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Full text of "Soldiers all; portraits and sketches of the men of the A. E. F."

JDLDIERf ALL 

PORTRAITS AND vTKETCHEvf O] 
THE MEN OF THE A-E F- 





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\. 




CAase 




DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 
MEDAL 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 
CROSS 







MEDAL OF 
HONOR 




DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 
MEDAL 



DISTINGUISHED SERVICE 
CROSS 



JDLDIERT ALL 

PORTRAITS AND JTCETCHEvT OF 
THE MEN OF THE A E F 



by 




Cfiase 




NEW ^S4T YORK 

GEORGE H DORAN COMB^NY 



- 



COPYRIGHT, 1920 
BY JOSEPH CUMMINGS CHASE 



PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



DEDICATED TO 

THE MEN WHO WERE AWARDED 

THE DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS 

BUT WHO DID NOT LIVE TO KNOW IT 



WAH PLANS DIVISION 

WAR DEPARTMENT 
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF OF STAFF 

WASHINGTON 



The portraits of American soldiers, - ranging from general to 
private, - painted by Joseph Cumndngs Chase, constitute a valuable 
and unique addition to the Official pictorial record of the war. 
Mr Chase was authorized by the War Department to go overseas with 
the purpose of carrying out this commission, and the unusual facil- 
ities placed at his disposal by the A. E. F. enabled him to obtain 
likenesses of our more distinguished soldiers, and to furnish copico 
for the permanent files of the General Staff. More than any American 
artist has he succeeded in preserving the likenesses of the foremost 
officers and men of the A* & F, a task that was made possible by 
the personal interest of General Pershing. 




C. W. WEEKS 

Colonel, General Staff. 
Chief, Historical Branch. 



CONTENTS 

SOLDIERS ALL A FOREWORD .... 
THE ARMY CORPS AND DIVISION ASSIGNMENTS 
THE THIRTEEN MAJOR OPERATIONS . 
AMERICAN MILITARY DECORATIONS . 
PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 



ADAMS, HARRY J 

ALEXANDER, ROBERT . . . 

ALLEN, HENRY T 

ANDREWS, AVERY D. . . . 
ATKINSON, RALPH . . . . 
ATTERBURY, WILLIAM W. 
BAILEY, CHARLES J. . . . 

BAKER, BURTON M 

BARNWELL, NATHANIEL B. . 
BASKERVILLE, CHARLES, JR. . 

BELL, GEORGE, JR 

BENSON, PHILIP 

BETHEL, WALTER A. . . . 
BINKLEY, DAVID .... 

BLISS, TASKER H 

BOYD, CARL 

BRADLEY, PAUL W 

BROCKI, MIECZYSLAW . . . 
BROWN, PRESTON . . . . 

BROWN, ROSCOE D 

BULLARD, ROBERT I 

BUNCH, HENRY E 

BURR, GEORGE E 

CAMERON, CHARLES . . . 
CAMPBELL, DOUGLAS . . . 

CARNEY, FRED 

CONGER, ARTHUR L. . . . 

CONNER, FOX 

CRAIG, MALIN 

CRONKHITE, ADELBERT . . 
DASCH, CARL W 



Sergeant 

Major General 

Major General 

Brigadier General 

Sergeant 

Brigadier General 

Major General 

Private 

Lieutenant Colonel 

First Lieutenant . 

Major General 

First Lieutenant . 

Brigadier General 

Sergeant 

General 

Colonel 

Corporal 

Corporal 

Brigadier General 

Major .... 

Lieutenant General 

Major . . . . . 

Sergeant 

Private 

Captain 

Private 

Colonel 

Brigadier General 

Brigadier General 

Major General 

Private 



PAGE 

. 15 
. 35 
. 38 
. 39 



. 91 

. 163 

. 167 

. 431 

. 207 

. 367 

. 263 

. 381 

. 479 

. 235 

. 171 

. 213 

. 259 

. 159 

. 77 

. 33 

. 271 

. 189 

. 55 

. 479 

. 144 

. 441 

. 112 

. 95 

. 192 

. 317 

. 477 

. 239 

. 469 

. 320 

. 419 



SOLDIERS ALL 



PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 



DAVIS, ROBERT C. . . . 

DAWSON, CLARENCE W. . 

DEVEREAUX, HAROLD J. . 

DICKMAN, JOSEPH T. . . 

DOUGHERTY, H. C. . . . 

DUGAN, THOMAS B. . . 

DUNCAN, GEORGE B. . . 

EDWARDS, CLARENCE R. . 

EGGERS, ALAN LOUIS . . 

ELLIS, MICHAEL B. . . . 

ELTINGE, LE ROY . . . 

ELY, HANSON E 

FALLAW, THOMAS H. . . 

FERGUSON, DOUGALD . . 

FISKE, HAROLD B. . . . 

FLAGLER, CLEMENT A. F. . 

FOULOIS, BENJAMIN D. . 

FRITZ, ALBERT W. . . . 

GAULTNEY, WALTER E. . 

GIBBS, GEORGE S. . . . 

GORDON, WALTER H. . . 

HAAN, WILLIAM G. . . . 

HALE, HARRY C 

HALPHEN, DEWEY . . . 

HARBORD, JAMES G. . . 

HARTMAN, WILLIAM A. . 

HARTS, WILLIAM W. . . 

HAY, WILLIAM H. . . . 

HERREN, WILLIAM . . . 

HERSEY, MARK L. . . . 

HINDS, ERNEST . . . . 

HINES, JOHN L 

HOOVER, CHARLES S. . . 

HOWE, MAURICE N. . . 

HOWZE, ROBERT L. . . . 

HUNT, IRVIN L 

KING, EDWARD L. . . . 

KORTH, HERMAN . . . 

KREGER, EDWARD A. . . 

KUHN, JOSEPH E. . . . 



PAGE 

Brigadier General . . 307 
Mess Sergeant . . . 363 

Private 195 

Major General ... 99 
Color Sergeant . . .179 
Brigadier General . .175 
Major General . . .115 
Major General . . . 339 

Sergeant 135 

Sergeant 51 

Brigadier General . . 407 
Major General . . .231 

Captain 251 

Sergeant 315 

Brigadier General . .461 
Major General . . . 355 
Brigadier General . . 295 

Private 323 

Corporal 352 

Brigadier General . . 473 
Major General . . .291 
Major General ... 69 
Major General . . .343 

Private 399 

Major General . . . 224 

Sergeant 303 

Brigadier General . .221 
Major General . . . 243 

Sergeant 427 

Major General . . . 375 
Major General . . . 457 
Major General . . .127 

Sergeant 347 

Captain 141 

Major General . . .103 

Colonel 479 

Brigadier General . . 473 

Sergeant 256 

Brigadier General . .331 
Major General ... 83 



SOLDIERS ALL 



XI 



PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: 



LANGFITT, WILLIAM C. . 
LANGHAM, GEORGE W. . 
LASSITER, WILLIAM . . 
LATHAM, JOHN CRIDLAND 
LEJEUNE, JOHN A. ... 
LEPLEY, JAMES B. . . . 
LEWIS, STACY A. ... 
LIGGETT, HUNTER . . . 

LINARD, 

McANDREW, JAMES W. . . 
McCAW, WALTER D. . . . 
McGLACHLIN, EDWARD F. 

McKAIG, F. H 

McRAE, JAMES H. . . . 
MAcARTHUR, DOUGLAS 
MANNING, SIDNEY E. . . 
MARTIN, CHARLES H. . . 
MAYHEW, CARL C. . . . 
MEISSNER, JAMES A. . . 
MENOHER, CHARLES T. . 

MOORE, E. J 

MORTON, CHARLES G. . . 
MOSELEY, GEORGE V. H. . 
MUIR, CHARLES H. . . . 
NOLAN, DENNIS E. . . . 
NUGENT, JOHN F. . . . 
O'BRIEN, JOHN R. . . . 
O'RYAN, JOHN F. . . . 
PARRISH, GRADY . . . 
PECK, ROBERT G. . . . 
PERSHING, JOHN J. 

(Chaumont, 1918} 
PERSHING, JOHN J. 

(Paris, 1919} .... 
PITMAN, BUDIE .... 
PURYEAR, GEORGE W. . . 

READ, ALVAN C 

RICE, CHARLES H. . . . 
ROCKENBACH, SAMUEL D. 
RUCKER, KYLE 



PAGE 

. 327 

. 349 

. 435 

. 135 

. 311 

. 151 

. 285 

. 80 

. 28 

. 403 

. 131 

. 123 

. 253 

. 359 

. 45 

. 227 

. 87 

. 399 

. 155 

. 267 

Master Signal Electrician 48 
Major General . . .391 
Brigadier General . .387 

Major General . . . 371 
Brigadier General . .185 

Sergeant 65 

Corporal 288 

Major General . . . 247 

Sergeant 283 

Lieutenant Colonel . . 479 

General 22 



General . . Frontispiece 

Private 73 

First Lieutenant . . .411 

Colonel 479 

Major 479 

Brigadier General . .299 
Lieutenant Colonel . 479 



Major General 

Private 

Major General 

Sergeant 

Major General 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 

Lieutenant General 

Colonel 

Major General 

Brigadier General 

Major General 

Corporal 

Major General 

Brigadier General 

Corporal 

Major General 

First Lieutenant . 

Major .... 

Major General 



xii SOLDIERS ALL 

PORTRAITS AND BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES: PAGE 

RUSSEL, EDGAR Brigadier General . . 275 

SHERMAN, WHITNEY D. . . Corporal 465 

SMITH, HARRY A Brigadier General . . 453 

SMITH, RICHARD T. . . . Major 441 

SMITH, WILLIAM R. . . . Major General ... 449 

SNOW, WILLIAM A Major 441 

STEIDL, AUGUST . . . . Sergeant 279 

STEIN, FRED C Corporal 147 

STEWART, JOHN W Lieutenant Colonel . . 441 

STOWERS, JAMES W. . . . Sergeant 335 

STURGIS, SAMUEL D. . . . Major General . . . 423 

SUMMERALL, CHARLES P. . . Major General ... 217 

SYMINGTON, JAMES M. . . First Lieutenant ... 379 

WAGSTAFF, C. M Brigadier General . . 29 

WALKER, MERRIWEATHER L. Brigadier General . . 395 

WALSH, PATRICK .... Sergeant 119 

WATSON, GEORGE L. . . . Lieutenant Colonel . . 445 

WEIGEL, WILLIAM .... Major General ... 384 

WILLIAMS, F. M Major 61 

WINES, PEARL J Sergeant 211 

WINN, FRANK L Major General ... 415 

WITTENMYER, EDMUND . . Major General ... 203 

WRIGHT, WILLIAM M. . . . Major General ... 199 

YORK, ALVIN C Sergeant 109 



SOLDIERS ALL 



SOLDIERS ALL 

There are many extraordinary individuals among 
the commanders of the A. E. F. whose names are 
destined to go down in history. My close and in- 
formal association with these men was, though brief, 
illuminating and, to me, captivating a romantic 
opportunity for a painter. Close scrutiny of their 
features at so critical a time impressed upon me a 
very definite mental record. 

Our general officers vary in age from about fifty 
years to the early sixties and their most obvious traits 
are poise, alertness, self-control, fearlessness, and a 
high mentality, even scholarliness. Judging from 
their mellowness of mind, which very much impressed 
me, I felt that West Point has given something to 
these men that shows to great advantage by the time 
they reach middle life. Taking into consideration the 
fact that these commanders are obliged at intervals 
to pass a severe physical examination which would 
debar the average citizen from any strenuous service, 
one concludes that up-standing, clear-eyed, clear- 
brained American manhood is at its best among them. 
Altogether, their type is that of the soldier-student 
this in contra-distinction to the tvpe predominating 
among the officers of the German Army. It would 

15 



16 SOLDIERS ALL 

seem that the Germans think a good command- 
ing officer must have a meaty face, an arrogant man- 
ner, and a heavy scowl. 

The American commanders spoke with deep feel- 
ing and appreciation of the man-in-the-ranks, re- 
peating again and again that he was the one who 
" put it over " and that to him belonged the glory. 
One general, speaking of the man-in-the-ranks as the 
one to whom credit was due, and referring with a 
smile to the fact that the public has fully accepted 
this view, remarked: " In some ways, in this war it 
has been hell to be a general." 

On the other hand, the man-in-the-ranks was just 
as ready to express his confidence in his commanding 
officer. For one thing, he appreciated the fact that 
necessities, and even comforts, had been provided 
to an extraordinary degree. " Kicks " on the part 
of the man-in-the-ranks were infrequent and mild. 
The American boy, to be sure, will kick if his shoe 
laces are not a pair, or if the rain falls on too many 
successive days, or if his hair grows too fast, but never 
does he need to be driven to deeds of heroism. When 
he gets a command to go " over the top," he goes 
over, and those who have watched him have felt a 
thrill never to be forgotten. He not only went 
" over the top," but he went over in the face of 
machine-gun fire and gas, singing, " Oh Boy, Oh 
Joy, Where do we go from here?" 

The Liberty Loan Committee for the Fifth Loan 
asked me to paint " over there " portraits of four 
boys who had done deeds of extraordinary heroism. 



SOLDIERS ALL 17 

I painted the four, and found the task so absorbing 
that I could not stop with that small number, but 
painted fifty. These soldiers were picked out by 
their commanders as the ones in their various com- 
mands who at that time had performed the most 
extraordinary deeds of valour. Absolute disregard 
of personal danger, quick-witted adroitness in turn- 
ing unexpected conditions to good account, a wish not 
only to equal, but to surpass the deeds of his com- 
rades, an abiding belief that he was fighting for an 
ideal all these influences made of the American sol- 
dier such a soldier as has never before been seen on 
the field of battle. The stories of the escapades of 
the young warriors whose portraits are here included 
with those of their general officers might well be 
classed among our stories for the young, with those 
of " Horatius at the Bridge," and David of ancient 
days. Again and again I was told by officers of our 
Allies, ' The American Army is the best disci- 
plined army in Europe." We had felt sure that our 
boys would make fighters as good as the best, but as 
to their being entirely amenable to discipline some 
were doubtful, and the oft-repeated assurance just 
quoted gives us particular satisfaction. This attitude 
toward discipline was entirely a free-will offer- 
ing on the part of each fighting man. He was un- 
willing that any soldier should be better than he in 
any respect whatsoever, and he wished to be a per- 
fect cog in a perfectly well-oiled machine. It is ab- 
solutely true that the American soldier fought for an 
ideal and knew it not that he was always sure just 



18 SOLDIERS ALL 

what that ideal might be, but his confidence that there 
was an ideal and that he was fighting for it gave him 
almost religious ardour in his efforts to surpass his 
fellows. There was also very much of the " play " 
element in the make-up of our boys. Their many 
years of competitive sports worked greatly to their 
advantage. Their enormous discomforts and suffer- 
ing were made more endurable by the " josh " which 
pervaded their everyday life, on the field and off. 
If one boy brought in as a prisoner a German lieu- 
tenant, his " buddy " instantly made up his mind to 
capture an enemy officer higher in rank than a lieu- 
tenant. If one boy brought in two prisoners, every 
man in his squad thereupon resolved to bring in more 
than two prisoners. This spirit frequently led the 
fellows into great danger, and even death, but re- 
sulted in an amazing number of individual deeds of 
heroism. 

The discipline of the American Army must have 
been in a great measure due to the precise and exact- 
ing attitude of our Commander-in-Chief. I was 
particularly fortunate in being given the opportunity 
to paint two pictures of General Pershing, for had I 
rested content with the portrait obtained at Chau- 
mont I should always have had a one-sided impres- 
sion of the man. The Pershing whom I met in this 
old French town, which for more than a year had 
been the headquarters of the American Army, was 
rather an austere figure. The circumstances of the 
meeting perhaps accentuated this effect. Probably 
at one time Chaumont was a beautiful and charming 



SOLDIERS ALL 19 

French village, but at the time of my visit it was 
desolate. The day was rainy, of course. If you wish 
to provoke a groan among the " doughboys " who 
spent any considerable time in this field of action, all 
you have to do is to mention " sunny France." The 
streets were deep with mud, the houses were sadly 
out of repair, and the old barracks which furnished 
headquarters for the American Staff a structure 
forming three sides to a square looked dark, damp, 
bedraggled, and grim. The Armistice had just been 
signed. Though Germany had admitted her defeat, 
there were no signs of excited rejoicing about the 
American Headquarters, and the atmosphere in that 
region was just as busy and as serious as in the days 
preceding November llth. 

The room in which I painted General Pershing 
was, like everything else in the American Head- 
quarters, orderly, plain, and business-like. As I 
entered this room, I saw the General at the opposite 
side, sitting at his flat-topped desk, his back to the 
window; the desk was characteristically in good 
order, and the walls were bare, except for several 
large maps, which showed the position of the Ameri- 
can divisions. The General was hard at work, going 
through a pile of important reports, preparatory to 
leaving town that evening. As I stepped in, he 
looked up alertly and greeted me with a cordiality 
which was dignified and not at all effusive. He had 
a strong grip and a way of shaking hands and get- 
ting through with it promptly. The Pershing w r hom 
I met that afternoon was a very serious man. Every 



20 SOLDIERS ALL 

line of his face, and I have seldom seen a face more 
deeply furrowed, showed the tremendous strain 
through which he had passed. The Argonne offen- 
sive had ended in a glorious triumph for the Ameri- 
can Army, but the man who had directed that 
operation showed, in his deep-set, harassed eyes, and 
in his sharply drawn face, the suffering and the 
anxiety which it had caused him. Do not think 
that Pershing is a soldier of flint-like soul, who 
stolidly would throw his thousands of American 
hoys at German machine-guns; the man whom I 
painted that afternoon was a man who had sounded 
the depths. His face at this sitting was a bit 
screwed up, the lines were accentuated, and he 
looked old and tired; he did not smile once during 
the entire pose, and he talked hardly at all. Indeed, 
after our first greeting, he seemed to lose all con- 
sciousness of my presence, and I think he actually 
forgot what was going on. Personal vanity is 
certainly not Pershing's leading trait. He was very 
busy with his papers and was entirely taken up with 
the business in hand. I have said that Pershing's 
appearance was that of a man who had suffered 
a great nervous strain, but I should not give the 
impression that he did not have himself quite 
under control. He was the picture of complete 
self-possession. His movements were quick, but not 
spasmodic; he is the sort of man who moves his 
papers very rapidly, but who does not rattle them 
nervously; he moves his papers at a precise moment, 
because that is the moment to move them, and not 



SOLDIERS ALL 21 

because he is labouring under suppressed excitement. 
He walks quickly, yet always with premeditation. 
One of his staff officers told me that Pershing has 
himself remarkably in hand and that when the 
opportunity offers, he can always sleep. 

The General was much greyer than I had men- 
tally pictured him. His photographs had given me 
the impression of a man comparatively young, but 
his hair is now very grey, and in parts it is almost 
white. His intimates told me that the whitening 
of his hair is the result of his service in France. 
But it is always scrupulously brushed, for in this, 
as in everything else, General Pershing shows his 
predominant tendency to neatness arid order. The 
Pershing photographs suggest a rather dark mous- 
tache; as a matter of fact, it is light, having a touch 
of the sandy, and some grey. The public knows 
well the firm manner in which the General draws 
down the corners of his mouth, and this has given 
an impression that he seldom smiles. My own im- 
pression, derived from the experience of that sombre 
afternoon, was similarly one of stern, unremitting 
attention to business; yet the fact is that he often 
smiles, and his friends feel that his photographs in 
general convey an idea of severity of expression 
which is overdone. Yet there is no doubt that 
General Pershing can be severe, though his intimates 
say that when it is necessary for him to use the 
knife, it falls upon his friends of long acquaintance, 
as well as upon those officers who have not been so 
close to him. The words which I most constantly 



22 



SOLDIERS ALL 



heard about the General were: "He plays no 
favourites." That afternoon he had the appearance 
of one difficult to approach, and certainly one with 
whom a casual visitor would take no liberties. His 

figure has been de- 
scribed as that of 
the perfect soldier, 
and I agree with 
this description. 
He is a " stickler " 
for regulation in 
dress. He keenly 
scrutinizes any one 
with whom he is 
conversing; you 
feel that he knows 
whether or not you 
need a hair-cut, 
and whether your 
leather has been 

properly attended to that day. Your hand instinc- 
tively follows up the edge of your coat to make 
sure each button is buttoned, and you are hoping 
that your orderly has brushed you properly. 

Some one has said that General Pershing looks 
like a Roman. Certain of our generals look like 
Englishmen General Harts, for example; others 
look like Frenchmen; one or two of them even 
resemble Germans. But I cannot apply the word 
Englishman, Frenchman, German, or even Roman 
to General Pershing. His face and figure suggest 




SOLDIERS ALL 23 

only one nationality; he is simply, distinctively 
United States. In whatever part of the world you 
might find him, and in whatever garb, and in 
whatever company, you would say at once: "That 
man is an American!" There is nothing about his 
personality that suggests the foreigner; he is redo- 
lent of the American soil. He has an unusually full, 
rounded head, and his skull gives the impression 
of filling out his hair tightly. He was seated 
at his desk; his electric light was burning brightly 
a few inches from his face, and just a little day- 
light was coming in from the windows behind. 
He was much occupied discussing many matters 
with a string of staff officers who appeared one at 
a time and stood in front of his desk. As the 
General listened, or talked, his eyes were raised 
to the staff officer standing opposite; his eye- 
brows also, which, by the way, are very pale, 
were raised; and the strong light from the desk 
lamp accentuated the deep, vertical cuts in the 
General's cheeks. The nose is slightly aquiline 
and rather distinguished; the eyes are a light grey- 
blue with a little suggestion of brown eyes which 
sometimes are called hazel. His brow is par- 
ticularly full and round, with furrows that arc 
well defined, and his ears are a bit pointed, 
and differ a trifle in their angle from the head. 
One officer who has had many conferences with 
the General conferences which have not been 
entirely to his liking insists that one ear, which is 
not quite so close to his head as the other, stiffens 



24 SOLDIERS ALL 

and straightens sharply when the General gets 
angry. The cheek-bones are not prominent, the 
jaw is particularly strong, and the lips are sharply 
chiseled and rather thin. The General's neck is 
solid, and, particularly in the profile, is very wide, 
and his head is set on his shoulders with a very 
unusual appearance of power. Indeed, I have 
never seen an arrangement of head, neck, and 
shoulders which has suggested greater strength 
and force. The General's uniforms always fit 
smoothly; he seldom wears many decorations, 
although he has enough entirely to cover his chest. 
Most people do not realize how tall General 
Pershing is; he is so well-built that he appears to 
advantage when grouped with the generals of 
the Allied armies. One of his room-mates at 
West Point told me that Pershing has not changed 
at all, except that he has grown older and greyer; 
his manner and disposition have been the same 
from his student days. Fortunately I was able 
to visualize this Pershing of West Point time, for 
one of the General's aides is his nephew, Lieu- 
tenant Pershing, who bears the most astonishing 
resemblance to his distinguished uncle. 

After I had been painting an hour or so, the 
General had to leave to keep an important en- 
gagement. He came round, looked at the picture, 
and said: 

"I didn't think you could do it in this length 
of time and with this light." 



SOLDIERS ALL 25 

Those were practically the only words that 
passed between the artist and his subject. 

The portrait sketch which I painted in Novem- 
ber shows a pretty sombre General; yet in this re- 
spect, at least, it fairly reflects the Pershing whom 
I met that afternoon. Still that sitting gave me 
Pershing in only one of his moods. I found that 
he had another side, when, in early January, I made 
an appointment to paint him again. The Pershing 
whom I now met at the Ogden Mills house in 
Paris was a very different man from the one whom 
I had painted at Chaumont. The one whom I 
met at Headquarters was serious, dignified, pre- 
occupied, possibly even melancholy; the one 
whom I painted in Paris was altogether easy 
and gay. The change was caused, perhaps, by 
the fact that the weight had lifted from his mind; 
an American Army was now occupying a part of 
Germany; the fighting was actually over; and the 
Allied cause had achieved a splendid and com- 
plete success. I came to Paris with the well- 
known sculptor, " Jo " Davidson, who proposed 
to make a bust of the General while I was paint- 
ing him. Our subject kept his appointment to 
the minute, coming into the room with a rapid, 
military step, greeting Davidson cordially, and 
stepping up to me with an outstretched hand and 
a "Hello, Chase!" 

' This room looks like an atelier in the Latin 
Quarter! " he said, glancing about the beautiful 



26 SOLDIERS ALL 

salon in which Davidson had moved the furni- 
ture and arranged the lighting. 

" Do you know anything about the Latin 
Quarter? " I asked. 

" Oh, yes, I know about the Academy Julien 
and the Beaux Arts," the General replied and to 
this subject he returned afterward. 

Ordinarily a sculptor and a painter would have 
difficulty in working at the same time; the sculp- 
tor prefers to have his subject standing, a painter 
sitting; a sculptor likewise wishes to have him walk 
about continually, while the painter prefers a 
fairly quiet posture. I gave way to Davidson in 
the main, but I demanded a compromise in the 
matter of strolling. The General was greatly 
amused at our argument, and entered completely 
into its spirit. Davidson agreed that he could sit 
occasionally, if I would accept an arrangement 
about the lighting that was not entirely to my 
advantage. Throughout the sitting, the sculptor 
and the painter " joshed " each other about their 
respective arts and the General took part, now 
supporting one side, now another. 

"What good is an art that can show only one 
side of a man's face at a time? That's only half 
an art!" said Davidson. 

"Sculpture scored one that time!" the General 
laughed. 

Davidson meanwhile was dropping his clay all 
over the beautiful floor of the Mills salon. 



SOLDIERS ALL 27 

"But see what a dirty business sculpture is!" 
I retorted. 

"Painting got the best of it, then!" said the 
General, with a perfectly good grin, showing a 
wonderful set of white teeth. 

We soon discovered that General Pershing 
knew a great deal about art and artists. In a 
few minutes both Davidson and I felt as though 
we had met an old friend of our art-student days. 
We asked our sitter how he happened to know so 
much about the Latin Quarter. 

"Oh, I've been there!" he answered. "I used 
to know it well." 

It seems that, in his early days, while visiting 
Paris, Pershing had friends among the art stu- 
dents, with whom he spent much time in their 
favourite haunts. Sitting there on the edge of a 
lounge, the General gave us many reminiscences 
of those old days. He described particularly one 
lively party which he had attended in the Latin 
Quarter a story that might have fitted well into 
the pages of " Trilby." 

" How did you stand the ordeal, General? " 
Davidson asked. 

" I did my best to preserve throughout my 
military composure," he answered with a 
smile. 

I had an impression, indeed, that General Per- 
shing found the three hours we spent with him a 
pleasant relief from his exacting duties; we talked 



28 



SOLDIERS ALL 



of several things, but there was one subject that 
was not mentioned throughout the sitting that 
was the War. As before, he showed no vanity, 
but he did display considerable interest in the 
work we were doing. He had the attitude of a 
man who, if a thing is to be done at all, wants 
it done well. In one of his many trips to 
watch the progress of his portrait, I caught him 
looking, somewhat pensively, at the very grey 
hair. 

" Is it too grey, General? " I asked. 
" Not at all," he answered. " That's the way it 
is; paint me just as I am." 

I was reminded of the story of Cromwell, sitting 
for his portrait. Cromwell had a conspicuous 
excrescence on his nose. 

" Paint me, wart 
and all! " was his 
injunction to the 
artist. 

When the pic- 
ture was finished, 
General Pershing 
expressed his sat- 
isfaction. 

" I think it must 
be the best of your 
series," he said. 
CC I would like 
some photographs 
of it." 




FRENCH KICPRESENTATIVK 
AT Q. H. Q. 



SOLDIERS ALL 



29 



Davidson's admirable bust of the general also 
pleased him greatly. 

We lingered for a few moments, talking art and 
artists, and listening to the comments of Pershing's 
staff on our work. 

When one thinks of the American Army, the two 
men that come to mind after Pershing are Liggett 
and Bullard. Bullard represents the student type, 
and, in fact, looks like a college professor. The 
face of General Bullard has something of the re- 
finement of Joseph H. Choate; it is distinctly the 
countenance of a thinker. He has not much colour, 
but he has plenty of lines of character and his face 
is a particularly interesting one to paint. General 
Bullard's every feature really is individual. His 
nose has a rather curious bend, which is well shown 
in this particular por- 
trait; it is long and aris- 
tocratic. Indeed, Gen- 
eral Bullard looks every 
whit an aristocrat; he has 
the fine hands of the 
aristocrat the thin hand 
that shows each move- 
ment of the fingers. He 
impresses me as a man 
who would be sure of 
every move he makes; he 
has the appearance al- 
most of infallibility. You 
feel at once absolute con- 




BRIl'iSii KKPHESENTATIVE 
AT G. H. Q. 



30 SOLDIERS ALL 

fidence in him; he is precisely the type of man to 
whom Americans would safely entrust their sons. 

American army officers have lived in so many 
parts of the world that they have become cos- 
mopolitan, and it is almost impossible to locate 
them definitely by their speech. But General Bui- 
lard is an Alabaman, and he talks still in soft 
Southern accents. I asked him many questions 
while the portrait was under way; I could not get 
him to talk about himself, but there was one topic 
upon which he became animated that was the 
American soldier. 

" In every army," he said, " there are two kinds 
of soldiers: those who do things because they are 
ordered to, and those who are always looking for 
things to do. It is the latter kind that leavens any 
army. And this kind prevails in the American 
Army to a greater extent than in any ever 
known. 

Liggett and Bullard certainly represent the 
American Army at its best Bullard, the South- 
erner, Liggett, the Northerner; both are men of 
culture, evidently much given to reading and 
study. Liggett was possibly a little less reserved, 
and more chatty and genial, though in both I felt a 
sense of great personal dignity. Liggett has ab- 
solutely no sense of pose. He was keenly interested 
in the operation of painting; he knew many 
artists, and asked many questions about them. The 
one impression you get from contact with Liggett is 
the sincere, human, affectionate quality of the man; 



SOLDIERS ALL 



31 



he is the type of citizen you would like to room 
with at college. 

The subject that General Liggett, like the other 
Major General, talked most about, was the " man- 
in-the-ranks." 

" He's the one who did it," was the way he 
summed up the American " doughboy's " part in the 
War. 

Much could be written about the various distin- 
guished and distinguishing characteristics of our 
general officers, which would increase the pride 
of the reader in these sound and able men. These 
are indicative of the kind of things we might 
enlarge upon: The unceasing vigour and energy of 
Brigadier General Preston Brown, not a product 
of West Point, but a Yale graduate, who after the 
signing of the Armis- 
tice was in charge of 
Advance G. H. Q. at 
Trier, and who han- 
dled the situation there 
in a way original and 
convincing; the natural 
dignity and keen wit 
of Brigadier General 
Dennis E. Nolan, tall, 
lanky, astute, who was 
the head of G2, which 
is a synonym for the 
Intelligence Section 
of the General Staff, 




32 SOLDIERS ALL 

comprising the Secret Service and the Press. It 
was under General Nolan that I had the pleasure 
of operating, and I shall never forget his under- 
standing and interest. The sturdiness of Major 
General Adelbert Cronkhite, who, if he wore a ruff, 
might with perfect propriety step into a Franz 
Hals canvas; the humane vision of Major General 
McAndrew, Chief of Staff, A. E. F., surely one 
of the great personages of the War; the efficiency 
of Brigadier General Avery D. Andrews, Assistant 
Chief of Staff, who had resigned his commission in 
the Army to go into business, but at the beginning 
of the War re-entered the Army with enthusiasm; 
the bulldog tenacity of Major General William 
M. Wright, Commander of the First Corps; the 
Indian-like virtues of Major General Robert L. 
Howze, whose men call him " Sioux," and of Major 
General Flagler, who is also known to his men by 
the same "pet" name; the imperturbability of 
Major General Charles P. Summerall, who is said 
to be, of all our generals, the best judge of the 
merits of his officers. His name will always 
be associated with that colossally important first 
day of November, 1918. 

I would not fail to make mention of the men 
who were of especial assistance to me Brigadier 
General Eltinge, Assistant Chief of Staff, G. H. Q.; 
Major General Harbord, Pershing's First Chief of 
Staff, who later became head of the Service of 
Supply; Col. Carl Boyd, Aide to General Pershing, 
whose effectiveness was always apparent, and who, 



SOLDIERS ALL 33 

alas, died in the service; and Col. A. L. Conger, 
whose keen judgment and kindly attitude meant 
much to me during my strenuous days and nights. 
Also I shall remember with particular pleasure the 
seven members of the Senior Officers' Mess, at Bit- 
burg, and later at Coblenz, who took me in and 
gave me good company and good cheer. 

I should like to mention with especial regard my 
intrepid chauffeur, one McQuillin, of Buffalo, a 
stripling with a heart of oak. His appreciation of art 
was second only to his ingenuity in " carrying on." 

The portraits are life-sized heads painted in oils. 
The average time required for each was two hours, 
the studio being sometimes a fine chateau, some- 
times a dugout, sometimes a shack in the devastated 
area, sometimes a castle on the Moselle or on the 
Rhine. The painting was done at any hour of the 
day or night as circumstance permitted, and by any 
light that was available. Many of the pictures were 
painted by the light of a candle. I especially remem- 
ber Major General Summerall, alert, serene, and 
smartly dressed, as he entertained me while I painted 
him between midnight and two o'clock in the 
morning. 

All in all, I am filled with a sense of obligation 
for the opportunity accorded me in the great 
adventure. 




NEW YORK, OCTOBER, 1919 



ARMY, CORPS AND DIVISION 
ASSIGNMENTS 

TO NOVEMBER 11, 1918 

1st Army, LIGGETT 

2nd Army, BULLARD 
3rd Army, DICKMAN 



1st Corps, 

2nd Corps, 
3rd Corps, 

4th Corps, 
5th Corps, 

6th Corps, 
7th Corps, 



LIGGETT, 
DICKMAN, 

READ, 

WRIGHT, 

BULLARD, 

HINES, 

DICKMAN, 
MUIR, 

WRIGHT, 

CAMERON, 

SUMMERALL, 

BUNDY, 

BALLOU, 

MENOHER, 

WRIGHT, 
BUNDY, 



January 20 October 11. 
October 12. 

June 12. 

June 17 July 11. 
July 14 October 11. 
October 12. 

August 18 October 11. 
October 12. 

July 10 August 18. 
August 21 October 11. 
October 18. 

August 27 September 12. 
October 23 November 9. 
November 10 to 11. 

August 22 September 4. 
September 13 October 24, 



1st Division, SIBERT, 

BULLARD, 

SUMMERALL, 

BULLARD, 

SUMMERALL, 

BAMFORD, 

PARKER, 



October 25 December 12, 

1917. 
December 13, 1917 June 

30, 1918. 
July 1 July 6. 
July 7 July 17, 
July 20 October 11. 
October 12 October 24. 
October 25. 



[34] 



SOLDIERS ALL 35 

ARMY, CORPS AND DIVISION ASSIGNMENTS 



2nd Division, BUNDY, 

HARBORD, 

BUNDY, 

HARBORD, 

LEJEUNE, 

3rd Division, DICKMAN, 

SLADEN, 

BUCK, 
BROWN, 



October 25, 1917 June 30, 

1918. 

July 1 July 5. 
July 6 July 19. 
July 20 August 2. 
August 3. 

March 30, 1917 August 
23, 1918. 

August 24 August 30. 

Division in reserve 

August 31 October 17. 
October 18 



4th Division, CAMERON, 
POORE, 

HINES, 

CAMERON, 

POORE, 

HERSEY, 

5th Division, McMAHON, 
ELY, 

6th Division, ERWIN, 
GORDON, 

7th Division, BARTH, 
WAHL, 



May 25 August 23, 1918. 
August 24 August 30. 

Division in reserve 

August 31 October 11. 
October 12 October 24. 
October 23 October 30. 

Division in reserve 

October 31 

April 9 October 17, 1918. 
October 18 

July 18 July 31, 1918. 

Division not in line 

August 1 

August 17 October 24, 

1918. 
October 25 October 26. 



WITTENMYER, October 27- 



26th Division, EDWARDS, 

BAMFORD, 
HALE, 

27th Division, O'RYAN, 



December 8, 1917 Octo- 
ber 24, 1918. 
October 25 



May 25. 



28th Division, MUIR, 
HAY, 



May 18 October 25, 1918. 
October 26 



36 SOLDIERS ALL 

ARMY, CORPS AND DIVISION ASSIGNMENTS 

29th Division, MORTON, July 6, 1918. 

30th Division, READ, May 24 June 28, 1918. 

Division not in line 

LEWIS, June 25 July 5 . 

Division not in line 

FAISON, July 6 July 20. 

LEWIS, July 21- 

32nd Division, HAAN, February 16, 1918. 

33rd Division, BELL, May 25, 1918. 

35th Division, WRIGHT, May 4 June 21, 1918. 

Division not in line 

McCLURE, June 22 June 28 

Division not in line 

TRAUB, June 29 July 5. 

McCLURE, July 6 July 19. 

TRAUB, July 20 

36th Division, SMITH, August 3, 1918. 

37th Division, FARNSWORTH, July 6, 1918. 

48nd Division, MENOHER, November 1, 1917 No- 

vember 4, 1918. 

RHODES, November 5 

MAcARTHUR, November 10 

77th Division, JOHNSON, April 19 May 25, 1918. 

Division not in line 

DUNCAN, May 26 August 23. 

JOHNSON, August 24 September 6. 

ALEXANDER, September 7 

78th Division, McRAE, May 25, 1918. 

79th Division, KUHN, July 28, 1918. 

80th Division, CRONKHITE, June 22, 1918. 

81st Division, BAILEY, September 7, 1918. 



SOLDIERS ALL 

ARMY, CORPS AND DIVISION ASSIGNMENTS 



37 



82nd Division, BURNHAM, 
DUNCAN, 

88th Division, BEACH, 

WEIGEL, 
89th Division, WINN, 

WRIGHT, 

90th Division, ALLEN, 
91st Division, JOHNSTON, 
92nd Division, BALLOU, 



May 17 October 14, 1918. 
October 15 

October 16 November 4, 

1918. 
November 5 

July 13 September 30, 

1918. 
October 1 

July 6, 1918. 
August 31, 1918. 
July 6, 1918. 



NOTE. The twenty-nine Divisions here represented are known 
as The Combat Divisions. 



THE THIRTEEN MAJOR OPERATIONS 

AS OFFICIALLY ANNOUNCED IN GENERAL ORDERS, 
NUMBER 83, JUNE 30, 1919. 

a. Cambrai. Between 12th of May and 4th of De- 
cember, 1917. 

b. Somme, defensive. Between 21st of March and 
6th of April, 1918. 

c. Lys. Between 9th of April and 27th of April. 
1918. 

d. Aisne. On the Chemin des Dames and northeast 
of Rheims between 27th of May and 5th of June, 
1918. 

e. Montdidier-Noyon. Between 9th of June and 
13th of June, 1918. 

/. Champagne-Marne. Between 15th of July and 
18th of July, 1918. 

g. Aisne-Marne. Between 18th of July and 6th of 
August, 1918. 

h. Somme, offensive. Between 8th of August and 
llth of November, 1918. 

i. Oise- Aisne. Between 18th of August and llth of 
November, 1918. 

j. Ypres-Lys. Between 19th of August and llth 
of November, 1918. 

k. St. Mihiel Between 12th of September and 16th 
of September, 1918. 

I. Meuse-Argonne. Between 26th of September 
and llth of November, 1918. 

m. Vittorio-Veneto. Between 24th of October and 
4th of November, 1918. 

[38] 



AMERICAN MILITARY DECORATIONS 

THE CONGRESSIONAL MEDAL OF HONOR is the high- 
est honor obtainable by an American soldier. Estab- 
lished by Congress, July 12, 1862. 

The award of the Medal of Honor is confined to 
officers, non-commissioned officers and privates of 
the American Army whose action complies with the 
following tests: "(a) who have performed IN AC- 
TION deeds of most distinguished bravery and self- 
sacrifice; (b) above and beyond the call of duty; 
(c) so conspicuous as to clearly distinguish them for 
gallantry and intrepidity above their comrades; (d) 
which involve risk of life or the performance of 
more than ordinary hazardous service; (e) the omis- 
sion of which would not justly subject a person to 
censure for shortcoming or failure in the perform- 
ance of duty." It is the only American honor worn 
as a neck decoration on occasions of ceremony. 

The Distinguished Service Cross and the Distin- 
guished Service Medal were created by an act of 
Congress, July 9, 1918. Both are worn as military 
medals. 

The DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS is awarded to 
those who distinguished themselves by "extraordinary 
heroism in action" (which does not justify the award 
of the Medal of Honor). 

The DISTINGUISHED SERVICE MEDAL is awarded "to 
those who in positions of great responsibility have 
conferred distinguished service upon their country 
through the Military Establishment and in associa- 
tion with it." 



NOTE. Reproductions of these decorations appear on the end- 
sheets of this book. 

[39] 



SOLDIERS ALL 



BRIGADIER GENERAL DOUGLAS M A cARTHUR 

Arrived in France, October 29, 1917, with rank of 

Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General, June 26, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Chief of Staff, 42nd Division ; 

Commanded 84th Infantry Brigade, 42nd Division, 

August 6th; 

Commanded 42nd Division, November 10th ; 
Commanded 84th Infantry Brigade, 42nd Division, 

November 23rd. 

Born: Arkansas, January 26, 1880. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 

"When Company D, 168th Infantry, was 
under severe attack in the salient du Feys, 
France, he voluntarily joined it, upon finding 
that he could do so without interfering with 
his normal duties, and by his coolness and con- 
spicuous courage aided materially in its suc- 
cess. 

An oak-leaf cluster is awarded Gen. Mac- 
Arthur for the following acts of distinguished 
service: As brigade commander Gen. Mac- 
Arthur personally led his men and by the 
skilful maneuvering of his brigade made pos- 
sible the capture of Hills 288, 242, and the 
C6te-de-Chatillon, France, October 14, 15, and 
16, 1918. He displayed indomitable resolution 
and great courage in rallying broken lines and 
in re-forming attacks, thereby making victory 
possible. On a field where courage was the 
rule, his courage was the dominant feature." 
G. O. 27 (February 17, 1919). 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 

[41] 



guished services. He served with credit as 
chief of staff of the 42nd Division in the opera- 
tions at Chalons and at the Chateau-Thierry 
salient. In command of the 84th Infantry 
Brigade he showed himself to be a brilliant 
commander of skill and judgment. Later he 
served with distinction as commanding general 
of the 42d Division." G. O. 59 (May 3, 1919) . 



[43] 









I i 




V. 






* *.< 



E. J. MOORE, Master Signal Electrician, 

Company C, 314th Field Signal Battalion, 
89th Division. 

In charge of wire laying and maintenance detail, 
under violent shell-fire, on November 4 and 5, 1918. 
Moore established and maintained a line of com- 
munication to the advanced message center, Beau- 
clair. He worked incessantly all day and all night, 
climbing trees and poles under extremely heavy shell- 
fire, putting the wire up and mending breaks. On 
November 5 he aided in extending and maintain- 
ing this line to the assaulting battalion of the 355th 
Infantry, between Beauclair and Lauencille. Again, 
on the night of November 10 and the morning of 
November 11, Moore rendered invaluable aid to 
the 356 Infantry in Pouilly, extending a telephone 
line to them and thence to La Pignepp Farm. Al- 
though shell fragments tore through his gas mask 
and the air was full of flying shell-fire, he showed 
utter disregard of personal safety, setting a fine ex- 
ample of courage and devotion to duty. 
So says his citation for the Distinguished Service 
Cross. 



[47] 













llfc 




MICHAEL B. ELLIS, Sergeant, 

Company C, 28th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

Private Ellis showed unusual courage in carrying 
supplies and in attacking "strong points" at Breuil, 
Pleissy, and Berzy-le-Sec, July 19-22, 1918. In the 
attack southwest of Soissons this man Ellis, alone, 
worked in behind the enemy line, capturing a German 
Company Commander and his Lieutenant. At the 
point of his bayonet he ordered these officers to lead 
him to their dugouts, where enemy troops were, and 
drove back to our lines not fewer than fifty prisoners. 
This won for him a citation. 

Sergeant Ellis was also awarded the Medal of Honor 
(in G. O. 74) "For conspicuous gallantry and in- 
trepidity above and beyond the call of duty in action 
with the enemy near Exermont, October 5, 1918. 
During the entire day's engagement he operated far 
in advance of the first wave of his company, volun- 
tarily undertaking most dangerous missions and 
single-handed attacking and reducing machine-gun 
nests. Flanking one emplacement, he killed 2 of the 
enemy with rifle fire and captured 17 others. Later 
he, single-handed, advanced under heavy fire and cap- 
tured 27 prisoners, including 2 officers and 6 machine 
guns, which had been holding up the advance of the 
company. The captured officers indicated the loca- 
tions of 4 other machine-guns, and he in turn cap- 
tured these, together with their crews, at all times 
showing marked heroism and fearlessness." 
Medal of Honor. 



[49] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL PRESTON BROWN 

Arrived in France, August, 1917, with rank of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. 
Promotions: 

Colonel, February 6, 1918; 
Brigadier General, August 16. 
Assignments: 

Chief of Staff, 82nd Division, August 25, 1917; 
Chief of Staff, 2nd Division, April 5, 1918; 
Chief of Staff, 4th Army Corps, September 19, 1918; 
Commanded 3rd Division in the Meuse-Argonne, Oc- 
tober 18, 1918; 

Assistant Chief of Staff, Advance G. H. Q., Germany. 
Born: Kentucky, January 2, 1872. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As Chief of Staff of the 
Second Division he directed the details of the 
battles near Chateau-Thierry, Soissons, and 
at the St. Mihiel salient with great credit. 
Later, in command of the Third Division in 
the Argonne-Meuse offensive, at a most criti- 
cal time, by his splendid judgment and ener- 
getic action, his division was able to carry to 
a successful conclusion the operations at Clairs 
Chenes and at Hill 294." G. O. 12 (January 
17, 1919). 



[53] 



F. M. WILLIAMS, Major, 

Machine Gun Battalion, 

82nd Division. 

After many years' experience as a cowboy, Williams 
became a member of Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show. 
His "stunt" in the show was shooting glass balls and 
riding "bad" horses. Whenever his leg was broken 
he played in the band until the break mended. When 
the United States went to war Williams entered 
training camp and was graduated a lieutenant. He 
went overseas with a machine-gun outfit. 
On October 11, 1918, Williams (then Captain) was 
shot through the neck by a sniper. He tied his hand- 
kerchief around the wounds at the front and back 
of the neck and the wounds were never treated. He 
stayed continuously in the line. On October 15th 
four days later at about 4 A.M., he received orders 
to proceed to Hill 182, which is just north of St. 
Juvin. He sent runners to notify his platoon com- 
manders to move at once. Taking one runner, he 
started toward Hill 182. Having reached the hill 
and found everything quiet, he sent his runner back 
to guide the company in, while he remained on the 
hill reconnoitering for machine-gun positions. In the 
early morning haze he saw a party of five Germans 
with an American prisoner. He at first thought that 
the American had five German prisoners and saun- 
tered leisurely toward the group. At about twenty 
feet the American prisoner shouted for help and one 
of the Boches raised his rifle to his shoulder. Capt. 
Williams pulled his pistol and dropped this German. 
At the same time the second one of the enemy aimed 
his rifle at the American prisoner, who had fallen 
to the ground and was engaged in an attempt to load 
his revolver. The second shot from Williams' pistol 
brought down this second of the enemy. The third 

[57] 



German, whose position was slightly to the rear of 
Williams, with his rifle clubbed Capt. Williams, the 
blow glancing off the side of his head, his left shoul- 
der, and striking his right hand which was holding 
his pistol. The Captain did not let go his pistol, but 
with his left hand grasped the German's rifle, wrest- 
ling for possession of it. At this juncture, the second 
German started to get up from the ground where 
he had fallen and Williams, wrestling for possession 
of the rifle of the third German, again fired with his 
revolver at the second German, this time putting 
him out of business. He then turned his entire at- 
tention to the third German, with whom he was 
grappling, and shot him through the Adam's apple. 
The man went down, leaving his rifle in the Captain's 
left hand. The fourth German had started to return 
to the fight, but turned again and ran. The fifth 
German continued to hold his hands in the air and 
Capt. Williams, dropping to his knee, brought down 
the fleeing man with the German rifle, at a distance 
of some 75 yards. The fifth German was then the 
Captain's prisoner; the other four were dead. Will- 
iams had just begun to dress the wound of his new 
American friend, when a big skirmish line of Boches 
came up over the hill from the north. He still had 
the Boche rifle and with it he killed the leader of this 
skirmish line, at a distance of about 200 yards. One 
of the sorrows of the Captain's life is that his Ger- 
man prisoner jumped into the woods and got away. 
The wounded American was by this time hurrying 
back to his own lines and the Captain ran back to 
the spot where his company was due to arrive and 
met his men with their machine-guns, coming up. He 
rushed them to the top of the hill in time to stop the 
general counter-attack on the town of St. Juvin. 
They held this position without outside assistance 

.[59] 



from six o'clock on the 15th until two A.M. on the 
16th about 20 hours capturing 32 prisoners and 
inflicting heavy losses on the enemy. Later in the 
day his company went over the top seven times in 
succession with the assault battalions, with the result 
that when he came out of the line he had left one 
officer and 25 men of his original company, which 
numbered 6 officers and 183 men. Capt. Williams in- 
cluded in his report this remark: "It sure was a good 
bunch of men." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 
Italian War Cross of Merit. 



JOHN F. NUGENT, Sergeant, 

165th Infantry, 83rd Brigade, 

42nd Division. 

Dispatch Rider (Horse or Motorcycle) 
For keeping liaison work under very heavy bom- 
bardment, as well as performing first aid work and 
bringing food to men in the front lines, he was rec- 
ommended for the Distinguished Service Cross for 
three days' fighting July 30, 31 and August 1, 1918, 
in the Chateau-Thierry district. 



[63] 




, f 7 





/j5 U 

fTf! ' ''/ * 

hf}j^" 

ff'f 




MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM G. HAAN 

Arrived in France, March 4, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Commanded 32nd Division, February 16, 1918; 
Commanded 8th Army Corps, October 23; 
Commanded 32nd Division, November 6; 
Commanded 7th Army Corps, November 18. 

Born: Indiana, October 4, 1863. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. This officer, in command of 
the Thirty-second Division, took a prominent 
part in the Argonne-Meuse offensive and in 
the brilliant and successful attack against the 
Cote Dame Marie, covering several days, 
which deprived the enemy of the key point of 
the position. His clear conception of the tac- 
tical situations involved showed him to be a 
military leader of superior order." G. O. 12 
(January 17, 1919). 



[67] 



BUDIE PITMAN, Private, 

Company M, 18th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

Private Pitman was a dispatch bearer. Gassed and 
suffering severely from shell shock he continued 
carrying messages at the front line through violent 
barrage. He was cited March 16, 1918. His com- 
mander selected him as the representative enlisted 
man of his command because of his initiative, bravery 
and speed. Private Budie Pitman says he wouldn't 
have missed it for a million dollars, but that five mil- 
lion would not induce him to do it again unless we 
have another war. 



[71] 



X... 







\ 



I 



: *1$l 




. 

**- ^ 






GENERAL TASKER H. BLISS 

Chief of the American Section of the Supreme War 
Council. 

Born: Pennsylvania, December 81, 1853. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For his most exceptional services as Assistant 
Chief of Staff, acting Chief of Staff, and Chief 
of Staff of the United States Army, in which 
important positions his administrative ability 
and professional attainments were of great 
value to our armies. As chief of the American 
section of the Supreme War Council he has 
taken an important part in the shaping of the 
policies that have brought victory to our 
cause." G. O. 136 (December 20, 1918). 



[75] 



LIEUTENANT GENERAL HUNTER LIGGETT 

Arrived in France, October 5, 1917, with rank of 
Major General. 

Promoted to Lieutenant General, October 16, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 41st Division ; 

Commanded 1st Army Corps, January 20, 1918; 

Commanded 1st Army, October 12, 1918; 

Later commanded 3rd Army, Army of Occupation. 
Born: Pennsylvania, March 21, 1857. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as commander of the First 
Army of the American Expeditionary Forces. 
He commanded the First Corps and perfected 
its organization under difficult conditions of 
early service in France. Engaged in active 
operations in reduction of the Marne salient 
and of the St. Mihiel salient, and participated 
in the actions in the Forest of Argonne. In 
command of First Army when German re- 
sistance was shattered west of the Meuse." 
G. O. 136 (December 20, 1918). 



[79] 








#VJ 




MAJOR GENERAL JOSEPH E. KUHN 

Arrived in France, July 13, 1918. 

Commanded 79th Division, July 28, 1918. 
Engagements : 

Meuse-Argonne (twice in line on offensive sectors and 

once on defensive sector). 
Born: Kansas, June 14, 1864. 







[81] 



MAJOR GENERAL CHARLES H. MARTIN 

Arrived in France, September 24, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 86th Division; 

Commanded 92nd Division, November 16; 

Commanded 90th Division, December 30, Army of 

Occupation. 
Born: Illinois, October 1, 1863. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As commander of the 90th 
Division during the greater part of its service 
with the Army of Occupation, by his ceaseless 
energy he performed his duties with the ut- 
most efficiency, giving the closest personal 
supervision to the training, discipline and 
equipment of his division. His brilliant pro- 
fessional attainments and steadfast devotion 
to duty were reflected in the high standards 
maintained throughout the organizations un- 
der his command, rendering important services 
to the American Expeditionary Forces." 







^t%('V 

i 

[85] 




\ 



V 



X 



V " ' 










HARRY J. ADAMS, Sergeant, 

Company K, 353rd Infantry, 

89th Division. 

Adams is the American hunter who bagged the larg- 
est number of German game. 

On September 12, 1918, after the town of Bouillon- 
ville had been shelled Sergeant Adams was ordered 
by his Lieutenant to enter the town and bring back 
a prisoner. Rushing into the town at double quick, 
Adams spotted a German soldier and chased him 
into a little stone house. The Boche fastened the 
door in Adams' face. Sergeant Adams had but two 
shots left in his automatic. He fired them both 
through the door and ordered the Boche to surrender. 
The Boche came and after him one Lieutenant 
Colonel, eighteen Staff Officers and three hundred 
and fifty-five soldiers a total of three hundred and 
seventy-five. For this he received the Croix de 
Guerre and later the Distinguished Service Cross. 
It is reported that when Sergeant Adams turned 
over his prisoners to his Battalion Headquarters the 
instincts of a filing clerk caused him to insist upon a 
written receipt for his three hundred and seventy- 
five. 

Sergeant Adams' citation for the Distinguished Serv- 
ice Cross mentioned the number of his prisoners as 
"approximately three hundred" while the specific 
statement as above was given in connection with his 
award of the Croix de Guerre. 



[89] 



CHARLES CAMERON, Private, 

Company B, 3rd Machine Gun Battalion, 
1st Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Soissons, 
July 19, 1918." 

When the Infantry, of which this youngster was a 
part, was held up by a trench occupied by Germans, 
he voluntarily ran around the end of the trench, like 
a football player, to its rear, facing the American 
fire. He fired into the trench, killing at least one of 
the enemy and frightening the Germans into the be- 
lief that they were "surrounded." They surrendered 
in a panic, and were taken prisoners by Private 
Cameron. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[93] 



MAJOR GENERAL JOSEPH T. DICKMAN 

Arrived in France, March 14, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 3rd Division, March 30, 1917; 

Commanded 4th Army Corps, August 18, 1918; 

Commanded 1st Army Corps, October 12, 1918; 

Commanded 3rd Army (Army of Occupation). 
Born: Ohio, October 6, 1857. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as commander of the Third 
Army, American Expeditionary Forces. 
Commanded the Third Division and contrib- 
uted in large measure to success in hurling 
back the final German general attack com- 
mencing July 14, 1918. He participated in 
offensive northward to Vesle River; com- 
manded successively the First Army Corps 
and the Third Army Corps in the Argonne 
Forest operation. In command of Third 
Army of occupation at Coblenz, Germany." 

<G. O. 136 (December 20, 1918). 



MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT L. HOWZE 

Arrived in France, September 28, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 38th Division ; 

Temporarily assigned to 78th Division; 

Commanded 3rd Division, Army of Occupation. 
Engagements : 

Meuse-Argonne. 

Born: Texas, August 22, 1864. 
Distinguished Service Medal. G. O. 89. 




[101] 




(c) 

M~*> K 



i 



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'? 



ALVIN C. YORK, Sergeant, 

Company G, 328th Infantry, 

82nd Division. 

Major General Duncan said, "The exploit of this 
tall, raw-boned, Tennessee mountaineer, with a red 
face and red hair, is the most remarkable I have 
heard of in the whole war." He is a drafted man. 
He "got religion" previous to the war. Although he 
had toted a gun ever since he could carry one, and 
was an excellent squirrel shot, he had then a fixed 
conviction that it was wrong to kill. However, he 
did not resist the draft and in fact he became a very 
excellent corporal. Captain Danforth, of his com- 
pany, took an interest in the boy and as a result of 
the Captain's use of scriptural quotations, York was 
convinced of the righteousness of the war and decided 
to fight. 

On the morning of the 8th of October, 1918, he was 
sent out with a combat group, in charge of a sergeant, 
to put certain enemy machine-guns out of action. 
The group came under the fire of a Hun machine- 
gun nest and the sergeant in command and all the 
members of the party were killed outright or mor- 
tally wounded, except Corporal York and seven men. 
Corporal York assumed command, the party pro- 
ceeded, charged the machine-gun nest, captured it 
and took several prisoners. The little party then 
advanced until they came under the fire of a line of 
thirty-five enemy machine-guns. In a moment York 
was fighting a battle alone against the thirty-five 
machine-guns. In fact, he out-fought the machine- 
gun battalion with his rifle and automatic pistol. He 
killed twenty of the Germans, captured one hundred 
and thirty-two prisoners, including a major and three 
lieutenants, put the thirty-five machine-guns out of 
business, and thereby broke up an entire battalion 

[105] 



which was about to counter-attack against the Ameri- 
cans on Hill 223, in the Argonne section, near Cha- 
teau-Thierry. 

Corporal York delivered his prisoners to the nearest 
battalion headquarters, which was not his own, and 
at his own headquarters he made no mention of his 
part in the affair. It was only by accident that the 
story came to his own commander from an adjacent 
battalion. The facts were then verified and for this 
action York received the Distinguished Service Cross 
and later the Congressional Medal of Honor. The 
artist asked Corporal York if he were married. 
"No," he answered slowly, with his Southern drawl, 
"I was always a kind of a mommer's boy." 

"I certify that I personally counted the 
prisoners reported to the P. C. of the 2nd 
Battalion, 328th Infantry, by Corporal 
Alvin C. York, Company G, 328th Infan- 
try, on October 8, 1918, and found them to 
be one hundred and thirty-two in number. 
Joseph A. Woods, 1st Lieutenant, 

Assistant Division Inspector." 



[107] 




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. 



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GEORGE E. BURR, Sergeant, First Class, 
Company C, 107th Field Signal Battalion, 
32nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Cierges, 
August 2, 1918." 

Sergeant Burr, in charge of a detachment, strung 
wire far in advance of the front lines, working 
through heavy artillery fire, to the point where the 
regimental post of command was to be situated, one 
hundred yards from the enemy line. When he was 
ordered to leave one man at the instrument while the 
rest of the detachment returned to the rear, Sergeant 
Burr selected himself and remained alone in this 
dangerous position. The men of his detachment say 
his smile "never came off." 



[in] 



-1 r I. 




MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE B. DUNCAN 

Arrived in France, June, 1917, with rank of Colonel. 

Promotions : 

Brigadier General, August 5, 1917 ; 
Major General, April 12, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Colonel, 26th Infantry, 1st Division; 

Commanded 1st Brigade, 1st Division, August 5. 

1917; 

Commanded 77th Division, May 26, 1918; 
Commanded 82nd Division, October 15, 1918. 

Born: Kentucky, October 10, 1861. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. Arriving in France with the 
first contingent of American troops, he com- 
manded in turn a regiment, brigade, and divi- 
sion with conspicuous success. In the com- 
mand of the Seventy-seventh Division, in the 
Baccarat sector, his sound military judgment, 
energy, and resolution were important factors 
in the successes gained. Later, in command 
of the Eighty-second Division, in the Argonne- 
Meuse offensive, he proved himself a brilliant 
leader, with great force and energy." G. O. 
12 (January 17, 1919). 



[113] 






I 




H 




*-Vm 



PATRICK WALSH, Sergeant, 

Company I, 18th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

Pat you know it's Pat has done thirty-one years 
of service in the U. S. Regular Army. He is the 
kind of sergeant upon whom the training and disci- 
pline of the Army depend. Wlien we went into the 
war he was given a chance to retire with pension, 
having served his full time, but Walsh preferred to 
go overseas after more medals and won them, too 
the Distinguished Service Cross and the Croix de 
Guerre with Palm. In a brilliant manner he cap- 
tured a nest of enemy machine-guns that was doing 
particular damage to his unit. General Pershing's 
congratulations were conveyed to Sergeant Walsh 
through the First Division Headquarters March 5, 
1918. 

According to his citation in General Orders 126, 
"He voluntarily followed his company commander to 
the first line through a severe barrage, and when 
the captain was killed, he assumed command of a 
group on his own initiative, attacked a superior force 
of the enemy and inflicted heavy losses upon them." 



[117] 



MAJOR GENERAL EDWARD F. McGLACHLIN 

Arrived in France, March 4, 1918, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 
Promoted to Major General, April 12, 1918. 

Born: Wisconsin, June 9, 1868. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As commander of the Ar- 
tillery of the First Army in its organization 
and subsequent operations he solved the diffi- 
cult problems involved with rare military 
judgment. In the St. Mihiel and Argonne- 
Meuse offensives his qualities as a leader were 
demonstrated by the effective employment of 
Artillery that was planned and conducted 
under his direction. He later commanded with 
great ability and success the First Infantry 
Division of the American Expeditionary 
Forces." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[121] 




^ ArtAX3 &4&^ 



MAJOR GENERAL JOHN L. HINES 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1917, with rank of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Colonel, August 5, 1917; 
Brigadier General, April 12, 1918; 
Major General, August 8, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 16th Infantry; 

Commanded 1st Infantry Brigade, 1st Division, May 

5, 1918; 

Commanded 4th Division, August 31, 1918; 
Commanded 3rd Army Corps, October 12, 1918. 
Born: West Virginia, May 21, 1868. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as regimental, brigade, divi- 
sion, and corps commander. He displayed 
marked ability in each of the important duties 
with which he was intrusted and exhibited in 
the operations near Montdidier and Soissons 
and in the St. Mihiel and Argonne-Meuse 
offensives his high attainments as a soldier and 
a commander." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[125] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL WALTER D. McCAW 

Arrived in France, March 7, 1918, with rank of 

Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General; 
Surgeon General, A. E. F. 
Born: Virginia, February 10, 1863. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. His counsel and advice in 
the earlier stages of the operations of the 
American Expeditionary Forces were of par- 
ticular benefit to the effective work of the 
Medical Department. As chief surgeon of 
the American Expeditionary Forces, in the 
later operations in the field, he maintained the 
splendid efficiency of that department at a 
critical time and solved each new problem 
presented with wisdom and marked ability." 
G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[129] 



ALAN LOUIS EGGERS, Sergeant, 

Machine Gun Company, 107th Infantry, 
27th Division. 

JOHN CRIDLAND LATHAM, Sergeant, 
Machine Gun Company, 107th Infantry, 
27th Division. 

"Sergeant Alan Louis Eggers, Sergeant John Grid- 
land Latham and Corporal Thomas E. O'Shea, Ma- 
chine Gun Company, 107th Infantry For conspicu- 
ous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the 
call of duty, in action with the enemy near Le Catelet, 
September 29, 1918. Becoming separated from their 
platoon during a smoke barrage, Sergeants John 
Cridland Latham, Alan Louis Eggers and Corporal 
Thomas E. O'Shea took cover in a shell hole well 
within the enemy's lines. Upon hearing a call for 
help from an American tank, which had become dis- 
abled thirty yards from them, the three men left their 
shelter and started toward the tank, under heavy fire 
from German machine-guns and trench mortars. In 
crossing the fire-swept area Corporal O'Shea was 
mortally wounded, but his companions, undeterred, 
proceeded to the tank, rescued a wounded officer and 
two men and assisted them to cover in a nearby 
trench. Sergeants Latham and Eggers then returned 
to the tank in the face of violent fire, dismounted a 
Hotchkiss gun and took it back to where the wounded 
men were, all day keeping off the enemy by effective 
use of the gun, and later bringing it, with the 
wounded men, back to our lines under cover of dark- 



ness." 



Medal of Honor. 



[133] 




u. 




MAURICE N. HOWE, Captain, 

167th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

"Captain Maurice N. Howe, 167th Infantry, led the 
most brilliant raid ever accomplished by this division. 
In September, 1918, immediately after the lines had 
stabilized, following the St. Mihiel Offensive, the 84th 
Infantry Brigade of the 42nd Division held the most 
northerly part of the line (as part of the plan of 
operation preliminary to the Verdun Offensive) and 
was directed to take prisoners. A simultaneous raid 
with artillery preparation was planned for five o'clock 
in the morning for both the 167th and 168th Infantry. 
The former regiment was to raid Haumont, then 
known to be held by a Jaeger Battalion and the 
latter regiment was to clean out Marimbois Farm. 
Captain Howe planned and executed the raid of the 
167th Infantry, commanding his entire company. 
Under cover of the artillery preparation, he pushed 
his company to the immediate outskirts of Haumont 
on which the artillery was firing, and the moment 
the artillery lifted, he led his company at full speed 
around and through the town from the south and 
when he reached the north limit of the town, turned 
and struck back for his lines, killing or gathering 
in all Germans that were encountered a total of 
twenty-nine prisoners. While the town was being 
mopped up, Captain Howe maintained his com- 
mand at the church and after the last man of his 
company had left, followed the raiding party out 
so as to make sure that no (wounded or) un wounded 
Americans were left within the enemy lines. He 
then returned to our lines. The total elapsed time 
of the raid, including artillery preparation, was fifty- 
three minutes. Forty per cent of the outpost com- 
pany of a well known Jaeger Battalion was taken 

[137] 



prisoner, and due to Captain Howe's daring and 
masterly leadership, the total American casualties 
were one wounded." 

(Signed) WOLF, Chief -of -Staff, 

167th Infantry. 
CITATION : 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Haumont, 
France, on September 22, 1918. 
"Captain Howe commanded an early morning raid 
on the town of Haumont and not only executed the 
raid successfully, but returned alone a second time, 
to be sure that none of his men had been left wounded. 
He inflicted severe losses on the enemy and took 
seventeen prisoners." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 
Chevalier, Ordre Leopold I. 



[139] 



LIEUTENANT GENERAL ROBERT L. BULLARD 

Arrived in France, June 28, 1917, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 
Promotions : 

Major General, August 5, 1917; 
Lieutenant General, October 16, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded First Division, December 13, 1917 ; 
Commanded First Corps, January 20, 1918; 
Commanded Second Army, October, 1918. 
Born: Alabama, January 15, 1861. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as commander of the Second 
Army of the American Expeditionary Forces. 
In the course of this war he commanded in 
turn the first American division to take its 
place in the front lines in France, the Third 
Corps, and the Second Army. He partici- 
pated in operations in reduction of the Marne 
salient and in the Meuse-Argonne offensive. 
He was in command of the Second Army when 
the German resistance west of the Meuse was 
shattered." G. O. 136 (December 20, 1918). 



[143] 



FRED C. STEIN, Corporal, 

Company F, 125th Infantry, 

32nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Romagne, 
October 9, 1918. 

"Corporal Stein charged and captured a strong 
enemy machine-gun nest and immediately turned the 
gun on the enemy. He was twice wounded while 
changing the position of the gun, but continued to 
operate it under heavy shell and machine-gun fire 
until he received a third wound, in the arm, which 
made it impossible for him to further operate the 
gun/' 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[145] 



JAMES B. LEPLEY, Sergeant, 

Company M, 168th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

On July 28th, near Sergy, he led his platoon for- 
ward in the face of heavy machine-gun fire, and in 
spite of being wounded, captured six machine-guns 
and thirteen prisoners from the Prussian Guards. 
Near Souain, to the northeast of Chalons-sur-Marne, 
on the night of July 14, 1918, Sergeant Lepley left 
his trench and returned to the woods, through a 
smothering fire of gas, high explosives and shrapnel, 
to search for two men of his platoon who were miss- 
ing. He found them lost in the woods and guided 
them safely back to the platoon. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[149] 



5v 







JAMES A. MEISSNER, Major, 

Air Service, Pilot, 

147th Aero Squadron. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action in the Toul 
sector May 2, 1918." 

This was while Meissner, then a lieutenant, was at- 
tached to the 94th Aero Squadron. This engage- 
ment was with a German Albatross Scout the first 
enemy plane he had seen in the air. He was flying 
a Nieuport and in the combat the entering wedge and 
upper surface of fabric were torn away from the wing 
of his plane and he was subjected to heavy fire from 
anti-aircraft batteries, but by a skilful operation and 
cool judgment, he succeeded in making a landing 
within the American lines. A Bronze Oak Leaf was 
awarded Meissner, then Captain, for each of the fol- 
lowing acts of heroism in action: 
On May 30, 1918, he attacked two enemy planes at 
an altitude of 4500 meters, and after a sharp en- 
gagement shot one down in flames and forced the 
other back into its own territory. One of his wings 
was again torn as before, but he was able to land 
safely on the home field. His third victory was in 
combat with a Boche Observation Plane over Eply, 
June 5th. This after a long chase. His fourth vic- 
tory was in combat with another Boche Observation 
Plane, June 13th, over Thiacourt. 
July 24th he was assigned to command the 147th 
Aero Squadron (this when he was 21 years old). 
August 1st, aided by Lieutenant Brotherton, in a 
fight against six Fokker Scouts, he won his fifth vic- 
tory. During the St. Mihiel Drive and the Argonne 
Drive, he operated from the Rembercourt Field, do- 
ing low patrols from 100 to 1500 feet high and spe- 
cializing in attacks on enemy observation balloons at 
dawn and sunset. His sixth victory was in combat 

[153] 




> 





with an observation plane over Nantillois in con- 
junction with Lieutenant O'Niel, on October 10th. 
October 28th he shot down an observation balloon 
east of Dun-sur-Meuse at dawn. October 29th he 
won a victory over an observation plane (Rumpler) 
at Buzancy. 

Total combats, about 20. Promoted to Major Octo- 
ber 4, 1918. 

Distinguished Service Cross and four Bronze Oak 
Leaves. 



DAVID BINKLEY, Sergeant. 

Company I, 168th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action at Hill 212, 
near Sergy, northeast of Chateau-Thierry, July 18, 
1918. 

"Private Binkley sought and obtained permission to 
go out in front of our lines and recover his corporal 
who was lying severely wounded in the open." He 
crossed an open area that was swept for more than 
fifty yards by enemy machine guns. While the enemy 
fire was directed at him he reached his corporal, 
picked him up and carried him in his arms safely 
back into our lines. Later he was wounded but re- 
fused to go to the aid station until his company had 
won its objective. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[157] 



MAJOR GENERAL ROBERT ALEXANDER 

Arrived in France, November, 1917, with rank of 
Colonel. 

Promotions : 

Brigadier General, December 17, 1917 ; 
Major General, August 8, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Inspector General, Lines of Communication, Novem- 
ber 23, 1917; 
Commanding 41st (1st Depot) Division, February 

13, 1918; 

Commanding 63rd Infantry Brigade, August 3 ; 
Commanding 77th Division, September 7. 

Born: Maryland, October 12, 1863. 

Distinguished Service Cross. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near 
Grand-Pre, France, October 11, 1918. Dur- 
ing the advance in the Argonne Forest, and at 
a time when his forces were fatigued by the 
stress of battle and a long period of active 
front-line service, Major General Alexander 
visited the units in the front line, cheering and 
encouraging them to greater efforts. Unmind- 
ful of the severe fire to which he was sub j ected, 
he continued until he had inspected each group, 
his utter disregard of danger and inspiring 
example resulting in the crossing of the Aire 
and the capture of Grand-Pre and St. Juvin." 
G. O. 35 (March 8, 1919). 



[161] 



MAJOR GENERAL HENRY T. ALLEN 

Arrived in France, June 22, 1918; 

Organized, trained, and fought 90th Division; 

Later organized and commanded 8th Army Corps. 
Born: Kentucky, April 13, 1859. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. In command of the Nine- 
tieth Division. He had the most important 
position of conducting the right flank at the 
St. Mihiel salient. The brilliant success there 
gained and later repeated in the Argonne- 
Meuse offensive showed him to be an officer 
of splendid judgment, high attainments, and 
excellent leadership. Later he commanded the 
Eighth Army Corps with skill and judgment." 
G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[165] 







CSV 




MAJOR GENERAL GEORGE BELL, Jr. 

Arrived in France, May 24, 1918; 
Commanded the 33rd Division, May 25, 1918. 

Born: Maryland, January 23, 1859. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He led his command, with 
distinction, in the offensive operations with 
the British which resulted in the capture of 
Hamel and Hamel Woods, and in the fighting 
on the Meuse that gained the villages of 
Marcheville, St. Hilaire, and a portion of Bois 
d'Harville. He displayed a high order of 
leadership in the Argonne-Meuse offensive, 
when his division attacked and captured the 
strongly fortified Bois de Forges. The suc- 
cessful operations of the division which he 
trained and commanded in combat were 
greatly influenced by his energy and abilities 
as a commander." G. O. 59 (May 3, 1919). 



[169] 





et ft. 




BRIGADIER GENERAL THOMAS B. DUG AN 

Assignments : 

70th Infantry Brigade; 

Later commanded 35th Division. 

Born : Maryland, July 27, 1858. . 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded the 70th 
Infantry Brigade during a part of the Meuse- 
Argonne offensive with great distinction and 
marked ability. By his painstaking energy, 
zeal, and great initiative he proved to be a 
material factor in the successes of the divi- 
sion." G. O. 59 (May 3, 1919). 



[173] 







f 



H. C. DOUGHERTY, Color-Sergeant, 

Headquarters Company, 18th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

His Division Adjutant designated Dougherty as a 
"non-commissioned officer of splendid courage, 
energy and ability an example to all. Notably on 
July 21st and 22nd, when in command of reinforce- 
ments for the front line, he carried out his mission 
with complete success, commanding his detachment 
with the greatest skill, coolness and energy. Upon 
being relieved, he returned to bring out on his back 
one of the wounded of his detachment." 
For this act of bravery he was cited by the com- 
manding general of the First Division and was also 
awarded the Croix de Guerre. 

Color-Sergeant Dougherty participated with his regi- 
ment in all its battles, including the St. Mihiel and 
the Meuse-Argonne offensives. From November 6 
to 11 he particularly distinguished himself in the 
Ardennes Drive. Colonel Hunt, of the 18th Infan- 
try, wrote, "Color-Sergeant Dougherty, when at the 
Picardy front April 28th to July 28th, rendered in- 
valuable services to the regiment. He was at all 
times an example of the best type of an American 
soldier." 
Distinguished Service Cross and the Croix de Guerre. 



[177] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL DENNIS E. NOLAN 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1917, with rank of 

Major. 
Promotions: 

Colonel, August 5, 1917; 
Brigadier General, August 8, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Assistant Chief of Staff, G. H. Q., 2nd Section (In- 
telligence) ; 
Commanded 55th Infantry Brigade, 28th Division, 

September 28 ; 

Assistant Chief of Staff, G. H. Q., 2nd Section (In- 
telligence), October 10. 
Born: New York, April 22, 1872. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near 
Apremont, France, October 1, 1918. While 
the enemy were preparing a counter-attack, 
which they preceded by a terrific barrage, Gen. 
Nolan made his way into the town of Apre- 
mont and personally directed the movements 
of his tanks under a most harassing fire of 
enemy machine-guns, rifles, and artillery. 
His indomitable courage and coolness so in- 
spired his forces that about 400 of our troops 
repulsed an enemy attack of two German 
regiments." G. O. 50 (April 12, 1919). 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He organized and admin- 
istered with marked ability the intelligence sec- 
tion of the General Staff of the American 
Expeditionary Forces. His estimates of the 
complex and everchanging military arid politi- 

[181] 



cal situation, his sound judgment, and accurate 
discrimination were invaluable to the Govern- 
ment, and influenced greatly the success that 
attended the operations of the American 
armies in Europe." G. O. 12 (January 17, 
1919). 



[183] 



MIECZYSLAW BROCKI, Corporal, 

Company B, 16th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

For extraordinary heroism in action south of Soissons 
July 21, 1918, Brocki was awarded the Distinguished 
Service Cross. On this date German machine-guns 
were causing very heavy losses to Company B, and 
Brocki, on his own initiative, dashed forward with 
two companions through the heavy fire of the enemy, 
and captured two German machine-guns. This was 
only one incident of Corporal Brocki's exceptional 
activities during the operations from July 18 to 22. 



[187] 



DOUGLAS CAMPBELL, Captain, 

Air Service, Pilot. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action on May 19, 
1918. 

"Captain Campbell attacked an enemy biplane at an 
altitude of 4500 meters east of Flirey. He rushed to 
the attack, but after shooting a few rounds, his gun 
jammed. Undeterred by this accident, he maneu- 
vered so as to protect himself, corrected the jam in 
mid-air and returned to the assault. After a short, 
violent action the enemy collapsed and crashed to 
the earth. 

"One Bronze Oak Leaf was awarded to Captain 
Campbell for each of the following acts of extraor- 
dinary heroism in action: 

"On May 27th he encountered three enemy mono- 
planes at an altitude of 3000 meters over Montsec. 
Despite the superior strength of the enemy, he 
promptly attacked and, fighting a brave battle, shot 
down one German machine, which fell in three pieces, 
and drove the other two well within the enemy lines. 
On May 28th he saw six German Albatross aero- 
planes flying toward him at an altitude of 3000 
meters, near Bois Rata. Regardless of personal dan- 
ger, he immediately attacked and by skilful maneu- 
vering and accurate operation of his machine gun, he 
brought one plane down in flames and drove the other 
five back into their own lines. On May 31st, he took 
the offensive against two German biplanes at an alti- 
tude of 2500 meters, over Lironville, shot down one 
of them and pursued the other far behind the German 
lines. On June 5th, accompanied by another pilot, 
he attacked two enemy battle-planes at an altitude 
of 5700 meters over Eply. After a spirited combat, 
Captain Campbell was shot through the back by a 



machine gun bullet, but in spite of his injury, kept 
on fighting until he had forced one of the enemy 
planes to the ground, where it was destroyed by ar- 
tillery fire, and had driven the other plane back into 
his own territory." 

Distinguished Service Cross and four Bronze Oak 
Leaves. French Legion of Honor. 



HAROLD J. DEVEREAUX, Private, 

Company M, 125th Infantry. 

32nd Division. 

When General LudendorfT reported that the Ameri- 
can soldier is less a soldier and more a "hunter," he 
evidently had in mind this type. 
When Devereaux's company had crossed the River 
Ourcq and captured the Bois Pelger, the corporal of 
his squad, fighting beside Private Devereaux, was 
wounded by machine-gun fire. The corporal fell to 
the ground and the enemy continued to fire on the 
wounded man. This peeved Private Devereaux, who 
sprinted across the open and single handed attacked 
and put out of action that machine-gun. Devereaux 
is one of the "hunters" who won the Distinguished 
Service Cross and the Croix de Guerre with gilt star. 



[193] 



MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM M. WRIGHT 

Arrived in France, April 16, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Commanded 35th Division, May 4 ; 
Commanded 3rd Corps, June 17; 
Commanded 5th Corps, July 10; 
Commanded 7th Corps, August 22; 
Commanded 89th Division, October 1 ; 
Commanded 1st Corps. 

Born: New Jersey, September 24, 1863. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded in turn the 
Thirty-fifth Division; the Third, Fifth, and 
Seventh Army Corps, under the eighth French 
Army in the Vosges Mountains, and later com- 
manded the Eighty-ninth Division in the St. 
Mihiel offensive and in the final operations on 
the Meuse River, where he proved himself to 
be an energetic and aggressive leader." G. O. 
12 (January 17, 1919). 



[197] 



MAJOR GENERAL EDMUND WITTENMYER 

Arrived in France, April 30, 1918, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 

Promoted to Major General, October 13, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 153rd Infantry Brigade, 77th Division ; 
Commanded 7th Division, October 27. 
Born : Ohio, April 25, 1862. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He served with marked 
distinction as brigade commander in the Ar- 
gonne-Meuse offensive and as division com- 
mander in the final operations in the Toul 
sector, and in both capacities, by his untiring 
efforts and breadth of vision, proved himself 
to be an able leader." G. O. 12 (January 17, 
1919). 



[201] 




\ 



RALPH ATKINSON, Sergeant, 

Headquarters Company, 167th Infantry, 
42nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Landres- 
et-St. Georges, October 16, 1918." 
During the attack on C6te-de-Chatillon Sergeant 
Atkinson, in command of the Stokes Mortar Platoon, 
was advancing with the first wave of the assault, when, 
upon nearing the objective about two hundred and 
fifty of the enemy formed for a counter-attack. At 
this juncture Sergeant Atkinson with a Stokes mor- 
tar ran out under heavy fire to a position where he 
could get a fair field of fire, set up the mortar and 
opened a murderous fire on the approaching enemy, 
dispersing them in every direction. His quick action 
and good judgment not only broke up the enemy 
counter-attack but inflicted very severe losses, Atkin- 
son himself showing extraordinary heroism and cour- 
age at a most critical time. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[205] 



"V 

"* ^ 




PEARL J. WINES, Sergeant, 

Company E, 358th Infantry, 

90th Division. 

Wines was wounded at St. Mihiel, September 12, 
1918. Five Germans unexpectedly jumped upon 
him and "got him" in the side. Down went Sergeant 
Wines, but up again and at the five. Unaided, he 
engaged the entire number. Three of the Germans 
perished by his bayonet and the other two he drove 
back as prisoners to his own lines. This about one 
kilometer north of Fey-en-Haye. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



PHILIP BENSON, First Lieutenant, 

Air Service, Pilot, 

185th Aero Squadron. 

Volunteered under orders for night bombing and 
with a Sop with camel was particularly efficient in 
night "chasse" work. He was one of those who had 
the privilege and distinction of giving the Hun a 
taste of his own medicine this by dropping bombs 
on German towns and firing into Hun supply trains. 



[ 209] 










a 




i 




m 

T yl 




m 



.*> 






MAJOR GENERAL CHARLES P. SUMMERALL 

Arrived in France, October 31, 1917, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 

Promoted to Major General, June 26, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 67th Field Artillery Brigade; 
Commanded 1st Field Artillery Brigade, Decem- 
ber 19; 

Commanded 1st Division, July 1 ; 
Commanded 5th Corps, October 18. 
Born: Florida, March 4, 1867. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded in turn a 
brigade of the First Division in the operations 
near Montdidier, the First Division during the 
Soissons and St. Mihiel offensives and in the 
early battles of the Argonne-Meuse advance, 
and the Fifth Army Corps in the later battles 
of this advance. In all of these important 
duties his calm courage, his clear judgment, 
and his soldierly character had a marked in- 
fluence in the attainment of the successes of 
his commands." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919) . 



[215] 




C. 9, 



BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM W. HARTS 

Commanded U. S. Troops, Paris, September 31, 1918. 
Before that date was American Representative at 
British G. H. Q. (France). 

Born: Illinois, August 29, 1866. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. In command of the im- 
portant district of Paris, by his painstaking 
efforts and able direction he maintained a high 
standard of discipline and efficiency among 
his large command. By his tact and keen 
perception he handled numerous diplomatic 
affairs with great satisfaction, rendering serv- 
ices of superior value to the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces." 



[219] 



MAJOR GENERAL JAMES G. HARBORD 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1917, with rank of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Brigadier General, August 5, 1917 ; 
Major General, June 26, 1918. 
Assignments : 

First Chief of Staff, A. E. F. ; 

Commanded 4th Infantry Brigade, May 5, 1918; 

Commanded 2nd Division, July 1-July 5, July 20- 

August 2; 
Commanding General of the Service of Supplies, 

July 26, 1918. 

Born: Illinois, March 21, 1866. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For his most exceptional services as chief of 
staff of the American Expeditionary Forces, 
and later as commanding general, Services of 
Supply, in both of which important positions 
his great constructive ability and professional 
attainments have played an important part in 
the success obtained by our Armies. Com- 
manded Marine Brigade of Second Division, 
Belleau Wood, and later ably commanded 
Second Division during attack on Soissons, 
France, July 18, 1918." G. O. 36 (Decem- 
ber 20, 1918). 



[223] 



SIDNEY E. MANNING, Corporal, 

Company G, 167th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above 
and beyond the call of duty in action with the enemy 
near Breuvannes, France, July 28, 1918. When his 
platoon commander and platoon sergeant had both 
become casualties soon after the beginning of an as- 
sault on strongly fortified heights overlooking the 
Ourcq River, Corporal Manning took command of 
his platoon, which was near the center of the attack- 
ing line. Though himself severely wounded, he led 
forward the 35 men remaining in the platoon, and 
finally succeeded in gaining a foothold on the enemy 
position, during which time he had received more 
wounds and all but seven of his men had fallen. 
Directing the consolidation of the position, he held off 
a large body of the enemy only 50 yards away by 
fire from his automatic rifle. He declined to take 
cover until the line had been entirely consolidated 
with the line of the platoon on the flank, when he 
dragged himself to shelter, suffering from the wounds 
in all parts of the body." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 
Medal of Honor. 



[225] 



MAJOR GENERAL HANSON E. ELY 

Arrived in France, June 15, 1917, with rank of 

Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Brigadier General, July 9, 1918; 
Major General, October 4, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Chief of Staff, 1st Division; 
Commanded 28th Infantry; 

Commanded 3rd Infantry Brigade, July 15, 1918 ; 
Commanded 5th Division, October 18, 1918. 
Born: Iowa, November 23, 1867. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded with skill 
and marked distinction a regiment in the 
trench fighting north of Toul, in the operations 
west of Montdidier, and in the action at Can- 
tigny. As a brigade commander at Soissons 
and as a division commander in the Argonne- 
Meuse offensive he demonstrated rare capa- 
bilities as a commander." G. O. 12 (Janu- 
ary, 1919). 



[229] 



CHARLES BASKERVILLE, Jr., First Lieutenant, 

166th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

A Plattsburg graduate who went overseas with the 
Rainbow Division October, 1917, and commanded 
his company during the winter training that followed. 
He went into the trenches in the Lorraine sector 
February, 1918. He participated in many patrols 
and was recommended for the D. S. C. for his ex- 
traordinary heroism. On June 5th, when in charge 
of a patrol, he was caught between two barrages and 
by his intrepidity and quick-wittedness succeeded in 
conducting his patrol safely through the barrages, at 
the same time keeping the enemy from making a 
counter-attack. 

During the last German offensive in the Champagne 
sector, on July 14-15, he was cited for "gallant and 
meritorious conduct" by his Colonel for refusing to 
be evacuated or to leave his company, although badly 
wounded and gassed. In fact, a serious shoulder 
wound was not dressed for thirty hours during this 
action. 

"Later, in the Aisne-Marne offensive north of Cha- 
teau-Thierry he again gave evidence of rare courage 
and faithfulness to duty," as is recorded in his cita- 
tion. After several months in hospitals he acted as 
a confidential courier in the Argonne offensive, was 
later assigned to duty at the German Officer Prisoner 
of War Enclosure at Richelieu where he served until 
invalided home, in January, 1919, to be honorably 
discharged as disabled by wounds. 



[233] 




\r\ 



BRIGADIER GENERAL FOX CONNER 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1917, with rank of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Colonel, August 5, 1917 ; 

Brigadier General, August 8, 1918; 

Assistant Chief of Staff, G. H. Q., Chief of Third 

Section (Operations). 
Born: Mississippi, November 2, 1874. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As assistant chief of staff in 
charge of the operations section he has shown a 
masterful conception of all the tactical situa- 
tions which have confronted the American 
forces in Europe. By his high professional 
attainments and sound military judgment he 
has handled with marked skill the many de- 
tails of the complex problems of organization 
and troop movements that were necessitated by 
the various operations of the American Ex- 
peditionary Forces." G. O. 12 (January 17, 
1919). 



[237] 







I 






MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM H. HAY 

Arrived in France, June 19, 1918, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 
Promoted to Major General, October 1, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Commanded 184th Brigade, 92nd Division; 
Commanded 28th Division, October 26, 1918. 

Born: Florida, July 16, 1880. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As commander of the 184th 
Infantry Brigade he showed efficient leader- 
ship. Promoted to major generalship in the 
early part of October, 1918, he took command 
of the 28th Division, and by his marked ability 
and great energy he contributed to the suc- 
cesses attained by the division during the time 
in which he was in command. He rendered 
services of a high character to the American 
Expeditionary Forces." G. O. 89 (July 15, 
1919). 



[ 241 ] 



MAJOR GENERAL JOHN F. O'RYAN 
Arrived in France, October 5, 1917. 
Commanded 27th Division. 

Born: New York, August 21, 1874. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As commander of the 
Twenty-seventh Division in its successful 
operations with the British in France in the 
autumn of 1918 he displayed qualities of skill 
and aggressiveness which mark him as a leader 
of ability. In the breach of the Hindenburg 
line between St. Quentin and Cambria the 
name of his division is linked with the British 
in adding new laurels to the allied forces in 
France." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[245] 





/f/7 



THOMAS H. FALLAW, Captain, 

167th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Landres- 
et-St. Georges, October 16, 1918. 
"In the attack on the C6te-de-Chatillon, seeing that 
the entire advance was being held up in an open field 
by heavy machine-gun fire from the edge of the wood, 
Captain Fallaw organized a detachment and led it 
in a rush on the woods under heavy fire, making a 
daring and vigorous attack on the enemy machine- 
gun nests, clearing the edge of the woods, capturing 
prisoners, and inflicting severe losses on the enemy. 
Through this gallant act Captain Fallaw gained the 
final objective with a minimum loss to his command 
and set an inspiring example of disregard for per- 
sonal safety and devotion to duty." 
Citation for Distinguished Service Cross. 



F. H. McKAIG, Corporal, 

83rd Company, 6th Marines, 

2nd Division. 

Corporal McKaig was one of the boys who "held 
'em" at Chateau-Thierry. He showed extraordinary 
heroism while acting as battalion runner, repeatedly 
carrying important messages through heavy fire of 
enemy machine-guns and artillery and gas and under 
the bombs of enemy planes. This on the night of 
September 14, 1918, while the Germans were counter- 
attacking near Jaulny. 



[249] 



HERMAN KORTH, Sergeant, 

Company D, 121st Machine Gun Battalion, 

32nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action at Juvigny, 
north of Soissons, August 31, 1918." 
This man was born in a little German town, but was 
made in America. Out on the brow of a gently slop- 
ing hill went Korth alone. The enemy machine-guns 
were below the slope of the hill, and it was impossible 
for our gunners to see their location, so Korth volun- 
teered to go out on the hill top and drive stakes to 
line our artillery fire on. There, within sight of the 
enemy, he remained directing our artillery fire, his 
chance for life one in a million. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[255] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL WALTER A. BETHEL 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1917, with rank of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. 

Promoted : 

Brigadier General, August 5, 1917; 
Judge Advocate, A. E. F. 

Born: Ohio, November 25, 1866. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As judge advocate of the 
American Expeditionary Forces he organized 
this important department and administered 
its affairs with conspicuous efficiency from the 
date of the arrival in France of the first Ameri- 
can combat troops. His marked legal ability 
and sound judgment were important factors in 
the splendid work of his department, and he at 
all times handled with success the various mili- 
tary and international problems that arose as 
a result of the operations of our armies." 
G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[257] 



MAJOR GENERAL CHARLES J. BAILEY 

Arrived in France, August 18, 1918; 

Commanded the 81st Division, September 7, 1918. 

Born: Pennsylvania, June 21, 1859. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. 

He commanded the 81st Division, with dis- 
tinction, throughout its operations beginning 
October 1, 1918. The excellent conduct of this 
division was due, in a large measure, to his 
great military knowledge, energy and zeal. 
He has shown qualities of able leadership and 
has rendered services of great value to the 
American Expeditionary Forces." 



[261] 



> 





MAJOR GENERAL CHARLES T. MENOHER 

Arrived in France, August 13, 1917, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 

Promoted to Major General, November 28, 1917. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 42nd Division, November 1, 1917; 
Commanded 6th Army Corps, November 10, 1918. 
Born: Pennsylvania, March 20, 1862. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. In command of the Forty- 
second Division from Chateau-Thierry to the 
conclusion of the Argonne-Meuse offensive, 
including the Baccarat sector, Rheims, Vesle, 
and at the St. Mihiel salient, this officer, with 
his division, participated in all of those im- 
portant engagements. The reputation as a 
fighting unit of the Forty-second Division is 
in no small measure due to the soldierly quali- 
ties and the military leadership of this officer." 
G, O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[265] 




\ 





PAUL W. BRADLEY, Corporal, 

Machine Gun Company, 165th Infantry, 
42nd Division. 

Cited four times for extraordinary heroism in action : 
April 26, 1918, Ancerviller; July 29, Meurcy Farm 
(Chateau-Thierry) ; October 14, near Landres-et-St. 
Georges (Meuse-Argonne) ; and November 3, in the 
advance on Sedan. 

"When an enemy shell struck the gun position of 
his squad near Ancerviller severely wounding him, 
Corporal Bradley, then a private, coolly removed the 
gun to a place of safety and returned for the tripod, 
being wounded for the second time in so doing." 
Near Meurcy Farm this soldier, in command of his 
squad, was severely wounded in the arm by machine- 
gun fire, but refused medical treatment, remaining 
with his command until the objective had been taken 
and the line firmly established. 

"During the advance on the enemy position near 
Landres-et-St. Georges, Corporal Bradley again dis- 
played conspicuous coolness and courage in taking 
charge of his section, after the section-sergeant had 
been wounded, and directing the placing and firing 
of the guns." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[269] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL EDGAR RUSSEL 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1917, with rank of 
Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General, August 5, 1917; 

Chief of the Signal Corps, A. E. F. 
Born: Missouri, February 20, 1862. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptonally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As chief signal officer, 
American Expeditionary Forces, he has 
shown great ability in the organization and 
administration of his department and the re- 
sults attained are largely due to his zeal and 
energy. The Signal Corps in France stands 
out as one of the masterful accomplishments 
of the American Expeditionary Forces, and 
to General Russel is due the credit for its 
foundation and organization." G. O. 12 
(January 17, 1919). 



[273] 



AUGUST STEIDL, Sergeant, 

Company A, 26th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

Cited for extraordinary heroism in action from July 
18 to 23, 1918. 

"Steidl showed exceptional bravery and control over 
his platoon while advancing through enemy machine- 
gun and artillery fire before reaching his final ob- 
jective, which he took, in spite of wounds, gas, and 
shell shock." 

For further acts of extraordinary heroism he was 
awarded the Croix de Guerre with Palm, and the 
Medaille Militaire. 



277 ] 



GRADY PARRISH, Sergeant, 

Company G, 167th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near C6te-de- 
Chatillon, October, 16, 1918. 

After his platoon commander had been severely 
wounded and his platoon had suffered heavy casual- 
ties, Sergeant Parrish quickly reorganized the re- 
mainder of the platoon and personally led it in the 
attack on C6te-de-Chatillon. By his daring acts, 
coolness, and good judgment, he broke up a heavy 
enemy counter-attack on his front, thereby saving his 
men and being an example of exceptional heroism 
and devotion to duty." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



STACY A. LEWIS, Sergeant, 

Company A, 2nd Machine Gun Battalion, 

1st Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Soissons, 
July 22, 1918. 

"He voluntarily organized a machine-gun crew, 
moved forward in front of the Infantry under heavy 
machine-gun and shell fire, killed an entire enemy 
machine-gun nest, and captured the guns." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[281] 




> 










JOHN R. O'BRIEN, Corporal, 

Company K, 23rd Infantry, 

2nd Division. 

"After his platoon commander had been severely 
wounded and his platoon sergeant killed, he assumed 
command of the platoon, keeping the men well up 
on the line, controlling their fire and, by good advice 
and judgment, conserving life. This on the 6th of 
June, 1918." 

On June 18th a particularly pesky nest of enemy 
machine-guns were blazing with a deadly fire at Com- 
pany K. That's this boy's company and "up and at 
'em" went Corporal J. R. O'Brien, of Boston. That 
machine-gun nest received O'Brien's particular at- 
tention. For his nerve a French general decorated 
him with the Medaille Militaire and the Croix de 
Guerre with Palm, and kissed him on the cheek. 



[287] 



c 




MAJOR GENERAL WALTER H. GORDON 

Arrived in France, May 1, 1918, with rank of Briga- 
dier General. 

Promoted to Major General, August 8, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 10th Brigade, 5th Division; 
Commanded 6th Division, August 1, 1918. 
Born: Mississippi, June 24, 1863. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As Brigade Commander of 
the 10th Infantry Brigade, he showed great 
energy and zeal in the conduct of his Brigade 
during the major part of its manoeuvers. 
Later, as Division Commander of the 6th 
Division, by his painstaking efforts, he 
brought this division to a marked state of 
efficiency, rendering services of great value to 
the American Expeditionary Forces." G. O. 
70. 




[289] 



>. 
.%>?< 




^> 




BRIGADIER GENERAL BENJAMIN D. FOULOIS 

Arrived in France, November 12, 1917. 
Assignments : 

Chief of Air Service, November 17, 1917 May, 

1918; 
Chief of Air Service, First Army, May, 1918 

July, 1918; 

Assistant Chief of Air Service, A. E. F., July, 1918. 
Born: Connecticut, December 9, 1879. 

Cited for especially meritorious services by the Commander- 
in-Chief, A. E. F. 



[293] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL SAMUEL D. ROCKENBACH 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1917, with rank of 

Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General, June 26, 1918; 
Chief of Tank Corps. 

Born: Virginia, January 27, 1869. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished service. As quartermaster of Base 
Section No. 1, St. Nazaire, from June to 
December, 1917, he rendered especially valu- 
able services. Confronted with a problem of 
great magnitude befraught with serious diffi- 
culties, he went about his task with keen 
determination, and by his energy and great 
zeal organized and efficiently operated the first 
American base in France. Later as Chief of 
the Tank Corps, by his tireless energy and 
keen determination he established schools of 
training for tank personnel and laid the foun- 
dation for the organization of the tank units. 
He ably directed the operations of the tanks 
with the First Army and contributed in a 
measure to the success attained." G. O. 78 
(June 16, 1919). 



[297] 



1 ^ 






WILLIAM A. HARTMAN, Sergeant, 

Company F, 107th Engineers, 

32nd Division. 

"He was a member of a patrol sent out from the 
battalion post of command at midnight, August 4, 
1918, to reconnoiter the Vesle River front, near 
Fismes, for the location of possible sites for pontoon 
bridges and of material for making such structures. 
Despite heavy artillery and machine-gun fire that 
forced the patrol to scatter and separated him from 
the lieutenant in charge, he continued the work on 
his own initiative, and, acting entirely without orders, 
started his detail on the actual construction of rafts 
for the pontoon bridges. His courage, ability as a 
leader, and his inflexible determination made the 
reconnaissance a complete success." 
In his portrait Sergeant Hartman is exhibiting two 
cubes of "T N T", the wire used in fastening the 
explosive, and a spool of time-fuse. 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[301] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL ROBERT C. DAVIS 

Arrived in France, July 28, 1917, with rank of Major. 
Promotions : 

Lieutenant Colonel, August 5, 1917; 

Colonel, May 9, 1918; 

Brigadier General, June 26, 1918; 

Adjutant General, A. E. F. 
Born : Pennsylvania, October 12, 1876. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As adjutant general of the 
American Expeditionary Forces he has per- 
formed his exacting duties with high profes- 
sional skill and administrative ability. The 
exceptional efficiency of the adjutant general's 
department under his direction was a material 
factor in the success of the staff work at gen- 
eral headquarters." G. O. 12 (January 17, 
1919). 



[ 305 ] 



MAJOR GENERAL JOHN A. LEJEUNE 

Arrived in France, June 8, 1918, with rank of Briga- 
dier General. 

Promoted to Major General, August 30, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 64th Brigade, 32nd Division, July 5, 

1918; 
Commanded 4th Brigade, Marines, 2nd Division, 

July 25 ; 

Commanded 2nd Division, July 28. 
Born: Louisiana, January 10, 1867. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded the Second 
Division in the successful operations of Thiau- 
court, Masif Blanc Mont, St. Mihiel, and on 
the west bank of the Meuse. In the Argonne- 
Meuse offensive his division was directed with 
such sound military judgment and ability that 
it broke and held, by the vigor and rapidity 
of execution of its attacks, enemy lines which 
had hitherto been considered impregnable." 
G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[309] 




% ..4 





DOUGALD FERGUSON, Sergeant, 

Machine Gun Company, 126th Infantry, 
32nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action. 
"When the Infantry on his right was held up by fire 
of an enemy machine-gun at Cierges, northeast of 
Chateau-Thierry, August 1, 1918, he seized a rifle 
and rushed around the flank of the enemy's position, 
bayoneting two of the machine-gun crew and shoot- 
ing the third, thus enabling the Infantry to advance." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 
Croix de Guerre with Palm. 



FRED CARNEY, Private, 

Company G, 26th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

"With great coolness and bravery, under machine- 
gun and shell fire, maintained liaison between his 
battalion and company and assisted in reorganizing 
his platoon after the platoon commander was 
wounded" (citation, December 13th) this during 
operations between the Argonne and the Meuse. 
His Commanding Officer selected Private Carney as 
his "ideal soldier." 



[313] 






:~ 








MAJOR GENERAL ADELBERT CRONKHITE 

Arrived in France, May 30, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Commanded 80th Division, June 22, 1918; 
Commanded 9th Army Corps, November 25. 

Born: New York, January 5, 1861. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded the Eighti- 
eth Division during the Argonne-Meuse offen- 
sive where he demonstrated great ability as a 
leader and proved himself a commander of 
initiative and courage." G. O. 12 (January 
17, 1919). 



[819] 













/ n 




ALBERT W. FRITZ, Private, 

Company I, 16th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

This big fellow looks like a Gibson man, but his buddy 
says "he fights like the devil." He received the 
D. S. C. for extraordinary heroism in action south of 
Soissons, July 16-23, 1918. During these five days 
Private Fritz was twice wounded, but he was an 
ammunition carrier and his machine-gun company 
needed ammunition, so in spite of his two wounds 
and in spite of the heavy shell fire to which he was 
constantly exposed, this young giant continued to 
carry ammunition through the entire action. 



[321] 



MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM C. LANGFITT 

Arrived in France, August 17, 1917, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 

Promoted to Major General, December 17, 1917; 
Chief of Enginers, A. E. F. 

Born: Virginia, August 10, 1860. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As director of light, rail- 
ways, and roads, and later as chief of utilities 
he displayed great ability and marked breadth 
of vision. As chief engineer of the American 
Expeditionary Forces his brilliant profes- 
sional attainments, untiring energy, and devo- 
tion to duty placed his department in a state 
of efficiency and enabled it to perform its im- 
portant function in the most satisfactory man- 
ner." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[325] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL EDWARD A. KREGER 

Arrived in France, March 21, 1918. 
Judge Advocate. 

Born: Iowa, May 31, 1868. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As Acting Judge Advocate 
General for the American Expeditionary 
Forces he organized and efficiently adminis- 
tered his office, performing exacting duties 
with marked distinction. His masterful 
knowledge of military law, his foresight and 
practical comprehension of the complex prob- 
lems involved in his work, enabled him to per- 
form it with noteworthy success. His counsel 
was wise; his decisions were just. His services 
to the American Expeditionary Forces have 
been of great value." G. O. 47 (April 7, 
1919). 



[329] 




V, 



JAMES W. STOWERS, Sergeant, 

Machine Gun Company, 167th Infantry, 
42nd Division. 

Colonel Wm. P. Screws, commanding the 167th In- 
fantry, wrote of Sergeant Stowers as follows: 
"He has been with the organization in all its cam- 
paigns and battles and has made an excellent, cou- 
rageous soldier, and has shown marked ability as a 
leader on all occasions, both on and off the battle- 
field, and his conduct and deportment have been a 
model for, and inspiration to, the men of this com- 
mand." January 2, 1918. 

He was cited for rushing into the open under fire 
of enemy machine-guns and high explosive shells, 
through an area flooded with gas, to the assistance 
of a wounded comrade who was lying exposed. Ser- 
geant Stowers brought the wounded man safely back 
in his arms. 



[833] 



MAJOR GENERAL CLARENCE R. EDWARDS 

Arrived in France, October 10, 1917. 

Commanded 26th Division, December 8, 1917. 
Engagements : 

Champagne-Marne. 

Aisne-Marne. 

St. Mihiel. 

Meuse-Argonne. 
Born: Ohio, January 1, 1859. 




[337] 



MAJOR GENERAL HARRY C. HALE 

Arrived in France, September 3, 1918. 
Commanded 26th Division, November 16, 1918. 
Born: Illinois, July 10, 1861. 




[341] 




i 




















CHARLES S. HOOVER, Sergeant, 

308th Battery, Trench Artillery, 

158th Field Artillery Brigade. 

Sergeant Hoover was awarded the D. S. C. and the 
Croix de Guerre with gilt star, for his intrepidity 
during the offensive action in the Boissois Bois, where 
he was in charge of trench mortars. This was near 
Brabant-sur-Meuse, October 23, 1918. 
Wounded by shrapnel and knocked down by the ex- 
plosion of bombs, Hoover crawled to the one mortar 
that was undamaged and continued to fire for some 
time, until it and he were put out of action. 



GEORGE W. LANGHAM, Private, 

Company H, 128th Infantry, 

32nd Division. 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near Juvigny, 
north of Soissons, August 20 to September 2, 1918. 
"Though he had been severely gassed Private Lang- 
ham remained on duty with his company while it was 
in the front line. Later, when it was in support, he 
voluntarily aided in the work of carrying wounded 
across an area covered by artillery and machine-gun 
fire." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[345] 



WALTER E. GAULTNEY, Corporal, 

Company K, llth Infantry, 

5th Division. 

Corporal Gaultney was picked out by his commander 
as the example of his finest type of soldier. He was 
wounded, but that couldn't stop him. Alert, inge- 
nious, speedy, heedless of personal danger, he went at 
the Hun like Samson with the well known jaw-bone 
only this young Samson's jaw-bone was that nice 
long trench knife you see strapped along his pack, 
just east of his smile. 



[351] 




,/ 



MAJOR GENERAL CLEMENT A. F. FLAGLER 

Arrived in France, June 11, 1918, with rank of 
Brigadier General. 

Promoted to Major General, October 1, 1918; 
Assignments : 

Commanded 5th Field Artillery Brigade, June 11, 
1918; 

Chief of Artillery, 3rd Corps, October 15 ; 

Commanded 42nd Division, Army of Occupation. 
Engagements : 

St. Mihiel 

Meuse-Argonne. 

Born: Georgia, August 17, 1867. 

Cited by the Commander-in-Chief, A. E. F., April 19, 1919. 
"For exceptionally meritorious and conspicuous services as 
Commanding General, 42nd Division, American Expedition- 
ary Forces." 



[353] 



MAJOR GENERAL JAMES H. McRAE 

Arrived in France, June 8, 1918 
Commanded 78th Division, May 25, 1918. 

Born: Georgia, December 24, 1863. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded with great 
credit the Seventy-eighth Division in the Ar- 
gonne-Meuse offensive and had an important 
part in that operation which forced the enemy 
to abandon Grandpre. In this and other cam- 
paigns his personal influence on the result ob- 
tained showed a rich quality of military leader- 
ship." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[ 357 ] 



CLARENCE W. DAWSON, Mess-Sergeant, 

Company B, 168th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

Colonel Wolf, Chief -of-Staff of Dawson's regiment, 
wrote of this boy as follows: "On March 5, 1918, 
while the 42nd Division was in the earliest days of 
its tuitionary period in trench warfare and the 168th 
Infantry was, in the execution of this program, inter- 
leaved with the 128th French Division, the Germans 
attempted a large scale raid with extremely severe 
artillery preparation and support near Badonviller. 
Sergeant Dawson, then a Corporal, was one of the 
garrison of a small combat group in the front line 
who survived the bombardment, during which the 
trenches and dugouts of his position were battered 
in. Severely wounded and entirely surrounded, he 
met the Germans who were attempting to penetrate 
and "mop up" his position, and with great bravery 
and skill, assisted by a mere handful of the sur- 
vivors of the garrison, ejected all of the raiders from 
our lines and conclusively repelled the attempted 
raid. For his gallantry and courage on this occasion 
he was awarded, upon recommendation of the French 
division commander, the Croix de Guerre." 



[361] 




\ 



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^ 





*&& .* 
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'V 

^ 



BRIGADIER GENERAL WILLIAM W. ATTERBURY 

Arrived in France, August 30, 1917. 
Chief of Railroad Transportation. 

Born: Indiana, January 31, 1866. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As director general of trans- 
portation, in the face of almost insurmountable 
obstacles he organized and brought to a high 
state of efficiency the transportation service of 
American Expeditionary Forces. The suc- 
cessful operation of this most important serv- 
ice, upon which the movements and supply of 
the combat troops were dependent, was largely 
due to his energy, foresight, and ability." 
G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[365] 



- 




MAJOR GENERAL CHARLES H. MUIR 

Arrived in France, May 18, 1918. 
Commanded 28th Division, May 18, 1918; 
Commanded 4th Corps, October 12. 

Born: Michigan, July 18, 1860. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as division and corps com- 
mander. Commanding the Twenty-eighth 
Division during the Argonne-Meuse offensive, 
and especially in the difficult operations which 
resulted in the clearing of the Argonne Forest, 
he proved himself to be an energetic leader 
of the highest professional attainments. As a 
corps commander he displayed the same fine 
qualities that characterized his service with a 
division." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[" 369 ] 



MAJOR GENERAL MARK L. HERSEY 

Arrived in France, June 8, 1918, with rank of Briga- 
dier General. 

Promoted to Major General, October 1, 1918; 

Commanded 4th Division, October 31, 1918. 
Born: Maine, December 1, 1863. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As a brigade commander 
during the latter part of the Meuse-Argonne 
operation he exhibited qualities of excellent 
leadership and sound judgment. His brigade 
attacked and penetrated the strong enemy 
position of Bois des Loges and wrested this 
strong point from the enemy. The success of 
his brigade in this engagament was in a large 
measure due to his able leadership. Later he 
commanded with distinction the 4th Division 
during its operations in the occupied terri- 
tory." G. O. 62 (May 10, 1919). 



[373] 








A 



JAMES M. SYMINGTON, First Lieutenant, 

Intelligence Officer of the 1st Battalion, 23rd Infantry, 
2nd Division. 

"Showed unhesitating bravery and devotion during 
the attack on the enemy June 6, 1918, near Chateau- 
Thierry, when, the officers of two platoons having 
been killed and the men, not knowing their objective, 
having been thrown into great confusion and suffering 
heavy losses, he voluntarily and outside of his regular 
duty rushed in front of the firing line and assisted 
in reorganizing the men and leading them toward the 
proper objective; this in the face of artillery and 
machine-gun barrage. 

"The objective was taken, a small reverse changed 
into a success and the men saved from useless de- 
struction." 



BURTON M. BAKER, Private, 

Machine Gun Company, 168th Infantry. 
Baker began his fighting career on the Lorraine 
front, near Badonviller, on the 5th of March, 1918. 
His battalion was in the trenches for the first time. 
The enemy attacked in great strength, after heavy 
artillery preparation. Most of his comrades in his 
unit were killed or wounded and the oncoming Boches 
far outnumbered the small group of Americans. Just 
then Private Baker, by his disregard of personal 
danger, showed a dashing example to his remaining 
fellows and the Boche attack was utterly repulsed. 



[377] 



I 









MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM WEIGEL 

Arrived in France, May 12, 1918, with rank of Briga- 
dier General. 

Promoted to Major General, August 8, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 56th Brigade, 28th Division ; 
Commanded 88th Division, November 5. 
Born: New Jersey, August 25, 1863. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As commander of a brigade 
of the Twenty-eighth Division in the fighting 
on the Vesle of August, 1918, he inspired con- 
fidence by his constant activities and his ag- 
gressive pressing of the enemy at every oppor- 
tunity, which resulted in driving the hostile 
forces across the Vesle northward toward the 
Aisne." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[383] 




V 



BRIGADIER GENERAL GEORGE V. H. MOSELEY 

Arrived in France, September, 1917, with rank of 

Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General, June 26, 1918; 
Assistant Chief of Staff, G. H. Q., 4th Section (Co- 
ordination). 

Born: Illinois, September 28, 1874. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and conspicu- 
ous services as assistant chief of staff. He 
handled with great executive ability and rare 
understanding all problems of equipping and 
supplying the large numbers of American 
troops arrived and operating in France, and 
by his large grasp of supply problems and 
tireless energy he has conspicuously aided the 
successful administration of the supply depart- 
ment." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[ 385 ] 





a 




W^i ,,.) . 

^Ife 



MAJOR GENERAL CHARLES G. MORTON 

Arrived in France, June 27, 1918. 
Commanded 29th Division, July 6, 1918. 

Born: Maine, January 15, 1861. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He commanded the Twenty- 
ninth Division from the date of its organiza- 
tion until the end of hostilities; and led this 
division with skill and ability in the successful 
operations east and northeast of Verdun 
which forced the enemy to maintain this front 
with strong forces, thus preventing an increase 
of hostile strength between the Argonne and 
the Meuse." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[389] 




f 



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BRIG. GENERAL MERRIWEATHER L. WALKER 

Arrived in France, December 10, 1917, with rank of 

Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General, June 26, 1918. 
Director of Motor Transport Corps ("Gas 

Hounds"). 

Born: Virginia, September 30, 1869. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 




[393 ] 



DEWEY HALPHEN, Private, 

Company I, 28th Infantry, 

1st Division. 

This boy received the D. S. C. and the Croix de 
Guerre for conspicuous gallantry in action during 
the capture and defense of Cantigny, May 27-31, 
1918. One of his acts of heroism was a knife duel 
with one of the enemy who had attacked him. Hal- 
phen succeeded in killing his attacker. An on-looker 
said that the participants in the duel looked like 
David and Goliath. 

His citation as given in General Orders 99 further 
states that Halphen acted as liaison agent during the 
fight at Cantigny with courageous disregard of his 
own safety. In this citation he is listed as a private 
of Company M, 37th Infantry. 



CARL C. MAYHEW, First Lieutenant, 

101st Infantry, 

26th Division. 

"For skill and courage displayed while making a dar- 
ing patrol in the enemy's front line trenches on the 
night of May 8, 1918, resulting in the death of two 
German officers, and the gathering of valuable in- 
formation." 

Lieutenant Mayhew participated in forty-four raids 
and received three citations. 
Croix de Guerre. 



[397] 



MAJOR GENERAL JAMES W. McANDREW 

Arrived in France, June 28, 1917, with rank of 
Colonel. 

Promotions : 

Brigadier General, August 5, 1917 ; 
Major General, April 12, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Commanded Army Schools at Langres ; 
Chief of Staff, A. E. F., May 3, 1918. 

Born : Pennsylvania, June 29, 1862. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as chief of staff of the Ameri- 
can Expeditionary Forces. The development 
of the Army schools in France is largely due 
to his marked ability as an organizer and to 
his brilliant professional attainments. As 
chief of staff of the American Expeditionary 
Forces during the period of active operations, 
he has met every demand of his important 
position; by his advice and decisions he has 
materially contributed to the success of these 
forces; and he has at all times enjoyed in full 
the confidence of the commander-in-chief." 
G. O. 136 (December 20, 1918). 



[401] 



' 




BRIGADIER GENERAL LE ROY ELTINGE 

Arrived in France, July 27, 1917, with rank of Lieu- 
tenant Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Colonel, August 5, 1917; 
Brigadier General, August 1, 1918. 
Deputy Chief of Staff, G. H. Q., May 6, 1918. 
Born: New York, September 17, 1872. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. By his untiring efforts, his 
great ability, and his devotion to duty he has 
rendered most conspicuous services to the 
Government as deputy chief of staff of the 
American Expeditionary Forces." G. O. 12 
(January 17, 1919). 



[405 ] 



GEORGE W. PURYEAR, First Lieutenant. 

Air Service, Pilot. 

Lieutenant Puryear was the first American officer 
to escape from a German prison. He was captured 
July 26, 1918, north of Chateau-Thierry, and con- 
fined in four different prison camps in Germany. 
He escaped the first time from Friedrichferter Prison 
Camp, Rastatt, August 5th, and was recaptured 
August 8th, before getting out of Germany. He es- 
caped again October 6th, this time from Villingen, 
and reached Switzerland October llth, after swim- 
ming the Rhine a little below the junction of the 
Aar. While making his escape he was shot at six 
times, at distances varying in range from ten to fifty 
yards, and escaped being hit because he ran at the 
guard who was shooting at him, instead of away from 
the guard, thus, as he had hoped, confusing the enemy. 



[409] 



MAJOR GENERAL FRANK L. WINN 

Arrived in France, June 13, 1918, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 

Promoted to Major General, October 1, 1918. 
Commanded 89th Division, July 13, 1918. 

Born: Kentucky, August 4, 1864. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As commander of the 177th 
Infantry Brigade and later of the 89th Divi- 
sion, he displayed military attainments of a 
high order and achieved signal successes. In 
the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives 
he accompanied the assaulting battalions and 
placed them on their objectives, inspiring all 
by his personal courage and gaining their con- 
fidence by his exceptional tactical skill and 
ability as a leader. At all times he was tireless 
in energy, showing keen judgment and initia- 
tive in handling difficult situations." G. O. 62 
(May 10, 1919). 



[ 413 ] 




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CARL W. DASCH, Private, 

Headquarters Company, 167th Infantry, 

42nd Division. 

Captain Robert Joerg, Jr., commanding the com- 
pany of which Dasch was a private, spoke of the 
boy's distinguished bravery and exceptional devotion 
to duty in action near Croix Rouge Farm, July 26 
to August 1, 1918, in these words: 
"Private Carl W. Dasch, during this entire period 
(six days and nights), while attached to the Third 
Battalion, carried messages between the firing line 
and Battalion Headquarters, through heavy enemy 
shell fire. Upon returning from the firing line he 
would pick up a severely wounded man and carry 
him through and out of the barrage to a first aid sta- 
tion. Finally, he was so badly gassed that he could 
not see, but had to be given a direct order to report 
to the first aid station. During the whole series of 
engagements, Private Dasch did not sleep and taxed 
his physical endurance to the utmost, at all times 
setting to his comrades an example of utter disregard 
of danger and exceptional devotion to duty." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[417] 



MAJOR GENERAL SAMUEL D. STURGIS 

Arrived in France, September 10, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded 87th Division; 

Commanded 80th Division, November 19, 1918. 
Born: Missouri, August 1, 1861. 



[421] 




v t9.irif\6 
Ch a f. 



WILLIAM HERREN, First Sergeant, 

Machine Gun Company, 58th Infantry. 
"For extraordinary heroism in action near Ville- 
Savoye, August 7/1918." 

This soldier showed great bravery and devotion to 
duty throughout this action. On the morning of 
August 7, 1918, Herren supplied the Company with 
spare machine-guns and ammunition through a 
deadly artillery barrage after several carrying details 
had failed to get through. The company had lost 
four machine-guns and was practically without am- 
munition at this time. After distributing machine- 
guns and ammunition to the different platoons under 
terrific machine-gun fire, he showed extraordinary 
heroism by pushing forward on the right flank with 
a captured light German Maxim machine-gun and 
repulsing a counter-attack. At this time the bat- 
talion on the right flank had fallen back, leaving that 
flank unprotected. Sergeant Herren showed com- 
plete disregard for personal safety and displayed 
great resourcefulness throughout the entire action. 
Sergeant Herren's gas mask is exhibited in the paint- 
ing, because he wished to be "taken" with his "best 
friend." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



[425] 









m 




BRIGADIER GENERAL AVERY D. ANDREWS 

Arrived in France, December 1, 1917, with rank of 

Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General, October 13, 1918. 
Assistant Chief of Staff, Chief of First Section (Ad- 
ministration), G. H. Q. 
Born: New York, April 4, 1864. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as assistant chief of staff, 
American Expeditionary Forces. He has 
rendered most efficient service in connection 
with the organization and administration of 
the transportation department of the Ameri- 
can Army in France and as deputy chief of 
utilities in the services of supply. Later, with 
marked ability, he headed the important ad- 
ministrative section of the general staff of the 
American Expeditionary Forces." G. O. 12 
(January 17, 1919). 



[429] 



MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM LASSITER 

At commencement of war was on duty as Military 
Attache in London. 

Promotions : 

Brigadier General, August 5, 1917 ; 
Major General, August 8, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Commanded 51st Field Artillery Brigade, 26th Divi- 
sion, November, 1917; 

Chief of Artillery, 1st Army Corps, May, 1918; 
Chief of Artillery, 4th Army Corps, August, 1918 ; 
Chief of Artillery, 2nd Army, October, 1918 ; 
Later commanded 32nd Division in Army of Occu- 
pation. 

Born: Virginia, September 29, 1867. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As commander of the Fifty- 
first Field Brigade, as chief of Artillery of the 
First and Fourth Army Corps in turn, and as 
chief of Artillery, Second Army, he showed 
himself to be a leader of conspicuous ability. 
His energy and sound judgment influenced 
greatly the successful operations of his com- 
mands on the Vesle, at the St. Mihiel salient, 
and in the Toul sector. He later commanded 
with skill and a marked success the Thirty- 
second Infantry Division." G. O. 12 (Janu- 
ary 17, 1919). 



f 433 ] 





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X 






WILLIAM A. SNOW, Major, 

Corps of Engineers. 

2nd Division. 

Arrived in France September, 1917, as Captain, Co. 
E, 2nd Engineers, 2nd Division. 
He was cited four times in Division orders and twice 
recommended for the Distinguished Service Cross. 
He went into the line first at Verdun, March, 1918. 
When the British were attacked by the Bodies in the 
vicinity of Beauvais, in April, he was with them. He 
received his majority in time to be in command of 
a battalion at Chateau-Thierry. His battalion acted 
as Infantry and as Engineers. During this period 
he was wounded twice once on June 12th, in the 
famous attack on the Bois de Belleau, and once on 
July 5th while working on wire entanglements. He 
was again in the fighting in the line south of Soissons 
in the Allied Counter Offensive beginning July 18th. 
His regiment had the Croix de Guerre pinned on its 
colors for its work in this fight. At Pont-a-Mousson 
he was again engaged on trench and wire entangle- 
ments and later participated in the St. Mihiel Drive. 
His battalion for its work at Chateau-Thierry was 
cited by General Harbord and by General Bundy. 



JOHN W. STEWART, Lieutenant Colonel, 

Corps of Engineers, 

3rd Division. 

Arrived in France as Major of the 6th Engineers, 
3rd Division, December, 1917. 

After participating in several operations on the Brit- 
ish front, he with his regiment joined the Third Divi- 



[437] 



sion under General Dickman, participating in the 
counter-offensive against the Germans July 15, 1918. 
He carried out special operations, building bridges 
for the Infantry out of captured German pontoons 
and trestle bridges for heavy artillery, which made 
possible the crossing of the Marne. After the Vesle, 
he participated in the reduction of St. Mihiel; later, 
in the American advance between the Argonne and 
the Meuse, he was second in command of his regiment, 
carrying out its special operations in the building 
of bridges on the Marne at Mezy and Joulgonne. 
Practically all of his work was done under heavy 
fire and he was many times mentioned in orders for 
his intrepidity and extraordinary efficiency in action. 



RICHARD T. SMITH, Major, 

117th Field Battalion, Signal Corps, 

"Before daylight on the morning of March 17, 1918, 
sixty-nine men of the 117th Field Battalion Signal 
Corps, in charge of Captain Richard T. Smith, were 
constructing communication lines in the vicinity of 
Fort de Manonvilles, France. Between five and six 
o'clock a violent bombardment of this section was 
started by the enemy. Private Wilbur Wilkerson, 
Company A, was mortally wounded, Private William 
Walter, Company B, was wounded in the back, and 
several were knocked to the ground by shells explod- 
ing near them. 

"Captain Smith conducted the men to a place of 
safety and while under fire returned and carried Pri- 
vate Wilkerson to a dugout. The clothing of Cap- 
tain Smith was wet with blood of the wounded man, 
and he fell exhausted when he reached the dugout." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 

[439] 



HENRY E. BUNCH, Major, 

Medical Corps, 168th Infantry, 

"For extraordinary heroism in action near the Bois 
de Chatillon, October 13-16, 1918. 
"During the advance of his regiment in the Verdun 
sector Captain Bunch established aid stations at 
points as far advanced as possible and supervised 
them throughout the combat, working continuously, 
tirelessly and fearlessly without food or rest. On 
October 14th this officer went out in advance of the 
front line to reconnoiter a site for an aid station and 
an ambulance route. Seeing a wounded officer lying 
about 300 meters from the enemy's line, he went to 
his rescue and carried him through terrific machine- 
gun and rifle fire to a shell hole, where he administered 
first aid, in entire disregard of his own safety." 
Distinguished Service Cross. 



GEORGE L. WATSON, Lieutenant Colonel, 

General Staff Headquarters, 

3rd Army. 

Watson, as Captain commanding Company B, 30th 
Engineers (Offensive Gas) was attached to the 1st 
British Army. Later he was in command of the 
1st Battalion, 30th Engineers, attached to the 8th 
French Army. As Major commanding the 1st Bat- 
talion, he was attached to the First Army Corps and 
the 4th Army Corps, A. E. F. After the signing 
of the Armistice he was detailed to the General Staff 
and promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, on 
the General Staff of the 3rd Army. 
He was wounded three times and mentioned in Or- 



[ 443 1 



ders five times. He was awarded many decorations, 
French, English, Belgian, Portuguese and American. 
The Legion of Honor and the Croix de Guerre with 
Palm were awarded him "For his success in carrying 
out the first American Gas Projector Attack against 
the Germans and standing for two hours in gas which 
the Germans had thrown." 



MAJOR GENERAL WILLIAM R. SMITH 

Arrived in France, July 31, 1918. 

Commanded 36th Division, August 3, 1918. 
Born: Tennesse, April 2, 1868. 

The 36th Division fought with the Fourth French 
Army. 

"The 36th Division, U. S. A., recently organized, 
and still not fully equipped, received, during the 
night of the 6th of October, the order to relieve, 
under conditions particularly delicate, the 2nd Divi- 
sion, to drive out the enemy from the heights to the 
north of St. Atienne-a-Arnes, and to push him back 
to the Aisne. Although being under fire for the first 
time, the young soldiers of General Smith, rivalling 
in push and tenacity the older valiant regiments of 
General Lejeune, accomplished their mission fully. 
All can be proud of the work done. To all, the Gen- 
eral commanding the Army Corps is happy to ex- 
press his cordial appreciation, gratitude, and best 
wishes for future success. The past is assurance of 
the future. General Naulin." G. O. of the 21st 
French Army Corps. 



[ 447 ] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL HARRY A. SMITH 

Arrived in France, November 25, 1917, with rank of 
Colonel. 

Promoted to Brigadier General, June 26, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded Army Schools at Langres, May 1, 1918 ; 
In charge of Civil Affairs in German occupied terri- 
tory, December 1. 
Born: Kansas, June 18, 1866. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He rendered most conspicu- 
ous service as commandant of the Army 
schools at Langres, France, the success of 
which was, in a large measure, due to his vision, 
zeal, and administrative ability. He later 
showed marked executive ability as officer in 
charge of the administration of civil affairs 
in the German territory occupied by the Amer- 
ican Army." G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[451] 







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MAJOR GENERAL ERNEST HINDS 

Arrived in France, October 5, 1917, with rank of 

Brigadier General. 

Promoted to Major General, April 12, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Commanded Field Artillery Schools at Saumur; 
Commanded First Corps Artillery at Souge; 
Commanded First Army Artillery, February 26, 

1918; 

Chief of Artillery, A. E. F. 
Born: Alabama, August 18, 1864. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services as chief of Artillery, First 
Army Corps; commanding general, Army Ar- 
tillery, of the First American Army, and as 
chief of Artillery, American Expeditionary 
Forces. He perfected and successfully di- 
rected the organization and training of the 
Artillery of the American Army in France." 
G. O. 12 (January 17, 1919). 



[455] 



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BRIGADIER GENERAL HAROLD B. FISKE 

Arrived in France, August 28, 1917, with rank of 
Lieutenant Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Colonel, January 22, 1918; 

Brigadier General, June 26, 1918; 

Assistant Chief of Staff, G. H. Q., Chief of Fifth 

Division (Training). 
Born: Oregon, November 6, 1871. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. In charge of the training 
section of the General Staff, this brilliant offi- 
cer perfected and administered the efficient 
scheme of instruction through which the Amer- 
ican Army in France was thoroughly trained 
for combat in the shortest possible time. By 
his great depth of vision, his foresight, and 
his clear conception of modern tactical train- 
ing he has enabled our forces to enter each 
engagement with that preparedness and effi- 
ciency that have distinguished the American 
Army in each battle." G. O. 12 (January 
17, 1919). 



[459] 




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WHITNEY D. SHERMAN, Corporal, 

18th Company, 5th Regiment, Marines, 
2nd Division. 

His Captain, John R. Foster, said "Sherman was 
wounded in action at Belleau Woods, June 10, 1918. 
This man is a typical marine and showed himself to 
be a brave and valiant soldier at the Battle of Belleau 
Woods, now known as the Bois de la Brigade de 
Marines. It was such brave and gallant men as 
Corporal Sherman proved himself to be who won the 
great battle." 



[463] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL MALIN CRAIG 

Arrived in France, October 5, 1917, with rank of 

Lieutenant Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Colonel, February 6, 1918; 
Brigadier General, June 26, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Chief of Staff, 5th Division, October 17, 1918; 
Chief of Staff, 1st Army Corps; 
Chief of Staff, 3rd Army, November, 1918. 
Born: Missouri, August 5, 1875. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He served in turn as chief 
of staff of a division, a corps, and an army, 
in each of which capacities he exhibited great 
ability. His personal influence, aggressive- 
ness, and untiring efforts were repeatedly dis- 
played in the operations of the First Corps in 
the vicinity of Chateau-Thierry, on the Ourcq, 
and the Vesle during the St. Mihiel and Ar- 
gonne-Meuse offensives." G. O. 12 (January 
17, 1919). 



[467] 



BRIGADIER GENERAL GEORGE S. GIBBS 

Arrived in France, October 13, 1917. 
Assistant Chief Signal Officer. 

Born: Iowa, December 14, 1875. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

'Tor exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As assistant to the chief sig- 
nal officer, American Expeditionary Forces, 
much of the efficiency of the Signal Service 
in the zone of advance was due to his splendid 
ability and to his skill in the handling of the 
tactical and technical operations of the Signal 
Corps organizations attached to the service at 
the front." G. O. 59 (May 3, 1919). 

BRIGADIER GENERAL EDWARD L. KING 

Arrived in France, October 5, 1917, with rank of 

Lieutenant Colonel. 
Promotions : 

Colonel, November 5, 1917 ; 
Brigadier General, June 2, 1918. 
Assignments : 

Chief of Staff, 28th Division, August 25, 1917; 
Commanded 65th Brigade, 33rd Division, August 1, 

1918. 

Born: Massachusetts, December 5, 1873. 
Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. He served, with marked dis- 
tinction, as chief of staff of the 28th Division. 
Later, as brigadier commander, he planned 
and directed the operations resulting in the 
capture by the 65th Infantry Brigade of Cha- 
teau d'Aulnois and Marcheville, where he dis- 
played great tactical skill and demonstrated 
his abilities as a commander." G. O. 59 (May 
3, 1919). 

[471] 



COLONEL ARTHUR L. CONGER 

Arrived in France, May, 1917, with rank of Major. 

Promotions : 

Lieutenant Colonel, August 5, 1917 ; 
Colonel, July 30, 1918. 

Assignments : 

Second Section, General Staff, G. H. Q. ; 
Commanded 56th Brigade. 

Born: Ohio, January 30, 1872. 

Distinguished Service Medal. 

"For exceptionally meritorious and distin- 
guished services. As a member of the Second 
Section, General Staff, General Headquar- 
ters, by his marked professional attainments, 
his zeal, and his sound judgment he contrib- 
uted largely to the successful operation of this 
section. As chief of the Second Section, Gen- 
eneral Staff, of the 2d Division, during active 
operations, and later as commander of the 56th 
Brigade of the 29th Division during the Ar- 
gonne-Meuse offensive, he demonstrated his 
great energy and his clear conception of tac- 
tics." G. O. 59 (May 3, 1919). 

SENIOR OFFICERS' MESS 

Army of Occupation : 

Colonel Alvan C. Read, Inspector General. 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert G. Peck, Assistant In- 
spector General. 

Major Charles H. Rice, Assistant Inspector General. 

Colonel Irvin L. Hunt, in Charge of Civil Affairs. 

Lieutenant Colonel Kyle Rucker, Judge Advocate. 

Lieutenant Colonel Nat. B. Barnwell, Assistant Judge 
Advocate. 

Major Roscoe D. Brown, Personnel Officer. 

[475] 




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