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Full text of "The songs of Robert Burns : now first printed with the melodies for which they were written : a study in tone-poetry : with bibliography, historical notes and glossary"

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THE GLEN COLLECTION 
OF SCOTTISH MUSIC 
Presented by Lady Dorothea Ruggles- 
Brise to the National Library of Scotland, 
in memory of her brother, Major Lord 
George Stewart Murray, Black Watch, 
killed in action in France in 1914. 
28i7t Januarp 1927. 



hduced facsimile of turns' ^olograpfi. 

By permission of William Law, Esq. Littleborough. 



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THE SONGS 

OF 

ROBERT BURNS 

NOW FIRST PRINTED WITH THE MELODIES 
FOR WHICH THEY WERE WRITTEN 

A STUDY IN TONE-POETRY 



WITH BIBLIOGRAPHY, HISTORICAL NOTES, AND 
GLOSSARY 



JAMES C. DICK 




HENRY FROWDE 
LONDON, EDINBURGH, GLASGOW, AND NEW YORK 

1903 



OXFORD : HORACE HART 
PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY 



To mark an appreciation of a long, though 

intermittent, friendship, I Dedicate this 

edition of the Songs of Robert Burns 

and Collection of Folk-Music to 

JOSEPH JOACHIM 

MUS. DOC. 

who, during his life, has nobly sustained 
the dignity of Music 



. PREFACE 

In bringing together for the first time the songs of Robert 
Burns with the melodies for which they were written I do not 
propose to criticize either. So far as the verses are concerned they 
have remained famous for more than a century, and are hkely to 
continue famous independent of any Hterary criticism. So far as 
the airs are concerned — airs which go to make up the folk-music 
of Scotland; that particular form of unconscious art of which the 
vehemence, pathos, and often eccentric progressions have been 
known outside the limits of the country for the last 250 years — 
want of space forbids any criticism. A merely verbal description 
of music cannot convey any real impression to the general reader, 
and an imperfect technical account of Scottish music would be 
unsatisfactory to the expert. Both will doubtless prefer to read 
the music for themselves and form their own opinions. For this 
reason the Preface will be confined to an explanation of (i) 
Burns's own theory as a song-writer, (2) how he carried it into 
practice, and (3) what his qualifications were for writing and 
adapting his verses to pre-existing nausic. 

To begin with, then, the term song as it is now used admits of 
more than one meaning. Originally it meant — and was invari- 
ably — a combination of poetry and music, something to be sung. 
It did not mean, as it often means nowadays, vei'se with or with- 
out tune ; nor was it, like the songs of most modern poets, purely 
literary verse to which music might accidentally be attached. For 
Burns's songs, peculiarly, this latter meaning is insufficient, and 
I designate Burns a tone-poet because he wrote for music, and 
his songs with their airs are a study in tone-poetry. 

His Commonplace Book (recording his experience about the age 
of twenty-three, and before he was known to the world) makes 
this evident, and shows beyond all doubt that he always associated 
music with his songs. Speaking, for example, of a forgotten old 
song of which he remembered that the verse and the tune were 
'in fine unison with one another,' he says that when one would 



vi PREFACE 

compose to these Scottish airs ' to sough [hum] the tune over and 
over is the readiest way to catch the inspiration and raise the Bard 
into that glorious enthusiasm so strongly characteristic of our old 
Scotch poetry ^.' Again, late in life, when he declined to write for 
an unfamiliar air, he explains that until he was master of a tune 
in his own singing he never could compose for it, adding that his 
invariable way was to consider the expression of the music and 
choose his theme, ' humming every now and then the air with the 
verses I have framed ^.' So invariable with him was this way of 
writing that his first song was made for the favourite reel of the 
girl he loved, and his last for the 'difficult measure ' of a 'beautiful 
strathspey ' ; and (though it may be that he was elevating the 
music he wrote for at the expense of his own reputation as a 
poet) when he said that some of his songs were often mere 
rhymes to express airs, he spoke a literal truth. 

Nevertheless, though he knew more of the popular music of 
his country than any man of his time, and he is unique ^ among 
distinguished poets in writing for pre-existing music, this side of 
him has been rarely noticed, if at all. His achievement in the 
reconstruction of old poetry seems to have blinded his critics' 
eyes to his knowledge of its sister art, Scottish music, of which 
he was the apostle. Perhaps his very uniqueness in this respect 
has caused it to escape notice. Old melodies as a vehicle for 
song have been despised or ignored by literary poets themselves, 
from Corneille, who execrated the commands of his royal master to 
write for them, saying that a hundred verses cost him less than two 
words of a song * {que deux mots de chanson), to Lord Byron, who, 
after trial, flatly refused to be harnessed in music ^ And though 
the exquisite songs of the Elizabethan poets were made to be sung, 
and many of them are to be found only in contemporary music 
books, there is this difference between their work and Burns, that 
the music was composed to fit their words, but his words were 

^ Commonplace Book, 1872, /2. ^ Cf. Note loi. 

' Unless w« accept Marot, whose psalms for secular airs are still in the 
Genevan Psalter, and Luther, who led the Reformation by adopting popular 
melodies for the hymns sung in the Reformed churches. 

* See Tiersot's Chanson Poptclaire, Paris, 1889, 441. 

s See an important letter of Byron in Hadden's George Thomson, 1898, igi. 



PREFACE vii 

written for music ^ Burns adopted what other poets rejected — 
popular airs — and he adopted them consciously. Just as when 
he was taunted with ' the ignominy of the Excise,' he replied that 
he would rather be ' thought to do credit to his profession than 
borrow credit from it ; so when Thomson implied a censure on 
his musical taste, he said that although many cultured persons 
found no merit in his favourite tunes, that was no reason why 
being cheaply pleased ' I should deny myself that pleasure ^.' He 
did not deny himself that pleasure, and as the result his songs are 
an epitome of Scottish music still known and still admired. 

Considering this it is the more remarkable that Burns's 
biographers should with one accord have ignored or omitted 
a description of his musical perception and his treatment of 
music. One would have thought that, apart from his peculiar 
method of writing always to airs — a method which probably goes 
a long way towards explaining why his songs have outlived and 
made of no account the songs of so many other poets — his mere 
musical-editorial talent must have attracted notice. If he com- 
municated to Johnson's Museum only one-half of the forty-five 
traditional airs which Stenhouse assigns to him, the record is 
remarkable enough for an amateur musician. But his biographers 
have not allowed him any musical standing whatever. Currie 
obviously accepted without comment Murdoch's opinion, who said 
of him that he was a remarkably dull boy and his voice untunable, 
and that it was long before he learned to distinguish one tune 
from another ^ A verdict of tune- deafness seems to have been 

^ Dr. Thomas Campion, a musician as well as a poet, composed for his verses, 
but the music, like all conscious art of the polyphonic period, is now forgotten 
and known only to the student. All artistic music fades before the continuous 
progress of the art ; whereas the unconscious and untutored music of nature, 
the simple anonymous airs of the people, which are the basis of -the art, remain 
unimpaired by age. 

^ Works of Robert Burns (Edin. 1877-9, 8vo, 6 vols.), v\. J04. 

^ As John Murdoch, the only schoolmaster of Burns, at the same time said 
that he was the most unlikely boy to be a poet, his observations— from what 
was but an immature and dormant intellect — may be disregarded in the light of 
what came after. Here follows what Murdoch said of Burns and his brother 
Gilbert : — ' I attempted to teach them a little church music. Here they were 
left far behind by all the rest of the school. Robert's ear, in particular, was 
remarkably dull, and his voice untunable. It was long before I could get 



viii PREFACE 

considered proven against Burns, and little or nothing said to 
counteract the belief. So that we find Tom Moore in 1841 
expressing surprise that ' the rare art of adapting words success- 
fully to notes ' should have been exercised by Burns, ' who was 
wholly unskilled in music ^,' and Robert Chambers, in his garrulous 
Life of Burns, ineptly remarking on the subject that Burns thought 
himself a kind of musician. Thus widely may biographers miss 
the point. 

From the writings of Burns, and particularly from the Thomson 
letters and MSS. in the British Museum, it is possible to describe 
with some accuracy his musical knowledge and acquirements. It 
may be granted at once that about the higher forms of the musical 
art he knew little and cared less. He never heard a symphony 
or a string quartette^, and though at the houses of some of his 
friends he listened to sonatas on the harpsichord, they raised in 
him neither emotion nor interest. His knowledge of music was 
in fact elemental ; his taste lay entirely in melody, without ever 
reaching an appreciation of contrapuntal or harmonious music. 
Nor, though in his youth he had learned the grammar of music 
and become acquainted with clefs, keys, and notes at the re- 
hearsals of church music, which were in his day a practical part 
of the education of the Scottish peasantry ^, did he ever arrive at 

them to distinguish one tune from another . . . and certainly, if any person who 
knew the two boys had been asked, which of them was the most likely to 
court the muses, he would surely never have guessed that Robert had a pro- 
pensity of that kind ' (Currie's Works of Robert Burns, Liverpool, 1 800, 
i. 91). 

' Moore, in the Preface to his Works, 1841, vol. v., says, ' Robert Burns was 
wholly unskilled in music; yet the rare art of adapting words successhdly to 
notes, of wedding verse in congenial union with melody, which, were it not for his 
example, I should say none but a poet versed in the sister art ought to attempt, 
has yet, by him, with the aid of a music, to which my own country's strains are 
alone comparable, been exercised with so workmanly a hand, as well as with so 
rich a variety of passion, playfulness, and power, as no song-writer, perhaps, but 
himself, has ever yet displayed.' Farquhar Graham, in his Notes on the Songs 
of Scotland, stated briefly the result of an inquiry into the musical training 
and acquirements of Burns, but it received no attention and has been 
forgotten. 

2 At a performance of The Messiah of Handel he remarked on the infinite 
pathos of the air ' He was despised.' 

^ Currie, i. 11 



PREFACE ix 

composition, except in the case of one melody which he composed 
for a song of his own at the age of about twenty-three, and this 
melody displeased him so much that he destroyed it and never 
attempted another \ In the same way, although he practised the 
violin, he did not attain to excellence in execution, his playing 
being confined to strathspeys and other slow airs of the pathetic 
kind ^. On the other hand, his perception and his love of music 
are undeniable. For example, he possessed copies of the prin- 
cipal collections of Scottish vocal and instrumental music of the 
eighteenth century, and repeatedly refers to them in the Museum 
MS. and in his letters. His copy of the Caledonian Pocket 
Companion (the largest collection of Scottish music), which copy 
still exists with pencil notes in his handwriting, proves that he was 
familiar with the whole contents. At intervals in his writings he 
names at least a dozen different collections to which he refers and 
from which he quotes with a personal knowledge. Also he knew 
several hundred different airs,- not vaguely and in a misty way, but 
accurately as regards tune, time, and rhythm, so that he could 
distinguish one from another, and describe minute variations in 
the several copies of any tune which passed through his hands. 
The Thomson letters (and particularly one about September, 
1793, only published in part by Currie) contain a description or 
criticism of over One hundred melodies. Many of the airs he 
studied and selected for his verses were either pure instrumental 
tunes, never before set to words, or the airs (from dance books) of 
lost songs, with the first lines as titles. That he sometimes 
esteemed the air of a song more than the words is clear from his 
saying, ' Better to have mediocre verses to a favourite air than 
none at all ^.' It is hard to believe that a poet with such prefer- 

^ Cf. Note 312. 

^ On a private copy of his Epistle to Davie he describes himself as a brother 
fiddler, and in his humorous anonymous letter to Sharpe of Hoddam he styles 
himself a fiddler and a poet ( Works, v. j66) . 

^ Note 91. Compare his statement made in requesting permission to insert 
a song of the Duke of Gordon's in the Mtiseum — that he was assisting in 
collecting old poetry and for a fine air making a stanza when it had no words 
{Works, iv. 2C)j). Also his apology for many trifling songs, which, as he 
explains, are due to the fact that many beautiful airs wanted words, and 
he was obliged to pass in a hurry what he had written (Note 19). 



X PREFACE 

ences should have been considered tone-deaf. Of his practical 
acquaintance with music, his letters to his publishers^ wherein he 
details how he wrote for airs, where the best sets of them are to 
be found, and how he wished them printed with his verses, show 
the truth. Concerning Song No. 126^ for example, he gives 
instructions that ' the chorus is the first or lower part of the tune, 
and each verse must be repeated to go through the high or second 
part.' For another song (No. 1^2) he refers the printer to the 
book where the music is to be found. With all the knowledge 
of an antiquarian he tells Thomson how the notation of the 
humorous tune When she cam ben she bobbit should be printed ^ 
and for another^ he technically describes the music as it appears 
in the collection where he found it, with the alterations that are 
necessary to make it fit his verses. 

Such instances go to show the critical interest Burns took in 
music. But besides this it was his practice to spend considerable 
time in listening to the playing of tunes, that he might become 
familiar with the correct swing and cadence of the melodies and 
form an impression of their m£aning. Professor Walker relates 
how he was calling on Burns in Edinburgh for some particular 
purpose, and found him so engrossed in correcting his songs, while 
the tunes were being played on the harpsichord, that he would 
listen to nothing else. Burns himself tells Clarinda, ' I have just 
been composing to different tunes V ^i^d tells Cunningham that 
The Sitter's Dochter ' is a first-rate favourite of mine, and I have 
written what I reckon one of my best songs to it *.' And it was 
this practice of listening to airs and studying their meaning that 
made of him not merely an enthusiastic collector of traditional 
airs, but also the means of getting them printed. At home, 
during the Highland tours, and in his excursions through the 
South of Scotland, he collected unknown and rare melodies as if 
it were his business. As he writes to Thomson, ' I have still 
several MS. Scots airs which I picked up mostly from the singing 
of country girls ^' The book in which he copied these traditional 
airs, if it still exists, is not known (though, as I have said, Sten- 

' Note 151. 2 j^j^tg ^8. 3 Note 84. * Note 87. 

5 Works, vi. 24"], where he sends a beautiful little air which he ' had taken 
down from viva voce.' 



PREFACE xi 

house assigns to him about forty-five of those in the Miiseinn ^) ; 
and it has been doubted whether Burns was capable of writing 
the notation of viva voce airs. It is true that Clarke, the musical 
editor of the Museum, often did this for him ; but it is equally true 
that Clarke could not always be present when wanted, and it is 
more than probable that Burns in many cases did it alone with the 
aid of his violin. For, gifted as he was with a retentive memory, 
and — as has been shown — with an acute ear for musical sound, 
combined with a passionate love of Scottish melody, his genius 
would enable him to do readily what would be laborious for an 
ordinary amateur, nor can I see any reason why his remark, 
' I took down the tune from the voice of a girl,' or some other 
unconditional statement, should not be accepted literally. In 
fact he obtained many of the fugitive airs from his wife, who was 
a good natural singer, and from Kirsty Flint, among others, a 
masculine woman who took pleasure in showing off her vocal 
powers to him ^. Two of the best airs discovered by Burns were 
obtained in the same manner ; one, Ca' the Yowes ^, from the voice 
of a friendly minister of the Kirk, and Craigieburn Wood^ (for 
which he wrote two sets of verses) from the singing of a girl. He 
first heard the Gaelic air of Song No. ^f, The Banks of the Devon, 
from a lady in Inverness, and ■" got the notes taken down ' for the 
Museu?H, and obtained for Johnson a better set of the tune of 
No. icfj than that supplied by Dr. Blacklock ®. 

So much for Burns's musical experience, about which there is 
little more to say, except that he was himself a mediocre vocalist 
with a rough but not an untunable voice. He was constrained 
in company sometimes to sing, but he was conscious of his defect, 
and avoided any exhibition of the kind as much as possible ^ 
But though his musical training and practice may have been no 

'^ The MSS. of most of his historical and traditionary airs have disappeared, 
except two or three pieces from his hand, of which one, The German lairdie, is 
now printed for the first time on p. 336. 

^ Professor Gillespie, from personal observation, related how Burns was in the 
habit of tying his horse outside her cottage door and sitting by her fireside while 
she sang ' with a pipe of the most overpowering pitch.' 

^ No. 114. * No. 90. 

^ Extensive references to Burns and music will be found on p. 535 infra. 

' To a friend, no more gifted than himself, he exclaimed, ' Heaven knows we 
are no singers ! ' {IVorks, V.J64). 



xii PREFACE 

more than that of any ordinary amateur, his attachment to melody 
and wide knowledge of Scottish music, together with his genius, 
fully equipped him for writing verse to illustrate the anonymous 
airs of his country. 

It was in the year 1787 that Burns's opportunity came, and he 
was able to get his verses published with music. From that time 
forwards he wrote scarcely anything else but songs. For the mere 
love of the thing, and without fee or reward, ungrudgingly he 
worked day and night for the last nine years of his life to illus- 
trate the airs of Scotland, and he died with the pen in his hand. 
His farming brought him no riches, his business of gauger only 
weariness, his songs nothing at all — then. But it is by his songs 
that he is best known and will be longest remembered. This he 
forecast himself : yet, curiously enough, only sixteen songs are in 
the last authorized edition of his Works \ though by this time he 
had probably contributed upwards of two hundred to both John- 
son's Museum and Thomson's Scotish Airs. These he never 
publicly claimed, only disclosing himself as the author of some of 
them in private letters to intimate friends^. So that besides 
working voluntarily and simultaneously for these two collectors — 
neither of whom would have succeeded without his constant help 
— he even denied himself the name of author ^ 

A few words about the general musical rage of this time, and 
about these two music books in particular, may be useful at this 
place. It must be borne in mind that when Burns began to write 

^ Edition of 1794. 

^ It is important to remember, as a consequence of this, tliat all his songs in 
modern editions of his Works (except a fraction) have been accumulated by 
degrees, and are the insertions of a succession of editors. When Burns resolved 
in 1796 to publish a musical selection of his songs, death prevented him from 
carrying the resolution into effect {Works, vi. 2//). 

* With the exception of a few songs bearing his name in the Index, all his 
writings in Johnson's Museum were published anonymously during his life. 
His name is attached to a large number of songs in many copies of the Mtiseuin, 
but not in those of the first issue ; the insertion of it in later reprints being 
posthumous. Many erroneous inferences have been drawn from the assumption 
that Burns acknowledged the insertion of his name. Compare the copy of the 
Miisetim in the British Museum, where Burns's songs in vols, ii.-v. are all 
anonymous, except a few with B. and R. marked by the publisher. A description 
of the original edition of the Museum is in the Bibliography following. I 
possess three copies of some of the early volumes, all with different title-pages. 



PREFACE xiii 

for the Museum he had comparatively only a small number of 
vocal airs to choose from. In all the various collections pub- 
lished up to 1787 there were not two hundred different Scottish 
airs printed with verses, and of these Johnson had utilized a good 
proportion in the first volume of the Museum — that is, before 
Burns became connected with it. The greater number, therefore, 
of the airs for which Burns wrote were only to be found in instru- 
mental or dance books, and consisted of pure reels and strathspeys, 
which had never before had words, or of the tunes of lost and 
forgotten songs ^. 

In these numerous instrumental collections of the eighteenth 
century, and particularly those of the latter half, when Burns 
flourished, is stored the most characteristic Scottish music in 
peculiar scales and with eccentric intervals. Never before had 
there been such a plentiful crop of Scottish dance and other 
music, and never has there been since. Dancing in Scotland^ 
had reached its climax. In Edinburgh every coterie had 'Assem- 
blies,' and each of the resident dancing-masters followed suit. 
Captain Topham ', on a visit to Edinburgh, was amazed at the 
vigorous dancing practised in the Northern Capital. Every class 
indulged in it — -duchess and housemaid and grave professor ahke 
— and danced for dancing's sake. And it was to find appropriate 
words for some of these dance tunes that Burns set himself. 
Before he could do this he was obliged to study their accent 
and rhythm. This was no difficult task for him as long as he 
was free to choose or reject ; but when the egregious Thorhson 
not only selected airs for him, but tried even to dictate the ortho- 
graphy of his text, it became hard enough. ' These English 
verses gravel me to death,' he groans ; or, when criticized, declines 
to alter his words, and says with regard to a disliked air, ' the stuff 
won't bear mending.' And, as a result of his compliance in other 
cases, the Thomson series contain — among a number of brilliant 

* In some cases Bums utilized the whole tune, in others he selected particular 
movements or measures of the air for the verses he proposed to write. 

^ At the close of the century reels and strathspeys became fashionable in 
London, and the habittiis of Almack's engaged Niel Gow, the famous fiddler in 
the North, to lead the music in their ball-room. 

^ Letters from Edinburgh, 1776, 262. 



xiv PREFACE 

songs — many no better than the average artificial product of the 
eighteenth-century song books, and quite beneath the standard of 
the genius of Burns ^ 

Nevertheless it was from his intimate connexion with this pub- • 

lication and with the Scois Musical Museum that Burns became an 

extensive writer of songs. To Scotish Airs he contributed verses, 

partly at his own discretion, partly at the request of the proprietor 

— ^though in neither case had he power to decide what should- 

be published^. Of the Museum he was the real though concealed 

editor from a little after the time when, being engaged then in 

correcting the proofs of the Edinburgh edition of his Works, he 

made Johnson's acquaintance. James Johnson was a practical 

engraver in Edinburgh. In February, 1787, with the assistance 

of two gentlemen interested in the anthology of Scotland, he 

had projected and advertised a ' Collection of Scots, English, and 

Irish Songs in two neat 8vo volumes. . . .' The first volume was 

nearlyready when Johnson met Burns, and it is surmised that Burns 

suggested the title of Scois Musical Museum, under which title the 

volume — despite the more accurate description given of it in 

the advertisement — appeared in May. Burns eagerly grasped the 

opportunity of associating himself with a work which eventually 

he remodelled and extended into six volumes. His position of 

author, editor, and contributor of verse became more and more 

established as the original advisers of the publication fell into the 

rear. His sole assistant was a professional musician, Stephen 

Clarke, who corrected technical errors in the music and fitted the 

tunes for presentation to the public in the prescribed form. 

Johnson was unfitted to conduct any work of the kind. He was 

of a simple confiding nature, entirely illiterate, and as poor as 

Burns himself. However, like Burns also, he was an enthusiast 

for the Songs of Scotland. He undertook the cost of printing 

^ The peculiar rhythm of the Caledonian Hunt's Delight only fetched one 
poor stanza of English verses, although it is the popular and favourite air of the 
vernacular Banks 0' Doon (No. 12}). The beautiful strathspey Rothiehiurche 
for his last song (No. 12) is practically obscured because he was constrained 
to write verses of the ordinary sort to please Thomson. 

^ There were fundamental differences between Burns and Thomson, for which 
reason Scotish Airs contains a large number of Burns's songs with editorial 
insertions (both in verse and air) for which Burns is in no way responsible. 



PREFACE XV 

and publishing the work. Burns neither expected nor received 
reward, and the tacit understanding between the two continued, 
and the connexion remained unbroken, up to the death of Burns 
in 1796. Burns always knew Johnson as an 'honest worthy 
fellow,' and in his first extant letter said that he had ' met with 
few whose sentiments were so congenial with his own.' Johnson 
seems to have belonged to the social Crochallan Club, and must 
have had some qualifications to be admitted as one of its members, 
considering that among them were 'rantin roarin Willy' Dunbar, 
the President ; the grisly philosopher — printer Smellie ; the iras- 
cible Latinist Nicol, the writer Cunningham, ' auld Tennant ' 
of Glenconner, Masterton the composer of lVi//j> brew'd a peck 
d mant, and probably Henry Erskine, the most brilliant member 
of the Scottish bar. This was the society in which Burns re- 
created himself after dining with more formal company in the 
then New Town, 

It was after the inspiring Highland tours, in which Burns had 
laid in a good stock of new poetic ideas, that he set to work in 
Edinburgh to reorganize the Museum. The venerable author of 
TuUochgorum, and other friends, were put under contribution, so 
much so that about this time Burns informed a correspondent 
that he had ' collected, begged, borrowed, and stolen all the 
songs ' he could find ^ An accident which confined him to the 
house for a considerable time enabled him within ten months 
from the publication of the first volume to issue the second volume 
of a hundred songs, of which forty were his own, all bright and 
merry and flashing with wit and humour. In the buoyant and 
aggressive preface he remarks that ' ignorance and prejudice may 
perhaps affect to sneer at the simpHcity of the poetry or music of 
some of these pieces, but their having been for ages the favourites 
of Nature's judges — the common people — was to the Editor a suf- 
ficient test of their merit.' Here we have partly exposed the reason 
why Burns concealed himself, and the meaning of the phrase put 
against many of his songs, ' Mr. Burns's old words.' 

The third volume, containing a ' flaming preface,' took nearly 
two years to complete and publish. During the interval he was 

^ Works, iv. 21)8. 



xvi PREFACE 

partly in Mauchline and partly at EUisland — a period which 
included many sorrows, ending in a prudent marriage and a soli- 
tary residence on the banks of the Nith preparing a home for his 
wife. Such was his life while he wrote the Honeymoon and other 
songs '^ for the Museum. 

More than fifty songs in this third volume are his own, and 
during the process of preparation for the press he was' constantly 
informed of the progress of the volume and exhibited the greatest 
interest in it. He asks Johnson ' to send any tunes or anything 
to correct,' and afterwards tells him that when he comes to Edin- 
burgh he will overhaul the whole collection. 

Immediately after the publication of the fourth volume, in 
August, 1 792, the attention of Burns was diverted from the Museum 
by the intervention of George Thomson, and four years elapsed be- 
tween the appearance of the fourth and the posthumous fifth volume, 
which, however, was all sketched and nearly ready for publication 
at the poet's death. Thus, about the end of 1793, Burns informed 
Johnson that he was laying out materials for the fifth volume ; a few 
months later he sent ' forty-one songs,' and still later he requests 
that ' those tunes and verses that Clarke and you cannot make 
out' should be sent to him. In June, 1794, Johnson intimated 
that the fifth volume was actually begun. In March, 1795, Burns 
returned a packet of songs, and a year afterwards had proofs sent 
him to correct. In this way Burns knew the contents of the 
posthumous volume, which was indeed far advanced in the press 
when he died. The surplus songs left over from this and the 
previous volumes constitute nearly one-third of the last and 
sixth volume, yet it took Johnson seven years to complete and 
publish it. 

The Scots Musical Museiun remains the standard collection of 
Scottish Song, and as a work of reference cannot be superseded. 
Considerably more than one-half of the pieces in the following 
pages were originally published there, and next to the authorized 

1 A facsimile, which follows the Bibliography, of the holograph list of songs 
proposed for the third volume and heretofore unnoticed is an important 
document. It discloses Burns as the author of a considerable number of songs 
hitherto unsuspected and anonymous, among which may be named Sir John 
Cope (No. 2p/), The Campbells ai-e comin Q:io. jj6), Johnie Blimt (No. Ji/), 
and many others. 



PREFACE xvii 

editions it is the most important authority on the works of Burns. 
It contains, moreover, his most happy and spontaneous effusions, 
published with their melodies, as he wrote them, free from outside 
interference. Johnson without remark acted upon instructions, 
accepted what was sent to him, and printed the verses with the 
tunes selected. And Burns, by portraying in that collection the 
morals and manners of his country with a rare fidelity and 
sympathetic humour, became famous. 

But in the meanwhile Burns had become associated with 
another publication. Immediately after the appearance of the 
fourth volume of Johnson's Museum, George Thomson, a govern- 
ment clerk and amateur musician (who, by the way, always de- 
spised the Museum), applied to Burns to assist him with verses 
for a collection of twenty-five Scottish airs which he would select. 
He said he wanted the poetry improved for 'some charming 
melodies,' and he would ' spare neither pains nor expense in the 
publication.' He declared himself in favour of ' English ' verses, 
which English ' becomes more and more the language of Scotland ' ; 
and he said elsewhere, but not to Burns, that the vernacular was 
to be avoided as much as possible, ' because young people are 
taught to consider it vulgar,' and, with an eye to business, ' we 
must accommodate our tastes to our readers.' How the partner- 
ship with this opportunist in art was maintained is set out in the 
long series of letters now in Brechin Castle. It is amusing to 
remember that Thomson, who engaged Burns to destroy the 
Scottish vernacular, should have been the unconscious instrument 
of its preservation. Burns, although fully occupied with Johnson, 
promptly accepted the invitation conveyed to him, but with con- 
ditions. He would accept no wages, fee, or hire, he would alter 
no songs unless he could amend them, and his own would be 
' either above or below price,' and, if not approved, they could be 
rejected without offence. ' I have long ago,' he says, ' made up 
my mind as to my reputation of authorship, and have nothing to 
be pleased or offended at your adoption or rejection of my verses.' 

The conventional clerk, who was very early impressed with the 
genius, enthusiasm, and industry of his correspondent, rapidly 
extended his aim, and resolved to include in his collection ' every 
Scotch air and song worth singing.' All through the long corre- 

' b 



xviii PREFACE 

spondence he tenaciously held his original opinion of * English ' 
verses and his choice of airs. So far he had the best of the 
arrangement, for Burns wrote many pieces which he disapproved, 
and for airs which he disliked. Only five songs written for Scot- 
ish Airs were published in Burns's lifetime, and these are more 
or less incorrectly printed. For the rest, Thomson was under no 
control, and without compunction altered the text when it suited 
him, added stanzas, and adapted them for unauthorized airs. 
There was, as I have said, little sympathy between the two men. 
Thomson cared nothing for a human lyric, and preferred the 
insipid compositions then current. Burns told him ' exotic rural 
imagery is always comparatively flat,' and, in another place, ' You 
are apt to sacrifice simplicity in a ballad for pathos, sentiment, and 
point.' Again, he tries to console Thomson by saying that the 
English singer will find no difficulty in the sprinkling of the Scot- 
tish language in his songs ^ ; or refuses pointblank to change the 
orthography of a piece with the remark, ' I'll rather write a new 
song altogether than make this English ^.' But Thomson meddled 
and muddled on without regarding him. Airs and verses alike 
had to submit to his editorial jurisdiction. Burns had to complain 
that the accent of his The-lea rig had been altered, and advised 
him to ' let our natural airs preserve their native features.' But 
Thomson preferred his own way ; and when Burns refused to 
rewrite some disputed Hues, he altered them for him. The story 
of Scots wha hae (which I have told in Note 255) illustrates 
particularly the fashion in which Burns was constrained to change 
metre in order to have his ode fitted to a melody which he had 
not contemplated. And though most of the songs written for 
Thomson were spontaneous, and sent to him for approval, he 
would never return those he considered unsuitable, but retained 
them in the manner described. Nevertheless, shortly before 
Burns died, he assigned to Thomson without consideration the 
absolute copyright of the songs he had sent to him. 

Thus Scotish Airs, in five sumptuous folio volumes completed in 
1 8 18, came to contain much of the text of Burns in an untrust- 
worthy form. Its airs, too, with their many editorial improvements, 
are to be disregarded as too artificial. When it is known that 
* Works, vi. 24"]. 2 Note 51. 



PREFACE XIX 

Thomson had the audacity to suggest alterations in the composi- 
tions of the great Beethoven^, who told him that his music was 
not written for schoolgirls, no one need wonder that the songs of 
the amiable Burns were altered and excised. The most that can 
be said for the collection is that it is interesting in so far as it con- 
tains accompaniments by some eminent composers, who failed in 
what they attempted ; and for Thomson the most that can be 
said is that in selecting the famous air for the verses oiAuld Lang 
Syne, he achieved a success which covers a multitude of sins. 

Since I am resolved, for want of space, not to enter in this 
Preface upon any criticism, nor yet to insist (further than is neces- 
sary for an explanation of the purposes of this book) on the 
musical aspect of Burns's songs so uniquely made to melodies, 
nothing really remains to be said except a few words about the 
Text. This, which is unexpurgated, has been drawn from original 
MSS. and the authorized editions, and from the Scots Musical 
Museum, and it is collated with the two modern standard editions 
of the Works of Burns. I have left unnoticed, with a few excep- 
tions, readings in the various writings of the poet other than those 
here selected. Every song and ballad which could be published 
is entire, and the collection is so complete that it includes many 
pieces now printed for the first time as Burns's work. The greater 
number of these pieces appeared originally in the Scots Musical 
Museum from Burns's MSS., most of which are still available for 
reference. More or less all have been reprinted as anonymous 
in miscellaneous publications. The chief authority for inserting 
many of them is Law's MS. List. This list confirms many 
statements of Stenhouse, who had the Museum MSS. through 
his hands early in the nineteenth century. As regards those 
pieces which Burns himself has designated ' Mr. Burns's old 
words,' the evidence is for the most part negative, and further 
investigation may reveal that the original publication was earlier 
than Burns. The presumption is that some of the narrative or 
historical ballads previously existed in some form ; but how little 
or how much Burns altered or amended is unknown to me except 

^ A German editor asserts that ia the Scottish collection Thomson has 
' not only incorrectly printed, but wilfully altered and abridged ' the music of 
Beethoven (Hadden's George Thomson, J4j), 

b2 



XX PREFACE 

in so far as is recorded in the Notes, which are the result of an 
examination of several hundred song books of the seventeenth 
and eighteenth centuries. Until positive evidence is produced 
they, with many others, may remain at least as editorial originals 
of Burns. Among the original authorities which I have consulted 
it is necessary to name the interleaved Scots Musical Museuui, in 
which Burns wrote a large number of ' Strictures ' or Notes on 
Scottish Song. By a singular fatality these four important volumes 
have not been publicly examined until now for nearly a century. 
They contain an unsuspected holograph copy of Auld Lang Syne, 
which is printed on page 208. In the Notes the numerous wilful 
and negligent errors in Cxomok's Reliques of Robert Brims (1808) 
are now pointed out for the first time and corrected, and an abstract 
of Cromek's misdeeds will be found in the Bibliography following. 

For the 303 Airs the Authorities are the poet's writings and 
— occasionally — Johnson's Museum. The tunes in that collection, 
in a few cases, are not those selected by Burns, for the reason 
that the latter had previously appeared in the first volume of the 
collection with other verses. Certain of Burns's songs have not 
until now been printed with any air. Such, for example, are the 
best set of verses of The Banks <?' Doon (' Ye flowery banks o' 
Bonie Doon '), and the powerful invective, The Kirk's Alarm 
(' Orthodox, orthodox ! wha believe in John Knox '), which few 
realize is a song at all ; and ' Amang the trees where humming 
bees ' to the curious air The King d France he rade a race. On 
the other hand, many songs are nearly always published with wrong 
airs. Among others Kantin rovin Robin and 'The gloomy night is 
gathering fast,' which belongs to the beautiful air Roslin Castle. 

The Tunes have been drawn from early MSS. and from the 
numerous vocal and instrumental collections of the eighteenth 
century, including the Museum. Two are from the MSS. of 
Burns and therefore interesting, and a few are rare examples. 
If there has been any system in selecting any particular set of the 
tune, it has been to form a representative collection of examples 
from the earliest sources to the close of the eighteenth century, 
sometimes even at the expense of the verses. Some of the airs are 
at least three hundred years old, and obviously none are less than 
a hundred. Excluding the exceptional English and Irish airs, 



PREFACE xxi 

they form an epitome of Scottish music which probably would 
have been more attractive to the general reader with pianoforte 
accompaniments. But this is not a music book in the modern 
sense, only a quarry for the constructive composer and for the 
student of folk-songs. ' Most of the airs are anonymous. They 
floated in the air for an indefinite time until caught and chained 
by the printing-press. Of a few alone are the composers known, 
those by the friends of the poet, too amiably adopted, being 
among the worst in the collection, with the brilliant exception of 
Willie brew'd a peck d maut. 

I have only to add that, although great care has been taken in 
revising and correcting the Notes, it would be vain to expect that 
all the references are complete. To discover the historical origin 
of the airs, much time has been spent in the examination of a large 
number of musical collections, and those who have experience of 
research among undated books will most readily forgive editorial 
imperfections and errors which have escaped notice in revision. 

My thanks are due for much valuable assistance in the compila- 
tion of this volume. Among others I am indebted to the late 
Thomas Law, of Littleborough, for permission to insert a facsimile 
of the original MS. of Burns, which is referred to under the title 
Law's MS. List, and also for the loan of the copy of the Caledo- 
nian Pocket Companion, which belonged to Burns ; to the Scottish 
Text Society for permission to reprint the verses of Welcum 
Fortoun, on p. xxix, from The Gude and Godlie Ballatis, 1897 ; 
to Mr. George Gray, of the County Buildings, Glasgow, for the 
use of the detached sheets which are referred to in the Notes as 
Gray's MS. Lists, and for the use of some rare song books ; to 
Mr. John Glen, of Edinburgh, for the dates of publication of some 
scarce musical collections, and for the loan of old music books 
and assistance in tracing airs ; to Miss Oakshott, of Arundel 
Square, Barnsbury, London, who permitted me to copy for in- 
sertion the Notes of Burns in the Lnterleaved Museum ; and, 
though last not least, to Professor Joseph Wright, of Oxford, the 
editor of the colossal Dialect Dictionary, for valuable suggestions 
in compiling the Glossary. 

II Osborne Avenue, 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne, ya^, 1903. 



CONTENTS 



Preface 



PAGE 
V 



Bibliography ......... xxv 

Facsimile of Burns's MS. 



Songs : Verse and Air. 
I. Love : Personal 
II. Love : General 

III. Love : Humorous 

IV. Connubial 
V. Bacchanalian and Social 

VI. The Jolly Beggars . 
VII. Patriotic and Political 
VIII. Jacobite 
IX. Miscellaneous . 

Appendix : Uncertain 
„ Unknown 

Historical Notes . 

Glossary .... 

Index of First Lines . 

Index of Tunes . 



I 

lOI 

150 
187 
202 
219 
230 

259 
288 

343 
349 

351 

504 

519 

529 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 



I. WORKS OF BURNS. 

[Burns was born January 25, 1759 ; he wrote his first song in the autumn of 
1773 or 1774 ; published the first edition of his Works in 1786, and the last in 
1794. His connexion with Johnson's Scots Musical Museum began in the 
spring or summer of 1787, and with Thomson's Scotish Airs in September, 
1792, and he continued to contribute to both collections until his death on 
July 21, 1796. The Bibliography of Burns in the ' Memorial Catalogue of the 
Bums Exhibition, 1896. Glasgow: Hodge, 1898,' describes 696 editions of 
the Works of Bums published in the United Kingdom.] 

Hastie MSS., in the British Museum (No. 22,307), include 162 songs, mostly 
in the handwriting of Burns, which he contributed to the Scots Musical 
MtiseufH. 

Dalhousie MS., in Brechin Castle, consists of Letters to George Thomson, 
and songs intended for publication in Scotish Airs. 

Gray's MS. Lists, belonging to George Gray, Esq., of the Coimty Buildings, 
Glasgow, are a number of detached sheets containing the titles of songs pro- 
posed for insertion in the second and subsequent volumes of the Scots Musical 
Museum. The lists are partly in the handwriting of Burns and partly in that 
of James Johnson. 

Law's MS. List, lately in the possession of William Law, Littleborough, 
is a holograph of Burns, entitled ' List of Songs for 3rd Volume of the Scots 
Musical Mtiseum^ which he sent to Johnson in a letter dated April 24, 1789. 
This MS., now referred to for the first time, definitely settles the authorship of 
many songs, some of which in the following pages are printed for the first time 
as the work of Burns. See facsimile following. 

Glenriddell MSS., in the Athenaeum Library, Liverpool, consist of Poems 
and Letters of Burns, presented to Robert Riddell of Glenriddell. 

Interleaved Museum is a copy of the first four volumes of the Scots 
Musical Museum which belonged to Robert Riddell of Glenriddell, and in 
which Burns wrote numerous Notes (or Strictures as he called them) on Songs, 
many of them his own. R. H. Cromek was permitted to examine the volumes 
by the owner, Eliza Bayley, and pages 187 to 306 of his Reliques of Robert 
Burns, 1 808, contain a transcript of the Notes, which are the most interesting 
part of the work. Every editor of Burns has relied implicitly on the accuracy 
of Cromek. Upon the recent discovery of the Interleaved Museum after a 
sequestration of nearly a century, I have been permitted to collate it with 
the Reliques with the following result: Out of 173 Notes printed by 
Cromek only 127 are verbatim copies; eighteen are garbled or imperfect, of 
which four differ entirely from the MS., and another four are written partly by 
Burns and partly by Riddell ; fourteen are written entirely by Riddell or other 
than Burns ; lastly, fourteen are not in the MS. at all, and the leaves of four of 
these have been cut out and are now missing. On the other hand seven short 



xxvi BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Notes by Bums are not printed, and in place of that on Auld Lang Syne in 
Reliques, 282, which is a pure invention, there is a complete and hitherto 
unsuspected holograph copy of the verses of Auld Lang Syne, for which see 
page 208 infra. 

Numerous references and quotations in the following pages from the Reliques 
were set up in type before discovery. These have been since corrected from 
the MS., and so far as they go can be compared with Cromek's work. The 
four volumes of the Lnterleaved Museum, with the autograph of Robert Riddell, 
were left by Mrs. Riddell to her niece Eliza Bayley, of Manchester. A London 
bookseller acquired them for ' an old song,' and, with other Burns's rarities, 
sold them in 1870 out of his catalogue to A. F. Nichols, who bought them 
on the express condition that neither his name nor address should be disclosed. 
After his death in P"eb., 1902, the volumes passed into the possession of 
Miss Oakshott, who permitted me to examine them. 

' Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. By Robert Burns. Kilmarnock : 
Printed by John Wilson, MDCCLXXxyi.' 8vo. The Kilmarnock edition con- 
sisted of 600 copies at a subscription price of three shillings each. 

' Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. By Robert Burns. Edinburgh : 
Printed for the Author, and sold by William Creech, M,DCC,LXXXVii.' 8vo. 
Two separate issues, the skinking and the stinking, so called from a printer's 
error on p. 263. The text of the latter generally agrees with that of the first 
Kilmarnock edition, so far as it goes, 

' Pdems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. By Robert Bums. In two 
volumes. The second edition, considerably enlarged. Edinburgh : Printed for 
T. Cadell, London, and William Creech, Edinburgh, M,DCC,XCIII.' Sm. 8vo. 
Contains twenty additional pieces. 

' Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect. By Robert Bums. In two 
volumes. A new edition considerably enlarged. Edinburgh : Printed for 
T. Cadell, London, and William Creech, Edinburgh. MDCCXCIV.' 8vo. This 
is a reprint of the 1793 edition with a few alterations. It is the last edition of 
the author. 

' The "Works of Robert Burns ; with an account of his life, and a criti- 
cism on his writings. To which are prefixed, some observations on the 
character and condition of the Scottish peasantry. In four volumes. [By Dr. 
Currie.] Liverpool, printed by J. M^Creery, Houghton Street ; for T. Cadell, 
Jun., and W. Davies, Strand, London; and W. Creech, Edinburgh . . . 1800.' 
8vo. 4 vols. 

' Poems ascribed to Robert Burns, the Ayrshire Bard, not contained in 
any edition of his works hitherto published. Glasgow, printed by Chapman 
& Lang, for Thomas Stewart . . . 1801.' 8vo. pp. vi and 94. 

' Beliques of Bobert Bupns ; consisting phiefly of original letters, poems, 
and critical observations on Scottish Songs. Collected and published by R. H. 
Cromek. London : Printed by J. M^^Creery, for T. Cadell, and W. Davies, 
Strand. 180S.' 8vo. 

This is the volume referred to in the preceding note on the Lnterleaved 
Mtiseum. 

'Life of Robert Burns. By J. G. Lockhart, LL.B. Edinburgh: Con- 
stable & Co. 1828.' 8vo. The second edition in 1829. 

' The "Works of Robert Burns. Edited by the Ettrick Shepherd and 
William Motherwell. Glasgow : A. Fnllarton & Co.' 1834-6. i2mo. 
5 vols. 



WORKS OF BURNS xxvii 



' Kilmarnock Edition. In two volumes, revised and extended. The 
Complete Poetical "Works of Robert Burns, arranged in the order of 
their earliest publication. Volume First. Pieces published by the author, 
with new annotations, biographical notices, &c. Edited by William Scott- 
Douglas. Kilmarnock : M^Kie & Drennan. MDCCCLXXVI.' Cr. 8vo. Volume 
Second. ' Pieces published posthumously.' 

' Robert Burns' Commonplace Book. Printed from the original manu- 
script in the possession of John Adam, Esq., Greenock. Edinburgh : privately 
printed. 1872.' 8vo. 

' The "Works of Robert Burns. [By W. Scott-Douglas.] Edinburgh : 
William Paterson. 1877-9.' I^P- ^vo. 6 vols. 

' Centenary Edition.' ' The Poetry of Robert Burns. Edited by 
William Ernest Henley and Thomas F. Henderson.' Edinburgh : T. C. & 
E. C. Jack, Causevk'ayside. 1896-7. 8vo. 4 vols. 

Together, the Scott- Dotiglas and the Centenary are the modern standard 
editions of the complete Works of Burns. 

' Robert Btirns. [Vol. i.] La Vie. [Vol. ii.] Les CEuvres. Auguste 
Angellier. Paris : Hachette & C®. 1893.' Large 8vo. pp. 1038, Remark- 
able as containing the most comprehensive life of Burns yet published, and a 
lengthy description and criticism of Scottish poetry prior to Burns. Angellier 
does not claim Burns as a Frenchman, but he thinks that he is more French 
than English. 

' Poesies Completes de Robert Burns. Traduites de I'ecossais par 
M. Leon de Wailly, avec une Introduction du meme. Paris : Adolphe Dela- 
hays, Libraire. 1843.' 12 mo. 

' Gedichte von Robert Burns. Ubersetzt von Philipp Kaufmann. Stuttgart 
und Tubingen : Verlag der J. G. Cotta'schen Buchhandlung. 1839.' 8vo. 

' De schoonste Llederen van Robert Burns. Uit het Schotsch vertaald 
door Frans de Cort. Brussel : L. Truyts. 1862.' Cr. 8vo. 

'Poesie di Roberto Bvirns. Prima versione italiana di Ulisse Ortensi. 
Parte prima. Modena : E. Sarasino. 1893.' 

' Vijftig uitgesogte Afrikaanse Gedigte, versameld door F. W. Reitz, 
Hoofregter in d'Oranje Vrijstaat. 1888.' Contains translations into the Taal 
of The Cottar s Saturday Night, Tarn 0' Shanter, and Duncan Gray, which are 
curious as being the work of the Secretary of State of the Transvaal, who wrote 
the Ultimatum which precipitated the war in South Africa. 

Other published translations of Bums exist in Welsh, Gaelic, Bohemian, 
Danish, Dutch, Flemish, French, Frisian, German, Swiss-German, Hungarian, 
Italian, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish, and Latin. 

The Merry Muses of Caledonia. A collection of favourite Scotch Songs 
ancient and modern, selected for the use of the Crochallan Fencibles. c. 1800. 

A small surreptitious i8mo volume of 127 pages without imprint or date, 
containing about ninety songs assumed to be copied from a private manuscript 
volume which Burns intended to destroy, and which it is believed does not now 
exist. The references in our Notes are from a genuine copy which belonged to 
the late W. Scott-Douglas. 



xxviii BIBLIOGRAPHY 



II. SONGS AND SONG LITERATURE WITHOUT MUSIC. 

Cowkelbie Sow. A poem of the fifteenth century in the Bannatyne MS. 
and printed in Laing's ' Select Remains of the Ancient Popular Poetry of 
Scotland^ Edinburgh, 1822. A large number of airs, songs, and dances are 
named in the poem, all of which are otherwise unknown. 

Asloan MS., of about the beginning of the sixteenth century, is a collection 
of early poetry. The MS. is imperfect ; and of sixty pieces named in the 
contents thirty-four are missing. It has never been properly examined, and the 
present owner declines access to it. 

' The Complaynt of Scotland, written in 1548, with a preliminary Disserta- 
tion and Glossary. Edinburgh: Archibald Constable, 1801.' [By John 
Leyden.] 8vo. Of the airs, dances^ songs, and tales named in the work 
the greater number are unknown. 

Maitland MS. , in the Pepysian Library, Cambridge, was compiled by Sir 
Richard Maitland, of Lethington (1496-1586). It was bought at the Lauderdale 
sale in 1692 by the diarist, Pepys, who bequeathed it to Magdalen College in 
1703. It consists of two volumes of poetry written from about 1420 to 1585. 
Vol. i., folio, pp. 366, contains 176 pieces. Vol. ii., quarto, 138 leaves, contains 
96 pieces. See Pinkerton's Ancient Scotish Poems, London, 1786 ; and Poems, 
Maitland Club, Glasgow, 1830. 

'Ane compendious bulk of godlie Psalmes and spirituall Sangis collectit 
furthe of sindrie partis of the Scripture, with diueris Vtheris Ballatis changeit 
out of prophane Sangis in godlie Sangis for auoyding of sin and harlatrie. With 
augmentation of sindrie gude and godlie Ballatis not contenit in the first 
editioun. Imprentit at Edinbrugh be Johne Ros for Henrie Charteris. 
MDLxxviii. Cum priuilegio Regali.' i6mo, pp. 16 and 207. [A literal reprint 
was issued by David Laing, Edinburgh, 1868 ; and the Scottish Text Society 
has since reprinted an earlier edition of 1567. The contents are metrical 
versions of some of the Psalms, a selection of hymns, chiefly translations, from 
the German, and (for our purpose) a number of imitations or religious parodies 
of popular secular songs then current. This kind of poetry was written for the 
use of the Reformers in England, Holland, Germany, France, and Italy prior 
to the Scottish collection. The two last-named countries suppressed it. 
Coverdale wrote a ' godlie ' song which would be impossible to print in a 
hymnary of the present day. The ' psalmes ' of a noble lord of Holland, 
Nievelte by name, were published in 1540, and sung in the families and private 
assemblies of the Protestants, ' ut homines ab amatoriis, hand raro obscoenis, 
aliisque vanis canticis, quibus omnia in urbibus et vicis personabant, avocaret,' 
&c. The spiritual songs of CoUetet published in France as late as 1660 are 
scandalously bad. The subject is sketched in M«Crie's Life of John Knox, 
Edinburgh, 1840,^99. See also Douen's Le Psautier Huguenot, Paris, 1878, 
2 vols. 8vo. In connexion with this subject a sang which had been sought in 
vain for many years has just come to light. In 1568 the General Assembly of 
the Kirk unanimously ordered Thomas Bassandine to call in all the copies of 
a psalm buik which he had published without licence, and to keep ' the rest 
unsauld ' until he deleted ' a baudie song out of the end of the psalm booke.' 
Now that a copy of Welcum Fortoun has been discovered it is difficult to 
understand why it should have been singled out for opprobrium and the printer 
so severely punished. The decorum of the verses as compared with some lively 
sangis in the Godlie ballads is presumptive evidence that the Assembly wanted 
an excuse to punish the unlicensed printer. By permission of the Scottish Text 



SONG LITERATURE WITHOUT MUSIC xxix 

Society I reprint the verses as follows from the Gude and Godlie Balla^is, 
Edinburgh, 1897, 222. 



' Welcum Fortoun, welcum againe, 

The day and hour I may vveill blis 
Thow hes exilit all my paine, 

Quhilk to my hart greit plesonr is. 
For I may say that ie^fi men may, 

Seing of paine I am drest, 
I haif obtenit all my pay 

The love of hir that I lufe best. 
I knaw nae sic as scho is one, 

Sa trew, sa kynde, sa luiffandlie, 



Quhat suld I do, an scho war gone? 

Allace ! zit I had leuer die. 
To me scho is baith trew and kynde, 

Worth ie it war scho had the praisej 
For na disdaine in hir I find, 

I pray to God I may hir pleis. 
Quhen that I heir hir name exprest, 

My hart for loy dois loup thairfoir, 
Abufe all vtlier I lufe hir best, 

Until I die, quhat wald scho moir ? ' 



Bannatyne MS. 1568. In the Advocates' Library, Edinburgh. Compiled 
in 1568 by George Bannatyne (1545-c. 1606) in a folio containing about 340 
pieces and other additional poems by later hands. A complete catalogue is 
in Memorials of George Bannatyne, Edinburgh, 1829. The whole has been 
reprinted for the Hutiterian Club. Selections are in Ancient Scottish Poems, 
Edinburgh, 1770 ; and Sibbald's Chronicle of Scottish /^x^^ry, Edinburgh, 1802. 

' A handefull of pleasant delites, containing Sundrie new Sonets and 
delectable Histories, in dmers Kindes of meeter. Newly deuised to the newest 
tunes that are now in use, to be sung : euerie Sonet orderly pointed to his 
proper Tune With new additions of Certain Songs, to very lately deuised Notes, 
not commonly knowen, nor vsed heretofore, By Clement Robinson and diuers 
others. At London : Richard Jhones. 1584.' i2mo, pp. 63. Only a unique 
copy imperfect is known. Reprinted in Arber's English Scholar's Library, 1878. 
Of the first edition of 1566 not any portion has been verified. It is the first 
miscellaneous collection of songs, marked for popular tunes, issued in England. 

' Merry Drollery, or a collection of Jovial Poems, Merry Songs, Witty 
Drolleries. Intermixed with Merry Catches. The first part. Collected by 
W. N. ; C. B. ; R. S. ; L G. ; London, Printed by L W. for P. H.,' &c. [1661]. 
The Second Part with additions in 1671. i2mo. 

' "Westminster Drollery. Or a choice Collection of the Newest Songs and 
Poems both at Court and Theaters. By a Person of Quality. With additions. 
London: Printed for H. Brome at the Gun in St. Paul's Church Yard, &c. 1671.' 
i2mo. 

' Scotch Presbyterian Eloquence Display'd; or, The folly of their teaching 
discover'd from their Books, Sermons, Prayers, &c. With additions. London, 
1694.' Second edition, 4to. 

' A choice Collection of Comic and Serious Scots Poems both ancient 
and modern. By several hands. Part i. Edinburgh : printed by James 
Watson. Sold by John Vallange. 1706.' Cr. 8vo. Part ii. in 1709, and 
Part iii. in 1711. 

This is the first miscellaneous collection of Scottish Secular Poetry published 
in Scotland. It contains only a few vernacular songs. 

' A Collection of Old Ballads corrected from the best and most ancient 
copies extant. With Introductions historical, critical, or humorous. Illustrated 
with copper plates. London : printed for J. Roberts,' &c., 1723—5. i6mo. 
3 vols. 

The Tea- Table Miscellany : a collection of the most Choice Songs, Scots 
and English. By Allan Ramsay. Edinburgh. i8mo. 

Original copies of the several volumes of this work are exceedingly rare. The 
following are the dates of publication : Vol. i. in 1724; vol. ii. in 1724 or 
1725; vol. iii. in 1727; and vol. iv. in 1740. The third volume contains no 



XXX BIBLIOGRAPHY 



Scottish songs, the others are a mixed collection. The eighteenth edition 
appeared in 1792. A presumably unauthorized edition, two volumes in one, has 
the following title : ' The Tea-Table Miscellany ; or Allan Ramsay's Collection 
of Scots Songs. London : Printed by J. Watson over against Hungerford 
Market in the Strand, 1730.' i8mo. pp. 230. In the preface it is styled the 
' fifth edition.' 

The Hive, a Collection of the most Celebrated Songs. London : 
Printed for J. Walthoe, Jun., 1724. i6mo. 4 vols. The last in 1732. 
Contains a criticism on Song Writing by ' Namby-pamby ' Philips. 

' The Vocal Miscellany, a collection of above four hundred celebrated songs ; 
many of which were never before printed. With the names of tlie tunes 
prefixed to each song. The third edition corrected with additions. Dublin : 
Printed by W. Rhames in Capel Street . . . 1738.' i6mo. pp. xx and 340. 
The first edition, London, 1733. 

' The Lark : containing a collection of above Four hundred and seventy 
celebrated English and Scotch Songs none of which are contained in the other 
collections of the same size called The Syren and The Nightingale. With 
a curious and copioUs alphabetical glossary for explaining the Scotch words. 
London: printed for John Osbom . . . 1740.' i8mo. pp. 416. 

' The Charmer, a choice collection of Songs, Scots and English. Edinburgh : 
Printed for J. Yair . . . 1749. i2mo.' The second volume in 1751. The 
second edition in 1752 ; the third in 1765 is subscribed ' Edinburgh : Printed 
for M. Yair, bookseller.' 

' Orpheus : a collection of One thousand nine hundred and seventy- four of the 
most celebrated English and Scotch songs. With a glossary explaining the 
Scotch words. In three volumes. London : Printed for C. Hitch and J. 
Osborn . . . 1749. i6mo.' This is a collection of three volumes under the titles 
— The LinHet, The Thrush, and The Robin, published the same year. 

Collection of Loyal Songs, Poems, &c. London, 1750. Privately 
printed. 

Herd's MS., now in the British Museum, contains songs, ballads, and 
remnants ; it is the foundation of Herd's Collections of Songs published in 
1769 and 1776. Many unpublished pieces are referred to in the Notes. 
Sir Walter Scott and other ballad editors since his time have examined it and 
drawn from it. 

' A Collection of Songs. Edinburgh : Printed by A. Donaldson and J. Reid. 
1762.' i2mo. 

A choice Collection of Scotch and English Songs, taken from the 
Amyrillis, Phoenix, &c. . . . Glasgow, 1764. i2mo. 

The Blackbird : a choice collection of the most celebrated songs . . . , by 
William Hunter, Philo-Architechtonicae. Edinburgh, 1764. i6mo. 

The Lark : being a select collection of the most celebrated and newest songs, 
Scots and English. Edinburgh: W. Gordon, 1765. Vol. i. i2mo. Only one 
volume published. 

' The Masque : a new and select collection of the best English, Scotch, and 
Irish Songs . . . with a great number of valuable originals. ... A new edition 
with great additions. London : printed for Richardson & Urquhart under the 
Royal Exchange,' n. d. i2mo. The first edition in 1761, another in 1768. 
That described above is a few years later. 

' Keliques of Ancient English Poetry : consisting of old Heroic Ballads, 



SONG LITERATURE WITHOUT MUSIC xxxi 



Songs, and other pieces of our earlier Poets (chiefly of the lyric kind). 
Together with some few of later date. By Thomas Percy. London, 1765.' 
3 vols. Second English edition in 1767, third in 1775, fourth edition improved 
1794, fifth in 1 81 2. 

' The ancient and modern Scots Songs, Heroic Ballads, &c. Now first 
collected into one body, from the various miscellanies wherein they formerly 
lay dispersed. Containing likewise, a great number of original songs from 
manuscripts, never before published. Edinburgh : printed by, and for, Martin 
& Wotherspoon. mdcclxix.' i2mo. This is Herd's original edition in one 
volume, which is very rare. 

The Grlasgow Miscellany : a select collection of Scots and English Songs. 
Glasgow, n. d. 8vo. 

' The Caledoniad. A collection of Poems, written chiefly by Scottish 
authors. London: Printed by W. Hay .. . 1775.' i6mo. 3 vols. A curious 
and rare collection of Poems and Songs, including satirical pieces by Sir Robert 
Keith Murray (1732-95), Ambassador-Extraordinary to the Court of 
Vienna. 

' Ancient and Modern Scottish Songs, Heroic Ballads, &c. Collected 
from memory, tradition, and ancient authors. The second edition. In two 
volumes. Edinburgh : Printed by John Wotherspoon for James Dickson and 
Charles Elliot,' mdcclxxvi. i2mo. This is the second edition of Herd's 
Collection. Another and different edition in 1791 by Laurie and Symington. 

' The Wightingale : a collection of ancient and modern Songs, Scots and 
English, none of which are in Ramsdy. . . . Edinburgh : Printed for J. Murray, 
1776.' i2mo. 

Essay on Poetry and Music . . . [Dr. Beattie.] Edinburgh, 1776. Svo. 

' Letters from Edinburgh. [Captain Edward Topham.] Written in the 
years 1774 and 1775 : containing some Observations on the Diversions, Customs, 
Manners, and Laws of the Scotch nation, during a six months' residence in 
Edinburgh. London : J. Dodsley, 1776.' Svo. 

' The Scots Nightingale ; or Edinburgh Vocal Miscellany. A new and 
select collection of the best Scots and English Songs, and a great number of 
valuable originals by Drs. Beattie, Goldsmith, Blacklock, Scrymgeour, Webster, 
Innes, Sir Harry Erskine, Messrs. Tait, Boswell, Ferguson. . . . The second 
edition : with the addition of one hundred modern Songs. Edinburgh : Printed 
by James Murray, Parliament Square, 1779.' i8mo. 

Dissertation on the Scottish Music by W. Tytler, of Woodhouslee. 
First printed at the end of Arnot's History of Edinburgh, 1779. 

' The True Loyalist ; or Chevalier's Favourite. Being a collection of 
elegant songs, never before printed. Also several other loyal compositions, 
wrote by eminent hands. Printed in the year 1779.' i8mo. 

' The Sky-Lark ; or the Lady's and Gentleman's Harmonious Companion. 
Edinburgh,' n. d. i2mo. 

' St. Cecilia ; or the Lady's and Gentleman's Harmonious Companion : being 
a select collection of Scots and English Songs ; many of which are originals. . . . 
Edinburgh : Printed by W. Darling for C. Wilson . . . 1779.' i6mo. 

' Scottish Tragic Ballads. [John Pinkerton.] London: J. Nichols, 1781.' 
Cr. Svo. 



xxxii BIBLIOGRAPHY 



' The Goldfinch ; or New Modem Songster. Being a select collection of the 
most admired and favourite Scots and English Songs, Cantatas, &c. Edinburgh : 
Printed for A. Brown,' n.d. [1782]. i2mo. The first edition was published in 

1777. 

' The Charmer : a collection of songs, chiefly such as are eminent for 
Poetical merit ; among whicii are many originals and others that were never 
before printed in a Song Book. In two volumes. Vol. i. Fourth edition with 
improvements. Edinburgh: Printed for J. Sibbald, &c., 1782.' i2mo. Vol. ii. 
' an entire new collection.' The first volume is a reprint of that of 1765 with 
the exception of thirteen songs substituted for twelve others omitted. 

'Select Seotish Ballads. [John Pinkerton.] London : J. Nichols, 1783.' 
Cr. Svo. 

' The Chearful Companion, containing a select collection of favourite Scots 
and English Songs, Catches, &c.,many of which are originals. Second edition. 
Perth. ... J. Gillies, Bookseller, 1783.' i6mo. 

' The Poetical Museum. Containing Songs and Poems on almost every 
subject. Mostly from periodical publications. Hawick : printed for G. Carr, 
1784.' i6mo. 

The New British Songster. A collection of Songs, Scots and English, 
with toasts and sentiments for the Bottle, Falkirk, 1785. i2mo. 

'The Humming Bird; or a compleat collection of the most esteemed Songs. 
Containing about Fourteen hundred of the most celebrated English, Scotch, and 
Irish Songs. . . . Canterbury: printed and sold by Simmons and Kirby . . . 
1785.' Square i2mo. 

The "British Songster, being a select collection of favourite Scots and 
English Songs, Catches, &c. Glasgow: A. Tillock . . . 1786. i6mo. 

'Ancient Seotish Poems, never before in print, but now published from the 
MS. collections of Sir Richard Maitland of Lethington. . . . With large notes 
and a Glossary. . . . London : Printed for Charles Eiilly . . . 1786.' 2 vols, 
cr. Svo. This is the collection of Pinkerton, who anticipated Ritson in the 
history of Scottish Song. 

' The Busy Bee or Vocal Repository ; being a selection of the most 
favourite songs . . . and a variety of Scotch and Irish Ballads, &c. London : 
J. S. Barr,' n.d. [1790]. i2mo. 3 vols. 

The Edinburgh Syren or Musical Bouquet ; being a new selection of 
Modern Songs. . . . Edinburgh: Thomas Brown, 1792. 24mo. 

Essay on Scottish Songs by John Ramsay of Ochtertyre. Printed in The 
Bee, Edinburgh, 1794, and signed y! Runcole. 

Poetry; Original and Selected. Glasgow : Printed for and sold by 
Brash & Reed, n. d. [1796-7]. 4 vols. i6mo. 

The N"ightingale, a collection of Songs, Scots, English, and Irish. Printed 
for and sold by the Booksellers, 1798. 24mo. 

' Sangs of the Lowlands of Scotland, carefully compared with the original 
editions, and embellished with characteristic designs composed and engraved 
by the late David Allan, Esq., historical painter. Edinburgh : printed and sold 
by David Foulis . . . 1799.' 4to. pp. 222. 



SONG LITERATURE WITHOUT MUSIC xxxiii 

The Polyhymnia: being a collection of Poetry, original and selected, by 
a Society of Gentlemen. Glasgow: John Murdoch, n. d. [1799]' i6mo. 
Twenty Nos. of eight pages each. 

Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border : consisting of historical and romantic 
ballads, collected in the southern coimties of Scotland, with a few of modern 
date founded upon local tradition. Kelso, 1802, for vols. i. and ii; Edinburgh, 
1803, vol. iii. The final authorized edition of this collection by Sir Walter 
Scott was edited by J. G. Lockhart, and published in 1833. 

The Principal Collections of Scottish Ballads are : Jamieson's Popular Ballads 
and Songs, Edinburgh, 1806 ; Finlay's Scottish Historical and Romantic 
Ballads, 'E.Amhmgh, 1808; Illustrations of Nor/hern Antiquities, Edinburgh, 
1814; Gilchrist's Ancient and Modern Scottish Ballads, Edinburgh, 1815; 
Struther's British Minstrel, Glasgow, 1821 ; 'LsXng's Ancient Popular Poetry 
of Scotla7td,^A\x\h\iT^, 1824; Laing's The Thistle of Scotland, Aberdeen, 1823; 
Sh-arpe's A Ballad Book, Edinburgh, 1823; Maidment's A North Coufitrie 
Garland, Edinburgh, 1824 ; Motherwell's Miristrelsy , Ancient and Modern, 
Glasgow, 1827; Kinloch's Ancient Scottish Ballads, London, 1827 ; Kinloch's 
The Ballad Book, Edinburgh, 1827; and Maidment's A New Book of Old 
Ballads, Edinburgh, 1844. 

' Select Scotish Songs, Ancient and Modem. With critical observations 
and biographical notices, by Robert Bums. Edited .by R. H. Cromek. London : 
Printed for T. Cadell and W. Davies, Strand, by J. Mi'Creery. 1810.' 2 vols^ 
Cr. 8vo. The Notes quoted from Bums in these volumes must be received with 
caution. 

' Illustrations of the Lyric Poetry and Music of Scotland. By the late 
William Stenhouse. Originally compiled to accompany the Scots Musical 
Museum, and now published separately, with additional Notes and Illustrations. 
William Blackwood & Sons: Edinburgh aiid London. 1S53.' 8vo. About 
900 pages. Contains a facsimile Letter of Robert Bums. This important 
work on Scottish verse and air was begun prior to the year 1817, was printed 
at the close of 1820, was delayed and ultimately laid aside until 1839, when it 
was first published with additional Illustrations and a copious Bibliography of 
Scottish Music to accompany a new issue of the Scots Musical Museum. 
Stenhouse had the use of the MSS, of Burns's songs which were printed in 
the Museum, and he is more to be depended upon as a commentator of Burns 
than as an historical annotator on music. Although his work is defaced by 
numberless erroneous dates and quotations which have to be verified, it must 
be admitted that he was the first investigator of Scottish music ; and all who 
undertake the subject are obliged to refer to his work as a starting-point. His 
volume contains numerous melodies dispersed in the text. 

' The Poems of the Sempills of Beltrees. Now first collected, with Notes 
and Biographical Notices of their lives. By James Paterson. . . . Edinburgh : 
Stevenson,- 1849.' i2mo. 

Musical Memoirs of Scotland. With Historical Annotations and 
numerous illustrative plates. By Sir John Graham Dalyell. Edinburgh, 1849. 
4to. 

' Scotish Ballads and Songs. [James Maidment.] Edinburgh : Steven- 
son, 1859.' i6mo. 

' The Dialect of the Southern Counties of Scotland : its pronunciation, 
grammar, and historical relations. With an appendix on the present limits of 



xxxiv BIBLIOGRAPHY 



the Gaelic and Lowland Scotch, and the dialectical divisions of the Lowland 
tongue, and a lingnistical map of Scotland. By James A. H. Murray . . . London : 
Asher & Co., 1873.' 8vo. pp. 24S. 

The English and Scottish Ballads. Edited by Francis James Child. 4to. 
In ten parts, or five volumes. 1 88 2-98. The most comprehensive work of 
its kind. 



III. SONGS AND SONG LITERATURE WITH MUSIC 

This list includes all the known original collections of Scottish Song with 
Music, published in Scotland during the eighteenth century. The first printed 
music book was ' The whole Psalmes of David in English meter ' at Edinburgh, 
by Robert Lekprevik, 1564, included in Knox's Liturgy. 

' Cantus, Songs and Fancies. To thre, foure, or five Partes, both apt for 
voices and viols. With a briefe Introduction to Musick, as is taught in the 
Musick-schole of Aberdene by T. D., M'' of Musiok. Aberdene : Printed by 
John Forbes, and are to be sold at his shop, mdclxii.' Sm. ob. 

The second and third editions, varied and enlarged, appeared in 1666 and 
1682 respectively. The collection is chiefly English scholastic part-music. 

'A choice Collection of 180 Loyal Songs, all of them written since the 
two late Plots, viz. the horrid Salamanca Plot in 1678 and the Fanatical Con- 
spiracy in 1683. Intermixt with some new Love Songs. With a table to find 
every song. To which is added the musical notes to each song. The third 
edition with many additions. London : Printed by N. T. . . . Old Spring- 
Garden . . . 16S5.' i6mo. pp. 372. 

'"Wit and Mirth ; or. Pills to purge melancholy. Being a collection of the 
best merry ballads and songs, old and new. Fitted to all Humours, having 
each their proper tune for either voice, or instrument : Most of the songs being 
new set. London : . . . Printed by W. Pearson for I. Tonson, &c., 1719-1720.' 
i2mo. 6 vols. 

This is known as Durfey's Pills. The first edition was published in 1699, 
and the third in 1707. That described above is the fourth edition, the most 
complete, and contains some genuine Scottish airs, with numerous parodies 
of Scottish songs and Anglo-Scottish airs. 

' Orpheus Caledonius : or, a collection of the best Scotch songs set to 
musick by W. Thomson.' London : engraved and printed for the author . . . 
n. d.' [1725]. Folio. Contains fifty songs. This is the earliest collection 
proper of Scottish songs. 

' The Musical Miscellany : being a collection of choice songs, . . . &c. 
London : John Watts,' 1729-31.' Sm. 8vo. 6 vols. The title-pages of vols, 
iii. to vi. are slightly different from above. Contains reprints of some songs in 
the Orpheus Caledonius, and other Scottish Songs. 

A Collection of Original Scotch Songs, with a thorough Bass to each 
song, for the Harpsichord. London : Printed for and sold by J. Walsh, &c., 
n. d. [1731]. Folio. Another collection in 1734 also undated. 

' Orpheus Caledonius ; or, a collection of Scots songs. Set to musick by 
W. Thomson. London: Printed for the author. .. 1733.' 8vo. 2 vols. 
The first volume is a near reprint of that of 1725, the second volume contains 
an additional fifty songs. 



SONG LITERATURE WITH MUSIC 



' Biekham's Musical Entertainer. Printed for C. Corbett at Addison's 
Head, Fleet Street,' n. d. [1737]. Folio. 2 vols. Contains verses, music, 
pictorial head-pieces and ornamental borders, finely engraved throughout by 
Gravelot and Bickham, of 200 songs, printed on one side of the leaf. 

' Calliope ; or, English Harmony. A collection of the most celebrated Eng- 
lish and Scots Songs. Neatly Engrav'd and embellish'd with designs adapted 
to the subject of each song. . . . London : Engrav'd and sold by Henry Roberts 
... in High Holborn, 1739.' 8vo. 2 vols. 

' Universal Harmony ; or, the Gentleman and Ladies Social Companion. 
Consisting of a great variety of the best and most favourite English and Scots 
Songs ... all neatly engraved on quarto copper plates and set to music for the 
voice. . . . London : Printed for J. Newbury . . . 1745.' 4to. pp. 129. 

' The Muses Delight. An accurate collection of English and Italian songs 
. . . set to music . . . and several hundred English, Irish, and Scots Songs, 
without the music. Liverpool : John Sadler,' 1754. 8vo. pp. 32S. 

' Thirty Scots Songs for a voice and harpsichord. The music taken from 
the most genuine sets extant ; the words from Allan Ramsay. Edinburgh : 
Printed and sold by R. Bremner at the Harp and Hoboy,' n. d. [1757]. 
Folio, pp. 33. 

'A Second Set of Scots Songs for a voice and harpsichord. Edinburgh : 
[as above] R. Bremner,' n. d. [1757]. Folio, pp. 33. 

Twelve Scots Songs for a voice or guitar, with a thorough Bass adapted 
for that instrument. By Robert Bremner. Edinburgh, n. d. [1760]. Ob. 4to. 
pp. 18. 

A Collection of the best old Scotch and English Songs set for the 
voice, with accompaniments, and thorough Bass for the harpsichord. . . . 
London : Printed for J. Oswald, n. d. Folio, pp. 36. 

Anthologie Fran90ise, ou Chansons Choisies [by Meusnier de 
Querlon], depuis le 13® siecle jusqu'a present. 1765. 8vo. 3' vols. 

Twelve Songs for the voice and harpsichord. Composed by Cornforth 
Gilson. Edinburgh, 1769. Folio, pp. 14. 

' Vocal Music ; or, the Songster's Companion. Containing a new and 
choice collection of the greatest variety of Songs, Cantatas,' &c. London : 
Printed for Robert Horsfield, n. d. [1770-5]. i2mo. 3 vols. 

Thirty Scots Songs adapted for a voice and harpsichord. The words by 
Allan Ramsay. Edinburgh. . . . N. Stewart & Co., n. d. [c. 1772]. First Book. 
Folio. 3 books. 92 pp. in all. 

A Collection of Scots Songs adapted for a voice or harpsichord. Edin- 
burgh : Printed and sold by Neil Stewart. . . . n. d, [1772]. Folio, pp. 28. 

A new and complete Collection of the most favourite Scots Songs, 
including a few English and Irish, with proper graces. ... By Signor Corri. 
Edinburgh . . . Corri & Sutherland, n. d. [1783]. Folio. 2 vols. pp. 35 
each. 

Rosina. A Comic Opera as performed at the Theatre Royal, Covent 
Garden (a new edition). Composed and selected by W. Shield. London: 
Printed by Goulding, &c., n. d. Folio. Rosina was performed for the first 
time in 1783. 

The Musical Miscellany. A select collection of the most approved Scots, 
English, and Irish Songs, set to music. Perth : Printed by J. Brown, 



xxxvi BIBLIOGRAPHY 



MDCCLXXXVI. i2mo. pp. 347. Inscribed to the Provost, Baillies, and Town 
Council of Perth. The first handbook of songs with music printed in Scotland. 
All preceding collections were 4to or folio size. 

' The Scots Musical Museum, humbly dedicated to the Catch Club, insti- 
tuted at Edin""., June, 1771. By James Johnson. Vol. i. Price 6s. [vignette 
without border]. Edinburgh : Sold and subscriptions taken in by and for the 
publisher, N. Stewart, R. Bremner, Corri and Sutherland, R. Ross, Edin''. and 
all the music sellers in London.' Preface dated May 22, 1787. In the text 
Burns is named once. 

Vol. ii. has the same title-page as tha,t of vol. i. so far as the address at foot, 
which is altered to ' Edinburgh : Printed and sold by James Johnson, Engraver, 
Bells Wynd. Sold also by N. Stewart, R. Bremner, Corri and Sutherland, 
R. Ross, C. Elliot, W. Creech, J. Sibbald, Edin"'. ; A. M«Gowan and W. Gould, 
Glasgow; Boyd, Dumfries; More, Dundee; Sherriffs, Aberdeen; Fisher and 
Atkinson, Newcastle; Massey, Manchester; C. Elliot, T. Kay & Co., No. 332 
Strand ; Longman and Broadrip, No. 26 Cheapside, London.' Preface dated 
March i, 1788. Burns is named once, and that in the Index. 

Vol. iii. Same title-page as vol. ii, except that the vignette has an orna- 
mental border surmounted by a thistle, and the address at foot is enlarged, 
ending with 'J. Preston, No. 97 Strand, London.' Preface dated February 2, 
1790, ends with ' materials for the 4th and in all probability the last volume are 
in great forwardness.' In the Index Burns is marked as the author of six 
songs. 

Vol. iiii. has the same title-page as vol. iii. with the ornamental vignette as 
above described, but with a changed address, which is ' Edin"". Printed and sold by 
Johnson & Co., Music Sellers, head of Lady Stair's Close, Lawnmarket, where 
may be had variety of music and musical instruments lent out, Tun'd and Re- 
paired.' Preface is dated August 13, 1792. In the Index Burns is named as 
the author of six songs. 

Vol. v. The title-page is throughout identical with that of vol. iiii. as follows : 
' The Scots Musical Mtisettm humbly dedicated to the Catch Club instituted at 
Edinburgh, June 1771. By James Johnson. Vol. v. Price 6s. [Vignette with 
an ornamented border surmounted by a thistle.] Edin"". Printed and sold by 
Johnson & Co., Music Sellers, head of Lady Stair's Close, Lawnmarket, where 
may be had variety of music and musical instruments lent out, Tun'd and 
Repaired.' Undated [Dec. 1796]. Preface undated. In the Index only Burns 
is named as the author of fifteen songs, one of which, however, is not his. 

Vol. vi. and last is titled as follows : ' The Scots Musical Museum in six 
volumes consisting of six hundred Scots Songs with proper Basses for the 
pianoforte, &c. Humbly dedicated to the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland. 
By James Johnson. In this publication the original simplicity of our ancient 
national airs is retained unincumbered with useless accompaniments and graces 
depriving the hearers of the sweet simplicity of their native melodies. Vol. vi. 
75. Printed and sold by Johnson, music seller, Edinburgh, to be had at T. 
Preston, 97 Strand, London ; MacFadyen, Glasgow, and at all the principal 
music sellers.' Preface is dated June 4, 1803, and in the Index and Text Burns 
is marked as the author of twenty-six songs. Each volume contains one 
hundred songs. On the completion of the work in 1 803 the title-pages of the 
preceding volumes were altered and made uniform with that of the sixth ; the 
Prefaces were revised and corrected ; and under the titles in the Text of many 
of the songs of vols. ii. to v. were added : ' Written for this work by Robert 
Burns.' During his lifetime all the songs of Burns in Johnson's Museum were 
published anonymously, except those marked in the Indexes referred to above. 
A complete set of the original issues is very rare, and hitherto difficult to 
recognize. During the long course of publication the title-pages of some of the 
early volumes were altered more than once. 



SONG LITERATURE WITH MUSIC xxxvii 

Calliope ; or the Musical Miscellany. A select collection of the most 
approved English, Scots, and Irish Songs, set to music. London : Printed for 
C. Elliot and T. Kay. ... and C. Elliot, Edinburgh, 1788. 8vo, pp. 472. 

A Selection of the most favourite Scots SoBgs, chiefly pastoral, adapted 
for the harpsichord, with an accompaniment for a violin. By eminent masters. 
. . . London. . . . William Napier, n. d. [1790]. Folio, pp. 77. 

A Selection of Original Scots Songs in three parts, the harmony by 
Haydn. . . . London. . . . William Napier, n. d. [1792]. Folio, pp. loi. This 
is the second volume of the above. Vol. iii. published in 1794- 

The Edinburgh Musical Miscellany. A collection of the most approved 
Scotch, English, and Irish Songs ; set to music. Selected by D. Sime, Edin- 
burgh : printed for W. Gordon . . . 1792. i2mo. Vol. ii. printed by John Elder, 
1793- 

' A Selection of Scots Songs, harmonised and improved, with simple and 
adapted Graces. ... By Peter Urbani, professor of Music. Printed for the 
author and sold at his shop, foot of Carruber's Close. . . . Edinburgh,' n. d. 
[1793]. Folio, pp. 51. Book ii. in 1794, pp. 50; Books iii. and iv. in 1799, 
pp. 54 each. 

' A Select Collection of Original Scotish Airs, with select and charac- 
teristic Scotch and English verses, the most part of which written by the 
celebrated R. Burns ; arranged for the voice, with introductory and concluding 
symphonies and accompaniments for the pianoforte. ... by P. Urbani. Edin- 
burgh : Printed and sold by Urbani & Listen, lo Princes Street,' n. d. Folio, 
pp. 59. This is Books v. and vi. of Urbani's Collection. 

Scotish Songs. In two volumes [Joseph Ritson]. London : printed by 
J. Johnson . . . 1794. i2mo. This contains the valuable Historical Essay on 
Scotish Song. 

Dale's Collection of Sixty Favourite Scotch Songs, taken from the 
original manuscripts of the most celebrated authors and composers. . . . 
London ... J. Dale, n. d. [1794]- Folio. Books ii. and iii. same year, containing 
sixty songs each. 

'A Select Collection of Original Scotish Airs for the voice. To each of 
which are added introductory and concluding symphonies and accompanyments 
for the violin and pianoforte by Pleyel, with select and characteristic verses by 
the most admired Scotish Poets, adapted to each air ; many of them entirely 
new. Also suitable English verses in addition to each of the songs as written in 
the Scotish dialect, price \os. dd. First set. London : printed and sold by 
Preston & Son . . . Strand, for the proprietor, (signed) G. Thomson,' n. d. 
Folio. Contains twenty-five rtirs, pp. 1-25. Preface dated May i, 1793. 

Second set, with varied title: 'accompanyments' by Kozeluch and the 'greater 
number ' of the songs ' written for this work by Burns,' n. d. [1798]. Twenty- 
five airs, pp. 26-50. 

Third set same title as second set [1799], pp. 51-75- 

Fourth set: ends vol. ii., accompts. 'chiefly by Kozeluch and partly by 
Pleyel,' otherwise same as third set [1799], pp- 76-100. Vol. iii. pub. in 1801 ; 
vol. iv. 'Printed by J. Moir, 1805,' containing fifty airs each, harmonized by 
Haydn; and vol. v., preface dated June, 1818, containing thirty airs harmonized 
by Beethoven, and a mutilated version of The Jolly Beggars by Burns, set to 
music by Henry R. Bishop. The editor expresses ' the satisfaction he felt when 
he saw the practicability of excluding those passages without depriving the Poem 
of its unity, its raciness of humour, or its interest ' ! 

The above describes the original edition of George Thomson's collection, to 
which Burns contributed so largely. The title is rarely quoted correctly and 

C3 



xxxviii BIBLIOGRAPHY 



the original volumes are difficult to recognize, as Thonrison made numerous 
alterations in all the volumes during the many years of issue. 

The Vocal Magazine, containing a selection of the most esteemed English, 
Scots, and Irish songs, ancient and modern : adapted for the harpsichord or 
violin. Edinburgh . . . C. Stevi'art & Co., 1797. 8vo. Vol. ii. in 1798; 
vol. iii. in 1799. 

The Musical Kepository, a collection of Scotch, English, and Irish songs 
set to music. Glasgow: Printed by Alex. Adams, 1799. i6mo. pp. 278. 

The Jacobite Relics of Scotland : being the songs, airs, and legends of 
the adherents to the house of Stuart. Collected and illustrated by James Hogg. 
Edinburgh, 18 19 and 1821. 2 vols. 8vo. 

The Select Melodies of Scotland, interspersed vi^ith those of Ireland and 
Wales, united to the songs of Robert Burns, Sir Walter Scott, and other dis- 
tinguished poets : with symphonies and accompaniments for the pianoforte by 
Pleyel, Kozeluch, Haydn, and Beethoven. The whole composed for and arranged 
by George Thomson in five vols. London: Preston, n.d. 8vo. [1822-3] 
with a sixth volume in 1825. 

The Ballad Literature and Popular Music of the Olden Time, a history 
of the ancient songs, ballads, and of the dance tunes of England with numerous 
anecdotes and entire ballads ... by W. Chappell, F. S. A. The whole of the airs 
harmonized by G. A. Macfarren. London: Chappell & Co., n.d. [1859]. 
2 vols. 8vo. Continuous pages 823. Under a somewhat different title the 
work was issued to subscribers in 1855, and to the public in 1859. Although 
the author found it very inconvenient and troublesome to ascertain the date of 
publication of many of the airs, he nevertheless perpetuated the trade custom. 
His own work bears no date of publication either on the title or introduction. 

Traditional Ballad Airs, arranged and harmonized for the pianoforte and 
harmonium from copies procured in the counties of Aberdeen, Banff, and 
Moray. By W. A. Christie & Co. Edinburgh, 1876. 4to. 2 vols. 

Histoire da la Chanson Populaire en France, par Julien Tiersot. 
Paris: Librarie Plon, 1889. pp. viii and 441. 

Early Scottish Melodies : including samples from MSS. and early printed 
works, along with a number of comparative Tunes, Notes on former annotators, 
. . . Written and arranged by John Glen. Edinburgh: J. & R. Glen, 1900. 



IV. INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

'Orchesographie, metode et teorie en forme de discours et tablature pour 
apprendre a dancer, battre le tambour en toute sorte et diversite de batteries, 
jouer du fifre et arigot, tirer des armes et escrimer, avec autres honnestes 
exercices fort convenables k la jeunesse, affin d'estre bien venue et toute joyeuse 
compagnie et y montrer sa dexterity et agilet^ de corps. Par Thoinet Arbeau, 
demeurant a Lengres. A Lengres, par Jehan des Preyz, imprimeur et libraire 
tenant sa boutique en la rue des Merciers dicte les Pilliers. mdlxxxix. Avec 
privilege du Roi.' This is the full title of a rare volume in the Bibliotheque 
Nationale written by a priest, Jean Tabouret, Canon of Lengres, whose anagram 
is Thoinet Arbeau. On pages 80 and 81 are the music and description of a 
Scottish dance entitled Branle d'Escosse, as opposite. 

Brantome records that he accompanied in Scotland the young Due d'Angouleme, 
the son of Henri II by Lady Fleming the governess of Mary, Queen of Scots, 
and mother of Mary Fleming, one of the Queen's Maries. The Due is described 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 



XXXIX 



m 



\t 



T2 



%il 



rrn 



'I 
Si 



Premier Branle d'Escosse. 

Step to left. 
Right foot approach. 
Step to left. 
Right foot across. 

Step to right. 
Left foot approach. 
Step to right. 
Left foot across. 
Step to left. 
Right foot across. 
Step to right. 
Left foot across. 

[Repeat the above 
twelve movements.] 



^-i 



^W^ 



I 



-1-J 



^ 



Second Branle d'Escosse, 

Step to left. 

Right foot approach. 

"i Step to left. 

J 

* Right foot across. 
Step to right. 
Left foot across. 
Step to left. 
2 J Right foot across. 
Step to right. 
Left foot approach. 
Step to right. 
Left foot across. 
Step to left. 
Right foot approach. 

I Step to left. 

T Right foot across. 

Step to right. 
Left foot across. 
Right foot in the air. 

Left foot in the air. 

Right foot in the air. 
Hop and capriole. 



xl BIBLIOGRAPHY 



as one of the best dancers of his time and as having introduced many Scottish 
dances to the Court of France. Tabouret, in his introduction to the Branles 
d'Escosse, says that they were in vogue in 156S, and refers his learners to the 
instrumentalists for a knowledge of the movements of the different Branles 
which were then popular. Contemporary evidence of dancing in Scotland in 
the middle of the sixteenth century is in the Complaynt of Scotland, where 
Branles and Brangles are named as among the other ' licht dances ' then 
indulged in ; but there is no example of music in Scotland so early as the 
preceding Scottish Branle from the Orchesographie (reprint, Paris, 1888). 

Rowallan MS. c. 1620. A tablature lute book of fifty pages in the 
Edinburgh University Library which formerly belonged to Sir William Muir 
of Rowallan (1594-1657). It contains a few Scottish melodies. 

Straloch MS. 1627-9. ' An playing book for the Ivte. Wherein ar con- 
tained many currents and other musical things. Musica mentis tnedicina 
7naestae. At Abirdeen. Netted and collected by Robert Gordon. In the 
yeere of our Lord 1627, in Februarie' . . . Colophon. ' Finis huic libra ini- 
posittis. Anno D. 1629. Ad finem Decern 6. In Stra- — Loth.' A small 
oblong 8vo volume containing the original of a number of Scottish melodies, 
a few of which are known. The MS. was sold by auction in March, 1842, 
to an unknown buyer, still undiscovered. Extracts from the MS. were made 
by G. F. Graham, who presented them in 1847 to the Advocates' Library. 

Skene MS. c. 1615-30. A small volume in the Advocates' Library con- 
taining 114 tunes, some of which are repetitions. A translation in modern 
notation of a portion of the MS. is in Dauney's Ancient Scotish Melodies, 1838. 

Airs and Sonnets, in Trinity College Library, Dublin, marked F. 5. 13, is 
part of the imperfect fifth volume of Woods MSS. of Psalms and Canticles 
with music, written in 1569, pp. 112. From p. 34 and onwards some one of 
later date has written verses and airs of a number of Secular Songs, ' which are 
all netted heir with the Tennor or common pairt they ar sung with.' 

Dalhousie MS., of about the beginning of the seventeenth century, is in the 
Panmure Library. Contains about 160 airs. 

IFitzwilliam Virginal Book [,;. 1650I, edited by J. A. Fuller Maitland and 
W. Barclay Squire. London, 1894. Folio. A MS. of English music in the 
Fitzwilliam collection, Cambridge. 

Guthrie MS. c. 1670. In the University Library, Edinburgh. Contains 
about forty tunes in tablature which have not yet been deciphered. The 
manuscript was discovered by David Laing in a bound volume of sermons by 
James Guthrie, a Covenanting minister, who was executed in 1661 for writing 
a pamphlet and disowning the king's authority. Most of the titles of the tunes 
are Scottish. 

Blaikie MS. 1692. In tablature for the Viol da Gamba, containing up- 
wards of one hundred and ten tunes. This and another MS. of 1683 with 
nearly the same music have disappeared, but a copy of a portion of the 1683 
MS. is in the Dundee Public Library. 

Leyden MS. c. 1692. Contains about eighty tunes in tablature for the 
Lyra Viol and a few in modern musical notation. The present owner of the 
MS. is not known, but a copy is in the Advocates' Library. 

Atkinson MS., 1694-5, is a small volume in the Library of the Society 
of Antiquaries, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. It bears the name ' Henry Atkinson his 
book 1 69 1,' with a note by W. A. Chappell to the effect that Atkinson was 
a native of Northumberland and lived in the neighbourhood of Hartburn. It 
contains English and numerous Scottish tunes. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC xli 

Hume MS. 1704. In the Advocates' Library. 

Laing MS. 1706. 

Crockatt MS. 1709. Belonged to William Stenhouse (who annotated the 
Scots Mzisical Museum), and after his death became the property of C. Kirk- 
patrick Sharpe, of Hoddam. It has since disappeared, and there is no known 
copy of it. Stenhouse often quotes it in his Ilhistrations. 

Sinkler's MS. 1710. Bears the docket 'Margaret Sinkler aught this music 
book written by Andrew Adam at Glasgow October the 31 day 1710.' It is 
the property of Mr. John Glen, of Edinburgh, and contains over one hundred 
tunes partly noted on a six-line stave.. 

Waterston MS. c. 1715. 

M'^Farlan MSS. 1740. Three volumes with the title 'A Collection of 
Scotch airs with the latest variations written for the use of Walter M'^Farlan 
of that Ilk by David Yoimg W. M. in Edinburgh. 1740.' The second and third 
volumes belong to the Society of Antiquaries, Edinburgh. The first has been 
lost. 

Before the printing of music in Scotland the originals of many Scottish airs 
are found in English publications, such as Playford's English Dancitig Master, 
1651 (in the reprint of 1652 the title was altered to the Dajtcing Master, &c., 
and so remained to the last edition, c. 1628); in Apollo's Banquet, 1663, in 
many editions ; the fifth in 1687 ; Music/iS Delight, 1666 ; and Musick's 
Recreation, 1652. 

' A Collection of Original Scotch Tunes (full of the Highland Humours) 
for the violin : being the first of this kind yet printed : most of them being in ■ 
the Compass of the ilute : London : printed by William Pearson ... for 
Henry Playford. . . . Fleet Street, 1700.' Sm. ob. 4to. pp. 16. Tunes 39. 
A second edition in 1701. 

Musick for Allan Ramsay's Collection of Scots Songs. Set by 
Alexander Stuart and engraved by R. Cooper. Vol. i. Edinburgh : printed 
and sold by Allan Ramsay, n. d. {c. 1726]. Sm. pb. pp. 156. Contains the 
music of seventy-one songs selected from the Tea- Table Miscellany. Only one 
vol. published. 

' A Collection of the Choicest Scots Tunes, adapted for the harpsichord 
or spinnet, and within the compass of the voice, violin, or German flute. By 
Adam Craig. Edinburgh, 1730.' Ob. folio, pp.45. 

A Curious Collection of Scots Tunes for a violin, bass viol, or German 
flute, with a thorough bass for the harpsichord. ... By James Oswald, musician 
in Edinburgh, n. d. [1740]. Ob. folio, pp.42. 

A Collection of Curious Scots Tunes for a violin, German flute, or 
harpsichord. By Mr. James Oswald. London : printed by John Simpson . . . 
n. d. [i 742]. Folio, pp. 46. A ' Second Collection,' pp. 47, same year. 

A Collection of Scots Tunes, some with variations for a violin, by William 
McGibbon [Book i.]. Edinburgh: printed by Richard Cooper, n. d. [1742]. 
Ob. folio. Book ii. in 1746 ; Book iii. in 1755, both undated, pp. 36 each. 

The Cal3donian Pocket Companion, containing fifty of the most favourite 
Scotch Tunes, several of them with variations, all set for the German flute by 
Mr. Oswald. London : printed for J. Simpson in Sweetings Alley, n. d. [1743]. 
Roy. 8vo. pp. 36. The complete work with variations in the title-pages 
consists of twelve books or ' volumes,' all undated, averaging about thirty 
pages each. The approximate dates of issue are as follows : Vol. ii. 1 745 » 



xlii BIBLIOGRAPHY 



vol. iii. 1751 ; vol. iv. 1752 ; vol. v. 1753 ; vol. vi. 1754 ; vol. vii. 1755; vol. viii. 
1756; vol. ix. 1758; vols. X., xi., and xii. I'^^g. Burns's complete copy, with his 
pencil notes against many of the tunes, and which he presented to Nathaniel 
Gow, was lately in the possession of W. Law, of Littleborough. The work 
contains nearly 560 tunes. 

Caledonian Country Dances, being a collection of all the Scotch country 
dances now in vogue. . . . London : printed for and sold by J. Walsh, n. d. 
[1744]. Sm. ob. In eight books, various dates. 

A Collection of Scots Keels or Country Dances, with a bass for the 
violoncello or harpsichord. . . . Edinburgh : Printed and sold by Robert 
Bremner . . . Ob. 4to. Published in fourteen numbers of eight pages each, 
between the years 1757 and 1 761, all undated. The earliest published collection 
of ' Reels.' 

Twelve Scotch, and Twelve Irish. Airs, with variations set for the German 
ilute, violin or harpsichord, by Mr. Burk Thumoth. London . . . John Simpson, 
n.d. [c. 1760]. Roy. 8vo. pp. 49. 

' A Collection of the newest and best Beels or Country Dances. . . . 
Edinburgh : printed for and sold by Neil Stewart,' n. d. Ob. 4to. In nine 
numbers, undated, of eight pages each issued from 1761 to c. 1764. 

' Fifty Favourite Scotch Airs, for a violin, German flute, and violoncello, 
with a thorough bass for the harpsichord.' . . . By Francis Peacock. London : 
printed for the publisher in Aberdeen . . . n. d. [1762]. Folio, pp. 35. 

A Collection of Scots Reels or Country Dances, and Minuets. . . . 
Composed by John Riddell in Ayr. . . . Edinburgh : . . . Robert Bremner, n. d. 
[1766]. Ob. 4to. pp. 45. A second edition 'greatly improved,' Glasgow, 
c. 1782. 

A Collection of Scots Tunes . . . and a bass for the violoncello or harpsi- 
chord. By William M^Gibbon. W'ith some additions by Robert Bremner. 
London : . . . Robert Bremner, n. d. [1768]. Ob. 410. pp. 120. 

' A Collection of Favourite Scots Tunes, with variations for the violin 
and a bass for the violoncello and harpsichord, by the late Mr. Charles M'^Lean 
and other eminent masters. Edinburgh. Printed for and sold by N. Stewart ' 
. . . n. d. [c. 1772]. Ob. folio, pp. 37. 

Thirty-seven New Keels and Strathspeys, for the violin, harpsichord, 
pianoforte, or German flute. Composed by Daniel Dow. Edinburgh : printed 
and sold by Neil Stewart . . . n. d. [<:. 1776]. Ob. 4to. pp. 26. 

A Collection of Ancient Scots Music for the violin, harpsichord, or 
German flute, never before printed. Consisting of Ports, Salutations, Marches, 
or Pibrochs, by Daniel Dow. Edinburgh, n. d. [<:. 1776]. Folio, pp.46. 

A Collection of the Newest and best Keels and Minuets with improve- 
ments, adapted for the violin or German flute. ... By Joshua Campbell, 
Glasgow. ... J. Aird . . . n. d. [1778]. Ob. 410. pp. 80. 

A Collection of Strathspeys or Old Highland Reels. By Angus Cumming, 
at Grantown in Strathspey. Edinburgh, 17S0. Ob. folio, pp. 20. The first 
collection of ' Strathspeys.' 

A Collection of Strathspey Keels. ... By Alexander M^Glashan. Edin- 
burgh : printed .... and sold by Neil Stewart, n. d. [1780]. Ob. folio, pp. 34. 

A Choice Collection of Scots Keels or Country Dances and Strathspeys, 
with a bass for the violoncello or harpsichord. Edinburgh : printed and sold by 
Robert Ross . . , n. d. [1780]. Sm. ob. pp. 40. 



INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC xHii 

Anoient Seotish. Melodies, from a manuscript of the reign of James VI, 
with an introductory inquiry illustrative of the music of Scotland. By William 
Dauney. Edinburgh, 1838. 4to. 

A Collection of Scots Measures, Hornpipes, Jigs . . . with a bass for 
violoncello or harpsichord, by Alex. M<^Glashan. Edinburgh : N. Stewart & Co., 
n. d. [1781]. Ob. folio, pp. 36. 

A Collection of Strathspey Beels. . . . Composed by William Marshall, 
Edinburgh : printed for Neil Stewart, n. d. [1781]. Ob. folio, pp. 12. 

A Selection of Scotch, English, Irish, and Foreign Airs. . . . Glasgow : 
Printed and sold by James Aird, n. d. [1782]. Sm. ob. The complete work 
consists of six volumes of 200 tunes each, except the last with 181. Vol. ii. in 
1782; vol. iii. in 1788; the last three vols, at about 1794 to 1799, all 
undated. 

A Collection of Highland Vocal Airs never hitherto published. To 
which are added a few of the most lively Country Dances or Reels of the North 
Highlands and Western Isles; and some specimens of Bagpipe Music, By- 
Patrick M<^Donald, Minister of Kilmore, in Argyleshire. . . . Edinburgh : Corri 
& Sutherland, n. d. [1784]. Folio, pp. 22 and 43, 

A Collection of Strathspey Keels with a bass for the violoncello or harpsi- 
chord, &c. ... By Niel Gow at Dunkeld. Edinburgh : Corri & Sutherland, 
n. d, [1784]. Folio, pp. 36. The Second Collection issued in 1788 ; third in 
1792; fourth in 1800 ; fifth in 1809; and sixth in 1822. Various printers, and 
all undated. 

A Collection of Reels, consisting chiefly of Strathspeys, Athole Reels . . . 
by Alexander M^Glashan. Edinburgh : printed for the publisher ... by Neil 
Stewart, n. d, [1786]. Ob. folio, pp. 46. 

A Collection of Strathspey Heels, with a bass for the violoncello or 
harpsichord ... by Malcolm McDonald. Edinburgh : printed for the author, 
n. d. [1788]. Ob. 4to. pp. 24. ' A Second Collection' in 1789, folio, pp. 13, 
and a ' Third Collection ' c. 1792, pp. 12, all undated. 

A Collection of Strathspey Reels and Cotuitry Dances. . , . By John 
Bowie. Edinburgh : Neil Stewart, n. d. [1789]. pp. 35. 

Sixty-eight new Reels, Strathspeys, and Quick steps. . . . Composed 
by Robert Macintosh. Printed for the author, Edinburgh, n. d. [1793]- Folio. 
PP- 39- 

A Collection of Scotch, Galwegian, and Border Tunes for the violin and 
pianoforte. . . . Selected by Robert Riddell of Glenriddell, Esq. Edinburgh : 
Johnson & Co., n. d. [1794]. Folio, pp. 37. The editor was the friend of 
Bums. 

New Strathspey Reels for the pianoforte, violin, and violoncello. Com- 
posed by a gentleman and given with permission to be published by Nathaniel 
Gow. Edinburgh . . . N. Stewart & Co., n. d. [1796]. Folio, pp. 27. Said 
to have been composed by the Earl of Eglinton. 



CORRECTIONS 



Page II, No. 12, for tune see No. 103. 

13, ,, 14, ,, No. 112. 

15, „ j6, „ No. 284. 

6^, „ 65, „ No. 112. 

67, ;; 66, line 13 from foot for wandringxfaA wana'ring 

69, ,, 68, for tune see No. 253 or 309. 

78, „ 81, „ No. 302. 

95, „ 102, for No. 228 read No. 225. 

97, „ 104, ,, No. 228 „ No. 225. 

99, „ 107, for tune see No. 308. 

123, „ I35> » No. 308, 

138, „ 154, title, Thou hast, &c. 

146, „ 164, for tune see No. 239. 

191, ,, 214, ,, No. 249. 

198, ,, 222, title and first line, for woo read woo'. 

211, ,, 236, fortune see No. 329. 

239, „ 261, ,, No. 283. 

244, ,, 266, crotchet D on fourth syllable should be dotted 

296, ,, 315, end of first line of music should be barred. 

324, ,, 341, crotchet E in second line should be dotted. 

346, )) 358, stanza 3, for hmzic-bane read lunzie-banes. 

ZS^i )> 5) fo"^ 6^2/^read Gude. 

362, ,, 33, for W.S. read Writer. 

367, ,, 46, last line, for Scottish read Scotish. 

376, ,, 69, last line, for Scottish read Scotish. 

418, ,, 198, second last line, /should be It. 

460, ,, 275, line 5, for sufra read S7ipra. 

461, ,, 279, second last line, 17^7 should be 17^6. 
483) )> 325) add in Kilmarnock ed. 1786. 

5'^'^) )! 356) second last line, for Gedde's read Geddes" 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



I. LOVE — PERSONAL 



No. I. O, once I lovd a bonie lass. 

Tune : / am a man unmarried. (Unknown. ) 



O, ONCE I lov'd a bonie lass, 
Ay, and I love her still, 

And whilst that virtue warms 
breast 
I'll love my handsome Nell. 



my 



As bonie lasses I hae seen. 
And monie full as braw; 

But for a modest, gracefu' mien, 
The like I never saw. 

A bonie lass, I will confess, 

Is pleasant to the e'e ; 
But without some better qualities 

She 's no a lass for me. 



But Nelly's looks are blythe and 
sweet ; 

And, what is best of a', 
Her reputation is compleat. 

And fair without a flaw. 

She dresses ay sae clean and neat, 
Both decent and genteel ; 

And then there's something in her 
gate. 
Gars ony dress look weel. 

A gaudy dress and gentle air 
May slightly touch the heart ; 

But it's innocence and modesty 
That polishes the dart. 



'Tis this in Nelly pleases me ; 

'Tis this inchants my soul. 
For absolutely in my breast 

She reigns without controul. 



No. 2. In Tarboltojt, ye ken, 

(Tune unknown.) 

In Tarbolton, ye ken, there are proper young men, 
And proper young lasses and a', man ; 

But ken ye the Ronalds that live in the Bennals ? 
They carry the gree frae them a', man. 

Their father's a laird, and weel he can spare't, 
Braid money to tocher them a', man ; 

To proper young men, he'll clink in the hand 
Gowd guineas a hunder or twa, man. 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

There's ane they ca' Jean, I'll warrant ye've seen 

As bonie a lass or as braw, man ; 
But for sense and guid taste she'll vie wi' the best, 

And a conduct that beautifies a', man. 

The charms o' the min', the langer they shine 
The mair admiration they draw, man ; 

While peaches and cherries, and roses and lilies. 
They fade and they wither awa, man. 

If ye be for Miss Jean, tak this frae a frien', 

A hint o' a rival or twa, man ; 
The Laird o' Blackbyre wad gang through the fire, 

If that wad entice her awa, man. 

The Laird o' Braehead has been on his speed 
For mair than a towmond or twa, man ; 

The Laird o' the Ford will straught on a board, 
If he canna get her at a', man. 

Then Anna comes in, the pride o' her kin, 

The boast of our bachelors a', man ; 
Sae sonsy and sweet, sae fully complete, 

She steals our affections awa, man. 

If I should detail the pick and the wale 

O' lasses that live here awa, man, 
The faut wad be mine, if they didna shine 

The sweetest and best o' them a', man. 

I lo'e her mysel, but darena weel tell, 

My poverty keeps me in awe, man, 
For making o' rhymes, and v^rorking at times. 

Does little or naething at a', man. 

Yet I wadna choose to let her refuse, 
Nor hae't in her power to say na, man ; 

For though I be poor, unnoticed, obscure. 
My stomach 's as proud as them a', man. 

Though I canna ride in weel -booted pride, 
And flee o'er the hills like a craw, man, 

I can baud up my head wi' the best o' the breed, 
Though fluttering ever so braw, man. 

My coat and my vest, they are Scotch o' the best; 

O' pairs o' guid breeks I hae twa, man, 
And stockings and pumps to put on my stumps. 

And ne'er a wrang steek in them a', man. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



My sarks they are few, but five o' them new, 
Twal' hundred, as white as the snaw, man; 

A ten-shillings hat, a Holland cravat ; 

There are no mony poets sae braw, man. 

I never had friens weel stockit in means, 
To leave me a hundred or twa, man ; 

Nae weel-tocher'd aunts, to wait on their drants. 
And wish them in hell for it a', man. 

I never was cannie for hoarding o' money, 

Or claughtin't together at a', man, 
I've little to spend and naething to lend. 

But deevil a shilling I awe, man. 



No. 3. AltJid my bed wej^e in yon miiir. 

Tune: Galla Water. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 125. 
A}idanfe 




Had 



1 my dear Mont - gom - erie's 

Altho' my bed were in yon muir, 
Amang the heather, in my plaidie, 

Yet happy, happy would I be, 

Had I my dear Montgomerie's Peggy. 

When o'er the hill beat surly storms. 
And winter nights were dark and rainy, 

I'd seek some dell, and in my arms 
I'd shelter dear Montgomerie's Peggy. 

Were I a Baron proud and high. 

And horse and servants waiting ready, 

Then a' 'twad gie o' joy to me — 

The shairin't with Montgomerie's Peggy. 
B 2 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 4. Yestreen I met yoiL on the moor. 

Tune: Invercattld's Reel. Stewart's i?f(?/s, 1762, p. 31. 
Lively 



^^ 






Chokus. O Tib-bic, I hue seen i he day, Ye wad-na been sae shy; 
tr Fine. 



Egj pg^g^^^:^ 



sg; 



5P3^: 



:ii=^ 



For laik o' gear ye light - ly me. But, trcfwth, / care tia by. 



gg^ggg^^^i^g^i^ 



Yestr-een I met you on tlie moor, Ye spak na but gaed by likestoure: 
tr D.C. 



V^ ^^^^^^ =^^^^^=f=^- 



Ye geek at me be-cause I'm poor, But Cent a hair care I. 

Chorus. O Tibbie, I hac seen Ike day, 
Ye wadna been sae shy ; 
For laik o' gear ye lightly tne, 
But, trozvth, I care na by. 



Yestreen I met you on the moor, 
Ye spak na but gaed by like stoure : 
Ye geek at me because I'm poor, 
But fient a hair care I. 

When comin hame on Sunday last, 
Upon the road as I cam past, 
Ye snufft an' gae your head a cast — 
But, trowth, I care't na by, 

I doubt na, lass, but ye may think, 
Because ye hae the name o' clink. 
That ye can please me at a wink, 
Whene'er ye like to try. 

But sorrow tak him that's sae mean, 
Altho' his pouch o' coin were clean, 
Wha follows ony saucy quean, 
That looks sae proud and high ! 



Altho' a lad were e'er sae smart, 
If that he want the yellow dirt, 
Ye'U cast your head anither airt, 
And answer him fu' dry. 

But if he hae the name o' gear, 
Ye'll fasten to him like a brier, 
Tho' hardly he, for sense or lear 
Be better than the kye. 

But, Tibbie, lass, tak my advice. 
Your daddie's gear maks you sae nice ; 
The deil a ane wad speir your price, 
Were ye as poor as 1. 

There lives a lass beside yon park, 
I'd rather hae her in her sark 
Than you, wi' a' your thousand mark 
That gars you look sae high. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



No. 5. If ye gae up to yon kill-tap. 

(Tune unknown.) 



If ye gae up to j'on hill-tap, 
Ye'll there see bonie Peggy ; 

She kens her father is a laird, 
And she forsooth 's a leddy. 

There 's Sophy tight, a lassie bright, 
Besides a handsome fortune ; 

Wha canna win her in a night 
Has little art in courtin. 

Gae down by Faile, and taste the 
ale. 

And tak a look o' Mysie ; 
She's dour and din, a deil within, 

But aiblins she may please ye. 



If she be shy, her sister try, 
Ye'll maybe fancy Jenny ; 

If yell dispense wi' want o' sense — 
She kens hersel she 's bonie. 

As ye gae up by yon hillside, 
Speir in for bonie Bessy ; 

She'll gie ye a beck, and bid ye 
light, 
And handsomely address ye. 

There's few sae bonie, nane sae guid 
In a' King George' dominion ; 

If ye should doubt the truth of this — 
It's Bessy's ain opinion! 



No. 6. Her flowing locks, tke ravens zving. 

(Tune unknown.) 

Her flowing locks, the raven's wing, 
Adown her neck and bosom hing ; 
How sweet unto that breast to cling, 
And round that neck entwine her ! 

Her lips are roses wat wi' dew ; 
O, what a feast, her bonie mou' ! 
Her cheeks a mair celestial hue, 
A crimson still diviner ! 



No. 7. Had I a cave. 

Tune : Robin Adair- or Aileen a roon (see No. 45). 



Had I a cave on some wild distant 

shore, 
Where the winds howl to the wave's 
dashing roar. 
There would I weep my woes. 
There seek my lost repose, 
Till grief my eyes should close, 
Ne'er to wake more ! 



Falsest of womankind, canst thou. 

declare 
All thy fond, plighted vows fleeting 
as air ? 
To thy new lover hie. 
Laugh o'er thy perjury, 
Then in thy bosom try 
What peace is there ! 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Lively 



No. 8. // was upon a Lammas night. 

Tune : Corn rigs. Craig's Scots Times, 1730, p. 42. 






It was up - on a Lammas night, When corn rigs are 



H (-- 



^^ 



^ 






bon - ic, Be - neath the moon's uii - cloud - ed light, I 



^—M s^ ^* 



^=^ 




tent - less heed, Till 'tween the late and ear 



-W-^^ 



^S=t=fe5 



m^ 



^-;t 



Wi' sma' per - sua - sion she a - greed 



' -* h r 



^ 



SH3^= 



m 



To see rae thro' the 

Chorus. 



ley. 



T=^- 



q S I -A—i^^ 



*=*^=J^ 






3£S 



Corn rigs, an^ bar-ley rigs, Alt' corn rigs are bon - ie : 



^^ii^^ 



/'// ne''er for - get that hap • py niglit. 



^3: 



^^^^^JP^^^ 



A ■ inang the rigs wi^ An 



LOVE : PERSONAL 



It was upon a Lammas night, 

When corn rigs are bonie, 
Beneath the moon's unclouded hght, 

I held awa to Annie : 
The time flew by, wi' tentless heed*, 

Till, 'tween the late and early, 
Wi' sma' persuasion she agreed 

To see me thro' the barley. 

Chorus. Corn rigs, an' barley rigs, 
An' corn rigs are bonie: 
I'll ne'er forget that happy night, 
Amang the rigs wi' Annie. 

The sky was blue, the wind was still, 

The moon was shining clearly ; 
I set her down, wi' right good will, 

Amang the rigs o' barley : 
I kent her heart w^as a' my ain ; 

I lov'd her most sincerely ; 
I kiss'd her owre and owre again, 

Amang the rigs o' barley. 

I lock'd her in my fond embrace ; 

Her heart was beating rarely : 
My blessings on that happy place, 

Amang the rigs o' barley ! 
But by the moon and stars so bright. 

That shone that hour so clearly ! 
She ay shall bless that happy night 

Amang the rigs o' barley. 

I hae been blythe wi' comrades dear; 

I hae been merry drinking ; 
I hae been joyfu' gath'rin gear; 

I hae been happy thinking : 
But a' the pleasures e'er I saw, 

Tho' three times doubled fairly. 
That happy night was worth them a', 

Amang the rigs o' barley. 

* In editions 1786 and 1787, 'head'; editions 1793 and 1794, 'heed. 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 9. O, leave novels, ye Mauchline belles. 



Tune : Ye Mauchline belles. 
Lively 



Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 573. 



B^ 



'W^^^ 



a 



S 



5ri; 



-«fr^- 



O, leave no - vels, ye Mauchline belles, Ye' re sa - fer at your 



ES 



=^ 



1^^^3 



*i 



i^ 



spin • ning wheel ! Such witch - ing books are bait - ed hooks For 

r 



1^ 



s 



rak • ish rooks like Rob Moss - giel. 



Your fine Tom Jones and 



15^; 



l^ 



^^^ 



-«-W- 



:^: 



a 



-m^9-id 



Gran - di - sons They make your youth - ful fan - cies reel ; They 



i^"^^^ 



^^ 



heat your brains, and fire your veins, And then you 're prey for Rob Mossgiel. 

O, LEAVE novels, ye Mauchline belles, 
Ye' re safer at your spinning-wheel ! 

Such witching books are baited hooks 
For rakish rooks like Rob Mossgiel. 

Your fine Tom. Jones and Grandisons 
They make your youthful fancies reel ; 

They heat your brains, and fire your veins, 
And then you're prey for Rob Mossgiel. 

Beware a tongue that 's smoothly hung, 
A heart that warmly seems to feel ; 

That feeling heart but acts a part — 
'Tis rakish art in Rob Mossgiel. 

The frank address, the soft caress, 

Are worse than poisoned darts of steel ; 

The frank address, and politesse. 
Are all finesse in Rob Mossgiel. 



* An 8ve lower in original. 



I. I.OVE : PERSONAL 



No. lo. O, zuha my babie-clouts will buy? 



Tune: Whare wad bonie Annie lie. Scots Musical Museum^ 1792, No. 324 



Lively 



i: 



P^ gg 



:^=: 



3: 



=3^1=1 



■\vha my ba - bie - clouts will buy? Wha will tsnt me 



l^^g^g^ 



i^ 



^E?E?E 



g^^ 



when I cry? Wha will kiss me where I lie? The ran - tin 

ifj: ^-1 s n 1^ ^5-s ^-^ — N- 



=]^: 



— a ^^-"-^ • » 



dog, the dad - die o"t 

— "S— « w 1- 



^ 



Wha will own he did the faut ? 

^s — N — ; — 1 1^- 



^^^ 



ip — — , 



s 



Wha will buy the groan - in maut ? Wha will tell me 



l?-H^-h- 



a^ 



a m — -U 



how to ca't? The ran - tin dog, the dad - die o't. 

O, WHA my babie-clouts will buy ? 
Wha will tent me when I cry? 
Wha will kiss me where I lie ? — 
The rantin dog, the daddie o't. 

Wha will own he did the faut? 
Wha will buy the groanin maut? 
Wha will tell me how to ca 't ? — 
The rantin dog, the daddie o't. 

When I mount the creepie-chair, 
Wha will sit beside me there ? 
Gie me Rob, I'll seek nae main, — 
The rantin dog, the daddie o't. 

Wha will crack to me my lane ? 
Wha will mak me fidgin fain ? 
Wha will kiss me o'er again ? — 
The rantin dog, the daddie o't. 



TO 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. II. Now zvestlin zvinds and slaugM ring guns. 

Tune: Port Gordon. Cal. Pocket Companion, c. 1756, viii. p. 25. 
Siotv 



i 






zh 



3L^ al j |- 



:1^= 



¥ 



a 



& 



5^ 



3t^ 



Now west -lin winds and slaught'ring guns Bring Autumn's plea - saiit 



mm^ 



3 



H^a 



vea-tlier; And the moor - cock springs, on wliirr - ing wings, A 



m 



T 



p — * — s—^ — « — * — 



=0 



mang the bloom - ing hea-ther: Now wav- ing grain, wide o'er the plain, 

tr tr 



3^ 



i:a= 



=t^=5s= 



De - lights the wea - ry far - mer ; And the moon shines bright. 



^E^H 



when I rove at night, To muse up - on my charm - er. 

Now westlin winds and slaught'ring guns 

Bring autumn's pleasant weather ; 
And the moorcock springs, on whirring wings, 

Amang the blooming heather : 
Now waving grain, wide o'er the plain, 

Delights the weary farmer ; 
And the moon shines bright, when I rove at night, 

To muse upon my charmer. 

The partridge loves the fruitful fells ; 

The plover loves the mountains ; 
The woodcock haunts the lonely dells. 

The soaring hern the fountains : 
Thro' lofty groves the cushat roves, 

The path of man to shun it ; 
The hazel bush o'erhangs the thrush, 

The spreading thorn the linnet. 



I. LOVE: PERSONAL 11 

Thus ev'ry kind their pleasure find, 

The savage and the tender ; 
Some social join, and leagues combine ; 

Some solitary wander : 
Avaunt, away ! the cruel sway, 

Tyrannic man's dominion ; 
The sportsman's joy, the murd'ring cry, 

The fluttering, gory pinion ! 

But Peggy dear, the evening's clear, 

Thick flies the skimming swallow ; 
The sky is blue, the fields in view, 

All fading green and yellow : 
Come let us stray our gladsome way, 

And view the charms of Nature ; 
The rustling corn, the fruited thorn. 

And ev'ry happy creature. 

We'll gently walk, and sweetly talk. 

Till the silent moon shine clearly ; 
I'll grasp thy waist, and fondly prest, 

Swear how I love thee dearly : 
Not vernal show'rs to budding flow'rs, 

Not autumn to the farmer. 
So dear can be, as thou to me, 

My fair, my lovely charmer! 



No. 12. F7ill well ikou knowst I love thee, dear 

Tune : Rothiemurchii s rant. 

Chorus. Fairest maid on Devon banks, 
Crystal Devon, winding Devon, 
Wilt thou lay that frown aside, 
And smile as thou wert wont to do? 

Full well thou know'st I love thee, dear, 
Couldst thou to malice lend an ear? 
O, did not love exclaim : — ' Forbear, 
Nor use a faithful lover so ! ' 

Then come, thou fairest of the fair, 
Those wonted smiles, O let me share ; 
And by thy beauteous self I swear 

No love but thine my heart shall know. 



12 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



i 



w 



No. 13. Behind yon hills where Lugar fiozvs. 

Tune : My Natiie, O. Orpheus Caledoniits, 1725, No. 38. 

Slowly 



'-rr—c. 



^^: 



Be - hind yon hills where Lu - gar flows 



P 



3: 



^ 



s^^; 



s* 



'Mang moors an' moss - es 



O, 



^^ 



^ 



^m 



s 



win - try sun the 



day has clos'd, 



i^ 



m 



And I'll 



Nan - ie. 



O. 



m 



33^^ 



The west - "lin wind blaws loud an' shill ; 



^. r"> 



S 



r— rr^ ^j^^E 



^^EE^EE^ 



?^ 



The night's baith mirk and rai - ny, O; 



il 



i^ 



^l^^^i 



But I'll get my plaid, an' out I'll steal, 



; g=tf: 



t£^ 



-^—^ 



An' owre the hill to 



Nan 



Behind yon hills where Lugar flows 

'Mang moors an' mosses many, O, 
The wintry sun the day has clos'd, 

And I'll awa to Nanie, O. 
The w^estlin wind blaws loud an' shill ; 

The night's baith mirk and rainy, O ; 
But I'll get my plaid, an' out I'll steal, 

An' owre the hill to Nanie, O. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 13 

My Nanie 's charming, sweet an' young ; 

Nae artfu' wiles to win ye, O ; 
May ill befa' the flattering tongue 

That wad beguile my Nanie, O. 
Her face is fair, her heart is true ; 

As spotless as she's bonie, O; 
The op'ning gowan, wat wi' dew, 

Nae purer is than Nanie, O. 
A country lad is my degree. 

An' few there be that ken me, O ; 
But what care I how few they be, 

I'm welcome ay to Nanie, O. 
My riches a's my penny-fee. 

An' I maun guide it cannie, O ; 
But warl's gear ne'er troubles me, 

My thoughts are a', my Nanie, O. 

Our auld guidman delights to view 

His sheep an' kye thrive bonie, O ; 
But I'm as blythe that bauds his pleugh, 

An' has nae care but Nanie, O. 
Come weel, come woe, I care na by, 

I'll tak what Heav'n will sen' me, O ; 
Nae ither care in life have I, 

But live, an' love my Nanie, O ! 



No. 14. True-hearted ivas he, the sad swain 
d the Yarrow. 

Tune : Bonie Dundee. 

True-hearted was he, the sad swain o' the Yarrow, 

And fair are the maids on the banks of the Ayr ; 
But by the sweet side o' the Nith's winding river 

Are lovers as faithful and maidens as fair : 
To equal young Jessie seek Scotia all over: 

To equal young Jessie you seek it in vain ; 
Grace, beauty, and elegance fetter her lover, 

And maidenly modesty fixes the chain. 

Fresh is the rose in the gay, dewy morning. 

And sweet is the lily at evening close ; 
But in the fair presence o' lovely young Jessie 

Unseen is the lily, unheeded the rose. 
Love sits in her smile, a wizard ensnaring ; 

Enthron'd in her een he delivers his law ; 
And still to her charms she alone is a stranger — 

Her modest demeanour's the jewel of a'! 



H 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 15. Young Peggy blooms our boniest lass. 

Tune: Loch Eroch Side. Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 78. 
Andante .1 - 




Young 



gy blooms our 



iest lass, 



^=b=^ 



is like 



:^ 



^^^S^=t. 



V- 



ro - sy dawn, the spring 



grass, 



i^z: 



@S 



-^- 



gems 



a - dorn 



^g^ ^ 



¥- 



eyes out • shine the 



E^^ 



ra - diant beams 



S^^ 



That 



gild the pass 



ing 



^^^ 



1^^^==. 



And 



ter o'er the chrys - tal streams, 



r-=5 



^^ 



0^=^^ 



:^=T 



And 



chear 



each fresh' 



nmg 



Young Peggy blooms our boniest lass, 

Her blush is like the morning, 
The rosy dawn, the springing grass, 

With early gems adorning ; 
Her eyes outshine the radiant beams 

That gild the passing shower. 
And glitter o'er the chrystal streams. 

And chear each fresh'ning flower. 



LOVE : PERSONAL 15 



Her lips, more than the cherries bright- 

A richer dye has graced them — 
They charm th' admiring gazer's sight, 

And sweetly tempt to taste them ; 
Her smile is as the ev'ning mild, 

When feather'd pairs are courting, 
And little lambkins wanton wild, 

In playful bands disporting. 
Were Fortune lovely Peggy's foe, 

Such sweetness would relent her : 
As blooming Spring unbends the brow 

Of surly, savage Winter. 
Detraction's eye no aim can gain 

Her winning powers to lessen, 
And fretful envy grins in vain 

The poison'd tooth to fasten. 
Ye Powers of Honor, Love, and Truth, 

From ev'ry ill defend her ! 
Inspire the highly-favour'd youth 

The destinies intend her ! 
Still fan the sweet connubial flame 

Responsive in each bosom ; 
And bless the dear parental name 

With many a filial blossom. 



No. 16. Alihd tJiou maiin never be mine. 

Tune : Here 's a health to them that 's awa. 

Chorus. Here^s a health to ane I lo'e dear, 

Here's a health to ane I lo'e dear; 
Thou art siveet as the smile when fond lovers meet. 
And soft as their parting tear — Jessy. 

Altho' thou maun never be mine, 

Altho' even hope is denied ; 
'Tis sweeter for thee despairing 

Than ought in the world beside— Jessy. 
I mourn thro' the gay, gaudy day. 

As hopeless I muse on thy charms ; 
But welcome the dream o' sweet slumber, 

For then I am lockt in thine arms— Jessy. 
I guess by the dear angel smile, 

I guess by the love-rolling e'e ; 
But why urge the tender confession, 

'Gainst Fortune's fell cruel decree?— Jessy. 



i6 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 17. The Catrine woods were yellow seen. 

Tune : The braes o' Ballochmyle. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 276. 



Slow 




lav' - rock sang 



i 






w 



Na - ture sick 



e'e ; 



ifee^n^ 



ded groves 



Ma 



sang, 
r7\ 



i§^=^^^^§ 



^w=^- 



Her 



sel' in beau - ty's bloom the while ; 



— -- ^ ^ — A — J 



j^ _^ I fgaa g 



-^^:r^ 



5^^ 






-^ 



=t^ 



And ay the wild - wood 



choes rang; — 



^^^^ 



^5^ 



' Fare - weel the braes o' Bal - loch - myle ! ' 

The Catrine woods were yellow seen, 

The flowers decay'd on Catrine lea ; 
Nae lavVock sang on hillock green, 

But Nature sicken'd on the e'e ; 
Thro' faded groves Maria sang, 

Hersel' in beauty's bloom the while ; 
And ay the wild-wood echoes rang; — 

' Fareweel the braes o' Ballochmyle ! ' 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



17 



* Low in your wintry beds, ye flowers, 

Again ye'll flourish fresh and fair ; 
Ye birdies, dumb in withVing bowers, 

Again ye'll charm the vocal air ; 
But here, alas ! for me nae mair 

Shall birdie charm, or floweret smile; 
Fareweel the bonie banks of Ayr, 

Fareweel ! fareweel sweet Ballochmyle ! ' 



No. 18. Stay, my chainncr, can you leave me? 



Tune : An gille dtibh ciar dubJi. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 129. 

Slow ^. 



i^^g ii ^g^^i^r=f ? 



Stay, my charm - er, can you leave me ? Ciu - el, 



^m- 



=p=i= 



de 



eeive me ! Well you 



-/. 



i^^; 



^- 



=^=i=p= 



f 






know how 



much 



grieve me : 



Cru 



el 



i^p^ 



i» 



--^ 



3= 



g 



charm • er, can you go? Cru - el charm - er, can you go? 



Stay, my charmer, can you leave me? 

Cruel, cruel to deceive me ! 

Well you know how much you grieve me : 

Cruel charmer, can you go ? 

Cruel charmer, can you go ? 



By my love so ill requited. 

By the faith you fondly plighted, 

By the pangs of lovers slighted. 

Do not, do not leave me so ! 

Do not, do not leave me so ! 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 19. My heart was ance as blythe and free. 



Tune: To the weaver's gin ye go. 
Slowly 



Scots Musical Miiseiitn, 1788, No. 103. 



i^^^;^^§^^^^l 



:=a=t 



My heart was ance as blythe and free as sim - mar days were 






lang ; But a bonie, west - lin weaver lad Has gart me change my sang. 
Chorus. 



i^-z^z— 



^,-_^^ss^=^^g^g^ ^ 



I 



To the iveaver^s gin ye go, fair maids, To the -weavcr^s gin ye 



^^^^^i^il^ilipi 



go, I rede you right, gang ne'er at night,To the weaver^ s gin ye go. 

My heart was ance as blythe and free 

As simmer days were lang ; 
But a bonie, westlin weaver lad 

Has gart me change my sang. 

' Chorus. To the weaver s gin ye go, fair maids, 

To the weaver's gin ye go, 
I rede yott right, gang ne'er at night, 
To the weaver s gilt ye go. 

My mither sent me to the town, 

To warp a plaiden wab ; 
But the weary, weary warpin o't 

Has gart me sigh and sab. 

A bonie, westlin weaver lad 

Sat working at his loom ; 
He took my heart, as wi' a net, 

In every knot and thrum. 

I sat beside my warpin-wheel. 

And ay I ca'd it roun' ; 
But every shot and every knock, 

My heart it gae a stoun. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



The moon was sinking in the west 

Wi' visage pale and wan, 
As my bonie, westlin weaver lad 

Convoy'd me through the glen. 

But what was said, or what was done, 

Shame fa' me gin I tell ; 
But O ! I fear the kintra soon 

Will ken as weel 's mysel ! 



No. 20. How long and dreary is the night. 



Tune : A Gaelic air. 
Slow 



Scots Musical Museum^ 1788, No. 175. 



M 



■ i—m — »-^ — ^— 



a^t^^ 



-^ ^ "v — 



How long and drear-y is the night, When I am frae my 



^^=^ 



^S 






dear - ie ! I sleep - less lye fi ae e'en to morn, Tho" 



I^^P^ 



^^ 



--i=Q 



-^—9- 



I were ne'er sae wear - y. I sleep • less lye 



^ 



^T^ 



P^g^^^g^ 



:?v=^ 



e'en to morn, Tho' I were ne'er sae wear - }' ! 

How long and dreary is the night, 

When I am frae my dearie ! 
I sleepless lye frae e'en to morn, ) ■ . 

Tho' I were ne'er sae weary. ) 

When I think on the happy days 

I spent wi' you, my dearie : 
And now what lands between us lye, 

How can I be but eerie ! 

How slow ye move, ye heavy hours,. 

As ye were wae and weary ! 
It wasna sae ye glinted by, ) , • 

When I was wi' my dearie, 
c 2 



his 



20 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 21. Yo7i wild mossy mountains. 

Tune : Phoebe. Cal. Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. p. 19. 

Slow 




Where the grouse lead their cov-eys thro' the heath 



feed, 



=ES=^£Eg3iS^^ 



And the shep - herd tents his flock as he pipes on his reed. 



-^^^'- 



:^=:^ 



aEd£EEEEBE3: 



53- 



J^: 



.r^' 



l:c^= 



Where the grouse lead their cov-eys thro' the heath -er to feed, 

tr 






6/s 



And tlie shep-herd tents his flock as he pipes on his reed. 

Yon wild mossy mountains sae lofty and wide, 

That nurse in their bosom the youth o' the Clyde, 

Where the grouse lead their coveys thro' the heather to feed, ) , • 

And the shepherd tents his flock as he pipes on his reed. S 

Not Cowrie's rich valley nor Forth's sunny shores. 
To me hae the charms o' yon wild mossy moors ; 
For there, by a lanely, sequestered stream, 
Resides a sweet lassie, my thought and my dream. 

Amang thae wild mountains shall still be my path. 
Ilk stream foaming down its ain green, narrow strath ; 
For there wi' my lassie the day-lang I rove, ) , ■ 

While o'er us unheeded flie the swift hours o' love. 

She is not the fairest, altho' she is fair ; 

O' nice education but sma' is her share; 

Her parentage humble as humble can be; ) , • 

But I lo'e the dear lassie because she lo'es me. ) 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



21 



To Beauty what man but maun yield him a prize, 
In her armour of glances, and blushes, and sighs? 
And when wit and refinement hae polish'd her darts, ) , . 
They dazzle our een, as they flie to our hearts. \ 

But kindness, sweet kindness, in the fond sparkling e'e 
Has lustre outshining the diamond to me. 
And the heart-beating love as I'm clasp'd in her arms, ) , . 
O, these are my lassie's all-conquering charms ! \ 



No. 22. An7ia, thy cJiainns my bosom fire. 

Tune : Bonny Mary. Cal. Pocket Companion, 1743, i. p. 24. 



Slow 

Ann - a, thy cliarins mv bo - som fire. And 



g^ 



soul with care ; iiut ah ! 



A\aste my 



ah ! how 

tr 



I 



boot - less 



to ad - mire When fa - ted to des - pair ! 



mm 

Yet 



\W=S^w:^i^ 



'^^^U- 



^m 



:^t= 



thy 



pre-sence, love - ly Fair, To 



p m^=^m^ ^m^^^mm 



hope may be for -given; For sure 'twere im - pious 



ril^:^^gig=gi^ ^gg 



much 



sight 



- pair so 

Anna, thy charms my bosom fire. 

And waste my soul with care ; 
But ah ! how bootless to admire 

When fated to despair I 
Yet in thy presence, lovely Fair, 

To hope may be forgiven ; 
For sure 'twere impious to despair 

So much in sight of Heaven. 



Hea - ven. 



22 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 23. 'Twas even — the dewy fields were green. 

Tune : Ettrick Banks, Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 45. 




pearls hang. The Ze - phyr wan • ton'd round the bean, And 



1=3^ 



=i^=^=i»= 



-*— . — a — :; — a — •- 



bore its fra - grant sweets a - lang; In ev' - ry 



@i 



glen the ma - vis sang, All Na - ture list' - ning 



'¥=^^= F~T ^ ^^-1— g- — ^m—a — -1—1 — =j: 



seem'd the while, Ex - cept where green - wood e - choes 



1^ 



braes 



Bal ■ loch - myle. 



'TwAS even — the dewy fields were green, 

On every blade the pearls hang, 
The zephyr wanton'd round the bean, 

And bore its fragrant sweets alang ; 

In ev'ry glen the mavis sang, 
All Nature list'ning seem'd the while, 

Except where greenwood echoes rang 
Amang the braes o' Ballochmyle. 

With careless step I onward stray'd, 
My heart rejoic'd in Nature's joy. 

When, musing in a lonely glade, 
A maiden fair I chanced to spy : 
Her look was like the morning's eye, 

Her air like Nature's vernal smile ; 
Perfection whisper'd, passing by : — 

' Behold the lass 0' Ballochmyle ! ' 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 23 

Fair is the morn in flowery May, 

And sweet is night in autumn mild, 
When roving thro' the garden gaj^, 

Or wand'ring in the lonely wild : 

But woman, Nature's darling child — 
There all her charms she does compile ; 

Even there her other works are foil'd 
By the bonie lass o' Ballochmyle. 

O, had she been a country maid, 

And I the happy country swain, 
Tho' shelter'd in the lowest shed 

That ever rose on Scotia's plain ! 

Thro' weary winter's wind and rain 
With joy, with rapture, I would toil, 

And nightly to my bosom strain 
The bonie lass o' Ballochmyle ! 

Then pride might climb the slipp'ry steep, 

Where fame and honours lofty shine ; 
And thirst of gold might tempt the deep, 

Or downward seek the Indian mine ; 

Give me the cot below the pine, 
To tend the flocks or till the soil. 

And ev'ry day have joys divine 
With the bonie lass o' Ballochmyle. 



No. 24, As I gaed tip by yoit gate-end. 

(Tune unknown.) 

As I gaed up by yon gate-end. 
When day was wax in weary, 

Wha did I meet come down the street 
But pretty Peg, my dearie ? 

Her air sae sweet, her shape complete, 

Wi' nae proportion wanting, 
The Queen of Love did never move 

Wi' motion mair enchanting ! 

Wi' linked hands we took the sands 

Adoun yon winding river; 
O, that sweet hour and shady bower 

Forget it shall I never. 



24 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 25. How pleasant the banks. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 157. 



Tune : Bhannerach dhon na chrie. 
Slow 



E 



P^g^ 



How pleas -ant the banks of the clear wind - ing De - von, 



&=^ 



^=5: 



^^ 



r:^£ 



^^^ 



With wreen spread-ing bush - es and flow'rs bloom - ing fair ! 



A 



^^^^FEg^^^^i 



But the bo - ni - est flow'r on the banks of the De • von 



^^^^m 



EE 



Was 


once 


a 


sweet 


bud 


on tl 


e braes of the Ayr. 
N- 




i§"^=r- 


"— * — 


-b- 


f- 


-V 


-Vr- 


f-^ P— « Nn— 


^-^ — 


V; / / r t 


V ^ » 


*J 














m 



Mild be the sun on this sweet blush - ing flow - er, 



^m. 



m—i p' — *- 



-^^ 



In 

-& i 


the gay ro - 


sy morn, 
— 9^-' 9- 


as 


it bathes in the dew ! 

1 s 


4-^N 


V '-^ ^ 


-V^r- 


=^ 





And gen - tie the fall of the soft ver - nal show - er, 



:S"-: 



^^^^El^E^^f 



Tliat steals on the even - ing each leaf to re - new ! 

How pleasant the banks of the clear winding Devon, 

With green spreading bushes and flow'rs blooming fair! 
But the boniest flow'r on the banks of the Devon 

Was once a sweet bud on the braes of the Ayr. 
Mild be the sun on this sweet blushing flower, 

In the gay rosy morn, as it bathes in the dew! 
And gentle the fall of the soft vernal shower, 

That steals on the evening each leaf to renew ! 



LOVE : PERSONAL 



25 



O, spare the dear blossom, ye orient breezes, 

With chill, hoary wing as ye usher the dawn ! 
And far be thou distant, thou reptile that seizes 

The verdure and pride of the garden or lawn ! 
Let Bourbon exult in his gay gilded lilies. 

And England triumphant display her proud rose ! 
A fairer than either adorns the green vallies, 

Where Devon, sweet Devon, meandering flows. 



No. 26. The fiower it blaivs, it fades, it fas. 

Tune: Ye' re welcome Charlie Stewart. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No, 471. 
Lively 



^?^^^ 



^ 



IP^^IV 



=f5: 



Chorus. O love - ly Pol - ly Slew - arl, O 



^=^: 



charm-iiig Pol • ly 



i: 



Slew 



^m^ 



^=^=1 



arl, P/iere 'j 7ie'er a flower that blooms in May, That 's 
Fine. 



"^ 






half so fair 



thou art! 



The flower it blaws, it 




worth and truth e - ter - nal youth Will gie to Pol - ly Stew - art ! 

Chorus. O lovely Polly Stewart, 

O charming Polly Stewart, 
There 's ne^er a floiver that blooms in May, 
That 's half so fair as thou art ! 

The flower it blaws, it fades, it fa's, 

And art can ne'er renew it; 
But worth and truth eternal youth 

Will gie to Polly Stewart ! 

May he whase arms shall fauld thy charms 

Possess a leal and true heart ! 
To him be given to ken the heaven- 

He grasps in Polly Stewart ! 



26 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Slow 



No. 27. From thee Eliza, I must go. 

Tune: Gilderoy. Orpheus Caledontus, 1733, No. 47. 






# 



From thee E 



I must go, And 



li^^ife 



:P^ 



;p^^^ 



from my na - tive shore : The era - el fates be 



i 



fc^ 



& 



s^g * — W ! — ^— 



tween us throw A bound - less 



cean s roar ; 



i 



it^ 



& 



p^e^J 



^ 



i* 



But bound - less o - ceans, 



roar - ing wide 



Be 



a — I — 9-^ • — ^— ' — o— ^ — ^-= — ' — *fi» — *=^ — ^^ ' 



tween my love and me, They nev - er, nev - er 



--^^ 



& 



m^ 



ran di - vide My heart and soul from thee. 

From thee Eliza, I must go, 

And from my native shore : 
The cruel fates between us throw 

A boundless ocean's roar ; 
But boundless oceans, roaring wide 

Between my love and me, 
They never, never can divide 

My heart and soul from thee. 

Farewell, farewell, Eliza dear. 

The maid that I adore ! 
A boding voice is in mine ear. 

We part to meet no more ! 
But the latest throb that leaves my heart. 

While Death stands victor by, 
That throb, Eliza, is thy part. 

And thine that latest sigh I 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



27 



No. 28. Where, braving angry winter's storms. 



Tune : Lament for Abercairney. 



Moderate lime 



ijfe 



l-R=' - 



Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 195. 



^^zz^== 



Where, brav - ing an - gry win - ter's storms, The lof • ty O 



fct 



1^^^ 



^^^ 



-0- - 

chils rise, Far in their shade my Peg-gy's charms First 




i^^^i 



^ N R -J^ ^ 



^i 



blest my wonder - iiig eyes ; As one who by Eome 



^ N 



^ 



ii^l^mri^^^i^ 



sav - aga stream A lone - ly gem sur - veys, A - ston - ish'd 




doub • ly, marks it beam With art's most pol - ish'd blaze. 



Where, braving angry winter's storms, 

The lofty Ochils rise, 
Far in their shade my Peggy's charms 

First blest my wondering eyes ; 
As one who by some savage stream 

A lonely gem surveys, 
Astonish'd doubly, marks it beam 

With art's most polish'd blaze. 

Blest be the wild sequester'd shade, 

And blest the day and hour, 
Where Peggy's charms I first survey'd, 

When first I felt their pow'r ! 
The tyrant Death with grim control 

May seize my fleeting breath ; 
-But tearing Peggy from my soul 

Must be a stronger death. 



28 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 29. My Peggy s face, my Peggy s form. 

Tune: My Peggy's face. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 501. 
Slowfy 



£ 



My Peg-gy's face, my Peg - gy's form The frost of her - mit 



^m 



-^-=^-- 




age might warm, My Peg - gy's worth, my Peg - gy's mind Might 



^tlf 



±^ 



;^- 



:S5: 



^^ 



charm the first of 



hu - man kind. 



love my Peg - gy's 



^ 




m^^^^m^ 



:t^=;c 



grace so void of art; But 1 a - dore my Peggy's heart. 

My Peggy's face, my Peggy's form 
The frost of hermit age might warm ; 
My Peggy's worth, my Peggy's mind 
Might charm the first of human kind. 
I love my Peggy's angel air. 
Her face so truly heavenly fair, 
Her native grace so void of art ; 
But I adore my Peggy's heart. 

The lily's hue, the rose's dye, 
The kindling lustre of an eye — 
Who but owns their magic sway ? 
Who but knows they all decay ? 
The tender thrill, the pitying tear, 
The generous purpose nobly dear, 
The gentle look that rage disarms— 
These are all immortal charms. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



29 



No. 30. By OiLghtn^'tyre grows the aik. 



Tune : Andro and his cutty gun. 
Cheerily 



Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. i8o. 



^m 






^^ 



Chorus. Blyl/ie, My/he and mer-ry was she, Blythe was she but atid beii ; 

Fine. 



Blythe by the banks of Earit, Aitd blythe in Gleii - tu - rit glen! 



^^J^^^^^^^ 



S: 



By Ougli-ter - tyre grows the aik, On Yarrow banks the bir - ken shaw 



^3^ 



S!§=^ 



»— ! — -, « — 



S 



^^E^ 



'^^=S=X 



H--K- 



But Plie - mie was a bon - ier lass Than braes o' Yar-row ev - er 

Chorus. Blythe, Blythe and merry was she, 
Blythe was she but and ben ; 
Blythe by the banks of Earn, 
And blythe in Glenturit glen I 

By Oughtertyre grows the aik, 

On Yarrow banks the birken shaw ; 

But Phemie was a bonier lass 
Than braes o' Yarrow ever saw. 

Her looks were like a flow'r in May, 
Her smile was like a simmer morn : 

She tripped by the banks o' Earn 
As light's a bird upon a thorn. 

Her bonie face it was as meek 

As ony lamb upon a lea : 
The evening sun was ne'er sae sweet 

As was the blink o' Phemie's e'e. 

The Highland hills I've wander'd wide, 
As o'er the Lawlands I hae been, 

But Phemie was the blithest lass 
That ever trode the dewy green. 



30 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 31. A rosebud, by my early walk. 

Tune : A rosebud. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. i8c 



Slow 



A rose - bud, by my ear - ly walk A - down a corn - in - 






clos - ed bavvk, Sae gent - ly bent its thor - ny stalk, All 







^3^EEb=i 



y morn - ing. Ere twice the shades o' 



lii^i^ig^^^^^g 



dawn are fled, In a' its crira - son glo - ry spread. And 



^^-^ 



-a^fi- 



^^ ^^^=^=^g=^ ^J 



droop-- ing rich the dew - y head. It scents the^ ear - ly morn - ing. 

A ROSEBUD, by my early walk 
Adown a corn-inclosed bawk, 
Sae gently bent its thorny stalk, 

All on a dewy morning. 
Ere twice the shades o' dawn are fled, 
In a' its crimson glory spread, 
And drooping rich the dewy head. 

It scents the early morning. 



Within the bush, her covert nest 

A little linnet fondly prest, 

The dew sat chilly on her breast, 

Sae early in the morning. 
She soon shall see her tender brood, 
The pride, the pleasure o' the wood, 
Amang the fresh green leaves bedew'd, 

Awake the early morning. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



31 



So thou, dear bird, young Jeany fair, 
On trembling string or vocal air 
Shall sweetly pay the tender care 

That tents thy early morning! 
So thou, sweet Rosebud, young and gaj', 
Shalt beauteous blaze upon the day. 
And bless the parent's evening ray 

That watch'd thy early morning. 



No. 32. Mitsing on the roaring ocean. 

Tune : Dnumionn dubh. M''Donald's Highland Airs, 1784, No. 89. 
Slow 




Weary - ing 



Heav'n in 



tion For his weal wher - e'er he 



Z^Z 



be. 



Musing on the roaring ocean, 
Which divides my love and me. 

Wearying Heav'n in warm devotion 
For his weal where'er he be. 

Hope and fear's alternate billow 
Yielding late to Nature's law, 

Whisp'ring spirits round my pillow, 
Talk of him that 's far avva. 

Ye whom sorrow never wounded, 
Ye who never shed a tear. 

Care-untroubled, joy-surrounded, 
Gaudy Day to you is dear, 

Gentle Night, do thou befriend me ; 

Downy Sleep, the curtain draw ; 
Spirits kind, again attend me, 

Talk of him that 's far awa ! 



32 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 33. She's fair and fause that causes my smart. 

Tune: The lads of Leith. Cal. Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. p. 31, 

Slowly 



ifzfii 



^ 



=^=^ 
5^=^ 



She 's fair and fause that caus - es my smart ; I 

tr 




lo'ed her 
tr 



1^ =1 _-^^t=^ 

I— J-h-» — f* « — J ! — 



^fcv 



lizitii 



=]: 



1^^^ 



mei-kle and 



She's broken her vow, she 's broken my heart, And 

-> ir 



533^ 






may e en gae 



hang. 



coof cam in 



9^^ 



-^ 



F^-i^ 



-* J - 



5 



routh o' gear. And I hae tint my dear - est dear ; But 

i-all tempo 



H ^ J_^_^_^_ 



t 



I^ 



qv:^ 



^ 



:S 



W=T 



jiz:^ 



la^-"-*' 



wo - man is but warld's gear, Sae let the bon-ie lass gang ! 

She 's fair and fause that causes my smart ; 

I lo'ed her meikle and lang ; 
She 's broken her vow, she 's broken my heart, 

And I may e'en gae hang. 
A coof cam in wi' routh o' gear, 
And I hae tint my dearest dear; 
But Woman is but warld's gear, 

Sae let the bonie lass gang ! 

Whae'er ye be that woman love, 

To this be never blind ; 
Nae ferlie 'tis tho' fickle she prove, 

A Woman has't by kind. 
O Woman lovely, Woman fair, 
An angel form 's faun to thy share, 
'Twad been o'er meikle to gien thee mair! — 

I mean an angel mind. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



33 



No. 34. Noiu Spring has clad the grove in green. 

(Tune unknown.) 

Now Spring has clad the grove in green, 

And strew'd the lea wi' flowers ; 
The furrow'd, waving corn is seen 

Rejoice in fostering showers ; 
While ilka thing in Nature join 

Their sorrows to forego, 
O, why thus all alone are mine 

The weary steps o' woe! 

The trout within yon wimpling burn 

That glides, a silver dart, 
And, safe beneath the shady thorn. 

Defies the angler's art — 
My life was ance that careless stream, 

That wanton trout was I, 
But love wi' unrelenting beam 

Has scorch'd my fountains dry. 

The little floweret's peaceful lot, 

In yonder cliff that grows. 
Which, save the linnet's flight, I wot, 

Nae ruder visit knows, 
Was mine, till love has o'er me past, 

And blighted a' my bloom ; 
And now beneath the withering blast 

My youth and joy consume. 

The waken'd laverock warbling springs, 

And climbs the early sky, 
Winnowing blythe his dewy wings 

In morning's rosy eye ; 
As little reck't I sorrow's power 

Until the flowery snare 
O' witching love in luckless hour 

Made me the thrall o' care ! 

O, had my fate been Greenland snows 

Or Afric's burning zone, 
Wi' man and Nature leagu'd my foes, 

So Peggy ne'er I'd known! 
The wretch whase doom is, 'Hope nae mair,' 

What tongue his woes can tell. 
Within whase bosom, save despair, 

Nae kinder spirits dwell. 



34 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 35. O, wilt thou go wi me, sweet Tibbie Dtmbar. 



Tune : Johnny M'^Gill. 
Briskly 



Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 207. 



•fefi- 



B=^ 



1^ 



=!^ 



O, wilt thou go 



me, sweet Tib - bie Dun - bar? 



^^ 



^i^ 



O, wilt thou go 



me, sweet Tib - bie Dun - bar ■ 



-W- 



5^^^ 



-S M 



:i^ 



Wilt thou ride on a horse, or be drawn in 



■ttt 



Or 



Jt 



^ 



^ 



— I- 



walk by my side, O sweet Tib - bie Dun -bar? 



^^^^^^ 



'jSlI 



care na thy dad - die, his lands and his mon - ey; 




:S^fe^ 



care na thy kin, sae high and sae lord - ly: 

— f»^ 



^^^ 



^EEfc 



-^'=^ 



—9-—]?— 


Bit s 


ay that thou'lt hae 

1 ^ V 


me for 


bet - ter 


or 


waur, 


iS^^t= 


=t=^ 


P^=^=^^?= 




— h— >^ 




— , 


W-^ 


-bs-J 


<> J d^ 




t=^=^ 


-a 


— 1 -'-' 

-•- 



And come in thy coa - tie, sweet Tib - bie Dun - bar. 

O, WILT thou go wi' me, sweet Tibbie Dunbar ? 
O, wilt thou go wi' me, sweet Tibbie Dunbar? 
Wilt thou ride on a horse, or be drawn in a car, 
Or walk by my side, O sweet Tibbie Dunbar? 

I care na thy daddie, his lands and his money ; 
I care na thy kin, sae high and sae lordly: 
But say that thou'lt hae me for better or wfaur, 
And come in thj'^ coatie, sweet Tibbie Dunbar. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



35 



No. ^6, Fate gave the word — the arrow sped. 

Tune: Fuilayston house. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 271. 

. Slow 




, And pierc'd my dar - ling's heart; And with hi: 



i 



**mmSS 



I sas — -^ J" I *'_^"" 



3^ 



all the 



:-• ^ 



joys are fled Life 






^^ 



3=33^ 




me im - part. 



By cru - el hands the 






^-^: 



sap - ling drops, 



dust dis - hon 



our'd 






laid: 



So fell the pride 



.4= 

i- 

all my hopes, 




Fate gave the word — the arrow sped, 

And pierc'd my darling's heart ; 
And with hitn all the joys are fled 

Life can to me impart. 
By cruel hands the sapling drops, 

In dust dishonoured laid: 
So fell the pride of all my hopes, 

My age's future shade. 



The mother-linnet in the brake 

Bewails her ravish'd young ; 
So I for my lost darling's sake 

Lament the live-day long. 
Death, oft I've fear'd thy fatal blow, 

Now fond I bare my breast ! 
O, do thou kindly lay me low 

With him I love at rest ! 



36 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 2,7' '^^^^ ^^y ^'eturns, my bosom burns. 

Time: Seventh of November. Scots Musical Museum. 1790, No. 224. 

Notfast 




^ 



3=S 



t= 



day re - turns, my bo - sora burns, The bliss - ful 



3=|fE^^iEg; 






twa did meet: Tho' win - ter wild 



tem - pest 



* — ^ — ^*-f-^ ~\ s — 4- 



toil'd, Ne'er 



sura - mer sun was half sae sweet. Than 




globes, Heav'n gave 



made thee mine ! 



The day returns, my bosom burns, 

The blissful day we twa did meet ; 
Tho' winter wild in tempest toil'd, 

Ne'er summer sun was half sae sweet. 
Than a' the pride that loads the tide, 

And crosses o'er the sultry line. 
Than kingly robes, than crowns and globes, 

Heav'n gave me more — it made thee mine 

While day and night can bring delight. 

Or Nature aught of pleasure give ; 
While joys above my mind can move, 

For thee, and thee alone, I live! 
When that grim foe of life below 

Comes in between to make us part, 
The iron hand that breaks our band, 

It breaks my bliss, it breaks my heart ! 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



37 



No. 38. Ye gallants bright, I rede you right. 

Tune: Bonie Ann. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 215. 

Slowly 



■ISgSjgE^ g^ 



^E 



*-a^^ 



gal - lants bright, I 



rede you right, Be - 






ware o' bon • ie Ann ; Her come - ly 



^^gSii^^i^^ 



face sae fu' o' grace, Your heart she will tre - pan : 



l?=^;f=El 



S 



=S=*= 



S 



W 



a 



^ 



:t^ 



^ 



Her een sae bright like stars by night, Her skin is 



m 



~-^w- 



=& 



~4 



J^ — -. 



^^^331^ 



!ke the swan : 



Sae jim - ply lac'd her 

tr 



S 



-•--* — I F- 



.ts^i^e. 



^=mmmB. 



gen - ty waist, That sweet - ly ye might 

Ye gallants bright, I rede you right, 

Beware o' bonie Ann ; 
Her comely face sae fu' o' grace, 

Your heart she will trepan : 
Her een sae bright like stars b^' night, 

Her skin is like the swan ; 
Sae jimply lac'd her genty waist, 

That sweetly ye might span. 

Youth, Grace, and Love attendant move, 

And Pleasure leads the van : 
In a' their charms, and conquering arms. 

They wait on bonie Ann. 
The captive bands may chain the hands. 

But love enslaves the man : 
Ye gallants braw, I rede you a', 

Beware o' bonie Ann ! 



38 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No, 39. / gaed a waefii gate yestreen, 

Tuiie : The blue eyd lassie. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 294. 
Modcra/e time 



te^S^ 



-^ 



r=a=^- -^ J- 



:. S- 



gaed a wae - fu' gate yes - treen, A 



I^S^I 



=es^ 



gate 



fear 



dear - ly rue ; 



i=S^=^^i^^=pS 



my death frae twa sweet een, Twa love - ly 







& 



n\ 



^^1 



wat wi' dew, Her heav - ing bo - som li - ly - 



L -+- 



-m---\ a v-tf 



33i 



-S|-i-«» j^- 



vhite — It was her een sae bon - ie 

I GAED a waefu' gate yestreen, 

A gate I fear I'll dearly rue ; 
I gat my death frae twa sweet een, 

Twa lovely een o' bonie blue ! 
'Twas not her golden ringlets briglit, 

Her lips like roses wat wi' dew, 
Her heaving bosom lily-white — 

It was her een sae bonie blue. 



blue. 



I. LOV£ : PERSONAL 



39 



She talkM, she smil'd, my heart she wyFd, 

She charm'd mj'- soul I wist na how ; 
And aye the stound, the deadly wound, 

Cam frae her een sae bonie blue. 
But 'spare to speak, and spare to speed' — 

She'll aiblins listen to my vow : 
Should she refuse, I'll lay my dead 

To her twa een sae bonie blue. 



No. 40. Ely the hae I been on yon hill. 



Tune : The Quaker's Wife. 
Slow 



Bremner's Reels, 1759, p. 53. 

if 




=r1=^ 



BIythe hae I been on yon 






hHl As the lambs be 



Ig^^^S^^ 



Care -less il - ka thought, and free 



As tlie 



^^•= 



:^ 



£E 



=^ 



^^=^ 



breeze flew o'er 



Now nae Ian - ger sport and 
ir 




is sae fair ami coy, 



Blythe hae I been on yon hill 

As the lambs before me. 
Careless ilka thought, and free 

As the breeze flew o'er me ; 
Now nae langer sport and play. 

Mirth or sang can please me; 
Lesley is sae fair and coy. 

Care and anguish seize me. 



Care and an - guish seize me. 



Heavy, heavy is the task, 

Hopeless love declaring ; 
Trembling, I dow nocht but glow'r, 

Sighing, dumb despairing ! 
If she winna ease the thraws 

In my bosom swelling, 
Underneath the grass-green sod 

Soon maun be my dwelling. 



4b 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 41. Yestreen I had a pint d wine. 

Tune: Banks of Banna. Perih Musical Miscellany, 1786, p. 75. 



Merrily 



S 



^ 



^m 



1*1=^: 






Yes - treen I had a pint o' -wine, A 



3^ 



S= 



33 



33Eg^^p 



=^=p: 



^U 



i 



place where bo - dy saw na ; Yes - treen lay on this 



breast 


0' 


mine 


The 


gow - den 


locks 


of 


-7? r ---^ 


S- 


— 1 f.: — 1 1 


-~\- 


— ! — ' '" 


-M~>- 


*>=^-d- 


-- r^-^ 


— •— 


—^ \^-A — J- 


-*— 


— *— ^ — »- 


1 ^ 


«y 'oi 


-»- 






# "■ 




" 





An - na. The hun - gry Jew in wil - der - ness Re 



^^J^^^ ^ ^^^^^fr^m^ 



joicing o'er hia man - na Was naething to my hi - ney 



— ^-=: •— • — J — «=^ '*' ' m — 



bliss Up - on the lips of An - na. 



Yestreen I had a pint o' wine, 

A place where body saw na ; 
Yestreen lay on this breast o' 
mine 

The gowden locks of Anna. 
The hungry Jew in wilderness 

Rejoicing o'er his manna 
Was naething to my hiney bliss 

Upon the lips of Anna. 

Ye monarchs take the east and 
west 

Frae Indus to Savannah ; 
Gie me within my straining grasp 

The melting form of Anna : 
There I'll despise imperial charms, 

An Empress or Sultana, 
While dying raptures in her arms 

I give and take wi' Anna ! 



Awa, thou flaunting god of day ! 

Awa, thou pale Diana ! 
Ilk star, gae hide thy twinkling ray, 

When I'm to meet my Anna ! 
Come, in thy raven plumage, Night ! 

(Sun, moon, and stars, withdrawn 
a'). 
And bring an angel-pen to write 

My transports with my Anna ! 

POSTSCRIPT. 

The kirk an' state may join, an' tell 

To do sic things I maunna : 
The kirk an' state may gae to hell, 

And I'll gae to my Anna. 
She is the sunshine o' my e'e 

To live but her I canna : 
Had I on earth but wishes three, 

The first should be my Anna. 



LOVE : PERSONAL 



4^ 



No. 42. Wishfully I look and languish. 



^i 



Tune : Bonie wee thing. 
Slowly 



E 



T— »= 



:t^= 



Scots Musical Musemn, 1792, No. 341. 



--^ 



^^ 



=e^ 



::^- 



i — h 



^r^ir*: 



^ 



Bon- 



ie wee thing., Can • nie wee things Love - ly 



•a=^ 



=H^3Eg^ 



IS 



i^^=3^E^:i 



z£i£e thing, wert thou mine, F wad wear thee 

tr Fine. 






in iny bos - oin Lent iny jew - el it should tine, 
tr tr — c_HBs 



M ■ 



■^^ 



Wish - ful - ly 






look and Ian - guisli 



!^ 



3: 



=& 



-^",^--h- 



In that bon - ie 



thine, and my heart 



D. C. 



-ferti 



^^=feErEE:* 



&= 



"^ 



— r^^ 



iEWEE3 



stounds \vi' an - g;uish, Lest my vee thing be na 

Chorus. Bonie tvee thing, caimie wee thing, 

Lovely wee thing, wert thou mine, 
I wad wear thee in my bosom 
Lest my jewel it should tine. 

Wishfully I look and languish 

In that bonie face o' thine, 
And my heart it stounds wi' anguish, 

Lest my wee thing be na mine. 

Wit and Grace and Love and Beauty 

In ae constellation shine ; 
To adore thee is my duty, 

Goddess o' this soul o' mine! 



42 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 43. O, how shall I, 2inskilfu\ try. 

!, No. 349. 



Tune: Miss Muir. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 349. 
Cheerfully 







O, how shall I, un - skil - fu', try The 



^^ 



E^ 



-_?z=*: 



po - et's oc - cu • pa - tion? The tune - fu' 



eS 



J ^ ;.,.— ^ JO 1 



3EE3^Ea 



"W- 



powers, hi hap - py hours That whis - per in - spi 

■i- 



.t^ 



-I 1 ■!- 






ra • tion; Even they maun dare an ef - fort mair Than 

r 



^ — ,«-^" 



8^^^=^ 



!^ 



:£i 



=^ 



aught tliey ev - er gave us, Ere they re - hearse in 



^^^^E^==^ 



3^=^aEg^^£E3ppg^|E^: 



e - qual verse The charms o' love - ly Da - vies. 



w 






=^£t±^ 



=^5?: 



Each eye, it cheers, when she ap - pears. Like Phoe - bus 



-0^^^^^^^m^^ 



the morn - ing. When past the shower, and eve - ry 



-p-^-a 



-^EE^. 



& 



m 



li^Z^ 



rJ^^ 



I 



flower The gar - den is 



dorn - ing! As tlie 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



43 



i=Ei^^ 



See? 



wretch looks o'er 



S"- 



be 



ria's shore, When 




win - ter - bound the wave is, Sae droops our heart whe 






we maun part Frae charm - ing, love - ly Da • vies. 

O, HOW shall I, unskilfu' try 

The poet's occupation ? 
The tunefu' powers, in happj' hours 

That whisper inspiration ; 
Even they maun dare an effort mair 

Than aught they ever gave us, 
Ere they rehearse in equal verse 

The charms o' lovely Davies. 
Each eye, it cheers, vvhen she appears, 

Like Phoebus in the morning. 
When past the shower, and every flower 

The garden is adorning ! 
As the wretch looks o'er Siberia's shore, 

When winter-bound the wave is, 
Sae droops our heart when we maun part 

Frae charming, lovely Davies. 

Her smile 's a gift frae 'boon the lift. 

That maks us mair than princes ; 
A sceptred hand, a king's command. 

Is in her daiting glances : 
The man in arms 'gainst female charms. 

Even he her willing slave is : 
He hugs his chain, and owns the reign 

Of conquering lovely Davies. 
My Muse to dream of such a theme 

Her feeble powers surrenders ; 
The eagle's gaze alone surveys 

The sun's meridian splendours : 
I wad in vain essay the strain : 

The deed too daring brave is ! 
ril drap the lyre, and, mute, admire 

The charms o' lovely Davies, 



44 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 44. O, sazv ye bonie Lesley ? 

Tune! The Collier's hon'e lassie. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, Nd. 33. 
Merrily 



^^EE^EEk 






O, saw ye bon - ie Les - ley, As she gaed o'er the 



,=fe 



■EE^=5 



eSe^^ 



^m^^s=^^ 



Bor - der? She's gaiie like A - lex - an - der, To 



- Sfl — -^ ,^ - 



^^^^mmm^m 



spread her con - quests far - ther ! To see her is to 



i=h«^=& 






i^zzii 



=^ 






ea 



love her, and love but her for ev - er ; For Na - ture 



-=]V 



:=^=J^ 



1^^- 



H 1 1 



-■^. 



its 



made her what she is, And nev - er made a - ni - tlier ! 



O, SAW ye bonie Lesley, 

As she gaed o'er the Border ? 
She's gane, like Alexander, 

To spread her conquests farther ! 
To see her is to love her, 

And love but her for ever; 
For Nature made her what she is, 

And never made anither ! 

That art a queen, fair Lesley — 

Thy subjects, we before thee : 
Thou art divine, fair Lesley — 

The hearts o' men adore thee. 
The deil he couldna skaith thee, 

Or aught that wad belang thee ; 
He'd look into thy bonie face. 

And say -.—^ I canna wrang thee ! ' 



I. LOVE: PERSONAL 



45 



The Powers aboon will tent thee, 

Misfortune sha' na steer thee; 
Thou'rt like themsel', sae lovely, 

That ill they'll ne'er let near thee. 
Return again, fair Lesley, 

Return to Caledonie ! 
That we may brag we hae a lass 

There 's nane again sae bonie. 



No. 45. While larks with little wing. 



Tune : Aiken a roon. 

Slow 



Cal. Pocket Companion, 1753, v. p. ar. 




?3iE 



3^ 



Wliile larks with lit - tie wing Fann'd the pure 




Gay, the sun's gol-den eye Peep'd o'er the mountains high ; 
tr 



m 



3i^ 



gl 



'Such thy bloom' did I cry — 'Phil - lis the 



While larks with little wing 

Fann'd the pure air. 
Viewing the breathing spring, 

Forth I did fare : 
Gay, the sun's golden eye 
Peep'd o'er the mountains high ; 
' Such thy bloom,' did I cry — 

' Phillis the fair.' 

In each bird's careless song, 

Glad, I did share ; 
While yon wild-flowers among, 

Chance led me there : 



Sweet to the op'ning day, 
Rosebuds bent the dewy spray 
' Such thy bloom,' did I say — 
'Phillis the fair.' 

Down in a shady walk 

Doves cooing were ; 
I mark'd the cruel hawk 

Caught in a snare : 
So kind may Fortune be, 
Such make his destiny, 
He who would injure thee, 

Phillis the fair. 



46 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 46. Farewell, thoic stream that winding flows. 



Slow 



Tune : Alace yai I came owr the moor. Skene MS., c. 1630. 



^^ 



Fare - well, thou stream that wind - ing flows 






^ 



'-^^^^ 



round E 



dwel - ling! 




swel - ling : 



Con - demn'd to drag 



=?=^=F= 



hope -less chain And yet 



guish, 



^^^: 



q^- 



i^i 



fee! a fire in ev - ery vein, Nor dare dis - close my an - guish ! 

Farewell, thou stream that winding flows 
Around Eliza's dwelling ! 

mem'ry, spare the cruel throes 
Within my bosom swelling : 

Condemn'd to drag a hopeless chain 

And yet in secret languish, 
To feel a fire in every vein. 

Nor dare disclose my anguish ! 

Love's veriest wretch, unseen, unknown, 

I fain my griefs would cov^ : 
The bursting sigh, th' unweeting groan 

Betray the hapless lover. 

1 know thou doom'st me to despair, 
Nor wilt, nor canst relieve me ; 

But, O Eliza, hear one prayer — 
For pity's sake forgive me ! 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



47 



The music of thy voice 1 heard, 

Nor wist while it enslav'd me ; 
I saw thine eyes, yet nothing fear'd, 

Till fears no more had saved me : 
The unwary sailor thus, aghast, 

The wheeling torrent viewing, 
'Mid circling horrors sinks at last 

In overwhelming ruin. 



No. 47. A slave to loves tindounded sway 



Tune : The Cordwainers march. 
. Slow ^ . 



Scots Musical Musetim, 1803, No. 574. 



i^ 



Chorus. O lay thy loof in mi'tie, lass, In f7u'ne, lass, in 



_« — ^_f 



:^ 



mine, lass. And swear' on thy white hand, lass. That ihoti wilt 
Fi7ie. f 



gi^i^lg g^^g^ g^g 



m 



be my ain. A slave to love's un - bound - ed sway, He 




^-=^=^=^ 



-BBb 



But 



aft has wrought me 



5^ 



:^: 



i?5Ef 



de:id - ly 
Chorus. 



Un 



thou be 



fae, Un - less tfiou De my 

O, lay thy loof in mine, lass, 
In mine, lass, in mine, lass, 
And swear on thy while hand, lass, 
That thou wilt be my ain. 
A SLAVE to love's unbounded sway. 
He aft has wrought me meikle wae ; 
But now he is my deadly fae, 
Unless thou be my ain. 

There 's monie a lass has broke my rest. 
That for a blink I hae lo'ed best ; 
But thou art queen within my breast, 
For ever to remain. 



48 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 48. T^Lvn again, thoiL fair Eliza ! 

Tune: A Gaelic air. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 368. 
Slow 



'^^-- 



^ 



35^: 



3-^ 



i^: 



'^t=^-- 



m 



f 



Turn a - gain, tliou fair E - li 



za ! Ae kind 



3^^ 



1":B 



:f1=fs=:fi!: 



i^^zMz 



i 



blink be - fore we part ; Rue on tli}' des - pair - ing 



^^3^ 



lov - er — Canst thou break his faith - fu' heart? 






Turn a - gain, thou fair E 



za ! If to 



— I i-i-jJ — * ^- 



^ 



love thy heart de - nies For 
K &-n 1 F=^ a . , -I H- 



£^ 



id: 



pi - ty hide the 



^^mm 



cm . el sen - tence Un - der friend - ship's kind dis - guise. 

Turn again, thou fair Eliza ! 

Ae kind blink before we part ; 
Rue on thy despairing lover — 

Canst thou break his faithfu' heart ? 
Turn again, thou fair Eliza ! 

If to love thy heart denies, 
For pity hide the cruel sentence 
• Under friendship's kind disguise ! 

Thee, dear maid, hae I offended ? 

The offence is loving thee : 
Canst thou wreck his peace for ever, 

Wha for thine wad gladly die? 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 49 

While the life beats in mj' bosom, 

Thou shalt mix in ilka throe : 
Turn again, thou lovely maiden, 

Ae sweet smile on me bestow ! 

Not the bee upon the blossom, 

In the pride o' sinny noon ; 
Not the little sporting fairy 

All beneath the simmer moon, 
Not the poet, in the moment 

Fancy lightens in his e'e, 
Kens the pleasure, feels the rapture, 

That thy presence gies to me. 



No. 49. There was a lass, and she was fair 

To its ain time. (Unknown.) 

There was a lass, and she was fair, 

At kirk and market to be seen 
When a' our fairest maids were met. 

The fairest maid was bonie Jean. 

And ay she wrought her country wark, 

And ay she sang sae merrilie ; 
The blythest bird upon the bush 

Had ne'er a lighter heart than she ! 

But hawks will rob the tender joys. 
That bless the little lintwhite's nest, 

And frost will blight the fairest flowers, 
And love will break the soundest rest. 

Young Robie was the brawest lad, 
The flower and pride of a' the glen, 

And he had owsen, sheep, and kye, 
And wanton naigies nine or ten. 

He gaed wi' Jeanie to the tryste. 
He danced wi' Jeanie on the down, 

And, lang ere witless Jeanie wist. 

Her heart was tint, her peace was stown ! 

As in the bosom of the stream 

The moonbeam dwells at dewy e'en. 

So, trembling pure, was tender love 
Within the breast of bonie Jean. 



5° 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



And now she works her country's wark, 
And ay she sighs wi' care and pain, 

Yet wist na what her ail might be, 
Or what wad make her weel again. 

But did na Jeanie's heart loup light, 
And did na joy blink in her e'e, 

As Robie tauld a tale o' love 
Ae e'enin on the lily lea? 

The sun was sinking in the w^est, 
The birds sang sweet in ilka grove ; 

His cheek to hers he fondly laid, 

And whisper'd thus his tale o' love :^ 

' O Jeanie fair, I lo'e thee dear — 
O, canst thou think to fancy me ? 

Or wilt thou leave thy mammie's cot. 
And learn to tent the farms wi' me ? 

'At barn or byre thou shalt na drudge. 
Or naething else to trouble thee, 

But stray amang the heather-bells, 
And tent the waving corn wi' me.' 

Now what could artless Jeanie do ? 

She had nae will to say him na : 
At length she blush'd a sweet consent, 

And love was ay between them twa. 



No. 50. O Philly, happy be that day. 



Tune : The SouPs tail to Geordie. M<^Glashan's Scots Measures, 1781, p. 39. 
Blythly 



B3 gEg^gEgEgE£JEgE^^ gE^gE gEJ^^E^EgEgj 




:$^=^=5.q 



O Phil - ly, hap-py bethatday When, rov-ing thro' the gath-er'd ha)', My 



1 — -* ^ -^ J m—^- 



^ 



-jtze- 



w 



youth - fu' heart was stown a way, And by thy charms, my Phil - ly. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 51 

Chorus. For a' the joys that gowd can gie, 
Both. I dintta care a single Jlte! 

The 1 ."^ [ / love 's the \ , [ for mc, 
( lass ) ( lass ) 

\ Willy. 
And that's my ain dear \ „, .„ 
•^ ( Philly. 

He. O Philly, happy be that day 

When, roving thro' the gather'd hay, 
My youthfu' heart was stown away, 
And by thy charms, my Philly. 
She. O, Willy, ay I bless the grove 

Where first I own'd my maiden love, 
Whilst thou did pledge the Powers above 
To be my ain dear Willy. 

He. As songsters of the early year 

Are ilka day mair sweet to hear, 
So ilka day to me mair dear 
And charming is my Philly. 
She. As on the brier the budding rose 

Still richer breathes, and fairer blows, 
So in my tender bosom grows 
The love I bear my Willy. 

He. The milder sun and bluer sky, 

That crown my harvest cares wi' joy, 
Were ne'er sae welcome to my eye 
As is a sight o' Philly. 
She. The little swallow's wanton wing, 

Tho' wafting o'er the flowery spring. 
Did ne'er to me sic tidings bring, 
As meeting o' my Willy. 

He. The bee, that thro' the sunny hour 
Sips nectar in the op'ning flower, 
Compar'd wi' my delight is poor 
Upon the lips o' Philly. 
She. The woodbine in the dev^ry weet. 

When ev'ning shades in silence meet, 
Is nocht sae fragrant or sae sweet 
As is a kiss o' Willy. 

' He. Let Fortune's wheel at random rin. 

And fools may tyne, and knaves may win ; 
My thoughts are a' bound up in ane. 
And that's my ain dear Philly, 
She. What 's a' the joys that gowd can gie ? 
I dinna care a single flie ! 
The lad I love's the lad for me, 
And that 's my ain dear Willy. 
E 2 



52 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 51. Adown winding Nith I did wander. 

Tune : The rmtckin o' Geordys byre. Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 33. 

„ n. Slow ,-, 



3SES 



down wind - ing- Nith 



did wan - der To 



:|=fc: 



.C 9 *— 



Ifc^ 



^J^^ 



i 



mark the sweet flowers as they spring ; A - down winding Nith I did 

Chorus. 



:^=^ 



g^ 



fej 



wan - der Of Phil - lis to muse and to sing. 



t|^=&. 



S^ 



J^=fc=fe: 



^?=g=^£=p: 



wa "wf your belles and your beau - ties, They nev ■ er wi' 



l=ps: 



s= 



^^^^ 



^ 



her can com -pare! Wha - ev - er hae -met ivP my 



^fe^^^^=^=^ N^=^^ 



Phil - lis, Has met wi'' the queen o' the Fair. 



Adown winding Nith I did wander 

To mark the sweet flowers as they spring ; 

Adown winding Nith I did wander 
Of Phillis to muse and to sing. 

Chorus. Awa wV your belles and your beauties- 
They never wi' her can compare! 
Whoever hae met wV my Phillis, 
Has m.et wi' the queen o' the Fair. 

The daisy amus'd my fond fancy, 

So artless, so simple, so wild : 
'Thou emblem,' said I, ' o' my Phillis' — 

For she is Simplicity's child. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 53 

The rosebud's the blush o' my charmer, 

Her sweet balmy lip when 'tis prest : 
How fair and how pure is the lily ! 

But fairer and purer her breast. 

Yon knot of gay flowers in the arbour, 

They ne'er wi' my Phillis can vie: 
Her breath is the breath of the woodbine. 

Its dew-drop o' diamond her eye. 

Her voice is the song o' the morning. 

That wakes thro' the green-spreading grove, 

When Phebus peeps over the mountains 
On music, and pleasure, and love. 

But beauty, how frail and how fleeting ! 

The bloom of a fine summer's day! 
While worth in the mind o' my Phillis, 

Will flourish without a decay. 



No. 52. Here is the glen, and here the bower. 

Tune : Banks ofCree. (Unknown.) 

Here is the glen, and here the bower 

All underneath the birchen shade, 
The village bell has told the hour — 

O, what can stay my lovely maid ? 
'Tis not Maria's whispering call — 

'Tis but the balmy-breathing gale, 
Mixt with some warbler's dying fall 

The dewy star of eve to hail. 

It is Maria's voice I hear ; — 

So calls the woodlark in the grove 
His little faithful mate to cheer : 

At once 'tis music and 'tis love ! 
And art thou come ? and art thou true ? 

O, welcome, dear, to love and me, 
And let us all our vows renew 

Along the flowery banks of Cree. 



54 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 53. O, wert thou in the catdd blast. 



Tune : Lenox love to Blantyre. 
Slow 



Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 483. 



::3eB: 



^^^^^^^ 



^££ 



O, wert thou in the cauld blast On yon - der lea, on 



* 



^^^^^^ 



yon - der lea, My plaid - ie to the an - gry airt, 



i^ 



53^^ 



shel - ter thee, Td shel • ter thee; Or did Mis - for -t 



&^^^^^^^ 



bit - ter storms A - round thee blaw, a - round thee blaw. 



Thy 




bield should be my bo - som, To share it a', to share it 



O, WERT thou in the cauld blast 

On yonder lea, on yonder lea, 
My plaidie to the angry airt, 

I'd shelter thee, I'd shelter thee ; 
Or did Misfortune's bitter storms 

Around thee blaw, around thee blaw. 
Thy bield should be my bosom, 

To share it a', to share it a'. 

Or were I in the wildest waste, 

Sae black and bare, sae black and bare, 
The desert were a paradise, 

If thou wert there, if thou wert there ; 
Or were I monarch of the globe, 

Wi' thee to reign, wi' thee to reign. 
The brightest jewel in my crown 

Wad be my queen, wad be my queen. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



55 



No. 54. Ilk care and fear ^ when thoii art near. 

Tune: Braes 6' Balquhidder. Scots Musical Museum, I'jQQ, No. 193. 
Slow 



S^E^S3^3^^ 



■(i-=3L 



m 



^=^ 



^ 



-ig^-» 



Ckorvs. Ajtd I HI kiss thee yei, yet, And l''U kiss thee o'er a - gain ; 

^ Fine. 



W^ 



]^: 



^S 



^;£^E^£*^3E^EiEi^ 



And IHl kiss ihee yet, yet. My bon - ie Peg ■ gy A - It ■ son. 







Ilk care and fear, when thou art near, I ev - er mair de - fy them, O ; 
^^ D. C. 



s=s 



-g- . w 



■if=^ 



^^^m 



S^^Eg^^ 



^Is 



^=Mz 



Young kings upon their hansel throne Are no sae blest as I am, O ! 



Chorus. And I'll kiss thee yet, yet, 

And I'll kiss thee o'er again 
And I'll kiss thee yet, yet, 
My bonie Peggy Alison. 

Ilk care and fear, when thou art near, 

I ever mair defy them, O ; 
Young kings upon their hansel throne 

Are no sae blest as I am, O ! 

When in my arms, wi' a' thy charms, 
I clasp my countless treasure, O ; 

I seek nae mair o' Heav'n to share 
Than sic a moment's pleasure, O ! 

And by thy een, sae bonie blue, 
I swear I'm thine for ever, O ! 

And on thy lips I seal my vow, 
And break it shall I never, O ! 



56 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 55. On Cessiiock banks a lassie dwells. 

Tune: The bttichcr boy. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 304 




=i^=^ 



^ 



^ 



:?^=i: 



On Cessnock banks a las - sie dwells; Could I describe her 



ife^^^^P^^^ 



shape and mien ; Our las - sies a' she far ex - eels; An' she has twa 
tr 



^m^^^^^^m s^m^^^m 



sparkling, rogueish een; She's sweet - er than the morning dawn, When 






lis - ing Phoe - bus first is seen; When dew-drops twin - kle 



I^^E^ ^^Eg EgEglgg^g Eg, ^^ 



fca 



o'er the lawn ; An' she has twa sparkling rogue - ish een. 



On Cessnock banks a lassie dwells ; 

Could I describe her shape and mien ; 
Our lasses a' she far excels ; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

She's sweeter than the morning dawn, 
When rising Phoebus first is seen ; 

When dew-drops twinkle o'er the lawn ; 
An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

She 's stately like yon youthful ash. 
That grows the cowslip braes between, 

And drinks the stream with vigour fresh ; 
An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

.She's spotless like the flow'ring thorn, 

With flow'rs so white and leaves so green. 

When purest in the dewy morn ; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 57 

Her looks are like the vernal May, 

When ev'ning Phoebus shines serene ; 
While birds rejoice on every spray ; 

An' she has twra sparkling, rogueish een. 

Her hair is like the curling mist. 

That climbs the mountain-sides at e'en, 
When flow^'r-reviving rains are past ; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish eon. 

Her forehead's like the show'ry bow, 

When gleaming sunbeams intervene. 
And gild the distant mountain's brovi,'; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

Her cheeks are like yon crimson gem, 

The pride of all the flowery scene. 
Just opening on its thorny stem; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

Her bosom's like the nightly snow, 

When pale the morning rises keen ; 
While hid the murmuring streamlets flow ; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

Her voice is like the ev'ning thrush. 

That sings on Cessnock banks unseen ; 
While his mate sits nestling in the bush ; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

Her lips are like yon cherries ripe, 

That sunny walls from Boreas screen ; 
They tempt the taste and charm the sight; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

Her teeth are like a flock of sheep, 

With fleeces newly washen clean : 
That slowly mount the rising steep. 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

Her breath is like the fragrant breeze 

That gently stirs the blossom'd bean ; 
When Phoebus sinks behind the seas; 

An' she has twa sparkling, rogueish een. 

But it's not her air, her form, her face, 

Tho' matching beauty's fabled queen ; 
'Tis the mind that shines in every grace, 

An' chiefly in her rogueish een. 



58 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 56. O Mary, at thy window be. 

Tune: Duncan Davison. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 149. 

Anda72te 



£EEE 



5^:£^:s?:^pp^5i^ 



O, Ma - ry at thy window be, It is the wish'd, the trysted hour ! 



gi^jp^g;^¥^^^$gp^^ 



Those smiles and glances let me see, That make the miser's treasure poor. 




^1^^ 



ep^EEE^^.EEEp 



How blithely wad I bide the stoure, A weary slave frae sun to sun, 



^^^^\F^S^^^^^^ 



Could I the rich re - ward secure — The love - ly Ma - ry Mor - i - son. 

O Mary, at thy window be, 

It is the wish'd, the trysted hour ! 
Those smiles and glances let me see. 

That make the miser's treasure poor. 

How blithely wad I bide the stoure, 
A weary slave frae sun to sun, 

Could I the rich reward secure — 
The lovely Mary Morison. 

Yestreen, when to the trembling string 
The dance gaed thro' the lighted ha', 

To thee my fancy took its wing, 
I sat, but neither heard nor saw : 
Tho' this was fair, and that was braw, 

And yon the toast of a' the town, 
I sigh'd and said amang them a' ; — 

' Ye are na Mary Morison ! ' 

O Mary, canst thou wreck his peace 

Wha for thy sake wad gladly die ? 
Or canst thou break that heart of his 

Whase only faut is loving thee ? 

If love for love thou wilt na gie, 
At least be pity to me shown ; 

A thought ungentle canna be 
The thought o' Mary Morison. 



LOVE : PERSONAL 



59 



No. 57. Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary? 



Tune : Ewe-bughts Mat-ion. 
Very slow 



Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 15. 



^^ ^^^m 



g 



^ 



Will ye go to the Indies, my Ma - ry, And leave auld Sco-tia's 



m 



m 






fe^E^Efc 



:^=?V 



iziit 



3^ 



ffi 



shore? Will ye go to the Indies, my Ma - ty, A - cross th' At- 







^^^^P 



Ian - tic roar? O, sweet grows the lime and the orange, 




^^E^ 



And the ap - pie on the pine ; But a' the charms 



gs^ss 



gg^gE g^^^^ag^ g^;gg^ 



o' the In - dies Can nev - er e - qual thine. 

Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, 

And leave auld Scotia's shore? 
Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary, 

Across th' Atlantic roar ? 

O, sweet grows the lime and the orange, 

And the apple on the pine ; 
But a' the charms o' the Indies 

Can never equal thine. 

I hae sworn by the Heavens to my Mary, 
I hae sworn by the Heavens to be true. 

And sae may the Heavens forget me, 
When I forget my vow ! 

O, plight me your faith, my Mary, 
And plight me your lily-white hand ; 

O, plight me your faith, my Mary, 
Before I leave Scotia's strand ! 

We hae plighted our troth, my Marj', 

In mutual aifection to join ; 
And curst be the cause that shall part us ! 

The hour and the moment 0" time J 



6o 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 58. Flow gently, sweet A/ton. 

Tune : Afton Water. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 386. 

Slew 



^^^m^^^EE^^^E^^m 



Flow gently, sweet Af-ton, a - mong thy green braes, Flow gently, I'll 



:^=r^^ 






[=Sz^zJzii: 



;:=^: 



r^Z 



£i 



sing thee a song in thy praise ; My Ma-ry's a - sleep by thy mur- 



'^^^^^^^m 



mur - ing stream, Flow gently, sweet Af-ton, dis - turb not her dream ! 



Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes, 
Flow gently, Fll sing thee a song in thy praise ; 
My Mary's asleep by thy murmuring stream, 
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream ! 

Thou stock-dove whose echo resounds thro' the glen. 
Ye wild whistling blackbirds in yon thorny den. 
Thou green-crested lapwing, thy screaming forbear, 
I charge you, disturb not my slumbering fair. 

How^ lofty, sweet Afton, thy neighbouring hills. 
Far mark'd with the courses of clear, winding rills ; 
There daily I wander, as noon rises high. 
My flocks and my Mary's sweet cot in my eye. 

How pleasant thy banks and green vallies below, 
Where wild in the woodlands the primroses blow; 
There oft, as mild ev'ning weeps over the lea. 
The sweet-scented birk shades my Mary and me. 

The crystal stream, Afton, how lovely it glides. 

And winds by the cot where my Mary resides ; 

How wanton thy waters her snowy feet lave. 

As, gathering sweet flow'rets, she stems thy clear wave. 

Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes, 
Flow gently, sweet river, the theme of my lays ; 
My Mary 's asleep by thy murmuring stream, 
Flow gently, sweet Afton, disturb not her dream ! 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



6r 



No. 59. Nae gentle dames, thd nier sae fair. 



Tune ; M<=Lauchlin's Scots-measure. 
Slowly 



Scots Musical Musemn, 1788, No. 117. 



s 



i^ 



s 



3 



-^-^-•c 






Nae gen - tie dames, tho' ne'er sae fair, Shall ev - er be my 



Mu 



3p^Sggg^ gg^^g ^^' 



se's care: Their ti - ties a' are amp - ty show — Gie me my 

Chorus. ^ _ 



jfS pg^B^lggg^B 



w 



High - land las - sie, O. With- hi the glen sae bush- y, Of A 






^^pE 



boon the plain sae ra - shy^ Of I set me down wi' 






-i^--i-^V 



m 



4=1- 



right glide will. To sing iiiy High - land las • sie, O! 



Nae gentle dames, tho' ne'er sae 

fair, 
Shall ever be my Muse's care : 
Their titles a' are empty show — 
Gie me my Highland lassie, O. 

Chorus. 

Within the glen sae bushy, O '. 
Aboon the plain sae rashy, O ! 
I set me doivn wi' right gude will 
To sing my Highland lassie, O ! 

O, were yon hills and vallies mine. 
Yon palace and yon gardens fine, 
The world then the love should 

know 
I bear my Highland lassie, O. 

But fickle Fortune fi-owns on me, 
And I maun cross the raging sea ; 
But while my crimson currents flow 
I'll love mj^ Highland lassie, O. 



Altho' thro' foreign climes I range, 
I know her heart will never change ; 
Fpr her bosom burns with honour's 

glow, 
My faithful Highland lassie, O. 

For her I'll dare the billows' roar, 
For her I'll trace a distant shore. 
That Indian wealth may lustre throw 
Around my Highland lassie, O. 

She has my heart, she has my hand. 
By secret troth and honor's band ! 
'Till the mortal stroke shall lay me 

low, 
I'm thine, my Highland lassie, O. 

Chorus. 

Fareweel the glen sae bushy, O ! 
Fareiveel the plain sae rashy, O! 
To other lands I now must go 
To sing my Highland lassie, O ! 



62 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 60. Thou ling'' ring star with lessning ray. 



Tune : Captain Cook's death. 

Slow 



Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 279. 



'S^^^ 






i^ 



Thou ling' - ring star with less'-ning ray, That lov'st to greet 



s 



H^ 



^S 



a 



the 



ear - ly morn, A - gain thou ush - er'st in the day 




Ma - ry from my soul was torn. 



I# 



^i^^P^^^ 



53? 



a= 



ry, dear de - part - ed shade ! Where is thy place of 

-55- 






=^& 



^R=S= 



bliss 



ful rest ? See'st thou thy lov - er low - ly 



H=g; 



r3; 



£E 



s 



m 



::a--=l= 



laid ? Hear'st thou the groans that rend his breast ? 

Thou ling' ring star with less'ning ray, 

That lov'st to greet the early morn, 
Again thou usher'st in the day 

My Mary from my soul was torn. 
O Mary, dear departed shade ! 

Where is thy place of blissful rest? 
See'st thou thy lover lowly laid? 

Hearst thou the groans that rend his breast? 

That sacred hour can I forget, 

Can I forget the hallow'd grove, 
Where, by the winding Ayr, we met 

To live one day of parting love ? 
Eternity can not efface 

Those records dear of transports past, 
Thy image at our last embrace : 

Ah ! little thought we 'twas our last ! 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



63 



Ayr, gurgling, kiss'd his pebbled shore, 

O'erhung with wild woods thickening green ; 
The fragrant birch and hawthorn hoar 

Twin'd amorous round the raptur'd scene ; 
The flowers sprang wanton to be prest, 

The birds sang love on every spray ; 
Till too, too soon, the glowing west 

Proclaim'd the speed of winged day. 

Still o'er these scenes my memVy wakes, 

And fondly broods with miser care. 
Time but th' impression stronger makes, 

As streams their channels deeper wear. 
O Mary, dear departed shade ! 

Where is thy place of blissful rest ? 
See'st thou thy lover lowly laid ? 

Hear'st thou the groans that rend his breast? 



No. 61. Ve banks and braes and streams around. 



Tune : Lady Catherine Ogle. 
Slow 



Apollo's Banquet, 1686. 

-N, r*^ 



ps^^^^^:^^ 



Yebanks and braes and streams around The castle o' Mont - go-mery, Green 



^^^^^^ 



^ 



beyourwoodsandfairyourflowers,Yourwa-tersne-ver drum-lie : There Si 



-:i^ teE^^gg^g^g^^ 



riz^ 



mer first un - fald her robes, And therethe lang - est tar - ry; 



^^^^^^^^ 



For there I took the last fareweel O' my sweet High-land Ma-ry. 

Ye banks and braes and streams around 

The castle o' Montgomery, 
Green be your woods, and fair your flowers. 

Your waters never drumlie : 
There Simmer first unfald her robes, 

And there the langest tarry ; 
For there I took the last fareweel 

O' my sweet Highland Mary. 



64 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



How sweetly bloom'd the gay, green birk, 

How rich the hawthorn's blossom, 
As underneath their fragrant shade, 

I clasp'd her to my bosom ! 
The golden hours on angel wings 

Flew o'er me and my dearie ; 
For dear to me as light and life 

Was my sweet Highland Mary. 

Wi' monie a vow and lock'd embrace 

Our parting was fu' tender ; 
And, pledging aft to meet again, 

We tore oursels asunder. 
But O, fell Death's untimely frost, 

That nipt my flower sae early ! 
Now green 's the sod, and cauld 's the clay. 

That wraps my Highland Mary ! 

O, pale, pale now, those rosy lips 

I aft hae kiss'd sae fondly ; 
And clos'd for ay the sparkling glance 

That dwalt on me sae kindly ; 
And mouldering now in silent dust 

That heart that lo'ed me dearly ! 
But still within my bosom's core 

Shall live my Highland Mary. 



No. 62. Thd cruel fate should bid. tis part. 

Tune: She rose and let me in. Orpheus Caledoitms, I'l'^'^, No. 14. 
Slowly 



gg^^i^lS^I^^^ 



\-^-~ 



PI- 




Tho' cruel fate should bid us part Far as the pole and line; Her 



SEJEJE^I^lEg^gE^ g p^^ 



dear i-dea round my heart Should ten-der - ly en - twine. Tho' moun-tains 



s=a 



=^p» 



;^E^ 



"^^^^ ^^ 



rise, and des - erts howl, And o - ceans roar be-tween; Yet, 



gg g^^^fe^^^^Eggj^ 



dear - er than my death - less soul, I still would love my Jean. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



6=; 



Tho' cruel fate should bid us part 

Far as the pole and line, 
Her dear idea round my heart 

Should tenderly entwine. 
Tho' mountains rise, and deserts howl, 

And oceans roar between ; 
Yet dearer than my deathless soul 

I still would love my Jean. 



iM* 



No. 63. A It ho my back be at the wa . 

From Burns's MS. (Key G). 



Tune : The job of journey work. 
Brisk 



feS^^S 



■^F^V- 



^^^m^ 



Al-tho' my back be at the wa'. And tho' he be the fau-tor, AI - tho' 



^^^pi^SPip^ 



my back be at the wa', Yet here's bis health in wa-ter ! O, wae gae 



l^e^ 



:^ 



^EE^^E^ 



55 



by his wan-ton sides, Sae braw-lie's he could flat-ter; Till for 

tr 




his sake I'm slighted sair, And dree the kin - tra clat-ter! But, 



;1?==1!5: 






tho' my back be at the wa', Yet here's his health in wa - ter ! 

Altho' my back be at the wa', 

And tho' he be the fautor, 
Altho' my back be at the wa', 

Yet here 's his health in water ! 
O, wae gae by his wanton sides, 

Sae brawlie 's he could flatter ; 
Till for his sake I'm slighted sair 

And dree the kintra clatter ! 
But, tho' my back be at the wa', 

Yet here 's his health in water ! 
F 



66 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 64. When fii^st I came to Stewart Kyle. 

Tune : I had a horse, andl had nae tnair, Scots Mus. Museum, 1788, No. 185. 
_ , Moderate fime . 



HP^E^^^^^^ 



When first I came to Stew-art Kyle My mind it was na steady ; Wlier- 



-k- 



^^^S^^§i^3^pi^-1 



it 



-m- 
e'er I gaed, wher - e'er I rade, A ■ mistress still I had ay : But when 



w^^^^^^^^sm^^ r^ 



I came roun' by Mauchline toun, Not dreadin an - y bo-dy, My 



m 



^^^i^i.^^^^ 



heart was caught, be - fore I thought, And by a Mauch-Iine la - dy. 

When first I came to Stewart Kyle 

My mind it was na steady ; 
Where'er I gaed, where'er I rade, 

A mistress still I had ay ; 
But when I came roun' by Mauchline toun, 

Not dreadin any body, 
My heart was caught, before I thought. 

And by a Mauchline lady. 



No. 65. In Mauchline there dwells six proper 
young belles. 

Tune : Bonie Dundee. 

In Mauchline there dwells six proper young belles, 

The pride of the place and its neighbourhood a', 
Their carriage and dress, a stranger would guess, 

In Lon'on or Paris they'd gotten it a'. 
Miss Miller is fine, Miss Markland 's divine, 

Miss Smith she has wit, and Miss Betty is braw ; 
There's beauty and fortune to get wi' Miss Morton, 

But Armour's the jewel for me o' them a'. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



67 



No. 66. O ihoiL pale Orb that silent shines. 

Tune: Scots Queen. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 190. 



iL Slow ^ 



O thou pale Orb that si - lent shines Wliile care - un - trou - bled 



:*=» 



^^^^^^^^m 



mor - tals sleep ! Thou see'st a wretch who in - ly pines, And wan 



hp^^ii^pai^r^ii 



ders here to wail and weep! With woe I night-ly 




^ 



g 



^ 



warm - ingbeam; And mourn, in 



ta - tion deep, How life and love are all a dream 



men - ta - tion deep. How life aiTd love are 
O THOU pale Orb that silent shines 

While care-untroubled mortals sleep ! 
Thou seest a wretch who inly pines, 

And wanders here to wail and weep ! 

With woe I nightly vigils keep, 
Beneath thy wan, unwarming beam ; 

And mourn, in lamentation deep, 
How life and love are all a dream ! 
O, thou bright Queen, who o'er th'expanse 

Now highest reign'st with boundless sway! 
Oft has thy silent-marking glance 

Observ'd us, fondly-wan'dring, stray ! 

The time, unheeded, sped away, 
While Love's luxurious pulse beat high, 

Beneath thy silver-gleaming ray, 
To mark the mutual-kindling eye. 
O Scenes in strong remembrance set ! 

Scenes, never, never to return ! 
Scenes if in stupor I forget, 

Again I feel, again I burn ! 

From ev'ry joy and pleasure torn. 
Life's weary vale I'll wander thro', 

And hopeless, comfortless, I'll mourn 
A faithless woman's broken vow, 
F 2 



68 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 67. Again rejoicing Nature sees. 

Tune : Jockey's gray breehs. 
Brisk 



Cal. Pocket Companion, c. 1745, ii. p. 32. 

-I 



ffTz^r-^" 



A - gain re - joic - ing Nature sees Her robe as -same its ver-nal 

— . — ^ — I- 



^g 



:^^- 



-fc— *- 



hues : Her 



fy.' locks wave 
Chorus. 




-J 1 — ^- 

the breeze, All fresh - ly 
if 



^J 



^^ 



^^ 



steep'd in morn-ing dews. And mauit I still on 



Me-nie doat.And 






bear the srorti that's in her e^e? For it's jet, jet black, and 



^ 



i 



s 



Si^g^^^g 



it ' J like 



W171 - na 



hi 



hawk. And ii 

Again rejoicing Nature sees 

Her robe assume its vernal hues ; 

Her leafy locks wave in the breeze. 
All freshly steep'd in morning dews. 

Chorus. And tnattn I still on Menie doat. 

And hear the scorn that^s in her e'e 
For it's jet, jet-black, and it^s like a h 
A lid it winna let a body be I 

In vain to me the cowslips blaw, 

In vain to me the vi'lets spring ; 
In vain to me in glen or shaw, 

The mavis and the lintwhite sing. 

The merry ploughboy cheers his team, 
Wi' joy the tentie seedsman stalks, 

But life to me 's a weary dream, 
A dream of ane that never wauks. 

The wanton coot the water skims, 
Amang the reeds the ducklings cry, 

And stately svvan majestic swims. 
And ev'rything is blest but I. 



bo - dv be / 



auk. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 69 

The sheep-herd steeks his faulding slap, 

And o'er the moorlands whistles shill, 
Wi' wild, unequal, wand'ring step, 

I m^t him on the dewy hill. 

And when the lark, 'tween light and dark, 

Blythe waukens by the daisy's side. 
And mounts and sings on flittering wings, 

A woe-worn ghaist I hameward glide. 

Come Winter, with thine angry howl, 

And raging, bend the naked tree ; 
Thy gloom will soothe my cheerless soul, 

When Nature all is sad like me ! 



No. 68. Tho womeiis minds like winter zuiiids. 

Tune : For a' that. 

Tho' women's minds like winter winds 

May shift, and turn, an' a' that. 
The noblest breast adores them maist — 

A consequence, I draw that. 

Chorus. For a that, aii d that] 

And twice as ntickle^s d that, 
The bonie lass that I loe best. 
She'll be my ain for a' that'. 

Great love I bear to a' the fair. 

Their humble slave, an' a' that ; 
But lordly will, I hold it still 

A mortal sin to thraw that. 

But there is ane aboon the lave 

Has wit, and sense, an' a' that ; 
A bonie lass, I like her best, 

And wha a crime dare ca' that? 

In rapture sweet this hour we meet, 

Wi' mutual love an' a' that. 
But for how lang the flie may stang. 

Let inclination law that. 

Their tricks an' craft hae put me daft. 

They 've taen me in an' a' that, 
But clear j'our decks, and here's — 'The sex'! 

I like the jads for a' that ! 



70 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 69. Of a the airts the wind can blaw. 

: Miss Admiral Gordon'' s Strathspey. Scots Mtts. Museum, 1790, No. 235. 
Slow 



-Sl 



Of a' the airts the wind can blaw I dear-ly like the west, For there the 



^^5^S 



*=i^ 



EEEi^ 



bonie las - sie lives, The las - sie I lo'ebest:There'swiId-woodsgrow,and 



1=*=*: 



^i^^^^ 



P 



I S— jS — p : 



riv - ers row, And aioiiy a hill be - tween. But day and night 






m)' fan-cy's flight, Is ev - er \vi' my Jean. I see her in 



^,^E^^' 



=^=J-_x=i=:?:z=g^^ 



^^ 



the dew - y flowers, I see her sweet and fair: I hear her 






$^^^^^^^^m 



in the tune - fu' birds, I hear her charm the air: There's not 



^ 



13; 



:^ -^ ig->^ i= 



:t^^=S^- 



a bon - ie flower that springs By foun - tain, shaw, or green, 



m 



m^^s^^^^ 



5^ 



:»=J*: 



-a -"»- 



There's not a bon-ie bird that sings. But minds me o' my Jean. 

Of a' the airts the wind can blaw 

I dearly like the west, 
For there the bonie lassie lives, 

The lassie I lo'e best. 
There 's wild-woods grow, and rivers row, 

And mony a hill between, 
But day and night my fancy's flight 

Is ever wi' my Jean. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



71 



I see her in the dewy flowers, 

I see her sweet and fair : 
I hear her in the tunefu' birds, 

I hear her charm the air : 
There 's not a bonie flower that springs 

By fountain, shaw, or green, 
There's not a bonie bird that sings. 

But minds me o' my Jean. 



No. 70. O, how can I be blythe and glad? 

Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 317. 



Tune : The bonie lad that ^sfar awci 
Slow 




bon - ie lad that I lo'e best Is o'er the hills and far a-wa ? When the 

ir 



lad that 



lo'e best Is o'er the hills and 



his 



O, HOW can I be blythe and glad, 

Or how can I gang brisk and braw, 
When the bonie lad that I lo'e best 

Is o'er the hills and far awa. 
It 's no the frosty winter wind. 

It's no the driving drift and snaw ; 
But ay the tear comes in my e'e ) , .^ 

To think on him that 's far awa. ) 
My father pat me frae his door. 

My friends they hae disown'd me a' ; 
But I hae ane will tak my part — | , ■ 

The bonie lad that 's far awa. ) 
A pair o' glooves he bought to me, 

And silken snoods he gae me twa, 
And I will wear them for his sake, 

The bonie lad that 's far awa. 
O, weary winter soon will pass. 

And spring will deed the birken-shaw. 
And my sweet baby will be born, ) , . 

And he'll be hame that's far awa. ] 



his 



72 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 71. / hae a wife my ain. 

Tune : / hae a wife o' my ain. Scots Musical Museum ^ 1792, No. 352. 
Qttick 



^E^^^^^^^^^^^ 



I hae a wife o' my ain, I'll partake wi' nae-bo-dj' ; I'll tak cuckold 



i — I — / — \/- 9 — 1 " r — P— p- — I- — p- 



frae nane, I'll gie cuckold to nae-bo-dy. I hae a pen-ny tospend,There— 



3^^^^^^^^^^ 



I ^ ITT Cr^^' 

thanks to nae-bo-dy! I hae naeihing to lend, I'll bor-row frae nae-bo-dy. 



I HAE a wife o' my ain, 
I'll partake wi' naebody ; 

I'll tak cuckold frae nane, 
I'll gie cuckold to naebody. 

I hae a penny to spend. 
There — thanks to naebody ! 

I hae naething to lend, 
I'll borrow frae naebody. 



I am naebody's lord, 

I'll be slave to naebody : 

I hae a gude braid-sword, 
I'll tak dunts frae naebody. 

I'll be merry and free, 
I'll be sad for naebody, 

Naebody cares for me, 
I care for naebody. 



No. 72. // is na, Jean, thy bonie face. 

Tune: The maid' s coniplaint. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 333. 

Slow 



It is na, Jean, thy bon - ie face Nor shape that I ad - mire, 



Sg^l^l^P^^ 



rife 



Al - the' thy beau - ty andthygraceMight weel a-wauk de - sire. 

- — - - -5^ ^—^9^-f 






Some - thing in il - ka part o' thee To praise, 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



73 




me, titiU dear - er is thy 

It is na, Jean, thy bonie face 

Nor shape that I admire, 
Altho' thy beauty and thy grace 

Might weal awauk desire. 
Something in ilka part o' thee 

To praise, to love, I find ; 
But, dear as is thy form to me. 

Still dearer is thy mind. 

Nae mair ungenVous wish I hae, 

Nor stronger in my breast, 
Than, if I canna mak thee sae, 

At least to see thee blest. 
Content am I, if Heaven shall give 

But happiness to thee. 
And, as wi' thee I'd wish to live, 

For thee I'd bear to die. 



No. 'j'}^. Lotds, what reck I by thee? 



Tune : Louis^ what reck 
Boldly 



Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 414. 



t^^^ j^^^j^^l E^ jE^^ Eg^^ 



Lou-is, what reck I by thee, Or Geordie on 



his 



o - cean r 



-ggg^g^^^^ 



g=S; 



-(^— <^I 



Dy - vor beg-gar loons to me ! I reign in Jea - nie's bo - scin. 

Louis, what reck I by thee, 

Or Geordie on his ocean ? 
Dyvor beggar loons to me ! 

I reign in Jeanie's bosom. 

Let her crown my love her law, 
And in her breast enthrone me : 

Kings and nations — swith awa ! 
Reif randies, I disown ye ! 



74 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 74- O, were I on Parnassus hill. 

Tune : My love is lost to me. Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1753, v. p. 25. 

Mod. quick 



e^=g^^g^_^=^g=E^=^1 



o, 



Par 



nas - sus 



Or had o" He - li - 



l^=iP3iE^^^^^ 



^ 



on my fill, Tfiat I might catch po - e 

i^ L^ — ^^^ U L-.^ m — u 1 T—. 



tic skill To 



sins: how dear 



love thee ! Bat Nith maun be 



Mu 



se's well, My Muse maun be thy bo - nie sel', On 



11^:1 



:^ 



it£ 



:^- 



-^ 



S:^:^ 



^ 



Cor-sin-con I'll glow'r and spell, And write how dear 1 
O, WERE I on Parnassus' hill, 
Or had o' Helicon my fill, 
That I might catch poetic skill 

To sing how dear I love thee ! 
But Nith maun be my Muse's well, 
My Muse maun be thy bonie sel', 
On Corsincon I'll glow'r and spell, 

And write how dear I love thee. 
Then come, sweet Muse, inspire my lay! 
For a' the lee-lang simmer's day 
I couldna sing, I couldna say 

How much, how dear I love thee. 
I see thee dancing o'er the green, 
Thy waist sae jimp, thy limbs sae clean, 
Thy tempting lips, thy rogueish een — 

By heaven and earth I love thee ! 
By night, by day, a-field, at hame, 
The thoughts o' thee my breast inflame, 
And ay I muse and sing thy name — 

I only live to love thee. 
Tho' I were doom'd to wander on, 
Beyond the sea, beyond the sun, 
Till my last weary sand was run ; 

Till then— and then— I'd love thee! 



love thee. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



75 



No. 75. Out over the Forth, I look to the north. 

Tune : Charles Graham's welcome hame. Scots Mus. Museii7?i, 1796, No. 421. 

„ Siow 



455=^-:^ 



M 



±h 



5:^^^ 



^^-N-S 



» — a — «l — 0- 



:Mzz^ 



Out o - ver the Forth, I look to the north— But what is the north and 



^E^^^^^^^^^m^^^ 



its High-lands to me ? The south nor the east gie ease to my breast, The 



fl^iii^^^^iPi^^Ei^ 



far foreign land, or the wide roU-ing sea ! But I look to the west, When I 



r=^^^^g^^^|3^^^=^g^ 



gae to rest, That hap-py my dreams and my slumbers may be; For far in 



E^p^i^^^pp^-Epiig35^3Ei 



the west lives he I lo'ehest. The man that is dear to my ba-bie and me. 

Out over the f^orth, I look to the north — 

But what is the north, and its Highlands to me ? 

The south nor the east gie ease to my breast, 
The far foreign land or the wide rolling sea ! 

But I look to the west, when I gae to rest, 

That happy my dreams and my slumbers maj' be ; 

For far in the west lives he I lo'e best, 
That man that is dear to my babie and me. 



No. 76. For thee is laughing Nature gay. 

Tune : Scots Queen (see No. 66). 

For thee is laughing Nature gay, 
For thee she pours the vernal day : 
For me in vain is Nature drest, 
While Joy 's a stranger to my breast. 



76 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 77. Your friendship much can make me blest. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 186. 



Tune : Banks of Spcy 
Very slow 



Very slow g«» ^^_ 



Your friend-ship jnuch can make me blest— O, why that bliss de 




stroy? Why urge the only, one re 



quest You know 




there, Con - ceal 



that thought, Nor cause me 



^^^lE=teig^^p 



fiom my bo - som tear The ve 



friend 



sought. 



Your friendship much can make me blest — 

O, why that bhss destroy? 
Why urge the only, one request 

You know I will deny ? 
Your thought, if Love must harbour there, 

Conceal it in that thought, 
Nor cause me from my bosom tear 

The very friend I sought. 



No. 78. Thine am 

Tune : The Quaker 

Thine am I, my faithful fair. 

Thine my lovely Nancy ! 
Every pulse along my veins, 

Ev'ry roving fancy ! 
To thy bosom lay my heart 

There to throb and languish : 
Tho' despair had wrung its core, 

That would heal its anguish. 



/, my faithful fair. 

■'s Wife (see No. 40). 

Take away those rosy lips 

Rich with balmy treasure ! 
Turn away thine eyes of love, 

Lest I die with pleasure ! 
What is life when wanting love "? 

Night without a morning: 
Love's the cloudless summer sun, 

Nature gay adorning. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



77 



No. 79. Behold the hour, the boat arrive! 

Tune: Omn gaoil. Scots Musical Museum^ 1790, No. 273. 
Slow I ,,-r~^ ~^ I I 



i^s^g^ 



Be - hold the hour, the boat ar - rive ! Thou go-est, the dar - hng 



s^iE^^p^^^ip^E 



of my heart! Sever'd from thee, can I sur - vive? But 



^— «^r 



33= 



to-^: 



3t 






T^w:::^ 



i 



Fate has wiU'd and we must part. Til oft - en greet the 

■••-^-T r 1- 



^!?2= 



^ 



-^m 



:H 



is^rt 



surg-ing swell, Yon dis - tant isle will oft - en hail: — 'E'en here I 



^^iiiiS^ 



-j^ 



^7*'. 



took the last fare - well; There, la-test mark' d her van - ish'd sail!' 

Behold the hour, the boat arrive ! 

Thou goest, the darling of my heart ! 
Sever'd from thee, can I survive ? 

But Fate has will'd and we must part. 
I'll often greet the surging swell, 

Yon distant isle will often hail : — 
' E'en here I took the last farewell ; 

There, latest mark'd her vanish'd sail ! ' 



Along the solitary shore, 

While flitting sea-fowl round me cry, 
Across the rolling, dashing roar, 

I'll westward turn my wistful eye : — 
' Happy, thou Indian grove,' I'll say, 

' Where now my Nancy's path may be ! 
While thro' thy sweets she loves to stray, 

O, tell me, does she muse on me?' 



78 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 80. Clarinda, mistress of my soul. 

Tune : Clarinda. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 198. 

Slow 



?^^=s 



^ 



^ 



u 



^^ 



Cla - rin - da, mis -tress of my 



soul, 



The 



sur'd 






M 



run 



g| 



-1 



neath the 



:ta.ii=^: 



drear 



So 



marks 



his 



la - test 



y pole 

Clarinda, mistress of my soul, 

The measur'd time is run ! 
The wretch beneath the dreary pole 

So marks his latest sun. 
To what dark cave of frozen night 

Shall poor Sylvander hie, 
Depriv'd of thee, his life and light, 

The sun of all his joy? 
We part — but, by these precious drops 

That fill thy lovely eyes, 
No other light shall guide my steps. 

Till thy bright beams arise ! 
She, the fair sun of all her sex. 

Has blest my glorious day ; 
And shall a glimmering planet fix 

My worship to its ray ? 



No. 81. Now in her green mantle blythe 
Nature arrays. 

Tune : There are feiv good fellows when Jamie 's awa. 

Now in her green mantle blythe Nature arrays, 
And listens the lambkins that bleat o'er the braes. 
While birds vs^arble welcomes in ilka green shaw. 
But to me it's delightless — my Nanie's awa. 
The snaw-drap and primrose our woodlands adorn, 
And violets bathe in the w^eet o' the morn. 
They pain my sad bosom, sae sweetly they blaw, 
They mind me o' Nanie, — and Nanie 's awa ! 



LOVE : PERSONAL 



79 



Thou lav'rock, that springs frae the dews of the lawn, 
The shepherd to warn o' the grey-breaking dawn, 
And thou mellow mavis, that hails the night-fa', 
Give over for pity — my Nanie's awa. 

Come Autumn, sae pensive in yellow and grey. 
And soothe me wi' tidings o' Nature's decay ! 
The dark, dreary winter and wild driving snaw 
Alane can delight me — now Nanie's awa. 



No. 82. O May, thy morn zvas neer so sweet. 

Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1753, v. p. 26. 



Tune : The rashes. 
Moderate time 



gte^: 



-^\r--^- 






O May, thy morn was ne'er sae sweet As the mirk night o' De - cem-ber ! For 



i^^l^^i^^ 



i 



spark-ling was the ro - sy wine, And pri - vate was the cham-ber: And 

I 

-p— : — q 




PBS^^SP^^ 



dear was she I dare na name, But I will ay re - mem-ber : And 




dear was she I dare na name ; But I will ay re - mem - ber. 



O May, thy morn was ne'er sae sweet 
As the mirk night o' December ! 

For sparkling was the rosy wine. 
And private was the chamber : 

And dear was she I dare na name. 
But I will ay remember. 



bis 



And here 's to them that, like oursel, 

Can push about the jorum ; 
And here 's to them that wish us weel- 

May a' that 's guid watch o'er 'em ; 
And here 's to them we dare na tell, ) , . 

The dearest o' the quorum ! 



8o 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 83. Ance mair I hail thee, thoti gloomy December- 



Tune : Thro the lane; moor. 



u. Slow 



if 



Scots Musical Museum, 1 796, No. 499. 



^p^S^^ils:J^^ 



Ance mair I hail thee, thou gloomy De - cem - ber ! Ance mair I 
ir ^^ 




hail thee wi' sor-row and care ! Sad was the part - ing thou makes 

ir 



'^^^^^^^^^^ 



me re - mem - ber : Parting wi' Nan - cy, O, ne'er to meet mair ! 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Fond lov - ers' part - ing is sweet, pain-ful pleas - ure, Hope beam- 

ir I «„^ 






ing mild on the soft part - ing hour; But the dire feel - ing, O, fare- 






well for ev - er! An-guish un-min-gled and a - go - ny pure! 

Ance mair I hail thee, thou gloomy December ! 

Ance mair I hail thee wi' sorrow and care ! 
Sad was the parting thou makes me remember ; 

Parting wi' Nancy, O, ne'er to meet mair ! 

Fond lovers' parting is sweet, painful pleasure, 
Hope beaming mild on the soft parting hour ; 

But the dire feeling, O, farewell for ever ! 
Anguish unmingled and agony pure ! 

Wild as the winter now tearing the forest, 
Till the last leaf o' the summer is flown — 

Such is the tempest has shaken my bosom, 
Till my last hope and last comfort is gone ! 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



8i 



Still as I hail thee, thou gloomy December, 
Still shall I hail thee wi' sorrow and care ; 

For sad was the parting thou makes me remember ; 
Parting wi' Nancy, O, ne'er to meet mair ! 



No. 84. Ae fond kiss, and then we sever ! 

Tune: Rory DaWs Port. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 347. 

Slow 



^:s=iS^=te=s5^^;^ 



Ae fond kiss, and then we se-ver! Ae fare-well, and then for ev - er ! 



Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge thee, Warring sighs and groans I'll wage thee. 

Ae fond kiss, and then we sever ! 

Ae farewell, and then for ever ! 

Deep in heart-wrung tears I'll pledge 'thee, 

Warring sighs and groans Fll wage thee. 

Who shall say that Fortune grieves him. 
While the star of hope she leaves him ? 
Me, nae cheerfu' twinkle lights me, 
Dark despair around benights me. 

Fll ne'er blame my partial fancy — 
Naething could resist my Nancy ! 
But to see her was to love her, 
Love but her, and love for ever. 

Had we never lov'd sae kindly, 
Had we never lov'd sae blindly. 
Never met — or never parted — 
We had ne'er been broken-hearted. 

Fare-thee-weel, thou first and fairest ! 
Fare-thee-weel, thou best and dearest ! 
Thine be ilka joy and treasure, 
Peace, Enjoyment, Love and Pleasure ! 

Ae fond kiss, and then we sever ! 

Ae farewell, alas, for ever ! 

Deep in heart-wrung tears Fll pledge thee, 

Warring sighs and groans Fll wage thee. 



82 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 85. Sensibility how charming > 



Tune : Comwallis' s lament. 
Plaintive 



Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 329. 




3=a^ 



zizzat 



Sen - si - bil - i - ty how charm-ing, Dear-est Nan - cy, thou canst 



^^3^^i^ 



:s=5 



? 



s^ 



-9- 

tell ; But dis - tress with hor-rors ann-ing. Thou alas ! hast known too well ! 



jfp^ipiE^g^g^ i^^ 



Fair-est flow-er, be-hold the li - ly Bloom-ing in the sun - ny ray ; 



igg si^^gl^ ^E^ili 



bis 



Let the blast sweep o'er the val - ley, See it pros-trate in the clay. 

Sensibility how charming, 

Dearest Nancy, thou canst tell ; 
But distress with horrors arming, 

Thou alas ! hast known too well ! 
Fairest flower, behold the lily 

Blooming in the sunny ray : 
Let the blast sweep o'er the valley, 

See it prostrate in the clay. 

Hear the woodlark charm the forest, 

Telling o'er his little joys ; 
But alas ! a prey the surest 

To each pirate of the skies. 
Dearly bought the hidden treasure 

Finer feelings can bestow : 
Chords that vibrate sweetest pleasure 

Thrill the deepest notes of woe. 



bis 



No. 86. From the white-blossom d sloe. 

(Tune unknown.) 

From the white-blossom'd sloe my dear Chloris requested 

A sprig, her fair breast to adorn : 
'No, by Heaven !' — I exclaim'd — 'let me perish for ever. 

Ere I plant in that bosom a thorn ! ' 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



83 



No. Sy. Wilt thoiL be my dearie? 

Scots Musical Museum^ '^19^} No. 470. 



Tune : The suior's dochter. 
Slow 



5^ ^_:^j Ey ^^ ^g^p8^^#^ 



Wilt thou be my dear-ie ? When sor-row wrings thy gen-tle heart, O, 



^Sg 



^^5^3 



-\ i-i- J — • — * — » — • — • -d-i — — J— •-t 



wilt thou let me clieer thee ? By the treasure of my soul — That's the love I bear 



te^jggg^pgg^^^ ^g^ i 



thee— I swear and vow that on - ly thou Shall ev - er be my dear-ie 



S 



On - ly thou, I swear and vow Shall ev - er be my dear - ie. 

Wilt thou be my dearie ? 
When sorrow wrings thy gentle heart, 

O, wilt thou let me cheer thee ? 
By the treasure of my soul — 

That 's the love I bear thee — 
I swear and vow that only thou 

Shall ever be my dearie ! 
Only thou, I swear and vow, 

Shall ever be my dearie. 

Lassie, say thou lo'es me, 
Or, if thou wilt na be my ain. 

Say na thou'lt refuse me ! 
If it winna, canna be, 

Thou for thine may choose me, 
Let me, lassie, quickly die, 

Trusting that thou lo'es me ! 
Lassie, let me quickly die, 

Trusting that thou lo'es me ! 



No. 88. Why, why tell thy lover. 

Tune : Caledonian Hunfs delight (see No. 123). 



Why, why tell thy lover 
Bliss he never must enjoy? 

Why, why undeceive him. 

And give all his hopes the 
lie? 



O, why, while Pancy, raptur'd, 
slumbers, 

' Chloris, Chloris,' all the theme ; 
Why, why wouldst thou, cruel, 

Wake thy lover from his dream ? 



84 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



i 



No. 89. Sleep' st thou, or wak'st thoit ? 

Tune : Diil tak the Wars. Durfey's Pills, 1719, i. p. 294. 

Cheerfully — 



S 



=£ 



^^* -^ * a— "-J-*—*- ^w^ 1-* ' 



Sleep'st thou, or wak'st thou, fair - est crea-ture ? Ro - sy morn now 






lifts his eye, Num-ber-ing il - ka bud, which Na-ture Wa - ters 



i 



g^^^^i^ 



-^ 



wi' the tears o' joy. Now to the streain-ing foun-tain Or 



^^^m^^^^^. 



up the heathymountain The hart, hind, and roe, free-ly wild-ly wan - ton 



jl_j __^[^— ^: =^=^ri^^ ^„^_sa =^^:q=::j^F:^^^ 






stray ; In twining ha-zel bow'rs His lay the lin-net pours ; The lave-rock to 






the sky Ascends wi sangs o' joy, While the sun and thou a-rise to bless the day. 

Sleep'st thou, or wak'st thou, fairest creature ? 

Rosy morn now lifts his eye, 
Numbering ilka bud, which Nature 

Waters wi' the tears o' joy. 

Now to the streaming fountain 

Or up the heathy mountain 
The hart, hind, and roe, freely, wildly-wanton stray ; 

In twining hazel bow'rs 

His lay the linnet pours ; 

The laverock to the sky 

Ascends wi' sangs o' joy, 
While the sun and thou arise to bless the day. 

Phoebus, gilding the brovir of morning, 

Banishes ilk darksome shade, 
Nature gladdening and adorning ; 

Such to me my lovely maid ! 

When frae my Chloris parted 

Sad, cheerless, broken-hearted, 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



85 



The night's gloomy shades, cloudy, dark, o'ercast my sky ; 

But when she charms my sight 

In pride of beauty's light, 

When thro' my very heart 

Her beaming glories dart — 
'Tis then— 'tis then, I wake to life and joy. 



No. 90. Sweet fas the eve on Craigiebtirn. 

Scots Musical Mi4seum, 1792, No. 301. 



Tune : Craigie-burn Wood. 
With expression 



1^-^ 



^^^E^E^^^i^^^ 



Sweet fa's the eve on Craig - ie - burn, And blythe a - 



gi^^^g 



^i*J 



wakes the mor - row, But a' the pride o' Spring's re - turn Can 



g^H^JgP ^PP^Eg 



yield me nocht but sor - row. I see the flow - ers and 

'tr ,^ ** 



^ 



t. 



^l^lpii^ 



n 



^^ 



spread - ing trees, I hear the wild birds sing-ing; But what a 



^^^^^S^^^^ 



wea - ry wight can please, And Care his bo - som wring - ing ? 



Sweet fa's the eve on Craigieburn, 

And blythe awakes the morrow, 
But a' the pride o' Spring's return 

Can yield me nocht but sorrow. 
I see the flowers and spreading 
trees, 

I hear the wild birds singing ; 
But what a weary wight can please. 

And Care his bosom wringing? 



Fain, fain would I my griefs impart, 

Yet dare na for your anger ; 
But secret love will break my heart, 

If I conceal it langer. 
If thou refuse to pity me. 

If thou shalt love another, 
When yon green leaves fade frac 
the tree. 

Around my grave they'll wither. 



86 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 91. Sae flaxen were her ringlets. 

Tune : OonagKs Waterfall. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 447. 
Cheerfully 



^^^^m^^^^^ 



=s 



Sae flax - en were her ring-lets, Her eye-brows of a dark-er hue, Be-witch - 
ing - ly o'er-arch-ing Twa laugh-ing een o' bon - ie blue, Her smil-ing, sae wyl-ing, 



g pg^^^BE^ gJES^ ^g^g^ 



Wad make a wretch for-get his woe ! What pleasure, what treasure, Un - to those 



te ^ ^Si^^t gETE^p ^^E^E^^^g^ 



ro - sy lips to grow ! Such was my Chloris' bon - ie face, When first that bon-ie 



m^Ek^^s^ ^^^^^s^^^^^^^E^^ 



face I saw, And ay my Chloris' dearest charm— She says she lo'es me best of a'. 

Sae flaxen were her ringlets, 

Her eyebrows of a darker hue, 
Bewitchingly o'erarching 

Twa laughing een o' bonie blue. 
Her smiling, sae wyling, 

Wad make a wretch forget his woe ! 
What pleasure, what treasure. 

Unto those rosy lips to grow! 
Such was my Chloris' bonie face, 

When first that bonie face I saw. 
And ay my Chloris' dearest charm — 

She says she lo'es me best of a'. 

Like harmony her motion, 

Her pretty ankle is a spy 
Betraying fair proportion 

Wad mak a saint forget the sky ! 
Sae warming, sae charming, 

Her faultless form and gracefu' air ; 
Ilk feature — auld Nature 

Declared that she could do nae mair ! 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



87 



Hers are the willing chains o' love 

By conquering Beauty's sovereign law, 

And ay my Chloris' dearest charm — 
She says she lo'es me best of a'. 

Let others love the city, 

And gaudy show at sunny noon ; 
Gie me the lonely valley, 

The dewy eve, and rising moon, 
Fair beaming, and streaming. 

Her silver light the boughs amang ; 
While falling, recalling, 

The amorous thrush concludes his sang ! 
There, dearest Chloris, wilt thou rove 

By wimpling burn and leafy shaw, 
And hear my vows o' truth and love, 

And say thou lo'es me best of a' ? 



No. 92. Can I cease to care? 

Scots Musical Museum., 179O) No. 213. 



:* 



Tune : Ay^ wmtkiii, O 
Slow 



^^m^^i^^^^ 



Chorus. Long, long the night, Heavy comes the tnor-row, While my soul's de-light 

Fine. 



ge 



^ 



ss 



Is on her bed of sor-row. Can I cease to care ? Can I cease 

D.C. 



^^ 



^ ite g=rT^ 



:t^ 



:P=^ 



to lan-guish, While my dar - ling fair Is on the couch of an - guish ! 



Chorus. Long, long the night, 

Heavy comes the morrow, 
IVhile my souFs delight 
Is on her bed of sorrow. 

Can I cease to care? 

Can I cease to languish, 
While my darling fair 

Is on the couch of anguish ! 



EvVy hope is fled, 
Ev'ry fear is terror ; 

Slumber ev'n I dread, 
Ev'ry dream is horror. 

Hear me, Powers divine ! 

O, in pity, hear me ! 
Take aught else of mine, 

But my Chloris spare me ! 



88 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 93. Their groves sweet myrtle. 

Tune : Humours of Glen. Thomson's Scotisk Airs, 1799, p. 95. 
Moderate time 



g^^^^^s^ipg^ 



-1 H 



Their groves o' sweet myr-tle let foreign lands reckon, Where bright-beam - 



«^ 



^s^^^e 



p^^^^^^^gg^^ 



3335 



ig sum-mers ex - alt the per-fume ; Far dear- er to me yon lone glen o' 

-P- 



green breckan, Wi' the burn steal - ing un - der the lang, yel-low broom ; 



spq^i: 



s^^^^^^^s 



Far dearer to me are yon hum . ble broom bowers, Where the blue-bell and 



^^J^ ^ EkE^^E^ ^^^ ^^ 



gowan lurk low - ly, un-seen ; For there, light-ly trip-ping A - mang the 



j^^^^^^i^^^iB 



wild flow - ers, A - list'-ning the lin - net, aft wan-ders my Jean. 

Their groves o' sweet myrtle let foreign lands reckon, 

Where bright-beaming summers exalt the perfume ; 
Far dearer to me yon lone glen o' green breckan, 

Wi' the burn stealing under the lang, yellow broom ; 
Far dearer to me are yon humble broom bowers, 

Where the bluebell and gowan lurk lowly, unseen ; 
For there, lightly tripping amang the wild flowers, 

A-list'ning the linnet, aft wanders my Jean. 

Tho' rich is the breeze in their gay, sunny vallies, 

And cauld Caledonia's blast on the wave, 
Their sweet-scented woodlands that skirt the proud palace, 

What are they ? — The haunt of the tyrant and slave I 
The slave's spicy forests and gold-bubbling fountains 

The brave Caledonian views wi' disdain ; 
He wanders as free as the winds of his mountains. 

Save Love's willing fetters — the chains o' his Jean. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 89 



No. 94. Mark yonder pomp of costly fashion. 

Tune : Deil tak the Wars (see No. 89). 

Mark yonder pomp of costly fashion 

Round the wealthy, titled bride ; 
But, when compar'd with real passion, 
Poor is all that princely pride. 

What are the showy treasures? 

What are the noisy pleasures ? 
The gay, gaudy glare of vanity and art ! 

The polish'd jewel's blaze 

May draw the wond'ring gaze, 

And courtly grandeur bright 

The fancy may delight. 
But never, never can come near the heart. 

But did you see my dearest Chloris 

In simplicity's array. 
Lovely as yonder sweet opening flower is, 
Shrinking from the gaze of day ! 

O then, the heart alarming 

And all resistless charming, 
In Love's delightful fetters she chains the willing soul ! 

Ambition would disown 

The world's imperial crown ! 

Ev'n Avarice would deny 

His worshipp'd deity, 
And feel thro' every vein Love's raptures roll ! 



No, 95. Ah, Chloris, since it may not be. 

Tune : Major Graham (see No. 152). 

Ah, Chloris, since it may not be 

That thou of love wilt hear, 
If from the lover thou maun flee. 

Yet let the friend be dear. 

Altho' I love my Chloris mair 

Than ever tongue could tell, 
My passion I will ne'er declare 

I'll say, I wish thee well. 

Tho' a' my daily care thou art. 

And a' my nightly dream, 
I'll hide the struggle in my heart, 

And say it is esteem. 



go 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 96. / see a form, I see a face. 

Tune : This is no mine ain house. Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 32. 
Moderate time 



^^^^m^^^^m^ 



# 



Chorus. This is no my ain las - sie^ Fair iho' the las - sie be ; Weel 

Fine. 



^^m^^^^. 



^^SB^ 



S= 



•- -9- 

ken I 97iy ain las - sie — Kind love is in her e'e. I see a 



^^^^^^^^ 



form, I see a face, Ye weel may wi' the fair - est place : It 

D.C. 






^^ 



wants to me the witch - ing grace, The kind love that's in her e'e. 



Chorus. This is no my ain lassie, 
Fair iho'' the lassie be ; 
Weel ken I my ain lassie — 
Kind love is in her e''e. 

I SEE a form, I see a face. 
Ye weel may wi' the fairest place : 
It wants to me the witching grace. 
The kind love that's in her e'e. 

She 's bonie, blooming, straight, and tall, 
And lang has had my heart in thrall ; 
And ay it charms my very saul, 
The kind love that 's in her e'e. 

A thief sae pawkie is my Jean, 
To steal a blink by a' unseen ! 
But gleg as light are lovers' een, 
When kind love is in the e'e. 

It may escape the courtly sparks, 
It may escape the learned clerks ; 
But well the watching lover marks 
The kind love that 's in her e'e. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



91 



No. 97. (9, bonie was yon rosy briei\ 

Tune : I wish my love were in a mire. Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 5. 
Moderate time 



pi^^ 



^ 



fci: 



^ 



-,--^--9- 



bon - ie was yon ro 



sy brier That blooms sae 



S?^^ 



4^ 



P^^^ 



far frae haunt o' man, And bon - ie she — and ah, 



^^^^^P^ 



how dear ! It shad - ed frae the e'en - in sun. Yon 



^^^E ^-^^S^g^^EJ^g^ 



se - buds in the morn - ing dew, HoW pure a - mang 



^^^^^^ii^^^=p 



the leaves sae green— But pur - - er was . the 






lo - ver's vow They wit-ness'd in their shade yestr - een. 

O, BONIE was yon rosy brier 

That blooms sae far frae haunt o' man, 
And bonie she — and ah, how dear ! 

It shaded frae the e'enin sun. 
Yon rosebuds in the morning dew, 

How pure amang the leaves sae green — 
But purer was the lover's vow 

They witness'd in their shade yestreen. 

All in its rude and prickly bower, 

That crimson rose how sweet and fair ; 
But love is far a sweeter flower 

Amid life's thorny path o' care. 
The pathless wild and wimpling burn, 

Wi' Chloris in my arms, be mine, 
And I the world nor wish nor scorn — ■ 

Its joys and griefs alike resign ! 



92 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 98. O, wat ye wha that Ides ine. 



Tune : Morag. 
Gracefully 



Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 143. 



& 



^pl^gp^^ P^Pp^^^^ 



O, wat ye wha that lo'es me. And has my heart a keep-ing? O, sweet is 



^S^ 



i 



g^^^^^g: 



5 



-S'=t^ 



she that lo'es me As dews o' sum-mer weep-ing, In tears the rose-buds 
Chorus. *. /vn 



Si^^^^^^^i^ 



steep-ing! O, ihafs ike lassie o' my heart, My las - sie ev ■ er dear-er; 



^m 



i^. 



S3=^^^ 



m ' m ^ • 



^r=3=P^ 



-^ — *- 



C, that^s the queen o' wo-man-kind And ne'er a ane to peer her I 



O, WAT ye wha that lo'es me, 
And has my heart a keeping? 

O, sweet is she that lo'es me 
As dews o' summer weeping, 
In tears the rosebuds steeping ! 

Chorus. O, thafs the lassie o' my heart, 
My lassie ever dearer ; 
O, thafs the queen o' womankind, 
Avid ne'er a ane to peer herl 

If thou shalt meet a lassie 

In grace and beauty charming, 

That e'en thy chosen lassie, 

Erewhile thy breast sae warming. 
Had ne'er sic powers alarming : — 

If thou hadst heard her talking 
(And thy attention 's plighted), 

That ilka body talking 

But her, by thee is slighted, 
And thou art all delighted : — 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 



93 



If thou hast met this fair one, 
When frae her thou hast parted, 

If every other fair one 

But her thou hast deserted, 
And thou art broken-hearted ; 

O, that 's the lassie o' my heart, 
My lassie ever dearer ; 

O, that''s the queen o' womankind, 
And ne'er a ane to peer her I 



No. 99. There's nane shall ken, there's nane 
can guess. 

Tune : Vll gae nae ntair to your town, Bremner's Scots Reels, 1757, p. 6. 



Brisk 



^ 



^ 



s 



::^ 



fe^SteS 



^ 



^^^ 



^ 



Chorus. /'// ay ca' in by yon town And by yon gar-den greeti a-gainl 




t-l— ha — *- 



^=^=tg 



^^=:^=^^=rf^ 



^^ 



^ 



:^ 



I'll ay CO' in by yon town. And see my bon-ie Jean a-gain. There 's 



9 • K^ — m m — ' m m — ■«fc^- — ^,=?!— M_ 



nane shall ken, there 's nane can guess What brings me back the gate a . gain, 

D.C. 



m^^^^^ff^^^^m^^ - 



But she, my fair -est faith -fu' lass, And stown-lins we shall meet a - gaii 

Chorus. Vll ay ca' in by yon town 

And by yon garden-green again I 
ril ay ca'' in by yon town, 

And see my bonie Jean again. 

There 's nane shall ken, there 's nane can guess 

What brings me back the gate again, 
But she, my fairest faithfu' lass, 

And stownlins we shall meet again. 

She'll wander by the aiken tree, 

When trystin time draws near again ; 

And when her lovely form I see, 
O, haith ! she's doubly dear again. 



94 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. lOO. Behold, my love, how green the groves. 

Tune : On the cold ground. Plajrford's Dancing Master, 1665. 
Slowly 



ii§^^^ 



g 



j^^^^tp 



Be-hold, my love, how green the groves, The prim-rose banks how fair ! 



s 



:i^: 



i ^g^ffl^^a^ 



-■iC=*: 



'^ 



The bal - my gales a - wake the flowers, and wave thy flax - en hair. 



^M 



S^ 



x^- 



=p! \--X 



]^ 



&=te^ 



m^^ 



The lav' -rock shuns the pa -lace gay, And o'er the cot-tage sings: 



s 



i^= 



^^^S 



i^^^^^ 



5S 



For Na - ture smiles as sweet, 1 ween, To sliep - herds as to kings. 

Behold, my love, how green the groves, 

The primrose banks how fair ! 
The balmy gales awake the flowers, 

And wave thy flaxen hair. 
The lav'rock shuns the palace gay, 

And o'er the cottage sings : 
For Nature smiles as sweet, I ween, 

To shepherds as to kings. 

Let minstrels sweep the skilfu' string 

In lordly, lighted ha' ; 
The shepherd stops his simple reed, 

Blythe in the birken shaw. 
The princely revel may survey 

Our rustic dance wi' scorn ; 
But are their hearts as light as ours, 

Beneath the milk-white thorn ? 

The shepherd in the flowery glen, 

In shepherd's phrase will woo : 
The courtier tells a finer tale — 

But is his heart as true ? 
These wild-wood flowers I 've pu'd, to deck 

That spotless breast o' thine : 
The courtiers' gems may witness love — 

But, 'tis na love like mine ! 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 95 

No. 1 01. 'Twas na her bonie blue ee was my rtdn. 

Tune : Laddie lie near me (see No. 142). 

'Twas na her bonie blue e'e was my ruin, 
Fair tho' she be, that was ne'er my undoin' : 
'Twas the dear smile when naebody did mind us, 
'Twas the bewitching, sweet, stown glance 6' kindness. 

Sair do I fear that to hope is denied me, 
Sair do I fear that despair maun abide me ; 
But tho' fell Fortune should fate us to sever, 
Queen shall she be in my bosom for ever. 

Chloris, I'm thine wi' a passion sincerest, 
And thou hast plighted me love o' the dearest, 
And thou'rt the angel that never can alter — 
Sooner the sun in his motion would falter ! 



No. 102. O, poortith catild and restless love. 

Tune : Cauld kail (see No. 228). 

O, POORTITH cauld and restless love, 
Ye wrack my peace betv^reen ye ; 

Yet poortith a' I could forgive, 
An 'twere na for my Jeanie. 

Chorus. O, why should Fate sic pleasure have 
Lifers dearest bands untwining? 
Or why sae sweet a flower as love 
Depend on Fotiune's shining? 

The warld's wealth when I think on 

Its pride, and a' the lave o't ; 
My curse on silly coward man, 

That he should be the slave o't ! 

Her een sae bonie blue betray 

How she repays my passion ; 
But prudence is her o'erword ay, 

She talks o' rank and fashion. 

O, wha can prudence think upon. 

And sic a lassie by him ? 
O, wha can prudence think upon. 

And sae "in love, as I am ? 

How blest the wild-wood Indian's fate ! 

He vifoos his artless dearie ; 
The silly bogles, wealth and state, 

Can never make him eerie. 



96 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 103. Now Nature deeds the flow ery lea. 

Tune : Rothietniirche' s rant, Bremner's Reels, 1759, p. 42. 
Slow ir . 



^ 



6=S: 



:p3=^^^S3= 



^^;=^^ 



-N-jfj^-zzi ^ - ^ — «*- 



Chorus, ^a^ - «a wP the lint-white locks. Bo • nie las - sie, art ■ less las - sie, 
tr »- fe Fine. 



=^ 



^.^ 



-jtj=Mzt± 



^ — ^- 



^^^S 



Wilt thou wi^ me tent the flocks— Wilt thou be my dear- ie, O? Now 
ir 



^ — 0-^-t 



£EiEEE|EpEg 



-■F V ai- 



=^^r=^ 



Na-ture deeds the flow - ery lea, And a' is young and sweet like thee, O, 
ir w ,.. w D.C. 



S^^^F^ 



^=5^=^ 



-m m^ — jm- 



3^ 



?^^^ 



iiilt thou share its joys wi' me, And say thou'lt be ray dear-ie, Oi 

Chorus. Lassie wi' the lint-white locks, 
Boitie lassie, artless lassie. 
Wilt thou wV me tent the flocks — 
Wilt thou be my dearie, O ? 

Now Nature deeds the flowery lea, 
And a' is young and sweet like thee, 
O, wilt thou share its joys wi' me, 
And say thou'lt be my dearie, O ? 

The primrose bank, the wimpling burn, 
The cuckoo on the milk-white thorn. 
The wanton lambs at early morn 
Shall welcome thee, my dearie, O. 

And when the welcome simmer shower 
Has cheer'd ilk drooping little flower. 
We'll to the breathing woodbine-bower 
At sultry noon, my dearie, O. 

When Cynthia lights, wi' silver ray, 
The weary shearer's hameward way, 
Thro' yellow waving fields we'll stray, 
And talk o' love, my dearie, O. 

And when the howling wintry blast 
Disturbs my lassie's midnight rest. 
Enclasped to my faithfu' breast, 
I'll comfort thee, my dearie, O. 



I. LOVE : PERSONAL 97 

No. 104. Co7ne, let me take thee to my breast. 

Tune ; Cauld Kail (see No. 228). 

Come, let me take thee to my breast, 

And pledge we ne'er shall sunder, 
And I shall spurn as vilest dust 

The world's wealth and grandeur; 
And do I hear my Jeanie own 

That equal transports move her? 
I ask for dearest life alone, 

That I may live to love her. 

Thus in my arms, wi' a' her charms, 

I clasp my countless treasure, 
I'll seek nae mair o' heav'n to share 

Than sic a moment's pleasure : 
And by thy een sae bonie blue 

I swear I'm thine for ever, 
And on thy lips I seal my vow, 

And break it shall I never ! 



No. 105. Forlorn my love, no comfort near 

Tune : Let me in this ae night (see No. 159). 

Forlorn my love, no comfort near, 

Far, far from thee I wander here ; 

Far, far from thee, the fate severe, 

At which I most repine, love. 

Chorus. O, wert thou, love, hut near me, 
But near, near, near me. 
How kindly thou would'' st cheer me, 
And mingle sighs with mine, love! 

Around me scowls a wintry sky, 
Blasting each bud of hope and joy, 
And shelter, shade, nor home have I 
Save in these arms of thine, love. 

Cold, alter'd friends, with cruel art, 
Poisoning fell misfortune's dart — 
Let me not break thy faithful heart, 
And say that fate is mine, love. 

But dreary tho' the moments fleet, 
O, let me think we yet shall meet ; 
That only ray of solace sweet 
Can on thy Chloris shine, love. 



98 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

No. 106. Now haply down yon gay green shaw. 

Tune : III gae nae mair to yon town (see No. 99). 

Chorus. O, wat ye wha 's in yon town^ 
Ye see the e''enin sun upon ? 
The dearest maid 's in yon town 
That e'enin sun is shining on ! 

Now haply down yon gay green shaw 
She wanders by yon spreading tree ; 

How blest ye flowers that round her blaw, 
Ye catch the glances o' her e'e ! 

How blest ye birds that round her sing, 
And welcome in the blooming year ! 

And doubly welcome be the spring, 
The season to my Jeanie dear ! 

The sun blinks blythe in yon town. 
Among the broomy braes sae green ; 

But my delight in yon town, 

And dearest pleasure, is my Jean. 

Without my Love, not a' the charms 

O' Paradise could yield me joy ; 
But gie me Jeanie in my arms. 

And welcome Lapland's dreary sky ! 

My cave wad be a lover's bower, 

Tho' raging winter rent the air, 
And she a lovely little flower, 

That I wad tent and shelter there. 

O, sweet is she in yon town 

The sinkin sun 's gane down upon ! 
A fairer than 's in yon town 

His setting beam ne'er shone upon. 

If angry fate be sworn my foe, 

And sufF'ring I am doom'd to bear ; 

I'd careless quit aught else below, 
But spare, O, spare me Jeanie dear! 

For, while life's dearest blood is warm, 
Ae thought frae her shall ne'er depart, 

And she, as fairest is her form. 
She has the truest, kindest heart. 



I. LOVE: PERSONAL 99 

No. 107. It was the charming month of May. 

Tune : Dainty Davie (see infra). 

Chorus. Lovely was she by the dawn, 

Youthful Chloe, charming Chloe, 
Tripping o'er the pearly lawn. 
The youthful^ charming Chloe. 

It was the charming month of May, 
When all the flowVs were fresh and gay, 
One morning, by the break of day, 

The youthful, charming Chloe, 
From peaceful slumber she arose, 
Girt on her mantle and her hose, 
And o'er the flowVy mead she goes — 

The youthful, charming Chloe — 

The featherM people you might see 
Perch'd all around on every tree ! 
In notes of sw^eetest melody 

They hail the charming Chloe 
Till, painting gay the eastern skies, 
The glorious sun began to rise, 
Out-rivall'd by the radiant eyes 

Of youthful, charming Chloe. 



No. 108. Let not woman eer complain. 

Tune : Duncan Gray (see No. 173). 

Let not woman e'er complain 

Of inconstancy in love ; 
Let not woman e'er complain, 

Fickle man is apt to rove : 
Look abroad through Nature's range, 
Nature's mighty law is change ; 
Ladies, would it not be strange 

Man should then a monster prove? 

Mark the winds, and mark the skies, 
Ocean's ebb and ocean's flow. 

Sun and moon but set to rise ; 
Round and round the seasons go. 

Why, then, ask of silly man 

To oppose great Nature's plan ? 

We'll be constant while we can — 
You can be no more, you know. 
H 2 



lOO 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No, 109. Where are the joys I hae met in 
the morning. 

Tune : Saw ye my father "i Scots Musical Museum^ 1787, No. 76. 



Slow and pointed 



Pis 



i^ 



=t=?i:r5qd==fc 



^^a- 



^ 



^ 



Where are the joys I hae met in the morning, That danc'd 



^^^^^^^^^E^m 



to the lark's ear - ly sang ? Where is the peace that a - wait 



^^E^ m^ ^^^m 



ed my wand' -ring At e'en - ing the wild woods a - mang ? 



Where are the joys I hae met in the morning, 
That danc'd to the lark's early sang? 

Where is the peace that awaited my wand'ring 
At e'ening the wild woods amang? 

Nae mair a-winding the course o* yon river 
And marking sweet flow'rets sae fair, 

Nae mair I trace the light footsteps o' pleasure. 
But sorrow and sad sighing care. 

Is it that Summer's forsaken our valHes, 

And grim, surly Winter is near? 
No, no, the bees humming round the gay roses 

Proclaim it the pride o' the year ! 

Fain would I hide what I fear to discover, 
Yet lang, lang, too well hae I known : 

A' that has caused the wreck in my bosom, 
Is Jenny, fair Jenny alone. 

Time cannot aid me, my griefs are immortal, 
Not Hope dare a comfort bestow : 

Come then, enamour'd and fond of my anguish, 
Enjoyment I'll seek in my woe. 



II, LOVE : GENERAL 



lOI 



II. LOVE— GENERAL 



No. no. My Sandy gied to me a ring. 

Tune : I love my love in secret. M^^Gibbon's Scots Tunes., xi\'2^ p. 4. 
Sfnooihly ir 



Q=l 



13= 



£^ 



My San - dy gied to ine a ring Was a' be - set wi' diamonds 



[^^^^i^g^i^^ 



fine; But I gied him a far bet - ter thing, 1 giea my 

ir Chorus. tr 



l^g^^^^^S^^^ 



heart in pledge o' his ring. My San - dy O, my San • dy O, 
tr 



s^^^g^Eg^liig;^^^^ 



My hon - ie, bon-ie San-dy O ; Thd' the love that I owe to 
tr tr 



p^^E^^^ ^^^ElS^^^^^^^ 



I dare na show. Yet I love my love in se • cret, my San • dy O J 

My Sandy gied to me a ring 
Was a' beset wi' diamonds fine ; 
But I gied him a far better thing, 
I gied my heart in pledge o' his ring. 

Chorus. My Sandy O, my Sandy O, 
My bom'e, bonie Sandy O; 
Tho' the love that I owe to thee I dare na show, 
Yet I love my love in secret, my Sandy O ! 

My Sandy brak a piece o' gowd, 

While down his cheeks the saut tears row'd, 

He took a hauf, and gied it to me, 

And ril keep it till the hour I die. 




I02 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. III. There's nought but care on evry han . 

Tune: Green grow the rashes, O. Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 77. 
Lively 

Chorus. Green grow the rash-es, Of Green grow the rash- es. O! The 

Fine. 



i^^ 



3S: 



mm. 



^ 



^v=^ 



sweet- est hours that ere I spend, Are spent a • mang the las-sies, Of 



^ 



fc^ 



^ 



^^35^^ 



^^^ 



There's nought but care on ev- 'ry han', In ev - 'ry hour that passes, O ; What 

D.C. 






J^^E^B 



3^ 



:3=:: 



sig - ni - fies the life o' man, An 'twere na for the las - sies, O? 

Chorus. Green grow the rashes, O I 
Green grow the rashes, O '. 
The sweetest hours that e'er I spend, 
Are spent amang the lasses, O ! 

There's nought but care on ev'ry han', 

In ev'ry hour that passes, O ; 
What signifies the life o' man, 

An 'twere na for the lasses, O ? 

The warl'y race may riches chase, 

An' riches still may fly them, O ; 
An' tho' at last they catch them fast, 

Their hearts can ne'er enjoy them, O. 

But gie me a cannie hour at e'en. 

My arms about my dearie, O ; 
An' warl'y cares, an' warl'y men, 

May a' gae tapsalteerie, O ! 

For you sae douce, ye sneer at this, 
Ye're nought but senseless asses, O ; 

The wisest man the warl' saw. 
He dearly lov'd the lasses, O ! 

Auld Nature swears, the lovely dears 

Her noblest w?ork she classes, O : 
Her prentice han' she tried on man. 

An' then she made the lasses, O. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



103 



No. 112. O, whar gat ye that hauver-meal 
bannock ? 

Skene MS. c. 1630. 



Tune : A dew Dundee. 
Moderate time 



xfe 



^ 



:jV^ 



a 



^=t^ 



3=B^^ 



--^ 



= ft— ?^=^ 



:t?=i;2 



' O, whar gat ye that hauv-er - meal ban-nock?' 'O sil - ly blind 



L^^ 






bo - dy, O din - na ye see? I gat it frae a young, 



te 



1^=^: 



'^^^^^^^^m 



brisk sod- ger lad - die, Between Saint Johnston and bo - nie Dun-dee. 



eEp^gEEfeNg^g^ ^ 



m 



63^"- 



O, gin I saw the lad - die that gae me't ! Aft has he 



l -ai^^aEggpipp ^^g^g p ^ 



doudl'd me up on his knee; May heav'n pro-tect my bon - ie Scots 



i 



±1^=3^=^^:^ 



i^^^ 



:ees^^ 



^zlzaL 



lad - die, And send him safe hame to his ba - bie and me ! 

' O, WHAR gat ye that hauver-meal bannock ? ' 
' O silly blind body, O dinna ye see ? 
I gat it frae a young, brisk sodger laddie, 

Between Saint Johnston and bonie Dundee. 
O, gin I saw the laddie that gae me't ! 

Aft has he doudl'd me up on his knee ; 
May Heaven protect my bonie Scots laddie, 
And send him safe hame to his babie and me ! 

' My blessins upon thy sweet wee lippie ! 

My blessins upon thy bonie e'e-brie ! 
Thy smiles are sae like my biythe sodger laddie, 

Thou 's ay the dearer and dearer to me ! 
But I'll big a bow'r on yon bonie banks, 

Whar Tay rins wimplin by sae clear ; 
And I'll deed thee in the tartan sae fine. 

And mak thee a man like thy daddie dear.' 



104 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 113. Now simmer blinks on flowry braes. 

Tune : The Birks of Abergeldte. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 113. 

Lively 



s 



s 



-7^-^ 



w^^^m^^^ 



Chorus. Bon ■ ie las - sie, will ye go^ 



Will ye go, will ye go i 

Fine. 



^^ ^^^P^^^^ 



Bon - ie las - sie, will ye go To the birks of A - ber -feld 



9- -0- * -a- -9- -m- ^^ 



Now sim-mer blinks on flow-'ry braes, And o'er the crys-tal stream -lets 

D.C. 



w^^^^^^^^^^ 



plays, Come, let us spend the lightsome days In the birks of A - ber - feld - y. 

Chorus. Bonie lassie, will ye go, 
Will ye go, will ye go ? 
Bonie lassie, will ye go 

To the birks of Aberfeldy? 

Now simmer blinks on flowVy braes, 
And o'er the crystal streamlets plays, 
Come, let us spend the lightsome days 
In the birks of Aberfeldy. 

The little birdies blythely sing, 
While o'er their heads the hazels hing, 
Or lightly flit on wanton wing 
In the birks of Aberfeldy. 

The braes ascend like lofty wa's, 
The foaming stream, deep-roaring, fa's 
O'erhung wi' fragrant spreading shaws, 
The birks of Aberfeldy. 

The hoary cliffs are crown'd wi' flowers, 
White o'er the linns the burnie pours, 
And, rising, weets wi' misty showers 
The birks of Aberfeldy. 

Let Fortune's gifts at random flee. 
They ne'er shall draw a wish frae me, 
Supremely blest wi' love and thee, 
In the birks of Aberfeldy. 



II, LOVE : GENERAL 



105 



No. 114. As I gaed down the water-side. 

Tune: Ca' the yoives. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 264. 

Slow 




Ca' the yowes to the knowes, Ca' them whare the heath - er grows, 




Ca' them whare the bur - nie rowes, My bon - ie dear - ie. 



Chorus. Co' the yowes to the knowes, 

Co' them whare the heather grows, 
Ca'' them whare the burnie rowes, 
My bonie dearie. 

As I gaed down the water-side, 
There I met my shepherd lad : 
He row'd me sweetly in his plaid, 
An he ca'd me his dearie. 

* Will ye gang down the water-side, 
And see the waves sae sweetly glide 
Beneath the hazels spreading wide ? 
The moon it shines fu' clearly.' 

'I was bred up in nae sic school. 
My shepherd lad to play the fool. 
And a' the day to sit in dool. 
And nae body to see me.' 

' Ye sail get gowns and ribbons meet, 
Cauf-leather shoon upon your feet, 
And in my arms thou'lt lie and sleep, 
An' ay sail be my dearie.' 

' If ye'll but stand to what ye've said, 

I'se gang wi' you my shepherd lad, 

And ye may row me in your plaid. 

And I sail be your dearie.' 

' While waters wimple to the sea. 
While day blinks in the lift sae hie. 
Till clay-cauld death sail blin' my e'e, 
Ye sail be my dearie.' 



io6 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 115. On a bank of fiowers in a summer day. 



Tune: The bashful lover. Watts's Musical Miscellany, 1729, i. p. 30. 

Gracefully 



ifeB^:^ 3^:j;j.i;'^(bJd=^j^^te e: 



On a bank of flowers in a summer day, For summer light - ly drest, 



E^^: 



P^ P^E^^^ 



rp: 



The youthful, blooming Nel - ly lay With love and sleep op - prest ; When 







^=^^ 



r^ziit* 



Willie, wand'ring through the wood, Who for her fa - vour oft had sued ; He 



S^l^^^ 



?3- 



gaz'd, he wish'd, he fear'd, he blush'd. And trembled where he stood. 

On a bank of flowers in a summer day. 

For summer lightly drest, 
The youthful, blooming Nelly lay 

With love and sleep opprest ; 
When Willie, wand'ring through the wood, 

Who for her favour oft had sued ; 
He gaz'd, he wish'd, he fear'd, he blush'd, 

And trembled where he stood. 

Her closed eyes, like weapons sheath'd, 

Were seal'd in soft repose ; 
Her lips, still as she fragrant breath'd, 

It richer dyed the rose ; 
The springing liHes, sweetly prest, 

Wild-wanton kiss'd her rival breast ; 
He gaz'd, he wish'd, he fear'd, he blush'd, 

His bosom ill at rest. 

Her robes, light-waving in the breeze, 

Her tender limbs embrace ; 
Her lovely form, her native ease, 

All harmony and grace. 
Tumultuous tides his pulses roll, 

A faltering, ardent kiss he stole ; 
He gaz'd, he wish'd, he fear'd, he blush'd, 

And sigh'd his very soul. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



107 



As flies the partridge from the brake 

On fear-inspired ■wings, 
So Nelly starting, half-awake, 

Away affrighted springs ; 
But Willie follow'd — as he should ; 

He overtook her in the wood ; 
He vow'd, he pray'd, he found the maid 

Forgiving all, and good. 



No. 116. When rosy May comes in wi Jlowe7^s. 

Tune: The gardener's march. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 220. 
Slow and pointed 



Eg^^^^g^^^^ 



When ro- sy May comes in wi' flowers To deck her gay, green-spreading bowers, 



p^p^^^^^^^ig 



Then bu - sy, bu - sy are his hours — ,The gard'ner wi' his pai-dle. The 



msifEk^ ^iE^EiE ^^ mmfwf^ 



$ 



crystal wa-ters gently fa', The merry birds are lo - vers a', The 

tr 



^ 



^^^^^^ 



^^^S3 



scented breezes round him blaw — The gard'ner wi' his pai-dle. 

When rosy May comes in wi' flowers, 
To deck her gay, green -spreading bowers, 
Then busy, busy are his hours — 

The gard'ner wi' his paidle. 
The crystal waters gently fa'. 
The merry birds are lovers a', 
The scented breezes round him blaw — 

The gard'ner wi' his paidle. 

When purple morning starts the hare 

To steal upon her early fare ; 

Then through the dew he maun repair — 

The gard'ner wi' his paidle. 
When day, expiring in the west, 
The curtain draws o' Nature's rest. 
He flies to her arms he lo'es best — 

The gard'ner wi' his paidle. 



io8 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 117. If thou should ask my love. 

Tune : Janiie, conie try me. Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1745, ii. p. 34. 

Slowly ^ tr 



15 



g 3^^f1^55 



l^EgSl^^lgp 



S33 



Chorus. Ja-mie, come try me^ Ja-mte, come try me ; If thou would 

• tr Fine. 



i 



1^^ 



X, 



g 






:^=Ust 



win my love, Ja - niie, come try me. If thou should 

tr ^^ V*'' 



iF^-?N=l=rj^E ^^^ 



Eg^ 



I^ZZ 



ask my love, Could I de - ny thee? If 

tr^ ^ . -^ tr B.C. 



^^m 



:S^ 



g 



it 



S 



thou would win ray love, Ja - mie, come try me. 

Chorus. Jamie, come try me, 
Jamie, come try me ; 
If thou would win my love, 
Jamie, come try me. 



If thou should ask my love, 
Could I deny thee ? 

If thou would win my love, 
Jamie, come try me. 



If thou should kiss me, love, 
Wha could espy thee ? 

If thou wad be my love, 
Jamie, come try me. 



No. 118. Hark the mavis eening sang. 

Tune : CcC the yowes (see No. 114). 

Chorus. Ca' the yowes to the knowes, 

Co' them, where the heather grows, 
Co' them where the burnie rowes, 
My bonie dearie. 



Hark, the mavis' e'ening sang 
Sounding Clouden's woods amang, 
Then a-faulding let us gang. 
My bonie dearie. 



We'll gae down by Clouden side, 

Thro' the hazels, spreading wide 

O'er the waves that sweetly glide 

To the moon sae clearly. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



109 



Yonder Clouden's silent towers 
Where, at moonshine's midnight 

hours, 
O'er the dewy bending flowers 
Fairies dance sae cheery. 



Ghaist nor bogle shalt thou fear, 
Thou'rt to Love and Heav'n sae 

dear, 
Nocht of ill may come thee near, 
My bonie dearie. 



Fair and lovely as thou art, 
Thou hast stown my very heart ; 
I can die — but canna part, 
My bonie dearie. 



No. 119. When the d^'tmis do beat. 

Tune : The Captain'' s lady. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 233. 
Briskly 



WSI^ 



^^& 



35i 



Chorus. O, mount and go. Mount and make ye rea ■ dy ; O, 

Fine. 



^ 



m^ 



'^ 



3t^3t 



=^=^ 



mount and go, And be the Captain^ s la • dy ! When the drums do beat, 



fe5^ a.E i B=F iig^iN^^ 



And the can - nons rat - tie, Thou shalt sit in state, And see thy love 



Si^^^^^^^^ 



in bat - tie. When the drums do beat, And the can - nons 

D.C. 



^^gp^§^^^ 



rat - tie. Thou shalt sit in state. And see thy love in bat - tie. 

Chorus. O, mount and go, 

Mount and make ye ready ; 
O, mount and go, 

And be the Captain^ lady '. 



When the drums do beat, \ 
And the cannons rattle, (^ , • 

Thou shalt sit in state, j 

And see thy love in battle. ^ 



When the vanquish'd foe 

Sues for peace and quiet, ( , • 

To the shades we'll go, 
And in love enjoy it. 



no 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 1 20. Young Jockie was the blythest lad. 

Tune : Jockie was the blythest lad. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 287. 

Sloivly tr 



^Ipg P^^f^ ^J N^ 



& 



Young Jock 



g^^^ 



a=3^a^^^ 



the blyth - est 



lad, In a' 



^±^E^S±^. 



our town or here a - wa ; Fu' blythe he whist - led 



^^^m. 



ig^^S 



I^E^E^E^S 



at the gaud, Fu' light - ly danc'd he in the ha'. He 



^^^^^il^^^ii^ 



roos'd my een sae bon - ie blue, He roos'd my waist 



§E^ 



=^=i= 



^: 



?^e 



=r^= 



^ 



gen 



- ty sma', An' ay 



my 



heart cam 
tr 






my mou. When ne'er 



a bo - dy heard or saw. 



Young Jockie was the blythest lad, 

In a' our town or here awa ; 
Fu' blythe he whistled at the gaud, 

Fu' lightly danc'd he in the ha'. 
He roos'd my een sae bonie blue. 

He roos'd my waist sae genty sma', 
An' ay my heart cam to my mou, 

When ne'er a body heard or saw. 

My Jockie toils upon the plain, 

Thro' wind and weet, thro' frost and snaw ; 
And o'er the lea I leuk fu' fain. 

When Jockie 's owsen hameward ca'. 
And ay the night comes round again, 

When in his arms he taks me a' ; 
And ay he vows he'll be my ain 

As lang 's he has a breath to draw. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



III 



No. 121. Sweet are the banks — the banks d Doon. 

(first version.) 
Tune : Canibdelmore. Bremner's Reels, 1761, p. 92. 



tSlow 



jj^ gji^g^^S^g gEiggi^pil 



Sweet are the banks — the banks o' Doon, The spreading flowers are fair, And 



^^ 



Ue^SSe^^ 



•^^^^^ 



every-thing is blythe and glad, But I am fu' o' care. Thou'll break my heart. 



* 



m 



:^=fc: 



i^^^^^^igi^ 



thou bo-nie bird, That sings up-on the bough ! Thou minds me o' the hap-py days 




-0^^Sm^^^^^ 



When my fause Luve was true : Thou'll break my heart, thou bo-nie bird That sings 



feSl^^^l^P^i^ 



be-side thy mate, For sae I sat, and sae I sang. And wist na o' my fate. 

Sweet are the banks — the banks o' Doon, 

The spreading flowers are fair, 
And everything is blythe and glad, 

But I am fu' o' care. 
Thou'll break my heart, thou bonie bird 

That sings upon the bough ! 
Thou minds me o' the happy days 

When my fause Luve was true : 
Thou'll break my heart, thou bonie bird 

That sings beside thy mate, 
For sae I sat, and sae I sang. 

And wist na o' my fate ! 

Aft hae I rov'd by bonie Doon 

To see the woodbine twine. 
And ilka bird sang o' its Luve, 

And sae did I o' mine. 
Wi' lightsome heart I pu'd a rose 

Upon its thorny tree, 
But my fause luver staw ray rose. 

And left the thorn wi' me : 
Wi' lightsome heart I pu'd a rose 

Upon a morn in June, 
And sae I flourished on the morn, 

And sae was pu'd or noon. 



112 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 12 2. Ye fiowery batiks d bonie Doon. 

(second version.) 
See Tune : BallendalloM s Reel, or Cambdelmore (see No. 121). 

Ye flowery banks o' bonie Doon, 

How can ye blume sae fair? 
How can ye chant, ye little birds, 

And I sae fu' o' care? 

Thou'll break my heart, thou bonie bird 

That sings upon the bough : 
Thou minds me o' the happy days 

When my fause Luve was true ! 

Thou'll break my heart, thou bonie bird 

That sings beside thy mate ; 
For sae I sat, and sae I sang. 

And wist na o' my fate. 

Aft hae I rov'd by bonie Doon 

To see the woodbine twine. 
And ilka bird sang o' its Luve, 

And sae did I o' mine. 

Wi' lightsome heart I pu'd a rose 

Frae afT its thorny tree ; 
And my fause luver staw my rose, 

But left the thorn wi' me. 



No. 123. Ye banks and braes d bonie Doon. 

(third version.) 

Tune : Caledonian Hunt's delight. Scots Musical Museum^ 1792, No. 374. 
Slow 



^: 



it 



EgpSi 



E 






-^ 



\= -^— lt 



Ye banks and braes o' bon - ie Doon, How can ye 






^^igS 



teP=;5=fc:S=I 



^* — I ^H- 



m 



bloom sae fresh and fair? How can ye chant, ye lit - tie birds, And 



m 



t=a 



fcii 



S^i 



-'^ 



^£E5 



:t^ 



I sae wea - ry fu' o' care! Thou'll break my heart, thou warb-ling 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



113 



i 



i^ 






=5^#= 



bird, That wan - tons thro' the flower - ing thorn : Thou minds me 



^^^^^^^m- 



o' de - part - ed joys, De - part - ed nev - er to re-turn ! 

Ye banks and braes o' bonie Doon, 

How can ye bloom sae fresh and fair? 
How can ye chant, ye little birds, 

And I sae weary fu' o' care ! 
Thou'll break my heart, thou warbling bird, 

That wantons thro' the flowering thorn : 
Thou minds me o' departed joys, 

Departed never to return ! 

Aft hae I roved by bonie Doon 

To see the rose and woodbine twine, 
And ilka bird sang o' its Luve, 

And fondly sae did I o' mine ; 
Wi' lightsome heart I pu'd a rose, 

Fu' sweet upon its thorny tree ! 
And my fause luver staw my rose — 

But ah ! he left the thorn wi' me. 



No. 124. O, stay, sweet warbling woodlark, stay. 

Tune : Whare shall our gudeman lie (see No. 10). 

O, STAY, sweet warbling woodlark, stay, 
Nor quit for me the trembling spray ! 
A hapless lover courts thy lay. 

Thy soothing, fond complaining. 
Again, again that tender part. 
That I may catch thy melting art ! 
For surely that wad touch her heart 

Wha kills me wi' disdaining. 

Say, was thy little mate unkind, 

And heard thee as the careless wind ? 

O, nocht but love and sorrow join'd 

Sic notes o' woe could wauken ! 
Thou tells o' never-ending care, 
O' speechless grief and dark despair — 
For pity's sake, sweet bird, nae mair, 

Or my poor heart is broken ! 
I 



1 14 



TOKE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 125. O, saw ye my deai'ie, my Eppie M'^Nab ? 

Tune : Eppie M'^Nab. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 336. 

Slow 



aiS^li 



^ 



S 



O, saw ye my dear - ie, my Ep - pie M^ - Nab ? O, 



^^S^S^^l^S 



saw ye my dear - ie, my Ep - pie M« - Nab ; ' She 's down 



3=t= 



^- 



ggpg 



Xi^ 



S^gS 



in the yard, she's kiss -in the laird, She win - na come hame 



'^^^^^^^^^m 



to her ain Jock. Rab!' O, come thy ways to me, my 



i 



*^ 



i§^^^^^i^iii 



Ep - pie M" - Nab ! O come thy ways to me, my Ep 



^.^Jt-—^-^ J 1 — \^j f^ 1 1 1 ^ 1 1— ■•■i ^ «*5— 



pie M^ - Nab ! What - e'er thou has'done, be it late, be it 



^^-g^^g^^giiiii^ii 



soon. Thou 's wel - come a - gain to thy ain Jock Rab! 

O, SAW ye my dearie, my Eppie M^Nab? 
O, saw ye my dearie, my Eppie M^Nab? 

' She 's down in the yard, she 's kissin the laird, 
She winna come hame to her ain Jock Rab.' 

O, come thy ways to me, my Eppie M<^Nab ! 
O, come thy ways to me, my Eppie M<=Nab ! 

Whate'er thou has done, be it late, be it soon, 
Thou 's welcome again to thy ain Jock Rab. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



115 



What says she, my dearie, my Eppie M'^Nab? 
What says she, my dearie, my Eppie Mi^Nab? 

' She lets thee to wit that she has thee forgot, 
And for ever disowns thee, her ain Jock Rab.' 

O, had I ne'er seen thee, my Eppie M'^Nab ! 
O, had I ne'er seen thee, my Eppie M'^Nab ! 

As hght as the air and as fause as thou 's fair, 
Thou 's broken the heart o' thy ain Jock Rab. 



No. 126. By love and by bemity. 

Tune : Eppie Adair. Scots Musical Museutn, 1790, No. 281. 
Slow 



Si 

_i:c — ^ 



z± 



5^ 



i=r 



3^ 



Chorus. An' O my Ep-pie, My Jew - el, my Ep-pie: Whawadnabe happy 
Fine. 



"^^^^^^^^^^^S. 



Wr Ep-pie A - dair ? By love and by beau-ty, By law and by du - ty, 



^^^^ ^^^mmw^^^^w^^ 



I swear to be true to My Ep-pie A -dair! By love and by beauty, By 

D.C. 



I^^^^P^g^^^^ 



law and by du - ty, 1 swear to be true to My Ep - pie A - dair ! 

Chorus. Alt' O my Eppie, 

My jewel, my Eppie; 
JV/ia wadiia be happy 
Wi^ Eppie Adair? 

By love and by beauty, - 
By law and by duty, I , . 
I swear to be true to 
My Eppie Adair ! 

A' pleasure exile me, 
Dishonour defile me, ( ,. 
If e'er I beguile thee. 
My Eppie Adair ! 



Tl6 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 127. O, luve will venture in. 

Tune: The poste. Scots Musical Mttseum, 1792, No. 373. 
Moderate time 




& 



^^^^^^^mw^ 



O, luve will ven-ture in where it daur na weel be seen ; O, luve will 



:#!; 



=fc: 



p^^^^^^i^^^^^ 




venture in, where wisdom ance hath been; But I will doun yon river rove a 

tr 



fSSfe 



^^^iE^S^^^Si^ 



mang the wood sae green, And a' to pu' a po - sie to my ain dear May! 

O, LUVE will venture in where it daur na weel be seen ; 
O, luve will venture in, where wisdom ance hath been ; 
But I w^ill doun yon river rove amang the wood sae green, 
And a' to pu' a posie to my ain dear May ! 

The primrose I will pu', the firstling o' the year, 

And I will pu' the pink, the emblem o' my dear, 

For she's the pink o' womankind, and blooms without a peer — 

And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May! 

I'll pu' the budding rose when Phoebus peeps in view, 
For it's like a baumy kiss o' her sweet, bonie mou'. 
The hyacinth's for constancy wi' its unchanging blue — 
And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May. 

The lily it is pure, and the lily it is fair, 
And in her lovely bosom I'll place the lily there ; 
The daisy 's for simplicity and unaffected air — 
And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May. 

The hawthorn I will pu', wi' its locks o' siller gray. 
Where, like an aged man, it stands at break o' day ; 
But the songster's nest within the bush I winna tak away — 
And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May. 

The vi^oodbine I will pu' when the e'ening star is near. 
And the diamond draps o' dew shall be her een sae clear ! 
The violet's for modesty, which weel she fa's to wear — 
And a' to be a posie to my ain dear May. 

I'll tie the posie round wi' the silken band o' luve. 
And I'll place it in her breast, and I'll swear by a' above. 
That to my latest draught o' life the band shall ne'er remove. 
And this will be a posie to my ain dear May. 



II. love: general 



117 



No. 128. Let loove sparkle in her ee. 

Tune : Jockey foil and Jenny fain. Scots Musical Musemn, 1792, No. 381. 
Lively 



-s*-;^ 



Ith-ers seek they ken - na what, Fea-tures, car - riage, and a" that ; 



^^^ 



^^^ 



^ 



Gie me loove in her I court, Loove to loove maks a' the sport. 



i 



It- r «» '"^~1 - 



3^^^^^^ 



i 



Let loove spar - kle in her e'e, Let her lo'e nae man but me ; 



-m^E&^m^^^^ . 



That's the toch - er gude I prize, There the luv - er's treasure lies. 

[Ithers seek they kenna what, 
Features, carriage and a' that ; 
Gie me loove in her I court — 
Loove to loove maks a' the sport.] 
Let loove sparkle in her e'e, 
Let her lo'e nae man but me ; 
That 's the tocher gude I prize. 
There the luver's treasure lies. 



No. 129. How crzcel are the parents. 

Tune : John Anderson my jo (see No. 212). 



How cruel are the parents 

Who riches only prize. 
And to the wealthy booby 

Poor woman sacrifice ! 
Meanwhile the hapless daughter 

Has but a choice of strife ; 
To shun a tj'rant father's hate 

Become a wretched wife ! 



The ravening hawk pursuing, 

The trembling dove thus flies, 
To shun impelling ruin 

Awhile her pinion tries. 
Till, of escape despairing. 

No shelter or retreat, 
She trusts the ruthless falconer. 

And drops beneath his feet ! 



ii8 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 130. The S77iiling Spring comes in rejoicing. 

Tune : Bonie Bell. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 387. 
Lively 



^^^g^ p^E^ ga^i^gi 



The smil - ing Spring comes in re - joic - ing, And sur - ly Win - ter 



^^^^^^^ 






m^. 



grim - ly flies ; Now crys-tal clear are the fall-ing wa - ters, And bon - ie 



ig_^^=S^gSiE PES;^EJfeg 



£^=^ 



blue are the sun - ny skies. Fresh o'er the mountains breaks forth the morn- 



^i^^^^i^^^^pE^ 



ing, The ev'n - ing gilds the ocean's swell ; All crea-tures joy in 



^^^^^^^^^m 



the sun's re - turn - ing, And I re - joice in my bon - ie Bell. 

The smiling Spring comes in rejoicing, 

And surly Winter grimly flies ; 
Now crystal clear are the falling waters, 

And bonie blue are the sunny skies. 
Fresh o'er the mountains breaks forth the morning, 

The ev'ning gilds the ocean's swell ; 
All creatures joy in the sun's returning. 

And I rejoice in my bonie Bell. 

The flowery Spring leads sunny Summer, 

The yellow Autumn presses near ; 
Then in his turn comes gloomy Winter, 

Till smiling Spring again appear. 
Thus seasons dancing, life advancing. 

Old Time and Nature their changes tell ; 
But never ranging, still unchanging, 

I adore my bonie Bell. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



119 



i 



No. 131. Whej^e Cart rins i^owin to the sea. 

Tune : The gallant weaver. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 389. 
Briskly 



:t^ 



333 



E^^a^i^ 



lilZZE 



Where Cart rins row - in to the sea By mon-ie a flower and 



i^ 



l^^^i^^: 



w 



-Jt±^r 



spreading tree, There lives a lad, the lad for me — He is 
tr 



jj^j^Eg^^^j^ ^g^gE^Eg^ 



a gal - lant weav - er. O, I had woo - ers aught or 



S^^^iE^i^^^ 



nine, They gied me rings and rib-bons fine, And I was 

.ir 



P^E^g^Sfcp^ 



* 



fear'd my heart wad tine, And I gied it to the weav - er. 



Where Cart rins rowin to the sea 
By monie a flower and spreading tree, 
There lives a lad, the lad for me— 

He is a gallant weaver ! 
O, I had wooers aught or nine, 
They gied me rings and ribbons fine, 
And I was fear'd my heart wad tine, 

And I gied it to the weaver. 

My daddie sign'd my tocher-band 
To gie the lad that has the land ; 
But to my heart I'll add my hand, 

And give it to the weaver. 
While birds rejoice in leafy bowers. 
While bees delight in opening flowers. 
While corn grows green in summer showers, 

I love my gallant weaver. 



I20 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 132. I do confess thou art sae fair. 

Tune: The cuckoo. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 321. 
Moderately quick 



j^^pp^ggia^^^^ 



I do con - fess thou art sae fair, I wad been o'er 



fes^^a^lg^^^^^ 



the lugs in luve, Had I na found the slight - est prayer That 



^ 



.=!= 



fe^ 



S- 



lf==^ 



^ 



lips could speak thy heart could rauve. I do con - fess thee sweet, but 



^^^^^^^^^m 



find Thou art so thrift - less o' thy sweets, Thy fa - vours are 



m 



g^^aS^^3E^ 



the sil - ly wind That kiss • es il - ka thing it meets. 

I DO confess thou art sae fair, 

I wad been o'er the lugs in luve, 
Had I na found the slightest prayer 

That lips could speak thy heart could muve. 
I do confess thee sweet, but find 
. Thou art so thriftless o' thy sweets, 
Thy favours are the silly wind 

That kisses ilka thing it meets. 

See yonder rosebud rich in dew, 

Amang its native briers sae coy, 
How sune it tines its scent and hue, 

When pu'd and worn a common toy ! 
Sic fate ere lang shall thee betide, 

Tho' thou may gaily bloom a while. 
And sune thou shalt be thrown aside. 

Like onie common weed, an' vile. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



121 



No. 133. Whare live ye, my bonie lass? 

Tune: My collier laddie. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 361. 
Gracefully 



te 



& 



i^^^^g^^S 



'Whare live ye, my bon - ie lass, And tell me what 



^^^^ip^^^^S 



iS: 



they ca' ye?' 'My name,' she says, 'is Mis - tress 



^^ 



E^-=^S 



^^^^^iSi 



a^Ez 



Jean, And I fol - low the Col - - Her Lad - die.' 



' Whare live ye, my bonie lass, 

And tell me what they ca' ye ? ' 
'My name,' she says, 'is Mistress Jean, ) , . 

And I follow the Collier Laddie.' ) 

' See you not yon hills and dales 

The sun shines on sae brawlie ? 
They a' are mine, and they shall be thine, ) , • 

Gin ye'll leave your Collier Laddie. ) 

'An' ye shall gang in gay attire, 

Weel buskit up sae gaudy, 
And ane to wait on every hand, ) , . 

Gin ye'll leave your Collier Laddie.' j 

'Tho' ye had a' the sun shines on, 

And the earth conceals sae lowly, 
I wad turn my back on you and it a', ) , . 

And embrace my Collier Laddie. ) 

' I can win my five pennies in a day, 

An' spend it at night fu' brawlie. 
And make my bed in the Collier's neuk ) , . 

And lie down wi' my Collier Laddie. ) 

' Luve for luve is the bargain for me, 
"Tho' the wee cot-house should haud me, 

And the warld before me to win my bread — ) , • 
And fair fa' my Collier Laddie ! ' 



122 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 134. hi simmer, when the hay was mawn. 

Tune : The country lass. Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 38, 
Rather slow 



W 



m 



5^ 






^^S^ 



-9- -»- 

In sim - mer, when the hay was mawn And corn wav'd green in 



i^^i 



^q^^== 



1 \ .| — ht=^: 

■•— r-—l ^— 1^- 

— in W * — A 



w 



^ES^t^Si. 



il - ka field, While clav-er blooms white o'er the lea, And ro - ses 



^E ^E^=N^E^i^^^Egg^^ 



blaw in il - ka bield, Blythe Bes - sie in the milk - ing 






:^^ 



shiel, Says 'I'll be wed, come o't what will'; Out spake a dame in 



^E ^^E±^ E^^^^r-^h^0^^ 



wrinkled eild : — ' O' guid ad - vise - ment comes nae ill.' 

In simmer, when the hay was mawn 

And corn wav'd green in ilka field, 
While claver blooms white o'er the lea. 

And roses blaw in ilka bield, 

Blythe Bessie in the milking shiel. 
Says — Til be wed, come o't what will'; 

Out spake a dame in wrinkled eild : — 
' O' guid advisement comes nae ill. 

' It 's ye hae wooers mony ane, 

And lassie, ye're but young, ye ken ; 
Then wait a ■wee, and cannie wale 

A routhie butt, a routhie ben : 

There 's Johnie o' the Buskie-Glen, 
Fu' is his barn, fu' is his byre : 

Tak this frae me, my bonie hen : — 
It's plenty beets the luver's fire.' 

' For Johnie o' the Buskie-Glen 

I dinna care a single flie : 
He lo'es sae weel his craps and kye, 

He has nae luve to spare for me : 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



123 



But blythe's the blink o' Robie's e'e, 
And weel I wat he lo'es me dear : 

Ae blink o' him I wadna gie 
For Buskie-Glen and a' his gear.' 

' O thoughtless lassie, life 's a faught ! 

The canniest gate, the strife is sair ; 
But ay fu'-han t is fechtin best ; 

A hungry care 's an unco care. 

But some will spend, and some will spare, 
And wilfu' folk maun hae their will. 

Syne as ye brew, my maiden fair, 
Keep mind that ye maun drink the yill.' 

' O, gear will buy me rigs o' land. 

And gear will buy me sheep and kye ! 

But the tender heart o' leesome luve 
The gowd and siller canna buy : 
We may be poor, Robie and I ; 

Light is the burden luve lays on ; 
Content and luve brings peace and joy — 

What mair hae queens upon a throne ? ' 



No. 135. Now rosy May comes in wi flowers. 

Tune : Dainty Davie (see infra). 

Chorus. Meet ni.e on the warlock knowe, 
Dainty Davie, Dainty Davie; 
There Pll spend the day wi'' you, 
My ain dear Dainty Davie. 



Now rosy May comes in wi' flowers 
To deck her gay, green-spreading 

bowers ; 
And now comes in the happy hours 
To wander wi' my Davie. 

The crystal waters round us fa', 
The merry birds are lovers a', 
The scented breezes round us blaw, 
A wandering wi' my Davie. 



When purple morning starts the 

hare 
To steal upon her early fare. 
Then thro' the dews I will repair 
To meet my faithfu' Davie. 

When day, expiring in the west, 
The curtain draws o' Nature's rest, 
I flee to his arms I lo'e the best : 
And that 's my ain dear Davie I 



124 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 136. Wke?i der the hill the eening star. 

Tune : My ain kind dearie, O. Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 49. 

Slowly 



^^m^^^^^ESE^^m^ 



^^: 



When o'er the liill the e'en - ing star Tells bught-in time is 






^^=^s 






-0- -9- • 



-- 1^5— I F 1 ^— 



i^^*— ^— te^ 



near, my jo, And ows - en frae the fur-row'd field Re - turn 



i^^F^j^fe^jgggg^ 



sae dowf and wea - ry, O, Down by the burn, where scent 



--^^^ 



' ^ ^rj^z^ ^^iz^iA 



^ 



ed birks Wi' dew are hang - in clear, my jo, I' 



fe% g^-^^^^^E^^= 



meet thee on the lea - rig, My ain kind dea - rie, O. 



When o'er the hill the e'ening star 

Tells bughtin time is near, my jo, 
And owsen frae the furrow'd field 

Return sae dowf and weary, O, 
Do\\ai by the burn, w^here scented birks 

Wi' dew are hangin clear, my jo, 
I'll meet thee on the lea-rig, 

My ain kind dearie, O. 

At midnight hour in mirkest glen 

I'd rove, and ne'er be eerie, O, 
If thro' that glen I gaed to thee, 

My ain kind dearie, O ! 
Altho' the night -were ne'er sae wild, 

And I were ne'er sae weary, O, 
I'll meet thee on the lea-rig, 

My ain kind dearie, O. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



125 



The hunter lo'es the morning sun 

To rouse the mountain deer, my jo ; 
At noon the fisher takes the glen 

Adown the burn to steer, my jo ; 
Gie me the hour o' gloamin grey, 

It maks my heart sae cheery, O, 
To meet thee on the lea-rig, 

My ain kind dearie, O ! 



No. 137. Br aw, draw lads on Yarrow braes. 

Tune : The brave lads of GaJla Water, Cal. Pocket Comp., c. 1756, viii. p. 28. 
tr tr tr 



^ 



Pi^ 



H^ 



5^^ 



s 



Braw, braw lads on Yar-row braes, They rove a-mang the bloom-ing heather ; 

if. 



iiil^^l^SiiS^ 



But Yar-row braes, nor Et-trick shaws Can match the lads o' Gal - la Water. 



Braw, braw lads on Yarrow braes, 

They rove amang the blooming heather ; 

But Yarrow braes nor Ettrick shaws 
Can match the lads o' GaUa Water. 

But there is ane, a secret ane, 
Aboon them a' I lo'e him better ; 

And I'll be his, and he'll be mine, 
The bonie lad o' Galla Water. 

Altho' his daddie w^as nae laird. 
And the' I hae nae meikle tocher, 

Yet, rich in kindest, truest love, 

We'll tent our flocks by Galla Water. 

It ne'er was wealth, it ne'er was wealth 
That coft contentment, peace, and pleasure ; 

The bands and bliss o' mutual love, 
O, that's the chiefest warld's treasure. 



126 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 138. O, mirk, mirk is this midnight hour. 

Scots Musical Museum^ 1787, No. 5. 



Tune : Lord Gregory. 

Slow 



ggg^^N f^^ 



:^=it 



O, mirk, mirk. 



wm^^ 



is this midnight hour, And loud the 



i^^^^^^^E^^ 



tern - pest's roar ; A w ae - fu' wander-er seeks thy tower — Lord 



i^rzz^ 



:t^=^= 



-^ 



:^= 



^ 



it=i 



Gre - go - ry, ope thy door! An ex - ile frae her 




pi - ty on me shaw, If love it may na be. 



O, MIRK, mirk is this midnight hour, 

And loud the tempest's roar ; 
A waefu' wanderer seeks thy tower — 

Lord Gregory, ope thy door ! 
An exile frae her father's ha,' 

And a' for sake o' thee, 
At least some pity on me shaw, 

If love it may na be. 

Lord Gregory mind'st thou not the grove 

By bonie Irwine side, 
Where first I own'd that virgin love 

I lang, lang had denied ? 
How aften didst thou pledge and vow. 

Thou wad for ay be mine ! 
And my fond heart, itsel sae true, 

It ne'er mistrusted thine. 

Hard is thy heart, Lord Gregory, 

And flinty is thy breast : 
Thou bolt of heaven that flashest by, 

O, wilt thou bring me rest ! 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



127 



Ye mustering thunders from above, 

Your willing victim see, 
But spare and pardon my fause love 

His wrangs to Heaven and me ! 



No. 139. There's aidd Rob Morris that wons 
in yon glen. 

Tune : Aiild Rob Morris. Orpheus Caledonms, 1725, No. 30. 
, Slow , if 



^ 



^^^^^Sm 



^ 



There 's auld Rob Mor-ris that wons in yon glen. He's the king o' gude 



J3 



pg : 



^: 



s 



fel-lows and wale of auld men ; He has gowd in his coffers, he has ows 
tr 




en and kine, And ae bo - nie las-sie, his dau-tie and mine. 



There 's auld Rob Morris that wons in yon glen, 
He 's the king o' gude fellows and wale of auld men ; 
He has gowd in his coifers, he has owsen and kine, 
And ae bonie lassie, his dautie and mine. 

She's fresh as the morning the fairest in May, 
She's sweet as the ev'ning amang the new hay. 
As blythe and as artless as the lambs on the lea, 
And dear to my heart as the light to my e'e. 

But O, she 's an heiress — auld Robin 's a laird, 

And my daddie has noucht but a cot-house and yard; 

A wooer like me maunna hope to come speed, 

The wounds I must hide that will soon be my dead. 

The day comes to me, but delight brings me nane ; 
The night comes to me, but my rest it is gane : 
I wander my lane like a night-troubled ghaist, 
And I sigh as my heart it wad burst in my breast. 

O, had she but been of a lower degree, 
I then might hae hop"d she wad smil'd upon me ! 
O, how past descriving had then been my bliss, 
As now my distraction no words can express ! 



128 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 140. Here aw a, there awa, wandering Willie, 

Scots Musical Museum^ '^i^li No. 57. 
tr 



Tune : Here awa, there awa. 
Slow 



^m 



^^- 



i^^i^^^g 



1^=^^^ 



Here a - wa, there a-wa, wan-der-ing Wil - lie, Here a - wa, 



^S53^1^ 



EE^ 



there a-wa, haud a-wa hame; Come to my bo-som, my ae 
tr 



^^^EJBE ^Eg^ 



-i=^p: 



3iS 



- y-h - 



on - ty dear-ie, And tell me thou bring'st me my Wil - lie the same. 

Here awa, there awa, wandering Willie, 

Here awa, there awa, haud awa hame ; 
Come to my bosom, my ae only dearie, 

And tell me thou bring'st me my Willie the same. 

Loud tho' the winter blew cauld at our parting, 
'Twas na the blast brought the tear in my e'e : 

Welcome now simmer, and w^elcome my Willie, 
The simmer to nature, my Willie to me. 

Rest, ye wild storms in the cave o' your slumbers — 
How^ your wild howling a lover alarms ! 

Wauken, ye breezes, row gently, ye billows, 

And waft my dear laddie ance mair to my arms. 

But O, if he's faithless, and minds na his Nannie, 
Flow still between us, thou wide roaring main ! 

May I never see it, may I never trow it. 

But, dying, believe that my Willie 's my ain ! 



No. 141. O, ope7i the door some pity to shezu. 

Tune : Open the door softly. Bunting's Irish Melodies, 1796. 
With pathos 



^^^g^^^^^g^ 



O, open the door some pi - ty to shew, If love it may na be, O ! Tho 



^^gi^^^^g^ 



thou hast been false, I'll ev-er prove true — O, op - en the door to me, O! 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



129 



O, OPEN the door some pity to shew, 

If love it may na be, O ! 
Tho' thou hast been false, I'll ever prove true — 

O, open the door to me, O ! 

Cauld is the blast upon my pale cheek, 

But caulder thy love for me, O : 
The frost, that freezes the life at my heart, 

Is naught to my pains frae thee, O ! 

The viran moon sets behind the white wave, 

And Time is setting with me, O : 
False friends, false love, farewell ! for mair 

I'll ne'er trouble them, nor thee, O I 

She has open'd the door, she has open'd it wide, 
She sees the pale corse on the plain, O ! 

'My true love,' she cried, and sank down by his side- 
Never to rise again, O ! 



No. 142. Lang hae we parted been. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 218. 



Tune : Laddie lie near me. 
Rather slow 



^^li 



i^^p: 



li 






^: 



S^ 



x^ 



^ 



Lang hae we part-ed been, Las - sie, my dear - ie ; Now we are 

Chorus. 



jfep^ j^aggi^i^ 



::?s=]: 



met a - gain, Las - sie, lie near me ! Near 7ne, near me. Lassie^ He 



^^^^^^^^^m^ 



7iear me^ Lang hast thoii lien thy lane. Las - sie, lie near me. 



Lang hae we parted been, 

Lassie, my dearie ; 

Now we are met again, 

Lassie, lie near me ! 

A' that I hae endur'd, 

Lassie, my dearie, 
Here in thy arms is cur'd ! 
Lassie, lie near me. 



Chorus. Near me, near me, 

Lassie, lie near nte I 
Lang hast thou lien thy lane, 
Lassie, lie near me. 



I30 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 143. By Allan stream I chancd to rove. 

Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 28. 



Tune : Allan Water. 
Slowly 



&Bi 



is- 



^^^^^^^^^^ 



By Al -Ian stream 1 chanc'd to rove, While Phcebus sank be - yond Ben- 






le - di ; The winds were whis - p'ring thro' the grove, The 



:pc 



H:^=££&i55iz4=C==||=t==E£ 



Xii=^ 



yel - low corn was wav - ing rea - dy : I lis - ten'd 



^^^^^^Sfe^ 



to a lov - er's sang. An' thought on youth - fu' 



^^^^ ^^^ m^^^^k^m 



plea - sures rao-nie, And ay the wild wood e 



:=1=S^^: 



-•^^9 ^ , — ^ 



-^*i- 



3: 



n. 



'»-r-ii—»- 



- choes rang:— O, 



my love An - nie 's ve - ry bon - ie. 



By Allan stream I chanc'd to rove, 

While Phoebus sank beyond Benledi ; 
The winds were whisp'ring thro' the grove, 

The yellow corn was waving ready : 
I listen'd to a lover's sang, 

An' thought on youthfu' pleasures monie, 
And ay the wild wood echoes rang : — 

'O, my love Annie's very bonie ! 

' O, happy be the woodbine bower, 

Nae nightly bogle make it eerie ! 
Nor ever sorrow stain the hour. 

The place and time I met my dearie ! 
Her head upon my throbbing breast. 

She, sinking, said: — "I'm thine for ever!' 
While monie a kiss the seal imprest — 

The sacred vow we ne'er should sever.' 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



131 



The haunt o' Spring's the primrose- brae, 

The Summer joys the flocks to follow. 
How cheery thro' her short'ning day, 

Is Autumn in her weeds o' yellow ; 
But can they melt the glowing heart, 

Or chain the soul in speechless pleasure? 
Or thro' each nerve the rapture dart. 

Like meeting her, our bosom's treasure? 



No. 144. I feed a man at Martinmas. 

Tune: O can ye labour lea. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 394. 



m « — : — m —K. 



KK^ 



^ 



i 



Chorus. O can ye 

I 



^B5 



la • bor lea, young man, O, can ye 



^ 



^^_E^^ 



la - bor 

Fine. 



:?z=i 



lea} It fee nor bountiih shall us twine Gin ye can labor lea. 



:t 



^?=^=tE: 






fc 



1 fee'd a man at Mar - tin - mas Wi' airle pen - nies 

D.C. 



m 



»-=—•-: 1 J-; — I — J—-* \— 



I^h- 



three : But a' the faut I had to him, He could na la - bor lea. 

Chorus. O, can ye labor lea, young man, 
O, can ye labor lea ? 
It fee nor bountith shall us twine 
Gin ye can labor lea. 
I fee'd a man at Martinmas 

Wi' airle pennies three ; 
But a' the faut I had to him 

He could na labor lea. 
O, clappin 's gude in Febarwar, 

An' kissin 's sweet in May ; 
But my delight's the ploughman lad 

That weel can labor lea. 
O, kissin is the key o' luve, 

An' clappin is the lock ; 
An' makin o's the best thing yet 
That e'er a young thing got ! 
K 2 



132 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No, 145. As down the btirn they took their way. 

Tune : Down the burn, Davie. Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 50. 
Moderate time 



M^g^^g^H E^^^:^^^ 



As down the burn they took their way, And thro' the flower - y 



ifete 



■s±. 



;=?nE=& 



^^^^33 



-9- ~^-m- 
dale ; His cheek to hers he aft did lay, And love was ay the 



i 



i^i^^i^^^^ 



i 



tale. With : — ' Mary, when shall we re-turn, Sic pleasure to re 
tr 



*fc 






^^gfeg^^ 



eizz^t 



-g-^- 



new?' Quoth Mary:-' Love, I like the burn, And ay shall fol - low you.' 

As down the burn they took their way, 

And thro' the flowery dale; 
His cheek to hers he aft did lay, 

And love was ay the tale, 
With: — 'Mary, when shall we return. 

Sic pleasure to renew ? ' 
Quoth Mary : — ' Love, I like the burn, 

And ay shall follow you.' 



No. 146. O, were my love yon lilac fair. 

Tune : Gin niy love were yon red rose. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 562. 
Smoothly 



S35: 



— « 1 ^4=«— * — 9 — ^— J— * — 1 1^— ' 1 ^ 



\.-& 



O were my love yon li - lac fair Wi' pur-ple blossoms to the spring. And 



:fi- 



:^^: 



^zdE ^i — ^ 



P£S^ 



I a bird to shel - ter there, When wearied on my lit - tie wing. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



133 



O, WERE my love yon lilac fair 
Wi' purple blossoms to the spring, 

And I a bird to shelter there, 

When wearied on my little wing, 

How I wad mourn when it was torn 
By autumn wild and winter rude ! 

But I wad sing on wanton wing, 

When youthfu' May its bloom renew'd. 

[O, gin my love were yon red rose, 
That growls upon the castle wa', 

And I mysel a drap o' dew 
Into her bonie breast to fa', 

O, there, beyond expression blest, 
I'd feast on beauty a' the night, 

Seal'd on her silk-saft faulds to rest, 
Till fley'd awa' by Phoebus' light.] 



No. 147. Simmer's a pleasant time. 

Napier's Scots Songs, 1790, i. p. 61. 



Tune : Ay, waukin, O, 

Slow 



I ^E^g^^^^EgE^^pgggg 



CuORVS. Ay, wau- kin, O, Wau-kin siill and wear-iel Sleep I can get nane 



Fi7te. 
r7\ 



^fe^P^ EgE pEJ^Eg^-rJEgEgEpEJE ^Eg^gEl 



For think-in^ on my dearie. Simmer 's a pleasant time : Flowers of ev'ry 



^^ii^^^ 



D.C. 



-/=i — It — ^ 



^=i^: 



colour; The water rins o'er the heugh, And I long for my true lov - er. 



Chorus. Ay, waukin, O. 

Waukin still and wearie ! 
Sleep I can get nane 
For thinking on my dearie. 

Simmer's a pleasant time; 

Flowers of ev'ry colour ; 
The water rins o'er the heugh. 

And I long for my true lover. 



When I sleep I dream. 
When I wauk I'm eerie, 

Sleep I can get nane 

For thinking on my dearie. 

• Lanely night comes on, 
A' the lave are sleepin, 

I think on my bonie lad. 
And I blear my een wi' greetin. 



134 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 148. Go, fetch to me a pint d wine. 

Tune: The secret kiss. Scots Musical Mt^seum, 1790, No. 231. 

Gracefully 



^gp^=3Eg^^ 



-T-*- 



-i-9 — •*- 



HS 



Go, fetch to me a pint o' wine, And fill it in a sil - 

tr n\ 






ver tas-sie, That I may drink be - fore I go A ser-vice to 
^ ' tr rr\ 



^f pEJ^^E^ ^^ 



SeSe 



i 



:^: 



my bo - nie las-sie! The boat rocks . at the pier o' 

ir ^T\ 



IP 



S^^ 



=!: 



:g=pi 



SS^f 



:v=5^ 



^^ 



Leith, Fu' loud the wind blaws frae the fer - ry, The ship rides by 

tr 



/-= 



-9 — *"CI 



a^ 



^^m 



t^±=t=^ 



-*-• 



the Bar - wick - Law, And I maun leave . my bo - nie Ma-ry. 



Go, fetch to me a pint o' wine, 

And fill it in a silver tassie, 
That I may drink before I go 

A service to my bonie lassie ! 
The boat rocks at the pier o' Leith, 

Fu' loud the wind blaws frae the ferry, 
The ship rides by the Berwick-law, 

And I maun leave my bonie Mary. 

The trumpets sound, the banners fly. 

The glittering spears are ranked ready, 
The shouts o' war are heard afar, 

The battle closes deep and bloody, 
It 's not the roar o' sea or shore 

Wad mak me langer wish to tarry, 
Nor shouts o' war that 's heard afar — 

It 's leaving thee, my bonie Mary ! 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



135 



No. 149. Young yamie, pride of a the plam. 

Tune : The carlin o' the glen. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 420. 

With gravity 



KB^ 



^^^ 



e35£^ 



^^to 



^ 



Young Ja - mie, pride of a' the plain, Sae gal - lant 



^^^^^ 



^^ifcS^g 



and sae gay a swain, Thro' a' our las - sies he 



^^^S^Se^^^S 



did rove, And reign'd re - sist - less king of love. 



"^^^^^ mm^ ^s^^B^^ 



But now, wi' sighs and start - ing tears. He 



strays 




rock - y caves, His sad com - plain - ing dow - ie raves ; 



Young Jamie, pride of a' the plain, 
Sae gallant and sae gay a swain, 
Thro' a* our lassies he did rove, 
And reign'd resistless king of love. 
But now, wi' sighs and starting tears. 
He straj's amang the woods and breers ; 
Or in the glens and rocky caves. 
His sad complaining dowie raves : — 

* I, wha sae late did range and rove. 
And chang'd with every moon my love ; 
I little thought the time was near 
Repentance I should buy sae dear : 
The slighted maids my torments see, 
And laugh at a' the pangs I dree ; 
While she, my cruel, scornfu' fair, 
Forbids me e'er to see her mair ! ' 



136 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 150. Hee balou, viy sweet wee Do7iald. 

Tune: The highland balou. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 472. 
Very slow 



^S^^^ - ^^-:^^g^.S% EgE| 



Heeba-lou, my sweet wee Donald, Pic-tureo' the great Clanronald ! 



%E g ::3 .^^=^-J ^iE^ P^^^ 



Braw - lie kens our wan - ton chief Wha gat my young Highland thief. 



Hee balou, my sweet wee Donald, 
Picture o' the great Clanronald ! 
Brawlie kens our wanton chief 
Wha gat my young Highland thief. 

Leeze me on thy bonie craigie ! 
An thou live, thou'll steal a naigie. 
Travel the country thro' and thro', 
And bring hame a Carlisle cow. 

Thro' the Lawlands, o'er the Border, 
Weel, my babie, may thou furder, 
Herry the louns o' the laigh countrie, 
Syne to the Highlands hame to me. 



No. 15 1. O, saw ye my dear, my P hilly. 

Tune : When she cam ben she bobbit. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 353 
Slow 



^7 Ci h-^^=P=^ 



EgE^S 



i^ 



^ 



O, saw ye my dear, my Phil-ly? 



O, saw ye my 



^^^^^ 



"^ 



^=^=3=E=^ 



^^- 



^^ 



^ 



:5at 



dear, my Phil - ly? 



r 



t^=^^ 



~-^SE. 



She 's down i' the grove, she 's wi' 



-w — ^r 



i^^ 



^__^ 



a new love, She win -na come hame to her Wil - ly. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



137 



O, SAW ye my dear, my Philly? 
O, saw ye my dear, my Philly? 
She 's down i' the grove, she 's wi' a new love. 

She winna come hame to her Willy. 
What says she my dear, my Philly? 
What says she my dear, my Philly? 
She lets thee to wit she has thee forgot, 

And for ever disowns thee, her Willy. 

O, had I ne'er seen thee, my Philly ! 
O, had I ne'er seen thee, my Philly ! 
As light as the air, and fause as thou 's fair, 
Thou 's broken the heart o' thy Willy. 



No. 152. My luve is like a red, red rose. 

Tune : Major Graham. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 402. 
Moderate time 



'-^ WFf . 



^^^^^^g^P 



My luve is like a red, red rose,That's newly sprung in June: My luve is like 




the me -lo-die that's sweetly play 'din tune. As fair art thou, my bonie lass, 



:t*x=^ 



^^^^^^^m. 



bis 



So deep inluveam I, And I willluve thee still,mydear,Till a' the seas gang dry. 

My luve is like a red, red rose, 

That's newly sprung in June: 
My luve is like the melodie, 

That 's sweetly play'd in tune. 
As fair art thou, my bonie lass. 

So deep in luve am I, 
And I will luve thee still, my dear. 

Till a' the seas gang dry. 

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear, 

And the rocks melt wi' the sun ! 
And I will luve thee still, my dear. 

While the sands o' life shall run. 
And fare-thee-weel, my only luve 

And fare-thee-weel a while ! 
And I will come again, my luve, 

Tho' it were ten thousand mile, 



bis 



138 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 153. The ploughman, he's a bonie lad. 

Tune : The Ploughman. Perth Musical Miscellany., 1786, p. 248. 
Briskly 



i 



w 



fct^s 



:S=S 



ir=fe: 



:^ 



3^=^ 



i 



-m. 



s 



The ploughman he's a bo - nie lad, His mind is ev - er true, jo! 



^^^P^^^^^^5^^ 



His gar-ters knit be - low his knee. His bon-net it is blue, jo. 

-- The ploughman, he 's a bonie lad, 

His mind is ever true, jo ! 
His garters knit below his knee, 
His bonnet it is blue, jo. 

Chorus. Then up wi^t cC , my ploughman lad, 
And hey, my merry ploughtnan ! 
Of a' the trades that I do ken, 
Commend me to the ploughman ! 

I hae been east, I hae been west, 

I hae been at Saint Johnston ; 
The boniest sight that e'er I saw 

Was the ploughman laddie dancin. 

Snaw-white stockins on his legs. 

And siller buckles glancin, 
A gude blue bonnet on his head. 

And O, but he was handsome ! 

Commend me to the barn-yard 

And the corn-mou, man ! 
I never gat my coggie fou 

Till I met wi' the ploughman. 



No. 154. Thou has left me ever, Jamie. 

e : Fee him father, fee him. Bremner's Scots Songs, 1757, p. 6. 
m — m ' g 1— • — m ' ^ —^» — w-^ 



Thou hast left me ev - er, Ja-mie, Thou hast left me ev-er! Thou hast 



i ^^g^gg j ^^^jg^E^iB^ 



left me ev - er, Ja - mie. Thou hast left me ev-er ! Aft - en hast 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



139 



i 



3R 



^m 






-ts F= * — F — I — 



mm 



thou vow'd that death On - ly should us se - ver ; Now thou'st left thy lass for 



^^^^^m 



S5^ 



ay^ I maun see thee never, 

Thou hast left me ever, Jamie, 

Thou hast left me ever ! 
Thou hast left me ever, Jamie, 

Thou hast left me ever ! 
Aften hast thou vow'd that death 

Only should us sever ; 
Now thou'st left thy lass for ay — 

I maun see thee never, Jamie, 
I'll see thee never ! 



Ja - mie, I'll see thee never! 

Thou hast me forsaken, Jamie, 

Thou hast me forsaken ! 
Thou hast me forsaken, Jamie, 

Thou hast me forsaken ! 
Thou canst love another jo, 

While my heart is breaking ; 
Soon my weary een I'll close, 

Never mair to waken, Jamie, 
Never mair to waken 1 



No. 155. Afy heart is sair — / darena tell. 

Tune : For the sake 0' Somebody. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 436. 

Slow 



^ 



^ 



^ 



3gg 



s 



EEe: 



^ 



» — -J — 



^ 



-^- 



My heart is sair— I dare - na tell, — My heart is sair for 






Some - bo - dy ; 

I-i 


1 


could wake a 


win - ter 


night For the 


sake 0' 


\j 1 r> 


^. ___v __ 


SI '^ 


k ^ 


P \ 


-/7V-b-h ■- te ST- 




.... l:^., a 




^-fs — ^. 


__ *--^'£— 


1 


•• ' -^ 


mH=jh=^=fA 


^ 


— •^^-* 


—J- 


=*— f— F^ 


k— 


jS--^- 



Some -bo - dy. 



feS 



O - hon! for 

— N— * 



Some-bo-dy! O - hey! for Some-bo - dy ! 



^^^ 



E=^ 



^^=^ 



I could range the world a - round For the sake o' Some - bo - dy. 



M 



heart is sair — I darena 

tell,— 
My heart is sair for Somebody ; 
could wake a winter night 
For the sake o' Somebody. 

O-hon ! for Somebody ! 

O-hey ! for Somebody ! 
could range the world around 
For the sake o' Somebody, 



Ye Powers that smile on virtuous 
love, 
O, sweetly smile on Somebody ! 
Frae ilka danger keep him free. 
And send me safe my Somebody. 
O-hon ! for Somebody ! 
O-hey ! for Somebody ! 
1 wad do — what wad I not ? — 
For the sake o' Somebody I 



140 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 156. The winter it is past. 

Tune: The winter it is past. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 200. 
Slowly 



^^ aj^^^-^ ggjE^^ 



The win - ter it is past, and the sim - mer comes at last, And the 



^^^^^^^ 



-^^^ 



Im 



small birds sing on ev' - ry tree : The hearts of these are glad. 



^^^^^ii^^g 



but mine is ve - ry sad, For my lo - ver has part - ed from me 

The winter it is past, and the simmer comes at last, 

And the small birds sing on ev'ry tree : 
The hearts of these are glad, but mine is very sad, 

For my lover has parted from me. 

The rose upon the brier by the waters running clear 

May have charms for the linnet or the bee : 
Their little loves are blest, and their little hearts at rest, 

But my lover is parted from me. 

[My love is like the sun in the firmament does run — 

For ever constant and true ; 
But his is like the moon, that wanders up and down 

And every month it is new. 

All you that are in love, and cannot it remove, 

I pity the pains you endure, 
For experience makes me know that your hearts are full of woe, 

A woe that no mortal can cure.] 



No. 157. Coinin thro the rye, poor body. 

Tune: Miller's wedding. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 417. 
Slow 



'^m^^^^^^^ ^E ^E^^m 



Com - in thro' the rye, poor bo - dy, Com - in thro' the rye, She 






3^^^ 



draigl't a' her pet - ti - coa - tie, Com -in thro' the rye! 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



141 



pip 



■^=3. 



=P^=?5 






:SE 



^^SB 



Chorus. 


0, 


9- 


Jeti-ny V 


a' 


weet poor bo - dy 

-n^ — f^ — ^fe-i 


Jen-ny''s sel-dom dry; She 


m ^ — 


^ 


_.h;r-^* _ 


\A- 


i^ . _a^ ._ *. 


— fe-t^— ^— fe^^v-^ 










«y 






k* 









draze'ri a' ^er 



/z' - roa - tie, Com-in thro' the rye! 



CoMiN thro' the rye, poor body, 

Comin thro' the rye, 
She draigl't a' her petticoatie, 

Comin thro' the rye ! 

Chorus. O, Jenny '5 a' wcet, poor body, 
Jenny 's seldotn dry ; 
She draigVta' her petticoatie, 
Comin thro' the rye ! 



Gin a body meet a body 
Comin thro' the rye ; 

Gin a body kiss a body 
Need a body cry ? 

Gin a body meet a body 
Comin thro' the glen ; 

Gin a body kiss a body 
Need the warld ken ? 



Tune : Wae is my heart. 
Slow tr 



No. 158. Wae is my heart. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 476. 



XT' "—^—-dS- 



^^ 



S 



3^S 



Wae is my heart, and the tear's in my e'e ; Lang, lang joy's been a 



i^^ii^^gi^ii^S 



stran-ger to me: For - saken and friend - less my bur - den I 



i^^is 



S! 



na 



S=S=feE 



bear, And the sweet voice o' 



E^^Eg- 



pi - ty ne'er sounds in my ( 

Wae is my heart, and the tear 's in my e'e ; 
Lang, lang joy 's been a stranger to me : 
Forsaken and friendless my burden I bear. 
And the sweet voice o' pity ne'er sounds in my ear. 

Love, thou hast pleasures-^and deep hae I luv'd ! 
Love, thou hast sorrows — and sair hae I pruv'd ! 
But this bruised heart that now bleeds in my breast, 
I can feel by its throbbings, will soon be at rest. 

O, if I were where happy I hae been, 

Down by yon stream and yon bonie castle-green ! 

For there he is wand'ring and musing on me, 

Wha wad soon dry the tear-drop that clings to my e'e. 



142 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 159. O lassie, are ye sleepin yet? 

Tune : Will ye lend me your loom, lass? Cal. Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. p. 21. 

Slowly 



Slowly ^ pi I 



Chorus. O, let me in this ae nighty This ae, ae, 

^M=^_^_, — _ - n . ^ 0-^. — ^- 



r^ 



fe^Jg^S^^^^g^gg 



ae night, O, let fne in this ae night, I'll 

Fine. 



;r^l^E^§^ 



^- 



come back a - gain, jo. O las - sie, are ye sleep - in yet, 



^ 



jm. — m — «--^ *— • 



'^^^s^ 



Or are ye waukin, I wad wit? For love has bound me 

3^ 



:i^^ 



ii 



f~^- 



s 



hand an' fit, And I would fain be 



in, jo. 



Chorus. O, let me in this ae night, 
This ae, ae, ae night ; 
O, let me in this ae night, 
ril no come back again, jo ! 

O LASSIE, are ye sleepin yet, 
Or are ye waukin, I wad wit? 
For love has bound me hand an' fit, 
And I would fain be in, jo. 

O, hear'st thou not the wind an' weet? 
Nae star blinks thro' the driving sleet ; 
Tak pity on my weary feet, 

And shield me frae the rain, jo. 

The bitter blast that round me blaws. 
Unheeded howls, unheeded fa's : 
The cauldness o' thy heart's the cause 
Of a' my grief and pine, jo. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



143 



HER ANSWER. 

Chorus. / tell you now this ae nighty 
This ae, ae, ae flight, 
And ance for a' this ae night, 
I winna let ye in, jo. 

O, tell na me o' wind an' rain, 
Upbraid na me wi' cauld disdain, 
Gae back the gate ye cam again, 
I winna let you in, jo. 

The snellest blast at mirkest hours, 
That round the pathless wand'rer pours. 
Is nocht to what poor she endures 
That's trusted faithless man, jo. 

The sweetest flower that deck'd the mead. 
Now trodden like the vilest weed — 
Let simple maid the lesson read 
The weird may be her ain, jo. 

The bird that charm'd his summer day. 
And now^ the cruel fowler's prey ; 
Let that to witless woman say 
'The gratefu' heart of man,' jo. 



No. 1 60. Will ye go to the Highlaiids, Leezie Lindsay ? 

Tune : Leezie Lindsay. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 434. 
Moderately 



I 



5^?^^S^ 



^ 



:^ 



±di 






Will ye go to the Highlands, Leezie Lind-say? Will ye 



g^^ 



g^'F3=#^^ 



to the High -lands wi' nie? Will ye go to the High- 



^^ 



^ 



lands, Lee zie Lind-say, My pride and my dar - ling to 

Will ye go to the Highlands, Leezie Lindsay? 

Will ye go to the Highlands wi' me? 
Will ye go to the Highlands, Leezie Lindsay, 

My pride and my darling to be. 



be? 



144 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 1 6 1. 'Twas past one o clock. 

Tune : Cold frosty morning. M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, c. 1766, p. 119. 

Siiicoihly 



^^liSS^^^^^^^ 



'Twas past one o' - clock in a cauld fros - ty morn ing When 






s 



can-kert No - vem - ber blaws o-ver the plain, I heard the kirk 






:ab 



bell re - peat the loud warn-ing, As rest - less I sought 

ir - , ^— tr 



^gjl^ ^j^i 



-«^^- 



ii 



for sweet slum - ber in vain : Then up I a - rose, the sil - ver 



^S^^^^^^^ 



moon shining bright ; Moun-tains and val - lies ap - pear - ing all 



'rk 



'^^^^=r^i 



^^^pt^^^S-^gE^fel^^^ 



hoary white ; Forth I would 



id the pale, 



£3: 



g^]^3^E^E^ 



^ 



si - lent night, To vis - it the fair one, the cause of my pain. 



'TwAS past one o'clock in a cauld frosty morning 
When cankert November blaws over the plain, 

I heard the kirk-bell repeat the loud warning 
As restless I sought for sweet slumber in vain : 

Then up I arose, the silver moon shining bright, 

Mountains and vallies appearing all hoary white ; 

Forth I would go amid the pale, silent night, 
To visit the fair one, the cause of my pain. 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



145 



Sae gently I staw to my lovely maid's chamber, 

And rapp'd at her window, low down on my knee, 
Begging that she would awauk from sweet slumber, 

Awauk from sweet slumber and pity me : 
For, that a stranger to a' pleasure, peace and rest. 
Love into madness had fir6d my tortur'd breast, 
And that I should be of a' men the maist unblest, 
Unless she would pity my sad miserie ! 

My true love arose and whispered to me — 

(The moon looked in and envy'd my love's charms ; — ) 

' An innocent maiden, ah, would you undo me ! ' 
I made no reply, but leapt into her arms : 

Bright Phoebus peep'd over the hills and found me there ; 

As he has done, now, seven lang years and mair, 

A faithfuller, constanter, kinder, more loving pair, 
His sweet chearing beam nor enlightens nor warms. 



No. 162. Jockie 's taen the parting kiss. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 570. 



Tune : Bonie lass tak a man 
Poi7itedly 



S 



3: 



i^^%^-S^ 



=P2: 



Jockie 's taen the part - ing kiss, O'er the moun-tains be is gane, And 



—I ■— =^ — • — ri-^ — ' ="" ^'=*- 



^ 



with him is 



f^^ 



i 



my bliss — Nought but griefs with me 



-e>- 

re-main. 



^^^^mmm 



-^^ 



Spare my luve ye winds that blaw, Plashy sleets and beat-ing rain ! Spare 



g^^^i^^j^^^^ 



my luve thou feath - ery snaw, Drift-ing o'er the fro-zen plain! 

When the shades of evening creep 

O'er the day's fair gladsome e'e, 
Sound and safely may he sleep, 

Sweetly blythe his waukening be! 
He will think on her he loves — • 

Fondly he'll repeat her name. 
For where'er he distant roves, 

Jockie's heart is still at hame. 



Jockie 's taen the parting kiss, 

O'er the mountains he is gane. 
And with him is a' my bliss — 

Nought but griefs with me remain. 
Spare my luve ye winds that blaw, 

Plashy sleets and beating rain ! 
Spare my luve thou feathery snaw. 

Drifting o'er the frozen plain ! 



146 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 163. As I was walking iip the street. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 597. 



Tune : Molly '5 meek, Mally 's sweet. 
Gracefully 



c 


HORUS Mally 's meek. 


Mally ' J sweety Mally 's mo - desi and dii 
Fine. 


^-creet, Mally "s 




?=*=^^'=J= 


— V* ^ d . ^ 1 ^ N;- 


E2 





rare, Mally 'j fair, Mally V ev'ry way coni-plete. As I was walk - 



g^^lj^^^^^ 




the road was ve - ry hard For that fair mai-den's ten • der feet 



Chorus. Mally 's meek, Mally 's sweet, 
Mally'' s modest and discreet,, 
Mally '5 rare, Mally '5 fair, 
Mally' s ev'ry way com.plete. 

As I was walking up the street, 
A barefit maid I chanc'd to meet ; 

But O, the road was very hard 
For that fair maiden's tender feet ! 

It were mair meet that those fine feet 
Were weel lac'd up in silken shoon ! 

An' 'twere more fit that she should sit 
Within yon chariot gilt aboon ! 

Her yellow hair, beyond compare, 

Comes trinklin down her swan-white neck, 

And her two eyes like stars in skies, 
Would keep a sinking ship frae wreck. 



No. 164. Is this thy plighted, fond regard? 

Tune : Ruffian's rant (see infra). 

Chorus. Canst thou leave nie thus, my Katie ! 
Canst thou leave me thus, my Katie! 
Well thou know''st my aching heart. 
And canst thou leave me thus for pity ? 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



147 



Is this thy plighted, fond regard, 
Thus cruelly to part, my Katie? 

Is this thy faithful swain's reward — 
An aching broken heart, my Katie ? 

Farewell ! and ne'er such sorrows tear 
That fickle heart of thine, my Katie ! 

Thou may'st find those will love thee dear. 
But not a love like mine, my Katie ! 



No. 165. There was a bonie lass. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 586. 



Tune : A bonie lass. 
Briskly 



Ih^e^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ 



=s: 



There was a bon - ie lass, and a bon - ie, bon - ie lass, And 



* 



i^^ 



^ 



t=*; 



^ 



she lo'ed her bon - ie lad - die dear ; 



Tm 



war's loud 



^^^^^^^s^^^ 



^ 



a - larms tore her lad - die frae her arms Wi' 



i S3^^n-p^ - 



t^ 



:^=t^ 



ztz*: 



sigh and a tear. O - ver sea, o-ver shore, where the cannons loudly 



ig ^EJ^g^j^Egg 



=t^=^=*= 



roar, He still was a stranger to fear. And nocht could him quail, or his 



^^gg^E^-g ^ ^J^ g^ 



bo - som as - sail, But the bon - ie lass he lo'ed sae dear. 

There was a bonie lass, and a bonie, bonie lass, 

And she lo'ed her bonie laddie dear, 
Till war's loud alarms tore her laddie frae her arms 

Wi' monie a sigh and a tear. 
Over sea, over shore, where the cannons loudly roar, 

He still was a stranger to fear. 
And nocht could him quail, or his bosom assail, 

But the bonie lass he lo'ed sae dear. 

L 2 



148 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 166. As late by a sodger I chanced to pass. 

Tune : /'// mak yon he fain to follow me. Scots Mus, Museum, 1790, No. 268. 






S^i^ 



s^ 



- N — ?S — V ^-3 — V—-^ — p — h 



yi- 



As late by a sodg-er I chanced to pass, I heard him a courtin 



ife^^^^^^^^ 



^^ 



-4V-^ 



p^ 



a bon - ie young lass ;' My hin - ny, my life, my dear-est,' quo' he, 'I'll 






^ 



mak you be fain to fol - low me.' 'Gin I should fol - low you a poor 



i 



itf?=^ 



^^^ 



^^V 



i^^S 



-^i^^ 



£ 



=5^=^ 



^Efc 



sodger lad, Ilk ane o' my cummers wad think I was mad : For battles I nev- 



^EP 



B 






er shall lang- to see, I'll nev - er be fain to fol - low thee.' 



As late by a sodger I chanced to pass, 
1 heard him a courtin a bonie young lass, 
' My hinny, my life, my dearest,' quo' he, 
' I'll mak you be fain to follow me.' 
'Gin I should follow you a poor sodger lad 
Ilk ane o' my cummers wad think I was mad. 
For battles I never shall lang to see, 
I'll never be fain to follow thee.' 

'To follow me, I think ye may be glad, 
A part o' my supper, a part o' my bed, 
A part o' my bed, wherever it be, 
I'll mak ye be fain to follow me. 
Come try my knapsack on your back, 
Alang the king's highgate we'll pack, 
Between Saint Johnston and bonie Dundee, 
I'll mak you be fain to follow me.' 



II. LOVE : GENERAL 



149 



No. 167. O dear min7iy, what shall I do? 

Tune : O dear minny. Ancient MS. (Stenhouse's ///.). 
Moderate time 



P^ 



fe^ 



^^=^3^=g:^3 



Chorus. O dear min ■ Jty, what shall I do} O dear min - 7iy, 



m^m^m 



what shall I do} O dear min - ny, what shall I do } 

Fine. 



i 



e 



i 



^ Daft things doylt thing, do as I do.'' If I be black, I 
-#»-* . . ^-ft- 



g^ 



g 



:g 



can-nabe lo'ed; If I be fair I can-na be gude ; If I be 

D.C. 



^ 



g 



^^^m 



w 



lord-ly, the lads will look by me : O dear min - ny, what shall I do ? 

Chorus. O dear fninny, what shall I do ? 
O dear minny, what shall I do ? 
O dear minny, what shall I do ? 
'Daft thing, doylt thing, do as I do.' 

If I be black, I canna be lo'ed ; 

If I be fair I canna be gude ; 

If I be lordly, the lads will look by me : 

O dear minny, what shall I do ? 




I50 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



III. LOVE— HUMOROUS. 



No. 1 68. Here's to thy health, my bonie lass! 



Tune : Laggan burn. 

Briskly 



Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 495. 



^^^^^^^^^^ 



Here's to thy health, my bonie lass ; Gude night and joy be \vi' thee; 



-9- -m- • -m-^ 



I'll come nae mair to thy bower-door To tell thee that I lo'e thee. 

=3^ 



—a graj — 1 7-^, — * — I 6 



zg:nw- 



-^-^ 



# 



:r^: 



O, din - na think, my pret - ty pink, But I can live with - out 






thee: 



vow and swear I din - na care How lang ye look a - bout ye ! 

Here 's to thy health, my bonie lass ! 

Gude night and joy be wi' thee ; 
I'll come nae mair to thy bower-door 

To tell thee that I lo'e thee. 
O, dinna think, my pretty pink, 

But I can live without thee : 
I vow and swear I dinna care 

How lang ye look about ye ! 

Thou 'rt ay sae free informing me 

Thou hast nae mind to marry, 
I'll be as free informing thee 

Nae time hae I to tarry. 
I ken thy freeiis try ilka means 

Frae wedlock to delay thee — 
Depending on some higher chance, — 

But fortune may betray thee. 

I ken they scorn my low estate, 

But that does never grieve me, 
For I'm as free as any he, — 

Sma' siller will relieve me ! 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



151 



I'll count my health my greatest wealth 

Sae lang as I'll enjoy it : 
I'll fear nae scant, I'll bode nae want 

As lang's I get employment. 

But far off fowls hae feathers fair, 

And ay until ye try them, 
Tho' they seem fair, still have a care — 

They may prove as bad as I am ! 
But at twel at night, when the moon shines bright, 

My dear, I'll come and see thee. 
For the man that loves his mistress weel, 

Nae travel makes him weary. 



No. 169. The tay lor fell thro the bed. 

Tune : I rede ye beware o' the ripells young man. Scots M. M., 1790, No. 212. 
Cheerily 




^^^^=P=feg^^^ 



The tay - lor fell thro' the bed, thirn-ble an' a', The tay - lor 



|s=^ 



U—^^^ 



s 



-J^ 



i^E 



fell thro' the bed, thim - ble an' a' ; The blankets were thin, and 



^"^ 



—f—m- 



the sheets they were sma', The tay - lor fell thro' the bed, thim-ble an' a' ! 

The taylor fell thro' the bed, thimble an' a'. 

The taylor fell thro' the bed, thimble an' a'. 

The blankets were thin, and the sheets they were sma', — ■ 

The taylor fell thro' the bed, thimble an' a' ! 

The sleepy bit lassie, she dreaded nae ill, 

The sleepy bit lassie, she dreaded nae ill ; 

The weather was cauld, and the lassie lay still ; 

She thought that a taylor could do her nae ill ! 

Gie me the groat again, cannie young man ! 

Gie me the groat again, cannie young man ! 

The day it is short, and the night it is lang — 

The dearest siller that ever I wan ! 

There 's somebody weary wi' lying her lane. 

There 's somebody weary wi' lying her lane, 

There 's some that are dowie, I trow wad be fain 

To see the bit taylor come skippin again. 



152 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 1 70. O, merry hae I been teethin a heckle. 



Tune : Lord Breadalbine' s March. 
Brisk 



Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 270. 



-^ 



E^SEElE5^zJM=^^ 



3^^ 



S^l=^^^=itt^ 



^^-^ 



O, met - ry hae I been teeth - in a heckle, An' mer - ry 



^^S^^g^^i^ 



hae I been shap-in a spoon ; O, mer -ry hae I been clout -in 



53^^ 



:^ 



^ 



N-i — 1^ . 



4^ 



e 



^^* 



a kettle. An' kiss - in my Ka - tie when a' was done. 



tdv 



gJ^ES^-ggg ^^^ g^^Eg 



O, a' the lang day I ca' at my ham-mer, An' a' the lang 



^'=P^^^^ 



^g!^S^^=^ElES=iES=^ 



day I whis - tie and sing ; O, a' the lang night I cud - die 

F> _ ^ 



;^^=S 



^=i= 



^ 



^^E^E:^ 



my kim - mer, An' a' the lang night as hap - py's a king! 

O, BiERRY hae I been teethin a heckle, 

An' merry hae I been shapin a spoon ; 
O, merry hae I been cloutin a kettle, 

An' kissin my Katie when a' was done. 
O, a' the lang day I ca' at my hammer, 

An' a' the lang day I whistle and sing ; 
O, a' the lang night I cuddle my kimmer, 

An' a' the lang night as happy 's a king ! 

Bitter in dool, I lickit my winnins 

O' marrying Bess, to gie her a slave : 
Blest be the hour she cool'd in her linens, 

And blythe be the bird that sings on her grave ! 
Come to my arms, my Katie, my Katie, 

An' come to my arms, and kiss me again ! 
Drucken or sober, here's to thee, Katie, 

An' blest be the day I did it again ! 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



153 



No. 171. My lord a- hunting he is gane. 

Tune : My lady's gown. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 554. 
Brisk 



U # ilrisk 



Chorus. My lady's gown, there' sgairs upon't, And gowden flowers sae rare tipon't; 
-||-_ V w V ^ Pine. 






But Jenny's jimps andjir -kin- et, My lord thinks meikle mair up-on't. 



My lord a-hunt - ing he is gane, But hounds or hawks wi' him are nane; 



-^- 



By Colin's cot - tage lies his game, If Colin's Jen-ny be at hame. 

Chorus. My lady's gown, there's gairs upon't. 
And gowden flowers sae rare upon't; 
But Jenny's jimps and jirkinet, 
My lord thinks meikle mair upon't. 

My lord a-hunting he is gane, 

But hounds or hawks wi' him are nane ; 

By Colin's cottage lies his game, 

If Colin's Jenny be at hame. 

My lady's white, my lady's red, 
And kith and kin o' Cassillis' blude ; 
But her ten-pund lands o' tocher gude 
Were a' the charms his lordship lo'ed. 
Out o'er yon muir, out o'er yon moss, 
Whare gor-cocks thro' the heather pass, 
There wons auld Colin's bonie lass, 
A lily in a wilderness. 

Sae sweetly move her genty limbs. 
Like music-notes o' lovers' hymns : 
The diamond-dew in her een sae blue, 
Where laughing love sae wanton swims. 

My lady 's dink, my lady 's drest. 
The flower and fancy o' the west ; 
But the lassie that a man lo'es best, 
O, that 's the lass to mak him blest ! 



154 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 172. The heather was blooming. 

Tune : The Tailor s March. 




-^ « «-— -ta — * -m—. \— \ 1 — ^ ai-i-r 



t-H 



^ 



The heather was blooming, the meadows were raawn, Our lads gaed 



6^*i^^^^^^^^i^ 



a - hunt - ing ae day at the dawn, O'er moors and o'er moss - es and 



:g^^=&El=^^^fe^i 



mon - ie a glen ; At length they dis - cov - er'd a bon - ie moor-hen. 



m 



E^: 



^^^ 



:I^=?^ 



g3:^^j^^^E§E$EP^^-^iE^^vEg:i 



3^ 



Chorus. / rede yon, be-ware ai the hitnt-ing young inen ! I rede you be 



#4^ 


3=fe 


fK 

--^=i-- 


=fc=|; 


^^^ 







ware at the himting, young men ! Take some on the wing, and 



ii^^^^gzpE^g^l 



some as they spring. But cati - Jii - ly steal on a bo7t-ie moor-hen. 

The heather was blooming, the meadows were mawn, 
Our lads gaed a-hunting ae day at the dawn, 
O'er moors and o'er mosses and monie a glen ; 
At length they discover'd a bonie moor-hen. 

Chorus. / rede you, beware at the hunting, young men ' 
I rede you, beware at the hunting, young men I 
Take some on the wing, and some as they spring, 
But cannily steal on a bonie moor-hen. 

Sweet-brushing the dew from the brown heather bells, 
Her colours betrayed her on yon mossy fells ; 
Her plumage outlustred the pride o' the spring, 
And O ! as she wanton'd sae gay on the wing, 

Auld Phoebus himsel, as he peeped o'er the hill, 

In spite at her plumage he tried his skill ; 

He levell'd his rays where she bask'd on the brae — 

His rays were outshone, and but mark'd where she laj^ 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



155 



They hunted the valley, they hunted the hill, 
The best of our lads wi' the best o' their skill ; 
But still as the fairest she sat in their sight. 
Then, whirr ! she was over, a mile at a flight. 



No. 173. Weary fa you, Duncan Gray. 

(old words.) 

Tune : Durtcan Gray. Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1751, iii. p. 8. 

Moderately tr 



^i^^ SE^S=3£ fegg^ 



^ 



g 



Wea - ry fa' you, Dun -can Gray! Ha, ha, the gird- in o't! Wae 
tr 



i^p^=g^g=^^g^^ Ep^i^ 



■^- 



gae by you, Dun-can Gray ! Ha, ha, the gird - in o't ! When a' the 



i 



I ^-.^ 



=i^ 



E^^ 



E^^^* 



lave gae to their play, Then I maun sit the lee - lang day. And 



^^^^i^l^ig 



jeeg the era - die wi' my tae, and a' for the gird - in o't ! 



Weary fa' you, Duncan Gray ! 

Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
Wae gae by you, Duncan Gray ! 

Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
When a' the lave gae to their play. 
Then I maun sit the lee-lang day. 
And jeeg the cradle wi' my tae, 

And a' for the girdin o't ! 



Bonie was the Lammas moon — 

Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
Glowrin a' the hills aboon, — 

Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
The girdin brak, the beast cam down, 
I tint my curch and baith my shoon, 
And, Duncan, ye're an unco loun — 
Wae on the bad girdin o't ! 



But Duncan, gin ye'll keep your aith, 

Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
I'se bless you wi' my hindmost breath, 

Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
Duncan, gin ye'll keep your aith. 
The beast again can bear us baith. 
And auld Mess John will mend the skaith 

And clout the bad girdin o't. 



156 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

No. 174. Wi braiv new branks hi meikle pinde. 

(Tune unknown.) 
Wi' braw new branks in meikle pride, 

And eke a braw new brechan, 
My Pegasus I'm got astride, 

And up Parnassus pechin ; 
Whiles owre a bush wi' downward crush 

The doited beastie stammers ; 
Then up he gets, and off he sets 

For sake o' Willie Chalmers. 

I doubt na, lass, that weel-kenn'd name 

May cost a pair o' blushes ; 
I am nae stranger to your fame, 

Nor his warm-urged wishes : 
Your bonie face, sae mild and sweet, 

His honest heart enamours ; 
And faith ! ye'll no be lost a whit, 

Tho' wair'd on Willie Chalmers. 

Auld Truth hersel might swear ye're fair, 

And Honor safely back her ; 
And Modesty assume your air. 

And ne'er a ane mistak her : 
And sic twa love-inspiring een 

Might fire even holy palmers ; 
Nae wonder then they've fatal been 

To honest Willie Chalmers. 

I doubt na Fortune may you shore 

Some mim-mou'd, pouther'd priestie, 
Fu' lifted up wi' Hebrew lore, 

And band upon his breastie : 
But O, what signifies to you 

His lexicons and grammars ? 
The feeling heart 's the royal blue, 

And that 's wi' Willie Chalmers. 

Some gapin, glowrin countra laird 

May vsrarsle for your favour ; 
May claw his lug, and straik his beard. 

And hoast iip some palaver. 
My bonie maid, before ye wed 

Sic clumsy-witted hammers. 
Seek Heaven for help, and barefit skelp 

Awa' wi' Willie Chalmers. 

Forgive the Bard ! my fond regard 

For ane that shares my bosom 
Inspires my Muse to gie'm his dues. 

For deil a hair I roose him. 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



157 



May powers aboon unite you soon, 
And fructify your amours, 

And every year come in mair dear 
To you and Willie Chalmers ! 



No. 175. / am my mammy s ae bairn. 

Tune : Ftn d'e^- young to marry yet. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 107. 

Gaily 



'-^^^^^^^^^^m 



I am my mammy's ae bairn, Wi' un - co folk I wea-ry, sir, 



P^^^E^iEpI^^^^ 



And ly - ing in a man's bed, I'm fley'd it male me eer - ie, sir. 



^^^=i^ 



EE- 



W^ 



:U;i=^=t^^ 



^~ 



1^=^ 



Chorus. Vm o'er youngs rm o'er youngs Fnt o'er yoimg to mar-ry yet! 



t 



i^^^^^^^ 



^^=^ 



Vm o^er young, ^twad be a sin 7'o tak me /rae my tna?nmy yet. 

I AM my mammy's ae bairn, 

Wi' unco folk I weary, sir, 
And lying in a man's bed, 

I'm fley'd it mak me eerie, sir. 

Chorus. Fm o'er youngs Ftn o^er young, 
Vm o'er young to marry yet I 
Fm. o'er young, 'twad be a sin 
To tak me frae my mammy yet. 

Hallowmas is come and gane. 

The nights are lang in winter, sir ; 

And you an' I in ae bed — 

In trowth, I dare na venture, sir. 

Fu' loud and shill the frosty wind 
Blaws thro' the leafless timmer, sir, 

But if ye come this gate again, 
I'll aulder be gin simmer, sir. 



158 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 1 76. There was a /ass, they cad hei'- Meg. 

Tune : Ye' II ay be welcome hack again. Bremner's Scots Reels, 1759, p. 56. 
Merrily 






There was a lass, they ca'd her Meg, And she held o'er the moors to spin ; 






There 


was 
tr 


a 


lad that fol-low'd her, They ca' 


1 him Dun-can Da - vi - son. 


[# .A 


« 


^ 

™ 


P f • ^ m P 


^ Nk « \. r fe 


-JL- ?— 






* r [/• L> [ 


' i m r 


f0 \z 


"1^ 


Lg 


i L' ' ff y >" 








_^_ 




— ? C- zl ? 



The moor was dreigh, and Meg was skeigh, Her fa -vour Dun - can could - na 
tr tr 



gEgEgEj ^Et^E^^EEgEggliSSE i^Ep 



^^ 



win ; For wi' the rock she wad hira knock, And ay she shook the tem - per - pin. 

There was a lass, they ca'd her Meg, 

And she held o'er the moors to spin ; 
There was a lad that follow'd her, 

They ca'd him Duncan Davison. 
The moor was dreigh, and Meg was skeigh, 

Her favour Duncan couldna win ; 
For wi' the rock she wad him knock, 

And ay she shook the temper-pin. 

■ As o'er the moor they lightly foor, 

A burn was clear, a glen was green ; 
Upon the banks they eas'd their shanks, 

And ay she set the wheel between : 
But Duncan swoor a haly aith, 

That Meg should be a bride the morn ; 
Then Meg took up her spinnin graith, 

And flang them a' out o'er the burn. 

We will big a wee, wee house, 

And we will live like king and queen, 
Sae blythe and merry 's we will be, 

When ye set by the wheel at e'en ! 
A man may drink, and no be drunk ; 

A man may fight, and no be slain ; 
A man may kiss a bonie lass. 

And ay be welcome back again ! 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



159 



No. 177. The blude-red rose at Yule may blaw. 

Tune : To daunton me. Cal. Pocket Companion^ i743> '• P- 16. 

Slow 



m^^ — I— J — m — J N^ ^ I— ^-^^^- 



^==r^ 



fe^g;^^ 



Chorus. To daim - ton me, to daun - ton me. An auld man 

tr 



shall never datin ■ ion me. The blude-red rose at Yule may 



^^^^^^^^^^ 



blaw, The sim - mer lil - lies bloom in snaw, The frost maj' freeze the 



^.^^i^^p^l^f^ 



deep - est sea ; But an auld man shall nev - er daun - ton me. 



Chorus. 



To daunton me., to daunton me, 

An auld man shall never daunton me. 



bis 



The blude-red rose at Yule may bla-w, 
The simmer lilies bloom in snaw, 
The frost may freeze the deepest sea, 
But an auld man shall never daunton me. 

To daunton me, and me sae young, 
Wi' his fause heart and flatt'ring tongue : 
That is the thing you ne'er shall see, 
For an auld man shall never daunton me. 

For a' his meal and a' his maut. 
For a' his fresh beef and his saut. 
For a' his gold and white monie. 
An auld man shall never daunton me. 

His gear may buy him kye and yowes. 
His gear may buy him glens and knowes ; 
But me he shall not buy nor fee, 
For an auld man shall never daunton me. 

He hirples twa fauld as he dow, 
Wi' his teethless gab and his auld held pow, 
And the rain rains down frae his red blear'd e'e- 
That auld man shall never daunton me. 



i6o 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 178. Her daddie forbad, her minnie forbad. 

Tune : Junipin John. Scots Musical Museuni, 1788, No. 138. 
Brisk 




^^^^i^g^^^iS 



Her dad-die for - bad, her min-nie for-bad ; For-bid-den she wad-na 



be : She wad-na trow't the browst she brew'd Wad taste sae bit - ter - 



:d^ 



She wad-na trow't the browst she brew'd Wad taste sae bit - ter 
Chorus. ^^ 



ES 



^^S^^^ 



lie! The lang lad they ca^ Junipin John BegiiiVd the bo-nie las - sie ! 



j^gl^g^ Ea 



s 






-•^^ 



The lang lad they cd' Jiimpin John BeguiP d the bo-nie las ■ sie! 

Her daddie forbad, her minnie forbad ; 

Forbidden she wadna be : 
She wadna trow't the browst she brew'd 

Wad taste sae bitterlie ! 

Chorus. The lang lad they ca' Junipin John 
BegidVd the bonie lassie ! 
The lang lad they ca'' Jumpin John 
BeguiP d the bonie lassie I 

A cow and a cauf, a yowe and a hauf, 

And thretty gude shillins and three ; 
A vera gude tocher, a cottar- man's dochter, 

The lass wi' the bonie black e'e. 



No. 179. Dtmcan Gray cam here to woo. 

Tune : Duncan Gray (see No. 173). 

Duncan Gray cam here to woo 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 
On blythe yule-night when we were fou 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 
Maggie coost her head fu' high, 
Look'd asklent and unco skeigh, 
Gart poor Duncan stand abeigh — 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! _ 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



i6i 



Duncan fleech'd, and Duncan 
pray'd— 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 
Meg was deaf as Ailsa Craig 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 
Duncan sigh'd baith out and in, 
Grat his een baith bleer't and blin', 
Spak o' lowpin o'er a linn — 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 

Time and chance are but a tide. 
Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 

Slighted love is sair to bide 
Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 

' Shall I, like a fool,' quoth he, 

' For a haughty hizzie die ? 

She may gae to — France for me ! — 
Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 



How it comes, let doctors tell. 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 
Meg grew sick, as he grew hale 

Ha, ha, the wooing o't ! 
Something in her bosom wrings, 
For relief a sigh she brings, 
And O ! her een they spak sic 
things ! — 
Ha, ha, the wooing o't. 

Duncan was a lad o' grace. 
Ha, ha, the wooing o't, 

Maggie's was a piteous case. 
Ha, ha, the wooing o't : 

Duncan couldna be her death. 

Swelling pity smoor'd his wrath ; 

Now they're crouse and canty baith — 
Ha, ha, the wooing o't. 



No. 1 80. Hey the dtisty miller. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 144. 



I 



Tune : Dusty ■miller. 
Quickly 



^^^^^^^^ 



m 



Hey the dus - ty mil - ler And his dus - ty coat ; He will win a 



SEg; 



4-^-^^^^^ 



shil-ling Or he spend a groat : Dus - ty was the coat, Dus - ty 



jfa^^ 



FF^ 



was the colour, Dus - ty was the kiss That I gat frae the mil - ler. 



Hey the dusty miller 

And his dusty coat ; 
He will win a shilling 
Or he spend a groat : 
Dusty was the cd^t, 

Dusty was the colour. 
Dusty was the kiss 

That I gat frae the miller. 



Hey the dusty miller 

And his dusty sack; 
Leeze me on the calling 
Fills the dusty peck. 
Fills the dusty peck, 

Brings the dusty siller ; 
I wad gie my coatie 
For the dusty miller. 



1 62 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



i 



No. 18 1. I gaed tip to Dicnse. 

Tune : Rob shear' din hairst. Cal. Pocket Companion, 1753, v. p. 11, 
Brisk 
t-jj ^ I ■ r— ,— N- 



iiB33 



"wm^^m 



w^9 



Chorus. Rob-inshure in hairst^ I shure wi' him; Fient- a heuk had 
Fine. 



i 



^^^^^^^ 



^GF 



tbtDt 



/, Yet I stack by hiin. I gaed up to Dunse To warp a 

D.C. 



^^^=^S 



:P^ 



T^ 



^ 



wab o' plaid-en ; At his dad-dy's yett Wha met me but Ro - bin ! 



Chorus. Robin shure in hairst, 
I shure wV him ; 
Fient a heuk had I, 
Yet I stack by him. 

I gaed up to Dunse 

To warp a wab o' plaiden ; 
At his daddy's 'yett 

Wha met me but Robin ! 



Was na Robin bauld, 
The' I was a cottar? 

Play'd me sic a trick, 

An' me the Eller's dochter ! 

Robin promis'd me ■ 

A' my winter vittle; 
Fient haet he had but three 

Guse feathers and a whittle ! 



No. 182. My love, she's but a lassie yet. 

Tune : My love, she''s but a lassie yet. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 225. 
Lively 



:2: 



^ 



:^^=J==£=^E^ 



:sr* 



;gE^? 



i^ 



My love, she 's but a las - sie yet, My love, she 's but a las - sie yet ; 



:^_N_^ 



•i^^ 



^ 



#=^^ 



^a==^ 



We'll let her stand a year or twa, She'll no be hauf sae sau - cy yet ; 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



163 



m 






fes^ 



;^=P^: 



^= z^- fv -> 



I rue the day I sought her, O ! I rue the day I sought her, O ! 



j ife^^gEi^gEE^,E% ^E^ 



5=^^ 



Wha gets her needna say he 's woo'd, But he may say he 's bought her, O ! 

My love, she 's but a lassie yet, 
My love, she 's but a lassie yet ; 

We'll let her stand a year or twa, 
She'll no be hauf sae saucy yet ; 
I rue the day I sought her, O ! 
I rue the day I sought her, O ! 

Wha gets her needna say he 's woo'd, 
But he may say he has bought her, O I 

Come draw a drap o' the best o't yet. 
Come draw a drap o' the best o't yet ; 

Gae seek for pleasure whar ye will, 
But here I never miss'd it yet. 
[We're a' dry wi' drinkin o't, 
We're a' dry wi' drinkin o't ; 

The minister kiss'd the fiddler's wife — 
He couldna preach for thinkin o't.] 



No. 183. / murder hate by field or flood. 

(Tune unknown.) 

I MURDER hate by field or flood, 

Tho' glory's name may screen us ; 
In wars at hame I'll spend my blood — 

Life-giving wars of Venus. 
The deities that I adore 

Are social Peace and Plenty ; 
I'm better pleas'd to make one more. 

Than be the death of twenty. 

I would not die like Socrates, 

For all the fuss of Plato ; 
Nor would I with Leonidas, 

Nor yet would I with Cato : 
The zealots of the Church and State 

Shall ne'er my mortal foes be ; 
But let me have bold Zimri's fate 

Within the arms of Cozbi. 

M 2 



164 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 184. Wka is that at my bower-door? 

Tune : Lass, an I come near thee. Scots Musical Museutn, 1792, No. 337. 
Lively 



i^^^^^^^g 



=^ 



atz?: 



' Wha is that at my bower-door ? ' ' O, wha is it but Find-lay.' 



^-r^i-i^ 



^^^^^^ 



|g^^b=k 



^^^=^^=^=^ 



'Then gae your gate, ye'senae be here:' ' In-deed, maun I,' quo' Findlay. 



fe^^z^fe^&^^^^gg^jE^^E^^^ g 



'Whatinak ye sae like a thief?' 'O, come and see,' quo' Find-lay; 'Be - 



i^g=^^^^h^^^H^^ 



- fore the morn ye'U work mis-chief?' 'In-deed will I,' quo' Find-lay. 

'Wha is that at my bower-door?' 

' O, wha is it but Findlay ? ' 
' Then gae your gate, ye'se nae be here : ' 

'Indeed, maun I,' quo' Findlay. 
'What mak ye sae like a thief?' 

' O, come and see,' quo' Findlay ; 
' Before the morn ye'll work mischief? ' 

'Indeed will I,' quo' Findlay. 

' Gif I rise and let you in ' — 

' Let me in,' quo' Findlay — 
' Ye'll keep me waukin wi' your din ? ' 

'Indeed will I,' quo' Findlay. 
' In my bower if ye should stay ' — 

' Let me stay,' quo' Findlay ; 
* I fear ye'll bide till break o' day ? ' — 

'Indeed will I,' quo' Findlay. 

' Here this night if ye remain ' — 

' I'll remain,' quo' Findlay — 
' I dread ye'll learn the gate again ? ' — 

' Indeed will I,' quo' Findlay. 
'What may pass within this bower' — 

' Let it pass,' quo' Findlay ; 
*Ye maun conceal till your last hour' — 

' Indeed will I,' quo' Findlay. 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



1 6'^ 



No. 185. There's a youth in this city. 

Tune : Niel Govu's lament. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 258. 

Moderately 



^^J ^^f^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^ 



There's a youth in this ci - ty, it were a great pi - ty That he from 



^^S^^^^^^S 



our las - sies should wan-der a - wa ; For he's bon-ie and braw, weel- 



^g^^g^ga 



^ 



i-tg- 



^-^ 



fa - vor'd, with-a'. An' his hair has a na - tu-ral buckle and a'. 



^^ ^^^P=g4=g=g=fe^ ^^^=fe^ 



His coat is the hue o' his bon - net sae blue, His feck - et is 



^ 



^ 



P 



b!=^ 



=3^ 



white as the new - driv-en snaw, His hose they are blae, and his 



^g=EEg=g^^ i£j:^ ^^^^ 



shoon like the slae, And his clear sil - ler buck-les, they daz - zle us a'. 



[There 's a youth in this city, it were a great pity 
That he from our lasses should wander awa ; 
For he's bonie and braw, weel-favor'd witha', 
An' his hair has a natural buckle an' a'.] 
His coat is the hue o' his bonnet sae blue, 
His fecket is white as the new-driven snaw, 
His hose they are blae, and his shoon like the slae, 
And his clear siller buckles, they dazzle us a'. 

For beauty and fortune the laddie 's been courtin ; 
Weel-featured, weel-tocher'd, weel-mounted, an' braw ; 
But chiefly the siller that gars him gang till her, 
The penny 's the jewel that beautifies a' ; 
There 's Meg wi' the mailen, that fain wad a haen him, 
And Susie, whase daddy was laird o' the ha' ; 
There 's lang-tocher'd Nancy maist fetters his fancy ; 
But the laddie's dear sel he lo'es dearest of a'. 



i66 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 1 86. O, meikle thinks my luve d my beauty. 

Tune : The highway to Edinburgh. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 312. 



^r-N- 



m^m^^^^^^^ 



s 



O, mei - kle thinks my luve o' my beau - ty, And mei-kle thinks 



-m- -«- s- -m- — 1- • • • .9- • 



my luve o' my kin ; But lit - tie thinks my luve I 



^m ^^^^ ^^^^^ 



ken braw - lie My to-cher 's the jew - el has charms for him. It 's 



^i 



^^^^E^ 



a' for the ap • pie he'll nour - ish the tree ; It 's a' for the 



-•- -m- -m- -»- • -•- • -m- 



hin - ey he'll cher-ish the bee; My lad-die's sae mei-kle in luve 



^JE ^E^EJ^PEEp ^E^^JEgEgE^j;^^ 



wi' the sil - ler, He can - na hae luve to spare for me ! 



O, MEIKLE thinks my luve o' my beauty, 

And meikle thinks my luve o' my kin ; 
But little thinks my luve I ken brawlie 

My tocher 's the jewel has charms for him. 
[It's a' for the apple he'll nourish the tree; 

It's a' for the hiney he'll cherish the bee!] 
My laddie 's sae meikle in luve viri' the siller, 

He canna hae luve to spare for me ! 

Your proffer o' luve 's an airle-penny ! 

My tocher's the bargain ye wad buy ; 
But an ye be crafty, I am cunnin, 

Sae ye wi' anither your fortune may try. 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



167 



[Ye're like to the timmer o' yon rotten wood, 
Ye're like to the bark o' yon rotten tree, 

Ye'll slip frae me like a knotless thread, 

An' ye'll crack your credit wi' mair nor me !] 



No. 187. Whare are you gaiin, my bonze lass. 

Tune: A waukrife mtnnie. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 288. 



g^la^^^^pg ^^B^^^I^ 



' Whare are you gaun, my bon - ie lass, Whare are you gaun, my hin - ey ? ' 



is^g^S 



=P^ 



^^ 



^^^ 



She answer'd me right sau - ci - lie,— * An er-randfor my min - nie.' 



'Whare are you gaun, my bonie lass, 
Whare are you gaun, my hiney ? ' 

She answer'd me right saucilie, — 
'An errand for my minnie.' 

' O, whare live ye, my bonie lass, 
O, whare live ye, my hiney?' 

' By yon burnside, gin ye maun ken, 
In a wee house wi' my minnie.' 

But I foor up the glen at e'en 

To see my bonie lassie ; 
And lang before the grey morn cam 

She was na hauf sae saucie. 

O, wearie fa' the waukrife cock, 
And the foumart lay his crawin ! 

He wauken'd the auld wife frae her sleep 
A wee blink or the dawin. 

An angry wife I wat she raise, 
And o'er the bed she brocht her; 

And wi' a meikle hazel rung 

She made her a weel-pay'd dochter. 

' O, fare-thee-weel, my bonie lass ! 

O, fare-thee-weel, my hiney ! 
Thou art a gay and a bonie lass, 

But thou hast a waukrife minnie ! ' 



l68 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

No. 188. My heart is a-breaking, dear Tittie. 

Tune : Tarn. Glen. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 296. 
Brisk 



i|g p ^;j;^^^^E^ ^ ^^^Jg g^gg 



My heart is a - break-ing, dear Tit - tie, Some coun-sel un - to me come 



:*: 



^^^^^^^^^^g^EgE ^E,^ 



len' : To an-ger them a' \s a pi - ty, But what will I do wi' Tam Glen ? 

My heart is a-breaking, dear Tittie, 

Some counsel unto me come len' : 
To anger them a' is a pity, 

But what will I do wi' Tam Glen? 

I'm thinking, wi' sic a bra'w fellow 

In poortith I might mak a fen' : 
What care I in riches to wallow, 

If I mauna marry Tam Glen ? 

There's Lowrie the Laird o' Dummeller; 

' Guid day to you ' ;— brute ! he comes ben : 
He brags and he blaws o' his siller, 

But when will he dance like Tam Glen ? 

My minnie does constantly deave me, 

And bids me beware o' young men : 
They flatter, she says, to deceive me : 

But wha can think sae o' Tam Glen ? 

My daddie says, gin I'll forsake him, 

He'd gie me guid hunder marks ten : 
But if it 's ordain'd I maun take him, 

O, wha will I get but Tam Glen? 

Yestreen at the valentines' dealing. 

My heart to my mou' gied a sten, 
For thrice I drew ane without failing. 

And thrice it was written — ' Tam Glen ' ! 

The last Hallowe'en I was waukin 

My droukit sark-sleeve, as ye ken ; 
His likeness came up the house staukin, 

And the very grey breaks o' Tam Glen ! 

Come, counsel, dear Tittie, don't tarry ! 

I'll gie ye my bonny black hen, 
Gif ye will advise me to marry 

The lad I lo'e dearly — Tam Glen. 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



169 



No. 189. They snool me sair, and hand me down. 

Tune: The moudiewart. Caledonian Pocket Companion^ c. 1752, iv. p. 8. 
Brisk 



"^^^^^^^^^m 



Chorus. An' C, for a7te-and-twen-ty,Tainl And hey, sweet ane - and- 

tr 



m ^=rfmn f ^ ^ ^ 



-id- -*- 

twen - ty. Tarn ! Pll learn my kin a rati - lin sang An I 



^^m 



m 



^ 



fcs 



^^^=^5 



saw ane - and- iwen-iy. Tarn. They snool me sair, and baud me 



iik-f^ 



g^JEg^EEgE^g ^EgEE^E^JE^^Eg^ 



down, And gar me look like blun-tie, Tam ; But three short years 

D.C. 



m^m^^^ m^^ 



^=3: 



will soon wheel roun' — And then comes ane - and - twen - ty, Tam ! 



Chorus. An'' O, for ane-and-twenty, Tam ! 

And hey, sweet ane-and-twenty, Tam ! 
ril learn my kin a rattlin sang 
An I saw ane-and-twenty, Tam. 

They snool me sair, and baud me down, 
And gar me look like bluntie, Tam ; 

But three short years will soon wheel roun' — 
And then comes ane-and-twenty, Tam ! 

A gleib o' Ian', a claut o' gear 

Was left me by my auntie, Tam : 
At kith or kin I needna spier, 

An I saw ane-and-twenty, Tam. 

They'll hae me wed a wealthy coof, 

Tho' I mysel hae plenty, Tam ; 
But hear'st thou, laddie! there's my loof; 

I'm thine at ane-and-twenty, Tam ! 



170 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 190. But warily tent when ye come to court me. 

Tune : Whistle an' Til come to ye, my lad. Scots Mus, Museum, 1788, No. 106. 
Lively 






Chorus. O, whistle an' rU come to ye^ iny lad! O, whistle an' 



m 



i^-- 



^^^^^^& 



=J^:as^R= 



m 



?^F5 



/'// come to ye, my lad! Tho'' fa-ther an'' mother arC a'' should gae 

Fine. 



i-m * — 



*^ 



^^ 



S! 



S^^i? 



irg. 



zf—4-fi 



^j^-j±=A 



7nad^ O, whistle an' I'll come to ye, tny lad! But war - i - ly tent 



^ 



^m3^^3^^^^^m^ , 



-* — •- 



=^^ 



when ye come to court me, And come nae un-less the back-yett be a - jee ; 



^^^^^^^^^ 



tr 



Syne up the back-style, and let nae - bo - dy see, And come as ye were 

D.C. 



^^^^^^ 



m 



5^ 



na com -in to me. And come as ye were na com- in to me. 

Chorus. O, whistle an' Fll come to ye, my lad I 
O, whistle an' Fll come to ye, my lad I 
Tho'' father afC mother an' cC should gae mad, 
O, whistle an' Fll come to ye, my lad! 

But warily tent when ye come to court me, 
And come nae unless the back-yett be a-jee ; 
Syne up the back-style, and let naebody see, 
And come as ye were na comin to me. bis 

At kirk, or at market, whene'er ye meet me, 
Gang by me as tho' that ye car'd na a flie ; 
But steal me a blink o' your bonie black e'e, 
Yet look as ye were na looking to me. bis 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



171 



Ay vow and protest that ye care na for me, 
And whiles ye may lightly my beauty awee ; 
But court na anither, tho' jokin ye be, 
For fear that she wile your fancy frae me. bis 



No. 191. O, when she cam ben, she bobbed fit law ! 

Tune : When she cam ben she bobbit. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 353. 
Moderaie 



g^ ^JE^^^igEJ^N ^J^^: ^ ^ 



O, when she cam ben, she bob - bed fu' law ! O, when she 



^^^^^^^^^m 



cam ben, she bob - bed fu' law ! And when she cam ben, she 



^^Si^^^^^^ 



¥ 



/=t^=l2=l=Q 



kiss'd Cock - pen, And syne she de - ny'd she did it at a'. 



[O, WHEN she cam ben, she bobbed fu' law ! 
O, when she cam ben, she bobbed fu' law ! 
And when she cam ben, she kiss'd Cockpen, 
And syne she deny'd she did it at a'. 

And was na Cockpen right saucy witha' ? 
And was na Cockpen right saucy witha'?] 
In leaving the dochter o' a lord, 
And kissin a collier lassie an' a' ? 

O, never look down, my lassie, at a' ! 
O, never look down, my lassie, at a' ! 
Thy lips are as sweet, and thy figure complete, 
As the finest dame in castle or ha', 

Tho' thou hast nae silk, and holland sae sma', 
Tho' thou hast nae silk, and holland sae sma', 
Thy coat and thy sark are thy ain handy wark, 
And Lady Jean was never sae braw. 



172 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 192. O, ken ye what Meg d the Mill 
has gotten ? 

(first version.) 



Tune : O hen ye what Meg. 
Moderately 



Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 566. 



Moderately 

O. ken ve what Mee' o' the Mill has P'ot-ten ? An' ken ve what 



O, ken ye what Meg o' the Mill has got-ten ? An' ken ye what 



fegJEgEEg^z^q- EESJ^ 



^^^ 



Meg o' the Mill has got-ten? A braw newnaig wi' the tail o' a 






rot-tan, And that's what Meg o' the Mill has got-ten ! O, ken ye 



5Eg^gE[lfE:-gE^^^^^5E^^^g:EiEg|;^ 



what Meg o' the Mill lo'es dear-ly ? An' ken ye what Meg o' the Mill 



-•— #: 



a morn - ing 



lo'es dear-ly? A dram o' gude strunt in 



^^^^m^^^^. 






ear - ly, And that 's what Meg o' the Mill lo'es dear - ly ! 

O, KEN ye what Meg o' the Mill has gotten? 
An' ken ye what Meg o' the Mill has gotten ? 
A braw new naig wi' the tail o' a rottan, 
And that's what Meg o' the Mill has gotten! 

O, ken ye what Meg o' the Mill lo'es dearly? 
An' ken ye what Meg o' the Mill lo'es dearly? 
A dram o' gude strunt in a morning early, 
And that's what Meg o' the Mill lo'es dearly! 

O, ken you how Meg o'. the Mill was married? 
An' ken ye how Meg o' the Mill was married? 
The priest he was oxter'd, the clark he was carried, 
And that's how Meg o' the Mill was married! 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



173 



O, ken ye how Meg o' the Mill was bedded? 
An' ken ye how Meg o' the Mill was bedded? 
The groom gat sae fu', he fell awald beside it, 
And that's how Meg o' the Mill was bedded! 



No. 193. O, ken ye what Meg d the Mill 
has gotten ? 

(second version.) 
Tune : O bonie lass, will ye lie in a barrack ? Napier's Scots Songs, 1 79a, ii. p. 90. 



m 






W 



O, ken ye what Meg o' the Mill has gotten? An' ken ye what Meg 



j ^gg^gji^ E^ipE ^^^gi^ 



o' the Mill has got-ten ? She 's gotten a coof wi' a claut 



g%]^^^^^Fi^g^l^g^^-gip^ 



o' sil - ler, And bro-ken the heart o' the bar - ley mil - ler ! 

O, KEN ye what Meg o' the Mill has gotten? 
An' ken ye what Meg o' the Mill has gotten? 
She 's gotten a coof wi' a claut o' siller, 
And broken the heart o' the barley miller! 

The miller was strappin, the miller was ruddy, 
A heart like a lord, and a hue like a lady. 
The laird was a widdifu', bleerit knurl — 
She 's left the gude fellow, and taen the churl ! 

The miller, he hecht her a heart leal and loving, 
The laird did address her wi' matter mair moving ; 
A fine pacing horse wi' a clear, chained bridle, 
A whip by her side, and a bonie side-saddle. 

O, wae on the siller, it is sae prevailin, 
And wae on the love that is fixed on a mailen ! 
A tocher's nae word in a true lover's pari. 
But gie me my love and a fig for the warl ! 



174 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 194. Cauld is the eenin blast. 

Tune : Peggy Ramsay. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 583. 

t Slowly 



^ 



^ 



^^^5^ 



^ 



^^ 



5 



^ 



—»—»- 



~s — *~ 

Cauld is the e'en - in blast O' Bo-reaso'er the pool, An' daw - in 



i=^ 



^^ 



:i^^=^=^ 



^ 



-^ 



^^^ 



it is drea - ry When birks are bare at Yule. O, cauld blaws the e'en 



I — •— = ^ — ' ^ 



- in blast, When bit-ter bites the frost, And in the mirk and drea - ry drift. 






^r 



The hills and glens are lost ! Ne'er sae mur-ky blew the night That drift - ed 



g^ ^^^JE^^ ^ 



^ 



^ 



o'er the hill, But bon - ie Peg - a - Ram -say Gat grist to her mill. 



Cauld is the e'enin blast 
O' Boreas o'er the pool, 

An' dawin it is dreary 

When birks are bare at Yule. 

O, cauld blaws the e'enin blast, 
When bitter bites the frost, 



And in the mirk and dreary drift. 
The hills and glens are lost ! 

Ne'er sae murky blew the night 
That drifted o'er the hill, 

But bonie Peg-a-Ramsay 
Gat grist to her mill. 



No. 195. The taylor he cam here to sew. 

Tune: The Dnimm.er. Aird's ^/rs, 1782, i. No. 129. 
Lively 



i 



:S=:p= 



m 



^ 



^^V 



-^=^ 



:^=r 



i^zz: 



The tay - lor he cam here to sew, And weel he kend the way 



t 



g ^ =P=l=^ ^J=^^^^^P^ 



i: 



^ 



woo. For ay he pree'd the las-sie's mou', As he 



but and 



i^isPS 




S 



J^ 



P 



ben, O. For weel he kend the way, O, The way, O, the way 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



175 



^^=g 



^a^ JEgE 



O ! For weel he kend the way, O, The las-sie's heart to win, O ! 



The taylor he cam here to sew, 
And weel he kend the way to 

woo, 
For ay he pree'd the lassie's mou'. 
As he gaed but and ben, O. 
For weel he kend the way, O, 
The way, O, the way, O ! 
For weel he kend the way, O, 
The lassie's heart to win, O ! 



The taylor rase and shook his duds, 
The flaes they flew awa in cluds ! 
And them that stay'd gat fearfu' 
thuds, — 
The taylor prov'd a man, O ! 
For now it was the gloamin. 
The gloamin, the gloamin, 
For now it was the gloamin. 
When a' to rest are gaun, O ! , 



No. 196. O, steer her up. 

Tune: Steer her up. Scots Musical Museum^ 1803, No, 504. 



Merrily 



EE 



m 



^^^ 



O, steer her up, an' haud her gaun— Her mither 's at the 



i 



p^ 



mill, jo. An' gin she win - na tak a man. E'en let her tak 



s 



S3 



^^m 



^ 



3^^"^=^ 



her will, jo : First shore her wi' a gen-tle kiss. And ca' a - nith - er 




B m-. "m 1 — ^■ 



s=^^ 



-¥- 



^^ 



gill, jo. An' gin she tak the thing a-miss, E'en let her flyte her fill, jo. 



O, STEER her up, an' haud her 
gaun — 

Her mither 's at the mill, jo, 
An' gin she winna tak a man. 

E'en let her tak her will, jo : 
First shore her wi' a gentle kiss, 

And ca' anither gill, jo. 
An' gin she tak the thing amiss, 

E'en let her flyte her fill, jo. 



O, steer her up, an' be na blate. 

An' gin she tak it ill, jo. 
Then leave the lassie till her fate. 

And time na langer spill, jd ! 
Ne'er break your heart for ae re- 
bute, 

But think upon it still, jo. 
That gin the lassie winna do't, 
. Ye'll fin' anither will, jo. 



176 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 197. What can a young lassie? 

Tune : What shall I do with an auld man ? Scots Mus. Mus., 1792, No. 316. 
Merrily 



^^^g^^^S^ 



-gJIZZ 



What can a young las - sie, what shall a young las - sie, What can a young 



fe 



^^=F= 



'^ 



^35 






^ 



sie do wi' an auld man? Bad luck on the pen-ny that tempt-ed my 






^^ 



^ 



i^ 



^ 



-•—d- 



min-nie To sell her puir Jen-ny for sil-ler an' Ian' ! Bad luck on the pen 



^^^^i^^^S^^ 



ny that tempted my min-nie To sell her puir Jen - ny for sil - ler an' Ian' 



What can a young lassie, what shall a young lassie, 
What can a young lassie do wi' an auld man? 

Bad luck on the penny that tempted my minnie ) , . 
To sell her puir Jenny for siller an' Ian'! ) 

He's always compleenin frae mornin to e'enin ; 

He hoasts and he hirples the weary day lang : 
He 's doylt and he 's dozin ; his blude it is frozen, ) , . 

O, dreary 's the night wi' a crazy auld man ! ) 

He hums and he hankers, he frets and he cankers, 
I never can please him, do a' that I can : 

He 's peevish an' jealous of a' the young fellows : ) 1 • 
O, dool on the day I met wi' an auld man ! ) 

My auld auntie Katie upon me taks pity, 
I'll do my endeavour to follow her plan : 

I'll cross him and wrack him, until I heartbreak him, ) , . 
And then his auld brass will buy me a new pan. ) 



III., love: humorous 



177 



No. 198. A7va wV your witchcraft d Beauty s 
alarms. 

Tune : Balin a mone. Thumoth's English and Irish Airs, c. 1760, p. 26. 



■t^^^f^^f^^-^ ^^E^^^^ m 



A - wa' wi' your witch-craft o' Beau - ty's a - larms, The slen - der bit 



Pip E^E^E^^ EjEJ^^^gEEpEg^^ 



beau - ty you grasp in your arms, O, gie me the lass that has acres o' 

Chorus. 



¥^^rm E^3 ^^3^ ^^^^ ^^ ^ ^ 



charms ! O, gie me the lass wi' the weel-stock-it farms ! Xhett key for 



^ 



5?- 



^ 



^^g 



^^ 



±^EAz 



a lass wV a toch - er, Then hey for a lass ■wi' a toch • er. Then hey for 



I^EgEg^ P^^gE^^gEgEEEE^ : 



a lass wV a] ioch-er. The nice yel-low guin-eas for me! 



Awa' wi' your witchcraft o' Beauty's alarms, 
The slender bit beauty j'ou grasp in your arms, 
O, gie me the lass that has acres o' charms ! 
O, gie me the lass wi' the weel-stockit farms ! 

Chorus. Then hey for a lass wi'' a tocher, 
Then hey for a lass wV a tocher, 
Then hey for a lass wi' a tocher, 
The nice yellow guineas for me '. 

Your Beauty's a flower in the morning that blows, 
And withers the faster the faster it grows ; 
But the rapturous charm o' the bonie green knowes, 
Ilk Spring they're new deckit wi' bonie white yowes ! 

And e'en when this beauty your bosom has blest. 
The brightest o' beauty may cloy when possess'd ; 
But the sweet, yellow darlings wi' Geordie impress'd. 
The langer ye hae them, the mair they're carest ! 



178 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 199. Had I the wyte. 

Tune : Come kiss with me. Orpheus Caledonitts, 1733, No. 39. 
Briskly 



P^,tJ^ ^ J^^ ^^^j^:^^g=^ 



t£fc 



Had I the wyte, had I the wyte, Had I the wyte? — she bade me; She 



^^ 



:^=^;= 



fe^^ifP^^i^iS 



1^^: 



watch'd me by tlie hie - gate side, And up the loan she shaw'd me ; And 



^^P 



£ 



^ 



when I wad - na ven - ture in, A cow - ard loon she ca'd me: Had 



&=s: 



35 



^ 



^ 



E^ 



kirk and state been in the gate, I'd light - ed when she bade me. 



Had I the wyte, had I the wyte, 

Had I the wyte ? — she bade me ; 
She watch'd me by the hie-gate side, 

And up the loan she shaw'd me ; 
And when I wadna venture in, 

A coward loon she ca'd me : 
Had kirk and state been in the gate, 

I'd lighted when she bade me. 

Sae craftilie she took me ben 

And bade me mak nae clatter: — 
' For our ramgunshoch, glum guidman 

Is o'er ayont the water : ' 
Whae'er shall say I wanted grace. 

When I did kiss and dawte her, 
Let him be planted in my place, 

Syne say I was the fautor! 

Could I for shame, could I for shame, 

Could I for shame refus'd her? 
And wadna manhood been to blame 

Had I unkindly used her? 
He claw'd her wi' the ripplin-kame, 

And blae and bluidy bruised her — 
When sic a husband was frae hame, 

What wife but wad excused her? 



in. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



179 



I (lighted ay her een sae blue, 

An' bann'd the cruel randy ; 
And, weel I wat, her willin mou' 

Was sweet as sugar-candy. 
At gloamin-shot it was, I wot, 

I lighted on the Monday, 
But I cam thro' the Tyesday's dew 

To wanton Willie's brandy. 



No. 200. Gat ye me, O, gat ye me. 

Tune : Jack Latin. Scots Musical Museum^ "^19^1 No. 430. 

Jovially __ 



1:3: 



^ 



IF-^^ 



9—» ^*- 



' Gat ye me, O, gat ye me, O, gat ye me wi' naething? 



s 






Rock an' reel, an" spin-ning wheel, A mic - kle quar-ter ba - son : 






^^ 



Bye at - tour, my gutch-er has a heich house and a laigh ane, 



^^^^^^^^^m 



^ for - bye my bon - ie sel, The toss o' Ec - cle - fe - chan.' 

' Gat ye me, O, gat ye me, 

O, gat ye me wi' naething? 
Rock an' reel, an' spinning wheel, 

A mickle quarter bason : 
Bye attour, my gutcher has 

A heich house and a laigh ane, 
A' forbye my bonie sel, 

The toss o' Ecclefechan.' 

' O, haud your tongue now, Lucky Lang, 

O, haud your tongue and jauner ! 
I held the gate till you I met. 

Syne I began to wander : 
I tint my whistle and my sang, 

I tint my peace and pleasure ; 
But your green graff, now Lucky Lang, 

Wad airt me to my treasure.' 
N 2 



i8o 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 20 1. Last May a brazv wooer. 

Tune : The Lothian lassie. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, p. 52. 
Lively ^ 






Last May a braw woo - er cam down the lang glen, And sair wi' 



i 



E£ 



^Et 



^^^ 



his love he did deave me. I said there was nae-thing I 



^i^ip^ps^ii^ 



hat - ed like men — The deuce gae wi' him to be - Have me, 



:^=!s: 



H^ 



^ 



^=^^=f^ 



^ 



be - lieve me — The deuce gae wi' him, to be - lieve me! 

Last May a braw wooer cam dow^n the lang glen, 

And sair wi' his love he did deave me. 
I said there was naething I hated like men — 

The deuce gae wi'm to believe me, believe me — 

The deuce gae wi'm, to believe me ! 

He spak o' the darts in my bonie black een, 

And vow'd for my love he was diein. 
I said, he might die when he liket for Jean — 

The Lord forgie me for liein, for liein — 

The Lord forgie me for liein ! 

A weel-stocket mailen, himsel for the laird, 

And marriage aff-hand were his proffers ; 
I never loot on that I kenn'd it, or car'd, 

But thought I might hae waur offers, waur offers — 

But thought I might hae waur offers. 

But what wad j'e think? — in a fortnight or less — 

The deil tak his taste to gae near her — 
He up the lang loan to my black cousin, Bess, 

Guess ye how, the jad ! I could bear her, could bear her— 

Guess ye how, the jad ! I could bear her. 

But a' the neist week, as I petted wi' care, 

I gaed to the tryste o' Dalgarnock, 
And wha but my fine fickle lover was there ? 

I glowr'd as I'd seen a warlock, a warlock, 

I glowr'd as I'd seen a warlock. 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



i8i 



But owre my left shouther I gae him a blink, 

Lest neibors might say I was saucy ; 
My wooer he caper'd as he'd been in drink, 

And vow'd I was his dear lassie, dear lassie — 

And vow'd I was his dear lassie. 

I spier'd for my cousin fu* couthy and sweet, 
Gin she had recover'd her hearin ? 

And how her new shoon fit her auld, shachl'd feet? 
But heavens ! how he fell a swearin, a swearin — 
But heavens ! how he fell a swearin ! 

He begged, for gudesake, I wad be his wife, 

Or else I wad kill him wi' sorrow ; 
So e'en to preserve the poor body in life, 

I think I maun wed him to-morrow, to-morrow — 

I think I maun wed him to-morrow. 



i 



No. 202. Wantonness for evermah\ 

e : 



Tune: Wantonness. Scots Musical Museum, X']g6, l^o. ^22. 
Slow ^ tr 



s 



ii 



mi 



^ 



Wan - ton - ness for 



?g 



X 



ev - er - mair, Wan - ton - ness has been 



S^P^^S^^^ 



my ru 



@ 



E^; 



in. Yet for 



dool and care It's 



a^^3 



s 



i^zzi; 



? 



for 



ev - er - mair. 



hae lo'ed the Black, 



^ 



^i^ii^ 



^^^ 



the Brown: I ha'e lo'ed the Fair, the Gow - den : A' the 



p^=mEE^^^^^^^^^^^ 



co - lours in the town I hae won their wan - ton fa - vour. 



Wantonness for evermair. 
Wantonness has been my ruin. 
Yet for a' my dool and care 
It's wantonness for evermair. 



I hae lo'ed the Black, the Brown : 
I hae lo'ed the Fair, the Gowden ; 
A' the colours in the town — 
I hae won their wanton favour. 



l82 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 203. The Rabin cam to the Wrens nest. 

Tune: The wren s nest. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 406. 



?^=^ 



^ 



^ 



5 



P?^^ 



The Rob - in cam to the "Wren's nest And keek - it in, and 



^ ' — ^ v= ff=^ — 



keek - it in ; O, weel 's me on your auld pow, Wad 



^^^ 



^: 



^ 



35^ 



^g=s 



i^; 



ye 



be in, wad ye be in? Ye'se ne'er get leave to lie with 



^^m 



3^ 



■^ — •- 



^-=^^^= g==^-=^=^= B=i=^^=^ 



out, And I with - in, and I with - in; Sae lang's I 



^^ 



n 



^s^^ 



^ 



hae an auld clout To rowe ye in, to rowe ye in. 

The Robin cam to the Wren's nest 

And keekit in, and keekit in ; 
O, weel 's me on your auld povv^, 

Wad ye be in, wad ye be in ? 
Ye'se ne'er get leave to lie without, 

And I within, and I within ; 
Sae lang's I hae an auld clout 

To rowe ye in, to rowe ye in. 



No. 204. Lassie, lend me your braw hemp heckle. 

Tune : The Bob o' Dumblane. Orpheus Cakdom'us, 1725, No. 45. 
Rather slow 



i^^^^s^^^ 



:^d=t^ 



Las - sie, lend ttie year braw hemp hec - kle. And I'll lend 



i^^s^i^^^^^ 



you my thripp-ling-kame; My hec - kle is brok - en, It can 



III. LOVE : HUMOROUS 



183 



i 



i=ifcj^ 



^I^E^I^^^^g 



iV=^ 



- na be got - ten, And we'll gae dance the Bob o' Dum-blanp. 

Lassie, lend me your braw hemp heckle, 

And I'll lend you my thrippling-kame ; 
My heckle is broken, it canna be gotten. 

And we'll gae dance the Bob o' Dumblane. 

Twa gaed to the wood, to the wood, to the wood, 
Twa gaed to the wood — three cam hame ; 

An it be na weel bobbit, weel bobbit, weel bobbit. 
An it be na weel bobbit, we'll bob it again. 



No. 205. My daddie was a fiddler fine. 

Tune : The reel o' Stuntpie. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 457. 
Lively 



i^a^jEg^ 



^ 



5 



"^^^ 



;£ 



CHOR0S. Wapandrowe, wap and rowe, Wap and rows the feeiie o't; I 

J^ Fine. 



^^^^^^^^^ 



ihoitght I was a maid-en fair. Till I heard the greetie o't. 



g^^^gg^^ d^i l 3^-3 SE ^ 



My dad - die was a fid - dler fine, My min-nie she made mantle, O ; And 

D.C. 



il^g^^^^^^^g^^^ 



I my - sel a thumpinquine, And danc'd the reel o' Stumpie, O. 

Chorus. Wap and rowe, wap and rowe, 
Wap and rowe the feetie o't; 
I thought I was a maiden fair, 
Till I heard the greetie o't. 

My daddie was a fiddler fine. 

My minnie she made mantie, O ; 
And I mysel a thumpin quine. 
And danc'd the reel o' Stumpie, O. 



i84 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 206. There's news, lasses, neivs. 

Tune: There's news, lasses. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No, 589. 
Briskly 



i 



V=k^r± 



^ 



t=:M=P3^ 



^= 



There's news, lass - es, news, Gude news I've to tell! There's a boat 
^ — Chorus. ^ 



;fc=i=i^ 



^^Hg rJU^ .^=P E^ 



fu' o' lads Come to our town to sell ! T'Ae wean 



E^ 



-N— ^- 



^^ 






wants a era • die. And the era • die wants a cod. An' ril 



;J^=i^ 



:^ 



^^^^^ 



^^^^^ 



no gang to my bed Un - til I get a nod. 



There 's news, lasses, news, 

Gude news I've to tell ! 
There's a boatfu' o' lads 

Come to our town to sell ! 

Chorus, The wean zvants a cradle, 

And the cradle wants a cod. 
An'' ril no gang to my bed 
Until I get a nod. 

'Father,' quo' she, 'Mither,' quo' she, 

' Do what you can : 
I'll no gang to my bed 

Till I get a man ! ' 

I hae as gude a craft rig 

As made o' yird and stane ; 
And waly fa' the ley-crap, 

For I maun till'd again. 



III. LOVE t HUMOROUS 



185 



No. 207. O, Galloway Tarn cam here to woo. 

Tune : Galloway Tarn. Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1754, vi. p. 25. 

fet 



g-^^g^j^gj^ 



lEfe 



- ^ . » 



r-=t^=^t==5^: 



O, Gal - lo - way Tarn cam here to woo; I'd ra - ther 



M 



I5E 



Sgg 



Si 



^^ 



^ — r — ^- 



ti=^ 



we'd gien him the braw - nit cow ; For our lass Bess may 



:tet. 



gg^^^^gP^P^^g^ 



curse and ban The wan - ton wit o' Gal - lo - way Tam. 



l#*=i=F--^ 



=[=P^ 



'^ 



g 



^ES^^^^g 



:^ 



O, Gal - lo - way Tam cam here to shear; I'd ra - ther 



I** 



^^^m 



^^^s 



tt=t= 



we'd gien him the gude gray mare; He kist the gude - wife 

J_— r-^-^ — Nr 



l?3ig^ 



Ei^i^^^i^ii=siE*EESi^ 



and strack the gudeman; And that's the tricks o' Gal - lo - way Tam. 



O, Galloway Tam cam here to woo; 
Fd rather we'd gien him the brawnit cow ; 
For our lass Bess may curse and ban 
The wanton wit o' Galloway Tam. 

O, Galloway Tam cam here to shear ; 
I'd rather we'd gien him the gude gray mare ; 
He kist the gudewife and strack the gudeman; 
Aud that 's the tricks o' Galloway Tam. 



i86 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 208. The Collier has a dochter. 

Tune : The Collier's borne lassie. Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 44. 
Blythely 



^^^^^^^^E^^^E^^^^^^ 



The Col - lier has a dochter, And O, she's won- der bon-ie! A 



^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^m^E^^m 



laird he was that sought her, Rich baith ia lands and mon-ey: She 



^^m^^^^^ 



wad - na hae a laird. Nor wad she be a la - dy, But she 



SEgEE^ES ^^ ^^iE^EgE^gE^^ 



wad hae a col - lier The co - lor o' her dad - die. 



The Collier has a dochter, 

And O, she's wonder bonie ! 
A laird he was that sought her, 

Rich baith in lands and money ; 
She wadna hae a laird, 

Nor wad she be a lady, 
But she wad hae a collier 

The color o' her daddie. 




IV. CONNUBIAL 



187 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



No. 209. First when Maggie was my care. 

Tune: Whistle der the lave dt. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 249. 

Slowly 



^-^(T- jN 



^ 



S 



=t^feS^ 



^-^S^-:^ 



$ 



First when Mag gie was my care, Heav'n, I thought, was in her air ; 



^^ 



^^ 



S=F 



g 



i^E^S 



-• — *— = — =-* 



Now we're mar-ried, spier nae mair, But whis - tie o'er the lave o't! 



^^ 



S 



^ 



:^=^=^=£=tt^^ 



-•— -pt 



Meg was taeek, and Meg was mild, Sneet and harm -less as a child- 



g^^i^ pgE^Ep=fegE^;^E^SEgE^ 



:;=;: 



Wis - er men than me 's be - guiled — Whis - tie o'er the lave o't. 



First when Maggie was my care, 
Heav'n, I thought, was in her air ; 
Now we're married, spier nae mair, 

But whistle o'er the lave o't ! 
Meg was meek, and Meg was mild, 
Sweet and harmless as a child — 
Wiser men than me's beguiled — 

Whistle o'er the lave o't. 

How we live, my Meg and me, 
How we love, and how we gree, 
I care na by how few may see — 

Whistle o'er the lave o't ! 
Wha I wish were maggots' meat, 
Dish'd up in her winding sheet, 
I could write — but Meg maun see't — 

Whistle o'er the lave o't. 



i88 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 2IO. O, some will court and compliment. 

Tune : John, come kiss nie now. Playford's Skill of Music, 1674, p. 120, 



O John, come kiss me now, now, now ; O John, my luve. 



:S=P- 






^^ 



come kiss me now! O John, come kiss me by 



^m 



^3^1^ 



fet 



and by, For weel ye ken the way to woo ! 

Chorus. O John, come kiss tne now, now, now ; 
O John, my luve, come kiss me now ! 
O John, come kiss me by and by, 
for weel ye ken the way to woo I 

O SOME will court and compliment, 
And ither some will kiss and daut ; 

But I will mak o' my gudeman, 
My ain gudeman, — it is nae faute. 

O, some will court and compliment, 
And ither some will prie their mou', 

And some will hause in ither's arms, 
And that's the way I like to do! 



No. 2 11. There was a wife wound in Cockpen. 



Tune; Scroggam. 
Slow 



Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 539. 



^^^^^^i 



^ 



"^ 



-^'^— F- 



There was a wife wonn'd in Cock - pen, Scroggam ! 



She 



EEE3 



m 



brew'd gude ale for gen - tie - men : Sing auld Cowl, lay you 



^^^^^^^^ 



:3=Ei 



down by me — Scrog - gam, ray dear - ie, ruf - fum ! 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



189 



There was a wife wonn'd in Cockpen, 

Scroggam ! 
She brew'd gude ale for gentlemen : 
Sing auld Cowl, lay you down by me — 
Scroggam, my dearie, ruffum ! 

The gudewife's dochter fell in a fever, 

Scroggam ! 
The priest o' the parish fell in anither : 
Sing auld Cowl, lay you down by me — 
Scroggam, my dearie, ruffum ! 

They laid the twa i' the bed thegither, 

Scroggam ! 
That the heat o' the tane might cool the tither ; 
Sing auld Cowl, lay you down by me — 
Scroggam, my dearie, ruffum ! 



No. 212. John Anderso7i my jo, yoJm. 

Tune : John Anderson ntyjo, John. Scots 3Iusical Museum, 1790, No. 260. 

Slow 



^^^ 



:eb^ 



m 



^^-"-^- ^ 



John An- der-son my jo, John, When we were first ac - quent, 



i 



H 



-^- 



Your locks were like the rav - en, Your bon - ie brow was brent 



I 



^EfSE 



1 ^-7 M — » ar^^ — I 



E£ 



But now your brow is beld, John, Your locks are like the snaw, 



ME^^^E^^^^3^E^m^i^^^ 



But bless-ings on your fros - ty pow, John An-der-son my jo ! 



John Anderson my jo, John, 

When we were first acquent. 
Your locks were like the raven, 

Your bonie brow was brent ; 
But now your brow is beld, John, 

Your locks are like the snaw. 
But blessings on your frosty pow, 

John Anderson my jo ! 



John Anderson my jo, John, 

We clamb the hill thegither; 
And mony a cantie day, John, 

We've had wi' ane anither : 
Now we maun totter down, John, 

And hand in hand we'll go, 
And sleep thegither at the foot, 

John Anderson my jo ! 



igo 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 213. Willie Wastle dwalt on Tweed. 

Tune : Sic a wife as Willie had. Scots Musical Museum.^ 1792, No. 376. 
Moderate Ume 



^^S^^g^ 



i:e^ 



^ 



=^t 



^&--^ 



Wil - lie Was - tie dwalt on Tweed, The spot they ca'd it 




Lin-kum-dod-die ; Wil - lie was a wabs-ter gude Could stoun a 



3^ 






± 



clue wi' o - ny bod - ie : He had a wife was dour and din, 



^g^^^ ip^^^^^^ 



O, Tiiik - let Maid . gie was her mit - her ; Sic a wife as 



Si^^ 



-d *- 



Wil - lie had, I wad - na gie a but - ton for her. 



Willie Wastle dwalt on Tweed, 

The spot they ca'd it Linkumdoddie ; 
Willie was a wabster gude 

Could stoun a clue wi' ony bodie : 
He had a wife w^as dour and din, 

O, Tinkler Maidgie was her mither; 
Sic a wife as Willie had, 

I wadna gie a button for her. 

She has an e'e — she has but ane, — 

The cat has twa the very colour, 
Five rusty teeth, forbye a stump, 

A clapper tongue wad deave a miller ; 
A whiskin beard about her mou', 

Her nose and chin they threaten ither: 
Sic a wife as Willie had, 

I wadna gie a button for her. 



IV. CONNUBIAL 191 



She's bow-hough'd, she's hem-shinn'd, 

Ae limpin leg a hand-breed shorter ; 
She 's twisted right, she 's twisted left, 

To balance fair in ilka quarter : 
She has a hump upon her breast, 

The twin o' that upon her shouther : 
Sic a wife as Willie had, 

I wadna gie a button for her. 

Auld baudrans by the ingle sits, 

An' wi' her loof her face a-washin ; 
But Willie's wife is nae sae trig, 

She dights her grunzie wi' a hushion ; 
Her walie nieves like midden-creels. 

Her face wad fyle the Logan Water : 
Sic a wife as Willie had, 

I wadna gie a button for her. 



No. 214. There's sax eggs in the pan, gudeman. 

Tune : O, ait ye were dead guidman (see infra). 

Chorus. O, an ye were dead, gudeman ! 

A green turf on your head, gudeman I 
I wad bestow my ividowhood 
Upon a rantin Highlandman I 

There's sax eggs in the pan, gudeman, 
There 's sax eggs in the pan, gudeman ; 
There 's ane to you, and twa to me, 
And three to our John Highlandman ! 

A sheep's head in the pot, gudeman, 

A sheep's head in the pot, gudeman, 

The flesh to him, the broo to me. 

An' the horns become your brow, gudeman! 

Sing, round about the fire wi' a rung she ran. 
An' round about the fire wi' a rung she ran : — 
'Your horns shall tie you to the staw, 
An' I shall bang your hide, gudeman I ' 



±92 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 215. / bought my wife a stane 6 lint. 

Tune: The weary pund d' tow. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 350, 

Slow 



fi^^^E^^B^^^^^^^:^ 



3r 



Chorus. The wea - ry pund, the wea-ry pund. The wca - ry pund o' tow! 

Fine. 



pE^m^^^^^S ^^ZZ^^^^ f^ ^ ^. 



I think my wife will end her life Be -fore she spin her tow. 



^^^li^^^^^ 



I bought my wife a stane o' lint As gude as e'er did grow. And 

D. C. 



if 



i^p^^^^^g 



E£ 



a' that she has made o' that, Is ae poor pund o' tow. 

Chorus. The weary pund, the weary pund, 
The weary pund 0' tow ! 
I think my wife will end her life 
Before she spin her tow. 

I BOUGHT my wife a stane o' lint 

As gude as e'er did grow, 
And a' that she has made o' that 

Is ae poor pund o' tow. 

There sat a bottle in a bole 

Beyont the ingle low ; 
And ay she took the tither souk 

To drouk the stourie tow. 

Quoth I : ' For shame, ye dirty dame, 

Gae spin your tap o' tow ! ' 
She took the rock, and wi' a knock 

She brak it o'er ray pow. 

At last her feet — I sang to see't ! — ■ 
Gaed foremost o'er the knowe, 

And or I wad anither jad, 
I'll wallop in a tow. 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



193 



No. 216. The bairns gat out wi' an unco shout. 

Tune : The dettks dang o'er nty daddie. Scots Mus. Museum, 1792, No. 396. 

Merri'ly. 



P^ 



^J^E^^^ 



::^: 



The bairns gat out wi' an un - co shout: — ' The deuks dang o'er my 



^^J^ 



:^-=is 



=P?=t2: 



*7 '^ -0j- -0- ' "■ • -ff- • ^ • I 

dad -die, O!' 'The fien - ma-care,' quo' the fei - rie auld wife, 'He was but 



^I^ESE-^^EiE:-^ 



s 



^^ 



a paid lin bo - dy, O ! ' He paid - les out, and he paid - les in, 



^^^SS^^^S^ 



An' he paid - les late and ear - ly, O ! This se • ven lang years I hae 



^^ 



:^?=?r=^ 



^^^ 



]s=^^ 






'-¥=M 



T^=^ 



lien by his side, An' he is but a fus - ion - less car - lie, O ! ' 



The bairns gat out wi' an unco shout : — 

' The deuks dang o'er my daddie, O ! ' 
'The fien-ma-care,' quo' the feirie auld wife, 

' He was but a paidHn body, O ! 
He paidles out, and he paidles in, 

An' he paidles late and early, O ! 
This seven lang years I hae lien by his side, 

An' he is but a fusionless carlie, O ! ' 



'O, haud your tongue, my feirie auld wife, 

O, haud your tongue, now Nansie, O ! 
I've seen the day, and sae hae ye, 

Ye wadna been sae donsie, O ! 
I've seen the day ye butter'd my brose, 

And cuddl'd me late and early, O ; 
But downa-do's come o'er me now, 

And, och, I find it sairly, O ! ' 



194 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 2 1 7. Husband, husband, cease your strife. 

Tune : My jo, Janet. Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 36. 
Slow and pointed. 



g=^=fc=P^ 



^Sl 



^^e=^- 



' Hus- band, hus- band, cease your strife, Nor long - er id - ly rave, sir! 



Tlio' I am your wed - ded wife, Yet I am not your slave, sir ! 



=F=^ 



s 



\^=^^ 




One of two must still o - bey, Nan - cy, Nan - cy ; 



f^^^^^=^^ 



S^ 



it man or wo - man, say, 



your 



' Husband, husband, ce 
strife, 

Nor longer idly rave, sir ! 
Tho' I am 3'our wedded wife. 

Yet I am not your slave, sir ! ' 
' One of two must still obey, 

Nancy, Nancy ; 
Is it man or vvoman, say, 

My spouse Nancy?' 

' If 'tis still the lordly word. 

Service and obedience, 
I'll desert my sov'reign lord. 

And so good-bye, allegiance ! ' 
' Sad will I be so bereft, 

Nancy, Nancy ; 
Yet I'll try to make a shift, 

My spouse Nancy.' 



My spouse Nan - cy : 



'My 



poor heart, then break it 
must, 
My last hour I am near it : 
When you lay me in the dust, 
Think, how you vsrill bear it.' 
' I will hope and trust in Heaven, 

Nancy, Nancy ; 
Strength to bear it will be given. 
My spouse Nancy.' 

'Well, sir,' from the silent dead, 

Still I'll try to daunt you : 
Ever round your midnight bed 

Horrid sprites shall haunt you ! ' 
' I'll wed another like my dear 

Nancy, Nancy ; 
Then all hell will fly for fear. 

My spouse Nancy.' 



No. 218. / 7ie-jer saw a fairer. 

Tune : My wife's a wanton wee thing (see No. 220). 

Chorus. She is a winsome wee thing, 
She is a handsome wee thing. 
She is a Idesonie wee thing, 
This sweet wee wife c' tnine \ 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



195 



I NEVER saw a fairer, 
I never lo'ed a dearer, 
And neist my heart I'll wear her, 
For fear my jewel tine. 

The warid's wrack, we share o't, 
The warstle and the care o't, 
Wi' her I'll blythely bear it, 
And think my lot divine. 



No. 219. O, that I had neer been mavfied. 

Scots Musical Museum y 1803, No. 593. 



* 



Tune : Crowdte. 

Slowly 



gJtegEgEgEgEJE^^ ^^^g 



O, that I had ne'er been mar-ried, I wad ne - ver had nae care ! 



i^^^^^^ 



^?=^^ 



Now I've got - ten wife an' weans, An' they cry 'crow - die' ev - er - mair. 



'■^E^^E^^E ^^ ^^tjL ^^^ ^^ 



Chorus. — Ance crow-die:, twice crow-die. Three times crow-die in a day; Gin 



k^ 



S^ 



m 



£JU3 



y^-^5^ 



ye ^ crow-die'' on - ie mair, YeHl crow -die a" tny meal a -way. 

[O, THAT I had ne'er been married, 

I wad never had nae care ; 
Now I've gotten wife an' weans, 

An' they cry ' crowdie ' evermair. 

Chorus. Ance crowdie, twice crowdie, 

Three times crowdie in a day; 
Gin ye ' crowdie ' onie mair, 

Ye II crowdie a' my meal away."] 

Waefu' want and hunger fley me, 

Glow'rin by the hallan en' : 
Sair I fecht them at the door, 

But ay I'm eerie they come ben. 
02 



196 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 220^ She play'd the loon or she was married. 

Tune : My wife's a ivanton wee thing. Stewart's Reels, 1762, p. 30. 



p^=;^°^l^E^^|^ !E^ 



Chorus. My wife V a -wan - ion wee thing. My -wife ^s a wan • 



f^ ^$^^=^=B ^^^^^ ^^ 



ton wee thing. My wife 'j a ■wan 
Fine- 



ton wee thing. She win - 
tr 



s 



^5^3^3^ 



3^ 



na be guid-ed by me. 



She play'd the loon or she was mar 



^^ 



^-i^^ 



ried, She play'd the loon or she was mar - ried, She play'd the loon 

D.C. 



:gE£=^= g=g^ 



35EEE^ 



or slie was mar - ried, She'll do it a - gain or she die. 



Chorus. \_My wife's a wanton wee thing, 
My wife 's a wantoit wee thing, 
My ivife 's a wanton wee thing, 
She winna be guided by me. 

She play'd the loon or she was married, 
She play'd the loon or she was married, 
She play'd the loon or she was married. 
She'll do it again or she die.] 

She sell'd her coat and she drank it, 
She sell'd her coat and she drank it, 
She row'd hersell in a blanket, — 
She winna be guided by me. 

She mind't na when I forbade her. 
She mind't na when I forbade her, 
I took a rung and I claw'd her. 

And a braw gude bairn was she. 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



197 



No. 221. On peace aiC rest my mind was bent. 

Tune : My wife she dang me. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 532. 






Chorus. O, cji wy wife she dang me, Alt' aft my wife 



^^^^^^S 



P 



she bang'd fnel If ye gie a wo - man a' 

Fine. 



i 



ei. 






i^^ 



9 S -J'' 



^ 



-c^- 



//«r will^ Glide faith! she'll soon o'er • gang ye. 



^#S^ #^^^^^ 



^ 



On peace an' rest my mind was bent, And, fool 



ggg^SB 



^^^^^^ 



1= 



I was ! I mar - ri - ed ; But nev - er hon - est man's 

D.C. 



^ 



B^^S 



^^^^=^^=B 



tt= 



in - tent Sae curs - ed • ly mis - car - ried. 



Chorus. O, ay my wife she dang tne, 

Alt' aft my wife she banged me I 
If ye gie a woman a' her will, 

Gude faith ! she'' II soon d'ergang ye. 

On peace an' rest my mind was bent, 

And, fool I was ! I married ; 
But never honest man's intent 

Sae cursedly miscarried. 

Some sairie comfort at the last, 

When a' thir daj's are done, man ; 

My ^ pains o' hell ' on earth is past, 
I'm sure o' bliss aboon, man. 



198 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 2 2 2. / coft a stane d haslock woo. 

Tune : The cardin o't. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 437. 



' ^^^^S^^ES^^^^ . 



coft a stane o' has - lock woo, To mak a wab 



^^^^^^^ 



S^gi 



^£^ 



John - ie o't ; For John - ie is my on ' 

Chorus. 



w -m- 



ly jo — I lo'e him best of on - ie yet ! The 



^^ 



^i 



;?==* 



a 



& 



-Ui 



card - w o't, the spm - wz« o't. The warp - in 



ig=g^ 



:?i==?=^=S= 



gj^Egi^ 



0"= 



<7V, the wm - iiin of; Whe7z il - ka ell cost 



^^ 



I 9-^ ^-^ «. 



tEi 



3=^ 



Si 



fcat 



a!=:i^: 



a groat. The tai - lor stow the lyii ■ in o't. 



I COFT a stane o' haslock woo. 

To mak a wab to Johnie o't ; 
For Johnie is my only jo — 

I lo'e him best of onie yet ! 

Chorus. The cardin o't, the spinnin o't. 

The warptn o't, the winnin o't; 
When ilka ell cost me a groat. 
The tailor staw the lynin o't. 

For tho' his locks be Ij'art gray, 
And tho' his brow be held aboon, 

Yet I hae seen him on a day 
The pride of a' the parishen. 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



199 



No. 223. The cooper Ctiddie came hei'e azva. 

Tune: Bab at the bowster. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No, 431. 



r#: 



f ^ m- 



tt=titF=^^=P=?Et^ 



m=^^=^^ h^^ . 



Chorus. WeHl hide the coop • er be ■ hint the door. Be ■ hint the door, be 



SE35£^E^^^:EEi^E^^^g=Eg=B 



hint the door, We'll hide the coop-er be - hint the door. And 
Fine. 



Efc 



i^Efef 



IS 



^^^m 



cov • er him tin - der a mawn, O! The coop-er o' Cud-die came 



^ip^^^^ip 



te 



here a - wa, He ca'd the girrs out owre us a', An' our gude 

D.C. 



^^ ^ ^ U^=^^ ^^^:^^ 



wife has got- ten a ca', That's an-ger'd the sil . ly gudcman, O. 



Chorus. Well hide the coopir behint the door., 
Behint the door., behint the door.. 
We'll hide the cooper behint the door. 
And cover him under a mazvn, O. 

The cooper o' Cuddie came here awa, 
He ca'd the girrs out owre us a', 
An' our gudewife has gotten a ca', 
Tliat 's anger'd the silly gudeman/ O. 

He sought them out, he sought them in, 
Wi', ' Deil hae her ! ' and, ' Deil hae him ! ' 
But the body he was sae doited and blin', 
He wistna where he was gaun, O. 

They cooper'd at e'en, they cooper'd at morn. 
Till our gudeman has gotten the scorn ; 
On ilka brow she's planted a horn, 

And swears that there they sail stan', O ! 



200 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 224. Guide en to you, kim7ner. 

Tune : We're cC noddin. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 523. 



H P-» ts ta- 



^^^ 



■* — -• S — * ^-f It ' P- 



'Guid-e'en to you, kim-mer, And how do you do?' ' Hic-cup,' 

Chorus. 



- ^ -, — 4^ — » — a — r^ — •--f- P — -"S- 



9 — • — ^ — I- 



:^ 



»— ^ 



quo' kim-mer, 'The bet - ter that I'm fou.' We're a' nod - din. 




^E^E^^E ^3E^E^^^ :^ m :E^J^. 



7tid, 7iid, nod - din, We^re a' nod - din at our house at hame ! 



' Guide'en to you, kimmer, 

And how do you do?' 
'Hiccup,' quo' kimmer, 

'The better that I'm fou'.' 

Chorus. We''re a' noddin, nid, nid, noddin, 

We're a' noddin at our house at hante I 

[Kate sits i' the neuk, 

Suppin hen broo ; 
Deil tak Kate, 

An she be na noddin too !] 

' How 's a' wi' you, kimmer, 

And how do ye fare?' 
'A pint o' the best o't, 

And twa pints mair.' 

' How 's a' wi' you, kimmer, 

And how do ye thrive? 
How mony bairns hae ye ? * 

Quo' kimmer, ' I hae five.' 

'Are they a' Johnie's?' 

' Eh ! atweel, na : 
Twa o' them were gotten 

When Johnny was awa ! ' 

[Cats like milk, 

And dogs like broo ; 
Lads like lasses weel, 

And lasses lads too.] 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



20 1 



No. 225. There's cauld kail in Aberdeen. 

Tune: Cauld kail. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 162. 
Lively 



^^^^i^^^i^i 



There's cauld kail in A - ber-deen, And cas-tocks in Strath - bo - gie. 



p^^^^^^pi 



When il - ka lad maun hae his lass, Then fye, gie me my Cog-gie. 



lg- ^^^gi|gE|ErfgEgEgi^ ^ ^ 



Chorus. My Cog-gie, Sirs, My Cog-gie, Sirs, I can-not want my Cog - gie: I 

rr\ 



fegga^|^^^pE g£^^ 



wad ■ na gie my three-girr'd cap For e'er a quean on Bog 



There 's cauld kail in Aberdeen, 

And castocks in Strathbogie, 
When ilka lad maun hae his lass, 

Then fye, gie me my coggie. 

Chorus. My coggie, Sirs, my coggie, Sirs, 
I cannot want my coggie: 
I ivadna gie tny three- girr' d cap, 
For e'er a quean on Bogie. 

There 's Johnie Smith has got a wife 
That scrimps him o' his coggie. 

If she were mine, upon my life 
I wad douk her in a bogie. 




202 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



IMo. 226. The deil cam fiddliii thro the toivn. 

Tune: The Hemp-dresser. Scots Musical Museum, 1793, No. 399. 



Merrily 



^ — J^=^^e 



^ 



j^=:^€=^z 



^ 



The deil cam Cdd - Hn thro' the town, And danc'd a ■ wa 



^ 



t* 



?=s?S^@ 



vV the Excise-man, And il - ka wife cries : 'Auld Ma - houn, I 
Chorus. 



[^^g^^i^^ 



:^=^ 



ffi 



^ 



ish you luck o' the prize, man! 77/« deiVs a ■ wa, the deWs 



33^ 



eS 



53; 



2^^i=^ 



a - wa. The deil's a - wa wi' the Exciseniati! He's danc'd a 



m 



^. 



a^ 



^^1 



z=i: 



3EEt 



^—atz 



wa, he's danc'd a - wa. He's danc'd a - wa wi' the Excise-man! 

The deil cam fiddlin thro' the town, 

And danc'd avva wi' the Exciseman, 
And ilka wife cries: — 'Auld Mahoun, 

I wish you luck o' the prize, man ! ' 

Chorus. The deil's awa, the deiVs awa, 

The deil's awa wt the Exciseman ! 
He's danc'd awa, he's danc'd awa, 
He's danc'd awa wi' the Exciseman! 

'We'll mak our maut, and we'll brew our drink, 

We'll laugh, sing, and rejoice, man, 
And monie braw thanks to the meikle black deil, 

That danc'd awa wi' the Exciseman. 
' There 's threesome reels, there 's foursome reels. 

There 's hornpipes and strathspeys, man, 
But the ae best dance e'er cam to the land, 

Was The deil 's awa wi' the Excisemait ! ' 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



203 



No. 227. Landlady, cmmt the lawin. 

Tune: Hey tutti, taiti. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 170. 
Lively 



¥^=^ 



^g^^^E^^lppp^^l^ 



Land-Ia-dy, count the law-in. The day is near the daw - in ; Ye're a' 

Chorus. 



1^ 1 * B-JL-« — *a,'_iJ_— m m SI* -J 



blind drunk, boys, And I'm but jol - ly fou. Hey tut - ti, tai - ti. 



ii^^^^^p^pg^^ 



How tut ■ ti, tai - ti, Hey tut ■ ti, iai - ti, W/ia V /on now s 



Landlady, count the lawin, 
The day is near the dawin ; 
Ye're a' blind drunk, boys, 
And I'm but jolly fou. 

Chorus. Hey tuiti, taiti, 
How tutti, taiti, 
Hey tutti, taiti, 
Wha 's fou now ? 



Cog, and ye were ay fou, 
Cog, and ye were ay fou, 
I wad sit and sing to you, 
If ye were ay fou ! 

Weel may we a' be ! 
Ill may we never see ! 
God bless the king 
And the companie ! 



No. 2 2 8. A' the lads d Thornie-bank. 

Tune : Ruffian's rant (see No. 239). 

A' THE lads o' Thornie-bank, 

When they gae to the shore o' Bucky, 

They'll step in an' tak a pint 
Wi' Lady Onlie, honest lucky. 

Chorus. Lady Onlie, honest lucky, 

Bi-ews guid ale at shore o' Bucky ; 
I wish her sale for her guid ale, 
The best on rt' the shore o' Bucky. 

Her house sae bien, her curch sae clean — ■ 

I wat she is a dainty chuckle, 
And cheery blinks the ingle-gleede 

O' Lady Onlie, honest lucky ! 



204 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 229, / sing of a whistle. 

Tune: The Whistle. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 314. 



I sing of a whis-tle, a whis-tle of uorth, I sing of a whis-tle, 



JJ^J^^BJi ^g^^ggP^ ^^ 



the pride of the North, Was brought to the court of our good Scot - isli 

Chorus. 



^^^^^^^^^m 



king, And long with this wliis-tle all Scot-land shall ring. Fal de 



i^^s^^i^^p^^a 



7'al lal lal lay. And long with this whistle all Scotland shall ring. 



I SING of a whistle, a whistle of worth, 

I sing of a whistle, the pride of the North, 

Was brought to the court of our good Scotish king. 

And long with this whistle all Scotland shall ring. 

Chorus. Fal de ral lal lal lay 

And long with this whistle all Scotland shall ring. 

Old Loda, still rueing the arm of Fingal, 
The god of the bottle sends down from his hall — 
'This whistle's your challenge, to Scotland get o'er, 
, And drink them to hell, sir, or ne'er see me more ! ' 

Old poets have sung, and old chronicles tell. 
What champions ventur'd, what champions fell ; 
The son of great Loda was conqueror still. 
And blew on the whistle their requiem shrill. 

Till Robert, the lord of the Cairn and the Scaur, 
Unmatch'd at the bottle, unconquer'd in war. 
He drank his poor god-ship as deep as the sea : 
No tide of the Baltic e'er drunker than he. 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 20= 



Thus Robert, victorious, the trophy has gain'd ; 
Which now in his house has for ages remain'd ; 
Till three noble chieftains, and all of his blood, 
The jovial contest again have renew'd. 

Three joyous good fellows, with hearts clear of flaw ; 
Craigdarroch, so famous for wit, worth, and law ; 
And trusty Glenriddel, so skill'd in old coins ; 
And gallant Sir Robert, deep-read in old wines. 

Craigdarroch began, with a tongue smooth as oil. 
Desiring Glenriddel to yield up the spoil ; 
Or else he would muster the heads of the clan, 
And once more, in claret, try which was the man. 

' By the gods of the ancients ! ' Glenriddel replies, 
'Before I surrender so glorious a prize, 
I'll conjure the ghost of the great Rorie More, 
And bumper his horn with him twenty times o'er.' 

Sir Robert, a soldier, no speech would pretend, 
But he ne'er turn'd his back on his foe, or his friend ; 
Said, 'Toss down the whistle, the prize of the field,' 
And, knee-deep in claret, he'd die ere he'd yield. 

To the board of Glenriddel our heroes repair, 

So noted for drowning of sorrow and care ; 

But for wine and for welcome not more known to fame. 

Than the sense, wit, and taste of a sweet lovely dame. 

A Bard was selected to witness the fray. 
And tell future ages the feats of the day ; 
A Bard who detested all sadness and spleen. 
And wish'd that Parnassus a vineyard had been. 

The dinner being over, the claret they ply. 

And ev'ry new cork is a new spring of joy ; 

In the bands of old friendship and kindred so set, 

And the bands grew the tighter the more they were wet. 

Gay Pleasure ran riot as bumpers ran o'er ; 
Bright Phoebus ne'er witness'd so joyous a core. 
And vow'd that to leave them he was quite forlorn. 
Till Cynthia hinted he'd see them next morn. 

Six bottles apiece had well wore out the night. 
When gallant Sir Robert, to finish the fight, 
Turn'd o'er in one bumper a bottle of red. 
And swore 'twas the way that their ancestor did. 



2o6 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

Then worthy Glenriddel, so cautious and sage, 
No longer the warfare ungodly would wage ; 
A high ruling-elder to wallow in wine ! 
He left the foul business to folks less divine. 

The gallant Sir Robert fought hard to the end ; 
But who can with Fate and quart-bumpers contend ? 
Though Fate said, ' A hero should perish in light : ' 
So up rose bright Phoebus — and down fell the knight. 

Next up rose our Bard, like a prophet in drink : — 
' Craigdarroch, thou'U soar when creation shall sink ; 
But if thou w^ould flourish immortal in rhyme, 
Come — one bottle more— and have at the sublime ! 

'Thy line, that have struggled for Freedom with Bruce, 

Shall heroes and patriots ever produce : 

So thine be the laurel, and mine be the bay ; 

The field thou hast won, by yon bright god of day ! ' 



No. 230. Ye sons of old Killie. 

Tune : Over the water to Charlie (see infra). 

Ye sons of old Killie, assembled by Willie 

To follow the noble vocation. 
Your thrifty old mother has scarce such another 

To sit in that honored station. 
Fve little to say, but only to pray, — 

As praying 's the ton of your fashion — 
A prayer from the Muse you well may excuse — 

'Tis seldom her favourite passion : — 

'Ye powers who preside o'er the wind and the tide, 

Who marked each element's border, 
Who formed this frame with beneficent aim, 

Whose sovereign statute is order : — 
Within this dear mansion may wayward Contention 

Or withered Envy ne'er enter ; 
May secrecy round be the mystical bound 

And brotherly Love be the centre ! ' 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



207 



No. 231. It's now the day is dawin. 

Tune : Three gude fellows ayont the glen. Scots Mas. Museum, 1 796, No. 442. 
Lively 



i 



:& 



i 



P 






Chorus. There's three true gude fellows^ Inhere'' s three true gude f el-lows^ 

Fine. 




There'' s three true gude fel - lows, Down a - yont yon glen! 



pEgE pp^^=£:^ gig^^g^^Eg 



It's now the day is daw - in, But or niglit do fa' 



^^^^i^^^^i 



Whase cock's best at craw - in, Wil - lie, thou sail ken ! 

Chorus. There '5 three true gude fellows, 
There'' s three true gude fellows, 
There 's three true gude fellows, 
Down ayont yon glen '. 

It's now the day is dawin, 

But or night do fa' in, 
Whase cock 's best at crawin, 

Willie, thou sail ken ! 



No. 232. Deluded swain, the pleastire. 

Tune : The Collier^ s bonie lassie (see No. 44). 



Deluded swain, the pleasure 
The fickle fair can give thee 

Is but a fairy treasure — 

Thy hopes will soon deceive thee ; 

The billows on the ocean, 
The breezes idly roaming, 

The clouds' uncertain motion — 
They are but types of woman. 



Oh ! art thou not ashamed 
To doat upon a feature ? 

If man thou wouldst be named, 
Despise the silly creature ! 

Go, find an honest fellow ; 

Good claret set before thee. 
Hold on till thou art mellow, 

And then to bed in glory ! 



208 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 233. Should auld acquamtance be forgot? 

(Now first printed from a holograph of Burns in the Interleaved Museum, 
who states: — 'The original and by much the best set of the words of 
this song is as follows.') 

{AtUd Lang Syne.) 

Tune: Auld lang syne. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 413. 

Moderate Uine. 




S^g^ 



^g^gggjg^^ 



Should auld ac-quaint-ance be for - got, and nev - er brought to 



^a^ 



'^^^^^^^ 



mind ? Should auld ac-quaint-ance be for-got, And days o' lang syne ? 
Chorus. 



^^^^^^^m 



syne, my jo. For auld lang syne, WeHl 



^ 



^^^^^ 



SeB 



tak a Clip o' kifid-ness yet. For auld lang syne. 



Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And never brought to mind? 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And days o' lang syne ? 
Chorus. And for auld lang syne, my Jo, 
For atdd lang syne, 
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, 
For auld lang syne. 

And surely ye'U be your pint-stowp ! 

And surely I'll be mine ! 
And we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, 

For auld lang syne. 

We twa hae run about the braes. 

And pou'd the gowans fine ; 
But we've wander'd mony a weary foot 

Sin auld lang syne. 

We twa hae paidl'd i' the burn, 

Frae mornin sun till dine ; 
But seas between us braid hae roar'd 

Sin auld lang syne. 

And there 's a hand my trusty fiere ! 

And gie 's a hand o' thine ! 
And we'll tak a right gude-willy waught. 

For auld lang syne. 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



209 



No. 234. Should aidd acqtiaintance be forgot. 

(Thomson's Copy.) 

Tune: Auld lang syne. Thomson's Sco^/sA ^z'^, 1799, No. 68. 
Cheerily 



gfegE^aa^EJa^^gi ^^^^^ 



w 



Should auld ac-quaint-ance be for-got, And nev - er brought to mind ? 



^ 



:K — N— >- 



S 



fcE 



^g=it# 



?-^ 



Should auld ac-quaint-ance be for-got, And days o' lang syne? 
Chorus. r"^ 



^*g- 



5^^=^^ 



^ 



=t- 



For auld lang syne., my dear., For auld lang syne., 



i 



^^ 



-"^=g= 






We'll tak a cup 0' kijid-ness yef. For auld lang syne. 

Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And never brought to mind ? 
Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

And days o' lang syne ? 

Chorus. For auld lang syne, my dear, 
For auld lang syne, 
We'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, 
For auld lang syne. 

We twa ha'e run about the braes. 

And pu'd the gowans fine ; 
But we've wander'd mony a weary foot, 

Sin' auld lang syne. 

We twa ha'e paidlet i' the burn, 

Frae morning sun 'till dine : 
But seas between us braid ha'e roar'd 

Sin' auld lang syne. 

And there's a hand, my trusty feire, 

And gie 's a hand o' thine; 
And we'll tak a right gude-willie waught, 

For auld lang syne. 

And surely ye'll be your pint-stoup, 

And surely I'll be mine ; 
And we'll tak a cup o' kindness yet, 

For auld lang syne. 



2IO 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 235. (9, Willie brewd a peck maiU. 



Tune : Willie brew'd a peck o' tnaut. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 291. 

Blythely 



pa, — 




see; Three bly - ther hearts that 



ei 



— V=; * •-- *- 0- 



ig 



S^t: 



lang 



i 



night Ye 
Chorus. 



wad 



found 



Chris 



— *-— « — m ^ - 






die. 



We 



are na fou. 






-».-J^-»- 



that 



;fc=s=; 



i^^E^^^EE^E^H^^ 



/oa, &</ 



just 



$ 



^^S^^^^iES 



3EEHE 



EB 



rfrd;* - J>ie in our 

1 h-1— te 



r-*-*-a- 



^V ; The 



cock 



may craw, the 



day 



m 



m 



T=?: 






s^— •-^ 



daw, Atid ay we'll taste 



bar - ley bree. 



O, Willie brew'd a peck o' maut, 

And Rob and Allan cam to see ; 
Three blyther hearts that lee-lang night 

Ye wadna found in Christendie. 

Chorus. We are na foti, we^re nae that fott, 
But just a drappie in our ee ; 
The cock may craw, the day may daw, 
And ay we'll taste the barley bree. 

Here are we met three merry boys, 
Three merry boys I trow are we ; 

And monie a night we've merry been, 
And monie mae we hope to be ! 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



211 



It is the moon, I ken her horn, 

That 's blinkin in the lift sae hie : 
She shines sae bright to wyle us hame, 

But, by my sooth, she'll wait a wee! 
Wha first shall rise to gang- awa, 

A cuckold, coward loun is he! 
Wha first beside his chair shall fa', 

He is the king amang us three! 



No. 236. No churchman am I for to rail 
and to write. 

Tune : Come let its prepare (see infra). 
No churchman am I for to rail and to write, 
No statesman nor soldier to plot or to fight, 
No sly man of business contriving a snare, 
For a big-belly 'd bottle 's the whole of my care. 
The peer I don't envy, I give him his bow ; 
I scorn not the peasant, tho' ever so low; 
But a club of good fellows, hke those that are here. 
And a bottle like this, are my glory and care. 
Here passes the squire on his brother— his horse, 
There centum per centum, the cit with his purse. 
But see you The Crown, how it waves in the air? 
There a big-belly'd bottle still eases my care. 
The wife of my bosom, alas ! she did die ; 

For sweet consolation to church I did fly; 

I found that old Solomon proved it fair 

That a big-belly'd bottle's a cure for all care, 

I once was persuaded a venture to make; 

A letter inform'd me that all was to wreck; 

But the pursy old landlord just waddled upstairs 

With a glorious bottle that ended my cares. 

'Life's cares they are comforts '-a maxim laid down 

By the bard, what d'ye call him? that wore the black gown 

And faith I agree with th' old prig to a hair; 

For a big-belly'd bottle 's a heav'n of a care. ' 

A STANZA ADDED IN A MASON LODGE. 

Then fill up a bumper and make it o'erflow. 
And honours masonic prepare for to throw; 
May every true brother of the compass and square 
Have a big-belly'd bottle, when harass'd with care ! 
Pa 



212 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 237. O, rattlin, roarin Willie. 

Tune: Rattlin, roarin Willie. . Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 194. 
Lively 



^h 



^pi^g^^i^^^ 



O, ratt - lin, roar - in Wil - lie, O, he held to the fair, 




J-ad 1 — 9 — 



i^^^^ 



- ^ I - — — ff— * — » — / — 1^ 



An' for to sell his fid - die And buy some oth - er ware ; But 



^^^^^^l^S 



--^=^^=^ 



part - ing wi' his fid - die. The saut tear blin't his e'e — And, 




& 



& 



^ 



±^=^=t=t^=t2=^^^ 



—0 — 9- 

ratt - lin, roar - in Wil - lie, Ye're wel - come hame to me ! 



[O, RATTLIN, roarin Willie, 

O, he held to the fair, 
An' for to sell his fiddle 

And buy some other ware ; 
But parting wi' his fiddle, 

The saut tear blin't his e'e — 
And, rattlin, roarin Willie, 

Ye're welcome hame to me ! 

'O Willie, come sell your fiddle, 
O, sell your fiddle sae fine ; 

O Willie come sell your fiddle 
And buy a pint o' wine ! ' 



' If I should sell my fiddle. 
The warl' would think I was mad ; 

For mony a rantin day 

Mjr fiddle and I hae had.'] 

As I cam by Crochallan, 

I cannily keekit ben, 
Rattlin, roarin Willie 

Was sitting at yon boord-en' ; 
Sitting at yon boord-en'. 

And amang guid companie ; 
Rattlin, roarin Willie, 

Ye're welcome hame to me. 



No. 238. Here's a bottle and an honest friend. 

(Tune unknown.) 

There's nane thai''s blest of human kind 
But the cheeiful and the gay, mait. 



Here 's a bottle and an honest friend ! 

What ■wad you wish for mair, man ! 
Wha kens, before his life may end, 

What his share may be o' care, man ! 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



213 



Then catch the moments as they fly, 
And use them as ye ought, man ! 

Believe me, happiness is shy, 
And comes not aye when sought, man ! 



No. 239. In comin by the brig Dye. 

Tune : Ruffian's rant. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 156. 

Sprightly 



pg^^^ ^^^ ^i i ^ 



In comin by the brig o' Dye, At Dar-Iet we a 




blink did tar-ry 



^g^i^^^i^ 



As day was dawin in the sky, We drank a health to bon - ie Ma - ry. 






Chorus. Theniel Mensies' bon - ie Ma • ry, Theniel Memies' bon - ie Ma - ry, 

-.-^ - - ^ 



pi^ 



i^ 



^i=^ 



Charlie Grigor tint his plaidie, Kissin XheniePs bon • ie Ma - ry. 

In comin by the brig o' Dye, 

At Darlet we a blink did tarry ; 
As day was dawin in the sky. 

We drank a health to bonie Mary. 

Chorus. Theniel Menzies' bonie Mary, 

Theniel Menzies'' bonie Mary, 
Charlie Grigor tint his plaidie, 
Kissin ThenieVs bonie Mary, 

Her een sae bright, her brow sae white. 
Her haffet locks as brown 's a berry ; 

And ay they dimpl't W\ a smile. 
The rosy cheeks o' bonie Mary. 

We lap and danc'd the lee-lang day. 
Till piper lads were wae and weary ; 

But Charlie gat the spring to pay, 
For kissin Theniel's bonie Mary. 



214 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 240. Adieu ! a heart-warm^ fond adieu. 

Tune : Good night and joy be wV you a'. Scots Mus. Museum, 1803, No. 600. 
Lively 



I 



5 



m. 



s 



e^ 



gS^EE? 



A - dieu ! a heart-warm, fond a - dieu ; Dear bro - thers 



i=s: 



^E^eEEH3?EEiEEiEEe;p3E? 



of the mys ■ tic iye. Ye fa - vour - ed en - Ugh - ten'd 



tf — ■ ^» — , ^-^ — 2^# — r-^- 



s?i= 



few, Com - pa - nions of my so - cial joy! Tho' I 



^^^^ ^m^^mm^ 



to for - eign lands must hie ; Pur - su - ing For 



& 






tune's slid - d'ry ba' ; With melt - ing heart and brim 



i^ ^r^ ^pg^^ ?^-^^^^ 



ful eye, I'll mind you still, tho' far a - wa. 

Adieu ! a heart-warm, fond adieu ; 

Dear brothers of the mystic tye, 
Ye favoured, enlighteiid few, 

Companions of my social joy ! 

Tho' I to foreign lands must hie, 
Pursuing Fortune's slidd'ry ba' ; 

With melting heart and brimful eye, 
ril mind you still, tho' far awa. 

Oft have I met your social band, 

And spent the chearful, festive night ; 
Oft, honour'd with supreme command, 

Presided o'er the sons of light: 

And by that hieroglyphic bright, 
Which none but craftsmen ever saw ! 

Strong Mem'ry on my heart shall write 
Those happy scenes, when far awa ! 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



215 



May Freedom, Harmony, and Love, 
Unite you in the grattd design, 

Beneath th' Omniscient eye above — 
The glorious Architect Divine — 
That you may keep th' unerring line, 

Still rising by the plummet's laiv, 
Till Order bright, completely shine, 

Shall be my pray'r when far awa. 

And you, farewell ! whose merits claim 

Justly that highest badge to wear : 
Heav'n bless your honour'd, noble name, 

To Masonry and Scotia dear ! 

A last request permit me here, — 
When yearly ye assemble a', 

One round, I ask it with a tear. 
To him, the Bard that 's far awa. 



No. 241. Up ivi the carls d Dysari. 

Tune: Hey ccC thro\ Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 392. 
With spirit 



jiS^gg^gig^^PpS^^iE^^^- 



Up wi' the carls o' Dy - sart And the lads o' Buckhaven, And the kimmers 

Chorus. 



i^^^i^g^H 



w 



? 



o' Lar-go And the las-ses o' Leven. Hey, ca' thro\ ca^ thro'. For we hie 



^^^^^1^1^^^ 



mei-kle a -do; Hey, ca' thro\ ca' thro\ For zve has mei-kle a -do! 



Up wi' the carls o' D3'sart 
And the lads o' Buckhaven, 

And the kimmers o' Largo 
And the lasses o' Leven. 

Chorus. Hey, ca' thro', cci thro', 
For we hae meikle ado ; 
Hey, ca' thro', ca^ thro'. 
For we hae meikle ado 1 



We hae tales to tell. 

And we hae sangs to sing ; 
We hae pennies to spend. 

And we hae pints to bring. 

We'll live a' our days. 

And them that comes behin', 
Let them do the like, 

And spend the gear they win. 



2l6 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No, 242. Gane is the day. 

Tune : Gudewife, count the lawin. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 313. 
Brif^htly 



i 






^ 



-^^ 



E 



EZ^E 



Gane is the day, and mirk's the night, But we'll ne'er stray for faut o' 



^ 



*=(£: 



^g=S? 



5 



light, 



For ale and bran -dy's stars and moon, And blude - red wine 's the 
Chorus. 



?-S3 



?^ 



ry - sin sun. Then, gude-wife, count the law - zw, The law - in, the law 



^m 



^5 



5^5 



M • " 



f;~> j- 



m 



-^ 



z«; Then,gudewife,cou7tt the law - in. And bri7tg a cog-gie viair. 

Gane is the day, and mirk's the night, 
But we'll ne'er stray for faut o' light, 
For ale and brandy 's stars and moon, 
And blude-red wine 's the rysin sun. 

Chorus. Then, gudewife, count the lawin, 
The lawin, the lawin ; 
Then, gudewife, count the lawin, 
And bring a coggie tnair. 

There's wealth and ease for gentlemen, 
And simple folk maun fecht and fen' ; 
But here we're a' in ae accord, 
For ilka man that 's drunk 's a lord. 

My coggie is a haly pool, 

That heals the wounds o' care and dool. 

And pleasure is a wanton trout : 

And ye drink it a', ye'U find him out ! 



No. 243. Come, dumpers high ! express your joy I 

Tune : Ye're welcome Charlie Stewart (see No. 26). 

Chorus. You're welcome, Willie Steivart! 
You^re welcome, Willie Stewart! 
There 's ne'er a flow'r that blooms in May, 
That''s half sae welcome's thou art! 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 



217 



Come, bumpers high ! express your joy ! 

The bowl we maun renew it — 
The tappet-hen, gae bring her ben, 

To welcome Willie Stewart ! 
May foes be Strang, and friends be slack ! 

Ilk action may he rue it ; 
May woman on him turn her back, 

That wrangs thee, Willie Stewart ! 



No. 244. Contented wi little and canty wi mair. 

Tune : Lumps of Pudding. Durfey's Pills, 1720, vi. p. 300. 

Cheerily 



^^^^^^^^^^ 



Con - tent - ed wi' lit - tie and can - tie wi' mair, 



i 



^^ 



^^^^i^ 



3^^ 



When - e'er I for - gath - er wi' sor - row and care, I 



i 



t 



^ 



^=^ 



^^^=^ 



gie them a skelp as they're creep - in a - lang, Wi' a 

t tq te .^ . a^^ ==?^ 



^ 



^^ 



^3^^ 



-^ & - 



2e 



^ 



o ' 



cog o' guid swats and an 



auld Scot - tish sang. 



Contented wi' little and cantie wi' mair, 

Whene'er I forgather wi' sorrow and care, 

I gie them a skelp as they're creepin alang, 

Wi' a cog o' guid swats and an auld Scottish sang. 

I whyles claw the elbow o' troublesome thought ; 

But man is a soger, and life is a faught ; 

My mirth and guid humour are coin in my pouch, 

And my freedom's my lairdship nae monarch daur touch. 

A towmond o' trouble, should that be my fa', 

A night o' guid fellowship sowthers it a' : 

When at the blythe end o' our journey at last, 

Wha the deil ever thinks o' the road he has past ! 

Blind Chance, let her snapper and stoyte on her way, 
Be't to me, be't frae me, e'en let the jade gae ! 
Come ease or come travail, come pleasure or pain, 
My warst word is: — 'Welcome, and welcome again!' 



2l8 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 245. / had sax owsen in a pleugh. 

Tane : The bottom of the punch bowl. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 542. 



^m 



^m 






'^ 



Chorus. O gude ale comes, and gude ale goes, Gude ale gars me 



^# 



§1 



* ^~ 

sell my hose., Sell my hose and pawn my shoon — Gude ale keeps 



^^^^§^ 



my heart a - boon! I had sax ow - sen in . a 



i^Si 



sq=?i= 



FffTEMg^ 



pleugh, And they drew a' weel e - neugh : I sell'd them a' 

D.C. 



g 



E^ 



S 



ii 






just ane by ane— Gude ale keeps the heart a - boon. 



Chorus. O gude ale comes, and gude ale goes, 
Gude ale gars me sell my hose. 
Sell my hose, and pawn my shoon — 
Gude ale keeps my heart aboon ! 

I HAD sax owsen in a pleugh, 
And they drew a' weel eneugh : 
I selFd them a' just ane by ane — 
Gude ale keeps the heart aboon. 

Gude ale hands me bare and busy, 
Gars me moop wi' the servant hizzie, 
Stand i' the stool when I hae dune — 
Gude ale keeps the heart aboon. 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS 219 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS, 



A Cantata. 



[No. 246.] 



RECITATIVO. 



When lyart leaves bestrow the yird, 
Or, wavering like the bauckie-bird, 

Bedim cauld Boreas' blast ; 

When hailstanes drive wi' bitter skyte, 

And infant frosts begin to bite, 

In hoary cranreuch drest ; 

Ae night at e'en a merry core 

O' randie, gangrel bodies 
In Poosie Nansie's held the splore. 
To drink their orra duddies : 
Wi' quaffing and laughing 

They ranted an' they sang, 
Wi' jumping an' thumping, 
The vera girdle rang. 

First, niest the fire, in auld red rags 
Ane sat ; weel braced wi' mealy bags 

And knapsack a' in order ; 
His doxy lay within his arm, 
Wi' usquebae and blankets warm 

She blinket on her sodger : 
An' ay he gies the tozie drab 

The tither skelpin kiss, 
While she held up her greedy gab 
Just like an aumous dish : 

Ilk smack still, did crack still, 

Just like a cadger's whip, 

Then staggering an' swaggering 

He roar'd this ditty up : — 



220 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Tune : Soldier's joy. 
Boldly 



[M<=Glashan's Scots Measures, 1781, p. 32.] 



»— * — t— m m- !-^«- 



3^^ 



E 



S^^ 



5^ 



I am a son of Mars, who have been in ma - ny wars, 



5=B^^^^ 



g 



s 



§^ 



-d — •_ 

And show my cuts and scars wherever I come ; This here 



e 



?^H 



Fft^^ 



^^ 



was for a wench, and that oth - er in a trench When wel- 

Chorus. 






com-ing the French at the sound of the drum. Lai de dan 



^^^^ ^^E^^^^mm 



dle^ 4-c. 




g^^^P^ 



I AM a son of Mars, who have been in many wars, 
And show my cuts and scars wherever I come ; 
This here was for a wench, and that other in a trench 
When welcoming the French at the sound of the drum. 
Chorus. Lai de daudle, &^c. 

My prenticeship I past, where my leader breath'd his last, 
When the bloody die was cast on the heights of Abram : 
And I served out my trade, when the gallant game was play'd. 
And the Moro low was laid at the sound of the drum. 

I lastly was with Curtis, among the floating batt'ries. 
And there I left for witness an arm and a limb ; 
Yet let my country need me, with Elliot to head me, 
I'd clatter on my stumps at the sound of a drum. 

And now, tho' I must beg with a wooden arm and leg, 
And many a tatter'd rag hanging over my bum, 
I'm as happy with my wallet, my bottle, and my callet. 
As when I us'd in scarlet to follow a drum. 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS 



221 



What tho' with hoary locks I must stand the winter shocks, 
Beneath the woods and rocks oftentimes for a home ! 
When the t'other bag I sell, and the t'other bottle tell, 
I could meet a troop of hell at the sound of a drum. 



[No. 247.] 



RECITATIVO. 

He ended; and the kebars.sheuk 

Aboon the chorus roar ; 
While frighted rattons backward leuk, 

An' seek the benmost bore : 
A fairy fiddler frae the neuk. 

He skirl'd out, ' Encore ! ' 
But up arose the martial chuck, 

An' laid the loud uproar : — 



Tune : Sodger laddie. [Orpheus Caledonms, 1733, No. 27.] 
Moderate 



m 



^^^^^^ 



i5=^ 



^ 



I once was a maid tho' I can - not tell when, And 



t^Ti 



^ 



:??= 



^^ 






still my de - light is in pro-peryoungmen; Someone of 



^^Eg^Efe^gg^E^^-^^ 



a troop of dra - goons was my dad - ie ; No won - der 

Chorus. 



^^ ^^^ ^^=^=^NEg 



I'm fond of a sodg - er lad - die. Stn£^, lal de 



^^^F^^^^= g^^g£ £=^-=^^ 



lal, ffC. 



^^i^^^pi^^^^ 



# 



^^ 



=i==F 



g^t^^ 



3^^^"^ 



=P^=^ 



222 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



I ONCE was a maid tho' I cannot tell when, 
And still my delight is in proper young men ; 
Some one of a troop of dragoons was my dadie ; 
No wonder I'm fond of a sodger laddie. 

Chorus. Sing, Lai de lal, c^c. 

The first of my loves was a swaggering blade ; 
To rattle the thundering drum was his trade ; 
His leg was so tight and his cheek was so ruddy, 
Transported I was with my sodger laddie. 

But the godly old chaplain left him in the lurch ; 
The sword I forsook for the sake of the church ; 
He venturd the soul, and I risked the body ; 
'Twas then I proved false to my sodger laddie. 

Full soon I grew sick of my sanctified sot ; 
The regiment at large for a husband I got ; 
From the gilded spontoon to the fife I was ready ; 
I asked no more but a sodger laddie. 

But the peace it reduc'd me to beg in despair, 
Till I met my old boy in a Cunningham fair ; 
His rags regimental they flutter'd so gaudy ; 
My heart it rejoic'd at a sodger laddie. 

And now I liave lived — I know not how long I 

And still I can join in a cup and a song; 

But whilst with both hands I can hold the glass steady, 

Here's to thee, my hero, my sodger laddie. 



[Na 248.] 



RECITATIVO. 



Poor Merry Andrew, in the neuk 

Sat guzzling wi'' a tinkler-hizzie ; 
They mind't na wha the chorus teuk, 

Between themsels they were sae busy : 
At length wi' drink an' courting dizzy, 

He stoiter'd up an' made a face ; 
Then turn'd an' laid a smack on Grizzie, 

Syne tun'd his pipes wi' grave grimace: 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS 



223 



Tune : Attld Sir Symon. [Pills to Purge Melancholy^ 1719? iii- P- 143] 
Andante 



«3BEB 



^ 



m 



^^m 



^i=F=P 



tf=3-F^ 



=P^ 



Sir Wisdom 's a fool when he's fou ; Sir Knave is a fool in a ses - sion, 



#^^^pa^^i^ PF^^^^ 



He 's there but a prentice I trow, But I am a fool by pro-fes-sion. 



Sir Wisdom 's a fool when he's fou ; 

Sir Knave is a fool in a session, 
He 's there but a prentice I trow, 

But I am a fool by profession. 

My grannie she bought me a beuk. 
An' I held awa to the school ; 

I fear I my talent misteuk, 

But what will ye hae of a fool ? 

For drink I would venture my neck ; 

A hizzie 's the half of my craft ; 
But what could ye other expect 

Of ane that 's avowedly daft ? 



I ance was tied up like a stirk 

For civilly swearing and quaffing ; 

I ance was abus'd i' the kirk 
For towsing a lass i' my daffin. 

Poor Andrew that tumbles for sport 
Let naebody name wi' a jeer : 

There 's even, I'm tauld, i' the Court 
A tumbler ca'd the Premier. 

Observ'd ye yon reverend lad 
Mak faces to tickle the mob ; 

He rails at our mountebank squad, — 
It's rivalship just i' the job ! 



And now my conclusion I'll tell, 
For faith! I'm confoundedly dry; 

The chiel that 's a fool for himsel, 
Gude Lord ! he 's far dafter than I. 



[No. 249.] 



RECITATIVO. 



Then niest outspak a raucle carlin, 
Wha kent fu' weel to cleek the sterlin ; 
For mony a pursie she had hooked. 
An' had in mony a well been douked. 
Her love had been a Highland laddie, 
But weary fa' the waefu' woodie ! 
Wi' sighs an' sobs she thus began 
To wail her braw John Highlandman : — 



224 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Tune : O, an ye were dead, Guidtnan. [Cal. Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. p. 24.] 
Cheerily tr 




feii^=3^|^^ 



J— J— a/- 



A high-land lad my love was born, The lal-land laws he held in 



i^^g^^g^p^ 



:^=Q= 



j^o?:^ 



scorn, But he still was faith - fu' to his clan, My gal - lant, braw 
Chorus. ^ 






John High-land-tnan. Sing hey my braw John High - lartd- man! 



lE^^^^^^^SEJ^Eg -^^ 



Sing ho my braw John Highlandman! There'' s ?ioi a lad 

tr 



ps^^^l^i^^i 



ijt a' the Ian'' Was match Jor my Johti High - land-man: 



A Highland lad my love was born, 
The lalland laws he held in scorn, 
But he still was faithfu' to his clan, 
My gallant, braw John Highlandman. 

Chorus. Sing hey my braw John Highlandman '. 
Sing ho my braiv Johti Highlandtnan ! 
There'' s not a lad in a' the Ian' 
Was match for my John Highlandman ! 



With his philabeg an' tartan plaid, 
An' guid claymore down by his side, 
The ladies' hearts he did trepan. 
My gallant, braw John Highlandman. 

We ranged a' from Tweed to Spey, 
An' liv'd like lords an' ladies gay ; 
For a lalland face he feared none,^ 
My gallant, braw John Highland- 
man. 

They banish'd him beyond the sea, 
But ere the bud was on the tree, 



Adown my cheeks the pearls ran, 
Embracing my John Highlandman. 

But, och ! they catch'd him at the last, 
And bound him in a dungeon fast ; 
My curse upon them every one — 
They've hang'd my braw John High- 
landman ! 

And now a widow I must mourn 
The pleasures that will ne'er return ; 
No comfort but a hearty can. 
When I think on John Highlandman. 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS 



225 



[_i\0. 2 2 O.J RECITATIVO. 

A PIGMY scraper wi' his fiddle, 

Wha us'd to trystes an' fairs to driddle, 

Her strappan limb an' gausy middle 

(He reach'd nae higher) 
Had hol'd his heartie like a riddle, 

An' blawn't on fire. 

Wi' hand on hainch, and upward e'e, 
He croon'd his gamut, one, two, three, 
Then in an arioso key 

The wee Apollo, 
Set off wi' allegretto glee 

His giga solo : — 



Tune: Whistle owre the lave o''t. [Bremner's Sco/s j??^^/!?, 1759, p. 56.] 
Moderately ir tr 



^ 



Si^ 



:fr-^7— ^^ 



^ 



^^ 



Let me ryke up to dight that tear, An' 
tr 



wi' me an' be my 
tr 



^^^^^^ 



S BE ^-.--U 



^ 



=^=N- 



?^ 



i 



dear, An' then your ev - ry care an' fear May whis-tle owre the lave o't. 

tr tr 



^^i^^g^ ^EJ^Egjp ^^^ 



Chorus. / ara a Jid-dler to my trade ^ Alt' a' the tunes that e' er I play" d^ 

tr 



^ 



^^^^^^^^^^ 



The sweet - est still to wife or maid Was — Whistle owre the lave o"t. 



Let me ryke up to dight that tear. 
An' go wi' me an' be my dear, 
, An' then your every care an' fear 
May whistle owre the lave o't. 

Chorus. 

/ am a fiddler to my trade, 
ArC a' the tunes thai e'er I play' d, 
The sweetest still to wife or maid 
Was — Whistle owre the lave o't. 

At kirns an' weddins we'se be there, 
An' O, sae nicely 's we will fare ! 



We'll bowse about till Dadie Care 
Sing, Whistle owre the lave o't. 

Sae merrily 's the banes we'll pyke, 
An' sun oursels about the dyke ; 
An' at our leisure, when ye like 
We'll whistle owre the lave o't. 

But bless me wi' your heav'n o' 

charms. 
An' while I kittle hair on thairms, 
Hunger, cauld, an' a' sic harms 
May whistle owre the lave o't. 



226 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



[No, 251.] 



RECITATIVO. 

Her charms had struck a sturdy caird 

As weel as poor gut-scraper ; 
He taks the fiddler by the beard, 

An' draws a roosty rapier — 
He swoor by a' was swearing worth 

To speet him like a pliver, 
Unless he Avould from that time forth 

Relinquish her for ever. 

Wi' ghastly e'e, poor Tweedle dee 

Upon his hunkers bended, 
An' pray'd for grace wi' ruefu' face, 

An' so the quarrel ended. 
But tho' his little heart did grieve 

When round the tinkler prest her, 
He feign'd to snirtle in his sleeve 

When thus the caird address'd her :- 



Tune : Clout the caudron. 

Lively 



{Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 23.] 



E 



g ^EE F^"R^ 



:^=:Si: 



^=4^=t2 



My bon - ie lass, I work in brass, A tink-ler is my sta-tion; I've 



^ 



S^^^^^^^PI^^- 



=^T==^q 



^B=p: 



iE^:^ 



=1^=^=^— ^tC=t2 



tra-vell'd round all Christian ground In this my oc - cu - pa - tion ; 



I've 



i 



P3S 



^ 



E 



^^^^^^ 



^ 



ta'en the gold, an' been en-roll'd In many a no - ble squadron : But vain 



i 



H 






n 



=t 



they search'd, when off I march'd To go an' clout the caudron. 

My bonie lass, I work in brass, 

A tinkler is my station ; 
I've travell'd round all Christian ground 

In this my occupation ; 
I've ta'en the gold, an' been enroll'd 

In many a noble squadron : 
But vain they search'd, when off I march'd 

To go an' clout the caudron. 

I've ta'en the gold, &c. 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS 227 

Despise that shrimp, that wither'd imp, 

With a' his noise an' cap'rin, 
An' take a share with those that bear 

The budget and the apron : 
And by that stowp, my faith and houpe, 

And by that dear Kilbaigie, 
If e'er ye want, or meet with scant, 

May I ne'er weet my craigie ! 

And by that stowp, &c. 



[No. 252.] 



RECITATIVO. 



The caird prevail'd — th' unblushing fair 

In his embraces sunk, 
Partly wi' love, o'ercome sae sair, 

An' partly she was drunk. 
Sir Violino, with an air 

That show'd a man o' spunk, 
Wish'd unison between the pair. 

An' made the bottle clunk 

To their health that night. 

But hurchin Cupid shot a shaft 

That play'd a dame a shavie; 
The fiddler rak'd her fore and aft, 

Behint the chicken cavie. 
Her lord, a wight of Homer's* craft, 

Tho' limpan wi' the spavie. 
He hirpl'd up, and lap like daft, 

And shor'd them Dainty Davie 
O' boot that night. 

He was a care-defying blade 

As ever Bacchus listed ! 
Tho' Fortune sair upon him laid, 

His heart, she ever miss'd it. 
He had no wish but — to be glad, 

Nor want but — when he thristed ; 
He hated nought but — to be sad ; 

An' thus the Muse suggested 

His sang that night : — 

Homer is allowed to be the eldest ballad singer on record. — Burns. 

Q2 



228 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Tune : — For cC that, an' fl' that. 

Andante 



[Bremner's Scots Reels, 1759, P- S^-l 



-m^^^Et^ ^ES^^^^^^^ 




fe 



I am a bard, of no re - gard Wi' gea - tie folks an' a' that ; 

t=^- ^ h a-N . h.-a- l ^^-^t^— fa s 



^ 



-* « m — 



But Homer - like, the glow-ran byke, Frae town to town I draw that. 



P^^£^^#^ FiPp ^r^g 



Chorus. Foy a' that, an'' a' that, An'' twice as muckWs a' that; 




^^ 



^ 



i^ 



^ 



^^ 



I've lost but ane, I've two. be-hzn^, I've wife e-neugh for a' that. 



I AM a bard, of no regard 
Wi' g-entle folks an' a' that ; 

But Homer-like, the glowran byke, 
Frae town to town I draw that. 

Chorus. 

For cC that, an' d that, 

ArC twice as ntuckle's a that ; 
Fve lost but ane, I've twa behui' , 
Fve wife eneughfor a' that. 

I never drank the Muses' stank, 
Castalia's burn, an' a' that ; 

But there it streams, an' richly reams. 
My Helicon I ca' that. 

Great love I bear to all the fair, 
Their humble slave an' a' that ; 



But lordly will, I hold it still 
A mortal sin to thraw that. 

In raptures sweet, this hour we meet, 
Wi' mutual love an' a' that : 

But for how lang the flie may stang. 
Let inclination law that. 

Their tricks an' craft hae put me daft, 
They've taen me in, an' a' that ; 

But clear your decks, an' here 's ' the 
Sex ! ' 
I like the jads for a' that. 

For a' that, an' cC that, 

An' tivice as muckle's a' that ; 

My dearest bhtid, to do them guid, 
They're welcome tilVtforcC that. 



[No. 253.] 



RECITATIVO. 



So sung the bard — and Nansie's 

wa's 
Shook with a thunder of applause 
Re-echoed from each mouth ! 
Theytoom'd their pocks, theypawn'd 

their duds. 
They scarcely left to coor their fuds 
To quench their lowan drouth : 



Then owre again, the jovial thrang, 

The poet did request 
To lowse his pack and wale a sang, 
A ballad o' the best ; 
He rising, rejoicing. 

Between his twa Debdrahs, 

Looks round him, an' found them 

Impatient for the chorus : — 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS 



229 



Tune : Jolly Mortals, fill your glasses. [Ritson's English Songs, 1783.] 



i 



* 



■r^ 



i 



W 



w^^ 



See the sraok - ing bowl be - fore us, Mark our 



^ ^^m 



^ 



i 



jo - vial, rag 



ring! Round and round take 



i — r^—r^. 






-1 I 



*— ■ — \ h- 



'^^^-P 



::^ di 



up the chor - us, And in rap - tures let us sing,— 



See the smoking bowl before us, 

Mark our jovial, ragged ring ! 
Round and round take up the chorus, 

And in raptures let us sing, — 

Chorus. A fig for those by law protected! 
Liberty '5 a glorious feast ! 
Courts for cowards were erected, 
Churches built to please the priest ! 



What is title, what is treasure, 
What is reputation's care? 

If we lead a life of pleasure, 
'Tis no matter how or where ! 

With the ready trick and fable 
Round we wander all the day ; 

And at night, in barn or stable 
Hug our doxies on the hay. 

Does the train-attended carriage 
Thro' the country lighter rove ? 

Does the sober bed of marriage 
Witness brighter scenes of love ? 



Life is all a variorum, 

We regard not how it goes ; 
Let them cant about decorum, 

Who have character to lose. 

Here's to budgets, bags, and wallets! 

Here's to all the wandering train ! 
Here 's our ragged brats and callets ! 

One and all, cry out, — 'Amen ' ! 

A fig for those by law protected! 

Liberty 's a glorious feast ! 
Courts for cowards were erected, 

Churches built to please the priest ! 



230 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



No. 254. Amang the trees, where humming bees. 

Tune : The king of France he rade a race. Cal. Pock. Comp., c. 1756, viii. p. 26. 



I 



i?=5 



« — I « m I y • 



'l^fe 



A - mang the trees, where hum- ming bees At buds and flow'rs were 



^^^^^^^^ 



^=f^ 



^B^ 



hing-ing, O, Auld Cal - e - don drew out her drone, And to her 



*=fe 



^^^ 



^iEEE^PPg 



-jj-i 



pipe was sing - ing, O : 'Twas pi-broeh, sang, strath • speys, and reels, 






^^^^^ 



She dirl'd them aff fu' clear - ly, O, When there cam a yell 



— ^ — 1 a> — L_« __: ^<=*— I -U 



o' foreign squeels. That dang her tap - sal - tee - rie, O ! 

Amang the trees, where humming bees 

At buds and flow'rs were hinging, O, 
Auld Caledon drew out her drone. 

And to her pipe was singing, O : 
'Twas pibroch, sang, strathspeys, and reels — 

She dirl'd them aff fu' clearly, O, 
When there cam a yell o' foreign squeels, 

That dang her tapsalteerie, O ! 

Their capon craws and queer ' ha, ha's,' 

They made our lugs grow eerie, O ; 
The hungry bike did scrape and fyke, 

Till we were wae and weary, O. 
But a royal ghaist, wha ance was cased 

A prisoner aughteen year awa, 
He fir'd a fiddler in the north, 

That dang them tapsalteerie, O ! 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



231 



No. 255. Scots, zvha hae wt Wallace bled. 

Tune: Hey, tutti taiiie. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1801. 
Boldly . 



m^^^^^ 



Scots, wha hae wi' Wallace bled, Scots, wham Bruce has af - ten led, 



i 



- \> » • • 



p7^-~^-=^ 



^^^^^^ 



^ 



Wel-come to your gor - y bed Or to vie - tor - ie! 



^^=i^^^i F=FR =^^^ 



E 



Now 's the day, and now 's the hour : See the front o' bat - tie lour. 



EEEES 



HTJ ^-N 



^ 



i^ 



« •-= — " 1 — ' 



See approach proud Ed - ward's power — Chains and sla - ^er - ie ! 



Scots, wha hae wi' Wallace bled, 
Scots, wham Bruce has aften led, 
Welcome to your gory bed 
Or to victorie I 

Now's the day, and now's the hour: 
See the front o' battle lour, 
See approach proud Edward's power- 
Chains and slaverie ! 

Wha will be a traitor knave? 
Wha can fill a coward's grave? 
Wha sae base as be a slave ? — 
Let him turn, and flee ! 

Wha for Scotland's king and law 
Freedom's sword will strongly draw, 
Freeman stand or freeman fa', 
Let him follow me! 

By Oppression's woes and pains, 
By your sons in servile chains, 
We will drain our dearest veins 
But they shall be free ! 

Lay the proud usurpers low! 
Tyrants fall in every foe ! 
Liberty 's in every blow ! — 
Let us do, or die ! 



232 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 256. O, wha will to Saint Stephens house. 

Tune: Killiecrankie. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 102. 
Briskly 



^^^i^g^p^ 



^^ 



4^-*-^-^ 



O, wha will to Saint Ste-phen's house, To do our er 



Si 



m 



i^ 



* — ^ 



i 



rands there, man ? O, wha will (o Saint Ste-phen's house O' 



■»-T-»- 



e 



W^^ 



^ 



ig 



th' merry lads of Ayr, man? Or, will ye send a man o' 



S 






law? Or will ye send a 



•er? Or him wha led o'er 



:r=& 



i^EE^E^m^^ 



^ 



Scot - land a' The mei - kle Ur - sa Ma - jor? 



O, WHA will to Saint Stephen's house, 

To do our errands there, man ? 
O, wha will to Saint Stephen's house 

O' th' merry lads of Ayr, man ? 
Or will ye send a man o' law? 

Or will ye send a sodger ? 
Or him wha led o'er Scotland a' 

The meikle Ursa Major? 

Come, will ye court a noble lord, 

Or buy a score o' lairds, man ? 
For worth and honour pawn their word. 

Their vote shall be Glencaird's, man? 
Ane gies them coin, ane gies them wine, 

Anither gies them clatter ; 
Annbank, wha guessed the ladies' taste. 

He gies a Fete Champetre. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 233 

When Love and Beauty heard the news 

The gay greenwoods amang, man ; 
Where, gathering flowers and busking bowers, 

Ti^ey heard the blackbird's sang, man ; 
A vow, they seal'd it with a kiss, 

Sir Pohtics to fetter ; 
As theirs alone, the patent bliss 

To hold a Fete Champetre, 

Then mounted Mirth on gleesome wing, 

O'er hill and dale she flew, man ; 
Ilk wimpling burn, ilk crystal spring, 

Ilk glen and shaw she knew, man: 
She summon'd every social sprite, 

That sports by wood or water. 
On th' bonie banks of Ayr to meet 

And keep this Fete Champetre. 

Cauld Boreas wi' his boisterous crew 

Were bound to stakes like kye, man; 
And Cynthia's car, o' silver fu', 

Clamb up the starry sky, man : 
Reflected beams dwell in the streams. 

Or down the current shatter; 
The western breeze steals thro' the trees 

To view this Fete Champetre. 

How many a robe sae gaily floats. 

What sparkling jewels glance, man, 
To Harmony's enchanting notes, 

As moves the mazy dance, man ! 
The echoing wood, the winding flood 

Like paradise did glitter. 
When angels met at Adam's yett 

To hold their Fete Champetre. 

When Politics came there to mix 

And make his ether-stane, man ! 
He circled round the magic ground, 

But entrance found he nane, man : 
He blush'd for shame, he quat his name, 

Forswore it every letter, 
Wi' humble prayer to join and share 

This festive Fete Champetre. 



234 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 257. How can my poor heart be glad? 

Tune : O'er the hills and far away. Durfey's Pills, 1719, v. p. 316. 



^^^^^^^^^^^g 



How can my poor heart be glad When ab - sent from my 
Chorus. On tlie seas and far a - way, On storm ■ y seas and 



^^^^^^^^^s w^ ^^ m^^ ^ 



sai-lorlad? How can I" the thought forego — He's on the seas to 

* far a-way ; Night-ly dreams and thoughts by day Are ay with him thaf s 

Fine. 

P--»-m r-T i h-^~*- 



fe 



::^ 



ife*M 



1^ 



U 



E 



S 



meet the foe? Let me wander, Let me rove, Still my heart is with my love; 
far a - way. 

D. C.for Chorus. 



iS>- 



~^ — ar" 



a 



iS>- 



Night - ly dreams and thoughts by day Are with him that's far a - way. 

How can my poor heart be glad 
When absent from my sailor lad ? 
How can I the thought forego — 
He's on the seas to meet the foe? 
Let me wander, let me rove, 
Still my heart is with my love : 
Nightly dreams and thoughts by day 
Are with him that's far away. 

On the seas and far away. 

On stormy seas and far away; 

Nightly dreams and thoughts by day 

Are ay with him that's far away. 

When in summer noon I faint, 

As weary flocks around me pant, 

Haply in this scorching sun 

My sailor's thund'ring at his gun. 
, Bullets, spare my only joy ! 

Bullets, spare my darling boy ! 

Fate, do with me what you may. 

Spare but him that 's far away ! 
On the seas and far away, 
On stormy seas and far away — 
Fate, do with me what you may. 
Spare but him that 's far away ! 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 235 

At the starless, midnight hour, 

When winter rules with boundless power, 

As the storms the forest tear. 

And thunders rend the howling air, 

Listening to the doubling roar 

Surging on the rocky shore. 

All I can — I weep and pray 

For his weal that 's far away. 

On the seas and far away, 

On stormy seas and far away, 

All I can — I weep and pray 

For his weal that 's far away. 

Peace, thy olive wand extend 

And bid wild War his ravage end ; 

Man with brother Man to meet, 

And as brother kindly greet ! 

Then may Heaven with prosperous gales 

Fill my sailor's welcome sails. 

To my arms their charge convey 

My dear lad that's far away. 

On the seas and far away, 

On stormy seas and far away, 

To my arms their charge convey 

My dear lad that's far away! 



No. 258. There was on a time. 

Tune: Caledonian hunfs delight (see No. 123), 

There was on a time, but old Time was then young, 

That brave Caledonia, the chief of her line, 
From some of your northern deities sprung, 

(Who knows not that brave Caledonia 's divine ?) 
From Tweed to the Orcades was her domain. 

To hunt, or to pasture, or do what she would : 
Her heav'nly relations there fixed her reign. 

And pledged her their godheads to warrant it good. 

A lambkin in peace, but a lion in war, 

The pride of her kindred the heroine grew ; 
Her grandsire, old Odin, triumphantly swore : — • 

' Whoe'er shall provoke thee, th' encounter shall rue ! ' 
With tillage or pasture at times she would sport, 

To feed her fair flocks by her green rustling corn ; 
But chiefly the woods were her fav'rite resort, 

Her darling amusement the hounds and the horn. 



236 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Long quiet she reign'd, till thitherward steers 

A flight of bold eagles from Adria's strand : 
Repeated, successive, for many long years, 

They darken'd the air, and they plunder'd the land. 
Their pounces were murder, and horror their cry ; 

They'd conquer'd and ravag'd a world beside. 
She took to her hills, and her arrows let fly — 

The daring invaders, they fled or they died. 

The fell harpy-raven took wing from the north, 

The scourge of the seas, and the dread of the shore ; 
The wild Scandinavian boar issued forth 

To wanton in carnage and wallow in gore : 
O'er countries and kingdoms their fury prevailed, 

No arts could appease them, no arms could repel ; 
But brave Caledonia in vain they assail'd, 

As Largs well can witness, and Longcartie tell. 

The Cameleon-savage disturb'd her repose, 

With tumult, disquiet, rebellion, and strife ; 
Provok'd beyond bearing, at last she arose. 

And robb'd him at once of his hopes and his life. 
The Anglian lion, the terror of France, 

Oft, prowling, ensanguin'd the Tweed's silver flood, 
But, taught by the bright Caledonian lance. 

He learned to fear in his own native wood. 

Thus bold, independent, unconquer'd, and free. 

Her bright course of glory for ever shall run, 
For brave Caledonia immortal must be, 

I'll prove it from Euclid as clear as the sun : — 
Rectangle-triangle, the figure we'll chuse ; 

The upright is Chance, and old Time is the base, 
But brave Caledonia's the hypothenuse ; 

Then, ergo, she'll match them, and match them always ! 



No. 259. Does haughty Gaul invasion threat? 

Tune : Push about the jorum. Chappell's Popular Music, p. 685. 
Spirited 




^^^^m^^. 



Does haughty Gaul in - va - sion threat ? Then let the louns be ■ 



^^ 



5: 



^e^i 



ware, sir; There's wooden walls up - on our seas. And vo-lun-teers on 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



237 



m 



-^m 



i^s 



^m 



:|^=t= 



-t^i^ 



shore, sir! The Nith shall run to Cor-sin-con, The Crif-fel sink in 



m 



fe^ 



^ 



E^ 



V^^^^. 



V- 



^^ 



Sol-way, Ere we per-mit a foreign foe On British ground to ral-ly! 



Irf 



ii^^^i^^i^^^ 



^ 



We'll ne'er per-mit a foreign foe On British ground to ral-ly! 

Does haughty Gaul invasion threat ? 

Then let the louns beware, sir ; 
There's wooden walls upon our seas, 

And volunteers on shore, sir! 
The Nith shall run to Corsincon, 

The Criffel sink in Solway, 
Ere we permit a foreign foe 

On British ground to rally ! 

We'll ne'er permit a foreign foe 
On British ground to rally ! 

O, let us not, like snarling tykes, 

In wrangling be divided, 
Till, slap ! come in an unco loun, 

And wi' a rung decide it ! 
Be Britain still to Britain true, 

Amang oursels united ! 
For never but by British hands 

Maun British wrangs be righted ! 

The kettle o' the kirk and state, 

Perhaps a clout may fail in't ; 
But deil a foreign tinkler loun 

Shall ever ca' a nail in't I 
Our fathers' blude the kettle bought. 

And wha wad dare to spoil it ; 
By heavens I the sacrilegious dog ^ , ■ 



bis 



Shall fuel be to boil it! 

The wretch that would a tyrant own, 

And the wretch, his true-sworn brother, 
Who would set the mob above the throne, 

May they be damn'd together ! 
Who will not sing God save the King 

Shall hang as high 's the steeple ; 
But while we sing God save the King, 

We'll ne'er forget the People ! 



bis 



238 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 260- As I stood by yon roofless tower. 

Tune : Cumnock Psalms. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 405. 
a Recii. 



q=s=5 



E 



S 



^ 






As I stood by yon roof-less tow'r, Where the wa'-flow'r scents the 



^ 



^ 



*=^ 



^ 



dew • y air, Where the hou - let mourns in her i - vy 

^7^ tempo _ r:\ Chorus. 



^^^^m 



:S= 



^^= 



s 



bower, And tells the mid - night moon her care ; A las - 



^a^=Ff^^ 



:s: 



g 



-9 — *- 



=^=t^ 



i 



* 



sie all a - lone was niak - ing her moan. La - nieni-ing our 



^^^S 



3^^S^ 



?2^"^3E? 



1^ 



i 



lads he - yond the sea ;—' In the bluid-y wars they fa'', And our 
^-^ tem.po 



^S 



^^^ 



hon- or's gane an' a\ And brok -en heart -ed we fnaun die.'' 



As I Stood by yon roofless tower, 

Where the wa'-flow'r scents the dewy air, 

Where the houlet mourns in her ivy bower. 
And tells the midnight moon her care : 

Chorus. A lassie all alone was making her moan, 
Lamenting our lads beyond the sea; — 
' In the bluidy wars they fa", 
And our honor 's gane an' a'. 
And broken hearted we tnaun die.' 

The winds were laid, the air was still, 

The stars they shot along the sky, 
The tod was howling on the hill, 

And the distant-echoing glens reply. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 239 

The burn, adown its hazelly path, 

Was rushing by the ruin'd wa', 
Hasting to join the sweeping Nith, 

Whase roarings seem'd to rise and fa'. 

The cauld blae North was streaming forth 

Her lights, wi' hissin, eerie din : 
Athort the lift they start and shift, 

Lilce Fortune's favors, tint as win ! 

Now, looking over firth and fauld, 

Her horn the pale-fac'd Cynthia rear'd. 
When lo ! in form of minstrel auld 

A stern and stalwart ghaist appear'd. 

And frae his harp sic strains did flow. 
Might rous'd the slumb'ring dead to hear. 

But O, it was a tale of woe 
As ever met a Briton's ear ! 

He sang wi' joy his former day, 

He, weeping, wail'd his latter times : 
But what he said — it was nae play ! — 

I winna ventur't in my rhymes. 



No. 261. The laddies by the banks d Nith. 

Tune : Up aii' waur them a' Willie (see infra). 

Chorus. Up and waur them a' , Jamie, 
Up and waitr them a' ! 
The Johnstones hae the guidin o't : 
Ye turncoat Whigs, awa 1 

The laddies by the banks o' Nith 
Wad trust his Grace wi' a', Jamie ; 

But he'll sair them as he sair'd the king — 
Turn tail and rin awa, Jamie ! 

The day he stude his country's friend, 

Or gied her faes a claw, Jamie, 
Or frae puir man a blessin wan, — 

That day the Duke ne'er saw, Jamie. 

But wha is he, his country's boast? 

Like him there is na twa, Jamie ! 
There's no a callant tents the kye, 

But kens o' Westerha', Jamie. 



240 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



To end the wark, here 's Whistlebirk ! 

Lang may his whistle blaw, Jamie !- 
And Maxwell true, o' sterling blue, 

And we'll be Johnstone's a', Jamie. 



No. 262. As I cam down the banks d Nith. 

(another version.) 
Tune : The black tvatch (see No. 269). 

As I cam down the banks o' Nith 

And by Glenriddell's ha, man, 
There I heard a piper play 

Turncoat Whigs awa, man. 

Drumlanrig's towers hae tint the powers 
That kept the lands in awe, man : 

The eagle 's dead, and in his stead 
We're gotten a hoodie-craw, man. 

The turncoat Duke his King forsook, 
When his back was at the wa, man : 

The rattan ran wi' a' his clan 

For fear the house should fa', man. 

The lads about the banks o' Nith 
They trust his Grace for a', man : 

But he'll sair them as he sair't his king, 
Turn tail and rin awa', man. 



No. 263. Farewell to the Highlands. 

Tune: The musket salute. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 259. 
tr tr 



^^ 



I 



:S==S: 



i*^^ 



-9 1— *1— ■■ 



Chorus. My hearths in the high-lands, My heart is not here. My 






hear f sin the High-lands a - chas-ing the deer; A 



chas 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



241 



S 



-A 1 « i^ — ^ -fe-| s^ 1 — -f 



f/ie wild deer and fol - low - in^ the roe — My hearf s in 

Fine. 




the High-lands, fare - well to the Noith, The birth - place 

tr 




=1— * — fCr|--a-=^- I = 



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val - our, the coun - try of worth ; Wher - ev 



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er I wan - der, wher - ev - er I rove, The 

D.C. 






a3=E^F=^ 



hills of the High - lands for ev - er I 



love. 



Chorus. My heart 's in the Highlands, my heart is not here, 
My heart 's in the Highlands a-chasing the deer, 
A -chasing the wild deer and following the roe — 
My heart 's in the Highlands, wherever I go. 

Farewell to the Highlands, farewell to the North, 
The birthplace of valour, the country of worth ; 
Wherever I wander, wherever I rove. 
The hills of the Highlands for ever I love. 

Farewell to the mountains high cover'd with snow, 
Farewell to the straths and green vallies below, 
Farewell to the forests and wild-hanging woods. 
Farewell to the torrents and loud-pouring floods ! 

R 



242 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 264. Farezveel to a our Scottish fame. 

Tune : A parcel of rogues in a nation. Scots Musical Museum^ 1792, No. 378. 
Andante 






m 






-0- •-^ 
Fare - weel to a' our Scot - tish fame, Fare - weel our an - cient 






glo - ry ; Fare - weeJ ev - en to the Scot - tish name, Sae fam'd in 






mar - tial sto - ry ! Now Sark rins ov - er Sol - way 



ii 



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fct^ 



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sands, An' Tweed rins to the o - cean, To mark where Eng 



e 



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li: 



fszns: 



land's pro - vince stands-Such a par - eel of rogues in a na - tion 1 



Fareweel to a' our Scottish fame, 
Fareweel our ancient glory ; 

Fareweel even to the Scottish name, 
Sae fam'd in martial story ! 

Now Sark rins over Solway sands, 
An' Tweed rins to the ocean, 

To mark where England's province stands- 
Such a parcel of rogues in a nation ! 

What force or guile could not subdue 

Thro' many warlike ages, 
Is wrought now by a coward few 

For hireling traitors' wages. 
The English steel we could disdain, 

Secure in valour's station : 
But English gold has been our bane — 

Such a parcel of rogues in a nation ! 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



243 



O, would, or I had seen the day 

That treason thus could sell us, 
My auld grey head had lien in clay 

Wi' Bruce and loyal Wallace ! 
But pith and power, till my last hour 

I'll mak this declaration : — 
'We're bought and sold for English gold' 

Such a parcel of rogues in a nation ! 



No. 265. The Thames flows proudly to the sea. 

Tune : Robie donna gorach. Scots Musical Museum, 1790; No. 257. 




:f5l 



l^^^ip 



-1 — "-= — *- 

The Thames flows proud - ly to the sea, Where roy 



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al ci - ties state - ly stand ; But sweet - er flows the 






^^ 



=^ 



Nith to me, Where Cum - mins ance had high com-tnand. 



The Thames flows proudly to the sea, 
Where royal cities stately stand ; 

But sweeter flows the Nith to me, 

Where Cummins ance had high command. 

When shall I see that honour'd land, 
That winding stream I love so dear! 

Must wayward Fortune's adverse hand 
For ever — ever keep me here ? 

How lovely, Nith, thy fruitful vales. 

Where bounding hawthorns gaily bloom. 

And sweetly spread thy sloping dales, 

Where lambkins wanton thro' the broom ! 

Tho' wandering now must be my doom 
Far from thy bonie banks and braes, 

May there my latest hours consume 
Amang the friends of early days ! 

R 2 



244 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 266. When wild wars deadly blast was blawn. 

Tune: The mill, mill O. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 24a. 






When wild war's dead-ly blast was blawn, And j;en - tie peace 

tr 



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re - turn - ing, Wi' monie a sweet babe fa - ther - less And 



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HES 



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monie a wi - dow moum-ing, I left the lines and tent 

^ ^ tr 



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ed field, Where lang I'd been a lod - ger, My hum - bio 



i 






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knap - sack a' my wealth, A poor and hon - est sod - ger. 



When wild war's deadly blast was blawn, 

And gentle peace returning, 
Wi' monie a sweet babe fatherless 

And monie a widow^ mourning, 
I left the lines and tented field, 

Where lang I'd been a lodger, 
My humble knapsack a' my wealth, 

A poor and honest sodger. 

A leal, light heart was in my breast, 

My hand unstain'd wi' plunder ; 
And for fair Scotia, hame again, 

I cheery on did wander : 
I thought upon the banks o' Coil, 

I thought upon my Nancy, 
And ay I mind't the witching smile 

That caught my youthful fancy. 

At length I reach'd the bonie glen, 

Where early life I sported ; 
I pass'd the mill and trysting thorn, 

Where Nancy aft I courted. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 245 

Wha spied I but my ain dear maid, 

Down by her mother's dwelHng, 
And turn'd me round to hide the flood 

That in my een was swelling ! 

Wi' alter'd voice, quoth I : — ' Sweet lass, 

Sweet as yon hawthorn's blossom, 
O, happy, happy may he be, 

That 's dearest to thy bosom ! 
My purse is light, I've far to gang, 

And fain wad be thy lodger ; 
I've served my king and country lang — 

Take pity on a sodger.' 

Sae wistfully she gazed on me, 

And lovelier was than ever : 
Ono' she: — 'A sodger anee I lo'ed, 

Forget him shall I never : 
Our humble cot, and hamely fare, 

Ye freely shall partake it ; 
That gallant badge — the dear cockade — 

Ye're welcome for the sake o't.' 

She gaz'd, she redden'd like a rose, 

Syne, pale like onie lily. 
She sank within my arms, and cried : — 

' Art thou my ain dear Willie ? ' 
' By Him who made yon sun and sky, 

By whom true love's regarded, 
I am the man ! and thus may still 

True lovers be rewarded ! 

'The w^ars are o'er, and I'm come hame 

And find thee still true-hearted ; 
Tho' poor in gear, we're rich in love. 

And mair, we'se ne'er be parted.* 
Quo' she : — ' My grandsire left me gowd, 

A mailen plenish'd fairly ; 
And come, my faithfu' sodger lad, 

Thou'rt welcome to it dearly ! ' 

For gold the merchant ploughs the main. 

The farmer ploughs the manor ; 
But glory is the sodger's prize. 

The sodger's wealth is honor : 
The brave poor sodger ne'er despise, 

Nor count him as a stranger; 
Remember he 's his country's stay 

In day and hour of danger. 



246 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 267. There was five carlins in the South. 

Tune : Chevy chase. M<=Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1768, iv. p. 108 (adapted). 

ir 



i 



s 



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i^^ 



w=^ 



^=:\^\^^z^±=± 



XT — • * • •" ' 

There was five car - lins in the South, They fell up - on a scheme 



1= 



=15=*: 



3^ 



5? 



tc* 

To send a lad to Lon-don Town To bring them ti - dings hame. 



There was five carlins in the South, 

They fell upon a scheme 
To send a lad to London Town 

To bring them tidings hame : 

Not only bring them tidings hame, 
But do their errands there ; 

And aiblins gowd and honor baith 
Might be that laddie's share. 

There was Maggie by the banks o' 
Nith, 

A dame wi' pride eneugh ; 
And Marjory o' the monie Lochs, 

A carlin auld and teugh : 

And Blinkin Bess of Annandale, 
That dwelt near Solway-side ; 

And Whisky Jean, that took her gill 
In Galloway sae wide ; 

And Black Joan frae Crichton Peel, 

O' gipsy kith an' kin — 
Five wighter carlins were na found 

The South countrie within. 

To send a lad to London Town 

They met upon a day ; 
And monie a knight and monie a laird 

This errand fain wad gae. 

O, monie»a knight and monie a laird 
This errand fain wad gae ; 

But nae ane could their fancy 
please, 
O, ne'er a ane but twae. 



The first ane was a belted knight, 

Bred of a Border band ; 
And he wad gae to London Town, 

Might nae man him withstand ; 

And he wad do their errands weel. 

And meikle he wad say ; 
And ilka ane at London court 

Wad bid to him gude-day. 

Then neist cam in, a soger boy, 
And spak wi' modest grace ; 

And he wad gae to London Town, 
If sae their pleasure was. 

He wadna hecht them courtly gifts, 
Nor meikle speech pretend ; 

But he wad hecht an honest heart 
Wad ne'er desert his friend. 

Now, wham to chuse and wham 
refuse 

At strife thir carlins fell ; 
For some had gentlefolks to please, 

And some wad please themsel. 

Then out spak mim-mou'd Mego'Nith, 
And she spak up wi' pride, 

And she wad send the Soger lad, 
Whatever might betide. 

For the auld gudeman o' London 
court 

She didna care a pin ; 
But she wad send the Soger lad 

To greet his eldest son. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



247 



Then up sprang Bess o' Annandale, 
And a deadly aith she 's ta'en, 

That she wad vote the Border knight, 
Tho' she should vote her lane. 

' For far-off fovi^ls hae feathers fair, 
And fools o' change are fain ; 

But I hae tried the Border knight, 
And I'll try him yet again. 

Then Whisky Jean spak owre her 
drink : 

'Ye weel ken, kimmers a'. 
The auld gudeman o' London court, 

His back 's been at the wa' : 

'And monie a friend that kiss'd his 
caup 
Is now a fremit wight ; 
But it 's ne'er be sae wi' Whisky 
Jean — 
I'll send the Border knight.' 



Says Black Joan frae Crichton Peel, 
A carlin stoor and grim : — 

'The auld gudeman, or the young 
gudeman. 
For me may sink or swim ; 

' For fools will prate o' right or wrang. 
While knaves laugh them to scorn ; 

But the Soger's friends hae blawn 
the best, 
So he shall bear the horn.' 

Then slow raise Marjory o'the Lochs, 
And wrinkled was her brow. 

Her ancient weed was russet grey, 
Her auld Scots bluid was true ; — 

' There 's some great folk set light 
by me, 

I set as light by them ; — 
But I will send to London Town 

Wham I like best at hame.' 



Sae how this sturt and strife may end, 

Nae mortal wight can tell : 
God grant the king, and ilka man, 

May look weel to himsel ! 



No. 268. You're welcome to despots^ Dumourier ? 

Tune : Robin Adair (see No. 45). 

You're welcome to despots, Dumourier ; 
You're welcome to despots, Dumourier ; 

How does Dampiere do? 

Ay, and Bournonville too? 
Why did they not come along with you, Dumourier ? 

I will fight France with you, Dumourier ; 
I will fight France with you, Dumourier ; 

I will fight France with you, 

I will take my chance with you. 
By my soul, I'll dance with you, Dumourier ! 

Then let us fight about, Dumourier ; 
Then let us fight about, Dumourier ; 

Then let us fight about, 

Till Freedom's spark be out. 
Then we'll be damn'd, no doubt, Dumourier. 



248 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 269. When Gidlford good our pilot stood. 



Tune : The black watch. 



M'^Glashan's Strathspey Reels, 1780, p. 6. 






^ 



When Guilford good our pi - lot stood, An' did our hel-lim thraw, man, Ae 
tr 



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night, at tea, be - gan a plea. With - in A - mer - i - ca, man : Then 



: ^_fe_|s-J i i -F=jhi=!^=^ 



-7dr—»^ ^-»-r-:d - 



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up they gat the mask - in - pat. And in the sea did jaw, man ; An' 

tr 




^^^^^^^^ 



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did nae less, in full Con - gress. Than quite re-fuse our law, man. 



When Guilford good our pilot stood, 

An' did our hellitn thraw, man, 
Ae night, at tea, began a plea. 

Within America, man : 
Then up they gat the maskin-pat, 

And in the sea did jaw, man ; 
An' did nae less, in full Congress, 

Than quite refuse our law, man. 

Then thro' the lakes Montgomery takes, 

I wat he wasna slaw, man ; 
Down Lowrie's burn he took a turn, 

And Carleton did ca', man : 
But yet, whatreck, he at Quebec, 

Montgomery-like did fa', man : 
Wi' sword in hand, before his band, 

Amang his en'mies, a', man. 

Poor Tammy Gage within a cage 

Was kept at Boston-ha', man ; 
Till Willie Howe took o'er the knowe 

For Philadelphia, man : 
Wi' sword an' gun he thought a sin 

Guid Christian bluid to draw, man; 
But at New York, wi' knife an' fork, 

Sir-Loin he hacked sma', man. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 249 

Burgoj^ne gaed up, like spur an' whip, 

Till Fraser brave did fa', man ; 
Then lost his way, ae misty day, 

In Saratoga shaw, man. 
Cornwallis fought as lang's he dought, 

An' did the buckskins claw, man ; 
But Clinton's glaive frae rust to save. 

He hung it to the wa', man. 

Then Montague, and Guilford too, 

Began to fear a fa', man ; 
And Sackville doure, wha stood the stoure, 

The German chief to thraw, man : 
For Paddy Burke, like onie Turk, 

Nae mercy had at a', man ; 
An' Charlie Fox threw by the box. 

An' lows'd his tinkler jaw, man. 

Then Rockingham took up the game, 

Till death did on him ca', man ; 
When Shelburne meek held up his cheek, 

Conform to gospel law, man ; 
Saint Stephen's boys, wi' jarring noise, 

They did his measures thraw, man ; 
For North an' Fox united stocks, 

An' bore him to the wa', man. 

Then clubs an' hearts were Charlie's cartes ; 

He swept the stakes awa', man, 
Till the diamond's ace, of Indian race. 

Led him a sair faux pas, man ; 
The Saxon lads, wi' loud placads. 

On Chatham's boy did ca', man ; 
An' Scotland drew her pipe an' blew : 

' Up, Willie, waur them a', man ! ' 

Behind the throne then Granville's gone, 

A secret word or twa, man ; 
While slee Dundas arous'd the class 

Be-north the Roman wa', man : 
And Chatham's wraith, in heav'nly graith 

(Inspired bardies saw, man), 
Wi' kindling eyes cried, 'Willie, rise! 

Would I hae fear'd them a', man ? ' 

But, word an' blow, North, Fox, and Co. 

Gowff'd Willie like a ba', man. 
Till Suthron raise, an' coost their claes 

Behind him in a raw, man ; 
An' Caledon threw by the drone. 

An' did her whittle draw, man ; 
An' swoor fu' rude, thro' dirt and bluid, 

To make it guid in law, man. 



250 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 270, Fy, let its a to Kirkcziddrigkt. 

Tune : Fy, let tis a" to the bridal. Orpheus Caledonms, 1725, No. 36. 
Briskly 



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Fy, let us a' to Kirkcudbright, For there will be bick-er- in there; For 



^^m^^^^m^ 



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Murray's light horse are to muster, An' O, how the he-roes will swear! And 

lt -r-J-g = rir r 1 ^ 



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there will be Mur-ray, com-man-der. An' Gordon the bat - tie to win; Like 



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brothers they'll stan' by each o - ther, Sae knit in al - li - ance and kin. 

Fy, let us a' to Kirkcudbright, 

For there will be bickerin there ; 
For Murray's light horse are to muster, 

An' O, how the heroes will swear ! 
And there will be Murray, commander, 

An' Gordon the battle to win ; 
Like brothers they'll stan' by each other, 

Sae knit in alliance and kin. 

And there will be black-nebbit Johnie, 

The tongue o' the trump to them a' : 
An' he get na Hell for his haddin, 

The deil gets nae justice awa ! 
And there will be Kempleton's birkie, 

A boy no sae black at the bane ; 
But as to his fine nabob fortune, — 

We'll e'en let the subject alanel 

And there will be Wigton's new Sheriff ; 

Dame Justice fu' brawly has sped ; 
She's gotten the heart of a Bushby, 

But Lord! what's become o' the head? 
And there wll be Cardoness, Esquire, 

Sae mighty in Cardoness' eyes ; 
A wight that will weather damnation, 

For the devil the prey would despise. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 251 

And there will be Douglasses doughty, 

New christening towns far and near ; 
Abjuring their democrat doings 

By kissing the doup of a Peer : 
And there will be folk frae Saint Mary's, 

A house o' great merit and note ; 
The deil ane but honors them highly — 

The deil ane will gie them his vote ! 

And there will be Kenmure sae gen'rous 

Whose honor is proof to the storm, 
To save them from stark reprobation. 

He lent them his name in the firm : 
And there will be lads o' the gospel : 

Muirhead, wha 's as gude as he's true; 
And there will be Buittle's apostle, 

Wha 's mair o' the black than the blue ! 

And there will be Logan's M^Dowall, — 

Sculdudd'ry an' he will be there. 
An' also the Wild Scot o' Galloway, 

Sogering, gunpowder Blair ! 
But we winna mention Redcastle, 

The body — e'en let him escape ! 
He'd venture the gallows for siller, 

An 'twere na the cost o' the rape ! 

But where is the Doggerbank hero. 

That made ' Hogan-Mogan ' to Skulk? 
Poor Keith's gane to hell to be fuel, 

The auld rotten wreck of a hulk. 
And where is our King's Lord Lieutenant, 

Sae fam'd for his gratefu' return ? 
The birkie is gettin' his Questions 

To say in St. Stephen's the morn ! 

But mark ye there's trusty Kerroughtree, 

Whose honor was ever his law ; 
If the virtues were pack'd in a parcel, 

His worth might be sample for a' ; 
And Strang an' respectfu 's his backing, 

The maist o' the lairds wi' him stand ; 
Nae gipsy-like nominal barons 

Whase property's paper — not land. 

And there frae the Niddisdale borders. 

The Maxwells will gather in droves, 
Peugh Jockie, staunch Geordie an' Wattie, 

That girns for the fishes and loaves; 



252 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



And there will be Heron, the Major 
Wha'll ne'er be forgot in the Greys: 

Our flatt'ry we'll keep for some other : 
Him only its justice to praise ! 

And there will be maiden Kilkerran, 

An' also Barskimming's gude Knight ; 
And there will be roarin Birtwhistle, 

Yet luckily roars in the right ! 
And there'll be Stamp Office Johnnie 

(Tak tent how ye purchase a dram). 
And there will be gay Cassencarry 

And there'll be gleg Colonel Tam. 

And there'll be wealthy young Richard, 

Dame Fortune should hing by the neck : 
For prodigal, thriftless bestowing — 

His merit had won him respect. 
And there will be rich brother Nabobs, 

(Tho' nabobs, yet men not the first,) 
And there will be Collieston's whiskers, 

An' Quinton — o' lads no the worst ! 

Then hey! the chaste interest o' Broughton, 

And hey ! for the blessings 'twill bring ; 
It may send Balmaghie to the Commons — 

In Sodom 'twould make him a king ; 
An' hey! for the sanctified Murray, 

Our land w^ha wi' chapels has stor'd ; 
He founder'd his horse among harlots, 

But gied the auld naig to the Lord ! 



No. 271. O Logan, sweetly didst thou glide. 

Tune : Logan Water. Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 23. 

Shw 






O Lo - gan, sweet ■ ly didst thou glide That day I 




was my Wil - lie's bride, And years sin - syne hae 



§^^^^^ ^-^?^^ ^^ 



o'er us run Like Lo - gan to the siin - mer sun: 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



253 



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But now thy flow - ery banks ap - pear Like drum -lie Win - ter, 



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dark and drear, While my dear lad maun face 



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his faes Far, far frae me and Lo - gan braes. 



O Logan, sweetly didst thou glide 
That day I was my Willie's bride, 
And years sinsyne liae o'er us run 
Like Logan to the simmer sun : 
But now thy flowery banks appear 
Like drumlie Winter, dark and drear. 
While my dear lad maun face his faes 
Far, far frae me and Logan braes. 

Again the merry month of May 

Has made our hills and vallies gay ; 

The birds rejoice in leafy bowers, 

The bees hum round the breathing flowers ; 

Blythe morning lifts his rosy eye. 

And evening's tears are tears o' joy : 

My soul delightless a' surveys, • 

While Willie 's far frae Logan braes. 

Within yon milk-white hawthorn bush, 
Amang her nestlings sits the thrush ; 
Her faithfu' mate will share her toil, 
Or wi' his song her cares beguile: 
But I wi' my sweet nurslings here, 
Nae mate to help, nae mate to cheer. 
Pass widow'd nights and joyless days, 
While Willie 's far frae Logan braes. 

O, wae upon you, Men o' State, 
That brethren rouse in deadly hate ! 
As ye make monie a fond heart mourn, 
Sae may it on your heads return ! 
Ye mindna 'mid your cruel joys 
The widow's tears, the orphan's cries, 
But soon may peace bring happy days, 
And Willie hame to Logan braes ! 



254 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 272. Fa7'ewell, thoiL faii^ day. 



Tune : Or an an aoig. 

Very slow 



Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 385. 




^ I ^^^L _ Z. 1. 



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t^ 



Fare-well, thou fair day, thou green earth, and ye skies, Now gay with 



^35 



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S 



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the broad set - ting sun ; Fare - well, loves and friend-ships, ye 




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dear ten - der ties — Our race of ex - ist - ence is run ! 



fes 






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Thou grim King of Ter-rors! thou life's gloomy foe, Go, fright - en 



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the CO - ward and 



Go, teach them to trem - ble, fell 



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ty - rant ! but know, No ter - rors hast thou to the brave ! 

Farewell, thou fair day, thou green earth, and ye skies, 

Now gay with the broad setting sun ; 
Farewell, loves and friendships, ye dear tender ties — 

Our race of existence is run ! 
Thou grim King of Terrors ! thou life's gloomy foe. 

Go, frighten the coward and slave! 
Go, teach them to tremble, fell tyrant ! but know, 

No terrors hast thou to the brave ! 

Thou strik'st the dull peasant — he sinks in the dark, 

Nor saves e'en the wreck of a name ! 
Thou strik'st the young hero — a glorious mark ; 

He falls in the blaze of his fame ! 
In the field of proud honor — our swords in our hands. 

Our king and our country to save, 
While victory shines on life's last ebbing sands, 

O, who would not die with the brave ! 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



255 



No. 273. Wka will buy my troggin? 

(The Trogger.) 
Tune : Buy broom besoms. Northumbrian Minstrelsy, p. 118. 




g^£Epd^i^g^z^1:^E pEg 



Wha will buy my troggin, fine e - lee - tion ware, Brok - en trade 

Chorus. 



li^ 



f^=h- 



^ 



o' Broughton, a' in high re- pair? Buy braw irog - giii frae the 



i=^ 



^ 



banks o' Dee\ Wha wants trog -gin- let hint come to 



Wha will buy my troggin, fine election ware, 
Broken trade o' Broughton, a' in high repair? 

Chorus. Buy braw troggin frae the banks o' Dee; 
Wha wants troggin let him come to me. 

There's a noble Earl's fame and high renown, 

For an auld sang— it's thought the gudes were stown — 

Here's the worth o' Broughton in a needle's e'e. 
Here's a reputation tint by Balmaghie. 

Here's its stuff and lining, Cardoness's head — 
Fine for a soger, a' the wale o' lead. 

Here 's a little wadset, — Buittles scrap o' truth, 
Pawn'd in a gin-shop, quenching holy drouth. 

Here's an honest conscience might a prince adorn, 
Frae the downs o' Tinwald - so w^as never worn ! 

Here 's armorial bearings frae the manse o' Urr : 
The crest, a sour crab-apple rotten at the core. 

Here is Satan's picture, like a blizzard gled 
Pouncing poor Redcastle, sprawlin like a taed. 

Here 's the font where Douglas stane and mortar names, 
Lately used at Caily christening Murray's crimes. 

Here 's the worth and wisdom Collieston can boast ; 
By a thievish midge they had been nearly lost. 

Here is Murray's fragments o' the ten commands, 
Gifted by black Jock to get them aff his hands. 

Saw ye e'er sic troggin? if to buy ye're slack, 
Hornie 's turnin chapman — he'll buy a' the pack ! 



256 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 274. ' Twas in the seventeen hunder year. 

Tune : The children in the wood. Chappell's Popular Music, p. 201. 



4=ff=v- 



i^l^^^^^ 



::^s;: 



-^V 



ri^^^33= 



'Twas in the seven-teen hun - der year O' grace, and nine-ty five, 



r^:^-::^: 



=^ 



m 



:k: 



-^ 



Tliat year I was the vi'ae'-est man Of on - ie man a - live. 



'Twas in the seventeen hunder year 
O' grace, and ninety-five, 

That year I was the wae'est man 
Of onie man alive. 

In March the three-an '-twentieth 
morn, 

The sun rase clear an' bright ; 
But O ! I was a waefu' man. 

Ere to-fa' o' the night. 

Yerl Galloway lang did rule this 
land 

Wi' equal right and fame, 
And thereto was his kinsman join'd 

The Murray's noble name. 

Yerl Galloway's man o' men was I, 
And chief o' Broughton's host ; 

So twa blind beggars, on a string, 
The faith fu' tyke will trust. 

But now Yerl Galloway's sceptre 's 
broke. 

And Broughton's wi' the slain, 
And I my ancient craft may try. 

Sin' honesty is gane. 

'Twas by the banks o' bonie Dee, 
Beside Kirkcudbright's towers. 

The Stewart and the Murray there 
Did muster a' their powers. 

Then Murray on the auld grey yaud, 
Wi' winged spurs did ride : 

That auld grey yaud a' Nidsdale 
rade, 
He staw upon Nidside. 



An' there had na been the Yerl 
liimsel, 

O, there had been nae play ; 
But Garlies was to London gane, 

And sae the kye might stray. 

And there was Balmaghie, I ween — 
In front rank he wad shine ; 

But Balmaghie had better been 
Drinkin Madeira wine. 

And frae Glenkens cam to our aid 
A chief o' doughty deed : 

In case that worth should wanted be, 
O' Kenmure we had need. 

And by our banners march'd Muir- 
head, 
And Buittle was na slack, 
Whase haly priesthood nane could 
stain, 
For wha could dye the black? 

And there was grave Squire Car- 
doness, 

Look'd on till a' was done ; 
Sae in the tower o' Cardoness 

A howlet sits at noon. 

And there led I the Bushby clan : 
My gamesome billie, Will, 

And my son Maitland, wise as brave. 
My footsteps follow'd still. 

The Douglas and the Heron's name, 
We set nought to their score ; 

The Douglas and the Heron's name, 
Had felt our weight before. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



257 



But Douglasses o' weight had we : 

The pair o' lusty lairds, 
For building cot-houses sae fam'd, 

And christenin kail-yards. 

And then Redcastle drew his sword 
That ne'er was stain'd wi' gore 



Save on a wandVer lame and blind. 
To drive him frae his door. 

And last cam creepin Collieston, 
Was mair in fear than wrath ; 

Ae knave was constant in his mind — 
To keep that knave frae scaith. 



No. 275. Wham will we send to London town. 

Tune : For a' that (see No. 252). 

Wham will we send to London town, 

To Parliament and a' that ? 
Or wha in a' the country round 
The best deserves to fa' that ? 
For a' that, and a' that, 
Thro' Galloway and a' that, 
Where is the Laird or belted Knight 
That best deserves to fa' that? 

Wha sees Kerroughtree's open yett, 

(And wha is't never saw that?) 
Wha ever wi' Kerroughtree met. 
And has a doubt of a' that? 
For a' that, and a' that ! 
Here 's Heron yet for a' that ! 
The independent patriot, 

The honest man, and a' that ! 



Tho' wit and worth, in either sex, 
Saint Mary's Isle can shaw that, 
Wi' Dukes and Lords let Selkirk 
mix, 
And weel does Selkirk fa' that. 
For a' that, and a' that. 
Here 's Heron yet for a' that ! 
The independent commoner 
Shall be the man for a' that. 

But why should we to Nobles jouk. 

And is't against the law, that? 
For why, a Lord may be a gowk, 
Wi' ribban, star, and a' that. 
For a' that, and a' that. 
Here's Heron yet for a' that! 
A Lord may be a lousy loun 
Wi' ribban, star, and a' that. 



A beardless boy comes o'er the hills 

Wi 's uncle's purse and a' that ; 
But we'll hae ane frae 'mang oursels, 
A man we ken, and a' that. 
For a' that, and a' that. 
Here 's Heron yet for a' that ! 
For we're na to be bought and sold. 
Like naigs, and nowte, and a' 
that. 

Then let us drink: — 'the Stewartry, 
Kerroughtree's laird, and a' that, 
Our representative to be ' ; 

For weel he 's worthy a' that ! 
For a' that, and a' that, 
Here's Heron yet for a' that! 
A House of Commons such as he, 
They wad be blest that saw that. 



258 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 276. Dire was the hate at old Harlaw. 



Tune : The Dragon of Wantley. 
Spirited 



Durfey's Pills, 17 19, iii. p. 10. 



j ilg^^^ 



^^m 



-» — P- 



D ire was the hate at old Har - law, That Scot to Scot did car - ry; 



^^S^ 



And dire the dis-cord Langside saw For beauteous, hap-less Ma - ry : But 




-a — a — »—»- 



:^t;: 



^gg^Eg ^ 



Scot to Scot ne'er met so hot, Or were more in fu - ry seen, sir. Than 'twixt 



§^^^ 



^^z+gilzt 



Hal and Bob for the fa - mous job, Who should be the Faculty's Dean, sir. 



Dire was the hate at old Harlaw, 

That Scot to Scot did carry ; 
And dire the discord Langside saw 

For beauteous, hapless Mary : 
But Scot to Scot ne'er met so hot, 

Or were more in fury seen, sir, 
Than 'twixt Hal and Bob for the 
famous job, 

Who should be the Faculty's Dean, 
sir. 

This Hal, for genius, wit, and lore. 

Among the first was number'd ; 
But pious .Bob, 'mid learning's store 

Commandment the tenth remem- 
ber'd : 
Yet simple Bob the victory got, 

And won his heart's desire, 
Which shows that Heaven can boil 
the pot, 

Tho' the deil piss in the fire. 

Squire Hal, besides, had in this case 
Pretensions rather brassy ; 

For talents, to deserve a place, 
Are qualifications saucy. 



So their worships of the Faculty, 
Quite sick of merit's rudeness, 

Chose one who should owe it all, 
d'ye see, 
To their gratis grace and goodness. 

As once on Pisgah purg'd was the 
sight 

Of a son of Circumcision, 
So, may be, on this Pisgah height 

Bob's purblind mental vision ; — 
Nay, Bobby's mouth may be open'd yet. 

Till for eloquence you hail him, 
And sw^ear that he has the Angel met 

That met the ass of Balaam. 

In your heretic sins may ye. live and 
die. 

Ye heretic eight-and-thirty ! 
But accept, ye sublime majority, 

My congratulations hearty ! 
With your honors, as with a certain 
King, 

In your servants this is striking. 
The more incapacity they bring, 

The more they're to j'our liking. 




VIII. JACOBITE 



259 



VIII. JACOBITE 



No. 277. When first my bi^ave yok?iie lad. 

Tune: Cock up your beaver. Scots Musical Museurn, 1793, No. 309. 

B7-tsk 



3i=dz 



3E^E§i=S^ 



:i=^: 



When first my brave John-ie lad came to this town, He had a blue 



ifszz^ 



:«t 



-at-v-*- 



- ^—'- 



^^ 



bon-net that want-ed the crown, But now he has got -ten a 



^^ 



:^^ 



— I — — I — ? 



hat and a feather — Hey, brave Johnie lad, cock up your bea - ver ! 



^BEJ^ 



Cock up your beaver, and cock it fu' sprush. We'll o - ver the Bor- 



J«=i 



S 



-tJ — ar- 



^=zp=J 



t^=i^ 



der and gie them a brush ; There's some - bo - dy there we'll teach bet 



^ 



i^=i 



:^=i: 



la^i 



~W=^- 



:t^[r 



ter be - ha - viour — Hey, brave Johnie lad, cock up your bea - ver ! 



[When first my brave Johnie lad came to this town, 
He had a blue bonnet that wanted the crown, 
But now he has gotten a hat and a feather — 
Hey, brave Johnie lad, cock up your beaver !] 

Cock up your beaver, and cock it fu' sprush, 
We'll over the Border and gie them a brush ; 
There's somebody there we'll teach better behaviour — • 
Hey, brave Johnie lad, cock up your beaver ! 



26o 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 278. Our thrissles fiourisJi d fresh and fair. 

Tune: Awa, Whigs, awa I Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 263. 
Moderate ^^ 



:iS: 



=P^ 



?St 



^^^E?^ p3 ^^ 



Chorus. A - wa, Whigs, a - wa! 



wa, Whigs, a • wa! Ye' re 
Fine. 



^- 



3^ 



^. 



-p-- 



but a pack d" trai - tor loiins, YeHl do nae glide at a\ 



-^- 



^^ 






i=fe 



-I F 



Our 



thrls - sles flour 



i 



-» — I w — 2 - 



fresh and fair, And 



1 



::^: 



^Zr=«t 



bon - ie bloom'd our ros - es; But Whigs cam like a 

^— o.a 



f^E^^S: 



© 



frost in June, An' 



er'd 



pos 



Chorus. \_Awa, Whigs, awa ! 
Awa, Whigs, awa ! 
Ye're but a pack o traitor lowis, 
Ye'll do nae gude at a . 



Our thrissles flourish'd fresh and 
fair, 

And bonie bloom'd our roses ; 
But Whigs cam like a frost in June, 

An' wither'd a' our posies.] 

Our ancient crown 's fa'en in the 

dust — 

Deil blin' them wi' the stoure o"t, 

And write their names in his black 

beuk, 

Wha gae the Whigs the power o't ! 



[Our sad decay in Church and 
State 

Surpasses my descrlving : 
The Whigs cam o'er us for a curse, 

An' we hae done wi' thriving.] 

Grim Vengeance lang has taen a 
nap, 
But we may see him waukin ; 
Gude help the day when roj^al 
heads 
Are hunted like a maukin ! 



VIII. JACOBITE 



261 



No. 279. Now Nature hangs her mantle green. 

Tune : Mary Queen of Scots lament. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 404. 



fe 



J5 



^P^_^ES^^pE^ 



i^nat 



Now Na - ture hangs her. man-tie green On eve - ry bloom-ing tree, 

ir 




And spreads her sheets o' dai - sies white Out o'er the grassy lea. 



Now Nature hangs her mantle green 

On every blooming tree, 
And spreads her sheets o' daisies 
white 

Out o'er the grassy lea : 
Now Phoebus cheers the crystal 
streams, 

And glads the azure skies ; 
But nought can glad the weary wight 

That fast in durance lies. 

Now laverocks wake the merry morn, 

Aloft on dewy wing ; 
The merle, in his noontide bow'r, 

Makes woodland echoes ring ; 
The mavis wild wi' monie a note 

Sings drowsy day to rest : 
In love and freedom they rejoice, 

Wi' care nor thrall opprest. 

Now blooms the lily by the bank. 

The primrose down the brae ; 
The hawthorn 's budding in the glen, 

And milk-white is the slae : 
The meanest hind in fair Scotland 

May rove their sweets amang ; 
But I, the Queen of a' Scotland, 

Maun lie in prison Strang. 

I was the Queen o' bonie France, 
Where happy I hae been ; 

Fu' lightly rase I in the morn. 
As blythe lay down at e'en : 

And I'm the sov'reign of Scotland, 
And monie a traitor there ; 



Yet here I lie in foreign bands, 
And never-ending care. 

But as for thee, thou false woman, 

My sister and my fae, 
Grim Vengeance yet shall whet a 
sword 

That thro' thy soul shall gae ! 
The weeping blood in woman's breast 

Was never known to thee ; 
Nor the balm that draps on wounds 
of woe 

Frae woman's pitying e'e. 

My son ! my son ! may kinder stars 

Upon thy fortune shine ; 
And may those pleasures gild thy 
reign. 

That ne'er wad blink on mine ! 
God keep thee frae thy mother's faes, 

Or turn their hearts to thee : 
And where thou meet'st thy mother's 
friend. 

Remember him for me ! 

O ! soon, to me, may Summer's 
suns 

Nae mair light up the morn ! 
Nae mair to me the Autumn winds 

Wave o'er the yellow corn ! 
And, in the narrow house of death, 

Let Winter round me rave ; 
And the next flow'rs that deck the 
Spring 

Bloom on my peaceful grave. 



262 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 280. O, cam ye here the fight to shim ? 

Tune : Cameronian rant. Scots Musical Mttsemn, 1790, No. 282. 
Brisk 




m 



^ 



45=45 



^^^ 



'O, cam ye here the fight to shun, Or herd the sheep wi' me, man? 




3535^ 



^ 



^ 



:S=s 



m 



Or were ye at the Sher - ra-moor, Or did the bat - tie see, man?' 






'I saw the bat - tie sair and teUgh, And reek - in - red ran monie asheugh; 



ESe^S^S^^^ 



^^^=^ -^ 



My heart for fear gae sough for sough, To hear the thuds, and see the cluds 



ie^ipi^^^^^^^ 



O' clans frae woods in tar-tan duds.Whaglaum'datking-domsthree, man.' 




!£ 



#^P= 



^ 



Js=K=i: 



■^-d 



» — I — « — *— J « — — •— '— — — * — ■" 



' O, CAM ye here the fight to shun, 
Or herd the sheep wi' me, man ? 
Or were ye at the Sherra-moor, 

Or did the battle see, man?' 
' I saw the battle sair and teugh, 
And reekin-red ran monie a sheugh ; 
My heart for fear gae sough for sough, 
To hear the thuds, and see the cluds 
O' clans frae woods in tartan duds, 
Wha glaum'd at kingdoms three, man. 

' The red-coat lads wi' black cockauds 
To meet them were na slaw, man ; 

They rush'd and push'd and bluid outgush'd, 
And monie a bouk did fa', man ; 



VIII. JACOBITE 263 



The great Argyle led on his files, 
I wat they glanc'd for twenty miles ; 
They hough'd the clans like nine-pin kyles, 
They hack'd and hash'd, while braid-swords clash'd, 
And thro' they dash'd, and hew'd and smash'd, 
'Till fey men died awa', man. 

' But had ye seen the philabegs 

And skyrin tartan trew^s, man, 
When in the teeth they daur'd our Whigs 

And covenant True-blues, man ! 
In lines extended lang and large. 
When baignets overpower'd the targe, 
And thousands hasten'd to the charge, 
Wi' Highland wrath they frae the sheath 
Drew blades o' death, till out o' breath 

They fled like frighted dows, man.' 

' Oh, how deil, Tam, can that be true ? 

The chase gaed frae the North, man ; 
I saw mysel, they did pursue 

The horseman back to Forth, man ; 
And at Dunblane, in my ain sight, 
They took the brig wi' a' their might, 
And straught to Stirling wing'd their flight ; 
But, cursed lot ! the gates were shut ; 
And monie a huntit poor red-coat 

For fear amaist did swarf, man !' 

'My sister Kate cam up the gate 

Wi' crowdie unto me, man : 
She swoor she saw some rebels run 

To Perth and to Dundee, man ! 
Their left-hand general had nae skill ; 
The Angus lads had nae good-will 
That day their neibor's blude to spill ; 
For fear by foes that they should lose 
Their cogs o' brose, they scar'd at blows, 

And hameward fast did flee, man. 

' They've lost some gallant gentlemen, 

Amang the Highland clans, man ; 
I fear my Lord Panmure is slain, 

Or in his en'mies' hands, man : 
Now wad ye sing this double flight, 
Some fell for wrang, and some for right. 
But monie bade the world gude-night; 
Say, pell and mell, w^i' muskets' knell. 
How Tories fell, and Whigs to hell 

Flew off in frighted bands, man ! ' 



264 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 281. Ye Jacobites by name. 

Tune : Ye Jacobites by name. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 371. 



i:gE g^.:^^E ^ EP ^3=^ ^^: 



9 9 ^ 

Ye Ja - co-bites by name, give an ear, give an ear! Ye Ja - co 



^^^^^^^^^^^ 



bites by name. Give an ear ! Ye Ja - co-bites by name, Your fautes 



:^ 



E^i^^^^ 



m^*^ 



\^^^=' -*-u : 



I will pro-claim, Your doc-trlnes 1 maun blame — You shall hear ! 



Ye Jacobites by name, give an ear, give an ear ! 
Ye Jacobites by name, give an ear ; 

Ye Jacobites by name, 

Your fautes I will proclaim, 
Your doctrines I maun blame — You shall hear ! 

What is right, and what is wrang, by the law, by the law? 
What is right, and what is wrang, by the law ? 

What is right, and what is wrang ? 

A short sword and a lang, 
A weak arm and a Strang for to draw ! 

What makes heroic strife famed afar, famed afar ? 
What makes heroic strife famed afar? 

What makes heroic strife ? 

To whet th' assassin's knife, 
Or hunt a parent's life wi' bluidy war ! 

Then let your schemes alone, in the state, in the state ! 
Then let your schemes alone, in the state ; 

Then let your schemes alone, 

Adore the rising sun. 
And leave a man undone to his fate ! 



VIII. JACOBITE 



265 



No. 282. O, Kenmure' s on and azva, Willie. 

Tune : Kenmure^s on and awa. Scots Musical Mtisewn, 1792, No. 359. 
Spri'gh/ly 



O, Kenmure's on and a - wa, Wil-lie, O, Kenmure's on and a - \va; 



An' Kenmure's lord's the bravest lord That ev - er Gal-lo-\vay saw. 



Egi^^jEgiE^ 



* — \~m ' a — 



Sue - cess to Kenmure's band, Wil-lie, Suc-cess to Kenmure's band! 



There's no a lieart that fears a Whig, That rides by Kenmure's hand. 

O, Kenmure 's on and awa, Willie, 

O, Kenmure 's on and awa ; 
An' Kenmure's lord's the bravest lord 

That ever Galloway saw. 

Success to Kenmure's band, Willie, 

Success to Kenmure's band ! 
There 's no a heart that fears a Whig, 

That rides by Kenmure's hand. 

Here 's Kenmure's health in wine, Willie, 
Here 's Kenmure's health in wine ! 

There ne'er was a coward o' Kenmure's blude 
Nor yet o' Gordon's line. 

O, Kenmure's lads are men, Willie, 

O, Kenmure's lads are men ! 
Their hearts and swords are metal true. 

And that their faes shall ken. 

They'll live or die wi' fame, Willie, 

They'll live or die wi' fame ! 
But soon wi' sounding victorie 

May Kenmure's lord come hame. 

Here's him that's far awa, Willie, 

Here 's him that 's far awa ! 
And here 's the flower that I lo'e best — ■ 

The rose that 's like the snaw ! 



266 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 283. When we gaed to the braes Mar. 

Tune : Up^ and warn a\ Willie. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 188. 

Quickly 



^ 



^^^ 

g~* * * — 



Chorus. Up, and warn a\ Wtl - lie, Warn, warn cC ; To hear my can - ty 

Fine. 



^-^v- 






high ■ land sang Re - late the thing I saw, Wil - lie. When we gaed 






&=E^ 



^^=r=^ 



to the braes o' Mar, And to the wea - pon - shaw, Wil - lie ; Wi' 

D.C. 



^S 



^3^ 



1^ 



true de - sign to serve the king And ban - ish Whigs a - wa, Wil - lie. 

Chorus. Up, and warn cC , Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
To hear my canty Highland sang 
Relate the thing I saw, Willie. 

When we gaed to the braes o' Mar, 
And to the weapon-shaw, Willie ; 
Wi' true design to serve the king 
And banish Whigs awa, Willie. 
Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
For lords and lairds came there bedeen, 
And wow ! but they were braw, Willie. 

But when the standard was set up, 

Right fierce the wind did blaw, Willie, 
The royal nit upon the tap 

Down to the ground did fa', Willie. 
Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
Then second-sighted Sandie said 
We'd do nae gude at a', Willie. 

But when the army join'd at Perth, 

The bravest e'er ye saw, Willie, 
We didna doubt the rogues to rout. 

Restore our king and a', Willie. 



VIII. JACOBITE 267 



Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
The pipers play'd frae right to left 
O whirry Whigs awa, Willie. 

But when we march'd to Sherramuir 
And there the rebels saw, Willie ; 
Brave Argyle attack'd our right, 
Our flank, and front and a', Willie ; 
Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
Traitor Huntly soon gave way, 
Seaforth, St. Clair and a', Willie. 

But brave Glengary on our right 

The rebels' left did claw, Willie ; 
He there the greatest slaughter made 
That ever Donald saw, Willie ; 
Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a'. 
And Whittam fyled his breeks for fear, 
And fast did rin awa, Willie. 

For he ca'd us a Highland mob, 

And soon he'd slay us a', Willie ; 
But we chas'd him back to Stirling brig — 
Dragoons, and foot, and a', Willie. 
Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
At length we rallied on a hill, 
And briskly up did draw, Willie. 

But when Argyle did view our line 

And them in order saw, Willie, 
He straight gaed to Dumblane again, 
And back his left did draw, Willie. 
Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
Then we to Auchterairder march'd 
To wait a better fa', Willie. 

Now if ye spier wha wan the day, 
I've tell'd you what I saw, Willie, 
We baith did iight, and baith did beat, 
And baith did rin awa, Willie. 
Up, and warn a', Willie, 
Warn, warn a' ; 
For second-sighted Sandie said 
We'd do nae gude at a', Willie. 



268 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 284. Here's a health to them that's awa. 

Tune : Here 's a health to them that 's awa. Scots Mus. Mus., 1796, No. 412. 



3HE 



5? 



jggg 



i^ 



=(^sr 



Here's a health to them that's a - \va, Here's a health to them that's a 






:t^=t2 



S 



:i!=^ 



4^-i=t^ 



-I ! — * ^s 



^ 



wa ! And wha win - na wish guid luck to our cause, May nev 




- er 


y 




S >i V > &< . 


1 


-fry .'^^ I's -is— !§ 


1 1 N 


hJ^^-J-^^ 


rj^^-^- 


fsl 


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^r-i . J 


L-^ »— 1 




^--' 



gTiid luck be their fa'! It's guid to be mer - ry and wise, 



It's 




guid to be hon - est and 



true, 



It's guid to sup - port Cal 






- do - ni 



blue. 



a's cause, And bide by the buff and the 

Here's a health to them that's awa, 

Here 's a health to them that 's awa ! 
And wha winna wish guid luck to our cause, 

May never guid luck be their fa' ! 

It's guid to be merry and wise, 

It's guid to be honest and true, 
It 's guid to support Caledonia's cause 

And bide by the buff and the blue. 

Here's a health to them that's awa, 

Here's a health to them that's awa! 
Here's a health to Charlie, the chief o' the clan, 

Altho' that his band be but sma'. 

May Liberty meet wi' success ! 

May Prudence protect her frae evil ! 
May tyrants and tyranny tine i' the mist. 

And wander their way to the devil ! 

Here's a health to them that's awa. 

Here 's a health to them that 's awa ! 
Here's a health to Tammie, the Norlan' laddie, 

That lives at the lug o' the law ! 

Here's freedom to them that wad read. 

Here's freedom to them that would write! 
There 's nane ever fear'd that the truth should be heard 

But they whom the truth would indite. 



VIII. JACOBITE 



269 



Here's a health to them that's awa, 

An' here 's to them that 's awa ! 
Here's to Maitland and Wycombe ; let wha does na like 'em 

Be built in a hole in the wa' ! 

Here's timmer that's red at the heart, 

Here 's fruit that is sound at the core, 
And maj' he that wad turn the buff and blue coat 

Be turn'd to the back o' the door ! 

Here 's a health to them that 's awa. 

Here 's a health to them that 's awa ! 
Here's Chieftain M'Leod, a chieftain worth gowd, 

Tho' bred amang mountains o' snaw ! 

Here 's friends on baith sides o' the Firth, 

And friends on baith sides o' the Tweed, 
And wha wad betray old Albion's right. 

May they never eat of her bread ! 



No. 285. Wha in a brulzie. 

Tune : The Killogie. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 475. 



Moderate time 




lads Wi' 



ban - nocks o' 



Chorus. Bannocks o' bear meal, 
Bannocks o' barley; 
Here''s to the Higldandman' s 
Bannocks o' barley I 



Wha in a brulzie 

Will first cry a parley ? 
Never the lads 

Wi' the bannocks o' barley. 



Wha, in his wae-days, 
Were loyal to Charlie ? 

Wha but the lads 

Wi' the bannocks o' barley. 



270 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



ks 



No. 286. T/ie small birds rejoice. 

Tune : Captain O'Kane. M^Glashan's Reds, 1786, p. 36. 

Slow 



& 






The small birds re- joice in the green leaves re - turn-ing, The 




by care? No birds sweet - ly sing - ing, nor flow'rs gai - ly 






spring-ing, Can soothe the sad bo - som of joy - less des - pair. 

The small birds rejoice in the green leaves returning, 
The murmuring streamlet winds clear thro' the vale, 

The primroses blow in the dews of the morning. 
And wild scatter'd cowslips bedeck the green dale : 

But what can give pleasure, or what can seem fair, 

"When the lingering moments are number',d by care? 
No birds sweetly singing, nor flow'rs gaily springing. 

Can soothe the sad bosom of joyless despair. 

The deed that I dared, could it merit their malice, 
A king and a father to place on his throne? 

His right are these hills, and his right are those valleys. 
Where the wild beasts find shelter, tho' I can find none ! 



VIII. JACOBITE 



271 



But 'tis not my suff'rings thus wretched, forlorn — 
My brave gallant friends, 'tis your ruin I mourn ! 

Your faith prov'd so loyal in hot-bloody trial, 
Alas ! can I make it no better return ? 



No. 287. My love was born in Aberdeen. 

Tune : The White Cockade. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 272. 
MeyriVy 




i^l^^^^=3=i§ 



My love was born in Ab - er - deen, The bon - iest lad 



.*=J=i-* « a> gi-^—dS — m .^ — ff^ 



that e'er was seen ; But now he makes our hearts fu' 



P=^ 






m 



zM ^ 



sad, — He takes the field wi' his White Cock - ade. 



li5^E^ ^=Fz;gg ^=fe^'^^^ 



Chorus. O, he's a rant - ing, rov - ing lad J He is a brisk 



B 



s^i^ 



^S 



an'' a bon - ie lad! Be - tide what may, I will 



m 



-^s^m^ 



be wed. And fol - lozv the boy wP the White Cock - ade. 

My love was born in Aberdeen, 
The boniest lad that e'er was seen ; 
But now he makes our hearts fu' sad, — 
He takes the field wi' his White Cockade. 

Chorus. O, /ze's a ranting, roving lad I 
He is a brisk an'' a bonie lad! 
Betide what may, I will be wed, 
A lid follow the boy wV the White Cockade. 

I'll sell my rock, my reel, my tow, 

My gude gray mare and hawkit cow, 

To buy mysel a tartan plaid, 

To follow the boy wi' the White Cockade. 



272 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 288. The noble Maxwells and their powers. 

Tune : NithsdaWs welcotne hame. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 364. 
Joyous 



E 



S^E^^E^P^]^?^^ 



The no - ble Max- wells and their powers Are com - ing o'er the Bor - 



1^1^^^^^=^ 



der; And they'll gae big Ter-rea- gles' towers, And set them a' in or - der. 



5S=S 



^^^ 



^^=i^ 



And they de - clare Ter-rea - gle's fair, For their a - bode they choose 

tr 



-9 •-!— ^~ -^-! 






-^=^ 



^S 



^ 



it; There's no a heart in a' the land But 's light -er at the news o't ! 



The noble Maxwellsand their powers 

Are coming o'er the Border ; 
And they'll gae big Terreagles' 
towers, 

And set them a' in order. 
And they declare Terreagle's fair, 

For their abode they choose it ; 
There 's no a heart in a' the land 

But's lighter at the news o't! 



Tho' stars in skies may disappear, 

And angry tempests gather, 
The happy hour may soon be near 

That brings us pleasant weather ; 
The weary night o' care and grief 

May hae a joyfu' morrow ; 
So dawning day has brought re- 
hef— 

Fareweel our night o' sorrow ! 



No. 289. My Harry was a gallant gay. 

Tune; Highlander's lament. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 209. 



^m^ 



E 



3y^i5^SE3^^^3S^EE-EilES33vE3-; 



My Har-ry was a gal - lant gay, Fu' state-ly strade he on the plain ; 






:i:5- 



^^^"^ 



_^ — ,— ^- 

But now he 's ban-ish'd far a-way; I'll nev - er see him back a - gain. 
Chorus. 



:iE^^E 



ijSi 



-F-~ — J — I ^- 



^J=? 



O, for him back a - gain! O for hiitt back 



gain i 



VIII. JACOBITE 



273 



^Eia 



m 



^^ 



:J5=f5 



-r- 



I wad gie a' Knockhaspie' s land For Highland Har-ry back a ■ gain. 

When a' the lave gae to their 
bed, 

I wander dowie up the glen, 
I set me down and greet my fill, 

And ay I wish him back again. 



My Harry was a gallant gay, 
Fu' stately strade he on the plain 

But now he's banish'd far away; 
I'll never see him back again. 



Chorus. 

O, for him hack again ! 
0,/or him back again ! 
I wad gie a' Knockhaspie^ s land 
For Highland Harry back again. 



O, were some villains hangit high. 
And ilka body had their ain. 

Then I might see the joyfu' sight, 
My Highland Harry back again ! 



No. 290. A71 somebody we7'-e come again. 

Tune: Carl.^ an the king co^ne. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 239. 



Slow 



te^gi^ 



a^sis 



^ 



-ct- 



Chorus. Car/, ati the king come, Carl, an the king acme. Thou shall dance, 

tr Fine. 



Ej^N^^E^^ ^JgE gg^^^^^a iig 



and I will sing, Carl, an the king come! An some - bo - dy were 



i^ 



^^ 



^^^^ 



come a - gain, Then some-bo-dy maun cross the main, And eve - ry 
^7N 1 D.C. 



man shall hae his ain, Carl, 



S^ 



Chorus. 

Carl, an the king come, 

Carl, an the king come, 
Thou shall dance, and I will sing, 
Carl, an the king come! 

An somebody were come again. 
Then somebody maun cross the main, 
And every man shall hae his ain, 
Carl, an the king come. 



an the king come. 

I trow we swapped for the worse : 
We gae the boot and better horse. 
And that we'll tell them at the 
cross, 

Carl, an the king come. 

[Coggie, an the king come, 
Coggie, an the king come, 
I'se be fou, and thou'se be toom, 
Coggie, an the king come.] 



The music between the asterisks is an 8ve higher in the original. 



274 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 291. Sir John Cope trode the 7iorth right far. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 234. 



Tune : Johnie Cope. 
In moderate time 



■i 



± 



^ 



a 



3E 



SeS^ 



Sir John Cope trode the north right far, Yet ne'er a 




s 



H^ 



-'-Ji^ 



cam naur, Un 



i 



-^r^ 



& 



he land - ed 
Chorus. 



Si 



S 



^-» 



3^ 



at Dun - bar Right ear - ly in a morn - ing. Hey! 



J5§: 



i^sg^^^#^^j^^ 



John"^' ie Cope, are ye waiik - ing yet) Or are ye 




drums do beat; O, fyel Cope, rise in the morn -ing. 



Sir John Cope trode the north right far, 
Yet ne'er a rebel he cam naur, 
Until he landed at Dunbar 

Right early in a morning. 

Chorus. Hey! Johnie Cope., are ye wanking yet "? 
Or are ye sleeping I would wit ; 
O, haste ye get up, for the drums do beat ; 
O fye ! Cope, rise in the morning. 

He wrote a challenge from Dunbar, 
' Come fight me, Charlie, an ye daur. 
If it be not by the chance of war 
I'll give you a merry morning.' 

When Charlie look'd the letter upon. 
He drew his sword the scabbard from — 
' 3o Heaven restore to me my own, 

I'll meet you, Cope, in the morning.' 



VIII. JACOBITE 275 



Cope swore, with many a bloody word, 
That he would fight them gun and sword, 
But he fled frae his nest like an ill-scar'd bird, 

And Johnie took wing in the morning. 
It was upon an afternoon, 
Sir Johnie march'd to Preston town, 
He says, 'My lads come lean you down, 

And we'll fight the boys in the morning.' 
But when he saw the Highland lads, 
Wi' tartan trews and white cockauds, 
Wi' swords, and guns, and rungs, and gauds — 

Johnie, he took wing in the morning. 

On the morrow when he did rise. 

He looked between him and the skies ; 

He saw them wi' their naked thighs, 

Which fear'd him in the morning. 
O, then he flew into Dunbar, 
Crying for a man of war ; 
He thought to have passed for a rustic tar, 

And gotten awa in the morning. 
Sir Johnie into Berwick rade, 
Just as the devil had been his guide ; 
Gien him the warld he would na stay'd 

To foughten the boys in the morning. 
Says the Berwickers unto Sir John : — 
'O what's become of all your men?' 
'In faith,' says he, 'I dinna ken — 

1 left them a' this morning.' 

Says Lord Mark Car — 'Ye are na blate 
To bring us the news o' your ain defeat, 
I think you deserve the back o' the gate ! 
Get out o' my sight this morning.' 



No. 292. Loud blaw the frosty bi^eezes. 

Tune : Morag (see No. 98). 

The trees, now naked groaning, 

Shall soon wi' leaves be hinging. 
The birdies, dowie moaning. 

Shall a' be blythely singing, 

And every flower be springing. 
Sae I'll rejoice the lee-lang day. 

When (by his mighty warden) 
Myyouth's returned to fair Strathspey 

And bonie Castle-Gordon. 



Loud blaw the frosty breezes. 

The snaws the mountains cover; 
Like winter on me seizes, 

Since my young Highland Rover 

Far wanders nations over. 
Where'er he go, where'er he stray. 

May Heaven be his warden ; 
Return him safe to fair Strathspey 

And bonie Castle-Gordon ! 

T 2 



276 



TONE-POETRY OF l^OBERT BURNS 



No. 293. My heart is wae, and unco wae. 



Tune : Marys dream. 
,, Slow 



Perth Musical Miscellany^ 1786, p. 96. 



iS ^Ep ^g 



*fc 



My heart is wae, and 




think 



SlSia^^^^ES^I 



up - on the rag - ing sea, That roars be-tween her 



-ftT\ — V — a'v»~*---^-(— — r — * — ^ — *- P 1 ^ - F-^—m- -J 1— ^ 1 — H 



gar - dens green An' tlie bon - ie Lass of Al - ban - ie. 




5^^ 



(1^=^ 



IE 



=Ust 



-'^=^r^= 



W- 



love - ly maid 's of roy - al blood, That rul - ed Al 



^-- 



&^- 



bion's king - doms three; But O' a - las! for 




bonie face ! They've wrang'd the Lass of Al - ban - ie. 



My heart is wae, and unco wae, 
To think upon the raging sea, 

That roars between her gardens 
green 
An' the bonie Lass of Albanie. 

This lovely maid 's of royal blood, 
That ruled Albion's kingdoms 
three ; 
But O, alas ! for her bonie face ! 
They've wrang'd the Lass of 
Albanie. 

In the rolling tide of spreading Clyde, 
There sits an isle of high degree, 

And a town of fame, whose princely 
name 
Should grace the Lass of Albanie. 



But there is a youth, a witless youth. 

That fills the place where she 

should be ; 

We'll send him o'er to his native 

shore. 

And bring our ain sweet Albanie. 

Alas the daj', and woe the day ! 

A false usurper wan the gree, 
Who now commands the towers and 
lands — • 

The royal right of Albanie. 

We'll daily pray, we'll nightly pray. 

On bended knees most fervently. 
The time may come, with pipe and 
drum 

We'll welcome home fair Albanie. 



VIII. JACOBITE 



277 



No. 294. Come boat me der, come row me o'er. 

Tune : Over the water to Charlie. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 187. 
„ Brisk 



jfeft 



:^5n^: 



^ 



P^ 



i3 



P^ 



e 



Come boat me o'er, come row me o'er, Come boat me 



^^p^i^^^^^^ 



o'er to Char - lie, I'll gie John Ross a - noth-er baw - bee To 

Chorus. 



i^^li 



£ 



m 



boat me o'er to Char - lie. We'll o'er the wa - ier^ we'll 



kF=i^=is 



fe 



g 



^ 



^^ 



:iz^ 



-i-<^ — ^- 



*--*-t m~ 



o'er the sea. We'll o'er the wa-ier to Char-lie ; Come weal, come 



^^=^=S^5^i^i^ 



woe, we' II ga-ther and go. And live and die wV Char-lie. 



Come boat me o'er, come row me o'er, 

Come boat me o'er to Charlie ; 
I'll gie John Ross another bawbee 

To boat me o'er to Charlie. 

Chorus. We'll o''er the water, we'll o''er the sea, 
JVeUl o'er the water to Charlie ; 
Come weal, come woe, we'll gather and go, 
And live and die wf Charlie. 

I lo'e weel my Charlie's name, 

Tho' some there be abhor him ; 
But O, to see auld Nick gaun hame, 

And Charlie's faes before him ! 

I swear and vow by moon and stars 

And sun that shines so early, 
If I had twenty thousand lives, 

I'd die as aft for Charlie. 



278 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 295. O, I am come to the low countrie. 

Tune : The Highland widow's lament. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 498. 

, Vary slow j. " 



S 



igii^g^iP^i^^ 



O, 1 am come to the low countrie— Och-on, Och-on, Och - rie ! — 



^^ 



3^: 



^^^^ 



With - out a pen - ny in my 

O, I am come to the low countrie - 
Ochon, ochon, ochrie ! — 

Without a penny in my purse 
To buy a meal to me. 

It wasna sae in the Highland hills- 
Ochon, ochon, ochrie ! — 

Nae woman in the country wide 
Sae happy was as me. 

For then I had a score o' kye — 
Ochon, ochon, ochrie ! — 

Feeding on yon hill sae high 
And giving milk to me. 

And there I had threescore o' yowes- 
Ochon, ochon, ochrie ! — 

Skipping on yon bonie knowes 
And casting woo' to me. 



purse To buy a meal to me. 

I was the happiest of a' the clan — 
Sair, sair may I repine ! — 

For Donald was the brawest man. 
And Donald he was mine. 

Till Charlie Stewart cam at last — 

Sae far to set us free ; 
My Donald's arm was wanted then 

For Scotland and for me. 

Their waefu' fate what need I tell '? 

Right to the wrang did yield ; 
My Donald and his country fell 

Upon Culloden field. 

Ochon ! O Donald, O ! 

Ochon, ochon, ochrie ! — 
Nae woman in the warld wide 

Sae wretched now as me. 



No. 296. It was a' for our rightfu' king. 

Tune: Mally Stuart. Scots Musical Museum, I'jgS, 'No. 4g']. 






It was a' for our right - fu' king We left fair 



gggg 



isi: 



:^=5^ 



:ix?= 



m 



hSX^i 



22=:^^ 



=?^: 



:^: 



Scot-land's strand ; It was a' for our right - fu' king, We 



m^^^^^^m^^ 



e'er saw I - rish land, my dear— We e'er saw I - rish land. 



VIII. JACOBITE 



279 



It was a for our rightfu' king 
We left fair Scotland's strand ; 

It was a' for our rightfu' king. 
We e'er saw Irish land, my dear — 
We e'er saw Irish land. 

Now a' is done that men can do, 

And a' is done in vain, 
My Love and native land fareweel, 

For I maun cross the main, my 
dear — 

For I maun cross the main. 

[He turn'd him right and round 
about 
Upon the Irish shore, 



And gae his bridle reins a shake. 
With Adieu for evermore, my dear, 
And adieu for evermore !] 

The soger frae the wars returns, 
The sailor frae the main, 

But I hae parted frae my love 
Never to meet again, my dear — 
Never to meet again. 

When day is gane, and night is come, 
And a' folk bound to sleep, 

I think on him that's far awa 
The lee-lang night and weep, my 

dear — 
The lee-lang night and weep. 



No. 297. Thickest night, surround my divelling. 

Tune: Strathallaii' s lament. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No^ 132. 
Slow 




^ 



m 






Thick - est night, surround my dwell - ing ! Howling tem-pests, o'er me 



^= 



Qt 



^f5=(s- 



g^^ 



S3 






rave! Turbid torrents win - try swell- ing, Roaring by my lone-ly 



w^^^m 



^ 



^^^^m 



cave! Crys-tal streamlets gen - tly flow-ing, Bu-sy haunts of base man- 



a^^pp^Sp^ 



kind, Western breezes soft - ly blowing, Suit not my dis - traded mind. 



Thickest night, surround my dwell- 
ing ! 

Howling tempests, o'er me rave ! 
Turbid torrents wintry swelling, 

Roaring by my lonely cave ! 
Crystal streamlets gently flowing. 

Busy haunts of base mankind. 
Western breezes softly blowing, 

Suit not my distracted mind. 



In the cause of right engaged, 

Wrongs injurious to redress. 
Honour's war we strongly waged, 

But the heavens deny'd suc- 
cess. 
Ruin's wheel has driven o'er us ; 

Not a hope that dare attend, 
The wide world is all before us, 

But a world without a friend ! 



28o 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 298. There grows a bonie brier-bush in our 
kail-yard. 

Tune : The bonie brier-bush. Scots Musical Mtiseutn, 1796, No. 492. 
Briskly 



feiES 



gggg 



i—m-^ — m — m— — ■ — *- 



iS^@ 



There grows a bon - ie bri - er - bush in our kail - yard, There 



-^^E^^^^^^^^ 



grows a bon - ie bri - er - bush in our kail - yard ; And be 



g=^l^g=^^P^z g=g^ 



:&^=P^ 



:^z=i=i?=i: 



low the bon - ie bri- er- bush there's a las - sie and a lad, And 



i^^^ii^^ESl^^^iEi 



they're bu - sy, bu - sy court - ing in our kail - yard. 

There grows a bonie brier-bush in our kail-yard, 
There grows a bonie brier-bush in our kail-yard ; 
And below the bonie brier-bush there 's a lassie and a lad, 
And they're busy, busy courting in our kail-yard. 

We'll court nae mair below the buss in our kail-yard, 
We'll court nae mair below the buss in our kail-yard ; 
We'll awa to Athole's green, and there we'll no be seen, 
Whare the trees and the branches will be our safe-guard. 

' Will ye go to the dancin in Carlyle's ha' ? 

Will ye go to the dancin in Carlyle's ha' ? 

Where Sandy and Nancy I'm sure will ding them a' ? ' 

' I winna gang to the dance in Carlyle ha.' 

What will I do for a lad when Sandy gangs awa ? 
What will I do for a lad when Sandy gangs awa? 
I will awa to Edinburgh, and win a penny fee, 
And see an onie bonie lad will fancy me. 

He's comin frae the North that's to fancy me. 
He 's comin frae the North that 's to fancy me ; 
A feather in his bonnet and a ribbon at his knee, 
He 's a bonie, bonie laddie, and yon be he ! 



VIII. JACOBITE 



281 



No. 299. The lovely lass of Inverness. 

Tune : The lovely lass of Inverness. Scots Musical Mttseum, 1796, No. 401. 
Slow 



^^m- 



i=P! 



3^fey#3E^S^a^Sg 



'rr-m—a-i-o — r- 




The love - ly lass of In - ver - ness, Nae joy nor pleasure can 

tr 



iip^pg^^^ 



she see ; For e'en to morn she cries ' a - las ! ' And ay the 
tr 






life: 



£ 



^S 



=P=5: 



^s==^=s 



s:^: 



^ 



saut tear blin's her e'e :— 'Dru- moss - ie Moor, Dru - moss - ie 
ir tr 



^g^^Egp ^ffe^rf ^^:^ 



i 



day — A wae - fu' day it was to me! For there I lost my 

tr 



»-i-^ — •=x 






fa - ther dear, My fa - ther dear and breth - ren three.' 



The lovely lass of Inverness, 

Nae joy nor pleasure can she see ; 
For e'en to morn she cries, ' alas ! ' 

And ay the saut tear blin's her e'e : — 
' Drumossie Moor, Drumossie day — 

A waefu' day it was to me ! 
For there I lost my father dear, 

My father dear and brethren three. 

'Their winding-sheet the bluidy clay, 

Their graves are growin green to see, 
And by them lies the dearest lad 

That ever blest a woman's e'e. 
Now wae to thee, thou cruel lord, 

A bluidy man I trow thou be. 
For monie a heart thou hast made sair 

That ne'er did wrang to thine or thee.' 



282 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 300. Whare hae ye been sae braw, lad? 

Scots M. M. 1790, No. 292. 



Tune : An ye had been where I hae been. 
Briskly 



^S^^^. 



-^=^- 



V=-V=-'t' 



=E 



iir:± 



^^^^=S 



SEi 



^ 



' Whare hae ye been sae braw, lad ? Whare hae ye been sae 




S^ 



1^^ 



V -^-^ 



-^^ 



bran - kie, O ? Whare hae ye been sae braw, lad? Cam ye 
Chorus. 



fgJggiP^^gPpEgE^p^ig^ 



by Kil - lie - cran - kie, O ? ' An ye had been wliare I 






'9 

been. Ye wad-na beeit sae ca?i - tie, O; An ye had seen what 



I 






/ hae seen, /' the braes d' Kil ■ lie - cratt - kie, O. 



Whare hae ye been sae braw, lad ? 

Whare hae ye been sae brankie, O? 
Whare hae ye been sae braw, lad ? 

Cam ye by Killiecrankie, O ? ' 

Chorus. 

An ye had been ivhare I hae been, 

Ye wadna been sae catttie, O ; 

An ye had seen ivhat I hae seen, 

r the braes o' Killiecrankie, O. 



' I faught at land, I faught at 
sea, 

At hame I faught my auntie, O ; 
But I met the devil and Dundee, 

On the braes o' Killiecrankie, O.' 

' The bauld Pitcur fell in a furr, 
An' Clavers gat a clankie, O, 

Or I had fed an Athol gled, 

On the braes o' Killiecrankie, O.' 



No. 301. The bojiniest lad that eer I saw. 

Tune : The Highland laddie. Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1743, i. No. 36. 
Brisk tr 



-£EEgE^ p .=3;^g^| EJ ^gEg-^ ^gE^^^ 



The bon-niest lad that e'er I saw — Bon-ie lad- die, Highland lad - die ; 
ir 




Wore a plaid and was fu' braw — Bon - ie High -land lad - die! 



VIII. JACOBITE 



283 




5=1^ 



Pp^gjii^^^^^^gi^gS 



On his head a bon-net blue— Bon-ie lad -die. Highland lad -die; His 



:i 



^m^m^^^^^m 



roy - al heart was firm and true— Bon - ie Highland lad - die ! 



The bonniest lad that e'er I saw — 

Bonie laddie, Highland laddie ; 
Wore a plaid and was fu' braw — 

Bonie Highland laddie ! 
On his head a bonnet blue — • 

Bonie laddie, Highland laddie ; 
His royal heart was firm and true — 

Bonie Highland laddie ! 

' Trumpets sound and cannons roar, 
Bonie lassie, Lawland lassie — 

And a' the hills wi' echoes roar, 
Bonie Lawland lassie ! 



Glory, honor, now invite — 
Bonie lassie, Lawland lassie ; 

For freedom and my King to fight, 
Bonie Lawland lassie ! ' 

The sun a backward course shall take, 

Bonie laddie, Highland laddie ; 
Ere ought thy manly courage shake ; 

Bonie Highland laddie ! 
Go, for yoursel' procure renown, 

Bonie laddie. Highland laddie. 
And for your lawful king his crown, 

Bonie His-hland laddie!' 



No. 302. By yon Castle wd at the close of the day. 

Tune : There are feiv good fellows when Jamie's awa. Sco^s iT/,il/.i792, No. 315. 
With pathos 






-x±. 



yon cas - tie wa' at the close of 




And 



^^^^^. 



sing - ing, the tears 



doon came, 



^ 



=3^ 






' There'll nev - er 



be 



till 



Ja - inie comes hame.' 



By yon castle wa' at the close of the day, 
I heard a man sing, tho' his head it was grey. 
And as he was singing, the tears doon came, 
' There'll never be peace till Jamie comes hame.' 



j84 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



The Church is in ruins, the State is in jars ; 
Delusions, oppressions, and murderous wars, 
We darena weel say't, but we ken wha's to blame — 
'There'll never be peace till Jamie comes hame.' 

My seven braw sons for Jamie drew sword, 
But now I greet round their green beds in the yard 
It brak the sweet heart o' my faithfu' auld dame — 
' There'll never be peace till Jamie comes hame.' 

Now life is a burden that bows me down, 
Sin I tint my bairns, and he tint his crown ; 
But till my last moments my words are the same — 
' There'll never be peace till Jamie comes hame.' 



No. 303. / hae been at Crookieden. 

Tune : The old highland laddie. Scots Musical Museum^ 1792, No. 332. 

Lively 



=^ 



^Ea^E^EEJEa- 



S: 



-j^-^, 



I hae been at Croo - kie - den — My bon - ie lad 



a 



^mm^^^^= ^^. 



rjlzz. 



die, High - land . lad - die, View - ing Wil - lie and 



Sp^^^g^ 



d^- 



=?^: 



a 



^^^m 



his men — My bon - ie lad • die, High - land lad - die! 



^*= 



^i^^ 



^^^^^^^^ 



There our foes that burnt and slew — My bon - ie lad - die, 



ii^^EES^ mm 



i^g^^^ 



e=E? 



High - land lad - die, There at last they gat their 



iii P^f^^ ^ 



=rt 



^=F 



^^^^^^ 



due— My bon - ie lad - die, High - land lad - die. 



VIII. JACOBITE 



285 



I HAE been at Crookieden — 

My bonie laddie, Highland laddie, 
Viewing Willie and his men — 

My bonie laddie, Highland laddie! 
There our foes that burnt and slew — 

My bonie laddie, Highland laddie, 
There at last they gat their due — 

My bonie laddie, Highland laddie. 



Satan sits in his black neuk — 

My bonie laddie, Highland laddie. 
Breaking sticks to roast the Duke — 

My bonie laddie, Highland laddie. 
The bloody monster gae a yell — 

My bonie laddie. Highland laddie. 
And loud the laughgae rounda'hell — 

My bonie laddie. Highland laddie. 



No. 304. 'Tiuas on a Monday morning. 

Tune : Charlie, he''s my darling. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 428. 



feBEgg^^lp^^g^^i^^^ 



'Twas on a Mon-day morn - ing Right ear - ly in the 

/7^ 



g^^^^^: 



* 



^ 



^ 



year, That Char - lie came to our town — The young Che • va - Her ! 



e£ 



^ 



Chorus. An'' Char - lie, Jie's my dar-ling, my dar-lmg, my dar-ling. 



Char - lie. he V mv dar - liner— the young Che - va 



Char - lie, he V my dar - ling— the young Che - va - Her I 



'TWAS on a Monday morning 
Right early in the year. 

That Charlie came to our town — 
The young Chevalier ! 

Chorus. 

Ail' Charlie, he '5 my darling, 

My darling, my darling, 
Charlie, he^s my darling — 
The young Chevalier I 

As he was walking up the street 

The city for to view, 
O, there he spied a bonie lass 

The window looking thro', 



Sae light 's he jumped up the stair, 

And tirl'd at the pin ; 
And wha sae ready as hersel' 

To let the laddie in ! 

He set his Jenny on his knee, 
All in his highland dress ; 

For brawly weel he ken'd the 
way. 
To please a bonie lass. 

It 's up yon heathery mountain 
An' down yon scroggy glen. 

We daurna gang a milking, 
For Charlie and his men ! 



286 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 305. Frae the friends and land I love. 

Tune: Carron side. Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1756, viii. p. 10. 
Plaintive 



i^Ei 



:e 






W 



-f^^j^ 



a^ 



:^23t 



31 



Frae the friends and land 
ir tr 



love Driv'n by For - tune's 
tr 






i 



fel - ly spite, Frae my best be - lov'd I rove, Nev 

tr tr 



a 



^:SJt=±=J^ 



i^ 



er mair to taste de - light : Nev - er mair maun 



hope to find Ease frae toil, re 




^ 



"-Ez 



^'=^- 



Ss 



lief 



;^^S^^ 



frae care ; When re - mem - brance WTacks the 

tr 



^ 



1—1 =>-^=zr-« — ^ — :^r*— *■ 



:23t 



mind, Plea - sures but un - veil des - pair. 

Frae the friends and land I love 

Driv'n by Fortune's felly spite, 
Frae my best belov'd I rove, 

Never mair to taste delight ; 
Never mair maun hope to find 

Ease frae toil, relief frae care : 
When remembrance wracks the mind, 

Pleasures but unveil despair. 

Brightest climes shall mirk appear. 

Desert ilka blooming shore, 
Till the Fates, nae mair severe, 

Friendship, Love, and Peace restore ; 
Till Revenge vvri' laurel'd head 

Bring our banish'd hame again, 
And ilk loyal, bonie lad 

Cross the seas, and win his ain. 



VIII, JACOBITE 



287 



No. 306. As I came der the Cairney mount. 

Tune : The Highland lassie. Scots Musical Museum^ 1796, No. 467. 
Brisk 



^^^^S^^^^^S 



As I came o'er the Cair - ney mount, And down a 



* 



J^ 



^^^^^^^^^^ 



mang the bloom - ing hea-ther, Kind-Iy stood the milk-ing-shiel To 

Chorus. ^ ^ 



i^ 



S^EEg^^^ 



^ gsgg 



shel-ter frae the storm -y wea-ther. O, nty bon - ie High - 



■ m^^ ^^ m s^^^^^EBE^^ 



land lad. My win-sotne,weel-far''d High -land lad - die ! Wha wad 



fe^a^ 



— 1 1 1 1 y^ — •=>v- 



-d-9- 



mind ike wind and rain Sae weel row' d in his tar-tan -plaid - ie! 

As I came o'er the Cairney mount, 

And down amang the blooming heather, 

Kindly stood the milking-shiel 

To shelter frae the stormy weather. 

Chorus. O, my bonie Highland lad, 

My winsome, weel-fard Highland laddie I 
Wha wad mind the wind and rain 
Sae weel row' d in his tartan plaidie ! 

Now Phoebus blinkit on the bent, 

And o'er the knowes the lambs were bleating ; 
But he wan my heart's consent 

To be his ain at the neist meeting. 




288 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



No. 307. The sun he is sunk in the west. 

Tune : Go from my window, love, do. Scots Mus. Museum, 1803, No. 581. 

I: 



s= 



:f^: 



:?5=:5^ 



1^^^ 



3-^ 



a 



The sun he is sunk in the west, All crea-tures re 



p^ ^^^ ^=m ^z^^=^ =$^^^ 



ti - red to rest, While here I sit, all sore be - set With 



■i-¥=^^ 



^^^^g^^^ 



fe 



sor- row, grief, and woe ; And its O fie - kle For - tune, O! 



The sun he is sunk in the west, 
All creatures retired to rest, 
While here I sit, all sore beset 

With sorrow, grief, and woe ; 
And it's O fickle Fortune, O! 

The prosperous man is asleep, 
Nor hears how the whirlwinds 

sweep ; 
But misery and I must watch 
The surly tempest blow : 
And it 's O fickle Fortune, O ! 

There lies the dear [partner] of my 

breast ; 
Her cares for a moment at rest ; 
Must I see thee, my youthful pride, 
Thus brought so very low? — 
And it's O fickle Fortune, O! 



There lie my sweet [babies] in her 

arms ; [alarms ; 

No anxious fear their [little] hearts 

But for their sake, my heart does ache. 

With many a bitter throe : 
And it 's O fickle Fortune, O ! 

I once was by Fortune carest : 
I once could relieve the distrest ; 
Now life's poor [pittance] hardly 
earn'd. 

My fate will scarce bestow ; 
And it 's O fickle Fortune, O ! 

No comfort, no comfort I have ! 
How welcome to me were the grave ! 
But then my wife and children dear — 

O, whither would they go ? 
And it's O fickle Fortune, O! 



O whither, O [whither] shall I turn 
All friendless, forsaken, forlorn ? 
For in this world Rest or Peace 

I never more shall know ! 
And it 's O fickle Fortune, O ! 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



289 



No. 308. There was a lad was born in Kyle. 

Tune : Dainty Davie. M<=Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1746, p. 32. 
„ Brisk 



^^^s^^^^^^m 



Chorus. Ro - bm was a ro - vm boy, Ran - tin, ro - vzit, 



W^^^^^^m^^- 



ran - tin, ro - vin, Ro • bin was a ro - vin boy, Ran-iin, 

tr Fine. ^--^ 



'^m. 



SEtEE=EE 



ro - vin Ro - bin I There was a lad was born in Kyle, 



^i^^^^ii 



^--^ 



But what - na day o' what - na style, I doubt it 's hard - ly 

tr _ tr D.C. 



^^^^^^^gi=EE 



worth the while To be sae nice wi' Ro - bin. 



Chorus. Robin was a rovin boy, 

Rantin, rovin, ranlin, rovin, 
Robin was a rovin boy, 
Rantin, rovin Robin ! 



There was a lad was born in Kyle, 
But whatna day o' whatna style, 
I doubt it 's hardly worth the while 
To be sae nice wi' Robin. 

Our monarch's hindmost year but 

ane 
Was five-and-twenty days begun, 
'Twas then a blast o' Janwar win' 
Blew hansel in on Robin. 

The gossip keekit in his loof, 
Quo' scho 'wha lives will see the proof, 
This waly boy will be nae coof ; 
I think we'll ca' him Robin. 



' He'll hae misfortunes great an'sma', 
But ay a heart aboon them a' ;. 
He'll be a credit till us a' ; 
W '11 a' be proud o' Robin. 

' But sure as three times three mak 

nine, 
I see by ilka score and line, 
This chap will dearly like our kin', 
So leeze me on thee, Robin.' 

Guid faith, quo' scho, I doubt you, sir, 
Ye gar the lasses lie aspar, 
But twenty fauts ye may hae waur, — 
So blessins on thee, Robin ! 



290 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 309. Is there for honest poverty ? 

Tune : For a' that. Scots Musical Museum^ 179°; No. 290. 
Boldly 



^^^m^^^ 



^ 



=^i=S 



^ 



E 



Is there forhon-est pov - er - ty That hings his head, an' a' that? 



^^^^^^^^^^ 



^- 



tt 



The cow - ard slave, we pass him by— We dare be poor for a' that ! 



i^i^=^^i^=i=^^^ 



For a' that, an' a' that, Our toils ob-scure, an' a' that, The 

4 __^_* 



5^E^ 



^S=F 



* «_? . .—m-- — * — ■— • — ^ — I 



rank is but the guinea's stamp, Tlie man 's the gowd for a' that. 



333^8 



Is there for honest poverty 

That hings his head, an' a' that ? 
The coward slave, we pass him by — 
We dare be poor for a' that ! 
For a' that, an' a' that, 

Our toils obscure, an' a' that, 
The rank is but the guinea's stamp, 
The man's the gowd for a' that. 

What the' on hamely fare we dine, 

Wear hodden grey, an' a' that ? 
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine- 
A man 's a man for a' that ! 
For a' that, an' a' that. 

Their tinsel show, an' a' that, 
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor, 
Is king o' men for a' that. 

Ye see yon birkie ca'd a lord, 

Wha struts, and stares, an' a' that ; 
Tho' hundreds worship at his word, 
He 's but a coof for a' that. 
For a' that, an' a' that. 

His ribband, star, an' a' that, 
The man o' independent mind. 
He looks an' laughs at a' that. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



291 



A prince can male a belted knight, 

A marquis, duke, an' a' that. 
But an honest man 's aboon his might — 
Gude faith, he mauna fa' that ! 
For a' that, an' a' that, 

Their dignities, an' a' that. 
The pith o' sense an' pride o' worth 
Are higher rank than a' that. 

Then let us pray that come it may — 

As come it will, for a' that — 
That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth 
Shall bear the gree, an' a' that ; 
For a' that, an' a' that, 
It's comin yet for a' that, 
That man to man the world o'er, 
Shall brothers be for a' that. 



No. 310. / dream d I lay where flowers were 
springing. 

Tune : I dreamed I lay. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 146. 



I dream'd I lay where flowers were spring-ing Gai - ly in the 



i 



ri?=^^=ss= 



£i 



^ 



^s 



l^s 



lizz^ 



^—*- 



ny beam; List'ning to the wild birds sing-ing, By a 



^ 



^S 






^ 



fall 



i 



ing crys - tal stream : Straight the sky grew black and 



P 



an 



a 



PS^^^^^gl^ii 



dar - ing ; Thro' the woods the 



w;hirl - winds rave ; Trees with 



P 



^ 



:s=ft 



s^^S 



^ 



^^^- 



=* — »- 



ed arms were war - ring O'er the swell - ing, drum - lie wave. 

I dream'd I lay where flowers were springing 

Gaily in the sunny beam ; 
List'ning to the wild birds singing, 

By a falling crystal stream : 
u 2 



2g2 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Straight the sky grew black and daring ; 

Thro' the woods the whirlwinds rave ; 
Trees with aged arms were warring 

O'er the swelling, drumlie wave. 

Such was my life's deceitful morning, 

Such the pleasures I enjoyed ; 
But lang or noon loud tempests, storming, 

A' my flowery bliss destroy'd. 
Tho' fickle Fortune has deceived me — 

She promis'd fair, and perform'd but ill ; 
Of mony a joy and hope bereav'd me — 

I bear a heart shall support me still. 



No. 311. Farewell, ye dungeons dai^k and strong. 

Tune : M'^Phersoit's rant. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 114. 

Boldly 

4 . , . ■|__^> i===;^--=^s;=^^=jv=^z^=z:Sg--:p.-^^3Z=iii= 



B ^j^^g^:^^^^ : 



Fare - well, ye dun - geons dark and strong, The wretch's des 



^ ^^^^=m^^m^ 



trn - ie! M« - Pher- son's time will not be long On 

Chorus. 



^ — ^ ^- 



:i=^ 



^1^^^^^ 



litzt 



der 



gal 



lows tree. Sae 7'ant - ing - ly, sae 



^^^ 



S^^ 



HEfe 



g^-^ 



wa7i-ion - ly, Sae daunUing • ly gaed he. He played a spring, 






^ J' *— ^ 7^ ~J J 



■ft^^=BaJ=^— ^ 



ajid dand'd it round Be - low the gal - lows tree. 



Farewell, ye dungeons dark and strong. 

The wretch's destinie ! 
M'=Pherson's time will not be long 

On yonder gallows-tree. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



293 



Chorus. Sae rantingly^ sae wantonly, 
Sae daitntingly gaed he, 
He played a spring, and danced it round 
Below the gallows tree. 

O, what is death but parting breath ! 

On many a bloody plain 
I've dared his face, and in this place 

I scorn him yet again ! 

Untie these bands from off my hands, 

And bring to me my sword, 
And there's no a man in all Scotland 

But I'll brave him at a word. 

I've hv'd a life of sturt and strife; 

I die by treacherie : 
It burns my heart I must depart, 

And not avenged be. 

Now farewell hght, thou sunshine bright, 

And all beneath the sky ! 
May coward shame distain his name, 

The wretch that dare not die ! 



No. 312. O, raging Fortunes withering blast. 

(Tune unknown.) 

O, RAGING Fortune's withering blast 

Has laid my leaf full low, 
O, raging Fortune's withering blast 

Has laid my leaf full low. 

My stem was fair, my bud was green, 

My blossom sweet did blow ; 
The dew fell fresh, the sun rose mild, 

And made my branches grow. 

But luckless Fortune's northern storms 

Laid a' my blossoms low ! — 
But luckless Fortune's northern storms 

Laid a' my blossoms low ! 



294 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 313. The gloomy night is gatli ring fast. 

Tune: Roslin Castle. Bremner's Scots Songs (2nd set), 1757, p. 27. 
Slow 



m — _ — I ^^ tf^ 1 — i.,^ tt—m ^ m — ^ — ' 



The gloo - my night is gath - 'ring fast, Loud 




roars the wild, 



con - stant blast : Yon 



^^^^^^^^^^m 



- ky cloud is 



foul 



with rain, 1 



§^^ 



^^^ 



driv • ing o'er tlie plain ; The hun - ter now has 



^ ^I^fe ^^^ig 



S 



left the moor, The 



scat - ter'd co - veys meet 



^ 



I «^ L— v= M—0 I ^_«. 



cure; While here I wan - der, prest with 

tr 






care, A - long the lone - ly banks of Ayr. 



The gloomy night is gath'ring fast, 
Loud roars the wild, inconstant 

blast ; 
Yon murky cloud is foul with rain, 
I see it driving o'er the plain ; 
The hunter now has left the moor. 
The scatter'd coveys meet secure ; 
While here I wander, prest with 

care, 
Along the lonely banks of Ayr. 



The Autumn mourns her rip'ning 

corn 
By early Winter's ravage torn ; 
Across her placid, azure sky, 
She sees the scowling tempest fly : 
Chill runs my blood to hear it 

rave ; 
I think upon the stormy wave. 
Where many a danger I must dare, 
Far from the bonie banks of Ayr. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



295 



'Tis not the surging billows roar, 
'Tis not that fatal, deadly shore ; 
Tho' death in ev'ry shape appear, 
The wretched have no more to fear : 
But round my heart the ties are 

bound, 
That heart transpierc'd with many a 

wound ; 
These bleed afresh, those ties I 

tear, 
To leave the bonie banks of Ayr. 



Farewell, old Coila's hills and dales. 
Her heathymoors and windingvales ; 
The scenes where wretched fancy 

roves. 
Pursuing past unhappy loves ! 
Farewell my friends ! farewell my 

foes ! 
My peace with these, my love with 

those : — 
The bursting tears my heart declare 
Farewell the bonie banks of Ayr ! 



No. 314. Raving winds arotmd her blowing. 

Tune : M'^Grigor of RorcCs lament. Macdpnald's Highland Airs, 1784, p. 13. 
Very slow ir 






=^»=F 



§^ 



i^ 



i 



Rav - ing winds a - round her blow - injf, Yel - low leaves 
ir 



Zi^Z 



-^mm 



S^: 



the wood - lands strow - ing, By 



nv - er 



^^ 



hoarse - ly roar - ing, Is - a 



bel 



la stray'd de - plor - ing. 



Raving winds around her blowing. 
Yellow leaves the woodlands strowing, 
By a river hoarsely roaring, 
Isabella stray'd deploring : — 

' Farewell, hours that late did measure 
Sunshine days of joy and pleasure ! 
Hail, thou gloomy night of sorrow — 
Cheerless night that knows no morrow! 

' O'er the past too fondly wandering. 
On the hopeless future pondering, 
Chilly Grief my life-blood freezes. 
Fell Despair my fancy seizes. 
' Life, thou soul of every blessing. 
Load to Misery most distressing. 
Gladly how would I resign thee. 
And to dark oblivion join thee ! ' 



296 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 315. What will I do gin my hoggie die ? 

Tune: What will I do, dr^c. Mt^Glashan's 5co/s MmsM^es, 1781, p. 11. 



¥ 



i^ ^l^^^^g^^ga^^-?^ 



What will I do gin my hog-gie die? My joy, my pride, my 



'^^^^^^^^m 



hog - gie ! My 011 - ly beast, I had nae mac, And vow but 
tr 



ipi^^pgii^J^^^ 



I was vo - gie ! The lee-Iang night we watch'd the fauld, 



igi^=i^^i^^ig^ 



Me and my faith - fu' dog - gie ; We heard nocht 



^i^_^^pi^^^l^i 



but tlie roar-ing linn A - mang the braes sae scrog-gie. 



What will I do gin my hoggie die ? 

My joy, my pride, my hoggie 1 
My only beast, 1 had nae mae, 

And vow but I was vogie ! 
The lee-lang night we watch'd the fauld, 

Me and my faithfu' doggie ; 
We heard nocht but the roaring linn 

Amang the braes sae scroggie ; 

But the houlet cried frae the castle wa', 

The blitter frae the boggie. 
The tod reply'd upon the hill ; 

I trembled for my hoggie. 
When day did daw, and cocks did craw, 

The morning it was foggie, 
An unco tyke lap o'er the dike. 

And maist has kill'd my hoggie ! 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



297 



No. 316. It was in sweet Senegal. 

Tune: The slave's lament. Scots Musical Museum, I'jgs, Ho. 384. 



^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^m 



It was in sweet Sen - e - gal that my foes did me en - thral For the 



^^^^^^i^^S^ 



lands of Vir- gin-ia, -gin - ia, O: Torn from that lovely shore, And must 



J^^E^^^^^^ ^ E^t ^ f^^P g 



nev - er see it more, And a - las! I am wea - ry, wea - ry, O. 



It was in sweet Senegal that my foes did me enthral 

For the lands of Virginia, -ginia, O : 
Torn from that lovely shore, and must never see it more, ) , . 

And alas ! I am weary, weary, O. ) 

All on that charming coast is no bitter snow and frost, 

Like the lands of Virginia, -ginia, O : 
There streams for ever flow, and the flowers for ever blow, 

And alas ! I am weary, weary, O. 



bis 



The burden I must bear, while the cruel scourge I fear. 

In the lands of Virginia, -ginia, O ; 

And I think on friends most dear with the bitter, bitter tear. 1 , • 
« , , . r ^ ^ \ bts 

And alas ! I am weary, weary, O. 



No. 317, One night as I did wander. 

Tune : John Anderson my jo (see No. 212). 

One night as I did wander. 

When corn begins to shoot, 
I sat me down to ponder 

Upon an auld tree root : 
Auld Ayr ran by before me, 

And bicker'd to the seas ; 
A cushat crooded o'er me, 

That echo'd through the trees. 



298 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 318. The lazy mist hangs fro7n the brow of 
the hill. 

Tune : The lazy mist. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 232. 

Slow 




A—A^ 



E^ 



The la - zy mist hangs from the brow of the hill, Con- 



m. 






r^: 



^- 



3^i 



ceal - ing the course of the dark wind - ing rill ; How lan-guid 



3^^ 



^EEB 



S^ 



the scenes, late so spright - ly, ap - pear, As Au - tumn to Win - 



^^^^^ 



a=s=3: 



ter re - signs the pale year ! The for - ests are leaf - less, the 



^ 



-^=^ 



-h-p 



mea-dows are brown, And all the gay fop - pery of Sura - 



mm 



^^=i^=^; 



- mer is flown. A - part let me wan - der, a - part let me 



S 



e 



s 



ft 



muse, How quick Time is fly - ing, how keen Fate pur -sues! 



The lazy mist hangs from the brow of the hill, 
Concealing the course of the dark winding rill ; 
How languid the scenes, late so sprightly, appear, 
As Autumn to Winter resigns the pale year ! 
The forests are leafless, the meadows are brown, 
And all the gay foppery of Summer is flown. 
Apart let me wander, apart let me muse. 
How quick Time is flying, how keen Fate pursues ! 

How long I have liv'd, but how much liv'd in vain 
How little of life's scanty span may remain. 
What aspects old Time in his progress has worn ! 
What ties cruel Fate in my bosom has torn ! 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



299 



How foolish, or worse, till our summit is gain'd ! 

And downward, how weaken'd, how darken'd, how pain'd ! 

Life is not worth having with all it can give — 

For something beyond it poor man, sure, must live. 



No. 319. Ken ye oiLght Cap tarn Grose? 

Tune: Sir John Malcohn. Scots Musical Museum^ 1796, No. 455. 

Slow 



i^^^PP^iE^^^^^ 



:# 



Ken ye ought o' Cap - tain Grose ? I - go and a - go. If 






he's a - mong his friends or foes? /• rain, co- rant, da - go. 



^£EB= ^^ P^-i=:j ^^g^ 



Is he south, or is he north? / - go and a ■ go. Or 



^^^^^ 



it=5=fc: 



£ 



3=r=« 



drown - ed in the ri - ver Forth? /- ram, co- ram, da - go. 

Ken ye ought o' Captain Grose? Igo and ago, 

If he 's among his friends or foes ? Iram, coram, dago. 

Is he south, or is he north? Igo and ago, 

Or drowned in the river Forth? Iram, coram, dago. 

Is he slain by Hielan' bodies? Igo and ago, 

And eaten like a wether haggis? Iram, coram, dago. 

Is he to Abra'm's bosom gane ? Igo and ago, 

Or haudin Sarah by the wame ? Iram, coram, dago. 

Where'er he be, the Lord be near him ! Igo and ago, 
As for the deil, he daurna steer him ! Iram, coram, dago. 
But please transmit th' enclosed letter, Igo and ago, 
Which will oblige your humble debtor, Iram, coram, dago. 

So may ye hae auld stanes in store, Igo and ago, 
The very stanes that Adam bore, Iram, coram, dago. 
So may ye get in glad possession, Igo and ago. 
The coins o' Satan's coronation ! Iram, coram, dago. 



300 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 320. O, leeze me 07i my spimiin-wheel. 

Tune : Sweet 's the lass that loves me. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 360. 



f±^ 



? 



^^^^^m^m^^mm 



O, leeze me on my spin - nin • wheel, And leeze me 



^m 



Sl^^i 



^^^ 



S 



on my rock and reel, Frae tap to tae that deeds me 






bien, And haps me Cel and warm at e'en! I'll 



^^m 



^^ 



g=iE 



ep 



set me down, and sing- and spin, While laigh de 



'^^^^^^^^ 



scends the sim - mer sun. Blest wi' con - tent, and milk 



^^^^^^^^^m^ 



and meal — O, leeze me on my spin - nin - wheel! 

O, LEEZE me on my spinnin-wheel, 
And leeze me on my rock and reel, 
Frae tap to tae that deeds me bien, 
And haps me fiel and warm at e'en ! 
I'll set me down, and sing and spin, 
While laigh descends the simmer sun, 
Blest wi' content, and milk and meal — 
O, leeze me on my spinnin-wheel ! 

On ilka hand the burnies trot. 
And meet below my theekit cot. 
The scented birk and hawthorn white 
Across the pool their arms unite, 
Alike to screen the birdies' nest 
And little fishes' caller rest: 
The sun blinks kindly in the biel', 
Where blythe I turn my spinnin wheel. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



301 



On lofty aiks the cushats wail, 
And Echo cons the doolfu' tale. 
The lintwhites in the hazel braes, 
Delighted, rival ither's lays ; 
The craik amang the claver hay. 
The paitrick whirrin o'er the ley, 
The swallow jinkin round my shiel, 
Amuse me at my spihnin-wheel. 

Wi' sma' to sell and less to buy, 
Aboon distress, below envy, 
O, wha wad leave this humble state 
For a' the pride of a' the great ? 
Amid their flaring, idle toys, 
Amid their cumbrous, dinsome joys, 
Can they the peace and pleasure feel 
Of Bessie at her spinnin-wheel? 



No. 321. Cauld 6 laws the wind frae east to west. 



Tune : Up in the morning early. 

Slowly 



Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 140. 



ia 



^^^^^ 



^: 



fe^=1v=F 



-^T--*" 



Cauld blaws the wind frae east to west, The 



drift 



m 



1* 



^^s^^ 



K 



5t5 



m 



f* 



is driv - ing sair - ly, Sae loud and shill's I hear the 

Chorus. 



q^^ 



e 



^^mm 



m 



blast— I'm sure 



it 's 



ter fair - ly. 



l/p in the 



^--^^—^^ 



^ZZaZf—Z^MZZK 



w 



:EES 



W^SE. 



morning^ s no for 7ne^ Up in the 7norn-ing ear-lyl When a' 



i^^^^^^^^^ 



the hills are cover'' d wi'' snaWjPm sure zV'j win - ter fair-ly! 



Cauld blaws the wind frae east to west. 

The drift is driving sairly, 
Sae loud and shill 's I hear the blast — 

I'm sure it 's winter fairly. 



302 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Chorus. Up in the morning'' s no for me. 
Up in the morning early I 
IVhen «' the hills are coverd wV snaw, 
Pm. sure it's winter fairly I 
The birds sit chittering in the thorn, 

A' day they fare but sparely ; 
And lang 's the night frae e'en to morn — 
I'm sure it 's winter fairly. 



No. 322. No cold approach, no alter d mien. 

Air : lanthy the lovely. Scots Musical Museum., 1 792, No. 340. 



* 



Slow 



^BS^I 



-^ 



^i^^i^ 



^ 



cold ap - proach, no 
tr 



ter'd mien, Just what 







ex - tremes be - tween : He made me blest — and broke 

_ r- 

S3: 



g^^^ 



m 



ili 



i 



^^ 



my heart. From hope, the wretch's an - chor, torn, Ne- 



-^"^ 



S 






^^ 



gleet - ed 



lect - ingf all; Friend - less, for - 



^^ 



^s 



1^5-*: 



iie^ 



sak - en 



and 



for - lorn. 



shed 



l=ffl: 



:r=F 



eSe 



S=^: 



^ 



-■^—f- 



=P=5= 



ev - er fall, must ev - er 

No cold approach, no alter'd mien. 

Just what would make suspicion start, 
No pause the dire extremes between : 

He made me blest— and broke my heart. 
[From hope, the wretch's anchor, torn, 

Neglected and neglecting all ; 
Friendless, forsaken and forlorn, 

The tears I shed must ever fall.] 



fall. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



303 



No. 



My father was a farmer. 



Tune : The Weaver and his shuttle (see No. 67). 



My father was a farmer 

Upon the Carrick border, O, 
And carefully he bred me 

In decency and order, O ; 
He bade me act a manly part, 

Tho' I had ne'er a farthing, O, 
For without an honest, manly heart. 

No man was worth regarding, O. 

Then out into the world 

My course I did determine, O ; 
Tho' to be rich was not my wish, 

Yet to be great was charming, O : 
My talents they were not the worst, 

Nor yet my education, O ; 
Resolved was I at least to try 

To mend my situation, O. 

In many a way, and vain essay 

I courted Fortune's favour, O ; 
Some cause unseen still stept be- 
tween 

To frustrate each endeavour, O : 
Sometimes by foes I was o'er- 
power'd, 

Sometimes by friends forsaken, O, 
And when my hope was at the top, 

I still was worst mistaken, O. 

Then sore harassed, and tir'd at last 

With Fortune's vain delusion, O, 
I dropt my schemes like idle dreams, 

And came to this conclusion, O : — 
The past was bad, and the future 
hid; 

It's good or ill untried, O ; 
But the present hour was in my 
power. 

And so I would enjoy it, O. 

No help, nor hope, nor view had I, 
Nor person to befriend me, O ; 

So I must toil, and sweat, and broil, 
And labour to sustain me, O : 



To plough and sow, to reap and mow, 
My father bred me early, O ; 

For one, he said, to labour bred. 
Was a match for Fortune fairly, O. 

Thus all obscure, unknown, and 
poor, 

Thro' life I'm doom'd to wander, O, 
Till down my weary bones I lay 

In everlasting slumber, O ; 
No view nor care, but shun whate'er 

Might breed me pain or sorrow, O ; 
I live to-da3' as well 's I may. 

Regardless of to-morrow, O. 

But, cheerful still, I am as well 

As a monarch in a palace, O, 
Tho' Fortune's frown still hunts me 
down. 

With all her wonted malice, O : 
I make indeed my daily bread, 

But ne'er can make it farther, O ; 
But, as daily bread is all I need, 

I do not much regard her, O. 

When sometimes by my labour 

I earn a little money, O, 
Some unforeseen misfortune 

Comes gen'rally upon me, O : 
Mischance, mistake, or by neglect. 

Or my good-natur'd folly, O ; 
But, come what will, I've sworn it 
still, 

I'll ne'er be melancholy, O. 

All you who follow wealth and power 

With unremitting ardour, O, 
The more in this you look for 
bliss, 

You leave your view the farther, O. 
Had you the wealth Potosi boasts. 

Or nations to adore you, O, 
A cheerful, honest-hearted clown 

I will prefer before you, O 1 



304 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 324. When chill November s stirly blast. 

Tune: Peggy Bawn. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 509. 
Slow 



m^m^m^^^m 



:^^=^ 



T^- 



When chill No - vem-ber"s sur - ly blast Made fields and for-ests bare, 




One ev'^ - ing, as I wan-der'd forth, A - long the banks of Ayr, 



i 



^^ 



^ 



^ 



tt 



:tt 



I spy'd a man whose a - ged step Seem'd wea - ry, worn with care; 



^^^m 



His face was fur-row'd o'er with years, And hoa - ry was his hair. 



When chill November's surly blast 

Made fields and forests bare, 
One ev'ning, as I wander'd forth, 

Along the banks of Ajt, 
I spy'd a man whose aged step 

Seem'd weary, worn with care ; 
His facewas furrow'd o'erwithyears, 

And hoary was his hair. 

' Young stranger, whither wandVest 
thou?' 

Began the reverend Sage ; 
' Does thirst of wealth thy step con- 
strain. 

Or youthful pleasures rage ? 
Or haply, prest with cares and woes. 

Too soon thou hast began 
To wander forth, with me to mourn 

The miseries of man. 

' The sun that overhangs yon moors, 

Outspreading far and wide, 
Where hundreds labour to sup- 
port 
A haughty lordling's pride : — 



I've seen yon weary winter-sun 
Twice forty times return ; 

And ev'ry time has added proofs, 
That man w^as made to mourn, 

' O man ! while in thy early years. 

How prodigal of time ! 
Mis-spending all thy precious hours. 

Thy glorious, youthful prime ! 
Alternate follies take the sway ; 

Licentious passions burn ; 
Which tenfold force gives nature's 
law. 

That man was made to mourn. 

' Look not alone on youthful prime. 

Or manhood's active might ; 
Man then is useful to his kind. 

Supported is his right : 
But see him on the edge of life. 

With cares and sorrows worn ; 
Then age and want — O ill-matched 
pair ! — 

Show man was made to mourn. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



305 



'A few seem favourites of fate, 

In pleasure's lap carest ; 
Yet think not all the rich and great 

Are likewise truly blest ; 
But oh ! what crowds in every 
land 

All wretched and forlorn, 
Thro' vveary life this lesson learn, 

That man was made to mourn. 

' Many and sharp the num'rous ills 

Inwoven with our frame ! 
More pointed still we make ourselves 

Regret, remorse, and shame ! 
And man, whose heav'n-erected face 

The smiles of love adorn, — 
Man's inhumanity to man 

Makes countless thousands mourn ! 

'See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight. 

So abject, mean, and vill'. 
Who begs a brother of the earth 

To give him leave to toil ; 
And see his lordly fellow-worm 

The poor petition spurn, 
Unmindful, tho' a weeping wife 

And helpless offspring mourn. 



' If I'm design'd yon lordling's slave — 

By Nature's law design'd — 
Why was an independent wish 

E'er planted in my mind? 
If not, why am I subject to 

His cruelty, or scorn ? 
Or why has man the will and pow'r 

To make his fellow mourn ? 

' Yet, let not this too much, my son, 

Disturb thy youthful breast ; 
This partial view of humankind 

Is surely not the last! 
The poor, oppressed, honest man 

Had never, sure, been born, 
Had there not been some recompense 

To comfort those that mourn. 

' O death ! the poor man's dearest 
friend, 

The kindest and the best! 
Welcome the hour my aged limbs 

Are laid with thee at rest ! 
The great, the wealthy fear thy blow, 

From pomp and pleasure torn ; 
But oh ! a blest relief to those 

That weary-laden mourn ! ' 



No. 325. T/ie wintry west extends his blast. 

Tune: M^Pherson's rant (see No. 311). 

The wintry west extends his blast, 

And hail and rain does blaw ; 
Or, the stormy north sends driving forth 

The blinding sleet and snaw : 
While tumbling brown, the burn comes down, 

And roars frae bank to brae ; 
And bird and beast in covert rest. 

And pass the weary day. 

'The sweeping blast, the sky o'ercast,' 

The joyless winter day 
Let others fear, to me more dear 

Than all the pride of May : 
The tempest's howl it soothes my soul. 

My griefs it seems to join ; 
The leafless trees my fancy please. 

Their fate resembles mine. 



3o6 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Thou Power Supreme whose mighty scheme 

These woes of mine fulfil, 
Here firm I rest, they must be best, 

Because they are Thy will ! 
Then all I want — O do Thou grant 

This one request of mine ! — 
Since to enjoy Thou dost deny, 

Assist me to resign. 



No. 326. But lately seen in gladsome green. 



Tune : East Indian air. 
„ Slow „ 



B^ 



Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 486. 



^^ 



: 4:=^ ^^ ^==*!^^=^g! I ^"^ 



it 



? 



But late - ly seen in gladsome green, The 



woods re-joic'd the 



i= 






day; Thro' gea-tleshow'rs the laughing flow'rs In 



dou - ble pride were 



^- 



s 



53taEpSfE?EE^ 






-^v— 



gay: 



But now our joys are fled On win - ter blasts a - wa, Yet 



I^^ E^-^jd^:^^^^ !^^-^^ 



mai-denMay in rich ar-ray A 



gain shall bring them a'. 



But lately seen in gladsome green. 

The woods rejoic'd the day ; 
Thro' gentle show'rs the laughing flow'rs 

In double pride were gay : 
But now our joys are fled 

On winter blasts awa. 
Yet maiden May in rich array 

Again shall bring them a'. 

But my white pow, nae kindly thowe 

Shall melt the snaws of age ; 
My trunk of eild, but buss and bield, 

Sinks in Time's wintry rage. 
O, age has weary days 

And nights o' sleepless pain ! 
Thou golden time o' youthfu' prime, 

Why comes thou not again ? 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



307 



Tune : Wee Totunt Fogg. 
Cheerfully 



No. 327. Wee Willie Gray. 

Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. 514. 



fe^N^fe^^^^ai^^ 



*=t5: 



i 



^ 



=^ 



Wee Wil-Iie Gray and his lea-ther wal - let, Peel a wil - low wand to 



^^^^^i^=^^a ^ ^ 



be him boots and jack-et : The rose up - on the brier will be him trouse 



^. 



»=^ 



W^^ 



*=t= 



D. C. 



-N^T 



and dou-blet, The rose up . on the brier will be him trouse and dou-blet ! 

Wee Willie Gray and his leather wallet, 

Peel a willow wand to be him boots and jacket : 

The rose upon the brier will be him trouse and doublet, 

The rose upon the brier will be him trouse and doublet ! 

Wee Willie Gray and his leather wallet, 
Twice a lily flower will be him sark and cravat ; 
Feathers of a flie wad feather up his bonnet — 
Feathers of a flie wad feather up his bonnet ! 



No. 328. He clencJid his pa7npJilets in his fist. 

Tune : Killiecranhie (see No. 256). 



LORD ADVOCATE. 

He clench'd his pamphlets in his fist, 

He quoted and he hinted, 
Till in a declamation-mist 

His argument, he tint it ; 
He gaped for't, he graped for't, 

He fand it was awa, man ; 
But what hiscommon sense came short 

He eked out wi' law, man. 

X a 



MR. ERSKINE. 

Collected, Harry stood awee, 

Then open'd out his arm, man ; 
His lordship sat, wi' ruefu' e'e, 

And ey'd the gath'ring storm, man : 
Like wind-driv'n hail it did assail, 

Or torrents owre a linn, man ; 
The Bench sae wise lift up their eyes, 

Half-wauken'd wi' the din, man. 



3o8 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 329. Orthodox! orthodox! wha believe in 
John Knox. 

Tune : Come, let us prepare. Watts's Musical Miscellany, 1730, iii. p. 72. 
Boldly 



pJgffi^^^E^lEg^^^ 



w 



Or-tho-dox! or - tho - dox f Wha he- lieve in John Knox, Let me 



i^^^^^^^^^^E^EE^^^^EEg^ 



sound an a - larm to your conscience — A her - e • tic blast 



'^^^^ 



^ 



fc 



^^S 



* ^ 



^pi^ ^ ^^ 



Has been blawn i' the wast, That ' What is not sense must be non 



± 



1^^=^=$= 



^ 



■^=^^=^ 



-^f^^ 



• sense': Or -tho- dox t That what is not sense must be non - sense. 



Orthodox ! orthodox I 

Wha believe in John Knox, 
Let me sound an alarm to your conscience — 

A heretic blast 

Has been blawn i' the wast, 
That ' What is not sense must be nonsense ' : 
Orthodox ! That what is not sense must be nonsense. 

Doctor Mac ! Doctor Mac ! 

You should streek on a rack, 
To strike evil-doers viri' terror ; 

To join Faith and Sense, * 

Upon ony pretence, 
Was heretic, damnable error, 
Doctor Mac — was heretic, damnable error. 

Town of Ayr, town of Ayr, 
It was mad, I declare. 
To meddle wi' mischief a-brewing ; 
Provost John is still deaf 
To the Church's relief. 
And Orator Bob is its ruin — 
Town of Ayr ! And Orator Bob is its ruin. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 309 

D'rymple mild, D'rymple mild, 
Tho' your heart's like a child, 
And your life like the new-driven snaw ; 
Yet that winna save ye, 
Auld Satan must have ye 
For preaching that three 's ane and twa — 
D'rymple mild ! For preaching that three 's ane and twa. 

Calvin's sons, Calvin's sons. 

Scour your spiritual guns, 
Ammunition you never can need ; 

Your hearts are the stuff 

Will be powther enough. 
And your skulls are a storehouse o' lead — 
Calvin's sons ! And your skulls are a storehouse o' lead. 

Rumble John ! Rumble John ! 

Mount the steps with a groan. 
Cry: — 'The book is wi' heresy cramm'd'; 

Then out wi' your ladle. 

Deal brimstone like adie, 
And roar ev'ry note o' the damn'd — 
Rumble John ! And roar ev'ry note o' the damn'd. 

Simper James ! Simper James, 

Leave the fair Killie dames, 
There 's a holier chase in your view ; 

I'll lay on your head 

That the pack ye'U soon lead, 
For puppies like you there 's but few — 
Simper James ! For puppies like you there 's but few. 

Singet Sawnie ! Singet Sawnie, 

Are ye huirding the penny, 
Unconscious what evils await ? 

Wi' a jump, yell, and howl, 

Alarm ev'ry soul, 
For the foul thief is just at your gates, 
Singet Sawnie ! For the foul thief is just at your gates. 

Poet Willie ! Poet Willie, 

Gie the Doctor a volley, 
Wi' your ' Liberty's chain ' and your wit ; 

O'er Pegasus' side 

Ye ne'er laid a stride, 

Ye but smelt, man, the place where he 

Poet Willie ! Ye but smelt, man, the place where he 



310 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

Barr Steenie ! Barr Steenie, 
What mean ye, what mean ye ? 
If ye'll meddle nae mair wi' the matter, 
Ye may hae some pretence, 
To havins and sense, 
Wi' people wha ken ye nae better — 
Barr Steenie ! Wi' people wha ken j'e nae better. 

Jamie Goose ! Jamie Goose, 

Ye hae made but toom roose, 
In hunting the wicked Lieutenant ; 

But the Doctor 's your mark. 

For the Lord's haly ark 
He has cooper'd and ca'd a w^rang pin in't, — 
Jamie Goose ! He has cooper'd and ca'd a wrang pin in't; 

Davie Bluster ! Davie Bluster, 
For a saint if ye muster. 
The corps is no nice o' recruits; 
Yet to worth let 's be just. 
Royal blood ye might boast, 
If the Ass were the king o' the brutes, — 
Davie Bluster ! If the Ass were the king o' the brutes. 

Cessnock side ! Cessnock side, 

Wi' your turkey-cock pride. 
Of manhood but sma' is your share ; 

Ye've the figure, 'tis true. 

Even your faes will allow. 
And your friends daurna say ye hae mair — 
Cessnock side ! And your friends daurna say ye hae mair. 

Muirland Jock! Muirland Jock, 

Whom the Lord gave a stock 
Wad set up a tinkler in brass, 

If ill manners were wit, 

There 's no mortal so fit 
To prove the poor Doctor an ass — 
Muirland Jock ! To prove the poor Doctor an ass. 

Andro Gouk ! Andro Gouk, 

Ye may slander the Book, 
And the Book not the waur, let me tell ye ; 

Tho' ye're rich, and look big, 

Yet, lay by hat and wig, 
And ye'll hae a calf's head o' sma' value — 
Andro Gouk ! And ye'll hae a calf's head o' sma' value. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 31I 

Daddy Auld ! Daddy Auld, 

There 's a tod in the fauld, 
A tod meikle waur than the clerk ; 

Though ye do Httle skaith, 

Ye'll be in at the death, 
And gif ye canna bite, ye may bark, 
Daddy Auld ! And gif ye canna bite, ye may bark. 

Holy Will, Holy Will, 

There was wit in your skull 
When ye pilfer'd the alms o' the poor ; 

The timmer is scant. 

When ye're taen for a saunt, 
Wha should swing in a rape for an hour — 
Holy Will ! Wha should swing in a rape for an hour. 

Poet Burns ! Poet Burns, 

Wi' your priest-skelping turns, 
Why desert ye your auld native shire ? 

Your Muse is a gipsy — 

E'en tho' she were tipsy, 
She could ca' us nae waur than we are, — 
Poet Burns ! Ye could ca' us nae waur than we are. 

PRESENTATION VERSES TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Factor John ! Factor John, 

Whom the Lord made alone, 
And ne'er made anither, thy peer, 

Thy poor servant, the Bard, 

In respectful regard. 
He presents thee this token sincere. 
Factor John ! He presents thee this token sincere. 

Afton's Laird ! Afton's Laird, 

When your pen can be spar'd, 
A copy of this I bequeath. 

On the same sicker score 

As I mention'd before, 
To that trusty auld worthy, Clackleith,. 
Afton's Laird ! To that trusty auld worthy, Clackleith. 



No. 330. Peg NicJiolson was a good bay ma^^e. 

Tune : Chevy Chase (see No. 267 or 274). 
Peg Nicholson was a good bay mare 

As ever trod on airn ; 
But now she's floating down the Nith, 
And past the mouth o' Cairn. 



312 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



Peg Nicholson was a good bay mare, 
An' rode thro' thick an' thin ; 

But now she 's floating down the Nith, 
And wanting even the skin. 

Peg Nicholson was a good bay mare, 

And ance she bore a priest ; 
But now she 's floating down the Nith, 

For Solway fish a feast. 

Peg Nicholson was a good bay mare, 
An' the priest he rode her sair ; 

And much oppress'd, and bruis'd she was. 
As priest-rid cattle are ! 



No. 331. There lived a carl in Kelly biLrn braes. 

Tune : Kellyhurn braes. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 379. 
Briskly 



mm^^^^ m^^ m^^ 



There liv - ed a carl in Kel - ly - burn braes, (Hey and the 



^pEpi^pEf^^^^ 



rue grows bon - ie wi' thyme), And he had a wife was the plague o' 



^ 



pJ ^l^g^ gEEJ^EigiSSg 



his days (And the thyme it is with-er'd, and rue is in prime). 



There lived a carl in Kellyburn braes, 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme), 

And he had a wife was the plague o' his days 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

Ae day as the carl gaed up the lang glen, 
(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme). 

He met wi' the devil, says: — 'How do you fen?' 
(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

' I've got a bad wife, sir : that 's a' my complaint 
(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme). 

For, saving your presence, to her ye're a saint ' 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is. in prime). 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 3T3 

' It 's neither your stot nor your staig I shall crave 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme), 
But gie me your wife, man, for her I must have' 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

'Oh! welcome, most kindly,' the blythe carl said 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme), 
' But if ye can match her, — ye' re waur than ye're ca'd ' 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

The devil has got the auld wife on his back 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme). 
And, like a poor pedlar, he 's carried his pack 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

He 's carried her hame to his ain hallan-door 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme). 
Syne bade her gae in for a bitch and a whore 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

Then straight he makes fifty, the pick o' his band 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme), 
Turn out on her guard in the clap o' a hand 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

The carlin gaed thro' them like ony wud bear 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme) : 
Whae'er she gat hands on cam near her nae mair 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

A reekit wee deevil looks over the wa' 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme) : 
* O, help, master, help ! or she'll ruin us a' ! ' 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

The devil he swore by the edge o' his knife 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme), 
He pitied the man that was tied to a wife 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

The devil he swore by the kirk and the bell 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme). 
He was not in wedlock, thank Heaven, but in hell 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 

Then Satan has travell'd again wi' his pack 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme). 
And to her auld husband he's carried her back 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 
' I hae been a devil the feck o' my life 

(Hey and the rue grows bonie wi' thyme). 
But ne'er was in hell till I met wi' a wife 

(And the thyme it is wither'd, and rue is in prime). 



3H 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 332. There was three kings into the east. 

Tune : Lull me beyond thee. Playford's Dancing Master, 1670, p. 148. 
Smoothly 



:fe 



w^^^ 



fc 



s 



'> 9 — ^9- 



There was three kings in - to the east, Three kings both great 



i 



^^^pf 



s 



:^=?zi==; 



and high; And they hae sworn a so - lemn oath John 

ores 






^^^ 



m^ 



Bar - ley - corn should die. They took a plough and plough'd 



^^^EfE^ ^^g^ 



/ 



E^ 



him down, Put clods up - on his head ; And they hae 



H^F 



m^ 



^^^E^^ 



5^E 



» 9 Ui^L 

sworn a so - lemn oath John Bar - ley - corn was dead. 



There was three kings into the east, 
Three kings both great and high ; 

And they hae sworn a solemn oath 
John Barleycorn should die. 

They took a plough and plough'd him 
down, 

Put clods upon his head ; 
And they hae sworn a solemn oath 

John Barleycorn was dead. 

But the cheerful Spring came kindly 
And show'rs began to fall ; [on, 

John Barleycorn got up again, 
And sore surprised them all. 

The sultry suns of Summer came. 
And he grew thick and strong ; 

His head weel arm'd wi' pointed 
spears, 
That no one should him wronc;. 



The sober Autumn enter'd mild. 
When he grew wan and pale ; 

His bending joints and drooping 
head 
Show'd he began to fail. 

His colour sicken'd more and more, 

He faded into age ; 
And then his enemies began 

To show their deadly rage. 

They've taen a weapon long and 
sharp, 

And cut him by the knee ; 
Then tied him fast upon a cart, 

Like a rogue for forgerie. 

They laid him down upon his back, 
And cudgell'd him full sore ; 

They hung him up before the storm. 
And turn'd him o'er and o'er. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



315 



They filled up a darksome pit 

With water to the brim ; 
They heaved in John Barleycorn, — 

There, let him sink or swim ! 

They laid him out upon the floor. 
To work him farther woe ; 

And still, as signs of life appear'd 
They toss'd him to and fro. 

They wasted o'er a scorching flame 
The marrow of his bones; 

But a miller used him worst of all, 
For he crush'd him 'tween two 
stones. 

And they hae taen his very heart's 
blood, 
And drank it round and round. 



And still the more and more they 
drank. 
Their joy did more abound. 

John Barleycorn was a hero bold. 

Of noble enterprise ; 
For if you do but taste his blood, 

'Twill make your courage rise. 

Twill make a man forget his woe ; 

'Twill heighten all his joy : 
'Twill make the widow's heart to 
sing, 

Tho' the tear were in her eye. 

Then let us toast John Barleycorn 
Each man a glass in hand ; 

And may his great posterity 
Ne'er fail in old Scotland ! 



No. 333. When yanuar wind was blawiii caidd. 

Tune : The lass that made the bed to me. Scots Musical Mus. 1796, No. 448. 






north 


I took 


my way, The 


inirk - some 


night did 


.-^ 


f — S^ — s — h — te- 


s^ ^ ^—^ 


-ifrfzi 


~w~ 


— = — 6-f^- 


'% 


K^^ 


-J ^^-^ 


1 — «' 


_^=_J 


tt?= 


ti - '^a 



me en - fauld, I knew na where to lodge till day. 

When Januar' wind was blawin cauld. 

As to the north I took my way. 
The mirksome night did me enfauld, 

I knew na where to lodge till day. 
By my gude luck a maid I met 

Just in the middle o' my care; 
And kindly she did me invite 

To walk into a chamber fair. 
I bow'd fu' low unto this maid, 

And thank'd her for her courtesie ; 
I bow'd fu' *low unto this maid, 

An' bade her mak a bed to me. 



3l6 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

She made the bed baith large and wide, 
Wi' twa white hands she spread it doun, 

She put the cup to her rosy lips, 

And drank: — 'Young man, now sleep ye soun', 

She snatch'd the candle in her hand, 
And frae my chamber went wi' speed ; 

But I call'd her quickly back again, 
To lay some mair below my head. 

A cod she laid below my head. 
And served me with due respeck, 

And, to salute her wi' a kiss, 
I put my arms about her neck. 

' Haud aff your hands, young man,' she said, 

'And dinna sae uncivil be ; 
Gif ye hae onie luve for me, 

O, wrang na my virginitie ! ' 

Her hair was like the links o' gowd, 

Her teeth were like the ivorie, 
Her cheeks like lilies dipt in wine. 

The lass that made the bed to me ! 

Her bosom was the driven snaw, 
Twa drifted heaps sae fair to see ; 

Her limbs the polish'd marble stane, 
The lass that made the bed to me ! 

I kiss'd her o'er and o'er again. 
And ay she wist na what to say ; 

I laid her 'tween me an' the wa' — 
The lassie thocht na lang till day. 

Upon the morrow, when we raise, 
I thank'd her for her courtesie, 

But ay she blush'd, and ay she sigh'd. 
And said : — 'Alas, ye've ruin'd me!' 

I clasp'd her waist, and kiss'd her syne. 

While the tear stood twinkling in her e'e ; 
I said: — 'My lassie, dinna cry, 

For ye ay shall mak the bed to me.' 
She took her mither's Holland sheets, 

An' made them a' in sarks to me ; 
Blythe and merry may she be, 

The lass that made the bed to me ! 

The bonie lass made the bed to me. 
The braw lass made the bed to me ; 

I'll ne'er forget, till the day I die, 
The lass that made the bed to me ! 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



317 



m 



No. 334. O, Lady Maiy Ann. 

Tune : Lady Mary Ann. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 377. 
Moderately 



^^^^^ 



^ 



O, La - dy Ma - ry Ann looks o'er the cas - tie 



iisfe^jE^gE£^= ^-H-^^ 



wa', She saw three bon - ie boys play - ing at the 



m 



-^ 



■^:, 



P^ ^K^^^ -^i 



ba', The young -est he was the flower a - mang them a' 



i^^3^ 



^ 



:t: 



My bon - ie lad - die 's young, but he 's grow - in yet. 



[O, Lady Mary Ann looks o'er the castle wa', 
She saw three bonie boys playing at the ba', 
The youngest he was the flower amang them a' — 
My bonie laddie 's young, but he 's growin yet. 

* O father, O father, an ye think it fit, 
We'll send him a year to the college yet ; 
We'll sew a green ribbon round about his hat, 
And that will let them ken he's to marry yet.'] 

Lady Mary Ann was a flower in the dew. 
Sweet was its smell, and bonie was its hue, 
And the longer it blossom'd the sweeter it grew, 
For the lily in the bud will be bonier yet. 

Young Charlie Cochran was the sprout of an aik ; 
Bonie and bloomin and straught was its make, 
The sun took delight to shine for its sake, 
And' it will be the brag o' the forest yet. 

The simmer is gane when the leaves they were green, 
And the days are awa that w^e hae seen ; 
But far better days I trust will come again, 

For my bonie laddie's young, but he's growin yet. 



3i8 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 335. There livd a 7nan in yonder glen! 

Tune : Johnie Blunt. Scats Musical Museum^ 1792, No. 365. 
Gaily 



^^ 



5^S 



=^=1^ 



n^i 



A 



3t=t^ 



There liv'd a man in yon - der glen, And John Blunt 



i 



S3^ 



^gg^-EE£^^=i^ 



=^ 



was his name, O ; He maks gnde maut, and he 



g^g^N =l=g=^ 



:iz-2i 



brews gude ale, And he bears a won - drous fame, O. 



There liv'd a man in yonder glen, 

And John Blunt was his name, O ; 
He maks gude maut, and he brews gude ale, 

And he bears a wondrous fame, O. 

The wind blew in the hallan ae night, 

Fu' snell out o'er the moor, O ; 
* Rise up, rise up, auld Luckie,' he says, 

* Rise up and bar the door, O ; ' 

They made a paction 'tween them twa, 

They made it firm and sure, O, 
Whae'er sud speak the foremost word. 

Should rise and bar the door, O. 

Three travellers that had tint their gate, 

As thro' the hills they foor, O ; 
They airted by the line o' light 

Fu' straught to Johnie Blunt's door, O. 

They haurl'd auld Luckie out o' her bed, 

And laid her on the floor, O ; 
But never a word auld Luckie wad say. 

For barrin o' the door, O. 

' Ye've eaten my bread, ye hae druken my ale. 
And ye'll male my auld wife a whore, O,' — 

' Aha ! Johnie Blunt ! ye hae spoke the first word,- 
Get up and bar the door, O,' 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



3^9 



No. 336. Upon the Lomonds I lay, I lay. 

Tune : The Campbells are contin. Scots Mtts. Museum, 1790, No. 299. 
Briskly 

N--N--iV-T— r 1 — r: — S: 



=s 



tT — ^=r 



Z3t. 



^ 



^ 



Chorus. The Campbells are com - in, O • ho! O - ho! The Cainpbells 



^^^gj=i=3^ii^^ 



com - in, O • Jio ! O - lio ! Tlie Campbells are cotn - in to 

Fine. 



^g ^^g^ ^gg^^I^=^^ 



bon - ie LocJi - lev -en, Tlie Campbells are co?iz - in, O - Jio! O - !io ! 



■"^^mE^^^^EM^m^^ 



Up 



the Lo-monds I lay, I lay, Up - on the Lo - monds 



pg 






ntzfi 



E^g^i^ 



lay, I lay, I look - ed down to bon 



:| 



D.C. 



m 



le - ven And saw three bon - ie perch ■ es play. 

Chorus. The Campbells are comin, Oho ! Oho .' 

The Campbells are cotnin, Oho I Oho) 

The Campbells are comin to honie Lochleven, 

The Campbells are comin, Oho ! Oho ! 

Upon the .Lomonds I lay, I lay, 

Upon the Lomonds I lay, I lay, 
I looked down to bonie Lochleven 

And saw three bonie perches play. 

Great Argyle he goes before ; 

He maks his cannons and guns to roar, 
Wi' sound o' trumpet, pipe and drum ; 

The Campbells are comin, Oho! Oho! 

The Campbells they are a' in arms, 

Their loyal faith and truth to show, 
Wi' banners rattling in the wind, 

The Campbells are comin, Oho ! Oho ' 



320 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 337. Twa bonie lads were Sandy and yockie. 

Tune : Jenny's lamentation. Bickham's Musical Entertainer^ 1737) i- P- 59- 
Moderately 



s 



3 



^ 



Twa bon - ie lads were San - dy and Jock - ie, Jock - ie was 



* 



?2- 



lo'ed but San - dy un - luck 



Jock - ie was laird baith of 



i: 



=P=^ 



^±^J =^t=»=i^ EBEg 



hills and of val - lies, But San - dy was nought but the king o' 



i 
* 
I 



3^ 



a 



iptzziai 



gude fel - lows. Jock - ie lo'ed Madg - ie, for Madg - ie had mo ■ 



t 



^E 



S 



E 



-t — 

ney, And San - dy lo'ed Ma - ry for Ma - ry was bon - ie, Ane 



%-. 



^^^^^^^m 



t-=^-^;i±^=| 



wed - ded for love, Ane wed - ded for trea - sure, 



t 



- f_ P m-V- m- 



So Jock - ie had sil - ler and San - dy had plea - sure. 

TwA bonie lads were Sandy and Jockie, 

Jockie was lo'ed but Sandy unlucky, 

Jockie was laird baith of hills and of vallies, 

But Sandy w^as nought but the king o' gude fellows. 

Jockie lo'ed Madgie, for Madgie had money, 

And Sandy lo'ed Mary for Mary was bonie, 

Ane wedded for love, ane wedded for treasure, 

So Jockie had siller and Sandy had pleasure. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



321 



No. 338. Its lip wi the Souters o Selkirk. 

Tune : The Souters o' Selkirk. Craig's Scots Times, 1730, p. 28. 



Briskly 



^^g^^=gp^ii^=i^ 



Its up wi' the Sou - ters o' Sel-kirk, And down wi' the 



:?2= 






s 



^ 



Earl 



of Hume, And here is to 



the braw lad - dies 



i 



r^F^ 



=t^- 



That wear the sin - gle-sol'd shoon. Its up wi' the Sou-ters o' 

1 - ^l0orf -' g— ^- 



:?2i 



^ 



:^ 



:t 



Sel-kirk, For they are baith trus - ty and leal, And up wi' the 




lads 



the for - est, And down wi' the Merse to the deil • 



Its up -wi' the Souters o' Selkirk, 

And down wi' the Earl of Hume, 
And here is to a' the braw laddies 

That wear the single-sol'd shoon. 
Its up wi' the Souters o' Selkirk, 

For they are baith trusty and leal, 
And up wi' the lads o' the Forest, 

And down wi' the Merse to the deil! 



No. 339. Oiir lords are to the mountains gaiie. 

Tune : Druimionn dubh (see No. 32). 

Our lords are to the mountains gane, 

A hunting o' the fallow deer ; 
And they hae gripit Hughie Graham, 

For stealing o' the bishop's mare. 



322 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

And they hae tied him hand and foot, 
And led him up thro' Stirling town ; 

The lads and lassies met him there, 

Cried ' Hughie Graham thou art a loun.' 

' O lowse ray right hand free,' he says, 
' And put my braid sword in the same, 

He's no in Stirling town this day, 
Daur tell the tale to Hughie Graham.' 

Up then bespake the brave Whitefoord, 
As he sat by the bishop's knee ; 

' Five hundred white stots I'll gie you, 
If ye'll let Hughie Graham gae free.' 

'O haud your tongue,' the bishop says, 
' And wi' your pleading let me be ; 

For tho' ten Grahams were in his coat, 
Hughie Graham this day shall die.' 

Up then bespake the fair Whitefoord, 
As she sat by the bishop's knee, 

' Five hundred white pence I'll gie you, 
If ye'll gie Hughie Graham to me.' 

' O haud your tongue now lady fair, 
And wi' your pleading let it be ; 

Altho' ten Grahams were in his coat. 
It 's for my honor he maun die.' 

They've taen him to the gallows knowe, 
He looked to the gallows tree. 

Yet never color left his cheek, 
Nor ever did he blin' his e'e. 

At length he looked round about, 
To see whatever he could spy, 

And there he saw his auld father, 
And he was weeping bitterly. 

' O haud your tongue, my father dear 
And wi' your weeping let it be ; 
* For tho' they rob me o' my life. 
They cannot o' the Heaven hie. 

And ye may gie my brother John 

My sword that's bent in the middle clear. 

And let him come at twelve o'clock, 
And see me pay the bishop's mare. 



Va.na.tioa in Museum: 'Thy weeping's sairer on my heart 
Than a' that they can do to me.' 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



323 



'And ye may gie my brother James 

My sword that's bent in the middle brown, 

And bid him come at four o'clock, 
And see his brother Hugh cut down. 

' Remember me to Maggy, my wife. 
The niest time ye gang o'er the moor. 

Tell her she staw the bishop's mare, 
Tell her she was the bishop's whore. 

' And ye may tell my kith and kin 
I never did disgrace their blood ; 

And when they meet the bishop's cloak, 
To make it shorter by the hood.' 



No. 340. As I cam down by yon Castle wd. 



Tune : As I cam down, &c, Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 326'. 
,, Slow 



3^^ 



S 



:n=F^ 



^ 



-P2: 



~^=.^ 



As_ 



I cam down by yon cas - tie wa', 



^ 



And 



i- ^1 

4f — » « — * — *-f 



'^ 



^ 



P^ 



e 



5 



^m. 



1^=^ 



-^3^- 



in by yon gar - den green, O, there I spied a bon - ie 



^ 



*=?v: 



i3=t 



:# 






P 



^: 



1^ 



:5t 



bon - ie lass, But the flower - bor - ders were us be - tween 

As I cam down by yon castle wa'. 

And in by yon garden green, 
O, there I spied a bonie, bonie lass. 

But the flower-borders were us between. 

A bonie, bonie lassie she was, 

As ever mine eyes did see : 
' O, five hundred pounds would I give, 

For to have such a pretty bride as thee.' 

' To have such a pretty bride as me, 

Young man ye are sairly mistaen ; 
Tho' ye were king o' fair Scotland, 

I wad disdain to be your queen.' 

Y 2 



324 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



' Talk not so very high, bonie lass, 
O talk not so very, very high : 

The man at the fair that wad sell, 

He maun learn at the man that wad buy. 

' I trust to climb a far higher tree, 

And harry a far richer nest : 
Tak this advice o' me bonie lass, 

Humility wad set thee best.' 



No. 341. O, where hae ye been Lord Ronald, 
my son ? 

Tune : Lord Ronald, my son. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 327. 
Very slow 






p^ 



u 



tt: 



^^^M 



f--^-r^ — 



' O, where hae ye been, Lord Ron - aid, my son ? 



^m 



a^ 



^ 



been. 



O, where hae ye 



Lord Ron - aid, my 



:isi=-S: 



»T3^ 



■m « — -« *=-^- 



^ g o- 



^ 



--d ^ 



:^ 



son?' 'I hae been wi' my sweet-heart, mo-ther, make my bed 






i: 



soon, For I'm wea - ry wi' the hunt-ing, and fain wad lie down.' 



' O, WHERE hae ye been Lord Ronald, my son ? 

O, where hae ye been Lord Ronald, my son?' 

' I hae been wi' my sweetheart, mother, make my bed soon, 

For I'm weary wi' the hunting, and fain wad lie down.' 

' What got ye frae your sweetheart. Lord Ronald, my son ? 
What got ye frae your sweetheart, Lord Ronald, my son ? ' 
' I hae got deadly poison, mother, make my bed soon, 
For life is a burden that soon I'll lay down.' 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



325 



i 



No. 342. As I went out ae May morni?ig. 

Tune : As I went ot4t, &^c. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 397. 
Lively 



*^B=j 



isa^s 



^ 



-*-^d 



As I went out ae May morn - ing, A May morn - 



^^^^^^P 



-m—W^ 



=P=i:. 



in? it chanc'd to be ; There I was a - ware of a 



J^ 



g^^^^g^^ ; 



^- 



^ 



weel - far'd maid, Cam lin - kin o'er the lea to me. 

As I went out ae May morning, 

A May morning it chanc'd to be ; 
There I was aware of a weel-far'd maid, 

Cam linkin o'er the lea to me. 

O, but she was a weel-far'd maid. 

The boniest lass that 's under the sun ; 

I spier'd gin she could fancy me, 

But her answer was, ' I am too young. 

*To be your bride I am too young. 

To be your loun wad shame my kin, 
So therefore pray young man begone, 

For you never, never shall my favour win.' 

But amang yon birks and hawthorns green, 
Where roses blaw and woodbines hing, 

O, there I learn'd my bonie lass, 

That she was not a single hour too young. 

The lassie blush'd, the lassie sigh'd, 

And the tear stood twinklin in her e'e ; 

' O kind Sir, since ye hae done me this vvrang, 
It's pray when will ye marry me.' 

* It 's of that day tak ye nae heed, 

For that 's a day ye ne'er shall see ; 
For ought that pass'd between us twa, 

Ye had your share as weel as me.' 

She wrang her hands, she tore her hair, 

She cried out most bitterlie, 
' O, what will I say to my mammie 

When I gae hame wi' & fause storie.' 



326 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



' O, as ye maut, so maun ye brew, 

And as ye brew, so maun ye tun : 
But come to my arms, my ae bonie lass, 

For ye never shall rue what ye now hae done.' 



No. 343. There was a battle in the north. 

Tune : A country lass, Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 346. 



g^ n^^^^^^^^^iEi^CT 



:t=±f= 



There was a bat - tie in the north, And nobles there was many, And 

ir 



gE^E^fe ppEEpE^gE ^IjZ^^l^ jHgi 



they hae kiird Sir Char-lie Hay, And they laid the wyte on Geor-die. 



There was a battle in the north, 

And nobles there was many, 
And they hae kill'd Sir Charlie Hay, 

And they laid the wyte on Geordie. 

O, he has written a lang letter — 

He sent it to his lady : — 
'Ye maun cum up to Enbrugh town 

To see what words o' Geordie.' 

When first she look'd the letter on. 

She was baith red and rosy ; 
But she had na read a word but twa, 

Till she wallow't like a lily. 

' Gar get to me my gude grey steed, 

My menzie a' gae wi' me ; 
For I shall neither eat nor drink 

Till Enbrugh town shall see me.* 

And she has mountit her gude grey steed, 

Her menzie a' gaed wi' her ; 
And she did neither eat nor drink 

Till Enbrugh town did see her. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 327 

And first appear'd the fatal block, 

And syne the aix to head him. 
And Geordie comin down the stair 

And bands o' airn upon him. 

But the' he was chain'd in fetters Strang 

O' airn and steel sae heavy, 
There w^as na ane in a' the court 

Sae bra' a man as Geordie. 

Oj she's down on her bended knee, 

I wat she 's pale and weary ; 
' O pardon, pardon, noble king 

And gie me back my Dearie ! 

' I hae born seven sons to my Geordie dear 

The seventh ne'er saw his daddie : 
O, pardon, pardon, noble king, 

Pity a waefu' ladyl' 

' Gar bid the headin-man mak haste ! ' 

Our king reply'd fu' lordly : 
' O noble king, tak a' that 's mine 

But gie me back my Geordie.' 

The Gordons cam and the Gordons ran 

And they were stark and steady ; 
And ay the word amang them a'. 

Was, ' Gordons keep you ready.' 

An aged lord at the king's right hand 

Says : ' Noble king, but hear me : — 
Gar her tell down five thousand pound. 

And gie her back her Dearie.' 

Some gae her marks, some gae her crowns. 

Some gae her dollars many ; 
And she 's tell'd down five thousand pound, 

And she 's gotten again her Dearie. 

She blinkit blythe in her Geordie's face, 

Says : ' Dear I've bought thee, Geordie, 
But there sud been bluidy bouks on the green 

Or I had tint my laddie.' 

He claspit her by the middle sma,' 

And he kist her lips sae rosy, 
'The fairest flower o' woman-kind 

Is my sweet bonie Lady/ 



q28 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No, 344. O, I forbid you maidens a. 

Tune : Tarn. Lin. Scots Musical Museum^ 1796, No. 411. 




O, 



I for - bid you mai-dens a', That wear gowd on your hair, 



i^gg^^^gggj 



=# 



To come or gae by Car - ter-haUgh, For young Tam Lin is there. 



O, I FORBID you maidens a', 
TJiat wear gowd on your hair, 

To come or gae by Carterhaugli, 
For young Tam Lin is there. 

There 's nana that gaes by Carterhaugh 
But they leave him a wad ; 

Either their rings, or green mantles, 
Or else their maidenhead. 

Janet has belted her green kirtle 
A little aboon her knee ; 

And she has broded her yellow hair 
A little aboon her bree ; 

And she's awa to Carterhaugh 
As fast as she can hie ! 

But when she cam to Carterhaugh, 
Tam Lin was at the well, 

And there she fand his steed stand- 
ing, 
But away was himsel. 

She hadna pu'd a double rose, 

A rose but only twae, 
Till up then started young Tam Lin 

Says, ' Lady thou 's pu' nae mae. 

'Why pu's thou the rose, Janet, 
And why breaks thou the wand ! 

Or, w^hy comes thou to Carter- 
haugh 
Withoutten my command ? ' 

' Carterhaugh it is my ain ; 

My daddie gave it me, 
I'll come and gang by Carterhaugh, 

And ask nae leave at thee.' 



Janet has kilted her green kirtle 

A little aboon her knee. 
And she has snooded her yellow hair 

A little aboon her bree, 
And she is to her father's ha' 

As fast as she can hie. 

Four and twenty ladies fair 
"Were playing at the ba', 

And out then cam the fair Janet 
Ance the flower amang them a'. 

Four and twenty ladies fair 
Were playing at the chess, 

And out then cam the fair Janet 
As green as ony glass. 

Out then spak an auld grey knight 
Lay o'er the castle wa' ; 

And says: ' Alas ! fair Janet for thee 
But we'll be blamed a'.' 

' Haud your tongue, ye auld fac'd 
knightj 

Some ill death may ye die. 
Father my bairn on whom I will, 

I'll father nane on thee.' 

Out then spak her father dear. 
And he spak meek and mild, 

' And ever alas ! Sweet Janet,' he 
says— 
' I think thou gaes wi' child.' 

' If that I gae wi' child, father, 
Mysel maun bear the blame, 

There 's ne'er a laird about your ha', 
Shall get the bairn's name. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



329 



' If my love were an eaithly knight, 

As he 's an elfin gray, 
I wadna gie my ain true-love 

For nae lord that ye hae. 

' The steed that my true-love rides on 
Is lighter than the wind ; 

Wi' siller he is shod before, 
Wi' burning gowd behind.' 

Janet has kilted her green kirtle 
A little aboon her knee ; 

And she has snooded her yellow hair 
A little aboon her bree ; 

And she's awa to Carterhaugh 
As fast as she can hie. 

When she cam to Carterhaugh, 
Tam Lin was at the well ; 

And there she fand his steed standing, 
But away was himseL 

She hadna pu'd a double rose, 

A rose but only twae ; 
Till up then started young Tam Lin 

Says, ' Lady thou 's pu' nae mae. 

'Why pu's thou the rose, Janet, 
Amang the groves sae green, 

And a' to kill the bonie babe 
That we gat us between ? ' 

'O, tell me tell me, Tam Lin,' she 
says, 

Tor's sake that died on tree, 
If e'er ye was in holy chapel, 

Or Christendom did see.' 

' Roxbrugh he was my grandfather 
Took me with him to bide. 

And ance it fell upon a day. 
That wae did me betide. 

' And ance it fell upon a day, 
A cauld day and a snell. 

When we were frae the huntingcome 
That ffae my horse I fell. 

* The Queen o' Fairies she caught me 
In yon green hill to dwell. 

And pleasant is the fairy-land : — 
But, an eerie tale to tell I • 



' Ay, at the end o' seven years 

We pay a tiend to hell ! 
I am sae fair and fu' o' flesh 

I'm fear'd it be mysel. 

' But the night is Hallowe'en, lady, 
The morn is Hallowday ; 

Then win me, win me, an ye will, 
For weel I wat ye may. 

' Just at the mirk and midnight hour 
The fairy folk will ride ; 

And they that wad their true-love win 
At Milecross they maun bide.' 

' But how shall I thee ken, Tam Lin, 
Or how my true-love know, 

Amang sae mony unco knights 
The like I never saw.' 

' O first let pass the black, lady, 
And syne let pass the brown ; 

But quickly run to the milk-white 
steed, 
Pu' ye his rider down. 

' For I'll ride on the milk-white steed, 
And ay nearest the town, 

Because I was an earthly knight 
They gie me that renown. 

' My right hand will be glov'd, lady, 
My left hand will be bare, 

Cockt up shall my bonnet be 

And kaim'd down shall my hair ; 

And thae 's the tokens I gie thee — 
Nae doubt I will be there : 

' They'll turn me in your arms, lady. 

Into an esk and adder. 
But hold me fast and fear me not — 

I am your bairn's father. 

' They'll turn me to a bear sae grim. 

And then a lion bold ; 
But hold me fast and fear me not, 

As ye shall love your child. 

' Again they'll turn me in your arms 
To a red het gaud of airn ; 

But hold me fast and fear me not, 
ril do to you nae harm. 



330 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



' And last they'll turn me in your arms 

Into the burning lead : 
Then throw me into well water ; 

O ! throw me in wi' speed. 

' And then 111 be your ain true love, 
I'll turn a naked knight ; 

Then cover me wi' your green 
mantle, 
And cover me out o' sight.' 

Gloomy, gloomy was the night, 

And eerie was the way, 
As fair Jenny in her green mantle, 

To Milecross she did gae. 

About the middle o' the night, 
She heard the bridles ring ; 

This lady was as glad at that 
As any earthly thing. 

First she let the black pass by. 
And syne she let the brown ; 

But quickly she ran to the milk-white 
steed. 
And pu'd the rider down. 



Sae weel she minded what he did 

say 

And young Tam Lin did win ; 

Syne cover'd him wi' her green 

mantle, 

As blythe's a bird in Spring. 

Out then spak the queen o' fairies, 

■ Out of a bush o' broom ; 
'Them that has gotten young Tam 
Lin 
Has gotten a stately groom.' 

Out then spak the queen o' fairies, 
And an angry queen was she : 

' Shame betide her ill-far'd face. 
And an ill death may she die, 

For she 's taen awa the boniest knight 
In a' my companie. 

' But had I kend, Tam Lin,' she says 
' What now this night I see, 

I wad hae taen out thy twa grey 
een. 
And put in twa een o' tree.' 



No. 345. Aften hae I playd at the cards and 
the dice. 

Tune : The rantin laddie. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 462. 

Slow 




^^=TT^ ^^^^^=^^^:^ 



Af - ten hae 1 play'd at the cards and the dice, 



1^ 



^^=2=1=^ 



For 


th 


e 


love 


of a bon - 


ie 


ran 


- tin 


lad - 


die; 


V iTit • • ^ ' 






• P Mt 




Si* 


[S - V 


/L 5 if 




1 \m 






n 






|> 


im * ^ 


1 f IS 1 r • * 


S ' 


^ 1 ^ 




vL/ L»-J 




L^ ^ « 


.^ . ,-— 








f 








^ 





now I maun sit in my fa - ther's kitch-en 



J^: 



lou 



ar3 



neuk, And ba 



bas - tan 



ba - bie. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 331 

Aften hae I play'd at the cards and the dice, 

For the love of a bonie rantin laddie ; 
But now I maun sit in my father's kitchen neuk, 

And balou a bastard babie. 

For my father he will not me own, 

And my mother she neglects me, 
And a' my friends hae lightlied me. 

And their servants they do slight me. 

But had I a servant at my command — 

As aft times I've had many. 
That wad rin wi' a letter to bonie Glenswood — 

Wi' a letter to my rantin laddie. 

' Oh, is he either a laird or a lord, 

Or is he but a cadie. 
That ye do him ca' sae aften by name, 

Your bonie, bonie rantin laddie.' 

' Indeed he is baith a laird and a lord, 

And he never was a cadie, 
For he' is the Earl o' bonie Aboyne, 

And he is my rantin laddie.' 

' O ye'se get a servant at your command, 

As aft times ye've had many. 
That sail rin wi' a letter to bonie Glenswood — 

A letter to your rantin laddie.' 

When Lord Aboyne did the letter get, 

O, but he blinket bonie ; 
But or he had read three lines of it, 

I think his heart was sorry. 

' O, wha is he daur be sae bauld, 

Sae cruelly to use my lassie ? ' 
["But I'll tak her to bonie Aboyne 

Where oft she did caress me.] 
' For her father he will not her know. 

And her mother she does slight her ; 
And a' her friends hae lightlied her, 

And their servants they neglect her.' 
' Go raise to me my five hundred men, 

Make haste and make them ready ; 
With a milkwhite steed under every ane 

For to bring hame my lady.' 
As they came in through Buchan-shire, 

They were a company bonie, 
With a gude claymore in every hand 

And O, but they shin'd bonie. 



332 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 346. Our young lady's a huntin gane. 

Tune : The rowtn't in her apron. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 424. 

Slow 



5^ 



^^^^^^ 



Si 



"1 ^ 



-* — ^- 



Our young la - dy's a hunt - in gane, Sheets nor blan - kets 



=t^ 



ig — r 



"^Ha L,^j ^^=^ 



has she taen, But she's born her auld son or she 



g^^^^^ 



3 



cam hame, And she 's row'd him in her a 

Our young lady's a huntin gane, 
Sheets nor blankets has she taen. 
But she 's born her auld son or she cam hame, 
And she's row'd him in her apron. 

Her apron was o' the hollan fine, 
Laid about wi' laces nine ; 
She thought it a pity her babie should tyne, 
And she 's row'd him in her apron. 

Her apron was o' the hollan sma', 
Laid about wi' laces a', 
She thought it a pity her babe to let fa' ; 
And she row'd him in her apron. 



Her father says within the ha', 
Among the knights and nobles a' : — 
' I think I hear a babie ca' 

In the chamber among our young ladies.' 

' O father dear ! it is a bairn, 
I hope it will do you nae harm. 
For the laddie I lo'ed, and he'll lo'e me again. 
For the rowin't in my apron.' 

O, is he a gentleman, or is a clown, 
That has brought thy fair body down ? 
I would not for a' this town 
The rowin't in thy apron.' 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



333 



' Young Terreagles is nae clown, 
He is the toss of Edinborrow town, 
And he'll buy me a braw new gown 
For the rowin't in my apron.' 

4i ^ ifi ifi ii: ^ :ii 

'It 's I hae castles, I hae towers, 
I hae barns, and I hae bowers ; 
A' tbftt is mine it shall be thine 
For the rowin't in thy aproij.' 



No, 347. * O, for my ain king' quo glide Wallace. 

Tune : Gude Wallace. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 484. 

Slowish 



fc^ 



^ 



& 



g^^^^Sa 



^ 



& 



'O, for my ain king,' quo' gude Wal • lace, 'The right 



i 



^^=rx 



m 



^ 



^m. 



m 



e 



--H:^^^ 



=1= 



fu' king of fair Scot - land, Be - tween me and my 



ifeEES; 



S^^^ 



^ 



S^^ 



«^ 



ve - reign blude, I think I see some ill seed sawn/ 



'O, FOR my ain king,' quo' gude Wallace, 
' The rightfu' king of fair Scotland, 

Between me and my sovereign blude, 
I think I see some ill seed sawn.' 

Wallace out over yon river he lap, 

And he has lighted low down on yon plain, 

And he was aware of a gay ladie, 
As she was at the well washing. 

' What tydins, what" tydins, fair lady,' he says, 
' What tydins hast thou to tell unto me — 

What tydins, what tydins, fair lady,' he says, 
' What tydins hae ye in the south countrie ? ' 

' Low down in yon wee Ostler-house 

There is fyfteen Englishmen, 
And they are seekin for gude Wallace ; 

It 's him to take, and him to hang,' 



334 TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 

'There's nocht in my purse,' quo' gude Wallace, 
' There 's nocht, not even a bare pennie ; 

But I will down to yon wee Ostler-house 
Thir fyfteen Englishmen to see.' 

And when he cam to yon w^ee Ostler-house 

He bad benedicite be there ; 
[The Englishmen at the table sat 

The wine-fae'd captain at him did stft"e.] 

'Where was ye born, auld crookit carl, 
Where was ye born — in what countrie?' 

' I am a true Scot born and bred. 
And an auld crookit carl just sic as ye see.' 

'I wad gie fyfteen shillings to onie crookit carl — 
To onie crookit carl just sic as ye, 

If ye will get me gude Wallace, 

For he is the man I wad very fain see.' 

He hit the proud captain alang the chaft blade, 
That never a bit o' meal he ate mair ; 

And he sticket the rest at the table where they sat, 
And he left them a' lyin sprawlin there. 

' Get up, get up, gudewife,' he says, 
' And get to me some dinner in haste ; 

For it will soon be three lang days 
Sin I a bit o' meat did taste.' 

The dinner was na weel readie, 

Nor was it on the table set, 
Till other fyfteen Englishmen 

Were a' lighted about the yett. 

'Come out, come out, now gude Wallace 
This is the day that thou maun die ; ' 

' I lippen nae sae little to God,' he says, 
' Altho' I be but ill wordie.' 

The gudewife had an auldgudeman, 
By gude Wallace he stifiBy stood ; 

Till ten o' the fyfteen Englishmen 
Before the door lay in their blude. 

The other five to the greenwood ran, 
And he hang'd these five upon a grain; 

And on the morn wi' his merry men a' 
He sat at dine in Lochmaben town. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



335 



No. 348. Near Edinburgh was a young son born. 

Tune: Hynde Horn. Motherwell's ikf/ws/r^/sy, No. 13. 



-\j. — s « « — « « m^-0 — «_,^ 



-^- 



f^ 



Near Ed - in - burgh was a young son bom, — Hey li - le 



-•— =?S 



s^E 



i^ 



lu an' a how low Ian', An' his name it was 



^^^m 



:?^1=fc 



^ 



P 



^ 



call - ed young Hyn horn. An' it's hey down down, deedle air - o. 



Near Edinburgh was a young son born, — 

Hey lilelu an' a how low Ian', 
An' his name it was called young Hynhorn, 

An' it 's hey down down, deedle airo. 

Seven long years he served the king, — 
Hey lilelu, &c. 

And it's a' for the sake of his daughter Jean, — 
An' it 's hey down, &c. 

The king an angry man was he, — 
He sent young Hynhorn to the sea. 

An' on his finger she put a ring, 

[Wi' three shining diamonds set therein.] 

When your ring turns pale and wan, 
Then I'm in love wi' another man. 



Upon a day he look'd at his ring, 
It was as pale as any thing. 

He 's left the sea, and he 's come to the Ian', 
And there he met an auld beggar man. 

' What news, what news, my auld beggar man, 
What news, what news by sea or by Ian' ? ' 

' Nae news, nae news,' the auld beggar said, 
'But the king's daughter Jean is going to be wed.' 

' Cast off, cast off, thy auld beggar weed, 
An' I'll gie thee my gude grey steed.' 



336 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



When he cam to our gude king's yett, 

He sought a glass o' wine for young Hynhorn's sake. 

He drank out the wine and he put in the ring, 

And he bade them carry 't to the king's dochter Jean. 

* * * * * * ■ * 
' O gat ye't by sea, or gat ye't by Ian', 
O gat ye't aff a dead man's han'? 

' I gat na't by sea, I gat na't by Ian', 
But I gat it out of your own fair han'.' 
******* 
* Go, take away my bridal gown. 
And I'll follow him frae town to town.' 
'Ye need na leave your bridal gown, 
For I'll make ye ladie o' mony a town.' 



No. 349. What merriment has taen the Whigs. 

Tune : The German lairdie. Corrected from Burns's MS. 



S 



-^-i- 



1^ 



EE 



^^^ 



^ 



4==F 



What mer - ri - ment has taen the Whigs, I think they be gaen mad, Sir, 



Wi' play - ing up their Whig - gish jigs, Their dan - cin may be sad, Sir. 
Chorus. 



^^^E^^S^^^^ 



Sift£', hee - die lil • tie, tee - die HI - He, An-dunt, ian-duw, tan - die. 



fS =^"^ 



35E 



^^m 



Stuff, fal de dal, de dal lal lal. Sing how ■ die lil - tie dan - die. 

What merriment has taen the Whigs 

I think they be gaen mad. Sir, 
Wi' playing up their Whiggish jigs. 

Their dancin may be sad, Sir. 

Chorus. Sing heedle liltie^ teedle liltie, 
Andtim, iandunt, tandie, 
Sing fal de dal, de dal lal lal, 
Sing howdle liltie dandie. 



IX, MISCELLANEOUS 



337 



The Revolution principles 

Has put their heads in bees, Sir ; 
They're a' fa'en out amang themsels- 

Deil tak the first that grees, Sir. 



No. 350. O, that I were where Helen lies. 

Tune : Where Helen lies. Blaikie^s MS., 1692. 



i^p^^^g^^ip^ 






O, that I were where He-Ien lies! Night and day on me she 



-0 — ^-«- 



^ 



■a 



£EEf 



cries ; O, that I were where He - len lies In fair Kirk-con - nel lee. 



O, THAT I were where Helen lies ! 
Night and day on me she cries ; 
O, that I were where Helen lies 
In fair Kirkconnel lee. 

O Helen fair ! beyond compare, 
A ringlet of thy flowing hair, 
I'll wear it still for evermair 
Until the day I die. 

Curs'd be the hand that shot the shot, 
And curs'd the gun that gave the 

crack. 
Into my arms bird Helen lap, 
And died for sake o' me. 

O think na ye but my heart was sair, 
My love fell down and spake nae 

mair, 
There did she swoon wi' meikle care 
On fair Kirkconnel lee. 



I lighted down, my sword did 

draw, 
I cutted him in pieces sma' ; 
I cutted him in pieces sma' 
On fair Kirkconnel lee. 

Helen chaste, thou wert modest* 
If I were with thee I were blest, 
Where thou lies low, and takes thy 

rest 

On fair Kirkconnel lee. 

1 wish my grave was growing green, 
A winding sheet put o'er my een, 
And I in Helen's arms lying 

In fair Kirkconnel lee ! 

I wish I were where Helen lies ! 

Night and day on me she cries ; 

O, that I were where Helen lies 

On fair Kirkconnel lee. 



'O Helen chaste, thou'rt now at resl^ — ]o\mson''s Museum. 



338 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 351. O heard ye of a silly harper? 

Tune: The Lochmahen harper. Glenriddeirs MS., I'^gi. 



:ia^ 



^ ^^E^^^^^^E^^ 



O, heard ye of a sil - ly har-per, Liv'd long in Loch-ma-bentown? 




^^=£=E 



~m — s^ 



^=S= 



^W=^^- 






How he did gang to fair England To steal King Hen-ry's wan-too brown, 






::J^=tep- 



^m^ 



5^^=^g 



How he did gang to fair Eng-land To steal King Hen-ry's wan-ton brown. 



O, HEARD ye of a silly harper 
Liv'd long in Lochmaben town ? 

How he did gang to fair England 

To steal King Henry's wanton brown. 



But first he gaed to his gudewife 

Wi' a' the speed that he could thole : 

* This wark,' quo' he, ' will never w^orli 
Without a mare that has a foal.' 



bis 



bis 



Quo' she, ' thou has a gude grey mare 
That'll rin o'er hills baith low and hie ; 

Gae tak the grey mare in thy hand, ) ,. 

And leave the foal at hame wi' me.' 

' And tak a halter in thy hose. 

And o' thy purpose dinna fail. 
But wap it o'er the wanton's nose. 

And tie her to the grey mare's tail. 

* Syne ca' her out at yon back yeate, 
O'er moss and muir and ilka dale, 

For she'll ne'er let the wanton bite, 
Till she come hame to her ain foal.' 



bis 



bis 



So he is up to England gane, 

Even as fast as he can hie, 
Till he came to King Henry's yeate — ) ,. 

And wha was there but King Henry ? ) 

'Come in,' quo' he, 'thou silly blind harper. 

And of thy harping let me hear ' : 
'O ! by my sooth,' quo' the silly blind harper, 1 , • 

'I'd rather hae stabling for my mare.' 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 



339 



bis 



bis 



The king looks o'er his left shoulder, 

And says unto his stable groom ; — 
'Gae tak the silly poor harper's mare, ) ,. 

And tie her 'side my wanton brown.' \ 

And ay he harped, and ay he carpit, 
Till a' the lords gaed through the floor; 

They thought the music was sae sweet 
That they forgat the stable door. 

And ay he harpit, and ay he carpit, 

Till a' the nobles were sound asleep ; 
Then quietly he took aff his shoon 

And saftly down the stair did creep. 

Syne to the stable door he hies 

Wi' tread as light as light could be, 
And when he open'd and gaed in, . 

There he fand thirty good steeds and three. '* 

He took the halter frae his hose, 

And of his purpose did na fail ; 
He slipt it o'er the wanton's nose, ) ,. 

And tied it to his grey mare's tail, i 

He ca'd her out at yon back yeate 

O'er moss and muir & ilka dale ; 
And she loot ne'er the wanton bite, 

But held her still gaun at her tail. 



bis 



bis 



The grey mare was right swift o' fit. 
And did na fail to find the way, 

For she was at Lochmaben yeate 
Fu' lang three hours ere it was day. 

When she came to the harper's door, 
There she gae many a nicher and snear ; 

'Rise,' quo' the wife, 'thou lazy lass. 
Let in thy master and his mare.' 

Then up she raise, pat on her claes. 
And lookit out through the lock-hole : 

' O ! by my sooth, then,' quo' the lass, 
' Our mare has gotten a braw big foal.' 

'Come haud thy peace thou foolish lass, 
The moon 's but glancing in thy e'e ; 

I'd wad my haill fee 'gainst a groat 
It's bigger than e'er our foal will be.' 
z a 



bis 



bis 



bis 



340 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



The neighbours too that heard the noise 
Cried to the wife to put her in ; 

'By my sooth, then,' quoth the wife 
'She's better than ever he rade on.' 

But on the morn at fair daylight, 

When they had ended a' their cheer : 

King Henry's wanton brown was stawn. 
And eke the poor auld harper's mare. 



^5 



bis 



' Alace ! alace ! ' says the silly blind harper ; 

' Alace ! alace ! that I came here, 
In Scotland I've tint a braw cowte foal, 

In England they Ve stawn my gude grey mare.' 

'Come baud thy tongue, thou silly blind harper, 

And of thy alacing let me be, 
For thou shall get a better mare, 

And weel paid shall thy cowte foal be. 
For thou shall get a better mare, 

And weel paid shall thy cowte foal be.' 



bis 



No. 352. N'ae birdies sang the mirky hour. 

Tune : Sweet Willy. Blaikie's MS., 1692. 



Slow 



^ 



a^ 



^^ 



e 



Nae bir - dies sang the mir - ky hour A - mang the 



i^^^^^^P^ 



braes o' 



Yar - row, But slum - ber'd on the 



'm 



=p=i" 



=& 



boughs to wait the wauk - 'ning mor - row. 

Nae birdies sang the mirky hour 

Amang the braes o' Yarrow, 
But slumber'd on the dewy boughs, 

To wait the wauk'ning morrow. 



IX. MISCELLANEOUS 34I 

'Where shall I gang, my ain true love, 

Where shall I gang to hide me ; 
For weel ye ken, V ye're father's bow'r, 

It wad be death to find me.' 

' O, go you to yon tavern house. 

An' there count o'er your lawin, 
An' if I be a woman true, 

I'll meet you in the dawin.' 

O, he 's gone to yon tavern house, 

An' ay he counted his lawin. 
An' ay he drank to her gude health — 

Was to meet him in the dawin. 

O, he 's gone to yon tavern house, 

An' counted owre his lawin. 
When in there cam three arm^d men 

To meet him in the dawin. 

' O, woe be unto woman's wit, 

It has beguiled many ! 
She promised to come hersel, 

But she sent three men to slay me.' 



' Get up, get up, now Sister Ann, 
I fear we've wrought you sorrow ; 

Get up, ye'll find your true love slain 
Among the banks of Yarrow. 

She sought him east, she sought him west, 
She sought him braid and narrow, 

Till in the clintin of a craig, 

She found him drown'd in Yarrow. 

She's ta'en three links of her yellow hair 
That hung down long and yellow ; • 

And she 's tied it about sweet Willie's waist, 
An' drawn him out of Yarrow. 



I made my love a suit of clothes, 
I clad him all in tartan ; 

But ere the morning sun arose 
He was a' bluid to the gartan. 



342 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 353. Rob Roy from the Highlands cam. 

Tune: Mill, Mill O ! (see No. 266). 



Rob Roy from the Highlands cam 

Unto the Lawlan' border, 
To steal awa a gay ladie, 

To haud his house in order : 
He cam owre the loch o' Lynn, 

Twenty men his arms did carry ; 
Himsel gaed in an' fand her out. 

Protesting he would marry. 



' O, will ye gae wi' me,' he says, 

' Or will ye be my honey ; 
Or will ye be my wedded wife. 

For I love you best of ony ' ; 
' I wnna gae wi' you,' she says, 

' Nor will I be your honey ; 
Nor will I be your wedded wife, 

You love me for my money.' 



But he set her on a coal black steed, 

Himsel lap on behind her, 
An' he 's awa to the Hieland hills, 

Whare her frien's they canna find her. 

No. 354. 

[The song went on to narrate the forcing her to bed ; when the titne 
changes to something like 

Jenny dang the weaver.'] Orpheus Caledontus, 1733, No. 37. 



^^^^^ 



f — ^ f 



Rob Roy was my fa - ther ca'd, Mac - gre - gor was his name, la 




^^^^^ 



^^= 



a band o' he - roes bauld, An' I am here the same, la 



-^ 



^^^^^ 



^^ 



die. Be con - tent, be con 



- tent. Be con - tent to stay, la - die ; 



:£eeEe5e3e;EeE 



S^^S 



pCZD 



For thou art my wed - ded wife Un - til thy dy - ing day, la - die. 



Rob Roy was my father ca'd, 

Macgregor was his name, ladie 
He led a band o' heroes bauld. 

An' I am here the same, ladie. 
Be content, be content, 

Be content to stay, ladie ; 
For thou art my wedded wife 

Until thy dying day, ladie. 



He w as a hedge unto his friens, 

A heckle to his foes, ladie ; 
Every one that durst him wrang, 

He took him by the nose, ladie ; 
I'm as bold, I'm as bold, 

I'm as bold, and more, ladie ; 
He that daurs dispute my word 

Shall feel my guid claymore, ladie. 



APPENDIX 



UNCERTAIN 



No. 355. (9, Donald Coiiper and his man. 

Tune: Donald Couper. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 334. 



iiB# 



isi 



'e^^^M^ 



Chorus. Hey 



Donald, 



how 



Donald, 



Hey 



Donald 



i 



fe^: 



m 



liS^F-^ 



*Z±^lt± 



Coil - per; He V gane awa to seek a wife, and he V 

Fine. 



i 



^ 



^^E^i^sS 



<:(?;w£ /ia»«fi with - out her. O, Do - nald Cou - per an ] his man 



P 



s 



^ 



Held to a High -land fair, man, And a' to seeic a 

D.C. 



i^^p^p^^^^i^ 



bon - ie lass. But fient a ane was there, man. 



Chorus. Hey Donald, hoiv Donald, 
Hey Donald Couper; 
He '5 gane awa to seek a wife, 
And he^s come liame without her. 

O, Donald Couper and his man 

Held to a Highland fair, man, 
And a' to seek a bonie lass, 

But fient a ane was there, man. 

At length he got a carlin gray, 

And she 's come hirplin hame, man : 

And she 's fa'n o'er the buffet stool 
And brak her rumple-bane, man. 



344 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 356. O'er the moor amang the heather. 

Tune : O'er the moor amang the heather. Scots Mus. Museum, 1792, No. 328. 



g^^^Sl 



feBE^Egg^i^S 



E^I^^i!^ 



Com - in thro' the craigs o' Kyle, A-mangthe bon-ie bloora-ing heather, 



[| 



( — I . ^ ■ P*- 



=^1^ 



Sp^fe^^ 



-*— ^ 



There I met a bon - ie las-sie Keep-ing a' her yowes the - gith - er. 
Chorus. 



^^^=j^^^£=|=r-^^^^^£^^^ 



0''er the moor a-7nang the heather^ O'er the moor a-mang the heather ; 



g^lEgEgg p^gEEfeME gE^ Ed^^EJ^ 



There J met a bon • ie las - sie Keep- ing a' her yowes the -gith- er. 

CoMiN thro' the craigs o' Kyle, 
Amang the bonie blooming heather, 
There I met a bonie lassie, 
Keeping a' her yowes thegither. 

O'er the moor amang the heather ; 

O'er the moor amang the heather ; 

There I met a bonie lassie 

Keeping a' her yowes thegither. 

Says I, ' My dear whare is thy hame. 
In moor, or dale, pray tell me whether?' 
She says, ' I tent thae fleecy flocks 
That feed amang the blooming heather.' 
O'er the moor amang the heather, 
O'er the moor amang the heather ; 
She says, ' I tent thae fleecy flocks, 
That feed amang the blooming heather.' 

We laid us down upon a bank, 
Sae warm and sunny was the weather ; 
She left her flocks at large to rove 
Amang the bonie blooming heather. 
O'er the moor amang the heather, 
O'er the moor amang the heather ; 
She left her flocks at large to rove 
Amang the bonie blooming heather. 



APPENDIX 345 



While thus we lay, she sang a sang, 
Till echo ran a mile and farther; 
And ay the burden o' the sang 
Was, O'er the moor amang the heather. 
O'er the moor amang the heather, 
O'er the moor amang the heather ; 
And ay the burden o' the sang 
Was, O'er the moor amang the heather. 

She charm'd my heart, and ay sinsyne, 
I could na think on ony ither : 
By sea and sky she shall be mine ! 
The bonie lass amang the heather. 

O'er the moor amang the heather, 

O'er the moor amang the heather ; 

Bji sea and sky she shall be mine ! 

The bonie lass amang the heather. 



No. 357. As I lay on my bed on a night. 

Tune : Go from my window, love, do (see No. 307). 

As I lay on my bed on a night, 
I thought upon her beauty bright, 

But the moon by night 

Did give no light 
Which did perplex me sore — 
Yet away to my love I did go. 

Then under her window I came, 
I gently call'd her by her name ; 

Then up she rose. 

Put on her clothes. 
And whisper'd to me slow, 
Saying : — ' Go from my window, love, do.'' 

' My father and my mother are asleep, 
And if they chance to hear you speak, 

There will be nocht 

But great abuse 
Wi' many a bitter blow : — 
And it's Go from my window, love, do.' 



3^6 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 358. The auld 7na?is mare's dead. 

Tune : The auld mavis mare^s dsad. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 485. 



i 



^^m^^^ 



:B^S 



:eese 



Chorus. The auld man^s mare^s dead. The poor man^s mare^s dead. The 
-^ Fine. 






auld vtatt's mare V dead, A mile a ■ boon Dun - dee. She was 




cut - lug - git, painch - lip - pit, Steel waim - it, stan - cher - fit - ted, 

D.C. 



m 



--^ 



Chan - let - chaf - tit, lang - neck - it, Yet the brute did die. 



Chorus. 77?^ auld man^s mare 's dead, 
The poor malt's mare 's dead, 
The auld mans -mare '5 dead, 
A mile abooH Dundee. 

She was cut-luggit, painch-lippit, 
Steel-waimit, stancher-fitted, 
Chanler-chaftit, lang-neckit, 
Yet the brute did die. 

Her lunzie-bane were knaggs and neuks ; 
She had the cleeks, the cauld, the crooks, 
The jawpish and the wanton yeuks, 
And the howks aboon her e'e. 

My master ca't me to the town, 
He ty'd me to a staincher round, 
He took a chappin to himsel. 
But fient a drap gae me. 

Chorus. The auld man's mare's dead. 
The poor mans mare^s dead. 
The peats and tours and a' to lead 
And yet the jad did die. 



APPENDIX 



347 



No. 359. She sat down below a thorn. 

Tune : Fine flowers in the valley. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, No. 320. 
Very slow 



fe;^=T 



^is 



B 



"C3 



:f=^i^t^ 



:f= 



She sat down be - low a thorn, Fine flow'rs in the val-ley; And 



^^^S^^^^PS 



there she has her sweet babe born, And the green leaves they grow rare- ly. 



She sat down below a thorn 

(Fine flowers in the valley), 
And there she has her sweet babe born, 

(And the green leaves they grow rarely). 

Smile na sae sweet, my bonie babe 

(Fine flowers in the valley), 
And ye smile sae sweet, ye'll smile me dead, 

(And the green leaves they grow rarely). 

She's taen out her little penknife, 

(Fine flowers in the valley). 
And twinn'd the sweet babe o' its life, 

(And the green leaves they grow rarely). 

She 's howket a grave by the light o' the moon, 

(Fine flowers in the valley) ; 
And there she's buried her sweet babe in, 

(And the green leaves they grow rarely). 

As she was going to the church, 

(Fine flowers in the valley) ; 
She saw a sweet babe in the porch, 

(And the green leaves they grow rarely). 

sweet babe and thou wert mine, 
(Fine flowers in the valley) ; 

1 wad deed thee in silk so fine, 

(And the green leaves thej' grow rarely). 

O mother dear when I was thine, 

(Fine flowers in the valley) ; 
You did na prove to me sae kind, 

(And the green leaves they grow rarely). 



348 



TONE-POETRY OF ROBERT BURNS 



No. 360. ICs whisper d in parlour. 

Tune : The broom blooms bonie. Scots Musical Museum,, 1796, No. 461. 
„ Slow 



^^^i3^ii^^^^=^ 



It's whis-per'd in par- lour, it's whis - per'd in ha', 



^^^m 



The broom blooms bon - ie, The broom blooms fair ; 



^^feE^^dS^g^. -^!=^- 



La - dy Mar - get's wi' child 



mang our la - dies a', 
tr 



^^ 



m 



m 



And she dare na 



down to the broom nae mair. 



It's whisper'd in parlour, it's whisperM in ha', 
The broom blooms bonie, the broom blooms fair ; 

Lady Marget's wi' child amang our ladies a', 

And she dare na gae down to the broom nae mair. 

One lady whisper'd unto another, 

The broom blooms bonie, the broom blooms fair; 
Lady Marget's wi' child to Sir Richard her brother. 

And she dare na gae down to the broom nae mair. 



O, when that you hear my loud, loud cry, 

The broom blooms bonie, the broom blooms fair ; 

Then bend your bow and let your arrows fly. 
For I dare na gae down to the broom nae mair. 



APPENDIX 



349 



No. 361. A nobleman livd i7i a village of late. 

Tune : The poor thresher. Scots Musical Museum , 1792, No. 372. 



i 



^^ 



« 



Esg 



i3= 



4^-^-*^ 






no - ble - man liv'd in a vil 



of late, 



^ 



s^ 



^^^^^^^^ 



Hard by a poor thresher whose toil it was great, Who 



Jfegg^fe^^^gJE^^^ ^ 



;^-j-|jR 



# 



had ma - ny chil - dren and most of them small, 



^^^^^^^^m 



And nought but his la - bor to keep them up all. 

A NOBLEMAN Hv'd in a village of late, 
Hard by a poor thresher whose toil it was great, 
Who had many children and most of them small, 
And nought but his labor to keep them up all. 

The poor man was seen to go early to work ; 
He never was known to idle or lurk ; 
With his flail on his back and his bottle of beer, 
As happy as those that have thousands a year. 
&c., &c. 



UNKNOWN. 

Cockabendy. 

Wha ' s fou now, my jo. 

Fair Emm^a. 

Can ye leave me so, laddie. 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Note. — The greater number of the Music Books, referred to in the following 
Notes, are undated. To avoid defacement by innumerable brackets the 
ascertained year of publication follows the title and precedes the volume 
or page of the book quoted. The works with and without dates of 
publication are shown in the Bibliography. 

The Notes marked with an asterisk * refer to the Songs now printed for the 
first time as the works of Burns. 



I. LOVE-SONGS: PERSONAL. 

a. Various. 

No. 1. O, once I lov'd a bonie lass. Burns remarks in his Comv.ionplace 
Book, prior to copying this song, ' I never had the least thought or inclination 
of turning poet till I got once heartily in love,' and records it as ' the first of 
my performances, and done at an early period of life, when my heart glowed 
with honest warm simplicity ; unacquainted, and uncorrupted, with the ways of 
a wicked world. The performance is, indeed, very puerile and silly ; but I am 
always pleased with it, as it recalls to my mind those happy days when my 
heart was yet honest and my tongue was sincere ' {Commonplace Book, Edin. 
1872,^). The song was written in 1774 (the above note is dated April, 1783), 
in honour of Nelly Kilpatrick, ' who sang sweetly,' a farm servant, and daughter 
of a village blacksmith who in former days had lent the boy Burns romantic 
chap-books to read. Burns did not publish the song, and it was first printed 
posthumously in the Scots Musical Musetim, 1803, No. jjz, without the Fal 
de lal chorus in the original copy. 

I cannot trace the tune / am a jjian tmmarried — the favourite reel of the 
girl — for which Bums wrote the verses ; and the music to which the verses 
were set in the Museum, and there printed for the first time, has not the 
' ancient ' character assigned to it by Stenhouse, and there is no evidence that 
Burns knew the tune as printed. 

No. 2. In Tarbolton, ye ken. Chambers's Bui'ns, 1851 ; without title of 
tune. The farm of the Bennals named in the verses is situated near Afton 
Lodge, a few miles from Lochlea, where Burns probably lived at the time he 
celebrated the two daughters of Ronald, who was reputed to be a person of 
means and gave himself airs. Gilbert Burns, it is said, had wooed Jean, but 
was rejected on account of his poverty : Robert affected the other, Anna. In 
1789 Ronald became a bankrupt, and Burns in conveying the news to his 
younger brother William did not conceal his feelings when he says, ' You will 
easily guess, that from his insolent vanity in his sunshine of life, he will now 
feel a little retaliation from those who thought themselves eclipsed by him ; 
for, poor fellow, I do not think he ever intentionally injured any one.' The 
tune of the song is unknown. 

No. 3. Altho' my bed were in yon muir. This gallant little song has 
been much neglected, and, so far as I know, has never been printed with its 
proper melody. The verses are in the Commottplace Book entitled, ' Fragment. 



352 HISTORICAL NOTES 

Tune, Galla Waier^ with a note : ' Done something in inaitation of the manner 
of a noble old Scottish piece called l^P Millan s Peggy, and sings to the tune of 
Galla Water. My Montgomerie's Peggy was my deity for six or eight months. 
She had been bred, tho', as the world says, without any just pretence for it, in 
a style of life rather elegant ... I began the affair merely in gaiti de cceur 
.... but it cost me some heart-aches to get rid of the affair. I have even tried 
to imitate, in this extempore thing, that irregularity in the rhyme which, when 
judiciously done, has such a fine effect on the ear' {Cominonplace Book, 1872, 
//). So far as ascertained, Peggy was the housekeeper of Montgomery of Coils- 
field. She and Burns attended the same church, and there began the flirtation 
which ended abruptly as described. The verses were originally printed in 
Qxom^'a Reliqiies of Robert Burns, 1808, jjo. Neither Johnson nor George 
Thomson seem to have known this metrically defective but verbally melodic 
song. The esteemed German composer of songs, Robert Franz, has set it to 
an original air. For the origin of tune Galla Water, see No. ijj. 
The poetic model of Burns's M'^Millan's Peggy is unknown to me. 

Wo. 4. Yestreen I met you on the moor. Commonplace Book, 1872, 2;. 
' Tune, IfTvercazild's Peel, Strathspey^ Printed without the second and last 
stanzas, and signed 'X' in the Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. ig6. The 
manuscript is in the British Museum. The song was written at the age of seven- 
teen for Tibbie or Isabella Stein, the daughter of a farmer at Tarbolton, whose 
land marched with that of Lochlea, the home of Burns. Invercauhf s Peel has 
been a popular air in Scotland since it was printed in Stewart's Peels, 1762, ji. 
It is an excellent specimen of the dance-music of Scotland, illustrating the use 
of the ' Scots snap ' and having an irregular close. The Mtiseuin copy differs 
from that in the text, which is from Stewart's Collection, in that every alternate 
quaver is dotted. The music is also in Bremner's Peels, 1768, loj; and 
M<^Glashan's Strathspey Peels, 1 780, 26. 

ISo. 5. If ye gae up to yon hill- tap. In Chambers's Bums, 1851. No 
tune named. These sarcastic lines on the Tarbolton lasses are an early 
production. As Burns strolled through the village the old wives came to the 
door-step to look and wag their wise heads at the passenger. ' Faile ' in the 
third stanza, famous for ale, was notable for an ancient monastery, the friars of 
which in the sixteenth century were styled ' lymmars ' or villains in the Gud 
and Godlie Ballads. 

No. 6. Her flowing locks, the raven's wing. First printed in Cromek's 
Peliques of Robert Burns, 1808, 44^, styled 'Fragment,' and with no indica- 
tion of a melody. No trustworthy account is attached to the verses, but 
Cunningham connects them with 'a Mauchline lady,' whom Scott- Douglas 
conjectures to be Miss Whitefoord, the daughter of a landed proprietor there, 
and a friend of Burns. The verses can be sung to, and fit. Loch Eroch Side 
(No. ij). 

TSo. 7. Had I a cave on some wild distant shore. Scotish Airs, I799> 
92. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Robin Adair. ^ MS. 
at Brechin Castle. This despairing lyric was written for the tune which the 
poet could not get out of his head, and on the same subject as No. ^j. 
Nowhere has Burns been more successful in English than in the present song. 
For the tune Aileen a roon or Robin Adair, see No. 4^. 

TSo. 8. It was upon a Lammas night. Written about the year 1782, and 
published in the Kilmarnock Edition, 1786, 222. Tune, Corn rigs are bottle. 
Who this ' Annie' was has never been satisfactorily settled, for several of the 
name with whom Burns was more or less acquainted claimed to be the original. 
According to Scott-Douglas, the daughter of a farmer called Rankine, who 
lived within two miles of Lochlea, boasted that she was the heroine. The 
fifth line of the song in the Kilmarnock and first Edinburgh editions runs 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 353 

* tentless head,' instead of ' tentless heed ' in the editions 1783 and 1 784. Both 
the words have a like sound, and rhyme with ' feed.' 

Few of Burns's songs are better known than this one. Late in life he said of 
the last stanza that it was the best he had ever written, and that it came 
nearest to his beau ideal of poetical perfection. The origin of the tune is 
disputed. In Playford's Choyce Ayres, 16S1, it is entitled A Northern Song. 
In 180 Loyal Songs, 1685, 79/, it is given as Sanmey will never be my love 
again. It was sung in Durfey's The virHious wife, 16S0, beginning, 'Sawney 
was tall and of noble race.' The music alone is in Apollo's Banquet, 1687, 
titled Sawney. Words and music are in Durfey's IVit a7id Mirth, 1698, i. ijj, 
and again in Durfey's Pills, 17 19, '\. }i6. 

The first record of the music as a Scottish air is in Craig's Scots Tunes, 1730, 
42, entitled Corn rigs is bonny. It afterwards was printed with Ramsay's 
words, beginning, ' My Patie was a lover gay,' which had the exclusive use of 
the printed tune, until Burns's gay lyric superseded it. Whether a lost original 
of Scottish extraction may have existed prior to 1681, as 'a Northern song,' 
cannot be ascertained. The melody by its intrinsic merit has maintained its 
popularity to the present day, and it is found in every important collection of 
Scottish song and dance music of the eighteenth century, such as the Orpheus 
Caledonius, 1733, No. j5; M'^Gibbon's Scots Times, 1742, 20; Bremner's Scots 
Songs, 1757' ^^1 ^nd many others. The tune with Ramsay's verses is in the 
Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. pj. An old rustic song which gave Burns 
the idea of his Rigs of Barley runs as follows : — 
* O, corn rigs and rye rigs, 
O, corn rigs are bonie ; 
And where'er you meet a bonie lass 

Preen up her cockernonie.' {R cliques, 1808, 231.) 

No. 0. O, leave novels, ye Mauchline belles. Early verses published in 
Currie's Burns, 1800, S.}(>j ; and with music in Johnson's Museum, 1803, N0./7J. 
The advice here tendered to the Mauchline belles vi'as neglected by one, at 
least, of them. The music of the text, originally published in the Museum, 
is evidently a pipe-tune of good Scottish type. The title of the tune for 
the verses is marked Dotiald Blue, which I cannot trace, unless it be that given 
here under another name. The original imprint of the song has a tal la lay, 
indicating a refrain. 

Wo. 10. O, wha my babie-clouts will buy P Glenriddell MS. ' Tune, 
Whar' II bonie Annie lie.' Scots Musical Musetim, 1790, No. 277, signed ' Z,' 
with the tune East Nook of fife. A note in the MS. runs: 'I composed 
this song pretty early in life, and sent it to a young girl, a very particular 
acquaintance of mine, who was at that time under a cloud' (^Reliques, 2j8). 
In the Law's AIS. Burns has written ' Mr. B.'s old words.' 

Burns's tune for the song was well known last century in Scotland and the 
North of England. It obtained the name that Burns quotes, from the first line 
of Ramsay's song. Where wad bonny Annie ly, in the Tea- Table Miscellany, 
1724. It was known .under several titles. In 2l Northumberland MS., dated 
1694, it is Rood house rant; in Playford's Dancing Master, 1695, it is Red 
house. The proper name, so far as Scotland is concerned, is Where will {or 
shall) our goodman ly. The music with that title is in Watls's Musical 
Miscellany, 1731, v. 106; Oswald's Companion,c.\^^^,V\\. 22; and Aird's ^«Vj, 
1782, i. No. 9/. In the Reliques, 1808, ajy. Burns quotes the following stanza 
of a silly old song, the original : — 

* O whar'U our gudeman lie, gudeman lie, gudeman lie, 
O whar'U our gudeman lie, till he shute o'er the simmer? 
Up amang the hen-bawks, the hen-bawks, the hen-bawks^ 
Up amang the hen-bawks, amang the rotten timmer.' 



354 HISTORICAL NOTES 

• The well-known Westmoreland hunting ditty, ' D'ye ken John Peel,' is sung 
to this old melody Red house or Bonny Annie of the seventeenth century. 

No. 11. Wo'w ■westlin winds and slaught'ring guns. In the Commotiplace 
Book, 1872, .^7, entitled Hat-'ste : — a fragment, are eight lines substantially the 
same as begins the song which the sister of Burns said was written for Jean 
Armour. The complete song is in' the A'ihiiarnock edition, 1786, 224, entitled 
Sortg, composed in August. Tune, I had a horse, I hadnae niair, and the MS. 
is in the British Museum. Burns changed tlie heroine to Peggy Thomson, who 
lived next door to the Kirkoswald School, where Burns studied trigonometry, 
and she ' upset all my sines and co-sines, and it was in vain to think of doing 
any more good at school.' She subsequently married a Mr. Neilson, and 
Burns was on friendly terms with both. 

When the song was revised, Burns altered the melody to Por-t Gordon, as 
may be seen in the Gray and Law MS. Lists, but Johnson of the Ah/seutn 
neglected the instruction, and attached the melody Wheii the King co77ies o'' er 
the water, titling it erroneously Come, kiss with me. Thomson, in Scotish Airs, 

1799, pj, mutilated the verses, and adapted them to the Irish air Ally Croker. 
The tune Port Gordon, for which Burns wrote the Song, is in Caledonian Pocket 
Co7)ipatiio7t, c. 1756, viii. 2j. There is a family resemblance, but the air is not 
the same as Whe7i the King coi7ies o'er the water. 

No. 12. Full "well thou know'st I love thee, dear. Currie, Works, 

1800, iv. 2(5/. 'Tune, Rothie77iU7'che' Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1801, 121. 
This is the last work from the pen of Burns. Written at Brow on the 
Solway Firth, where he had gone for sea bathing. He casts his memory back 
and reverts to the time when he met Charlotte Hamilton and Peggy Chalmers. 
The poet was conscious that this song was not one of his best, and he explains 
the reason in his letter [of July 12, 1796] to Thomson: 'I tried my hand on 
Rothic7Jiurche this morning. The measure is so difficult that it is impossible 
to infuse much genius into the lines.' In this letter he asks for a loan of five 
pounds in these words : ' Curst necessity compels me to implore you for five 
pounds. . . . Do, for God's sake, send me that sum, and that by return of 
post. ... I hereby promise and engage to furnish you with five pounds 
worth of the neatest song-genius you have seen.' Shortly before. Burns, by 
request, assigned to Thomson, without any consideration, the absolute copyright 
of all the songs which he had sent him during the previous three years. 

For the tune Rothiei/iiirche, see No. loj. 

No. 13. Behind yon hills where Lugar flows. Edi7ibu7-gh editioti, 1787, 
J22, ' Tune, My Na7iie, (9.' In the Co7/i77i07iplace Book it is marked for the 
tune As I cai/ie in by Lo7idon, 0, which I cannot trace. In both copies the 
first line of the song is ' Behind yon hills where Stinchar flows,' but the more 
euphonious 'Lugar' was afterwards adopted. The original of the song is 
supposed to be Annie Fleming, the daughter of a Tarbolton farmer, whose 
society Burns sought because she was a good singer. The song has enjoyed 
undiminished popularity since its original appearance. Burns sent it to George 
Thomson in 1793 for his projected musical collection. The editor wished to 
mend the diction, but Burns abruptly said, 'Now don't let it enter your head 
that you are under any necessity of taking my verses,' but Thomson accepted 
the song, and altered the metre of the second stanza. Prior to Allan Ramsay's 
Na7my, in the Tea-Table Miscella7iy, 1724, there was a London broadside 
entitled The Scotch IVooittg of Willy a7id Na7t7iy to a pleasant New Tu7ie, 
or Na7i/iy, 0, beginning 'As I went forth one morning fair.' But a popular 
song of the eighteenth century was the model of Burns, a fragment of which is 
in the //e/-d MS. as follows, and now printed for the iirst time : — 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 355 

' As I came in by Edinburgh toun, 
And in by the banks o' the city, O, 
And there I heard a young man cry, 

And was na that great pity, O ? 
And still he cried his Nanie, O, 

His weel far'd, comely Nanie, O, 
And a' the warld shall never ken 
The love that I bear Nanie, O.' 
Burns wrote his song about 1782, and the copy in his Commonplace Book is 
dated April, 1 784. It is quite improbable that he could have seen the Herd MS. 
so early as either year named, if he ever saw it at all. For some reason or 
another the editors of the Centenary Burns do not quote the above lines. 

The nationality of the music oi Afy A'anie, is disputed. The late J. Muir 
Wood stated that the air is in a Graham A/S. of 1694. The earliest printed copy 
is in Orphens Caledonius, 1725, No. ^<S, with Ramsay's verses ; then in Ramsay's 
Mustek, c. 1726; Watts's Miscellany, 1730, iii. 126; British Musical Miscel- 
lany, 1734, ii. 14; M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1742, 27; Oswald's Caledonian 
Companion, c. i753- v. j ; Bremner's Scots Songs, 1757, ij (2nd series) ; and else- 
where. The tune is now permanently associated with Burns's song. Thomson 
wished to set it to a different melody ; but Burns disapproved, and replied that 
his subscribers would prefer My Nanie, set to its own tune, and accordingly 
it appeared in Scotish Airs, 1793, 4. The popularity of the verses compelled 
their insertion in Johnson's Museum, 1803, vi. No. ^80; but as the tune had 
been previously appropriated to Ramsay's verses in the first volume, Johnson 
set it to an English air by Thomas Ebdon, a Durham musician, which, how- 
ever, failed to catch the public ear. 

Wo. 14. True-hearted was he, the sad swain c' the ITarroT^. Thomson's 
Scotish Airs, 1 798, 46. ' Written for this work by Robert Bums. Tune, 
Bonny Dundee' Written for Miss Jessie Staig, daughter of a Provost of 
Dumfries, and the lady who afterwards married Major William Miller, a son 
of the landlord of Ellisland. Mrs. Miller died at the early age of twenty-six. 
The song was sent to Thomson in April, 1793, to suit Bonie Dundee. 
Thomson objected to a stiff line in the song; Burns agreed with him, but 
declined to make any alteration, as 'it would spoil the likeness, so the picture 
must stand.' 

For the tune, see Song No. 112. 

TTo. 15. Young Peggy blooms our boniest lass. Scots Mtisical Museum, 
1787, No. 75, with its tune Loch Eroch Side. Written for Miss Margaret 
Kennedy, the daughter of a small landed proprietor, and a relative of Mrs. Gavin 
Hamilton. She was about seventeen years of age when Burns made her 
acquaintance. He sent her a copy of the verses, with a letter, in which 
he says : ' Flattery I leave to your lovers, whose exaggerating fancies may 
make them imagine you are still nearer perfection than you really are.' His 
good wishes that she should be preserved from all misfortune were very far 
from being realized, for she fell a victim to a military adventurer of a good 
family like herself. 

Margaret Kennedy was accomplished by birth and education, and one of the 
first of Burns's acquaintances out of his sphere of life. The song resembles the 
artificially polished verses of the eighteenth century, and has not been much 
thought of. Burns execrated his literary advisers, who compelled him to omit 
this song in the first Edinburgh edition, and it accounts for its early publication 
in Johnson's Mttseum. The tune is in Agnes Hume's MS., 1704, entitled 
Lady Strathden's. 

The words and music are in dime's Edinburgh Musical Miscellany , 1793, ]6o. 
Loch Eroch Side, or Strathspey, is now better known as the melody of Baroness 



356 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Nairne's song The lass of Gowrie. As Loch Eireachd Side it is in M'=Glashan's 
Reels, 1786, 46. It is also in Aird's Airs, 1788, iii. No. j-^j. It is probably 
the original of the air which is now usually set to the song ' I'm o'er young to 
marry yet.' 

Wo. 16. Altho' thou maun never be mine. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
'799; 7/- 'Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Here^s a health to 
them that 'j awa.' Burns's letter enclosing this song to Thomson was written 
in May, 1796- Rlieumatism, cold, and fever were a terrible combination, and 
Jessie Lewars, an orphan eighteen years of age, voluntarily became his nurse. 
She acted as an eldest daughter to Mrs. Burns, and as a mother to the poet's 
children. Her attention to Burns was unflagging and incessant ; her devotion 
much affected him, and he repaid her with a love-song, the only coin he had, 
and a copy of the four printed volumes of the Scots Musical Museum, now in 
the possession of the Earl of Rosebery. In his letter to Thomson, he writes : 
' I once mentioned to you an air, which I have long admired, Here 's a health 
to them that's awa, hiney, but I forgot if you took any notice of it. I have just 
been trying to suit it with verses, and I beg leave to recommend the air to your 
attention once more.' The following couplet in Here ^s a health is exquisite : — 
' Thou art sweet as the smile when fond lovers meet, 
And soft as their parting tear, Jessy.' 

A corrected copy of the song was found among Burns's papers, containing the 
last stanza not in the copy sent to Thomson. Burns had previously written 
a political song for the air (see Song No. 284). 

No. 17. The Catrine woods were yellow seen. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 2j6, with the music of the Braes 0' Ballochmyle. This autumn song 
was written for one of the daughters of Sir John Whitefoord, Reliques, a-jj. 
Ballochmyle had been long in the family, but the disastrous failure of the Ayr 
Bank in 1772, of which Whitefoord was a partner, obliged him to sell the 
estate. It is situated on the right bank of the river Ayr, with the Catrine 
v/oods on the opposite side. Burns had to pass Ballochmyle and the Catrine 
woods in his solitary circular walks from Mossgiel. 

The melody is the composition of Allan Masterton, and is unconsciously 
modelled on the psalm-tune style. It is in the modern scale throughout, quite 
distinct from the quaint progressions of the anonymous folk-tunes. Masterton 
was, however, more successful in setting Burns's verse to music than the other 
musical friends of the poet. 

No. 18. Stay, my charmer, can you leave me ? Scots Musical Museum, 
1788, No. 12^, signed ' B.' Tune, An Gille dubh ciar dubh. Nothing is 
known of the origin of this song, which is among the Burns's MSS. in the 
British Museum. It is most likely a souvenir of the Highland tour written for 
a pretty simple Gaelic air, Anglice, The black-haired lad, in yi'^'Dou^dHs, High- 
land Vocal Airs, 1784, No. 142. 

No. 19. My heart was ance as blythe and free. Scots Musical Museum, 
17S8, No. 10}, signed 'X,' entitled. To the weavers gin ye go. The fol- 
lowing note is in the Interleaved Mtiseu?n : ' The chorus of this song is old, 
the rest of it is mine. Here, once for all, let me apologize for many silly 
compositions of mine in this work. Many beautiful airs wanted words; in the 
hurry of other avoc.itions, if I could string a parcel of rhymes together anything 
near tolerable, I was fain to let them pass. He must be an excellent poet 
indeed, whose every performance is excellent' {Reliques, 180S, 2y). This 
explains the difficulty in precisely ascertaining how much original matter Burns 
put into songs which previously existed. In tlie present case he adopted an 
old chorus ; in some songs disjuncted portions were old, in others everything 
but the title was original. A story connecting Jean .\rmour with this song is 
not authenticated. 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 357 

The tune To the weaver' s gin ye go is in Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. 16. It is a 
good melody, with considerable variety ; the chorus starts in a merry strain, but 
gets back to the half-querulous mood of the verse, and ends in the minor. It 
is named in a broadside of the middle of the eighteenth century, 

Wo. 20. How long and dreary is the night. Scots Musical Museum, 
1788, No. 77/. Tune, ' A Galick air.' This is the first of two versions. The 
second was a recast for George Thomson, who importuned Burns to write for 
Cauld Kail, a tune he disliked. Burns tried three songs for the air, and his 
middle one. How long and dreary, is the best. In a letter on the subject 
he said, ' I met w^ith some such words in a collection of songs somewhere, 
which I altered and enlarged ; and to please you, and to suit your favourite air 
of Cauld Kail, have arranged it anew.' In the Herd MS. there are nine stanzas 
in a different measure, with some similar ideas to Burns, beginning : — 
' The day begins to peep, 

And the birds sing sweet and cheery, 
But I maun rise and greet 
And think upon my deary.' 
The beautiful Gaelic air originally published in the Museum is very little 
known. To the student of folk-music all the Celtic airs selected by Burns are 
well worth particular attention. They are chiefly sad, and redolent of a race 
living ' on the shores of a melancholy ocean.' 

No. 21. Ton wild mossy mountains. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. jji. Signed 'X,' to the tune Phoebe. In the Interleaved Museum Burns 
refers to the song as belonging to a part of his private history, which was of no 
consequence to the public. Nothing certain is known of the origin of the 
verses ; but Chambers and Scott-Douglas both agree in thinking that the 
incident which prompted them occurred during his first journey to Edinburgh 
in 1786. Bums passed close to Tinto or 'Tintock,' the highest isolated peak 
of the district. ' Yon wild mossy mountains ' are the natural ramparts which 
flank the upper Clyde. 

Burns recommended George Thomson to republish his song, and set it 
to the Jacobite air, There'll never be peace till Jamie comes hatne (.not the 
original melody of the song), of which he writes, ' It is a little irregular in 
the flow of the lines, but where two short syllables, that is to say, one syllable 
more than the regular feet — if these two syllables fall to the space of one 
(crotchet time), composed of two different quavers under a slur, it has, I 
think, no bad effect to divide them' {Letter, ^xAy, 1793). The explanation, 
although a little clumsily expressed, is very interesting, as it shows that Burns 
carefully studied his verses from a musical basis, and that he was sensitive 
to minute differences in musical sound. Johnson had published the song with 
the proper melody, and Thomson doubtless suggested another tune. 

The tune Phoebe, here reprinted, is the composition of James Oswald, 
musician and publisher of much Scottish music in the middle of the eighteenth 
century. I find the air in Universal Harmony, 1745, 119, and in his Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. ig. 

No. 22. Anna, thy charms my bosom fire. Edinburgh edition, 17935 
ii. 226; and with music in Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. j}0, and a foot- 
note, ' written for this work by Robert Burns.' According to the Centenary 
Burns, the lines were first printed in the Star newspaper, April 18, 1789. 
Scott-Douglas identified ' Anna ' as Miss Ann Stewart, who was engaged to be 
married to the poet's friend, Alexander Cunningham. Burns knew the lady, 
but not intimately, and the verses were written on account of his friend. 

The tune Bonny Mary is the composition of James Oswald, and is in his 
Curious Collection Scots Tunes, 1 740, i; ; also in the Caledonian Pocket Com- 
panion, 1743, i. 24. It is a good melody of the professional style of the 



358 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



eighteenth century, but I am unable to find any authority under the hand of 
Burns that he wrote his verses for the air. 

No. 23. 'Twas even — the dewy fields were green. The Pofyhymnia, 
No. iS [1799J; Currie, Works, 1800, i. J2/ (no tune named); Thomson's 
Scotish Airs, iSoi, jo8, set to an unauthorized tune, Joliniiys gray breeks. 
The 'Tass o' Balloclamyle' — Miss Wilhelmina Alexander — was the sister of 
the proprietor of the estate of Ballochmyle. The poet saw her for the first 
time as he was taking a solitary stroll in the evening. He sent her a copy of the 
verses, with a request that she would permit him to publish them, but she took 
no notice of the request. Many years after, when the poet had become famous, 
and she was a maiden past her prime, she had the song and the letter framed, 
and hung them up in the hall. The letter, dated Nov. 18, 1786, describes the 
circumstances under which the song had been written. Burns wished this song 
and Young Peggie blooms (No. //) inserted in the Edinburgh edition of his works, 
but the literary tasters dissuaded him from it, and neither was printed. 

Ettrick Banks, for which the song was written, is named in a letter to 
Mrs. Stewart of Stair, which enclosed a copy of the verses. The tune is named 
in the original publication Folyhymma. The music is in the Orpheus Caledonius, 
1733, No. .//, to pastoral verses beginning : — 

' On Ettrick banks in a summer's night. 

At gloaming when the sheep drove hame, 
I met my lassy bra' and tight. 

Cam wading barefoot, a' her lane : 
My heart grew light, I ran, I flang 

My arms about her lily neck, 
And kiss'd and clap'd her there fu' lang, 
My words they were na' mony feck.' 
This song was afterwards printed in tlie fourth volume of the Tea-Table 
Miscellany, 1740. The tune is in Oswald's Curious Collection Scots Tunes, 
1740^ 2&\ M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1742, 2j\ Caledonian Pocket Co?npamon, 
1 75 1, iii. j6 \ Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 81, and every important 
collection of vocal music of the latter half of the eighteenth century. 

TSo. 24, As I gasd up by yon gate-end. Aldine edition, 1839, First 
published anonymously in the Edinburgh Magazine, 1818. It appears that 
the Aldine editor printed the verses from a MS. which contained only the 
twelve lines as reprinted here. No tune is named. 

No. 25. How pleasant the banks of the clear winding Devon. Scots 
Musical Museum, 1788, No. jj/, signed ' B.' Tune, Bhannerach dhon na 
chri. The MS. is in the British Museum. ' These verses were composed 
on a charming girl, a Miss Charlotte Hamilton, who is now married to 
James M'^Kitrick Adair, Physician. She is sister to my worthy friend Gavin 
Hamilton, of Mauchline ; and was born on the banks of the Ayr, but was, at 
the time I wrote these lines [Oct., 1787], residing at Harvieston, Clack- 
mannanshire, on the romantic banks of the little river Devon. I first heard 
the air from a lady in Inverness, and got the notes taken down for this work ' 
(i.e. the Scots Mtisical Museum). {Reliques, i8c8, 24J.) 

The tune, Anglice, The b?'ow}i dairy maid, communicated by Burns, was 
originally published in the Ahisetun with his song. Another, but different 
rudimentary melody of the same title is in McDonald's Highland Airs, 1784, 
No. io/. 

No. 26. The flower it blaws, it fades, it fa's. Scots Alusical Museum, 
1796, No. 4^1, entitled Lovely Polly Stezvart. The MS. is in the British 
Museum. Polly was the young daughter of William Stewart of Burns's song 
' You're welcome, Willie Stewart.' According to Scott-Douglas, without 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 



359 



quoting authority, she married her cousin, by whom she had three sons; 
he fell into some scrape which compelled him to abscond. Polly afterwards 
contracted a quasi-matrimonial alliance with a farmer named George Welsh, 
but, as they could not agree, they separated. In 1806 she lived with her father 
at Maxwelton, who was no longer factor of Closeburn. There Polly picked up 
an acquaintance with a Swiss soldier named Fleitz, with whom she went 
abroad, and after many wanderings died at Florence in 1847. 

Burns's song was formed on one of the Jacobite ballads made after the 
rebellion of 1745. The tune is entitled Queensheny House in Bremner's Reds, 
1758, 40, and Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. loi. It is said to be in Walsh's Cale- 
donian Country Dances, c. 1736, under the title The Co7ifederacy. In 1749, 
on the anniversary of the Battle of Culloden, some English officers in the dress 
circle of the Canongate Theatre, Edinburgh, called on the orchestra to 
play Culloden, which incensed the audience, who retaliated by demanding 
Ye' re welcome, Charlie Stewart. A riot ensued, and the officers got the 
worst of it. The lively air Culloden is very little known ; the following is 
a copy from Johnson's Two Hundred New Country Dances, 1748 ; — 




^^ g^^Eg^zg^jE^^^ 



i-a «_^_^_i zj 



I — m — —I J-*-* 1 — — — J-*-* ^^— ^-- — ^ 4 



Wo. 27. Prora thee, Eliza, I must go. Kilmarnock edition, i'jS6, 22J. 
' Tune, Gilderoy.' Burns recommended Thomson to insert the song in his 
collection ; but in Scotish Airs, 1793, i. //, he set it to a wrong tune. 
'Eliza' was very likely one of the Mauchline belles. 

Gilderoy is the tune of a celebrated seventeenth century ballad of the same name. 
It is a corruption of Gillieroy, the red-haired lad, applied to Patrick Macgregor, 
a native of the Lomonds, of the same clan, or sept, as the notorious Rob Roy. 
He pursued the business of a cattle-lifter, and by his courage and audacity 
raised himself to be the leader of a band of Caterans, who scoured the country 
from Strathspey to Strathdee. According to the Privy Council Records, 
Gillieroy and his band sorned through the whole bounds of Strathspey, Brae- 
mar, Cromar, and the districts thereabouts, oppressing the common people, 
violently taking from them their meat, drink, and provisions, and their 'haill 
goods.' In those days the Argyle family acted as the hereditary police, and 
Lord Lorn tried to stamp out the system of robbery carried on by the lawless 
Celts. He captured Gillieroy about July, 1636, and nine other notorious 
ruffians, who were charged with plundering the house of William Stewart 
on the romantic isle of Inchcailloch in Loch Lomond, and making a clean 
sweep of the island and the premises, including the title-deeds of the property. 
The whole band were convicted and hanged in Edinburgh, Gillieroy and his 



360 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



henchman, John Forbes, having the honour of suffering on a gallows 'ana 
degree higher' than the others, and of having their heads stuck on a pole 
and exhibited at the city gate as a warning to other evil-doers. A few years 
after the execution a black-letter ballad was printed in London, entitled The 
Scotch Lover s Lamentation ; or Gilderoy's Last Farewell. The verses, in ten 
double stanzas, are assumed to be written by his paramour, who laments the 
untimely fale of her ' bonny boy.' In course of time he was canonized and 
admitted into the Newgate Calendar. His biography is in A compleat History 
of the Lives and Robberies of the most notorious Highwaymen, Foot-pads, Sec, 
&c., printed in London, 1719. He is there depicted as having set his mother's 
house on fire, ill-used his sister, fled to France, picked Cardinal Richelieu's 
pocket in the King's presence, returned to England, hanged a judge, then been 
taken prisoner, and executed in Scotland. 

The popularity of Gilderoy may be judged from the fact that there are 
at least four different versions of the ballad. The broadside was copied 
into Collection of Ballads, London, 1723, 2yi, but a short version of five 
stanzas was previously published in Westminster Drollery, 16'j 1,112, entitled 
A Scotch Song, called Gilderoy. The third and best-known version is that 
of thirteen stanzas attributed to the pen of Lady Wardlaw, the reputed 
authoress of Hardy Knttte. Here the indelicacies of the older versions are 
pruned, and this is the one copied into Percy's Reliques, wanting a stanza, and 
in all modern collections of ballads. The fourth version in seven stanzas, 
preceding the last-named in order of time, is the best of the series, and is 
written in vigorous and graphic language. It is in the Orpheus Caledonius, 
1733, No. 4y, with the tune here set to the verses of Burns. 

The ballad had two tunes in England. In Dudey's Fills, 1719, v. Jp, the 
original verses are set ' to a new tune,' from which it may be inferred that 
there was an earlier one. The Scottish tune has no striking family resemblance 
to that in the Fills, except in the cadence. The Scottish tune is in Ramsay's 
Musick, c. 1726 ; in the Caledotiiatt Focket Companion , 1753, v, 20 ; M'^Gibbon's 
Scots Tunes, 1742, 26 ; and in Bremner's Scots Songs, 1757, 10, with the verses 
beginning, *Ah ! Chloris.' 

ITo. 28. "Where, braving angry winter's storms. Scot's Musical 
Museum, i788> No. /£;, signed ' R.' Tune, N. Cow's Lamentation for 
Abercairney. The MS. is in the British Museum. Miss Margaret Chalmers 
was the subject of this and the next song. The acquaintance ripened into 
intimacy, and an active correspondence began, lasting from October 26, 
1787, to September 16, 1788. Peggy Chalmers is described as having 
large and bright hazel eyes, white, regular teeth, and possessing a charm 
in her face not always the result or accompaniment of fine features. Her 
figure was short, but faultless ; she spoke easily and well, but preferred 
listening to others. Some of the letters to her are among the finest Burns 
wrote. They are remarkable for an easy flowing style, apparently spon- 
taneous, and penned without effort. He took her into his confidence, and 
discussed his affairs in a frank and confidential manner. She exercised 
considerable influence over him, and he invariably spoke of her in the highest 
terms. Dr. Blacklock said that Burns always paid her the most respectful 
deference. None of her letters have been preserved, but his letters to her 
are uniformly excellent, and the correspondence ceased only a short time 
before her marriage with Mr. Lewis Flay, a partner in the distinguished 
banking house of Sir William Forbes & Co., the founders of Coutts & Co. 
Mrs. Hay was left a widow in the year 1800, and died in Switzerland in 1843. 

This song and the next were sent to the lady with an intimation that he 
intended to print them. She objected, and he contested the point. Both 
were sent to the editor of the Museum, the present song being inserted, but the 
Other, My Pegg/s Face, was suspended for more than fifteen years. 



I. LOVE-SONGS ; PERSONAL 361 

The tune, Lamentation for Abercairney, is the composition of Niel Gow, 
and printed in his Collection of Keels, 1784, and KuA'sAirs, 1788, iii. No./^2. 

No. 29. My Peggy's face, my Peggy's form. Currie, Works, 1800, 
\v. ^c)8. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1 801, 106, 'Peggy' being altered to ' Mary,' 
and set to an unauthorized air. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No. joi, 
' written for this work by Robert Burns,' which is strictly accurate. Johnson 
having been forestalled, printed in the Museum with the song a letter from 
Burns, in which he states that he has a very strong private reason for wishing 
the song in the second volume. It is very probable that Peggy Chalmers 
directly or indirectly was the cause of the delay, as she objected to be publicly 
criticized. Burns records in his MS. Lists that Johnson took a copy of the 
Celtic tune, LLa a' chaillich, for which the verses were written, but was in 
doubt whether the music suited, and referred the matter to the professional 
musical editor, who evidently decided against the tune. Whether the poet then 
selected the good melody in the text. My Peggy's face, is not known, but it was 
originally printed in the Museum with Burns's song, and remains its proper 
tune. For a copy of LLa a chaillich, see Uow's Scots Music. A copy is in 
Glen's Early Scottish Melodies, 1900, 2//. 

Wo. 30. By Oughtertyre grows the aik. Scots Mtisical Museum, 1788, 
No. 180, signed ' B,' entitled Blythe was she, with the music of Atidro and his 
cutty gun. In Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, 61. Burns's second visit to the 
Highlands was the fulfilment of a promise to Sir William Murray of Ochtertyre, 
in the lovely valley of the Earn, Perthshire. The poet was entertained for 
about ten days, and there he met Euphemia Murray, a cousin of his host, aged 
eighteen years, who was known as the Flower of Strathmore. She was the 
subject of the present song, and did not appreciate the honour of being put 
into verse. She married Mr. Smythe of Methven Castle, who became one of 
the judges of the Court of Session {Reliques, 1808, 2J4). 

The tune Andro and his cutty gun belongs to a brilliant vernacular song of 
the same name, first printed in the Tea-Table Miscellany, 1740, This song was 
exceedingly popular in the eighteenth century at all peasants' feasts. It 
describes an alehouse and the joyous condition of the guests, in the peculiar 
humour of the social songs of Scotland. Many imitations have been written, 
but none equals the original, still often printed. The two following stanzas are 
excellent : — 

' When we had three times toom'd our stoup. 

And the niest chappin new begun, 
In started, to heeze up our hope ; 
Young Andro wi' his cutty gun. 



The carlin brought her kebbuck ben, 

With girdle cakes weel toasted brown 
Weel does the canny kimmer ken 

They gar the scuds gae glibber down.' 
The paraphrase of the last four lines is. Well did the old landlady know 
that cheese and toasted cakes made the ale more palatable, and disappear the 
quicker. 

The tune is in Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1754, vi. 4; Aird's Airs, 
1782, ii. No. jy; in the Perth Musical Miscellany, 1786, ijj; Calliope, 1788, 
4J0; and Ritson's Scotish Songs, 1794, i. 268. In the Merry Muses there is 
a version of Andro and his cutty gun, beginning : — 

' When a' the lave gaed to their bed, 
And I sat up to clean the shoon, 
O wha think ye cam jumpin ben 
But Andro and his cutty gun ? ' 



362 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



!N"o. 31. A rosebud, by my early walk. Scots Musical Miiseiim,\*l^%-i 
No. i8g, signed ' B.' The MS. is in the British Museum. The 'Rosebud' was 
a little girl of twelve years, the only child of William Cruikshank, Classical 
Master in the High School of Edinburgh, with whom Burns resided after his 
return from the Highland tour. The poet stayed with Cruikshank from 
September, 1787; to February, 1788, with the exception of a few days' visit to 
Sir William Murray at Ochtertyre. During this period he was principally 
occupied in writing songs for the second volume of the Rhiseum. The ' Rosebud ' 
for her years was an accomplished player on the harpsichord, and Burns was 
intensely interested in her singing and playing the songs he was preparing 
for publication. In this way he tested his verses with the melodies. He was 
so absorbed in this occupation that it was difficult to draw his attention ftom it. 
Burns displays his tenderness and love of children in the song, and as a mark 
of gratitude to the child he freely distributed copies among his friends. ' The 
air is by a David Sillar, quondam merchant, and now Schoolmaster in Irvine. 
He is the Davie to whom I address my printed poetical epistle in the measure 
of the Cherry and the Slae' {Reliques, 1808, 2j8). I suppose that this is the 
first reprint of the tune since it was published in the Miisctim as transmitted by 
Burns, and it would not be reproduced now if Burns had not made his song for 
it. It is an attempt in Strathspey style, containing unvocal intervals which 
unfit it for performance. 

Wo. 32. Musing on the roaring ocean. Scots Musical Miisemn, 1788, 
No. 775?, signed ' R.' Tune, Drtdmionn dubh. The MS. of the verses is 
in the British Museum. Written on account of a Mrs. M^'Lachlan, whose 
husband was an officer in the East India Company's service, on duty abroad 
{Reliques, 1808, 2J4). It may be remarked that, although Burns lived in the 
view of the sea for many years, its immensity or grandeur does not appear to 
have impressed him. This is his only sea-song. Mountains and natural 
scenery he passed over in the same way. His genius lay in studying and dis- 
secting human life. For inorganic matter with the vaoAtm fan gloss he cared 
little or nothing. His diary of the Highland tour contains few or no remarks 
on the beautiful scenery he passed through. In a fragment in the Herd MS., 
now first printed below, the same idea occurs as in the third line of Burns. 
Thus : — 

* But he 's avva, and very far frae hame, 

And sair, sair I fear I'll ne'er see him again ; 

But I will weary Heav'n to keep him in its care. 

For O! he's good — and good men are rare.' 

The tune Druimionn dubh, Anglice, The black coiu, is in Corri's Scots Songs, 
1783, ii. 2p, and M'^Donald's Highland Airs, 1784, No. 5p. Sir Samuel 
Ferguson translated the fragment of an Irish Jacobite lyric on James the Second 
with the title of the tune. The last stanza is — 

' Welcome home, welcome home, druimion dubh, O ! 
Good was your sweet milk for drinking, I trow ; 
With your face like a rose, and your dewlap of snow, 
I'll part from you never, ah, druimion dubh, O !' 
Another but different air of the same title is in the Caledonian Pocket Co??t- 
panion, c. 1756, viii. 12. 

M"o. 33. She 's fair and fause that causes my smart. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1792, No.^piS, signed ' R.' ; and Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, 40. 
The MS. is in the British Museum. This sprang from the heated imagination 
of the poet about the middle of January, 1789, on reading an account of the 
marriage of Miss Ann Stewart, the subject of Song No. 22. She had been 
engaged to his intimate friend, Alexander Cunningham, W. S., and jilted him. 
As soon as Burns heard the news, he wrote an indignant letter of condolence to 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 363 

liis friend, who however survived the disappointment, and married four years 
later. 

The time The lads of Leith is in the Caledonian Pocket Companio7t, 1752, 
iv. }i. It is a graceful combination of the major and the minor modes. 
Mr. Glen states that the music is in Walsh's Caledonian Country Dances some 
years earlier than the above date. 

nSTo. 34. ITow Spring has clad the grove in green. Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1799, gi. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' The MS. is in 
the Thomson Collection. This address of condolement with Alexander 
Cunningham is on the same subject as the preceding song. Burns intended 
Stephen Clarke to compose for the verses, but nothing came of it, and the song 
has no original melody. Thomson obtained a copy of the verses in the 
beginning of August, 1795, and published them with the old tune of jluld 
lang sytie, disguised under a new title, The hopeless lover, which he lifted 
bodily from the Scots Musical Museum. There is no doubt about the source, 
because Johnson's setting of the tune is considerably different from all previous 
copies. Thomson did precisely the same thing with the popular tune, 0, can 
ye labour lea for Burns's Azcld laiig syne. 

No. 35. O, wilt thou go wi' me, sweet Tibbie Dunbar. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1790, No. .207, entitled '■Tibbie Dunbar. Twa^, Johnny APGill.' The 
MS. is in the British Museum. In Law's Museum MS. List, Burns has 
written 'Mr. Burns's old words.' Nothing is known of the subject of the 
verses, which were written to illustrate the melody. Riddell's Note (not 
Burns's) in the Interleaved Museum is ' This tune is said to be ihe composition 
of John M<=GilI, fiddler, in Girvan.' An old song in the Merry Muses is marked 
for the tune, the first stanza of which is : — 

' Duncan Macleerie and Janet his wife, 
They gaed to Kilmarnock to buy a new knife ; 
But instead of a knife they coft but a bleerie : 
" We're very weel sair'd," quo' Duncan Macleerie.' 
The nationality of the tune is disputed ; on some slender evidence it is 
claimed as Irish. In Scotland it is now best kno^TO with MacNcil's song, 
Co^ne under my plaidie. The music is in Campbell's Reels, 1778, ^i, and 
Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. 7/51. 

No. 36. Pate gave the word — the arrow sped. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 277, signed 'B,' entitled 'A mothers lament for the death of her 
son. Tune, Finlayston housed Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, 4^. ' Mr. 
Burns's words ' (Law's MS. List). These lines were written for Mrs. Ferguson 
of Craigdarroch, who had lost a promising son, eighteen years of age, in 
November, 1787. 'I have just arrived [Mauchline] from Nithsdale, and will 
be here a fortnight. 1 was on horseback this morning (for between my wife 
and my farm there is just forty-six miles) by three o'clock. As I jogged on in 
the dark, I was taken with a poetic fit' (Letter to Mrs. Dunlop, September 27, 
1788). 

The eulogistic Note in the Interleaved Museum on the tune and its composer 
is by Robert Riddell, and not written by Burns, as Cromek makes it appear in 
Reiiques, 1808, joj. Posterity has not endorsed Riddell's opinion of the melody. 
John Riddel had no doubt the gift of melody ; in his collection of Scots Reels, 
1782 (the tune is on page 55), there are some good specimens of folk-music. 
Pie died at Ayr on April i;, 1795, aged seventy-six years. 

No. 37. The day returns, my bosom burns. Scots Musical Mtiseum, 
1790, '^0.224, signed 'R.' Tune, Seventh of A'ovember. 'Mr. B.'s words' 
(Law's MS. List). The MS. is in the British Museum. Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1798, 28, with the music. 'I composed this song out of compliment 



3^4 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



to one of the happiest and worthiest of married couples in the world, Robert 
Riddell, Esq., of Glenriddell, and his lady. At their fireside I have enjoyed 
more pleasant evenings than at all the houses of fashionable people in this 
country put together ; and to their kindness and hospitality I am indebted for 
many of the happiest hours of my life ' {Reliques, 1808, 2<5p). The leaf of the 
Interleaved Museum where this has been written is now wanting. Living alone in 
an old weather-worn house, on the banks of the Nith, the poet was particularly 
grateful for the Riddell hospitality. This country gentleman was the brother- 
in-law of Maria Riddell, whom we shall come across by-and-by. He was an 
antiquarian and amateur musician. It was in his house that the appalling 
Bacchanalian contest took place commemorated in The Whistle. A letter of 
September 16, 1788, to Peggy Chalmers, fiixed the date when The day returns 
was written. ' Johnson's collection of songs is going on in the third volume ; and, 
of consequence, finds me a consumpt for a great deal of idle metre. One of the 
most tolerable things I have done m that way is two stanzas that I made to an 
air a musical gentleman of my acquaintance composed for the anniversary of 
his wedding-day, which happens on the seventh of November.' 

The tune of Riddell's is in his New Music, 1787. Burns was generally and 
generously wrong when he adopted the melodies of his personal friends. There 
are some exceptions, but his amiability obscured his judgement in most cases. 

No. 38. Ye gallants bright, T rede ye right. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 2j/, signed 'X,' entitled Beware d bonie Ann. Written in 1788, 
according to Stenhouse ; but Scott-Douglas, with better authority, places it a year 
later — February, 1789 — when the poet was in Edinburgh. ' I composed this 
song out of compliment to Miss Ann Masterton, the daughter of my friend, 
Allan Masterton, the author of the air of Strathallan^s Lament, and two or 
tliree others in this work ' {Reliques, 1808, 266). The lady of the song 
subsequently married a medical doctor of Bath, and died in 1834. 

The tune Bonie Ann is the composition of Allan Masterton. Internal 
evidence proves it to be a modern melody. 

No. 39. I gaed a waefu' gate yestreen. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, 
No. 2^4, entitled l^he blue-eyed lassie. 'Mr. Burns's words' (Law's AIS. 
List). This charming song was written on the daughter of Andrew Jeffrey, 
the parish minister of Lochmaben. He admired Burns, who stayed in his 
house on several occasions whilst on his Excise excursions. The poet presented 
the song to Jean Jeffrey — then about fifteen years of age — with a copy of 
O, Willie hrew'd a peck 0' maut, shortly after dining in William Nicol's 
cottage at Moffat, which the irascible schoolmaster had rented as a summer 
residence, on account of his daughter's health. Miss Jeffrey was a minor poet; 
her memoirs and a collected edition of her writings were published in 1850. 
She became a Mrs. Ren wick of New York, and died there about 1850. 

Few of Burns's lyrics surpass this one, and it is a pity the poet did not choose 
a more suitable melody out of the Scottish garner, instead of adopting the 
composition of Robert Riddell contained in his New Music, 1787. It is 
by no means the worst of that musical amateur's melodies, but it is spoiled 
by the prodigious compass of more than two octaves, which renders it unsing- 
able. In a letter to Mrs. Dunlop of October 29, 1788, Burns states that the 
song was written for Riddell's composition. 

No. 40. Blythe hae I been on yon hill. Thomson's Scotisk Airs, 1799, 
j8, ' Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, T/ie Quaker's Wtjfe.' The 
second song for Miss Lesley Baillie. Bums thought this one of his finest songs, 
and enthusiastically affirms that the lady was positively the most beautiful 
young woman in the world. He transmitted the verses to Thomson about 
June, 1793. And of the tune The Quaker's Wife, he says: 'Mr. Eraser 
plays it slow, and with an expression that quite charms me. I got such an 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 365 

enthusiast in it that I made a song for it, which I here subjoin, and enclose 
Fraser's set of the tune. If they hit your fancy, they are at your service ; if not, 
return me the tune, and I will put it in Johnson's Museum.' The music in the 
text is from Bremner's Reels, 1759, x?, entitled Merrily dance the Quaker. In 
a letter of October, 1793, Bums stated that 'an old gentleman, a deep anti- 
quarian,' knew The Quaker's Wife as a Gaelic air by the name of Leiger ''m 
choss, and that the words of the West Country fragment of the song were as 
follows : — 

'Leiger 'm choss, my bonie wee lass, 

Leiger 'm choss, my dearie ; 
A' the lee-lang winter night, 

Leiger 'm choss, my dearie.' 

A song of Burns for the tune is in Merry Muses, beginning : — 
* Come rede me dame, come tell me dame, 
My dame come tell me truly,' &c. 

TTo. 41. Yestreen I had a pint o' wine. Stewart's Edition, 1802 ; 
Cromek's Scotish Songs, 1810, i. 61. Tune, Banks of Banna. The Globe 
Tavern, Dumfries, was the head quarters of Burns when he was there on Excise 
business, while the niece of the landlady, Anna Park — ' the lass with the gowdea 
locks' — was drawer and general waitress. A copy of the verses, with some verbal 
alterations, is in the Merry Ahtses. 

Burns considered this his best love-song, although he never intended to publish 
it; and several years after it was written he tried to persuade George Thomson 
to insert a different version in his collection with the tune The Banks of Banna. 
Thomson did not print the new version, which is now unknown. 

The tune — an Irish melody in Corri's Scots Songs, 1783, 14; in Musical 
Miscellany, Perth, 1786, 7/ ; and Calliope, 1788, i — is best known by the song 
'Shepherds, I have lost my love,' in llie Charmer, Edinburgh, 1782, ii. i']6, 
■written by the Right Honourable George Ogle, who represented Dublin in 
1799, and voted against the Union, The scene of his more celebrated song 
Molly Asthore, written in his youth, is also that of The Banks of Banna. 

Wo. 42. Wishfully I look and languish. Scots Musical Miiseum, 
1792, No.j^7, signed 'R,' entitled The bonny wee thing; Thomson's Select 
Melodies, 1825, vi. 22. The MS. is in the British Museum. 'Composed 
on my little idol, the charming lovely Davies' {/? eligues, 1S08, joj). Bums 
met Deborah Davies at the house of her relative Robert Riddell of Glenriddell ; 
a young lady of short stature and much beauty. Two letters to her are in the 
Burns correspondence. 

The tune is a fine type of the pathetic music of Scotland. In a rudimentary 
form it is in StralocK s MS., dated 1627, entitled Wo betyd thy wearie bodie. 
It is in the Caledonian Pocket Companioti, 1758, ix. /. A different melody is 
in Bremner's Reels, 1758, 40, entitled The Bonnie wr thing. 

No. 43. O, how shall I, unskilfu', try. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. 7^9, entitled Lovely Davies. Tune, Miss Muir. The MS. is in the 
British Museum. The song was sent to Miss Davies in the autumn of 1791. 
She was engaged to be married to a Captain Delaney, who went abroad 
on foreign duty, and after a short-lived correspondence his letters to her ceased. 
The rift in the lute seriously affected her health, and Burns delicately refers 
to the subject in his letter in these words : ' So strongly am I interested in 
Miss Davies's fate and welfare in the serious business of life, amid its chances 
and changes, that to make her the subject in a silly ballad is downright 
mockery of these ardent feelings ; 'tis like an impertinent jest to a dying friend.' 
The following sentence is quite Burnsian : ' When I meet with a person after 
my own heart ... I positively can no more resist from rhyming on the impulse 
than an Aeolian harp can refuse its tones to the streaming air.' 



366 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



The tnne of the song, a great favonrite of Burns, is in Oswald's Companion, 
c. 1756, viii. II, entitled Port Athol, or, as in the Museum, Miss Muir. In 
the poet's copy of Oswald's collection he has styled the tune ' exquisite.' 

No. 44. O, saw ye bonie Lesley? Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, j), 
' written for this work by Robert Burns.' Air, The Collier s bonie lassie. 
Written in honour of Miss Lesley Baillie. A copy was sent in a letter to 
Mrs. Dunlop, August 22, 1792. 'Mr. B[aillie] with his two daughters, ac- 
companied by Mr. H of G , passing through Dumfries a few days ago, 

on their way to England, did me the honour of calling on me ; on which 
I took my horse (though God knows I could ill spare the time), and ac- 
companied them fourteen or fifteen miles, and dined and spent the day with 
them. 'Twas about nine when I left them ; and riding home, I composed the 
following ballad. . . . You must know that there is an old ballad begin- 
ning with My bonie Lizzy Baillie, I'll rowe thee in my flaidie, &c., so I 
parodied it as follows, which is literally the first copy.' The old ballad 
referred to is in Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. 3, and in the Scots Musical 
MuseuNi, 1796, No. 4j6 (the first stanza omitted), with the following pretty 
melody, which Burns communicated to the editor : — 






My bo - nie Liz-zy Baill - ie, I'll row ye in my plaid - 




ggi^^^^^^ 



and ye maun gang a - lang wi' me, And be a High-land la - dy. 



On November 8, 1792, Burns sent a copy of his song to George Thomson, 
who without authority altered the last line of the second stanza. 

The tune, 7Vie collier s dochter or The collier s bonie dochter, is very well 
known on both sides of the Border. It is in Leyden^s MS., c. 1690 ; in Playford's 
Original Scotch Tunes, 1700; Sinklers MS., 1710; Stewart's Reels, 1762, 4^; 
and entitled the Nine pint Cogie in M'^Farlane's MS., 1741, and with the 
words by Ramsay in the Orphetis Caledonius, 1725, No. 44. See Notes on 
Nos. 20& and 2^2. 

No. 45. "While larks with little wing. Cnrrie, Works, 1800, \v. 88, 
entitled ' Fhillis the fair. Tune, Robin Adair^ Phillis was the sister of Bonie 
Jean, of Song No. ^9. The verses were written in August, 1793, and sent 
to Thomson with this note ; ' I likewise tried my hand on Robin Adair, and 
you will probably think with little success ; but it is such a damned cramp, 
out-of-the-way measure, that I despair of doing anytliing better to it.' . . . 
Burns, although dissatisfied with Phillis the fair, did not carry out his intention 
of writing a Scots song for Robin Adair. 

The tune Robin Adair or Eire a ruin is a captivating melody entitled 
Aileett a roon in the Caledonian Pocket Companion. 1753, v. 21, and Mi^Lean's 
Scots Tunes, 1772, 28, Professional vocalists usually load it with tawdry 
decorations, and throw rhythm overboard. 

Burns has a note on the nationality of the air in his letter to Thomson 
of August, 1793. 'I have met with a musical Highlander in Breadalbane's 
Fencibles, which are quartered here, wlio assures me that he well remembers 
his mother singing Gaelic songs to both Robin Adair and Grainachree. They 
certainly have more of the Scots than the Irish taste in them. This man came 
from the vicinity of Inverness, so it could not be any intercourse with Ireland 
that could bring them ; except what I shrewdly suspect to be the case — the 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 



367 



wandering minstrels, harpers, or pipers, used to go frequently errant through 
the wilds both of Scotland and Ireland, and so some favourite airs might be 
common to both.' The air is Irish, so far as ascertained, 

ITo. 46. Farewell, thou stream that winding flows. Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1799, 80, ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' Air, TAe last time 
1 came der the moor. This is the English version of a song written for Thomson 
in honour of Mrs. Maria Riddell, and after the quarrel with her he cancelled her 
name and replaced it by ' Eliza ' as in the text. Of the first version which he 
sent to Thomson in April, 1793, he says: 'I had scarcely put my last letter 
into the post-office when I took up the subject of " The last time I came o'er 
the moor>" and e'er I slept, drew the foregoing.' Eighteen months later he 
rewrote it as in the text, but was not enthusiastic on the result, and asked why 
Thomson could not take Ramsay's song in the Tea- Table Miscellany for the 
English specimen. 

The tune mthe Ske7ie MS.,c, i6j^o, is entitled Alas ! yat I came ozvr t/ie ?noor 
and left my love behind me. Although Burns knew not the Skene MS., he 
makes the following note on his song : ' Where old titles of songs convey any 
idea at all, it will generally be found to be quite in the spirit of the air' 
{Reliques, 204). The music is in the Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 6; 
Ramsay's Musick, c. 1 726 ; Watts's Musical Miscellany, 1 729, i. 142; M "Gibbon's 
Scots Tunes, i'j^2, J4; Caledonian Pocket Companion, I745i ii- •"•z ; Bremner's 
Scots Songs, 1757, 9 ; Scots Musical Museum, 1787, iS ; Ritson's Scotish Songs, 
1794, i. 114. In all cases the tune published differs considerably from that in 
the Skene MS., which is here reprinted from the transcription in Dauney's 
Ancient Scottish Melodies, 1838, 2iy. 

No. 47. A slave to love's unbounded sway. Scots Musical Museum, 
1803, 'iso. S74, signed ' B.' 'Written for this work by Robert Burns,' and 
confirmed by Stenhouse. How this song was written has not been ascertained. 
Scott-Douglas surmised that Jessie Lewars, who nursed Burns in his last illness, 
was the subject of it. 

The tune, The Cord'ivainer''s q^: Shoemaker s March, is in Aird's Airs, 17S2, i. 
No. 1^6. It is a good melody in the minor mode, framed on the modern scale 
with sharp sixths and sevenths. The following Russian air, resembling the 
tune in the leading passages, is taken from Graham's Songs of Scotland, 




^^i^^5 




ISTo. 48. Turn again, thou fair Eliza! Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. j68, signed ' B,' entitled Fair Eliza, ' a Gaelic air.' Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1798, 42, with a wrong tune.. In one of the few existing letters to James 
Johnson, the publisher of the Scots Mttsical Museum, the following extract 
'is from that of November 15, 1788: 'Have you never a fair goddess that 
leads you a wild-goose chase of amorous devotion ? Let me know a few of her 
qualities, such as whether she be rather black or fair, plump or thin, short or 
tall, &c., and choose your air, and I shall task my muse to celebrate her.' 
Sonic years later he made a similar application to George Thomson, but that 
gentleman replied that his name was Geordie, and his wife Katherine, both too 
unmusical to be put into verse. The song Fair Eliza was written for 
Johnson, as the original line in the MS. in the British Museum is Turn again, 
thou fair Rabina, a name previously suggested by Johnson. 



368 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



The tune in the Museum is an adaptation of a Perthshire melody which 
Bums heard in his Highland tour. In evidence of Burns's attention to musical 
details for his songs, his instructions to Johnson for the tune of this song may 
be cited from the MS. in the British Museum : ' The song will not sing 
to your tune; but theie is a Perthshire tune in M<=Donald's collection of 
Highland Airs which is much admired in this country ; I intended the verses to 
sing to that air. It is on page 17, and No. 112. There is another air in the 
same colleclion, an Argyleshire air, which with a trifling alteration will 
do charmingly. It is on page 20, and No. /y- The alterations are : in the 
fourth bar of the first and third strains, which are to be the tune, instead of 
the crotchet C, and the quavers G and E, at the beginning of the bar make an 
entire minim in E, I mean E, the lowest line,' &c. &c. Johnson printed the song 
with both the melodies here cited by Burns, and that in our text is the last- 
named in McDonald's Airs, 1784, No. ijj, slightly varied in Johnson's Museum. 

TTo. 49. There was a lass, and she was fair. Cnrrie, Works, 1800, iv. 
79; Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1805, 7/2. Tlie MS. is in Brechin Castle. 
Written for Jean, daughter of John M'^Murdo of Dumfries. Stephen Clarke, 
the professional musical editor of the Museum, was engaged as singing-master 
to the family, and Burns and he often met about this time. A portion of the 
song was sent to Thomson in April, 1 793, with the copy of an unprinted air. 
The complete song was transmitted on July 2, when Burns states that ' Mr. 
Clarke, who wrote down the air from Mrs. Burns's wood-note wild, is very fond 
of it, and has given it celebrity by teaching it to some young ladies of the first 
fashion here. If you do not like the air enough to give it a place in your 
collection, please return me the air ; the song you may keep, as I remember it.' 
Later, he urged Thomson to make a point of publishing the song to its own 
tune, in his next number, informing him that the old name of the air was 
There was a lass, and she %v as fair. 

Thomson rejected the ' beautiful little air' which Burns sent, and printed the 
song to Willie was a tvanton ivag. The traditional air of the song is now 
irrecoverably lost. A well-known tune, Bonny Jean (of Aberdeen), which fits 
these verses of Burns, is in the Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 18, and many 
other publications of the eighteenth century, but it is not the melody which 
Burns meant. 

No. 50. O Philly, happy be that day. Currie, Works, 1800, iv. 201. 
'Tune, The sows tail.' Scotish Airs, 1805, 160. Thomson suggested verses 
for the Jacobite air, The sozas tail to Geordie. Burns replied that he was 
delighted with the tune, and proposed to write verses for it, which he 
completed on November 19, 1794. 

The original Jacobite song is a bitter vulgar satire on the ' wee wee German 
lairdie ' and ' Madame Kilmansegge,' whom George I brought with him from 
Hanover. The Countess of Darlington, nee Kilmansegge, was a very large- 
sized noblewoman, known in England as ' The Elephant.' The Scots, even less 
polite, compared her to a more undignified animal in the song, which now 
occupies the book-shelves of the student of manners. One stanza out of eight 
in Yiogg's Jacobite Relics, 1819, i. gi, may be quoted ; — 
' It 's Geordie, he came up the town, 
Wi' a bunch o' turnips on his crown ; 
" Aha ! " quo she, " I'll pull them down, 
And turn my tail to Geordie." 

Cho7'us : — The sow's tail is till him yet,' &c. &c. 

The tune — very popular in Scotland in the eighteenth century — is a remark- 
ably easy-flowing melody. It has dropped out of use, and ought to be better 
known. The music is in M'^Glashan's Scots Measures, 1781, jg, and Aird's 
Airs, 1783, ii. No. 183. 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 369 

No. 51. Adown -winding Nith I did wander. Currie, Works, 1800, 
iv. p$». The second song on Phillis Macmnrdo, written to gratify the poet's 
friend and musical adviser, Stephen Clarke. In August, 1793, Burns wrote to 
Thomson : ' Another favourite air of mine is The Mtickin 0' Geordies Byre. 
When sung slow with expression, I have wished that it had better poetry : that 
I have endeavoured to supply.' Thomson riding his favourite hobby, suggested 
that the verses should be entirely English, but Burns declined, and replied : 
' I'll rather write a new song altogether than make this English. The sprinkling 
of Scotch in it, while it is but a sprinkling, gives it an air of rustic naivete, 
which time will rather increase than diminish.' Thomson did not print the 
song. The following stanza in the original copy was suppressed by Burns, as 
he thought it weak : — 

' The primrose is o'er for the season. 
But mark where the violet is blown ; 
How modest it peeps from the covert, 
So modesty sure is her own.' 
The melody has been popular for nearly two hundred years. The tune is 
stated to be in Crockatfs MS. 1709; it is in the Orpheus Caledotiius, 1725, 
No. jj, to a song beginning : — 

' My daddie 's a delver of dykes. 

My minnie can card and spin, , 

And I'm a bonnie young lass 

And the siller comes linkin in,' &c. 
The tune is also in the Caledonian Packet Companion, c. 174c;, ii. JLT, and the 
Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. ()6. A fragment is in Herd's Scots Songs, 
1769, jii:~ 

' The mucking of Geordie's byre, 
And shooling the grupe sae clean, 
Has gar'd me weit my cheeks 

And greit with baith my een. 
Chorus. ' It zvas ne'er my father s will. 
Nor yet my mother s desire. 
That eer I should file my fingers 
VVi' mucking of Geordies byre. 

' The mouse is a merry beast. 

And the moudiewart wants the een : 
But the warld shall ne'er get wit 
Sae merry as we hae been.' 

Wo. 52. Here is the glen and here the bower. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
1798, 2"], set to the air The Tlozvers of Edinburgh. The MS. is in 
the Thomson Collection. Sent in a letter to Thomson in June, 1794 : ' I know 
you value a composition, because it is made by one of the great ones, as 
little as I do. However, I got an air, pretty enough, composed by Lady 
Elizabeth Heron of Heron, which she calls the Banks of Cree. Cree is a 
beautiful romantic stream, and as her ladyship is a particular friend of mine, 
I have written the following song to it. The air, I fear, is not worth your 
while ; else I would send it to you.' The air, if it ever saw the light, 
cannot now be identified. The song is supposed to have been written for 
Mrs. Maria Riddell. 

MTo. 53. O, -wert thou in the canld blast. Currie, Works, 1800, 
iv. }8i, entitled Address to a lady. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1818, 2ig. The 
story of this song is on the authority of Chambers. One day Burns, weak and 
pained, called on Jessie Lewars. He offered, if she would play to him her 
favourite tune, to write verses for it. She played Lenox love to Blantyre on 

Bb 



370 HISTORICAL NOTES 

the harpsichord until he was familiar with it by ear. The song, wert thou 
in the cauld blast, a carefully polished work of art, was the result. Instead of 
adhering to the text and melody, Thomson changed the metre and printed the 
song to a different tune. The hand which penned it was soon to lose its cunning. 
On the tomb of Franz Schubert, the most prolific German composer, who died 
at an earlier age than Burns, is inscribed ' Music has here entombed a rich 
treasure, but still fairer hopes.' As a song-writer the same might probably 
be said of Burns, whose life and career resemble in many points those of the 
composer. A generous countryman said of Schubert Ihat, if he had lived, he 
would have put the whole German language into music. Of Burns it may be 
said that, if he had lived, he would have put the whole of Scottish music into 
verse. 

The first theme of Lenox love to Elantyre ends in the minor and the second 
on the major mode, like many other Scottish tunes. It has an extended compass 
— a serious drawback to popularity. The peculiar title was obtained from an 
estate acquired by Lord Blantyre. Frances Theresa Stewart, daughter of 
Walter Stewart, son of the second Lord Blantyre, born about, 1647, ^^^ ^^ 
original of the emblem of Britannia on the coinage. She married Charles 
Stuart, fourth Duke of Richmond and Lenox, and died in 1702, leaving con- 
siderable property to her nephew Alexander, fifth Lord Blantyre, requesting that 
an estate should be purchased in East Lothian, to be named Lenox lave to 
Blantyre. The tune with this title is in Sinkler's MS. 1710. It is also in 
Bremner's ^e^/j', 17.^7)^7: Stewart's ^(?e/i-, 1761, 9 ; Campbell's Reels, 1778,7^; 
and in the Scots Musical Museum, 1 796, No. 48^, to the old song The wren 
shoe lyes in care's bed. 

b. Ellison Begbie. 

Wo. 54. Ilk care and fear, when thou art near. The last two stanzas 
and tiie chorus with the tune Braes o' Balquhidder are in the Scots Musical 
Museum, 1788, No. ig}. The complete song is in Cromek's Reliques, 1808, 
441. The MS., wanting the first stanza, is in the British Museum with 
a note by Burns directing that the chorus is to the first or lowest part of the 
tune. Burns has stated that Bonie Peggie Alison or Ellison Begbie, was 
a juvenile production ; but he never directly revealed the episode which 
occasioned this and the two following songs of his early years. The Bi-aes d 
Balquhidder, one of his favourite reels, is said to be in Walsh's Caledonian 
Country Dances for 1742. It is in Bremner's Reels, 1758, yj ; Aird's Airs, 
1782, ii. No. 181, and elsewhere. It is a model specimen of the dance-music 
of Scotland of the early part of the eighteenth century. The modern air I^m 
ower young to marry yet (not the same as the old tune of that name) is a variation 
of the Braes d Balquhidder. 

Wo. 55. On Cessnock banks a lassie dwells. Twelve stanzas marked 
Tune, If he be a butcher neat and trim, first imperfectly printed in Cromek's 
Reliques, 1808, 442, and complete from the MS., in the Aldine edition, 
1839. The verses are founded on a love passage in the poet's youth. The 
first four letters to an unknown correspondent, E., dated 1780 and 1781, and 
printed in Currie, Works, 1800, ii, i, with a fifth printed by Scott-Douglas in 
1878, were addressed to Ellison or Alison Begbie, the daughter of a farmer in 
the parish of Galston. At the time Burns knew her, she lived near Cessnock 
Water, about two miles from Lochlea. She was in the same rank of life as the 
poet, who began the correspondence partly as practice in the art of letter- 
writing. Burns's sister described Ellison Begbie as much above the small 
ordinary farmer's daughter, naturally gifted both in mind and person, 
accomplished in manners, and with a fair stock of personal attractions. 
Cromek took down his verses from the recitation of a lady in Glasgow, whom 
he said Burns affectionately admired. Probably she was the object of them. 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 371 

The Tune, The butcher hoy, is taken from the Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. J04. I have not seen it in any earlier publication. 

Wo. 56. O Mary, at thy window be. This exquisite lyric, which Burns 
of many moods rather disparaged in his later years, written in honour of 
Ellison Begbie, was originally published by Currie {JVorks, 1800, iv. 41), 
marked for the Tune, Bide ye yet ; but in the copy sent to Thomson, March 20, 
1793, the song is directed for the music oi Duncan Davison. In the letter is 
the following statement : ' The song is one of my juvenile works. I leave it 
among your hands. I do not think it very remarkable, either for its merits or 
demerits. It is impossible to be always original, entertaining and witty.' It 
was published with the tune The Glasgoiv lasses, in Scotish Airs 1818, v. 2t<), 
and it is invariably printed in modern collections with The Miller, another 
unauthorized air. For the tune Duncan Davison or Yell ay be welcome back 
again, see Note 1 76. 

e. Highland Mary (Mary Campbell). 

Wo. 57. 'Will ye go to the Indies, my Mary? Currie, IVorks, 1800, 
iv. 12. This is the first song of the Highland Mary series, written when Burns 
proposed to emigrate. It lay unseen for nearly four and a half years, after 
which time he sent it to George Thomson. His letter of October, 1792, 
enclosing the song, contains one of his few references to Mary Campbell. ' In 
my very early years,' he writes, 'when I was thinking of going to the West 
Indies, I took the following farewell (i.e. the song") of a dear girl. It is quite 
trifling, and has nothing of the merits of Ewe-btights ; but it will fill up this 
page. You must know that all my earlier love-songs were the breathings of ardent 
passion, and though it might have been easy in after times to have given them 
a polish, yet that polish, to me whose they were, and who perhaps alone cared 
for them, would have defaced the legend of the heart, which was so faithfully 
inscribed on them. Their uncouth simplicity was, as they say of wines, their 
race.' Thomson had a poor opinion of the song, and missed the opportunity of 
the original publication by sending it to Currie. He printed it more than 
a quarter of a century later in his Select Melodies, 1S22, i. 8. 

The fine old verses for air Ewe-bughts Mario7i were published in Ramsay's 
Tea-Table Miscellany, 1724, and copied into Percy's Reliques, 1765. Percy 
misled the public by making it believe that all the pieces of poetry in his collec- 
tion were in the MS. he described. Ewe-bughts Marion is not there, nor 
found anywhere else in the peculiar orthography of his Reliques. It is one of 
the remarkable pastorals for which Scotland is famous. The tune has been 
very much altered since its original publication in the Orpheus Calcdonius, 
1733, No. //. It is in the modern style in Stewart's Scots Sojtgs, 1781, ji ; 
in the Musical Miscellany, Perth, 1786, j^; in Aird's Airs, 1788, iii. No. 476; 
and in the Museum, 1787, No. 5j. In the Interleaved Museum, Burns says, 
' I am not sure if this old and charming air be of the South, as is commonly 
said, or the North of Scotland. There is a song, apparently as ancient as 
Ewe-bughts Marion, which sings to the same tune, and is evidently of the 
North.' It begins thus : — 

'The Lord of Gordon had three dochters, 
Mary, Margret, and Jean ; 
They wad na stay at bonie Castle-Gordon 
But awa to Aberdeen.' {Reliques, 1808, 22(}.) 

The complete ballad, which Ritson obtained from a stall copy, was originally 
published in his Scotish Songs, 1794, ii. /<5(?, and partly reprinted in Johnson's 
Museum, 1796, No. 41^. If the fourth Earl of Huntley is referred to, then 
Burns's denomination, the ' Lord of Gordon,' is correct, and that in Ritson's 
and subsequent copies, the ' Duke of Gordon,' is wrong, for the Dukedom of 
Gordon was not created until 1684. George Gordon succeeded his grandfather 

B b 2 



372 HISTORICAL NOTES 

Alexander, the third Earl of Huntley, in 1523, and had three daughters as in 
the ballad. Jean married the Earl of Bothwell, who divorced her in 1568 to 
marry Mary, Queen of Scots. Her second husband was the Earl of Sutherland, 
who died in 1594, and surviving him (she must have had a tough constitution) 
she married Captain Alexander Ogilvie of Boyne, who died in 1606. As Jean 
is described in the ballad as 'bonny Jeanie Gordon,' evidently young, and 
having three children in three years by Captain Ogilvie, history and the ballad 
do not fit one another very well. 

No. 58. Flow gently, sweet Afton, among thy green braes. Scots 
Musical Museum, 1792, No. j5(5, signed ' B,' entitled Afton Water. A MS. 
is in the British Museum, entitled Sweet Afton. The origin of this well-known, 
beautiful lyric is disputed. Currie relates that it was written on Afton Water, 
and in compliment to Mrs. Stewart ; Gilbert Hums states that Mary Campbell 
was the heroine ; Scott-Douglas agrees with this, but in the Ceittenary Burns 
it is asserted that it has no connexion with Highland Mary, but was written as 
a compliment to the river Afton which flows into the Nith near New Cumnock ; 
and that the verses were sent to Mrs. Dunlop on February 5 , 1 789. This is 
doubtless correct ; but it may be, and very likely is, a reminiscence of Mary 
Campbell. In 1791 Burns sent a copy to Mrs. Stewart of Stair. Stenhouse 
states that Burns communicated the melody to the Museum. 

jNTo. 59. Tfae gentle dames, tho' ne'er sae fair. Scots Musical Museum, 
1788, No. ii"], signed ' X,' entitled The Highland Lassie 0\ Scotish Ahs., 1798, 
J7, with a wrong tune. The MS. is in the British Museum. ' This was 
a composition of mine in very early life, before I was known at all in the 
world. My Highland Lassie was a warm-hearted, charming young creature 
as ever blessed a man with generous love. After a pretty long tract of the most 
ardent reciprocal attachment, we met by appointment, on the second Sunday 
of May, in a sequestered spot by the Banks of Ayr, where we spent the day 
taking a farewell, before she should embark for the West Highlands, to arrange 
matteis among her friends for our projected change of life. At the close of 
Autumn following she crossed the sea to meet me at Greenock, where she had 
scarce landed when she was seized with a malignant fever, which hurried my 
dear girl to the grave in a few days, before I could even hear of her illness ' 
{Reliques, 1808, .2/7). This note has an important bearing on the Highland 
Maiy episode, and it is necessary to warn the reader that the leaf from which 
Cromek is supposed to have copied it is now wanting in the Interleaved 
Museii7n. The questions arise. Was the note ever there? and, if so, why was 
it cut out, who abstracted it, and where is it now? For the Marion controversy 
see the Edinburgh edition, 1S77, iv. 120-ijo. 

The tune, APLauchlin^s Scots Measti7-e., is in Original Scotch Tuties, 1700, 
and is unsuitable for Burns's gay song from its extended compass, which no 
ordinary voice can reach, and its skipping intervals. Another copy of the music 
is in the Caledoniati Pochet Companioft, 1754, vi. 28, entitled The Inverness 
Scots Aleasure, and in Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. 9/. 

UTo. 60. Thou ling'ring star with less'ning ray. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. .279, entitled My Maty, dear departed shade. Tune, Captain Cook's 
death, &c. This lyric is believed to have been written in October, 1789, the 
third anniversary of the death of Mary Campbell. There is no comment on 
the song by the poet in his notes. Many curious conjectures have been made 
as to the circumstances of the Highland Mary attachment, and Cromek was 
the first to connect this song with her. He relates how that on a night in 
October, Burns lay in the barn-yard on the lee-side of a corn-stack to protect 
himself from the keen frosty wind, and remained there until the dawn wiped 
out the stars, &c., &c. Lockhart, Life, chap, vii, on the authority of Mrs. Burns, 
gives a more circumstantial account of the oiigin of the song, quite as sensa- 
tional as the other. That Burns was the victim of great emotion and hypochondria 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 373 

at this period may be learned from his correspondence. In a letter of 
December 13, 1789, full of melanchol}', he laments the death of a dear young 
friend, and speaking of heaven, he says, ' There should I, with speechless agony 
of rapture, again recognize my ever dear Mary, whose bosom was fraught with 
truth, honor, constancy, and love.' 

The tune is the sentimental composition of Miss Lucy Johnson, who became 
Mrs. Oswald of Auchencruive. That old beau, Kirkpatrick Sharpe, describes 
her as ' giving double charm to a minuet and dignifying a country dance.' No 
attempt will be made here to disturb the opinion that the tune is very beautiful, 
7?iais chacim ct son goilt. 

ITo. 61. Ye banks and. braes and. streams around. Scotish Airs, '799) 
8j, ' Written for this Work by Robert Burns.' ' Tune, Katherine Ogie.' This 
song on Mary Campbell is described to Thomson, November 14, 1793 : 'It 
pleases myself; I think it is in my happiest manner; you will see at first glance 
tliat it suits the air. The subject of the song is one of the most interesting 
passages of my youthful days, and I own that I would be much flattered to see 
the verses set to an air which would ensure celebrity. Perhaps, after all, 'tis 
the still glowing prejudice of my heart that throws a borrowed lustre over tlie 
merits of the composition.' He requested Thomson to print the song in his 
first volume, but his wish was not gratified. 

The tune Katherine Ogle was a favourite of Burns. Thomson suggested 
that the old song should be dressed, but Burns declined any connexion with 
such poor stuff. The song in the Tea-Table Miscellany , 1724. is an amended 
version of ' As I v^'ent forth to view the plain,' taken from Wit and Mirth, 
or Pills to purge melancholy. The nationality of both words and music are 
disputed. The tune is in Playford's Dancing Master, 1688, with the title, 
Lady Catherine Ogle, a new dance. In Apollo's Banquet, 1686, it is printed 
twice ; the first time with the same title as in the Dancing Master, and in the 
second part of the collection as A Scotch Tune. Tom Durfey wrote verses 
for it entitled A N'ew Scotch Song, beginning Walldng down the Highland 
town, and printed in his Pills, 1719, ii. 200, and elsewhere as Bonny Katherine 
Loggy : a Scotch song. The verses are a poor imitation of the Scots' vernacular. 
The music is also in Brute's MS., 1706, and Graham's MS., 1694, both quoted 
by the late J. Muir Wood ; Craig's Scots Tunes, 1 730, 20 ; Orpheus Caledonius, 
1725, No. .22 ; Watts's Musical Miscellany, 1729, ii. 166; M'^Gibbon's Scots 
lunes, 1742,20; Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. 2, and elsewhere. 
The title of the air, as in ihe Dancing Master, was obviously in honour of 
Lady Catherine Ogle, youngest daughter, and one of the co-heirs of the Duke 
of Newcastle and Baron Ogle. She died in 1691. 

d. Jean Armour (Mrs. Burns). 

No. 62. Tho' cruel fate should bid us part. Scots Musical Museum, 
1788, No. J25, signed ' R.' The MS. is in the British Museum, with no 
direction for the tune. There is, however, another MS. of the verses marked 
for the air She rose and loot trie in, which Johnson could not adopt, as it had 
already been appropriated in the first volume of the Museum. So he set the 
verses of Burns to The Noi-thern Lass. 

Both the words and air of the original song She rose and let me in are 
disputed. According to Chappell, the complete song is in a New Collection 
of Songs, London, 1683, the words by Thomas Durfey and ' set by Mr. Thomas 
Farmer.' It is also in Durfey's Pills, 1719, i. ^2./. The earliest copy of the 
music in a Scottish collection is in Sinklers MS., 'i'j^o, and the words in 
Ramsay's Miscellany, 1725. Both are in the Orpiietis Caledonius, 1733, No. j./, 
and the music is much improved. It is repeated in the Caledonian Pocket 
Companion, 1743, i. 21. There is no copy of either the words or the music 



374 HISTORICAL NOTES 

known in Scotland before the early part of the eighteenth century, and the 
claim for the verses being the work of Sir Francis Beltrees, a Renfrewshire 
knight, falls to the ground. The tune is a good melody of the scholastic kind, 
without any traits of the untutored music of Scotland. It is here taken from 
the Orpheus Caledoiihis. 

Wo. 63. Altho' my back be at the wa'. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 4&0, signed ' Z,' entitled Here 's his health in water, with the music of 
The job of Jotirney work. In writing about the Jacobite song of Lewie Gordon, 
Burns refers to the pathos of the line, ' Tho' his back be at the wa'.' See Hogg's 
Jacobite Relics, 1821, 776. It would be difficult to prove that Burns's verses 
refer to Jean Armour, but they must remain here as the best place for them. 

The music in the text is from Burns'' s MS. in the British Museum, from which 
Johnson got his tune which was first printed in Aird's Airs, 1788, iii. No. ./o/. 
The second movement of an Irish melody The little red fox, which may be 
seen in Stanford's /rzj-/; Melodies, 1894,^6, has a remarkable likeness to the 
swing of The job of joui-ney work, and lurther light is wanted on the origin 
of the melody for which Burns wrote his song. 

No. 64. "When first I came to Stewart Kyle. Comtnonplace Book, 1872, 
4-], entitled 'A fragment. Tune, I had a horse and I had nae mair' Printed 
in Cromek's Reliques, 1808, J46. Burns's mother stated that he first met 
Jean Armour at a peasants' ball, or some similar entertainment. The poet 
was attended by his collie dog, which followed him about the room, and got 
in the way of the dancers ; whereupon he remarked to his partner that he 
wished he could find a lass who would like him as well as his dog. A few 
weeks afterwards the acquaintance was renewed, which ripened into marriage. 

1 cannot trace the music of / had a horse further back than the copy in 
Johnson's Museum, 1788, No. i8j, printed with the old song, which Burns said 
was founded on an incident in the life of a John Hunter, whose great-grand- 
child related the story to Burns. The verses, published in Herd's Scots So7igs, 
ij6(),j2j, begin : — 

' I had a horse, and I had nae mair, 
I gat him frae my daddy ; 
My purse was light, and my heart was sair. 

But my wit it was fu' ready. 
And sae I thocht upon a wile, 

Outwittens of my daddy. 
To fee m)sell to a lowland laird. 
Who had a bonny lady,' &c. 

"No. 65. In Mauchline there dwells. Glenriddell MS. Published in 
Currie, Works, 1800, iii. j5o, entitled The Mauchline belles. Tune, Bon7iie 
Dundee. The first of these 'belles' was Helen Miller, who married 
a Dr. Mackenzie. The second, Miss Markland, married Burns's friend and 
future colleague in the Excise, James Findlay. Jean Smith married James 
Candlish, another friend of Burns, and was the mother of Dr. Candlish who 
succeeded Dr. Chalmers as leader of the Free Kirk of Scotland. Betty Miller, 
sister of Helen above referred to, became a Mrs. Templeton. Miss Morton 
married a merchant in Mauchline ; while the last was Jean Armour, who became 
the poet's wife. For the tune, see No. 112. 

!N"o. 66. O thou pale Orb that silent shines. Kilmarnock edition, 1786, 
jjo. The verses in the text are three stanzas of The Lament, which Burns, 
in Grays MS. Lists, directed as follows : ' For the tune in the Scotch Qtieen, 
Oswald, take the first and the last two stanzas of the poem entitled The 
I^ament in Burns's poems.' These directions Burns sent to Johnson of the 
Museum, but they were not followed, and the verses are now printed for 
the first time with the proper melody. For the tune in the Scots Musical 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 375 

Museum a song of Mrs. M^Lehose was inserted, for which Burns wrote a stanza 
to complete the verses. See Song No. 7<5. 

The tune Scots Queen is in Oswald's Companion, c. 1759, xii, /, and the 
Scots Mtisical Museum, 1788, No. /90. 

The primary cause of Burns's arrangements for emigrating in 1 786 arose out 
of the amour with Jean Armour, to which the beautiful poem The Lament 
refers. The state of mind of the poet, at this time bordering on madness, is 
described in his Autobiogi'aphy . 

!N"o. 67. Again rejoicing Nature sees. Edinburgh edition, 1787. ^2j. 
Tune, Jockey s gray brceks, with a footnote on the chorus : ' 'J'his chorus is part 
of a song composed by a gentleman in Edinburgh, a particular friend of the 
author's.' According to Scott-Douglas, the chorus was written by the poet 
himself, and to conceal the reference to Jean Armour he changed the name 
to ' Menie.' At this time, the beginning of 1787, he was in Edinburgh 
correcting the proofs of the first EdinburgJi edition. 

The tune, a variation of The weaver and /lis shuttle, a title not in any 
Scottish collection, is taken from the Caledonian Toc/cet Companion, c. 1745, 
ii. j2. The music is also in Oswald's Curious Scots Tunes, 1742, ii. 6, Aird's 
j4irs, 1782, i. No. /9, and in tlie Perth Musical Miscellany , 1786. 2/6. The 
old song for the tune has never been printed, and it is doubtful whether more 
exists than the following fragment in Herd's MS. : — 

' I'll hae Johnny's gray breeks 

For a' the ill he's done me yet 
And I'll hae Johnny's gray breeks 

For a' the ill he 's done me yet. 
He's done me ill and against my will, 

And a' the country kens o' that ! 
Yet I'll hae Johnny's gray breeks 

For a' the ill he 's done me yet.' 

No. 68. The' •women's minds like winter winds. Scots Musical 
Musetim, 1790, No. 2^0, signed 'X,' and with the Vvccve. For a' that. 'This 
song is mine, all except the choxus'' {Keliques, 282). In a footnote Cromek 
states that it is part of the bard's song in 77ie Jolly Beggars. Doubtless ; but 
it would be more proper to say that the song was rewritten for publication 
in the Museum, and for one of the favourite melodies of Burns. In the 
Law MS. it is marked ' Mr. B.'s old words.' The third stanza was originally 
printed in the Pickering edition of Burns. For the tune, see Nos. 27/ and jop. 

Wo. 69. Of a' the airts the wind can blaw. Scots Musical Musetim, 
1790, No. 2];, signed ' R,' entitled / love tny Jean, Tune, Aliss Admiral 
Gordoti's Strathspey. ' Mr. Burns sent the words' (Law's MS. List). The MS. 
is in the British Museum. This and the following five songs are the honey- 
moon series, written in the last seven or eight months of 1788, and referring 
to his wife or his matrimonial life. 0/ a' the airts is justly one of the best- 
known and most popular songs of Scotland. ' The air is by Marshall ; the song 
I composed out of compliment to Mrs. Burns. N.B. It was during the honey- 
moon ' (^Reliques, 1808,27^). It was written at Ellisland in June; his wife 
was then staying at Mossgiel with his mother and sisters. The song is very 
rarely printed correctly, and in many copies are added two spurious double 
stanzas, the work of John Hamilton, a music publisher. Allan Cunningham 
was responsible for leading the public astray, by asserting that they were in 
Burns's MS. In Thomson's Select Melodies, 1823, v. No. 10, a new set of 
sixteen lines are marked, ' Added by Mr. Richardson for this work.' 

The tune is the composition of William Marshall, butler to the Duke 
of Gordon. Stenhouse assumed that Marshall borrowed part of the air from 
The lowlands of Holland, but Mr. John Glen of Edinburgh has proved the 



376 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



opposite. The latter tune was not printed before 1790, while Miss Admiral 
Gordofis Strathspey was published in Marshall's Collection of Reels, 1781, 
It is in M'^Glashan's Keels, 1786, 4. The rudiments of this fine melody can 
be seen in the Skene MS., c. 1630, under the title A lace ! I lie my alon I'm 
lik to die auld. (Dauney's Ancient Scottish Melodies, p. 227.) 

No. 70. O, how can I be blythe and glad ? In Scots Musical Mnseiim, 
1792, No. J77, signed 'X,' entitled The bonie lad that'' s far awd , without 
the second stanza. Complete in CromnlCs Reliqttes, 1808, .5(^.2. This song is 
supposed to be sung by Jean Armour, lamenting the absence of her husband. 
Burns has left no memorandum of the song, but the MS. is in the British 
Museum, minus the second stanza. Burns got the idea from verses in Herd's 
Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. i, which in its turn was an abridgement of a black- 
letter ballad of fifteen stanzas, c. 1690, entitled The i}tco7tstant shepherd, or the 
Forsaken Lass's Lamentation. Londoti: Printed for C. Bates at the Sun and 
Bible, Pye Corner. To an excellent new Tnne. Herd, with slight variation, 
copied the first, fourth and eighth stanzas into his collection. The ballad is 
exceptionally good for a street publication, the following being the first stanza : — ' 
' O, how can I be merry or glad, 
Or in my mind contented be ; 
"When the bonny, bonny lad whom I love best 

Is banish'd out of my company ? 
Tho' he is banish'd for my sake, 

And his true love I still remain. 
He has caused me many a night for to wake 
And adieu to my true love once again ! ' 
I cannot identify the ' excellent new tune ' of this ballad, but it may have 
been O'er the hills and far aivay (see Song No. -2/7). Songs vk'ith this refrain 
were common in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The tune in the 
text from the Museum was originally published there, and was probably 
communicated by Burns. 

Wo. 71. I liae a wife o' my ain. Scots Musical Museimi, 1792, No. jt/^, 
signed ' B.' The MS. is in the British Museum. The style and humour of 
this iiTesistible song is delightful, and the nationality unmistakable. The 
energetic verses were framed on an old model : — 

' I hae a wife o' my awn, 
I'll be haddin to naebody ; 
I hae a pat and a pan, 
I'll borrow frae naebody.' 
Burns owed nothing to this or any other previous verses. 

The tune confirms the evidence of the existence of songs now lost. The title 
/ hae a tuife 0' my ain, clearly the first line of a song, is in Walsh's Caledonian 
Country Dances ; in Bremner's /s'(?£/j', 1759, .^y; in Stewart's Keels, i'j6i,j2; 
and in Campbell's Peels, 1778, yj. Schumann composed an original lilt on 
Scottish lines, entitled Niemand, for a translation of Burns's song. 

No. 72. It is na, Jean, thy bonie face. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. jjj. The MS. is in the British Museum, without direction for music. This 
eulogy on his wife was written near the close of the year 1788. ' These were 
originally English verses : I gave them their Scots' dress' {Interleaved Museum). 
There is more philosophy than passion in them. Burns may have got the idea 
from a popular song of last century, by George Etheridge, beginning It is not 
Celia, in our power, otherwise nothing of another similar song has been 
discovered. 

The tune, The maid's complaint, is by James Oswald, printed in Curious 
Collection Scots Tunes, 1740, 14, and in the Caledonian Pocket Cofnpanion, 
1752, iv. JO. 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 377 

No. 73. Louis, what reck I by thee? Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 414, signed ' R,' entitled Louis, what reck I by thee ? The MS. is not 
known. Scott-Douglas assumes that the verses were written in December, 1788, 
after the poet's wife and family joined him at Ellisland. The hand of Burns 
is apparent in the vigorous language of the verses. The signature in the 
Museum confirms the authorship. 

Stenhouse, without quoting authority, states that Burns communicated the 
tune to the editor of the Museum. I have not discovered it in any earlier 
Scottish collection of music. The first two lines in the relative major key are 
the opening bars of The British Grenadiei-s. 

No. 74. O, were I on Parnassus' hill. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, 
No. 2j/, signed ' R.' Tune, My love is lost to me. ' Mr. B.'s words ' (Law's 
MS. List). Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, No. zg. Nearly all Burns's 
letters of the latter part of the year 1788 contain some reference to his married 
life. To Peggy Chalmers, dated September 16, he relates that his wife never 
spent five minutes on any book, except the Old and New Testaments, the 
Psalms of David, and his own poems, which she has perused very devoutly, 
and all the ballads in the county, ' as she has the finest woodnote wild I ever 
heard.' A surfeit of probable models of the song are in the Centenary Burns. 
'This air is Oswald's : the song I made out of compliment to Mrs. Burns' 
(yhiterleaved Museum). The tune My love is lost to me, or Jean, I love thee, 
is in the Caledonian Pocket Cornpanion, 1753, v. 2/, and in Calliope, 1788, 
i']6. The extended compass of the air has interfered wilh its popularity. 

No. 75. Out over the Forth, I look to the north. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1796, No. 421. The MS. is in the British Museum, with the title 
I look to the no7'th. In a letter to Cunningham, Burns quotes four lines of the 
song, and asks his correspondent how he liked ihem as a sample he had 
' on the tapis.' He wrote on the copy for the Musetmt, ' The enclosed tune 
is a part of Gow's Charles Graham'' s welcome hame, but I do not think the 
close of the second part of the tune happy. Mr. Clarke, on looking over Gow's 
air, will conceive a better ; ' which Clarke did. The tune is in Gow's Second 
Collection, 1788, 20. 

e. ' Clarinda' (Mrs. M'^Lehose). 

No. 76. For thee is laughing Nature gay. Museum, 1788, No. 790, 
entitled ' To a blackbird. By a lady,' and signed • M.' Tune, Scots Queen. The 
MS. is in the British Museum. Burns wrote only the four lines beginning, 
' For thee is laughing Nature gay ' ; the rest are by Mrs. M^Lehose. For 
the tune, see No. 66. 

No. 77. Your friendship much can make me blest. Second stanza 
of a song in Scots Musical Aluseuni, 1788, No. 186, entitled ' Talk not of love, 
it gives me pain. By a lady.' Tune, Banks of Spey. Signed 'M.' The MS. 
is in the British Museum. About the beginning of December, 1787, Burns 
met Mrs. M^^Lehose for the first time. She was parted from her husband, 
a Glasgow solicitor, who had gone to the West Indies. Handsome and good- 
looking, sentimental and religious, and about the same age as Burns, she 
wished to become better acquainted with the poet, and invited him to take tea 
at her house. He was prevented from keeping the engagement by an accident 
which confined him to his lodgings for two months. A formal correspondence 
began in the orthodox fashion, but it progressed so rapidly that in a fortnight 
she signed herself Clarinda and he followed suit with Sylvander. Sometimes 
two or three letters a day were interchanged, and the whole episode lasted 
three and a half months. The writing for the most part is stilted sentiment, 
and although there is the appearance of much enthusiasm and passion, there 
is an absence of reality about the whole affair. But Burns showed that he 



^78 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



could compete with Abelard or Sterne in that style of epistolography. On 
the lady's part it was a more serious affair, and during all her long life she 
cherished the memory of Burns. 

Mrs. M'^I.ehose wrote verses, and Burns assisted her with his criticism. 
The eight lines in the text were added to twelve written by her, four of which 
were omitted in the Aluseutn. 

The tune, rather commonplace, was taken from M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 
1755, 2j ; it is also in Caledonian Pocket Companion, xi. 10. A different 
Banks of Spey is in M^Glashan's Keels, 1786, j. 

No. 78. Thine am I, my faithful fair. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, jp. 
' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' The MS. is in Brechin Castle. 
There is no record of this song before 1793, but it probably is one of the 
Clarinda series. On sending it to Thomson the only remark Burns makes 
is : ' The verses I hope will please you as an English song to the air ' (i. e. The 
Quaker's wife). In 1795, two lines were altered to fit Jean Lorimer. He 
was at that time under the ' Chloris ' enchantment, and he threatened to 
anathematize Thomson if he did not make the pioposed alterations. The 
song was published as desired, but to the melody Up in the morning early, 
without authority. 

For the tune, The Quaker's wife, or Merrily dance the Quaker, see Song No. 40, 

1^0.79. Behold the hour, the boat arrive! Currie, Works, 1800, iv. ///. 
'Tune, Oran gaoir ; T\\on\?,ons Scotish Airs, i^oc^, i;4. A song altered in 
December, 1791, to connect it with Mrs. M'^Lehose, who was about to leave 
for the West Indies. The original begins : — 

' Behold, the fatal hour arrive, 
Nice, my Nice, ah, farewell.' 

The time Oran Gaoil is referred to in a letter to George Thomson of August, 
1 793. ' They have lately in Ireland, with great pomp, published an Irish air 
as they say, called Caun du delish. The fact is, in a publication of Corri's 
a great while ago, you find the same air called a Highland one, with a Gaelic 
song set to it. Its name there, I think, is Oran Gaoil, and a fine air it is.' 
More than a year afterwards he returns to the subject. ' The other one in your 
collection Oran gaoil, which you think is Irish, they claim as theirs by the 
name of Cautt die delish, but look into your publications of Scottish Songs, and 
you will find it as a Gaelic Song, with the words in that language, a wretched 
translation of which original words is set to the tune in the Museum. Your 
worthy Gaelic priest gave me that translation, and at his table I heard both 
the original and the translation sung by a large party of Highland gentlemen, 
all of whom had no other idea of the tune than that it was a native of their own 
country.' The authorities referred to by Burns are Corri's Scots Songs, 1783, 
ii. 29, and the Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 27J. The old Jew, in the 
Caledonian Pocket Compafiion, c. 1753, v. ig, has only a remote resemblance 
to this admirable Celtic melody. 

No. 80. Clarinda, mistress of my soul. Scots Musical Museum, 17S8, 
No. i()8, entitled Clarinda. Signed ' B.' W'ritten early in 1788, during the 
Clarinda craze. Thomson inserted them in his Select Melodies, 1822, iii. /J, 
altering some of the lines without authority. He set them to an original 
melody of little merit by Stephen Clarke, the friend of Burns. 

The tune in the Museum, is the composition of Schetki, according to Bums in 
the Interleaved Museum, where he acknowledges the verses. The music, in the 
style of a psalm-tune, does not resemble the secular music of the country. 

Wo. 81. Wow in her green mantle blythe Nature arrays. Thomson's 
Scotish Airs, 1 799, gg. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' On December 
9, 1794, Burns wrote to Thomson that he had just framed this song. A short 
time before he had styled Clarinda a ci-devant goddess of his. His last letter 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 379 

to Mrs. M^Lehose is dated June 2?, 1794. Scott-Doiiglas makes a curious sug- 
gestion that this song is her composition, which Burns abstracted. 

The tune for this celebrated lyric, Therll never be peace till Jatnie comes 
hame, is a Jacobite melody. Thomson disregarded Burns's direction, and set the 
song to the Irish tune Coolin. In vocal collections the song is printed with 
a modern tune. It is now for the first time associated with the music for which 
it was written, otherwise known as There are few good fellows when Jamie's 
awa\ See tune No. J0.2. 

No. 82. O May, thy morn was ne'er sae sweet. Scots Musical Museum, 
1796, No. 464, signed ' B.' The MS. is in the British Museum. The verses are 
supposed to commemorate the last interview with ' Clarinda.' Burns entitled 
the tune The Rashes, which is in Oswald's Companion^ I75.^» v, 26. The 
editor of the Museum considerably altered the tune. The music in the text is 
taken from the copy Burns directed. It is now best known as The wee wee 
German Lairdie, from a song which originally appeared in Cromek's A'ithsdale 
and Galloway Song, 18 10, written probably by Allan Cunningham, although 
vouched as old by the Ettrick Shepherd. Tibbie Shiel, of St. Mary's Loch, the 
celebrated hostess of Sir Walter Scott, sung it to The dowie dens of Yarrow. 
It is set to that well-known ballad in Kidson's Tiaditional Ttines, 1891, 27 ; it 
also did modern service in Yorkshire to a Roxburgh ballad, A latnentable new 
ditty , . . to a delicate Scottish tune. In the Caledonian Pocket Compattioti, xi. 
2f , the tune is repeated under the title When the King comes o'er the water. 

Wo. 83. Ance mair I hail thee. Scots Musical Musetmi, 1796, No. 4g<), 
signed ' R.' The MS. is in the British Museum. An unfinished copy of the 
verses was sent to ' Clarinda' about the end of December, 1791. Steuhouse has 
asserted that Burns wrote the song for the tune Wandering Willie, but that is 
incorrect. On the MS. of the song, Burns wrote as follows : ' Tune, ThrS 
the lang tmiir I followed him haine. See this tune, Oswald's Book [vii.] jo.' 
It is also in Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. ^4. 

Wo. 84. Ae fond kiss, and then we sever ! Scots Musical Museum, 
1792, No. J4J, signed 'X,' entitled jRory DalPs port. This impassioned lyric 
also belongs to the second cycle of the ' Clarinda' series. The lady had arranged 
to rejoin her husband in the West Indies, and the verses refer to her departure 
in December, 1791. Burns sent her copies of a few songs at the same time, 
saying ' I have just been composing to different tunes, lor the Collection of 
Songs [Johnson's Mtiseuni], of which you have three volumes, and of which 
you shall have the fourth.' 

The 2L\r Rory DaWs port is in the Caledonian Pocket Compatiion, c. 1756. 
viii. 24. In StralocJi's MS. 1629, there is a different melody of the same name. 
Rory Dall was the cognomen of a succession of harpers attached to the family 
of Macleod of Skye. Port is the generic name for the national Celtic airs of the 
Highlands of Scotland. A large number of ports are believed to be still floating 
in the Western Highlands, unrecorded. 

Wo. 85. Sensibility how charming. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
N0.J29. Select Melodies, 1822, iii. y6. The MS. is in the British Museum. 
After Bums relinquished Ellisland and before removing to Dumfries, he made 
an excursion to Edinburgh, on which occasion he paid a visit to Clarinda. 
The correspondence between them, which abruptly terminated in 1788 in con- 
sequence of his marriage, was resumed in 1791, and this watery song was 
written in return for some verses she sent to him. Copies were forwarded to 
Mrs. Dunlop and Mrs. Stewart of Afton. In the Micsettm MS. the song is 
directed to be sung to Comwallis lattient for Colo7tel Moorhouse, a poor 
composition of the professional type, written by a Malcolm Stewart. No 
ordinary human voice can reach all the notes in the tune. To account for 
the great compass of many of the Scottish melodies, it is necessary to know 
that the falsetto voice was much used among the peasantry. 



38o 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



f. ' Chloris ' (Jean Lorimer) . 

No. 86. From the white-blossom' d sloe. This fugitive fragment is said 
to have been published in a newspaper in the year 1800. It is in Stewarfs 
edition, 1802 ; Edinburgh edition, 1877, iii. 20/. The authorship has been 
disputed, but the holograph of Burns is in the possession of Mr. Walter Steven, 
Montrose. Early last century a second stanza was added, and William Shield 
composed an original air for the verses and published it as a sheet-song. The 
lines have been attiibuted to Charles Dibdin, but Hogarth very properly has 
not included them in Dibdin's Works. In a modern popular collection of 
songs, the stanza of Burns is stated to be by John O'Keefe. 

Tfo. 87. Wilt thou be my dearie? Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 4']o, signed ' B.' Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, T]. The MS. is in the 
British Museum. Written for Miss Janet Miller of Dalswinton, and referred to 
as follows in a letter to Alexander Cunningham, dated March 3, 1794: 
' Apropos, do you know the much-admired Highland air called The sutors 
dochtorl It is a firstrate favourite of mine, and I have written what I reckon 
one of my best songs to it. I will send it to yon, set as I think it should be, 
and as it was sung with great applause in many fashionable groups by Major 
Robertson, of Lude, wlio was here with his corps.' Cunningham showed the 
song to Thomson, who admired it. Burns inquired if he intended it for 
publication, but the reply was apparently indefinite, and Burns sent a copy 
to Johnson for the Museum. A note in the MS. states that the song is to 
be set to the first part of the tune, entitled 7he shoemaker s daughter, in 
Stewart's Reels, 1763, 72 ; as The siittors daughter in M^Glashan's Strathspey 
Reels, 1780, 6 ; and in Cumming's Strathspeys, 1780, No. 10, as the Dutchess 
of Bucclcugli s Recll. 

!N"o. 88. "Why, why tell thy lover. Currie, Works, 1800, iv. 2ji, 
entitled ' Fragment. Tune, The Caledonian Hunt's Delight^ This was sent 
to Thomson with the explanation: 'Such is the peculiarity of the rhythm of this 
air, tliat I find it impossible to make another stanza to suit it ' ; and so the song 
remained unfinished. Thomson replied that the lines would suit, but preferred 
bacchanalian verses which he thought fitted the pace and gait of the music. 
On the margin of the MS. Thomson wrote that he would take the song for 
some other air (which he never found), and inserted instead the verses of 
Ye Banks and Braes with the melody. 

For the tune, see Song No. J2j. 

No. 89. Sleep'st thou, or wak'st thou, fairest creature? Currie, Works, 
iv. i&i, entitled ^The lover s morning salute to his mistress. Tune, Deil tak the 
wars'; Th.oxnson'z Scotish Airs, 1805, 2/7. The MS. is in Brechin Castle. 
Jean Lorimer is now an imposing figure in the canvass of Burns. The first 
draft of Steepest thou differs materially from that printed, showing that it was 
revised and polished. Burns hoped that Thomson would insert the song in his 
next volume. Thomson suggested English verses, but Burns replied : ' I could 
easily throw this into an English mould ; but to my taste, in the simple and 
tender of the pastoral song, a sprinkling of the old Scottish has an inimitable 
effect.' He declined to alter what he had written, and Thomson was told that 
he could reject the song or place it as a secondary one, or set it to the air and 
put the old song second. The editor wished to insert in Scotish Airs the verses 
of Deil tak the wai's from Durfey's Wit and Mirth, 169S, but Burns fell foul 
of him for proposing that such rubbish (well-known in Scotland) should be 
selected for a Scottish collection. 

The tune, variously named, is said to be in Leydens MS., 1690 ; it is in 
Atkinsons MS., 1694; Durfey's Pills, 1719, i. 2g4, entitled A Scotch Song; 
Oswald's Cui ious Scots Tunes, 1740, 26 ; Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1743, 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 381 

i. 7; M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1768, iv. 7/7; Perth Musical Miscellany, 1786, 
}40 ; and Scots Musical Musenm, 1 790, No. 262. 

TSo. 90. Sweet fa's the eve on Craigieburn. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
1 798, 32. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' This is the second set of 
the song Sweet closes the evning on Craigieburn Wood, which had previously 
been published in Johnson's Museum, 1792, No. joi, and now fitted for his 
friend Jolin Gillespie, who had fallen in love with Jean Lorimer, or the ' Chloris' 
of his songs. Burns explained to Thomson how it was penned, and was anxious 
that it should be published. He says: 'The lady on whom it was made is one 
of the finest women in Scotland, and in fact, is in a manner to me, what Sterne's 
Eliza was to him. ... I assure you that to my lovely friend you are indebted 
for many of your best songs of mine. . . . The lightning of her eye is the 
godhead of Parnassus, and the witchery of her smile the divinity of Helicon.' 

Bums obtained the melody from ' the singing of a girl,' and communicated it 
to the Museujii when he sent the first version. In the Iiiterleaved Museum he 
made a note on the tune, which is an excellent specimen of the folk-melody 
of Scotland. 

Wo. 91. Sae j3axen were her ringlets. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 447, signed ' B,' entitled '■She says she lo'es me best of a\ An Irish air.' 
'J homson's Scotish Airs, 1805, jgo. The MS. is in the British Museum. The 
song was sent to Thomson, September, 1794, in a letter: 'Do you know 
a blackguard Irish song, Oonaglis ■waterfaW. The air is charming, and I have 
often regretted the want of decent verses to it. It is too much, at least for 7ny 
humble rustic muse to expect that every effort of hers must have merit ; still, 
I think it is better to have mediocre verses to a favourite air, than none at all. 
On this principle I have all along proceeded in the Scots Musical Museum, and 
... I intend the following song to the air I mentioned, for that work. If it 
does not suit you as an editor, you may be pleased to have verses to it, that 
you may sing it before ladies.' 

The tune Oonaglis waterfall deserves the praise Burns gave it. It is still 
well known and popular in Ireland. The music is in the Scots Musical 
Museum, 1796, No. 44']. I do not know where an earlier imprint can be 
found. Tom Moore copied the melody, and it is still reprinted as in the 
Museum. Mr. Glen states that it was introduced into Shield's ballad opera 
Marian, 1788. 

TSo. 92. Can I cease to care? Currie, Wo7-ks, 1800, iv. 22'], entitled 
'0« Chloris being ill. Tune, Ay,waukin, 0';' Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1801, 
III, where it is mutilated by garbled verses and a modern set of the air which 
destroys its character. For the Notes, see No. 14"]. 

No. 93. Their groves o' sweet myrtle. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, 
9/. ' By Robert Burns. Air, The humours of Glen.' The MS. is in the 
Thomson collection. Written in April, 1795. Currie was enthusiastic over 
the song, and predicted that it would be sung by emigrant Scots with equal 
or superior interest on the banks of the Ganges, or the Mississippi, than on the 
Tay or the Tweed. His forecast is true, but not in the way intended ; for it is 
equally neglected at home and abroad. Burns wrote to Thomson : ' The Irish 
air, Humours of Glen, is a great favourite of mine, and except the silly verses 
in the Foor soldier, there are not any decent verses for it.' The poor soldier 
is one of O'Keefe's successful operas written about the middle of the eighteenth 
century. The tune is in M'^Lean's Scots Tunes, c. i']']2,ji, and in the Scots 
Musical Mtiseum, 1803, No. /<57. A tradition in Ireland assigns the composi- 
tion to one of the family of Power, about the middle of the eighteenth century, 
who owned an estate near Clonmel. Glyn or Glen is a small country village 
midway between Carrick and Clonmel. 



382 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



No. 94. Mark yonder pomp of costly fashion. Currie, Works, 1800, iv. 
2y. 'Tune, Deil tak the wars.^ Scotish Airs, 1805, ^S7- The MS. is in the 
Thomson collection. Another of the English songs concerning which Burns 
wrote to Thomson that he took credit to himself for answering orders with the 
punctuality of a tailor making a suit of clothes. For the tune, see No. 8^. 

Tfo. 95. Ah, Chloris, since it may not be. Aldine edition, 1839. 'Tune, 
Major Graka?n.'' It may be assumed that this was written in 1794. It was 
originally printed from the poet's MS. For the tune, see No. ij2. 

Tfo. 96. I see a form, I see a face. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, j6. 
' Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, This is no my ain house.' 
The MS. is in the Thomson collection. The first sketch made in July, and 
finished in August, 1795. Burns remarked that the rhythm of the music 
puzzled him a good deal, and he thought that changing the first or chorus part 
would have a good effect. 

The tune This is no my ain house, or Abbeyhills rant, is said to be in 
Blaikie's MS., 1692; Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. ja with words; Aird's 
Airs, I78'2, ii. No. i']6, and Cakdo)tiati Pocket Co!?ipanion, xi. 8. Verses are 
marked to be sung to the tune in Ramsay's Miscellany , 1725 ; and Herd's Scots 
Songs, 1769, /po. Thomson is responsible for making considerable variations 
in the melody. 

No. 97. O, bonie was yon rosy brier. Currie, Works, 1800, iv. 2^2, 
entitled ' Scottish Song'; Thomson's ^'c^/w,^ Airs, iSoi, iij. The MS. is in 
the Thomson collection. Written for Stephen Clarke, who proposed to set it 
to an original melody for publication in sheet form. The arrangement was not 
carried through, and Burns instructed Thomson to print his song with the tune 
/ wish my love zvere in a mire. Thomson published it with quite a different 
melody. Of 1 ivish my love were in a mire, That I may pti her out again, 
Burns says in the Interleaved Museum : ' I never heard more of the old words 
of this old song than the title.' The music is said to be in Crockatfs MS., 
1709; it is in Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. /,' to verses by ' namby-pamby ' 
Phillips beginning ' Blest as the immortal Gods'; Ramsay's Musick, c. 1726; 
(Z\2X^i Scots Tunes, 1730,^7; M^Gibbon's 6'c77/'i' Tunes, 1742, ly, Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, 1754, vi. 9; Bremner's Scots Songs (second series), 1757, 7; 
and Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 41. 

KTo. 98. O, wat ye wha that lo'es me. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, 67. 
' Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Morag.' The precise date when 
it was written has not been ascertained, but probably in the autumn of 1795, 
for in January, 1796, in forwarding a copy to Robert Cleghorn, Burns 
apologizes for not sending it sooner, and excuses himself for the omission. 
He had lost a young and darling daughter, and immediately after, was 
attacked by rheumatic fever which kept him many weeks in bed. Cleghorn 
had previously met Jean Lorimer at Burns's house, and was interested in the 
poet's model. 

The song is marked for the tune Morag, as Burns did not consider that his 
Young Highland rover fitted that melody. See Song No. 2^2. 

No. 99. There's nane shall ken. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 4j;8. The MS. in the British Museum contains the following holograph 
note : ' This tune is evidently the old air. We'' II gang nae mair to yon town, 
and I suspect it is not the best set of the air, but in Bowie's and other 
collections the old tune is to be found, and you can correct this by these copies.' 
Burns was always at his best in the songs for the M2iseu?fi. He worked in his 
natural element unfettered, and was never gravelled in the compulsory use of 
English to satisfy an editor who wished to suppress the Scottish vernacular. 
The airy freedom of this little lyric may be compared with the laboured verses 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 383 

of No. 106 for the same tune, written for Thomson. The old song, as quoted 
by Stenhouse, began : — 

' I'll gang nae mair to yon town, 

O, never a' my life again; 

I'll ne'er gae back to yon town 

To seek anither wife again.' 

The tune 77/ £-ae nae mair to your \_yon\ town is in Bremner's Scots Reels, 

1757, i.d; in Campbell's /?^e/5, 1778, i7; and Aird's ^?W, 1782, i. No. j'j ; and 

in Bowie's Reels, 17S9, to which Burns referred the printer of the Museum. 

TSo. 100. Behold, my love, bo-w green the groves. Currie, Works, 1800, 
iv. 288. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1818, 201. The MS. is in the Thomson 
collection. The original version began ' My Chloris, mark how green the 
groves,' but was altered to that in our text. The first copy was transmitted to 
'i'homson in November, 1794, in a letter stating that Chloris suggested the 
verses. Burns had previously disapproved of a song chosen by Thomson for 
the tune Aly lodging is on the cold ground, and Behold my love was written 
for it. The popular melody of the name — of either English or Irish origin — 
was first printed in Vocal Music, London, 1775, 18, and very soon afterwards 
became popular in Scotland. It ejected an earlier tune which had held its 
ground for more than a century. The original (that copied in our text) 
composed by Matthew Lock, is the finer melody of the two. Nell Gwyn, in 
the play of All Mistakcji. 1672, sang it to a parody satirizing Moll Davis her 
rival, who was short and fat, thus : — 

' My lodging is on the cold boards 
And wonderful hard is my fare; 
But that v/hich troubles me most is 
The fatness of my dear,' &c. 

The tune known by the titles On the cold ground, or I prithee love, turn to 
me, is in the Dancing Master, 1665 ; Music k' s Delight, 1666 ; and Apollds 
Banquet, 1669. 

No. 101. 'Twas na her bonis blue e'e was my ruin. Currie, Works, 
1800, iv. 229. ' Tune, Laddie lie near me^ The MS. is in the Thomson 
collection. In a letter to Thomson, dated September, 1793, Burns explains his 
manner of writing songs and choice of melodies. ^Laddie lie near me, must 
lie by m.e for some time. I do not know the air ; and until I am complete 
master of a tune, in my own singing (such as it is), I never can compose for it. 
My way is: I consider the poetic sentiment correspondent to my idea of the 
musical expression ; then choose my theme ; begm one stanza ; when that is 
composed, which is generally the most difficult part of the business, I walk out, 
sit down now and then, look out for subjects in nature around me that are in 
unison and harmony with the cogitations of my fancy, and workings of my 
bosom, humming every now and then the air with the verses I have framed. 
When I feel my muse beginning to jade, I retire to the solitary fireside of my 
study, and then commit my effusion to pnper; swinging at intervals on the 
hindlegs of my elbow-chair, by way of calling forth my own critical strictures 
as my pen goes on. Seriously, this at home is almost invariably my way.' 
In April, 1795, 'Twas na her bonie blue e'e was completed, but in the following 
May he suppressed it as unworthy of his pen. A black-letter English ballad 
of the seventeenth century to a 'northern tune' is entitled The longing 
shepherdess , or Lady lie near me. Ritson discovered a Northumberland ballad 
which begins : — 

' Down in yon valley, soft shaded by mountains 
Heard I a lad an' lass making acquaintance ; 
Making acquaintance and singing so clearly, 
Lang hae I lain my lane, laddie lie near me.' 



384 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



The English melody in Playford's Dancing Master, 1650, copied into 
Chappell's Popular Music, i8j, is not the same as that in the Scots Musical 
Museum, 1790, No. 218. The Scottish tune is also in M<=Gibbon's Scots 
Ttmes, 1768, iv. 116; and Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1760, xii. /. 
See Tune and Notes, No. 142. 

No. 102. O, poortith cauld and restless love. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
1798, 4g. 'Written for this work by Robert Burns,' and in honour of Jean 
Lorimer, who eloped with a young Cumberland farmer, named Whelpdale, and 
made a hasty marriage, which she had leisure to repent. After an experience 
of three weeks, she returned to her father's house. Her husband retired before 
his creditors, and left the country. The song was sent to Thomson in January, 
1793, with a request to set it to the tune Cauld kail, but the editor neglected 
the instruction. In April, Burns revised the song as in the text, and agreed to 
change the tune, but he had a very poor opinion of the verses, and told 
Thomson that ' The sttiff won't bear mending, yet for private reasons I should 
like to see them in print.' Cauld kail had always been associated with 
rollicking humorous songs, but Burns treated the air as a slow measure. 

Among the Cauld kail songs, that not the best perhaps, but the most 
respectable, written by the Duke of Gordon, the friend of Burns, is on dancing 
— the engrossing recreation of the Scots. A stanza may be quoted : — 
' In cotillons the French excel ; 
John Bull, in contra-dances. 
The Spaniards dance fandangoes well, 

Mynheer in All'mande prances ; 
In foursome reels the Scots delight, 

The threesome maist dance wondrous light; 
But twasome ding a' out o' sight 
Danc'd to the reel of Bogie.' 
Gie the lass herfairi7i, lad, is a song for the tune in the Merry Muses. One 
of the earliest of the kind is that in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, 314, written on the 
first Earl of Aberdeen, an octogenarian widower, who died in 1720. It begins : — 
'Cauld kail in Aberdeen, 

And castocks in Strathbogie; 
But yet I fear they'll cook o'er soon, 

And never warm the cogie. 
The lassies about Bogie gicht. 
Their limbs they are sae clean and tight, 
That if they were but guided right 
They'll dance the reel o' Bogie.' 
I do not know v^rhere an earlier copy of the tune is to be seen than in the 
Scots Musical Museum, 1 788, No. 162. It is in Dale's Scotch Songs, 1794, ii. 61. 
A song is in a collection of fugitive poetry in the Advocate's Library, which 
belonged to James Anderson, the eminent antiquary, who died in 1728. It 
begins : — 

* The cald kail of Aberdeen, 
Is warming at Strathbogie ; 
I fear 'twill tine the heat o'er sune. 
And ne'er fill up the cogie.' 

(Maidment, Songs, 1859, 20^ 
This is precisely the rhythm of the tune, for which see No. 22^, incorrectly 
marked 228 in text. 

No. 103. Now Nature deeds the flowery lea. Currie, Works, 1800, iv. 
ig2. Tune, Rotheniurche''s rant. Scotish Airs, i%oi, 121. A MS. is in the 
Thomson collection. One of the pastoral lyrics which has helped to make 
Burns famous. It was written for an instrumental air of much beauty, although 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 385 

in this, as in many other cases, Burns failed to win for it the approval of his 
dilettante editor. A fragment was sent to Thomson in a letter about September, 
1794. The poet had gauged Thomson's taste in verses and airs, and it was 
necessary to anticipate an unfavourable reception for Lassie lui' the lint-white 
locks, so he says : ' I am sensible that my taste in music must be inelegant and 
vulgar, because people of undisputed and cultivated taste can find no merit in 
many of my favourite tunes. Still, because I am cheaply pleased, is that any 
reason why I should deny myself that pleasure ? Many of our strathspeys, 
ancient and modern, give me exquisite enjoyment, where you and other judges 
would probably be showing signs of disgust. For instance, I am just now 
making verses to Rothienucrche's Ra7it, an air which puts me into raptures ; 
and in fact, unless I be pleased with the tune, I never can make verses to it. . . . 
Rothietnurche, Clarke says, is an air both original and beautiful ; and on his 
recommendation, I have taken the first part of the tune for a chorus, and the 
fourth or last part for the song.' In November he completed the song, and 
describes it to Thomson : ' This piece has at least the merit of being a regular 
pastoral ; the vernal morn, the summer noon, the autumnal evening, and the 
winter night, are regularly rounded. If you like it, well ; if not, I will insert it 
in the Museum^ He returns to the subject of the tune before closing the letter, 
as he would not trust the editor to arrange it, and says : ' On second thoughts, 
I send you Clarke's singing set of Rothemurche, which please return me in 
your first letter : I know it will not suit you.' Thomson did print it, but copied 
the tune badly. The tune in the text comprises the first and fourth sections of 
Rothiemui'che^ s Rant from Bremner's Scots Reels, I7.S9) 4^i according to the 
direction of Burns. It is all that Burns describes it. The music is also in 
M'^Glashan's Strathspey Reels, 1780, 77. 

N"o. 104. Come, let me take thee to my breast. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
17991 93- ' Written for this work by Robert Burns ' Another song on ' Chloris,' 
sent in a letter to Thomson in August, 1793, with the following remark: 
' That tune, Caitld Kail, is such a fivourite of yours that I once more roved 
out yester evening for a gloaming shot at the muses ; when the muse that 
presides o'er the shores of Nith, or rather my old inspiring dearest nymph, 
Coila, whispered me the following,' &c. The last stanza is modelled on his 
early song Peggy Alison. (^See No. j./.) Burns said he would have a song to 
celebrate the Indy of the rejected Poortith caiild and restless love. This second 
attempt to fit Cauld Kail did not satisfy Thomson any more than the first, and 
he printed it to the Irish air Ally Croker, much run on at public concerts about 
the end of the eighteenth century. The song is here for the first time directed 
to its proper tune, for which see Nos. 102 and 22J. 

No. 105. Forlorn my love, no comfort near. Currie, Works, iSoo, 
iv. 246, entitled English Song. Tune, Let me in this ae night. The MS. is 
in the Thomson collection, and was introduced to Thomson as follows : ' I have 
written it within this hour ; so much for the speed of my Pegasus ; but what 
say you to his bottom ? ' The third stanza was unfavourably criticized ; Burns 
admitted the objection, and rewrote it as in the text. For the tune, see No. z/p, 
under the title Will ye lend me your loom, lass ? 

ITo. 106. Now haply down yon gay green shaw. Scots Musical 
Mtiseum, 1796, No. 4^8 (second song) signed 'B,' for the tune, L'll gae nae 
mair to yon town. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799,^7. MS. in the Thomson 
collection. A specimen verse of this song, which the poet styled ' doggrell ' 
and suppressed later on, was sent to Thomson in order to try the tune. The 
following is an extract from a letter dated Ecclefechan, February 7, 1795 : 
' I came yesternight to this unfortunate, wicked little village. I have gone 
forward, but snows often feet deep have impeded my progress ; I have tried to 
" gae back the gate I cam again," but the same obstacle has shut me up within 



386 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



insuperable bars. To add to my misfortune, since dinner, a scraper has been 
torturing cat-gut .... and thinks himself, on that very account, exceeding good 
company. In fact, I have been in a dilemma, either to get drunk, to forget 
these miseries, or to hang myself, to get rid of them ; like a prudent man 
(a character congenial to my every thought, vt^ord, and deed), I, of two evils, 
have chosen the least, and am very drunk at your service ! . . . Do you know 
an air We II gang nae mair to yon town? I think, in slowish time, it would 
make an excellent song. I am highly delighted with it ; and if you should 
think it worthy of your attention, I have a fair Dame in my ej'e to whom 
I would consecrate it.' After writing the stanza of ' doggrell ' he went to bed, 
and Thomson affirms that the handwriting of the poet shows that he had chosen 
the lesser of the two evils. In April the song was finished, and a month after- 
ward a copy was sent to Syme, with ' Jeanie ' changed to ' Lucy ' to fit 
Mrs. Oswald, of Auchencruive, whom he wished to conciliate for a stinging 
epigram he had previously written on her. 

For the tune, see Song No. t?^, entitled in Bremner's Reels, Pll gae nae mair 
to your town. 

No. 107- It was tlie charming month of May. Scotish Airs, 1799, 
6<). Written as an English song for Thomson. Burns writes, November, 
1794: 'Despairing of my own powers to give you variety enough in English 
songs, I have been turning over old collections, to pick out songs of which the 
measure is somewhat similar to what I want ; and with a little alteration, so as 
to suit the rhythm of the air exactly, to give them for your work. Where the 
songs have hitherto been but little noticed, nor have ever been set to music, 
I lliink the shift a fair one. A song which, under the same first verse of the 
first stanza, you will find in Ramsay's Tea-Table Miscella7iy and elsewhere, 
I have cut down for an English dress to your Dainty Davie. You may think 
meanly of this, but take a look at the bombast original, and you will be 
surprised that I have made so much of it.' Burns does not underrate the 
quality of the original song of six stanzas in the Tea-Table Miscellany, 1725, 
marked to be sung to The happy clown, but he has not improved it much. 

For the tune Dainty Davie, see Song No. jo8, 

No. 108. Let not ■woman e'er complain. Scotish Airs, 1798, 48. 
Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Duncan Gray. The MS. is in 
Brechin Castle. Written to meet Thomson's demand for English verses. It 
is one of the number which Thomson approved — he inserted it in his next 
volume — but it is devoid of the warm colour of the poet's Scottish songs. 
Burns pathetically wrote : ' These English songs gravel me to death. I have 
not that command of the language that I have of my native tongue. In fact, 
I think my ideas are more barren in English than in Scottish. I have been at 
Duncan G}'ay to dress it in English, but all I can do is deplorably stupid.' — 
Letter, October, 1794. The opinion of Burns on this song need not be disturbed. 

For Duncan Gray, see Nos. i"]} and 779. 

No. 109. "Where are the joys I hae met in the morning. Currie, 
Works, 1800, iv. 121. Tune, Saw ye my father? Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
1801, 102. MS. in the Brechin collection. Sent to Thomson in September, 
1793, with this note: ' Saw ye my father ? is one of my greatest favourites. 
The evening before last I wandered out, and began a tender song in what 
I think is its native style. I must premise, that the old way, and the way to 
give most effect, is to have no starting note, as the fiddlers call it, but to burst 
at once into the pathos. Every country girl sings Saw ye my father? ' Thomson 
disputed Burns's reading of the air, and thought it should open on an unaccented 
note. The poet deferred to the editor's opinion, but he was right. 

The early song which Bums said delighted him with its descriptive simple 
pathos is four stanzas in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, j2.f, as follows : — 



I. LOVE-SONGS : PERSONAL 387 

' O saw ye my father, or saw ye my mother, 
Or saw ye my true love, John? 
I saw not your father, I saw not your mother, 
But I saw your true love, John. 
' Up Johnnie rose, and to the door he goes, 
And gently tirled the pin ; 
The lassie taking tent, unto the door she went, 
And she open'd and let him in. ■ 
* Flee, flee up, my bonny grey cock. 
And craw whan it is day ; 
Your neck shall be like the bonny beaten gold, 

And your wings of the silver grey. 
' The cock prov'd false, and untrue he was. 

For he crew an hour o'er soon ; 
The lassie thought it day when she sent her love away, 
And it was but a blink of the moon.' 
The origin of this beautiful song has been disputed by Chappell {Popular 
Music, p. 7J/), who claimed that the original publication of five stanzas is in 
Vocal Music, or the Songsters Companion, London, 1772, ii. j6. He stated 
that a Scottified version was reprinted by Herd in 1776, but I have shown that 
the song was printed in Herd's first edition of 1769. The third stanza in Focal 
Music, as follows, can be compared with the above second stanza : — 
' Then John he up arose, and to the door he goes, 
And he twirled, he twirled at the pin ; 
The lassie took the hint, and to the door she went, 
And she let her true love in.' 
The English copyist discloses his ignorance of the Scots language in the 
second line, where the lover tirls the wooden latch or pin of the door to arrest 
his sweetheart's attention. Tivirling is not ti7-litig at all, which in this case is 
a tremulous vibration of sound like the clicks of an electric instrument trans- 
mitting a message. The song in Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. 20S, is 
extended to seven stanzas and not improved. Pinkerton printed this version in 
Select Ballads, 1783, 1J4. Lastly a spurious, so-called traditional, version in 
Cromek's Nitksdale Song, 1810, ^4, is probably the work of Allan Cunningham. 
The music of the song as in our text is in Stewart's Scots Songs, 1772, 14, 
with the original verses of 1769. In the Scots Musical Museum, I'jS'j, No. y6, 
with the seven stanzas of 1 776 ; and in the Pertk Musical Miscellany, 1 786, 2/. 



IL LOVE : GENERAL. 

M"o. 110. My Sandy gied. to me a ring. Scots l\Iusical Museum, 1790, 
No. 204, entitled / love my love in secret. This song is a near copy with 
alterations of one in Herd^s MS. In Law's MS. List for the Museum, Burns 
wrote : 'Mr. Burns's old words.' In Scotland it was customary for lovers who 
were to be temporarily separated, to break a silver coin at time of parting, 
each keeping a piece as a pledge to be faithful during absence. The custom 
is described in Logic 0' Buchan : — 

' He had but a saxpence, he brak it in twa 
And gied me the hauf o't when he gaed awa.' 



388 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



The oldest form of the well-known tune Logie o Buckatt is derived from / love 
my love in secret, which is in Guthrie's MS., according to Dauney ; in Playford's 
Original Scotch Tunes, 1700; in Sinkler's MS., Glasgow, 17 10; in M'Gibbon's 
Scots Tunes, 1742,^; in Caledoniait Pocket Companion, c. 1745, 11.26; and 
other collections. 

TTo. m. There 's nought but care on ev'ry han'. Of this song all but 
the last stanza is in the Commonplace Book, under the date Aug., 1784. In its 
complete form it was published in the Edinburgh edition, 1787, J^jt find with 
the tune in the Scots Musical Mtiseum, 1787, No. 77, as the earliest song 
of Burns printed with music. In a passage in the Coinmoyiplace Book, 
p. 20, Burns divides young men into two classes — the grave and the merry ; 
and in a later reference to the subject, instead of stating to which class 
he himself belongs, he quotes tlie fragment of Green grow the rashes, so 
that the reader may determine the matter himself. The song is so free and 
spontaneous in its rhythm and cadence, as to require no music to interpret it. 
It is as popular now as when first given to the public ; not even a century has 
diminished its lustre. The earlier rustic song which Burns knew, and had 
in his mind when he wrote his own poem, cannot be printed entire. It is 
a humorous satire on manners, one stanza running thus : — 

' We 're a' dry wi' drinkin o't. 
We're a' dry wi' drinkin o't, 
The minister kissed the fiddler's wife, 
And could na preach for thinkin o't.' 

Two highly-flavoured songs for the tune are in the Me7-ry Muses. In 1794 
Thomson proposed to set the verses to the tune Cauld Kail, but Burns objected, 
saying that as the old song was current in Scotland under the old title, and 
to the merry old tune of that name, the introduction of his verses with a new 
tune would mar its celebrity. Cou thou me the raschyes green is named in the 
Complaynt of Scotland, c. 1549. A tune with this title, which is in a MS. in 
the British Museum, is quite a different melody from that in the text ; but 
the germ of the present air is in Straloch's MS., 1627, entitled A dance : Greett 
grow the rashes. It was known later as / kist her while she blusht, evidently 
from the first line or refrain of forgotten verses. In Bremner's Reels, 1759, 6^, 
it is named The Grant's Rant. Its earliest appearance in print is in Oswald's 
Curious Collection Scots Ttines, I'j^o, p. 42. It is in Oswald's Coffipanion, 
1743, i. 18; Stewart's Reels, 1761, ij, and many other tune-books of the end 
of the eighteenth century. 

No. 112. O, whar gat ye that hauver-meal bannock ? Scots Musical 
Aluseum, 1787, No. pp, entitled Bonie Du?idee, with the tune of the same 
name. Cromek's Scotish Songs, 1810, ii. 202 ; Lawrie's Scottish Songs, 1791, 
ii. pi. Early in 1787, the Earl of Buchan sent a complimentary letter to 
Burns, who carried it in his pocket for some time, and ultimately used the 
dingy blank leaf at one of the meetings of the Crochallan Club to pencil 
the opening lines of Bonie Dundee, which his friend Robert Cleghorn had just 
sung. A short time afterwards he sent to the latter the verses in the text. 
Stenhouse says that the first four lines are old ; while, according to Scott- 
Douglas, the first eight lines are in the original song. Neither statement 
is correct ; for only the first two lines of the song are in the original broadside 
(in the Pepys and other collections), reprinted in Wit and Mirth, London, 1703, 
as follows: — 

' Where gott'st thou the Haver-meal bonack ? 

Blind Booby, can'st thou not see; 
I'se got it out of the Scotch-man's wallet, 

As he lig lousing him under a tree. 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 389 

' Come fill up my cup, come fill up my can, 
Come saddle my horse, and call up my man ; 
Come open the gates, and let me go free. 
And I'se gang no more to bonny Dundee.' 
The title is Bonny Dundee ; or. Jockey's Deliverance, &c., in Collection of 
Old Ballads, 1723, 27/. It describes, in ten stanzas, the intrigue of a licentious 
trooper with a parson's daughter. This song was veiy popular in England, 
and was often reprinted. It is named in A second tale of a tub, published in 
1715, as one which the Blue bonnets sang in London. A fragmentary stanza 
in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, }ii, is evidently a purified remnant of the song. 
Sir Walter Scott adopted the chorus in Up wV the bonnets d bonnie Dundee. 

The tune is in the Skene MS., c. 1630, entitled Adew Dundee, here reprinted. 
It is in V\2l^{o\S!% Dancing Alasier, published in 1688, and afterwards, with the 
words, in Durfey's Pills, 1719, v. 77. The music, as a dance tune, is in the 
Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1751, iii. 4, and in many other instrumental 
collections. 

The simplicity of the melody is considerably obscured in all the printed 
copies. Durfey corrupted it with unmeaning flourishes ; it was partly restored 
in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, but still a good deal removed from the 
plain smoothness of the original. Copies are also in CraXgs Scots Tunes, 1730, 
22, and in M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1 746, j6. 

There are two songs in the Merry Mttses for the tune ; and Cromek, Scotish 
Songs iSio, ii. 207, gives the following as the stanza of an old song: — 
' Ye 're like to the timmer o' yon rotten wood, 
Ye 're like to the bark o' yon rotten tree, 
Ye slip frae me like a knotless thread. 

An' ye'll crack your credit wi' mae than me.' 

!N"o. 113. Tfow simmer blinks on flo'w'ry braes. Scots Musical Museum, 
1788, No. 77^, signed ' B,' entitled Birks of Aberfeldy. This is the earliest 
of the series of songs due to the first tour in the Highlands in company with 
William Nicol, of the High School of Edinburgh. On August 30, 17S7, Burns 
arrived at Aberfeldy, and wrote in his copy of the Museum, that this song was 
composed ' standing under the falls of Aberfeldy, at or near Moness.' It is 
justly esteemed one of the most popular songs in Scotland. The original was 
known as The Birks of Abergeldie, two stanzas of which are inserted in the 
Museum, immediately following Burns's verses. The old fragment was copied 
from Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. 221, and begins thus: — 
' Bonny lassie, will ye go, will ye go, will ye go, 
Bonny lassie, will ye go to the Birks o' Abergeldie? 
Ye shall get a gown of silk, a gown of silk, a gown of silk, 
Ye shall get a gown of silk, and coat of calimancoe.' 

In his Scottish Ballads and Songs, 1859, /p, Maidment reprinted verses 
from an original broadside of the beginning of the eighteenth century, but he 
considered Herd's fragment older. The Maidment ballad is written throughout 
in English. 

The sustained popularity of the song is due in a great measure to its melody. 
In the 1690 edition of Playford's Dancing Master the tune is entitled A Scotch 
Ayre; 2a Abergeldie it is in Atkinsons MS., 1694; in Sinklers MS., 17 Jo, as 
Birks of Ebergeldie. It is also in Original Scotch Tunes, 1700; in Bremner's 
Keels, 1758, J/; Stewart's Reels, 1761, j ; Caledonian Pocket Companion, 
c. 1756, viii. 16, and others. Abergeldy, near Balmoral, is now a royal demesne. 

N"o. 114. As I gaed dcwn the ■water-side. Scots Musical Musemn, 1 790, 
No. 264. The MS. is in the British Museum, with the opening bars of the 
tune, and a note that Clarke has it (R. B.) ' This beautiful song is in the true 
old Scotch taste, yet I do not know that ever either air or words were in print 



390 HISTORICAL NOTES 

before' {Interleaved Museum). 'Mr. Biirns's old words' (Law's MS. List). 
Neither Cromek nor Scott-Douglas correctly stated how much of the song 
Burns wrote and amended. The last two stanzas are Burns's, and the first two 
are made out of the original first stanza. ' I am flattered at your adopting 
Ca' the yoxves, as it was owing to me that ever it saw the light. About seven 
years ago, I was well acquainted with a worthy little fellow of a clergyman, 
a Mr. Clunyie, who sang it charmingly ; and, at my request, Mr. Clarke took 
it down from his singing. When 1 gave it to Johnson, I added some stanzas 
to the song, and mended others, but still it will not do for you ' {Letter to 
Thomson, September, 1794). See Song No. J/ 5. Tibby Pagan, an eccentric 
woman, who sold whisky without a licence, and dispensed a fund of bold 
humour to her customers, is said to have been the author, but there is no 
authority for the statement. A collection of her songs and poems was printed 
in Glasgow about 1S05, but Cd the yoives is not in the volume. Burns 
deserves to be remembered with gratitude, if for nothing else, as being the 
discoverer of the melodic gem of this pastoral. There is no second part, and 
the verse and chorus are sung to the same music. 

Wo. 115. On a bank of flowers in a summer day. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1 790, No. .22/. 'Mr. Burns's words,' (Law's iJflS". Z/j/ ; Thomson's 
Scotish Airs. 1799, 8S). The original verses are English, copied into the last 
volume of The Tea-Table Miscellany, c. 1740. The author, Mr. Theobald, 
was a large contributor to the song-books of his day. For the sake of the 
melody popular in Scotland, Burns recast the original licentious verses, making 
a new song of them. 

The tune The bashftil lover is English, the composition of John Galliard, 
by birth a German, who came to London in early life and remained there. He 
was the composer of numerous good airs. The music is in Playford's Dancing 
Master, 1728, entitled The bashful swain ; with Theobald's verses in Watts's 
Musical Miscellany, 1729, i. jo; in the Perth Musical Miscellany, 1786, <Sj ; 
and in Calliope, 1788, 2J4. 

No. 116. "When rosy May comes in wi' flowers. Scots Musical 
Mtiseiim, 1790, No 220, signed ' Z,' entitled The Gardener wt his paidle; 
Law's MS. List: 'Mr. B.'s old words;' Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, 6g. 
The MS. is in the British Museum. ' This air is the Gardener s March. The 
title of the song only is old ; the rest is mine ' {Interleaved Mztseum). The old 
song referred to is not known. To accommodate George Thomson, who wished 
a copy for his collection, Burns altered the fourth line in each stanza, and added 
a chorus to fit the verses for the tune Dainty Davie (see Song No. ijs)- 

The tune The Gardener's March, appropriated by the guild of gardeners, 
is in Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. ijy, as stated by Burns on his MS. I doubt 
whether it is an authentic Scottish melody, and whether it is much older than 
its appearance in Aird's volume, 

Wo. 117. If thou should ask my love. Scots Musical Museum, 179c, 
No. 22^, entitled Jamie, come try me. In Law's MS. List: ' Mr. Burns's old 
words.' Written from a single line or title of an old song to resuscitate James 
Oswald's melody, printed in Curious Scots Tttnes, i'/42, ii. 26; and the 
Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1745, ii. J^. The tune is inteiesting, but its 
compass is too great for ordinary voices. 

No. 118. Hark the Mavis' e'ening sang. Currie, Works, iSoo, iv. 160. 
Scotish Airs, 1S05, 166. The MS. is at Brechin Castle. This second version 
of Cd the ewes was sent to Thomson in September, 1 794, with a note : ' In 
a solitary stroll which I took to-day, I tried my hand on a few pastoral lines, 
following up the idea of the chorus, which I would preserve.' Burns was 
aware of its inferiority to the original. 

Thomson divorced it from its proper melody, and set it to The maid that 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 391 

tends the goats. For the tune, see No. 114. The Clouden is a small tributary 
of the Nith near Dumfries. 

Wo. 119. 'When the drums do beat. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, 
No. 233, entitled The Caplaitis lady. I have definitely identified Barns with 
this song in the musical MS. made up for the engraver of the Aluseum. The 
poet entitled the tune Mount my baggage, then drew his pen through the words 
and wrote above them The Captahis lady, as printed in the Museiwi ;Gray's 
Museum Lists). In Law's MS. List, Burns wrote : ' Mr. Burns's old words.' 
The following stanza is from an English song of the seventeenth century : — 
' I will away, and I will not tarry, 
I will away and be a Captain's lady. 
A Captain's lady is a dame of honour — 
She has her maid ay to wait upon her, 
To wait upon her, and get all things ready, 
I will away and be a Captain's lady.' 
Burns's first title is that of a ballad in the Dalmeny Collection, quoted in the 
Centenary Burns as The Liggar lady, or the ladle's love to a soldier, to the tune 
of Mount the baggage. This most prosaic production is apparently the original 
of Burns's verses. 

The tune with the title Mount my baggage is in Caledonian Pocket Companion, 
1755, vii. 26, and in Bremner's Reels, 1768, log ; as the Cadie laddie, it is in 
Walsh's Caledonian Country Dances ; and as Mount your baggage in Aird's 
Airs, 1782, ii. No. 74. A song Ramillies, attributed to one of the Sempills of 
Beltrees, does not fit the tune. The first stanza and chorus reads thus : — 
' My daddie marrie't me too young 
To an auld man baith deaf and dumb ; 
He laid beside me like a rung, 
He wadna turn unto his lassie. 

Och ! laddie munt and go. 
Dear sailor, hoise and go ; 
Och ! laddie, munt and go. 

Go, and I'se go with thee, laddie.' 

(Sempill's Poems, 1849, xcv.) 

Ifo. 120. Young Jockie was the blythest lad. Scots Musical Mtiseumy 
1790, No. 2^7, signed ' Z ; ' Cromek's Reliques, 1808, 4^8. Hitherto this song 
has been accepted on the sole authority of Stenhouse, who stated that the whole 
of it, with the exception of three or four lines, was written by Burns. I have 
before me now the MS. music of the tune, and the words which Johnson 
proposed to insert in the Museum, entitled The devoted maid, by Dr. Blacklock, 
beginning ' My virgin heart when Jockey woo'd.' Twne, Jockey was the blythest 
lad in a' our town. The MS. was sent to Burns for his approval. He returned 
it with a note in the margin, in his own handwriting, ' Take Mr. Burns's old 
words,' so accordingly the song was changed, and his verses with the title were 
printed. In Law's MS. List he wrote : ' Mr. Burns's old words.' The Jockies 
and Jennys of the English parodies of Scots Songs are as common as black- 
berries in autumn. In The Goldfinch, 1771, is a song beginning 'Young 
Jockey was the blithest lad,' but it has little resemblance to Burns's song. 

The tune is &x\\XWtA Jockie the blithest in M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1746, 36. 
It has the gait of an English melody. A different tune with the title Jockey 
was the blithest lad is in Atkinson'' s MS., 1694. In the Caledonian Pocket 
Companion, 1755, vii. 8, there is a corrupted form of the melody. 

No. 121. Sweet are the banks — the banks o' Doon. This is the first 
of three versions of the Banks d' Doon. Originally published in the Edinbtirgh 
edition, 1877, \\. jji. There is not much verbal difference between this and the 



392 HISTORICAL NOTES 

next version sent to John Ballantine. The following is an extract from a letter, 
dated March ii, 1791, to Alexander Cunningham, enclosing a copy of the 
song : ' I have this evening sketched out a song which I had a great mind to 
send you, though I foresee that it will cost you another groat of postage. . . . 
My song is intended to sing to a strathspey, or reel, of which I am very fond, 
called in Cumming's Collection of Strathspeys Balk^idalloclis Keel, and in 
other collections that I have met with, it is known by the name of Cambdelmore. 
It takes three stanzas of four lines each to go through the whole tune. I shall 
give the song to Johnson for the fourth volume of his publication of Scots 
Songs which he has just now in hand.' This quotation disposes of the theory 
of Robert Chambers that The banks d Doon was written in 1787 for Peggy 
Kennedy, the unfortunate lady referred to in the note on Song No. 77. 

The recovery of the letter to Cunningham reveals the fact that the song was 
written for a particular tune practically unknown. Neither the words nor the 
music is in Johnson's Museum, and both are here printed together for the first 
time. It is entitled Cambdelmore in Bremner's Reels, 1761, 92; and in 
Stewart's Reels, 1763, //, as Ballendalloch; as Ballendalloch's Reel in 
Cumming's Strathspeys, 17S0, 7; and Gordon Castle in M*^Glashan's Strath- 
spey Reels, 1780, 26. 

Wo. 122. Ye flowery banks o' bonie Doon. Cromek's Reliques, 1808, J7. 
The second version of the song, which was enclosed in an undated letter 
addressed to John Ballantine, Ayr. The following is an extract : ' While here 
I sit, sad and solitary, by the side of a fire in a little country inn, and drying 
my wet clotlies, in pops a poor fellow of a sodger, and tells me he is going to 
Ayr. By Heavens ! say I to myself, with a tide of good spirits which the 
magic of that sound, Auld toon d Ayr, conjured up, I will send my last song 
to Mr. Ballantine.' The poet at this time was most likely on one of his excise 
expeditions. Ye flowery banks d bonie Doon is a distinct improvement on the 
first version, and Cromek's opinion of it in comparison with the third or 
popular set has been endorsed by all subsequent commentators. The redundant 
feet in the second and fourth lines of the popular stanza can easily be spared, 
and as a poem this short metre version is superb compared with it, although it 
is now hopeless to expect that the popular version will be displaced. 

No. 123. Ye banks and braes o' bonie Doon. In Scots Musical Mtiseum, 
1792, No. ^7^, signed ' B,' entitled The banks d Doon. Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1798, ^j. The MS. is in the British Museum. 'Mr. B.'s old words' 
(Law's MS. List). Two bathetic stanzas, written by a music publisher, were 
added to the song, and printed in the Pocket Encyclopedia, Glasgow, 1816, i, 29. 
Why this, the popular version, was written in a different measure from the 
other two, has never been accurately ascertained. It is probably true that 
Burns altered the song against his will, but nowhere does he say so. It is 
quite certain that he approved the air now so popular (although it may be 
remarked in passing that the pen is drawn through the title Caledonian Hunt's 
Delight in the MS. in the British Museum), for in a letter to George Thomson 
in November, 1794, he recommended it for insertion in Scotish Airs at the cost 
of excluding another song to make room for it. He relates the story of the 
tune being composed ' a good many years ago ' by an amateur playing on 
the black keys of the harpsichord. A copy was given to Gow, who entitled it 
The Caledonian Hiinfs delight, and printed it for the first time in his second 
collection of Strathspey Reels, 1788, that is six years before Burns related its 
history to Thomson, and four years before it was printed with the verses in the 
Scots Musical Miisejim. In 1789, Burns wrote There was on a Time (Song 
No. 2j8) for the same tune. 

The origin of the air has been called in question, and its nationality disputed. 
The late William Chappell asserted that the amateur effected nothing more 
than the alteration of a note here and there of a melody which previously 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 393 

existed. On the difficulty of ascertaining the birth of tunes, Burns has a note 
in the same letter to Thomson as previously quoted : ' Now to shew you how 
difficult it is to trace the origin of our airs, I have heard it repeatedly asserted 
that this was an Irish air; nay, I met with an Irish gentleman, who affirmed 
he had heard it in Ireland among the old women ; while on the other hand, 
a lady of fashion, no less than a countess, informed me that the first person 
who introduced the air into this country was a baronet's lady of her acquaintance, 
who took down the notes from an itinerant piper in the Isle of Man. How 
difficult then to ascertain the truth, respecting our poesy and music ! I myself 
have lately seen a couple of ballads sung through the streets of Dumfries, 
with my name at the head of them as the author, though it was the first time 
I had ever seen them.' 

The editor of Graham's Songs of Scotland states that he saw a street song, 
entitled List, list, to my story, with the water-mark of the year 1801 on the 
paper, on which the tune, the same as The banks 0' Doon, was stated to be an 
Irish air. The Popular Music of the Olden Tivie of William Chappell is 
a monument of industry and research. He had as keen an eye for a date, 
as a cross-examining barrister, and although he often complains about their 
absence on musical works, it is a curious fact, that his Popular Music bears 
no date of publication either on the title-page or elsewhere. He contested the 
Scottish origin of the Banks o' Doon, because it was in Dale's Collection of 
English Songs. In this case his claim breaks down, because this collection 
was issued in 1794, and subsequent to the same publisher's Scotch Songs of 
that year. Without any evidence he accuses Stephen Clarke of inventing the 
story related by Burns, and of making the tune himself from Dale's English 
tune, Lost, lost is my quiet, without the intervention of any amateur to fit it 
for the Scots Musical Museum. As previously stated, tlie air was first printed 
in 178S, six years before it was copied into the ALuseum, and this date fits the 
story Burns related to Thomson, in 1 794, of the air having been made ' a good 
many years ago.' Whether it be a Scots, an English, or an Irish air need not 
be further discussed ; it has been preserved for more than a century entirely 
through Burns's song, first printed with the music in Museum, 1792. In Aird's 
Airs, 1794, iv. No. i}2, Lrish is affixed to the tune, entitled Caledonian LLunt's 
Delight, so that it appears there was a popular belief that the melody was 
Irish. 

No. 124. O stay, sweet warbling woodlark, stay. This, known as 
Address to the zvoodlark, is in Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, 26. 'Written for 
this work by Robert Burns.' The MS. is in the Thomson collection. This 
and twelve other songs were sent to Thomson between April and August, I79.S- 
They are evidence of the poet's remarkable mental activity although in bad 
health, and engaged in daily hard physical work. The first sketch of the song 
was copied by Scott-Douglas from a pencil MS. in the poet's handwriting. It is 
entitled Song. — Composed on hearing a bird sing while musing on Chloris : — 

' Sing on, sweet songster o' the brier, 
Nae stealthy traitor-foot is near, 
O sooth a hapless lover's ear, 

And dear as life I'll prize thee. 
' Again, again that tender part, 
That I may learn thy melting art. 
For surely that v/ould touch the heart, 
O' her that still denies me. 

' O, was thy mistress, too, imkind. 
And heard thee as the careless wind? 
For nocht but Love and Sorrow join'd 
Sic notes of woe could wauken.' 



394 HISTORICAL NOTES 

Burns agreed with Thomson that the rhythm of Loch Eroch side suited the 
song, and on this general agreement it was printed with that tune in Scotish 
Airs. But the proper melody is Whare shall our gudeman lie ? or Where II 
honie Anttie lie? as marked on the copy of the verses sent to Thomson. For 
tune, see No. lo. 

N"o. 125. O, saw ye my dearie, my Eppie M'^Wab ? Scots Musical 
Museum, 1792, No. }];6, signed 'X,' entitled Eppie M'^Nab. The MS. is in 
the British Museum. An old song rewritten and purified for insertion in the 
Museum. ' The old song with this title has more wit than decency' {Interleaved 
Museum). The fragment in the He)'d MS. is as follows : — 

' O, saw ye Eppie M'^Nab the day? 
O, saw ye Eppie M'^Nab the day ? 
She 's down in the yaird 
She 's kissing the laird 
She winna cum hame the day, the day. 

'O, see to Eppie M°Nab as she goes, 
See to Eppie M'^Nab as she goes, 
With her corked heel shoon 
And her cockets aboon ; 
O, see to Eppie M^Nab as she goes.' 

In the Merry Muses is a ' revised ' song for the tune, in which occurs : — 

' Her kittle black een they wad thirl ye thro' ; 
Her rosebud lips cry. Kiss me just now,' &c. 

The tune is in Curious Scots Tunes, 1742, 46; the Caledonian Pocket 
Companion, 1754, vi. 18; Bremner's Reels, 1768,///; and a bad copy in Aird's 
Airs, 1782, ii. No. i6j. From its construction it is much older than the earliest 
date named. 

No. 126. By love and by beauty. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, No. 281, 
entitled Eppie Adair. The MS. is in the British Museum among the Burns 
papers, and he there directs that the chorus should be sung to the first part 
of the tune, and the verse must be repeated to take up the second part. 

The air is a very fine specimen of Scottish music in the minor mode ; but 
has probably been evolved into a double tune. The music in the Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, xi. i(), is entitled My Apple. 

Wo. 127. O, luve -will venture in. Scots Musical Museum, 1 792, No. j"]), 
signed ' B,' entitled The posie. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, j6, ' By Robert 
Burns.' MS. is in the British Museum. This song is not only chaste and 
beautiful, but is set to one of the best-constructed and most artistic melodies 
in the Scottish collections of the eighteenth century, yet it is entirely neglected, 
and is scarcely known. The lines were suggested to Burns on hearing his wife 
sing a street ballad There was a pretty May, which Cromek has printed in 
Reliqnes, 1808, 27/, but neither the Note nor the verses are in the Interleaved 
Museum. The substance of the Note is in an undated letter to Thomson 
about October, 1794. From this commonplace thing Burns wrote The posie, 
which mechanical critics say offends the unity of time, because the flowers named 
in the song do not bloom in the same season. The subject is a very old one 
in English poesy. Burns's song may be compared with A nosegaie alwaies 
sweet, of fifteen stanzas, in the unique volume, '■A Handefull of pleasa^tt Delites. 
At London, 1584.' The last two stanzas are: — 

' Cowsloppes is for Counsell, for secrets vs between. 
That none but you and I alone should know the thing we meane ; 
And if you wil thus wisely do as I think to be best. 
Then have you surely won the field, and set my heart at rest. 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 395 

' I pray you keep this Nosegay wel, and set by it some store : 
And thus farewel, the Gods thee guide, both now and evermore. 
Not as the common sort do vse, to set it in your brest : 
That when the smel is gone away, on ground he takes his rest.' 

The tnne is an adaptation of Roslin Castle (see Song No. 313^. Whether 
The Posie or Roslin Castle be the original cannot now be ascertained : the 
former is the simpler of the two. 

No. 128. Let loove sparkle in her e'e. Scots Musical Musetim, 1792, 
No. 3&1, entitled Jocky fou and Jenny fain. The MS. is in the British 
Museum. Burns added four lines to complete a stanza to Jocky foti and Jenny 
fain, taken from Ramsay's Tea-Table Miscellany, 1725, and also made verbal 
alterations in the rest. He wrote on the MS. for the Museum : ' These are the 
old words, and most excellent words they are. Set the music to them' (R. B ). 
The first four lines, not written by Bums, are within brackets. The tune is in 
Craig's Scots Tunes, 1730, 23. 

Wo. 129. How cruel are the parents. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, 
//. 'Written for this work by Robert Burns.' Thomson wanted English 
verses iox John Anderson my jo, and he got them on May 9, 1795, such as 
they are. At the head of the MS. is written, ' Song altered from an old 
English one,' which is said to be in The Hive, 1733, but it is not in the earlier 
edition, 1725-7. The verses are in Muse's Delight, 17,^4, spi, and Burns has 
adhered to the sentiment of them. In Bickham's Mtcsical Entertainer, 1737, 
ii. 68, the daughters take the business into their own hands, as follows : — 
' When parents obstinate and cruel prove, 
And force us to a man we cannot love ; 
'Tis fit we disappoint the sordid elves 
And wisely get us husbands for ourselves.' 

This they sing to the music of Henry Carey. For the air of Burns's verses, 
see No. .27.2. 

Wo. 130. The smiling Spring comes in rejoicing. Scots Musical 
Mttsettm, 1792, No. jSj, signed 'B,' entitled Bonie Bell. A MS. of this 
joyous song, by an amanuensis, is in the British Museum among the Burns 
papers. Burns does not refer to it in any way, and the only confirmatory 
evidence, which is quite good, is the initial at the end of the song in Johnson's 
Ahtseum. Stenhouse says : ' This is another production of Burns, who also 
communicated the tune to which the words are set in the Museum.' {^Illustra- 
tions, p. JXf .) I have not found any earlier copy of the tune. 

K"o. 131. "Where Cart rins rowin to the sea. Scots Musical Museu7n, 
1792, No. 38(), signed ' R,' entitled The gallant weaver. 'Mr. B.'s old 
words '(Law's MS. List). Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798,^9. The MS. is 
in the British Museum. The Cart, a stream of moderate pretentions, is known 
chiefly as furnishing a river to the ancient burgh of Paisley in Renfrewshire. 
The city of weavers is reported to have given birth to more poets than any 
town in Scotland. ' The chorus of this song is old, the rest of it is mine. 
Here, once for all, let me apologize for many silly compositions of mine in this 
work [jScots Mtcsical Museiutf\. Many beautiful airs wanted words; in the 
hurry of other avocations, if I could string a parcel of rhymes together any- 
thing near tolerable, I was fain to let them pass. He must be an excellent 
poet indeed, whose every performance is excellent' {Interleaved Museurji). 

The tune is in Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. i'j4, entitled IVeaver's March, or 
Twcnty-fi rst of August. It has not the character of a Scottish melody. The 
Hew Stvedish Dance, in the Alusical Pocket- Book. c. 171 5, resembles the tune. 
Thomson printed Burns's song in his musical collection, and without authority 
changed the 'weaver' into a 'sailor,' and set it to The auld wife ayont 
the fire. Mr. John Glen has found the tune in the Dancing Master, 1728, 
entitled Frisky Jenny, or the Tenth of June. 



396 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



No. 132. I do confess thou art sae fair. Scois Musical Museiwi, 1792, 
No. j2i, signed ' Z.' ' This song is altered from a poem by Sir Robert Ayton, 
private secretary to Mary and Anne, Queens of Scotland. I think that I have 
improved the simplicity of the sentiments, by giving them a Scots dress' 
{Interleaved Aluseiini). Tlie MS. is in the British Museum. Burns's opinion is 
not shared by posterity, which thinks that the original verses have not been 
improved. The original in four stanzas of six lines, with music by Henry 
Lawes, is in Playford's Select Ay res, 1659. The words alone are in Watson's 
Scots Poems, 1711, gi. 

The tune with the title Come ashore, jolly tar is in Aird's Airs, 1782, i. 
No. igo, and I conjecture that the music in the Museum was copied from that 
work. In Hogg^s Jacobite Relics, 1819, i. iii is a song The Cuckoo, applied to 
the Old Pretender. The last stanza is as follows : — 

' The Cuckoo 's a bonny bird, but far frae his hame ; 
I ken him by the feathers that grow upon his kame ; 
And round that double kame yet a crown I hope to see, 
For my bonny cuckoo, he is dear to me.' 

The tune in Rutherford's Dances, c. 1770, is entitled The Cuckoo's Nest. No 
one has yet given a rational or satisfactory reason why James VIII was called 
the Cuckoo. Charles Mackay supposed that the Pretender was expected in 
spring to chase away the winter of the discontent of his followers. To which 
I may be permitted to add that when he did come he was not much appreciated, 
and, like the cuckoo, made a very short stay. 

Bunting has claimed the music for Ireland, and states it is in a music- 
book of the early eighteenth century. The tune is not in the Scottish style. 

Wo. 133. Wliare live ye, my bonie lass? Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. j6i, entitled My collier laddie. The MS. is in the British Museum, 
but the song is not otherwise referred to by Burns in his works. According to 
Stenhouse, the words and the tune were transmitted by Burns to the editor of 
the MuseH?ii, where both were printed for the first time. There is no earlier 
record of the music. A song in the Merry Muses is marked for the tune of 
The collier laddie. 

M"o. 134. In simmer, when the hay -was mawn. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1792, No. j66, signed ' B,' entitled Country Lassie. The MS. is in 
the British Museum. In a letter to George Thomson, October 19, 1794, Burns 
admits having written the song. Thomson printed it without authority in 
Select Melodies, 1822, ii. 24, to the tune oijolui, come kiss me noiv. 

The Scottish tune, The country lass of the text, is in the Orpheus Caledonius, 
1733, No. 38, with English verses written by Martin Parker, which Allan 
Ramsay copied, with variations, into the Tea-Table Miscellany. The English 
tune of the same title is that to which Sally in our Alley is now sung, en- 
titled Cold and raw in Durfey's Pills, 1719, iv. 7/2. A third tune for the verses 
was The mother beguiled t/ie daughter. Burns's song does not in the least 
resemble the English version, nor does the tune in the Orpheus, or in 
M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1768, iv. <?<5, resemble any of the three English tunes 
named, except in the closing bars of Sally iti our Alley. 

BTo. 135. Wow rosy May comes in wi' flowers. Scotish Airs, 1799, 6g. 
' Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Dainty Davie.'' Sent to 
Thomson in August, 1793, with this note: ' I have been looking over another 
and a better song of mine in the Museum (see Song No ij6), which I have 
altered as follows, and which I am persuaded will please you. The words 
Dainty Davie glide so sweetly in the air that, to a Scots ear, any song to it, 
without Davie being the hero, would have a lame effect. So much for Davie. 
The chorus you know is to the low part of the tune.' Thomson objected to 
the arrangement of the tune, but Burns adhered to his opinion. For tune see 
No. joS. 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 397 

Wo. 136. When o'er the hill the e'ening star. Currie, Works, 1800, 
iv. 8. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1805, 751/. The MS. is in the Thomson 
collection at Brechin Castle. This is the first song Burns sent to George 
Thomson; with 'eastern star' in the first line. In reply, Burns wrote to 
Thomson ; ' Let me tell you that you are too fastidious in your ideas of songs 
and ballads. I own that your criticisms are just ; the songs you specify in your 
list have, all but one, the faults you remark in them — but who shall mend the 
matter? — who shall rise up and say, "Go to, I will make a better?" For 
instance, on reading over The lea-7-ig, I immediately set about trying my hand 
on it, and after all, I could make nothing more of it than the following, which 
Heaven knows is poor enough' {^Letter, October 26, 1 792). At Thomson's request 
Burns rewrote the third stanza and made some verbal changes in the rest. An 
earlier song, My ain kind dearie, 0, in the Mitsetim suggested the verses. In 
the Interleaved Musetun Burns quotes a still older version : — 
' I'll rowe thee o'er the lea-rig, 
My ain kind dearie, O ; 
I'll rowe thee o'er the lea-rig, 

My ain kind dearie, O. 
Altho' the night were ne'er sae wat, 

And I were ne'er sae weary, O ; 
I'll rowe thee o'er the lea-rig, 
My ain kind dearie, O.' 

A song for the tune is in the Merry Muses, and two different fragments are 
in the Herd MS. The tune The lea-rig or My ain kind dearie, 0, probably 
belongs to the seventeenth century. It is in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 
c. 1756, viii. 20; in Bremner's Reels, 1760, 76; Campbell's Reels, 1778, 18; 
Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. 44; and the Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 4(). 
The original has neither a fourth nor a seventh of the scale. Burns remonstrated 
about corrupting the airs in a letter April, 1793, to Thomson, who often 
disregarded the injunction. The modern form of the melody is given in 
the text, and was discovered too late to make an alteration. 

Wo. 137. Braw, braw lads on Yarrow braes. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
1793, \. II. 'Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Galla Water.' 
Framed on an older pastoral song of the Borderland and the rornantic country 
of Tweeddale. Burns wrote his Galla Water in January, 1793, and sent it in 
a letter to Thomson, with the following remarks illustrating his interest 
in music : ' I should also like to know what other songs you print to each 
tune besides the verses to which it is set. In short, I would wish to give you 
my opinion on all the poetry you publish.' A fragment of an earlier anonymous 
song is in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, j/j? : — 

' Braw, braw lads of Galla-water, 

braw lads of Galla-water, 
I'll kilt my coats below my knee, 

And follow my love thro' the water. 

'Sae fair her hair, sae brent her brow, 
Sae bonny blue her een, my dearie, 
Sae white her teeth, sae sweet her mou', 

1 aften kiss her till I 'm wearie. 

' O'er yon bank, and o'er yon brae. 
O'er yon moss amang the hether, 
I'll kilt my coats aboon my knee, 
And follow my love thro' the water,' 

The tune is in the Caledonian Pocket Compaction, c. 1756, viii. 28 ; Stewart's 
Scots Songs, 1772, /, adapted to a song of different metre; Scots Musical 



398 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Museum, 17S8, No. 12^, with Herd's verses ; in Ritson's Scotish Songs, 1794, 
i. 84 ; and Dale's Scotch Songs, iii. 163. It is a model of simplicity and dignity. 
In many modern copies it is corrupted by closing on the key-note, with the 
introduction of the leading note. 

No. 138. O mirk, mirk is this midnight hour. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
1798, }8. 'Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Lord Gregory.' 
Among the Dalhousie MS. in Brechin Castle. The tragic ballad of Lord 
Gregory, containing about sixty stanzas, better known as Fair Annie of 
L.ochryan, is the foundation of Burns's verses. The earliest printed fragment 
is in Herd's Scottish Songs, i'j'j6, i. 14^, entitled The bonny lass 0' Lochryan. 
Two double stanzas, with the tune, were engraved in the Scots Musical Museum, 
1787, No. /. This was one of the few historical ballads which made an 
impression on Burns. Thomson had informed him that Dr. Wolcot had 
written a song on the subject, and he replied on January 26, 1 793, by enclosing 
a copy of the verses in the text. A few weeks before his death. Burns touched 
up the song, and sent a copy to his friend Alex. Cunningham. 

The tune is not in print before the Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No./. 
According to Stenhouse, it is an old Gallwegian melody. The music is also 
in Urbani's Scots Songs, 1792, i ; and Dale's Scotch Songs, -ii^^, iii. iig. 

No. 139. There 's auld Rob Morris that ■wons in yon glen. In 
Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1793, zy. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' 
The original vigorous song of the seventeenth century describes an old man in 
a dialogue between a girl and her mother, who recommends Rob as a husband. 
Two stanzas of the rough-cast ditty may be quoted : — 

Daughter. ' Auld Rob Morris, I ken him fou weel. 
His back sticks out like ony peet creel ; 
He's out-shin'd, in-knee'd, and ringle-ey'd, too; 
Auld Rob Morris is the man I'll ne'er loo. 

Mother. ' Tho' auld Rob Morris be an elderly man, 
Yet his auld brass will buy a new pan ; 
Then, dochter, ye should na be sae ill to shoo, 
For auld Rob Morris is the man ye maun loo.' 

Burns's song is on the same subject, but treated differently. He informed 
Thomson, on November 14, 1792 : ' I have partly taken your idea oi Auld Rob 
Morris, and am going on with the song on a new plan, which promises pretty 
well.' On December 4 the song was completed. The old words are in the 
Tea-Table Miscellany , 1724, and Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, 10. 

The tune is in Blackie's MS., 1692, under the title Jock the laird's brither. 
The old song and tune are in the Orpheus Caledonitts, 1725, No. jo ; in Watts's 
Musical Miscellany, 1730, iii. 174; Ritson's Scotish Songs, 1794, '^-176, and 
the Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 1^2. The music alone is in Craig's Scots 
Tunes, 1730, 4J ; the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1754, vi. 9; M'^Gibbon's 
Scots Ttmes, 1755, 10, and elsewhere. The compass of the tune is rather 
extended for the present generation. 

No. 140. Here a'wa, there awa, -wandering "Willie. Scotish Airs, 1793, 
2. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' Among the Thomson MS. in 
Brechin Castle. The original song of the name was printed in Herd's Scots 
Songs, 1769, 2gi ; and with the tune in the Scots Musical Museum, 1787, 
No. jj. The first stanza in Herd is : — 

' Here awa, there awa, wandering Willie, 
Here awa, there awa, here awa hame ; 
Lang have I sought thee, dear have I bought thee, 
Now I have gotten my Willie again.' 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 399 

In Gray's MS. Lists, Burns quotes the following stanza, which he states 
must be added, and says it is 'the best in the song.' The stanza has never 
been printed until now. 

' Gin ye meet my love, kiss her and clap her, 
And gin ye meet my love, dinna think shame ; 
Gin ye meet my love, kiss her and clap her. 
And shew her the way to had awa hame.' 
Burns's song, which he sent to Thomson in March, 1783, is entirely different, 
except the title. A committee of taste suggested some alterations, which Burns 
partly adopted. The verses in the text are the final result in April. 

The tune in the Caledotiian Pocket Coinpanion, c. 1756, viii. /, is entitled 
Here azva', WtUie ; and as Uere awa, there awa in M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 
1768, iv. 108 ; Bremner's Second Series Scots Songs, 1757, 11; Perth Musical 
Miscellany, 1786, i"] ; Calliope, 1788, 136; and Ritson's Scotish Songs, 
1794, i. 86. 

No. 141. O, open the door some pity to shew. Scotish Airs, 1793, i. 21. 
'As altered by Robert Burns.' Sent to Thomson in March, 1793, with the 
remark, ' I do not know whether this song be really mended.' The original 
song has hitherto eluded research, and has given rise to some curiosity. The 
verses and air of the original are in Corri's Scots Songs, 1783, ii. jo; in the 
Perth Musical Miscellany, i786,/o7; and in Calliope, 1788,2/. The following 
are the pathetic verses from Corri, marked for an Irish Air : — 
' It 's open the door some pity to shew, 
It 's open the door to me, oh ! 
Tho' you have been false, I'll always prove true. 
So open the door to me, oh ! 
' Cold is the blast upon my pale cheek, 
But colder your love unto me, oh I 
Tho' you have, &c. 
' She 's open'd the door, she 's open'd it wide, 
She sees his pale corpse on the ground, oh 1 
Tho' you have, &c. 
* My true love, she cry'd, then fell down by his side, 
Never, never to shut again, oh I 
Tho' you have,' &c. 
It is reminiscent of the old ballad of Lord Gregory, only that it is he who 
dies claiming admission, and not she. Burns has compressed the last two 
stanzas into one, using the refrain only in his first stanza, and making verbal 
alterations, sometimes not for the better. His third stanza is original, and with 
unerring instinct Carlyle detected Burns's hand in : — 

' The wan moon sets behind the white wave. 
And time is setting with me, O,' &c. 
Thomson made material alterations in the air. In Ireland it is known as 
Open the door softly. It is in Bunting's Irish Alelodies, 1796 ; and Edward 
Nagle, who lived about 1760, wrote verses for it, beginning, 'As I wandered 
abroad in the purple of dawn.' Also, Tom Moore's fine song, ' She is far from 
the land where her young hero sleeps,' was written for Sarah Curran, the lover 
of Robert Emmet, the young Irish rebel who was executed. A corrupted 
setting of the air is 'Ho. ^84 of the Scots Musical Museum, 1803. 

No. 142. Lang hae we parted, been. Scots Musical Museu7n, 1790, 
No. 218. ' Mr. Burns's old words' (Law's MS. List). Doubtless there was an 
old song, but it is uncertain how much of the two stanzas were written by 
Burns. He stated to Thomson that he did not know the tune Laddie lie near 
me well enough to write for it. The note by Burns in the Interleaved 



400 HISTORICAL NOTES 

Mtiseuf/i, that Laddie lie near me is by Dr. Blacklock, refers to the first song 
for the tune in the Museum, beginning, ' Hark, the loud trumpet.' Lady lie 
near me, in Playford's Dancing Master, 1650, is in the same measure, but 
there is no resemblance to Oswald's tune except in the rhythm. This English 
tune served many songs, and was popular about the period of the Restoration. 
The original seems to be a black-letter ballad, entitled, ' The longitig 
Shepherdess, or Lady lie near me, printed by W. Thackery at the Angel in 
Duck Lane^ Still less resemblance is there to an English tune, J^enny, come 
tye my cravat, m Apollo's Banquet, 1687. Wherever the original verses are 
to be discovered, upon which Burns founded his song, they are not in either 
of the English songs. See No. loi. 

Wo. 143. By Allan stream I chane'd to rove. Scotish Airs, 1799, 79. 
'Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Allan Water.'' One of the 
Thomson MS. How this pastoral was written in (? August, 1793) is described 
as follows : ' I walked out yesterday evening with a volume of the Museum 
in my hand, when turning up Allan Water, " What numbers shall the muse 
repeat," it appeared to me rather unworthy of so fine an air, and recollecting 
that it is in your list, I sat and raved under the shade of an old thorn, till 
I wrote one to suit the measure. I may be wrong, but I think it is not in my worst 
style. You must know that in Ramsay's Tea- Table Miscellany , where the modern 
song first appeared, the ancient name of the tune, Allan says, is Allan Water, 
or, My love Annie 'j very bottie. This last has certainly been a line of the 
original song; so I took up the idea, and, as you see, have introduced the line 
in its place, which I presume it formerly occupied ; though 1 give you 
a choosing line if it should not hit the cut of your fancy.' 

The music oi Allan Water is in Blaikie's MS., i6g2 ; Atkinsons MS., 1694 ; 
Original Scotch Tunes, 1700; Sinklers MS., 1710; Caledotiiafi Pocket Com- 
panion, 1752, iv. 2j ; M<=Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1742, j4 ; and with verses in 
Orphetis Caledonius, 1733, No. 2^ ; Scots Musical Museiivi, 1787, No. 4^, and 
Dale's Scotch Songs, 1794, ii. 72. 'This Allan Water, which the composer 
of the music has honoured with the name of the air, I have been told, is 
Allan Water, in Strathallan ' {^Interleaved Musentn). 

No. 144. I fee'd a man at Martinmas. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. j<)4, entitled can ye labour lea. The MS. is in the British Museum. 
An amended version of an equivocal rustic song in the Merry Muses, which 
differs slightly from that here printed. Cromek, in Select Scotish Songs, 1810, 
ii. 40, remarks : ' This song has long been known among the inhabitants of 
Nithsdale and Galloway, where it is a great favourite.' 

This is the tune which George Thomson copied from the Scots Musical 
Museum, and printed for the first time in 1799 as the melody of Burns's Auld 
lang syne. See Song No. 2^4. 

Wo. 145. As down the burn they took their way. Currie, Works, 1800, 
iv. iij. Written at the request of Thomson, to replace a stanza in a song by 
William Crawford, beginning, ' When trees did bud,' originally printed in the 
Tea-Table Miscellany, 1724. Burns at first declined to touch the song, but 
Thomson prevailed, with the unsuccessful result in the text. In Select Melodies, 
1822, iii. II, Thomson replaced Burns's stanza by some vapid lines of his own ; 
as he said Burns ' did not bring the song to the desirable conclusion.' 

The tune, with Crawford's verses, is in the Orphetis Caledonius, 1725, No. jo ; 
in Bremner's Scots Songs, 1757, 27; the Perth Musical Miscellany, 1786, i, and 
the Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 7.^. The tune alone is in the Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. i&, and M'Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1742, _y. 
According to a tradition related by Riddell in the Interleaved Museum, David 
Maigh, a keeper of the hounds of the Laird of Riddell in Tweeddale, was 
the composer. Tradition here is probably wrong. 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 401 

No. 146. O, were my love yon lilac fair. Cunie, Works, 1800, iv. y6. 
Scotish Airs, 1805, 1^4. The MS. is at Brechin Castle. Only the first eight 
lines are the work of Bums. Enclbsing the poem in a letter of June 25, 1793, 
Burns writes thus : ' The thought is inexpressibly beautiful, and quite, so far as 
I know, original. It is too short for a song, else I would forswear you 
altogether, except you give it a place. I have often tried to eke a stanza to it, 
but in vain. After balancing myself for a musing for five minutes on the 
hind-legs of my elbow-chair, I produced the following. [That is, the first eight 
lines in the text.] The verses are far inferior to the foregoing [The fragment — 
the last eight lines], I frankly confess ; but, if worthy of insertion at all, they 
might be first in place, as every poet, who knows anything of his trade, will 
husband his best thoughts for a concluding stroke.' This little lyric was 
dreadfully mutilated by the editor. Thomson suggested Hnghie Graham as 
the tune, and while Burns agreed that the measure would suit, he was doubtful 
whether it would properly express the verses. The poet was evidently not 
familiar with the proper tune, and modelled his stanza from the fragment 
which he got from Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. .^. 

Thomson's imprint was a curious piece of patchwork ; at least five authors 
were represented in the poetry and music. In his Select Melodies, 1825, y'\. J2, 
the poetry is in three stanzas : the first by Burns as in the text, the second by 
a Mr. Richardson, and the third is the anonymous original. As to the melody 
— an imitation of that in the text — the first part is the composition of a lady 
correspondent, the second part is the work of the editor. 

Another old song of three stanzas on the threadbare theme is in the 
Herd MS., and the middle one runs as follows : — 

' O, if my love was a bonny red rose. 
And growing upon some barren wa', 
And I myself a drap of dew, 

Down in that red rose I would fa'. 
The song has rarely been printed with its proper melody. In the Scots 
Musical Aluseum, 1803, No. j-p^?, it is set to Lord Balgonie's favourite, now 
better known as Gloomy zvinter's noo azua, probably because the proper tune 
had been appropriated to another song in the volume, beginning, ' Gently blaw, 
ye western breezes.' 

A bad setting of the proper tune, Gin my love were yon red rose, is in 
Macfarlan MS., 1740, entitled Under her apron; and in the Scots Musical 
Riuseum, 1803, No. j'<52. 

No. 147. Simmer's a pleasant time. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, 
No. 21J. In Law's MS., 'Mr. Burns's old words.' A fragment from which 
Burns completed this song is in the Herd MS. : — 

' O wat, wat and weary, 
Sleep I can get nane 
For thinking on my deary. 

A' the night I wak, 
A' the night I weary. 

Sleep I can get nane 
For thinking on my deary.' 
The origin of this peculiar lyric has exercised the pens of numerous critics. 
In the same year as it was published in the Museum, a version appeared in 
Napier's Scots Songs, i. 61, with the best form of the music as in our text, 
which was communicated from the MS. of Robert Riddell, the friend of Burns. 
A reprint of Napier's music was published in the Museum of 1792, No. _?<S2, 
A sheet-song, entitled Jess Macfarlan, with music, was issued in 1793, which 
Kirkpatrick Sharpe said applied to a nondescript beauty in Edinburgh about 
1740. 

Dd 



402 HISTORICAL NOTES 

The melody is remarkable for its brevity and simplicity. Tytler, Ritson, 
and other antiquarians considered it much earlier than its recorded first 
appearance. 

Ritson stated that the fragment of eight lines printed in his Scotish Songs, 
1794, i. 4^ (with music as in our text), was dictated to him many years ago by 
a young gentleman, who had it from his grandfather. Thomson spoiled the 
character of the music with a modern dress in Select Melodies, 1822, iii. 79. 
To the Song, No. 9.2, sup. ' Can I cease to care,' he added a line at the end of each 
verse in order to fit the rhythm of the music, which he altered to close the air 
on the tonic. Those editorial ' improvements' were doubtless made to elaborate 
the music. The setting of the chorus of the air in the text from Napier's Songs 
differs considerably from that of our No. ^2, which I consider is nearer the 
original air. 

No. 148. G-o, fetch to me a pint o' wine. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, 
No. 2}i, entitled My Bonie Mary; Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1805, i8q, with 
a wrong tune. The MS. of these brilliant verses is in the British Museum. 
Sent to Mrs. Dunlop in a letter, dated December 17, 1788: 'Now I am on 
my hobby-horse, I cannot help inserting two other old stanzas, which please 
me mightily : ' then follows a copy of Aly bonie Mary. Subsequently he 
writes : ' This air is Oswald's ; the first stanza of the song is old, the rest mine ' 
{^Interleaved Musetmi). His object in concealing himself as the author is not very 
obvious, but probably it was to record his opinion of the verses. The 
following fragment is printed on the frontispiece of the second volume of 
Morison's Scotish Ballads, 1790, evidently a part of some undiscovered song: — 

' The loudest of thunder o'er louder waves roar 
That's naething like leaving my love on the shore.' 

An engraving represents the parting of two lovers, and a boat on the beach 

close by. 

Peter Buchan, the editor oi Ancient Ballads, 1828, and other collections, 
professed to have recovered the first four lines of this song written, as he said 
in 1636, by Alexander Lesley, grandfather of the celebrated Archbishop Sharp. 
The Rev. Alexander Dyce, the Shakespearian editor, believed Buchan to be 
absolutely untrustworthy. His opinion would be spoiled by any paraphrase, 
so here are his words : ' This Buchan, whom I once endeavoured to assist in 
his poverty, by procuring purchasers of his books, was a most daring forger ; 
scarcely anything that he has published can be trusted to as genuine.' Dean 
Christie, in his Traditional Ballad Airs, 1876, gets Buchan into a tight place 
over a statement that Hugh Allan, the author of The pipers 0' Btichan, could 
not write a simple letter. Christie says that Allan, on the contrary, was a good 
mathematician and theologian, that he taught his father mathematics, which 
first induced him to study the science. ( Traditional Ballad Airs, 1876, i. j5.) 

The tune, by James Oswald, is in Universal Harino7iy, 1745, loS, entitled 
The stolen Kiss; in the Caledotiian Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. 2], The secret 
Kiss. Burns was not quite satisfied with his choice of a melody, for in 
September, i793i lie suggested to George Thomson that as it precisely 
suited the measure of the air, Waes my heart that we should sunder, he might 
set it to this. Thomson did not act on the advice, but printed it to The old 
highland laddie, which subsequent compilers have adopted. Burns's alternative 
melody, Waes my heart that we should sunder, is a characteristic tune printed 
in Original Scotch Tunes, 1700 ; also in the Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 9. 

!N"o. 149. Young Jamie, pride of a' the plain. Scots Musical Museum, 
1796, No. 420. The MS. is in the British Museum, marked for the tune The 
carlin of the glen, and Stenhouse was the first who claimed the song for Burns. 
Nothing is known of its history. The tune is said to be in Clark's Flores 
Musicac, I'j'js, with the title; but the music is evidently derived from the 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 403 

Scottish form of Barbara Allan, which is in Oswald's Curious Collection, 
1740, _j, and Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1745, ii. 2j. 

No. 150. ilee balou, my sweet "wee Donald. Scots Musical Museum, 
1796, No. .^7.2, entitled The Highland balou. Stenhouse says : 'This curious 
song is a versification, by Burns, of a Gaelic nursery song, the literal import 
of which, as well as the air, were communicated to him by a Highland lady. 
The bard's original MS. is in the Editor's possession.' i^I llicstrations , p. 416^ 
The MS., entitled ' Fragment,' is in the British Museum. 

The morality of the Highland cateran was that of the chosen people, who 
thought it no wrong to spoil the ' Egyptians.' The relation of the Celt to the 
Sassenach, and to the rights of property, are the subject of a conversation 
between Evan Dhu and Waverley on Donald Bean Lean and his daughter 
Alice : — 

' Oich, for that,' said Evan, * there is nothing in Perthshire that she need 
want, if she ask her father to fetch it, unless it be too hot or too heavy.' 

' But to be the daughter of a cattle stealer — a common thief! ' 

'Common thief! — no such thing; Donald Bean Lean never lifted less than 
a drove in his life.' 

' Do you call him an uncommon thief, then ? * 

'No, he that steals a cow from a poor widow or a stirk from a cottar is 
a thief; he that lifts a drove from a Sassenach laird is a gentleman drover. 
And, besides, to take a tree from the forest, a salmon from the river, a deer 
from the hill, or a cow from a Lowland strath, is what no Highlander need 
ever think shame upon.' ( Waverley, chap, xviii.) 

The original tune is in Johnson's Musetim. Robert Schumann, the German 
composer, adopted the theme, and treated it classically in his Liederkreis, 
opus 2J. 

No. 151. O, saw ye my dear, my Philly. Currie, Works, 1800, iv. 1J4, 
entitled Sazv ye my Philly. Tune, When she cam ben she babbit. The MS. 
is in Brechin Castle. A prosaic version oi Eppie M'^Nab (Song No. 72;), 
furnished to Thomson in October, 1794. Burns advised the editor how the 
tune should be printed : ' Let me offer at a new improvement, or rather 
a restoring of old simplicity, in one of your newly-adopted songs : — 
' When she cam ben she bobbit [a crotchet stop) 
When she cam ben she bobbit ; (« crotchet stop) 
And when she cam ben, she kissed Cockpen, 
And syne denied that she did it' (a crotchet stop). 

This is the old rhythm, and by far the most original and beautiful. Let the 
harmony of the bass at the stops be full, and thin and dropping through 
the rest of the air, and you will give the tune a noble and striking effect.' 
Thomson acted on this excellent advice, and adopted the pauses as indicated. 
Haydn, the celebrated composer who harmonized the tune for Scotish Airs, 
filled the vocal blanks with a single instrumental chord. 

For the tune, see Song No. igi, where Burns did not treat the ' old words ' 
in the way he advised Thomson. 

No. 152. My luve is like a red, red rose. Urbani's Scots Songs, 1794, 
with an original melody. Scots Musical Mtcseum, 1796, No. 402, signed 'R,' 
entitled A Red, red rose. Scotish Airs, 1799, 8^, 'from an old MS. in the editor's 
possession.' The make-up of a song which Burns learnt in his youth. Several 
variants of it are printed in the Hogg and Motherwell's Burns, 1 8 34, ii. 2']4, 
and in the Centenary edition. The first four lines Burns altered, the second 
he left untouched, the third he materially altered, and the last four lines are 
almost, if not the identical words of the old song. The rest he discarded ; 
and like nearly everything he touched, he transformed dead or commonplace 

D d 2 



404 HISTORICAL NOTES 

verses into living, emotional song. The MS. is in the British Museum, and 
contains this note : ' The tune of this song is in Niel Gow's first collection, and 
is there called Major GrahuTn.^ The first three stanzas are in the Museum 
as No. 402, to the tune Major Graham. One of the chap-books, containing 
a version of the ballad, belonged to Burns in his youth. Some of the variants 
are in the metre o^ Mally Stezvart of Song No. 2g6, as the following opening 
verses of The Turtle Dove ; or Triie love'' s farewell, will show: — 

' O fare you well, my own true love, 
O farewell for a while, 
But I'll be sure to return back again 
If I go ten thousand miles, my dear, 
If I go ten thousand miles.' 

Thomson printed My luve is like a red., red 7'ose, and with his usual 
propensity to improve, he chose a tune of double measure, and altered the 
song to fit it. For example : ' And fare thee weel awhile' becomes ' And fare 
thee weel a little while,' truly a water-logged addition. 

The tune Major Grahani is in Aird's Airs, 1788, iii. No. /_>7, and Gow's 
Strathspeys, 1784, 6. It is unconsciously framed on the lines of Miss Admiral 
Goi'don's Strathspey, No. 6^ supra. 

No. 153. The ploughman, he 's a bonie lad. Scots Musical Museum, 
1788, No. 16s. A new or amended version of a rustic song taken from Herd's 
Scots Songs, i'j()g,jij, to furnish words for the tune. The second and third 
stanzas in the Museum, as follows, are taken from Herd, and improved : — 

' My ploughman he comes hame at e'en, 
He's aften wat and weary: 
Cast aff the wat, put on the dry. 
And gae to bed, my dearie. 

'I will wash my ploughman's hose. 
And I will dress his o'erlay ; 
I will mak my ploughman's bed, 
And cheer him late and early.' 

The rest, considerably altered by Burns, is in the te,\t. 

Another song of the same kind is sequestered in the Merry Muses. The 
tune The Ploughtnan is in the Caledonia7i Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. 6; in 
Brenmer's Reels, 1761, 8g ; in the Perth Musical Miscellany, 1786, 248, 
entitled Merry Plowman; and in Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. 41. A tune 
Sleepy body in the Orpheus Caledonitis, 1733, No. /o, although in different 
measure, is substantially the same melody. The music for the chorus of The 
Ploughman is the same for the verse. ^ 

Wo. 154. Thou hast left me ever, Jamie. Scotish Airs, 1799, 90. 
' Written for this work by R. I'urns.' After bearing Fraser play the tune 
Fee him, father, fee him, Burns wrote to George Thomson, in September, 1793 : 
'I enclose you Fraser's set of this tune; when he plays it slow, in fact he 
makes it the language of despair. I shall here give you two stanzas in that 
style, merely to try if it will be any improvement. Were it possible, in singing, 
to give it half the pathos which Fraser gives it in playing, it would make 
an admirable pathetic song. I do not give these verses for any merit they 
have.' Thomson kept the song for six years, altered yawzV into Tam, and 
what is more deplorable, set it to the tune My boy Taminie. 

Thomas Fraser was a native of Edinburgh, and the principal oboe player 
in the orchestral concerts of the city at the end of the eighteenth century. 
G. F. Graham, who knew Fraser personally, confirmed Burns's opinion of him 
as a musician. He died in 1S25. 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 



405 



Bums, in the Interleaved Museum, says: 'This song for genuine humour in 
the verses, and lively originality in the air is unparalleled. I take it to be very 
old.' The verses of Fee him, father, fee hiiii are in The Charmer, Edinburgh, 
1752; the last stanza is:— 

' O, fee him, father, fee him, quo' she, 
Fee him, fee him, fee him. 
He'll had the pleugh, thrash in the barn, 
And crack wi' me at e'en, quo' she, 
And crack wi' me at e'en.' 
The song is also in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, 7.?, and vi^ith music in 
Bremner's Scots Songs, I757> ^- With different words in Cito and Euterpe, 
1762, ii. lyi, entitled A new Scotch song; and Scots Musical Aluseum, 1787, 
No. p. The tune alone is in M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1768, iv. g8. The 
earliest publication of verses and music in a corrupted form is in Walsh's 
Original Scotch Songs, c. 1 740. 

No. 155. My heart is sair — I darena tell. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 4^6, signed 'B,' entitled 'For the sake o" Somebody.' The MS. is in the 
British Museum. In ^SinKa-ys Miscellany, 1725, there is a song of no con- 
spicuous merit with the same title. Burns took the chorus, and made new 
verses. Here is a stanza of the commonplace verses of Ramsay to show the 
alteration Burns effected : — 

' I am gaun to seek a wife, 

I am gaun to buy a plaidie, 
I have three stane of woo', 

Carling, is thy daughter ready?' 
The Jacobites used the indefinite ' somebody ' as a synonym for the Pretender, 
and patchwork verses referring to the royal line are in the Jacobite collections. 
A stanza runs : — 

' If Somebody were come again, 

Then Somebody maun cross the main ; 
And ilka ane will get his ain, 
And I will see my Somebody.' 
Burns's tenderly pathetic love-song treats the passion in a lofty and dignified 
manner. An unwieldy melody by Allan Masterton, based on the original 
tune, was communicated to the editor of the Mttseum, and rejected. Bums 
wrote underneath the music that * it was difficult to set.' Underneath the copy 
of another cramped tune by Masterton, Burns remarked that ' the notation 
of the music seemed incorrect, but I send it as I got it ' (Gray's AIS. Lists). 

For a copy of the tune For the sake <?' Somebody, Burns directed the editor 
of the Museum to the Caledonian Pocket Co??ifanton, 1752, iv. jo. The 
music consists of only four bars repeated in the chorus. Since Buins's time 
a graceful second strain has been grafted on, probably composed by Urbani, 
who published a selection oi Scots Songs between 1793 and 1799. The modern 
addition is as follows : — 



i 



i^^E^^ESa 



EE 



-*^" 



i 



O - hon ! for Some - bo - dy ! O - hey ! for Some - bo - dy ! 



^ 



B^ 



=?V=: 



^^< 



-0'-, ?si_| s_ 



I could range the world a - round For the sake o' Some - bo • dy ! 



4o6 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



The tune of a forgotten and now unknown song, entitled / have waked the 
winter's nights, corresponding to a line in Burns's song, is in a Dutch music 
book, Friesche Lust-Nof, i 634. The song in the Tea- Table Miscellany may 
probably have been sung to that tune, or another, Carlin, is yotir daughter 
ready? in Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. 24. 

Wo. 156. The "Winter it is past. Scots Musical Museum^ 17887 No. 200, 
entitled The wiftter it is past. Cromek printed the first two stanzas in the 
Keliqties, 1808, 446, and other versions vary. Burns wrote only the second 
stanza, and corrected the first ; the rest was printed before his time as a stall- 
ballad. The song of seven stanzas is in the Herd MS. Dr. Petrie has copied 
it into the Ancient Music of Ireland. From the beauty of the melody it had 
a wide range of popularity ; Dean Christie took it down from the singing of 
a native of Banffshire, and inserted the words and music (much different 
from our text) in Traditional Ballad Ai7-s, 1876, 1.114. The original song 
(imperfectly authenticated) belongs to the middle of the eighteenth century, 
and was written on a highwayman called Johnson, who was hung in 1750 for 
robberies committed in the Ctirragh of Kildare. The tune is in the Caledonian 
Pocket Co77ipanion, 1759, x. 9. Both poetry and music, so far as dates are 
concerned, make it a Scottish song. 

No. 157. Comin. thro' the rye, poor body. Scots Musical Musetim, 1796, 
No. 41'], signed ' B.' ' This song was written by Burns ' (Stenhouse, Illustrations, 
p. J77). Burns wrote against the title : ' Tune, Miller's Wedding — a Strathspey ' 
(Gray's MS. Lists). Evidence exists that the bob of this jingle was very popular 
in Scotland in the eighteenth century. A private version of the song is in the 
Merry Muses. A later edition of the Miiseuni states that Comin thro' the rye 
was ' written for this work by Robert Burns.' Chappell, with patriotic fervour, 
tried to show that a pantomime song, with the title, &c., entered in Stationers' 
Hall, June 6, 1796 (Burns died on July 21) was the original of the class. But 
( I ) Burns was then very ill, ( 2) his Merry Muses copy was much earlier than 
the date named, and (3) he was acquainted wilh a considerable portion of the 
posthumous fifth volume of the Museum, printed December, 1796. Chappell's 
object was to annex the tune to England, it being a variant oi Atild tang syne. 
Cotnin thro' the 7ye has been popular in England since the close of the 
eighteenth century, and it renewed the imitations of the ' Scots' snap.' 

For the tune and its variants, see Nos. 144 and 2J4. In Bremner's Reels, 
1759, .^z, it is entitled The Miller s IVedding. 

No.l58. Wae is my heart, and the tear's in mye'e. Scots Musical Mtiseum, 
i^gG, No. 4y6. The holograph MS. is in the British Museum. No reference 
to this song is in the poet's writings. Stenhouse states that Burns communi- 
cated the melody, vifhich is very beautiful, to the editor of the Museum, where 
it was originally published. I have not found it earlier. 

No. 159. O lassie, are ye sleepin yet? Currie, Works, 1800, iv. 220. 
Tune, Let vie in this ae night. Scotish Airs, 1805, 1^6. MS. is in the Brechin 
Castle collection. A version of a song in Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. 16 j, 
was altered by Burns to fit it for presentation in the Museum, where it 
appeared in 1792, No. }ii. The MS. of this is in the British Museum. 
Burns rewrote it in August, 1 793, but he did not think it worthy of preservation, 
and cast it aside. In September, 1794, he tried again, and wrote three stanzas, 
but with the same result. P'inally, the song in the text was transmitted to 
Thomson in February, 1795, styled by Burns, 'Another trial at your favourite 
air.' The first stanza and the chorus are from the old song ; the rest is original. 
The following fourth stanza of the second part was suppressed by Burns : — 
' My kith and kin look down on me, 
A simple lad of high degree ; 
Sae I maun try frae love to flee 
Across the raging main, jo.' 



II. LOVE-SONGS : GENERAL 407 

Burns disapproved of the arrangement of the tune printed with the old song 
in the Museum, and recoinmended Thomson to adopt the copy in the Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, and to put the chorus of the song to the high part of the 
tune. With his usual perversity, the editor set the chorus to the low part. 

The tune, entitled The gozine new made, is said to be in Leydens MS., 1685 ; 
as I would have tny goiine i/iade in Sinkler s MS., 17 10; entitled Will ye lend 
me your loom, lass in the Caledottian Pocket Cotnpanion, 1752, iv. 21 ; the Scots 
Musical Museum, 1792, No. j7z, with the old words amended by Burns; and 
in Dale's Scotch Songs, 1794, ii. 97. 

No. 160. Will ye go to the Highlands, Leezie Lindsay ? Scots Musical 
Musetun, 1796, No. 4^4, entitled Leezie Lindsay. Burns appears to have 
recovered the ballad of L^eezie Lindsay, and intended to make a complete song 
out of it. Johnson of the Musctwi marked on the musical MS. which Burns sent, 
' Mr. Burns is to send words,' but the four lines in the text are the whole 
contribution. Jamieson, in Popular Ballads, 1806, ii. i4(), first published the 
complete ballad, which refers to Donald MacDonald, heir of Kingcausie, 
who proposes to go to Edinburgh for a wife. His mother consents on the 
condition that he shall represent himself as a poor man. To the ' bonny young 
ladies ' of Edinburgh he promises curds and whey, a bed of bracken, &c. The 
tune was communicated to Johnson of the Museum, where it was first printed. 
It is a remarkably simple melody. 

*'^o. 161. 'Twas past one o'clock. Scots Musical Mtiseiim, 1790, No. 22-], 
signed ' Z.' The MS. verses are in the British Museum. In the La%v MS., 
' Mr. Burns's old words ' ; and further on in the same sheet is the note : 
' There is an excellent set of this tune in M'Gibbon which exactly suits with the 
words,' which were first sketched in August, 1 788, at Mauchline. The air in a 
rudimentary form is in the opera Flora, 1729, with Gibber's verses, beginning : — 
' 'Twas past twelve o'clock on a fine summer morning 
When all the village slept pleasantly,' &c. 

The tune with a Celtic title, Chi mi ma chattle, is in Ramsay's Musick, 
c. 1726, and a song is so marked in the Tea- Table Miscellajty, 1724. The 
music, widely known, is in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. 16; 
M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1768, iv. ii(f ; and Thumoth's Scotch and Irish Airs. 

In my copy of M'^Gibbon some previous owner has marked the title Madhyn 
Bugeeven, as if it were a Dutch melody. 

No. 162. Jockie's taen the parting kiss. Cunie, Works, i8oo, iv. _?p7; 
Scots Musical Ahiseum, 1803, No. jyo, ' Written for this work by Robert 
Burns'; Edinburgh edition, 1877, and Centenary Burns, 1897. Stenhouse 
remarks that ' this charming song was written by Burns for the Ahiseum ' 
(^Illustrations, p. 4gd). 

The tune is probably English, and the copy is a bad setting of Bo7tie lass 
take a man in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, c.\']^(j, xi. 18, which, accord- 
ing to Mr. Glen, was one of the airs sung in Mitchell's opera, Llighland Fair, 
1731- 

N'o. 163. As I was -walking up the street. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, 
No. /97, ' W'ritten for this work by Robert Burns ;' Edinburgh edition, 1877 ; 
and in the Cente7tary Btirns, 1897, iii. 20"], where the last and best stanza is 
omitted. Stenhouse affirms that the song was written by Burns for the Museum 
(^Illustrations, p. jid). When and why it was written has not been discovered. 
It is the second last song by Burns in the Musetim. The tune is said by Stenhouse 
to have been communicated by Burns. Mr. Glen states that the air is entitled 
Devil Jly over the water wi' her in Aird's Keels, c. 1788, a collection which I 
have not seen. 

Wo. 164. Is this thy plighted, fond regard? Scotish Airs, 1799, 70, 
' Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Roy's wife.' The MS. is in the 



4o8 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Thomson collection. Sent to Thomson on November 20, 1794. ' Since yesterday's 
penmanship, I have framed a couple of English stanzas, by way of an English 
song to Roys wife. You will allow me thai in this instance my English corre- 
sponds in sentiment with the Scottish.' This was originally written to celebrate 
Mrs. Riddell, but her name was cancelled, and an imaginary one inserted. 
The tune Roy's wife or Ruffian! s rant is noted in Song No. 2jg. 

No. 165. There was a bonie lass, and a bonie, bonie lass. Scots 
Musical Museum, 1803, No. /(S6, ' By R. Kuins.' No historical evidence has 
been forthcoming for this fragment in the Mtisetun, except that it is marked as 
stated. 

The tune, A bonie lass, so far as concerns the first section, is a variation of 
Pinky house in the Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. 21, and the Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, 1743, i. // ; the second part appears to be original. 

*lSo. 166. As late by a sodger I chanced to pass. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 26S. Neither Stenhouse nor Cromek connect Burns with this song, 
nor is it in his published works. In Law's MS. List for the third volume of 
the Museum Bums wrote against the title, ' Mr. Burns's old words.' The first 
twelve lines are substantially those in the Herd MS., and the remaining four 
lines are original to complete the second stanza for the tune, which is marked as 
to be sung for one of Allan Ramsay's songs in his Miscellany, 1725. Ramsay's 
verses, beginning 'Adieu for a while,' are reprinted in Herd's Scots Songs, 
1769, 106. 

The music witliout title is in Sinklers MS., 1710; as a variation entitled 
Gig it is in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. ij ; and with the title 
rilmakye be fain to follow me in Bremner's Reels, 1757, 24 ; Stewart's Reels, 
1 761, 10; Campbell's A' ^e/j, 1778, 12; and elsewhere. 

*]Sro. 167. O dear minny, what shall I do? Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 2j6. The MS. is in the British Museum, and in Laws MS., ' Mr. 
B. gave the old words,' in the poet's handwriting. Part of the verses are in 
the Herd MS. The alteration made by Burns was to recast six lines into 
eight, the second line being original. 

The tune is in Sinklers MS., 1710, entitled Minie; in Oswald's Curious 
Collection of Scots Tmies, 1740, .25; in Caledoniait Pocket Companion, 17.1^1, 
iii. 10; M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1746, jj. A similar melody is in Apollo's 
Banquet, 1695, entitled Long cold nights. 



III. LOVE: HUMOROUS. 

Ho. 168. Here 's to thy health, my bonie lass ! Scots Musical Museum, 
1796, No. 4()S, signed ' B,' with the tune Laggan Burn. I adopt the opinion 
of Scott- Douglas, that this is an early production of Burns, but the chronology 
is uncertain. The MS. is in the British Museum. In a later issue of the 
Miiseum it is marked ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' According to 
Mrs. Begg, the poet's sister, the song was known previous to her lime, but there 
is no trace of any such song. 

According to Stenhouse, Burns communicated to Johnson of the Museum two 
melodies for this song, Laggan Burn, and another. The 'other' was not 
suitable, and Laggan Burn was chosen. Stephen Clarke, the musical editor, 
is reputed to have adapted it to the verse according to Burns's direction. 
It is not easy to account for the neglect of this insinuating melody. It may be 



III. LOVE-SONGS : HUMOROUS 409 



compared with Greenend Park, in Malcolm M'^Donald's Reels, second coll., 
1789, 10. 

3S"o. 169. The taylor fell thro' the bed. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 212, entitled The taylo7- fell thro' the bed, &c. • The air is the March 
oj the Corporation of Tailors. ' The second and fourth stanzas are mine ' 
{^Interleaved Museum); ' Mr. Burns's old words,' in Law's MS. List. The tune 
is in Atkinso)i's MS., 1694, entitled Beivare of the Kipells; in the Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, xi. 28; and as The Taylor s March in Aird's Airs, 1782, 
i. No. 77^. A song with substantially the above title is in the Merry Muses ; it 
is named / rede you beware d' the ripples, to the tune The taylor' s faun thro'' 
the bed, the second stanza being ; — 

' I rede you beware o' the ripples, young man, 
I rede you beware o' the ripples, young man, 
Tho' music be pleasure, tak music in measure 

Or ye may want win' i' your whistle, young man.' 

See the tune No. 1^2, which is the same as this, differently arranged. The 
more modern Logie 0' Bttchatt is nothing but this seventeenth century melody, 
which is also allied to / love my love in secret, No. no. 

ITg.ITO. O, merry hae I been teethin a heckle. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 2']o. Tune, Lord Breadalbine^ s March. 'Mr. B.'s old words' 
(Law's MS. List) in Burns's handwriting. Stenhouse had the MS. of the song 
through his hands. There is no authority for assuming that it is a variant of 
the tinker's song in The Jolly Beggars, although it looks it. 

The Celtic tune of Burns's choice has no sort of affinity with The bob d' 
Dumblane. Mr. Henley has followed Scott-Douglas in assuming that it is the 
same air. The bob d Dumblane is the tune of Song No. 204, and can be 
compared with Lord Breadalbine''s March, or Boddich na^mbrigs, which is in 
Low's Ancient Scots Music, c. 1776, j2. It is an excellent specimen of Scots 
dance music of the eighteenth century. It lacks the intervals of a fourth and 
a seventh, and closes on the second of the scale. 

No. 171. My lord a-hunting he is gane. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, 
1^0. J J4, ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' This is a side view of one 
of the fashionable amusements of the eighteenth century. ' The kith and kin of 
Cassilis' blude ' recalls the ancient renown of the Kennedy family, which has 
been in the Scottish peerage since 15 10. Cassilis House, near Ayr, was the 
scene of the not unwilling abduction of the Countess, and her subsequent 
incarceration for life in the tower with the heads of Faa and his gypsy gang 
emblazoned in stone on the turrets. The ballad o{ Johnny Faa or The Gypsy 
Laddie is supposed to have its origin from this traditional story. 

According to Stenhouse, the tune is the composition of James Greig, a teacher 
of dancing in Ayrshire, who had a taste for painting, mechanics, and natural 
history. My lady's gown was originally published in the Museum. It is a 
remarkably good specimen of the untutored music of Scotland without regard 
to any of the scholastic rules of the art. Another specimen of Greig's tunes is in 
Stewart's Reels, 1762, 44, and in Campbell's Reels, 1778, 11, entitled Greig's 
pipes. 

Wo. 172. The heather was blooming. Cromek's Reliques, 1808, 4^0 ; 
entitled LLunting Song, for the tune / rede ye beware d the ripells, young man. 
It is one of the Crochallau Club Songs in the Merry Muses, or rather an 
amended version of a song then current, but now not available. Mrs. M'^Lehose 
begged the author not to print it, and he acted on the advice, but Cromek, 
though very fastidious about The Jolly Beggars, inserted it in the Reliques 
of Burns. For the tune, see Note 16^, 



4TO HISTORICAL NOTES 

Wo. 173. "Weary fa' you, Duncan Gray. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, 
No. 160, signed 'Z.' The MS. is in the British Museum. 'Dr. Elacklock 
informed me that he had often heard the tradition that this air was composed 
by a carman in Glasgow' (^Interleaved Museiini). Founded on an old song, 
and written for the Museum. Bums borrowed the rhythm, and the refrain, 
' Ha, ha, the girdin o't.' A version of four stanzas in the Merry Muses 
begins : — 

' Can ye play me Duncan Gray ? 

Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
O'er the hills and far away, 
Ha, ha, the girdin o't ! 
' Duncan cam our Meg to woo, 
Meg was nice and wadna do, 
But like an ether puffed and blew 
At offer o' the girdin o't,' &c. 
Substantially the same verses of five stanzas are in the Herd MS. in the 
British Museum. They are not redolent of a pious education. For the tune, 
see Note 779. 

Wo. 174. Wi' braw new branks in meikle pride. Lockhart's Life of 
Burns, 1829. Burns has described the interest be felt in parish secrets as a 
statesman in the knowledge of European diplomacy at his finger ends. His 
friends employed him as a confidential clerk to write their letters, and he acted 
the part of an unpaid French notaire in conducting their correspondence. 
In this case it was a poetical epistle on behalf of William Chalmers, a solicitor 
of Ayr, the same who drew the deed assigning Burns's interest in the farm 
of Mossgiel to his brother Gilbert when the poet decided to emigrate. Burns 
sent the epistle to the sweetheart of his friend; in 1787 he gave a copy to 
Lady Don, who handed it to Sir Walter Scott. 

I cannot discover that the verses were written for any particular melody. 
An old tune, Omnia vincit Amor, in the Skene MS., c. 1630, will suit the 
words. It is in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, Book, viii. considerably 
altered. 

Wo. 175. I am my mammy's ae bairn. Scots Musical Museufn, 1788, 
No. loy, signed ' Z,' to the tune I'm o'er young to marry yet. ' The chorus of 
this song is old ; the rest of it, such as it is, is mine ' {Interleaved Museum'). 
With considerable emendations, it still occupies a place in all modern collections 
of Scottish song, and is very popular to a modern tune, different from that in the 
text for which it was written. 

In Cromek's Scotish Songs, i. 707, is an additional stanza, not by Burns, 
which that editor thinks ought to be restored, but our text may be quite 
sufficient. Two stanzas of another of the same kind are in the Herd MS., 
beginning : — 

' I am gaun to court a wife. 
And I'll love her as my life ; 
But she is a young thing, 
And new come frae her minnie.' 
The subject is common to the folk-song of other countries. There is, for 
example, a French popular song of the fifteenth century with the same text, 
beginning, ' Je suis trop jeunette, Pour faire ung amy,' &c. The excellent old 
melody of these French verses may be seen in Tiersot's Chanson Fopulaire, Paris, 
1889, 66. 

The tune, I'm o'er young, slightly varied from that in our text, is in Bremner's 
Reels, 1758,25; Stewart's Reels, 1761, 7; and M'^Glashan's Reels, I'jSG, 46. 
An offshoot is probably lock Eroch Side, No. />. 

No. 176. There was a lass, they ca'd her Meg. Scots Musical Musettm, 



III. LOVE-SONGS : HUMOROUS 41 1 

1788, No. 14^, entitled Duncan Davison. Signed 'Z.' This naerry rustic 
song is not named by Burns in any of his writings, neither is it among the 
Burns MS. in the British Museum. Sten house states : ' I have recovered his 
original MS. of the song, which is the same as that inserted in the Museum ' 
(^Illustrations , p. i}<)). The model is a song of two double stanzas, which 
Burns wrote in the Merry Muses, and a fragment of another of the same sort, 
You'll aye be welcome hack, is in Herd^s MS. 

The tune, as in our text, is in Bremner's Reels, 1759, j6, entitled Ye" II ay be 
7velcotne back again; in Campbell's Reels, 1778, jj, entitled Dtincan Davie. 
In M^Glashan's Strathspey Reels, 1780, 14, it bears the name Duncan Davidso?t, 
by which it has since been known. It is in Dale's Scotch Songs, 1794, i. jS, 
with Burns's verses. For another setting of the tune, see No. /6. 

No. 177. The blude-red rose at Yule may blow. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1788, No. 182, entitled To dauttton me. Two MSS. containing the 
complete song in his handwriting are in the British Museum ; and into 
the Interleaved Museum he copied two stanzas (apparently from memory) 
of the following good Jacobite song, which is in Loyal Songs, 1750, and 
refers to the Revolution of 1688 : — 

' To daunton me, to daunton me, 

Do you ken the thing that would daunton me ? 

Eighty-eight, and eighty-nine, 

And a' the dreary years sinsyne, 

With cess and press and presbytrie, 

Good faith 1 this had liken till a daunton me. 
' But to wanton me, but to wanton me, 

Do you ken the thing that would wanton me ? 

To see gude corn upon the rigs, 

And banishment to all the Whigs, 

And right restor'd where right should be ; 

O, these are the things that wad wanton me. 
' But to wanton me, but to wanton me, 

And ken ye what maist would wanton me ? 

To see King James at Edinb'rough Cross, 

With fifty thousand foot and horse. 

And the usurper forc'd to flee ; 

O, this is what maist would wanton me.' 
Several versions of this song exist, satirizing the Whigs and in praise of the 
Stuarts. The domestic song of Burns harps on the old tale of the attempted 
purchase of a young wife by an old man. The subject is one of Poggio's 
Jocose Tales of the beginning of the fifteenth century. 

The tune of Burns's song in the Mttsettm is printed incorrectly. It embraces 
eight lines, but the original stanza, as above, is six lines. The memorandum 
written by Burns in his copy of the Caledonian Pocket Covipanion, 1743, 
i. 16, runs : ' The chorus is set to the first part of the tune, which just suits it 
when played or sung once over,' The music is in Atkinsons MS., 1694, ly, 
Oswald's Curious Collection, 1740,^5; M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1746,^7; 
Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. 60, and elsewhere. 

Kg. 178. Her daddie forbad, her minnie forbad. Scots Mtisical 
Miiseum, 1788, No. ij8, with the inne. Jumpin John. Stenhouse states that 
this is the fragment of an earlier song, which Burns mended to illustrate 
a melody requiring words. But nothing is known of any song of the kind 
except one with the title My daddie forbad, my minnie forbad in Ramsay's 
Tea-Table Miscellany, 1724, not at all resembling Burns's verses. It is in 
Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, i}j. The title Jumpin John is in Burns's hand- 
writing in Gray's Museum Lists. The tune, although well known in Scotland 



412 HISTORICAL NOTES 

under this title, is not a Scottish air. As Joatis placket is torn, it has been 
in use for nearly two hundred and fifty years. Pepys, in his diary of June 22, 
1667, describing tlie capture of the man-of-war Tioydr/ Charlie by the Dutch, 
speaks of a trumpeter sounding Joans placket is torn. 

The music is in Playford's Dancing Master, 1686. A political song with 
the music is in 180 Loyal Songs, 1685, 14}. The second part of the tune is 
the chorus oi Lilliburlero, the celebrated political song of 1688, which Wharton 
claimed to have written, and which he boasted had sung a king out of three 
kingdoms. Lastly, it is the parent stock of a spurious Celtic air The Cock 
of the North, played on the great Highland bagpipe, much in vogue a year 
or two ago. In Scottish collections, the tune as Junipiti Joan is in the 
Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1758, ix. 10; and as When I followed a lass in 
Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. c)6. 

Wo. 179. Duncan Gray cam here to •woo. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 
1798, 48, 'Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Duncan Gray.'' 
The MS. is in the Thomson collection. Sent to Thomson with his song Atild 
Rob Morris : ' The foregoing I submit to your better judgment ; acquit 
or condemn them as seemeth good in your sight. Duncan Gray is that kind 
of light-horse gallop of an old air which precludes sentiment. The ludicrous 
is the leading feature.' It is an original treatment of the old song, and one 
of the best-known of Burns's humorous productions. The ancestry is treated 
in Note No. 27J. 

The tune is in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1751, iii. 8 ; M^Gibbon's 
Scots Tunes, T75.5, 7; Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. iii; and with part of the old 
song in Scots Musical Musetiin, 1788, No. 160. For the music, see No. i']}. 

Wo. 180. Hey the dusty miller. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, No. 144, 
entitled Dusty miller, with music. A holograph title is in the Gray MS., 
and a MS. of the versus is in the British Museum. This is another of the 
unconsidered trifles floating among the peasantry, which Burns dressed for 
the Muscu7n. The original is in the Herd MS. All the second stanza is 
Burns's, and he corrected the rest to preserve the melody. The miller was an 
important person in Scotland. The multure, or mouter, was the portion of the 
grain retained by him as the charge for grinding. He had the reputation 
of being able to take care of himself, and Acts of Parliament were passed 
to protect the public against his extortion. He is embalmed in satirical songs 
of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. 

The tune as Binnys Jigg is in Blackie's MS., 1692; as Dusty miller in 
Bremner's Reels, 1758, 27; Welsh's Coinpleat Dancing Master, c. 1718; aD<i 
Dale's Scotch Songs, 1 794, iii. i6j. 

No. 181. I gaed up to Dunse. In Scots Musical Museum, 1803, No./.jy, 
entitled Robin shure in haste. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' 
* Mr. B. gave the old words ' (Law's MS. List). The poet himself was not the 
hero of the verses, for on August 23, 1787, he wrote to Robert Ainslie, heading 
the letter with a first stanza, and ending ' Call your boy what you think proper, 
only interject Burns. What say you to a Scripture name? lor instance, Zimri 
Burns Ainslie, or Achitophell, &c. &c., look your Bible for these two heroes.' 
In another letter to the same correspondent, dated January 6, 17S9, he says, 
'I am still catering for Johnson's publication, and among others, I have 
brushed up the following old favourite song a little, with a view to your 
worship, I have only altered a word here and there ; but if you like the humour 
of it, we shall think of a stanza or two to add to it.' The first Border tour 
ended in the middle of June, 1787, when Burns accompanied Ainslie and stayed 
for a short time in the house of Ainslie's father, at Dunse ; so that the Robin of 
the song who gaed to Dunse, and played a trick with the Elder's daughter, 
was his young friend, who afterwards became a writer to the Signet, settled 
down as a grave and serious person, and as Lockhart remarks, ' is best known 



III. LOVE-SONGS : HUMOROUS 413 

as the writer of Maniials of Devotion.' He died in 1838, and, as Burns pre- 
dicted elsewhere, left a good deal more than the professional ' three goose 
feathers and a whittle.' 

The tune is familiar on both sides of the Border, and only a portion is used 
for the song. The whole may be seen in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 
1753, V. //, as a very good example of the peculiar measure and rhythm of the 
Scottish pipe melodies. It is also in Bremner's Reels, 1768, loj. That in the 
Museum, printed with Burns's verses, is the old English and different air Bob 
and Joan. 

Wo. 182. My love, she 's but a lassie yet. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, 
No. 22s, and Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1798, jj. In the Law MS. Burns 
describes this as his ' old words,' and a holograph of the verses is in the British 
Museum. The last four lines is the middle stanza of a song in Herd's Scottish 
Songs, 1776, ii. 22; (not in the 1769 edition), entitled Green g)-ow the rashes, 0. 
The second stanza of the song in the text seems to have little connexion with 
the first, and so far as known Burns wrote the whole except the last four lines. 

The earliest date when the tune bears the title My love she^s but a lassie yet 
is Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. i ; so it would appear that either Herd did not 
know the air of the song, or that between 1776 and 1782 it was changed. The 
original publication of the tune is in Bremner's Reels, 1757, 7p, entitled Miss 
Farquharson^s Reel. Stenhouse saw a manuscript copy of the music, entitled 
Lady BadinscotKs Reel, in a musical publication of a few years earlier date, 
which only proves that the air was very popular in the eighteenth century. It 
is necessary to correct a mistake of C. Kirkpatrick Sharpe, who asserts in 
Stenhoiise's Illustrations, p. *jo7, that Put up thy dagger Jamie is the same as 
the tune in the text. That tune in the Filzwilliam Virgijial Book, c. 1650, 
is quite a different melody. 

Wo. 183. I murder hate by field or flood. Stewart's Edition, 1802, and 
Edinburgh Edition, 1877, ii. 29/. In the Gleitriddell MS., entitled A Song. 
Burns wrote the first eight lines on a window of the Globe Tavern, Dumfries, 
where he and Stephen Clarke, the musician, had many a merry meeting. The 
tune is unknown if ever there was one, which is doubtful. 

No. 184. Wha is that at my bower-door ? Scots Musical Museum, \1()2, 
No.j^7. The MS. is in the British Museum, and a copy of the verses is in the 
Merry Muses. There can be no doubt that Burns wrote the song, although 
Cromek's quotation, ' The words are mine,' are not in the Interleaved Museum 
as printed in Reliques, 1808, jo7. In the Centena}y Burns, 1897, it is shown 
that the original is Who but I, quoth Finlay, ' a new song much in request, 
sung with its proper tune ' ; a prosaic production of seven stanzas, of which 
a broadside copy is in Lord Rosebery's collection, beginning : — 

' There dwells a man into this town, 
Some say they call him Finlay ; 
He is a brisk and an able man — 
O, if I knew but Finlay ! ' 

Nearly all the incidents were taken from this song, but it is as brass to the 
gold of Burns's humorous verses. The find disposes of the myth that they were 
"written on James Findlay of Tarbolton, the exciseman, and a colleague of 
Burns. 

The tune bears the title of the chorus of an old song, as follows : — 

' Lass, an I come near thee. 
Lass, an I come near thee, 
I'll gar a' your ribbons reel 
Lass, an I come near thee.' 



414 HISTORICAL NOTES 

A fragment of a different kind, in two stanzas for the same tiine, is in 
the Herd MS. A wife replies to her husband : — 

' Say 't o'er again, say 't o'er again — 
Ye thief, that I may hear ye ; 
I'se gar ye dance upon a peat 
Gin I sail come but near ye.' 

In Findlay's MS., c. 1715, there is a tune entitled Findlay cam to my bed 
stock, which I have not seen. In Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. 1&3, is Lass, if 
I come near thee. Schumann, the German composer, composed an original 
melody for Burns's song. 

!N"o. 185. There 's a youth in this city. Scots Musical Museum, 1 790, 
No. 2/5, signed Z, ' a Gaelic air.' ' Mr. Burns's old words ' (Law's MS. List). 
The MS. in the British Museum contains directions for the air. ' This air is 
claimed by Niel Gow, who calls it his Lament for his brother. The first 
half-stanza of the song is old, the rest is mine* {Interleaved Museum). Else- 
where he instructed the editor of the Museum to leave out the name of the 
tune, and call it a Gaelic air. Nothing more is known of the history of 
the song. 

The X.\ine Niel Gow's Lameiit, in his second collection oi Reels, 1788, is a 
good example of the Highland style, and worth reprinting. 

No. 186. O meikle thinks my luve o' my beauty. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1792, No. j/^, signed 'B,' entitled My tocher's the jewel. Thomson's 
Scotish Airs, 1799, 7J. According to Cromek the fifth and sixth lines are 
much older than Burns ; and the last four lines were sent to Tytler in 1787 by 
Burns, and marked as ' Stanza of an old song ' in Croraek's Scotish Songs, 1810, 
ii. 20"]. The original MS. is unknown, but Stenhouse saw it, and is precise in 
the statement that the following remark on the tune was written by the poet : 
' This song is to be sung to the air called Lord Elcho' s favourite (another name 
for the tune), but do not put that name above it, let it just pass for the tune 
of the song, and a beautiful tune it is.' Burns has a note in the Interleaved 
Museum stating that Nathaniel Gow claimed the air, but it is before his time ; 
and the music in the text is a jig variation, without title, of The highway 
to Edinburgh in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, I'j^i, iii. 2S, and reprinted 
in Aird's Airs, 1788, iii. No. ^op. This beautiful melody was copied into 
a collection of Gow's, who named it Lord Elchd's favourite, hence the in- 
struction of Burns that the tune should be given the title of his song. This 
treatment of the melody is evidence of Burns's acute perception of musical 
sound. The tune The highway to Edinburgh (not the variation in the text"), 
is almost identical in the second movement with The black eagle in Oswald's 
Companion. 

TSo. ISil. "Whare are you gaun, my bonie lass. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 2S8, entitled A waukrife minnie. In the Interleaved Museum, 
Burns says, ' I pickt up this old song and tune from a country girl in Nithsdale. 
I never met with it elsewhere in Scotland.' It is thought that he amended 
some verses, and wrote others. I can find no trace of any original prior 
to Burns. 

The simple air communicated by Burns has all the marks of pure unsophisti- 
cated music. 

KTo. 188. My heart is a-breaking, dear Tittle. Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 296, entitled Tam Glen ; Thomson's Scotish Airs, i799> 66- ' Mr. 
Burns's words ' (Law's MS. List). Stenhouse says that there was an old song of 
the title, but gives no reference ; I can find no such song in any of the col- 
lections. The verses of Tam Glen are uniformly good, it is one of the best of 
Burns's humorous songs, and maintains undiminished popularity. The original 



III. LOVE-SONGS : HUMOROUS 415 

publication, obviously surreptitious, is in the Edinburgh Magazine, I789> x. 
3S7-> signed T. S., following which is the original anonymous publication of 
Burns's poem, 7 he humble petition of Bruar Water. It may be remarked that 
Robert Riddell has a note in the Interleaved Mtiseum (unnoticed by Cromek) 
saying that Tarn Glen 'is the composition of my much esteemed friend, 
Mr. Bums, to the tune oi Mall Roe ^ I do not know any melody of this title, 
but Mad Moll vi, in the same time and rhythm, but not the same music as that 
of Tarn Glen, which is also of English origin, and known as Hewson the 
Cobbler. It was sung to the words, ' I once was a poet,' &c., in the opera 
of The Jovial Crew, 1731, and the music can be seen in Walsh's edition, p. 6. 
It belongs to a scurrilous and indecent Commonwealth song, entitled Old 
Hewson the Cobbler, the verses of which are in the Vocal Miscellany , Dublin, 
I738,j[j5. Hewson was a remarkable man of considerable talent. He was 
originally a shoemaker, had only one eye, was a soldier in the Parliamentary 
army, became a colonel, was knighted by Cromwell, and afterwards was one of 
his lords. The Restoration song-books teem with punning verses on his person 
and character. Tarn Glett was very early divorced from its proper tune, and is 
now universally set to The nmckin <?' Geord/s byre, for which see Song and 
Note, No. //. 

Wo. 189. They snool me sair, and baud m© down. Scots Musical 
Musetwi, 1792, No. JXT, signed ' B,' entitled ifor ane-and-tzventy Tarn. Tune, 
The moudiewart. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, /Ji- This is an oiiginal song 
with the exception of the first line, the title of the tune. Burns acknowledged 
having written it in a letter dated October 19, 1794, and directed it to be set to 
the tune in the text, for which there is a song in the Merry Muses : — 

'This moudiewart tho' it be blin', 
If ance its nose you lat it in ; 
Then to the hilts, within a crack, 
Its out o' sight, the moudiewark.' 

The setting of the tune in the Museu7n did not please Burns. He recom- 
mended Thomson to publish the song, and said, ' but if you will get any of our 
ancienter Scots fiddlers to play you in Strathspey time The moudiewart — that is 
the name of the air — I think it will delight you.' The suggestion was ignored, 
and Thomson printed the song to Cold and raw. The music in the text is 
taken from the Caledo7iian Pocket Companion, 1753, iv. 8, there entitled Scotch 
Gig. It differs in some essentials from the copy in the Museuin, but the title 
which Bums gave it is in Walsh's Caledonian Country Dances. The moudie- 
wart, or moldwarp, as in Shakespeare, or mole, was respected by the Jacobites 
in consequence of the death of William of Orange, caused by his horse stumbling 
on a mole-hill. 

Wo. 190. But -warily tent when ye come to court me. Scotish Airs, 
1799) 94- ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' A variation of the first two 
stanzas was supplied to Johnson, and printed in his Museiufi, No. 106, of which 
a MS. 1^ in the British Museum. In August, 1793; Burns wrote to Thomson : 
' Is Whistle and Pll come to you, my lad one of your airs ? I admire it much, 
and yesterday I set the following verses to it. Urbani, whom I have met with 
here, begged them of me, as he admires the air much ; but as I understand that 
he looks with rather an evil eye on your work I did not choose to comply. 
However, if the song does not suit your taste, I may possibly send it to him. 
He is, ent7-e nous, a narrow, conceited creature; but he sings so delightfully, 
that whatever he introduces at your concert must have immediate celebrity.' 
Two years later, while under the influence of Jean Lorimer, Burns asked 
Thomson to alter the last line of every stanza to read, * Thy Jeanie will venture 
wi' ye my lad.' Pietro Urbani, a native of Milan, was a vocalist of some 
eminence. At the time Burns refers to him, he was collecting materials for 



4i6 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



a Selection of Scots Songs, which he published c. 1 794. He ruined himself by 
orchestral concerts in Edinburgh, and died in 1816 in poverty. 

The chorus of the song is in the Herd MS. ; the unprinted stanza of Burns's 
MS. in the British Museum is the third stanza of Song No. /(5p supra. The 
tune, an excellent specimen of natural music, fits exactly the verses of Burns. 
O'Keefe used it for one of the songs in his opera, The Poor Soldier, 1783. 
Bums has not stated that he knew the composer of the air, as represented by 
LStenhonse and others. 

No. 191. O, when slie cam ben, she bobbed fu' law. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1792, No. ^/j. The MS. is in the British Museum. An old song in 
Herd's Scots Songs, 1769,^//, dressed up to make it presentable. Burns wrote 
all but the first stanza, and the first two lines of the second stanza. Tradition 
reports the Laird of Cockpen as a boon companion of Charles II. 

The melody has been continuously popular for at least two centuries. It is 
in Leydeiis MS. of the end of the seventeenth century; in Sinklers MS., 1710. 
A song in the Tea- Table Miscellany, 1 7 24, beginning Come fill me a bumper, is 
directed to be sung to the tune which is printed in Ramsay's Musick, 1726 ; in 
Oswald's Curious Collection, 1740, 40; his Companion, 1743, i. 14 ; Aird's Airs, 
1782, ii. No. 80; and elsewhere with the title of our text. See the note on 
Song No. iji supra. 

Wo. 192. O, ken ye what Meg o' the mill has gotten? Scots Mtisical 
Museum, 1803, No. /<5(5. 'Written for this work by Robert Burns.' This is 
the original version which Burns wrote for the Mitseum, and intended for 
publication in the fourth volume. When he was on the point of sending his 
verses to Johnson, he wrote to George Thomson (April, 1793), saying, ' Do you 
know a fine air called Jackie Hu?ne^s lament ? I have a song of considerable 
merit to that air, beginning, "O, ken ye what Meg o' the mill has gotten." 
I enclose you both the song and the tune, as I had them ready to send to 
Johnson's Museum.' It was not at all the kind of song which Thomson 
affected, and he managed to induce Burns to write a second version, although 
the poet at first declined, and said that the song as it was pleased him so much 
that he could not write another for the same air. Of the ixvue Jackie Hume's 
lament, Thomson has stated that it is the same air as 0, honie lass will ye 
lie hi a barrack. I have not iciVC!\A Jackie Humes lament in any collection, 
therefore cannot identify it with the tune in the text from the Museu?n. 

No. 193. O, ken ye what Meg o' the mill, &c. Currie, Works, iv. J4. 
This is the second version of the preceding song, and marked for the air 
O, bonie lass will ye lie in a barrack. It contained too much -vernacular 
for Thomson, who did not print it in his Scotish Airs. 

The tune, 0, bonie lass, Sec, is in Campbell's Keels, 1778, 80; and the 
complete song in Napier's Scots Songs, 1792, ii. 90, with the following as 
the first stanza : — 

' O say ! bonny lass, will you lie in a barrack 
And marry a soldier and carry his wallet ; 
O say ! vvou'd you leave baith your mither and daddie 
And follow the camp with your soldier laddy?' 

No. 194. Cauld is the e'enin blast. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, 
No. s^3- ' Written for this work by Robert Bums.' The rechauffee of a coarse 
ditty, beginning: — 

' Bonnie Peggie Ramsay as ony man may see, 

Has a bonnie sweet face and a gleg glintin e'e.' 

In Durfey's Fills, 1707, is also a coarse but different song of the same name. 

Whoever Peg was, she had a wide and long reputation on both sides of the 

Border, and was not burdened with morals. • She is referred to in Shakespeare's 

Twelfth Night, Act 2, Sc 3, and is named by Tom Nashe in The Shepheard's 



III. LOVE-SONGS: HUMOROUS 417 

Holiday as the title of a ballad or dance tune. In England, two different 
melodies served for numerous ballads of the Peg-a-Ramsay class, but neither is 
identical with that of Burns's verses. The earliest specimen of the English 
melody is in Ballet's Lute Book, a MS. of uncertain date, the other is in a MS. 
by Dr. John Bull, entitled Little Pegge of Raiitsie, known later as Watton 
Towii's End, or O, London is a fine i07un, in the Dancing Master, 1665, and 
with the song- in Pills, 1719, y. ijg. The music is reprinted in Chappell's 
Popular Musie, p. 218. The Scottish tune in the Musetim, 1803, with Burns's 
sons: is entirely different from the English Air. I have not found it in any 
earlier music book. 

No. 195. The taylor he cam here to sew. Scots Musical Museum, 1796) 
No. 4^0. The MS. is in the British Museum. A song in Herd's Scots So?tgs, 
1769, jiS, entitled Tke tailor gave only a bare suggestion to Burns, neither the 
subject nor the rhythm being identical with that in the text. In the MS. 
he informs the editor that the tune Th^ Drummer is in Aird's Airs, 1783, 
i. No. 7.29, and goes on to instruct him as follows : ' Only remember that the 
second part of the tune, as Aird has set it, goes here to the first part of the 
song; and of course Aird's first part goes to the chorus' (R. B.). The in- 
struction was carried out with a little variation from the melody in Aird, which 
is as in our text. The music is also in Stewart's Reels, 1762, 28, and Ross's, 
Reels, 17S0, j2. It is said to be also in Walsh's Caledonian Country Dances, 
c. 1 741. 

TSo. 196. O, steer her up, and baud her gaun. Scots Musical Museum, 
1803, No.jo.^. 'Written for this work by Robert Burns.' 'Mr. Burns's old 
words' (Law's MS. List). In Ramsay's Miscellany, 1725, is a garbled and 
disconnected song of the title, which Herd copied into Scots Songs, 1 769, iSi. 
Stenhouse says ' Ramsay very properly suppressed the old song, enough of 
which is still well known ' {Illustrations, p. 441). Bums wrote all but the first 
four lines, and put it wholly in Scottish orthography. 

The tune Steer her up, a seventeenth century production, is said to be 
in Guthrie'' s MS. It is in Playford's Original Scots Tunes, 1700; Sinklers 
MS., 1710; M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1742, 7; Oswald's Co?npanion, 1745, ii. 
2j ; and Aird's Airs. 1782, i. No. 118. The first half oi Steer her up is in the 
tune Scerdustis in the Skene MS.., c. 1630. 

Ifo. 197. What can a young lassie? Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. ^/(5, signed ' R,' entitled What can a young lassie do wi' an auld man'i 
The MS. is in the British Museum. In Gray's MS. List — 'Mr. B. — words.' 

A variation of the subject of the song is four lines in the Herd MS., as follows, 
now printed for the first time : — 

' Kiss ye Jean, kiss ye Jean ; — 
Never let an auld man kiss ye Jean, 
An auld man 's nae man till a young quean ;— 
Never let an auld man kiss ye Jean.' 

Holbein made a wood-cut of this very old episode in human life for Erasmus's 
Praise of Folly. There is an English ballad on the subject about two hundred 
and fifty years old. The earliest copy is a black letter broadside of the 
seventeenth century, entitled ' 71ie young woman s complaint, or a caveat to all 
maids to have a care how they be married to old men. The tune is What 
should a yottng woman do with an old man, &^c., or The Tyrant. London, 
printed for W. Gilbertson in Giltspur Street Without Nevgate.' It is referred 
to in a medley in Durfey's Pills, 1719. This street ballad is better than the 
average of the rhyming literature of the flying stationers. I cannot identify 
the English melody or its alternative The Tyrant, but it is not at all likely 
to be the tune in the text, wliich is in Oswald's Companion, 1754, vi. /, and 
for which Burns wrote his song. 



4i8 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Dr. Blacklock had written a long ballad for the tune, about which Bums 
made the following remark on the MS. of his own song to the editor of the 
Museiim : 'Set the tune to these words. Dr. B.'s set of the tune is bad ; I here 
enclose a better. You may put Dr. B.'s song after these verses, or you may 
leave it out as you please.' The editor rejected Blacklock's ballad. 

No. 198. Awa wi' your witchcraft o* beauty's alarms. Thomson's 
Scotish Airs, 1799, 100. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, 
Balina?nona OraJ The MS. is in the Thomson collection. From August, 
1795 to January, 1796 is a blank in Burns's correspondence. At the request of 
Thomson he resumes his work. Verses were wanted for Irish airs, and in 
sending the present song Burns, in February, repeats what he has done in this 
way. ' I strung up a kind of rhapsody to another Hibernian melody which 
I admire much ... If this will do, you have now four of my Irish engage- 
ments — Hutnours of Glen, Captain ff Kean, Oonaghs Waterfall, and Balina- 
mona? In a line he disposes of his former ideal, Jean Lorimer : ' In my 
by-past songs, I dislike one thing, the name Chloris.' There is a reminiscence 
of Allan Ramsay's ' Gie me a lass wi' a lump o' land ' in the present song. 

The tune Balinamona is in Thumoth's English and Irish Airs, c. 1760, 26; 
in the Pej-th Musical Miscellany, 1786, loy, and Calliope, London, 1788, 2;6. 
I was a popular air at public concerts in London during the last half of 
the eighteenth century. 

No. 199. Had I the wyte. Scots Musical Museufn, 1796, No. 41^, 
signed ' Z.' The MS. is in the British Museum. The version in the Merry 
Muses is slightly different. The chorus and a stanza which Bums did not 
use are in Herd's MS. The tune can be traced to near the beginning of the 
eighteenth century, and it is plain that it was sung to some other song besides 
the present class. Apparently an earlier original in Ramsay's Miscellany , 
1724, My Jocky Myth for what thou hast done is marked for Cotne kiss 
with ?ne, come clap with 7)ie. The tune is in Ramsay's TJ/wkV/^, c. 1726, and 
with Ramsay's verses in the Orpheus Caledonius, 1733, No. jg. In Oswald's 
Companin7i, c. 1755, vii. 20 there is an additional strain, and the title for the 
first time is Had I the wate she bade me. In Campbell's Reels, 1778, 20, 
it bears the naAne Highlatid Hills, the same as that named in the Merry Muses. 
In Ross's Reels, 1780, g, it is called Mason laddie; lastly, Gow in his third 
collection of Reels names it the Bob of Fettercairn. The popularity of this 
gay attractive melody is by no means exhausted. In Northumbrian Minstrelsy , 
1882, ij6, a collection of Northumbrian tunes published by the Newcastle 
Society of Antiquaries, there is a bad setting of it entitled Newhurn lads, and 
it is still played on the small pipes in Northumberland. I heard it the other day 
ground out of a barrel organ in the streets of Newcastle, preceded and followed 
by airs from the newest operas. The foreign arti.st who turned the handle 
knew it as a Scotch tune. 

No. 200. Gat ye me, O, gat ye me. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 4J0, entitled The lass of Ecclcfechan. ' The MS. incomplete is in the 
British Museum, entitled Lucky Laitig' (R. B.). A copy, with the exception 
of alterations in the second four lines, is in the Merry Muses marked for the tune 
Jacky Latin ; the following is the first stanza and chorus of a song of uncertain 
age:— 



' Bonie Jockie, braw Jockie, 
Bonie Jocky Latin, 
Because she wudna gie 'm a kiss. 
His heart was at the breaking. 

This capital pipe tune, as Jack Latin, is in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 
c. 1759, xii. 6; in M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, i'j6S,iio; and M'^Lean's Scots 
Tunes, c. 1772, 27. It is still a favourite in Northumberland, where it is known 



Bonie Jockie, braw Jockie, 

Bonie Jockie Latin, 
His skin was like the silk sae fine, 

And mine was like the satin.' 



III. LOVE-SONGS : HUMOROUS 419 

2L%Jacky Leyton. The English tune Jack a Lent, in Playford's Dancing Master, 
1670, has no resemblance to the present air, but it is also a pipe melody. The 
earliest known ballad oi Jack of Lent was written in 1625 to welcome Queen 
Henrietta Maria. A copy is in CJioyce Drollery, 1656, 20. In early times 
Jack a Lent was a stuffed puppet. The origin of the effigy is obscure, but 
most likely it was set up in ridicule of the monks. The game survives in the 
present day as Autit Sally. 

TSo. 201. Last May a braw wooer. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, /2. 
'Written for this work by Robert Burns.' — Air, The Lothian Lassie {Scots 
Musical Museum, 1803, No. s^2). A MS. is in the Thomson collection. 
Burns has hit off in a ludicrous and veracious manner a particular trait of the 
Scottish character. The apparent coldness of the people is effected by a 
simulated repression of the affections. No one has yet undertaken a psycho- 
logical criticism of the Scot on historical principles. The sober dour Scot has 
strong human sympathies, but the spring is deep, and an earthquake is some- 
times required to make them flow. The style of the present song is original ; 
there were verses on the same subject, not devoid of merit, but much inferior to 
those of Burns. The first stanza of The Lothian Lassie begins as follows : — 

' The Queen o' the Lothians cam cruisin to Fife, 
Fal de ral, lal de ral, lairo, 
To see gin a wooer wad tak her for life. 
Sing hey fal de ral,' &c. 

A wooer does turn up, but he is bashful, and cannot muster sufficient courage 
to speak to Jenny. He solicits an aunt of the fair one to be the go-between, and 
she, with a natural faculty for matchmaking, soon arranges the business. 
When Jenny appears the swain loses "courage, runs away, but is brought forcibly 
back still blushing. Jenny being a person of considerable perspicuity, thinks 
the best way is to accept the offer promptly, lest the lover after consideration 
should change his mind. 

' The question was spier'd, and the bargain was struck 
The neighbours cam in, and wished them good luck.' 

Before forwarding Last May a braw wooer Burns sent to Thomson in May or 
June, 1795, The Lothian Lassie, with a letter, saying: 'The song is well 
known, but was never in notes before. The first part is the old tune. It 
is a great favourite of mine. I think it would make a fine Andante ballad.' 
Here Burns refers to the music. The immediate success of the song published 
by Thomson caused Johnson to insert it in the Museum, 1803, No. /22, with 
some alterations for the worse which Stenhouse pretended were authorized 
by Burns. Whether or not he sent to Johnson a copy of the words of Last 
May a braw wooer, it is certain from a MS. which I have seen, that he 
furnished Johnson through Clarke with a copy of the tune, which was first 
printed with his words in 1 799- Some parts of the air have a strong resemblance 
to Kellybu7-fi braes, No. jji infra. 

No. 202. ■Wantonness for evermair. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 422 ; Centenaty edition, 1897, i'i- ^54- ' This bagatelle was written and 
communicated by Burns to the Museum ' i,Stenhouse, Illustrations, p. }"]()). 

This excellent melody, with the precise title of the first line of the verses, is in 
Aird's Airs, 1788, iii. No. 44^, and the title indicates that a song existed before 
Burns wrote his stanza, if it is not a corrected verse of the song itself. Wanton- 
ness was a favourite character with the Scottish poets, Dunbar, Lindsay, and 
Gavin Douglas, in their dramas and interludes of the early part of the 
sixteenth century. 

No. 203. The robin cam to the wren's nest. Scots Musical Museum, 
1796, No. 406, entitled The wren's nest {Scott-Douglas edition, 1877, iii. 2^6). 



420 HISTORICAL NOTES 

The original of this stanza is a nursery rhyme long known in the west of 
Scotland. On the Museum MS. Clarke, the musical editor, wrote, ' The tune 
is only a bad set ol Johnny' s grey breeks. I took it down from Mrs. Burns's 
singing. There are more words I believe. You must apply to Burns ' ; to which 
Johnson, the publisher, replied, ' there are no more words ' (Stenhouse, Illustra- 
tions, p. j<5/). The following verses are the last stanzas of a song in Herd's 
Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. 16']: — 



'Now in there came my Lady Wren, 
With mony a sigh and a groan ; 
O what care I for a' the lads, 
If my wee lad be gone ? 



' Then Robin turned him round about, 

E'en like a little king : 
Go, pack ye out at my chamber door, 
Ye little cutty quean.' 



The wren, for some unknown reason, has been long known in Scottish 
poetry. In the fifteenth century a popular poem was entitled How the wren cam 
out of Ailsa. Gavin Douglas in the Palace of Honour, written in 1501, 
enumerates some tales and ballads then current. Thus : — 

* I saw Rauf Colyear with his thrawin brow, 
Craibit John the I\eif and auld Cowkelbie's sow ; 
And how the wrati ca??ie out of Ailssay 
And Piers Plewitian that made his workmen fow; 
Greit Gowviahnor^ie and Fyn Makowl, and how 
They suld be goddis in Ireland as they say ; 
Then saw I Maitland upon auld Beird Gray ; 
Robene Httde, and Gilbert with the white hand, 
How Hay of Nauchtan flew in Madin land.' 

(Douglas's Works, 1874, i. <5/.) 
The tune has no history, and can be compared with No. 6"] supra. 

*K'o. 204. Lassie, lend me your braw h-emp-heckle. ' The Bob <?' 
Duinhlane remains to be added in your fifth volume. Take it from the Orpheus 
Caledonius : if you have not this book I will send you a reading of it. At the 
end of this set (Ramsay's) let the old words follow' {Burns to Johnson, 1795). 
In Gray's MS. Lists Burns wrote against the title of the song ' Mr. Burns's 
old words.' The following note is not in the Interleaved Museum as quoted in 
Q-iovcitV^ R cliques, i8oS,j<3x, and it is given with reservation: 'Ramsay, as 
usual, has modernised this song. The original, which I learned on the spot 
from my old hostess in the principal inn there (Dunblane), is,' as in the text. 
Neither the tune nor the ' old ' words of Burns were inserted in the Musetcm, and 
this is the first time both have been brought together. Ramsay's words, 
referred to by Burns, are in his Miscellany, 1724, reprinted in Herd's Scots Songs, 
1769, 42 : and with the tune, in the Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. .51!/, which 
is not the same as Lord Bredalba7te' s March often confused with it, for which see 
Song No. 270. With the exception of the first two lines, Burns's verses are 
different from the song in the Orphetts. 

Wo. 205. My daddie was a fiddler fine. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 4ST, Centenary Burns, 1897, iii. 166. This is the chorus, and first of 
three stanzas in the Merty Muses, of a clever and witty song revised by Burns 
which cannot be further quoted. 

The tune entitled Stumpie is in Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. 44. The same 
subject, as near as possible, is Lady Betty Wemyss' Reel, in Bremner's Reels, 
1757, 21. Stenhouse says it was formerly c&^At^ Jocky has gotten a wife, but I 
cannot find the music under this name. Mr. Glen states that it is titled Butter' d 
pease in Walsh's Caledonian Country Dances, c. 1734. 

Ifo. 206. Therie's news, lasses, news. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, 
No. j-^p, ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' Scott-Douglas edition, 
iii. 2^8. An old song remodelled, and only remarkable in the last stanza 



III. LOVE-SONGS t HUMOROUS 



421 



for a vernacular description of the duties of a ploughman in the south of 
Scotland. The original is a fragment of eight lines in Herd's MS., beginning :— 

' Newes, lasses, nevves, 

Gude newes I hae to tell ; 
There 's a boat fu' o' young men 
Come to our town to sell.' 

The title of the time in Burns's hand is in the Gray MS. The first half is the 
first subject of Captain Mackenzie s Reel in Stewart's Reels, 1762, j6. The air 
was sung to a metrical satire on the ladies of Edinburgh, entitled The vain 
guidwife, printed in Sharpe's Ballad Book, 1824. 

*Wo. 207- O, Galloway Tam Cftm here to ■woo. Scots Musical Mtisetim, 
1792, No. j2)' and marked in Law's MS. ' Mr. Burns's old words/ who intended 
the fragment to precede one of Dr. Blacklock's songs for the Museum for the 
same tune. In i§io Cromek printed the lines with an additional stanza of 
palpable modern construction, which, however, he alleged to be old and part of 
the song. 

The following Note by Robert Riddell is in the Interleaved Museum, and it 
is not in Burns's handwriting as pretended by Cromek : ' I have seen an inter- 
lude (acted at a v^'edding) to this tune called 77ie wooing of the maiden. 
These entertainments are now much worn oiit in this part of Scotland. Two 
are still retained in Nithsdale, viz. : Silly pure auld Glenae, and this one, llie 
wooing of the maiden : {Reliqtces, 1808, *9S). The tune is -in Atkinson''s MS., 
1694, and Oswald's Companion, 1754, vi. ^j. In a common measure O'er the 
hills and far away resembles it. 

*N'o. 208. The Collier has a doehter. This fragment of eight lines is in 
the Interleaved 3Iuseum, and may be entitled in his own way ' Mr. Burns's 
old words.' The note of Bums is correctly quoted by Cromek mReliques, 2ig : — 
' The first half stanza is much older than the days of Ramsay ' whose song 
is in his Miscellany, 1724; and with the tune in Johnson's Museum, 1787, 
No. 4']. 

Burns wrote two original songs for The Collier s bonie lassie, for which see 
Nos. 44 and 2}2, 



IV. CONNUBIAL, 

No. 209. First when Maggie was my care. Scots Mttsical Museum, 
1790, l<!o. 24p, signed Jf., entitled Whistle der the lave dt. 'Mr. Burns's old 
words' (Law's MS. List). Burns got the title of this from a song of the 
seventeenth century. The lords of creation in Scotland were no better than 
their sex elsewhere. They were never so good as to be able to dispense with the 
discipline of married life. It has not been ascertained to whom Burns referred 
in this song. In Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, ji6, are the two following stanzas 
for the tune : — 



' My mither sent me to the well, 
She had better gane hersell, 

I got the thing I dare nae tell, 
Whistle o'er the lave o't. 



' My mither sent me to the sea, 
For to gather mussels three ; 
A sailor lad fell in wi' me, — 
Whistle o'er the lave o't.' 



This is styled one of the malignant songs in Scotch Presbyterian Eloquence 
of the seventeenth century. 

- The tune lP7iistle ower the lave o't is in Bremner's Reels, 1759, s^- It varies 
a little from the copy in the Mtiseum. It is also in the Caledonian Pocket Com- 
panion, 1759, xii. ij. C. Kirkpatrick Sharpe incorreptly stated that Dance Katie 



422 HISTORICAL NOTES 

Bairdie of the seventeenth century is the same tune. He retails a traditional 
story of a pedestrian who, crossing Glasgow churchyard one moonshine night, 
saw the Devil and a male acquaintance who had recently died dancing round 
the tombstone of the dead man, his majesty playing on the fiddle Whistle oer 
the lave o't. Another proof, if any were wanted, that the devil knows and 
appreciates good music. The tune is said to be in Blaikie's MS., 1692, which 
is not improbable. According to Burns, John Bruce, a Highland fiddler who 
lived in Dumfries, composed the air about the beginning of the eighteenth 
century. (See Letter to Thomson, Oct. 1794.) 

No. 210. O, some will court and compliment. Scots Musical Museum, 
1792, 'Ho. joj, entitled yo/z«, come kiss me now. 'Mr. Burns's old words,' 
(Law's MS. List). The MS. is in the British Museum. A fragment of eight 
lines in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, jij was the model of Burns's verses. The 
tenacity of life in a popular song is illustrated here, for the tune and verses 
have been in continuous use for the last 350 years. A parody of twenty- 
six stanzas is in the Gude and Godlie Ballads, 1567, and it is an example 
of a Reformation song referred to in the note on No. 212. The first four lines 
of Herd begin this early song, and two other stanzas of the religious imitation 
may serve as a specimen : — 

' The Lord thy God I am ' My prophetis call, my preichouris cry, 

That Johne dois the call ; Johne, cum kis me now, 

Johne representit man, Johne, cum kis me by and by, 

Be grace celestiall. And mak no moir adow.' 

It is remarkable that no verses oi John, come kiss nie now have been found in 
England, although the tune has been preserved there. Numerous references 
are made to the latter in English literature, but always as a dance. In A 
woman killed with kindness, 1600, Sisly says ' I love no dance so well a.% John, 
come kiss ??ie nozu.'' In Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy (1621) 1893, iii. 180, 
is ' Yea, many times this love will make old men and women that have more 
toes than teeth, Ao.nct John, come kiss me now.' In 'Tis merry when gossips 
meet, 1609, is said ' Such store of ticking galliards I do vow ; not an old dance, 
buty^£7/zw, come kiss me now.' In a song in Westminster Drollery, 1671, 4^, 
beginning ' My name is honest Harry ' is the following verse : — 

' The fiddlers shall attend us, 

And first play, John, come kiss me ; 

And when that we have danced a round, 

They shall play, Hit or misse me' 

In Philips' Z^^w Quixote, 1687, is said 'all naturally singing Walsingham, 
and whistling, John, come kiss me noiv' A copy of the music is in the 
Fitzwilliam Virginal Book c. 1650, with a number of variations composed by 
Will. Byrd. But in an earlier book of MS. Airs and Sanitets at Trinity 
College, Dublin (F. 5. 13, pp. 55 and 56) is the tune with variations of a song 
of thirteen stanzas in the Scottish phraseology of the sixteenth century. I copy 
the tune and the verses, now both printed for the first time : — 



:?^ 



i: 



:22i 



^^^ ^r=f=^'^=^F=r-'=f^=^ =^=^=^'^ 



' Jon, come kisse me now, now, Jon, come kisse me now ; 
Jon, come kisse me by and by and mak no mor adoe. 
His answer to yt sam toone 



IV. CONNUBIAL 423 



Peace, I'm angrie now, now ; Peace, I'm angrie now, 
Peace I'm angrie at the hert, and knows not what to doe, 
Wyfes can faine and wyfes can flatter : have I not hitt them now, 
When once they beginn they still do clatter : & soe doeth my wyf too. 
Wyfes are good and wyfes are bad : have I not, etc. 
Wyfes can mak their husbands mad : & so doe, etc. 

Wyfes can sport and wyfes can play : have I not, etc. 

And with little work passe over the day : & so, etc. 

Wyfes hes many fine words & looks : have I not, etc. 

And draw sillie men on folies hooks : and soe, etc. 

Wyfes will not their meeting misse : have I not, etc. 

A cup of sack they can well kisse : and so, etc. 

Wyfes can dance and wyfes can lowp : have I not, etc. 

Wyfes can toome the full wyne stowp : and soe, etc. 

Wyfes can ban and wyfes can curse : have I not, etc. 

Wyfes can toome their husbands purse : and so, etc. 

Wyfes can flyte and wyfes can scold : have I not, etc. 

Wyfes of ther toungs they have no hold : and none has myne, etc. 

Wyfes they'r good than at no tym : neither is my wyf now ; 

Except it be in drinking wyn : and so is my wyf too. 

Some they are right needfull evills : so is my wyfe now ; 

Wyfes are nothing elss but divles : and so my wyf too. 

Now of my song I make ane end : etc. 

All such wyfs to the divell I send : amongst them my wyf too. 

Peace I'm angrie now, now : Peace I'm angrie now, 

Peace I'm angrie at the hert, and cannot tell qt to dow.' 

A somewhat licentious parody on the above is in Merry Droller le, 1670, jo^, 
which is reprinted in Durfey's Pills, 17 19, iv. 181. Neither the verses nor the 
tune have any reference to John come kiss tne now. 

The Dublin MS. lettered Airs and Sonnets is curiously enough a part of 
Wood's Scottish MSS. oi Psalm and Hymn Ttcnes, 1566 — 1578, and it contains 
the earliest specimen of secular music written in Scotland. According to David 
Laing the secular songs and music are, however, not earlier than 1620. The 
sacred music, or Wood's portion in the Dublin volume, bears the title : " This is 
the fyft Buke addit to the four psalme Bukkis for songs of four or fyve pairtis 
. . . 1569,' and ends on page 33. Then follows a considerable number oi Airs 
and So>inets — ' Which are all notted heir with the Tennor or common pairt 
they are sung with.' 

As bearing on the nationality of the air, we have the curious fact that there 
was a song popular in Scotland about 1560, probably that above quoted, and a 
fragment traditionally handed down and printed in 1769, while in England, 
the tune never had words attached to it. William Chappell in Popular Music, 
p. 147, could not find words, and printed with the air a stanza from the Godlie 
Ballads. The old form of the music consisted of one measure ; the second part 
was added about the end of the seventeenth century. The tune in our text is 
from the seventh edition, 1674, of Playford's Inti-oduction to the Skill of Musick, 
London, first printed in 1654. The music is also in Blaikies MS. 1692 ; 
Sinkler's AfS. 1710; Oswald's Co7}ipanion, 1754, vi. 2; M'^Gibbon's Scots 
Tunes, 1768, iv. 94; and printed for the first time with words in the Scots 
Musical Museum, 1792, No. jcy. Burns directed the publisher for the music 
to M'^Gibbon's Collection. 

No. 211. There was a wife wonn'd in Cockpen. Scots Musical Museum, 
1803, No. /_;9, . signed ' B,' entitled Scroggam. 'Written for this work by 



424 HISTORICAL NOTES 

Robert Burns,' to preserve the melody of an old song. Stenhonse records 
' There is another, and a very old song, to the same air, but it is quite inad- 
missible.' I can find no record of the very old song with the rhythm. The 
ale-wife of Cockpen is a good match for the laird of Song No. igi. He may 
have been a customer, and indulged himself in singing at her board his favourite 
song of Brose and hitter. 

I have not found the tune Scroggam before its appearance in the Museum. 
It is not composed on the lines of the old Scottish scales, the major sixths and 
sevenths of the modern minor scale being rarely, if at all, used in antique, 
Scottish melodies. 

JKTo. 212. John Anderson my jo, John. Scots Musical Museum, 1790, 
No. ^<5o, signed ' B.' In MS. List — ' Mr. Burns's old words,' and in the Interleaved 
Mttseiim, ' This Song is mine.' Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1 799,//, with additional 
spurious stanzas, first printed in Brash and Reid's Chap-book, 1796. Dr. Currie, 
in Works, 1800, iv. }02, published the correct words and warned the public 
against the spurious stanzas, but in many editions of Burns they are still 
inserted as part of the original song. 

In Percy's Rcliques, 1765, are printed two curious stanzas, entitled yti/i« 
Anderson my JQ. — A Scotish song. The verses are in the form of a dialogue 
between a man and a woman, and the matter is more provocative of family 
discord than connubial bliss. The woman begins : — 

' John Anderson my jo, cum in as ye gae bye, 
and ye sail get a sheips held weel baken in a pye ; 
Weel baken in a pye, and the haggis in a pat ; 
John Anderson my jo, cum in, and ze's get that.' 

She informs the man on inquiry that she has five bairns, but three of them 
are not the guidman's. Jn subsequent editions of Percy's Reliqnes, the five 
bairns are turned into seven — two legitimate, and five illegitimate — most likely 
to round off the pretty invention that the verses are an allegory on the Romish 
sacraments. The authority for the verses was not given. In the Bishop's 
preface to his fourth edition it is said ' where any variation occurs from the 
former impression it will be understood to have been given on the authority of 
that MS.' This statement caused an infinity of trouble until it was discovered 
that very many pieces in the Reliques, includingyo/z« Anderson my jo, are not 
in the MS. at all. The invention of the sacramental allegory gave an historical 
reputation to a tradition which has continued to circulate ever since. Percy 
probably knew Haile's specimens of the Gude and Godlie Ballads, \ 765 ; but 
no song \\\itJohn A?iderson my Jo is there, nor in the complete collection since 
published. Percy is responsible for saying that the song is as old as the 
Reformation, and that his verses are a satire on the Church of Rome. It may 
be so, but there is no historical evidence, 1 may here remark that the description 
' old words ' which Burns gave to many of his songs was very elastic. In the 
case oi John Anderson my jo he adopted only the title or first line of the song, 
the rest is entirely original ; and the subject has nothing in common with the 
verses ' sung by the choice spirits ' of the eighteenth century. In that curious 
surreptitious small volume known as the Merry Muses is the 'old' song 
beginning : — 



' John Anderson my jo, John, 
I wonder what you mean, 
To lie sae lang i' the mornin 
And sit sae late at e'en ? 



Ye'U blear a' your een, John, 
And why do ye so ? 

Come sooner to your bed at e'en 
John Anderson, my jo.' 

The complete song in Richardson's Masque, c. 1770,592, cannot be repeated 
here. I know of no other Scottish song than this one answering to the title. 
For further light on the subject, see Note 22.^, Other three songs marked 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



425 



for the tune are in the Merry Muses, one in the Tea-Table Miscellany, 1724, 
and another beginning When I was a wee thing, in Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, 
ii. 21^; but none of them have any reference \.o John Anderson my jo. That a 
much earlier song did exist is proved from the music books. 

The tune entitled yi>//« Andersonne i>iy jo is in the Skene MS. c. 1630; also 
with Ramsay's \Vords in ^2Xi^% Musical Miscellany, 1731, vi. 202; Oswald's 
Companion, 1752, iv. 22 ; and Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. i6']. 

The melody of two English songs — Patil's Steeple and / am the Duke of 
Norfolk— htXon^va.^ to the latter half of the sixteenth century is claimed to be 
the original oijohn Anderson my jo, but the music in English collections is 
not found earlier than the Dancing Master, 1651. The following is taken from 
a translation of the Skene MS. 




-m^m^ 



g=gg^pggEg 



i ^H p ^^-^^^ 



For further information on the English melody see Chappell's Popular Music, 
p. 117. 

It is necessary to enter a warning against the following remark on John 
Anderson my jo by Bishop Percy in his A'eliques. 'It is a received tradition 
in Scotland that at the time of the Reformation ridiculous and obscene 
songs were composed to be sung by the rabble to the tunes of the most favourite 
hymns in the Latin Service. Green Sleeves and puddii7g pies is said to have been 
one of these metamorphosed hymns ; Maggy Lauder was another ; John 
Anderson my jo was a third. The original music of all these burlesque sonnets 
was very fine.' This is a most confused and misleading statement. There is 
not an example of a hymn tune or a tune 'of the most favourite hymns in the 
Latin Service ' to be found in Scotland in connexion with a secular song. The 
three titles named are secular airs, and none are known to have been used for 
the purpose named. It is ridiculous to speak of the very fine original music 
of these ' sonnets' in the past tense. All were very popular and well known in 
Percy's time, and they are well known now as secular folk tunes with secular 
words. What was done in Scotland was to imitate every European country, 
including England. Religious parodies of secular songs were written for 
popular secular airs, and these ' sangs, ' mixed up with hymns and psalms, are 
preserved in the collection known as The Gude and Godlie Ballads. In the 
whole song and dance music of Scotland only one melody called Cumnock 
Psalms (see No. 260, and that was collected by Burns from tradition) can 
by any stretch of the imagination have any connexion with the church tunes. 
The offensive epithet applied by Percy to the songs is not warranted. ' The 
paipe that pagane full of pryde,' which casts spirited ridicule on the morals of 
the priests, is the most plain spoken, but scarcely deserves the epithet. 

No. 213. "Willie Wastle dwalt on Tweed. Scots Mtisical Museum, 
1792, No. j']6, signed ' B,' entitled Sic a ivife as Willie had. The MS. is in 
the British Museum. The verses are unrivalled as a vernacular pen and ink 
portrait of one who had not a single point of physical beauty to recommend 
her. A recent writer in the public press indentifies Linkumdoddie as five and a 
half miles from Broughton on the road to Tweedsmuir and Moffat. On the 



426 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



opposite bank of the Tweed, where a hill stream called Logan Water runs into 
the Tweed, stood a thatched cottage called Linkumdoddie, which disappeared 
forty years ago. At the end of the eighteenth century a weaver called Gideon 
Thomson lived there, but nothing is known of his wife. This story has not been 
verified, but it may be remarked that Burns knew the locality, and more than 
once stayed at the Crook Inn, a few miles distant from where Linkumdoddie is 
said to have stood. 

The fragment of a popular rhyme of the seventeenth century is quoted in 
Scotch P7-eshyterian Eloquence Display" d, 1694. A preacher at Linton is repre- 
sented as saying ' Our bishops thought they were very secure this long time, like 

Willie Willie Wastle, I am in my castle ; 

A' the dogs in the town, dare not ding me down.' 

Willie Wastle's Castle is the ancient castle of Home, situated in the North- 
East corner of Roxburghshire. Cromwell besieged and destroyed it. The 
owner challenged the Protector to do his worst, and he did it effectually. 

The tune was first printed in the Museum with Bums's song. A song and 
tune Sike a wife as Willy had is in i&o Loyal Songs, 1685, J20 ; the music is 
also in Atkinson s MS. 1694 and elsewhere, but it has no resemblance to that 
here printed. The tune of Bums's song is a specimen of a numerous class of 
Scottish folk music which puzzles the composer to harmonize. 

Wo. 214. There's sax eggs in the pan, gudeman. Scots Musical Museum, 
1796, No. 40^. This MS. is in the British Museum. A version in Herd's Scots 
Songs, 1769, j/<5, has four stanzas and a chorus. The first and second stanzas 
of Burns are near copies from Herd, the chorus is somewhat altered, and the 
' sheephead ' stanza is much altered. ' Mr. B. gave the old words ' : (Law's 
MS. List). 

For information on the tune, see Song No. 24^. Burns made a note on his 
manuscript that the chorus was to be simg to the first part of the tune, as in the 
text. 

No. 215. I bought my wife a stane o' lint. Scots Musical Musetim, 
1792, No. j'/o, entitled The tveary pund 0' tow. The MS. is in the Britisii 
Museum. It is the model of a song known by the name of its tune. Marriage 
as a release from work is described by George Colman the younger in one of 
his comedies. The mistress of a servant who is careless, asks her how she 
expects to get a character when she is so lazy, and receives the snappish reply 
' Character ! I don't want a character ; I am going to be married.' A black 
letter ballad entitled The Crttell Shrow or the patient man's zvoe, printed by 
M.P. for Henry Gosson about 1665, describes the life of a suffering husband. 
The last stanza contains a generous wish and offer : — 

' O that some harmless honest man. 

Whom death did so befriend. 
To take his wife from off his hand, 

His sorrows for to end. 
Would change with me to rid my care. 

And take my wife alive, 
For his dead wife, unto his share ! 
Then I would hope to thrive.' 
A song The pound of tow— \x\com.Yi\eiQ — in The Charmer, 17S2, '\. Jjg, is also 
in a Chap-book by J. Jennings, Fleet Street. The following is the middle 
stanza in The Charjner : — - 

' But if your wife and my wife were in a boat thegither, 
And yon honest man's wife were in to steer the rither ; 
And if the boat were bottomless, and seven mile to row, 
I think my wife would ne'er come back to spin her pound of tow.' 



IV. CONNUBIAL 



427 



The tune is in Oswald's Companion, c. 1756, viii. 4. In the Museum, with 
Burns's song, it is directed to be sung very slow. 

ISo. 216. The bairns gat out wi' an unco shout. Scots Musical 
Museum, 1792, No. jg6, signed ' B,' entitled The deuks dang d'e?- my daddie. 
The MS. is in the British Museum with directions by Burns where the tune is 
to be found. One of the humorous connubial songs for which Scotland is 
distinguished. The dialogue sparkles with fun. The hale and active wife has 
a profound disrespect for her rheumatic ' fushionless ' old husband, whose 
children even deride him. A fragment from a MS. once in the possession of 
the late C. K. Sharpe is subjoined : — 



' The nine pint bicker's fa'n aff the bink, 

And broken the ten-pint cannie, O, 

The wife and her kimmers sat down 

to drink. 

But ne'er a drap gae the guidman- 

nie, O ; 



The bairns they a' set up a shout, 
The deuks dang o'er my daddie, O; 

" There's no muckle matter " quo' the 
guidwife 
" He's ay been a daidlin bodie, O." ' 



The tune first printed in Playford's Dancing Master, 1670, is English; the 
title Buff Coat indicates a political origin in the Restoration period or earlier, 
for Fletcher, in The Knight of Malta, refers to a song as The soldier has 710 fellow, 
which was sung to the tune. Early in the seventeenth century the defensive 
armour of the soldier was a buff leather jerkin thick enough to protect the 
body from sword cuts. This continued to be the uniform during the reigns of 
Charles I and II, and the Commonwealth. No version exists of The 
soldier has no fellow Cor 77ie buff coat has no fellow) ; but various ballads on 
other subjects are marked to be sung to Bttff coat, and during the eighteenth 
century the tune was introduced into several operas. The Scots tune The deuks 
dang o'er my daddie differs in detail from Bttff coat, but both are practically 
the same. The music entitled The buff coat has no fellow is in Atkinson' s MS. 
1694, and as the Deukes daitg over my daddie in Oswald's Curious Collection 
Scots Tunes, 1740, 4 ; in his Companion, 1743, i. i\ M'^Gibbon's Scots Tziites, 
I755> 7; 3-nd Aird's Airs, 17S2, i. No. 68. 

No. 217. Husband, husband, cease your strife. Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1799, 62, ' Written for this Work by Robert Burns.' The MS. is in the 
Thomson collection. An imperfect copy is in the British Museum. My 
spouse Nancy sent in December, 1793, is an English version oi My Jo Janet, 
which is a delightful humorous dialogue, conducted in the most courteous 
manner between a parsimonious husband and a vain young wife who dresses to 
attract the attention of the public. Janet of the old song and the Naficy of 
Burns are different characters. The latter is a termagant requiring physical 
force argument. My Jo Janet is in the Tea- Table Miscellany, 1724, and 
Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, ij2. The first stanza is : — 

' Sweet Sir, for your courtesie, 

When you come by the Bass then. 
For the love ye bear to me. 

Buy me a keeking-glass then. 
" Keek into the draw-well, 

Janet, Janet, and there ye'U see your bonny sel 
My jo Janet." ' 

The rest can be seen in any good collection of Scottish Songs. Wanting the 
last stanza it is in Johnson's Museum, 1788, No. iii. In the Interleaved 
Museum Burns says ' Johnson the publisher, with a foolish delicacy, refused to 
insert the last stanza of this humorous ballad.' A broadside of the seventeenth 
century in the British Museum, entitled y^??;?)/, _/g««j; or the false-hearted 
knight, obviously an English copy of the Scots original, relates the same 



428 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



incidents as those of My Jo Janet. There are at least two other black letter 
ballads to the tune Jenny, Jenny. One, The kind-hearted Maidetts Resolution ; 
and the other The Faithful Young Afaft's answer to the kind-hearted Maiden's 
Resolution ; both printed for I. Clarke at the Harp and Bible, in West Smith- 
field, between the years 1666 and 1684. 

The primitive melody is in the Straloch MS., 1627-29, entitled The old man; 
and, wanting the second part, as Long er onie old man, in the Skene MS. c. 
1630. The Leyden MS. c. 1692, contains another form called Robin and 
Janet. The tune is in Oswald's Companion, 1751, iii. 16; M'^Gibbon's ^'c^/'j' 
Tunes, 1755, 11 ; and with the verses of My jo Janet in the Orpheus Caledoniits, 
1733, No. j6; the Perth Musical Miscellany., 1786, 7/9; Scots Musical 
Museiun, 1788, No. ///, and Ritson's Scotish Songs, 1794, i. iTJ. 

No. 218. I never saw a fairer. Currie, IVorks, iv. i^, entitled My IVi/e's 
a zvinsome wee thing, which was written for George Thomson and described to 
him in a letter Nov. S, 1792, as ' a few lines smooth and pretty,' and he goes on 
' If you mean, my dear Sir, that all the songs in yonr collection shall be poetry 
of the first merit, I am afraid you will find difficulty in the undertaking more 
than you are aware of Thomson did not publish the song in Scotish Airs, 
1818, but he inserted it in his Select Melodies, 1825, vi. 44, in twenty-four 
lines, four being by Burns, and twenty by himself ! For the tune, see No. 220. 

No. 219. O, that I had ne'er been married. Scots Musical Mtiseutn, 
1803, No. /9J. 'Corrected by R. Burns.' 'Mr. B. gave the old words' 
(Law's MS. List). The chief portion of a distracting letter to Mrs. Dunlop 
dated 15th December, 1793, states the reason of Burns's attention to the present 
song. The following is an extract : ' These four months, a sweet little girl, 
my youngest child, has been so ill, that every day, a week or less threatened to 
terminate her existence. There had much need be many pleasures annexed to 
the state of husband and father, for God knows they have many peculiar 
cares. I see a train of helpless little folk ; me and my exertions all their stay ; 
and on what a brittle thread does the life of man hang ! If I am nipt off at 
the command of fate ; even in all the vigour of manhood as I am, such things 
happen every day — Gracious God ! what would become of my little flock ! 'Tis 
here that I envy your people of fortune. A father on his deathbed, taking an 
everlasting leave of his children, has indeed woes enough ; but the man of 
competent fortune leaves his sons and daughters independence and friends ; 
while I — but I shall run distracted if I think any longer on the subject! To 
leave off talking of the matter so gravely, I shall sing with the old ballad 
that L had ne'er been man-iedi' He then quotes the first stanza of the present 
song. The only part written by Burns is the last stanza beginning ' Waefu' 
want and hunger fly me.' The first stanza and chorus are in the LLerd MS. 

The tune entitled Three Crowdys in a day is in Atkinson's MS., 1694 : the 
editor of the Museum, ignoring the sentiment of Burns's song, cruelly marks the 
music to be sung ' a little lively,' presumably on the principle of driving away 
dull care. 

*!N'o. 220. She play'd the loon or she was married. Scots Musical 
Museiun, 1790, No. 21-]. Burns's holograph in the Law MS. is 'Mr. Burns's 
old words.' The first eight lines are a fragment in Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, 
ii. 2^0, the last eight are the work of Burns. The whole song as here printed is 
in the Merry Muses. For the dainty verses which Burns wrote for Thomson to 
the tune, see No. 21&. The music in our text is an early and good set from 
Stewart's Reels, 1762,^0. The tune was first printed in Oi-iginal Scotch Tunes, 
1700, entitled Bride Next, and with the present title in Caledonian Pocket 
Companion, 1754, vi. 12 ; and Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. 41. 

No. 221. On peace an' rest my mind was bent. Scots Mtisical Museum, 
1803, No. JJ2. ' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' ' Mr. B's old 



IV. CONNUBIAL 429 



words ' (Law's MS. List). The MS. is in Chicago. Stenhouse refers to an 
old song Afy wife she dang me, but gives no particulars. Burns had no 
experience of such a wife as is suggested in these verses : his humorous 
connubial songs are uniformly excellent. The class is very largely represented 
in the vernacular songs of Scotland, and indicates that the women could hold 
their own against the lords of creation. Hector Boece, the Scottish historian of 
the fifteenth century, says that in ancient times they were nearly as strong as 
the men, and maidens and wives ' yeid als weile to battle as the men ' (went as 
well to battle as the men). In Motherwell's Burns, 1834, iii. 29, an obviously 
modern song is quoted, which need not be regarded. The tune My tvife she 
dang me is in Oswald's Companiott, 1754, vi. 4 ; and M^Gibbon's Scots Times, 
1755, 28. It is a characteristic melody probably of the seventeenth century. 

No. 222. I coft a stane o' haslock woo'. Scots Musical Miisetwt, 1796, 
No. 4}^, signed ' Z,' entitled The cardin d't, &c. The MS. of this fragment is 
in the IBritish Museum. The ' haslock woo ' named in the first line is the wool 
on the throat or hals of the sheep, from which tlie finest and softest yarn is 
made. The second stanza is a reminiscence oijohn Attderson my jo. 

The tune The cardin dt, or Salt fish a7id dwiiplijigs, is a smooth flowing 
melody, well worth preservation. It is in Sinkler's MS., 1710, entitled 
Qtieensburys Scots measure ; and in Aird's Airs, 1788, iii. No. 487. 

No. 223. The cooper o' Cuddle came here awa. Scots Mttsical 
Museum, 1796, No. 4}!, entitled. The couper d Cuddy. The MS. is in the 
British Museum. A version substantially the same is in the Merry Muses. At 
the bottom of the musical MS. for the printer Burns has written ' This tune is 
to be met with everywhere.' Bab at the bowster is an old favourite dance, and 
never omitted at penny weddings and other rustic balls. As practised in the 
West of Scotland it was rather a lengthy function. A row of men and a row 
of women faced each other, with one in the middle carrying a bolster. The 
company sang the refrain : — 

' Wha learnt you to dance, you to dance, you to dance, 
Wha learnt you to dance, Bab at the bowster, brawly.' 

At the close of the stanza, the holder of the bolster, laid it at the feet of one of 
the opposite sex, and then both knelt and kissed. The process was repeated, 
until all had participated, or until the company tired of the game. Burns, in a 
letter dated June 30, 1787, describes a ball he was at in the Highlands, 
where among others Bab at the bowster was danced with enthusiasm. This 
form of salutation was common in England to the end of the sixteenth century 
and later, when the gentlemen kissed the ladies on entering a room. Erasmus 
does not give it a place in his satire The Praise of Folly, but he was much 
impressed with the custom, which he could not sufficiently praise, and on 
which Captain Topham, a competent critic, has remarked that it says much 
for the superior beauty of English women who could fire the lifeless soul of 
a Dutchman. The custom went out earlier in England than in Scot- 
land, where it only began to decline in the last quarter of the eighteenth 
century. It still survives as ' kiss in the ring ' in ' unfashionable society.' 

In the time of Burns the passion for dancing was at its height in Scotland. 
Captain Topham, in his Letters from Edinburgh, 1775, describes an upper and 
a middle class ball, where the company danced nothing but reels and strath- 
speys. They sat unmoved at most of the English country dances, but the 
moment a reel was played, they jumped up as if they had been bitten by a 
tarantula. The gravest men in Edinburgh, with the exception of the ministers, 
were as fond of dancing as the Scottish rustics of the day, and danced not for 
recreation, but for the sake of dancing. 

The Tune is in the Skene MS. c. 1630, entitled Who learned you to dance 
and a towdle; as Country Btunpkin, in Stewart's Reels, c. 1768, jz ; and as 



430 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Bab at the bowster, in Aird's Aii's, 1782, i. No. 11^. It was sung in at least 
five English operas of the eighteenth century, and known in England as A 
country bumpkin from one of the opera songs beginning : — 

' A country bumpkin who trees did grub, 
A vicar that used the pulpit to drub, 

And two or three more, o'er a stoup of strong bub, 
Late met on a jolly occasion.' 
The Cushion dance, precisely that described above, was fashionable and popular 
in England in the reign of Queen Elizabetli : every class from the Court down- 
wards favoured it. John Selden (1584-1664), in Table Talk, gives a ludicrous 
account of the English dancing propensities. ' The Court of England is much 
altered. At a solemn dancing, first you had the grave measures, then the 
Corrantos and the Galliards, and this is kept up with ceremony, at length, to 
Trench-more and the Cushion-Dance , and then all the company dance. Lord 
and groom, Lady and kitchen-maid, no distinction. So in our Court in Queen 
Elizabeth's time gravity and state were kept up. In king James's time things 
were pretty well. But in King Charles's time, there has been nothing but 
Trenchmore and the Cushion Dance, omnium gatherum, tolly polly, hoite cum 
toite.' Taylor, the water poet, called the cushion dance a provocative dance, 
for he before whom the cushion was placed was to kneel and salute the lady. 
A full description can be seen in Chappell's Poptdar Music, p. 1 54. 

The music of the English Cushion Daitce is different from the Scottish tune. 
The earliest printed copy is entitled Gahiarde Attglaise in a Dutch music book, 
Amsterdam, 1615. The following is from Nederlandtsche Gedenck-Clanck, 
1626, entitled : — 

Galliarde Suit Margriet. 




^- 



SEi^zz^^ 



± 



D.C. 



SJ^^J 



idzsiziili 



^m^ =^^^^^ 



5E 



i^ 



m 



^^^ 



Fine. 



B.C. 

No. 224. Guide'en to you, kimmer. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, 
No. /2/, signed ' B' and marked ' corrected by Burns.' Centenary edit. 1897, 
iii. i8<). In Gray's MS. Lists ' The music with Mr. Clarke.' In Law's MS. 
' Mr. Bnrns's old words.' A part of the verses is a repetition, and probably the 
original, of the fragment quoted by Percy (see Notes to No. 212). Is it not 
likely that the fourth and fifth stanzas of We're cH noddi7i are the original of 
Percy's lines, and that the general Johny became the particular /ohn 
Anderson ? Stenhouse circulated Percy's statement in his Illustrations. The 
second and last stanzas in the text are in the Herd MS. 70 ; the rest were 
added by Bums or obtained from tradition. In Sharpe's Ballad Book, 1823, 
there is an incoherent set of verses of the close of the eighteenth century 
beginning ' Bide a wee, woman, and gie'st a' out', for the tune which probably 
originated in the street and circulated viva voce until put in the Museum. 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 431 

*N'o. 225. There's cauld kail in Aberdeen. The two stanzas and chorus 
in the text are in the Interleaved Museum where Burns states they are ' the old 
verses.' They are not found elsewhere, and he doubtless mended them. For 
an account of the tune Cauld Kail, see notes to Nos. 102 and 104. 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL. 

No. 226. The deil cam fiddlin thro' the town. Scots Musical Museum^ 
1792, No. ^9p, entitled, The deiVs awa wV the exciseman. Enclosed in an 
undated letter addressed to J. Leven, General Supervisor of the Excise, and 
introduced as follows : ' Mr. Mitchell mentioned to you a ballad, which I 
composed and sung at one of his excise dinners : here it is — The Deil' s awa -wV 
the exciseman. Tune Madame Cossy. If you honor my ballad by making it 
one of your charming boft wz'z'flw/ effusions, it will secure it undoubted celebrity.' 
Lockhart, in his Life of £ tints, 1828, relates the origin of the song, which he 
received from an Excise officer, to the effect that Burns was left on the Solway 
shore to watch the movements of the crew of a stranded smuggler, while his 
companion went for assistance to board the vessel. Burns got tired tramping 
the wet sands, and exercised himself in writing The deiVs aiva wi the excise- 
7tian. 

The tune Madani Cossy I conjecture to be The Quaker s Wife, see No. 40 ; 
or it may be another name for that here reprinted from the Museum, where the 
song was first published under Burns's direction. It is a good English melody 
entitled The hemp-dresser in Aird's Airs, ii. No. loj, and without a title in the 
Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1756, viii. 21. It is in every edition of 
Playford's Danciitg Master from the first issue in 1651. In Durfey's Pills, 
1719, i. 320, it is set to a song The sun had loos d his weary tearn. 

TSo. 227. Landlady, count the lawin. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, 
No. 170, entitled, Hey tutti, iaiti. The MS. is in the British Museum. An 
early Jacobite song of the beginning of the eighteenth century is on the same 
page of Johnson's Museum. This political song is written with considerable 
vigour, one of the stanzas being as follows : — 

' When you hear the trumpet-sounds Chos. Fill up your bumpers high, 

Tuttie taitie to the drum; We'll drink a' your barrels dry. 

Up your swords, and down your guns, Out upon them, fy ! fy ! 

And to the louns again. That winna do't again.' 

The tune, slightly varied, is that for which Burns wrote Scots wha hae — see 
Song No. ^Xf. 

No. 228. A' the lads o' Thornie-bank. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, 
No. 7/(5 b, signed ' Z.' Tune Rufiaiis rant. The MS. is in the British 
Museum. Buckie is an important fishing village between Castle Gordon 
and Cullen. Burns must have passed through Buckie on September 7, 17875 
for he slept at Cullen the same night, and we know that he dined on that 
day with the Duke of Gordon. The song is probably a reminiscence of a call 
for refreshment at the Inn kept by ' Lady Onlie, honest lucky, who brew'd good 
ale at the shore o' Bucky.' 

For the tune, see No. 2j(). 

No. 229. I sing of a whistle, a whistle of worth. Scots Musical Museum, 
1792, "No. J14, entitled The Whistle. Burns has described the origin of the 
contest for the whistle, and whether true or not there can be no doubt that our 
Scandinavian ancestors were deep drinkers. Poetry and song were the magic 
of Odin ; beer was the ambrosial liquor. Regner Lodbrog, in his Dying Ode, 



432 HISTORICAL NOTES 

expresses his opinion of the juice of the malt, and in the last stanza says : 
' Odin hath sent his godesses to conduct me to his palace. I am going to be 
placed in the higliest seat, there to quaff goblets of beer with the gods.' 

The whistle, according to Burns's 'authentic ' history, was brought to Scotland 
by a gigantic Dane who followed Anne, Princess of Denmark, whom James VI 
married. The Dane challenged any one to drink with him, the condition 
being that the man who sat longest at the table should become the owner of 
the Cd or whistle. The ancestor of Sir Robert Lowrie of Maxwelton won the 
trophy after a three days and nights' contest, and blew the Vvhistle over the 
prostrate Scandinavian. A descendant of Sir Robert Lowrie lost the trophy, 
which passed into the possession of Walter Riddell of Glenriddell, and remained 
in the family. The contest celebrated by Burns took place on Friday 
October i6, 1789, between Robert Riddell brother of the holder, Sir Robert 
Lowrie of Maxwelton, and Alexander Ferguson of Craigdarroch, the latter- 
named gentleman carrying off the prize, and in a very peculiar way proving the 
survival of the fittest. It is very unlikely that Burns was present at the contest, 
although the penultimate stanza of the ballad makes it appear that he was. 
On the same day he had forwarded two letters to be franked by Sir Robert 
Lowrie, and said he would send a servant for them in the evening. 

The ballad was printed in several newspapers before it appeared in the 
Museut?i. Stenhouse says that the tune is the composition of Robert Riddell, 
one of the competitors, and if so, it is his best tune. It is in the style of an 
Irish melody, but it is not in any collection prior to the Musetim. 

No. 230. Ye sons of old Killie, assembled by 'Willie. Cunning- 
ham's edition, 1S34. Tune, Over the water to Charlie. Burns was admitted 
as an honorary member to the Kilmarnock Lodge of Kilwinning Freemasons, 
on October 26, 1786, when he recited the foregoing verses, and afterwards 
handed a copy of them to the chairman, Major William Parker. 

The tune Over the water to Charlie was composed shortly after the rebellion 
of I745i unless it had a previous unrecorded existence. Burns knew it as 
Irish under the name of Shawnboy ; the earliest form is in Johnson's Cotmtry 
Dances, 174S, entitled Pot-stick. It is in Oswald's Coinpanion, 1752, iv. 7, as 
Over the water to Charlie, and with the same title in Bremner's Reels, 1757, 16 ; 
and the Museum, 1788, No. i&'j. In Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. <)8, it is entitled 
Marquis of Granby-Shamhuy . It was also known by an Irish name Legrunt 
Cush, and it may be the Madam Cossy referred to in No. 226. For tune, see 
No. 2(^4. 

No. 231. It 's now the day is dawin. Scots Musical Museum, i']()6, 
No. 442. Stenhouse in Illust., jc)j, says : ' The four lines in the Musetim were 
hastily penned by Burns at the request of the publisher, who was anxious to 
have the tune in that work, and the old words could not be discovered.' Burns 
admired the air and refers to it in a letter to Alex. Cunningham, May 4, 1789, 
when he thought of writing a song for the three Crochallan members Cruikshank, 
Dunbar and Cunningham : ' I have a good mind to write verses on you all to 
the tune Three gude fellows ayont the glen.' No verses are known except 
those in the text. This spirited and well constructed melody is neglected and 
almost unknown. It is in M'^Gibbon's 6'<;(7/'j' Tunes, 1746, 18; and Oswald's 
Companion, 1753, v. 1. 

ISo. 232. Deluded swain, the pleasure. Scotish Airs, 1798,^^. Tune: 
The Collier'' s Iwnie lassie. Currie's I Forks, iSoo, iv. ijj. The only informa- 
tion about this sentimental production is a line in the letter to Thomson 
enclosing the song : ' Then for The Colliers dochter take the following old 
bacchanal.' No one has discovered any previous song of the kind : the 
presumption is that Burns had no wish to father it. The tune is noted in songs 
Nos. 44 and 208. 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 433 

1^0.233. Should auld acquaiKtattce be forgot? (Johnson's set.) From 
a holograph copy in the Interleaved Museum. Scots Musical Museum, 1796, 
No. 41}, signed ' Z.' Auld lang syne is the best known and most widely spread 
social song in the Anglo-Saxon language. Without official aid such as has 
been given by religion to the Old Hundredth, or to God save the King hy the 
State, Auld lang syne has steadily worked its way to the heart of all classes 
of the nation, and it stands pre-eminent as the most familiar secular song of 
the English-speaking people throughout the world. In Scotland it slowly 
supplanted and eventually obliterated Good night, and joy be wt you a' which 
for a century and a half had been the dismissory song at festive meetings. It 
would be difficult to apportion the relative merit of the verse and the air which 
has contributed to the extraoi;dinary popularity of Auld lang syne. Both are 
simple and directly emotional. Nine-tenths of the words are monosyllabic; the 
melody is a Scottish country dance tune, which in the course of half a century 
of continuous use was giadually divested of superfluous ornament, and was 
developed into the simplest musical phraseology of the original. A century of 
increasing fame has put Auld lang syne beyond criticism, and we might as well 
try to analyse the colour or aroma of a wild flower in order to direct the taste as to 
make an impression by dissecting the song. The description of Burns has been 
justified, and it illustiates the power of song so effectively expressed by Andrew 
Fletcher of Saltoun (1653-1716) nearly two hundred years ago in the following 
words more often than otherwise quoted incorrectly: 'I said I knew a very 
wise man so much of Sir Chr — 's sentiment, that he believed if a man were 
permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws 
of a nation.' {Account of a Conversatioi't; Edin. 1704.) 

A brief and bare statement of the origin of the verse and air may be permitted 
here, as the history of both are obscure and disputed. As regards the verse 
Burns is responsible for leading the public astray, and his musical editor George 
Thomson obscured the source of the air. The words were originally published 
from the manuscript of Burns in Johnson's Museum at the close of the year 
1796, or about six months after the poet died. It is not certain, but it is very 
probable, that Burns saw the engraved Museum copy of Atild lan^ syne. 

In a letter to Johnson ab-mt October, 1 793, he says 'as to our Musical Museum, 
I have better than a dozen songs by me for the fifth volume.' In the same 
month he asks Johnson why the tunes and verses which could not be made 
out were not sent to him, and he requests that they be forwarded without delay, 
for he and Clarke are laying out materials for the fifth volume. About 
February, 1 794, he sent forty-one songs for the volume, and informed Johnson 
that he had a good parcel of scraps and fragments in his hands. In the middle 
of June, 1794, Johnson wrote to Burns stating that the fifth volume was actually 
begun ; and in March, 1795, a packet of songs was returned to Johnson, ob- 
viously received by Burns for correction. Finally, a few months before his 
death a friend who was in Etiinburgh was commissioned to bring any proofs 
that were ready. These references are given to show, that Burns knew the 
contents of the posthumous fifth volume of tlie Museiun of which Auld lang 
syne is the thirteenth number. The poet wrote at least four holograph copies 
of Auld lang syne. The first was part of a letter to Mrs, Dunlop on December 17, 
1788, from which the following is an extract: 'Your meeting which you so 
well describe with your old schoolfellow and friend, was truly interesting. Out 
upon the ways of the world ! they spoil these " social offsprings of the heart." 
Two veterans of the " men of the world " would have met with little more heart- 
workings than two old hacks worn out on the road. Apropos, is not the .Scotch 
phrase Auld lang syne exceedingly expressive ? There is an old song and tune 
which has often thrilled through my soul. You know I am an enthusiast in 
old Scotch songs. I shall give you the veises on the other sheet . . . Light be 
the turf on the breast of the heaven-inspired poet who composed this glorious 
fragment ! There is more of the fire of native genius in it than in half a dozen 

Ff 



434 HISTORICAL NOTES 

of modem English Bacchanalians.' Tfeis Dunlop Manuscript, incomplete, is in 
the possession of Mrs. Pruyn of Albany, New York. The copy differs from the 
published versions, and it is obvious that Burns revised the song before sending 
it for publication. The first and fifth stanzas and chorus are as follows : — 

First Stanza. Choms. 

' Should auld acquaintance be forgot, For auld lang syne, my jo, 

And never thought upon ? For auld lang syne ; 

Lets hae a waught o' Malaga, Lets hae a waught o' Malaga, 
For auld lang syne. P'or auld lang syne. 

Fifth Stanza. 
' And there 's a han' my trusty fiere, 

And gie 's a han' o' thine ; 
And we'll tak a right gudewilly waught, 
For auld lang syne.' 

The rest is substantially the same as that in Johnson's Musetmi. The manu- 
script of the Johnson copy has disappeared. The song having been written 
for the Mttsetcm, it may be assumed that Burns, soon after the Dunlop letter, 
sent his verses to Johnson, who however put them aside because the air for 
which they were written had already appeared with the verses of Allan Ramsay 
in the first volume of the Museum published in 1787. Johnson afterwards 
discovered the merit of the song which caused him eventually to publish it, and 
thus to take the unusual step of reprinting a tune which had already appeared 
in his collection. To Johnson therefore must be given the credit of the original 
publication of Auld lang syne. 

Some years later — in September, 1793 — Burns forwarded a third copy to 
George Thomson with the following note : 'One song more, and I have done, 
Auld lang syne. The air is but mediocre; but the following song — the old 
song of the olden times, and which has never been in print, nor even in manu- 
script, until I took it down from an old man's singing — is enough to recommend 
any air.' In November 1 794, or after a lapse of more than a year, Burns writes 
again to Thomson, apparently in answer to a reference the latter had previously 
made to the m.usic. (Thomson had probably discovered from Clarke, the musical 
reviser of the Mtiseum, that Johnson was in possession of a copy of Auld lang 
syne.) He says : ' The two songs you saw in Clarke's are neither of them 
worth your attention. The words of Auld lang. syne are good, but the music 
is an old air, the rudiments of the modern tune of that name. The other tune 
you may hear as a common Scots country dance.' I have marked the last 
sentence in italics as I will refer to it in the Notes on Thomson's set following. 
The fourth copy of the verses unsuspected and unknown I have discovered in 
the Interleaved Museum which I have been permitted to examine. These 
four precious volumes have been hidden fiom the public for nearly one hundred 
years, and Cromek, who, in his Reliqties of Robert Burns, 1808, pretended 
to have printed a verbatim copy of the Notes written by Burns, has misled the 
public in several ways as to the contents. In connexion with Ajild lang syne 
he quotes what is not in the Interleaved Museum, and he omits what is there, 
which is : ' The original and by much the best set of the words of this song is 
as follows' as in our text. The Dunlop and Interleaved Museum copies definitely 
settle the disputed gude-willy controversy which need not have caused any 
controversy, as the term is Old English and occurs for example in the line ' A ! 
faire lady ! Welwilly found at al,' in John Lydgate's (c. 1375-1462) Complaint 
of the black knight. A 'gude-willy waught' means a deep drink of good 
fellowship. 

It is necessary to explain what Burns meant by 'an old song.' Most of his 
numerous contributions to the Museum were original, but many were earlier 
fragments with his additions and corrections, and these he has described in the 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 435 

Latv MS. as 'Mr. Burns's old words.' To his correspondents in general he 
pretended that several were not his work at all, but merely verses that he had 
heard or been told, and Johnson had no particular information about them. 
A number of the songs in the Museum bear the signature X or Z. On one of 
these, To the weaver s giti ye go. Burns made the following note in the Inter- 
leaved Museum. ' The chorus of this is old ; the rest of it is mine ' ; and then 
he goes on to make a general statement : ' Here, once for all, let me apologize 
for many siljy compositions of mine in this work. Many beautiful airs wanted 
words ; in the hurry of other avocations, if I could string a parcel of rhymes 
together anything near tolerable, I was fain to let them pass. He must be an 
excellent poet indeed, whose every performance is excellent.' A few examples 
from his Notes may serve to illustrate the subject. ' Go fetch to me a pint of 
wine ' he described as old to Mrs. Dunlop, though he subsequently stated that 
he was the author of all but the first four lines. Strathallatt s lament in the 
Museum is wholly original ; in ' I'm o'er young to marry yet,' signed ' Z,' the 
chorus alone is old ; while in MTherson^s Farewell the legend alone is all 
that he borrowed, and there is scarcely anything in his verses to compare with 
the old ballad. Of 'John Anderson my jo,' only the first line or title is 
borrowed, the rest is the very antipodes of the early and now unprintable verses. 
Again, the whole of the Gardener wP his paidle (signed Z in the Museum') 
except the title is original, and the same is the case with Whistle der the lave 
dt. How far Burns revised or amended the so-called ' old ' version of Auld 
lang syne may be gathered from what follows ; but it may be premised that 
no verses containing sentiments akin to those in Burns's song have ever been 
found, the only discovery being a ballad with the refrain ' On old lang syne, 
my jo' (quoted below) which from the context is the echo of another set of verses 
— or the reverse — at any rate, not at all in the spirit of Burns's world-wide 
* Bacchanalian.' 

The earliest mention of the precise vernacular phrase Atddlang syne is in that 
scurrilous work Scotch Presbyterian Eloquence Display'' d, London, 1694, 64, 
where the author quotes the following from a sermon preached : * Did you 
ever hear tell of a good God, and a cappet (pettish) prophet. Sirs? The good 
God said, Jonah, now billy Jonah, wilt thou go to Nineveh, lo\ Auld lang syne 
(old kindness).' The italicized words in the original are probably the reminiscence 
of a popular song, in which case it takes us back to the late part of the 
seventeenth century; or it may be only a phrase. Jamieson, in his Scottish 
Dictionary, describes syne as follows : ' To a native of this country it is very 
expressive, and conveys a soothing idea to the mind, as recalling the memory 
of joys that are p.ist.' This is precisely what the whole of the song of Burns 
does, and it is the central source of its immense popularity. The word is Old 
English ; Robert de Brunne c. 1300, in a curious description of manners of the 
time, uses it thus : — 

* The king said, as the knight gan ken 

Drinkhaille ! smiland on Rowen 
Rowen drank as her list. 

And gave the king : sine him kist.' 

It occurs in the works of Barbour, Dunbar, Douglas, and many of the older 
Scottish poets in the sense of then or since. 

The germ of the song lies in an anonymous ballad of eight double stanzas in 
the Bannatyne MS. 1568 (folio 80 Zi), entitled Auld Kyndnes foryett, which 
begins ' This warld is all bot fenyeit fair,' and is the soliloquy of one in 
straitened circumstances, who, having seen better days, laments the ingratitude 
of those who formerly professed themselves friends. The fifth stanza may be 
quoted as a specimen of the poetry of the early part of the sixteenth century, 
and as an example of the masculine strength of the Scots language : — 

F f 2 



436 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



* Thay wald me hals with hude and hatt, 
Quhyle I wes riche and had anevvch, 
About me friendis anew I gatt, 
Rycht bljthlie on me they lewch ; 
Bot now thay mak it wondir tewch, 
And lattis me stand befoir the yelt ; 
Thairfoir this warld is verry frevvch, 
And auld kyndnes is quyt foryett.' 

A later ballad is the well-known two sets of verses attributed on slender 
authority by some to Sir Robert Aytoun (1570-1638), and on more imperfect 
evidence by others, to Francis Sempill of Belltrees (died c. T683). It was first 
printed in a miscellaneous collection in Watson's Scots Poems, 1711, and begins 
as follows : — 



' Should old acquaintance be forgot. 
And never thought upon, 

The flames of love extinguished, 
And freely past and gone ? 



Is thy kind heart now grown so cold 
In that loving breast of thine, 

That thou canst never once reflect 
On old-long-syne?' 



In the Laing collection, now in the possession of Lord Rosebery, is a street 
song (referred to in the Centenary Bums) headed '■An excellent and proper iiezu 
ballad, entitled " Old long syne ". Newly corrected and amended ivith a large 
and new edition of several excellent love lines ^ The date of the issue of this 
broadside is about the end of the seventeenth century, and ihe chorus or refrain 
runs as follows : — 

' On old long syne, 

On old long syne, my jo, 

On old long syne : 

That thou canst never once reflect 
On old long syne.' 

It will be observed from the title that this ballad is the reprint of an earlier 
publicaiion, and it is important to notice that the refrain contains (i) the same 
sentiment ' Ihat thou canst never once reflect,' as that expressed in the song 
attributed to Aytoun, and (2) that the words ' my jo' are part of the title of 
the earliest copy of the tune, and also of Burns's chorus as printed in the 
Museum. Whether this popular song is anterior to that previously mentioned 
and ascribed to Aytoun is uncertain. 

In Scots Songs, 1720, ']'], Allan Ramsay published a song of five stanzas 
which has often been reprinted. The first lines are : — 

' Should auld acquaintance be forgot, 

Tho' they return with scars ? 
These are the noble hero's lot, 

Obtain' d in glorious wars : 

And the poem goes on to describe, in the usual conventional style of the 
eighteenth century, the conjunction of- Mars and Veniis, and concludes happily 
with the words : — 

' Where the good priest the couple blest, 
And fiut them out of pine.' 

There are, urther, several political or patriotic ballads, one of which modelled 
on the Watson set is against the union of the countries, and contains the 
following lines : — 

' Is Scotsmen's blood now grown so cold. 

The valour of their mind 
That they can never once reflect 
On old long sine ? ' 



Welcome, my Varo, to my breast, 
Thy arms about me twine. 

And make me once again as blest. 
As I was lang syne.' 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 437 

Another entitled O CakdoK^ O Caledon, is in the Laing collection, and 
published in the Lockhart papers, 18 17. Lastly a Jacob.te ballad of six 
double stanzas in the True Loyalist, 1779, entitled Langsyne, is supposed to 
be written by a skulker in the year 1746, beginning : — 

'Should old gay mirth and cheerfulness 

Be dashed for evermore, 
Since late success in wickedness 

Made Whigs insult and roar.' 

which is the nearest approach to the social sentiment of Burns's song, but, with 
the exception of the title, there is nothing in it or in any of the poems quoted 
which could either have inspired Burns, or served as a model for his verses. 

We have thus to fall back upon his statement of the street ballad which had 
never been in print nor in writing. We know^ the transformation which 
Burns effected in all songs of this class, so it is not to be wondered that his 
contemporaries who could discover no soig of the kind should be sceptical as 
to his account of their origin. Cromek, in Scotish Songs, 1810, ii. 128, says: 
' This ballad lof Auld lang syne was also introduced in an ambiguous manner, 
though there exist proofs that the two best stanzas of it are indisputably his He 
delighted to imitate and muse on the customs and opinions of his ancestors . . 
all tended to confer on him that powerful gift of imitating the ancient ballads of 
his country with the ease and simplicity of his models.' Cromek was a warm 
admirer of Burns's genius, and scoured A3'rshire and the Southern counties of 
Scotland in collecting memorials of the poet which he afterwards published ; 
but he does not state what authority he had for saying that Burns wrote only 
two stanzas of the song. George Thomson was also sceptical about the old 
original; to enhance his collection, however, he printed at the head of Auld 
Lang Syne in Scotish Airs, the observation that it was ' from an old MS. in 
the Editor's possession,' without mentioning Burns at all. This statement was 
misleading, for the MS. was less than five years old and in the poet's hand- 
writing. In the later editions the word ' old ' was deleted, and the head note 
reads, ' from a MS. in the Editor's possession ' with this remark — ' The follow- 
ing exquisitely beautiful song was sent by Burns with information that it is an 
old song &c. ... It is more than probable, however, that he said this in a 
playful humour, for the editor cannot help thinking that the song affords full 
evidence of Burns himself being the author.' By this time Auld lang syne had 
acquired considerable fame, and Thomson was obliged to correct his misleading 
note. We shall see, however, from the story of the modern melody that this is 
not the only instance of his having led the public astray. 

The last writer who may be named on the subject is William Stenhouse, who 
affirms that Burns admitted to Johnson that three stanzas only were old, the 
other two being written by himself. This is a mere repetition of Cromek 
with the additional information that Burns told Johnson. The three supposed 
old stanzas are those relating to the cup, the pitit stoup and the gude-willy 
•waught. No trace of the ' old ' song, if it ever existed in the particular of 
Burns, has been discovered ; and if according to his statement, that it never was 
in print, or even in manuscript, it never can be discovered: and further it is 
difficult to admit the assertion, unless he wrote the verses himself. After his 
warm eulogy on the song with the first copy to Mrs. Dunlop, he was bound to 
adhere to the anonymous origin, and as he continued to extol it he was not the 
man to open himself to ridicule by claiming it. 

The air or tune of our text is that for which Burns wrote his song. It should 
be remembered that this tune was associated with every song or ballad of 
Auld lang syne, including that of Burns up to the year 1799, when it was 
displaced by the present well known air to be described in the next Number. 
The music has an historical record of exactly a hundred years. Doubtless it 
belongs to a considerable part of the seventeenth century, although the music 



438 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



has not been found earlier than in Playford's Orighial Scotch Tunes, 1700, 
the first printed collection of Scottish music of any kind. The title of the 
tune there is For old long Gine (sic) iny jo, which corresponds with the first 
line of the refrain of the seventeenth-century ballad cited above, On old long 
syne, my jo. In all later collections of music of the eighteenth century, except 
one, the title is invariably Auld larig syne. The tune is in Sinklers MS., 
1710; Orpheus Caledonins, 1725, No. j/; Ramsay's .M^i-zV,^, c. 1726; Watts's 
Musical Miscellany, 1730, iv. 46; Caledonian Pocket Co7npa7iion, I'JSi, iii- 
21 ; Scots Musical Museum, 1787, No. 2^, with Ramsay's words, and later in 
the same work with Burns's verses. The copies in these and other collections 
vary more or less from one another, but all of them except that in the Museum 
of 1 796 close upon the fifth of the scale. This latter is the simplest form of the 
melody divested of superfluous notes. The exception to the invariable title is 
the copy in Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, 9/, where it bears the name of The 
hopeless lover set to the song of Burns ' Now Spring has clad the grove in green.' 
The music is an exact reprint of that in the Museum, 1796, and Thomson 
probably changed the name to conceal his indebtedness to the work which he 
styled a vulgar publication. 

Variations in Johnson's Museutn : verse i, line 4, ' and auld lang syne ' ; chorus 
line I, 'For auld lang syne,' &c. ; v. 3, 1. 3, 'fitt'; v. 4, 1. i, 'in- ; 1. 2, 'morning.' 

ISo. 234. Should auld acquaintance be forgot (Thomson's set). Scotish 
Airs, 1799, 68; ' From an old MS. in the editor's possession.' Select Melodies , 
1S22, ii. i<) ; 'From a MS. in the editor's possession.' The difference in the 
description of the manuscripts in the two publications of Thomson has already 
been noticed. With one or two slight variations this is the version in Currie's 
Btirtts, 1800, i-v. 12J. The principal variations from the Museum copy is the 
substitution of ' my dear ' for ' my jo ' in the chorus ; and the second stanza in 
the Museiim is the last in Scotish Airs. This latter is more often printed in 
modern collections although the Museum copy is more radiant and attractive, 
and the better of the two. 

The present popular melody was first attached to the song in Scotish Airs, 
a.nd, although Thomson is generally believed to be solely responsible for 
selecting it, there is reason for saying that Burns was consulted. That he was 
familiar with the air will be evident from what follows. Thomson obtained 
the music from the Scots Musical Musetim, and of this there can be no doubt. 
On comparing the music in our text with that of song No. 144, two passing 
notes in the first part of the tune are the only variations from can ye labor 
lea, — the music of the chorus of Auld lang syne being a close copy of the 
other. It is important to point this out, which has not been done before, 
because Thomson made an ambiguous statement as to the source of his 
melody, which has led up to the unwaiTanted claim that William Shield 
composed the air. Neither Thomson, Stenhouse, Graham, Chappell, nor any 
other expert has said so, and Shield himself, who died in 1829, never claimed 
it. Stenhouse, simply repeating Thomson, saj^s: 'Mr. Thomson got the words 
arranged to an air introduced by Shield in his overture to the opera of Rosina, 
1783.' The word in italics or its equivalent has always been used by writers 
on the subject, but the meaning was overlooked and deflected by the public, 
and gradually the supposititious pretension of Shield was alleged as a fact ; and 
Burns's editors, not knowing the merits of the case, have given it currency. 
Chappell, who wished it to be an English air, did not trouble himself to correct 
the uncritical, and chiefly relying on the ambiguous statement of Thomson he 
maintained what was not denied, that the air is in Rosina. He did not 
challenge the accuracy of the following paragraph by Stenhouse that 
' Mr. Shield, however, borrowed this air, almost note for note, from the third 
and fourth strains of the Scotish Strathspey in Cumming's collection, under the 
title of The Miller s Wedding^ but he disputed the statement that Cumming's 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 439 

publication was issued as early as 1780. An edition, and perhaps not the 
earliest, of Cumming's ^^ra^/zjr/^yj- containing the tune is dated Edinburgh 1780, 
which settles the priority so far as Shield is concerned. Why Thomson misled 
the public and did not acknowledge his obligation to the editor of the 
Museum has been already told. He regarded Johnson's collection as mean and 
inferior, and always spoke contemptuously of it. In the published corres- 
pondence of Burns he never once names it, although Burns repeatedly refers 
Thomson to the work in his letters. This appears to me to be the reason why 
Thomson made a far-off and unnecessary allusion to the Roshia music, which, 
compared with that in the Museum, varies considerably from his copy both as 
regards notes and accents. He apparently consulted Burns as to the tune. 
In the poet's letter to him speaking of the old tune as mediocre he accurately 
describes the air which was selected as ' the other tune ) ou may hear as a 
common Scots country dance.' It is quite certain that Burns knew it well, 
for he contributed the verses ' I fee'd a man at Martinmas ' for the tune, and 
for a variant of it ' Comin thro' the rye,' which in the Gray MS. he instructs to 
be set to 'Tune — Millers Wedding, a Strathspey.' Thus the melodies olAuld 
la7ig syne, cati you labor lea, Comin thro' the rye and others in Scottish song 
books are all variants of the same air and derived from a Strathspey, originally 
published in Bremner's Reels, 1759. No tune was better known or more 
popular in Scotland during the last half of the eighteenth century, and it was 
published in numerous collections under many titles. It is not difficult to 
explain why a Scots country dance should be in Shield's opera. The English 
opera belongs to a class, the songs of which are not set to music expressly 
composed for them, but are written for existing tunes, principally those of old 
ballads and songs. The overtures are generally pot-pourris of popular 
melodies such as are performed by the orchestra of a modern pantomime. The 
Beggars' Opera is the first and best of the class, and was the most successful 
of its kind. It had no original music, all the songs are written for particular 
airs, many of which are Scottish. The overture was subsequently composed by 
Dr. Pepusch. The title page of Rosina announces that it is composed and 
selected by W. Shield. The overture is a mixture of portions of The British 
grenadiers, Sitigletons Slip, some bars of See the conquering hero cotnes, an 
English country dance and other old airs strung together with a few bars of 
original music, the last movement being a variation and an adaptation of the 
Scots country dance, with orchestral accompaniment to imitate the music of 
the bagpipe. At least one-third of the airs in Rosina are selected from 
English, French, and Scottish songs. The openmg song See the rosy morn 
appearing is the composition of John Garth, an organist of Durham and the 
English editor of ' Marcello's psalms.' Such is a sketch of Rosina, an English 
opera, after a cursory examination of the work. For his time William Shield 
was a good composer with a gift of melody. He was a native of Swalwell, 
a village in Durham on the borders of Northumberland, and was familiar with 
Scottish melodies from his youth. He harmonized the music of Napier's 
Scots Songs, 1792, and I believe that he selected and edited the tunes, for 
Ritson's Scotish Songs 'va. 1794. He was intimate with Robert Bremner, the 
leading publisher of Scottish music in London, and frequently visited his shop. 
The leading phrase of the first part of Aiild lang syne is the first movement 
of The Duke of Buccletigh's Tune in Apollo's BaJtquet, 1690-. The tune itself 
was originally published under the title The Miller's Weddiitg, in Bremner's 
Scots Reels, 1759, 41 ; and also in Cumming's Strathspeys, 1780, 17 ; with the 
title of The Miller's Daughter in M'Glashan's Strathspey Reels, 1780,/ ; as 
The lasses of the ferry in Stewart's Reels, i'j62,jj ; in the Overture to Rosina, 
1783 ; as Sir Alex. Don in Gow's Strathspey Reels, 1784 ; as Roger's farewell 
in Aird's Airs, 17S8, iii. No. J28 ; as can ye labor lea in Johnson's Museum, 
1792, No. jg4 ; as Comin ikro' the rye in the same collection of the year 1796, 
No. 418 ; and finally as Auld lang syne in Scotish Airs, as in the text. None 



440 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



of the copies are exact reproductions. Every succeeding editor made alterations 
here and there, and Shield simply took his place in the development of the air. 
To show how he got it and how he left it I subjoin the air from Cumming's 
Strathspeys^ 1780, and that fiom Rosina, 1783. 



Cumming, 1780. 



3^^ 






:^ 



:t 



^^ 



3^^?: 



^^ 



_^_^.. 



^^^Ei-S: 



^=^^r= 






^■^ 



::s=S= 



^F=^ 



lgg|£r^"i^-^^fe=^:^ 



Roshia, 1783. 



4=— •-— — * • r; * • * 1 • • • 1— 



_-=r^: 



~^^^^^^^^^^ 

-'—'—' —^ 3=*-*-*- ^ 






5^iZ=s 



i^-=p 



:^=^: 



gS^E^^ 



teP^^ 



^ 



m 



^^^ 



HNzqs-=S: 



^ 



To complete the examination : these transcripts can be compared with the 
music of can ye labor lea (No. 144) and Atdd lang sytie. bhield certainly 
changed the ciiaracter of the air by leaving out the dotted notes in the first 
portion of the air, and the conspicuous improvement he effected by some 
altered intervals was more than lost in weakening the accents by the use of 
equal notes. The editor of the 1792 copy in the Museum restored the original 
character, and improved Shield by raising the climax in the fourth bar by a full 
tone. Thomson, in Auld lang syne, completed the tune by more melodic steps 
in the third bar leading up to the climax ; and also by a more gradual and 
easy descent in the fifth bar. The result of my investigation is that the air 
was selected by Shield as announced in the title-page of his opera, and that he 
was not the composer of Aitld lang syne any more than the restorer of an 
edifice can be called the architect. 

Wo. 235. O, 'Willie brew'd a peck o' maut. Scots Musical Mtiseu7n, 
1790, No. 2c)i, entitled, Willie brewd a peck <?' viaut; Select Melodies, 1825, 
vi. ^7. This convivial song is known almost as well as Auld Lang Syne. It 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 441 

was written to commemorate a festive meeting which took place in the autumn 
of 1789- 'This air is Mastertoa's ; the song mine. The occasion of it was 
this: Mr. William Nicol, of the High School, Edinburgh, dining the autumn 
vacation being at Moffat, honest Allan, who was at that time on a visit to 
Dalswinton, and I went to pay Nicol a visit. We had such a joyous meeting, 
and Mr. Masterton and I agreed, each in our own way, that we should celebrate 
the business' {Interleaved Alusciini). The verses and music were forthwith sent 
to the Museum. Nicol died on April 21, 1797, and Masterton in 1799. Currie, 
in lVo7'ks, 1800, lamented that the three honest fellows who took part in the 
festival, all men of uncommon talents, were now under the turf. Burns probably 
found the model of his song in The fiimhler s rant, in the fourth volume of the 
Tea-Table Miscellany, 1740, the fifth stanza of which is as follows: — 

' Here 's a health to John Mackay we'll drink, 

To Hughie, Andrew, Rob, and Tam ; 
W'e'll sit and drink, we'll nod and wink, 

It is o'er soon for us to gang. 
Foul fa' the cock, he 's spilt the play. 

And I do trow he 's but a fool, 
We'll sit awhile, 'tis lang to day, 

For a' the cocks they rave at Yool.' 

The Baroness Nairn, the authoress of The land d' the leal, projected a bowdler- 
ized edition of Burns's songs, but fortunately abandoned the idea. She was 
the anonymous editor of The Scottish Minstrel, where many of her finest songs 
were first printed. The publisher on his own responsibility inserted IVillie 
brew d a peck d inaut, but Lady Naiin strongly disapproved of the selection, 
and it was suppressed in the next edition. 

The Tune is a copy from the o) iginal in the Scots Musical Mtiseiun ; words 
and music are also in Ritson's Scotish Songs, 1794, i. 2^^, and Dale's Scotch 
Songs, 1 794, iii. ij2. Use and selection have divesied the melody of the original 
superfluous passing notes which the singers of last century considered graceful 
and artistic. It is improved in modern collections ; written in the modern 
scale it is easily harmonized, and many composers with more or less success 
have made it into a three or four part song. Both verses and music are 
inspirations. 

No. 236. No churchman am I for to rail and to write. First Edinburgh 
edition, 1787, _y<5. Tune — Prepare fny dear brethren, &c.; also Scots A/usical 
Mtiseiim, 1803, No jS"] : ' By R. Burns,' with music. This song is neither 
better nor worse than the average bacchanalian tol-de-rol ditty of the eighteenth 
century on which it is Iramed. 

On October i, 1781, Burns was made a Master in the Tarbolton Lodge of 
Freemasons, and the last stanza was specially written for the craft. The wrong 
tune The lazy mist is printed in the JMiiseitm. That in the text has long been 
popular with the Freemasons. It is entitled \\\t Freemasons' health in VVatts's 
Musical Alisccllany, 1730, iii. 72, and begins, Come, let us prepare we brothers 
that are: while it is called The freemasons' march in Aira's Airs, 1782, i. 
No. -77/. It was well known in the West of Scotland, the children in the 
streets singing it to the rhyme : — 

' Hey the merry Masons, and ho the merry Masons 
Hey the merry Masons goes marching along,' &c., &c. 
A humorous song, with the music, is printed in Uurfey's Pills, 1719, ii. 230, 
entitled, O71 the Queen'' s progress to the Bath. It is named The enter d appren- 
tice s song in a Masons' Song Book, 1 790. For tune, see No. j^p. 

Wo. 237. O, rattlin, roarin "Willie. Scots Musical Museum, 1788, 
No. i()4, signed 'Z,' with the music of Rattlin, roarin Willie. This is an old 
unprinted song with corrections and additions. ' The last stanza of this song is 



442 HISTORICAL NOTES 

mine, and out of compliment to one of the worthiest fellows in the world, 
William Dunbar, Esq., Writer to the Signet, Edinburgh, and Colonel of the 
Crochallan Corps, a club of .wits who took that title at the time of raising the 
fencible regiments' (^Interleaved Musetim). The song has little merit, but 
there is a touch of human nature in the old lines where the drouthy gut- 
scraper resists the temptation to sell his fiddle for the liquor for which he 
thirsts. This hero is said to have been a border reiver. 

In the Tea-Table Miscellany, 1724, the tune is marked with a sentimental 
song beginning 'O Mary, thy graces and glances' — an irrelevant combination. 
The music, as £on?ty, roaring Willie, is in Blackies MS., 1692 ; entitled 
Ranting, roving Willie in Atkinson's Northumberland MS., 1694 ; and printed 
in Oswald's Co>npanion,c. 1755, vii. 9. It is a bag-pipe melody of the class 
common to the South of Scotland, and North of England. 

No. 238. Here 's a bottle and an honest friend. Cromek. Reliques, 
1808, 440, entitled ' Song^ without name of tune. The following motto was 
attached to the title in Pickering's Burns, 1834 '• — 

' There 's nane that 's blest of human kind 

But the cheerful and the gay, man ; 

Fa, la, la, la, &c.' 

The song books of the eighteenth century were loaded with bacchanalian ditties 

good and bad — chiefly the latter. This stanza of Burns is classical compared 

with the coarse materialistic rhymes of the collections. 

No. 239. In comin by the brig o* Dye. Scots Musical Museum, 
1788, No. ij6, signed ' Z,' and with the tune, Ruffiaiis rant. The MS. 
is in the British Museum. The poet was at Stonehaven on September 10, 
1787, just after a meeting at Aberdeen with Bishop Skinner, son of the author 
of Tullochgoru7n. Ten days before, he had spent a day with Niel Gow at 
Dunkeld. Close to Stonehaven is the river Dye, a tortuous stream which 
zigzags from the eastern spur of the Grampians, and falls into the Dee at 
Upper Banchory. 

Who the Theniel Menzies, or Bonie Mary, or Charlie Grigor of the song 
M^ere, is not known. The verses are doubtless a reminiscence of a night spent 
at the Inn of the Brig of Dye. The Tune Ruffian^s ratit is widely known as 
Roy's wife, from Mrs. Grant's sprightly song of the same name. It was origin- 
ally a slow strathspey air, but the eclecticism of music in adapting itself to 
different moods by a change of time is exemplified here, as in Scots, who' hae. 
A slow movement of Ruffians rant is the tune of the following pathetic 
verses : — 

' Though thou leave me now in sorrow. 

Smiles may light our love to-morrow; 

Doom'd to part, my faithful heart 

A gleam of joy from hope shall borrow.' 

The Tune is in Bremner's Reels, 1 759, 4J ; Cumming's Strathspeys, 1 780, page j ; 
and Aird's Airs, 1782, ii. No. 114 ; also in M" Far lane' s MS., c. 1740, entitled 
Cog na scalati. Burns wrote a conventional Anglo-Scottish song for the tune 
in reply to a whip of George Thomson — see Song No. 164. 

Three old songs for the melody are in the Mej-ry Muses. 

M"o. 240. Adieu! a heart-warm, fond adieu. Kilmarnock editioti, i'j?>6, 
228, entitled ' The farewell. To the brethren of St. James's I^odge, Tarbolton. 
Tune Good night and joy be wi you a' ' ; Scots Musical Museum, 1 803, No. 600. 
This, the last song in both publications, is supposed to have been sung at the 
meeting of the Freemasons' Lodge, Tarbolton, held in June, 1786. Until 
superseded by Burns's Auld Lang Syne, Good night a7idjoy be wt you was the 
parting song at all social meetings in Scotland. A number of the chief collec- 
tions of Scottish Melodies close with the tune. The distinguished song-writers 



V. BACCHANALIAN AND SOCIAL 443 

of Scotland, Joanna Baillie, Susanna Blamire, and Sir Alexander Boswell, have 
each written -verses for the tune. Burns had a high appreciation of the melody, 
and in a letter to George Thomson of April 7, 1793, in a burst of enthusiasm 
thus writes : ' Ballad-making is now as completely my hobby-horse as ever 
fortification was Uncle Toby's ; so I'll e'en canter it away till I come to the 
limit of my race, and then cheerfully looking back on the honest folks with 
whom I have been happy, I shall say, or sing Sae merry as ive a' hae been, 
and raising my last looks to the whole human race, the last words of the voice 
of Coila shall be Good night and joy be wT you a'.' 

The authority to insert the song in Johnson's Museum was conveyed in 
these words : ' Let this be your last song of all in the collection and set it to 
the old words ; and after them insert my Gude night and joy be wi' you a' 
which you will find in my Poetns. The old words are : — 



' The night is my departing night. 
The morn 's the day I maun awa ; 
There's no a friend or fae o' mine 
But wishes that I were awa. 



What I hae done, for lake o' wit, 

I never, never can reca' ; 
I trust ye 're a' my friends as yet, 

Gude night a^idjoy be wi' you a\' 



Johnson followed strictly the instructions of Burns. 

The tune is in the Skene MS., c. 1630, entitled. Goodnight, and God be with 
you ; in Playford's 07-iginal Scotch Tunes, 1 700 ; in a MS. dated Glasgow, 
1 710; in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1752, iv. 32; and Aird's Airs, 
1782, ii. No. 200. The tune has been considerably altered since its first 
appearance in the Skene MS. 

Tfo. 241. Up wi' the carls o' Dysart. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. _;92, lo the tune Hey cd thro^ ; Edinburgh edition, 1877, ii. 68. On 
September 15, 1787, Burns slept at Kinross, and next day came through a cold 
barren country by Queensferry to Edinburgh. The four fishing villages named 
in the song are close to one another on the south coast of Fife. No version 
of the song was known until it appeared in the Museum. It has been accepted 
as the work of Burns on the authority of Stenhouse, but it is not among the 
Burns manuscripts in the British Museum. 

The melody of a ' Boat song,' Hey ca' thro', is a characteristic small pipe 
tune, in compound triple time, common to the Border. The music, which 
Burns is said to have communicated when he sent the verses, is not in any 
collection prior to the copy in the Museum, 

mo. 242. Gane is the day, and mirk's the night. Scots Musical Mtcseum, 
1792, No. jz/, signed ' B,' entitled, Then Gudewife, count the lawin. The 
MS. is in the British Museum. In the hiterleaved Museum is : ' The chorus 
of this is part of an old song, one stanza of which I recollect : — 
"Every day my wife tells me, 
That ale and brandy will ruin me ; 
But if gude liquor be my dead, 
This shall be written on my head, 

O Gudewife, count the lawin," &c.' 

Burns's song is worthy of Walter de Mapes, the sprightly monk of the twelfth 
century who wrote Mihi est propositum in taberna mori. According to 
Stenhouse, Burns obtained the tune from tradition and had it printed in the 
Museum. It is a bright and joyous melody, which ought to be better known. 

The well-known obscure proverb, ' As drunk as a lord,' is evidently a corrup- 
tion of the last line of the second stanza in this song, ' For ilka man that 's 
drunk 's a lord,' which is quite a different phrase from the common saying. 

No. 243. Come, bumpers high ! express your joy ! Lockhart's Life of 
Burns, 1829. Written for William Stewart, resident factor or bailiff of the 
estate of Closebum in Dumfries, with whom Burns became acquainted in his 
business excursions. The sister of Stewart was landlady of Brownhill Inn, in 



444 HISTORICAL NOTES 

the neighbourhood of Thomhill on the Nith, where the poet sometimes stayed, 
and where he wrote the verses on a glass tumbler which is now in the library 
at Abbotsford. 

The tune Ye're wekonie, Charlie Stewart is referred to in Song No. 26. 

ISo. 244. Contented wi' little and cantie wi' mair. Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1799, 6^, 'Written for this work by Robert Burns. Air, Lumps 0' 
pudding.' The MS. is in the Thomson collection. Burns accepted Thomson's 
proposal to write a song for the tune about the middle of November, 1794. 
In May, 1795, Thomson had presented to Burns a painting of The Cottar's 
Saturday night, by David Allan, in which the poet figured. Burns, in thanking 
the donor, suggested that if a vignette were made the motto should be, Con- 
tented wi little and cantie wi' mair, 'in order that the portrait of my iace 
and the picture of my mind may go down the stream of Time together.' 

The tune known as Lumps of J'udding or Sweet Pudding is in the Dancing 
Master, 1701 ; Sinkkrs AJS., 17 10; and the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 
c 1755, vii. 4. Verses and the music are in Durfey's Pills, 1720, joo. In 
Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, ii. 221, a vernacular humorous song is marked for 
the tune, showing that this English melody was domesticated in Scotland. The 
subject is not an uncommon satire in Scottish song. The last stanza of the 
Herd fragment is : — 

' As I gaed by the minister's yard, 

I spied the minister kissing his maid. 

Gin ye winna believe, cum here and see 

Sic a braw new coat the minister gied me.' 

No. 245. I had sax owsen In a pleugh. Scots Musical Museum, 1803, 
No. ^42, ' Corrected by R. Burns.' ' This humorous drinking-song, with the 
exception of the chorus which is old, was written by Burns' (Stenhouse, 
Lllustrations, p. 41}). Ale was the common beverage and even an article of 
food of the people of Scotland. Home-brewed small beer and oatmeal porridge 
were the diet of the peasantry withm living memory. 

The tune The bottom of the punch-bowl is in Oswald's Co7npanion, 1743, 
i. 29; McGibbon's Scots Times, 1742, ij; and Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. ^j. 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS.— A CANTATA. 

(Nos. 246-253.) Poems ascribed to L^obert Burns, 1801,7; Crovaekl's Scotish 
Songs, 1 8 10, ii. 2jj. This remarkable composition was written about the end 
of 1 785. Nowhere is the genius of Burns more displayed than in this description 
of the lowest stratum of human life, and the portraiture of the individuals 
composing the society of the most depraved Bohemians. One true function of 
art is to provoke sympathy with all animated nature, and Burns was the first 
poet of his century who cast aside the artificial Damons and Celias of song and 
the affectations of the rhymer ; he stepped out into the field of nature, saw it with 
a clear open eye, gauged it with a sound mind, and depicted it with the feeling 
that he was a part of the great scheme. No poet before him— except Cowper — 
sang of the weeds, the flowers, and the lower animals as subjects of affectionate 
regard. Burns's Deil was a human spirit who spoke ' broad Scots,' with whom 
he could converse in familiar terms, and from whom he parted on the best of 
terms, hoping he 'will tak a thocht and mend.' 

Llie Jolly\Beggars is a sordid scene of the dregs of humanity. The ragged 
crew are spendmg their precarious earnings in the most reckless manner. The 
microscopic analysis of the con pany, and the humorous portraits of the indi- 
viduals of the group, are so exquisitely real, that a sneaking kindness is felt for 
the social outcasts. How the poem originated may be briefly told. On a winter 



VI. THE JOLLY BEGGARS 445 

night of 1785, Burns and two companions left the house of an innkeeper and 
brother rhymer — Johnie Dow — and made their way through Mauchline. They 
were passing the door of a small dingy public house, in a narrow street, kept 
by a Mrs. Gibson, better known as Poosie Nansy, noted for entertaining and 
lodging vagrants ; her assistant in the business was a putative daughter known 
as Racer Jess, from her fleetness of foot and love of running. Sounds of 
merriment proceeded from the house as Burns and his companions passed ; 
they ventured in and joined the company. They did not remain long, but 
quite long enough for Bums, who in a few days read to John Richmond -one 
of the three in the adventure — some verses on the subject, and shortly after- 
wards presented him with a portion of the manuscript. When finished the 
poem was given away, and so little did Burns think of it, that in a few years 
he had forgotten its existence. Only one reference to it is in his correspondence, 
and that in reply to an inquiry made in September, 1 793, when George Thomson 
asked for a reading of the poem ; he had heard of it casually, perhaps through 
Richmond, who was then resident in Edinburgli. Burns replied, ' I have forgot 
the Cantata you allude to, as I kept no copy, and mdeed did not know that it 
was in existence ; however, I remember that none of the songs pleased myself, 
except the last, something about : — 

'Courts for cowards were erected, 
Churches built to please the priest.' 

Nothing more was heard of The Jolly Beggars during the poet's life, nor until 
it appeared in a (ilasgow Chap-Book, issued in 1799. The demand was so 
great, that the publisher reprinted it in 1801, in a thin octavo volume with 
other unpublished pieces, as '■Poems ascribed to Robert Burns the Ayrshire Poet^ 
&c. In this volume, with The Jolly Beggars, appeared for the first time The 
Kirk's Alarm, The iwa Herds, Holy Willie's Prayer, and some minor pieces. 
The extraordinary power displayed in these poems attracted the attention of 
Sir Walter Scott, who had the volume reprinted, and a few years later, 
in the Quarterly Review, castigated both Dr. Currie and Cromek for refusing 
to publish The Jolly Beggars. The latter defended himself on moral grounds — 
to protect the fame of Robert Burns, as he said — and to prove his sincerity in 
the cause of morality, he printed The Jolly Beggars in the apjiendix to his 
Scotish Songsl Our text is taken from the lacsimile of Burns's MS., published 
in 1823. 

Burns appears to have got the idea of The Jolly Beggars from a song of seven 
stanzas in the fourth volume of the Tea- Table Miscellany , entitled The merry 
Beggars — of which there are six — a poet, a lawyer, a soldier, a courtier, a 
fiddler, and a preacher. Each of the characters sings a stanza. The fiddler as 
follows : — 

' I still am a merry gut-scraper, 
My heart never yet felt a qualm ; 

Tho' poor, I can frolic and vapour, 
And sing any tune but a psalm.' 

The verses are not devoid of merit. A copious assortment of canting and 
begging metrical literature are in the notes on the Jolly Beggars, in the 
' Centenary edition ' of Burns. From what has been said it is obvious that 
Burns never intended to publish The Jolly Beggars. He, however, copied 
most of the songs into his Merry Muses. 

M"o. 246. I am a son of Mars. The tune Soldier's Joy is in Joshua 
Campbell's Reels, 1778, /(5 ; M'^Glashan's Scots Measures, 1781,. j2; and in - 
Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. log. It is still reprinted in modern collections of 
popular music, and is a favourite with country fiddlers. I first heard the 
air played by a pitman in the parlour of a Northumbrian inn before 1 discovered 
it in print. One of the editors of Burns mistook the melody and brought 



446 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



a charge of carelessness against the poet in writing for particular tunes. The 
charge does not hold good ; for the verses, ' I am a son of Mars,' have not 
until now been printed with the proper melody, and it fits the verses exactly. 

K"o. 247. I once was a maid. Tune, Sodger Laddie. The verses are in 
the Merry Muses or Crochallan Song Book. The music is in Atkinson's MS., 
1694, and Sinklers MS., 17 10, entitled Northland ladie. A song in the 
Tea- Table Miscellany, partly by Ramsay, beginning, ' My soger laddie is over 
the sea,' was reprinted with music in Watts's Musical Miscellany, 1731, vi. no, 
and copied into the Orpheus Caledoniiis, 1733, No. 27. The music is also 
in Bremner's Reels, 1757, 22. During the eighteenth century the tune was very 
popular in Scotland, and often reprinted. In Stewart's Reels, 1761, //, it is 
entitled Sailor laddie. Burns made a song with this title for The Jolly Beggars ; 
probably he may have got the idea from the title of the tune in Stewart. In 
the version printed by Cromek, the third line of the second stanza of the 
Recitativo to the bard's song, a ' sailor ' instead of a fiddler is named. 

TSo. 248. Sir "Wisdom 's a fool when lie 's fou. Tune, Auld Sir Symon. 
This English melody, assigned to the man of the cap and bells, is above three 
hundred years old, and is well known on both sides of the Border. Its title 
appears first in a Scottish collection with the song. Come, here''s to the nymph 
that I love, in the Tea-Table Miscellany, 1724, and later in Herd's Scots Songs, 
1769, ij, to Sofne say that hissing's a sin. It is the tune of the Elizabethan 
ballad Ragged and torn, and must necessarily be older than these verses. 
Ritson considered it one of the ' Ancient ballads ' referred to by Laneham as 
being in the bundle of Captain Cox, the Coventry mason. In the seventeenth 
century, a large number of ballads were sung in London to Old Symon the 
King, and Chappell, in Popular Music, p. 262, quotes five different names by 
which it was known. It served moral, political, social, and bacchanalian 
songs, but chiefly the latter. 'Symon the King' is supposed to have been 
a noted tavern-keeper who kept good liquor, and sampled it often himself. 
' Says Old Symon the King, 

Says Old Symon the King, 
With his ale-dropt hose, and his malmsey nose, 
Sing hey ding, ding a ding ding.' 

A political song with this chorus is in Loyal Songs, 1685, 7^p. The 
earliest copy of the music is in Musick's Recreation, 1652. The tune is 
also in Durfey's Pills, 1707, and in the 1719 edition, iii. 143, set to a ballad 
rather less coarse than usual for that remarkable collection. The music was 
published in a Scottish collection in Oswald's Companion, c. i755, '^ii- ^. and 
in M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1768, iv. 102. Two songs in the Merry Muses 
are directed to be sung to Atild Sir Symon the King. 

Wo. 249. A Highland lad my love was born. Tune, 0, an ye -were 
dead, guidman. See note on Song No. 214. Stenhouse says he copied this 
tune from an old manuscript, which he does not, however, further specify. 
A song of the kind was popular in Scotland at the Reformation, for it is 
parodied in the Gude and Godlie Ballads, 1567, of which the following stanza 
is a specimen : — 

' For our Gude-man in heaven dois ring, 

In gloir and blis without ending, 
Quhair Angellis singis ever Osan, 

In laude and praise of our Gude-man.' 

The first part of the tune resembles the second phrase of the Duke of 
BuccleucKs Tune, in the sixth edition of Apollo's Banquet, 1690, and com- 
plete in the Dancing Master, 1709. It is also in Macfarlanes MS., 1741 ; in 
Oswald's Companion, 1752, iv. 24, and M'^Glashan's Scots Measures, 1781, 7, 
entitled Watson s Scots Measure. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 



447 



No. 250. Let me ryke up to dight that tear. Tune, Whistle owre the 
lave o't. A copy of the minstrel's song is in the Meriy Mtises. See note on 
Song No. 2op. 

N"o. 251. My bonie lass, I work in brass. Tune, Clout the Caudron. 
The earliest imprint of the title and subject in a Scottish collection, is that in 
the Tea-Table Miscellany, 1724, beginning: — 



'Have you any pots or pans, 
Or any broken chandlers? 
I am a tinkler to my trade, 
And newly come frae Flanders, 



As scant of siller as of grace, 
Disbanded, we 've a bad run, 
Gae tell the lady of the place, 
I'm come to clout her caldron. 



But the original is much older. As The Thiker it was printed in the very 
rare collection. Merry Drollery, London, 1661, 1^4, in seventeen stanzas, 
beginning — ' There was a lady in this land.' The third stanza will show the 
connexioa with Ramsay's version : — 



* I am a Tinker, then quoth he, 
That worketh for my fee, 

If you have vessels for to mend, 
Then bring them unto me : 



For I have brass within my bag, 

And target in my apron, 
And with my skill I can well clout, 

And mend a broken cauldron.' 



The following note is in the htterleaved Museum, but it is not written by 
Burns : ' I have met with another tradition that the old song to this tune, 
" Hae ye ony pots or pans or onie broken chanlers," was composed on one of 
the Kenmore family in the cavalier times. . . . The air is also known by the 
name of The Blacksmith and his apro^i.'' The note is probably by Robert 
Riddell. The song in Me7-ry Drollery, just quoted, is indisputably an English 
song. The Scottish version was printed for the first time with music in the 
Orpheus Caledonius, 1 733, No. 2j. The copy in the Scots Musical Mtisetitn, 
1787, No. 2^, is that in the text. 

TTo. 252. I am a bard, of no regard. Tune, For a' that, an cC that. 
The verses in the Cantata are far superior to the so-called variant-song. No. 68. 
The tune is noted in Song No. jo<). 

No. 253. See the smoking bowl before us. Tune, Jolly mortals, fill 
your glasses. There are two tunes of this name — both English — set to a 
drinking-song in three stanzas. One is the composition of John Ernest 
Galliard (i 687-1 749), a distinguished oboe player, and chamber musician to 
Prince George of Denmark. He had the gift of melody, and composed a 
number of good airs. The music is in Calliope, 1739, and Watts's Musical 
Miscellany, 1731, vi. 182. The other and older air in the text is from Ritson's 
English Songs, London, 1783, vol. iii. Galliard's tune as arranged in Watts 
does not fit Burns's song very well, and the other is probably that which Burns 
intended. 



Vn. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL. 

Uo. 254. Am.ang the trees, where humming bees. Cromek's Reliques, 
1808, 4^}. Tune, The King of Trance, he rade a race. Niel Gow is the 
' fiddler in the North ' referred to in the song. The sarcasm on foreign music 
was intended to cool the rage for Italian compositions and vocalists that 
invaded the country before the middle of the eighteenth century. The capon- 
craws of Farinelli, who was the lion of the operatic stage, stigmatized as one 
of the castrati, is sarcastic enough. The ' royal ghaist ' refers to James I of 
Scotland, who was detained a prisoner in England for nineteen years. The 
royal author of The King''s Quair was a distinguished poet and an accomplished 
musician. Hogg quotes an unintelligible Jacobite song beginning ' The King of 



448 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



France he rade a race,' which may have been the model of Burns. The second 
stanza is : — 



'But there cam a fiddler out o' Fife, 
A blink beyond Balweavie, O, 

And he has coft a gully knife 
To gie the Whigs a bleary, O. 



This fiddler cam wi' sword and lance, 
And a' his links o' leary, O, 

To learn the Whigs a morice dance 
That they lov'd wondrous deary, O.' 



The tune is in the Caledonian Pocket Companion, c. 1756, viii. 26, and 
Campbell's Reels. 1778, 7/. but it was printed previously in Bremner's Reels, 
1757, 1. under the title Lady Doll Sinclair's Reel. The melody is very little 
known, and Burns's song is here for the first time printed with its tune. 

No. 255. Scots, wha has wi' Wallace bled. Scotish Airs. 1799, 7./, 
' Written for this work by Robert Burns.' Two different accounts exist of the 
origin of Scots, wha hae. Syme, the distributer of Government stamps in 
Dumfries, an intimate friend and neighbour of Burns, communicated to 
Dr. Currie a graphic account of a short excursion Burns and he made through 
Galloway in the end of July, 1793. In traversing Kenmure, the savage sjenery 
and desolate appearance was intensified by bad weather. ' Next day,' Syme 
says, ' he produced me the Address of Bruce to his troops, and gave me a copy 
for Dalziel.' According to this statement related in Currie, Works, 1800, i. 2oq, 
21J, Scots, zvha hae was written and completed between July 28 and 30, 1793. 
Burns's own account is contained in a letter toThomson, assigned to September I, 
1793, enclosing a copy of the ode. I quote the entire letter, as it formulates 
Burns's impressions of music. ' My dear Sir,— You know that my pretensions to 
musical taste are merely a few of nature's instincts, untaught and untutored by art. 
For this reason, many musical compositions, particularly where much of the 
merit lies in counterpoint, however they may transport and ravish the ears of you 
connoisseurs, affect my simple lug no otherwise than merely as melodious din. 
On the other hand, byway of amends, I am delighted with many little melodies, 
which the learned musician despises as silly and insipid. I do not know whether 
the old air Hey, tutti, taitie may rank among this number ; but well I know 
that with Fraser's hautboy, it has often filled my eyes with tears. There is a 
tradition which I have met with in many places in Scotland, that it was Robert 
Bruce's march at the battle of Bannockburn. This thought, in my yesternight's 
evening walk, warmed me to a pitch of enthusiasm on the theme of liberty and 
independence, which I threw into a kind of Scots Ode, fitted to the air, that 
one might suppose to be the gallant royal Scot's address to his heroic followers 
on that eventful morning. So may God ever defend the cause of Truth and 
Liberty, as He did that day. Amen ! R. B. P.S. — I shewed the air to Urbani, 
who was highly pleased with it and begged me make soft verses for it ; but I had 
no idea of giving myself any trouble on the subject, till the accidental 
recollection of that glorious struggle for Freedom, associated with the glowing 
ideas of some other struggles of the same nature, not quite so a7icicnt, roused 
my rhyming mania. Clarke's set of the tune, with his bass, you will find in the 
Aluseiivi, though I am afraid that the air is not what will entitle it to a place 
in your elegant selection.' From this letter several inferences may be drawn : 
first, that Burns suspected Thomson would not care for the tune Hey , tntti, 
taitie ; second, that professional musicians considered it a pathetic air ; and 
third, that the French revolution was a cause of the origin o'l Scots, wha hae. 

Dr. Currie made no attempt to decide when the song was written, and the 
subject is not of vital importance here. When Burns sent it to Tliomson he 
may have finally drawn it up and corrected it fit for the press. As we know, 
he took an active interest in the stirring drama of the French Revolution, and 
it is interesting to remember that the struggles of the same nature, ' not quite so 
ancient,' produced a much more famous song in France. The Chant de guerre 
pour rarini!e du Rhin, better known as The Marseillaise Hymn, was written 
and composed at Stiasburg, by Ronget de Lisle, a Captain of Engineers in the 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 449 

French Army, between the night of the 25th and the morning of the 26th April, 
1792, or about seventeen months before Burns wrote Scots ztiha hae to com- 
memorate an event more than five hundred years old. 

It must be told how Burns's song was criticized, revised, altered, and finally 
printed in a diiferent rhythm and to a wrong tune. Thomson having shown it 
to some friends, they agreed as to the merit of the verses, but 'reprobated the 
idea of giving it a tune so utterly devoid of interest or grandeur as Hey, tutti, 
taitie ' ; saying further, ' I never heard any one speak of it as worthy of notice.' 
Thomson and the committee of taste decided that the poet must have created 
some fanciful partiality for the air through connexion with the tradition 
concerning it, which was nearly correct, but not in the sense they meant ; and 
then they proceeded to suggest what they thought as a more appropriate 
melody — Lewie Gordon ; but as its measure differed, they recommended that 
a foot should be added to every fourth line of the song, thus : — Stanza 1, Or to 
glorious victory; 2, Chains, chains and slavery; 3, Let him, let him turn 
and flee ; 4, Let him bravely follow me ; 5, But they shall, they shall be 
free; 6, Let us, let zis do or die. What was Burns to do? he had not a 
single supporter ; every one disapproved of his tune — that melody for which 
the song was specially written, and over which he had wept when Fraser played 
it. Professional musicians, editor, and committee had declared Hey^tiitti, taitie 
unsuitable, so he succumbed and agreed to alter the verses as suggested — in 
his own way. Thomson, having affected a material and emasculated alteration, 
proceeded to suggest further amendments but Burns now lost patience, 
straightened himself, and sent an ultimatum in the following terms : ' My Ode 
pleases me so much, that I cannot "alter it. Your proposed alterations would, 
in my opinion, make it tame. I am exceedingly obliged to you for putting me 
on reconstructing it, as I think I have much improved it, ... I have scrutinised 
it over and over ; and to the world some way or other, it shall go as it is.' 
This closed the correspondence on the subject. Scots wha hae. as reconstructed, 
completely reversed Burns's invariable method of writing with the sound of 
some favourite melody ringing in his ears. The verses originally appeared in 
the London Morning Chronicle, May, 1794. Thomson printed them with the 
tune Lewie Gordon, in Scotish Airs, 1 799, ^4 ; or three years after Burns's death. 

The public learnt from Currie, in Works, 1800, the struggle for existence of 
the Ode of Burns, and how the song had been altered ; and demanded that the 
original words should be printed with its own tune. Thomson admitted his 
error and reprinted the song in his next volume, in 1801, jy, witli a note that 
he thought that ' Lley, tutti, taitie gave more energy to the words than Lewie 
Gordon.'' The original draft in Burns's handwriting — that which he wrote on 
August 31, 1793 — belonged to the late Frederick Lockyer, the author of 
London L^yrics. 

LLey, tutti, taitie or Hey nozv the day dawes, the tune of Scots wha hae, 

requires an exposition in order to get rid of some misconception regarding its 

origin. There is no evidence supporting the tradition that it was played at 

Bannock burn, although one of the earliest fragments of Scottish song existing 

is in the peculiar rhythm of the tune. In the Book of St. Albaii's^a, chronicle 

relating to the time of Robert the Bruce — the stanza of a contemporary 

satirical song is quoted on the flamboyant dress of the officers of the English 

army .who kept the country in check at that period. I quote in modern 

English ; ' At that time the Englishmen were clothed all in coats and hoods 

painted with letters, and with flowers full seemly, with long beards : and 

therefore the Scots made a rhyme that was fastened upon the Church doors of 

St. Peter towards Stangate (York). And thus said the scripture in despite 

of Englishmen : — „ ., , , , , 

"Longe berdes hertles, 

Payntyd hodes wytles, 

Gay cotes graceles, 

Makyth Englond thrifteles." ' 

Gg 



450 HISTORICAL NOTES 

In Fabyau's Chronicle the same verses are repeated, but they are assigned to 
the time of David Bruce vi'hen he married the English Princess. ' To their 
more derision, they — the Scots — made divers truffes, rounds and songs, against 
the English.' 

In Dunbar's poem To the Mercha?its of Edinburgh, written about the year 
1500, a couplet runs : — 

'Your common menstrallis lies no tone 
But Now the day dawis, and Into /one J 

The common minstrels in Scotland were the Corporation pipers, maintained 
at the public expense. They were lodged by the householders in succession, 
and about the end of the fifteenth century Edinburgh appears to have supported 
three. Any one who found it inconvenient to billet them in their turn was 
liable to pay ninepence, 'That is to ilk pyper iiid at the leist.' A tune 
was popular in the time of Gavin Douglas. In the prologue of the 13th book 
of his translation of Virgil, printed in 151,^, these lines occur: — 

' Tharto thir byrdis singis in the shawis 

As menstralis playing, Thejoly day now dawes.' 

• In the Fayrfax MSS. (Addl. MS. 5465), a collection of English songs by 
different composers of the latter part of the fifteenth and beginning of the 
sixteenth centuries — is a song written in honour of Elizabeth, the daughter of 
Henry VII, entitled, This day dawes, this getitill day, with music for three 
voices. 

One of Alexander Montgomery's poems, Hey now the day dawis, supposed to 
have been written before 1580, resembles a popular song : — 



' Hey now the day dawis. 
The jolly cock crawis, 

Now shrouds the shawis, 
Through nature anone : 



The thrissel cock cryis, 
Or lovers quha lyis 

Now skaillis the skyis, 
The nicht is neir gone.' 



Montgomery's song was probably modelled from an earlier type parodied in 
the Glide and Godlie Ballads, beginning, 'Hay now the day dawes,' every 
stanza closing with ' the nicht is neir gone ' — the identical line used by 
Montgomery. The following stanza ridicules the saving efficacy of the bone of 
St. Giles' arm, once the palladium of the Parish Church of Edinburgh : — 

' Ye beguiled us with your hoods, 
Shawing your relics and your roods, 
To pluck fra us poor men our goods, 

Ye shaw us the heid of St. John 
With the arme of St. Geill ; 
To rottan banes ye gart us kneill. 
And savit us frae neck to heill, 

The nicht is neir gane.' 

Hey now the day dawnes is designated a celebrated old song in The Muses 
Threnodle, written in the reign of James VI, on the local affairs of Perth. 

In The Piper of Kilbarchan, a humorous poem in Scots metre, the tune is 
named as one which Habbie Simson played. Robert Semple, the author, lived 
between 1595 and 1665, and the poem belongs to the first quarter of the 
seventeenth century. A stanza is: — 

'Now who shall play the Day it Daws'). 
Or Hunts up when the cock he craws ? 
Or who can for our Kirktown cause, 

Stand us in stead ? 
On bagpipes now no body blaws 
Sen Habbie 's dead.' 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 451 

Kirkpatrick Sharpe contributed to Stenhouse's Illustrations the copy of 
a local Annandale hunting song. In the first stanza the well known refrain is 
introduced : — 

* The cock 's at the crawing, 
The day 's at the dawing, 
The cock 's at the crawing, 
We're o'er lang here.' 

Lastly, the concluding stanza of the bacchanalian Landlady, count the lawin, 
Song No. 22'j, contains the lines so often quoted : — 

' Landlady count the lawin 

The day is near the dawin,' &c. 

Stenhouse erroneously assumed that the music of the song in the Fayrfax MS. 
was that of Hey, ttctti, tattle. Neither is The day dawis in StralocKs MS., 
1627, the tune of Hey, tutti, taitie, which from its construction may well 
be accounted an ancient melody, although the music is not in any collection 
prior to the Caledonian Pocket Companion, 1751, iii. /?. It is also in 
M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1755, j}\ and with the Ode in Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1801. For another set of the air, see Song No. 227. The Rebellion doubt- 
less brought it into more prominent notice, which would account for its publica- 
tion, but that it was played at Bannockbum is most likely a pleasing fiction. 
According to Froissart, who obtained the particulars from three eye-witnesses, 
the Scottish foot-soldiers at the Battle of Otterburn, 1388, carried a large horn 
slung round the neck after the manner of hunters. To frighten the enemy 
these horns were sounded in chorus and, being of different sizes, the noise was 
so great that it could be heard miles off. The bagpipe is first named in Scottish 
records about the close of the fifteenth century. The figure of a piper is 
sculptured in Melrose Abbey of an earlier date than any written record of the 
instrument in Scotland, and in Rosslyn Chapel is a chiselled figure with baie 
legs and feet and wearing a kilt, playing the pipes. 

No. 256. O, wha will to St. Stephen's house. Gilbert Burns Edition, 
London, 1820, from a manuscript entitled ' The fete champetre. Tune Killi- 
crankie^ The summer of 1788 is fixed as the date of the entertainment re- 
corded in this programme ballad. According to Gilbert Burns, its origin was 
due to a garden-party given by William Cunninghame of Annbank, Ayrshire, 
on coming of age and entering into the possession of his grandfather's estates. 
The entertainment was then believed to have a political meaning. Burns 
knew the host, who some years later married a daughter of his dear friend and 
correspondent, Mrs. Stewart of Afton. Boswell and Dr. Johnson are referred 
to in the close of the first stanza. 

For Notes on the tune, see song No. }28. 

Wo. 257. How can my poor heart be glad? Currie, Works, 1800, 
iv. //<5, entitled ' On the seas and far away. Tune, O'er the hills, &c.' 
Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1805, 161. The MS. is in Brechin Castle. Sent to 
Thomson August 30, 1794. Later Burns withdrew the song saying that 
making a song ' is like begetting a son : you cannot know whether you have 
a wise man or a fool, until you produce him to the world and try him.' 
Thomson omitted the second stanza, and for a chorus repeated the first without 
variation. Burns was not much attached to this melody of doubtful origin, 
which belongs to a song referring to the wars in Queen Anne's reign, entitled, 
Jockey s Lamentation, printed with the tune in Durfey's Fills, edition 1709 and 
1719, V.J16. Ramsay published an altered version in the Tea-Table Miscellany, 
1725, beginning 'Jockey met with Jenny fair.' In the Pepysian library is 
a black letter ballad in Scottish orthography printed about 1660 entitled The 
■wind hath blawn my plaid atvay : or, a discourse betwixt a young 7nan and the 
Elphin Knight to be sung to its own new pleasattt tune. The last line of every 

G g 2 



452 HISTORICAL NOTES 

stanza repeats the title The wind hath blaiv7i my plaid away which was probably 
an early name for O'er the fields and far away, very popular in England and did 
service in several operas of the eighteenth century. 

The tune is in Atkinson'' s MS. 1694; Siizkler's MS., 1710, entitled My 
plaid away; Watts's Musical Miscellany, 1730, iii. i<)2\ Caledoniait Pocket 
Companion, c. 1755, vii. 2y, M'^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1768, iv. 97; Aird's 
Airs, 1782, ii. No. 2^; Scots Mnsical Museumj 1787, No. 62; and other 
musical collections. 

!N"o. 258. There was on a time. Currie, Works, 1800, iv. jj4, entitled 
Caledottia. ' Tune : Caledoniatt Hunfs delight^ The MS. is in the Watson 
collection. The following letter, dated Jan. 23, 1789, was addressed to 
James Johnson of the Scots Musical Musettm, enclosing a copy of the song 
' I shall be in Edinburgh, my dear sir, in about a month, when we shall 
overhaul the whole collection and report progress. The foregoing I hope will 
suit the excellent air it is designed for.' The song was not printed in the 
Museu?n, because, I conjecture, Burns afterwards furnished a much better 
song — The banks d Doon for the tune. See No. 123. 

Wo. 259. Dees haughty Gaul invasion threat? Currie, Works, 1800, 
iv. jiSj, entitled The Dumfries Vohintee7-s. Tune, Push about the jorum. 
Scots Musical Museum, 1S03, No. J46. Burns was suspected of holding 
treasonable opinions, and he suffered for railing at the constitution. But he 
was decidedly of the opinion that British wrongs should be righted by British 
hands. The French Convention menaced the country in the early part of 1795, 
and two companies of volunteers were raised in Dumfries as a defence against 
invasion. Burns became a member, and shouldered the musket and pike. The 
irony of fate hemmed him in over this business. As a suspected rebel he was 
officially censured and reduced. But it is curious to note that his death was 
accelerated through patriotism. The most pathetic letter in his correspondence 
is that of June 12, 1796, nine days before his death, to his uncle James Burness, 
Writer, Montrose, begging a loan of ten pounds by return of post to save him 
from an attachment by the unpaid tailor who supplied his volunteer uniform. 
The ballad The Dumfries Volunteei-s, with music composed by Stephen 
Clarke, was printed on a sheet in March, 1795, for circulation among the 
volunteers. Thomson, in Select Melodies, set it to Get up and bar the door. 
But as stated by Currie it was written for Push about the Jorum, a popular 
English melody, composed about 1770 for a song in the opera of The Golden 
Pippin. It is a good marching air with a free swing. This is the first time 
the Dumfries Volunteers has been printed with its proper tune, entitled The 
jorum in Campbell's Reels, 1778, ^j ; and Push about the jorum in Aird's Airs, 
1782, i. No. III. The tune was a particular favourite of Burns. In the Merry 
Muses three different songs are marked for it. This patriotic song with its 
tune has the true Burnsian ring ; and although the events which produced it are 
now only historical the vehemence of the poet can still be felt. 

No. 260. As I stood by yon roofless tovrer. Scots Musical Museti7n, 
1796, No. 40^, signed ' B.' Tune, Cunuiock Psalms, named on the MS., is 
in the British Museum. The verses are known as The minstrel of Lincluden. 
Burns was wont to walk and muse among the ruins of the Abbey, situated on 
the angle of land at the junction of the Cluden with the Nith, about a mile and 
a half north of Dumfries. Pennant gives a description of this collegiate Church 
in his Tour in Scotla7id, 1772, which is accompanied with a fine engraving of 
the ruin. Parts of the chancel and nave were all that remained in Burns's time. 
Margaret, daughter of Robert III, the wife of Archibald Earl of Douglas, son 
of Bell-the-cat, is buried in the chancel. 

The stanza and curious tune which Burns appropriated for the Mi7istrel of 
Li7icluden, was known as The grey goose a7td the gled from an old erotic song 
of that name. Stephen Clarke transcribed the music for Burns, and in a letter 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 453 

to Thomson about September, 1794. the poet writes: 'Mr. Clarke says that 
the tune is positively an old chant of the Romish Church, which corroborates 
the old tradition that at the Reformation, the Reformers burlesqued much of 
the old church music. As a further proof, the common name for this song is 
Cumnock Psalms' As shown in Note 212, Bishop Percy lirst accentuated this 
myth. A song for the tune is in the Merry Muses and it is very unlikely that 
Thomson knew it. The origin of the tune Cumnock Psalms is obscure. It is 
framed upon no existing type of Scottish music, and it stands alone. It is 
chiefly recitative, with only the rudiments of a modern melody and a compass 
not extending beyond a musical fifth. 

Wo. 261. The laddies by the banks o' With. In The Spirit of British 
Song, 1826, ii. /_7, and Cunningham's Burns, 1834, entitled 'Election Ballad 
for Westerha'.' In this second election ballad of 1789, the poet openly sympa- 
thizes with the Tory candidate. The Duke of Queensberry is held up to 
derision. Bums had a very poor opinion of the character of the Whig candi- 
date, the son of his landlord. He is not named in the ballad but he is described 
in a letter to Graham of Fintry as ' a youth by no means above mediocrity in 
his abilities, and is said to have a huckster lust for shillings, pennies and 
farthings.' For a Note on the tune Up and waur them d Willie; or, Up 
and warn a, see No. 28J. 

ITo. 262. As I cam down the banks o' With. Centenary Edition, 1896, 
ii. }()8. The MS. is in the possession of Lord Rosebery. This is another 
version of the preceding ballad for the tune of The black watch, for which 
see Song No. 269. 

The two series of Election ballads which Burns wrote to assist his friends 
are not printed here in chronological order for reasons which it is unnecessary 
to explain. This and the preceding are the second and third of the election of 
1789 ; and No. 26-] ' There was five Carlins in the South ' is the first. After 
the close of the election in 1790 the exasperated Burns addressed to Graham of 
Fintry a vigorous invective chiefly directed against the Duke of Queensberry 
who supported the Whigs. It begins ' Fintry my stay in worldly strife,' and 
is in the metre of Suckling's celebrated ballad ' I tell thee, Dick, where I have 
been,' and can be sung to that melody, but as Burns did not name any tune for 
his ballad, and evidently had no mind that it should be sung, it is not in this 
collection. The various versions can be seen either in the Edinburgh, 1877 
edition or the Centenary edition of his Works. The ballads of the 1795-6 
contest are in order of time as follows — our Nos. 27/, 2-]o, 2T4 and 27J. The 
result of this election was not known at the time Burns died. 

Wo. 263. Farewell to the Highlands. Scots Musical Aluseum, 1790, 
No. 2/9, signed ' Z.' Tune Failte na miosg. The MS. is in the British 
Museum. ' The first half stanza of this song is old ; the rest is mine': {Inter- 
leaved Museum). ' Mr. Burns's old words.' (Law's MS. L ist.) C. Kirkpatrick 
Sharpe refers to the original as a broadside of seven stanzas and a chorus 
entitled The strong walls of Derry. The ballad is a mixture of Scottish and 
Irish affairs of the eighteenth century, and the fifth stanza is the chorus oi My 
heai-t 's hi the Highlajids. The ballad was a favourite of Sir Walter Scott, who 
sometimes sung it to his friends at convivial meetings. Nature had not endowed 
the great novelist with the gift of true intonation — he was what the Scots call 
' timmer-tun'd ' — so he very properly confined himself to vocal performances 
with his intimates only, and at the stage of the proceedings suggested in the 
following chorus of the ballad. 

'There is many a word spoken, but few of the best, 
And he that speaks fairest, lives longest at rest ; 
I speak by experience — my mind serves me so. 
But my heart's in the highlands wherever I go. 



454 HISTORICAL NOTES 

Chonis. Let us drink and go hnme, drink and go hame, 
If we stay any longer we'll get a bad name. 
We'll get a bad name, and we'll fill ourselves fon, 
And the strong walls of Derry it's JU to go through.' 

The tune Failie na miosg or The mtisket sahtte is Celtic. The second part 
is inferior to the opening four lines, and is probably an excrescence. The tune 
is in Oswald's Ctirious Collectioit Scots Tunes, 1 740, jp, and the Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, 1743, i. 22. English and foreign composers have set 
to original music these melodious verses of Bums. 

No. 264. Fareweel to a"* our Scottish fame. Scots Mtisical Mttseum, 
1792, No. J75, entitled Such a parcel of rogues in a natio^t. The original 
MS. is in the British Museum. ' Mr. B — words,' (Gray's MS. Lists). An 
invective in twenty-seven stanzas entitled Upon the rogues in Parliatnent, 1^04 
is in Maidment's Scotish Pasquils, 1868, jjp. The union of the two countries 
was execrated in Scotland, except among the Whig nobles. The Commissioners 
who carried through the treaty were styled the thirty-one rogues, and were 
made targets for the most bitter satire, and held up individually to public 
ridicule. The rhyming ware of that period is not very well known. I quote 
the penultimate stanza of The Rogites Pasquil. 

' In such an array of rogues Argyle may come in, 
Whose blood bears the stain of original sin, 
And if he 's like to go on, as they did begin, 
Then he'll follow the fate of his grandsire.' 

The Curse, written and circulated immediately after the Union was completed, 
is still more violent, and swears at large. It is as follows : — 



Curst be the wretch who seized his 
throne 

And marred our Constitution ; 
Curst be all those who helped on 

Our cursed Revolution ! 



Curst be those treacherous traitors who, 
By their perfidious knaverie. 

Have brought the nation now unto 
Ane everlasting slaverie ! 

Curst be the Parliament that day 
They gave the Confirmation ; 

And curst for ever be all they 
Shall swear the abjuration.' 



' Scotland and England now must be 

United in one nation ; 
So we again must perjured be, 

And taik the abjuration. 

The Stuarts antient true born race, 

We must now all give over ; 
We must receive into their place, 

The mungrells of Hanover. 

Curst be the papists who first drew 

Our King to their persuasion; 
Curst be the covenanting crew. 

Who gave the first occnsion 
To strangers to ascend the throne. 

By a Stuart's abdication ! 

Lockhart of Carnwath states the amounts paid by England to each of the 
Scottish Union Commissioners — the thirty-one rogues. The blood money 
ranged from £\ 104 1 5J. 7^. paid to the Earl of Marchmont down to Lord Banff, 
the most easily squared traitor, who agreed to dispose of himself for <Cii 2.5-. 
sterling besides throwing in his religion, in order that he might qualify himself 
to act. The key note of the stanzas of Burns is that what could not be effected 
by reason or force, was at last obtained by gold and guile. 

The model of Burns's verse has been lost, and no existing song fits the rhythm 
of the tune. A parcel of rogues in a nation is in Oswald's Companion, 1752, 
iv. 26, and in M^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1755, /p. 

On the Mttsewn manuscript of the song Burns wrote, ' I enclose what 
I think the best set of the tune,' but this like nearly all Burns's musical MS. 
has disappeared. 

No. 265. The Thames flows proudly to the sea. Scots Musical 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 455 

Museum, 1790, No. 29/, signed ' B,' entitled The Banks of Kith. 'Tune, 
Kobie donna gorach ' (Daft Robin). Burns intended this air lor his verses, but 
although it is so marked in the Museum, the music of the Banks of Nit h, the 
composition of Robert Riddell was engraved instead. In the Law MS. the 
direction is ' The Banks of Nith — Tune, Rohie don^ia gorach. Mr. Burns's 
words.' The verses are now for the first time set in the text with the proper 
tune. It may be stated here that The Captive Ribbattd beginning ' Dear Myra 
the Captive ribband 's mine,' which for sixty years has been printed as a song 
of Bums, is the work of Dr. Blacklock. As may be seen in the Law MS. the 
holograph note of Burns is ' Dr. B — gave the words,' which definitely settles 
the question. This song, No. 2jy in the Museum, is set to Robie donna gorach, 
hence the substitution of another tune for that in our text. 

The Celtic air is in M'^Farlane's MS. c. 1 740 ; in Dow's Scottish Music, 
c. 1776, 2y, and M'^Donald's LLighland Airs, 1784, 2/. 

No. 266. "When wild war's deadly blast was blawn. In Thomson's 
Scotish Airs, 1793, i. 22. 'Written for this Work by Robert Burns.' Air, The 
7nill, mill 0\ In September, 1792, Thomson asked Burns to touch up and 
amend the verses of a song in Ramsay's Miscellany, but Burns declined to have 
anything to do with such insipid stuff. He declared he would alter no song 
unless he could amend it. Thomson had been pegging at the poet to write in 
English and got the following reply in April, 1 793 : ' These verses suit the 
tune exactly as it is in the Museum. There is a syllable wanting at the 
beginning of the first line of the second stanza ; but I suppose it will make 
little odds. There is so little of the Scots language in the composition that 
the mere English singer will find no difficulty in the song.' Thomson main- 
tained that the third and fourth lines must be altered in order to suit the music. 
Burns declined to make any change. ' I cannot alter the disputed lines in 
The mill, mill O. What you think a defect I esteem as a positive beauty.' 
Thomson substituted two lines of his own for the third and fourth of Burns. 
Cnrrie, in Works, i8oo, iv. jo, restored Burns's words. The oiiginal, or at 
least a song evidently prior to Ramsay's, is in the Merry Muses, beginning : — 

' Chortis. The Mill, Mill O, and the kill, kill, O, 

And the coggin o' Peggie's wheel O, 
The sack and the sieve, and a' she did leave. 

And danc'd the Millers reel, O. 
As I cam down yon waterside. 

And by yon shellin-hill, O, 
There I spied a bonie, bonie lass. 

And a lass that I lov'd right weel, O.' 

Cromek interpolated in Reliques these verses with a note, neither of which 
is in the Interleaved Museum. A version is in Herd's MS., and there is 
a second song of the kind in the Merry Muses, which obviously Cromek had 
consulted. 

The tune was very popular in the eighteenth century. It is in Orpheus 
Caledonius, 1725, No. 20; Ramsay's Mustek, c. 1726; Watts's Musical 
Miscellany, 17,^, vi. 7<5; M"^Gibbon's Scots Tunes, 1746, 14; Caledonian 
Pocket Companion, 1751, iii. 2; Bremner's Scots Sojigs, 1757, jo; Scots 
Musical Museum, 1790, No. 242, and many other collections. It is said to be 
in a MS. of 1709. 

No. 267. There was five carlins in the South. Stewart's Burns, 1802. 
Lockhart, Life, 1829, entitled, The five carlins. Tune. Chevy chase. A MS. 
is in the British Museum. Written on the contested election of a member of 
Parliament for the five boroughs in the shires of Dumfries and Kirkcudbright. 
Dumfries is 'Maggie by the banks o' Nith'; Lochmaben, 'Marjory o' the 
monie lochs'; Amian, ' Blinkin Bess'; Kirkcudbright, 'Whisky Jean'; and 



456 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Sanqnliar, 'Black Joan.' The candidates were the sitting Tory member. Sir 
James Johnston, of Wester-hall — the ' belted knight,' and Captain Patrick 
Miller — the ' Soger Youth ' — son of Patrick Miller of Dalswinton, Burns's land- 
lord. As will be seen elsewhere Burns actively supported the Tory side, 
chiefly because ' Old Q,' the notorious Duke of Queensberry, assisted the Whigs. 
On December 9, 1789, a copy of the ballad was sent with a letter to Graham 
of Fintry. ' The election Ballad, as you will see, alludes to the present canvass 
in our string of burghs. I do not believe there will be a harder run match in 
the whole general election. The great man here, like all renegadoes, is a flam- 
ing zealot kicked out before the astonished indignation of his deserted master, 
and despised, I suppose, by the party who took him in, to be a mustering 
faggot at the m)'sterious orgies of their midnight iniquities, and a useful drudge 
in the dirty work of the country elections. . . . Dumfries and Sanquhar are 
decidedly the Duke's to ' sell or let '; so Lochmaben, a city containing upwards 
of fourscore living souls, that cannot discern between their right hand and their 
left — for drunkenness— has at present the balance of power in her hands. The 
honourable council of that ancient burgh, are fifteen in number; but alas! 
their fifteen names endorsing a bill of fifteen pounds, would not discount the 
said bill in any banking office.' 

The tune in the text — the Scottish Chevy Chase — is in Scout's, Minstrelsy, 1830. 
Itisinthe Caledonian Pocket Companio7i, 1753, v.j7; 'wi'W^Qt^bhoYL'iScots Times, 
1768, iv, 10& ; and in Dale's Scotch Songs, 1794, i. j^. How long it was known 
before the earliest date named is quite uncertain, and it is useless to speculate. 
At least three different English tunes of the name are known. The earliest 
is entitled Flying Fame, because it is directed to be sung to the oldest copy of 
the Chevy Chase ballads. The next, with the distinctive title of The Children 
in the wood, belongs to the well-known ballad of that name. It is the tradi- 
tional melody of the gravedigger in Hamlet, the music of which can be seen in 
■ song No. 27./ below. The third is In pescod time; or, The hitnt''s tip. The 
unravelling of the history of these three melodies can be seen in Chappell's 
Poptilar mtisic, and because the last is connected with Scotland as the melody 
of one of the Gtide and Godlie Ballads, I subjoin the music of The hunfs up, 
with a stanza of the curious parody : — 



^^^^^^^i^^aS 



&. 



^|--^=i^^=:g=:^rj:^»^= j=^ 



The hunt-er is Christ that huntis in haste, The hounds are Pe-ter and Paul; 






The paip is the foxe, Rome is the rox, That rub-bis us on the gall. 

Wo. 268. You're welconie to despots, Dumourier. Cromek's Reliques 
1808, 421. Entitled 'Address to General Dumourier: — a parody on Robin 
Adair? General Dumourier, like General Monk and the Marquis of Montrose, 
began his military career as a rebel, but changed sides in the course of the 
game. Dumourier was one of the best generals of the French Revolution, but, 
events proving distasteful to him, he abjured Republican principles. As soon as 
he heard that the Directory proposed to arrest him, he took refuge in Austrian 
quarters and nearly succeeded in bringing his army with him. He is briefly 
and picturesquely described by Carlyle ' A most shifty wiry man ; one of 
Heaven's Swiss : that wanted only work. Fifty years of unnoticed toil and 
valour ; one year of toil and. valour not unnoticed, but seen of all countries and 
centuries, the thirty other years again unnoticed, of memoir writing, English 
Pension, scheming and projecting to no purpose.' 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 457 

The model of Burns's 'Impromptu ' is a bacchanalian closing thus : — 

' Come let us drink about, Robin Adair, 
Come let us drink about, Robin Adair, 
Come let us drink about, and drink a hogshead out. 
Then we'll be drunk, no doubt, Robin Adair.' 

For the tune Robin Adair or Aileen a roon, see Song No. 4;. 

No. 269. "When Guilford good our pilot stood. Edinburgh Edition, 
1787^ 311-, entitled, 'a fragment. — Tune: Gilliecrankie.' In Scots Musical 
Museum, 1788, ii. No. 101, it is set to the tune in the text according to the 
instructions of Burns contained in Gray's MS. Lists. It is the first song in 
the Muse^nu over which he had control, and he changed the melody because 
KiUiecra7ikie had already been printed in the collection. The ballad refers 
to events between 1775 and the close of 1783 in Canada and North America. 
Pitt became Premier in December, 1783, after the fall of the Coalition ministry 
of North and Fox. There are Hogarthian touches in most of the political 
ballads of Burns, and Pitt's rival is well drawn in the two lines : — 
' An' Charlie Fox threw by the box 
An' lows'd his tinkler jaw, man.' 

Fox is said to have often come straight from the gaming room knee-deep in 
cards to the House of Commons. 

The Gaelic tune, M.freicedan or The black watch is entitled The highland 
zvatch in Dow's Ancient Scots Music, c. 1776, 42, and The Earl of Glencairti's 
in M'^Glashan's Strathspey Reels, 1780, 6. The 42nd Regiment or The black 
watch was embodied to keep down rebellion in the Highlands. 

No. 270. Fy, let us a' to Kirkcudbright. Broadside 1795; Cunning- 
ham's Burns, 1834. Tune Fy, let us a' to the bridal. The first seven stanzas 
satirize and ridicule the opposite political party ; and the rest, except the 
closing lines, eulogize the Whig candidate. The butchering invective is not 
nearly so amusing as The holy fair or Orthodox zuha believe in fohn Knox. 
Lockhart declined to print some of these political ballads in his Life of Btims, 
1S28, on the ground that 'perhaps some of the persons lashed and ridiculed 
are still alive— their children certainly are so'. These reasons cannot now be 
advanced, and Time has solved the propriety of printing them. The ballad 
which gave its name to the tune is in Watson's Choice Collection of Cotnic and 
Serious Poems, Edin. 1706, the first miscellaneous collection of poetry published 
in Scotland. The first stanza is : — 

' Fy, let us a to the briddel. 

For there will be lilting there, 
For Jockie 's to be married to Maggie 

The lass with the gauden-hair ; 
And there will be lang-kail and pottage 

And bannocks of Barley-meal, 
And there will be good salt herring 

To relish a cog of good ale.' 

This song and the tune The blythsome Wedding or Fy, let us a to the 
bridal, are in the Orpheus Caledonitis, 1725, No. ^6, the music is in Craig's 
Scots Tunes, 1730, 41, entitled An the Kirk wad let me be ; the Scots Musical 
Museum, 1787, No. j8 \ Ritson's Scotish Songs, 1794,!. 208; Dale's Scotch 
Songs, 1794, iii. 141; also in M^Gibbon's Sects Tunes, 1755, 32, and Aird's 
Airs, 1782, i. No. i2j. The modern copies of the music differ considerably 
from the older, as indeed they do between themselves. Durfey printed a para- 
phrase of The blythsome Wedding in Pills, \ 720, vi. jjo. The editor's ignorance 
of the Scottish vernacular produced a cacophonous parody of meaningless 
words. The tune in the Pills, although from the same source as that in the 



458 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Orpheus Calcdonius, 1725, differs particularly in the chorus. The oldest verses 
to The blythsome bridal, or Kirk wad let me be are in Herd's Scots Songs, 1 769, 
114, and several songs in Ramsay's Miscellany are marked for the tune. The 
title Silly old man in Walsh's Caledonian Country Dances coincides with a 
song referred to in Cromek's Reliqiies, 2y, as part of an interlude performed in 
Nithsdale. 

Tfo. 271. O Logan, sweetly didst thou glide. Currie, JVorks, 1800, 
iv. 7^. 'Tune, Loga?z Water.'' Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1801, 116. Two 
stanzns, of which the following is the first, is in Herd's Scottish Songs, 1776, 
ii. 2J0, and in the Merry Muses. It is not a plaintive song : — 

' The Logan burn, the Logan braes, 
I help'd a bonie lass on wi' her claes. 
First wi' her stockings, and syne wi' her shoon. 
But she gied me the glaiks when a' was dune.' 

A different song in Ramsay's Miscellany is marked for the tune. Several 
ballads to the tune Logan Water were popular in England in the seven- 
teenth and eighteenth centuries. About 1675, a white letter ballad was 
printed for C. Bates and Jonah Deacon, entitled The Frolicsome wager, the 
first line of which is ' Behold what noise is this I hear, to the tune Logan 
Water.'' Also printed about the same time is a black letter broadside, con- 
taining two ballads. The Devoitshire Damsels /rollick and The Devonshire 
Boys Courage. The latter is ' To an excellent new tune call'd the Devonshire 
Boys Delight or the Liggan Waters, &c.' The popularity of the tune is 
confirmed in another broadside of the seventeenth century entitled ' The bonny 
Scottish lad and the yielding Lass to an excellent new Tune much in request 
called Liggan Waters! One of the stanzas in dialogue form is here given as 
a specimen : — 

' Bonny lass, I love thee well,' 
' Bonny lad, I love thee better.' 

' Wilt thou pull off thy hose and shoon 
And wend with me to Liggan Water?' 

This evidently is connected with the verse previously quoted. The author of 
The Seasons wrote a song for the tune which is in the Orpheus Caledonius, 
1733 ; lastly, about the year 1 78 1, John Mayne, the author of The Siller Gun, 
wrote By Logan''s Streams that rin sae deep. Sec, often sung publicly in 
London about the end of eighteenth century. Burns incorrectly thought that this 
latter was old, and incorporated two lines of it in his own song which he 
forwarded in a letter dated June 25, 1793, to Thomson, who thanked him for 
it, but, being a government official and not likely to interfere in politics, handed 
it to Currie. 

The tune Logan Water is in Ramsay's iJ/««zV/?', c. 1726 ; Orpheus Caledonius, 
I733> I*<o- -^i; M'^Gibbon's Scots Ttines, 1742, j/; Caledonian Pocket Com- 
panion, 1753, V. 18; Scots Musical Museutn, 1787, No. 42; Ritson's Scotish 
Songs, 1 794, i. J7 ; and in many other collections. A very emasculated set of the 
tune entitled The Logati water is so deep in the opera Flora, 1729, contains 
only four lines of music. 

No. 272. Farewell, thou fair day. Scots Musical Museum, 1792, 
No. j8}, entitled Or an an Aoig or The Song of Death ; Thomson's Scotish 
Airs, 1799, 76, with a wrong tune. ' The circumstance that gave rise to the 
verses was — looking over with a musical friend Mi^Donald's Collection of 
Highland Ai7-s (1784), I was struck with one, an Isle of Skye tune, entitled 
Oran an Aoig. or The Song of Death, to the measure of which I have adapted 
my verses.' — Letter to Mrs. Dunlop, undated (May, 1791). The short prefatory 
note usually printed with the song is an interpolation for which there is no 
authority. 



VII. PATRIOTIC AND POLITICAL 459 

Dr. Currie states that Burns intended to print the song with music in sheet form, 
but owing to the inflammable state of the country was dissuaded from doing so. 

This beautiful melody is in M<^Donald's Ahs, 1784, No. 162; Ritson's 
Scotish Songs, 1794, ii. .2/9. 

Wo, 273. Wha will buy my troggin ? Cunningham's Edition, 
1834, entitled ' The trogger, tune, Buy broom besoms.' The Parliament 
elected in 1795 was dissolved in May, 1796, and Heron of Heron was again 
cast on another turbulent political sea. This time he was opposed by the 
Hon. Montgomery Stewart, a younger son of the Earl of Galloway. Burns, 
although confined to the house by severe illness, assisted his friend with The 
trogger. Before the election took place Bums was dead. Heron won, but was 
unseated on a petition and died shortly afterwards. 

To appreciate the satire it is necessary to remember that a ' trogger ' or 
' troker,' is the Autolycus of Scotland. The word is an example of French 
influence on the Scottish language. Troquer means to exchange, to barter, 
to do business on a small scale. The two following examples from Jamieson's 
Scottish Dictionary illustrate the term : — 

' How could you troke the mavis note 

For penny pies all piping hot.' — Farguson. 

' Nae harm, tho I hae brought her ane or twa 

Sic bonny tracks to help to mak her braw.' — Shirrefs. 

The tune Buy broom besoms is ascribed without authority to William Purvis, 
or Blind Willie, an eccentric blind fiddler, born in Newcastle, 1752. Buy 
broom besoms was Willy's chef d' ceuvre in the streets and public houses that he 
frequented. He died in the Newcastle poor house in 1832 upwards of 80 years 
of age. The music of the text is from Aforthumberland Minstrelsy , 1882, 118. 
The fact of Burns having written his ballad for the tune is evidence that it was 
popular in the south of Scotland at the end of the eighteenth century. It is 
not in any Scottish collection. 

The characters in this, the last election ballad written by Burns, are as 
follows : — Stanza 2 : The Earl of Galloway, a sour Puritan whom Biuns did not 
love. His son was the Tory candidate. St. 3 : — Murray of Broughton, who 
eloped with a lady and left his wife ; Thomas Gordon of Balmaghie, his 
nephew. St. 4 : A Galloway laird, David Maxwell of Cardoness, whom 
Burns described as ' a stupid, money-loving dunderpate.' St. 6 and 1 1 : John 
Bushby of Tinwald, a lawyer and a banker. St. 7 : Rev. James Muirhead of 
Urr, who satirized Burns in an epigram. He invented a crest and armorial 
bearings. St. 8 : Walter Sloan Lawrie, of Redcastle. St. 9 : Douglas of 
Carlinwark, which latterly was changed to Castle Douglas. St. 10 : Copeland 
of CoUieston. St. 12: The Devil. 

No. 274. 'Twas in the seventeen hunder year. Hogg and Mother- 
well's Edition, 1834 (with the exception of three stanzas), entitled_/^/^« Btisbys 
lamentatioft. Tune : Babes in the wood. Written to celebrate the election of 
the Whig candidate Heron of Kerroughtrees. Black-nebbit John Bushby was 
a solicitor and bank agent, a man of capacity whose taste lay in money-making. 
Burns was an unsympathetic acquaintance, and, when in an opposite camp, he 
attacked his quondam friend without reluctance. (For reference to tune see 
No. 2*57.) 

Wo. 275. Wham, -will we send to London town? Broadside, 1795; 
Cunningham's Edition, 1834. This is another ballad belonging to the local 
politics of the early part of 1795. With characteristic fervour Burns threw, 
himself into the midst of the election warfare. The Stewarty of Kirkcud- 
bright was in want of a parliamentary representative, and a friend of the 
poet. Heron of that Ilk and Kerroughtrees, became the Whig candidate. 



460 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



He was opposed by a Tory, Thomas Gordon of Balmaghie, who had the 
support of most of the landed proprietors of the district. Burns knew most of 
the principal supporters on the other side, and his personal aversion to some of 
them whetted his pen. In his only known letter to Heron early in 1795 he sent 
a copy of this and No. 270 sufra, which had been previously printed in broad- 
sides for circulation among the electors. He informs Heron : ' In order to 
bring my humble efforts to bear with more effect on the foe, I have privately 
printed a good many copies of both ballads, aud have sent them among friends 
all over the country . . . You have already as your auxiliary the sober detesta- 
tion of mankind on the head of your opponents ; and I swear by the lyre of 
Thalia to muster on your side all the votaries of honest laughter and fair, 
candid ridicule ! ' Whether it is fair or not, there can be no question of the 
candidness of the ridicule. In these ballads we get a glimpse of the manners 
and high jinks at parliamentary elections a hundred years ago. 
For the tune For cH that, see Songs Nos. 2/2 and _?op. 

No. 276. Dire "was the hate at old Harlaw. Cromek's Reliques, 
1808, 416, entitled ' The Dean of Faculty. A new ballad. Tune, The dragon 
of Wantley' The last stanza is wanting in Cromek. The MS. is in the 
British Museum. Towards the close of 1795 the ferment of politics was 
very brisk in Scotland. Henry Erskine, the eloquent Dean of Faculty and the 
most briHiant member of the Scottish bar, presided at a public meeting in 
Edinburgh to discu.ss political reform. His action displeased the members of 
the Edinburgh Bar, and at the next election of a Dean, Robert Dundas, the 
mediocre son of a distinguished father, was nominated and was elected by a 
large majority. Burns had an old score to settle with the new Dean, who slighted 
him in 1787. At the instigation of the physician of the late Lord President 
Dundas, who had then just died. Burns wrote a eulogy and sent it to the son in 
a letter. Neither the poem nor the letter was acknowledged, and in writing the 
pungent satire Dire was the hate, Burns was paying tribute to his old friend 
and adviser, the witty Henry Erskine, and scoring off Robert Dundas. The 
iirst line of the ballad refers to the battle of Harlaw, which took place in 141 1 
at Garioch in Aberdeenshire, between the Highlanders and the Lowlanders. It 
is celebrated in minstrelsy, and is memorable as being the last contest for 
political supremacy in Scotland between the Celtic and the Anglo-Saxon races. 
Next to Bannockburn it was the most decisive battle in Scottish history. The 
ballad oi Harlaw is named in the Complaynt of Scotland c. 1549, and an old 
pibroch bears the title, the tune of which in a modern form set to verses 
printed by Allan Ramsay in 1724 is in the Scots Miisical Museum, No. ^12. 

The latter part of the first couplet of Burns's verses refers to the Battle of 
Langside, which, determined the career in Scotland of Mary Queen of Scots. 
After this short introduction the poet proceeds to impale the new Dean and his 
heretic supporters. 

The tune and ballad of The Dragon of Wantley are in Durfey's Pills, 1719, 
iii, 10. The words alone in A Collection of old ballads , 1723, jj, entitled An 
excellent Ballad of a most dreadful combat fought between Moore of Moore-hall 
and the Dragon of Wantley. The verses are coarse, but the wit and humour 
are undeniable and superior to the ordinar}' class of narrative ballads. A specimen 
is the following stanza : — 

' This dragon had two furious wings, 

Each one upon each shoulder; 
With a sting in his tail, as long as a flail, 

Which made him bolder and bolder. 
He had long claws, and in his jaws 

Four and forty teeth of iron ; 
With a hide as tough, as any buff, 

Which did him roimd environ.' 



VIII. JACOBITE 461 



The ballad certainly belongs to the seventeenth century. A black letter copy 
is in the Pepys collection, which is reproduced in Child's Ballads, 1861, viii. 
128, where the editor says that he thinks it a parody of some early heroic 
tale. This is the first time Burns's ballad has been printed with its tune, which, 
it is needless to say, is English. 



VIII. JACOBITE. 

Ifo. 277. When first my brave Johnie lad. Scots Musical Musetim, 

1792, No. J09, entitled Cock up your beaver. The MS., not in Burns's hand, 
is in the British Museum. A fragment of the old song is in Herd's Scots 
Songs, i'j6g, J14. Burns made a few alterations in the first stanza, the second 
being entirely his. 

The tune was popular in England as a Scotch dance in the seventeenth 
century. It is printed in the seventh edition of Playford's Dancing Master, 
1686, also edition 1695, entitledy^j/iw;;/ cock thy beaver. It is also in Atkin- 
son's MS.., 1694 ; in Durfey's Fills, 1719, i- ii^, set to a semi-political song 
beginning ' To horse brave boys of Newmarket, to horse ' ; in Sinkler's MS., 
Glasgow, 1710; in Oswald's Companion, c. 1755, vii. 2; and in M^Gibbon's 
Scots Tunes, 1755, 20. 

Wo. 278. Our thrissles flourish'd fresh and fair. Scots Musical 
Miiseujn, 1790, No. 26J, entitled Aiva, whigs, awa. The MS. is not among 
the Burns papers in the British Museum. In Law's MS. List, ' Mr. Burns's 
old words.' In the fourth stanza Burns is indignant against the enemies of the 
Jacobites, for with all his democratic feeling he cculd not escape from his 
Jacobite proclivities. The Union in his day was not accepted as favourable to 
his country — ihe pride of the nation rebelled against occupying an inferior 
position. The feeling'was expressed on the slightest provocation whether over 
the taxation of beer barrels, or a suggestion to abolish Bank notes. Sir Walter 
Scott astonished the Parliament of St. Stephen's by his furious attack on the 
proposal to amend the paper currency established for more than 150 years 
when the country was independent. In spite of Burns's feeble apologies for 
writing up the Jacobite cause, he embodied his sentiments in all the Jacobite 
songs, although this one like some of the others was not acknowledged. 

The original of Burns's song is eight lines in the Herd MS. as follows : — 

'And when they cam by Gorgie Mills 

They licked a' the mouter, 
The bannocks lay about there 
Like bandoliers and powder ; 
Awa, whigs, awa ! 
Awa, whigs, awa ! 
Ye're but a pack o' lazy louns, 
Ye'll do nae guid ava ! ' 

Arva, whigs, awa, is still a very popular melody which was originally 
published in Oswald's Companion, 1754, vi. /^ without a second part and 
without the sharp minor seventh near the close of the fourth line. The tune is 
also in Aird's Airs, 1^8, iii. No. 411. Another and different air is in Songs 
Prior to Burns, page 72 which R. Chambers said was sung to the song in the 
house of a Perthshire Jacobite famil}'. 

No. 279. Wow Watiore hangs her mantle green. Edinburgh Edition, 

1793, ii. I"]"] \ entitled 'Lament of ALary Queen of Scots on the approach of 
Spring^ ; Scots Musical Museum, 1797, No. 404, signed ' B.' The first copy 
was enclosed to Dr. John Moore in a letter dated February, 27, 1791, while 



462 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Bums was reading Percy's Reliques of Ancient English Poetry. Copies were 
sent to several other friends. Burns was particularly pleased with the ballad — 
a class of poetry he was not much attached to, — and he told Lady Constable 
' When I would interest my fancy in the distresses incident to humanity, I shall 
remember the unfortunate Mary. I enclose a poetic compliment I lately paid 
to the memory of our greatly injured, lovely Scottish Queen.' He writes in 
the same strain to Mrs. Graham, and to Clarinda when sending them copies. 

The ballad was printed in the Museum with the melody, which Burns 
communicated to the editor. 

A song Queen Marys lamentation ' I sigh and lament me in vain,' with 
a melody by Giordani, is well known : but neither words nor music have any 
relation to the ballad of Burns. The absorbing interest in Queen Mary is the 
excuse for noticing here the fabricated verses so long attributed to her on 
bidding adieu to her beloved France. The song was written by Meusnier de 
Querlon and first printed in his Anthologie Fran(oise, 1765, i. 29, with music. 
He pretended that he obtained it from a manuscript of the Duke of Bucking- 
ham, which has never been discovered. His countryman, Fournier exposed 
this and other of Querlon's tricks, and Charles dubs the song ' rimes barbares.' 
As a curiosity — the following are the original verses in the rare Anthologie : — 

'Adieu, plaisant pays de France, 

O ma patrie. 

La plus cherie. 
Qui as nourri ma jeune enfance ! 
Adieu, France, adieu mes beaux jours. 
La Nef qui dejoint nos amours 
N'a cy de moi que la moitie: 
Une part te reste, elle est tienne ; 
Je la fie a ton amitie, 
Pour que de I'autre il te souvienne.' 

"No. 280. O, cam ye here the figM to shun? Scots Musical Museum, 
1790, No. 282, entitled The battle of Sherra-moor : 'Mr. B. gave the words.' 
Tune, Cajuer-onian Kant. Law's MS. List. The battle of Sheriffmuir was 
fought on Sunday, November 13, 1715, between the Government forces com- 
manded by the Duke of Argyle, and the rebels under the Earl of Mar. The 
battle was drawn, both sides claiming the victory, and the peculiar humour of 
the country which delighted to treat matters of serious political import in 
a ridiculous manner, chose this event as the subject of ballads to satirize both 
sides in an impartial manner. The two armies approached each other on the 
broad muir between the Ochils and the Grampians. It is an undulating 
platform of gentle hummocky hills, and neither army saw very clearly the 
position and movements of the other. When the forces came into collision, it 
was discovered that the right wing of each was the strongest. The rebels out- 
numbered the Government army, but lost the advantage by rushing the attack 
before the arrangements were completed. 

Sir Walter Scott described how the Highlanders behaved in a campaign. 
While on the field they would desert in three cases : if much lime was lost in 
bringing them into action, they would get tired and go home ; if they fought 
and were victorious, they would plunder and go home ; if they fought and were 
beaten, they would run away and go home. These tactics were obviously 
perplexing and inconvenient to the leaders, but they were practised in the 
rebellions of 171? and 1745, and explain how the rebel armies in both cases 
rapidly melted away. The ballad recites, as the only thing certain, that a battle 
was fought, and both sides ran away, but who won or who lost, the satirical 
rhymer knows not. 

The Clan Campbell in general was much in evidence in the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries, and was famed for making an intelligent forecast of events 



VIII. JACOBITE 463 



with a view to promoting personal advancement. The enormous extent of 
territory in the possession of the family, stretching right across Scotland from 
sea to sea, is proof of inherited worldly wisdom. In 1715 the Duke of Argyle 
led the Government army : his kinsman, Breadalbane, the second great branch 
of the family, hedged and made himself safe whatever might happen. He 
secretly arranged with the rebels to bring twelve hundred active men on the 
field, but only three hundred arrived, and they merely surveyed the battle from 
a distance. When the war was over Breadalbane claimed a reward from the 
Government for having prevented his men taking part in the rebellion. It was 
an ingenious device to claim compensation for benevolent neutrality. Breadal- 
bane is described thus by a contemporary — ' of fair complexion and has the 
gravity of a Spaniard, is as cunning as a fox, wise as a serpent, and slippery as 
an eel.' The celebrated Rob Roy — one of the clan — was a chip of the same 
block. He also was present at the battle of Sheriffmuir with his caterans. He 
sympathized with the Pretender, but was restrained from assisting the rebels, it 
is said, for fear of giving offence to his protector the Duke of Argyle. Rob stood 
on an eminence watching the progress of the battle as described in a stanza of 
one of the ballads. He was pressed to assist, but he coolly replied, ' if they 
cannot do without me, they cannot do with me,' and remained inactive. When 
the battle was over he and his followers impartially spoiled the wounded and 
dead on both sides, and went home laden with plunder. 

The battle of Sheriffmuir practically closed the rebellion of 171.5; when 
James arrived in the country and landed at Peterhead a few months later, his 
adherents were perplexed what to do with him, as they had no further plans 
for continuing the war, and the Pretender did not inspire the Highlanders with 
enthusiasm. As Burton observes, their principles of Royal Succession or Divine 
right of reigning were never very strong unless the personal character or appear- 
ance of the monarch coincided with these decrees of Providence. In this case 
they saw a small wizened man, listless, feeble, inanimate, with a body shaken 
by dissipation. This representative of the old race of the fair-haired Stuarts, 
was a little dark-complexioned man. They took unkindly to him from the first 
time they saw him, and in less than three months from landing on the shores of 
Scotland, he had embarked and returned to France. The following scurrilous 
description of his defects and suspected spurious origin extracted from a con- 
temporary pamphlet, is worth reproduction, and shows that the Whigs were not 
altogether devoid of humour as has so often been alleged. ' Whereas one 
James Stewart, alias Oglethrope, alias Chevalier, alias Pretender, alias King, 
alias No King ; neither Caesar nor Nullus ; neither a man nor a mouse, a man's 
man nor a woman's man, nor a statesman, nor a little man, nor a great man, 
neither Englishman nor Frenchman, but a mongrelion between both ; neither wise 
nor otherwise ; neither soldier nor sailor, nor cardinal : without father or mother, 
without friend or foe, without foresight or aftersight, without brains or bravery, 
without house or home, made in the figure of a man, but just alive and that's 
all ; hath clandestinely lately eloped from his friends through a back door and 
has not been seen or heard of since . . . and whereas the said alias pretended to 
come here, to watch and fight, to bring men and money with him to train an 
army and march at the head of them, to fight battles and besiege towns, but in 
reality did none of these, but skulked and whined, and speeched and cryed, stole 
to his head quarters by night, went away before morning, and having smelled 
gunpowder and dreamed of an enemy, burnt the country and ran away by the 
light of it,' &c. &c. 

It is a common remark that all the wit and humour of the Jacobite period 
was confined to the supporters of the Stuarts. This is scarcely correct, for any 
one can see some good Whiggish songs in Political Merriment, London, 17 14. 

Several well-known ballads exist on the battle of Sheriffmuir. The oldest, 
consisting of twenty-one stanzas and a chorus, in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, 26^, 
was written immediately after the battle, and the names of some of those 



464 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



satirized are indicated by initials. Burns ascribed it to the Rev. Murdoch 
M<=Lennan, minister of Crathie. The ballad is in Hogg' a Jacobite Relics, 1821, 
ii. I, with three additional stanzas by himself. 

A later version beginning Fi-ay came yoti here the fight to shun, was written 
by another minister, the Rev. John Barclay, of Muthill in Perthshire. Barclay's 
ballad is entitled in the stall copies A dialogue bet-ween Will Lickladle and Tom 
Cleancogue, to the tune of the ' Cameron's March.' This was the ballad which 
Burns imitated and amended. He told the publisher of the Museum that the 
old words did not quite please him. A -third ballad is entitled From Bogie Side, 
or The Marquis'' s Raide. 

The London fugitive press was quite as active on Sheriffmuir, but it is dull 
compared with the specimens quoted. A dialogue between his Grace the Duke 
of Argyle and the Earl of Mar begins ' Argyle and Mar are gone to war.' 
One of the two woodcuts on the sheet represents a kilted Scot riding woman- 
fashion, and playing the Scotch fiddle, i.e. scratching himself. A second is 
an excellent new ballad entitled Mars lament for his rebellion; and a third 
The Clan's lamentation for their own folly. All three are dated 17 15. 

Cameronian Rant is a strathspey tune of considerable merit, and admirably 
adapted for expressing the humorous verses. It is in Bremner's Reels, 1761, 
82; in Stewart's Reels, 1761, 6\ it is entitled The Camerotiians Reel in 
M<=Glashan's Strathspey Reels, 1780, 16; in Campbell's Reels, 1778, 16; and 
Aird's Airs, 1782, i. No. lo'j. In Bremner's Reels, 1759, 4(), is another 
spirited reel tune entitled Will ye go to She7-iffmiiir . A third, different from 
either, is in Hoggs Jacobite Relics, 1821, ii. 2/0, but Cameroniatt Rant is the 
best of the three. 

Wo. 281. Ye Jacobites by name. Scots Musical Alusetim, 1792, No. J77. 
The MS. is in the British Museum. A pithy ironical satire couched in 
equivocal terms which may be read by either Whig or Tory. 

The tune is a good English specimen inserted in Durfey's Pills, 1719, vi. 2/7, 
with a song beginning A young man and a maid. Stenhouse quotes the title 
of a song, ' You've all heard of Paul Jones have you not., have you not^ sung to 
the melody in the eighteenth century in Edinburgh. The fame of Paul Jones 
was extended by means of songs and broadsides from Seven Dials and elsewhere, 
after the buccaneer's visit to the East coast of Scotlg,nd in 1779. In one of his 
manuscripts Burns quotes an alternative title of the tune Up black-nebs a', 
evidently as belonging to a song now unknown. 

!N"o. 282. O, Kenm^ure 's on and a^wa', "Willie. Scots Musical Museum, 
1792, No. j/f?. This song is in the Edinburgh Edition, 1877 and Centenary 
Edition, 1897, and although there is no reasonable doubt that Burns contributed 
these verses to the Museum, the authority for that rests solely on Stenhouse, 
who, in his Illustrations , says : ' Burns transmitted the ballad to Johnson in his 
own handwriting, with the melody to which it is adapted.' There is no 
mark in any edition of the Museufu connecting Burns with the song, nor do 
I know where the manuscript is. Cromek was not aware that Burns wrote 
the verses, and inserted them in Nithsdale and Galloway Song, 1810, with 
three stanzas which he pretended were old. With these additions it is 
reprinted in modern collections of Jacobite song as belonging to the Rebellion 
of 1 71 5- The confirmation of Stenhouse's assertion is desirable. Neither the 
words nor the melody can be traced before publication in the Musetim. The 
verses and music in the Appendix of Ritson's Scotish Songs, 1794, are an exact 
copy from the Museum. Sir Walter Scott, in a letter April 3, 1820, represented 
Lady Huntley playing Kenmw'e 's on and azva', Willie, in a way enough to raise 
the whole country side. 

Viscount Kenmure, the hero of the song, led the chevalier's army of the 
South-west of Scotland. He surrendered at Preston, and was marched through 
the streets of London to the Tower, accompanied by a howling mob with tin 



VIII. JACOBITE 465 



kettles and other musical instruments of a like sort. He was condemned and 
beheaded on February 24, 17 16. 

*]Sro. 283. "When we gaed to the braes o' Mar. Scois Musical Museum, 
1788, No. 188. The MS. is in the British Museum. In the Interleaved 
Museum Burns describes how he obtained the verses, as follows : ' This edition 
of the song I got from Tom Niel, of facetious fame in Edinburgh. The 
expression " Up and warn a' Willie " alhides to the Crantara, or warning of 
a Highland clan to arms. Not understanding this, the Lowlanders of the 
west and south say, "Up and waur them a','" &c. It is now impossible to 
discover what alterations or amendments Burns made, but the verses in the 
text contain many variations from the original song of seven stanzas in The 
Charmer, 1752, i. 61, signed ' B. G.'; of which the following is the first 
Stanza : — 

'When we went to the field of war, 
And to the weaponshaw, Willy, 
With true design to stand our ground, 

And chase our faes awa, Willy ; 
Lairds and lords came there bedeen, 
And vow gin they were pra', Willy, 
Up and war 'em a', Willy ; 
War 'em a', war 'em a', Willy.' 

The song belongs to the Rebellion of 1715, and is one of the Sheriffmuir 
satires, in which both sides are treated in an impartial manner. 

The tune is in the Caledonian Pocket Cofnpanion, 1751, iii. i; Bremner's 
Peels, 1759, 60; McLean's Scots Tunes, c. 1772, 2p ; and in Johnson's 
Museum, 1788, as in the text. It contains the 'Scotch snap' in its best form 
so inordinately imitated by foreign composers. 

No. 284. Here's a health to them that's awa. Partly in Cromek's 
K cliques, .1808, 42g, entitled Song: patriotic -unfinished. MS. in the 
British Museum. Written when Burns had the Revolutionary fever about 
the end of 1792, and sent to Captain William Johnston, the editor of the 
new Edinburgh Gazetteer, who had started the periodical on ' progressive ' prin- 
ciples. Johnston was subsequently charged with a treasonable conspiracy, 
and imprisoned. At this time Burns was suspected of holding opinions hostile 
to the Constitution, and it was alleged that he had proposed the following 
toast at a public meeting — ' Here 's the last verse of the last chapter of the last 
Book of Kings.' 

Here's a health to them that^s awa is founded on a Jacobite ballad of which 
Hogg has a copy in Jacobite Reliques, 1819, i./o. The tune does not appear 
to have been printed before being set to a stanza of the ballad contributed by 
Burns to the Scots Musical Museum, 1796, No. 412. The music resembles 
that of song No. 282. 

No. 285. Wha in a brulzie. Scots Musical Museum, I'jg6, No. 47J. 
The MS. is in the British Museum. Framed on a seventeenth century ballad 
which may be seen in Jacobite Relics, 18 19, 1. 20. Hogg got it probably from 
Myln's manuscript. It is a trenchant satire on the Whigs and Covenanters, 
reputably written by Lord Newbottle in 1688. He was a professional politician, 
who believed that it was necessary for him to live, and acted on the principle 
that— 

' A merciful Providence fashioned us holler 
A purpose that we might our principles swaller.' 

He changed from Whig to Tory, was made a Chief Justice, and Lord High 
Commissioner of the Kirk he had reviled. He died the first Marquis of 
Lothian. He sketches and satirizes in his ballad about forty of the principal 

Hh 



466 



HISTORICAL NOTES 



Whigs of his time. I quote two stanzas as a specimen of the verse from 
Maidment's Scotish Pasqtdls, 1868, ^^8. 

' Next comes our statesmen, these blessed reformers. 

For lying, for drinking, for swearing enormous ; 
Argyle and brave Morton, and Willie my Lordie — 

Bannocks of bear meal, cakes of Crowdy. 
My curse on the grain of this hale reformation. 

The reproach of mankind, and disgrace of our nation ; 
Deil hash them, deil smash them, and mnke them a soudy, 

Knead them like bannocks, and steer them like crowdy.' 

A satirical song on an Argyle of the eighteenth century with the title 
Bantiocks d barley meal is in Herd's Scots Songs, 1769, 280 ; and in Herd MS. 
is a rhyme of the seventeenth century : — 



Saw ye e'er, heard ye e'er 

Siccan a soudie? 
Bannocks o' bear meal, 

Cakes o' crowdie ! ' 



' Mass David Williamson, 
Chosen of twenty, 
Gaed up to the pulpit 
And sang KiUiecrankie. 

The tune The killogie was kept in use by a rustic song beginning ' A lad and 
a lassie lay on a killogie.' The verses are neither edifying nor instructive. The 
tune rejoiced in a variety of names. It is Bonox of bear meal in Si7ikler''s MS., 
1 710 ; z& Johnny and Nelly in Orpheus Caledonius, 1725, No. 21 ; as /'// never 
leave thee in Watts's Musical Miscellany, 1 730, iv. 7^; M^Gibbon's Scots Times, 
1746, 8, to which Burns directed Johnson for the tune; and in the Scots 
Musical Musetini, 1803, No. ^07. Two settings are in the Caledonian Pocket 
Companion, \1<^\, iii. 6. One entitled Banoks of Bear meal, and the other 
in vol. vi. 1754, 26, as There was a lad and a lass in a killogie. 

No. 286. The small birds rejoice. Thomson's Scotish Airs, 1799, 97. 
' From a MS. by Robert Burns. Irish Air, Captain O^Kaiie.' Currie's Works, 
1800, ii. 14J. Several MSS. exist. On March 31, 1788, Burns wrote from 
Mauchline, to his friend James Cleghorn, farmer, as follows : ' Yesterday, as 
I was riding thro' a track of melancholy, joyless muirs, between Galloway and 
Ayrshire ; it being Sunday, I turned my thoughts to psalms and hymns and 
spiritual songs; and your favourite air Captain C Kane coming at