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Full text of "Songs and ballads of the West : a collection made from the mouths of the people"

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Central University Library 

University of California, San Diego 
Note: This item is subject to recall after two weeks. 

U.CS.D. Date Due 



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Songs & Ballads 
The baest 

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KeV..Ii..Hl^EETalOOD.jSHEf^PARC>,fl).3;- 

Kannoni^cb anb Jlrranocb for 

VOICE . JIDD . PlHDOBOliTE 

By TtJB r^ev. Ij. BLeeiTtaooD SljePPH^D, m.H. 



fiDctbuen & Co., 36, esses street, toi.c. 



DEDICATED TO 

D. RADFORD, Esq., J. P., 

Of Mount Tavy, 
Tavistock, 

at whose hospitable table the idea of 

making this collection was 

first mooted. 



CONTENTS. 



o«« 



I. 


By Chance It Was. 




XXVI. 


II. 


The Hunting of Arscott 


of 


XXVII. 




Tetcott. 




XXVIII. 


III. 


Upon a Sunday Morning. 




XXIX. 


IV. 


The Trees they are 


So 


XXX. 




High. 




XXXI. 


V. 


Parson Hogg. 




XXXII. 


VI. 


Cold Blows the Wind. 




XXXIII. 


VII. 


My Garden Grew Plenty 
Thyme. 


OF 


XXXIV. 


VIII. 


Roving Jack, the Journeyman. 


XXXV. 


IX. 


Brixham Town. 




XXXVI. 


X. 


Green Broom. 




XXXVII. 


XI. 


As Johnny Walked Out. 




XXXVIII. 




{For Four Voices.) 




>» 


XII. 


The Miller and His Sons. 




XXXIX. 


XIII. 


Ormond the Brave. 




XL. 


XIV. 


Fathom the Bowl. 




XLI. 


XV. 


Sweet Nightingale. 




XLII. 


XVI. 


Widdecombe Fair. 




XLIII. 


XVII. 


The Imprisoned Lady. 




XLIV. 




{For Four Voices.) 




XLV. 


XVIII. 


The Silly Old Man. 




XL VI. 


XIX. 


The Seasons. 






XX. 


The Chimney Sweep. 




XLVII. 


XXI. 


The Saucy Sailor. 




XLVIII. 


XXII. 


Blue Muslin. 




XLIX. 


XXIII. 


The Squire and the Fair Maid. 


M 


XXIV. 


Hal-an-Tow, the Helston 


L. 




Furry Dance. 






XXV. 


Blow Away, ye Morn 


ing 


LI. 




Breezes. 




LII. 



A Hearty Good Fellow. 
The Bonny Bunch of Roses. 
The Last of the Singers. 
The Tythe Pig. 
My Lady's Coach. 
Jan's Courtship. 
The Drowned Lover. 
Childe, the Hunter. 
The Cottage Thatch'd with 
Straw. 

Cicely Sweet. {Duet.) 

A Sweet Pretty Maiden. 

The Green Cockade. 

The Sailor's Farewell. 
Ditto. {As Duet and Chorus.) 

A Maiden Sat a Weeping. 

The Bonny Blue Kerchief. 

An Evening so Clear. 

The Warson Hunt. 

The Green Bushes. 

The Broken Token. 

The Rout is Out. 

Why Should we be Dul- 
lards Sad ? 

May Day Carol. 

Nancy. 

Lullabye. 
{With Violin Accompaniment.) 

The Gipsy Countess, in 
Two Parts. 

The Grey Mare. 

The Wreck off Scilly. 



CONTENTS 

(Continued.) 



LIII. 


Henry Martin. [ 


LXXXIII. 


LIV. 


Plymouth Sound. 


LXXXIV. 


LV. 


Farewell to Kingsbridge. 


LXXXV. 


LVI. 


Furze Bloom. 


LXXXVI. 


LVII. 


The Oxen Ploughing. 


LXXXVII. 


LVIII. 


Something Lacking. 


LXXXVIII. 


LIX. 


The Simple Ploughbov. 




LX. 


The Wrestling Match. 


LXXXIX. 


LXI. 

LXII. 

LXIII. 

LXIV. 

LXV. 

LXVI. 

LXVII. 


The Painful Plough. 
Broadbury Gibbet. 
The Orchestra. 
The Golden Vanity. 
The Bold Dragoon. 
Trinity Sunday. 
The Blue Flame. 


XC. 

XCI. 

XCII. 

XCIII. 

XCIV. 

XCV. 


LXVIII. 


Strawberry Fair. 


XCVI. 


LXIX. 


The Country Farmer's Son. 


XCVII. 


LXX. 


The Hostess' Daughter. 


XCVIII. 


LXXI. 


The Jolly Gosshawk. 


XCIX. 


LXXII. 


Fair Girl, Mind This. 




LXXIII. 


On a May Morning so Early. 


c. 


LXXIV. 


The Spotted Cow. 


CI. 


LXXV. 


Cupid the Ploughboy. 


GIL 


LXXVI 


Come, my Lads, Let us be 
Jolly. 


cm. 


LXXVII 
LXXVIII 


Poor Old Horse. 
The Dilly Song. 


CIV. 




[For Three Voices.) 


cv. 


LXX IX 


The Mallard. 


CVI. 




{Duet and Clwnis.) 


evil. 


LXXX 


. Constant Johnny. [Duet.) 


CVIII. 


LXXXI 


. The Duke's Hunt. 


CIX. 


LXXXII 


. The Bell Ringing. 


ex. 



A Nutting We Will Go. 

Down by a River Side. 

The Barley Rakings. 

Deep in Love. 

The Rambling Sailor. 

A Single and a Markied 
Life. 

Midsummer Carol. 

{For Four Voice-:.) 

The Blackbird. 

The Green Bed. 

The Loyal Lover. 

The Streams of Nantsian. 

The Drunken Maidens. 

Tobacco is an Indian Weed. 
{Canon.) 

Fair Susan Slumbered. 

The False Lover. 

Barley Straw. 

Death and the Lady. 

{Solo, or Quartette.) 

Adam and Eve. 

I Rode my Little Horse. 

The Saucy Ploughboy. 

I'll Build Myself a 
Gallant Ship. 

{For Four Voices.) 

The Everlasting Circle. 

All in a Garden. 
, Hunting the Hare. 
. Dead Maid's Land. 
, Shower and Sunshine. 
. Haymaking Song. 
. Bibberly Town. 



PREFACE. 




HEREVER Celtic blood flows, there it carries with it a love of 
music and musical creativeness. Scotland, Wales, Ireland, 
Brittany, have their national melodies. It seemed to me incredible 
that the West of England — the old Kingdom of Damnonia — Devon 
and Cornwall, where the Celtic element is so strong, should be 
void of Folk-Music. When I was a boy I was wont to ride round and on 
Dartmoor, and put i p at little village taverns. There — should I be on a pay- 
day — I was sure to hear one or two men sing, and sing on hour after hour, one 
song following another with little intermission. But then I paid no particular 
attention to these songs. 

In iS83 it occurred to me that it would be well to make a collection — at all 
events to examine into the literary and musical value of these songs, and their 
melodies. I could not find that any one had taken the pains to gather in this 
field. The only Cornish songs generally known were the " Helston Furry Dance," 
which is claimed by Cornishmen as an ancient British melody, but which is a 
hornpipe in common measure, not older than the middle of last century; and 
" Trelawny," which is a ballad reconstructed by the late Rev. R. Hawker, 
Vicar of Morwenstowe, the tune of which is merely " Le Petit Tambour," and 
therefore not Cornish at all. Through local papers I appealed to the public in the 
West for traditional songs and airs. I received in return a score of versions of one, 
" The Widdecombe Fair." However, 1 heard from the late C. Spence Bate, Esq., of 
The Rock, South Brent, that there were two notable old men singers in that place ; 
and I also knew of one in my own neighbourhood. Tlie latter, James Parsons, a 
day labourer, well known in public-houses as a " song-man," was the son of a still 
more famous song-man, now dead, who went by the nick-name of " The Singing- 
Machine." I sent for him, a man of about 74 years, and, after a little urginr, 
persuaded him to sing. From him I procured about five-and-twenty ballads and 
songs, some of a very early and archaic character, certainly not later than the reign 
of Henry VII., which he had acquired from his father. 

Accompanied by F. W. Bussell, Esq., Fellow of Brazenose College, Oxford, an 
accomplished musician, I then visited South Brent, and we enjoyed the hospitality 
of Mr. Spence Bate. Then, on that occasion, we obtained some more songs. A 
second visit to Soutli Brent, with the Rev. H. Fleetwood Sheppard, resulted in 
almost exhausting that neighbourhood, from which we derived about fifty. The 
chief singers there were an old miller and a crippled labourer, who broke stones 
on the road. 

At Belstone, as I learned from J. D. Prickman, Esq., of Okehampton, lived an old 
yeoman, with stalwart sons, all notable singers. Mr. Sheppard and I met this old 
man. Belstone is a small village under the rocks of Belstone Tor, on the edge of 
Dartmoor, a wild and lonesome spot. From this yeoman we acquired more songs. 

The Rev. H. Fleetwood Sheppard and I next penetrated to the very heart of 
Dartmoor, and saw Jonas Coaker, an old blind man, of 8g years, very infirm, and only 
able to leave his bed for a few hours in the day. He is, however, endowed with a 
remarkable memory. From him, and helped by Mr. J. Webb, captain of a tin mine, 
hard by, who could recall and very sweetly sing the old melodies, we gleaned several 
important and interesting songs, with their traditional airs. 

Further stores were yielded by a singing blacksmith, John Woodrich, at Wollacott 
Moor, in the parish of Thrushleton ; also by Roger Luxton, of HaKvell, N. Devon, 
aged 76 ; James Oliver, tanner, Launceston, aged 71, a native of St. Kewe, Cornwall ; 
William Rice, labourer, Lamer'.o 1, aged 75; John Rickards, of Lamerton ; John Masters, 
of Bradstone, aged 83 ; William Friend, labourer, Lydford, aged 6?. ; Edmund Fry 



Vlll. 

thatcher, a native of Levant, Cornwall ; Will and Roger Hucrgins, Lydford ; John 
Woolrich, labourer, Broadwoodwidgcr ; Matthew Baker, a poor cripple, aged 72, Lew 
Down ; some songs taken down from moor-men on Dartmoor in or about 1SG8 were 
sent me by W. Crossing, Esq., of South Brent ; others from Chagford, Menheniot, 
and Liskeard, and more recently from Mawgan in Pyder, and Padstow. 

I find that in addition to one large common store of songs and ballads, each 
place visited and explored yields up two or three which are, so to speak, particular 
to each village, or musical centre. 1 have no hesitation in saying that several hundreds 
of ballads and songs, with their melodies, may by this means be collected, of which 
perhaps a third are very good, a third good, and the remainder indifferent. 

The singers are nearly all old, illiterate, — their lives not worth five 3'ears' 
purchase, and when they die the traditions will be lost, for the present generation 
will have nothing to say to these songs, — especially such as are in minor keys, and 
supplant them with the vulgarest Music Hall performances. The melodies are in 
many instances more precious than the words. Ballads that were printed in London, 
Bristol, Exeter, Plymouth, became common property throughout England, but then, 
here in the West, these ballads imported from elsewhere, were set to tunes already 
traditional. The words were less frequently of home growth than the airs. For 
instance, the 17th century song, " I sowed the seeds of Love," I found was known 
by James Parsons, but not to the tune to which wedded elsewhere, and to which the 
verses are said to have been written. " The Outlandish Knight," again, is sung to 
an entirely indepenent tune. On the other hand, " Cuper's Garden," a song of the 
beginning of last centurj', was sung to me to the same tune, slightly varied only, 
as that given by Chappell. In a good number of cases I have found that the illiterate 
men sing a less corrupt form of a ballad that such as appears on broadsides. The younger 
men always sing from the broadside copies. 

The minstrels were put down by Act of Parliament in 1597, and most, if not all 
early ballad tunes belong to a period still earlier. There was a recandescence — 
excuse the word — of ballad music in the reign of Charles II., but the character 
of the tunes of that period is distinct. We have been able to recover several early 
ballad tunes, some in their most archaic form, which consisted of four lines in CM. 
only, but others altered and extended, for in process of time singers added four more 
lines, which are a slight variation of the theme. We have preserved these additions, 
as they do not interfere with the original melody. 

In the reign of Charles II. appeared Tom D'Urfey, a native of Exeter, who 
compiled six volumes of songs, with, their airs; to two of the volumes all the words 
are his own, but the tunes he took whence he could, and unquestionably he utilized 
for his purpose melodies he had heard in his native county, and which, through 
the press, he gave to become the common property of all Englishmen. Nay, further, 
some of them crossed the border and were appropriated as Scotch songs. A fashion had 
set in for Scotch songs, and several demonstrably English airs were set by D'Urfey 
and his imitators to quasi Scotch words. Then came Allan Ramsay and Burns, who dis- 
carded the ridiculous imitation Scotch dialect of these English composers, and set these 
same tunes to real Scottish words, and so these melodies came to be claimed as belonging 
to the land beyond the Tweed. One instance of the manner in which English tunes 
were appropriated may be given. James Johnson, of Edinburgh, published his collection 
of what he considered to be native songs of Scotland at the end of last centur}', yet, 
within the first twenty-four songs of his first volume were compositions by Purcell, 
Arne, Hook, Berg, and BattishiU Scottish compilers had the notion that all Scotch 
songs were without certain intervals, and they did not at all scruple to adapt English 
tunes and give them a Scotch flavour by altering such notes as contravened this 
imaginary canon. When we come to consider the dates of the melodies collected, 
we find that they vary very considerably, and the affixing of a date can only be 
tentative. Tunes may be roughly classed by the instruments by which they were 
intended to be accompanied, or on which they were to be played. The earliest 
melodies were composed to the harp, the lute, and the bagpipe. Then came the fiddle, 
and finally the hornpipe. All CM. hornpipe tunes belong to the i8th century. The 
triple time tunes are somewhat earlier. Chaucer speaks of the hornpipe as a Cornish 
instrument. A good many of the words in the old songs have lost their meaning to the 
singers, and a correct version is only to be obtained by comparing several obtained in 



IX. 

different quarters. I was much puzzled when I took down " Cuper's Garden " by 
the lines — 

•' The third she was the virgin, 
And she was lorrioware ; " 

but when I looked at the printed song, I found that the original stood thus: — 

" The third she was a virgin, 

And she tLie laurel wore." 

One must not be surprised to find "Tragedy" turned into " dragotee," "galore" 
into " glorore," and " Tlie Outlandish Knight" converted into "The Outlandish 
Cat," and " The Bay of Biscay " into " The Bag of Biscuits." We have endeavoured 
to trace the tunes in the six volumes of D'Urfey, in " The Musical Miscellany " 
(1731), in six volumes, "Apollo's Cabinet" (1757), and in several of the editions 
as " The Complete Dancing Master." Tliere were eighteen of these between 
1650 and 1728. We searched also such ballad-operas as we could obtain, but 
without much success. Chappell's " Popular Music of the Olden Time " has also been 
of great assistance. Some of the airs are later, and these, it is possible, may have 
been printed ; if so, it is without our knowledge. Our object is, as far as possible, 
with only a rare exception or two, to confine ourselves to printing such as we 
believed to be unpublished, and all we give, with such exceptions as shall be 
notified, are taken down from oral recitation. 

In some instances the ballads reveal a rudeness of manner and morals that 
make it impossible for me to publish the words exactly. We have endeavoured to 
obtain three or four versions of the same ballads and tunes, and are by this means 
enabled to arrive at what we believe to be the most correct form of both. But as 
to the antiquary everything is important exactly as obtained, uncleansed from 
rust and unpolished, it is the intention of Mr, Sheppard and myself to deposit 
a couple of copies of the songs and ballads, with their music exactly as taken 
down, one in the library of the Exeter, the other in that of the Plymouth Institution, 
for reference. 

As already said, in five years' time all will be gone ; and this is the supreme moment 
at which such a collection can be made. Our traditional music lies in superimposed 
beds. Among the yeomen and farmer class, a few, chiefly hunting songs remain, such 
as " Arscott of Tetcott," and such as "The Widdecombe Fair." They know notliing 
of those in the social bed below, wliich is the most auriferous, and the old song-men 
who sang for their " entertainment " in taverns do not know the songs sung at the 
firesides of the yeomen. 

It has been asked by not a few — How is it that these songs are so unprovincial ? 
For one reason : Because they are an heirloom of the past, from a class of 
musicians far higher in station and culture than those who now possess the treasure. 
In many cases, probably, our West of England song-men are lineal descendants of the 
old minstrels or gleemen put down by Act of Parliament in 1597, and forbidden to go 
about from place to place. In the next place, all such broad dialect songs as have 
come to us, prove to be modern compositions by educated writers, who have amused 
themselves in writing dialect songs, as Lord Tennyson wrote his " Northern 
Farmer," and as many Scottish poets have written provincial dialect songs. The 
songs and ballads were, of course, recited and sung to me in broad Devonshire or 
Cornish, but this was not of the essence of the songs, and I have not thought it 
necessary to reproduce the dialect. It can always be added, by anyone familiar with it. 

When the minstrels were forbidden to journej' from place to place, by the Act 
of 1597, they settled down in country places, married, took to some trade, or became 
workers on the land, and supplemented their wages from what they could pick up at 
Whitsunales, May-games, Sheep-shearings, Harvest Homes, Christmas Feasts, Wakes, 
and Weddings. They handed on their stock-in-trade of old ballads and songs to their 
sons, and thus it came about that certain families were professional village musicians 
from generation to generation. In process of time they dropped out of their collection 
some of the ruder melodies and ballads, and adopted such as had come into fashion ; 
thus there was a continuous accretion on one side, and loss on the other. Ncvertlieless, 



a considerable reskluum of early music has remained. We have given samples 
of all kinds. In some cases — but not many — the niclodies mny have been composed 
by the song-men themselves, or, what is more likely, they have taken known 
melodies and altered them according to their own provincial musical ideas. An 
example or two of these will be given. 

I have said that I think that some of the melodies may have been composed 
by the song-men themselves, but, I contend, only some, an infinitesimally small 
number, and such are musically worthless, and I doubt if one of these is included 
in this collection. It must be borne in mind that folk-music is nowhere spontaneous 
and autochthonous. It is always a reminiscence, a heritage from a cultured past. 
Tiie yokel is as incapable of creating a beautiful melody as he is of producing a 
piece of beautiful sculpture, or of composing a genuine poem. 

M. Loquin, in a series of articles on the Folk-music of France, in " Melusine," 
1S88-9, points out that nearly all Gallic folk-melodies are derived from the early 
masters of music in France, Lully, Lambert, Campra, Gilliers, &c. They have not all 
been traced, but they are almost all traceable. In England the opera never influenced 
folk-music as it did in France ; the reverse took place, the folk-music drove out 
at one time tlie Italian opera, and Ballad operas were all the vogue, the old folk- 
melodies being united to new words. But it does not follow that these folk 
melodies were the spontaneous productions of the people. On the contrary, they 
were heirlooms preserved by the people, the creation of skilled musicians in the 
past. I have stated that the minstrels were put down by Act of Parliament in 
1597. Still more severe Acls were passed against them in the Third Parliament 
of Oliver Cromwell. The result was that the minstrels settled down in the country 
and followed trades, supplementing their earnings from their trade by what they 
made at village festivals. So also the cultured musicians attached to cathedrals 
and theatres were dispersed by the Puritans at the time of the Commonwealth, 
and they also settled down in the country places, where they taught village choirs, 
or else went abroad. Thus we have music of Henry VII. and Henry VIII. 's 
reigns, and we have music of the time of James I. and Charles I., sung by our 
villagers, — none of it their own production, all inherited from the minstrels and 
the Caroline musicians. In the Hanoverian period there were musical men under- 
standing counterpoint throughout the land, a school of them in Cornwall and 
Devon. Their old, somewhat elaborate church music remains in IMS. in many an 
old church chest, and Mr. Heath, of Redruth, has recently published some of 
their carols. 

Now, our folk-music, and not ours only but that of Scotland and Ireland, of 
France and Germany, and Italy as well, is a veritable morraine of rolled and 
ground fragments from musical strata far away. It contains melodies of all centuries 
down to the present, all thrown together into one confused heap. 

Of French folk-music M. Loquin says: "To the question, Have all popular 
melodies an artistic origin? I would not answer with an unqualified Yes; that 
would be going a little too far, but I do say that we have no reason to assert that 
a melody is original because we have so far failed to track it. Some day or other 
it is almost certain to turn up in some unengraved ballet music, or — such as the 
malice des clioses — in a collection every one has in hand, one turned over by cverj* 
writer on music, and yet for some reason or other it has not been recognised there. 
What I do assert is that nearly all the popular melodies have a perfectly well 
established musical urban origin. That I can affirm wath confidence, for I have 
the evidence in both hands. But that is not all. Of such tunes as have been 
composed by village singers, very few they are, — what are they, in fact ? Naught 
but a jumble of phrases caught from pre-existing songs, reminiscences badly fused 
together of songs sung in the towns at one time and then forgotten. So true 
is it that everything here below has its origin, which origin is not always easy 
to find." 

Now, if this be so — and that it may be so is quite possible — it may be asked, 
what is the good of collecting folk-melodies ? and secondly, what riglit have you to 
claim those you have collected as belonging to the Celtic parts of Devon and of 
Cornwall? I will answer bolh questions at once. 



zi. 

Directly the Exe is crossed we come into a different musical deposit. I do not 
say different in kind, for music was the same everj'where in certain epochs, and 
where certain instruments were in use. For instance, a harp tune was of the same 
character in Ireland, in Wales, in Cornwall, in Scotland, and in France; and a 
bagpipe tune or a hornpipe tune had the same character everywhere. But what 
I find is that songs and ballads sung to their traditional melodies in Somersetshire, 
in Sussex, in Yorkshire, and Northumberland, are sung to quite independent airs on 
Dartmoor and in Cornwall. How is this ? Because the same process went on in 
the West as in Scotland. 

The Celtic tongue retrograded and finally expired in Cornwall. Then English 
ballads and songs found their way into Cornwall, as they found their way into 
Scotland and Ireland, and were set to already familiar melodies thenceforth dis- 
sociated from their no longer understood words. Take an instance. There is in 
Welsh a song on the pleasures of the bottle, " Glan meddwdod mwyn." New 
precisely the same melody was sung in Cornwall, almost certainly to words of a 
like nature. When the Cornish tongue ceased to be spoken, then this melody was 
applied to a broadside drinking song, " Fathom the Bowl." But " Fathom the 
Bowl" has, everywhere else, its own traditional air. 

Another well-known song is "Tobacco is an Indian weed," another is "Joan's 
Ale is New," both w'edded one would have supposed indissolubly to their traditional 
airs known everywhere else in England. But not so in Cornwall and on Dartmoor ; 
there these words are set to quite independent melodies — melodies that probably had 
accompanied words in the old Cornish tongue in former limes. To descend later. 
Broadside ballads, and songs in " Warblers," and " Apollo's Cabinets," &c., got 
down into the West, unassociated with music. Then, again, the local composers 
went to work and set them to tunes of their own creation. Thus, " Sweet Night- 
ingale " was a song by Bickerstaff, to which Dr. Arne wrote music in 1761, and it 
was sung in an opera in London. The words got into a song-book, " The Syren," 
which found its way into Cornwall. Some village musician — no bumpkin at the 
plough tail — set it, and it was sung by the miners in their adits and the labourers 
in tlie fields to the locally produced air, not to that by Dr. Arne. 

Consequently, I am able to answer both questions at once. I hold that these 
melodies are of West of England origin in a majority of cases, and that they are 
worth collecting, because they are the remains of a school of cultured musicians 
that has passed away unheard of out of their own counties. 

Now for another point. 

Were any of the melodies sung in the West borrow^ed, as were many of the 
words ? Certainly they w'ere. All people borrow. The Irish have borrowed. The 
Scotch have " lifted " English folk-tunes by the scores. The Flemmings, the 
Germans, the French have all borrowed of the English. Horace Walpole heard 
" Buttered Pease," and " Cold and Raw," and other country dances played at the 
palace of the Grand Duke of Tuscan}' in 1740. Quite recently (iSgo) a volume of 
English music in IMS. has turned up in the library of Trent. The song, " Shall 
Trelawney die ? " is sung to " Le petit Tambour," a French melody. I have heard 
an old ballad sung in Devon to the Scotch " Auld lang syne." The Irish sing 
"The wearing of the Green" to an old English melody. They, on one side, and 
the Scotch on the other, have appropriated the ancient English melody of " Paul's 
Steeple," found in Playford's ''Dancing Master," in 1650, and have converted it 
in the one case into " Cruiskeen Lawn," in the other into "John Anderson, my 
Jo." There has been give and take on all sides : with regard to old English airs 
mostly take. How many of the melodies we have collected in the West can be 
determined as borrowed we are unable to saj'. Mr. Sheppard has not had the 
time, nor have I the ability to follow the track of melodies through the vast 
collections of past days. All we pretend to do is to give up wh.at we have gathered. 

One w'ord further as to our method. 

We have taken down all the variants of the same air we have come across, and 
have given that form of tk.e air which seemed to us most genuine. In some cases 
where we could obtain no variants, we have printed what we received, as received 



Xll. 

from the only singer we fuund wlio knew that air. The necessity for having 
several variants arises from this fact. When a party of singers are together, or 
when one man sings a succession of ballads, the memory becomes troubled ; the 
first two or three melodies are given correctly, but after that, the airs become 
deflected and influenced by the airs last sung. At Two Bridges one old singer, 
G. Kerswell, after giving us " The Bell-ringer," sang us half-a-dozen otlu r ballads, 
but the melody of the bells went through them all and vitiated them all so as to 
render them worthless. On another occasion, we took down four or five airs 
all beginning alike, because one singer impressed this beginning on the minds of 
the others. At another time, when this impression was worn off, they would sing 
truly enough, and then the beginnings would be different. To obtain the music we 
have gathered is not so easy a matter as might be supposed ; and I venture to think 
that only a native of the West, one thoroughly understanding the people, their ways, 
their prejudices, the turns and twists of their minds, could do it. Tlie aged men 
from whom the collection has been made have been laughed down, and silenced for 
thirty or forty years. The generation that has grown up since those singing days 
heartily despise this old world music. One day Mr. Bussell and I had been sitting 
in a little thatched cottage listening to two aged song-men, one nearly blind, the 
other childish with age, and had reverently and lovingly noted down their ballads 
and melodies. Then we went into a farm-house, and there asked our direction 
across the moors; we told the farmer and his wife what we had been doing. 
They laughed till tlie tears ran down their cheeks at the bare idea of anything 
worth having being obtained from old Gerard and Stoneman. " Ah ! " said the 
farmer's son, "Come in. I'll sing you a song, a first-rate one, 'What a shocking 
bad hat.' That is something worth your having." We have driven and walked 
in storms of rain and wind over Dartmoor, and have sat with hands that shivered 
with cold on a moorstone taking down ballads from some old shepherd or an aged 
crone. But we have also gathered the hearty moor-men about a great fire, and 
after a good supper have spent with them very merry evenings. I venture to 
believe that the warm shake of the hand and the cheery smile that welcome us 
wherever we go, are evidence that we have reached the hearts of these old and 
failing men — and have kindled in them again a spark of pride in their old world 
loved music that has been disparaged, jeered at, by the board-school bred 
new generation, and so have enabled them proudly to raise their old grey heads 
again, in the thought that they have been the means of transmitting to the new 
age a whole body of precious melody, that but for them would have been 
absolutely and irretrievably lost. I am glad also to be able to say that I have 
been able, through profits realised by concerts of this West of England music, to help 
some of these poor old fellows when suffering from accidents and the infirmities 
of extreme old age. In conclusion, I must express my thanks to Mr. F. W. 
Bussell for his unflagging good humour and readiness to go with me anywhere 
and in any weather after a song-man. I am unable myself to note a melody if 
I have not an instrument, and most of these airs must be gleaned in the cottages, 
often miles away from any piano. 

Mr. W. Crossing, of South Brent, and Mr. T. S. Cayzer have given us 
melodies collected on the moor twenty and thirty years ago. Those noted down by 
Mr. Sheppard are so described in the text. Our budget must not be supposed to 
be exhausted ; something like 300 airs have been collected. W'hat we have done 
is to give samples of the various sorts, with not too large a preponderance of the 
earliest and most ancient melodies, which, though to us of the highest interest, 
would not perhaps meet with general appreciation. We have found it more difficult 
to decide what to omit, than what to include. 

I. " By Chance it was." Music and words dictated by James Parsons, 
hedger, Lew Down. Learned from his father, "The Singing Machine," a very 
famous song-man, who, when turned on could go on and never stop — so it was 
reported. His son says that his father certainly knew 200 ballads and songs. 
Some of the best and earliest melodies have been derived by us from Parsons. 

This song is to be found (as far as the words go) in a collection of early 
ballad books in the British Museum, entitled " The Court of Apollo." It consists 
of six verses, the first three of which are almost word for word the same. The 



Xlll. 

others vary somewhat. In " The Songster's Favourite," another and later collec- 
tion, the same song occurs. It is in three verses only and in a very corrupt form. 

A second version of the melody was obtained from Bruce Tyndall, Esq., of 
Exmouth, who learned it from a Devonshire cook in 1839 or 1840. The melody 
was slightly modernised. 

II. "The Hunting of Arscott of Tetcott." This song, once vastly popular 
in North Devon, and at all hunting dinners, is now nearly forgotten. The 
words have been published in "John Arscott of Tetcott," Luke, Plymouth. A 
great many variations of the words are found. An early copy was supplied me 
by R. Kelly, Esq., of Kelly. Another by a gentleman, now dead, in his grand- 
mother's handwriting, with explanatory notes. In the first edition I stated that as 
it was impossible to reconcile the date, 1752, with any John Arscott, I thought 
the date must be 1652, and the song refer to the then squire of Tetcott, John 
Arscott, buried in 170S. But in one of the versions I have received the date is 
not 52, but 72, and that will answer for John Arscott, who died in 1788, the last 
of his race. 

The "Sons of the Blue," it is supposed, were Sir John Molesworth, William 
Morshead, of Blisland, and Bradden Clode, of Skisdom, — so the annotations to the 
printed version by Luke, of Plymouth. But neither Sir J. Molesworth nor Mr. 
Morshead were, as it happens, naval men, so that the identification is not satis- 
factory. Now, if the date be 1652, it is right as far as Sir J. Molesworth of that 
time is concerned, for he was Vice-Admiral of Cornwall, and Pencarrow is the 
Molesworth place. John Arscott is still believed to hunt the country, and there 
are men alive who declare they have heard his horn, and seen him and his hounds 
go by in the park at Tetcott. 

The author of the song is said to have been one Dogget, who used to run 
after Arscott's fox hounds on foot. If so, then he probably followed the habit of 
all rural bards of using for his purpose an earlier ballad, and spoiling and vulgar- 
ising it ; such poets are incapable of originating anything. I think this because 
along with much wretched stuff there are traces of something better, and smacking 
of an earlier period. As Dogget's doggerel has been printed, and I have taken 
down from ten to twelve versions all widely differing, I have not considered it 
worth preserving except only where there are pre-Doggetian verses, incorporated 
by him into his copy ; and I have ventured to recast the conclusion. The tune 
vas obtained through the assistance of Mr. J. Richards, schoolmaster at Tetcott. 
The same tune is found in Wales to the words " Difurwch gwyr Dyfl " (E. Jones' 
Musical Relicks of the W^elsh Bards, 1794, I., p. 129). 

It — or rather half of the tune — was introduced by D'Urfey into his " Pills to 
purge Malancholy," to the words " Dear Catholic Brother " (Ed. 1719-20, Vol. VI., 
p. 277). From D'Urfey it passed into the "Musical Miscellany" (1731, Vol. VI., 
p. 171), to the words " Come, take up your Burden, ye Dogs, and away." D'Urfey 
was a Devonshire Man, and he probably picked up the tune when a boy in the 
West, and used as much of it as he wanted to set to his song. The air is much 
older than the age of D'Urfey ; it probably belongs to an early stock common 
to the Celts of Wales and Cornwall. A very fine variant from J. Benney, 
Menheniot. 




And sing Fol-de-rol, 



III. " Upon a Sunday Morning." The melody taken down from old Robert 
Hard, a crippled stone-breaker, at South Brent. He sang to the air the words of 
Charles Swan, 

' 'Twas on a Sunday morning, before the bells did pcnl, 
A note came throujjh the window, witb Cupid on the seal," &;, 



XIV. 

Tliese words were set to music by Francis Mori, in 1853. The character of 
Mori's melody is distinct from that of old Hard, the opening strains alone being 
alike in both. In tlic; first edition we printed Swan's words, not knowing whose 
they were. Hard obtained them indirectly from a broadside by Catnach, of Seven 
Dials. Having since discovered their origin, I have written fresh words to Hard's melody. 

IV. "The Trees they are so high." Words and air taken in 1888 from 
James Parsons and Matllicw BaJcer, a cripple on Lew Down. The same ballad 
to the same melody obtained in 1891 from Richard Broad, aged 71, at Ilerodsfoot, 
near S. Keyne, Cornwall. Some verses completing the ballad we have, since 
the publication of the first edition, obtained from Roger Hanaford, of Lower 
Widdicombe, but his melody was not the same; it was less archaic. There are 
several versions of this ballad ; some very fragmentary, by Catnach and other broad- 
side printers — a very fairly complete one printed in Aberdeen at the end of last 
century or beginning of this. 

Johnson, in his "Museum" professed to give a Scottish version: 

" O Lady Mary Ann looks owre the Castle wa' 
She saw three bonny boys playing at the ba' 
The youngest he was the flower among them a' ; 

My bonny laddie's young, but he's growing yet." 

But of this version, only three of the verses are genuine, and they are inverted; 
the rest are a modern composition. 

A much more genuine Scottish form is in Maidment's " North Country 
Garland " (Edinburgh, 1824) ; but it is an adaptation to the story of a young 
Lair of Craigstoun. It begins : 

" Father, said she, you have done me wrong. 
For ye have married me on a childe young man, 
And my bonny love is long 
Agrowing, growing, deary, 

Growing, growing, said the bonny maid." 

But by far the truest form is that in an Aberdeen broadside ; it will be 
found in the British Museum, under Ballads (1750 — 1840), Scottish, (Press mark, 
1 871 /.). The Scottish version has verses not in the English, and the English has 
a verse or two that are not in the Scottish. 

I have also received an Irish version as sung in Co. Clare by a old lady 
some years ago; it is in six verses, but that about the "Trees so High" is lacking. 
The rhyme is more correct than any of the other printed versions ; the lines are 
in triplets that rhyme. One verse runs : 

" O Father dear Father, I'll tell you what we'll do. 
We'll send him off to College for another year or two 
And we'll tie round his college cap a ribbon of the blue. 
To let the maidens know he is married." 

In one of the versions I have taken down (Hannaford's), there were traces of 
the triplet, very distinct, and the tune is akin to the Irish melody sent me from Clare. 

Again, another version of this ballad I obtained from William Aggett, a 
paralysed labourer of 70 years, at Chagford, to an entirely different melody. 
Apparently, there exist two distinct variants of this ballad, each to its peculiar 
melody. 

For broadside version, see Ballads collected by Crampton, B.M. (1162, h.), 
Vol. VII. ; it is No. 63 of Such's Broadsides. 

In most versions, the age of the boy when married is 13, and he is a father 
at 14. I advanced his age a little, in deference to the opinion of those who like to 
sing the song in a drawing-room or at a public concert. 

The Scotch have two airs, one in Johnson's Museum, the other in " The 
British Minstrel," Glasgow, 1844, Vol. II., p. 36, entirely distinct from ours. 

V. "Parson Hogg." This was sung by my great uncle, Thomas Snow, Esq., 
of Franklyn House, near Exeter, when I was a child. It was given me by my 
cousin, Edmund Snow ; it was also a song sung in old days by the Winchester 
boys. Another version I obtained from Mr. H. Whitfeld, Brushmaker, Market 



XV. 

Alley, Plymouth. Tie words are to be found, not quite the same, but substantially 
so, in "Tlie New Cabinet of Love," a collection of songs sung at Vauxhall, 
Ranelagh, &c., n.d., but about 1810, as " Doctor Mack." Broadside versions exist 
by Catnach, of Seven Dials, and Bachelor, of Hackney Road, also as " Doctor 
Mack." Also in " The Universal Songster," n.d. II., p. 34S. In Oliver's " Comic 
Songs," circ. 1815, it is " Parson Ogg, the Cornish Vicar." 

VI. "Cold blows the Wind." The words originally reached us as taken 
down by Mrs. Gibbons, daughter of the late Sir W. L. Trelawney, Bart., from 
an old woman, Elizabeth Doidge, who was, sixty years ago, in the service of 
her father. The Doidge family belongs to the neighbourhood of Brentnor. She 
sang it to the air given subsequently, No. 33, to " Childe the Hunier." Another 
person who sang this song was J. Woodnch, blacksmith, Wollacot Moor, Thrus- 
tleton, to the melody here given. We obtained the same melody from Mr. H. 
Westaway, a yeoman at Belstone. At Huckaby Bridge, on Dartmoor, we got the 
same melody from Mary Satcherly, an old woman, who sang it to the ballad of 
" Lord Thomas and the Fair Eleanor," to which, according to Chappell, it properly 
belongs ("Pop. Music of the Olden Times," I., p. 145). It is the air "Who list to 
lead a Soldier's Life." In Peek's Edward I., 1593, is the direction " Enter a 
harper, and sing to the tune of 'Who list to lead a soldier's life,'" &c. In 
Delaney's "Strange Histories," 1607, is a song on the life and death of Richard III., 
to be sung to this melody. Ophelia's song, " Good Morrow, 'tis St. Valentine's 
Day," is only a different version of the same. 

I ventured to add the last verse, as the original tune taken down from Westaway 
by Mr. Sheppard was in the major, and it was thought advisable to have two 
verses in that key. For much information relative to this ballad, I must refer the 
reader to Professor Child's " British Ballads," now in process of publication in 
America, where it is treated of exhaustively. 

Also, to complete the story of the ballad, I have added verses 6, 8, and 10 
from a West of England folk-tale, which probably is this ballad turned into prose. 

VII. "In my Garden grew plenty of Thyme." Taken down from James 
Parsons. After the second verse he broke away to " I sowed the seeds of love," a 
well-known folk s ng composed about 1670 by Mrs. Fleetwood Habergam to the 
air of " Come, open the door, Sweet Betty," and to that melody it is usually sung. 
Parsons's tune was distinct. 

Three verses, a fragment, as sung anciently in Scotland, in " Albyn's Anthology," 
1816, I., p. 40. Mr. Kidson, "Traditional Tunes," 1891, p. 69, gives five stanzas. 
From Joseph Dyer, an old labourer at S. Mawgan-in-Pyder, I took down six. None 
of these versions agree except in the initial verse, which is the second in Mr. Kid- 
son's Yorkshire version, and the last verse of Dyer's agrees with the last of 
Mr. Kidson's. But Dyer had a stanza found in no other : — 

" O ! and I was a damsel so fair, 

But fairer I wished to appear, 
So I washed me in milk, and I dressed me in silk, 

And put the sweet Thyme in my hair." 

He, like Parsons, imported portions of "The Seeds of Love" into this song. 
Dyer's melody was practically the same as that of Parsons, but the third line was 
different, and he sang in common time. So doubtful am I what were the original 
words of this song, that I have thought it advisable to add fresh verses after the 
first two taken from Parsons. For the Scottish air see "Albyn's Anthology ;" for 
the Yorkshire air, Mr. Kidson's " Traditional Tunes ;" for the Northumbrian, see 
" Northumbrian Minstrelsy," 1882, p. go. All these airs differ from ours. 

In the "Westminster Drolleries," 1671, is a song: — 

" Heartseas, an herb that somehow hath bin seen 
In my love's garden plot to flourish green, 
Is dead, and withered with a kind of woe, 
And bitter Rue in place thereof did grow." 

Then follows a similar play on Thyme. My impression is that Mrs. Habergam s 
was a re-writing of an earlier ballad. 



XVI. 

VIII. " Roving Jack." Taken, words and melody, from James Parsons ; again 
to the same air from Wm. Aggett, an old crippled labourer at Chagford. An inferior 
version of the words on Catnach's broadsides. Aggett followed the broadside. In 
Catnach the town is Carlow. Ballads, B.M. (1162, h.) Vol. VII. Another, 
printed in Edinburgh. Ballads (1750— 1840) B.M. (1871. f.). 

IX. " Brixham Town." Words taken down from Jonas Coaker, of Post Bridge, 
on Dartmoor, aged 85, and blind. The melody was sung to us by Mr. John Webb, 
captain of a tin mine hard by, and was noted by Mr. Slieppard. Another version, to 
the same melody, was obtained where the town was North Tawton. Again, another 
version of the words was given me by the Hon. and Rev. A. F. Northcote, who 
took it down in 1877 from an itinerant pedlar of 90 years at Buckingham. 

There is an additional verse in the latter edition, 

" Now there be creatures three, 
As you may plainly see. 
With music can't agree. 

Upon this earth. 
The swine, the fool, the ass, 
And so we let it pass. 
And sing, O Lord, thy praise. 
Whilst we have breath." 

The words and tune alike belong to the 17th century. The words were clearly 
composed at the time of the Puritan regime, 1640 — 1661. 

X. "Green Broom." Words and melody taken down from John Woodricln 
blacksmith ; he learned both from his grandmother when he was a child. The 
Hon. and Rev. J. S. Northcote sent me another version taken down from an old 
woman at Upton Pyne. Another again from Mr. James Ellis, of Chaddlehanger, 
near Tavistock, another from Bruce Tyndall, Esq., of Exmouth, as taken from a 
Devonshire cook, in 1839 or 1840. This, the same melody as that from Upton 
Pyne. Woodrich's tune is the brightest, but the other the oldest. D'Urfey, in 
his "Pills to Purge Melancholy," Ed. 1720, Vol. VI., p. 100, gives this ballad 
in 14 verses, with a different conclusion. All the versions except Woodrich's 
begin " There was an old man who lived in the West." Broadside versions by 
Disley and Such (No. 65); see also "The Broom-man's Garland," in LXXXII. 
old ballads collected by J. Bell, B.M. (11621, c. 2). Bell was librarian to the 
Society of Antiquaries, Newcastle-on-Tyne, 1810-20. See also "Northumbrian 
Minstrelsy,' where the air is different, and words also. 

XI. "As Johnny walked out." Words and melody from James Parsons. 
The original words in six verses ; these I have compressed for the convenience 
of modern singers. The words with verbal differences are found in a good 
many early collections, set about 1750, to an air by "Mr. Dunn." It was first 
published to Dunn's tune in " Six English Songs and Dialogues as they are 
performed at the Public Gardens," n.d., but circ. 1750. Then in "The London 
Magazine" for September, 1754; in "Apollo's Cabinet," Liverpool, 1757, p. 250; 
in " Clio and Enterpe," Lond., 1758, vol. I., p. 34. But our melody, of which 
we have taken down some four or live versions, and one was taken down by 
Mr. T. S. Cayzer, at Post Bridge, in 1849, is quite different from Dunn's air. 

XII. The Miller and his Sons. Taken down, words and music, from 
Helmore, miller. South Brent. The words occur in the " Roxburgh Collection," 
III., p. 681. It is included in Bell's " Songs of the English Peasantry," p. 194, and 
in the " Northumbrian Minstrelsy," Newcastle, 1S82. In the North of England it 
is sung to the melody of "The Oxfordshire Tragedy," Chappell, p. igi. Our 
air bears no resemblance to this, 

XIII. Ormond the Brave. Thisvery interesting ballad was taken down, words by 
myself and melody by Mr. Sheppard, from J. Peake, Tanner, Liskeard; it was a song sung 
by his father, about 60 years ago. It refers to Ormond's landing in Devon in 1714. 
Ormond fled to France in the first days of July, " a duke without a duchy," as Lord 
Oxford termed him, when it was manifest that the country was resolved on having 
the Hanoverian Elector as King, and unwilling to summon the Chevalier of S. 



XVll. 

George to the throne. In the end of October the Duke of Orniond landed in Devon 
at the head of a few men, hoping that the West would rise in the Jacobite cause, 
but as not a single adherent joined his standard, he returned to France. This song 
is particularly curious as it is a Jacobite ballad proclamation, in which Ormond, who 
was a poor creature, is glorified as though a hero. From the same singer we 
derived another ballad relative to Ormond, recounting his exploits at Vigo in 1703. 
The melody is certainly not later than the words, and is probably older considerably. 
In our first editions we gave here a composition by Mr. Sheppard and myself. This 
we have withdrawn now for a genuine West country ballad. 

XIV. Fathom the Bowl. Taken down, words and air, by the Rev. 
H. Fleetwood Sheppard, from Robert Hard, of South Brent. Another version 
from H. Whitfeld, Plymouth, who said it had been sung by his grandfather. In 
"Notes and Queries," 3rd s., XII., p. 245, inquiry was made relative to this song, 
but elicited no reply. Broadside editions exist by Catnach, Pitts, and Such. 
This melody is also found in Wales, sung to " Glan Meddwdod Mwyn," and it 
has the character of a harp air. Jones, " Bardic Relicks," 1794, I., p. 149. In 
other parts of England this song is sung to an entirely different melody. 
Broadwood and Lucas, " Sussex Songs," 1S90, No. 20. 

XV. Sweet Nightingale. In "Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of the 
Peasantry of England, by Robert Bell." London, 1857, the author says, " This 
curijus ditty, which may be confidently assigned to the 17th century .... 
we first heard in Germany, at Marienberg on the Moselle. The singers were 
four Cornish miners, who were at that time, 1854, employed at some lead mines 
near the town of Zell. The leader, or Captain, John Stjcker, said that the 
song was an established favourite with the miners of Cornwall and Devonshire, 
and was always sung on the pay-days and at the wakes ; and that his grand- 
father, who died thirty years before, at the age of a hundred years, used to 
sing the rong, and say that it was very old. The tune is plaintive and original." 
Unfortunately, Mr. Bell does not give the tune. The melody was first sent me 
by E. F. Stevens, Esq., of Terrace, St. Ives, who wrote that the melody "had 
run in his head any time these eight and thirty years." I have since had it 
from a good many old men in Cornwall, always to the same air. They say 
it is a duet, and has therefore been so set. Mr. Bell has taken liberties with 
the words ; the original I did not recover till the first edition was out. I have 
traced the song to Bickerstaff 's " Thomas and Sally," 1760, a ballad opera, 
the music by Dr. Arne. The Cornish melody is, however, quite distinct from that 
by Arne. The melody is not later than the middle of last century. 

XVI. Widdecombe Fair. At present the best known and most popular of 
Devonshire songs. The original Uncle "Tom Cobleigh " lived in a house near 
Yeoford Junction. The names in the chorus all belonged to Sticklepath. The tune 
and words first came to me from W. F. Collier, Esq., of Woodtown, Horrabridge. 
Other versions, slightly varying, then poured in. A slight variant has been 
published by Mr. W. Davies, of Kingsbridge. There is one more verse in the original, 
which I have been forced to omit from lack of room. I obtained on Dartmoor 
the same song to a different air, an old dance tune. 

XVII. The Imprisoned Lady. W^ords and melody from James Parsons. 
The fullest broadside version, but very corrupt, is one published at Aberdeen. 
Ballads, B. M. (1871, f., p. 61), another, shorter, by \\Mliams, of Portsea. In both 
great confusion has been made by some ignorant poetaster in enlarging and altering, 
so that in many of the verses the rhymes have been lost. This is how the Aberdeen 
broadside begins : — 

" You maidens pretty 
In country and city 
With pity hear 

My mournful tale ; 
A maid confounded 
In sorrow drownded 
And deeply wounded 

With grief and pain,** 



XVlll. 

In the third line the " pity " has got misplaced, and " sad complain " has beer) 
turned into "mournful tale" to the loss of rhyme. Verse four has fared even worse, 
it runs, literally :— 

" My hardened parents 
Gave special order 
That I should be 

Close confined be, (sic.) 
Within my chamber 
Far from all ranger 
Or lest that I 

Should my darling sec." 

A parody of it was written by Ashley, of Bath, and sung in " Bombastes Furioso," 
Rhodes' burlesque, in 1810 (performed at the Haymarket, August 7), to the Irish tune 
of " Paddy O'Carrol." This appears also in " The London Warbler," 3 Vols., n.d., 
but about 1826, 1., p. 80. 

" My love is so pretty, so gay and so witty, 
All in town, court, and city, to her must give place, 
My Lord of the woolsack, his coachman did pull-back 
To have a look, full smack, at her pretty face," &c. 

The metre was a favourite one in former times. Songs in that metre were 
composed in the reigns of Henry VIII. and Elizabeth. Others are found in Allan 
Ramsay's " Tea Table Miscellany," 1724; and in D'Urfey, 1719. Indeed Chaucer's 
" Virelai " lacks but a syllable to be in it. A favourite old English ballad, "Ye 
Beaux of Pleasure" was in the same metre; the melody was taken into several of the 
ballad-operas, as "The Lover's Opera," 1729, "The Footman," 1732, "The Jovial 
Crew," 1 731, etc. 

Words and melody are probably of the Elizabethan age. 

XVIII. The Silly Old Man. A ballad that was sung by the late Rev. E. 
Luscombe, some five and forty years ago. He was then curate of Bickleigh, and 
by ancestry belonged to a good old Devonshire family, and he was particularly fond 
of ancient West of England songs, which he sang in the truest Devonshire brogue. 
I have had it from one of his old pupils, W. Weekes, Esq., of Willestrew, Lamerton. 
Another version from old Suey Stephens, a char-woman at Stowford. Another, as sung 
in 1848, by Dr. Reed, of Tiverton. Mrs. Mason, in her " Nursery Rhymes and 
Country Songs," 1877, gives a slight variant, also from Devonshire. 

The ballad is found printed in Dixon's " Songs of the English Peasantry," 
published for the Percy Society in 1846, and taken down by him from oral 
recitation in Yorkshire in 1845. It exists in a chap-book under the title " The 
Crafty Farmer," published in 1796. In Yorkshire the song goes by the name of 
"Saddle to Rags;" there, and elsewhere in the North of England, it is sung to 
the tune of " The Rant," or " Give ear to my frolicsome Ditty," an air better known 
as "How happy could I be with Either." It has been published as a Scottish 
song in Maidment's " Scottish Ballads and Songs," Edinburgh, 1859. The tune 
to which this song is sung in Devonshire is quite distinct and independent. The 
words may also be found in "A Pedlar's Pack of Ballads and Songs," Edinburgh, 
1849, p. 126, in 20 stanzas. The West of England version differs somewhat from 
that current in Yorkshire. The tune is very fresh and spirited. There are 
broadside editions by Birt, of Seven Dials, &c. 

XIX. The Seasons. Still a popular song among the labouring class. Three 
versions of the air and words were taken down, one at South Brent, one at 
Belstone, and one at Post Bridge. The words slightly vary, and are crude. The 
air is clearly an old dance tune. The version we preferred was that given by 
J. Potter, of Post Bridge, taken down by Mr. Sheppard. 

XX. The Chimney Sweep. Taken down from J. Helmore, South Brent. 
Wc have been quite unable to trace this song. It belongs to the end of last 
century or beginning of this. 



XIX. 

XXI. The Saucy Sailor. Words and melody taken from James Parsons. A 
broadside with a different ending was printed by Disley, Pitts, Such, and Hodges, 
also by Pratt, of Birmingham; the metre also is not quite the same, and the air 
to which sung in other parts of England, I am informed by Dr. A. W. Barrett, 
is distinct from ours. This will be found in F. Tozer's " Forty Sailors' Songs," 
Boosey & Co., No. 33. Parson's air bears a strong likeness to "When in Death I 
shall Calm Reckxe ""in Moore's " Irish Melodies." He gives the tune as " unknown" 
as to its origin, i'nd as not having any Irish words fitted to it. It is probably an 
English air carrii. d to Ireland, or one merely appropriated by Moore, as he did 
others that took K'ls fancy, viz., "The Girl I Left Behind Me," "My Lodging is 
on the Cold Ground," " Bobbing Joan," " Alley Croker," " The Black Joke," &c. 

XXII. Blue Muslin. Taken down, words and melody, from John Woodrich, 
blacksmith. A quaint song of an ir'dividual character. This is thought to require 
great skill in singing owing to the reversal of the stanzas, and is taken as a test 
whether a singer is sober or not. When he fails to give the order correctly, he is 
regarded as having had just one drop too much. Muslin had been introduced into 
England in 1670, and cork in 1690. Both are spoken of as novelities, and muslin 
is sung to the old form of the word, mous-el-ine. 

Miss F. Crossing sent me another version taken down from an old woman in 
South Devon, in or about 1S50. 

1. " My man John, wliat can the matter be ? " 
" I love a lady, and she won't love me." 

" Peace, sir, peace, and don't despair, 
The lady you love will be your only care : 

And it must be gold to win her."^ 

2. " Madam, will you accept of this pretty golden ball, 
To walk all in the garden, or in my lady's hall ? " 
" Sir, I'll accept of no pretty golden ball 

To walk all in the garden, or in my lady's hall. 
Nor will I walk, nor will I talk with you." 

Chorus : " My man John," &c., as verse i. 

3. " Madam, will you accept of a petticoat of red. 
With six golden flounces around it out-spread ? " 
" Sir I'll accept of no petticoat," &c. 

4. " Madam, will you accept of the keys of my heart. 
That we may join together, and never, never part ? ' 
"Sir, I'll not accept of the keys," &c. 

5. " Madam, will you accept of the keys of my chest, 

To get at all my money, and to buy what you think best?" 

" Sir, I will accept of tlie keys of your chest. 

To get at all your monej', and to buy what I think best ; 

And I'll walk, and I'll talk with you." 

"My man John, here's a bag of gold for you. 

For that which you have told me, has come true, 

And 'twas gold, 'twas gold, that did win her." 

Another version comes from Yorkshire. See Halliwell, Nursery Rhymes, 
(4th Ed., 1846). Another to a different air from Cheshire. Another again in 
Mason's "Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs." Metzler, 1877, p. 27. Melody 
quite different. 

XXIII. The Squire and the Fair Maid. Taken down, words and music, 
from J. Hoskin, labourer. South Brent, also from James Parsons, John Woodrich, 
in fragments, very full from John Masters, Bradstone, an old man of So. Another 
very full from H. Smith, Post Bridge, Dartmoor. A form of the same, the same 
theme, in Johnson's Museum, 1787-1803, Vol. IV., p. 410. The same toned down 
in Lyle's Ballads, 1827, "I am too young." He says, "This ballad in its original 
dress at one time from my recollection was not only extremely popular, but a great 
lavourite amongst the young peasantry in the West of Scotland. To suit the 
times, however, we have been necessitated to throw out the intermediate stanzas, 



XX. 

as their freedom would not bear transcription; whilst the second and third have 
been slightly altered from the recited copy." 

Allan Cunningham took the song from Johnson's Museum and rewrote it in his 
second volume. 

It has been necessary to somewliat tone down a couple of tlie stanzas for the 
same reason as that given by Mr. Lyle. 

The Scottish ballad begins : — 

"As I went out one May morning, 

A May morning it happened to be, 
Then I was aware of a weel fa'rd lass, 

Come linking o'er the lea to me. 
She had a voice that was more clear 

Than any damsel's under the sun, 
I ask'd at her if she'd marry me ? 

But her answer it was, I am too young," &c. 

I have not been able to find it in any collection of broadsides, and tlie two 
versions are almost certainly variants of some early English ballad that found its 
way on one side into Scotland, and on the other into Celtic Cornwall and Devon. 
The Scottish air is quite different from ours, which is an early ballad tune. 

XXIV. The Helston Furry Dance. On May 8th, annually, a festival is 
held at Helston, in Cornwall, to celebrate the incoming of spring. Very early 
in the morning a party of youths and maidens goes into the country, and returns 
dancing through tlie streets to a quaint tune, peculiar to the day, called the 
" Furry Dance." At eight o'clock the " Hal-an-tow " is sung by a party of from 
twenty to thirty men and boys who come into the town bearing green branches, 
with flowers in their hats, preceded by a single drum, on which a boy beats the 
Furry Dance. They perambulate the town for many hours, stopping at intervals at 
some of the principal houses. 

At one o'clock a large party of ladies and gentlemen, in summer attire, — the 
ladies decorated with garlands of flowers, the gentlemen with nosegays and 
flowers in their hats, assemble at the Town Hall, and proceed to dance after the 
band, playing the traditional air. They first trip in couples, hand in hand, during 
the first part of the tune, forming a string of from thirty to forty couples, or per- 
haps more ; at the second part of the tune the first gentleman turns with both 
hands, the lady behind him, and her partner turns in like manner with the first 
lady ; then each gentleman turns his own partner, and then they trip on as before. 
The other couples, of course, pair and turn in the same way, and at the same 
time. 

The dancing is not confined to the streets, the house doors are thrown open' 
and the train of dancers enter by the front, dance through the house, and out 
at the back, through the garden, and back again. It is considered a slight to 
omit a house. Finally the train enters the Assembly Room and there resolves 
itself into an ordinary waltz. 

As soon as the first party is finished another goes through the same evolu- 
tions, and then another, and so on ; and it is not till late at night that the 
town returns to its peaceful propriety. 

There is a general holiday in the town on Flora Day, and so strictly was 
this formerly adhered to, that anyone found working on that day, was compelled 
to jump across Pengella, a wide stream that discharges its waters into Loo Pool. 
As this feat was almost impracticable, it involved a sousing. The festival has by 
no means ceased to be observed, it has rather, of late years, been revived in 
energetic observance.* 

The " Helston Furry Dance " is a relic of part of the Old English May Games. 
These originally comprised four entirely distinct parts, ist. The election and pro- 
cession of the King and Queen of the May, who were called the Summer King 
and Queen. 2nd. The Morris Dance, performed by men disguised, with swords 
in their hands. 3rd. The " Hobby Horse." 4th. The " Robin Hood." 

• See Forfar. The Helstone Furry Day, Helston, 1803. 



XXI. 

The first began with the dispersing of the young of both sexes over the country 
and through the woods collecting iiowers. Chaucer, in his " Court of Love," 
says that early on May Day, " Forth goeth all the court, both most and least, 
to fetch the flowers afresh." In the reign of Henry VIII. the heads of the 
Corporation of London went to tlie high grounds of Kent to gather the may, 
the King and his Queen, Catherine of Arragon, coming from their palace at 
Greenwich, to meet them on Shooter's Hill. This was called the Bringing Home 
the May. Then came the decorating of the houses. Herrick describes this as 
performed in Devon. 

" Come, and coming mark. 

How each field turns a street, and each street a parkj 

Made green and trimmed with trees; see how 

Devotion gives each house a bough 

Or branch ; each porch, each door, ere this 

An ark, a tabernacle is 

Made up of white-thorn neatly interwove." 

Then ensued the election and coronation of the King and Queen. This 
Spenser describes in the Shepherd's Calendar. 

" I saw a skole of shepherds outgo 

With singing, and shouting, and jolly cheer; 

Before them yode a lusty tabrere. 

That to the many a horn-pipe play'd. 

Where to they danced each one with his maid. 

Then to the greenwood they spreden them all, 

To fetchen home May with their musical : 

And home they bring him in a royal throne 

Crowned as king ; and his queen attone 

Was lady Flora, on whom did attend 

A fair flock of fairies and a fresh bend 

Of lively nymphs — O that I were there 

To helpen the ladies their May-bush to bear." 

Tlie dance to the May-pole and round it then ensued. 

2nd. The Morris dance was a masque. With this we need not now con- 
cern ourselves. 3rd. The Hobby Horse was a feature also introduced, and almost 
certainly was a relic of Odin and his horse Sleipnir. 4th. The Rubin Hood 
Games was a play fully described in Strutt's novel " Queen Hoo Hall," it has 
been mixed up with rapier dancing and the gambols of the Hobby Horse, and 
is still performed in various places at Christmas. 

In the Helston performance we have a fragment only of the original series 
of pageants ; the bringing home of the May and the dance, and the song about 
Robin Hood. At Padstow, the Hobby-horse still figures. The two earliest extant 
representations of the Old English ]\Iay games are found in a Flemish print, 
given by Douce in his " Illustrations of Shakespeare," and in Tollett's celebrated 
painted window, described in Johnson and Steven's " Shakespeare." The " Helston 
Furry Dance" tune was first printed in Davies Gilbert's Christmas Carols, 
and Ed., 1823. His form is purer than ours, which is as now sung. 

XXV. " Biovi^ away, ye Mountain Breezes." Taken down, words and music, 
from R. Hard ; melody noted down by Mr. Sheppard. This very curious song is 
sung as a duet; that is to say, the first voice taunts the other, and the second replies 
to the taunt, then both unite in the chorus. We have omitted the retort, which 
is simply an application of the same words to the first singer. It is certainly a 
very early composition. One passage in it occurs also in " The Kniglit and the 
Shepherd's Daughter," in Percy's Relicks, Child's British Ballads, &c. 

" Would I had drunk the water cleare 

When I had diuuk the wine. 
Rather than any shepherd's brat 

Should be a lady of mine, 
Would I had dnmke tl'.e puddle foula 

When I did drink the ale," &.c. 



XXil. 



The chorus, or burden, "Blow away, &c.," occurs also in the ballad of "The 
Baffled Knight," in Percy. Bell gives a Northumbrian version of this ballad of 
the Baffled Knight. Air in " Northumbrian Minstrelsy." I obtained a very full 
one of 15 verses,— some in no other copy I have seen, from James Olver. The 
chorus to each verse was ; — 

" O 1 Blow the winds of the morning, 1 
Blow the winds, heigh-ho ! 
And clear away the morning dew, 
Blow the winds, heigh-ho 1 " 

XXVI. The Hearty Good Fellow. Taken down, words and music, from 
Robert Hard, South Brent. Although in the Roxburgh Ballads there is a whole 
class given up to " Hearty Good Fellows," this ballad does not occur among 
them. I have, however, a broadside by Pitts, of last century, with it, entitled 
" Adventures of a Penny." The first verse runs :— 

" Long time I've travelled the north country 
Seeking for good company. 
Good company I always could find. 
But none was pleasing to my mind, 

Sing whack fal de ral, &c., 
I had one penny." 

The rest is very much the same as our version. 

XXVn. The Bonny Bunch of Roses. Of this we have taken down a great 
number of versions. The melody is everywhere the same, with insignificant 
variations, and a very fresh and charming air it is. In most of the versions the 
youth is Napoleon Bonaparte, and wonderful it is to see how the metre is 
disregarded in order to lug in this name. That history does not agree with 
what is said in the song matters as little as the discrepancy of the metre. The 
song is unmistakeably an anti-Jacobite production, adapted at the beginning of 
this century to Napoleon, when an additional verse was added relative to Moscow. 
In this later form it issued from Catnach's press, and from him it was copied 
by Harkness, of Preston ; Paul, of Spitalfields ; Pitts, of Seven Dials ; Williams, of 
Portsea, &c. In the broadsides of Williams, and of Hodges it is said, "To the 
tune of The Bunch of Roses, O I " indicating an earlier form of the song. This 
was a favourite fo'castle song some 40 or 50 years ago. 

XXVIII. The Old Singing Man. The melody taken down from William 
Huggins, mason, of Lydford, wlio died in the Cottage Hospital at Tavistock, in 
March, i8Sg. He had been zealously engaged that winter going about among his 
ancient musical friends collecting old songs for me. The words he gave were — 
" The little Girl down the Lane," and were of no merit, and much more motlern 
than the air to which he sang them. I have therefore discarded them, and written 
fresh words, and dedicate them to the memory of poor old Will. 

XXIX. The Tythe Pig. Words and air taken down from R. Hard, South Brent. 
It is also well known to the old miller, J. Helmore. The song appears as a broadside, 
printed by Disley, Jackson, of Birmingham ; Harkness, of Preston ; Ross, of Newcastle ; 
Catnach, and others. There are 10 verses in the original. I have cut them down 
to seven. To what air sung elsewhere I do not know. 

XXX. My Ladye's Coach. This was sung fifty years ago by Anne Bickle, 
ot Bratton Clovelly. The tune, to other vi'ords, also by James Parsons. A second 
melody to it, obtained at South Brent, we give as No. 70, " Broadbury Gibbet." 
My Ladye is, no doubt, Death personified, the Hela of Norse mythology ; but 
locally supposed to be Lady Howard, daughter and heiress of Sir John Fitz, 
of Fitzford, Devon, b. 1596, who is supposed to travel nightly from Okehampton 
Castle to Fitzford Gate, Tavistock, in a coach of bones preceded by a phantom 
dog. I have added verses 4, 5, and part of 6 ; there were, however, originally many 
more, but I have not been able to recover them. 

XXXI. Jan's Courtship. Words and air from Mr. R. Rowe, Longabrook, 
Milton Abbott. Another set, words and air, but slightly varied, from W. Crossing, Esq., 



South Brent ; another, practically identical, from Mr. Chowen, of Burnville, Brentor ; as 
" Poor Bob," it occurs in " The Universal Songster," n.d., but about 1830. To what 
tune I have not ascertained. Other tunes to the same words have been sent me. In 
the Roxburgh Ballads, VI., 216-7, 's what is probabl)' the earliest form. " Come hither, 
my dutiful son, and take good counsel of me." This was sung to the air " Grim King 
of the Ghosts." Another variant probably is referred to in "Beggars' Opera," 
Act iii., sc. 8. "Now, Roger, I'll tell thee, because thou'rt my son; " but the melody is 
not the same as ours. Our air is rugged and early. 

XXXII. The Drowned Lover. Taken down, words and melody, from James 
Parsons, air noted down by Rev. H. Fl. Sheppard. 

This is a very early song. It first appears as " Captain Digby's Farewell," 
Roxburgh Ballads, IV., p. 393, printed in 1671. In Playford's "Choice Ayres," 
1675, I., p. 10, it was set to music by Mr. Robert Smith. Then it came to be applied 
to the death of the Earl of Sandwich, after the action in Sole Bay, 1673. ^ black 
letter ballad, date circ. 1675, is headed "To the tune of the Earl of Sandwich's 
Farewell." The original song consisted of three verses only ; it became gradually 
enlarged and somewhat altered, and finally Sam Cowell composed a burlesque song 
on the same lines, a parody of the original, which has more or less served to corrupt 
the versions of the old song, since printed on broadsides by Catnach, of Seven Dials, 
Harkness, of Preston, and others. 

The black letter ballad of 1673 begins : — 

"One morning I walked by myself on the shoar 
When the Tempest did cry and the waves they did roar 
Yet the noise of the Winds and the Waters was drowud 
By the pitiful cry, and the sorrowful Sound, 
Of Ah ! Ah ! Ah ! My Love's dead. 
There is not a bell. 
But a Triton's shell. 
To ring, to ring, to ring my Love's Knell." 

" Colonel Digby's Lament " begins as follows : — 

" I'll go to my Love, where he lies in the Deep, 

And in my Embrace, my dearest shall sleep. 

When we wake, the kind Dolphins together shall throng, 

And in chariots of shells shall draw us along. 

Ah 1 Ah ! My love is dead. 

There was not a bell, But a Triton's shell 
To ring, to ring out his knell." 

The next verse resembles our third. A second version of the melody, but slightly 
varied from that we give, from old Parsons, was sent me by Mr. H. Whitfeld, of 
Plymouth, as sung by his father. Our melody is entirely different from that given 
by Playford, and is probably the older air, which Playford hoped to displace by the 
more elaborate composition of ]\Ir. R. Smith. What makes this probable is that it 
is sung to the same air, slightly varied, in Ireland. 

XXXIII. Childe the Hunter. Words taken from Jonas Coaker, of Post 
Bridge, aged 82, and blind. He died in the spring of 1890. I am glad to be able 
to say that through some profits obtained by concerts of these West of England 
songs, I was able to send the poor old fellow some money, that eased his last 
days. He had used up the material of this ballad, incorporating it into a "poem" 
he had composed on Dartmoor, and vastly preferred his own work to what was 
traditional ; but that was natural. The melody given is that to which the Misses 
Phillips, who were born and reared at Shaw, on Dartmoor, informed me they had 
heard it sung fifty years ago. It is the air we give an account of as having been 
received from Mrs. Gibbons to " Cold blows the wind," No. 6. It is unquestionably 
an early harp tune, not later than the reign of Henry VII. For the story of Childe 
of Plymstock, sec Murray's " Handbook of Devon," Ed. 1S87, p. 208 ; more fully 
and critically, W. Crossing's " Ancient Crosses of Dartmoor," 1SS7, p. 51. 



XXIV. 

XXXIV. The Cottage Thatched with Straw. Taken, words and melody, 
from John Watts, quanyman, Alder, Thi ushletoii. This is one of the best known, 
and next to " Widdeconibe Fair," most favourite songs of the Devon peasantry. 
Sung also by one or two old men at Looe, Cornwall. So far we have not been 
able to trace either words or melody, though neither can be earlier than the 
beginning of this century. 

XXXV. Cicely Sweet. Words and air from J. S. Ilurrell, Esq., Kingsbridge. 
who had learned both 50 years ago from Mr. A. lialoran, a Devonshire schoolmaster. 
It has been published already, as " Sylvia Sweet," in Dale's " Collection," circ. 
1790, with two additional verses. Two verses are given by Halliwell as a traditional 
nursery rhyme, in his Nursery Rhymes, 4th Ed., 1846, p. 223. 

XXXVI. " A Sweet Pretty Maiden." Melody taken down from James Parsons 
by Mr. Sheppard. The words of his ballad were very interesting and poetical, the story 
similar to that of the Scottish ballad " Our young lady's a hunting gone," in Johnson's 
" Musical Museum," 1787, V., p. 437. Unfortunately, it deals with a topic not 
advisable to be sung about in the drawing-room. We have, therefore, set to it 
another song, on the same theme as "Oh for a Husband" in D'Urfey's "Pills to 
Purge Melancholy," Ed. 1719, p. 56. 

XXXVII. The Green Cockade. Words and melody from Edmund Fry, 
thatcher, Lydford, but a native of Lezant, Cornwall. The words of this ballad 
are sometimes mixed up with those of another that begins " It was one summer 
morning, as I went o'er the grass," printed as broadside by Keys, of Devonport, and 
given by Bell in his " Ballads of the English Peasantry," p. 230. 

In the "Duke of Gordon's Garland," in a collection of Stray Garlands, B.M* 
(11621, a. 6) is an Irish form of the ballad. It is there " The Blue Cockade." 

" So now my love you've changed 
From the Orange to the Blue." 

XXXVIII. The Sailor's Farewell. Words and music taken from J. Ilelmore, 
South Brent. A broadside version by Williams, of Portsea. We have given first 
the traditional song to its air unaltered, and then an arrangement as a sceiia, as 
we obtained it from another singer in dialogue form. 

This song in full, but m bad metre and rhyme, will be found in a broadside 
by Wright, of Birmingham, entitled " Lovely Nancy," date circ. 1830. 

" Adieu, my lovely Nancy, ten thousand times adieu, 
I'm going to cross the ocean to seek for somethiag new 
Come, change your ring, my dear, with me. 
As that will be a token when I am on the sea. 

" When I am on the sea, my love, you know not where I am, 
But letters I will write to you all from a foreign land, 
With the secrets of my mind, my dear, and the best of my good will, 
And let my body be where it may, my heart is with you still," &c., &Ct 

This is in a collection of Ballads printed in Birmingham B.M. (1876, e., 2). 

XXXIX. The Forsaken Maiden. Words and melody from James Parsons, 
r,oted by Mr. Sheppard. In our opinion, a very delicately beautiful song; tune 
probably of i6th century. Again heard at Chagford. 

XL. The Blue Kerchief. Words and air from John Woodrich, blacksmith. 

The words have appeared with slight variations on broadsides, in ten verses — 

Catnach, Such, Ross, of Newcastle, &c. Catnach published a parody on it, " The 

Bonny Blue Jacket." In Dr. Barrett's " English Folk Songs," the air is set to 
" Paul Jones." 



XXV. 

XLI. "An Evening so Clear." Music from poor Will Huggins. His word? 
were ;— 

" One evening so clear, in the meadows did pass, 
Her eye full of tear, a beautiful lass. 
The age she did bear, it was scarcely sixteen, 
She around her did wear, a girdle of green. 
Her lips as the rubies, and sparkled her ej'es, 
As diamonds precious, or stars in the skies. 
The meadows along, she sang as a dove, 
And all her sad song, was concerning her love." 

The ballad was long and uninteresting. Moreover, it is found " As down in 
the Meadows I chanced to pass, &c.," in the "Musical Miscellany," 1729, I. 62, 
and Allan Ramsay's "Tea Table Miscellany," 1724, and in "The Merry Musician," 
II., 129. It goes by the name of " Susan's Complaint," see Chappell, p. 648. Our 
air is quite distinct, and as " Susan's Complaint " is a melody associated for near 
two hundred years with these words, I have thought it best to write a fresh copy 
of verses to go to Will Huggins' tune. " Susan's Complaint " may also be found 
in a Collection of Garlands in the British Museum, press mark, 11,621, c. 4, 
Vol. II., No. 74. Curiously enough, Huggins' version was more correct in rhyme; 
also from J. Peakc, List card. 

XLII. The Warson Hunt. Words and melody taken down from James 
Parsons, Edmund Fry, Richard Home, a miller, and others. A song well- 
known in the neighbourhood of Lew Trenchard. Of Squire Arthur Kelly, of 
Kelly, whose hounds were in this memorable run, an epigram was made by 
a carpenter in Milton Abbott, on the death of the squire in 1S23. 

'' Here lies my old Tom Cat, I tell'y, 
He died, same day as did Squire Kelly. 
One hunted hares, the t'other rats; 
Squires they must die as well as cats." 

XLIII. The Green Bushes. Words and melody taken down from Robert 
Hard, South Brent. Again to another air from James Parsons. Mr. Crossing 
sent me the same words to the same air as sung by Parsons, heard by him on 
Dartmoor, from a labouring man, in i86g. 

In Buckstone's play of " The Green Bushes," 1S45, Nelly O'Neil sings 
snatches of this song, one verse " I'll buy you fine petticoats, &c.," in Act I., 
and that and the following verse in Act III. Nowhere is the complete ballad 
given. That, however, owing to the popularity of the drama, was published soon 
after as a "popular Irish ballad sung by Mrs. FitzWilliam, in the drama of 'Green 
Bushes.' " Later, it was attributed to the husband of that lady, Mr. E. F. 
FitzWilliam ; but it was not published as by him in his lifetime. That Buckstone 
believed it to be an Irish melody is likely enough, but a good many of the so- 
called Irish melodies, to English words, are English that have been carried to 
Ireland by the soldiers quartered there. Thus, the old EngHsh " Packington's 
Pound" has been converted into "The wearing of the Green," and called an Irish 
air. The words are substantially old, in this form are a softening down of an 
earlier ballad which has its analogue in Scotland, " My daddie is a cankered carle," 
each verse of which ends : — 

•' For he's low down, he's in the broom 
That's waiting on me." 

This is in Grier's Musical Cyclopedia, Glasgow, 1S35. The English form is 
•' Whitsun Monday," an early copy of which is to be found in one of the 
collections in the British Museum, date about 1760. Each verse ends: — 



" And 'tis low down in the broom 
She's waiting there for me." 



and the last verse ends : — 



" My dear, said she. 
So farewell to the bonny broom," 



XXVI. 

This is an undesirable form of the ballad. Broadsides by Such and Disley, the 
latter different from Buckstone's. In a collection of early ballad books in the 
British Museum is "The Lady's Evening Book of Pleasure," printed in Cow Lane, 
n.d., but about 1760. This contains a ballad that begins thus: — 

" As I was a walking one morning in May, 
I hoard a young damsel to sigh and to say. 
My love is gone from me, and showed me foul play, 
It was down in the meadow, among the green hay." 

Again, another — a north country form very distinct —is found in Broadside Ballads. 

As I walked through the meads, one morning in May, 
Delighted to see the young lambkins at play. 
Among the Green Bushes I met a sweet maid, 
I saluted (her) kindly, and to her I said, — 

I'll give you fine jewels, and I'll give you fine rings 
Witti diamonds so costly, and many fine things 
With gowns and silk petticoats flounced to the knee, 
" I'll leave father and mother to marry with thee. 

" My father's a shepherd, he keeps sheep on yon(der) hill, 

And you may go to him and ask his good will ; " 

In truth I will, lassie, I'll go instantly. 

All among those Green Bushes my Jenny meets me. 

Good morning, old man, you are tending your flock. 
Will you give me a ewe-lamb to breed me a stock ? 
"Indeed will I, laddie, there up on the lea." 
And among the Green Bushes my Jenny meets me. 

" O ! " says the father, " you have me beguiled, 

For little I thought it was my dear child; 

But, since it is so, even so let it be." 

And among the Green Bushes my Jenny meets me. 

To church then they went, without any delay. 
Unto her fond lover she would not say Nay, 
And he oftentimes sings as she sits on his knee 
Among the Green Bushes my Jenny meets (met) me I 

This was published by Hodges, of Seven Dials. Ballads, B.M. (1875, b. 19). 

Dr. Joyce, in his "Ancient Irish Music," 1873, gives the genuine Irish air to 
the " Green Bushes," as sung by the peasantry, not the same. 

As I do not think the "Green Bushes" can be by Buckstone, nor the melody 
Irish, I have admitted it into this collection. 

XLIV. The Broken Token. Words and melody from Robert Hard, South 
Brent ; noted by Kev. H. Fl. Sheppard from his singing. Broadside variant by 
Such, as "The Brisk Young Sailor," or as "Fair Plioebe," as "The Dark-eyed 
Sailor," by Wheeler, of Manchester, and as " The Sailor's Return," by Catnach. 

Dibdin composed a song on the same theme, and called it " The Broken 
Gold." The Catnach ballad, to an entirely distinct air, I obtained from Harry 
Smith at Two Bridges. The broadsides are very rude and corrupt. 

The same air was noted down by Mr. S. Reay, about 1830-5, from a ballad singer 
in the market, at Durham. He has most kindly sent it me. The differences are 
slight. The air is known throughout Cornwall. 

XLV. "The Rout is Out." Words and melody taken down from John Woodrich. 

I have a broadside by Bloomer, of Birmingham, circ. 1780, entitled " Lancashire 
Lads," that is certainly a rude version of the same original. Instead of his dressing her 
in "velvet red, and wrangling her hair in blue," he " is clothed in scarlet and turned up 
with blue." The air cannot have been the same. There is no chorus of " Adieu my 
boys, &c." 



xxvu. 

XLVI. "Why should we be dullards sad?" Words and air from 
Edmund Fry, Will Huggins, and James Olver, of Launceston, who learned it in 
1828, when apprenticed to a tanner at Liskeard, from one George Brooks, the 
foreman in the tanyard, a native of Grampouiid, in Cornwall. In 1760, or there- 
about, Isaac Bickerstaff wrote a song to this melody for one of his ballad operas. 
It is found as a copper-plate engraved sheet song, "The Social Powers," about 
1765; then in "Calliope," Lond., 17SS, p. 278. 

XLVII. May Day Carol. Melody noted down a good many years ago by 
J. S. Cayzer, Esq.; was sung, till of late years, in my neighbourhood, where a bunch of 
flowers at the end of a stick is carried about by children. The history of this carol is 
curious. It was customary in England, as it is still in Tyrol and in Swabia, for a lover 
on May morning to take a green bough to the house of the beloved. If she opens the 
door and takes it in, it is a token of acceptance. At the Puritan epoch, this 
custom was altered, and the song was converted into a carol with a good deal of 
pious sentiment added on, and it was given to children to sing. Thus the original 
significance was completely lost. See " Notes and Queries," 3rd Series, IX., p. 380; 
also Hone's "Every Day Book," I., p. 567; Chambers' " Book of Days," I., p. 578. 
Herrick refers to the custom of youths bringing their May bushes to the maids of 
their choice, when he says : 

" A deale of youth ere this is come 
Back, and with white thorn laden home. 
Some have dispatched their cakes and creanii 
Before that we have left to dream." 

In "The Bath Musical Garland," n.d., but about 1745 (B.M. 1162, c. i., 
No. 29), is a " Pleasant Dialogue betwixt two lovers, in which the lady presents 
a bunch of May and some Thyme to her discontented lover." He says: 

" Your riddle I can Read 



This Iilay was took in Time, 

Grant that in Time I May 

Gain your Love and sweet contentment.' 

The melody is a very early one, and is much like that of the carol : 

" The moon shines bright, the stars give light 
A Uttle before the day," 

still sung in Cornwall, and known also in Sussex. Broadwood and Lucas, " Sussex 
Songs," i8go. 

XLVIII. Nancy. Taken down from William Friend, of Lydford, James 
Parsons, and Robert Hard. All had the same melody somewhat varied. As taken 
from their sinj/ing, it had an archaic character: 




Mr. Sheppard, who did not take down the tune, considers this form to be due 
to the way in which the men sang the air, and he has restored it to what he 
conceives to be the correct form. The words occur in a collection of forty early 
ballad books in the British Museum, in Book 11., "The Lover's Jubilee," date end 
of 17th or beginning of the i8th century. 

XLIX. Lullaby. Noted by me from recollection as sung by a nurse, Anne 
Bickle, of Bratton Clovelly, about 50 years ago. The tune known also to James 
Olver, of Launceston. The words I have recomposed to the best of my ability — 



XXVIU. 

partly from recollection. " Hush-a-by baby on the tree top " was also sung to this 
tune. The air cannot be older than the end of last century. We have treated it 
in modern fashion. 

L. The Gipsy Countess. The melody of the first part from James 
Parsons, as well as the words, the second melody from John Woodrich. Three 
more verses in the original I have been unable to admit for lack of room. 

The Scottish ballad of "Johnny Faa " first appeared in Allan Ramsay's "Tea 
Table Miscellany,' 1724, from which it was taken into Herd's and Pinkerton's Col- 
lections, Johnson's Museum, and Ritson's Scottish Songs. All these turn on a story 
— utterly unhistorical — that Lady Jean Hamilton, married to the grim Covenanter, 
John, Earl of Cassilis, fell in love with, and eloped with. Sir John Faa, of 
Dunbar, who came to her castle disguised as a gipsy along with some others. 
She was pursued, and Faa and his companions where hung. I venture to suggest 
that the Jacobites took an earlier ballad of a gipsy girl married to an Earl, and 
adapted it to serve as a libel on Lady Cassilis, who was the mother of Bishop 
Burnet's wife. Such things were done— ballads were utilised for political purposes, 
and D'Urfey did the same. If this be so, then the existence of the earlier part 
of the ballad, and the variation in our second part of "Johnny Faa" is explained. 
Versions also from Peter Cherton, shoemaker, Oakford, near Tiverton ; William 
Setter and George Kerswell, Two Bridges, Dartmoor. But some of these are 
taken from the broadsides which are reproductions of "Johnny Faa." Mr. Robert 
Browning composed on this theme his poem " The Flight of the Duchess," having 
heard a beggar woman sing the ballad. Mrs. Gibbons tells me that as she re- 
members tlie ballad as sung by her nurse sixty years ago, it was the story of 
the girl going back to her brothers. For a very full account of the "Johnny Faa" 
ballad see Child's " English and Scottish Ballads," No. 200. He is of opinion 
that the English ballad of the gipsies who carried off the lady is derived from 
the Scottish. I have no doubt that our broadside versions are so, but in my 
opinion— whatever it be worth — the Scottish are a re-shaping for political purposes 
of an earlier ballad, of which our Devonshire Gipsy Countess is a no doubt corrupted 
version. In Parsons' ballad there was no division into parts. We have separated 
the parts so as to give both melodies. 

LI. The Grey Mare. The melody and a fragment of the song taken down 
by Mr. ShepparJ trom J. Hoskin, South Brent. Again from Jas. Olver. Neither 
knew the song in its complete form, only a verse or a few lines here and there. I 
have, therefore, had to reconstruct it. A broadside version by Such to a metre 
that will not fit the air as sung in the West. See Kidson, Trad. Tunes, p. 78. 

LII. The Wreck off Scilly. Words and Melody from James Parsons. It 
properly consists of seven verses. Broadside by Catnach, which ends: — 

•' 'Tis Polly love you must lament 
For the loss of your sweetheart, 
'Tis the raging seas, the stormy winds, 
Caused you and me to part." 

But this seems nonsense. The singer does come home, and is not lost. I have 
ventured to give a different conclusion to the song, having been told by a friend 
that he heard this ballad sung in Cornwall by a mendicant sailor. The air belongs 
to the Dibdin era. 

LI II. Henry Martyn. Words and melody from Roger Luxton, Halwell. 
This air noted down by Mr. Sheppard. Again from Matthew Baker, a cripple on 
Lew Down. Again from J. Masters, Bradstone. Again from a shepherd on 
Dartmoor. The versions of words somewhat varied, but the melody was always 
the same. In one the ship had the Lifeguards on Ijoard, in another the King's 
Mariners. In one Henry Martyn received his death wound, in another it is 
the King's ship which is sunk by the Pirate. Professor Child, editing " The 
British Ballads," informs me that he has heard a version sung in the U.S.A. 
by an immigrant, and he called the pirate Andrew Bawbee. The real name 
was Andrew Barton. In 1476, a Portuguese squadron seized a richly-laden ship 



XXIX. 

commanded by John Barton, in consequence of which letters of reprisal were granted 
by James IV. to the three sons, Andrew, Robert, and John, and these were renewed 
in 1506. Hall, in his chronicle under 151 1, says that the king (Henry VHI.) being in 
Leicester, tidings reached him that Andrew Barton so stopped the king's ports, that the 
merchant vessels could not pass out, and he seized their goods pretending that they 
were Portuguese. Sir Edward Howard, Lord High Admiral, and Sir Thomas 
Howard were sent against him. Their two ships were separated, but a fight ensued in 
which Andrew was wounded, and his vessel, the Lion, was taken. He died of his 
wounds. Buchanan, twenty years later, tells the story also. 

There is a long ballad of Sir Andrew Barton, in Percy and elsewhere, quite 
different. That in Percy is the ballad as recompcsed in the reign of James L, 
when there was a perfect rage for re-writing the old historical ballads. Un- 
happily, as these new compositions were printed, and the old were not, they 
have been preserved to the loss of the far finer early ballads. There the Scotch 
have the advantage of us. What the original form of this ballad was it is hard to 
say, as it has become sadly altered in process of handing down through three 
hundred and fifty years. It does not appear in print, that I am aware of, 
before 1820-30, on a broadside, and that is in a very corrupt form. It is easy to 
see how Andrew pronounced Andree Barton, yet altered into Henry Martyn. The 
air is probably of Henry VIII. 's reign. See in reference to Sir Andrew Barton, 
Child's "English and Scottish Ballads." New Ed., No. 167. 

LIV. Plymouth Sound. Melody taken down from Roger Luxton, to a song of 
this name. The original words were not only very poor, but somewhat coarse. There 
are three songs that go by the title of " Plymouth Sound." Broadsides by Keys of 
Devonport and Such. The air cannot be earlier than the beginning of this century. 

LV. Farewell to Kingsbridge. Taken down, words and air from Roger 
Huggins, mason, Lydford, who learned them in 1S68, from a man called Kelly, in 
Tavistock. There are old men in Kingsbridge who can recall when soldiers were 
stationed there. The song belongs to the year 1778-80. It exists as a broadside 
by Such, but without naming Kingsbridge, so that probably it was a song of the 
time adaptable to other places as well. A form of the same ballad, beginning 
" Honour calls to arms, boys," refers to fighting the French in North America, 
circ. 1759, published in broadside by Hodges. 

LVI. Furze Bloom. Taken down from Roger Luxton, 01 Halwell. The 
original words of " Gosport Beach" were worthless. Moreover, " Gosport Beach" 
has its own traditional melody to it elsewhere. I have therefore written fresli 
words to it, embodying the folk saying in Devon and Cornwall — 

" When the Furze is out of bloom, 
Tlieu Love is out of tune." 

LVII. The Oxen Ploughing. This song was well known throughout Devon 
and Cornwall seventy years ago. It went out of use along with the oxen at the 
plough. We found every old singing man had heard it in his boyhood, but none 
could recall more than snatches of the tune and a few of the words. We were for 
three years on its traces, always disappointed. Those who recalled the strains did 
not agree as to its metre, and with the metre the strain varied. Then we heard 
that there was an old man at Liskeard who could sing the song through. Mr. 
Sheppard and I hastened thither, to find that he had been speechless for three 
days and that his death was hourly expected. By great good luck, however, we 
found a labouring man, Joseph Dyer, at S. Mawgan-in-Pyder who could sing the song 
through. We gladly throw out a joint production of Mr. Sheppard and myself that 
occupied this place in the first edition, to replace it with this genuine old-folk song. 

LVIII. Something Lacking. From Thomas Dark, labourer, Holcombe Burnell, 
age 74. This was most difficult to note, owing to the old fellow changing his key when 
asked to re-sing it for purpose of notation. I am not satisfied that it is right now. 

LIX. The Simple Ploughboy. This charming ballad was taken down, words 
and air, from J. Masters, of Bradstone. Mr. Sheppard noted the melody. The broad- 
side versions that were published by Fortey, Hodges, Taylor of Spitalfields, Ringham 



XXX, 



of Lincoln, and Pratt of Birmingham, are all very corrupt. The version of old pilasters 
is given exactly as he sung it, and it is but one instance out of several of the superiority 
of the ballads as handed down traditionally in the country, to those picked up by the 
ballad-mongers employed in towns by the broadside publishers. 

LX. The Wrestling Match. Words and air taken down from James Olver of 
Launceston, Tanner. He said that when he was a boy this was wont to be sung at 
wrestling matches at Liskeard. Such matches took place every week day evening, 
from Lady-Day to Michaelmas, in a field, strewn with tan, outside the town. 

LXI. The Painful Plough. Words and melody from Roger Huggins, mason, 
Lydford. The air noted down by Mr. Sheppard. It is in reality a much longer song, 
and consists of 9 or 10 stanzas. Under the title of the " Ploughman's Glory," it runs 
to 25 verses. Bell gives nine verses in his " Ballads of the English Peasantry." 
It is found on broadsides. In the original it consists of a contention between the 
ploughman and the gardener as to which exercises the noblest profession. Our 
melody, as I am informed by Dr. W. A. Barrett, is not the same as that to which 
"The Painful Plough" is sung in the j\lidlands and South-East of England. The 
earliest copy of the words I know is in a volume of Garlands in the British 
Museum (1078, p, 16). There it occurs as "The Plowman's Glory" in "The 
Irish Girl's Garland," Hull, "Printed and sold in the Butchery" and consists of 
25 stanzas. Date, I suppose, about 1779. One verse runs: — 

" Three mighty powers in Europe 
Against us do advance. 
Led by the crafty notions of 
That restless Fox of France." 

And one concludes with, " Long life to our King, and confusion to his foes by 
George's sword." 

This is, I suspect, a re-writing of " The Farmer's Glory," an earlier song found 
in "Bonny Jockey's Garland," in a collection made by J. Bell; all printed by 
J. White, who died 1769, and T. Saint, who died 1788. Here are two verses: — 

" The Parson he doth con his lesson 
And prays for all his congregation, 
But ttie Devil may take both me and you, 
If he was not upheld by the Plow. 

" So to conclude and end my ditty. 
No tradesman that's in town or citj', 
But what will say these hnes be true. 
So let us sing to speed the Plow." 

As in the same garland is one on Pamela, the date is probably about 1740-5. 

UXLII. " Broadbury Gibbet." This tune was an alternative to that already 
given (No. 30) for " My Lady's Coach," and was taken down at South Brent by 
Mr. Sheppard. As the melody was weird and gruesome, and we had no other old 
ballad that seemed appropriate, I wrote a fresh set of words. The gibbet on Broad- 
bury was standing in 1814, and the beam is still in existence in a barn near the 
spot. One man was hung on it in chains for an atrocious murder committed on 
two sisters. His name was Wellon. He was a stranger passing by the house in 
which the sisters Rundle lived. He asked for bread and was given it. He returned 
later to the house, murdered them, and robbed them of £s- He then walked to 
Ashburton, where over his cups he told of the murder committed at Bratton, before 
the news had arrived there, and this led to his arrest. 

■ XLIII. The Orchestra. The melody taken down from John Woodrich, of 
Thrushleton. The words began : — 

" I went unto my true love's house 

At eight o'clock at night. 
And little did my true love know, 
I owed her a despite." 

It then went on to describe a singularly brutal murder. The words exist in a 
broadside by Catnach and Such, "The Cruel Miller." The earliest form, however, 



XXXI. 

is in a broadsheet by Pitts, of Seven Dials, " The Berkshire Tragedy, or the 
Wittam Miller," and this is in 22 verses. It begins : — 

" Young men and maidens give ear 
Unto what I shall relate, 
O mark you well, and you shall hear 

Of my unhappy fate. 
Near famous Oxford town, 

I first did draw my breath, &c." 

As the tune clearly did not belong to these words I ventured to write fresh 
words, and Mr. Bussell has somewhat developed the original melody which was 
limited to four lines. 

LXIV. The Golden Vanity. Taken down words and air from James Olver, 
of Launceston. Melody noted down by Mr. Bussell. This ballad was printed as 
" Sir Walter Raleigh sailing in the Lowlands, showing how the famous ship called 
the Sweet Trinity was taken by a false galley ; and how it was recovered by the 
craft of a little sea-boy, who sunk the galley," by Coles, Wright, Vere, and Gilbertson 
(1648—80). In this it is said to be sung "to the tune of the Lowlands of Holland," 
and in it there is no ingratitude shown to the poor sea-boy. In this version there 
are fourteen verses. It begins: — 

" Sir Walter Raleigh has built a ship 
In the Netherlands, 
And it is called the Sweet Trinity, 
And was taken by the false Gallaly, 
Sailing in the Lowlands." 

It has been reprinted in Ashton : "A century of Ballads," p. 201. Under the 
form of " The Goulden Vanity," it is given with an air (of no value, and quite 
unlike ours), in Mrs. Gordon's Memoirs of Christopher North, 1862, ii., p. 317, 
as sung at a convivial meeting at Lord Robertson's by Mr. P. Fraser, of 
Edinburgh, before Mr. J. C. Lockhart and Professor Wilson. This begins : — 

" There was a gallant ship, 
And a gallant ship was she, 

Sik iddle dee, and the Lowlands low. 
And she was called the Goulden Vanitie, 

As she sailed to the Lowlands low." 

This also is in fourteen verses. The broadside version printed by Such, and 
Pitts, of Seven Dials, begins : — 

" I have a ship in the North Countrie, 
And she goes by the name of the Golden Vanity ; 
I'm afraid she will be taken by some Turkish gallee, 
As she sails on the Lowlands low." 

This is in seven verses, and very imperfect. Verse two contains five lines, 
verse three only three, verses four and si.x have four lines, verses five and seven 
have three lines. Consequently it would not be possible to " put a tune to it." 
Giver's melody is a very fine and striking one. It was adopted with some modernisa- 
tion that spoiled it by Clifton, in the early part of this century, for his iong of " The 
Oyster Girl." " Sir Walter Raleigh," says Mr. Ebbsworth, in his introduction to 
this ballad in the Roxburgh Ballads (V., p. 418), "never secured the popularity, the 
natural affection which was frankly given to Robert Devereux, the Earl of Essex. 
Raleigh was deemed arrogant, selfish, with the airs of an upstart, insolent to superiors, 
unconciliating with equals, and heartlessly indifferent to those in a lower position. 
The subject of the following ballad is fictitious — sheer invention, of course. The 
selfishness and ingratitude displayed by Raleigh agreed with the current estimate. 
He certainly had a daughter." The tune to which " The Golden Trinity " was set 
in the broadsides was " The Sailing in the Lowlands," and must therefore be an 
older air than the ballad. We obtained the same ballad at Chagford as " The 
Yellow Golden Tree." Our air is not earlier than the end of last centurj'. To a 
different tune it was a favourite fo'castle song forty or fifty years ago. We have 
beard this ballad to the tune we give at Mawgan-in-Pyder, 



xxxu. 

LXV. The Bold Dragoon. Words and melody taken down by W. Crossing, 
Esq., of South Brent, many years ago, from a labouring man on Dartmoor, now 
dead. The words were very corrupt. 1 have taken down a fuller version from a 
man at H\ickaby Bridge, Dartmoor, and have discovered an early version, "The 
Jolly Trooper," in " The Lover's Garland," n.d., but of the begmning or middle 
of last century. It begins : — 

" There was a Trooper in the West 
And with riding he was weary ; 
He knocked at, he rapped at. 
And he asked for his kiud deary. 

• •••«• 

She took the horse by the bridle rein, 

And led him to the stable. 
She gave him corn and hay to eat. 

As much as he was able," &c. 

As in the original, in singing, the last two lines were repeated, and the story 
was very lengthy, I have condensed it, by making each stanza of six lines instead 
of four. Moreover, as the original was too coarse to be presentable, I have recast 
it. There is naught about a cliimpanzee in the old ballad. The press mark in 
the British Museum is 11,621, c. 5. 

LXVI. Trinity Sunday. Melody noted down by T. S. Cayzer, Esq., in 1849, 
at Post Bridge, from a moor man ; the original words were unsuitable, a broad- 
side ballad of a murder. 

This is certainly a fine old dance tune. 

To convert it into a three-stanza song instead of six stanzas, a slight liberty 
has been taken with the tune; the music has been expanded after line four, by 
the addition of five and six; the original air ends at "all the year." 

In connection with this charmingly fresh air, I will give Mr. Cayzer's account 
of taking it down in 1849, which he has kindly extracted for me from his diary: — 
"This air, together with 'As Johnny walked out' (No. 11), I got from Dart- 
moor; nor shall I soon forget the occasion. The scene was a lonely one (I 
think Two Bridges, but it may have been Post Bridge). It had been raining all 
day. There was not a book in the house, nor musical instrument of any kind, 
except two hungry pigs and a baby that was being weaned. Towards 
nightfall there dropped in several miners and shepherds, and I well remember 
how the appearance of these Gentiles cheered us. We soon got up a glorious 
fire — such a fire as peat only can make, and drew the benches and settles round. 
By the friendly aid of sundry quarts of cyder I, before long, gained the confi- 
dence of the whole circle, and got a song from each in turn ; and noted down 
two that were quite new to me : no easy matter, considering that they were 
performed in a strange mixture of double bass and falsetto. The action with which 
they accompanied the singing was extremely appropriate. They always sing 
standing." 

Many a similar evening have Mr. Sheppard, Mr. Bussell, and I spent in like 
manner over the peat fire with the burly, red-faced moor men and shepherds, 
standing to sing their quaint old songs, and very happy evenings they have been. 

LXVII. The Blue Flame. Melody taken down by Mr. W. Crossing, from 
an old moor man, to " Rosemary Lane." Roger Luxton and James Parsons also 
sang " Rosemary Lane " to the same air. The words are objectionable. Moreover, 
in other parts of England, this broadside song is always sung to one particular air. 
We therefore thought it well to put to our melody entirely fresh words. 

It is, or was, a common belief in the West of England, that a soul after death 
appears as a blue flame ; and that a flame comes from the churchyard to the house 
of one doomed to die, and hovers on the doorstep till the death-doomed expires, 
•when the soul of the deceased is seen returning with the other flame, also as a 
flame, to the churchyard, 



XXXlll. 

LXVIII. Strawberry Fair. Melody taken down from Jas. Masters, of 
Bradstone, by Mr. Sheppard. The ballad is a recast of " Kytt hath lost her key," 
given by Dr. Rimbault in his " Little Book of Songs and Ballads gathered from 
Ancient Music Books," 1851, p. 49; but this was a parody in 1561 of "Kit 
hath lost her keye (cow)." The song was certainly early, but unsuitable ; and 
I have been constrained to re-write it. The old air was used, in or about 1835, 
by Beuler, a comic song writer, for his " The Devil and the Hackney Coachman," 

" Ben was a Hackney Coachman rare, 
Jarvey ! Jarvey ! — Here I am, your honour." 

Beuler composed the words of a good number of songs, and set nearly all tc 
old airs. Thus he wrote " The Steam Coach " to " Bonnets of Blue," " Don Giovanni " 
to the air of "Billy Taylor," "the Sentimer,tal Costermonger " to "Fly from the 
World," "Honesty is the best Policy" to the old melody of " The Good Dajs of 
Adam and Eve," " Ireland's the nation of Civilization " to the tune of " Paddy 
O'Carrol," and " The Nervous Family " to " We're a Nodding." 

The same thing was done by Hudson, and a score of comic song writers. 
They took good old tunes and set them to vulgar words, which were, in some cases, 
no doubt an improvement, for vulgar words are better than those which are obscene. 
That " Strawberry Fair " is a genuine old melody I have no doubt. The ballad 
is sung everywhere in Cornwall and Devon to the same melody. The words are 
certainly not later than the age of Charles 11., and are probably older. They turn 
on a double entindre which is quite lost — and fortunately so — to half the old fellows 
who sing the song. It seems to me impossible to believe that the air should have 
become dissociated from Beuler's words and attached to very early words of the 
peculiar metre required. I have never found a singer who had any knowledge of 
" The Devil and the Hackney Coachman," but all have heard " Strawberry Fair," 
and some men of 70-80 say they learned it of their fathers. The earliest date of 
Jacob Beuler's song is 1834, and if what the old singers tell me is true, ther 
certainly Beuler adopted a tune taken from a folk ballad, and did not contribute a 
tune to folk melody. 

LXIX. The Country Farmer's Son. Taken down by Rev. H. Fleetwood 
Sheppard from John Woolrich (not Woodrich), labourer, Broadwood Widger. The 
original ballad, " The Constant Farmer's Son," is found in a broadside by Ross, 
of Newcastle. It is a good, robust tune of the end of last century. 

LXX. The Hostess' Daughter. Taken down by Mr. Sheppard from 
J. Masters, of Bradstone. The frankness and rudeness of the original words 
demanded modification before the song was fitted for the drawing room. 

LXXI. The Jolly Goss-hawk. Melody taken down by Mr. Sheppard from 
H. Westaway, yeoman, of Belstone. The tune is set to a nonsense counting-song 
for children, and is then called "The Nawden Song." This begins: — 

" I went to my ladye the first of May 
A Jolly goss hawk and his wings were grey. 
Come let us see who'll win this fair ladye — you or me." 

To the 2nd of May is a " two-twitty bird," then "a dushy cock," a "four- 
legged pig," "five steers," "six boars," " seven cows calving," " eight bulls roaring," 
" nine cocks crowing," " ten carpenters yawing," " eleven shepherds sawing," "twelve 
old women scolding." A Scottish version in Chambers' " Popular Rhymes of 
Scotland," 1842, as "The Yule Days." A Northumbrian version, "The XII. days 
of Christmas," with air, not like ours, in "Northumbrian Minstrelsy." 



xxxiv. 

A version of this is the " Gousper ou ar Ranad " (the Frogs' Vespers) sung 
by the peasants of Brittany. " Cliansons Populaires de la Basse Bretagne," par 
Luzel, iSgo, p. 94. Tlie West of England song has got mixed up with the " Goss 
Hawk," another song. The same melody did for bolli, but one was a nursery song 
and the other was not. A rather corrupt form of the " Goss Hawk " is to be found 
in " The Fond Mother's Garland," in a collection of early Garlands in the 
B. Museum (11,621, c. 5). 

LXXn. " Fair Girl Mind This ! " Taken, words and melody, from James 
Parsons. He learned this from his father 70 years ago. His father once sar.g it 
at a tavern in Plymouth, whither he had driven some cattle for the farmer for 
whom he worked. Next morning the landlady came to him and said, " Zing me 
thicky (that) zong again, now do'y, and you shall pay naught for your bed and 
board." So old Parsons sang the song. " Zing it me again," said the landlady. 
When he had so done she said, " There now, take what you can carry away in 
eaten' and drinken,' and welcome, and mind this, never you come to Plymouth 
again without coming here, and never you come here wi'out zinging thicky zong 
to me — as long as I be alive." 

I have discovered this song in " The Contented Wife's Garland," date about 
1730. It is in a collection of early garlands that belonged to Mr. Halliwell, and \vas 
acquired in 1832 by the British Museum. It is there as sung by the wife, not tlie 
man, and instead of coffee she gets him chocolate. The order of the verses is 
different, but the number is the same. It begins with our second verse, and the 
moral which in Parson's version comes first, is thrown in the Garland to the end. 
The melody is probably the original ; it fits the words admirably. 

LXXIII. On a May Morning so Early. This melody belongs to the 
song or ballad " I'm Seventeen on Sunday," which is known elsewhere than in 
Devon and Cornwall. The air was taken down by Mr. Sheppard, from Roger 
Huggins, at Lydford. Taken down again by Mr. Bussell, from William Bickle, of 
Bridestowe. Bickle sang it to the broadside ballad, " Seventeen on Sunday," but 
Huggins' words, as far as they went, were earlier and better. The original ballad was 
altered by Burns to the " Wakeriffe Mammy," which he re-wrote for Johnson's 
Museum, IV., p. 410 ; and Allan Cunningham arranged a song on this topic, as the 
original was objectionable. Lyle gives it in his " Ballads," 1827, saying: "This 
ballad, in its original dress at one time, from my recollection, was not only extremely 
popular, but a great favourite among the young peasantry of the West of Scotland. 
To suit the times, however, we have been necessitated to throw out the intermediate 
stanzas, as their freedom would not bear transcription, whilst the 2nd and 3rd have 
been slightly altered from the recited copy." An Irish version (re-written) to the 
Irish air, in Joyce: "Ancient Irish Music," 1S73, No. 17. He says: "I cannot 
tell when I learned the air and words of this song, for I have known them as 
long as my memory can reach back. For several reasons [the original words] could 
not be presented to the reader." It was not possible for us either to give the 
ballad in its original form. Mr. Sheppard re-wrote it. 

LXXIV. The Spotted Cow. Words and air from James Parsons, J. Helmore, 
H. Smith, and from John Woodrich, Thrushleton, noted down by Mr. Sheppard. 
The earliest version of the words is found in a Garland of last century, printed 
by Angus, of Newcastle. Brit. Mus. Garlands (11,621, c. 4), Vol. II., No. 53. 
There are several later broadside versions by Disley, Such, Dodds, of Newcastle, 
Keys, of Devonport, &c. As sung, it consists of four lines, and the two last 
are repeated. To avoid monotony, and to curtail the ballad, I have made each 
stanza to consist of six lines. The air to which sung everywhere in Devon is 
different. Dr. W. A. Barrett informs me, from that to which sung elsewhere. About 
1760, Dr. Berg set the same song to a recast in Scotch form of the words, so as 
to transform it into a Scottish song : " As Jamie gang'd blithe his way, along the 
Banks of Tweed," &c., and so it was sung at Ranelagh. " The Bulfinch," n.d., 
P- 159- 



XXXV. 

LXXV. Cupid, the Plough Boy. Words and music taken down from 
J. Watts, Alder quarry, Thrushlcton. He sang of " Cubick, the Plougli-boy," and 
made Cubick marry the damsel in the end. Broadside versions, very corrupt, by 
Catnach, Fortey, &c. The earliest copy is " Cupid, the Pretty Plough-boy," a new 
song;" no date or place, but about the latter half of last century in the B.M. 
(1S75, b. 19). This ballad is, I believe, a mere recomposition of " Cupid's 
Triumph," a black letter ballad, circ. 1670, Roxburgh Ballads, IV., p. 13 ; but 
this is a sequel to another piece, "Cupid's Courtesy." The air was a Saraband. 
Perhaps that given by Chappell, p. 497. Barrett's " English Folk Songs," No. 16, 

TXXVL "Come my Lads, let us be Jolly." Words and melody from Tames 
Olver, of Launceston, and Kdmund Fry, of Lydford. Olver acquired it at Liskeanl, 
in 1828, along with " Why should we be dullards sad ? " from G. Brooks, of 
Grampound. Fry had the melody incomplete. Olver knew the whole of it. Barrett's 
" English Folk Songs," No. 6, as "Sheep-sheering Song;" we have never so heard 
it used. W'e have heard it sung also by a hind, J. Hockin, Menheniot, Cornwall, 
with no reference to a sheep-sheering. We have taken down a notable variant from 
Samuel Gilbert, Landlord of the Falcon, aged 81, at Mawgan-iii-Pyder In that 
the chorus runs : — 

" Let union be with all its fun. 
And we will join all hearts in one. 
And we'll go through as we've begun, 
Since it 'j our holiday." 

In this also no reference to a sheep-.' .leering. Also the air of this chorus differed 
from ours, as well as from that given by Dr. Barrett. Mr. Gilljert's ran tlius: — 



Let urion be, with all its fun, Since it is our hoi • i- day. 



The verse was the same as our chorus, in common time. 

LXXVII. Poor old Horse. Words and melody taken from Matthew Baker 
Lew Down, the melody noted by Mr. Sheppard. This song is given in Bell's " Ballads 
of the English Peasantry," p. 184, as sung by the mummers in the neighbourhood 
of Richmond, Yorkshire. He says : " The rustic actor who sings the song is dressed 
as an old horse, and at the end of every verse the jaws are snapped in chorus. 
It is a very old composition, and is now (circ. 1864) printed for the first time." 
This is not so — it exists as a broadside, printed by Hodges, of Seven Dials, and 
by Such. Our tune, which has not any merit, is not the same as that to which it 
is sung in the Midlands and Sussex. I differ from Mr. Bell as to the age of the 
song. I do not fancy it older than the latter half of last century. The Midland 
air and form of the song in Mason's " Nursery Rhymes and Country Songs," 1877. 

LXXVIII. The Dilly Song. A great number of versions of this song have 
been taken down, and a good many were sent to the pages of the Weiteyn Morning 
News, in 1888, from various parts of Cornwall and Devon. This is known through- 
out Cornwall, and is, indeed, still sung in the cliapels. When a party of amateurs 
performed some of these "Songs of the West" in Cornwall, 1S90, the Dilly Song 
always provoked laughter among the good folk at the back of the halls; this 
puzzled the performers, till they enquired into the reason of the lau;_;hter, and 
learned that folk laughed because it was their familiar chapel hymn. In the text 
I have given the version of the words with least of the religious element in them. 
Here are some of the other versions. 

2. Is God's own Son, or Christ's natures, but, in a Horrabridge version two 
are the strangers o'er the wide world rangers : another, " the lily white maids " 
not "babes." 

3. The strangers are probably the Three Wise Men. In a Cornish version 
" Three is all eternity." In another, " Three is the Thrivcrs." 



XXXVl. 



4. " The Gospel Preachers ; " at S. Austell, " The Evangelists." 

5. " Five is the Ferryman in the Boat " ; at Horrabridge, " The Dillybird ; " 
another, " The Nimble Waiters." 

6. " The Cherubim Watchers," " The Crucifix," " The Cherry-bird Waiters." In 
an American version " The Ploughboys under the Bowl," " The Cheerful Waiters." 

7. "The Crown of Heaven," see Rev. i., 16, but more likely the Pleiades, "The 
Seven Stars in the Sky." 

8. "The Great Archangel," "The Archangels ;" at Horrabridge, "Eight is the 
daybreak." 

9. "Nine are the Nine Delights," i.e., the Joys of Mary. "The Moonshine, 
bright and fine," " The Pale Moonshine." " The nine that so bright do shine." 

10. " The Commandments." " Begin again." 

11. "The Eleven Disciples." "They who go to Heaven." 

There are very similar verses in German and Flemish. The Flemish version in 
Coussemaker : " Chants populaires des Flamands," with three variants of the air, 
which is a corruption of " Adeste fideles." The Scottish version in Chambers 
" Popular Rhymes of Scotland," 1842, p. 50. Dilly, as applied to the song, the 
hour, the bird, is probably the Festal Song, &c. (Welsh dillyn, pretty, gay, pi. dillynion, 
fineries, jewels.) 

Sir Arthur Sullivan has introduced a song of the same character into his 
"Yeoman of the Guard," but the melody is not quite the same as ours. 

The air to which the Dilly Song is sung in Somersetshire is similar to ours, 
and is, in fact, an artistic canon. 

This song is very familiar throughout Brittany, as "Gousperou Kerne," Les 
Vfepres de Cornouaille. 

" Dis moi ce que c'est qu'un ? 
Un Dieu, sans plus, qui est au ciel. 
Qu'est-ce que c'est que deux? 
Deux testaments. 

Les trois Personnes de la Trinite, 
Quatre evangelistes," &c. 

" Chansons populaires de la Bretagne," par Luzel, 1890, p. 88. Also 
M. Villemarque gives two rude melodies (Barz-Breiz, 1846, Nos. I. & VHI.) to 
which it is sung by the Bretons. There was a Mediaeval Latin form of the 
song which began " Unus est Deus." A Hebrew form as one for instructing 
children in truths, is printed in Mendez : "Service for the First Night of the 
Passover," London, 1862. It begins: "Who knoweth one? one is God who is 
over heaven and earth." The numbers go up to thirteen. 

" Thirteen divine attributes, twelve tribes, eleven stars, ten commandments, 
nine months preceding childbirth, eight days preceding circumcision, seven days 
of the week, six books of the Mischna, fine books of the law, four matrons, three 
patriarchs, two tables of the Covenant, but one is God alone, &c. 

A Moravian form in Wenzig : Slawischer Miirchenschatz, 1857, p. 295. 

LXXIX. The Mallard. A country dance tune, so called because of some silly 
words that go to it relative to the gobbling up of a Mallard. They begin :— 

" Oh what have I ate, and what have I ate ? 
I have eaten the toe of a Mallard, 

Toe and toe, nevins and all, 
And I have been to biliary allerj'. 
And so good meat was the Mallard." 

I have written fresh words to the tune, which is an excellent example 01 an 
early dance tune, as the words do not belong properly to the tune. We have had 
the same sung in Dartmoor, and in Cornwall to entirely different melodies. It was 
taken from J. Masters, of Bradstone. This also is a song, like the last, and hke 



xxxvii. 

The Everlasting Circle (No. 104), and like the Nawden Song (No. 71), common to 
the Cornish and the peasants of Brittany. The Breton version is " Dispennais ar 
Voualc'h " (Depecer le merle), given in " Chants Populaires de la Basse Bretagne," 
par Luzel, p. 80. 

LXXX. Constant Johnny. Words and melody taken down from Roger 
Luxtsn, of Halwell, the melody noted by Mr. Sheppard. It has heja arranged by 
Mr. Sheppard as perhaps originally set, in duet form, such lovers' duets being a common 
feature in folk song. Ravenscroft gives one in broad Devonshire in his " Brief 
Discourse," 1614, entitled "Hodge Trellindle and his Zweethart Malkyn." Our 
duet seems to be based on " Doubtful Robin or Constant Nanny," printed as a 
"new ballad," in or about 1680, in black letter; it is given in the 4th Vol. of the 
Roxburgh Ballads. The tune to that is " Would you be a Man of Fashion," or 
" The Doubting Virgin." 

LXXXI. The Duke's Hunt. Words and melody taken down from James 
Olver, Launceston. I have heard another version at Stoke Gabriel, near Dartmouth; 
another at S. Mary Tavy, another at Menheniot. This is a mere cento from a long 
bLilad, entitled " The Fox Chase," narrating a hunt by Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, 
in the reign of James I. Reprinted in Hindley's " Roxburgh Ballads," I., p. 453. It 
was originally printed by W. Oury, circ. 1650, but probably there was an earlier 
edition, not now extant. The air, noted down by Mr. Bussell, is very bright and 
pleasant. None is indicated in the heading of the ballad in 1650, which is merely 
headed, "To an excellent tune, much in request." It consists of eijhteen verses. 
The dogs in this early and original version are Dido, Spanker, Ruler, Bonny Lass, 
Caper, Countess, Comely, Famous, Thumper, and Cryer. In it the dog who never 
looks behind him is Ruler. 

The ballad begins: — 

" All in a morning fair. 

As I rode to take the air, 
I heard some to halloo most clearly; 

I drew myself near 

To listen who they were. 
That were going a hunting so early. 

I saw there were some gentlemen. 

Who belonged to the Duke of Buckingham," 6k., 

This hunting ballad also occurs in " A Collection of Forty Early Ballad and 
Song Books," in the British Museum, in the 20th book of that collection. " The 
Vauxhall Concert," with a print of William and Mary on the title page. Also on a 
broadside "Dido and Spandigo." Ballads collected by Crampton, B.M. (11,621 h.). 
Vol. VIII. 

LXXXII. The Bell Ringing. Words and air from William George Kerswell, 
a moorland farmer, an old man, near Two Bridges, in the heart of Dartmoor. 
Broadwood Widger, Ashwater, and North Lew are small villages situated near 
Broadbury Down, the highest land between Dartmoor and the Atlantic. When 
sung by the old farmer over a great fire in the kitchen, his clear, robust voice 
imitating the bells, produced an indescribable charm. 

LXXXIII. A Nutting we will Go. Taken down from J. Garrard, aged 68, 
and nearly blind, a labouring man, illiterate, Cullyton, near Chagford. He knew, 
however, only the melody of the chorus, the complete tune was taken down by 
Mr. Sheppard, from Robert Hard, labourer. South Brent, who sang to it a ballad 
called "Jack of all Trades." The same tune to tlie " nutting " song at Menhenoit. The 
same also by James Parsons. Bunting, in his " Irish Melodies," 1840, gives the same 
tune to a fragment of the same words, and says he took it down in 1792 from Duncan, 
a harper. Duncan remembered half or a good portion of a tune he had heard, perhaps 
from English soldiers, and eked it out with some other tune. Then came S. Lover, and 
he took this air from Bunting, and wrote " The Lowbacked Car " to it. But the 
original melody is found, not only in Cornwall and Devon, but also in the North, 
and Mr. Kidson gives it in his "Trad. Tunes" as "With Henry Hunt we'll go," 
a song sung in Manchester in connection with the arrest of Hunt in 1819. The 



XXXVUl. 

air was then adapted to this song from " The Battle of Waterloo." When we find the 
same words to the same air in Ireland and in Cornwall, and in the North of England 
as well, we may well believe that our tunc belonged originally to •' A Nutting we wiU 
Go." It is probable', therefore, that the air we give is more genuine than " The Low- 
backed Car " which has become popular, and its inartistic quality and incongruities 
have been forgiven. There is a broadside version, " The Nut Girl," printed by 
Fortey, Ryle, &c. See Ballads collected by Crampton, B.M. (11,621, h.), Vol. I., 
and (1S75, b. 19); but these are both without the chorus. The printed broadside 
has lost somewhat. For instance, Gerrard's 



has become 



" His voice rang out so clear and stout 
It made the horse-bells ring," 



" His voice was so melodious 
It made the valleys ring." 

Cut the broadside is longer, it consists of fourteen verses. Neither can be given 
untoned down, to make the song tolerable for polite ears. 
A still earlier broadside version, by Pitts, with chorus. 

LXXXIV. Down by a River-side. Taken down by Mr. Shcppard from 
the singing of Jas. Townsend, Holne. It was a song of his grandfather's, who was 
parish clerk at Holne for fifty years, and died in 1883, over eighty years old. 

LXXXV. The Barley Rakings. Taken down from Roger Hannaford, of 
Lower Widdecombe, Dartmoor, by Mr. Sheppard. The words exist in broadside 
versions, by Such, Bingham, of Lincoln, Robertson, of Wigton, &c. Such's 
version consist of six verses, the others of four. Hannaford's verses, 2 and 3, 
were unlike those of Bingham and Robertson, but resembled 3 and 4 of Such. He 
had not 2 and 6 of Such, and his lines and rhymes were not identical with the 
London version. Moreover, he had a curious line in verse 2 : " They had a mind 
to style and play " (the Anglo-Saxon styllan, to leap or dance), not found in the 
printed copies. As none of these versions would be tolerable in the drawing-room, 
Mr. Sheppard has modified the words considerably. The melody to which " Barley 
Rakings" is sung in other parts of England is wholly different, ours is probably 
an early dance tune. 

LXXXVI. Deep in Love. This very curious song was obtained by the late 
Rev. S. M. Walker, of Saint Enoder, Cornwall, from an old man in his parish. 
Miss Octavia L. Hoare sent it me as preserved by Mr. Walker. Wc have 
obtained the same song from Mary Sacherley, aged 75, perfectly illiterate, at 
Huckaby Bridge, Dartmoor. Mary Sacherley is daughter of an old singing moor 
man, \\\\o was a cripple, on Dartmoor. She possesses the unique distinction of 
having a house that was built and inhabited in one day. The circumstances are 
these : Her husband's father had collected granite boulders to erect a cottage on a 
bit of land that he deemed waste, but a farmer interfered as he began to build. 
He accordingly had all the stones rolled down hill to a spot by the road side, 
heaped one on another in rude walls, rough beams thrown across, and covered with 
turf, and went into the house the same night. In that house his grandchildren are 
now living. 

Two of the stanzas, 3 and 5, are found in the Scotch song, " Wally, Wally, up 
the bank," "Orpheus Calsdonicus," 1733, No. 34; stanzas 4 and 5 in the song in 
•'The Scott's I^Iusical Museum," 17S7 — 1803, VI., p. 582 ; Herd's "Scottish Songs," 
3rd ed., 1791, I., p. 140; part of last stanza is like our conclusion. In "The 
Wandering Lover's Garland," circ. 1730, are two of the verses worked into an 
independent ballad, showing that the original is earlier. Again taken down from 
W. Nichols, of Whitchurch, near Tavistock, it was a song of his grandmother's, 
who sixty years ago was hostess of the village inn. 

LXXXVII. The Rambling Sailor. Taken down by Mr. Sheppard from 
Roger Hannaford, South Widdecombe. A hornpipe tune. There are several 
broadside versions of this. Originally the song was " The Rambling Soldier," 
and so appears about the middle or latter end of last century. Then some 



XXXIX. 

poetaster of Catnarli's re-wrote it as " The Rambling Sailor," dcstroj'ing all the 
wit and point of the original; which wit and point, by the way, were characteristic 
of the age ; but as in the West it is set to a hornpipe, we have retained the song as 
one of a sailor, only modifying the words where objectionable. The "Rambling 
Soldier," the early copy I have seen, is in the possession of Dr. Barrett ; a later 
copy, circ. 1820, by Whiting, of Birmingham. Ballads, B.M. (1C76, e. 2). The 
" Rambling Sailor," by Disley, circ. 1830 ; Ballads collected by Cramplon, B.M. 
(11,621, h.), Vol. VIII. 

LXXXVIII. A Single and a Married Life. Taken down from Henry Bickic, 
of Bridestowe, This belongs to the class of diaiogae Ballads, of which the best known 
is " The Husbandman and the Serving Man." We have not been able to trace this 
anywhere so far. But that is no reason why we should not yet light on it soinewhere- 

LXXXIX. Midsummer Carol. Taken down from Will. Aggett, an old 
crippled labourer, very illiterate, at Changford ; melody noted by Mr. Bussell. A very 
early and curious melody of the same date as that to the " May Day Carol," 
No. 47 ; and the words belong to a similar custom. This has not been moralised 
as has been the " May Day Carol," by the Puritans. 

XC. The Blackbird. The melody taken down twice by Mr. Sheppard, first 
from James Parsons, secondly from Roger Hannaford. From Parsons we got but 
one verse, that with which we begin ; but from Hannaford we recovered the entire 
ballad, that begins thus : — 

I. " Three pretty maidens a-niilking did go. 
Three pretty maids a-niilking did go, 
When the wind it did blow high. 
And the wind it did blow low, 
And it tossed their milking pails to and fro. 

Then she met with a man that she did know, 
O she met with a man that she did know, 
And she asked have you skill ? 
And she ask'd have you the will ? 
To catch me a small bird or two." 

Then comes the verse on the blackbird ; and two additional verses, not desirable. 
The same ballad in Lyle's Collection, 1827, " from recollection ; air plaintive and 
pastoral." It is a curious song, as one docs not well see what connexion the first 
verse with the three milkmaids has with the rest, which concerns only one. This 
is one of the many old English songs which have found their way into Scotland on 
one side, and into Cornwall on the other. A broadside version of this ballad in 
nine stanzas, printed by Williamson, of Newcastle. In this, the last verse begins: 

" So here's a health to the bird in the bush, 
Likewise to the linnet and the thrush," &c. 

In order to preserve the charming old air it was necessary to write another 
ballad, preserving only one verse of the original. 

XCI. The Green Bed. Taken down from J. Masters, Bradstone, melody 
noted by Mr. Sheppard. The same melody set to the " Outlandish Knight," sung 
by Richard Gregory at Two Bridges, Dartmoor ; he imported into the air a phrase 
from the " British Grenadier." The " Green Bed " exists as a broadside in six 
double verses. Mr. Sheppard has re-written the ballad, as the original was poor, 
condensing the story into somewhat shorter space. The air somewhat resembles 
" The girl I left behind me." 

XCII. The Loyal Lover. Taken down from Mary Sacherley, Huckaby Bridge, 
and Anne Roberts, Scobbetor, Widdecombe. Mr. Bussell had infinite labour with 
this air, which we had first from Mary Sacherley, an old illiterate woman, born 
and bred on the moor, and daughter of a very famous old song-man. She sang it 
to an interminable ballad, " The Lady and the Apprentice," and never sang two 
verses alike. Four or five variations were taken from her lips, with mucli trouble, 
as she sang quickly, and could not be checked to suit the requirements of the 
notator. However, we got the same melody afterwards from Mrs. Anne Roberts, 



xl. 

now in Widdccoine, but formerly of Post Bridge in the heart of tlie moor ; she 
sang with perfect precision and always the same. 

The words exist in part in "Colin and Phccbe's Garland" (B.M., 11,621, c. 5), 
but this has only two verses. 

XCIII. The Streams of Nantsian. Taken down from Mathew Baker, a 
cripple, aged 72, who can neither read nor write, Lew Trenchard. Music noted 
down by Mr. Siieppard. Again from James Olver, Laimceston, and from Matthew 
Ford, shoemaker, Menheniot, practically the same melody. This song is " The 
Streams of lovely Nancy," of the broadsides. It was printed about 1830 by Keys 
of Devonport, with four verses, of which verse three had naught to do with the 
song. And in many broadside versions the short original, consisting of four verses 
only, is swelled out with scraps from other ballads, perfectl}' recognisable, and 
merely put in by the printer to fill up the available space. The Nancy of the 
broadsides is Nant — (something or other). Nant or Nan is firstly a falling stream, 
and then secondly a valley or glen. Nankivell is the Horse-vale, Nanteglos the 
church-dale, Nanvean is the small vale; there are hundreds of dales and streams with 
names beginning Nan or Nant, in Cornwall. Devon is Dyfneint, the Deep Vales. 

XCIV. The Drunken Maidens. Taken down from Edmund Fry, Lydford. 
Melody noted by Mr. Bussell. This is an old ballad ; it is found in " Charming Phillis' 
Garland," circ. 1710. A Breton version, given by Luzel, " Merc'hed Caudan." 

XCV. Tobacco is an Indian Weed. This is an old and famous song, originally 
written, it is conjectured, by George Withers, as Mr. Collier found a copy of it in 
a MS. of the date of James I. with his initials to it. Previous to this discovery, 
it was attributed to Ralph Erskine, who died in 1752. It is found in " Merry 
Drollery Complete," 1670, and on a broadside dated 1672. We give the tune to 
which it is sung traditionally all round Dartmoor and in Cornwall, and Mr. 
Sheppard has arranged it in canon form; but it is entirely distinct from that to 
which it is sung elsewhere, as printed by Chappell, II., 564, which is the air given 
by D'Urfey in his "Pills to purge Melancholy," 1719. 

XCVI. Fair Susan Slumbered. Music taken down from George Cole, 
quarryman, aged 76, Rundlcstone, Dartmoor. The music was noted by Mr. Sheppard. 
The words were too utterly worthless to be given here, and Mr. Sheppard has 
written a fresh copy of verses to the melody. The original words are found in 
"The Vocal Library," London, 1822; No. 1,421, "As a fair maid walked." 

XCVII. The False Lover. Words and music taken down from old Mary 
Sacherley by Mr. Sheppard. Such, among his broadsides, has two versions of it. 
The earliest begins " I courted a bonny lass on a rainy day," and is in 7 stanzas. 
It is No. 49. The other. No. 592, is a modern re-writing of the old theme. 

XCVIII. Barley Strav/, Taken down from the singing of Mr. G. H. Hurell, 
the blind organist at Chagford, as he heard it sung by a carpenter, William Beare, 
some fifteen years ago. The words were very vulgar, and consequently Mr. 
Sheppard has re-written the song. The air is of a robust character, and was better 
than the words, The air was used by A. S. Rich, without some of the most 
characteristic passages, for Hunneman's comic " Old King Cole," pub. circ. 1830. 

XCIX. Death and the Lady. Taken down from Roger Hannaford, South 
Widdecombe. Melody noted by Mr. Sheppard. The words were also sent by 
Captain Hale Monro, of Ingesdon House, Newton Abbot, as sung by an old man 
there. This is quite different from the " Dialogue of Death and the Lady," found 
in black letter broadsides, and given by Bell in his " Songs of the English 
Peasantry," p. 32. The tune to this latter is given by Cliappell, I., 167. In Carey's 
"Musical Century," 1738, is given the air of "Death and the Lady," and as "an 
old tune." But this melody and ours have nothing in common. 

C. Adam and Eve, This charming old song is a favourite with the peasantry 
throughout England, and is sung in Yorkshire and in Sussex, in Gloucester and 
the Midlands, to the same melody. Taken down by Mr. Sheppard from John 
Rickards, Lamerton. The words are printed in Bell's " Songs of the English 
Peasantry," p. 231. He says, " We have had considerable trouble in procuring a 
copy of the old song, which used, in former days, to be very popular with aged 



xli. 

people resident in the North of England. It has been long out of print, and 
handed down traditionally. By the kindness, however, of Mr. S. Swindells, printer, 
Manchester, we have bevn favoured with an ancient printed copy." In the 
original the song consists of lo verses. The earliest copy of it I know is in " The 
Lady's Evening Book of Pleasure," printed in Cow Lane, London, about 1740. It 
will be found in a collection of early Garlands and Ballad Books in the Brit. Mus., 
made by Mr. J. Bell about 1812, and called by him "The Eleemosynary Emporium." 
This air is first found in " Vocal Music, or the Songster's Companion," 2nd ed., 
1772, to the song, " Farewell, ye green fields and sweet groves," p. 92. Then it was 
taken into "The Tragedy of Tragedies, or Tom Thumb," as the air to "In hurry 
post-haste for a license," and was attributed to Dr. Arne. In " Die Familie 
Mendelsohn," Vol. 2, is a scrap by Felix Mendelsohn, dated Leipzig i6th August, 
1840, which is identical with the first four bars of this melody. 

CI. I Rode my Little Horse. Taken down from Edmund Fry, of Lydford, 
but the tune was faulty. We afterwards obtained it complete and correct from 
John Bennett, a labourer, aged 67, at Chagford. This ballad runs on the same 
lines as "Jolly Roger Twangdillo," by D'Urfey. Can it not be, substantially, the 
original, which he re-wrote in or about 1700? 

CII. The Saucy Ploughboy. Melody taken down from Will. Setter, labourer, 
Two Bridges, Dartmoor. The words he sang to this tune began : — 

" As I went down to Salisbury, 

'Twas on a market day. 
By chance I met a fair pretty maid, 

By chance all on the way. 
Her business it to market was. 

With butter, eggs, and whey. 
So we both jog on together, my boys, 

With Dcrry-down weeday." 

But, for very sufficient reasons, we could not employ the words. 

CIII. I'll build myself a gallant Ship. In our first edition we gave the Devon- 
shire form of " The Lowlands ot Holland," setting it to a second melody we had taken 
down for " The Bold Dragoon." But the accent not agreeing satisfactorily with that of 
the music, I have been compelled to -very slightly alter the words so as to agree 
with the music. 

The air was taken down by Mr. Bussell from Richard Cleave, at " The 
Forest Inn," Huckaby Bridge. Never shall I forget the occasion. Mr. 'Bussell 
and I drove across Dartmoor in winter in a furious gale of rain and wind, to Huckaby 
Bridge, in quest of an old man we had heard of there as a singer. We found 
the fellow, but he yielded nothing, and our long journey would have been fruit- 
less had we not caught Richard Cleave and obtained from him this air which cost me 
a bronchitis attack, that held me a prisoner for six weeks. 

CIV. The Everlasting Circle. A widely-known song in Devon. A version taken 
down from J. Woodrich, another from Will. Setter, Two Bridges; but the best from 
" Old Capul," i.e., William Nankivell, an aged quarryman, who for years lived under 
Roos Tor, on the River Walla above Merrivale Bridge, absolutely illiterate, but with a 
memory laden with old songs. This same song is sung by the Breton peasants. 
It is called in Brittany " Ar pare caer " (The fair field). Luzel : " Chans, pop. de 
la Basse Bretagne," 66. In the variants we have taken down, the latter part 
differs. That of Nankivell, is : — 

" And out of the baby there grew a fine lawyer, &i. ," 

" And then from the lawyer there came a fine parson, &c." 

"And out of the parson there sprang a black devil." 

Music noted down by Mr. Bussell. A copy of it in broadside. "The Tree in 
the Wood," printed by Pitts, of Seven Dials, in my possession. This begins : — 

" There was a tree grew in a wood, 
A dainty curious tree. 
For the tree was in the wood, 
And the wood was down in the valleys low." 



xlii. 

Another Devon version with air in Mason's " Nursery Rhymes and Country 
Songs," 1S77. M. Kidson tells me he has heard the sonfr sung at Oxford to " Le 
Petit Tambour," with an ending tacked on from " Rule Uritannia." 

CV. All in a Garden. Taken down from Harry Smith, Two Bridges, Dart- 
moor. Melody noted by Mr. Sheppard. The words follow so closely on " The 
Broken Token" (No. 44), that we have thought it advisable to give the melody 
a fresh copy of verses. The original began, "As Polly walked into her 
garden." 

CVI. Hunting the Hare. An old country dance, taken down from " Old 
Capul." The melody noted by Mr. Bussell. Date of the air the begining of the 
17th century. 

CVII. Dead Maid's Land. Taken down from Joseph Paddon, Holcombe 
Burnell, but he sang the words to the air we have used to No. 108. The first 
three verses were "I Sowed the Seeds"; then he branched off into what I give. 
Compare with this the Scottish ballad, "The Gardener," in Child's "English 
and Scottish Popular Ballads," Pt. VII., No. 219, but the ballad has an entirely 
different ending. We have set therefore to it an air taken down from Anne 
Roberts, of Scobbctor, Widdecombe-in-the-Moor. In the major this is a massive 
li3'mn-tune. 

CVI 1 1. "Shower and Sunshine." Air taken down from Joseph Paddon, 
Holcombe Burnell, N. Devon. New words; the original hear a certain resemblance 
to " I Sowed the Seeds of Love," and yet differ considerably from it. 
The melody is the old English air " I Sowed the Seeds of Love," in Chappell, 
IL, 522, and is interesting as a local variant. A Scottish variant is given by 
Alexander Campbell, in "Albyn's Anthology," 1816, I., p. 40. The Irish in 
Joyce's " Ancient Irish Music," No. 74. 

CIX. Haymaking Song. This quaint old carol-like song was ta^c^n down first 
from J. Woodrich. The song was his father's ; Woodrich learned it of him about 
1850, and he says it was his father's favourite song. We then got it again from 
J. Parsons. The air belongs to the same date as the May Day Carol. Wood- 
rich could not recall the first stanza, and knew only one or two complete, the 
rest in fragmentary state. Not till after I had recomposed the fragments did I 
detect the ballad in "West Country Garlands," cir. 1760 (B.M., 11,621, b. 11), 
and among the broadsheets of Pitts, about the end of last century. It 
begins " In the merry month of June." But this is the title of a well-known 
old English ballad air, different from ours. Moreover, Woodrich's air did not 
fit the printed words, and I did not like to alter the latter to fit his melody, 
as the printed ballad went to the air of its initial words. " In the merry month 
of June" will be found in "The Beggar's Wedding," 1729, air 22. 

ex. Bibberly Town. Melody taken down from John Bennett, Chagford, 
labourer, aged 68. Dr. Barrett, to whom I showed the air, believed it to be a 
variant of " Moll in the Wad," to which, about 1S28, Mr. H. Williams set his 
song of " Sarah Syke," beginning : — 

"To me, said Mother, t'other day, 

Why Giles you seem to pine away," &c. 

Mr. Sheppard and I have compared the tunes, but fail to trace the likeness, 
as far as we can judge, they are both ^ time, ind there the resemblance 
begins and ends. The words, as sung, were vulgar, the point being that 
the tinker kisses all tlie girls he meets and they pay him with " guineas of 
gold " for his kisses, and he drinks the guineas away in the tavern. Mr. Sheppard 
has written fresh words to the ballad. The " Bibberly Town " is, on the broad- 
side copies, "Beverley Town." As we have altered the words, we have thought it 
well not to take tlie title, " Beverley Town," that belongs to the original ballad as in 
print. When we have re-written a ballad, it has been to rescue the melody from 
being lost. Many an old melody, associated with undesirable words, was 
saved by Burns, Ramsay, Cunningham, &c., from disappearance by their writing 
good words to the old tunes. The grossness of the words to which it was 



xliii. 

associated drove it into the background — drove it out of memory altogetlier 
among decent people. We Iiave not had among us such kings and queens 
of song writing as Burns, Ramsay, Hogg, Tannaliill, Baronness Nairne, Lady 
Anne Barnard, &c., to give the old airs a new spell of life by associating 
tnem to imperishable words. We have not re-written words unless there were 
good cause. Many an old ballad is coarse, and many a broadside ballad is common- 
place. Songs that were thought witty in the Elizabethan and Caroline epochs, are 
no longer sufferable ; and broadside ballads are in many cases vulgarised versions of 
earlier ballads lost in their original forms. Two courses lay open to us. One is 
that adopted by Dr. Barrett and Mr. Kidson, to print the words exactly as given 
on the broadsides, with asterisks for the undesirable stanzas. There is a good deal 
to be said for this course. 

On the other hand, there is that adopted by the Scottish and Irish collectors, to re- 
write and modify where objectionable or commonplace. This has been the course we 
have adopted. It seemed to me a pity to consign the lovely old melodies to the 
antiquarian's library, by publishing them with words which were quite fatal to the 
success of the songs in the drawing-room or the concert-hall. And be it observed 
some of the best airs wers linked to the worst words, not always gross, but 
utterly commonplace. We resolved, where the old words were good, or tolerable, 
to retain them intact. When bad, to re-write, adhering as closely as possible to 
the original. Where the songs were mere broadside ballads we have had no scruple 
in doing this, for we give reference to the pressmark in the British Museum, 
where the broadside may be found, or give the number of ]\Ir. Such's series, so 
that anyone interested may purchase it for a halfpenny. When, however, the 
ballad or song seemed to be traditional, and not taken from a broadside, then we 
have printed it as truly as we could, and if we have supplied a hiatus, we frankly 
say so. 

No two singers give the same ballad exactly alike, the variations are sometimes 
so great that we suspect they are reproductions by local poets of the old themes. 
A striking instance of this is " The Masterpiece of Love Songs," that was printed 
about 1670 ; and has been reproduced by Mr. Ashton, in his " Century of Ballads." 
I have taken down one form of this, tolerably like the earliest printed form. It exists as 
a modern broadside in another. Mr. R. N. Worth has sent me another taken down 
from an old man of 87 quite different, and I have had a fourth also different from 
another singer. 

No topic is more dear to the bucolic mind than that of the young lady who 
follows her lover to sea, or in the ranks, in male costume. The earliest form of 
the first of these is perhaps " The Simple Ploughboy," No. 49. The same story 
has been re-written and re-written again and again, and reappears in a score of 
forms, the last of which is tlie fo'castle song of " In Causand Bay Lying." 

In conclusion, I may say, in the words of an old song in D'Urfey's •'Pills," 
and in "The Aviary," circ. 1730: — 

" Come buy my (old) Ballad 

I have in my Wallet. 
But 'twill not I fear please every Pallate. 

Then mark what ensu'th, 

I swear by my youth, 
Til at every Line in my Ballads is Truth: 
A Ballad of Wit, a brave Ballad of Worth, 
'Tis newly printed, and newly come forth." 



S. BARING-GOULD. 



Lew Trenchard, N. Devon, yuly, 1891. 



xliv. 



ON THE MELODIES OF SONGS OF THE WEST. 

By H. FLEETWOOD SHEPPARD. 



Of the hundred and ten melodies in this volume, about a dozen are found to have been 
already published. A few more may yet be identified with ti;nes known elsewhere, 
but the bulk can fairly claim to be regarded as traditional tunes of the West of England, 
and specially of Devonshire. 

No account can be given of the origin of folk-songs in England or abroad. 
It has no history. We know that in Greece the reapers and the sowers, the 
weavers and herdsmen, the millers and wool-carders, had their distinctive songs; 
that Britain was a song-loving country before the time of Bede; that in the 13th 
and 14th centuries the troubadours in France, and the minnesingers in Germany, 
greatly promoted the spread of song; that Scandinavia has an extensive ballad 
literature unexplored; that we owe to the Celtic race the preservation of the song- 
relics of Bards, Scalds, and Minstrels, and that the legitimate successors of these 
have been the ballad-singers of the last three centuries : all this we know, but of 
the earliest history of the people's music we know nothing. Only it is certain that, 
whilst music was being painfully developed as an art, or elaborated as a science, 
the uneducated of all countries were carolling their songs as freely as the birds ; 
and that their traditional melodies are regarded by authorities, almost without 
exception, as the productions of untaught composers, singing, as it were, by 
inspiration. 

Why should not this be so? Melody is not a progressive art, nor is any 
scientific knowledge of music necessary for the production of tunes both striking 
and touching. We see this in the early hymn-tunes of the Church, which, notwith- 
standing their strange form, are often full of beauty and expression, and instinct 
with that devotional feeling which no scientific knowledge can give. Yet these 
old tunes are no remains of any cultivated musical age : they are simply the 
inartistic efforts of devout minds to express religious emotions in song. 

The same thing happens elsewhere. In many an ancient village churcn we find 
attempts at architectural ornament, in which some native genius has striven to 
embody his idea of the beautiful. Rude though the work may be, it yet reveals 
the artistic mind. Artistic knowledge may be lacking, but the feeling is there, and 
asserts itself. So in painting. If the dawning genius of Opie and Reynolds had 
unhappily been neglected, it would have asserted itself, and served art after 
its own fashion. Or, in music, if little John Davy, who, at six years old, 
purloined the friendly smith's horseshoes to make a peal of bells, had never been 
apprenticed to " Mr. Jackson of Exeter," his gift of melody would not have 
withered away ; he would still have invented charming tunes, picking them out 
on his horseshoes, or warbling them without premeditation. So it may have 
been with tunes in this book. I see no reason for doubting that they are, 
in the main, native productions, or that in other parts of the country may be 
made similar collections of what are really the true folk-songs of England. 

Many no doubt think otherwise. M. Loquin, for instance, maintains that 
in France there are no such things as folk-songs originating with the people ; 
but that what are so-called are invariably relics of an age of musical culture. 
It may be so in France. The songs of Adam de la Hale, or de Machault, 
or Depres can hardly ever have been popular, but we may seek for inspiration 
lower down. The Ballard family, who held the sole patent for printing music 
in France from 1550 to the Revolution, published hundreds of Cliaiisous pour boire 
tt pour danscr, and these may have leavened the popular music just as Playford's 



xlv. 

Dancing Master leavened it in England, as Chappell abundantly shows. But the 
compositions of our own cultured song-writers had no such influence. You may turn 
over the pages of scores of collections of songs, printed in the last century, 
without finding any trace of such tunes as we have brought together in the 
following pages. These have a strong local flavour and a natural simplicity which are 
wholly wanting in the printed collections. M. de Coussemaker observes the same 
thing in the folk-songs of Flanders. He says " Our Flemish melodies are none 
the less freely original ; that is to say, native to the country and the offspring 
of spontaneous inspiration." Nor can one look into the folk-songs of other 
countries, Sweden for example, without perceiving that their structure, rudeness, 
anil tonality betray no signs of a cultivated musical origin. What musical culture 
within reach of the people was there before the thirteenth century ? And yet there is 
a great mass of rehgious music far older than that. Whence came the earlier Church 
hymns ? Many of them were no doubt spontaneous inspirations, and why should 
it not have been the same with secular melodies, and in a later age ? 

In these Songs of the West there are specimens of tunes composed by the 
men who sang them.* They are not the most original certainly, but what one man 
does indifferently another with greater but equally untrained gifts may do well. 
All originality is not equal. To say that ploughmen could not originate melodies 
is a mere assumption. Ploughmen have produced poetry, why not music ? Burns 
was a ploughman, Clare a farm lad, Bloomfield a shoemaker, Tannahill a weaver; 
they cultivated their gifts, but the gift was there. People do not postpone using 
their gifts until they have cultivated them any more than they postpone using 
their legs until they have learned to walk. I know a sweet singer who composed 
songs before she had learned a note of music. At seven years old a book of 
children's poems was put into her hands and she immediately began to sing them, 
making her own melodies as she went along. I took down one of these tunes, fresh 
from her childish inspiration, and here it is, as pretty a little child's song as one 
need wibh for. 



See, see how the i - ces are melt - ing a - way, The riv - er has burst from its chain ; The woods and the 



hedg-es with ver-dure look gay, j\nd dui- sles en- am - el the plain! 



It is quite conceivable that some of our West Country airs may have had a similar 
though not so juvenile an origin. But there is no longer the same call for the 
exercise of the faculty. The article is evolved by machinery, turned out by the 
thousand, and the world, rural as well as urban, is deluged with songs good, 
bad and very indifferent. No real folk-songs have been produced in the present 
century. The popular ditties of the day are imposed upon the people, but do not 
spring from them. The ballad maker's, no less than the ballad singer's, occupation 
is gone ; and in a very short time the ballads themselves will be gone also. 

The dates of these songs can no more be decided than can their origin. They 
defy chronology. Old tunes are not always quaint, nor graceful ones always new. 
Here is a tune which we might set down as a dance-tune of the iSth century: 



^ 



r*N '\v JlJ-J'^ l J-;j l ;.j.. !L!.:| l -J ^ \ ^ ll\JJ JV^ 



• We met with one Dartmoor minstrel who sang to us a composition of his own, both words and 
music ; unhappily we could make nor head nor tail of either. As a rule authorship is not 



confessed unless the production be approved. 



xlvi. 

whereas it is really a hymn • tunc of 500 years earlier, extant in a 
i3lh century MS. Assertion, therefore, is hazardous; but we may classify the 
songs in the different styles to which they apparently belong. We have heard 
them of all styles. Songs with an archaic ring in them, of the ancient church 
modes, and as old as the Wars of the Roses, or older (4, 47, 53, 73) ; common-metre 
ballad tunes of the i6th century (33, loS) ; songs of the Elizabethan era, with a 
quasi-madrigalian flavour about them (28, 78) ; songs of a didactic turn, of the 
early Stuart times (8g, 107) ; Puritan songs of the Commonwealth (g) ; jovial songs 
of the roystering Restoration days (5, 26, 68) ; tripping tunes, such as might have 
come out of Playford's Dancing Master (59, 79) ; hunting and hornpipe tunes of the 
last century (91, 106) ; songs of seafaring and shipwreck (38, 48, 52) ; songs of 
country life (83, 86, 98) ; of ploughing and reaping (61, 69) ; of haytime and harvest 
(19, 109) ; of wrestling and bell-ringing (60, 82) ; of humour, satire, sentiment, 
drinking, dancing, poaching, and love-making : all sorts and conditions of songs 
(except religious songs, which did not survive the Reformation) had their place in 
the memories of our old singers. And so had many more which had no pretence 
of being traditional : songs of the Hook, Reeve, and Dibdin school ; of the Volunteer 
epoch ; of Bishop and Braham's day ; of the London streets fifty years ago ; mock- 
rustic and dialect songs, down to songs of the present music-hall and Christy 
Minstrel type; all were offered as genuine wares for our acceptance, demanding 
some discretion, lest, instead of preserving local and traditional melodies, we should 
be merely reproducing music of widely different origin, written to sell, and imported 
in the way of trade. For no reliance was to be placed on the statements of the 
singers. The song which an old man of four-score firmly believed that he 
learned at his mother's knee in his early childhood, proved to be the composition of 
a well-known London writer thirty years later ; and the genuine Devonshire ballad, 
vouched for as the production of a talented friend forty years ago, was found to be 
one of Dibdin's, sixty years earlier ; and so we came, by degrees, to recognise the 
professional type, and to learn that songs with too much regularity in the tune, 
and too much point in the words, were never the genuine ditties of Arcadia. 

The Devonshire songs, with all their merits, do not present any strongly- 
marked melodic peculiarities or features. Less harsh than the northern, less bold 
than the Welsh tunes, their affinity is rather with those of Ireland ; but their 
character is that of Englisli music, though with a grace and softness which 
indicates their Celtic vein. Such songs as 31 or no should, perhaps, be transferred 
to Somersetshire ; their roughness is foreign to the more western county, whereas 
such tunes as 39, 70, 84, 93, 96, seem plainly native to it. 

As a characteristic song "The Bell Ringing" (82) may be cited. There is 
an indolent easy grace about this tune which is quite in keeping with the words 
and charmingly suggestive. The sunny valleys, the breezy downs, the sweet bell- 
music swelling and sinking on the soft autumn air, the old folk creeping out of 
their chimney-nooks to listen, and all employment in the little town suspended in 
the popular excitement at the contest for the hat laced with gold ; all this, told in 
a few words and illustrated by a few notes, quite calls up a picture of Devonshire life, 
and stamps the song as genuine. The narrator is unhappily slightly intoxicated, 
but no one thinks the worse of him : stern morality on that or any other score 
will in vain be looked for in Songs of the West. This very easy morality 
is perhaps one reason why the younger generation of singers takes no 
care, nor shows any readiness to hand down the songs which delighted our 
forefathers. Public opinion will not now tolerate the coarse humour, and coarser 
seiitinient of the 17th and i8th centuries; and, although we may lament the loss of 
the tunes, the singers who eschew these songs are more to be praised for their 
good ethical sense than blamed for their bad musical taste. 

Gold-laced hats went out of fashion a full hundred years ago. After that 
date folk-songs cease to be traditional, and lose their interest. The influx of 
London publications muddied the stream, and to find it pure we must remount 
higher up. But very old songs can hardly be expected to have a local or even 
national character. Whether we take those of Sweden or Portugal, Flanders or 
Ireland (before Moore tampered with them) we find them all associated with the 
Church modes. The ancient scales may be so frequently discovered in the following 



xlvii. 



songs, that it will be as well to point out 
enough. On the pianoforte, from D to D 
the Dorian mode ; E to E that of the 
G to G of the Mixolydian. Others there 
Their peculiarity is, that in each scale th 
so that no two scales are precisely alike, 
47, 73 ; the Phrygian in 4, 67 ; the Lydian 
very common, although we have given no 
down on Dartmoor. It will be observed 
key of G, it has t}F all through. 



how they may be recognised. It is easy 

, using only the white notes, is the scale ot 

Phrygian ; F to F of the Lydian ; and 

are, but these suffice for the purpose. 

e serni-tones occur m different positions, 

The Dorian mode may be traced in 

does not appear, but the Mixolydian is 

example of it. But here is one taken 

that although apparently in the modern 



Song in the Mixolydian Mode. 

J , 1-^ , ^~ 



-I — ^ r 

In Worcester-shire Town a young dam . sel did dwell, For wit and for beau - ty none could her ex- eel; His 



bride for lo be a young man court • ed her, And he by his trade was a ship's car • pen • ter. 

If the last line be played with Fj{ instead of F5, it will at once be evident 
that the tune does not belong to our key of G major, but that the flat seventh is 
intentional. So again in the following tune in the same mode : — 



I was brought up at Ex - e - ter, The place right well know I — Brought up of hon - est pa - rents, And 



reared right ten - der • !y, Till 1 be - came a rov • ing blade, Which proved my des - ti - ny. 

This use of the minor seventh, awkward as it may seem to us, finds favour 
everywhere with rural singers. The late Sir G. Macfarren laid it down * that " the 
demand of the natural ear is for a semi-tone between the leading note and the tonic, 
instead of the gross rough major second that lies between the yth and 8th degrees 
of some of the Church modes ; " and further, " that in melodies preserved by oral 
tradition, this note is always altered from what we find in early written copies ; " 
i.e., altered from a tone to a semi-tone. With all respect to so great an authority, 
experience teaches just the opposite : that it is the tendency of untaught singers 
to change the semitone into a whole tone. I believe that the natural uneducated 
ear prefers the " gross rough major second." There is an instance of it in the West 
Riding people. The hymn "Christians Awake" (H. A. M. 6i) may almost be called 
their national hymn. All Christmas-tide it is sung in every church, chapel, or 
rneeting-house, and in every home in everj' village. It is played by every itinerant 
fcand, and sung by every company of carollers or mummers. At line 4, bar 2 of 
this tune occurs an Att leading to the chord of B minor ; and wherever this 
hymn is sung without accompaniment, the gross major second is always substituted for 
the semi-tone. I have noticed it for over thirty years, and the use is becoming 
traditional. That the effect of this interval is not always disagreeable will be 
evident to all who sing Molloy's pretty song, " The Clang of the Wooden Shoon." 

Other peculiarities connected with the Church modes, such as tunes beginning 
in one key and ending in another; in major and relative minor (51); or vice versa 
(gg) ; modulation into unrelated keys (2, 53) ; endings on the dominant, or 4th or 
2nd of the scale (102), are often regarded as mistakes of the singers, whereas they are 
often marks of antiquity, and found in the folk-songs of all nations. But variations of 
tunes are frequently due to the errors of singers, and possibly to their vanity. There 
is a curious instance in the well-known song " I sowed the seeds of Love." The 



• Lectures on Harmony, 1877, p. 40. 



xlviii. 

Midland county form of the melody is given in ChappcU ; the Northern form 
in Northumbrian Minstrelsy ; and the Western form in the present volume (108). The 
tliree versions are here contrasted : the Devonshire form being reduced to 
common time for the sake of comparison, and the extension of bar 10 {vUe 
song 108) being restricted to the flourish which no doubt it originally wao. 




The identity of the tune is clear enough, but the variations could hardly 
be greater. In No. 2, phrase i begins in a different key ; in No. 3 it ends 
in a different key. No. i repeats phrase 4 ; No 2 expands it ; No. 3 omits 
it. In No. I the leading note is avoided ; in No. 2 it appears as an embellish- 
ment ; in No. 3 it is changed to the gross major second. 

Different forms of a tune seldom vary so much as this, but they do vary 
everywhere. Dr. Petrie states in his "Ancient Irish Airs" tliat in collecting them he 
hardly ever found two copies of the same tune precisely alike. 

It has not been thought necessary, because these songs were sung by simple 
folk, to make the accompaniments as simple as possible. Some require to be, and 
have been so treated ; others seem to demand a more elaborate arrangement. 
When the minstrel of old days sang a ballad like "Chevy Chase" of nearly seventy 
verses, an occasional chord to sustain the voice was all that was needed. The 
interest of the hearers lay in the story, not in the music. But when there is no 
story to tell, or when it has to be told in three verses, and becomes tedious after 
four, more prominence may well be given to the music. Songs so widely differing 
as " Brixliam Town" (9), "Sweet Nightingale" (15), "The Rout is out" (45), 
"The Gipsy Countess" (50), "Henry Martyn ' (53), "The Blue Flame" (67), 
The Rambling Sailor" (87), and " Bibberley Town" (no), surely require very 
different treatment to biing out the poetical character in the melody, and to 
impart seme interest to the accompaniment. I am sure that this is also the 
opinion of Mr. Bussell, whose valuable help and great kindness I gratefully 
acknowledge, and to whose excellent taste and musician-like writing the following 
pages bear too infrequent testimony. The melodies are preserved as faithfully 
as lay in our power, and that is the chief thing. They are far too good to be 
iDSt, and our desire has been to present them in a form acceptable to the musical 
public, and in which they may hold their own in the great competition for public 
fa\our. Should they fail to do this, they have yet another leg to stand upon ; 
and put in their plea for preservation as being not ephemeral productions (of 
whatever merit) ; but melodies which may honestly lay claim to a place in a 
national collection of the genuine songs of the English people. 

H, F. S. 



Thurnscoe Rectory, July, 1891. 



.V<^ [ 



BY CHANCE IT WAS 



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jyoi. "BY CHANCE IT WAS." 



B> fhancp it was I mt-t m\ lo^c, 

It did iiR' niiifli surprise, 
Down by a shad\ iu\rtK' ;i,ro>i\ 

Jnst as the sim did rise. 
The birds thcv sang; iig,ht glorionslv. 

And pleasant was the air; 
And there was none, save shi' aud I 
Amon^ the Flowers fair. 
2 
III dewy S'"^ss and green we vialk'd, 
She timid was aud coy; 
"Hum ean'st thou i-hoose but pity nne, 
My pretty pearl, my joy? 
How comes it that thuii stroH'st this 

Sweet maiden, tell ine true. 
Before hri<i;ht Phuei.us' glittering ray 
Has supped the morning dew?" 
3 
"I go to tend the floeks I io\e 
The ewes aud tender la;ubs. 
That pasture b\ the m\rtle grove, 

'rh\t gamlioi by their dams; 
There I eiijo_\ a pure content 

At dawning of the day." 
Then, hand in hand, \\e lovers went 
To see the flock at pli\. 
4 
And as Ml- wended doMu the read. 

I said to her, "Sweet Maid, 
Three years I in iii\ place abode 
And three more must be staved. 
The three that I am bound so fast, 

() fairest wait for me. 
And when the wear\ _\ears are past, 
I'hen married we will bel' 



Ma\ 



Three \ears are long, three times too long, 

'I'<io lenijthv the delay'.' 
then I answered iu m\ song. 

"Hope wastes them quick awa\. 
Where love is fervent, fain and fast, 

.Vnd knoweth not decay. 
There nimbly fleet the seasons past 

Accounted as one day:' 



P « *. Hi. t ' 



,y92. 



THE HUNTING OF ARSCOTT OF TETCOTT. 



H.F.S. 



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of No-vem-ber, III tni' \o;ir iif-ty-two;Tliivi' jol - ly fox-huut-ers all Soiisof (lioRliie.^. 
o'er from Peudtrrow.not foariii<; a \\A coat, 'lo havx' soiin' di -ver - sioii with Ai-s.-ottofTod-olt. 



fol- de-ri)l, liil- de -rill, Jul - de - rol Jul Sins, f"' "^^ ■""' '"' ^^ '^''' '"' '''= ■""' '"'■ 



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, \y 2. THE HUNTING OF ARSCOTT OF TETCO TT. 

(1652) 
1 
Ii] tlu' niuiith uC Novembi'f, ill tin- u-ai- riltv-twu, 
Thive jolly Fox-hniiters, all Hoiisol' the Blue, 
C.irne o'er frum Peuearrov.uot fi'aritij;uwe( cu.it , 
1^0 have some (li\ersioi) ^\ith Ai'si-ntf un'tt'dtt. 

Siii<;-, Fol da rol de rol, lol rie rol iol 

Sill" , Ful fie rol de rol, lol de rul lol fol lul . 
Came o'er Crom Pencarrow, not f" uriuj; a «et eoat , 
To ha\e Some diversion Mith Aiseott of Tetfott. 

2 

The daylight Mas rLm iiiii<i, rij;ht radi ui( flio morn, 
Wheu Arseott of Teteott he Minded his horn; 
He hleM siieh a flonrish, so loud in the h ill, 
The rafters resounded, and danrcd to thr c.ill. 
Siii^, Fol derol de rol, &e: 
3 
In til'' kill-hen the servants, in kennrl the hoiinrls, 
lu the stahle the horses were ronsed by thi' sounds, 
On Black-Cap in saddle sat Arsi-ott ,"To day 
I will shou \ou <^ood sport, lids. Hark! I'oIIom, away ?" 
Sin'^, Fol de rol de lol, &e: 
* 4 :;■,; 5 

They tried in the eoppiee.Croin Beeket to Thorn, i '■H:irk,\'iiliMn!'s lid Arscott,"Thebest ol'^ioodhminds.' 

There were Rin}i;wood and Rallv.aud Prineess and Seorn H^■iiih,^enlls.''■he shoiited,"Hi.\\ nimbly she Iwnndsf 



Theu out bounded Reynard, away they all went, 
With the wind in their tails, od a beautiful scent 

Sing, Fol de Pol de rol , &f: 
6 
They hunted o'er I.iUon*, oVr field and on moor. 
And never a hound, man or horse would *jivetfer. 
Sly Heyuard kept distance fm- iuan\ a mile. 
And no one dismounted for <j,ate or for stile. 

Sing, Fol de ml de rol, tc: 

H 

Thro' Whitstoneand Ponnilstoi'k.St Gennys they rui 
As a fireball, red, in the sea set the sun. 
Theu ont on Penkeuner — a leap, and they go, 
Full five hundred feet to the orean below. 
Sing, Fol de rol de ro|,&c: 



And nothii.g re-echoes so sweet in the valley, 
As the music of Rattler, of Phil-pot, and Rally;' 
Sin^, Foi de rol de rol, &cr 
7 
"How firdovoii mikeit?"said Simon, the Son 
"The day th.it's deidining m ill shortly lie done'.'^ire 
"Wii'll fulluu till Doom's U ly," 4110th Arscott.-Be- 
Tlie\ hear tile Atlantic with menacing roar. 
Sing, Fill de rol de rol, &c; 
9 
Wlien the full moon is shining aselear as theday. 
John Arscott still hnnteth the country, tlv) say; 
^ou may slv him mi Bl:irk-C'ip,and hear,in full i-ry 
The pack from Peiicarrow to Dazardgoby- 
Sin<4, Fol de rol de rol,&c: 



10 



When the tempest is howling, his lnoii ym may hear, 
And the ba\ of his hounds in their headlong career; 
Fur Arscott of Teteott loves hunting so well, 
That he breaks for the pastime from Heaven — or Hell. 
Sing, Fol de rol de rol, &e: 



In sinfjinK. the'^e verse- m.ty be umittfd, fi)r shurlness. 



P t .V. l.Thil.' 



Upon a Sunday iyiorning. 



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H.F.S. 




Up - 00 a Snuday morning, when Spring was iu its prime, A- 



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-lonjj the Chnich line tripping, I lieird the church hells ehime; 



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block'd the way, so san - c\. 




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JV'?-^. UPON A SUNDAY MORNING. 



Upon a Sunday morning, whf?n Spring was in its prime. 
Along the Church-lane tripping, I hnar-i the Church-bells chime, 

And there encountered Reuben, astride upon tli" »*ile. 
He blocked the way, so saucy, upon his lips a smile. 

2. 

Upon a Sunday morning, ther" came a ru'sh of bells. 
The wind was music-laden, in changeful falls and swells; 

Hh would not let me over, he held, he male me stay. 
And promise I wouii meet him again at close of day. 



Upon a Sunday evning, the ringers m th- tower. 
Were practising their changes, they rang for full an hour," 

And Keub'-n by me walking, would never let me go, 
Until a Yes 1 answered, he would not take a No. 

4. 

Again a Sunday morning, and Reuben stands by me. 
Not now in lane, but chancel, where all the folks may see. 

A gold-'n ring h** offers, as to his side i cling, 
happy Sunday morning, for us the Church-bells ring. 



p. f W. I3«.1J 



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THE TREES THEY ARE SO HIGH 

#--112 Plaintively. . ^ 



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leaves they are so green The day is past and gone, sweetheart That yon and I have 



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.r?4. THE TREES THEY ARE SO HIGH, 



All till- trees the\ are so hi^h, 

IMie li';i\es thev ;»re so y;i\en, 
Tile fl;i\ is |i:ist ;ind ^oiie, sweet-heart, 
Th;it \iiii ;iii(l I have seen. 
It is i-(iM w iiiti'i-'s iii^ht, 
YoM aiul I Millet liide aluue: 

WliiUt iin |'ivlt\ lid is _\oiing 
And is "^i'"\w'ii!^. 

2 
In :i garden as I \> ilked, 

I heard them lui^h anrl call; 
There were foiir and tN\eiit\ pla\injl' there, 
Tle\ |)la\ed with bat and hall 
() tile rain on the roof. 
Here and I must make my moan: 
M hilst iiu |jrett\ lad is \oiiiijj 
AnrI is iji'ou in<r. 

3 

I listened in the garden, 
I looked o'er the wall: 
Amidst fi\e and twenty gallants there 
My lu^e exceeded all. 

O the wind .lu the thatch. 
Here ,arid I alone mnst weep- 
Whilst my pretty lad is young; 
And is growing;. 

4 
() father, father dcr 

(ireit w riiiiii' tn mc is done, 

'I'liat I shi/iild m irried he this dav. 

IJel'ore the set el still. 

At the hnffle of the g.ile. 

Here I toss and can not sleep: 

Whilst my pi-etty I. id is young 

And is growing. 



INIy dan<,:hter, dairijhter dear. 

If better he, mure fit, 
I'll send him to the c-mirt awhile. 
To point his pretty w it. 

Bnt the snow , snoM flakes fall, 
() and I am chill as dead: 

M^'hilst mv pretty lad is yonng 
AikI is "ii-owing. 

" To let the li.vely ladies kio>\v 

They ma\ imt touch and taste, 
I'll liiiifl a Iniueh of rihlions red 
About his little waist. 

Bnt the raven hoirselv croaks, 
And I shi\er in my bed; 

Whilst m\ pretty lad is yonng 
And is growing. 

7 
I married was, alas, 
A I,idy high to be, 
lu foiirt and stall and stately hall. 
And bower of tapestry 

Bnt the bell did onl\ kncll. 
And I •.hnddered ,is one cold: 
"U'heu I wed the pretty lad 
Not done grow ing. 

8 
At seventeen he wedded was, 

A fither at eighteen, 
Atnineteou his face was white as milk. 
And then his gra\e \>as green. 

And the daisies \\i're outspi'ead. 
And bnttercnps of gold. 

O'er m\ pi'ettx lad so young 

Now eeasefl growing. 



mtv bt- oiniirfd in niiifjin^. 



P 4W. I.KH-; 



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PARSON HORG. 



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• •- SS. Boldly 



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uow maintaiu The bnrdcii of my song Sirf A sin-gle life per-forie he led Of 






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con-sti-tn - tion strong Sir Sing tal - Iv ho! sins: t;il-lv ho.' sing tal - 1> hoi why 



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zoamls Sir? He monnts his mare to hunt the hare, Sing tal - ly ho! the hnnnds Sir. 




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11 
JV.Q .5 . P A R S N HOGG. 

1 

Miss l*;ii;>iiii H'i<4<i- sliLill rj(i\> inaintaiu, 

Tin' biii(K'ii ul iiM SIIIIU-, Sir, 
A siii^li' life, pct-roi-cc he lud, 
or coiisliditidii .tr'oiiji, Sir. 

Sill- tail\-lio.' siii-,t.tll\4io.' 

Siii<i, ( ;iil\ -ho.' wh\ zorinds sir. 
Hi' inoniils his inne.ti) hiiiil the hire 
Siujj' talls-hii.' 'he huiimls, Sir . 
2 
AimI eM'r\ (l,i\ he i;oes to AI:tss, 
He I'ii-st fli.iws uii the bout, Sir, 
'rh:it shoiilfl the be.i^les i-him-e to jjiss, 
He iiiit;li( join in pursuit , Sii-.' 

Sill'.i, t;lll\-ho! vie. 

3 

Th;it P;irsoii littli lovedi (iraver, 

Ami Pdter. iii'^lit aiifl morn, Sir, 
F'or hell anil book,h,iih little care 

Hilt (le;irl\ lo\es the lioin. .Sii-. 
Sins till\-hu.' icr . 
4 
S. Stephen's l)i\,this holy man 

He went a pair to ued. Sir, 
When ,is the St'i-\ ice he be'^an 

Puss li\ th • ('hiircli-\.inl sped. Sir. 

Siiiu- tall\-l'o! !<cr. 
o 
He shut his book, come on he s.iid, 
111 pi IV and bless no more. Sir, 
He <|ie\\ his surplice o'er his he, id 
And started for the door, Sir 
Sinu; fall)- ho! Act-. 
6 
In piil|)it P.irsoti Ho^o v:,j; sti'ony;. 
He pre.iched withoiit i book. Sir, 
And to the point, and never loiiy;, 
.Viid this the text he took. Sir, 

"() talI\-hof tall\-ho.' 

Dearl\ beloved — zounds. Sir 
I mount m\ mare to hunt the hare. 
Singing t ill\-ho.' the ho,inids. Sir?" 



P £ *.ISfi,v; 



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XOLD BLOWS THE WIND SWEET-HEART" 



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ever I h;id, In §^reeu-Mood he was slain! 



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* I have moarn'd op on his grave A twelve-month and a day; 

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13 



.Y96. "COLD BLOWS THE WIND, sweet-heart: 



"Cold hlows tlu' wind (ifiii'^ht, SMei't-hcait , 

Cold are the drops ol'raiu; 
Tile very first love tlmt evn- I hid , 
In green-wood he was bliiii. 
2 
I'll do as ranch for m\ trae-love 

As any fair maiden may; 
I'll sit and monrn npon his j^iave 
A twelvemonth and a day." 
3 
A twelvemonth and a day beinj^ np, 

The ghost began to speak; 
"Why sit you here by my grave-side 
From dusk till da\\ning break?" 
4 
"() think upon the garden, love, 
Where yon and I did walk. 
The fairest f|o\^eI• that blossomed (here 
Is withered on its stalk" 
5 
"What is it that yon want of me, 

And will not let me sleep? 
Vonr salteD teai's they triekK' down 
My Minding sheet to steep'.' 



+ 



* 



11 



"Now I have monrued upon his gravi 
A twelvemonth and a day . 
I'll set my sail before the wind 
To Haft me far away. 



"Oh I «ill now redei'm the pK-dge 
The pledge that onee I gave. 
A kiss from fjfC th\ lily white lips 
Is all of yon I erave" 
7 
"Cold are m\ lips in deaf li, sweet-heart. 

My breath is earthv strong. 
If von do toneh m\ clay-eold lips. 
Vonr time will not be long!' 
8 
Then through the monld he heaved his head, 

And through the herbage green. 
There fell a frosted bramble leaf, 
It came their lips between. 
9 
"Now if yon were not trne in word. 

As now I know yoa be, 
I'd tear vou as the withered leaves. 
Are torn from off the tree. 
10 
"And well for yon that bramble-leaf 

Betwixt our lips was flnng. 
The living to the livin'j- hold. 
Dead to the dead belong." 



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"I'll set my sail before ih^' wind. 
Ere comi's the break of day, 
111 seek another lover new. 
And change my roundelay." 



f i W.l:\t;.»-.' 



14 



FLOWERS AND WEEDS 



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III my g;ar(liMi jirew pli'iity of Thymu, It wiuild flourish l)\ nijiht and l)\ day . O'er the 



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IS 



M91. FLOWERS AND WEEDS. 



Ill m\ j^.irdeii fi^rew plot:tv of 'l'li\iiu\ 

It uuiilfl fluiirish b\ iii^ht and li\ ii.i\. 
O'er the M.ill c.uno a I;uI. he to„k jII thi( I Ind , 
And stole m\ tliyiiu- ;i«.iy. 
2 
My garden uitli heartsease uas lii-i^ht. 

The pMis\ so pie'd and so '^av .■ 
One bli|j|)ed through the Ji ate, and alas? cruel fate, 
M\ heartsease took awa\. 
3 
My ^ATih'W Ji'rev* self-heal and halm. 

And speedwell tliats' liini' Inr an himr, 
Theu Mossdiiis a^^ain, () j^rieMxis n\\ piiu! 
I'm phindered of eaeh flu\ier. 
4 
There liidus in iii\ {garden the rue. 

And Lo\e-lii>s- a- bleedinj; diuops (liere. 
The h\ssop and m\rrh,the teazle' and burr, 
In place of iihissoms fair. 
5 
The willow with br.mclu's that weep, 

The thorn and the c\ press tree, 
O why were the seeds of dolorons weeds, 
'I'has scattered there by thee? 



PS w.is«.ii 



le. 



THE ROVING JOURNEYMAN. 



^V.^ 8. 



H.F.S. 



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Yljnng Jack he ^^as a j<)iiriii\ man, That 



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li^htlj sat him down. With his kit np-on his shonlffiT And a grafting knife in 



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hand; He mvil the conn-try ronnd a-Lont, A mer - ry jonr-ney - min . 



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JV^S. THE ROVING JOU R NEYIVI AN 



\'(iiiii<; J;ii'k Hl' «as a j(){irn>'\ iiiui 
'I'liut roM'il from town to tipwn, 
Aud mIumi hi''(l doiK' a jiili <ii ^^'iik, 

He lij;Iill\ s.;it him ilnw n . 
With his kit npon his shonldir, and 

A si;rartin" knife in himl, 
He ro\ed the coiintr\ rotind ahunt, 
A rneiT) juMrnr\-man. 
2 
And when he came In Exeter. 
The maidens le iped for joy; 
Said one and all, liofh short and tall. 

Here comes a ijaliant hoy 
The lady dropt her ueedle, and 

The maid her I'ryinu-paii 
Each plainly told her mnther that 
She loved the joiirnry-man. 
3 
He had not been in Exeter. 

The da\s were barely tliree. 
Before the \1a\oi-, his s^veet daiij;hter. 

She loved him di'sperately ; 
She bifl him to her mothers house, 

She toiik him l)\ the hand. 
Said siie,"M\ deari-st mother, see 
I luve tile journey -III in? " 
4 
Now iMit on thee, thon silly maid! 

Sueli folly speak no more. 
How iMirst thon love a ro\iuu; man. 
Thon ue'er hast seen before? ' 
"() mother sweet, 1 do entreat, 
I love him all I can; 
Aronnd the eoiinlr\ '^ilad I'll ro\e 
"With this \oiin'.; journey man. 
o 
He need no more fo trndfie afoot. 

He'll travel coach and pair; 
My x\ealth with me — or po\erty 
With him. content I'll share'.' 
Now fill the horn with liarleyi'orn. 

And flowing fill the cau: 
Here let ns toast the Mayor's danghter 
And the rovinji jonrueyraau. 



P 4 *. ^^n^■' 



18 



B R I X HA M TOWN 



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J>r9 9. BRIXHAMTOWN 



1 

All ye that lov,- to h^-ar 
Music pertormed in air. 
Fray list'^n. and giv*:? ear, 

To what I shall perpend . 
Concerning music, who'd, — 
-If rightly understood — 
"Not tind 'twould do him good 

To hearken and attend. 
2 
In Brixham town so rare 
For singing sweet and fair, 
Few can with us compare, 

We bear a-vay the bell. 
Extolled up and down 
By men of high renown. 
We go from toivn to town; 

And none can us excel). 
3 
There's a man in Brixhain town 
Of office, and in ayttu. 
Strove to put singing down. 

Which most of men idore. 
For House of God unmeet , 
The voice and orpan sweet.' 
Wh«!n pious men do meet, 

To praise their God before. 
4 
Go question Holy writ, 
.4nd you will find in it. 
That seemly 'tis and fit. 

To praise and hymn the Lord . 
On cymbal and on lute, 
On organ and on flute, 
With voices sweet, that suit, 

All in a fair concord . 



In Samuel you may read 
How one was troubled. 
Was troubled indeed. 

Who crown and sceptre bore; 
An evil spirit lay 
On his mind both night and day. 
That would not go away. 

And vexi' ) him very sore. 
H 
Then up and uttered one. 
Said, ".Jesse hath a son, 
Of singers next to none ; 

David his name they say " 
"So Send for David, fleet- 
To make me music sweet. 
That the spirit may retreat, 

A nd go fro n me away :' 
7 
Now when that Divid, hi 
Kin« Saul had coine to see. 
And played merrily- 

Upon his strinf^ed harp. 
Th-; Devil in all speed. 
With music ill agreed. 
From Saul the Kint;, he fleed. 

Impatient to depart 
8 
So now, my friends, adieu! 
I hope that all of you 
Will pull most strong and true. 

In strain to serve the Lord. 
God prosper us, that we. 
Like anjels .niy a»ree. 
In sinking merrily 

In tune and in accord. 



F iw. r.\fi.^? 



20 



BROOM GREEN BROOM 



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in his bed till 'twas noon, bright noon.' 



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21 



X?10. GREEN BROOM 



1 

ThriT WIS ;ill old III. Ill liu'd iiiit ill the winid. 

His h'.ulr Was ;i-<-ii tt i ii'^ nj' liiimni. ^rcii] BriMini; 

Ho li 1(1 liiit olK' sun withmit tliiilt, wil limit ^'jod, 
Wliu lay ill his l)ud till tw. is nnmi, liii^lif noon. 

2 
Tlu; old mill auoke, one mornin<; nid sjiokc. 

Hi' sv\oic hi' would fire the room, tint room, 

ir his John would not riso and open his eyes, 

And awav to the wiiod to cut Broom, u;-i"i'iMi Broom. 

3 

So Johnny arose, and he slipju'd uii his clolhes, 

And a\\a\ to the wood to cut Bi'oom ^rei'ii F?rnom, 
He sh.i r])''ned his knives, for once he contrives 

I o cut a ^reat liniidle of B moiii , '^i-eeii Broom. 

4 
When Johnny passed under a l.idy's line house- 
Passed undei- a lady's fine room, fine room. 
She ealle(l to he|- maid, "(to fetch me," she said. 

"(ro letch me the hoy th.it sells Broom, ;:;reeu Broom 

5 

When Johnny came into the l.uU's fine house, 

And stooi] in the lad\'s fine room, fine icMim,- 
'Yoiin<4 Johnny," she said, "Will yon iiive np \oiir trade. 
And marry i lad\ in hioijm , full Moom?" 

H 
Johnny 'i»vi' his consent, and to church they both went. 

And he wedded the lad\ in bloom, full bloom. 
At market ami fair, all folks do declare. 

There is none like the Boy that sold Broom, green Broom. 



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X9 II 




AS JOHNNY WA LKED OUT 

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23 



^Pii AS JOHNNY WALKED OUT. 



Ab Johiiii\ wilki'd 'till iiiii' day 

It \\M^ i Sinn incr liiur'ii , 
Himsi'lf hv hiid beiieitli tin- sh;idi' 

All of .1 twisti'd thorn , 
AihI .is he tluTi' l;i\ lazily 

A shi'jili 'iflobs puss'd liy 
And'tvMiS) d<iwii in \"iiiK'l' \ ;ilK'\ . luvc , 

WlnM-f til' M.itci- glidrtli b\ . 
2 
'() hi\>' \oti seen d ()i-i'tt\ I'Wi- 

Tlhit hitii a tiMidcr l.imli, 
A stiM\i'd fium tlir miliard jllidc 

Tilat little Hin- iiid (I nil '{" 
"() pri'ttv uKiiil ill' iiisMiMi'd , 

'l'hi'\ [),ibsi'il as luTi' 1 111'!" 
Aiid'tw.is (liiwri ill \uihK'r \ ;ill('\ , love, 

WluTr tlu' water ^.lidetli I)}- 

SliL' waiidt'iiMl u'er the cuiiiitrv wide 

Till" shoe)) she ettiild imi ("ind; 
And miiiv tiiiub she did upbraid 

VtJiiMij J'lhiinv iu her iiiiud. 
She Noiiirht in le ii\ forest j^reeu 

She siiii^ht tlhm low and hij;h, 
And 'twas down in Mjnder valle\,lo\e, 

Where the water "lideth li\ . 



"Oh sill\ maid," yiiui',^ Johnny said 

"Alone wh\ did ym seek?" 
Her heart ^^as full of aii',;fr, a iid 

The flush \\as in her cheek 
Where one alone a\aileth nut. 

There Iwo \iiiir sliee|i in i\ ^pie, 
Aiui'tis low 11 111 \iinder \ a lle\ , loX e, 

Where (he .^aler •illdelh h\ '.' 

Then lo?tlie\ both foi-'^ot their ini'st 
Thev fniiiid what iieitlier suN;;ht, 

Two liiiiiiii hearts lon^ ki'jit apart 
Tir^elliel- iiiiv. Were brought . 

He found the words he joie^ had lacked. 

He round and held her e\e : 
And't\\as do\wi in \ under \ alle\ , l<ive , 

Where the-'water ^lideth by. 
-"■6 
Now married vi're this lo\i;iu; pair. 

And joined iii hol\ band, 
No more th('\ jjo a seekiiej; sheep. 

Together hand in hand. 
Aioiind her feet |)la\ ehildren sweet. 

Beneath the snmnier skv 
And tis down in \onder \alley. love. 

Where the water -^lideth b\ . 



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24 



THE lYI ILLERS' LAST WILL. 



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25 

.yofg. THE IVIILLERS LAST WILL 

TliiMi' wus ;» tiiillcr, ;is \iiii nIi.iII hear, 

Loujj; time he li\i'i| in De-Mnishirc 

Hi> A* as took sick iiid fliMfll\ ill. 

And had iicitiim- to »i-itc his \^ill. 

So hi' i-iiil'd ri)J his eldest sun, 

S;iid hi' INI V y.l'iss is ^ilmiist run. 

If I to thi'c iiu mill sliill ;ii\e, 

TrII iiu' ^^\\ it tnll thmril t;ikc to li\e?" 
^ 

"Father," Slid lic."lVl\ ti.imo is Jick, 

From r\i'r\ Imshri I'll take a peck . 

Fioiii every S''i*>t that I do j^rind. 

That I miN thus good living I'iud!' 

'"I'li'Mi art a lool'.' the old man said, 

"Thoii hast not half acqnired thy ti-ade. 

M\ mill to thee I ne'er Mill f^ivi' 

For h\ such toll no mau can live:' 
3 

Then he eall'd up his second son, 

S;iid he, "Mv Jilass is almost run. 

Ill til thee m\ mill shall make. 

Tell me what toll to li\e thoult take?" 

"Father \oii kuow my name is Raljth, 

From e\i'r\ bushel 111 take a half 
From i.:\cr\ ^rist th.it I do ^rind. 

That I may thus a living find I' 
4 

"Thon art a fool" tlie old man said : 

"Thou hast not half aoinired thy trade. 
My mill to thee I will not give, 
F'-r hy siicii toll 00 man may live" 
Then he call'd np his yoiin'j;est son, 
Says he, IVly glass is almost run 
If I In thee my mill shall m.ike 
Tell me uhit toll, to li\i', thi.il'lt like?" 
5 

"Father I am voiir yonngest hoy. 
In taking toll is all my joy. 
Before I uoiild good living lack, 
I'd take the \>hole — fors»eir the sack" 
"Thou art the boy," the old man said. 
"For thon hast fnll acquired the trade. 
The mill is thine," (he old mau cried. 
He laugh'd.gave np the gho'^t,and died. 



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ormond the brave 



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27 

Xo IS. ORMOND THE BRAVE. 



1 

I »m Orni'irifl the brave, did ye never ho.ir nf me? 
WIm litely v»;is driveu from my owu country. 
The\ tried me.eoiideraiied me, they plnndered my est;ite, 
For liriii^ so lo^al to Qiieeii Anne the Gre;U, 

Cryins;, ().' I am Ormoiid, >im kiio«. 

2 
O to \ii't'ry I led, ;iii(I I vauqnishcd e\ery foe. 
Some do c.ill me James Bntler, I'm Ormond , y'li kiuw, 
lam Qneen Anne's darling , and old England's delight, 
A friend to the Church , in Presh\ teri in despite. 

Crying, O ! I am Ormond, yon know. 

3 
Then aNNike Devon dogs, and arise yon Cornish cats. 
And follov* me a chasing the Hauoveriaii rats, 
They shall fly from the eonntry. ve'll gnard the British throoe. 
Have no German electors with a king, sirs, of onr omm. 

Crying, O! I am Ormoinl , you kuo\* . 

4 
O I wronged not my country as Scottish peers do. 
Nor my soldiers defrauded, of tint v\hich is (heirdne. 
All such deeds I do ahhor, hy the [Jo\^crs that are above, 
I've bei|uc;ith'd all ui\ fortune to the country I love. 

Crying, O ; 1 am Ormond, you know. 



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28 



FATHOM THE BOWL. 



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Ciniu- all \oii old minstrels where_ev _ er yoa be With cDinrados ii _' nit _ ed in 




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^? 14. FATilONl THE BOWL, 



Come all you old minstrels, wherever you be! 

With comrades united m swt^et harmony. 
Whilst the clear crystal fountain thro' England shall roll, 
O give rm- the Punch Ladle — I'll fathom the Bowl. 

2. 
Let nothing but harmony reign m your breast, 

Let comrade with comrade be ever at rest. 
Well toss off our bumper, together will troll. 
Ogive methe Punch Ladle — III fathom the Bowl. 
3. 
From France cometh Brandy, Jamaca giv-s Rum, 

Sweet oranges, lemons from Portugal come. 
Of Beer and good Cyder well also take toll 
Ogive methe Punch Ladle — 111 fathom the bowl. 
4. 
Our brothers lie drowned in the depths of the sea. 

Cold stones tor their pillows, what matters to me. 
■We'll drink to their healths, and repose to each soul. 
Ogive me the Punch Ladle — I'll fathom the Bowl. 

5. 
Our wives they may fluster as much as they please. 
Let'em scold, let'em grumble, we'll sit at our ease, 
In th" ends of our pipes we'll apply a hot coal. 
Ogive Hie the Punch Ladle— I'u fathom the Bowl. 



' < ii ^^f,^ii 



30 



SWEET NIGHTINGALE. 

Traditional Melody for Two Voices. 



.Y9 15.(1) 



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ill 
JVQ 15. SWEET NIGHTINGALE. 

] 

My sweet he:trt, conn- aloiiji. 

Don't you hear the fond soiii;" 
The sveet notes oT (he NiRhtiugule I'luw { 

Don't you hear the foucl tale, 

Or the hweet nij:^htiiigale, 
At> she sink's iu the valleys helow ? 

2 
Pretty Betty, dou't fail. 

For I'll carry your jjail 
Safe home to your cot is \\c go; 

Voii shall hear the IoikI tale 

01 the sMeet nightingale. 
As she sings iu the valle\s belnw 

3 
Pray let aie alone, 

I have hands of ray owo, 
Along with \oii Sir, I'll not go. 

To hear the fond tale 

Of the sweet nightingale. 
As she sings in (he vjJK'ys heliiw. 

4 
P ra\ sit \iiiirs(lf dow n 

With me on the y;ionnd 
.On this hauK where (he primroses groM, 

You shall h.'ar (he fond (ale 

Of the s-,»eet ni;rh(in''.ile, 
As she sings in (he valleys helow. 

5 
The collide agr*'ed , 

And wei'e married uith speed, 
And soon to the chuirh they did <;o: 

No more is she a fr.i id 

For to walk in the shade. 
Nor sit iu those valle\s belou . 



p \ f .i:((i3'; 



32 



JS-? 15. 



SWEET NIGHTINGALE 

Arranged as a Song. 



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M\ swiut heart CI iiiK' ,i _ Ion o^'Dunt ym lu'ar tin" fond soiig',Tln' swoot notesof the iii«5-ht_iii_g-:ile 

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33 



JV? 15. SWEET NIGHTINGALE. 



My sMeot lioai-t, coiiu' aldii". 
Dou't \oii hear till' I'liiifl siiiij; 
Tlu' s\\ei't tiutc!, uT the Nisi;htiiigale flow ? 
Don't vm luMi- the foud taK-, 
()l the sweet lliji^htiiiiiale, 
Ab she siii|Js iu the vallejs, helu« ? 

2 
Prett\ Betty, don't I'lil, 

For I'll i-ai-ry your jju'l 
Safe home to your fot us we go; 
You shall hear the I'oikI t ile 
or the sweet uii-htiii" ile, 
An she siiigs iu the valle\s below. 

3 
Pray let me aloue, 

I ha\e hands of m\ om n , 
Alon<^ uith \ou Sir, I'll not ^o, 
To hear the I'ond tale 
Of the sweet ui;;htin;;ale. 
As she siii'^-s in the valle\s iiehjw. 

4 
Pra\ sit MHirsi'lf dnwii 

W ith me <iu the uiiHind, 
Ori this liinK sphere the primroses "row. 
Yon shall h,Mi- the fell,! tale 
Of the s'.u'.-l nightingale, 
As she sink's in the valle\s beluu . 

5 
Thi" eon|jle agreed , 

And \(ere married with speed, 
^Vnd soon In the chnrrh they did go; 
No inoi'e is she al'r liil 
Fnr (ii walk ill the shade. 
Nor sit ill those v il!,\s heluw . 



' 1 '" r.»63-; 



•14 ■ 



WIDDICONIBE FAIR 



.Y? 16. 



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nlfl iiij.cic TdMi Cohley and all. 

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A'^i6-.WIDDIC0IV1BE FAIR. 

1 

"roni Pc.irsi', 'I'dim Piirsr, Iriid iiic mhit ^rc\ iii;iri', 
All aluiiji;, (liiwii ;ili)iiji,u"( ^ilmii;, Ice. 
For I Wiiiit for to '4(1 to V\ iildi'cniiilK' F:iir, 

Wi' Bill Bi'ower, Jan Sti-Mrr, Peter Guriiuj, F^li>r L).t\_\. Duil M hidiion. 
H;icrv H;i\\k, old Uncle Tom Cohlilcijih and alj',' 
CHORUS. Old Um-le Tom C'ol)bIei<:;li iiid all. 
2 
"Aui\ wlii'ii shall I see a^aiii iii\ ji,rtj marc i"' 

All aloiiii', ic. 
'ii\ FiidiV f>(>oii. or Saturday imoii, 
Wi' Bill Brewrr, Jan Stcwer, &c. 

S 
Then Friday came, and Saturday noon, 

All aloti;^, &c. 
But Tom Peai'se's old mate liatli not tr(/tti'd hurae, 
Wi' Bill Brewer, i:<-. 

4 
S> Tom Pearse lie )i;ot ii|) to the to|'(i'tlie hill 

All alonfi;, Scc. 
And he seed His old mare d'lwfi a mikin<i her- «ill 
Wr Bill Brewer, &e. 

5 
So Tom Pearse's old mare, her. tncK sick and died. 

All .iloiii;, ic. 
And Tom he bat do\»ii un a stone, and he crird 
Wi' Bill Brewer, Act. 

H 

Biit this isn't the I'lid o'this shoikinjii; affair. 

All ulono, &c. 
Nor, though they be dead, of the horrid career 

Of Bill Brewer, ice. 

7 
When the wind whistles eold on the moor of a niffht 

All alon^-, &e. 
Tom Pearse's old mare doth appear, gashl\ white, 

Wi' Bill Brewer, &e. 

8 
And all the lon<j night be heard skirlinii and urinns. 

All alon^, (fee. 
From Tom Peii'se's old mare in her rattlin;; hones. 

And from Bill Brewer. Jan Stewer, Peter (inrney, Peter Davy, Daiil Whtddoii, 

Harry Haw k , old Uncle T.^m CohMn-h ii.d ,11. 
CHORUS. Old Unci.- Tom CoM'ieillh .uel ill. 



!" i V.-.l.ii;;i-! 



86. 



jyp 17. 



Ye lYlAIDENS PRETTY 
For 4 Voices. 



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37 

.yj n YE MAIDENS PRETTY. 



1. 

Ve n; videns prt^ttv 
lr. town and city, 
1 pray you pity 

My mourntu! strain 
A maiden weeping, 
Her night-watch keeping. 
In grief unsieepinj; 

Makes her complain: 
fn tower I, languish 
In cold and sadness. 
Heart full of anguish. 

Eye full of tear. 
Whilst glades are ringing 
With maidens singing, 
S,veet roses bringing 

To crown the year 
2 
Thro' hills and va!Iies, 
Thro' shaded alir'vs. 
And pleached palis — 

Aim 5 of grove ; 
Among fair bov/ers, 
Midst fraf,rant flowers. 
Pass su'.'.ny hours. 

And sing of love. 

In tower 1 languish, \-c. 
3. 
■ My cruel father 
Gave straitest order, 
By watch and warder, 

I barr'd should be. 
All in my chamber, 
Hi3,h out of danger. 
From eye of ranger. 
In misery. 

In to'.^er 1 languish, jtc. 
4. 
'Enclosed in mortar. 
By wall and water, 
A luckless daughtei 

All white and 'van; 
Til! day is breaking 
My bed forsaking, 
1 all night waking 

Sing like the swan. 

In tower I languish. 
In cold and sadness. 
Heart full of anguish, 

Eye full ot tear. 
Whilst plades ar- ringing 
With maidens singing 
Sweet roses bringing. 

To crown the year." 



P t * nti.i 



3s 



THE SILLY OLD MAN. 



.V? 18. 



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X9l8. THE SILLY OLD MAN. 



1. 



A* ! Come now, I'll sing you .1 song, 
'Tis a song ot right merry intent. 
Concerning a silly olci man, 

Who went for to pay his rent, 

bingiiig. Too_rd-la.loo.ra.loo. 
•i. 
Ani as this here silly old man, 

\Nas riding along the lane, 
A Gentleman, th:ef overtook him, 
Saying "V\-ll ov'-r-taki-n old man'.' 
3. 
"VVhat! Well over-taken, do'y say?" 

"Yes, Well over taken',' '^uoth he. 
' No, no,"said the silly old man. 
"1 don't want thy company. 
4. 
"lam only a silly old man, 

I farm but a parcel of ground. 
And 1 am going to the landlord to pay, 
My rent which is just forty pnutid'.' 
5. 
"But supposing a highway -man stopped you^ 
For the rascals are many, men say. 
And take all the money from oft you 
As you riie on the king's highway'" 
6. 
"What! supposing some t'ellow should stop nie^ 
Why badK thr thief would be sped. 
For the money I carry about me 
In the quilt o'my saddle is hid'.' 
7. 
And as they were riding along. 

Along and along the green lane. 
The Gentleman thief rode afore him 
And summoned the old man to stand. 



But the old man was crafty and cunning, 
As, 1 wot, in the world there be niany 
Pitche'i his saddle clean over the hedge, 

Say ing, "Fetch' n if thou woulds't havi- anv" 
Singing Tco_ri.li.loo.ra.loo. 
9. 
Then the thief being thirsty for gold, 

And eager to get at his bags. 
He Ira'ed out his rusty old sword, 
And chopped up the saddle to rags. 
10. 
The old man slipped otf his old mare, 

And mounted the thiet's horse astride, 
Clapp'd spur, and put him in a gallop, 
tsayiug"!. without teaching, can ride',' 
11. 
When he to his landlord's had come, 

Th At old man was almost a-spent , 
Sayi he, "l.andl&rd, provide me a room. 
I be come for to pay up my rent'.' 
12. 
He opened the thief, his portmantle 

And there was a sight to behold. 
There were fi\e hundred pounds in silver. 
And five huTi ired pounds in gold. 
13. 
And as h'- was on his way hoiiie. 
And niing along the same lane. 
He seed — his ^ illy old mare. 

Tied up to the hedge by the mane. 
14. 
He loosed his old mare from the heilge, 
As she of th- .•];rass there did crib. 
He gi'ed her a whack o' the broad o' the back, 
Saying"Fcllow nie home, old Tib".' 



15. 



Aw! When to his home he were come 
His daughter he dress'd like a duchess. 

And his ol' woman kick-'d and she capered for joy, 
And at Christmas danced jigs on her crutclies. 
Singing, Too.ra.la.loo.ra.loo. 



Pi* l.-lS.li' 



40 



THE SEASONS 



.Y? 19. 



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41 



J^919. THE SEASONS. 



1. 

First comes .lanuary 

Wh'-n the sun li-is very low; 
1 See in thf! farmer's yar<i 

The cattle feed on stro" 
The weither being so cold 

The sn'-.w lies on the ground. 
There will be another change of moon 

Before the year comes round. 
■>. 
Next IS February, 

So early in the spring; 
The Farmer ploughs the fallows 

The rooks their nests begin. 
The little lambs appearing 

Now frisk in pretty play. 
1 think upon the increase, 

Anii thank my God, to-day. 

March it is the next month. 

So cold and hard and drear. 
Prepare we now for harvest. 

By brewing of strong beer. 
God grant thdt we who labour. 

May see the reaping come. 
And rirink ami dance and welcome 

The happy Harvest Home. 
4. 
Next of Months is April, 

When eaily in the morn 
The cheery farmer soweth 

To right and left the corn. 
The gallant team come after, 

A-smoothing of the land. 
May Heaven the Farmer prosper 

What-e'er he takes in hand. 
5. 
In May 1 go a walking 

To hear the linnets sing. 
The blackbird and the throstle 

A- praising God the King. 
It cheers the heart to hear them 

To see the leaves unfold. 
The meadows scattered over 

With buttercups of gold, 
tj. 
Full earlv in the morning 

Awakes the summer sun, 
The month of June arriving. 

The cold and night are done, 
The Cuckoo is a fine bird 

She whistles as she flies, 
An.1 as shp whistles. Cuckoo, 

The bluer grow the skies. 



7. 
Six months I now iiavt; named, 

The seventh is -July. 
Come lads and lasses gather 

The scented hay to dry. 
All full of mirthand gladness 

To turn it in the sun. 
And never cease till daylight sets 
And all the work is done. 
8. 
August brings the harvest. 

The reapers now advance. 
Against their shining sickles 

The field stands little chance. 
Well done'.exclaims the farmer. 

This day is all men's friend. 
We'll drink and feast in plenty 
Wh'-n We the harvest end. 
9. 
By middle of September. 
The rake is laid aside. 
The horses wear the breeching 

Rich dressing to provide. 
All things to do in season. 

Me -thinks IS just .md right. 
Now summer season's o\ er 
The frosts begin at night. 
H). 
October l^ads in winter. 

The leaves begin to fall. 
The trees will soon be naked 

No flowers left at all. 
The frosts will bite them sharply 

The Elm alone is green. 
In orchard piles of apples red 
For cyder press are seen. 
11. 
The eleventh month, November, 

The nights are cold and long, 
By day we're felling timber. 

And spend the night in song. 
In cozy chimn''y corner 

We take our toast and ale. 
And kiss and tease the maidens, 
Or tell a merry tale. 
12. 
Then comes dark December, 

The la^t of months in turn. 
V\it!i holly, box. and laurel. 

We house and Church adorn. 
So now, to end my story, 

I wish you all good cheer. 
A merry, happy Christmas, 
A prosperous New Year. 



P V * \7.(,?.i 



4 2 



THE CHIMNEY SWEEP. 



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JV9 20. THE CHIMNEY SWEEP. 



Oh.'swLH'p chimiK'v, sweep? 
Yuu inaideus sliike off sleep 
If \oii m\ cry can f'iil|in\. 
I climb the chiQiiie\ top, 
Without lidHer :iiul rope; 
Aye iiifl tlieie.'aye mn! tliere.'aM- and there yoiill hear me haUool 

2 
Arise! maids, arise! 
Uuseal and ml' your eves. 
^Vrise and do yoin- duly . 
I siiiniiiiiM yet .i^aiii. 
And do uot m.' disdain, 
That niN lall-that my e.ill-tliat my raliiusj-'s pour and sooty. 

3 
Behold.Miere I stand! 
With brnsh and scr'ipe in hand. 
As a soldier that st.mds on his sentry. 
I SMirk for the liettei' sort , 
And well they pay me for't . 
() I work, O I work, O I woi k for the best of gentry. 

4 
Oh! sweep chimni'V, sweep! 
The hiMirs onward creep. 
As the lark I am alert , I 
Clear away, and take 
The smut that others make. 
O I clean, () I clean, () I clean wh.it others dirty. 



P \ *. l.tii:^-.' 



44 



THE SAUCY SAILOR 



X!' 21. 



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X9 21 THE SAUCY SAILOR, 



"Conn- iin r.uiest, coiiir in\ dciii'st 

Love with inc. 
Comi" aiifl \oii sli ill ui'd ,i s;u'lur 

Fi'om the SL':i ." 
'"F.utli I want iiriiif of \iiuv sailoi-s," 

Slic did sa\ . 
Si* hi'^iiiii" \on saiir\ crPafiirc. 

So ln'^OIK- IVulM llic, I |jr |\ . 

2 
"Yoii are ra^-^i>d , von iic d!rt\ , 

Sllli'll uf t If. 

Get yi'ii ji,oiie to i'(ji\-i<ru eoniitries, 

Heiice iifar." 
"Ir I'm ra^zui'd . il' I'm ilirtv , 

or tar I Mnell. 
Yet there's siher in n)\ pockets, 

Aui'i of gold, i btore as well!' 
3 
When slic saw the shininif silver, 

Saw the ^'/Id ", 
Down she Iviieeled, and \cr\ hniiiMv 

Hands did fold; 
Saying "() forgive the foll^ 

From me fell, 
Tarr\ , dirtv, rag-ged sailors, 

I love more than words can tell? 
4 
'Do not think, yon chaugefnl maiden, 

I am mad. 
That I'll take yon, v^heu there's other 

To be had . 
Not the ontside coat and wuistco.it 

Make the man. 
Yon have lost the chance that offered. 

Maidens snap — when e'er yoa can' 



P i *.l:i«a-< 



46 



BLUe lYI USLIN 



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47 

X? 2 2. BLUE NIUSLIN. 



1. 

"O will you accept of the mus-e-lin so blue, 

To wear all in the morning, ami to dabbln in the df-w. 
"No, I will not accept of the mus-e-lin so blue. 

To wear all in the morning, and to dabble m the dew, 

\or I'll w.\'.k, nor TU talk-with you'.' 
2. 
"O will you accept of the prettv silver pin. 

To pm your golden hair with the fine mus-e-lini 
"No, 1 will not accept of the pretty silver pin, 

To pin my golden hair with the fine mus-e-lin. 

Nor I'll walk, nor Til tiUk-with you'.' 

3. 

"O will you accept of a pair of shoes of cork, 

j-i,^ one IS made in London, the others made '.n York. 
"No, I will not acceid of a pair of shoes of cork, 

The o,ie that's mad-' in London, the other's m^dr in York, 

Nor I'll \tdlU, norfU talk with you'.' 
4. 
"O wi'l you accept of the k^ys of Canterbury, 

Th-it uU the bells of England may ring, and make us merry? 
"No, I will not, accept of th-- keys of Canterbury, 

That ail the bells of Eni^Umd mav ring, and mak- us iTiHrry. 

Nor Til w.V.k, nor I'll talk with you? 
5. 

"o will you acc'-pt of a kiss from loving heart; 

?'' 

That A^ ina\ )oir. together and never more may part. 

"\>.s, 1 will accept of a kiss from loving heart. 

That we may join together and nev-r more may part, 

Ani l"l! walk, and i'l! talk with yoj'.' 
"When you might you would not; 
Now sou will vou shall not. 

So fare you well, my dark ev'i'i S'-i.-"' 



Tht- -Oh- llitn Inrn- h,(k ir n v. i^. > rd-r. will, liip"«.h(>es ot ciirk" llie "Silver pin" ana llif"bliu- .iiii-lli>', 
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X9 2S. THE SQUIRE AND THE FAIR MAID 
1. 

As 1 was walking out one day 
Where silver waters gU'lf^- 
1 saw a Squire 'and gentle maid, 
Down by the river's side . 
''Thou hast a fair presence;'she said, 

"Thou hast a nimble tongue'.' 
"1 would thou wert my Bride, fair maid!" 

"Kind Sir 1 am too young'.' 

CHORUS "The young'-r you are, the better you are 
The better you are t'or ncf . 
1 vow and swear, and do declare 
I'll marry none saVe thee!" 
2. 
He took her by the lily-white hand, 

He'd scarce her t'lngers press'd , 
Ere all around his neck slie hung. 

And Sank upon his breast. 
She kissed him on his cherry lips. 

She kissed his ruddy cheek, 
She stroked his flowing fla/en hair. 
No -.vords the Squire might speak. 

CHORUS. To all who seek good wives,! speak; — 
Each forward Maid eschew. 
When fishes fly as swallows high , 
Such maids as these prove true. 

3. 

Then from her arms himsell he loosed 

Hei tiiigers did unbind. 
"Fair m.ii i, you mav be urider age. 
But you are over kind, 
if 1 of marri?»ge spoke a word, 

1 bitterly it rue, 
Man loveth non^- so easy won, 
So over-fond as you. 

CHORUS. To all who seek &c. 
4. 
Go get you wher'- are gardens fair 

Then sit and weep your fill 
No man alive, I wot, will wivf' 

A maid cf forward will. 
There is a herb in vour gurd^-'n 

I think they call IT rue. 
And willows weep, o'er waters d.-ep. 
Thf'se b'' the plants for you'.' 

CHORUS. To all who seek S-c. 
5. 
She went all down to her garden. 

And sitting there did cry. 
Was ever found on God's fair ground, 

A maid so used as I . 
Whilst some, I ween, dance on th'- gre-n. 

And others widely roam, 
U-'v I must stay. Alack *hf '-lay! 
An 1 Irink my tears..' hom^." 

CHORUS. To all who se-k c. 



» t w i.ih.v; 



,r? 24: 



THE HAL-AN-TOW,oR 
Helston Furry Dance. 



Arranged bv J. MATHEWS. 



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51 

, Y0 24. THl HAL- ANTOW or 
HELSTON FURRY DANCE. 



1 

UoMii Hood uuH little John 

'IMk'V l)oth ai-i' jioiic to tin- I'.iir, ().' 
And Ml' «ill ^0 to till' Muii-y jiircii wipod. 
To set' what th.'\ .lo thrrcO! 

And lor to ch;isi',(), to cIiisl' the inick inrl doe? 
With H:il-au-toM, jolly nimlile.O, 
(/> And \\e \\ere nu as soon as the day.O, 
Di For to fetch theSainmer home, 

T The Summer, and the M.v.O.' 

o 

Nou theWiuter is a goue, O. 
2 
WhiM-e are those Spaiiiai-ds, 

That make so n;reat a boast, O! 
Why, they shall eat the )^re\ ^oose feathers, 
And we will eat the roast, ().' 

In every laud, (), the land where'er we ^o, 
With Hal-an-tow, jolly nnuhle O ' 
Chorus. And ue uere iip,&c: 

3 
As for that ;i,oiid Kni;j,ltt, S. George , 

S-lTeor^e he was a KnijJ^ht.O 
Of all the knights in Christendom! 
S.Geurjce he is the ri^ht, () .' 

Irie\er\ l.ind.O! the land whi're'er we gu, 
With Hai-aii tiiw. jolly rnrahle O 
Chorus. And we were np, jcO: 

4 
God hless Modryh Maria* 

Aiid all her power and mi^ht.O! 

And send ns peaei; in merry Entfland. 

Send peace hy day and ni^ht , () ! 

To merry England ,().' both now and ever mo' 
With Halan tow, joll\ rnmi.le O 
Cho'ij<;. Aud we were np, -te. 

Willi i., >.iiii(i: ■•'■•"••II.V i-^ Aunt >l 1 1 v 'M.i-.i~. Iml lliiv i^ pr'ibtbl.Y ■« cmrupl 
all"ialii.n fnmi the Curnish Mudryb ( \iint i Tlii~ lu>^ bf-n < l\ in(CP»1 Ik Muses 
ind Iranslilnd ln-h le tlu mnii- In fill 'iiil tli- line ".Viinl" .ind''l'nr li-".<rc titles 
' i tr . I Afi .X ■! "f revnence jf'*"" if. ('■■in->.|l niili- iicespi rtive ui lel.il innsliip. 



BLOW AWAY YE lYlORNING BREEZES. 



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Blow aw;i\ tilt' moniiiM'- kisses Blow Blow 




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I will liiki' the wheat. en llniir md (hmi s|ii|| li||<,. thehraii. 

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63 



Chorus. 




y? 25. "BLOW AWAY, YE MORNING BREEZES: 



1. 

Blow aw\y. y*^ morning breezes. 
Blow, ye win4s, H-'ii^h-ho! 
Blow away the morning kisses. 

Blow, blow, blow. 
'O thou shalt rue the very hour, 

That e'er thou knew'st the man. 
For 1 will bake the wheaten flour. 
And thou shall bake the bran'.' 
CHORUS. 

Blow away, ye inorning hrc-Zr-b jtC. 
2. 
'O thou bhalt sorrow thro" thv soul 

Thou stood st to him so near. 
For thou shalt drink the puddle loul. 
And 1 the crystal clear'.' 

CHORUS. Blow away ye morning breezes.\> 



"O thju shalt rue that e'er thou wo'ld 
Behold a love of mine. 
For thou sha'.t tup the water cold. 
But I will sup red wine'.' 

CHGRL'S. Blov% away ye morning breeze;. &f". 
4. 
"Thou shalt lament in »rief and doubt. 
Thou spake'st with him at all, 
For thou shalt wear the sorry c'.out. 
And 1 the purple pall'.' 
5. 
O thou sha't curse thy Hay of birth, 

And curse thy dam anii ure. 

For 1 shall warm me at the hear'h. 

And thou shalt feed the fire, 

CHORUS. Blow away ye morning b-eezes^JcC. 



\at>-. Ill lUf ••riKin.ll ••( llir .ili,.ie B.illiil e,u h vi-f i>. rrpeited nilli Ihr »..ri,<1i^.n of 'I !.l>..ll ii.l"'f> r"i ^|M!!'' 

Sc>. . Iliii.. aftfr tht fir..| vrr^c otni*'^, 

I shall nut rue the very hour 

That e'er I kijew th'' man 

But /will ba_ke th" wheaten tlour 

And <h(>M <:halt bake the bran. 

It seem.- iiiitie«*'-.....it \ !•• ;ninl llif^e rrp'-l il iun>. 
? S # l.1>;3? 



54 



THE HEARTY GOOD. FELLOW. 



JV« 26. 



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.35 

J^9J6. THE HEARTY GOOD FELLOW. 

1 N.i(itllod \\\\ liorso, iiiid ;iw;>y I did ride 
Till I canio tu lu .ili.'-hiiiisi' h.ti-d li\ the I'lcul-sidc, 
I cill'd Tor;! ^>it III ik'- IVotluii^ .mil liruuii, 
And I'lose liy the I'iivside' I s;i( iii\s('lf dnwn, 

SiM'4,iii^, Tol-di'H-ii|-lul-dc-n)l -ThI-cK'-i-oI doi'! 

And 1 ill iu\ pocket had ONE PENNY. 
CHORUS: Siiisj-iii;;, Tlll-dl•^•lll &r: 

2 

I s ,\\ tlu'ri' t^'i ^iMitleiiii'n |jli\iiiji ,i( dii'i', 

Tlii'\ tiHik WW tn In' sciiiu' iimIiIi'miiii uii'c. 

With iii\ s\wii'j,i'r, mil iMpiiT, and cniintouaiicr liuld, 

Thi'\ thuii*j,lit thai m\ |jnrkets were well lined v^ith ^uid, 

Sinjiin^-, ThI-, i. ■-!■,. 1- l..|-de-rul-Tul-dv'-i-n| dee! 

And I in in\ jiorket had ONE PENNY. 
CHORUS: Sinuiii-, Tnl-de-rol .tr .- 

3 

"A hi"irt\ i^iHiri rello\ ;' the\ ^aid /'|i)\eth |ila\'.' 
'"That lies with the stakes, |jreU\ si -s, that \on lay" 
Then line said "A jJiiineaV hut I said " Fi\e Puaiid,"' 
The het it WHS taken — un iiiniiey laid down. 
Sin- 111-.;^ Tul-dL'-rul-l'il-de-roi-T'il-de-nil dee! 
Aud I iu m\ pu.ket had ONE PENNY. 
chorus: Siii^iny,, Tnl-de-nii &r: 

4 

I tiiok ii|) the dire, and I threw them the mam, 
It was xei'v '^.iijil fiirinne , t h it e\eninji' . to ;;aiii; 
If the\ had a won , sirs, therfVlhcfnri Imid i-iirse 
When I threw in iianuht saw a niniu-vl'ss pnrse 

Sinj,in<i T.i!-de-rul-lul-de-riil-fMl-de-rul dee.' 

And I in m\ porket had ONE PENNV. 
CHORUS: Sinijinij, Tol-de-rol &r: 

3 

W;is e\er a mm'tal a 'jii irter as ^I'd, 

With the little of HiMiiev ;it lust that I had! 

A heart\ i.^iiiid lellnw , is must men o|)iiu' 

I uii ; SI) m\ neii;lilMMirs |ira\ ponr nut the wine, 

Siiiuini Tol-de-i-ul- lul-de-rul -Tn|-de-rn| dee ! 

And I ill iii\ |)i.i-ket had FIVE POUNDS, tia't-. 
CHORUS: Siiiiiiii^, T'.l-ile-rnl .«-.•.- 

6 

I tarried all iii<iht, and I parted uext day, 
Thinks I tn mvseli', I'll lie jojjiiiiiu- awa\ I 
I asked 1)1' thi- landlady what was iii\ hill, 
'0 II iiiuht s i\e a kiss ul' \oiir lips, if \o(i will!' 
Siii^iii'i Till lie rol hd ile i-ul T'll-de-mi dee! 
And I ill m\ p-eket had FIVE POUNDS free. 

CHORUS; Sin^in^, Tol-de-rol -lol-de-nd Tol-de-r.d-dee .' 
A:,l~liii mv pueket had FIVE POUNDS, free. 



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THE BONNY BUNCH OF ROSES 



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m^ 21. THE BONNY BUNCH OF ROSES. 
1 

B^■•^i(l^? tht' ruUiiiff ocean 

Oin' iiiDniiii^ ill the iiioiitli <il' Jiiiu', 
The t'e.ither'd warhliiiji; siiiij;!,t,.|s 
Were sueetU chuiiiijintj note and tune. 
I overheard a damsel I'air 
Coni|>laiii ill Nmrds of bitter voe, 
With It'll- (Ml (dieek, slie thifs did speak, 
lor the h()iiM\ Hniich uP Hoses, 0.' 
2 
Thi'ii ii|) and spake lier lover 

And siTas|jed the maiden liy the hand, 
HaNe |jatienee, Fairest, patieneel 
A K'tiiou I will soon eommand. 

I'll raise teu thousand soldiers hrave 

Thro' (Jain and jji'ril I will j;o 

A hrHiichvil! break, for th\ sweet sake, 

A branch uftlie Ijonny Bunch of Roses, Oj 
3 
Then sadK said his mother. 

As touu;h as truest heart of oak. 
That stem that bears the roses, 
AncI is lint easy bent or broke 

Th\ I'lther he essayed it first 
And iKiu ill Fraiii-e his he.id lies low ,• 
For shir|)est thinii, is ever borne 
hv the Ixinnv Bunch of Roses , Ol 
4 
He r.iised a mij^hty arm) 

And many nobles joined his thj-oiiji' 
With pipe and banner flung 

To pliiek the rose, he mareh'd along: 

The stem he (oiind was far too toagh 
And piercing sharp, the tln'in, I tiow 
No blossom he rent from the tree 
Allof the l)oiniv Biiiiidi of Roses, Oj 

'O mnther,dearest mother! 

I lie npoii my dying bed. 
And like nn gallant fit her 

IVIusl hide .III iiiicrowiied, humbled head. 
Let none hence forth essay to touch 
That rose so red, ur full of wof. 
With bleediiiL-- han.l hell flv the Land 

The land uf the boiinv Bunch of Roses, 0.' 



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THE Old singing-iyian 



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59 

,y'> 28. THE OLD SINGING-MAN . 
1 

1 reckon th-; days is d-'parted, 

Whsn folks ud a Iisteri'-d to ii.r;. 
And I fei^ls like as one broken-heartr;d, 

A-thinking o' what us-^i to be. 
And 1 don't know as m'lch be amended, 

Than wah in them merry old Times, 
When, wi' pipes and good ale, folks attended, 

To me and my purty old rhymes, 

CHORUS: To me and my purty old rhvmes. 
2 
'Tis true, 1 be cruel asthmatic 

I've lost every tooth I' my head; 
And my limbs b>^ that crim'd wi ' rh'-um itic 

D'rsay 1 were better in bed. 
Oh my! all the world be for readfng 

Newspapers, and books and what not; 
Sure —'tis only conceitedness breeding, 

And the old zinging man is forgot. 

CHORUS; And thr old singing man is forgot. 
3 
I reckon that 'A i my brown fiddle 

T'l f;o from this cottage to thit; 
All the youngsters 'ud danc^- in the middle, 

Their pulses and feet, pit-a-pat. 
I cu'd zing, if you'd stand me the liquor, 

Alt the night , and 'ud never give o'er 
My voice — 1 don't deny it getting thicker, 

But nev^i'r exhausting my store. 

CHORUS; But never exhausting my store. 
4 
'Tis politics now IS the fashion 

As sets folks about by the ear. 
And slops makes th^ poorest of lushing, 

No zinging for mr wi'out beer. 
1 reckon the days be departed 

For such )Olly gaffers as I, 
Folks never will ht so light-hearted 

.As they was in the days that's gone by. 

CHORUS: As they was in the days that's gone by. 
5 

Lor.' what wi' their edication. 

And me — neithi^r cypher nor write; 
But in zinging the br'St in the nation 
And give the whole parish delight 

1 be going, I reckon, full mellow 

To laiy in the Churchyard my head; 
So say — God be wi' you, old fellow.' 
The last o' tho Zing-rs is de,\1. 

CHORUS: Th- last o' the Zingers is dead. 



hO 



THE TYTHE-PIG 



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H^ith huinmii , nut tuo fusf 




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61 




jVo^g. THE TYTHE-PIG, 



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All you that Iovh a Dit ot' tun, come listen her-^ dwhil-^, 

I'll tell you of a droll dfiair, will cause you all to smile. 

The Parson dressM, all in his best, 

Cock'd haf and bushy wig, 
He went into a farmer^ house, to choose a sucking pi^ 

Good morning said the Parson; good morning, sir, to you! 

I'm come to take a sucking pig, a pig that is my due. 
2 
Th-n went the t'armer to the stye, amon'^st the piglings small, 
He chose the very wee est pig, the wee-est of them all ; 

But wh-!n the Parson saw the choice. 

How he did stamp and roar.' 
He snorted loud, he shook his wig, he almost — cursed and swore 

Good morning &c: 

3 
O then out spake the Farmer, since my offer you refuse 
Pray step into the styeyourself, that you niAy pick and choose. 

So to the st>e the Priest d:i hie, 

And there without ado. 
The old sow ran with open mouth, and grunting at huu flew. 

Good morning &;c: 

4 
She caught him by the breeches black, that loudly he did cry 
help me! help me from the sow lor surely I shall di-. 

The little pigs his waistcoat tore. 

His stockings and his shoes, 
Thi Farmer said, with bow and smile, you're welcome, sir, to choose. 

Good morning &c: 

.5 
Away the Parson scamper'd home, as fast as he could run, 
His wife was standing at the door, expecting his return. 

But when she saw him in such plight 

She fainted clean away, 
Alas! alas! the Parson said, I bitter rue this day. 

Good morning, A:C; 

Go fetch III-- down X suit of clothes, a sponge and soap, 1 pray 
And bring me, too, my greasy wig, and rub me down with hay 

Another time, 1 won't be nice. 

When gathering my dues 
Another time in sucking pigs, I will not pick and choose. 

Good morning, said the Parson, good morning, sirs, to you, 

1 will not pick a sucking pig — I leave the choice to you. 



62 



lYlY LADYE'8 COACH 



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Lady*' halli a ii-annt bloofl hoiiiKri'liat riiiiiu'tli on l)e-t<MV 

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63 

.V9 SO. MY LADYE'S COACH 
1 

MV Ladyf! hath a sabl>i coach, 

An.i horsrtstA-o ami t'our, 
My La'iy't hath a f;aunt bloo'l-lioun.i, 

Tli.it runn-'tli on b^'t■ore. 
My Lviy'''b Cjach hith iTj^idinj; plumbs, 

Til" irivt^r hith no ht^ad, 
.My La'lvr IS an ashrin vhltr;, 

As ont^ that long is ^li-a i . 
2 

Now pray st'^p m ! my Lay 1-^ salth. 

Now pray strfp in .in^i rilr;. 
I thank ther" I ha^l rath-^r walk: 

Than gath-^r to thv siHe. 
The wh'^fils go round without a sound 

Of tramp or turn ot wh-^r^ls 
As clour) at ni'i;ht,in pal-' nioonli^ht, 

Along th-^ carriag'' ste.ils. 
3 
Now priy step in! mv Lady^ saith, 

Now prithee come to m^- . 
She takes the baby from the crib, 

She sets it on h-r knee; 
The wheels go round, ic: 

4 
Now pray step in! niy Ladye saitli. 

Now pray step in Aiid ride. 
Then ijeidly pale, in waving veil. 

She takes to her the bride; 
The wheels go round, icc: 

5 
Now pray stf-p in! my Ladye saith. 

There's room I wot for you, 
She wav'd her hand, the coach did stand. 

The Squirj within she drew. 
The wheels go round Jcc: 

No'v pray step in! my Ladye saith, 

Why should'st thou trudge afoot.' 
She took the gaffer in by her. 

His crutches in the boot. 
The wheels go round A;C: 

7 
I'd rather walk a hundred miles 

.■\nd run by night and day 
Than have that carnage halt for me. 

And hear mv Ladye say 

Now pray step in and make no (iin, 

Step in with me to rid"; 
There's room Itrow, by me for you 

And all the world beside. 



P » «. |.1.'1.8.> 



r, 1 



JANS COURTSHIP. 



jV.^ si. 



H. F. S, 



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Ci'iili' ^it (|n\Mi h\ MU' and iiu sf(i_r> shill li^',- III t"II li"W tn y,i't thee .\ 




P * iV. I VIH' 



X^^.jf. JAN'S COURTSHIP. 
1 

Com^^ hither, son -JdiiJ since thou art a man, 

I'll gi'e the best counsel in life. 
Come, sit down by me, and my story shall b-', 
I'll tell how to get thee a uit'-'. 
Iss, 1 will! man- 1 will! 

Zur- I will! 
I'll tell how to ^et thee a wit-! Iss,l will! 
2 
Thy self thou must dres= m thv Sunday -go-best ; 

They'll at first turn away and be shy. 
But boldly. kiss each purtyniaid that thou see'st , 
They'll call thee th-'ir Love, by-and-bye . 
Iss, they will! man, they will! 

Zur-- they will! 
They'll call thee their love by-and-bye! Iss.th-v will! 
3 
So a courting Jan goes in his holiday clothes. 

All trim, nothing ragged and torn. 
From his hat to his hose, with a sweet yellow rose. 
He looked like a gentleman born. 
Iss he did! man he did! 

Zure he did! 
He looked like a gentlemin born! Iss he did! 
4 
The first V'r>^tty lass that -Ian did see pass 
A farmer's fat cl.iughter called Grace. 
He'd scarce said 'Ho.v doTand a kind word or two. 
Her fetched him a blap in the face. 
Iss, her did.'man, her did! 

Zure her did! 
Her fetch-d him a slap in the face! Iss, her did! 
5 
As -Jan, never le.uing o nothing at all. 

Was walking adown by the locks. 
He kiss'd the parsons wife, which stirred up a strife 
And -Ian was put into the stocks. 
Iss, he wasl man, he was! 

Zure he was! 
And Jan .vas put into the stocks ! Iss, he was! 
6 
'If this be the way. iiow to get me a wife 

Quoth Jan, I will never have none 
I'd rather live single the whole of my lite 
And horn-- to m> mammy I'll run 
Iss, 1 will! man.l will 

Zure I will! 
And home to my mammy I'll run! Iss, I will. 

> ( *.i4V8* 



THE DROWNED LOVER 



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^VC>.j^. THE DROWNED LOVER. 

1 

As I \\ IS J-\\;lllvil|u (liiwil |!\ till' s^'.|-^|)l)|■l', 

W {iiic till' "iiids \\lHstK'd hijih, iml the \\;iti*''s did ruir, 

W I.Tii' tlu' winds wliisth'd lii^h, ,iiid the waves ri^erl iimiiiKl, 

I hi'.ii'd A i\\v 111. lid mike .i Ijitil'iil suiiiid, 

Cr\iii>;', ()! iii\ lu\e is di'ciuiiedl 

INT\ lii\e must I defjloie! 
And I ik'M'r , ()! never 

Sliill M-e iii\ love iiinre.' 
2 
I ue\er n nobler, ,i (rner diil see 
A lidti in ciinr.t^e, Imt '.^'entl- tn me. 
All cNe like an e;iu|e, a lieal't iik«' a dove, 
And the sonii th.il he s.im<;- me M;is e\er of InM- 
Nou lei'\,0! iiu lu\e is dr iNuied I 

M^ lu\e must I dejiloii' J 
And I never; O.' ue\er 

Sli.ill stH! my love iimre! 
:i 
Hi' is Slink in the waters, there jii^s he ,isKn'|i, 
I uill pliinjie there is well, I will kiss his cnjil feet, 
I "ill kiss the white li|)s, onre cur il-li k'" red, 
And die.it his sidr. , I'or m\ t rin' lii\c is di'id. 

Now Irr\,()l in\ InM' is drnw lied. 

iM\ lo\e must I de|)lore 
A lid I ne\er; ().' iie\er 

Shill see m\ lo\e more! 



r i A 1 1 I 8'.< 



CHILDE THE HUNTER 



Ay -is. 



H.F. S, 




P * ^. I t !^-.' 



89 

m^S^i. CHILDE THE HUNTER 
_ 

Com-, list-en all. both Ki>;dt anl sindli 

To you a tal-e I'll t'lll , 
Whit on this hl'^ik .i:i'l barr-n moor, 

In ancii^nt -i.ivs bt-tV-U. 

It so b-Tffll. J^ I'v- hr-ar'l tpll. . 

Thtv. CdP.-.'- th» hunt-r ChiH", 
All Hay W chased on h-!dth and '.vast-. 

On Dart- .1 -moor so wiM. 

Thr; winds did blGA,th''n i-ell th-e snow, 

He ch is-ed on Fox-tor inir-e; 
H" Ijst his .vay, aul s.iv thr day. 

And wintr;r's sun -expir-^. 
4 
Cold blew th>- blast, th-e snow ifll fast, 

\nd dirk-r yx-tvi thf^ ni^ht; 
H-f vandered hlgh.h- w\nd-r>'d lo.v. 

And novh-r^ s in- a light. 
5 
In darkn''ss blind, li- could not find 

Wh-^r-e ho iscapf^ inii^ht S'"n . 
Long tim-- Ii- ti"!'-;d. no track ►'spiod, 

His 1 ibjijrs all in vam . 
fi 
His knlt> h^r drr;v, his h^rs- h- sl-w, 

A.-, on th- j^round it l.iv; 
Hf? cut full de-fip, th-r-^in to cr-ir^p. 

And tarry till thu day. 
7 
Thf winds did blow, fast irtW iW snow. 

And d\rk-:!r ^rr:.\! tli-e nt£;ht , 
Thf.n well h- wot, he hop- might not 

A :^ain to see tli ' light . 

So with ills finder iii'p'd ;n blood. 

He scribbled oi. th>! ston-s, 

"This is mv will, God it fulfil, 
\nd bun-'d be inv bjnes. 
^> 
"VVhoe'ei he b-- thit fin let h m- 
And brings to a j^rav-, 
Y\\'- lands thit no-v to me belong. 
In Flvmstock he sh.ill have." 
1(» 
Tiier? was a cross erect-.d then. 

In memory of his n.ime; 
And there it stands- in wild vaste lands. 
To t.estifv th-- sa-ne. 
/' i n. ! V.i s-.< 



7(1 



THE COTTAGE THATCHED WITH STRAW. 



.\*:^ SI. 



F. W. B, 



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.V.^ -^4. THE COTTAGE THATCHED WITH STRAW. 



" i *.l j+d-? 



In thf^ ijaysot' yorr;, th-^rr; sat at his door, 

An old t'armer. and thus sang he, 
'With my piprt and my glass, 1 wish •ivery class 

On iht earth were as well as me!' 
For he en-vi-ed not any man his lot, 
The richest, the proudest, he saw, 
For he had home brew'd — brown bread. 
And a cottage well thatch'd. with straw, 

A cottage well thatch' i with straw, 

A cottage well thatch'd with straw,- 
For he had home-brew"d, brown bread, 
And a cottage well thatch'd with straw. 
2 
My dear old dad this snug cottage had, 

And he got it, I'll tell you how. 
He won It, 1 wot, with the best coin got. 

With the sweat of an honest brow. 
Then says my old dad, 'Be careful lad 
To keep out of the lawyer's cla.v. 

So you'll have honie-trcw'd brown bread. 

And a cottage well thatch'd with straw. 

A cottage well thatch'd with straw, jcC: 
3 
The ragged, the torn, from my door 1 don't turn. 

But I give them a crust of brown,- 
And a drop of jood ale, my lad, without fail, 

For to wash the brown crust down. 
Tho' rich I may be, it may chance to me, 

Tliat misfortune should spoil mv store. 
So — I'd lack home-brew'd — brown bread, 
And a cottAge well thatch'd with straw. 

.A cottage well thatch'd with straw. i:c; 
i 
Thin in frost and snow to the Church I go. 

No matter the weather how. 
And the service and pray^i" that I put up there. 

Is to Him who spe-ds the plou'^h. 
Sunday saints, i 'feck, who cheat all the week, 

With a ranting and a c\nting jaw. 
Not for them is my home-brew'd — brown bread , 
And my cottage well thatch'd with straw. 

My cottage well thatch'd with straw 

.My cottage well thatch'd with straw. 
Not for them is my home-brew'd — brown bread, 
And my cottage well thatch'd with straw. 



72 



CICELY SWEET 



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wilt thou bi'iiiirie? Vfs i>r \(t? 




K9 66. CICELY SWEET. 



1 

HE. 
Cicely swi^et, the morn is fair. 
Wilt thou drive m-i to despair? 

Ott lidve 1 suf-d in \Min 

And now I'm come i^din, 
Wilt thou be mine, or Yes or No? 

Wilt thou be ni:ne, or Noi 

.^ 

Cicely sweet, if thou'lt love me, 
Mother'll io a deal for tlv^e . 

Herd ratlier sell her cow, 

Thar. I should die for thou. 
Wilt thou be mine, or Yes, or NoV 

Wilt thou be mine, or NoV 
•J 
Cicely sweet, you dome wrong, 
My legs be straight , my arms be strong 

I'll carry thee about, 

Thou'lt go no more afoot, 
Wilt thou be mine, .tc: 



2 

SHE. 



Prithee, Simon quit thy suit. 
All thy pains will yifl i no truit; 

Go booby, get a sack. 

To stop thy ceaseless clack 
Go for a booby, °;o,gG, go! 

Go for a booby, go! 
1 
iMother thine had best by half, 
Keep her cow and sell her calf; 

No, never for a crown; 

Will I marrv with a clown; 
Go for a booby, go, go, go! 

Go for a booby jo! 
(5 
Keep thy inns to fight in fray, 
Keep thy ■►'gs to run away; 

Ne'er will I— as I'm a lass, 

Care to ride upon an ass 
Go fo: a booby .V:c; 



P iW.H vtt»> 



74 



A SWEET PRETTY lYlAlDEN. 



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J^o S6. A SWEET PRETTY MAIDEN. 



A sM^'^'t prett\ mirVli'ii sit iiiidn- ,i tree, 
SIk' si^hi'd iiiH Slid , Wiiiild tli.it I ni irrird mi^ht lie! 
iVl \ iii.imniy is so cr.ihh'H .md iii\ didd\ is su cross 
l^h.it a hiish.tiid lor i-iTt.iiii i-niild ihmt l>r Morse. 

2 
111 drIld^^' ill thi' kitrdcu, I'll bikr .lud I 11 ln•l■v^, 
A cradle be rockinjj tlu' «e;ir\ iii;i^ht throiijih. 
A hiisbdod.he may scold, hi- is ui'k-onie,I agiue, 
If that only .i hiisbuiid be granted to me. 

3 
M\ husband iiui\ beat me, I little will mind. 
If oiilj a liusb.ind to be;tt me I find. 
My fingers I will work, I «ill work them to the bone. 
If I g^L't but .1 husband ami home of my ouu. 

4 
A husband the\ tell me will make me his slave; 
So be it if only a hiisb and I have. 
A sweet pretty maiden sat iiuder .i tree, 
Singing, coiiie and m. wry , O, come ! m.irry me! 



'kit. ins* 



7fi 



THE GREEN COCKADE. 



^9 S7. 



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77 

.yo St. THE GREEN COCKADE 
1 

Alas! my love's -rnlibtrd , 

He wears a green cockade. 
He IS ds gay a f;illant 

As any roving bUHe. 
He's gop.'' the k;ng a sen-ir.g, 

The green cookd'ie to '.vear , 
Whilst my poor h-jrt is bretkmg. 

For the love to him I bear. 
2 
"Leave ott' your gri-'t' ani sorrow. 

And quit this .ioletul strain. 
T!ir gi'-t'n co^kad" aiorns me 

Whilst ii'.arching o'er the plain. 
Whe'i 1 yturn F'.l ni.irry. 

By this cockai1>r 1 swear. 
Your hrrart t'roiu griet' must rally, 

AnA n.y departure brar." 
3 
"Fair maid, 1 bring bad tidings;' 

So lid the S'-'-g-anl say, 
"Your love was sl.in in battle. 

He sends you this to-da', , 
The 5rf;en cockile he t'loarlshed. 

Now dabbled in his gore. 
With his last kiss he sends it. 

The green cockade he wore!' 
4 
She spoki- no word her tears. 

They fell a salten tlood; 
And from th'- draggled ribbons 

Washed out the stains of Wood. 
"O mother 1 am dying! 

And when in grave I'm lail . 
Upon my bosom mother! 

Then pin tht. gr»;en cockade." 



» i *. I ; n' 



7s 



THE SAILORS FAREWELL, 



.V(' S8. 



F. W. B. 



With mark-'i ■•n.'i'i'.ix . 



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79 



jy? S8. THE SAILORS FAREWELL, 



A tlluiisainl tiiiic-s .idii'ii ! 
'Tis sad t'l |Jii-t; liiit iu'\er li'ir, 

Ynnr s.ulni- w ill in- ti'iii>. 
Aiifl must I Jilt, iiini ii'iVf v>" i>"i — 

Wliili' thntid'riii^' billows nmr ^ 
I ;im .itViicI, in\ lAMi swc^'t iiiaifl, 

Vnin- r.H-l' I'll s>'<' III) iiinrc. 
2 
'I' lie \M':i\i"rs .\\)A the t.iilnrs 
Ari.' siiKiiii;; l.tsl ,isti'i'|), 
Wliili' \M- |«Hir ')iill> siiliirs' 

Arr tnssiii<4^ 1)11 tin- (li'i'|i: 
All' (nssiiiji OH till' (lei'|), (k' II- sirl. 

Til ti'Mipi'st, iM'^i' aii'l t'o;iin; 
Wlu'ii MMs I'dii hijili, :iii(l d.n-U 1 lie sk\ , 
We tllinU on tlioM' it Iuhik' . 
3 
When J.ii-k's aslioi-i', sill' lionu' onrc mciro, 

Wi' li'id 1 iiuTi'V li I'e . 
With |)i|'i' viid }i,l is'^. ■md lnixoui liss, 

A s\M'i'tlu':irt or .1 will" ; 
Wc r.ill lor linnor iiirrri l\ , 

Wc bijiMid oiii' aiun>'\ fri'e, 
And whiMi our iiion-cys spout ;iiid ii"«iii\ 
Au I'n ^''' '-" til M'l ■ 
4 
Yofill not know w hi , c I iun.de.ir y,irl , 

But wluMi I'm on the m-.i, 
iVIy si'iTi'f thou 'jilts I will iinl'url 

III Ictti'rs homo to tb^e. 
'['Ii.' M'cri'ts, .i\c! Ill' hoirt.I s;i> , 

And lo'st of ni\ Jl'ood will. 
M\ !"id\ ini\ l;i\ just wlnMV it miv 
M\ luMl-t IS Wit h \oii still 



p i n.i I is-i 



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vV? S8. 



THE SAILORS FAREyVELL, 

(SCENA, Ouet & Cl.orus.) 



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,r?S8.JH £ SAILORS FAREWELL. 

2'.".' VERSION AS DUET .USD CUURIS. 



Tenor. Farewell', farewell , my HollvJearl 
A thousand times adieu'. 
'Tis sad to part; but never fear. 
Your sailor will be true. 
Snpr. And must you go and leave us so, 
While thund'nng billows roar. 
1 am airaid that I, sweet maid. 
Will see your face no more, 
f/iorus. Farewell.' farewell ye /sailors , .i,;^^; 

'maidens' 
A thousand times adieu! 

Tis sad to part, but never fear. 
Your r^"^'^"^^) will be true. 



^sailors 



Snpr. The weavers and the tailors 
Are snoring fast asle^^p, 
Whilst you poor sailor boy^ 
Are tossing on the deep. 
T< n. Are tossing on the d-ep, dear girls, 
In tempest, rage and foam; 
When seas run high, and dash to sky. 

We think of those at home. 
Chorus. Farewell! ferewell! £c. 

P. iw. insj 



Ttn. When Jack's ashore, safehome once more. 
We lead a merry life. 
With pipe and glass, and buxom lass, 
A sweetheart or a wife. 
.Soyir. You call for liquor merrily, 

Yo'i spend your money iree. 
And when your money's spent andgon". 

Again you go to sea. 
Chorus. Farewell! farewell.' &c. 



w^ 



THE FORSAKEN lYlAIDEN. 



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JV^a>9. THE FORSAKEN MAIDEN. 
1 

A mAideu sat ;i weepiii";; 

Down by tile sea sliore, 
Whit ;iils my pretty mistress? 
What ails my pretty mistress? 

Auil makes hei' heart sore.' 
2 
Heeanse I am a-wearv, 

A weary in mind, 
No comfort, and no pleasnre, love, 
No comfort, and no pleasnre, love 

HeDceforth can I find. 



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I'll spread my sail ot" silver, 

I'll loose my rope of silk , 
My mast is of the cypress-tree, 
Mjf mast is of the cypress-tree. 

My track is as milk . 
4 
I'll spread my sail of silver 

I'll steer toward the sim 
And thon, false lo\e wilt weep for me. 
And thon, false love wilt wtep fur me, 

For me — when I ;im gone. 



Hi 



THE BLUE KERCHIEF. 



X" W. 



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JV? 40. THE BLUE KERCHIEF. 



1 

I s i\\ a s"rct lUiiHrii trij) "Mt thi' li>,i 
Hi'ri'_\i"s wcw .IS lii.iilstijiM's .itt ri''l in^ "!' iiu- . 
Hi-'i' rlu'i'ks wciH' till" ^osl•^, til it Ciipi'l lurks in, 
With ii lioiiiiv liliir k»'ri'liii'i' tii'ii iiikIit licr cliiii . 

2 
O wheiv ;iri' yiii -ioiiii^ , iii\ I nr |ii-i'tt\ iii.iiii V 

whithi'i- s(. swift tlii'uii'^h llir (li'w (lr>'|i^? I Slid, 

1 1^0 til m\ iii'itliiT, kind sir, (mi- t,, sjiiii. 

O till' liiMiM\ hhii' kiTi-liirl 'ii'd iinik'r licr'-liiii. 

*3 
Why \u>:ir \oii tint k^MM-hicf tin! hvit ymir li>';iiU 
'Tis the roiintrv ^irlshsliiiin. kiml sir. thru she s;iiH . 
AikI till" fasliiiiii \(iiiiiii iiMiilriis will .il.v i\s I,,, ill 
Si) I wear :i hliie keii'liief tied under m\ i-liiii. 

■i 
T"i) kiss her sweet lips then I soii'^iht to iie'.;in, 
O iiav Sir! she s:iid,'ere i kiss yni winild win, 
FiM\ slmw me ,i rinu;, tlm' uf '^'ild (he iiinst thiii. 
O sljest lilne kereliief" tied under the eliiiil 

5 
Wlij weir .1 blue ken-liiel', sweet in.iideii, I saiif, 
IJecHMse the bine r-olmir is dm' nut tn l.ide, 
As u sailor's blue jaeket who lrj,hts tVii' the kitii;-, 
Su's (in li i\ iiliie kerehiel' tied iiiidei'the i-lun. 

6 
'IMle io\i' that I value is ceriain to l.ist , 
Nut fudiiitr and ehaiitjing, but ever set fast , 
That onl\ the eoloiir. m\ love sir to win, 
So u-uudbve i'roin the kereJiieC tied nnder the ehiii. 



.Vd.i, h) tinift' il in sini!;iiv^ 



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h6 



AN EVENING SO CLEAR. 



.YV 41. 



F. W. B, 



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Tm kiss tli\ snft ••luM'K With tin- faint _ est of 



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jr? //. AN EVENING SO CLEAR. 



All iMeiiiii<i so cliMi-. 

O 1 NMIIlId tll;lt I UcVc , 

'I'o kiss tli\ iiiil't i-lieek 
With thi' fiiinti'st of air. 
Thi" star til it is twiiikliii": 
So britjhtl\ iliiiM', 
I would tli.it I iiii<^ht be , 
To eii-li^htL'ii iii\ love! 

2 

If 1 ML'i'c the scMs 

Th.it alioiit the woilil run, 

I'd give thee my peails 

Not re(ailliil<i^ of one. 

If I «iiv the SiiiiiniiT, 

With l"|i)\\ers and lireeii, 

I'd garnish th\ ti'iiijiles 

And would erowii thee my niieeul 

3 

If I "ere a kiln 

All in tervuiii- ;iik1 I'l.iiin' 
Id e.itcli thee, and thon'd lie 
Cdlisuiiied ill t 111' s ; mr . 
I>llt ^)l'l'.Ul■^^• I aiii |iutllillj>' 
S.ive l^ve-total'd* Bill, 
Pr i\ t.iki' iif me , in, ike 
( ) r me just' u hat jnn will. 



-ft 

Tutiiled is liiolisli, cr.ized. 



P i *.l I H4 



88 



THE Warson Hunt, 



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H9 

^?4g. THE WARSON HUNT. 
1 

Com>; all vou jolly hunters bold, 
I'll slii^ yo'i som''tliin^ n-'w , 

'Twas in the springing of the year 

In Hi^liteen huu ired two. 
A pack of hounds from Kelly came. 

And cobs from far and ni^h, 
The hij'-.tsman swor- of oaths a score, 

This liv a Hare shall die 
2 
Th^* Sqijirewas on his silver tail 

The Kirson on his bay. 
And Surgeon Ston-; bestrode a roan. 

The huntsman rode a prey; 
And some on b.orses from the jdough , 

And such as coaches dre.i, 
But somr; were there on shinks's mare, 

And one on crutches too. 
3 
They trif-d tiie down by War-^on town, 

At last thev start the har<e, 
And full in vie-.v the hounds pursue, 

With titf and taff, and tare. 
The MASTER said, "I stake my head, 

A golden guinea lay. 
We'll kill that hire, by George, 1 swear 

Btifare the turn of day." 
4 
Long tiniK they toil'd, with s-veat were soiled. 

That Puss WIS not overtook, 
Away sh« wore to Sandry moor 

She lyap'd lull many a brook. 
The Squire he rode with whip and spur 

His gallant silver tail; 
And they on foot were hard put to't , 

.And some be^an to fail . 
5 
Thin Siid the hunters drawing rein 

That Puss US all has beat, 
A mighty run, and we well done 

Acknowlei2;e our defeat. 
And some went east, and some went west 

And some returned south, 
But not a few went into Lew 

To fill the hungry mouth. 
tt 
The Squire he opened wide his door 

The hunt to entertain, 
With beef and beer and such good cheer 

As hunters ne'er disdain. 
Then it is said, he who staked his head, 

That he would kill, that div, 
He lost his head, all night as d-ad. 
Beneath the table lav- 
7 
Then, Hey! down derry.' let's be merry! 

And drink a hunters toast 
And never swear to kill a hare. 

Lest we should rue the boast. 
Yet — should we fail,- - on flowing ale 

And punch, a royal brew. 
We do not care — let's miss our hire, 
.And lose our heads-at Lew! 



i> i «. II i^s? 



9(1 



THE GREEN BUSHES, 



JVP4.S, 



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91 

jr? 4S. THE GREEN BUSHES. 
1 

As I \\;is ;i will<iii;jj (inr mtirtiinji; in May, 
To hi'ur thu hirds uliistlu, sec l.unlikiiis it |)l;ij, 
I spied a fuirdnmsel, O s\M'ctlv saii<j, slie — 
'Du\Mi y>\ till' j^u'L'ii biislir-- In- thinks tu tni'i't me.' 

2 
'O whi'i'e are you nnin^. my sweet prett\ maid?' 
'My lo\er I'm seekinjj, kind sir,' she said 
Shall I be your lover, and will jon agree, 
To forsake the old love, and forgather with me? 

3 
'I'll bny yon fine beavers, a ija\ silken ii:owri. 
With fur beliiwed |)etti('oats flounced (o the g-romid, 
If \oirU leave your old lo\e,and followinjj me, 
Forsake the j^reeri bushes, where he wails for thee?' 

4 
'Quick, let iis be moviuji, from nnder the trees, 
Qniek, let ns be inovinsi;, kind sir, if yon please; 
For yonder my trne love is comiMg, I see, 
Down by the green bashes He thinks to meet me'. 

5 
The old lo\e arrived, the maiden was gone 
He sighed very deeply , he sighed all alone. 

She is on with another, before off with me, 
So, adien, ye green bnshes for ever '.' said he. 

6 

I'll be as a schoolboy, I'll frolic and play, 
No false hearted maiden shall tronble my day, 
Untronbled at night, I will slnmber and snore 
So, adien. \e green bnshes! I'll fool it no more. 



P t W. ]\%tt} 



92 



THE BROKEN TOKEN. 



.V." 44. 



H. F. S. 



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M.-1 

^P44. THE BROKEN TOKEN. 



1 

Onf^ summeir rjv^ning , a maiil'^n fair 
VVjs walking forth in the balmy air, 
5hrt met a sailor upon the way; 

'Mallen stay' he whispered, 
'Maiden stay'h-' whispered 

'O pretty miiden, stay!' 
2 
Why art thou walking abroad alone? 
The stars are shining, the day is done', 
O th-in her tears they be^an to flow 
For a dark eyed sailor. 
For a dark eyed sailor 

Had fill:;d her heart with woe. 
3 
'Three years are pass'd since he left this land, 
A ring of gold he took off my hand, 
He broke th-? token, a half to keep. 
Half he bade ni-; tr-;a5ure, 
H.ilf he bade me treasure. 

Then crossed the briny deep'. 
4 
'O drive him danibel from out your mind. 
For men are changeful as is the. wind. 
And love inconstant will quickly grow 
Cold as winter morning 
Cold IS winter morning 

When lands ar- uhite with snow'. 
5 
'Abov-e the snoA' is the holly seen, 
In bitter blast it abldeth green. 
And blood red drops it a? berries bears 
So mv aching bosom , 
So my aching bosom. 

Its truth and sorrow wears'. 
6 
Then half the ring did the sailor show, 
Away with weeping and sorrow now! 
In bands of mirriage united we 

Like the broken Token 
Like the broken Token 

In one shall welded be. 



p t *.ine. ! 



7-4 



THE ROUT IS OUT. 






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JVP^^. THE ROUT IS OUT. 

A mirisummr;r morning fr-^sh and bright. 

And all th^; world is gay, 
The Rout it is out, we must j11 turn out, 

The Idds they march dway. 
The pretty maids are left in town. 

They look from the windows hlp;h, 
They stand in th-' 'Street, they crowd in the door. 
With m^ny a tear and sigh, 

Singing, Adieu, my boys. Adieu! my boys! 

Adieu, ray boys, adieu! 
Alack the day, th^-\- be going away! 
Pray girls what shall we do! 
2 
O bind them posies ot' pleasant flowers, 

Ot Marjoram, mint, and rue. 
And blow them kisses, to tike away, 

As favours to wear — of you . 
And wavr; the kerchiefs from off your necks. 

And ribbons about them bind: 
And bid them never. O ne'er forget 
The pretty maids left behind 
Singing. Adieu &c: 
3 
My -lohnny, a bonnet , he swore would buy 

The bravest in all the town, 
But no>v my .Johnny must march away, 

1 know not whither bound. 
He'd dress me, he saldi 'n velvet red. 

He'd wran'ile my hair in blue, 
.And now he is gone from me along 
I doubt if lie will prove true 
Singing, .-\ lieu &c: 
4 
O, why av'^ you looking so sad , my child ! 

why does your colour change! 

im thinking of .fohnny, who's march'd away 

1 know not where to range. 

My lover he was a gallant blade. 

He warbled a merry lay. 
And now am 1 sa I, for my pretty lad 

So far, O! so far away! 

Singing, Adieu 'i-.c : 



9fi 



DRINKING SONG. 



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Xo 4-6 WHY SHOULD WE BE DULLARDS SAD. 

V\ hy should wr; be dullards sad. 

Whilst on earth we moulder' 

See the gay the ^oo 1 the glad, 

Every day grow older. 
Fill the tlask sweet music bring, 

Joy shall quickly find us, 

VVfi will sh&ut and laugh and sing. 

And cast dull care behind us. 

Chorus: Fill the flask, &c 
2 
Hail good comrades every one, 

Round the polished table. 
Pass the bottle with the sun. 

Drink, sirs, whilst y-'re able. 
Life is but a little span. 

Full ot painful »hinking, 
Let us live a= fits a man. 
All good liquors drinking . 

Chorus: Fill the flask, &c. 
3 
Uh-n at fUncle Tom'sl* we meet, 

A glass to take together. 
Hand in hand, in union sweet, 

Friendship we'll keep ever. 
We're no moles throughout the night 

Blind Ln darkness groping, 

But are crickets, son? of light' 

Singing, chirping, toping! 

Chorus; Fill the flask, a:c 
4 
[UncleJ brim the flowing bowl. 

Here's to '•ach good liver 
Harmony pervade the soul. 

Discord enter never) 
Fill the flask, sweet music bring 

Joy shall quickly find us. 
W" Hill shout and laugh, and sing. 
And cast dull care behind us. 

Chorus; Fill the tlask, ic. 
Same ^f hf>-.f r,r of nl'ir- ■ hi-^n h'r- 



9» 



lYlAY-DAY CAROL 



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9S» 

JV^47. IVIAY-DAY CAROL . 
1 

A\'d.kc;,ye prritty maids, awake-, 

R-jtVeshed from drowsy dr^jam, 
And histe to dairy houst^ . and tik" 
Kor us I dish ot' cr-eam. 
2 
If not a dish of y-llow cr-aiii, 

Th^n give us kisses three 
The woodland bower is whit-- rith flower, 
And green is every tree. 
3 
A branch of May we b-.»r about 

Before the door it stands; 
There's not a sprout unbudiied out, 
The work oi God's 07. n hands. 
4 
Awake, d-v »ke ye prettv maids, 

And take th-- May-bush in, 
Or 'twill be (^one ere tomorrow iiurn , 
And you'll have none -vithin . 
5 
Throughout the night, before the light, 

There fell the dew or rain. 
It twinkles brn^ht on M.n bush white. 
It sparkles on ftie plain. 
6 
The heavenly gites are open wide 
To let ''SCape th- d-v, 
And heavenly grace fills on each place 
It drops on us and you. 
7 
The life of mm is but a span. 

He blossoms as a flower. 
He makes no stay, is here to day. 
And vanisli'd in an hour. 
8 
My song is done, I must be gone. 

Nor make a longer st.jy. 
God blnss you all, both great a;id small. 
And send you gladsome May. 

^ V?rspv6&7,6(;i./ *h-r-> h'lO" 4— ;i o^h-rs of/U- moralhin-7 nif.'ir-^ w-r^ald-'l wh-n fh- chiiracf-T 
of th" May-Dai/ vi-.it was altT-'dfnm one y//o'/T.s to th-ir sw-'-t-ffurts into on^ ofchillr-'n seek- 
inn May-Crift-:. Th'-n 'h" 'Kisses thr^^' wr-^ changed to "Pennies on- or r/iree." 

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NANCY. 



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,Y9 48. NANCY. 

1 

My ow n prettv N im y 
Mj liAP iiid ik'lijjlit ; 

This is till- kind Ictti-r 
To \iiii I inil ill- . 

It is til iiil'onn ym, 

AVIuM-OMT I tjo , 

III ti'm|M'st , ill liittle 
I'm t'lithl'iii to \cin . 



When hlnst'riiiji; and rortfinfij 

We're tossed jbotit 
Five hundred hright sailors. 

All sturdy and stout , 
One moment deep pinnjied, 

Theu hijjh in the air, 
To see my sweet Naiiey 

I aliuosc despair-. 
3 
We fonght with a Spauiard, 

A galleon of pride , 
With entlass and pike, love, 

We elimbed op her side 
We fonght as sea lions, 

Tlie di'uk ran with lilinnl 
But soon all was over. 

And \ ictors we stoorl . 
4 
Stuiiii , lidttle, all ended, 

ir (rod spares mir jiws, 
We'll come to our sweethearts, 

Our children .ind w ives. 
A health to sweet Nancy." 

I <lrink on the main , 
(i'ld solid me to Nauey , 

And Em,:^! ind ajj'iin- 



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LULU BY. 

1st Version. 



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X94-9. LULLABYE. 



Sh'i'|) liili\ sli'('|).' 

D 111 is imt iii'^h , 
TdSSi'd oil till' (lirlJ, 

LiiI-1n!-.i-Ii\ ! 
IVliKiii ;>li i II ill >i iirjiilii , 

Dm puiiiii (if iliu . 
Ouh hinit ill iiiiilit 

T(i-\\!iit' t.i-«li..u! 
2 
Slci'p ,b,ili\, sK'i'|).' 

Did is itw .i\ , 

TusmmI nil t lu' 'Iri'p , 

Lull k I II ii lur (l.i\ . 
Ill the lu'diii' l'ii\i 

(i liiw -NMii'ins ,il i'_;lit , 
U i\ II K't s t'l(i\\ , 

A II til riiiiu li I lu' iiii;lit . 
3 
SKh'|) hiliy slri'|j! 

D^id is ai'ur, 

Tnssi'd (III till' ili'('|) , 

A\ it I- hill;;- I stiir. 
f ' lock •i;iiiii'j;-tir K , 

T Ilk, -ill I lu' ill rk . 
On till hi' nth - rink! - 

Dii's the list s|i;iik . 



Sli'i'|) , li.ili\ , sli'('|) ! 

Wli it ! lii.t i u ink) 
Dill 111! ihi' di'r|i. 

Wli.t «in llr Ihinki" 
B,ili\ d<' 11", situn 

D.ldil\ uill rdiiH', 

iJrinji;iiii; rrA slin.iii 
For li.iliy it linino ■ 



' \ W. II IS.' 



JVP 4.9.(2.) 



104 

LULLABY. 

2nd Version with N'i'iljn 



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105 



y^^-O. LULLABYE. 



SK'l'p b:ll>\ sli'l'p! 

Dad i^ nut iiij;h , 
Tossed on the ili'ep, 

Liil-l(rl-a-l»> ! 
IVlooii sli i II ill j; liri'^ht , 

Dioppiiijj, of Aitw . 
Owls hodt it 11 iiifiht 

To-whit.' to-\vhi)o! 



Sleep .baby, sleep; 
Darl is aw a\ , 

Tussed III) the deep , 

Lookiiiff f"<ir day. 
Ill the hed^e row 

(iliiw-wonns alight, 
Ri\iilets t'low, 

All through the iiig-ht 
3 
Sleep baby sleep! 

Dad is afar. 
Tossed 01) the deep, 

Watching a star. 
Clock goiug-tiik. 

Tack,- in the dark . 
On the hearth - click ! - 

Dies the last spark . 
4 
Sleep .baby, sleep! 

What! tlot a uiiik.' 
Dail (III- the del' (I. 

What will he think? 
Bab\ dear, soiui 

Daddy will I'oaie, 
Uriiigiiiir re<l shooti 

For 1' ih^ at home . 



Pi *.ii i-s," 



loK 



THE GIPSY COUNTESS, 
Part 1. 



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107 

^-OSO.IHI GIPSY COUNTESS. 

PART. 1 . 
1. 

Th'ir'! cdiii''. an Earl a rHing by, 

A i^ipsy maid espy^-i h-e; 
"0 nut-brown maid, from grer;n wood glade, 

prith.i>; corns along with me!' 

'"In greenwood glade, fair Sir .'" she said, 

1 am so blythe, as bird so gay. 

In tliy castle tall, in bower and hall, 
I fear for grief I'd pine away." 
2 
"Thou shalt no more be set in stocks. 

And tramp about from town to tovn, 
But thou i-hilt ride in pomp and pride 
In velvet red and broidered gown'.' 
"My brothers three no more I'd see, 

If that 1 Went with thee, 1 trow. 
They sing me to sleep, with songs so sweet , 
They sing as on our way we go." 
3 
-Thou shilt not be torn by thistle and thorn. 
With thy bare feet all in the dew. 
But shoes shall wear of Spanish leather 
And silken stockings all of blue." 
" 1 will not go to thy castle high, 

For thou wilt weary soon, I know. 
Of the gipsy maid, from green-wood glade. 
And drive her forth in rain and snow." 
4 
"All night you Ii-^ neath the starry sky 

In riin an! snow vou trudge all day. 
But thy brown head, m a feather bed. 
When left the gipsies, thou shalt lay." 
"1 love to lie 'neath the stirry sky, 

I do not heed the snow and rain. 
But fickl-- is wind, I fear to find 

Tlie man who now my h'-art would gain'.' 
5 
''1 will thee wd, sweet maid," he said, 
"1 will thee wed with a golden ring, 
" Thy days shall be spent in merriment ,- 

For us the marriage bells shall swing." 
The dog did howl, and screech'd the owl, 

Th- raven croiked, the night-wind sighed; 
The wedding bell from the steeple fell. 
As home the Earl did bear his bride. 



P J W. 14 18'> 



108 



THE GIPSY COUNTESS. 
Part II. 



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10 y 

X'.'oO. THE GIPSY COUNTESS 



PART 2. 

Thi>!f- Gipsi^jK stoo'i at th.i Cdstln gate, 

Th«y sang so high, th^y sang so low. 
Th.' lady satu in her chamb-^r iate, 
Hrir h-^art it iD'ilted away as sno'v, 
Away as snow, 
H-r li-^art it melt-^d iway as snow. 
2 

Th-iy sang so swe-it ,• th^jy sang so shrill, 

That fast her t-ars b^gan to flow . 
.And slw laid down hnir silken gown, 
Her golden rings, and all her show, 

All her shoiv icC : 
* 3 
She plucked off her high-heeled shoes, 

A -made of Spanish leather, O. 
She would in the street; with her bare, bare feet; 
All out in th-- wind and weatlier, O. 
Weather, O! jbcr 
I 
She-took in hand but a one posie. 

The wildest flowers that do grow. 
.And down the stair. went the lady fair, 
To go away with the gipsies, O! 

The gipsies O.' JcC: 
5 
At past midnight her lord came home, 

.And where his lady w.is a'ouM know; 
The Servants r^\died on -very side, 
She's gonti away with the gipsies, O! 

The gipsies, O; &c: 
='•- H 
Then he rode high, an 1 he rod" low, 

.And over hill and vale, 1 tro.v. 
Until he espied his fair young brlie, 
Who'd gone away with the gipsies, O! 
The gipsies, O! .ScC: 
'■•= 7 
<) will you leave your house an^i lands, 

Your golden treasures for to go. 
Away trom vour lord that weareth a sword. 
To follow along with the gipsres, O.' 

The gipsies O! &c : 
8 

1 will leave my house and lands. 
My golden treasures for to go, 

1 love not my lord that weareth a SAfOrd, 
I'll follow along with the gipsies, O! 

The gipsies O! &c ; 
9 
'Nay, thou shalt not!' then he drew, I wot. 
The sword that hung at his saddl-' bow, 
And once he smote on her lily-white throat, 
And there her red blood down did flow 
Down did flow, &c: 
10 
Then dipp'd in blood was the posie good, 

That was of the wildest flowers that blow. 
She sank on her side , and so she died , 
For she would away with the gipsies O; 
The gipsies OJ 
For she would away with the gipsies O! 

II is? :"; / n sin'jiiui. th-'s" man />■■ omi^f-'^l. 



Ill 



The crey iyiare. 



JVP 51. 



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jXP 51. THE GREr. MARE 



1 

Young, kj^e-i , tliri Miller, w-'nt courting oi late 
A tirii.-.r's sweet 'IdUghter called B-dutit'ul Kate; 
Now Kitty was buxom, and bonny and fair, 
Had plenty of humour, ot' trolic a share, 
And her t.tfh-:r possessed an uncommon grey mare, 

A grey mare, a grey mare 
An uncommon grey mare. 
2 

So Koger he dressed himselt' up as a beau, 

He comb'd down his locks, and in collars of snow, 

H- went to th- firmer, and said,"Hov d'v dol 

1 love pretty Kitty to her I'll prove true; 

Will you »iv- me tli- t;rey mare and Katherin-' too. 

The ^rey iiiir-^.the t;rey mar-' &C: 
.3 
"She's a very nice maiden, a-courtin^ I'm come. 
Lawks) how 1 would like the grey mare to ride home! 
I love your sweet liaughter so much I declare, 
I'm ready my mill — and my stable — to share, 
With Kittv-the cturmins, and with the grey mire, 

Th-! grey mare, the grey mare ic: 
4 
"Your' welcome to her, to her hind and her heart, 
But from the gr-*y mare, man, I never will part'.' 

So said the jld farmer, then Roger, "1 swear. 

It is up with my courting, for Kate I don't care, 
Unless I be giv-n as well thf- grey mare. 

The grey m ir-, the grey mare JeC: 

5 

The yeirs hid piss'd swiftK',wh-n withered and grey. 
Old Rog'-r, the Miller, met Katherin- one day. 
Said h--, "I remember you, buxom and fair, 
As roses your cheek- md as broom was your hair. 

And 1 came a courtini',! Ah.Kat-! the fjrey mare. 

The g;rey mar-, the grey m-.re .v. 
H 
"1 reiii-'mber vour coming to court the grey mare 
Very well, MF Roger, when gold-n my hair, 
And che^-ks .vere as roses tli at bloom on the wtH. 

But, lawks! MT Roger. I can not r-call 

That e'er you Cam-- sweet -hearting ni»', man, at all. 

But the mare, the grey mare 
That uncommon grey mare." 



p i w. 1 v+8 .' 



112 



A Wreck off the scilly. 



X^ 52. 



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XQ 52. THE WRECK OFF SGILLY. 



1 

Coiii'^ .ill \ou brisk voun^ sailors boM 

Th.it plou^^i ^'^'' f^^R'^- ni.im, 
A trd5'"iy 1 "^'" unt'ob) 

In story sd'i an i i'lain. 
Prom my trur^ lov-^ 'twas presst^'i was I 

Thr- gallant ship to sr«er 
To Indiris west, each heart b^-at hi^h 

With confidence and cheer. 
2 
A-yeir was fi;one. and hjnie at last. 

We .urnM with swelling; sail. 
When ere the Scilly over-passed 

Th^re broke on us a gale. 
Th4 boatswain up alott dii go, 

He went aloft so high. 
Mo:e angry did the oc^an grow. 

More menacing tli'- sky. 

:i 

To make the stripe in vain, we tried 

'I'll'- SciUv rock- to clear, 
The thunder o\' th- furious tide 

Was filling everv '-ar. 
There came a snarp and sudden shock, - 

Each thought of wife and home! 
The gallant ship was on a rock. 
And swept .vith wave and foam. 
4 
01 eighty seamen 'prised the crew, 

But one did reach the shore, 
The gallant vessel, good and true, 

Was shatter-d aft and fore. 
The n-ws to Flvmouth swift <lid fly, 

Th.vt our good ship was gone ; 
And wet with tears was many an eye. 
And many i widow lone. 
5 
And when 1 cam^- to Plymouth sound 

Alive, of eighty dead , 
My pretty love, then f.ils- 1 found 

And to a landsman wed . 
O centles ail that live on land 

Be-think the boys at sea, 
Lo.' her- 1 stand with cap in hini. 
And crave your charity. 



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HENRY MARTYN, 



NO 53. 



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115 

JS'9 5S. HENRY NIARTYN. 
1 

In merry Scotland, in merry Scotland, 

There !iv>-d brothers three. 
They all did Cast lats which of th>:ni sh'^uld go, 

A robbing upcir.the salt sea. 

2 

The lot it t'ell upon Henry Martyn, 

The youngest of the three. 
That he should go rob on the salt, salt sea, 
To maintain his brothers and he, 

3 

He had not a sailed a long winter^ night. 

No yet a short winter's day. 
Before he e^spied the King's gallant ship, 

Come sailing along *hat way. 

4 

How far, how tar, cried H-nry Martyn, 

How far are you going? said he 
Fori am a robber upon the salt seas, 

To maintain my brothers and me. 

5 

Stand off , stand off! the Captain he cried. 

The lifeguards thiiy are aboard. 
My cannons are loaden with powder and shot; 

.And every man hath a sword. 

6 

For three long hours they merrily fought. 

For iiours they fought full three. 
And many a blow it dealt many a wound. 
As they fought on the salt, salt sea. 

7 
Twds broadside against a broadside then, 

Ar,d at it, the which should win, 

A shot in the gallant ship bored a hole. 

And then did the water rush in. 

h 
Bad news! bad news, for old England 

Bad news has come to the town, 

Tlie king his vessel is wrecked and lost. 

And all his brave soldiers drown. 

y 

Bad news! bad news through the Loudon street! 

Bad news has come to the King, 
The lives of his guards tbey be all a lost, 

O the tidings be sad that I bring. 
10 
O had I a twisted rope ot hen.p, 

A bowstring strong though thin; 
I'd soon hang him up to his middle yard arm, 

And have done with Henry Martyn. 



F. i W. 1606. 



J Ifi 



JVP 54. 



PLYMOUTH SOUND. 



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O the fair fuv\u of Pljmuuth is b} the sea . side Tlu'Soiiiid is so Miieaud 



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liliie Ply . month Sound O where is your e -uiial mi Earth to by found. 



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JT? 54. PLYMOUTH SOUND. 
1 

O the fair town of Hlynioutli is by the sea-sidi^, 
Th«Soun<iissoblu»*, dn>i so still and bo wide, 
Encircled with hills and with forests all green. 
As a crown of fresh leaves on the heail of a queen, 

O dear Plymouth town, and O blue Hlymouth Sound! 

O where is your equal on Earth to be found. 

2 

the maidens of Plymouth are comely and sweet. 
So mirthful of eye and so nimble of feet, 

1 love all the lasses of Plymouth so well, 

That the which I love best not a prophet can tell. 
O dear Plymouth town, & c. 

3 

O the bells of old Plymouth float over the bay. 

My heart it does melt.as li'ii sailing away. 
O be they a ringing when i do return. 
With thoughts matnmciiial my bosom will burn. 
O dear Plymouth town, & c. 



P.& W. 15U6. 



For the maidens of Plymouth my love is so hot. 
With a bushel of rings 1 would marry the lot. 
But as 1 can't marry them all well-a-day! 
Perhaps It's as well that I'm sailing away. 
O dear PI> mouth town, <& c. 



118 



FAREWELL TO KiNGSBRIDGE. 



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JVr^ 55. FAREWELL TO KINGSBRIDGE. 



Of th?; ninth day of November, at the dawning in the sky. 
Ere we sailed away to New York, we at anchor here did lie. 
O'er the meadows fair of Kingsbridge, then the mist was lying grey; 
We were bound against th^- rcbels,tn the North America. 

2 

O so moyrntul was the parting of the soldiers and their wives, 

For that none could say for certain, they'd return home with their lives. 
Then the women they were weeping, and they curs'd the cruel day, 
That we sailed against the rebels, in the North America. 

3 

O the little babes were stretching out their arms with saddest cries. 

And the bitter tears were falling, from their pretty simple eyes. 
That their scarlet coated daddies, must be hurrying away. 
For to fight against the rebels, in the North America. 

4 

Now with God preserve our Monarch, I will finish up my strain, 

be his subjects ever loyal, and his honour all maintain. 

May the Lord our voyage prosper, an i our arms across the sea 

And put down tlie wicked rebels in the North America. 



P. & W. 1506. 



120 



FURZE BLOOM. 



JVf> 56. 



tfith tt ndtrness 



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P. & W. 1506. 



121 



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JV? 56. FURZE BLOOM. 



There's not a cloud a sailing by, 
That does not hold a shower; 
There's not a furze-bush on the moor, 

That doth not put forth flower. 
About the roots we need not delve, 

The branches need not prune, 
The yellow furze will ever flower, 
And ever love's in tune! 

Golden furze in bloom! 
O Golden furze in bloom! 
When the furze is out of flower, 
Then love IS out of tune. 

2 

There's not a season of the year, 

Nor weather hot nor cold. 
In windy spring, in watery fall, 

But furze is clad in gold. 
It blossoms in the falling snow. 

It blazes bright in .June, 
And love, like it, is always here. 

And ever opportune. 

O golden turze & c. 



There's not a saucy lad I wot. 

With light and roguish eye, 
That doth not love a pretty lass. 

And kiss her on the sly, 
There's not a maiden in the shire 

From Hartland Point to Brent, 
In velvet, or in cotton gown, 

That will his love resent. 

O golden furze & c. 

4 

Beside the fire with toasted crabs. 

We sit and love is there. 
In merry spring, with apple flowers, 

It flutters in the air. 
At harvest when we toss the sheaves. 

Then Love with th<-m is toss't. 
At fall when nipp'd and sere the leaves, 

Unnipp't is Love by frost. 
O golden furze, & c . 

'"" May be omitted in singliig. 



P. & W. 1506. 



122 



THE OXEN PLOUGHING 



JV9 57. 



H.F.S. 



In mod^rat-:: time *— 112 




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Hump. a. long! Jump.a-longiHeredrlvesmylad along! Prettv.Spirk!-, B-rrv, Good lucli?peedwell,Cherry! 



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12S 




W-! arw th-^ lads thdtcan follow the plough.O we ar^ the lads that can follow the plough. 

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eTP S7. THE OXEN PLOUGHING . 
1 

Prith->e l-'nd your jocund voices, 

For to Iist'-n we're agreed ; 
Com- sing of songs th-* choicest, 

Ot th-- lif- th" filoufjh-boys l-ad. 
Thr-re are none that live so merry 

As the ploughboy does in Spring 
When he hear^ the sweet birds whistle 
And the nightingales to sing. 

With my Hump-a.Iong! Jump.a.lcng! 
Here drives my lad along! 
Pretty, Sparkle, Berry 
Good-luck , Speedwell , Cherry .' 
We are th- lads that Can follow the plough. 



2 

For it's, my little ploughboy 

Come awaken in the morn. 
When the cock upon the dunghill 

Is a-blowing of his horn . 
Soon the sun above Brown Willy,''"' 

With his golden fac- will show, 
Therefore hasten to the linney 

Yoke the ox-n to th- plough. 

With niv Hump a long' &c. 
8 
In the h-at of the day lim- 
it's but little we can do. 
We will lie beside our oxen 

For an hour, or for two. 
On th- bank'; of sw--t violets, 

i'li take my noontide r-vt , 
And It's I can kiss a pr-tty fl'r! 

As hearty as theb-st. 

W'lth my Hump-a-long! &c. 



When the sun at -ve is setting 

And the shadows fill the vale, 
Then our throttles w-'H be w-tting. 

With the farm-r's humming ale. 
And the oxen home returning 

We will send into the stall. 
Where the logs and turf are burning. 

We'll be merry ploughboy s all. 

With my Hump-aloftg! tc. 
5 
O the farmer must have s— d.sirS 

Or I sw-ar h- cannot sow. 
And the miller with his mill wheel 

Is an idle man also . 
And th" huntsman gfv-s up hunting, 

And the trades'man stands aside, 
And the poor man bread is wanting. 

So tis w- for all provi.v. 

With my Hjmp-a-lJngl S:c. 



P&W.1506. 



" Or any o^tfr suitable htil . 



124 



SOMETHING LACKING. 



JVr^ 58. 



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P. &: W. 1506. 



125 




taste, b^ their luok }J"t I conldnot^ut at them for latkof a crunk 




JV:^58. SOMETHING LACKING. 
1 

I chanced to rise at the dawning of day, 

"I'j walk in the sweet summer air. 
1 buckled my belt, donned my ribbons so gay, 

Totravel to Hathcrleigh tair. 
Then as 1 went over the road I espied 
Some blackberries hanging all in the hedge side, 
So pleasant, inviting to taste by their look. 
But 1 Could not get at them for lack of a crook. 



* 



As I was a. taking my Wifv to the town, 

Beforethat bright Phoebus did rise, 
1 saw some red roses, their heads hanging down. 

Red roses to gladden girls" eyes. 
1 said. Pretty roses. 111 pluck you, 1 swear. 
That's' one for my hat, and two others to spare. 
i?uf, gloveless, alackl with my hands in the thorn. 
No roses I got. though 1 got my hands torn. 

3 

As I was awalkmg along by the stream, 

I saw a blue king fisher dart. 
Your plumage I'll wear pretty bird, ^ I declare. 

No lad at the fair'll be as smart. 
With feathTS arraved, in mv br-avr displayed. 
Admired 1 shall be. in request by each maid, 
Hu/, alack! without trap, without sling, without bow. 
Ungarnished with feathers 1 w^as forced to go. 



I went to the fair, and I heard the bells ring. 

The maidens were many and gay. 
I said, with the lasses I'll frolic an.l tling, 

Bvit every one laughedand said Nay! 
They'd, have a bright nbbon, a kerchief , a toy, 
And non"- would say aught to a penniless boy, 
■So, having no money, my jcurnev in vain. 
Alone, lacking sweet-heart, 1 trudged home again. 

Maybe omitted in singing. 



F- i W. ISOt). 



126 

THE PLOUGHBOY. 



^VV'' 59. 




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JVr^ 59. THE PLOUGHBOY. 
1 

O the Ploughboy WdS a ploughing 
With his horses on the plain. 

Ani was singing of a song as on went he. 
' Since that 1 have talfn in love. 
If the parents disapprove, 

'Tis the first thing that will send me to the seal' 

2 

When the parents came to know 
That their daughter loved him so. 

Then they sent a gang, and pressed him for the sea. 
And they made of him a tar, 
To be slain in cruel war; 

Of the simple Ploughboy singing on the lea. 

3 

The mai ien soredid griev>-. 
And without a word of leave. 

From her father's house she fled secretlie, 
In male nttire dress'd. 
With a star upon her breast, 

All lO seek h>-r simple Floughboy on the sea. 

4 

Then she went o'er hill and plain. 

And she walked i-.i wind and rain. 

Till she came to the brink of the blue sea. 
Saying,"! am forced to rove. 
For the loss of my true love. 

Who IS but a simple Ploughboy from the lea)' 

^ 5 

^•Now the tirbtshe did behold, 

O It was a sailor bold, 

Have you seen my simple ploughboy?'then said she. 
"They have press'! him to the fleet, 
Sent him tossing on the deep, 

Who IS but a simple Ploughboy from the Ira? 

6 

Th-n she v.'r-'.,t to the Captain. 

And to hini she made complain, 

"(J a silly Ploughboy'srun away from nie!" 
Then the Captain smile 1 and said, 
"Why Sir! surely vcu're a maid? 

So the Plou(<i.buy I will render up to thee." 

Then she pulled out a store. 

Of five hundred crowns and more. 

And she strewed them on the deck, did she. 
Then she took him by the hand. 
And she rowed him to the land. 

Where she wed the simple Ploughboy back from sea. 
May be omitted in singing. 



128 



THE WRESTLING MATCH, 



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129 

X?60.J\\l WRESTLING MATCH. 
1 

I sing of champions bold. 
That wrristled not for gold. 

And al! th- Cry was Will Trrfry! 
That htt should win thr; day. 
So, Will Tr'-t'ry Huzzah! 
Thr! iddieb clap thr;ir hands and cry 
Trel'ry.' Tr-;try'. Huzzah? 

2 

Th'in up sprang lif'^! Jan, 

A lad scarCfr grown a man, 

Hr! said, Trrfry! 1 wot, ill try 
A hitch with thee this day. 
So, little .'an, Huzzah! 
The ladies clap their hands and cry, 
O little Jan, Huzzah! 

3 

They wrestled on the ground 

His match TreiVy had found 

And back he bore, in struggle sore. 
He felt his force give way. 
So little Jan, Huzzah! 
So some did say — but others. Nay, 
Trefry.' Trefry ! Hjzzah! 

4 

Then W!'h a desperate toss, 

Wiil showei the flying hoss. 

And little .Jan fell on the tan, 
And never more he spake. 
O little Jan! alack! 
The ladies say, O woe's the day, 
O little Jail -alack! 

5 

Now little .Ian, I ween. 

That day had married been; 

Had he not died, a gentle bride. 
That day he home had led. 
The ladles sigh, the ladies cry 
O little .Jan is dead! 



P. Xc W. 1506. 



130 



THE PAINFUL PLOUGH. 



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131 
CHOtiVS. 



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^r^ 6'1. THE PAINFUL PLOUGH. 



1 

Adam was a ploughboy, when ploughing first begun, 
The next that di'i succeed him was Cam, his eliest son; 
Some of the generation the calling still pursue. 

That breai may not be Wanting, they labour at the plough. 

2 

Samson was the strongest mm, and Solomon was wise. 

And Alexander conquering, he made the worJd his prize. 

King David was a valiaiit man, an i many thousands slew. 

Yet non'' of all these heroes bold could live witln^ut the plough . 

3 

Behold the wealthy merchant, that trades on foreign seas, 
And brings home gold and treasure, for such as live at ease. 
With spices and with cinnamon, and oranges also. 
They're brought us from the Indies, by virtue of the plough. 

4 

1 hope there's none offended at me for singing this. 

For never I intended to smg you ought amiss. 

And if you well consider, you'll find the saying true. 

That a!l mankind dependeth upon the painful plough. 



P. & W. 1506. 



132 



BROADBURY GIBBET. 



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^V:' 6-;?. BROADBURY GIBBET. 
1 

On Broadbury lown th'' ravens croak, 

The breezes shriek and groan, 
Now low, now high, the wh;te owls tly, 

As !;nowflakes in the moon. 
The cotton -grass ^rows under me, 

In tufts of silver white, 
i swing and swav throughout the day, 

I swdv and swing all night. 

2 

On Broadburv down my gibbet stands, 

.Just where the highways cross. 
It tells the moments, marks the hours. 

With shaiow on the moss. 
."^nd 1 am js a pendulum. 

That svung and never stay. 
The Death Clock ot a bad old world 

Thai cankereth away. 



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p. Sr W. 1506. 



134 



THE ORCHESTRA 



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Tli(.Tcv»as al . so CiddliL^IJi]! There was laukyTumwitliliis lii^tiomlion'Mitha 




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jVr^6'.3.THE ORCHESTRA, 



1 

I w>^nt unto my true love's house 

At cif;ht o'clock dt night, 
And in her chamber-window high 

There burnt a taper's light. 
Of windows had that maiden four, 

They looked every way. 
And from each window, in the nig 
Shone forth an equal ray. 

TherP, was I with my tl 
There was also fiddl 
There was lanky Tom, 
With a tooth-comb, 
2 
Each lover deemed himfeh alone 
Her chosen swain to prove. 
And she looked out on every one 

With equal words of love. 
So 1 began on my tlageolet. 
And Bill his Violin. 

And Tom-BimbomI on his Trombone, 

And Hill his tooth -comb thin. 
There was I, &C. 

* , 3 

V\ hy what a marvel! then said I, 

Such echoes be most rare! 
And round the corner ran to spy, 

.And found the fiddler there. 
The fiddler round the corner ran, 

On lanky Tom he lit; 
And Tom he hushed his bom bom bom, 

And next on Humphry hit. 
Thr-:>= was I. (tc. 

■SI. 

" May be omitted in singing. 
P. Sc W. 1506. 



ht, 

ageolet, 

ing BUI. 

with his big trombone, 

Humphry Hill. 

4 
My pipe I split on Willy's head 

His violin broke Will, 
And Tom struck home with his Trombone, 

Upon the head of Hill. 
And Humphry round the corner ran. 

And wlien he did me spy; 
He up with his tooth-comb like a man, 
And hit me in the eye. 

There was I, & c. 
5 
Now Brothers, peace!! said, Be calm, 

Tom Humphry and WilUe, 
Let's walk away, all arm in arm. 

And leave her solitary. 
Our brokr!i instruments well let 

Upon her doorstep lie. 
Well love abjure, we'll court no more, 
Not Hill. Tom. Bill, nor I. 
There was 1, * c. 



136 

THE GOLDEN VANITY. 



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P. 4 W. 1506. 



137 



.V." 6-4. THE GOLDEN VANITY. 



1 

A ship I lidv« got in th^^ Nortli Country 
And sh^; go^is by thf^ name of the Gol i-^n Vanity, 
O I f-^ar sIik'iI bf. taken by a Spanis-h (".a-la.lie, 
As she sails by the Low-Ian is l^v,'- 

2 

To the Captain then upspake the little Cabin-boy, 

He said, What is my fee, if the galley I destroy? 
The Spanish Ga-la-li^-, if no more it shall anoy, 
As you sail by the Low -lands low. 

3 

Of silver and of gold 1 will give to you a store; 
And my pretty little daughter that dwelleth on the shore. 
Of treasure and of fee as well, 111 give to thee galore. 
As we sail by the Low- lands low. 

4 
Then tlie boy bared his breast, and straightway leaped in. 

And he held all in his hand, an augur sharp and thin. 

And he swam until he came to the Spanish galleon, 

As she lay by the Low-lands low. 

5 

He bore'd with the augur, he bored once and twice. 

And some were playing cards, and soiu^ we-r- pUying dice. 
When the water flowed in it dazzled their eyes. 
And she sank by the Low-lands low. 

6 

*So the Cabin-boy did swim all to the lavboardnde. 

Saying Captain! take me in, 1 am drifting with the tide! 
I will shoot you! 1 will kill you! the cruel CapTuin cried- 
You may sink by the Low-lands low. 

7 

Then the Cabin-boy did swim all to the starboard side 

Saying, Messmates take me in, 1 am dritting with the tide! 
Then they laid him on the deck, and he closed his eyes and died. 
As they sailed by the Low-lands low. 

8 
^ They sewed his body up, all in an old cow's hide, 

And taev cast the gallant cabin-boy , over the ship's side. 

And left him without more ado adrifting with the tide, 

And to sink by the Low-lands low. 



* May be omitted in singing 
P i VV. 1506. 



138 

The bold dragoon, 



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A bold dragoon frurn oat of theNorthTo a la . dy's Iioiiseoame ri . diufi^, Brinj^ 
With clauk of steel aud spur at his heel Hiseon. seqneiiee uo.wa^s hi - ding. 



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^i'65.1\\l BOLD DRAGOON. 



A bold dragoon from out of the North, 

To a lady's house came riding; 
With clatik of steel, and spur at his heel. 
His consequence noways hiding. 
"Bring forth good cheer, tap claret and beer, 
For here 1 think of abiding. 
Abiding, Abiding. 



The chamber best with arras be dress'd 

I intend to be comfortable. 
Such troopers as we always make ourselves free, 

Heigh! — lead my horse to the stable? 
Give him corn and hay, but for me Tockay, 

WVll eat and drink whilst able. 
Able, aye!Able. 

3 

The daintiest meat upon sliver plate. 

And wine that sparkles and fizzes. 
Wax candles light, make the chamber bright, 

And_as soldiers love sweet Misses, 
My moustache I curl with an extra twirl, 

Fhe better to give you kisses. 
Kisses, aye! Kisses. 

4 

There's cake and wine," said the lady fine. 
There's oats for the horse, and litter. 

There's silver plate, there are servants to wait. 
And drinks, sweet, spark'lmg, bitter . 

Tho, bacon and pease, aye? and muuldy cheese. 
For such as you were fitter. 
Fitter ayel Fitter. 

.< 5 

Your distance keep, 1 esteem you cheap 

Tho' your wishes I've granted, partly. 
But no kisses for me frcm a Chimpanzee,'* 

The lady responded tartly. 
V\hy! a rude dragoon is a mere Baboon." 

And she boxed his ears full smartly. 
Smartly, aye? smartly. 



P. & W. 1506. 



140 



JVP 66. 



TRINITY SUNDAY. 



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141 




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jVP^<5. TRINITY SUNDAY. 
1 

W'h^^n bites the frost and winds are a b;ow:ng. 

I do not heed I do not care; 
If Johnnys by me, what if it be snowing. 

Tis summer time with me all the year. 
The icicles they may hang on the fountain. 

And frozen over the f^irmyard pool. 
The bleak wind whistle across the mountain. 

No wintry blast our love can cool. 

2 , 

what to me the wind and the weather' 

what to me the wind and the rain? 
My Johnny loves me, and being together. 

Why let it blLster_it blows in vain. 

1 never tire, I never am weary, 

1 drudge and think it is only play; 
As Johnny loves me, and I am his deary, 

Why_all the year it is holiday. 

3 

1 shall be wed upon Trinity Sunday, 

And then adieu to my holiday. 
Conie frost and frown the following Monday. 

Why then beginneth my workaday. 
If drudge and smudge begins on the Monday, 

If scold and gramble_l do not care, 
My winter follow Trinity Sunday- 

I Can't have summertime all the year. 



P 3c \V. 1506. 



142 



THE BLUE FLAME. 



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P. & W. 1506. 



143 




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Xi'67. THE BLUE FLAME. 
1 

All 'jri'lT tlie stars, ani bf^nrath th^: green tree. 
All o%-er tl.-- swar'i, and along the col'i lea, 

A little blue t'larae 

A fluttering Came, 
It came from the churchyard for you or for me. 

2 

1 sit by the cradle, my baby's aslei-p. 

And rocking the cradle, I wonder and weep. 

O little blue light, 

In the d^ad bf the night, 
O prithee, O prithee no nearer to creep. 

3 

Why follow the church path, why steal you this way? 

Why halt in your journey, on threshold why stay? 

With flicker and flare, 

Why dance up my stair! 
O 1 would, I \Aoijld, It wrre iawiiing of day. 

4 

All under th- stars, and along thf green lane. 

Unslaked by the dew, and unquenched by th-^ rain. 

Of little tlames blu- 

To the churcfiyar i steal two, 
The soul of my baby! now from me is ta'en. 



P. & W.1506. 



114 

STRAWBERRY FAIR. 



j\r'j 68. 



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^'i'68. STRAWBERRY FAIR. 
1 

As 1 was going to Strawbf^rry Fair, 

Singing,stnging, Butt^rr-cups an'i Daisies 
1 mr-A a maii^;n taking her ware, 
Fol-de-der-.! 
Her eyes were blue and golden her hair. 
As she went on to Strawberry Fair, 
Ri-fol, Ri.tol, Tol-de.nJdle-li-do. 
Ri-fol, Ri-t'ol, Tol-de-ridile-dee. 

2 
Kind Sir, prav pick of my basketj'she said 

Singing, & c. 
My cherries ripe, or my roses red, 

F-.l. de-dee: 
My strawberries sw--,-!, I can of them spare, 
As 1 go on to S'rawberry Fair." 
Ri-fol 4 c. 

3 

Your ch''rries soon will be wasted away. 

Singing, &c. 
Your ruses wither and never stay, 

Tol -de- de. 
Tis not to seek such p-rishing ware, 
That I ani tramping to btrawberry Fair 

Ri -fol *c. 

4 

1 want to purchase a generous heart. 

Singing, <6 c. 
A tongue that neither is nimble nor tart 

Tol -de- dee! 
An honest mind, but such trifles are rare 
I doubt if they're found at Stra^b^-rry Fair: 

Ri-fo! &c. 

5 

The price I offer, my sweet pretty maid 

Singing. &c. 
A rmg of gold on your finger dispUved, 

Tol -de -dee .' 
So come makeover to me your ware, 
in church today at Strawberry Fair. 
Ri-fol ±c. 



P. & W. 1506. 



146 



^7' 69. 



THE COUNTRY FARMER'S SON. 



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hiud thepluu^h.Tisbetterl trow he- hitid tliepliiuj^h.A (■ijau(r\ farmer's Son, 'Tis 



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I would not be a monarch great; 

With crown upon my head. 
And Earls to wait upon my state. 

In broidereii robes of red. 
For he must bear full many a care. 

His toil IS never done, 
Tis better I trow behind the plough, 

A Country Farmer's Son. 
2 
1 would not be the Pope of Rome, 

And sit in Pr-ter's chair; 
V\ith priests to bow and kiss my toe, 

No wife my throne to share. 
And never know what 'tis to go. 

With beagles for a run; 
'Tis better for me at liberty 

A Country Farmer's Son. 



I would not be a merchant rich, 

And eat oft'silver plate. 
And ever dread, when laid abed 

Some freakish turn of fate. 
Oneday on high, then ruin nigh. 

Now wealthy, now undone, 
'Tis better for me at ease to be 

A Country Farmer's Son. 

4 

I trudge about tlie tarm, all day. 

To know that all things thrive 
A maid I see that pleaseth nie, 

Why then I'm fain to wive. 
Not over rich, 1 do not itch, 

For wealth, but what is won. 
By honest toil, from out the soil, 

A Country Farmer's Son. 



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May be omiited in singing. 
P.&W. 1506 



14S 



THE HOSTESS' DAUGHTER. 



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149 




jr? 10. THE HOSTESS' DAUGHTER. 
1 

The Hostess of the Riuj; of Bi'lls 

A danghtiT halh with unhnrii h;»ir; 
(ro v^h^'r(' I will.d'i^r pliiii aofl hill, 

I do not find a m.iid more fiir; 
She welcomes me with dimpled smiles. 

And e'eu a kiss will not deny. 
O 1 would Pt us the bells did ring ! 

And MP were wed_that mnid and I ! 
2 
But :is I travelled dnun the mad, 

There went (j\ ine a paeker-train ; 
Twas Koger liawle.and Sandy PanI, 

And Hnnehbac'k Joe, and Philip Mi\ne, 
Sajs Koger, I have had a kiss. 

From that sly maiden at the Bell, 
And f , said Joe, and PanI siid so. 

And so did Philip Ma^ue as well. 
8 
Till weather-beaten as the sign 

'I'hat dnth before the tavern s«inij. 
That maid will stay, and none ess i\ , 

To make her his with bell and ring. 
Methinks I II take another road, 

V^'here hap some modest maideo dwells, 
Nu s du'v misv, with ready kiss, 

And then for iis shall ringthe Bells. 



P& W.1506. 



150 



THE JOLLY COSS-HAIVK. 



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151 




JVf>T/. THE JOLLY GOSS-HAWK. 



I sat on d bank in triri(^ aud \)\:iy , 

With my jo'l) goss-hawk,;iiiH her winjrs wereorey; 
She flew to my breast, AnrI she there biiiither nest, 

I urn sure (jrett^y hirr) yon with me mjII stay. 
2 
She builded within, and she Imilrled v\ithorit, 

My jolly goss-hawk and her w iii.;s were " rey ; 
She fintterod her wings, And she jingled her rings. 

So merry was she, and so fond of play. 
3 
I got me a bell, to tie to her foot, 

My jolly goss-hawk.and her wings were grey, 
She raonnted in flight, And she flew ont of sight. 

My bell and my rings she carried away , 
4 
I ran up the street, witli niinlilest f'l't, 

My jolly goss-hawk, and her wings were grey; 
I whooped and hallo'd, IJiit never she shewed, 

And r lost my pret(_\ goss-h.i«k that d.n . 
5 
In .1 meadow so green, the hedges between, 

^^} j"") goss-h.iwk and her wings weregrey; 
l^|j(in a Ml in's hand. She perch 'd did stand. 

In spnrt, and trifle, and full .irr,i\ . 
(i 
Who's gilt her may keep her as best he ean, 

My jolly goss-hawk and her wings weregre\ ; 
To every man she is frolic and free, 

I II cast her off if she come my way. 



P. &W.1506. 



152 



FAIR GIRL, MIND THIS! 



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153 




JVfns. FAIR GIRL, MIND THIS '." 



A MoniMii (hit hitli a Icul hiisbanH, I fiiiH , 

H\ sctilfliiig won't make him thi' hettcr . 
So let her lie easy, ••onfented in mind, 

Nor suffer his fuibles to fret her. 
Let every jjund woman her hiishand adore. 
Then hujjp^ her lot, thon<^h't he hnmhie and jjoor. 
We live like two tnrtles, no sorrows v\e know , 

Atid.fiir Sfirl 1 Mii]d this when \on marry'. 
Fair i^irl '. Mind this when yon marry • 
2 
My wife has beiMi wedcled full man-, a year, 

And blesses the day she was married. 
She ne\(>r fell out in her life with her dear, 

Tho' he at the ale-honse has tarried. 
She kindles the candle, and goes to ht^rhed, 

Nowdrd of conlenlio ri and i-hiding' is said, 
We live like two 'I'nrtles, &c, 

O 

At morniniC fnll early my wife's on the trot. 

Is laying and Iii;htin2^ the fire ; 
She gets rae a |Jot of lnowri coffee, and hot; 

Or anything else I desire. 
She's nnder subjection, is dapper and ("air. 
She greeteth me always with Darling, and Dear! 
M'e live like twoTurtles, <Cc. 

4 
Shonid .Saturday come and the money ran short. 

Why then _ there is less i'nv the Sunday. 
Shesa^s she's contented,— no angry retort; 

Only_ work all the harder on Monday 1 
She gives me a kiss, and away I do go, 
She never says, Husband, why worry me so? 
We live like two Tnrtles , &c. 



P & W. 1506. 



164 



ON A lYlAY lYlORNING SO EARLY. 



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155 



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^97S. ON A MAY MORNING SO EARLY. 

1 

As I \\;ilki'd out one Ma) fiiorniiii^, 

'•rie \T:iy miiriiitij^ so ear!\ ; 
I Ihrri' i's|jiiM| a fn'r |jri'tt\ miirl, 
All ill fhi' dew so pearl\ . 

Ol 'twas sweet, swt'i't spring', 
Merry birds did mii<;, 

A II ill the moriiinu- carl\. 
2 
St i\, fair oiie,s(,i\ ; 'i'iiiis did I say, 

Oil a May moriiiie^ su early; 
My tale of l(U(>,\(iiir hi'art. will nn(i\e. 
All ill the dew sii |)i'arl\ . 

(); tis sui'c't, sweet spriiiir, Mi'rry hirdsdu sing, 
iMI ill the inoriiiiii;' earU . 
3 
\m t ill's Imp me, Kind sir, said she 

()i. a "S] i\ miiriiiiii; so earl\ ; 
\1\ sw lie IS iru(\ I dnnt want two 
All ill the di''w so pearly . 

Ol t«as sweet suret s|>riiiii, Merry birds did sing, 
A II in the nl^^llill^■ early . 
4 
With li^;litsMine tread. Away she sped, 

'I'his \1 n iiioriiiiiij sii ea rl> ; 
Tu inret her lad. And left ine sad, 
All in th(> dew so pearly. 

01 twas sweet, swei't sprin^.Merry birds did sing, 
All in the morning early. 






P & W. 1506, 



156 



THE SPOTTED COW. 



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P i: W. 1506 



A*('r4. THE SPOTTED cow. 



One inorniii^ so gav.in the glad month of IMav, 

When I frond my cottaj^'e strayed; 
As broke the ray of aMakeuing' day, 

I met a pretty maid . 
A Deat little lass on the twiiikMin"^ grass, 

To see, ray foot I stayed. 

i 

My fiir pretty maid, why wander?"! said 

"So early, tell me iio« ? " 
The maid replied, "Pretty SirT'and sighed, 

'I've lost my Spotted Cow. 
She's stolen," she said, many tears she shed, 
"Or lost, I can't tell how." 
3 
No fnrther complain in dolorons strain, 

I've tidings will yon cheer. 
I know she's strayed, in ponder green glade. 

Come, lovel I II shew yon where . 
So dry np yonr tears and banish fears. 
And bid begone despair." 
4 
I truly confess in my bitter distress, 

Von are most good,"said she 
With help so kind, I am certain to find, 

My cow, 80 I'll with thee. 
F^onr e\ es.it is true are better than tvo. 

And friend, fonr eyes have we." 
5 
Throagh meadow and grove, we together did rove, 

We crossed the flow'ry dale. 
Both morn and noon, we stra)ed till the moon 

Above onr heads did sail. 
The old Spotted Cow, clean forgotten was noM', 

For love was all onr tale . 
6 
Now never a day, do I go ray way, 

To handle flail or plongh. 
She comes again, and whispers ,' Sweet swain 

I've lost mySpotted Cow." 
I pretend not to hear, she shonts'My dear, 

I've lost my Spotted Cow." 



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CUPID THE PLOUGH BOY. 



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P& W.1506. 



159 




J\r915. CUPID THE PLOUGH BOY. 



As I one day walkorlont in May, 

Mhen Ma} was white in hloDOi, 
I bent my fj:i<h arross thi- SH.ith, 

AikI bri'illu'd the sweet perfume. 
I wandered near a tillage field, 

And leaninj^on a stile 
I sa« ^11 liy a plongliiiiji hoj , 

\\ ith lijjs and e)e asmile. 
2 
O Cnpid was that saney boy 

Who furrows deeply drew , 
He broke soil, destroyed the spoil 

Of wild thyme wet with dew. 
Before his feet the field was sweet 

With flowers and grasses f^reen, 
Behind tiirn'd down, and bare and brown, 

By Cnpid's oonlter keen . 
3 
crnel, cruel plunghing hoy I 

V\ ith sharp and cntting share ! 

why thy plongh turn on me now. 

And leave mi> rent and bare? 

1 won Id, I wot ,that I had not. 

Aw ended down this way, 
Nanght did I gain save raek and pain 
And dolonr night and diy. 



P «:W.1506. 



'Thy heart I trnwfnll deep I plongh. 

My seed therein to sow , 
A crop will sonn npspring and bloom. 

And make a pretty show. 
There'll pome this wa\ a gallant, gay. 

He'll view this fluwery field, 
Then straight to him, nnqnrst inning, 

The crop of Love yon'll yield." 



160 



COME MY LADS, LET US BE JOLLY 



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a fol . Jy, 



When We've met 



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P i: W. J506. 



J^9W. COME MY LADS, LET US BE JOLLY. 

1 

Coni'' mv lads l-^t us be jolly! 
Drive away dull melancholy 
For to gri^-ve it is a fc!!v, 

Wh-n we're met together. 
Come, let's live and well agree, 
Always shun bad company, 
Why should we not merry merry be, 
When we're met together? 
C/iori/s.Come my lads let -is be joily &c, 
2 
Here's the bottle, as it passes. 
Do not fail to fill your glasses. 
Water-drinkers are dull asses, 

When they're met together. 
Milk is meet for infancy, * 

Ladies hk^ to sip Pohea, 
Not such stuff for you and m*^ 

W'hen we're met togethT. 
Chorum. Come my lads, let us be jolly, S-.c, 
3 
Solomon a wise man hoary 
Told us quite another story. 
In our drink we'll chirp and glory, 
Wh.-n W'-'re m-t together. 
Come my lads 1-t's sing m chorus. 
Merrily, but yet decorous, 
Praising all good drinks before us, 
W hen we're met toge* her. 
Chorus. Com<; my lads, let us be jolly .Ec. 



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POOR OLD HORSE. 



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P & W,1506. 



ran. 



163 




JV?7r. POOR OLD HORSE. 



oiico I l:iy ill stable, a hnnter.wpll and warm, 

1 had the best of shelter, from eold and raiii ;iiid h.irm; 
But iKiw ill open meadow, a hedge I'm J^lid to find. 

To shield my sides from tempest, from drivinji, sleet and wiud. 

Poor old horse, let him die I 

2 
Mv shoulders once were stiird\ , were jjlossy , smooth and round. 
But nn«,alasl they're rotten, I'm not aeeouiited sound. 
As I h^ue grovMi soared, m\ teeth gone todecaj, 
M) masler froMPS npon me ; I often hear him say, 

Poor old horse, let him die'. 
*3 
A groom upon me waited, on straw I sniigij lay, 
l^^hen fields were full of flowers , the air was sweet with hay; 
Bat now there's im ijoiKJ feediug prepared for me atall, 
I'm foreed to mnneh the nettles npon the kennel wall. 

Poor old horse, let him die I 

4 
yiy shoes and skin, the huntsman , that eo\ets them shall have, 
My flesh and bones the hniuids.Sir! I ver^ freely s:i\e, 
I've followed them full often, a^e '. many a score of miles, 
O'er hedges, Walls and ditehes, nor blinked at g;ites and stiles. 

Pocjr old horse, let him die '. 

5 
Ve g'entlemen of England, ye sportsmen g'ood and bold. 
All yon that ln\(' a hunter, remember him when old, 
O put him in \oiir stable, and make the old boy warm, 
And visit him iiid pit him, and kec'p him out of harm, 

Pi.ur old horse, till he die 1 



* 



May be omitted in sinj^ing. p&w.lSoe. 



164 

THE DULY SONG. 



J^9n8. 



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Smoothly & not too fast. » - 120. 



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* Come and I will siii<i >un ! 



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What will Jiiu sing- me? 




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I \\ill si Hi; 3 on One O ', 



One of them IS all a - IdiiP.niiil 



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M'hitt is vonr Orio O? 



One o(" them 



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all a.loriP.drKJ ev . or will rp . raaiu so; and ev . cr wi 



ro . m:n(i so. 




Oiip nT the m is all a . loiie,;irKl ev . or wil 



re . main so , 




PJkW 1506. 



);n p'^C) Tii'd . 



165 



^\>18. THE DULY SONG. 



Cnrnc, .iii'l I "ill siii^ y.ii . 

Wfi it Mil! \uii siiii;' rac ? 
I Hill sin^ Mill Olio O ! 

Whtit is \uiir Oi/c ' 
Oi:.' (if ttu'in is ;ill all liloiie , anHiMcr will rPiiiiiti su . 

Conn*, ami I \m11 siiiii \Mr]. 

\\ hat will \c''i siiiji iik'? 
I will siiiji \'>n Tw(i,0 1 

M^h;it is \onr Two.O? 
T\M) of tliem nrp lil\-\»hitc babfs, and flr(>bs.'d ail in ^rci'n.O . 

3 
Clime , &<' . 
I w ill sing \\n\ Thri'e, O I 

What is vorir Three, ? 
Thri'p of them are stranjiers, o'er the «icle world they are raii-i-rs. 

4 
C'(pme,,E:r . 
I will sinji \0M Four , O 

U'h 't is yonr Fonr, 0? 
Four it is the Uill\ Hour, when hlooms the ^\\\\ flower. 

5 
Co[ne,,fee. 
I w ill siiii: }on Fi\e, O 1 

What is yoar Five.O ? 
Fi\e it is the Uili\ Bird, that's never seen, but heard, O J 

6 
Come, <6e. 
I will sing yon Six.O I 

\i"hat is \0Nr Six, O ? 
Six the FiTr>mari iu the Boat, that doth on the ri\er float, 01 

7 
Come, .fee. 
I w ill siti^ yon SeMMi, 1 

What is vonr Seven, 0? 
Seven it is theerown nf Heaven, the shining stars be seven, 01 

8 
Come, &'■ . 
I will sing yon Eight, O I 

Whit is yonr Eight, O? 
Ei"ht it is the morning breik , wh.Mi all the world's awake, 0! 

9 
Come, i6c. 
I M ill sing ^ nn Nine, O I 

What is your \ine,0? 
Vine it is the pale moonshine, the pale moonlight is nine, 01 

10 
Come, <6e. 
I will sing yon Ten, O I 

\^'h:it is \our Ten, 0? 
Ten forbids all kind uf sin, and ten attain begin, 0! 



P&W 1506. 



THE lYlALLARD, 



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W hi»u lamhkiiis skip, and apples are g;ro«iiiji, (irass is gTPOii.iind roses a.liluvv. 



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pi -pjfiiis cnn, ai]d fattle are Iom . ing-.Mist lie-swhite in valiies beloH, Win shonid we be 



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all thedav toil. iu<i?Lads at d lasses, a . lotiu- y ith me 1 Done with drndjie?y, dast, and moil.in", 




allthe(l:i\ toil. inff?Lads and lasses, a . Ion"; m ith rael Dune with dradgerv, dnst, and r^luil.iM<_^ 

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are milked the team's in the stable;Wi)rk is o\er,and 



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Haste a.^^ay to the )i;reenwoodtreeI 



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P&W1566 



167 




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pl.iv is begnn. 



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ome farm. . prlads'. Ere theraoon ri^p'Hp'vi!'h:i\eT(iii. 



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pla\ is bL'sjnn.Come farm . er lads hoth liis lyaiid a. hie, Ero tlit^ iiKmiirise wpwillh:i\efiiii. 





UhyshcnlHvp be all the day toiLii)^?Ld(lsaiid lasses a.loiig with ine UoiieMith diiidgen.diist.audmoiliiiu 



Why shoiildwe lie ill thi' d:iytoil.iD;i?Ladsaudlassesa.long v^ithme Uuuewith driidgerj,dust,dudmoiliii;i 



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Why shijiildMe he all the day tuil. in;i?Ladsai;d lassesa . loiigMithrae Douewith drndgPiy.diist.aud moiling; 



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Haste dMa\ lij the greeuwofd tree Haste away Haste a.way 



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Haste away to the greenwood tree Haste away Haste a.way Hastea.way tu the greenwood tree. 



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Haste away to the greenwond tree Haste away Haste a. way Hastea.way to the greenwood trei 



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V4W 1506. 



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168 

.V(>T.9. THE MALLARD. 

(A COUNTRY DANCE) 

1 

Sh'i Wlii'ii l;uiilikiiis ski|),;uHl ,i|)|) Ics t ri> tC''''" ' "U , 

(r |•;^SS is Ji rrr ii,-u r| ru M' S h|i I (lU , 

He: \^ lien |)i^iMiiis cdii , ,itiH cattle arc li)«iiij^. 
Mist lios « hitc ill \ ;illi('s ImMciu , 

Tiiiielh'r-.W hy shoillrl mi- lif ;tll till' H:)\ tnimi^? 
Lads ,1'irl lasses, aloii^ witli iin' I 
Done with (iriifl;i('r\,(liist and mdiliii;^ 
Hai^teaway to the j^reciiwood trci" 
Sh': The I'ous are niilkfd.thc team's in the stahle, 

V^(||•k is ()\('r, and fjlaj lie^nii, 
H' : \'e farmer lads all l(ist\ and alile 

K re (lie niniin rises, we'l I li.ui'oiir ("iin , 
Ch'jrus: Win slionlrl « e, <6e . 

#2 
>>hf: The ij;l(i\\-wiirm li<j^hts,as da\ is afiilin};, 

Dew is I'dlinjj ovor the I'leld , 
//?.- 'I'lie iiu'adiiw-sM-eet its scent is exhalinjf, 
H une\ siii-kles their fra^ i-atice. \ield. 
T'jqrfhfT: A^ ]]\ slllillld we, .te. 

Sh': Tliere's J ink (I'liiiferii lustily dancing' 

In the marsh with flickerinj; flame , 
Hs: And D idd\-l(insif-le}js , spiiiniiii:; and prancitig, 

M'oth and midi^e are duinj; the same, 
Choru^: \V hy shonid we, i£e. 

3 
^he : Sii Het iml f*r(ie,and Uolly and Celie, 

M ilh milkinjr pail 'tis time tn have done. 
He: And Kilph and Phil, and Kuhin and Millie, 

The thresliiijj^ flail must sleep with the sun. 
Tonerhcr: Why shun Id we, .fe. 
bhe; UpoD the j^reeii hej;inneth onr pleasnre. 

Whilst we dance «e merrily sing. 
He: A I'onntry dance, a jitf.and a measnre. 

Hand in hand v\e \^u in a ring. 
Chorum: Why should we, .C-e. 

I 
She: O sweet it is to fout on the chner. 

Ended work and revel hegiiii. 
He: Aloft the planets never give over, 

Dancing, circling ronnd of the sun . 
Tmiether : V\ h\ shonId, we , ifc. 
She: So Ralph and Phil, and Kobiii atid Willie, 

Take 3 our partners each of yon now. 
He: And Bet anil Fnie, and Dolly and Celie, 

IVTake a curtsey; ladsl make a how. 
Churns: Why should, we. 



* 



M.i\ he omitted in singing. p.iu-iKnc 



169 



CONSTANT JOHNNY. 



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Chirm-iii^ IVlui.h 1 <h> Iuvp thee There'siiune o . ther I a . dure 



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Pieri^eH bv viinrbpniilPoase\es M\ heart trinsfix . .H lies S i\ de-K'^st ^^dl\ ("in! be 




P fcW1506. 




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N(!'er I II see thee more 



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Can I see juiiii;jj 



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mine for ev . t more 

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Cii!st tlion see yonnjf 




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John . iiv bleerl.iiig Down in Cn . pids to . s\ bower See his sad tp:tns. 



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Ji'hn.ny bleed.ing Down in Cn . pids ro . s_v bower Seehis transfixed he.irt 



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171 



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I'lx . ?d heart'. O dearest John uj I am thine for e\er more 



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F^iili of grief iiifl full ufsmtrt Sa} dearest Molly thoiilt be mine for evermore. 




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Happy as the li>e.loiii;-diy Often to each other say John ny dearest Johnny 



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Happy as the live.louji day 



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«e part no more we part no more 



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Pic W.1506. 



1 Ti 



THE DUKE'S HUNT. 



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lintit . in<j horit, At earli . est hour of the moru . itit:: 



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173 



CHORUS, 



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ThcrcMns Dido.Spendiii^o (ieiitr) too.aiid Herd.Aiifl'IVavellerthat ncverlooks behind him. 



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Cniiiitessiiiid Towler Bnimj -lass and Jiiwler were somr- of the huiiiidsthatdid find him. 




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CHORUS. 




P & W.1506. 



171 



X<?81. THE DUKE'S HUNT. 



Tw;i on a hriiihl aiiH shining morn 
I hivirrl the morry hinifiiiu linri], 

At cirlipst hiirir of tho morriiiij^. 
'rinTc rod^'thc Uiiko oC Biiokiiij^ham, 
Anil n)nu\ :i squire' and yeoman riimc, 

Dull sle;»(j :infl |jh;jn(oin sliarlows scorning 
'I'hcrc was Uido, Sjjpndi^o 
(ri^ntr\ liHi, and Hi'ro, 

And 'I'r t\ pIIit that tu'ver looks bcliind him 
Coiinti'ss and Tow li'r, 
Honii^-lass and Jovslcr . 

Tlu'sc werp some of the honnds that did find him. 
2 
Old tf irk hi' conrses oc'r the |ilairi, 
I'^nw I'arii'd trios it hack ai^iin, 

His horse and his honuds fail ii('\er. 
Oiirhi'irtv hiiatsiiian hi'«illsi^, 
KorPM'raiid fur ee'r a day, 

Hark I Furw ird 1 s^allant hounds to;^ether. 
Tlirrc w as Dido, &c. 
i 

'I'lif fiix \\p followed, hrinjf whui^, 
Onr S|iiirl tndi\ is scan-e lir^iiil, 

K re out of the i'ij\er hreikinj^, 
^Vwa\ he rnus o'er hill and dile, 
Away we followed without fiil 

Hark I Furwardl sleepiuj^ echoes aw akiiig! 
'I' here V, as Dido, <£e. 
4 
Sin Ki'Miinl iM'ini^ ^vell nij^h spent, 
His wa\ he tii till- water bent. 

And speedily crossed the river. 
'I'o save his life he soauht to swim. 
Hilt Dido sharp went after him, 

Heiiih ! 'I'raM'ller destroyerl his life for ever. 
There was Dido, f e, 
5 
Sii, whoo-too-hoo .' we did proilaim 
(iud liless the Dnkeuf Bm-kin^ham , 

Our huiiiids the) have jjained great jjlorA . 
This maketh imw the twentieth foX, 
We've killed in river, dale and rocks. 

So here's an end to my story. 

There wis I) idn, ifee. 



P & W. 1506. 



175 



THE BELL RINGING. 



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so_ber,0%r Broalb'irv Down 1 was w-niin^mv wav;V\h^i I h-arH of som- ring!".^,Som>^ ■i-incinednH 



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singint^, I ought to r-^. memb'^r that .lu-bl _ lee day. Twas in Ash-A'a-ter town The 




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bells they did soun; They rang tor a beltani a hat laced with gold. But the men ot North 




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176 




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1. 

One 'lay in October, 
Neith-T drunken nor sober, 

o'er Broadbury Down I was wending my way. 
When ! heard of sonje ringing. 
Some dancing and singing, 
I ought to remember that Jubilee Day. 
REFRAIN. 
Twas in Ashwater Town, 
The helU they did soun' 

They rang for a belt and a hat laced with gold. 
But th- m-n of North Lew 
Rang so steady and true, 

That nftver wer* better in D-von,! hold. 

4. 

When th-- match it came on, 

At good Callington, 




Twas misunderstooJ, 
For.thtt men of Broadwood, 

Gave a blow c.n th- tenor should never have been. 
B'jt th-- men of North Lew, 
Rang so faultlessly true, 

A difficult matter to heat them I ween. 
Twas in Ashwater Town itc; 
3. 
Th-y of Broadwood b-ing na ighfy 
Th-n <;aid to our party. 

We'll ring you a challenge again in a round, 
Well give you the char.ce, 
A* S* Stephens cr Launc- - 



The bells th-'y rang out o'er th" valleys below. 
Then old and young peopl-'. 
The hale and th-^ feeble, 
They came out to hear th-' sw-et bell music flow. 
Twas at Callington town 
The bells then did soun' 
They rang,c6c; 
.5. 
Those of Broadwood once mor*", 

Were obliged to give o'er. 

They were beaten compl-'tely and don-' in a rr>und. 
For the men ot North Lew 
Pull so steady and tru-", 



_ston the prize to the winner's a no'e of five pound. That no better th-n thoy in the West can he round. 
'Twas in Callington Town 'Twas at A=;hwater town 

The bells next lid soun' 



Th-'y ran<,'f-c: 
HAW. 1506. 



Th-^n a» Callington town 
Th-^v rang,itc: 



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THE BELL RINGING, 



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A^SS. A NUTTING WE WILL GO. 

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Tis ot a Jolly ploujihing-min. 
Was ploughing ot' hi~ 'a-H, 
H- call-l. Ho! h- call^i.Wol 
Ani bal< his hors»;s stand. 
Upon his plough h-* sat, I trow. 

An! loud h-gan to sing, 
His voicf' lang out, so cl-'ir an-I stout, 
It ma-i-i th'^ hor'^- b-lls ring. 

For a nutting W"^ will go my boys, 

A nutting w; will go. 
From haz-1 bush,lou1 sings th" thrush, 
A nutting w- will go! 

2. 

A mai'ien sly was passing by 

With bask-^t on h-r arm, 
Shr! stood to h^^ar his- singing cUar, 

To listen was no hirm. 
Th^ ploughboy stay-'d that pr-^tty mail. 

And cUsp-d h-^r middl-' small. 
He kissed her twice, he kissed her thrice 

Ere she could cry or call. 

For a nutting &c: 

3. 

Now all you pretty maidens that 

Go nutting o'er the grass 
Attend my rede, and give good heed, 

Ot' ploughhovs that yoi piss. 
VNhen lions roar, on Atric's shore> 

No r, ortal v-ntures n-^ar. 
When hootsth- owl, and b-ars do grDwI, 

The heart- is t'ull ot' tear. 

For a nutting ic: 
4. 

And yet.'tls sa.id, to pretty maid, 

Th'-r- is a graver thing. 
In any clime, at any tim-, 

-A plouhboy that doth sing. 
So all you maidens, young an! fair 

Take lesson from my lay, 
V\h-n you do hear a ploughman sing, 

Th-n lightly run away. 

For a nutting &c: 



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DOWN BY A RIVER-SIDE, 



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jr.Q^J^.DOWN BY A RIVER SIDE. 
1. 

Down by a River -sid--, 
A fair nm i I ecpi^^d, 
Lamenting tor her own triie love; 
I. amenting, crying, sighing, dying; 
Dying for her own true lov^. 



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wife should be' Yet 
all your tears, For 



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3. faith-ful 1 to you will prov^; So 



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3. Church bells ring - ing. 



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mjrrted to her own tru^ lov<?. 



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THE BARLEY RAKING, 



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JV?S5. THE BARLEY RAKING. 



'Twis in th>' prim- of summ-^r tim-;, 

Wh-n hay it was a making; 
And harvest tid^ was coming; on, 

And barl-"/ wanted raking; 
Two woeful lovers met one day. 
With sighs their sal farewell to s-iy. 
For John to place must go away, 
A.nd Betty's heart was breaking. 
Lov'-rs ot't have proved untrue; 
lasl what can poor maidens do* 



But hiri!v w'as h-r swe-t-h-art gin-. 

With vows ot' ne'er torsaking; 
The foolish Wench did so take on, 

To ease her bosom ■< aching - 
She sent a letter to her love. 
Invoking all the powers above. 
If he should e'er inconstant prove. 
To her and the Barley raking. 
Lovers oft have proved untrue; 
'las! what can poor maidens do* 



Nov.' when this letter reach-d the youth, 

It put him in 1 taking; 
Sure of each others love and truth. 

Why such a fuss be making? 
But being a tender h-arted swain. 
From hasty words h- did refrain. 
And wrot-- to her in g>-nt!e strain. 

To bid her cea<:e from quaking. 
Lovers oft hav- proved untrue; 
las! what can poor maid-ns do* 



1 ve got as good a pair of shoes 
As e'er w-re made of I-ath-r; 

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1 11 pull my beav-r o'er my nose. 
And face all wind and weather; 
And when the year h^is run its race, 
III seek a new and n-arer place; 
And hope to see your bonnie face 
At time of the Barley raking." 
Lovers oft hav- proved untrue; 
las! what can poor mail-nsdo* 



So wh-n the year was past and gone, 

And hay once more was making; 
Back to his love cam- faithful .John, 

To find a rud- awaking: 
For Betty thought it long to wait, 
So she had ta'-n another mate. 
And 1-ft h-r first love to his fate. 
In spite of the Barley raking. 
Lov-rs oft have proved untrue; 
!a>i! what can poor maidens do* 



HlA. ifinf 



184 

DEEP IN LOVE. 



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sor _ rows fill me to th-' brim, I care not if I 



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A''.'8fi. DEEP IN LOVE. 
1. 

A ship cam>^ sailing ov-^r th-^ si4 
As d'-^ply laden as sh- coil-l b-; 
My sorrows fill m- to th^' brim, 
1 car»^ not it' 1 sink nr swim. 

T'-'i thousand Udi-'s in th>' room, 
But my trur; lovt^'s th>' t'lirrst bloom, 
Of stirs she is my brightest sun, 
I said 1 wo'iH have her or none. 

3. 

I leaned my back agiinst an oik. 
But first It h-nt and then it broke; 
Untru^ty as I found thit tree. 
So did my love prove t'llse to me. 

Down in a meil th'- oth"r Uy, 
As C-irelessly 1 vent my wiv. 
And plucked flowers red it 1 blue, 
I little thought what love could do. 

5. 

I saw a Rose with ruddy b'ush. 
And thrust my hind into th- hush, 
I pri.-.ked my fingers to th- bone, 
I would I'i left that rose alone! 

6. 

I wish! 1 wish! but 'tis in vain, 
I wish 1 hi I my heart agiinl 
With silver chain and diamond locks. 
Id fasten it in a go!d-n box. 



p&w.ifin?''^ May be omitted in singing. 



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THE RAMBLING SAILOR 



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JV.^«r. THE RAMBLING SAILOR. 



1. 

I toss my cajj up into the air, 

Anri away whilst all are •sleeping. 
The host may swear, and the hostess stare. 

And the pretty mdids be we-pin^i 
There IS nevnr a pl^c-^ th it I do grice, 

Which d second time shill see my face; 
For 1 travel the world from place to pUce, 

And still am a Rambling Sailor. 

2. 

when I come to London town. 
Or entnr any city, 

1 settle down at the Bell or Crown, 
And court each lass that's pretty. 

And 1 say, "My dear, be of good cheer, 
111 never depart, you need not t'eir!" 

But 1 travel the county t'lrandn-^ir 
And still am a R imbling Sailor. 

3. 

And if that you would know my mm*, 

I ve any that you fancy, 
Tis n-ver the same, as I change my flame. 

From Bet, to .Joan, or Nancy. 
1 court maids all, marry non- at all. 

My h-art is round, and rolls a= a ball. 
All 1 trav-1 th- land from Spring to Fall, 

An! still am a Rimhling Sailor. 



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A SINGLE AND A lYlARRlEO LIFE. 



.Y'>88. 



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f 4 W.JBH? 



189 



X'JSH. A SIN GLE AND A MARRIED LIFE. 

A DIALOGUK. 



1. THE MARRIED MAN SAITH:— 

Come all you yoang rri'-n boH, 
And us-f^ your b>^st enfi-^dvour, 
-As a woman's hf'art is gold ,- 
To wm and truly w-^ar h^r. 
For a man that is aJon-^ 

Doth lack th^; rich-'st tr-^asure, 
Makes a solitary moan, 
Nor knows th* highest pleasure. 

And some the seas have crobst 
For wealth on t'oreign coast, 
And so their lives have lost. 
Yet treasure be'^t lies nearest. 

It e'er shill b" my boa>;t 
Thit a mir:i-d lite is t'air-";t I 

3. THE MARRIED MAN SaITH!- 

My contention is not done, 
Man's half a man unmit» i. 
' Min IS not well alonel" 
Said He who min created, 
The wife lifn's loa-ls doth bear. 

Relieves the burdened shoulder-. 
Shares youthful joy and care, 
And comforts thee, grown older. 

In spring sh- is thy flower, 
In dro^aght a quickening shower, 
Sh-'s warmth n wintry hour, 
An 1 food when thou goest cp^rnt. 

God's bles>;ing !« h-r dow-r 
So a married life is tairestl 



2. THE SINGLE MAN SAITH :- 

1 trust fond wonia'i-kind 

No furthur than I prove h-r, 
She's fickle as the wind. 
And is a taithless rover. 
When first you her embrace. 

She sooth-th all your sorrow. 
Yet speedy shifts her face. 
And curs't''"is on the morrow. 

You h«e her love to-day; 
To-morrow she salth.Niyl 
Nor constant e'er doth stay. 
Wlif-n skies are at their clearest, 

III l-ave,and fare away. 
For a single life is rarest. 

4. THE SINGLE MAN SAITH .'- 

Don't mtrry one that's young, 
Mayhap her love will wander, 
Nor marry one that's old. 

There's, no one may command her. 
Nor marry one thit's bold. 

She'll seem to he above you. 
Nor marry one that's cold. 
She'll nevr truly love you . 

For the old ones they grow stale. 
And tl,^ scolding rant and rail, 
An 1 pride must have a fall , 
And d-'a'h doth end the fairest. 

S) I'll hav- non- at all 
Faith.' a single life's the rarest. 



5. THE MARRIED M \N SAITHl- 
In marrying a wife 

I hold m vindication, 
A man completes his life. 
It is the true vocation, 
A wife's a goH'-n crown 

For brow of man intended. 
With children rising round 
His lif- IS never ended. 

A married man doth sing. 
As proud as any king, 
New days new pleasures bring, 
Though a single life be rarest. 

Yet a wife's the choicest thing. 
So. a married life is fairest. 



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lYllDSUMIVIER CAROL. 



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Smoiitbly. 



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'Twds ear . ly 1 wilk'i on a mid - sum-m-T morn - ing, Th- 




woo'l - - land a ring 



ing, Twa<; ►iar- . ly in th- morn- . mg at 





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191 



JV'PS.9. MIDSUIVIIVIER CAROL. 



1. 

Twas -^arly I walked on a midsumm-^r morning 
Th'! t'irHs and Xh". m'-adows w-T'^ l-^ck- i and gay, 

Th« small birds w-^r-; singing, th>' woodlands a-ringing. 
It was f^arly in thf morning, at br-^aking of day, 

1 will play on my pip-s,l will sing th>ir my Uyl 

It IS '■arly in th>^ morning, at br-^aking ot day. 

2. 

O hark .' and O haik!to th- nightingal-'^ wooing, 
TIt^ lark IS alott piping shrill in th" air. 

In r!VHry gr-'-n hox-r th»^ turtl-'-doVf^s cooing, 
Til-" sun IS ]iist gl'-iming, arlsH up my fair! 

Aris--, lov--, arispi n -n-^ fairer 1 '-pi-' 

Arts-;, lov--, arisrj O why should 1 di»^? 



Arisr;, loV';, arisr;! go and g-^t your love posi-^s, 
Th-^ fairest of flowers in garden that grows, 

Go gather me lilies, carnations and roses 

I 11 Wear them with thoughts ot the maiden I chose 

1 stand at thy door, pretty love, full of care, 

O why should 1 languish so long in despair? 

4. 

O why love.O why, should 1 banished be from th-ef 
O why should 1 see my own chosen no more.' 

why look your paren's so slightingly on me* 

It is all for the rough ragged garments I wore, 
Biit -ir-ss m» wi*h flowers, I'm gav a- a king, 
Im glad as a bird, when my carol 1 sing. 

5. 

Arise, lov-, aris-'. n sjng and in '-tory. 

To rival thy h-auty .vas nev-r a may, 

1 will play thee a tin- ^n my pip-s oi ivory. 

It IS early in th- morning, at breaking of day, 
I will play on my pipes, 1 will sing th-- my lay i 
It is early in the morning, at breaking of day. 



4vy.iRi7? 'May b- omitted la singing. 



192 



THE BLACKBIRD. 



J^<> 90. 



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. Y9 9C. THE BLACKBIRD . 
1 

H-r^'s d h-dltli to tl.H Bldrk-hirl in lh>^ bush'. 
Llk>^-wis<? to the bonny Wood-do'-; (dov";! ! 

If you'll go along with mf, 

Untoyondf^r flow'ring tree, 
I will catch you a small bird or two. 

O the hif-dth of the May is swe-^t as hay, 
And pleasant where t^'-iV it pass. 

And the butterfly's light 'wing, 

Is a-flutter all the spring, 
And the golden-cups g!-am in th- grass. 

3 

All the birds of the air consort m pair. 

And nest in each pretty green tree, 

Then my merry little maid. 

Be not coy, be not afraii, 

I've a cottage well fitted for thee. 

4 

On the roof there is thatch; O, lift th-- latch, 
Come in, take your place there as bride. 
You will find the hearth-stone clean, 
FitI a thronf s-t for my Queen, 
'Tis th- s^-trlr- th-- chimney beside. 

5 

WVll , I reckon, 'tis so rul-'d by Fa'-", 
That I should be married this Mav. 
Then so long as you're inclined, 
V\hy_ I wont go far to find. 
Clap your hand, Miss', in min-' with a \'-a\ 



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Ma\- be cmitt-'d in singing. 



194 



THE GREEN BED. 



^•o 91. 



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J\'99\. THE GREEN BED . 
1 

Young Sailor Dick, as \i-. st-rpp-id on shor*», 

To his quart-frs of oH r-'turn'd 
Th>? host'-ss glad, crir!s"Dick my lad 1 

What prizc^ monfy hav*^ you ^^ara'd ' 
"Poor luck I poor luck '. yf^t Molly, my duck. 

Your daughter I've come to see : 
Get ready some suppT, with pipes and grog, 

And the best Gr'-'-n Bed for m"." 

2 

My daughter, she's gone out for a walk; 

My beds are all bespoken; 
My larder's bare, like the rum-keg there. 

And my baccy pipes all are broken." 
Says Dick,"ril steer for another berth, 

1 fear I have made too bold : 
But I'll pay for the beer that I've just drunk here. 

And he pulled out a hand-ful of gold." 

3 

'Come down Molly, quick', here's your sweetheart Dick 

Has ]ust come back from s.ia : 
He wants his supper, his grog, and a b-d. 
The bfst Green Bed it must be." 

' No bed ,"cri''S Dlck"'no supper, no grog, 
No sweetheart for m>- I swear '. 
You shewed me the door when you thought me poor, 
So I'll carfy my gold elsewhere, " 



PlW.lfilT? 



i^r. 



THE LOYAL LOVER 



.W? 92. 



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1 11 wc^avHTTiy lov** a gar - lanH, it shall h** rjrnc^^rjso fin*-. 1 11 



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- caus-- my lov^- lov^s ni-- 



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X'.>9'2. THE LOYAL LOVER . 
1 

I'll w-av-- my \ov a garland, 

It shall hn drf-.ssrtd so firif ; 
I'll set it round with ros^s, 

\\ith lilies, pinks and thyme. 
And I'll present to my love 

When he comes back from sea, 
For I love my love, and I love my love, 
Because my love loves me. 

Rj-fol-di-rol fol-di-rol 
Ri-fol-riddle-li-do. 
2 

I wish I were an arrow. 

That sped into the air; 
To se»-k him as a sparrow. 

And if he was not ther-. 
Then q'jickly I'd become a fish 

To search the raging se^. 
For I love my love, and 1 love my lov^, 

Becaijse my love loies me. 
Ri-fol Sec. 

3 

I would I \v-r- a reaper, 

I'd seek him in th" corn, 
I would I were a kerj.er, 

I'd hunt him with my horn. 
I'd blow a blast, when found at last, 

R-neath th- greenwood tr-e, 
For 1 love my love, and I love my lo\-e, 

Because my love loves me. 
Ri-fol &c. 



P«w.i6nH 



19« 



THE STREAMS OF INANTSIAN 



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jro98. THE STREAMS OF NANTSIAN 
1 

O th'; Strfams of Nant-vi-an 

In two parts divlrlf-, 
W hf-rr thi^ young mm in dancing 

Meet sweetheart and bride. 
They will take no denial, 

We must frolic and sing. 
And the sound of the viol 

O it mak-s my heart ring. 
2 
On the rocky cliff yonder 

A Castle up-stands; 
To the seamen a wonder 

Above the black sands, 
'Tis of ivory bullded 

With diamonds glazed bright, 
And with gold it is gild-d. 

To shine in the night. 

3 

Over yonder high mountain 

Th-- wild fowl do fly; 
And in ocean's d'-'p fountain. 

The fairest pearls lie. 
On eagle's wings soaring, 

I'll sp'-ed as \h>' wind ; 
Ocean's fountain exploring, 

My true love I'll find. 

4 

O the str'-ams of Nant-si-an 

Divide in two parts 
And rejoin as in dancing 

Do lad', th'-ir t.w-eth-'artc. 
So th" streams, bright and shitiing 

Tho' parted in twain 
Re-untt'-, intertwining, 

Onn thenceforth remain. 



P t-*.i6i7i; 



200 



THE DRUNKEN lYlAIDENS 



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There w-rti three drunken maid - ens Came from the Isl*- of Wight, They 



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Saturday night dli come. Sirs'. They would not then go out, Not the three drunk'-n 



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jsro 91-. THE DRUNKEN IVIAIDENS . 
1 

Th'-r-' were three Hrunkm maiHens, 

Came from the Isle of Wight. 
Th-y ^rank from Monday morning, 

Nor stayed till Saturday night. 
When Saturday night did come. Sirs'. 

They would not then go out ; 
Not th>* three drunken maidens, 

As they pushed the jug about . 

2 

Thf-n came in Bouncing Sally, 

V\ith cheeks as red as bloom. 
" Make space my |olly sisters. 

Now make for Sally room. 
For that I will be your equal , 

Before that I go out." 
So now four drunken maidens, 

Th'-y pushed the jug about. 

3 

It was woodcock and pheasant. 

And partriges and har-. 
It was all kinds of dainties, 

No scarcity was there. 
It was four quarts of Malaga, 
Each fairly did drink out, 
So the four drunk'"j maidens. 

They push^-d the jug about. 

4- 
Then down came the landlord. 

And asked for his pay. 

O! a forty-pound bill, Sirs'. 

The damsels dr''W that day. 
It was ten pounds ajiece. Sirs'. 

But yet, they would not out. 
So the four drunk'-n matd^-ns, 

They pushed the jug about . 

5 

'O wh'-re be your sp-ncers? 

Your mantl''S rich and fin" ' " 
"They all be a swallowed 

In tankards of good wine . " 
"O where be your charact^-rs 

Y^- maidens brisk and gay? " 
O they be a swallowed ! 

We've 'drunk them clean a«ay." 



Ptw.isn? 



202 



TOBACCO IS AN INDIAN WEED. 



DUET. 



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gr^-Ti at morn, is cut down at eve 



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203 




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Think of this, think of this, When you smok-to - bac 



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Think of this think of this. When you smoke to - bac 



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m'95. TOBACCO IS AN INDIAN WEED . 
1 

Tobdcco IS an Indian W'-e.i , 

Grow; jjreen at morn, cut down at tv^; 

It shows our d'-cay; 

W" fad" as hay. 

Think on this, — wh-'n you smoke tobacco. 

2 

Th" [.ip-thdt is so lily-white, 
Wherein so many take delight, 

Gone with a touch; 

Man's lifH is such , 

Think on this, — when you smok" tobacco. 

3 

The pipe that is so foul within, 
Shews how the soul is staini-d with sin; 

It doth require 

The purging fire . 

Think on this, wh'-n yr.u smok- tobaccu. 

4 

Tti^ ash-s that av l»lt behind. 
Do s^rv- to put us all in mind, 
That unto dust. 
Return we must. 
Thi-nkon this, —when vo.u smoke tobacco. 



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The smok-that doth so high asc-nd, 
Shows that our life must ha'.-- an end ; 

Thf: vapours' gor,-- , 

Man's lif-- is done. 

Thinkonthts, Ahenyou smoko tobacco. 



2(14 

FAIR SUSAN 



JV? 96. 



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P I *.lfil7? 



205 




^'996. FAIR SUSAN 
1 

Fair Susan slumb'^irrd la shady bower, 
Sdtr hil.ihr! thought, from -^VTy tyt; 

Nor drnam-^d she in that trdnquil hour 
Hrr own tru'' lave was passing by. 

2 

He gazed in rapture upon her beauty. 

Sleep did he.- charms but inorp reveal ; 
He de'-med it sure a lever's duty 

From those sweet lips a kiss to steal. 
3 
In shame and anger poor Susan started, 

With eyes afUme she bade him go ; 
'Retain no more! —for --ver parted; 
Cruel and base to use me so!" 
4 
'By too much love I hive offended, 
Forgiv- nK if 1 uause you pain ; 
But if indeed our lov- b-' ended, 

Pray give me back my kiss again ." 



p 4 ".ifin« 



206 



THE FALSE LOVER 



A*? .97. 



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now she IS going to be niirried! But now she is going to b" iiurned! 



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207 

J^o 97. THE FALSE LOVER . 

1 

1 courtfd d maid-^n both buxom and gay, 
Unh'^eding what people against her did say, 
I thought her as constant and true as the day 
But now she is going to b-- nurried. 
2 

whun to the church 1 my tair love saw go. 

1 followed her up with a he irt full ol woe, 
And eyes that with tea's ot griet' did o'erflow. 

To see how my suit had miscarried. 
3 

when In the chancel 1 saw my love stan', 
With ring on her finger, and true love in han', 

1 thought that for certain 'twas not the right man, 

Although 'twas the man she wa^ taking. 
4 

when I my fair love saw sit in her seat 

1 sat myself by her, but nothing could eat; 
Her company, thought 1, v.'as better than meat, 

Although my hi=>art sorely was aching. 
5 
O woe be the day that 1 courted the maid , 
That ever I trusted a word that she said. 
That with her 1 wander'd along the green glade, 
Accurs'd be the day that I niet her. 
6 
O make me a grave that is long, wide and deep. 
And cover me over with flowers so sweet. 
That there I inay lie, and may take my last sleep; 
For that Is the way to forget h-r. 



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2U8 



THE BARLEY STRAW. 



JV? 98. 



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met his sweetheart Kit. 




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209 




JS'? 98. THE BARLEY STRAW. 
1 

Ab Jdn was hurrying down th'^ glddn, 
H- m--t his swnr-.th-art Kit ; 
"O whith-T so fast?" th-" maiden ask'i, 

"L-fs bid-; dni talk a bit." 
"fin going to thr! barn, and it' you'll conir;. 
And h'flp mt thr^-sh X\\t stro', 
That task compl'-t-f, why th-^n my swrtrit, 
A rambk Wr; will go." 

2 
Sh-; gave consent, to w^rk th-'y w^-nt , 

As if 'twere only tiUv; 
Th'' flail he plied, whilst Kit untied. 

The -.heaves, and cleared away. 
O ■villi'.ig hands made labjur li^ht, 

Anl Vre the sun wa- low. 
With arms entwin-'d, these lovers kind, 

Did down the vallies go. 
<i 
Said Jan'.'thou art a iielj ful lass, 

Wilt thoij be mine fur life?" 
"For sure!" she said. To church they sped, 

And soon were man and wife. 
A lesson then, for ail young men 

Who would a courting go, 
Your sweetheart ask to share your task, 

And thresh th-- Barl-y Stro*. 

4 

Now niany j y-a; , this coupl-- dear, 

They livd in harmony; 
And children hid, both lass ani lad, 

I think 'twas thirty three. 
The sons so hale dii wi-'ld the fUil, 

And like their father gro* ; 
The maidens sW''et,llke luoth'-r WTe neat: 

And cl^an as the Barley Stro'. 



p i w.ifin" 



210 



DEATH AND THE LADY 



y'}99. 



Smnnthlff & ruther altuly J = 84-. 



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A^ I walkr;(i oat on^- dav, ow day, All in th-- ui'-r _ ry 



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month of May Wh'-n Iambs did skip an i thrush_ns sing, And ev'_ ry bush with 




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THE SAME ARRANGED tor FOUR VOICES. 



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As I walked out one day on- day All m the in«r- ry month of May When 



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^ As I walked out one -day one div All in the mer - ry month of May When 

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As I walked out one diy one day All In the mer - ry month of May When 



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As I walked out one diy one day All in the mer - ry month of May When 



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Idmbs did skip and thrush_r;s 

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lambs did skip and thrush-^s sing And ev' _ ry b^h with buds dH 



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./V'^ .9.9. DEATH AND THE LADY . 



1 

As I wdlk.'d out on.^ day, one day. 
All in th*" nit^rry month ot' May, 
When lambs di.l skip and thrushes sing. 
And rtv'ry bush with buis did spring. 

2 

I met an old man by the way, 
His head was bald, his beard was gr^y. 
His coat was of the Myrtle-grei^n, 
But underneath his ribs wete seen. 

3 

He in his han 1 a glass did holi. 

He shook as one that shakes with cold. 

1 asked oi him what was his name. 

And what Strang" place from which he came. 

4 

"My name is Death, fair maiden, see 
Lords, DuVes and Squires bow down to me; 
For of thi=- Branchy Tree'"" am I 
And you, fair maid, with nie must hie." 

5 

"I'll give you goJd,if me you'll spare, 

I'll give you costly robes to wear!" 
"O no, ^weet m^id, make no delay 
Your sand is run, you must away!" 

6 

Alas! alack! the fair maid died. 
And these the last sal viords she cried; — 
"Here lies a poor , distressed maid. 
By Death — and Deith aion.- betrayed." 

"* W^u' »■•-• want 01/ th'- "Branch!/ Tree" I do wit kn-t'V,bif ^j th-' wjrU run in 'Ml Veraions. 



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■iVi 



ADAM AND EVE 



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Both sex_ies givr? r-xx to my fin - cy, In prdiise of sw-^et woman I sing. 



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-fin'i not to Doll, Su-! or Nan - cy; The mdtrf of th-^ beg-gar or King 



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213 

,y9 100 . ADAM AND EVE. 
1 

Both sexes give e-ir to niy fancy, 

fn praise of sweet woman 1 Mri< 
Confined not to Doll, Sue, or Nancy, 

The mate of the b-.^i^\x : king. 
When Adam was first a-creat--.l , 

And lord of the universe crown'd , 
His happiness was not compl'^ted , 

Until that a h-'lpmat" was fcuTid. 
2 

A garden was planted by Nature , 

Man could not produce in his life. 
But no rest had he till his Creator 

Discovered lie wanted a wife 
H" had horses and foxes for hunting 

Which most men love dearly as life 
No relishsonie food was a wanting 

But still — h-- was short of a wiff . 
3 
As Adam was resting in slumber. 

He lost a small rib from his side. 
And when he awoke twas in wonder. 

To See a most beautiful bride. 
In transport he gazed upon h^r. 

His happiness now was complete 
H>^ praised tlK bountiful Donor, 

Wlio to him had given a mate. 
4 
She was not taken out of his head, sir, 

To rule and to triumph in man. 
Nor was sh'- took out of his foot, sir. 

By him to be trampled upon. 
But she was took out of his siie, sir. 

His equal co-partner to he; 
So, united is man with his bride sir, 

Yet man is the top of the tree. 
5 

Then l-'t not the lair be despisp] 

Bv man , as she's part of hims-lf. 
L»t woman by man be a-prized 

As mor:? tlian the world full of w-alth. 
A man witliout woman's a beggar, 

Tho' by him the world we're posstss'd 
But a beggar that's got a good woman 

W;tii more tlian the world is he bless'd . 



P i W.|. IT 1 



214 



I RODE MY LITTLE HORSE 



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I rodr; my lit-tl-^ horse, 



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From Lon_don town I dm''; 



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w-nt in - to th-- coun - try To srfr^k my-s-'It' a dinir;, 



And if 1 meet, a 



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pret - tv nidi'i, B-' sure I'll kiss her th-n, Ani sweir thit 1 will nijr_ry h-'r. But 



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'11 swear thdt I will 



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win not t-'U her wh.-;n! 



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215 




jV? ICl I RODE MY LITTLE HORSE. 
1 

I rode my littl-^ horS'', from London to'A n I Cdm-?, 

I rod" into th-^ country, to seek niyselt d ddm--. 

And if I meet a pretty maid, be sure I'll kiss her then,- 

And swear that Ta' IK marry h-r — but will not tell her wh-'n! 

2 

I found a bixom widow, with many tonb of goli, 

I livd upun her fortune, as long as it would hold. 

Of pounds I took five hundred, bettrud- my horse, and th--n , 

1 promised I would marTy h-r but never told her wh-nl 

3 

A vintner had a daught--r , the Golden Sun his sign, 
1 turned at his tavern , I drank his choicest wine; 
I drank out all his cellar, bestrode my horse, and then, 
1 said the n.ail I'd marry, but never told him wh-ni 

4 

Th'- guineas are expended , the win-' is also spent; 
The widow and the maiden, they languish and lament. 
And if they come to se-k me, I'll pack them back again. 
With promises of marriage, — but n-ver te4l them wh^n. 

5 

My little horse I mounted , the world that I might see, 

I found a pretty maid-n as poor as poor coul i be. 

My little horse neglected, to London ran away, 

J asked if she would marry, and bade h-^r name the day. 



F 4 *.|B|7d 



21fi 



THE SAUCY PLOUGHBOY. 



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maid- >'ns,Anri lis - ten un-to ms; 



Bii snv. towed a ploughboy, N'onn 




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hath a heart more free. The ploughbcy.is so sau - cy, Yet n-'ver doth an 




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noy ; O who in all the world maids is like a ploughing boy' 



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217 

m>W2. THE SAUCY PLOUGHBOY . 
1 

Coni'- all you pretty mdidens. 

And list-^n unto me. 
Be sure <ind wed a plough-boy. 

None hath a heart more tree. 
The plough-bov is so saucy, 

Y'-t never doth annoy, 
O who in all the world, maids, 

Is like a ploughlng-boy ? 
2 

He nseth in the morning, 

Awaking with the sun . 
And as a dew-drop flashing. 

So gleams his eye with fun . 
When all the birds are singing. 

He SI ngeth too for joy . 
O who in all the world, maids , 

Is like the ploughing-boy ! 

3 

When coming from the milking. 

And carrying my pail , 
The saucy plough-boy leaveth 

To help me, hook and flail . 
And when the hay is making, 

1 cannot well be coy ; 
For who in all th" world, maids. 

Is like the ploughlng-boy? 

4 

At even-tide he waiteth 

Beneath the green-wood tree 

And will not dance with others. 
He'll only dance with me. 

No pleasures of the country 
His honest heart can cloy, 

who in all the world, mai is. 
Is like the ploughing-boy ? 

5 

i swear to you young maidens, 
A plough-boy I will wed, 

1 will not have a soldier 

For all his jacket red, 
No sailor, no, nor footman. 

Shall e'er my thoughts employ 
The lad to win my heart, maids, 

Shall be a ploughing-boy . 



i ft. 1617?; 



218 



I'll build iyiyself a gallant ship. 



(SOLO or QUARTf.TTE. 



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111 build my- self a gal - lant ship, A ship of no - bl" 



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main, to urgeth-^m, to urge them, And I will stand with helm in hand, To 



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urg-- th--m oVr the mam. 



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. V^/g.^. I LL BUILD MIYSELFA GALLANTSHIP . 
1 

I'll buili my^'lf 4 gillant ship, 

A ship of nobk t'dm--; 
An'l tour aril twenty niiriti-rs, 

Shill bjx and man the '^anw, 
And I will stand, with h'-lm in hand. 

To urge th-rn o'-r the main. 
2 
No scarf' shall e'er mv shoulders go, 

i will not ccmb iiiV hair; 
Th- pale moonlight, the candle bright 

Shi'.l neither t^ll I'm fair. 
B-sil- the mast I stand so fist , 

Unresting in lespair. 
3 
The rain iiiav b-'it, and round my feet 

The waters wash and foam, 

thou North wind lag not behind 

But bear mr- tjr from home! 
My hands 1 wring, and Slabbing sing 

As over seas 1 roam . 
4 
The moon so pale shall light my sail. 

As o'er th-* s-a I fly^ 
To where afar the Eastern star 

Is twinkling in th- sky. 

1 would I Were with mv love fair, 

Er'' ev-'r my lov'- iie ! 



P t *.lfil7* 



220 



THE EVERLASTING CIRCLE 



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All in a wood there giew a fins. tree, The fin- ''st tree that 



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ev - er you did sef, And the green grass grew a - round, a-round, a- round, And th' 



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greengrass gr-w a - round. And on this tree th-r-'grew a fine bough, The finest hc';ghthat 



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gr'-en leaves flourished th>*re - on,th''r'!-on,th>'re-on, And the greTi leaves floijashedthef^on. 




^'9 104. THE EVERLASTING CIRCLE 



All in a wood th-r- ^:-'-^ a tin- tr--, 
The finest tree that ev-r you did see, 

^nd th- green grass grew around, around, around. 

And the green grass grew around. 

2 

And on this tree there grew a fine bough 

The finest bough that ever you did see, 

And the bough on the tree, and the tree in the wood. 
And the green leaves flourished thereon, thereon.thereon. 
And the green leaves flourished thereon. 

3 

And on this bough there grew a fia>' *wig 
The finest twig that ever you did see. 

And the twig on the bough, and the bough on the tree, and the 
tree in the wood, 

And the green leaves flourished thereon cScC. 

4 

And on this twig th-re stood a fin- nest. 
The finest nest that ever you did s-e, 

And the n-'st on the twig, and the twig on the bough&c. 

5 
And in this nest th-re sat a fine bird. 

The finest bird, &c . 

6 
And on this bird there grew a fine feather 
The finest feather, &c. 

7 

And of this f-ather was mai-" a fin- h- i 
The fin«"st bed ,&c. 

8 

And on this bed was laid a fine mother, 
The finest mother &c. 



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In th-^ arms of this mother was laid a fine babe 
Th- rinest babe, ScC. 

10 

And th- babe he gr-w up and becam- a fine boy 
The fin-st boy, ^f^- 

11 
And boy put an acorn all into the -arth 
The fin-st acorn .t'^. 

12 

And out of this acorn there grew a tine tree 
The finest tree &c. 



222 



Within a garden 



^'.> 105 



H .F. S. 



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With- in a gar- jen a mdi - d-^n linc^ev'^i, \Mifn soft th't shales of 




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^yWD. WITHIN A GARDEN . 
1 

Within d gard-fn a niaii-n ling-^r';'-), 
V\ h'-n soft th-- shad'-s of f-vrining ff;ll 
Exp-cting, t-armg, 
A footst'-p hearing, 
H-T lovr; app-^aring, 

To say far<-«>'Il. 

2 

With sighs and sorrow th-ir vows they phghted 
One more -mbrace, on- last aiieta; 
Tho' St-d> di'ile, love, 
in this confide, love, 
Whate'er betide, love 

To the- I'm true. 

3 

Long years are ovr, and still th- maiden 
Seeks oft at evr the trystrng tr-- ; 
H-r promise keeping. 
And, faithful, weeping 
H-r lost love sleeping 

Across the s-a. 



"" t *. I«I7? 



224 



THE HUNTING OF THE HARE. 



A COUNTRY DANCE. 



m> 106. 



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Turn an! sf? m-r - ri - ly Hunt liouni?, a-wav'. 



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N?\C^. THE HUNTING OF THE HARE . 
1 

I hunted my Mtiv al! into th'' hay, 

The Hare was before and the hounds " war* away I" 

Wi»h my Hickerly Tout, ticklesom" Trout, 

Hipjjerly, tif.pTly, eversheen, nipperly. 

Up th>- middle, vdridigo-van 
Twa!r !j;) The hill, dnwn th" form, 
Her-? a ttep.ther- a ttjr-i, 

Turn and sing meriily, 
Hunt hounds, away • 

2 

I hunt'-d my M-rry all into the barl-y, 
And there the poor puss was pursued by hound Snarl-y. 
With niy Hick-rly tout, &c. 

3 

I hunte i my M>=iry all intoth'^ wh>-at, 
And tr.H'-e tn" sly puss did attempt us to cheat. 
\\:'h my Hick-rly tout, &c. 

4 

1 huntt- I rr.v M-rrv all into the rye, 
And thr-re tl,'- poor hare was constrained to \\- . 
With my Hickerly tout, &c. 

5 

I hunt- i my Merry al: r.tothe oat> 

And thtr» I cut off both his paw and his si^u'". 
Wit;, my Hickerly tout, &c. 



P t *. Ihll? 



226 



DEAD lYlAID'S LAND. 



m' 101. 



H.F.S. 



In moAtrule time. 



J ^132. 





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Thr-r-^ stooH a gar-i'i^r at th- gat-, And 



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227 



.yp 107. DEAD MAID'S LAND . 
1 

Th'T'T stood a gdr1-?n-r at th'-ga'- 
And in -ach hand a tlow^r; 
"O pr--tty mai i, corri'^ in," h- said, 
And vi-u mv b'-aut-^ous how-r. 

2 

Th'- lily It ihai! h^ thy smock , 
Th- jonquil sho^^ thy ♦'"-•t ; 

Thygown shall br- th-^ t'^n-W'-rk stock, 
To mak'^th'-'! tair and sw>^Ht. 

#3 

The gilly-flower shall dr;ck thy li--ad, 
Thy way witli h-^rbs I'll str";w, 

Thy stockings shall b-- marigold, 
Thy glovs thr; vi'l-it blu'j." 

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-4 

I will not hav^ th-? gilly-floW'^r 
Nor h-rbs nsy path to str'-w. 

Nor stockings of the marigold, 
Norglov-sof vi'l'^t blur. 

5 

1 will not have the ten-wrrk stock. 
Nor jonquils to my shoon ; 

But I wilt have the red, red rose, 
That flow'reth sw-rt in Jmh"." 

The red, red rose it hath a thorn 
That pi-TCethto the bon"." 

I little heed thy idle rede; 
I will have that or none." 

7 

" Thr r-d,red los- it hath a thorn, 
Tiiat pierc-th tothe heart " 

" T!i'' red, red rose, O I will hav--, 
1 little h^rd th^ smart." 

8 

Sli= stooped down unto th-' grqun". 

To pluck the rose so red . 
The thorn it pierced h'-r to the heart, 
■\a i this fair mai i was d'-ad . 

9 

There ^tood a gardener at th- gat-*, 
UVh cypress in his hani. 

And he did say, "let no fair may. 
Come i ntc Dea i Ma! i's Lan i ." 



May be omitt-'d in singing. 

' 1 *. 1617? 



228 



SHOWER AND SUNSHINE. 



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wond'rous brnath pass-^d o - v^^r m^; And st^jepf^dall my soul in pain. 




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^i>lOS. SHOWER AND SUNSHINE . 
1 

Th-T'- Wf^nt a wind ov^:r the sea, 
And borne on its wings was rain . 

A wond'rous breath passed over me. 
An i ste-ped all my soul in pain . 
I wept,l>ijt 1 wpt in vain. 

2 

Along w ith the wind went a sigh. 
And shaduws tell deep around ; 

In darkness 1 lay, with desolate cry, 
Despairing I toss'd on the ground; 
in anguish and fear profound. 

3 

The sun in the sky shines clear; 

And glittTing after rain. 
The flowers in brighter titrts <<] pear, 
A rainbow o'er aiches th" plain. 
I W'-pt—hut 1 wept not in vain. 

4 

Thou love art the mightiest gale, 
To shatter to wither and rive. 

Thou makest all nature grow fresh and hale. 
Thou dost the whole world revive. 
I was deadj and am now alive , 



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.r.^fa.9. HAYMAKING SONG . 
1 

Tht^ gold-in sun is shining bright , 

Th^! d-^w is offthsfi^ld; 
To us it IS our main delight, 

Thr- fork and rake to wield. 
The pipe and tabor both shall play, 

The viols loudly ring, 
F'roni morn till evi- each summer day, 

As wr- go hay-iiiaklng . 
Chorus: The pipf! and tabor, &c. 

2 

As we my boys haymaking go, 

All in the month of -June. 
Both Tom and Bet, and Jess and .Joe 

Th-ir happy hearts in tune. 
up come lusty Jack and Will, 

With pitchfork and with rake, 
And ap come daintv Doll and Jill, 

The sweet, sweet hay to make. 
Churui: Th-^ pip- and tabor, &c. 
3 

when th-' liayiel all is done, 
Then in the arishgrais, 

The lads shall have tii'-ir till of tun , 
Rach dancing with his lass. 

The goo.i old farmi^r and his wife, 
Shall bring the best of cheT, 

1 would it were, aye, odds my lifel 

Hay-making all th" y^ar. 
Chorus: The pipe and tabor, Sco. 



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IN BIBBERLEY TOWN, 



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^1^9 WO. IN BIBBERLEY TOWN . 
1 

In Bibb-rlry town a maid did dw^ll, 

A buxom lais, as I've hr^ard t-^l! ; 

As straight as a wan-i, just twenty two, 

And many, a bachelor had h-r in virw. 

Ri fa] d^ ral diddl-, ri fal de ral de-, 
Uhat ups and downs in thf world th-re be ? 

2 

This maid so bf^autiful fair and f ri^e , 

Was sought by a squire of high dr^grrje; 
W". courted hr-r hon'-stly for his wif-, 
But sh'^ could'nt v^ntur"; so high 'r. hf-!. 
Ri fal d-ral &c. 

3 

A tinlc^r th-T-- cam-- to m-n i th^- kfttlp, 
Sh*- f"-!! in lovH wifhthf man of iii>?tal ; 
His songs and his jok-^s won her hsart and Wx hand, 
And she promised with liim in the church to stand . 
Ri fal d-- ral &c. 

4 

They wed, and this jovial mender of pots 
Proved only a brute and the prince of sots ; 
He bfat her, he Starved her, she gave him the slip. 
And Hack to Bibberl^y town did trip. 
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She found that the Squire her formT tlani- 
Had woocd and married a wealthy dame. 
But a vacant place in the house sh^took, 
And, instead of his wifV, she becam- his cook. 

Ri fal dp ral diddle, ri fal de ral de*- ; 

VVhat ups and downs in the world thHr" be ! 



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ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



Name of Song. 


WOUDS. 


Name of Tune. 


No. OF 

Song. 


Adam and Eve 


O.W. 


Traditional 


100 


All in a Garden 


N.W. 


As Polly Walked Out 


105 


A Maiden sat a Weeping 


O.W. 


Traditional 


39 


An Evening so Clear ... 


N.W. 


It ... ... 


41 


A Niittins; we will Go ... 


Altered 


n ... ... 


83 


Arscott of Tetcott 


Altered 


11 ... ... 


2 


Asjohnny Walked Out 


O.W. 


», ... ... 


II 


A Sweet Pretty Maiden 


N.W. 


A Maiden sweet in May 


35-^ 


A Ship came Sailing ... 


O.W. 


Traditional 


85 


Barley Raking, The 


Altered 


f, ••• •*. 


85 


Barley Straw, The 


Altered 


)i *.. •,. 


93 ' 


Bell-ringing, The 


O.W. 


», ... ... 


82 


Bibberley Town 


N.W. 




no 


Blackbird in the Bush ... 


N.W. 


(•Three Pretty Maidens a^ 
i Milking did Go... ) 


90 - 


Blow Away, ye Morning Breezes 


O.W. 


Traditional 


25 


Blue Flame, The 


N.W. 


Rosemary Lane ... 


67 


Blue Muslin ... 


O.W. 


Traditional 


22 


Bold Dragoon, The 


Altered 


,1 «•• ... 


65- 


Bonny Blue Kerchief, The 


O.W. 


fi ... ... 


40 


Bonny Bunch of Roses, The ... 


O.W. 


,, ... ... 


27 


Brixham Town 


O.W. 




9 


Broadbury Gibbet 


N.W. 


A 2nd to " My Lady's Coach" 


62 - 


Broken Token, The 


Altered 


Traditional 


44 "^ 


By Chance it was 


O.W. 





I 


Childe the Hunter 


O.W. 


2nd to " Cold blows theWind " 


33 


Chimney Sweep, The ... 


O.W. 


Traditional 


20 


Cicely Sweet ... 


O.W. 


II ... ... 


35 


Cold Blows the Wind ... 


O.W. 


), ... ... 


6 


Come, my Lads 


O.W. 


1, •.• 


76 


Constant Johnny 


O.W. 


,t ■.• ... 


80 


Cottage Thatched with Straw ... 


O.W. 


,) ... ... 


34 


Country F'armer's Son... 


N.W. 


1, ... ... 


69 


Cupid the Ploughboy ... 


Altered 


If ... ... 


75 


Deadmaid's Land 


O.W. 


( 3rd tune to " Cold blows the ■) 
I Wind" ... i 


107 


Death and the Lady ... 


O.W. 


Traditional 


99 


Deep in Love ... 


O.W. 


II ... ... 


85 


Dilly Song, The 


O.W. 


11 ... ... 


73 


Down by a River Side ... 


O.W. 


II ••• ... 


84 


Drowned Lover 


O.W. 


II ••• ... 


32 


Drunken Maidens 


O.W. 


II ... ... 


94 


Duke's Hunt, The 


O.W. 


II ... ... 


Si 


Everlasting Circle 


O.W. 


n »•• ." 


104 


Fair Girl, mind tliis ... 


O.W. 


II ... ... 


72 


Fair Susan Slumbered... 


N.W. 


In Yonder Grove ... 


95- 


False Lover, The 


O.W. 


Traditional 


97 


Farewell to Kingsbridge 


O.W. 


II ... ... 


55 


Farmer's Son, The 


N.W. 




69 


Fathom the Bowl 


O.W. 


It •■• ... 


14 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



Name of Song. 



Flowers and Weeds ... 

Gipsy Countess 
Golden Furze in Bloom 
Golden Vanity, The 
Green Bed, The 
Green Broom ... 
Green Bushes, The 
Green Cockade, The ... 

Grey Mare, The 

Hal-an-Tow ... 

Haymaking Song 

Hearty Good Fellow, The 
Henry Martyn 

Hostess' Daughter, The 

Hunting the Hare 

I'll build myself a gallant Ship ... 
I rode my httle Horse ... 

Jan's Courtship 

Jolly Gosshawk, The ... 

Last of the Singers, The 
Loyal Lover ... 

Lullaby 

May-day Carol ... ... 

Mallard, The ... 
Midsummer Carol 
Miller's last Will 

My Garden grew plenty of Thyme 

My Lady's Coach 

Nancy 

On a May Morning 
Ormond the Brave 
Orchestra, The 
Oxen Ploughing, The ... 

Painful Plough, The ... 
Parson Hogg ... 
Ploughboy, The 
Plymouth Sound 
Poor Old Horse 
Punch Ladle, The 

Rambling Sailor, The ... 
Rout is out, The 
Roving Jack ... 

Sailor's Farewell 
Saucy Ploughboy, The... 
Saucy Sailor, The 
Seasons, The ... 
Silly old Man, The ... 
Single and Married Life 



Words. 



( pt. old ■^ 

( pt. new i 

O.W. 

N.W. 

O.W. 

Altered 

O.W. 

O.W. 

Altered 

< pt. old •( 

(. pt. new 3 

O.W. 
Cpt. old -^ 
(. pt. new J 

O.W. 

O.W. 

N.W. 
O.W. 

Altered 
O.W. 

O.W. 
O.W. 

N.W. 
O.W. 

(pt. old ■( 
i pt. new i 

O.W. 

N.W. 

O.W. 

O.W. 
(pt. old ■( 
[ pt. new ) 

O.W. 



O.W. 

N.W. 
O.W. 
N.W. 
O.W. 

O.W. 
0.\V. 
O.W. 
N.W. 
O.W. 
O.W. 

Altered 
O.W. 
O.W. 



Name of Tune. 



Traditional 



Gosport Beach 
Traditional 



( To London Town when '^ 
^ first I came ... ) 

Traditional 



Little Girl down the Lane . 
Lady and Apprentice 

Traditional 



Seventeen on Sunday 
Traditional 
Cruel Miller 
Traditional 



O.W. 




N.W. 


Salisbury Plain 


O.W. 


Traditional 


O.W. 


11 


O.W. 




O.W. 


11 



No. OF 

SONO. 



50 
56 
64 
91 
10 

43 

37 

51 

24 
109 

26 

53 

70 - 
106 

103 

lOI 

31 

71 

28 
92 

4y 

47 
79 

t'9 
12 

7 
30 

48 

73- 

13 

63 

57 

61 
5 
59 
54' 
77 
14 

87 

45 
8 

38 

102 

21 

19 
18 
88 



ALPHABETICAL INDEX. 



Name of Song. 


Words. 


Name of Tune. 


No. OP 
Song. 


Something Lacking 


O.W. 


Traditional 


58 


Spotted Cow, The 


Altered 


1, ... ... 


74 


Squire and Fair Maid, The 


O.W. 


,, 


23 


Strawberry Fair 


Altered 




68-^ 


Streams of Nantsian, The 


C slightly -^ 
faltered ) 


„ 


93 


Sunshine and Shadow... 


N.W. 


I sowed the seeds of Love ... 


95 


Sweet Nightingale 


O.W. 


Traditional 


■5 


There went a Wind ... 


N.W. 


I sowed the seeds of Love ... 


95 


Tobacco is an Indian Weed 


O.W. 


Traditional 


95 


Trees they are so High, The ... 


O.W. 


,, ... ... 


4 


Trinity Sunday 


N.W. 


f'As I walked out one^ 
i beautiful morning " ) 


66 


'Twas on a Sunday .Morning ... 


N.W. 


( Traditional Alteration (?) ") 
I from Mori ... j 


3 


Tythe Pig, The 


O.W. 


Traditional 


29 


Warson Hunt, The 


O.W. 


}i ... ... 


42 


Why should we be Dullards Sad 


O.W. 




46 


Widdecombe Fair 


O.W. 


,1 ... ... 


16 


Wreck off Scilly, The ... 


O.W. 


,, 


52 


Wrestling Match, The... 


O.W. 




60 


Ye Maidens Pretty 


O.W. 


,1 


17 



Tunes have been unaltered except where mentioned in Introduction. O.W. for Old Words 
N.W. for New Words. 



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