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Full text of "Snap shots on the midway of the Pan-Am expo, including characteristic scenes and pastimes of every country there represented ... with vivid pen descriptions"



BANCROFT LIBRARY 





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LA MORA 

DANCER OF THE SEVILLIANA 



THE MIDWAY WHERE EVERYTHING THAT is AMUSING, 

GROTESQUE, HILARIOUS, FOOLISH, NOVEL AND ABSURD IS 
FOISTED AND INTONED, WHERE ALL THAT INGENUITY CAN 
DEVISE, SKILL PROJECT OR DARING ACCOMPLISH IS BROUGHT 
FOR THE DIVERSION OF A SUMMER'S DAY. BARRY. 



FOR INDEX 
SEE LAST PAGE, 162. 



SJVAT SHOTS' 

on the 

MIT) 

of the 

EJCTO 





INCLUDING 

CHARACTERISTIC SCENES AND PASTIMES 
OF EVERY COUNTRY THERE REPRESENTED: 
THE CELEBRATED ORIENTAL, AFRICAN, 
HAWAIIAN, MEXICAN AND INDIAN DANCERS 
AND DANCING SCENES, THE BULL FIGHT, 
CAMEL AND DONKEY PROCESSIONS, INDIAN 
BATTLES AND THE ODD, NOVEL AND SPICY 
ATTRACTIONS OF THIS MOST ATTRACTIVE 
PORTION OF THE EXPOSITION, WITH VIVID 
PEN DESCRIPTIONS. ^ X X ^ ^ ^ 



BY RICHARD H. BARRY. 



The Trade Supplied by tKe AMERICAN NEWS COMPANY and its Branches. 
The BUFFALO NEWS COMPANY. General Sales Agents. 



BUFFALO, N. Y.: 

ROBERT ALLAN REID, Publisher, 

1901. 

Copyright 1901, by Robert Allan Reid. All rights reserved. 




THE MEXICAN BAND STREETS OF MEXICO 




HE STORY is related of the great Conde that, 
at the opening of his last campaign, sunken in 
melancholy, half maddened with fatigue and the 
dog star heat of summer, having reached at 
length the cool meadows in front of the abbey of 
St. Antoine, he suddenly leaped from his horse, 
flung away his arms and his clothing, seized a 
monstrous drinking gourd from a nearby well and 
an oak stave from a pile of fagots and rolled in 
the green grass under a group of trees, playing 
boisterously with the baubles and laughing in 
high glee. After being thus diverted and 
refreshed, he arose smiling and calm amongst his 
astonished officers, permitted himself to be dressed 
and armed anew and rode to battle with all his 
accustomed resolution. This longing for a whimsical return to 
boyishness and buncombe is one that lies deep seated in all natures. 
Most men have a fondness for a circus, and wherever languorous warmth 
is dominant in climate, carnival is king, and mirth holds high revel, so 
that it is appropriate and wise that beyond the Exposition's shell of 
outer beauty should be built this lane of laughter with its strange 
medley of queer sights and sounds, where the elusive strains of sweet 
music and the spray from laughing fountains is neither heard nor 
heeded, where everything that is amusing, grotesque, hilarious, foolish, 
novel and absurd is foisted and intoned, where all that ingenuity can 
devise, skill project or daring accomplish is brought for the diversion of 
a summer's day. 

The Midway is the most gigantic, the most complex, the most 
costly and the most exacting plaything yet devised for modern man. 
Those who made it have had the world for a stalking ground and the four 



THE 
MIDWAY 



138133 



NAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



corners have contributed to" its strange sights and stranger sounds. Its 
name has no relevance to its nature. A street which is a jumble of 
fantastic architecture, embracing one corner of a harmonious exposition 
like a gilded shoulder on the polished mahogany frame of a plate glass 
mirror cannot appropriately be called a Midway. What is now a name 
was at first but an adjective. It modified Plaisance and the two 
defined that broad stretch of grassy boulevard that reached from Jackson 
Park in Chicago far through what was then the sand wastes of the south 
side to another beautiful park, called Humboldt, miles to the west. 
Along it was built the extension of the World's Fair, and there was 
placed what was catalogued as Department Q of the Ethnological Divis- 
ion. There was some excuse for so hard and scientific and altogether 
uncongenial a classification, for the peculiar and unknown people of the 
world were gathered for display, but display soon became amusement 
and the amusement hilarious, the public was looking for novelty and 
the showmen, for the men who had made the exhibit were of that class, 
were anxious to cater to such a taste. Ethnology was forgotten, and 
reference to it relegated to the guide books and official reports. Visitors 
became students of the dances of all nations, and the Midway became 
synonomous for masked folly. At Buffalo the projectors of the Expo- 
sition agreed without hesitancy on a Midway, for such a feature in some 
form has been an essential part of all expositions, but considered other 
names: "The Whirlpool," as indicating its frothy, uncertain character 
and as peculiarly fit because of the nearness of Niagara, was proposed. 
"The Rapids" for similar reasons was considered, but "The Midway" 
with its suggestive associations and the prestige of its Chicago reputa- 
tion was the only real applicant, and its choice has made the same sobri- 
quet imperative for all future streets of all nations. 

Whatever there is of ethnological value on the Pan-American Mid- 
way is there for other than scientific reasons. It is like the bit of 
Wagner music that Sousa is sometimes permitted to play at an open air 
concert; a part of the program that is swallowed almost unconsciously 
and without complaint, sort of a sugar-coated pill, for though students 
go to the Midway they do not go for study. The boistrous noise of 
brass music that makes a trip through it a constant succession of 




A GROUP OF INHABITANTS IN THE STREETS OF MEXICO 




SITALA 

DANCING GIRL COSINEROS COSTUME STREETS OF MEXICO 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWA 



MEXICAN 
DANCES 




discordant crashes distracts attention from many a less presuming attrac- 
tion \\;iitin^ behind high walls. Though less presumptuous the dances 
of the street are the engrossing things that are offered, and they hold 
the attention of most visitors. 

The dances of Spain are languorous, and of all the dances in the 
world they have the most of the rhythm and graceful ease that is so 
otten called the poetry of motion. The dances of Mexico are those of 
Spain. Some of the dances that are given in old Mexico come from the 
. and with the Spanish influence that they meet they assume a 
tinge of spicy abandon and the free movement of unrefined surround- 
ings. The difference between those of pure Spanish extraction and 
those of native character can be clearly traced through the snatches 
that may be seen in the Streets of Mexico. It is much the same dis- 
tinction that may be drawn between the country hoe down or the side 
step and the refinement of European culture that is seen in the waltzes 
and elaborate quadrilles of this country. One is rough and elemental 
.:>andon, while the other is polished, artistic and smoothly pleas- 
ing, moving to a climax of expressed vitality with true dramatic inten- 
rity. 

Jerabe is a Mexican dance, swift in action, cumulative in movement 
and hilarious in outcome, and it employs both a man and woman besides 
a chorus. All the Mexican dances have a chorus and all are accom- 
panied by an orchestra. La Coca is the petite and buxom dancer of 
Jerabe (pronounced as though the J were an H) and she moves through 
its blithesome steps with a suppleness that employs all the ginger her 
dainty feet contain. As a conclusion she stamps around the brim of the 
cone-shaped straw hat of Juaquin Bringas, her partner, and squats on 
the floor, while Juaquin hurdles over as boys do playing leap frog. It 
is a distressing end of a pretty dance, and is a freakish evidence of its 
native origin. No such remission from grace is seen in La Mora's per- 
formance of Sevillana, except as it comes through the dancer's observ- 
ation of the couchee girls in the Orient across the street. The Mexican 
music, gay with color, warm in tone and quick in time carries the casta- 
.' it-ring and voluptuous swirl of Sevillana to a riotous conclusion. 
Ili/rt \\rotc- incomparable music for it in Carmen, and its peppery 
re should have the kaleidoscopic action of that tragedy for its 
background and the Toreador song for its conclusion. La Mora is an 
impetuous dancer and seldom fails to catch the sensuous swing of its 
idences. As with other dancers on the Midway she has imbibed 
t the corrupted movements of the couchee dance that in its 
1 appeal is indigenous to no country, and has no inception but the 



....- 



10 




COLUMBA QUINTANO 

DANCING SOUBRETTE STREETS OF MEXICO 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



prompting that comes from low music halls. With the Oriental girls 
the suggestiveness is less apparent, for practice has brought facility, 
and with that the muscular movement has become mechanical and so 
less harrowing. It is the difference between French and American 
nastiness; one is smooth and natural, the other artificial, labored and so, 
vulgar. 

The fandango hall built for the Mexican dances in imitation of the 
similar halls in the south, and seen in this country now for the first 
time, is a pit around which, on three sides, rise tiers of seats, and it is 
a fit arena for the dancing of Jerabe and La Jota. Sitala is the dancer 
of La Jota, and she has the limpid nut brown eyes peculiar to many 




DEFIANCE DANCE OF THE IROQUOIS INDIAN CONGRESS 



12 




ISOLA HAMILTON 

THE ARTIST'S MODEL, IN THE DANCING SHOW KNOWN AS " AROUND THE WORLD ; 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



dancers and stage people of ecstatic temperament. They are the notice- 
able equipment of three-fourths of the dozen girls who offset the tumult 
tie bullfighting in the Streets of Mexico with the color of their cos- 
tumes, their supple grace and languorous ease. 

INDIAN Indians take a certain rude, ecstatic enjoyment in their ceremonial 

DANCERS dances, and all ot them are of that character; but the glide and swelling 

that comes with a waltz in a modern ball room is as unknown to 

them as is the luxury of tailor made clothes. They dance as all primitive 

peoples do; as an outlet for their emotions. Excitement, not dilletanti 

desire, the intensity of momentary exaltation, not the puttering of 

energy, induces the elate, religious dances of the red man. The 

prospect of battle, the flush of victory, the lament for death, the joy 

lor prosperous harvests, the chuckling in fierce triumph over fallen 

foes, the welcoming and speeding of guests, the anticipatory relish for 

the hunt, the terrifying, nameless ghost dance, all the great epochs in a 

life are heralded in expectation and commemorated in tireless 

rhythm. 

On the Midway it is possible to give only sketches of a few of the 
great tribal dances. No audience will sit for more than twenty min- 
utes in the elm bark ceremonial house in attendance even on the tradi- 
tionary customs of the Sioux and the Apache. Nowhere else is the 
restlessness of an exposition crowd better illustrated. The continual 
sur^ r e and push and the ceaseless unrest of those who take the show as 
they do pills, so much in a dose, compel the change of the program 
three times every hour. That gives the Indians time enough to bob up 
and bob down again and time enough for the spectacular introduction of 
Miiimo, but with the feathers and war bonnets and the fresh bright 
pigment daubed in great gashes on naked flesh there is an effect of grim 




MOSTLY SQUAW DANCERS, INDIAN CONGRESS 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWA 



reality that brings a flood of history-bred recollection to many, and 
snickers of foolish laughter from the nondescript. 

The defiance dance of the Iroquois is usually shown by two young 
warriors, who enter the small roped arena, one with a torn torn and the 
other with a war club and hunting knife. It is the dance that the Eastern 
braves give before starting on a war expedition, and is designed to show 
the war god the nature of the men who propose to contest for victory. 
The Indian buys his successes from his gods and he sometimes promises 
wondrous things. In this case he indicates what he will do in pursuit of 
the foe, and concludes with a demonstration of what will happen when 
he catches him. In about five minutes he succeeds in working himself 
into a frenzy, marked by all the symptoms of real temper, and secures 
from the audience little "Ahs" of suppressed fright and admiration. He 
throws the knife into the earth, seizes his war club and gesticulates 
about the weapon with the menace which he means to say to the god 
will be duplicated if he is permitted to meet his enemy. 

The brave man dance is similar to the war dance of the Cape Lopez 
cannibals, in its embodiment of all the characteristic movements of a 
war party in action. It shows the attack and the retreat, the use of the 
war club and tomahawk and the fierce rhythm that controls each intri- 
cate step. The Omaha dance of the home guard, who like white militia 
have successfully repelled invasion or attack, generally concludes the 
performance. In it a full party of twenty braves, half of them naked 
except for a brief breech clout, tap the tan bark floor in tremulous, 
quick time to the incessant ki yi of the torn torn holders in the rear. 
Through it all is filtered the rank odor of common things and back of it 
all is the plaintive, patient, hardy faces of the men who have bade good- 
bye to actuality and are showing the sacred blood of an ancient race 
to strangers and dawdlers for a dollar. 

FILIPINO That the Filipines are a people who have felt somewhat the influence 

DANCES of civilization is shown by the cut of the clothes they wear, by their 

methods of living, and surest of all by their dancing. It has been a 

beneficent civilization in their case at least, for the lurid and degen- 

rraU- hue th;it has tinged the dances of other peoples has quite escaped 

them, as shown in the festive steps they display on the Midway. The 

asdero, or marriage dance, is as simple as a Virginia reel and as innocu- 

It is so much so with its playful side step and half timid figure 

lution th.it ;it lirst sight it appears as though improvised, as some of 

the other Midway dances are, for special Pan-American use. The 

il.-mrrrs three mm and three women, accompanied by a tinkling guitar 

orchestra, in which further evidence of Filipino advancement is shown 



16 



A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 




DANCERS OF THE ASDERO 

THE FILIPINO VIRGINIA REEL PHILIPPINE VILLAGE 

in the skillful playing of three violins, perform a delicate step which has 
the intricacy and reserve that all refined dancing has. Another of their 
quaint performances is the esmeralda or star dance, showing another 
figure that would do credit to the designer of a cotillion, and indeed, it 
is said that many of the elaborate turns that are apparently improvised 
for fancy balls are merely excerpts from the native dances of such people 
as the Filipinos, the Mexicans and the Japanese. The bolo dancer is 
the only one of the company who shows the indigenous stock that 
derives its hardihood from the Malay race. He twirls a long bolo, or 
thick sword of good steel, and performs a series of significant evolu- 
tions, holding in his other hand a shield of stretched raw hide and hard 
wood, performing with high step and elaborate finish much of the glide 
that gives the fandango its subtle motion, and which may be seen in 
modified conventionality in the ball room waltz. 

There are many who come to the Midway to look for impropriety ORIENTAL 

and who depart satisfied with the visit if they discover a rouged face or AND 

a bare leg. For these the Orient has its horrors, and the hula hula HAWAIIAN 

dancers are baneful, for they are the Midway's red lights that make the DANCES 



17 



\ 1 1 \SB 

1 E 'oH? . 




FATIMA-THE LITTLE TEMPEST 

BEWITCHING BLACK-EYED COUCHEE-COUCHEE DANCER BEAUTIFUL ORIENT. 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 



ONE OF THE GROUP- 
INGS IN THE ARTISTIC 
SINGALESE DANCE 
BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 





>s .MMC DB'.-wiH M ITU * 



trip down the lane of laughter really worth while for a great number, 
just what per cent, no census can enumerate, but larger than would be 
revealed by responses to a category. The two dances are similar, but 
not alike. Both depend for their effects on the sinuous, gyratory 
movements of abdominal and body muscles. The gliding of feet is only 
an incident in either dance; the whole body moves in undulating panto- 
mime that is also seen in the epithalamium or marriage festival of the 
blacks. Savage dancing is an instinct that civilization has not improved. 
American influence has affected the couchee couchee, while it has not 
yet had time to weaken the elemental dancing of the Hawaiian girls. 
One is the formless, free religious dance of the buoyant, open West, and 
the other the effeminate expression of a degenerate East, compared to 
which a stifling interior, rank with dank odors, would be mild and 
healthy. The hula hula is the genuine expression of real feeling, 
accompanied by no tuneful harp or glib piano or resinous violin, but 
filtered through all the monotonous fall of the soft, bare feet of the 
brown women on pine boards is the crescendic thump of two silent male 
crouchcrs,who pound with rhythmic regularity on hollow gourds. In the 
background stretches a desert waste of arid land, and its dull, tense, 
;<res>ed vitality shows in the vacant eyes and hollow stare of the 
women's faces, as they intermittently cry out in ejaculatory plaintive- 
ness. It is the outward manifestation, which for ages has given relief 
to pent up feeling. It recalls the wild, old Corybantian dance with the 
nits \\ournliiitf each other, the torture dance of the Soudan der- 
the metrical shuttling of the feet of the Roman youth to the 
shrill sound of flageolets as he feverishly tossed his weapon on high. 
There are many times in every life when outward expression is imper- 
Sometimes it comes at night under the silent stars, sometimes at 



20 




FATMA-THE GREAT TEMPEST 

JPPLE TWIRLER OF THE COUCHEE-COUCHEE DANCE, " LA GRANDE ARTISTE '--BEAUTIFUL ORIENT. 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



broad noon in the spray of laughing water, sometimes in feast and 
sometimes in sorrow. It must always have relief or it burns inwardly 
and consumes. Some men laugh, some women cry, the ancients danced 
seriously and soberly, compared to which the usual modern dilettanti 
shuffling is play and nonsense. The most used modern substitute is to 
take a drink. Saul and David and wise Solomon removed the stop cock 
by dancing in the sight of the Lord. The others of the world's 
annointed have painted pictures, or written books, or sung great songs, 
or acted superb dramas, but legs may substitute fancy and suppleness 
take the place of imagination. The Old Testament does not relate 
whether Israel's Kings tossed their belly buttons under their legs or cut 
a figure eight with their collar bones or sedately twirled the minuet, but 
whatever their maneuvers, it was a holy sight. 




THE TORTURE DANCE 
SPIKE DRIVEN THREE INCHES INTO THE SKULL OF HADJI BEN SALA-- BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



22 



AN -AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




THE TORTURE DANCE 

THE BODY PIERCED WITH DANGLING AWLS" BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 

There is nothing in the Midway's Oriental dances that recalls primi- 
tive emotion. The adepts in the art, for the couchee dance is an elabo- 
rate one, were not tutored in academic schools and the pleasing profi- 
ciency they assert is a polyglot of Eastern origin and east side corrup- 
tion. 

Saturday night at 12 o'clock is the time for the torture dance in the 
Streets of Cairo. It is usually given after an exhibition of the abdom- 
inal proficiency of Fatma and Zulieka, and after a diffident little Turk 
with an insinuating smile has been around with a bunch of five cent palm 
leaf fans. As the couchee girls are told to cut loose for the last per- 
formance the sale of fans is usually quite brisk. When Hadji Ben Sala, 



THE 

TORTURE 

DANCE 



23 




lil 

o 

z 

2s 




YAMINA 

THE ALGERIAN DANCERBEAUTIFUL ORIENT. 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 



the chief dancer, begins the peeling of his outer waist, that looks like a 
piece of figured wall paper, the dusky depths of the room are pretty well 
filled with nervous spectators wrought to the screaming point by the 
assurances of Baccarat, the barker, that though they may see nails driven 
into men's heads some two or three inches, or watch burning coals glow 
on naked breasts, they need not fear, for it is only the way that some 
men, who live under the shadow of the crescent and the scimitar, have 
ol expressing their reverence for Almighty God. 

The three dancers are similar in their methods. Sala, the chief, is the 
most excruciating of the lot. After removing his garments, one by one, 
his turban first, then his sash, collar and shirt, he finally appears naked 
from the waist up. Throughout his undressing he jumps heavily from 
one foot to the other. It is like the insensible flopping of a decapitated 
hen, without rhythm or measure, accompanied by the incessant, alter- 
nate heavy and short thump of a pair of brand new torn toms, stretched 
to creaking and warmed over a brazier of burning coals. Some doctor 
who takes advantage of the invitation to see the dance at first hand 
steps onto the platform. Sala, half drunk with excitement, his eyes 




SOME AFRICAN DANCERS 

CHIEF OQOULA WOURY, WITH THREE OF HIS WIVES, SON, AND DIRECTOR PENA- 
DARKEST AFRICA-THE WOMEN ARE FESTIVAL DANCERS 



28 




MLLE. DODO-AROUND THE WORLD 

CHANTEU8F. AND DANCER FROM GAYEST PARIS. 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



IN DARKEST 
AFRICA 



dull and dazed with leaden numbness, turns, discovers the intruder, 
knows instinctively that he is a Christian and springs at him with the 
wild abandon of an insensate fanatic. When two of the helpers seize 
him he lies in their arms, glaring savagely like a wild animal at bay. 

The doctor removed, Sala returns to his torture. He seizes a double 
bladed dagger of Damascene steel. This he suddenly plunges into his 
stomach. It doesn't go very easily, so he calls for the assistance of two 
Moslems who succeed in placing about three-eighths of an inch of the 
steel inside his epidermis. He then runs six long needles through his 
cheeks, two long prongs through his tongue and a dozen through the 
cuticle of his forearm. Thus lacerated, with not a drop of blood show- 
ing, for these dancers have perforated the same places frequently for 
years until the wounds are callous, he crouches before the footlights 
and exhibits the wonder. On rare evenings he submits to the pounding 
of a ten penny nail half an inch into his head. At such times women 
faint and strong men rise from their seats and leave the place declaring 
the exhibition brutal. The dancers come out of it, though, with no 
apparent injury and are perfectly willing to repeat the performance 
once a week. 

The war dance of the Cape Lopez blacks is a wild, unnatural orgy, 
scientific in detail, frenzied with passion and terrifying with its cumula- 
tive intensity. Walk in on it casually, pick up the thread of its bar- 
baric motion with no information of its intent, be listless with sated 
sightseeing and enervated with the froth and fraud of the Midway, and 
in spite of blase indifference you will be swept along by its elemental 




THE NUBIAN DANCERS BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



30 




TATU PECARAHE-AROUND THE WORLD 

BROWN MAORI HIP WIGGLER. 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 







MARIE OULMONT 
--VENICE IN AMERICA 



grandeur. It is the savage and serious rite of a primitive people. 
Knowing the blood of centuries that filters its weird rhythm, the uncouth 
thirst and daring that pervades its almost painful realism, the carnal 
taste of slaughter and the fiendish glee of combat that have marked its 
performance for generations, and permitting the imagination to carry 
thought from play to actuality, the cannibalistic frenzy becomes terrify- 
ing and then unbearable. No artifice can succeed; life and feeling and 
experience triumph in a climax of rouse and startling enthusiasm. 

The war dance is preceded by two minor dances given in the rustic 
theatre, with its proscenium of elm boughs. The fetish dance is the 
usual religious ceremonial performed on every conventional occasion. 
The simple gyration of its movement and the monotony of its succes- 
sive repetition of the same figures place it first on the program. Then 
follows the black epithilamium, like the wedding dances of all the East- 
ern countries, sensual in its coarse suggestion, but the blacks, as yet, 
entirely moral in their purpose, perform it as seriously as they tap an 
awl on a pine stick, believing that orchestration has reached its limit 
and that they are producing music. The war dance requires the large 
floor and the free incentive of outdoor air in the big hall for its proper 
performance, and there the audience is invited after the wives of 
Augandagua have concluded their scortatory soiree. John Tivie, 
the only one of the blacks on the Pan-American Midway who was 
at Chicago, or who ever before left Africa, leads the mob of 
twenty warriors, who, naked from the waist up, with skirts of 
swishing rush and war clubs that look more like genteel walking 
sticks than they do like ugly instruments, go through the move- 
ments of the dance, some thirty minutes in duration. 

The twenty are led down the hall slowly, stamping first with left 
feet, then with right, accompanied ever and continuously, without 
an instant's let up, by the monotonous thump of impenetrable 
drum heads and the harsh clang of ebony sticks on metal covers. 
The first procession is slow, the next increases in rate of move- 
ment. Tivie wears a horned cap to distinguish him from the rest. 
His physique is perfect, tapering up from the waist like a wedge, 
shoulders strong, but not over broad, head well poised, neck and 
arms sinewy, not an ounce of flesh to spare, and his chocolate 
skin smeared daily with palm oil, and as soft as a lady's, glisten- 
ing with shiny sweat. He lunges forward with his stick. It 
is the plunge that the Aussa makes with his assegai, and the 
band does the same. Then follow all the characteristic move- 
ments of war, the skirmish, the attack, the repulse, the hand 
to hand fight, the short breath and the quick patter of 
retreating foes, the removal of the wounded, the victorious 
return, the celebration and the final feast. 



32 




MARIE DULMONT AND LEA DELAPIERRE-VENICE IN AMERICA 

NEAPOLITAN OUT-OF-DOORS ENTERTAINERS, SWEET VOICED WITH 
GAY SONG AND PICTURESQUE IN BRILLIANT COSTUME 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWA 



THE Just as types of people, races or nations maybe distinguished by 

SCHUHPLATTL dress or general features or language, or even as the ethnological 
expert can construct the entire human figure if he be given a cranial 
bone, so it is possible to distinguish the mode of life, the 
temperament and almost exactly the geographical location 
of the country of dancers, by the style of the dance they 
exhibit. In the German village, Old Nuremburg, every 
day at noon and three times thereafter may be seen the 
schuhplattl or shoe dance of the Koenigseer peasants, with 
its reflex of bouyant life in rare atmosphere, clean habits, 
exuberent spirits and a general healthy, animal existence 
of frank and frequent expression. Two men and two 
women hop about to the hardly audible twang of a quick- 
ened waltz on a Bavarian xylophone. At infrequent inter- 
vals they meet and pick up the thread of the three step 
whirl, but the novelty of the dance, its real character, and 
nominal value lie in the half minute interspersions of an 
impulsive leap into air by the men and their simultaneous 
shrill shouts of thrilled enthusiasm, as they slap thighs 
and shoe bottoms smartly with their hands. It is a dance 
that sends little tingles of admiration and silent envy 
through the observer. 

THE The trousered girls in the Streets of 

TARENTELLA Venice whose comic opera attire is 
obtrusive, for such dressing requires 
calcium and perspective to be effective, are the performers 
of the tarentella, the national dance of Italy. It is a 
quick, almost a brilliant dance, suggestive in several meas' 
ures of the sailor's hornpipe, and in others of the Parisian 
pirouette that Selica, the lion tamer at Bostock's, and 
Mile. Dodo, in Around The World, also have. 

OTHER DANCES A young man in a red coat and an 
asbestos voice, that is more strident 

than the coat, announces that the lour quarters of the 

globe have contributed dancers for Around The World. 

If his statement is accepted as are the other announcements 
on tin.- street, as something else than gospel truth, the visitor will 
CM joy the presence of Sophie Sobieski, the Polish single stepper, Mile. 
Dodo, the French chanteuse, Tatu Pecarahe, the brown Maori hip wrig- 
gler, and Juliette Gardner, the American who infuses what there is of 
grace or rhythm in the performance. 




SOPHIE 80BIE8KIE, RUSSIAN DANCER 
~AROUND THE WORLD 



34 




PRINCESS STELLITA 
TARANTELLA DANCER ROYAL GYPSY CAMP 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWA 



The most daring of all the Midway 
dances, and which, unlike most animal feats, 
retains the natural quality of spontaneity, 
is the familiar heel-and-toe skirt dance of 
the old vaudeville days that Selica performs 
with dextrous dignity about four lions 
snapping at her outstretched toes from 
four pedestals inside the great arena at 
Bostock's animal show. Selica has the 
hardihood of the lion tamer and the nerve 
of the dancer, and the two displayed 
together are a pleasing conjunction. 

La Belle Ruby, flaxen haired and with 
lustrous brown eyes, is one of the five maids 
in the moon who, with their revels in the 
palace of the man in the moon, render the 
trip to the satellite like the living of a fairy 
tale in its eerie winsomeness. There are 
several skirt dancers in the gypsy camp. 

The simplest of all the Midway dances is 
in the Esquimaux Village. It is the plain 
tapping of feet, heavily wrapped in seal 
skin on bare floors of tightly packed snow. 
It is a ceremonial dance of very ancient 
origin and was probably used in former 

times as a means of quieting wild game. Now the Esquimaux perform it 
lor a marriage ceremony and its step has descended to many of the tribes 
in lower Finland and in Kamchatka for their betrothal rites. Animal 
dances, such as the dance of the white bear and the dance of the old 
dogs, are curious evidences of a superstitious feeling. 




EXPECTATION-POSE BY MISS HAMILTON 




MISS HAMILTON, ARTIST'S MODEL AROUND THE WORLD 



A N - A M 



EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




THE MOON CALF AVENGING SPIRIT OF THE MOON 



Midtvay S'pectactilar Attractions 



Senator Depew took the trip to the moon one afternoon, and when he 
came out he said to the inventor, Frederic Thompson: 

"I have traveled a great deal, but of all the wonderful things I have 
seen and of all the trips I have made that is the most extraordinary." 
Then he went across the street to the bullfight. There he remained 
half an hour. When he came back to the world of noise and brazen 
ballyhoos and walked up the Midway for more sights, he met, coming 
down, a small boy with a huge, freshly painted sign, which bore in 
appropriately enormous letters the bold announcement: 

"Senator Chauncey Depew says of the Trip To The Moon ." 

"Well," said the Senator. "That is the biggest bit of enterprise I 
have ever known." Frederic Thompson, who got this notice from 
Depew, designed the Trip to The Moon, and he has also helped in the 



A TRIP 

TO THE MOON 



37 



ft 

I 






APPROACH TO THE CASTLE OF THE MAN IN THE MOON 

A PLACE INHABITED BY GNOMES AND STRANGE GIANTS, GUARDIANS 
OF THE CASTLE OF THE MAN IN THE MOON 




CO J, 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE M I D W A 



construction of all the other Midway attractions except live. The 
moon trip is the latest and the newest. The prodigal promise which 
ither makes to his child that he shall have the moon for a play- 
thing is now possible of realization. The illusion of aerial fight is so 
perfect that men have wagered in the Luna's cabin over the question of 
whether or not the boat leaves the building. The sensation of flight 
through the air is strong enough to bring fainting spells to some. 

The trip begins with a sight of the Luna, lying quietly beside her 
dock in the pale moonlight. You seem to be above the world some 
hundreds of feet. Below lies the exposition, the tower nearby, showing 
its bulbs of incandescence through perforated holes of dimmed radiance. 
In the distance scattered spots of illuminated darkness show the location 
of the city. The Luna is a green and white cigar shaped thing, the size 
of a small lake steamer with a great cabin in the middle. Slowly she 
starts and gathers a long undulating motion. The exposition grounds 
drop. The city appears a great sprawling thing, with thousands of tiny, 
blinking eyes. Niagara is seen. You fancy you hear the roar of the 
\\aters. It all merges into a great globe. The globe lessens in size. 
It becomes a ball, then a mere speck and finally sinks from sight. There 
comes a storm, flashes of lightning, dusk, peals of thunder, utter dark- 
ness, grim rumblings, violent crashes, and then all clears away and the 
storm cloud is passed. The moon is seen to sink across the line of 
sight from above and a seared countenance, the face of the Man in the 
Moon is plainly visible. Rocks and lava pilings, stained red and yellow 
and green as though by fire and decomposition, are just ahead. The 
Luna slows up. She veers to the right and comes to a halt at her 
landing dock, a yawning hole in the moon's side, the crater of an extinct 
volcano. 

The trip through the moon, its fantastic beauty, its weird marvels 
and its queer people is a fit complement to the wonders of the aerial 
_-. Fungi, volcanic growths, stalactite droppings, crystalized 
mineral wonders that form a frozen dream, all the deceptions and fairy- 
tale magnificence that paper mache and expert property men can weave 
under the prompting of a facile imagination are shown in exfoliate 
\ariety. The city of the moon is reached. It is the underground 
habitation of midgets an.l strange giants. On the hacks of the Selen- 
ro\\s of long spikes, hedged in at angles like the stakes of an 
lru<|uoi* stockade. At the entrance to a long avenue, that stretches 
a \\ay \\ith illuminated foliage of fantastic trees and toadstool growths 
that nr\.-r exi-led save in the lurid imagination of Srhenezerade, stand 
t\\o men. An ordinary mortal reaches to their waists. They are the 
i th.- moon, four times the size of the midgets. They stand 








il 

UJ 9: 



U. I 

o - 

QJ 5 
O iu 

< 2 

li 

SH 

LU 

O 

QC 
I 

H 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE M1DWA 



there on guard. A broad moat appears. Beyond is a frowning wall 
and high above a great turret. It is the Castle of the Man in the Moon. 
In the throne room of the Man in the Moon are seats for the guests. 
Bronze griffins are ranged along the sides. The Man is in the centre on 
a throne of mother-of-pearl. In front is an electric, scenic theatre, 
Hanked by glass columns. Here is the burst of splendor. It is delicate, 
subtle, elate, a creation, the Geisler electric fountain. All the colors of 
the spectrum operate through running water in radiant profusion, and at 
the height of the display the maids of the Man in the Moon enter in a 
rhythmic, graceful dance. They fade away and the curtain falls. 

CYCLORAMA When a limping veteran, named Johnson, leads the way from the 

OF MISSION street, where a ridiculous ballyhoo is piping a torn torn and drawing 
RIDGE contortionate faces, to a platform that commands a view of a plastic 

foreground of autumnal foliage, melting into a canvas portraying the 
bend in the road that led from Lookout Mountain to the then little town 
of Chatanooga, and points with a gnarled stick to the memorable scene 
of grim carnage, shown in a space only sixty feet in diameter, he brings 
back to the memory of those who stood that day behind Grant at 
Orchard Knob, or with Hooker above the clouds, and to the imagination 
of those younger, who have listened at camp fires, the reality of the 
hell that raged that day in Tennessee. 

It is a cyclorama, a painting, built in a huge wooden cylinder and 
silent like a dull, black volume of history, but like that volume, that may 
have come from the hands of a Taylor or a Grant, its eloquence speaks 
with anvil distinctness, as plain as the throbbing of the six guns that 
gave the signal that warm November day for the launching of the most 
terrible, the most sublime diapason of war's grim horror that this great 
continent of the new world has ever known. 

The scene represents the last of those three memorable days in 
November, 1863, which commenced with the smiting of the Confederate's 
crescent line of battle on Monday, November 23d; the capture from the 
rebel forces of Lookout Mountain Tuesday, November 24th, and the 
storming of Mission Ridge by the Union army under the invincible 
leadership of the indomitable Grant on Wednesday, November 25th. 

You are standing again as did Grant with his hesitant, questioning 
>taff that afternoon in '63 at 4 o'clock on Orchard Knob, the centre of 
the Union line of advance. Mission Ridge is before; Fort Wood behind; 
the shining elbow of the Tennessee River to the left; Lookout Mountain 
to thi- right. Never was theatre more magnificent. Never was drama 
more worthy of its surroundings. Imagine a chain of Federal forts, 
built in between, with walls of living men, the line tlung northward out 



'AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 



of sight, and southward beyond Lookout Mountain, and this grand 
corydon commanded by Generals Grant, Thomas, Sheridan, Granger, 
Wood and Beard, with the tips of its wings led by Sherman and 
Hooker and a chain of mountains crowned by batteries and manned 
by the Confederate forces, through a six-mile sweep, officered by Gen- 
erals Bragg, Breckenridge, Hardee, Stevens, Cleburne, Bates and 
Walker, and you have the two fronts. 

The immediate scene is the climb of the Union forces to the cloud of 
death, high on the summit of Mission Ridge. Stout hearted Sheridan, 
"Little Phil," is there, dismounted, "hustling to hell," doing homeric 
battle with the greater gods he is wrestling with Mission Ridge in a 
torrid zone of battle with the ridge, like a wall before him at an angle 
of 45 degrees, but clambering steadily on up upward still. Hearts 
loyal and brave are on the anvil all the way from base to summit of 
Mission Ridge; the iron sledges beat on the dreadful hammers never 
intermit. Swarms of bullets sweep the hills. The rebels tumble rocks 
down on the rising line of victorious blue; they light the fuses and roll 
shells down the steep; they load their guns with handfuls of cartridges 
in their haste; and as if there were powder in the word they shout 
"Chickamaugua" down at the advancing host. But it will not do, and 
just as the sun, weary of the scene, sinks out of sight with great bursts 
all along the line, the advance surges over the crest, and the battle is 
won. 

So much is not shown. The action, the shots, the death rattle, the 
surge and sweep of forces are for the imagination to devise. Who that 
was with Hooker on that day, or who that has been with men who were 
with Hooker on that day, can ever forget the mighty achievements that 
this canvas blazons forth ! 

A horror is a peculiar subject to choose for depiction as an entertain- THE 
ment, yet "Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde" packed the theatres for months JOHNSTOWN 
and the weird marvels of Edgar Allen Poe, still captivate youthful FLOOD 
imagination as they have the critical judgment of his peers. The love 
for the intense, and the dominant interest in dramatic situation make the 
reproduction of such a catastrophe as the Johnstown Flood something 



JOHNNY BAKER, ONE OF THE WORLD'S HEROES, 
RACED WITH THE CONEMAUGH FLOOD, 
ALARMING THE INHABITANTS, WAS FINALLY 
OVERTAKEN AND PERISHED IN THE 
TUMULTUOUS WATERS 




SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWA 



more than an appeal to morbid taste. The scene of the disaster is so 
near Buffalo that the probable attendance at the exposition of a large 
number from that section of Pennsylvania gave promise of financial 
reward to such an undertaking. 

As a mechanical representation of the phenomena of everyday events, 
the setting and rising of the sun, the vitreous, pale blue effulgence 
of the full moon, the thunder and lightning of a terrifying electric 
storm and, finally, the stupendous burst of water that came over the 
town of Johnstown with the break of the dam, the show is a spectacle 
of impressive dignity and life-like appeal. It seems to have struck 
popular fancy. A scenograph, the logical evolution of the cyclorama, 
the diorama and the scenic theatre, accomplishes the illusion, which is 
set on an ordinary stage and is in reality a performance in pantomime, 
where all the actors are what would be called in stage parlance "prop- 
erties." Instead of a bit from real life reproduced with fidelity and 
tinged with poetic fancy, there is shown a black chapter in a sunny 
history of blithesome, everyday experience, blocked in miniature and, 
by ingenious mechanism and a skilful use of the values of perspective, 
brought to startling realism. A mighty tragedy of bold, blunt execu- 
tion, grand in terrific energy, involving in fatality an entire populous 
city, lives again in memory and imagination through the medium of a 
bit of stage craft. 

The curtain rises on Memorial Day, 1889, more than twenty-four 
hours before the flood. A Grand Army procession crosses a little 
bridge, the business of the town is transacted before the spectator's 
eyes, dusk comes, the lights appear in the windows, trains move across 
th: line of vision, the moon appears, the night wanes and the day of 
the. disaster breaks, rosy and smiling. The hours pass until four in the 
afternoon, the time when the trickling of the waters from the rivulets 
that fed the lake of South Fork, fourteen miles away on the mountain 
side, undermined its half century-old wood foundation and launched 
that avalanche of water down the Conemaugh valley, sweeping away 
tivr thousand of the inhabitants of Johnstown and furnishing a disaster 
for which the history of the world has no parallel. An electric storm is 
made to burst in the stage picture before the arrival of the deluge, 
when the afternoon of May 31st, 1889, was innocent of water from the 
skies, but under cover of the darkness and in the fitful gleam of vivid 
lightning the spectacular effect is hightened and is convincing. The 
cry of the talker: "The dam has burst!" his relation of the wild ride of 
Johnny Baker, a ride between a flood and a horse, between life and 
, the loss of the horse and the death of the noble boy, comes with 



AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




ENTRANCE TO JOHNSTOWN FLOOD 



startling effect. Fire then breaks out in the debris about the stone 
bridge. Hundreds of dead and other hundreds of the living are 
imprisoned there. They are burned to a crisp. The Catholic church, the 
field hospital, also breaks into flames. The rescued perish there. 
Then the fire dies away and the scene darkens. The turn of a hand 
measures the time of the change coming with the light which shows 
Johnstown as it is to-day, rebuilt and flourishing. 

The coon song is the talisman of worth on the Midway, the essential THE FALL 
of success. With the undulating cadence of the couchee tunes it repre- OF BABYLON 
sents music, and here before one of the greatest paintings in the world 
it lends its ridiculous presence; a torn torn at a Wagner festival. A 
strong effort bars it from the imagination, which is then occupied with a 



45 



AN-AM. EXPO AT BUFFALO 



scene of singular grandeur, a painting of truly Babylonish dimensions. 
"The Fall of Babylon" is a reminder of long mornings in Sunday 
school, of preaching from the text, "Thou art weighed in the balance 
and found wanting," of the seemingly impossible, part-myth, part- 
historical tales of writers and old poets, of idle dreams of magnificence 
and luxurious debauch, of all that is artful and awful, grand and 
grotesque, wicked and weak, dazzling and disastrous. It typifies 
revenge and remorse in their vastest scope. 

The scene depicted is the close of a supreme orgy, an antique ban- 
quet, compared to which ours of to-day are puny and mean. There is 
a taste of the appalling sumptuousness of the princes of ancient Asia. 
In the foreground may be seen the remains of this monstrous, frenzied 
feast. Roasted phinnecopters' tongues, a dainty morsel; baskets of 
partly eaten artichokes, the leavings of peacock's brains, and that most 
exquisite of all the ancient dishes, baked eels, which had been fed on 
human flesh, are strewn about in inextricable confusion. Bits, only, are 
gone; the superbly prepared food merely tasted a whole modern city 




ENTRANCE TO DARKNESS AND DAWN 



47 




ON THE NORTH MIDWAY 

AERIO CYCLE TRIP TO THE MOON GLASS FACTORY 



AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




A PORTHOLE INTO PURGATORY-DARKNESS AND DAWN 

SPECIAL APARTMENTS FOR RECEIVING CIGARETTE FIENDS 

might subsist for eight days on the leavings of such a feast as Balshazzar 
served that night. 

The work is so perfected as to leave nothing to the imagination. The 
painter insists that you shall behold his fancy in all its details the posi- 
tion of objects, the texture of stuffs, the interstices of stone work, the 
gleam of a lamp upon sharp angles of furniture, the whispering sound 
of trailing silk all is visible, tangible, almost audible. There is nothing 
that leaves a vacancy for the eye to light upon no hiatus for the 
imagination to supply. It is the perfection of the art of painting. It is 
not wonderful that such a man should at times sacrifice what is called 
"atmosphere" for graphic portrayal. This is the only adverse criticism 
it gets from artists. It is too minute, too elaborate, too full of detail, 



49 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE 



MIDWAY 



DARKNESS 
AND DAWN 




they say. So is the greenery of Delaware Park on a summer's day. 
Naturally, a painter of this kind pays small regard to the demands of 
prudery. A perfect human body is to him the most beautiful of objects. 
Ik- does not seek to veil its loveliness with cumbrous detail. He depicts 
it in all the perfectness of its divine nudity. He shows the tremulous 
roundness of living flesh, the diaphanous sheen of silvered drapery, 
and, not satisfied with this beauty of form alone, he must add to it the 
vital glow of delicate coloring, evidence of life and health, on white 
limbs and snowy bosom. 

Some writer who told of the consternation of a man at finding living 
skeletons in the coffins provided for eating tables in the cafe of the 
dead said that "he arose and filed out in the middle of the performance." 
There are usually enough w r ho arise in the middle of the performance in 
the outer darkness that precedes the dawn to form a "file" of frightened 
visitors, and the lone man who provided incentive for the notice is often 
accompanied by some woman unable to endure the hollow moans and 
grinning skeletons and lugubrious widows in black weeds who help to 
impress whoever comes, that the place is a very dismal one, indeed, and 
tar from an entertainment in any ordinary understanding of the word. 

The success of such attractions as "Darkness and 
Dawn," and the Midway has several of them, is proof that 
the only bid for those who want amusement is not to be 
made by pruriency or license, and that novelty or bizarre 
originality will tickle the fancy of such, even more quickly 
than enervated unwholesomeness. The Midway, after the 
Chicago fair, became a synonymous term for loose license, 
but here its influence is, in the main, salutary. A whole- 
some show of clean character that has the merit of some 
artistic worth and the value that pertains to absolute 
novelty has been accepted by the public as quickly as the 
less healthy portion has welcomed nastiness. And there 
are very many more of the good shows than there are of 
the bad. "Darkness and Dawn," one of the better class, 
produces a violent transition, a tremendous and startling 
hiatus from terror to ecstacy. It has this effect on sensi- 
tive and timorous persons, though, of course, there are 
many \\h<> find in it mere clever illusion and a somewhat 
humorous contrivance for cartooning the stale possibilities 

.t lirll. 

Att.-r one of the visitors has sacrificed his life in a pre- 
pared coffin in the Cabaret de la Mort, and then been 



THE DEVIL'S THRONE 
--DARKNM9 AND DAWN 



50 



AN-AM EXPO 



A T 



BUFFALO 




ENTRANCE 
TO THE 
HAWAIIAN 
VILLAGE 



resuscitated for the purpose of permitting his spirit to conduct his fellows 
through the regions of the damned, a clanking chain slides to, permitting 
the opening of a creaking door and Charon appears, waiting in his boat. 
The pits of hell fixed for the cigarette fiend, the gossip, the borrower of 
unreturned umbrellas, the Tammany statesmen, and the conniver in the 
breaking of the Raines law, precede the entrance to the throne room of 
His Majesty, the Devil. When the fiendish visage of the monster, Crime, 
and the ghostlike appearance of brown suited young men, wearing painted 
skeletons have done all they could to unnerve the highstrung, the opposite 
doors open with an almost celestial relief, showing the way to halls of 
jasper and sweet fountains that come as near as paint and tinsel can come 
to picturing the peace and angelic harmony of heaven. There concludes 



51 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



THE VOLCANO 
OF KILLAUEA 



DAWSON CITY 

UNDER THE 

MIDNIGHT SUN 



the trip to Dawn, with filmy clouds and pendant angels showing through 
a round proscenium. 

The volcano of Killauea is interesting as illustrating to the 
people of the United States what a wonderful sheet of fire 
they have annexed. It is _a cyclorama, drawn with fidelity from 
sketches made on the spot, and housed in a building some sixty 
feet in diameter. A plastic foreground of realistic lava pilings 
and tropical fungi unites with the painting in inexplainable 
exactness that leaves the spectator in doubt as to where one leaves 
off and the other commences. It is the art of all cycloramas to induce 
this illusion, but here it is paramount, for in the fissures of dingy rock 
slumber tissue paper fires of seemingly vast subterranean depth, and the 
interstices stretch into nothingness through the vista. 

The entrance to the platform which commands a view of the volcano 
is through a reproduction, in small scale, of a subterranean lava hole, 
such a one as extends twenty-seven miles from the base of Manalaua to 
the sea, and through which, for three weeks, molten lava flowed, heating 
the water for twenty miles around. Rocks melted like wax in its path 
and forests crackled and blazed before its fervent heat. Imagine 
Niagara's stream above the Falls, with its dashing, whirling, madly 
racing waters, hurrying on to their plunge, instantaneously converted 
into fire; a gory hued river of fused minerals, the heavens lurid with 
flame, the atmosphere dark and oppressive, the horizon murky with 
vapors and gleaming with the reflected contest. Such was the scene as 
the fiery cataract, leaping a precipice of fifty feet, poured its flood upon 
the ocean. 

Something of the awful menace of such a catastrophe is conveyed by 
the cyclorama. The livid lake of fire, immeasurable in depth and 
scarred throughout its rugged border by inchoate rocks, lies there in 
apparent nature. A storm approaches, the lava heaves, the native 
Milkers, headed by the cohuna, or head priest, appear in the crater and 
\oire their tremulous sweet melodies, appealing to Pele, the Goddess, 
lor divine protection. Pele answers the prayer, appears and quells the 
rioting hellfire as the gladsome thanks of the Hawaiians float back in a 
carol of joy. 

A State ot Maine longshoreman exclaimed in a Chicago theatre, where 
In- \\as taken lor a view of the rustic realism of "Shore Acres," that he 
>aw nothing in the plain down-Kast farmers represented, that he could 
liiul cattle and guinea pigs and suppers of baked beans without traveling 
halt across the continent to see them stuck on a stage and to hear them 



52 



UN-AM. EXPO AT BUFFAL 



o 



^- 

EliCTRICAL PRODUCTION 




DAWSON CITY-LAND OF THE MIDNIGHT SUN 



say ordinary things, and he added that his idea of a theatrical perform- 
ance comprised a little red fire, with some spangles, a pistol shot and a 
murder. But the public is pleased with the stage representation 
of real things in a realistic manner, because it appreciates the delicacy 
of the art that does it. It seems to be the anamoly of human nature 
that men would rather see a painting of a gorgeous sunset, which, 
though illumined by imagination and the spark of genius, is yet, even 
with Turner or Inness at their best, very much inferior to the real cloud 
banks that pile up on rare evenings, to a view of those actual evidences 
of Nature's handiwork. They are perhaps prized as proof that even 
Nature has her rivals, which though not peers, are yet, because of 



53 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWA 



consanguinity, successful competitors. By the same card may be 
explained the attractiveness of the Midway's presentment of the land of 
the midnight sun, and the most glorious sun phenomena that is known 
over the round earth, the aurora borealis. It is true that a glimpse of 
the aurora is not to be had from the back door yard of a Maine farm 
house such as is obtained of the shore acres of John Berry, and the 
rarity of its presence would make its stage appearance interesting, but 
so lurid a thing has not been captured before by the wielders of paint 
brush and the builders of stage scenery. These with the aid of elec- 
tricity, which throughout the Exposition has demonstrated admirably its 
genii proclivities and responded nobly to the Aladdin caressing of its 
masters, have produced a marvelous bit of skillful illusion. 

A trip is made to Dawson City in the Klondike, starting the morning 
of the first day among the snow covered mountains of Utah, embarking 
the next night from Seattle, weathering a storm at sea, entering the 
harbor of distant Skaguayand proceeding thence through the ice bound, 
chill grimness of the forbidden Chilcoot Pass to the metropolis of the 
North, Dawson City, in the heart of the Yukon gold region, there to be 
surprised and entranced with the last of countless sunsets, which have 
been forever following each other around the earth, where, by the 
midnight sun, the past is transformed into the present and yesterday 
becomes to-day. 

THE The hollow, musty air of these cycloramas sometimes hides remark- 

SPECTATORIUM :il)le surprises, for after the cobweb dimness has been taken from your 

OF JERUSALEM l '}' es b. v a few minutes stay in the place you begin to realize the seeming 

immense vastness that stretches away endlessly, and to forget the 

comparative littleness of the space that houses it, though the cyclorama 

buildings are the largest on the Midway and in themselves are most 

conspicuous. Such a surprise is to be found in the cyclorama of 

Jerusalem on the day of the crucifixion. A foreground and a great 

painting spread on a circular runway unite in producing the effect. ^ on 

see before you Jerusalem. Caravans are in the streets, the people 

1..1 over some great event. In the distance Mount Mispah lifts its 

Callow head. On this side the luxuriant olive trees on the undulating 

slopes of Mount Olivet are partly hidden by the grimy walls of the city 

that frown gloomily over all. The musky light glints upon the polislied 

arcades, and colonnades of Herod's home and the sullen bastions of the 

fortress nt Antonio menace the Temple of the Holies, /ion and Acre 

look ill under the forbidding greenish light of a lowering sky. From 

tlie commotion in tlie streets your eye turns to Calvary. There, on the 

^rounded |,y executioners, unbelievers and his redoubtable 



> A N - A M EXPO. AT BUFFALO 



followers is Christ. The scene is that indicated in St. Luke, the twenty- 
third chapter: 

"And when they were come to the place, which is called Calvary, 
then they crucilied him, and the malefactors, one on the right side and 
the other on the left. . . And it was about the sixth hour, and tlu-iv \\as 
a darkness over all the earth until the ninth hour . And when Jesus 
had cried with a loud voice, he said: 'Father, unto Thy hands I 
commend my spirit ;' and having said this he gave up the ghost." 

The painting was made by a Viennese artist, Bruno Pighlhin and an 
Kgyptologist of Munich, Karl Frosch. 




ENTRANCE TO THE SPECTATORIUM OF JERUSALEM 

A PRODUCTION OF GREAT HISTORIC VALUE, BEING A CYCLORAMIC REPRESENTATION OF THE 

CRUCIFIXION, THE EVENTS OF THE DAY, AND OF THE SCENES AND PEOPLES 

WHERE THE CHRISTIAN RELIGION HAD ITS BIRTH 




o 

ll 




\N-AM EXPO AT BUFFALO 



Villages 



One hot July night, just after sundown, while Llaverito, the 
matador and his quadrilla of Mexican bull fighters were parading with 
lusty strides through the streets, while several hundred light-hearted 
pleasure seekers were in the theatre, commenting on the agility and 
prettiness of the dancing girls, under a protecting portal, with the 
stuttering arc lamps giving tell-tale light to all dark corners, a pale 
Mexican, his lips tight with determination and his impulsive heart almost 
stifled with the dread approach of a tragedy stepped behind a pillar and 
fired a 38 calibre bullet through his heart. When the nervous young 
man who bent over him as his breath died away heard the doctors 
pronounce him dead he quickly disclosed the romantic cause of the 
shooting. The dead man, an aristocrat, desperately in love with one 
of the dancing girls, had followed her to Buffalo, and, his suit repulsed, 
had in this Southern fashion closed the incident. It added a tinge of 
reality to the Streets of Mexico and gave this transplanted bit of 
Old Mexico the intense interest of fatal passion. The girls in the 
theatre, before an audience that brought numbers and enthusiasm, and 
which was being paid, as usual, in kind, knew nothing of the fatality 
that concerned one of them, and continued in their gay fandango with its 
hilarious conclusion as they do on any night. That heedlessness is also 
another characteristic of real Mexico and it is in the play Mexico that 
something of the bouyancy, the impulsive, rollicking freedom of this 
country's southern neighbor is to be found. The laziness of the place 
is pleasing, and its rosiness attractive. 

But the life that is shown on a busy afternoon is one of rare gayeiy. 
Step into the village at such a time. Here come the bullfighters, 
wearing coats of gold and breeches of bright scarlet, clear cut lithe 
faces, small alert eyes, a clean stride, haughty and self confident, 
raiment sparkling with spangles, something pernicious and free 
about them, very far from a puny and pious life. The bullfighters of 
Mexico, it is said, are of the lowest caste, but they have developed, 
surely, a skillful dash and precision that plays with death quite fear- 
lessly. The bull ring is something distinctive and admirable. It is very 
much a matter of play in America, but the five who make the show on 
the Midway are real specimens and they handle the bullfight in a 
realistic manner that depends for its dramatic intensity more on the bull 
than on any one else. He is usually endowed with about the same 



STREETS 
OF MEXICO 




LUIS LEAL, "EL BARBE" 
BANDEHILLO--8TREET8 OF MEXICO 



57 






MIGHTY MEN IN THE MIDWAY GENTLEMEN SHOWMEN WHO AMUSE 
AND INSTRUCT MULTITUDES 



H. F. McGARVIE 

TO WHOM OUR GRATITUDE AND DOLLARS ARE DUE FOR THE REPRESENTATION 

WE HAVE OF LIFE IN OUR SOUTHERN SISTER REPUBLIC IN THE 

STREETS OF MEXICO 



A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 



ability to fight that his Spanish masters displayed on the morning of the 
lirst of May three years ago in the harbor of Manila, and the gore that 
results from the slaughter is not to be compared to that that flows in a 
well developed college foot ball match. The pantomime ot the spectacle 
is there and on occasion Llaverito or Luis Leal do enough prodigious 
bobbing before a new bull to send shivers of startled scare down the 
backs of the timorous. 

When H. F. McGarvie, a man with a very un-Mexican name, who is 
the manager, conceived the idea of a Mexican village for the Exposition, 
it was with the conclusion that such a sight would be indespensible to a 
Pan- American show. The life of Mexico is shown, the peons, the 
diminutive burros, the ever present bazaars, and the girls who dance 
with the abandon of the Midway and the languor of Old Spain. 




WINONA, SIOUX INDIAN MAIDEN 

CHAMPION PHENOMENAL RIFLE SHOT OF THE WORLD INDIAN CONGRESS 



l~ 



TALL RED BIRD, SIOUX CHIEF-INDIAN CONGRESS 



N - A M . EXPO AT BUFFALO 




ON THE TRAIL INDIAN CONGRESS 

Enter the Indian Congress some evening. If you go at all early you 
will be in a hurry because of the shots that tell of coming activity 
within. There is sombre twilight, only. The boards of the arena are 
white and bare and in the dark corners 
are moving figures, like silent spectres 
in the grim dusk. A crowd slowly 
gathers, led by the same anised bait 
of exciting musketry that brought you 
in. The show begins in a little while, 
to the clear notes of the Indian band. 
The grand entrance comes; Indians 
in hundreds, the first on horseback, 
others follow on foot, slow-stepping 
feet and common features, sunken 
eyes, sprawling noses and ragged 
mouths, the fluid and friendly savage, 
brawny and quite harmless. Winona, 
the Sioux crack shot enters, her teeth 
the whitest on the Midway, her pol- 
ished rifle barrel glinting in daredevil- 
coquetry in the last rays of the sinking 
sun. She raises her weapon and picks 
twenty glass balls in fifteen seconds 
from a moving board, the world's 
record. The races are announced, 
then the sham battle, the pitching of 
the wigwams, the skirmish, the retreat 
of the squaws, the rattle-clatter of 
musketry, the rosy flash amid the 
smoke, the shrill cries of daring and 
the groans of the wounded. Those 



THE INDIAN 
CONGRESS 




THE ELOQUENT ONE-LEGGED "LECTURER" AT THE 
BALLYHOO OF THE INDIAN CONGRESS 



63 







' 






U; 




GROUP OF HEROES-PHOTOGRAPHED IN INDIAN CONGRESS 
FIRST CAPTAIN HOBSON, SPANISH WAR HERO AND USEFUL SUBJECT FOR NEWSPAPERDOM 

IN SEASONS OF DROUTH 
CENTRAL FIGURE GERONIMO, FORMERLY WICKEDEST OF ALL RED-SKINS. HERO OF MANY 

BLOODY FRAYS UPON THE PLAINS 
THIRD GENERAL DIRECTOR CUMMINS, HERO OF MANY SANGUINARY SHAM BATTLES IN 

THE INDIAN CONGRESS, PAN-AMERICAN EXPOSITION 



> ; 



1 





INTRODUCING THE RENOWNED CHIEFS TO THE PUBLIC 

THE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE VARIOUS TRIBES AS THEY APPEAR AT EACH PERFORMANCE 




GROUP OF SIOUX CHIEFS-INDIAN CONGRESS 

LONE ELK RED CLOUD, Jfl HARD HEART 



P/\N-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO. 



wounded fall; the ground is strewn with dead. Savage conflict is hand 
to hand. Dirks glisten in the artificial light that throws over the 
scene a fitful pale gleam. The tumult dies away, the foes retreat, the 
victorious chant a diapason of joy. 

Then the mimicry of it sinks home. The uncouth 
grandeur of the red man and his pitiful history are painful 
with these real specimens of a giant race so identified with 
painted scenery and gaudy tinsel. But behind artifice is 
candor, and in a circus ballyhoo are manly men, childlike 
in confidence and with the quick, receptive minds of 
children, and so tainted somewhat with the Midway's 
brass, but true in fibre and wise in observation. Their 
condition a mockery; their presence a rebuke; their exhi- 
bition a falsehood. Such is the conclusion, but listen 
to American Horse, the envoy extraordinary and minister 
plenipotentiary of the Sioux nation. President Schurman 
of Cornell University had expressed surprise that so noted 
and upright a chief should consent to degrade himself 
enough to join a Midway show. 

"American Horse would be deeply grieved at the White 
Chief's slur were he not an Indian and so accustomed to 
the ways of the white man," wrote the chief. "Such a 
show as the White Chief will find here is not degrading to 
the Indian; it is an education to him. What would you 
have of the Indian ? Would you have him wither away and 
die, forgotten. The white man knows the Indian. He studies him, knows 
his cunning, his bravery, his truth, his uprightness and his ignorance. 
Because the white man is not ignorant, while the Indian is, is why the 
white man has conquered him, owns him, is killing him. The Indian's 
heart fails him when he thinks of his people, so soon to be scattered and 
forgotten. The avarice of the white man shall prevail. But would the 
White Chief have the Indian remain as he is, ignorant and unknown ? 
Would he have the Indian stay, rotting away through sloth as a farmer? 
Would he have him die with a hoe in his hands and know nothing of the 
beauty and the wealth that the white man builds for himself? Would 
he have the white man remember him only through bad books and worse 
lies ? No ! Let the Indian see what there is in this civilization that has 
conquered him; let him crouch at the camp fires of the white man's 
wonderful electric lamp and learn from it something of that deep cunning, 
deeper than his own, that gives the plains and the world to him. There 
is no other way. The white man locks him up. He is stronger and he 
can do it, but by the grace of the white man's God this way remains. 
Let the Indian again bid the White Chief welcome and good bye." 

There are moments, however, when regret departs and the Indian 




A FACE TO INSPIRE A FENIMORE COOPER 
WINONA-- INDIAN CONGRESS 



67 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 



Congress furnishes a dashing spectacle. There is the entrance into the 
arena of Geronimo, mounted, lashing his horse with leather thongs, 
wearing the hereditary sign of Apache chieftainship, a yellow cap; 
straight as an arrow, 88 years old, with the face of Napoleon and the 
carriage of Grant, grim, preoccupied and inscrutable, the greatest war 
chief of his time, a figure fit for heroic commemoration. Waiting 




PRINCESS ESTEEDA AND PAN ANNA 

THE PAPOOSE, PAN-ANNA, WAS BORN IN THE INDIAN CONGRESS AND NAMED BY VICE-PRESIDENT ROOSEVELT WHEN HE 

VISITED THE EXPOSITION. THE HONOR OF SO EXALTED A GODFATHER IS GREATLY 

ESTEEMED BY THE MOTHER PRINCESS ESTEEDA 







AN INTERESTING GROUP, PHOTOGRAPHED IN THE INDIAN CONGRESS 

1 CHIEF BLACKHEART, MASTER OF SEVERAL EUROPEAN LANGUAGES. 2 LONE BEAR, NOTED SIOUX 
CHIEF. 3 CHIEF BLUE HORSE, SIGNED ALL TREATIES WITH THE UNITED STATES FOR 
PAST FIFTY YEARS. 4 CHIEF LITTLE WOUND, THE ELOQUENT ORATOR OF 
THE SIOUX NATION, RECENTLY DECEASED. 5-WILLIAM JENNINGS 
BRYAN, TWICE RECENTLY CHIEF DEMOCRATIC CANDI- 
DATE FOR PRESIDENT OF UNITED STATES 








MIGHTY MEN OF THE MIDWAY GENTLEMEN SHOWMEN WHO AMUSE 
AND INSTRUCT MULTITUDES 

FRED'K T. CUMMINS 

IS OF INTEREST TO THE PUBLIC BECAUSE HE IS THE ORGANIZER AND DIRECTOR 

OF WHAT THE CIRCUS BILL MIGHT CALL THE "GREATEST AGGREGATION 

OF LIVING AMERICAN INDIANS EVER PRESENTED TO THE PUBLIC," 

WITH ALL THEIR NATIVE ACCESSORIES WHERE HOURS 

AND DAYS MIGHT BE PROFITABLY SPENT IN 

THE STUDY OF THE AMERICAN INDIANS 





N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 



without, always waiting there, are United States regulars, for Geronimo 
is a prisoner of war and will remain so to the end of his time, for in his 
more palmy days he was the most vicious chief that that wild country of 
the West had known. 

A man with a low standing collar and a white necktie, and a facial ex- 
pression that indicated he was a clergyman, came one afternoon to 
Xavier Pene, the French explorer who brought the blacks in Darkest 
Africa to America, with the complaint that the pigmies which were 
advertised for the show were not to be seen. Some Armenian tobacco 
seller had told him so. The Armenian, as it developed, had understood 
the clergyman to ask if he was a pigmy, and had denied the accusation. 
But before the explanation could occur 
Pene yelled in excitable half French 
and half negro dialect to a little man 
with a sheep's skin about his head, a 
piece of cotton cloth about his loins, 
and glistening black flesh visible every- 
where else, to hurry quick with his 
evidence that there were real pigmies 
in the village. The little man carried 
this with him, for the clergyman had 
read in Stanley and Du Chaillu of the 
poisoned arrows that the pigmies use 
for slaughter ot game and human ene- 
mies, not stopping with an attack on 
the most powerful of all the African 
tribes, the Zulus of the East. He had 
read that the pigmies are the real 
monarchs of interior Africa, that all 
other black men are afraid of them, 
and that the secret which controls the 
output of the poisoned arrow is the 
cause of it. He was anxious, of course, 
to disseminate this information, but 
Pene rather took his breath away when 
the pigmy who had responded to his 
call turned up with a full quiver of the 
viperish things hanging unconcernedly 
on his front. An examination of the 
arrows and the wearer convinced the 
man who had read his missionary 
reports and the travels of the explor- 
ers that the real thing was on show. 



DARKEST 
AFRICA 




71 



FEMALE TYPES IN DARKEST AFRICA 
MARY ACCROBE8SIE MUCAY OKU 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MID 



W A 




THE AFRICAN GOLDSMITH-ACROBESSIE-DARKEST AFRICA 

There are also cannibals in the village and members of ten tribes of 
South and Central African natives, but all have little of the ferocious 
appearance that would be conveyed by the violent adjectives that ad- 
vertise their presence. They are genuine enough and they have not 
the dross of professional showmen that may be found in such places. 
Their simple selves are the finest exhibits that can be made. Their 
clean, strong, firm-fibred bodies, in the best of them, are more beau- 
tiful than the most beautiful face. Their eyes are life-lit and childishly 
credulous. They are full of pluck, with pliant backbone and neck, 
good-sized arms and legs, and the flesh not flabby, nor over-sensitive. 
They are great bathers, these blacks; they require a hot bath every 
nitfht and rub themselves daily with palm oil, as dainty as a lady. 

Tln-y are simple, but they are also quick. They adopt customs rap. 
i.lly, and the most rapid acquisition they have made has been the inborn 



72 



5NAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



attribute of the colored gentleman of the palace car, whose remote an- 
cestors they suggest; they can solicit a tip on the slightest provocation. 
Their artists, for the negroes have very good artists, are unusually 
receptive, too. They have never been outside of the stockade that 
fences them about. If they had been imprisoned in the heart of 
Africa since their arrival they would have seen as much of Buffalo as 
they have, for they never leave the bark enclosure that separates them 
from the outer world, except to execute a few steps on the ballyhoo. 
In spite of this, and with only the advantage that comes from a sight of 
the Midway from the lookout in the tower, the carvers in ivory have 
been able to reproduce Midway scenes with excellent fidelity. One 
shows a woman, an American, with a parasol, in a jinrickisha; another 
reproduces the parade of the Mexican vaqueros next door. 

Besides the dances, which furnish 
the performance in the theatre, the 
village shows a glimpse of African 
life. The bamboo of the huts was 
brought from the interior through 
Cape Town, and, on the Midway, 
made into native habitations. There 
the tribal chiefs and the other 
men of the village dwell. Oben- 
daga, the real chief of the lot, has 
fifty-five wives. There are only three 
here, but he has demanded more 
and believes that the rest are on the 
way, though they will never reach 
him, for he has been told they were 
coming to keep him contented. He 
says it is a good plan to marry much, 
that it is not a thing to be taken 
too seriously, that often bad wives 
make good widows. "Children?" 
he grunts in reply to the question. 
"They are incidents. Great men 
deal only with events, such as 
marriage." 

CONSTANS DE BACCARAK 

BROKEN ENGLISH SPIELER, DIRECTOR OF AMUSEMENTS 
AND CREATOR OF VIM BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 




73 




ABOUK-YOUSEF AND SON SALLIM 

SWORD FIGHTERS IN THE STREETS OF CAIRO AND PICTURESQUE AIR SLASHERS IN THE 
ORIENTAL PROCESSION-BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 




AN EARLY AFTERNOON HOUR STREETS OF BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



No one misses the place that is called the Beautiful Orient. Kvi-n it 
you wanted to, you couldn't get away from it. A brass band has always 
been synonymous for noise, and this one just outside the gate has a 
tremendous amount of brass in it, but there is more than that to make 
Rome howl. A colored minstrel parade, coming up the village street on 
a quiet afternoon in midsummer, drawing the postmaster from his paper, 



AKOUN'S 

BEAUTIFUL 

ORIENT 




AT THE GATES OF CAIROBEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



75 







CARMEN 

BEAUTIFUL MOORISH DANCING GIRL BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 



. 



the school boys from their books, the schoolma'am 
from her discipline, the store keepers from their coun- 
ters, almost tlra wing the window panes from their 
frames, is a tin pan in a barrel to the noise that a 
Soudan dervish and two Nubian pipers can get from a 
tom-tom and a windpipe. It is hideous or enchanting, 
just as your mood happens to be, but there is no half- 
way stop, no dullness that comes from indifference. 
The din and irresistible witchery of its monotonous 
chant will probably get you inside the gates. 

Once within there opens up first the Streets of 
Cairo, that is if you go in the west entrance. If you 
go in the east way you'll stumble into a cross section 
of a blind alley that is labeled "Constantinople," 
and then will follow "Tunis," "Algiers," "Damas- 
cus" and "Morrocco." Moslem towers and tall, 
cloud-piercing minarets give a pink and blue pictur- 
esque atmosphere to the place, 
and you will stare in mild 
wonderment at the haphazard 
booths and be mystified at the 
strange polyglot of tongues. 

Camels and donkeys will race past. Holy 
Moses and Holy Smoke, both velvety nosed 
carriers, furnish nine-tenths of the hilarious 
sport. To ride the camel is the boisterous 
close of many a lark. It really is a mildly 
exciting time. Suddenly the street is cleared 
and the cry is made that the marriage procession 
is coming. It occurs at regular half-hour inter- 
vals. It is a marriage procession without a 
bride or groom, for it is considered indelicate 
in the Orient for them to appear at so interesting 
a time, and they remain behind closed shutters, 
while the people of the village go through the 
procession. First are the dancing girls with 
bare necks and bare bosoms, perched high on 
lumbering camels and decked in their gayest 
finery, scarlet petticoats and beads of pearl. 
Fatma, the queen, leads the rest, alone on the 
greatest dromedary of the lot. Then come the 

GROVER CLEVELAND 

5MPLAISANT ZITHER PLAYER IN THE 
ENTAL THEATRE, WHO HAS EM- 
IALMED TA-RA-RA-BOOM -DE-AY 
- BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 

77 





'~ i : : 



THE LADIES AND THE ELEPHANT 
-BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 




SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE 



MIDWAY 




POL AT IE 

THE STRONG MAN, WITH HIS FIVE LIVE 
WEIGHTSBEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



sword lighters, Joseph and his son, with their usual lee- 
way of twenty yards, air-slashing with all their accus- 
tomed vigor, and behind, a motley throng of Turks and 
ragged Arabs with weak breeches and napkined heads. 

The place is now called the Streets of Cairo, for the 
Orient has had to slip back to the name its Chicago noto- 
riety made known. A Saturday night there is about the 
most lively outing 
that can be gotten on 
the Midway, unless it 
be some confetti 
night, when the main 
street is six inches 
deep with the multi- 
colored paper, and 
when the spirit of 
carnival has torn the 
mask from all re- 
serve The Saturday 
evening crowds con- 
tract the forced vim 
of Baccarat, the 

broken-English barker, and go in 

for a rousing old time. He urges 

all to the theatre and explains that 

tin- place is a very good one for 

\\mnen and children. Then he re- 
peats the French for "Evil to him 

\\lio evil thinks " all of the shows 

i)l shady reputation intone the same 

pretext and pounding on his box 

with a loud stick throws open the JOSEPH AND HIS DONKEY 

BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 





doors that reveal a stage decked 
in rugs and ottomans. If you go 
in, as you likely will, you will come 
out thinking evil maybe, maybe not. 
At any rate you will have seen 
the dansc du ventre. 



HOLY MOSES, A GREAT FAVORITE 

WITH THE LADY RIDERS, 
NOTWITHSTANDING A VARIABLE TEMPER 




r 



MIGHTY MEN OF THE MIDWAY GENTLEMEN SHOWMEN WHO AMUSE 
AND INSTRUCT MULTITUDES 

GASTON AKOUN 

ORGANIZER AND GENERAL DIRECTOR OF THAT COSMOPOLITAN SETTLEMENT OF 

EASTERN MARTS, MERCHANTS, PLAYERS, DANCERS AND MERRY MAKERS 

COMBINING THE BEAUTIFUL ORIENT AND STREETS OF CAIRO 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE M I D W A 




DISMOUNTING-BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 

ONE OF THE FAVORITE PASTIMES FOR LADIES AND GENTLEMEN 
VISITING THE BEAUTIFUL ORIENT IS THE CAMEL RIDING 

THE There are three exhibits in the Hawaiian village, the hula hula girls, 

HAWAIIAN tht-' singers and Tobin. Tobin is in the bally-hoo, so that he is really \ 
VILLAGE be enjoyed without the payment of an entrance fee, and, as Tobin will 

tell you, he is the whole show himself; it is hardly necessary to be enter- 
tained with the hula hula girls or the singers. Tobin is one of the best 
of the speilers, self styled "The King of the Midway," with all the 
assertive swing and ease of a real monarch. He has outgrown the 
necessity for loud bluster and buncombe, and has a delicious way of 
assuring a crowd that he is about the only man on the street who tells 
the truth, and he does tell the truth about everything except about him- 
si-lt, when he talks to the reporters. He possesses a huge scrap book 
tilled with innumerable clippings, telling of his remarkable exploits in his 
travels about the world. He has associated much with royalty and 
cultivated persons and that may be the reason he has acquired the 
blandness he shows in his talks to the public, for he is a believer in the 
wnrthk'ssness of blatant assertion. He talks quietly and never makes 
an extravagant statement. He uses the inferential method of con- 
vincing, and he gets patronage enough to make the method popular. 
"The rest will tell you they have the largest shows on the Midway, 



80 



A N - A M EXPO AT BUFFALO 




HAWAIIAN TROUBADOURS-HAWAIIAN VILLAGE 

that they cost the most money, that they are the only features out 
here," calls Tobin, "but I tell you no such thing. This is not 
the greatest show that ever happened. It is not the most wonderful 
exhibition in the world, but I'll tell you what we have got. We've got 
the hulu hulu dancers, not 89 as they tell you at other places, but 23. 
Count 'em." Should you take Tobin's advice you would find 14, but 
that is another story. 

Tobin is not as virtuous, though, as he would have it appear. One 
afternoon John Philip Sousa came down the Midway and bought a ticket 
for the Hawaiian village. He had been inside but a few moments when 
the place began to fill with an unusual crowd. At the close of the 



81 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 




show it was packed and as he 
passed out he heard Tobin yelling: 
"Sousa is inside! Sousa! The superb 
Sousa, king of bandmasters! He is 
inside leading the Hawaiian orchestra. 
As he passes out he will give a sou- 
venir to every lady. Sousa, the king, 
will give a souvenir to every lady. 
Inside! Inside!" 

When Senator Depew came out 
from the same kind of a packed audi- 
ence he discovered Tobin announcing 
to an eager crowd, almost fighting for 
a chance to get tickets: "Chauncey 
Depew is inside ! Chauncey, the peach, 
is talking to 
them now. He 
is in there tel- 
1 i n g them 
about Hawaii 
as he found it. 
Depew will 
give a souve- 
nir to every 
lady who at- 
ten d s the 
show. The 
souvenir will 
be a kiss . 
Chauncey will 
kiss every lady 
in the house. 
Inside!" 

The per- 
formance which Tobin advertises would be at- 
tr.ii live anyway, without the services of so pro- 
lific a spieler. The dancing girls form its most 
seductive enticement, but the tender melodies of 
the male singers get more applause. Probably 
tht- admiration for the muscular proficiency of 
Is is a silrnt OIH-, while the wholesome 
songs of the men bring spontaneous recognition, 



W. MAURICE TOBIN 

KINO OF THE MIDWAY 

ttCLER AT THE HAWAIIAN VILLAGE. THE ONLY AMERICAN SPIELER 

AT THE LATE PARIS EXPOSITION AND A MUCH 

TRAVELED YOUNG AMERICAN 




APEKILA 

HULA HULA GIRL-HAWAIIAN VILLAGE 



A N - A M EXPO AT 



BUFFALO 




BRAWLEO BARBAYA 

THE TAXIDERMIST AND HIS CHILDREN. A FAMILIAR CHARACTER 
IN THE PHILIPPINE VILLAGE 

The Filipino ballyhoo is about the oddest outdoor show ever offered 
American people. Of all the queer, unusual sights on the Midway it 
stands at the head. The blacks have perfect bodies; the Hawaiian girls, 
rush mats for dresses; the Esquimaux, suits of sealskin; the Orientals, 
swaths of limp linen; the Indians, feathers and war paint; the Mexicans, 
sombreros and gay dress, and they all have life and noise and grotesque 
nonsense, but the Filipinos have more. They have earnestness and 
they have modesty, and better than all else they are clean, wholesome 
and somewhat diffident. The ballyhoo shows all of this. In this out- 
door show the bolo man is the principal figure, a grotesque combination 
of Oriental sword fighter, Japanese gaily-gowned priest 
and American circus clown. He wears the checkered 
clothes of the sword fighter, possesses the innate dignity 
of the priest and the rich broad humor of the clown. 
He stands there in solemn silence, a mere lay figure to 



FILIPINO 
VILLAGE 



NATIVE CART 
FILIPINO VILLAGE 




83 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE 



M I D W A 




THE WATER BUFFALO-PHILIPPINE VILLAGE 

attract attention, while the little brown Malays beside him furnish 
harmonious, sweet music on most peculiar wind instruments of wide 
bamboo and long reed stems. 

The Filipinos and the Hawaiians have much in common, for they are 
both children of the Pacific seas, and the peace that Balboa thought he 
found in the waters of that great ocean seems to have permeated the 
root and fibre of the human dwellers by its shores. Most noticeable is 
the plaintive, sad-sweet music of the two, a rhythmic languid measure of 
simple melody, but musical in the highest degree. In the noise of the 
Midway's contemptuous bustle it is almost lost, but its persuasive ink- 
ling of an idyllic life floats intermittently through the village, and on the 
ballyhoo serves to make the show there genuine and pleasant. 

Most of the peculiar things in the village are shown on the ballyhoo. 
The water buffalo, unwieldly with their great wide horned appendages, 
stand there in patience that is surprising alter an observation of their 
somewhat ferocious appearance, but the water buffalo is a meek animal 
and a useful one. He serves as a producer of beef, for the use of 
tanners and shot-makers, for the dairy maid and chiefly as a beast of 
burden. Inside the gates he performs the service that the camels do in 
the Beautiful Orient; that the elephants do in Bostock's animal show, and 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE M I D W A 



that the funny little burros with weak knees and strong backs do in the 
Streets of Mexico. He gives visitors useless rides of no length and 
little excitement, and not even the danger that attends kissing the 
IMariH-y stone. 

The houses of the Filipinos are shown to be not so very primitive, 
for they have cooking stoves and chairs and even door mats, and the 
people themselves, except for the two of the race of mountain wild men, 
are quiet and domestic and apparently industrious. The rope walk is 
the first one seen in America. It shows the laborious, but certain and 
safe way the natives have of twisting hemp fibre into serviceable lengths. 
There is a church in the village, a reproduction of a Catholic church in 
Manila, and on Sunday mornings, long before the Exposition's gates are 
open to the public, the Filipinos assemble there for worship. 

ALT NUREMBERG One April day, before the Exposition was finished, a woman whose 

age is a trifling subject, for time has 
touched her lightly, but whose features 
mirror the buoyance of youth, dressed 
to the tips of her ears in furs, uas 
driven through the then partly com- 
pleted Midway in an open barouche, 
and glanced with the tragic eyes of 
Phedre, lightened with concealed mer- 
riment at the brown, seemingly age- 
mellowed walls of the German village 
of Nuremburg. High over one end, 
in a lofty tower overlooking all the 
street, in a nest of pliant, dusty reeds, 
its legs doubled under and its head 
poked to the west at a half elevation, 
sat a stork, the indispensable adjunct 
of all German villages. Across the 
street a little red brick building bore 
the conspicuous announcement: " In- 
fant Incubators." The woman in the 
carriage, Sarah Bernhardt of Paris, 
noticed the two and said in broken 
English to her companion: "Is not 
ze stork on ze wrong building? " The 
I i flu hwoman passed on, but the stork 
remained, and there it has sat ever 
since, its legs still doubled under in 

MMM 

GIANT NUREMBERG GUARD AT ENTRANCE TO THE VILLAGE 




86 



A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 



the same excruciating fashion, and its pleading beak still unsatisfied in 
its appeal to the west. It is a part of the realistic transferral of CUM man 
customs to America. 

Within the walls of "Alt Nurnberg " is to be found a complete illu- 
sion, even to the beer pavilion, all of which is heightened by the pres- 
ence of the Royal Bavarian band, accoutred in military style and 
performing daily, with all the accustomed regimental noisy melody that 
is found in Germany, the selections that are favorites with Germans. 
It is the one band at the Exposition which has succeeded in keeping 
Wagner and Brahms and even Mozart on its programs. The patrons of 
the restaurant, a fashionable and, because of its prices, a somewhat 
exclusive dining place, are more pleased with such than with the tin pan 
rattle of American marches. The Tyrolean yodlers and the dancers of 
the Schuhplattl occupy a stage, and a pretty madchen passes edelweiss 
among those who will buy. When asked if the flowers are bogus she 
replies: "Nein! Not bogus, they are cloth." Else- 
where the home of Albrecht Duerer is shown in repro- 
duction, and the corner in which he sat over his beer 
with Hans Sachs, the poet, is pointed out. i 

ESQUIMAU The other places on the Midway use 
VILLAGE huge signs telling what General Miles or 
Chauncey Depew or Wu Ting Fang or 
William Jennings Bryan said about their wonders. It 
is all put in the language of the press agent, and its 
monotonous laudation is the same for a dance as it is 
for a spectacle. Before the Esquimau village the name 
of Benjamin Franklin is used, and Franklin himself 
probably authorized it about as much as Miles or Bryan 
did the hyperbolic quotations they are made to say. 
Franklin's aphorism proclaims to the public that an 
investment in knowledge pays the best interest. A 
good investment in knowledge that is difficult to be 
obtained can be gotten within, for the show is one 
that belongs to the instructive class. A lecture begins 
the entertainment, a staccato talk illumined by numer- 
ous stereopticon slides, that show the perils of an arctic 
voyage and the features of the principal arctic explor- 
ers from Franklin to Nansen. The ignus fatuis of the 
North pole is a fascinating study, and its impenetrable 
mystery is faintly conveyed in these stray sketches of 
its frigid terrors and phenomenal natural beauties. 




THE OLD CORNER BATTLEMENTALT NUREMBERG, 

THE TOWER ROUND WHICH WE ALL PASS IN 

GOING TO AND FRO BETWEEN 

NORTH AND SOUTH MIDWAY 



87 



A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 




THE ESQUIMAU VILLAGE 

A REMARKABLY FINE REPRESENTATION OF AN ARCTIC SCENE ON THE RIGHT HAND OF THE 
NORTH MIDWAY, WHICH GREETS VISITORS AS THEY ENTER THE " STREET" 

In the village the ice stretches away in long, unbroken cliffs, greenly 
transparent and shimmering in the sun. It would take the capital and 
material of the ice trust to keep the real thing on hand, but the imita- 
tion that has been attained by the use of plaster and paint might worry 
the trust into thinking that ice of such material would supplant their 
ammonia product in the affections of the public. It is most wonderful 
ice, and the casual impression got from a trip to the village is that it is 
the real stuff. Below it are the topeks of the Esquimaux. A topek is a 
clean dwelling place, more so than the tepees of the Indians, at best a 
slovenly race. The Esquimaux are as cleanly as the Japanese, and 
these skin houses show it. There are also ice houses with windows of 



89 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 




NATIVES IN THE ESQUIMAU VILLAGE 

AND ONE OF THE SEALSKIN TOPEKS USED IN SUMMER 

isinglass for the sunlight to struggle through, and pots of fat to give 
added warmth. 

The Esquimaux do not need much artificial heat these days, and e\en 
it they did there would be enough exercise in the games they practice- 
to furnish warmth with the mercury 50 degrees below zero. The 
games are simple, and modified by the exigencies of the snowy country 
they inhabit. One of them is the seal race, men racing for a penny on 
tlirir bellies, their feet held up over their backs with their hands, while 
they grovel along with floundering slowness like the seals they imitate. 
It i< \cry si-ldnm that they finish a heat in the prescribed fashion. It is 
like a trotting race in which there are no judges; half-way down the 



90 



N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO. 



course one breaks and the rest follow. Not the least of their skilled 
performances is the cracking of a cent from under two inches of c.uth 
at a distance of twenty paces with the single snap of a whip-lash. 

Every curio in the village and every bit of substantial building i.> a 
direct transplantation from the North. Perhaps the most interesting is 
an igloo, or hut, made entirely of whalebone, a great rarity even in the 
North and never before seen in America. The Anthropological Society 
of France wants it, but it is to be presented to the Smithsonian Institute 
after the Exposition is over. It is one of the curious mementoes in mi 
the land of July blizzards and midnight suns. 




SCENE WITHIN THE ESQUIMAU VILLAGE-THE NATIVE KAYAK 



9! 




THE GEISHA GIRLS FROM THE PACIFIC SLOPE 

FAIR JAPAN 



AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO. 




The comic opera ideas of lair Japan 
will not prevail after a Midway trip. 
KYI- n so desultory an opinion as may 
be thus gained will put to rest the 
deluding notion that a geisha girl and 
a figured parasol, accompanied 1>\ an 
agile juggler, are the sum of the 
attractions of the flowery kingdom. 
There are no discordant noises then-, 
nor any ponderous gew gaws, nor any 
brazen ballyhoos, nor any flim (lam 
flattery. The talker does not shout 
the amusing but irrelevant announce- 
ment that within are cooing trees 
and laughing pansies. There are no 
patent fakes, anxious for a penny and 
gorged with a dollar, more dreaded 
than the hold up man, nor any false 
pistol shots and frenzied scurryings 
to attract attention. The press agent 
never lost one of his girls nor hatched 
an assassination to get a column in 

the morning papers, and, as a final test of true worth, the construction 
of the place is genuine, Japanese material, put up by Japanese work- 
men, fashioned in Japanese style and built as a real sketch of foreign 
life, a specimen of what a Midway show might be and what few are. 

What Japan is not would take volumes to tell, but what the Midway's 
fair Japan is, in its subtle suggestion of. the land of art and studied com- 
fort and healthy life, would take a library to tell, for it is to the imagi- 
nation that such a place is chiefly helpful. Its stunted mimosa trees, 
graceful even in their deformity and luxuriantly beautiful in a green 
that turns to crystallized malachite under the evening rays of a lighted 
arc lamp, are outposts for its beauty and gentle quiet. A day may find 
a satisfying close in the tea house with an orchestra of girls playing 
some melodious tune from "Wang" or the "Mikado." The evening 
sun outside, dallying in shadow, intensifies the notes of a clarified bugle 
ringing through the somnolent air, while beyond the outer walls, 
happily built of thick bamboo, the ceaseless surge of the crowd con- 
tinues its racking search for allaying divertisement. This end to a 
period of hustle will be convincing in some degree of the worth of the 



CEREMONIAL TEA 



FAIR JAPAN 




A FAIR INHABITANT OF 
FAIR JAPAN 



93 




is* 



L-P 



ENTRANCE TO FAIR JAPAN 

SOUTH MIDWAY 



AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




li 



THE JINRIKISHA 

FROM FAIR JAPAN. ONE OF THE POPULAR MODES OF CONVEYANCE 
ABOUT THE EXPOSITION GROUNDS 

Exposition. It takes the curse from its idle bluster and fulsome 
nonsense. 

The repose, the responsive beauty of fair Japan is its claim to dis- 
tinction, and it is a commanding claim. Most of the blithesome frolic of 
Venice next door is not to be found, and there are none of the rougher 
elements of a midway show there. Its pleasure is refined, its life smooth 
and flowing and all that is known of the artistic atmosphere of the 
imperial kingdom, not an unknown subject, may find some verifica- 
tion. The fluid and natural life of the Japanese is one that has had 
extended comment, and it is one that is favorably known. It is not 
extravagant talk. There is no extended display of village life and the 
place takes advantage of all the opportunities that are given for the sale 
of clothes and trinkets. The bazaars, however, are not owned by 



95 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE M I D W A 




YOUTHFUL ACROBATS FAIR JAPAN 

showmen. There is no disposition to force a sale nor to charge 
abominable prices for ordinary goods and, indeed, the chief claim there 
is to a reputation for genuineness is the sometimes diffident manner in 
which the sales people hold back with their wares. This is a curious 
trait to find in a Midway bazaar. It is frequently quite difficult to 
accomplish a purchase, the Japs seem to have the true love of an artist 
for their creations and part with them only with compunction. 

Lafcadio Hearn tells ot the contained dignity of Japanese women and 
draws a charming picture of the home life of the higher class in the 
islands. This exclusiveness of the women is not one of the noticeable 
equipments of the Midway show, but the girls there are by no means 
devoid of it. They are the ordinary tea house waitresses, not the 
geisha girls of the real fair Japan. 



96 




ENTRANCE TO VENICE IN AMERICA 
SOUTH MIDWAY 



FAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




Venice in America is the chief landing dock of the 
boats that make the most delightful trip within the 
Exposition grounds, the canal route that circumnavi- 
gates the rainbow city by day and the city of light by 
night. The Venetian gondoliers chant their gay songs 
there, and many a carol of midnight joy rings through 
its rambling streets. Scoffing laughter sometimes 
greets the announcement that anything refined and 
really charming is to be found amidst the babel of 
yapping din that resounds through the Midway, but 
it is a thoughtless sneer. The ramshackle place that 
is called Venice in America is not a wonderfully 
beautiful resort, nor is it likely that its copy of the real 
Venice is more faithful than is demanded by the 
exigencies of the occasion, for if the truth is told 
Midway showmen court dollars more than they do 
artistic ensemble; nor is the collection of deal tables 
and modern varnished substitutes particularly hallowed 
with association, but the simple, subtle comfort that 
may be soaked in there on a summer's 
evening, if you're not afraid of missing 
the next car or a sight of some exhibit 
from Rhode Island, is worth about all that a long, long 
trip to it would cost. 

It is not so hilariously exciting, nor is it at all novel, 
except in the details of dress and decoration. There 
is little hurried movement for some feverish perform- 
ance, and if you do visit the theatre that offers, the 
singing that is found causes little comment; it gets only 
murmurs of satisfaction. It is the kind of an enter- 
tainment that does not incite criticism, because it is 
not the effort so much of art as of nature, and natural 
work is always pleasing. It is when the performer 
challenges attention that he falls foul of the shafts of 
comment. The difference between a cultivated and an 
uncultivated voice is mostly one of manufactured stand- 
ards. Madame Sembrich would say that it meant the 
difference between riotous growth and the precision 
that comes from a lifetime of precise advance, and a 
heritage of bountiful good fortune; but nothing, not 
even the clearest, softest note from the silvery throat 



VENICE IN 
AMERICA 



CWEET-VOICED, WINSOME 

LITTLE PATTI 

--VENICE IN AMERICA 




LEA DELAPIERRE 

NEAPOLITAN SINGER 
VENICE IN AMERICA 



Q9 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 




THE STRINGED ORCHESTRA-STREETS OF VENICE 

of the most celebrated contralto can equal the lusterous diapason of 
delicious melody that floats as free and languorous from the lips of those 
Venetian girls as the song of the red breasted thrush at daybreak. The 
Ian-ing strains of 

11 Yama Yama, 

11 Yama Yama yah! " 

never cease their restful serenade for some vocal caper, and they die 
away in the night air like the memory of a dream, while in the distance, 
with the lamps trom the neighboring bazaars shedding their soft radiance 
on the canal, and with boat loads of people gliding through the luminous 
water to tinkling guitars and clattering castanets, buxom girls in blue 
dance the blithesome tarentclla. 



100 



N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 



There are two superb things on the Midway. The life-size and 
astonishingly realistic bronze group by Biondi of " The Saturnalia," 
and George Rochegrosse's mammoth painting "The Fall of Babylon." 
Both are marvelous in idea and composition. Whatever trite and 
academic standards may proclaim about flowing lines and atmosphere 
might partially condemn these masterful creations, but of all artistic 
endeavor they seem the nearest to the popular heart, because the easiest 
understood, and after all, art is not so esoteric a thing as it is made out 
to be; the hedge may be jumped by ordinary understandings. Kven the 
artistic world honors the Saturnalia for it took the grand prize and a 
diploma of honor at the International Exposition at. Paris in 1900. 

The scene depicted is the close of a night of debauch; every detail 
i.i the ten representative figures of the prominent classes of later Rome 
is distinct and admirable. The night has been finished, and over the 
significant scene is probably breaking a cold dawn, the dawn of fright- 
ened remorse, remorse stung with the bitterness of sated opportunity 
and the dull realization of decayed strength. The reign of the great 
and wise Aurelius has long been tender memory in the hearts of his most 
devoted pagans, and now the Roman world, so long the pillar of the 
earth, is about to topple to its death. 

The Saturnalia was a religious feast, and a feast at which drunken 
revelry was not the custom but the compulsory rule, and at which honor 
to the gods Was drunk with damnation to the suspected dread rising of 
the intangible' and unknown God, Christ. Chief in the group is a gladi- 
ator, handsome and glorified in his rude strength, leading along the 
Appian way his wife, she who would be known to our own times as a com- 
mon law wife, her embroidered gown and clear cut profile proclaiming 
her proud descent from the ancient patrician families of the old republic, 
long before the days of Caesar and his destroying glory, and with the 
two is the boy, a child of free love. To the right are the pagan priests, 
sottish and indulged to vulgar repletion. Their portrayal is the final 




SATURNALIA 
VENICE IN 
AMERICA 







_ 



SWEET MEMORIESVENICE IN AMERICA 



1C1 



THE ITALIAN ADONIS 

NEAPOLITAN SINGER 
VENICE IN AMERICA 




o 

f! 



3j 3 

1 1 

\- < 



IAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 



triumph of a genre study in art, a picture of the three degrees of 
intoxication, the half-sober, the satirical and the maudlin, the last numb 
in sense and fibre, a lifeless mass of inert clay. The patrician woman 
listens in patronizing, derisive condescension to the savage reproofs of 
the half drunken priest, the boy doubles up his fists in anger, while the 
father, the backbone and reliance of them all, haughtily observes and is 
silent, throwing a pitying, protecting arm over the poor, enervated 
body of low abandoned woman who leers with flaming eyes of passion, 
drunk with wine, from the side opposite the patrician w r ife. Farther to 
the left are: the slave with a new found freedom, the libertine soldier, 
the last relic of the solidarity of the legions, and the singing Tibicine, 
hilarious in irresponsible folly. The whole breathes the atmosphere of 
the antique, a sample of what the Midway has of art. 




DARKNESS AND DAWN-NORTH MIDWAY 



103 



PAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO. 



The cool of a summer's evening is about the most enjoyable time on BOSTOCK'S 
tlu- Midway, and then the animal show is in its finest trim. Tin- bea>K TRAINED WILD 
are fed at 5 o'clock and after the supper hour, with tin- dim radiance nl ANIMAL ARENA 
the street's incandescence just showing in the string of lambent bulbs 
that are lighted here a full hour before the shooting of the current into 
the half million glow balls that furnish brilliance for the- exposition 
proper, both animals and men, a thousand of one and fifty of the other, 
alter laboring through the enervating heat of the day are prepared for 
the evening's work. For a performance, the evening is by far tin- best 
part of the day. The barker, a tall lank fellow of quick wit and little 
reading, who in his physical resemblance 
is often mistaken for DeWolf Hopper, 
stood in front of the show at such a time 
one night and called: 

"Here! Here! Everybody! Here is 
Bostock, the king of wild animals!" 
Frank Bostock sat on a tiger skin in the 
door of his office and smiled at the Mrs. 
Partington thrust. A further elucidation 
of what was to be found within came when 
the barker called: 

"Inside you will witness the conflicts 
of wild beasts in the arena that will recall 
to your mind the gladiatorial combats of 

ancient Rome, of the time when the great ^^^^^^^^^^^^^ *tt,.- '^^^^K 
emperor, Nero, contested in the Olympian 
games." At this Bostock raised his hands 
to his mouth and called across the street 
to friends who were enjoying the har- 
angue, the one word: "Esau." 

Esau is the connecting link, the remark- 
able chimpanzee who furnishes the tell- 
tale evidence in one of Bostock's shows 
called "The Evolution of Man." Aside 
from such levity those who listen to the 
seductions of the barker long enough to 
pass inside the gates find a show of real 
quality and of that instructive educational 
value which is considered the prime 
requisite for the children who become 
guests en the lane of laughter. 

SELICA 

FEARLESS LION TAMER. THE BEAUTIFUL WOMAN WHO DANCES 
AMIDST THE LIONS 




105 



PAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




THE PRIZE-FIGHTING KANGAROO AND HIS OPPONENT 
BOSTOCK'S ARENA 

AT TIMES THE KANGAROO IS NO MEAN MATCH FOR THE MAN, AS THE LATTER IS 
OFTEN MADE TO KNOW WHEN HE GETS " IT" IN THE NECK 

Most of the animals that are brought to a zoo are not very strange. 
Lions and tigers, elephants that labor about in pitiful patience, lumber- 
ing bears all dazed and numb with long captivity, gentle camels, whose 
velvety noses are as meek as the lion and the lamb who pose hourly in 
the central cage under the appealing caption, "The Millenium," snappy 
hyenas with snarls tor fidgety people, and yelp's of distress for each 
other, and fulsome monkeys, chattering like gossips, amusing everybody 
but their scared selves, are the nucleus of the zoological gardens of 
every large city. In addition to such, Bostock advertises trained 
animals, and it is the presence of Bonavita and Morelli and Selica that 
gives him prestige and the show distinction. 

There are a number of places on the Midway where the adroit and 
the daring bring thrills of intense excitement to the auditor. The 



107 




ONE OF BOSTOCK'S BEAUTIES 

AN AFRICAN GOLD COAST BOA 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY. 




SHEIK BCRMON 

THE HINDOO PIPTR 
--BOSTOCK'S ARENA 



strong man in the Streets of Mexico who holds with his unaided arms 
the prancing exertions of two horses in their attempts to break loose 
from heavy rope tied about his biceps, and the shooting in the Indian 
Congress by Winona of glass balls from the hat of her husband, 
California Frank, who faces a 38-calibre Winchester unflinchingly, cause 
short breaths during the performance and sighs of relief after, but 
neither, for brilliant personal exploit or prolonged suspense is compar- 
able with the daily efforts of Captain Bonavita and Madame Morelli, 
one the trainer of fifteen lions and the other the only living woman 
tamer of the most fractious and uncontrollable of wild beasts, the 
jaguars of South America. Bonavita's performance with his lions is 
marvelous in its exhibition of patience and personal mastery. Lion 
training is a science in which patience as infinite as the tact of a diplo- 
mat and nerve as unfailing as tempered steel are the requisites. There 
are no half successes. A slip of any nature means absolute defeat. A 
lion tamer is a personality of spectacular aplomb, and Bonavita is the 
best in the world. 

One peculiarity which pertains to no other class of show people 
except the cultured stars of the stage, which is noticeable in a real 
animal trainer, one who loves his work and pursues it with the ardor 
that only an artist possesses, is the disregard for fulsome notice and 
entire absorption in the work to be accomplished. These qualities are 
perhaps the most pleasing possessed by Morelli and Selica, the chief 
women cf the Bostock show. Morelli, "the lady of the jaguars" is 
quiet and modest. There is no evidence to be had from a casual glance 
at her that she is the bundle of concentrated lire and skillful, patient 
determination that she is shown to be in her appearances in the arena. 
She has made friends in exposition 
circles among the highest officials, 
and her work prompts a personal 
regard that is given over the foot- 
lights to magnetic influence. She 
c-ntc-rs with live jaguars, a slinking, 



BOSTOCK'S BABY 
ON HIS WHEEL 




110 




MIGHTY MEN OF THE MIDWAY GENTLEMEN SHOWMEN WHO AMUSE 
AND INSTRUCT MULTITUDES 



FRANK C. BOSTOCK 

THE ANIMAL KING 

A MAN OF UNBOUNDED COURAGE AND RESOURCE, BEFORE WHOM ANIMALS COWER, AND 
A COMMANDING AND PICTURESQUE PERSONAGE ON THE MIDWAY 




A NOVEL MIDWAY INVITATION TO PRESIDENT McKINLEY 

(OBVERSE) 

BOSTOCK'S LATEST NOVELTY. AN INVITATION TO THE PRESIDENT TO VISIT 

THE WILD ANIMAL ARENA UPON THE OCCASION OF HIS TRIP 

TO THE EXPOSITION 




A NOVEL MIDWAY INVITATION TO PRESIDENT McKINLEY 

(REVERSE) 

THE WORDING IS DONE BY THE BURNT LEATHER PROCESS, NOW SO FASHIONABLE, 
ON THE DRESSED SIDE OF A BEAUTIFUL LEOPARD SKIN 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE M 1 D W A 



DOGS 
DONKEYS 
AND MONKEYS 
AT BOSTOCK'8 







seemingly cowardly lot, feline and noiseless in their tread, and so sup- 
ple in joint and movement that they seem to be made of ligaments and 
flesh from which so substantial a frame work as is formed from bones 
has been omitted. She puts them through the paces of an involved 
act, charging them with a whip and compelling them frequently only 
with the sharp prongs of an iron fork to mount pedestals, dismount, 
leap on revolving balls and play teeter in sullen silence. It is nerve- 
wracking, usually, to both auditors and performer. 

Selica's graceful dancing among four lions has the novelty that is the 
great factor in the success of a Midway show. It is in the details of the 
performance that Selica is exquisite, for her entrance, her simplest 
movements about the arena, her apparently careless posing in the cal- 
cium that plays abont her in the evening, the subtle little taps of her 
pet, "Major," with the riding whip she carries, and, finally, her buoyant, 
facile exit put color and dexterity into it all. The clown is a part of 
the show, and there is a boxing kangaroo of almost human intelligence 
and sometimes more than human precision in the strength and certainty 
ol the blows he deals the man who stands up with him. There are 
other trainers, too, and latterly the 



.-.',- 



'st elephant in captivity, Jumbo 
II, late of his Majesty's service in 
India, man eater and howdah car- 
rier, a walking mountain that 
weighs nine tons. 



A CHARMER 
AT BOSTOCK'8 




114 



AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




INFANT INCUBATOR BUILDING 

CORNER OF THE MIDWAY AND MALL. A SCIENTIFIC INSTITUTION 
FOR THE REARING OF PREMATURELY BORN INFANTS 



Joseph Jefferson was affected almost to tears, after he had visited the 
incubators and seen children, still two or three months from the period 
that is required by nature for mature birth, cared for in warmth and cleanly 
nourishment, and so brought slowly to life and health. The thought that 
life could so become the product of science brought to him a flood of 
tenderness. It is a curious fact to be noted in an observation of the 
character of the people who are attracted to this peculiarly located show, 
that they are mostly women and the more thoughtful men, those who 
are taken chiefly with the subtle influences that are brought to bear on 
modern life. The morbidly curious come, too, and only the doorkeeper 
knows how many ignorant, poor women surrender the only quarter they 
spend on the Midway for a visit to the place. It is a scientific institu- 
tion for the safe rearing of prematurely born infants. 

" Is it worth the while ?" is the mental question that invariably first 
occurs. If he is asked, the attendant answers that Victor Hugo and 
Julius Caesar were infants such as are brought here. To call the highly 



INFANT 
INCUBATOR 



115 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 



polished metal machines, elaborately fitted with ventilating devices, and 
holding beribhoned infants on dainty pillows, "incubators" is a mis- 
nomer. The babies are not incubated, like the chicken from the egg in 
one of the kerosene lamp varieties of the poultry farm machine. They 
are taken at birth from mothers of low vitality, when the conditions of 
food and air make their survival quite impossible, placed safe behind 
plate glass and swathed in delicate flannels, and in that way reared into 




INCUBATOR APPARATUS 



normal babyhood. Yet the misnomer clings, and the excuse that is given 
for the placing of the name " Infant Incubators " over the door is that 
the entire establishment, and not the simple machines themselves, con- 
stitute the incubator. Yet nowhere does incubation occur, so that 
Hamlet's injunction to Ophelia about conception being a blessing is still 
a credit to Shakespeare's wisdom. 

Caesar and Hugo were saved by ordinary means, but thousands of such 

children have died, whose 
like are now rescued. The 
machines need no watching ; 
they take care of themselves, 
and this automatic principle 



PROFESSAH ALEXANDAH DONALDSON 

DEAN OF THE SPIELERS 

"FIFTY YEARS IN THE SERVICE, 8AH" 

INFANT INCUBATOR 




1 16 




SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



has added greatly to their efficiency. The former percentage of deaths 
alter premature birth was 86, and with the use of the new machines it is 15. 
Though a scientific display, the " incubator " does not dispense with 
Midway methods of advertising. It is the home of the renowned that 
is, renowned in Exposition circles Charles Alexander Donaldson, the 
dean of the outside talkers, an announcer who has served at every expo- 
sition since the London Crystal Palace in 1859. His persuasive, tender 
solicitation is one of the treats of the street. 




BABY QBATA 

SMALLEST INFANT EVER BORN WHO LIVED-WEIGHT, AT BIRTH, 2 LBS 9 OZ. 
LIFE CONTINUED BY INCUBATOR 



1 18 



A N - A M 



EXPO AT BUFFALO 




ROLTAIR'S HOUSE UPSIDE DOWN 

The highest development of optical illusion is reached in the house 
upside down. It would furnish, if anyone cared for finding scientific infor- 
mation in such a place, a wonderful study in the physical phenomena 
pertaining to optics. The sensory effect that is to be obtained from the 
observance of opposite mirrors arranged at an angle of sixty degrees, 
and reflashing the image of yourself and of the objects that surround 
you, contrasted with the imaginative effect, leads to close question into the 
actual value of many of the marvelous mechanical devices that operate in 
recent stagecraft. The employment of new principles has not been done 
for the very simple reason that in illusions there are no new principles, 
but the application of the old principles has never before had so elabo- 
rate and artistic a setting. A man of middle age, Henry Roltair, formerly 
a student with the magician, Herman the Great, and familiar with the 
work of the recent successful illusionists of France, is the designer of the 
inverted house. He says that he believes in making the inside of a show 
more attractive than the outside, and that the public is becoming more 
exacting of amusements, so that he thinks it shrewd business to make 
the place that he has so exquisite. 

Though the public gets its entertainment from the show and not from 



THE HOUSE 

UPSIDE 

DOWN 



119 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 

the ballyhoo, the advertising freaks that are used are as striking as any 
to be found on the street. The barker in front has a galvanized voice 
and a cast iron face, and Ki Yi, a hideously painted nondescript, worthy 
of the title of Barnum's " What-is-it?" is freak enough to be a twin. 
The two are brothers, one the ballyhoo, the other the barker, and both 
as brazen and bold as any pair on the Midway. 

After entering and ascending the stairs which seem down and down the 
stairs which seem up, the first exclamation is one of wonder, and then 
follows the invariable explanation, always amusing, for no man, espe- 
cially if a woman is with him, cares to be fooled by even so palpable an 
illusion. It is downstairs in what Roltair calls his Palace ot Illusions 
that bridegrooms and best fellows get stuck for an explanation. The 
spieler outside calls the upstairs "the labrynthine circumvolutions of 
mazy wonders," and he says that downstairs "the multiflexuous 
anfractuosities " to be seen will simply paralyze the imagination. The 
illusion certainly might have that effect on anyone whose imagination 
required a sledge hammer blow to be affected. 




ONE OF THOSE PATIENT WATER BUFFALOS PHILIPPINE VILLAGE 



120 






P A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BU-FFALO 




CLEOPATRA'S TEMPLE 

The Midway custom of patent medicine testimonials has its most 
ludicrous exposition in front of Cleopatra's temple. That it is intention- 
ally so is none the less amusing. A huge board announces "what 
celebrated people say about Cleopatra." Below is printed: 

" I have seen a great many sights, but never anything like this." 

Susan B. Anthony, sister of Mark Anthony. 

" I saw Lydia E. Pinkham, but she's not in it with Cleopatra." 

Dr. Mary Walker. 

"I will give a month's treatment free to anyone who can produce her 
equal." Dr. Munyon. 

"I have met many beautiful women in my practice, but think none 
can compare with Cleopatra." Dr. S. V. R. Pierce. 

Either the testimonial sheet or the ten-cent admission gets a good 
many, and the picture is supposed to be something that, as Sam Weller 
would say, "is werry fillin." It has enough pink flesh to be so for 
those inclined that way. It was done by Astley Cooper, the painter of 
the half nude "Trilby." 

121 



CLEOPATRA 



PAN-AM". EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




CHIQUITA'S PALACE 

WHERE SHE HOLDS COURT AND REIGNS SUPREME, DISPLAYING DIADEMS AND SPARKLIf 
GEMS, THE GIFT OF CROWNED HEADS AND OTHER "ROYALTIES" 



CHiQUITA " Chiquita " is Spanish for " Little One," and is the name chosen for 

Alice Xenda, perhaps the tiniest human being ever seen on earth, cer- 
tainly the most perfectly formed midget known to late generations. 
Dwarfs are usually foolish little men and women known to the sideshow 
world and the realm of the freak. Twisted hacks or abnormal growths 
mar their appearance, and their exhibition is often a pity rather than a 
reward to curiosity. But Chiquita is not like that. She is a dainty doll, 
a living person, seemingly carved by a supreme artist and then endowed 
with life. She is so tiny that in traveling three times around the earth 
she has never paid a cent of car fare. An attendant goes with her and 



122 



P A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 




CHIQUITA-THE DOLL LADY 

THE TINIEST TOT OF A LADY IN THE WORLD FULLY DEVELOPED 
AND A LITTLE BEAUTY 

she passes for an infant. She is the only grown person being 31 \vars 
old who has repeatedly passed through the Exposition gates without a 
ticket or a pass. She is not taller than the average child of a year and 
weighs but eighteen pounds, and she rides about in an automobile that 
is the smallest vehicle ever made, hardly large enough for a good-sized 
doll. She has a fortune, for she has made $100,000 exhibiting herself; 
she has beauty and she is popular. What more can she want? 



123 




ESAU-THE CONNECTING LINK 

A REMARKABLE CHIMPANZEE, WHOSE HABITAT 13 AT PRESENT ON THE SOUTH MIDWAY 



PAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




THE OLD PLANTATION AND ITS BALLYHOO 

There are two complete innovations in the exhibition of foreign life 
on the Midway, and both are quite essential to a Pan-American K\p<>- 
sition, for among all the curious peoples of the Western Hemisphere, 
aside from the Indians of the West, which were already more or less 
familiar through stage exploitation and printed fancy, these are the 
most interesting and offer the best inducements for spectacular present- 
ment. They are the picturesque and sunnily ecstatic people of modern 
Mexico, and the remnants of the jocular, careless serfs, who in the 
South before the war gave slavery the deceptive hue of contented and 
oft-times happy dependence. The Streets of Mexico and the Old Planta- 
tion are the results of a choice from among the available children of 
these luminously transparent localities. 

The Old Plantation has that which Mexico lacks, local interest, for school 
histories and the novels of a generation have given the American people a 
taste for more intimate knowledge of these transplanted blacks, whose 
pitiful history is a bitter memory, but whose cheerful life is a passing 



THE OLD 
PLANTATION 



125 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 



benediction. It is easy to pick up the colored people of the North and 
draught them into the show business, but the darkies of the South do 
not take as kindly to the public rouge box. They all love the beat of a 
bass drum and the limber-jointed abandon of a cake-walk, but the 
Southern negro is a stay-at-home darkey, not so much through dislike 
for publicity as through the inherent laziness that will not run the risk 
of a nomadic life. And consequently he is a more valuable acquisition 
than the somewhat machine-made coon of the variety stage, has more 
of the real ginger of genuine enjoyment and gives more correctly a 
picture of real Southern life. Negroes of this kind are those that the 
Old Plantation has, and it has a lot of them, who go through a half- 
hour's desultory program of uttered melody, shakedown and variety 
sketch. 

It is the exhibit of still life that is of more interest than the hilarious 
performances in the rustic theatre. The view from the entrance shows 
the vista of a southern cotton field, rich in white blooms and hazy with 
mellow air of a summer aiternoon. A monstrous, unwieldy old cotton 




THE LOG CABIN IN WHICH ABRAHAM LINCOLN WAS BORN 

OLD PLANTATION" 



126 



P A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 




THREE "CULLUD GEMMEN 

LAUGHING BEN AND HIS COMPANIONS IN AGE OLD PLANTATION 

press and a half-dozen log cabins, built with real logs and real cement 
mortar, are but the introduction to what might be the most hallowed 
relic on the Exposition grounds, the log cabin in which Abraham 
Lincoln was born, weather beaten, and stanchioned in necessary places 
with modern stays. Its presence strongly recalls the predicament that 
Mark Twain found in going the rounds of the European cathedrals, each 
of which had a piece of the cross that held Christ through the cruci- 
fixion. He did not question the authenticity of the relics, for each 
plainly bore the announcement that it was a part of the real cross from 
Calvary, but Twain said that after a while he wondered a little how 
Christ was able to carry all those pieces in one cross through the 
streets of Jerusalem that morning. And so the Abraham Lincoln cabin 
cannot be questioned, for the sign plainly announces what it is; but the 



127 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 




TYPICAL SOUTHERN NEGRO LOG CABIN 

FROM THE PLANTATION WHERE JEFFERSON DAVIS WAS BORN OLD PLANTATION 

wonder is occasioned as to how it was located, when no one is just sure 
yet as to exactly which county in Kentucky it was that Lincoln's 
father lived in. Beside it is not the cabin in which Jefferson Davis 
was born, but one of the cabins from the plantation on which Jefferson 
I);ivis was born, for Davis, himself, first lived in a mansion that was 
palatial compared to the backwoods hovel of Tom Lincoln. 

Further beyond, in a plot of red iron filings, is the home of Laughing 
Ben, the oddest negro ever seen. Ben is a prodigious mountain of 
merriment. Poke your finger at him and lie laughs, smile at him and he 
roars, laugh with him but gently and he doubles up in promiscuous peals 
of leviathan amusement that threaten to rupture the swelling black 
veins in his healthy neck. He laughs at nothing, at everything, and at 
all times, and the best part of the joke is that it is an uncontrollable, 
infectious glee that spreads and doubles back upon itself, giving visitors 
and Old Ben himself the hugest time for the least cause that is offered 
throughout the extent of the hilarious Midway. 



128 




PAN- AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




WILD WATER SPORTS BUILDING AND BALLYHOO 



There is a pool some ten feet deep and three times as many across, 
and hedged in by a high-reaching canvas background of painted woods 
and rocky glens, that form an autumn landscape, on the North Midway, 
just beyond the bend in the street. It is there that the wild water 
sports are given with more or less excitement. The spectacle 
of an antlered elk, full grown and handsome in its sleek coat of bro\\n, 
on a cliff, twenty feet above the pool, poised there for an instant and 
then plunging voluntarily into the shallow water below, is thrilling, and 
is followed by the wild boar chase by crimson-coated hunters, who 



WILD WATER 
SPORTS 



129 



SNAP SHOTS ON 




THE DIVING ELK MAKING THE HIGH DIVE 

--WILD WATER SPORTS 

plunge into the same pond, with the resulting surprise that comes from 
the willing dousing. 

Before the chase of the boar and the diving of the elk, one of the 
Midway's two intelligent horses, Trix, the other being Bonner, the 
black, gives an exhibition of her smartness. Trix is a mottled gray in 
color, and in physique is as well rounded as a petted and perfectly 
formed animal can be kept. She chooses colored handkerchiefs from 
the hand <>l her trainer, mounts an ei^hteen-inch pedestal, and con- 
cludes by counting the people on the first row of seats and announcing 
their number by the seizure of a lettered stick. The trick that is in it, 
one of a skilful use of the known proclivity of every animal to obey 
the prompting of habit, is not apparent, and the performance seems 
very marvelous. 



130 





THE WONDERFULLY EDUCATED HORSE "TRIXY" 

WILD WATER SPORTS 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 




AROUND THE WORLD NORTH MIDWAY 

MIDWAY Molasses, say the flies, is a very deceptive substance. It is attractive 

MOLASSES to the sight and to the taste, and the enjoyment of it is lasting until the 
time for stopping comes and then the tanglefoot detains. It is an 
embarrassing and usually a fatal situation to be placed in, but the fact 
that molasses is of that treacherous character does not prevent further 
investigation by more flies, and it is a fact which seems anomalous that 
the reputation of molasses in fly-world continues to be good and not shady. 
On the Midway all that is sweet is not molasses, but a good share of 
it is, and the Hies that are stuck seem to mind its application quite as 
little as do their prototypes among the insects, for they have two 
peculiarities in common; they continually return for a taste of the 



132 



A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 



confection and there are no exceptions to the 
molasses proclivity in all the species. 

The shows that smell of the sugar-cane also have 
some of the smut that destroys the usefulness of the 
molasses product. They are risque without being 
clever, and sometimes vulgar without indecency, and 
all of them are as patent in their intentions as the 
page testimonial "ads" in a daily newspaper, and 
most peculiar of all they are the most popular 
shows on the streets, handle larger crowds, take in 
more money and conclude the season by declaring 
dividends among shrewd investors that far outshine 
the financial results of the placing of works of art 
on the Midway. Such famous and valuable works 
as "The Fall of Babylon " or "The Saturnalia" 
gains one admission where ''Around the World" 
gets a hundred or even 




a thousand. 

A buxom girl in an 
abbreviated gown in the 
ballyhoo, a bit of ginger- 
bread decoration in the 
main hall, a lithograph of 
rouged and voluptuous 
beauties and a brazen 
barker constitute the 
stock in trade of the 
molasses attractions. 
The countrymen that 
may be egged in through 
curiosity, and the others 
who go because it is 
cheap, give the Midway 
much of its atmosphere of fake. It certainly 
improves the interest of the street, for the 
Midway would not be what it is without its 
double nature, like that of the chameleon, 
both transparent and deceptive. 

The ballyhoo beauties that proclaim the 
presence of dancing girls, in "Around the 




JULIETTE GARDINER 

THE AMERICAN DANCERAROUND THE WORLD 



LOLA COTTON 

THE CHILD MIND READER AND MATHEMATICIAN 
GYPSY CAMP 



133 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 



World" serve their time on the little platform in front of the show, 
while inside another four go through some improvised steps. The 
chief enticement is the artist's model, Isola Hamilton, " Beautitul 
in form and feature " says the announcer, as he dwells on the romantic 
history of the girl, who is allied to the British aristocracy. Her 
posing has the rudiment of artistic perception, though it frequently loses 
the right touch because of no practiced prompter. 

" The Girl From Up There " is so brief in her performance that it was 
thought necessary to precede her exhibition with several music hall bits. 
The girl herself becomes the background with a broad cloak she wears 
for the flashing of some very fine stereopticon views from richly painted 
plates. 

The Streets of Nations is a pocket edition of the Streets of Cairo, 
whose few dancing girls exhibit the couchee movement for less than is 
paid for the long performance in the Oriental Theatre. The latest 
molasses show is " She " quite a ludicrous innovation, the simplicity of 
whose fake io too good to be given away. 




THE BALLYHOO AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE GYPSY CAMP 



134 



PAN- AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 




ENTRANCE TO THE IDEAL PALACE 

In front of a place that is not strikingly palatial, with a very real and 
tawdry atmosphere surrounding it, on which is stencilled the words 
" Parisian Art Studio," a spieler, whose bland manners are as smooth as 
the silk hat he wears, reels off every half-hour a talk that is known on 
the Midway as "bull con." The Exposition closed the place early in 
the season, not because it was indecent, but because it was not up to 
grade in quality, and the publicity obtained from the incident has been 
worth many thousands of dollars to these men who understand the value 
of pandering to salacious taste. The spieler calls it a "Parisian Art 
Studio," and evidently thinks that anything will do that sounds like Paris, 
and probably he is right, for the attendance he draws does not come 
from those who know the ateliers, or from those who have heard of them. 
He explains that it is not considered immodest in artistic circles for 



THE 
IDEAL 



PALACE 



135 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY. 



STEORRA 

THE FLYING STAR 
DREAMLAND 





women to pose in the altogether, and adds as his most clinching argu- 
ment that " the most beautiful woman in America, Maxine Elliott, posed 
for the heroic Goddess of Light on the Electric Tower." He continues by 
saying that the young women inside were not troubled by the customs 
officials on their arrival in this country from France, that they did not 
bring extensive wardrobes packed in dress suit cases, that all they had 
could have been contained in an envelope, and a dainty envelope at that. 
He then says that it is not an entertainment for theological students or 
superintendents of Sunday schools, but that all intelligent people will 
welcome the opportunity to see real life. Those who are thus appealed 
to go in to find a cheap show of ordinary coarse display that hasn't 
even the virtue of being skilfully vulgar. 

DREAMLAND One of the most peculiar photographs ever taken 
was snapped in Dreamland. It mirrors one man from 
thirty two angles, taken at the same time, on one plate and by a snap 
shot. He faces himself in five of the figures and the whole looks like a 
squad of soldiers on parade. It was taken in the maze, the introduction 
to the illusionary show that is given later. The suspension of a girl in 
mid air, by means of an invisible teeter, is the chief feature. 



S30 




CORA BECKWITH 

CHAMPION WOMAN SWIMMER OF THE WORLD 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE M I D W A 



ENTRANCE TO 
CORA BECKWITH'S 
NATATORIUM 




CORA BECKWITH A woman with sleek hair as black as jet, with flesh as soft and 
pliable as that of a baby, whose form has been but the more deli- 
cately molded by its long caress with the water, and which, though a 
trifle stout, is yet in its full strength of a superb womanhood, her hands 
and feet prettily turned, and her shoulder and torso muscles as finely 
developed and as brawny as those of the most expert boxer, and whose 
eyes proclaim the delight she takes in physical exercise, spends nine 
hours daily in a shallow tank filled with four feet of water, and floats 
there as serenely as a lily on a pond. It is difficult to appreciate the 
marvels that Cora lieckwith exhibits. How anyone can spend one-third 
of the time in tepid water and stay tor two and three minutes beneath it, 
and with it all be as healthy as an athlete, is not comprehended as 
quickly as are the Hindoo tricks of some fakir. She has lived in water 
for forty days, twelve hours out of each twenty-four, and though she 
does not do as much on the Midway, the results she accomplishes make 
the recital of that history believable. 



138 




P A N - A M 



EXPO 



AT BUFFALO 



iR 




THE CHINESE DWARF IN THE BALLYHOO AT THE CARDIFF GIANT ENTRANCE 

When David Hannum, the farmer of Western New York who, in com- THE CARDIFF 
mon with all great men, little suspected the fame that was coming to him, GIANT 
or that his fictional biography would reach the half-million mark in sales 
when done into the form of a novel called " David Harum," listened to a 
proposal to bury the Cardiff giant on his farm and later dig it up for a 
real find, his shrewd calculation saw the money in it and he consented to 
put the great lump of Iowa gypsum, corroded with Chicago acid, under 
earth for a few years. When it was dug up it created as much of a sen- 
sation as did the Siamese twins or Barnum's " What Is It? ". It had its 
day with the public, and it grew so popular that almost every county 
fair had its own Cardiff giant. Meanwhile the real original fake was 
laid away in a barn in Connecticut, and there it stayed until this year, 
when it was resuscitated and brought to Buffalo. Here it is as proof 
that what the great American showman said about the humbug-loving 
people still has its big grain of truth. 

"A sight of everything " is what the Panopticon promises. It tries to MOORISH 

do this by picking out Shakespeare and Uncle Tom, Mozart and Dickens, PALACE AND 

General Lawton and a group of drinking Spaniards, Leo XIII and a PANOPTICON 
ridiculous old maid, reproducing their supposed appearance in dummy 



139 



SNAP SHOTS ON' THE MIDWAY 



wax and dressing them in appropriate garments, while a placard helps 
you to make no mistake in choosing Lawton for Dickens or Mozart for 
the old maid. The value of the place is in the correct idea that may be 
gained of the costuming of former periods, and in a very incomplete way 
of the physical appearance of great men. There is an elaborate attempt 
to picture the leading scenes in the life of Christ by means of plastic 
figures and paper mache scenery. 




THE EDUCATED HORSE, BONNER 

BONNER A horse worthy of the name of Bonner walks daily without guidance 
through a great red horseshoe and becomes his own ballyhoo. He is a 
beautiful creature, plain black with a wide band of white fastened 
around his middle, and he carries his head as proudly as a West Point 
cadet. No rein or whip or harness, other than the tugs that are neces- 
sary to draw the small cart he sometimes pulls about, ever hamper him, and 
he proves worthy of the trust that is shown, for he appears as intelligent 
as any ordinary driver that could be found. Bonner's arithmetical calcu- 
lations are the best ever accomplished by an animal. He can add a 
column of eight figures with three numbers in each row, and the result 
he gives is never askew unless the trainer on the stage happens to make 
a mistake. In that case he tries again. The training of an animal is a 
laborious and an infinitely patient operation, one that deserves the 
admiration that this performance gets. 



140 



PAN-AM. EXPO AT BUFFALO 




SOME OF THE BIRDS "OSTRICH FARM 

The Ostrich Farm may be set down as one of the instructive shows, THE 
for it makes no effort to be amusing; yet, in spite of its good intentions, OSTRICH 
the sight of the ungainly birds, all legs and neck, their hams bare and FARM 
their huge wings flapping in the wind, is ludicrous. Their meaningless 
method of running about the inclosure built for them in response to the 
coaxing of a brindled horse and his boy rider partially explains why 
the ostrich covers his head in the sand of the desert to hide from his 
enemies. There are two dozen fully grown ostriches in the quarter-acre 
farm, and outside the public gets a free view of two youngsters, twice 
the size of a full-grown hen. 

It might be a greater sensation to drop from the top of the electric THE 
tower than it is to shoot down the inclined spill of the scenic railway, SCENIC 
but it would not be as safe and it would be far from as pleasurable. RAILWAY 
That drop, the safe one, down to earth from a height near the skies is 
very much like a countryman's first trip on a swift elevator. Its a very 
personal feeling. Your heart drops to your boots, your boots rise to 
the pit of your stomach, your breath and your hat fly off together, and 
you grab the first object that is presented; it may be a girl or it may be 
a stanchion, and when you reach the bottom you're laughing hysteric- 
ally and shouting in uncontrollable glee. 

The quality of the sensation depends very much on the girl who is 



141 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE 



M I D W A 



with you. There are several dark tunnels, where the unrivaled splendor of 
the electric display outside might just as well be in Hindostan, for it has 
no effect on a wall of pine boards and three thicknesses of tarred paper. 
There is but one objection. Unless you've made the trip often and 
are familiar with it, light will flash from a little oblong hole in the side 
of the dark caverns, showing some scene from Siberia or New Jersey 
that is wholly uninteresting and quite impertinent to the affairs in 
hand. 

THE A gigantic teeter, the Aeriocycle, takes you an elevation of two hundred 

AERIOCYCLE and thirty-five feet and there suspends you in mid-air for ten minutes, 
where, if you are not nervous, you will get by a night ascent the most 
comprehensive view obtainable of the illumination of the Exposition and 
of the city. Next door, in the moon, there is a search light, the smaller 
brother ot the great light in the Electric Tower. It is a monstrous, 
unweildy shell of steel, a gnomish thing with a Cyclopean eye; a con- 
cave mirror its retina, a blinding, burning steady gleam of carbon its 
optic nerve and slashed bars of glass its iris. Under its light the crowd 
stands out like big splashes of ink on white paper. Around the ballyhoos 
it clusters in massive, gobby splotches, like huge, irregular bunches of 
malaga grapes, and occasionally it reaches past the Midway's entrance 
to the plaza, where the antiques are almost as thick as 
the people, and hovers about one, a Venus or a Her- 

cules, bathing it in a frozen halo that sets it out in 
opulent, low relief, paler than ivory. Then it dashes 
its erratic fire up and down the Midway in a seeming 
glee that is impish and gigantic. 

The illuminated Exposition below is as though the 
buildings had been poured in some vast alembic and had 
come out in a setting of fluid fire. The city beyond is 
like a mighty scarabseus, its hundred legs dipped in phos- 
phorous, sprawling there in the pale, misty moonlight, a 
palpitant glowing thing, half apologetic in its scrimpy 
niggardliness, mean and poor with that transcendent 
burst of brilliance on its outskirts. Away off down ti>\\n 
thrrr is a spiral of light, Hashing intermittent signals, a 
single ^leam of intelligence in all that vast expanse of 
den>e, black ignorance. 

Then from directly below floats some careless laugh- 
ter, and you reali/e that the panorama is fading a\\a\, 
that your bird's eye has lost its cunning, for the great 
wheel is descending and the voice of the spieler is 
again in the land. 

A MEMBER FROM THE OSTRICH FARM 



142 






THE ZANCIGS 

WONDERFUL MIND READERS 

A young man with a huge pair of lungs and a monstrous piece of 
glass on the end of a blowpipe is the ballyhoo for the Glass Factory. 
The display of the manufacture of glass is made by the National Glass 
Company, the trust that controls the output of the commodity, and it 
is complete. The furnaces and blowers are shown at work, and there 
are three foreign glass workers who design elaborate patterns. The 
delicate uses of glass which accomplish the making of dresses and of 
neck'ties for country visitors open the door to a study of a fascinating 
industry. 

The thought transference of the Zanzigs is remarkable mental tele- 
pathy. The booth is on the South Midway. To the north is the Gypsy 
Camp with another set of fortune tellers, and with the added attraction 
of a tarentella dancer. Lolla Cotton, the Infant Mind Reader, is also 
there. The Golden Chariots are an elaborate extension of the merry- 
go-round of the county fair, and Lubin's Cineometograph is a continuous 
performance of moving pictures. 



THE GLASS 
FACTORY AND 
OTHER SHOWS 



143 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



THE M en follow expositions as a business. The running of these mam- 

CONCESSIONER moth shows has almost become one of the professions. In the principal 
departments the line of advance is as surely marked, and the progress of 
an able man as certain, as it is in any of the experienced walks of life. 
Expositions now come so otten that a man may find almost continuous 
employment with them, and there is about the same fascination about 
it that there is about theatrical enterprises. The publicity attained 
has a glamour in it, and spectacular success finds sure reward in some 
more substantial employment. And there is also the lottery of it. No 
one can tell just what an exposition will do; no one knows how far a 
man may reach if he has the cunning or the luck to strike the right gait. 

The business men of the Midway are frequently of consequential 
origin, and are regarded as quite an estimable factor in the affairs of the 
exposition proper. During the opening months of the Pan-American it 
was a case of the tail wagging the dog, for the Midway jumped to 
the fore in the matter of prominence in the minds of the 
public. This resulted mostly from shrewd advertising, but was not 
entirely without its merit, for the street possesses the most varied and 
extensive list of amusement devices ever offered at one time to any 
public. It is as a show that an exposition chiefly appeals to the masses, 
and as the Midway is its show end it is not to be wondered at that it 
should strike the popular fancy. The Midway Day, managed by the 
Midway men and filled with their specialties, and, more than all else, 
advertised by their methods, brought the largest attendance that the 
Exposition had throughout its first half. 

The Midway concessioner is an ingenious and a shrewd man, and in 
several cases he is extraordinarily resourceful. Like all showmen he 
is fond of big type and superlative adjectives, and loves the roll of the 
"aire " with which he usually announces his interest in a concession. 
He is a "concessionaire," a sonorous something that is very much 
more important than a plain showman. 

Among the concessioners there are several men who have distinct 
claims to other consideration. There is the professional designer of 
Midway attractions, such as Frederic Thompson or Edward J. Austen. 
There is the illusionist, such as Henry Roltair, and there is the man \\lio 
has made his reputation along other lines and who brings to the Mid\v;iy a 
wealth of experience and a valuable personality. Such a man is Frank 
Bostock, the owner of the animal show. The director of amusements, 
such as Frederic Cummins of the Indian Congress, is a necessary part of 
the layout, and the capitalist certainly is. Most of the Midway's capital, 
which amounts to more than a million dollars, is subscribed by Buffalo 
business men, but some comes from the concessioners themselves. 
The most monied man on the Midway is Skip Dundy, who started at 




MIGHTY MEN OF THE MIDWAY GENTLEMEN SHOWMEN WHO AMUSE 
AND INSTRUCT MULTIUDES 



FREDERICK THOMPSON 

\NVENTOR OF THE AERIOCYCLE, INVENTOR AND MANAGER OF THE SHIP LUNA 

AND THE TRIP TO THE MOON. ARCHITECT OF THE FOLLOWING MIDWAY 

BUILDINGS: DARKNESS AND DAWN, MOORISH PALACE, GLASS WORKS, 

STREETS OF MEXICO, OLD PLANTATION, AROUND THE WORLD, WAR 

CYCLORAMA, CLEOPATRA, BEAUTIFUL ORIENT, HAWAIIAN THEATRE 

AND VOLCANO, HOUSE UPSIDE DOWN, DREAMLAND, GYPSY 

CAMP, PHILIPPINE VILLAGE, JOHNSTOWN FLOOD, BABY 

INCUBATORS, WILD ANIMAL ARENA, VENICE IN AMERICA, 

CHIQUITA, ESAU, JERUSALEMTHE CRUCIFIXION, 

WITH PABST'S AND LOWNEY'S THROWN IN 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE MIDWAY 



Nashville, cleared a good deal at Omaha, and came to Buffalo with enough 
to equip a half dozen shows. It is his money, mostly, that built A Trip 
to the Moon and Darkness and Dawn, and he entirely owns The Old 
Plantation, the Ariocycle, the horse Bonner and The Fall of Babylon, 
besides additional interests in several other places. E. W. McConnell is 
the general manager of eight of the largest and most expensive attrac- 
tions, known as the Red Star Route. The history of H. F. McGarvie 
is an unusual one. He was the director general of a San 
Francisco exposition held seven years ago, and at Omaha was the 
director of publicity through the concluding months of the fair. He 
came to Buffalo to take charge of the Bureau of Publicity, but fell out 
with the management, and in a moment of inspiration conceived the 
scheme of The Streets of Mexico. 

Most of these men began small at other expositions and have now 
become influential. Frederic Thompson was an employee at the World's 
Fair in Chicago; in Buffalo he has designed all but five of the Midway 
shows and is one of the chief men. There is the concessioner of small 
bits, who waits until the last half of the show, when he knows the 
crowd is coming, and who then rents some jagged piece from a big con- 
cession, costing perhaps thousands of dollars, puts on a show costing a 
few hundred, and takes out more money at the end of the season than is 
earned by his neighbor. Such a case is that of Rhodes and Milligan, 
spielers for the Indian Congress, who rented a small space in front ol 
the Spectatorium of Jerusalem, spent $300 on scantling and bunting for 
the decoration of a booth for the exhibit of " She," charged ten cents 
for a sight of her, and took in more money than did the Spectatorium, 
whose cost was $30,000, and whose front is twenty times that of " She." 
These are the little men of the Midway. In time they may be as mighty 
as the big ones. 





MIGHTY MEN OF THE MIDWAY GENTLEMEN SHOWMEN WHO AMUSE 
AND INSTRUCT MULTITUDES 

E. S. DUNDY 

"THE POWER BEHIND THE THRONE" 

PROPRIETOR AND MANAGER OF THE OLD PLANTATION AND "TREASURER " OF 
MANY MIDWAY SHOWS 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE 



M I D W A 







DOC WADDELL 

THE PRE-EMINENT PRESS AGENT OF THE MIDWAY, 

OF WIDE EXPERIENCE AND FERTILE RESOURCE 

INDIAN CONGRESS 

THE The Midway would be no Midway without the press agent. He is 

PRESS AGENT peculiar to the show business, and the very best that that most ardent 
foster parent of genius has produced are drafted by the Midway places. 
A press agent must have, first of all, personal qualities, for he meets 
and entertains all the newspaper men that come. Newspapers are 
the life of the Midway. Without them the street would be barren indeed, 
and the men who write for them are the most difficult of all men to 
please. They are the press agent's prey, and he knows more than to 
stalk them with a blunderbuss. His tact and resource must be inlinite. 
He must have affability and patience. More than all else, he must have 
imagination, for something sensational must be forthcoming every day, 
whether that something really happens or not. And he must have dis- 
cretion, for newspaper men, though gullible on occasion, do not accept 
(\rrything for its pretension. They usually know a hawk from a 
handsaw. If he has a little literary ability so much the better, for In- 
then can make readable matter for outside papers; but that really is 
not of great importance, for it is more difficult to get space in a ne\vs- 



148 





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SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWA 



paper than it is to find something with which to fill it. Two qualities 
put Doc Waddell among the first of the Midway press agents. He is per- 
sonally agreeable and he has imagination. His is not the mechanical 
politeness that may be found in most of the pleaders for favor, but is 
of a very personal kind, one that makes a friend of a man for keeps. 
He has a fertile imagination. An idea is an extraordinarily valuable 
thing in newspaperdom, and Doc Waddell is never at a loss for one. 
The only first name h'e has is "Doc." He came by it when traveling 
with a one-ring circus in Indiana, when he mixed a salve that would 
cure snake bites. 

A BOISTROUS A confetti night finds the Midway in its most boistrous disposition. 

NIGHT ON Such a night comes rarely, only when the crowd is large and warmed 

THE MIDWAY into a gala spirit by the festival happenings of the day. Then the 
barriers of reserve are down and a common cause of rollicking mischief 
prompts promiscuous fun. American confetti is not like the Italian kind. 
It is made of paper, multicolored and chopped into fine, square bits, 
while the other is of flour and powdered sugar. Staid Americans, having 
little of the abandon of the South where the Mardi Gras holds high revel, 
nor with the ecstatic effervescense of the mirth makers on Neapolitan 
carnival nights, find paper plenty dangerous enough for play, and are not 
willing to sacrifice clothes and comfort for the more hilarious throwing 
of sticky confections. The paper breeds mischief enough though, for 
some are unable to enter into the license that the larger part enjoy, and 
the temper that they show does not spoil the fun, but merely increases it. 
The romping begins early, shortly after the unrivaled splendor of the 
Exposition beyond has broken into the night to keep company with the 
already illumined Midway, and while the shadows of some glorious 
sunset are being obscured by myriad incandescents. You can stand half 
way down the north Midway and get the full brunt of the flowing tide of 
light-hearted gaiety. It sweeps past in a resistless, onward flood of 
blithesome frolic, careless of manners and observant of few decorous 
laws. Some girl, perfumed and daintily dressed, is peppered from two 
sides with handfuls of the billowy stuff, and the folds of her dress are 
filled with little hillocks of downy paper. She coughs and gets some in 
her mouth, flushes, grows angry a bit, then finds her escort smiling and 
twenty others loudly laughing, finally concludes to enjoy the joke, too, 
puts a quarter into the hands of the nearest Dago for a supply of the 
hilarity, and goes off down the street doing to others as she was done by. 
Thousands break their compunction in the same way, and by the time the 
lights of the Exposition are out there is the buoyancy of irresistible 
laughter throughout the street, sweeping into the lobbies of the spec- 
tacular shows and entering the dance halls, where its accelerated mirth 



150 



PAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 



finds wildest expression in uncontrollable shuttlecock and battledore. 
Grown men forget their dignity, and portly ladies lose their air of aplomb. 
Boys pelt everybody with the sifty confetti and carry the sport so tar 
that the steam engendered cannot find a let until long after the time 
when the police are anxious for the din to cease, and when even the 
restaurants are waiting for a chance to close. 

After midnight, when the crowd thins out, the shouts of laughter are 
isolated but more pronounced. They burst out in loud peals of tipsy 
merriment, and the occasional rush of some closely clinging petticoat 
toward the western gate tells of memories suddenly awakened to find 
that the new day is Sunday. You brush the confetti from the available 
portions of your clothes, though the last of it will be emptied from 
your pockets weeks afterward, and straighten up to find that merely the 
scattered arc lights are there to pilot you out. From behind the impas- 
sive sphinx of the Orient come the rising strains of the Marseillaise, 
rolling from the loosened throats of some Algerian French, and beyond, 
the night sounds of the crickets give a setting of disturbing comment to 
the last remnant of the great day. The Electric Tower, lit for the 
street sweepers long after midnight a prodigal waste of brilliance, 
like the low tavern revels of Edmund Kean and Brutus Booth, when 
genius was squandered as desert air stands there rebukingly strong 
and majestic in the moist moonlight, rising in proud dominance over the 
nearly expired Midway below, an etching of fire on a background of 
stars and black night. In passing it you leave the Midway with its fulsome 
noise and its babel of tongues, with its folly and its splendor, its riot 
and its extravagance, and creep silently home to bed. 




151 




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AN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 



Terms. 



BALLYHOO. The outside performance used on the street to attract 
attention to the show; supposed to be a sketch of what is given inside, 
but frequently it has no relevancy to anything but promiscuous and 
conscienceless advertising. 

BARKER. A street shouter whose verbal din calls attention to the 
show. He is not to be confounded with the spieler. 

SPIELER. The man in front who secures the attention of the paasers-by 
to what there is inside. He uses the ballyhoo as an object lesson. He 
is discerning, observant, witty, quick, a fluent talker, leathern-lunged 
and high-salaried. 

MIDWAY SOBRIQUETS. Lane of Laughter, Rue de Folie, Street of 
Song, Mile of Mirth, the Whirlpool. 

FLYING THE GOOSE. A newspaper term for seeing the Midway all 
or nearly all of the shows; also called " Doing the street " and "Shoot- 
ing the Rapids." 



153 



PAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFAL 

Indejc 1o Contents. 






PAGE. 

Aeriocycle 142 

Alt Nuremberg 86 

Beautiful Orient 75 

Boisterous Night on the Midway 150 

Bonner 140 

Bostock's Animal Show 105 

Cardiff Giant 139 

Chiquita 122 

Cleopatra 121 

Cora Beckwith 138 

Cyclorama of Mission Ridge 42 

Dances in Darkest Africa 30 

Darkest Africa 71 

Darkness and Dawn 50 

Dawson City 52 

Dreamland 136 

Esquimau Village 87 

Fair Japan 93 

Fall of Babylon 45 

Filipino Village 83 

Filipino Dances 16 

Girl from Up There 134 

Glass Factory 143 

Golden Chariots 143 

Gypsy Camp 143 

Hawaiian Village 80 

Hawaiian Dances 17 

House Upside Down 119 

Ideal Palace 135 

Illustrated Title Page 3 

Infant Incubators .. . 115 



154 



SNAP SHOTS ON THE MIDWAY 



Index to Contents Continued. 

Indian Congress 63 

Indian Dances 14 

Index to Illustrations 1 :> ; 

Johnstown Flood 43 

Lubin's Cineometograph 143 

Mexican Dances 10 

Midway Molasses \'.W 

Moorish Palace and Panopticon 139 

Native Villages 57 

Old Plantation 125 

Oriental Dances 17 

Ostrich Farm 141 

Saturnalia 101 

Scenic Railway 141 

Spectacular Attractions 37 

Spectatorium of Jerusalem 54 

Streets of Mexico 57 

Streets of Nations 134 

The Schuhplattl 34 

The Tarantella 34 

The Concessioner 144 

The Press Agent 148 

The Torture Dance 23 

Trip to the Moon 37 

The Zanzigs 143 

Venice in America 9 

Volcano of Killauea . . "- 

Wild Water Sports 129 



155 




PICKANINNIES AT CRAPS 
OLD PLANTATION 



PAN-AM. EXPO. AT BUFFALO 



Indejc to Illustrations. 



PAQB. 

Abraham Lincoln, Log Cabin 126 

Abouk Youssef and Son Sallini 74 

A Charmer at Rostock's 114 

A Fair Inhabitant of Fair Japan 93 

African Gold Coast Boa 109 

African Goldsmith 72 

Akoun, Gaston 79 

Akoun's Beautiful Orient 6 

An Elephant Class 106 

An Early Afternoon Hour 75 

Approach to the Castle of the Man in the 

Moon 38 

Apelika 88 

Around the World 132 

At the Gates of Cairo 75 

At the Entrance to Beautiful Orient 159 

Baby Qbata 118 

Baccarak, Constans de 73 

Bostock, Frank C Ill 

Bostock's Baby Elephant on his Wheel. . . 110 
Bostock's Trained Wild Animal Arena. . . . 104 

Brawleo Barbaya 83 

Bryan, Wm. Jennings 69 

Carmen 76 

Carolina Delgardo 10 

Ceremonial Tea 93 

Chief Black Heart 69 

Chief Blue Horse 69 

Chief Little Wound 69 

Chief Lone Bear 69 

Chief OgoulaWoury 28 

Chiquita, the Doll Lady 123 

Chiquita's Palace 122 

Cleopatra's Temple 121 

Columba Quintano 11 

Cora Beckwith's Natatorium 138 

Corner Battlement Alt Nuremberg 87 

Cummins, Frederick T 65-70 

Dawson City 53 

Defiance Dance of the Iroquois 12 

Devil's Throne 50 

Dismounting 80 

Diving Elk Making the High Dive 130 

Donaldson, Professah Alexandah 116 

Dogs, Donkeys and Monkeys 114 

Dundy, E. S .. 147 

Entrance to Darkness and Dawn ... 103 and 47 

Entrance to Fair Japan 94 

Entrance to Hawaiian Village 51 

Entrance to Ideal Palace 135 



PAGE. 

Entrance to Johnstown Flood 45 

Entrance to Spectatorum of Jerusalem. . 56 

Esau The Connecting Link 134 

Expectation 86 

Fall of Babylon . . 46 

Fatma ^i 

Fatiina 19 

Female Types 71 

Freak Race 149 

Geronimo 65 

Geisha Girls '.> 

Giant Nuremberg Guard 86 

Group of African Dancers 26 

Group of Inhabitants of Mexico 8 

Group of Sioux Chiefs 66 

Grover Cleveland 77 

Gypsy Camp Ballyhoo 134 

Hawaiian Beauty 146 

Hawaiian Troubadours 81 

Hobson. Captain 65 

Holy Moses 78 

Illustrated Title Page 3 

Incubator Apparatus 116 

Infant Incubator Building 115 

Indian Kindergarten 64 

Interior of Infant Incubator 117 

Interior of Philippine Village 85 

Introducing Renowned Chiefs 66 

Isola Hamilton 13-36 

Jack Bonavita and his Pyramid of Lions.. 108 

John Baker <:$ 

Joseph and his Donkey 78 

Juliette Gardiner 133 

La Belle Rosa 152andl60 

La Mora 1 

Lea Delapierre 99 

Llaverito and his Bull Fighters 58 

Little Patti 99 

Lola Cotton 188 

Marie Dulmont TJ 

Marie Dulmont and Lea Delapierre 88 

Mile. Dodo 29 

McGarvie, H. F 60 

Member from the Ostrich Farm 142 

Mostly Squaws 14 

Native Cart, Filipino Village 83 

Native Kayak 91 

Natives of the Esquimau Village 90 

North Midway 2 

North Midway from Alt Nuremberg 15 



157 



SNAP SHOTS 



O N 



THE M I D W A 



Index to Illustrations Continued. 



PAGE. 

.. 112 
113 

30 
48 
63 



Novel Midway Invitation, Obverse 

Novel Midway Invitation, Reverse 

Nubian Dancers 

On the North Midway 

On the Trail 

One of Bostock's Beauties 109 

Old Plantation and its Ballyhoo 125 

Olupa Dancers 18 

Philippine Dancers 17 

Pickaninnies at Craps 156 

Plaza de Toroi 59 

Polatie, the Strong Man 78 

Porthole into Purgatory 49 

Princess Esteeda and Pan Anna. . 67 

Princess Stellita 35 

Principal Gondola Landing 97 

Roltoir's House Upside Down 119 

Saturnalia 102 

Sheik Bernon 110 

Sitalia 9 

Silica, the Lion Tamer 105 

Singalese Drummer 20 

Singalese Stick Dancers 24 

Some of the Birds Ostrich Farm 141 

Sophie Sobieskie 34 

South Midway 4 

Streets of the City of the Moon 39 

Steorra 136 

Streets of Mexico, Ballyhoo at the En- 
trance to 56 

Sweet Memories of Venice 101 



PAGE. 

Tall Red Bird 62 

Tatu Pecarahe 31 

The Chinese Dwarf 139 

The Ed ucated Horse, Bonner 140 

The Eloquent One-Legged Lecturer 63 

The Esquimau Village 89 

The Italian Adonis 101 

Three Cullud Gemmen 127 

Tobin, W. Maurice 82 

The Jinrikisha 95 

The Ladies and the Elephant 77 

The Mexican Band 7 

The Moon Calf 37 

The Prize-Fighting Kangaroo 107 

The Stringed Orchestra 100 

The Zanzig's Ballyhoo 143 

Throne Room, Palace of the Man in the 

Moon 41 

Thompson, Frederick 145 

Torture Dancers 22, 23 

Typical Southern Log Cabin 128 

Venice in America 98 

Waddell, Doc . . . 148 

Water Buffalo 81-120 

War Dance of Cape Lopez Blacks . . 27 

Winona 61-67 

Wild Water Sports Building and 

Ballyhoo 129 

Within Alt Nuremberg 88 

Yamina 25 

Youthful Acrobats of Fair Japan 96 




HULA HULA GIRLS 

HAWAIIAN VILLAGE 




LA BELLE ROSA 

BEAUTIFUL ORIENT 



INDEX TO CONTENTS, PAGE 154. 

INDEX TO ILLUSTRATIONS. PAGE 157. 



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