(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Solano County, California"

^-f^? 

SU D? 



(Unp^ 



> 




Jba 



n& 



CHinf 



/ 




'<Ajifln/eO 



m 



F 868 
.S66 D9 
Copy 2 



50LAN0 




CALI FORN lA 

THE PRIZE WINNING 
COUNTY 




A FIVE THOUSAND DOLLAR TROPHY 
WON BY SOLANO COUNTY FOR'THE 
BEST EXHIBIT OF ODUNTY PRODUCTS 



Solano County 

CALIFORNIA 



By ARTHUR DUNN 




?r* ^\i< //■7/19J 

nI9l'5)g SOUVENIR EDITION gO 




i 



ISSUED BY SUNSET MAGAZINE SERVICE BUREAU FOR 
THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS OF SOLANO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA 

M 1 r 



PJ 



sit -. 



..v'-^-> 



K 



^' '..,•. 



^/'' > 



*, 








n 



I 








Solano County, California 



»*^ 



i^^ i^^ 



Solano is the prize county of California. It is situated midway 
between Sacramento, the capital city, and San Francisco, the metrop- 
olis of this great State, in the very heart of the most populous section 
of the entire Pacific Coast. On the cover of this booklet is embossed 
a miniature reproduction of the magnificent $5000 gold cup awarded 
to Solano County as first prize at the Mid- Winter Fair of 1894. And 
from that day to the present the products of Solano County have been 
winning prizes, medals and cash awards. 

Solano County, however, is not merely a show county. Its fruits 
are first in the market, commanding the highest prices, commended by 
the best judges. 

Solano County dairies have been scoring the highest points in a 
majority of tests ; and, what is more to the point, these tests may 
be made every day in the year, for the products of the dairies have 
been standardized. Any day is as good as show day. There is no 
difference. 



i — i 

{j Solano County grains are as good as the best in the country. The '^ 
great grain ranches in the eastern section of the county produce 
abundantly. 

The location of Solano County is ideal commercially, climatically 
and agriculturally. It is less than two hours from San Francisco by 
water and rail; Sacramento, the State capital, may be reached in 
like manner in the same time. The whole world is its market, both 
for its farm products and its manufactured goods, for the merchant 
fleets of the universe may navigate the waters that wash Solano 
shores, and railroads stretch web-like to all quarters of this continent. 
San Pablo Bay and Suisun Bay touch Solano County, and the eastern 
boundary is the Sacramento River, the largest navigable stream in 
California. Thus Solano County enjoys more advantages of water 
transportation than any other county, thereby affording maaufactur- 
ing sites without limit. If evidence were required to back up the 
claims of Solano County that its waters are navigable at all seasons 
of the year, all that would be necessary would be to cite the fact 
that the United States government has located here its largest Pacific 
Coast navy-yard — jMare Island ; also large ocean-going steamers may 
navigate the Sacramento River all along the eastern boundary of 
Solano County, landing and loading produce from and to all ports. 

This booklet is not written in a boastful spirit. It was conceived 
with the idea that the peoples of the world now coming to California 
should know something of the grandeur and the greatness of Solano 
County. The data from which it was compiled were furnished by 
the civic organizations of the respective towns and cities in the 
county, and because of its authenticity it is given official approval 
and endorsement by the Board of Supervisors of Solano County, 
Fact is more efficacious than fancy in attracting attention to a worthy 
object or a desirable community. Therefore Solano County should 
command the serious consideration of all, especially those who may 
contemplate making California their permanent residence. Here will 
be found all of the advantages of the most favored spot on earth — ■ 
healthy climate, natural wealth, matchless soil, ideal farming condi- 
tions, unusual manufacturing opportunities. 

FRUIT INDUSTRY 

The fruit industry was started in Solano County more than sixty 
years ago. There was at that time no previously gained knowledge 
to aid the pioneers in their search for the best methods of making 
fruit growing profitable. Now one can gain reliable information as 
to the most profitable crops to plant in the different localities. Fruit 
can be successfully grown over a very large area of Solano County but 
there are four distinct fruit sections, namely, Vaca Valley and 
Pleasants Valley, pre-eminently ahead of all other sections in the State 
in the production of early plums, peaches and apricots ; Suisun Valley, 
noted for its Bartlett pears and cherries, and Green Valley, noted for J 



I 




10 




u 



f 



¥1 




im—Mi 

BEARING ORCHARDS BORDER MANY OF THE HILHWAVS oF THi: ((UNTV 

its early cherries and wine grapes. That part of the county known as 
northern Sohino is particularly adapted to the successful production 
of nuts, apricots and peaches. 

. The most important fruits that are produced are : Cherries, apricots, 
peaches, wine grapes, table grapes, pears, plums and prunes. There 
are many varieties of these and they ripen over a period of about five 
months. This fact is important. It gives the investor an opportunity 
to settle on a small acreage in a community Avhere plums and cherries 
do especially well. With the aid of members of his family, a person 
owning a small orchard may market his product without employing 
outside hands, while there is ample opportunity for light work in the 
packing-houses. In order to do this varieties must be planted so the 
fruit ripens in succession, say about two weeks apart. The next most 
important fruits grown here are figs, olives, oranges, apples, almonds, 
walnuts, i)omegranates and persimmons. 

In speaking of growing fruits in this county we refer commonly 
to certain localities as being adapted particularly to the production 
of certain kinds. Almost all of our soils will produce anything under 
the sun. But if one is looking for a place to grow fruits and nuts 
commercially, he will learn upon investigation that fruits require 
certain climatic and soil conditions in order to do the best. 

The College of Agriculture at the University of California and 
the University Farm, which is located adjacent to our orchards, are 
supplying expert knowledge in practical form. 



12 



I 




•1' 

i 



A VIGOROUS AND PROMISIXO YOUNG PRUNE ORCHARD IN THE BEAUTIFUL LAGOON VALLEY 

The following official census sliow^s the number of trees in Solano 
County and gives the best obtainable information concerning the 
ripening season. 

Number 

VARIETIES of Trees 

Almonds 88,600 

Apples 1,440 

Apricots 178,800 

Cherries 03,248 

Figs 6,000 

Wine Grapes 265,724 

Table Grapes 420,143 

Olives 1,440 

Oranges 1,400 

Peaches 254,349 

Pears ' 126,202 

Plums 182,618 

Prunes 161,372 

Walnuts 3,800 

Persimmons 5,000 

The value of the products from orchard and vineyard is estimated 
to be as follows : 

2,000 cars of green fruit, shipped East annually at an average of 81,400 per car $2,800,000 

10,000,000 lbs. dried prunes at 43 ^ cents 450,000 

3,000,000 lbs. dried apricots at 10 cents 300,000 

6,000,000 lbs. dried peaches at 6 cents 360,000 

867,000 lbs. almonds at 12 cents 104,040 

Local cars to San Francisco, green fruit 50,000 

Miscellaneous: Dried pears 5,000 

English walnuts 6,000 

Dried figs ' 7,000 

Apples 2,000 

Total $4,084,040 



Number 






Varieties 
6 


Season 




9 

8 


May 20 to July 


1 


16 


April 25 to June 


20 


4 


June 15 to Sept 


16 


8 . 


Aug. 15 to Sept 


15 


10 


July 17 to Sept. 


25 


2 


Nov. 15 on 




3 


Nov. 1 to Feb. 


15 


25 


June 1 to Sept. 


10 


8 


June 14 to Aug. 


30 


34 


June 1 to Aug. 


10 


8 


Aug. 15 to Sept. 


15 


4 


Sept. 15 to Oct. 


15 


3 


Nov. 15 to Jan. 


15 



13 




14 




15 




A PLENTIFUI. WATER SUPPLY AIDS MATERIALLY IN THE PRODUCTION OF ALL CROPS 



16 




FRUIT PACKED IN SOLANO COUNTY IS SHIPPED TO ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD 

CANNERIES 

There are canneries at Vallejo, Benicia, Suisun and Rio Vista, the 
product being sent to all parts of the world. The Vallejo cannery- 
does an exclusive foreign business, shipping canned salmon. The 
Rio Vista cannery handles asparagus. The Benicia cannery puts up 
some of the finest fruits and fish. The Suisun cannery handles fruit 
exclusively. During the season these canneries give employment to 
hundreds of persons. There is opportunity to develop these industries, 
and the advantages that make attractive manufactories also apply 
to the canning enterprises. 

WINERIES 

There is a considerable acreage in wine grapes. There are two 
wine cellars at Cordelia, each with a capacity of 500,000 gallons. 
There is a large acreage devoted to table grapes. 

DAIRYING 

Solano County already has an enviable reputation for the high 
standard of its dairy produce. The largest certified milk dairy farms 
in California are located near Dixon, the "Dairy City." The product 
of these dairies is about 6000 quarts of milk a day, which is shipped 
to Bay points where it commands the highest prices. There is also a 
creamery at Dixon, another at Suisun, two at Benicia and one at 
Vallejo. 

There is a vast area in Solano County available for dairy farms. 






17 




I 



COMFORTABLE HOMES BEAR WITNESS TO THE PROSPERITY OF SOLANO'S CITIZENS h 



I 



18 










PALMS AND VINING PLANTS LEND A DISTINCT CHARM TO MANY OF THE HOMES 



19 



S" 




^^^StSSSii^^mmfmmmf 



^- ■ a 1 ' 'y'l. 



23 :3i ^^ 







HENRT C. BMITH, ARCHITECT 
SOLANO COUNTY CITIZENS APPRECIATE FCTLLY THE ADVANTAGES OF MODERN SCHOOL BXHLDINGS 
RIU VISTA UNION HIGH SCHOOL ARMIJO UNION HIGH SCHOOL DDCON UNION HIGH SCHOOL 




21 




22 




MILK IS LOADED UPON WAITING EXPRESS CARS FOR QUICK TRANSPORTATION TO CITY MARKETS 

Conditions are ideal, in many instances reliance being placed entirely 
upon natural grasses, while other dairymen feed alfalfa. With the 
development of this forage under the matchless conditions of this 
section, the growth of the dairy industry will be astounding. Every 
section of the county is accessible to a creamery; or if it be deemed 
advisable to ship the milk, quick and certain transportation facilities 
are afforded to the largest market on the Pacific Coast, the San 
Francisco Bay region. "Where alfalfa is raised there is ample water 
for irrigating, the sub-surface supply being without limit and ex- 
tending over a wide area. 

The dairy stock that is in use is of the best breeds. In many 
cases the dairies are either certified or inspected, the cows being 
subjected to the most rigid tests. 

Good dairying lands may be purchased in several desirable sec- 
tions of the county. GRAIN ^ 

Solano County is a large producer of grain.- There are thou- 
sands of acres of the richest delta land in the world, and prairie 
and rolling hill lands that have grown cereals for forty years. In 
large areas wheat and barley have been grown year after year. Now 
crops are being rotated and new life given to the soil. Any grain 
grower with ability and backing can obtain land in various sections 
and make good from the beginning. One great advantage is the 
fact that Port Costa, one of the greatest grain ports of the Pacific 
Coast, on tide water, joins Solano County, and freight charges are 
low. Montezuma Hills, in the eastern section of the county, is recog- 
nized as one of the largest grain sections in California. 

MILLING AND MANUFACTURING 

Solano County is situated ideally for mills and manufactories. One 
J of the largest flour mills in the State is situated at Vallejo, and ^ 
I there is another at Dixon. Benicia has two tanneries, an iron works •^• 
S and shipyard among its enterprises. Rio Vista has a shipyard. •^ 



23 



! 




, rf -S-C^ 




j'J.-^ • 




lA PERMANENCY MARKS THE PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS, AS INDICATED BY THESE SUBSTANTIAL BRIDGES 



8 



I 



24 




UNDER THE MATCHLESS CONDITIONS OBTAINING HERE ALFALFA REACHES ITS HIGHEST 

DEVELOPMENT 

Climatic conditions make Solano perfect for manufactories. One 
incentive for establishing new industries and the extension of exist- 
ing ones should be the fact that none of the communities having deep 
water shipping facilities stand in the way of progress. Available 
sites may be purchased at reasonable prices. The city of Vallejo 
itself has taken over virtually two miles of water-front under bond 
issue, and is developing it to its highest efficiency. Water and rail 
never combined to better advantage than here. . 

STEAM, ELECTRIC AND WATER TRANSPORTATION 

The Southern Pacific railroad traverses the county with its main 
transcontinental line, and many transcontinental and local trains are 
passing through the county daily. 

The Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Railroad operates through the 
eastern portion of the county, connecting San Francisco with 
Sacramento. 

The Northern Electric operates at present between Vacaville and 
Suisun-Fairfield, besides running fruit trains out of Suisun Valley. 
Other electric roads are under construction or will be started soon. 

The Sacramento Valley railroad is operating between Dixon 
Junction (on the Oakland, Antioch & Eastern) to Dixon. The Napa 
Valley & Calistoga connects Vallejo and the Napa Valley country. 

The Monticello Steamship Company makes six daily trips be- 
tween Vallejo and San Francisco carrying passengers and freight. 



25 




26 



f'' 




""'""'''iSiii^i 



HEADED DO\\'^"STREAM FOR THE OITTSIDE MARKET WITII THE PRODUCTS OF THE FIELD 



27 



I 












t 



I'Mtilc "111! I 



m% 



1/ e* 



"''' I Hi 1 1, 1/ ■ rl 






,r|/!fw 






f(Mi^? 






CI E 



> i H 



o 



?8 



^ 



¥ 




I' 



^ 




PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY 3 STATION AT CORDELIA, LARGEST IN THE WORLD 

Three lines of steamers make daily trips between Sacramento and 
Sau Francisco. 

Collectively this network of rail and water transportation would 
be hard to excel and should appeal to those considering the estab- 
lishment of a future home. 

QUARRIES AND MINERAL SPRINGS 

Immense quantities of road building material are located in 
different parts of Solano County. This material is being used to 
improve the highways of the county. The main trunk of the State 
Highway traverses the county and this section will be one of the 
first completed. Also material for the manufacture of cement is 
found in great quantities. Onyx quarries and mineral springs are 
found in the county. 

VALLEJO, THE NAVY- YARD CITY 

Vallejo is the largest and the principal city of Solano County. It 
is located in the extreme southwestern section of the county and is 
distant from San Francisco only twenty-seven miles by either rail 
or water, a journey from the Pacific Coast metropolis of less than 
two hours. 

Here is located the United States largest Pacific Coast navy-yard, fei 
officially designated as Mare Island. Vallejo is a thoroughly modern Li 
and progressive city, one of its main attractions, besides its beautiful \i 



30 






1 




AN ARMY OF EMPLOYEES RETI'RNTXG FROM THEIR WORK AT THE MARE ISLAND NAVY-YARD 

situation on the hills overlooking the water dotted with mammoth 
engines of peace, being its perfectly paved streets. In the last two 
years the city spent $1,000,000 in street improvements, with the 
result that more square feet of first-class paving have been laid in 
Vallejo than in any city of its population in the United States, and 
the result has been accomplished in a shorter space of time than 
anywhere in the world. 

The growth of Vallejo has been phenomenal. At the outbreak of 
the Spanish-American war the population was not more than 6000. 
Today the population is more than 15,000. The hills of the city are 
dotted with beautiful homes, many of them owned by mechanics 
employed at the navy-yard. 

The United States government has built and maintained its largest 
navy-yard here, and is increasing its capacity every year. Millions 
of dollars invested indicate the permanency of this gigantic estab- 
lishment. Vallejo 's strategic location is further emphasized by the 
fact that within a distance of less than five miles fully a score of 
the principal institutions of upper San Francisco Bay maintain their 
Pacific Coast deep-Avater terminals. Among these are the Union 
Oil Company and the Associated Oil Company, both of which have 
the terminal of their pipe lines from the oil belt of California here, 
thereby connecting with deep-water transportation. Others are 
the Selby Smelting & Lead Company, the National Lead Company, 
the Selby Cartridge AVorks, the California-Hawaiian Sugar Refining 
Company, the Balfour-Guthrie Company, F. A. Somers & Company, 



J 



31 



)^.-^ 

m^^ 




i 1 


. ; Ir ,1 1 


f': - 




m 


- 5 

1 z 

V- 
HI 






I 



p 



I 



32 



4 Nevada Warehouse & Dock Company, Granger Warehouse & Dock 
8 Company, G. W. McNear Warehouse & Dock Company, Sperry 
51 Flour Company, Trescott Packing Company and the Pacific Fisheries 
Company. 

To make available this multiplicity of industries the United States 
government spent $1,250,000 in dredging and deepening the San 
Pablo shoals to thirty feet at mean low tide, and $420,000 in dredging 
the Mare Island channel. After the completion of the dredging 
operations this channel — which separates the navy-yard from 
Vallejo — will be 600 feet in width at its narrowest point. It is now 
1,500 feet wide at its greatest span and is navigable by any vessel 
that can enter the Golden Gate at low tide. 

The equipment at Mare Island navy-yard permits of the building 
of vessels of the largest type, and conditions are such that the work 
can be done cheaper than at any navy-yard in the country. An 
example of the skill of the employes at this yard is evidenced in the 
naval collier Jupiter, the dimensions of which are larger than those 
of the U. S. battleship Oregon. This is the first electrically driven and 
operated vessel built, and a recent successful trial trip establishes the 
speed of the vessel at 15.1 knots, although the requirements were 
only 14 knots. 

The City Government of Vallejo, through a bond issue in the sum 
of $150,000, has begun the work of constructing a bulkhead between 
North and South Vallejo. Incidental to this construction is the 
reclamation of 160 acres of tide lands, all of which will be available 
for sites for manufacturing and industrial development. 

Vallejo unhesitatingly invites the closest investigation of her 
numerous advantages, especially with reference to the opportunities 
that here await the manufacturer. Few cities can boast such a water- 
frontage as owned by Vallejo, and certainly none has a longer line 
of deep-water dockage sites. The government maintains a dredge 
to keep the channel to San Francisco Bay to a guaranteed depth of 
thirty feet so that vessels of the navy may reach the navy-yard at 
any time. This is positive assurance of the permanency of the deep- 
water facilities for the ships of the world. In addition to this, Vallejo 
has two railroads — the Southern Pacific and the San Francisco, Napa 
& Calistoga. The Southern Pacific operates trains to all main-line 
connections, and the San Francisco, Napa & Calistoga is an electric 
railway operating between Vallejo and some of the State's richest 
orchard country. The Monticello Steamship Company operates a 
line of superb fast steamers between San Francisco and Vallejo. The 
Northern Electric Railway, now building between Vallejo and 
Sacramento, will maintain its deep-water terminal and shops at 
Vallejo, and this railroad is early destined to become the terminus 
of another transcontinental line. 

Vallejo has a commission form of government, which means that 
its public affairs are conducted on the highest plane. The excellent 
schools are the especial pride of the city. There are five grammar 
schools and a new high school, erected at a cost of $65,000. This 
^^ institution is fully accredited to the University of California. The 
A teachers in all grades are thoroughly capable. 



33 




34 



^ 



^ The water system of Vallejo is municipally owned, and the supply 
is of the purest, the source being in the mountains north of Green 
Valley Falls, a distance of twenty miles from Vallejo by air line. 
This supply is stored in two enormous reservoirs with a combined 
capacity of more than 1,000,000,000 gallons. After leaving the lakes 
the water flows through a natural channel for a distance of two 
miles to the intake pipe, dropping in that distance more than seven 
hundred feet. In this way the water is thoroughly aerated before 
entering the city's pipes. 

Little Lake Chabot, so called to distinguish it from the larger 
lake of the same name, located in Alameda County, is used for 
storage purposes to the extent of 400,000,000 gallons of water. 

Fraternal orders have a large following in Vallejo, virtually every 
organization having a good-sized local membership. ]\Iany lodges 
own their own buildings, the value of this property being estimated 
at $300,000. All of the representative religious denominations have 
edifices and resident ministers. 

Just outside the city limits of Vallejo is White Sulphur Springs, 
noted for its excellent mineral waters and its historical interest. 

Vallejo essentially is a prosperous city, for it has probably the 
largest pay-roll of any community its size in the country. The navy- 
yard alone pays out approximately $2,500,000 annually to perma- 
nent residents of Vallejo. In addition to this great industry, the 
largest flour mill on this Coast is located here. Other industries are 
a tannery, steam laundries, brick kilns, cannery, lumber mill, and 
very soon important railroad shops will be built. 

There are four daily newspapers and one weekly in Vallejo, 

The outlying country is devoted to farming and dairying, and 
much of the land is held at $100 an acre. Truck gardeners find 
a ready market for their produce in the city. 

Near Vallejo is one of the richest quicksilver mines in the country. 
This property has yielded hundreds of thousands of dollars, and gives 
employment to many men. 

BENICIA 

Several important manufactories are located at Benicia, situated 
in the southwestern section of the county. This is a city of about 
3000 population, ideally situated on Carquinez Straits, where the 
waters of the great rivers of the interior — the Sacramento and the 
San Joaquin — after flowing into Suisun Bay to the east meet the 
tides of the Pacific Ocean that sweep in through the Golden Gate. 

The city's situation for a manufacturing center is superb. The 
water-front is extensive and more than two miles of it lies between 
the main transcontinental line of the Southern Pacific and deep water, 
where the largest vessels could dock. Several factories are directly on 
the Straits, the vessels carrying materials and the finished product 
tying up to private docks. The city enjoys terminal transcontinental 
railroad rates and vessels engaged in coastwise trade deliver their 
cargoes in Benicia from points up and down the coast at the same 
rate as in San Francisco. From this city main line trains of the ^ 
^i Southern Pacific are ferried across the Straits to the opposite shore f] 



35 



! 




ONE OF THE liANklM", INSTITUTIONS OF VALLEJO, THE CITY OF CASH 

on the train transports Solano and Contra Costa, the two largest ferry- 
boats in the world. The valley lines of the Southern Pacific run along 
the opposite shore, connection being made by train transport at Port 
Costa, or by the Martinez-Benicia ferry at Martinez. This is the 
connecting link between the northern system of State highways center- 
ing in Benicia and the all-shore State highway to Oakland, and it is 
at present the only automobile ferry across a hundred miles of waterway. 
Three lines of river steamers, as well as the lines of railroad mentioned, 
connect Benicia with San Francisco and with interior cities and towns, 
including Stockton and Sacramento. 

The only government arsenal on the Pacific Coast is at Benicia. 
From this point are shipped all the stores used up and down the 
coast and in the Philippines, Hawaii and Alaska. Many of these are 
manufactured here, about 150 men and women being the average 
number maintained at the arsenal. 

The Baker & Hamilton iron works is another important industry. 
Agricultural implements made here are shipped to many parts of the 
world, including Australia, New Zealand, South America, China and 
Japan, being loaded at the company's own wharf. At the busiest 
season of the year the iron works employs 125 men and its pay-roll is 
about $100,000 a year. 

The Western Creameries Company, the largest west of Denver, 
Colorado, is operated here. Cream is brought from the big dairy 
ranches of California, the company maintaining about twenty stations, ^ 
some at points distant over two hundred miles. The fortnightly dis 



§^ 



36 




THE FIRST STATE CAJITOL OF CALIFORNIA, NOW BENICIA'S CITY HALL 

bursernents for cream aggregate $45,000, or more than a million 
dollars a year. The capacity of the plant is more than 20,000 pounds 
a day, and of this vast output over three million pounds of butter are 
marketed yearly under one famous brand. The permanent employes 
number from thirty to fifty. Benicia was selected by this company 
for the location of this immense plant because of its situation, being 
the gateway by rail and water to the great agricultural sections of 
central and northern California, and the markets of the world. 

Another creamery manufactures a high-grade butter for local con- 
sumption and is the medium through which the cream from nearby 
dairies, situated principally along the marsh lands between Benicia 
and Cordelia, ultimately reach the consumer, 

A cannery located here is near enough to some of the greatest 
orchards of California, notably those of the Suisun and Vaca valleys, 
to be able to secure all the fruit it requires for its canning capacity. 
Its output is marketed under several well-known brands and is of the 
highest quality. The fish-packing department is a large one, the fish, 
principally salmon, being taken from the Straits, and Suisun and 
San Pablo bays. This industry gives employment to scores of fisher- 
men, while in the canning department the number of the employes 
depends upon the season of the year. 

A local shipyard has built over a hundred vessels, and recently 
^ has added to its equipment. With the opening of the Panama Canal h 
}ij and the impetus that will be given to shipping on the Pacific it is g 
fi expected that there will be a greater development of this industry, 



1 



yj 



37 




38 




OFFICES AND HARNESS AND SKIRTING LEATHER FINISHING DEPARTMENT, KULLMAN, 
SALZ & COMPANY, BENICIA TANNERY 

Benicia also has a factory which makes and distributes to fruit- 
growers and stockmen a variety of sprays and stock dips. 

The largest tannery on the Pacific Coast, that of Kullman, Salz & 
Company, is in Benicia and operates steadily to full capacity, handling 
about 1,000 sides daily. The tannery employs about 250 men daily, 
and the pay-roll aggregates upward of $200,000 a year. There is 
another tannery here, also, and the output is excellent. 

Benicia is an important railroad point, thirty passenger trains 
of the Southern Pacific stopping here daily. The ferry and switching 
facilities maintained by this company afford employment to more 
than a hundred men, the annual pay-roll being $120,000. 

The city is one of the historic places of the State. The capital 
of California was once located here and the fine old Capitol building, 
where many legislative debates among the notables of the early 
days were carried on, is in a good state of preservation, and today 
is used as a city hall and library. The city has four churches. 
Besides the public school there is the Dominican monastery and a 
convent. Benicia is beautifully situated, with attractive homes, fine 
climate, striking scenery, good schools, superior transportation facil- 
ities, easy access to the cities and the big valleys of California, sur- 
rounded by hill and valley farms that have never been intensively 
cultivated, and with work enough at hand to give employment to 
hundreds of men and women. 



39 



! 







40 



SUISUN AND FAIRFIELD 

Suisun and Fairfield are such close neighbors that the Southern 
Pacific Railroad Company maintains one station for both. All that 
divides them is an imaginary line defining the legal limits of the towns. 

Fairfield is the county seat, and here the people of the county 
have erected one of the handsomest courthouses in all California. 
A magnificent high school and numerous other private improvements 
either are under way or projected. 

Suisun is also a central point for handling fruits. Two large 
fruit-packing houses are located here. Shipments are received from 
various points in central and northern California, and in the packing- 
houses at this place are put up in cases and boxes suitable for the 
eastern and foreign markets. Famous brands from Suisun packing 
establishments find their way to all quarters of the globe. 

The fruit industry is one of the principal resources of this rich 
section. Suisun and Green valleys supply some of the finest fruits 
grown in the State, and many orchardists have grown rich in the 
development of varieties for which they are noted. It would be 
difficult to find homes of more striking beauty than those in the 
vicinity of Suisun and Fairfield, and within the corporate limits of 
the towms also will be seen every evidence of prosperity and progress. 

Statistics for 1912-1913 give an idea of the importance of the 
fruit industry, the shipments of fruits from Suisun being as follows : 

The green fruit shipped from Suisun, season 1913, totaled 400 cars. 

The green fruit shipped to canneries, season 1913, totaled 75 cars, 
and the dried fruit shipped from Suisun, season 1913, made 230 cars. 

The total number of cars shipped from Suisun during the season 
of 1913 was about 700. 

There is a large acreage in the vicinity of Suisun devoted to 
dairying and much more land that may be used for a like purpose 
to the immediate and certain profit of a large number of settlers. 
There is an excellent creamery here, which, at the California State Fair 
of 1913, received a gold medal and a cash prize for the excellence 
of its creamery butter. 

The conditions in the vicinity of Suisun for • dairying are ideal. 
The summers are not hot, a fact which many dairy farmers have 
learned to their own profit. Many of them raise hogs as a side line. 

To the south of Suisun are the island districts and low lands 
that have been used for dairy farms for forty years. There is a 
large acreage in this vicinity wdiich is being reclaimed and will afford 
additional opportunity for newcomers. 

In addition to the fruit packing-houses at Suisun and Fairfield, 
which employ numbers of persons during the season, there is a fruit 
cannery operated to capacity during the fruit season. 

Suisun enjoys water transportation facilities in addition to the 
service of the main line Southern Pacific and the Northern Electric. 
Suisun is a junction point for the Southern Pacific, which operates 
a branch line to Cordelia, Napa Junction and other points. 

There are some excellent opportunities for settlers in this vicinity 
and never need there be fear of crop failures. The rainfall is 



\l 



I 




a 



J 



42 



f 




aim'mm\ i :' ~^-ailMi 




tas p jfir 








.^g» 



Sf 



Si I \ 1 -. 1 1\ riii- iiri;i"\ OK 1^1 ( I \i\ii,i> SI I 'I'll INS \\ III Ki \\u\nM;rri ni \ i i ( i:'m •■ ■ ' i- \v-,i i,:i',i) 



ample for general purposes, killing frosts rarely visit the valleys i 
where the fruit is grown, and climatic and soil conditions cannot ' 
be excelled in all northern California. 

VACAVILLE 

Vaeaville ships the earliest fruits from California. In more than 
sixty years of fruit growing there has not been more than two or 
three exceptions to this statement. Vaeaville is beautifully located 
at the mouth of the valley, surrounded by mountains and foothills, 
separated from the main Sacramento Valley by these low-lying hills. 
Vaeaville is on a branch line of the Southern Pacific railroad four 
miles west of Elmira, the Southern Pacific railroad's main line 
junction, thirty miles southwest of Sacramento and sixty miles north- 
east of San Francisco. 

The valley is protected from extreme cold in winter and from 
heavy winds in summer by its mountains and hills. The soils of the 
valley, silt washed from the surrounding hills by the erosion of winter 
rains during many centuries, are deep, friable and especially adaptable 
to fruits. Although diversified farming is possible, 15,000 acres of 
orchards and vineyards from which fruit is shipped from the latter 
part of April until the middle of November, offer sufficient proof that 
Vaeaville is most ideally located and has the proper soil and climatic 
conditions for successful fruit growing. Earliest orchards are on the 
rolling lands and foothills. 

The principal fruits grown in the Vaca Valley are cherries, 
apricots, peaches, plums, prunes, figs, grapes and apples. Walnuts, 
almonds and oranges also produce well, but are at present not 
extensively grown. 

Between Vaeaville and Elmira, a distance of four miles, there is 
a large acreage of level land ideally located for alfalfa growing and 
dairying. 

Unimproved land in the Vaca Valley sells for from $100 to $200 
per acre, depending upon location and quality of soil. However, the 
acreage of desirable unimproved orchard land in the immediate 
vicinity of Vaeaville is limited. Bearing orchards are worth from 
$275 to $500 per acre, depending upon location, age and variety of 
fruit. Good orchards, well cared for, may be depended upon in 
the average season to pay ten per cent, or more interest upon these 
valuations. 

The winter rainfall, which averages thirty inches, is generally 
sufficient to insure full crops. While there are occasional seasons of 
light rainfall, there is no instance known during the last forty years 
where there has been insufficient rainfall to mature satisfactory and 
profitable crops. 

There are many opportunities for the settler in the vicinity of 
Vaeaville, and while many of the orchards bring large returns on 
comparatively high valuations, there is a small acreage within the 
reach of persons of small capital. Time is required to bring trees to 
a bearing stage and one must be prepared either to work for others 
or be able to finance himself while waiting for a crop. There are 



I 



45 



j^ instances in Vaca Valley of persons starting with only a few hun- 
dred dollars, purchasing land under contract and planting trees. 
While the trees were growing these people have worked for neighbors, 
and after a few years have been able to rent the young orchard or 
operate it themselves, earning a good living and each year paying 
off a considerable part of the first cost and improvements. A pros- 
pective purchaser of any sort of land should make inquiry as to the 
character of the soil before buying, for conditions at relatively nearby 
localities may be entirely different. 

Vacaville has a population of 1,500. One of the most valuable 
assets of the community is exceptionally good schools, embracing both 
grammar and high schools. The California State University Agricul- 
tural Farm is but eighteen miles distant. Vacaville has good sewers, 
electric light and water system, several mercantile establishments, 
two banks and six churches. 

The State Highway leading from San Francisco to Sacramento 
passes through the main street of the town. The Vallejo & Northern 
Electric Railway connects Vacaville with Suisun and will ultimately 
be extended to Sacramento. 

Herewith is appended a list of shipping fruits grown in the Vaca- 
ville section, together with the average dates of ripening : 

Cherries, leading varieties: 

Purple Guine April 20 Bing May 14 

Chapman April 25 Royal Ann May 10 

Tartarian April 30 Advance April 27 

Burbank cherry May 4 

Plums, leading varieties: 

Clyman May 30 Sugars July 2 

Tragedy June 6 Grand Duke July 12 

Santa Rosa June 6 Kelsey July 9 

Burbank June 8 Giants July 15 

Climax June 8 Cross July 20 

Wickson June 20 Formosa June 4 

Dimonds July 2 

Peaches, leading varieties: 

Alexander June 2 Crawford July 10 

Triumph June 10 Elberta July 25 

St. John June 13 

Grapes, leading varieties: 

Tokay Aug. 8 — 18% sugar. Fontainebleau July 19 — 18% sugar. 

Rose Peru Aug. 1 — 18% sugar. 

Bartletta June 20 — Half box. Wilder June 1 1 — Half box. 

Royal Apricots May 26 

Blue Figs June 8 

DIXON, THE DAIRY CITY 

Dixon is known as the Dairy City, because of the excellence of 
its dairy produce. The surrounding country formerly was devoted to 
grain-growing purposes, but alfalfa fields are the order of this pro- 
gressive age, the exact acreage in alfalfa being 9,500 acres up to the 
latter part of 1913, with an estimated increase for 1914 of about 
1500 acres. The soil of the Dixon ridge country is of the richest, 
and there is a plentiful supply of sub-surface water for irrigating 
purposes. In the district there are 200 pumping plants, of which 
150 are within reasonable distance of electric lines or about eighty per 
cent, of the total is operated by electricity. The total horsepower used 
approximates 2,000 which shows an increase in electric irrigation con- 
^ sumers during the year 1914 of fifty per cent. In this district two 
% acres will support three cows, and a good cow will earn from $8 to 
$12 a month, and may be milked ten months in the year. 



I 



',» 



47 




\1 



48 



=0 " 







s^t®^ 




CLEANLINESS AND SANITATION ARE THE WATCHWORDS OF THE GREAT SOLONO DAIRIES 

The dairies of Dixon are either inspected or certified. The Jerseys 
and Holsteins are subjected to the severe tuberculin test by veteri- 
naries employed by the State Dairy Commission. Two of the largest 
certified dairies in California have 500 cows, producing about 6,000 
quarts of milk a day, which are shipped to the Bay region. 

A creamery has an output of 125,000 pounds of butter a year. 

The Dixon Milling Company operates three distinct businesses. 
The first, flour milling, includes a modern equipment throughout. 
Wheat is obtained from Dixon, Tremont, Batavia and Allendale ware- 
houses, all local points, combining a capacity of some 25,000 tons. 

Distinct from the flour milling is a feed grinding business. 

In an entirely separate plant is an alfalfa meal mill, capacity 
three and a half tons per hour, perfectly equipped to operate twenty- 
four hours each day, if necessary. The 1913 run totaled some 2650 
tons, but under normal conditions this could be increased, as the 
acreage of alfalfa hay in this district is increasing in a rapid ratio, 
and nearly 10,000 acres now in will bring the tonnage of available 
hay for grinding purposes to a figure like 50,000 to 80,000 tons. The 
company plans to double the capacity of the present mill, making a 
possibility of 120 tons per day maximum. With a grinding season as 
long as California's remarkably long summer and fall, the plant 
could be operated some 125 days during the months of May, June, 
July, August and September and could produce some 12,500 tons of 
alfalfa meal. 




PLENTY OF WATER FOR IRRIGATION, NATURE'S INSURANCE POLICY FOR THE FARMER 



The future of alfalfa milling in California is destined to be bright, 
as the opening of the Panama Canal will make California meal within 
an easy and cheap freightage of the Eastern seacoast, and there it 
is constantly coming into greater demand. Alfalfa meal supplies the 
protein in stock feeds which cannot be obtained locally in the East 
in paying quantity on account of the shorter growing climate there. 

The alfalfa production will also be largely increased over the 
present crop in this territory when the Yolo Water & Power Company 
has succeeded in bringing its overland irrigation ditch into Solano 
County, with a supply of water for 50,000 acres. This project is 
advancing rapidly and will be able to make deliveries within 
eighteen months at most. 

The Dixon ridge land, so called because it is above average eleva- 
tion and has good drainage and sub-drainage, yields large crops of 
almonds and is peculiarly adapted to a fine quality of alfalfa, clean, 
fine texture and of good color. It is the result also of good, strong soil 
and intelligent husbandry. Dixon alfalfa groAvers are exceptionally 
adept and painstaking in seeding, cultivating, irrigating and curing. 

The city of Dixon has fine homes and excellent business buildings, 
which bespeak the general prosperity of the community. The local 
population is 1500, while adjoining farms have an additional 3000. 
The fact that the two local banks have deposits aggregating $1,100,- 
000 is indicative that alfalfa and dairying are dividend-payers. 






49 



i 





*3-J.i[*' ^#1 



IN TIIK L.WU 111'' Mll.K AND HOXEY. 



AX APIARV (IX Tin; | lici; (iF A DAIRY FARM 



The city has a good water system and a sewer system recently 
was installed at a cost of $30,000, guaranteeing good sanitary 
conditions. A twenty-three-acre park is one of the prized possessions 
of the city. 

The schools of the town are good. The handsome Mission grammai 
school occupies an entire block, and the high school has a staff of 
five teachers. A bond election calling for an additional $60,000 for 
school purposes has just carried. There is a $10,000 Carnegie library 
l)uilding. 

There are five churches — the Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian, 
Lutheran and Roman Catholic. 

A large tonnage of grain is shipped from Dixon annually, the 
average for a period of six years being approximately 6500 tons, 
A large number of cattle, hogs and sheep go out in carload lots. 

CORDELIA 

Cordelia has a population of 300 and is situated at the southern 
end of Green Valley on the branch line of the Southern Pacific. 
Green Valley is noted for the excellence of its fruit product, its 
cherries, pears, prunes, peaches and grapes. There are two wine 
cellars here, each having a capacity of 500,000 gallons. Here is a large 
I rock-crushing plant. 

The Pacific Gas & Electric Company has just built one of its S 






50 




SPIXELESS CACTUS, THE NEW FORAGE PLANT, ONE YEAR AFTER PLANTING 

largest distributing plants near Cordelia, spending $495,000 in erecting 
the steel and concrete building, 280 feet long, 80 feet wide, and 40 
feet high. The high-tension wires from the company's great power 
plant at Lake Spaulding, in Placer County, and the Drum power- 
house, carry 100,000 horse-power to this station, whence it is dis- 
tributed to different lines and cities. 

At the head of Green Valley is Green Valley Falls, the source 
of the water supply for Vallejo, Mare Island and Cordelia. There 
are two lakes having a storage capacity of more than 1,000,000,000 
gallons of water. 

In 1912 forty-three cars of cherries were shipped from Cordelia 
to the Eastern market, where they brought fancy prices. The 1913 
shipment was thirty-nine cars. A large quantity was also shipped 
to local markets, the season lasting from April 20 to June 1. 

Considerable milk is shipped from Cordelia, the adjacent country 
being rich in natural grasses for grazing dairy cattle. 

RIO VISTA 

Rio Vista is the metropolis of the Netherlands of America, situ- 
ated in the Montezuma hills on the western shores of the Sacramento 
River. From this picturesque city one looks upon the famed delta 
land through which runs a network of sloughs. The water-front is 
dotted with vessels of every description. Vessels that navigate the 






51 



i 




52 



^ high seas come here to discharge their cargoes, and the river boats 
carry produce to and fro. Rio Vista is mid-way between Sacramento 
and San Francisco, being distant fifty miles from both. It is the 
clearing-house for some of the richest agricultural territory in the 
.West. 

The town has a population of 1000, and this is increasing rapidly, 
for there is hardly a community possessing the many natural advan- 
tages of this pretty little place. This is evidenced by the character 
and the permanency of the improvements made recently, the aggre- 
gate cost of which was $200,000, all expended during 1913. A new 
hotel, valued at $50,000, has just been completed and opened to the 
public. There is another first-class hotel here. Notwithstanding the 
unusual building activities there is not a single vacant store or 
residence in the community. The town has first-class mercantile 
establishments and a bank. 

One of the principal industries of Rio Vista is a cannery having 
a capacity of 1400 cases per day. In the season of 1913 it packed 
60,000 cases of asparagus grown on adjacent islands. Local labor is 
employed, so far as possible. 

A large lumber yard and planing mill receive cargoes of lumber 
direct from ocean-going vessels. 

A short time ago a boat-building establishment was located at 
Rio Vista, and a brick and tile pottery at Toland's Landing gives 
promise of larger development in the immediate future. Though 
fishing and agriculture have been important factors in the develop- 
ment of Rio Vista, the community is now looking forward to an era 
of manufacture, for her magnificent water-front and other natural 
advantages presage great progress at a no distant day. 

The land holdings in the Montezuma hills are in large tracts, the 
acreage for the most part being devoted to grain, of which 100,000 
tons are shipped from this place annually. There has never been a 
total crop failure in the Montezuma hills since this land was first 
cultivated. Only in years of droughts — 1877 and 1898 — have crops 
been other than bountiful. As an example, in one year. Supervisor 
J. B. Hoyt took 1200 tons of wheat and 100 tons of hay from 1000 
acres of this unirrigated hill land, and others have done even better. 

Olives, walnuts and prunes are well adapted to the hills, and 
grapes may be grown commercially on any of this land. 

A portion of the Montezuma hills is utilized solely for pasturage, 
which accounts in a large measure for the excellence of the stock 
of horses in this vicinity. It is asserted that they are not surpassed 
by any in the United States. Being of draughting stock — Shire, Bel- 
gian and Percheron — many of the animals weigh over the ton mark. 
Many of the thoroughbred stallions weigh as high as 2250 P9unds, 
and there are some beautiful mares, which have carried off first 
prizes at the California State Fair. 

On these pasture lands there are cattle and sheep valued at fully 
$1,000,000. 

Of the islands the largest and most important wholly within 
Solano County is Ryer. It is one of the richest pieces of land in 
California and lies within Rio Vista township. It consists of 12,000 



fl 



63 



t 




^ ».s»^ i^ 'WSft^,,! ■i^t^'^ 










'Jk.^-^!. 46 



-^\,^.^^. 




»5 A 2000 ACRE BEAN FIELD AND THRESHER WITH A CAPACITY OF 4OO SACKS EACH HOUR ON K 

iH RYERS ISLAND M 



54 




^is^"- 




WORKERS FOR TROSPKRITY IX THE MOXTEZUMA HILLS GRAIN COTXTRY 

acres of delta land and is protected from the Sacramento River by 
strong levees. This land is producing from forty to sixty sacks of 
barley to the acre, from thirty to forty-five sacks of beans to the 
acre, and potatoes average 230 sacks to the acre on a tract of 200 
acres. Asparagus, pears, peaches and plums all do well there. The 
growth of hemp and flax has been carried on for years, the hemp 
growing to a height of sixteen feet and yielding 1500 pounds of 
fiber to the acre. This product is sent to Oakland to be made into 
I)aling rope which is thirty to forty-five per cent stronger than 
ordinary rope. 

The island has cross levees and good roads. The land is always 
kept moist from the river, and a failure of crops is unknown. Sheep 
to the number of 16,000 are fattened on the island each year, being 
turned into the stubble and later into the grain fields ; this means is 
taken to prevent too rank growth of grain. The products of Ryer 
Island are shipped directly over the levees onto the boats, saving the 
expense of hauling. 

Wood Island, opposite the town of Rio Vista, has a shipyard 
where river steamers are built and repaired, many men being em- 
ployed there constantly. 

Rio Vista has been awaiting a railroad for years, and one is 
headed that way now. Rio Vista auto stages now make connection 
with the Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Railroad. The ultimate aim is 
a railroad from Red Bluff to Rio Vista, where passengers and freight 



56 




"the fat of the land," PASrUEED ON StTCCCTLENT ALFALFA, FINISHED ON GRAIN 

will be transferred to palatial steamers for all points on the inland 
waters of California. 

The river service at present is excellent. The Southern Pacific, 
the California Transportation Company and the Lauritzen Transpor- 
tation Company operate magnificent vessels between Rio Vista, Sacra- 
mento, San Francisco and inter-island cities and towns. Rio Vista 
is the main stop for all vessels operating on the Sacramento River. 

Rio Vista has an excellent grammar school and a high school 
with a fine staff of teachers. A new schoolhouse with adequate con- 
veniences for polytechnic training in addition to the regular high 
school course, ample grounds for athletic sports and, in general, 
greater efficiency are the immediate aims. 

In addition to the public school system there is an academy for 
young ladies and a school for boys, both conducted by Roman 
Catholic Sisters. These establishments have State-wide reputations. 

The climate of this section is most salubrious and healthful. The 
temperature is universally moderate and mild. Strong winds prevail 
during the summer months, which serve to keep the atmosphere cool 
and refreshing. Flowers grow profusely and all kinds of garden 
fruits and vegetables abound. Prosperity, in a word, is the proper 
description of this metropolis of the Netherlands. 

ELMIRA 

Twelve miles northeast of the county-seat, on the Southern Pacific 
railroad, a junction point to Vacaville is Elmira. 



I 



57 






I 




58 



^ 



Jj Elmira is located in the center of a great grain country, and large 
shipments of hogs, cattle, sheep, wool and poultry are also shipped 
from here annually. 

There is a large acreage east of Elmira adapted to rice, and with 
proper development this section will produce large crops. 

CEMENT 

At Cement, distant a few miles north of Fairfield, the Pacific 
Portland Cement Company, Consolidated, operates one of the largest 
establishments in the West. Starting in 1902 with a production of 
600 barrels a day, the company has added to its equipment until it 
has produced in one working month 186,000 barrels of cement, or 
a little more than 6000 barrels a day. The company has a capitali- 
zation of $6,000,000, and is one of the few cement companies on the 
Pacific Coast that has been able to pay regular dividends. The com- 
pany employs 500 men regularly, and to afford them accommodations 
owns the village in which they live. There is a modern hotel with all 
conveniences to be obtained in a city. The company owns a store 
and has a hospital on the grounds, with a physician and steward 
in attendance at all times. There is a ranch of several hundred acres, 
upon which cattle are kept grazing. Many of the animals are 
slaughtered in the company's own slaughter-house. A model dairy 
barn, made of concrete, houses about sixty head of cows. A modern 
chicken ranch furnishes eggs and poultry for the hotel and village. 
There are over fifty cottages for the married employes. There is a 
good school with two teachers, one provided by the county and the 
other by the company. There is a hall in which entertainments are 
given from time to time. 

Pacific Portland Cement Company, Consolidated, also operates an 
auxiliary quarry at Auburn, Placer County, where about 200 men 
are employed regularly. 

COLLINSVILLE 

Collinsville, on the Sacramento River, fourteen miles south of Rio 
Vista, serves as a shipping point for a farming country immediately 
contiguous. 

BIRD'S LANDING 

Bird's Landing, a short distance inland from Collinsville, is sur- 
rounded by rich farms and serves as the trading place of many 
farmers. 

MAINE PRAIRIE 

Maine Prairie is in the northeastern section of the county. Here 
there is a considerable acreage in alfalfa and many sheep and some 
cattle are sent from this place. 

MOLENA 

Molena is ideally located about midway between San Francisco 
.c and Sacramento on the Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Railroad. To the i*, 
\ east is one of the richest grain districts in California and to the west ^ 
IS are the fertile delta lands. Water transportation is also available. of 



I 



59 



% OPPORTUNITIES IN SOLANO 

There are innumerable opportunities in Solano County for farmers 
and orchardists. Good lands are to be had at reasonable prices. Of 
course, highly improved orchards and farms command fancy figures. 
The field for dairymen is exceptionally good. Alfalfa growers will 
find almost perfect conditions for this forage crop, irrigation and 
soil combining to make the yield phenomenally large and unusually 
rich in food values. Cattle, sheep and hogs are produced at a good 
margin of profit on the high-grade land of the county, because 
the soil produces a much greater tonnage and a larger amount of 
protein, or fats, than elsewhere. Solano County, centrally located 
between the great cities of northern California — Sacramento and San 
Francisco — will become one of the greatest fat producing counties of 
the State, if not on the Pacific Coast, and this will be made possible, 
in the opinion of cattlemen, by stall-feeding alfalfa hay and rolled 
barley as a balanced ration. 

All farmers find hog raising profitable. This is especially so 
among dairymen, the hogs being fed skimmed milk and alfalfa. 

Conditions for poultry are perfect, as is evidenced by the record 
of one man in Dixon. His place covers less than a city block in 
extent, and yet his returns for the year were $1,500. 

MANUFACTURING SITES 

There are many excellent sites ofi'ered manufacturers throughout 
Solano County. Beginning at Vallejo, manufacturers will find a 
water-front owned by the municipality and highly desirable sites, on 
railroads and adjacent to deep-water docks, may be leased from the 
city. 

Benicia, on the main line of the Southern Pacific, also controls a 
fine water-frontage, afl'ording sites for docks for river and ocean 
vessels. 

Kio Vista, on the Sacramento River, may be reached at all times 
by ocean-going vessels. It has a large water-frontage. 

Suisun, on the main line of the Southern Pacific, also enjoys 
water transportation, recent dredging operations increasing the har- 
bor facilities. Ocean-going steamers of considerable tonnage navigate 
to Suisun. 

Each of these cities and towns has progressive civic organizations 
which are anxious to communicate with manufacturers seeking desir- 
able locations on the Pacific Coast. 

THE PRIZE-WINNING COUNTY 

Since winning the handsome $5,000 gold cup at the Mid-Winter 
Fair at San Francisco in 1894 for the best display of county products, 
Solano County has not lagged behind its competitors. At the California 
State Fair held at Sacramento in 1913 Solano County exhibitors won 
twenty-two prizes, a majority of them first prizes. 

Under the heading "Special Prizes for County Exhibits of Agricul- 
tural, Horticultural, Viticultural, IManufactured and Other Industrial 
Products" in Class A, Solano County won first prize, $600. 



I 



61 




THE PRACTICAL POULTRY RAISER FINDS CONDITIONS IDEA I 



. I )R SUCCESS 



COUNTY LIBRARY 

Solano County maintains a very active and successful Free Library, 
with branches established in different parts of the county. The 
efficiency of the library is very much increased, working as it does in 
conjunction with the State Library. 

STATE EXPERIMENTAL FARM 

The University of California Experimental Farm is located at Davis. 
The proximity of this institution offers the new settler an opportunity 
to get first-hand information from men experienced in every phase of 
farm production. Advice is fully and freely given. 

Solano County is also prepared to assist the new settler in many 
ways, in giving gratuitous advice as to proper farming methods, the 
right fruit to plant in a given locality, etc. The county employs a "farm 
adviser" to co-operate with and help all who desire his services. 

AN INVITATION TO YOU. 

Solano County, the prize winner of California, invites the world to 
come and witness the wonders worked here in field and in orchard. 

From one end of the county to the other the visitor will see 
evidence that has converted newcomers into enthusiasts and old resi- 
dents into firm loyalists. 

]\Iany large landholdings are being cut up into smaller tracts, not 
that the owners had cause to regret their ownership, but Solano 
County has come to realize that its lands are exceptionally valuable 
because unusually rich, and by intensive cultivation may yield three 
times the value of crops obtained under the older and less scientific 
method of farming. 

Solano County is anxious to have homeseekers come, if only for 
a visit. The Solano County Chaml)er of Commerce will answer gladly 
any inquiry and will forward literature to persons interested. 

Address all communications 



SECRETARY 

SOLANO COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

FAIRFIELD, CALIFORNIA 



4 



62 



n 



I 




U 



03 



Southern Pacific 

CALIFORHIA 
LINES 







LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



017 168 779 2 




SOLANO COUNTY. AS INDICATED BY THE REPRODUCTION OF A FEW OF HER 
WINNINGS HEREWITH, CONSISTENTLY CLAIMS SUPERIORITY OF PRODUCTS 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



017 168 779 2 «