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Full text of "Society of the Sons of the Revolution in the State of Michigan"

Gc 

973.3406 
S6m3y 
1916-23 
1752853 



/ 



ftHYNOLDS HISTORlCMu 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 00084 8264 



Digitized by tlie Internet Arcliive 

in 2010 witli funding from 

Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center 



http://www.archive.org/details/societyofsonsofr19161923sons 



„YEAR BOOK 
MICHIGAN SOCIETY 
SONS^OHE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 




COMPILED BY 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE 

Secretary 

1729 Ford Boildlng 

Detroit, Michigan 



X y-^iccfe3' 



, . MICHIGAN SOCIETY 
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 




J^^^ 



YEAR BOOK 
1916 



.'hC- 



OFFICERS OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY, 
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



1916-1917 



CLARENCE MONROE BURTON ■ 
President 

JACOB SHAW FARRAND, JR. 
Vice-President 

RAYMOND ELMOINE VAN SYCKLE 
Secretary 

^ FRANK GOFF SMITH 
Treasurer 

FRANKLIN SMITH DEWEY 
Registrar 

CHARLES MOORE 
Historian 

REV. JOSEPH ADDISON VANCE. D. D. 
Chaplain 



DELEGATES TO THE CONGRESS OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETY 

Richard H. Fyfe, Delegate-at-Large 
George H. Barbour, Detroit Warren W. Florer, Ann Arbor 

J. Remsen Bishop, Detroit Charles C. Follmer, Grand Rapid* 

Edward W. Bissell, Detroit Albert M. Henry, Detroit 

William M. Finck, Detroit Williani Judeon, Grand Rapid* 

Edward C. Parsons, Kalamazoo 



Alternate Delegate* 



Kendall P. Brooks, Mt. Pleasant 
Junius E. Beal, Ann Arbor 
Fred H. Begole, Ma»-quette 
George W. Bisaell, Lansing 
Burt D. Cady, Port Huron 



James M. Crosby, Grand Rapids 
Edwin Denby, Detroit 
George A. Loud, Bay City 
Edwin O. Wood, Flint 
Wilbert H. Barrett, Adrian 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



John P. Antisdel, Detroit 
John E. Baker, Detroit 
Frederick J. Baldwin, Munising 
Levant E. Bedell, Romeo 
Hugh C. Chedester, Detroit 
Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, Detroit 
Norman B. Conger, Detroit 
Horace K. [>ickin»on, Detroit 



William P. Holliday, Detroit 

Dr. Stephen H. Knight, Detroit 

Leroy E. Perine, Detroit 

Charles N. Remington, Grand Rapids 

Charles M. Turner, Lansing 

Arthur J. Tuttle, Detroit 

Charles M. Woodruff, Detroit 



The Officers of this Society, and the Delegates to the Congress of th< 
National Society, ex-officio. 



MEMBER BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF NATIONAL SOCIETY 

Albert M. Henry, Detroit 



OFFICERS OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY SINCE ITS ORGANIZATON 

Presidents 

Henry B. Ledyard 1690-1897 

Thomas \y. Palmer 1897-1901 

Alfred Russell 1901-1903 

Thomas Pitts 1 903- 1 905 

Rufus W. Clark 1 905- 1 908 

Richard H. Fyfe 1908-1909 

Frank D. Taylor 1909-1911 

Lee S. McCollester 1911-1912 

Joseph Greusel 1912-1913 

Albert M. Henry 1913-1916 

Clarence M. Burton i 1916- 

Vice-Pressdents 

William H. Brearley 1 890- 1 893 

Richard Storrs Willis 1893-1900 

Alfred Russell . . 1900-190! 

Thomas Pitts 1901-1903 

Rufus W. Clark 1 903- 1 905 

John N. Bagley 1 905- 1 907 

Richard H. Fyfe 1907-1908 

Almon B. Atwater 1908-1909 

Albert M. Henry 1 909- 1910 

•Charles E. Baxter ^...1910-1911 

Joseph Greusel 1911-1912 

Gen. Charles A. Coolidge 1913-1915 

Clarence M. Burton 1915-1916 

Jacob S. Farrand, Jr 1916- 

Secretaries 

Frederick T. Sibley 1890-1893 

Henry S. Sibley 1 893- 1905 

Rufus G. Lathrop | 905- 1 908 

Williams C. Harris 1908-1913 

Raymond E. Van Syckle 1913- 



Registrars 

Silas Farmer ■ 1890-1692 

William F. H. Edwards 1892-1897 

George W. Bates. ' 897-1 905 

Norman B. Conger 1905-1908 

Charles E. Baxter. • 1908-1909 " 

Raymond E. Van Syckle 1909-1913 

Franklin S. Dewey 1913- 

Treasurers 

Silas Farmer 1890-1892 

William F. H. Edwards 1892-1897 

George W. Bates 1897-1899 

Edward W. Gibson 1899-1905 

Enoch Smith 1905-1915 

Frank C Smith 1915- 

Historians 

James C. Smith. . 1899-1 905 

Joseph Greusel I 905-1 908 

Clarence M. Burton 1908-1915 

Charles Moore '915- 

Chaplains 

Rev. Nehemlah Boynton, D. D 1899-1903 

^ev. Lee S. McCoUester. D. D ...1903-1908 

Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D. D ^...1908-1909 

Rev. Lee S. McCollester, D. D 1909-1911 

Rt. Rev. Charles D. Williams, D. D. 1911-1913 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D 1913- 



BIOGRAPHIES OF STATE OFFICERS • 

MICHIGAN SOCIETY SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

CLARENCE MONROE BURTON. President. 

Clarence Monroe Burton, National No. 17213, Michigan No. 488, elected 
president at the annual meeting May 10, 191^, was born in California, 
November 18, 1853. He graduated from the University of Michigan, which 
has conferred upon him the following degrees: B. S. (1873), LL. B. (1874) 
and M. A. (1905). He is a lawyer and abstractor. He has served as 
member of the Board of Education, member of the Charter Commission, 
member of the State Constitutional Convention, and is also much interested 
in historical matters, having served as president of the Michigan Pioneer 
and Historical Society and member of the Michigan State Historical Com- 
mission. He is the donor of the Burton Historical Library to the city of 
Detroit. Mr. Burton is a member of the faculty of the Detroit College of 
Law. 

His membership in this society is based on his descent from Samuel 
Clark, major of Ulster County, New York Militia (his great-great grand- 
father). Mr. Burton was admitted to membership July 5, 1905; elected 
member of the Board of Managers, 1906-1907; historian, 1908-1915; 
vice-president, 1915-1916. 

JACOB S. FARRAND. JR.. Vice-President 

Jacob S, Farrand, Jr., of Detroit, National No. 3180, Michigan No. 130, 
elected vice-president May 10, 1916, was born in Detroit, June II, 1857, 
and is a graduate of the Detroit High School. He is a director of the Old 
Detroit and First National Bank and secretary-treasurer of Farrand, Wil- 
liams & Clark. 

l^e is the great-grandson of Bethue'^; Farrand, Morris County, New Jer- 
sey Militia, and was admitted to membership April 4, 1896, He was 
elected Delegate to the National Congress 1905-1906, member of the Board 
of Managers 1907, 1908, Delegate to National Congress again 1909 and 
1912. 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE, Secretary. 

Raymond E. Van Syckle, National No. 15650, Michigan No, 475, was 
born in Bay City, August 24, 1868. He graduated from the University 
of Michigan, B. S. (1891), M. S. (1895), LL. B. (1895). He is an attor- 
ney-at-law and a professor of law at Detroit College of Law. He has served 
the city as a member of the Board of Estimates, has been secretary of the 
Lawyers* Club and treasurer of the University of Michigan Club of Detroit. 

He was admitted to this society November 28, 1904, by reason of hi» 
descent from Timothy Corbin, 5th Worcester County, Mass. Militia (hie 



great-great grandfather). He was elected member of the Board of Man- 
agers 1907-1908, Registrar 1 909- 1 9 1 2, and Secretary 1913-1916. Mem- 
ber of Committee on Military and Naval Records, National Society 1913. 

FRANK GOFF SMITH, Treasurer. 

Frank Goff Smith, National No. 26798, Michigan No. 723, was born 
in Milwaukee, V/is., Sept. 2, 1871; educated Detroit High School. He is 
vice-president of the Old Detroit and First National Bank and has served 
as a member of the Michigan State Naval Brigade, 

He derives his eligibility in this Society from the fact that he is the 
great-great grandson of Thomas Pool, Col. David Green's Mass. Regiment, 
and great-great grandson of Col. Eli Willard of Mass. Militia. He v/as 
admitted to this Society March 23, 1915, and elected Treasurer, which 
office he has held since that time. 

FRANKLIN S.MITH DEV/EY, Registrar. 

Franklin Smith Dewey, National No. 18318, Michigan No. 518, was 
born in Cambridge, Lenawee County, March 27, 1845. Graduate Univer- 
sity of Michigan, B. S. (1869), M. S. (1872). Secretary National Casualty 
Company; former principal High School, Saginaw; superintendent of 
schools, Alpena; also member Board of Education, Alpena. 

His revolutionary ancestors were his great-grandfathers Simon Dewey 
2d, ensign in Colonel Chase's New Hampshire Regiment; Peter Selleck, 
private in Colonel Charles Webb's Conn. Regiment; Ezekiel Sniilh, cor- 
poral in Colonel John Lamb's Mass. Regiment; William Knight, in coast 
defense; and his great-great grandfather Isaac Bridgman, private in Colonel 
Chase's New Hampshire Regiment. He was admitted to membership No- 
vember 27, 1907; elected Delegate to National Congress in 1910; served 
as member of the Board of Managers, ^1911-1912; and as Registrar from 
f9r3 to date. ^ 

CHARLES MOORE, Historian. 

Charles Moore, National No. II435, and Michigan No. 569, was born 
at Ypsilanti, October 20, 1855. He graduated Harvard A. B. (1878), and 
was given M. A. (1898), and received from Columbian University, Wash- 
ington, Ph. D. in I 900. Author and historian. 

He was' secretary to U. S. Senator McMillan 1699-1902; was secretary 
of the Michigan Historical Commission, and the Michigan Pioneer and His- 
torical Society, and is now director of the Art Museum, Detroit. 

He is the grandson of John McAllister, private New Hampshire troops; 
and great grandson of James Aiken, captain New Hampshire troops. Lie 
was admitted to Michigan Society by transfer from the District of Columbia 
Society, June 15. 1909. 



He served as a member of the Board of Managers 1911-19.12, and was 
elected Historian 1915. 

REV. JOSEPH A. VANCE. D. D.. Chaplain. 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D., National No. 22604, Michigan No. 623, 
was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., November 17, 1864. He was grad- 
uated from Kings College A. B. (1885) and from Union Iheological Sem- 
inary B. D. (1888). He received the degree of D. D. from Huron College 
(1902) and from Kings College (1904). Formerly pastor of Hyde Park 
Presbyterian Church, Chicago; pastor First Presbyterian Church, Detroit. 

His eligibility is derived from his great-great grandfathers Patrick 
Vance, private, 4th Company, 1st Battalian, Cumberland County, Penn., 
Militia, under Colonel Johnson, and Robert Sevier, captain North Carolina 
Militia, mortally wounded at Kings Mountain. 

Dr. Vance was received into this Society by transfer from Illinois 
December 27, 1911, to which society he was elected December 15, 1910. 
He served as a member of the Board of Managers 1912, and as Chaplain 
since 1913. 

ALBERT McKEE HENRY 

Member of the Board of Trustees of the National Societly. 

Albert McKee Henry, National No. 3153, Michigan No. 103, born in 
Grand Rapids, September 20, 1845, graduated University of Michigan, B. S. 
(1867), M. S. (1870). Admitted to the bar at Omaha, Neb., where he 
practiced from 1869-1875, until his removal to Detroit. He has served as 
member of the Common Council, Board of Estimates, State Board of Par- 
dons, Chairman Education Committee of the Board of Cmmerce. 

He is a great grandsn of Eli Brownson, lieutenant Vermont Militia, and 
was admitted to this Society October 25, 1895; elected Delegate to the 
National Congress 1906, 1907, 1908, and 1912; Vice-President 1909, and 
President 1913-1916. 

Chairman of Committee on Arrangements fcr 28th Annual Congress 
of the National Society, 1916; chairman Committee on Organization (Mis- 
sissippi Valley-East) National Society, 1915-1916; member of the Execu- 
tive Committee National Society, 1914 to date; member of the Board of 
Trustees of the National Society, 1910-1917; member of Credentials Com- 
mittee of the National Society, 1912; member of Committee on Finance 
of the National Society, 1911. 



COMMnTEES FOR 19161917 
MICHIGAN SOCIETY, SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Membership 

Norman B. Conger, Frederick T. Harward, John D. Wiley, George E. 
Buehnell, Walter C. Boynton, George £. Hawley, Charles A. Merrell, Charl=» 
F. Law»on, Detroit; Chas. N. Remington, Frederick K. Tinkham, Grand 
Rapids; Dr. Wm. A. Stone, Kalamazoo; Wolcott H. Butler, Ajsn Arbor; Dr. 
Sheridan E. Gardiner, Mt. Pleasant. 

P.-\triotic Education 

George W. Patterson, Junius E. Heal, Shirley W. Smith, Warren W. 
Florer, Harry N. Cole, Ann Arbor; J. Rsmsen Bishop, Benjamin F. Com- 
fort, Edwin L. Miller, Detroit; Henry Whiting, St. Clair; Fred H. Begole, 
Marquette; Edward C. Hinmaa, Battle Creek; George W. Bissell, Lansing; 
Kendall P. Brooks, Mt. Pleasant; Frederick L. Bliss, Jackson; Lee E. Anii- 
don, Chicago; Rev. Lee S. McCollester, Tufts College; George D. Hadzits, 
Philadelphia; William Alden Smith, Jr., Grand Rapids. 

Americanizatioa of Alien* 

Edward C. Parsons, Kalamazoo; Loyal E. Knappen, Grand Rapids; Al- 
bert M. Henry, Arthur J. Tuttle, George S. Hosmer, Frederic B. Smith, 
George FI. Barbour, Charles A. Ducharme, Roy D. Chapin, J. Walter Drake, 
Paul F. Bagley, William M. Finck, Detroit; Walter F. Newberry, Mt. Pleas- 
ant. 

Patriotic Legislation 

William Judaon, Claude Hamilton, Grand Rapids, Burt D. Cady, Port 
Huron; Nathaniel H. Stewart, Kalamazoo; Frank W. Fletcher, Alpena; Philip 
T. Colgrove, Hastings; Crawford S. Reilly, Cheboygan; Edwin O. Wood, 
Flint; Frederick J. Baldwin, Munising; James D. Jerome, William S. Sayres, 
Jr., Detroit. 

Historical 

Charles Moore, William Stocking, Andrew C. Wood, Edward "W^ Stod- 
dard, Dudley W. Smith, Louis C. Rogers, Detroit; Lucius Boltwootf,*^^^rand 
Rapids: Allen B. Morse, Ionia; Dr. Ralph E. Balch, Kalamazoo; Harry G. 
Miller, Mt. Peasant. 

Memorials 

Van A. Wallin, Grand Rapids; Williams C. Harris, Richard H. Fyfe, 
Charles M. Woodruff, Walter M. Trevor, Joseph L. Hepburn, John W. Case, 
Mark B. Stevens, William J. Keep, Detroit. 

1 



Flag 

George A. Loud, Bay City; George W, Bates, Hugh C. Chedester, Frank' 
C. Sibley, Charles Wright, Detroit; George Kemp, Sault Ste. Marie; Cha«. 
F. Marsh, Mt. Pleasant. 

Public Welfare 

Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale, Ann Arbor; Dexter M. Ferry, Ira W. Jayne, 
Dr. Frank Ward Holt, Charles L. Clark, Dr. Walter P. Manton. Dr. William 
H. Price, Dr. Frederick W. Robbins, Rev. Joseph A. Vance, Detroit; Mark 
Norris, Grand Rapids; Dr. Royal S. Copeland, New York; Dr. Rush McNair, 
Kalamazoo. 



International Affaire. 

Harry A. Lockwood, Edwin Denby, Fred G. Dewey, Edward W. Bissell, 
Samuel L .Pitts, Enoch Smith, Almon B. Atwater, Detroit; Arthur E. Corbin, 
Petrograd. 

National Defense 

Burns Henry, Harry M. Jewett, Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, Gen. Chas. W. 
Harrah. Col. Oscar A. Janes, Col. Walter Barlow, Capt. Frederick M. Alger, 
Capt. Fred D. Standish, Riley L. Jones, C. Frederick Heyerman, Detroit; 
Gen. Byron R. Pierce, Capt. Edward C. Smith, Grand Rapida; Lieut. Merritt 
U. Lamb, Muskegon; Levi S. Warren, Albion; Clarence F. Connor, U. S. A. 

Publicity 

Harlan H Johnson, Ann Arbor; George T. Campbell, Owosso; Francis 
L. Baldwin, Escanaba ; William A. Smith, Jr., Roy K. Moulton, Grand Rap- 
ids; Arthur C. Hoskins, Detroit. 

Banquet 

Dr. Stephen H. Knight, Julius E. Thatcher, John P. Antisdel, Palmer E» 
Win»low. Wm. H. H. Hutton, Jr., Detroit; Charles C. Follmer, Grand Rap- 
ids; Kendall P. Brooks, Mt. Pleas^^j Edward S. Parsons, Kalamazoo; 
Robert W. Hemphill, Ypsilanti. 



Organization of New Cbapters 

Alger County: Frederick J. Baldwin, Cone Barlow, Harold K. Rightcr. 

-Alpena County: Frank W, Fletcher, James B. Forman. 

Bay County: Edward W. Cressey. Frederick P. Browne, George A. Loud, 
Charles C. Rosenbury. 

Barry County: Philip T. Colgrove. 

1 1 



Calhoun County: EdwarJ C. Hinman, William F. Church, Charles E. 
Gorham, Craig C. Miller, Levi S. Warren. 

Cheboygan County: Crawford S. Reilley. 

Chippewa County: Elmer S. Sutton, George Kemp. 

Deha County: Francis L. Baldwin. 

Grand Traverse County: Ansel A. Howard, George S. Rice. 

Genessee County: Edwin O. Wood. 

Ingham County: George W. Bissell, Charles M. Turner, James B. Boyce. 

Ionia County: Erastus T. Yeomans, Allan B. Morse. 

Jackson County: Edward A. Bancker, Frederick L. Bliss, Enoch 
Bancker. 

Lenawee County: Wilbert H. Barrett. 

Livingston County: Albert L. Smith, Charles G. Jewett, Miles W. Bul- 
lock, Harry N. Carlisle, Leon H. Barnum. 

Macomb County: Levant E. Bedell, George A. Skinner, Dr. Harry F. 
Taylor. 

Marquette County: Fred H. Begole, Alfred F. Maynard, Edward O. 
Stafford. 

Montcalm County: S. Perry Youngs. 

Muskegon County: Louis B. Haight, Lieut. Merritt U. Lamb. 

Ontonagon County: Samuel Brady. 

Oakland County: Williams C. Harris, Alpheus W. Chittenden, Thomas 
W. Taliaferro, Charles W. -Warren, George N. Brady, Herbert R. 
Earle, Frederic B. Smith, Frederick P. Smith, Dr. Edward B. 
Spalding, Charles Stinchfield, Walter Thompson, Frederic J. 
Stevens, William J. Chittenden. 

Ottawa County: Nathaniel Robbins. 

St. Clair County: Burt D. Cady, Charles K. Dodge, Edward R. Har- 
rington, Sidney G. McClouth. Russ S. Jenks, Henry Whiting. 

Saginaw County: Robert F. Johnson. 

Schoolcraft County: Clarence E. Kelso, Arthur S. Putnam. 

Shiawassee County: George T. Campbell. 



1 2 



CONSTITUTION 
Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Article I. — Name. 

The name of this Society shall be the Michigan Society of the Sons of 
the American Revolution. 

Article II. — Objects. 

The object and purpose of this Society is to keep alive among our- 
selves and our descendants the patriotic spirit of the men who, in military, 
naval or civil service, by their acts or counsel, achieved American inde- 
pendence; to collect and secure for preservation the manuscript rollt, rec- 
ords and other documents relating to the War of the Revolution, and to 
promote social intercourse and good feeling among its members now and 
hereafter. 

Article III. — Membership. 

Any male person shall be eligible for membership in this Society who 
is a resident of Michigan, and who is descended from a revolutionary 
ancestor wherever resident, who is of the age of twenty-one, and whose 
ancestor was either a military or naval officer, soldier or sailor, or an 
ofiicial in the service of any one of the thirteen original Colonies or States, 
or of the Government representing or composed of those Colonies or States 
who assisted in establishing American independence during the War of the 
Revolution, or a member of a Committee of Correspondence or of Public 
Safety or a recognized patriot who rendered material service in the cause 
of American independence. 

Article IV. — Officers. 

The officers of this Society shall be a President, Vice-President, Secre- 
tary, Treasurer, Registrar, Chaplain, and Historian. 

Article V. — Meetings. 

A meeting for the election of officers and transaction of buaines* ihall 
be held annually at such place as the Board of Managers may determine, 
on the 15th day of April, or in case said date shall fall upon Sunday the 
meeting shall be held on the following day. And a meeting for social pur- 
poses shall be held annually at such time and place as the Board of Man- 
agers may determine. At each annual meeting there shall be elected, in 
addition to the officers provided for in Article IV, one delegatc-at-large 
and one delegate for each fifty or fraction of fifty exceeding twenty-five 
members, who together with said officers as provided for by the Constitu- 
tion of the National Society, shall represent this Society in the National 
Society. (As amended April 15, 1913.) 



1 3 



Article VI. — Boa/d of Manassrs. 
There shall be a Board of Manager? >vhcse duty it shall be to conduct 
the affairs of this Society, which Board shall consist of the officers of thia 
Society, the delegates to the National Society and fifteen others who shall 
be elected at the annual meeting. 

Article VII. — Local Chapters. 

Section 1. A charter for a local chapter may be granted by the Board 
of Managers to ten or more rncmbers of the Society residing in the same 
county, upon their written petition stating the proposd name, the county 
in which it is to be located, and the names of its proposed members. Such 
Chaper may adopt a Constitution and By-Laws not inconsistent with those 
of this Society or of the National Society. 

Section 2. No perron shall be admitted to membership in such Chap- 
ter unless he is a member in good standing of this Society; and all mem- 
bers of this Society shall be eligible for membership therein. Any member 
who shall in any way lose membership in the State Society shall thereupon 
cease to be a member of such Chapter. 

Section 3. Membership in Chapters shall not in any w^ay change the 
relations of members to this Society, nor impair obligations of payment of 
dues and other requisitions of the Constitution and By-Laws of this Society. 
Provided, however, that the Board of Managers may from time to time, 
by vote, authorize the return to designated Chapters, or classes of Chapters, 
of a portion of the annual dues paid the Society by members of said 
Chapters. 

(Article Vll adopted April 15, 1913.) 

Article VIII. — Amendments. 

This Constitution may be amended, altered or repealed, provided writ- 
ten resolutions to that effect are first presented to the Board of Managers, 
and approved by a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular 
meeting of said Board, or at a special meeting called for that purpose; and 
provided said amendments are approved by a majority of the members 
present at any regular meeting of the Society. 



1 4 



BY-LAWS 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Articltt I. — Application for Membership. 

All applications for xnombership in this Society shall be upon blank 
forms furnished by the Society, and each application shall be accompanied 
by the membership fee, which shall be returned if the applicant is not 
accepted. 

Article 11. — Examination by Registrar. 

All applications for membership shall be submitted to the Registrar 
for examination, and shall be reported by hirn to the Board of Managers, 
and when approved by said Board, shall be returned to the Registrar for 
preservation, and upon paym'^nt of membership fee, the applicant shall 
become a member of the Society. 

Article III. — Fees and Dues. . 

Section 1. The membership fee shall be five dollars, and the annual 
dues shall be three dollars. Members elected prior to the first day of July 
shall pay dues for the whole year. Members elected on and after that 
day shall pay one-half the dues for the year of their election. 

Section 2. The payment of fifty dollars at one time by any member 
not indebted to the Society shall constitute him a life member, exempt from 
annual dues. 

Section 3. The annual dues shall be paid to the Secretary on or 
before the first day of January in each year. The Secretary shall notify 
members three months in arrears, and report their names to the Board 
of Manaf^ers, and non-payment of dues in three months thereafter shall, 
Bt the option of the Board, be regarded as terminating the membership 
of such person. 

Section 4. Members admitted by transfer from any other State 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, or from the Society of 
the Children of the American, Revolution, to which they have paid an 
initiation fee, shall be exempt from payment of such fee in this Society. 

•Section 5. If the Board of Managers deem it advisable, they may, by 
vote, permit the collection of annual dues from members affiliated with 
local Chapters by the Treasurers of the respective local Chapters, and 
Jnake such other regulations regarding collection and remittance of such 
dues as the Board may think desirable. (As amended April 15, 1913.) 

1 5 



Article IV. — Annu?.! Metting. 

The members of this Society shall meet at such place a» the Board 
of Managers may determine on the fifteenth day of April, and annually 
thereafter, for the election of ofHcers and the transaction of the business 
of the Society. In cr.se said day shall fall upon Sunday, the meeting 
shall be held on the following day. in the election of officers a majority 
of the votes cast shall be necessary for a choice. 

ArHcIe V. — Board Meetinss. 

The regular meeting of ihe Board of Managers shall be held upon 
the morning of the fifteenth day of April in each year at 10:30. Special 
meetings may be called by the Piesident at any time, and shall be called 
upon the request of any three members of the Board of Managers. Three 
(3) members of the Board of Managers shall constitute a quorum at c 
meeting of said Board. Five (5) members of this Society shall constitute 
a quorum at a meeting of said Society. 

Article VI. — Secretary. 

The Secretary shall receive all moneys from the members, and shall 
pay it over to the Treasurer, taking his receipt for the same, and perform 
the usual duties of a Secretary. 

Article VII. — Treasurer. 

The Treasurer shall deposit all moneys in the name of the Society, and 
shall pay out nothing except upon receipted orders which have been ep- 
proved by the Managers. 

Article VIII. — Board of Managers. 

TTie members of the Board of Managers shall be elected in the same 
manner and at the same time as is provided for the election of officers. 
They shall judge of the qualification of applicants for membership and shall 
have control and management of the affairs of the Society. They shall 
appoint an Auditing Committee. They may call special meetings at any 
time, and shall call a special meeting upon the written request of any five 
members of the Society. They shall also have power to fill vacancies. 

Article IX. — Registrar. 

The Registrar shell receive all applications and proofs of membership 
after they have been passed upon by the Board of Managers, and shall 
make a record of the sanie in a book of forms prepared for that purpose, 
and shall forward duplicates to the Registrar-General. He shall also have 
custody of all the historical, geographical and genealogical papers, books, 
manuscripts, and relics of which the Society may become possessed. 

IG 



Article X. — Amendments. 

These by-laws shall not be altered nor amended, unless such alteration 
or amendment shall have been proposed in writing at a previous meeting 
of the Board of Managers, and entered upon the records, with the nam© 
of the member proposing the change, and adopted by a majority of the 
members present at a regular meeting of the Society, or at a special meet- 
ing called for that purpose. 

Article XI. — Nominations. 

Section 1. Not later than January 1st of each year, three shall be 
appointed by the Board of Managers, a Nominating Committee of five 
members, no one of whom shall be an officer of the Society. 

Section 2. At least thirty days before the Annual Meeting of the 
Society, the Nominating Committee shall report in writing to the Secretary 
the names of candidates for Officers, for Delegates, and for members of 
the Board of Managers, 

Section 3. Any seven members of the Society may, by writing signed 
by themselves and filed with the Secretary at least twenty days before the 
Annual Meeting of the Society, nominate candidates for any of the offices 
mentioned in paragraph 2 above. 

Section 4. At least ten days before the Annual Meeting of the Society, 
the Secretary shall mail to each member of the Society a printed list of all 
persons nominated for any of the offices above mentioned, together with 
■the names of the persons by whom any such nomination has been made. 

(Article XI adopted April 15, 1910.) 



1 7 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING FOR 1916 

of the 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

The annual meeting of the Michigan Society. Sons of the American 
Revolution, was held pursuant to adjournment and notice at the Detroit 
Club, on Wednesday, May 10, 1 9 i 6, at 6:45 p. m. 

The-meeting was called to order by the President, Albert M. Henry. 

The minutes of the last meeting were read and approved. 

Secretary Raymond E. Van Syckle presented his annual report, which 
w^as received and placed on file. 

Treasurer Frank G. Smith presented his annual report of receipts and 
disbursements which was approved and ordered placed on file. 

In the absence of the historian, the Secretary presented a memorial 
report of members who had died during the past year, which was received 
and placed on file. 

The President then announced the annual election and asked for the 
report of the Nominating Committee. The report was presented by the 
chairman of the committee, J. Remsen Bishop, and was sighed also by 
Norman B. Conger. Richard H. Fyfe, Charles M. Woodruff and William 
M. Finck. There being no nominations from the floor, upon motion duly 
seconded, the Secretary was instructed by the unanimous vote of the 
Society to cast the ballots of the members present for the officers nom- 
inated in the committee's report. The Secretary announced that he had 
cast the ballots of those present for the persons named in the commit'et 
report, and the President declared such persons were duly elected to the 
respective positions, as follows: President, Clarence M. Burton; Vice-Pre?i- 
dent, Jacob S. Farrand, Jr.; Secretary, Raymond E. Van Syckle; Treasurer, 
Frank G. Smith; Registrar, Franklin S. Dewey; Chaplain, Rev. Joseph A. 
Vance, D. D. ; Historian, Charles Moore; Delegates to National Convention, 
Richard H. Fyfe; Delegate-at-Larg.^, George H. Barbour, J. Remsen Bishop, 
William M. Finck, and Albert M. Henry, Detro't; Warren W. Fiorer. Ann 
Arbor: Charles C. Follmer, William Judson, Grand Rapids; Edward C Par- 
sons. Kalamazoo. Alternate Delegates: Kendall P. Brooke. Mt. Pleasant; 
Junius E. Bcal. Ann Arbor; Fred H. Begole, Marquette; George W. Bissell, 
Lansing; Burt D. Cady, Port Huron; James M. Crosby, Grand Rapids; Ed- 
win Denby, Detroit; George A. Loud, Bay City; Edwin O. Wood, Flint; 
Wilbert H. Barrett, Adrian. Board of Managers: John P. Antisdel, John 
E. Baker, Hugh C Chcdester, Gen. Charles A. Coolidge, Norman 
B. Conger. William P. Holliday, Dr. Stephen H. Knight, Leroy 
E. Ferine, Arthur J. Tuttle, Charles M. Woodruff, Horace H. Dick- 
inson, Detroit; Frederick J. Baldwin, Munising; Chas. M. Turner, Lansing. 
After the business meeting the guests proceeded to the banquet hall, 
which was decorated with national flags and the emblems of the Society. 

1 8 



Albert M. Henry, retiring Presidenr cf tho State Society, presided as toait- 
master. Invocation was pronounced Ly Rev. W. D. Maxon. Patriotic airs 
comprised the selections played by tbe orcKertra, and the members sang 
"America," "Michigan, My Michigan," and "Star Spangled Banner," under 
the direction of John P. Antisdel. Solos v/ere sung by Compatriot John 
Dickinson, accompanied by Compatriot Henry Riley Fuller. 

An actual son of a Revolutionary soldier, Milton B. Purdy, was ad- 
mitted to membership and prt-sented to those present. His father, Jeremiah 
Purdy, born 1761, died 1842, served three years, in the Revolution, from 
the State of New York. 

Medals for service in the Spanish-American war were presented to 
Compatriots Edwin Denby and John E. Baker, recently admitted to mem- 
bership. President Clarence M. Burton gave an interesting address, men- 
tioning his recent discovery of the records of the early pension agent in 
Detroit, in 1842, contaming the names of all Revolutionary pensioners in 
Detroit at that time, and also referred to the unmarked grave in Dearborn 
village of a hero of the American Revolution. 

Secretary Van Syckle tcld of the progress made by the Society and 
of its activities in promoting lectures throughout the State in aid of Amer- 
icanizaion of the various alien elements, its participation in the celebrations 
of Americanization Day, and the aid its members had rendered in assisting 
in procuring allowances of appropriations for the education of aliens. 

Reports and greetings were received from the presidents of local 
Chapters in Michigan as follows: Kalamazoo Chapter, Edward A. Parsons; 
\X'ashtenaw Chapter, Prof. Warren W. Florer; Kent Chapter, Grand Rap- 
ids, Chas. C. Follmer; Detroit Chapter, Harry A. Lockwood. 

Compatriot Parsons told of the organization of the Chapter at Kala- 
mazoo with a membership of 12. Compatriot Florer told of the influence of 
the meetings at Ann Arbor upon the students, and of the intense interest 
manifested throughout the State in the lecture and pictures presented by 
Him in the various Michigan cities under the auspices of this Society, pro- 
moting the cause of Americanization. Compatriots Follmer and Chas. N. 
Remington, Secretary, gave an account of the development of the Chapter 
at Grand Rapids, now with a membership of 53; and Compatriot Lockwood, 
v.ho has been absent from Detroit during a tour of South America, spoke 
on our relations with our neighbors there and advised the establishment 
of a press agency to promote mutual knowledge between us. 

Moving pictures were shown illustrating life in the army and navy. 
These were followed by discussions participated in by the invited military 
and naval rnen present. The army film was taken by Henry P. Joy while 
with the United States expedition into Mexico, and showed the difficulties 
pr^-sented in maintaining communication and transporting supplies from 
the border to the forces, and demonstrated the efficiency of the modern 
motor truck. Col. G. R. Cecil, U. S. A., described the arid conditions of 



1 9 



Mexico and the physical difT'cuitles to be encountered by our troops, illus- 
trated by his own experiences in command along the border. Gen. Chao. 
A. Coolidge, U. S. A., told of the advance made in the last few years in 
the problems of miiitary science and transportation noted the passing of 
the army mule. Gen. Chas. W. Harrah, U. S. V., demonstrated the neces- 
sity of military preparedness for the United States. Col. Walter Barlow, 
M. N. G., described the Mir.hig:an National Guard, asserting that it is now 
one of the best organizations in the country, L.ieut. Emory S, West, U. 
S, A., in charge of the local recruiting station, advocated as a help to 
preparedness that all Americans seek to unify and Ataericanize the various 
alien and foreign elements amongst us. 

The second film displayed was "Training for the U. S. Navy." Lieut. 
S. Wells Utley, M. N. B., discussed the present efficiency of the navy, and 
deplored the influence of politicians upon the control of matters which 
should be in the hands of experts alone. Com. J. Farrand Lewis, M. N. 
B., asked that the employers of men should recognize the desirability of 
encouraging their employes to join the local military forces. 

103 members were present at the banquet. Among these were Presi- 
dent Charles C. Follmer, Vice-President Charles H. Leonard and Secretary 
Charles N. Remington of the Kent Chapter, Grand Rapids; President Ed- 
ward C. Parsons, and Secretary William A. Stone of the Kalamazoo Chap- 
ter; President Warren W. Florer, Robert W. Hemphill, and Milton E. Os- 
borne, of the Washtenaw Chapter, Ann Arbor. 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE. 
Secretary, Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution. 



2 



SECRETARY'S ANNUAL REPORT 

The Secretary of the Michigan Society respectfully submits his annual 
report of the progress of this Society during the year beginning April 1, 
1915. and ending March 31. 1916. 

Of the delegates elected to represent the Michigan Society at the 26th 
annual congress of the National Society at Portland, Oregon, on July 19, 
1915. the following ■were present: Albert M. Henry, William M. Finck, 
James H Hall, and Howard A. Starret, all of Detroit. Our Society has 
been represented during the year on the Board of Trustees of the National 
Society by President Albert M. Henry, v/ho was further honored by being 
reappointed a member of the Executive Committee of the National Society 
for the current year. 

The organization of a local chapter at Kalamazoo was completed and 
a charter granted December 31, 1915. There are also local chapters at 
Detroit, Grand Rapids, Ann Arbor, and Mt. Pleasant. Interest throughout 
the State has greatly iricreased. During the year nineteen new members 
have been added to the Detroit Chapter, eleven to the Grand Rapids Chap- 
ter, 6ei.'en to Klamazoo Chapter, two to Ann Arbor and one to Mt. Pleasant. 
New members have also been admitted from Muskegon, Mt. Clemens and 
Cheboygan. The total number of new members added during the year 
was 42 and 3 old members reinstated. The loss of membership during the 
year was 15 deceased, 7 resigned, and 3 demilted to other states, making 
a total membership April 1st, 1916, of 450 members. 

The membership by Chapters is as follows: 

Detroit Chr.pter 238 

Kent Chapter, Grand Rapids 50 

Washtenaw Chapter, Ann Arbor 20 

Kalamazoo Chapter '2 

Mt. Pleasant Chapter ' • 

Members residing in Michigan who are not affiliated with local chapters 93 

Members in other states. . 26 

During the year the Society formulated a plan for lectures throughout 
the state promoting Americanization, and has endorsed the lecture on ' The 
American Revolution," by Prof. Warren W. Florer, of the University of 
Michigan, President of the Washtenaw Chapter, illustrated by stereopticon 
• lidce prepared by George R. Swain. This lecture shows how the various 
racial elements co-operated in the establishment of American unity and the 
part played in the Revolution by each of them. These lectures were given 
in the schools and in foreign settlements and have been received with great 
interest among those of foreign birth, as well as our native sons. Wherever 
Kivcn the press have praised it highly as a factor in promoting unity among 
'lie diveise elements in our population. This lecture was included by the 
Lnivcrsity of Michigan in its free extension lecture course, and was also 
obtained by private arrangement. 

2 1 



The field orgajaLzer sent to Michigan by the National Americanization 
Day Committee was furnished by youi secretary with a list of the Sons cf 
the American Revolution in the Michigan cities to be visited by him, and 
was introduced to the Mayor's office and the newspapers of the city of 
Detroit. The campaigrn thus begun resulted in a most successful celebra- 
tion of Americanization Day on the Fourth of July, in Detroit, Kalamazoo, 
and elsewhere, under committees among w^hose members the Sons of the 
American Revolution were prominent, President Albert M. Henry being on 
the Detroit committee, and Compatriot Edward C. Parscr-s being chairman 
of the Kalamazoo committee. 

The eudcation of aliens, so long advocated by this Society, has been 
taken up in earnest by the Board of Commerce and the Municipality of the 
City of Detroit, and an appropriation has been made for the coming year 
by the Common Council and the Board of Estimates of the City of Detroit 
of the sum of $96,700 for maintenance of night schools for the coming 
year. Compatriots Charles L. Clark and Raymond E. Van Syckle, mem- 
bers of the Board of Estimates of the City of Detroit, actively participated 
in the procuring of the allowance of this sum for this purpose, 

A recent addition to the membership of this Society and the Detroit 
Chapter is Milton Bentley Purdy, an actual son of the Revolutionary soldier, 
Jeremiah Purdy, who enlisted in Newburgh, N. Y., in 1777, in Capt. John 
Shepherd's Company, Col. J. Baldwin's Artillery Artificers, and served 
three years. The soldier was born on the 29th day of June, 1761, and 
died in Hamilton, N. Y., on the 16th day of June, 1842. His son, Milton 
B. Purdy, was born August 28, 1839, the twelfth member of a family cf 
thirteen children. The papers in the pension office disclosed that the 
•oldier, at the age of 71, married a second time, in 1832, Miss Susanna 
Walworth, who was then 18, and that he had thereafter four children — 
the last being born in 1842, when the soldier was 81. 

Two veterans of the Spanish-American war, who saw service on the 
U. S. Yosemite, have been admitted to membership and presented with 
Spanish War medals issued by this Society — Hon. Edwin Denby and John 
E. Baker of Detroit. Other recent additions are Compatriot Clarence F. 
Conner, of Mt. Clemens, corporal with Troop B, 1 3th Cavalry U. S. A., 
with the expedition into Mexico, and Colonel Walter Barlow, commanding 
3 1 at Regiment, Michigan National Guard, to whom a Spanish War meda! 
has also been issued by this Society for his previous service in the United 
States Volunteers in the^ Spanish-American war. 

A public meeting on Washington's Birthday, 1916, in the auditorium 
of the Art Museum, Detroit, was arranged by Compatriot Charles Moore, 
Secretary of the Art Museum, in conjunction with your Secretary and 
officers of other patriotic societies, at which Claude H. Van Tyne, Ph. D., 
of the University of Michigan, was the speaker. 

2 2 



Detroit Chap lei" 

The local social ev.^nts in Detroit are carried on by the Detroit Chapter. 
The annual meeting cf Detr&it Chapter was held May 14, 1915, at the 
Detroit Athletic Club, President Frederick B. Smith presiding. The reports 
of the Committees on P=^triotic Education and on Americanization were 
submitted, and J. H. Dague, Industrial Secretary of the Y. M. C. A., spoke 
on "The Alien Population in Detroit and the Opportunities Offered TTiem 
-in Preparation for Citizenship." A buffet luncheon was served. 

Meetings for the wint'^r season 1915-16 have been held by Detroit 
Chapter as follows: 

December 3, 1915 — Hotel Cadillac. An illustrated address v/as given by 
Prof. Warren W. Florer on "Scenes of the American 
Revolution," showing his especially prepared stereop- 
ticcn slides. 

February 8, 1916 — Detroit Athletic Club. Compatriot Arthur J. Tuttle, 
U. S. District Judge, discussed "The Admission of 
Aliens to Citizenship." 

March 17, 1916 — University Club. Capt. Fred M. Alger spoke on "Pre- 
paredness and National Defense." A general discus- 
sion followed, participated in by Gen. Chas. A. Coo- 
lidge, U. S. A., Gen. Charles W. Harrah, M. N. G., 
Lieuienant Emory S. West, U. 5. A., Lieutenant Wil- 
liam V Rosevear, and Compatriots Burns Henry and 
Harry Jewett, organizers of the Business Men's Train- 
ing Organization of Detroit. 



Kent Chapter 

At Grand Rapids the Kent Chapter has held the following meetings 
during the season of 1915-16: 

October 12, 1915 — At the home of Compatriot Charles Carroll Follmer, 
465 F'ountain St., N. E., Compatriot Mark Norris 
spoke on the topic, "Early History." 

Novembe- 9, 1915 — At the home of Compatriot William Judson, 225 
Fountain St., N. E., Honorable T. J. O'Brien spoke on 
the topic, "American Diplomacy.' 

December 14, 1915 — Compatriot Claude Hamilton gave a complimentary 
dinner at the Pantlind Hotel, the guest and speaker 
being Governor Woodbridge N. Ferris. 

January 11, 1916 — At the home of Compatriot James M. Crosby, "Kent 
Hills." The speaker was Dean Francis White. 

2 3 



9 

February 8, 1 9 16 — At the home ot Compatilot Stuart E. Knappen, 322 
Foiintain St., N. E. Ex-Governor Chase S. Osborn 
was the speaker. 

March 7, 1916 At the home of Compatriot Charles H. Leonard, 455 

Morris Ave., S. E. The speaker was Albert M. Henry, 
President of the Michigan Society, Detroit. 

April ]I, 1916 — At the home of Compatriot Lucius Boltwood, "River- 
side." Honorable Huntley Russell was the speaker. 

Ml P5ea*ant Chapter 

The Mt. Pleasant Chapter met at the Central Michigan Normal College 
Hall on Friday, January 14. Tlie program included a stereopticon exhibit 
of views of the American Revolution, with a lecture by Prof. Warren W. 
Florer, President of the Washtenaw Chapter. An audience of 500 attended. 
After the lecture the local Chapter and the invited guests were entertained 
at the home of A. E. Gorham with a banqu-it. Albert M. Henry, President 
of the State Society, spoke on the "Purposes and Aims of the Sons of the 
American Revolution." 

Washtenaw Chapter 

The Washtenaw Chapter held meetings at Ann Arbor as follows 

August 12. 1915— At High School Hall. Speaker. Dr. W. B. Hinsdale. 
Subject. "The Indian Mounds of Michigan." Illus- 
trated.' 

November 16, 1915 — At Nev.-berry Hall. Speakers, Mr. Frank Almen- 
dinger and Mrs. A. A. Freer. Subject, "The Original 
Location of Ann's Arbor. 

February 22, 1916 — Michigan Union, Annual Meeting and Banquet. Elec- 
tion of officers. 

February 22, 1916 — P'^blic exercises at High School Auditorium. Address 
by Albert M. Henry, on "Patriotism." Illustrated talk 
on "The American Revolution," by Prof. Florer. Tlie 
meeting was attended by Company I, Michigan Na- 
tional Guard, in uniform. Civil war veterans and 
members of the Woman's Relief Corps. 

May I, 1916 — Regular meeting. Address by Prof. Claude Van Tyne on 
"The Personal Side of the Diploniacy of the Ameri- 
can 'Revolution." 

June 14, 1916 — .'^t Dr. C. G. Darling's residence. Speaker, Hon. Erwin A. 
Holt, of Burlington, N. C. "The Battle of Almance." 
Resrpectfully subniitted, 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE. 

Secretary. 

2 4 



MEMORIAL REPORT 

Compiled by Raymond E. Van Syckle. 

The following members of Michigan Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution, passed away during the year I 91 5-191 6: 

William C. Phipps. National No. 10833, State No. 233. Born in 
Chatham, Ohio, on November 14, 1861. Admitted to membership in the 
Society December 22, 1897. Great-great grandson of William Russcli, 
who enlisted as private in Capt. Michael Doveael's Company, subsequently 
commissioned Ensign in the Third Pennsylvania line. Lost a leg at Brandy- 
wine. Mr. Phipps was a merchant at Saginaw, Mich., and died February 
27, 1915. 

Henry Rutgers Mizner, Jr. National No. 11967, State No. 292. Born 
in Detroit, August 15, 1666. Admitted to membership March 13, 1899. 
Died August 25, 1915. Son of Brig.-Gen. Henry F. Mizner, U. S. A., 
Colonel 14th Michigan Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war, great-great 
grandson of Anthony Rutgers, Captain Second Company, New York Artil- 
lery, during the Revolution. 

Charles W. Moses. National No. 14153. State No. 403. Born in Mar- 
ccllus, N. Y., on November 16, 1858. Admitted to membership June 4, 
1901. Died October 17, 1915. Great-great grandson of Eliphelet Curtis, 
Captain Connecticut troops. Member of Connecticut Assembly. 

Henry Stewart Dean. National No. 10844, State No. 244. Born in 
Lima, N. Y., June 14, 1830. Admitted to membership January 15, 1898. 
Grandson of Stewart Dean, Captain of the sloop "Beaver," under commis- 
sion isETied by the Stale of Nc'a' York. Colonel Dean v/as a charter member 
of the Washtenaw Chapter, Regent of the University of Michigan, i 894- 
1898; Commander G. A. R. 1892. He died at Ann Arbor October 18. 
1915. 

Samuel Judson Wilson. National No. 12895, State No. 395. Born in 
Genesee County, Michigan, September 3, 1849. Admitted to membership 
March 12, 1901; died November 4, 1 9 I 5, at Flint, Michigan. Great grand- 
son of John Slafter, private Vermont militia, member Committee of Safety. 
also great grandson of Nahum Newton, private Baldv/in*s New Hampshire 
troops; also great grandson of Thos. Wilson, private Capt. H. Hutchins' 
Company, Col. Reed's Regiment. N. H. troops. 

Samuel Buvlin Standish. National No. 26793, State No. 718. Born in 
Detroit June 5, 1888. Admitted to membership March 23, 1915. Died 
November 6, 1915. Son of Charles D. Standish, deceased. State No. 23, 
National No. 3028; great-great-great grandson of Sergeant Samuel Stand- 
ish. Col. John Ashley's Massachusetts Regiment, pensioned, who v/as at 
the battle of White Plains, and afterwards, while on picket duty at Fort 
Edward, was taken prijoner and witnessed the capture and murder of Jane 

2 .") 



McCrae by the Indians. Compatriot StandisK was a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of fVIichigau and was engaged in the practice of law. He was a 
descendant cf Fvliles Standish. He waa stricken by death at the age of 
twenty-seven and during the first year of his membership in this Society, 
of which his father was a charter member. 

Elliott Truax Slocum. National No. 30004, State No. 4. Admitted to 
membership March 21, 1890. Born in Trenton, Mich., May 15. 1839. A 
charter member of the Michigan State Society, died November 20, 1915, a 
great grandson of Giles Slocum, whose first military service was in General 
Sullivan's expedition against the Indians in the Genesee Valley. In i 778 

he lived with his parents in the neighborhood of Wilkesbarre, Pa., and was 
one of the 200 who marched out of Fort Forty to meet Col. Butler's band 
of Tories and Indians 600 strong. From the "massacre of the V/yoming 
Valley" which follov.'ed, about 60 of this troop escaped, among whom was 
Giles Slocum, who sv/ani to an island in the Susquehanna River and re- 
mained in the water, hidden by driftwood till night favored his escape. 
His father was killed about the tix le of the massacre and his sister five years 
eld was carried off by the Indians. Compatriot Slocum attended the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1856-1659; graduated Union College 1862, B. A.; 
received the degree of M. A. from the U. of M. in 1869; was State Senator 
1869-1870, and was president of the Belle Isle Park Commission. He was 
always intensely interested in the affairs; of this Society, serving as delegate 
to the National Congress in 1909, 1911, and 1913. 

George O. Robinson. Natior.al No. 11176, State No. 251. Born in 
South Redding, Vt., June 14, 1832. Admitted to membership February 15, 
1898. Grandson cf Ebenezer Robinson, who served as both soldier and 
seaman in the Revolutionary War. Compatriot Robinson was a graduate 
of the University of Vermont in 1857. Received the honorary degree of 
LL. D. of Albion College, Michigan, in 1904. Began the practice of law 
at Janesvillc, Wis., in 1851, removed to Detroit in 1861, and continued 
his practice here until 1892. He was a member of the firm of Robinson 
6c Flynn timber, mining and la\v, established in 1372. Formerly Justice 
of the Peace and a member of the Board of Education. He was a promi- 
nent Methodist and was for nine years Trustee of Albion College, donating 
Robinson Hall to the college. He was for sixteen years president of the 
Board of Trustees of the Central M. E. Church. He died December 14, 
1915, at the age of 83. 

William Frederick Blake. National No. 9079, State No. 154. Admitted 
to membership June 17, 1896. Born in Farmington, Maine, May 3, 1851. 
Great grandson of Joseph Tarbell, private in troops of Pepperell, Mass., 
and served three years; pensioned. Compatriot Blake was a wholesale 
grocer of Grand Rapids, Mich. He died December 24, 1915. 

James H. Hall. National No. 26795, State No. 720. Born in Warwick, 
Orange Co., -New York, March 7, 1846. Admitted to membership March 
23, 1915. Graduate of University of Michigan, LLB., ) 874. Member of 



2 6 



the Constitu^io^.a! Convcii' lo-i of ;99?-8 A delegate to the National Con- 
gress of tLe Sons of tKe American Revolution at Pcrtlar.d Oregon, 1915. 
Great grandson of John Hal!, fife major, 4lK Orange Co., N. Y., militia. 
Creat-grcja grandsor. of Ezra Sanford, private 4tK Cranye Co., N. Y. mili- 
tia. Cor.-ipatriot Hall practiced law fcr 38 years at Port Austin Mich., 
removing to Detroit, v-here he died January I, 1916. 

Jasper C. Gates. National No. 3005, State No. 5. Born at Pleasant- 
ville. Pa., March 23, 1850. A.dmitted to this Society May 8, 1890, aa a 
charter member. He graduated from Union College, C. E. 1872, A. B. 
1873, and from the Albany Law School, LL. B. 1874, He was married in 
1678. and practiced law in the city of Detroit for forty years, beginning 
in IC75. He was a professor in the Detroit College of Law from 1893 
to the time of his death. Union College honored him with the degree of 
M. A. in 1893. He was a great grandson of Euriah Cross, Capt. Ensign's 
Compan}', Col. Morley's Regiment, Connecticut Militia. Compatriot Gates 
died at his desk in his oflice on January 8, 1915. 

Julian G. Dickinson. Nativ nal No. 26602, State No. 677. Admitted to 
membership Jane 2, I 9 1 4. Born in Hamburgh, N. Y., January 20, 1843. 
He was a great-great grandson of Samuel Manning, private in Col. Hun- 
tington's Regiment, Connecticut Militia. Mr. Dickinson enlisted as a pri- 
vate in the 4th Michigan Volunteers, Julj 10, 1862, promoted to Sergeant 
March 31, 1864; First Lieutenant Adja:ant July 15, 1854; Brevet Captain 
May 10, 1865. He wa.? Captiln of the" 2nd Michigan Volunteers July 10, 
1865, and served in tKe army of the Cumberland three years. He ettendsd 
tie University of Michigan law department in 1855-6, admitted to the bar 
in 1866. Married at Detroit in 1878, and practiced law in Detroit fifty 
years. Died January II, 1916. 

Charles L. Mayo, National No. 17272, State No. 487. Admitted to 
the Society July 5, 1905. Born in Troy, Miami County, Ohio, September 
30, 1846. Attended Kenyon College, was treasurer of the Detroit Up- 
vertity School, and afterwards custodian of the safety deposit va':!.< of 
the Detroit Trust Company. He was a great grandson of Joeept^ Mayo, 
F-.rat Lieut. Hampshire County Militia. Compatriot Mayo died January 
14, 1916. 

George Thrall. National No. 12368, State No. 343. Admitted April 
25, 1699. Grandson of Jesse Thrall, Sergeant Willett's M33!achu3etis 
Militia; grf-at grandson of Samuel Thrall, Capt. Hampshire County, Mass., 
Miljtia; also of Nathaniel Gore, Lieut. 1 7th Conn. Continental^, prisoner. 
Compatriot Thrall was born at Rutland, Vt., February 24, 1836. Grad- 
unte of Comer's Commercial College, Boston, 1855. Was bookkeeper 
for a Rutland merchant for three years, and entered the hotel business 
which he pursued as clerk, manager and director from 1858 to 1678, in 
NcH- Orleans, Nar.hville, Albany, Rochester, Worcester, Mobile, and Omeha. 
From 1878 to 1882 he was in the packing business in Omaka. In 1882 
nc came to Detroit and became Secretary of the Detroit Screw Work», 

2 7 



whicn business he ha? since contimi<°fL He was also a member of the 
Standard Screw Company, orgaiiized ir% !9G0. He died suddenly Feb- 
ruary 22, 1915. 

Frank G. Knecland. National No. J 1! 92, State No. 267. Admitted 
to membership July i 8, 189.5. Died February 7, 1916. He was born 
November 13, 1C53, at 1 ecumseh, Mich. Educated in a German Uni- 
veraity. Banher at St. Louis, Mich. Great grandson of Thomas Tracy, 
private Capt. Erin Rowley's Compan)', Berkshire Co. Regiment, under 
Major Rossiter, Massachusetts Miliiia. Member Committee of Corre- 
spondence. 

Jared Root Cook. Nciticnal No. 23891, State No. 641. Admitted to 
the Society March 5, !9I3. Grandson of David Osgood, quartermaste? 
and captain of the 7th Worcester Co. Regiment, Massachusetts Militia. 
He v/as a marine engineer. He resided at Sault Ste. Marie, nsd died 
March 31, 1916. He was born at Lancaster, N. Y., May 25, 1838. At- 
tended Polytechnic School at Chittenango, N. Y. 

James Crapo Cristy. National No. 11952, State No. 277. Admitted 
to membership December 7, 1898. He was born at Flint, Mich., February 
8, 1874. He was a great-great grandson of Peter Crapo, private Massa- 
chusetts Continental troops. He died April 6, 1916. 

William Savidge. National No. 3080, State No. 80. Admitted to 
membership June 3, 1G95. Born at .Spring Lake on Sept. 30, 1863, and 
died May 9, 1916. Graduated University of Michigan, A, B. 1684. State 
Senator 1897, 1898. Great grandson of Bartrum Round, Lieut. Scituate 
Rangers, R. I., pensioned. 

Lucius H .Collins. National No. 3086, State No. 85. Admitted to 
membership June 7, 1895. Born at Romeo, Mich. He resided at Detroit, 
and died May 15, 1916. He attended the literary department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, 1673-74. He was a lawyer. He was a grandson 
of Levi Collins, private in Capt. Everett's Company of Col. Bedell's Regi- 
ment, N. H. Great grandson of Amos Parmelee, private in Capt. Jeremiah 
Parmelee's Company, Col. Sam. Elmore's Regiment, Conn. Great grandson 
of Isaac Wheeler Stanton, sergeant, from Preston, Conn., with the men 
who marclied on the Lexington Alarm. Great grandson of Ephraim Col- 
lins, private Capt. Edward Everett's Com.pany, Col. Bedell'^s Regiment, 

N H. 

Arthur L. Holmes. National No. 20606, State No. 555. Admitted to 
membership February 10, 1909. Born in Detroit June 17, 1861. Died 
May 27, 1916. Great' grandson of Elezer Andrus, private Maine Militia. 

James Pardee Scranton. National No. 21707, State No. 582. Ad- 
mitted to membership May 30, 1910. Born in Monroe May 28, 1844. 
Great grandson of Abraham Scranton, Jr., Lieut, and Quartermaster Ser- 
geant Conn, troops, pensioned. Died July 13, 1916. 

2 8 



Charles Clark Hopkins. National No. 3090, State No. 90. Admitted 
to merr.'oership June 15, 1895. Born White Lake, Oakland County, Mich- 
igan, April 4, 1849. Graduated University of Michigan, LL. B. 1876. 
Clerk of the Supreme Court of Michigan since 1882, residing at Lansing. 
Great grandson of Consider Hopkins, private in Lieut. Bidweir.s Com- 
pany, 16th Regiment Connecticut Militia. Died July I, 1916. 

Lee Earll Amidon, National No. 21708, State No. 583. Admitted to 
membership March 30, 1910. Born February 4, 1865', in Hamilton, Indi- 
ana. Graduated University of Michigan, A. B. 1892; Harvard, A. M. 
1698. -Superintendent of Schools, Iron Mountain. Died Chicago, Novem- 
ber 29, 1916. Great-grandson of Moses Amidon, sergeant Col. Samuel 
McLellan's Conn. Regiment, pensioned, and great-great-grandson of Henry 
Amidon, Captain Twenty-second Regiment, Conn. Militia; also of Daniel 
Darning, private Massachusetts Militia, pensioned; and of Daniel Earll, 
private, Col. John Greaton's Mass. Regiment. 

Jay Whitney Bigelow, National No. 12890, State No. 390. Admitted 
to membership December 5, 1900. Died February 17, 1 9 1 7, at Easton, 
Md. He was born February 6, 1865, in Port Huron. Organized firm of 
Jewett, Bigelow & Brooks, coal operators, Detroit. Great grandson of 
Jabez Bigelow, Jr., private, Worcester County Mass. Regiment, and of 
Joseph Enos, Ensign, Rhode Island State Troops, pensioned. 



2 9 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 

Of the National Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

The Quarterly Bulletin 

The quarterly publication of the National Society, "The Official Bul- 
letin," is issued by the Secretary-General, at Washington, and is mailed 
free to each member of the Society in March, June, October and De- 
cember. It records action by the General Officers, the Board of Trustees, 
the Executive ar.d other National committees, lists of members deceased 
and of neviT members. Local chapters are requested to communicate 
promptly to the Secretary written or printed accounts of all meetings or 
celebrations, to forward copies of all notices, circulars, issued by thern, 
and to notify him at once of dates of deaths of members. Members 
not receiving their copies of the bulletin should report the fact together 
■with their proper address. 

The Year Book 

The annual "Year Book" of the National Society is sold to members 
for 50c per copy. It contains the list and biographies of the officers of 
the National Society, the general committees, the charter, constitution 
and by-laws; a list of officers of all State Societies and Chapters, a com- 
plete report of the proceedings at the annual congress of the National 
Society, and a register of all new members enrolled during the year, 
griving their revolutionary ancestor and their line of descent. Orders may 
be placed with the Secretary for this interesting compilation. 

Americanization Leaflets 

Leaflets are also published and distributed free by this Society for 
Americanization purposes, comprising "The Constitution of the United 
States," and "Information for Immigrants.' T'he latter is published in 
various foreign languages as well as in English. Upon application, the 
State Secretary v.-ill furnish these leaflets in the quantities desired. 



3 



CHAPTER ORGANIZATiON IN MICHIGAN 

By Raymond E. Van Syckle, Secretary. 

The development of chapter organization in Michigan has been as 
follows : 

Prior to the granting of a charter to the Detroit Chapter there existed 

in Michigan but one chapter organir.ation. This the Western Michigan 

Chapter — was granted a charter March 12, 1897, upon the application of 
eleven members of the State Society residing in Grand Rapids, giving them 
territorial jurisdiction over the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Kala- 
mazoo, Ionia, Barry and Muskegon. This chapter continued in existence 
until March 27, 1914, during which period forty-three gentlemen residing 
within these counties were members. 

From the time of the organization of the State Society the great major- 
ity of the members have resided in Detroit, and it became the custom for 
the State Society to hold frequent social functions in that city. Members 
residing outside the County of V/ayne began to feel that the State Society 
was in fact rather a local affair, the benefits of which were principally | 

enjoyed by the residents of Detroit. 

To remedy this situation the members residing in Detroit decided to 
divorce their local social functions from the activities of the State Society 
and to carry them on through the agency of a local organization. On 
March 12, 1913, they applied for a charter for a Detroit Chapter with 
territorial limits comprising Wayne County. The charter for this Chapter 
was granted May 2, 1913. The Chapter was organized and a constitution 
adopted November I, 1913. All members of the State Society residing in 
Detroit were invited to become members. 

Two hundred and fifty members are enrolled. Monthly meetings are 
held during the winter seasons at the hotels, clubs, and by invitation at 
the residences of members. At these meetings, addresses are given upon 
topics of interest followed by general discussion participated in by the 
members. Refreshments and social intercourse follow. 

Other chapters have been established in Michigan as follows: 

On March 27, 1914, the members of the Western Michigan Chapter 
relinquished all territorial rights under their charter of 1897 to counties 
other than Kent, and received in return a new charter limited to Kent 
County. Their membership, which had diminished greatly, at once began 
to increase. Grand flapidr, now has an active and flourishing Chapter with 
a membership of 55. 

Upon the same date March 27, 1914 — five members of the State 

Society residing in Washtenaw County, together with eleven new members 
whcm they had secured, were granted a charter for the County of Wash- 

3 1 



tenaw. This Chapter, with headquarters at Ann Arbor, now has a mem- 
bership of 2i. Situated at the State University its opportunity is wide. 

On January 22, 1915, ten gentlemen residing in Mt. Pleasant were 
admitted to membership and granted a charter for a Chapter for Isabella 
County. Their membership included an actual son of the Revolution — 
Peter Alverson Wilsey. 

On February 22, 1915, fve members residing in Kalamazoo formed 
a provisional organization for the establishment of a local chapter in that 
county. Six additional members were secured and a charter granted De- 
cember 31, 1915. 

The State Society receives from each new applicant an admission fee 
of $5.00, and has adopted the plan of returning to local chapters, where 
such exist, one-half of this admission fee. All members of the State Society 
pay state and national duf.s amounting to $3.00, whether members of 
local chapters or not. Members of local chapters pay in addition such 
chapter dues as arc fixed by ths local chapter. Detroit Chapter requires 
chapter dues of $2.00 from each member. 

There can be no question but that the organization of local chapters 
greatly stimulates interest in this Society throughout the state. Its effect 
upon the growth of membership in the State Society may be noted as 
follows: 



For the ten years ending 1913 there had been no growth in member- 
bership, the losses by death and resignation being equal to the gain from 
new members. But the increase in membership since the adoption of the 
new policy has been: 24 new members were admitted in the year ending 
April 1, 1914; 62 in the year ending April 1, 1915, and 45 in the year 
ending April I, 1916. 



3 2 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 
Of the Michigan Societ>-, Sons of the Amencan Revolution 

DETROIT CHAPTER 

Charter granted May 2, 1913. 

250 Members. 

Dr. Stephen H. Knight President 

William P. HoUiday Vice-President 

Raymond E. Van Syckle Secretary 

Frank G. Smith Treasurer 

William Stocking Historian 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D Chaplain 

KENT CHAPTER 
Charter granted March 27, 1914 (superseding West Michigan Chapter). 

55 Members. 

Charles C. Follmer President 

Charles H. Leonard Vice-President 

Charles N. Remington Secretary 

Henry T. Stanton Treasurer 

WASHTENAV/ CHAPTER 

Charter granted March 27, 1914. 

20 Members. 

Robert W. Hemphill President 

Junius E. Beal • Vice-President 

Wolcott H. Butler Secretary 

Milton E. Osborn Treasurer 

Harlan H. Johnson Historian 

George W. Patterson Chaplain 

MT. PLEASANT CHAPTER 

Charter granted January 22, 1915. 

I I Menibers. 

Kendall P. Brooks President 

Charles Frank Marsh Vice-President 

Dr. Sheridan E. Gardiner Secretary 

Warren C. Perry Treasurer 

Harry G. Miller Historian 

KAL/.MAZOO CHAPTER 

Charter granted December 31,1915 
I 2 Members. 

Edward S. Parsons President 

Dr. William A. Stone Secretary 

3 3 



MEMBERSHIP REPORT 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Membership April 1, 1913 383 

New members during year 1913-14 23 

Old members reinstated i 

~ 24 

Deaths 5 

Resignations 2 

Demissions • 

Dropped 5 

— 13 

Membership April 1, 1914 399 

New members during year 1914-15 56 

By transfer ' 

Old members reinstated 5 

— 62 

Deaths 9 

Resignations • ^ 

Demissions ^ 

Dropped '6 

— 31 

Membership April 1, 1915 430 

New members during year 1915-16 42 

Old members reinstated 3 

— 45 

Deaths '5 

Resignations ' 

Demissions * 

— 25 
Membership April 1, 1916 450 



3 4 



1752853 



ROLL OF MExMBEPS 
Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

THE UPPER PENINSULA 

Alger County 

Frederick J. Baldwin Munising 

Cone Barlow ....... Munislng 

Harold K. Righter Munising 

Chippewa County 

George Kemp • Sault Ste. Marie 

Elmer S. Sutton Sault Ste. Marie 

Delta County 
Francis L. Baldwin Escanaba 

Dickinson County 
Ward F. Davidson. Iron Mountain 

Marquette County 

Fred H. Begole Marquette 

Alfred F. Maynard Marquette 

Edward O. Stafford Marquette 

Ontonajfon County 

Samuel Brady Rockland 

SchoolcriJt County 

Clarence E. Kelso Mani«tique 

Arthur S. Putnam •" • • Manislique 



THE LOWER PENINSULA 

Alpena County 

Frank W. Fletcher Alpen 

James B. Forman Alpe 



na 



Bay County 

Frederick P. Browne Bay City 

Edward W. Cressey Bay City 

George A. Loud Bay City 

Charles C. Rosenbury Bay City 



3 5 



THE LOWER PENINSULA— Continued 

•Barry County- 
Philip T. Colgrove Hastings 

Calhoun County 

William F. Church '. Marshall 

Charles E. Gorham Marshall 

Craig C. Miller Marshall 

Edward C. Hinman Battle Creek. 

Levi S. Warren Albion 

Cheboygan County 
Crawford S. Reilley Cheboygan 

Grand Traverse County 

Ansel A. Howard Petoskey 

George S. Rice Petoskey 

Genesee County 
Edwin O. Wood Flint 

Ingham County 

Wilbur E. Bailey Lansing 

George W. Bissell Lansing 

James B. Boyce Lansing 

Charles M. Turner Lansing 

Ionia County 

Allan B, Morse Ionia 

Erastus T. Yeomans Ionia 

Isabella County — The Mt. Pleasant Chapter 

Kendall P. Brooks Mt. Pleasant 

Harry N. Carlisle Howell 

Franklin C. Crego Mt. Pleasant 

Dr. Sheridan E. Gardiner Mt. Pleasant 

Walter E. Keene Mt. Pleasant 

Charles F. Marsh Mt. Pleasant 

Charles J. Myers Mt. Pleasant 

Harry G. Miller'. Mt. Pleasant 

Horace A. Miller Mt. Pleasant 

Walter F. Newberry Mt. Pleasant 

Warren E. Perry Mt. Pleasant 

3 6 



Jackson County 

Edward A. Bancker. . .• Jackson 

Enoch Bancker lackson 

Frederick L. Bliss Jackson 

Hugh E. Keeler 325 W Cortland. St.. Jackson 

SCEJamatzoo Ccuuty — The Kalamazoo Chapter 

Dr. Ralph E. BalcK , , .....> Kalamazoo 

Harry den Bieyker < Kalamazoo 

Walter den Bieyker Kalamazoo 

George M. Buck Kalamazoo 

Gordon W. Davis Kalamazoo 

Frank F. Ford Kalamazoo 

Carl H. Kleinstuck Kalamazoo 

Dr. Rush McNair, Kalamazoo 

Edward C. Parsons Kalamazoo 

Nathaniel H. Stewart Kalamazoo 

Dr. William A. Stone Kalamazoo 

Chauncey Strong Kalamazoo 

Miner C. Taft , Kalamazoo 

The Kent Chapter — Grand Rapids 

Charles M. Alden 901 Scribner Ave., N. W. 

Harry C. Angell 511 Terrace Ave., S. E. 

Terry J. Barker 159 Lafayette Ave., N. E. 

Norman W. Beecher 260 Jefferson Ave. 

Lucius Boltwoqd E Street, Riverside Nortli 

George S. Bucher 811 Lafayette Ave., S. E. 

Louis C. Covell 449 Pleasant St., S. E. 

James M. Crosby Kent Hill 

Lewis D. Cutcheon 431 Lyon St., N. E 

Fred McR. Deane 438 Madison Ave., S. E. 

Harrison E. Fairchild 242 Eastern Ave. S. E. 

Charles C. FoUmer 465 Fountain St. .N. E. 

Don W. Farrant 427 Terrace Ave. S. E 

Isaac B. Gilbert 341 Paris Ave. S. E. 

Louis B. Haight Muskegon 

Claude Hamilton 37 Terrace .Ave. S. E. 

John M. Himes 232 Union Ave. S. E. 

Horace W. Hardy 218 Terrace Ave. S. E. 

Lee M. Hutchina 313 College Ave. S. E. 

William Judson 225 Fountain St. N. E. 

Loyal E. Knappen 330 Washington St. S. E. 

Stuart E. Knappen 322 Fountain St. N. E. 

Comstock Konkle 610 Windsor Terrace S. E. 

Lieut. Merritt U. Lamb Muskegon 

3 7 



Kent CLopter — Continued 

Dr. Frederick J. Lar^ieH 340 Union Ave., S. E. 

Paul Leake Michigan Trust Co. 

Charles H. Leonard 455 Morris Ave. S. E. 

Roy K. Moulton J 5 J 2 Robinson Road S. E. 

George W. Munson 26 Grant St. S. W. 

Charles O. Naah , 20 Union Ave. S. E. 

Mark Norris _ 29 Prospect Ave. N. E. 

Charles M. Norton I935 PJainfield Ave. 

Daniel T. Patton 550 Fountain St. N. E. 

Gen Byron R. Pierce 47 Jefferson Ave. 

Charles F. Reed. 238 Paris Ave. S. E. 

Charles N. Remington 340 College Ave, S. E. 

H. Parker Robinson 222 Fountain St. N. E. 

Rev. George P. T. Sargent | 50 Lafayette Ave. S. E. 

William R. Shelby 65 Lafayette Ave. N. E. 

Edward C. Smith Michigan Soldiers' Home 

William Aldan Smith, ]r Robinson Road 

William Alden Smith 465 College Ave. S. E. 

Dr. Ralph H. Spencer 327 Paris Ave. S. E. 

Harold. L. Spooner fj_ p £) j^Jq 1 q 

Joseph W. Spooner 29 College Ave. N. E. 

William T. P. Spooner 558 Morris Ave. S. E. 

Harry T. Stanton 437 V/ashington St. S. E. 

William F. Stanton I 758 Plainfield Ave. N. E. 

Forris D. Stevens 55 Lafayette Ave. N. E. 

Edson W. Steward 216 Benjamin S. E. 

Frank A. Stone 444 pleasant St. S. E. 

Frederick K. Tinkham 3 | 5 Pari, Ave. S. E. 

Van Arthur Wallin 442 Madison Ave. S. E. 

Dudley E. Waters Oakhurst 

Edward D. Winchester 320 Lafayette Ave. N. E. 

Walter C. Winchester 441 Madison Ave. S. E. 

Herbert A. Woodruff 229 Crescent Ave. N. E. 

Silas McK. Wright 512 Franklin St. S. E. 

Leiiawe« County 
Wilbcrt H. Barrett ^d 



nan 



Livingston County 

Leon H. Barnum Howell 

Miles W. Bullock Howell 

Harry N. Carlisle Howell 

Charles G. Jewett Howell 

Albert L. Smith Howell 

.3 8 



Macomb County 

Levant E. Bedell Romeo 

George A. Skinner Mt. Clemens 

Dr. Harry F. Taylor Mt. Clemens 

Clarence F. Connor, U. S. A Mt. Clemens 

Montcalm County 
S. Perry Youngs Stanton 

Muskegon County 

Louis B. Haight (Kent Chapter) , Muskegon 

Lieut. Merritt U. Lamb (Kent Chapter) Muskegon 

Oakland County 

George N. Brady (Detroit Chapter) .' Birmingham 

William J. Chittenden (Detroit Chapter) Birmingham 

Williams C. Harris (Detroit Chapter) Birmingham 

Dr. Edward B. Spalding (Detroit Chapter) Green Lake 

Frederick B. Smith (Detroit Chapter) Pine Lake 

Frederick P. Smith (Detroit Chapter) Royal Oak 

Frederic J. Stevens (Detroit Chapter) Royal Oak 

Charles V/. Warren Royal Oak 

Alpheus W. Chittenden Bloomfield Hills 

Herbert R. Earle (Detroit Chapter) Bloornfield Hills 

Charles Stinchfield (Detroit Chapter) Bloornfield Hills 

Thomas W. Taliaferro Bloornfield Hills 

Ottawa Countj 
Nathaniel Robbins Grand Haven 

St. Clair County 

Burt D. Cady ' Port Huron 

Charles K. Douge Port Huron 

Edmund R. Harrington Port Huron 

Sidney G. McClouth M'-'rine City 

Russ S. Jenka St. Clair 

Henry Whiting ^ St. Clair 

Saginaw County 
Robert F. Johnson Saginaw 

Shiawassee County 
George T. Campbell ' Owosso 

3 9 • 



or 



Washtenaw County — -The Washtenaw Chapter 

Ernest H. Barnes. . Ann Arbor 

Junius E. Beal ^ ^^^ ^^^or 

R-« W. Bea! . . , Ann Arbor 

Dr. E. L. M Bristol . . . , Ann Arbor 

Wolcott H. Butler Ann Arbor 

Lucius Clarke Ann Arbor 

Charles B. Coe Ann Arbor 

Harry N. Cole __ Ann Arbor 

Warren W. Florer Ann Arbor 

J. J. Goodyear Ann Arbor 

William T. Groves Ann Arbor 

Robert W. Hemphill. Ypsilanti 

Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale. Ann Arbor 

Harlan H. John.on Ann Arbor 

Dr. Robert G. Mackenzie Ann Arbor 

Milton E. Osborn Ann Arb 

George V/. Patterson Ann Arbo. 

J. Q. A. Sessions Ann Arbor 

Shirley W. Smith Ann Arbor 

Lucius P. Watkins Manchester 

Wayne County 

Almon B. Atwater 65 Taylor Ave., Detroit 

Walter C. Boynton 7 1 Atkinson Ave., Detroit 

William H. Burtenshaw 550 Jefferson Ave.. Detroit 

Hal D. Cady 57 Watson St., Detroit 

David S. Carter Grosse Pointe Village 

Arthur C. Cogswell 2716 West Grand Blvd. 

Dexter M. Ferry Crosse Pointe 

Charles W. Harrah 120 Pingree Ave., Detroit 

Lawrence B. Hay ward |09l Second Ave.. Detroit 

William L. Henry 542 Jos. Campau Ave., Detroit 

C. Frederic Heyerman 83 Forest Ave. E., Detroit 

Riley L. Jones 568 Helen Ave., Detroit 

Everett A. Leonard 60 Stimson PL. Detroit 

William E. .Metzger 28 Longfellow Ave., Detroit 

Jonathan Palmer | 97 Bethune Ave. W., Detroit 

Albert F. Peck Pasadena Apts., Detroit 

Samuel L. Pitts 1691 Jefferson Ave.. Detroit 

Frederick A. Smith 93 Farnsworth St., Detroit 

Fred D. Stsndish 212 Seyburn Ave., Detroit 

William W. Talman I 559 Jefferson Ave.. Detroit 

F rederic Towle 919 Jefferson Ave., Detroit 

Ernest C. Wetmore 526 Jefferson .Ave.. Detroit 

Bert C. Whitney Gros.e Pointe Village 

4 0. 



The Defroit Chapter 

Shslden A. 'Wood 31 Edmund PI., Detroit 

Frederick M. Alger Grosse Pointe N'iilage 

Mark \V. Alien 425 Hurlbut Ave. 

Stephen L. Angle Chatham, N. J. 

John P. Antisdel 319 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Edv/ard H. Ashley 71 C^^rficlc Ave. 

Frank W. Averill 1042 Second Ave. 

Harry E. Avery 33 Palmer Ave. E. 

John H. Avery 652 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Charles H. Ayers , 53 Trowbridge Ave. 

John N. Bagley Grosse Pointe Farms 

Paul F. Bagley Witherell Apts. 

John E. Baker 1041 Cas3 Ave. 

Edwin S. Barbour Grosse Pointe Farms 

George H. Barbour Grosse Pointe Farms 

Col. Walter Barlow 56 Hancock Ave. E. 

George W. Bates 53 Bagg St. 

Jerome H. Bishop Wyandotte 

J. Remsen Bishop 1555 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Edward W. Bissell 750 Jefferson Ave. 

Roman A. Bissell 750 Jefferson Ave. 

Clifford C. Boone 15 Owen Ave. 

Albert W. Bosley 89 Warren Ave. E. 

George N. Brady Birmingliani 

Gerald D. Bunker 96 Collingwood Ave. 

Clarence M. Burton 65 Boston Blvd. W. 

George E. Bushnell 33 Davenport St. 

Edward H. Butler Grosse Pointe Farms 

Fred E. Butler Pasadena Apts. 

Wells D. Butterfield 66 Glendale Ave. 

Guy B. Cady 217 Seyburn Ave. 

David C. Cady 57 Watson St. 

Sherman D. Callender 73 Pingrce Ave. 

Allan Campbell 34 Warren Ave. W. 

Hamilton Carhartt 843 Jefferson Ave. 

Henry T. Carpenter 60 Florence Ave. 

G. Lewis Carter 744 Cass Ave. 

John W. Case 123 Clairmount Ave. 

Cornelius K. Chapin Grosse Pointe 

Roy D. Chapin Grosse Pointe Farm* 

Hugh C. Chedester 68 Peterboro St 

V/illiam J. Chittenden Birmingham 

Dr. Harold E. Clark 50 Atkinson Ave. 

Charles L. Clark 51 Holbrook Ave. 



4 1 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Carl F. Clarke 68 Pcterboro St. 

Benjamin F. Comfort j 76 Warren Ave. W. 

Harry A. Conant Windsor, Ont. 

John S. Conant 504 Pa«adena Apt*. 

Norman B. Conger 66 Tuxedo Ave., H. P. 

Charles G. Cook 226 Pallieter Ave. 

J. Clifton Cook 2909 V/est Grand Blvd. 

Gen. Charles A. Coolidge Paaadena Apt*. 

Arthur E. Corbin , Petrograd, Russia 

John B. Corliss 34 Canfield Ave. W. 

J. Donaldson Craig 1 045 Trumbull Ave. 

Roy« J. Cram Westchetter, Pa. 

William A. Crampton 143 Canfield Ave. W. 

Frank D. Crisiman 1475 West Grand Blvd. 

Charles B. Crouse 25 Peterboro St. 

William McI. Crouse Solvay Lodge 

Harry B. Crowl 830 Second Ave. 

George S. Davia P. O. Box 574 

James El. Davis 870 Jeffereon Ave. E. 

John Davi» 56 Garfield Ave. 

Edwin Denby 310 Iroquois Ave. 

Franklin S. Dev^rey 309 Warren Ave. W. 

Fred G. Dewey 145 Trowbridge Are. 

Horace K. Dickinson 77 Westminster Ave. 

John L. Dickinson | | | 2 1 «t St. 

Paul Dickinson 106 Tyler Ave., H. P. 

George A. Drake 92 Lawrence Ave. 

Dr. Harlow B. Drake Pasadena Apt*. 

J. Walter Drake 1 1 2 Boston Blvd. W. 

Charles A. Ducharme Grosse Pointe Village 

Frederick T. Ducharme 200 Burn* Ave. 

Bethune Duffield 480 Woodward Ave. 

Dr. George DufHeld 186 Canfield Ave. W. 

Harry B. Earhart 1631 Washtenaw St., Ann Arbor 

Herbert R. Earle Bloomfield Hill* 

C. Goodloe Edgar 188 Iroquois Ave. 

Harold S. Ellington 201 Gladstone Ave. 

Dr. Justin E, Emerson St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Jacob S. Farrand, Jr 45 7 Woodward Ave. 

William R. Farrand 149 McDougall Ave. 

Oliver A. .Farwell 101 Smith Ave. 

William M. Finck 145 Van Dyke Ave. 

Albert H. Finn 36 Bethune Ave. W. 

Frank D. Forbush 315 Seminole Ave. 

4 2 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Charles E. Fox 430^2 Cass Ave. 

Henry Riley Fuller Pasadena Apt«. 

Richard H. Fyfe 939 Woodward Ave. 

William T. Gage • Crosse Isle 

James Brooks Gale, . . '. 357 Cass Ave. 

Lewis LeB. Goodwin 1 80 E. Grand Boulevard 

John H. Greusel Hollywood, Calif. 

Paul S. Hamilton Solvay Lodge 

Byron E. Hamlin. . .• 3079 Grand Blvd. W. 

Rawson B. Harmon Grosse Point© Village 

William P. Harris 1751 Jefferson Ave. | 

Williams C. Harris Birmingham j 

Walter S. Harsha 32 Petcrboro St. I 

Frederick T. Harward 80 Connecticut Ave., H. P. | 

Charles H. Hatch 99 Delav/are Ave. | 

George E. Hawley 60 Palmer Ave. W. } 

William C. Heath 789 Third Ave. j 

Albert M. Henry Grosse Pointe Farms j 

Burns Henry Grosse Pointe Farms < 

William H. Hill 100 Boston Blvd. 1 

Joseph L. Hepburn 309 Warren Ave. W. | 

Dr. Charles W. Hitchcock 55 Stimson Place i 

William H. Holden 115 Hancock Ave. E. 

William P. Holliday 68 Davenport St. 1 

Dr. Frank WarJ Holt 130 Tuxedo Ave. 

Henry W. Horton 316 Hudson Ave. | 

Arthur C. Hoskins 529 Jefferson Ave. j 

George S. Hosmer 51 Eliot St. j 

Rex Humphrey 500 Jefferson Ave. 

Wetmore Hurt 677 Jefferson Ave. 

Wm. H. H. Hutton, Jr 663 Second Ave. 

Oscar A. Janes 30 California Ave., H. P. 

Deming Jarves Dinard, France 

Ira W. Jayne 33 Warren Ave. W. 

Charles C. Jenks 472 Woodward Ave. 

Henry L. Jenness 39 Rowena St. 

Dr. Charles G. Jennings 435 Jefferson Ave. 

James D. Jerome 55 Rowena St. 

Edward H. Jewett 239 Burns Ave. 

Harry M. Jewett Grosse Pointe Shores 

Henry K. Jones 898 Jefferson Ave. 

Lee E. Joslyn 66 Euclid Ave. W. 

4 3 



Detroit Chtplir — Continued 

Charles A. Kant=r 99 Merrick Ave. 

Charles E. Kanter 63 Eliot St. 

William J. Keep 753 Jefferson Ave. 

James A. Kier 109 Blaine Ave. 

Louis B. King 76 Stimson Place 

Hale G. Knight 37 wm;, ^.^^ £ 

Rufus H. Knight 37 Willis Ave. E. 

Dr. Stephen H. Knight 37 WiHig Ave. E. 

Alburn H. Krum 36 Seward Ave. 

Howard A. Ladue 894 Cass Ave. 

Marion B. Landry 49 Qwen Ave. 

Kirke Lathrop 200 Parker Ave. 

Charles F. Lawson 862 Trumbull Ave. 

Fred C. Lawton 122 Rhode island Ave. 

Henry B. Ledyard Crosse Pointe Farms 

James L. Lee , Crosse Pointe Farms 

Dr. Charles B. Leonard 40 Massachusetts Ave. 

Cornelius W. Leonard 3 70 Harper Ave. 

Richard L'Hommedieu | 9 1 McDougall Ave. 

Charles E. Locke I 58 McDougall Ave. 

Harry A. Lockwood 1077 Second Ave. 

Frank T. Lodge 75 Tuxedo Ave. 

Ferdinand G. Luderer 5 1 3 4^}^ Ave. 

Dr. Albert D. Lyons 1 02 Alger Ave. 

Dr. Carl C. McClelland 130 Webb Ave. 

Howard A. McGraw 1209 Cass Ave. 

Francis C. McMath 215 Iroquois Ave. 

Dr. Walter P. Manton 45 Watson St. 

Caleb McD. Mathews 1 O4 Lincoln Ave. 

Charles A. Merrell 68 Peterboro St. 

Edwin L. Miller 5O Delaware Ave. 

Sidney T. Miller 524 Jefferson Ave. 

Charles Moore 1 97 p^^l,^^ Ave. 

William V. Moore Garden Court Apts. 

John L. C. Mulkey 1| 29 Jefferson Ave. 

lohn M. Mulkey 1 129 Jefferson Ave. 

Owen M. Mulkey Pasadena Apts. 

Manuel Munoz 1 I pj^^ St.. New York 

James O. Murfln I 84 Van Dyke Ave. 



John S. Newberry Grosse Pointe F.- 
Truman H. Newberry Grosse Pointe Far 

Herbert W. Noble 424 Seminole Ave 



arms 
ms 



4 4 



-, Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Lewis H. Paddock 496 Jefferson Ave. 

DeForest Paine Detroit Athletic Club 

Calvin A. Palmer , 200 Edison Ave. 

Jonathan Palmer, jr ■ , . . 31 Euclid Ave. W. 

Orren L. Palmer Hi Tyler Ave.. H. P. 

Dr. Homer E. ParsKall ' . .42 Kirby Ave. W. 

Leroy E. Perine , ..458 Chicago Blvd. 

■Harry H. Pettee 83 Harper Ave. 

Oliver Phelps , . , 134 McDougall Ave. 

Ralph Phelps, Jr 345 Iroquois Ave. 

T. Glenn Phillips , Hotel Plaza 

Marvin Preston 311 Addison Apts. 

Dr. William H. Price 20 Davenport St. 

Milton B. Purdy 559 Cass Ave. 

William P. Putnam 75 Owen Ave. 

Frederick T. Ranney 89 Eliot St. 

Charles L. Raymond 77 Arden Park 

Jerome H. Remick 501 Jefferson Ave. 

Dr. Frederick W. Robbins 96 Forest Ave. \V. 

Louis C. Rogers 439 Vinewood Ave. 

William H. Rose 220 Virginia Park 

William S, Sayres, Jr 96 Hazelwood Ave. 

Charles H. Sedgwick Pasadena Apts. 

Dr. T. M. Sellards 24 Peterboro St. 

Francis M. Sessions I 64 Josephine Ave. 

Frank C. Sibley 144 Woodland Ave. 

Thomas H. Simpson 25 Eliot St. 

Dudley W. Smith 73 Pallister Ave. 

Enoch Smith 532 St. Paul Ave. 

Frank G. Smith 89 Hancock Ave. E. 

Frederick B. Smith Pine Lake 

Frederick P. Smith Royal Oak 

James Coslett Smith Garden Court Apts. 

W. Peyton Smith 1 00 Warren Ave. E. 

Dr. Edward B. Spalding Green Lake 

H. Wibirt Spence Grosse Isle 

Howard A. Starret 140 Canfield Ave. 

John W. Starret 140 Canfield Ave. 

Samuel C. Stearns Kingsville, Ont. 

Arthur E. Stevens 125 Hancock Ave. W. 

Frederic J. Stevens Royal Oak 

Mark B. Stevens 57 Garfield Ave. 

Charles Stinchfield.' Bloomfield Hills 

William Stocking 220 E. Grand Boulevard 

4 5 



Detroit Chapter-— -Coiititiued 

Edward W. Stoddard 153 Putnam Ave. 

Ralph Stone 975 Cass Ave. 

Joseph S. StrlngK am . . , 275 Seminole Ave. 

John H. Swift , Sandwich, Ont. 

DeWitt H. Taylor 25 Alfred St. 

Frank D. Taylor , 105 Watson St. 

Julius E. Thatcher I 865 Second Ave. 

James W. Thompson 90 Putnam Ave. 

Dr. J. Melville Thompson , , 148 Westminster Ave. 

Walter Thompson Birmingham 

Wilfred S. Thompson. . 1 76 Warren Ave. W. 

James H. Thornbu<«-g. 206 Northwestern Ave. 

Arthur C. Tredway 452 Cadillac Ave. 

James Turner 241 Seminole Ave. 

Arthur J. Tuttle 140 Colling^vood Ave. 

Walter M. Trevor 178 Iroquois Ave. 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D.D 21 Edmund Place 

Frank G. Van Dyke 114 Rivard St. 

Raymond E. Van Syckle 450 Putnam Ave. 

Will A. Waite 41 Adelaide St. 

William C. Wakefield Henry Clay Hotel 

Charles A. Warren 789 Cass Ave. 

John H. Wendell 159 Port St. W. 

George M. West 56 Garfield Ave. 

George C. Wetherbee 765 Cass Ave. 

John L. Whitehead 305 Elmhurst Ave. 

Laurence J. Whittemore 98 Burlingame Ave, 

William S. Wightman 261 24th St. 

Bert C. Wilder 146 Hazelwood Ave. 

John D. V/iley 300 Putnam Ave. 

Henry P. Williams 9 | Merrick Ave. 

Maurice O. Williams Pasadena Apts. 

Jefferson T. Wing 200 McDougall Ave. 

Palmer E. Winslow 628 Second Ave. 

Albert F. Wood •. . .31 Edmund Place 

Andrew C. Wood 935 Cass Ave. 

Hugh J. Wood 73 Bethune Ave. W. 

Charles M. Woodruff 475 East Grand Blvd. 

Fremont Woodruff 4290 Jefferson, Grosse Pointe Village 

F. Raymond Woolfenden 21 Forest Apts. 

George R, Woolfenden ,169 Ferry Ave. W. 

Charles Wright 919 Jefferson Ave. 



4 6 



N3EMBERS-OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY IN OTHER STATES 

Alabama 
Frederick T. Peck Mobile 

Alaska 

Ralph R. Tinkham Ketchikan 

California 

John H. Greusel (Detroit Chapter) Hollywood 

William L. ^-liite San Francisco 

J. Winslow Howarth Berkley 

Dr. Henry M, Kier Woodland 

Colorado 
Levi W. Partridge 327 Railway Exchange Bidg., Denver 

Florida 

Dr. Justin E. Emerson (Detroit Chapter) St. Petersburg 

Georgia 
John E. Bushnell Augusta 

Louisiana 
Jesse C. Remick Moberly 

Massachusetts 

Rev. Lee S, McCollester Tufts College 

Frank B. Gaylord 58 Pomeroy Terrace, Northampton 

Minnesota 
Fred B. Coleman McKnight Bldg., Minneapolis 

Missouri 
Dr. William F. Kier 3609 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis 

New Jersey 
Stephen L. Angle (Detroit Chapter) Chatham 

New York 

Kent M. Austin Buffalo 

Dr, Royal S. Copeland 63d St. and Eastern Blvd., New York 

George E. Hardy 14 Wall St., New York 

Joshua E. Howard 103 Fulton St., New York 

William J. Raincy 225 West 69th St., New York 

Rev. John H. Randall 28 West 12 7th St.. New York 

Sidney B. Wight 330 Riverside Drive, New York 

4 7 



New Mexico 
Clarence F. Connor First Aero Squadron, Signal Corps, U. S. A. 

Ohio 

Solace B. Coolidge .Cleveland 

William J. Weaver Cleveland 

Pennsylvania 

Roya J. Cram (Detroit Chapter) Westchester 

George D. Hadzits 4207 Sansone St., Philadelphia 

H. Starkey Saiiford Pittsburgh 

Wisconsin 
RusccU Y. Cooke Racine 

Ontario 

John D. Chase U. S. Customs Service, London 

Albert M. Marshall Toronto 

France 
Deming Jorves (Detroit Chapter) Dinard 

Russia 

Arthur E. Corbin (Detroit Chapter) Petrograd 



4 8 









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MICHIGAN SOCIETY 
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 




HpMmk 



YEAR BOOK 
1917-1918 



YEAR BOOK 

MICFilGAN SOCIETY 

SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

1917-1918 




COMPILED BY 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLL 

Secretary 
1 729 Ford Building 
Detroit, Michigan 



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CONTEKTS 

'^' • Page 

Present Officers 3 

Delegates to National Congress 4 

Board of Managers 4 

Oi&cers Since Organization 5 

Biographies of State Officers 7 

Comtnittees H 

Constitution 14 

By-Laws 16 

Secretary's Annual Report, 1917 19 

Minutes of Annual Meeting, 1 9 1 7 22 

Secretary's Annual Report, 1918 23 

Memorial Report 28 

Official Publications 31 

Badge and Service Bar 32 

Service Ust. War. 1917-1918 33 

Chapter Organization .' • 36 

Roll of Chapters 38 

Membership Report 40 

Roll of Members 41 

Deceased Members 38 



'^ ^ - ^ ^ 



iO 
I 

^^ 

'j:^ OFFICEPvS OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY, 

C^^ SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

-U - 

V 

^ 1917-1918 






3 



3 



GEORGE I-IARRISON BARBOUR 

MAJOR FREDERICK MOULTON ALGEH 
Vice-President 



CHARLES H. LEONARD 
, Second Vice-Preeident 

^ RAYMOND ELMOINE VAN SYCKLE 

^^'"^'^ Secretary 

r---- FRANK. GOFF SMITH 

V^i^^ Treasurer 

FRANKLIN SMITH DEWEY 

Registrar 

I 

WARREN WASHBURN FLORER, Ph.D. 
Historian 

^ REV. JOSEPH ADDISON VANCE. D. D. 

i ^ Chaplain 

\\0 



DELEa\TE5 TO THE CONGRESS OF TKE NATIONAL SOCIETY 



Dr, Stephen H. Knight, Detroit, Dilcgate-at-Large 



Junius E. Bcal, Ann Arlaor 
J. Remsen Bishop, Detroit 
Kendall P. Brooks, Mt. Plea^nt 
Gen. Charle» A. Coolidge, Detroit 
James M. Crosby, Grand Rapids 



Jacob S. Farrand, Jr., Detroit 
William M. Finck, Detroit 
Charles C- Follmer, Grand Rapids 
Robert W. Hemphill, Jr., Ypsilanti 
Julius E. Thatcher, Detroit 



Alternate Delegates 



Francis L- Baldvrin, EUcsnabzi 
Enoch Bancker, Jackson 
Wilbert K. Barrett, Adrian 
George \V. Bissell, Lansing 
Philip T. ColgTOve, Haatings 



Frank W. Fletcher, Alpena 
Crawford S. Reilley, Cheboygan 
Dr. William A. Stone, Kalamazoo 
Charles M. Turner, Lansing 
Levi S. Warren, Albion 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 



John P. Antisdel, Detroit 
John E. Baker, Detroit 
Frederick J. Baldwin, Munising 
George E. Bushnell, Detroit 
Hugh C. Chedester, Detroit 
Carl F. Clarke, Detroit 
Norman B, Conger, Detroit 



Herbert R. Earle, Detroit 

Lewis LeB- Goodwin, Detroit 

Frederick T. Marward, Detroit 

Burns Henry, Detroit 

William P. Holliday, Detroit 

Harry M. Jewett, Detroit 

Charles N. Remington, Grand Rapids 



Charles M. Woodruff, Detroit 
and 
The OfEcers of this Society, and the Delegates to the Congress of the 
National Societj', ex-ofScio. 



MEMBER BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF NATIONAL SOCIETY 
Albert M. Henry, Detroit 



OFFICERS OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY SINCE ITS ORGANIZATON 

Presidents 

Henry B. Ledyard 1890-1897 

Thomas W. Palmer J 897-1 901 

Alfred Russell I 90 1 - 1 903 

Thomas Pitts I 903- 1 905 

Rufus W. Clark 1905-1908 

Richard H. Fyfe 1908-1 909 

Frank D. Taylor 1909-1911 

Lee S. McCollester 1911-1912 

Joseph Greusel 1912-1913 

Albert M. Henry 1913-1916 

Clarence M. Burton 1916-1917 

George H. Barbour 1917-1918 

Vice-Presidents 

William H. Brearley 1 890- 1 893 

Richard Storrs Willis I 893- 1 900 

Alfred Russell I 900- 1 90 1 

Thomas Pitts 1901-1903 

Rufus W. Clark 1903-1905 

John N. Bagley 1905-1907 

Richard H. Fyfe I 907- 1 908 

Almon B. Atwater | 908-1 909 

Albert M. Henry 1909- 1910 

Charles E. Baxter 1910-1911 

Joseph Greusel 191I-I9I2 

Gen. Charles A. Coolidge 1913-1915 

Clarence M. Burton 1915-1916 

Jacob S. Farrand, Jr 191 6- 1917 

Frederick M. Alger 1917-1918 

Charles H. Leonard 1917-1918 

Secretaries 

Frederick T. Sibley , | 890- I 893 

Henry S. Sibley 1 893- 1 905 

Rufue G. Lathrop 1 905-1 908 

Williams C. Harris 1908-1913 

Raymond E. Van Syckle 1913-1918 



Silaa Farmer 1890-1892 

William F. H. Edwards 1892-1897 

George W. Batea 1897-1905 

Norman B. Conger 1905-1908 

Charles E. Baxter 1908-1909 

Raymond E. Van Syckle. 1909-1913 

Franklin S. Dewey I913-I918 

Treasurers 

Silas Farmer 1 890-1 892 

William F. H/Edwards. 1892-1897 

George W. Bates 1897-1899 

Edward W. Gibson 1899-1905 

Enoch Smith 1 905- 1915 

Frank G. Smith 1915-1918 

Historians 

James C. Smith.. 1899-1905 

Joseph Greusel 1905-1908 

Clarence M. Burton 1908-1915 

Charles Moore 1915-1917 

Warren W. Rorer 1917-1918 

Chaplains 

Rev. Nehemiah Boynton, D. D 1899-1903 

Rev. Lee S. McCollester, D. D 1903-1908 

Rev. Rufus W. Clark. D. D 1908-1909 

Rev. Lee S. McCollester. D. D 1909-1911 

Rt. Rev. Charles D. Williams, D. D 1911-1913 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance. D. D 1913-1918 



BIOGRAPHIES OF STATE OFFICERS 
MICHIGAN SOCIETY SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

GEORGE HARRISON BARBOUR. President. 

George Harrison Barbour, National No. 9582, Michigan No. 182, was 
born at ColIInsville, Conn., June 26, 1846. He was educated in a country 
school at Collinsville, where his father and he conducted a general store. 
In 1872 he came to Detroit as secretary of the Michigan Stove Company, 
of which he is now president. In 1907 Mr. Barbour organized the Michigan 
Copper & Brass Company and was its president up to 1914. He is also 
associnted with nunnerous financial institutions f.nJ other large business in- 
terests- He is president of the Ireland & Mathews Manufacturing Com- 
pany; director of the Peoples State Bank; vice-president and director of 
the Dime Savings Bank; director of the Michigan Fire & Marine Insurance 
Conipany. He was a member of the National Commission of the World's 
Fair, Chicago, 1893, and chairman of Michigan Commission, Pan- Ameri- 
can Exposition, Buffalo, 1901. He was the first president of the Detroit 
Board of Commerce; the first president of the Michigan Manufacturers* As- 
sociation and active in the affairs of the National Association of Manufac- 
turers, having been chairman of the Legislative Committee in 1 902 ; ex-presi- 
dent National Association Stove Manufacturers, and a member of the Board 
of Aldermen, 1887-88, of which he was president during his last term. He 
is a former president of Detroit Museum of Art. 

Admitted February 18, 1897, by reason of his descent from Joel Bar- 
ber, private, Enos' Connecticut regiment; Isaiah Thompson, colonel, Con- 
necticut infantry and artillery, and Enoch Drake, private, Connecticut 
troops. He was elected National Delegate 1905. 1906, 1911. 1912. 
1 9 1 3, I 9 1 6. and was elected President April 20. 1 9 1 7. 

MAJOR FREDERICK MOULTON ALGER. Vice-President. 

Frederick Moulton Alger, National No. 12886, Michigan No. 386, was 
born in Detroit June 27, 1876, son of Russell A. Alger, National No. 12881. 
Major Alger graduated at Harvard in 1899 with the degree of A. B. He 
served as captain and assistant adjutant-general U. S. Vol., Spanish-Ameri- 
can war, 1898. He has been engaged in business in Detroit since 1900; 
director and treasurer Alger, Smith Ac Co., lumber manufacturers; director 
Packard Motor Car Company, Anderson Forge & Machine Company, Na- 
tional Bank of Commerce, etc. He now holds commission as major of cav- 
alry, O. R. C, stationed at Camp Custer. He was admitted to membership 
in this Society October 24, 1900, by reason of his descent from Captain 
Freeborn Moulton, Danielson's Regiment at Lexington Alarm. He served 
as a member of the Board of Managers of this Society in 1905 and was 
elected Vice-President April 20, 1917. 



CHARLES HEMAN LEONARD. Second Vice-President. 

Charles Heman Leonard, National No. Iblli), Michigan No. 701, wa« 
born in Grand Rapids, Mich., January 15, 1847. He g^raduated from Grand 
Rapids High School in 1866, Entering his father's store, he was admitted 
to partnership in 1868 under the firni name of H. Leonard & Sons, dealers 
in crockery and house furnishings goods, in which concern he still retains 
his interests. In 1882 he took out a patent for an improvement in refrig- 
erators and commenced their manufacture, organizing the Grand Rapids 
Refrigerator Company, of which he is the president- 
He was admitted to membership in this Society Noveniber 6, 1914, by 
reason of his descent from William Hincher, Jr., private Brookfield Co. 
Mass. Militia; great-great grandson of Sergeant \Vm. Hincher, Colonel Job 
Cushing's Mass. Regiment. 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE, Secretary. 

Raymond E. Van Syckle, National No. 15650, Michigan No. 475, was 
born in Bay City, August 24, 1868. He graduated from the University 
of Michigan. B. S. (1891), M. S. (1895), LL. B. (1895). He is an attor- 
ney-at-law and a professor of law at Detroit College of Law. He has served 
the city as a member of the Board of Estimates, has been secretary of the 
Lawyers' Club and treasurer of the University of Michigan Club of Detroit. 

He was admitted to this society November 28, 1904, by reason of hi» 
descent from Timothy Corbin, 5th Worcester County, Mass., Militia (his 
great-great grandfather). He was elected member of the Board of Man- 
agers 1907-1908, Registrar 1909-1912, and fiecretary 1913-1917. Mem- 
ber of Committee on Military and Naval Records, National Society 1913. 

FRANK GOFF SMITH, Treasurer. 

-■ Frank Goff Smith, National No. 26798, Michigan No. 723, was born 
in Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 2, 1871; educated Detroit High School. He i« 
vice-president of the First and Old Detroit National Bank and has served 
as a member of the Michigan State Naval Brigade. 

He derives his eligibility in this Society from the fact that he is th« 
great-great grandson of Thomas Pool, Col. David Green's Mass. Regiment, 
and great-great grandson of Col, Eli Willard of Mass. Militia. He was 
admitted to this Society March 23, 1915, and elected Treasurer, which 
office he has held since that time. 

FRANKLIN SMITH DEWEY, Registrar. 

Franklin Smith Dewey, National No. 18318, Michigan No. 518, was 
born in Cambridge, Lenawee County, March 27, 1845. Graduate Univer- 
sity of Michigan, B. S. (1869), M. S. (1672). Secretary National Casualty 
Company; former principal High School, Saginaw; superintendent of 
schools, Alpena; also member Board of Education, Alpena. 

8 



His revolutionary ancestors were Kia great-grandfatliers Simon Dewey 
2d, ensign in Colonel Chase's New Har.:psKije Regiment; Peter Selleck. 
private in Colonel Charles Webb's Conn. Regiment; Ezekiel Smith, cor- 
poral in Colonel John Lamb's Mass. RegimeiM; William Knight, in coast 
defense; and his great-great grandfather Isaac Brldgman, private in Colonel 
Chase's New Hampshire Regiment. He was admitted to membership No- 
vember 27, 1907; elected Delegate to National Congress in 1910; served 
as member of the Board cf Managers, 1911-1912; and as Registrar from 
1913 to date. 

WARREN WASHBURN FLORER, Ph.D.. Historian. 

V/arren Washburn Florer, of .Ann Arbor, National No. 14856, Michigan 
No. 431, was born in Loda, 111.. May I 1. 1869, and is the son of William 
Jefferson Florer and Mary Ann Louise Washburn; grandson of Alexander 
Bruce Florer and America Ann Herbert; great grandson of Charles Herbert 
and Elizabeth Marquis; great great grandson of Josiah Herbert, born in 
England August 22. 1755, privatu and drummer of Virginia troops; pen- 
sioned; also of William Marquis, private Virginia troops. His maternal 
great grandfather was Thomas Cain, private and Minute man in Capt. 
Josiah King's Company, Col. Mitchell's regiment, Massachusetts Militia. 
He was admitted to membership in this Society June 30, 1908, and was 
President of the Washtenaw Chapter, 1914 to 1916; an alternate delegate 
in 1914; member of the Board of Managers in 1916; elected delegate to the 
National Congress in 1916, and in April, 1917, was elected Historian of 
the State Society. 

Professor Florer is a member of the faculty of the University of Mich- 
igan and i^ at present engaged in writing articles and books on the demo- 
cratic ideals advocated in Europe by the revolutionists of 1848. He is also 
in charge of Company B, First Regiment, Officers' Reserve Training Corps, 
University of Michigan. 

{ REV. JOSEPH A. VANCE, D. D., Chaplain. 

I Rev. Joseph A. Vance. D. D., National No. 22604, Michigan No. 623, 

i was born in Sullivan County, Tenn., November 17, 1864. He was grad- 

I uated from Kings College A. B. (1885) and from Union Theological Sem- 

\ inary B. D. (1888). He received the degree of D. D. from Huron College 

^ (1902) and from Kings College (1904). Formerly pastor of Hyde Park 

Presbyterian Church, Chicago; pastor First Presbyterian Church, Detroit. 

His eligibility is derived from his great-great grandfathers Patrick 
Vance, private, 4th Company, 1st Battalian, Cumberland County, Penn., 
Militia, under Colonel Johnson, and Robert Sevier, captain North Carolina 
Militia, mortally wounded at Kings Mountain. 

Dr. Vance was received into this Society by transfer from Illinois 



December 27, 1911, to which society he was elected December 15, 1910. 
He served as a member of the Board of Managers 1912, and as Chaplain 
since 1913. 



ALBERT McKEE HENRY 

Member of the Board of Trustees of the National Societly. 

Albert McKee Henry, National No. 3153, Michigan No. 103, born in 
Grand Rapids, September 20, 1845, graduated University of Michigan, B. S. 
(1667), M. S. (1870). Admitted to the bar at Omaha, Neb., where he 
practiced from 1869-1875, until his removal to Detroit. He has served as 
member of the Common Council, Board of Estimates, State Board of Par- 
dons, Chairman Elducation Committee of the Board of Commerce. 

He ia a great grandson of Eli Brownson, lieutenant Vermont Militia, and 
was admitted to this Society October 25, 1895; elected Delegate to the 
National Congress 1906, 1907, 1908, and 1 9 1 2; Vice-President 1909, and 
President 1913-1916. 

Chairman of Committee on Arrangements for 28th Annual Congress 
of the National Society, 1916; chairman Committee on Organization (Mis- 
sissippi Valley-East) National Society, 1915-1916; member of the Execu- 
tive Committee National Society, 1914 to date; member of the Board of 
Trustees of the National Society, 1910-1917; member of Credentials Com- 
mittee of the National Society, 1912; member of Committee on Finance 
of the National Society, 1911. 



1 



COMMITTEES FOR 1917-1918 
MICHIGAN SOCIETY, SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Membe^'ship 

Norman B. Conger, Frederick T. Harward, John D. Wiley, Georg* E. 
Buahncll, Walter C. Eoynton, George E. Hawley, Charles A. Merrell, Charle* 
F. Lawson, Detroii; Chas. N. Remington, William T. P. Spooner, Frederick 
K. Tinkham, Grand Raplcs; Dr. Wm. A. Stons, Kalamazoo; Wolcott H. 
Butler, Ann Arbor; Dr. Sheriaaii E. Gardiner, Mt. Pleasant. 

Patnotic Education 

George W, Patterson, Junius E. Beal, Shirley W. Smith, Warren W. 
Florer, Harry N. Cole, Ann Arbor; J. Remsen Bishop, Benjamin F. Com- 
fort, Edwin L. Miller, Detroit; Henry Whiting, St. Clair; Fred H. Begole, 
Marquette; Edward C. Hinman, Battle Creek; George W. Bissell, Lansing; 
Kendall P. Brooks, Mt. Pleasant; Frederick L. Bliss, Jackson; Rev. Lee S. 
McCollester, Tufts College; George D. Hadzits, Philadelphia; William Aldcn 
Smith, Jr., Grand Rapids. 

Americanixation of Alien* 

Edward C. Parsons, Kalamazoo; Loyal E. Knappen, Grand Rapids; Al- 
bert M. Henry, Arthur J. Tuttle, George S. Hosmer, Frederic B. Smith, 
George H. Barbour, Charles A. Ducharme, Roy D. Chapin, J. Walter Drake, 
Paul F. Bagley, William M. Finck, Detroit; Walter F. Newberry, Mt. Pleas- 
ant. 

Patriotic Legislation 

William Judson, Claude Hamilton, Grand Rapids, Burt D. Cady, Port 
Huron; Nathaniel H. Stewart, Kalamazoo; Frank W. Fletcher, Alpena; Philip 
T. Colgrove, Hastings; Crawford S. Reilly, Cheboygan; Frederick J. Bald- 
win, Munising; James D. Jerome, Willianx S. Sayres, Jr., Detroit. 

Historical 

Charles Moore, William Stocking, Andrew C. Wood, Edward W. Stod- 
dard, Dudley W. Smith, Louis C. Rogers, Detroit; Lucius Boltwood, Grand 
Rapids; Allen B. Morse, Ionia; Dr. Ralph E. Balch, Kalamazoo; Harry G. 
Miller, Mt. Pleasant; William L. Jenks, Port Huron- 
Memorials 

Van A. Wallin, Grand Rapids; Williams C. Harris, Richard H. Fyfe, 
Charles M, Woodruff, Walter M. Trevor, Joseph L. Hepburn, John W. Cose, 
Mark B. Stevens, William J. Keep, Detroit. 

11 



Flag 

George A. Loud, Bay City; George W. Bates. Hugh C. Chedester, Frank 
C. Sibley, Charles Wright, Detroit; George Kemp, Sault Ste. Marie; Cha«. 
F. Marsh. Mt. Pleasant. 

Public Welfare 

Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale, Ann Arbor; Dexter M. Ferry, Ira W. Jayne. 
Dr. Frank Ward Holt, Charles L. Clark, Dr. Walter P. Manton, Dr. William 
H. Price, Di. Frederick W. Robbins, Rev. Joseph A. Vance, Detroit; Mark 
Norris, Grand Rapids; Dr. Royal S, Copeland, New York; Dr. Rush McNair, 
Kalamazoo. 

International Affairs. 

Harry A. Lockwood, Edwin Denby, Fred G. Dewey, Edward W. Bissell, 
Samuel L. Pitts, Enoch Smith, Almon B. Atwater. Detroit; Arthur E. Corbin, 
Petrograd. 

National Defense 

Burns Henry, Harry M. Jewett, Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, Gen. Chas. W. 
Harrah, Col. Oscar A. Janes, Col. Walter Barlow, Capt. Fred D. Standish, 
Riley L. Jones, C. Frederick Heyerman, Detroit; Gen. Byon R. Pierce, Capt. 
ELdward C. Smith, Grand Rapids; Levi S. Warren, Albion. 

Publicity 

Harlan H. Johnson, Ann Arbor; George T. Campbell, Owosso; Francis 
L. Bald-win, Escanaba; William A. Smith, Jr., Roy K. Moulton, Grand Rap- 
ids; Arthur C. Hoskins, Detroit. 

Banquet 

Dr. Stephen H. Knight, Albert M. Henry, William P. Holliday, Norman 
B. Conger, Raymond E. Van Syckle, George E. Bushnell, Lewis L. Goodwin. 

Organization of New Chapter* 
Alger County: Frederick J. Baldwin, Cone Barlow, Harold K. Righter. 

Alpena County: Frank W. Fletcher, James B- Forman, Henry E. 
Fletcher. 

Bay County: Edward W. Cressey, Thomas L. Handy. Jr., George A. 
Land, Charles C. Rosenbury. 

Barry County: Philip T. Colgrove. 

Berrien County: Leonard C. Vosburg- 

Calhoun County: Edward C. Hinman, William F. Church, Charles E. 
Gorham. Craig C. Miller, Levi S. Warren, Dr. Wilfrid Haughey, 
Russell W. Snyder. , 

1 2 



Cheboygan County: Crawford S. Reilley 

Chippewa County: Elrner S. Sutton, George Kemp, Chase S. Osborn, 

Delta County; Francis L. Baldwin. 

Dickinson County: Albert R. Pierce, Robert W- Pierce, Ward F. David- 
son. 

Grand Traverse County: Ansel A. Howard, Homer Sly. 

Houghton County: Dr. George W. Orr, Frederick N. Bosson, Ashley C. 
Leavitt, Leslie E. Deli. 

Iron County: Hugh P. Gaston, Alvin L. Burridge. 

Ingham County: George W. Bissell, Charles M. Turner, James B. Boyce, 

Ionia County: Erastus T. Yeomans, Allan B. Morse. 

Jackcon County: Edward A. Bancker, Frederick L. Bliss, George M. 
Carter, William W. Todd. 

Lenawee County: Wilbert H. Barrett, Charles M. Lamb, Herbert W. 
Lamb, Howell Van Auken. 

Livingston County: Albert L. Smith, Charles G. Jewett, Miles W. Bul- 
lock, Harry N. Carlisle. Leon H. Barnum. William H. McPher- 
son. 

Macomb County: Levant E. Bedell, George A. Skinner, Dr. Harry F. 
Taylor, Clarence H. Church, Fiske S. Church, Clarence E. Con- 
nor, Frank S. Schanher. 

Marquette County: Fred H. Begole, Alfred F. Maynard, Edward O. 

Stafford. 
Menominee County: William T. Waite. 
Monroe County: Harry A. Conant. 
Montcalm County: S. Perry Youngs. 
Muskegon County: Louis B. Haight, Lieut. Merritt U. Lamb. 

Oakland County: Edward C. Smith, Charles I. Shattuck, Marquis E. 

Shattuck, Williams C. Harris, Alpheus W. Chittenden, Thomas 

W. Taliaferro, Charles W. Warren, George N. Brady, Herbert R. 

Earle, Frederic B. Smith, Frederick P. Smith, Dr. Edward B. 

Spalding, Charles Stinchfield, Walter Thompson, Frederic j. 

Stevens, William J. Chittenden. 
Ontonagon County: Samuel Brady. 
Ottawa County: Nathaniel Robbins. 
Presque Isle County: Dr. Joseph Sill. 
Saginaw County: Robert F. Johnson. 

Schoolcraft County: Clarence E. Kelso, Arthur S. Putnam. 
Shiawassee County: George T. Campbell. 



1 3 



CONSTITUTION 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Article I. — Name. 

The name of this Society shall be the Michigan Society of the Sobs of 
the American Revolution. 

Article II. — Objects 

The object and purpose of this Society is to keep alive among our- 
selves and our descendants the patriotic spirit of the men who, in military, 
naval or civil service, by their acts or counsel, achieved American inde- 
pendence; to collect and secure for preservation the manuscript rolls, rec- 
ords and other documents relating to the War of the Revolution, and to 
promote social intercourse and good feeling among its members now and 
hereafter. 

Article III. — Membership. 

Any male person shall be eligible for membership in this Society who 
is a resident of Michigan, and who is descended from a revolutionary 
ancestor wherever resident, who is of the age of twenty-one, and ^rhose 
ancestor was either a military or naval officer, soldier or sailor, or an 
official in the service of any one of the thirteen original Colonies or States, 
or of the Government representing oi composed of those Colonies or States 
w^ho assisted in establishing American independence during the War of the 
Revolution, or a member of a Committee of Correspondence or of Public 
Safety or a recognized patriot who rendered material service in the cause 
of American independence. 

Article IV. — Officer*. 

The officers of this Society shall be a President, Vice-President, Secre- 
tary, Treasurer, Registrar, Chaplain, and Historian. 

Article V. — Meetings. 

A meeting for the election of officers and transaction of business shall 
be held annually at such place as the Eioard of Managers may determine, 
on the I 5th day of April, or in case said date shall fall upon Sunday the 
meeting shall be held on the following day. And a meeting for social pur- 
poses shall be held annually at such time and place as the Board of Man- 
agers may determine. At each annual meeting there shall be elected, in 
addition to the officers provided for in Article IV, one delegate-at-large 
and one delegate for each fifty or fraction of fifty exceeding twenty-five 
members, who together with said officers as provided for by the Constitu- 
tion of the National Society, shall represent this Society in the National 
Society. (As amended April 15, 1913.) 

1 4 



Article Vi, — Board of Managers. 
There shall be a Beard cf fVianagets wliose duty it shall be to conduct 
the affairs of this Society, which Board shall consist of the officers of this 
Society, the delegates to the National Society and fifteen others who shall 
be elected at, the annual meeting. 

Article VII. — Local Chapters. 

Section I. A chailer foi a local chapter may be granted by the Board 
of Managers to ten or more members of the Society residing in the same 
county, upon their written petition stating the proposed name, the county 
in which it Is to be located, and the names of its proposed members. Such 
Chaper may adopt a Con;5titutiDn and By-L-aws not inconsistent with those 
of this Society or of the Nstioi^al Society. 

Section 2. No person shall be admitted to membership in such Chap- 
ter unless he is a member in good standing of this Society; and all mem- 
bers of this Society shall be eligible for membership therein. Any member 
who shall in any way lose membership in the State Society shall thereupon 
cease to be a member of such Chapter. 

Section 3. Membership in Chapters shall not in any way change the 
relations of members to this Society, nor impair obligations of payment of 
dues and other requisitions of the Constitution and By-Laws of this Society. 
Provided, however, that the Board of Managers may from time to time, 
by vote, authorize the return to designated Chapters, or classes of Chapters, 
of a portion of the annual dues paid the Society by members of said 
Chapters. 

(Article VII adopted April 15, 1913.) 

Article VIII. — Amendments. 

This Constitution may be amended, altered or repealed, provided writ- 
ten resolutions to that effect are first presented to the Board of Managers, 
and approved by a two-thirds vote of the members'present at any regular 
meeting of said Board, or at a special meeting called for that purpose; and 
provided said amendments are approved by a majority of the members 
present at any regular meeting of the Society, 



1 5 



BY-LAWS 

Michigan Society, Sons c» the American Revolution 

Article I. — Applicalion for Membership. 

All applications for membership in this Society shall be upon blank 
forms furnished bj' the Society, and each application shall be accompanied 
by the membership fee, >vhich shall be leturned if the applicant is not 
accepted. 

Article il. — Examination by Registrar. 

All applications for membership shall be submitted to the Registrar 
for examination, and sh&Il be reported by him to the Board of Managers, 
and v.'hen approved by said Board; shall be returned to the Registrar for 
preservation, and upon payment of membership fee, the applicant shall 
become a member of the Society. 

Article III.-^ — Fees and Dues. 

Section I. The membership fee shall be five dollars, and the annual 
dues shall be three dollars. Members elected prior to the first day of July 
shall pay dues for the whole year. Members elected on and after that 
day shall pay one-half the dues for the year of their election. 

Section 2. The payment of fifty dollars at one time by any member 
not indebted to the Society shall constitute him a life member, exempt from 
annual dues. 

Section 3. The annual dues shall be paid to the Secretary on oi 
before the first day of January in each year. The Secretary shall notify 
members three months in arrears, and report their names to the Board 
of Managers, and non-payment of dues in three months thereafter shall, 
at the option of the Board, be regarded as terminating the membership 
of such person. 

Section 4.. Members admitted by transfer from any other State 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, or from the Society of 
the Children of the American Revolution, to which they have paid an 
initiation fee, shall be exempt from payment of such fee in this Society. 

Section 5. If the Board of Managers deem it advisable, they may, by 
vote, permit the collection of annual dues from members affiliated with 
local Chapters by the Treasurers of the respective local Chapters, and 
make such other regulations regarding collection and remittance of such 
dues as the Board may think desirable. (As amended April 15, 1913.) 

1 6 



Article IV. — Annual Meeting. 

The members of this Society shall meet at such place at the Board 
of Managers may determine on the fifteenth day of April, and annually 
thereafter, for the election of officers and the transaction of the bu8ine»s 
of the Society. In case said day shall fall upon Sunday, the meeting 
shall be held on the following day. In the election of officers a majority 
of the votes cast shall be necessary for a choice. 

Article V. — Board Meetings. 

The regular meeting of the Board of Managers shall be held upon 
the morning of the fifteenth day of April in each year at 10:30. Special 
meetings may be called by the President at any time, and shall be called 
upon the request of any three members of the Board of Managers. Three 
(3) members of the Board of Managers shall constitute a quorum at a 
meeting of said Board. Five (5) members of this Society shall constitute 
a quorum at a meeting of said Society. 

Article VI. — Secretary. 

The Secretary shall receive all moneys from the members, and shall 
pay it over to the Treasurer, taking his receipt for the same, and perform 
the usual duties of a Secretary. 

Article VII. — Treasurer. 

The Treasurer shall deposit all moneys in the name of the Society, end 
shall pay out nothing except upon receipted orders vt^hich have been ap- 
proved by the Managers. 

Article VIII. — Board of Managers. 

The members of the Board of Managers shall be elected in the same 
manner and at the same time as is provided for the ele'ction of officort. 
They shall judge of the qualification of applicants for membership and shall 
have control and management of the affairs of the Society. They »hall 
appoint an Auditing Committee. They may call special meetings at any 
time, and shall call a special meeting upon the written request of any five 
members of the Society. They shall also have power to fill vacancies. 

Article IX. — Registrar. 

The Registrar shall receive all applications and proofs of membership 
after they have been passed upon by the Board of Managers, and shall 
make a record of the same in a book of forms prepared for that purpose, 
and shall forward duplicates to the Registrar-General. He shall also have 
custody of all the historical, geographical and genealogical papers, books, 
manuscripts, and relics of which the Society may become possessed. 

17 



Article X. — Amendments. 

TTiese by-laws shall not be altered nor amended, unless such alteration 
or amendment shall have been proposed in writing at a previous meeting 
of the Board of Managers, and entered upon the records, with the name 
of the member proposing the change, and adopted by a majority of the 
members present at a regular meeting of the Society, or at a special meet- 
ing called for that purpose. 

Article XI. — Nominations. 

Section I. Not later than January Ist of each year, there shall be 
appointed by the Board of Managers, a Nominating Committee of five 
members, no one of whom shall be an officer of the Society. 

Section 2. At least thirty days before the Annual Meeting of the 
Society, the Nominating Committee shall report in writing to the Secretary 
the names of candidates for Officers, for Delegates, and for members of 
the Board of Managers. 

Section 3. Any seven members of the Society may, by writing signed 
by themselves and filed with the Secretary at least twenty days before the 
Annual Meeting of the Society, nominate candidates for any of the offices 
mentioned in paragraph 2 above. 

Section 4. At least ten days before the Annual Meeting of the Society, 
the Secretary shall mail to each menaber of the Society a printed list of all 
persons nominated for any of the offices above mentioned, together with 
the names of the persons by whom any such nomination has been made. 

(Article XI adopted April I 5. 1 9 1 0.) 



SECREIARY'S ANNUAL REPORT— 1917. 

The Secretary of the Michigan Scciely respectfully submits his annual 
report of the progress of the Society in Michigan during the year ending 
April 15, 191 7, as follows: 

The Society wp.s represented at the 27th Annual Congress at Newark, 
N. J., in May, 1916, by Albert M. Henry, William M. Finck and Edward W. 
Bissell. Our Society was lepresentcd on the Board of Trustees of the Na- 
tional Society by Albert M. Henry, v/ho also served as a member of the 
Executive Committee of the National Society, and as Chairman of the 
Committee on Organization. 

The organization of local chapters in Michigan has given an impetus 
to growth in membership throughout the state. New members have been 
admitted from Owosso, Augusta, Ga., St, Louis, Mo., Woodland, Calif., and 
London, Ont. Seventeen new members have been added to the Detroit 
Chapter, 9 to the Kent Chapter. Grand Rapids; 2 to the Washtenaw^ Chap- 
ter, Ann Arbor, and 1 to Kalamazoo Chapter. The total number of new 
members added during the year was 36, with 2 members admitted by trans- 
fer and 3 old members re-instated. The loss of membership during the 
year w^as 8 deceased, 1 resigned, and 5 dropped, making a total member- 
ship March 31. 1917, of 477 members. 

Membership by Chapters April I, I 9 1 7, Is as follows: 

Detroit Chapter 258 

Kent Chapter (Grand Rapids) 57 

Washtenaw Chapter (Ann Arbor) 21 

Kalamazoo Chapter (Kalamazoo) , 13 

Mt. Pleasant Chapter (Mt. Pleasant) It 

Members residing in Michigan who are not affiliated with 

local chapters 89 

Members of Michigan Society in other states 28 

1 otal 477 

During the year the Secretary received many requests from members 
for the assignment to their locality of the illustrated lecture on the American 
Revolution by Professor Warren W. Florer of the University of Michigan. 
The assignment of these lectures v^ras obtained from the Extension Lecture 
Bureau of the University of Michigan. 

Kent Chapter 

The program of the Kent Chapter, Grand Rapids, for the meetings 
during the season of 1916-17 was as follows: 

October 10, 1916 — Complimentary dinner, President Charles C. Follmer, 
Speaker Compatriot Senator William Alden Smith, 
at the Kent Country Club, 

1 9 



November 14, 1916 — Ac'diess by Compatriot Charles M. Alden, "Facta 
Leading Up ^o arid the Cause of the American Revo- 
lution." At the home of Compatriot Walter C. Win- 
chester. 

December 12, I 91 6 — Address by Compatriot Dr. Ralph H. Spencer: "The 
French in the American Revolution." At the home 
of Compatriot William R. Shelby. 

January I 1, 1917 — Address, Compatriot William T. P. Spooner: "The Ger- 
mans in the American Revolution." At the home of 
Compatriot Stuart E,. Knappen. 

February 13, 1917 — Address, Judge Charles R. Collingwood of Lansing, 
"The Irish in the American Revolution." At the 
home of Compatriot Dudley E. Waters. 

March 13, 1917 — Address, Compatriot Lucius Boltwood, "The Dutch in the 
American Revolution." At the home of Compatriot 
William Alden Smith, Jr. 

April 17, 1917 — Paper by Compatriot Daniel T. Patton on "The Poles in 
the American Revolution." Brig.-Gen. Louis A. 
Covell spoke upon the needs of the Army. At the 
home of Compatriot Van A. Wallin. 



Washtenaw Chapter 

Washtenaw Chapter celled a meeting January 9, 1917, of foreign born 
and native citizens for the purpose of arousing interest in the establishment 
of a night school for foreigners in Ann Arbor. Hon., Merton A. Sturgis 
represented the Immigratioii Bureau of the United States, Compatriot Milton 
E. Osborn drew up a petition to the Board of Education requesting the 
establishment of a school for foreigners, w^hich was signed by the Conrj- 
mittee on Naturalization. 

The annual formal dinner and election was held February 22, 1917, at 
the Michigan Union. Robert W. Hemphill, Jr., was chosen president, 
Junius E. Beal, vice-president; Milton E. Osborne, treasurer; Wolcott H. 
Butler, secretary; Harlan H. Johnson, historian; and Prof. George W. Pat- 
terson, chaplain. Later in the evening a Washington's Birthday observa- 
tion was held in the High School Auditorium, presided over by Compatriot 
George W. Patterson. Compatriot Fred G. Dewey of Detroit was the prin- 
cipal speaker of the evening. Rev. G. W. Knepper spoke of the work to be 
done by the Red Cross Society. Stereopticon views of Washir.gton's days 
and early home were shown by Compatriot Warren W. Florer. 

2 



Detroit Chapter 

The activities of the Detroit Chapter during the winter season of 
1916-17 have been as follows: 

October 14, 1916 — Adjourned annual meeting and election of ofncers. Ad- 
dress by President Harry A. Lockwood: "Conditions 
in the South American Republics as Observed During 
a Recent Visit There." Hotel Cadillac. 

December 18. 1916 — Address by Dr. William H. Price, Health OfScer of 
Detroit, on "Patriotism and Public Health." Detroit 
Athletic Club. 

January 19, 1917 — Reception by Dr. Stephen H. Knight, President of 
Detroit Chapter. Address by Hon. Charle? Denby, 
former Consul-General at Shanghai, on "The Chinese 
Republic and the United States." Illustrated by ster- 
eopticon views. University Club. 

February 16, 1917 — Address by Major Sydney D. Waldon, Aviation Section 
U. S. A., and Lieut. G. C. Faulkner, British Royal 
Flying Corps: "Aeronautics in War." Detroit Ath- 
letic Club. 

March 16, 1917 — Address by Roy D. Chapin, president of the Hudson 
Motor Car Company: "Work Done by the Council of 
National Defense and Its Member from Detroit, 
Howard E. Coffin." Detroit Athletic Club. 

June 1, 1917 — Annual Meeting and Election of Officers of Detroit Chapter. 
Address by Fred M. Randall, in charge of the local 
organization, on "The American Protective League; 
Its Work and Its Relation to the Secret Service De- 
partment of the National Government." Dr. V/alter 
P. Manton exhibited stereopticon views of conditions 
in the alleys and homes in the districts lying outside 
the corporate limits of the city. Board of Commerce. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE, 
i. Secretary. 



2 1 



MINUTES OF ANNUAL MEETING FOR 1917 

of the i 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

The annual meeting of. the Michigan Society. Sona of the American 
Revolution, was held pursuant to adjournment and notice at the Hotel Stat- 
ler on Friday evening, April 20, I 91 7, at 6:30 p. m. 

The meeting was called to order by President Clarence M. Burton. 
The minutes of the last meeting were approved. 

Secretary Raymond E. Van Syckle' presented his annual report, which 
was received and placed on file. 

Treasurer Frank C Smith presente<3 his annual report of receipts and 
disbursements, bearing the approval of the Auditing Committee. Same wai 
approved and ordered placed on file. 

In the absence of the Historian, the Secretary presented a memorial 
report of members who had died during the past year, which was received 
and ordered placed on file. 

On motion of the Registrar, duly seconded, the following application, 
were approved and members admitted to membership: John Curtis Clark, 
Detroit, State No. 807; William H. McGraw. Detroit, 809; William V/. Todd' 
Jackson, 812; William H. Cay. Grand Rapids. 815; William H. Crampton] 
Detroit. 616. 

On motion, duly seconded, the application for transfer of George E. 
Donnell. Ann Arbor, was received and the applicant admitted to mem- 
bership. No. 813. 

The President then announced the annual election and asked for th« 
report of the Nominating Committee. The leport was presented by the 
Chairman of the Committee, Dr. Stephen H. Knight, and was signed also 
by Albert M. Henry, Julius E. Thatcher, and George E. Bushnell. Norn- 
inations from the floor were requested. None appearing, the Secretary 
was instructed by the unanimous vote of the members present to cast their 
votes for the officers nominated in the committee's report. The Secretary, 
having announced that he had complied with such instructions, the Presi- 
dent declared the following officers to have been elected: 

President, George M. Barbour. Detroit; Vice-President, Frederick M, 
Alger. Detroit: Second Vice-President. Charles H. Leonard. Grand Rapids; 
S=cretary. Raymond E. Van Syckle. Detroit; Treasurer. Frank G. Smith, 
Detroit; Registrar, Franklin S- Dewey, Detroit; Historian, Warren V/. 
Florer, Ann Arbor. Chaplain, Rev. Jos. A. Vance. D. D., Detroit. 

Delegates to the Congress of the National Society: Dr. Stephen H. 
Knight, Detroit, Delegate at Large; Junius E- Beal, Ann Arbor; J. Remsen 
Bishop. Detroit: Kendall P. Brooks. Mt. Pleasant; Gen. Chas. A. Coolidge, 
Detroit: James M. Crosby, Grand Rapids; Jacob S. Farrand, Jr., Detroit; 
William M. Finck, Detroit; Charles C. Follmer, Grand Rapids; Robert w' 
Hemphill, Ypsilanti; Julius E. Thatcher, Detroit. 

2 2 



Alternate Delegates: Francis L. Baldwin, Escanaba; Enoch Bancker, 
Jackson; Wilbert H. Barrett, Adrian; George \V. Bissell, Lansing; Philip T. 
Colgrove, Hastings; Frank W. Fletcher, Alpena; Crawford S. Reilley. 
Cheboygan; William A Stone, Kalamazoo; Charles M. Turner, Lansing; 
Levi S. Warren, Albion. 

Board of Managers: John P. Antisdel, Detroit; John E. Baker, Detroit; 
Frederick J. Baldwin, Munising; George E. Bushnell, Detroit; Hugh C. 

Chedester, Detroit; Carl F. Clarke, Detroit; Norman B. Conger, Detroit; | 

Herbert R. Elarle, Detroit; Frederick T. Harward, Detroit; Burns Henry, | 

Detroit; William P. Holliday, Detroit; Harry M. Jewett, Detroit; Charles N. j 

Remington, Grand Rapids; Charles M. V/oodruff, Detroit; Lewis LeB. Good- j • 

win, Detroit. 1 

Member Board of Trustees of National Society: Albert M. Henry, 1 

Detroit. I 

Following the business meeting a reception was held for the Honor- j 

able Elmer M. Wentworth, President General of the National Society. There j 

were present as invited guests the American Army and Navy officers , 

commanding in Detroit, officers of the Canadian Army from Windsor, 
Canada, and the Consuls of the allied nations resident in Detroit. 

After the reception a banquet was held in the banquet hall of the hotel, 
which was decorated with American flags and emblems of the Society, 
and an official British flag Ic-aned for the occasion by Howard A. Meredith, 
the British Consul in Detroit. Clarence M. Burton, the retiring President 
of the State Society, presided as toastmaster. Invocation was pronounced 
by Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D- D., Chaplain. Patriotic airs were played by 
the orchestra and the members sang "America" and "The Star Spangled 
Banner." Patriotic solos were sung by Compatriot John L. Dickinson. 
Greetings and reports were received from the presidents of local chapters 
in Michigan as follows: Kalamazoo Chapter, Kalamazoo, Edward S- 
Parsons; Washtenaw Chapter, Ann Arbor, Robert W. Hemphill; Kent 
Chapter, Grand Rapids, Charles C. Follmer; Detroit Chapter, Dr. Stephen 
E- Knight. 

Patriotic addresses were made by Compatriot George H. Barbour, 
President-elect of the Michigan Society; by Hon. Elmer M. Wentworth, 
President-General of the National Society; Compatrot Edwin Denby, ex- 
Congressman, and president of the Board of Commerce, forcibly presented 
our government's need of support and offered his own services to the U. 
S. Marine Corps, entering the ranks as a private. 

Major S. J. Robins, of the Canadian Army, Headquarters Staff, Ottawa, 
was present as a guest of the Society, and responded with eloquence so 
stirring that his audience was brought to their feet in cheers. This was 
the first occasion in the history of the Michigan Society, Sons of the Am- 
erican Revolution, upon which the British flag or British officers in uniform 
had ever appeared in a meeting. 

2 3 



Major F. M. Phelps, U. S. A., made an urgent appeal for enlistmenti 
in the United States Army. Capt. Fowler, U. S. A., told of the work of th< 
Engineer Corps. Lieut. V/illiam N. Richardson, U. S. N., related the pro- 
gress being made in recruiting for the navy in the city. Capt. Victor J. 
Morrison, U. S. M., told of the services of the United States Marine Corps, 
Compatriot Brigadier-General Louis C. Covcll, commanding the Michigan 
National Guard, told of the resdinet-s of the Michigan Reginients to respond 
to the national call. Commander J. Farrand Lewis of the Michigan Naval 
Militia responded to the toast, "The Michigan Naval Brigade," which has 
already gone into the service of the nation. Major Burt R. Shurly, M. D., 
commanding Base Hospital No. 36, told of the Red Cross work and hospita^ 
8«rrice. 



The following resolution offered by George W. Bates was unanimousi 
adopted: j 

"The time has now come for this Society to declare itself on the subject 
of a crisis that nov.- confronts the counliy. The Minute Man in the days 
of the Revolution -was an expression of the public spirit w^hich created the 
active force to resist the encroachments of the Crown and resulted in the 
organization of an arrned force, which secured to the American people 
their national independence, and which declared for a free and inde-. 
pendent people. i 

"The principles of that declaration are in danger today, and the ques-i 
tion is, shall the principles of American Democracy survive the peril* 
which now threaten the perpetuity of American institutions. We, as sons 
of the American Revolution, and as true to the principles we profess, do 
hereby pledge ourselves and the great organization we represent in this 
State, to the support and defence of the administration at Washington, and 
declare ourselves as ready and willing to lend any aid and assistance to 
any task that may be imposed upon us, according as the President of the 
United States thinks we may be of assistance in the prosecution of the war. 

"Our fealty to the cause calls for the highest patriotism and the most 
self-sacrificing devotion, and it is our resolve, that we prove ourselves loyal 
and equal to the demands of the hour- 

"And it is further resolved that a copy of this resolution be forwarded 
to the President of the United States, to the President of the Senate, and 
to the Speaker of the House of Representatives, in Congress assembled." 

Among the others attending -v^'cre: Frank W. Fletcher, Alpena; Charles 
M. Turner, Lansing; Charles C. Follmer, Charles H. Leonard, Walter C. 
Winchester, Grand Rapids; George T. Campbell, Owosso; Junius E. Beal, 
Rice W. Beal, Warren W. Florer, Milton E. Osborn, Ann Arbor; Robert 
W. Hemphill, Ypsilanti; Harry A. Conant, Windsor, Ont.; Pietro Cardiello. 
Italian Consul; Theophile Francois, Belgian Consul. 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE, 

Secretary Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution. 
2 4 



SECRETARY'S ANNUAL REPORT— 1918. 

The annual report cf the secretary of the Michigan Society, Sons of 
the American Revoluticpj for the year tsrminatirig April 15, 1918, is 
herewith submitted. 

The annual meeting for the election of officers and banquet was held 
by the State Society April 20, 1917, at the Hotel Statler, Detroit, the par- 
ticulars of which appear in the niinutes of such meeting accompanying this 
report. 

Owing to the fact that this country was at v/ar, the National Congress 
scheduled to be held at Nashville, May 21, 1917, was postponed. The 
Executive Committee of the National Society, of which Compatriot Albert 
M. Henry is a member, met May 24, 1917, at New York, and November 
14, 1917, at Bridgeport, Conn., however, transacting the business of the 
National Society. An account of which will be found in the "Official Bul- 
letin." 

The growth of this society in Michigan has been greatly stimulated 
by a campaign for membership c?irried on by the Secretary, who procured 
a list of eligibles from the local chapters of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution throughout the state, and from other sources, and to these 
eligibles, nine hundred in number, sent letters inviting them to become 
members. The effect of the cibove action may be noted in the fact that 
the increase in membership during the year has been 120, originating as 
followsi: Detroit Chapter, 55; Kent Chapter (Grand Rapids), 24; St. Clair 
Chapter, 10; Houghton County, 5; Lenawee County (Adrian), 4; Calhoun 
County, 3; Jackson, 2; Sault Ste. Marie, 2; Pontiac, 2; Foster City, 2; and 
one each from Ann Arbor, Bay City, Howell, Mt. Clemens, Niles, Onaway, 
Petoskey, Utica, Menominee, Alpha and Crystal Falls. Of these 1 1 1 are 
new members; 5 were received by transfer from other state societies, and 
4 are old members reinstated. The loss of membership during the year 
was 6 deceased, I demitted to another state society and 2 dropped, making 
the net increase during the year III, and the total membership belonging 
586 on April 15. 1918. 

Of the new membership 24 are sons of members, 2 are grandsons, 
and 35 are in the service in the army or the navy. The total number of 
members of Michigan Society serving in the army and navy is 70. Of 
these Detroit Chapter furnished 43, Kent Chapter 8, Washtenaw Chapter 
2, Kalamazoo Chapter 2, and St. Clair Chapter 2. 

Membership by chapters April 1, 1918, was as follows: 

Detroit Chapter 312 

Wayne County (outside Detroit Chapter) 23 

Kent Chapter 82 

Washtenaw Chapter 21 

St. Clair Chapter 18 

Kalamazoo Chapter 13 

Mt. Pleasant Chapter 6 

2 5 



Calhoun Ccuuly , . ,. 8 

Macomb County . , 7 

Livingston County ...,...., 6 

Oakland County 6 

Houghton County .....<, 5 

Jackson County 5 

Lenawee County ....<:, 5 

24 other countiee ...... c 41 

Members of Michigan Society in other states 26 



TotaL , 586 

Detroit Chapter. 

The Detroit Chapter held its annual meeting and election of officers, 
June I, 1917, at the Board of Commerce. President Dr. Stephen H. 
Knight told of the support of the Society to the Red Cross campaign and I 
of its material assistance extended to members of the naval militia by 
raising a fund for their relief and comfort. The report of the Secretary, j 
Raymond E. Van Syckle, shovred an increase in membership of 25 dur- j 
ing the year and Iocs by death of two. The Historian's annual report, j 
presented by William Stocking, stated that the year was an especially event- I 
ful one for Detroit Chapter, its meetings having been dominated by the ! 
national needs arising from the European war. The activities of the Mem- j 
bership Committee were described by Carl F. Clarke, chairman; Enlertnin- ! 
ment Committee, Julius E. Thatcher, chairman; Patriotic Education, Benja- j 
min F. Comfort, v/ho described the military units in the high schools and ' 
credited the Sons of the American Revolution with having been largely ! 
instrumental in bring about the increased activity in the education of aliens j 
in the municipality; National Defense, Gen. Charles A. Coolidge; Patriotic 
Legislation, Walter M. Trevor; Historical, Frank D. Taylor; George W. 
Bates, chairman of the Flag Committee, gave an interesting account of 
the flag law and violations, illustrating same with posters. The report 
of the Memorial Commiittee was made by Charles M. Woodruff. The 
report of the Public Welfare Committee was presented by Dr. Walter P. 
Manton, illustrated with stereopticon views of the conditions in the alleys 
in the outlying districts of Detroit. 

The Detroit Chapter held its first meeting of the present season on 
November 16, 1917, at the University Club, when a narrative was given 
hy Captain Baxter, Canadian Expeditionary Forces, of his experiences 
at the front in command of a company. The Committee for the Relief 
and Comfort of the Michigan Naval Militia reported collection and dis- 
bursement of $205.67 in its behalf. The Surgical Dressings Committee 
reported $830.77 collected from members and disbursed. On January 19, 
1918, at the University Club, an address was given by Rev. M. S. Rice on 
observations at the front during his recent visit to the Allies' lines. On 
February 16, 1918, a reception to the Chapter ■v\'as tendered by Dr. and 
Mrs. Stephen H. Knight at their home. The g^est and speaker was Sous- 

2 6 



lieutenant Jean Becker, French army, stationed at Camp Custer, who told 
what the American army -would experience in France. The officers of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution assisted in receiving. Reports 
of the progress made by the Yarn Committee were made by Regent Mrs. 
McDonald and Mrs. Knight. The Committee of the Detroit Chapter, S. 
A. R., to solicit funds for the purchase o[ yarn, reported that it had ob- 
tained and turned over to the Daughters $!,000. 

St. Clair Chapter. 

The St. Clair Chapter, located at Port Huron, was organized on March 
I I writh I 7 members, including Milton R. Purdy, an actual son of a Revo- 
lutionary soldier. The officer'., of the Chapter are as foUov^rs: President, 
Burt D, Cady: Vice-President. Sydney E. McLouth; Secretary, William R. 
Chadwick; Treasurer, Alberf: D. Bennett; Historian, William L. Jenks; 
Chaplain, A. L. Chamberlain. 

Kent Chapter. 

Kent Chapter held its annual meeting in Grand Rapids on January 1 1 . 
The officers elected were: President, Charles N. Remington; Vice-President, 
Charles M. Alden; Secretary, W. T. P. Spooner; Treasurer, T. J. Barker. 

The serving of refreshments at meetings of the Chapter has been dis- 
contmued during the war as a patriotic effort to assist in the conservation 
of food. 

The Secretary's report showed a membership at the beginning of the 
year of 52 and at the end of 78 — a net gain of 26. 

During his incumbency of the office of Secretary, Mr. Remington, by 
searching the records of the State and National Societies and the files 
of the daily newspapers, together with such information as he was able 
to gather from the later members of the Chapter, has compiled a com- 
paratively complete history of this Chapter, and also a complete genea- 
logical record of all present and former members of the Chapter. He 
has also placed copies of both the history and the genealogies in the 
Grand Rapids library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE, 
«--. Secretary. 



2 7 



MEMORIAL REPORT 

Compiled by Raymonfi £. Van Syckle 

The following members of Michigan Society, Sons of the American 
Revolution, passed away during the year 1916-1917: 

William Savidge. National No, 3080, State No. 80. Admitted to 

membertKip June 3, 1695. Born at .Spring Lake on Sept. 30, 1863, and 

"died lAny 9, 1916. Graduated University of Michigan, A. B. 1684. State 

Senator 1897, 1898. Gieat grandson of Bartrum Round, Lieut. Scituate 

Rangers, R. I., pensioned. 

Luciu* H .Collins. National No. 3086, State No. 86. Admitted to 
membership June 7, 1893- Born at Romeo, Mich. He resided at Detroit, 
and died May 15, 1916. He attended the literary department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan? 1873-74. He was a lawyer. He was a grandson 
of Levi Collins, private in Capt. Everett's Company of Col. Bedell's Regi- 
ment, N. H. Great grandson of Arnos Parmelee, private in Capt. Jeremiah 
Parmelee's Company, Col. Sam. Elmore's Regiment, Conn. Great grandson 
of I&aac Wheeler Stanton, sergeant, from Preston, Conn., with the men 
who marched on the Lexington Alarm. Great grandson of Ephraim Col- 
lins, private Capt. Edward Everett's Company, Col. Bedell's Regiment, 
New Hampshire. 

Arthur L. Holmes. National No. 20606, State No. 555. Admitted to 
membership February 10, 1909. Born in Detroit June 17, 1861. Died 
May 27, 1916. Great grandson of Eiezer Andrus, private Maine Militia. 

James Pardee Scranton. National No. 21707, State No. 582. Ad- 
mitted to membership May 30, 1910. Born in Monroe May 28, 1844. 
Great grandson of Abraham Scranton, Jr., Lieut, and Quartermaster Ser- 
geant Conn, troops, pensioned. Died July 13, 1916. 

Charles Clark Hopkins. National No. 3090, State No. 90. Admitted 
to membership June 15, 1895. Born White Lake, Oakland County, Mich- 
igan, April 4, 1849. Graduated University of Michigan, LL. B. 1876. 
Clerk of the Supreme Court of Michigan since 1882, residing at Lansing. 
Great grandson of Con.'iider Hopkins, private in Lieut. Bidwell's Com- 
pany, 18th Regiment Connecticut Militia. Died July 1, 1916. 

Lee Earll Amidon, National No. 21708, State No. 583. Admitted to 
niembership March 30, 1 910. Born February 4, 1865, in Hamilton, Indi- 
ana. Graduated University of Michigan, A. B. 1892; Harvard, A. M. 
1898. Superintendent of Schools, Iron Mountain. Died Chicago, Novem- 
ber 29, 1916. Great-grandson of Moses Amidon, sergeant Col. San^uel 
McLellan's Conn. Regiment, pensioned, and great-great-grandson of Henry 
Amidon, Captain Twenty-second Regiment, Conn. Militia; also of Daniel 
Deming, private Massachusetts Militia, pensioned; and of Daniel Earll, 
private. Col. John Greaton's Mass. Regiment. 

2 8 



Jay Wliitney Bigelow, National No. 12890, State No. 390. Admitted 
to membership December 5, 1900. Died February 17, 1917, at Easton, 
Md. He was born February 6, 1 865, in Port Huron. Organized firm of 
Jewett, Bigelow & Brooks, coal operators, Detroit. Great grandson of 
Jabez Bigelow, Jr., private, Worcester County Mass. Regiment, and of 
Joseph Enos, Ensign, Rhode Island State Troops, pensioned. 

Enoch Bancker, National No. 12879, State No. 379. Admitted to mem- 
bership March 12, 1900. Born in Greenfield, Saratoga County, New York, 
^October 7, 1831. Graduated from University of Michigan, LL. B., 1860. 
Lawyer, Jackson, Mich. Great-grandson of Floris Bancker, 2nd Major, 
6th Albany County, Nevv' York Militia. Member of Board of Managers 
1911, 1912, 1914. Alternate Delegate to the Congress of the National So- 
ciety, 1917. Died June 29. 1917. 

James Coslett Smith, National No. 3093, State No. 93. Admitted to 
membership May 22, ,1895. Born Canandaigua, N. Y., March 23, 185 7. 
Graduated Hobart College, M.A., 1 878; Columbia La v^ School IS80. Lawyer. 
Began practice in ofHces of .Miller, Bissell & Sibley, 1881; has been a 
member of the firm of Miller, Smith & Paddock since 1902. Great-great- 
grandson of Levi Adams, Minute Man, Connecticut. Member of Board of 
Managers, 1897. Historian, 1899-1903; member of Board of Managers 
1905-6; Delegate to the National Congress 1907; member of Board of 
Managers 1908-9. Died Friday. September 7, 1917, 

Rev. John E. Bushnell, D. D., National No. 28833, Michigan No. 783. 

He was born at Winchester, Virginia, October 1 1th, 1856, and v/as left 
an orphan at early age during the Civil War. He attended the Shenandoah 
Valley Academy and because of the early impressions of his life decided to 
prepare himself for the ministry. He graduated from Roanoke College at 
the age of eighteen with the degree of A. B. and a year later received his 
Masters degree. He then took a special course at the divinity school of 
Yale and returned to his native state, where he was graduated from the 
Lutheran Theological Seminary. He began his ministry at Prosperity, South 
Carolina, and was called from there to St. Mark's at Roanoke, where was 
organized during his pastorate the United Synod of the South. It was 
here he began his work as a writer on religious subjects and as a conse- 
quence was given an opportunity to serve as a professor at Kee Mar Col- 
lege, Hagerstown, Maryland. However, he preferred to return to the 
active ministry and served a while in Maryland and then was sent by the 
home mission board of his church to organize the First English Lutheran 
Church of Oakland, California. He returned some years later to his home 
in Winchester and served as pastor a number of years in \ irginia. 

In 1916 he was called to Holy Trinity Church of Augusta, Ga.. as its 
pastor, and during the last year of his life, in addition to the duties of his 
pastorate, he spent much time in religious work among the soldiers of the 
Penn. National Guard at Camp Hancock. He died suddenly November 13, 

2 9 



1917, while on his way to attend a meeting of the South Carolina Synod 
under whose jurisdiction he began his life work. 

He was widely known in church circles as a forceful writer and an 
active minister. His degree of Doctor of Divinity was conferred by West- 
minster College in 1894. 

He was admitted to membership in this Society on Dec. 28, 1916, by 
reason of his descent from John Bushnell of Saybrook, Conn., private in 
Maj. Skinner's Troop of Horse, and Captain Adam Eichelberger, of Han- 
over, Penn., Third York County Battalion of Pennsylvania Associatora. 

Charles Frank Marsh, National No. 26789, State No. 714. Admitted to ; 
membership Jan. 22, 1915. Born Volga City, Iowa, Sept. 22, 1658. Lo- 
cated Mt. Pleasant in 1894, where he has been engaged in mercantile 
business since. Member of the board of public works. Great-great-grand- 
son of Harris Hotchkiss, private Col. Richards* Conn. Regiment; pensioned. 
Died at Mt. Pleasant Feb. 7, 1918. 

Charles Edgar Fox, National No. 123 70, State No. 345. Admitted to 
membership April 25, 1899. Born March 19, 1847, Taunton, Mass.. En- 
gaged in tailoring business in Detroit, later carried on the sale of woolens. 
Great-grandson of Jabez Fox, private Putnam's Conn, troops; pensioned. 
Died Detroit, Feb. 26, 1918. i 

I 

Richard Henry L'Hommedieux, National No. 3099, State No. 99. Ad- 
mitted to membership Nov. 30, 1895. Born Cincinnati, Ohio, Dec. 29, 
1850. Trainmaster M. C. R. R. 1873-77; superintendent West division 
1879-90; assistant general superintendent 1890-96; general superintendent 
1896-1903; general manager 1903-12. Great-grandson of Captain Samuel 
L'Hommedieux, Colonel David Mumford's regiment Suffolk County Militia, 
New York. Died at Detroit March 18, 1918. ] 

Chauncey Strong, National No. 28843, State No. 793. Admitted to 
membership March 29, 1917. Born Kalamazoo, May 6, 1843. Cashier 
Kalamazoo Stone Company. Great-grandson of John Strong, Private and 
Corporal Massachusetts Militia, Died April 23, 1918. 



3 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS 
Of the National Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

The Quarterly Bulletin 

The quarterly publication of the National Society, "The Official Bul- 
letin," is issued by the Secretary-General, at Washington, and is mailed 
free to each member of the Society in March, June, October and De- 
cember. It records action by the General Officers, the Board of Trustees, 
the Executive and other National committees, lists of members deceased 
and of new^ members. Local chapters are requested to communicate 
promptly to the Secretary written or printed accounts of all meetings or 
celebrations, to forward copies of all notices, circulars, issued by them, 
and to notify him at once of dates of deaths of members. Member* 
not receiving their copies of the bulletin should report the fact together 
with their proper address. 

The Year Book 

The annual "Year Book" of the National Society is sold to members 
for 50c per copy. It contains the list and biographies of the officers of 
the National Society, the general committees, the charter, constitution 
and by-laws; a list of officers of all State Societies and Chapters, a com- 
plete report of the proceedings at the annual congress of the National 
Society, and a register of all new members enrolled during the year, 
giving their revolutionary ancestor and their line of descent. Orders may 
be placed with the Secretary for this interesting compilation. 

Americanization Leaflets 



Leaflets are also published and distributed free by this Society for | 

Americanization purposes, comprising "TTie Constitution of the United \ 

States," and "Information for Immigrants." The leaflet is published in I 
various foreign languages as well as in English. Upon application, the 

State Secretary will furnish these leaflets in the quantities desired. , 



Prospectus 

A handbook is also distributed stating the purposes and objects of the 
Society and its accomplishments, what qualifications for membership are 
necessary, how lineage may be traced, where records of descent and revo- 
lutionary service may be found and how membership may be acquired. 



3 1 



THE S. A. R. BADGE AND THE SERVICE BAR. 

Badges. — The standard badge of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
as provided by Art, XV., Sec. I, of the Constitution, "may be worn by any 
member of the Society on ceremonial occasions only, and shall be carried 
on the left breast or at the collar if an officer or Past President General of 
the National Society, or the President, active or past, of a State Society-** 

The authority for the wearing of the badge by Army and Navy Men is 
the U. S. Statutes at Large, Vol. 26, p. 661 : 

"Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United Stales of 
America in Congress assembled. That the distinctive badges adopted by military 
societies of men who served in the armies and navies of the United States! 
in the War of the Revolution, the War of Eighteen Hundred and Twelve,! 
the Mexican War, and the War of the Rebellion, respectively, may be worn' 
upon all occasions of ceremony by officers and enlisted men of the Army 
and Navy of the United States who are members of said organizations in j 
their own right." j 

Army Uniform Regulations of 1917, paragraph 64 (b), reads: j 

"64 (b). Badges of military societies may be worn by officers and en-; 
listed men who in their own right, or by right of inheritance, are mem- 
bers of military societies of men who served in the armies and navies of 
the United States in the War of the Revolution, the War of 1812, the | 
Mexican War. * * *" 

It is not permitted, however, to wear the formal insignia of military 
societies at the same time as the official medals or badges awarded by the 
government (62d), nor can any medals or badges be worn on other than : 
full-dress uniform (64d). i 

Service Bars. — Army Uniform Regulations make no provision for the 
w^earing of bars or sectional ribbons pertaining to military societies, but 
the Quartermaster Corps provides (to be \vorn Vk'ith service uniform.s) 
sectional ribbons and bars covered with ribbon corresponding to the medals 
and badges awarded by the Government, such as "Certificate of Merit 
Badge," "Medal Commemorating the Battle of Manila Bay," and about a 
dozen other official badges. The Sons of the American Revolution like- 
wise provides ribbon bars to be -worn by its members on service uniforms 
but these are unofficial and, as in the case of the badge, should not be worn 
at the same time as any government bar. 

Naval uniform regulations describe the form of ribbon bars and specify 
the manner of wearing them; but no specific mention is made of bars of 
military societies, which are considered as unofficial. 

The S. A. R. bar is not an emblem of merit, but is a mark of mem- 
bership in a great patriotic Society. It is presented to compatriots in the 
Army and Navy of the United States, and it is the desire of the National 
Executive Committee that every compatriot in the service wear the bar 
whenever permissible in accordance with the official regulations. 

Application for the bars should be made to the Secretary, etating 
name, address, and branch of service to which member belong*. 

3 2 



SERVICE LIST, WAR OF 1917 
Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

The following members of Michigan Society are now serving in the 
Army and Navy of the United States. To each of these the Society haa 
presented a service bar bearing the colors of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, which may be worn with his service uniform in commemora- 
tion of the fact that the wearer is descended from a soldier who fought in 
the war for American independence. 

Detroit Chapter 
Frederick M. Alger, Major, Cavalry, O. R. C. 31 0th Ammunition Train, 

Camp Custer. 
Stanley F. Bates, Ensign. U. S. N. R. ' 

Morris C, Burnside, Captain, Aviation Section, S. R. C, U. S. A., Love 

Field, Dallas, Texas. 
Allan Campbell, Second Lieutenant, Aviation Section, S. R. C, Camp Sevier, 

Greenville, S. C. 
C. E. Frazer Clark, OfHcers* Training Camp, Camp Custer. 
Harold E. Clark, M. D., First Lieutenant, 60th Inf. U. S. A., Camp Greene, 
Carl F. Clarke, First Lieutenant, Ordnance. 
John C. Clarke, Base Hospital I 7, A. E. F., France. 
William S. Conant, Captain, O. R. C, Springfield Armory, 
Clarence F. Conner, Detroit, First Lieutenant, Aviation Section, U. S. A. 
James H. Cooke, Private, 1 1th Co., 3rd Bn., 160th Depot Brigade, Camp 

Custer. 
James B. Craig, First Lieutenant, 3 1 5 F. A., Camp Lee, Va. 
William H. Crampton, Second Lieutenant, U. S. A. 
Chas. B. Crouse, Sergeant, Ambulance Co. 8, Officers' Training Camp, 

Camp Custer. 
William McI. Crouse, Able Seaman. U. S. N. R.. S. S. DeKalb. 
Eldwin Denby, First Lieutenant, U. S. Marine Corps, Paris Island, S. C. 
Berrien C, Eaton, Second Lieutenant, Battery A, 330th F. A. N. A., Camp 

Custer. 
C. Goodloe Edgar, Colonel, Signal Corps, U. S. A., Washington. 
Dexter M. Ferry, Captain, Q. M. R. C, Chicago, 111. 
Paul S. Hamilton, First Lieutenant Ordnance, O. R. C, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

3 5 



Detroit Chapter (Continued) 

Burns Henry, Captain, O. R. C. 

J. Winslow Howarth, Private, U. S. Marine Corps, Paris Island, S, C, 

Rex Humphrey, First Lieutenant, Ordnance, O. R. C, Washington. 

Wm. H. H. Hutton, Lieutenant-Colonel, Signal Corps, U. S. A., France. 

Elwood C. Johnston, Coxswain, U. S. N. M., S. S, DeKalb. 

William D. Johnston, U. S. Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, III y 

Lee El. Joslyn, Jr., Sergeant, Base Hospital No. 36, A. E. F., France. 

Charles A. Kanter, Captain, Ordnance, O. R. C., Waahington- 

Rufus H. Knight, Ensign, U. S. N. R. 

Hale G- Knight, Ensign, U. S. N. M., S. S. Birmingham. 

George EL O. Kunze, Sergeant, Ordnance, U. S. A., Augusta Arsenal, Ga. 

Howard A. Ladue, Captain, Ordnance, O. R. C, Springfield Armory. 

William F. LeBaron, Lieutenant, Aviation Section, Signal Corps, San Ai 

tonio, Texas. 
Edvrard H. Locke, Second Lieutenant, 338th Infantry, N. A., Camp Custei 
Barnes Newberry, Ensign, U. S. N. Fortress Monroe, Va., 
Phelps Newberry, Major, Infantry, O. R. C, Fort Leavenworth. 
Truman H. Newberry, Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. N., Brooklyn Nay 

Yard. , 

Le Moyne L. Parkinson, Illuminating Engineer, S. C. t 

Frederick R. Sheridan, Sergeant, Co. A, 339th Infantry, Officers* Trainin 

Camp, Camp Custer. 
Joseph Sill, M. D., Captain, M. O. R. C, Base Hospital 36, France. 
Frederick B. Smith, Jr., 1st Lieutenant, Sanitary Engr. Corps, A. E. F. 

France, 
John W. Starrett, Private, N. A., Officers' Training Camp, Camp Custer. 
Joseph S. Stringham, Captain, Ordnance, U. S. A., Detroit. 
Herbert B. Trix, Captain, Ordnance, Washington, D. C. 
Marshall W. Waite, Aviation Section, U. S. N. 

Kalamazoo Chapter. i 

Dr. Ralph E. Balch, Major, Base Hospital, Camp Custer. 

Gordon W. Davis, Lieutenant, 328, F. A., Camp Custer. 

i 
Kent Chapter | 

1 

Louis C. Covell, Grand Rapids, Brigadier General, Infantry, U. S. A., Camp 

McArthur, Texas. 
Frederick T. Peck, 1st Lieutenant, 325th Infantry, Camp Gordon, Atlanta, 

Georgia. 

3 4 



Kent Chapter — Continued 
William Alden Smith, Jr., Grand Rapids, Captain Aviation, Washington, 

D. C. 

Philip T. Stanton, Grand Rapids, Ambulance Corps 339, Sanitary Train 

3 I 0, Camp Custer. 
Forris D. Stevens, Grand Rapids, Second Lieutenant, Q. M. C, N. A., Camp 

Custer. 
Edson M. Steward, Grand Rapids, First Lieutenant, O. R. C, Field Artillery. 
John R. Lamb, Rockford, Sergeant Co. C, 107 Field Signal Batt., U. S. N. G., 

A. EL F., France. 
Merritt U. Lamb, Muskegon, First Lieutenant, 1 25th Infantry, U. S. N. G., 

A. El. F., France. 

St. Clair Chapter 
Henry Howard Bennett, Port Huron, Officers* Training Camp, Camp Meade. 
Carleton Howard Jenks, Port Huron, Cadet, Aerial Service, A. E. F., France. 

Washtenaw Chapter 

Robert W. Hemphill, Jr., Ypsilanti, Captain, Ordnance, U. S. A., Shefiield, 

Alabama. 
George E. Donnell, Ann Arbor, Private, Ordnance, U. S. N. A. 

The State at Large 

Alvin L. Burridge, Crystal Falls, First Lieutenant, Engineers U. S. A. 
Clarence H. Church, Utica, Corporal, Twentieth Engr., U. S. A., France. 
Fiske S. Church, Utica, Sergeant, Ordnance, U. S. A., Augusta Arsenal. 
Fred B. Coleman, Minneapolis, First Lieutenant, Q. M. C, N. A., Washing- 
ton. D. C. 

William C Crosby, Albion, Lieutenant, 1 6 1 st U. S. Inf., A. E. F., France. 

Ward F. Davidson, Iron Mountain, First Lieutenant, O. R. C, 308th Engr., 
Chillicothe, Ohio. 

Leslie E. Delf, Laurium, Lieutenant, 315th U. S. Engr., San Antonio, Texas. 

Wilfred Haughey, M. D., Battle Creek, Captain, O. R. C. Base Hospital 36, 

France. 
Herbert W. Lamb, Adrian, First Lieutenant, U. S. Eng., Fort Benj. Harrison. 
Ashley C. Leavitt, Calumet, Private, 107th Engr., Camp McArthur. 

Frank S. Schanher, Mt. Clemens, Corporal, Machine Gun Co., 338th Inf., 

Camp Custer. 
Marquia E. Shattuck, Pontiac, Private, U. S. Marine Corps, U. S. A. 

3 5 



CHAPTER ORGANIZATION IN MICHIGAN 
By Raymond E. Van Syckle, Secretary. 

The development of chapter organization in Michigan has been at 
followa: 

Prior to the granting of a charter to the Detroit Chapter there existed ' 

in Michigan but one chapter organization. This — the Western Michigan j 

Chapter — was granted a charter March 12, 1697, upon the application of | 

eleven members of the State Society residing in Grand Rapids, giving them | 

territorial jurisdiction over the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan. Kala- ^ 

mazoo, Ionia, Barry and Muskegon. This chapter continued in existence ^ 

until March 27. 1914, during which period forty-three gentlemen residing j 
within these counties were members. 

On March 12, 1913, members residing in Detroit applied for a char- 
ter for a Detroit Chapter, with territorial limits comprising Wayne County. * 
The charter for this Chapter was granted May 2, 1913. The Chapter was 
organized and a constitution adopted November I, 1913, and the local 
activities in Detroit formerly carried on by the State Society were taken 
over by the Chapter. 

Three hundred members are enrolled. Monthly meetings are held 
during the winter seasons at the hotels, clubs, and by invitation at the 
residences of members. At these meetings, addresses are given upon 
topics of interest, followed by general discussion participated in by th« 
mmbera. 

On March 27, 1914, the members of the Western Michigan Chapter 
relinquished all territorial rights under their charter of 1897 to counties 
other than Kent, and received in return a new charter limited to Kent 
County. Their membership, which had diminished greatly, at once began 
to mcrease. Grand Rapids now has an active and flourishing Chapter with 
a membership of 78. 

Upon the same date — March 27, 1914 — five members of the State 
Society residing in Washtenaw County, together with eleven new members 
whom they had secured, were granted a charter for the County of Wash- 
tenaw. This Chapter, with headquarters at Ann Arbor, now has a mem- 
^^ership of 2 1 . Situated at the State University its opportunity is wide. 

36 



On January 22, 1915, ten gentlemen residing in Mt. Pleasant were 
admitted to membership and granted a charter for a Chapter for Isabella 
County. Their membership included an actual son of the Revolution — 
Peter Alverson Wilsey. 

On February 22, 1915, five nuembers residing in Kalamazoo formed 
a provisional organization for the establishment of a local chapter in that 
county. Six additional members v/ere secured and a charter granted De- 
cember 31, 1915. The membership is now 13. 

On December 28, 1917, the application for a charter by seventeen 
members residing in St. Clair County ^vas granted and St. Clair Chapter 
organized, w^ith headquarters at Port Huron. One of the members ia an 
actual Son of the Revolution — Milton R. Purdy — residing at Sarnia, Canada. 

The State Society receives from each new applicant an admission fee 
of $5.00, and has adopted the plan of returning to local chapters, where 
such exist, one-half of this admission fee. All members of the State Society 
pay state and national dues amounting to $3.00, whether members of 
local chapters or not. Members of local chapters pay in addition such 
chapter dues as are fixed by the local chapter. Detroit Chapter requires 
chapter dues of $2.00 from each member. 

There can be no question that the organization of local chapters 
greatly stimulates interest in this Society throughout the state. Its effect 
upon the growth of membership in the State Society may be noted as 
follows: 

For the ten years ending 1913 there had been no growth in member- 
bership, the losses by death and resignation being equal to the gain from 
new members. But the increase in membership since the adoption of the 
new policy has been; 24 new members were admitted in the year ending 
April ,1, 1914; 62 in the year ending April 1, 1915; 45 in the year ending 
'April 1, 1916; 41 in the year ending April 1, 1917, and 120 in the year 
ending April 1, 1918. 



3 7 



ROLL OF CHAPTERS 
Of the MlcLig«n Society, Sons of the American ReTcIution 

DETROIT CHAPTER 
Detroit. 

Charter granted May 2, 1913. 

300 Members. 

Dr. Stephen H. Knight President 

William P. Holliday Vice-President 

Julius E. TTiatcher 2nd Vice-President 

Raymond E. Van Syckle Secretary 

Frank G. Smith Treaiurer 

William Stocking Historian 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D Chaplain 

KALAMAZOO CHAPTER 

^^ J Kalamazoo. 

*" ■ Charter granted December 31, 1915. 

13 Members. 

Edward S. Parsons President 

Dr. William A. Stone Secretary 

Miner C. Taft Historian 

KENT CHAPTER 

Grand Rapids. 

Charter granted March 27, 1914 (superseding West Michigan Chapter). 

76 Members. 

Charles N, Remington President 

Charles M. Alden Vice-President 

1 
William T. P. Spooner Secretary ! 

Terry J. Barker Treasurer i 

Rev. Charles W. Merriam Chaplain i 

3 8 



MT. PLEASAfiT CHAPTER 

Mt. Pleasant. 

Charter granted January 22, i915. 

I I Members. 

Kendall P. Brooks President 

Charles Frank Marsh , ..>....,... .Vice-President 

Dr. Sheridan E. Gardiner. , . Secretary 

Warren C. Perry , Treasurer 

Harry C. Miller Historian 

ST. CLAIR CHAPTER 

Port Huron. 

Charter granted December 28, 1917. 

I 7 Members. 

Burt D. Cady , President 

Sydney C. McCIouth Vice-President 

William R. Chadwick Secretary 

Albert D. Bennett Treasurer 

William L. Jenks , Historian 

Alfred L. Chamberlain Chaplain 

WASHTENAW CHAPTER 

"^Jl S '-■':' Ana Arbor. 

Charter granted March 27, 1914. 

20 Members. 

Junius E. Beal President 

Lucius L. Clarke Vice-President 

Wolcott H. Butler Secretary 

Milton E. Osborn Treasurer 

Harlan H. Johnson Historian 

George W. Patterson Chaplain 



3 9 



MEMBERSHIP REPORT 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Membership April 1, 1913 • 388 

New members during year 1913-14 23 

Old members reinstated ] 

Deaths 5 

Resignations 2 

Demissions , ] 

Dropped 5 

Membership April 1, 1914 399 

New members during year 1914-15 56 I 

By transfer | | 

Old members reinstated 5 i 

r^ V — 62 

Deaths 9 I 

Resignations 3 | 

Demissions 3 I 

Dropped 16 

— 31 
Membership April 1, 191S 43Q 

New members during year 1915-16 42 

Old members reinstated 3 

Deaths J 5 

Resignations 7 

Demissions 3 

— 25 
Memherthip April 1, 1916 450 

New members during year 1916-17 36 

Transfers , 2 

Reinstatements 3 

41 

Deaths 9 I 

Resignations 2 

Dropped 5 ! 

' — 16' 

I 
Membership April 1, 1917 475 

New Members during year 1917-18 11 I i 

Transfers from other State Societies 5 

Reinstated 4 

120 

Deaths 6 

Demissions ,. 1 

Dropped 2 

— 9 
Membership April 1, 1918 586 

4 



POLL OF ME.MBERS 

Michigan Society, 3on& of lb© Aniericaa Revolution 

THE UPPER PENINSULA 

Alger County 

Frederick J. Baldwin Muniting 

Cone Barlow , :> Muniting 

Harold K. Righter. ...... c Muniaing 

Chippewa County 

Walter W. Case Sault Ste. Marie 

George Kemp Sault Ste. Marie 

Chase S. Osborn , Sault Ste. Marie 

Elmer S. Suttcn Sault Ste. Marie 

Delta County 

Francis L. Baldwin Escanaba 

Dickinson County 

Ward F. Davidson. Iron Mountain 

Albert R. Pierce , . . , Foster City 

Robert W. Fierce Foster City 

Houghton County 

Frederick N. Bosson Calumet 

Leslie E. Delf Laurium 

Ashley C. Leavitt Calumet 

George K. North Hancock 

Dr. George W. Orr Lake Linden 

Iron County 

Alvin L. Burridge Crystal Falls 

Hugh P. Gaston Alpha 

Marquette County 

Fred H. Begole Marquette 

Alfred F. Maynard Marquette 

Edward O. Stafford Marquette 

Menominee County 
William T. Waite. . Menominee 

Ontonagon County 
Samuel Brady Rockland 

Schoolcraft County 

Clarence E. Kelso Manistique 

Arthur S. Putnam Manistique 



4 1 



THE LCWER PEI'JINSULA 

Alpeoa County 

Frank W. Fletcher Alpei 

Henry E. Fletcher ......o , Alpen 

James B. Forman » Alpen 



Bay County ' 

Edward W. Cressey . „ . . . , Bay Ci^ 

Thomas L. Handy, Jr , , . . .N. Euclid Ave., Bay Cit 

George A. Loud Bay Gib 



Charles C. Ro3enbury Bay Citi 

Barry County | 

t 
Philip T. Colgrove Hasting) 

Berrien County 
Leonard G. Vosburg . . . . , Nile 

Calhoun County 

William F. Church Marshal 

Charles E» Gorham Marshal 

Craig G. Miller Marshall 

Dr. Wilfrid Haughey : Battle Greelj 

Edward C. Hinman Battle Creel^ 

Russel W. Snyder Battle Creeic 

William G. Crosby Albiori 

Levi S. Warren Albior^ 

Cheboygan County 
Crawford S. Reilley Cheboygan 

Grand Traverse County 

Ansel A. Howard Petoskey 

Homer Sly .Petoskcy 

Ingham County 

George W. Bissell Lansing 

Jamc s B. Boyce Lansing 

Charles M. Turner Lansing 

Ionia County 

Allan B. Morse Ionia 

Erastus T. Yeomans Ionia 



4 2 



Isabella CoTinty — The Mt. Pleaseint Chapter 

Kendall P. Brooks Mt. Pleasant 

Franklin C. Crego Mt. Pleasant 

Dr. Sheridan E. Gardiner. Mt. Pleasant 

Charles J. Myers Mt. Pleasant 

Harry G. Miller Mt. Pleasant 

Horace A. Miller Mt. Pleasant 

Walter F. Newberry Mt. Pleasant 

Warren E. Perry Mt. Pleasant 

Jackson County 

Edward A. Bancker Jackson 

Frederick L. Bliss Jackson 

George M. Carter Jackson 

Hugh E. Keeler 325 W Cortland. St., Jackson 

William W. Todd j,,k,,, 

Kalamazoo County — The Kalamazoo Chapter 

Dr. Ralph E. Balch Kalamazoo 

Harry den Bleyker Kalamazoo 

Walter den Bleyker Kalamazoo 

George lA. Buck Kalamazoo 

Gordon W. Davis 616 So. West St.. Kalamazoo 

Frank F. Ford 704 Kalamazoo Nat'l Bank Bldg., Kalamazoo 

Carl H. Kleinstuck Kalamazoo 

Dr. Rush McNair Kalamazoo 

Edward C. Parsons 518 Academy St., Kal 

Nathaniel H. Stewart 112 West South St., Kal 

Dr. William A. Stone 1 I 02 West Main St., Kal 

Miner C. Taft 309 Douglas Ave., Kalamazoo 



amazoo 
aniazoo 
amazoo 



Kent County — The Kent Chapter — Grand Rapids 

Arthur S. Ainsworth .254 James Ave., S. E, 

Charles M. Alden .T^OJ Scribner Ave., N. W. 

Harry C. Angell 5 11 Terrace Ave.. S. E. 

Melvin D. Baldwin 566 College Ave., S. E. 

Ralph F. Baldwin. . . 7 | 5 Fullet^Ave., S. E. 

Terry J. Barker 159 Lafayette Ave., N. E. 

Norman W. Beecher 512 Morris Ave. 

Lucius Boltwood E Street, Riverside North 

George S. Bucher 611 Lafayette Ave.. S. E. 

William Mc. Burleson 451 Paris Ave., S. E. 

George G. Clay 24 Union Ave.. S. E. 

4 3 



Kent Chapter — Continued 

Louis C. Covell 449 Pleasant St., S. l 

James M. Crosby Kent Hi 

Lewis D. Cutcheon 431 Lyon St., N. { 

Fred McR. Deane 438 Madison Ave., S. E 

Lewis W. Edison 338 Paris Ave., S. E 

Janies C. Everett , Kent Hills Roa 

Harrison E. Fairchild 242 Eastern Ave. S. E 

Don W. Farrant 427 Terrace Ave. S. t 

Charles C Follmer 465 Fountain St. N. E 

V/illiam H. Gay 422 Fulton St. E 

Blaine Gavett 445 Lyon St.. N- ^ 

Isaac B. Gilbert , 341 Paris Ave. S. ^ 

Louis B. Haight Muskego! 

Harry C. Leonard ; 440 Logan Si 

Claude Hamilton 37 Terrace Ave. S. c 

Horace W. Hardy 218 Terrace Ave. S. E 

Thomas W. HefFeran 648 Fountain St., N. c 

John M. Himes 232 Union Ave. S. E 

Dr. Raymond L. Hobart 139 Campbell PI., N. ^ 

Charles B, Hooker. . 700 Briggs Blvd., North Pari 

Arthur R. Hurst 7 1 4 E. Fulton sj 

John B. Hutchins 109 Earldon Ave., S. E 

Lee M. Hutchins 313 College Ave. S. E 

William Judson 225 Fountain St. N. E 

Loyal E. Knappen 330 Washington St. S. E 

Stuart E. Knappen . 322 Fountain St. N. E 

Comstock Konkle 610 Windsor Terrace S. E! 

John R. Lamb Rockforj 

Lieut. Merritt U. Lamb Muskegoj 

Dr. Frederick J. Lamed 340 Union Ave., S. E 

John S. Lawrence 307 Fulton St. E 

Paul Leake 218 John St.. N. E 

Charles H. Leonard 455 Morris Ave. S. E 

Harry C. Leonard 440 Logan St 

Rev. Charles W. Merriam. . 228 Madison Ave., S. E 

Roy K. Moulton 1512 Robinson Road S. E 

George W. Munson 26 Grant St. S. ^ 

Charles O. Nash 20 Union Ave. S. E 

Mark Norris 29 Prospect Ave. N. E 

Charles M. Norton 1935 Plainfield Ave.. N. E 

Daniel T. Patton 550 Fountain St. N. E 

Gen. Byron R. Pierce 47 Jefferson Ave., S. E. 

Charles F". Reed 238 Paris .Ave. S. E. 

Charles N. Remington 340 College Ave. S. E, 

Glendon A. Richards 308 Morris St. 



Kent Chapter (Continued) 

H. Parker Robinson. . 222 Fountain St. N. E. 

Guy \V. Rouse 135 College Ave., S. E. 

Rev. George P. T. Sargent 150 Lafayette Ave. S. E. 

William R. Shelby 65 Lafayette Ave. N. E. 

William Alden Smith, Jr Robinson Road 

William Alden Smith 465 C<?llege Ave. S. E. 

Dr. Ralph H. Spencer 327 Paris Ave. S. E. 

Harold L. Spooner R. F. D. No. 10 

Joseph W. Spooner 29 College Ave. N. E. 

Williani T. P. Spooner , 568 Morris Ave. S. E. 

Harry T. Stanton 43 7 Washington St. S. E. 

Philip T. Stanton 43 7 Washington St.. S. E. 

Willis F. Stanton 1758 Plainfield Ave.. N. E. 

Forris D. Stevens 55 Lafayette Ave. N. E. 

Edson M. Steward. . . . , 216 Benjamin Ave. 

Edson W. Steward , 216 Benjamin S. E. 

Frank A. Stone ' 444 Pleasant St. S. E. 

Frederick K. Tinkham - 315 Paris Ave. S. E. 

Daniel W. Tower 907 Jefferson Ave.. S. E. 

Van Arthur Wallin 442 Madison Ave. S. E. 

Dudley E. Waters College Ave., S. E. 

Lewis T. Wilmarth 540 Cherry St., S. E. 

Edward D. Winchester 320 Lafayette Ave. N. E. 

Walter C. Winchester 441 Madison Ave. S. E. 

Herbert A. Woodruff 229 Crescent Ave. N. E. 

Sila. McK. Wrijjht .- 512 Franklin St. S. E. 



Lenawe« County 

Roland B. Barrett Detroit 

Wilbert H. Barrett Adrian 

Charles M. Lamb Adrian 

Herbert W. Lamb Adrian 

Howell Van Auken Adrian 



Livingston County 

Leon H. Barnum Howell 

Mile. W. Bullock Howell 

Harry N. Carlisle Howell 

Charles G. Jewett , Howell 

William McPherson 111 Howell 

~ Albert L, Smith Howell 



4 5 



Macomb County 

Levant E. Bedell Romeo 

Fiske S. Church Utica 

Clarence H. Church ^tica 

Clarence F. Conner, U. S. A Detroit j 

Frank S. Schanher Mt. Clemens | 

George A. Skinner ^^^- Clemen- j 

Dr. Harry F. Taylor Mt. Clemeni ' 

Monroe County 
Harry A. Conant (Detroit Chapter) Monroe 

Montcalm County 

S. Perry Youngs Stanton 

Muskegon County 

Louis B. Haight (Kent Chapter) Muskegon 

Lieut. Merritt U. Lamb (Kent Chapter) Muskegon 

Oakland County 

George N. Brady (Detroit Chapter) Birmingham j 

Robert J. Brennan (Detroit chapter) . .Birmingham | 

William J. Chittenden (Detroit Chapter) Birmingham j 

Williams C. Harris (Detroit Chapter) Birmingham j 

Dr. Edward B. Spalding (Detroit Chapter) Green Lake, Orchard Lake P. O. j 

Frederick P. Smith (Detroit Chapter) Royal Oak , 

Frederic J. Stevens (Detroit Chapter) Royal Oak ! 

Charles W. Warren Birmingham 

Alpheus W. Chittenden Bloomfield Hills, Birmingham P. O. j 

Herbert R. Earle (Detroit Chapter) Bloomfield Hills, Pontiac P. O, i 

Charles Stinchfield (Detroit Chapter) Bloomfield Hills, Pontiac P. O. | 

Thomas W. Taliaferro Bloomfield Hills, Birmingham P. O. j 

Marquis E. Shattuck Pontiac | 

Charles I. Shattuck Pontiac ; 

Edv/ard C. Smith 146 Lawrence St., Pontiac 

Ottawa County 

Nathaniel Robbina Grand Haven 

Presque Isle County 

Dr. Joseph Sill (Detroit Chapter) Onaway 

Saginaw County 
Robert F. Johnson Saginaw 

4 6 



St. CI?.ir County — St. Clair Chapter 

Albert D. Bennett 1420 Military Road, Port Huron 

Henry Howard Bennett ........ = ...., Port Huron 

Lewis T. Bennett I 626 Military Road, Port Huron 

Burt D. Cady 733 Court St., Port Huron 

William R. Chadwick Port Huron 

Alfred L. Chamberlain Port Huron 

Charles K. Dodge. Port Huron 

Edmund R. Harrington Port Huron 

Carleton Howard Jenks Port Huron 

Frank D. Jenks Port Huron 

William L. Jenks Port Huron 

William S. Jenks Port Huron 

Russ S. Jenks St. Clair 

Gordon W. Kingsbury St. Clair 

Sydney G. McClouth . . , Marine City 

Franklin Moore St. Clair 

Milton B. Purdy 310 Nelson St., Sarnia, Ont. 

Henry Whiting , » St. Clair 

Shi&wa^ee County 
George T. Campbell Owomo 

Washtenaw County — The Washtenaw Chapter 

Ernest H. Barnes .1308 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor 

Junius E. Beal 343 So. 5th St., Ann Arbor 

Rice W. Beal 913 Church St., Ann Arbor 

Wolcott H. Butler 806 Arch St., Ann Arbor 

Lucius Clarke 923 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Charles B. Coe 809 E. Kingsley, Ann Arbor 

Harry N. Cole 702 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

George E. Donnell 406 E. Jefferson St., Ann .Arbor 

Warren W. Florer 910 Olivia St., Ann Arbor 

Walter B. Ford 904 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

J. J. Goodyear 1312 Hill St., Ann Arbor 

William T. Groves 907 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor 

Robert W. Hemphill Ypsilanti 

Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale 716 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Harlan H. Johnson 203 N. State St., Ann Arbor 

Dr. Robert G. Mackenzie 117 Division St., Ann Arbor 

Milton E. Osborn 1015 Packard St., Ann Arbor 

George W. Patterson 2101 Hill St., Ann Arbor 

J. Q. A. Sessions 911 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Shirley W. Smith I 706 S. University Ave., Ann Arbor 

Luciut D. Watkins Manchester 



4 7 



Wayae County 

Almon B. Atwater , 65 Taylor Ave., Detroit 

Roland B. Barrett (Lenawee Chapter) ...... .492 Trumbull Ave., Detroit 

Walter C. Boynton , . 71 Atkinson Ave., Detroit 

William H. Burtenshav/ .550 Jefferson Ave., Detroit 

Guy B. Cady , c . . . - 2 1 7 Seyburn Ave., Detroit 

Hal D. Cady 57 Watson St., Detroit 

David S. Carter Crosse Pointe Village 

Arthur C. Cogswell .» 2716 West Grand Blvd,' 

Lawrence B. Haywazd .1091 Second Ave., Detroit; 

William L. Henry 542 Jcs. Campau Ave., Detroit 

C. Frederic Heyerman 83 Forest Ave. E., Detroit 

Riley L. Jones 568 Helen Ave., Detroit 

Everett A. Leonard 60 Stimson PI., Detroit- 
William E. Metzger 28 Longfellow Ave., Detroit 

Jonathan Palmer 197 Bethune Ave. W., Detroit 

Albert F. Peck Pasadena Apts., Detroit 

Samuel L, Pitts 1691 Jefferson Ave., Detroit; 

Frederick A. Smith 1101 Junction Ave., Detroit 

Fred D. Standish 212 Seyburn Ave., Detroit 

William W. Talman 1559 Jefferson Ave,, Detroit 

Frederic Towle 919 Jefferson Ave., Detroit! 

Ernest C. Wetmore 526 Jefferson Ave., Detroit 

Shelden A. Wood 31 Edmund PI., Detroit 

The Detroit Chapter 

William F. Adams 56 Pingree Ave 

Aithur S. Albright. 608 Delaware AveJ 

Frederick M. Alger Groase Pointe Villa go[ 

Mark W. Allen 425 Hurlbut AveJ 

Stephen L. Angle Chatham, N. J-; 

John P. Antisdel 319 Jeffer»on Ave. EJ 

James C. Armstrong 621 College Ave., Beloit, Wis. 

Edward H. Ashley 71 Garfield Ave. 

Frank W. Averill 1042 Second Ave. 

Harry E. Avery. . . . , 33 Palmer Ave. E. 

John H. Avery 652 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Chailcs H. Aycr« 53 Trowbridge Ave. 

Eben R. Ayres 389 Canfield Ave. W- 

I 

John N. Bagley 870 Jefferson Ave. E- 

Paul F. Bagley Detroit Athletic Club 

John E. Baker 1 04 1 Cass Are. 

Edwin S. Barbour Groise Pointe Farm* 

George H. Barbour Crosse Pointe Farm* 

Col. Walter Barlov/ « . 56 Hancock Ave. E. 

4 8 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

George W. Bate* 53 Bagg St. 

Stanley F. Bates 53 Bagg St. 

Shirley W. Beebe 99 Cameron Ave. 

Jerome H. Bishop Wyandotte 

J, Remsen Bishop 3 I 8 E. Grand Boulevard 

Edward W. Bissell 750 Jeffcr»on Ave. 

Roman A. Bissell 750 Jefferson Ave. 

Clifford C. Boone 15 Owen Ave. 

Albert W. Bosley 89 Warren Ave. E. 

Herbert Bowen 33 Forest Ave. W. 

George N. Brady Birmingham 

Robert J. Brennan Birmingham 

Dr. E. L. M. Bristol 126 John R. St. 

Gerald D. Bunker 96 Collingwood Ave. 

Morris C. Burnside 112 Hendrie Ave. 

Clarence M. Burton 65 Boston Blvd. W. 

George E. Bushnell 66 Richton Ave. 

Edward H. Butler .Grosse Pointe Farms 

Fred E. Butler Pasadena Apt*. 

Well. D. Butterfield 66 Glendale Ave. 

David C. Cady 57 Wat.on St. 

Sherman D. Callender 73 Pingree Ave. 

Allan Campbell 34 Warren Ave. W. 

Hamilton Carhartt 843 Jefferson Ave. 

Henry T. Carpenter 60 Florence Ave. 

G. Lewi* Carter 744 Cas« Ave. 

John W. Case 1 23 Clairmount Ave. 

Cornelius K. Chapin Grosse Pointe 

Roy D. Chapin Grosse Pointe Farm* 

Hugh C. Chedester 68 Peterboro St. 

r-William J. Chittenden Birmingham 

C. E. Frazer Clark 51 Holbrook Ave. 

Charles L. Clark 5 ! Holbrook Ave. 

Dr. Harold E. Clark 50 Atkinson Ave. 

John C. Clark 1 75 E. Kirby Ave. 

Carl F. Clarke 68 Peterboro St. 

Howard A. Coffin 200 McLean Ave. 

Benjamin F. Comfort 133 Henry St. 

Harry A. Conant 402 Washington St., Monroe 

John S. Conant 504 Pasadena Apts. 

William S. Conant 166 Seminole Ave. 

Norman B. Conger 154 Moss Ave., H. P. 

Charles G. Cook 226 PalHster Ave. 

J. Clifton Cook 2909 West Grand Blvd. 

4 9 



DetroU Chaptej' — Continued 

James H. Cooke 1540 Twelfth 

Gen. Charles A. Coolldge 312 Pasadena Aj 

Arthur E. Corbin, 120 Broadway, New York, N. 

John B. Corliss. 34 Canfield Ave. 

James B. Craig , 240 Van Dyke A 

J. Donaldson Craig 1045 Trumbull A 

Roys J, Cram Westchester, 1 

William A. Cramrton , . ^ , 143 Canfield Ave. \ 

William H. Cramptor 143 Canfield Ave. I ' 

Frank D. Crissrnan 1475 West Grand BI 

Charles B. Grouse 25 Peterboro' 

William McI. Grouse Solvay Lot 

Harold W. Crowell 366 Chicago HI 

Harry B, Crowl 830 Second A 

I 

George S. Davis P. O. Box 5 

James E. Davis c 870 Jefferson Ave.! 

John Davis 56 Garfield Ai 

Edwin Denby 310 Iroquois A' 

Garvin Denby 524 St. Paul Aj 

Franklin S. Dewey 309 Warren Ave. 1 

Fred G, Dewey 145 Trowbridge Ai 

Clarence W. Dickeison Hotel Pla • 

Horace K. Dickinson. 77 Westminster Ai 

John L. Dickinson Ill Twenty-first I 

Paul Dickinson 106 Tyler Ave., H. \ 

George A. Drake 92 Lawrence Ai 

Dr. Harlow B. Drake Pasadena Ap 

J. Walter Drake 112 Boston Blvd. ^ 

Charles A. Ducharme Grosse Pointe Villa 

Frederick T. Ducharme 200 Burns A^ 

George A. Ducharme 803 Hotel Charlevo 

Bethune Duffield 480 Woodward A\ 

Dr. George DufSeld 1 86 Canfield Ave. \ 

Harry B. Earhart 115 Virginia Pa: 

Herbert R. Earle Bloomfield Hi 

Berrien C. Eaton 185 Iroquois Av 

C. Goodloe Edgar 188 Iroquois Av 

Harold S. Ellington 201 Gladstone Av 

Dr. Justin E. Emerson. St. Petersburg. FI 

Jacob S. Farrand, Jr 457 Woodward Av 

William R. Farrand 149 McDougall -Av 

Oliver A. Farwell 101 Smith Av. 



5 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Dexter M. Ferry, Jr Groase Pointe 

William M. Finck 145 Van Dyke Ave. 

Albert H. Finn 36 BetKune Ave. W. 

Charles Flowers 140 Hancock Ave. W. 

Frank D. Forbush 315 Seminole Ave. 

Elmer E. Ford 720 Jefferson Ave. E. 

William P. Freligh Hotel Plaza 

Henry Riley Fuller 116 Pasadena Apts. 

Richard H. Fyfe 939 Woodward Ave. 

William T. Cage , Gro9«e lale 

James Brooks Gale 357 Cass Ave. 

Ernest F. Goodwin 217 Rhode Island Ave. 

Lewis LeB. Goodwin 180 E. Grand Boulevard 

John H. Greusel Hollywood, Calif. 

Paul S. Hamilton Solvay Lodge 

Byron E. Hamlin 125 Hancock Ave. W. 

Rawson B. Harmon Grosse Pointe Village 

Charles W. Harrah 120 Pingree Ave. 

William P. Harris I 75 1 Jefferson Ave. 

Williams C. Harris Birmingham 

Walter S. Harsha 32 Peterboro St. 

Frederick T. Harward 80 Connecticut Ave., H. P. 

Charles H. Hatch 99 Delaware Ave. 

George E. Hawley . . 60 Palmer Ave. W. 

Frank D. Heath 156 Putnam Ave. 

William C. Heath 789 Third Ave. 

Albert M. Henry Grosse Pointe Farm* 

Burns Henry Grosse Pointe Farms 

Joseph L. Hepburn 309 Warren Ave. W. 

William H. Hill 1 00 Boston Blvd. E. 

Dr. Charles W, Hitchcock 55 Stimson Place 

William H. Holden 115 Hnncock Ave. E. 

William P. Holliday 68 Davenport St. 

Dr. Frank Ward Holt 145 Highland Ave.. H. P. 

Henry W. Horton 316 Hudson Ave. 

Arthur C. Hoskins 525 Jefferson Ave. 

George S. Hosmer 51 Eliot St. 

J. Winslow Howarth Kent School, Kent, Conn. 

Richard K. Hoyt Ford City. Ont. 

Isaac L. Hughes Ojibway, Ont. 

Rex Humphrey 500 Jefferson Ave. EL. 

Wetmore Hunt 677 Jefferson Ave. El. 

Wm. H. H. Hutton. Jr 663 Second Ave. 

5 1 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

William S. Jackson 316 Tuxec3o Ave., H. I 

Oscar A. Janes , .30 California Ave., H. I 

Deniing Jarves Dinard, Franc 

Ira W. Jayne : 159 Blaine Av, 

Charles C. Jenks 472 Woodward Av 

Henry L. Jennesa 39 Rowena S 

Dr. Charles G. Jennings 435 Jefferson Av' 

James D. Jerome. 55 Rowena S 

Edward H. Jewett 239 Burns Avi 

Harry M. Jewett Grosse Pointe Shor< 

Elwood C. Johnston 218 Van Dyke Avi 

Frank P. Johnston 218 Van Dyke Avi 

William D, Johnston 218 Van Dyke Av. 

Henry K. Jones 898 Jefferson Avi 

Lee E. Joslyn 66 Euclid Ave. V 

Lee E. Joslyn, Jr 66 Euclid Ave. \^ 

Charles A. Kanter . 99 Merrick Avi 

Charles E. Kanter. 63 Eliot 5 

William J. Keep 753 Jefferson Avi 

James A. Kier 52 High St. \S 

Louis B. King 76 Stimson Plac 

Hale G. Knight 37 Willis Ave. I 

Rufus H. Knight 37 Willis Ave. I 

Dr. Stephen H. Knight. 37 Willis Ave. E 

Alburn H. Krum 36 Seward Av< 

George E. O. Kunze 204 Pasadena Apt) 



Howard A. Ladue 3063 ELast Grand Blvc 

Marion B. Landry 49 Owen Av« 

Kirke Lathrop 200 Parker Av« 

Charles F. Lawson 862 Trumbull Ave 

Fred C. Lawton 122 Rhode Island Ave 

William F. Le Baron 232 Warren Ave. W 

Henry B. Ledyard Grosse Pointe Farm 

James L. Lee Grosse Pointe Farm 

Harry B. Leinbach 67 Calvert Ave 

Leslie J. Leinbach I 56 La Mothe Ave 

Dr. Charles B. Leonard 40 Massachusetts Ave 

Cornelius' W. Leonard 370 Harper Ave 

Charles E. Locke 158 McDougall Ave 

Edward H. Locke 158 McDougall Ave 

Harry A. Lockwood 3049 East Grand Blvd 

Frank T. Lodge 75 Tuxedo Ave 

5 2 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Ferdinand G. Luderer 5 1 3 4tK Ave. 

Dr. Albert B. Lyons 1 02 Alger Ave. 

Dr. Carl C. McClelland 130 Webb Ave. 

Rollin McConnell 95 Florence Ave.. H. P. 

Howard A. McGraw 1 209 Cass Ave. 

William H. McGraw 1209 Cass Ave. 

Ray McLaughlin Sandwich, Ont. 

Francis C. McMath 215 Iroquois Ave. 

Walter Macfarlane 223 Iroquois Ave. 

Dr. Walter P. Manton 1 45 Watson St. 

Caleb McD. Mathews 47 Churchill Ave. 

Charles A. Merrell 68 Peterboro St. 

Edwin L. Miller 50 Delaware Ave. 

Sidney T. Miller 524 Jefferson Ave. 

Charles Moore 197 Parker Ave. 

William V. Moore Garden Court Apts. 

Rev. Minot C. Morgan 856 Second Ave. 

Warren A. Morley 208 Eason Ave., H. P. 

John L. C. Mulkey 1129 Jefferson Ave. E. 

John M. Mulkey 11 29 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Owen W. Mulkey Pasadena Apts. 

Manuel Munoz '. . . ,207 Holly St., Cranford, N. J. 

James O. Murfin 184 Van Dyke Ave. 

Edwin B. Nail 176 Seyburn Ave. 

Barnes Nev/berry Grosse Pointe Farms 

John S. Newberry Grosse Pointe Farn^s 

Phelps Nev/berry Grosse Pointe Farms 

Truman H. Newberry .' Grosse Pointe Farms 

Herbert W. Noble 424 Seminole Ave. 

Lewis H. Paddock 496 Jefferson Ave. 

DeForest Paine Detroit Athletic Club 

Calvin A. Palmer 200 Edison Ave. 

Ervin R. Palmer 120 Harmon Ave. 

Jonathan Palmer, Jr 31 Euclid Ave. W. 

Orren L. Palmer 195 Tuxedo Ave. 

Le Moyne L. Parkinson . 153 Merrick Ave. 

Dr. Homer E. Parshall 42 Kirby Ave. W. 

Leroy E. Ferine 458 Chicago Blvd. 

Harry H. Pettee 83 Harper Ave. 

5 3 



Detroit Chapter — Continued i 

Oliver Phelps 134 McDougall Av 

Ralph Phelps, Jr 345 Iroquois Av 

T. Glenn Phillips Hotel Pla; 

Edward M. Pittenger 1124 Cass Av 

Marvin Preston 311 Addison Hot 

Dr. William H. Price 20 Davenport S 

William P. Putnam 73 Owen Avj 

i 

Frederick T. Ranney 89 Eliot S 

Charles L. Raymond 77 Arden Paij * 

Jerome H. Remick 501 Jefferson Ave. £ 

Dr. Frederick W. Robbins 96 Forest Ave. ^ 

Louis C. Rogers 439 Vinewood Av< 

William H. Rose 220 Virginia Part 

William S. Sayres, Jr Alhambra Apt« 

Charles H, Sedgwick Pasadena AptJ 

Dr. Thomas M. Sellards 24 Peterboro S< 

Francis M. Sessions 1 64 Josephine Ave 

Frederick R. Sheridan .....767 Cass Ava 

Philip H. Sheridan 767 Cass Ave 

Frank C. Sibley 144 Woodland Ave 

Dr. Joseph Sill Oaawaj 

Thomas H. Simpson 25 Eliot St 

Dudley W. Smith 73 Pallister Ave 

Enoch Smith 465 Iroquois Ave 

Frank G. Smith 89 Hancock Ave. E 

Frederick B. Smith .3034 East Grand Blvd. 

Frederick B. Smith, Jr 3034 Elast Grand Blvd. 

Frederick P. Smith Royal Oak 

Dr. Edward B. Spalding Green Lake, Orchard Lake P. O. 

H. Wibirt Spence Grosse Isle 

Howard A. Starret 1 40 Canfield Ave. W. 

John W. Starret 140 Canfield Ave. W. 

Samuel C. Stearns 2425 West Grand Blvd. 

Arthur E, Stevens 125 Hancock Ave. W. 

Frederic J. Stevens Royal Oak, R. F. D. No. 2 

Mark B. Stevens 57 Garfield Ave. 

Albert E. Stewart 95 Willis Ave. E. 

Charles Stinchfield Bloomfield Hills, Pontine P. O. 

William Stocking 220 E. Grand Boulevard 

Edward W. Stoddard 153 Putnam Ave. 

Ralph Stone 975 Cass Ave. 

Joseph S. Stringham 275 Seminole Ave. 

John H. Swift Sandwich, Ont. 

5 4 



Detroit Chapter— Contmued 

De Witt H. Taylor 25 Alfred St. 

Frank D. Taylor 115 Erskine St. 

Julius E. Thatcher 1 865 Second Ave. 

Benjamin W. Thompson. 15 Reed Place 

James W. Thompson 90 Putnam Ave. 

Dr. J. Melville Thompson 148 Westminster Ave. 

Walter Thompson Birmingham 

Wilfred S. Thompson , 114 Blaine Ave. 

James H. Thornbu-rg , 206 Northwestern Ave. 

Arthur C. Tredway. . 452 Cadillac Ave. 

Herbert B. Trix 61 Hancock Ave. E. 

Jam.es Turner 241 Seminole Ave. 

Arthur J. Tuttle 139 Collingwood Ave. 

Walter M. Trevor 178 Iroquois Ave. 

Lent D. Upson 971 Brush St. 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D.D 21 Edmund Place 

Frank G. Van Dyke 449 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Raymond E. Van Syckle 450 Putnam Ave. 

Marshall W. Waite 41 Adelaide St. 

Will A. Waite 41 Adelaide St. 

William C. Wakefield 248 East Grand Blvd. 

Charles A. Warren 789 Cass Ave. 

Ronald R. Weaver 594 Warren Ave. West 

John H. Wendell 1 59 Fort St. W. 

George M. West 56 Garfield Ave. 

George C. Wetherbee 767 Cass Ave. 

John L. Whitehead 305 Elmhurst Ave. 

Laurence J. Whittemore 98 Burlingame Ave. 

William S. Wightman 261 24th St. 

Bert C. Wilder 146 Hazelwood Ave. 

John D. Wiley 300 Putnam Ave. 

Henry P. Williams 91 Merrick Ave. 

Maurice O. Williams Pasadena Apts. 

Jef?erson T. Wing 200 McDougall Ave. 

Palmer E. Winslow .*« . 628 Second Ave. 

Albert F. Wood 31 Edmund Place 

Andrew C. Wood 935 Cass Ave. 

Hugh J. Wood 73 Bethune Ave. W. 

Charles M. Woodruff , 475 East Grand Blvd. 

Fremont Woodruff 4290 Jefferson, Grosse Pointe Village 

F. Raymond Woolfenden 20 Maidstone Ave. 

George R. Woolfenden ,169 Ferry Ave. W. 

Charles Wright 23 7 Van Dyke Ave. 

5 5 



MEMBKRo OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY IN OTHER STATES 

Alabama 
Frederick T. Peck Mob: 

Alaska 
Ralph R. Tinkham >'.... .Ketchik 

California 

John H. Greusel (Detroit Chapter) 6059 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywoi 

Dr. Henry M. Kier Woodlai 

William L. White 210 Bankers Investment Bldg., San Francia( 

I 

j 
Colorado j 

i 
Levi W. Partridge 327 Railway Exchange Bldg., Denv> 

Florida 
Dr. Justin E. Emerson (Detroit Chapter) St. Petersbu 

Louisiana j 

Jesse C. Remick Mober 

Massachusetts 

Frank B. Gaylord 58 Pomeroy Terrace, Northamptc 

Rev. Lee S. McCollester Tufts Collej 



Minnesota 
Fred B. Coleman McKnight Bldg., Minneapol 

Missouri 
Dr. William F. Kier 3609 Lindell Blvd., St. Lou 

New Jersey 

Stephen L. Angle (Detroit Chapter) Chathar 

Manuel Munoz (Detroit Chapter) Cranfor 

5 6 



New York 

Dr. Royal S. Copeland 63d St. and Eastern Blvd., New York 

George E. Hardy 14 Wall St.. New York 

Joshua E. Howard 108 Fulton St., New York 

William J. Rainey 1 60 Claremont Ave.. New York 

Rev. John H. Randall 28 West 127th St., New York 

William S. Rathbone ,1 02 West 80th St., New York 

Sidney B. Wight 330 Riverside Drive, New York 

Bert C. Whitney Douglaston, L. I. 



Ohio 

Kent M. Austin Cleveland 

Solace B. Coolidge 1721 ELast 82nd St., Cleveland 

William J. Weaver. 1889 AUandale Ave., Cleveland 



Pennsylvania 

Roys J. Cram (Detroit Chapter) Westcheeter 

George D. Hadzits 4207 Sanson© St., Philadelphia 

H. Starkey Sanford Pittsburgh 

Wiscomin 

James C. Armstrong (Detroit Chapter) 621 College Ave., Beloit 

Russell Y. Cooke 1301 West Blvd., Racine 

Ontario 

John D. Chase 4 Ingleside St., London 

Richard K. Hoyt (Detroit Chapter) Ford City 

Isaac L. Hughes (Detroit Chapter) Ojibway 

Albert M Marshall ! 1 Pacific Ave., Toronto 

Ray McLaughlin (Detroit Chapter) Sandwich 

Milton B. Purdy (St. Clair Chapter) 310 Nelson St., Sarnia 

John H. Swift (Detroit Chapter) Sandwich 

France 
Deming Jarves (Detroit Chapter) Dinard 

6 7 



DECEASED MEMBERS 



National 


Mich 


No. 


No. 


2906 


22il 


8834 


415 


12881 


381 


21708 


583 


3087 


87 


3162 


112 


18322 


522 


10843 


243 


11177 


252 


11190 


265 


20619 


568 


12879 


379 


12273 


322 


11953 


278 


3157 


107 


14859 


434 


12890 


390 


9079 


154 


23894 


644 


14169 


419 


3036 


36 


12417 


367 


3007 


7 


28833 


783 


3095 


95 


11975 


300 


14858 


433 


11964 


289 


12373 


348 


12406 


356 


3041 


41 


3081 


81 


12896 


396 


12274 


324 


9586 


186 


3026 


26 


3086 


86 


12408 


358 


20604 


554 



Name 



Residence 



Date of De&l 



Col. Milton B. Adams, \ 3. A., Grand Rapids, June 22, 19C 

Rev. Addis Albro, Orchard Lake Oct. 15, 191 

Gen. Russell A. Alger, Detroit Jan. 24, 1 9G 

Lee E. Amidon, Iron Mountain Nov. 29, 191 

Dr. Frederick P. Anderson, Grosse He June 8, 190 

William K. Anderson, Detroit Aug. 28, 190 ' 

Howard B. Anthony, Detroit Nov. 20, 191 

Noyes L. Avery, Grand Rapids June 8, 1 90 

i 

James L. Babcock, Ann Arbor Jan. 3 1 1 191 

Lyman R. Baldwin, Detroit Dec. 1, 190 

James E. Ball, Marquette April 4,191 

Enoch Bancker, Jackson June 29, 191 

Orlando M. Barnes, Lansing Nov. I I, 189' 

Eugene T. Barnum, Detroit Oct. 14, 190 

Hartson G. Barnum, Port Huron Sept. 6, 191! 

George V/. Bissell, Detroit Sept. 2, 1 90; 

Jay W. Bigelow, Easton, Md Feb. 17, 1911 

William F. Blake, Grand Rapids Dec. 24. 1911 

Henry H. Boggs, Detroit Nov. 1 , 1 9 P 

George G. Bogue, Detroit Nov. 29, 191( 

Preston Brady, Detroit Nov. 19, 190S 

Chaunccy N. Brainerd, Detroit June 26, 1913 

William H. Brearley, New York Mar. 26, 1909 

Rev. John E. Bushnell, D.D., Augusta, Ga. . .Nov. 13, 1917 
William A. Butler, Jr., Detroit Mar. 14.1914 

Frederick Carlisle, Detroit Apr. 7, 1906 

Edwin T. Carrington, Bay City Sept. 21, 1914 

David Carter, Detroit Nov. 21, 1901 

George C. Carter, Detroit May 1 7, 1903 

Joseph R. Carpenter, Grand Rapids Nov. 1 , 1905 

Theodore R. Chase, Detroit Feb. 10, 1898 

Frederick L. Chittenden, Detroit Apr. 21,1907 

George C. Clark. Detroit May 17, 1903 

James J. Clark, Detroit May 24. 1899 

Nelson B. Clark. Grand Rapids May 15, 1897 

Rev. Rufus W. Clark, D.D.. Detroit Jan. 10, 1909 

Lucius H. Collins, Detroit May 15, 1916 

Dr. Leartus Connor. Detroit Apr. 16, 1911 

James Cook, Jackson June 6, 1 909 



5 8 



Deceased Members — Continued 



National Mich. 



No. Name Residence Date of Death 

64 I Jared R. Cook, Sault Ste. Marie Mar. 31, 1916 



No. 
23891 

11952 277 James C. Cristy, Detroit April 6, 1916 

10842 242 Sullivan M. Cutcheon, Detroit Apr. 18, 1900 



3166 


116 


3200 


150 


10844 


244 


3040 


40 


11184 


259 


26602 


677 


3029 


29 



Clement A. Davison, Detroit Feb. 24, 1913 

Harlow P. Davock, Detroit Aug. 30 

Henry S. Dean, Ann Arbor Oct. 1 8 

Peter E. DeMill, Detroit June 27 

Lawrence Depew, Detroit .Jan. 3 

Julian G. Dickinson, Detroit Jan. 1 1 

Gen. Henry M. Duffield, Detroit July 14 



9589 189 Theodore H. Eaton, Detroit Nov. 6 

15638 463 Frank W. Eddy, Detroit May 1 2 

3020 20 Dr. Wm. Fitz Hugh Edwards, Detroit Oct. 27 

9077 152 S. Dow Elwood, Detroit. Sept. 20 



Henry B. Fairchild, Grand Rapids May 1 7 

Bingley R. Fales, Detroit Feb. il 

Silas Farmer, Detroit „ . . . .Dec. 28 

Jeremiah J. Farwell, Detroit Jan. 29 

Leon C. Finck, Detroit Nov. 25 

Charles E. Fox, Detroit Feb. 26 

Jasper C. Gates, Detroit Jan. 8 

Rufus W. Gillet, Detroit Dec. 3 

Oliver Goldsmith, Detroit Jan. 1 6 

Joseph Greusel, Detroit Feb. 1 3 

James H. Hall, Detroit Jan. 1 

Theodore P. Hall, Grosse Pointe Jan. 4 

Joshua C. E. Hanford, Detroit Jan. 31 

Ernest F. Harrington, Port Huron Sept. 28 

Samuel S. Harris, Detroit May 23 

Guy F. Hinchman, Detroit Sept. 30 

Arthur L. Holmes, Detroit May 27 

Charles C. Hopkins, Lansing July 1 

George H. Hopkins, Detroit Mar. 6 

Cleveland Hunt, Detroit Mar. 1 7 

De Forest Hunt, M.D.. Grand Rapids Mar. 10 

Albert P. Jacobs, Birmingham Jan. 30 

Charles H. Jacobs, Nordhoff, Cal .' .Mar. 5 



14175 


425 


12889 


389 


3009 


9 


12894 


394 


15647 


472 


12370 


345 


3005 


5 


3098 


98 


3173 


123 


11963 


288 


26795 


720 


3069 


69 


11191 


266 


10831 


231 


10838 


238 


10846 


246 


20606 


555 


3090 


90 


3089 


89 


3034 


34 


3023 


23 


3078 


78 


1G836 


236 



1910 
1915 
1893 
1904 
1916 
1913 

1910 
1914 

1897 
1898 

1912 
1913 
1902 
1904 
1910 
1918 

1916 
,1906 
1911 
1913 

1916 
1909 
1902 
1905 
1906 
1905 
1916 
1916 
1906 
1906 
1903 

1909 
1909 



5 9 



Deceased Members — Continued 

National Mich. 

No. No. Name Residence Date of Death 

12269 319 Edward W. Jenks, M. D., Detroit Mar. 18, 1903, 

3160 no Thomas S. Jerome. Detroit Apr. 13. 1914 

3179 129 David E. Johnson, Grosse Isle Jan. 22. 190 



15631 456 Henry L. Kanter, Detroit Sept. 18. 1 90S 

9098 173 Loftus N. Keating, Muskegon April. 1 9 I 4 

11192 267 Frank G. Kneeland, St. Louis Feb. 7, 1 9 I 6 

Samuel S. Lacey, Marshal! Feb. 2, 1896 

Herschel B. Lazell, Lansing Sept. 22, 1909 

Theodore O. Leonard, Detroit May 31, 1910 

Richard H. L'Hommedieu, Detroit Mar. 18,1918 

Dwight N. Lowell, Romeo July 27, 1907 

Charles F. Marsh, Mt. Pleasant Feb. 7, 1918 

Mathew H. Maynard, Marquette Dec. 20, 1907 

Charles T. Mayo, Detroit Jan. 14, 1916 

William C. McMillan, Detroit Feb. 23, 1907 

Elijah W. Meddaugh, Detroit Dec. 20, 1903 

William Merrill, Saginaw Feb. 16, 1907 

Henry R. Mizner, Detroit Aug. 25, 1915 

Alexander Monroe, Webberville Mar. 4, 1907 

William A. Moore, Detroit Sept. 25, 1906 

William S. Moore, Detroit June 22, 1906 

Couverneur Morris, Detroit Dec. 30, 1 897 

Robert Morris, Detroit 1 906 

Charles W. Moses, Detroit Oct. 17, 1915 

William F. Mulkey, Detroit Sept. 27, 1902 

11969 294 Dr. George J. Northrop, Marquette Mar. 8. 1899 

Clarence A. Palmer, Pontiac Feb. 9, 1907 

Thomas W, Palmer, Detroit June 1 , 1913 

John Patton, Jr., Grand Rapids May 24, 1907 

Edward T. Peck, Seaford. L. I .Aug. 8, 1913 

William G. Phipps, Saginaw Feb. 27. 1915 

Thomas Pitts, Detroit Oct. 28, 1907 

Daniel Putnam, Ypsilanti. . July 29, 1906 

Francis Raymond, Detroit Apr. 29, 1906 

George B. Remick. Detroit Sept. 16,1913 

James A. Remick, Detroit Dec. 28. 1903 

George O. Robinson, Detroit Dec. 14, 1915 

Fordyce H. Rogers, Detroit Nov. 2, 1 9 M 

6 



3006 


6 


19892 


542 


3195 


145 


3099 


99 


12405 


355 


26789 


714 


17203 


478 


17202 


487 


3085 


85 


12270 


320 


15676 


451 


11967 


292 


12271 


321 


9084 


159 


1795 


177 


3158 


108 


10830 


230 


14153 


403 


12413 


363 



14163 


413 


3156 


106 


3010 


10 


10176 


201 


10833 


233 


10193 


218 


3046 


46 


3077 


77 


3167 


117 


I0I89 


214 


11176 


251 


19879 


529 



Deceased Members — Continueil 



National Mich. 
No. No. 



Name* 



Residence 



Date of Death 



142 Col. Joseph S. Rogers, Orchard Lake Sept. 14. 1901 

1903 
1905 



3192 

12423 3 73 William G. Rosenbury, Bay City Dec. 24 

3178 128 Alfred Russell, Detroit May 8 

123 74 349 Francis G. Russell, Detroit Jan. 1 1 



3080 


60 


21701 


582 


3003 


3 


3030 


30 


12265 


315 


3068 


68 


3004 


4 


3093 


93 


3028 


28 


26793 


718 


9597 


197 


12401 


351 


12368 


343 


14170 


420 


3013 


13 


3048 


48 


10848 


248 


12352 


327 


14158 


408 


3188 


138 


3152 


102 


12414 


364 


12267 


317 


22728 


603 


18304 


504 


3025 


25 


26622 


697 


12895 


395 


11183 


258 


3199 


149 


12415 


365 



William Savidge, Spring Lake May 9 

James P. Scranton, Detroit July 13 

William Shotwell, Pontiac May 25 

Henry S, Sibley, Birmingham Sept. I 7 

Chau-ncey M. Silliman, Detroit March 22 

Dr. Eugene C. Skinner, Detroit Jan. 24 

Elliot T. Slocum, Detroit Nov. 20 

James C. Smith, Detroit Sept. 7 

Charles D. Standish, Detroit. . Oct. 8 

Samuel B. Standish, Detroit Nov. 6 

George B. Stevens, Detroit Sept. 27 

William G. Thompson, Detroit July 20 

George Thrall, Detroit Feb. 22 

Charles W. Tufts, Detroit June 27 

Isaac D. Toll, Petoskey April 

Fred T. Ward, Lansing Aug. 13 

Lewis C. Watson, Detroit Feb. 5 

Edgar Weeks, Mount Clemens Dec. 17 

Frank West, Detroit Feb. 28 

Alexander B. Wetmore, Detroit Oct. 28 

Herschel Whitaker, Detroit May 5 

Peter White, Marquette June 6 

I. Wixom Wliitehead, Flint Oct. 20 

Denny O. Wiley, Detroit Apr. 14 

Richard F. Williams, Detroit Feb. 21 

Richard Storrs Willis, Detroit May 7 

Peter Alverson Wilsey, Mt. Pleas£\nt Feb. 3 

Samuel J. Wilson, Flint Nov. 4 

Alvinus B. Wood, Detroit Jan. 24 

James N. Wright, Detroit Nov. 13 

Hal. C. Wyman, M. D., Detroit Mar. 9 



1902 

1916 
1916 
1894 
1909 
1905 
1899 
1915 
1917 
1910 
1915 
1911 

1904 
1916 

1906 
1908 

1902 
1901 
1904 
1910 
1912 
1900 
1908 
1903 
1914 
1907 
1900 
1915 
1915 
1910 
1910 
1908 



6 1 



JMICPxIGAN SOCIEl^Y 
SONS OF THE AJMERICAN REVOLUTION 






YEAR BOOK 
1919-1923 



year book 

jmichigan society 

sons of the american reaoll tion 

1919-1923 




COMPILED BY 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE 

Secretary 

1729 Ford Building 

Detroit, Michigan 

1923 



CONTENTS 



Page 

Present Officers 3 

Delegates to National Congress 4 

Board of Managers 4 

Officers Since Organization 5 

Biographies of State Officers 7 

Committees 11 

Constitution 13 

By-Laws 15 

Official Publications ". 18 

Roll of Chapters 19 

Secretary's Report 21 

Membership Report 23 

Service List, War 1898 24 

Ser\'ice List, War, 1917-1918 25 

Historical Papers — 

"William Hull, First Territorial Governor of Michigan 31 

"Michigan Territory Under a British Governor" 55 

Roll of Members 63 

Deceased Members S7 






OFFICERS OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY, 
SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



1923.1924 



DR. FRANK WARD HOLT 
^ President 

J EDWARD COLT PARSONS 

Q Vice-President 

THADDEUS DeWITT SEELEY 
Second Vice-President 

RAYMOND ELMOLNE VAN SYCKLE 
Secretary 

FRANK GOFF SMITH 
Treasurer 

FRANKLIN SMITH DEWEY 
Registrar 

WILLIAM LEE JENKS 
Historian 

REV. GEORGE PAULL TORRENCE SARGENT, D. D. 

Chaplain 

WILBERT HAMILTON BARRETT 
National Trustee 



DELEGATES TO THE CONGRESS OF THE NATIONAL SOCIETV' 



Milton E. Osborn, Ann Arbor, Delegate at Large 



Frederick M. Alger, Detroit 
Aliuon B. Atwater, Detroit 
Carl F. Clarke, Detroit 
(k'li. diaries A. Coolidge, Detroit 
Clarence W. Dickerson, Detroit 
William M. Finck, Detroit 
William P. Holliday, Detroit 
William H. Holden, Detroit 



Dr. Stephen H. Knight, Detroit 
Rev. Joseph A. Vance, Detroit 
Edward D, Winchester, Gd, Rapids 
Frank A. Stone. Grand Rapids 
G. Roscoe Swift, Adrian 
Roy V. Barnes, Royal Oak 
Joseph W. Fordney, Saginaw 
Burt D. Cady, Port Huron 



Alternate Delegates 

Jolin P. Antisdel, Detroit Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale, Ann Arbor 

.Morris C. Burnside, Detroit Lemuel S. Hillman, Grand Rapids 

Lloyd G. Grinnell, Detroit H. Parker Robinson, Grand Rapids 
William H. H. Hutton, Jr. Detroit Philip T. Colgrove, Hastings 

Rev. Minot C. Morgan, Detroit Lewis T. Sterling, Iron Mountain 

Arthur E. Stevens, Detroit Henry E. Fletcher, Alpena 

Julius E. Thatcher, Detroit Elmer S. Sutton, Sault Ste Marie 

George H. Kimball, Pontiac Frederick J. Baldwin, Munising 



BOARD OF MANAGERS 

William Judson, Grand Rapids 
William R. Shelby, Grand Rapids 
Norman B. Horton, Adrian 
Frederick L. Bliss, Jackson 
George W. Bissell, Lansing 
Rev. Carl G. Ziegler, Ishpemlng 
Claude P. Sykes, Benton Harbor 
Dr. Wallace F. MacXaughton, Detroit 
and 
The Officers of this Society, and the Delegates to the Congress of the 
National Society, ex-officio. 



Edgar M. Bosley, Detroit 
George E. Bushnell, Detroit 
-N'orman B. Conger, Detroit 
Or. Ray Connor, Detroit 
I>ewis Le B. Goodwin, Detroit 
Williams C. Harris, Detroit 
Dr. Howard L. Jones, Detroit 



Wilbert H. Barrett 1922-1923 

Milton E. Osborn 1922-1923 

Edward C. Parsons 1923-1924 

Thaddeus D. Seeley 1923-1924 

Secretaries 

Frederick T. Sibley 1890-1893 

Henry S. Sibley 1893-1905 

Rufus G, Lathrop 1905-190? 

Williams C. Harris 1908-1913 

Raymond E. Van Syckle 1913-1924 

Registrars 

Silas Farmer 1890-1892 

William F. H. Edwards 1892-1897 

George W. Bates 1897-1905 

Norman B. Conger 1905-1908 

Charles E. Baxter 1908-1909 

Raymond E. Van Syckle 1909-1913 

Franklin S. Dewey 1913-1924 

Treasurers 

Silas Farmer 1890-1892 

William F. H. Edwards 1892-1897 

George W. Bates .' 1897-1899 

Edward W. Gibson 1899-1905 

Enoch Smith 1905-1915 

Frank G. Smith 1915-1924 

Historians 

James C. Smith 1899-1905 

Joseph Greusel 1905-1908 

Clarence M. Burton 1908-1915 

Charles Moore 1915-1917 

VV^arren W. Florer 1917-191^5 

William L. Jenks 1919-1924 

Chaplains 

Rev. Nehemiah Boynton, D. D 1899-1903 

Rev. Lee S. McCoIlester, D. D 1903-1908 

Rev. Rufus W. Clark. D. D 1908-1909 

Rev. Lee S. McCoIlester, D, D 1909-1911 

Rt. Rev. Cliarles D. Williams, D. D 1911-1913 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance, D. D 1913-1921 

Rev. Minot C. Morgan, D. D 1921-1922 

Rev. Charles W. Merriam, D. D 1922-1923 

Rev. George Paull T. Sargent, D. D 1923-1924 

e 



BIOGRAPHIES OF STATE OFFICERS 
MICHIGAN SOCIETY SONS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

DR. FRANK WARD HOLT, President 

Dr. Frank Ward Holt, National Xo. 9095, Michigan No. 170, elected 
President of the Michigan Society Sons of the American Revolution, 
April 16, 1923, is a direct descendant of Nicholas Holt, who came from 
England in the ship James, June 3rd, 1635; also of William Ward, 
1639; MosesCleveland, 1635; George Abbot, Sr. 1640; William Chand- 
ler, 1687; Garrett Church, about 163- ; Thomas Graves, 1645; John 
Marshall, 1635; Robert Russell, before 1645; Solomon Johnson, before 
1638; James Pike, 1640; Solomon Keyes, before 1653; Job Rathbone; 
Benjamin Fassett; John Barnard, 1634; John Ball, before 1650; Thomas 
Flagg, before 1643; John Pierce, 1637; Edward Winn, 1635 and Joseph 
Downer, 1650. 

He joined the Sons of the American Revolution in 1896 and has 
attended six National Congresses of the Society. 

His Revolutionary ancestors were Abiel Holt, William Ward and 
Solomon Cleveland. Dr. Holt is a member of the Michigan Society 
of Colonial Wars and the New York society. Order of the Founders 
and Patriots of America. He is a son of Ira Farnsworth Holt and Perla 
M. Ward, was born in Detroit, and graduated from the dental depart- 
ment of the Detroit College of Medicine in the class of 1903. 



EDWARD COLT PARSONS, Vice-president 

Edward Colt Parsons, National No. 17217, Michigan No. 492, was 
born June 24, 1848. He is a resident of Kalamazoo, where he is in- 
terested in the manufacture of paper. He was admitted to member- 
ship November 21, 1903, by reason of descent from Sergeant Gaius 
Brewer of Colonel Pynchon's Massachusetts Regiment. 

He has served the society many years as Member of the Board 
of Managers, Delegate to the National Congress, and as President of 
Kalamazoo Chapter. 



THADDEUS DEWITT SEELEY, Vice-president 

Thaddeus D. Seeley, National No. 34544, Michigan No. 1069, born 
on a farm in the City of Pontiac, August 26, 1S67. Educated in City 
schools. Was engaged in farming and stock raising during the earlier 
years of business life, and has been for a number of years engaged 
in building and development of real estate in Pontiac and vicinity 



Admitted November 6, 1920, as desceudant of Ebenczer Dewey, private 
New Hampshire Militia. 

He is a director in the Pontiae Commercial and Savings Bank, 
Director and Vico-PrCbident of the Pontiae Mortgage Investment Co. 
and President of the Pontiae Finance Corporaion. Served eight year^ 
as a member of Legislature, having been elected to the House of 1901 
and 1903 and the Senate of 1903 and 1907. Was Mayor of the City 
of Pontiae from 1920 to 1923. 

RAYMOND E. VAN SYCKLE, Secretary. 

Raymond E. Van Syckle, National No. 15650, Michigan No. 475, was 
born in Bay City, August 24, 1S6S. He graduated from the University 
of Michigan, B. S. (1S91), M. S. (1895), LL. B. (1895). He is an attor- 
ney-at-law and a professor of law at Detroit College of Law. He has 
served the city as a member of the Board of Estimates. 

He was admitted to this society November 28, 1904, by reason of 
his descent from Timothy Corbin, 5th Worcester County, Mass., Militia, 
(his great-great-grandfather). He was elected member of the Board 
of Managers 1907-1908. Registrar 1909-1912, and Secretary 1913-192o. 
Member of Committee on Military and Naval Records, National Society 
1913. 

FRANK GOFF SMITH, Treasurer. 

Frank Goff Smith, National No. 2679S, Michigan No. 723, was born 
in Milwaukee, Wis., Sept. 2, 1871; educated Detroit High School. He 
is vice-president of the First National Bank and has served as a 
member of the Michigan State Naval Brigade. 

He derives his eligibility in this Society from the fact that he is 
the great-great-grandson of Thomas Pool, Col. David Green's Mass. 
Regiment, and great-great grandson of Col. Eli Willard of Mass. Militia. 
He was admitted to this Society March 23, 1915, and elected Treasurer, 
which office he has held since that time. 

FRANKLIN SMITH DEWEY, Registrar. 

Franklin Smith Dewey, National Xo. 1S318, Michigan No. 518, was 
born in Cambridge, Lenawee County, March 27, 1845. Graduate Uni- 
versity of Michigan, B. S. (1869), M. S. (1872). Secretary National 
Casualty Company; former principal High School, Saginaw; superin- 
tendent of schools, Alpena; also member Board of Education, Alpena. 

His revolutionary ancestors were his great-grandfathers Simon 
iJewey 2d, ensign in Colonel Chase's New Hampshire Regiment; Peter 

8 



Sellcck, private m Coionel Charies Webb's Conn. Regiment; Ezekiel 
Smith, corporal in Colonel John Lamb's Mass. Regiment; William 
Knight, in coast defense; ar-\ his great great grandfather Isaac Bridg- 
man, private in Colonel Chase's New Hampshire Regiment. He was 
admitted to membership November 27, 1907; elected Delegate to Na- 
tional Congress in 1910; served as member of the Board of Managers, 
1911-1912; and as Registrar froui 1913 until his decease, April 30, 1924. 

REV. GEORGE FAULL TORRENCE SARGENT, Chaplain. 

Rev. George Paull Torrenee Sargent, National No. 16120, Michigan 
No. 572, admitted November 15, 1909. by transfer. Geo. Pr.ull Torrenee 
Sargent is the Rector of Grace Episcopal Church, Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 12, 1S81, the son of the Rev. Chris- 
topher Smith Sargent, and Jane Findlay Torrenee. He is a member 
of the Society of Colonial Wars, and of the Huguenot Society of 
America. He graduated from Yale University in 1905, attended the 
General Theological Seminary during 1906 and 1907 and attended 
Berkeley Divinity School in 1908. Was married to Mabel Irene Mac- 
Mahan in 1907, and has two children, Jane Findlay Torrenee Sargent, 
II, and Christopher Smith Sargent, II. 

Mr, Sargent was first assistant at St. David's Church, Indian- 
apolis, 1908-1909; Rector St. Thomas' Church, Battle Creek, Michigan, 
1909-1913; Rector of Grace Church, Grand Rapids, 1914 to present time. 
President of Diocesan Standing Committee, Deputy to General Con- 
vention, 1913-1916. Provincial Representative on the National Church 
School Commission. 

WILLIAM LEE JENKS, Historian. 

William Lee Jenks, National No. 31S4, Michigan No. 134, admitted 
February 17, 1896. 

Born at St. Clair, Michigan, December 27, 1856, educated at St. 
Clair and University of Michigan, where he graduated, receiving the 
degrees of A.B. in 1878 and M.A. (honorary) in 1916. He was admitted 
to the bar in Port Huron in 1879, and has practiced law there since. Has 
devoted leisure time to historical matters, wrote History of St. Clair 
County and various articles in historical magazines. At present presi- 
dent of Michigan Pioneer and Historical Society and member of Michi- 
gan Historical Commission. Great-grandson of Lieutenant Jeremiah 
Jenks and of Jesse Lane of Newport, N. H. 

WILBERT HAMILTON BARRETT, National Trustee. 

Wilbert Hamilton Barrett. National No. 22734, Michigan No. 609, 
admitted March 27, 1911, through Lieut. James Tomlinson, who served 



witli the New Jersey State Troops. He has served the State Society on 
the Board of Governors, as First Vice-President, and in 1923 as Na- 
tional Trustee. Pre^;ident of the Lenawee Chapter at Adrian. 

He was born in New Jersey in 1S58; educated in the public schools 
and in the Union Academy and the South Jersey Institute. First en- 
gaged in teaching and in 1887 came to Michigan and engaged in the 
canning business. Organized and has since served as President and 
General Manager of the Acme Preserve Company. Interested in civic 
affairs; Past President of the Chamber of Commerce. Now a director 
of the Commercial Savings Bank and the Bond Steel Post Co. Presi- 
dent of the local Masonic Temple Association, 



10 



COMMITTEES FOR 1923 
MICHIGAN SOCIETY, SONii OF Tim AMERICAN REVOLUTION 

Membership 

Norman B. Congei Lloyd G. Grinnell. George E. Bushnell, Detroit; 
Chas. N. Remington, Grand Rapids: Carl H. Kleinstuck, Kalamazoo; 
Milton E. Osborn, Ann Arbor; Clarence K. Redfield, Pontiac; Henry 
E. Ed-wards, Jackson. 

Palriotic Education 

George W. Patterson. Junius E. Beal, Ann Arbor; Marquis Shattuck, 
Benjamin F. Comfort, Ed^in L. Miller. Detroit; George W. Bissell, 
Lansing; Frederick L, Bliss, Jackson. 

Americanization of Aliens 
C. Carroll Follmer, Loyal E. Knappen, Grand Rapids; Arthur J. 
Tuttle, Ira W. Ja3-ne, George H. Barbour, Charles A. Ducharme, Roy 

D. Chapin, Detroit; Philip T. Colgrove, Hastings. 

Patriotic Legislation 

Willam Judson, Claude Hamilton, Grand Rapids; Burt D. 
Cady, Port Huron; Frederick J. Baldwin, Munising; William S. Sayres, 
Jr. Detroit. 

Historical 

William Stocking, Edward W. Stoddard, Dudley W. Smith, Detroit; 
Lucius Boltwood, Grand Rapids; William L. Jenks, Port Huron. 

Flag 

John P. Antisdel, Detroit; Fred H. Begole, Marquette; I^e M. 
Hutchins, Grand Rapids. 

Organization of New Chapters 

Alger County: Frederick J. Baldwin, George A. Baldwin, Theodore 

E. Bissell. 

Alpena County: Frederick H. Loud, James B. Forman, Henry E. 
Fletcher. 

Bay County: E. Wilson Cressey, Thomas L. Handy, Jr., Charles C. 
Rosenbury. 

Barry County: Charles M. Atkins, Philip T. Colgrove. 

Berrien County: Claude P. Sykes, Leonard C. Vosburg. 

Calhoun County: William F. Church, Charles E. Gorham. Craig C. 
Miller, Dr. Wilfrid Haughey, Russell W. Snyder, Daniel E. Squier, Dr. 
Theodore L. Squier, Glenn A. Van Syckle. 

11 



Chippewa ('oanty; Elmer S. Sutton, Chase S. Osborn, Hugh P. Gas- 
ton. 

Dickinson County; Albert R. Pierce, Robert W. Pierce, Morris E. 
Richards, Lewis T. Sterling. 

Emmet County: Homer Sly. 

Houghton County: Frederick N. Bosson, Leslie E. Delf, Tenney C. 
De Sollar, George K. North, Albert W. Senter. 

Iron County: Alvin L. Burridge. 

Ingham County: George W. Bissell, James B. Boyce, George E. Don- 
nell, Harry A. Kinney, Glenn A. Stimson. 

Jackson County: Henry E. Edwards, Edward A. Bancker, Frederick 
L. Bliss, George M. Carter, William W. Todd, Howard Corwin, Horace 
W. Hardy, Frank J. Belknap. 

Livingston County: Albert L. Smith, Charles G. Jewett, Miles W. 
Bullock, William H. McPherson, Harry N. Carlisle, W. McPherson 
Smith. 

Macomb County: Levant E. Bedell, Henry O. Chapoton, Clarence H. 
Church, Fiske S. Church, Calvin M. Church, Richard S. Reade. 

Marquette County: Fred IL Begole, Alfred F. Maynard, Edward 0. 
Stafford, Rev. Carl G. Ziegler. 

Monroe County: Harry A, Conant. 

Ottawa County: Nathaniel Robbins. 

Saginaw County: Joseph W. Fordney, Robert F, Johnson, Allen B. 
Schall. 

St. Joseph County: Francis W. Davis. 



12 



CONSTITUTION 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Article I. — Name 

The name of this Society shall be the Michigan Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution. 

Article II. — Objects 

The object and purpose of this Society is to keep alive among our- 
selves and our descendants the patriotic spirit of the men who, in 
military, naval or civil service, by their acts or counsel, achieved 
American independence; to collect and secure for preservation the 
manuscript rolls, records and other documents relating to the "War of 
the Revolution, and to promote social intercourse and good feeling 
among its members now and hereafter. 

Article III. — Membership 

Any male person shall be eligible for membership in this Society 
who is a resident of Michigan, and who is descended from a revolu- 
tionary ancestor wherever resident, who is of the age of twenty-one, 
and whose ancestor was either a military or naval officer, soldier or 
sailor, or an official in the service of any one of the thirteen original 
Colonies or States, or of the Government representing or composed of 
those Colonies or States, who assisted in establishing American inde- 
pendence during the War of the Revolution, or a member of a Com- 
mittee of Correspondence or of Public Safety or a recognized patriot 
who rendered material service in the cause of American independence. 

Article IV. — Officers 

The officers of this Society shall be a President, Vice-President, 
Secretary, Treasurer, Registrar, Chaplain, and Historian. 

Article V. — Meetings 

A meeting for the election of officers and transaction of business 
shall be held annually at such place as the Board of Managers may 
determine, on the 15th day of April, or in case said date shall fall 
upon Sunday the meeting shall be held on the following day. And a 
meeting for social purposes shall be held annually at such time and 
place as the Board of Managers may determine. At each annual meet- 
ing there shall be elected, in addition to the officers provided for in 
Article IV, one delegate-at-large and one delegate for each fifty or 
fraction of fifty exceeding twenty-five members, who together with 
said officers as provided for by the Constitution of the National Society, 
shall represent this Society in the National Society. (As amended 
April 15, 1913.) 

13 



Article VI. — Board of Managers. 

There shall be a Board of Managers, whose duty it shall be to ton- 
duct the affairs of this Society, which Board shall consist of the Officers 
of this Society, the delegates to the National S<jciety and fifteen others 
who shall be elected at the annual meeting. 

Article VII. — Local Chapters. 

Section 1. A charter for a local chapter may be granted by the 
Board of Managers to ten or more members of the Society residing in 
the same county, upon their written petition stating the proposed name, 
the county in which it is to be located, and the names of its proposed 
members. Such Chapter may adopt a Constitution and By-Laws not 
inconsistent with those of this Society or of the National Society. 

Section 2. No person shall be admitted to membership in such 
Chapter unless he Is a member in good standing of this Society; and 
all members of this Society shall be eligible for membership therein. 
Any member who shall in any way lose membership in the State So- 
ciety shall thereupon cease to be a member of such Chapter. 

Section 3. Membership in Chapters shall not in any way change 
the relations of members to this Society, nor impair obligations of pay- 
ment of dues and other requisitions of the Constitution and By-Laws 
of this Society. Provided, however, that the Board of Managers may 
from time to time, by vote, authorize the return to designated Chapters, 
or classes of Chapters, of a p<:)rtion of tlie annual dues paid the Society 
by members of said Chapters. 

(Article VII adopted April 15, 1913.) 

Article VIII. — Amendments. 

This Constitution may be amended, altered or repealed, provided 
written resolutions to that effect are first presented to the Board of 
Managers, and approved l>y a two-thirds vote of the members present 
at any regular meeting of said Board, or at a special meeting called fi>r 
that purpose; and provided said amendments are appi'oved by a ma- 
jority of the members present at any regular meeting of the Society. 



BY-LAWS 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Article I. — Application for Membership. 

All applications for meuihership in this Soeiotr shall he upon hlauk 
forms furnished by the Society, and each application shall be accom- 
panied by the membership fee, which shall be returned if the applicant 
is not accepted. 

Article II. — Examination by Registrar. 

All applications for membership shall be submitted to the Registrar 
for examination, and shall be reported by him to the Board of Managers, 
and when approved by said Board, shall be returned to the Registrar | 

for preservation, and upon payment of niembcrship fee, the applicant 
shall become a member of the Society. 

Article HI. — Fees and Dues. 

Section 1. The membership fee shall be five dollars, and the annual 
dues shall be three dollars. Members elected prior to the first day of 
July shall pay dues for the whole year. Members elected on and after 
that day shall pay one-half the dues for the year of their election. 

Section 2. The payment of fifty dollars at one time by any member 
not indebted to the Society shall constitute him a life member, exempt 
from annual dues. 

Section 3. The annual dues shall be paid to the Secretary on or 
liefore the "first day of January in each year. The Secretary shall notify 
members three months in arrears, and report their names to the Bt>ard 
of Managers, and non-payment of dues in three months thereafter shall, 
at the option of the Board, be regarded as terminating the memliership 
of such person. 

Section 4. Members admitted by transfer from any other State 
Society of the Sons of the American Revolution, or from the Society of 
the Children of the American Revolution, to which they have paid an 
initiation fee, shall be exempt from payment of such fee in this Society. 

Section 5. If the Board of Managers deem it advisable, they may. 
liy vote, permit the collection of annual dues from members affiliatfi 
with local Chapters by the Treasurers of the resi)cctive local Chapter--. 
and make such other regulations regarding collection and remittance of 
such dues as the Board may think advisabU-. (As amended April 15. 
1913.) 

15 



Article IV. — Annual Meeting 

The members of this Society shall meet at such place as the Board 
of Managers may determine on the fifteenth day of April, and annually 
thereafter, for the election of officeis and the transaction of the busi- 
ness of the Society. In case said day shall fall upon Sunday, the meet- 
ing shall be held on the following day. In the election of officers a 
majority of the votes cast shall be necessary for a choice. 

Article V. — Board Meetings 

The regular meeting of the Board of Managers shall be held upon 
the morning of the fifteenth day of April in each year at 10:30. Special 
meetings may be called by the President at any time, and shall be 
called upon the request of any three members of the Board of Man- 
agers. Three (3) members of the Board of Managers shall constitute 
a quorum at a meeting of said Board. Five (5) members of this 
Society shall constitute a quorum at a meeting of said Society. 

Article VI. — Secretary 

The Secretary shall receive all moneys from the members, and shall 
pay it over to the Treasurer, taking his receipt for the same, and per- 
form the usual duties of a Secretary. 

Article VII. — Treasurer 

The Treasurer shall deposit all moneys in the name of the Society, 
and shall pay out nothing except upon receipted orders which have 
been approved by the Managers. 

Article VIII. — Board of Managers 

The members of the Board of Managers shall be elected in the same 
manner and at the same time as is provided for the election of officers. 
They shall judge of the qualification of applicants for membership and 
shall have control and management of the affairs of the Society. They 
shall appoint an Auditing Committee. They may call special meetings 
at any time, and shall call a special meeting upon the written request 
of any five members of the Society. They shall also have power to 
fill vacancies. 

Article IX. — Registrar 

The Registrar shall receive all applications and proofs of member- 
ship after they have been passed upon by the Board of Managers, and 
shall make a record of the same in a book of forms prepared for that 
purpose, and shall forward duplicates to the Registrar-General. He 
shall also have custody of all the historical, geographical and genealog- 
ical papers, books, manuscripts, and relics of which the Society may 
become possessed. 

16 



Article X. — Amendments 

These by-laws shall not be altered nor amended, unless such altera- 
tion or amendment shall have been proposed in writing at a previous 
meeting of the Board of Managers, and entered upon the records, with 
the name of the member proposing the change, and adopted by a major- 
ity of the members present at a regular meeting of the Society, or at 
a special meeting called for that purpose. 

Article XI. — Nomin&tions 

Section 1. Not later than January 1st of each year, there shall be 
appointed by the Board of Managers, a Nominating Committee of five 
members, no one of whom shall be an officer of the Society, 

Section 2. At least thirty days before the Annual Meeting of the 
Society, the Nominating Committee shall report in writing to the Secre- 
tary the names of candidates for Officers, for Delegates, and for mem- 
bers of the Board of Managers. 

Section 3. Any seven members of the Society may, by writing 
signed by themselves and filed with the Secretary at least twenty days 
before the Annual Meeting of the Society, nominate candidates for any 
of the offices mentioned in paragraph 2 above. 

Section 4. At least ten days before the Annual Meeting of the 
Society, the Secretary shall mail to each member of the Society a 
printed list of all persons nominated for any of the offices above men- 
tioned, together with the names of the persons by whom any such 
nomination has been made. 

(Article XI adopted April 15, 1910.) 



17 



0FFk:»aL PUBLlCATIOrMS 

Ot »he National So<~«ely, Sons r-f the Arrcrican Revolution 

Iht Mv'ansriy BuUetn 

rti.i iiuarferiy v»'>'bii"«"'-tioi.i of the National Society, 'The ^iinute 
Uaa " is issued by the Secretary-General, at Wi,£hington, and is mailed 
;iee to each member of the Society in March, June. October and De- 
.•«nihei It records action hy the General Officevs. tlie iJoard of Trus- 
■.ees. the Executive and other National commi'.tee.s. It contains the 
list and biograpbiet of the officers of the National Society, the gen- 
eral c<m)iiiitn-t-.'-. the charter, constitvition and by-laws, a list i-f 
officers of all State Societies, a complete report of the proceedings at 
he -annual congress of thf National Society, and a register ot all new 
iiembers enrolled dtiring the year, p;iving their revolutionary ancestor 
md their line of descent, and a list of members deceased. Local 
chajjiers are requested to con^municate promptly to the Secretary 
•A-ritten or prinred accounts of all meetings or celebrations, to forward 
j(.tpies of all notices, circulars, issued by' them, and to notify liim at 
once oi dates of death-"^ of members. Members not receiving tlieir 
copies of the bulletin should veitort the fact together with their proper 
•-ddres.s 

Ainerscanization Leaflets 

. i^eadeis are also publisned and distributed free by this Society for 
\niericanizatiou ptirposes comprising "The Constitution of the United 
States," and "Information for Immigrants." The leaflet is published 
in various foreign languages as well as in English. Upon application, 
the State Secretary will furnish these leaflets in the quantities desire;'.. 

Prospectus 

A handbook is also distributed stating the purposes unci objects of 
fht' Society and its accomplishments, what qualifications for meinber- 
--hii* are necessary, how lineage may be traced, where records of 
descent and revolutionary service may be found and how mcmbfishi; 
may be acquired. 



IS 



ROLL OF CHAPTLHh 

Of the Michigan Society, Son.> of tiSfr American ReVkSutioi 

DETROIT CHAPTF.P 
Detroit 

Charier granted May 2, 191?.. 

Gfuige K Bushiifcli Presidor.' 

.Ill I ins j-^. Thatcher Vice-Presidoui 

N-innau ]'.. Conger 2nd Vice-President 

Rci y;nond E. Van Sycki.e Secretary 

Frank G. Smith Treas-;rer 

Kdgar -M. Bosley Hisiorian 

Rev. .losej.li A. Vance, D. D ri,;;rlmi; 

KALAMAZOO CHAPTER 



Kal 



amazoo 



Charter gianted Decem^'r ol, 1915. 

Kd'VHrd t;. Parsons President 

nr. v.il'iam A. Stone Secretary 

Miner C. Taft • Historiar. 

KENT CHAPTER 

Grand Rapids 

Charter granted March 27, 1914. 

Lee M. Hutchin.s President 

Waldo M. Ball Vice-Pi'^sidcni 

George B. Daniels Sec.-etar> 

Alfred E. Driscoll Trea<urei 

Rev. Charles W. Merriara Chaplain ' 

(^hail'-s X. Heniington Reeistrar 

LENAWEE CHAPTER 
Adrian 

Charter granted July 9, 1920. 

V.'ilbert H. P.a rrctt ^» •?■■*"'■ ^'^ 

).;idd .]. Lewis, Jr Vice-Pre- ictt 

V\-. Her'j.nc Goff Secre',i.ry-Tre;.? .:rer 

Praukiin .1. Russell R^f,.'vrar 

T^idd .T. Lewis .Kioto- un 

;.rv!ng v. Swift Cli.'^."U. 

19 



OAKLAND CHAPTER 
noiJuIovsv'i ..no ..:... Pontiac 

Charte)r::^anted November 6, 1920. 

Thaddeus D, Seeley y^. President 

George H. Kimball, Sr "Vice-President 

Roy V. Barnes ;v.'.'. .-. .vr.-. .'. Secretary 

BlrUin' (x, Campbell Treasurer 

U'.-)U'r-.-) I'l-^ )'['/ 

J ,-.:>;-!•) I' 1-), •/ h _ . MT. PLEASANT CHAPTER 

vu;!-* DSri 

H!!;^t:'iiT Mt, Pleasant ... 

'■''"""'^''''^' Charter-granted January 22, 1915. 

n!!:i'!i:.i'> « ! li .■; 

Dr. Sheridan E. Gardiner Secretary 

ST. CLAIR CHAPTER 

ooTs.nrie.X 

•f! h^ )i'i Charter, granted. Dece.mber. 28, 1917;.)^ ;;' /-; . 

Burt* D^Cady. ,.,,,,,,,,,,,..,.,,,,,. ;.........• •...•.•.v.:^« • • •.• • .;. .President 

Sydney ■^, .IM.cCIouth .. .. . . . . ., .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. .. ,. .. .. .. ., .. .. . . ,. .. ..YJee-President 

William R. Chadwick Secretary 

Albert D. Bennett ;aZ.T^AH.'> .'.'^-ir. ; Treasurer 

William L. Jenks Historian 

abiq .H b : ^Cl 

A • WA^iHTENAW CHAPTER ) 

Jrrooi: 'n*^! ■■(:'■ -.lu' ." <k\ 

JiT-)f)f>i. -■•-.,?: V A°°. '^•■^°*' :•■.,( 

<'^>' J '•>■-■' Charter granted MarGh.27, 1914. ;': ;; . :--. ' 

Wilhert' b; Hinsdale'. ... ....\.. . :\:. .::.:: \\.:\ ...:.. . .\ . . ..President 

J." j! 'dopdyear'. ; ■. ■. . : '. '. '. ■.-. ; : ; : . . . ; ; . ; ... ..•.■. .'. .1 Vic&-Presidcnt 

Wolcott'H. Butler.'.', ..■..■.■.■.'.■.■..■.■.■.■.■...■..■.■.'.".■. .'.v. V: .V. .'. . .i Secretary 

Milton E. Osborn .^^..^ ..... .^^...,. Treasurer 

George W. Patterson Historian 

Junius E. Beal nsi-J^A Chaplain 

!..i)^>'»f*( ^ -• - . 

■.!->[r-'>lM-'r>r/ •'' .— -.1 ■ ■ ■• J 

I >ii) -iUiiT-'/iijr) ;))H T':r» '-i-i ^ ') . ' 

TinnisoH 1 ') 'U ' ." i, r i 

;: i;'T>iyitl , J :; . i 

■■■■M-^Vi 1 ./-.■■ -.1 ;1 



SECRETARY'S REPORT 

From 1897 to 1913 there existed in Michigan but one chapter or- 
ganization. This — the Western Michigan Chapter — was granted a char- 
ter March 12, 1897, upon the application of eleven naerabers of the 
State Society residing in Grand Rapids, giving them territorial juris- 
diction over the counties of Kent, Ottawa, Allegan, Kalaraazoo, Ionia. 
Barry and Muskegon. This chapter continued in existence until March 
27, 1924, during which periud forty-three memhers residing within these 
counties were enrolled. 

On March 12. 1913, members residing in Detroit applied for a char- 
ter for a Detroit Chapter, with territorial limits comprising Wayne 
County. The charter for this Chapter was granted May 2, 1913. The 
Chapter was organized and a constitution adopted November 1, 1913. 
and the local activities in Detroit formerly carried on by the State 
Society were taken over by the Chapter. Four hundred members are 
enrolled. 

On March 27, 1914, the members of Western Michigan Chapter 
relinquished all territorial rights under their cliarter of 1807 to wun- 
ties other than Kent, and received in return a new charter limited to 
Kent County. Grand Rapids now has an active and flourishing Chapter 
with a .membership of 100. 

Upon the same date— March 27, 1914— members of the State Society 
residing in Washtenaw County were granted a charter for the County 
of Washtenaw. This Chapter, with headquarters at Ann Arbor, now 
has a membership of 30. 

On January 22, 1915, ten gentlemen residing in Mt. Pleasant were 
admitted to membership and granted a charter for a Chapter for 
Isabella County. Their membership included an actual son of the 
Revolution — Peter Alverson Wilsey. 

Members residing in Kalamazoo were granted a charter Decem- 
ber 31, 1915. 

On December 28, 1917, the application for a charter by members 
residing in St. Clair County was granted and St. Clair Cliaptor organ- 
ized, with headquarters at Port Huron. Membership 15. 

On July 9, 1920, a charter was granted to the members residing In 
Lenawee County with headquarters at Adrian. IMembership 4:.. 

On Nov. 6, 1920, the members residing in Oakland County were 
granted a charter. Their headquarters is at Pontiac. Membership 25. 

The State Society receives from each new applicant an admission 
■fee of $10.00. All members of the State Society pay state and national 
dues amounting to $3.00, whether members of local chapters or not. 
Members of local chapters pay in addition such chapter dues as are 
fixed by the local chapter. 

"' 21 



For the ten years ending U^IS there was no growth in niember- 
sliip. the losse? by deiith and resignation being equal to the gain from 
new members. Foj' the decade from 1913 to 1923 the membership has 
increased from M^S to 677. 

Sin<-e tiic imMication ..f the last Year Book in 1918, the activities 
■ if Micliiifan Society ha\o been as follows: 

The annual meeting; in 191S was held May 3, at the Detroit Clnb, 
I'lesidciil <!eoi-.-e H. r.arbour. presidin.L'. Speakers: Major J. F. Tenv 
j.h-tou. I'.rirish Army. Fdirar A. (^uest, Fnsigii Hiile <^. Knight, L'.S.N.. 
:i!id l-ldwin <;. I'ipp. 

The annual meeting in 1919 was held April 2S. at Hotel Cadillac, 
!>t'rroir. Oeneral Charles A. <\H)lidjre, presiding. Speaker.*: Rev. Joseph 
.\. Vance, and I.icuT. Carl F. Clarke. 

Thf Tliirticth Annual Congress of the National Society was held at 
Ibitcl StailiM-, Ketroit. fn May. 1919, opening with services at the First 
Pi-esbyterian Church. Sunday. May IS. conducted by Rev. .Joseph A. 
A'ance. State ("ha plain ami Rev. Lee S. McColb/ster. National Chaplain. 
Lnncheou Monday noon, :May 19, at Hotel Statler. as guests of Louisa 
St. Clair Chapter. 1). A. R. Re<-eption Monday evening at the home of 
<'ol.inel and Mrs. Fn^lerick M. Alger. Gros«e rointe. Automobile drive, 
Tuesday afternodn. May 20. stopping for tea at the Ingleside Club as , 
-niests of Mrs. .lames H. McDonald, retiring president of Louisa St. 
Clair Chaiiter. 1). A. R. Tuesday evening was held the banquet at the 
Hotel Statler. Spr.-ikers: I'rcsident-Ceneral Louis Annin Ames, Presi- 
'lent-(Jeneral rl(>cr Chancellor L. .lenks. Rear Admiral Fre<lerick B. 
liassett. r.S.N.. Major (Joneral William 't. Haf.n. I'.S.A., Past Presi- 
•lents .\elson A. McClary, R. C." Ballard Thruston, Newell B. Woodworth 
and Fliner }>\. AVentworth. 

The annual meeting in 1920 was held April 15 at the Detroit Club. 
Ceneral Charles A. Coolidge. presiding. Speakers: I'resideut General 
Chancellor L. .Icnks. Chicago, Illinois. 

Tlic annual meetiiru' in 1921 was held April 15 at the Detroit Club, 
Cen<'ral Charles X. C<M>lidge, presiding. Speaker: Vice-president Geu- 
cial Moulton 1'.. Houck. l>elaware. Ohio. 

The annual meeting for 1922 was held April 15 at the Detroit Club, 
I'lcsidcut William II. Holliday. presiding. Speakers: Dr. F. E. Perry 
and Dr. Wilfred Ilaughey. 

The annual meeting f(»r 1923 was held April 16 at the Detroit Club. 
I'resident AVilliam H. Holliday presiding. Speaker: Vice-president 
Ceiici-al Louis .V. Bowman. Chicago, Illinois. 

Tla> State meetings were atteiided by representatives from the local 
'ha piers throughout the state, presenting rev»orts of the local activities 
.n rliejr iesi)ective i-onntie.s. 



R.\YMo.Nu E. Van Syckle, 

Secretary. 



22 



MEMBERSHIP REPORT 
Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

Membership April 1, 1918 :.s.; 

New members during year 7,~, 

Reinstated 1 

Deaths 17 

Resignations 11 

Dropped 12 

~ 4') 

Membership April 1. 1919 tjiM 

New members during year .'iii 

By transfer 1 

Reinstated 2 

Deaths i:; 

Resignations '.1 

Demissions 

Dropped 1 

— ;J" 

Membership April 1, 1920 i;;!? 

New members during year 7,'j 

By tiansfer 7 

Reinstated 2 

Deaths 1 .^ 

Resignations i_i 

Demissions ti 

— 1 .". 

Membership April 1. 1921 >)'.»" 

New members during year 4;: 

Transfers 1' 

Reinstated ii 

— 4.'. 

Deaths 12 

Resignations 1.'. 

Demissions :'. 

Dropped 3 

Membership April 1, 1922 7<'J 

New members during year ."•;; 

Transfers <; 

Reinstated c 

Deaths 8 

Resignations 4 

Demissions 4 

Dropped f^s 

Membership April ], 192:1 i;7: 

23 



MEMBERS OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY AWARDED MEDALS 
FOR SERVICE IN THE SPANISH WAR 

Members serving in the Spanish-American War to whom 
medals were awarded by the National Societ}' pursuant to 
resolution adopted at its Congress held in Detroit, in 1S99 : 

Milton B. Adams, Lt.-CoL, Engineers, U. S. A. 

Frederick M. Alger, Capt., Asst. Adj. Gen., U. S. V. 

Paul F. Bagley, Seaman, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

John E. Baker, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. X. 

Lyman E. Baldwin, Seaman, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

Walter Barlow, Capt. 32 Mich. Inf., U. S. V. 

Andrew P. Biddle, Major, Surgeon 31 Mich. Inf., U. S. V. 

Charles A. Coolidge, Major, 9 Inf., U. S. A. 

Charles W. Chapman, Seaman, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

Edwin Denby, Gunner's Mate, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

J. Walter Drake, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

Henry M. Duffield, Brig. Gen., U. S. V. 

Frank B. Gaylord, Ensign, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

Schuyler C. Graves, Major, Surgeon, U. S. V. 

Charles W. Harrah, Capt. Mich. Inf., U. S. V. 

Samuel S. Harris, Gunner's Mate, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

C. Frederic Heyerman, Seaman, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 

George H. Hopkins, Major, Asst. Adj. Gen., U. S. V. 

John Howard, Lieut. 19 Inf. U. S. A., Major 48 Mich. Inf., 
U. S. V. 

Edward H. Jewett, Gunner's Mate, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 
Hari-j' M. Jewett, Boatswain's Mate, S.S. "Yosemite," U. S. N. 
George A. Loud, Disbursing Officer, S. S. "McCullocli," U. S. 

Revenue Marine. 
William W. Meade, Commander, S. S. ''Machias," U. S. N. 
Edwin B. Xall, Seaman, S. S. ^'Yosemite," U. S. N. 
John S. Xewberry, Chief Q. M. S. S. '^Yosemite," U. S. X. 
Truman H. Xewberry, Lieut. J. G., S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. X. 

Charles A. Eathboue, Boatswain's Mate, S. S. "Yosemite," U. 
S. X. 

Mark M. Sibley, AVater Tender, S. S. "Yosemite," U. S. X. 

Frank E. Spraker, Lieut. 32 Mich. Inf., U. S. V. 

Muir B. Snow, Seaman, S. S. ''Yosemite," U. S. X. 

24 



Frederick D. Standis;h, Capr. g. S, ''Yo.semite," U. S. X. 
Frederick von Scbrader, Major, Actir.- Cliief Q. 31. 7 \riiiv 

. Corps and Major 2 Army Corps. 
Charles C. Wallin, Private, 32 Mich. Inl'., U. S. V. 
William L. White, Lt-Col. 35 3Iich. Inf., U. S. V. 
Louis D. AVight, Seaman, S. S. 'Tosemite," U. S. X. 
Henry L. Warren, Private, 33 Mich. Inf., U. S. V. 
George K. Woolfenden, Sergeant, 31 Mich. Inf., U. S. V. 

MEMBERS AWARDED MEDALS BY MICHIGAN SOCIETY 
FOR SERVICE IN THE WORLD WAR 

The following members of Michigan Society served in the 
Army and Xavy of the United States during the World War. 
To each of these, in recognition of his services, the Society has 
presented a Service Medal bearing the insignia of the Sons of 
the American Revolution. 

Detroit Chapter 

Alger, Frederick M., Lieutenant-Colonel, F. A., A. E. F. 

Bagley, Paul, F., Captain, Hospital Service, A. R. C. 

Barkley, Earl C, Captain, D. C. Base Hospital Xo. 17, A. E. F. 

Battelle, Frederic A., First Lieutenant, 119 F. A., 32d Division, 
A. E. F. 

Barker, Dr. F. Marion, Lieutenant-Colonel, Surgeon, Sth Div., 
A. E. F. ^ ^ . 1 

Bates, Stanley Fowler, Lieutenant, U. S. N. K. F. 

Bear, Frederick James, Private, S. A. T. C, U. S. A. 

Bennett, H. Howard, Second Lieutenant, O. D., 13th Aero 
Squadron, A. E. F. 

Bosley, Edgar M., First Lieutenant, Q. M. C, A. E. F. 
Bosley, A. Jerome, Quartermaster, 3rd class, U. S. Navy. 
Bowles, Harry L. W., Second Lieutenant, F. A., 30 th Div. 
Bradford, Thomas H., First Lieutenant, 119th F. A., 12d Div.. 
A. E. F. 

Brodhead, Willis, Captaiji, U. S. Marine Corps. 
Bronson, Karl H., Reg. Sergeant-Major, Camp Custer. 
Burnside, :\rorris C, Major, A. S., U. S. A. 
Burnside, Don G., 2nd Lieutenant, F. A., U. S. A. 
Bushnell, George E., 2nd Lieutenant, M. T. C, U. S. A. 
Bushnell, Samuel Miller, Private, Infantry, U. S. A. ' 

25 



Men-.bers Awarded Med?Js by Michigan Society 
for Service in ihe World War 

niisliiiell, William 'JVrrill, 2ud Lieulenant M. T. C, U. S. A. 

iJuttertield, Duaiie O., Sergeant, S. C, A. E. F. 

llutterrield, James D., Jr., Private, IStli F. A., Srd Div., A. E. F. 

CaiMpbell, AUau, Lieuieiiaut, A. S., S. li. C. 

Ciurk, C. E. Frazer, Ca])taiu, liifaiitrY, A. D- C, 37tli Division. 

A. E. F. 
Clark, John C. Sergeant, Base Hospital 17, A. E. F. 
("larlc, Harold E., :^.[ajor, Med. Corps, A. E. F. 
Clarke, Carl F., 1st Lieutenant, A. S., A. E. F. 
Coiiaut, William S., Major, Ord. D., U. S. A. 
('ouuer, Clarence F., First Lieutenant, A. S., S. C, A. E. F. 

(Died in Service, Dec. 3, 1918). 
Conner, Edward R., Radio U. S. X. R. F. 
Connor, Dr. Ray, Captain, M. C. Base Hospital fi9, A. E. F. 
Cooke, George G., Sergeant, M. T. C, A. E. F. 
Cooke, James H., Private, A Co., 3rd Battalion, ICO B. D. 
Covell, Louis C, Brigadier-General, 32nd Div., A. E. F. 
Craig, James B., First Lieutenant, 315 F. A., A. E. F. 
Ciampton, AVilliam H., First Lietutenant, 44tli Infantry, U. 

S. A. 
Crouse, Charles B., Plrst Lieutenant, Infantry, U. S. A. 
Ci-ouse, William McL, Ensign, U. S. N. R. F. 
Denby, Edwin, Major, U. S. Marine Corps. 
Dnffield, Muir B., 2nd Lieut., GOtli Reg. F. A., U. S. A. 
Ivisley, Harold M., 2nd Lieutenant, Inf., U. S. A. 
i:at<m, Berrien C, Lieutenant, F. A., Soth Division, A. E. F. 
IMgar, C. Goodloe, Colonel, S. C, U. S. A. 
I^nimons, Harold H., Lieutenant, U. S. N. R. F. 
lOmniOus, Waller T., Lieutenant (J. G.), U. S. X. R. F. 
JY-rry, Dexter M., Lieutenant-Colonel, M. T. C, U. S. A. 
Finn, James Crampton, Corporal, M. D., IGtli Eng., A. E. F. 
Finn, Silas Munger, Private, Base Hosp. Xo. 3G, A. E. F. 
Goodrich, Edmond T., Sergeant, Base Hospital. 
Grow, Russell, Sergeaui, 33Sth Ambulance Co., 85 Div., Russia. 
ILil], Wallace C, Sergeant, Signal Corps, A. E. F. 
Hamilton, Paul S., Captain. Ord., U. S. A. 



20 



Members Awarded Medals by Michigan Society 
for Service in the World War 

Haiina, Frederick, Major, U. S. A, 

lianna, J. Cliliord, Second Lieutenant, Koyal Air Force. 

Harmon, Eawson B., Second Lieutenant, Q. M. C. 

Hendrie, William, Major, U. S. A., A. E. F. 

Henry, Burns, Major, Ord. D., A. E. F. 

Hollidav, AVilliam F., 2nd Lieut., A. S., M. A., Balloon tScctioii. 
U. S. A. 

Hollister, Farrand P., Landsman, Electrician, Radio U. S. N. 

Hopper, James E., Corporal, Co. A, 810 Ammunition Train, 
85th Division, A. E. F. 

Hopper, Lawrence S., Trivate, 329tli F. A., S-jth Div., A. lO. I\ 

Hoskins, Arthur C, Chief Quartermaster A. S., U. S. N. B. 

Howarth, J. Win slow. Private, M. C, A. E. F. 

Humphrey, Rex., Captain, Ord. R. C, U. S. A, 

Button, William H. H., Jr., Colonel, U. S. A. 

Jolmstou, Elwood C, Coxswain, V. S. ^s"^., R. F. 

Johnston, William D., Ensign, U. S. N., R. F. 

Joslyn, Lee E., Jr., Sergeant, Base Hospital 'M, A. E. F. 

Kahter, Charles A., Captain, Ord. C, U. S. A. 

King, Alexander M., Captain, A. S., U. S. A. 

Kinney, H. Edison, Chief Petty Ofiicer, U. S. Coast Ouard. 

Knight, Hale G., Lieutenant, U. S. Navy. 

Knight, Rufus H., Lieutenant, U. S. Srvv. 

Kuuze, George E. O., Sergeant, Ord., A. E. F. 

Ladue, Howard A., Captain, Ord. C, U. S. A. 

Landry, Marion B., Sergeant, S. C. 

LeBaron, William F., Lieutenant, A. S. 

Lee, Howard B., Ensign, U. S. X. 

Locke, Edward H., Second Lieutenant, C. A., 128 Inf., ;'2 Divi- 
sion, A. E. F. (killed iu action, Oct. 1."), 1!)1S). 

Lothrop, George V. X., Major, 32Uth F. A., A. E. F. 

Loud, Frederic H., Captain, F. A., O. R. C, A. E. F. 

Luderer, Ferdinand G., Able Seaman, V. S. X. 

Ludington, Allen G., 1st Lieutenant, Infantry, F. S. A, 

Ludington, Ivan. Private, S. A. T. C, T^ S. A. 

:Merrell, Clias. A., Q. M., 2 C. U. S. X. R. F. 

27 



Membsrs Av/arc!ed R^edab by MicKigan Societj' 
for Service in the World War 

McGraw, Hosvai'd A., Serge? nt> Ked Cross, A, E. F. 

McKiuney, Herbert E., 2d Lieut. Inf., O. K. C, A. E. F. 

MacXaiighton, Dr. '\Tallace F., 1st Lieut., M. C. II., A. E. F. 

Merrill, Kobert L., Seaman, U. S. N. R. F. 

More}-, John G., Jr., First Lieuteuaut Inf., A. E. F. 

Mulkey, Claude E., 2nd Lieutenant, U. S. a. 

Xewberry, Truman H , Lieutenant Commanded", U. S. X. 

Xewberry, Barnes, Lieutenant, U. S. N. 

Xewberry, Phelps, Major, Infantry. 

Parshall, Homer H., Private, U. S. A., O. T. C. 

Parshall, James E., Second Lieutenant, French Artillery. 

Pitts, S. Leudail, First Lieutenant, A. Pv. C, A. E. F. 

Prescott, Ray B., Captain, M. T. C, A. E. F. 

Putnam, William P., Major, O. C, U. S. A. 

Shattuck. Marquis E., Corporal, S3rd Co., Gth Regiment, L'. S. 

Marine Corps, A. E. F. 
Shelden, Alger, Ensign U. S. X. R. F. 
Shelden, Allen, Lieutenant, U. S. X. R. F. 
Shelden, Henry, Chief Yeoman, U. S. N. R. F. 
Sheridan, Frederick E., Second Lieutenant, F. A., A. E. F. 
Shreve, Charles U., 2nd Lieutenant, Artillery, U. S. A. 
Sill, Joseph, Captain, M. R. C, Base Hospital 3G, A. E. F. 

Skinner, George A., Jr., Private, Ambulance Co. 35, Camp 
Greeulcaf. 

Smith, Frederick B., Jr., First Lieutenant, SanitaiT Corps, A. 
E. F. 

Starret, John W., First Lieutenant, F. A., U. S. A. 

Starret, Howard A., Second Lieutenant, Q. M. R. C, O. T. S. 

Steward, Edson M., First Lieutenant, Q. :M. C, U. S. A. 

Stoner, John M., Sergeant, Co. F, 51st Inf., G Div., A. E. F. 

Stringham, Joseph S., Captain, Ord. Dept., U. S. A. 

Sutter, Frederick M., Ensign, U. S. X. R. F. 

Thatcher, Henry Clay, Mechanic, Evacuation Ambulance Co. 
9, A. E. F. 

Tiukham, Ralph R., Captain, Engineers Corps, U. S. A. 
Turner, James, Major, G. H. Q. and S. O. S., A. E. F. 

28 



Members Awarded Medals by Michigan Society 
for Service in the World V/ar 

Trix, Herbert B., Major, Ord. D., A. E. F. 

Waite, Marshall W., Student OlScer, Aviatiou Section, U. S. 
X. E. 

Warren, Charles B., Colonel, Judge Advocate, U. S. A. 
Watson, I*hilip K., Second Lieutenant, F. A., U. S. A. 
Weadock, George P., Private, Cth Regiment, U. S. M. C, A. 
E. F. 

Kalamazoo Chapter 

Balch, Dr. Ealph E., Major, M. C, Base Hospital 20S, A. E. F. 

Davis, Gordon W., First Lieutenant, F. A. 

Kleinstuck, Carl H., Private, Adj. -Generals Dctailment, Cauii> 
McClellan. 

Kent Chapter 

Booth, Ted, Lieutenant, J. G., U. S. X. R. F., Pensacola, Fla. 
Farrant, Don W., Ensign, \j. S. X. R. F. 
Hillman, Lemuel S., Ensign (Pay Corps), V. S. X. 
Hurst, Arthur A., First Lieutenant, Q. M. C, Camp Knox, Ky. 
Lamb, Clarence R., Sergeant, 307 R. U. M. T. C, A. E. F. 
Lamb, John R., Sergeant, 107 Field Signal Batt., :->2 Div., 
A. E. F. 

Lamb, Merritt U., Captain, 125 Infantry, 32 Div., V. S. X. G.. 
• A. E. F. (killed at the battle of Jiivigny, Aug. 20, lOls. ) 
More, John C. 
Robinson, Karl A., Sergeant, 59 Battery, 15 Anti-Aircraft 

Sector, Camp Eustis, Va. 
Smith, William Alden, Jr., Major, A. S., March Field, Cal. 
Spraker, Eugene C, First Lieutenant, Hq., Go Iiifantrv Bi'v^.. 

A. E. F. " 

Stanton, Philip T., Private, 85 Division, A. E. F. 
Stevens, Forris D., Second Lieutenant, "Q. M. C, X. A. 

Lenawee Chapter 

Dodge, Frank R., Lieutenant, U. S. X. 

Lamb, Herbert W., ^lajor. Engineers Corps. V. S. A. 

Stafford, Leo J., Captain, Medical Corps, A. E. F. 

St. Clair Chapter 

Jenks, Carletou Howard, First Lieutenant, A. S. Siirtutl Cori-. 
A. E. F. 

29 



Members Awartled MeJals by Michigan Society 
for Service in the World War 

Washtenaw Chapter 

Cole, Ilariv X., PHvat.^, Hq. Co., S. A, T. C, Ft. Sheridan. 
Beal, T^•a^■i!s F., En.dKi', I'. B. X. }l. F. 
Oeoi'fre, Kicliard E., Private, Base Hospital 86, A. E. F. 
(^J roves, AVilliaiti T.. I'rivare, Infantry, U. S. A. 
Henjphill. Koiiert W.. Jr., Captain, 6. C, U. S. A. 
bollards, G. Davis, Private, 10 Co., &!. A. T. C, U. of M. 

Wayne County 

Conger, Leslie X., Captain, InfantiT, U. !?. A. 
Keed-Hill, Elli.s, Lieut. Commander,' U. S. C. G. 

Merabers-at-Large 

Chvircli, Calvin M., Utica, Wagoner 2U Engineers, A. E. F. 
Cliurcii, Clarence H., Utica, Corporal, 20 Engineers, A. E. F. 
Cliurch, FJske S., Ftica, Hergeant, O. C, A. E. F. 
Coleman, Frederick AV. P.., ^linneapolis, Captain Q. M. C, A. 

E. F. 
Crosby, Will G., Captain, Dental Corps., A. E. F. 
DeSoilar. Tenney C, Hancock, Captain, Engineers. 
Davidson. V/ard F., Iron Mountain, Captain, ^lOS Engineers, 

A. E. F. 
l>elf, Leslie E., Lanrinm, Captain, 315 Engineers. A. E, F. 
l)onnell, (Jeorge E., Lansing, Private, -M Field Artillerv, Camp 

Meade. 
Fletcher, John W., Minneapolis, First Lieutenant, 50(3 Engi- 
neers, A. E. F. 
Haughev, Dr. "Wilfrid, Battle Creek, Major, M. C. Base H<ts- 

pital 30, A. E. F. 
Kriapj), James F., Wisconsin Bapids, Corporal, Camp Custer. 
Leavitt, Ashley C, Calumet, Private, 107 Engineers, A. E. F. 
-Mead, Henry Kay, Omer. Yeoman, T. S. X. 
North, George K., Hancock, l»rivate, IIG F. A.. 31 Div., A. E. F. 
Peck, F. Tavlor, Mobile, First Lieutenant, 325 Infantrv, 82 

Div., A.'e. F. 
Pierce, Albert IL, Foster City, Private, Engineers, Camp Hum- 

plueys. 
Schall, Allen B., Saginaw, 2nd Lieutenant. 313 M. G., 80 Div.. 

A. E. F. 
Schanher, Frank 8.. Mt. Clemens. 2nd Lieut., 338 Infantrv, .S5 

Div., A. E. F. 
Taybii-. Harry P., Mt. Clemens. Captain M. C. Base Hospital, 

Camp Cu.ster. 

30 



WILLIAM HTLL— FIKST TEKKITOKIAL GOVEKXOU 
0/ MICHIGAN 

By Wi I J.I am L. Jkxks 

Historical of Michigan ISocivty, S. A. R. 

Kead at Detroit, February 23. 1922 

111 the life of William IlulJ, hi.s snriciuler of Detroit has 
so concentrated the attention of liistorians ami hi.s bio;^M-aphers 
npon that episode that tlie rest of his career, including the 
jjovernorship of the Territory of Michigan from 1805 to 18 IL'. 
has passed almost without notice. 

Born June 4th, 17r)3, in Derby, Conn., he was gradual(<l 
from Yale College in 1772, studied law, and was admitted to 
the bar in 1775. That same year a company was raised at 
Derby for the Ueviduiionan- Army, and Hull was chosen its 
captain, and served with gallantry and credit during the entire 
w:ir; became ^la.jor. Lieutenant Cidonel and Colonel, and at 
the end of the war was retained as Lieutenant Colonel in the 
one regiment continued in service, and remained until 17^(^ 
when he resigned and removed to Newton, Mass., where he 
passed the rest of his life with the exception of tlie time si>eiii 
in Miclngau as Governor, and in the War of 1812. 

In 1781 he married Sarah Fuller, of Newton, the daughter 
of Abraham Fuller, a citizen of that community of high stand 
ing, influence and means, and between the time of his marring'^ 
and retirement from the army he had three children, two 
daughters and an only sou. He later l)ecame the father of 
five more daughters, so that altogether he acquired a family 
<»f seven daughters and one son. 

Coming to Newton with- the reputation of a brave and suc- 
cessful soldier, a friend of Washington, and the son-indaw 
of a man of local standing and influence, he quickly acquired 
an important position for himself. Although admitte<l to the 
bar, he probably did not much engage in active practice. It 
was during his first year at Newton that the unrest and dis- 
satisfaction at the close of tlie Kevolntion culminated in tin- 

31 



uprising knowu as Shay's Rebellion, and at a toAvn meeting in 
Xewtou in August, ITSG, Hull, although just arrived in the 
town, was asked to prepare a reply to letters from the insur- 
gents, and in January of the following year he took an active 
part as Aide to Governor Lincoln in suppressing the rebellion. 

In the discussions and campaign on the adoption of the 
U. S. Constitution, Hull followed Ids old Commander-in-Chief 
and favored the adoption, althougli he subsequently became 
Jeffersoniau in his sympathies. 

In 17SS he was appointed Justice of tlie Peace, an office 
in Massachusetts of some importance, and continued to hold 
the office until his removal to Michigan, becoming also in 1793 
a Special Justice of the Common Tleas, in 1797 Justice of the 
Common Pleas, and the following year a Justice of the Peace 
and of the Quorum. 

During all this period he was interested in the State 
Militia, being Brigadier General foi^ some years and Major 
General from 1797. He was a founder and charter member 
of the Massachusetts Society of Cincinnati, and a member of 
the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Boston, 
and its Commander in 1789. 

In February, 1792, he made an unsuccessful application 
for the appointment of Postmaster of Boston, and later in the 
spring of the same year he spent some time in Philadelphia 
as the representative of the Massachusetts Officers of the Revo- 
lutionary War in an attempt to induce Congress to make fur- 
ther and suitable compensation to the officers and soldiers of 
that war. The attempt was rene^ved the following year, with 
the assistance of similar representatives from other states, but 
without success. 

In January, 1793, he was appointed by. Hamilton, Secre- 
tary of the Treasury, an Agent of the United States to visit 
Canada and if possible obtain supplies for the Indians who 
were expected to meet U. S. Commissioners during the follow- 
ing simimer at Sandusky, for the purpose of ell'ecting a treaty. 
He went to Niagara, where Governor Simcoe was stationed, 

32 



au(.l who-se co-opt'iatioii, or at lea^^t consent, was uecessaiT to 
the success of his mission. This was not Hull's first trip to 
Canada. In 17S4 he had gone to Quebec as the representative 
of the United States to arrange for the evacuation by the 
British of the Upper Posts along the Great Lakes, but without 
fault on his part was unsuccessful, nor were his efforts in this 
instance of much greater avail. General Hull arrived at Niag- 
ara February 3, Avhere he found Governor Simcoe on the point 
of leaving on an ofQcial visit to the Thames River and Detroit, 
and in fact, he left the following day, but at a meeting between 
them declined for several reasons to allow provisions to be 
taken from Canada for the Indians. He, however, assureil 
Hull that no impediment would be put by the British in the 
way of transporting such provisions over the lakes, and with 
this assurance the mission terminated. 

In April, 179G, Hull bought for a combination of men, or, 
as we would now call it, a syndicate, for the expressed con- 
sideration of •"^.50,000, from John Livingston of Xew York, the 
so-called ''Excess land" in the Connecticut Reserve in Ohio. 
Owing to incorrect maps, the Reserve was supposed to contain 
considerably more than 3,000.000 acres, and when the State 
of Connecticut, after having given 500,000 acres at the western 
end of the Reserve to its citizens along Long Island Sound 
who had suffered from British attacks in the Revolution, of- 
fered the remainder for sale in 17'J5, John Livingston was one 
of the purchasers. Finally a combination was effected among 
the competitors, Livingston withdrew his bid, which had been 
the highest, under an arrangement that he was to have all 
the land in the Reserve in excess of three million acres upon 
condition of paying his proportitmate share of the costs an<l 
expenses. When the surveys were completed, however, it was 
found that the Reserve contained much less tlian three million 
acres and Hull's investment must have been a total loss. 

At about the same time Hull Ijecame interested in the 
famous — and later notorious — Yazoo lands in Mississii)pi. 
January 17, 1700, he appears with 32 others as purchasing a 
tract of one million acres, which they sold in the f(dl(<wim: 
MarcJi. 

33 



February 28, 1797, the Georj^aa-Mississippi Company, oi.- 
of the original grantees from the State of Georgia of nearl.v 
;>,.")00,000 acre-s conveyed its grant to William Iluli and two 
«>ther.s as Trustees for the Xew England Mississippi Land Cu., 
and Hull continued as one of such Trustees until some tiim' 
in 1803 or 1804. During the years of his Trusteeship i\u n- 
vi-as much agitation in Congress and out over the so-called 
Yazoo lands, and after Hull became Governor of ^Michigan l;i^ 
connection with the matter was used as a basis of attack upon 
liim, and this investment was probably a financial loss. 

In 1795 Hull made a trip to Europe, going fii'st to Eng 
land and in the following spring to France and Holland, wlicn- 
he visited Lafayette, with M-hom he had been on tei-ms of warm 
personal friendship during the Revohitionarj' War. 

He steadily advanced in the estimation of his community, 
and in 1802 was made a member of the State Senate, and lu'ld 
this influential position at the time of his appointment as 
<iovernor of Michigan. 

Congress passed the Act creating the Territory of Jlichi- 
gan in January, 1805, but it did not become operative until 
July 1 of that year, so that ample time was given for the ap- 
pointment by the President of the oflicials for the new govern 
ment. It had been evident from the introduction of the lull 
December lith, 1801:, that there would be no doubt of the 
creation of the new Territory, and the question of filling tiu* 
new offices thus provided came up, and the position of (gov- 
ernor, both in salary and influence, was regarded as desirable. 
Friends of Governor Hull were early and influential with 
President JeJVerson, in presenting the claims of a man n\1i" 
was politically in sympathy -^ith the President's views, wh'> 
had such a creditable civil and militarj^ career, and was not 
too old to expect to give a considerable number of years !•» 
active public service. 

Januaiy 2Sth, 1805, Gideon Granger, then Postmastor 
(Jeneral, wrote to the President soliciting the position, but in 
tiie course of his letter said that he knew General Hull hu'i 

34 



been tlioiiglit of for rlie place, ainl if be were williii},' to accept, 
he (Granger) would decline all competition. 

Friends of Samuel Huntingtoii, of Ohio, urged his ap- 
pointment, but Senator Worthington wrote on Fel>ruary 2Gth 
that when, shortly after the law passed, he saw the President 
in regard to the appointment, the latter informed him tliat he 
had previously determined to appoiut General Hull, of ^f^ssa 
ehusetts. 

It is difficult now to ascertain the motives which induced 
General Hull to desire or accept this appointment. He was 
52 years of age, of excellent standing and reputation in Massa- 
chusetts, but it is probable that his means had become im- 
paired in the Ohio and Yazoo land speculations. Three of his 
daughters — Sarah, Eliza, and Rebecca— were married, and his 
family consisted of his wife, son and four daughters. The 
salaiy of the Governor was fixed at ^2,000.00, and the expenses 
attendant upon removal to so distant a point were consider 
abk% so that from a tinancial standpoint the position to a man 
of profitable business or profession could not be consideretl 
attractive. However, he decided to accept the position, and 
on February 2Gth his name was sent to the Senate and unani- 
mously, confirmed on March 1st. 

•Receiving his commission in April, ISC"), General Hull set 
out for his Territoi*;\- in the following month by way of New 
York, then up the Hudson to Albany, where, on June ^nl, he 
took the oath of ollice before Vice-President Clinton, then went 
up the Mohawk River, over to Oneida Lake, and down the 
Oswego River to Lake Ontario, frouj there by sailing vessel t«» 
Niagara and Queeustown, and portage to Bull'alo from wliich 
point he took the sailing vessel ''Camden'' to Detroit. Debn> 
and uncertainties attended every step of this journey, and it 
is not to be wondered at that tlie trip consumed more than 
twice as many days as it now takes hours. The time in cross 
ing Lake Erie depended on favorable winds, and in the fidlow 
ing year, when he was returning to Detroit from a jcniruey t<> 
Washington and Ins old home, it took him twenty days t<' 
cross the lake. 

35 



With him on this trip were his wife, his sun, Abraham 
Fuller Hull, -who was killed in the battle of Lundy's Lane in 
the War of 1S12. his daughter Xancy, who later marrieil 
Harris H. Hickman, a young lav\"yer of Detroit, and his daugh- 
ter Maria, who, later as Mrs. Campbell, wrote a life of her 
father. At Albany they were met b}' vStanley Griswold, newly 
appointed Secretary of the Territory, and his family, on their 
way from New Hampshire, and from that point they traveled 
together to Detroit. The early French explorers who had come 
np the Detroit Eiver more than a century and a quarter 
before, had exhausted their vocabulary in describing the 
beauty of the scene — the river itself, the forests on both. banks, 
the wild animals, which were then in large numbers, and dur- 
ing all that time but little change had come. Occasional gaps 
in the forest line, partly filled with the cabin and small cul- 
tivation of a French habitant, a lessening of the animals and 
the total disappearance of one — the buffalo — the infrequent 
appearance of a canoe or even a small sailing vessel, were the 
greatest changes, and we may well imagine the frequent ex- 
pressions of delight from all the members of the party as on 
the first day of July, 1S05, the new Governor and his Secretary 
sailed slowly up the Detroit Kiver, and at evening came to 
anchor at the place where Detroit had been, and where unex- 
pected problems confronted him. 

His capital city had vanished, and instead of a compact 
little town of perhaps -iOO people, for twenty days there had 
been only blackened chimneys and ashes. No mansion was 
awaiting the first governor, and even a hut was difficult to 
obtain, and he was compelled to take up his residence in a 
small farm house a mile up the river. The desolate inhabi- 
tants, anxious to get new roofs over their heads and re-estab- 
lish themselves as human beings and also men of business, 
had been persuaded to await the governor's coming before 
beginning town planning or building construction. 

The first day was spent in arranging some place in which 
to live, in meeting and administering the ofiicial oath to the 
Secretary, and to Judges Woodward and Bates, and in the 

36 



attempt to adjust Limseif to a .situation so diirereiit in every 
respect from anything he had ever experienced; neitlier his 
civil nor his? military life had furnished much preparation for 
the duties now facing him, multiplied as they were by the 
pressing needs of the unfortunate citizens of Detroit who com- 
prised more than one-tenth of all the white people under iiis 
administration. 

The form of government provided for the Territory com- 
prised the Governor, a Secretary, and a Supreme Court con- 
sisting of three judges, who, together v.ith the Governor, con- 
stituted the legislative l)ody. Hull, wliile supporting the adop- 
tion of the Constitution of 1787, had anti-Federalist connec- 
tions and leanings. Griswold, the Secretary, owed his ap- 
pointment to his ministerial and editorial activity in Jetfer- 
son's behalf, and for the anti-Federalists. Judge A. B. Wood- 
ward, while avowing himself to he of no political party, was a 
strong friend and admirer of Jefferson. Judge Bates had no 
pronounced views, but his family connections made him an ad- 
herent of Jefferson's party. The third judge did not reach 
Detroit until September, 1800, in the person of Judge Grillin. 

The political atmosphere of Detroit was Federalist; its 
three representatives in the Assembly of the Northwest Ter- 
ritory were all of that party, and this fact, indicating it to 
be the prevailing sentiment in the region around Detroit, had 
caused that section to be cut off from tlie State of Ohio when 
it was formed in 1802. 

The second day Governor Hull performed his first official 
acts in dividing the Territory into four Districts — Erie, De- 
troit, Huron, and Micliillimackinac, and constituting tlie en- 
tire territory one district for the execution of pi'ocess, and 
those parts of the Territory in which the Indian titles had 
been extinguished, one county, although those parts lay in 
a six-mile strip along the Detroit Ixiver and a similar strip at 
Mackinac. No name was given to this county, but apparently 
the name of Wayne, fixed in 1700, was understood to bo con- 
tinued, nor was any other county ever established by Gover- 
nor Hull. On the same day the Governor and Judges Wood- 

37 



ward and Bates sat for the first fime. in their legisUitivt- 
capacity at the hor.se of Janjos^ May and procecHled at once 
to consider the distressful condition oJ' the people of Detroit. 
The solution arrived at a few days later was to lay oiit n 
tovni which would include the ground occupied by the old 
town and a consideral^le addition, chiefly on the nortli, which 
would include land ciaiTned by the citizens as a common, but 
of which the apparent title was in the Tnited States. Tlic 
lots in the plan thu« laid out were to be sold at auction to 
inhabitants of the old town, who were permitted to exchanji«> 
the area of their old lots for an equal area in new lots, pay- 
ing for the excess area at the price fixed by the bidding. It 
was understood by all that no title could be given to the lots 
thus bought or exchanged, but the purchasers were assured 
that eveiy attempt wculd be made to have Congress at its 
next session ratify the action. 

In addition to this trouble, all the settlers outside of 
Detroit were anxious about their titles. ^Vith vei-j' few ex- 
ceptions, nearly all their titles v.-ere based upon deeds froTn 
Indian chii^fs followed by possession. These deeds had never 
been recoguized by either the Fi-ench, l^aglish or American 
governments as of any validity, and as nine years had now 
elaiised since the United States acquireil jurisdiction, and 
nothing had been done to validate such titles, althougji re 
peated representations had been made to Congress, the owners 
became fearful that their claims would not be recognized.^ 

Although the new TerritoiT inherited all the laws of the 
Northwest Territoiw, the Governor and Judges seemed to feel 
that conditions in Michigan were sufficiently ditlVrent to de 
mand a new judicial system and considerable other legislation, 
including a new law providing a territorial militia. This 
law passed August 30th, 1805, was based chiefly on the laws 
of Xew York, and among other provisions empowered the Com- 
mander-in-chief—the Governor— to direct the color an<] fashion 
of the uniforms of the oiKcers and men. 

The following month after providing for i-egiments and 
vompauies and apj.ointing their ofticers, the Commander-in- 

38 



cliit'f is^Jiied an order tiiat all officers and private soldiers 
should under penalty provide tliemselves with uniforms before 
the following .June, the uniform of a private to be a lonj; blue 
coat, extending to the knee, white plain buttons, white under- 
clothes in summer, white vests and blue pantaloons in winter, 
half boots or gaiters, round black hats, black feathers tipped 
with red, black cartridge and bayonet belts. The officers were 
to l)e proportionately more gayly arrayed. When the char 
acter and poverty of the people who constituted the militia 
is c(msidered, the difficulty an<l expense of oljtaining the out- 
fits were so great and so ill-suited to their circumstiinces, that 
it. is not st]-ange that opposition arose, and malicious enemies 
of the Governor whispered that he was making a private spec- 
ulation by bringing on a large quantity of the blue cloth, which 
could be obtained from no other supply. In the following 
winter during the absence from the Territory of Governor 
Hull, Secretary Griswold, acting commander-in-chief, suspend- 
ed the order. 

The anxiety of the residents of Detroit and of the coun- 
try settlei's over their titles increased, and on October 4th. 
ISO-"), a meeting was held at Detroit of officers of the Militia 
regiments, an address to the I*resident authorized, and Gov- 
ernor Hull and Judgq Woodward requested to present it to 
tile. President and use their endeavors to obtain the results 
desired. * 

It had been the intention of Governor Hull to return t«» 
his home in Massachusetts to settle up some of his private 
atTairs, and as Congress was to meet in December ami the 
necessity of their acting upon land titles urgent, and it v\as 
the general opinion that Judge Woodward, because of his 
former residence in Washington and acquaintance with pid)- 
lie lueii, could be of great value in obtaining the needed K-g 
islation, on October 11th the Governor and Judge left Deirnir 
for tiie Capital City, going by boat to Fort Erie, thence t'» 
New York and Washington. They timk with thtun a rep-u-t 
upon the situation drawn up by Wcnxlward, and upon their 
arrival at Washington in December, presented it and the di\ 
liress of the militia officers to the President. 

39 



After rt'l^ainill^^' in Washington until in February, ISOt;. 
Governor Hull v.ent to his home in Xewton, Mass., and in the 
latter part of May left for his seat of Government where he 
arrived June 7th, after an unusually rapid journey. During 
his stay at his old home he had been approached by some 
capitalists of Boston, who persuaded him that it was their 
intention to organize a company to engage in the western fur 
trade and make Detroit their center of operations, and in- 
cidentally they proposed as a part of the scheme the estab- 
lishment of a bank with a large capital to be incorporated in 
Michigan. In fact, the bank was the main if not the only real 
purpose of the associates, and although Governor Hull seems; 
to have acted in good faith, he was a victim to his credulity 
and good nature. Judge Woodward did not return to Detroit 
until September 3rd, and at the first legislative session. Gover- 
nor Hull introduced a petition for a bank, signed by the Bos- 
ton promoters, and upon the matter being referred to him, he 
brought in a bill which after some discussion and amendments 
was adopted and the bank incorporated, Hull himself sub 
scribing for five shares. 

Judge Woodward stated not long afterward that Gover- 
nor Hull desired to be the president of the new bank, but in 
this he was disappointed as the, judge was elected. This may 
have had some effect upon the Governor's view of the institu- 
tion, and when within a few months affer the bank was in- 
corporated, it fell into the hands of Andrew Dexter, a noted 
bank speculator of Boston, ami Congress disapproved the Act 
creating it, he v/rote to Madison, Secretary of State, that he 
rejoiced in the action of Congress. 

When Governor Hull returiujd to Detroit in ISUf) he 
brought with him some buildijig materials and soon began 
the construction of a brick house— the first one in Detroit— 
on the southeast corner of Jefferson Avenue and Randolph 
Street. John Gentle, in his attack on the Governor, called it 
a palace. In lSl.5 General Hull deeded this property to his 
uephevr, Commodore Isaac Hull, probably as security, as Ik- 
was indebted to him, and the latter, a year later, reconveyed 
it to tlie genernl who, in January, 1S17, conveyed it to El- 

40 



. kaiicLi WatsoD, tiie YvTil-kiiOTvii traveler, agriculturist, and per- 
haps the foremost progenitor of the Erie Canal, who had 
visited Detroit the yenv before and reoeived a strong impres- 
sion of its future. The building, athn- passing through many 
changes, became the American House, and \ras burned in the 
great fire of ISiS. 

AVhen the Territory of ]^Tichigan was created it contained 
but a very small area to which the Indian title had been ex- 
tinguished, this consisting of a strip six miles deep along 
Detroit Kiver from Lake St Clair to Kaisin River, and a small 
piece at Mackinac. It was obvious that there could be no 
growth in the territory unless some room was obtained by 
getting the Indians to release their rights to additional 
[ ground. 



I 



In order to meet this necessity the President in January, 
1S07, issued a commission to Governor Hull to hold a treaty 
wuth the Indians interested and obtain a release of their title 
to two tracts of land, one bounded on tlie south by tlie Miami 
(Maumee) Eiver, west by a line running northwardly from 
the mouth of the Auglaize Kiver to a point due west of the 
head of Saginaw Bay, thence east to Saginaw Bay and thence 
by the bay, Lake Huron and the international boundary to 
the mouth of Miami River. This area vras supposed to contain 
4,000,000 or 5,000,000 acres and Hull was autliorized to pay 
one cent, if necessary, two cents, per acre. The other tract 
extended from the Miami River to the Connecticut or Western 
Reserve in Ohio, and was desired for the purpose of permitting 
connnunication between the Eastern and Southern settle- 
ments and Detroit. 

A large part of the year 1S07 was spent in arranging a 
treaty. Invitations were sent to the various tribes of the 
Chippewas, Ottawas, Wyandottes and Potrawatomies living 
or hunting within the desired district to meet at Detroit on 
July 4th. It soon became evident that the Saginaw Chip- 
pewas, the largest and most turbulent tribe within the dis- 
trict, would not consent to the alicnati:;n of their land around 
Saginaw Bay, and as the treaty woul^l not be acceptable 

41 



without tbeii- taking part — their claims extending over thi.* 
whole area north of Detroit— the meeting wa^ postponed ami 
was finally held and consummated at Detroit, ^'ovember 7. 
1807. An additional cause for postponement wa.s the fluctuat- 
ing state of mind in which Hull passed the summer of that 
year regarding the danger of war with England and of In- 
dian outbreaks, of which exaggerated rumors were frequent. 

The treaty as made extended the western boundary pro 
posed by the President only as far north as a point opposite 
the foot of Lake Huron, thence to run northeasterly to White 
Kock, an object well known to the Indians and held in venera- 
tion by them, and then following the international boundaiw 
line as suggested. This tract was estimated by Governor Hull 
to contain a little more than 5,000.000 acres and for it he en- 
gaged to pay ?10,000, and an annuity forever of two thousand 
four hundred dollars, or capitalized at six per cent the prin- 
cipal sum of SJ:0,000, equivalent to a tojal of ^50,000, or a cost 
of one cent joer acre. 

The other tract, in Ohio, was secured by the Treaty of 
Hrownstown, made by Governor Hull in November, ISOS, and 
without any additional payment. In these negotiations Gov 
(U'uor Hull showed good judgment in his treatment of the 
Indians and ability in obtaining the desired concessions. 

During 1S07 Governor Hull built the Council House at 
Detroit, a stone building at the southwest corner of Jeiferson 
Avenue and Randolph Street, 25 feet by 17 feet, two stories 
high, for ofilces and meeting place with the Indians. He also 
built a stockade around a part of Detroit to protect the peo- 
ple in case of Indian attacks. 

There was dissension in his official family almost from the 
beginning. Secretary Griswold was at the head of a coterie, 
whom Hull called British sj'uipathizers. and who minimized 
the danger of Indian troubles, and to evidence his strong dis- 
approval of their conduct, iu July, 1807, Governor Hull re- 
moved James Abbott, a close friend of (Jriswf>ld, from several 
ofllces to which he had been appointetl. and in January, ISOS. 
he issued a pr<Kdamatiou warning citiziMis against factiiuis. 

43 



The situation grew r-o xitij^leas^tit ami notorious that it coulil 
not be ignored at T\'ashiiigton, with tlio result that the Presi- 
dent, in February, 1S08, removed Griswohl from his office of 
Secretary- and Collector, and appointed l\eul)on Attwater, a 
native of Connecticut", but at that time residing in Vermont. 
Governor Hull's term expiring in- the summer of ISOS, tlic 
President sent his name to the Senate for reappointment 
February 19th. There was considerable objection to. confirma- 
tion, and it was not until March 81st tliat tlie nomination was 
confirmed, and then only by a vote of 18 to 10. 

No doubt much of this opposition was due to a series of 
articles published in the Pittsburgh Commonwealth and Phila- 
delphia Aurora during 1807. They were v/ritten by John Gen- 
tle, an Englishman l)y birth, who had lived for some years 
in Detroit and who belonged to the faction of Secretai*)- Gris- 
wold. His articles purported to be a History of the Territory 
of Michigan, and were in fact a series of nmlicious accusations 
against the conduct of Govenior Hull and Judge Woodward, 
with just enough sprinkling of facts to give a small color of 
truth. Governor Hull was charged with being a "Burrite," 
a ''Yazoo speculator,'' with ordering the militia to purchasf 
uniforms made from cloth which he furnished at a fat profit, 
and with many other improper and corrupt actions. These 
articles were widely read, and as Governor Hull never noticed 
them, or dignified them by a reply, they doubtless created in 
Congress some prejudice. Judge Woodward began a reydy in 
the same papers in January, 1808, but as he defended Hull 
only as the. latter was united with him in Gentle's charges, 
the reply Avas not of much advantage to Hull. 

The year 3808 passed in much the same manner as 1S07. 
Indian troubles were occasionally feared, but probably with- 
out much real basis. Hull's correspondence with the Secre- 
tars' of War shows that the activity of the Prophet, Tecum - 
sell's brother, was felt all around the Northwest. In October 
Judge Withevell, wlio had been appointed to fill the jdace first 
lield by Judge Bates, arrived in Detroit, and proved a welconii- 
aid to the Governor in his struggle against dudge Woodward. 
The latter, a man of unusual mental atlaiuments, well e<lu- 

43 



cated, greatly superior iu capacity anil training to the aver- 
age, and coming to Detroit after several years spent in ^^'ash- 
ington, doubtless felt and perhaps indicated some impatience 
and contempt for his slower minded and less assertive fellow 
officials and associates. He and Governor Hull had frequently 
ditfered and on the occasion of Hull's reappointment he took 
a position with regard to his right to administer the oath of 
office to the new Governor, which did little credit to his good 
sense and was severely commented on by both Jefferson and 
Madison, 

In November, ISOS, Judge Woodward left for the East 
and just before leaving presented to the Governor and Judges 
sitting as a legislative body, a series of resolutions, several of 
which reflected severely on the Governor. They were referre<l 
to the Governor as a committee, and iu his report he responded 
in kind. During Woodward's absence, under the influence of 
Judge Witherell, much legislation was enacted, adding some 
new laws and altering and repealing many of the old ones, 
and an illegal method was adopted of authenticating laws. 

In Februaiy, 1S09, Governor Hull received a communica- 
tion from Washington requesting his presence there and in- 
dicating that President Madison, upon taking office in 31arch, 
intended appointing him Secretary of \Var. Surprised, but 
highly pleased with this preferment, and by the prospect of 
escape from a place and office which had many troubles, he 
was dined by some of his fellow citizens of Detroit, left the 
city the last of February, escorted some distaiKe by a military 
troop, and started on his journey to Washington. On his 
arrival at Chambersbnrg, Pa., he was chagrined to receive a 
letter from Gideon Granger, Postmaster General, announcing 
that there had been so much objection to his appointment that 
the President was compelled to resign the idea. This shock 
and the fatigue of hasty travel brought on a fit of sickness, 
which detained him so that he did not reach Washington until 
the end of March. He was naturally very indignant at his 
treatment, and it required the active services of Mr. Granger 
to mitigate his resentment, and induce him to meet the Presi- 
dent at the White House. The matter was finally smoothed 

44: 



over. \\u\. Eustis, of Massachusetts, was appointed Secretary 
and Governor Hull returned to his post at Detroit, where he 
arrived June 7th. Shortly after his return he went to Michilli- 
mackinac and held a council with the Indians wliom he warned 
against the machinations of the Prophet and tiie influence of 
the British, and from there went over to Sault Ste. Marie 
and a short distance into Lake Superior. 

The domestic situation at Detroit had not been improved 
by the absence of the Governor and Judge Woodward. The 
latter found on his return in May, 1S09, that practically all 
the legislation prepared by him and known as the Woodward 
Code had been superseded by statutes prepared by Judge 
Witherell. One of the new statutes contained sections ex- 
pressh' aimed at the Bank of Detroit, which was still in oi)era- 
tion as a private enterprise, and in which Judge Woo(lward 
was still to a slight extent interested, another nidile a funda- 
mental change in the manner of enacting laws and authen- 
ticating them. Early in October, ISOO, a case came before tlie 
Supreme Court in which the validity of the autlienticating 
statute was involved, and Judge Woodward, with Judge CJrif 
fin assenting, held that act, and by consequence all the other 
acts passed in his absence, invalid. Consternation followed, 
but within a few days Governor Hull, badl}' counselled by his 
partisans, issued in French and Englhsh a proclamation, in 
effect directing the people to disregard the decision of the 
court and to continue obeying the invalid statutes. The Gov- 
ernor apparently did not send a copy of this proclamation t*» 
Washington, and it was probably well for his position that 
he did not, as his action in the matter was indefensible. F«tr 
some months the condition of affairs was really serious, jinli 
lie meetings were held, resolutions adopted, angry feelings 
aroused and friends and associates diviiled. A (Jrand .fury 
in September, 1S09, presented the Governor for his illegal 
action iu pardoning John Whipple, who had been fmeil by tiie 
Supreme Court for an abusive attack on Judge AVoodward. 
and about the same time, a petition was printed and circulateil 
addressed to President Madison, [>raying him to remove the 
Governor. 

45 



The first decision of the Sui)i'eiiie Conrt was followe<l liv 
others of like import, and the Governor jxradnally came to scr 
that his position could not be maintained, and finally in 
September, ISIO, although with great reluctance on the ])ari 
of Judge Witherell, the acts declared invalid were all re 
pealed, and at least a semblance of harmony once more reigned. 

The Goveraor and Judges had, since the fall of 1S06, sal 
together in two entirely different capacities, one as the legis- 
lative body of the territory, the other as the Land Board t<> 
settle titles and dispose of lots in the City of Detroit. Upon 
both boards, until Judge Witherell came. Judge Woodward 
had been the dominating spirit. He prepared most of the 
legislative acts. It was his plan of Detroit that was adopte<i. 
Judge Griflin general!}' coincided with him, but after Witlic 
rell came it frequently occurred upon both boards that action 
upon important matters was prevented by an equal division 
of the niembers, Governor IIull and Judge Witherell always 
voting together against Judges Woodward and Gritlfin. 

During nearly all the period of Hull's governorship tlierc 
was apprehension in Detroit of danger from the Indians, 
which was more or less closely connected with the possibility 
of war with England, The affair of the Chesapeake occuricd 
in June, 1S07, and tlie British, who had a fort and Indian 
agency at Maiden, at once began to cultivate more strongly 
the friendship of their fonuer Indian allies, many of whom 
were located within the borders of Michigan, and even farther 
we.st, and visited Detroit on their way to and from their an- 
nual visits to Maiden to receive their presents from the British. 

For several years as the relations betAveen Great Britain 

(and America became strained or relaxed in intensity, the atti 
^ tude of the Indians formed a quite accurate index to those 

I relations. 

I In 1S07, in view of the conditions, Governor Hull decided 

I . that the erection of a stockade around the town of Detrnii 

I was a necessaiT protection, and i)artlv bv voluntary labor an<l 

I partly by the use of militia, about fifty acres lying nearlv 

I e(]ually nni-tli and south of Woodwaj-d Avenue and adjoinin*-' 

I 46 



tlu' river, was eiicl(;.-(Ml by pickets eighteen feet in lengUi an<l 
driven six feet into tlie jii-onnd. The enforced use of the militia 
for this purpose was resented by tlie men. After a few months, 
the fear of the Indians wore' away aiid in fact much of tho 
alarm during all this time was pure hysteria, the horrors of 
Indian warfare f^tiniu]atin<,'- tlie imagination and creatin;; 
non-existing enemies. 

During the succeeding years hopes alternated with fears 
that in the event of war v.itli England the Indians would be 
neutral, and not hostile, and in February, 1810, Uull wrote a 
long letter to the Secretary of War, describing conditions in 
Canada and expressing the belief that in the event of war, as 
many of the Canadians were originally from the Uniled States 
arid not deeply attached to (Jreat Britain, a proclamation from 
the President would secure at least their neutrality. 

Except for the internal dissension the year ISIO passed 
ipdetly and after the governor withdrew from his untenable 
position in regard to legislation there were no further troubles 
of that character. 

On January 9, 1811, the President re;:i)poiuted Hull <inv- 
ernor of the Territory for three years and this tiuu? he was 
ctrnfirmed without opposition. 

.By this time nuitters with Englajid began to look very 
dark and apprehensi(jn of trouble with the Indians iucrcasctl. 
The battle of Tippecanoe, the increasing unrest, the ability of 
'I'ecumseh and his success in connecti(Ui with liis luothci-. the 
Prophet, in uniting the Indians against further advances of 
tfie Americans, all condtined to make the isolation of Detroit 
and the adjacent settlements a matter of .seriotis niomcnt. 
(rovernor Hull wrote frequently and urgently to tin- Secretary 
of War upon the importance of Detroit and the iiect-<^ity of 
assistance, but neither the Secretary nor President .Madison 
reallj' appreciated the situation, or uas litte.l by temptnanieni 
or ability to cope with war conditions. 

In October of that year after receiving permission from 
tlie Secretary of State. Hull left for the East to spi-nd the 
winter, and in Febi-uary. 1812, went to \\'ashiiigtoii. Tiu' \var 

4T 



with Eiiglanu was coming on. The cfiimn-y was entirely un- 
prepared for war although the "Republicans v.-ere clamorous 
for it. Party spirit was rampant and when the President in 
view of the threatening conditions appointed two major gen- 
erals and five brigadier generals they were all from his own 
party and none had ever commanded a regiment in the face 
of the enemy. Hull, the last of the brigadiers to be named 
and therefore lowest iii rank, was appointed April 3rd, 1912, 
and confirmed five days later by a vote of 19 to 10. He was 
then nearly 59 years old and after 26 years of retirement from 
army experience was disinclined to again take up its respon- 
sibilities and anxieties; he also knew the undefended condi- 
tion around the Great Lakes and appreciated more than did 
the powers at Washington the extent to which the English had 
kept the interest and respect of the Indians. His late appoint- 
ment was due to the fact that when it was first suggested to 
him, he declined it and Colonel Kingsbury, who had formerly 
been stationed at Detroit was appointed to take charge of the 
force, which it was proposed to send to Detroit to protect, 
in the event of war, the American interests on the lakes. 
Kingsbur}- falling sick, and unable to act, the matter was again 
pressed on Hull, who finally agreed to accept, and the appoint- 
ment was duly made. 

In the preceding December, however, he had written to 
Eustis, the Secretary' of War, stating at some length his ex- 
periences in the Eevolutionary War, in the militia and as 
Governor of Michigan, his knowledge of Canada and of the 
Indians, his vigorous and healthy constitution and offered his 
services in any capacity in which they might be useful, and on 
March G, while at Washington he wrote again to Eustis in 
considerable detail of the conditions at Detroit and what 
would be needed in order to take and retain Canada. His 
subsequent hesitation may have been due to his obsen-ing at 
Washington the nnpreparedness and incompetency of the 
militaiT authorities there. 

The details of the campaign, the surrender of Detroit, and 
the court martial of Hull are too well known to need recount- 
ing. Public opinion was at first and for a long time strongly 

48 



condenniatcry. The government itself, liowever, and the oh iff 
army otlkials were greatly to blame in their conduct bearing 
on the Hull expedition. The facts are that Hull was not a 
traitor, as charged, in any respect. He was not used to in- 
<lependent command. Disuse of military sen-ice for 2G years, 
combined with his years, had lessened whatever military initi- 
ative and force he had ever possessed. The activity and suc- 
cess of General Erock, a really capable officer, disheartened 
him, but above all the presence of a large body of Indianw, 
with all the possible consequences to his family and the citi- 
zens of Detroit in the event of defeat unnerved him. Duriu;: 
his entire governorship there had been freciuent fears of Indian 
attacks. His correspondence with the War Department befor*- 
the war shows that he was subject to exaggerate<l appit- 
hensions on this subject, and the results of British succcsh 
with his fears of the atrocities the Indians would commit 
overbore all other considerations, led him to overestimate tho 
enemy strength, and underestimate his own. 

After the surrender General Hull was .sent as a prisoner 
of war to Montreal, arriving there the latter part of Soi)tem- 
ber, and was at once released on parole by Sir George Prevosf. 
He had previously sent to the Secretai^ of War an account of 
the suri-ender and his explanation of the causes leading to it. 
Returning to his old home in Newton, lie was formally ex- 
changed in the winter following. In December the PrcsbU-nt 
who had been greatly shocked at the suri-euder of Detroit, 
ordered a court martial of General Hull, and the time of the 
trial was set for February 2r)th, 1S13, at Philadelphia, wiiii 
Brigadier General Wade Hampton as President. This court, 
however, did not convene, as its members were all nw<]e<l f..r 
active service in the war. In Xovend)er, 18l:{, President -M;i<! 
ison called another court t^ meet in Albany, January 3, 1>! 1. 
with Major (General Henry Dearborn as Presi<lent. 

Regardless of all other matters involved in the question 
of Hull's conduct in the surrender of Detroit, the choice of 
General Dearborn to sit as the presiding otlicer of this trib 
unal was, to say the least, unfortunate, as his own conduct 
and his responsibility for many of the conditions attending 

49 



tiie entire Hull expedition and surrender were necessarily 
involved. 

The Court Martial met at the time fixed, and continue"! 
in session nntil Marcli 2Sth, when the}' announced their de 
cision, finding General Hull guilty of most of the charges, but 
nut guilty of treason. At this date even the making of such a 
charge seems absurd and indicative of the deep pi-ejudice then 
prevailing. The sentence of death which the court impose<l 
was remitted by Madison, and General Hull, who had never 
resigned his governorship, which continued nntil the appoint- 
ment of General Cass, October 20, 1813, retired to the home 
at Xewtou which he had, unfortunately for his fame, left nine 
years before. 

His means were limited and his support during the re 
nminder of his life was drav>-n chiefly, from the farm on which 
he lived, and. which had been given many years before to his 
wife by her father. Although it seems to have been clearly 
»inderstood when he accepted the position of Commanding 
officer of the Northwestern army that he was to continue his 
oflice and salary as governor, and he did in fact exercise the 
duties of governor from his arrival at Detroit in 1812 until 
his surrender, the accounting officers at Washington refused 
to pay his salai-y as governor after April 10, 1812, the date 
of his commission as general. Efforts were made, but for a 
long time in vain, to obtain this much needed sum, and finally 
V after his death Congress passed an act March 21, 1826, ap- 

f propriating .'i?l,G2S.32 to pay his salary from April 10, 1812, to 

I I'ebruary 1, 1813. Why this date was selected for the tenni- 

I nation of his salary is uncertain, but it certainl}' was wdthout 

I any foundation in justice, and this was recognized by Con- 

f gress, which two years later on March 10, 1828, appropriate*! 

i?!l,3S0.00 to be in full of his claims against the United States. 
This, however, did not pay his salary up to the time of the 
I appointment of Lewis Cass as his successor, October 29, 1813. 

I and in 1831 and again in 1812 his daughter, Mrs. Hickman, 

petitioned Congress for the payment of the balance due. In 
i each case a favorable reiiort was made by the committw? t'> 

I which it was referred, but no further action was taken. 

50 



Ill 1S24 he was able for the fivst time to procure from 
the War Department copies of letters and documents bearing; 
upon the Detroit situation, and which he had asked for in 
vain at the time of his trial. With these in his possession 
he wrote a series of letters published in the "Boston States- 
man," and later published in book form under the title ''Mem- 
oirs of the Campaign of the Northwestern Army," intendctl 
to clear his memory in the minds of the people, and which 
had considerable influence upon public sentiment. 

In June, 1825, Lafayette, while in America on a visit in 
Boston, called on General Hull, who had been a friend ijt 
Kevolutionaiy days, and condoled with him upon the treat- 
ment he had received. 

On November 2~>, 1825, he died at his home at the ajxe 
of seventy- two. 

Ilis only son, Abraham Fuller, who had acted as his aide 
de camp at Detroit, was killed in the battle of Luudy's Lane. 
July 25, 1814, having been appointed a Captain in the army 
in ISll. Two of his daughters came with liim to Detroit 
in 180.5, and in April, 1808, one, Nancy, married Harris II. 
Hickman, a lawyer at Detroit, and later Collector of Customs 
at Mackinac. 

His six daughtei*s all married, one became tlie motluT 
uf Isaac McLellan, a poet of some reputation, liis youngot 
dangliter was the mother of Gen. Joseph Wheeler of Civil 
an<l Spanish war fame, another daughter was the mother <>f 
James Freeman Clarke, well known preacher and writer, an<l 
still another published the :Militan' and Civil Life of Genom! 
Hull. 

Governor Hull was a man of fair ability, rather credulous 
and easily influenced by those he trusted, but not a g(H»d ]»<!;:«■ 
of men, anxious to perform his duties faithfully but not well 
adapted by temperament or training to properly han<lle tin- 
frontier conditions and men he found at Detroit, warmly dc 
voted to his family and on that account Uiore app^'hensivt- 
of Indian warfare. In more peaceful surroun<lings and favor 

51 



able conditions he probabh- would have made a good execu- 
tive, but he lacked force and initiative, and in the great crisis 
of his career was most unfortunate, first in the incompetency 
and ignorance of Washington officials, and second in his own 
lack of persistent, steady firmness of purpose. 



52 



MICHIGAN TEKKITORV CXDER A BIUTISH GOVERNOR 

By WilUam L. Jenks, Historian Afichigan Society S. A. R. 

Read at tbo Annual JRvting, April 16. 1923. 

By the surreDder of Fort ^Mackinac, July 17, 1812, and tlie 
capitulation of Detroit, August 16tli following, the Territory 
of Michigan, whose irJ.iabitauts were all located along the 
eastern edge of the lower peninsula soutii of Lake Huron and 
at Mackinac, together witii a few at Sault Ste. Marie, passed 
under British control. By the terms of the capitulation be- 
tween Gen. Brock and Gen. Hull, "private persons and property 
of every description was to be respected.'' The same day Gen. 
Brock issued a proclamation to the inhabitants of the Terri- 
tory announcing that the laws theretofore in existence should 
continue in force ''until his Majesty's pleasure be known, or 
so long as the peace and safety of the said Territory will 
admit thereof.'' 

Of the former government, the Governor (Gen. Hull), 
was a prisoner of war, who v>'as taken to Montreal, exchanged, 
and never returned to Detroit. Judge Witherell, who had 
taken part in the war, commanded a battalion of volunteers, 
became a prisoner of war, v/as taken to Kingston, there par- 
oled, went to his old home in A'ermont, and did not return 
to Detroit until IS 14. Judge Griffin and Reuben Attwater, 
Secretary of the Territory, were at Detroit at the time of the 
surrender, but not long afterward left for the East, the latter 
never returning ; William ^^'oodbridge being appointed his suc- 
cessor in October, 1811. ami the former coming back to Detroit 
in the fall of that year. 

This left Judge Woodward as the only representative of 
the former government remaining in Detroit. 

Colonel Proctor, who had been in charge of the British 
forces at Amherstburg, was left in charge at Detroit by Gen. 
Brock, and on August L'Oth he wrote to Judge Woodwanl, 
addressing him as Chief Justice, recpiesting information about 
the Territoiw, its limits and settlements, its government and 
expenses, and asking if the government could be reorganized 

53 



witliont a new Supreme Civil Magistrate, and wbelher the laws 
required such Magistrate to reside in tlie Territor}-, and also 
if the civil officers who had held positions would be willing t<» 
continue in the exercise of them. The same day Judge W(K)d- 
ward replied fully to all the inquiries, stating that a Civil 
Governor was necessary to fill offices and he must reside in 
the Territory'. A Secretary to act as Lieutenant Governoi- 
was also necessary, and certain revenue officers if American 
revenue laws were to be enforced. One jrulge might hold the 
courts. Civil officers holding their commissions from the U. S. 
Government could not lawfully hold olTice under a foreign 
government, while those of local appointment might properly 
do so, but their willingness to do this could only be ascertained 
by personal inquiry. 

As a result of this correspondence, there was issued on 
the following day "Regulation of the Civil Government of the 
Territory of Michigan'' which after reciting the capitulatiim 
and Gen. Erock's proclamation, proceeded: 

"Now, therefore, be it known that I, the undersignc«l, 
Henry Proctor, Colonel in the forces of His Britannic Majesty. 
now commanding in the Territoiy of Michigan, do make and 
establish for the time l)eing, the following Eegulations for the 
Civil administration of the said Territory.'' 

I. 

The civil officers remaining in the Country shall continue 
to exercise the respective functions appertaining to their 
offices, without any new commissions for the same, and those 
offices which are suspended by the departure from the Counti?" 
of those hobling them shall be supplied as hereinafter pnn-idetl. 

II. 

The civil executive powers shall be exercised by a civil 
Government. The Civil Government shall appoint to all civil 
offices, which are or shall be vacant, and shall take care that 
the laws be faithfully executed. 

III. 

Courts of Justice shall be held as usual. 

54 



i 



IV. 

Legislative i)i-()visioiis need not be adopted from tlie laws 
of any of the American States. A majority shall not be iieces 
sary ^s•heu any of the offices are vacant. The Secretary shall 
make two copies of all executive proceedings and legislative 
regulations, one of which shall be transmitted for the use of 
the British Government, and the other shall be retained. 

V. 

The expenses of the civil administration shall be defrayed 
(}uarterly by the proper officer in the Military Department, 
paying the lawful amount thereof to the civil treasurer. The 
duties, customs and revenues accruing according to the laws 
of the United States shall be paid quarterly by the collectors 
to the proper officer in the Military Department. The internal 
duties and revenues accruing to the Territory of iliciiigan 
shall be paid to the proper treasurers thereof. 

VI. 

The undersigned will act as Civil Governor of the Terri- 
tory of Michigan for the time being. Augustus B. Woodward. 
Chief Justice of the said Territory, is appointed Secretary, tiie 
otlices of register and receiver of the Land OiTice ami post 
nuister are superseded, reserving a full right to adjust all 
anterior concerns. All offices in the lu<lian Department arc 
superseded. 

(Signed) HENRY PROCTOR, Colonel. 

The original proclamation is in .]u<lge 'WcMxlward's writ- 
ing with the exception of his own nauu^ and title. lie appears 
to have suggested some additions to articles III. IV and ^'I 
which Proctor would not admit. It was printed and generally 
circulated, and a copy sent by Proctor to General Brock at 
Xiagara, who approved it, and on September 7th, "\^'oodward 
wrote to the U. S. Secretary of the Treasury an account of 
the transactions occurring after the British took possession. 



f For a time matters went very well, Proctor was com 

I pUiisant and willing to carry out the arrangements, and Wood 

I ward was active and hopeful of good residls. Proctor, as 

i 



Governcr, on Soptoniher 5111 by proclrdnation fixed the Lultlin;: 
of the Supreme Court, which uyder ordinary circumstaun.'s 
would have been held in September, as on the third Monday 
in December, and before that day arrived, adjourned it until 
February 21st, ISlo, but before the latter day arrived he had 
declared raartiai law, which effectually put an end to sessions 
of court. 

Judge Woodward in his letter of September 7th stated 
that he was the only one left of the officers of the late U. S. 
Government and justified his remaining and accepting the 
office of Secretary and evinced a high sense of his duties, not 
only to his own government but also to the unfortunate peo- 
ple who were left in the Territory. 

The courts continued to do business although in a limited 
way. September 1st a writ iu a civil suit issued out of the 
Supreme Court and September lith Col. Proctor appointed 
William Jones Justice of the Peace for the District of Detroit. 
In the latter part of November, James May, one of the Jus- 
tices of the Peace at Detroit, addressed Judge Woodwanl. 
stating that he had been frequently applied to by citizens of 
Detroit to act in his official capacity and tiy cases, but under 
the circumstances he was uncertain what to do and desired his 
advice. To this Woodward replied that in general, although 
there were cases to the contrary — in case of conquest the civil 
authorities were left undisturbed to exercise their regular 
duties, but he could not undertake in this particular to advise 
him what to do; he must follow the path where his duty ap- 
peared plain. In consequence of this advice Mr. May con- 
tinued to exercise the duties of his position. Peter Audrain, 
who held a number of official positions, including that <»f 
Justice of the Peace, as well as Clerk of the Supreme Court, 
does not appear to have sufl'ered any apprehensions as to his 
duties and issued warrants and tried cases all through tlif 
year of British occupation. 

The attitude of Judge Woodward during his stay in Do- 
troit under the British appears quite correct and guided by a 
clear sense of his peculiar po.sition — the only rcpresentativf- 

56 



of the former American Government. He performed no oflicial 
act as j^(l^■;^^ and altliou^li appointed Secretary by (\>lon(d 
Proctor, while not declining it, he never acted in that capac- 
ity except in the matter of the proclamation, and had no 
pecuniary transactions of any kind with the officers of tlie 
British Government; in fact when he left Detroit he declined 
to accept from them money for his expenses. 

On receipt of the news of the surrender of Chicago and 
the killing by the Indians of a large number of the prisoners, 
Judge Woodward at once addressed Col. Proctor, requesting 
his assistance in securing help for the suiwivors, to which 
Proctor replied favorably, but both these letter-s are addressed 
—one to Proctor as Colonel, and the reply to Chief Justice 
Woodward. 

The citizens of Detroit highly appreciated Judge Wood- 
ward's conduct, and early in January, 1813, having heard that 
he intended leaving Detroit for Washington, 47 of the leading 
men joined in an address, begging him to whom they had 
looked ^'as the rock of their safety and repose" to remain and 
share the dangers and maintain and support those riglits and 
privileges which he had so successfully commenced and 
I prosecuted. Deeply touched by this address, Woodwanl. wh*. 
had received no reply to his communications to the officials at 
Washington, answered that he conceived it to be the duty of 
those constituting the civil organization of a country over- 
run in time of war, to remain at their posts until tlie p<ilicy 
of the enemy should change, or their own government other- 
wise instruct, and therefore he would stand or fall with them. 
He urged them, however, to continue to respect the rights «'f 
the enemy. 

While matters and relations were in this rather satisfac- 
tory form, General Winchester was approaching Detroit from 
Ohio and on danuary 20th had reached Kiver Kaisin. where 
he encamped. Col. Proctor, who had his military heachiuarlerH 
at Maiden, made arrangements to attack Winchester an<l on 
the i!lst withdrew most «>f the gari-ison from Maiden an.l early 
in the morning <.f the 21st attacked and .lefcatcd Wincliester, 



taking over five hundred prisoners, and in utter disregard «^f 
his obligations to the wounded prisonei-s, and knowing what 
must follow, returned the same day to Maiden, leaving iIji- 
wounded, who, to the number of over thirty, were the next day 
killed and scalped by the Indians. 

In his first report to his superior officer. Col. Proctor madf 
uo reference to this, but merely said that the Indian warriors 
displayed their usual courage. On February 1st he roporicd 
-There have been some instances, I am sori'y to say, of Indian 
barbarity, but the example was set by the enemy. I have not 
anything to excuse myself of." 

The people of Detroit were both alarmed and indignant 
at Proctor's conduct and no doubt expressed themselves strong- 
ly. It happened also that on the evening of tUe 20th there 
had been some irresponsible talk in Detroit about scaring tht- 
British garrison, which was small. This coming to Proctors 
ears, and being by nature suspicious and prone to exaggerate 
the number and strength of his enemies, he jumped to the con- 
clusion that there was an active eft'ort on the part of th«' 
Americans in Detroit to assist Gen. Harrison in his cam- 
paign. He wrote on January 25th that '*the people of Detroit 
had already begun to show themselves,'' and on February 1st 
that he would be "under the necessity of sending several from 
that depot of treachery, Detroit." 

Among the prisoners taken at the River Raisin were Whit 
more Knaggs and Robert Forsyth. Col. Proctor claimed that 
Kuaggs, who had been taken prisoner on the surrender of 
Detroit, and given his parole, had nevertheless taken part in 
the battle at River Raisin and that Forsyth, who had abo 
taken part, was a British subject, and that both men were 
subject to the severest treatment. Judge Woodward, aIthou;^'h 
he had been treated most offensively by Knaggs some yeai-^^ 
before, and was not personally friendly, nevertheless took up 
the defense of both promptly and strongly. 

All this angered Col. Proctor so that on February l^t he 
notified about thirty of the leading Americans in Detroit that 

58 



they nnist leave the Territory without their families or prop- 
erty. 

On that same day twenty-nine of these citizens met and 
adopted vigorous resolutions protesting against such an order 
and entertaining "a high sense of the manly, dignified and 
spirited conduct of Augustus B. Woodward, whose services 
have heretofoi-e been so pre-eminently useful to the inhabi- 
tants," requested hiin to lay the resolutions before Col. Proc- 
tor, and if possible obtain a revocation of the order. 

Judge Woodward justified the confidence of the people in 
him. The next day he wrote Col. Troctor a letter which boldly, 
strongly, clearly, and concisely stated the facts and conditions 
which warranted the deepest apprehension on the part of the 
citizens and reflected severely on the British officers. He called 
Procter's attention to the fact that when the citizens had felt 
alarmed before the Raisin River 'Massacre he (Proctor) had 
assured them that he considered his own honor pledged for 
their efl'ectual protection. And then followed a recital of some 
of the outrages : prisoners tomahawked, citizens shot and pil- 
laged, and their houses burnt by the savages. Small wonder 
then that the people felt and perhaps \ery justly that their 
persons and property were not respected. The Judge then 
suggested that a force be stationed at Detroit for the express 
purpose of protecting the citizens, and that the latter be per- 
mitted to arm themselves for the same purpose, that the In- 
dians should not be permitted to come near Detroit, or carry 
scalps through the town, and that the citizens give hostages 
to insure proper conduct on their part. 

The following day, February 3rd, Col. Proctor, through 
one of his officers, verbally asked Judge Woodward for evidence 
of the massacre of American prisoners, but the Judge's letter 
and suggestions which intimated doubts of Proctor's depend- 
ability evidently rankled in the latter's mind, and on February 
4th he issued a Proclamation in his capacity as Governor of 
the Territory of Michigan, establishing Martial Law and sus 
pending the civil and criminal laws. 

On the same day he wrote to his superior officer, Maj.-Gen. 

59 



SfioatTe, atteiuptiug to justify his action I)y cliargiug some of 
the citizens of Detroit with holding meetings and adopting 
"indecent rcsolntions/' and accusing Cliief Justice Woodward 
with insolently pi'oposing conditions for a convention. "IJe 
is an artful, designing and ambitious man" and "in such a 
man I could not place confidence'' and "associated with him in 
government it would be impossible to possess sufScieut energy 
to control such men," an<l he therefore said he Imd retpiested 
some of the more suspicious and turbulent cliaracters to ([uit 
the Territoiy. 

In this justification letter he made some important mis- 
statements. The only meeting was that of the men whom he 
had ordered to leave, and the only resolutions were those 
adopted at that meeting called forth by liis arbitrary and out- 
rageous action, and the men banished from their homes and 
business were the leading nfen of the town. 

Without the knowledge of this letter, but feeling that 
under the circumstances, with all laws suspended, his useful- 
ness to his fellow citizens and his country was ended, Judge 
Woodward on February Gth asked for his passport, intending 
to leave for Washington. 

Action on this request was delayed and on February 9th 
he was formally requested to produce ijroofs to substantiate 
his assertions relative to the slaughter of the American and 
wounded at River Raisin. It is noticeable that in this and 
all subsequent communications to Woodward he is no longer 
termed "Judge" or "Chief Justice" but plain "Augustus B. 
Woodward, Esq." 

The judge promptly replied on the following day with 
some affidavits and a letter in which he said "'The truth icill 
undouhtcdly cventuallj/ appear and that nnfortunate day iiiiist 
meet the steady and impartial eye of history." He also called 
attention to a suggestion which the British officer had made 
that some American citizens might be willing to take oath of 
allegiance to the British King and notified him that not only 
would that be treason on the part of such citizens, but also 
would those be guilty who would lay temptation to such con 
duct, and again he asked for his passport. 

60 



On February 13th Judge Woodward attended Col. Proctor 
at Saudwich where he was making his headquarters, hnt Proc- 
tor indulged in such intemperate and unbecoming demeanor 
that nothing was done; tinally a meeting was held on February 
19th, and as one result Judge Woodward got his passport. Fie 
left Detroit February 211 h, going by way of Fort George on 
Niagara Kiver, York (Toronto), Kingston, across Lake On- 
tario to Brownville and Albany, where he arrived March lOth, 
and on March 19th wrote to James Monrue, then Secretary of 
State, a long letter describing the occurrences at Detroit an<l 
his own experiences from the surrender of Detroit until his 
arrival at Albany. 

From February 4th until September L'8th, 1813, the Terri- 
tory of Michigan continued under Martial Law. On SeptemlH>r 
13th Proctor, then advanced to Major General, issued another 
Proclamation directing such law to be enforced in supplying 
the wants of the troops and sending away or apprehending all 
traitorous or disaffected persons. This was his last effort in 
this direction, and on Septeud)er 28th the British tlag was 
hauled down, never again to wave except in friendly exchange 
and co-operation, over the soil of Michigan, and on the follow- 
ing day Gen. Harrison, who had arrived with the Amei-icau 
troops, issued a Proclamation re-establishing civil g')V(>rum('nr 
in the Territory, although it was several months before the 
officials arrived and began the exercise of their official duties. 

An echo of the situation in Detroit during the British 
occupation is found in the action of Congress, November 24, 
1812, when Mr. Poindexter, the delegate of Mississippi Terri- 
tory, moved the appointment of a committee to inquire into 
the expediency of repealing the act creating Michigan Terri- 
tory, giving as one of his reasons for the motion that one of 
the officei-s — evidently meaning Judge Woodward— had ac- 
cepted under British authority an appointment of Secretary 
of State or something of that kin<l. The motion was carried 
and the committee appointe<l, but notliiug fui-ther was heard 
of it. 

Governor Proctor ruled the Terntory in a civil capacity 

61 



for a little more than five months. His militaiy duties occu- 
pied his time and with the exception of adjourning the terms 
of the Supreme Court and appointing a Justice of the Peace 
he does not appear to have taken any administrative or legis- 
lative action. Ilis subsequent career as a militaiy officer, in- 
cluding his court martial at which he was found guilty, shows 
him to be impulsive, lacking in self-control, and therefore nn- 
able to properly control others, and though intelligent, never- 
theless of poor judgment. Preceded in the government of the 
Territory by Hull, somewhat resembling him in temperament, 
he was followed by Gov. Cass, a distinct contrast to both in 
evenness of temper, capacity for business, management of men 
and boldness of execution, and who was one of the most dis 
tinguished of Territorial or State governors. 



63 



ROLL OF MEMBERS 

Michigan Society, Sons of the American Revolution 

THE UPPER PENINSULA 

Alger County 

George A. Bald wiu Munising 

Frederick J. Baldwin Munising 

Theodore E. Bissell Munising 

Chippewa County 

Hugh P. Gaston 1207 Tweed St., Sault Ste. Marie 

Guy C. Kemp Sault Ste. Marie 

Chase S. Osbom Sault Ste. Marie 

Elmer S. Sutton 306 Armory Place, Sault Ste. Marie 

Dickinson County 

Albert R. Pierce Foster City 

Robert W. Pierce Foster City 

Morris K. Richards Iron Mountain 

Lewis T. Sterling Iron Mountain 

Houghton County 

Frederick N. Bosson Calumet 

Leslie E. Delf 505 Tamarack St., Laurium 

TcLuey C. DeSollar Hancock 

George K, North Hancock 

Albert W. Senter Calumet 

Iron County 
I Alvin L. Burridge Crystal Falls 

I Marquette County 

Fred H. Begole Marquette 

i Alfred F. Mayuard Marquette 

I Edward O. Stafford Marquette 

{ Rev. Carl G. Ziegler Ishpeming 



63 



THE LOV/ER PENINSULA ' ' " 

Alpena County 

Jleniy E. Fletcher Alpena 

James B, Formaii Alpena 

Frederick H. Loud (Detroit Chapter) , Alpena 

Arenac County 
H enry R. Mead Omer 

Barry County 

Charles M. Atkins , Hastings 

Philip T. Colgrove Hastings 

Bay County 

E. Wilson Cressey Bay City 

Tliomas L. Handy, Jr N, Euclid Ave., Bay City 

Charles C. Kosenbui'y Bay City 

Berrien County 

Ix^ouard C. Vosburg Niles 

I Claude P. Sykes G45 Pipestone St., Benton Harbor 

j CaJhoun County 

j William F. Church Marshall 

I (^harles E. Gorham Marshall 

I Dr. Wilfrid Hau^hey 303 Post Bldg., Battle Creek 

\ Craig C. Miller 224 W. Prospect St., Marshall 

I Daniel E. Squier 127 Greemvood Ave., Battle Creek 

j Dr. Theodore L. Scjuier Battle Creek 

Glenn A. Van Syckle 171 Manchester St., Battle Creek 

Emmet County 

j Homer Sly Petoskey 

i ■ ' 

[ Genesee County 

Isaac B. Gilbert Fb'nt 

Grand Traverse County 

Carl AV. I'anuelee (Kent Chapter). 231 Washington St., 

Traverse City 

G4 



Ingham County 

(Jeorge W. Bisscll East Lansing 

James B. Boyce 233 N. Chesnnt St., Lansing 

George E. Donuell 309 W. Washtenaw St., Lansing 

Charles F. Haight 119 E. Elm St., Lansing 

Harry A. Kinney 205 N. Penn Ave., Lansing 

Theodore S. Kich 414 Barnes Ave. W., Lansing 

Glen K. Stimson Ill E. St. Joseph St., Lansing 

Isabella County — TTie Mt, Pleasant Chapter 

Dr. Sheridan E. Gardiner Mt. Pleasant 

Jackson County 

Edward A. Bancker Jackson 

Frank J. Belknap Jackson 

Frederick L. Bliss Jackson 

George M. Carter A Jackson 

Charles E. C(iok 132 Ridgeway St., Jackson 

Howard D. Corwin lOOG Wildwood Ave., Jackson 

DeLand Craiy 315 W. Wesley Ave., Jackson 

Henry E. Edwards 512 Wildwood Ave., Jackson 

Horace W. Hardy 809 Second St., Jackson 

William W. Todd 1510 E. Main St., Jackson 

Kalamazoo County — The Kalamazoo Chapter 

Gordon W. Davis 61G So. West St., Kalamazoo 

Frank F. Ford Kalamazoo 

Carl H. Kleinstuck Kalamazoo 

Archibald I. McCoU Kalamazoo 

Dr. Knsh McXair Noel Place, Kalamazoo 

Edward C. Parsons 518 Academy St., Kalamazoo 

Kent County — The Kent Chapter Grand Rapids 

Milton P. Adams 529 Lyon St., N. E. 

Arthur S. Ainsworth G29 College Ave., S. E. 

Charles M. Alden 311 Pleasant St. 

Liieius B. Andrus 473 Fulton St. E. 

Melvin D. Baldwin 5G6 College Ave., S. E. 

Iviilph F. Baldwin 715 Fuller Ave., S. E. 

65 



Kent Chapter — Continued 

Waldo M. Ball 208 Fuller Ave., S. E. 

Terry J. Barker 159 Lafayette Ave., N. E. 

Howard F. Baxter .23 Colloge Ave., S. E. 

Lucius Boltv/ood E Street, Eiverside North 

Frank DeF. Bryant 1436 Eobinson Koad 

Ted Booth .1454 Wilcox Park Drive 

George S. Bucher 811 Lafayette Ave., S. E. 

Dr. John F. Burleson 40 N. College Ave. 

Dr. Willard Mc. Burleson 451 Paris Ave., S. E. 

Don A. Cawthra 230 Cherry St., S. E. 

George G. Clay 240 Union Ave., S. E. 

James iL Crosby : Kent Hills Road 

Harry P. Crunie 655 Innes St., N. E. 

Lewis D. Cutche»n 431 Lyon St., X. E. 

George B. Daniels 320 E. Fulton St. 

Elvert M. Davis 120 Euskin Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Edward M. Deane 439 Wasliington St. 

Fred McR. Deane 438 Madison Ave., S. E. 

Alfred E. Driscoll 157 Fountain St., N. E. 

Harold M. Easley 224 Union Ave., S. E. 

Lewis W. Edison 338 Paris Ave., S. E. 

Howard A. Ellis 156 N. Lafayette Ave. 

Harrison E. Fairchild 242 Eastern Ave., S. E. 

Don W. Farrant 427 Terrace xVve., S. E. 

Charles C. Follmer 465 Fountain St., N. E. 

Charles L. Frost 627 Fountain St., X. E. 

Blaine Gavett 337 Richard Terrace 

Joseph R. Gillard 1141 Lake Drive, S. E. 

Addison S. Goodman 473 Fulton St., E. 

Claude Hamilton Robinson Road 

Benjamin S. Hanchett J^5 College Ave., S. E, 

Gerald J. Hanchett 125 College Ave,, S.E. 

Thomas W. Heti'erau 648 Fountain St., X. E. 

Lemuel S. Hillman 330 E. Fulton St. 

John M. Himes 1529 Robinson Road 

Frank W. Hiue 105 Auburn Ave. 



ee 



Kent Chapter — Continued 

Dr. Raymond L. Hol.ait 139 Campbell PI., X. E. 

Charles Holden 621 Madison Ave., S. E. 

Charles B. Hooker 700 Briggs Blvd., North Park 

Myron II. Hopkins 132 Madison Ave. 

Arthur R. Hnrst. . . .Stratford Arms Apt., Madison Ave., S. E. 

John B. Hutchins 109 Earldon Ave., S. E. 

Lee M. Hutchins 313 College Ave., S. E. 

William Judson 225 Fountain St., N. E. 

Loyal E. Kuappen 330 Washington St., S. E. 

Stuart E. Knappen 322 Fountain St., X. E. 

Comstock Konkle 610 Windsor Terrace, S. E. 

Dr. Frederick J. Larned 110 College Ave., X. E. 

John S. Lawrence 307 Fulton St. E. 

Charles H. Leonard 455 Morris Ave^ S. E. 

Frank E. Leonard <> 423 Terrace Ave., S. E. 

Harry C. Leonard 440 Logan St. 

Fred A. Maynard Grand River Road 

Rev. Charles W. Merriam 549 College Ave., S. E. 

Alexander McColl 939 Scribner Ave., X. W\ 

Archibald I. McColl Kalamazoo 

J. Langdon McKee 226 Lyon St., X. E. 

Samuel W. McKee 418 Xorth Ave. 

H. Brnco Moore Stratford Arms, Madison Ave., S. E. 

John E. More 115 Madison Ave., S. E. 

Stoddard S. More 115 Madison St., S. E. 

Charles O. Xash 1600 Robinson Road 

Mark Xorris 29 Prospect Ave., X. E. 

Charles M. Xorton 445 EluiAvood St., X. E. 

Ira J. Owen 1259 Thomas St. 

Dr. John H. Palin 618 Windsor Terrace, S. E. 

W. Millard Palmer 221 Paris Ave., S. E. 

Carl \V. Parmclee 231 Washington St., Traverse City 

Daniel T. Patton 534 College Ave., S. E. 

Gen. Byron R. Pierce Reed Lake Sanatarium 

Charles F. Reed 115 Fuller Ave., S. E. 

Charles X. Remington 340 College Ave., S. E. 



67 



Kent Chapter — Continued 

Gleiidoii A. Richards Oakwood Manor 

Karl A. Kobiuson 609 Greenwood Ave., S. E. 

H. Parker Robinson 222 Fouutain St., N. E. 

Theodore E. A. Rose 523 Crescent St., N. E. 

Guy W. Rouse 135 College Ave., S. E. 

Rev. George Paull T. Sargent 308 State St., S. E. 

William R. Shelby G5 Lafayette Ave., N. E. 

William Alden Smith 45G College Ave., S. E. 

Dr. Ralph H. Spencer 338 Paris Ave., S. E. 

Joseph W. Spooner 217 Hampton Ave., S. E. 

William T. P. vSpoouer 248 James Ave., S. E. 

Frank E. Spraker 659 Crescent St., N. E. 

Eugene E. Spraker ^ 659 Crescent St., N. E. 

Harry T. Stanton ' 4.37 Washington St., S. E. 

Willis F. Stanton 1753 Plain field Ave., N. E. 

Forris D. Stevens 55 Lafayette Ave., N. E. 

Edsou W. Steward 216 Benjamin Ave., S. E. 

Henry I. Stimson 579 Madison Ave. 

Frank A. Stone Stone Hill, Bridge St., X. W. 

Leon R. Stow .536 Prospect Ave., S. E. 

Frederick K. Tinkham 315 Paris Ave., S. E. 

Albert H. Tippens 325 Crescent St., N. E. 

Arthur H. Vaudenberg 316 Morris Ave., S. E. 

Edward A. Wallace 305 Paris Ave., S. E. 

Winifred J. Wallace 563 Terrace Ave., S. E. 

Van Arthur Walliu 4458 Drexel Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Dudley E. Waters College Ave., S. E. 

Lewis D. Waters 130 W. 34th St., New York, N. Y. 

Lewis T. Wilmarth 540 Cherry St., S. E. 

Edward D. Winchester 320 Lafayette Ave., N. E. 

Lee M. Woodruff 322 College Ave., S. E. 

Paul E. Wright 721 Kellogg St., S. E. 

Silas McK. Wright 349 Highland St., S. E. 

Lenawee County — Lenawee Chapter 

George W. Armstrong 334 Merrick St., Adrian 

Wilbert H. Barrett 225 Toledo St., Adrian 

68 



Lenawee County — Continued 

Loland P. Beal Hudson 

Leland F. Bean 461 S. Main St., Adrian 

Joseph T. Cai-penter Biissfield 

William H. Cliilds Adrian 

William A. Cutler 333 Ferguson Ave., Adrian 

Irving A, Dewey 506 Allis St., Adrian 

Lieut. Frank R. Dodge, U. S. N 464 So. Main St., Adrian 

George H. Eldredge 950 College Ave., Adrian 

Harlan L. Feeman 1029 W. Manniee St., Adrian 

Charles W. Gibford 534 S. Main St., Adrian 

W. Herbert Goff 235 X. Broad St., Adrian 

Marshall L. Goodrich Hudson 

Fletcher B. Goodrich Hu<lson 

Norman B. Horton * Fniit Ridge 

Oren Howes Hudson 

Henry R. Jewett 135 S. Broad St., Adrian 

Dr. William E. Jewett, Jr 307 S. Winter St., Adrian 

William E. Jewett Adrian 

Fred L. Johnson 137 E. Front St., Adrian 

Charles M, Lamb 27 Oak Park Road, Asheville, N. C. 

Herbert W. Laudj 773 College Ave., A<lrian 

Ladd J. Lewis 216 Division St., Adrian 

Ladd J. Lewis, Jr 409 State St., Adrian 

Earl C. Michener 340 S. Main St., Adrian 

Dr. Oscar X. Rice 109 Chestnut St., Adrian 

Charles L. Robinson 128 Chandler St., A<lrian 

Franklin J, Russell 513 Broad St., Adrian 

Fred R. Segar 233 Division St., Adrian 

William McK. Shepherd 530 S. Winter St., Adrian 

Dr. Leo J. Stafford Adrian 

Paul H. Stafford 153 E. Maple St., Adrian 

Waldron E. Stewart 462 State St., Adrian 

Charles B. Stowell Hudson 

G. Roscoe Swift ,536 Dennis St., Adrian 

Irving W. Swift 839 W\ Maumee St., Adrian 

Samuel U. Swift 784 W. Maumee St., Adrian 



69 



Lenawee County — Continued 

Franklin D. Teachout R. F. D. No. 2, Adrian 

Daniel Todd Adrian 

Fred J. Todd Adrian 

Lawrence A. Walker. .328 Merrick St., Adrian 

Livingston County 

Miles W. Bullock .Howell 

Charles G. Jewett Howell 

William McPlierson III Howell 

Albert L. Smith Howell 

W. McPherson Smith Howell 

Macomb County 

Levant E. Bedell Romeo 

Henry O. Chapoton. . ^ 139 Cass Ave., Mt. Clemens 

Calvin M. Church Center Line 

Clarence H. Church Utica 

Fiske S. Church Utica 

Richard S. Reade Rornet* 

Monroe County 

Harry A. Conant (Detroit Chap.) 402 Washington St., Monroe 

Oakland County — Oakland Chapter 

Roy V. Barnes Royal Oak 

Birum G. Campbell 365 Iroquois Road, W. Pontine 

John E. Church 209 Oakland Ave., Pontiac 

DeWitt C. Davis 44 W. Huron St., Pontiac 

Mark R. Fisher 251 W. Pike St., Pontiac 

George F. Gross Water! ord 

Williams C. Harris Birmingham 

George H. Kimball 330 Iroquois Road W., Box 135, Pontiac 

George H. Kimball, Jr Waterford 

Dr. Robert LeBaron 120 William St., Pontiac 

Thomas Lytle Farmington 

Dr. Ellsworth Orton 143 W. Howard St., Pontiac 

Clarence A. Redfield R. F. D. 4, Birmingham 

Thaddeus D. Seeley 190 Perry St., Pontiac 

70 



Oakland County — Oakland Chapter — Continued 

Charles I. Shattuck 91 N. Johnson Ave., Pontiac 

Franklin A. Slater G4 Mill St., Pontiac 

Alfred L. Smith 35 Lorraine Ct., Pontiac 

Charles V. Taylor 2288 Euclid Ave., Detroit 

Ililand H. Thatcher Auburn Heights 

Ottawa County 

Nathaniel Robbins Grand Haven 

Saginaw County 

Joseph W. Forduey Saginaw, W. S. 

Ivoitert F, Johnson 217 Hanchett St., Saginaw 

Allen B. Schall SOS Johnson St., Saginaw 

VViiliani T. Otis ^ .3oI Millard St., Saginaw 

St. Clair County — St. Clair Chapter 

Albert D. Bennett 1420 Military Road, Port Huron 

Lewis T. Bennett 162G Military Road, Port Huron 

Dr. AValter E. Bostwick Algonac 

Burt 1). Cady 733 Court St., Port Huron 

William R. Chadwick 1.303 Sixth St., Port Huron 

Alfred L. Chamberlain Port Huron 

Edmund R. Harrington Port Huron 

Frank D. Jenks Port Huron 

William L. Jenks Port Huron 

Russ S. Jenks St. Clair 

Gordon W. Kingsbury St. Clair 

Sydney C. McLouth Marine City 

Franklin Moore St. Clair 

Henry Whiting St. Clair 

St. Joseph County 

Francis W. Davis , Constantine 

Washtenaw County — The Washtenaw Chapter 

Ernest H. Barnes 1308 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor 

Junius E. Beal 343 So. 5th Ave., Ann Arbor 

Detlev Wulf Bronk 11 Ridgeway St., Ann Arbor 

71 



Washtenaw County — Continued 

VVolcott II. Butler 1010 Monroe St., Ann Arbor 

Lucius Clarke 923 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Harn- X. Cole 702 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Harold E. Covert 820 Hill St., Ann Arbor 

Dr. Willis A. Dewey SOS Catherine St., Ann Arbor 

Warren W. Florer 910 Olivia St., Ann Arbor 

Walter B. Ford 901: Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Benjamin E. Franklin 917 Church St., Ann Arbor 

Kichard E. George 810 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor 

J. J. Goodyear 1316 Hill St., Ann Arbor 

William T. Groves 907 E. Huron St., Ann Arbor 

Dr. Wilbert B. Hinsdale 71G Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Rodney K. Johnson _ 1301 Geddes Ave., Ann Arbor 

Hugh E. Keeler ". 1102 Willard St., Ann Arbor 

Theron S. Langford 707 Church St., Ann Arbor 

Dr. Kobert G. MacKenzie 718 W. Liberty St., Ann Arbor 

Burkett T. Xewkirk 1117 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Henry W. Xewkirk 1117 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Burr K. Osborn 1624 Hill St., Ann Arbor 

Milton E. Osborn 1624 Hill St., Ann Arbor 

George W. Patterson 2101 Hill St., Ann Arbor 

Hervey B. Porter 407 N. Ingalls St., Ann Arbor 

C. Paul Sellards 1111 Fair Oaks, Ann Arbor 

G. Davis SeUards 1111 Fair Oaks, Ann Arbor 

Allen F. Sherzer 1213 Ferdon Road, Ann Arbor 

Arthur W. Smith lOOS Oakland Ave., Ann Arbor 

Norman A. Wood 921 Church St., Ann Arbor 

Wayne County 

<}uy B. (^ady 8120 Jefferson Ave. E., Detroit 

Hal D. Cady Detroit 

Leslie X. Conger 154 Moss Ave., Detroit 

Francis A. Davis Ill Grand Ave., Highland Park 

Oliver A. Farwell 271 Smith Ave., Detroit 

Lawrence B. Hay ward 5.535 Second Ave., Detroit 

Ralph X. Hold ridge 2332 Park Blvd., Detroit 

Laurence S. Hopper 217 Willis Ave. E., Detroit 

:2 



Wayne County — Continued 

William E. Metzger 5G Longfellow Ave., Detr<jit 

F>r. Lnther Peck (Washtenaw Chapter) Plynioutli 

Samuel Lendall Pitts 8115 E. Jett'erson Ave., Detroit 

Frederick A. Smith 151 Woodland Ave., Detroit 

Fred D. Staudish lOGO Seybiirn Ave., Detroit 

AVilliam Stocking 214 East Grand Blvd., Detroit 

Sydney D. Strong Plymouth 

Charles V. Taylor (Oakland Chap.) .2288 Euclid Ave., Detroit 

Frederic Towle 719 McDougall Ave., Detroit 

Charles W\ Warren Birmingham 

Ernest C. Wetmore 2170 E. Jetlerson Ave., Detroit 

Albert F. Wood - 710 Trumbull Ave.. Detroit 

Shelden A. Wood 710 Trund)ull Ave., Detroit 

The Detroit Chapter 

William F. Adams. ..590 X. Cahueuga Ave., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Arthur S. Albright 2038 Delaware Ave. 

Frederick M. Alger Grosse Pointe Village 

Mark AV. Allen .-,10 Lodge Ave 

John W. Anderson SI 09 Jefl'erson Ave. E. 

Frank D. Andrus 2170 Jetlerson Ave. E. 

John P. Autisdel .5.53 Jefferson Ave. E. 

•lames C. Armstrong 1147 Milwaukee Road, Beloit, Wis. 

Edward H. Ashley 225 Gartield Ave. 

AluK.n B. Atwater 740 Oak Knoll Ave., Pasadena, Ca!. 

Harry E. Avery Detroit Club 

John H. Avery Oxford 

Charles H. Ayers Apt. .32, G90 Philadelphia Ave. W. 

J:i)en K. Ayres 4277 Seebaldt Ave. 

John N. Bagley 1130 Parker Ave. 

Paul F. Bagley Detroit Athletic Club 

George S. Baker 3440 Seminole Ave. 

•leirerson AV. Baker 004 Clairmount Ave. 

•John E. Baker Lake Angelus, Pontine 

1:^(1 will S. Barliour.UT Lake Shore Road. Giosse Pointe Farm>< 

73 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

<Jeopge H. Barbour 40 Berkshire PL, Gro.sse Pointe Farms 

Dr. Frank Marion Barker. . .410 Univei-sity PL, Gros.se Pointe 

Dr. Earl C. Barkley .92 Peterboro St. 

Walter Barlow 438 Ferry Ave. W. 

Edward A. Barnes 1834 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Roland B. Barrett 8797 Ep worth Blvd. 

Stanley F. Bates 8793 Dexter Blvd. 

Hariy M. Baxter .3222 Blaine Ave. 

Frederick J. Bear G54 Putnam Ave. 

Jerome H. Bishop 1C4 Biddle Ave., Wyandotte 

Edward W. Bissell 2250 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Albert W. Bosley .2G3 Warren Ave. E. 

A. Jerome Bosley .263 Warren Ave. E. 

Edgar M. Bosley 2G3 Warren Ave. E. 

Henry L. W. Bowles*! 5.")36 Maplewood Ave. 

Robert J. Brennan Birmingham 

Willis Brodhead 1135 Missouri Ave., East St. Louis, 111. 

Karl H. Broasou 40G7 Pingree Ave. 

Don G. Burnside .3253 Taylor Ave. 

Morris C. Burnside 292 Hendrie Ave. 

Clarence M. Burton 121 Boston Blvd. W. 

George E. Bushnell 8824 Second Blvd. 

S. Miller Bushnell 219 Eason Ave., H. P. 

W. Terrill Bushnell 219 Eason Ave., H. P. 

Edward H. Butler GG Lake Shore Ed., Grosse Pointe Farms 

Wells D, Butteriield Farmingtou 

Duane O. Butterfield 245 Glendale Ave. 

James D. Butterfield, Jr 64 Glendale Ave. 

David D. Cady 8120 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Sherman D. Calleuder 159 Pingree Ave. 

\Villiam L. Carpenter 637 Seward Ave. 

William H. Carruthers 150 Gladstone Ave. 

David S. Carter. . .17440 Jefferson Ave. E., Grosse Pte. Village 

G. I^wis Carter 4204 Cass Ave. 

John W. Case 377 Palmer Blvd. W. 

74: 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Cornelius K. Cliapin 3G0 Liuculu Road, Grosse Pointer 

Roy D, Chapiu Grosse Pointc Farm;- 

Hugh C. Chedester 52S2 Second Blvd. 

Dr. Harold E. Clark 100 Atkinson Ave. 

J. Curtis Clark 8055 Jefferson Ave. E. 

C. K. Frazer Clark Ill Holbrook Ave. 

J. "Warren Clark 5232 Avery Ave. 

Carl F. Clarke 92 Peterboro St 

Howard A. Coffin 34 Califoraia Ave. 

Benjamin F. Comfort 2695 Ford Coun 

Harry A. Conant .102 Washington St., Monroe 

John S. Conant. . . .501 Pasadena Apts., 2170 Jefferson Ave. E. 

William S. Conant 2170 .Jeff'erson Ave. E. 

Xorman B. Conger 151 Moss Ave., H. P. 

Edward R. Conner ^ 12130 Northlawn Ave. 

Dr. Ray Connor 2989 East Grand Blvd. 

Chas. G. Cook 701 Rex Arms Apts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

J. Clifton Cook 203 Rex Arms Apts., Los Angeles, Cal. 

James H. Cooke 

Gen. Chas. A. Coolidgo. .312 Pasadena Apts., 2170 Jefferson E. 

John B. Corliss G8 Canfield Ave. W. 

Louis C. Covell 1G2 Massachusetts Ave. 

Herbert C. Craig 4001 W. Philadelphia Ave. 

John L. Cramer 3054 East Grand Blvd. 

William A. Crampton 1001 Jefferson Ave. E. 

William H. Crampton 1001 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Charles B. Crouse. . .514 Cadieux Road, Grosse Poiute Village 

William McI. Crouse Hotel Lenox 

Harold W. Crowell 153 Tuxedo Ave. 

Hari'y B. Crowl 2058 Hazlewood Ave. 

George S. Davis 5752 Fifteenth St. 

James E. Davis 2906 Jefferson Ave. E. 

John Davis 151 Longfellow Ave. 

Edwin Deuby 2224 R St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Clarence W. Dickers<in Hotel Plaza 

75 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

.John C. Dickersou 663 Hazelwood Ave. 

Horace K. Dickinson 131 Gladstone Ave. 

I'anl C. Dickinson 148 Davison Ave. W., H. P. 

(Jeorge A. Drake 606 Lawrence Ave. 

.1. Walter Drake 2200 R St. N. W., Washington. D. C. 

<'harles A. Dncharme Grosse Pointe Milage 

Frederick T. Diicharnie 982 Bnrns Ave. 

George A. Ducharme Detroit Athletic Club 

Kethune Duffiekl 2834 Woodward Ave. 

Muir B. Duffiekl 2151 Seminole Ave. 

Harry B. Earhart K. F. D. No. 5, Ann Arbor 

Herbert R. Earle Bloomfield Hills, Pontiac 

Berrien C. Eaton 1018 Bishop Road, Grosse Pointe Park 

(\ Goodloe Edgar ^ 866 Iroquois Ave. 

Harold S. Ellington 2531 Blaine Ave. 

Harold H. Enunons 4130 Cass Ave. 

Walter W. Ennuons 4430 Cass Ave. 

•facob S. Farrand, Jr 2733 Woodward Ave. 

William R. Farrand 601 McDougall Ave. 

Dexter ^l. Ferry, dr 17100 Jefierson Ave. E., Grosse Pointe 

William :SL Finck 649 Van Dyke Ave. 

Albert H. Finn 70 Bethune Ave. W. 

dames R. Flynn 3017 East Grand Blvd. 

Frank D. Forbush 1121 Van Dyke Ave. 

Charles E. Freese 2060 Longfellow Ave. 

Henry Riley Fuller Birminghaui 

Richard H. Fyfe 4761 Woodward Ave. 

Irwin Fullerton 2316 Calvert Ave. 

William T. Gage Grosse He 

William S. Gilbreath :J77 W. Palmer Blvd. 

William S. Gilbreath, Jr 10210 Second Blv<l. 

Eduiond T. Goodrich 58 Tavlor Ave. 

George X. Gcodrich 58 Taylor Ave. 

76 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Eniest F. Goodwin 803 Congress St., Ypsilanti 

Lewis LeB. Goodwin 550 Seyburn Ave. 

Harold M. Gould 2191 Cadillac Ave. 

lOdward R. Grace Colonial Koail, (Jro.'^se Poiute Shores 

Jolm H. Greusel (iOGl Flollywood Blvd., Hollywood, Cal. 

Albert A. Grinuell 29^ Boston Blvd. E. 

(diaries H. Grinnell 354 Monterey Ave., H. V. 

Clayton A. Grinnell 90 Arden Park 

Elmer W. Grinnell 1101 Chicago Blvd. 

Frederick A. Grinuell Pontiac 

Herbert Jay Grinnell 112G Virginia Park 

J.eonard E. Grinuell 1101 Chicago Blvd. 

Lloyd G. Grinnell 105 California Ave., H. P. 

.L Alfred Grow 2220 Atkinson Ave. 



Wallace C. Hall 2G Glendale Ave. 

J'aul S. Hamilton 4907 Clarendon Ave. S. 

Byron E. Hamlin 537 Seyburn Ave. 

Frederick Hanua S9 Gene.see Ave., New Hartford, X. Y. 

.]. Cliftord Hanua 103 Kenilworth Ave. 

Itawson B. Harmon. .383 Wasliiugton Koad, Grosse Pt. Village 

Charles W. Harrah G58 Pingree Ave. 

I'red K. Harris 5637 Stanton Ave. 

Frederick T. Harward SO Connecticut Ave., H. V. 

( Miarles H. Hatch G15 Delaware Ave. 

( k'orge E. Hawley 408 Palmer Ave. W. 

Frank D. Heath 2072 Taylor Ave. 

AVilliam C. Heath 332 Dragoon Ave. 

AVilliam Hendrie G McKinley PL, Grosse Pte. Farm.v 

liurns Henry Grosse Poiute Farms 

•loseph L. Hepburn 1153 "Warren Ave. W. 

C. Frederic Heyermaii 1130 Parker Avq. 

William H. Hill 230 Boston Blvd. E. 

1 >r. Charles W. Hitchcock 3439 Field Ave. 

^\'illiam H. Hoblen. .Ilnniardcu Park, Hickory IsL. Grosse He 
^\'i!liam F. Hollidav GOO Piugree Ave. 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

William P. llolliday 1500 Seminole Ave. 

Dr. Frauk Ward Holt 145 Hi^blaiul Ave., H. P. 

James E. Hopper. 7586 Diine<lin Ave. 

Allen A. Horton 129 Farraud Park, H. P. 

Henry W, Horton 154 McLean Ave., H. P. 

J. Winslow Howarth 1G73 Lawrence Ave. 

James A. Hoyt S120 Jetferson Ave. E. 

Richard K. Hoyt 261 Riverside Drive, Ford City, Ont. 

I. Lament Hughes 270 W. Madison Ave., Youngstown, O. 

Rex Humphrey SI 00 .lett'erscm Ave. E. 

Wetmore Hunt 1121 Van Dyke Ave. 

Wm. H. H. Hutton, Jr 1503 Montclair Ave. 

William S. Jackson 1316 Sheridan Ave., Plymouth 

Oscar A. Janes 30 California Ave., H. P. 

Deming Jarves Dinard, France 

Ira W. Jayne ^ 1416 Chicago Blvd. 

Dr. Harrison D. Jeuks 1245 Howard St. 

Dr. Charles G. Jennings 2900 Jefferson Ave. E. 

James D. Jerome 3757 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Edward H. Jewett R. F. D. No. 2, Walled Lake 

Harn- M. Jewett Grosse Pointe Shores 

Elwood C. Johnston 7957 St. Paul Ave. 

W. Durand Johnston 201 S. La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Dr. Howard L. Jones 520 Marlborough Ave. S. 

Lee E. Joslyn 130 Euclid Ave. W. 

Lee E. Joslyn. Jr 2036 Collingwood Ave. 

Lewis R. Judsou R. D. 2. Redford 

Charles A. Kanter 460 Merrick Ave. 

James A. Kier 1900 Hazel wood Ave. 

Alexander M. King University Club 

Louis B. King Pasadena Apts., 2170 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Robert C. Kingsley 55 Hazelwood Ave. 

H. Edison Kinney 253 vSo. Franklin St., Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 

Hale G. Knight 1530 Seward Avh. 

78 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Dr. Stephen H. Kuight 69 Willis Ave. E. 

Alburn H. Krum 72 Seward Ave. 

George E. O. Kunze 1006 Forest Ave., Ann Arbor 

Charles F. Lambert 8120 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Kirke Lathrop 874 Iroquois Ave. 

Charles F. Lawson 839 Taylor Ave. 

Howard B. Lee Grosse Poiute 

James L. Lee 17631 Jefferson Ave. E., Grosse Pointe 

Harrv B. Leinbach 135 Calvert Ave. 

I^3slie J. Leinbach 2290 La Mothe Ave. 

A. Clark Liscom 47 Willis Ave. E. 

Charles E. Locke. . .102 Pasadena Apts., 2170 Jefferson xVve. E. 

Frank T. Lodge 75 Tuxedo Ave., H. P. 

George V. X. Lothrop University Club 

Frederick H. Loud Alpena 

Ferdinand G. Luderer. . . ^ St. Clair Shores, Ont. 

Allen G. Ludiugton 928 Forest Ave. W. 

Ivan Ludington 928 Forest Ave. W. 

Lewis Ludiugton 928 Forest Ave. W. 

liewis J. Ludington 3255 Hazlewood Ave. 

Dr. Albert B. Lyons > 271 Alger Ave. 

Elias B. Lyons 5041 Maplewood Ave. 

[.eonard Lytle 2433 Elmhurst Ave. 

Frederick E. McCain 16 Poplar Park, Pleasant Ridge 

Dr. Carl C. McClelland 678 Webb Ave. 

PiOllin M. McConnell 2314 Longfellow Ave. 

William H. McGraw K. F. D. No. 5, Poutiac, Mich. 

Herbert K. McKinney 2627 John R. St. 

Kay McLaughlin 7210 McCurdy Place, Ben Avon, Pa. 

Francis C. McMath 1037 Iroquois Ave. 

Frederick J. JIcMurtrie 5123 Martindale Ave. S. 

Wallace F. MacNaughton 8808 Clarendon Ave. 

Caleb McD. Mathews 3314 Euclid Ave. W. 

Robert Jlerrill 5510 Fourth Ave. 

79 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Kdwin L. Miilor 100 Delaware Ave. 

Leslie W. Millar 510 Wasliingtoii Ave., Wilmette, 111. 

Sidney T. Miller 1432 Jeffersou Ave. K. 

Sidney T. Miller, Jr.. , . .10 Beverly Hoad, Gi'osse Pointe Farms 

Donald R. Mitchell G-L8 Van Dyke Ave. 

William V. Moore 2900 Jefferson Ave. K. 

John G. Morey, Jr. .G9S Lawrence Ave. 

Rev. Minot C. Morgan G77 Parker Avt^. 

AVarren A. Morley .208 Eason Ave.. H. P. 

Claude E. Mnlkey 1110 Seyburii Ave. 

John L. C. Mulkey 2259 Calvert Ave. 

John M. Mnlkey 8005 St. Paul Ave. E. 

Owen W. Mulkey. 8120 Jeffer.son Ave. E. 

Manuel Munoz 7 "Wood St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

James O. Murfin . 744 Van Dyke Ave. 

Albert C. Murphy 9:J0 Canfield Ave. \V. 

Edwin B. Xall '. 724 Seyburn Ave. 

George W. Xeedles 505 4th St., Royal Oak 

James W. Xesbit 1151 Maryland Ave., Grosse Pointe Park 

Charles P. Xewberry Gros.se I W 

John S. Xewberry. . . .90 Lake Shore Rd., Grosse Pointe Farms 

Phelps Xewberry oG4 University PL, Grosse Pointe 

Truman H. Xewberry. .123 Lake Shore Rd., Grosse Pte. Farms 

James K. Xichols 153 California Ave. 

Herbert W. Xoble : 1013 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Lewis H. Paddock 1039 Seminole Ave. 

DeForest Paine Detroit Athletic Club 

Calvin A. Palmer 834 Edison Ave. 

Ervin R. Palmer 829 Burlingame Ave. 

Jonathan Palmer. Jr Gl Euclid Ave. W. 

Dr. Homer E. Parshall 82 Kirby Ave. W. 

Homer H. Parshall 33G X. Saginaw vSt., Pontia*- 

Jam(\s E. Parshall Willoughby, Oliin 

Montginueiy H. Parsons 8100 Jefferson Ave. 1>. 

80 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Albert F. Peck Pasadeua Apts., 2170 Jetteisc.u Ave. E. 

Harry H. Pettee 2:31 Harper Ave. 

Oliver Phelps 514 McDoiigail Ave. 

Ralph Phelps, -Ir 1731 Seminole Ave. 

T. Glenn Phillips 1623 Hazehvood Ave. 

Edward M. I'ittenger 217 Broadway, New York City. N. Y. 

Gilbert C. Polk 371 1 Concor<l Ave. 

Dr. William H. Price Detroit Athletic Club 

Milton B. Purdy 8112 Mandalay Ave. 

William P. Putnam 01 7 Hancock Ave. W. 

Frederick T. Ranuey 203 Eliot St. 

William S. Rathboue Hotel Statler 

Charles L. Raymond l.")3 Arden Park 

Crawford S. Reilley :a Farr;5nd I'ark 

Jerome H. Reniick ^ 1397 Jefferson Ave. E. 

Charles F. Remington 

Dr. Frederick W. Robbins 558 Seyburn Ave. 

Dr. Stanley B. Robertson 1571 Hubbard Ave. 

Dr. Tom H. Robertson 1571 Hubbard Ave. 

Lewis C. Rotters 1580 Vinewood Ave. 

William H. Rose 884 Virginia Park 

William S. Say res, Jr 1)5 Winona Ave., H. P. 

Thomas H. S. Schooley 4861 Avery Ave. 

Francis M. Sessions 348 Josephine Ave. 

Marquis Shattuck 091 Merrick Ave. 

Alger Sheldeu .525 Lake Shore Rd., Grosse l*ointe Shores 

Allan Shelden 2550 Iro(piois Ave. 

Henry Shel.len Grosse Pointe Shores 

Frederick R. Sheridan 120 Virginia Park 

Philip H. Slieridau .2442 Blaine Ave. 

Charles L'prou Shreve, 3rd 134G Cadillac Ave. 

Frank C. Sibley 1958 Lawrence Ave. 

Harold A. Sleeper University Club 

Frederick A. Smart, Jr 2050 Collingwood Ave. 

81 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

Lewis L. Smart 327 Roosevelt PL, Grosse Poiiite Village 

Dudley W. Smith 141 Pallister Ave. 

Frank G. Smith 1183 Boston Blvd. W. 

Frederick B. Smith Pine Lake, R. F. D. 5, Pontiac 

Frederick P. Smith 69 Bnrlingame Ave. 

Tracy S. Smith 707 Bnrlingame Ave. 

Lawrence W. Snell, Jr R. F. D. 5, Pine Lake, Pontiac 

Dr. Edward B. Spalding 235 Eliot St. 

H. Wibirt Spence 570 Seyburn Ave, 

Howard A. Starret 1155 Park Place 

Samuel C. Stearns. G55 Pallister Ave. 

Bertram S. Stephenson 1130 Parker Ave, 

Arthnr E, Stevens C17 Hancock Ave. W. 

Frederic J. Stevens Ridge Road, Pleasant Ridge 

Albert E. Stewart 269 Willis Ave. E. 

Edward W. Stoddard 1651 Atkinson Ave. 

Ralph Stone *. 5135 Cass Ave. 

Dwight L. Strong 59 N. Van Alstyne St., Wyandotte 

Joseph S. Stringhara 1117 Seminole Ave. 

Frederick M. Sutter Columbus, Ind. 

John H. Swift 221 Sandwich St. E., Sand\^ich, Ont. 

Thomas W. Taliafero Bloomfield Hills, Birmingham 

William W. Talnian 2990 Seminole Ave. 

De Witt H. Taylor 59 Alfred St. 

John W. Taylor 2288 Euclid Ave. W. 

Lyndon 'B. Taylor. 3000 W. Grand Blvd. 

Henry C. Thatcher 61 Gladstone Ave. 

Julius E. Thatcher 119 Hazlewood Ave. 

Benjamin W. Thompson 4895 Martindale Ave. S. 

Dr. J. Melville Thompson 314 Westminster Ave. 

Walter Thompson R. F. D. 3, Pontiac 

Wilfred S. Thompson 646 Blaine Ave. 

James H. Thornbnrg 3280 Northwestern Ave. 

Charles G. Tomcrlin Plaza Hotel 

Robert M. Toms 2744 Pingree Ave. 

82 



Detroit Chapter — Continued 

James Turuer 1091 Seminole Ave. 

Arthur J. Tuttle 701 Colliugwood Ave, 

Rev. Joseph A. Vance 45 Edmund Place 

Howell Van Aukcn 1G93 Lawrence Ave. 

Frank G. Van Dyke 10.32 Shipherd Court 

Raymond E. Van Sycklc 1611 Putnam Ave. 

Charles E. Wade 3417 Seminole Ave. 

Whitsou G. Waldo 2905 Virginia Park 

Charles B. Warren 273 Lake Shore Koad, Grosse Pointe 

Philip K. Watson 2S9 Marston Ave. 

Ronald K. Weaver 1151 Van Dyke Ave. 

George B. Wells 92 Erskine St. 

George C. Wetherbee 35 Tuxedo Ave. 

John L. Whitehead 305 Elmhurst Ave. 

Laurence J. AVhitteraore. . . .j 618 Burlingame Ave. 

William S. Wightman 1405 24th St. 

John Wilcox 4841 Cass Ave. 

Geoi'ge W. Willard Ypsilanti 

Henry P. Williams 441 Merrick Ave. 

Maurice O. Williams Pasadena Apts., 2170 Jefferson E. 

Samuel R. Williams 1411 .Jefferson Ave. E. 

Jefferson T. Wing Ford City, Out, 

Palmer E. AVinslow 3053 West Grand Blvd. 

Hugh J. Wood 700 Longfellow Ave. 

Charles M. Woodruff 475 East Grand Blvd. 

Fremont Woodruff .17160 Jefferson Ave. E., Grosse Pte. Village 

George K. Wooll'euden 083 Ferry Ave. W. 

F. Raymond Woolfeuden 1656 Philadelphia Ave. W. 

Charles Wright 293 Roosevelt Place, Grosse Pointe 



83 



MEMBERS OF MICHIGAN SOCIETY IN OTHER STATES 
Arizona 

Marshall W. Waite Gleudale 

California 

William F. A<lauis (Detroit Chapter) Los Angeles 

AliHon B. Atwater (Detroit Chapter) Pasadena 

Ciiarles G. Cook (Detroit Chapter) Los Angeles 

J. Clifton Cook (Detroit Chapter) Los Angeles 

.James H. Cooke (Detroit Chapter) Santa Mouica 

John 11. Greusel (Detroit Chapter) .Hollywood 

Dr. Henry M. Kier 1S02 Fort Stockton Drive, San Diego 

Dr. Walter P. Manton .312 S. Holliston Ave., Pasadena 

Dr. Joseph Sill 1681 X. Allen Ave., Pasadena 

District of Columbia 

Edwin K. Denby (Detroit Chapter) Washington 

J. Walter Drake ( Detroit Chapter) Washingtoji 

Lieut. Ellis Reed-Hill. .** U. S. Coa.st Guard, Washington 

FloricU. 

Joshua Edward Howard Cocoauut Grove 

Illinois 

Harry F. Kleist 540 Brier Place, Chicago 

Leslie W. Millar (Detroit Chapter) Wilmette 

John H. More 672S Ridgeland Ave., Chicago 

Van Arthur Wallin (Kent Chapter) .130 X. Wells St., Chicago 

Indiana 

Frederick M. Sutter (Detroit Chapter) Columbus 

Kentucky 

Henry Williaui Heine Greenup 

Massachusettj 

Kev. Lee S. McCoIlester 4S Professor Bow, Tufts College 

Bufus U. Knight Salem 

S4 



New York 

Arthur E. Coi'biu - :n E. V.nh .St., Now York 

Ward F. Davidson. Suniinit K<>ad. I'ort ^VashingtoIl 

Frederick Haniia (Detroit Clwiptrrt 

IL'OS (i(!tliain Xati(Uial Bank IJlil^i-, New York 

George E. Hardy . J 4 Wall St., New York 

Arthur K. IJurst jKeiit Cliai>ter).. .:{()(; W. 9Uth St., New York 

Roy K. Moulton 4(50 Kiveiside Drive, New York 

Edward M. Pittenger ( Deii-oit ("hap. ) . . .217 Broadway, N. Y. 

Raymond B. Prescoti 2;}y W. aoth St., New I'ork 

William J. Rainey 52 Wall St., New York 

Rev. John II. Randall 28 We.st 127th St., New York 

John W. Starret 'M E. :ll)tli St., New York 

Lewis D. Waters (Kent Chapter) . .VM) W. :J4th St., New York 

Bert C. Whitney . Douglastou, L. I. 

Sidney B. Wight ?,S0 Riverside Drive, New York 

William L. White Room 112:}, 17 Iv 42nd St.. New York 

North Carolina 

Cliai'les M. I^aud) (Lenawe<» Chapter) Asheville 

Ohio 

Solace B. Coolidge.2:U'.l» Delamere Dr., Euclid Hghts, Cleveland 

Frank B. Gaylord Lakeside Hospital, Cleveland 

Isaac L. Hughes (Detroit Chapter) Youngstown 

James E. Parshall (Detroit Chapter) Willonghby 

Handd K. Righter Columbus 

William J. Weaver 12U1X) Cedar Road. Cleveland Fleights 

Pennsylvania 

Elvert M. Davis (Kent Chapter) Pittsburgh 

n. Edison Kinney ( Detroit Chapter) Wilkes-Barrcr 

Ray McLaughlin ( Detroit Chapter) Ben Avon 

Manuel ^lunoz (Detroit Chapter) Pittsburgh 

II. Starkey Hf^tuiford Pittsburgh 

Texas 

Leslie E. Delf Fort Worth 

S5 



Vermoui 
John D. Wik\ Westminster 

Wisconsin 

Kussell Y. Cooke 1301 West Blvd., Eacine 

James F. Kiuipp .Wisconsin Kapids 

£nglan<j 

Edward C. Weeks 

1 and 2 Ramillies St.. Olreat Marlborough St., London W. 

France 

Deuiinj^^ Jarve^i ( Detroit Chapter) .Dinard 

Ontario 

John D. Chase 1G2 Washington Road, London 

Richard K. Hoyt (Detroit Chapter) Ford City 

Ferdinand G. Lnderer (Detroit Chapter) St. Clair Shor-es 

John H. Swift (Detroit Chapter) Sandwich 

Jefferson T. Wing ( Detroit Chapter) Ford City 

Java 

Rollin R. Winslow Soerabaya 



SO 



DECEASED MEMBERS 



Nat'l Mich. 

No- No. Name Residence Date of Death 

2906 221 Col. Milton B. Adams, U.S.A. Gd. Rapids.. June 22, 1909 

8834 415 Rev. Addis Albro, Orchard Lake Oct. 15, 1911 

12881 381 Gen. Russell A. Alger, Detroit Jan. 24^1907 

2170S 5S3 Lee E. A.niidou, Iron I\Jountain Nov. 29, 1916 

3087 87 Dr. P'rederick P. Anderson, Giosse lie June 8, 190S 

31C2 112 William K. Anderson, Detroit Aug. 28, 1909 

22721 596 Stephen L. Angle, Chatham, N. J 

1S322 522 Howard B. Anthony, Detroit Nov. 20, 1913 

10843 243 Noyes L. Avery, Grand Rapids June 8,1901 

11177 252 James L. Babcock, Ann Arbor Jan. 31, 1912 

11190 265 Lyman R. Baldwin, Detroit Dec. 1, 1906 

20619 568 James E. Ball, Marquette ." April 4, 1914 

12879 379 Enoch Bancker, Jackson June 29, 1917 

12273 322 Orlando M. Barnes, Lansing Nov. ll', 1899 

11953 278 Eugene T. Barnum, Detroit Oct. 14, 1909 

3157 107 Hartson G. Barnum, Port Huron Sept. 6, 1913 

3061 61 George \V. Bajifis, Detroit ;...Oct. 11,1921 

12890 390 Jay W. Bigelow, Easton, Md Feb. 1?! 1917 

14859 434 George W. Bissell. Detroit Sept. 2,1902 

9079 154 William F. Blake, Grand Rapids Dec. 24,1915 

23894 644 Henry H. Boggs, Detroit Nov. 1,1914 

14169 419 George G. Bogue. Detroit Nov. 29, 1910 

30776 876 Herl)ert Bowen, Detroit Dec. 17 1921 

3060 60 George N. Brady, Detroit Dec. 25,' 1920 

3036 36 Preston Brady, Detroit Nov. 19 1909 

17215 490 Samuel Brady, Rockland Oct. 1,1919 

12417 367 Chauncey N. Brainerd, Detroit June 26, 1913 

3007 7 William H. Brearley, New York Mar. 26, 1909 

27457 732 George M. Buck, Kalamazoo Feb. 2, 1919 

28833 7S3 Rev. John E. Bushnell, D.D., Augusta, Ga. .Xov. 13, 1917 

3097 97 Fred E. Butler, Detroit Aug. 29^ 1920 

3095 95 William A. Butler, Jr., Detroit Mar. 14,1914 

2SS32 782 George T. Campbell, Owosso Apr. 1, 1923 

11975 300 Frederick Carlisle, Detroit Apr. 7,1906 

26800 725 Horry N. Carlisle. Howell V. . Apr. 17.' 1024 

31992 967 Charles W. Carman, Grand Rapids Sept. 19, 1919 

12406 356 Joseph R. Carpenter, Grand Rapids Nov. 1, 1905 

14858 433 Edwin T. Carriugton, Bay City Sept. 2l! 1914 

11964 289 David Carter, Detroit Nov. 2l! 1901 

8? 



DECEASED MEMBERS — Continued 

Nat'l Mich. 

No. No. Name Residence Date of Death 

12373 348 George C. Carter, Detroit May 17,1903 

3041 41 Theodore R. Chase, Detroit Feb. 10, 1898 

3081 81 Frederick ^.. Chittenden, Detroit Apr, 21,1907 

r'0S6 161 Charles L. Clark, Detroit Aug. 28, 1918 

12274 324 .James J. Clark, Detroit May 24,1899 

9586 1S6 Nelson B. Clark, Grand Rapids May 15, 1897 

3026 26 Rev. Rufus W. Clark. D.D.. Detroit Jan. 10,1909 

3086 86 Lucius H. Collins, Detroit May 15,1916 

27461 736 Lieut. Clarence F. Conner, Detroit Dec. 3, 1918 

12408 358 Dr. Leartus Connor, Detroit Apr. 16,1911 

20604 554 James Cook, Jackson June 6, 1909 

23891 641 Jared R. Cook, Sault Ste. Marie Mar. 31, 1916 

31993 908 Charles H. Coolid.i^e, Detroit Nov. 14, 1922 

11952 277 James C. Cristy, Detroit Apr. 6, 1916 

10842 242 Sullivan M. Cutcheon. Detroit Apr. 18, 1900 

3166 lie Clement A. Davison, Detroit Feb. 24, 1913 

3200 150 Harlow P. Davock, Detroit Aug. 30, 1910 

10844 244 Henry S. Dean, Ann Arbor Oct. 18,1915 

34532 1057 John B. Dean, Pontiac Feb. 15, 1921 

3040 40 Peter E. DeMill, Detroit June 27, 1893 

11184 259 Lawrence Depew, Detroit Jan. 3,1904 

18318 518 Franklin S. Dewey. Detroit Apr. 30, 1924 

26602 677 Julian G. Dickinson, Detroit Jan. 11,1916 

12404 354 Charles K. Dodge, Port Huron Mar. 22, 1918 

3052 .52 Dr. George Duffield, Detroit Nov. 12, 1919 

3029 29 Gen. Henry M. Duffield, Detroit July 14, 1912 

32398 998 Levi P. Eaton, Detroit Jan. 1, 1921 

9589 189 Theodore H. Eaton, Detroit Nov. 6, 1910 

15638 463 Frank W. Eddy. Detroit May 12,1914 

3020 20 Dr. Wm. Fitz Hugh Edwards, Detroit Oct. .27, 1897 

9077 152 S. Dow Elwood, Detroit Sept. 20, 1898 

8624 222 Dr. .Tustin E. Emerson, Detroit Apr. 8, 1923 

14175 425 Henry B. Fairchild, Grand Rapidf? May 17, 1912 

128S9 3S9 Bingley R. Fales, Detroit Feb. 10. 1913 

3009 9 Silas Farmer. Detroit Dec. 28, 1902 

12894 394 Jeremiah J. Farwell, Detroit Jan. 29, 1904 

15647 472 Leon C. Finck, Detroit Nov. 25,1910 



88 



DECEASED MEMBERS — Continued 



Nat'l 
No. 



Mich. 
No. 



Name 



Residence 



Dale of Death 



34542 1067 Henry A. Fitzsimmons, Grand Rapids Aug. 12 

30515 865 Charles Flowers, Detroit Oct. 27 

29735 810 Elmer E. Ford, Detroit July 30 

12370 345 Charles E. Fox, Detroit Feb. 26 



Jasper C. Gates, Detroit Jan. 8 

"William H. Gay, Grand Rapids .May 19 

Rufu.s W. Gillett, Detroit Dec. 3 

Oliver Goldsmith, Detroit Jan. 16 

Byron H. Goodrich, Hudson Apr. 16 

Joseph Greusel, Detroit Feb. 13 



James H. Hall, Detroit Jan. 1 

Theodore P. Hall, Grosse Pointe Jan. 4 

Joshua C. E. Hanford, Detroit Jan. 31 

Ernest F. Harrington, Port Huron Sept. 28 

Samuel S. Harris, Detroit May 23 

William P. Harris, Detroit Feb. 4 

Walter S. Harsha, Detroit Aug. 7 

Robert W. Hemphill, Jr., Ypsilanti Dec. 8 

Albert M. Heniiy, Detroit Nov. 3 

William L. Henry, Detroit Mar. 18 

Guy F. Hinchman, Detroit Sept. 30 

Edward C. Hinman, Battle Creek Jan. 11 

Arthur L. Holmes, Detroit May 27 

Charles C. Hopkins, Lansing July 1 

George H. Hopkins, Detroit Mar. 6 

George S. Hosmer, Detroit Mar. 2 

Cleveland Hunt, Detroit Mar. 17 

De Forest Hunt, M.D., Grand Rapids.. Mar. 10 

Albert P. Jacobs, Birmingham Jan. 30 

Charles H. Jacobs, Nordhoff, Cal Mar. 5 

Charles C. Jenks, Detroit Oct. 23 

Edward W. Jenks, M.D., Detroit Mar. 18 

Henry L. Jenness, Detroit Apr. 21 

Thomas S. Jerome, Detroit Apr. 13 

William F. Jewell, Detroit Oct 15 

David E. Johnson, Grosse He Jan. 22 

Harlan H. Johnson, Aan Arbor July 1 



3005 


5 


29739 


814 


3098 


98 


3173 


123 


35709 


1109 


11963 


2S8 


26795 


720 


3069 


69 


11191 


266 


10S31 


231 


10S38 


238 


10S37 


237 


9091 


166 


11951 


276 


3153 


103 


11966 


291 


10846 


246 


12412 


362 


20606 


555 


3090 


90 


3089 


89 


14173 


423 


3034 


34 


3023 


23 


3078 


78 


10S36 


236 


11971 


296 


12269 


319 


12251 


301 


3160 


110 


19877 


527 


3179 


129 


25672 


672 



1923 
1921 
1919 
1918 

1916 
1920 
1906 
1911 
1923 
1913 

1916 
1909 
1902 
1905 
1906 
1922 
1917 
1922 
1922 
1920 
1905 
1921 
1916 
1916 
1906 
1921 
1906 
1903 

1909 
1909 
1923 
1903 
1920 
1914 
1911 
1904 
1922 



89 



DECEASED MEMBERS — Continued 

Nf.t'1 Mich, 

No. No. Name Residence Date of Death 

29743 818 Frank P. Johnston, Detroit Nov, 11, 1920 

14S63 438 Riley U Jones, Detroit Apr. 23, 1923 

38783 1211 George R. Kahler, Detroit Feb. 7.1924 

19895 545 Charles E. Kanter, Detroit July 16, 1922 

15631 456 Henry L. Kanter, Detroit Sept. 18, 1908 

9098 173 Loftus X. Keating, Muskegon April, 1914 

11974 299 William J. Keep, Detroit Sept. 30, 1918 

14155 405 George Kemp, Sault Ste. Marie Feb. 12, 1923 

11192 267 Frank G. Kneeland, St. Louis Feb. 7, 1916 

3006 6 Samuel S. Lacey, Marshall Feb, 2, 1896 

28134 759 Capt Merritt U. Lamb, Rockford Aug. 21, 1918 

19892 542 Herschel B. Lazell, Lansing Sept. 22, 1909 

2SS42 792 Paul Leake, Grand Rapids June 4, 1919 

3018 18 Henry B. Ledyard, Detroit .May 24, 1921 

21712 587 Dr. Charles B. Leonard, Detroit June 27, 1913 

3195 145 Theodore 0. Leonard, Detroit May 31, 1910 

3196 146 Everett A. Leonard, Detroit Aug. 6, 191S 

3099 99 Richard H. L'Hommedieu, Detroit... Mar. 18, 1918 

30507 857 Lieut. Edward H. Locke, Detroit Oct. 15, 1918 

14870 445 Harry A. Lockwood, Detroit July 28, 1920 

12405 355 Dwight N. Lowell, Romeo July 27, 1907 

10188 213 Walter Macfarlane, Detroit ....Dec. 16,1919 

21706 581 Howard A. McGraw, Detroit June 13, 1923 

26789 714 Charles F. Marsh. Mt. Pleasant Feb. 7,1918 

22751 626 Albert M. Marshall, Toronto Feb. 4, 1923 

17203 478 Mathew H. Maynard, Marquette Dec. 20, 1907 

17202 487 Charles T. Mayo, Detroit Jan. 14, 1916 

3085 85 William C. McMillan, Detroit Feb. 23, 1907 

12270 320 Elijah W. Meddaugh, Detroit Dec. 20, 1903 

15676 451 William Merrill, Saginaw Feb. 16, 1907 

11967 292 Henry R. Mizner, Detroit Aug. 25, 1915 

12271 321 Alexander Monroe, Webberville Mar. 4,1907 

9084 159 William A. Moore, Detroit Sept. 25, 190S 

0577 177 William S. Moore, Detroit June 22, 1906 

3158 108 Gouverneur Morris, Detroit Dec. 30,1397 

10830 230 Robert Morris, Detroit 1908 

21720 595 Allen B. Morse, Ionia July 1,1921 



90 



DECEASED MEMBERS— Continued 



Nat'l 
No. 

14153 
12413 
17216 

11969 

30517 

141G3 

3002 

315G 

3010 

10176 

10833 

10193 

12256 

3058 

3046 

3024 

3077 

3167 
101S9 
15G43 
11176 
19S79 

3192 
12423 

3178 
12374 

3080 
21701 
26675 
10183 

3003 

3030 
12265 
12267 

3068 



Mich. 
No. Name Residence Date of Death 

403 Charles W. Moses, Detroit Oct. 17, 1915 

363 William F. Mulkey, Detroit Sept. 27, 1902 

491 George W, Munson, Grand Rapids Dec. 29, 1918 

294 Dr. George J. Northrop, Marquette Mar. 8, 1899 

867 Dr. George W. Orr, Lake Linden Jan. 23, 1922 

413 Clarence A. Palmer, Pontiac Feb. 9, 1907 

2 Jonathan Palmer, Detroit Nov. 29, 1923 

106 Thomas W. Palmer, Detroit June 1, 1913 

10 John Palton, Jr., Grand Pvapids May 24, 1907 

201 Edward T. Peck, Seaford, L. I Aug. 8, 1913 

233 William G. Phipps, Saginaw Feb. 27, 1915 

218 Thomas Pitts, Detroit Oct. 28, 1907 

306 Marvin Preston, Detroit Jan. 9, 1924 

58 Arthur S. Putnam, Manistique Mar. 12, 1920 

46 Daniel Putnam, Ypsilanti July 29, 1906 

24 Thomas R. Putnam, Detroit July 10, 1916 

77 Francis Raymond, Detroit Apr. 29, 1906 

117 George B. Reipick, Detroit Sept 16, 1913 

214 James A. Remick, Detroit Dec. 28, 1903 

4GS Jesse C. Remick, Moberly, La Apr. 9, 1919 

251 George 0. Robinson, Detroit Dec. 14, 1915 

529 Fordyce H. Rogers, Detroit Nov. 2, 1914 

142 Col. Joseph S. Rogers, Orchard Lake Sept. 14, 1901 

373 William G. Rosenbury. Bay City Dec. 24, 1903 

128 Alfred Russell, Detroit May 8, 1906 

349 Francis G. Russell, Detroit Jan. 11, 1902 

80 William Savidge. Spring Lake May 9, 1916 

582 James P. Scranton, Detroit July 13, 1916 

700 Dr. Thomas M. Sellards. Ann Arbor Oct. 20, 1921 

208 John Q, A. Sessions, Ann Arbor Sept. 9, 1918 

3 William Shot well, Pontiac May 25, 1894 

30 Henry S. Sibley, Birmingham Sept. 17, 1909 

315 Chauncey M. Silliman, Detroit Mar. 22. 1905 

342 Thomas H. Simpson. Detroit May 9, 1923 

68 Dr. Eugene C. Skinner, Detroit Jan. 24, 1S99 



91 



DECEASED MEMBERS— Continued 



Nat'l 


Mich. 


No. 


No. 


3073 


73 


3004 


4 


12258 


308 


9087 


162 


3093 


93 


26778 


703 


3028 


28 


26793 


718 


9597 


197 


10199 


224 


10899 


399 


12891 


391 


28843 


7i)3 


12892 


392 


27468 


743 


17209 


484 


12411 


361 


12401 


351 


12368 


343 


3013 


13 


29742 


817 


14170 


420 


20616 


566 


30350 


850 


3048 


48 


11968 


293 


20627 


577 


12418 


368 


10848 


248 


12352 


327 


31595 


945 


23880 


630 


14158 


408 


14852 


42S 


3188 


13S 


3152 


102 


12414 


364 


12267 


317 



Name Residence Date of Death 

Henry W. Skinner, New York July, . 1916 

Elliot T. Slocuni, Detroit Nov. 20, 1915 

Edward C. Smith, Pontiac Sept. 27, 1923 

Enoch Smith, Detroit Aug. 16, 1923 

James C. Smith, Detroit Sept. 7, 1917 

William Alden Smith. Jr., Grand Rapids. . .Apr. 28, 1920 

Charles D. Standish, Detroit Oct. 8, 1910 

Samuel B. Standish, Detroit ...Nov. 6, 1915 

George B. Stevens, Detroit Sept. 27, 1911 

Mark B. Stevens, Detroit Aug. 12, 1918 

Nathaniel H. Stewart, Kalamazoo Apr. 4, 1919 

Charles Stinchfield, Detroit Sept. 17, 1918 

Chauncey Strong, Kalamazoo Apr. 23, 1918 

William A. Stone, M.D., Kalamazoo Feb. 19, 1924 

Miner C. Taft, Kalamazoo June 7, 1918 

Frank D. Taylor, Detroit Mar. 12, 1920 

Harry F. Taylor, M.D., Mt. Clemens .Mar. 17, 1921 

William G. Thompson, Detroit July 20, 1904 

George Thrall, Detroit Feb. 22,1916 

Isaac D. Toll, Petoskey April, 1908 

Daniel W. Tower, Grand Rapids Feb. 12, 1923 

Charles W.'^Tufts. Detroit June 27, 1906 

Will A. Waite, Detroit Feb. 16, 1924 

William T. Waite, Menominee Oct. 21, 1918 

Fred T. Ward, Lansing Aug. 13, 1902 

Charles A. Warren, Detroit Mar. 13, 1923 

Levi S. Warren, Albion Jan. 8, 1922 

Lucius D. Watkins, Manchester Jan. 10, 1920 

Lewis C. Watson, Detroit Feb. 5, 1901 

Edgar Weeks, Mount Clemens Dec. 17, 1904 

Charles L. Weil, Port Huron July 16, 1921 

John H. Wendell. Detroit May 3, 1919 

Frank West, Detroit Feb. 28, 1910 

George M. West, Detroit Dec. 12, 1918 

Alexander B. Wetmore, Detroit Oct. 28, 1912 

Herschel Whitaker, Detroit May 5, 1900 

Peter White, Marauette June 6, 1908 

I. WUom Whitehead, Flint Oct. 20. 1903 



02 



DECEASED MtM3ER.S— Coutinuea 



Nat'l 


Mich 


No. 


No. 


22728 


603 


1S304 


504 


3020 


25 


26622 


697 


12S9r> 


395 


22T45 


620 


14159 


409 


11183 


258 


12359 


334 


27475 


750 


3199 


149 


12415 


365 


22732 


607 


14S74 


449 



Name Residence Date of Death 

Denny 0. Wilsy. Detroit Apr. 14, 1914 

Richard F. Williams, Detroit. Feb. 21, 1907 

Richard Storvs Willis, Detroit May 7, 1900 

Peter Alverscn Wilsey, Mt. Pleasant Feb. 3, 1915 

Samuel J. '.Vilson, Flint Nov. 4, 1915 

William li. Wilson, Flint Sept. 23, 1914 

Walter C. Winchester, Grand Rapids Aug. 28, 1921 

Alvinus B. Wood, Detroit Jan. 24, 1910 

Andrew C, Wood, Detroit Feb. 1, 1919 

Herbert A. Woodruff, Grand Rapids Nov. 17, 1923 

James N. Wright, Detroit Nov. 13, 1910 

Ha) C. Wyman. M.D., Detroit Mar. 9. 1908 

Erastus T. Yeomans, Ionia Oct. 24, 1920 

S. Perry Youngs, Stanton Dec. 4, 1923 



93 



/; Pj^'I.Si'i 



56 



■i;-. 



-> 



if 

ill 

"mm