
Garton, a yeoman's daughter, and his political as well 
as religious principles, he had been discarded by his 
family. But apparently for these hypotheses there 
exists no proof whatsoever. Moreover, Nichol's 
pedigree (" History of Leicestershire ") clashes with 
certain pedigrees in the British Museum, date circa 
1764, the object of which pedigrees was to prove, that 
the male issue of the old Carington line was extinct 
— this in reference to the devolution of estates. It 
may be that these pedigrees, having been compiled 
with intention, lie open to suspicion. They were 
accepted, however, by the Court without dispute, 
and therein we find no John, son of George of 
Ashby, but on the contrary a John, son of Sii 
Francis, and brother of the first Lord Carington, 
which John died s.p. ! If the descendants of John 
of Cropwell had perceived a chance of obtaining the 
Carington estates, it is practically certain that such 
shrewd men of business — Nottingham bankers — 
would not have let the opportunity slip. So far 
from entering even a caveat, they never dreamt of 
any kinship, inasmuch as Thomas, High Sheriff for 
Notts in 1717, had already applied to the Heralds' 
College for a grant of arms, alleging that he was 



70 THE SMITH FAMILY 

uncertain what arms did belong to his family, and 
was unwilling to bear any to which he had not a 
just title. It seems rather putting a gloss on such 
words to assume that they were meant as a sort of 
challenge to the college to confirm a right to bear 
the Carington coat, though it may be admitted that 
the simpler plan would have been to urge that the 
family never had borne arms at all, but, as Sydney 
Smith sarcastically affirmed, had been in the habit of 
sealing their letters with their thumbs. The Smiths, 
it may be remarked, two and three centuries ago 
were as addicted to an alias as in later years. Thus 
the first of Cropwell Boteler Smiths was Stanydge 
or Standish, alias Smith ; just as the heir of Mr 
Augustus Smith, M.P., called himself Smith-Dorrien. 
It should be added that the Smith alias Stanydge 
wills and the register of Titheby, the parish whereof 
Cropwell is a hamlet, go to demonstrate that John of 
Cropwell was son of John Smith, alias Stanydge, and 
not of George Carington, grandfather of the first Vis- 
count Carington. Here the research of Mr Augustus 
Smith, M.P., has proved especially valuable and con- 
vincing, and it is a matter for regret that a mere 
problem in genealogy could not have been submitted 
to impartial consideration without importing political 
and polemical animus. That Providence has been 
invariably on the side of the Whigs amounts to an 
indemonstrable hypothesis, and that all descendants 
of Roundheads have been blessed, and all of Cavaliers 
cursed, is a generalisation altogether too sweeping to 
bear the test of analysis. That no family has so 
prospered as the Nottingham Smiths during the past 
two centuries cannot be controverted. That this 
phenomenon must be referred to a higher power 
every man who respects religion will affirm. But 
that the adherence of the Smiths to buff and dis- 
sociation with blue had anything to do with it 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 71 

represents the type of argument that would only 
appeal to the very ignorant or supremely prejudiced. 
Force of character, practical talent, plus the favour 
of God have combined to make the Smiths ; and so 
long as they retain their ancestral virtues, it may be 
safely prophesied that they will not be unmade. 

The following references to the old Caringtons 
supplement the account given in the Heralds' 
Visitations : — 

(1) A precis taken from the <: Diet. Nat. Bio- 
graphy ":— -Sir John Smith (sic) (1616-44), Royalist; 
born at Studley, "Warwickshire, being the fourth son 
of Francis Smith of Queeniborough, Leicestershire, 
by Anne, daughter of Thomas Markham of Allerton, 
Notts. His eldest brother was raised to the peerage 
in 1643 as Baron Carington of Wootton Wawen or 
Wavern, and Viscount Carington of Barreford, in 
Connaught. Educated as a Roman Catholic, he 
joined the Spanish army and served in Flanders. 
He then offered his sword to King Charles L, and 
receiving a commission defeated the Scots at Staple- 
ford. At the outbreak of the Civil War he received 
a Captaincy under Lord John Stewart, and took part 
in a skirmish at Powick. At Edgehill he recovered 
the Royal Standard, which had been captured by the 
enemy after the death of Sir Edmund Verney, and for 
this exploit was made knight- banneret on the field. 
Taken prisoner by Waller, he was released, and served 
as Colonel of Lord Herbert's Horse at Oxford. He was 
killed in a skirmish with Waller's troops at Cheriton, 
and is buried in Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford." 

(2) From " Stemmata Ferraria," by the late 
Augustus Smith, M.P., of Tresco : " The Smyth 
alias Carington family derived its origin from Sir 
Michael Carington, Standard- Bearer to King Richard 
I. in the Holy Land, and was long seated in the 
County of Essex at Cressing Temple. The name Smyth 



72 THE SMITH FAMILY 

(Smythe) or Smith is reported to have been adopted 
during the Wars of the Roses for the purposes of 
concealment, and afterwards retained during several 
generations. Its chief seat was subsequently trans- 
ferred to Wootton, in Warwickshire, by a marriage 
with an heiress of the Harewell family, and still later 
to Ashby Folville, in Leicestershire, by another mar- 
riage with the heiress of the Mortons in the reign 
of Henry VIII., about 1540. During the Civil Wars 
the head of the family was created by Charles I. 
Baron Carington, and the family to a certain extent 
gradually resumed the name of Carington. At this 
period the several branches were numerous, and 
for the most part adhered to the Roman Catholic 
faith. 

" Wootton Wavern (Wawen) is now possessed, 
curiously enough, by a baronet of the name of Smyth. 
This family are of Acton Barrell (Burnell), in Shrop- 
shire, and acquired this property by the marriage 
with the widow of its last Carington owner." 



The Cropwell Boteler Like 

Thomas Smith (1631-99) = (1) Mary Hooper, and 
by her had two daughters, Mary (1665-1720), who by 
John Egleton had a son, Sir Charles, ancestor of 
the Kents, Barts. ; and Fortune (1669-91). He = 
(2) Fortune, daughter of a Roundhead artilleryman, 
named Collin, of Nottingham, and by her (1654-1715) 
had Thomas, John, Samuel, Abel, Jane, and Anne. 
From Thomas, Samuel, and Abel sprang three 
distinct branches. 

Thomas, the eldest son (1682-1727), left no son, 
but a skein of daughters. Of these, Mary = Dr 
Tennison, nephew of the Archbishop and Chancellor 
of the Diocese of Oxford ; Elizabeth = Giles Eyre ; 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 73 

Katherine = "William Ring ; Anne, who died in 1786 
= Henry Walters, and Harriot, died in 1784. 

Samuel, of Gadsby, Leicestershire, goldsmith, of 
London, who died in 1651, = Elizabeth, heiress of 
John Cartlich, goldsmith, and by her had (1) John 
(1716-17), (2) Anne (b. 1718), (3) John, (4) Thomas 
(1720-65), of Nottingham and Keyworth = Dorothy 
Lister (who remarried Henry Powys of the Abbey, 
Shrewsbury), and by her had Elizabeth = Sir Philip 
Hales, Bart., and by him had Elizabeth, of Brymore, 
Somerset, at whose decease Brymore passed to the 
Bouveries ; (5) Samuel, of Aldermanbury and Epsom 
(1722-89) = Elizabeth (1723-82), daughter of Thos. 
Watson, and by her had (1) Elizabeth, (2) Samuel 
(1755-93), M.P. for Ilchester and Worcester = Mary, 
daughter of Geo. Lockyer (who remarried . . . Brett- 
ingham), and by her left Thomas (1778-1S06), s.p., 
and three daughters ; (3) Thomas (1755-1800) = Hon. 
Mary Hely Hutchinson, daughter of Lord Donough- 
more, and by her had (1) William, E.I.C.S. (1792- 
1821), s.p., (2) Christiana = Rev. Geo. Almond, (3) 
Rev. Hely Hutchinson (1796-1830) = Kate, daughter 
of J. Williams, Esq., and by her had Rev. Hely H. 
A = Harriet A, daughter of Joseph Merton, Esq., and 
had issue; (4) William (b. 1756), (5) Rev. Charles, 
Fellow of New Coll. (b. 1757) = Anne, daughter of 
Anthony Sawyer, of Hey wood, Berks., and by her 
had (1) Chas. W. =a sister of Vice- Chancellor Shad- 
well, and had issue; (2) Mary Anne, (3) Rev. Robert 
Hopton = Jane Bovill Chapman, and had issue; (4) 
Rev. Herbert, of Shirley (b. 1800) = Cassandra, 
daughter of Captain Chamberlayne, of Maugersbury, 
and had issue, Herbert Chamberlayne (b. 1829), 
Charles Harcourt (b. 1830), and a daughter ; (5) 
Lieut. John (1756-82), (6) Mary (b. 1760) = Thos. 
Watson, (7) Jemima (1761-93), (8) George (1764- 
1811) = Frances, daughter of Ant. Sawyer, and by 



74 THE SMITH FAMILY 

her had (1) George Anthony, E.I.C.S. (1801-49) = 
(a) Eugenie, daughter of Captain Bonchey (1802-31), 
and by her had Frances Mary (1826-53) = Captain 
Hamilton, Madras Inf. — issue; George, Mahratta 
Horse (1826-65)= Mary B. Kerr— issue; John S. 
(1830-52) ; Laura A (1831-48). Mr Geo. Anthony 
Smith = (/3) Katherine, daughter of Dr Batten, Prin- 
cipal of Haileybury, and by her had Katherine P. ; 
Jane C. = Rev. J. Aldworth. (2) Harcourt (b. 1802), 

(3) Frances M. (1804-51) = Herbert Sawyer — issue ; 

(4) Rev. Samuel = Frances J. M., daughter of Major 
Brooks — issue. (9) James, of Ashlyns, Herts (1768- 
1843) = (a) Frances, daughter of J. Arbuthnot, and 
had issue, James (1800-11) ; (/3) Mary Isabella, 
daughter of Augustus Pechell, Esq., and by her had 
(1) Augustus, of Ashlyns and Tresco Abbey, M.P. 
for Truro 1857-65 ; (2) Frederick G., 13th Dragoons 
(1806-26) ; (3) Frances M. I. = Col. Thos. Le Mar- 
chant ; (4) Theodore S. (1813-23), (5) Paulina W. 
(1820-35), (6) Robert A Smith-Dorrien, CoL Herts 
Militia = Mary Ann, daughter of Dr Drever, by Mary 
A, daughter of Thos. Dorrien. By her he had (1) 
Thos. A, 10th Hussars; (2) Frances A L; (3) 
Frederick (1846-48), (5) Marian, (6) Henry T, (7) 
Walter M., (8) Amy, (9) Edith, (10) Alena P., (11) 
Arthur H, (12) Horace L, (13) Mary B., (14) Maud 
C, (15) Laura M., (16) Helen D. 

Mr Augustus Smith, who waxed very sarcastic over 
any attempt to shelve a patronymic whereof he 
avowed himself proud, styled his brother, who had 
assumed the additional name of Dorrien, " semi- 
disguised." The Carringtons, Pauncefotes, and 
Bromleys he spoke of as totally disguised. In his 
justification of the old homely name he was at all 
events consistent, if, perhaps, unduly severe. 

We now come to Abel (so named after the Notting- 
ham Roundhead gunner, Abel Collin), who died in 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 75 

1757, and married Jane, daughter of Geo. Beaumont, 
of Darton. By her he had (1) Sir George, created 
Bart, in 1757. He married, first, Mary, daughter 
of Major Howe, by Elizabeth, co-heiress of William 
Pauncefote, of Carrswells, Newent. She died 1761, 
he 1763. By her he had (1) Howe (b. 1744); (2) 
Mary (b. 1751); (3) Sir George, 2nd Bart., who assumed 
the name of Bromley (1753-1808), and married Hon. 
Hester, daughter of Viscount Curzon, being succeeded 
by Sir Robert Howe Bromley (1778 - 1857), who, 
marrying Anne, daughter of Daniel Wilson, Esq., of 
Dalton Tower, had Robert (1815-1850), M.P. for 
Notts, s.p. ; Sir Henry Bromley (b. 1816), who, by 
Charlotte F. A., daughter of Colonel Rolleston, had 
a son, Henry (b. 1849) = Adela A, daughter of 
Westley Richards, Esq.— issue, Robert (b. 1874) ; 
Maurice (b. 1875) ; Arthur ;— he remarried Georgina 
E., daughter of Vere Fane, Esq., but by her had no 
issue ; Anne, died 1857 ; Charles, R.N. (b. 1820) ; 
William (1831 - 36) ; Thomas, Bombay Army (b. 
1822), married first, Lucie, daughter of General 
Webber, of Buckland, and by her had Reginald 
Howe ; Adelaide H. E. M. ; Edith V. and Constance 
G.— twins. He married, secondly, Clara, daughter of 
Sir Fitzroy Kelly, and by her had Inez M. M. S. E. ; 
Beatrice R. ; Rupert Fitzroy. Caroline = Sir James 
Campbell, Bart.— issue; Elizabeth = F. F. Eliot, Esq.; 
Mary = John Henry Elwes ; Arthur, Edward, Sophia. 
John, next brother to Sir George (b. 1716), had 
a son, Thomas, who, by Mary Bigsby, had Thomas, 
Mary, George, Robert. Of the issue of Thomas there 
is no record. Mary died s.p. George, of Edwalton 
(1774-1843) = Eliza Margaret, daughter of William 
Davis, and by her had (1) Charlotte (1801-38) = 
Thomas Boultbee, son of Sir Thomas Parkyns, and 
had issue Sir T. G. A Parkyns, sixth Baronet ; (2) 
Eliza (1803-59) = General W. D. Jones ; (3) George 



76 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Henry (1805-62) = Louisa, daughter of James Atkin- 
son, Esq., and by her had Charlotte Parkyns = 
Frederick Alexander, Esq.; Eliza = Major Bunny, 
RA. ; Thomas ; Robert Pauncefote ; George Llew- 
ellin ; Louisa Julia ; Constance E. ; Percy H. ; (4) 
Colonel John T. = Maria S., daughter of Dr Tyser, 
and had issue, Percy G., Louisa M., Henry C, Maria 
L=Molyneux Coldingham, Fanny E, Walter F., 
Emily G., Mary C, Arthur P., Edith C, Annie M., 
Mansfield G., Florence A; (5) Caroline = The Very 
Rev. L Llewellin, T.C.D., Dean of St David's; (6) 
Frances E. = Rev. C. W. Grove. 

Robert, the youngest son of Thomas Smith by 
Mary Bigsby (1788-1845), took the name of Paunce- 
fote. He was of Preston Court, Gloucestershire, and 
by Emma, daughter of R Smith, Esq. had (1) Clara = 
Admiral William Popbam, and had issue ; (2) Robert 
(1819-47), s.p. ; (3) Matilda T = Herr Lachmann ; (4) 
Bernard, E.I.C.S., by Louisa, daughter of A Phillips, 
Esq., had Bernard, Eleanor, Emma, Clara; (5) Sir 
Julian, of the Inner Temple, by Selina, daughter of 
Major Cubitt, had Julian Reginald, Selina Maude. 
After serving as Assistant Under Secretary of State 
at the Colonial Office, Chief-Justice of the Leeward 
Islands, Attorney-General and Chief-Justice of Hong 
Kong, he became Ambassador to the United States. 
and for his signal services as a diplomatist was raised 
to the Peerage, as Baron Pauncefote. The name his 
father assumed was one of great antiquity in Glouces- 
tershire. We find John Panfote (sic) Sheriff for that 
County, 1 Henry VI. He bore gules 3 lions rampant 
arg. ; and served a second time, 13 Henry VI. In 
the reign of Philip and Mary the name was Pannefort, 
Nicholas being Sheriff. The name also occurs in 
Doomsday Book, but in connection with Hampshire 
and Wilts. The family were established in Glouces- 
tershire by special grant from Henry IH. Later we 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 77 

find other branches ; but the home of the race was 
at Hasfield, Preston Court, Lord Pauncefote's seat, 
having been a younger son's portion. By his wife, 
Selina Fitzgerald, he has had four daughters, Maud, 
born 1862, Violet Sybil, 1872, Lilian, 1875, and 
Audley Olivia, 1876. 

We now revert to Abel, the Nottingham banker, 
born in 1717, M.P. 1774-85, and uncle of Robert 
Smith, of Preston Court, who assumed the name of 
Pauncefote. Abel, by Mary, daughter of Thomas 
Bird, Esq., of Barton, had (1) Thomas, s.p. ; (2) 
Abel ; (3) Robert. Abel, the younger, married Eliza- 
beth Appleby, and by her had a daughter, Mary, who 
married Rev. John Sargent, Squire of Lavington. 
Their son was Fellow of Merton College, Oxon, and 
died s.p. Their daughters married Bishop Samuel 
Wilberforce ; Rev. H. Wilberforce ; Cardinal Manning 
(as Archdeacon) ; and Rev. George Dudley Ryder. 

Robert, the next son (1752-1838), being the banker 
and personal friend of William Pitt, was by him created 
Baron Carrington of the Peerage of Ireland, 1796, 
and Baron Carrington of Upton, in the Peerage of 
the United Kingdom, 1797, D.C.L., ERAS. He 
married, in 1780, Anne, daughter of L. B. Barnard, 
Esq., of South Cave, and by her had, with others who 
died young, Robert J., second baron; Harriet = 
Colonel Crewe, nephew of Lord Crewe — she died 
1856 ; Catherine L. =the fourth Earl Stanhope, and 
died in 1843 ; Charlotte E. = the second Lord Gardner, 
and died in 1811; Esther = Right Hon. Sir H. Watkin 
Wynne, and died in 1854 ; Emily = the Right Hon. 
Lord Granville Somerset, and died in 1869. Lady 
Carrington died in 1827, and in 1836 Lord Carrington 
married, as his second wife, Charlotte, daughter of 
John Hudson, Esq., of Basingby, and widow of the 
Rev. W. Farquhar. She died in 1849. 

Robert John, the second baron (1796-1868), as- 



75 THE SMITH FAMILY 

sumed in 1S39 the old name Carington, with the single 
" r." He married, first. Eliza C, daughter of the first 
Lord Forester (1503-32). and by her had Cecil K. M, 
who = Lord Colville of Cnlross. He married, secondly, 
Charlotte Augusta, daughter of Lord Willoughby 
D Eresby. Hereditary Great Chamberlain, and by her 
had Charles R, now Lord Carrington; William 
H P., Colonel Grenadier Guards, M. P. for Wycombe, 
1565-53. Equerry to Queen Victoria — born in 1545, in 
1571 he = Juliet, daughter of F. Warden, Esq. ; Rupert 
C G.. M.P. for Bucks, 1550-55 — born in 1552. he 
married, in 1591. Edith, daughter of J. HorsfalL Esq., 
of Liverpool; Augusta C. = 1564, Lord Blythswood ; 
Eva = 1569, the eighth Earl of Harrington. Lord 
Carrington was Lord- Lieutenant of Bucks. 

The present Earl Carrington, born in 1543, was 
created Earl July 16. 1595. and Viscount Wen- 
dover. He is P.C. and G.C.MG. ; was MP. for 
Wycombe. 1565-65 ; Captain of the Corps of Gentle- 
men-at-Arms. 1551-55 ; Governor of >Tew South 
Wales. 1555-90: Lord Chamberlain, 1592-95; jure 
matris. one of the co-heiresses of Lord Wil- 
loughby D Eresby, he also is joint Hereditary Great 
Chamberlain. He married. July 15, 1575. the Hon 
Cecilia M Harbord. daughter of the fifth Lord 
Sufaeld. and by her has — Albert Edward. S.C.R... 
Viscount Wendover. born April 24. 1595 — sponsor. 
HM. the King; Marjorie C. ; born 1550 ; Alexandra 
A. bom 1551 — HM the Queen sponsor; 
Ruperta. born 1553; Judith S. M, born 1559; 
Victoria Alexandrina. born 1592 — HM Queen 
Victoria sponsor in person 

Arms of the Earls of Carrington : — Or, on a chevron 
cotised between 3 demi-griffins, sa., a mullet for 
difference. 

Crest : — An elephant s head erased or, eared gu., 
charred on the neck with 3 fleurs-de-lis, two and one, 



CABBINGTONS, CABINGTONS, ETC. 79 

az. Supporters. — Two griff, r.s, sa.. wings elevated or. 
the dexter charged with 3 fleurs-de-lis pale wise or, 

the sinister with 3 trefoils slipped palewise of the last. 

Motto : — Terras in fide. 

We now come to Samuel. :he nest brother of 
Robert. Baron Carrinston 1 1754-1534 . Ee was of 
Woodail Herts, and" B£P. He married Eliza 
Frances, daughter of Edmund Turner, a Lincolnshire 
squire 1 1756-1535'. and by her had I S:ohoa 1764- 
1544) = William Dick ens en :: 7\-'~g s "TTestin. and by 
him had William ■ 1504-1520 : Francis Henry = Cart- 
fine^ daughter of General Carey: Sophia : Caroline : 
Edmund = Emily, 'daughter of Lord Auckland. Bishop 
of Bath and Weils: Alary, laughter :: Francis 
Henry Dickenson. Esq. of King's Weston = 1575. The 
Hon. T. C Agar-Robartes. now Baron Robartes and 
Viscount Clifden. ;2 Frances Ann 1765-1562 = 
Claude G. Thornton, and left issue. .3 Mary = 
Thomas Daniell. and left issue. 4 Abel. INI. P. ::: 
Herts il755-1559 = 1 Tne Lady Mary Anne Mel- 
ville, daughter of the ninth Earl of Leven; (2) 
Frances A. Calvert, and by her had Bobert Han bury. 
M.P. for Middlesex: Abel. MP. ::: las: Herts = 
The Lady Susan Peiham. daughter of the Earl of 
Chichester, and had E.P.. z.~i'.~- Mary. Abel Henry. 
Mary = Charles Daniell. Robert. Elizabeth F 
Philip. Adelaide = John F. Sullivan. Albert. ~~:j 
= F. Pinney Sophia. 5 Samuel George 1759- 
1563; = Eugenia, daughter :■: Rev. Dr Caulneld. and 
by her had Samuei G.. MP. for Aylesbury Ire a. 
Chatheid = Harriet M. laughter of F. Pym. Fs and 
by her bad Herbert F.. Katherine Maud. Cecil L.. 
Ruthven F.. Ethel M . Rowland = Constance C L.. 
daughter of Lord Granville Somerset ana by her aaa 
Constance Eugenie. Granville R. : : Hcrace J. = 
Cecilia, daughter of George Bosanquet. Esq.; Eugenia 
Maria; Charlotte Eugenia. \o\ Caroline (1790-1516 



80 THE SMITH FAMILY 

= General Carey, and by him had Caroline (b. 1816), 
who became wife of Francis Dickenson of King's 
Weston (vide supra). (7) Lucy (1791-1820). (8) Anna 
Maria (1793-94). (9) Henry (b. 1794) = The Lady 
Lucy, daughter of the tenth Earl of Leven and 
Melville, and by her had Henry Abel (b. 1826) = 
Elizabeth, daughter of Francis Pym, M.P. (and had 
(1) Lucy Jane, (2) Elizabeth M., (3) Samuel Henry. 
(4) Marianne, (5) Alice M., (6) Constance H, (7) 
Francis Abel. Robert Melville, Lucy Jane, Mari- 
anne). (10) Margaret Jane (1796-97). (11) Barbara 
(1797-1361)= James Edward Gordon, RX., and had 
issue. (12) Edmund (1799-1805). (13) Charlotte (b. 
1300) = Hon. Alexander Leslie Melville, brother of 
the Earl of Leven, and had issue. 

We now come to George, next brother of the first 
Lord Carrington (1765-1336). He was of Selsdon, 
and MP. for MidhursL By Frances Maria, daughter 
of Sir John Mosley, Bart., he had (1) George Robert 
(b. 1753 = Jane, daughter of J. Maberly, MP., and 
by her had Ernald 5losley (b. 1839), Walter C. (b. 
1341) ). (2) Oswald (1794-1863) = Henrietta Mil- 
dred, daughter of Dr Hodgson, Dean of Carlisle (and 
by her had (1) Isabella M=Cadogan H Cadogan. 
and had issue ; (2) Oswald A = Rose S., daughter of 
A Vansittart, Esq., and had issue, Basil G O. ; (3) 
Eric Carrington = Mary, daughter of J. Maberly, 
MP., and by her had Gertrude M., Lindsay Eric, 
Virginia EL, Margaret R., Algernon F. E, Mildred 
F. ; (4) Laura Charlotte = Evan Maberly. RE. ; (5) 
Beilby ; (6) Frances Dora = the Earl of Strathmore ; 
(7) Maria Henrietta = Henry Dorrien Streatfield 
of Chiddingstone, and had issue; (8) Harry M.). 
(3) John Henry (b. 1795). (4) Thomas Charles ; 
(b. 1797). (5) Frances Mary (b. 1796) = Rev. Robert 
Mosley. and had issue. (6) Georgiana Eliza (b. 1801) 
= Rev. E S. P. Serocold, and had issue. (7) Edward 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 81 

Peploe = (1) Henrietta F., daughter of Charles 
Bailey, E.I.C.S., and by her had Mary Ann Bailey; 
(2) Harriet Chester, and by her had Emily F. = Archi- 
bald Murray ; Henrietta S. = Dr Kirby ; Arthur 
Chester; Isabella H. ; Louisa EL; Isabella M. (8) 
Arthur (b. 1804). (9) Emily (b. 1806) = Rev. C. 
Otway Mayne, rector of Midsomer Norton, and 
student of Christ Church, — issue. (10) Catherine 
(b. 1807) = Edward, twelfth son of Sir E. Wigram, 
Bart., and had issue. (11) Edmund of N Ferriby 
(b. 1809) = Hester, daughter of Judge Lushington, 
and had issue. (12) Mosley. (13) Sophia S. = Rev. 
W. P. Wigram, and had issue, with others, Ernest, 
Demy of Magdalen. (14) Alfred (b. 1815) = Mary, 
daughter of Vice-Chancellor Wigram. (15) Augusta 
Mary = Rev. Lewis Deedes, and had issue, with others, 
Rev. Cecil Deedes, Chaplain of Christ Church, and a 
daughter who married Bishop Saumarez-Smith, D.D. 
The last of the brothers of the first Lord Carring- 
ton was John (1767-1842), M.P. He married (1) 
Sarah, daughter of Thomas Boone, Esq., s.p. ; (2) a 
daughter of General Tucker, by whom he had (1) 
John Abel, M.P. (b. 1802) = Anne, daughter of Sir 
S. C. Jervoise, Bart., and by her had (1) Jervoise ; 
(2) Dudley R = Emma ML, daughter of E. Willes, 
Esq., of Astrop, and by her had Reginald, Ada M. ( 
Beatrice M. ; (3) Hugh Colin = Constance, daughter 
of H Adeane, Esq., of Babraham. (2) Martin Tucker, 
M.P. (b. 1803) = Louisa, daughter of Sir M. W. 
Ridley, and had issue (1) Martin Ridley = Emily C, 
daughter of the Hon. . . . Stuart, and had issue Martin 
Stuart ; (2) Elizabeth L. = Thomas H, son of Sir R. 
Newman, Bart., of Mamhead ; (3) Louisa M. = 
H. Daly- White, C.B. ; (4) Helen = Hon. Arthur 
Egerton, fourth son of the Earl of Ellesmere ; (5) 
Rosa ; (6) Francis N. ; (7) Gerard ; (8) Henry ; (9) 
Charles R ; (10) Minto ; (11) Mary. 



82 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Mr John Smith, M.P., married, thirdly, Emma, 
daughter of Egerton Leigh of the "West Hall, High 
Legh, Cheshire, and by her had Emma (b. 1812), 
Caroline (b. 1813) = General F. E. Gascoigne. 

Elizabeth, sister to Mr John Smith, M.P. = William 
Manning ; and another sister, Lucy, died unmarried. 

A more populous pedigree, and one more per- 
plexing to unravel — the record of Mr Augustus 
Smith differing from that of Burke — never taxed 
the long-suffering genealogist. Apart from the 
living Lord Carrington, who, as Governor of New 
South Wales, has played a part infinitely more im- 
portant than that of a Cabinet Minister, and apart 
also from the living Lord Pauncefote, a diplomatist 
whose tact approximates genius, the above catalogue 
teems with major and minor celebrities. 

Among their number I recall that personable and 
affable gentleman, Mr John Abel Smith, Liberal 
M.P. for Chichester. I had the pleasure, in the winter 
of 1858, of meeting him at the hospitable table of the 
late Mr Hervey of Bradwell Grove, my grandfather's 
trustee and life-long friend, whose wife, Lady Arabella, 
was great-aunt of the present Lord Rosebery. At 
that time reform was in the air, and the conversation 
turned on the ballot, to which Mr Hervey and the 
whole Tory party entertained a strong objection. To 
our amazement, in the midst of a heated discussion, 
the Whig, Mr John Abel Smith, remarked: "If you 
were to introduce the ballot (i.e. secret voting, vice 
the lobby) into the House of Commons, none but the 
most ultra- Tory measures would have a chance of 
passing." A few years later Disraeli capped this naif 
confession by styling the Liberal party " an organised 
hypocrisy." Certes, Mr John Abel Smith electrified 
my callow intelligence by his malapert honesty. 

The following particulars are extracted from the 
notice of this gentleman in the " Dictionary of National 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 83 

Biography" : John Abel Smith (1801-71), banker, son 
of John Smith, a member of the firm of which the 
first Lord Carrington was head. Educated at Christ's, 
Cambridge, B.A 1824, MA. 1827. M.P. for Mid- 
hurst 1830. M.P. for Chichester 1831-59, and again 
elected in 1863-68. A Liberal. Supported Lord 
Grey's Reform Bill, and the admission of Jews to 
Parliament. In 1869 introduced a Bill to limit the 
hours of closing. In 1827 married Anne, daughter of 
Sir J. Clarke Jervoise, Bart., widow of R. W. Grey 
ofBackworth. J. P. for Middlesex and Sussex. Died 
at Kippington, Kent. 

A contemporary of John Abel in the House of 
Commons was Augustus John Smith, author of 
" Stemmata Ferraria " (1804-72), son of John Smith 
of Ashlyns, Herts, by Mary Isabella, daughter of 
Augustus Pechell, Esq. He was born in Harley 
Street, and educated at Harrow and Christ Church, 
Oxford, — B.A. 1826. He contested Truro unsuc- 
cessfully in 1852, but was returned in 1857. A 
strong Liberal, he engaged a band of navvies to de- 
stroy the fences which Lord Brownlow had erected 
round Ashridge Common {vide Punch, March 24, 
1866, " A Lay of Modern England "). Lessee of The 
Scilly Isles, he proved a great benefactor to their 
inhabitants, and was succeeded at Tresco by his 
nephew, T. A Smith-Dorrien, Esq., "the semi-dis- 
guised," as he termed him. 

Of the Cropwell Smiths perhaps the first Lord 
Carrington occupies the highest place. Robert 
(1752-1838) was eldest surviving son of Abel 
Smith, by Mary, daughter of Thomas Bird of 
Barton, Warwickshire. He was baptised at St 
Peter's, Nottingham. His father had represented" 
Aldborough 1774, St Ives 1780, and St Germans 
1785. He was elected for Nottingham in 1779, and 
returned during the ensuing five Parliaments for his 



84 THE SMITH FAMILY 

native borough. He owed bis peerage to Mr Pitt, 
whom he is alleged to have financed ; and, if that be 
so, it may be affirmed that his was not the first, still 
less the last, instance where a commoner has been 
rewarded with a coronet for having rendered pecu- 
niary assistance to an existing or prospective Prime 
Minister. Unfortunately for him, his elevation was 
greeted with a chorus of ridicule — the banker of a 
century back inheriting the traditions of the scrivener 
and goldsmith of an earlier period, and being held in 
less reverence than has since been accorded the trade 
of money-dealing. George the Third was with diffi- 
culty induced to accord the Royal consent to his 
entering the House of Lords, and Mr Augustus 
Smith, who entertained no great love for the Upper 
House, quotes with gusto the following charade of a 
contemporary wit : 

" My first leads to triumph and fame ; 

My second brings joy or vexation ; 
My third — though it be but a name — 

Will govern the whole of the nation ; 
My whole is a title — but hush ! 

This charade will perchance be too clear, 
For it put the whole Court to the blush, 

When His Majesty made it appear (a peer)." 

Mr Augustus Smith's predecessors on the Liberal 
benches were especially outraged, the more so, perhaps, 
because the banker-baron, unlike other Smiths of this 
line, was a determined and enthusiastic Tory. He 
was fobbed off in the first instance with an Irish 
peerage, but the leverage of gold within a few months 
obtained him an English patent. From the title he 
assumed it seems tolerably certain that he believed 
in the link which Betham subsequently forged to 
connect the yeoman of Cropwell Boteler with the 
Cavalier and Crusader Caringtons ; but it was his son 
who eliminated the distinctive "r," and, in perfect 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 85 

good faith, restored the ancient Carington monuments 
in Ashby Folvile Church, having purchased the side 
chapel, which had been set apart as a mortuary for 
the real Caringtons. It is perhaps unnecessary to 
state that the present Earl has reverted to the tradi- 
tional family politics, and is a consistent supporter of 
the Liberal party. 

Although the link is missing, there seems a 
strong probability of William Smith, the Quaker of 
Besthorpe, Notts, who died in 1673, being of the 
Cropwell strain. He was imprisoned by Cromwell 
in 1658 for non-payment of tithes, and in 1661 was 
arrested, while preaching at "Worcester, for having 
refused the oath of allegiance. For this offence he 
lay in Nottingham gaol until 1665. He published 
several controversial books, and his second wife, 
Elizabeth Newton, was of Nottingham. Another 
Quaker, William Smith, of the same period, was of 
Sileby and Market Harborough. He too was a con- 
troversialist, and George Fox held meetings in his 
house at Sileby. Both these Quakers appear to have 
been indigenous to the Cropwell district. 

Carington — now Smith- Carington. 

[ Vide Visitations of Essex, 1612, 1634 ; Visitation of Norfolk, 1612 ; Visitation 
of Notts, 1569 ; Visitation of Warwick, 1619.] 

From the Comtes de Carinton in Normandy de- 
scended Hamo (temp. William I.), who gave his 
name to Carinton in Cheshire. It was probably his 
grandson, by name Sir Michael, who, after aliening 
to the Duttons the manor of Sale, joined Richard 
I. in the Crusades, became his standard-bearer, and 
died in the Holy Land. M.I. in St John's, Chester. 
His son William died 25 Henry III., leaving, with 
others, William, Bailiff of Dunham Massey = Agnes, 
daughter of William De Toft, and, dying in 1274, 
left issue — (1) Sir William, his heir; (2) Sir Edmond, 
killed at Bannockburn ; (3) Sir Philip ; and others. 



86 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Sir William, knighted at Falkirk by Edward I. = 
Anne, daughter of Sir Edmund Farnell, and by her 
had, with three sons and three daughters, Sir John 
De Carynton (d. 1359) = Sibilla, daughter of Alan 
De Rixton, and by her had, with others, Sir William, 
knighted by Edward III. at the battle of Sluys, 1340. 
He bore on a bend three lozenges, with for crest — out 
of a ducal coronet a unicorn's head. He married (1) 
Katherine, daughter of Sir William De Montacute, 
whose wife gave the meadow now known as Christ 
Church to the convent of St Frideswide at Oxford. 
M.I. Christ Church Cathedral. By her he had — (1) 
Sir Thomas, of whom anon ; (2) Michael, died in 
Spain, s.p. ; (3) Isabel = Sir Nicholas Farington ; (4) 
Catherine = Sir Thomas Wake ; (5) Eleanor = Sir John 
Curzon, and by him had William Curzon, Abbot of 
St Osyth, Essex, who, in 1404, befriended John 
Carington (vide infra). 

Sir William married (2) Matilda, daughter of Sir 
Peter Arderne of Alvanly, and by her had Edward, 
s.p. ; Sir George, Lord of Carington ; and others. 
He died in 1377, and was succeeded by his eldest 
son, Sir Thomas, knighted in Gascony by the Black 
Prince (d. 1383) = Margaret, daughter of Sir Robert 
De Poos, by whom he had (1) Sir Edmund, who, by 
Joanna, daughter of Sir John Ferrers, left no male 
issue ; (2) John (b. 1374). 

This latter gentleman, so the legend runs, was born, 
and also bred in Gascony by Sir N. Neville. Arrived at 
man's estate, he entered the service of Pichard II., and 
at the decease of his elder brother came to England. 
On Henry coming to the throne he fled the realm, 
and his uncle, Sir George, took possession of Caring- 
ton and the estates. In 1404 he changed his name 
to Smyth, and sought sanctuary at St Osyth's Abbey, 
where he found a patron in his kinsman, the Abbot 
Curzon. He must have been under attainder, for 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 87 

he never dared attempt to recover his rights, and 
continued to the end to disguise himself as Smyth, 
adopting a fresh coat of arms — viz. a cross between 
four peacocks (vide "Visitation of Essex"). He 
married (2) Millicent, daughter of Robert Laynham, 
and heiress of her grandfather, Lord Mayor Hende. 
By her he had (a) Thomas of Rivenhall = (l) . . . 
Hamond, and by her had Sir Thomas of Rivenhall ; 
= (2) Isabella, daughter of William Toft of Little 
Baddow, and by her had Sir Clement, who = Dorothy, 
sister of Queen Jane Seymour ; John, Serjeant-at- 
Law; Leonard of Shuldham. (b) Robert, who left 
issue, (c) Hugh of Cressing Temple. And others. 

Hugh Smyth of Cressing Temple (d. 1485) = Eliza- 
beth Smith of MorvilL Salop, and by her had Sir 
John Smyth, Remembrancer of the Exchequer, 1513, 
and Baron 1540 — will 1547. He married (1) Alice, 
daughter of Edward Woode, citizen of London, by 
whom he had (1) Edmund = Barbara, daughter of Sir 
John Hampden. Their daughter and heiress = Sir W. 
Paulet. (2) Thomas of Cressing Temple = (2) Mary, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Neville of Holt, whence the 
Nevilles of Holt. (3) Edward = Elizabeth, daughter 
of Eustace Fitzherbert, and had John of Dunmow. 
Sir John = (2) Agnes, daughter of John Harewell 
of Wootton Wawen, and by her had, with others, 
Francis, High Sheriff of Leicester and "Warwick, 1566 
(1522-1607), who = Mary, daughter of John Moreton 
of Ashby Folville, great -nephew of the Cardinal, 
who claimed to be twenty-second in descent from 
King Alfred, and by her had George (1541-1607) 
= Anne, daughter of Sir Thos. Giffard of Chilling- 
ton, and by her had, with others, Sir Francis* of 
Ashby Folville and Wootton Wawen (1570-1629) = 
Anne, daughter of Sir Thos. Markham of Allerton, 

* For the descent of this line, as given by.the Benedictines of Ghent, 
refer to pedigree of 3mytb.es, Barts. of Acton Burnett, page 92. 



88 THE SMITH FAMILY 

leaving issue — (1) Sir Charles, created Lord Carington 
13th October, and Viscount 4th November 1643, mur- 
dered at Pontoise, 1665. He married Elizabeth,* 
daughter of Sir John Caryll of S. Harting, Sussex, 
by whom, with six daughters, he bad Francis, second 
Viscount = (1) Juliana, daughter of Sir T. Walmesley, 
and (2) Anne, daughter of William Herbert, Marquis 
of Powis — by neither wife did he leave surviving 
issue ; Caryll = Grace, daughter of H. Turville, but 
had no male issue ; John, a Roman priest ; Charles, 
third Viscount (1635-1706) = Frances, daughter of Sir 
J. Pate, Bart., s.p. (2) Thomas of Broxton = Mary, 
daughter of Sir P. Blakiston, and left issue, three 
sons — all s.p. — and two daughters. (3) Francis, 
whose son, Francis of Acton, Salop = Audrey Att- 
wood, and by her had Francis = Catherine Southcote, 
and by her had Francis = Mary Englefield, and others. 
(4) Major -General Sir John, knighted at Edgehill 
for rescuing the Royal Standard, 1642. Killed at 
Alresford, March 30, 1644; buried at Christ Church 
Cathedral. M.I. 

We now revert to the issue of George of Ashby 
Folville (1541-1607). 

The third son, younger brother -of Sir Francis, was 
George of Queeniborough. Leicester (1577-1642), who 
by Mary, daughter of Edward Holte of Aston, War- 
wick, had (1) George of Queeniborough (1614-53) = 
(1) Mary, daughter of Anthony Dormer, son of the 
first Lord Dormer, and by her had issue. He = (2) 

* This lady, during the Protectorate, resided with her children at Led well 
Park, Oxon, her husband, Sir Charles, Viscount Carington, being abroad. 
The Calendar for compounding, under date August 1650, narrates thus : — 
"The Lady Elizabeth, wife, begs allowance of her fifths of her husband's 
sequestered estates in the counties of Warwick, Leicester, Oxford, Salop, and 
Lincoln. Her son Francis forwards the petition. Carryl, Charles, Ann, 
Mary, Lucy — children of Sir Charles Smyth — beg discharge of lands in 
Leicestershire, settled on Sir John Ford of Harting (Sir John being a relative 
of the Carryls). Date 1652. Granted to the children under age, and to the 
others on taking the oath of abjuration." Charles, second son of Francis 
Smith, Esq. of Acton, Salop, was buried at Kidlington, ;et. 9 years, 1722, M.I. 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 89 

Anne, daughter of William Byerly of Belgrave, bnt 
by her had no issue. 

(2) Edmund of Queeniborough (1615-94) = Mary 
Tipping, and had issue Francis, and others. 

Sir Thomas Smith, the fourth son of George of 
Queeniborough = (1) Jane, daughter of S. Erdes- 
wick ; (2) Mary, daughter of M. Powtrell, and dying 
1646, left issue : (1) George of Ashby Folville = 1659, 
Dorothy, daughter of Henry Turville of Aston Flam- 
vill ; (2) Thomas married Hannah Payne ; (3) Robert 
of Als worth, Notts. = (1) Sarah, daughter of William 
Smith of Strelley ; (2) Naomi, daughter of Thos. Blood, 
Esq., by whom he had a son, William of Plumtree (1699- 
1795) = Hannah, daughter of William Cox of Beeston, 
leaving, with others, Richard of Beeston (1748-1810) 
= Phcebe, daughter of Geo. Rhodes of Hucknell 
Torkard, and by her, with others, had Richard of 
Beeston (1718-1848) = Anne, daughter of B. Hanbury 
of Bridgnorth, and by her had Richard, who resumed 
the name of Carington in addition to Smith, and 
dying in 1901 was buried at Ashby Folville, being 
Lord of the Manor. He married (1) Elizabeth, 
daughter of Thos. Stroud of Clewer, and by her had 
(1) Hubert H. (b. 1851) = Elizabeth P., daughter of 
J. Stallard, Esq., of Worcester, and has issue ; (2) 
Richard of Gt. Malvern (b. 1852), Barrister-at-law of 
the Inner Temple = Alice S., daughter of E. Conder, 
Esq., of Colwall, and has issue ; (3) Elizabeth A. = 
Lieut. -CoL A H Holme; (4) Emily S. = G. E Giles, 
Esq., of Bonchurch, who died 1888, leaving issue. 
Mr Smith Carington, who was High Sheriff of 
Leicestershire, 1900 = (2) Patty, third daughter of 
Edward Leader- Williams, Esq., of Diglis, Worcester. 
She died s.p. 1894. 

Arms : — Quarterly 1 and 4 sa. on a bend arg. 3 
lozenges of the first ; 2 and 3 arg. a cross gu. between 
4 peacocks proper. Crests : — (1) Out of a ducal 



90 THE SMITH FAMILY 

coronet or, a unicorn's head arg., armed and crined or. 
(2) A peacock's head erased proper ducally gorged or. 
Motto : — Fides semper firma. 

It will be noticed in the above pedigree that the 
link with the old Carington stock occurs thus : 

George of Ashby FolviUe. 



Sir Francis = Markham. Sir Thomas = Jane Erdeswick. 

| 4th son. 

Sir Charles, Viscount Carington. 



Robert of Alsworth = ('2) Naomi Blood. 
3rd son. 



I 
William of Plumtree = Cox- 
It is a coincidence, and one with which genealogists 
are continually confronted, that in the registers of the 
same parish are found names identical, yet not of the 
same blood. Thus the registers of Plumtree, Notts, 
are full of the Cropwell Boteler yeomen Smiths. 
Nevertheless, some years after their departure from 
the parish, a gentleman bearing their name, though 
really Carington, becomes a resident landowner. It 
was probably this fact that caused Mr Augustus Smith 
to reject the Smith- Carington pedigree, assuming ap- 
parently that every Smith of Plumtree must be allied 
to Cropwell. Quod non constat. 

By the courtesy of Father Morrall of Downside, 
O.S.B., I have before me a pedigree of the Caringtons 
differing somewhat from the above, which, however, I 
take it, is the revised account. Briefly, this pedigree, 
compiled by Mr Fletcher in his Leicestershire Pedi- 
grees and Royal Descents, runs thus : (1) Hamo, (2) 
William (living 1118), (3) Sir Jordan, (4) Thomas 
(living in 1220), (5) Sir Mychell (standard-bearer to 
Richard Cceur-de-Lion in 1191), (6) William, (7) Sir 
William, (8) Sir John, (9) Sir William (knighted at 
Sluys, 1340), (10) Sir Thomas (knighted by the Black 
Prince), (11) John, who assumed the name of Smyth. 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 91 

The royal descent, through the Moretons, runs thus : 

Alfred the Great = Els wit ha Muchel of Mercia. 



Edward the Elder =Elgiva Sigeline. 
Edmund = Elgiva. 



Edgar = Elfritha Ordager. 

Ethelred, the Unready = Elgiva Thorold. 

I 



Uchtred = Elgiva, dan. of King Ethelred. 

Algitha, dau. of Uchtred=Maldred Fitzerinan. 



Cospatric Fitzerinan, Earl of Northumberland = ... 

Dolphin =Adele Flambert. 
I 
Maldred Fitzdolphin= . 



Robert Fitzmaldred = Isabel, dau. of Sir Geoffrey NevilL 

I 

Geoffrey, assumed the name of Nevill, 1257 = Mabel, dau. of Thomas De Monte 

Begonis. 

John Nevill of Holt = Maud Murdook. 



Jollan, a Justice Itinerant = Amphillis Rolleston. 



Sir Thoa. Nevill of Holt = Cecilie, dau. of Sir Guy Blanchminster, Lord of Scilly. 
Sir William Nevill = Elizabeth, dau. of Sir Thos. Fencotes. 



Isabel Nevill = Sir Robert Woodford of Ashby Folville. 

Thomas Woodford = Alice, dau. of Sir L. Berkeley. 

I 



Ralph Woodford = Elizabeth, dau. of William Villiers of Brooksby. 

William Woodford = Anne, dau. of Simon Norwich of Bringhurst. 
I 
Margaret Woodford = Thomaa Moreton 
(ob. 1507). (ob. 1516). 



John Moreton (1499-1521) = Elena, dau. of Attorney-Gen. Roper. 



Mary Moreton = Francis Smyth of Ashby Folville and Wootton Wawen. 



92 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 93 

This is one of the ancient Roman Catholic families 
of England, and through their alliance with the Hol- 
fords, they hold the seat of the yet more ancient 
house of Carington, also Roman Catholic. They were 
largely instrumental in erecting the beautiful Roman 
Catholic seminary at Ushaw, in the county of Dur- 
ham. The elder co-heiress of the ancient house of 
Lee of Langley found a distinguished representative 
in Assheton Smith of Vaynol and Tedworth (vide that 
line). 

From a pedigree of Smyth, Lord Carington, in a 
work entituled "The Benedictines of Ghent," pub- 
lished at Oulton, Staffs., the following shows the link 
connecting the two great Roman houses of Wootton 
Wawen and Acton Burnell — e.g. 



Sir Francis Smyth = Anne Markham. 
of Queningtoo 
(ob. 1629) 
(Query, Queeni- 
borough ?) 



I I 

Charles, Lord = Eliza Carry 1. Others. 

Carington 
(assassinated | 
1665). 

| . . . . 

Francis, Lord Car- Charles, Ld. C, Carryl=... Frances, Abbess Others, 
ington, s. p. s. p. of Ghent. 



I 
Grace Carington=Sir R. Smyths of Acton B., 

whose brother, Sir John 
S., = Constantia Blount, 
and was father of Sir Ed- 
ward Smythe. 

Constantia Smith = (2) Peter Holford of 
(or Smythe) I Wootton Wawcn. 

Catherine Holford (ob. 
1S31) = Sir Edward 
Smythe. 

Arms or Smyth : — Sa. 3 rates arg. 

Crest : — A bucks head erased gorged with a ehaplel of laurel.— all ppr. 

Motto : — Regi semper jidelis. 



94 THE SMITH FAMILY 

The devolution of the Wootton Wawen estate is 
by no means clear. Burke makes Sir Richard, the 
second Bart., marry Grace, daughter of Carryl Smith 
(or more exactly Smyth), and die s.p. 

The name Constantia evidently came into the 
family from the Blounts of Sodington, but, according 
to the published pedigree, • Constantia, daughter of 
Sir John = Marmaduke Langdale, and not Peter Hol- 
ford. The parentage therefore of Constantia, who 
married Mr Holford, remains a mystery. Probably 
the Holfords had purchased Wootton Wawen, but if 
the Smythes and Smyths (Carington) are to be linked 
in blood, this Constantia must be identified. In 
treating Carryl Carington as Smyth, or Smith, Burke 
overlooks the fact that the first Lord C. dropped his 
pseudo-patronymic and reverted to the ancestral Car- 
ington. Carryl therefore was Carington, and by no 
means Smyth, still less Smith. Vide footnote, p. 87. 

The Smythes possess the following Royal descent : — 

Henry IIL = Eleanor Berenger. 



Edward I. = Eleanor of Castile. 

I 

I 
Elizth. Plantagenet= Humphry, E. of Hereford. 



Lady Eleanor de Bohun = James, 1st E. of Ormonde. 

I 

James, 2nd E. of Ormonde = Elizabeth, dan. of Sir John Darcy. 



James, 3rd E. of Ormonde = Anne, dau. of John, 5th Lord Welles, by Margaret, 
dau. of John, Lord Mowbray, by Lady Elizth. 
Segrave, and granddau. of Lady Joan Planta- 
genet, granddau. of Edmund Plan tagenet, brother 
of Henry IIL* 



James, 4th E. of Ormonde = Joan, dau. of Gerald, E. of Kildare. 



Lady Elizabeth Butler = John, Earl of Shrewsbury. 



CARRINGTONS, CARINGTONS, ETC. 95 



Lady Anne Talbot = Sir Henry Vernon of Tong. 



Elizabeth Vernon=Sir Robert Corbet. 



Jane Corbet = Thomas Lee of Langley. 



I 
Richard Lee of Langley = Eleanor Wrottesley. 



Humphry Lee = Margaret, dau. of Richard tCorbett. 

Sir Richard Lee = Elizabeth, dan. of Sir Edward Allen. 

I 

Mary Lee = Sir Edward Smythe. 



* Inasmuch aa Lady Elizth. Segrave was granddanghter of Thomas Planta- 
genet, E. of Norfolk, son of Edw. L; and Lord Welles was descended, 
through Bardolph, Damory, and De Clare from Joan of Acre, daughter of 
Edw. L, there is a quadruple descent through the Corbet s from Henry III. 
for the Smythe family. Vide "A Record of the Redes," p. 91. 

t Another account calls him Reginald, Justice of the King's Bench. 



CHAPTER VI 

ENGLISH PEDIGREES 
ASSHETON SMITH. 

.. Smith of S. Ted worth, Hants. 



Right Hon. John (1658-1723), 
Speaker of the House of Com- 
mons and Chancellor, of the 
Exchequer. 



I 
John. 



A dau. = Assheton of 
Ashley Hall. 



Thomas Assheton. 



Mary = Hon. JR. S. Herbert, son 
of the 8th E. of Pem- 
broke. 



Thomas Assheton = Elizabeth, d. of Watkin 
Wynn, of Voelas. 



Thomas, M. P. = Matilda, 
s.p. d. of W. 

Webber, 
of Brin- 
field. 



I I 

William, R.N., Jane, 
died at Trafal- 
gar. 



Elizabeth = W. B. Astley, 
Esq., brother 
of Sir John 
Astley. 



Mary = R. G. Duff, Esq. 



George W. Duff 
Assheton Smith, 
of Vavnol 
(b. 1848). 



Charles G. = Hon. M. F. , Henry, 
(b. 1851). d. of 2d Lord 
Vivian. 



Louisa A. = Hon. H. C. 
son of .•.> 
Charles, 
2nd Lord 
Vivian. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 97 

SMITH OF LONG ASHTON, Bast.— later SMYTH. 

[Vide Visitation of Somerset, 1623, and Visitation of Cheshire, 1580.] 
From John Smith, of Aylberton, Glos. temp. Hen. VI. came : — 



Hugh = Beekhaw. Matthew = Jane Tycher. 



Elizabeth = Wm. Morgan, of Llanbaman, 
Abbey, Mon. 



Sir Hngh of Long = Elizabeth, dau. of Sir Thos. Gorges, and sister of 
Ashton. Lord Gorges. 

Thomas = Florence, dau. of Helen=Sir F. Rogers. Mary = Sir Thos. Smith 
| John, Lord of Halkerton. 

Poulett. 

Sir Hugh, created Bart. 1661 = Elizabeth, dau. of John Ashbumham. 



Sir John = a dau. of Sir Samuel Astry of Henbury, Glos. 

I _____ 

Sir John=... Pym, of Hugh. Arabella = Ewd. Gore Florence = (1) Pigott, 

Oxford. (whence = (2) Sir Jar - 

the Gore I rit Smyth, 

Langtons). Bart., Si. P. 

i " i 

Sir John Hugh Smyth, 2d Bart. =(1757) Eliz'th, Thomas=Jane, dau. of 
s. p. dau. of H. I Joseph Whit- 

Woolnough. church. 

Sir Hugh, = Margt., dau. of Sir John, 4th Florence = (1799) John Upton. 
3rd Bart. Bishop Wilson, Bart., sp. took the 

of Bristol. name of 

Smyth. 



Thos. Upton=(1329) Eliza, dau. of CoL Way, of Denham Place. 



Thds. Sir J. H. Greville Smyth, Eliza J. Florence = Clement Coetrell 

(1330-48). created Bart. 1859. Dormer, of 

Rousham. 

Asms:— Oh. on chevron ar>j. between 3 cinque/oils of the 2nd, S leopards' fact m. 
C-bw—A griffin' 3 head erased <ju. gorged with a collar gemel, beaked and 

eared or. 
Motto -.—Qui Capit Capitur. 



95 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMTH OF ISLET70ETH, Babts. 

1 Mary Alien. = Alderman James Smith =1 21 Sarah, dan. of 
I of London, and also of i Kobe. Cotton of W. 
! Hammersmith, where | Bergholt. 
I are 1-i.ls to his de 
' scendants. 



. 1', Anne. dan. of = Sir John. Knight. = i2 v Jane, dan. of Robert Deane. 
Wm. Wase of I Alderman and I 
Datchet. I Sheriff of the 

I Cirr. 



James, 
s.n. 



Sir John, created 3art. 1 694. = Mary Erie*. 
Gentleman of the Privy I 
Chamber to K-nf* William 
ind Queen Anne. 

Sir John. 
ob. 1T60. 



Charles = Anne, dan of W. 
Williamson. Ser- 
jeant-at-Arms. 



Anne=Leeh Masters. 



Rebecca = Orchard. 



Elirth.=rL Hawley 
2 others. 



ASMS: — Quarterly. 1 and i. A— a lion rampant or on a chief org. a mulltl 
raiei btrwten S lorteatLX. 2 and 3. Gu., 5 chtvronels tcuAm a 
Oor&'jrt org. 



SMITH OF EDMO>T>THORPE A>TD WTTHCOTE. oe 
W 1THC0CK, Baets. 

[Vide Visitation of Leicester. 1624 ; Visitation of London, 1568 : 
and Visitation of Xorthants, 1618-] 

The name of this House was Heriz or Hams, and one tradition links them 
to the ardent C»erdlev ztoct. whence the Smiths of Hough, of Oxford, etc 
W : i',-arn Hem. lemp. Hemy vu... assumed the name of Smith, and hmi a 
grant of arms 1*99. He aimed Catharine Ashby. His son was John Smith 
iob. 1546 1 of Wirhcote, whose elder son by Dorothy Cave, Roger, had a 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



99 



grant of crest in 1568,* and married Frances, dau. of Sir T. Griifin ; and 
whose fourth son, Erasmus, = (2dly) Margery, 3ister of Lord Burleigh of 
Husbands Bosworth, and widow of Roger Care. 

(Temp. Eliz.) ... Smith=lstly, ... Bydd, or Baiard. 



(1) Jane, dau. of = Sir Roger, =(2) Anne Goodman. 
Sir Edmund I knighted 

Heron. 1635. 



Henry (silver-tongue) 
(1550-91). 



Edward = Elizabeth, dau. of 
ob. vit. | Sir Ed. Heron. 

patr. 

Sir Edward, = (1) Constantia, dau. of Sir Win. 
created Bart. I Spencer of Yarnton. 

1661. (ob. 
170.7.) 

Sir Edward, = Olivia, dau. of Thomas Pepys 
2d Bart., of Merton Abbey. 

s.p. 



Alderman = Marr, dau. 



of Lord 
Coleraine. 




Roger = Anna, dau. 
| of Thos. 
Cotton. 



Anne = Sir 
John Nor- 
wich. 



Mary = Sir 
We Dud- 
ley, Bart. 



Roger of 
Frolesworth. 

I 

Edward, 

M.P. for 

Leicestershire. 



Sir John (1657-1726), 
a Judge of the Com- 
mon Pleas. 



Hugh = Dorothy, dau. of Dacres Barrett Lennard 
(ob. I of Belhouse. 

1745). I 



Lucy = James Lord Strange, eldest son 
or the Earl of Derby. iCb. 1747.) 



Dorothy = Hon. John Barry 
'whence Smith - Barry of 
Fota and Marbury Hall). 

Henrv Smith, the Regicide (1620-68), has been assigned to the Withcote 
stock. I can only conjecture, from the circumstance of his being described n= 
"the last owner of Withcote," that he was a grandson of Roger, the elder 
brother of Erasmus (1), who mamed Lord Burleigh's 3ister. The Regicide 
seems to have been regarded as a dupe or fool, and to have been ignored by his 
kinsmen of Edmondthorpe. Vidt Chapter on "Celebrities of the Name. ' 



* The original grant of crest is in the possession of Mr John J. Smyth of 
Rathcoursey, who claims descen» from Roger's next brother, Francis. [ Vidt 
Visitation of Leicester, 1624.] 



100 THE SMITH FAMILY 

This line has a special interest in having given not 
only the blood but the name also of Smith to subse- 
quent Earls of Derby. The fourteenth Earl, Prime 
Minister, and Chancellor of the University of Oxford, 
had already dropped the " Smith " from his patro- 
nymic, but notwithstanding this, his political oppon- 
ents in the University, by way of ridiculing his 
pretensions, utilised the bidding prayer as a vehicle 
for satire. The author has heard from the pulpit of 
St Mary's, the University Church, the words, "Ye 
shall pray for Edward Geoffrey Smith, our honoured 
Lord and Chancellor." Needless to add, the great 
scholar, orator, and leader of the Tory party treated 
this specimen of mendacious malice with the contempt 
it deserved.* 

Arms of Smith of Edmondthorpe and Withcote, 
Barts. : — Gu., on a chevron or between 3 bezants as 
many crosses patee fitchee sa. 



SMYTH OF REDCLIFFE, Babts. 

Sir William Smyth, =(1) Margaret, dau. of Sir Alexander Denton, 
created a Baronet = (2) A dau. of Sir N. Hobart, Master in Chancery. 
1661, -was M.P. in I 
the Long Parlia- ! 
ment for Bucks., I 
and a firm Rovalist. 



I I 

William, Sir Thomas, 

ob. 3. p., 2nd Bart., 

vit. patr. ob. s.p. 1732. 



* Mr Hugh Smith, who died in 1745, by the terms of his will, compelled 
both his sons-in-law — viz. The Hon. John Barry, son of Lord Barrymore, and 
Lord Strange, heir to the Earldom of Derby — to assume the name of Smith. 
The Stanleys, as already appears, shed that suffix after two generations, but 
the Smith-Barrys have retained it to the present day, as believers in the star 
of ^mith would allege, with admirable discretion, the name of Smith giving a 
guarantee of good fortune. — 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 101 



THE NON-JTJEOR SMITHS 



Matthew (1589-1640), annotator of Littleton's = 
Tenures, Barrister of the M. Temple, author 
of " The Country Squire," a ballad opera, and 
of "Masquerade du ciel,'' a strong Royalist 
and champion of the Royal Prerogative. 



John of Knaresborough, fought under William R. of = (1657) Elizth., 

Prince Rupert at Marston Moor, ex Lowther. I dau. of Giles 

parte Regit. I Wetherall ot 

. I Stockton. 



John (1659-1715), = Marv, dau. of Wm. Cooper Joseph, Fellow and Provost 

Preb. of Durham I of Scarborough, whose sister of Queen ! 3 College, Oxford 

and R. of Gates- married Hilkiah Bedford, (1670-1750). [See his pedi- 

head, D.D., St the Non-juror Bishop. gree, infra.] 
John's College, 
Cambridge. 



George (1693-1753), =Christian, dau. of Bishop Hilkiah Bedford, 
Non-juror Bishop I Non-juror (1702-81). 

of Durham. 



John,M.D.,of Burn Hall, =(1750) dau. of Nich. Shuttleworth 
Durham (ob. 1752). of Elvet, in Durham. 



George of Piercefield, Mon. = Juliet, dau. of Richd. Mott of Carleton, Suff. 



Sir Charles Felix. Elizth. (1776-1S06). 

\~ i i I 

Postumus = Dau. of Sir George William, M.D., George, Chaplain- 6 other 

of Old Wheler of Charing, of Leeds (ob. General (ob. 1725). sons. 

Burn Hall 1729). 
(ob. 1725). 

For this pedigree vide Lathbury's "History of Non-jurors" and the 
archives of Queen's College, Oxford. The Rev. Thomas Smith, one of the 
ejected Fellows of Magdalen, 1688, and R. of Standlake (1638-1710), may 
have been of this family. Although reinstated to his fellowship of Magdalen, 
he became a Non-juror, and in 1692, for refusing to take the oath, was de- 
prived. He became a tutor in the family of John Cotton, and died in the 
house of Bishop Hilkiah Bedford. It should be added that he was Vice- 
President of Magdalen in 1683, and Bursar in 1686. He had previously, i.e. 
in 1658, served as chaplain to Sir D. Harvey, Ambassador to the Porte. He 
graduated in 1661 from Queen's College. 



102 



THE SMITH FAMILY 






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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



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104 THE SMITH FAMILY 

The crest, so Betham affirms, was assumed by Sir 
Thomas Smijth, Secretary of State to King Edward 
VI. and to Queen Elizabeth, to commemorate his 
good fortune in escaping vivi-cremation under the 
regime of Queen Mary and Bishop Bonner. Prior 
to that date the family crest was an eagle with an 
ostrich feather in its claws, suggestive of the De 
Clarendon descent. It would appear, according to 
Grazebrook, that the Secretary of State spelt his 
name " Smith," or more probably, according to the 
fashion of the period, Smyth. An Elizabethan con- 
ceit caused the two upper strokes of the " y " to be 
dotted, thereby metamorphosing Smyth into Smijth. 
The spelling may be an affectation, but it is one 
consecrated by the usage of over three centuries. If 
the family would escape the small witticisms of the 
Philistine, it might with propriety revert to the more 
ancient and less eccentric patronymic, De Clarendon. 



SMITH OF GREAT FENTON 

[Vide Visitation of Cheshire, 1580 ; Visitation of Oxford, 1624.] 

Ab^s : — Gu., two bars wavy erm. on a chief or a demilion rampant issuant sa. 

armed and languid gu. 
<rest : — An ostrich, in the beak a horseshoe proper. 

The Right Rev. William Smith, D.D., Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 
consecrated 1493, is stated by Burke (" Landed Gentry") to have had two sons. 
Unless, as is practically impossible, these sons were illegitimate, the statement 
carries error on the face of it. These alleged sons, Edmund and John, were 
apparently heirs to the Bishop's estate, and either nephews or cousins. From 
Edmund, by his wife Catherine, dau. of Sir W. Brereton, came Sir Thomas Smith 
of Chester, father of Sir Lawrence Smith of Hough. The younger brother 
John had a son William, whose grandson John in 1614 obtained a confirma- 
tion of arms from St George Norroy, King-at-Arms. By Alice, dau. of H. 
Weston of Eyle in Madeley, he had 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 105 

Thomas = Dorothy, dau. of William Yonge, Esq., 
(b. 1584). I of Keynton. 

Thomas (ob. 1 694) = Elizabeth Gregson, s. p. Samuel = . . . 

I 

i I I 1 

Samuel of = (1696) Mary James Jeremiah. Sarah. Elizabeth = Joseph Wood. 
Hanley. I of Chester. 

Thomas (ob. 1729) = heiress of Charles Nicholls, Esq., of Gt. Fenton. 

I 

(l)Marg 

sister of 

1st Earl St (ob. 1792). I Jervis, Esq., of 

Vincent, 3. p. Darlaston. 



rgaret, = Jeremiah, High = (2) Elizabeth, Thomas. Sarah. Margaret, 
of the Sheriff of Stalls. I dau. of J. 



John, High Sheriff of = Elizabeth, dau. of Grace = Rev. W. Greenwood 

Staffs., 1816 (ob. 1840). I John Turner, Esq. of Bath. 

Charles John = (1829) Frances H, dau. of William H Rev. F. J., Pre- 

(1804-74). I J. Atkinson, Esq., of (1806-23). bendarv of Wells 

Maple Hayes. (1808-84). 



Charles William = (1877) Alice E., Constance Ellen = (1872) Rev. G. A. 



Jervis. 



dau. of Rev. E. Elizabeth. Festing.V. of 

Baskerville Mynors. Clifton, Derby. 



Reginald Baskerville (b. 1880). Beatrice F. G. 

SMITH OF NOTTINGHAM AND OF MANSFIELD, 
CO. NOTTS, ETC. 

Asms of Hortou-Smith and Lumley-Smith :— Arg., 2 chevronels invccted 
between 2 demi-gryphons couped respecting each other in chief, and as 
many battle-axes in saltire in base, ail sa. Mantling : — Sa. and arg. 

Crest : — On a wreath of the colours, in front of a mount vert, thereon a grey- 
hound couchant ppr., two battle-axes in saltire or. 

Motto : — Pre't a tressaillir. 

From John Smith the youuger of Cropwell Boteler, in the parish of Titheby, 
co. Notts (b. 1641, and baptised 2Sth March 1641 at Titheby aforesaid), vide 
supra, p. 70, descended apparently Richard Smith (1729-1825),* lace-manufac- 
turer of Nottingham, who acquired considerable estate in Mansfield, where, 
after a long and prosperous career, he was buried on the 7th Jan. 1825, at 
the age of 95. Will and codicU proved, April 5, 1825, in the Peculiar Court 
of the manor of Mansfield. This gentleman is stated to have been married 
twice. He left issue : — 

The Registers of St Mary's, Nottingham, contain the following entries : — 
July 20, 1724 :— John Smith and Sarah Stoaks married, both of this parish, 
by banns. 
January 3, 1727 :— Richard, son of John Smith and Sarah his wife, baptised. 



106 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



Richard (1771-1839), of Nottingham and Mansfield, co. John of Mails- 
Notts, of the City of London, and of Stoke Newington.co. field (ob. 1838, 
Middlesex, Merchant = ( 1794) Sarah, only child of Joseph aet. 74) = Ann nee 
Horton of Leicester and Nottingham, Merchant (descend- ... (ob. 1838, 
ant of the Hortons of Mowslev, co. Leicester), by his first st. 84). 
wife, TTa""-^ nee Heritage (ob. 1832, st. 63). 



Richard (1798-1358),: 
of the City of Lon- 
don, of Guildford 
Street, W.C., and of 
Littlehampton, co. 
Sussex, Merchant. 



(1828) Elizabeth, sister 
of William Golden Lum- 
lev, Q.C., LL.M., and 
Fellow of Trin. HaU, 
Camb., dan. of William 
Lumley of the City of 
London, Architect and 
Surveyor, and grand-Jau. 
of Edward Lumley of 
Gt. Dalby, co. Leicester, 
scion of the Family of 
Lumley whence the 
Lumleys, Earls of Scar- 
borough (1797-1884). 



Frederick Henry =. 

(1805-18) (1813-42) 

s.p. a. p. 



Richard 
Hortok-Smtth 
(b. 1S31), K.C., 
M.A., Fellow 
of St Johns, 
Camb., Bencher, 
Senior Trustee, 
and (1902) Mas- 
ter of Library, 
of Lincoln's 
Inn, etc., etc. 



(1S64) Maxilla {nee 
Baily), direct de- 
scendant of the 
illustrious James 
Graham, 5th Earl 
and 1st Marquis 
of Montrose (in the 
Peerage of Scotland), 
and dau. of John 
Baily, Q.C., M.A., 
Fellow of St John's, 
Camb. , Bencher of 
Lincoln's Inn, and 
Counsel to Univ. of 
Cambridge (b. 1838). 



Lumley - Smith 
(b. 1834), K.C., 
M.A., Fellow of 
Trin. Hall, 
Camb., Bencher 
of the Inner 
Temple, Judge of 
City of London 
Court, and some- 
time Judge of 
Westminster 
County Court, 
etc., etc. 



(1874) Jessie 
Croll, dau. and 
co-h. of Sir 
Thomas Gab- 
riel, Bart. 
(1851-79) [vide 
G. W. Mar- 
shall's Family 
of Comber- 
bach, 1866]. 



Percival (b. 1867), F.R.C.P., Lionel (b. 1S71), Raymond John(1873- 
M.A., M.D., and Fellow of St M.A.. Fellow and 99), M.A., M.B., 
John's, Camb., etc. =(1895) Lucy late M'MahonLaw and Scholar of I 
Josephine Hartley, dau. of Lieut.- Student of St 
CoL Joseph Hartley, LL.D., and John's, Camb., 

Barrister of Lin 

coin's Inn. Hon. 

V.-P. Navy 

League, etc. 



Fellow - Commoner of St John's, 
Camb.. J. P. co. Kent. J. P. aDd 
D.L. West Riding, co. York. 



John's, Camb.. Univ. 
Scholarof St Thomas' 
Hospital, London, 
etc. ; sj). The Ray- 
mond Horton-Smith 
Prize in the Univ. of 
Camb. , founded in his 
memory, 1900. 



Percival Hubert Graham Audrev Gwendolen 
(b. 1896). (b. 1900). 

This family, after having been founded in manufacture and carried forward 
by commerce, has further achieved success, as well in the University of Cam- 
bridge, as also in the professions of Law and of Medicine. That the 3ame 
family should have won four fellowships, a scholarship, and four university- 
prizes within little more than a quarter of a century will surely find but few 
parallels in either university. It recalls the triumphs of the Palmers, Fabers, 
and Wilberforces at Oxford — in which university, if at the same epoch, the 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



107 



Charles =. 



Sarah (ob. =(1787) John Barlow of Mans- 
1338,ast.74). I field (ob. 1836, at. 70). 



Mary = 
... Beck. 



Richard. John. 



Charles 
Smith. 



i 
William. 



I | 

Sarah =(1816) Matthew Ann= 
(1794- Surteesof Lon- (1796- I 
1819). don, and for- 1879). 
merly of New- 
castle- on -Tyne, 
nephewof Eliza- 
beth, Countess 
of Eldon (1790- 
1825). 
Mary Augusta 
-(1817-98). 
s.p. 



(1826) Nicho- Frances = (1837) George Eliza 
las Mason (1800- I Davenport, (1809- 
(ob. 1859, 45). (ob. 1869, 10). 

at. 67). | oet. 61). 

Edward Gershom (1838-74), M.A., 
Trin. Coll., Camb., and M.P. for St 
Ires, co. Cornwall = (1863) Louisa 
ne'e Oxenford (1837-75). 
I 

I I I 

Vivian Edward Frances Emily Ellen Marie 
(b. 1370). (1864-79). (ob. 1875). 



John Nicholas, Solicitor ( 1828-84) 
left issue : — Barry Willicombe (b. 
1868), Solicitor ; and others. 



; Francis, F.R.C.S., Hon. Fellow Mary Ann 

, of King's ColL, London, etc. ; (b. 1827) ; 

married, but ob. s.p. (1837-86). andothers. 



Hubert 
Barlow 
(1837-39). 



Alice Mary (1839-84), = (1867) Fredk. Meadows- 



Assoc. Philh. Soc. 
distinguished musician 
and composer [aide 
Diet. Nat. Biog., vol. 
Ivi, 1900, pp. 31 f.]. 



Theresa 
Winifred 
(1841-93) 
s.p. 



I 

Alice Hilda 

(b. 1869). 



Thomas Gabriel (b. 
1879), Etonand Trin. 
ColL, Camb., Lieut. 
21st Lancers. 



White, Q.C., M.A, 
Fellow of Magd. ColL, 
Oxford, Bencher of the 
Inner Temple, Judge of 
the Clerkenwell County 
Cou rt, etc., etc. (1829-98). 

I 
Alice Ida = (1897) Alfred Brav Kempe, 
(b. 1868). M.A., Scholar of Trin. Coll., 
____^__ Camb., Barrister of Inner 

I I Temple, Chancellor of St 

Sibyl Alice Albans, Southwell, and 

Gabriel Gabriel Newcastle, Fellow, Trea- 

(b. 1875). (b. 1876). surer, and V.-P., R.S. (b. 

1849.) 
Alfred Humphrey Meadows (b. 1900). 



I I 

Hubert Ethel Marilla, = (1900) Herbert Birkett, 

(1875-81). Associate Roy. M.I.Mech.E., fifth son 
Acad. Mus., of John Birkett, Fellow 

London (b. (and sometime Pres. ) 

1866). R.CT.S. {vide J. Foster'3 

Royal Descents], 



Edith Gwendolen 
(b. 1869). 



Kathleen Marilla (b. 1901). 

three Smiths, Goldwin, Harris, and Henry John Stephen Smith, achieved the 
highest academical reputation, none of them were of the same blood, or indeed 
of the same county. The Raymond Horton-Smith Prize at Cambridge will 
perpetuate the memory of a young student, who, though passing away in his 
early prime, had already given promise of distinction ; while the memory of 
the late Judge Meadows- White's accomplished wife must remain evergreen 
with all who reverence the art and poetry of music. 



108 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF CRANTOCK, Bart. 

John Smith, merchant of London, and of Crantock, in Cornwall, by tradi- 
tion a cadet of the house of Tredonnick, was created a barone in 1642, and 
died s.p. 



SMITH OF HOUGH AND HATHERTON, Barts. 

[Vide Visitation of Cheshire, 1580, and of Oxford, 1624.] 

Sir Thomas Smith of Hough, = Catherine, dau. of Sir .Andrew 
a scion of the house of Cuerd- | Brereto a. 

ley, ob. 1538. [Vide supra, 
Smith of Cuerdley. ] 



Sir Lawrence, =(1) Anne, dau. of Thomas 
Sheriff of Fulleshurst of Crewe ; 

Cheshire, (2) Jane, dau. of Sir Piers 
1553. Warburton, and widow 

of Sir Win. Brereton. 



I I 

Ursula = Sir Row- Bridget=R. 
land Stanley. Fulleshurst. 



Lawrence, 
s.p. 



I I I 

Sir Thomas = Anne, dau. of Edward. Eleanor = Mary = J as. 



of Hather- 
ton. Sheriff 
of Cheshire, 
1600. 



Sir Wm. 
Brereton. 



Thos. 
Cowper. 



Hurleston. 



Lawrence = Anne, dau. of Sir Randal 
Main waring. 



I 
Jane = Sir Randal Mam waring. 



I 

Sir Thomas, = Mary, dau. of Sir 

Sheriff of Hugh Smith of 

Cheshire, Long Ashton. 

1623. 



I 
Stephen, = ... 
Usher to 
the Mar- 
quis of 
Ormonde. 

Issue. 



Sir Thomas = Abigail, dau. 



created 

Bart, in 

1660 



of Sir John 
Pate of Sis- 
sonby. 



Laurence = 
of Bow 



Mary = ( 1 ) George 10 others. 
Cotton of Comber- 
mere : = (2) Sir 
Robt. Holte. 



Sir Thomas, 2nd Bart., 
ob. 1706. s.p. 



I 
Frances = Richard Lister. 



John Pate. Abigail. 

Ar.sis : — Az. S ban teavy ermine on a chief or a dtmilion rampant ta. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



109 



SMYTH OF ISFIELD, Barts. 

[Vide Visitation of Essex, 1664 ; Berry's Essex Pedigrees, p. 16 ; Visitations 
of London, 1633, and of Worcester, 1620.] 

Sir Robert Smyth, Bart, of Upton =. Judith Walmesley. 



Sir Robert, whence 
the Barts. of Upton. 



Sir James, knighted by = (l) Mary Peake. 

CharlesII.,LordMayor. = (2) Elizabeth, dau. of Arthur 
Shirley of Istield. 
= (3) Philadelphia, dau. of Sir 
Wm. Wilson of East- 
bourne, Bart. 



Sir James of Isfield, created Bart. 1714, = Mirabella, dau. of Sir Robt. Legard, 
ob. 1717. Master in Chancery. 



Sir Robert = Lady Louisa C. L Hervey, dau. of John, Earl of Bristol. 



Sir Hervey (1734-1811). Fought with Anne Mirabella H. = W. B. Brand 

General Wolfe at Quebec. Col. Foot of Polsted. 

Guards, s.p. 

Arms : — Az. 2 bars wavy erm. on a chief or, a demilion issuant sa. 
Crest : — An ostrich head ccrnped in the beak a horseshoe ail ppr. 



SMITH OF EAEDISTON, Barts. 

Thomas Smith of Burwaston, Salop = L;etitia Morris of Burford. 



Sir William of Eardiston, created Bart. =(1730) Mary Wheeler ofLambswick. 
1309 (ob. 1321). 



Sir Christopher Sidney = (1) Mary, dau. of Cecilia M. =(1816) V. W. Wheeler 



(1798-1839) 



Rev. R. Foley 
(ob. 1833). 
= (2) Mrs Murphy 
(ob. 1840). 



of Nash Court. 



Sir William = (1343) Susan, Edward Marv S. = Elizth. =(1853) Helen, 

(b. 1823) dau. of Sir (b. 1326). (1346) S. Charles J. 

W.G.Parkes, J. Heath- Shaw. 

Bart. cote. 



W. S. Win- 
wood 

(1844-45). 



Christopher 

s. w\ 

(b. 1846). 



I I 

William Charles 

G. W. E. W. 

(b. 1847). lb. 1853). 



I I 

Mary A. W. Elizth. E. 



Arms:— Sa. a crass dory or on a chief engrailed erm., a demilion UsuaiU 

between 2 cross crossltts gu. 
Crist :—A greyhound couchant sa. collared and line rejiexed over the back or, 

the body charged with a cross crosslet of the last, the dexter paw 

resting on a cross jiory. 



110 



THE SMITH FAMILY 






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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



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THE SMITH FAMILY 



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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 113 



SMYTH OF CUDDESDON 

Edward Smith, of Abingdon, Barrister of the Middle Temple, by some 
said to have began life as a tailor =... 

I I 

The Rev. Sebastian Smvthe, D. D ., = Dorothy, dau. of Arabella = Charles, E. of 
Canon of Ch. Ch. (ob. 1674). I Dr John Weston. Nottingham. 



I 
Sir Sebastian Smvthe of Cuddesdon, = Grace, heiress of Edward Astyne, grand- 
High Sheriff of Oxon, 1734. i son of William A of Oxley , Staffs. 



Grace = Bernard Gardiner, D.D., son of Sir Edward, M.A., Senior Student 
W. Gardiner, Bart., Warden of of Ch. Ch., (ob. 1714). 

All Souls, whence the Whalley 
Smythe Gardiners, Bart a., (2nd 
creation), of Roche Court. Mar- 
ried at Horspath 1712. 

Asms of Smith of Cttddesdon : — Per chevron org. and so. S anvils counter- 
changed. 

Crest : — On a mural coronet or an ostrich head erasgd ppr., beaked of the first, 
in the beak a horseshoe arg. 

This coat was entered in the Visitation of 1634- 
1688 as borne by Richard Smith of Abingdon, author 
of "The Obituary," an antiquary and genealogist. 
Sir Sebastian quartered with his own coat that of his 
mother, Weston — viz. Erm., a bird, on a chief az. 3 
bezants. Anthony A. Wood mentions that Sir Sebas- 
tian had a residence in Oxford. It would appear to 
have been an interesting timber house in the Corn- 
market, which, being then in the tenancy of Messrs 
Grimbly, grocers,' was burnt down in the sixties. 

SMITH OF OLD WINDSOR 

Walter Smith of Old Windsor. 



Christopher of Old Windsors... 

I 



Edward of Old Windsor Christopher of James of New Simon of 
(living in 1671). Buckhurst. Windsor. Westminster. 

Asms, granted April 21, 1671 : — Or, 3 martlets purpured. 

Crbst:— A martlet purpured. (Harl. MSS. 1172). 

H 



114 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF HALESOWEN" 
Senior Co-heir of the Barony of Dudley. 

William Smith of Hunnington [said to be of the line of Stoke Prior, whence 
the Baronets of Upton and Isfield], (oh. 1684). 

William of the Breach = ... 



i I 

William, Joseph, 

ancestor ancestor of 

of the the Smiths of 

Smiths of Hunnington. 
Bourne 
Heath. 



Jacobof = (1709) Eliza- Elianor = W. Car- Sarah 



Stoke 
Prior 



beth, dan. of 
John Lowe of 
Halesowen 
by Joice, 
dau. of J. 
Lea of Hale- 
sowen (ob. 
1762). 



dale. 



William = (1737) Hon. Anne Lea, senior Mary = (1746) R. Chambers, Esq., 



(1713-84). 



co-heiress of the 15th Lord 
Dudley (ob. 1762). 



of Whitbourne Court, 
High Sheriff of Here- 
fordshire, 1793. 



Harrv Ferdi- = ( 1774) Eliza- Frances = WalterWood- 



Grey nando 

(ob. (ob. 

1760), 1794). 
s.p. 



beth, dau. of (ob.,s.p., 
Humphrey 1821). 
Lyttelton, 
Esq. 



cock, Esq. 



Anne = Edw. Baker, 
Esq., Hill 
Court, Wor- 
cester. 



(1) (1802) Elvira, = Lieut. -Col. = (2) (1830) Elizabeth 
co-heiressof Major- Ferdinando | (ob. 1875), dau. of 
General Knudson (1779-1841). I M. Grazebrook, 
(ob. s.p. 1805). Esq., of Audnam. 



Captain William 
(1785-1824), s.p. 



I I I 

Henry Lyttelton Frances C. = (1803) Captain Marcus J. Annesley, 6 daus. 
(b. ITS") s.p. nephew of the 1st Earl Annesley. 



Ferdinando Dudlev Lea=(1865) Amy S., dau. of J. H. Leigh, 
(b. 1834). " Esq., of Belmont Hall. 



William Lea. 



Ferdinando D. W. F. (b. 1872). Charles E. L. (b. 1874). Lilian Amy Lea. 

It will be noted that the derivation of the Barony 
of Dudley came through the Lea family, thus : — 
"William Lea (1677-1741) = Frances, only daughter 
of Hon. W. Ward, and qua her issue sole heiress of 
William, Baron Dudley and Ward. Their son, Ferdi- 
nando Lea, took his seat as Baron Dudley in the 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



115 



House of Lords, but dying sp., the Barony fell into 
abeyance among his sisters, Mrs Smith, Mrs 
Woodcock, Mrs Hervey, Mrs Jordan, and Mrs 
Briscoe, Mrs Smith being the senior. 

Asms, lbss Quabtzbctgs : — Two bars icavy em. on a. chief or a demilion 
rampant issuant sa. 

Crsst : — An ostrich head quarterly sa. and arg. between 2 wings expanded gu., 
in the beak a horseshoe or. 

SMITH OF CUEEDLEY 

[Vide Visitation of Cheshire, 1580, and of Oxford, 1624.] 

Thomas Smith of C. = Katherine, dan. of Sir 
(ob. 1538. ) I Andrew Brereton. 



(1) Anne, dau. of = Sir Lawrence = (2) Jane, dau. of 



Thos. 

hurst. 



Fuls- 



Lawrence, 

ob. 1567. 

v.p. 

s.p. 



Sir Piers War- 
barton, and 
widow of Sir 
W. Brereton. 



Ursula = Bridget = 

Sir Row- R. Fills, 

land hurst. 
Stanley. 



ir Thos. , = Anne, dau. 
of Sir W. 



Sir 
Mayor of 
Chester, 
1598; 
Sheriff,- 
1600. 



Edward. 



Brereton. 



Lawrence, = Anne, dau of Sir Randle 
ob. 7. p. I Mainwaring the elder. 



Eleanor = 

Thos. 

Cowper. 



Mary = 
John 
Hurle- 
ston. 



Jane = Sir R. Mainwaring 
the younger. 



Sir Thomas, = Mary, dau. of Sir 



Mayor of 
Chester, 
1622; Sher- 
iff, 1666. 



22children, 
inter quos. 



Hugh Smith of 
Somerset — ». e. 
Long Ash ton. 



Stephen, ob. 1665, = Walsgrave, sister 
Usher to Lord Or- to the wife ot 
monde. the Lord Trea- 

surer Weston. 



Sir Thomas, = Abigail, dau. of Sir John Fate, 
created 
Bart. 1660. | 
Ob. 1675. 



Francis Fate, 
ob. v.p. 



A dau. a R.- Lister. 



Mary, 

3. p. 



Lawrence, 
ob. ante 
1675. 



Sir Thomas, 2nd Bart, 
(ob. sine haerede l. 



It is evident that Thomas, ob. 1538, was by no means the first Smith of 
Cuerdley. But the above pedigree is that supplied by Ormerod. 



116 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



117 



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118 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF SHOKTGEOYE AXD GREAT HAUTBOIS 

Henry of Great Hauibois = Elizabeth Johnson 



(1676-1743). 

Said to have been a 

grandson of Henry 

Smith als Heriz of 

Withcote, the Regicide. 



( buried at Co ttis - 
hall, 1735). 



Joseph, 5th son = Margaret, dan. of Anthony Atthill 
(1715-61) of Beardston. 



Joseph of Shortgrove = (l) Anna, dan of 
(1757-1822), Private J. Martin, 
Secy, to William Esq., of Ham 
Pitt; M.A., Caius Court. (Ob. 
ColL, Camb. s.p. 1791.) 

= (2) Mary (1773- 
1847), co-heir- 
ess of Joseph 
Cocks, brother 
of Cha3., first 
Lord Somers. 



Marv = Right Rev. 
Dr Porter, Bishop 
of Clogher. 



William Charles 
of Short jrove 
(ob. 1883Cs.p., 
H. Sheriff for 
Essex 1868 = 
(1860) Fanny 
R. , dau. of Sir 
R. Kong, Bart., 
G.C.B. 



I 
Henry 
Joseph, 
Barris- 
ter (ob. 
1878). 



I I I 

= Letitia, George Rev. John Rev. Rich 
dau. of J. R 



C. Shil- 
leto. 



(ob. 

1886), 

Master 

of the 

Court of Camb., 

Queen's M.A. 

Bench. 



Eliza- 
James (ob. ard Snow- beth 
1880), Fel- don, Pre- (ob. 
low and bendary 1S74) 
Tutor of of Chi- = 
Caius CoL Chester. Rich- 
ard 
Glyn, 
Esq. 



Joseph 
Charles 
Thomas, 
now of 
Short- 
grove. 



I 
Rev. 
Henrv 
G al's 
Heriz, 
M.A., 
Magd. 
Hall, 
Ox- 
ford, 
R. of 
Thorn- 
bury, 
Devon, 
= As- 
trea 
Cooke. 



Com- Rev. 

mander Somers 



Regi- 
nald 
Yorke, 
R.N., 
als 

Heriz = 
Ada, 
dau. of 
CoL 
Hunt, 
and wi- 
dow of 



P. als 
Heriz 
(b. 

1861), 
R. of 
Brad- 
dens 
(1896) 
Mary 
M. . dau. 
of Alex. 
Hill, 



Middle- Esq. 



ton 

Evans, 

Esq. 



of Man- 
chester. 



I 
Mar- 

garet 

Rev. 
W.G. 
Ed- 
wards, 
Minor 
Canon 
of 

Wind- 
sor. 



Issue. 



I I I 

Jane Susan F. Edith L. 
F. M. =J. D. — 

Holm- Leila M. S. 
wood, Esq. 



Issue. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 119 

Smith, now Dodsworth, Bart. 

John Smith of Ecclesfield = Priscilla Sylvester, and 
by her had John of Newland Hall (d. 1746), who = 
(2) Ann, daughter of Christopher Hodgson, Esq. of 
Westerton. Their son, John Sylvester Smith (d. 
1789), was created a baronet in 1784. He = 1761, 
Henrietta Maria, daughter of J. Dodsworth, Esq. of 
Thornton Watlass, through which lady the family 
claims descent from King Edward III. By her he 
had, with others — including Sir Charles, third 
baronet,— Sir Edward (1768-1845), who assumed the 
name of Dodsworth in lieu of Smith. He = 1804, 
Susannah, daughter of H. Dawkins, Esq. of Stand- 
lynch, and, dying s.p., was succeeded by his brother, 
Sir Charles (1775-1857), who = 1805, Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of J. Armstrong, Esq., and granddaughter of 
Cadwallader, ninth Lord Blayney, by whom he had 
five sons, who died s.p., Sir Mathew, his successor, 
of whom presently, and Frederick (b. 1822) = 1848, 
Jane R, daughter of J. Young, Esq. of Westridge, 
and had issue, a daughter, Rosie A. E. A.; Henrietta 
M. = Rev. R.Whytehead of All Saints, York; Elizabeth 
= 1849, J. Tetley, Esq. of Kilgran ; Frances E. = Rev. Dr 
Le Maistre ; Anna M. = G. Prickett, Esq. ; Catherine 
= J. Dalton, Esq. of Fillingham Castle ; Charlotte S. 

Sir Charles, who was Colonel of the 22nd Light 
Dragoons, was succeeded by his fourth son, Sir 
Mathew (1819-1858) = Anne Julia, daughter of 
Colonel Crowder, C.B., and by her had Sir Charles 
E., fifth baronet ; Mathew Blayney (b. 1856) ; 
Frederick C. (b. 1858) ; Henriette. 

Asms :— Quarterly. 1 and 4. Arg. a bend engrailed between 3 annulets 
gu.— Dodsworth. 2 and 3. Per saltire arg. and sa. 2 trefoils slipped in pale 
gu. — Smith. 

Crests:— <1) Dodsworth— A dexter cubit arm in chain mail or, the hand 
proper grasping a broken tilting spear, the broken part imbued gu. (2) Smith 
—Out of a ducal coronet or a boar's head couped at the neck az., cnned or. 

Motto : — Pro lege senatuque rege. 



120 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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122 THE SMITH FAMILY 

It will be noted that Hulcote and Aspley came to 
this family through Charlotte, co-heiress of the Rev. 
E. Hervey. In 1784 he had purchased Aspley House, 
built in 1680 by Sir Christopher Wren, Hulcote 
Manor having fallen into decay. On the decease of 
Mrs Downes, the senior co-heiress, Aspley passed 
to her eldest son, Major C. Villiers Downes. It is 
panelled throughout, and contains some portraits of 
interest, notably one of Katherine Eliot, granddaugh- 
ter of Sir John Eliot, who died in the Tower 1629, 
and wife of the celebrated antiquary, Browne Willis, 
whose third daughter became wife to Rev. E. Hervey ; 
also of the sisters Lamb, Lady Wentworth, and Mrs 
Smith ; and of the Chernocke (baronets), Orlebar, and 
Hervey families. 

Arms of Smith of Aspley, as entered at the College 
of Arms : — Per fesse nebuly sa. and arg. a pale with 
3 cross crosslets crosserl two and one and as many 
demi-men affronte couped, each holding in both hands 
a club in bend one and two, all counterchanged. 



CHAPTER VII 

English pedigrees— continued 

The three following pedigrees have been extracted 
from the able compilation of the late Mr H. Ecroyd 
Smith, a zealous antiquarian, whose work unfortun- 
ately is disfigured by polemical, political, and personal 
antipathy. A volume of vulgar detraction levelled 
at the clergy of the Church of England, an embittered 
partisanship, and an amusing insensibility to the ex- 
istence of any possible merit outside his own narrow 
circle, might be passed over with a smile, but when 
the gentleman descends to decry his distinguished 
relation, Mr W. Farrer Ecroyd, late M.P. for Preston, 
and that not merely on the score of political differ- 
ences, but chiefly because he has built a church for 
the benefit of his factory hands at Burnley, one can- 
not but stand aghast at so purblind a sample of sec- 
tarianism. This is the more regrettable, because the 
writer has proved himself researchful and accurate, 
while the sidelights he throws on the personnel of an 
eminent Quaker family raises his genealogy to the 
highest level of narrative. Because the fathers 
elected to eat sour grapes, why should the children's 
teeth be set on edge ? True, these industrious and 
pious religionists prospered, but times have changed, 
the world has advanced beyond the stage of a selfish 
individualism, and the Quaker, with all his virtues, 
represents but a phase of a remote past. It is 
perhaps superfluous to slay the slain, to whom we 
would raise a monument of reverent if qualified 
respect ; enough that " God fulfils Himself in many 
123 



124 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



ways," and hence at this time of day no system, no 
section, can lay claim to a monopoly of good. The 
man who in the darkest days of the Gladstonian 
illusion dared to exploit Fair Trade, precursor of 
imperial solidarity based on an imperial tariff; the 
man who, breaking away from the traditions of his 
family, brought the beneficent influence of the Church 
to mitigate the conditions of a teeming proletariat, 
might well have been spared the censure of a 
narrow empiricism, which has mistaken evolution 
for devolution, and asserts the hereditary claims of 
a venerable yet decaying brotherhood over those 
of conscience and common-sense. 



SMITH OF BAXTERGATE 
(Descended from Smith of Brockhole in Canlley) 
William Smith of Baxtergate, = (1788) Martha Ecroyd of Edgend, Burnley, 



Doncaiter, Wine Merchant, 
associated with Thomas 
Clarkson, M.P., the anti- 
alavery leader (ob. 1832, 
«et. 75). 



an active evangelist who preached 
in every part of the United King- 
dom (ob. 1832, aet. 69). 



Francis 
(1790-95). 



Henrv =(181 9) Maria, dan. of S. Robeon 
(1794-1866). 1 of Staindrop (1800-62). 



William (b. 1822) = (1849) Catherine, dau. of 
B. 0. Hagen. 



Henry 
Ecroyd 
(1823-89). 



Edward = Helen 
(b. 1826). Marsh. 



Marian L. 
(b. 1850). 



Isabella 
(b. 1855). 



Francis(b. 1S28) = (1S55) Frances, dau. Stephen(b. 1830) = Elizabeth E., dau. 
of J. Edmondson j of C. F. Smith, 

of Manchester. i U.S.A. 



Joseph Henry 
Robson (b. 1S65). 
(b. 1858). 



Sarah J. 
(b. 1856). 



Maria 
(b. 1869). 



Maria E. 
(1S67-71). 



Samuel Ecroyd=(1864) Sallie A., 
(b. 1831). I dau. of D. Bal'. 
I of Ferrisberg, 
I U.S.A. 

Eliza M. (b. 1869). 



Ann R. Martha Ecroyd Susanna 
(b. 1837) (b. 1833) of Waterhouse 

= R. Da vies. Egremont. (b. at Craw- 
ley 1842). 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



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126 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



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128 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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130 THE SMITH FAMILY 

SMYTH OE MYRESHAW AND HEATH HALT, 

Richard Smyth of Myreshaw, in Bradford (b. 1594) = ... 



An elder son. John = Isabel, dan. of Randall Wood, and niece of 

| Dr Margetson, Archbishop of Armagh. 

I 
John of Heath Hall (1654- 1729) = (1) Hannah, dan. of Richard Harrison, Esq., 
J of Wakefield . 

I I 

John of Heath Hall = Co-heiresa of Robert Frank, Esq. , Richard = Anne 
(1675-1731), s.p. of Pontefract I Wheatley. 

John of Heath Hall = Bridget, dan. of Benjamin Foxier, Esq. 
(1716-71). I (ob. 1800). 



The Right Hon. John, M.P., Lord of = (1778) Lady Georgiana Fitzroy, dan. 
the Admiraltv, Lord of the Treasury, I of the 3rd Duke of Grafton. 
Master of the" Mint (1748-1811). 



I 
(1) Sarah C, = John Henry of = (2) Lady Elizabeth CoL George = Sarah, 
dau. of H Heath Hall, A Frtzroy, dan. of (b. 1782). dan. of 
Ibbotson, Esq. , M. P. for Cam- 
fob., s.p., bridge Univ. 
1811). (1780-1822). 



4th D. of Grafton. Daniel 

Wilson. 



- I I I I 

Capt. Thomas, R.N. Major Charles (b. 1786), Georgiana A. Maria B. F. 

(b. 1784), s.p. died of wounds after (ob. 1864). (ob. 1813). 
Quaere Bras. 



I I 

Col. John George of Heath = Hon. Diana B., dan. Gen. Henry = Rebecca, 

Hall, M.P. for York I of 3rd Lord Mac- (b. 1816). dau.ofThos. 

(1815-69). [ donald (ob. 1880). Pierce, Esq. 



II II 

Elizth. = Abraham Louisa G. =Gervase Maria Isa- = Vice- AdmL Fran- 

S. G. Robarts. (ob. 1842). P. Bushe. bella (ob. R. Fitzroy. ces. 

1865). 



George John of Heath Hall William J. Diana E. M. = Henrv, 4th Earl 
(b. 1841). (b. 1841). ofHarewood. 



I I 

Louisa H. = J. H. Thursby, Esq. Mary Caroline. Eva Laura. 

Arms : — Erm. on a bend, beneath 2 unicorns' heads erased az., S lozenges or. 
Cbest : — A demi-butt rampant arg. issuing from a ducal coronet or, armed and 

horned of the same, and gorged with a collar az,, charged with S 

lozenges and rimmed or. 
Motto : — Nee timeo, nee sperno. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 131 



Smith of Southfield, Herts. 

James Smith (1725-1803) = a granddaughter of 
Rev. John James, one of the ministers ejected at the 
Restoration. By her he had with a daughter = Joseph 
Gutteridge, Esq., a son, named after his ancestor 
the minister, John James (1761-1821). He married 
Elizabeth, daughter of "William Lepard, Esq., and by 
her had two -sons — viz. (1) James (1789-1879) = 
Sophia King, and by her had, firstly, John James 
(b. 1804) -(i.) Caroline, daughter of W. Brodie 
Gurney, Esq., and by her had (a) Alfred G. = Emily 
J. "Walker, and had Emily C. ; Beatrice ; Winifred ;. 
Alfred E. ; John H— all unmarried ; (b) W. Lepard = 
Adelaide Farwig, s.p. ; (c) Herbert ; (d) Caroline G. ; 
(e) Charles R. = Isabella Lendon, and has Bessie, 
JohnLendon, James. 

Mr. John James Smith = (ii.) his cousin (vide infra), 
Mary Esther Smith, and by her had Ella Mariamne, 
unmarried. 

The second child of James Smith by Sophia King 
was Emma Sophia = John Hepburn, Esq., and had 
five sons and one daughter. The third, Eliza Jane = 
G. Harvey Betts, and had issue one son, four 
daughters. The fourth, viz. Joseph Gutteridge 
Smith = (1) Martha Rotton, but by her had no issue. 
He = (2) Mary E. Hepburn, and by her had Eliza- 
beth S., Catherine M., Eleanor A, Edith = Howard 
James, Esq. ; Frederick, Margaret. He married (3) 
Isabel Roots, and by her had Geoffrey, Richard, 
Irene, Augustine. 

The fifth child of James Smith and Sophia King 
was Charles King Smith, Esq., who, by Mary, daughter 
of John Cox, Esq., had (1) Helen Mary King = Frank 
Perry, Esq., and has issue two daughters ; (2) Arthur 
King Smith = Janet Keep, and has issue, Stanley, 



132 THE SMITH FAMILY 

May, Colin, Janet ; (3) Charles King Smith = Alice 
Keep, and by her has Muriel, Ronald, Philip, Alan ; 
(4) A. Sophia King Smith; (5) Harold King; (6) 
Oswald King; (7) Norman King; (8) Rowland 
King. 

The second son of John J. Smith by Elizabeth 
Lepard was William Lepard Smith (1795-1869) 
= Mary A Cooper, and by her had an only 
daughter, Mary Esther, who = her cousin, as his 
second wife — viz. Mr John James Smith (vide 
supra). 

The portrait of the founder of the family is at 
Southfield. He died at Colebroke Row, Islington, 
" well known in the religious world, and respected 
wherever known." — Vide Evangelical Magazine, 
January 1804. He was a deacon of the Chapel in 
Little "Wild Street, and, as such, closely associated 
with that noble Nonconformist, Howard, the philan- 
thropist. His son was proprietor of the Hamper 
Paper Mill, Watford. It may be added that the 
pastor of the Islington Chapel was son of one of 
Cromwell's chaplains, and also practised medicine, 
besides being a Hebraist. John Ward, one of the 
earlier Trustees of the British Museum, was a 
member of his chapel. 



Smith of Aldenham 

Joseph Smith = Elizabeth, daughter of . . . Bennet, a 
Wiltshire gentleman (b. circa 1760), and by her had 
twenty-two children. In Morant's "Essex," 1768, 
we have the descent of the Wiltshire Bennets, said to 
be of the same blood as the Earls of Tankerville, 
thus — 

Sir Denver Strutt, Bart, of Little Warley, created 
1641, was a zealous Cavalier, and fell at the Siege of 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 133 

Colchester in the Civil War, ex parte Regis. By his 
second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Woodhouse of Kimberley, he had two daughters, 
whereof Blanche, the elder, married Mr Bennet of 
Wilts, and by him had a son, Denver, who 
married Elizabeth, daughter of John Walker, Esq., 
of Brentwood. He died in 1741, leaving a son, 
Denver, whose daughter, Elizabeth, became the wife 
of Joseph Smith, Esq., of Aldenham ; of their numer- 
ous issue, twelve died as infants. Of the surviving 
ten,* Joseph, the eighth child, married Charlotte, 
daughter of General Conran, and by her had Conran ; 
John = Emily . . . , and had Noel, Frank, Conran, Emily ; 
Henry = Harriet, and had Balfour, Ewart, Henry, 
Reginald, Eric, Harriet ; Denver ; Charles ; Louisa, 
s.p. ; Emma = her first cousin, Frederick Wickings 
Smith, son of George Smith, F.S.A. {vide infra); 
Charlotte = Rev. Frank Buck ; Mary, s.p. ; Catherine. 
The thirteenth and eldest surviving child, George, 
F.S.A. (b. Sept. 28, 1782), married Sarah, daughter 
of John Howell, Esq., by Ann, daughter of... Hith- 
cock, Esq., of Leicester (b. Dec. 1, 1755). By her he 
had eleven children, and of these — (1) George 
Howell, Trinity College, Cambridge, died on a tour in 
Italy; (2) Sydney (1807-80), M.A. Trinity College, 
Cambridge, B.A 1835, deacon 1836, was Vicar 
of Worth, (1854-80) = Frances Mary, daughter of 
... Richardson, Esq., and by her had Sydney F. (b. 
1843), a priest of the Roman Church ; Algernon 
Howell (b. 1845), B.A 1869, Caius College, Cam- 
bridge (fifteenth Wrangler), M.A 1872, Tyrwhitt and 
University Hebrew scholar, sometime Vicar of St 
Peters, Tunbridge Wells, now Rector of St James, 
Dover, married (1879) his cousin, Ada, third daughter 
of Frederick Wickings Smith (vide infra), and by her 

• One son is said to have been a physician practising in London. 



134 THE SMITH FAMILY 

has Arthur Denver Howell (b. 1880), Christ's College, 
Cambridge ; Frederick Percival Howell (1881-87) ; 
Sydney Gerard (b. 1883) ; Eva Marjorie Howell (b. 
1886); (3) Arthur, died young; (4) Emily; (5) 
Frederick "Wickings, Solicitor, 13 Lincoln's Tnn 
Fields, of Bellefield, Blackheath, S.E. = a cousin in 
Emma, second daughter of Joseph Smith, Esq., of 
Barnet, and by her has had Walter F. — died young ; 
Emma L. Arundell = Rev. H R. Gray; Harry G., 
died in New Zealand, s.p. ; Agnes ; Arthur F, died 
in Canada, s.p. ; Ada Charlotte = Rev. Algernon 
Howell Smith (vide supra) ; Clara Fredericka = 
Augustus Beamish, Esq. ; Emily Maude ; Basil 
Wickings = Agnes Keen (and by her has : Agnes 
Hilda Maude Wickings (b. 1884) ; Basil Guildford 
Wickings (b. 1885); Claude Trebec Wickings (b. 
1886) ; Cyril Wickings (b. 1888) ; Frederick) ; Percy 
Trebec, died young ; Herbert Conran = Emily S. Ray 
(and by her has Leslie Noel Conran (b. 1889) ; 
Frederick Neville Conran (b. 1888) ; Doris Conran 
(b. 1885) ; Herbert Churchill Theodore Conran 
(b. 1893) ; Monica Conran (b. 1890) ) ; Herbert 
C. T. Conran ; George Norman, died young ; Helen 
Mary Gertrude ; (6) Harry Bennett (b. 1811), died 
Rector of St Nicholas at Wade, Kent ; (7) Walter 
William ; (8) Percy (b. March 8, 1818— died Feb. 5, 
1887) of Bretts, Aveley, Essex ; (9) Helen Matilda, 
s.p., died at Worth, Kent; (10) Rosa; (11) Emily 
Rosa, died at Balham House, aet. 25, s.p. 

Mr George Smith, F.S.A, was a distinguished 
Architect and Surveyor of the Old Jewry. He 
acted professionally for the Mercers' Company, 
and resided at " Little Blenheim," which mansion 
he erected aet. 24, and eventually sold to the 
Duke of Marlborough ; at Brookland, Blackheath ; 
the Manor House, Bushey, etc., etc. He died at 
Newlands, in Worth, and lies buried by the side 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 135 

of his wife and daughter in the family vault at 
Aldenham, Herts. 

He used the Crest of the Bennets (Earls of Tanker- 
ville) — viz. Out of a mural coronet or, a lion's head 
gu., charged on the neck with a bezant. 

According to Morant (" History of Essex "), John 
Bennet of West mins ter held the manors of Witham 
Magna and Newland, being of the Wilts family, 
whence the Earls of Arlington and Tankerville. He 
died in 1670, leaving these manors to his son, Sir 
John, Serjeant-at-Law, knighted in 1706. By Anne, 
sister to Sir Joseph Brand, this gentleman had two 
sons, who became Masters in Chancery, and a daugh- 
ter, who married the Hon. John Yaughan, son and heir 
of Viscount Lisburne. The elder son, who sold the 
manors in 1735 to the Rev. George Sayer, D.D., 
Vicar of "Witham Major, married at Wargrave (Nov- 
ember 27, 1844), Mary, daughter of Joseph Maynard, 
Esq., of Kentons, in Wargrave, and by her had 
Edith (b. and d. 1846) ; Walter (b. 1848) = 1893, 
Mary, daughter of... Gething, Esq. ; Howell (b. 1853), 
died in Queensland, s.p. ; Newton (b. 1855) = 1876, 
Caroline Augusta, daughter of William Part- 
ridge, of Barrie, Ontario (and by her had Percy 
Maynard (b. 1878) ; Howell (b. 1880), now a Trooper 
in Baden Powell's Police, late Volunteer in the 
Canadian Mounted Rifles ; George Wickens (b. 1884); 
Evelyn Gordon (b. 1885); Newton Maynard (b. 1879) ; 
Edith ; Rosa Mabel) ; Percy, twin with Newton = 
1880, Elizabeth, daughter of... Miller, Esq. (and 
by her has Harold Percy (b. 1881), a Trooper in 
Baden Powell's Police ; Norman Percy (b. 1884) ; 
Doris Percy (b. 1887) ; Ida Percy (1888-94)) ; Harry 
(b. 1858) ; George (b. 1860) ; Russell (b. 1862) ; 
Emmeline, now of The Holt, Ledbury ; Rosa. 



136 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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138 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF SHOPWTKE 

Rev. ... Smith, Baptist Minister, imprisoned under the Act of Uniformity, 
temp. Car. EL, with forfeiture of goods. 



Rev. William, Baptist Ministers Sarah ...(1679-1756). ML, St Panoras, 
and Brewer of Chichester. Chichester. 



William =. ..George (1713-76), = Ruth Biffin (?) John (painter), Elizabeth 



(1707-64), 
portrait- 
painter, 
of Shop- 
wyke. 



landscape 
painter, M.L, 
st Pancras, 
Chichester. 



(1732-95). 



(1714-61), 

ML, 

St Pancras, 

Chichester. 



(1710- 
57), 

ML, St 
Pancras, 
Chi- 
chester. 



2 daus. 



I I I 

(1)... Bethel = William =(2)... John. a dau. , of Portsea. 



of HulL 



of the 
Customs. 



a dau. = George Penny. 

|_ 



I I 

George, a. p. Elizabeth = Rev. William Prince. 



m I I I 

William. Charles. Augustus. 



I I I 

Charlotte = ...Beeston. Elizabeth = Richard Pink Richard = Eliza Pink. 



(1787- 
1863). 



of Hambledon. 



Ernest Smith Pink CoL Pink, 
of Leicester. 



There are several monuments to Smiths and Smyths 
in Chichester Cathedral, among others, in the West 
Cloisters, to Richard Smith (1704-67), and a tablet 
in the south aisle to Jane Smith (1733-80), whose 
husband's name was William. This may be William, 
son of the portrait-painter (vide supra). 

For a notice of the three brothers, painters, William, 
George, and John, see chapter on " Celebrities of the 
Name." 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 139 

There is also at present in Chichester a family of 
repute, leather merchants of very old standing, who 
originally came from HulL They are represented by 
Mr W. Smith, J.P. of Ivy Bank, Alderman of West 
Sussex, and on six occasions Mayor of Chichester. 



SMITH OF PICKEEDTG-, CANADA, Bart. 

Colonel William Smith, = Anne, dan. of W. Waylen 



Governor of Fort 
Niagara. Ob. 1795. 



of Devizes. 



(1) Anne O'Reilly = Sir David William, = (2) Mary, dau. of John 



Speaker of the 
Canadian Parlia- 
ment. Creation, 
1821. Ob. 1837. 



Tylee of Devizes. 



David William, Mary Elizabeth = Charles Hannah. 

R.N., killed in I Tylee, Esq. 

action, 1811. 

Issue — 2 sons, 3 daus. 

Arms : — Per pale gu. and az. on a chevron or, between 3 cinque/oils ary., as 
many leopards' faces sa., on a chief of the third a beaver passant ppr. 



The Lyveden Line 

The fact of the descendants of a gentleman of 
considerable parts, but unknown origin, having 
thrown themselves enthusiastically into the arms 
of the Whig faction, argues that the said unknown 
origin most likely was obscure. Sydney Smith, 
when someone inquired as to his coat-of-arms, re- 
sponded that his ancestors sealed their letters with 
their thumbs. Like Thackeray, he despised ancestry, 
for the simple reason that he had none to boast of, 
and took his stand on brains, and remarkably good 
ones. The genealogist, none the less, cannot but 
regret that the antecedents of the Witney merchant 
of Eastcheap, who, migrating from Devon, became 
the father of Robert Smith, founder of a singularly 



140 THE SMITH FAMILY 

able family, remain a mystery. Whoever he may 
have been, one thing is certain, that his grandson 
owed much to both parents. To Robert,* who, 
leaving his bride at the altar, and his business to 
his brother John, went off in search of a Pactolus, 
and returning, appears to have discovered the sources 
of that golden stream. To Maria Olier also, by 
repute the alter ego of Mrs Siddons. We com- 
mence, therefore, with Robert Smith (1739-1827) 
= Mary Olier — issue: (1) Robert Percy, (2) Cecil, 
(3) Sydney, (4) Courtenay, (5) Maria. (1) Robert 
Percy Smith (nicknamed " Bobus ") (1770-1845), 
M.P. for Lincoln, Judge Advocate-General = (1798) 
Caroline M, co-heiress of R. Vernon, Esq., by 
Lady Evelyn, widow of John F., Earl of Upper 
Ossory, and daughter of J., Earl Gower. By her he 
had Robert Vernon Smith, who assumed the name of 
Vernon in 1846 by Royal Licence (1800-73) — a Lord 
of the Treasury, 1830-34 ; Secretary to the Board of 
Control, 1835-39 ; Under-Secretary of the Colonies, 
1839-41 ; Secretary at War, 1852 ; President of the 
Board of Control, 1855-58. Raised to the Peerage 
as Baron Lyveden of Lyveden, in the County of 
Northants = Emma M. F, sister of Lord Castletown 
of Upper Ossory, and had issue — (i.) Fitzpatrick H., 
his successor; (ii.) Gowran C, Recorder of Lincoln 
(1825-72) = (1857) Caroline, daughter of J. N. Fitz- 
akerley, Esq., M.P., and by her had Eleanor E. 
= Col. Farmer, King's Rifles ; Dorothy H. ; Gertrude 
= (1889) Sir A Noel Agnew, ninth Bart, (hi.) Rev. 
Courtenay J. (1828-92), Rector of Grafton Under- 
wood =(1856) Alice G., daughter of Rev. M. Town- 
shend of Castle Townshend — issue, Courtenay R. P. 
= F, daughter of Major Hill of Wollaston; Sydney 
(b. 1862) ; Evelyn M. G. = Rev. H. A Gillett. 
(iv.) Greville R (b. 1835), M.P. for Ayrshire (1886-92) 

• Refer to Reid's "Life of Sydney Smith." 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 141 

= (1858) S. C, daughter of Captain Cockerell, RN. 
—issue, Cecil S. A. (b. 1862), Ronald J. (b. 1866), 
Eustace (b. 1871), Rupert R (b. 1872), Guy F. R 
(b. 1878), Florence A. (b. 1867) = (1894) R M. Lawrie, 
Esq. of Hardres, Hermione E. (b. 1875). (v.) Evelyn 
E. (1829-71) = (1850) George Woodhouse Currie, Esq. 

Fitzpatrick H. Vernon, second Baron Lyveden 
(b. 1829) = (1853) Alfreda E, daughter of Charles W., 
fifth Earl Fitzwilliam. 

Arms of the Lords Lyveden :— Quarterly 1 and 4, 
Vernon, arg. r a fret sa. ; 2 and 3, Smith, gu. 3 bars 
gemelles arg., a chevron erm., on a chief of the second 
3 blackamores' heads proper, a canton of the field 
charged with a battle-axe or— all within a bordure 
counter-compony, of the second and az. Crests : — 
Dexter Vernon, a boar's head eras'ed sa., ducally 
gorged or; sinister, Smith,- a cubit arm erect in 
armour proper, charged with a battle-axe sa., the 
hand grasping 2 wreaths of laurel pendant on either 
side, also proper. Supporters:— Dexter, a boar sa., 
ducally gorged, and suspended therefrom by a chain 
an eschocheon or, charged with a rose gu. slipped 
proper. Sinister. A wyvern vert, plain collared and 
suspended therefrom by a chain, an eschocheon or, 
charged with a rose gu. slipped proper. Motto : — 
"Ver non semper viret." 

The Vernons, from whom the Smiths descend. 
are of Hilton, Staffs— Richard Vernon, Esq., having 
represented Newcastle - under - Lyme, Okehampton, 
and Bedford. 

It may be mentioned incidentally that, while the 
origin of the family is uncertain, Sydney Smith 
having in a vein of mauvaise plaisanterie hazarded 
the audacious statement, that his grandfather disap- 
peared about the time of the Assizes and they asked 
no questions, we have a link of some interest, 
inasmuch as it shows a connection with Sir Isaac 



142 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Newton. Thus : The mother of Sir Isaac, on the 
decease of the elder Newton, re-married a Mr 
Barnaby Smith, and by him had a. daughter, who 
married a Dr Barton, and by him had a daughter, 
who was granted by Sir Isaac Newton an annuity 
of £100, and marrying M. Olier, a refugee from 
Languedoc at the Revocation of the Edict of Nantes, 
was mother of Maria Olier, wife of Robert Smith.* 
[For an account of Sydney Smith, and also of the 
first Lord Lyveden, vide the chapter on " Celebrities 
of the Name."] 

The Hambledon Line 

Henry Walton Smith, a naval officer, alleged to be 
descended from the Smithes of Wyke, Somerset, who 
received a grant of arms from Camden Clarencieux in 
1602, was living in the middle of the eighteenth century. 
By Anna Easthaugh he had three sons. Of these, 
W. H., in conjunction with his brother, H. E. Smith, 
commenced as newsagents. W. H. Smith = Mary 
Cooper in 1817 ; their son, William Henry (1825-91), 
after a brilliant commercial and political career, 
became Leader of the House of Commons. He 
married, in 1858, Emily, daughter of J. Danvers. Esq., 
and widow of B. Auber Leach, Esq., a lady who, at 
his decease, was created Viscountess Hambledon. 
By her he had (1) William F. D., M.P., = 1894, the 
Lady Esther C. G. Gore, daughter of the 5th Earl of 
Arran; (2) Emily A. = 1887, Captain W. A Dyke 
Ackland, RN. ; (3) Helen ; (4) Beatrice D. = 1885, 
Captain A Dyke Ackland; (5) Mabel D. = 1887, 
J. H. Dudley Ryder, Esq. 

Creation Nov. 10, 1891. Arms (as per " Burke's 
Peerage ") : — Per pale gu. and or on a chevron between 

* It is possible that the father of Robert may have been related to the 
above-mentioned Barnaby Smith, and thus that Maria Olier was a cousin. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 143 

3 mullets pierced, 2 martlets, all counterchanged. 
Supporters : — On the dexter side a sea-lion vert, 
sem£e of escalops, gorged with a collar, and pendent 
therefrom by a chain a portcullis, all or. On the 
sinister side a wyrern gu. sem^e of mullets, gorged 
with a chain, and pendent therefrom a portcullis, 
all or. 

But Grazebrook (1870) assigns him with a differ- 
ence, the coat granted in 1602 to George Smithes of 
Wyke, the original whereof is in possession of Francis 
Smythe, Esq., of Colchester (vide Misc. Gen. et Her. 
2. 96). 

The more ancient coat was arg., a chevron az. 
between 3 oak leaves vert, each charged with an 
acorn or. Crest : — A cubit arm erect, habited az., 
cuffed arg., in the hand proper 3 acorn branches vert, 
fructed or. 

The Right Hon. W. H. Smith, M.P.* (vide supple- 
ment to " Burke's Armory ") in 1868 bore : Arg., on a 
chevron az. between 3 oak leaves vert, each charged 
with an acorn or, as many leopards' faces jessant-de- 
lis of the field. The crest was as above, but the arm 
was charged with 3 mascles in chevron arg. (vide 
also Debrett). Apparently the present coat was 
granted simultaneously with the peerage. 

It may be added that the Smithes of Wyke claimed 
descent from the very ancient house of Cuerdley, 
Lanes., whose original coat was sa., six fleurs-de-lis, 
three, two, and one, arg. — a typical coat of the early 
mediseval pattern. 

* The author recalls the memory of this illustrious statesman, when 
"Cerberus of the Treasury," having had the honour of an introduction by the 
Right Hon. G. Ward Hunt, then First Lord of the Admiralty — a nephew of 
his uncle, Captain Allen F. Gardiner, R.X , the martyr. In Mr W. H. 
Smith he found the most courteous of gentlemen ; but — inasmuch as the 
objective was a pension for a friend — true to his sobriquet, " Old Morality," 
and in limine politely impassive. He must, however, have had a soft spot in 
his heart, for the pension — a compassionate allowance — ultimately was 
granted, and on the maximum scale. R.I. P. 



. .»■ 



144 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF KIDLTN T GTON AHT> IFFLEY 

Thomas, son of Thomas of Kidlington = Anne (ob. 1743). 



Thomas (1703-57) M-L= Anne Morris John Richard of Cutteslow 
Kidlington Church. (1704-71). (b. 1704). (1723-78). 



Thomas (1729-52) Mary John of Iffley (1731-95) = (1756) Anne Smith of 
ML Kidlington. (b. 1730.) MI. Kidlington. Islip (ob. 1805), 

I ML Kidlington. 



J 


ohn = 


= Elizabeth Richard = Nancy John. Anne Thomas M 


iry Others 


(1777- 


Blay(1775- of 


(1763- 


(b. 1763) (1754- (1759- 


1833), 


1861),M.L Little- 


1818). 


M.I. 1809), 1824). 


of 


Kidling- more 




Kid- ML 




Iffley, 


ton. (1768- 




lington Iffley. 




ML 


1821). 




= Black- 




Kid- 






nail 




ling- 






Carter 




ton. 






of Kid- 
lington. 






1 
John = Mary Pike Mary 


1 1 
Elizabeth Alice M. 


1 
William. 




(1790- 


of Cowley. (1798-1810). 


(1802-19). (1803-36). 


(1807-58) 




1868). 






— 






M.L to all t 


aese in Iffley Church. 


Others. 




1 
John Martha. Others. 








(1826-90). 







John (1799- Mary Anne Caroline Eliza M. A. RhodaS. Amelia M Stephen F. 
1853), sp., (1801-60), (1803-13), (1805-86), (1807-58), (1811-14), (1815-66), 
M.L Kid- =Willm. M.LKid- M.L Kid- = Peter M.L Kid- M.L Kid- 
lington. Faulkner, lington. lington. Miles. lington. lington. 

This appears to have been a family of well-to-do farmers and tradesmen. 

A Joseph Smith of Littlemore is also buried at Iffley. ML states that he 
was a nephew of Mrs Blacknall Carter [ride supra). 

Littlemore, some three miles east of Oxford, was the spot where Cardinal 
Newman, then Fellow of Oriel, founded a Brotherhood. Vide his "Apologia." 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 145 

SMITH OF OUTWOOD 

Charles Smith of Outwood (1712-78)= Mary Woods (1709-65). 



Charles (1743-1803) = Hannah (1747-1812), dau. of 
James Grantham (b. 1704) 
and granddaughter of 
John Grantham of Altrin- 
cham. 



Charles (1789-1850)=Ann (1790-1872), grandau. of Mary ( 1785- = William 
... Rowland (1723-98). 1822). I Bywater. 



Issue. 



Anne (1815- 1900)= Thomas, son of Thomas Taylor (b. 1765), 
I by Betty Chadwick (1789-1850). 



Charles Smith and 3 other sons. Edith Anne = ... Willoooks, Esq. 

Mr Charles Smith (3) was one of the thirteen gentlemen of Manchester who 
founded the Union Bank, of which he was elected unanimously the first 
managing director. 



SMITH OF ELLDTGHAM HALL 

John Smith, Esq., living about 1720 = Anne NankivelL 



John = Charlotte Townsend. 

Charles, barristers Anna Arabella Beaver. 

Col. John of Ellingham = (1828) Maria, dau. of James Lock- Lucy Charlotte. 
Hall (1791-1852). I hart, Esq., of Sherneld House. 

(1) Amelia H., dau. of = Henry of Ellingham = (2) Mary Gray, widow of Rev. 
CoL Greene, I Hall, barrister (b. I H. P. Measor, and dau. ot 

C B 1834). J- Dowie, Esq. 



Henry Lockhart Alfred T. 4 daus. Horace Mackenzie (b. 1870). 

(b. 1859). (b. 1867). 

Arms -.—Per bend indented az. and or, 2 crosses molim pierced ^interchanged. 
Crest : Out of a ducal coronet or a dove rising org. 



146 



THE SMITH FAMILY 








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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



147 



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THE SMITH FAMILY 






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150 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Few English families in the brief space of little 
more than a century have achieved so high a reputa- 
tion as this, the men having been conspicuous for 
brains, and the women, especially Mrs Waldy and 
Lady Sackville, for beauty. The Rev. George 
Stanley Faber, B.D., Master of Sherbum Hospital, 
an appointment of the value of £4000 a year, with 
patronage attached, was a noted writer on prophecy 
in the earlier years of the last century, and is referred 
to in Cardinal Newman's "Apologia." His nephew 
and protege, Father Faber, attained immortality as a 
hymn writer, and will long be remembered as founder 
of the beautiful Brompton Oratory. The Rev. Canon 
Arthur Faber was equally eminent as the creator of 
Malvern College, after a brilliant career at New 
College, Oxford ; and other members of the family 
have recently entered the House of Commons. The 
name Faber occurs in many documents prior to, or 
contemporaneous with, the Reformation as the equiva- 
lent of Smith. Thus the first of the ancient and 
honourable house of Elkington was Faber, and the 
grandsire of the yeoman of Cropwell Boteler, ancestor 
of Lords Carrington and Pauncefote, was also Faber. 
The Yorkshire Fabers appear never to have Angli- 
cised their patronymic. "We .find Fabers named as 
contributories to lay subsidies in the reign of Edward 
III. (vide publications of the Yorkshire Archaeo- 
logical Society) and as tenants of the Abbeys of 
Fountains and Kirkstall ; while a Sir William Faber 
was in the suite of Buckingham in France, 1380 ; and 
far back in history the architect of Battle Abbey was 
also a Faber, but a Frenchman imported for the 
purpose by William the Conqueror. 

Arms of Faber : — Or, on a pale erm. a rose gu., 
barbed and seeded ppr., on a chief az. 2 mullets arg. 
Crest : — On a wreath from the battlements of a 
tower or, a mailed arm and hand ppr. charged with 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



151 



2 mascles vert, holding a rose gu., barbed, seeded, 
and leafed ppr. Motto :— Quisque faber fortunse 



suae. 



SMITH OF EYHOPE 



William Scurfield of Sunderland and = Joanna Smith, an heiress, dau. of 
Newcastle, F.R.C.S., discoverer of Anthony Smith of Ryhope. 

copperas. 



A son, 3. p. 



William of Coatham. 



Dorothy of Ford. 



William Grey, J.P., of Norton = Joanna Scurfield. 



William Scurfield, 
J.P., D.L., High 
Sheriff of Durham, 
Barrister, s.p. 



George J., as heir of 
Dorothy, assumed 
the name of Scur- 
field, J. P., D.L. 



Rev. John William, assumed 
the name of Smith on suc- 
ceeding to the Smith estates. 
Rector of Dinsdale. ^ [See 
pedigree of Faber als Smith, 
supra.] 



SMITH OF HAENHILL, FAEMINGTON, AND 
CASSINGTON 

Thomas Smith, died at Kidlington, = Alice, heiress of Thomas Standard, 
1706. died at Kidlington, 1.0b. 



Humphrey (1672-1716) of Mary, sold the lease of Thomas, M.A, Others. 
Wadham College, High Kidlington Rectory. ' 



Sheriff for Oxon. 



Magd. Hall 
(1676-1707). 



Here this pedigree shows default, for we find a 
Thomas Smith of Elsfield, whose son, John, was bap- 
tised at Kidlington, 1699. He was probably a cousin 
of the Thomas who married Alice Standard. Again 
we find Thomas Smith of Cassington and Headington 
who died at Kidlington, 1761, set. 57. By Elizabeth, 
his wife, who died at Kidlington, 1755, he had (1) 
Thomas, surgeon of London (1714-84), buried at 



152 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Kidlington. His wife, Frances, was also buried at 
Kidlington in 1783 ; (2) William, died at Headington. 
Buried at Kidlington, 1793. He was born at Cassing- 
ton, 1732 ; (3) Mary, born 1726. Baptised at Yarn- 
ton ; (4) Elizabeth, died at Headington. Buried at 
Kidlington, 1825, set. 82. 

It may be added "that these Smiths came origi- 
nally from Harnhill, Gloucestershire (vide Atkyns's 
" History," and the Hon. Mrs Bryan Stapleton's 
" Three Parishes "). Atkyns says : "Thomas Smith, 
Esq., son of Humphrey Smith, is Lord of the Manor 
of Harnhill. He has a good house and estate, but 
resides in Oxon." The following presented to the 
living of Harnhill : 1595, Queen Elizabeth ; 1666, 
Humphrey Smith, Clerk in Holy Orders ; 1700, 
Thomas Smith, Esq. 

Identical with this family of Smith were the 
Smiths of Farmington, Northleach, e.g. : 

Rev. William Smith, presented by Humphrey = Dorothy, buried at Farming- 



Smith, M.A. , to the benefice of Alvescot by 
Bampton, Oxon. 



ton, 1668. 



(1) Winifred Cocks (at=Rev. Humphrey of Harnhill, = (2) Susanna Denys of 



Farmington), 1645. 
She died 1652. 



presented to the Rectory of Cricklade at Farm- 
Farmington, 1641. Died ington, 1663, s.p. 

there 1687, :et. 75. 



Humphrey (1647-59). 

Apparently the Rev. Humphrey's father must have 
had a brother Humphrey in Holy Orders, for in the 
Register of Blackbourton, Oxon., we find Ann, wife of 
Humphrey Smith, Clerk ; buried 1617 (vide Anthony 
A. Wood). 

Again, we find that Thomas Smith = Anne Fifield 
of Farmington, 1618, and had a son, Thomas, born 
1620. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 153 

Confirmation of Arms to Humphrey Smith of 
Farmington 

" Whereas it appears by the certificate of Richard 
Goddard, now rector of Castle Eaton in the Co. 
Wilts, that Mr Humphrey Smith, who was hereto- 
fore rector for the space of 47 years, did bear for 
his Armes an eagle displayed, as is evident in the 
Ingravement thereof 57 years since upon a Tomb- 
stone in the Church of Castle Eaton aforesaid, 
where the said Humphrey and Eliz" 1 his wife are 
interred. And whereas I am informed by Francis 
Sandford, Esq., Rouge Dragon Pursuivant-at-arms, 
that he, having collected the issue of the said 
Humphrey and Elizabeth, doth find that Humphrey 
Smith of Farmington in County Glos., and William 
of St Dunstan's Parish in the West London, are 
grandchildren of the said Humphrey and Elizabeth, 
that is to say, sonnes of William, sonne and heir 
of the said Humphrey and Eliz th , and that their 
father and grandfather have successively used the 
said Armes and sealed therewith. But the same 
not being registered in the College of Armes, and 
the said Humphrey having no other evidence that 
the said seals and tomb-stone (such other memorials 
as were being imbezzled during their minority) they 
are not certain of the true colours of the said armes : 
I, James Earl of Suffolk, Deputy to The Right 
Hon. Earl of Norwich (sic) Earl Marshall of England, 
being humbly desired on the behalf of the said 
Humphrey and William to give my consent that the 
said armes so proved may be allowed and entered 
in the said College of Armes, doe hold the same 
reasonable. And therefore doe hereby require you 
to devise such colours for the said armes as may 
be without wrong-doing to any. And in regard 
the same Humphrey and William, having liberally 



154 THE SMITH FAMILY 

contributed toward the rebuilding of the said College 
of Armes, the Registrar of the said College is re- 
quired (according to His Majesty's Commission 
touching such benefactors) to register the said armes 
together with a descent of the said William Smith, 
and also these presents in the College of Armes, 
under seal of the Earl Marshall's office, 7th 
October 1674. — Suffolk." (Vide Ashmole MSS. 
858, p. 239, and Stapleton, p. 897.) 

The arms were finally settled by the Heralds as 
" Parted per pale ermine and erminois. Over all 
an eagle displayed sa., beaked and membered gu." 
( Vide also the Registers of Cassington, Farmington, 
Kidlington, with MI. in Farmington and Kidling- 
ton.) 



SMTTHE OF HILTON 

From Smythe of Hilton, Salop, who obtained a charter from Edward I., 
descended Smythe of Hilton who obtained also a charter from Queen Eliza- 
beth, and from him derived : — 

Captain Thomas of Hilton, = Elizabeth, dau. of Wannerton Groome, 
living circa 1750. Esq., of TrysulL 

I — I 

Major John Groome = (1805) Anne, dau. of Thos. Parke, Esq., Elizabeth. 
(1771-1835). I and sister of Lord Wensleydale (ob. 1852). 

Thomas, =(1S57) Mary, John Captain = (1855) Rev. Anne (ob. 1878) 



Lieu.- 
CoL 

Madras 
E. (b. 
1808). 



heiress of Groome, George, 

R.-Adml H.E.LC.S. R.N. 

Deans (ob. (1809-39). (b.1811) 
1862). 



Georgi-Henry =(1839)Gen-H 

ana, R. (b. Monckton, son 

dau. 1813), of Hon. E. 

of Dr R. of Monckton, 3rd 

Allar- Beck- son of the 1st 

dyce. bury. Viscount Gal- 
way. 

Annie Georgianu. Issue. 



Mary Eliza Clio. Cecilia A. Parke. Anne B lance. 

Aems : — Sa. a bend between 6 martlets arg. 
Crest : — A buffalo's head proper. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



155 



SMITH OF NOTTINGHAM 

This family has adopted for crest a greyhound's head proper, but there does 
not appear to be any link with the Smiths of Devon or of Suffolk. 

... Smith of Nottingham St Mary. 



William of St Mary's, Nottingham (1765-1845) = Mary ... (1765-1823). 



(1) ...=John =(2) The William, = Eliza- Joseph James = Char- Sarah Mary 

Anne 
(b. 
1807) 



(b. widow Baptist 

1791). of ... Deacon 
SewelL (1793- 
1871). 



John 
(ob. 1900). 



beth (1797- 
Morley 1848). 
(1794- 
1857). 



[1805- 

82), 

(musi< 



lotte (b. 

Litch-1802), 

field =... 

(1805- Litch- 

86). field. 



Hall 
(emi- 
grated 
to 

Aus- 
tralia) 



James = . . . Issue. 



William (1819-37) Mary (1317-36), Elizabeth = James Ward Catherine 



accidentally drowned s. p. = Paul And- (b. 1822). 
when a candidate for rew Johnston, 
the Baptist Ministry. 



(1S23-38). 



(b. 1831), 
Deaconess. 



ll < II 

William Samuel James (b. 1851), Arthur = Florence, Ben- SarahE. = Wm. J. 



(1849-96), Actor, 


antiquarian 


(b.lS55) 


dau. of 


jamin 


1 b. 1353). 


Han 


a member of Mr 


and book-col- 




H. Wag- 


(1359- 




nah. 


Laurence Bar- 


lector, associ- 




staff, 


61). 




Esq. 


rett's Co. Played 


ated with 




Esq., of 








CardL Malespini 


Mr Bernard 




Sneinton. 








in Francesca Di 


Quaritch, 












Rimini in New 


member of 


Artb 


ur O. 




Percy W. 


York. 


the Ex-Libris 













Society, etc. 


Flore 


nee D. 




Cecil 


W. 



Sybil R. 

This family throughout (with a single exception, viz. James (1805-32), who 
appears to have been Anglican, and was interred in the Church cemetery by 
the Rector of St Peters) has exhibited a staunch adhesiou to the Bapti3t 
denomination in Nottingham, of which body they have proved munificent 
patrons. To the joint efforts of the Smith and Ward families, the Baptist 
chapels in Derby Road and George Street, as well as the Nottingham Baptist 
cemetery, in a large degree owe their existence. Mr James Ward's name is 
widely known as a connoisseur, he having presented a collection of objects of 
art to the Nottingham Museum ; and equally as a zealous and able anti- 
quarian, and collector of mediaeval MSS. and autographs, whereof he possesses 
some very notable specimens, including two unpublished poems by Kirke 
White, and a letter from Samuel Smith, draper, dated Nov. 30, 1700, to Robert 
Hacker, High Sheriff of Notts, offering to provide the javelin men with 
banners for their trumpets. 



156 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



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158 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF BATTLE FLATT, LEICESTERSHIRE \ 

From Thomas Smith of Battle Flatt (b. circa 1680), by his wife, Alice, came 
Thomas (b. 1717), who married Mary Nixon, and by her had Thomas (b. 1740), 
whose wife was Eliza Ward. Their son, Henry of Cressy Hall, Spalding ( 1767- 
1843), by Jane Robinson, had John of Cressy Hall (1798-1875), who married a 
cousin in Ann, dan. of Henry Smith, Esq. of Stamford. By her he had John 
Newbald of Loughborough (b. 1S26), who, by Caroline Hasley, had John 
Hasley Smith, born 1860, at Loughborough, and now of Nottingham. 

Battle Flatt would appear to "be the actual site of the battle of Bosworth 
Field. 



SMITH OF BUCKTON PARK* 

1 Squire " Smith, a celebrated Master = A dan. of Pritchard of Tickle ton Hall, 
of Hounds, of Buckton Park, Leint- Salop, 

wardine fob. 1762), buried at 
Leintwardine. M.I. in the chancel. 



Smith of Buckton = ... 



John (1765- 
1840), s.p., 
buried at 
Leintwar- 
dine. 



William = Anne Farmer 
of Walford, 
buried at 
Leintwardine. 



Bright (1771- 
1845) of 
Gathertop = 
Charlotte 
Thomas of 
Pilleth. 



Humphrey of Daus. 
Overton = Ann, 
widow of ... 
Weyman, 
Esq. 



7Uli 



William (ob. 1852), = Elizabeth Amiss 



buried at Monk- 
land. 



of Ludlow (ob. 
1850), buried 
at Monkland. 



Anne (1820-43), = Charles Price 
buried at of Tenbury. 

Boras ton, 
s.p. 



William = Jane S. Betts 
(1842-72), of Llandrindod. 
s.p. 

Both buried at 
Llandrindod. 



Anne (b. 1843] = (1865) John 
Thomas, eldest son of 
Andrew Chambers, Esq. 
of Orton Waterville, and 
grandson of John Cham- 
bers, Esq., Deputy -Lieut, 
for Huntingdonshire 
(1836-89), buried at Leint- 
wardine. 



Anne Amiss (1845- 
47), buried at 
Leintwardine. 



* This family possessed property at Walford in Leintwardine prior to 1762 
and until recently. I regret that I have not been able to trace the descent 
directly farther than the locally celebrated Squire of Buckton, whose hounds 
evoked the muse of some rhymester, unknown to fame, as thus : 



Sqittre Smith and his Hountw, Buckton Pake, Herefordshire. 

The morning was frosty, and the wind lying still. 
The sun shone with splendour over valley and hill, 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 159 

SMITH OF BLEA^SLET 

Richard, living circa 1730 = Mary Wordsworth, aunt of the poet. 



Richard Wordsworth = Martha, dau. of ... Fell of Ulverstone by ... dau. 

of ... Irton of Lrton Hall. 



I 
Richard (ob. 1S61) = U852) Catherine Ann Parrey. 

! 

ii ii 

Richard Wordsworth. Rev. Irton, M.A. Edward Iggulden Enuly Martin. 
V. of St Mar- (a. p.) 

garet, Ilkley, 
Rural Dean of 
Otter. 

Arms of Smith of Bleansley : — 5a., on a feast engrailed or, between S 
squirrels sejant arg., each holding a marigold slipped proper, as 
many heraldic fountains. 

CBEST : — On a mount vert, a squirrel as in the arms, charged on the body with 
an heraldic fountain. 



When Smith, that famed sportsman, assembled his hounds, 
To chase hotly Reynard, so fleet o'er the ground. 
Chorus — To chase, 4c. 

Hounds, horses, and men in condition being high, 
They were fully intending bold Reynard to try ; 
Their steeds pranced gaily, and the hounds seemed to play 
Not expecting such sport as they witnessed that day. 
Chorus — Not expecting, 4c. 

They dragged thro' each brier, each bramble, each brake ; 
If bold Reynard had started, his life was at stake ; 
But his mettle lay still, and they did little good. 
Till his highness broke cover in Stoke Castle's Wood. 

"Ha ! ha ! " says bold Reynard, " is Smith here to-day ? 
By the hounds and the horses, 'tis Smith, I dare say ; 
And if it be Smith, I shall meet with disgrace. 
So adieu to Stokes Wood, my old hiding-place." 



He then gave a double — came back by Old Hall, — 

And at Cromagearin he gave them a call ; 

He ranged Radnor Forest with a fleet, panting breath, 

When a few moments more brought the scene of his death. 

Thro' three noble counties in style ht had come, 
And parishes sixteen his old slyness aad run ; 
Now in a farm- yard he of life is bereft, 
So the eyes of bold Reynard here close in death. 

We will drink a full bumper, and the toast shall go round, 
Here's long life to brave Smith, and success to his hounds. 



160 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



161 



SMITH OF HELMSHOEE 

Smith of Ulverstone, born circa 1720= ... Hall of Nangreave, Bury. 



John of Bury = Betty, dan. of Daniel Leach, Esq. 
(1767-1842). (1773-1812). 



Thomas, J. P. of = Mary, dau. of Thomas Kay, Esq. Alice Richard Ellen 



Flaxmoss 

Haslingden 

(1796-1880). 



of Flaxmoss (by Mary Holden), (1794- (1802-73) (1810- 
a descendant of the Cheshire 1849). 56). 

Bradshaws, of whom the Regi- 
cide (1800-50). 



John (1) Thomas Kay = Mary Anne Eliza John (2) Alice Eliza Kezia 
(1822-23). (1823-91). Howorth Leach (1829- (1830- (1832- (1335- 

of Green- (1827- 29). 47). 94). 35). 

hiU, Ba- 28). 

cup. (Issue, 

3 sons, 4 

daughters. ) 



George Ashworth=Marv, dau. of Henrv H. 
(b. 1836). Stow, Esq. (b. 1845). 



Richard Leach 
(1839-40). 



William H. 
(b. 1841). 



Mary Louisa = John Hall. Henry Ashworth. Percy. George Arnold 
(Issue 3 sons, 4 daughters. ) Roasell. Wycliffe. 



ARMS of Smith of Ulverstone : — Plan, on a /ease engrailed or, between .T 
squirrels sejant argent, each holding a marigold slipped proper, a 
stag's head erased azure between two heraldic fountains. 

Cmst :— On a mount vert, a squirrel as in the arms, charged on the body with 
an heraldic fountain. 

L 



162 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF ASTLET, LANCS. 

William, son of ... Smith of Astley= ... Ward, 
and Butt's Bridge, Bedfordleigh. I 



John=(at Deane) Ann, dau. of ... Cleworth of Astley, by Nancy, dan. 
of ... Wharmby. 

Rev. Solomon, M.A., Fellow of St John's, = Barbara Anne Robson of Exning, 
Camb., Minor Canon of Ely, V. of St I Suft 

Mary's, Ely. 

Rev. Kenelm Henry, Curate of =1867 Frances A. P., dau. of Barbara Anne 
Chettisham, Ely, late scholar H. Winterof Colyton, Devon, (ob. s.p. ). 
of St John's, Cambridge. by . . . dau. of . . . Sampson, Esq. 

SMITH OF G01DIC0TE 

George of Goldicote = (1796) Frances, co-heiress of T. Grace Smith of 
I Normanton Turville. 



George 

Stavely = 

(Issue. ) 



(1) Sarah, =Captain Gus- = (2) Caroline Captain =(1840) Hon. 

Emily A. , 
dau. of 4th 
Viscount 
Bo ling- 
broke. 



dau. of 


tarus T. 


S., widow 


William 


Rev. N. 


(1800-75). 


of Sir J. 


Corbet 


Yates 




Mordaunt. 


of 


(a. p.). 






Bittes- 
well 
Hall 
(ob. 




2 dau. 


1847). 



I 

Captain Corbet = (1875) EvaC, dau. 
of Walcote, I of Mark Synot, 
Leicester Esq. 

(b. 1845). 

Ada E. Corbet. 



Emma E. = (1862) J. Du Plat 
Taylor, Esq. 



Charles Sergison of Consell=(1834) Georgiana, dau. of 



Hall, Stafford, 1st 
Dragoon Guards 
(1803-77). 



Hon. Herbert Gardner, 
son of Alan, 1st Lord 
Gardner. 



Francis 
(a. p.). 



Frances 
(s.p.). 



Captain Hyde = (1878) Jane, dau. of Rev. Walter F. = Mary L. C, dau. of 
Sergison ("b. I Isaac Kempson, Esq., (b. 1845). ! Mrs B. Durant. 

1838). of Cotton Hall. 



Herbert C. (b. 1880). 



Percy. 



I I 

Lieut. -CoL Charles Holled = Marv, dau. of Henry Florence Cornwall. 
(b. 1846). Scott, Esq. 

Asms : — Arg., on a bend between S unicorns' heads erased az., 3 lozenges or. 
Crest : — A unicorn's head erased so. 
MOTTO : — Virtus in arduis. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 163 



Smith of Thtmghill Court 

A Smith migrated from Derbyshire in 1760 to 
Staunton-on- Arrow, Herefordshire. His son was of 
Hurstley in Kynnersley, and married ... daughter 
of... Beaven, Esq., ofMonkland. This gentleman had 
a son, from whom descend the Smiths of "Woonton 
in Almeley ; a second son from whom was Smith of 
Bidney in Dilwyn, whence the Smiths respectively of 
Monkton, Ocle Pychard, Gathertop, and Hope-under- 
Dinmore. The third son, John of Kenchester Court 
(1792-1878) = Honoria Ferrer of Dilwyn and "Weobley 
(1812-98), and by her had (1) John William (b. 1847), 
now of Thinghill Court, J. P., C.C. ; (2) George Henry 
(b. 1853) ; (3) Jane Honoria (b. 1850) = 1875, Francis 
Hawkins, Esq., of Sugwas Court, J. P., C.C, and 
has issue. 

Arms of Smith of Derbyshire, vide Vincent's 
" Derbyshire," 1634 : Azure, a chevron between 3 
leopards' heads erased or, charged with pellets. 
Crest uncertain. But Grazebrook gives a grant of 
Cooke Clarencieux, 1585 (Harl. MSS., 1069), to 
"William Smith, barrister of Derbyshire — viz. : Gules, 
six lozenges in fesse between three maidens' heads 
affronters proper, crined or. Crest : — On a mount 
vert, a castle or, between two branches proper. And 
it is to be remarked that either of the above coats 
differ from that of Smith of Duffield, Derbyshire — 
viz. : Sable, a fesse dancett^e between three lions 
rampant, each supporting a garb, all or. Probably 
the coat ascribed by Vincent to four generations prior 
to 1634 is the true coat of the Derbyshire Smiths, 
from whom descend the Smiths of Thinghill Court. 
N.B. The term " Court " in the west of England 
represents "ancient Manor House," as distinguished 
from any mansion of later erection. Mr J. W. Smith, 



164 THE SMITH FAMILY 

the present representative of the family, acquired the 
estate of Thinghill by purchase from a family named 
Hisrgrins. 



'oo 1 



THE DESCENT OF SIE SIDNEY SMITH 
(The Hero of Acke) 

Captain Edward Smith, R.N. 
(mortally wounded in the attack on La Guaya, 1743). 



John, a captain in the Guards = (1766) (unhappily), Mary, dau. of 
Pincknev Wilkinson of Han- 



over Square, merchant, whose 
sister, Ann=1771, the 1st 
Lord Camelford. 



Charles Spencer, Admiral Sir William 

Ambassador to Sidney (1764- 

The Porte. 1840). 

SMITH OF LANGUARD 

John of Languard = Anne, dau. of Henry Roach, Esq. 

i i 

Major Henry. Charles Roach (1807-90). 

SMITH OF GLOUCESTER 

Rer. Martin Stafford Smith = Elizabeth, widow of Bishop Warburton. 



John Stafford, composer (1750-1S36) (vide chapter on 
"Celebrities of the Name"). 



SMITH OF TWYFORD, HANTS 

George Smith of Twyford (b. circa 1775 — d. 1836) = ... 
Issue. 

(1) George of Owslebury (1803-45) = Elizabeth Hewitt of Southsea, and by 
her had (1) Elizabeth Mary (b. 1835), (2) Sabina (1837-96) = Thomas Prime. 

(2) Peter of Barnsworth, Hants (1811-91) = Sarah Ann Janaway, and by 
her had Elizabeth = Richard Morley ; James Francis; William; Kathleen 
(b. 1871). 

(3) Stephen of Owslebury (1813-75) = (1) Elizabeth Doll, (2) Elizabeth Hill, 
but left no issue. 

(4) William of Cheriton (1815-1901) = Mary Hailstone, and by her had 
Frank John (b. 1841); George (1843-62); Mary Anne (1845- 1901) = William 
Poole of Southampton ; Sophia (b. 1861) = Benjamin Mould of Cheriton. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



165 



(5) Giles of Alresford (1821-74) = Julia Holland of Alresford, and bv her 
had Henry Frederick (1842-97) = Ellen Goodall of Kopley ; George (1843-62) = 
Kate Sapham ; Isabel (b. 1867) = William Wedge of Winchester ; Kate (b. 1371) 
= Edward Wedge of Winchester. 

(6) Mary (1805-56) = Richard Thompson. 

(7) Ann ( 1809- 74) = William Holdaway. 

(8) Harriet (1817-85) = Joseph Hobby. 

(9) Charlotte (1816-82) = William Pearce. 
(10) Sabina(1819-91) = David Turner. 

The remarkable characteristic of this Hampshire family is that of being 
smiths by profession as well as Smiths by name. Within the past half 
century they have contributed at least a dozen stalwarts to the good old 
trade of farrier, and it may be affirmed confidently that the late revered 
Queen boasted no more useful subjects. 



SMITH OF 0RCHEST02T, WILTS 



George Smith of Orcheston (living in 1310). 



A son, of Stoke = ... 
Newington. 



I 
Elizabeth Valis = (1868)(attheCongregl. 



(b. 1841), bapt. 
at Spetisbury, 
Dorset. 



Elizabeth = Frank Dudderidge (b. at Blandford 

Valis. 1869), son of Henry Dudderidge of 

Blandford, Principal of the School 

of Pharmacy, Newcastle-on-Tyne. 



Chapel, Blandford), 
Henry, 4th son of 
Robert and Fanny 
Dudderidge of Ray 
Hill, Burland, Somer- 
set. 



Issue. 



SMITH OF SOUTH SHIELDS 



John Smith of South Shields, : 
a ship's chandler who is said 
to have worked at Wool- 
wich side by side with Peter 
the Great of Russia, and 
who left as an heirloom a 
Russian, wicker-basket, a 
present from the Czar, which 
basket is in the possession 
of his descendant, Bernard 
P. Scattergood, Esq. 



Elizabeth, dau. of R. Foster 
(b. 1746). 



(i) Rev. Thomas Scattergood, = Jane = (2) 
Minister of the Wesleyan I 
New Connection. 



Bernard P. Scattergood of Leeds, M.I.E.E. 



166 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF TODDINGTON, GLOUCESTERSHIRE 

William Smith of Toddington (d. 1741) = Mary ... 



Mary William 
(b. (b. 1719). 

1717). 



Rebecca 
(b. 1721). 



I 
Henry = Ann Sysum 
(1722. | of Greet. 
89). 



John Charles 
(b. (b. 

1724). 1725). 



John Sysum = Mary Sysum. 

(b. 1754) of I 
Toddington. 



Mary (b. 1760)= John 
Chadburn of Winchcomb. 



of Bishops 
Burton. 



Mary John Henry William = Elizabeth Morley 
(b. (b. (b. (b. 1797) 

1789). 1792) 1795). of Mal- 

of Hoghton pas. 

Towers. 

Buried at 

Fleetwood. 



Charles Joseph 
(b. (b. 

1804). 1807). 



Henry =. 
(b. 1324). I 



I 
John= ... 
(b. I 
1826). 



Ann 

(b. 
1823). 



William = (1855) Leah 
(1830- | Taylor of 



97). 



Pilkington. 



I I I 

Thomas William Fanny. 
Sysum H. 
of High 
Wycombe. 



Issue — 3 
children. 



Issue — 5 sons 
and 5 daus. 



George 
(b. 1833). 

Mary (b. 
(b. 1835). 

Charles 
(b. 1837), 
left 2 sons. 



This family for generations were gamekeepers to various noblemen and 
gentlemen. They appear to have been of good repute, four in succession 
having been keepers at Toddington Park. 



SMITH OF THE GROVE EN" CROPWELL BOTELER 

Rev. ... Smith, curate, or minister of Cotgrave, 1762=... 

r, C ! I 

Rev. Henry, = ... Morris of Rev. Edward, rector Rev. John, vicar 

curate of I Cotgrave. of Tollerton. s.p. of Aldercar. s.p. 

Cotgrave. 



Henry, now = Miss Butler. 

of Cropwell I 

Boteler. 



Edward = Miss Barlow 
I of Cotgrave. 

Issue. 



A dan. = . . . Pearson 
of Shef- 
field. 



Mr Henry Smith, the present Lord of the Manor of Cropwell Boteler, is a 
J.P. , and a well-known breeder of Lincolnshire rams. Although situate in a 
village from whence sprung the great family of banker Smiths, he does not 
appear to share their blood ; and a member of the latter family has recently 
repurchased the farm which formed the estate in Cropwell Boteler of the 
yeoman John, whose son Thomas, marrying Fortune, the daughter- of Abel 
Collin, Cromwell's gunner, settled in Nottingham. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 167 

SMITH OF TE2TBTJRY 



Thomas of Tenbury, living circa 1810^= Sarah 



James Thomas = Phoebe ... 
of Clifton on I 
Teme. j 

James Thomas = Jemima .. 
of Felton I 



James Thomas. Joseph. William' George, John. Thomas. Harry. 



r — z i , i 



Mary Anne May. Phoebe. Albert Edward. Charles. AUce Maud. 

SMITH OF HORSHAM 

Charles, son of ... Smith of The Chantry, Horsham, left issue— 

(1) Rev. Charles Adam, vicar of Macclesfield. 

(2) Robert. 

(3) William Henry. 

(4) George Frederick. 

(5) Edmund James. 

(6) Caroline. 

(7) Maria. 
(81 Sophia. 

Edmund James Smith, the youngest 9on, left issue by .... dau. of John 
Noble, Esq., Governor of York Castle— 

(1) Herbert Edmund (b. 1846), educated at Eton. s.p. 

(2) Charles John (b. Jan. 14th, 1348), educated at Harrow. 

(3) Amy Margaret = Spencer Gore, Esq. 

4 Gertrude Caroline = Col. Shepherd, 9th Nortolk Regiment. 

(5) Arthur Frederick— Wellington, and Trin. Coll. Camb. 

(6) Reginald William— Rugby, and Christ Church, Oxlord. 

(7) George Cecil (died 1900). 

(8) Mabel Hannah. 

(9) Harry Griffith. 

(10) Percy Robert. 

(11) Ethel. 

SMITH OF WAVERTREE 

David Smith of Wavertree= ... Lathom of Ormskirk. 

a Roman Catholio (1779- I 

1850). 



1 I ' 

... Smith of Wavertree= ... 5 other sons. 3 daus. 

Clement of Bowdon. 

SMITH OF LEOMINSTER 

... Smith of Abergavenny (living in 1760). 
James of Abergavenny (b. 1780). 

1 T U 

James of Aston Ingham. 

! 
Thomas of Leominster. 



168 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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170 THE SMITH FAMILY 



SMITH OF STOKE DOYLE AXD OUNDLE 

John Smith of Stoke Doyle,, living in the eighteenth century, was twice 
married. He left, with others, a son, John of Stoke Doyle, contemporary, 
and presumably )Hn«man of Thomas Smith of the Chapter House, concerning 
whom presently. 

By Mary Morris of Stoke Doyle the younger John Smith had (A) John, 
D.L."and J.P., of Ndrthants, who married (1) Miss Staples, but by her had 
no issue. He married (2) Sarah B. E. Smith (vide infra), daughter of Thomas 
Smith of the Chapter House, by Sarah Seiion, and by her had (1) Sarah M = 
Charles Cowdell ; (2) John William = Editha Hume, and bv her had (a) Ruth 
M = Rev. W. R. Frith; (b) Sarah L. = Rev. W. W. Baillie ; (e) John H.= 
Marv Tavlor ; id) George, died in infancv ; (e) Edmund P.; (/) Marian H; 
[$) Helen E.: (h) Frederick H; (»') Margaret A.; (3) Emma S.=Rev. C. K. 
Bingham ; (4) Edward, died in infancy ; (5) George Percival, J.P., D.L. for 
Herefordshire, who assumed the name of Percival in addition to Smith, 
and married Martha, daughter of G. Capron, Esq. of Southwick Hall, 
bv whom he had (a) Martha B.; (b) Marv L-=Colonel Strong of Hodson's 
Horse; (c) Ellen G.; (d) Alice H; (e) Edith H=R. L. Howard; (/) Rev. 
H P. = Elizabeth M. Parker ; (g) Capron H (ob. I860), ML, Eaton Bishop ; 
(At Dorothv If. A. = C. S. Hoare ; (») Ethel F. =Rev. J. Cropper ; (/) Evelyn 
E.; (6) Elizabeth E. = R. G. B. Sellon ; (7) Paulina L.; (8) Herbert S., s.p,; 
(9) Anna H =Rev. G. H. Capron of Southwick Hall, Oundle. (B) Thomas = 
Ann York. (C) Ann = Richard Tibbits. (D) Elizabeth = Gervase Tibbits. 

(E) Frederick = Helen, daughter of Rev. R. M Boultbee, Vicar of BarnwelL 

(F) William = Ann Morris, and by her had John of Babbacombe = Helen 
Somerset, of the Beaufort family. 

We now revert to Thomas Smith of the Chapter House. By Sarah Sellon 
he had (1) Thomas Sellon, s.p. ; (2) Sarah Bridget, who married John Smith of 
Stoke Doyle (vide supra) ; (3) Anna S. M =Thomas A. Cock ; (4) Peter Baker, 
Captain R.N., who assumed his mothers name (Sellon). By his first wife 
Pnscilla L., daughter of Rev. S. White, Rector of Clerkenwell, he had 
(a) Anna = Rev. R. Joynes ; (6) William = Margaret, daughter of A. Storer, 
Esq. of Purley Park. Herts, and by her had Rev. William S. = Margaret 
Turner ; Katherine A. : Priscilla Li ; Stephanie ; Stephen W. = Mary A. 
M'Dougal; Cicely: Anthony G. ; Herbert P.; (c) Lydia, s-p. Captain 
Sellon=(2) Patty "Pybus of Bath, s.p.; (5) Rev. Edward J., Rector of scan- 
more = Anna. daughter of Rev. S. White; (6) Georee = Maria De la C. 
Navarro ; (T) Elizabeth L.=Percival N. Johnson; (8) Paulina=(i) Rev. 
R. Whittington, (ii) Rev. R. Watts; (9) Baker P., barrister = Caroline 
Hennah. 

A»v< of SsnTH or OrxDLZ (vide Graze'orook);: — Per chevron gu. and arg., 
in chief two garbs or, in base a horse's head erased of the first. 

CaEST : — Within an annulet gu., a garb or. 

Motto :— Honestt fortiter. 



PEDIGREE OF DR SMITH, PROVOST OF 
QUEEN'S COLLEGE 

Ait-\t'» : — A shield of ntne quarterings. 1. Smith, as on the hatchments in 
Kidlington Church. 2. Plantagenet, within a bordure gobonne, 
and a canton. 3. Worn out. 4. Ermine, on a canton argent a 
cross Calvary. 5. Argent, a lion rampant sable. 6. Gules, three 
lucies hauriant argent. 7. Sable, three escallop shells, within a 
bordure engrailed argent. 8. Sable, three covered tups argent. 
9. Or, two bars gules, in dexter corner a mullet pierced. 
This shield is over the tablet to Dr Joseph Smith and his wife. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 

Joan Smith of Kaaresbro', died 38 Elizabeth =... ToUoa. 



171 



Matthew Smith, S Kaaresbro', = Anne Roundle, dau. of aa 
oo. York, one of the Council I Alderman of Leeds, 
of the North (d. 1640). 



William Smith, M.A, of Care CoiL,= Elizabeth, dau. of Giles Wetherail, 
Camb., rector of Ingieton, Yorka. I of Stockton-on-j-ees. 



5th son, Joseoh Smith, MA., of Oxiord = Mary, aau.. ana to-aeiress with 
(1696), D.D", Provost of Queens 1 1730). j Baroara W-_soc. if J.enry _ow- 
Bom at Lowther. 10th October 1670. I ther, Esq., oiiag-eton 3a^ 
Died in Oxford, 1756, aged 36. j (d. 1745). 3ur.ea at nuoiington. 



Anne = Major James 
Hargreaves of Ox- 
ford,bur. at addling- 
ton, 17S3. 
| 
Rev. Joseph Smith 
Harzreaves, buried 
at Kldlington, 1S07. 



;l) Lydia, oniy = 
child of Joshua I 
3amay, late of ■ 
Wiuhamstow, 
Essex, mer- 
chant. She 
died 25th Jan. j 
1745, andwa3 : 
buried in chan- 
eei at Kidling- 
ton. 



Joseph, LL.I 
married 5 th 
■June 1740, in 
St Anthoiin'3 
Church, Lon- 
don, bur. at 
Kidlington, 
10th October 
1776. 



2 Z-Z2.:t-.z. :— 7 
dau. of James 
3ouchier. LL-D., 
of Han'oorough, 
and tf Zl-ra~e:z 
Hams parens 
buried in St Mic- 
hael's, Oxford', 
married m Queen 3 
College, Dec 1750, 
buried it Kidling- 
ton. 13th July 



Marv Fleming, 
d. April 1741 



Joseoh 
d. April *3, 1743: 






Elizabeth, born at 
Han'oorough, loth 
Aug. 1751, died Juiv 
12,1757. 



Mary Anne, bora 
in Magdalen 
Cod., Oxford, 
1752. our. at 
Eidlington, 
1752. 



Marv, born in 0x- = ° 17S31 Captain 
ford, 1753, died George Anson 
1739, bur. in >"utt. 

Greenwich Hos- i 
pitaL 

Toree sons and jce daughter. 



Joseph 3ouchier,*born 
in Oxford, 1753, matri- 
culated at Queen' 3 
ColL, li ,5 = daughter 
of Lord Coventry, no Bouchier 
no issue. 



Hams, oora Susanna, born 



in Oxford, 
1761- = i 
Miss 



Elizabeth, 
in Oxford, born in Ox- 
1762. ford. 1763. 

. Both died unmarried. 



□nana, 

bora '-a 
Oxford, 
1736, 
bur. it 

A--— Zg- 

ton, in- 
fant. 



[Pert of the above pedigree supplied by the courtesy of Dr Magrath, Provost 
of Queen's College, j 



* In T\t Giiultman i j[*vi=iiit. Dec. 29, 1322, occurs the following ■_. ifc 

on a visit to the Eari of Coventry, at Worcester. John ' 3ouchier' 5mi: = . Esq. 
He, while sealing a letter, was "attacked with spasms m the :hest, wmch in 
a few moments terminated his existence." 



have 



- In Burke'3 " Ext. Baronetage,'' under " Sidley^" Harris Smitz a M io 
,ve been admitted to Winchester College about 1772 as Founders r>_z. 



172 THE SMITH FAMILY 

SMITH AZS EAEDLEY, ALS LEFEVEE, BAETS. 

Thomas Smith of Hadley, Middlesex (whose ancestors of the name of 
Lefevre came from France, temp. Elizabeth, and assumed the cognomen of 
Smith), died in 1740, leaving an only son, 

Thomas Smith of Hadley, merchant (ob. 1744) = Culling, sister and co- 
heir of John Home, Esq., Governor of Bombay, leaving issue, 

1. Thomas of Evesham, Worcester (ob. without male issue, 1798), 

leaving two daughters, Louisa and Harriet. 

2. Culling, created a baronet. 

3. William, a captain in the E.I.C.'s naval service = Sarah, 

daughter of Humphry Sumner, D.D., Provost of King's 
College, Cambridge, and had issne — Sumner, in holy orders ; 
William Richard, R.N. ; Sarah = Rev. W. Stackhouse of 
Modbury, Devon ; Anna-Maria, and Charlotte. 

4. Charles, Governor of Madras=(l) Elizabeth Carvalho (of the 

Portuguese family of Pombal), by whom he had a son, Charles, 

an officer of the 59th Foot, who died at Gibraltar ; and (2) 

Zabier Charlotte, daughter of James Law, Esq. (of the Laws 

of Lauriston), by whom he had a son, 

Culling Charles = (1799) Lady Anne Fitzroy, widow of the 

Hon. Henry Fitzroy, and daughter of Garret Wellesley, 

Earl of Mornington, bv whom be had Frederick and 

Emily Frances = ( 1822)"Henry, Duke of Beaufort. Mr 

Culling Charles Smith died May 26, 1S53. 

5. Anne, died unmarried. 

6. Elizabeth =. John Munro, D.D., and died 1802. 

7. Maria = Rev. John Burrows, LL.D. 

8. Frances = Rev. Charles Jeffreys CottrelL 
The second son, 

1. Culling Smith, Esq. (1731-1812), created baronet December 

20, 1802. He = Mary, daughter of John Burrows, and 
sister of Rev. Dr Burrows, Rector of Hadley and St Clement 
Danes, Middlesex, by whom (who died April 5, 1782) he had 
(with a daughter Louisa = Rev. Thomas Rivett of Maresfield, 
Sussex) an only surviving son, Culling. 

2. SirCulling(b. 1769) = (September22, 1792) Charlotte Elizabeth, 

co-heiress ef Sampson,* Lord Eardley, by whom (who died 
September 15, 1826) he had Culling Eardiev, third baronet ; 
Maria Charlotte = ( October 30, 1826) Rev. Eardley Childers, 
who died at Nice in 1831 ; and Louisa Selina (ob. 1S52). 

3. Sir Culling-Eardlev Smith (assumed the names and arms of 

Eardley in lieu of" Smith, 1847) (b. 1805) = Isabella, daughter 
of Carr of Eshott, and by her had Eardley Gideon Culling, 
Frances Selina, Isabella Maria. 



DESCENT OF THE DEAN OF CHEIST CHUECH 

By Christian, daughter of Rev. E. Pain of Winchester, Samuel Smith of 
Westminster, an alleged descendant of the Regicide (Henry Smith of With- 
cote), had Rev. Samuel, LL.D., Headmaster and Prebendary of Westminster, 
Prebendarv of Peterborough, Rector, Patron, and Squire of Dry Drayton, 
Cambs. (1731-1841), whose son, Very Rev. Samuel, D.D. (1765-1841), became 
Dean of Christ Church and Prebendary of Durham. His son. Rev. Charles, 
M.A., Christ Church (1817-55), was Vicar of E. Garston and Rector of 
Boothby, and his son, Rev. C. Fullerton, M.A., Christ Church (b. 1848), is 
now Vicar of Lund, Lane. 

* Sir Sampson Gideon of Spalding, created Bart., 1759, and Lord Eardley, 
1789, left as co-heiresses (1) Maria Mason = George W., Lord Saye and Sele ; 
(2) Charlotte = Culling Smith, afterwards Sir Culling Smith ; and (3) Selina = 
Childers of Cantley. 



ENGLISH PEDIGREES 



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CHAPTEE VIII 

SCOTTISH PEDIGREES 
SMYTH! OF METHVKN CASTLE 

Thomas Smythe or Smithe, M.D., liviDg in 1477, Principal Physician 
to James ILL of Scotland. 

Patrick of Braco = . . . 



William of Braco = Agnes Scott, relict of Christ. Snel. 

Patrick of Braco, living in 1561 (ob. 1604) = Christian Haldane. 



Alexander = Margaret, dan. of Wm. Oliver, Esq. 



Patricks (1) (1618) Catherine, dau. of Dr Graham", Bishop of Orkney, 
of Braco I 
(ob. 
1651). ' 



Henry, slain at Marston Moor, George, Patrick Other 
expdrte Regis. s.p. [vide infra), issue. 

= (2) (1639) Margaret, dau. of H Stewart of Killinan. I 



I I I 

John. Rev. William = A co-heiress of Dr Ross, Atrnes = 

— I Bishop of Galloway. CoL 
David. Graham. 

— James, M.D. 
Alexander. 

= (3) Margaret Anderson. 



3 dans. 



(1) (1652) Anne, dau. of Hon. J. Keith, = Patrick of=(2) Janet, dau. of M. 
brother of William, 6th Earl Marischal. I Braco. Haldane of Gleneagles. 



Patrick, 
s.p. 



See p. 177. 



SCOTTISH PEDIGREES 



177 



r i 1 

David of= Kathleen, dau. of Cock- Mungo, Patrick 



Methven 
(ob.1732) 



rane of Kilmarnock, by 
Grizel, dau. of the 
Marquis of Montrose. 



Margaret Katherine 

= Eliz., =Sir T. =Camp. 

dau. of Mon- bell of 

CoLStras- creiffe. Glenlyon. 
burg. 



(1) Mary, dau. of J. Graham = David of Methven = (2) Kath., dau. of Lord 
ofBraco. I (1711-64 Monzie, s.p. 



(1) (1772) Elizabeth, heiress of=David Lord Methven = (2) Euphemia, a dau 
Sir R. Murray (ob. 1785) (1746-1806). of M. Murray. 



I I I 

Robert, s. p. 2 sons. 4 daus. 



(1) Margt., dau. of= William = (2) Emily, dau 



J. Walker, F.R.S. 
(ob. 1846), 



(b. 1803) 



Margaret, Viscountess 
Strathallan of Meth- 
ven Castle. 



of Sir J. Os- 
wald, G.C.B. 



Rev. P. M., R. of 
Solihull (1804- 
72) = Anne G., 
dau. of R. E. 
Mynors. 

(Issue.) 



Katherine 
(ob.1880) 
= Right 
Hon. D. 
Boyle. 



David M. Charles J. = Elizabeth, dau. Francis H. William F. Beatrice 
(b. 1350). (b. 1852). of J. King, Esq. (b. 1853). (b. 1859). 

Arms of Smythe of Methven Castle:— Az., a burning cup between 2 chess- 
rooks in /esse or. 

Crbst : — A dolphin haurient proper. 

Motto : — AlediU tranquillua in imdis. 



178 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



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SCOTTISH PEDIGREES 



179 



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180 



THE SMITH FAMILY 




SCOTTISH PEDIGREES 181 

George Smith (b. 1833), LL.D., CLE., etc., etc., 
the father of this numerous and distinguished pro- 
geny, has had a very distinguished career. He was 
Principal of Doveton College, Calcutta, editor of The 
Friend of India, Indian correspondent of the Times, 
editor of "Annals of Indian Administration," and 
was created CLE. Jan. 1, 1877, for his valuable ser- 
vices to the Indian Empire. He is also the biographer 
of Dr Carey, the missionary, Henry Martyn, Bishop 
Heber, Dr John Wilson, Indian Philanthropist, Dr 
Duff, Stephen Hislop, and Dr Somerville, and has 
further written "The Student's Geography of India," 
" The Conversion of India," " Twelve Indian States- 
men," and "A Short History of Christian Missions." 
The university of Edinburgh conferred upon him the 
honorary degree of LL.D. in 1878. 

Smith of Paisley 

James Smith of Paisley, the founder of this line = 
(1730) Jean, daughter of ... Renfrew, Esq., and by 
her had James, known as " Citizen Smith " of Paisley 
(1769-1847) = Henrietta, daughter of ... Taylor, Esq. 
By her, with others who were styled collectively 
J. & H. Smith & Co., Manufacturing Chemists of 
•Edinburgh, he had James (1792-1889) = Annie, 
daughter of ... Preston, Esq. Their son James 
(1816-86), established the eminent firm of iron- 
masters, Smith & Wellstood, and by her had William 
Macadam Smith (b. 1860), who, retiring from busi- 
ness in 1896, purchased the estate of Abbotsfield in 
Wiveliscombe. He = (1883) Helena Jane, daughter 
of ... Ross, Esq., and by her had Robina Metta; 
Dorothy Wells ; Ida Jean. Mr Macadam Smith is 
a J. P. for Somerset and a Commissioner of Supply 
for Lanarkshire. 



CHAPTER IX 



IRISH PEDIGREES 
SMITH, LATER CUSAC-SMTTH, BARTS. 

Joseph Smith of Kilbride = (1680) Elizabeth Wilkinson. 



Michael of Bally- = . . . 
naake&iob. 1747). I 



Issue— 6 sons. 



Joseph of Pick- = ... 
fordstown (ob. I 
1780). 

Issue — 2 dans. 



William = Hester Lynch. 



(1) Mary Anne, dau. of = Right Hon. Sir Michael = Eleanor, dau. of 



Jas. Cusac, Esq. 



(1769-1808). Baron 
of the Exchequer, 
1793; Bart, of Ire- 
land, 1799. 



Michael Smith, 
Esq. 



The Hon. Sir = Hester, 



William, 
D.C.L., 
F.R.S., as- 
sumed the 
name of 
Cusac. BaroD 
of the Irish 
Exchequer. 
(1766-1836.) 



dau. of 
Thomas 
Berrv of 
Eglish 
Castle. 



Angelina (ob. 
s.p. 1808) = (1) 
Smith, son of 
Sir R. Steele. 
= (2) William, 
son of Sir Kil- 
dare Borrowes. 



Maj.-Gen. M. William, = Charlotte 



C.B. 



Sir Michael = Eliza 
(1793-1859). 



Thomas = (1827) Louisa 



Carr. 



William 



Berry, 


Smith Barry Whitme 


Master 


of Marbury 


of the 


and Fota. 


Rolls in 




Ireland 




(ob. 1866). 





Eleanor 
C.A. 



I I I I 

Sir Michael Mary = H. E., Hester A. 

Wil- (1828- son of Sir H. (ob. 1863) 

liam 51). Hawley, Bart. =CoL 

(b. Craven Ord. 
1822). 



William R. = Mary Others. 

I B. Chis- 
enhale. 

Issue. 



Arms : — Quarterly 1 and i (for Smith). Arg. on a bend between 2 unicorns' 
heads erased az., armed or, 3 lozenges of the last. 2 and 3 (for 
Cusac). Per pale or and az. a /esse counterchanged. 

182 



IRISH PEDIGREES 183 

SUPPORTERS : — Dtxter, A merman sa. crintd and garnished or, bearing m 
his exterior hand a trident of the second. Sinister, A mermaid sa. 
crintd and garnished or, and bearing in her exterior hand a mirror 
ppr., framed and handled of the second. 

Crsst : — In a ducal coronet or a unicorn's head az. armed or. 

Motto : — En Dieu est main espoir. 



The Smyths of Gaybrook and Ballynatray 

There are two great Irish houses of this name — 
viz., of Gaybrook, with its branches, and of Bally- 
natray, with its branches. 

(A.) The Gaybrook line commences with William, 
who migrated to County Down from Rosedale Abbey, 
York, temp. James I. He married Mary, a grand- 
daughter of Sir Thomas Cusac, Irish Lord Chancellor. 
His grandson James, by Sarah Dawson, had Eev. Cur- 
rell Smyth, whose second son, Captain Ralph of Bally- 
macastle, Antrim, by Elizabeth, daughter of Sir R. 
Hawkesworth, had with Thomas, whence the Drum- 
cree Smyths, the Right Rev. William, Bishop of Kil- 
more. He married Mary, daughter of Chief-Justice 
Sir John Percy, and had with William, whence 
Smythe of Barba villa, Archdeacon James, who married 
Catherine, daughter of Dr Vesey, Archbishop of 
Tuam. By her he had Ralph, of whom anon ; Edward, 
Rev. James of Bath, William = Charlotte, daughter 
of Captain Stewart, and had issue— (1) James = Miss 
J. Ryan. Their son, the Rev. W. St John, Chancellor 
of Down = Mary, daughter of H. Mant, and had 
issue; (2) Ralph = A St G, daughter of Rev. T. A 
Brown, and had issue— (a) William, who by Mary, 
daughter of R. Chambers, Esq., of Whitbourne Court, 
had Edward St George = Marie, daughter ©f Mons. 
De Ligueres; and Mary St George = Rev. W. G G. 
A ustin, Demy of Magdalen, son of the late Bishop 
of Antigua; {b) Thomas Graham; (c) Colonel 



184 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Ralph. The elder son of Archdeacon Smith — 
viz., Ralph, High Sheriff of West Meath, 1766 = 
Judith, daughter of Rh. T. Cramer, Esq., and by 
her had Ralph of Gaybrook — Sheriff, 1790 = (2) 
Hannah M., and by her had, with others, Ralph of 
Gaybrook (1800-27), who, dying without issue, was 
succeeded by his next brother, Robert of Gaybrook 
(1801-78), Sheriff of West Meath, 1830 = Henrietta 
F., daughter of Right Rev. Dr Alexander, Bishop of 
Meath; and by her had (1) Ralph, his successor ; (2) 
Robert S. (b. 1837) = Christina Macpherson, and has 
issue, Ralph John ; (3) Col. James (b. 1829) = Lucy 
H, daughter of G. N. Purdon, Esq. ; and three 
daughters. Mr Ralph Smith (b. 1831), late captain 
17th Regiment, High Sheriff 1879 = 1861, Hon. Selina 
Constance, daughter of Kenelm, seventeenth Lord 
Somerville, Admiral RN. 

Arms of Smyth of Gaybrook : — Arg. on a bend 
between 2 unicorns' heads couped az., 3 lozenges or. 
Crest : — Out of a ducal coronet or a unicorn's head 
az. Motto : — Exaltabit honore. 

From the parent stem of Gaybrook issue the 
Smyths of Drumcree, e.g. Thomas of Drumcree, by 
Elizabeth Hawkesworth, had, with others, William 
of Drumcree, who married Mary, niece of Dr King, 
Archbishop of Dublin. By her he had, with Ralph, 
whence the Smyths of Glananea, Thomas of Drum- 
cree, who = (l) Alice, daughter of Thomas Nugent, 
Esq. By her he had William, his successor. He = 
(2) Miss Purefoy, and = (3) Martha, daughter of 
Archdeacon Hutchinson, by whom he had a son, 
Thomas H. Smyth, of whom anon. His elder son, 
William, M.P. for West Meath, and High Sheriff 
1770 = (1) Maria, sister to Sir W. Synot, and by her 
had (1) Robert, his heir; (2) Anne = Hon. R. Roch- 
fort. He married (2) Miss Maxwell, and by her hi d 
William M., J. P., of Drumbeg; James; threedaughter ;. 



IHISH PEDIGREES 185 

Mr Smyth, who died in 1827, was succeeded by his 
son Robert of Drumcree, Sheriff 1823, M.P. for 
West Meath County, 1826. He = Elizabeth, widow 
of Major Snodgrass, and sister of Col. Clones, by whom 
he had Alicia Maria Eliza, wife of Gen. the Hon. 
Sir Leicester Curzon, youngest son of the first Earl 
Howe, High Sheriff for West Meath 1872, who, by 
royal license, 1866, assumed the name and arms of 
Smyth. This distinguished officer was Military Secre- 
tary to Lord Raglan in the Crimean war, Commander- 
in-Chief South Africa 1880, and Governor of the 
Cape 1883. 

Smyth of Ballynegall descends directly from 
Thomas Hutchinson Smyth, vide supra, son of 
Thomas of Drumcree, by Archdeacon Hutchinson. 
He = 1796, Abigail, daughter of J. Hamilton, Esq. of 
Belfast, by whom he had, with others, Rev. Thomas 
(b. 1796) = 1832, Mary A, daughter of A. T. Gibbons, 
Esq., H.E.I.C.S., by whom he had, with others, 
Thomas James of Ballynegall, High Sheriff 1858, 
late captain Westmeath Rifles = 1864, Bessie, fourth 
daughter of Edward Anketell Jones, Esq., by whom 
he had Thomas G. H. (b. 1865) ; Ellinor M. H. ; M. 
G. A. H. — Arms of Smyth of Drumcree, the same as 
Smyth of Gaybrook, with a canton erm. for difference, 
quartering Curzon. — Arms of Smyth of Ballynegall, 
the same as those of Smyth of Gaybrook. 

Another branch of the Gaybrook stock is Smyth 
of Glananea. Ralph, second son of William of Drum- 
cree, by Mary King, purchased the estate of Glananea. 
He married in 1749, Jane, co-heiress of- Anthony 
Walsh, Esq., by whom he had William Thomas, who 
= Lucinda, daughter of the Right Hon. T. Loftus, 
and by her left, with others, Ralph of Glananea 
(1786-1839), who married Jane, a daughter of T. W. 
Fitzgerald, Esq., and by her had William Edward 
of Glananea, High Sheriff 1878, who married in 1880, 



186 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Margaret A. M., daughter of H. M. Smythe of Barba- 
villa, Esq. — Arms of Smyth of Glananea, the same as 
those of Smyth of Gaybrook. 

Yet another offshoot of the Smyths of Gaybrook 
exists in Smythe — with the final " e — " of Barbavilla, 
e.g. William of Barbavilla (b. 1693) was the youngest 
son of the Right Rev. William Smyth, Bishop of 
Kilmore. He married in 1712 Barbara, daughter of 
Sir G. Ingoldsby, second Baronet, whose wife, Eliza- 
beth Cromwell, was first cousin of Oliver. His heir, 
Ralph (1716-90) = Anne, daughter of D. Clarke, 
Esq., by whom, with others, he had William (1761- 
1812), who, by Catherine, daughter of W. M. Ogle, 
Esq., M.P., had, with Ralph his heir, William M.,. 
M.P. for Drogheda = 1815, Lady Isabella Howard, 
daughter of William, third Earl of Wicklow, and 
had issue ; Henry of Newtown = F. B. Cooke, and 
had issue ; Rev. John = Harriet, daughter of Rev. 
J. Wyatt, and had issue ; 3 daughters. Ralph 
Smythe (1786-1815) = Eliza, daughter of M. Lyster, 
Esq., and by her had (1) William Barlow = Lady 
Emily Monck ; (2) Henry Mathew of Barbavilla = 
1855, Maria, daughter of Captain, and sister of Sir 
Charles Coote, Bart., by whom he had (1) Captain 
William Lyster, R.A. = Agnes M H, daughter of 
H W. Litton, Esq.; (2) Margaret A M. = W. E. 
Smyth, Esq., of Glananea, vide supra; (3) Ada M. = 
(1) C. Bailey, Esq. ; (2) J. H. Dodgson, Esq. (4) L. 
E. Lyster ; (5) F. M. Lyster ; (6) L. L. Lyster. (3) 
Major Frederick = Ellen, daughter of B. Johnson, 
Esq., of Newcastle, and has issue. — Anns of 
Smythe of Barbavilla same as those of Smyth of 
Gaybrook. 

(B.) The Ballynacray line commences with Sir 
Richard Smyth, temp. Elizabeth, who married Mary, 
sister of Richard Boyle, first Earl of Cork, and by her 
had, with Catharine ~ W. F. Supple, ancestor of the 



IRISH PEDIGREES 187 

De Capell Brookes, Barts., and two other daughters, 
Sir Percy of Ballynatray, knighted 1629, Governor of 
Youghal. He married (1) Mary, daughter of R. 
Meade, Esq., and by her had Mabella = Sir H. Tynte, 
M.P.; Jean = B. Ussher, Esq., whose daughter = 
Francis Smyth of Rathcoursey ; Sir Percy = (2) 
Isabella, daughter of A. Ussher, Esq., and by her 
had, with William, his heir, Boyle, M.P., s.p. ; Percy, 
s.p. ; Richard ; John ; four daughters. 

His elder surviving son "William having the estate 
of Headborough, he bequeathed Ballynatray to his 
next son, Richard. By his second wife, Alice, 
daughter of Richard Grice, Esq., he had Grice of 
Ballynatray = Gertrude, daughter of W. Burton, Esq., 
whose son, Richard of Ballynatray (1706-68), by 
Penelope, daughter of J. Bateman, Esq. (his second 
wife), had, with others, (1) Richard, s.p. ; (2) Grice = 
1795, Mary Broderick, daughter of H. Mitchell, Esq., 
and by her had, with Richard, his heir, (1) Henry 
M., ancestor of Smyth of Castle Widenham ; (2) Rev. 
G. Blakeney ; (3) Rowland ; (4) Sir John Rowland, 
K.C.B., General, and Colonel of the 6th Dragoon 
Guards = Hon. C. A. Abbot, daughter of Charles, first 
Lord Tenterden, and by her had a daughter, who 
married her cousin, the fourth Lord Tenterden ; (5) 
Helen = H. Wallis, Esq.; (6) Penelope = The Prince 
of Capua, and dying, left a son, F. F. B., Prince 
of Capua; (7) Gertrude = 1840, William L., first 
Lord Dinorben. Their daughter = 1871, Sir Arundel 
Neave, Bart., and dying 1877, left Sir T. L. Neave, 
Bart., and other issue. 

Richard, the heir (1796-1846) = Hon. H. St L., 
daughter of Hayes, second Lord Doneraile, and had 
by her Charlotte M. of Ballynatray = Hon. C. W. 
Moore, second son of Stephen, third Earl of Mount- 
cashell, and has issue— (1) Richard Charles Moore = 
1884, Helen S., daughter of Rev. W. Makellar ; (2) 



188 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Harriette G. I. = Captain Holroyde, and has issue; (3), 
Charlotte A. L. R. The Hon. C. W. Moore assumed 
by royal licence the name and arms of Smyth, and 
served as High Sheriff for Waterford, 1862. 

The Ballynatray line bear the arms of the Gaybrook 
line, with a crescent for difference. 

Crest : — Out of a ducal coronet or a demi-bull salient 
arg. armed and unguled or, and charged with a cres- 
cent gu. for difference. Motto : — Cum plena magis. 

The actual senior line of Ballynatray is that of 
Headborough (M.1 in the ruined cathedral of Ard- 
more). It will be remembered that William, son of 
Sir Percy of Ballynatray was assigned the estate of 
Headborough. By Anne, daughter of Richard Smyth 
of Bridgfield, Cork, he had, with others, Percy of 
Headborough = Elizabeth, daughter of J. Jervois, 
Esq. By her he had William, who, dying s.p. in 
1794, bequeathed Headborough to the son of his 
third sister Anne, who had married Hibernicus Scott. 
Percy Scott Smith, Esq. = Sarah, daughter of S. 
Kingston, Esq. of Bandon, and by her had William, 
s.p. ; Rev. Percy, who, by Catherine, daughter of J. 
Odell, Esq., had Percy, High Sheriff for Waterford, 
1872 = 1868, Mary, daughter of R. P. Maxwell, Esq. 
of Finnabrogue, and by her has Percy R. E. (b. 1870); 
Cecil E (b. 1871); Robert R (b. 1875) ; Ethel Maud ; 
Louisa M. K. — Arms : — The same as those of Gay-, 
brook. Crest : — As of Ballynatray, and motto. 

A third offshoot of the Ballynatray line is that of 
Castle Widenham. Henry Mitchell, second son of 
Grice Smyth of Ballynatray = Priscilla Widenham, 
daughter of John Creagh, Esq., by his wife Elizabeth, 
daughter of Charles Widenham of Castle Widenham. 
By her he had Grice R, s.p. ; Lieut. Percy C, 
killed at Lucknow, 1858 ; Henry John Widenham of 
Castle Widenham ; Mary = E. Shelley, Esq., of Aving- 
ton Park ; Elizabeth = John Glover, Esq. ; Penelope = 



IRISH PEDIGREES 



189 



Maximilian Grant, Esq., 2nd Life Guards; Priscilla = 
B. H. Heathcote, Esq., of Raleigh. Henry J. "Widen- 
ham Smyth, Esq. (b. 1834) = 1864, Emily M., daughter 
of Abraham W. Robarts, Esq., of Roehampton, who 
died, s.p., 1865. — Arms of Smyth of Widenham: — The 
same as those of Headborough, but quartering Grice, 
Rogers, and Mitchell. Crest and motto also the same. 

SMYTH OF DUEPAEK— LEITEIM 

John Smyth of Dorpark (b. 1756)=Catherine Rourke. 



Thomas John (1300-47) = (1835) Frances, 2nddau.of 

(b. 1797). John Canon, Esq., of 

Ardechnan, by Jane, 
dau. of Lloyd of Ardna- 
gowan.* 



Jane (b. 1300), a. p. 



1 1 1 

John William Thomas 
(b. 1836). Henry (b. 1847). 
(1842- 
70), s. p. 


= 1873, Sarah, 
dau. of 
William 
Henry 
Monro, by 
Sarah 
Eales 
Alexander. 


Catherine = John Cullam. 


1 

William Henry 

(b. 1S74). 




1 

Alexander E. 
(1881-84). 


Frances May 
(b. 188H). 


Alfred John 
(b. 1876). 


V 


Falter Monro 
(b. 1884). 


Emily S. 
(b. 1389). 


Thomas Francis 
(b. 1873). 




Percy 
(b. 1893). 


Eileen Mary 
(b. 1891). 


Henry Carson 
(b. 1880). 




Herbert 
(b. 1896). 


Evelyn Maude 
(b. 1S94). 



* The Lloyds of Ardnagowan were related to Oliver Goldsmith, whose 
grandmother was a Lloyd of that ilk, and who was born in the Parish of 
Smithhill, ala Ardnagowan. The last Lloyd of Ardnagowan was in Holy 
Orders, and held the benefice of Anchrin. He was assassinated in 1347 as he 
was returning from the performance of divine service. His father was Robert 
Jones Lloyd, and it is noteworthy that he baptised all the Carson family, 
though they were not parishioners of his. 



190 



THE SMITH FAMILY 















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192 



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194 THE SMITH FAMILY 

The founder of this family, Mr Samuel Smith, 
migrated to Ireland with King William the Third. 
His immediate descendants were evidently strong 
Whigs, and his son, Patrick, moved from Belfast to 
Waterford at the suggestion of Lord Chesterfield, in 
order to introduce the growth of flax to the south of 
Ireland. His son, Samuel, was a merchant of Cat- 
eaton Street. In 1745, writing under the sobriquet 
" Veteran," though stated to be then a very young 
man, he launched a subscription for the English 
troops under Marshal Wade, then fighting against 
Prince Charles Edward. This elicited a letter of 
approbation from the Duke of Cumberland, whom 
he accompanied to Scotland, being present at 
Culloden, on which occasion the duke, in recogni- 
tion of his gallantry, gave him his pistols. He 
was also, on being presented at Court, thanked per- 
sonally by George IL His wife, Mary, daughter of 
Lieut. -Col. Worge, was a member of a Norman 
family included in the Muster Roll for the Rape of 
Hastings, 13 Edward HI. — Book of Battle Abbey. 
[ Vide " Life of General Worge, Governor of Senegal," 
by George Puke, Barrister — Parker & Furnival, 
London, 1844.] 

Sir J. S. Purcell, EL.C.B., son of Mary Anne Smith 
by Dr Purcell, Poor Law Commissioner for Ireland, 
possesses some interesting family portraits of the 
Smiths, as also Sir Spencer Maryon Wilson, Bart., of 
Charlton House, Kent. The Purcells came over 
from France with William the Conqueror, and Sir 
Hugh Purcell accompanied Strongbow to Ireland, 
and founded a church in Waterford, wherein he lies 
buried, as also the ancestors of Lord Roberts. A 
portrait of Patrick Smith of Waterford, by Gains- 
borough, is said to be in existence. 

Mr Worge Smith sold the moiety of 20,000 acres 
left him by his father to Lord Selkirk for £200. It 



IRISH PEDIGREES 195 

seems that thirty years' rental was owing to Govern- 
ment, and the estate was put up to auction, Lord S. 
being the purchaser for £6000. To perfect his title, 
he purchased Mr "Worge Smith's interest. [Erom a 
document in the possession of Sir S. Maryon Wilson, 
Bart.] 

Arms of Smith of "Waterford : — Erm. on a bend 
between 2 unicorns' heads erased az., 3 lozenges or. 
Crest : — A demi-bull rampant issuing from a ducal 
coronet or, crowned and horned of the same, and 
gorged with a collar az., charged with 3 lozenges and 
ermined of the second. 

SMITH OF MONAGHA2T 

This family dates from the Settlement of Ulster, temp., Jac. I. 

The Venerable John Smith, = Lady Jane Brabazon, dan. of the Earl 
Archdeacon of Clogher. I of Westmeath. 



Rev. William, Rector of Clones in 1689. = Lady Elizabeth Pakenham, 
Chaplain to William and Mary. I dau. of Lord Longford. 

1 | | 

Pakenham, s.p. John, 3.p. Henry= ... Digby. 

I I 
Henry = Mary, dau. of . . . Atkinson of Channon Rock, Others. 
I a descendant of Atkinson of Cangort 
Castle, one of the original grantees at 
| the Settlement of Ulster. 

David = Hannah Julia Atkinson, dau. of Captain A. of Corderry. 
Henry, s.p. = Miss Sondes. E. A. Smith (Miss). 

I i i 

A son, s.p. John Sondes = ... dau. of Major A dau. = Dillon Lawson, Esq., 
Sargint. Galway. 

The Rev. William Smith had a narrow escape when 
Clones was besieged by the Jacobites under Sars- 
field. The town was surrounded by the enemy, and 
he with his Protestant parishioners effected their 
escape per an underground passage leading from the 
fort underneath the town. They reached Dutch 
William's camp in safety. 



196 



THE SMITH FAMILY 



Mr Dillon Lawson informs me that the Monaghan 
estate came into Archdeacon Smith's possession 
circa 1626. It formed originally part of the Mac- 
mahon lands (hereditary princes, under the O'Donnell 
princes of Tyrconnel), which were confiscated and 
sold by the Crown. An abortive attempt was made 
about one hundred years ago by the Macmahons to 
recover their lands. After a prolonged lawsuit, 
judgment was given in favour of Mr David Smith. 

SMYTH OF MASOKBROOK 

James Smyth of Masonbrook = Charlotte, dau. of Major Macdermott. 



Captain John, = (1863) Charlotte, James Captain Annie Joseph 



High Sheriff 
for Galwav 
1878 (b. 18"35). 



I 
John James, 
Connaught 
Rangers 
(b. 1866). 



dau. of A. W. (1839- Anthony ine = (1857) 
Blake of Fur- 76). (b. 1842). John Martyn, 

bough, Galway. Esq. of Tillyra 

Castle. 



I 
Louisa, 
a nun. 



Robert H. 
(b. 1869). 



Edgar 
(b. 1873). 



I 
Harold 
(b. 1878). 



Marian. Mildred. 



SMITH, OR SMYTH, OF LIMERICK 

From Smyth of Dumdrum, Louth, came 
Thomas, D.D., Bishop of Limerick, 1695=... 



Rev. John, Chancellor of Connor = ... Others. 



Rev. Charles of Smithfield = . 



23 others. 



Captain John, R.A. , killed in the 
Peninsular War. 



Eliza = Joseph Samuel Hume 

| of Humewood, Wicklow. 

William Charles = . . . 

J. S. Hume of Mallow. 

The Rev. Chancellor Smyth married beneath him, and for many years was 
estranged from his father the Bishop. At last, a reconciliation having been 
effected, he duly presented his plebeian wife. His Lordship inquired the 
number of a family. ' ' A score and a cast, my Lord 1 " was the cool reply. 
" What ! " exclaimed the Bishop, "do you count your children as fish women 
count oysters?" The upshot was that the Bishop did not speak to her 
again. 



IRISH PEDIGREES 



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THE SMITH FAMILY 





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CHAPTER X 

CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 

Inasmuch as very many bearing the name Smith 
under its various spellings have achieved distinction, 
but not all of them can be associated with any of the 
foregoing pedigrees, it seems advisable to append a 
brief catalogue of celebrities. Here I must own my in- 
debtedness to the "Dictionary of National Biography," 
which, however, I have by no means slavishly fol- 
lowed, some of its articles, e.g. that, on Charles 
Reade, bristling with inaccuracies, and some also — 
again like that particular article — being injurious 
and unjust, and that too in reckless defiance of such 
competent critics as Messrs Swinburne, Besant, and 
Edwin Arnold. In the main, however, as regards 
data, this monumental compilation is fairly trust- 
worthy, albeit some names of eminence are omitted 
from its pages, while very small celebrities have 
been accorded a place. It has not, I am bound to 
add, libelled any Smith, but one or two chronicled 
were not worth immortality. I have arranged the 
various Smith celebrities, according to their respective 
callings, in groups. A few already mentioned in 
the preceding pedigrees have a star attached to their 
names for the convenience of the reader, and where 
no star is appended I have been unable to trace the 
descent of the particular individual, or, rather, I have 
left that task to more competent hands. I need 
scarcely add that the catalogue — like that of the 
" Dictionary of National Biography " — is far from ex- 

200 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 201 

haustive, but I trust it may prove helpful by way of 
reference. 



Distinguished Politicians and Lawyers 

Sib Thomas Smith or Smijth* (1513-77), states- 
man, eldest son of John Smith of Saffron Walden. 
His father claimed descent from Sir Roger De 
Clarendon, an illegitimate son of the Black Prince, 
and served as Sheriff of Essex and Herts. Educated 
at Queen's, Cambridge, as King's Scholar, B.A. 1529, 
and Fellow of Queen's. In 1533 M.A., and in 1538 
Public Orator. D.C.L of Padua, 1542, and in the 
same year LL.D. of Cambridge, where he took a lead- 
ing part in altering the prevailing pronunciation of 
Greek, publishing at Paris, 1568, a Tractate " de 
emendata Linguae Gnecae pronuntiatione." Regius 
Professor of Civil Law and Vice- Chancellor of Cam- 
bridge, 1544, Chancellor of Ely, 1545, and in 1546, 
having been ordained priest, Rector of Leverington. 
Prebendary of Lincoln. A strong Protestant, and 
by Edward VI. made in consequence Provost of 
Eton and Dean of Carlisle. In 1548 knighted. For 
his association with Protector Somerset he was im- 
prisoned in the Tower. On the accession of Mary, 
Gardiner stood his friend, but he resigned his pre- 
ferments, having been elected M.P. for Grampound. 
In 1559 elected M.P. for Liverpool, and a member 
of the Commission to revise the Prayer Book. 
Ambassador to France, 1570. During his absence 
made Chancellor of the Order of the Garter, and 
M.P. for Essex. Died at Theydon Mount. M.I. 
He left his library to Queen's, Cambridge. Portraits 
at Theydon Mount (by Holbein) and — a copy — at 
Eton College. He married (1) (1548) Elizabeth, 
daughter of W. Carkyke (1529-52), and (2) Philippa, 
daughter of Sir John Wilfrid of London, and widow 



202 THE SMITH FAMILY 

of Sir John Hampden. He died s.p., his heir being 
his nephew "William (d. 1626), whose .son Thomas 
was created Bart, in 1661, and was ancestor of the 
Smijths, Barts. Sir Thomas had an illegitimate son 
born a year after he was ordained priest, which dis- 
counts the encomia passed on him by Protestant 
writers. But he was a classical scholar, and learned 
in physics, mathematics, astronomy, and astrology. 
He was also a voluminous writer (vide Strype's " Life 
of Sir T Smith," 1698). 

Sib Thomas Smith* (1556-1609), Master of Be- 
quests, was born at Abingdon, being son of a mayor 
of that borough. Educated at Abingdon School and 
Christ Church, Oxford. Student, 1573; B.A., 1574; 
M.A, 1578; Public Orator, 1582; Proctor, 1584. 
In 1587 Clerk of the Privy Council. M.P. for Crick- 
lade, Tamworth, and Aylesbury. In 1597 Clerk of 
Parliament. Knighted at Greenwich, May 23, 1603. 
In 1608 Master of Requests. Died at Peterborough 
House, Parson's Green, S.W. Buried at Fulham. 
M.I. He married Frances (1580-1663), daughter of 
William Brydges, fourth Lord Chandos. His only 
surviving child, Margaret, married Robert Carey, 
first Earl of Monmouth. His widow re-married 
Thomas Cecil, first Earl of Exeter. A benefactor 
to the Bodleian. 

Sir John Smythe* (1534-1607), diplomatist, eldest 
son of Sir Clement Smythe of Little Baddow, Essex, 
Lord of the Manor of Rivenhall, and knighted 1547, 
but was " chidden " by Edward VI. for hearing 
Mass just before his death in 1552. Sir Clement 
married Dorothy, daughter of Sir John Seymour, 
sister of the Duke of Somerset and of Queen Jane 
Seymour. Sir John is stated by A A Wood to 
have been at Oxford — but query ? He was a 
Roman Catholic, and at variance with his Royal 
relatives. Served in the French army during the 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 203 

reign of Edward VI. In 1572 the Queen gave him 
(or probably restored to him) the Manor of Baddow, 
and he entered her service and was knighted. In 
1577 Ambassador to Madrid In 1589 he produced 
several military works, advocating, inter alia, the 
use of the bow, which was falling into desuetude, 
and in 1594 a second work. In 1589 he used sediti- 
ous words to a company of pikemen, and was 
arrested on a charge of treason. He remained a 
prisoner in the Tower up to 1598, when he was 
released on parole. Buried at Little Baddow. 

John Smith* (1657-1726), Judge, son of Roger 
Smith of Frolesworth, Leicester. Educated at 
Lincoln College, Oxon. Called to the Bar at Gray's 
Inn, 1684. Serjeant, 1700, and Justice of the Com- 
mon Pleas in Ireland. Transferred as Baron of the 
Exchequer to England, 1702. Lord Chief Baron of 
the Exchequer in Scotland, 1708. He founded a 
hospital for widows at Frolesworth. 

Sir Thomas Smythe* (1558-1625), Governor of 
the E.I.C., son of Thomas Smythe of Westenhanger, 
Kent, by a daughter of Sir Andrew Judd. His 
grandfather was a tradesman of Corsham, Wilts. 
His father purchased Westenhanger of Sir Thomas 
Sackville. Buried at Ashford. M.I. (His heir, Sir 
John (d. 1608), was Sheriff of Kent in 1600, and 
father of Sir Thomas Smythe, Viscount Strangford. 
Thomas, a younger son, was admitted to the Haber- 
dashers' Company and also to the Skinners'.) When 
the E.I.C. was formed he became its first governor, 
having served in the previous year, 1599, as Sheriff 
of London. Accused of participation in Essex's 
rebellion, but acquitted. Knighted May 13, 1603, 
at the accession of James I. In 1604 Receiver of 
the Duchy of Cornwall. Remained governor of 
E.I.C. up to 1621. ' Supported the efforts to secure 
the North- West passage, and Baffin stereotyped his 



204 THE SMITH FAMILY 

name in "Smith's Sound." Accused of enriching 
himself at the expense of the E.I.C., and during the 
trial died at Sutton-at-Hone, where he was buried. 
M.I. He assisted his grandfather, Sir A Judd, to 
found Tonbridge School. Married three wives. By 
the third, Sarah, daughter of William Blount, he had 
a daughter, who died s.p., and three sons, of whom 
the elder, Sir John of Bidborough, had issue, which 
terminated with Sir Sidney Stafford Smythe (1705-78). 

John Smith* (1655-1723), politician, son of J. 
Smith of South Tedworth, Hants. Educated at St 
John's, Oxford, but did not graduate. Student of the 
Middle Temple, 1674. M.P. for Ludgershall, 1678 
and 1681. M.P. in the Convention Parliament for 
Beeralston, 1691-95, and for Andover in six parlia- 
ments, viz. from 1695 to 1713, and for East Looe 
from 1715 to 1723. A staunch Protestant and Whig, 
for which party he was whip in the Convention 
Parliament. In 1705 elected Speaker, and re-elected 
in 1707. Resigned in 1708, on becoming Chancellor 
of the Exchequer. A great ally of Godolphin. 
Acted as manager in the impeachment of Sacheverell, 
and subsequently supported Sir R. Walpole. Buried 
at South Tedworth ; M.I. His estate passed later on 
to Thomas Assheton, who assumed the name of 
Smith. His daughter Mary married in 1705, Hon. 
R. S. Herbert, second son of Thomas, eighth Earl of 
Pembroke. 

Aaron Smith * (d. 1697), Solicitor to the Treasury, 
mentioned in a proclamation, June 1, 1677, as a 
seditious person. As frequenter of the Rose Tavern, 
he associated with Titus Oates, and attempted to ally 
himself with Sir John Trenchard and the supporters of 
the Prince of Orange. He was No. 45 of the 48 mem- 
bers of the Green Ribbon Club in 1679 (vide Danger- 
field, " Discovery of the Designs of the Papists," 1681). 
On January 30, 1682, be appeared at the King's 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 205 

Bench in answer to a charge of providing one Stephen 
Colledge with seditious papers for the purposes of his 
defence. Tried, he was found guilty of this, and of 
using disloyal words. He managed to escape before 
sentence was pronounced, and was despatched by 
Monmouth, Russell, etc., to forward their cause in 
the North. When the Rye House Plot was dis- 
covered Smith was arrested, and on July 4, 1683, 
committed to the Tower. Proof being absent, he 
was sentenced for his former offence to a fine of 
£500 and to be detained during the Bang's pleasure. 
He was released in March 1688. William III., on 
coming to the throne, made him Solicitor to the 
Treasury and Public Prosecutor. Ninety-nine out 
of a hundred of his charges were thrown out by the 
Grand Juries. In November 1692 he was summoned 
before the Lords to explain the procedure followed 
in the arrests of Lords Marlborough and Huntingdon 
(Hatton Correspondence, II. 186). On Sir John 
Trenchard becoming Secretary of State for the 
Northern Departments, Smith brought false accusa- 
tions against innocent Lancashire gentlemen, and 
was suspected of malversation of public funds. In 
February 1696 he was examined by the House of 
Commons as to his accounts, and failing to deliver 
them was ordered into custody and deprived of 
his offices and emoluments. Pleading illness, he was 
granted an extension by the House to January 16, 
1697. He failed to appear, and is believed to have 
died in the same year. He has been confused with 
John Smith (1655-1723), Chancellor of the Ex- 
chequer, 1699, and first Speaker after the Union. 

Matthew Smith (circa 1696), nephew of Sir W. 
Parkyns, entered Viscount Castleton's Regiment of 
Foot, 1693, but was discharged, and, occupying rooms 
in the Temple, wormed himself into the secrets of the 
Jacobites. In 1695 he offered to sell this informa- 



206 THE SMITH FAMILY 

tion to the Duke of Shrewsbury. He subsequently 
became the tool of Somers and Vernon, Under- 
Secretary of State, accepted the patronage of Mon- 
mouth, but was ready to sell either friend or foe. 
Eventually he framed an indictment against the 
Whigs, and offered it to the House of Commons. 
Kingston stigmatised him as a Squire of Alsatia, and 
he seems to have played the part of the common 
informer in reckless defiance of all considerations 
except his own interest. 

Charles Smith* (1713-77), son of Charles Smith, 
miller of Croydon. Educated at Radcliff School, 
realised a fortune in the corn trade, and became 
J. P. at Stratford. A great authority on contem- 
porary corn values. His "Tracts on the Corn 
Trade" won the encomium of Adam Smith. He 
was killed by a fall from his horse, February 8, 1777. 
By his wife, Judith, daughter of Isaac Lefevre, 
Huguenot, he had Charles of Suttons, MP. for 
Westbury, 1802. 

William Smith * (1756-1835), Political Dissenter, 
only son of Samuel Smith, merchant, of Clapham 
Common. His people hailed from the Isle of 
Wight, where they had held an estate for two 
centuries. Educated at Daventry, and supposed to 
have been a stockbroker. M.P. for Sudbury, 1784 ; 
for Camelford, 1791 ; for Sudbury, the second time, 
1796 ; and in 1802 for Norwich. In 1806 he lost his 
seat, and in 1807 was re-elected for Norwich, as also 
in 1812, 1818, 1820, and 1826. In 1830 he retired 
from public life. He spoke in favour of the repeal 
of the Test and Corporation Acts, and favoured 
Catholic claims. In a debate on religious disabilities 
he said : "As long as my name's William, I will 
stand up for my principles." The following lines 
show his political attitude : — 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 207 

" At length when the candles burn low in their sockets, 
Up gets William Smith with his hands in his pockets, 
On a course of morality fearlessly enters, 
With all the opinions of all the Dissenters." 

He supported William Wilberforce with warmth. 
Although a Nonconformist, he was a judicious 
patron of art, and among his friends were Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, Fox, Sir J. Mackintosh, and Sir Philip 
Francis. He married, 1781, Frances Coape, and by 
her had five sons and five daughters, all distinguished 
by longevity. His eldest son (1783-1860) represented 
Norwich from 1838 to 1847. Like his sire, he was 
a strong Liberal. 

Sir William Cusac Smith,* Bart. (1766-1836), 
Irish judge and pamphleteer, eldest son of Sir Michael 
Smith, Baron of the Irish Court of Exchequer, who be- 
came (1801-6) Master of the Rolls in Ireland, and was 
created Bart, in 1779. His mother's name was Cusac 
of Coolmine. Educated at Eton and Christ Church, 
Oxford, graduating in 1788. A personal friend of 
Edmund Burke. Called to the Bar in 1788, he 
became King's Counsel, 1795. M.P. for Donegal, 
1795, where he favoured the Union. In 1800 ap- 
pointed Solicitor-General of Ireland, and in 1801 
Baron of the Irish Exchequer. In 1834 attacked by 
O'Connell for partiality, but vindicated by the con- 
gratulatory addresses of nearly every grand jury in 
Ireland. He married Hester, daughter of Thomas 
Berry, Esq., of Eglish. Wrote verse under a 
pseudonym. His son, Thomas Barry Cusac Smith 
(1795-1866), educated at Dublin, unsuccessfully con- 
tested Youghal against O'Connell's son, but was 
returned in 1843 for Ripon, and became Master of 
the Rolls. O'Connell christened him " xAiphabet " 
and "The Vinegar Cruet." He married in 1S27, 
Louisa, daughter of Thomas Smith Barry, Esq., of 
Fota. 



208 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Robert Percy Smith * (Bobus) (1770-1845), brother 
of Sydney Smith. At Eton with Hookham Frere, 
Canning, and the third Lord Holland. In 1788 
Battie's Scholar, and in 1791 Browne's Medallist, B. A 
Bang's, Cambridge, 1794 ; M.A, 1797, in which year 
he was called to the Bar of Lincoln's Inn. In 1803 
Advocate-General- of Bengal. In 1812 M.P. for 
Grantham. Defeated at Lincoln in 1818, but elected 
in 1820, representing the borough up to 1826. A 
distinguished Latin versifier, and a reputed wit. He 
married in 1797, Caroline, daughter of Richard 
Vernon, M.P. for Tavistock, and by her had Robert, 
Lord Lyveden. 

Thomas Assheton Smith* (1776-1858), ■ son of 
T. A Smith, and descended from John Smith of 
South Tedworth, the Whig Whip in the Convention 
Parliament. Educated at Eton and Gen. Com. 
Christ Church. M.P. for Andover, 1821-31, and 
for Carnarvonshire, 1832-41. A leading member of 
Lords, and famous cricketer. From 1806 to 1816 
Master of the Quorn, and from 1816 to 1824 of the 
Burton. In 1832, in consequence of the Reform 
riots, he raised, at his own expense, a troop of horse. 
For many years a member of the R.Y.S., but quar- 
relled with the Committee over steam yachts. 
Married, October 29, 1827, Matilda, daughter of 
William Webber of Binfield, s.p. Died at Vaynol, 
Carnarvon, and buried at Tedworth. His widow 
died at Compton Bassett, 1859. 

John Prince Smith f (1774-1822), Law Reporter 
and Editor of the Law Journal. Died at Demerara. 

John Prince Smith, junior (1809-74), Political 
Economist, and son of above. Educated at Eton. 
A member of the Free Trade Union of Berlin, 1840, 
and in 1870 member of the Reichstag. 

t Query whether these Prince Smiths were of the Chichester family ? — vide 
supra. 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 209 

Robert Vernon Smith 1 * (later Vernon), Lord 
Lyveden (1800-73), a nephew of Sydney Smith, and 
the only son of Percy (Bobus) Smith. Educated at 
Eton and Christ Church, Oxford. B.A (second in 
classics), 1822. Student of the Inner Temple, but -was 
not called to the Bar. M.P. for Tralee, 1829-30, in 
which year he was Junior Lord of the Treasury 
under Earl Grey. In Lord Melbourne's second ad- 
ministration, i.e. from 1835 to 1839, he was joint 
secretary of the Board of Control, and Secretary 
for the Colonies from 1839 to 1841. Secretary at 
War under Lord John Russell, 1852. From Febru- 
ary 1855 to March 1858 President of the Board 
of Control, with a seat in the Cabinet. M.P. for 
Northampton, 1831, which borough he represented 
until 1859, when he was summoned to the Lords 
as Baron Lyveden. Abandoned his patronymic 
Smith for Vernon. Metropolitan Commissioner in 
Lunacy. G.C.B., 1872. Edited Horace Walpole's 
"Letters," and the early writings of his father. 
He married in 1823 the Hon. Emma Mary, daughter 
of John, second Earl of Ossory. 

John Abel Smith* (1801-71), banker, son of J. 
Smith of Blendon Hall, Kent, a member of the firm 
of which the first Lord Carrington was head. 
Educated at Christ's, Cambridge. B.A, 1824 ; 
M.A, 1827. Chief partner in Smith, Payne & Co. 
M.P. for Midhurst, 1830; M.P. for Chichester, 
1831-59 ; again elected 1863-68. A Liberal. Sup- 
ported Lord Grey's Reform Bill, and the Bill for the 
admission of Jews to Parliament. In 1869 he intro- 
duced a Bill to limit the hours of closing. Although 
a prominent member • of the Whig party, he said, 
a propos of the ballot, that if it were introduced into 
the House, and members were permitted to vote 
secretly, none but the most Tory measures would 
have a chance of passing. In 1827 he married Anne, 
o 



210 THE SMITH FAMILY 

daughter of Sir S. Clarke-Jervoise, Bart., and widow 
of R W. Grey of Back worth. By her he had (1) 
Jervoise (b. 1828), (2) Dudley R (b. 1830). He 
died at Kippington, Kent. J. P. for Middlesex and 
Sussex. 

Augustus John Smith* (1804-72), Lessee of Scilly, 
son of Jas. Smith, Esq., of Ashlyns Hall, Herts, (vide 
Lord Carrington), by Mary Isabella, daughter of 
Augustus Pechell, Esq. Born in Harley Street ; 
educated at Harrow and Christ Church ; B.A 1826. 
A strong Liberal, he engaged navvies to destroy the 
fences Lord Brownlow had erected around the com- 
mon at Ashridge ; see Punch — " A Lay of Modern 
England," March 24, 1866. A great benefactor to 
the Scilly Isles. He contested Truro unsuccessfully 
in 1852, but was returned unopposed in 1857. Presi- 
dent of the Royal Geological Society of Cornwall; 
author of " A True and Faithful History of the 
Family of Smith from Notts," 1861. He was suc- 
ceeded at Tresco by his nephew, T. A Smith-Dorrien. 

John William Smith (1809-45), eldest son of John 
Smith, Paymaster to the Forces in Ireland. In 1821 
Queen's Scholar of Westminster ; B.A, Dublin ; 
gold medal, 1829 ; called to the Bar of the Inner 
Temple, 1834. From 1837 to 1843 Lecturer at the 
Law Institution, and in 1840 Revising Barrister. 
Buried at Kensal Green. M.I., Temple Church. A 
voluminous author on legal subjects. 

Sir Montagu Edward Smith (1809-91), judge, son 
of Thomas Smith of Bideford, solicitor. Educated at 
Bid eford School. Entered at Gray's Inn, 1830. Called 
to the Bar, 1835 ; Q.C. 1853, and Bencher of Che 
Middle Temple. Conservative M.P. for Truro, 1859 ; 
Treasurer of the Middle Temple, 1863 ; appointed 
judge by Lord Westbury 1865, and knighted. 
Judicial member of the Privy Council, 1871 ; resigned 
1881, and died unmarried ten years later. 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 211 

Joshua Toulmin Smith* (1816-69), son of W. 
Hawkes Smith of Birmingham, student of Lincoln's 
Inn, 1835. In 1837 married Martha, daughter of W. 
J. Kendall, and emigrated to the U.S.A., settling at 
Boston. In 1842 he returned home, and attained 
celebrity as a writer on geology. A vehement op- 
ponent of centralisation, and in 1848-9 espoused the 
cause of Kossuth and Hungary. In 1854 he formed 
theAnti-Centralisation Union, and in 1857 established 
" The Parliamentary Remembrancer." Drowned at 
Lancing, and buried in Hornsey churchyard. A pro- 
lific writer, and a man of versatile intelligence. His 
most valuable work is that on English guilds. 

Josiah W. Smith (1816-87), legal writer, son of 
John Smith, Rector of Baldock. LL.B. Trinity 
College, Cambridge, 1841, in which year he was 
called to the Bar of Lincoln's Inn ; Q.C. 1861, and 
Bencher of Lincoln's Inn. County Court judge at 
Hereford. He married in 1844, Mary, daughter of Dr 
Hicks of Baldock. 

Robert Smith,* 1st Lord Carrington (1752-1838), 
eldest surviving son of Abel Smith, by Mary, daughter 
of Thomas Bird of Barton, Warwickshire. Baptised at 
St Peter's, Nottingham. His father, of the firm of 
Smith, Payne & Co.,. represented Aldborough 1774; 
St Ives 1780, and St Germans 1785. Elected M.P. 
for Nottingham 1779, and returned during the follow- 
ing five parliaments. Summoned to the Upper House 
1797 ; a warm friend of Pitt, and a patron of the poet 
Cowper. He owned the pocket boroughs of Mid- 
hurst and Wendover, and this secured for him, first 
in 1796, an Irish peerage, and in the next year a 
peerage of the United Kingdom. It was whispered 
that his financial aid to Pitt won him these honours, 
but he boldly refuted this slander in 1836 by a 
letter to the Quarterly. D.C.L., Oxford, 1810 ; LL.D., 
Cambridge, 1819 ; Vice-President of the Royal 



212 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Literary Fund, F.R.S., F.S.A A strong Tory 
throughout, and a man of reserve, but great natural 
nobility of character. Buried at High "Wycombe. 
He married, first, 1780, Anne, daughter of L. B. 
Barnard of Cave Castle, by whom he had a son, 
Robert John, born 1796, who took the name of 
Carrington, in lieu of Smith, by Royal Licence, 1839, 
and was succeeded by Charles Robert, who changed 
the family name to Carington. 

Erasmus Smith* (1611-1691), son of Sir Roger 
Smith, alias Heriz of Husbands Bos worth. " Silver 
tongue " Smith was his uncle. A Turkey mer- 
chant and member of the Grocer's Company. On 
the score of a debt owed by the Court to his father, 
he applied to Charles II. for the office of Carver to 
the Queen. He was granted 600 acres of land in 
Tipperary in 1652 — the Cromwellian Settlement, 
and by purchase and otherwise, in 1684 owned 46,000 
acres in nine Irish shires. In 1656 he had been a con- 
tractor for the troops in Ireland. Alderman of Billings- 
gate, 1657 ; a benefactor to Trinity College, Dublin, 
and Christ's Hospital, London. Resided at Clerkenwell 
and Weald Hall, Essex. He married Mary, daughter 
of the 1st Lord Coleraine, and by her had six sons 
and three daughters. His fourth son, Hugh of Weald, 
married Dorothy Barrett Lennard of Belhouse, and 
by her had two daughters, of whom, Lucy, married 
James Stanley, Lord Strange, who took the name of 
Smith Stanley, not now retained by the Earls of 
Derby. Buried at Hamerton, Hants. His portrait 
is in Christ's Hospital. 

The Right Hon. William H. Smith * (1825-91), son 
of W. H. Smith, newsvendor, and grandson of Henry 
Walton Smith, who held a commission in the Navy, was 
educated at Harrow, and married Anna Easthaugh 
at Christ's Church, Middlesex. (?) His third son, W. 
H, with another son, H. E., commenced a news- 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 213 

agency in Duke Street, and in 1820 moved to the 
Strand. In 1817, W. H. Smith = Mary Cooper at 
St George's, Hanover Square. Their son, W. H, 
the future statesman, was educated at Tavistock 
School, under Rev. W. Beal of Trinity College, Cam- 
bridge, who had married his sister, and, later, became 
pupil of Rev. W. Povah of Wadham College, Oxford. 
W. H. wished to go to Oxford, but his parents — 
Methodists — objected, hence his distaste for dissent ; 
as late as 1846 he had not abandoned the idea of 
Anglican orders, perhaps owing to his friendship for 
Regius Professor Ince of Oxford. In the end he 
became head of the firm, and in 1858 married Mrs 
Leach, nee Danvers. In 1857 invited to contest Boston 
and Exeter as a Radical. Blackballed for the Reform 
Club, he joined the Conservative party, and stood for 
Westminster in 1865 unsuccessfully, but was returned 
in 1868, and represented that borough until 1885, 
when he was returned for the Strand. Financial 
Secretary of the Treasury, 1874 ; First Lord of the 
Admiralty, 1877; D.C.L., Oxford, 1878; Secretary 
for War, 1885, and in the same year Secretary for 
Ireland; in 1887 First Lord of the Treasury and 
Leader of the Commons. Styled "Old Morality." 
His widow was created Viscountess Hambledon, and 
her son succeeded him as M.P. for the Strand. 

Sir Francis Smith, Chief-Justice of Tasmania, b. 
1819, son of Francis Smith of Lindfield, Sussex, a 
London merchant, married 1851, Sarah, heiress of 
Rev. Dr Giles, and settled in Hobart Town. 

Sir John Lucie Smith, C.M.G., Chief-Justice of 
Jamaica, b. 1825, son of John Lucie Smith, LL.D., 
of Demerara and Blackheath ; solicitor, and after- 
wards Attorney-General of British Guiana. Married 
(1851) Marie, daughter oi J. R Van Water Schoot. 

Sir Albert J. Smith of Ottawa, Canada, son of T. 
E. Smith, Esq., of Westmoreland, North Brunswick, 



214 THE SMITH FAMILY 

b. 1824 = 1868 Sarah M., daughter of J. W. Young, 
Esq., of Halifax, N.S. She died in 1883. A mem- 
ber of the Executive Council of New Brunswick ; 
Attorney-General 1862-65 ; Minister of Marine and 
Fisheries for Canada, 1873. 

Sm Archibald Letin Smith, son of Francis Smith, 
Esq. of Salt Hill, by Mary, heiress of Z. Levin, Esq. 
(b. 1836), married Isabel, daughter of C. J. Fletcher, 
Esq. of Dale Park, Sussex. Educated at Trinity 
College, Cambridge, and a famous oarsman. Judge 
of the High Court of Justice, 1883-92 ; Master of 
the Rolls, 1900. Died 1901. Heir— Archibald F. F, 
Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. 

Sir Cecil Clementi Smith, K.C.M.G., son of Rev. 
J. Smith, Rector of Buckhurst Hill, Essex, by Cecilia, 
daughter of Muzio Clementi, the illustrious composer, 
(b. 1840), M.A, Christ's College, Cambridge, married 
(1869) Teresa, daughter of A. Newcomen of Kirk- 
leatham. High Commissioner for Borneo, 1890. 

Sir Charles Bean Euan Smith, KGB. (b. 1842) 
= (1874) Edith, daughter of Colonel Alexander. 
Colonel retired, and Consul-General at Zanzibar. 

Sir Donald Alexander Smith, KC.M.G. (b. 1821), 
Resident Governor and Chief Commissioner at Mon- 
treal of the Hudson's Bay Company. 

Sir Edwin Thomas Smith, K.C.M.G., son of 
Edward Smith, Esq. of Walsall (b. 1831), married 
(1869) Elizabeth, daughter of E. Spicer, Esq. Some- 
time Mayor of Adelaide, and Member of the House 
of Assembly of South Australia. 

Sir Francis Villeneuve Smith, son of Francis 
Smith, merchant of London (b. 1819) = (1851) Sarah, 
daughter of Rev. Dr Giles. A Bencher of the Middle 
Temple, Chief- Justice of Tasmania, 1860-85. 

Sir William F Haynes Smith, son of Lucie Smith 
of Demerara (b. 1838), Governor of the Leeward 
Islands. 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 215 

Art Workers and Engravers 

John Smith (1652-1742), born at Daventry. A 
mezzotint engraver, who reproduced Kneller's por- 
traits, as well as those of Lely and others. Portrait 
in the National Portrait Gallery. Buried at St Peter's, 
Northampton. 

Charles Smith (1749-1824), a friend of Sir Joshua 
Reynolds, portrait painter, socialist, and unsuccessful 
musical composer. A native of Orkney, he died at 
Leith, after having resided in India. 

John Smith (1749-1831), water - colour painter, 
nicknamed ."Warwick" Smith. President of the 
Water- Colour Society, 1814. Examples of his work 
are in the South Kensington Museum. 

Anker Smith (1759-1819), engraver, son of a Cheap- 
side silk merchant, so called because his parents 
regarded him as their spes unica. Educated at 
Merchant Taylors, articled to a solicitor, but trans- 
ferred to James Taylor, engraver. Illustrated Bell's 
"British Poets." His engraving of Northcote's 
"Death of Wat Tyler" earned for him his election 
as AR. A in 1797. His plate of Leonardo Da Vinci's 
" Holy Family " remains in the Royal Academy. 
Illustrated Macklin's Bible, Boydell's " Shakespeare," 
Kearsley's "Shakespeare," Hume's "History of Eng- 
land," and Sharpe's "British Classics." He engraved 
Smirke's designs for " Gil Bias," " Arabian Nights," 
and "Don Quixote." Died of apoplexy, June 23, 
1819. His sister, a portrait painter, married Ross, 
the miniature painter. His son Frederick W. was a 
pupil of Chantrey (d. 1835), and a gold medallist, 
Royal Academy; and his younger son, Herbert 
Luther, was a painter of repute. 

John Thomas Smith (1766-1833), son of N. Smith, 
sculptor and printseller. In 1784 he executed a 
series of topographical engravings for Crowle and 



216 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Wyat, and in 1791 published "Antiquities of 
London and its Environs." In 1816 appointed 
Keeper of the Prints in the British Museum. In 
1817 he produced " Vagabondiana," and in 1828 
"Nollekens and his Times." 

John Raphael Smith (1752-1812), son of Thomas 
Smith of Derby, landscape painter, engraver, minia- 
ture painter, and publisher of engravings. Buried at 
Doncaster. 

Thomas Smith (d. 1767), landscape painter, of 
Derby. A collection of plates from his painted 
views of Derbyshire and Yorkshire was issued in 
1760. In 1769 Boydell published a set of four 
views of Rome by Smith, and six plates of race- 
horses. Other and similar works of his remain. 
Died at Hot Wells, Clifton, leaving two sons, Thomas 
Corregio and John Raphael Smith. 

Charles Harriot Smith (1792-1864), member of 
the R.I.B.A., was son of Joseph Smith, sculptor, of 
Portland Road. An authority on stone, he executed 
the ornamental carving of the Royal Exchange. His 
son, Percy Gordon Smith, was architect to the Local 
Government Board. 

Charles John Smith (1803-38), son of a Chelsea 
doctor. An engraver of merit, he published, in 1829, 
"Autographs of Royal and Illustrious Persons." 
Elected F.S.A. 1837. 

George Smith* of Chichester (1713-76), landscape 
painter, grandson of a Baptist minister, who suffered, 
temp. Car. II., under the harsh provisions of the Act 
of Uniformity, and son of "William Smith, brewer and 
Baptist minister. Became a pupil of his elder brother, 
William, portrait painter, with whom he migrated to 
Gloucester. Later, returning to Chichester, he found 
a judicious patron in the Duke of Richmond. In 
1760 he gained the first prize of the Society of Arts 
for landscape, as also in 1761 and 1763. He instructed 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 217 

his younger brother John, who took the first prize, 
George not competing, in 1762 ; but the latter died 
shortly after, in his prime, having given very large 
promise of attaining a high rank in art. A Life of 
George Smith was published in .1811, mentioning 
both his fine collection of engravings, by Claude, and 
also his proficiency as a 'cellist, Corelli being his 
favourite master. He and his wife lie in St Pancras, 
Chichester. MI. 

John Smith (1714-61), brother of George and 
William Smith, portrait and landscape painter, vide 
supra. Buried at St Pancras, Chichester. M.I. 

William Smith * of Chichester and Shopwyke, por- 
trait painter (1707-64), was sent by the second Duke 
of Richmond to become the pupil of an artist in 
St Martin's Lane. Like his brother George, vide 
supra, he was son and grandson of Baptist ministers. 
Invited by Sir William Guise to paint an altar-piece 
for his private chapel in Gloucestershire, he removed 
to Gloucester, where he achieved a considerable re- 
putation. Returning to London, he added still-life to 
his repertoire. HI health compelled him to return to 
his native air. He died at Shopwyke, and was buried 
at St Pancras, Chichester. Mr Algernon Graves, in 
his Dictionary of Artists, mentions that of the three, 
brothers, William exhibited forty pictures of fruit at 
the Free Society, and six at the Society of Artists ; 
George exhibited — landscapes only — four at the Royal 
Academy, one hundred and three at the Free Society, 
and two at the Society of Artists ; while John sent to 
the Free Society fourteen pictures of different sorts, 
and two to the Exhibition of the Society of 
Artists. 

Some fine examples of the work of all three brothers 
are among the collection of the Duke" of Richmond at 
Goodwood. Of their pictures many were engraved ' 
by Woollett. 



218 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Colvtn Smith (1795-1875), portrait painter and 
R.S.A, son of John Smith of Brechin, descended 
from the Lindsays als Smiths, heritable armourers 
to the Bishops of Brechin, by Cecilia, sister of Lord 
Gillies. A pupil of Nollekens. Best known for his 
portraits of Sir Walter Scott, Lord Jeffrey, Henry 
Mackenzie, Sir James Mackintosh, Lord Melville, 
Lord Neaves, and Lord Hope. He resided con- 
tinuously in Edinburgh. 

John Orbin Smith (1799-1843), wood engraver, 
born at Colchester. 

Stephen Catterson Smith (1806-72), portrait 
painter, son of Joseph Smith, coach painter, of 
Skipton. After a successful career in England he 
migrated to Dublin, and had the honour of painting 
all the viceroys for thirty years. Elected President 
of the Royal Hibernian Academy, 1859. He married 
in 1845, Anne, daughter of R T. Wyke of Wexford, 
the lady being a miniature painter, and by her left 
six sons and four daughters, of whom two sons are 
artists. 

William Smith (1808-76), printseller. Educated 
at Cambridge, but did not graduate, joining a brother 
in the printselling business. In 1836 he purchased 
the Sheepshanks' collection, whereof he sold the 
Dutch and Flemish portions to the British Museum. 
Deputy-chairman of the National Portrait Gallery, 
and a manager of the Art Union. F.S.A, 1852. 
Buried at Kensal Green, leaving his collections to 
the South Kensington Museum. 

Benjamin Smith, engraver (d. 1833). A pupil of 
Bartolozzi. He was employed by the Boydells, and 
for them executed plates after Romney, Banks, and 
Browne, for the Shakespeare series ; Sigismunda, 
after Hogarth ; portrait of Hogarth ; portrait of Lord 
Cornwallis ; portrait of George III., etc., etc. 

John Challoner Smith, C.E., and writer on mezzo- 



\ 



CELEBRITIES OF- THE NAME 219 

tints. Born at Dublin. Educated at Trinity Col- 
lege, Dublin. B.A, 1849. Engineer to various Irish 
railways. His reputation rests mainly on his chef- 
doeuvre, " British Mezzotint Portraits." 



Soldiers and Sailors 

John Smith (1580-1631), colonist, son of George 
Smith of Willoughby, Lincolnshire. Served in the 
French army 1596, and in 1600 returned home, but 
soon sought foreign service under the Archduke of 
Styria, passing through subsequently a series of 
thrilling adventures. He then led a party of 105 
emigrants to found an El Dorado in Virginia. Taken 
prisoner, he was rescued by the Indian Princess 
Pocahontas — an incident disputed. His later ad- 
ventures, which involved the creation of the colony 
of New England, were nit crowned with success, 
and he returned to London to publish maps and 
pamphlets. Buried in St Sepulchre's. He was 
much addicted to romancing about his exploits, but 
rendered considerable service as a pioneer. 

Thomas Smith (1600-27), soldier, of Berwick-on- 
Tweed. Author of the " Art of Gunnery " and other 
military works preserved in the British Museum. 

Sir John Smyth * (1616-44), Royalist, born at Stud- 
ley, Warwickshire, being the fourth son of Sir Francis 
Smith of Queeniborough, Leicestershire, by Anne, 
daughter of Thos. Markham it* Allerton, Notts. His 
eldest brother was raised to the Peerage in 1643 as 
Baron Carington of Wootton Wawen, and Viscount 
Carington of Barreford, in Connaught.' He was 
educated as a Roman Catholic. He .joined the 
Spanish army and served in Flanders, but offered his 
sword to Charles I., receiving a commission, and 
defeating the Scotch at Stapieford. When the Civil 



220 THE SMITH FAMILY 

War broke out, he was appointed captain under 
Lord John Stewart, and took part in the fight at 
Powick. At Edgehill he recovered the Royal Standard, 
which had been captured by the Roundheads when 
Sir Edmund Verney was slain, and for this was 
made Knight-banneret on the field. Taken prisoner 
by "Waller, after his release he became Colonel of 
Lord Herbert's Horse at Oxford, and was killed in 
the skirmish with Waller at Cheriton. Buried in 
Christ Church Cathedral, Oxford. 

Sir Jeremiah Smyth* (d. 1675), admiral, grandson 
of John Smyth of Much Warlingfield, Suffolk, and 
third son of Jeremiah Smith or Smyth of Canterbury. 
Merchant at Hull, where, in 1656, his wife Frances 
died, set. 40. Captain of the Advice, 1653; after- 
wards of the Essex. A strong Cromwellian. In 
1664. appointed captain of the Mary, and in 1665 
of the Sovereign. Took part in the Dutch War. 
Knighted June 1665. In the battle of July 25th 
he retreated before Van Tromp, and, being court- 
martialled, was acquitted, Albemarle being for him 
and Prince Rupert against. In 1667 commanded 
in the North Sea as Admiral of the Blue, and 1668 
was Vice- Admiral of the Fleet under Sir T. Allin. 
Died at Clapham, but was buried at Hemingborough, 
near Selby, where he had a seat. His second wife 
was Anne, daughter of T. Pockley, by whom he had 
three sons. 

Thomas Smith (d. 1708), renegade and adventurer, 
who, after holding various commands in the Royal 
Navy, and having been court-martialled and dis- 
missed, entered the service of the French and took 
part in the capture of the Nightingale off Harwich. 
In co mma nd of the captured Nightingale, he attempted 
to capture Harwich, but was himself, with his vessel, 
taken prisoner, and was hung, drawn, and quartered 
for bearing arms against his country. 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 221 

Sir John Smith (1754-1837), General and Colonel 
Commandant of R.A. Born at Brighton. Educated 
at Woolwich. Lieutenant R.A, 1771. In 1775 was 
captured at Fort St John. Exchanged 1777, and 
served under Sir W. Howe at New York. Present 
at Brandywine. Served under Clinton and Corn- 
wallis, but again made prisoner at Yorktown in 1781. 
In 1795 served under Sir R. Abercromby in the 
West Indies, and in 1799 accompanied the Duke of 
York to Holland. Governor of Gibraltar (1804-14). 
KG.G, 1831. Died at Charlton, 1837. 

Admiral Thomas Smith (d. 1762), said to have 
been the illegitimate son of Sir Thomas Lyttelton, 
Bart., appointed, 1727, Lieutenant of the Royal Oak. 
In 1728 transferred to the Gosport, in command of 
which he had a memorable difference with the Com- 
mander of the French corvette Gironde. Having 
compelled him to salute, Smith exceeded his instruc- 
tions and was dismissed the navy in 1729. But in 
the year following he was reinstated, and made 
captain of the Success. His pluck in compelling the 
Frenchman to haul down his colours won him the 
sobriquet of "Tom of Ten Thousand." He rose 
rapidly, and in September 1745 was appointed 
Admiral in command of The Nor?, and afterwards at 
Leith, to prevent communication between the young 
Pretender and France. In 1757 he was made 
Admiral of the Blue. In 1756 he presided over the 
trial of Admiral Byng and pronounced sentence, with 
a recommendation to mercy. In 1753 he retired. 
His portrait, by Wilson, Pv.A . is in the Hall at 
Greenwich. 

Sir Charles Felix Smith^ (1786-1553), Lieutenant- 
General, second son of George Smith of Burn Hall, 
Durham, by Juliet, daughter of Richard Mott, 
Esq., of Carlton. Suffolk. A distinguished military 
engineer. Served in the West Indies, 1807-10 ; in the 



222 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Peninsular War, at Cadiz, and Gibraltar. Took part 
in the Battle of Vittoria, and at Tolosa had his horse 
shot under him. Made Lieutenant-Colonel for " con- 
duct before the enemy at San Sebastian." Knighted 
by the Prince Regent, November 10, 1814. On 
Jun.3 19, 1815, he joined the army under Wellington 
in Belgium, and remained with the army of occupa- 
tion in France, where he killed three Frenchmen in 
duels. Afterwards Acting-Governor of Trinidad 
and Governor (1838) of Gibraltar. In 1840 he took 
part in the capture of St Jean DAcre, when he was 
severely wounded, returning to his command at 
Gibraltar in 1841. For his services in Syria he 
received the thanks of both House's of Parliament. 
He married (1) a daughter (died June 18, 1849) of 
Thomas Bell, Esq., and (2) in 1852 the eldest 
daughter of Thomas Croft, Esq. He died at Worth- 
ing, August 11, 1858. 

Sir W. Sidney Smith * (1764-1840), Admiral, was 
second son of Captain J. Smith of the Guards, and 
grandson of Captain Edward Smith, R.N., wounded 
at La Guayra. Called " Sidney" because of an alleged 
connection with the Strangford Smythes, who had 
intermarried with the Sidneys. Educated at Ton- 
bridge School and at Bath, he joined the Navy in 
1777. Served under Lord Rodney, and was present 
at St Vincent. Served also under Hood. Travelled 
in France and Morocco. Served under the Swedish 
flag in 1790. Made by Gustavus ELnight Grand Cross 
of the Order of the Sword, and was invested with the 
insignia by George III. He then went on a visit to 
his brother, Charles Spencer Smith, Ambassador at 
Constantinople. When war broke out in 1793, he 
purchased and manned a vessel, joining Lord Hood 
at Toulon, and next commanded The Diamond frigate 
in the North Sea, and was successful in harassing the 
French. In 1796 captured off Havre, and detained 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 223 

prisoner for two years. He escaped, and, landing at 
Portsmouth, was mistaken for a Frenchman. Sent 
out, as joint plenipotentiary with his brother at Con- 
stantinople, to Lord St Vincent, who, although he 
was in command of the Tigre, did not put him under 
Nelson's command. Difficulties arose, but eventually 
Smith accepted Nelson's orders, and undertook the 
defence, of St Jean D'Acre. This exploit, which made 
his reputation, has been eulogised by Mahan as a 
heroic inspiration. For it he received the thanks 
of Parliament and a pension. Elected MP. for 
Rochester, 1802 ; Rear- Admiral, 1805 ; Vice- Admiral, 
1810 ; G.C.B., 1838. Buried at Pere Lachaise ; M.I. 
He married (1810) Caroline, widow of Sir G. B. 
Rumbold, s.p. Portrait by Eckstein in National 
Portrait Gallery {vide Barlow's Life). 

Charles Hamilton Smith, ah Smet (1776-1859), 
born at Vrommen-hofen. Educated at Richmond, 
Malines, and Louvain. Served as Deputy Quarter- 
master-General in the Walcheren Expedition. F.RS., 
1824 ; F.L.S., 1826 {vide " Seven Homes," Mrs Rundle 
Charles). He retired in 1830, and after that became 
a dilettante in science and archaeology, supplying 
Barry with designs for details of the Houses of 
Parliament. He married (1808) Mary Anne, daugh- 
ter of Joseph Mauger, Esq. of Guernsey. 

Sir Lionel Smith (1778-1842), Lieutenant-General, 
was a son of Benjamin Smith, merchant, of Liss, by 
his wife Charlotte, the poetess. Entered the army as 
ensign, 1795. Served in the West Indies, Canada, the 
Persian Gulf, and at the taking of Mauritius. Major- 
General 1819 ; K.C.B. and Colonel of the 34th, 1834. 
As Governor of the Leeward Islands made himself 
unpopular, and was replaced by Sir Charles Metcalfe 
in 1839. At the coronation of the Queen he was 
created Baronet, and in 1840 became Governor of 
Mauritius. In 1841 G.C.B. He married (1) Ellen 



224 THE SMITH FAMILY 

M, daughter of Thomas Gal way, and by her had two 
daughters. In 1819 he remarried Isabella Curwen, 
daughter of E. C. Pottinger, by whom he had four 
children — a son, Lionel E., and three daughters. 

Sir John Mark Frederic Smith (1790-1874), 
General, son of Major- General Sir J. F. S. Smith, 
K.C.H. Born at Paddington Manor; educated at 
Woolwich. In 1807 served as lieutenant, Royal 
Engineers, in Sicily. Inspector- General of Railways. 
Director of the RE. establishment at Chatham, 1842. 
M.P. for Chatham, 1852, but unseated on petition. 
Major - General 1854 ; Lieutenant - General 1859 ; 
Colonel - Commandant of RE. 1860 ; and General 
1863. Died in Pembridge Villas, and buried at 
Kensal Green. F.R.S. He married, in 1813, 
Harriet, daughter of Thomas Thorn, Esq. of Buck- 
land, near Dover, s.p. 

John Thomas Smith (1805-82), Colonel, Royal Engi- 
neers, son of G. Smith of Edwalton, Notts. Educated 
at Repton and Addiscombe. In 1826 superintending 
engineer of public works in the N.W.P. In 1837 
F.R.S. In 1840, after having rendered conspicuous 
services professionally in Madras, appointed Mint 
Master, and was inventor of a machine for coining 
which gained an award in the Exhibition of 1851. 
Major 1852 ; Lieut. -Colonel 1854. In 1855 appointed 
Mint Master at Calcutta. He married, in 1837, 
Maria S., daughter of Dr Tyser, and his eldest son, 
Percy G. L. Smith of the Royal Engineers, after a 
long and honourable career, retired in 1887 with the 
rank of Major-GeneraL 

General Michael William Smith* (1809-91), post- 
humous son of Sir Michael Smith, Bart. (1740-1808), 
Master of the Rolls in Ireland. Served in India. 
Lieut. -Colonel 1850. During the Crimean War he 
commanded the Osmanli (irregular horse). Full 
Colonel 1854. Assisted Sir Hugh Rose in 1858 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 225 

against Tantia Topee. Took part in the capture of 
Gwalior, and otherwise in the operations against the 
rebels in India. C.B. 1859. Commanded the Poonah 
division from 1862 to 1867. Colonel of the 20th 
Hussars 1883. In 1830 married Charlotte, daughter 
of G. Whitmore Carr of Ardross, and by her had one 
son, Major W. Whitmore Smith, R.A, an able writer 
on military science. 

Sm Harry George Wakelyn Smith,* Bart. (1788- 
1860), victor of Aliwal and Governor of the Cape. 
Son of John Smith, surgeon, of Whittlesea, by 
Eleanor, daughter of Minor Canon Moore of Peter- 
borough. Two of his brothers were present at 
"Waterloo. Entered the 95th as ensign 1805. Served 
in South America under Auchmuty, and in the 
Peninsula under Craufurd. Wounded at Almeida. 
Present at Fuentes D'Onoro and at Ciudad Rodrigo. 
At Badajos he rescued two Spanish ladies from our 
soldiers, who were out of hand, and one of them 
became his wife. Present at Salamanca, Vittoria, 
Bidassoa, St Jean de Luz, Orthez, Tarbes, and 
Toulouse. After the peace he was sent to America, 
and took part in the burning of Washington. In the 
attack on New Orleans, Pakenham died in his arms. 
Returning to England, he took part in the battle of 
Waterloo. C.B. and Brevet Lieut. -Colonel 1815. 
Quartermaster- General of the Forces in Jamaica. 
1826. In 1828 transferred to the Cape. When the 
Kaffir War broke out in 1834, Sir B. D'Urban ap- 
pointed Smith Colonel of his Staff. It was in 1835 
that he accomplished his famous march from Cape 
Town to Graham's Town — seven hundred miles — in 
six days. He soon brought the Kaffirs to terms, but 
his arrangement with them was upset by Lord Glenelg, 
the precursor of Gladstone. 1839, Brevet Colonel. 
1840, Adjutant- General in India. In 1843 he took 
part in the Gwalior campaign under Gough. In 
p 



226 THE SMITH FAMILY 

1845, in the Sikh War, he was present at Mudki 
and at Ferozeshah. In 1846 he fought and won the 
battle of Aliwal. In 1846 he commanded the First 
Division at Sobraon, for which and his other services 
in the Sikh War he was made Major- General and a 
Baronet, receiving the thanks of Parliament. In 1847 
appointed Governor of the Cape. Here he again 
brought the Kaffirs to terms, but in 1848 Praetorius 
and his Boers revolted, and Smith defeated him at 
Boom Platz. In 1850, after the massacre of Whites 
by Kaffirs, Smith, being unable to cope with the situa- 
tion owing to insufficient reinforcements, was recalled, 
and in 1852 was pall-bearer at the Duke's funeral in 
St Paul's. Lieutenant-General, 1854. Died s.p. in 
Eaton Place West, he and his Spanish wife being 
interred at Whittlesea. M.I. His sabre now belongs 
to the Queen. A crayon by Isabey belongs to Lady 
Burdett-Coutts. 

Richard Baird Smith (1818-61), engineer, was 
son of a Scotch surgeon, R.N. Educated at Addis- 
combe, and obtained his commission in the Madras 
Engineers, 1836. In 1839 transferred to the Bengal 
Engineers, and in 1840 a member of the Arsenal 
Committee. Served under Sir Proby Cautley, and 
on the outbreak of the Sikh War under Sir Harry 
Smith. He received a medal for Aliwal, and a clasp 
for Sobraon. In the second Sikh War he was under 
Sir Colin Campbell and Sir Joseph Thackwell, taking 
part in the action at Sadulapoor. Present at Chilian- 
wallah (1849), and at Gujerat, receiving honourable 
mention. Brevet Captain 1851. In 1852 reported 
on Italian irrigation, and was offered by the King of 
. Sardinia the order of St Lazarus. Deputy-Superin- 
tendent of Canals, N.W.P., 1853 ; captain and brevet- 
major 1854. In June 1857 ordered to Delhi as Chief 
Engineer. The assault of Delhi and its success in 
the teeth of opposition from his superiors was Smith's 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 227 

grand achievement. In 1858 mint master at Calcutta ; 
In 1859 member of the Senate of Calcutta University,' 
and aide-de-camp to the Queen. Died at Calcutta ; 
buried at Madras ; MI. in Calcutta Cathedral. He 
married in 1856, Florence Elizabeth, daughter of 
Thomas de Quincey. His biography, by Col. H. M. 
Vibart, was published in 1897. 

Lieut. - General Sir Edward Selby Smyth,* 
K.C.M.G., Commander of the Auxiliary Forces in 
Canada. Served in India,, in the Kaffir War, and in 
Mauritius, besides holding appointments in Ireland. 
Born 1820, son of Colonel John Selby Smyth, C.B., 
by Isabella, daughter of John Thompson, Esq., of 
Low Wood, Sheriff for Antrim. Married, 1848, Lucy 
Sophia Julia, fourth daughter of Major-General Sir 
Guy Campbell, Bart., C.B., by Pamela, daughter of 
Lord Edward Fitzgerald. 

Scholars and Divines 
William Smyth * (1460-1514), Bishop of Lincoln, 
and Co-founder of B.N.C. Fourth son of Eobert 
Smyth of Peelhouse, in Prescot, Lanes., a country 
squire, alleged to have been commoner of Lincoln 
College ; Clerk of the Hanaper, 1485 ; Canon of West- 
minster. Paid £200 as Clerk of the Hanaper for the 
custody of Edward IV. 's two daughters. This he 
paid over to Lady Margaret as governess to the said 
ladies. Rector of Combe Martin, Devon, 1486, and 
of Great Grimsby, 1487. In the same year made Dean 
of Westminster, and in 1492 Rector of Cheshunt. 
Trustee of the estates of Lady Margaret under her 
will. In 1493 Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry; 
founder of St John's Hospital, Lichfield. In 1496 he 
was translated to Lincoln, but resided at Ludlow and 
Bewdley. In 1501 Lord President of Wales, with a 
salary of £20 a week, being then President of Prince 
Arthur's Council. In 1495 Chancellor of Oxford, 



228 THE SMITH FAMILY 

which office he resigned in 1503. It was during his 
term that Prince Arthur visited Oxford. In 1503 he 
assisted in the Investiture of Warham as Archbishop 
of Canterbury ; attacked by Empson and Dudley he 
was forced to pay £1800, but this was repaid him in 
1509. In 1507 he founded a fellowship at Oriel, and 
a school at Farnworth. A benefactor also to Lincoln 
College. B.N.C. founded by him and Bishop Sutton 
in 1512. A great opponent of the regulars ; accused of 
nepotism. He made three nephews archdeacons, one 
of them, Gilbert Smyth, being made prebendary 
while a layman. Portrait in the hall of B.N.C. 

Richard Smith, D.D. (1500-63), "the greatest 
pillar of the Eoman cause," as Anthony A Wood 
terms him. A native of Worcestershire. Prob. 
Fellow of Merton, 1527, and B.A ; M.A, 1530 ; 
Eegistrar of Oxford University, 1532 ; Eegius Pro- 
fessor of Divinity, 1536, and B.D. and D.D. In 1537 
Master of Whittington College, London ; collated by 
Archbishop Cranmer to the Eectory of St Dunstans 
in the East, also Rector of Cuxham, Oxon. ; Principal 
of St Alban's Hall, and Divinity Reader in Magdalen. 
Recanted on the accession of Edward VI., but equivo- 
cating concerning the terms of his recantation, was 
ejected from the Regius Professorship in favour of 
Peter Martyr. After that he was imprisoned, and 
on being released fled to Louvain, where he was con- 
stituted Professor of Divinity. On the accession of 
Mary, he was reinstated in his offices, appointed 
Chaplain to the Queen, and Canon of Christ Church. 
He gave evidence against Cranmer and Ridley, and 
when, with Latimer, they were burnt in the Broad 
Street, Oxford, he preached on the text, " If I give my 
body to be burned, and have not charity, it profiteth me 
nothing." As soon as Elizabeth ascended the throne 
he was again ejected from his preferments, and com- 
mitted to the custody of Archbishop Parker, but con- 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 229 

trived to escape, and was made Dean of St Peter's 
Douay, by Philip of Spain. In 1562 he became 
Chancellor of Douay University, where he died, 
being buried in the Lady Chapel of the Cathedral 
The accusation of adultery hurled against him by 
Bishop Jewel appears to have been false. He was a 
learned and capable controversial writer, no less than 
nineteen of his treatises being extant. 

Henry Smith* (1550-91), Puritan, styled "Silver 
Tongue," heir of Erasmus Smith of Somerby and 
Husbands Bosworth. Born at Withcote, Leicester- 
shire, the seat of his grandfather John (d. 1546). 
Erasmus Smith, benefactor, was his nephew. Fellow 
commoner of Queens, Cambridge, 1573. Entered 
Lincoln College, Oxford, 1576 ; B.A., 1579. In 
1587 Lecturer of St Clement Danes. This he owed 
to Lord Burghley, whose sister, widow of Roger 
Cave, his father had married, and who resided in the 
parish. A very powerful and popular preacher, 
suspended for irregularity by Aylmer, Bishop of 
London, 1588. By Lord Burghley's interest he was 
restored. His sermons, models of pure elegance, 
edited by T. Fuller, 1657. Buried at Husbands 
Bosworth. 

John Smith, divine (1563-1616), born at Coventry, 
and educated at its school and at St John's, Oxford, 
of which he was Fellow; M.A., 1585; B.D., 1591. 
Lecturer of St Paul's Cathedral, and Minister of 
Clavering, 1592. A benefactor to St John's College 
and to Clavering. Married (1594) Frances, daughter 
of William Babbington of Chorley. 

John Smyth or Smith (d. 1612), founder of the 
sect of the Baptists. Educated at Christ's, Cam- 
bridge ; M.A., 1576 ; Fellow and M.A., 1579 ; 
ordained prior to 1595. Termed the Se-baptist. 
Was Lecturer in the City of Lincoln from 1603 to 
1605. In 1606 established a separatist congrega- 



230 THE SMITH FAMILY 

tion at Gainsborough. In 1608 migrated to Ams- 
terdam, and became Arminian. It was here 
that he was called Se-baptist, because he baptised 
himself. Died at Amsterdam of consumption. 
Buried in the Nieuwe Kerke. Author of numerous 
tractates. 

John Smyth or Smith* (1567-1640), genealogist, 
son of Thomas Smyth of Hoby. Educated at Derby. 
Tutor to Thomas, heir of the seventeenth Lord 
Berkeley, with whom he went to Magdalen College. 
Oxon., in 1589. In 1594 he was of the Middle 
Temple, and in 1597 was appointed steward of the 
Manor of Berkeley. The Berkeleys treated him so 
lavishly that the family jester tied Berkeley Castle to 
Berkeley Church to prevent the former from going to 
Nibley, where Smyth resided. It was as Steward of 
the Manor that Smyth was able to overhaul the 
muniment room, whereby he found material for a 
history of the Berkeleys from the Conquest. MP. 
for Midhurst, 1621. Died at Nibley. By his first 
wife he had no issue. He married (2) Mary, daughter 
of J. Browning of Cowley, by whom he had five sons 
and three daughters. John Smith or Smyth, play- 
wright, is said to have been his grandson. 

Samuel Smith (1587-1620), a Lincolnshire man. 
Commoner of Magdalen Hall, 1604 ; Fellow of Mag- 
dalen, 1608 ; B.A, 1608-9 ; M.A, 1612 ; B.M., 1620 ; 
Junior Proctor, 1620. A A Wood terms him the 
most accurate disputant and profound philosopher in 
the university. Buried in Magdalen College Chapel. 
Chief work, "Aditus ad Logicam," Oxford, 1613. 
Five editions. 

James Smith (1605-67), son of Thomas Smith, 
Rector of Marston, Bedfordshire. Matriculated at 
Christ Church, 1622, but migrated to Lincoln Col- 
lege. Chaplain to the Earls of Holland and Cleve- 
land. A friend of Massinger, and wrote the epitaph 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 231 

of Felton. B.D., 1633 ; Rector of All Saints, Wayn- 
flete, 1634. In 1639, Vicar of King's Nympton, 
Devon. A Royalist, lie managed to keep peace with 
the Parliament, retaining his preferment. In 1660 
Archdeacon of Barnstaple and Canon of Exeter, but 
resigned these offices on being instituted to the 
Rectory of Alphington. A poet with a very broad 
muse, and a collaborator with Sir John Mennis. A 
contributor, with Mennis, Donne, and Davenant to 
" Wit and Drollery." This book was suppressed in 
1656. 

Thomas Smith* (1615-1702), Bishop of Carlisle, 
son of John Smith of Ashby, Cumberland. Educated 
at Appleby; B.A, Queen's College, Oxford, 1635; 
M. A, 1639 ; Fellow of Queen's. Select preacher at 
Christ Church before Charles L, 1645 ; B.D., 1660 ; 
D.D. the same year. In hiding during the Crom- 
wellian regime, and married Catherine, widow of Sir 
Henry Fletcher of Hulton. Chaplain to Charles II. ; 
Prebendary of Carlisle, 1660 ; Prebendary of Dur- 
ham, 1661 ; Dean of Carlisle, 1671. A great bene- 
factor to Carlisle, Appleby, and Queen's. Bishop of 
Carlisle, 1684. M.I. Carlisle Cathedral. Portrait by 
J. Smith at Rose Castle. 

John Smith (1618-52), Cambridge Platonist, born 
at Acworth, near Oundle. Educated at Emmanuel 
College, Cambridge; B.A, 1640; M.A, 1644. 
Transferred to Queen's College by the Westminster 
Assembly of Divines. Lecturer of Queen's. His 
reputation rests on his connection with the school of 
Cambridge Platonists, his papers — remains — having 
been edited by John Worthington after his decease, 
which was caused by consumption. He was buried 
in the Chapel of Queen's College. 

Miles Smith* (d. 1614), Bishop of Gloucester, 
son of a Hereford butcher. In 1568 student of 
Christ Church, migrating to B.N.C. B.A, 1573; 



232 THE SMITH FAMILY 

M.A., 1576; B.D., 1585; D.D., 1594. In 1576 
Chaplain of Christ Church. In 1580 Prebendary 
of Hinton in Hereford Cathedral In 1595 Pre- 
bendary of Exeter. An orientalist, he mastered 
Chaldaic, Syriac, and Arabic. One of the transla- 
tors of the Bible, and wrote the Preface. Bishop 
of Gloucester, 1612. Here he quarrelled with Laud, 
who was Dean, as to the position of the altar, but 
had to yield in consequence of Royal interference. 
He was a strong Puritan. 

Miles Smith, a relative of the Bishop, son of 
Miles, a Gloucester clergyman (1618-71). Magdalen 
CoUege, Oxford; Choral Clerk ;B.A, 1638; B.C.L., 
1646. A Royalist, and persecuted. An ally of 
Gilbert Sheldon, Archbishop of Canterbury, whose 
secretary he became. Buried in the chancel of 
Lambeth Church. Author of a Paraphrase of the 
Psalms. His son, Miles, was Gen. Com. of Trinity 
CoUege, Oxford (d. 1682). 

Thomas Smith* (1638-1710), non-juring divine, 
son of a London merchant, was born in All Hallows, 
Barking. Batler or Bateller Of Queen's, Oxford, 
1657 ; B.A, 1661 ; MA, 1663 ; Master of Magdalen 
College School, 1663 ; Probationary Fellow of Mag- 
dalen, 1666; Fellow, 1667; B.D. and Dean, 1674; 
Vice-President, 1682; D.D., 1683; Bursar, 1686. 
In 1668 Smith went to Constantinople as Chaplain 
to Sir Daniel Harvey, the Ambassador, where he 
remained three years, collecting ancient MSS. He 
was among the earliest advocates of communion 
between the Anglican and Greek Churches, and at 
Oxford was nicknamed " Rabbi " and " Tograi " 
Smith. In 1676 he travelled abroad again. In 1684 
presented by Magdalen to the Rectory of Standlake, 
which he resigned, and became in 1687 Prebendary 
of Heytesbury. In March 1687 Smith endeavoured 
to obtain from James II. the Presidency of Mag- 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 233 

dalen, but eventually, with the other fellows, was 
ejected. He was restored to his Fellowship in 1688, 
but, as he refused the oath to "William and Mary, 
was ejected for the second time. Eventually he 
became resident chaplain to Sir John Cotton, and 
for twelve years had charge of the Cottonian MSS. 
Died in Dean Street, Soho, at the house of Bishop 
HilMah Bedford. Smith's MSS.— 138 volumes— are 
in the Bodleian. He was, besides, a voluminous 
author and editor. 

James Smith, D.D., Roman prelate (1645-1711), 
born at "Winchester and educated at Douay, of 
which college he became President. In 1687 nomi- 
nated by James H. one of the Vicars Apostolic 
for England. Consecrated, 1678, Bishop of Calli- 
opolis in partibus. After the accession of William 
of Orange he was secreted by Tunstall of Wy- 
cliffe. Died at Wycliffe. His crozier is in York 
Minster, and his portrait in Laity's " Directory for 
1819." 

John Smith* (1659-1715), divine, grandson of 
Matthew Smith (1589-1640), a barrister of the Inner 
Temple, adherent of the Royal Prerogative. One of 
his sons was a Cavalier who fought under Rupert ; 
another, "William, was the father of the above John, 
who, being one of eleven brothers, was bora at 
Lowther. His third brother, Joseph, was Provost 
of Queen's. Educated at Bradford, Appleby, and 
St John's, Cambridge. B.A, 1677 ; MA, 1681 ; 
D.D., 1696. Minor Canon of Durham, 1682. In 1686, 
chaplain to Lord Lansdowne at Madrid. In 1694 
domestic chaplain to Bishop Crew, who gave him 
the living of Gateshead, and made him Prebendary 
of Durham. Rector of Bishop Wearmouth, 1704. 
Died at Cambridge, and was buried in St John's 
Chapel; M.I. He married in 1692 Mary, daughter 
of Wm. Cooper of Scarborough, and by her had 



234 THE SMITH FAMILY 

George, who completed an edition of Bede's History 
from the material his father had collected. 

Joseph Smith* (1670-1756), Provost of Queen's, 
son of William Smith, Rector of Lowther, where he 
was born. Educated at Durham and Queen's, where 
he was Taberdar. B.A, 1694 ; MA., 1697. Elected 
Fellow 1698, in absentid. In 1701 Vicar of Iffley. In 
1702 selected to deliver a congratulatory address to 
Queen Anne. In 1704 Senior Proctor. Presented 
by Dr Lancaster, Provost of Queen's, to Russell 
Chapel and the Lectureship of Hanover Chapel. 
B.D. and D.D., 1708. Rector of Upton Grey and St 
Dionis, Backchurch, E.C. Chaplain to the Princess 
of Wales. Prebendary of Lincoln. Prebendary of St 
Paul's ; and, in 1730, Provost of Queen's. A great bene- 
factor to his college, for whose buildings, so incon- 
gruous with their surroundings, he was responsible. 
Buried in Queen's Chapel. M.I. In 1709 he married 
a daughter of H. Lowther of Ingleton, who died in 
1745. By her he had Joseph, an advocate of Doctor's 
Commons ; and others. He wrote against the non- 
jurors. 

Alexander Smith, D.D. (1684-1766), consecrated 
Bishop of Mosinopolis in partibus, 1735. Procurator 
of the Scots' College in Paris ; Coadjutor Bishop to 
Dr James Gordon ; Vicar- Apostolic of the Lowlands. 
Died at Edinburgh, August 21, 1766. Author of two 
catechisms for Roman Catholics in Scotland. 

Robert Smith (1689-1768), founder of the Smith 
Prize at Cambridge, son of John Smith, Rector of 
Gate Burton, Lincoln. Educated at Leicester School 
and Trinity College, Cambridge. B.A, 1711 ; M.A., 
1715 ; LL.D., 1723 ; D.D., 1739. Minor Fellow, 1714 ; 
Major Fellow, 1715 ; and held various offices in his 
college. Master of Mechanics to George H., and 
mathematical preceptor to the Duke of Cumberland. 
A great supporter of Dr Bentley when he fell out 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 235 

with the college. Plumian Professor of Astronomy, 
1716-60. In 1742 Master of Trinity, and in 1743 
Vice-Chancellor. Buried in the college chapel. A 
bust of him by Scheemakers is in Trinity Library, 
and his portrait by Vanderbank (1730) in the Lodge, 
while a third hangs in the Hall. A great benefactor 
to his college. A voluminous author, some of his 
scientific works being translated into French and 
German. 

George Smith * (1693-1756), son of John Smith, 
Prebendary of Durham, and named after his god- 
father, Sir George Wheler of Charing, father-in-law of 
his uncle, Posthumus Smith. He was a nephew of 
Joseph Smith, Provost of Queen's, Oxford, and his name 
was entered on the books of Queen's, 1710, he having 
migrated, however, from St John's, Cambridge, where 
he had entered in 1709. Settled in 1717 at New Burn 
Hall, Durham, he there edited Bede's historical works. 
Prior to 1722 he had been ordained by a non-juror, 
and in 1728 was consecrated Non-juring Bishop of 
Durham by Henry Gaudy and others. Buried at St 
Oswald's, Durham. His wife was daughter of Hilkiah 
Bedford, his eldest son being an M.D., who married a 
daughter of N. Shuttle worth, and was grandfather of 
Sir Charles Felix Smith. 

. William Smith (1711-37), scholar and translator, 
son of Rev. Richard Smith, Rector of All Saints', 
Worcester. Educated at Worcester School and New 
College, Oxford, where he was a contemporary and 
friend of Bishop Lowth. B.A, 1732 ; M.A, 1737 ; 
B.D. and D.D., 1758. Resided at Knowsley as tutor 
to the tenth Earl of Derby, by whom he was presented 
to the Rectory of Trinity, Chester, 1735. In 1743 
appointed Lord Derby's chaplain, and in 1753 Rector 
of St George's, Liverpool. In 1758 he became Dean 
of Chester. With his Deanery he held the benefices 
of Handley (1766-87) and West Kirby (1780-87). 



236 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Buried in the south aisle of Chester Cathedral. M.I. 
placed by his widow, Elizabeth Heber. His chief 
works were a translation of Longinus, a translation 
of Thucydides, styled by Jowett "mediocre," and of 
Xenophon. His portrait prefaces his translation of 
Thucydides. 

John Smith (1747-1807), Gaelic scholar, born at 
Glenorchy. Educated at St Andrews. Minister of 
Tarbert, 1775, and of Kilbrandon, 1777. In 1781 
minister of Campbeltown, and in 1787 D.D.Edinburgh. 
In 1783 he married Helen M'DougaL who died in 
1843, leaving two sons, John and Donald, with three 
daughters. Said to have been an accomplished Gaelic 
scholar and a voluminous writer. 

John Smith (circa 1747), author of "Chronicon 
Rusticum." Educated at Trinity HalL Cambridge. 
LL.B., 1725. He wrote chiefly on the wool trade, 
which he desired to develop, and was praised by 
Arthur Young and M'Culloch. 

Adam Smith (1723-90), born at Kirkcaldy, June 5, 
1723, the only child of Adam Smith, Writer to the 
Signet, by Margaret, daughter of John Douglas of 
Strathendry. The elder A Smith was private secre- 
tary to the third Earl of Loudoun, and Comptroller of 
Customs at Kirkcaldy. He died in April 1723, and 
the future political economist was brought up by his 
mother. At three years of age he was kidnapped by 
gipsies, and, possibly owing to shock, was a delicate 
child. Educated at Kirkcaldy School and Balliol 
College, Oxford, where he resided for six years. He 
was entered Dominus in the books of Balliol, but his 
name is absent from the list of Oxford graduates. 
Returning to Kirkcaldy, he delivered a course of 
lectures on English, wherein he exalted Racine above 
Shakespeare. In 1757 he was elected Professor of 
Logic at Glasgow, and in the following year was 
transferred to the Chair of Moral Philosophy. In 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 237 

1759 he published his " Theory of Moral Sentiments." 
This led to his visiting London in 1761. In 1763 he 
resigned his Professorship in order to become travel- 
ling companion to the young Duke of Buccleugh. It 
was on his travels that he met Voltaire, and to his 
friend Hume he was indebted for many valuable 
introductions in Paris, including the philosophers 
Holbach, Helvetius, D'Alembert, Necker, Turgot, 
Quesney, and Morellet, who afterwards translated 
his "Wealth of Nations," which was published in 
1776, and quoted by Fox, as well as eulogised by 
Pitt, while Buckle termed it "the most important 
work ever written." His monograph on Hume, 
describing the peaceful death of one outside Chris- 
tianity, evoked a severe castigation from the pen of 
Dr Home, President of Magdalen and Bishop of 
Norwich. In January 1777 he was appointed, by 
the interest of the Duke of Buccleugh, Commissioner 
of Customs — £600 a year. Burke said of him that 
he was the only man who thought on economic sub- 
jects exactly as he did himself; and Pitt, at a dinner 
bade him be seated first, because "we are all your 
scholars." In 1787 he was elected Rector of 
Glasgow. He died 17th July 1790, and was 
buried in the Canongate Churchyard. The best 
biography of Adam Smith is that by Mr John Rae 
(1895). 

Jeremiah Smith (1771-1854), son of Jeremiah Smith 
of Brewood, Staffordshire. Hertford College, Oxon. 
B.A, 1794 ; M.A, 1797 ; B.D., 1810 ; D.D., 1811. In 
1807 Headmaster of the Manchester High School. 
He married (1811) Felicia, daughter of William 
Anderton of Mosely Wake Green, by whom he had 
eight children. The eldest son, Jeremiah Finch, was 
Prebendary of Lichfield. The third, James Hicks 
Smith, was author, with other works, of "Reminis- 
cences by an Hereditary High Churchman." The 



238 THE SMITH FAMILY 

fourth son, Isaac Gregory, was appointed Prebendary 
of Hereford. 

John Pye Smith, dissenting divine (1774-1851), 
son of a Sheffield bookseller. Educated at Rother- 
ham. In 1800 tutor of Hamerton College, and 
in 1806 theological tutor, an appointment he held 
for life. His chief work was an attempt to re- 
concile the mosaic cosmogony with that of geology. 
It was commended by Whewell and Professor Baden- 
Powell of Oxford, but is now out of date. 

George Charles Smith (1782-1863), "Boatswain 
Smith," born in Castle Street, Leicester Square. 
Midshipman (1797) in the Navy, and present at 
Copenhagen. Pastor of the Octagon Baptist Chapel, 
Penzance ; voluntary chaplain to the Army in Spain. 
Opened a chapel for sailors on the Thames, 1819, and 
organised the Watermen's Friendly Society, 1822, and 
in 1823 the Merchant Seamen's Orphan Asylum. In 
1824 he launched the City Mission. Died a pauper 
at Penzance. He married (1806) Theodosia, daughter 
of John Skipwith (see H Smith, 1620-68). 

Sir William Smith (1813 - 93), lexicographer, 
eldest son of William Smith of Enfield. Educated at 
a Nonconformist college, and afterwards at University 
College, Gower Street, where he took first-class 
honours in classics. Entered at Gray's Inn, but 
abandoned the law to become headmaster of Uni- 
versity College School. After editing several volumes 
of the classics, including Plato's "Apology," he. 
edited the " Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiqui- 
ties " from 1842 onwards. His "Dictionary of Greek 
and Roman Biography " was completed in 1849, and 
that of " Greek and Roman Geography " in 1857. 
Other works followed, and in 1860-5 he was engaged 
on "The Bible Dictionary." In 1875-80 he pro- 
duced, in collaboration with Archdeacon Cheetham, 
a " Dictionary of Christian Antiquities," and 1877-87 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 239 

with Dr Wace a "Dictionary of Christian Bio- 
graphy." He was a member of the Commission on 
copyright 1875, and in 1869 Registrar of the Royal 
Literary Fund. In 1870 Hon. D.C.L. of Oxford, and 
in 1890 of Dublin. Knighted in 1892. He married 
in 1834, Mary, daughter of James Crump, Esq., of 
Birmingham. A man of indomitable industry, and an 
energetic compiler. 

William Robertson Smith (1846-94), theologian 
and Semitic scholar. Born at Alford, Aberdeen, eldest 
son of Rev. W. Pirie Smith, Free Kirk Minister at 
Keig, by Jane, daughter of William Robertson, Head 
of the West End Academy, Aberdeen. Educated at 
Aberdeen University, where he won the Town 
Council's medal. Proceeded to New College, Edin- 
burgh; and resided as a theological student with 
Professor Schaarsmidt at Bonn. In 1869-70 assistant 
Professor of Natural Philosophy in Edinburgh, and 
in 1870 elected Professor of Oriental languages and 
exegesis -at Aberdeen. In 1875 appointed a member 
of the Old Testament Re vision Committee, and in 1872 
studied Arabic under Lagarde at Gottingen. Author 
of article "Angel," vol. ii. "Encyclopaedia Britannica" 
and of " Bible," in vol. iii. These articles angered the 
Free Kirk, and in consequence Smith ceased to act as 
Professor in 1878, while in 1881, as a result of his con- 
tributions to the " Encyclopaedia Britannica" and to the 
Cambridge Journal of Philology — on totemism — he was 
deprived of his chair. Appointed assistant-editor of 
the " Encyclopaedia Britannica " 1881. He had in the 
interim visited Syria and Palestine. In 1883 elected 
Lord Almoners Reader in Arabic at Cambridge; 
Fellow of Christ's College, 1885 ; Chief Librarian of 
the University, 1886 ; Adams Professor of Arabic, 
1889 ; Hon. LL.D., Dublin, and D.D., Strasburg. He 
bequeathed his Oriental MSS. to the Cambridge Uni- 
versity Library, and his library to Christ's College. 



240 THE SMITH FAMILY 

His portraits are in Christ's College, and in the Free 
Church College, Aberdeen. 

George Smith (1840-76), Assyriologist. Born at 
Chelsea, and developed an enthusiasm for Oriental 
exploration. Sir H Rawlinson in 1867 employed 
him on cuneiform inscriptions. In 1870 appointed 
senior assistant in the department of Oriental 
antiquities, British Museum. Discovered the Chal- 
dean account of the Deluge among the Layard 
Tablets. The Daily Telegraph having raised £1000 
for Oriental research, Smith went to Nineveh, and on 
his return published "Assyrian Discoveries. " He made 
a second excursion to the East, but broke down near 
Aleppo, and died there. Professor Sayce collected a 
sum wherewith to purchase an annuity for his widow. 

George Smith, Bishop of Victoria (1815-71), born 
at Wellington, Somerset. B.A, Magdalen Hall, 
1837 ; M.A, 1843 ; Vicar of Goole, 1841 ; consecrated 
Bishop, 1849 ; resigned, 1865. Died at Blackheath, 
having married a daughter of Andrew Brandram, 
Vicar of Beckenham, who was also Secretary of the 
Bible Society. 

Henry John Stephen Smith (1826-1883), mathe- 
matician. Born in Dublin. Son of an Irish barrister, 
by Mary Murphy of Bantry. Educated at Rugby and 
BallioL Ireland scholar, 1848 ; double first and 
Fellow of Balliol, 1849; B.A, 1850; M.A, 1855; 
Savilian Professor of Geometry, 1860 ; one of the 
Oxford University Commissioners, 1877 ; LL.D. 
Cambridge and Dublin. In 1878 unsuccessfully 
contested the University of Oxford in the Radical 
interest. A man whose attainments were obscured 
by an offensive affectation and a superb self-assertion. 
Buried at St Sepulchre's Cemetery, Oxford, he having 
been Keeper of the University Museum from 1874, 
and Sinecure Fellow of Christ Church. He was 
also Hon. Fellow of Balliol. 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 241 

Theyre Townsend Smith (1798-1852), originally a 
Presbyterian student of Glasgow, was converted to 
Anglican views by reading Hooker. Queen's, Cam- 
bridge, B.A, 1827 ; M.A, 1830 ; assistant preacher 
at the Temple, 1835 ; Hulsean Lecturer, 1839-40 ; in 
1848 Vicar of Wymondham ; Hon. Canon of Nor- 
wich, 1850 ; married Rebecca, daughter of Thomas 
Williams, Esq., of Coate, Oxon. Author of sermons 
and lectures. 

Edward Smith,* Bishop of Down (1665-1720), 
born at Lisburn, being son of James Smyth of Monk- 
town. Scholar of Trinity College, Dublin, 1678 ; B.A, 
1681; M.A and Fellow, 1684; LL.B., 1687; B.D., 1694; 
F.R.S., 1695 ; D.D., 1696. On James II. landing in 
Ireland he became chaplain to the Smyrna Company. 
Chaplain to William the Third during the wars of the 
Low Countries. Dean of St Patrick's, 1696 ; Bishop 
of Down, 1699, having previously been Vice-Chancellor 
of Dublin University. He married twice. By his 
first wife, a cousin, daughter- of William Smyth, 
Bishop of Kilmore, he had Elizabeth, who married 
James, first Earl of Courtown. He married secondly 
Mary, daughter of the third Viscount Massereene. 
and by her had two sons. A contributor to the Pro- 
ceedings of the Royal Society. 

Elizabeth Smith* (1776-1806), Oriental scholar, 
was sister of Sir Charles Felix Smith. Her mosc 
learned work was a Hebrew, Arabic, and Persian 
Vocabulary. She died unmarried at Coniston. 
Buried at Hawkshead. M.I. 

John Smith, D.D., only son of John Smith of 
Kensington, was successively Rector of Fairford and 
in 1796 Master of Pembroke College, Oxford, to 
which is attached a canonry in Gloucester Cathedral. 
He died in 1809. 

Two brothers, sons of Rev. Bernard Smith, of 
Great Ponton and Grantham, achieved distinction at 



242 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Oxford. These were Bernard Smith (Demy of 
Magdalen College, 1833, and the warm friend of 
Charles Reade), who went over to Rome with Cardinal 
Newman and became Roman priest at Marlow ; and 
Harris Smith, D.D., Fellow of Magdalen, Hertford 
Scholar, and Vicar of New Shoreham. Both were 
brilliant scholars, and must not be confounded with 
Barnard Smith, the arithmetician. 

The Very Rev. Samuel Smith, D.D., son of Dr 
Samuel Smith of Westminster, entered the University 
of Oxford May 30, 1782, aet. 16, and from 1824 to 1831 
was Dean of Christ Church. He resigned in the 
latter year his deanery, and accepted a prebendal 
stall in Durham Cathedral, being succeeded by Dean 
Gaisford. He died January 19, 1841. 

Goldwin Smith, D.C.L., son of a Reading doctor, 
entered the University of Oxford as Demy of Mag- 
dalen. With his friend John Conington, afterwards 
Professor of Latin, he migrated to .University 
College, of which he became Fellow, and later 
Professor of History. He relinquished his Oxford 
appointments to assist in launching the proletarian 
University of Cornell, and subsequently settled in 
Canada. A strong Radical, and an able writer. 

Literary, Musical, and Dramatic Smiths 

William Smith, Herald* (1550-1618), born at 
Warmingham, Cheshire, a younger son of Randall 
Smith of Oldhaugh. These Smiths were a branch 
of the Smiths of Cuerdley, Lancashire. Supposed to 
have graduated February 8, 1566-7, at Brasenose 
College. In 1575 a member of the Haberdashers' 
Company, then a restaurateur at Nuremberg. On 
October 23, 1597, created Rouge Dragon. Died 
October 23, 1618, having married Veronica, daughter 
of Francis Altensteig of Nuremberg. Author of 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 243 

"The Vale Royal of England, or Countie Palatine 
of Chester," "The Particular History of England," 
with various MSS. unpublished, which are included 
in the Harl. MSS. 

Richard Smyth* (1590-1675), a book collector, 
son of Rev. R. Smith of Abingdon, Berks, by Martha, 
daughter of Paul Dayrell of Lillingston Dayrell, 
where he was born and baptised. Entered at 
Oxford, articled to a solicitor in the city, and became 
Secondary of the Poultry Compter, which office he 
sold, devoting himself to collecting MSS. Buried 
at St Giles, Cripplegate. Author of " The Obituary 
of R. Smyth, a Catalogue of all such as he knew," 
Sloane MS., British Museum. The work was edited 
by Sir H Ellis for the Camden Society in 1849. He 
left in MS. " A Collection of Arms belonging to the 
Name of Smith," alleged to be in the Heralds' College. 

William Smith (nourished circa 1596), poet, an 
imitator of Spenser. Author of "Chloris," and 
" Corin's Dream," whereof two copies only are extant, 
of which one is in the Bodleian. 

Wentworth Smith (1601-23), dramatist. Author 
of thirteen plays written for the Rose Theatre. Best 
known because three plays of his, under the initials 
W. S., were published as by William Shakespeare 
in the latter's lifetime — a fraud easily detected, yet 
repeated as late as 1664. 

Walter Smith (nourished circa 1525), author of 
"The Widow Edyth," a volume in twelve chapters, 
each containing a "mery jeste." 

Bernard Smith, als Schmidt (1630-1708), com- 
monly called "Father Smith," a German, learnt the 
art of organ-building under Christian Former of 
Wettin-Halle. Erected an organ for the banqueting- 
hall at Whitehall, and in consequence was nominated 
Organ-maker in Ordinary to Charles II. He built 
organs for Westminster Abbey ; Wells Cathedral ; 



244 THE SMITH FAMILY 

the Sheldonian Theatre at Oxford, and for St Mary's 
Church, and Christ Church Cathedral ; Durham 
Cathedral ; the Temple Church, for which he com- 
peted with Renatus Harris ; St Paul's Cathedral ; 
Trinity College ChapeL Cambridge ; St Mary's, Cam- 
bridge ; St George's, Windsor ; Eton College Chapel, 
now removed to Bishopstone Church, Herefordshire ; 
Ripon Cathedral ; the choir organ of Manchester 
Cathedral ; Southwell Cathedral ; the Chapel Royal, 
Hampton Court ; St Alban's Cathedral, removed 
from St Dunstan's, Tower Street ; Chester Cathedral ; 
Pembroke, Emmanuel, and Christ's, Cambridge ; and 
numerous parish churches. His portrait is in the 
Oxford Music School. Smith's daughter married 
Schreider, one of his workmen, and his nephews 
obtained some celebrity in organ - building, more 
especially Gerard Smith. Christian Smith, living in 
1643, has been assumed to be his brother, but 
query? 

John Smith or Smyth (1662-1717), dramatist, son 
of J. Smyth of Barton (?), Gloucestershire. In 1676 
chorister of Magdalen College, Oxford ; matriculating 
1679 ; B. A, 1683 ; M.A, 1686 ; Choral Clerk, 1682 ; 
Usher, 1689. Buried in Magdalen Chapel. Author 
of " Win her and take her," played in London in 
1691, and dedicated to Lord Danby, with an epilogue 
by Tom D'Urfey. Author also of " Odes Para- 
phrased " and " Scaronides, or Virgil Travesty." 

William Smith (1651-1735), antiquary, son of 
William Smith of Easby, Yorkshire, by Anne, 
daughter of Francis Layton, master of the jewel- 
house to Charles I. Educated at University College, 
Oxford. B.A., 1672; MA, 1675. In 1673 Rector 
of Goodmanham, Yorkshire, and in 1675 elected 
Fellow of University College. Incorporated at Cam- 
bridge, 1678. Presented by his college to Melsonby 
Rectory, Yorks, to which he was instituted twice (!) 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 245 

— viz. October 1704 and June 1706. In 1705 he 
married, and vacated his Fellowship, but was per- 
mitted to retain its dividends until 1711. Author of 
"Annals of University College" and "Litterse de 
Sarumaria," together with twenty-seven volumes, in 
MS., of "Researches connected with Oxford," now 
in the possession of the Society of Antiquaries. 

John Smith (1673-80), clockmaker and writer on 
clocks. 

William Smith (d. 1696), actor, a barrister of 
Gray's Inn, who joined the Duke of York's company 
under Sir William Davenant. He played a vast 
number of parts between 1663 and 1696, and Pepys 
narrates how he killed a man in a quarrel over the 
dice. Shortly after James II. 's accession Smith was 
struck behind the scenes by a gentleman, whom, in 
consequence, the King refused to receive at Court. 
A number of young bloods thereon guyed Smith, who 
for eleven years retired from the stage. He returned 
in 1695, at the earnest entreaty of Betterton, Mrs 
Barry, and Congreve. In the following year he 
played Cyaxares in Banks' " Cyrus," but was taken 
ill suddenly on the fourth representation and died. 
[See Genest's " English Stage."] 

John Christopher Smith (1712-95), son of J. C. 
Schmidt of Anspach. Educated at Clare s Academy, 
Soho. A pupil — said to be the solitary pupil — of 
Handel, and also of Pepusch and Rosingrave, organist 
of the Foundling. Garrick produced his opera, 
" The Fairies," at Drury Lane in 1774. Composer 
of several oratorios. Handel left him his scores, 
which he bequeathed to George III., as well as his 
harpsichord and bust by Roubillac, which are now 
at Windsor Castle. He died at Bath. 

Edmund Smith (1672-1710), minor poet, only son 
of Edmund Neale, by Margaret, daughter of Sir 
Nicholas Lechmere. His father being impoverished, 



246 THE SMITH FAMILY 

he was adopted by his uncle, Matthew Smith, who 
had married Sir N. Lechmere's sister, and assumed 
his name. Educated at "Westminster, under Dr 
Busby, and elected student of Christ Church. At 
Oxford, he wrote panegyrics on the birth of the 
Prince of Wales (1688), and on the coronation of 
William and Mary. In 1691 he composed an alcaic ode 
on the death of Pococke, the Orientalist. Nicknamed 
"Captain Pag" (Gent. Mag., June 1780). M.A July 
1696, and in 1701 delivered the annual oration in 
praise of Bodley. On April 24, 1705, expelled from 
Christ Church for lampooning Dean Aldrich. In 
1690 he had been admitted to the Inner Temple, 
and, after quitting Oxford, fell in with Addison, who 
invited him to write a history Of the Revolution in 
the Whig interest. In 1707 his tragedy, "Phaedra 
and Hippolitus," was enacted at the Haymarket, 
with a prologue by Addison ; Betterton and Mrs 
Oldfield being in the caste. Praised by the critics, 
the piece was damned by the public. At a revival in 
1754, Peg "Woffington played Phaedra. He died at 
Hartham, Wilts, from an excessive dose of medicine. 
Johnson described him as a lucky writer, who, with- 
out much labour, attained high reputation ; on the 
other hand, the great Doctor placed his elegy on 
Philips, an Oxford crony of Smith's, as " one of the 
best our language can show — an elegant mixture of 
fondness and admiration, of dignity and softness." 

Charles Smith, Irish county historian (1715-62), 
an apothecary at Dungarvan. His more important 
histories were . those of Waterford and Cork. 
Founder in 1756 of the Medico-Philosophical Society 
of Dublin. 

Joseph Smith (1682-1770), collector of books and 
MSS., connoisseur of pictures and jewels. British 
Consul at Venice. Horace Walpole dubbed him " the 
Merchant of Venice."' Edited, in 1729, Boccaccio's 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 247 

"Decameron." George II. bought his library for 
£10,000, now in the British Museum ; George III. 
bought his art collection ; and Lord Dundas and he 
his MSS. for Blenheim. In 1758 he married a sister 
of Murray, Ambassador to the Porte. 

William Smith (1730-1819), actor, known as 
" Gentleman Smith," son of William Smith, grocer, 
of the City. Educated at Eton and St John's, 
Cambridge, where he fired an unloaded pistol at 
the Proctor. A pupil of Spranger Barry, he ap- 
peared with Mrs Cibber in the title-role of Lee's 
"Theodosius." Played Polydore in "The Orphan," 
and was the original Southampton in Jones' "Earl of 
Essex." Played Dollabella in "All for Love," and 
Abredah in "The Siege of Damascus." In the same 
year (1753) made his first appearance in comedy as 
Orlando in "As you like it." Spoke the prologue to 
"The Distrest Mother." He enacted numerous other 
parts, remaining at Covent Garden till the close of the 
1774 season. During his career he played Anthony, 
Henry V., Borneo, Comus, Hotspur, Lothario, Hamlet, 
Coriolanus, Lord Foppington, Sir Harry Wildair, 
Richard III., Iago, and Macbeth. He told Garrick 
he could play at a day's notice fifty- two parts, and 
quarrelled with Colman as to whether he should 
draw twelve pounds or twelve guineas per week. 
In 1774 he played at Drury Lane under Garrick a 
variety of great parts, his last being Charles Surface 
in 1788. Died at Bury St Edmund's, leaving £18,000 
to his widow. He married, in 1754, Elizabeth, 
widow of Kelland Courtenay, and second daughter 
of Lord Hinchingbroke. The Montagu family ob- 
jecting to the stage, he offered to retire if they would 
give him his stage income. This was declined, and 
on his wife's decease he married a woman of humble 
origin, to whom he proved unfaithful, levanting with 
Mrs Hartley, who had played Lady Macbeth with 



248 THE SMITH FAMILY 

him, but he left his widow his fortune. He was 
a great rider, and refused to play on a Monday in 
the hunting season. He is known to have ridden 
eighteen miles an hour in order to appear on the 
boards. Portraits in the Garrick Club and National 
Portrait Gallery, the latter by Hoppner. 

Pleasance, Lady Smith * (1773-1877), daughter of 
Robert Reeve of Lowestoft. She married, in 1796, 
Sir James E. Smith, whom she survived forty-nine 
years. Her chief distinction consists in having been 
painted by Opie as a gipsy, and in her extraordinary 
longevity; but she was a woman of parts, and enjoyed 
the friendship of Whewell, Sedgwick, and Dean 
Stanley. Buried at St Margaret's, Lowestoft, where 
is a memorial window to her. 

George Townshend Smith (1813-77), brother of 
Samuel, organist at Windsor and of Montem, Vicar- 
Choral of Westminster Abbey, tenor singer and com- 
poser. A man universally respected alike for his 
sterling musical qualifications as organist of Hereford 
Cathedral and conductor of the Festival of the Three 
Choirs. Author of several anthems and of some few 
songs, the best known whereof is "The Bonny OwL" 

Charlotte Smith (1749-1806), novelist, daughter 
of Nicholas Turner, Esq. of Stoke House, Surrey. 
Married Benjamin, son of Richard Smith, West India 
merchant and director of the East India Company. 
Her husband served as High Sheriff for Hants, as 
of Lys, but eventually became bankrupt. In conse- 
quence she published "Elegiac Sonnets," which ran 
through eleven editions, and, after an unsettled life, 
obtained a separation from her husband. Her first 
novel. "Emmeline," proved a pecuniary success, and 
was followed by "Celestina," "Desmond," and "The 
Old Manor House." She died at Tetford, Surrey, 
and was buried at Stoke Church. ML 

John Smith (1797-1861), Musician, born at Cam- 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 249 

bridge, and educated in a college choir. In 1815 
Lay Clerk of Christ Church, Dublin, and in 1819 
Vicar-Choral of St Patrick's. Appointed composer 
to the Chapel Royal, Dublin, and Professor. Author 
of various services and anthems. 

John Stafford Smith (1750-1836), composer, son 
of Martin Smith, organist, of Gloucester. A pupil 
of Dr Boyce, and one of the children of the Chapel 
Royal under Nares. In 1784 Gentleman of the 
Chapel Royal, and in 1785 Lay Clerk of Westminster. 
In 1802 organist of the Chapel Royal, and from 1805 
to 1817 Master of the children. A beautiful glee- 
writer, his chef domrres being " Return, blest days " 
and "Blest pair of sirens." In 1793 he issued a 
volume of anthems, and 1812 an erudite antiquarian 
work, styled "Musica Antiqua," being a collection of 
old music from the twelfth to the eighteenth century. 
Stafford Smith was not the least of the band of com- 
posers who created the glee, a musical form indigenous 
to England, and distinct altogether from its modern 
and German successor, the part-song. The Rev. 
Martin Stafford Smith was chaplain to Bishop War- 
burton of Gloucester, and married the Bishop's widow. 
The Bishop died 1779, and it would appear that 
the Rev. Martin was a son or nephew of ,the im- 
mortal glee writer. Mrs Warburton may have been 
the Rev. Martin Stafford Smith's second wife. 

Horace Smith (1779-1849), younger brother of 
James Smith, and, with him, author of "Rejected 
Addresses." His father, Robert Smith, was son of 
Samuel Smith, Custom-house officer, of Bridgewater. 
After leaving Mr Barford's school at Chigwell, he was 
relegated to a merchant's counting-house. He was 
patronised by Cumberland, dramatic author, who 
introduced him to literary circles. After publishing 
three novels — "The Runaway," "Trevanion," and 
" Horatio," — he wrote prefaces for plays, and it was 



250 THE SMITH FAMILY 

owing to having been one of the " rejected " at Drury 
Lane, when a prize was offered for a prologue on the 
re-opening of the house, which had been burnt, that 
he and his brother projected "Rejected Addresses." 
After the impressive triumph of this splendid jeu 
desprit, Horace Smith joined the Stock Exchange, 
where he amassed money so rapidly that in 1820 he 
was able to retire. A personal friend of Shelley, for 
whom he strove to intercede with Sir Timothy, and 
of Leigh Hunt. Next to his collaboration in "Re- 
jected Addresses " with his brother James, his best 
work was "Brambletie House." He wrote, however, 
continuously, and it is alleged that Thackeray 
named Laura of " Pendennis " from his youngest 
daughter, who married Mr Round of West Bergholt. 
His portrait by Harlow is owned by John Murray. 
That by Masquerier remains in his family. It may 
be safely affirmed that the chef d'ceuvre of the two 
brothers is more popular to-day than ever. He 
died at Tunbridge Wells. 

James Smith (1775-1839), humorist, elder brother 
of Horace Smith. Educated at ChigwelL Solicitor 
to the Board of Ordnance. He contributed to 
" Rejected Addresses " (1812), Nos. 2, 5, 7, 13, 14, 
16, 17, 18. "James Smith," said Charles Mathews, 
"is the only man who can write clever nonsense." 
This was inappreciative. He and his brother Horace 
were the greatest of all parodists, and their works 
must remain so long as the English language lasts. 
Died in Craven Street. Buried at St Martin's in the 
Fields. 

Sydney Smith* (1771-1845), wit, born at Wood- 
ford. His father, Robert Smith, must have been 
eccentric, for he left his bride, Maria Olier, at the 
church door, and after wandering the world in search 
of fortune eventually settled at Bishops Lydiard, 
where he died in 1827, aet. 88. Mrs Smith was said 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 251 

to have resembled Mrs Siddons. They had four 
children, of whom Robert Percy (Bobus) went with 
his brother Cecil to Eton, while Sydney and Courtenay 
were sent to "Winchester. In 1789 Sydney became 
Scholar of New College, Oxford, and in 1791 Fellow. 
Ordained in 1794 to the curacy of Netheravon. 
Tutor to Michael — grandfather of Sir M. Hicks Beach 
— whom he took to Edinburgh in 1798. There he 
formed a friendship with Jeffrey, Brougham, Francis, 
and Horner, and became a member of the Friday 
Club with Dugald Stewart, Playfair, Alison, and Sir 
Walter Scott. In 1800 he married Catherine Amelia, 
daughter of J. Pybus of Cheam. Assisted in the 
formation of The Edinburyh Review, to which he 
was a constant contributor. Preacher of the Found- 
ling Chapel, and Lecturer at the Royal Institution. 
Non-resident Rector of Foston le Clay 1806. In 
1807 he published his " Peter Plymley Letters " to 
support Catholic emancipation. Sixteen editions 
were issued in that year. In 1808 he moved to 
Foston, where he built a parsonage. Vicar of 
Londesborough 1820. Prebendary of Bristol 1828. 
Exchanged Foston for Combe Florey in 1829. In 
1831 fired off his immortal " Mrs Partington " speech 
at Taunton, and Earl Grey made him Canon of St 
Paul's. In 1839, having inherited £50,000, resided 
at 56 Green Street, Grosveaor Square, where he 
died, and was buried at Kensal Green. Of his issue, 
Saba married Sir H Holland, and wrote her father's 
biography ; Douglas — Westminster and Christ Church 
— died young; Emily married N. Hibbert, Esq., of 
Munden Furnyvale, and Windham. His portrait by 
Eddis belongs to Miss Holland. 

Charles Smith (1786-1856), singer, grandson of 
Edward Smith, page to the Princess Amelia, and son 
of Felton Smith, a chorister of Christ Church, Ox- 
ford. Chorister of the Chapel Royal and solo singer. 



252 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Deputy-organist at the Chapel Royal for Knyvett and 
John Stafford Smith. He wrote the music for the 
farces "Yes or No" (1808), "Hit or Miss" (1810), 
"Anything New" (1811). In 1818 he was bass 
soloist at the Oratorio Concerts. His best known 
work is a setting of Campbell's " Hohenlinden." 

Richard John Smith, known as "0. Smith" 
(1786-1855), actor. An Irishman. He began as a 
solicitor's clerk, but bolted to New Guinea, where 
he met with exciting adventures. He obtained his 
nickname by taking the part of Obi in "Three- 
fingered Jack" After enacting a number of parts, 
mostly villains, he played Newman Noggs in " Nicholas 
Nickleby," Fagin in " Oliver Twist," and (1843) Hugh 
in "Barnaby Rudge." His last and not least part 
was Musgrave in Charles Reade's " Two Loves and 
a Life," at the Adelphi Theatre, April 1854. He 
was buried at Norwood Cemetery. 

Aquila Smith, MD. (1806-90), Irish antiquary, son 
of William Smith of Nenagh, Tipperary. Educated 
at Trinity College, Dublin, receiving the degree M.D. 
him. caiusd in 1839. Member of the Royal Irish 
Academy, and a learned numismatist. He repre- 
sented the Irish College of Physicians on the Council 
of Medical Education. 

Charles Roach Smith* (1807-90), antiquary, son 
of a farmer at Shanklin. Began life as a chemist. 
A great collector of antiquities, he amassed from 
London excavations the nucleus of the collection of 
the Romano-British antiquities now in the British 
Museum. Elected F.S.A December 22, 1836; 
Honorary Secretary of the Numismatic Society. He 
intervened with Napoleon on behalf of the Roman 
Walls at Dax, and a medal (1858) was struck to com- 
memorate the event in France. A marble medallion 
of him by Fontana is in the possession of the Society 
of Antiquaries. Unmarried. 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 253 

William Henry Smith (1808-72), philosopher 
and poet, son of Richard Smith, barrister. Born 
at North End, Fulham. Educated at Radley and 
Glasgow. On his father's death he was placed with 
Sharon Turner to study law, and was called to the 
Bar, but did not practise. A friend of Maurice, Mill, 
and Sterling. His poems " Guidone " and " Solitude " 
appeared in 1836. He contributed one hundred 
and twenty-six articles to Blackwood. Macready 
produced his tragedy, " Athelwold," in 1843, a succes 
destine. In 1857 he published "Thorndale, a Con- 
flict of Opinions," another succes destine; as also 
" Gravenhurst." He married in 1861, Lucy Caroline, 
daughter of Dr George Gumming— a lady whose 
monograph has helped to preserve his memory. 
M. Joseph Milrand, " Litterature Anglaise et Philo- 
sophic," has both described and analysed the peculiar 
views expressed by dialogue in " Gravenhurst." In 
his dramas he appears to have taken Sir H. Taylor 
as a model. He died at Brighton, and his widow 
survived him nine years. 

Robert H. Soden Smith (1822-90), librarian. South 
Kensington, son of Captain Smith of Dirleton, 
N.B., who was Athlone Pursuivant-at-Arms under 
Sir Bernard Burke. Educated at Trinity College, 
Dublin. Tutor to the third Marquess Camden. 1857, 
assistant of the South Kensington Art Museum ; 
Keeper, 1868. Unmarried. Author of " Flower and 
Bird Posies." 

Robert A Smith (1780-1829), son of a weaver. 
Born at Reading of Scotch parents. In 1807 pre- 
centor at Paisley. 1822, musical conductor of St 
George's, Edinburgh. Author of " Jessie, the Flow'r 
of Dunblane." 

Albert Smith (1816-60) was son of Richard Smith, 
surgeon, of Chertsey, and educated at Merchant 
Taylors. In 1838 he became a member of the Col- 



254 THE SMITH FAMILY 

lege of Surgeons, and practised with his father at 
Chertsey. In 1841 he commenced a London practice 
at 14 Percy Street, "W., but soon deserted medicine 
for literature. He began by contributing to Bentley's 
Miscellany, and this led to his joining the staff 
of Punch. His first drama, "Blanche Heriot," was 
produced at the Surrey Theatre, September 26, 1842. 
To Bentley he contributed "The Adventures of Mr 
Ledbury," and for the Lyceum he wrote a series of 
extravaganzas. For the Adelphi he wrote "Esmer- 
alda," a highly popular burlesque, and for the 
Princess' "The Alhambra." His serial "Christo- 
pher Tadpole," 1848, had an immense sale, and there 
were those who ranked it on a level with " Pickwick." 
In 1850 he commenced as lecturer with "The Over- 
land Mail," followed in 1852-8 by "Mont Blanc." 
He was then in the zenith of his popularity, but 
shortly after commencing a new entertainment at the 
Egyptian Hall, called " China," he died of bronchitis, 
and was buried at Brompton Cemetery, May 23, 
1860. He married, August 1, 1859, Mary Lucy, 
elder daughter of Keeley, the comedian, who died 
March 19, 1870. His geniality and good humour 
rendered him a prime favourite with the public, but 
his presence was more powerful than his pen. 

Alexander Smith (1830-67), Scotch poet, son of 
Peter Smith by Helen Murray, said to have been a 
lady. His father was a mechanic, and he was em- 
ployed as a lace-pattern designer at Paisley. His 
first work, "A Life Drama," was supported by 
Lewes, and won some recognition. He became 
editor of the Glasgow Miscellany, and in 1854 
was appointed secretary to Edinburgh University, 
and later registrar. He collaborated with Sydney 
Dobell in a series of sonnets on the Crimean War, 
which Blackwood ridiculed as spasmodic. Professor 
Aytoun published a parody of these sonnets in May 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 255 

1854, entitled " Firmilian," and when in 1857 " City 
Poems " appeared, evidences of plagiarism were 
adduced, and the poet's reputation suffered. He 
married in that year Flora, daughter of Macdonald 
of Ordin, Skye. 

Alexander Smith commanded attention as a 
Glasgow Alton Locke, and found admirers both in 
London and in Oxford. His work, however, though 
on its first appearance welcomed effusively, has not 
survived. 

Eminent Dissenters 

Samuel Smith (1584-1662), the son of a clergyman. 
Entered St Mary's Hall, Oxford, as bateller, but did 
not graduate. Presented to Prittlewell, Essex, by 
Lord Rich, where he identified himself with the Pres- 
byterians. In 1648 appointed by Parliament rector 
of Cressage, the actual rector having been ejected, 
but at the Restoration was himself ejected for non- 
conformity. His best known work was " The 
Christian's Guide, with Rules and Directions for an 
Holy Life." 

Henry Smith* (1620-1668), regicide. Son of 
H. Smith of Withcote, Leicestershire, descended 
from the family of Smith alias Harris of Notts., 
whence Erasmus and Henry Smith. His mother was 
a daughter of Skipwith of Cotes. In 1623, owing to 
his father's death, a ward in Chancery. Entered 
Magdalen Hall, 1638. B.A., St Mary's Hall, 1640. 
M.P. for Leicestershire, 1640. One of the Committee 
for compounding, and one of the six Clerks of Parlia- 
ment, 1648. One of the judges at the King's trial, 
and signed the Death Warrant. Although attainted 
as a regicide and imprisoned in the Tower, he escaped 
execution, and was incarcerated in Jersey. He 
married a daughter of Cornelius Holland, the regi- 



256 THE SMITH FAMILY 

cide, and by her left an only daughter. He probably 
died in the Old Castle, Jersey. Heath defines him 
as a lawyer, but a mean one. He is said to have 
been called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn, but this 
appears to be erroneous. 

Stephen Smith (1623-78), Quaker, resided at Pir- 
bright. He was imprisoned in 1668 for holding a 
meeting at Elsted, and in 1670 fined £24 for preaching 
at Guildford. Afterwards he was remitted to New- 
gate for six months, and in 1673 he went to the 
Marshalsea for non-payment of tithe to the Vicar of 
Worplesdon. Buried at Worplesdon. Author of 
various treatises in connection with his sect. 

Humphrey Smith, Quaker (d. 1663), son of a farmer 
at Cowarne. In 1654, having become a convert to 
Quakerism, he was arrested at a meeting near 
Evesham, and George Fox visited him when in 
prison. In 1658 committed to Winchester Gaol, 
where he wrote several books. In May 1660, he 
prophesied the great fire of London, which occurred 
in 1666. In 1661 he was again in Winchester Gaol, 
dying of gaol-fever. 

William Smith, Quaker (d. 1673), imprisoned by 
Cromwell in 1658 for non-payment of tithes. He 
was a native of Besthorpe, Notts., and in 1661 was 
arrested while preaching at Worcester for refusing 
to take the oath of allegiance. He was imprisoned 
in Nottingham Gaol from 1661 to 1665. Author 
of a number of religious and controversial tracts, 
some written in gaol. He married twice, his second 
wife, Elizabeth Newton of Nottingham, surviving 
him. He must not be confounded with another 
Quaker of the same name, also a controversialist, who 
was of Sileby and Market Harborough, at whose 
house in Sileby George Fox held several meetings. 

John Smith (1790-1824), missionary, born at 
Rothwell, Northants, served in the West Indies 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 257 

under the London Missionary Society. Tried by 
court-martial, 1823, for inciting the blacks to revolt, 
and sentenced to be hanged. Died in prison. Lord 
Brougham espoused his case with warmth, but un- 
successfully. 

James Elimalet Smith, dissenting preacher, nick- 
named "Shepherd" (1801-57), was a brother of 
Eobert Angus Smith. Educated at Glasgow. A 
mystical Universalist, and associated with the 
Socialist, Robert Owen. Founder of The Family 
Herald. Author of " The Divine Drama of History " 
and of "The Coming Man." 

George Smith of Coalville (.1831-95), born at 
TunstaL Son of a brickmaker. A philanthropist. 
His brochure, "The Cry of the Children," attracted 
the notice of Lord Shaftesbury. He had become 
manager of the clay works at Coalville, and his 
championship of the children lost him his post in 
1872. He secured reforms for the children of persons 
employed on canals, and endeavoured to upraise the 
gipsies. From 1872 to 1885 he lived in great poverty, 
but in the latter year received a grant from the Royal 
Bounty Fund. Died at Crick, near Rugby. 

Medical and Scientific Smiths 

John Smith (1630-1679), physician. A native of 
Bucks. Educated at B.N.C. B.A, 1651 ; M.A, 
1653 ; M.D., 1652 ; Fellow of the College of 
Physicians, 1672. Died in the parish of St Helen's, 
Bishopsgate, and was there buried. Author of a 
tractate to prove that King Solomon was acquainted 
with the circulation, of the blood. 

Hugh Smith (d. 1790), medical author. Born at 
Hemel Hampstead. M.D. Edinburgh, 1755. Physician 
to the Middlesex Hospital, 1765. An advocate of 
venesection. Died at Stratford. Buried at West 
Ham. 



258 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Hugh Smith, said to be son of the above (1736-89), 
M.D. Leyden. Married a daughter of A. Maclean of 
Trevor Park, East Barnet. Also a medical author. 

Sir James Edward Smith, botanist (1759-1828), 
son of a nonconformist merchant of Norwich. 
Educated at Edinburgh; F.R.S., 1785 ; MD. Leyden, 
1786. Founder of the Linnsean Society. Lecturer at 
Guy's Hospital, 1789. Knighted in 1818 on the 
occasion of the Prince Regent becoming patron of the 
Linnsean Society. The Linnsean Society possesses his 
bust by Chantrey. Author of thirty botanical works, 
and of some dissenting hymns. He married in 1796, 
Pleasance, daughter of Robert Reeve of Lowestoft, 
who is separately noticed among " literary celebrities." 

William Smith (1769-1839), geologist, son of 
John Smith of Churchill, Chipping Norton, Oxon., 
by Anne Smith of Long Compton, Gloucestershire. 
Educated at the village school, where he acquired a 
passion for collecting fossils. Under Edward Webb 
of Stow he learnt surveying, and was employed on 
the Somerset Canal Blending business with scientific 
research, by 1796 he had already sketched in outline 
the strata of Great Britain. In 1806, having enjoyed 
the friendly aid of two Dukes of Bedford, and of 
Arthur Young, he published a volume on water 
meadows. His magnum opus was a geological map 
published in 1815, for which he received a premium 
of £50 from the Society of Arts ! To create this map 
he had sacrificed his small patrimony, and to crown 
his misfortunes, his wife became insane. At this 
time he seems to have been helped by his . nephew, 
Professor Phillips. In 1831 he was styled "The 
Father of Geology," and at the instance of the repre- 
sentatives of science in Great Britain, Government 
granted him a pension of £100 a year. LL.D., Dublin. 
He died at Northampton and was buried at St 
Peter's. ML 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 259 

John Gordon Smith (1792-1833), Professor of 
Medical Jurisprudence. Educated at Edinburgh. 
M.B. in honours, 1810. Army surgeon. Present at 
"Waterloo, where he saved the life of Colonel Ponsonby. 
Physician to the Duke of Sutherland. Surgeon to 
the Royal Ophthalmic Hospital. Lecturer on Medical 
Jurisprudence at the Royal Institution, 1825-26. 
Professor at the London University. Died in a 
debtors' prison after fifteen months' incarceration. 
Author of numerous medical works. 

Thomas Southwood Smith (1788 - 1861), born 
at Martock, and in early life a dissenting minister. 
Entered as medical student at Edinburgh, and simul- 
taneously became a Unitarian preacher. Published, 
in 1816, a book called "Illustrations of Divine 
Government," to prove that pain is a corrective, 
which won the admiration of Byron, Moore, and 
"Wordsworth. M.D., 1816. Moved in the same year 
to Yeovil, where he practised as physician, serving 
also the Unitarian Chapel. Licentiate of the College 
of Physicians, 1821, and Fellow, 1847. One of the 
founders of the Westminster Review. In 1824 Physi- 
cian to the London Fever Hospital. The treatment 
of fever led to his becoming a sanitary reformer. 
Jeremy Bentham bequeathed him his body for dis- 
section, and this he performed in the presence of 
Brougham, Mill, and Grote. In 1832 Smith espoused 
the cause of the factory children, and was precursor 
of Lord Shaftesbury's Factory Acts. He retired on a 
pension in 1856, and in 1861 died of bronchitis at 
Florence, and was buried in the Protestant Cemetery. 
His bust by Hart is in the National Portrait Gallery. 
Married (1) Miss Reade,* by whom he had two 
daughters ; and (2) Miss Christie of Hackney, by 
whom he left a son, Herman. 

Sir Andrew Smith (1797-1872), graduated M.D. at 

* I have been onabla to identify thia lady. ' She waa not of our blood. 



260 THE SMITH FAMILY 

Edinburgh, 1819, being a son of T. P. Smith, Esq. of 
Heron Hall, Roxburgh. Entering the army as hos- 
pital mate in 1815, be became staff-surgeon in 1837, 
and in 1834 pioneered an expedition to Central 
Africa, receiving the thanks of Government. It was 
due to his representation that Natal became a colony 
under the Crown. In 1852, just before his death, 
the Duke of Wellington appointed him Director- 
General of the Army Medical Department. He 
resigned in 1858, and was created K.C.B. 

Gerard Edward Smith (1804-81), botanist, born 
at Camberwell, was sixth son of Henry Smith. 
Educated at Merchant Taylors and St John's, 
Oxford. B.A, 1829. Vicar of St Peter's, Chichester, 
1835 ; Rector of North Marden, Sussex, 1836-43 ; 
Vicar of Cantley, near Doncaster, 1844-46 ; Vicar of 
Ashton, Cheshire, 1849-53; Vicar of Osmaston, 
Derby, 1854-71. Died at Ockbrook, Derby. His 
herbarium is in University College, Nottingham. 

James Smith (1805-72), a Liverpool merchant. He 
is known by his work, published 1859, " The Problem 
of Squaring the Circle solved." 

James Smith * (1782-1867), " Smith of Jordanhill," 
geologist, son of a West India merchant. Educated 
at Edinburgh and Glasgow. F.G.S., 1836 ; F.R.S., 
1830. Author of sixteen papers on geology, and of 
"The Shipwreck of St Paul." He also wrote a 
Diatessaron. In 1809 he married Mary (d. 1847), 
daughter of Alexander, and grand-daughter of Pro- 
fessor A. Wilson, of Glasgow. Archibald Smith was 
their son. 

Robert Angus Smith (1817-84), chemist, son of 
John Smith of Loudoun. Educated at Glasgow. In 
1842 assistant to Dr Playfair. President of the Man- 
chester Philosophical Society, 1845 ; F.R.S., 1857 ; 
chief inspector of alkali works, 1872 ; LL.D. Glasgow, 
1881, and of Edinburgh, 1882. His special line was 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 261 

sanitary science, of which he was a pioneer. A bust 
of him is in Owen's College, Manchester. 

Willoughby Smith (1828-91), electrical engineer, 
born at Great Yarmouth. In 1848 entered the ser- 
vice of the Gutta-Percha Company. Invented the 
method of covering iron or copper with gutta-percha. 
In 1849 laid the wire from Dover to Calais, and in 
1854 laid the first Mediterranean cable, between 
Spezzia and Corsica. Associated with Wheatstone 
in his experiments on the retardation of signals. In 
1865 he assisted in laying the cable from Ireland to 
Newfoundland, and later took charge of the French 
Atlantic cable expedition. Died at Eastbourne, and 
was buried at Highgate Cemetery, July 21, 1891. 

William Tyler Smith (1815-73), obstetrician, 
born near Bristol. B.M. London, 1840 ; M.D., 1848 ; 
Licentiate of the College of Physicians, 1850 ; Fellow, 
1859. Appointed Obstetric Physician at St Mary's 
Hospital. Examiner in Obstetrics in London Uni- 
versity. Sub -editor of The Lancet. Author of 
"Parturition" and "The Principles and Practice of 
Obstetrics" (1849). Founder of the Obstetrical 
Society of London. President, 1860. Deputy-chair- 
man of the Briton Insurance Company. Founded a 
convalescent hospital on his estate at Seaford, of 
which township he was bailiff for five years. Magis- 
trate of Seaford from 1861 to 1873. He married 
Tryphena, daughter of J. Yearsley of Southwick Park, 
Tewkesbury, and left five surviving children. His 
portrait is in St Mary's Hospital and in the Obstetrical 
Society of London. 

Archibald Smith (1813 - 72), mathematician. 
Educated at Trinity College, Cambridge.' B.A., 1836 ; 
M.A., 1839. Senior Wrangler and Smith's Prizeman. 
Fellow of Trinity. Fellow of the Royal Society, 1856. 
Barrister-at-law of Lincoln's Inn, 1841. LL.D. Glas- 
gow. Author of numerous scientific works, including 



262 THE SMITH FAMILY 

especially, " An Admiralty Manual for applying the 
Deviations of the Compass caused by Iron in a 
Ship." A corresponding member of the Scientific 
Committee of the Russian Navy. He married, 
in 1853, Susan E., daughter of Sir James Parker 
of Rothley Temple, and their eldest son, James 
Parker Smith, represents' the Partick division in 
the House of Commons. 

Sir Francis P. Smith (1808-74), inventor of the 
screw-propeller, son of Charles Smith, postmaster of 
Hythe, by Sarah, daughter of Francis PettiL He 
tried his model on a pond at Hendon, and patented 
it in 1835, and in 1837 a fresh and improved patent, 
which in 1844 was adopted by the Admiralty. Ad- 
viser to the Admiralty 1844-50. In 1860 appointed 
Curator of the Patent Office, and in 1871 he was 
knighted. He married (1) Ann, daughter of W. Buck 
of Folkestone, by whom he had two sons ; and (2) 
Susannah, daughter of John Wallis of Boxley. 

Edward Smith (1818-74), physician, born at 
Heanor. Educated at Queen's College, Birmingham, 
and London University. M.B., 1841 ; M.D., 1843 ; 
B.A. and LL.B., 1848. In 1863 Fellow of the Royal 
College of Physicians. Lecturer and Demonstrator 
at Charing Cross Hospital, 1853. Assistant Physi- 
cian at the Brompton Hospital, 1861. A distin- 
guished physiological chemist. Appointed medical 
officer for Poor Law purposes under the Local 
Government Board. An able writer on dietetics. 

Henry Lilley Smith,* surgeon, philanthropist, and 
originator of provident dispensaries (1788-1859), only 
son of William L Smith of Southam, by Sophia, 
daughter of Henry Chambers, of the family of that 
name settled at Tamworth, 1450. On his father's 
side, first cousin of Sir Fortunatus W. Lilley Dwarris, 
F.R.S. (ride Diet. Nat. Biography), and related to 
Miss Elizabeth Carter, minor poetess (vide Diet. 



CELEBRITIES OF THE NAME 263 

Nat. Biography). Educated at Guy's. Served as 
assistant -surgeon in the 45 th Regiment. In 1810 
commenced practice at Southam. An eye-witness 
of the evils environing the old Poor-Law system, he 
was the pioneer of co-operation among the labouring 
classes. In 1823, started the first provident dispen- 
sary on mutual lines at Southam, following this 
initial success by similar institutions at Coventry, 
Northampton, Leamington, Burton-on-Trent, Derby, 
etc., "until the movement became general, there being 
forty-five such dispensaries in London alone. In 
1818, established an eye infirmary at Southam, which, 
before his death, had treated over eleven thousand 
cases; and is stated to have been founder of the 
allotment 'system, in the teeth of virulent opposition 
from the farmers, but with the support of Sir Robert 
Peel, the Premier. He married, in 1819, Mary, 
daughter of Thomas Bicknell of Southam, and by 
her left a son, in holy orders, and a daughter (vide 
Encyclopaedia Americana). 



INDEX (1) TO PEDIGEEES 



Smith of 

Acre (Sir Sidney), 164 
Aldenham, 132-135 
Aspley, 120-122 
Assheton Smith, 96 
Ashatead, 63 
Astley, 162 

Balby, 126 

Barking (Berry), 17 

Battle Flatt, 158 

Baxtergate, 124 

Bideford, 157 

Belfast, 191 

Blackmore, 14 

Bleansley, 159 

Als. Bowden Smith, 59 

Brockhole, 125 

Als. Bromley, Barts. (see West 

Country Smiths) 
Broxted, 14 

Buckland Prope Maidstone, 23 
Buckton Park, 159 

Cambdek, 42 

Camborne, 158 

Cazner, 59. (Smith Masters) 

Camno (Berry), 17 

Als. Carington, 13, 41, 85-91 

Carrington, Earl, Carington, 

Vi3count, 66-72 
Cavendish, 33 
Cawood, 44-64 
Christ Church (Dean), 173 
Church Lawford, 30 
Corballis, 190 
Craigend, 179 
Crantock, Barts., 108 
Credenhill, 20 
Cropwell Boteler, 72-85 
Cuerdley, 115 
Als. Cusac-Smith, Barts., 182-183 

Als. Dorrien-Smith (see West 

Country Smiths) 
Als. Dods worth, Barts., 119 
Durham, 12 

Eardiston, Barts., 109 
Ala. Eardley, Barts., 172 
Edmonthorpe, Barts., 98, 99, 100 
Edwalton, 75, 76 
Ellingham, 145 

Ala. Faber, 146-151 
265 



Smith of 

Gadsby, 73 

Great Fenton, 104 

Glastonbury, 156 

Gloucester, 164 

Goldicote, 162 

Ala. Gordon, Barts., 112 

Gorleston, 38 

Greenwich, 23 

The Grove in Cropwell, 166 

Halesowen, 114 

Hambledon (Viscountess), 142, 

143 
Hampden Manor, 169 
HarnhillandFannington, 151-154 
Harwich, 14 
Helmshore, 161 
Horsham, 166 

Als. Horton-Smith (see Mansfield) 
Hough, 10, 108 

Ilminster, 56, 57, 62 

Isle of Wight and Parndon, 174, 

175 
Isle worth, Barts., 98 

Kest, 23 

Kidlington and Ilfley, 144 

Languard, 164 
Leeds, 123, 129 
Leominster. 167 
Limerick, als. Smyth, 196 
London, 29 

Long Ashton, als. Smyth, 37, 97 
Als. Lumley- Smith (see Mans- 
field) 

Maine, 197 

Smith- Marriott, Barts., 60, 61 
Monaghan, 195, 196 
Morville, 36 

Newark, 44 
Non-jurors, 101 
Nottingham, 155 
Nottingham and Mansfield, 105- 
107 

Oldhadoh, 11 
Old Windsor, 113 
Orcheston, 165 
Ostenhanger, 25 



266 

Smith of 

Outwood, 145 
Overton, 37 

Paisley, 181, 182 
Pauncefote, Lord, 76-77 
Pickering, Bart., 139 
Potterspury, 35 
Preston Court, 76 

Qtoen's_ College (Provost of), 

Restalbig, 180, 181 
Ryhope, 151 

Gbeat Saling, 136, 137 
Selsdon, SO 
Shopwyke, 138, 139 
Shortgrove, 118 
Southneld, 131, 132 
Southam, 173 
South Shields, 165 
Ala. Stanydge, 70 
Stoke Doyle, 170 
Stratford-on-Avon, 116, 117 
Suttons, Barts., 58 
Sydling (ate Smith Marriott 
Barts.) 

Texbitbt, 166 
Thinghill Court, 163, 164 
Toddington, 166 
Twyford, 164, 165 

Ala. Vereses (Viscount Gort), 

Ala. Vemon (Lyveden), 139-142 

Ala. Wakefield, 43 
Waterford, 192-195 
West Country, 52-65 
West Ham, 13 
Bishop Wilton, 127 
Withcote, 27 
WoodhaU, 79 
Wribbenhall, 168 
Wyghton, 34 

Smyth of 

Abingdon, 9 
Annables, 22, 46-52 
Athernie, 178 

Ballygowan, 198, 199 
BaUynatray and Headborough, 

Ballynegall, 185 

Campden, 19 

Castle Widenham, 188, 189 



INDEX TO PEDIGREES 



Smyth of 

Cavendish, 33 

Colkirk, 45 

Copcote, 42 

Crossing Temple, etc. (alt 

Carington), 66-72, 85-91 
Cuddesdon, 113 

Dartmouth, 12 
Drumcree, 184, 185 
Durpark, 189 

Elkinoton, 46-52 
Exeter, ala. Smith, 12 

Gaybbook, 183, 184 
Glananea, 185, 186 
Gloucester (Bishop of), 19 

Hackthobpe (Elkineton) 2S 
46-52 s ' 

Holborne, 30 
Ala. Hovel, 42 

Isfield, Barts., 109 

Kelmabsh, 35 

Ala. Smith of Limerick, 106 
Long Ashton, a&. Smith, Barts., 

London, 31 

Masonbbook, 196 

Merrow, 40 

Mitcham, 39 

Myreshaw and Heath Hall, 130 

Nedginoe, 31 
Ala. Neville, 14 
Nibley, 20 
Northants, 29 

Ostenhangeb, 30 (see Smith) 
Oxford, 36 

Pepebhabow, 38 (ate Hack- 
thorpe) 

READING, 110, 111 

Redcliffe, Barts., 100 
Rivenhall, 34 
Rochdale, 30 

Ala. Smltth, 15 
Southwark, 39 
Stoke Prior, 29, 4<> 
Suffolk, 32 

Tbeoonake, 11 

Upton, Barts. (Berry), 16 



INDEX TO PEDIGREES 



267 



SsfYTHof 

Waisham, 32 
Warlingfield, Much, 24 
Woburn, 10 



Smythe of 

Acton Bumtell, Barts., 92-95 

Babba villa, 186 

Hilton, 154 

Mxtbtss Castli, 116, 777 



Smtthjs of 

Withcock {see Smith), 31 



Smijth 

Basts., 15, 102, 103 



of Nobbobkx, 29 



Smithes of 

Wbenton', 38 



INDEX (2) OF PRINCIPAL NAMES AND 
PLACES 



The following Index does not pretend to be exhaustive. To have given 
references to every name would have been to reprint the entire work in 
kaleidoscopic form ; moreover, a multitude of entries appended to such a 
name as, e.g., John Smith, which recurs about two hundred times, would have 
proved a source of embarrassment, rather than of aid to the reader. As it is, 
the two Indexes — the latter, as is admitted, condensed — are out of proportion 
to the size if not to the scope of the volume, and ought, therefore, to prove 
amply sufficient for all practical purposes. 



Abbot op Reading, 7 

Abingdon, Richard of, 10 

Abinger, Lord, 63 

Ackworthe of Wolwiche, 23 

Acton Bunnell, 72 

Addington, Thos., 35 

Adeane of Babraharo, H., 81 

Agar, J., 198 

Agar-Robartes, Hon. T. C, 79 

Ailward, Oliver, 39 

Aldworth, Rev. J., 74 

Alexander, Right Rev. Dr, Bishop 

of Meath, 184 
Alfred, King, 87 
Allayne, Richard of Derby, 20 
Alles, Mary, 27 
Alresford, skirmish at, 38 
Alstenteig of Nuremberg, 11 
Altham, Sir G., 15 
American Smiths, 63 
Anderson, Sir Edmund, 22, 44, 64 
Anderson, Edward Miles, 2S 
Anketell Jones, Edward, 185 
Acnables, 22, 47 

Annals of Indian Administration, 181 
Annas in Lincolnshire, 23 
Anstey, Anne, 40 
Anthonie of Exeter, 12 
Antigua, Bishop of, 183 
Ap Gwillim, 22 
Ap Harry, 21, 22 
Ap Harry, George, 21 
Ap Harry, Lewis, 22 
Appulderneld, 30 
Archaeologia Kantiana, 26 
Arderne of Alvanley, Sir P., 86 
Arlington, Earl of, 135 
Arran, 5th Earl of, 142 
Arundell of Trevize, 12 
Ashby Folville, 68 



Ashridge, 51 

Ashmole, 158 

Ash ton, 44 

Aspley House, 122 

Assheton Smith, Thomas, sportsman, 

208 
Assheton Smith of Vaynol, 93 
Atkyns, Gloucestershire, 152 
Auber Leach, 142 
Auckland, Lord, 79 
Austen Leigh of Scarletts, 18 
Austin, Rev. W. G. G., 183 
Auvranches, 30 
A' Wood, Anthony, 113 
Ayliffe, John, 30 

BaBBINQTON' OF ROTHLIY T£3fPLE, 

179 

Badwell, 40 

Raiard, 35 

Bailey, C, SI 

Bailey, John, Q.C., 106 

Baines, merchant, 29 

Baker, Sir Henry, of Sissinghurst, 25 

Balby, 126 

Ball of Hadley, Thos., 39 

Balliol (Scott, alias), 26 

Balthrop, Richard, 10 

Baptist cemetery, Nottingham, 155 

Barff of Carlton, Wm., 44 

Bargrave, Dean of Canterbury, 24 

Barlow, John of Mansfield, 107 

Barnard, 33 

Barnard, Alf., 43 

Barnard, L. B., 77 

Barnesdale of Barwyk, John, 34 

Barnett of Downshill, 38 

Barony of Dudley, co-heiresses of, 1 15 

Barrington, Sir Thomas, 51 

Barroll, Sybil, 21 

268 



PRINCIPAL NAMES AND PLACES 269 



,13 



Barry, Hon. John, 100 

Barrymore, Lord, 100 

Barton, Dr, 142 

Baskerville, James, 21 

Battle Abbey, 150 

Battle Flatt, 157 

Bawton, 33 

Baxter of King's Lynn, Win., 34 

Baxter of Stannow, Robt., 34 

Baxtergate, 124 

Baydon, Smith of, 41 

Baynard, 34 

Baynham of Westbere, 20 

Beaumont of Warton, 75 

Beaven of Monkland, 163 

Bechinoe, Captain, R.N., 61 

Beds Visitation. 1634, 10 

Bellasys, Anne Margaret, 43 

Bell-ringing at Leeds, 129 

Bendish of Bumstead, Thos., 33 

Bendysh, Thos., 45 

" Benedictines of Ghent," 93 

Bennet, Alderman, 14 

Bennett, Alderman, 29 

Bennett, Elizabeth, 44 

Bennetts of Wilts, 132 

Berks Visitation, 1634, 9 

Berks Visitation, 1664, 10 

Berry's Essex Pedigrees, 15, 16, 1 

Bery, Gilbert, 27 

Besthorpe, Notts, 35 

Betham, Sir W., 68 

Bettenham of Pluckley, John, 23 

Biggleswade, 10 

Bird of Barton, 77 

Birkett, Herbert, M.I.M.E., 10/ 

Berkett, John, Pres. R.C.S., 107 

Bishop Smith, Churton's Life of, 169 

Bishop Wilton, 127 

Bisset of Batcomb, 33 

Blackbourton, Oxon, 152 

Blacknall-Carter, Mrs, 144 

Black Prince, the, 86 

Blake, Charlotte S., 16 

Blakesley, Lawrance, 10 

Blakiston, Sir P., 83 -.,,,_ 

Blayney, Cadwallader, ninth Lord, 119 

Blood, Thos., 39 

Blount, Richard. 31 

Blount, Sarah, "26 

Blount of Sodington, 94 

Blunt, Sir W., 25 

Blythswood, Lord, 73 

"Bobus" Smith, 140 

Bonevyle, Nich. , 22 

Bonner, Bishop, 104 

Boone, Thomas, 81 

Borage, 55 

Bosanquet, George, 79 

Bostock of >Torcroft,.ll 

Bosworth, 35 

Bosworth, Battle of, 157 

Bosville, Sir Robert, 23 



Boughton Monchelsey, 23 
Boughton of Plumstead, Edw. , 23 
Bourne, Dr Gilbert, 39 
Bowden Smiths, 59, 60 
Boys, David, 21 

Braintree Union, chairman of, 137 
Brampton, Walter, 40 
Brand, Sir Joseph, 135 
Branker, Joan, 25 
Brecknok of Bucks, 33 
Brereton, Sir Andrew, 10, 1 1 
Breynton of Stratton, 21 
Briscoe, Mrs, 115 
Brocket, Sir John, 49, 51 
Brockhole in Cantley, 125 
Brodie Gurney, W., 131 
Bromfeld, Lord Mayor, Sir E. , 20 
Bromley, Sir George, 75 ■ 

Bromley, Sir Henry, 72 

Brompton Oratory, 150 

Brompton, W., 34 

Browne, Sir Hugh, 36 

Browne- Willis, 122 

Brownlow, Lord, 33 

Browning of Cowley, John, 20 

Brymore, 73 

Broxted, 14 

Brynkle, Smith, parson of, 2 

Buckland Prope Maidstone, 23 

Buckle, Stephen, 44 

Buckner of Botley, William, 36 

Bunny, Major, R.A., 76 

Burgess, Elizabeth, 15 

Burgh, John, 39 

Burgh, Oliffe, 39 

Burghley, Lord, 27 

Burnley factory hands, 123 

Burrell of Cockneld, Ninian, 33 

Burridge of Crimchard, 57 

Byerly of Belgrave, 89 

Cadogax H. Cajjoga*, 30 

Calvert, Francis A. , 79 

Cambridge, 1 

Camden, 42 

Cambden, Clarencieux, 24 

Capua, Prince of, 1S7 

Carey, Dr, Biography of, 181 

Carey, General, 79 

Carmichael, Baron, dormant, ITS 

Carmichael, Sir James, ^178 

Carington alt. Smith, 13 

Carington ais. Smyth (Warwick \ .), 

Carington, Baron of Wootton Wawon. 

71 
Carington, Edmond, 13 
Carington, Sir E., 13 
Carington, Sir Francis, 37 
Carington, Sir John, 38 
Carington, John, 3, 13 
Carington, Sir Michael, 67, 71 
Carington, Thomas, of Broxton, 38 



270 



INDEX OF 



Carington, Viscount, of Barreford, 71 

Carington, Sir W., 13 

Carrington, Earl, 78 
Carrington, Eric, 80 

Carrington, Robert, 3 

Carrington, first Lord, 69 

Carringtons and Caringtons, Chapter 
V., 66 

Carlton Rode, 33 

Carswell, Dorothy, 62 

Caryll, Sir John, "88 

Case, Alice, 31 

Castle Eaton, Wilts, 153 

Castien&u, Richard, 29 

Castletown, Lord, 140 

Cave, Dorothy, 27 

Cave, Right Hon. Stephen, 50 

Cave of Stanford, R., 31 

Cavendish, 33 

Cavendish, Hon. J. G., Admiral, 81 

Cavendish, Hon. R., 60 

Cavendish of Lingford, Thomas, 33 

Caulfield, Rev. Dr, 79 

Cawood. 44 

Cecill, Richard, 35 

Celebrities of the name, Chapter X., 
200 

Cely, Mary, 39 

" Cerberus of the Treasury,'' 143 

Chamberlayne of Maugersbury, 73 

Chambers, Anne, 44 

Chambers, R., of Whitbourn Court, 
1S3 

Charles L, 71 

Charles Edward, Prince, 194 

Charnock, Agnes, 15 

Chart, juxta button, 23 

Chernocke Barts, 122 

Cheshire Visitation, 1580, 10 

Chester of Rovston, Sir Robert, 33 

Chesterfield, Lord, 194 

Chicheley, 30 

Chichester Cathedral, Smith monu- 
ments, 138 

Chichester, Earl of, 79 

Childersof Cantley, 172 

Chipping-Norton, William Smith of, 3 

Church Lawford, 30 

Chute of the Vine, William, 17 

" Citizen Smith" of Paisley, 181 

Clapton of Kentwell, William, 31 

Clark, Francis, 29 

Clarke, Bart., 39 

Clifden, Viscount, 79 

Clysby, Agnes, 43 

Colchester, siege of, 133 

Coldingham, >X. , 76 

Colebrooke Row, Islington, 132 

Colkirk, 45 

Collin, Fortune, 72 

Colville of Culross, Lord, 78 

Colville, John, 31 

Colt, 34 



Comberbatch family, 106 

Compton, 7 

Compton of Hartbury, Elizabeth, 42 

Conder of Colwall, 89 

Conway, Baron of Ragley, Helli- 

gaurth, daughter of, 15 
Coo of Coxall, 31 
Cooke, Clarencieux, 163 
Coote, Sir Charles, Bart., 186 
Copcote, 42 
Cooper, Alary, 142 ■ 
Cordall, Thomas, 34 
Cork, Richard, first Earl of, 186 
Cornwall Visitation, 1620, 11 
Cossam, Wilts, 30 
Cotton, John, 101 
Coupland, Eleanor, 44 
Couthop of Cambrook, 38 
Coventry, Earl of, 171 
Coventry, Robert, 41 
Covert of Slaugham, Sir Walter, 38 
Cox of Beeston, 89 
Crane of Chilton, Robert, 32 
Creagh, John, 188 
CTedenhili, 21 

Credenhill, John Smith of, 4 
Creed, Anthony, 30 
Creneure, 30 

Cresset of Upton Cresset, 36 
Creasing Temple, 14, 41, 71 
Cressy of Oldcotes, Henry, 36 
Crewe, Colonel, 77 
Criall, 30 

Croft of Hertford, 15 
Cromwell, Elizabeth, 186 
Cromwell, Oliver, 45 
Cropwell Boteler, 68, 69, 70, 105 
Crowder, CoL, C.B., 119 
Cubitt, Major, 76 
Culfe, Anne, 14 
Calverwell, Richard, 25 
Cumberland, Duke of, 194 
Cunliffe, Sir Ellis, 17 
Curdesley, 36 
Currie, Arthur, 18 
Curtys, William, 33 
Curzon, Abbot, 86 
Curzon, Sir John, 86 
Curzon, Gen. Hon. Leicester, 185 
Curzon, Viscount, 75 
Cusac, Sir T., High Lord Chancellor, 
183 

D alton, J., of Fillingham, 119 

Daly- White, H, C.B., 81 

Dance, George, R.A., 63 

Dansey of Bnnsop, Roger, 21 

Danvers, J., 142 

Davies, de la Marche, Reginald, 37 

Davies of Richards Castle, John, 37 

Dawkins, H., of Standlynch, 119 

DayreU, Pawle, 9 

Dean of Christ Church, descent of, 173 



PRINCIPAL NAMES AND PLACES 271 



Dearie, George, of Stepney, 9 

De Capell Brookes, Bart 3.", 187 

De Carinton, So 

De Clarendon, 104 

De Clarendon, Sir Roger, 15 

De Derndell, William, 37 

Deedes, Rev. Cecil, 81 

Deedes, Rev. Lewis, 81 

De la Chambre, John, 192 

De la Weare, Anne, 22 

De Leon, Juana M. De Los Dolores, 

64 
De Montacute, Sir W., 86 
Dene of Great Missenden, Edward, 29 
Denston, 38 

Denton of Am broaden, 36, 42 
De Otelev, Sir Ralph, 48 
Derby, Earl of, Premier, 100 
Dering, John, 24 
De Rixton, Alan, 86 
De Roos, Sir R., 86 
De Scacario, Richard, 37 
De Stifford of Essex, Richard, 23 
De Toft, William, 85 
Devel, Susanna, 18 
Des Voeux, Marquis, 156 
Devon Visitation, 1620, 12 
Dickenson of King's Weston, F., 80 
Dickenson of King's Weston, W., 79 
Digbv, Earl, 61 
Digby of Welby, Thomas, 33 
Dixon, Emily P., 192 
Dodsworth Baits., 119 
Dodsworth, J., of Thornton Watlass, 

119 
Doneraile, second Lord, 187 
Donne, Alice, 31 
Donoughmore, Lord, 73 
Dorington, Joane, 38 
Dormer, Anthony, S8 
Dormer, first Lord, 88 
Dorrien, Thomas, 74 
Dorset Visitation, 1623, 12 
Doveton College, Calcutta, 181 
Downes, Joane, 39 
Drever, Dr, 74 
Du Cane, Peter, 62 
Dudley and Ward, Baron, 114 
Dudley Ryder, 142 
Dugdale's Notes, 6 
Dnnraven, Earl of, 60 
Dunsany, Randall, Lord, 17 
Duppa, Bishop of Sarum, 23 
Duppa, Walter, of Greenwich, 23 
Durham Visitation, 1615, 12 
Duttons, the, 85 
Dyer of Barnstaple, Richard, 12 
Dvke-Ackland, 142 
Dysart, Earl, 61 

Eakyjjs, Robert, 10 
Eardlev, Lord, 172 
Eardley, Sir Culling, 172 



Easthaugh, Anne, 142 

Eaton Bishop, 170 

Ecroyd Smith, H., 123 

Ecroyd, W. Farrer, MP., 123 

Edgar, Nicholas, of Ashe, 32 

Edgehill, Battle of, 88 

Erilin of Pinner, Richard, 30 

Edward IV., 53 

Edward, C, 43 

Edwards, Chancellor, 9 

Egerton, Hon. A., 31 

Egleton, whence the Kent 3, Barts., 

72 
Eldon, Countess of, 107 
Eliot, Katherine, 122 
Eliot, Sir John, 122 
Elizabeth, Queen, 51 
Elkington, John Smith of, 3, 4 
Elkington Line, Chapter III., 46 
Ellesmere, Earl, 81 
Ellis of Long Melford, 33 
Elmore of Panton, George, 16 
Elphinston, Sir H, 59 
Elston, Hugh, 19, 42 
Emott, 20 

Engleneld, Mary, 88 
English Pedigrees, Chapter VL, 96 
English Pedigrees, continued. Chapter 

VTL, 123 
Erdeswick, Jane, 90 
Essex Visitation, 1634, 14 
Essex Visitation, 1664, 13, 14 
Evangelical Magazine, 132 
Eyre of Hodloke, Robert, 36 
Eyres of Bath, William, 44 

Fabeb, Rev. Canon Arthur, 150 

Faber, Father, 150 

Faber, Rev. G. S., B.D., 150 

Faber pedigree, 146, 147, 148, 149, 

150 
Faber, Sir W., 150 
" Familiae Minorum Gentium," 43, 

44, 45 
Fanshaw, Henry, 25 
Farington, Sir N., 36 
Farnell, Sir E., 86 
Farwell, Edmond, 13 
Farwell, Sir Edmond, 41 
Farwig, Adelaide, 131 
Farwy of Brockley, 38 
Fawley, Edward Sliles, 23 
Fitzakerley, John, M.P., 140 
Felstead, Society of Friends of, 137 
Ferrer, Honoria, of Weobley and 

Dilwyn, 163 
Ferrers, Sir J., 13, 36 
Field, 44 

Fineld, Anne of Farmington, 152 
Fish, Oliver, 10 
Fineox of Heme, John, 25 
Fitzgerald, Selina, 76 
Fitzgerald, T. W., 135 



272 



INDEX OF 



Fitzherbert, Eustace, 87 , 

Fortescue, Sir John, 51 
Fitzwilliam, Charles W., fifth Earl, 

141 
Fleetwood of the Vache, Bridget, 15 
Fletchamstead, 7 
Fly, Rev. Dr, 193 
Folville, Ashby, 41 
Ford of Harting, Sir John, 88 
Ford of Keldon, 29 
Forester, Lord, 78 
Forster of Aldermaston, 62 
Fortescue of Salden, Sir J., 22, 23 
Foster, Mary, 26 

Foster of Little Baddow, Wm., 13 
Fothergill, Dr M., 137 
Foulshurst, Sir T., 10 
Fountains and Kirk stall Abbeys, 150 
Fowen of Bristol, 38 
Fox, George, Quaker, So 
Foxley, 37 

Franklin of Maidstone, James, 38 
Freeman of Beverlev, Samuel, 45 
Fulford, Sir John, 11 

Gabriel, Sir T., Bart., 106 

Galway, William, Viscount, 17 

Gamlingay, Smith of, 2 

Garbesham, 31 

Gardner, second Lord, 77 

Gardner, Maria, 50 

Gardiner, Captain Allen, F., R.N., 

143 
Gardiner, Kath. of Southwark, 49 
Gascoigne, General, 82 
Gaytonthorpe, Thos., 34 
Gernon, 34 
Gery, Mary, 36 
Gideon, Sir Sampson, 172 
Giffard of Chillington, Sir T., 41, 68, 

87 
Giffard of Salop, 37 
Gilbert, Sarah, 17 

Gilby of Bath and London, Thos., 44 
Gilby, uxor to, 2S 
Giles, G. E. of Bonchurch, 89 
Glastonbury, Baron, 49 
Gloucester Visitation, 1683, 20 
Gloucestershire Visitation, 1624, 19 
Goddard of Overton, Thomas, 34 
Godden, John, of S. Petherton, 156 
Godden-Smith of Wick, Alfred S., 156 
Godwyn of Owkey, 38 
Goldbrooke, Belinda, 17 
Goldsmith, Oliver, 189 
Gordon, James E., R.N., 80 
Goodman of London, Ann , daughter 

of, 35 
Gore, Ladv Esther C. G., 142 
Gore, Sir John, 29 
Gorge, Sir Thos. , 37 
Gorge, Lord. 37 
Gorleston, 38 



Gort, Viscount, 198 
Gosling, Charles, 17 
Gower, Earl of, 140 
Grainger & Smith, firm if, 168 
Grant, Maximilian, 189 
Grenville, Sir Barnard, 12 
Grenville, Sir Bevil, 12, 56 
Grenville, Hon. James, 49 
Grey of Norton, 149 
Grey of Backworth, 83 
Grice, Richard, 187 
Griffin of Dingley, 27 
Grimblys, grocers of Oxford, 113 
Gunton, 32 

Haceett, Bishop of Down, 16 

Hackthorpe, 28 

Hagthorpe, 38 

Hales, Sir Philip, 73 

Hales of Tenterden, Wm., 23 

Halsted, Rev. R. , 44 

Halys, Alice, 32 

Halysworth, 32 

Hambledon, Viscountess, 142 

Hambledon Line, 142, 143 

Hames, Margt., 30 

Hamilton, J., of Belfast, 185 

Hamond, 13, 41 

Hampden, Sir John, 87 

Hamper Paper Mill, Watford, 132 

Hanbury of Bridganorth, 89 

Handford, Alderman, Sir Humphrev, 
39 

Hares, John, 31 

Harewell, 67, 68, 87 

Harewell, Agnes, 42 

Harington, Sir James, 45 

Hemminge of Poxwell, 12 

Hende, Lord Mayor, 13, 87 

Henry Martyn, Life of, 181 

Henslow. George of, 10 

Heralds' Visitations, Chapter IL, 9 

Herbert, Lord, 71 

Hereford Visitation, 1569, 20 
Heritage, Hannah, 106 
Heron, Sir Edward, 35 
Herriett, Sir Thos., 13 
Herts Visitation, 22 
Hervey of Bradwell Grove, 82 
Hervev, Lady Arabella, 82 
Hervey, Rev. E., 122 
Hervey, Wm., 115 
Hervye of Clare, Thos., 31 
Herwood, Thos., 40 
Hewlev, Sir John, 44 
Hewley, Thos., 44 
Hevingham, Sir Anthonv, 34 
Hibbins de Weo, Chas.,"36 
Hide, John, 28 
Harris, Smith ais., 27 
Harris of Woodhay, 25 
Harrington, eighth Earl, 78 
Hart, Robert, 38 



PRINCIPAL NAMES AND PLACES 273 



Hartley, Lieut. -CoL, 106 

Harvey, Sir D., 101 

Harwell of Wootton, John, 41 

Haaelrigge of Leicester, Ellinor, 39 

Hasted's Kent, 26 

Hasting, Catherine, 34 

Hawes, Sir John, 31 

Hawkes, 34 

Hawkins of Sugwas, Francis, J. P., 
C.C., 163 

Hawkins of Cardiff, Maria, 19 

Hawley, Clarencieux, 37 

Hawkesworth, Sir R., 183 

Hayward, Sir Rowland, 25 

Haywood, S., 44 

Havard, W., 21 

Heathcote of Raleigh, 189 

Heber, Bishop, Life of, 181 

Higgins family, 164 

Higham, 31 

High Legh, 3 

Hilkiah Bedford, Bishop, 101 

Hodge, Right Hon. Sir C, 15 

Hodgson, Christopher, of Westerton, 
119 

Hodgson, Br, Dean of Carlisle, SO 

Holborne, 30 

Holdich in Thorncomb, 55 

Holforda, the, 93, 94 

Holme, Lieut. -Col., 89 

Holrovde, Captain, 188 

Holte'of Ashton, EL, 88 

Hondon, 31 

Hopwood, Maud, 21 

Horsey, Sir Ralph, 12 

Horsfall, J., 78 

Horspoole, 25 

Horton of Mowsley, 106 

Horton-Smith arms, 105 

Horton - Smith, Lionel, M.A., etc., 
106 

Horton-Smith, Percival, M.D., 106 

Horton-Smith, Raymond J., M.B., 
106 

Horton-Smith, Richard, K.C., 106 

Houghton, Toby, of Houghton 
Towers, 14 

Howard, Lady Isabella, 186 

Howard, the Philanthropist, 132 

Bowarth, Captain, R.N., 43 

Sowe of Farnham, W., 14 

lowell, W., 32 
lowlett, 40 
lood. ais. Smith, 40 
ludson, J., of Basingby, 77 
(ulcote Manor, 122 
Lume, J. S., of Mallow, 196 
r urstley in Kynnersley, 163 
utchinson, Van. Archdeacon, 184 
yndford. Earl, dormant, 178 
yde of Albury, 48 
yde, John, 22 
/ston, Smith of, 2, 4 

S 



Tr.r.Tv r., W., 35 

Inglisberry, and Nemphiar, Viscount, 

dormant, 178 
Ingoldsby, Sir G., 186 
Ireton, Henry, 45 
Irish Pedigrees, Chapter IX., 182 
Isacke, History of Exeter, 54 

James HL of Scotland, 176 
James, Rev. John, ejected minister, 

131 
Jeflreys, Judge, 57 
Jennor of Bigotts, Andrew, 19 
Jennor, Sir Kenelm, 19 
Jervois, J., 188 
Jervoise, Sir S. C, Bart., 81 
Joyce of Grundisboro', Robert, 34 
Jones, General, 75 
Jordan, Mrs, 115 
Jud, Agnes, 23 
Judde, Sir Andrew, Lord Mayor, 25, 

26 

Kctj. t, Sir Fitzroy, 75 
Kelmarsh, 35 

Kelpos of Watergate, John, 38 
Kemp, Alfred Bray, Chancellor, 107 
Kenchester Church, assault therein, 

21 
Kent, alt. Smith, 35 
Kent, Earl of, 55 
Kent Visitation, 1619, 23 
Kidderminster Congregationalism, 

168 
Kinderley, Frances, 43 
King Dr., Archbishop of Dublin, 184 
King-Smith, Charles, 131 
Kingston of Bandon, S., 188 
Kinwarton, Rector of, 18 
Kippington, Kent, 83 
Kirke White, unpublished poems of, 

155 
Knatchbull, John, 26 
Knevett, Lady, 40 
Kyllachy, Lord, 181 

Lachmann, Herr, 76 

Lainham, Robert, 13 

Lancaster, Duchy of, 30 

Langdale, Marmaduke, 94 

Larkbeare, 12 

Last-Smith, Dr E., 192 

Lathbury, History of the Non-jurors, 

101 
Layham, 39 

Laynham, Robert, 34, 87 
Lawson, Dillon, 195 
Lea, Ferdinando, 114 
Lea, William, 114 
Leadam's Domesday. 6, 7, 3 
Leader- Williams of Diglifl, 89 
Lee of Langley, 93 
Leeke of Hallom, Adam, 36 



274 



INDEX OF 



Le Faber, 48 

Lefevre, Isaac, 18, 58 

Leggatt, William, 32 

Leicester, Earl of, 25 

Leicester Visitation, 1624, 27 

Leigh, Egerton, 32 

Leigh, Sir John, 39 

Leigh, Lord, 7 

Le Maistre, Rev. Dr, 119 

Le Marchant, Denis, 18 

Le.Marchant, Sir D., 58 

Lenthall of Latchford, 11 

Lepard, William, 131 

Le Smythe, John, 53 

Leven, ninth Earl, 79 

Lilborne, William, 22 

Lilboarn, Eleanor, 48 

Lincoln, Bishop of, 36 

Lincoln Visitation, 1562, 28 

Lisburae, Viscount, 135 

Lister, Leonard, 10 

" Little Blenheim," 134 

Littlemore, 144 

Llewellin, Dean, 76 

Lloyds of Arnagowan, 189 

Lloyd, Dorothy, 16 

Llovd, Sir John, 15 

Lloyd, Charles, LL.D., 43 

Loftus, Right Hon. T., 185 

Long of Great Leverraere, John, 33 

Longfield. Richard, 29 

London Visitation, 1568, 30, 31 

London Visitation, 1633, 29 

Lound of Essex, 34 

Lovedav, Xpofer, 30 

Lowe, George, 25 

Ludgershall, 7 

Lnmlev of Dalbv, Leicester, 106 

Lumle'y-Smith, K.C., Judge, 106 

Lumley-Smith Arms, 105 

Lushington, Judge, SI 

Lyanby, uxor to, 28 

Lygon of Madresfield, Richard, 19 

Lyght of Lvghtslary, Henry, 34 

Lylbourne," William, 28 

Lynford, Ann, 26 

Lyster, Captain, R.A., 186 

Lyttelton of Frankley, Sir John, 43 

Lytton, Helen, Lady Reade, 49 

Lvtton, Judith, 49 

Lytton, Sir Rowland, 22, 49 

Lyveden Line, 139, 140, 141. 142 

Lyveden of Lyveden, Baron, 140 

Mabeblet, J., M.P., 80 

Macadam - Smith, W., of Wivelis- 

combe, 181 
Mackintosh of Geddes, E., 61 
Mackintosh of Inverness, 181 
Macmahons, 196 

Magrath, Dr, Provost of Queen's, 171 
Malvern College, 150 
Manby, uxor to, 28 



Manchester, Union Bank of, 145 

Manning, Cardinal, 77 

Mansfield Estate. 105 

Man wanng, Sir R. , 10 

Markham, 68 

Markham of Alberton, Anne, 36 

Markham of Allerton, Sir T., 71, 87 

Markham of Notts, 41 

Marten, 30 

Marlborough, Duke of, 134 

Marsey of Berwood, Mary, 35 

Marsh, Sarah, 43 

Marriner, Captain, 18 

Marriott, Rev. Dr, of Horsmonden, 
60 

Martin, Lord Mayor, Sir R., 19, 42 

Martin, J., 43 

Maryon Wilson, Sir S., Bart., 192 

Mascall, Thomas, 37 

Masters, George, of Camer, 59 

Matthewes of Radnor, 37 

Maunsell of Plassv, Major, 192 

Maxwell of Finnabrogue, 188 

Maydwell, Colonel, 64 

Mayne, Rev. C. 0., 81 

Meadows -White, Judge, 107 

Meadows -White, Alice, nit Smith,107 

Meller of Came, 12 

Mellington, John Smith De, 3 

Melville, Hon. Alexander L., 80 

Melville, Lady Lucv, 80 

Melville, Lady Mary A, 79 

" Meninensis Cancellarius," 37 

Merrow, 40 

Meux, SirH., Bart., 15 

Middlesex Visitation, 1663, 28 

Milward, Anne, 14 

Minshall,, W., 11 

Mitcbam, 39 ; also Mycham 

Monck, Lady Emily, 186 

Monke of Powderidge, Sir T., 12 

Montague of Samm, William, 41, 55 

Montrose, Duke of, 179 

Montrose, Grisel, daughter of Mar- 
quess of, 177 

Montrose, first Marquess, 106 

Moore, Hon. C. W., 188 

Moore, Rev. Minor Canon, 64 

Morant's "Essex," 132 

Mordaunt, George, 10 

Moreton of Ashlev, John, 41 

Moreton of Ashby FolviUe, 63, 87 

Morton, Cardinal, 87 

Morton, Lady, 169 

Morgan of Llanterner, 37 

Morley, William, 29 

Morris, 40 

Morrall of Downside, Rev. Father 
O.S.B., 90 

Morvill, 36 

Morvs, John, 7 

Moslev, Sir John, 80 

Mosley, Rev. R., 30 



PRINCIPAL NAMES AND PLACES 275 



Motham, Thomas, 30 
Moantcashell, third Earl, 137 
Mouncacute, Catherin, 13 
Muttleberie, 55 
Mattleberrie, Alice, 12 
Mynors of Balshall, John, 32 

Neave, Sir Arundel, Bart., 187 

Neave, Sir T. L., Bart., 187 

Nedginge, 31 

Novell, Thomas, 13 

Nevile o£ Holte, Sir T., 14, 87 

Nevile, Sir N., 36 

Neville of Billingbeare, Sir H., 25 

Newark, 44 

Newman's "Apologia," 150 

Newman, Sir R., 31 

Newaam, Thomas, 10 

Newton, 11 

Newton, Sir Isaac, 142 

Newton, Elizabeth, 85 

Nicholls, Leicestershire, 69 

Nicholson of Cawood, 44 

Noble's " History of Cromwell," 45 

Non-juror Smiths, pedigree of, 101 

Norborne, 29 

Norfolk Visitation, 1612, 31 

Northampton, Charles, Marquess of, 

17 
Northants Visitation, 1616, 35 
Norwich, Earl of, Earl Marshall, 153 
Notts Visitations, 1569, 1614, 36 
Nugent, Thomas, 184 

" OBITUARY " OP RlCHABD SmTTH, 113 

O'Donnells, Princes of Tyrconnell, 

196 
Offley of Maresley, 40, 45 
Ogle, W. M., M.P., 186 
Oldhaugh, John of, 11 
"Old Morality," 143 
Olier, M., refugee, 142 . 
Orlebar family, 122 
Ormerod, pedigreeof Cuerdley Smiths, 

115 
Osborne, Mary, 21 
Ostenhanger, 25, 30 
Oteley, John, 23 
Otwell of Shawcross, 11 
Overdinsdale Hall, 149 
Owen, Judge Thomas, 25 
Owen, Sergeant, 30 
Owlde Buckenham, 32 
Oxford Visitation, 36 
Oxwick, 45 

Pags of Alpbam, 11 

Page, John, 31 

Painters, William, George, and John 

Smith, 138 
Palgrave, Sir John, 45 
Palmer, Archdale, 29 
Panfote, John, 76 



Pannefort, 76 

Parish Church, Leeds, 129 

Parkyns, Sir Thomas, 75 

Parratt, Thomas, 10 

Parry, Dame, 22 

Parry, Richard, 22 

Paske, John, 32 

Pate, Sir J., 88 

Paulet, Sir—., 87 

Pauncefote, Baron, 76 

Pauncefote of Carrswells, 75 

Payne, Peter, of Rowdham, 33 

Peake, Sir W., 13 

Pechell, Augustus, 54 

Peede of Berry Richard, 31 

Peiham, Lady Susan, 79 

Pelsham, Robert, 23 

Peperharow, 38 

Percival of Kingsale, 49 

Percy, Chief-Justice, Sir John, 183 

Peter the Great, 165 

Pigott of Chetwyn, Robert, 36 

Pitt of Colkirk, John, 45 

Pitt of Trimley, Thomas, 14 

Pitt, William, 77 

Pleasaunce, daughter of Reeve, 43 

Plumptre of Notts, Anne, 21 

Plumtree, Notts, 89 

Pontoise, 88 

Poole of Belsham, Robert, 14 

Poole, Sir Henry, 35 

Popham, Admiral, 76 

Portrait of Patrick Smith by Gains- 
borough, 194 

Potterspury, 35 

Powis, Marquis of, 88 

Powtrell, M., 89 

Powys of Henley, Salop, 21 

Powys of Shrewsbury Abbey, 73 

Powys of Sutton, 21 

Prescot, Lane, 36 

Prest of York, E., 44 

Preston Court, 76 

Prickett, G., 119 

Prince-Smith, John, law reporter, 208 

Prince - Smith, John, junior, econ- 
omist, 208 

Pryce of Godmanchester, Jasper, 33 

Pudsey of Barforth, Mary, 43 

Pugin, Welby, 193 

Purcell, Dr, Poor Law Commissioner, 
192 

Purcell, Henry F., 193 

Purcell, Sir John Samuel, K.C.B., 193 

Raolak, Lord, 187 

Randall, Archdeacon, 59 

Ransom, Griffin, 17 

Ray of Tannington, 49 

Raymond Horton-Smith Prize at 

Cambridge, 107 
Reade, Sir Thomas, 49 
" Record of the Redes," 95 



276 



INDEX OF 



Rede, Leonard, of Boarstal, 67 

Reeve, Robert, of Lowestoft, 43 

Reid, " Life of Svdney Smith," 140 

Rhodes of Hucknell Torkard, 89 

Rich, Lady Isabella, 26 

Richard L, 71 

Ridley, Sir M. W., Bart., 81 

Rivenhall, 34, 41 

Robartes, Lord, 79 

Robarts, Abraham W., 189 

Roberts, Lord, 194 

Robinson, John, 29 

Robinson of London, Richard, 38 

Rochdale, 30 

Rochfort, Hon. R., 184 

Rodney, Sir George, 37 

Rogers, Sir Francis, 37 

Roife. Jonas, 45 

Rolleston, Colonel, 75 

Romney, Sir W., 16 

Roose, Sir Robert, 13, 41 

Rosebery, Earl, 82 

Rosedale Abbey, 183 

Rosse, uxor to, 28 

Rotherham, G., 22 

Roxburgh, fourth Duke of, 61 

Royal Descent of Devon Smiths, 55 

Royal Descent of Elkington, 52 

Royal Descent of the Smythes, 94, 95 

Royds, 50 

Russell of BythelL 21 

Ryder, Rev. G. D., 77 

Ryther, Rector of, 44 

Sackville, Lady, 150 
Sager, Nicholas, 44 
Salesberry, Earl of, 13 
Salisbury, Earl of, 55 
Salop Visitation, 1623, 36 
Sandford of BakeweU, John, 36 
Sandford, Francis, Rouge Dragon, 153 
Sargent of Lavington, 77 
Sarsrield, General of Jacobites, 195 
Saumarez-Smith, Bishop, 81 
Saunders of Longmarston, 35 
Sawyer of Heywood, 73 
Save and Sele, George W., Lord, 172 
Sayer, Rev. Dr, 135 
Scarborough, Earls of, 106 
Scattergood of Leeds, Bernard P., 165 
Schorne, Richard Smith of, 4 
Scott, Hibernicus, 188 
Scottish Pedigrees, Chapter VUL, 176 
Scott of Scots Hall, John, 25 
Scott-Smith, Percv, 188 
Selkirk, Lord, 194" 
Selsdon, 80 
Sept O'Gowan, 198 
Sergeant of the Carriages, 40 
Sergeant, Rev. J., 49 
Serocold, Rev. E. S. P., 80 
Seymer, Edward, Duke of Somersett, 
13 



Seymour, Queen Jane, 87 
Seymour, Rev. R., 18 
Shadwell, Vice-chancellor, 73 
Shal cross, Leonard, 11 
Shelley, E., of Avington, 188 
Sherburn Hospital, Master of, 150 
Shuldham, 43 

Sidley of Morley, Martin, 32 
Sidney, Lady Barbara, 26 
Simms, Alderman, 27 
Skerne, Widow, 37 
SkyU, John, 34 
Sluys, Battle of, 86 
Smith, however spelt 

Aaron, 204 

Abel, 79 

Abraham, 65 

Adam, 36 

Albert, Sir, 213 

Albert, 253 

Alithea, 35 

Alexander, 234, 254 

Ambrose, 27, 31 

Andrew, Sir, M.D., 259 

Anker, 215 

Aquila, 252 

A. L., Sir, 214 

Archibald, 261 

Archdeacon, 183, 195, 196 

Arthur M., 54 

Augustas, 66, 210 

Augusta, 17, 18 

Awdry, 32 

Aysgough, 44 

Barbara, 26 

Barnaby, 142 

Belinda, 17 

Benjamin, 218 

Bernard, 241 

Caledon, 61 

Carington, ais., 89 

Challoner, J., 219 

Chancellor, 196 

Clement, 167 

Charles, Sir, 17, 18, 58, 59, 88, 
119, 214, 221 

Charles Felix, Sir, 221 

Charles, H., 223 

Charles, Rev., 73 

Charles, 52, 58, 137, 138, 145, 
162, 167, 206, 215, 216, 223, 
246, 251, 252 

Charlotte, 248 

Christopher, Sir, 109 

Christopher, 22, 30, 38, 40, 48, 
50, 113 

Clement, Sir, 13, 31, 34, 41, 87 

Colvin, 218 

Conway, 16 

Culling, Sir, 175 

Cusac, ah., 182 

Dorrien, ah., 70 

Dodsworth Barts., als., 119 



PRINCIPAL NAMES AND PLACES 277 



Smith, however spelt 

Dramatist, 244 

Drammond, Sir, 17, 58 

D.A.,8ir, 214 

Eardley, aU., 172 

Edmund, 59, 245 

Edmund, Colonel, 50 

E. F. N., Rev., 61 

E. A., Miss, 95 

Ed-ward, 168, 262 

Edward, Bishop of Down, 241 

Edward, G., MTP., 107 

Edward, 0., 193 

Edward, Sir, 15 

Edwin T., Sir, 214 

Elizabeth, 241 

Emmeline, 135 

E. Selby, Sir, 227 

Endymion, 26 

Erasmus, 27, 31, 35, 212 

Esther, 43 

Eva, 16 

Father, organ-builder, 243 

Ferdinando, D. L., 114 

Felicia, 24 

Francis, Sir, 213, 214, 262 

Frances, 5, 71, 107, 143 

Frederick, 137 

Gamekeepers, 166 

George, Sir, 5, 16, 22, 49, 51, 55, 

60, 75, 158 
George, 58, 63, 80, 133, 158, 181, 
191, 216, 235, 238, 240, 257 

George A., 161 

George, Bishop, 240 

George T., 248 

Gerard, 260 

Gertrude, Lady Dinorben, 187 

Gervase, 19 

Goldwin, 242 

Gordon, dLa., 112 

Grace, 56 

Grisegond, 19 

Harriett, 43, 64 

Harris, 171, 242 

Harry, Sir, 64, 225 

Helena, 37 

Henry, 166, 187, 229, 255 

Henry Ecroyd, 123 

Henry Wattou, 142 

H. J. 8., 240 

Henry Lilley, M.D., 173, 262, 

263 
Hester, 13 
Horace, 249 
Horton-Smith, ois. , 106 
Hugh, Sir, 37 
Hugh, 37, 257, 258 
Hugo, 5, 100 

Humphrey, 5, 152, 153, 256 
Irton, Rev., 159 
Jacob, 37 
James, 74, 230, 233, 250, 260 



Smith, however spelt 

James, Sir, 56 

James G., 5 

Jeremiah, 236 

Jeremiah, Sir, 229 

Jeremias, 24 

John, Sir, 14, 15, 17, 19, 25, 26, 
30, 34, 40, 41, 60, 87, 170, 187, 
192, 203, 215, 216, 258 

John J., Sir, 60, 168, 204, 210, 
217, 218, 219, 221, 224, 229, 
230, 231, 236, 238, 241, 245, 
248, 256, 257, 259 

John, 2, 3, 5, 6, 60, 71, 81, 107, 
131 

John of Kenchester, 163 

John Bosworth, 60 

John Bouchier, 171 

John Hasley, 157 

John Stafford, 249 

John W. of Thinghill, 163 

John Lucie, Sir, 213 

John Le Smythe, 53 

Joseph, 137, 234, 246 

John Abel, M.P., 72, 209 

John William, 163 

Joshua, 58 

Joshua Toulmin, 117, 211 

Josiah, 211 

Joyce, 35 

Ken elm. Rev. H., 162 

Laura, 33 

Laurence, 4 

Leonard, 29, 34, 87 

Leticia, 24 

Lidderdale, Canon, 63 

LiUey-Smith, M.D., 262 

Lionel, Sir, 223 

Lumley-Smith, alt., 106 

Mabilla, 24 

Magdalen, 22, 23, 31 

Margery, 19, 22, 33, 34 

Mariam, 19 

Mrs Mary Esther, 131 

Smith-Marriott, als., 60 

Martin, 30 

Martin Tucker, 81 

Master of Pembroke, 241 

Mathew, 205 

Maud, 21 

Methven, of, 176, 177 

Michael, 25, 224 

Milecencia, 41 

Miles, 231, 232 

Milo, 19 

Montagu, Sir E., 210 
Montem, 248 

Mylecent, 34 

Nathaniel, M.P., 63 
Nicholas, Sir, 54, 56 
Nicholas, 49 
Oswald, 29 

Patrick, 194 



278 



INDEX OF 



Smith, however spelt 
Paulus, 42 
Percy, Sir, 187 
Plea&aunce. 43, 248 
Priscilla, 40 

Provost of Queen's, 170, 171 
Prudence, 21, 37 
Ralph, 56 
Randoll, 11 
Randulfe, Sir, 28, 30 
Of Rathcoursey, 187 
Reginald Bosworth, 61 
Richard, 3, 188, 226, 228, 243, 

252 253 
Richard, Sir, 26, 30 
Robert, 1st Lord Carrington, 211 
Robert, 48, 51, 53, 57, 58, 185, 

234, 253, 260 
Robert V., 140 
Robert Percy, 208 
Robert, Sir, 13, 16 
Roger, Sir, 5, 14 
Rose, 36 
Rose. Hon., 56 
Rowland, 22, 49 
Samuel, 73, 79, 191, 193, 194, 

230, 255 
Samuel, C.,218 
Se-Baptist, the, 229 
Silvanus, 19, 42 
Sir Sebastian, 113 
Simon, 5, 15, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 37 
Spencer, 17, 58 
Stephen, 14, 256 
Sydnev, 250 
. Sydney J., 133 
Sybil, 21 
Theodosia, 45 
Theyre, T., 241 
Thomazin, 29 
T., Rev., Fellow of Magdalen, 

191 
Thomas, Sir, 4, 11, 14, 15, 19, 

25, 26, 30, 196, 201, 202, 203 
Thomas, 3, 5, 72, 170, 216, 219, 

220, 221, 231, 232, 259 
Trafford, Sir, 16 
Urith, 45 
Veronica, 11 

Villiers. Major, of Aspley, 121 
Waketield, als., 43 
Walter, Sir, 6 
Wellstood, &, 181 
William, Sir, 5, 13, 15, 27, 62, 

238 
W. H., Right Hon., M.P., 212, 

214 
William, 3, 7, 48, 49, 52, 54, 62, 
139, 143, 183, 185, 186, 206, 
207, 217, 218, 227, 235, 242, 
243, 244, 245, 247, 253, 256, 
258 
William Tyler, M.D., 261 



Smith, however spelt 

Willoughby, 261 

Wilmot, 11 

W. Robertson, 239 

W. Sidney, Sir, 222 
Somerset, Lord Granville, 77, 79 
Somerset Visitation, 1623, 37 
Somerville, Admiral Lord, 184 
Sparrow of Lavenham, Sain, 45 
Stafford, Kath., 26 
Staffs Visitation, 1583, 1614, 1663, 38 
St Aldate's, Oxford, 36 
Stallard of Worcester, 89 
Standard, Alice, 151 
Stanford, 43 

Stanhope, fourth Earl, 77 
Stanydge or Standish, 70 
Stapleton, Hon. Mrs Bryan, 152 
Staunton-on-Arrow, 163 
Stavely of York, 44 
St Dunstan's, West, 153 
Steele, Sir Richard, 182 
" Stemmata Ferraria," 83 
Stephens, Anne, 21 
Stevens of Horsley, 40 
Stewart, Lord John, 71 
St Frideswide Convent, 86 
St Mary's, Nottingham, Registers of, 

105 
Stoaks, Sarah, 105 
Stoke, Prior, 29, 42 
St Osyth's Abbey, 86 
Stowe, W ; Uiam, Archdeacon of, 36 
St Peter's, Nottingham, Rector of, 155- 
Strange, Lord, 100 
Strangford, Viscount, 26 
Strathallan, Margaret, Viscountess, 

Strathmore, Earl, 80 

Streatfield, H. D., 80 

Stretton-super-Street, 6 

Stroud of Clewer, 89 

Strutt, Sir Denver, 132 

St Toll's, or St Aldate's, Register, 169 

Studley, Warw., 71 

Sudbury, 14 

Suffolk, James, Earl of, 153 

Suffolk Visitation, 1561, 1577, 1612, 

38 
Supple, W. F., 186 
Surrey Visitation, 1623, 38 
Surtees, M., 107 
Sutton, Chancellor, 19 
Sutton, W., 11 
Syday of Lenham, Mary, 39 
Sydney, Lady Dorothy, 26 
Sykes, Sir Francis, 17 
Sylvester, Priscilla, 119 
Svmon de Chart, 24 
Synot, Sir W., 184 

T.i_vkekvllle, Earls of, 132 
Tavemor, 38 



PRINCIPAL NAMES AND PLACES 279 



Taylor, Hardwick, 44 

Taylor, Stephen, 32 

Telfe of Penhill, 17 

Tennison, Chancellor and Arch- 
bishop, 72 

Tenterden, Charles, first Lord, 187 

Tetley, J., Esq., of Kilgram, 119 

Tipping, Mary, 89 

Titheby Parish, 105 

"The Veteran," 194 

Thompson of Weatherby, Robert, 29 

Thornton, Claude, 79 

Throckmorton, Sir George, 19 

Throckmorton, Robert, 41 

Tolfte of Little Baddow, Henry, 34, 
41 

Throgmorton, Sir George, 42 

Thwaites, Audrey, 32 

Toft, W., of Little Baddow, 87 

Torre of Sydal, James, 44 

Toulmin, Dr, descendant of a Dutch 
Refugee, 117 

Tracie, Samwell, 19, 42 

Trafford, Jane, 13 

Tremayne, Roger, 11 

Trenchards, the family of, 56 

Trewynt in Blysland, 11 

Tucker, General, 81 

Turner, Thomas, of Crossing, 14 

Turville, H., 88 

Tusser, William, 34 

"Twelve Indian Statesmen," 181 

Tyberton, William Smith of, 3, 4 

Tyll, R., 31 

Tynte, Sir H.. M.P., 187 

Tyser, Dr. 76 

Upper Ossort, Earl of, 140 
Ushaw College, 93 
Usthwait, William, 28 

Valestia, Viscount, 15 

Vansittart, A., 80 

Vere of Ketton, 31 

Verney, Sir E., 71 

Vernon of Hartington, Thomas, 36 

Vernon of Hilton, Richard, 141 

Vernou-Sinith, R., Lord Lyveden, 

politician, 209 
Vesey, Right Rev. Dr, Archbishop 

of Tuam, 183 
Victoria, Queen, 78 
Villiers-Downes, Major, 122 
Viell, William, 12 

Wade, Marshal, 194 
Wake, Henry, 22 
Wake, Sir Thomas, 86 
Wakefield, als. Smith, 43 
Wakelyn of Whittlesey, 64 
Waldy, Mrs. 150 
Walford in Leintwardine, 159 
Walker, J., of Brentwood, 133 



Walter or Waller of Fawkham, 25 

Walker, James, 12 

Walker of Lincoln, Henry, 44 

Walkeringham, 36 

Wall Sutton, in Mershland, 32 

Walmesly, Chief-Justice, 16, 39 

Walmsley, Judith, 13 

Walsam in the Willows, 32, 40 

Walsh, Anthony, 185 

Walsh of Hereford, 42 

Waltham, Line, 22 

Walwyn, John, 21 

Wansley, Nicholas, 29 

Ward, James, antiquarian, 155 

Ward, John, trustee of the B. 

Museum, 132 
Ward, Hon. W., 114 
Warden, F., 73 
Ward- Hunt, Right Hon. G.W..M.P., 

etc., 143 
Warren of Great Thurloe, 31 
Warwick, Earl of, 25 
Warwick Visitation, 1619, 41 
Waterhouse of Berkhamstead, 22 
Waterpark, Lord, 60 
Watkin Wynne, Sir H., 77 
Watton at Stone, 23 
Watts, Sir J., Lord Mayor, 40 
Way of Deverston, John, 33 
Weare in Kenchester, 21 
Weaver, Jane, 36 
Welford, Anne, 21, 37 
Welsh, Elizabeth, 21, 37 
Wendover, Viscount, 78 
Wenland, Thomas, 21 
Wentworth, Lady, 122 
Weobley, Thomas Smith of, 3 
Worsop of Clapham, Rose, 39 
West Country Smiths, Chapter IV. , 

53 
Western, C, 43 
Weyland of Woodeaton, Letitia, 

daughter of, 15 
Whalley-Smythe-Gardiners, Barts. , 

113 
Whatton, Sir J., 16 
Whitfield, Major, 24 
Whytehead, Rev. R., 119 
Whytehead of Tytherlev, 16 
Wicklow, third Earl, 1S6 
Widenham, Charles, 188 
Widenham-Smyth, H. J., 188 
Wigram, Sir E., 31 
Wigram, Rev. Ernest, 81 
Wilberforce, Bishop S. , 77 
Wilder of Purley, Rev. H. W., 18 
Wilkenson, Hugh, 32 
Wilkins of Cawood, 44 
Wilkinson, Daniel, 24 
Willabye, Robert, 28 
Willerby, Joan, 48 
Willes of Astrop, E., 81 
William the Third, 194 



280 



INDEX 



Williams, Elizabeth, of Cardiff, 19 
Willoughby d'Eresby, Lord, 78 
Wilson, Alderman, 44 
Wilson of Walton Tower", 75 
Wilts Visitation, 41 
Winoet, Eercnles, 35 
Windham (Bowyer), Anne, 15 
Winter, Robert, 19, 42 
Witham, 14 
Withcote, 27, 35 
Woburne, 10 
Wood, Edward, 14 
Wood, Elizabeth, 15 
Wood of Salop, Abigail, 15 
Wood, W., 44 
Woodcock, Mrs, 115 
Woodhall, Herts, 79 
Woodhouse, Sir Thomas, of Kimber- 
ley, 133 



Woolavington, 16 
Wootton Wawen, 68 
Worcester Visitation, 1620, 42 
Wordsworth, Anne, 43 
Wordsworth, Mary, aunt of the poet, 

160 
Worge, Mary, 192 
Worge, Lieutenant-Colonel, 194 
Wren, Sir Christopher, 122 
Wrenton, 38 

Wrey of Totness, John, 11 
Wright, Alderman, 29 
Wyghton, 33 
Wylde, Isaac, 44 

Yntk Buboes, 17 

York Visitation, 43 

Yorkist, 1 

Young, J., of Westridge, 119 




BBIGHAM YOUNO j J j g '^[]|'Ij'| 

3 1197 20920 9938 



Date Due 

libran items are subject to recall at an> time. 



mjtmt 



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