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Full text of "Songs with music"

50NGS ^S^MUSIC 




ERCLE. 



THE KINDERGARTEN CHILDREN'S HOUR 

Edited by Lucy Wheelock 

IN FIVE VOLUMES 

ILLUSTRATED 

VOLUME V 

SONGS WITH MUSIC 
Compiled by Alice M. Wyman 




THE SWEETEST MONTH IN ALL THE YEAR IS JUNE, DEAR JUNE 



SONGS ^^MUSIC 




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Stack Collection 



COPYRIGHT, 1920, BY HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY 
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED 



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CONTENTS 



SONGS OF GRACE 

Hymn of Thanks , 1 

A Wee Prater 2 

God is Love n 2 

God Sends His Bright Spring Sun 4 

GREETING 

Good Morning Song 5 

Good Morning to You 6 

SONGS OF THE SEASONS 

Rain Song 7 

Spring , 8 

Bobby Redbreast 9 

The Tradespeople 10 

The Nest 11 

What Robin Told 12 

Pussy Willow 14 

June 15 

Buttercups 16 

Daisies 17 

A Pinky Wild Rose 18 

Autumn Leaves 19 

A Pretty Passenger 20 

Aster 21 

Good-bye to the Flowers 22 

Jack Frost 23 

Winter Song 24 

Snow Song 25 

To a Snowflake 26 

Coasting 27 

When the Snow is on the Ground 28 

Sunshine Far and Near 29 

Day and Night 30 

The Cloudy Day 31 

Rain 32 

Who has Seen the Wind? 32 

Over in the Meadow 33 

The Seasons 34 

Feeding the Chickens 36 

V 



CONTENTS 

SONGS OF THE SEASONS {continued) 

A Little Woodpecker am I 37 

Two Little Birds 38 

The Owl 39 

The Sparrows 40 

The First Bouquet 41 

The Fishes 42 



The "Zoo" 



44 



My Rabbit 45 

The Gray Donkey 46 

Bossy Cow 48 

The Giraffe 49 

TRADE SONGS 

The Baker ^ 50 

The Song of Iron 51 

The Little Shoemaker 52 

The Postman 54 

NURSERY RHYMES 

This Little Pig Went to Market 56 

Little Miss Muffet 57 

Jack and Jill 58 

See-Saw, Margery Daw 60 

Little Jumping Joan .60 

There was a Crooked Man 61 

Sing a Song of Sixpence 62 

Curly Locks 64 

The North Wind does Blow 64 

Little Polly Flinders 65 

Daffy Down Dilly 66 

Baa, Baa, Black Sheep 67 

Bean Porridge Hot 68 

HuMPTY Dumpty 69 

Lazy Sheep, Pray Tell me Why? 70 

The Little Mouse's Dream 71 

When the Man in the Moon Goes Fishing 72 

Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star 74 

PATRIOTIC SONGS 

My Country 't is of Thee 75 

Flag of Our Country 76 

Soldier Boy 77 

SPECIAL DAYS 

Thanksgiving Worries ' . , 78 

Christmas Hymn 79 

vi 



CONTENTS 

SPECIAL DAYS (continued) 

Santa's Visit 80 

Christmas Eve 81 

Santa Claus so Jolly 82 

The Christmas Tree 84 

The Little New Year 85 

Lincoln 86 

St. Valentine's Day 87 

Washington Song 88 

SLEEPY SONGS 

Doll's Cradle Song 89 

The Bird's Lullaby 90 

A Cradle Song 91 

Rock-a-Bye Baby 92 

Bye Baby Bunting 93 

The Land of Nod 94 

MISCELLANEOUS 

The Merry Little Men 96 

The Clock 98 

My Mother 99 

Friends 100 

Time to Rise 102 

The Cuckoo Clock 103 

Up in a Swing 104 

Wishes 105 

Sweeping and Dusting 106 

Tired Shoes 108 

The See-Saw 109 

The Chorister HO 

Shadows HI 

Pop-Corn Man 112 

The Windmill 113 

In a Hickory Nut 114 

Wishing 115 

The Orphan 116 

Daddy Long Legs 117 

A Tale of a Tail 118 

Mango Pepper 119 

My Dollie 120 

This is the Mother 121 

RHYTHMS 

Let 's Run a Little Way 122 

The Happiest Skip 123 

vii 



CONTENTS 

RHYTHMS (continued) 

Round and Round We Go 124 

The Galloping Horses 125 

The Trains Going by 126 

The Elephants go down the Street 126 

The Rocking Horse 127 

SINGING GAMES 

Looby Loo 128 

Soldier Boy, Soldier Boy 129 

Oats, Pease, Beans, and Barley Grow 130 

Here We Go Round the Mulberry Bush 131 

Itiskit Itasket 132 

In the Spring 133 

FOLK GAMES AND DANCES 

Greeting and Meeting 134 

I See You 135 

English May Game 136 

Rabbit in the Hollow 137 

French Flower Round 138 

RHYTHMIC ACTION, PLAYS AND DANCES 

Here We Go on a Merry-go-Round 139 

Hippity Hop to the Barber Shop . 140 

Hickory, Dickory, Dock 141 

Oh, where, oh, where is my Little Dog Gone ? 142 



June (p. 15), Colored Frontispiece. From a drawing by Willy Pogant. 
Title-page (in color) and text illustrations by Alice Ercle Hunt. 



INTRODUCTION 

THIS collection endeavors to give songs which will be of practical use in the 
home, and which will be a source of enjoyment to the little ones. 

Songs have been chosen which are simple, tuneful, and of especial interest to 
children, who will be able to interpret and to enjoy them because they are related 
to their everyday experiences and activities. 

A few songs, somewhat more difficult than those for whom this book is intended, 
have been included for the benefit of slightly older children, in the same family, 
who may want to share the pleasure of song with their younger brothers and sisters. 

Music, especially song, makes a tremendous appeal to the child. He usually 
loves to sing, and even the little monotone rumbles on, happily ignorant of the fact 
that his song consists of one long suffering note. 

Different songs appeal in different ways. The "Songs of Grace" foster the rever- 
ential attitude; the "Songs of the Seasons," and those pertaining to Nature, a love 
for the great out-of-doors and a kindly interest in all creatures. The nonsense rhymes 
satisfy the whimsical, the "just for fun " attitude. Many of the Nursery songs tend 
to keep alive old traditions. 

The sleepy songs rejoice the little mother, as she rocks the doUie that she loves 
best. Singing "The Song of Iron" or "The Little Shoemaker" will create a sympa- 
thetic attitude towards, and arouse an interest in, those who work so busily for our 
comfort. Love of home may be fostered through songs of the family relation, and 
love of country through songs of patriotism. 

In presenting these songs to the children it is best to tell the story and sing the 
song at an appropriate time. For instance, in the fall they will have noticed the 
leaves dropping from the trees, and naturally they will be glad to hear about 
the leaves "Softly, Softly Falling Down" and then to sing the song with a deeper 
appreciation of its significance. 

Each song in turn should be played and interpreted to the child in such a way as 
to instill in his mind the poetry of the story and develop an appreciation of the 
musical thought. 

Let singing be a pleasure rather than a task, something to look forward to with 
great anticipation and to remember with much joy. Every child has a musical sense 
which is fostered by listening to good music and by singing the little songs of child- 
hood. Children should sing joyfully and spontaneously, for music appeals to the 
finest and best emotions, and may be the means of awakening in them a spiritual 
consciousness of the good and beautiful, which will mean much to them in later life. 

"Music," says Disraeli, "teaches most exquisitely the art of development." 

Alice M. Wyman 




SONGS OF GRACE 
HYMN OF THANKS 



Myles B. Foster 



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For the hills, the trees, the flow - ers, And the sky so bright and clear. 
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From " Songs for Little People," by Frances Weld Danielson and Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1915, by The Congregational 
Sunday School and Publishing Society. 

1 



A WEE PRAYER 



Edith C, Rice 



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From " The ChUdren's Year." Edited by.Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1915, by MUton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass. 



GOD IS LOVE 



Lucy Wheelock 



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In your dress 


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3. Pret - ty stars! 




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4. God is love! 




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Tell me pray ! Tell me pray ! What your song may be. 

Tell me pray! Tell me pray.' What have you to say? 

Tell me pray ! Tell me pray ! Why you look so bright. 

Ev - 'ry breeze, Through the trees, Sings it through the air. 



Prom " The Child's Garden." By permission. 



GOD IS LOVE 





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Lit - tie child! 
Lit - tie child! 
Lit - tie child! 


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child ! 
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child ! 
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will tell you 
will tell you 
will tell you 
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God is love! God is love! This I sing . to you. 

God is love! God is love! He clothed me . and you. 

God is love! God is love! He bids us shine for you. 

is love ! God is love ! You must love . Him too. 



God 





GOD SENDS HIS BRIGHT SPRING SUN 



Elizabeth Peabody 

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1. God sends His bright spring sun To melt the ice and snow, To 

2. God sends His love to us, To make our good - ness grow, Let 



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the green leaf buds, And make the flow - ers grow, 
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From "Songs for Little Children, Part I," by Eleanor Smith. Copyright, 1887, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Maae. 




GREETING 

GOOD MORNING SONG 



Clare Sawyer Reed 



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Good morn - ing, Good morn - ing, Good morn - ing to all, 



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each hap - py day. Hur - rah ! Hur - rah ! For each hap - py day. 

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Words taken by permission from " Songs and Games for Little Ones." 

From "Timely Games and Songs for the Kindergarten" by Clare Sawyer Reed. Copyright, 1900, 1903, by J. L. Hammett 
Company, 




GOOD MORNING TO YOU 



Anon. 

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Good morn - ing to you ! Good morn - ing to you ! 



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From "Song Development for Little Children," White-Smith Publishing Company. Copyright, 1908, by Frederic H. Ripley and 
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SONGS OF THE SEASONS 

RAIN SONG 



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From "Songs for Little Children, Part 1," by Eleanor Smith. Copyright, 1887, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass. 

7 




SPRING 



Katherine Pyle 

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BOBBY REDBREAST 



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THE TRADESPEOPLE 



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Mary S. Conbade 



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builds a nest and plas - ters it With mud, and hay, and leaves. The 
what a era - die for his young The lit - tie thing has made. Of 



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10 



THE TRADESPEOPLE 



you may find him ham - mer - ing His house high up a tree, 
on the ap - pie - tree he weaves A co - zy lit - tie nest. 



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THE NEST 

{Let the children Join hands arid form a circle to represent a hedge, two of the smallest being chosen for the 
eggs, and kneeling in the center. In the second verse they raise their heads and sing the ^^ peeps," while all the 
children join in the last line.) 



Friedrich Froebel 



Russian Folk-song 



1. On the twigs, with - in a hedge, A bird her nest has made. 

2. From be - neath the moth - er's wings Two lit - tie birds ap - pear. 




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In the nest so soft and warm Two ti - ny eggs are laid. 
Hear them cry - ing, "Peep, peep, peep. We love you, moth - er dear." 

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Sunday-School and Publishing Society. 

11 



WHAT ROBIN TOLD 



George Cooper 

Oracefully 



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1. How do rob - ins build their nest? 

2. Where do rob - ins hide their nest? 



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First a wisp of yel - low hay, 
Up a-mong the leaves so deep, 



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Where the sun-beams rare-ly creep. 



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From " Nature Songs for Children " by Fanni Snow Knowlton. Copyright, 1898, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, 



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Long be - fore the leaves are gold, 



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Bright -eyed stars will peep and see Ba - by rob - ins, one, two three ; 



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sun - shine Of the ear - ly Spring, Tell me, tell me, pus - sy, 

sis - ters, I am sure you'll see Ti - ny lit - tie hous - es, 

move us In our lit - tie beds ; And when warm - er breez - es 



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For I want to know, Where it is you come from, How it is you grow! 
Out of which we peep, When we first are wak - ing From our win-ter's sleep. 
Of the Springtime blow, Then we lit - tie pus - sies All to cat - kins grow ! 



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From "Songs and Games for Little Ones." Prepared by Gertrude Walker and Harriet S. Jenks. 

Ditson Company. 



permission of Oliver 




14 



JUNE 



A. W. Wray, by permission 
Allegro grazioso 



Eleanor Smith 



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1. The sweet - est month in all 

2. The gay - est month in all 



the year 
the year 



is June, dear June : 
is June, dear June : 



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lit - tie brooks a - laugh - ing run, The ti - ny leaf - lets 
then the laugh - ing chil - dren run And shout " Hur - rah for 



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dance with fun. And bird - ies sing till day is done. In June, dear June, 
les - sons done ! Hur - rah for long, long days in June ! Hur - rah for June ! 



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16 



BUTTERCUPS 



Simply and tenderly 



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down there in the grass, 

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Do you each one hold shin - ing 



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drops of dew For the fai - ry folk who pass ? 






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From " Songs of the Child World, No. 2." Copyright, 1904, by The John Church Company. Used by permission. 

16 



DAISIES 



i 



Daintily 



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1. Lit - tie Miss Dai - sy lives in the grass, 

2. Lit - tie Miss Dai - sy's cou - sin Sue 



Mer - ry lit - tie 
Lives next door as 



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flow - er 
cous - ins 



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Her cap frills are as white as 

But black - eyed Su - san's ver - y 

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snow, She nods a greet - ing so 
gay And wears a yel - low cap . 



and 
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way. 



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Prom " Songs of the Child World. No. 2." Copyright, 1904, by The John Church Company. Used by permission. 

17 



Anna M. Pratt 



A PINKY WILD ROSE 

(CRADLE SONG) 



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wee era - dies are cur - tained with green, But of 



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all the dear ba - hies, not one can be seen, Un -til the June sun-beams,the 

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cur - tains un - close, And coax from each era - die, a pink - y wild rose. 



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From " Nature Songs for Children," by Fanny Snow Knowlton. Copyright, 1898, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass- 

18 



AUTUMN LEAVES 



G. W. C. 



Arr. from Haydw 



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Soft - ly, soft - ly, float - ing down, Red and rus - set, gold and brown, 



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(Bass very light) 




From " The Children's Year " by Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass. 




19 



Rapidly 



A PRETTY PASSENGER 

Words and music by Harvey Worthingtov Loomis 



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float on a pond One 



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with expression 



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A bright yel - low but - ter - fly 



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From " The Song Primer." Copyright, 1907, by The A. S. Barnes Company, New York. 

20 



ASTER 



Elizabeth Scantlebury 
Lively, tempo rubato 



rU. 




Oh, hur - ry, hur - ry, As - ter dear, Put on your pur - pie gown. For all the lit - tie 





boys and girls, Are com-ing out from town. Oh, Gold - en-rod put on your hat. With 




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yel - low feathers fine. Be read -y now to make a bow,The wind will give the sign. 




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From " Nature Lyrics for Children," by N. C. Schneider. Used by permission of The Willis Music Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Words used by permission of Educational Publishing Co., Boston, Mass. 



GOOD-BYE TO THE FLOWERS 



George Cooper 



Harriet P. Sawyer 



* 



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1. Good-bye, dai - sy, pink and rose, And snow-white lil - y, too! 

2. Good-bye, moss - y lit - tie rill. That shiv - ers in the cold, 



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Ev - ery 

Leaves that 

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pret - 
fall 


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on 


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lower that grows, 
vale and hill 

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here's 
Gov - 


a kiss 
er you 


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with 


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you ! 

gold! A 


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Good - bye, mer - ry bi' d and bee. And take this ti - ny song 
sweet good - bye to birds that roam. And rills and flow'rs and bees ! 



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when 


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early as 

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From "Songrs and Games for Little Ones," by permiasion of Oliver Ditaon Company 

22 



JACK FROST 



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1. Oh, Jack Frost is a mer-ry lit - tie elf, And a mer-ry lit - tie elf is 

2. He paints with glee on ev - 'ry win-dow pane, Things ver - y, ver - y fine to 

3. Oh, Jack Frost plays so man-y, rnan-y tricks, He . is so ver - y pert and 

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he. 
see. 
bold. 



He calls for his coat. And he calls for his brush, And he 
A moun - tain . high And a lake close by And a 
He pinch - es the cheeks And he tweaks the nose, And he 



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calls for his paint-pots one, two, three. And he calls for his paint-pots three, 
might -y . for - est tree, tree, tree. And a might-y . for - est tree, 
turns us . blue with cold, cold, cold, And he turns us . blue with cold. 



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From " Songs of The Child World, No. 1." Copyright, 1897. by The John Church Company. Used by permission. 



i 



Melody by 
Alys E. Bentley 
Allegro 



WINTER SONG 



Accorapaniment by 
Harvey Worthington Loomis 



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B-r-oo ! 



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B-r-oo ! 



It's ver - y cold to - day 



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B-r-oo ! 



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B-r-oo ! 



Jack Frost is out at play. He 



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pinch - es un - der heav - y clothes And bites your cheek and nips your nose. 



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Prom " Play Songs. " Copyright, 1912, by The A. S. Baraes Co., New York 

24 



WINTER SONG 



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B-r-oo ! 



It's ver - y cold to - day. 



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SNOW SONG 



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Adapted from Schubert 



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Snow, 



snow, ev - ery - where, On the ground and in the air, 



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In the fields and in the lane, On the roof and win - dow - pane. 



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1 " " 

From "Songs for Little People" by Frances Weld Danielson and Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1915, by The Congrega- 
tional Sunday-School and Publishing Society. 

25 



TO A SNOWFLAKE 



From the German, by 

Emii.ie Poulsson 
, Lightly - 



Eleanor Smith 



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1. O lit - tie frost - y snow 

2. Come, rest up - on our win 



flake, So light - ]y float - ing 
dow; How could you float so 






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by, A long, long way you trav - el In com- ing from the sky. 

far? We chil- dren love to see you,You pret - ty film - y star! 



" — — poco rit. — - 

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From ' Songs of a LitUe ChOd's Day," by Emilie 
Springfield, Mass. 



and Eleanor Smith. Copyright, 1910, by Milton Biadley Company, 
26 



COASTING 



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Joyfully 



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Oh, what fun, what jol - ly fun ! 

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In the win - ter wea - ther. 



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With our sleds to cHmb the hill, Trudg-ing up to - geth 






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Then a shove, 

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From "Songs of the ChUd World, No. 2." Copyright, 1904, by The John Church Company. Used by permission, 

27 



r 



WHEN THE SNOW IS ON THE GROUND 



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strew him here some crumbs of bread. And then he'll live till the snow is gone. 



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From " Mother Goose's Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs." Set to music by J. W. Elliott, McLoughlin Brothers, Inc., Pub- 
lishers. 



SUNSHINE FAR AND NEAR 



Emiue Poulsson 
Andante 



Eleanor Smith 



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1. The big, bright sun shines down on me When out at play I roam, . Yet 

2. And while at home 'tis shin - ing bright On Ba - by's cur - ly crown, . It 




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all the time 'tis shin - ing too. On Moth - er dear, at home, 
shines on Fa - ther at his work, A - far off in the town. 



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From "Songs of a Little Child's Day," by Emilie Poulsson and Eleanor Smith. Copyright, 1910, by Milton Bradley Company 
Springfield, Mass. 




DAY AND NIGHT 



Arthur Henry 

Slowly and expressively 



Harvey Worthington Loomis 



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By day the shad-ows slip a - way, At eve-ning back they creep. . . The 



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slower gradually and diminishing 



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gives Hght e - nough for play, The stars e-nough for sleep. 



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legato '^^^^^ mp slower gradtially 



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From '• The Song Primer." Copyright, 1907. by The A. S- Barnes Company. New York. 



Fed. * 



Fed. 



THE CLOUDY DAY 



Kate Whiting Patch 



Clare Sawver Reed 



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Oh, pret - ty white clouds, now what have you done? You've 



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hung a soft 


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us and the sun. 

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beams may 

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peep through to play Hide and seek with us chil - dren on this cloud - y day. 




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From "Timely Games and Songs for the Kindergarten," by Clare Sawyer Reed. Copyright, 1900, 1903, by J. L. Hammett 
Company, 




RAIN 



Robert Loots Stevenson 



Grace Wilbur Gjnant 



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The rain is rain - ing all a - round, It falls on field and tree, 



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From " The Children's Year " by Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass. 



Christina Rossetti 

Hdp 



m 



WHO HAS SEEN THE WIND? 



Alys E. Bentuey 



9 *-— ^- 



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Who has seen the wind? 

I- 



Nei - ther you nor I 



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But when the trees bow down their heads, The wind is pass - ing by 



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From " The Song Primer." Copyright, 1907, by The A. S. Barnes Company. New York 



OVER IN THE MEADOW 



Olive A. 


Wadsworth 






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- ver 


in 


the 


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ow, 


In 


the 


sand, 


in 


the 


sun. 




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in 


the 


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ow, 


Where 


the 


stream 


runs 


. . 


blue, 




3. 





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in 


the 


mead - 


ow, 


In 


a 


hole 


in 


the 


tree, 




4. 





- ver 


in 


the 


mead - 


ow, 


In 


the 


reeds 


on 


the 


shore. 




5. 




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the 


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ow, 


In 


a 


snug 


bee 


- 


hive. 




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Lived a moth-er - toad, And her lit - tie toad -ie one. 
Lived a moth-er - fish. And her lit - tie fish - es two. 
Lived a moth-er - bird And her lit - tie bird -ies three. 
Lived a mother-muskrat And her lit - tie rat -ties four. 
Lived a moth-er - bee And her lit - tie hon -eys five. 



"Wink!' 
"Swim!' 
"Sing!' 
"Dive! 



said the mother ; 
said the mother : 
said the mother ; 
said the mother : 



Buzz ! ' ' said the mother ; 



'I 

'We 
'We 
'We 
'We 



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wink, ' ' said the one : So he winked and he blinked In the sand and sun. 

swim," said the two: So they swam and they swam Where the stream runs blue, 

sing, ' ' said the three : So they sang and they sang In the hole in the tree, 

dive," said the four: So they dived and they dived In the reeds on the shore, 

buzz, ' ' said the five : So they buzzed and they buzzed In the snug bee - hive. 




From " Nature Songs for Children," by Fanny Snow Knowlton. Copyright, 1898, by Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, Mass. 



THE SEASONS 



i§ 



Edythe a. Turner 

Con spirito 



E. H. H. 



feSziz^ 



122: 



1. In 

2. In 



the spring 
the sum 



time bright 
mer - time 



and gay, 
so warm. 



Lit 

Soft 



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chil - dren love 
glides our boat 



to play With jump - ropes, hoops, and 

a - long, . . Pad - dling 'round with 

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mar - bles too — . . This is the way they love to do. 

out a care, To watch the fish - es play - ing there. 

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From " Play Time Songs," by Ethel Henderson Hurd. Copyright, 1906, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Ma 

84 



THE SEASONS 



i^i 



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^ 



3. When 

4. In 



the leaves 
the win 



com - mence 
ter cold 



to fall 
and brisk. 



Then 
O'er 



Jack 
the 



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Frost 



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be - gins 
we like 



call, 
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FEEDING THE CHICKENS 



Anna M. Pratt 



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From " Nature Songs for Children," by Fanny Snow Knowlton. Copyright, 1898, by Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, 

36 



FEEDING THE CHICKENS 



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to your din - ner, Come one, come 



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A LITTLE WOODPECKER AM I 



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When from the tree I'm seek - ing food, For tap, tap, tap, I go. 



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From "Songs and Games for Little Ones." By permission Oliver Ditson Co. 

37 



TWO LITTLE BIRDS 



Agnes R. Bacon 



Julia A. Hidden 



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Two lit - tie birds one Au - tumn day Sat on a tree to - geth-er. . They 



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flut-tered a - bout from bough to bough, And talked a- bout the weath-er. The 



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wind is blow-ing so cold they said, It chills us as we sing. Then a 



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From " The Garden Game and Other Songs " by Julia Hidden. Copyright, 1908, by Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, Mass. 
y 38 



TWO LITTLE BIRDS 



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way they flew to the sun - ny South, And there they staid till Spring. 

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THE OWL 



Words and Music by Dora I. Buckingham 



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1. O Mis -ter Owl, you look so wise, With those big fun - ny, fun - ny eyes. "To 

2. O Mis -ter Owl, you fly at night. And nev - er come out in the light. "To 



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whit to-whoo! To - whit, to-whoo!" Is all I've ev - er heard from you. 
whit to-whoo! To - whit, to-whoo!" In - deed, I'm not a - fraid of you. 



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From "Songs for Children " by Dora I. Buckingham. Copyright, 1913, by Milton Bradley Company. Springfield, Mass. 

39 



THE SPARROWS 



Rachel Barton Butler 

Not fast, but very staccato 



Jessie L. Gaynor 



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From " Songs and Shadow Pictures for the Child World." Copyright, 1898, by The John Church Co. Used by permission. 

40 



THE FIRST BOUQUET 



EsiILrE POULSSON 

Espressivo 



Eleakor Smith 



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1. He dug his gar - den, He sowed the seeds; He kept it 

2. And when it bios - somed With flow - ers gay, He gave his 



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wa - tered And pulled the weeds, 
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From " Songs of a Little Child's Day," by Emilie Poulsson and Eleanor Smith. Copyright, 1910. by Milton Bradley Company. 
Springfield, Mass. 




THE FISHES 



Kate Whiting Patch 



Clare Sawyer Reed 



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To the cool and shad - ed pond Let us go, 

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We will watch the fish - es swim To and fro, to and fro. 



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See them dart ! 



see them glide ! Now be-neath a rock they hide ; 



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From " Timely Games and Songs for the Kindergarten," by Clare Sawyer Reed. Copyright, 1900, 1903, by J. L. Hammett Com- 
pany. 

42 



THE FISHES 



Now they're gleaming in the sun; We are sure they're hav - ing fun, 



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43 



THE "ZOO 



Melody by 
Alys E. Bentley 

Fast 



Accompaniment by 
Harvey Worthington LooAns 




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seal and kan-ga-roo, And all the 


friendly 


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like to hear 


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From 'Play Songs.' 



Copyright, 1912, by The A. S. Barnes Company, New York 
44 



THE "ZOO 



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I can trav - el by my - self, I'm go - ing there to stay. 




MY RABBIT 



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Melody by 
Alys E. Bentley 

mp Moderato 



Accompaniment by 
Harvey Worthington Looms 



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My rab - bit sits like this, so still, And turns his long, long ears : 



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poco rail 



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wish that he could talk a - bout The man - y things he hears. 



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From " Play Songs." Copyright, 1912, by The A. S. Barnes Company, New York 



46 



THE GRAY DONKEY 



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Harvey Worthington Loomis 

Allegro mp 



Harvey Worthington Loomis 



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1. I have a lit - tie don - key that's gray; I 

2. I think he un - der-stands when I speak, Be 



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feed him in the barn ev - 'ry day. And when he hears me whis - tie, He 
cause I've had him near- ly a week, And all the things I've told him, (Of 



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knows I have a this - tie. He'd rath - er eat a this - tie than hay. 
course I nev - er scold him, ) He al - ways tries to an - swer and creak, 




From " Toy Tunes " by Harvey Worthington Loomis. Copyright, 1911, by Carl Fischer, New York. International copyright se- 
cured. Used by permiasion. 

46 



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THE GRAY DONKEY 



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" Hee - haw, hee -haw, hee - haw !" That is all my don -key can say. 
"Hee-haw, hee -haw, hee - haw !" Some- thing like a pump with a squeak. 




BOSSY COW 



tJ 



Emilie Poulsson 
Allegretto 



Eleanor Smith 



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1. Ting! ting! tin 

2. Good old Bos 



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ting ! Tin - kle 
cow ! What does 



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Bos 



gain, 
bring? 



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Here comes Bos - sy Cow Stroll - ing down the lane. 

Fresh milk for us all, Tin - kle, tin - kle, ting I 



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From " Songs of a Little Child's Day," by Emilie Poulsson and Eleanor Smith. Copyright, 1910, by Milton Bradley Company, 
Springfield, Mass. 

48 



THE GIRAFFE 

Words and Music by Dora I. Buckingham 



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1. O, don't you want to laugh When you see the tall gi-raffe Go 

2. He sees all o - ver town, All a- round and up and down, For he 



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march- ing up the street? 
holds his head quite high. . 



Ha, ha, ha ! I al - ways laugh When I 
Ha, ha, ha ! I al - ways laugh When I 



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see the tall gi- raffe. For I think he looks so queer In a cir- cus pa-rade. 
see the tall gi- raffe, For I think he looks so queer In a cir- cus pa-rade. 



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From "Songs for Children," by Dora I. Buckingham. Copyright, 1913, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, 

49 




TRADE SONGS 



THE BAKER 



S. M. Bush 



Adapted 



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1. What does the bak - er make, we say, As he rolls a - way from day to day, 

2. And now he presses and cuts his cake, .... Getting it ready so soon to bake ; 

3. Then into the oven with a push they go. And oft he turns them to and fro, 




Roll-ing so stead - i - ly this way and that, Roll - ing his dough so thin and flat? 
He makes the cook-ies so smooth and round, . , . And one is cut with each little sound. 
Roll-ing and press-ing he makes them round, When they are done, one for each will be found. 




From " Songs and Games for Little Ones." By permission, Oliver Ditson Company. 

50 



THE SONG OF IRON 



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j^ — ifi .r > j 

■♦-J — ^^# — *-. — •- 



1. Sing a song of i - ron in a mine so deep, Where the might - y 

2. Works with spade and shov - el bus - y all the day, Nev - er sees the 



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moun-tain guard - ing watch doth keep. Down must go the niin - ers in the 
sun- light, not a sin - gle ray. We should thank the min - er, you will 



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ground so damp. Each one with his pick - ax and his ti - nj' lamp. 
all a - gree. For his wea - ry la - bor down where none can see. 



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From " Songs of The Child World " No. I. Copyright, 1897, by The John Church Company. Used by permission. 

61 



THE LITTLE SHOEMAKER 



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accompaniment staccato 

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lit - tie wee man in a lit - tie wee house, Lives o - ver the way you 
puts his nee - die in and out, His thread flies to and 



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fro. 



And he sits at the win - dow and sews all day, 
With his ti - ny awl he bores the holes, 



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From ' Songs of The Child World," No. I. Copyright, 1897, by The John Church Company. Used by permission. 

52 



THE LITTLE SHOEMAKER 



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Mak- ing shoes for you and me. 
Hear the ham - mers bu - sy blow. 



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A - rap a - tap tap, A 



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rap a - tap tap, Hear the ham - mer's tit - tat - tee. 



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rap a - tap tap, A - rap a - tap tap, Mak-ing shoes for you and me. 



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53 



THE POSTMAN 



Anna M. Pratt 

Class 






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1. Good morn-ing, Mis - ter Post-man, Your bag is full, I see; I'm 

2. I'm sor - ry, Mis - ter Post-man, The rain is com - ing down; You 

3. I like to see you com -ing With let - ters ev - 'ry day, I'm 




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look - ing for a let - ter, Have you an - y - thing for me? 

must be ver - y tir - ed, From walk - ing round the town, 

sure that I should miss you If you nev - er came this way. 



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Postman 



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Good morn-ing ! here's a let - ter, 

Thank you ver - y kind - ly ; 

I can - not al - ways bring you 



And here's a pa - per, too; I've 

The walk - ing is not bad, But 

The let - ters you would choose. But 




^ i T \ ^- f i i f 



From " Nature Songs for Children," by Fanny Snow Knowlton. Copyright, 1898, by Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, Mass. 

54 



THE POSTMAN 



^ 



man - ny for your neigh - bors, But noth - ing more for you. 

when the days are pleas - ant, The post - men all are glad. 

I am al - ways hap - py, When I car - ry pleas - ant news. 



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NURSERY RHYMES 



Nursery Rhyme 

Jaimlily 



THIS LITTLE PIG WENT TO MARKET 

Grace Wilbur Conant 



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This lit - tie Pig went to mar - ket : This lit - tie Pig stayed at 



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This lit - tie Pig had roast -beef; This lit - tie Pig had 

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none ; This lit - tie Pig cried ' 'Wee wee 



I can't find my way home!" 
O moth- er, give me some!" 



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From "The Children's Year." Edited by Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, 
ss. 

56 



LITTLE MISS MUFFET 



Nursery Rhyme 
Oracefully 



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t^-- 



Lit - tie Miss Muf - fet, She sat 



a tuf - fet, 



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ite 



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Eat - ing of curds and whey 



There came up a spi - der, And 



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sat down be - side her, And fright-ened Miss Muf - fet a - way 



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life 



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From "Song Development for Little Children," by Frederic H. Ripley and Harry L. Harts. Copyright, 1908, by Frederic H. 
Ripley and Harry L. Harts. By permission White-Smith Music Co., Boston. 

57 



JACK AND JILL 



Allegretto 



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h i r . r ^ ^ 

I 1^ 1^ hi 



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Jack and Jill Went up the hill, To fetch a pail of wa - ter, 



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Jack fell down, And broke his crown, And Jill came turn - bling af - ter. 



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Up Jack got, And home did trot, As fast as he could ca - per, 



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From " Mother Goose's Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs." Set to music by J. W. Elliott, McLoughlin Brothers, Inc., Pub- 
lishers. 



JACK AND JILL 




Went to bed, To mend his head, With vi - ne - gar and brown pa - per. 





Third Verse 
mf 



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Jill came in, And she did grin, To see his pa - per plas - ter. 



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Moth 


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Did 


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SEE-SAW, MARGERY DAW 



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Allegretto 



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See - saw, Mar - ge - ry Daw, Jack shall have a new mas - ter, 



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cres. e ritard. 



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He shall have but a pen-ny a day. Be - cause he wont work a - ny fast - er. 



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From "Mother Goose's Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs." Set to music by J. W. Elliott. McLoughlin Brothers, Inc., Pub- 
lishers. 



LITTLE JUMPING JOAN 



i^^S 



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^^^^ 



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Here am I, lit - tie jump-ing Joan, When no - bod-y's with me I'm al - ways a - lone. 



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From " Little Songs of Long Ago." The original tune harmonized by Alfred Moffat, Augener Co.. Ltd.. London, Publishers. 

60 



THERE WAS A CROOKED MAN 



Allegretto moderato 
mf 



There was a crook - ed man, and he went a crook - ed mile, He 




mp 



found a crook-ed six-pence up - on a crook-ed stile : He bought a crook-ed cat, which 





caught a crook-ed mouse, And they all lived to-geth - er in a crook-ed lit - tie house. 




From " Mother Goose's Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs." Set to music by J. W. Elliott. McLoughlin Brothers, Inc., Pub 
lishers. 

61 



SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE 



Allegretto 



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Sing a Song of Six - pence, A pock - et full of Rye; 




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Four-and-twen - ty Black-birds Baked in a Pie. When the Pie was o-pened, The 




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Birds be -gan to sing; Was-n't that a dain - ty dish To set be-fore a King? 




f=^ 



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From " Mother Goose's Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs." Set to music by J. W. Elliott, McLoughlin Brothers, Inc., Pub- 
lishers. 



SING A SONG OF SIXPENCE 



Second Verse 


=1^= 


fc 




1 *- 


— M ai — 




— 1>" 


— d^ 


— fe— =^ fe^^ 


The 


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King was 


in 


— * 
the 


— ^ — 
count 


— ft L 

— j^ K^ 

- ing - house, 

tz 


t=^t fcS- 

Count-ing 

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out 


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his 

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mon 

ten. 

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- ey ; The 


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=fc 


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1 1 


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Queen was in the Par - lour, Eat - ing bread and hon - ey; The 

ten. 




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rallentando 



^==^^ ^E^^ ^^^ ^;^^E, ^ 



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came a ht - tie Dick - y Bird, And popp'd up - on her 



CURLY LOCKS 



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Cur - \y Locks, Cur - \y Locks, wilt thou be mine? Thou shalt not wash dish - es, nor 



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feed the swine ; But sit on a cush - ion and sew up a seam. And 



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eat line straw-ber - ries, sug - ar and cream. Cur - ly Locks, Cur - ly Lock^ 



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wilt thou be mine? Thou shalt not wash dish - es, nor feed the swine. 



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From " Little Songs of Long Ago." The original tunes harmonized by Alfred Moffat, Augener, Co., Ltd., London, Publishers. 



THE NORTH WIND DOES BLOW 



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The 


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rth Wind does 


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blow And 


we 


shall hav 


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e snow ; 


And 


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From " Little Songs of Long Ago." The original tunes harmonized by Alfred Moffat, Augener, Co., Ltd., London, Publishers. 

64 



THE NORTH WIND DOES BLOW 



/hat will the Rob - in do then, poor thing? He'll sit in the barn To 




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keep him - self warm, And hide his head un - der his wing, poor thing 



LITTLE POLLY FLINDERS 



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Lit - tie Pol 


■ ly 


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Flin - ders 


Sat 


a- mong the cin 

-f- 


- ders. Warm - ing her 



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pret 

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ty 


lit -tie 

^ 1 




. Her 


— 1 

^— t^ — 

Moth 

r 


- er 


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came and 


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caught 


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toes. . 


her And 

1 


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smacked her lit - tie daugh - ter For spoil - ing her nice new clothes. . 



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From " Little Songs of Long Ago." The original tunes harmonized by Alfred Moffat, Augener Co., Ltd., London, Publishers. 

65 



DAFFY DOWN DILLY 



LrLLiAN Hunter 



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Daf - fy Down Dil - ly has come up to town In a yel- low^ pet - ti - coat 



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and a green gown ; Daf - fy Down Dil - ly has come up to town 



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yel - low pet - ti - coat and a green gown. 



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Used by permission. 



BAA, BAA, BLACK SHEEP 



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Baa, Baa, black sheep, have you an - y wool? Yes, Sir, Yes, Sir, 



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three bags full; One for the mas - ter, and one for the dame. 



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And 



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for the lit - tie bov that 



in the lane. 




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From " Mother Goose Songs for Little Ones." by Ethel Crowninshield. Copyright, 1907. by Milton Bradley Company, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

67 



BEAN PORRIDGE HOT 



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Bean por-ridgehot, Bean por-ridge cold, Bean por-ridgein the pot nine days old; 



. ^ I I , ^^ r^ i~4 J^ J U-^ 1 J — 



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Some like it hot, Some like it cold. Some like it in the pot nine days old. 



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From " Mother Goose Songs for Little Ones " by Ethel Crowninsbield. Copyright, 1907, by Milton Bradley Company, Spring- 
field, Mass. 




08 



HUMPTY DUMPTY 



gll J ^ ^^E^ Jj^ F^-^^^^^iii^^^- ^i ^ ES i 



Hump - ty Dump - ty sat on a wall. Hump- ty Dump- ty had a great fall : 




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All the kings' hors-es and all the kings' men, Couldn't put Hump-ty back a - gain. 




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From " Mother Goose Songs for Little Ones," by Ethel Crowninshield. Copyright, 1907, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, 




LAZY SHEEP, PRAY TELL ME WHY? 



r-Q-^i 


















1 1 


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=^ 


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— -j — 


1 


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w — ^^-- 

1. La 

± "Nay, 


— ^ — 1 — ^ ^ — 

- zy sheep, pray 
my lit - tie 


tell 
mas - 


me 
ter. 


why In the 
nay. Do not 

1* ^ ^ 


pleas 
serve 


_^j 1 

- ant field 
me so, 

■f- -F- 


you 
I 


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poco rit. 


















irh^ 1 


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v-; 


1 1 ' 1 


1 '■ 1 


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lie. Eat - ing grass and dais - ies white From the morn - ing till the 
pray ; Don't you see the wool that grows On my back to make your 


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night? Ev - 'ry - thing can some-thing do. But what kind of use are you? 
clothes? Cold, ah, ver - y cold you'd be If you had not wool from me. " 



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From " Little Songs of Long Ago." The original tunes harmonized by Alfred Moffat, Augener Co., Ltd., London, Publishers. 




THE LITTLE MOUSE'S DREAM 



Moderately 
f 



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There was a lit - tie mouse who had a lit - tie dream All 

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bout a lit - tie house made of cheese and cream ; But a great big cat, who was 

— J — X — , 



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W<. ^ a tempo -> 



hun-gry and lean, Ate the mouse, and the house, and the cheese, and the cream. 



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a tempo 



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From " Song Development for Little Children," White-Smith Publishing Company. Copyright, 1908, by Frederic H. Ripley and 
Harry L. Harts. 

71 



WHEN THE MAN IN THE MOON GOES FISHING 

Author unknown Juua A. Hidden 



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When the man in the moon goes fish - ing, . . With long lines and hooks, 

1— ^.-=- 



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His lit - tie boat is emp - ty. 



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how it looks 



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When he's fished a night or two, And packed his load down flat. 



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From "The Garden Game and Other Songs," by Juiia A. Hidden. Copyright. 1908, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfleld, 

ss. 

72 



WHEN THE MAN IN THE MOON GOES FISHING 



^ 



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His lit - tie boat is e - ven full, And then it looks like that. And when 

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he has been out for weeks . And has not made a miss, . The 



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lit - tie boat is piled up high And then it looks like this. 

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73 



TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR 



Allegretto rnoderato 



4: 



-^ — -zg: 



V V ' V — ^ 



1. Twin - kle, twin - kle, lit - tie star, How I won - der what you 

2. When the blaz - ing sun is gone, When he noth - ing shines up • 

3. Then the trav - 'ler in the dark Thanks you for your ti - ny 

4. In the dark blue sky you keep. Of - ten through my cur - tains 



5. As 



your bright and 



ti 



ny spark Lights the trave - ler 



tht 




f) 


P 














poco rit. 






















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1 


II 


m — ^— 


— 





i=J_ 


—^ • £ — 


-\ ' 


'^ 




-Z * • • — 




u 


W 

are! 


Up 


a - 


bove 


^ — 

the world so 


high. 


Like 


a 


dia - mond in the 


sky. 




on, 


Then 


you 


show 


vour lit - tie 


light, 


Twin 


-kle. 


twin - kle all the 


night. 




spark 


: How could 


he 


see where to 


ffo, 


If 


you 


did not twin - kle 


so? 




peep. 


For 


you 


nev 


- er shut vour 


eye. 


Till 


the 


sun is in the 


sky. 




dark, 


Though I 1< 

r-^ — 


now 

r 


not what you 

1 1 ~i — 


are, 

1 
— * — 


Twin 


-kle. 


twin - kle, lit - tie 


star. 




■"^'"^ 


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~n 


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i — A — s — d— 


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s 


• 5 


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• II 






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From " Mother Goose's Nursery Rhymes and Nursery Songs." Set to music by J. W. Elliott, McLoughlin Brothers, Inc., Pub- 
lishers. 



74 



PATRIOTIC SONGS 



S. F. Smith, D.D. 



i 



MY COUNTRY, 'TIS OF THEE 



H. Carey 



W 



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m 



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1. My coun - try, 'tis of thee, Sweet land of lib - er - ty, 

2. My na - tive coun - try, thee, Land of the no - ble free, 

3. Let mu - sic swell the breeze. And ring from all the trees, 

4. Our fa - thers' God, to Thee, Au - thor of lib - er - ty, 



P r-f— f— ^ 



^ 



fe 



^^ 



-m=^ 



Of thee I sing; Land where my fa - thers died, Land of the 

Thy name I love; I love thy rocks and rills. Thy woods and 

Sweet free - dom's song; Let mor - tal tongues a - wake. Let all that 

To Thee we sing ; Long may our land be bright, With free - dom's 



e^ 



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w 



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pil - grim 's pride, From ev - 'ry moun - tain side. Let free - dom ring. 

tem - pled hills, My heart with rap - ture thrills, Like that a - bove. 

breathe par - take, Let rocks their si - lence break, The sound pro - long. 

ho - ly light, Pro - tect us by Thy might. Great God, our King. 



m 



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g=i= 



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i 



75 




FLAG OF OUR COUNTRY 



(For Washington's Birthday; or to follow the Salute to the Flag) 

G. W. C. Grace WiLBca Con ant 

With strong rhythm but not too fast 



te^^ 



1^=at 



^ 



^^=^ 



-^ « m-. -^ 

Stars in a blue sky, red stripes and white, Flag of our coun - try, 



i 



fe 



*('. J I n- 



3^^ 



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^ 



^^ 



3^; 



^ 



Con pedale 



* 



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free - dom and light, — Yes, we will serve thee, each do his part. 



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Copyright, 1907, by Grace Wilbur Conant. Used by permission. 

76 



Flag of our coun - try, we give thee our heart ! 




SOLDIER BOY 

Words and Music by Dora I. Buckingham 



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Sol - dier boy, 

4- 



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sol - dier boy 



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keep in 



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marcato 



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line, Keep in time to the mu - sic fine, With the col - ors that wave, 

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coun - try to save; O we greet you, our brave sol - dier boy 



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From " Songs for Children," by Dora I. Buckingham. Copyright, 191S, by Milton Bradley Company. Springfield, 

77 



SPECIAL DAYS 

THANKSGIVING WORRIES 



N. C. Schneider 

Tempo di Marcia 



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1. One night in chill No - vem - her, When the snow be - gan to fall, . I 

2. Just then I heard the pump -kins, To each oth - er they did call, . ' ' Are 



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heard the tur - key gob - bier To his chil - dren soft - ly call. — "Now 
you not ver - y sor - ry, That the time of year is Fall? — Thanks- 

4- 



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dears, you must be care - ful, For 'tis just the time of year, That 
giv - ing day is near - ing, Then the pump -kins all must die. They 



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life* 



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From " Nature Lyrics for Children," by N. C. Schneider. Used by permission of the Willis Music Company. 

78 



THANKSGIVING WORRIES 



i^ 



i^^ ^EESEgEE= g=^-^ ^E^ =|] 



tur - key meat is want - ed, For Thanks -giv - ing day is near. ' 
too must aid the Feast of Feasts, With good old pump - kin pie. . 




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!«• 



CHRISTMAS HYMN 



Ruth A. Watson, '03 



mm 



i=t 



Brocklesbury. Claribal 



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1. Christ-mas joy is 

2. Fa - ther of the 



all 
lit 



a - bout us, Thank- ful ev - 'ry child must be, 
tie chil -dren, Grate - ful hearts we bring to Thee; 



Si 



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r^r-r 



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=^—- — ^ \ r 


— ^ 1 ^— t- 


=:^=;J— 4^t-H 


For 
On 


this day of lov - ing 
this day of Christ -mas 

_^ £ ^__# f— 


kind-ness, Christ-mas gifts 
glad-ness, Guard Thy chil 

— f f— % % — [?*— 


and Christ-mas tree. 
- dren ten - der - ly. 

-^ ~t — s — ^ — 1 


g__r_ 


^ — \ — 1 — ^ — r 


L ^ 1 r ^=^ 


-E — ^f-f— f y 



From "Ring Songs and Games," by graduates of The Lucy Wheefock Training School. Compiled by Flora Clifford Kemp. Copy- 
right,1907, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass. 

79 



SANTA'S VISIT 



i 



N. C. ScHKEIDEa 

Lively 



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t&=-^ 



15=8=^ 



=ft=:ft: 



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=fei=^ 



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1. A - way up in the North-Land, Lives San - ta Claus we know, He 

2. He on - ly comes to the good child, To the one who'll say "I'll try," And 



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pES=gEii 



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pzbfi: 



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poco rit. 



is so fat and jol - ly. And we all love him so, . Just 
not to him who says, "I can't," And then runs off to cry, . Soon 



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now he's ver - y bu - sy, With toys for girls and boys, He 

will old San - ta come, With his rein - deer and his sleigh, Now 



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From " Nature Lyrics for Children," by N. C. Schneider. Used by permission of the Willis Music Company. 



SANTA'S VISIT 



i 



Slower 



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works all day and night they say, To give us Christ - mas joys, 
do your best and leave the rest, Un - til on Christ - mas day. 




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CHRISTMAS EVE 

Words and Music by Dora I. Buckingham 



=* b^ brf ^- 



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1. Now this is the Christ - mas eve, San - ta's com - ing, I be-lieve; 

2. He will be here just on time; Now I hear his sleigh bells chime; 



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Lit - tie rein - deer on their way — I wish you Mer - ry Christ - mas ! 
He has come to us at last — I wish you Mer - ry Christ - mas ! 



m m -"I "I — — m « 1- 



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From "Songs for Children," by Dora I. Buckingham. Copyright, 1913, by Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, Mass. 

81 



SANTA CLAUS SO JOLLY 



Joyfully 



ife 



I ^ ^ 



1. o 

2. He 



San 
cares 



ta Claus 
not for 



so jol 
the weath 



Loves 
Cold 



the 
or 



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*EiEEiEEE^EEE^ 



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girls and boys, 

rain or snow. 



He comes this way, With his 

He creeps thro' the house. He's as 



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bright red sleigh, 
still as a mouse. 



Packed to the brim full of toys. 
Then a - way his rein - deer go. 



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From "Child-Land in Song and Rhythm," by Harriet Blanche Jones and Florence Newell Barbour. Copyright, 1913, by 
Arthur P. Schmidt. By permission of The Arthur P. Schmidt Company. 



SANTA CLAUS SO JOLLY 



Chokus 



m^=^=^: 



Some - thing for you, 



some - thing for me, 




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In 



our stock-ings or on the tree. And he drives a - way with a 



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cheer - y call. 


"Mer 

r 


- ry Christ 


-mas 


to 


all, 


mer - ry Christ-mas 


to 


all." 




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THE CHRISTMAS TREE 



G. W. C. 



Grace Wilbur Conant 



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1 . Deep in the woods, the green sweet woods, A straight lit - tie, strong lit - tie 

2. All in the sun- light, all in the star- light, Blown by the winds so 

3. Now in our room, our own dear room. The straight lit - tie, strong lit - tie 



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tree 

free; 

tree. 



Stood stur - dy and gay, and grew ev - 'ry day; 'Twas 
In its thick green boughs the birds built their house: 'Twas 



Grown shin - ing and tall, bears fruit for 



all. This 




marcato 



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grow- ing for you and for me, 
grow- ing for you and for me, 
Christ-mas for you and for me. 



Yes, grow - ing for you and for me. 
Yes, grow - ing for you and for me. 
This Christ- mas for you and for me. 




: Children's Year," by Grace Wilbur Conant Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company. Springfield, Mass. 

84 




THE LITTLE NEW YEAR 



Abridged 

[I Allegro 



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HARRnrr S. Jemks 



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1. Oh, I am the ht - tie New Year, oh, ho! Here I come tripping it o - ver the snow, 

2. ... Blessings I bring for each and all, Big folks and lit - tie folks,short and tall, 

3. For I am the lit - tie New Year, oh, ho! Here I come tripping it o - ver the snow. 



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3 


Shak- 


ing my 


bells with 


a mer 


-ry 


din, 


So 


o - 


pen your doors 


and let me 


in! 




Each 


one from 


me a 


;reas-ure 


may 


win, 


So 


o - 


pen your doors 


and let me 


in! 




Shak- 


ing my 


bells with 


a mer 


-ry 


din. 


So 


o - 


pen your doors 


and let me 


in! 




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I 

From " Songs and Games for Little Ones." By permission Oliver Ditson Company. Words used by permission of Youth's Cooi- 
panion. 

85 



LINCOLN 



Lydia Avery Coonley 
With spirit 



Frank H. Atkinson, Jr. 



fei^ 



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1. It is of Lin - coin that we sing On this day set a - part, For 
2. We'll learn the les - son of his life, And ev - er try to be As 






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thoughts, and words, and deeds that bind His mem - 'ry to the heart, 
strong, as gen - tie, and as kind, As good and true as he. 



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From " Songs in Season," by Marian M. George and Lydia Avery Coonley. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company 
Chicago, 111. 




ST. VALENTINE'S DAY 



I 



Briskly 



a ?^°4=^ 



St. Val - en - tine's Day 



day of fun, From the 



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close of school to the set - ting of the sun ; Should your door-bell ring, you will 



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know I'm nigh. But you can -not see or catch me e - ven if you try. 

_J " - 1 . - 



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rit. 



a tempo 



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"I 1 _ 

From " Song Development for Little Children," White-Smith Publishing' Company. Copyright, 1908, by Frederic H. Ripley and 
Harry L. Harts. 

87 



WASHINGTON SONCx 



Lydia Avery Coonley 



Frank H. Atkinson, Jr. 



^^E^^^^^^^±EE^^^ 



1 — r 



1. O Wash - ing- ton ! O Wash - ing - ton ! Thy name is ev - er dear; To 

2. And we will try to learn thy ways, To do what thou did' st do; In 

3. O Wash - ing -ton ! O Wash - ing -ton ! Our tho'ts to thee are sent; Our 



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1 »- 1 1 


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/ ' ' ' 


1 N 1 ! 


2 W 


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w 


• 


9 




— -^ — -J — 


• 


~-'=^— 


9 


^ 


— 1 


h- 1 


sing 
work 
love 


of 
and 
shall 


thee, 

play 

be 


to 
on 
our 


tell 
ev - 

gift 

-- 1 


of thee, 

'ry day, 

to thee, 

^^ 1— 


We 
To 

Thou 

1 


all 

be 

dear, 

—\ — 


are 

as 

first 

\— 


gath - 

good 

pres 


ered 

and 

- i - 


here, 
true, 
dent. 


i^-—r^- 


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5 

=!?= 


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5- 


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— 'f^-= — 

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11 



From Songs in Season " by Marian L. George and Lydia Avery Coonley. Copyrighted : 
Chioego. 



published by A. Flanagan Company, 




SLEEPY SONGS 



DOLL'S CRADLE SONG 



Lydia Avert Coonley 



Frank H. Atkinson, Jr. 



M 



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^ 



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g=i->— i^ 



1. Lay your head up - on my arm, Shut your eyes, my dear; I will guard you 

2. Now for - get a - bout your play. Dreams are wait-ing near ; Do not let them 



3#: 



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1 


from all harm W 
go a - way — I 


^ — ^ — ^ — «- 

'^hile you're sleeping 
)ream, my dol - ly 


here, 
dear. 


-J — i^ — ■'^ — J- 

Stop your danc- ing. 
Stop your danc- ing, 

F^ — ^. t 


yel - low curl, 
yel - low curl. 


^: ! —^ 


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~f ■ 


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sleep, my lit - tie dol - ly girl ; Lul - la - by, lul - la - by, lul - la - by. 
sleep, my lit - tie dol - ly girl; Lul - la - by, lul - la - by, lul - la - by. 



^-^~i^3E£^ 



22: 




From " Songs in Season," by Marian M. George and Lydia Avery Coonley. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Com- 
pany. Chicago, ni. 



THE BIRD'S LULLABY 



Arthur Henry 



Alts E. Bentley 



3=^: 



^3 



s 



"Peep! 



peep 



Peep ! ' ' says the 



m^ 



lit - tie bird; 



PP 



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i 



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-*— -^ 



■'Sleep, 



i 



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sleep, ' ' 



Mur - murs the bush. 



Hush, 



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P 



Whis - pers the for - est breeze. " Rest in your 



hush," 



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^ 



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down 



nest. 



Peep 



sleep 



hush. 



^=f- 



"^ 



"^ 



From " The Song Primer." Copyright, 1907, by The A. S. Barnes Company, New York. 

90 



Word 



s anonymous 



^i-^y^Em^ 



A CRADLE SONG 



Music by F. H. Clifford, '01 



i 



i=^ 



J^Z3t 



1. There the drow - sy pop- pies grow, There the south winds ev - er blow. 

2. On - \y sweet - est songs are heard, Nev - er cross or self - ish word. 

3. Come with me, my lit - tie one, Good-night to the set- ting sun. 



|4: 



^^ TX ^ ^^ ^^J. ^ ^v' ^ ^^ ^ ^-i' ^JJ. ^ -^^ 



\ 



m^EB 



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^ 



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1&2 



V 5 



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-^ ^ W - 



^E?Et? 



1— '-trg 



There is nei - ther frost nor snow, In Bye - low land. 

Ev - 'ry heart by love is stirred, In Bye - low land. 

All the hap - py day is done, Now Bye - low ( Omit 



. . ) land. 




From " Ring Songs and Games " by Graduates of The Lucy Wheelock Training School. Compiled by Flora Clifford Kemp. 
Copyright. 1907, by Milton Bradley Co., Springfield, Mass. 




-^ 



iS^EjEEE^pt^E^ 



ROCK A BYE BABY 

Music by Annie B. Winchester 

s J \-J*-H>> 1 



EE35 



^ 



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Rock a bye ba - by on the tree top, When the wind blows the cra-dle will rock ; 




*=ft 



g^^p?^^^ ^^g=^-^^?^^r^ J Jit 



^ 



r 

When the bough breaks the cradle will fall, Down will come ba - by, cra-dle and all. 




Used by permission. 




92 



BYE BABY BUNTING 



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T^H- I 



By. 



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Ba - by Bunt 



i"g, 



Dad 



ly s gone 



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h 





^ 1 


^)^'^ J- 

hunt 




ing 


^:^-Z k= 

to get a 

1 h 


lit 


^ . 

- tie 

1^ 


vab 

r-i— 


— i^ •- 

- bit skin 

=> H= 




— P^ : 

to 


gl^: 




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4 — 


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3 


3=. 


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^ 








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V 2 rit. 



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1 



g= ^^ ^^_^ gzdj _-j - ^ , ^-X ± 



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d •- 



wrap the Ba - by Bunt - ing in. . . wrap the Ba - by Bunt-ing 



\1 



"V 2 rit. 



:fc=l: 



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iB 



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From ' Mother Goose Songs for Little Ones," by Ethel Crowninshield Copyright, 1907, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield. 
Mass. 



THE LAND OF NOD 



N. C. Schneider 
Andante 



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m 



1 . The sand - man gray steals on his way, Sprink -ling the sand as he 

2. The sand - man sings and sprink - les sand, On the chil - dren of Sleep - y 



fcf:: *1 ^' 



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r 



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t — ^—^ — I ^_^. 

goes, . . He sprink -les the sand in the eyes so bright, Un - til the eye - lids 
Town, . He sings of the won- ders of Land of Nod, As the sand falls soft - ly 




-* — ^ — ^ — » — d d - 



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rit. 



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softer 



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close, . Then off to Dreamland you will go In a ship with sails so white, And 
down , . Then as 3'our eyes be - gin to close And your head drops slowly down, You 




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From " Nature Lyrics for Children," by N. C. Schneider. Used by permission of The Willis Music Company. 

94 



THE LAND OF NOD 



* 



a little slower 



dim. e rit. 



PP 



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:^=pc 



-#—•■- 



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there you will tar - ry in the Land of Nod, Un - til the morn -ing light, 
know you have reach'd The Land of Nod, And left sweet Sleep -y - Town. 



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dfi 



MISCELLANEOUS 

THE MERRY LITTLE MEN 



EmILTE P0UI.SSON 



^ 2 — 



:«z±zjr 



Cornelia C. Roeske 



Oh ! where are the mer-ry, 



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mer - ry Lit - tie Men To jom us in our play? And where are the bus- 



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gf 



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IS 


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— 1 ^-^ ^ J^ 


— ^-| 


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bus - y Lit - 

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tie 


Men 


To help us work to - 

— ^-^^ h — ^ ^- 


1 J^ -J J ^ 

day? Up - on each hand 


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a 


Pff ' 




=ij= 


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^ ^ 


J 


«- 


lit - 


tie band For 

IS K IS 


work 


or play 


is 

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read 


- y. The 

— h ^1 


firsi 


to come 

N IS 


Is 




s^ ^ 


r r r 


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From " Finger Plays," by Emilie Poulsson. Copyright, 1893, by Lothrop, Lee and Shepard Co., Boston, 

96 



THE MERRY LITTLE MEN 



7?-^--? — ^ — r« F^ -n — h — h — t- -if^-d^^r 


— ^ — ^^ — -^ — ^- 


m — ^ — • — ^ j^ 1 — f* — • — J *-H — - — ^-— — -f^ 

Mas - ter Thumb ; Then Point -er, strong and stead - y ; Then 

^*— T- IS ^ ■> ..^ j^ — ^ ^4—=^ h J^=:^-i 


-^ — J — -^ — ^ 

tall Man high ; And 


i r%^ 1 i ^ III 

m-\ — J A — 


1 i^-^S^-^ 

N ^=1 


F^-H 1 ^ 


1 1 1 



^ 



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^^ 



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just close by The Fee - ble Man doth lin - ger; And last of all, So 



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IS 



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-^ ^^ w^ r ^ -i^=J^^ 


=^ 


— 1^ — h- 

— ^ — -^ — 


§> — ^ — • — ^ — j^ 

fair and small, The 


P5 W— 

— W 

ba - by- 

~n f*- 


-J — ^ — -^ — ^ ^1^ -^ 

-Lit - tie Fin - ger. Yes ! here are 

— sj N =i ^ — ^ — P* H ^~ 


the 


mer - ry, 




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— ^ 




ki 


=:• =td — — tj 




— 1 



w--=^^^=^=^ 



m 



^ 



w 



ry 






Lit - tie Men 



To 



1^1 



87 



^ 



our play ; 



And 






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THE MERRY LITTLE MEN 



i 



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- ^ ^ - 



ii^U==^ 



-li^ it- 



here are ■ the bus - y , bus - y Lit - tie Men To help us work to - day. 



i 



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THE CLOCK 



Rose Craig hiix 
I, Not too fast 



ita=: 



Alys E. Bentley 



1^^=^ 



15e=J!!: 



-» ^ ^ 



zarnutt 



gpM^ 






"Don't stop," says the clock, "Don't hur - ry, 

f!L-= .-^^ ^-^-^-.^^ J^-. ^w- 



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Glock striking 



L.H. l^ k 

pp staccato 



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fe 



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tick tock. Don't stop, don't hur - ry, tick tock, tick tock. 



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tick tock, tick tock, tick tock. 



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CtocA; striking 



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From " The Song Primer." Copyright, 1906, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 



MY MOTHER 



Mary Stanhope 



Grace Wilbur Conant 



Allegretto 



?BE£ 



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3 — ^ — •- 



When at morn I first a - wake, My moth - er's face I see, 

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ace. Icggiero 



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i^ed. I 



Peel. I simile 



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Smil - ing and all a - light with love. And bend - ing o - ver me. 

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When the bed-time shad - ows fall, I'm al - ways sure of this, 

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poco ri^. 



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Just as I'm drift- ing off to dreams, I feel my moth- er's kiss. 




Words from " The New First Reader, Educational Music Course," used by permission of Ginn and Company, Publishers. 
From " Songs for Little People," by Frances Weld Danielson and Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1905. by The Congregational 
Sunday-School and Publishing Society. 



FRIENDS 



Abbie Farweli. Browx 



Adapted from Myles B. Foster 



I 



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1. How good to lie a lit - tie while And look up thro' the tree! The 

2. The wind comes steal-ing o'er the grass, To whis - per pret - ty things, And 



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Ped. 



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Fed. 



Fed. simile 



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iti^i 



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1^ ^-* 

sky is like a kind, big smile Bent sweet-ly o - ver me. The 

though I can - not see him pass, I feel his care - ful wings. So 




' n=r-:=t =h 



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sun - shine flick - ers through the lace Of leaves a - bove my head, And 

man - y gen - tie friends are here. Whom one can scarce - ly see, A 



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Words used by permission of Houghton Mifflin Co. 

From " Songs for Little People," by Frances Weld Danielson and Grace Wilbur Conant. Copyright, 1915, by The Congregational 
Sunday-School and Pnblishing Society. 

100 



FRIENDS 



j ^TZZl^^^^ ^P^ 



t=t 



-KH^ 



-^ d 



kiss - es me up - on the face, As moth-er kiss - es me in bed. 
child should nev - er feel a fear, Wher - ev - er he may chance to be. 




1 r 



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Pi 



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101 




TIME TO RISE 



Lively 



E. Smith Athehtok 



mz 



bird - ie with 



yel - 1< 



bill 



ilB! 



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Hopped up - on the win-dow 

J — I — , — , — , — ^ 



r"; J J 



Cocked his shin - ing eye and 



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S^g 



^:t=1= 



eS 



:a^=^z=at 



i^zubz^ 



said: 



im 



"Ain't you 'shamed, you sleep - y, sleep - y head! " 



i 



A r 



Ir: 



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Ss 



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^oco rit. 






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;b 



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From " Four Song Buds, plucked from A Child's Garden of Verses," accompaniment by E. Smith Atherton. Copyright, 1917. 
by Carl Fischer, New York. International copyright secured. Used by permission. 

102 



THE CUCKOO CLOCK 



i 



Moderate 



fe=^: 



Words and Music by Gertrude Kaercher, '05 

^ _ 1 1_ 



^ 



?: 



I have a cun - ning cuck - oo clock, That sings all day and 



gir^ 



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tick tock; It has 



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a point - ed 

g : 



)f like this. And 



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un - del- it a bird - ie lives. It's ti - ny door is closed all day. 



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So the 


lit - 


— •— 
tie 


-4- 

bird 


— • — 
can't 


fly 


a - 


way ; 

— » — 


^ ' 

But 

Ti 


' # 

when 

-m 


the 


\ 

clock strikes 

r f 1 


^tr ;^ 


t=t= 


— t 


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1 


1 


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one an 



d two, The bird comes out and says Cuck - oo ! Cuck - oo ! 



From " Ring Songs and Games," by Graduates of The Lucy Wheelock Training School, compiled by 
right, 1907, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass. 

103 



Clifford Kemp. Copy- 



UP IN A SWING 



E. SsnTH Atherton 



i^^^^^^^EE^^i 



^^EE^^ 



1. How do you like to go 

2. Up in the air . and 



up 
o 



m a swuig, 
ver the wall. 



up 
till 



in the air so 

I can see so 



3. Till I look down 



the 



gar - den green, down on the roof 




1^ 



^l_/aJ^_J 



blue? . 
wide, 
brown, . 



^m 



Oh I do think it the pleas - ant - est 
Riv - ers and trees and cat - tie and 
Up in the air I go fly - ing a - 



thing 

all 

gain, 



T^* 9 *•- 



g^ 



m 



fet: 



^^ 



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ev - er a child can do. Oh! ev - er a child can do! 
o - ver the coun - try side. Oh ! o - ver the coun - try - side ! . 
up in the air and down, Oh ! up in the air and down ! 



^^^^m- 



1 



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^ 



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From " Four Song Buds, plucked from A Child's Garden of Verses," accompaniment by E. Smith Atherton. Copyright, 1917, by 
Carl Fischer, New York. International copyright secured. Used by permission. 

104 



WISHES 



i 



Allegretto 



Words and Music by Harvey WoaxHiNGTON Loomis 
rnp 



I wish I were a duck; I'd 




mp legato 



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EM 



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W^ 



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— ^ — '^ — '^ 

float and float and float, And then I'd be so hap - py, For I'd 




I 



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^ 



^ 



P 



know I was 



boat. 



i 



I'd like to be an ea - gle, And fly a- round up 






sempre legato 




i 



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1t=p: 



I 



high, For then I'd be 



aer - o - plane A - sail - ing in the sky. 



fe 



^ 



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T 



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From " Toy Tunes." Verses and music by Harvey Worthington Loomis. Copyright, 1911, by Carl Fischer, N. Y. International 
copyright secured. Used by permission. 

105 



SWEEPING AND DUSTING 



March tempo 



m^^^ 



Ct==3!=i=p: 



^i^ 



1. Don your cap and a - pron, Take your will- ing broom, O - pen all the 

2. Now the sweep-ing's o - ver, We will dust the room, Wipe off ev - 'ry 



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si 



e3: 



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i=^=t^-»-=|:==^^=«l?^«^^ 






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t>4 — r 



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1 


— ~9~~- tii f W~ 







— r- 


— f! — r- — w- 


1 1 


1 1 H 


win - 
dust 

r\ u 


id 

dows, 
- speck, 


\^ ^^ K t^ 1 

In the dust - y 
Brought forth by the 1 


room ; 
iroom ; 


— -m—- 

Move 

Put 


_S*^ — * • 171 

the chairs and 
the chairs and 


— W H 

ta - bles, 
ta - bles. 


zVb-* r-^ 


— *^ HW * * 


—. \— 


__^ 


^,— f^-J- 




-1 


if^.-'o—^- 


—t— 


^- 1 

T r 


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1 


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1 

1 


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— « 


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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^m 



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Gov - er all the books. Sweep in all the cor - ners. Dust in all the nooks. 
Each in prop- er place, Till the room is smil- ing, With its wont - ed grace. 



m 



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f^ 



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I I T 

m 
From " Songs of the Child World, No. 2." Copyright, 1904, by The John Church Company. Used by permission. 

106 



SWEEPING AND DUSTING 



With a big motion 


J .1 1- . , 


J. 1 1 J. 1 1 J. 1 1 

^rH ; — -jdT — 1 -. -A-. ^ 


I 


P^-t,. H -^- ^ — 

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s 



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tt r * * r-r r r-^ r 



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107 



TIRED SHOES 



Rachel Barton Butler 

Very seriously 



Jessie L. Gaynor 



Ih=455 



ii^^^^^^l^ 






I know my shoes are tired at night, As tired as they can be ; For I am ver - y 




poco rit. 



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T 



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:lt=t=^ft: 



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-^ -^- 



tired And they go ev - 'ry-where with me. Then moth-er puts them on the floor, And 



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tempo 



$ 



teS 



^ 



^^^^i^^ 



^hen she trims the light, I reach out quick and take them in My bed with me each night. 




From "Songs and Shadow Pictures for The Child World." Copyright, 1898, by The John Church Company. Used by permission. 




.108 




THE SEE-SAW 



With quiet motion 



Text and Music by 
Harvey Worthingtok Loomis 




Up, 
Rise 



downi, up, . down, This is the way to go ; 

sink, rise, . sink, Ea - sy to learn the knack 




^ ^'^''^^ observe the ti^ 



rxLf 




\ Use the pedal with skill \ Fed. 



-Ped.ijt * Fed. # 



slower gradually 




Fed.pfip\^^ 



From " Play Songs." Copyright, 1912, by The A. S- Barnes Company. 

109 



THE CHORISTER 



Clara Bushnell Castle 

„ Moderato 

wS ir^ i i r » i^ 


F=^'=^ 


^ 1 . 


Mary S. Covrade 

^ ^^ r-J-r— - 


1. A lit- tie black crick - et once 

2. He played for the bull- frog down 


lived in 
un - der 


— « W — 

a chink, — 
the oak — - 


'Cher-ry - che- rink - y ! 
"Cher-ry - che- rink - y ! 

1 


-J^#H H 


^ ^ d s — 


— 1 « 1 — =— 






=5 ^ — s ^ — 


— ai ^ ' — ^ — 




\,\} rs 




2 


Za 


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tj • • 


• 


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^- 


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Cher - ry - che - rink !" Who did noth - ing all night but fid -die and think, 
Cher - ry - che - roak ! " Who said, "We're re - mark - a - bly mu - sic - al folk." 



^ 



\ 



-^ w- 



^ 



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^=^ 



' ' Cher - ry - che - rink - y ! Che - ree ! 
' ' Cher - ry - che - rink - y ! Che - ree ! 



He played for the tree - toad her 
They did it to - geth - er be 



-^-^-^- 



-^-- 



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I 



ife3=E 



4^ 



1^ 



I 



song to be - gin, 
neath the same tree. 

I 



■ Cher - ry 
Cher - ry 



che - rink - y ! Cher - ry - che - rin ! " He 
che - rink - v! Cher - rv - che - ree!" And 

-J ^ 



r 



From "Songs in Season," by Marian M. George and Lydia Avery Coonley. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Com- 
pany, Chicago, 111. 

110 



THE CHORISTER 



^^^^^=^^=P ^ 



i^ 



^=W= 



worshiped the curves of her lit - tie green chin. "Cher - ry- che - rink -y 1 Che - ree ! 
this is the way that it sounded to me, — "Cher-rink -y ! Che-roak - y ! Chee ! 



:i 



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SHADOWS 



Allegretto misterioso 



Words and Music by Hakvey Worthington Loomis 

1 . Shad - ows from the fire - light in the cor - ner by the clos - et door, 

2. Eve - nings when I see them they are dwarf -men or they're gi - ants tall; 



m 



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-^ 



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^ 



fis 



^^ 



l¥. 



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Leap up, . to the ceil - ing, . and then squat down on the floor. 
Morn - ings, . when the sun shines, they are nev - er there at all. 
PP^ PP:S: 



S 



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g 



-^- 



mp 




From " Toy Tunes." Verses and music by Harvey Worthington Loomis. Copyright, 1911, by Carl Fischer, N. Y. International 
copyright secured. Used by permission. 

Ill 



POP-CORN MAN 



Alice Allen 

Allegro lightly 



m^ 



^i=si 



=^ 



1. There is a Ht -tie Pop - corn man lives some-where in our grate, 'Till 

2. But when the fire is dy - ing out its light up - on the wall, The 



8va. 



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^^ 



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^ 



some -one sets the fire a - light he al - ways has to wait; But 

pip, pip, pop of the pop -corn man can scarce be heard at all. Throw 



8va. 



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-* 1 — "1 «1 r-« -d- 

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^w=r=*'' 


—r — r— 


F^=^^ 


— ^ — ^r"Tr" 


-^ — ^- 


— ^ 








when the 
on a 

8va 


fire be - 
piece of 


gins to 
pine - 


— ^ — ^ — \-J - 

burn then he 
Avood then he'll 


-^ — J— 

be - gins 
come back 


=* — 

to 
to 


pop, 
pop, 




ft fe— 

With a 
With a 


#F*~^= 


* f 


, 1 _J 


-d — j r"T 


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__ 


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— r — r— 




=3 — j^H" 


-^ ^ — 




w 


^ 


— ^ H 




— ^ V— 


=i^t- 


—^ — ^ — J— 


—^ •— 


=^-= 


— 1 




^ 1 



From " Nature Lyrics for Children," by N. C. Schneider. Used by permission of The Willis Music Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

112 



POP-CORN MAN 

Poco andante 



i ^/ g ~^ ^ ^^r^=^^^^^^^ ^^ 



Pip, pip, pop and a Pip, pip, pop, a bush - el of corn pops he. 
8va 

js . ^ 




THE WINDMILL 



Lydia Avery Coonley 



Sfi=3: 



? 



Frank H. Atkinson, Jr 



^ 



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:^=3t 



:-^^==tt: 



-^o:±± 



1 . The wind - mill holds its arms so high, I real - ly think it wants to ^y ; But 

2. Deep down there is a well, I'm told. Where wa-ter's ver - y clear and cold, Turn, 



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it can on - ly turn a - round And draw the wa - ter from the ground, 
wind - mill, turn, and pump it up. And pour it in my lit - tie cup. 



^^^^: 






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^=»== r g- 






t=t 



I ^* — \ k— T 

From "Songs in Season," by Marian M. George and Lydia Avery Coonley. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Com- 
pany, Chicaga 

113 



IN A HICKORY NUT 



J, W. Riley 



G. H. Federlein 



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A wee lit - tie worm in a hick - o - ry nut Sang 




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From " The Song Primer." Copyright, 1907, by the A. S. Barnes Company. 

114 



WISHING 



Melody by 
Alys E. Bentley 
mp Fast 



Accompaniment by 
Harvey Worthington Loomis 



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From " Play Songs." Copyright, 1912, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 




115 



THE ORPHAN 



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Text and Music by Harvey Worthington Loomis 



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sing 

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From "Play Songs.' 


Copyright, 1912 


by The 


A. S. Ba 


mes Company. 
116 






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DADDY LONG LEGS 

Words and Music by Dora I. Buckingham 



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1 . Did you know that dad - dy - long-legs, Walk- ing on a Sum-mer day, 

2. But the fun - ny lit - tie snail, Walk- ing on a Sum-mer day, 



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Goes much slow - er, dear, than we do. For he walks that way. 




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From " Songs for Children," by Dora I. Buckingham. Copyright, 1913, by Milton Bradley Company. Springfield, Mass. 

117 



A TALE OF A TAIL 



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Words and Music by Harvey Worthingtok Loomis 
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Oh I should nev - er sup - pose 



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From " Toy Tunes," by Harvey Worthington Loomis. Copyright, 1911, by Carl Fischer, N. Y. International copyright secured. 
Used by permission. 

118 




MANGO PEPPER 

Words and Music by Dora I. Buckingham 



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1 . Man - go Pep-per swam out to sea ; A ver - y queer lit - tie boy was he ; He 

2. Man - go Pep-per swam out a mile, Then he came home with a hap - py smile ; He 

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said, "It is true that I . may sink, But I must know if a 
said, "I . know, but please don't think That I shall tell if a 



fish can wink, 
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From ' Songs for Children," by Dora I. Buckingham. Copyright, 1913, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, Mass. 

119 



MY DOLLIE 



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From "Song Development for Little Children," by Frederic H. Ripley and Harry L. Harts. Copyright, 1908, by Frederic H. Rip- 
ley and Harry L Harts. By permission White-Smith Music Co., Boston, Mass. 




120 



THIS IS THE MOTHER 



Froebel 

Sostenuto 



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pet of all ; Be - hold the good fam - i - ly, great and small. 




From Songs for Little Children, Part I," by Eleanor Smith. Copyright, 1887, by Milton Bradley Company, Springfield, 

121 



RHYTHMS 



LET'S RUN A LITTLE WAY 

Allegro. (Lightly.) Sempre staccato Elizabeth Rose Fogg 




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When children are happy they often say, " Now let's run." And this light, happy 
running step is full of hope. 



From " Rhythms of Childhood." Copyright, 1915, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 

132 



THE HAPPIEST SKIP 



fe 



Allegro 



Elizabeth Rose Fogg 



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This expresses the happiest mood of child-life. The lilt of the heart and the lift of the 
feet carry the body along like a bounding ball. It is a merry skip. 



From " Rhythms of Childhood." Copyright, 1915, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 

123 




ROUND AND ROUND WE GO 



Elizabeth Rose Fogg 



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Here is represented great excitement. Children sometimes whirl around singly, but 
often take hands and whirl two by two. 



From " Rhythms of Childhood." Copyright, 1915, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 



124 



THE GALLOPING HORSES 



il 



Allegro. Sempre staccato 



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Elizabeth Rose Fogg 



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Children often express vigorous, energetic moods through the common types for such 
representation. In the child's world, the usual pattern is the galloping horse. When a 
little child plays ' ' horse, ' ' he wants to go — to go like ' ' mad. ' ' 



From " Rhythms of Childhood." Copyright, 1915, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 



125 



THE TRAIN'S GOING BY 



Staccato. Slowly 



Moderato 



Allegretto 



Elizabeth Rose Fogg 




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* Play repeat presto and pianissimo. 



Children play train to go, — and go, — and go, — -as fast as ever they can. The folk 
do the same when they dance reels, and often with less imagination. 



From " Rhythms of Childhood." Copyright, 1915, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 



THE ELEPHANTS GO DOWN THE STREET 

Elizabeth Rose Fogg 



Moderato. Very heavily 



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The elephant suggests a very vivid image for the heavy, cumbersome thing that comes 
swinging along. Even the tiny ones catch the humorous character of this. 



From ' Rhythms of Childhood." Copyright, 1915, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 

126 



THE ROCKING HORSE 



Elizabeth Rose Fogg 



Moderato 



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Children may play this spontaneously occasionally. It is not very dramatic, and does 
not lend itself to very vivid expression. 

From " Rhythms of Childhood." Copyright, 1915, by The A. S. Barnes Company. 




127 



SINGING GAMES 

LOOBY LOO 



English 



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1. Here we dance loo - by loo, 



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Here we dance loo - by light, 



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Here Ave dance loo 


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loo, 


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All on a Sat - 

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ur - da}- night. 


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2. Put 


your right hands 


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Put 


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your left hands 


in. 


Put 


your left 


hands 


out. 






4. Put 


your right feet 


in. 


Put 


your right 


feet 


out. 






5. Put 


your left feet 


in, 


Put 


your left 


feet 


out, 






6. Put all your nod - dies 


in. 


Put all your nod - 


dies 


out. 






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put your whole selves 

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selves 


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Then give your right hands a shake, shake, shake. And turn yourselves a - bout. 

Give your left hands a shake, shake, shake. And turn yourselves a - bout. 

Give your right feet a shake, shake, shake, And turn yourselves a -bout. 

Give your left feet a shake, shake, shake, And turn yourselves a - bout. 

Give all your nod - dies a shake, shake, shake. And turn yourselves a -bout. 

Then give your whole selves a shake, shake, shake, And turn yourselves a -bout. 



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Directions. Children join hands in a circle singing and dancing, swaying from foot to 
foot with rhythm of the music for first verse. With second verse stand still and imitate 
action. Repeat first verse as chorus between activities. 

From "Children's Singing Games — Old and New," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, 
Chicago, 111. 

128 



SOLDIER BOY, SOLDIER BOY 



^ 



Kindergarten 



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Sol - dier-boy, Sol - dier-boy, 



where are you go - ing, Bear - ing so 



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proud - ly the red, white and blue? I'm go - ing where coun - try and 



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du - ty are call- ing ; If you'll be a sol- dier - boy you may go too. 

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Directions. Circle sings "Soldier boy " etc. One child steps into circle marching with 
flag. Child sings, "I'm going" etc. At words "If you'll be a soldier boy," stops and 
gives military salute to one in the circle who then joins in marching within the circle. This 
is repeated until all are chosen. This game makes a good introduction for a military march. 

From " Children's Singing Games— Old and New," by Mari R. Hofer, Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, 
Chicago, III. 




129 



OATS, PEASE, BEANS, AND BARLEY GROW 



English 



Oats, pease, beans, and bar - ley grow, Oats, pease, beans, and bar 



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ley grow. Can 



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you or 
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or a - ny - one know How oats, pease, beans, and bar - ley grow? 



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Thus the farm - er sows his seed. Thus he stands and takes his ease, 



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Stamps 


his 


foot 


and claps 


his hands and 


turns 

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a - round and views 


the land. 
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AVait - ing for 



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Directions. Children dance in a circle with one in the center who personates the 
farmer. All the circle imitate action which may be varied. The child chosen remains in 
ring and during the singing of "Waiting for a partner," etc., chooses a child for a partner. 
They dance together while circle repeats chorus to tra-la-la. Child last chosen remains in 
circle and game is repeated. When there are many children let all the chosen ones remain in 
the circle. The outer ring is soon exhausted and all dance off together. 

From "Children's Singing Games — Old and New," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, 
Chicaga 

130 



OATS, PEASE, BEANS, AND BARLEY GROW 
Tra la la la la la la la la, Tra la la la la la la. 



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O - pen the ring and choose one in, While we 
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all gai 



ly dance and sing. 



HERE WE GO ROUND THE MULBERRY BUSH 

American 



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1. Here we go round the mul - ber-ry bush. The mul - ber-ry bush, the mul - ber-ry bush, 

2. This is the way we wash our clothes. We wash our clothes, we wash our clothes. 




Here we go round the mul - ber - ry bush. So ear - ly in the morn - ing. 

This is the way we wash our clothes, So ear - ly Mon - day morn - ing. 




3 This is the way we iron our clothes, 

We iron our clothes, we iron our clothes. 
This is the way we iron our clothes, 
So early Tuesday morning. 

4 This is the way we scrub the floor. 

We scrub the floor, we scrub the floor, 
This is the way we scrub the floor 
So early Wednesday morning. 

5 This is the way we mend our clothes. 

We mend our clothes, we mend our clothes, 
This is the way we mend our clothes. 
So early Thursday morning. 



6 This is the way we sweep the house. 

We sweep the house, we sweep the house, 
This is the way we sweep the house 
So early Friday morning. 

7 This is the way we bake our bread, 

We bake our bread, we bake our bread, 
This is the way we bake our bread. 
So early Saturday morning. 

8 This is the way we go to church. 

We go to church, we go to church, 
This is the way we go to church, 
So early Sunday morning. 



Directions, The game consists in simply suiting the actions to the words of the song, 
singing and circling to the first verse between the activities. It is especially attractive to 
little girls who love to go through the dumb show of washing, ironing, sweeping, etc. 

Old and New," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company. 
181 



From " Children's Singing Games 
Chicago. 



ITISKIT ITASKET 



American 



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kit, I - tas - ket, Green and yel - low bas - ket, I 



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wrote a let - ter to my love, And on the way I dropped it, I 



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dropped it, I dropped it, 



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the way I dropped it. 




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Directions. A popular form of drop the pocket handkerchief. To be sung in rhythm 
with the slowly moving circle. To the words " I dropped it " the handkerchief is dropped 
behind some child, who pursues the one who dropped it. The latter escapes to the place in 
the circle occupied by pursuing child when the game is repeated. 

From "Children's Singing Games — Old and New," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, 
Chicago, 111. 

132 



IN THE SPRING 



French 



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1. In the spring, in 

2. On the bridge, on 



the spring, Dane - ing 
the bridge, Dane - ing 



gai 
gai 



ly, danc - ing 
ly, danc - ing 



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gai - ly, In the spring, in the spring, Danc-ing gai - ly as we sing, 
gai - ly. On the bridge, on the bridge, Danc-ing gai - ly as we sing. 




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Chil - dren all do this 
Gentle-man all do this 



way. Then a - gain do that way. 
way, Then a - gain do that way. 




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Directions, Here are given both settings, the old French version and a modern 
adaptation. Social courtesies are imitated in the French setting. With the words " In the 
spring," children's games, jumping rope, kites, marbles, rolling hoop, etc, may be imitated. 
Also the activities of home, farm, and garden represented. With change of season we may 
have summer, fall, and winter occupations. 

Children join hands and circle to the right for first half of song then reverse to left. 
One child in the center sings and gives gesture. Then all imitate while singing last two lines. 
Repeat refrain while a new child is chosen. 

From " Children's Singing Games — Old and New," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company 
Chicago, 111. 

133 




i 



Moderato 



FOLK GAMES AND DANCES 
GREETING AND MEETING 



Swedish 



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How - d'ye do, my part 



How - d'ye do 



to 



day ; 



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Will you dance 



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cle. 



I will show you the way. 



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Repeat with chorus la la for skip 

A very good game with tohich to organize a large number of small children. Introduce the 
game hy letting one child choose a partner and then both choose^ etc. , until all are chosen. Even 
the smallest will soon he able to play the game in the form given below. 

I. Form two circles by having all the children take partners, then turn and face each 
other in the circle one in and the other out. 

II. According to Swedish directions, the outside children bow to inside children to the 
first two measures ; inside bow to outside to next two. At "Will you dance," etc., join 
right hands, shaking them, cross with left and skip to the repeat with la. In the usual way, 
both children bow together twice. 

III. At the close, childi-en bow to each other and both step forward one to the left, 
which makes change of partner atid then dance is repeated. Observe time of last two 
measures. 

From " Popular Folk Games and Dances," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, Chicago, III 

134 



I SEE YOU 



Swedish 



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I see you, I see you ; Tra la la la la la la la la la la la la, If 



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I see you then you see me If 


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I take you then you take me. 


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you see me then I see you, If 



take me then I take you. 



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This ^^ Peek-a-boo " game can he played in a circle xvith partners, or children arranged in 
four lines facing' towards center and playing with alternate lines. See some book on Swedish 
games. 

I. For the circle let partners stand either behind each other or facing, with hands on 
hips playing in opposite direction. Let the movement be made at the waist — waist bending. 

II. In the second figure join hands alternately "peeping " front and back of the arm 
movements, head thrown back, arms front, arms pointing back, head thrown forward. 
Change partners by outside ring stepping forward to the left. Be careful to center bending 
movement in waist not neck. 

From " Popular Folk Games and Dances," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, Chicago, 




135 




ENGLISH MAY GAME 



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1. Here we come gath- er - ing boughs in May, Boughs in May, boughs in May: 



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Here we come gath -er - ing boughs in May, This cold and frost - y 



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This old Engi'rsh JolJc game is supposed to symbolize the conflict between summer and winter. 

2. Whom will you have for your bough in May, etc. 

3. We Mall have Mary for our bough in May, etc. 

4. You may have Mary for your bough in May, etc. 

5. Whom will 3 ou have to pull her away, etc. 

6. We will have Katie to pull her away, etc. 

I. The children form in two lines of equal length, facing each other with sufficient space 
between to admit of their walking backward, and forward. The two lines sing alternating 
verses, marching as they sing. 

II. At the end of the sixth verse a handkerchief is thrown on the ground, and the two 
children matched against each other join hands ( right ) and endeavor to pull each other over. 
The child pulled over is the captured bough and joins the side of the capturers. 

ni. The game is then again started by the victorious line. This is repeated until all 
have been chosen and the game may be ended by a grand tug of war. 

The word bough is also interpreted "knots " and its corrupt form "nuts" in May is 
drawn from this. The words are chanted to the well known air of the ' ' Mulberry Bush. ' ' 
The game should be sung without piano accompaniment as in village play. 

From " Popular Folk Games and Dances," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, Chicago. 



136 



RABBIT IN THE HOLLOW 



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Rab-bit in the hoi 

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■ low sits 

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and 


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sleeps. 


Hun - ter in the 


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for - est near - er creeps. 



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Lit- tie rab- bit, have a care. Deep with-in the 



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hoi - low there, Q 


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uick -ly to your 


home you must 


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run, run, 
hop, hop, 
hide, hide, 

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run. 
Kop. 
hide. 

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This game has many versions, of which the above is one of the most acceptable. 

I. One child crouches in the center of the ring while the hunter roams without. The 
children in the ring chant and march around. 

II. When they come to " run, run, run," the hunter from without breaks through while 
the rabbit escapes and is pursued. If caught he becomes the hunter while another child is 
chosen for the rabbit. 

III. "Hop, hop, hop," "hide, hide, hide," are actions for other verses which the child 
in center must imitate. At "hide" all the children seek to shield the rabbit while the 
hunter must break through and the chase is again made. 

From " Popular Folk Games and Dances," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A Flanagan and Company, 
Chicago, lU. 




FRENCH FLOWER ROUND 



Gracefully 



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1st Cho. Pret-ty gard-ners, where are you go - ing, On this pleas-ant sum-mer day? 
2nd Cho. To the mead-ows now we are go - ing,Search-ing for the flow -ers gay. 



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For the flow'rs so fresh and pret - 

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to plant 

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in our gar - den 
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gay. 


All 
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to - geth - er let us fol - low Search - ing 


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for 


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the flow'rs so 


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gay, All to - geth - er let us fol - low, Search-ing flow'rs so gay. 




This is one of the most delightfid of the French rounds, abridged and condensed into prac- 
tical playground form. 

I. Children form in two lines, the first chorus advances and sings "Pretty gardeners," 
etc. The second chorus responds with "To the meadows," etc., also advancing and return- 
ing to place. 

II. Partners from opposite lines then join hands and turn once around. Hands remain- 
ing joined, all skip forward into a circle which finishes with grand right and left to Tra-la-la. 

III. At close of repeat, the circle again resolves itself into lines, the children plucking 
flowers on their return. 



From " Popular Folk Games and Dances," by Mari R. Hofer. Copyrighted and published by A. Flanagan Company, Chicago, 
111- 138 



RHYTHMIC ACTION PLAYS AND DANCES 

HERE WE GO ON A MERRY-GO-ROUND 

Irene E. Phillips Moses American 

Lively 



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Here we go on a mer -ry - go-round, mer - ry - go-round, mer - ry - go-round. 



1st 



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we go on a mer - ry - go-round, on a li - on or 



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This is the way 


we start 


to move, 


start to move. 


start 


to move. 


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This is the way we start to move, on a li - on or 



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Formation. — ^ single circle facing inxcard caul clasping hands. 

1 Here we go on a merry-go-round, merry-go-round, merry-go-round. 
Here we go on a merry-go-round on a lion or a pony. 

All slide sideways right, around circle. 

2 This is the way we start to move, start to move, start to move. 
This is the way we start to move on a lion or a pony. 

Place right foot forward, alternately sway the weight to right and left foot, pointing the 
toe of the opposite foot. Hold arms bent as if holding reins. 

3 This is the way we hurry up, hurry up, hurry up. 
This is the way we hurry up on a lion or a pony. 

Maintaining the same position of the feet, leap forward on the right foot, raising the 
left leg backward; leap backward on the left foot and raise right foot forward. Continue 
alternately leaping forward and backward. The music should be played a little faster for 
this verse. 

4 This is the way we snatch a ring, snatch a ring, snatch a ring. 
This is the way we snatch a ring on a lion or a pony. 

Reach diagonally upward with right hand and in time to the music, snatch an imagi- 
nary ring with the index finger crooked. 

From " Rhythmic Action Plays and Dances," by Irene E. Phillips Moses. Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company, Spring- 
field, Mass. 



HIPPITY HOP TO THE BARBER SHOP 

Arranged by Mae Rehberg Scheuerman 



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Hip - pi - ty hop to the bar - ber shop To buy a stick of can - dy, 



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One 


for you 


and 


one 


for me, 

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And 


one 


for 


sis - 

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ter 


An 


- nie. 




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FoRMATiox. — Double circle, partners clasping' hands and facing' in line of direction. 

Hippity hop to the barber shop 
To buy a stick of candy, 
Hippity hop to the barber shop 
To buy a stick of candy, 
Hippity hop forward beginning with right foot and swinging clasped hands backward 
and forward with each step. Repeat. 

One for you 
Face Partner. Clasp hands and stretch arms toward partner waist high with palms 
facing upward. 

and one for me. 
Clasp hands and place tips of fingers on own chest. 
And one for sister Annie. 
Clasp right hands and hippity hop in circle around to left, and on to the next partner 
to the right. 

The changing of partners is too difficult for children at this stage of the course and 
should be given at some later date. Instead the partners may circle in place without the 
change. 

From " Rhythmic Action Plays and Dances," by Irene E. PhilHps Moses. Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company, Spring 
field, Mass. 



140 




HICKORY, DICKORY, DOCK 

Mother Goose Mae Rehberg Scheuerman 




Hick - o - ry, Dick - o - ry, Dock, The mouse ran up the clock ; The 



PS 



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clock stx'uck one and down he run, Hick - o - rv, Dick - o 



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rv. Dock. 



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Formation. — In a single circle facing inward. 

Hickory, Dickory, Dock, Stamp three times (left, right, left). 



The mouse ran up the clock ; 

The clock struck 

one 

and down he run. 

Hickory, Dickory, Dock. 



Slide in toward centre of circle, right foot leading. 

Slowly raise hands forward chin high. 

Clap once. 

Slide backward, left foot leading. 

Stamp three times (right, left, right). 



From " Rhythmic Action Plays and Dances," by Irene E. Phillips Moses. Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

141 



OH WHERE, OH WHERE IS MY LITTLE DOG GONE? 



Nursery Rhyme 



Old Tune 



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Oh where, oh where is my lit - tie 



gone, Oh where, oh 



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where can 



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cut short, and his 



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tail 



cut long. Oh where, oh 



where 



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A single circle is formed facing inward with the hands clasped. One of the players, the 
master, is in the centre of the circle. The circle moves around in line of direction, that is, 
the players slide sideways right. The master skips around the circle in the opposite direc- 
tion, holding his hand to his forehead and looking from side to side as if to find his dog. At 
the end of the verse the circle halts on the last "be" and raises the clasped hands high. 
The master also halts at the same moment and the one before whom he stops is the little dog. 
The little dog immediately turns and runs away around the circle, or in and out under the 
clasped hands. Wherever the dog goes, the master must follow the same path in his efforts 
to catch him. After he has caught the dog the master may join the circle and the dog be- 
comes the master, when the game begins anew. Should the master fail to catch the dog, 
after a reasonable chase, the dog may resume his former place in the circle and the game may 
begin again as before with the same master. 

This game helps to encourage the children to slide quickly and lightly and not drag, as 
they are likely to do at first, for all the childi'en desire to hurry past the master so that he 
will not stop in front of them. 

From " Rhythmic Action Plays and Dances," by Irene E. Phillips Moses. Copyright, 1915, by Milton Bradley Company, Spring- 
field, Mass. 

142 



1137 0117732 2 



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WHBELOGK COLijJi'^^ Wheelock College Library 



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Songs with music 



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W57k 
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Songs with music 



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