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Full text of "Some old French and English ballads"




University of California Berkeley 
Purchased in Memory of 
FLORENCE S. WALTER 



/f/7 




n 



VSOME OLD FRENCH AND ENQLISH 



EDITED BY ROBERT STEELE. 



iOH3 

JAJJ 

Yac 



All rights reserved. 



PREFACE. 

E Ballad Poetry of a country is its most 
characteristic and its most enduring con/ 
tribution to the romantic movement. Literary 
Romanticism has now swayed all currents of 
thought, again been banished in favour of clas/ 
sicism and formality, and once again triumphed, 
but through it all the love, the wonder, the ter/ 
ror, the imaginative spirit of these songs have 
been the unfailing refuge of the many from the 
narrowness of life, the inexhaustible source 
from which literature has at each renaissance 
drawn renewed strength and vigour. 
The little selection of some score of French and 
English Ballads now printed is perhaps the 
more representative of the popular poetry of 
the two countries, because it is not wholly 
anonymous or wholly popular. A poem, a 
folk/tale is not truly representative of its coun/ 
try until it can pass freely from cottage to 
palace, welcome alike and claiming kinship in 
either. The song which takes its rise among 
the people must be resung by the poet before 
it has lost its dross, the poet's composition must 
be censored by the million before it appeals to 
that universal element to which all great work 
is addressed. Simplicity, nobility, and the for/ 
tunate chance which says the unexpected right 
thing all these must come together. The 
King's Ballad is not the less popular because 



it was written by Henry VIII., it expresses the 
heart of Tudor England: L'amour de moi 
was by a skilled and courtly minstrel, but its in/ 
trinsic beauty & the intimate marriage of words 
and sense, made it the most popular song of its 
century in France. Most of these compositions 
have no assignable date like the cottage of the 
peasant, their simplicity is of all ages but all 
are earlier than the close of the sixteenth cen/ 
tury, some much older. 

The music of these songs has been taken, as 
a rule, from the oldest forms available, and for 
the choice between them, when variants exist, 
the editor's liking has been the sole determinis/ 
ing factor. With regard to time, it is as well to 
notice that the minim must be taken at the rate 
of a crotchet in our days. When the type was 
designed a question arose as to the use of bars. 
Bars are a device to awaken a sense of rhythm 
in those naturally deficient in it, unknown to 
music at the time when these songs were writ/ 
ten, and we have not thought it necessary to in/ 
trude them. The emphasis must be determined 
by the words themselves, even the relative 
length of the notes is a matter of approximation 
only. A song like La Courte Faille for ex/ 
ample, which has never been conventionalised, 
can only be written down by varying the time 
signature from bar to bar, and even then the re/ 
suit is not quite that which a good singer, by 



which I mean one who sings the words to be 
understood, intuitively produces. The best ac/ 
companiment for them is a lute, or failing that, 
a guitar. No word of praise of poems which 
have been loved and sung by artists and poets 
since they knew them shall be added. They are 
priceless monuments to the two peoples from 
which they sprang. 

Robert Steele. 



V CONTENTS. 

I. Les Princesses au Pommier doux . . 6 

II. L' Amour de moi s'y est enclose . 10 

III. Robin et Marion . . . .12 

IV. St. Nicolas et les Enfants au saloir . 14 

V. La Mort du Roi Renaud . . .17 

VI. Olivier Bachelin . . . . 21 

VII. La Fille du roi Loys . . . .23 

VIII. Le Convoi de Malbrough . . 27 

IX. La Courte Paille . . . .31 

X. Les Compagnons de la Marjolaine . 35 
XL The King's Ballad . . . 37 

XII. The three Ravens . . . -39 

XIII. O Mistress mine . . . 41 

XIV. Greensleeves . . . 43 

XV. Willo, Willo .... 46 

XVI. Barbara Allen . . . .51 

XVII. Early one morning ... 54 

XVIII. Colle to me the ryshes grene . 56 

XIX. We be Soldiers three . ' . . 58 

XX. The Lullaby 59 



V FRENCH AND ENGLISH BALLADS. 





Jfr I. LES PRINCESSES AU 
POMMIER DOUX. 






ER/RIER' chez mon p/re, 



ft T y T ft ? T 

Vole, mon cceur, vole! Derrier' chez mon 



pre, Ya un pom / mier dous, 

T y y T y t T r 

Ya un pommier dous, Tout dousl Et 



you! Ya un pommier dous. 

Derrier' chez mon pre, 
Vole, mon coeur, vole! 
Derrier' chez mon pe>e, 
Ya un pommier dous, 
Ya un pommier dous, 
Tout aous! 
Et you! 
Ya un pommier dous. 

Trois jeunes princesses 
Vole, mon cceur, vole! 
Trois jeunes princesses 
Sont couch's dessous 



Sont couches dessous 

Tout dousl 

Et you! 

Sont couch's dessous. 

Ce dit la plus jeune: 

Vole, mon cceur, vole! 

Ce dit la plus jeune: 

$( Je crois qu'il est jour. 

Je crois qu'il est jour. 

Tout dous! 

Et you! 

Je crois qu'il est jour. 

Ce dit la seconde: 

Vole, mon cceur, vole! 

Ce dit la seconde: 

9f J'entens le tambour. 

ccTentens le tambour. 

Tout dous! 

Et you! 

J'entends le tambour. 

Ce dit la troisieme: 

Vole, mon cceur, vole! 

Ce dit la troisieme: 

JJp C'est mon ami dous! 

C'est mon ami dous! 

Tout dous! 

Et you! 

Cest mon ami dous! 

8 



I1 va a la guerre 
Vole, mon coeur, vole! 
I1 va a la guerre 
Combattre pour nous. 
Combattre pour nous. 
Tout dous! 
Et you! 
Combattre pour nous. 

S'il gagne bataille, 
Vole, mon coeur, vole! 
S'il gagne bataille, 
Aura mes amours, 
Aura mes amours, 
Tout dous! 
Et you! 
Aura mes amours. 

QjMl perde ou qu'il gagne,; 
Vole, mon coeur, volet 
Qu'il perde ou qu'il gagne, 
Les aura toujours! 
Les aura toujours I 
Tout dous! 
Et you! 
Les aura toujours! 



V II. L' AMOUR. DE MOI S'Y EST EN. 
CLOSE. 



^*=* 



'AMOUR de moi s'y est en/ 




*> 



clo / / / / / se Dedans un joly / / jardinet 



t ft Iff 




Ou croist la ro / / se et le / / / muguet Et 






n 



aussi fait la passero / / / / / se. Ce jar / din 

On y prend 



ff y y 



est bel et / / / plaisant; II est garny de 
son es/bat / / / tement Autant la nuit com/ 
b 



tou / / / tes flours; 
me / / / le jour. 



10 



L'amour de moi s'y cst enclose 
Dedans un joly jar^Jinet 
Ou croist la rose et le muguet 
Et aussi fait la passerose. 

Ce jardin est bel et plaisant; 
II est garny de toutes flours; 
On y prend son esbatement 
Autant la nuit comme le jour. 

Helas! il n'est si douce chose 
Que de ce doulx roussignollet 
Qui chante au soir, au matinet: 
Quant il est las il se repose. 

Je la vy 1'autre jour cueillir 
La violette en ung vert pr, 
La plus belle qu'oncques je veis 
Et la plus plaisante a mon gre\ 

Je la regard^ une pose: 
Elle estoit blanche comme let, 
Et douce comme un aignelet, 
Vermeillette comme une rose. 

L'amour de moi s'y est enclose 
Dedans un joly jardinet 
Ou croist la rose et le muguet 
Et aussi fait la passerose. 



11 



HI. ROBIN ET MARION. 




Robin fav///anon, 



J'aymeray bien Ma / / / rion. Elle est 



gente et godinette, Marionnette, Plusque 
n'est femme / / pour vray, Hauvay! 



fr-* * 



Plus que n'est f cmme pour vray. 

Puisque Robin j'ay a non, 

Taymeray bien Marion. 

Elle est gente et godinette, 

Marionnette, 

Plus que n'est femme pour vray, 

Hauvay! 

Plus que n'est femme pour vray. 

12 



Puisque Robin j'ay a non, 

raymeray bien Marion. 

D'or en avant je vueil estre 

Plus grant maistre: 

Pastoureau je deviendray, 

Hauvay! 

Pastoureau je deviendray. 

Puisque Robin j'ay a non, 

raymeray bien Marion. 

fct merray mes brebis pestre 

Sur 1'erbette; 

Ma pannetiere saindray, 

Hauvay! 

Ma pannetiere saindray. 

Puisque Robin j'ay a non, 

raymeray bien Marion. 

Et scay bien qu'il my fault mectre 

Pour repaistre: 

Croyez que point n'y faudr, 

Hauvay! 

Croyez que point n'y faudray. 

Puisque Robin j'ay a non; 

I'aymeray bien Marion. 

Je suis seur qu'y fairons feste 

Marionnette 

Le m'a dit et je le croy, 

Hauvay! 

Le m'a dit et je le croy, 

Puisque Robin j'ay a non, 

J'aymeray bien Marion. 



IV. SAINT NICOLAS ET LES EN/ 
FANTS AU SALOIR. 




t i 



L / toit trois pe/tits enfans, 
Us sont tant al / ls et venus 



* 

Qui s'en alloient glaner aux chams. 
Que le soleil on n'a plus vu. 









S'en sont al / ls chez un bou / cher: 



1 J 1 



^p Boucher, vou/drois/tu nous lo/ger? 



1 




A 1 






^L 




v I 




1 


ff\ V 


4 


> A 


9 


1 


\i/ 






* A. 



_VAl/lez, al/lez, mes beaus en/fans, 









A A 




* 


^ W 1 






V v 


^5 


V 


IaE 


A < 


> A 




1 




\5J ^ 


v T 




1 





Nous a/vons trop d'em/p/che/ment. 



T * i * 1. 



II / toit trois pe / tits en / fans. 

II toit trois petits enfans, 

Qui s'en alloient glaner aux chams. 

Us sont tant alls et venus 

Que le soleil on n'a plus vu. 

S'en sont alls chez un Boucher: 
jf Boucher, voudrois/tu nous loger? 
$f Allez, allez, mes beaus enfans, 
Nous avons trop d'empchement. 
II ^toit trois petits enfans. 

Sa femme qu'^toit derrier' lui, 
Bien vitement le conseillit: 
jf Ils ont, dit/elle, de 1'argent, 
Nous en serons riches marchans. 
II ^toit trois petits enfans. 

Entrez, entrez, mes beaus enfans! 
Ya de la place assurment. 
Nous vous ferons fort bien souper, 
Aussi bien blanchement coucher. 
II etoit trois petits enfans. 

Us n'toient pas sit6t entrs, 
Que le boucher les a tus, 

e 15 



Les a coupes tout par morceaus, 
Mis au saloir comme pourceaus, 
II toit trois petits enfans. 

Quand ce fut au bout de sept ans, 
Saint Nicolas vint dans ce cham. 
II s'en alia chez le Boucher; 
9f ((Boucher, voudrois/tu me loger? 
II toit trois petits enfans. 



Entrez, entrez, Saint Nicolas! 
De la place, il n'en manque pas. 
II n'toit pas sitdt entr, 
Qu'il a demand^ a souper. 
II ^toit trois petits enfans. 

JJp((Voul'ous un morceau de jambon? 
j^ Je n'en veus pas, il n'est pas bon. 
$f Voulez/vous un morceau de veau? 
$p Je n'en veus pas, il n'est pas beau. 
II 6toit trois petits enfans. 

De ce sal je veus avoir, 

Qu'y a sept ans qu'est dans le saloir. 

Quand le boucher entendit 93, 

Hors de sa porte il s'enfuya. 

II toit trois petits enfans. 



((Boucher, boucher, ne t'enfuis pas! 
Repens/toi, Dieu te pardonra. 
Saint Nicolas posa trois doits 

16 



Dcssus le bord de ce saloir. 
II toit trois petits enfans. 



Le premier dit: 9f J'ai bien dormi ! 
Le second dit: jjp Et moi aussi ! 
A ajout le plus petit: 

9f JE CROYOIS ETRE EN PARADIS! 
II toit trois petits enfans. 



V. LA MORT DU ROI RENAUD. 







E Roi Re/naud de guerre 



(j i- 1 1 T r.t T 

vint, Portant ses tripes en sa main. 



j 1 



Sa mere ^/toit sur le crneau, Qui vit ve/ 



n 



nir son fils Renaud. 

17 



Le roi Renaud de guerre vint, 
Portant ses tripes en sa main, 
Sa mre toit sur le cr6neau, 
Qui vit venir son fils Renaud. 



Renaud f Renaud, rjouis/toi ! 
Ta femme est accouche' d'un roi. 
$f Ni de la femme, ni du fils 
Je ne saurois me rejouir. 

Allez, ma mere, allez devant; 
Faites/moi faire un beau lit blanc: 
Guere de tens n'y demorrai, 
A la minuit trpasserai. 

Mais faites/1' moi faire ici has, 
Que 1'accouche" n'entende pas. 
Et quand ce vint sur la minuit, 
Le roi Renaud rendit 1'esprit. 

II ne fut pas le matin jour, 
Que les valets ploroient tretous; 
II ne fut tens de djeftner, 
Que les servantes ont plor. 

$f Dites/moi, ma m&re m'ami', 
Que plourent nos valets ici? 
jjp Ma fille, en baignant nos chevaus, 
Ont laiss^ noyer le plus beau. 

18 



jjp Et pourquoi, ma mre m'ami', 
Pour un cheval plorer ainsi? 
Quand le roi Renaud reviendra, 
Plus beaus chevaus am&nera. 

Dites/moi, ma mre m'ami', 
Que plourent nos servantes ci? 
$f Ma fille, en lavant nos linceuls, 
Ont laiss^ aller le plus neuf. 

jjp Et pourquoi, ma mre m'ami', 
((Pour un linceul plorer ainsi? 
Quand le roi Renaud reviendra, 
Plus beaus linceuls achetera. 

Dites/moi, ma mdre m'ami', 
((Pourquoi j'entens cogner ici? 
Of Ma fill', ce sont les charpentiers 
Qui raccommodent le planchier. 

Of Dites/moi, ma m^re m'ami', 
((Pourquoi les seins sonnent ici ? 
jjp Ma fill', c'est la procession 
Qui sort pour les Rogations.)) 

9lf Dites/moi, ma m6re m'ami', 
Que chantent les prtres ici? 
9f Ma fill', c'est la procession 
Qui fait le tour de la maison.)) 



Or, quand ce fut pour relever, 
A la messe el' voulut aller; 
Or, quand ce fut pass huit jours, 
El' voulut faire ses atours: 

$f Dites/moi, ma mre m'ami', 
Quel habit prendrai/je aujourd'hui ? 
jjp Prencz le vert, prenez le gris, 
Prenez le noir, pour mieus choisir. 

$f Dites/moi, ma mre m'ami', 
Ce que ce noir/la signifi7 
jf Femme qui releve d'enfant, 
Le noir lui est bien plus sant. 

Mais quand el' fut emmi les chans, 
Trois patoureaus alloient disant: 
jjp Voila la femme du seignour 
Que Ton enterra 1'autre jour. 

Sf Dites/moi, ma m^re m'ami', 
Que dient ces pcitoureaus ici? 
JJp Ils nous dient d'avancer le pas, 
Ou que la messe n'aurons pas. 

Quand el' fut dans 1'^glise entr^', 
Le cierge on lui a prsente; 
Apercut, en s'agenouillant, 
La terre fraiche sous son bane: 



20 



Dites/moi, ma me>e m'ami', 
Pourquoi la terre est rafraichi' ? 
$f Ma fill', ne IVous puis plus celer, 
Renaud est mort et enterre\ 



Puisque le roi Rcnaud est mort, 
Voici les cls de mon trsor. 
Prenez mes bagues et joyaus, 
Noumssez bien le fils Renaud. 

Terre, ouvre/toi, terre, fens/toi, 
Que j'aille ayec Renaud mon roi! 
Terre s'ouvrit, terre fendit, 
Et si fut la belle englouti'. 



V VI. OLIVIER BACHELIN, 




g^gj 



ELLAS! O/li/vier Ba//che/ 



lin, Or / ron nous plus de voz nou/ 

21 



vel/ / / / / les? Vous ont les 





M 






1 . 1 


1 1 i ' 




^ 


ffl $. A 1 


r 








1 I A A - 






An/glois mis 


t ^ v v H || 
/ / / a fin? 


Vous 
Et 


/ 


h j. A A 








T v A 








y 





A 


mil i 
\LJ 1 ' 









soul / li / is / / gai / ment chanter / 
la blan/che / / li / vre port/er / 



Et de/me/ner jouy / eu / se vi / / e, 
Par le pa / is de Nor/man/di / / e. 

Hellas! Olivier Bachelin, 

Orron nous plus de voz nouvelles? 

Vous ont les Anglois mis a fin? 

Vous soullis gaiment chanter 
Et demener jouyeuse vie, 
Et la blanche livre porter 
Par le pais de Normandie. 

Jusqu'a saint Qille en Coutantin, 
22 



En une compaignie tresbelle, 
Oncques ne vy tel pellerin. 

Les Anglois ont fait desraison 
Aux compaignons du val de Vire: 
Vous n'orez plus dire chanson 
A ceulx qui les souloyent bien dire. 

Nous prirons Dieu de bon cueur fin 

Et la doulce Vierge Marie 

Qu'il doynt aux Anglois male fin. 



VII. LA FILLE DU ROI LOYS. 




an~n r t .1 

E roi Lo/ys est sur son 

d>'l. I l U M 1 



pont, Te / nant sa fille en son gi / ron; 



El' se vou / droit bien ma > ri / er 
g 23 



Till 



Au beau D/on, franc che/va/lier. 

Le roi Loys est sur son pont, 
Tenant sa fille en son giron; 
El' se voudroit bien marier 
Au beau Don, franc chevalier. 

$f Ma fill', n'aimez jamais Don, 
Car c'est un chevalier flon: 
C'est le plus povre chevalier, 
Qui n'a pas vaillant sis deniers. 

jjp J'aime Don, je 1'aimerai, 
J'aime Don pour sa beaut, 
Plus que ma mre et mes parens 
Et vous, mon peY, qui m'aimez tant. 

jjf Et vite, ou sont mes estafiers, 
Mes geoliers, mes guichetiers? 
Qu'on mette ma fille en la tour, 
E1' n'y verra jamais le jour! 

El' y f ut bien sept ans passes, 
Sans que person' la put trouver. 
Au bout de la septi&me ann', 
Son pere Talla visiter: 



24 



j(p Bon jour, ma fill', comment vous va? 
%p Hlas! mon pre, il va bien mal. 
J'ai un cdt mang des vers 
Et les deus pis pourris es fers. 

Mon pre, avez/vous de 1'argent, 
Cinq a sis sous tant sculement? 
C'est pour donner au geolier, 
Qu'il me desserre un peu les pis. 

jf Oui/da, ma fill', nous en avons, 
Et des mille et des millions, 
Nous en avons a vous donner, 
Si vos amours voulez changer. 

jjp Avant que changer mes amours, 
J'aime mieus mourir dans la tour. 
jjp H^ f bien! ma fill', vous y mourrez, 
De gu^rison point vous n'aurez! 

Le beau Ddon, passant par la, 

Un mot de lettre lui jeta. 

II y avoit dessus crit: 

jjp Belle, ne 1' mettez en oubli. 

Faites/vous morte ensevelir, 
Que Ton vous porte a Saint/Denis. 
En terre laissez/vous porter, 
Point enterrer ne vous lairrai. 



La belle n'y a pas manque" , 
Dans le moment a trpass; 
El' s'est laisse ensevelir, 
On 1'a porte a Saint/Denis. 

Le Roi va derriere pleurant, 
Les prtres vont devant chantant: 
Quatre/vint prtres, trente abbs, 
Autant d'vques couronns. 

Le beau Deon, passant par la: 
jf Arrtez, pr^tres, halte/la! 
Vous portez m'amie enterrer, 
Ma patendtre lui dirai. 

II tira son couteau d'or fin 
Et d^cousit le drap de lin; 
En 1'embrassant fit un soupir, 
La belle lui fit un souris. 



Ah! voyez quelle trahison 
De ma fille et du beau Don! 
I1 les faut pourtant marier, 
Et qu'il n'en soit jamais parl! 

Sonnez, trompettes et violons! 
Ma fille aura le beau Don. 
FILLETTE QU'A ENVF D7UMER, 
PERE NE L'E?4 PEUT EMPECHER. 

26 



VIII. LE CONVOI DE MALBROUQH. 




ALBROUQH s'en va en 



t= y I * n i i I 



guerre, Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Malbrough s'en va en guerre: Ne sai 
quand re/vien/drai. Ne sai quand re/vien/ 

drai. Ne sai quand re/vien/drai. 

Malbrough s'en va en guerre, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Malbrough s'en va en guerre: 
Ne sai quand reviendrai. 
Ne sai quand reviendrai. 
Ne sai quand reviendrai. 

h 27 



jjp Je rcvicndrai a Paques 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Je reviendrai a Piques 
Ou a la Trinit. 
Ou a la Trinit^. 
OualaTrinite. 

Lcs Piques sont passes 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Les Paques sont passes 
Aussi la Trinit^. 
Aussi la Trinit^. 
Aussi la Trinit^. 

Madame a sa tour monte, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Madame a sa tour monte, 
Si haut qu'el' peut monter. 
Si haut qu'el' peut monter. 
Si haut qu'el' peut monter. 

El' voit venir son page, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
El' voit venir son page, 
Tout de noir habilld: 
Tout de noir habil!6: 
Tout de noir habill: 

jf Beau pag', ah! mon beau page, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
28 



Beau pag', ah! mon beau page, 
Quel' nouvelle apportez? 
Quel' nouvelle apportez? 
((Quel' nouvelle apportez? 

Hf Nouvelle que j'apporte, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
((Nouvelle que j'apporte, 
Vos beaus yeus vont pleurer. 
Vos beaus yeus vont pleurer. 
Vos beaus yeus vont pleurer. 

((Quittez vos habits roses 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
((Quittez vos habits roses 
Et vos satins brochs, 
Et vos satins brochs, 
Et vos satins brochs, 

Prenez la robe noire, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Prenez la robe noire, 
Et les souliers cirs. 
Et les souliers cirs. 
Et les souliers cir6s. 

Malbrough est mort en guerre, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
((Malbrough est mort en guerre, 
Est mort et enterr. 

29 



Est mort ct enterr6. 
Est mort ct enterr. 

L'ai vu porter en terre 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
L'ai vu porter en terre 
Par quatres officiers: 
Par quatres officiers: 
Par quatres officiers: 

L'un portoit sa cuirasse 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
((L'un portoit sa cuirasse 
Et 1'autre son bouclier, 
Et Tautre son bouclier, 
Et 1'autre son bouclier, 

Le troisi^me son casque 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Le troisi&me son casque 
Et 1'autre son ep'. 
Et 1'autre son ep'. 
Et 1'autre son ep'. 

A 1'entour de sa tombe 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
A 1'entour de sa tombe 
Romarin fut planted 
((Romarin fut plant^. 
Romarin fut plant^. 
30 



Sur la plus haute branche 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Sur la plus haute branche 
Rossignol a chanted 
Rossignol a chant. 
Rossignol a chanted 

Disoit en son langage: 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
Disoit en son langage: 
Requiescat in pace! 
Requiescat in pace! 
Requiescat in pace! 

La ce>moni' faite, 
Mironton, tonton, mirontaine, 
La c^r^moni' faite, 
Chacun s'en fut coucher. 
Chacun s'en fut coucher. 
Chacun s'en fut coucher. 



IX. LA COURTE FAILLE 




L /toit un pe/tit na/vi/re, 
i 31 



II /toit un pe/tit na/vi/re, Dessus la mer 
Ma Ion Ion la! Dessus la mer s'en est al/l. 



II toit un petit navire, 

II toit un petit navire, 

Dessus la mer 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

Dessus la mer s'en est alle*. 

A bien t sept ans sur mere 

A bien t sept ans sur mere 

Sans jamais la 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

Sans jamais la terre aborder. 

Au bout de la septi&me anne"e, 

Au bout de la septi&me anne, 

Les vivres vin/ 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

Les vivres vinrent a manquer. 

Faut tirer a la courte paille, 
Faut tirer a la courte paille, 
Savoir lequel 
32 



Ma Ion Ion la! 

Savoir lequel sera mange\ 

Le maitrc qu'a parti les pailles, 

Le maitre qu'a parti les pailles, 

La plus courte 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

La plus courte lui a rest. 

S'est cri: 9lf O Vierge Mre! 

S'est cri: jjf O Vierge M6re! 

Sera done moi 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

Sera done moi sera mang! 

Le mousse lui a dit: Of Mon maitre, 

Le mousse lui a dit: 9Jf Mon maitre, 

Pour vous je me 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

Pour vous je me lairrai manger. 

Mais auparavant que je meure, 

Mais auparavant que je meure, 

Au haut du m^t 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

Au haut du mSt je veus monter. 

Quand il fut dedans la grand 'hune, 
Quand il fut dedans la grand 'hune, 
A regard^ 

33 



Ma Ion Ion la! 

A regard^ de tous c6t6s. 

Quand il fut moht sur la pomme, 

Quand il fut mont sur la pomme, 

Le mousse s'cst 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

Le mousse s'est mis a chanter: 

$f Je voi la tour de Babylone, 
j^ Je voi la tour de Babylone, 
Barbari' de 
Ma Ion Ion la! 
Barbari' de 1'autre c6t. 

Je voi les moutons dans la plaine 

Je voi les moutons dans la plaine 

O la bergere 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

O la bergere a les garder. 

Je voi la fille a notre maitre, 

]e voi la fille a notre maitre, 

A trois pigeons 

Ma Ion Ion la! 

A trois pigeons donne a manger. 

$f Ah! chante, chante, vaillant mousse, 
jjp Ah! chante, chante, vaillant mousse, 
Chante, t'as bien 
34 



Ma Ion Ion la! 

Chante, t'as bien de quoi chanter: 

T'as gagn la fille a ton maitre, 

T'as gagne" la fille a ton maitre, 

Le navire qu'est 

Ma Ion Ion fa! 

Le navire qu'est sous tes pis! 



X. LES COMPAQNONS DE LA MAR, 
JOLAINE. 




U'EST/CE qui passe i/ci si 



f t t ? T 



tard, Com/pag/nons de la Mar/jo/lai/ne, 



Qu'est /ce qui passe i/ci si tard, Qai, 



t 



Qai, des / sus le quai? 

J 35 



Qu'est/ce qui passe ici si tard, 
Compagnons de la Marjplaine, 
Qu'est/ce qui passe ici si tard, 
Gai, gai, dessus le quai? 

Ce sont les chevaliers du guet, 
Compagnons de la Marjolaine, 
Ce sont les chevaliers du guet, 
Gai, gai, dessus le quai. 

Que demandent ces chevaliers, 
Compagnons de la Marjolaine, 
Que aemandent ces chevaliers, 
Gai, gai, dessus le quai? 

Une fillette a marier, 
Compagnons de la Marjolaine, 
Une lillette a marier, 
Gai, gai, dessus le quai. 




jfr XL THE KING'S BALLAD. 







ASTIME with good com / / 



pan/y I love and shall un/til / / / I die: 



t I t U 



Grudge who will but none / / de/ny 



<ai t 



i 



So God be pleas'd, this life / / / will I 



* *- 



* * 



For my plesance, hunt, sing and dance: 






My heart / / is set. All goodly sport 

* * * nTfliJ 



To my comfort Who shall me let / // /? 

37 



Pastime with good company 

I love, and shall until I die: 

Grudge who will but none deny 

So God be pleas'd, this life will I 

For my plesance, hunt, sing, and dance: 

My heart is set. 

All goodly sport, to my comfort, 

Who shall me let? 

Youth will needs have dalliance 
Of good or ill some pastance: 
Company me/thinketh the best 
All thought and fantasy to digest, 
For idleness, is chief mistress, 
Of vices all. 

Then who can say, but pass the day, 
Is best of all? 

Company with honesty, 

Is virtue: and vice to flee. 

Company is good or ill, 

But ev'ry man hath his free/will. 

The best ensue, the worst eschew: 

My mind shall be, 

Virtue to use, vice to refuse 

I shall use me. 



/i oT 



XII. THE THREE RAVENS. 




HERE were three ra/vens 



i. t 



sat on a tree, Down a down, hey down, 

t i i 1 i 



hey down, They were as black as they 






might be, With a down. The one of 



them said to his make, Where shall we 



t i J IT' 



now our break/fast take? With a down, 



U 



derry, derry, derry down, down, 

k 39 



There were three ravens sat on a tree, 

Down a down, hey down, hey down, 

They were as black as they might be, 

With a down. 

The one of them said to his make, 

Where shall we now our breakfast take? 

With a down, derry, derry, derry down, down. 

Down in yonder green field, 

Down a down, hey down, hey down, 

There lies a knight slain, under his shield. 

With a down. 

His hounds they lie down at his feet, 

So well do they their master keep. 

With a down, derry, derry, derry down, down. 

His hawks they fly so eagerly, 

Down a down, hey down, hey down, 

There's no fowl mat dare him come nigh. 

With a down. 

There comes a lady full of woe 

As great with child as she might go. 

With a down, derry, derry, derry down, down. 

She lifted up his bloody head, 

Down a down, hey down, hey down, 

And kiss'd his wounds that were so red; 

With a down. 

She got him up upon her back, 

And carried him to earthern lake. 

With a down, derry, derry, derry down, down. 

40 / 



She buried him before the prime: 

Down a down, hey down, hey down, 

She was dead herself ere even/song time. 

With a down. 

God send every gentleman 

Such hawks, such hounds, and such a leman. 

With a down, derry, derry, derry down, down. 



XIII. O MISTRESS MINE. 




9 



MISTRESS mine where 



A y y 



are you roming? O / mistress mine where 

M t t 



9 



are you roming? O stay and heare your 

t t t t * t t ' 

true love's coming That can / sing both 

41 



(3 1 1 " * 



high and low. Trip no / further, prettie 



d"U . * 1 1 11 

sweet/ing; Journeys /end in lovers meeting 

J 1 1 T f I I H . | 

Every / wise man's sonne / doth / know. 

O Mistress mine where are you roming? 
O Mistress mine where are you roming? 
O stay and heare your true love's coming, 
That can sing both high and low. 
Trip no further, prettie sweeting; 
Journeys end in lovers meeting 
Every wise mans sonne doth know. 

What is love? 'tis not hereafter; 

What is love? 'tis not hereafter; 

((Present mirth hath present laughter; 

((What's to come is still unsure: 

In delay there lies no plentie; 

Then come kisse me, sweet and twentie, 

((Youth's a stuff e will not endure. 



V XIV. QREENSLEEVES. 




LASl my love, / you do me 



w 

wrong, / To cast me off / discourteously, 

nt '^Fi 



And I have lov / ed you so long 



De / light / ing in / your com / pa / ny. 






Qreen/sleeves / was all my joy, / / 

^W 
Qreen / sleeves / was my de / light, 






Qreen/sleeves was my heart of gold, t 
1 43 



And who but La / dy Green/sleeves. 

Alas! my love, you do me wrong, 
To cast me off discourteously, 
And I have loved you so long, 
Delighting in your company. 
Greensleeves was all my joy, 
Greensleeves was my delight, 
Greensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Greensleeves. 

I have been ready at your hand 
To grant whatever you would crave, 
I have both waged life and land, 
Your love and good/will for to have. 
Greensleeves was all my joy, 
Greensleeves was my delight, 
Greensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Greensleeves. 

I bought thee kerchers to thy head, 
That were wrought fine and gallantly, 
I kept thee booth at board and bed, 
Which cost my purse well favoredly. 
Greensleeves was all my joy, 
Greensleeves was my delight, 
Greensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Greensleeves. 

44 



I bought thee petticoats of the best, 
The cloth so fine as might be; 
I gave thee jewels for thy chest, 
And all this cost I spent on thee, 
Greensleeves was all my joy, 
treensleeves was my delight, 
Greensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Greensleeves. 

Thy smock of silk, both fair and white, 
With gold embroidered gargeously; 
Thy petticoat of sendal right, 
And these I bought thee gladly. 
Greensleeves was all my joy, 
Greensleeves was my delight, 
Greensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Greensleeves. 

They set thee up, they took thee down, 
They serv'd thee with humility; 
Thy foot might not once touch the ground, 
And yet thou wouldst not love me. 
Greensleeves was all my joy, 
Greensleeves was my delight, 
Greensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Greensleeves. 

Well I will pray to God on high, 
That thou my constancy mayst see, 
And that yet once before I die 
Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me. 

45 



Qreensleeves was all my joy, 
Qreensleeves was my delight, 
Qreensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Qreensleeves. 

Qreensleeves, now farewell ! adieu! 
Qod I pray to prosper thee! 
For I am still thy lover true, 
Come once again and love me. 
Qreensleeves was all my joy, 
Qreensleeves was my delight, 
Qreensleeves was my heart of gold, 
And who but Lady Qreensleeves. 



. WILLO, WILLO. 




HE poore soule sate sighinge 



T * t 



By a si/ka/more tree, Singe wil/lo, wiMo 
46 



I I ' ; t I 



wil/lo: With his hand in his bo/som 

i i r ' i i ' T i 

And his heade up/on his knee, O wil/lo, 
wil/lo, wil/lo, wil/lo, O wil/lo, wil/lo, wil/ 



1 


1 


1 1 I 








kA 


I 








A A 


1 










$ 


i 


| 


A 




V 


\s/ 




5 




T 




V 







lo wil/lo, Shall be my gareland. Singe all a 
greene wil/lo, Wil/lo, wil/lo, wil/lo, Aye 



i IT 



me the greene willo, Must be my gareland. 

The poore soule sate sighinge 
By a sikamore tree, 
Singe willo, willo, willo: 
With his hand in his bosom 
And his heade upon his knee, 

m 47 



O willo, willo, willo, willo, 

willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
Willo, willo, willo, 

Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland. 

He syghte in his singinge, 
And made a great moane, 
Singe willo, willo, willo: 

1 am dead to all pleasure, 
My true love she is gone, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
Willo, willo, willo: 

Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland. 

The mute bird sate by hym 
Was made tame by his moanes, 
Singe willo, willo, willo: 
The trewe tears fell from hym 
Would have melted the stones, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
48 



Willo, willo, willo: 
Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland. 

Come all you forsaken, 
And mourn you with mee, 
Singe willo, willo, willo: 
Who speakes of a false love, 
Myne's falser than Shee, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
Willo, willo, willo: 
Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland 

Let love no more boast her, 
In pallas nor bower, 

Singe willo, willo, willo: 
It budds, but it blasteth, 
Ere it be a flower, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
Willo, willo, willo: 
Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland. 



49 



Thou fair and more false, 
I dye with thy wounde, 
Singe willo, willo, willo: 
Thou hast lost the truest 
Lover that goes upon the ground, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, '? no 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
Willo, willo, willo: 
Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland. 

Let nobody chyde her, 
Her scornes I approve, 
Singe willo, wiilo, willo: 
She was borne to be false, 
And I to dye for love, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
Willo, willo, willo: 
Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland. 

Take this for my farewell 
And latest adiewe, 
Singe willo, willo, willo: 
Write this on my tombe, 
That in love I was trewe, 
50 



O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
O willo, willo, willo, willo, 
Shall be my gareland. 
Singe all a greene willo, 
Willo, willo, willo: 
Aye me the greene willo 
Must be my gareland. 



Sf XVI. BARBARA ALLEN. 




' 



N Scarlet Town, where I was 



T T 



born, There was a fair maid dwellin', 



it 



Made ev'ry youth cry, / Well / a / day? 



T 



Her name was Bar/bara Al/len. 

n 51 



In Scarlet Town, where I was born, 
There was a fair maid dwellin', 
Made ev'ry youth cry, Well/a/day? 
Her name was Barbara Allen. 

All in the merry month of May, 
When green buds they were swellin', 
Young Jemmy Grove on his death/bed lay, 
For love of Barbara Allen. 

He sent his man unto her then, 
To the town where she was dwellin'; 
jf You must come to master dear, 
Qiff your name be Barbara Allen. 

For death is printed on his face, 
And o'er his heart is stealin'; 
Then haste away to comfort him, 
O lovely Barbara Allen. 

9lf ((Though death be printed on his face, 
And o'er his heart is stealin'; 
Yet little better shall he be 
For bonny Barbara Allen. 

So slowly, slowly, she came up, 
And slowly she came nigh him; 
And all she said, when there she came, 
jjp Young man, I think you're dyin'. 



He turn'd his face unto her straight, 
With deadly sorrow sighin'; 
9f O lovely maid, come pity me, 
I'm on my death/bed lyin'. 

jjp If on your death/bed you do lie, 
What needs the tale you're tellin'; 
I cannot keep you from your death; 
Farewell, said Barbara Allen. 

He turn'd his face unto the wall, 
As deadly pangs he fell in: 
Hf Adieu! adieu! adieu to you all, 
((Adieu to Barbara Alien.)) 

As she was walking o'er the fields, 
She heard the bell a knellin'; 
And every stroke did seem to say, 
Hf ((Unworthy Barbara Allen. 

She turn'd her body round about, 

And spied the corpse a comin'; 

jJpLay down, lay down the corpse,)) she said, 

((That I may look upon him. 

With scornful eye she looked down, 
Her cheek with laughter swellin'; 
Whilst all her friends cried out amain, 
Of ((Unworthy Barbara Allen. 



53 



When he was dead, and laid in grave, 
Her heart was struck with sorrow, 
jf O mother, mother, make my bed, 
For I shall die to/morrow. 

Hard/hearted creature him to slight, 
Who loved me so dearly: 
O that I had been more kind to him 
When he was alive and near me! 

She, on her death/bed as she lay, 
Begg'd to be buried by him; 
And sore repented of the day, 
That she did e'er deny him. 

jjp ((Farewell,)) she said, ye virgins all, 
And shun the fault I fell in: 
((Henceforth take warning by the fall 
Of cruel Barbara Allen. 



V XVII. EARLY ONE MORNINQ. 




ARLY one morn / ing, 



1 l 1 * II 



just as the sun was ris / ing, I heard a maid 

d'l 'M 






sing / in the val / ley below: Oh! don't 
deceive / me, Oh! never leave / me! 

d" I | M ' T |f , j 



How / could you / use a / poor / maiden so? 

Early one morning, just as the sun was rising, 
I heard a maid sing in the valley below: 
Oh! don't deceive me! Oh! never leave me, 
How could you use a poor maiden so? 

Oh! gay is the garland, and fresh are the roses 
I've culled from the garden to bind on thy brow; 
<(Oh, don't deceive me! Oh, do not leave me! 
<(How could you use a poor maiden so? 

((Remember the vows that you made to your 
Mary, 

((Remember the bow'r where you vow'd to be true; 

55 



Oh, don't deceive me! Oh, do not leave me! 
How could you use a poor maiden so? 

Thus sung the poor maiden, her sorrows 

bewailing, 

Thus sung the poor maid in the valley below: 

Oh, don't deceive me! Oh, do not leave me! 

How could you use a poor maiden so? 



XVIII. COLLE TO ME THE RYSHES 
QRENE. 




1 * I 
j * 



OLLE to me the ryshes grene 



Colle to me the rysh / / / / es / grene, a 



Colle to me the rysh/es grene / / / 



p 
Colle to me the rysh / / / es / grene, a. 



Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a. 

For my pastyme upon a day, 
I walkyde alone ryght secretly: 
In a mornyng of lusty May, 
Me to rejoyce I did aplye. 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a. 

Wher I saw one in gret dystresse, 
Complayning him thus pytuously: 
Alas, he sayde, for my mastres 
I well perseyve that I shall dye. 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a. 

Wythout that thus she of her grace, 
To pety she wyll somewhat revert: 
I have most cause to say alas, 
For hyt ys she that hath my hart. 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a. 

57 



Soo to contynew whyle my lyff endur, 
((Though I fore hur sholdc suffre dethe: 
She hath my hart wythowt recure, 
And ever shall duryng my brethe. 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a 
Colle to me the ryshes grene 
Colle to me the ryshes grene, a. 



XIX. WE BE SOLDIERS THREE. 




E be sol/diers three, 



J. i 1 <v I i 



. 



Par/do/na moy je vous / an pree. 

,/ it, in 

Late/ly come forth of the low / coun/try 






. I 1 1 



With ne/ver a petvny of mo/ny. 
58 



We be soldiers three, 
Pardona moy je vous an pree. 
Lately come forth of the low country 
With never a penny of mony 

Here good fellow, I drinke to thee, 
Pardona moy je vous an pree; 
To all good fellowes wherever they be, 
With never a penny of mony. 

And he that will not pledge me this, 
Pardona moy je vous an pree, 
Payes for the shot whatever it is, 
With never a penny of mony. 

Charge it againe boy, charge it againe, 
Pardona moy je vous an pree; 
As long as there is any inck in thy pen, 
With never a penny of mony. 



V XX. THE LULLABY. 




OLD/EN slum/bers kiss 
P 59 



T I | j I 



your eyes, Smiles a/wake you when you 

d I I T I T ' T^ 



rise, Sleep, pret/ty wan/tons, do / not cry, / 

.3 ITT Ml 



And I will sing a lul/la/by. 

Golden slumbers kiss your eyes, 
Smiles awake you when you rise, 
Sleep, pretty wantons, do not cry, 
And I will sing a lullaby. 

Care you know not, therefore sleep, 
While I o'er you watch do keep 
Sleep, pretty wantons, do not cry, 
And I will sing you a lullaby. 



4" FINIS.* 



60 



EDITION OF OLD FRENCH 

AND ENGLISH BALLADS HAS BEEN 

EDITED by ROBERT STEELE.^^THE 

FRONTISPIECE HAS BEEN DESIGNED 

AND ENGRAVED ON THE WOOD BY 

L. PISSARRO. S@THE MUSIC TYPE 

HAS BEEN DESIGNED SPECIALLY 

FOR THIS WORK FROM XVIth. 

CENTURY MODELS. 5^ THE 

BOOK HAS BEEN PRINTED 

BY E. & L. PISSARRO AT 

THEIR ERAGNY PRESS, 

The BROOK, HAMMER/ 

SMITH, & FINISHED 

IN FEBRUARY, 

MCCCCMV. 




j|| SOLD BY THE ERAGNY 
PRESS, LONDON, 

AND 
JOHN LANE, NEW YORK. 



$f This edition is strictly limited to 200 paper 
and 10 vellum copies.