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Full text of "Some notes on the history of the Bogart family in Canada, with genealogical record of my parents Lewis Lazier Bogart and Elizabeth Cronk Bogart"

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cowpfiwcvita 




LAZIER IMMiAKT. 



HC.6C 



SOME NOTES ON 

THE HISTORY OF THE 
BOGART FAMILY 

IN CANADA 

WITH GENEALOGICAL RECORD OP MY PARENTS 

LEWIS LAZIER BOGART AND ELIZABETH 
CRONK BOGART 



COMPILED BY 



MARSHALL C. BOGART 



TORONTO: 

WILLIAM BRIGGS 

1918 




Copyright. Canada. 191 g. by 

MAM HALL C. BOOAJtT 



BrMratri 

TO THE MEMORY OF A NOBLE WOMAN 
MY GRANDMOTHER 

MARY LAZIER BOG ART 



PREFACE 



MY purpose in publishing these notes on 
the genealogy of my parents is not only to 
impart the information that I have teeu 
able to obtain, together with some of my 
personal knowledge, to my friends and 
relatives, but also to preserve an historical 
record of some of the prominent settlers 
who early came to this part of Canada. In 
fact I have endeavored to trace the four 
branches of my family back to the time 
when they first came to this continent, 
which has been no easy task. 

The more one delves into the past and 
finds an honorable record, the greater 
fascination the work has, and the greater 
satisfaction the information imparts. 

I shall feel amply repaid for my work if 
I have imparted information to my relatives 
that will lead them to a greater knowledge 
and appreciation of their ancestors. 

Much of the information herein I have 
obtained from records and family Bibles 
in my possession, yet it has been only 
5 



PREFACE 

with the assistance of willing helpers that 
I have been able to collect all the valuable 
data that I considered necessary for this 
family record. 

My sincere thanks are due to my esteemed 
nephew, Frederic Bogart McMullen, of 
Chicago, to whom I am indebted for most 
of the information relative to my ancestors 
before their emigration from the United 
States to Canada, and for the general 
arrangement of the work. 

Also to W. 8. Herrington, K.C., of 
Napanee, and his " History of Lennox and 
Addington." 

I have l>een fortunate in preserving the 
old photographs of my grandmother taken 
when she was eighty years old, of her eight 
sons, and of her one hundredth and one 
hundred and first anniversaries; also a 
copy of her marriage certificate. 

MARSHALL C. BOGART. 

Napanee, Ontario. 
October, 1918. 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

CHAPTER I 
THK BOOAUT FAMILY . 9 

CHAPTER II 
THE CRONK FAMILY . 

CHAPTER III 
THE BARKER FAMILY 35 

CHAPTER IV 
THE LAZIER FAMILY 47 



ILLUSTRATIONS 



PAGE 

Mary Lazier Bogart .... Frontitpiece 

Sons of Mary Lazier Bogart: 

John and Nicholas 21 

James C. and Lewis Lazier ... 23 

Gilbert Curtis and Cornlus Valleau . . 25 

David Demerest and Abraham Lent . . 27 

Marriage Certificate of Abraham Bogart and 

Mary Lazier 66 

The One Hundredth Anniversary . . 61 

The One Hundred and First Anniversary . . 67 

Residence of Lewis Lazier Bogart ... 68 

The Hay Bay Methodist Church ... 69 

Monument to U. E. Loyalists . . 70 

Marshall C. Bogart . . ... 72 



CHAPTER I 
THE BOOART FAMILY 

IF we had been permitted to choose our 
parents I am quite sure we would have 
chosen those assigned to us by Providence, 
for no one could have a more noble ancestry, 
dating back, as it does, several hundred 
years. 

The story of the coming of the Bogart 
family to America and their connection 
with its early history is most clear and well 
authenticated. It revolves mainly around 
one Jan Lou we Bogaert, who may be said 
to be the founder of the family in America. 
His home was in Schoonderwoerd, Holland, 
where he was born probably about 1630. 
His father was Louens Bogaert, the third 
son of Cornells Bogaert, who in turn was 
the son of Tunis Bogaert, all of Schoonder- 
woerd. Holland. This Tunis, Jan Louens' 
great - grandfather, was born probably 
between the years 1550 and 1565 ; no record 
of the dates of birth or death of Jan Louwe's 
9 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

ancestors seems to exist in this country, 
but their names are known, and it will be 
noted that the spelling of the Christian 
names, as well as that of the family name 
itself, underwent changes as time went on. 
Some of the descendants have dropped the 
" e," and others the " a " from the original 
Dutch Hogaert. The first Bogaert to come 
to America was Tunis, a first cousin of 
Jan Louwe's, who came over in 1G52 and 
who married Sara Rapelje, said to have 
been the first white child born in New 
York. This Tunis lived on Staten Island, 
New York, had one sou and one daughter, 
but does not appear to have left much 
impression on the community. 

It was left to his cousin, Jan Louwe, 
who came over in 1663, to take the more 
prominent part in the early annals of New 
Amsterdam. 

I quote from the " New Harlem Register," 
by Toler, which is: 

"A Genealogy of the descendants of the 
twenty- three original patentees of the town 
of New Harlem, containing proofs of births, 
baptisms and marriages from the year 
1630." 

"Jan Louwe (Lowe) Bogaert, from 
10 



THE BOOART FAMILY 

Schoonderwoerd, wife and two children, 
seven and four yean* old, left Amsterdam, 
April 16, 1603, in The Spotted Cow, a 
vessel under command of Captain Jan 
Bergen (1902 Year Hook, Holland Society, 
page 24). He first resided at Bedford, 
Long Island, moved to Harlem, New York, 
in 1672, was appointed magistrate 1675, 
re-elected 1676. He and his wife, on 
November 13th, 1676, were received at New 
York as a meinter of the Harlem Church. 
He and his wife Cornelia, conveyed on 
November 25th, 1695, forty acres of 
laud in Bedford (Brooklyn) to Thomas 
L;i in I >!! -. (as per page 51 of Liter 2 of 
Conveyances). Sold his farm to Captain 
Johannes Benson, September 9, 1706. The 
following spring removed to New York 
with his wife, uniting with the church 
there with certificate from Harlem on May 
27, 1707." (Riker's "History of Harlem," 
page 491.) 

Considerable interest and importance 
attaches to the distinction of being one of 
the original twenty-three patentees of the 
Town of Harlem, now part of New York 
City, because for many years and, in fact, 
until quite recently, their heirs entertained 
11 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

the hope of regaining possession of that 
valuable property. The following quotation 
from Toler's " New Harlem Register " tells 
of this patent: 

"In the year 1666, Charles Second of 
England issued to his brother, the Duke 
of York, a Patent or Grant, conveying, 
with other lands, the Island of Manhattan. 
Thereupon the Duke of York, through his 
Deputy, Governor Nicolls, issued, in the 
month of May, 1606, a Grant, Patent or 
Charter to the Freeholders and Inhabitant* 
of Harlem, incorporating the * Town of 
New Harlem' (alias Lancaster), and con- 
veying all lands on said island north 
and east of a line running from Seventy- 
fourth Street and East River to One 
Hundred and Twenty-ninth Street on the 
Hudson in the present City of New York. 

" On October 11, 1667, a second Nicolls 
Patent was issued and in 1686 a third 
Patent or Charter was granted through 
Governor Thomas Dongan by King James 
Second of England, ratifying and confirm- 
ing the first Patent mentioned; the latter 
Patent named all of the Freeholders and 
Inhabitants of Harlem as grantees and 
members of the Corporation, ' The Town of 
12 



THE BOGART FAMILY 

New Harlem.'" (Then follows the names 
of the original twenty-three patentees.) 

" By purchase of certain Patentee rights 
seven others became Associates of the 
Patentees named and owners of and 
entitled to all corporate privileges, although 
not named in the Dongan Patent." 

The name of Jan Louwe Bogaert is the 
first mentioned of these seven. 

Toler's book proceeds to give the 
genealogy of the families, who trace their 
connections to these original patentees. 
Among the many prominent families, 
whose connection and consequent claim 
descends from Jan Louwe Bogaert, are the 
Roosevelts, Van Houtens, De Peysters, 
Van Wagoners, Van Buskirks and 
Knickerbockers, of which family Harmen 
Janse Knickerbocker, born 1648, married 
Elizabeth Bogaert, eldest daughter of Jan 
Louwe. 

i 

Page 447, " Revised History of Harlem " 
(Riker). Published 1904, by New Harlem 
Publishing Co. 

" Jan Louwe Bogaert, otherwise from the 
place of his Nativity, called Jan Louwe, 
from Schoonderwoerd, claims a place 
13 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

among the patentees for reasons given in 
the annexed note: 

(NOTE. Peter Pnrmentier was one of the 
Mannheim refugees, who came out in company 
with -Ian Louwe Bogaert in h ;':'.. As hereto- 
fore noticed, Panneiitier and Bogaert lived as 
neighbors at Bedfonl for some years, and the 
former was one of the four named as trustees 
for the inhabitants at large to whom the 
Indians in 1070 sold I a mis in that vicinity. 
Purmentier became owner of a farm and grist 
mill in Bushwick, where in 1(575, one other 
excepted, he paid the largest tax on land and 
stock. Selling his farm to his only son, 
Michiel, he kept the mill and eight morgen of 
land, but these he also conveyed to Michiel some 
time after, and probably when he sold (May 
31st, 1(584) certain lands in Brooklyn to 
.Jacques Lazillere. He soon came to Harlem 
and assuredly took Bogart's place in Dongan'a 
patent, for which there seems no accounting 
except on the ground of a contract to buy 
Bogaert's farm, whose milling facilities prob- 
ably attracted him. Nevertheless, no sale took 
place; Bogaert kept the farm, and Permentier 
is not again named among the freeholders.) 

" Many references to him will be found 
in the preceding pages. Having spent nine 
years at Bedford, Long Island, he came to 
Harlem in 1672 as proprietor of the 
Montanye farm, the history of which up 
to its purchase by Bogaert has also been 
14 



THE BOGART FAMILY 

given. He was chosen a Magistrate in 1675, 
was re-elected in 1676, and on November 
30th of this year, with his wife, Cornelia 
Everts, was received at New York as a 
member of the Harlem Church. In 1677 
Bogaert drew lot No. 6 on Hoorn's Hook, 
but sold it December 9, 1679, to Joost Van 
Oblimis. He drew in 1691, lot No. 25, 
adjoining his farm on the South side, and 
which in the deed from the town, March 21, 
1701, is thus descril)ed: 

" There is set off for Jan Lou we Bogaert 
for the right of sixteen Morgen of land and 
an erf right; a piece of land lying in the 
bend of Hellgate, beginning from the South- 
west corner of the Hop Garden by a Birch 
tree, till to a White Oak tree, which stands 
by a small swamp, (Creupelbosje) marked 
I L B and I D L; thence towards the Kiver, 
past a rock marked I L B and I D L and 
so on to the Beech, till to the end of a 
medow north of a rocky hill ; as it is at 
present fenced in. The initials (I for J) 
are those of Jan Louwe Bogaert and Jan 
De Lamater." 

" Bogaert, having spent thirty-five years 
at Harlem, sold his farm to Captain 
Johannes Benson, September 21, 1706 for 
15 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

650, and the next spring removed to New 
York with his wife, uniting with the church 
there by certificate from Harlem on May 
27, 1707." 

As will be observed from the genealogical 
tables, our descent comes through Gysbert, 
the first child born to Jan Louwe after his 
arrival in America and according to 
Biker's History of Harlem, his second son. 
This Gysbert married Annatie Jansen, of 
Harlem, and of him Biker says: 

"About the time his parents left Harlem 
he removed to Tappan, where he bought 
land from Hendrick Lamberts, October 6th, 
1707 and served same month as a grand 
juror, and was living on his farm on the 
Sparkhill, 1729." 

It was his grandson, Gysbert, and wife, 
Maria Lent, who became United Empire 
Loyalists and founded the family in 
Canada, removing from Tappan to 
Adolphustown in 1784. 

It would appear that the Bogaert family 
in Tappan were not unanimous in their 
Tory leanings, as the following quotation 
from Toler's " New Harlem Begister " will 
show. It refers to one Nichols C. Bogart, 
who, like his cousin Gysbert, the U. E. 
16 



THE BOGART FAMILY 

Loyalist, was a great-grandson of Jan 
Louwe, living in the town of Tappan: 

" The family was strong Whigs, and he 
removed from the city during the British 
occupation to Tappan, New York, where 
he was taken a prisoner by the British 
and only released through the interposition 
of George Washington. It was at the house 
of Mr. Bogaert that the unfortunate Major 
Andre was confined after his arrest, and 
from it, October second 1780, he was led 
forth to execution. He was buried in the 
Dutch Church cemetery at New York. 
(See 1899 Year Book, Holland Society, 
page 148.) (See Steven's Chamber of 
Commerce, page 123.)" 

Major Andre, of course, was the famous 
Adjutant-General of the British Army, who 
conspired with General Benedict Arnold, 
of the American Army, for the delivery of 
the West Point forts into the hands of the 
British, and was hanged as a spy October 
2nd, 1780. 

GENEALOGY OP THE BOGART FAMILY 

Authorities: "Genealogical notes of New York and 
New England Families." By 8. V. Tolcott 
Published by Weed, Parsons A Co.. 1883. 

17 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

"ReTlsed History of Harlem." By Riker. Pub- 
lished by New Harlem Publishing Co., N.Y., 
1904. 

Family records belonging to Lewis Lazier Bogart 

Note. Numbers in brackets (1) denote successive 
rations. Letters In brackets (a) denote members 
nf same family. A star () Indicates the direct line 
of descent of Canadian Bogarts. 

(1) TUNIS BOGAERT. Born about 1540, nt 

Schoonderwoerd, Holland. 

His SON 

(2) CORNELI8 BOGAERT. Born about 

1570, at Schoonderwoerd, Holland. 

His SONS. 
(a) CORNELIS, 

I'M GUYSBERT, \\lmsc sun Til Ills 

came to America in 1652. 

(.'I) (c) LOUEN8 BOGAERT. Born about 
1605, at Schoonderwoerd, Holland. 

His SON 

(4) JAN LOU WE BOGAERT. Born about 
1630, at Schoonderwoerd, Holland. 
Married Cornelia EvertH. Came to 
America from Amsterdam, April 16th, 
166,'J, in the vessel The Spotted Cow. 
Settled in Bedford, Long Island (now 
Brooklyn). Moved to Harlem, and 
later to New York. 

His CHILDREN. 

(a) PETER, Born 1656, at Leer- 
dam, Holland. Married Fytio 
Vlierboom, 1686. 
18 



THE BOOABT FAMILY 

(6) GYSBBRT. Baptized Sept. 30th. 
1603, at Brooklyn, N.Y. Mar- 
ried A mi. 1 1 it- Jansen, of Har- 
lem. 

(c) CLAES (NICHOLAS). Born 1668, 
at Bedford. Died Jan. 5th, 
1727, at New York, where he 
lived as a baker. 

i </ 1 JOHANNES. Died in infancy. 

(e) JOHANNES. Baptized Aug. 16th, 
1679. Married Claessie Van 
Schaick. 

(/7 ELIZABETH. Married Harmen 
Janse Knickerbocker before 
1688. 

(<7) CATHERINE. Married Elbert 
Hermense. 

(h) MARGARET. Married Peter 
Harding, Dec. 4th, 1687. 

(i) JANNEKE. Married Joris 
(Geo.) Holmes, July 8th, 
1704. 

(;) CORNELIA. Married Wanter 
Quackenbos, Oct. 4th, 1(596. 

(5) GY8BERT BOGART. Son of Jan 
Lonwe Bogaert. Baptized Sept. 16th, 
1663, at Bedford, Long Inland (now 
Brooklyn). Married Annatie Jansen. 
Moved to Tappan on the Hudson 
River, where he bought land from 
Hendrick Lamberts, Oct. 6th, 1707. 
and served, according to court records, 
as gran<l juror that same month. He 
i* recorded as living on his farm on 
the Sparkhill in 1729. 
19 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

His CHILDREN. 

(a) JAN (JOHN). Born May 9th, 
1705. Married Catherine 
Evert. 

(6) MARYTJB. Born Oct. 14th, 
1707. Unmarried. 

(c) MARY. Born June 8th, 1709. 

Married Isaac Blauvelt. 

(d) LAWRENCE. Born April 12th, 

1710. Married. 

(c) CORNELIUS. Baptized Oct. 12th, 
1715. Married Orietje Blau- 
velt. 

(/) NICHOLAS (KLASS). Born Dec. 
12th, 1718. Married Katherine 
Myer. 

(0) CORNELIUS. Son of Oynbert. Bap- 
tized Oct. 12th, 1715, at Tappan. 
Married Orietje Blauvelt. 

His CHILDREN. 

*(o) GYSBERT. Born Oct. 3rd, 1742. 

Married Maria Lent. 
(6) GRIETJE (MARGARET). Married 

Thos. Eckerson. 
(c) LBAH. 

(7) GYSBERT BOGERT. Son of Cornelius. 
Born Oct. 3rd, 1742, at Tappan. Died 
March 25th, 1829, at Adolphustown, 
Ontario. Married Maria Lent. Born 
Dec. 19th, 1744. Died March 25th, 
1837. Came to Canada with his wife 
and son, Abraham, as United Empire 
Loyalists, June 16th, 1784. A daughter, 
20 



THE BOGABT FAMILY 

Qrietje (Margaret) ; born Aug. 6th, 
1762. Married John Duryee, and 
remained in United States. 

His SON. 

(8) ABRAHAM BOGART. Born May 28th, 
1767, at Tappaii. Died Oct. 12th, 1848, 
at Adolphustown. Married on March 
18th, 1792, to Mary Lazier. Born Aug. 
10th, 1772, at Yonkers, N.Y. Died 
Jan. 30th, 1874, at Adolphustown. 
She was a daughter of Nicholas 
Jacobus Lazier, also a United Empire 
Loyalist, who settled at Northport, 
Prince Edward County, in 1790. 

THEIR CHILDREN. 

(a) JOHN. Born Feb. 2nd, 1794. 
Married Phoebe Campbell. 
Died May 9th, 1869. 

(6) NICHOLAS. Born May 22nd, 
1795. Married Leticia Peter- 
son. Died Feb. 20th, 1871. 

(c) MARGARET. Born April 6th, 

1797. Died Sept. 30th, 1816. 

(d) JAMES. Born Aug. 12th, 1799. 

Married Debora Trumpour. 
Died June 24th, 1875. 

(e) PETER. Born Aug. 14th, 1802. 

Drowned in Bay of Quinte, 
Aug. 24th, 1819. 

*(/) LEWIS LAZIER. Born Jan. 18th, 
1804. Married Elizabeth 
Cronk. Died Dec. 24th, 1888. 

21 



THE BOOART FAMILY IN CANADA 

(g) GILBBBT CURTIS. Born Oct. 

:tli. 1806. Married. Ann 

Meacham. Died Aug. 2nd, 

1870. 
(h) CORNELIUS. Born Feb. 8th, 

1808. Married Betsy Dorland, 

(2nd) Mary Port. Died Jan. 

7th, 1888. 
() DAVID. Bern Aug. Kith, 1809. 

Married Hattie Bicford. Died 

Feb. 27th, 1877. 
(/) ABRAHAM. Born May 22nd, 

1811. Married Isabella Young, 

(2nd) Mrs. Evans. Died Dec. 

30th, 1886. 
(k) CHARITY CONK LIN. Born Dec. 

18th, 1814. Married Hubbard 

Meacham. Died Feb. 21st, 

1847. 

(9) LEWIS LAZIER BOGART. Son of 
Abraham. Born Jan. 18th, 1804, at 
Adolphiifttown, Ontario. Died Dec. 
24th, 1888, at Adolphustown, Ontario. 
Married Jan. 26th, 1835, to Elizabeth 
Cronk, born Nov. 26th, 1813, who 
died Jan. 20th, 1890, at Adolphustown. 
She was a daughter of Abraham Cronk 
and his wife Elizabeth Barker. 

THEIR CHILDREN. 

*(o) MORTIMER CROMWELL. Born 
Nov. 3rd, 1836. Married 
Delilah Churchill. Died Oct. 
12th, 1882. 




c 

X 




THE BOOART FAMILY 

(6) MARY ELIZABETH. Born April 
13th, 1843. Married James 
ButeH McMullen. Died Feb. 
2nd, 1873. 

(c) MARSHALL CAMPBELL. Born 
July 19th, 1847. Married 
Susan Emma Huffman. 

(10) (a) MORTIMER CROMWELL BOGART. 
Son of Lewin Lazier Bogart. Born 
Nov. 3rd, 1836. Died Oct. 12th, 1882. 
Married Delilah Churchill. Born Aug. 
28th, 1843. 



THEIR CHILDREN. 

(a) FRANKLIN CHURCHILL. Born 
Aug. 22nd, 1863. Married 
Sept. 10th, 1889, to Eugenia 
Wiggins, born Nov. 14th, 
1861. 

'(&) LEWIS FERDINAND. Born Jan. 
1st, 1866. Married June 10th, 
1889, to Marion Buchanan, 
born Dec. 28th, 1866. 

(c) CARRIE EVA. Born Oct. 28th, 

1868. Married Nov. :5rd, 1898, 
to Stewart L. Daly, who died 
Feb. 9th, 1903. One daughter, 
Katherine Daly, born Dec. 
21st, 1900. 

(d) MORTIMER JAMES MARSHALL. 

Born July 2nd, 1882. Unmar- 
ried. 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

(10) (6) MARY ELIZABETH. Daughter of 
Lewis Lazier Bogart. Born April 13th, 
1843. Died Feb. 2nd, 1873. Married 
Aug. 24th, 1870, to James Bates 
McMullen, born Aug. 20th, 1841, 
died July 4th, 1902. 

TIIKIK SON. 

(a) FREDERIC BOGART McMuLLXN. 
Born July 19th, 1871. Mar- 
ried Jan. 26th, 1899, to Lois 
Rice, born July 1st, 1871. 
One daughter, Mary Lois 
McMullen. Born Dec. 7th, 
1899. 

(10) (c) MARSHALL CAMPBELL BOOART. 

Born July 19th, 1847. Married June 
12th, 1878, to Susan Emma Huffman. 

(11) LEWIS FERDINAND BOGART. Son 

of Mortimer Cromwell Bogart. Born 
Jan. 1st, 1866. Married June 10th, 
1889, to Marion Louise Buchanan, 
born Dec. 28th, 1866. 

THEIR CHILDREN. 

(a) MARION QENBVIEVE. Born June 
16th, 1890. Married April 
18th, 1918, to Reade Mallory 
Roblin. 

(12) *(ft) LEWIS ARTHUR BOOART. Born 

July 16th, 1896. 



24 




X 

^ 

w 




THE BOGART FAMILY 

Gysbert Bogaert above referred to, great- 
grandson of Jan Louwe and the great- 
grandfather of the present writer, came to 
Canada with his wife, Maria Lent, and his 
son Abraham, as United Empire Loyalists, 
and landed in Adolphustown, June 16th, 
1784. 

The Crown deeded on May 17th, 1802, lots 
numbers 20 and 21 in the fifth concession 
of Adolphustown to Gysbert Bogart, one 
hundred and seventy-five acres, which was 
the home of his eldest son, our uncle John 
Bogart, who married Phoebe Campbell, and 
raised his family of eight children, four 
sons and four daughters. This farm has 
remained in the family ever since, there 
having been practically only three transfers 
of the title in the county register. 

The Crown also deeded to Gysbert 
Bogart, on the 19th of September, 1803, lot 
number 30 in the third concession of 
Adolphustown, one hundred and thirty- 
three acres, which he deeded on Decem- 
ber 1st the same year to Paul Trumpour. 
It remained in the Trumpour family until 
sold to Thomas Bygott, who married 
Catherine Bogart, daughter of John Bogart, 
25 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

and is now owned and occupied by their 
son, Frank Bygott, a great-great-grandson. 

On March 7, 1804, the Crown deeded to 
Abraham Bogart, our grandfather, who 
married Mary Lazier, the east half of lot 
number 21 in the fourth concession of 
Adolphustown, one hundred acres, and on 
December 1st, 1836, the Crown deeded to 
his father, Gilbert Bogart (the first time 
spelled Gilbert), the west half of the same 
lot, one hundred acres. They must have 
lived on this part of the lot for a great 
numlH?r of years before the patent was 
taken out, for it was on this west half that 
their first log house was built on the bay 
shore. Later on, early in the nineteenth 
century, they built their large frame dwell- 
ing to accommodate the two families, the 
finest house in that part of the country. 

This farm of two hundred acres was 
always known as the Bogart homestead, as 
it was on this farm our great-grandfather, 
Gysbert Bogart, and his wife, Maria Lent, 
lived and died. Here also our grand- 
father, Abraham Bogart, and his wife, Mary 
Lazier, raised their nine sons and two 
daughters, and here he died in his eighty- 
second year. 

26 



THE BOOART FAMILY 

Our uncle, Nicholas Bogart, his second 
son, inherited the farm. He married 
Leticia Peterson, and raised a family of 
four sons and four daughters. For beauty 
of situation, fertile soil, and very many 
natural advantages, a finer two hundred- 
acre farm could not have been selected. It 
remained in the family until 1870, when 
sold to Mr. Robert Collins. 

Our grandfather, Abraham Bogart, was 
also alloted lot number 17 in the fifth 
concession of Adolphustown, one hundred 
and fifty acres, but the patent deed had not 
been issued at his death, and not having 
made a will, the oldest son of the family 
inherited the property. It having been 
promised to his brother Lewis by his father, 
he very generously for a nominal con- 
sideration, deeded it to my father, Lewis 
Lazier Bogart, December 1st, 1866, showing 
that in those days they perferred to deal 
honorably rather than adopt the principal 
of to-day, " We keep what we hold." About 
this time Lewis purchased from Christopher 
Huyck part of lot number 18 to the west. 
All this property remained in the family 
until sold to The Rathburn Co. in 1884. 

On November 12th, 1834, the Crown 
27 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

deeded to Lewis Lazier Bogart the west 
half of lot number 17 in the fourth 
concession of Adolphustown, one hundred 
acres, and some time afterward he added 
the next farm, the east half of lot number 
18, one hundred acres, making a block of 
land of about four hundred and fifty acres, 
extending from Hay Bay to the Bay of 
Quinte. 

Lewis Lazier Bogart married Elizabeth 
Cronk, of Sophiasburgh, Prince Edward 
County, on January 20th, 1835. After her 
marriage she went to live with her husband 
on the farm taken up from the Crown, 
and there they raised three children, my 
older brother, my sister, and myself. My 
parents both passed away on the homestead 
within a little over a year of each other. 
The farm is now owned and occupied by 
their grandson, Lewis Ferdinand Bogart. 

My mother was a daughter of Abraham 
Cronk and one of a family of nine children, 
seven sons and two daughters. 



28 



CHAPTER II 
THE CRONK FAMILY 

THIS family also was Dutch, but whether 
or not Jacob Cronkheit, the most remote 
ancestor in this line of whom the present 
writer can find record, was himself born 
in Holland or near Poughkeepsie where 
the family settled is not clear. The record 
of his marriage on December 15th, 1713, 
at Sleepy Hollow, New York, to Helena 
Brent, is, however, authentic. Their grand- 
son, Abraham Cronk, was born in 1743, at 
Poughkeepsie, and there on June 24th, 
1762, he married Lavina Huff. This 
marriage is recorded on page 207, volume 
VI, " Marriage Records of New York." 
He with his family emigrated to Canada 
as United Empire Loyalists. 

It is established that the original name, 
Cronkheit, was in many cases shortened to 
Cronk by the American families, although 
there are many families now in the United 
States using the original name of Cronkheit. 
The records of the Fourteenth Regiment 
29 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

from Hoosack and Schaghtecooke, Albany 
County, New York, which fought under 
Col. Peter Yates in the war of the American 
Revolution, contained the name of an 
Abraham Cronkheit, a Tunis Cronkheit, 
besides five other Cronks and Cronkheits. 
This would seem to support the theory 
that the family had come to America, 
considerably before the year 1700, and that 
they entertained diversified political views. 
There are New York records that show 
that Duchess County Cronkheits favored 
the American cause and " Signed the 
Associations " in July, 1775. Two Ulster 
County Cronks refused, as did two 
Duchess County Kranchites. Captain 
James Kronkhytc. led a company of West- 
chester County revolutionary troops. All 
of these different spellings and opinions 
within the space of a few miles! 

The following is to be found on page 
200 of " Pioneer Life on the Bay of 
Quinte," published by Ralph and Clark, 
Ltd., Toronto: 

" The Cronks came from Holland and 
settled in New York. They were well-to-do, 
but their estates were confiscated at the 
close of the revolution." 
30 



THE CRONK FAMILY 

"Abraham Cronk, a native of Pough- 
keepsie, fought in the Royal ranks, and, 
after the Independence of the Colonies, 
\vas recognized by the Mother Country, he 
came to Canada and became one of the first 
settlers in Sophiasburgh, where, as a 
United Empire Loyalist, he was granted 
two hundred acres of land, with grants of 
two hundred acres for his children when 
they should have attained their majority 
under the privileges of proclamation." 

" On the corner of his old place is now 
to be found the Lazier cemetery, the land 
of which he donated to the Township for 
IMINH! purposes more than one hundred 
years ago." 

He reared a family of six sons and three 
daughters. 

Abraham, his third son and my grand- 
father, was born in Duchess County, New 
York, in 1777, and came to Canada, settling 
on the two hundred acre farm just west 
of Green Point, Peterson's Ferry. He 
early built the large stone dwelling, which 
still stands, and is considerably over one 
hundred years old. This farm is now 
owned and occupied by Selwin Cronk, a 
grandson. 

31 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

GENEALOGY OF THE CRONK FAMILY. 

Authorities: Family records of Mr. and Mrs. L. L. 
Bogart and Mr. James B. Cronk. 

(1) JACOB CRONKHEIT. Married Helena 
Brent, his second wife, Dec. 15th, 
1713, at Sleepy Hollow, N.Y. 



THEIR SON. 

(2) TUNIS CRONKHEIT. Born 1721. 

His SON. 

(3) ABRAHAM CRONK. Born 1743, in 

Dutchess Co., N.Y. Died March, 1818, 
in Sophiasburg, Canada. Married 
June 24th, 1762, at or near Pough- 
keepsie, N.Y., to Lavinia Huff. Emi- 
grated to Canada as United Empire 
Loyalists soon after close of Revolu- 
tionary War. 

THEIR CHILDREN. 

(a) MATHBW. 

(ft) JACOB. 

*(c) ABRAHAM. 

(d) ENOCH. 

(e) REUBEN. 
(/) JOHN. 
(g) SARAH. 
(h) OLIVE. 
(t) PHOEBE. 

32 



THE CRONK FAMILY 

(4) ABRAHAM CRONK. Son of Abraham. 

Born Oct., 1777, in Dutches* Co., N.Y. 
Died Sept. 9th, 1848, in Prince Edward 
County, Canada. Married in 1798, to 
Elizabeth Barker, daughter of David 
Barker. 

THEIR CHILDREN. 

(a) ASA. Born Nov. 28th, 1798. 

Died in 1878. 
(6) DAVID. Born Feb. 15th, 1801. 

Died in 1870. 

(c) EDWARD. Born Oct. 2nd, 1803. 

Died in 1884. 

(d) REUBEN. Born Oct. 19th, 1805. 

Died in 1819. 

(e) ABRAHAM. Born April 4th, 

1807. Died in 1834. 
(/) LYDIA. Born June 4th, 1809. 

Died in 1894. 
($r) JACOB. Born July 16th, 1811. 

Died in 1890. 

(5) (&) ELIZABETH. Born Nov. 2Gth, 

1813. Died Jan. 20th, 1890, 
married Lewig Lazier Bogart, 
Jan. 26th, 1835. 

(i) JAMES. Born June 26th, 1817. 
Died in 1911. 

Abraham Cronk, my grandfather, mar- 
ried Elizabeth Barker in 1798, and raised 
nine children. 

His wife was the daughter of David 
Barker, and one of a family of twelve 
children, seven sons and five daughters. 
33 



CHAPTER III 
THE BARKER FAMILY 

THIS was an English family, the records 
of which go back to about the year 1200. 
The most authoritative records seem to 
have been compiled by Jesse J. Barker, of 
Philadelphia, in a little book published in 
1898. I quote its account of the early 
Barkers, including the title page and 
authorities. 

THE COLONIAL BARKER FAMILIES OF THE 
UNITED STATES. 

Sketch of the English Ancestors of the 
three Principal Colonial Barker familieH 
of Massachusettes, Rhode Island, and 
Delaware, by Jesse J. Barker, of Phila- 
delphia (1898), a descendant of the Dela- 
ware Branch, a member of the Historical 
Society of Pennsylvania. Compiled largely 
from the Claverley Church records of 
marriages, births, and deaths and from 
35 



THE BOGABT FAMILY IN CANADA 

" Pedigree of the family of Barker of Salop 
(England), showing the branches settled 
at Hallon, Claverley, Colchurst, Woverton, 
Haghmond Abbey, and Hopton Castle, Co. 
Salop; at Fairford, Co. Gloucester; at 
Vale Royal, Co. Chester; at Coleshill, 
Co. Warwick; at Congreve, Co. Stafford; 
and at Twyford, Co. Berks. By Rev. 
William Gibbs Barker, Stoneleigh, Eng- 
land. Privately printed. London, 1877." 
(Authorities of Rev. William Gibbs 
Barker, Chartulary of Haghmond Abbey; 
records of the Court of Exchequer ; Shrews- 
bury Corporation Records, Sundorn Title 
Deeds; various Family Deeds, Wills and 
Settlements; Close Roll of 12 H 111; Monu- 
mental Inscriptions, Parish Registers and 
Alderley, Alberbury, Alvley, Bridgenorth, 
Cloverley, Condover, Drayton, Fitz, Hodnet, 
Lydhom, Prees, Shrewsbury, Stoke, Stottes- 
den, Uffington, Upton, Worfleld, Wroxeter, 
Harleian M8S. 1241, 12, 23, 93, 107-1396, 19, 
269-1424, 57-1472, 12-1502, 57-1535, 167- 
1972, 48-1982, 29, 30, 36, 76, 148-2119, 137- 
2153, 88; add. M8S. 14, 314, 99; Joseph 
Morris' MSS. (by kind permission of E. 
Creswell Peile, Esq. ) ; George Morris' MSS. ; 
Court Rolls of the Manor of Claverley; 
36 



THE BABKER FAMILY 

Guilliam's Display; Heraldry; Blakeway's 
Sherriffs, Salop; Owen and Blakeway's 
History of Shrewsbury; Eyton's Anti- 
quities of Salop; Duke's Antiquities of 
Shropshire.) 

The principal visitations of Shropshire 
commenced the pedigree of Barker with 
Kandulph de Coverall, who in the reign 
of Edward II married Margaret, daughter 
of Peter Pigot of Willaston; and then 
passing over the intermediate generations 
(which have been supplied from the Court 
Kolla of the Manors of Warfleld and Claver- 
ley by the industry of Mr. Joseph 
proceed with William Barker, alias Coverall 
Morris), proceed with William Barker, 
alias Coverall, who married the heiress of 
John Goulston of Qoulston. 

The explanation of this change of name 
seems to be as follows : " The Manor of 
Coverhall or Coverall, is in the Parish 
of Adderley, and in the time of Edward 
II formed part of the possessions of 
Bartholomew de Badlesmere, upon whose 
attainder and execution the undertenants 
of the Manor would share in his disgrace 
and fall. William de Calverhall seems to 
have fled southward and reappeared at 
37 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

Ha lion in Worfield under the name of 
William le Barker, a name either derived 
from dealings in Oak bark or from some 
unknown relationship with one already 
bearing the name ; for this surname appears 
in the Close Roll of 12 Henry III (1227), 
and also as a tenant in Stanton Lacy in 
1272. The name Calverhall, after being 
dropped by the family for more than two 
hundred years, appears to have been 
reaHsumed as an alias upon their resuming 
connection with the North of the county, 
where, besides land in Goulston, they 
became possessed of estates at Wolverton, 
Colchurst, etc., upon which the elder 
branches settled, while the younger, accord- 
ing to the Custom of the Manor, continued 
to hold Aston in Claverley (Co. of Salop)." 

The late John S. Barker of Picton, 
Ontario, spent much time in the search for 
records of the early Barkers. Some of his 
notes are as follows: 

" Forty noblemen and Privy Coun- 
cillors of Queen Elizabeth, by the act 
passed the previous year appointed as a 
commission empowered to examine and 
pass sentence on Mary, the late Queen of 
Scotts and heir James of Scotland. The 
38 



THE BARKER FAMILY 


commissioners came to Futhingay Castle 

and sent to her Sir Thomas Mi Id may, 
A Minis Pau let and Edward Barker, who 
delivered her a letter from Elizabeth, 
informing her of the commission and of 
the approaching trial. . . . 

To the wisdon of Queen. Elizabeth and 
the prudence and sagacity of Burleigh, we 
are indebted for the first newspaper, the 
English Meiruia, which was the first news- 
paper published and which by authority 
was imprinted at London by Christopher 
Barker, her high ness's printer. 

" There are two or more coats of arm 
and ten or eleven crests of different Barker 
families in England. One was conferred 
by the Sovereign's Clarencieux, Robert 
Cook, December 17, 1582 (five escallop 
shells in a cross). So he was the Barker 
there distinguished by Queen Elizabeth's 
representative. This coat of arms is, there- 
fore, registered officially and was borne by 
Rowland Barker of Wolleston in the 
County of Salop." 

This Sir Rowland Barker possessed 

Haughmond Abbey, located some few miles 

northwest of Shrewsbury, Shropshire. It 

was erected in the twelfth century, and 

39 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

some considerable portions of it still 
remained. Sir Rowland's grandson, James 
Barker, founded the family in America, 
coming over in 1634 from Harwich, Essex 
County, in the ship, Mary and John, sailing 
from South Hampton March 24th. He first 
settled in the Massachuttes Colony and 
afterwards Newport, Rhode Island. He 
married Barbara Dugan, daughter of Lord 
Weston, in 1644. His great-grandson, 
David Barker, U. E. Loyalist, founded the 
Barker family in Canada. He got into a 
great deal of trouble with the American 
army, and at the end of the Revolutionary 
war his property was confiscated, and he 
emigrated with his family to Canada. The 
following inscription is taken from his 
family Bible: 

" David Barker sailed with a party of 
Loyalists under the command of Capt Van 
Alstine, from New York, on the 8th of 
September, 1783, and arrived in Quebec 8th 
of October. A Fleet of seven sail and was 
protected by the Brig. ' Hope ' of forty 
guns. Wintered at Sorel, 21st May, 1784, 
the party left Sorel ; and reached the Fourth 
Township on the 16th of June in Batteauz, 
having lived during the Winter under 
40 



THE BARKER FAMILY 

canvass tents. This Bible was bought and 
the following entry put in by him on a slip 
of paper and his family was entered in the 
family record of said Bible. And on an- 
other paper attached to the Bible was 
this:" 

Be it remembered that I make this 
Bible a present to my grandson, David 
Barker, son of Edward Barker, and it is 
my desire that it may be kept in the family 
and to descend down to the name of David 
Barker. Sophiasburg, 5th of Sixth month, 
1849, in the presence of (this must be 
U. E. L. David's request, and it was not 
signed by him)." 

He settled with his family in Adolphus- 
town at what is now known as Thompson's 
Point, June 16th, 1784. He built before 
his death the Barker home, which still 
stands after the lapse of more than one 
hundred years. 



THE DOOART FAMILY IN CANADA 



(SKXEALOGY, BARKER FAMILY, FOR- 
MERLY CALVERHALL, SALOP, 
SHROPSHIRE. 

(1 ) RANDOLPH DE CALVERHALL, of the 

Manor of Calverhall, County Salop. 
1200 A.D. 

His Sox. 

(2) WILLIAM FITZ RALPH DE CALVER 

HALL, of BancmiiiRter, Tenant in fee 
of William de Dunstanville, 1219. 



His SON. 

(3) WILLIAM DE CALVERHALL, 1240 

1255. 

His SON. 

(4) WILLIAM DE CALVERHALL, 1284. 

Married Alina. 



His SON. 

(5) RICHARD DE CALVERHALL, 1319. 

Married Margaret, daughter of Peter 
Pigot, of Willaston, County of Salop. 

THEIR SON. 

(6) WILLIAM LE BERCER (BARKER), 

of Hallon in Warfield, County of 
Salop; time of Edward III; 1337. 
42 



THE BARKER FAMILY 

THEIR SON. 

(7) ROGER LE BARKER, 1368, of Hallow. 

Married Alice, who survived him. 
Died with estates there. 

THEIR SON. 

(8) WILLIAM BARKER, of Hallow. Mar- 

ried Marjery, daughter of Willinin 
Wharwood. Died 1411. 

THEIR Sox. 

(9) HENRY BARKER, of Hallon. Married 

Marjery, daughter and heiress of 
Stephen Lovestick, of Hallon. She 
survived her husband. Obtained land 
here from William Wharwood. Died 
1438. 

THEIR SON. 

(10) WILLIAM BARKER, of Hallon, gentle- 

man. Married Ann. daughter of John 
Colynon Rowlowe, of Rowlowe in War- 
field. Enjoyed great estates there, and 
died in 1480. 

THEIR Sox. 

(11) JOHN BARKER. Married Elizabeth, 

daughter and co-heiress of William 
Greene of Aston. Died, Aston, 1507. 
43 



THE BOGART FAMILY. IN CANADA 

THEIR SON. 

(12) JOHN BARKER of Aston. Died 1531. 

Married Margaret. Died 1538. 

THEIR SON. 

(13) HUMPHREY BARKER. 



His SON. 

(14) WILLIAM BARKER, alias Caverall, of 

Aston in Claverly. Married Margaret, 
daughter and heiress of John Qoulston 
of Ooulston, Cheswardine. He was 
buried ut Claverly, Oct. 30th, 1590. 

THEIR SON. 

(15) JOHN BARKER. First marriage Eliza- 

beth, sister of Sir Rowland Hill, first 
Protestant Lord Mayor of London. 

THEIR SON. 

(16) EDWARD BARKER. Married Cather- 

ine, daughter of Ralph Egerton of 
Wrinehill. 

THEIR SON. 

(17) SIR ROWLAND BARKER. Knighted 

December 17th, 1582. 

His SON. 

(18) JAMES BARKER. Died 1634, at sea, 

on ship Mary and John. 
44 



THE BARKER FAMILY 

His BON. 

(19) JAMES BARKER. Born 1617. Mar- 

ried 1644. Came from Harwich in 
ship Mary and John, in 1634. Settled 
in Rhode Island. 

THBIR SON. 

(20) WILLIAM BARKER. Born 1662. 

Married Elizabeth Easton. Had eight 
children. 

THEIR SON. 

(21) JAMES BARKER. Born Jan. 26th, 

1692. Died 1750. Married 1715, to 
Elizabeth Tucker. 

THEIR CHILDREN. 

(a) WILLIAM. Born 1716. Died 

1796. 
(6) ABRAHAM. Born 1718. Died 

1740. 
(c) HANNAH. Born 1719. Died 

1740. 
(tf) ELIZABETH. Born 1721. Died 

1799. 

(e) MARY. Born 1722. Died 1783. 
(/) JAMBS. Born 1725. Died 1742. 
(g) JOTHAN. Born 1727. Died 

1811. 

(h) CALEB. Born 1729. Died 1750. 
(I) RUTH. Born 17K1. 

(22) (/) DAVID. Born 1732. Died 1821. 

Married 1762, to Lydia Shove, 
who was born in 1743, and 
died in 1804. 
45 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

TUKIK CHILDREN. 

() SAMUEL. Born Oct. 8th. 1763. 

Died April 23rd. 1836. 
() ASA. Born Jan. 4th. 1765. 
(e) EDWARD. Born Nov. 17th. 1766. 

Died July 30th, 1820. 
rf > DAVID. Born Sept 19th. 1768. 

(e) JAMES. Born Aug. 10th. 1772. 
(/) ELIZABETH. Born July 8th. 

1774. Died Feb. 27tb.*1848. 

(f ) SARAH. Born Dec. 1st, 1776. 
(*) REBECCA. Born Aug. 1st, 1779. 
(i) ABRAHAM. Born Oct. 16th, 

1781. Died March 1st, 1829. ' 
(/) LTDIA. Born Oct. 16th. 1783. 
(*) CALEB. Born Sept. 4th. 1786. 
(I) PHOEBE. Born Mar 26th. 1770. 

123) ELIZABETH BARKER. Born July 8th. 
1774. Died Feb. 27th. 1848. Harried 
Abraham Cronk. 1798. 

THKI* DAUGHTBL 

(24) ELIZABETH CROXK. Married Lewi* 
Lazier Bogart. 

The Cronkct and the Barkers were strong 
orthodox Quakers, and formed quite a 
Quaker settlement near North port. 



CHAPTER IV 
THE LAZIER FAMILY 

OUR memory is particularly vivid of our 
grandmother, Mary Lazier, who lived a 
great many years with her son Lewis, and 
died at his home in her one hundred and 
second year. 

She was a grand, benevolent Christian 
woman, one of the salt of the earth and 
pure as gold. She possessed more than 
ordinary intelligence for the opportunities 
of those times and was endowed with a 
large measure of good saving common sense. 

She was most industrious, always busy 
quilting, knitting, in short, she was a 
beautiful seamstress, and she had some job 
to keep in repair the kneeless and seatless 
pants of her grandchildren. She made a 
patch quilt when she was one hundred 
years old. 

Her favorite motto that she was always 
impressing upon her grandchildren was, 
47 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

" I'll teach you to work, and teach you to 
love it" 

She was most neat and tidy about her 
personal appearance, her white kerchief 
about her neck and shoulders was always 
spotlessly clean. She was very fond of 
her snuff, which she used for probably fifty 
years, and the most acceptable present that 
her sons or anyone could bring her was a 
pound of snuff. She suddenly gave it up 
when over eighty years old. No one of the 
family knew it until, when a neighbor 
came in to enjoy a pinch, she handed him 
her snuff box, saying she had not taken 
any for a long time. She said she was 
afraid when she got old she might soil her 
kerchief. 

She would sometimes grow reminiscent 
of her early days. When they came to this 
country up the St. Lawrence in their 
batteaux, a long tedious trip, she told how 
a young English officer courted her during 
the voyage; she was then eighteen years 
old; of the struggles of their early home 
life in the little log cabin on the bay shore, 
where she went to live with her husband's 
father and mother, who spoke mostly Dutch ; 
of the busy time carding, spinning and 
48 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

weaving the home-spun clothing for her 
nine 8onH and two daughters; of their 
having to go around by boat with their 
little grist to be ground at the windmill 
at Kingston ; of the addition of a few acres 
of fallow or cleared land each year for 
cultivation to support their fast increasing 
family. 

She had a little ditty in Dutch that 
her grandchildren and great-grandchildren 
were very fond of having her recite to 
them : 

Tip a top a toncies, 
Varkies in the boncies, 
Conchies in the clover, 
Packies in the hover, 
A ncliics in the waterclaw, 
Colfles in the longagrass. 
Ho, boys, Ho!" 

i 

The following concerning the Lazier 
family is found on page 978 of the " Pioneer 
Life of the Bay of Quinte " : 

11 Data furnished from memoranda tran- 
scribed from the old Lazier family Bible 
record. Jacobus R. Lazier was born in 
1708, and left France for America during 
the time extreme persecutions were being 
inflicted on the Huguenots. 
49 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

" Settling presumably at Yonkers near 
New York, where his son subsequently 
owned considerable property, he married 
an Englishwoman, whose Christian name 
was Maria. 

They had at least one son, called 
Nicholas Jacobus Lazier, but whether there 
were other children cannot now be ascer- 
tained, although the assumption is that 
there were, as other Lazier descendants 
have been traced living in the vicinity of 
Yonkers. 

" Jacobus R. Lazier died in 1792, and 
was survived twelve years by his wife, who 
died at the age of eighty-eight years. 

Nicholas Jacobus Lazier arrived in 
Canada on November 6th in the year before 
that of his father's death. He was a man 
well advanced in years, being at that time 
fifty-three years of age, having been born 
in 1739. He came accompanied by his wife 
and eight children. 

His migration is stated to have been 
the effect of a refusal to take the oath of 
Allegiance to the American government, 
and the confiscation of the considerable 
milling and farming properties he possessed 
at Yonkers near New York. 
60 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

" Twenty years before setting foot in 
Upper Canada he married Charity Cocklin, 
who, although thirteen years his junior, 
was a sympathetic companion in his days 
of adversity and a faithful helpmate among 
the stress of his pioneering hardships. 

" The old homestead where he first settled 
in Hophiasburg is situated on the Eastern 
one hundred and twenty acres of Lot 
eighteen, west of Green Point. It stands on 
a knoll that looked across the Sylvan bay 
of Quinte. 

"A little way to its rear a grist mill was 
erected beside a creek which flowed from 
a lake enclosed by his land, and close by 
not much further along the shore the sad 
demands of later years placed a lonely 
burial ground, where the Laziers and other 
Pioneers of the Sophiasburg Bay Front 
have since been laid to their rest beneath 
the land of their adoption within sound of 
their Bay. 

" Prosperity attended the efforts of the 
Lazier family pioneer with such good effect 
as to enable him, before he died, to bequeath 
a farm to each of his sons. 

51 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

" Most of them settled on the road lead- 
ing from Picton to Demerestville and oppo- 
site Big Island. 

" John was left the old homestead." 
Dr. Canniff, speaking of slaves in his 
l)ook, " Settlement of Upper Canada," says: 
" Nicholas Lazier had slaves one slave 
named Sal was noted for her attachment 
to Methodism and would go a long distance 
to attend meetings. As a female slave, 
Black Bettie, was one of the first congre- 
gation in New York l>efore which the first 
Methodist Minister in America preached, so 
this woman was one of the first Methodists 
at the Bay and in Upper Canada. John 
Crank and she were the only Methodists in 
the Township of Sophiasburg for a long 
time." 
The Laziers were Presbyterians. 



GENEALOGY OF THE LAZIER FAMILY. 

Authorities: " Pioneer Life on the Bay of Qninte." 
Published by Ralph and Clark, Ltd., Toronto. 
Family records in the possession of the Lazier 
family and of Mary Lazier Bogart. 

52 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

(1) JACOBUS R. LAZIER. Born in Hol- 
land. Came to America; settled at 
Yonkere, N.Y. Died in 1792. 



His SON. 

(2) NICHOLAS JACOBUS LAZIER. Born 
in 1739, probably at Yonkers. Mar- 
ried Charity Conklin in 1771, who 
was born in 1752. Arrived in Canada 
with his wife and eight children, Nov. 
6th, 1791. 



THEIR CHILDREN. 

(a) MARY. Born 1772. Married 
Abraham Bogart. Died 1874. 
(6) JAMES. Born 1776. 

(c) LEWIS. Born 1779. Died 1813. 

(d) NICHOLAS. Born 1781. 

(e) MBHETABLE. 

(/) PETER. Born 1786. 

(g) JOHN. 

(h) ABRAHAM. 

lit WILLIAM. 

(3) MARY LAZIER. Born Aug. 10th, 1772. 
Yonkers, N.Y. Died Jan. 30th, 1874. 
Adolphustown, Canada, aged 101 
years, 5 months, 20 days. Married 
March 18th, 1792, to Abraham Bogart, 
of Adolphustown, Canada. 
53 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

THEIR CHILDREN 

are fully recorded on page 21 with 
the Bogart family. Their 
fourth son was the writer's 
father. 

(4) LEWIS LAZIER BOGART. Born Jan. 
18th, 1804. Died Dec. 24th, 1888. 

They settled on a fine two hundred acre 
farm one mile east of Northport on the 
bay shore. There was a water power on 
the farm, so they built a large flour 
mill and carried on an extensive milling 
business for nearly a century in the family. 

Nicholas Lazier had seven sons and two 
daughters. John settled on the homestead, 
Nicholas settled just west of Northport, 
Cabos (James), Peter and Abraham settled 
near Picton, and William, the youngest son, 
settled near Port Perry. There were two 
daughters, Mary, our grandmother, who 
was the eldest child, and Mihitable, who 
married Mr. Hill of Belleville. 

I have a photograph copy of the marriage 
certificate of my grandparents, Abraham 
Rogart, and Mary Lazier. 

This John Longhorn was the first Epis- 
copal missionary stationed at this part of 
54 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

Upper Canada and came to Bath in the 
year 1790. He built St. Paul's Church at 
Sandburist, the first church erected in this 
country, and for some time was the only 
clergyman in this district authorized to 
solemnize marriage, a privilege many a 
parson would like to enjoy to-day. 

Our grandparents had the good judgment 
to induce each of their large family of sons 
to learn some industrial trade, and nearly 
every branch of industry then available 
was represented among them. The oldest 
was a blacksmith, there was a carpenter, 
a cooper, a shoemaker, a tailor, a hatter, 
a miller, and a farmer. However, they did 
not all make their trade the means of their 
livelihood, for most of them sooner or later 
gravitated back to the farm. Three of them, 
John, Nicholas, and Lewis, settled in North 
Adolphustown, within a mile of their old 
home, and raised nineteen children among 
them, a good average. At one time the 
Bogarts were pretty thick about there, the 
parents with their children numbering 
twenty-five. 

Four of the brothers settled in Belleville 
Cornelius, Gilbert, David and Abraham. 
Cornelius, whose first wife was Betsy 
66 



THE BOGABT FAMILY IN CANADA 

Dorland, by whom he had two children, one 
son and one daughter, married after her 
decease Mary Port, by whom he had three 
children, one son and two daughters. He 
carried on a large boot and shoe business 
in Belleville for a great many years until 
he retired. 

Gilbert married Ann Meacham, by whom 
he had three children, one son and two 
daughters. He, being a carpenter, built the 
palatial home, which is now occupied as 
the Marchmont House in West Belleville. 
He sold this white elephant and came down 
to Camden East, where he operated a large 
flour mill in connection with his farm. 
Afterwards this mill became the Thompson 
Paper Mill, and now the Houpt Paper 
Mills. He sold out there and purchased a 
farm west of Napanee on the Deseronto 
road, where he died. 

David, who married Harriet Bicford, of 
Oswego, by whom he had one daughter, 
who died when twelve years old, engaged 
in the lumber business. He did well, but got 
a craze for a farm and purchased the four 
hundred acre farm two miles from Napanee 
on the Newburgh road. He had a man 
operate it for him, who managed to pile 
56 



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MAKKIACK CKKTIFICATK K ABRAHAM KOUART AM) MARY I.A7.IKK. 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

Peter was one of the victims of the sad 
drowning accident, which occurred on 
Sunday, August 29th, 1819. He was just 
seventeen years old. A party of young 
people, eighteen in number, were crossing 
Hay Bay to a quarterly service, which was 
held in the first Methodist church built in 
Canada (1792). The skiff was overloaded, 
and yet they urged my father Lewis to go, 
but he was afraid and ran away and hid 
until after they had set out from the north 
shore. Just before reaching the other side 
the boat sprang a leak, and in the 
confusion Boon capsized, plunging all in 
the water. 8ome were excellent swimmers, 
but appeared dazed, for instead of swim- 
ming for the shore, which they could easily 
have reached, swam right out in the bay 
and were drowned. Only eight were saved, 
plunging the whole neighborhood in the 
greatest sorrow over the saddest event that 
ever befell that part of the county. 

Of the ten drowned, there were, beside 
Peter Bogart, John and Jane German, from 
the farm next west, and Mary Cale, who 
lived on the next farm east. The other six, 
Mary and .fane Detlor, Matilda Bobbin, 
Betsy Macoy, Betsy Clark and Huldah 
68 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

Madden, were all residents of the immediate 
neighborhood. 

Mr. W. 8. Herrington, K.C., the able 
historian of the county, has this to say: 
" On the following day the ten coffins were 
ranged side by side in front of the chapel, 
and the Reverend Mr. Puffer, taking his 
text, * I know that my Redeemer liveth,' 
endeavored to preach a funeral service, but 
was so overcome with emotion in the 
presence of a large congregation, who could 
not restrain their tears, that he was 
unable to finish his discourse. In the old 
graveyard near by may still be seen the last 
resting place of the drowned. It is needles* 
to say that disaster was long remembered, 
and the sympathy of the district went out 
to the stricken families, among them being 
some of the best known in the county." 

A daughter, Margaret, their third child, 
died unmarried, in her twentieth year. 

Charity Cocklin, their youngest child, 
married Mr. Hubbard Meacham, who was 
postmaster at Belleville for over half a 
century. They had three sons and one 
daughter. One son died in early manhood, 
and their eldest son, the Reverend George 
69 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

M. Meacham, occupied many prominent 
circuits in the Bay of Quinte Conference 
and was one of the early Methodist mis- 
sionaries in Japan. 

The one hundredth anniversary of our 
grandmother's birth was a most interesting, 
successful and historical event, held on 
the 10th day of August, 1872. The gathering 
was held in a grove on the farm first taken 
up by her husband's father, Gysbert Bogart, 
in 1802. This land had been cleared and 
cultivated by him, but on account of the 
shallow soil had been allowed to grow up 
again and contained a fine grove of second 
growth timber. 

The people came from all over the 
country Picton, Napanee, Belleville, and 
some of her grandchildren from Toronto, 
Chatham and Chicago. 

She was truly the queen of the occasion, 
everyone calling her Aunt Polly, and she 
knew nearly everybody. It was an all-day 
affair, the people bringing their lunches 
and picnicing together, renewing old 
acqaintances and general good fellowship. 
In the photograph taken that day she 
WLS supported on either side by her two 
60 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

brothers, Peter and John Lazier. There 
were present also her four living sons, 
Lewis, Cornelius, David and Abraham; a 
great number of grandchildren, and quite 
a flock of great-grandchildren, Frederic 
Bogart McMullen of Chicago, being the 
youngest, then being a little over one year 
old. Her offspring up to that time had 
been eleven children, forty-six grand- 
children and eighty-five great-grandchil- 
dren, most of whom were living then. 

To her great moral worth it is fitting 
and right to pay a tribute. As Steele aptly 
remarks, " The memory of a well-spent 
youth gives a peaceful, unmixed and 
elegant pleasure to the mind." 

She never had to lay aside the vanities 
and frivolities of youth, for she never had 
taken them up. She was always a strong, 
earnest worker, " Bearing the burden and 
the heat of the day." It was her pleasure 
to take care of her family and work day 
and night for the comfort, education and 
elevation of her children. Certainly in her 
absorbing love for them she utterly forgot 
herself, and on that day she enjoyed the 
choicest pleasures of old age; the respect 
of all who knew her, the warm affection of 
61 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

all her descendant*, the testimony of a 
clear conscience and a strong, simple faith 
in God. 

We are told there is "An art of 
long-living." The science of hygiene wag 
unknown to her, microbes and bacteria she 
never knew of; she simply followed the 
dictates of a strong sound sense, avoiding 
all excess or abuse, and employed all her 
time and all her powers, physical, mental 
and spiritual, in doing the work of life. 

As one has well remarked, " Religion in 
age supplies the place of animal spirits in 
youth." Long ago she began to serve her 
God. Her habits of goodness had become 
fixed. She had no misgivings as to her 
future. She was a Christian. 

Many of the advantages of old age, which 
Xenophon in his " Banquet " and Cicero in 
his " De Senectute," have exalted, had been 
in her possession, but above all and beyond 
all which they delighted to dwell upon is 
that hope: 

" Thrice blessed, bliss inspiring hope 
Which lifts our fainting spirits up 
And brings to life the dead." 

She was like the mariner who, as he 
62 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

reachoH the end of his voyage to the Spice 
Inland : 

The stream is calmest when it nears the tide. 
And flowers are sweetest at the eventide, 
And birds more musical at close of day, 
And saints divinest when they pass away." 



ADDRESS TO MRS. BOGART ON HER 
HUNDREDTH BIRTHDAY. 

I i.-.i ! Madam, on this wond'rous natal day, 
Which finishes a century of your way, 
We come with warm congratulations, true, 
While, with your leave, we take a short review. 

"One hundred years ago, if told aright, 
Your infant eyes then first beheld the light, 
Not in this land, but under British sway; 
For good old George the Third had then his 

way. 
But ' Change,' that mighty tyrant of our 

world, 

Britannia's flag upon New England furled, 
Made for America an honoured name, 
Of which we speak without a tinge of shame. 
Not always in their favour could we speak. 
For by what seemed a most eccentric freak, 
In throwing off the shackles of a king, 
They bound them firmly round a weaker 

thing, 
While for themselves they fondly freedom 

craved, 

Most cruelly the luckless black enslaved. 
63 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

But these are only memories of the past, 
For following in Great Britain'H wake at last, 
They loosed the iron bonds of slaves and men, 
Never in time to be made fast again. 

"Now let us turn, and for a moment trace 
In other lands, the history of our race; 
And, as in former times, so now, we find 
Tumults and wars prevail among mankind. 
In France Napoleon Great arose and fell, 
Threw o'er the nations round a magic spell, 
And fondly hoped to conquer all the world ; 
When, like the leaflet by the tempest whirled, 
Fame, power and glory fled in one short day, 
As fades the winter in the spring of May; 
Before the ' Iron Duke ' he sank o'ercome, 
And St. Helena proved a quiet home. 

"A few more years of peace, then war once 

more, 

And stern, cold Russia thundered at the door, 
Claimed for herself the lion's share of power, 
And seemed triumphant for a little hour; 
Then France and England by united force, 
Drove the perfidious nation from her course, 
And brought her to her own and proper place 
Among the countries and the human race. 

"Now, southward next, we for a moment turn; 
From India's pages, this short lesson learn, 
That civilizing men, in whole or part, 
Will not the nature change nor change the 

heart. 

Rebellious Sepoys in a body rose, 
And proved themselves malignant, treach'rons 
foes 

64 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

MunU>re<l the helpless and the innocent, 
Until deliv'rance was divinely Kent; 
And we, with joy, remember evermore 
The names of Havelock, Lucknow and Cawn- 
pore. 

"The Russian Victory, and French defeat, 
German achievements, ruinous retreat 
These things are illustrations, one and all, 
Of that proud spirit which portends a fall: 
And of that virtuous humility, 
Which, saith the Scripture, shall exalted be. 
The memory of Sedan has not yet passed, 
Of Prussia's victories the best, and last. 

"But for our own dear land, and for our time, 
There yet remains a space within this rhyme; 
We fought for union too, and gained the day, 
Like our dear relatives across the way, 
But unlike them, no fire-arms were used ; 
And though the leaders were sometimes 

abused, 

The victories were bloodless, and the strife 
Caused only loss of friends, not loss of life. 
But, should the Fenian foe again invade 
Our land of sunshine and the Maple shade, 
Kach loyal heart and hand would then unite 
To save our country, and defend the right. 

"But we have travelled far o'er sea and land, 
From frozen Russia to hot India's strand 
Gathered a tiny record of the past. 
And come to Canada with it, at last. 

"But we must haste to offer you, once more, 
Congratulations, warmer than before; 
65 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

And if to-day your memory backward turn, 
God's providence, through all your life dis- 

cern; 
See how his hand has been your guide and 

stay, 

Through all the winding mazes of the way. 
And though no doubt bereavements you have 

had 

Admixtures of the joyous and the sad, 
Times when your tired spirit longed for rest. 
The everlasting quiet of the blest; 
You could look forward with a calm delight, 
With pleasing hope, anticipations bright, 
Gf meeting in the blessedness to come, 
The loved and lost ones of your early home. 
Now, may that God who brought you to this 

day 

Continue still to keep you in the way, 
Give you sweet songs and praises in the 

night, 
And grant, 'At eventide, there may be light.' " 

It was said on that occasion that " She 
and her husband had reared a large and 
somewhat remarkable family of eleven 
children, nine of whom were sons, and there 
was not a drone or a black sheep among 
them." They all lived to be elderly people, 
were married and had families of their 
own, except Peter, who was drowned, and 
Margaret, one of the daughters. The sons, 
nearly all of whom l>ecame prominent 
and respected men, attributed, and very 
60 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

properly, much of their success in life to 
their energetic mother, to whom the}- paid 
truly regal respect and homage when she 
became one hundred years old. 

Her sons were strong temperance men 
and all prominent members of the Methodist 
Church, in which they were brought up, 
except David, who went with his wife to 
the Presbyterian Church. 

The one hundred and first anniversary 
was just a family gathering of the nearby 
relatives, and took place on the same farm 
by the home of her grandson, Peter Bogart. 
Her one brother and four sons, grand- 
children and great-grandchildren were 
present to do her honor in passing another 
landmark of time. 

I cannot close this family narrative with- 
out paying a merited tribute of respect to 
my esteemed father and mother. 

Lewis Lazier Bogart was one of the last 
of the first generation of defendants of the 
U. E. Loyalists in that section of the 
country, his father being one of the com- 
pany who landed at Adolphustown in 1784, 
nearly a century and a half ago. 

He was the last survivor of the family 
67 



THE ROOART FAMILY IN CANADA 

of nine sons and two daughters, five being 
older than himself and five younger. 

He was born within a mile of the place 
where he lived and settled with his bride, 
Elizabeth Cronk. They lived together on 
this farm over fifty-three years, and by 
industry and frugality hewed out for him- 
self a comfortable home and accumulated 
considerable property. He possessed a 
splendid constitution, was never sick, and 
in regard to build and physique, was a 
perfect type of a man, and might have 
lived many years longer had it not been 
for his ambition and desire to perform 
work much beyond his strength, which 
brought on a cold with congestion and 
inflammation, which ended fatally. He 
was a consistent member of the Methodist 
Church for over half a century, and class 
leader in the church he largely helped to 
build, for over twenty-five years. He took 
a great interest in church work, the 
old-fashioned revival meetings being his 
delight. He would go for miles in any 
direction to attend them, and many can 
date their religious experience from his 
zeal and influence. 

He was Conservative in politics, being 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

a friend and playmate of Sir John A. 
Macdonald. He always persistently declined 
to be mixed up in municipal politics or 
honored with municipal office. 

He was universally esteemed and 
respected by all who knew him, and was 
widely known outside of his own county. 

His life was one of peace and good will 
toward men, and his death just what he 
long prayed for a sudden one. 

Elizabeth Cronk, of Prince Edward 
County, became his bride on January 26th, 
1835, and went to live on the farm he had 
just taken up from the Crown, upon which 
they both passed away. Brought up a 
Friend, she became a consistent, active 
member of the Methodist Church for half 
a century. 

Her home, heart, and hands were always 
open to her friends and neighbors; she 
endeared herself to the community for her 
hospitality and kindness, benevolence and 
Christian example. 

She survived her husband thirteen 
months. 

Near the close of my father's life he 
participated in an interesting event, regard- 
ing which I cannot do better than to quote 



THE BOGART FAMILY IN CANADA 

again from W. 8. Herrington's " History 
of Lennox and Addington": 

" On June sixteenth, 1884, the corner 
stone of the Monument now standing at 
the edge of the old burial ground was laid 
with Masonic honors by R.W. Bro. Arthur 
McGuiness, DD8M., of Belleville, before a 
great concourse of people assembled from 
all parts of Canada, to commemorate the 
Centennial Celebration of the landing of 
the Loyalists. Patriotic addresses were 
delivered by Lewis Lazier Bogart, then over 
eighty years of age, the oldest living male 
representative of the U. E. Loyalists, who 
acted as chairman of the occasion; A. L. 
Morden, Dr. Canniff, D. W. Allison, Sir 
Richard Cartwright, and Rev. D. V. Lucas. 
In due time the monument was completed 
and upon its face was inscribed: 

IN MEMORY OF THE U. E. LOYALISTS, 
WHO, THROUGH LOYALTY TO BRITISH 

INSTITUTIONS, 

LEFT THE UNITED STATES AND LANDED ON 

THESE SHORES ON THE SIXTEENTH 

OF JUNE, 1784.' 

A more enduring monument to the 
whole band of pioneers is the sweet memory 
70 




MoM'MKNT TO U. K. LOYALISTS AT ADOLPHU8TOWN. 



THE LAZIER FAMILY 

of their loyalty and sacrifice embalmed in 
the hearts of the present generation of 
their descendants who, with commendable 
zeal, are taking active measures to preserve 
all of the old landmarks in the township 
connected with its early history." 



71 




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