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P28964, 

1462249 



3ENEALOGY COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC 



3 1833 01411 5940 



SOME ACCOUNT 



OF 

NEW YORK AND PENNSYLVANIA 



BY 

JOSIAH GRANVILLE LEACH, LL.B. 



LANCASTER : 

WlCKERSHAM PRESS 
1918 



Reprinted with additions from the Publications of The Genealogical 
Society of Pennsylvania, March, 1918 



1462249 



SOME ACCOUNT OF THE PAWLING FAMILY OF NEW 
YORK AND PENNSYLVANIA. 



Henry Pawling,* a gallant young Englishman of means, 
education, and enterprise, came to America in 1664, in the 
military expedition sent out by the Duke of York and Albany 
to secure the patent accorded to him in that year, by his royal 
brother, King Charles II. The patent covered all the terri- 
tory from Maine to the Delaware River, and measures were at 
once taken for the reduction df the Dutch. The expedition, 
under Sir Richard Nicolls, a colonel in the English army, 
sailed from Portsmouth, England, 18 May, 1664, and arrived 
at New Netherlands in August. By September,! New Am- 
sterdam and Fort Orange had surrendered, and the whole 
territory came under the control of the Duke of York and his 
agent and governor, Colonel Nicolls,t and its name changed 
to that of New York. One of the earliest acts of the new gov- 
ernment was the establishment of a garrison for protection 

* In England, his surname appears under various spellings, and, as Pawlin, 
is found, 22 Edward III, at Odcombe, Co. Stafford, where the family bore for 
arms : On a chevron between three cinquefoils, as many darts' heads broken 
at the shaft. It will be noted that in this ancient arms no tinctures are 
given in the blazon. In Yorkshire, another branch of the same stock bore 
the following : Azure on a bend or, between six lozenges of the second, each 
charged with an escallop sable, five escallops of the last. 

t New Netherland surrendered to the English, 29 Aug., 1664. — New York 
Calendar of Council Minutes. 

X See " Biograpny of Richard Nicolls," in the Neic York Genealogical on* 
Biographical Record, vol. xv, p. 103. 



2 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

against the Indians at Esopus,* later Kingston, Ulster County, 
and the promotion of settlements in this district. Lands were 
promised to the ' ' soldiers and all other persons who had come 
over into these parts with Colonel Nicolls," and M r Pawling 
was appointed, 9 November, 1668, to lay out lands at Esopus 
Creek to induce the former to become settlers.t The garrison, 
of which Henry Pawling was a member and probably an 
officer, was maintained until the autumn of 1669, when, all fear 
of Indian depredations having ceased, the troops were with- 
drawn from service.! On 9 September of this year Sir Fran- 
cis Lovelace, having succeeded Colonel Nicolls as governor,!! 
appointed seven leading men of the Province a commission to 
"regulate affairs at Esopus and the New Dorpes," with Mr. 
Pawling as one of the commissioners. This body sat as a Special 
Court, at Esopus, from September 17th. to 29th., inclusive, 
during which time it located sites for the villages of Hurley 
and Marbletown, heard grievances, made redress, passed ordi- 
nances for the general betterment and government of the 
locality and appointed officers to carry out the same.§ Among 
the latter, "M r Pawling was Voted to be y e Officer to whom y e 
Indyans should repaire for Redress of Injuryes in Kingston,** 
Hurley tt and Marbletown." This appointment was due, 
doubtless, to the fact that, while at the garrison, he had be- 

* Esopus, or " Sopus," as known to the early Dutch, included Kingston and 
the country south of the Rondout. The Esopus Indians who inhabited the 
region were of Algonquin stock, allied to the Mohegan and other river tribes. 

t Brodhead's History of the State of New York, vol. ii, p. 656. 

t New York State Library Bulletin 58, Calendar of Council Minutes, 1668— 
1783, p. 10. 

II Governor Nicolls was in service in an official capacity as late as 21 August, 
1668. The earliest record of Sir Francis Lovelace as governor bears date 23 
May, 1668 ; while " Instructions for the well regulating of ye Militia and 
other officers at Albany," were signed by both governors in August, 1668. 

§ Report of State Historian of New York, Colonial Series, vol. i, pp. 264- 
269 ; Minutes of the Executive Council of the Province of New York, vol. i, 
pp. 256-282. 

** Kingston, so named in compliment to Governor Lovelace's maternal seat 
at Kingston Lisle, near Wantage in Berkshire. 

tt So called from Hurley House, originally a monastery known as Lady 
Place, in a wooded valley near Maidenhead, on the Thames, in Berkshire. The 
manor came into possession of the Lovelace family in the sixteenth century 
and the house was built by Sir Richard Lovelace, whose son became Baron 
Lovelace of Hurley. In the vault beneath the house frequent meetings were 
held during the reign of James II., and, according to an inscription on its 
walls, several consultations for calling in the Prince of Orange were there held. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 3 

come acquainted with the Indian tongue and displayed marked 
ability to deal with this people. So acceptably did he meet the 
demands of the complex position that the Governor and 
Council, on 27 January, 1673, voted that, he "be thanked for 
his vigilance concerning the Esopus Indians. ' ' * 

By another appointment of Governor Lovelace, he was again 
commissioner of a Special Court, held at the Town Hall in 
Kingston, from 30 March to 11 April, 1670, "for setting out 
the Boundaries of Kingston, Hurley, and Marbleton, and for 
Regulating the affairs of these places and y e parts adjacent," 
Captain Dudley Lovelace, brother of the Governor, being 
President of the Court.! The Court Minutes of April 11th 
bear the signatures of the gentlemen justices, of which none 
is in a more elegant hand than that of Henry Pawling.t 

On Easter Monday, 4 April of this year, he was made Cap- 
tain, with instructions "to raise and exercise the inhabitants 
of Hurley and Marbleton according to the discipline of war, 
proclamation of this fact being forthwith made by beat of 
drum publiquely in the Towne of Kingston." He was, fur- 
ther, "appointed to be present at the Rendezvous at Marble- 
ton Tomorrow y e 5th of April." That he kept the appoint- 
ment the following testifies : 

"Tuesday April 5th, 1670. — This day Capt Pawlings ffoot Company 
appeared at Bendevouse -where they were musterd & exercised in their 
arms. The President also caused all the Laws relating to the Military 
Affaires to be read before them, and then marched them with faying 
colours to the Towne of Hurley and there dismissed them. The Colours 
were Lodg with a Guard at the Town Hall in Kingston, where the Soul- 
diers were commanded to appeare next day in Court to draw their lots. " || 

One day later, 6 April, he and his lieutenant, Christopher 
Beresford, received grants of land in Marbletown,|| and on the 
7th, "Captain Pawling" was made "Viewer for measuring 
and laying out of the Home Lots and Streets of Hurley and 
Marbleton," and for the determining of the fencing of these 

* New York State Library Bulletin 68, Calendar of Council Minutes, p. IS. 

t Minutes of the Executive Council of the Province of New York, vol. i, 
pp. 256-282. 

X Ibid., Fac-simile of last page Court proceedings, with signatures facing 
p. 286. 

|| Report of State Historian of New York, Colonial Series, vol. i, pp. 290, 
291, 295, 379. 



4 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

lots and lands. He was also chosen to supervise the building 
of a bridge * at Marbletown, in which latter service he was to 
be assisted by "Captain Thomas Chambers,! Surveyor Gen- 
eral of his Ma 'ties High- ways." 

Twelve days thereafter his commission as Captain was 
signed by Governor Lovelace, a draft of which is of record in 
the Colonial Archives and reads : 

"To Henry Pawling Capt 'a By Vertue of ye Commission & 

authority unto mee given (by H's Royall Highness I do constitute & ap- 
point) you Henry Pawling & you are hereby constituted & appointed to 
bee Capt of the foot comp 'y listed & to be listed in the Townes of 
Marbleton & Hurley & Wyltwyck at Esopus. You are to take into y'r 
charge & care the s 'd comp 'a as Capt 'a thereof & duly to exercise both 
yer inferior offie'ers & souldy'ers in Armes & to use y'er best care skill 
& endeavor to keepe them in good orders & discipline, hereby requiring all 
inferior officers & souldy'ers under yer charge to — likewise to observe & 
follow such orders & directions as you shall from time to time receive 
from mee & other your superior officers according to the discipline of 
warre. 

' ' Given under my hand & seale this 18th day of Apr in ye 22th year© 
of his Ma 'ties Eeigne Annoq Domini 1670. ' ' 

On the back of the draft is an endorsement by Governor 
Lovelace, which reads in part as follows: "Whereas, Mr. 
Henry Pawling came over a soldier with my predecessor 
Colonel Richard Nicolls" . . . . t 

Without doubt, Captain Pawling continued to exercise his 
military office, in connection with his civil one, as a court of 
appeals in Indian affairs, until that unexpected event, the re- 
occupation of New York by the Dutch in 1673. The occupa- 
tion lasted only until July, 1674, when a treaty of peace re- 
stored it to English rule, and Sir Edmund Andross was sent 
over as governor, in whose first administration, or that of the 
previous Dutch interim, Captain Pawling would seem to have 
had no place. There was a quick succession of gubernatorial 
incumbents in New York, which at that time numbered about 

* Report of State Historian of New York, Colonial Series, vol. 1, pp. 290. 
291, 295, 379. 

t Captain Thomas Chambers, the hero of Fort Wiltwyck in the Indian raid 
of 1663, and the original patentee of the manorial grant of Pox Hall, which 
was invested, by Governor Dongan in 1686, with power to hold Court Leet 
and Court Baron. 

X Report of State Historian of New York, Colonial Series, vol. i, p. 379. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 5 

40,000 inhabitants, and polities and religious bias, as in Eng- 
land, went hand in hand. The "Anglican Andross" was re- 
placed by the "Papist Governor" Thomas Dongan, who, in 
turn, gave way for a second Andross regime in the person of 
his agent, Lieutenant-Governor Francis Nicholson. 

The division of the colony into counties was one of the 
earliest of Governor Dongan 's administrative acts, and Ulster 
County, so called from the Duke of York's Irish title, was 
established under that of 1 November, 1683. Two years later 
Captain Pawling was appointed by the governor its High 
Sheriff,* a position of dignity and responsibility which 
marked the measure of the man, and in which, for four years, 
he gave unqualified satisfaction. In February, 1689, he re- 
sponded to a call for assistance in the war then pending 
against the French and Indians, and marched with a detach- 
ment of volunteers to Albany, where he arrived on the 13th 
of that month.t At Albany, he was a member of the Con- 
vention, composed of prominent military and civil officers, 
which assembled on the 15th for the consideration of meas- 
ures defensive and offensive, Peter Schuyler, Mayor of Al- 
bany, being president. Schenectady had been burned by the 
savages; diverse of its inhabitants were in captivity; imme- 
diate action was necessary, and, on the 21st, among other 
resolutions, 

"Itt was Proposed to yt gentn of Sopus to levy 50 men out of there 
County for our assistance to lye in Garrison here, who Eeplyed that they 
would use all Endevors to Perswade there People for a Supply, but by 
there unhappy Eevolutions and Distractions Some adhering to ye first 
majestracy oyres to there new leaders They cannot Execute yt Power & 
Command as is Eequisite on such occasions People being under no Regu- 
lation. Eesolved to write to ye Civill & Military officers of Sopus for ye 
assistance of 50 men to lye in Garrison here to Defend there Majes King 
William & queen Mary 's Interest in these Parts. ' ' % 

The ' ' unhappy Revolutions and Distractions, ' ' alluded to by 
the gentlemen from Esopus, were, largely, those engendered by 
the supporters of the quondam Lieutenant-Governor Leisler, 

* New York Civil List, p. 45. 

t " Capt. Garten, Capt. Paling, Capt. Buckman, Capt. Matthys, with thirty 
men came from Sopus." — O'Callaghan's Documentary History of the State of 
New York, vol. ii, p. 88. 

t Ibid., pp. 41-2. 



6 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

and it would appear that, Captain Pawling and his associates 
did not desire to commit themselves or their constituency to 
the Leislerian policy of the hour. No record evidence is at 
hand to show him, at any time, a supporter of the first real 
republican ruler to attain to power in the new world, or, to 
have been an accessory to the death of the only political 
martyr to stain with his blood the soil of New York. 

An interesting sidelight on the character of the subject of 
this sketch, and his vision of men and means, is to be found in 
the circumstance of his being, in 1666, while still in garrison 
service, so large a purchaser at the sale of Dr. Gysbert van 
Imbrock's library at Esopus. This was a remarkable sale of 
books for the time and place, and, it is perhaps equally re- 
markable that the titles thereof, together with the names of 
the purchasers and the prices paid, have been so largely pre- 
served. Three hundred and sixty-eight books, at a cost of 130 
gulden, were bought by Mr. Pawling, many of a religious 
nature, others school books. Exquisite Proofs of Human 
Misery, Megapolensis ' Short Way, Borstius' Succinct Ideas, 
a French Catechism, Stories of David, and a Gardiner's Book 
are a few of the suggestive titles of his acquisition.* 

Eleven years thereafter, 1676, as a signatory to the petition 
''for a minister to preach both Inglish and Dutche, wch. will 
bee most fitting for this place, it being in its Minority," the 
man again stands out in the open, large, liberal, kindly. 

His worldly goods and acres increased with his years. In 
addition to his first grants in the uplands of Marbletown, 
where he continued to reside, he secured by petition, in or 
about 1677, some twenty acres at Hurley, adjoining the Wash- 
maker's lands, and also another tract at "Cuxing,"t on the 
west of Redoubt Kills t with a piece of woodland, together 
with forty additional acres at Marbletown. Shortly before 
his decease he purchased ten thousand acres known as Paw- 
ling's Purchase, on the east side of the Hudson River in 
Dutchess County, near Crum Elbow, a portion of which is 
now the pleasant village of Staatsburgh. The description of 

* American Record Series A., Ulster County Wills, vol. i, pp. U4-5. 
•f- Koxing Creek, a tributary of Rondout Creek. 
% Redoubt Kills, i. e. Rondout Creek. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 7 

its survey,* for Jacob Regniers by Angus Graham, Surveyor 
General, 5 April, 1704, includes the patent of four thousand 
acres granted to the widow Pawling and her children,! 11 
May, 1696. The present town of Pawling t in Dutchess 
County, through which runs the Harlem division of the New 
York Central Railroad, links the memory of this pioneer, 
together with that of his son, Ensign Albert Pawling, for 
whom it was so named, to the intimate association of to-day 's 
activities. In 1778 a considerable detachment of American 
troops were stationed at Pawling, and for a time General 
Washington had his headquarters there. 

The connection, if any, between Captain Henry Pawling of 
Ulster County and the Henry Pawling, said to have been of 
Padbury in Buckinghamshire, one of William Perm's sup- 
porters in his proposed Holy Experiment, the founding and 
settling of Pennsylvania, and a purchaser in 1681 of one thou- 
sand acres of Penn 's fair lands along the Neshaminy, with two 
lots in his ' ' dream city of Philadelphia, ' ' has not been ascer- 
tained. That they were not identical, as was suggested in Mrs. 
J. Frank Kitts' valuable article, the "Lineage of the Pawling 
Family," II or, in the "Annals of Phoenixville, " by the late 
Hon ble Samuel W. Pennypacker, is conclusive from the fact 
that, on the 10th 1st month, 1696/7, ' ' Henry Pawling acknowl- 
edged in open Court of Bucks County, Pennsylvania," one year 
after the death of Captain Pawling, "a deed of 480 acres of 
land in fee, dated 4 December, 1689, acknowledged and de- 
clared by said Henry Pawlin grantor to Richard Burgess 
grantee, and the seal of the said deed being imperfect and 
broken, the said Pawlin did and new make the said seal." 
The lands of this "first purchaser" of Penn adjoined those 
of William Paxson, also of Buckinghamshire, in England, and 

* New York Calendar of Land Papers, i, p. 146. 

t Tjerck DeWitt and Anne his wife, by deed of 1 Nov., 1736, conveyed to 
son, Henry DeWitt, their estate right in and to a certain patent of 11 May, 
1696, by which 4000 acres were granted to the children of Neeltje Pawling, 
widow of Henry Pawling, to wit : Jane, Wyntje, John, Albert, Anne, Henry 
and Mary, of which, said Anne is Anne DeWitt, party to these presents. — 
Dutchess county Deeds, Liber i, ff. 285-87. 

X Pawling Precinct was formed from Beekman Precinct, 31 Dec, 1768. The 
latter embraced the land granted to Col. Henry Beekman. whose daughter, 
Catharine, became the wife of Ensign Albert Pawling. 

|| Published in Old Ulster, vol. i, pp. 339 et seq. 



8 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

there were sundry land transactions between the two of record 
in Bucks County, to which Henry Pawlin came with the early 
settlers. Certain it is that he was there as early as September, 
1687, and there remained until as late as 12 September, 1705, 
at which time he was serving on the Grand Jury.* 

Captain Pawling closed his active, eventful and honorable 
life, at his seat in Marbletown, prior to 25 March, 1695, the 
date of probate of his will,f which had been executed 21 Jan- 
uary, 1691. His entire estate was left to his wife, subject to 
the payment of his debts, with remainder at her decease to his 
children. 

He married, on or about, 3 November, 1676,$ Neeltje Roosa, 
daughter of Captain Albert Heymans Roosa|| by his wife 
Wyntje Ariens of Marbletown. She survived her husband 
and was living as late as 27 October, 1745, when she was a 
legatee under the will of her son, Ensign Albert Pawling. 

Children, born, doubtless, at Marbletown : 

1. i. Jane, m. John Cock of Marbletown, banns, 27 Oct., 1706. 

ii. Wyntie, bapt. 20 July, 1679; m. as second wife, in 1698, Cap- 
tain Kichard Brodhead, son of Captain Daniel Broadhead by 
his wife Ann Tye. 

2. iii. John, m. (1) Aagje De Witt; (2) Ephia. 

iv. James, bapt. 25 November, 1683; died young. 

v. Albert, bapt. 29 March, 1685; d. in 1745; m. 26 November, 
1726, Catharine, daughter of Colonel Henry Beekman, and 
widow of Captain John Kutsen. He was an ensign in Mar- 
bletown, Ulster County, militia, 7 October, 1717, and repre- 
sented Ulster County in the New York Assembly, 1726-1737. 
He had no issue. 

vi. Anne, bapt. 19 June, 1687; d. before 1739; m. 18 January, 
1708, Captain Tjerck De Witt, son of Captain Andries De 
Witt, bapt. 12 January, 1683; d. at Kingston, 30 August, 
1762. 

3. vii. Henry, m. Jacomyntje Kunst. 

viii. Mary, bapt. 30 October, 1692 ; § m. Thomas Van Keuren. 

* Minute Book Common Pleas and Quarter Sessions Courts, Bucks County, 
Pennsylvania, 1684-1730. 

t See full copy of will, in Albert Schock Pawling's Pawling Genealogy, pp. 
13-14. 

X It is uncertain whether this is the date of the marriage, or that of the 
first publication of banns, probably the latter. 

|| Albert Heymans Roosa came to New Netherland from Herwynen in Gelder- 
land in the Spotted Cow, 15 April, 1660, with wife Wyntje Allard, or Arians, 
and eight children aged respectively 17, 15, 14, 9, 8, 7, 4 and 2 years. He 
settled in the Esopus district at Wyltwyck, now Kingston, where he was one 
of the first magistrates, and, in 1673, captain of the militia of Marbletown and 
Hurley. He died at Hurley, 27 Feby., 1679. 

§ " After her father's death." — Kingston Registers. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 9 

2. John 2 Pawling (Captain Henry 1 ), born, probably, at 
Marbletown, Ulster County, New York ; was baptized at Hur- 
ley, 2 October, 1681, and died in Perkiomen Township, Phila- 
delphia, later Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, in June, 
1733. 

The larger part of his life was spent in the community of 
his birth, in the cultivation and improvement of his lands and 
the enlargement of his flocks and herds. Rugged and typical, 
industrious and sincere, he and several succeeding generations 
of his family clung to the soil, which rewarded his and their 
intelligence and discrimination with much more than a com- 
petence. Imperfect and meager are the memoranda of those 
early Marbletown days, but sufficient to show that, to such in- 
stitutions as the emergencies of the time demanded and estab- 
lished, John Pawling gave his aid, with a predilection to 
military rather than civil affairs. As one of ' ' the freeholders 
and inhabitants of Ulster County, ' ' he was a signer * to the 
petition and address of the Protestants of New York to King 
William III, dated 30 December, 1701, setting forth their 
loyalty to his majesty during the Leisler troubles.! In June, 
1709, he was recommended for lieutenant in the Ulster County 
militia, under Captain Wessels Ten Broeck, raised for the 
proposed expedition against Canada, and in such capacity 
took part in the ill-fated campaign against that place, June 
to September, 1711.* 

It was about this time that his attention, together with that 
of his friend and neighbor Isaac Du Bois, was attracted to the 
fertile lands of Pennsylvania, where, on 26 March, 1709, a 
return of survey of 625 acres, for John Pawlin, was made to 
the office of the Proprietary. This tract along the Perkiomen 
in Van Bebber, later Perkiomen Township, then in Philadel- 
phia County, purchased jointly and held in common by the 
two friends, was not divided until some years after both had 
left it forever. On 10 September, 1713, he, then described as 
' ' John Pawling of Marbletown in Ulster County in the Prov- 
ince of New York," purchased of James Shattick, of Phila- 

* Of the 687 individual signers to this State paper only 61 made their mark. 

t New York Colonial Documents, vol. iv, pp. 933-941. 

| Report of the State Historian of New York, Colonial Series, vol. i, pp. 



10 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

delphia County, five hundred acres "beginning at a black oak 
at a corner of T. Padget's land and in the line of land be- 
longing to the Free Society of Traders." That he somewhat 
promptly removed thereto is evidenced from a deed of 22 Sep- 
tember, 5th George, [1719], by which he, at that time of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, conveyed certain lands in Kingston to 
Gerrard Van Wagenen of the latter place. Aagje his wife 
was a party to the deed which was witnessed by Edward Far- 
mer, Henry Pawling and Daniel Brodhead.* To these pur- 
chases in this picturesque region he made additions, notably a 
four hundred and fifty acre tract, also on the Perkiomen, 
with the edifices, tenements and mills, which, about 1730, he 
bought of Hans Jost Heijt.t On these broad acres, in addi- 
tion to agricultural pursuits, he operated grist mills, and 
attained much material wealth and standing in his new en- 
vironment, and Pawling 's Mills became, says a local anti- 
quarian, a well-known landmark in the surrounding country, 
as did Pawling 's Ford, near where the Perkiomen empties its 
waters into the Schuylkill. In 1747, the mansion house and 
mills, situated directly within the two branches of the Per- 
kiomen, devised by John Pawling to his eldest son, Henry 
Pawling, were sold by him to Peter Pennypacker, who added 
fulling mills to the grist mills already in operation some 
twenty or more years, and the place thereafter was known as 
Pennypacker 's Mills. Under its new name it was made his- 
toric from being the camping ground of Washington's army 
before and after the Battle of Germantown, the old house 
being the headquarters of the commander-in-chief after the 
Battle of Brandywine.t 

During the Indian troubles of 1728 the settlers along the 
Schuylkill became alarmed at the news that the Flathead In- 
dians, the Catawbas, had entered the Province with the inten- 

* Ulster County Deeds, Liber Cle., f. 5. 

t See also " The Pawlings on the Perkiomen," in The Perkiomen Region, 
edited by the late Henry S. Dotterer, vol. ii, p. 57 et seq. 

X It was then that Washington moved his army of eight thousand Conti- 
nentals and two thousand militia to the head of the Skippack road at Penny- 
packer's Mills and fixed his headquarters in the house then owned by Samuel 
Pennypacker, 1746-1826. In the year 1900, forty acres of the original tract 
and the mansion house were acquired by the late Hon>><« Samuel W. Penny- 
packer, who restored the house and in it spent his last yeara and days. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 11 

tion of striking at the local Indians and settlers.* There were 
various petitions for means and measures of defence, and on 
10 May in this year, Mr. Pawling was among those who peti- 
tioned for protection to the inhabitants of Falkner Swamp 
and Goshenhoppen against the common foe. Some disturb- 
ance was occasioned by the mistakes and misunderstandings 
of the white inhabitants, and the government, foreseeing 
trouble, commissioned John Pawling, Marcus Huling and 
Mordecai Lincoln t to assemble the colonists and put them in 
a position of defence. The work for which the Commission 
was appointed t was undoubtedly well accomplished, since 
both John Pawling and Mordecai Lincoln were made justices 
of the peace and of the Courts of Philadelphia County, 5 
March, 1732, and re-commissioned 3 December of the follow- 
ing year. The former was holding this position at the time of 
his decease. 

His will, executed 5 May, 1733, proved 5 June following,!! 
described him as of "Bebber's township, gentleman," pro- 
vided for the extension of the family burial ground § on the 
east side of the Perkiomen, ' ' where divers of my family ' ' are 
buried, and made extensive bequests to his children, with pro- 
vision for wife Ephia. The eldest son, Henry, was given the 
Jost Heijt tract of four hundred and fifty acres, and the 
younger sons, John and Joseph, the home plantation and an 
equal division of the undivided Pawling-Dubois tract, all of 
which was to be occupied by the eldest son until the younger 
ones had severally attained the age of twenty-one years. 

He married 1st., at Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 23 
August, 1712, Aagje, daughter of Tjerck Classen De Witt,** 

* Keith's " Chronicles of Pennsylvania from the EDglish Revolution to the 
Peace of Aix-la-Chapelle, 1688-1748." 

t Great-great-grand father of him who was, perhaps. America's greatest 
American, Abraham Lincoln. 

I Pennsylvania Archives, Second Series, vol. ix, pp. 705-6. 

|| Recorded Philadelphia Will Book B, p. ->43. 

§ " Whereas, there is a burying place upon the Land that I have bequeathed 
to my son Joseph, where divers of my family and others are buried. It Is my 
will that there shall be a quarter of an acre of Land laid out commodious 
thereto, the wi I do hereby give and bequeath for a burying ground from the 
day of my Decease thenceforward and forever." 

** The surname De Witt is of unusual antiquity and eminence in the Low 
Countries, few more so. The first of this name in New Netherlands, Tjerck 



12 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

one of the early magistrates of that county ; baptized at King- 
ston, 14 January, 1684 ; died after 1725, and is, doubtless, one 
of those alluded to in her husband's will as interred in the 
family burying ground. The date of his second marriage, or 
the surname of "wife Ephia," who survived him, has not 
been ascertained. 

Children,* the four eldest born, probably, at Marbletown: 

4. i. Henry,3 bapt. 1 Nov., 1713; d. 1763. 

ii. Eleanor, b. 22 Feby., 1715; m. her cousin, Henry Pawling, 
iii. Hannah, living 5 May, 1733 ; died before 9 Sept., 1746. 
iv. Deborah, m. Christopher Ziegler. 
v. Eebecca, m. Captain Abraham De Haven. 

5. vi. John, b. 28 Aug., 1722; d. 23 Oct., 1789. 

6. vii. Joseph, b. 1724; d. in May, 1797. 

3. Henry 2 Pawling (Captain Henry 1 ), born, doubtless, 
at Marbletown, Ulster County, New York, in 1689; died in 
Lower Providence Township, Philadelphia, now Montgomery 
County, in 1739. 

Little or nothing is known of his life in Ulster County save 

Claessen De Witt," " van Grootholdt en Zunderlandt," probably Saterland, a 
district in Westphalia on the southern border of East Friesland, was married 
in the Dutch Reformed Church of New Amsterdam, 24 Apr., 1656, to 
" Barbara Andriessen van Amsterdam." After a time he settled at Wiltwyck 
(Kingston), where he died 17 Feby., 1700. Many of his descendants in both 
male and female lines have been distinguished as scientists, statesmen, in the 
learned professions and military life. Through his eldest son, Gapt. Andries 
De Witt, he was great-grandfather of Col. Charles De Witt, 1727-1788, prom- 
inent in Ulster Co. throughout the political events which preceded and 
accompanied the Revolution ; of Mary De Witt 1737-1795, who married Gen. 
James Clinton and was the mother of De Witt Clinton, 1769-1828, leading 
Federalist, liberal patron of the sciences, literature and art, and a really 
great governor of New York, 1817-1828 ; of Thomas De Witt, 1741-1809, 
Major in Third New York Regiment in the Revolution, whose eldest son, Jacob 
M. De Witt, was Adjutant in the War of 1812, later Colonel and Member 
of Congress 1819-1821 ; and great-great-great-grandfather of Peter De Witt. 
widely known lawyer of New York City, during the earlier part of the last 
century. Simeon De Witt, a member of Washington's military staff and, for 
more than fifty years, Surveyor-General of New York, also descended 
through the eldest son of the worthy pioneer. — See De Witt Family of Ulster 
County, New York, by Thomas Gried Evans, in the Neic York Genealogical and 
Biographical Record, vols. 17, 18, 22. 

•By deed of 9 September, 1746, such of his children as were then living: 
Henry Pawling, John Pawling and Elizabeth his wife, Joseph Pawling and 
Elizabeth his wife, Henry Pawling of or near Schuyklll and Eleanor his wife, 
Abraham De Haven and Rebecca his wife and Christopher Zeigler and Deborah 
his wife, conveyed to the heirs of Isaac Dubois deceased, their interest in 
certain lands purchased in common by their deceased father and the said 
Isaac Dubois. In the body of the instrument the elder John Pawling is 
styled " Captain John Pawling." — Philadelphia County Deed Book O No. 12, 
P. 181. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 13 

that, in 1715, he served in Captain William Nottingham's 
Marbletown Company of Foot, Colonel Jacob Rutsen's Ulster 
County Regiment of militia.* By 22 September, 1719, his re- 
moval to Pennsylvania had been accomplished. This, without 
doubt, was simultaneous with that of his elder brother. He 
settled in Lower Providence Township, on a plantation of five 
hundred acres at the confluence of the Schuylkill and Per- 
kiomen, opposite what later became the almost sacred hills of 
Valley Forge. To the early settlers this region was known as 
the fat land of the Egypt District, and the analogy is close 
between these fair lands, so regularly inundated by the spring 
freshets and encrusted with the rich alluvial soil brought 
down by the upper river, and those in the East enriched by 
the annual life-bearing overflow of the Nile. His choice for a 
home and farm-stead could scarcely have been excelled. Rob- 
ert Sutcliff, the English diarist, said of it in 1804 :t "I am 
convinced that it is one of the most beautiful and healthful 
situations I have known either in England or America. ' ' Just 
prior to the Revolution, a portion of this estate was purchased 
by James Vaux of Croyden, near London, England, the an- 
cestor of the present Philadelphia family of his surname, and 
for many years was known as ' ' Vaux Hall. ' ' t Here Henry 
Pawling devoted himself to agriculture and reaped a com- 
petence. The inventory of his real and personal estate in- 
cludes : eight slaves, eight horses, twenty -five cattle, thirty-one 
sheep and fourteen pigs. 

From an early date the Pawlings were prominently iden- 
tified II with the Episcopal church of St. James, Perkiomen. 
At the first recorded meeting of its vestry, 2 October, 1737, 

* Report of New York State Historian, Colonial Series, vol. i, p. 561. 

t " Colonial Homes of Philadelphia and its Neighborhood," by Harold Don- 
aldson Eberlein and Horace Mather Lippincott, pp. 189-198. 

% In 1804, Vaux Hall went into the prossession of William Bakewell, who 
re-named it " Fatlands." Subsequently it passed by purchase into the hands 
of descendants of Samuel Wetherill, the able leader of the Fighting Quakers. 
One of these, as an act of pious patriotism, gave the use of the private burial 
ground at " Fatlands " for the re-interment of those who had been buried in 
the Free Quakers' Graveyard on the west side of Fifth Street below Locust 
Street, Philadelphia, and whose remains it became necessary, in Nov. 1905, to 
remove. The tombstone inscriptions of this ground will be found in the 
Publications of The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, vol. iii, pp. 135-38. 

II Pennsylvania Magazine of History, vol. xlx, pp. 87-95. 



14 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

Henry Pawling is present as a vestryman, and at that of 
June, 1738, as church warden.* In its grounds he was buried, 
and there a granite stone still plainly records: "In Memory 
of / Henry Pawling / who Died August the / 30th 1739. 
Aged 50 Years." 

He married, 26 June, 1713, Jacomyntje,t daughter of Cor- 
nells Borents Kunst by his wife Jacomyntje Slecht of Hur- 
ley, who survived him, and, with son Henry, administered on 
his estate, 10 October, 1739. 

Children,^ the first three baptized at Kingston : 

7. i. Henry,s bapt. 27 June, 1714. 

ii. Sarah, bapt. 8 July, 1716 ; survived her father. 

iii. Elizabeth, bapt. 22 March, 1719; survived her father. 

iv. Barney, was living in 1791 ; m. before 12 Dec, 1754, Elizabeth, 
only surviving child of Josiah James of Phila. Co. In 1766 
he was a warrantee of lands in Berks Co., Penna. He was 
probably the father of Josiah,* Isaac and John, enrolled in 
Philadelphia Co. for service during the Revolution; of Be- 
becca, who m. David Schryver of New York, and Elizabeth, 
who m. Owen Glancy.|| 

8. v. Levi, m. Helena Burhans. 

vi. Eleanor, m. before 22 Apr., 1746, James Morgan. 

9. vii. John, b. 27 Dec, 1732. 

4. Henry 3 Pawling (Lieutenant John, 2 Captain Henry 1 ) i 
baptized at Kingston, New York, 1 November, 1713; died in 
Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, in or about April, 1763. 

He had not reached his majority when his father's death 
brought upon him, not only the responsibility of the education 
of his younger brothers, but the administration of their con- 
siderable landed estate as well as that of his own, a total 
aggregation of twelve hundred acres. In "A List of the 
Names of the Inhabitants of the County of Philadelphia, with 

* The church was, in 1738, broken into and robbed of a pulpit cloth and 
cushion of plush purple fringed with black silk, also a pewter communion 
service and baptismal basin. A reward of five pounds was offered by the 
wardens, William Moore and Henry Pawling. — Pennsylvania Gazette. 

t 2 April, 1729, Henry Pawling and wife Jacomyntje " of Philadelphia in 
Pennsylvania " were signatories to quit-claim deed to land in Dutchess Co., 
N. Y., Dutchess Co. Deeds. 

J An un-recorded deed of 22 Apr., 1746, from Devi Pawling of Marbletown, 
N. Y. to James Morgan of Philadelphia Co., Pa., recites that, Henry Pawling 
died intestate leaving eldest son Henry, dau. Sarah, dau. Elizabeth, son Bar- 
ney, son Levi (the grantee), son John, and dau. Eleanor married to James 
Morgan, the said grantee. 

H For descendants of Owen Glancy and Elizabeth Pawling, Bee Jones Family, 
by Mrs. Ellen M. Beale; also Rodman Family, by the late Charles Henry 
Jones Esq. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 15 

the quantity of Land they respectively hold therein, accord- 
ing to the uncertaine Returns of the Constables Anno Dom : 
1734," his name appears, with the foregoing acreage, as the 
largest landholder in "Parkiomen and Skippak Township," 
indeed, the largest in the County.* 

His father's will suggests his trustworthiness; his adver- 
tisement in the Pennsylvania Gazette his progressiveness. It 

rcads: 1462249 

' ' December 12, 1735. There has been ever since March last, about the 
plantation of Henry Pawlin, junior in Perkiomen, a flea-bitten mare 
branded S. T. upon the near Shoulder, with a reddish Spot upon her 
Flank and a Bell about her Neck. She is about 13 hands high, and has 
now a young Colt with her. Whoever owns her is desired to come and 
fetch her and pay the charges. Henry Pawlin jr. ' ' 

The qualities mentioned, together with the landed estate 
which he controlled afforded him a recognized position in the 
county, and, in 1748, on or about 4 August, he was appointed 
Captain in the Associated Regiment of Philadelphia County, 
commanded by Colonel Edward Jones.t 

Between 1741 and 1745 he received from the Proprietary 
four warrants for lands then in Lancaster, later in Antrim 
Township, Cumberland County, one containing seven hundred 
and forty-five acres, and another one hundred and twenty-one 
acres. This acquisition was, doubtless, the compelling cause 
of his disposal of the four hundred and fifty acre tract, re- 
ceived under his father's will, known as Pawling 's Mills, to 
Peter Pennypacker, and his removal westward to what then 
was practically the frontier, where he died. 

His will of 31 December, 1762, proved 19 April, 1763,$ 
named but two children, a son Henry, and daughter Ellinor 
still in her minority. His only other legatees were : ' ' the sons 
of my brother-in-law, Henry Pawling of Philadelphia." 

He was, probably, twice married.ll His wife, at the execu- 
tion of his will, was Mary, daughter of Nicholas Hickes of 
Cumberland County, whom he had married prior to 6 Sep- 

* Publications of The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, vol. i, p. 180. 
t Pennsylvania Archives, second series, vol. ii, p. 504. 
t Cumberland County Wills, Liber A, f. 106. 
| See Pennsylvania Gazette, July, 1742. 



16 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

tember, 1749, and whom he made the executrix of his estate,* 
The date of her death has not been ascertained. 
Children : 

i. Henry,* b. cirea 1748; received from John Penn a patent for 
his father's Cumberland County lands, dated 31 Oct., 1769; 
served in the County militia during the Revolution, and was a 
delegate to the Convention of Associated Battalions held at 
Lancaster, 4 July, 1776, to choose Brigadier Generals to com- 
mand the Provincial forces. In 1783 he was a candidate for 
the Legislature. He was living in Kentucky in 1791 with the 
rank of Colonel. He died intestate in February, 1794.f His 
heir at law was an only sister Eleanor, then the wife of Dr. 
Johnston. His widow, Sarah m. Benjamin Price. 

ii. Eleanor, m. Dr. Robert Johnston, a distinguished surgeon in 
the Pennsylvania Line during the Revolution. It was at his 
house, in Franklin County, that Washington stopped to dine 
when on his way to quell the Whiskey Insurrection. It was 
also at his house, that the death occurred of the eminent Revo- 
lutionary surgeon, Dr. Barnabas Binney, ancestor of the Bin- 
ney family of Philadelphia.^ 

5. John 3 Pawling (Lieutenant John, 2 Captain Henry 1 ), 
born on the Perkiomen, Philadelphia, later Montgomery 
County, Pennsylvania, 28 August, 1722 ; died there, 23 Octo- 
ber, 1789. 

Towards the close of the so-called War of the Austrian Suc- 
cession he was, in 1748, commissioned ensign in the Provincial 
forces, Captain Abraham De Haven's Company of the Phila- 
delphia County Associated Regiment of Foot.ll 

In the census of 1756 for Skippack and Perkiomen, he is 
listed as farmer with three children under twenty-one, four 
hundred acres, two negroes, two horses, two mares, fourteen 
sheep and twenty horned cattle; in that of 1776, he had four 
hundred and seventy acres, four negroes, four horses and 
four horned cattle. At the execution of his will, 12 October, 
1789,§ he was also the owner of a house and lot in Phila- 
delphia.^ 

* Egle's " Notes and Queries," fourth series, vol. i, p. 216 ; also will of 
Nicholas Hickes in Abstracts of Cumberland County Wills, Collections of 
The Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania. 

t 4 Yeates, p. 526, Pennsylvania Supreme Court Reports. 

% Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography, vol. 24, p. 47. 

|| Pennsylvania Archives, second series, vol. ii, p. 504. 

§ Philadelphia County Wills. 

*\ " On the west side of Second Street opposite the New Market, bounded 
eastward with Second Street, southward with ground of Edward Shippen, 
westward with a four foot alley and leading into Lombard Street." The 
income of this was to be applied " to the use of daughter Rebecca Lynch." 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 17 

He was chosen a vestryman of St. James', Perkiomen, 26 
April, 1749, and continued as such, under yearly re-elections, 
until 1760. After this, he was more or less identified with the 
Rev. Henry Melchoir Muhlenberg's Congregation at Trapp, 
in the adjoining township of Providence, drawn thereto doubt- 
less by the eloquence of the "Patriarch of the Lutheran 
Church in America." It is to him that Dr. Muhlenberg 
refers in his Journal under, "Wednesday, March 12, 1777: 
M r John Pawling sent word that his married daughter had 
died and was to be buried in our churchyard tomorrow and 
requested my services." Some years previous to this, one of 
his younger daughters, and one or more of his negro depend- 
ants, had been baptized by the good Doctor, and, something 
more than a decade later, he and his wife were buried in the 
God's Acre adjoining the Trappe Church, one of the historic 
churches of the Commonwealth. The ledger stone over their 
graves reads : " In Memory of / John Pawling / who Departed 
this Life / October the 23 d 1789 / Aged 67 years 1 month / 
and 25 Days. / Elizabeth Pawling, / wife of John Pawling / 
Born May 16, 1723 / Died Dec. 9, 1791. 

His wife, Elizabeth, was the daughter of Herman DeHaven 
by his wife Annica Updengraf. 

Children, all born on the Perkiomen : 

i. Ann,* buried 13 March, 1777; m. Jacob Pennypacker; had issue. 

ii. Deborah, m. William Twaddell; had issue. 

iii. Hannah, m. John Hiester, 1745-1821, colonel in the Revolu- 
tion and major-general after the war; represented Chester 
County in the State Senate 1802-06, and was member of Con- 
gress, 1807-09. Ex-Governor Guy of Wisconsin descends from 
this line. 

iv. Rebecca, m. 13 April, 1786, Michael Lynch. 

v. Rachel, b. 13 July, 1765; bapt. 31 March, 1766; m. 7 April, 
1784, George Reiff of Lower Salford Township. The late 
Major George G. Groff, M. D., Ph. D., of Bucknell University, 
is a descendant of this marriage. 

6. Joseph 3 Pawling (Lieutenant John, 2 Captain Henry x ), 
born on the Perkiomen, Philadelphia, later Montgomery 
County, Pennsylvania, in or about 1724; died there in May, 
1797. 

Under his father's will he had an estate of nearly four 
hundred acres along the Perkiomen — one-half of the home 
plantation and one-half of his father's portion of the un- 



18 The Pawli)ig Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

divided Dubois tract, the middle of the creek being the divi- 
sion line between his and his brother John's farmstead. Ac- 
cording to the Perkiomen-Skippack census of 1756, he then 
had four hundred acres, four children, one slave, &c. In 1776, 
he was taxed for three hundred acres, two negroes, four horses, 
six cattle. To his patrimonial estate he made some additions, 
one, in 1774, of one hundred and fifteen acres which he sub- 
sequently conveyed to his son Benjamin,* and for years pre- 
ceding his decease was counted as of large means and standing 
in his community. He lived in ' ' the times which tried men 's 
souls," and he passed the ordeal to the full satisfaction of a 
man's most scrutinizing critics, his neighbors. 

His early religious affiliations appear to have been, mainly, 
with the Evangelical Lutheran Augustus Church of New 
Providence, commonly called the Old Trappe Church. There 
several of his children were baptized by Dr. Muhlenberg, and 
there he was one of the largest contributors to the support of 
Dr. Muhlenberg, and there, too, he probably remained until 
after the death of this well-beloved pastor of his people. 
During the Revolution and immediately following, largely 
through the activity of the Pawling family, St. James' Per- 
kiomen, so the minutes of the vestry attest,t took strong 
measures to meet the new condition of public sentiment, and 
Mr. Slator Clay, receiving deaconate orders, was placed in 
charge. At the meeting of the congregation and vestry, 22 
April, 1788, to provide for Mr. Clay's continuance, Joseph 
Pawling was elected vestryman, and continued to serve in this 
office, or as trustee or church- warden, until 4 April, 1793, 
when he was succeeded by his son Benjamin, who had first 
been elected vestryman, 17 May, 1776.+ Mr. Pawling was one 
of the largest contributors to the support of the Rev. Mr. Clay, 
as he had been to that of Dr. Muhlenberg, and in the allotment 
of pews, 20 December, 1788, he was assigned pew No. 2, his 
cousin, Judge Henry Pawling, having the first pew. 

His will of 12 January, 1797, proved 29 May following,!! 

* Montgomery County Deeds, Liber i. f. 266. 

t Copy of Vestry Minutes, 2 Act, [1737] to 28 March, 1799, in possession 
of The Historical Society of Pennsylvania. 
X " Benjamin Pawling of Perkiomen." 
|| Recorded Montgomery County Will Book 2, p. 2. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 19 

provided for wife, Elizabeth, and the children hereinafter 
given. The inventory of his personalty included four slaves : 
Phillis, Peter, Anthony Mix and Pegg, valued at $205. Two 
hundred and forty-nine acres .of his land was appraised at 
£2929. 

He married, before 9 September, 1746, Elizabeth , 

who, with her husband, is interred in the family burying 
ground, to which he, having received it under his father's 
will, made by his own a considerable addition,* and which, 
under the trust therein established, is still in a good state of 
preservation, as are the tombstones of Mrs. Pawling and her 
son Benjamin. 

Children, all born in Perkiomen Township : 

i. Rachel,* d. 11 Oct., 1828; m. 10 Oct., 1771, Lewis Trucken- 
miUer f of Skippack, Revolutionary soldier, Pennsylvania 
militia, 1778; d. Oct., 1826.$ Issue: 1. John s T. Miller. 2. 
Hannah T. Miller, m. Solomon Grimley. 3. William T. Miller. 
4. Elizabeth T. Miller, m. Adam Hatfield, Captain in Fifty- 
first Regiment, Penna. Militia in War of 1812, who died at 
Philadelphia, 8 Jan., 1846, in his sixty-sixth year; buried in 
Trappe churchyard. These latter were the parents of Dr. 
Nathan L. Hatfield, b. 2 Aug., 1804; d. 29 Aug., 1887, an 
eminent physician, and president of the Philadelphia Board 
of Health 1846-47, and father of the late Walter Hatfield, a 
prominent iron-master of Phila., the late Dr. Nathan Hatfield, 
surgeon to the Philadelphia Hospital, and of Major Henry 
Reed Hatfield, a member of the Board of Managers of The 
Genealogical Society of Pennsylvania, 
ii. Benjamin, b. 25 Dec, 1750; bapt. 25 Aug., 1751; d. 9 Oct., 
1800; m. Rebecca, dau. of Samuel and Rebecca Lane, b. 28 
Feb., 1756; d. 19 Sept., 1830; Revolutionary soldier, 2d lieut., 
Oapt. William Bull's Company, First Battalion, Phila.. Co. 
militia, in 1778. Issue: 1. Elisabeth^ b. Feb., 1777; m. 
20 Feb., 1803, Edward Vanderslice. 2. Joseph, married and 
had three sons, Benjamin, Curtis, and Albert, who settled 
in Wabash, Indiana. 3. Sarah, m. 8 June, 1806, Evan Rees. 
4. Samuel Lane, went to Union Co., Penna. 5. Rebecca, tn. 
Millon. 6. Mary, m. Benjamin Davis. 7. Harriet, m. 

* " Two acres for a family burying ground to run from the lower end of said 
burying ground to a small run of the Northeast bank thence along said bank 
up the run so as to take in two acres of land, as I there] is some dead already 
buried there, and tolo] for the family or as many of them as choose to bury 
their dead there, which said two acres of land I give and devise to my sons 
Benjamin and Joseph their heirs etc. in trust for the use of a burying ground." 

f According to his signature. His children and grand-children however 
divided the surname, using the letter T, as a prefix to Miller. 

t By deed of April, 1S29, the heirs of Lewis Truckenmiller joined in con- 
veying land bequeathed to his wife Rachel by her father, Joseph Pawling. The 
deed recites that, the said Rachel had deceased leaving the following children : 
John T. Miller, Hannah T. Grimley, William T. Miller and Elizabeth T. Hat- 
field. — Montgomery County Deed Book 45, p. 129. 



20 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

John S. Davis. 8. Eleanor, d. unmarried. 10. Benjamin, was 
living in Iowa in 1871. 

iii. Joseph, b. 28 Aug., 1753; d. 23 Oct., 1840; m. (1) 29 Sept., 
1783, Susannah Lukens; m. (2) 5 Nov., 1793, Mary Shannon, 
b. 20 Mar., 1766 ; d. 8 Mar., 1839. Mr. Pawling served in the 
Pennsylvania militia during the Eevolution. About 1794 he 
removed to Snyder Co., Penna., and later to Salem, Union Co., 
where he died. Many of his descendants still reside in this 
vicinity. Issue by first marriage: 1. John,s settled in Ken- 
tucky. Issue by second marriage : 2. Samuel, b. 9 Feb., 1794 ; 
d. 23 Nov., 1874; m. 24 Jan., 1815, Elizabeth Woodling, and 
had issue.* 3. Joseph, b. 23 Sept., 1797; d. 6 Oct., 1846'; m. 
14 Feb., 1826, Margaret Eebecca Kitzman, and had issue. 4. 
Nathan, b. 28 Feb., 1808 ; removed to Knox Co., 111., and had 
issue. 5. Elizabeth, m. EzeMel Davis. 6. Maria Teresa, m. 
Samuel Stetler, resided at Bloomsburg, Penna. 7. Hannah, 
m. Jacob Woodling. 8. Susannah, m. Christian Houtz, resided 
in Utah. 

iv. Maria Elizabeth, b. 5 Oct., 1756; bapt. 5 Jan., 1757; m. Wil- 
liam Shannon. 

v. Hannah, bapt. 9 Aug., 1761; m. John De Haven. 

vi. Anna, b. 6 June; bapt. 9 Aug., 1762; m. 9 Oct., 1788, Jona- 
than Jones. 

7. Henry 3 Pawling (Henry, 2 Captain Henry 1 ), baptized 
at Kingston, New York, 27 June, 1714; died in Providence 
Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, in November, 
1792. 

He succeeded to his father's estate on the Schuylkill and 
rose to prominence in local and Provincial affairs. From 25 
May, 1752, he was for some years justice of the peace and of 
the Courts of Common Pleas for Philadelphia County, and 
served as a member of the Provincial Assembly from that 
county in 1751, and from 1764 consecutively until the out- 
break of the Eevolution.f In 1761 he was appointed com- 
missioner for improving the navigation of the Schuylkill 
River, in which position he was, in 1773, succeeded by his son 
John Pawling, Jr. He was also appointed in 1761 to take 
charge of a building operation and the preparation of a plant- 
ing ground for the friendly Indians at Wyoming. In the 
assessment list of Perkiomen Township for 1776, he appears 
as Henry Pawling, Esq r ., with two hundred and ninety acres, 
two negroes, four horses and eleven cows. 

* From this line descends Albert Schock Pawling of Lewisburg, Penna., 
Compiler of the Pawling Genealogy, 1905. 

t Oct. 1. Ii70. Went to the State House to give my vote for Joseph Fox, 
Michael Hillegas, Henry Pawling, Thomas Livezey, Thomas Mifflin, George 
Gray, Samuel Miles and Edward Pennington for Assemblymen. — Diary of 
Jacob Hiltzheimer, p. 22. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 21 

The example of the father in his connection with St. James' 
Church, PerMomen, was followed by the son, who, elected 
church warden 4 April, 1743, continued to serve as such, or 
as a vestryman, until his decease. Measured by the Minutes 
of the Vestry, Mr. Pawling was, during all this period, its 
most active parishioner. By his will, he left a legacy of ten 
pounds towards the enclosure of its churchyard with a stone 
wall. His sons Henry, John and Nathan were also vestrymen. 

Judge Pawling 's will of 18 November, 1781, proved 3 No- 
vember, 1792, provided that, his lands in the Schuylkill River, 
called "Catfish Island," should be sold; that his son Henry 
should have the remainder of his tract in Providence Town- 
ship, with mansion house and between two and three hundred 
acres; that daughter, Catharine Stalford, should receive two 
hundred and seventy-five acres of land in Lucerne County 
and all silver plate; and that his interest in lands on Wya- 
lusing Creek in Northumberland County should, after paying 
an incumbrance of £250 to daughter Rachel Bartholomew, be 
vested in his grandson, Levi Pawling. The instrument further 
provided a competence for all his children, either in lands or 
money, and legacies to his brother, Barney Pawling and cousin- 
nephew, Colonel Henry Pawling of Kentucky. James Vaux, 
his neighbor, was constituted one of his executors. 

He married, about 1740, his cousin Eleanor, daughter of 
Lieutenant John Pawling by his wife Aagje De Witt, born, 
probably, at Marbletown, 22 February, 1715, and died before 
the execution of her husband's will. 

Children, born, probably, in Lower Providence Township : 

i. Rachel,* b. 1742; d. 1794; m. Col. Edward Bartholomew, of 
Philadelphia. 

ii. John, b. 17 May, 1744 ; will proved 24 June, 1815 ; m. 9 Sept., 
1771, Elizabeth, only daughter of Eees Morgan of Lancaster 
County, by his wife Margaret Edwards. On Assessment List 
of Providence Township, 1776, for two hundred acres, &c. 
Issue: 1. Margaret,* m. 25 Mar., 1792, Robert Adolf Farmer. 
2. Henry, living at the making of his grandfather's will, but 
not at that of "his father's. 3. Eleanor, b. 1 Aug., 1775; d. 
16 June, 1855; m. 2 July, 1795, John Cornman, M. D., of 
Phila., who d. 23 Apr., 1813. 4. Elisabeth. 5. John Morgan, 
b. 1 Dec, 1783; d. 26 Nov., 1838; m. 1 Feb., 1811, Rebecca 
Prather. 6. Rachel, d. unmarried at Greencastle, Penna., 20 
June, 1861. 7. Fanny. 

in. Henry, b. 25 Sept., 1746 ; d. 23 Oct., 1822 ; buried at St. James ', 
Perkiomen; m. 11 Dec, 1769, Rebecca, dau. of William Bull. 



22 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

He was Captain in Col. Eobert Lewis ' Battalion of the Flying 
Camp in 1776.* In 1784 he was appointed one of the Com- 
missioners for the new county of Montgomery and was also 
one of its first Associate Judges. Issue: 1. Levi,s b. 1770; d. 
1845; m. 17 Oct., 1804, Elizabeth, dau. of Maj. Gen. Joseph 
Hiester, Governor of Pennsylvania, who died at Norristown, 
27 July, 1826. Distinguished as a lawyer and Federalist, he 
filled many positions of trust in his town and county, and was 
Member of Congress 1817-19.f He had three sons and four 
daughters: Joseph « Hiester Pawling, 1806-1847. Henry 
DeWitt Pawling, M. D., 1810-1892, the well-known physician 
of King of Prussia, Pa.; m. Anna D., dau. of Levi Bull of 
West Chester. James Muhlenberg Pawling, Esq., 1811- 
1838; m. Lydia Wood. Elizabeth Pawling, m.$ Hon. 
Thomas Ross of Doylestown, Pa., eminent lawyer and Con- 
gressman, 1849-53. Ellen Pawling, m. Henry Freedley, Esq., 
of Norristown. Rebecca Pawling, m., as second wife, Henry 
Freedley, Esq. Mary Pawling, m. Sylvester N. Rich, Esq., 
of Philadelphia. 2. Henry, named in his father 's will, 5 July, 
1817. 3. William, of Pawling 's Bridge, d. 1835, leaving three 
sons: Henrys Pawling, Thomas Pawling, Albert Paw- 
ling. 4. Eleanor, m. 28 Feb., 1799, James Milnor, Esq., of 
Philadelphia, Member of Congress, 1811-1813, who, abandon- 
ing the law, entered the ministry of the Episcopal Church; 
was Doctor of Divinity and rector of St. George 's, New York, 
1816-1844. 

iv. Benjamin, m. after 1776, Susanna Ballinger. Revolutionary 
soldier in 1778; named in father's will; said to have removed 
to Canada. 

v. Nathan, b. 1750; d. unmarried 27 March, 1795; Revolutionary 
soldier; Cornet of the Montgomery County Troop of Horse, in 
1786; Lieutenant of Light Dragoons, commanded by Capt. 
James Morris, in 1792; High Sheriff of Montgomery County; 
buried at St. James', Perkiomen. 

vi. Jesse, named in his father's will; officer in British army; re- 
moved to Canada. 

vii. William, d. about August, 1845. 

viii. Catharine, m. Joseph Stalford; removed to Luzerne Co., Pa. 
Their son, John Pawling Stalford, b. Perkiomen, 20 Oct., 
1788; d. Wyalusing, Bradford Co., Pa., 27 Jan., 1863; was 
the father of John Bradford Stalford, now, or late, the presi- 
dent of the Bank of Wyalusing. 

8. Levi 3 Pawling (Henry, 2 Captain Henry 1 ), born in 
Lower Providence Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsyl- 
vania, circa 1722; died at Marbletown, Ulster County, New 
York, in March, 1782. 

Inheriting the considerable estate of his uncle, Albert Paw- 
ling, Esq., at Marbletown, his removal thereto had been accom- 

* Pennsylvania Associators and Militia, vol. i, p. 558. 

t In this connection see also Acge's Men of Montgomery County," pp. 
252 et seq. 

X Of the issue of this marriage ; Hon. Henry Pawling Ross, was President 
Judge of Mont. County Courts, and George Ross, Esq., was a well-known 
lawyer at Doylestown and a member of the Contltutional Convention. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 23 

plished before 22 April, 1746. At this time he, described as 
of that place, was party to a conveyance of land on the 
Schuylkill and Perkiomen to his brother-in-law, James Mor- 
gan. After this, his life was identified with Ulster County 
and the Provincial affairs of New York, where he achieved a 
large measure of distinction in the field of politics and mili- 
tary service. 

On 17 September, 1761, he was appointed one of a Commis- 
sion to hold a meeting with the Delaware Indians relative to 
the renewal of a treaty of peace. He was a member of the 
Provincial Convention which met at New York, 20 April, 
1775, to elect delegates to represent the Province in the Conti- 
nental Congress ; a member of the Fourth Provincial Congress 
and Representative Convention, 1776-77, and also a member 
of the second Council of Safety which continued in session 
from 8 October, 1777, to 7 January, 1778, and was succeeded 
by the Legislative Convention. An early justice of the peace, 
he was appointed by an ordinance of the Provincial Conven- 
tion, 8 May, 1777, first Judge of the Ulster County Courts. 
He was also State Senator from Kingston district, 1777 to 
1782. During the Revolution he was Colonel commanding the 
Third Regiment, Ulster County Militia, under commission of 
28 October, 1775. 

His will of February, 1782, was proved 19 March following. 
It named wife "Halana" and children Albert, Henry, Levi 
and Margaret. 

He married at Kingston, 12 October, 1749, Helena, daugh- 
ter of William Burhans by his wife Gretje Ten Eyck. 

Children, born at Marbletown: 

i. Albert,* bpt. 22 Apr., 1754; d. Troy, N. Y., 10 Nov., 1837; m. (1) 
28 Apr., 1782, Gretje Ten Eyck, b. 21 Nov., 1756; d. 23 May, 
1789; m. (2) Eunice, dau. of Col. Joshua Porter, and widow of 
Joshua Stanton. In the Revolution, he became successively 
cornet of Light Horse, lieutenant Third Regiment, Continental 
Line, brigade-major on staff of Gen. Clinton, lieutenant-colonel 
commanding an Ulster Co. regiment, and, he is said to have been 
a colonel on Washington 's staff. He was, in 1791, the first 
High Sheriff of the newly erected Rensselaer County, and be- 
came one of the founders of and the first president of the vil- 
lage of Troy, 1802-1816, and its first mayor 1816-1820, after its 
incorporation as a city. He served on many important com- 
mittees and, in 1824, was chairman of the committee to provide 
for the reception of General Lafayette. 

ii. Henry, b. 22 April, 1752; d. 29 June, 1S36; m. 12 March, 1782, 
Anna, dau. of Rev. John W. Brown, who died at Hagaman's 



24 The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 

Mills, Montgomery Co., N. Y., 29 Dec, 1828; m. (2) Mrs. Sela 
Wells. A ^Revolutionary soldier, he became Captain in the 
Second Begiment, New York Continental Line. Upon the fall 
of Forts Clinton and Montgomery, he was captured and confined 
for months in the prison ship Archer, and later on the Myrtle. 
His military Journal, now or late in the possession of Suther- 
land DeWitt, Esq., vividly describes the hardships on the for- 
mer ship. The war ended, he settled in Montgomery Co., where 
he was Captain of Light Infantry in 1786, and which he repre- 
sented in the State Legislature of 1798-9. He was also town- 
clerk of Amsterdam in 1798. His descendants are to be found 
in Montgomery and Steuben Counties, to the latter of which he 
removed shortly before his death. 

iii. William, bpt. 3 July, 1757 ; d. unmarried, before his father. 

iv. Levi, b. 12 Oct., 1759; m. 16 Oct., 1787, Jane, dau. of Alexander 
and Jane (Armour) Wilson. 

v. Margaret, bpt. 1 July, 1764; m. Levi Deyo, son of Peter Deyo, 
by his wife Elizabeth Helm. 

9. John 3 Pawling (Henry, 2 Captain Henry 1 ), born in 
Lower Providence Township, Philadelphia County, Pennsyl- 
vania, 27 December, 1732; died at Rhinebeck, Dutchess 
County, New York, 30 December, 1819, and is buried in the 
graveyard of the old Dutch Reformed Church of that place. 

He settled in that part of Rhinebeck Precinct known as 
Staatsburgh, which included the land purchased from the 
widow Pawling and her children, by Dr. Samuel Staats. Here, 
in 1761, he built a stone house on the post road on land orig- 
inally part of that patented to his paternal grandmother.* 
Occupied with the peaceful pursuits of husbandry, he never- 
theless followed the military traditions of his family and at- 
tained the rank of major in the Provincial forces. His cap- 
taincy in the Crown Point Expedition is thus noted in the 
Book of Military Appointments, etc., in 1759-60: "April 28, 
1759. John Pawling Capt. For Dutchess County gave Capt 
Pawling his Coram 'n & Qualified him, d[elivere]d him his 2 
Lt Comm'n and Warr't on the Treasurer, "t He is called 
Major Pawling in the Muster Roll of men raised in y* County 
of Dutchess and passed for Capt. Peter Harris's Company, 
May y e 1 : 1760." The fact of the latter title is further evi- 
denced by a bond, bearing date 3 November, 1767, between 

* May 19, 1729. Description of the boundaries of a patent granted to Neeltje 
Pawling, In Dutchess beginning at a river side and running eastward, by the 
side of a fresh meadow called Mansakln and a small creek called Nancapa- 
conmak and following said southerly and southeasterly as it runs to Hudson's 
River by the Crum Elbow called by the Indian name Eaquorsinck containing 
within the said bounds 4000 acres. — New York Calendar of Land Papers, p. 
194. 

t Report of the State Historian of New York Colonial Series, vol. 11, pp. 
515, 520, 557. 



The Pawling Family of New York and Pennsylvania. 25 

"Major John Pawling of Staatsburgh, Dutchess County, Levi 
Pawling Esq. of Marbletown, Ulster County, and Johannes 
Cramer of Oswego, Beekman's Precinct, New York."* In 
the struggle between the Colonies and the mother country, 
Major Pawling espoused the cause of the former and served 
it with fidelity. 

He married, first, at Kingston, 23 May, 1754,t his cousin 
Neeltje, daughter of Thomas Van Keuren by his wife Mary 
Pawling; second, 15 April, 1770, Marietje, daughter of Jacob 
Van Deusen by his wife Alida Ostrander. 

Children of first marriage : 

i. Henry,* b. 30 Nov., 1755; d. Johnstown, N. Y., in 1825; m. 

Elizabeth . Revolutionary soldier. 

ii. Cornelius, b. 22 Jan., 1758. Revolutionary soldier, 
iii. John, b. 24 Oct., 1760. Revolutionary soldier, 
iv. Mary, bpt. 11 Nov., 1764; m. Kane. 

Children of second marriage : 

v. Levi, b. 29 Jan., 1771; d. Staatsburgh, 12 Feb., 1858; m. (1) 
Gertrude T., dau. of Harman Jansen Knickerbocker; m. (2) 
18 May, 1816, Hannah, dau. of Stephen Griffing by his wife 
Elizabeth Uhl. Among the children of the latter marriage : 
Gertrude,* b. 25 Apr., 1822 ; m. David Wallace of Hyde Park, 
N. Y., and had : 1. John ' Alva Wallace, m. Emeline Coyle ; 
these latter were the parents of Katharine, wife of John 
Frank Kitts, author of The Lineage of the Pawling Family. 
2. Mary Caroline Wallace, m. John B. Roach, the late emi- 
nent shipbuilder of Chester, Penna., who was survived by five 
children: William Macpherson Eoach and John Roach of 
Chester, Penna. ; Mrs. Charles E. Schuyler of New York, since 
deceased; Mrs. George Forbes of Baltimore, widow of Fred- 
erick Farwell Long, M. D., and Emeline, wife of the Hon. 
William Cameron Sproul, State Senator of Penna., and presi- 
dent of Union League, Philadelphia. 

vi. Eleanor, b. 11 Mar., 1772; d. Ehinebeek, 11 Sept., 1862; m. 
Capt. Peter Brown. 

vii. Rachel, b. 13 Feb., 1774; d. Staatsburgh, 22 Nov., 1850; m. 
Christopher Hughes. 

viii. Alida, m. Peter Ostrom. 

ix. Catharine, b. 21 May, 1778; d. young. 

x. Jesse, b. 2 Mar., 1780; m. 14 Oct., 1804, Leah, dau. of Wil- 
liam Radcliff. He was commissioned second lieutenant, Dutch- 
ess Co. Artillery Company, 1814. 

xi. Jacomyntie, b. 25 May, 1782; m. 18 Dec, 1803, Wait Jaques. 

xii. Elizabeth, b. 5 Aug., 1784; d. 27 Sept., 1872; m. 5 June, 1803, 
William P. Stoutenburgh. 

xiii. Rebecca, b. 4 Apr., 1785; d. 13 June, 1832; m. Frederick Strut 
Uhl. 

xiv. Jacob, b. 4 Mar., 1787; d. Watertown, N. Y., 23 Mar., 1877; 
m. 27 Feb., 1822, Martha, dau. of Capt. Isaac Russell. 

xv. Catharine, b. 28 Dec, 1789; m. (1) Jacob Conklin; (2) John 
Coyle. 

* Dutchess County Deeds, Liber 5, f. 208. j. First publication of banns. 




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