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Full text of "Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute Catalog for the Academic Years 1965-1966, 1966-1967"

1895 



SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS 
TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 



CATALOG FOR THE ACADEMIC YEARS 

1965- 1966 

1966- 1967 



CAMPUSES AT 
North Dartmouth, Fall River 
and New Bedford, Massachusetts 



SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 

is a member of the 

NEW ENGLAND ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND 
SECONDARY SCHOOLS 

SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 
IS AN INSTITUTIONAL MEMBER IN THE FOLLOWING 
ASSOCIATIONS: 

American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers, Ameri- 
can Association of School Administrators, American Association of University 
Women, American College Health Association, American Council on Educa- 
tion, American Mathematical Society, American Society for Testing and Mater- 
ials, College Art Association of America, College Entrance Examination 
Board, Massachusetts Association of School Superintendents, Mathematical 
Association of America, New England Association of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, New England Association of School Superintendents. 



For all information pertaining to college admission, address: 

THE DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS 
Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute 

North Dartmouth, Mass. 02747 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



Calendar .......... 5 

Undergraduate Majors ........ 8 

Board of Trustees ........ 9 

Administrative Officers . . . . . . . .10 

Faculty . . . . . . . . . .11 

General Information . . . . . . . .21 

Admissions ......... 23 

Expenses .......... 28 

Financial Aid and Scholarships . . . . . .31 

Student Services 35 

Student Organizations . . . . . . . .38 

College Regulations . . . . . . . .41 

Graduate School ......... 47 

Undergraduate Curricula . . . . . . .51 

College of Arts and Sciences . . . . . .51 

College of Business and Industry . . . . .61 

College of Engineering ....... 68 

College of Fine and Applied Arts . . . . .77 

Directory of Courses . . . . . . . .81 

Index 141 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



September, 1965 

7— Tuesday, 9:00 A.M. 

8— Wednesday, 9:00 A.M. 

9— Thursday, 9:00 A.M. 

10— Friday, 8:00 A.M. 
13_Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

October 

1 2 — Tuesday 
30— Friday 

November 

1 1 — Thursday 
24-28 

29— Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

December 

20 — Monday 

21 — Tuesday 

22 — Wednesday 

23 — Thursday 

January, 1966 

3— Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

10- 19 

20— Thursday, 9:00 A.M. 

21— Friday, 9:00 A.M. 

24— Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

February 

22 — Tuesday 

March 

1 1 — Friday 
28— April 3 

April 

8 

11 — Monday, 8:00 A.M. 
1 9 — Tuesday 

May 

2-31 
16-26 



Freshman Registration 
Upper-class Registration 
Freshman Orientation 
Freshman Testing 
Fall Semester Begins 

Columbus Day — Holiday 
Mid-semester Grade Report 

Veteran's Day — Holiday 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Classes Resume 

Wednesday Schedule of Classes 
Thursday Schedule of Classes 
Friday Schedule of Classes 
Christmas Recess Begins 

Classes Resume 
Fall Semester Examinations 
Upper-class Registration 
Freshman Registration 
Spring Semester Begins 

Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

Mid-semester Grade Report 
Spring Recess 

Good Friday — Holiday 
Classes Resume 
Patriot's Day — Holiday 

Advanced Summer School 

Registration 
Spring Semester Examinations 



5 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR — Continued 



June 



July 



1-7 

1 2 — Sunday 

1 3 — Monday 

4 — Monday 
9 — Saturday 

1 1 — Monday 

1 2 — Tuesday 

1 5 — Friday 

1 9 — Tuesday 
23 — Saturday 



August 



9 — Friday 



September 

6— Tuesday, 9:00 A.M. 

7— Wednesday, 9:00 A.M. 

8— Thursday, 9:00 A.M. 

9— Friday, 8:00 A.M. 
12— Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

October 

1 2 — Wednesday 
29— Friday 

November 

1 1 — Friday 
24-27 

29— Monday, 8:00 A.M. 



Registration for the First Summer 

Session 
Commencement 
First Summer Session Begins 

Independence Day, no classes 
Make-up classes for Monday 
holiday 

Registration for the Second Sum- 
mer Session 

Registration for the Second Sum- 
mer Session 

Final examinations and close of the 
First Session 

Second Summer Session Begins 

Make-up classes for Monday 
schedule 



Final examinations and close of the 
Second Summer Session 



December 



9 — Monday 



Freshman Registration 
Upper-class Registration 
Freshman Orientation 
Freshman Testing 
Fall Semester Begins 



Columbus Day — Holiday 
Mid-Semester Grade Report 



Veteran's Day — Holiday 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Classes Resume 



Christmas Recess Begins 



6 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



Continued 



January, 1967 

3 — Tuesday 
1 1 — Wednesday 

16-25 

26 

27 

30— Monday, 8:00 A.M. 

February 

22 — Wednesday 

March 

1 — Friday 



April 



May 



June 



24 
2-9 

1 — Monday 
1 9 — Wednesday 



1 7 — Wednesday 
22-30 



11 



Classes Resume 

Last day of Classes for 

Fall Semester 
Fall Semester Examinations 
Upper-class Registration 
Freshman Registration 
Spring Semester Begins 

Washington's Birthday — Holiday 

Mid-Semester Grade Report 
Good' Friday — Holiday 

Spring Recess 
Classes Resume 
Patriot's Day — Holiday 

Last Day of Classes 

Spring Semester Examinations 

Commencement 



7 



UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Biology Chemistry 

Economics English 

Foreign Languages History 

Mathematics Medical Technology 

Physics Political Science 

Pre-Medical Sociology 
Psychology 

College of Business and Industry 

Accounting Business Administration 

Textile Chemistry Textile Technology 

College of Engineering 

Civil Engineering Electrical Engineering 

Industrial Engineering Mechanical Engineering 

College of Fine and Applied Arts 

Visual Design Painting 

Textile Design 

GRADUATE PROGRAMS 

Textile Chemistry 
Textile Technology 
Visual Design 



8 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



William F. Long, Jr., A.B., LL.B., Chairman 
42 Moore Street, Fall River, Mass. 

James Pilkington, Vice Chairman 

1032 Drift Road, Westport, Mass. 

Lydia B. Nunes, LL.B., LL.M., Secretary 
97 Hillman Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

Philip J. Assiran, LL.B., Treasurer 

17 Ashland Street, Taunton, Mass. 

George E. Carignan, M.S. 

1 1 1 Harvard Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

William F. Carney 

33 Summit Avenue, North Dartmouth, Mass. 

Joseph Dawson, Jr., M.S., D.Tex. Sc. 

131 Elm Street, South Dartmouth, Mass. 

Arthur E. Fitzgerald, E.E., S.M., ScD. 
9 Smith Avenue, Lexington, Mass. 

Albert G. Hamel, A.B., M.D. 

1918 Acushnet Avenue, New Bedford, Mass. 

PaulO. LaBelle, Jr.,B.S.,O.D. 

20 Ryder Street, North Dartmouth, Mass. 

Robert J. Nagle, B.S., Ed.M. 

309 Doherty Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Robert W. Nelson, B. Sc., Ch.E., M.Sc.Ch.E. 
37 Prospect Street, Attleboro, Mass. 

Ralph A. Roberts, LL.B. 

175 Hemlock Street, Fall River, Mass. 

Joseph M. Souza, A.B., M.S. 

25 Junior Street, New Bedford, Mass. 

Hon. Sherwood J. Tarlow, LL.B. 

100 Puritan Lane, Swampscott, Mass. 



ADMINISTRATION 



Joseph Leo Driscoll, B.A., M.A.T., Ed.D., President 
B.A., M.A.T., Ed.D. Harvard University 

John E. Foster, B.S., Sc.D., Sc.D. in Ed., Chancellor, 
Dean of the College of Engineering 
B.S. University of Vermont; Sc.D. (Honorary) Calvin 
Collidge College of Liberal Arts; Sc.D. in Ed. (Honorary) 
New Bedford Institute of Technology 

William J. Holland, B.S., Provost, Dean of the College of 
Business and Industry 
B.S. Harvard University 

Samuel A. Stone, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the College of 

A rts and Sciences 

B.S., M.S. University of New Hampshire; Ph.D. Boston 
University 

Theodore P. Mead, B.F.A., M.A., Dean of the College of 
Fine and Applied Arts 

B.F.A. Pratt Institute; M.A. Columbia University 

Augustus Silva, A.B., A.M., Dean of Students 

A. B. New York University; A.M. Columbia University 

Roger J. Canuel, B.S., Registrar 

B. S. Bradford Durfee College of Technology 

Warren M. Holt, B.S., M.Ed., Director of Admissions 

B.S. University of Massachusetts; M.Ed. Bridgewater 
State College 

J. Louis Roberts, B.S., Director of Physical Plant 
B.S. New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Louis J. Robitaille, B.S., M.Ed., Director of Special Programs 
B.S. Providence College; M.Ed. Boston University 

Basil Castaldi, A.B., A.M., Ed.D., Director of Building Development 

A. B., A.M. Clark University; Ed.D. Columbia University 

James Flanagan, B.S., Placement Officer 

B. S. Bridgewater State College 

Walter E. Marston, B.S., Ed.M., Placement Officer 
B.S., Ed.M. Bridgewater State College 



10 



FACULTY 



Adams, Dickinson W., Instructor in History 
B.A. 1955 Harvard College 

Ahearn, Marie L., Assistant Professor of English 

A.B. 1953 Regis College; Ed.M. 1958 Tufts University; 
A.M. 1961 Boston College; Ph.D. 1965 Brown University 

Alpert, Frederic, Instructor in Business Administration 

A. B. 1954 Dartmouth College; M.B.A. 1955 Amos Tuck 
School of Business Administration, Dartmouth College 

Arnold, Everett S., Assistant Professor of Textiles 

B. S. 1953 Bradford Durfee College of Technology; 
M.S. 1961 University of Rhode Island 

Aruri, Nasser H., Instructor in Political Science 

B.A. 1959 American International College; M.A. 1961 
University of Massachusetts 

Baker, Dwight L., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A. B. 1933 Amherst; M.A. 1934, Ph.D. 1940 Columbia 
University 

Bar-Yam, Zvi, Professor in charge of Physics 

B. S. 1958, M.S. 1959, Ph.D. 1963 Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology 

Barylski, John R., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. 1953 New Bedford Institute of Technology; M.Ed. 1960 
Bridgewater State College 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Beck, Clifford N., Assistant Professor of Textiles 

B.S. 1950 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Bento, Robert, Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S. 1956 Providence College; M.S. 1959 University of 
Maryland; M.S. 1960 University of Florida 

Biggelaar, Hans van den, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S. 1948, M.S. andE.E. 1951 University of Delft, Delft, 
Holland 

Booth, Robert C, Instructor in Art 

Broadmeadow, John C, Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. 1932 New Bedford Institute of Technology; B.S. 1934 
North Carolina State College; Ed.M. 1952 Bridgewater 
State College 



11 



FACULTY — Continued 



Buhl, Lance C, Instructor in History 

A. B. 1961 Kent State University; M.A. 1962 Harvard University 

Butler, Martin J., Instructor in History 

B. A. 1956 Providence College; M.A. 1957 Boston College 

Campbell, Allan L., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
B.S. 1951 Northeastern University 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Caron, Paul R., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S. 1957 Bradford Durfee College of Technology; M.S. 1960, 
Ph.D. 1963 Brown University 

Cass, Walter J., Associate Professor of English 

A. B. 1943 Northeastern University; M.A. 1947 Boston 
University 

Chandy, A. John, Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B. S. 1954 Kerala University, India; M.A. 1962, Ph.D. 1965 
Boston University 

Clark, Charles E., Assistant Professor of History 

A.B. 1951 Bates College; M.S. 1952 Columbia University 

Cloutier, Edward H., Associate Professor of Textiles 

Cobert, Jacqueline Bazinet, Special Instructor in Music — Voice 

Cobert, Josef, Director of Music 

Diploma 1949 Paris National Conservatory, France; Bachelor of 
Music 1957, Master of Music 1958 Boston University 

Cone, Albert A., Assistant Professor of Physics 

A. B. 1959Fordham University; M.A. 1961, Ph.D. 1965 
Harvard University 

Conrad, Walter E., Professor of Chemistry 

B. S. 1944, M.S. 1945 Wayne State University; Ph.D. 1951 
University of Kansas 

Cooper, Robert E., Assistant Professor of Textiles 

Cormier, Edward A., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.S. 1948 Providence College; Ed.M. 1955 Brown University 
Certified Public Accountant 

Correia, Charles A., Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S. 1960 University of Massachusetts; M.A. 1961 University 
of Mississippi 

Cory, Lester W., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S. 1963 Bradford Durfee College of Technology 



12 



FACULTY — Continued 



Counsell, Alden W., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. 1949 Northeastern University 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Creamer, David J., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. 1958 Bradford Durfee College of Technology; M.S. 1960 
University of Massachusetts 

Crowley, Michael, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. 1947 Boston College; M.A. 1949 Boston College Graduate 
School 

Cummings, Dennis E., Instructor in Textiles 

B.S. 1961 Bradford Durfee College of Technology 

dePagter, James L., Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S. 1951 University of Arkansas; Ph.D. 1958 Washington 
University 

Dias, Earl J., Associate Professor of English and Coordinator of 
Freshman English 

A. B. 1937 Bates College; M.A. 1938 Boston University 
Dumont, Lily, Special Instructor in Music — Piano 

Dupre, Edmund J., Associate Professor of Textile Chemistry 

B. S. 1948 North Carolina State College; M.Ed. Boston 
University 

Eaton, Helen, Assistant Professor of Bibliography 
S.B. 1925 Simmons College 

Felder, Joan, Instructor in Biology 

A. B. 1956 Barnard College; M.Ed. 1960 Boston University 

Fenaux, Louis E., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B. S. 1938, M.S. 1940 Boston College 

Fiocchi, Ferdinand P., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. 1937 Tufts College 

Flanagan, James A., Instructor in Chemistry 
B.S. 1 949 Bridgewater State College 

Flynn, Robert E., Assistant Professor of History 

B.A. 1960 Harvard College; M.A. 1961 Stanford University 

Freier, Jerome, Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. 1939 City College of New York; Ph.D. 1958 New 
York University 

Giblin, James L., Commonwealth Professor in charge of Textile 
Technology. 



13 



FACULTY — Continued 



Golcn, Frank Jr., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.S. 1 950 Boston University; Ed.M. Bridgewater State College 

Gonsalves, Lenine M., Professor in charge of Electrical Engineering 
B.S. United States Naval Academy; M.S. 1960 Northeastern 
University 

Registered Professional Engineer 

Gorczyca, Fryderyk E., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. 1958 New Bedford Institute of Technology; M.S. 1962 
Northeastern University 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Greenhalgh, John, Assistant Professor of Art 

Griff, Mason, Associate Professor of Sociology 

B.A. Tulane; M.A. Stanford; Ph.D. University of Chicago 

Hague, Charles J., Instructor in Business Administration 

B.S., B.A. Boston College; L.L.B. Boston College Law School 

Hardy, Bertram E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S.E.E. 1940 Brown University 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Hess, Rosemary T., Instructor in Biology 
B.S. 1960 Salve Regina College 

Higginson, Thomas, Instructor in Business Administration 

B.S. 1962 Boston College; M.B.A. 1963 Boston University 

Hoenig, Milton M., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.A. 1954 Washington University; Ph.D. 1964 Cornell 

Hoff, James G., Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S. 1960 East Stroudsburg State College; M.S. 1960, 
Ph.D. Rutgers University 

Hyslop, Gary A., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 

B.S. 1963 Bradford Durfee College of Technology; M.S. 1965 
University of Rhode Island 

Ingraham, Vernon L., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. 1949 University of New Hampshire; M.A. 1951 Amherst; 
Ph.D. 1965 University of Pennsylvania 

Jacobs, George, Instructor in Business Administration 

A. B. 1955 Harvard University; L.L.B. 1958 Harvard Law School 

John, Anthony J., Professor of Mathematics 

B. S. 1950, M.A. 1957 Boston College; M.S. 1960 Northeastern 
University 



14 



FACULTY — Continued 

Jolly, H. Paul Jr., Assistant Professor of Physics 

S.B. 1958 Massachusetts Institute of Technology; A.M. 1961, 
Ph.D. 1964 Harvard University 

Kern, Wolfhard, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.Sc. 1948 Universitat Frankfurt/Main; M.Sc. 1951 Universitat 
Frankfurt/Main; Ph.D. 1958 Universitat Bonn 

Kulkarni, Murlidhar V., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.Sc. 1951, M.Sc. 1956 University ofPoona, India; M.S. 1963, 
Ph.D. 1965 Yale University 

Laflamme, Alphee N., Instructor in Business Administration 
B.S. 1952 Providence College; M.Ed. 1957 Bridgewater 
State College 

LaVault, Rudolph L., Professor of Economics 

Ed.B. 1933, Ed.M. 1939 Rhode Island College 

Leung, Edward, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
S.B. 1955, S.M. 1955 Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D. 1962 Stanford University 

Lozinski, B. Philip, Associate Professor of Art History 

Absolutorium 1939 University of Warsaw, Poland; M.A. 1949, 
Ph.D. 1958 Yale University 

Macedo, Celestino D., Associate Professor of English 

A. B. 1953 Stonehill College; A.M. 1957 Boston College 

Marston, Walter E., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B. S. 1956, Ed.M. 1958 Bridgewater State College 

Mattfield, Frederic R., Associate Professor, Co-Professor in 
charge of Business Administration 
B.S. 1939, M.B.A. 1949, M.Ed. 1950 Boston University 

Mattfield, Mary S., Instructor in English 

B.S. 1955 Boston University; A.M. 1964 Brown University 

McCabe, Robert L., Assistant Professor of Mathematics % 

B.S. 1957 Union College; M.A. 1960 San Diego State College 

McCoy, Thomas F., Associate Professor of Art 

B.F.A. 1950 University of Kansas; Diploma 1951 Academie 
Royale des Beaux Arts, Liege, Belgium; M.F.A. 1952 
University of Kansas 

McNally, Alfred I. Jr., Instructor in Textiles 

B.S. 1961 Bradford Durfee College of Technology 



15 



FACULTY — Continued 

Mead, Theodore P., Professor of Art 

B.F.A. 1947 Pratt Institute; M.A. 1950 Columbia University 

Mehra, Jagdish, Associate Professor of Physics 

B.Sc. 1949 Agra University, India; M.Sc. 1952 University of 
Allahabad, India; M.S. 1962 University of California; D.Sc. 
1963 Universite de Neuchatel, Switzerland 

Mierzejewski, Walter E., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
A.B. 1948 Harvard University 

Mowery, Dwight F. Jr., Professor in charge of Chemistry 

A. B. 1937 Harvard College; Ph.D. 1940 Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

Murphy, Daniel J., Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B. S. 1960 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Nesbitt, Alexander, Associate Professor of Art in charge of Design, 
Director of Visual Design Graduate Program 

Neugebauer, Margot, Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A. 1952 Rhode Island School of Design; M.F.A. 1954 
Syracuse University 

Nicolet, William P., Assistant Professor of English 

B.A. 1956Bowdoin College; M.A. 1958, Ph.D. 1964 Brown 
University 

Noyi, Bronislawa Y., Instructor in Foreign Languages 

B.Sc. 1951 University of California; M.S. 1962 Canisius College 

Pacheco, Louis Jr., Associate Professor of Textiles 

B.S. 1950 New Bedford Institute of Technology; M.Ed. 1953 
Bridgewater State College 

Panos, Margaret A., Instructor in English 
B.A. 1954 Stonehill College 

Panunzio, Wesley C, Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

A. B. 1937, A.M. 1940, Ph.D. 1957 Harvard University 

Parente, Paul J., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B. S. 1954 Bradford Durfee College of Technology; A.M. 1961 
Boston University 

Pereira, Georgette, Instructor in Art 

B.F.A. 1962 Rhode Island School of Design 

Peyton, Henry H. Jr., Instructor in English 
B.A. 1950, M.A. 1951 Baylor University 



16 



FACULTY — Continued 



Picard, Hans E., Instructor in Electrical Engineering 
B.S. 1949 Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Plotnick, Alan R., Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A. 1949 Temple University; M.A. 1950, Ph.D. 1960 
University of Pennsylvania 

Presel, Donald S., Assistant Professor of Physics 

A. B. 1953 Brown University; M.Ed. 1959, M.S. 1964 North- 
eastern University 

Reardon, John H., Professor in charge of Biology 

B. S. 1948, M.A. 1949 University of Michigan; Ph.D. 1959 
University of Oregon 

Regan, John T., Assistant Professor of Textiles 

A. B. 1922 Holy Cross College 

Rehg, Norman M., Associate Professor of English 

B. A. 1939, M.A. 1943 University of Kansas; Ph.D. 1952 
Harvard University 

Reis, Richard H., Assistant Professor of English 

A. B. 1952 St. Lawrence University; M.A. 1957, Ph. D. 1960 
Brown University 

Richard, Conrad P., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

B. S. 1950 Rhode Island School of Design 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Rifkin, Lester H., Associate Professor of History 

B.S. 1945, A.M. 1946 New York University; Ph.D. 1959 
Brown University 

Roberts, J. Louis, Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. 1951 New Bedford Institute of Technology 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Robitaille, Louis J., Instructor in Business Administration 

B.S. 1949 Providence College; M.Ed. 1954 Boston University 

Rocha, Gregory F. Jr., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 

Ph.B. 1944 Providence College; A.M. 1948 Columbia University 

Rodil, Antone, Assistant Professor of Textiles 

Sasseville, Normand, Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S. 1949 Providence College; Ed.M. 1950 Boston University 

Sauro, Joseph P., Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S. 1955, M.S. 1958, Ph.D. 1965 Polytechnic Institute of 
Brooklyn 



17 



FACULTY — Continued 

Scionti, Joseph N. Jr., Instructor in History 

B.A. 1960 Suffolk University; M.A. 1961 Tufts University 

Shirali, Satish D., Instructor in Mathematics 
A.B. 1960, A.M. 1961 Harvard University 

Silva, Augustus, Professor in charge of English 

A. B. 1942 New York University; A.M. 1948 Colummia 
University 

Silveira, William A., Assistant Professor of Textiles 

B. S. 1954 New Bedford Institute of Technology; M.S. 1956 
Institute of Textile Technology 

Silvia, Manuel S., Assistant Professor of Business Administration 
B.S. 1955 New York University; M.Ed. 1959 Bridgewater 
State College 

Simeone, Louis S., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S. 1945 Northeastern University; A.M. 1951 Boston 
University 

Sniff en, John K., Assistant Professor of Art 

B.F.A. 1953 Pratt Institute; M.F.A. 1959 University 
of Illinois 

Stern, T. Noel, Professor of Political Science 

B.A. 1934 Swarthmore; M.A. 1937, Ph.D. 1942 University 
of Pennsylvania 

Stewart, Albert A., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. 1932 Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A. 1952 
Boston University 

Stickler, John G., Associate Professor of Textiles 

M.S. (Honorary) 1960 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Stone, Samuel A., Commonwealth Professor in charge of Mathematics 
B.S. 1936, M.S. 1937 University of New Hampshire; 
Ph.D. 1953 Boston University 

Sullivan, Leo M., Professor of Psychology 

B.S. 1947 Worcester State College; M.A. 1948 Columbia 
University 

Swaye, Arthur V., Assistant Professor of Textiles 
B.S. 1953 New Bedford Institute of Technology 

Tabachnik, Priscilla R., Instructor in Business Administration 
B.S. 1963 New Bedford Institute of Technology 



18 



FACULTY — Continued 

Teeter, Charles E., Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B. 1923, A.M. 1926, Ph.D. 1927 Harvard University 

Teeter, Lura S., Associate Professor of Philosophy 

A. B. 1928 University of California; A.M. 1934, Ph.D. 1951 
Radcliffe College 

Thomas, George J., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
S.B. 1939 Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Registered Professional Engineer 

Tinkham, Howard C, Professor in charge of Mechanical Engineering 

B. S. 1949 Worcester Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 1961 
Northeastern University 

Togneri, Edward P., Associate Professor of Art in charge of Fine 
Arts 

B.F.A. 1951 Rhode Island School of Design 

Tripp, Francis, Professor in charge of Textile Chemistry 

B.S. 1930 North Carolina State College; M.S. 1938, Ch.E. 1939 
University of North Carolina; B.S. 1956 New Bedford Institute 
of Technology 

Tripp, Fred R., Assistant Professor of Textile Chemistry 
B.S. 1930 North Carolina State College; B.S. 1959 New 
Bedford Institute of Technology 

Tykodi, Ralph J., Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S. 1949 Northwestern University; Ph.D. 1954 Pennsylvania 
State University 

Valente, Abel A., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 

B.S. 1928 University of Vermont; M.S. 1962 University of 
Notre Dame 

Registered Professional Engineer 

Wagner, Claude W., Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. 1946, M.S. 1949 University of Cincinnati 

Walder, Richard, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 
B.S. 1948 University of Rhode Island 

Walsh, Mary Louise, Instructor in Foreign Languages 

A.B. 1937 Regis College; M.A. 1956 Boston University 

Weeks, Walter J., Instructor in Foreign Languages 

A. B. 1962 Rutgers University; M.A. 1964 Brown University 

Whitaker, Ellis H., Associate Professor of Biology 

B. S. 1930 Worcester Polytechnic Institute; M.S. 1936, 
Ph.D. 1949 Cornell University 



19 



FACULTY — Continued 



Wild, William C. Jr., Professor of Business Administration, 
Co-Professor in charge of Business Administration 
B.S. 1942 Bridgewater State College; M.B.A. 1960 
Northeastern University 

Williams, Eugene R., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
B.S. 1942 Northeastern University; M.Ed. 1955 Rhode Island 
College 

Wilson, James L., Associate Professor of English 

B.A. 1931 University of Oklahoma; M.A. 1939 Yale University; 
Ph.D. 1947 University of North Carolina 

Winter, Frederick, Professor of English 

A. B. 1930 Clark University; M.A. 1949 University of 
New Hampshire 

Wolock, Fred W., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B. S. 1947 College of the Holy Cross; M.S. 1948 Catholic 
University of America; Ph.D. 1964 Virginia Polytech. 
Institute 

Wu, Chang Ning, Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A. 1956 Hartwick College; M.S. 1962, Ph.D. 1964 State 
University of Iowa 

Wu, Yung-Kuang, Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering 

B.S. 1956 National Taiwan University; M.A. 1960 Kansas State 
University; Ph.D. 1965 University of Michigan 

Zerbone, Vivian M., Assistant Professor of Foreign Languages 
Diploma 1927 Grenoble University of France; Diploma 1928 
Sorbonne, Paris, France; A.B. 1929 Smith College; 
M.A. 1936 Boston University 



20 



SOUTHEASTERN MASSACHUSETTS 
TECHNOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 

The Southeastern Massachusetts Technological Institute is a 
publicly supported coeducational institution of higher learning offer- 
ing programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science, Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Fine Arts, Bachelor of Business Administration, 
Master of Science and Master of Fine Arts. 

The Institute is situated in North Dartmouth, a town of 17,000 
bordering Buzzards Bay and proximate to the major cities of South- 
eastern New England and the cultural and recreational resources 
of the region. SMTI also operates campus centers at Fall River 
and New Bedford. 

Admission is open to residents and non-residents of the com- 
monwealth who can meet the entrance requirements. Instruction is 
given in the colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business and Industry, 
Engineering, and Fine and Applied Arts and in the Graduate School. 
The Institute also plays a role in the economic life of the region 
through the SMTI Research Foundation, which makes professional 
and technical services available to commerce and industry. 

SMTI was created in 1960 by an act of the General Court on 
the recommendation of the governor to provide a diversified educa- 
tional program for the Southeastern Massachusetts area and for the 
Commonwealth. In enacting this legislation, the General Court 
directed that SMTI assume the responsibilities of two existing colleges 
in the area — Bradford Durfee College of Technology and the New 
Bedford Institute of Technology. 

The consolidation of these institutions into SMTI was effected 
in 1964 and since that time the Institute has been engaged in an in- 
tensive program of development. 

One aspect of this development has been enrichment of the 
curriculum. In September of 1965, bachelor's degree programs 
in the humanities and social sciences were instituted to complement 
existing programs in engineering, the sciences, business administra- 
tion, textile technology and the fine and applied arts. 

Perhaps the most exciting developments at SMTI during the 
past several years have taken place on the new campus under con- 



21 



struction on a wooded 730-acre site in North Dartmouth. The 
campus, with its functional master plan and ruggedly handsome build- 
ings designed by architect Paul Rudolph, is being rushed to comple- 
tion to keep pace with the steadily rising demand for college admis- 
sion. Studies indicate that SMTTs enrollment will climb to more 
than 3,000 full-time students by 1967 and to more than double 
that number by the early 1970's. 

The first classroom building, to house programs in the human- 
ities, social sciences, business administration, and fine and applied 
arts, will be occupied in early 1966. Following over the next 
several years will be buildings for the natural and physical sciences, 
engineering and textile technology, an auditorium-administration 
building, a library-communications center that will include computer 
facilities, a research building, a student union, a physical education 
building, and dormitories. 

In addition, the beautifully landscaped campus will contain 
parking facilities for 2,000 automobiles and playing fields for all 
the major sports. Thus, SMTI's students will be able to pursue a 
wide range of programs in an exceptionally stimulating and har- 
monious academic environment. 



22 



ADMISSIONS 



Application for admission will be reviewed by the Director of 
Admissions and the Admissions Committee. The applicant prior 
to admission must have completed secondary school satisfactorily. 
A significant portion of the applicant's secondary school courses 
must have been of college preparatory quality and substance. 

APPLICATION PROCEDURE 

Requests for application forms should be addressed to the 
Director of Admissions, Southeastern Massachusetts Technological 
Institute, North Dartmouth, Massachusetts. 

Before June 15 (preferably early in the senior year) each 
applicant must file with the Director of Admissions: 

1. A formal application. 

2. His scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. 

3. His scores on two or more Achievement Tests. 

4. A transcript of his secondary school record. 

5. A recommendation from his secondary school prin- 
cipal. 

6. A $10 application fee. 

An applicant for one of the curricula in the College of Fine 
and Applied Arts must submit samples of original art work. 

Scholastic Aptitude Test 

All applicants for admission are required to take the Scholastic 
Aptitude Test given by the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Information concerning examination dates and procedures for taking 
this test may be secured from secondary school guidance directors or 
directly from the College Entrance Examination Board, P. O. 592, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

The Achievement Tests 

All applicants are required to take at least two achievement 
tests as specified below. 

Applicants who plan to major in Mathematics, Chemistry (in- 
cluding Textile Chemistry), or Physics must take the Level I Mathe- 
matics Achievement Test and a language achievement test. Appli- 
cants seeking admission to other programs in the College of Arts 
and Sciences must take a language achievement test and at least one 
other achievement test of his own choosing. 



23 



Applicants seeking admission to the College of Engineering 
must take the Level I Mathematics Achievement Test and at least 
one other. 

Applicants planning to major in Business Administration or 
Accounting must take a language achievement test and at least 
one other. 

Applicants seeking admission to the College of Fine and Ap- 
plied Arts or to the Textile Technology Curriculum may select any 
two or more achievement tests. 

The foreign language achievement test requirement shall apply 
only to those students who intend at SMTI to continue study in a 
language previously studied in secondary school. Students in this 
category must present, as a part of their application for admission, 
the results of a College Entrance Examination Board achievement 
test in the specific language they have chosen. The results of the 
language achievement test are to be used for placement purposes only. 

This modification of policy does not alter the requirement that 
all applicants must submit at least two achievement tests. 

SMTI offers courses of instruction in French, German, Portu- 
guese, Spanish and Russian. 

The Secondary School Transcript 

The secondary school transcript should be submitted to South- 
eastern Massachusetts Technological Institute by the school prin- 
cipal, along with his recommendation, on the form attached to the 
application blank. It is the responsibility of the applicant to see 
that this completed form is submitted to SMTI. The transcript 
should include the academic record of the applicant for the ninth, 
tenth, eleventh, and the first marking period of the twelfth grade, 
and his class standing for those years. If the applicant attended 
more than one secondary school, he should send transcript forms to 
the principal of each school attended. It is the responsibility of the 
applicant to see that transcripts for his complete secondary school 
record are submitted to SMTI. 

Interviews 

Interviews are not required of all students. In cases in which 
the Director of Admissions feels that an interview is advisable, he 
will so inform the applicant. Applicants who wish to initiate an 
interview may do so by writing to the Director of Admissions. 



24 



Foreign Students 

Complete applications (including official transcripts of sec- 
ondary school records) from students who are residents of other 
countries must be received at the college before February 1, in order 
to be considered for entrance the following September. Such appli- 
cants must also submit a statement from a school official certifying 
that the applicant can speak, write, and read English at a fluency 
level sufficient to do college work in the English language. 

Transfer Students 

Applicants who wish to transfer to SMTI from an approved 
college must follow the application procedure as outlined above. In 
addition, applicants for transfer must submit official transcripts of 
their records in all post-secondary schools attended. Applicants will 
be considered for second semester admission only if they have satis- 
factorily completed at least the first semester of the program to 
which they seek admission. December 31 shall be the deadline for 
the receipt of application, complete in every detail, for the Spring 
Semester. 

Successful Candidates 

The successful candidates must submit a $25.00 matriculation 
fee and a report of physical examination made by a physician of the 
student's choice upon a form supplied by SMTI. The $25.00 fee 
is not refundable, but will be credited to the student's account. 

The matriculation fee and physical report must be submitted 
within 30 days of the date of acceptance or a written request for an 
extension of time for said fee and report must be submitted. 

Course Requirements 

Minimum course requirements for all applicants: 

1. At least twelve units of college preparatory courses. 

2. Four units of English. 

3. Two units of social science (one must be in U. S. 

history). 

4. Two units of mathematics. 

5. One unit of natural science. 

6. Two units of the same foreign language. 



25 



Additional course requirements: 

Applicants seeking admission to programs in Engineering, 
Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Textile Chemistry 

1 . Three and one-half units in College Preparatory Mathe- 
matics which must include at least two units in Alge- 
bra and one-half unit in Trigonometry. 

2. Natural Science entrance requirements of Physics and 
Chemistry, one of which must be a laboratory course 
or three units in Natural Science, one of which must 
be a laboratory course in Physics or Chemistry. 

Applicants seeking admission to programs in Biology, 
Medical Technology, Pre-Medical and Textile Technology. 

1 . Three units of College Preparatory Mathematics which 
must include two years of Algebra. 

2. Two years of Natural Science. 

Applicants seeking admission to Business Administration 
and Accounting 

1. Three units of College Preparatory Mathematics which 
must include two units of Algebra. 

A person of extraordinary promise and talent may request 
admission although he or she does not meet exactly every require- 
ment specified above. Only under most unusual circumstances, 
however, would the Director of Admissions favorably consider such 
an application. 

Adult Applicants 

In the case of adult applicants the committee may waive some 
of the usual requirements. An adult applicant is anyone who has 
reached his twenty-first birthday by December 31 of the year prior 
to making application. 

Quality Requirements 

To be accepted for admission into any program of study at 
SMTI, the applicant's secondary school academic record must in- 
dicate a quality of achievement which SMTI considers adequate as 
preparation for doing work on a college level, and his scores on the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test must indicate a capacity for such work. 

Special quality standards may be required for admission into 
departments in which certain aptitudes and preparation are of 
prime importance to the curriculum. 



26 



Special Students 



Qualified students who wish to take college level courses but 
do not wish to work toward a degree at SMTI may apply for admis- 
sion in the manner described above. Some of the entrance require- 
ments may be waived by the Director of Admissions for such appli- 
cants. If accepted for admission, special students will have no class 
standing and will not be considered candidates for degrees at SMTI. 
Admission will be based upon the amount of available space and 
the applicants' maturity, seriousness of purpose, and preparation 
for the work to be undertaken. 



27 



EXPENSES 



Application Fee 

A formal application for admission must be accompanied by 
a $10 application fee by check or money order made payable to 
SMTI. This fee is not refundable, but will be applied toward tuition 
if the student matriculates. 

Matriculation Fee 

A student who has been accepted for admission must submit 
a $25 matriculation payment by check or money order made payable 
to SMTI. Students who fail to make this payment before the due 
date will not be allowed to matriculate. This payment is not re- 
fundable, but will be applied toward tuition if the student matriculates. 

Tuition 

The tuition charge for students who are residents of Massa- 
chusetts and who are registered for ten or more credits is $100 
per semester; for all others who are likewise registered for ten or more 
credits the charge is $300 per semester. Students who register for less 
than ten semester credits will pay tuition at the rate of $10 per 
credit if a Massachusetts residents and of $30 per credit if resi- 
dence is elsewhere. 

Because SMTI is a state-supported institution, its educational 
program and facilities are made available at a low tuition rate to 
students residing in the Commonwealth. Eligibility for admission as 
a resident is determined by the following policies: 

a. A student must present evidence satisfactory to the treas- 
urer of SMTI that his bona fide residence is in Massachusetts. 

b. The residence of a minor shall follow that of the parents 
unless the minor has been emancipated. A minor student in the 
latter category, shall, in addition to the requirements respecting 
residence, present satisfactory documentary evidence of such eman- 
cipation. Minors under guardianship shall present documentary evi- 
dence of the appointment of the guardian as well as certification of 
residence of the guardian in the Commonwealth. 

c. A student shall not be considered to have gained residence 
in Massachusetts by reason of attendance at SMTI, nor shall a stu- 
dent lose residential preference during continuous attendance at the 
Institute. 



28 



d. The residence of a wife shall follow that of the husband. 

e. The President of the Institute is authorized to adjust in- 
dividual cases within the spirit of these policies. 

General Fee 

All students who are registered for ten or more credits will be 
assessed a general fee of $55 per semester. Students registered for 
fewer than ten credits will be assessed a pro-rated fee. The general 
fee will be used to help support the men's and women's intercollegiate 
and intramural athletic programs; the medical, psychiatric and health 
services; and the Student Union. The fee will also be used to help 
defray the expenses of the student government and of various school 
and class activities. The fee entitles the student to all student publi- 
cations and to a reduced admission price to "home" athletic events. 

Medical and Surgical Insurance 

An optional plan to cover medical and surgical expenses in- 
curred by a student, on or off the campus, is available to all students 
at group rates. 

Laboratory Fee 

Students taking courses which include scheduled use of lab- 
oratories will be required to pay a fee of $10 per semester for each 
course. This fee is not refundable and is not to exced $20 per 
semester. 

Late Registration Fee 

A student will be permitted to register after the designated 
registration date only with the Registrar's approval. A $5 fee will 
be assessed for this privilege. 

Late Payment Fee 

All charges are due and payable at a date set by SMTI (usual- 
ly three weeks prior to the date of registration of each semester). 
Students who are unable to make payment by the due date must 
receive permission for deferred payment from the Treasurer, in 
which case a late payment fee of $5 will be required. Students 
may not register until all charges have been paid. 

Books and Supplies 

Costs for books and supplies vary with class and curriculum, 
but $100 per year is an estimated average. First year engineering 



29 



students have an additional expense of $40-$50 for engineering 
drawing equipment and a slide rule. Students in the College of 
Fine and Applied Arts may incur some additional expense for 

paints, brushes, and the like. 

Refund Schedule 

1. Within the first two weeks from the beginning of the 



semester 90% 

2. During the third week 70% 

3. During the fourth week 50% 

4. During the fifth week 30% 

5. During the sixth week 20% 

6. After the sixth week No refund 



30 



FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS 



Scholarships, loans, and part-time employment are available for 
a limited number of needy and deserving students. Incoming stu- 
dents must apply for a loan after they have been accepted for admis- 
sion and prior to registration in September. Further information on 
loans and scholarships, including the Commonwealth Scholarships, 
can be obtained from the Dean of Students. 

LOANS 

Financial assistance is available through the Massachusetts 
Higher Education Assistance Corporation and the National De- 
fense Loan Program. 

In 1956, the Massachusetts Higher Education Assistance Cor- 
poration was organized for the purpose of aiding young men and 
women who have successfully completed one year of their educa- 
tional program and then find themselves in need of financial aid. 
Students should make application for such loans at the commercial 
bank of their choice situated in Massachusetts. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

SMTI offers to its undergraduates a number of scholarships 
made possible through the generosity of private and industrial en- 
dowments. All scholarship awards are made on the recommen- 
dation of the Scholarship Committee of the Faculty or of the com- 
mittee appointed by the individual or organization establishing the 
scholarship. 

The following tuition scholarships are available to under- 
graduates. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Scholarships 

The Commonwealth has made available, to residents of Massa- 
chusetts, ten four-year tuition scholarships. These scholarships are 
granted to both upperclassmen and entering freshmen in all cur- 
ricula. 

Ivy Circle of the New Bedford Women's Club Textbook 
Scholarships 

Several textbook scholarships are awarded by the Ivy Circle 
of The New Bedford Women's Club. 



31 



William Firth Scholarship 

A $100.00 tuition scholarship made available from the William 
Firth Memorial Fund. 

Manning Emery, Jr. Scholarship 

A $100.00 tuition scholarship made available from the Man- 
ning Emery, Jr. Memorial Fund. 

Acushnet Process Scholarships 

Two $100.00 tuition scholarships to students matriculating in 
mechanical or electrical engineering or chemistry. Available to resi- 
dents of greater New Bedford; preference will be given to close rela- 
tives of Acushnet Process employees. 

Berkshire-Hathaway, Inc. Scholarships 

Two $200.00 awards to students majoring in textiles who have 
indicated an interest in pursuing their textile careers in New Eng- 
land. 

Morse Twist Drill Scholarship 

A $100.00 tuition scholarship to be awarded to a student in 
mechanical or electrical engineering or chemistry. Preference is 
given to alumni or active members of Junior Achievement. 

Barnet D. Gordon Family Foundation Scholarship 

A $50.00 grant to students majoring in any of the textile cur- 
ricula. 

Revere Copper and Brass Scholarships 

Two $200.00 awards to students majoring in mechanical or 
electrical engineering or chemistry. 

J. C. Rhodes Scholarships 

Four $100.00 awards to students in mechanical or electrical 
engineering or chemistry. 

Sandoz Chemical Scholarship 

A $200.00 tuition scholarship to a student majoring in textiles. 

32 



Chemstrand Corporation Scholarships 

Four $250.00 tuition scholarships are awarded to students maj- 
oring in textile technology or in textile chemistry. 

City of New Bedford Scholarships 

Under an ordinance of the City of New Bedford, five four- 
year tuition scholarships are awarded to seniors of the New Bed- 
ford High School, Holy Family High School, Vocational High School, 
and St. Anthony High School. These are distributed as follows: 
two to seniors of New Bedford High School, one to each of the 
other schools. 

Abraham S. Novick Memorial Scholarship 
A $100.00 grant. 

Allied Chemical Scholarship 

A $100.00 scholarship available to chemistry or textile chemistry 
majors. 

Abram Holland Memorial Scholarship 

A $100.00 scholarship awarded to a business administration stu- 
dent entering his junior year. 

Alumni Association Scholarships 

Several scholarships of varying amounts. 

Frank S. Stevens Scholarship Fund 

This fund, founded by Mrs. Elizabeth R. Stevens of Swansea, 
Massachusetts, provides a number of scholarships. According to the 
deed of gift, preference is given to students from the town of 
Swansea. 

Earle P. Charlton, Jr., Scholarship Fund 

This fund, founded by Mr. Earle P. Charlton, provides sev- 
eral scholarships. The deed of gift restricts these awards to natives 
of the city of Fall River, Massachusetts. 

City of Fall River Scholarships 

Under an act of the State Legislature, five four-year scholar- 
ships are awarded to residents of the City of Fall River. These 
scholarships are granted to both upperclassmen and entering fresh- 
men in all curricula. 



33 



Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 
Scholarship 

IEEE sponsors each year a $250.00 tuition scholarship awarded 
to a needy student majoring in electrical engineering. 

The New England Textile Foundation Scholarships 

The Foundation makes available each year several $100.00 
tuition scholarships. These scholarships are awarded to students 
majoring in textiles. 

The Textile Veterans Association Scholarship 

The Textile Veterans Association with headquarters in New 
York grants a $100.00 tuition scholarship annually to a textile major. 
This award is known as the Seabury Stanton Award in recognition of 
Mr. Stanton's outstanding contribution to textiles over the years. 



34 



STUDENT SERVICES 



Housing 

Dormitories are not yet available on the Dartmouth campus. 
Accommodations with private families are readily obtained. Although 
a list of approved rooms is maintained, SMTI does not supervise and 
does not assume responsibility for off-campus student accommoda- 
tions. 

Bookstores 

SMTI maintains a bookstore where text books and supplies 
can be purchased. 

Health Service 

Health offices are maintained at all divisions of SMTI. Medical 
advice and consultation are provided upon request. The offices 
are sufficiently equipped with furnishings and medications to handle 
cases in need of first aid treatment. 

Library 

To supplement instruction in the various courses, a library 
system, including approximately 45,000 volumes, is maintained by 
the Institute. 

Status as a Government Documents Depository and the de- 
mands of a rapidly developing institution with a greatly expanded 
curriculum, will change this figure dramatically within the next few 
years. 

The Library includes three divisions: one in Fall River, an- 
other in New Bedford, and one on the Dartmouth campus. Each 
is open for the same hours and subject to the same rules and regu- 
lations. Books from any of these centers are available for use by 
students, faculty and staff. A good periodical and reference collec- 
tion is provided at each location. Daily inter-library loans between 
branches can be arranged through the librarian at each branch. 

A new library implementing the latest in educational method- 
ology and machine technology is now being planned. It will provide 
one of the more modern and functional library-communications 
facilities available anywhere in the United States. 

Placement 

A Student Placement Service is maintained on a full-time basis 
to assist graduating students in securing positions in their chosen 



35 



fields. This office keeps abreast of the needs of the various in- 
dustries and passes this information along to the graduates. 

The Placement Officer arranges on-campus interviews and helps 
both the visiting officials and the students to get the most out of 
such interviews. The graduate can also find employment applica- 
tion forms of many concerns in the Placement Office. The stu- 
dent is also allowed to avail himself of the opportunity to use the 
many college directories and placement annuals that are housed 
here. 

The United States Government listings are also posted weekly, 
and many graduates have accepted positions in one of the many gov- 
ernmental departments. The government has also employed many 
of our students for summertime work in various fields. Information 
relative to such opportunities is passed on to the underclassmen. 

The Placement Service cannot guarantee employment. It does, 
however, assist the graduate in positioning himself. Its service is 
also extended to alumni who desire a change of position, particularly 
assisting in filling positions where experienced personnel are de- 
manded. 

Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association, from its social aspect, serves to con- 
tinue and renew the friendships and feelings of comradeship which 
all alumni felt as students; from a service viewpoint, the association 
serves the alumni as a focal point for placements; it serves as a 
clearinghouse for news about, and of interest to, the alumni; and 
it helps SMTI in those cases where alumni financial aid can be of 
assistance. 

The Alumni Association maintains an up-to-date file on all 
graduates. During the academic year, every alumnus receives News- 
Letters that keep him abreast with the latest information about SMTI 
and the activities of the alumni. At the end of May each year, the 
Alumni Association has an Alumni Reunion Weekend to renew ac- 
quaintances and see at firsthand the progress being made at SMTI. 

Guidance and Counseling 

A close personal relationship is maintained between the student 
body and the faculty. Through the Faculty Advisers, assistance is 
given to students during the year in the scheduling of their classes 
and in solving problems which may arise during the year. When- 
ever it is deemed necessary, correspondence and interviews are 



36 



entered into between the Dean of Students and families of those 
students whose performance is not considered satisfactory. 

The freshman year begins with a Freshman Orientation Period 
immediately preceding the Fall Term. Registration, general intelli- 
gence and aptitude tests are completed; orientation lectures on 
campus and professional life are given. Interpretive results of the 
intelligence and aptitude tests are available to the students, to the 
Dean of Students, and to the faculty advisers. 

Student Handbook 

A student handbook is given to each new student on registration 
day. The handbook contains information concerning student ser- 
vices, student behavior, scholastic regulations including the grading 
system, requirements for honors, and student activities. Every stu- 
dent is held responsible for knowledge of its contents. 



37 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



Student Council 

The Student Council is the governing body for all student or- 
ganizations. 

Business Management Club 

The Business Management Club was formed in May of 1961. 
Its membership is comprised solely of Junior and Senior majors in 
Management who are interested in broadening their business back- 
ground. 

Circle K Club 

This organization is sponsored by Kiwanis International and is 
a service organization similar to Kiwanis and other service clubs. 

Musical Organizations 

Membership in the following musical organizations is open to 
students of SMTI: Band, orchestra (small and large ensembles), 
chorus and small vocal ensembles. 

Any student who wishes to study voice or a musical instrument 
should consult with the musical director. 

The Marketing Society 

This organization attempts to acquaint students with unique 
problems and considerations in certain distributive areas of the 
business world. To do this, the officers and members employ such 
media as field trips, movies, luncheon speakers, and various com- 
pany representatives. Membership is open to all Business Adminis- 
tration students. 

Yearbook 

A Yearbook is published by and for all students at SMTI, 
and it provides for the most part a pictorial record of all classes 
and of all principal events of the school year. 

Biology Club 

This organization seeks to foster the advancement of profession- 
al awareness among students in the life sciences and to encourage 
the discussion and exchange of ideas relating to the numerous spec- 
ialties which comprise the biological sciences. Lecturers, discussions, 



38 



motion pictures, field trips and similar media of communication 
are utilized to stimulate student interest and to encourage discussion 
in the informal setting provided. 

Interact Club 

The Interact Club, whose membership comprises both Ameri- 
can and foreign students, seeks to provide opportunity for young 
men and women to work together in a world fellowship dedicated 
to services and international understanding; it also seeks to provide 
opportunities for gaining increased knowledge and understanding of 
community, national and world affairs. 

Fraternities 
Phi Psi 

Epsilon Phi Pi 
Delta Kappa Phi 
Nu Beta Tau 

Sororities 

Kappa Sigma Phi 
Chi Delta Phi 

The Americal Chemical Society 

The society seeks to encourage the advancement of chemistry 
and chemical education. The activities of the SMTI chapter in- 
clude field trips and lectures pertaining to chemistry and allied fields. 

American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists 

The SMTI chapter is a student unit of the national organization 
whose membership is open to students who are preparing for a 
career in Textile Chemistry. 

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 

The objectives of the I. E. E. E. Student Branch are to pro- 
vide an organization through which the technical development 
and the ideas of the engineering profession, outside the classroom, 
may be shared with students and to provide the student with the 
opportunity to contribute toward the advancement of professionalism 
in engineering. 

The Mechanical Engineering Society 

The Society attempts to establish and foster bonds of friend- 
ship and common interest among students in the same and related 
fields. 



39 



American Association of Textile Technologists 

The purpose of this organization is to bring about a more in- 
timate relationship between the textile industry and undergraduates 
majoring in the field of textiles or related areas. 

Geology Club 

The Club holds meetings once monthly during the academic 

year. The year's program varies and consists of such activities as 
lectures and organized field trips as well as discussional business 
meetings. 

Mathematics Club 

The Mathematics Club was formed in 1952, to further student 
interest in this subject field. The Club holds meetings once a month 
at which time either a student or a faculty member presents a talk 
on some mathematical topic. 

Newman Club 

The Newman Club is an organization of Catholic college stu- 
dents dedicated to the wider application of the teachings of the 
Catholic Faith to their private and social lives. 

Student Publications 

Torch. This is the student newspaper managed and published 
solely by student effort. In addition to publishing news events 
relative to the college and campus, the Torch makes available to the 
student body a channel for expressio nand general information. 

Talker. This is a weekly publication concerned for the most 
part with editorial comment pertaining not only to college life but to 
happenings of significance taking place within the community — 
that is, local, state, national and inter-national. 

Athletics 

The administration and faculty approve and encourage a full 
program on intercollegiate and intramural athletics. 

Varsity teams include baseball, tennis, soccer, fencing, golf, 
and track. SMTI is an active member of the National Association 
of Intercollegiate Athletics and of the Southern New England Coastal 
Conference. Future plans include varsity teams in football, wrest- 
ling, and other sport activities. 



40 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS 



PERSONAL STANDARDS 

It is assumed that a student matriculating at SMTI has at- 
tained sufficient maturity and developed those attributes condusive to 
an adequate preparation for a professional career. This means that 
the administration expects that each student will have developed an 
ability to get along well with others and to maintain a personal high 
standard of honesty and moral conduct. 

With regard to the question of personal attire and grooming, 
the administration assumes that each student will conduct himself 
according to those standards expected of young men and women 
preparing for professional careers. 

A student found guilty of cheating (dishonestly receiving or 
giving aid) in class work or in examinations or of plagiarism in any 
form is subject to strong disciplinary action. 

A student may be dropped or subject to other disciplinary 
action, for conduct not in keeping with the best interests of SMTI. 

No student or group of students in connection with any public 
performance, athletic or non-athletic, shall use any means or desig- 
nation that implies any connection with SMTI without the sanction 
of the Institute. 

Attendance 

Every student is expected to be present at all lectures and 
laboratories for which he is registered, unless a satisfactory excuse 
is presented for his absence. Excessive absences may result in dis- 
ciplinary action by Dean of the College, which may lead to loss 
of credit for a course, suspension or dismissal. 

Voluntary Withdrawal 

A student wishing to withdraw from SMTI must first notify 
the Registrar and fill out a "Withdrawal Notice" form. Failure to 
comply with this regulation will jeopardize the student's honorable 
withdrawal privilege and his receipt of official transcripts. A stu- 
dent who officially or unofficially withdraws from SMTI, after five 
weeks but before the end of the semester, shall receive a grade 
of WP or WF in each of his courses as it applies. A student with- 
drawing during the first five weeks shall receive a W in each of his 
courses. A WP indicates that the student was doing passing work 
at the time of his withdrawal from the course. A WP does not 



41 



affect the student's academic average. A WF grade indicates that 
the student's work was unsatisfactory at the time of his withdrawal 
from a course. A WF is the same as an F, insofar as his academic 
average is concerned. 

Veterans who withdraw from SMTI are urged to consult with 
their educational advisors in the Veterans' Administration. 

Academic Probation 

Any student whose cumulative average falls below 2, or 
whose average in the preceding semester falls below 1.5, will be 
placed on academic probation. While on academic probation, a 
student may not hold any office in any class, club, society or fraternity 
of SMTI. 

Registration 

On registration day, each student is assigned a room and adviser; 
this information is listed on official bulletin boards. 

No student may enter a new course later than two weeks after 
the first meeting of the course; he must obtain the permission of the 
Registrar to enter any classes after the regular registration period. 

No student shall be allowed to register for more credit hours 
(including off -campus courses) than the number scheduled for his 
program without approval of the Academic Committee. No student 
on academic probation will be granted this permission in any case. 
It is also required that such requests be submitted to the Registrar 
no later than 4:00 P.M. on the day of registration. 

All other questions pertaining to registration must be referred 
to the office of the Registrar. 

Late Registration Fee 

A student will be permitted to register after the designated regis- 
tration date only with the Registrar's approval. A $5.00 fee will 
be assessed for this privilege, if granted. 

Changes in Academic Programs 

All requests for change of major must be submitted to, and 
approved by, the Registrar. Request forms are available in the Regis- 
trar's Office. 



42 



Dropping of Courses 

During the first five weeks of a semester, a student may drop 
a course, without penalty, provided he gives written notification to 
his instructor and his adviser. A grade of W must be immediately 
submitted to the Registrar by the instructor. 

After the first five weeks of a semester, a student may drop a 
course in which he has a passing grade, provided that he receives 
the approval in writing of his adviser and notifies his instructor of 
his intention. In this case, a grade of WP will be reported immed- 
iately to the Registrar by the instructor. After the eighth week, a 
student may receive a grade of WP only in the case of extenuating 
circumstances. In such cases, the student must receive in writing 
the approval of his instructor, as well as that of his adviser. 

Repeating of Courses 

A student may repeat a course which he has passed only with 
the consent of his department head and his adviser. In such cases, 
credit shall be allowed only once, but in the computation of the 
grade-point average, the registered credit and the quality points for 
both grades shall be included. When a failed course is repeated, 
both grades will be included in the grade-point average. 

Grade Reports 

Grades are sent to the student at the end of each semester. At 
the mid-semester, a report is sent to the advisor and parents of those 
students who are in danger of failing one or more courses. 

Grades and Grading System 

Each student's academic achievement is reflected in the re- 
ports which are issued at the end of each semester. Grades are 

stated by letters according to the following interpretation and earn 
the indicated grade-points per credit: 

A— 90-100 Excellent 4 grade-pts. 

B— 80-89 Good 3 grade-pts. 

C — 70-79 Average 2 grade-pts. 

D — 60-69 Passing 1 grade-pt. 

(but unsatisfactory) 

F — Below 60 Failure grade-pt. 
W — Withdrawal No penalty, withdrawal within 

first five weeks 
WP — Above 60 Withdrawal and passing 

after fifth week 
WF — Below 60 Withdrawal and failing 

after the fifth week of 

the semester 



43 



Scholastic standing is determined by computing the weighted 
grade-point average. This is found by multiplying the grade-point 
value of the grade by the course credits. The grade-point values of 
the separate courses taken in the semester are added; the sum is then 
divided by the total credits taken in that semester. The result is 
the weighted grade-point average. Credit values are assigned as 
follows: Lectures and recitations (1 hour) 1; 2 or 3-hour laboratory 
periods have the same credit value as a one-hour lecture, viz. I, In 
effect one credit means three hours of work which may be a combina- 
tion of lecture, laboratory, or outside preparation per week for a 
semester. 

Whether a one-semester or a two-semester course, the grade 
received at the end of each semester stands as the final grade for that 
semester of the course. Quality point for the grade of F will be 
included in the student's cumulative average. An F indicates a fail- 
ure which may be made up only by repeating the course at SMTI 
or by presenting transfer credits of a grade of C or better from an ap- 
proved institution. Each failed course should be rescheduled at 
the earliest opportunity. 

Students must acquaint their advisers with such failures when 
registering for the next semester. Students are reminded that all 
courses taken outside of the regular schedule for which credit is to 
be requested must be APPROVED IN ADVANCE by the Registrar. 

A student who has received a failure (F) will not be allowed 
to register for any course for which the failed course is a prerequisite 
until such failure has been removed by repetition of the course at 
SMTI or at an approved institution. A student who earns an F the 
first semester of a continuing course must repeat the work of that 
semester before proceeding to the remainder of the course. 

An I grade must be removed by the student within a stated 
and definite period of time set by the course instructor, but not to 
extend beyond thirty calendar days subsequent to the scheduled final 
examination. Unless the work of the course is completed and the 
examination passed by that time, the I grade is converted to an F. 
When the student meets the conditions set by the course instructor 
within the time allowed, the instructor shall assign to the student a 
grade for the course to replace the I. 

The burden of removing an I grade rests with the student; in 
the event that the student does not remove this academic condition 
promptly, he jeopardizes his opportunity to graduate at the com- 
pletion of four academic years. 



44 



Transfer of Credit and Advanced Standing 

Requests for credit in courses taken at other institutions prior 
to admittance should be filed with the Director of Admissions and 
evaluated by the Dean of the College into which the student is 
accepted. Such requests must be accompanied by official trans- 
cripts and catalogs containing course descriptions from the colleges 
involved. 

No credit will be allowed for work completed elsewhere unless 
it has been passed with a grade of C or better. 

Transfer of credit will be recorded on the student's permanent 
record card but will not be calculated in the student's grade-point 
average. A student registered at SMTI, who wishes to enroll in 
courses in another college for transfer credit to SMTI must have 
such courses approved in advance by the Registrar. On the com- 
pletion of these courses, an official transcript should be forwarded 
to the Registrar. 

Dean's List 

Following the completion of each semester, the Registrar sub- 
mits to the academic deans a "Dean's List" consisting of the names of 
those students whose academic record for the previous semester is 
of high quality. Each dean submits his list, to the President, to be 
incorporated in a President's directory of scholars. 

To be eligible for the Dean's List, students must: 

1. Achieve a grade-point average of at least 3.2 for the semes- 
ter with no I grades. 

2. Carry a complete program of studies as indicated by the 
curriculum of the department, major, and year in which he 
is enrolled. 

Graduation Requirements 

To qualify for graduation, a candidate must satisfy the follow- 
ing requirements: 

The satisfactory completion of all courses in one of the pre- 
scribed curricula. 

A cumulative quality point average of not less than 2. 
Two years of residence at the Institute as a full-time student and 
firty percent of the required credits earned at SMTI. The 
senior year must be in residence. 



45 



Minimum Scholastic Standards 

A student will be dismissed from SMTI as deficient in scholar- 
ship, ( 1 ) if at the end of the freshman year the student has failed 
to earn a cumulative grade-point average of 1.2; (2) if at the end 
of the sophomore year the student has failed to earn a cumulative 
grade-point average of 1.6; (3) if at the end of the junior year the 
student has failed to earn a cumulative grade-point average of 1.8. 

A transfer student must satisfy the cumulative grade-point av- 
erage (based solely on his academic record at SMTI) of the class to 
which he is assigned. 

Financial Requirements for Graduation 

Degrees and transcripts will be withheld from students who 
have not paid all bills due SMTI. 

Transcript of Records 

Each student is entitled to three free transcripts of his college 
record. Additional transcripts will be prepared upon request at a 
charge of one dollar ($1.00) each. When a single request is for 
more than one copy of a transcript, there will be a charge of one 
dollar ($1.00) for the first copy and of thirty-five cents ($.35) for 
each additional copy. 



46 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS — MASTER OF SCIENCE 

DEGREE 

(1) Textile Chemistry 

(2) Textile Technology 

These graduate programs are designed to allow able students to 
further their studies in a specialized area. In addition to taking 
advanced courses in his field of special interest, a candidate is re- 
quired to investigate a specific problem such as might be encouraged 
in a research laboratory or textile plant and, under competent guid- 
ance, to carry it to its logical conclusion. The candidate is required 
to evaluate and interpret his findings in his master's thesis. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant must have received a Bachelor of Science degree 
in an appropriate field from a college recognized by the Institute. 

An average grade of "B" or better in the undergraduate major is 
required. 

All graduate candidates must designate a major field; no un- 
classified students will be admitted to the Institute. 

Admission will be to full graduate standing only. No provis- 
ional or special students will be admitted in graduate courses. 

Application Procedure 

A student interested in graduate studies at the SMTI should 
file an application with the Dean of the Graduate School, North 
Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02747. 

Applicants should also: 

File an application by May 1 preceding the fall term in which 
he wishes to enroll. 

Have mailed directly to the Dean of the Graduate School two 
letters of reference by persons qualified to judge the applicant's 
ability to carry on graduate work. 

Have official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate 
records sent to the Dean of the Graduate School by the insti- 
tutions previously attended. The content, credit hours and 
semesters related to each subject taken, must also be included. 
This information must be received at the Institute no later 
than the first of May preceding the fall term in which the 
applicant wishes to enroll. 



47 



Tuition 



In-State students $100.00 per semester 

Out-of State and foreign students $300.00 per semester 

Matriculation Fee 

A student who has been accepted for admission must submit 
a $25.00 matriculation payment. This payment is not refundable 
but will be applied toward tuition if the student matriculates. 

Credits 

A minimum of thirty semester credits is required by students 
for a graduate degree. Credits towards the Master of Science de- 
gree may be obtained as follows: 

All candidates for the graduate degree must prepare a thesis 
representing an original investigation. The thesis will repre- 
sent ten credits. 

No more than six transfer credits will be accepted from other 
institutions. 

Requirements for Graduation 

In order to be granted the Master of Science degree the candi- 
date must have fulfilled the following requirements: 

Satisfactorily completed the prescribed course of study lead- 
ing to the degree in the field in which the student has enrolled. 
Have passed a comprehensive oral examination to satisfy the 
examining committee that the candidate possesses a reasonable 
mastery of knowledge in his major and minor fields. This 
examination will not be held until all other requirements, except 
completing the course work of the last semester, are satisfied. 
The examination, however, must be taken not later than two 
weeks before the end of the semester in which the degree is to be 
awarded. 

Have maintained a minimum standing of "B" in graduate 
courses. 

A reading knowledge of at least one approved foreign language. 
Have a minimum of one year of academic residence. 

Must have completed all graduate work within five calendar 
years. 



48 



GRADUATE PROGRAMS — MASTER OF FINE ARTS 

A two-year program of study is arranged leading to the Master 
of Fine Arts degree, designed to prepare qualified candidates for 
professional achievement in the area of graphic design. Advanced 
design problems are presented, involving work in aesthetics, typo- 
graphy, calligraphy, communications, graphic design history, color 
and photography are undertaken with standards of absolute quality 
and significant cultural attainment as goals. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant must have received a bachelor's degree, with 
Visual Design or Graphic Design as a major, from a recognized in- 
stitution. 

The applicant must have received an undergraduate record with 
a B average; some exceptions may be made on evidence of significant 
professional performance in the field of graphic arts. 

Certain areas of undergraduate work may be required in ad- 
dition to the regular graduate program if the candidate's under- 
graduate program is found lacking. 

Admission Procedure 

A student interested in graduate studies at the Institute should 
file an application with the Dean of Graduate School. 

File an application by May 1 preceeding the fall term in which 
the student wishes to enroll. 

Have sent directiy to the Dean of Graduate School two letters 
of reference by persons qualified to judge the applicant's ability 
to carry on graduate work. 

Have official transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate records 
sent to the Dean of the Graduate School by the institutions previously 
attended. The course content, credit hours and semesters related 
to each subject taken must also be included. This information must 
be received at the Institute no later than the first of May preceding 
the fall term in which the applicant wishes to enroll. 

Submit a portfolio of the candidate's work to the Dean of Grad- 
uate School. 



49 



Requirement for the Master of Fine Arts Degree 

The entire program must be undertaken within five years unless 
extended by the Dean of the Graduate School. 

All candidates for the degree must pass a reading examination 
in a foreign language. 

A minimum of forty-eight credit hours is required of students 
for the M. F. A. 

No more than six transfer credits will be accepted from other 
institutions. 

A thesis covering original research and approved by the head of 
the department must be completed satisfactorily. 

A student must complete the program of studies as outlined 
by the department. 



50 



UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

During the 1965-66 academic year, first-year students in the 
College of Arts and Sciences may select their major fields of study 
from among the following: biology, chemistry, economics, English, 
history, foreign languages, mathematics, medical technology, physics, 
political science, pre-medical, psychology and sociology. 

Transfer students who wish to major in Economics, English, 
Foreign Languages, History, Pre-medicine, Psychology and Sociology 
will be accepted on the first- and second-year levels only. 

Majors in Medical Technology are candidates for the Bachelor 
of Science degree. Majors in Biology, Chemistry, and Physics may 
be candidates for either the Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of 
Arts degrees. All other majors are candidates for the Bachelor of 
Arts. Requirements for these two degrees are listed below . . . 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE 
Freshman English 

All first year students are required to take Freshman Eng- 
lish, a two-semester course in the basic skills of communica- 
tion, written and spoken. 

Foreign Language 

Every student in the College of Arts and Sciences must 
fulfill a minimum foreign language requirement in one of the 
following ways: 

( 1 ) He may satisfy the requirement in a foreign language which 
he has studied for two or more years in secondary school by 
either passing a second-year college course in that language or by 
passing a proficiency examination in it. 

(2) He may satisfy the requirement in a foreign language which 
he has studied for less than two years in secondary school by 
satisfactorily completing a first- and second-year college course 
in that language. 

Distribution Requirement for the Bachelor of Arts Degree 

All candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree must take 
one year of a Natural Science, eighteen semester credits in the 



51 



Humanities (six of these credits must be in English literature, 
and six must be in advanced courses), and twelve semester 
credits in the social sciences (six of which must be in advanced 
courses.) 

Major Field Requirement 

Every student must complete at least thirty semester credits 
of work in his major field and at least forty-two semester credits 
in his major field and a related field combined. Exact speci- 
fications will be determined by each department. The depart- 
ment will also determine what is considered a related field. 

During the senior year every student in the College of Arts 
and Sciences is required to take a comprehensive examination 
in his major field. 

Free Electtves 

A sufficient number of courses must be elected so that the 
earned semester credits total to a minimum of 120. 

Departmental Requirement 

All candidates for the degree will also be required to meet 
the specific requirements of their individual departments. 

Quality Requirement 

A cumulative grade point average of at least 2 out of a 
possible 4 is required of all students. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

DEGREE 

The candidate for the Bachelor of Science degree in the College 
of Arts and Sciences must satisfy the same requirements for the 
degree as the Bachelor of Arts candidate with the exception of the 
distribution requirement, which is replaced by the following: 



52 



Distribution Requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science Degree 

Six semester credits of natural science in addition to that 
required in his curriculum, six semester credits in English 
literature, and six semester credits in the social sciences. 

A student majoring in chemistry, physics, or biology may 
elect to be a candidate for either the B.A. or B.S. degree. Stu- 
dents majoring in medical technology are candidates for a B.S. 
degree. All other majors in the College of Arts and Sciences 
are candidates for the B.A. degree. 



53 



GENERAL BIOLOGY CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 







1st Year 


R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


C 


BIO 121 




♦Biology of Organisms 


3 


2 


4 








BIO 122 




Biology of Cells 








3 


2 


4 


CH 111, 


112 


Inorganic Chemistry and 


















Qualitative Analysis 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


MA 101, 


102 


**Elements of College Mathematics 


3 





3 


3 





3 


E 101, 


102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 






Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 





3 












17 






17 



* Biology of Organisms requirements may be waived for 
students who present evidence of having completed a high 
school BSCS course with an A standing or who have at- 
tained a BSCS achievement test of score 5. 
** Analytic Geometry and Calculus I and II may be sub- 
stituted for Elements of College Mathematics. 



2nd Year 

BIO 23 1 Genetic Mechanisms 3 3 



BIO 232 
CH 211, 212 
PHY 201, 202 


Biology of Populations 
Organic Chemistry 
* General Physics 
Foreign Language 
Humanities or Social Sciences 


3 3 4 
3 3 
3 3 
3 3 


3 2 4 
3 3 4 
3 3 
3 3 
3 3 






16 


17 




* Physics I, II, III, IV may be substituted for General Physics 


CH 301 


3rd Year 
Quantitative Analysis 
Humanities or Social Sciences 
Unspecified 


3 3 
13 


2 6 4 

3 3 

7 






16 


14 




4th Year 
Humanities or Social Sciences 
Unspecified 


3 3 
9 


3 3 
9 






12 


12 



54 



Biology Electives 



Fifteen (15) credits in biology electives must be chosen 
from among the following list. Approval of adviser is re- 
quired. Students must also meet college requirements for 
the B.S. or B.A. degree. 

Biology 121, 122, 231, and 232 are prerequisites for all 
of the following courses. Prerequisites may be waived 
with the consent of the instructor. 

BIO 421 Developmental Biology 

BIO 313 Comparative Physiology 

BIO 414 The Physiology of Cells 

BIO 314 General Ecology 

BIO 415 Limnology and Oceanography 

BIO 315 The Biology of Algae 

BIO 317 The Biology of Invertebrate Animals 

BIO 413 The Biology of Fishes 

BIO 411 Proseminar, Current Topics in Biology 



55 



CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 





1st Year 


R 


L 


c 


R 


L C 


MA 111, 112 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, II 


4 





4 


4 


4 


f^H 111 11? 
v r I ill, l i ~ 


IIIUI L;ilMlt v_ 1 1CI 1 1 loll y culU 














Qualitative Analysis 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 4 


PHY 111, 112 


Physics I and II 


4 





3 


4 


3 


PHY 121, 122 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


!/2 





2 J /2 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 


3 




Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 


3 








171/2 




17V4 




2nd Year 












MA 211 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 


4 





4 






MA 91? 


i ft ^T*pnf"i c\ 1 Pnnotinnc 

LJl i l C I C I 1 L I d V JL ^ LI cl L1UI lo 








j 




CH 211, 212 


Organic Chemistry 


3 


6 


4 


3 


6 4 


PHY 211, 212 


Physics III and IV 


4 





3 


4 


3 


PHY 221, 222 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


1/2 





2 




Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 


3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 




3 
















3rd Year 












CH 301 


Quantitative Analysis 


2 


6 


4 






CH 302 


Instrumental Analysis 








3 


4 4 


CH 311, 312 


Physical Chemistry 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 5 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 




3 




Unspecified 






3 




3 










15 




15 




4th Year 












CH 411 


Chemical Literature and Report 














Writing 


3 





3 








Chemistry Elective 






6 




6 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 




3 




Unspecified 






3 




6 










15 




15 



Chemistry Electives: 

CH 322 Organic Identification 

CH 331 Unit Processes 

CH 342 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

CH 351 Organic Micro — Quantitative Analysis 

CH 352 Organic Preparations 

CH 421, 422 Introduction to Research 



56 



MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 





1st Year 


R 


L 




XV 


T 

x_> 


c 


MA 111, 112 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus 
















I and II 


4 





4 


4 





4 


puv 111 119 


Xliyol^i X ctilU XX 


A 
*+ 





3 


A 
*+ 





3 


PHY 121, 122 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 







2 


!/2 




Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 





3 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 








I6V2 




16V^ 




zna Year 














MA 211 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 


4 





4 








MA 212 


Differential Equations 








3 





3 


MA 221 


Linear Algebra 


3 





3 








M/\ LLL 


Introduction to Modern Algebra 








3 





3 


PHY 211 212 

X J- x. J- 1 i. « 1 — 


Phvsics TTT and TV 

x ii y oicj in uiiu. x v 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 221 222 


Phvsirs T ahnratnrv fhiweeVIv^ 


o 


2 


!/2 





2 


V2 




iiuniaiiuico ui jutial JLiciiLC j 






3 






3 




Pnrpicrn T nnoiwop 

X VXLClgXl J_allUUclUC 







3 


■x 
j 





3 








16V2 




15V2 




3rd Year 














Tkyf A 111 Oil 

MA 311, 312 


Advanced Calculus 


3 





3 


3 





3 




IVXdlllWlllClUlCo u v c 






3 






3 




Natural Srienrf* 

i^< denial OLiwii^v 






3 






3 




Humanities or Social Srtpnrps 






3 






3 




T Tn cr»pr , i'fipr! 
\j no pcu 11 c u 






3 






3 










15 






15 




4th Year 














MA 401 


History of Mathematics 


3 





3 










Mathematics Electives (advanced) 






3 






3 


PH 482 


Philosophy of Science 








3 





3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






6 






6 




Unspecified 






3 






3 










15 






15 


Junior Math 


Electives: 














MA 341 


Differential Equations II 














MA 342 


Vector Analysis 














MA 351 


Numerical Analysis 














MA 361 


Theory of Numbers 














MA 362 


Theory of Equations 















57 



Senior Math Electives: 








MA 411 


Functions of Real Variables 








MA 421 


Functions of a Complex Variable 








MA 431 


Probability 








MA 422 


Linear Programming 








MA 441 


Modern Algebra 








MA 451 


Differential Geometry 








MA 452 


Introduction to Higher Geometry 








MA 461 


Elementary Topology 








MA 471, 472 


Mathematical Statistics I, II 








MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 


First 


Second 






Semester 


Semester 




1st Year 


R 


L C 


R L C 


BIO 121 


* Biology of Organisms 


3 


2 4 




BIO 122 


Biology of Cells 






3 2 4 


CH 111, 112 


Inorganic Chemistry and 










Qualitative Analysis 


3 


3 4 


3 3 4 


MA 101, 102 


**Elements of College 










Mathematics 


3 


3 


3 3 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 


3 


3 3 




Foreign Language 


3 


3 


3 3 








17 


17 



* Biology of Organisms requirements may be waived for 
students who present evidence of having completed a high 
school BSCS course with an A standing or who have at- 
tained a BSCS achievement test of score 5. 
** Analytic Geometry and Calculus I and II may be substi- 
tuted for Elements of College Mathematics. 

2nd Year 



BIO 221, 222 


Anatomy and Physiology 


3 


2 


4 


3 


2 


4 


CH 211, 212 


Organic Chemistry 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


PHY 201, 202 


General Physics 


3 





3 


3 





3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 




Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 





3 










17 






17 




3rd Year 














BIO 321 


General Microbiology 


3 


2 


4 








BIO 332 


Diagnostic Bacteriology 








2 


2 


3 


CH 301 


Quantitative Analysis 








2 


6 


4 




Biology Seminar 


1 





1 


1 





1 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






6 






6 




Unspecified 






3 
















14 






14 




4th Year 
















Technical Courses at Hospital 












30 



58 



P RE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

The pre-medical major is a candidate for the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts, and must satisfy all of the requirements for this degree. (See 
page 51). 

Additional courses required: botany (4 credits), zoology (4), 
comparative anatomy (4) inorganic chemistry (4), organic chem- 
istry (8), mathematics (6), physics (8). Courses recommended: 



genetics (4), embryology (4), mathematics (6 additional 


credits). 


PHYSICS CURRICULUM 


First 


Second 






Semester 


Semester 




1st Year 


R 


L C 


R 


L C 


Vf A (11 111 
lVLr\ 111, 1 1 Z 


/\naiyuc oeomeiry ana ^aicuius 1, 11 


4 


4 


4 


4 


CH 111, 112 


Inorganic Chemistry and 












Qualitative Analysis 


3 


3 4 


3 


3 4 


puv 111 11? 
r XT I 111, 1 1Z 


r ny&ica i ana 11 


4 


3 


4 


3 


PHY 121, 122 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 1/2 





2 Vi 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 


3 


3 


3 




Foreign Language 


3 


3 


3 


3 








17Vi 




XlVi 




2nd Year 










MA 211 


Analytic fieometrv and f^alculns TI 


4 


4 






MA 212 


Differential Equations 






3 


3 


PHY 211, 212 


Physics III and IV 


4 


3 


4 


3 


PHY 221, 222 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 Vi 





2 Vi 




Foreign Language 


3 


3 


3 


3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 




6 




6 








I6V2 




15V2 




3rd Year 










PHY 311 


Intermediate Mechanics 


3 


3 






PHY 312 


Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism 






3 


3 


PHY 322 


Advanced Physics Lab. I 









4 3 


PHY 331, 332 


Modern Physics 


3 


3 


3 


3 




Mathematics Elective or Phy 343, 344 


3 


3 


3 


3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 




3 




3 


«. 


Unspecified 




3 




3 








15 




15 



59 



4th Year 



PHY 415, 416 Thermodynamics and Statistical 

Mechanics I and II 3 3 3 3 

PHY 421 Advanced Physics Laboratory II 4 3 

PHY 431 Philosophy of Science 3 3 

Physics Elective 3 3 

Humanities or Social Sciences 3 3 

Unspecified 3 3 

15 15 



Physics Electives: 

PHY 351 Physical Electronics 

PHY 442 Introduction to Solid State Physics 

PHY 443 Physical Optics 

PHY 45 1 Introduction to Quantum Mechanics 

PHY 461 Atomic Physics 

PHY 462 Nuclear Physics 

PHY 490 Special Project in Physics 



60 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY 



The College of Business and Industry offers four major pro- 
grams: Business Administration, Accounting, Textile Technology, 
and Textile Chemistry. The programs in the Department of Busi- 
ness lead to the degree of Bachelor of Business Administration. The 
Department of Industry, which includes Textile Technology and 
Textile Chemistry, offers a Bachelor of Science degree. 

The candidate for the degree of B.B.A. must satisfactorily com- 
plete one of the specified curricula, and must include in his program 
12 semester credits in the social sciences (of which 3 should be in 
psychology), and 12 semester credits in the humanities (of which 6 
must be in English courses beyond E 101-102). 



61 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS 



ACCOUNTING CURRICULUM 


First 


Second 






Semester 


Semester 




let - O T* 


R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


c 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 


MA 101, 102 


Elements of College Mathematics 


3 





3 


3 





•> 
3 




Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 





3 


BA I0l, 102 


Basic Accounting 


3 


z 


3 


3 


z 


5 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 










15 






15 




znu i car 














ECO 23 1, 232 


Economics 


3 





3 


3 





3 


MA 23 1, 232 


Elementary Statistics and 
















Decision Theory 


3 





3 


3 





3 




Natural Science 






5 






3 




Foreign Language 


3 


u 


5 


•5 
J 


u 




DA Ofil 
Dl\ ZU 1 


Intermediate Accounting 


3 


u 


5 








13 A. ZUZ 


Advanced Accounting 








3 


u 


3 










15 






15 




5XQ. Year 














H 311 


Economic History 


3 





3 








BA 311 


Legal Framework of Business 


3 





3 








BA 321 


Principles of Marketing 


3 





3 








BA 312 


Business Finance 








3 





3 


BA 322 


Marketing Management 








3 





3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






6 


BA 301, 302 


Cost Accounting 


3 





3 


3 





3 










15 






15 




4th Year 














BA 40 1, 402 


Auditing 


3 





3 


3 





3 


BA 4ll, 412 


Taxation 


3 





3 


3 





3 


BA 44 1, 442 


Electronic Data Processing 


3 





3 


3 





3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






6 






3 




Unspecified 












3 










15 






15 



62 



DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION CURRICULUM 











First 


Second 










Semester 


Semester 








1st Year 


R L C 


R L C 


E 


101, 


102 


Freshman English 


3 3 


3 3 


MA 


101, 


102 


Elements of College Mathematics 


3 3 


3 3 








Foreign Language 


3 3 


3 3 


BA 


101, 


102 


Basic Accounting 


3 2 3 


3 2 3 








Humanities or Social Sciences 


3 


3 










15 


15 



2nd Year 



ECO 231, 232 Economics 3 3 3 3 

MA 231, 232 Elementary Statistics and 







Decision Theory 


3 





3 


3 





3 






Natural Science 






3 






3 






Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 





3 


BA 


221 


Theory of Administration 


3 





3 








BA 


222 


Managerial Economics 








3 





3 












15 






15 






3rd Year 














H 


311 


Economic History 


3 





3 








BA 


311 


Legal Framework of Business 


3 





3 








BA 


321 


Principles of Marketing 


3 





3 








BA 


312 


Business Finance 








3 





3 


BA 


322 


Marketing Management 








3 





3 






Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






6 






* Field of Concentration 






3 






3 












15 






15 






4th Year 














BA 


421 


Labor Management 


3 





3 








BA 


422 


Personnel Management and Industrial 


















Relations 








3 





3 


BA 


431 


Business Policy 


3 





3 








BA 


432 


Administrative Practices 








3 





3 






Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






6 






*Field of Concentration 






3 






3 






Unspecified 






3 


















15 






15 



♦There are two options for the Business Administration curriculum. 
Students in this curriculum must select one of these options for their field of 
concentration. The following courses are requirements for the degree: 



63 



Marketing Option 

BA 331, 332 Advertising and Selling 
BA 451, 452 Marketing Research 



6 credits 
6 credits 



Management Option 

BA 341 Production Management 3 credits 

BA 342 Time and Motion Study 3 credits 

BA 461 Industrial Management 3 credits 

Business Electives (select from following) 3 credits 

BA 351 Real Estate 

BA 352 Business Cycles and Forecasting 

BA 471 Corporation Law 

BA 472 Insurance Fundamentals 

BA 481 Seminar 



64 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY 

TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 





1st Year 


R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


C 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 


CH 101, 102 


General Chemistry 


3 


2 


4 


3 


2 


4 


MA 101 102 


Elements of College Mathematics 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ME 101 


Engineering Drawing 











6 


2 




*Humanities or Social Sciences 






6 






3 










lo 






1 c 

1 J 




2nd Year 














puv 901 90? 


oenerdi riiyan,a 


j 


o 

u 


j 




n 
u 


J 


PHY 203, 204 


General Physics Laboratory 





2 


1 


o 


2 


1 


TT 201, 202 


Yarn Technology 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


TT 211, 212 


Fabric Technology 


3 


1 


3 


3 


1 


3 


TT 231 232 


Knit Technology 


2 


1 


2 


2 


1 


2 


TT 221, 222 


Design and Structure 


3 


2 


3 


1 


3 


2 




*Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 










1 

lo 






1 / 




3rd Year 














JD/\ HO 1 


lnuusiridi ividnd.gemeiii 


j 


o 
u 


•2 
J 








TT 301, 302 


Yarn Technology 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


3 


TT 311, 312 


Fabric Technology 


3 


1 


3 


3 


1 


3 


TT 321 322 


Design and Structure 


3 


2 


3 


3 


2 


3 


TC 322 


Application of Dyes 


2 





2 








TC 323 


Finishing Technology 








2 





2 




*Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






6 










17 






17 




4th Year 














TT 472 


Professional Expression 








3 





3 


TT 431 


Physical Testing 


2 


3 


3 








TT 401 


Yarn Technology 


2 


2 


3 








TT 411 


Fabric Technology 


1 


2 


2 








TT 421 


Design and Structure 


3 


2 


3 








TT 452 


Quality Control 








3 





3 


TT 462 


Microscopy 








2 


3 


3 




♦Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 




Unspecified 






3 






3 



17 15 



*The candidate for the degree in the Textile Technology curriculum 
must satisfy the distribution requirement for the B.A. candidate. 



65 



Textile Electives: 



TT 402 Applied Yarn Technology 

TT 482 Fabric Research Development and Design 

TT 49 1 Time and Motion Study 

TT 492 Textile Cost Accounting 

TT 351 Textile Merchandising and Marketing 

TT 481 Plant Engineering 

TT 352 Introduction to Statistics for Engineers 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRY 



TEXTILE CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 





1st Year 


R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


C 


MA 111, 112 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus 
















I and II 


4 





4 


4 





4 


CH 111, 112 


Inorganic Chemistry and 
















Qualitative Analysis 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


PHY 111, 112 


Physics I and II 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 121, 122 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


Vi 





2 


V2 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 




Foreign Language 


3 





3 


3 





3 










tm 






17V 




2nd Year 














MA 211 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 


4 





4 








MA 212 


Differential Equations 








3 





3 


CH 211, 212 


Organic Chemistry 


3 


6 


4 


3 


6 


4 


PHY 211, 212 


Physics III and IV 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 221, 222 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


V2 





2 






Foreign Language 


-2 
J 





3 


-3 
J 





3 




♦Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 












I61/2 




5id Year 














CH 301 


Quantitative Analysis 


2 


6 


4 








CH 302 


Instrumental Analysis 








3 


4 


4 


CH 311, 312 


Physical Chemistry 


4 


4 


5 


4 


4 


5 




♦Humanities or Social Sciences 






6 






3 


TC 302 


Elementary Dyeing 








2 


3 


3 










15 






15 




4th Year 














CH 411 


Chemical Literature and Report Writing 








3 





3 


TC 401 


Advanced Dyeing 


2 


2 


3 








TC 411 


Textile Printing 


2 


3 


3 








TT 451 


Microscopy and Testing 


2 


3 


3 








TC 421, 422 


Chemical Technology of Finishing 


2 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


TC 431, 432 


Industrial Chemical Analysis 


2 


3 


3 


2 


3 


3 


TC 442 


Chemistry of Fibers 








2 


2 


3 


TC 452 


Textile Microbiology 








2 


4 


3 



15 15 



♦Majors in Textile Chemistry must take at least 6 semester credits in 
English literature and 6 semester credits in social sciences. 



67 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The engineering curricula recognizes the technological and social 
responsibilities that each graduate must accept on entering the en- 
gineering profession. The technological goal of the engineering 
programs is the preparation for the performance of the functions of 
analysis and creative design, or the functions of production and 
operations. This requires a mastery of fundamental scientific and 
mathematical principles associated with engineering. The social goal 
includes the development of leadership, the inculcation of a deep 
sense of professional ethics, and an understanding of the evolution 
of society and the impact of technology on it. 

The College of Engineering offers four major programs: civil, 
electrical, industrial and mechanical engineering. The student who 
satisfactorily completes the curriculum for one of these majors will 
receive a Bachelor of Science degree. Every engineering student must 
include in his program 9 semester credits in the humanities (6 semes- 
ter credits must be in English literature) and 6 semester credits 
in the social sciences. 



68 



CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 







lot Von t- 

isi i ear 


K 


T 




rv 


T 

J_r 


\^ 


MA 111, 


112 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus 


















I and II 


A 

4 


U 


A 

4 


4 


n 
K) 


A 


PHY 111, 


112 


Physics I and II 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 121, 


122 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


Vi 





2 


Vt 


CH 111, 


112 


Ironganic Chemistry and Qualitative 


















Analysis 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


E 101, 


102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ME 101 




Engineering Drawing 





6 


2 








ME 102 




Descriptive Geometry 








2 


3 


3 



w/2 im 



2nd Year 



MA 


211 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 


4 


4 






MA 


212 


Differential Equations 






3 


3 


PHY 


211, 212 


Physics III and IV 


4 


3 


4 


3 


PHY 


221, 222 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 Vi 





2 V2 


ME 


231, 232 


Applied Mechanics 


3 


3 


3 


3 


CE 


211 


Surveying 


3 


3 4 


2 


3 3 






Humanities or Social Sciences 




3 




3 










IIV2 




\5V2 



3rd Year 

CE 311 Strength of Materials 4 3 5 

ME 311 Thermodynamics 3 3 

ME 332 Fluid Mechanics 3 3 

EE 301 Elements of Electrical Engineering I 3 2 4 

CE 301 Geology 2 2 3 

CE 322 Soil Mechanics 3 2 4 

CE 312 Structural Theory 3 3 

CE 342 Sanitary Engineering 3 3 

Humanities or Social Sciences 3 3 

T8 16 



4th Year 

IE 401 Engineering Economy 3 3 

CE 411 Highway Engineering 3 3 

Technical Elective 7 7 

Humanities or Social Sciences 3 3 

Unspecified 6 

16 "~ 16 



69 



Technical Electives: 



CE 421, 422 
CE 431, 432 
CE 441 
CE 442 
CE 452 
CE 462 
CE 472 
CE 481 
CE 482 
CE 491 



Advanced Structural Theory I, II 

Structural Design I, II 

Reinforced Concrete 

Prestressed Concrete 

Foundations 

Hydraulic Structures 

Hydraulics 

Water Supply 

Sewage Disposal 

Sanitary Bacteriology 



70 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 





1st Year 


R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


C 


MA 111, 112 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus 
















I and II 


4 





4 


4 





4 


PHY 111, 112 


Physics I and II 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 121, 122 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


V2 





2 


Vi 


CH 111, 1 12 


Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative 
















Analysis 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


** 
3 





3 


Jvl h 101 


Engineering Drawing 





6 


2 








ME 102 


Descriptive Geometry 








2 


3 


3 








I61/2 




17V* 




2nd Year 














MA 211 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 


4 





4 








MA 212 


Differential Equations 








3 





3 


PHY 21 U 212 


T*l_ * TTT J TT T 

Physics III and IV 


4 





3 


4 





3 


T)TTV 

PHY 221, 222 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 


U 


2 







2 


Vi 


ME 23 1, 232 


Applied Mechanics 


3 





3 


** 

3 





3 


EE 201, 202 


Circuit Theory I 


3 





3 


3 





3 


EE 252 


Electrical Engineering Laboratory I 











6 


2 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 








16 ! /2 




17*72 




3rd Year 














EE 362 


Electromagnetic Theory I 








3 





3 


EE 321 


Circuit Theory III 


3 





3 








EE 311, 312 


Electronics I and II 


3 





3 


3 





3 


EE 351, 352 


Electrical Engineering Laboratory 
















II and III 





6* 


2 





6" 


■ 2 


EE 332 


Energy Conversion Devices 








3 





3 


ME 332 


Fluid Mechanics 








3 





3 


MA 321 


Advanced Engineering Mathematics 


3 





3 








ME 311 


Thermodynamics 


3 





3 










Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 










17 






17 




4th Year 














EE 431, 432 


Feedback Systems I and II 


3 





3 


3 





3 


EE-411 


Electronics III 


3 





3 








EE 451, 452 


Electrical Engineering Laboratory 
















IV and V 





6* 


2 





6* 


« 2 


EE 462 


Physical Electronics 
















of Materials 








3 





3 




Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 




Technical Elective 






3 






6 




Unspecified 






3 
















17 






17 



* Including outside work. 



71 



Technical Electives: 



EE 


401, 402 


Introduction to Network Synthesis I and II 


EE 


412 


Wave Forming Circuits 


EE 


421 


Microwave Theory 


EE 


441 


Advanced Electric Machinery 


EE 


442 


Semi conductor Circuits 


EE 


461 


Logic Circuit Design 


EE 


463 


Electromagnetic Theory II 


EE 


464 


Introductory Digital Computer Programming 


EE 


471, 472 


Introduction to Communication Theory I and II 


EE 


482 


Electric Power Systems 


EE 


483 


Linear System Analysis 



Note: Electives in physics and mathematics as approved. 



72 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

First Second 

Semester Semester 

1st Year R L C R L C 

MA 111, 112 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 

I and II 4 4 4 4 

PHY 111, 112 Physics I and n 4 3 4 3 

PHY 121, 122 Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 2 V 2 21/2 

CH 111, 112 Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative 

Analysis 3 3 4 3 3 4 

E 101, 102 Freshman English 3 3 3 3 

ME 101 Engineering Drawing 6 2 

ME 102 Descriptive Geometry 2 3 3 

16V* 17 V2 



2nd Year 



MA 211 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 


4 





4 








MA 212 


Differential Equation 








3 





3 


PHY 211, 212 


Physics III and IV 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 221, 222 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


V2 





2 


V2 


ME 231, 232 


Applied Mechanics 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ME 221 


Manufacturing Processes 


2 


3 


3 








ME 222 


Metallurgy 








3 


2 


4 


ECO 231 


Economics 

Humanities or Social Sciences 


3 





3 






3 



I6V2 16V* 



3rd Year 

CE 321 Mechanics of Materials 3 3 

ME 311 Thermodynamics 3 3 

ME 332 Fluid Mechanics 3 3 

ME 302 Mechanism 2 3 3 

BA 361 Industrial Accounting 3 3 

IE 321, 322 Engineering Statistics and Quality 

Control 3 3 3 3 

IE 312 Time and Motion Study 2 3 3 

IE 331 Personnel Administration 3 3 

Humanities or Social Sciences 3 6 

18 18 



73 



First Second 
Semester Semester 







4th Year 


R 


L 


c 


R 


L 


EE 


301 


Elements of Electrical Engineering I 


3 


2 


4 






EE 


302 


Elements of Electrical Engineering II 








3 


2 


IE 


401 


Engineering Economy 


3 





3 






BA 


431 


Business Policy 








3 





BA 


461 


Industrial Management 


3 





3 






IE 


422 


Plant Design and Layout 








2 


3 






Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 










Unspecified 






3 







16 16 



Industrial Electives: 

IE 43 1 Linear Programming 

IE 421 Wage Incentives and Job Evaluation 



74 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

First Second 
Semester Semester 







1st Year 


R 


L 


c 


R 


L 


c 


MA 


111, 112 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus 


















T and TT 


A 


o 

u 


A 


A 
*t 




4 


PHY 


111, 112 


Physics I and II 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 


121, 122 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


V2 





2 


V2 


CH 


111, 112 


Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative 


















Analysis 


3 


3 


4 


3 


3 


4 


E 


101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ME 


101 


Engineering Drawing 





6 


2 








ME 


102 


Descriptive Geometry 








2 


3 


3 












I6V2 






YIV2 






2nd Year 














MA 


211 


Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 


4 





4 








MA 


212 


T~)iffprpntia1 Fniiatinn^ 

LVi 11 CI C 1 1 1 1 lI 1 .L Llcl 1 1 Ul la 








3 





3 


PHY 


211, 212 


Physics III and IV 


4 





3 


4 





3 


PHY 


221, 222 


Physics Laboratory (biweekly) 





2 


V2 





2 


V2 


ME 


231, 232 


Applied Mechanics 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ME 


221 


Manufacturing Processes 


2 


3 


3 








ME 


222 


Metallurgy 








3 


2 


4 


ME 


211 


Machine Drawing 


1 


3 


2 












Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 










18*4 




I6V2 






3rd Year 


















Strength of Materials 


4 


3 


5 








ME 


321, 322 


Engineering Thermodynamics I and II 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ME 


332 


Fluid Mechanics 








3 





3 


ME 


302 


Mechanism 








2 


3 


3 


EE 


301 


Elements of Electrical Engineering I 


3 


2 


4 








EE 


302 


Elements of Electrical Engineering II 








3 


2 


4 


ME 


342 


Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I 











3 


1 






Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 












15 






17 






4th Year 














ME 


411 


Heat Transfer 


3 





3 








ME 


441 


Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II 





3 


1 








ME 


421 


Machine Design I and II 


3 





3 


3 





3 






Technical Elective 






6 






6 






Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 



Unspecified 3 

16 ~~ 15 



75 



Technical Electives: 



ME 401 


Advanced Kinematics 


ME 412 


Thermodynamics III 


ME 432 


Vibrations 


ME 451 


Advanced Strength of Materials 


ME 452 


Experimental Stress Analysis 


ME 431 


Internal Combustion Engines 


EE 464 


Introductory Digital Computer Programming 


EE 482 


Electric Power Systems 


EE 483 


Linear System Analysis 



76 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

The College of Fine and Applied Arts offers three majors (Vis- 
ual Design, Textile Design, and Painting) all leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Fine Arts. To qualify for this degree a student must 
satisfactorily complete one of the three curricula and satisfy the 
quality requirement set for all graduates. He must also satisfy the 
distribution requirement for the B.A. degree. Six credits of History 
of Art may be counted toward the distribution requirement for 
humanities. 



77 



VISUAL DESIGN CURRICULUM 

1st Year 

ART 111, 112 Foundation Color and Design 
ART 121, 122 Foundation Drawing 
ART 131 Ancient Art 

ART 132 Medieval and Renaissance Art 

E 101, 102 Freshman English 

Humanities or Social Sciences 



2nd Year 
ART 221, 222 Figure Drawing I 
ART 241, 242 Painting 
ART 251, 252 Visual Design I 
ART 224 Structural Representation 

ART 23 1 Baroque through Impressionism Art 

Humanities or Social Sciences 



3rd Year 
ART 351, 352 Visual Design II 
ART 323, 324 Illustration 
or 

ART 363, 364 Fashion Illustration 
ART 381 Photography I 

ART 382 Photography II 

or 

ART 386 Typography 
or 

ART 322 Figure Drawing II 

ART 383 Graphic Reproduction 

ART 332 Contemporary Art 

Natural Science 



4th Year 
ART 451, 452 Visual Design III 
ART 423, 424 Advanced Illustration 
or 

ART 485, 486 Advanced Typography 
or 

ART 481, 482 Advanced Photography 
ART 483, 484 Printmaking 

Humanities or Social Sciences 



First Second 
Semester Semester 



R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


C 





6 


3 





6 


3 





6 


3 





6 


3 


3 





3 














3 





3 


3 





3 


3 





3 






3 






3 






15 






15 





6 


2 





6 


2 





6 


2 





6 


2 





6 


3 





6 


3 











6 


3 


j 


A 

u 


•3 
J 












6 






6 






16 






16 





9 


4 





9 


4 





6 


3 





6 


3 


n 

V 


O 


j 


A 
U 


c 
o 


j 


i 
i 


9 


L 

















4 


2 











6 


2 











6 


2 


2 





2 














3 





3 






3 






3 






14 






15 





15 


7 





15 


7 





6 


3 





6 


3 





6 


3 





6 


3 





6 


3 





6 


3 





6 


2 





6 


2 






3 






3 






15 






15 



78 



TEXTILE DESIGN CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 







1st Year 


R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


C 


ART 111, 


112 


Foundation Color and Design 





6 


3 





6 


3 


ART 121, 


122 


Foundation Drawing 





6 


3 





6 


3 


ART 131 




Ancient Art 


3 





3 








AK1 LjL 




ivieuievdi dno ivencusadnce /\rt 








-3 
J 


n 
u 


"2 
J 


E 101, 


102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 






Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 












15 






15 






2nd Year 














ART 221, 


222 


Figure Drawing I 





6 


2 





6 


2 


ART 241, 


242 


Painting I 





6 


2 





6 


2 


ADT 071 
A.K L LI 1 , 


LI L 


Textile Design I 


c\ 
\J 


Q 


A 


u 


Q 


4 
1 


ART 231 




Baroque through Impressionism Art 


3 





3 












Humanities or Social Sciences 






6 






6 












17 






14 






3rd Year 














ART 371, 


372 


Textile Design 11 





9 


4 





9 


4 


TT 331, 


332 


Textile Technology 


2 


o 


2 


2 





2 


TT 341, 


342 


Fabric Construction I 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ADT 111 

AK1 3/3, 


3 /4 


Handloom Weaving I 





6 


2 


u 


6 


Z 


ART 332 




Contemporary Art 








3 


o 


3 






Natural Science 






3 






3 












14 






17 






4th Year 














ART 471, 


472 


Textile Design III 





15 


7 





15 


7 


TT 441, 


442 


Fabric Construction II 


3 





3 


3 





3 


ART 473, 


474 


Handloom Weaving II 





6 


2 





6 


2 






Humanities or Social Sciences 






3 






3 



15 15 



79 



PAINTING CURRICULUM First Second 

Semester Semester 





1st Year 


R 


L 


C 


R 


L 


C 


ART 111, 112 


Foundation Color and Design 





6 


3 





6 


3 


ART 121, 122 


Foundation Drawing 





6 


3 





6 


3 


ART 131 


Ancient Art 


3 





3 








ART 132 


Medieval and Renaissance Art 








3 





3 


E 101, 102 


Freshman English 


3 





3 


3 





3 




Humanitines or Social Sciences 






3 






3 










15 






15 




2nd Year 














ART 221, 222 


Figure Drawing I 





6 


2 





6 


2 


ART 241 


Painting I 





6 


2 








ART 244 


Painting 











12 


5 


ART 225, 226 


Drawing 





6 


3 





6 


3 


ART 231 


Baroque through Impressionism Art 


3 





3 










Humanities or Social Sciences 






6 






6 










16 






16 




3rd Year 














ART 341, 342 


Painting II 





15 


7 





15 


7 


ART 321, 322 


Figure Drawing II 





6 


2 





6 


2 


ART 311, 312 


Composition 





6 


3 





6 


3 


ART 332 


Contemporary Art 








3 





3 




Natural Science 






3 






3 










15 






18 




4th Year 














ART 441, 442 


Painting III 





15 


7 





15 


7 


ART 483, 484 


Printmaking 





6 


2 





6 


2 


ART 421, 422 


Figure Drawing III 





6 


2 





6 


2 




Humanities or Social Science 






3 






3 



14 14 



80 



DIRECTORY OF COURSES 



Biology 
college of arts and sciences 

bio 101, 102 general biology i, ii cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

A survey of the more important generalizations of biology. Uni- 
versal phenomena characteristic of all living organisms, funda- 
mentals of morphology and physiology including genetics and 
evolution. This course satisfies the liberal arts natural science 
requirement but is not acceptable for Biology Department majors. 

BIO 121 THE BIOLOGY OF ORGANISMS Cr. 4-0 (3-2) 0-0) 

An analysis of the adaptations of protista, plants and animals at 
behavioral, structural and physiological levels. Consideration of 
size, growth, energy capture and storage, reproduction, com- 
munication, integration and locomotion. Emphasis on the un- 
derstanding of each topic in the light of contemporary evolution- 
ary theory. 

BIO 122 THE BIOLOGY OF CELLS Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-2) 

An inquiry into the morphology and function of cell ultrastruc- 
ture; organic and inorganic cell components, cellular control 
mechanisms, including information storage, replication and util- 
ization. The membrane systems and their role in exchange of 
materials. A consideration of energy transfer. 

BIO 221, 222 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY Cr. 4-4 (3-2) (3-2) 

A systematic study of the human body with emphasis on the 
normal structures and functions. Required of all second year 
medical technology majors. 

Prerequisites: BIO 101, 102 or BIO 121, 122. 

BIO 231 GENETIC MECHANICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

An inquiry into the nature of genetic material. The transmis- 
sion and action of nucleic acids. Emphasis on the mole- 
cular aspects of heredity and the transmission of genetic mater- 
ial in bacteria and bacteriophages. 



81 



BIO 232 



THE BIOLOGY OF POPULATIONS Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3 



BIO 311, 312 



BIO 313 



BIO 314 



BIO 315 



The growth, distributional and behavioral characteristics of ph , 
microbial, and animal populations. Distribution in space i I 
time. Laboratory and field studies of selected populations v i 
emphasis on the study of mathematical models and populations^ 
insects and micro-organisms. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY SEMINAR I, II 

Cr. 1-1 (1-0) (1 ) 



Discussion and presentation of selected biological topics in 3 
field of medical technology. Required of all third year med 1 
technology majors. 

Prerequisite: completion of the first two years of 
the medical technology curriculum. 

COMPARATIVE PHYSIOLOGY Cr. 4-0 (3-3) (0-0) 

Adaptations in physiological mechanisms as illustrated by sel - 
ed vertebrate and invertebrate species. Regulatory mechanis ;, 
muscle action, gas exchange, nerve action, membranes, circulai 1 
and metabolism. 

GENERAL ECOLOGY Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (2-5) 

The biology of populations, communities, ecosystems and e 
biosphere. Distribution of organisms in space and time. r e 
regulation of the environment by organisms and the influe e 
of environment upon organisms. Consideration of energy flflj 
biogeochemical cycles. Laboratory and field studies of terresu I, 
fresh water and marine environments. Extended field trips, scle 
of which will be held on weekends and/or holidays, are an ii;> 
gral part of this course. 



THE BIOLOGY OF ALGAE Cr. 4-0 (2-5) (0-0) 



A survey of the principal taxa of marine, estuarine and fi h 
water algae. Emphasis will be placed on analysis of strucl e 
and identification of the more common species of algae of no | 
eastern U. S. and adjacent waters. Extended field trips, som< »f 
which will be held on weekends and/or holidays, are an inte.jil 
part of this course. 



82 



THE BIOLOGY OF INVERTEBRATE ANIMALS 

Cr. 4-0 (3-3) (0-0) 
An intensive survey of the taxonomy, morphology and function 
of the major invertebrate phyla. Field studies will emphasize the 
ecology and adaptions of marine invertebrates of the North Atlan- 
tic coast. Extended field trips, some of which will be held on 
weekends and/or holidays, are an integral part of this course. 

APPLIED MICROBIOLOGY Cr. 4-0 (3-2) (0-0) 

A study of the morphological and physiological characteristics of 

bacteria, fungi, ricketsia, and viruses. Required of all third 

year medical technology majors. 

Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122 or BIO 101, 102 

DIAGNOSTIC BACTERIOLOGY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (1-4) 
A study of human pathogens and common diagnostic procedures. 
Required of all third year medical technology majors. 
Prerequisites: BIO 321 CH 211 

PROSEMINAR: CURRENT TOPICS IN BIOLOGY 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Student presentation and discussion of current biological prob- 
lems. An introduction to some of the principal biological jour- 
nals, abstracts and reviews. 

THE BIOLOGY OF FISHES Cr. 4-0 (2-5) (0-0) 
The classification, life histories and ecology of fishes with em- 
phasis on the study of representative species of the Northeastern 
states and their coastal waters. Extended field trips, some of 
which will be held on weekends and/or holidays, are an integral 
part of this course. 

THE PHYSIOLOGY OF CELLS Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-3) 
The function of cells. An advanced treatment of thermodynamic 
aspects of cellular function. The function of mitochondria, enzyme 
systems and membranes. The function of neurones, muscle cells, 
blood cells and other specialized cells. 

LIMNOLOGY AND OCEANOGRAPHY Co. 4-0 (2-5) (0-0) 
The physics and chemistry of lakes, ponds, rivers, estuaries and 
oceans. Emphasis on the measurement and analysis of chemical 
and physical characteristics of water masses. The impact of 
physical and chemical factors on the distribution of organisms. 
Extended field trips, some of which will be held on weekends and/ 
or holidays, are an integral part of this course. 



83 



BIO 421 DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY (4-0) (3-3) (0-0) 

Growth, cellular differentiation, morphogenesis and senesce.y 
in multicellular organisms. Laboratory studies will emphasize U 
scriptive and experimental studies of selected vertebrate embrjll 

Slime molds and invertebrates will also be utilized. 



Chemistry 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

CH 101, 102 GENERAL CHEMISTRY Cr. 4-4 (3-2) (3-2) 

An introductory course in chemistry required for all students a 
the textile technology curriculum. It comprises a general sur w 
of chemistry, its basic laws and theories. 

CH 111, 112 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND QUALITATIVE 
ANALYSIS Cr. 4-4 (3-3) (3-3) 

A lecture and laboratory course dealing with the laws ;fl 
theories of chemistry. It will include an introduction to quH 
tative analysis. 

CH 211, 212 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Cr. 4-4 (3-6) (3-6) 

A systematic study of the chemistry of the compounds of carlo 
as presented by the more prominent authorities in the orgzp 
field. 

Prerequisite: CH 112 

CH 301 QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS Cr. 4-0 (2-6) (0-0) 

The student applies the standard methods of gravimetric 
volumetric analysis to typical inorganic salts, alloys, minerals, ai 
and bases. Routine chemical calculations form an integral j 
of the work. 
Prerequisite: CH 112 

CH 302 INSTRUMENTAL ANALYSIS Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-4) 

A study of the methods of analysis involving the use of spe 
instruments such as the polarograph, spectrograph, turbidime 
spectrophotometers and instruments dealing with radio chemis! 
Prerequisite: CH 301 



84 



CH 311, 312 PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY Cr. 5-5 (4-3) (4-3) 

A study of the laws of chemistry and physics supplemented by 
laboratory work and numerous problems. 
Prerequisite: CH 112, MA 102 

CH 322 ORGANIC IDENTIFICATION Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (1-6) 

A study of the systematic identification of organic compounds 
supplemented by extensive laboratory work and identification 
problems. 

Prerequisites: CH 341 and simultaneous study of CH 342 

CH 331 UNIT PROCESSES Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A course in the fundamental industrial operations and chemical 
processes, dealing with chemical calculations with engineering 
aspects in mind. 
Prerequisite: CH 112 

CH 332 ADVANCED INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Modern theories of atomic and molecular structure, coordination 
compounds, quantum mechanics, and other factors which explain 
the reactions of inorganic compounds. 
Prerequisite: CH 112 

CH 341, 342 ORGANIC MECHANISM Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

A study of the structure and reactions of organic molecules using 
modern orbital and resonance theories. 
Prerequisite: CH 212 

CH 351 ORGANIC MICRO-QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 

Cr. 3-0 (1-6) (0-0) 
The quantitative determination, on a microscale, of the elements 
and one or two of the groups commonly present in organic com- 
pounds. 

Prerequisite: CH 301, CH 212 

CH 352 ORGANIC PREPARATIONS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (1-6) 

The more intricate synthetic methods of organic chemistry are 
studied. The search of the literature of chemistry for the best 
synthetic methods for a given compound is stressed. 
Rrerequisite: CH 212 



85 



CH 361, 362 BIOCHEMISTRY I, II Cr. 4-4 (3-3) (3-3) 

The chemistry and metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, lipic 
and other natural products. 
Prerequisite: CH 212 

CH 372 INDUSTRIAL CHEMISTRY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 

Lectures are supplemented by field trips, films, and guest speakei : ] 
Prerequisite: CH 112 

CH 411 CHEMICAL LITERATURE AND REPORT WRITING 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-1 
A survey of the fundamental reference works and literature j 
chemistry with exercises in the use of these sources. 
Prerequisites: CH 112, CH 212, and one year of German 

CH 421, 422 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH 

Cr. 3-5 (0-9 to 15) (0-9 to 1 
Students who have research ability are encouraged and assisted 
undertaking an original investigation under the direction of 
interested instructor. Elective. 
Prerequisite: Departmental Permission. 



Economics 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

ECO 101 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A survey of economics for students who do not plan to ta 
additional work in economics. An institutional approach tl 
introduces the student to basic concepts and the economic crite 
applicable to the functions and processes of the Americ 
economy. 

ECO 231 ECONOMICS I Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

This course is included toward a macro-economic analysis of ij 
principles of economics and application of analysis to cum 
problems in our economy. Emphasis is given to national inco 
and product totals, determination of level of income, employme 
production, economic growth, economic fluctuations, moneti 
and fiscal policy, the level of prices, and allocation of resourc 



?6 



ECONOMICS II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
A continuation of ECO 231. Stress on micro and macro aspects 
of money, monetary policy, economic stability, economic growth 
and policy goals, income distribution, the public economy, and 
international trade and finance. 

CONTEMPORARY ECONOMIC ISSUES 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Analysis of selected current economic issues and their impli- 
cations for the American economy, both for short and long run 
views. Emphasis on developing student's ability to apply economic 
principles to problems of our economy with analysis of policy 
criteria. 

Prerequisite: ECO 232 

LABOR ECONOMICS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A study of the history and organization of unions, their aims and 

methods, and the process and results of collective bargaining. 

Special attention will be given to public policy towards labor 

relations. 

Prerequisite: ECO 101 or ECO 231 



English 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

E 101, 102 FRESHMAN ENGLISH Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

The aim of this course is to develop the student's ability to write 
clear, correct, effective English that reflects logical thinking and 
mature judgment. 

A complementary reading program provides examples from lit- 
erature illustrating principles of writing and affords experience in 
analysis and oral interpretation. 

E 201, 202 SURVEY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE I, II 

Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 
The first semester of this course covers the major writers in the 
English tradition from Anglo-Saxon times to the beginning of the 
eighteenth century. 

The second semester covers the major writers from the beginning 
of the eighteenth century to the present. 



87 



E 312 SHAKESPEARE Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The course is concerned with the careful reading of from ten 
twelve of Shakespeare's plays selected from the histories, comedk 
and tragedies. 

E 313 ENGLISH, THE ROMANTIC AGE Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-( 

A survey of English literature from 1798 to 1832, stressing tl 
major poets (Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Bryon, Shelly, Keats 
with some study of novels and personal essays. 

E 321 MODERN DRAMA Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with works 
important modern dramatists from Ibsen and Chekov through sw 
near-contemporaries or contemporaries as Shaw, Fry, Anouilh, Gi 
audoux, T. S. Eliot, Arthur Miller, and Tennessee Williams. Er 
phasis is placed on the changes and developments in dramal 
technique that have occurred in recent years. 

E 322 MILTON'S POETRY AND SELECTED PROSE 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-| 

A study of Milton's poetic achievement based on the reading 
selected minor poems and their developmental relationship 
PARADISE LOST, PARADISE REGAINED, and SAMSO 
AGONISTES. 

E 331 CHAUCER Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Intensive reading and critical analysis of THE CANTERBUR 
TALES, along with studies in TROLLUS AND CRISEYDE ai 
the lesser known works. 

E 332 CONTEMPORARY POETRY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

An analysis of selected writings of contemporary poets, design< 
to introduce the student to such poets as T. S. Eliot, Robert Fro: I 
Dylan Thomas, Gerard Manley Hopkins, Marianne Moore, Ogdi 
Nash, Robert Bly, George Oppen and others. 

CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

E 341 Selected American and European novels, dramas, and verse m 

be studied intensively as individual creative works and as e 
pressions of contemporary thought. 



88 



THE AMERICAN NOVEL Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
A study of the historical development of the American novel from 
Cooper to Hemingway to derive criteria for the appreciation of 
the form and content of the masters of American prose fiction. 

THE ESSAY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Appreciation of the essay as a literary form is gained by an 
analysis of its requirements, its origin, and its development, through 
readings of the masters from Montaigne and Bacon to the present. 

THE SHORT STORY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
After an introductory consideration of the nature of the short 
story as a form of literature, a diverse reading program of this 
fiction is undertaken, beginning with the forerunners of the modern 
short story — Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, and Harte — and advanc- 
ing to contemporaries. 

MASTERPIECES OF WORLD LITERATURE 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
This course covers a study of selected classics from the Golden 
Age of Greece to the twentieth century. Emphasis is placed upon 
some of the fundamental ideas and literary forms that are an 
important part of the heritage of Western civilization. 

THE ENGLISH NOVEL Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
A study of types of fiction popular in the eighteenth and nine- 
teenth centuries and the reading of major works of the period. 
Some consideration of the novel as an art form and of its inter- 
action with historical developments. 

SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
A survey of selected American writers from the Colonial Period 
to the present. Emphasis is placed upon the development of 
characteristic literary forms and upon ideas important in the 
evolution of American thought. 

MAJOR WRITERS IN ENGLISH LITERATURE 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
A study of carefully-selected, outstanding writers from Chaucer 
to the present. Emphasis is on representative and enduring mast- 
ers whose contributions to the history and development of Eng- 
lish literature have been significent and pleasurable. 



89 



E 382 STUDIES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE AND THE AR 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3 
This course relates the literary and artistic expressions of Ame j 
can culture, so that the literature is complemented and <[ 
hanced by an examination of the art and architecture. Throu| 
various literary works and a discussion of representative arti l 
and architects, the course will investigate the role of the si 
and the artist as creator, carrier, and critic of American cultm 
Five selected periods will be emphasized. 

E 391 TWENTIETH CENTURY BRITISH NOVEL 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (Oi 
A study of the twentieth century British novel includes the i [ 
lowing writers: Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, James Jam 
D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, Aldous Huxley, Evelyn Waul 
Joyce Cary, Graham Greene, and Kingsley Amis. 

E 392 STUART DRAMA Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A study of some of the leading English dramatists from the asc [ 
sion of James I to the throne in 1603 to the closing of the theat ; 
in 1642. Playwrights to be considered include: Jonson, Be[ 
mont, Fletcher, Chapman, Webster, Marston, Dekker, and Hi 
wood. 

E 401 PUBLIC SPEAKING Cr. 0-2 (0-0) (2-0) 

The technique of oral explanation is scientifically undertali 
through ja study of effective principles combined with speak e 
practice. The student is afforded the means to gain confidence, 9 
think on his feet in emergencies, and to know how to handle < \ 
speaking assignment. 

E 411 THE TRANSCENDENTAL MOVEMENT IN AMERICAN* j 

LITERATURE Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
The writings of Emerson and Thoreau will receive special attj 
tion, although the general character of the movement will be | 
plored. 

E 412 THE ARTHUR OF THE ENGLISH POETS 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (31 
A comparative study of English literature dealing with Kj 
Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. Works such I 
SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHT, Malon 
"MORTE <T ARTHUR," Tennyson's IDYLLS OF THE KIM 



and Morris' DEFENSE OF GUINEVERE will be read with em- 
phasis on the transformation of Arthur from noble hero with his 
knights to decadent king and his improper court. 

E 421 THE ENGLISH NOVEL TO 1880 Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A historical survey of the novel in England, from its beginnings 
in the eighteenth century until 1880. About ten works will be 
discussed in class, including novels by Fielding, Austen, Emily 
Bronte, Dickens, Thackeray, and several others. In addition, a 
study of several works by one author will be required of each 
student. 

E 422 WORLD LITERATURE — CLASSICAL GREECE TO 

THE RENAISSANCE Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Students will read in translation the foreign classics, from Classi- 
cal Greece to the Renaissance, that have had most influence on the 
thought of the modern Western World, with special emphasis on 
the works of Homer, the Greek Dramatists, Vergil, and Dante. 



History 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

H 101 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION I 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
A survey of the growth of European civilization from the Greco- 
Roman Era to the eve of the Reformation. Attention is given 
to economic, social, intellectual, and political developments dur- 
ing these centuries. 

H 102 HISTORY OF WESTERN CIVILIZATION II 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
A continuation of the study of European History from the Re- 
formation Era to the present. Emphasis is given to the back- 
ground of many of the contemporary problems of this century. 
Prerequisite: H 101 

H 201, 202 THE RENAISSANCE AND THE REFORMATION 

Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 
The first term includes treatment of political, economic, and cul- 
tural developments in Europe from A.D. 1300 to 1500 with 
special emphasis on Italy. The contributions of the great in- 
dividuals in all these fields will be placed in the framework of 



91 



the commercial revolution which preceded and helped to br;| 
about great political and cultural change. 

The second term includes a discussion of the political conditkl 
obtaining in Europe before the outbreak of the Reformation; i 
religious changes of the Reformation with considerable biograpj 
cal data on the reformers, Luther, Calvin, and Zwingli notably; gl 
the multitudinous effects of the Reformation on the Contin 
and in England. The temporal boundaries of the course are i 
proximately 1500 to 1600 A.D. 

H 241 AMERICAN COLONIAL HISTORY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0- 

The origin and the economic, social, cultural, and political i[ 
velopment of the American colonies until the close of the Ang j 
French struggle for empire and the beginning of the Revolution; , 
crisis. 



H 251 JEFFERSON'S IDEAS IN AMERICAN HISTORY 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (Of 

Jefferson's ideas and their use and modification by succeed I 
generations of Americans from his death to the present. 

H 301, 302 HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3 

A study and appraisal of the political, social, economic, and dipt 
matic developments and movements in American history from I 
American revolution to the present day. Continuity as well f 
change in American domestic and foreign policy will be e[ 
phasized. Wherever possible, an effort will be made to prest 
various interpretations of the more significant developments z I 
movements, and the role of individuals in shaping their charl 
ter and directing their course. History 301 will cover the peril 
through the Civil War, and History 302 will cover the peril 
since 1865. 
Prerequisite: H 301 

H 311 ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (01 
A study of the growth of the American economy from the Color| 
Period to the present. Stress is given to the development t 
business organizations, and the evolution of a predominantly m 
cultural economy into a highly complex industrial system. 
Prerequisite: ECO 101 



THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AND THE FOUNDING 
OF THE REPUBLIC, 1763 - 1789 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
The era of the American Revolution: Consciousness of nationality, 
the War for Independence, government under the Confederation, 
and the making of the Constitution of the United States. 
Prerequisite: H 241. 

AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY I 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
This course considers the foreign policy and diplomacy of the 
United States during that span of time (1776-1898) when Amer- 
ica was not considered by Europe or itself a great power. Em- 
phasis will be placed upon various concepts of national interest 
which motivated particular foreign policies, the role of certain 
policy makers, and American relations with Great Britain as an 
essential key to the understanding of the entire fabric of American 
policy. 

AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY II— 1898— Present 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
This course studies the development of American foreign policies 
in terms of specific American reactions to international events and 
situations. The course will demonstrate the phases of the Ameri- 
can response to its recognized position as a ranking world power 
from the Spanish-American War. 

H 341, 342 INTELLECTUAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF THE 
UNITED STATES Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 
A study of the major currents of thought — religious, social, and 
political — which have had an impact upon the development of 
American institutions, values, and "tastes," as well as upon the 
shaping of social and cultural movements of reform. The first 
semester covers from the Colonial period to the Civil war and the 
second from the Civil War to the present. 

H 352 EUROPE SINCE 1815 Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

An analysis of the political, social, and intellectual developments, 
which have most affected the major Powers of Europe, during the 
period from the defeat of Napoleon until the rise of Hitler. Special 
research projects will focus the students' attention on major topics 
of importance during this era. 



H 312 



H 321 




H 322 



93 



H 432 



MA 101 



MA 102 



MA 103, 104 



MA 111 



MA 112 



TERRITORIAL EXPANSION OF THE UNITED STATIi 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (I 
A comprehensive study of the economic, political and social L 
tors involved in the westward movement of the American pole 
from the French and Indian War until the turn of the twenijh 
century. 



Mathematics 
college of arts and sciences 

elements of college mathematics 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) CD) 
MA 101, 102 is a terminal course for students whose curricujm 
calls for one year of mathematics. The first semester covers n p- 
ber systems, algebra, symbolic logic and trigonometry. 

ELEMENTS OF COLLEGE MATHEMATICS 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (D) 
Analytic geometry and an introduction to calculus. 
Prerequisite: MA 101 

FINITE MATHEMATICS Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 
An elementary course covering symbolic logic, finite sets, p lb- 
ability, vectors and matrices, and the theory of games, lis 
course may be taken in place of MA 101, 102 to meet the be 
year mathematics requirement. 

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS I 

Cr. 4-0 (4-0) (p 
The straight line, coni-sections, vectors, differentiation andps 
tegration of algebraic and transcendental functions. Requirebf 
all first year engineering, physics, chemistry, and mathemjcs 
majors. 

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS II 
Continuation of MA 111 Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (p 

Differentiation and integration of logarithmic and exponential f (lo- 
tions, theory of limits, and continuity, formal methods of inte a- 
tion, improper integrals, hyperbolic functions, parametric eja- 



tions, and polar coordinates. Required of all first year engin- 
eering, physics, chemistry ;and mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: MA 111 

ANALYTIC GEOMETRY AND CALCULUS III 

Cr. 4-0 (4-0) (0-0) 
Continuation of MA 112, Solid analytic geometry, partial differ- 
entiation, multiple integration and infinite series. Required of 
all second year engineers, physics, chemistry, and mathematics 
majors. 

Prerequisite: MA 112 

DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS I Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Ordinary differential equations of the first order, linear differ- 
ential equations of the nth order, some nonlinear second order 
equations, series solutions and Laplace transforms. Required of 
k all second year engineering, physics, chemistry, and mathematics 
majors. 

Prerequisite: MA 211 

LINEAR ALGEBRA Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Vectors, linear transformations, matrices and determinants. Re- 
quired of all second year mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: MA 112 

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN ALGEBRA 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Integral domains, fields, rings, and groups. Required of all second 
year majors in mathematics. 
Prerequisite: MA 221. 

ELEMENTARY STATISTICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Collection and presentation of data. Frequency distributions and 
measures of central tendency. Introduction to probability. Esti- 
mation. Statistical inference and sampling. 
Prerequisite: MA 102 

INTRODUCTION TO DECISION THEORY 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Continued application of statistical procedures. Regression and 
correlation analyses. Statistical problems from decision making 
point of view, using loss functions, risks, and expectations. 
Prerequisite: MA 231 



95 



MA 311, 312 ADVANCED CALCULUS Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

A rigorous analysis of the concepts of limits, continuity, the L 
rivative, the Riemann integral, series, uniform conveyance, fifc- 
tions of several variables, Fourier series, improper integrals, le 
and surface integrals. 

MA 321 ADVANCED ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (il) 
Series solutions of differential equations, vector analysis, solutU 
of partial differential equations of mathematical physics andjw 
traduction to complex variables. Required of all third year mz Irs 
in electrical engineering. 
Prerequisite: MA 212 

MA 341 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS II Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0 

Numerical solutions of differential equations, partial differeial 
equations, and boundary-value problems. 
Prerequisite: MA 212 

MA 342 VECTOR ANALYSIS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The algebra and calculus of vectors and curvilinear coordinatl 
Prerequisite: MA 212 

MA 351 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Finite differences, polynomial and transcendental equations, nn- 
erical integrations and the least square method. 
Prerequisite: MA 212 

MA 361 THEORY OF NUMBERS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Prime numbers, congruences, quadratic residues, Diophar ie 
equations and other topics. 
Prerequisite: MA 211 

MA 362 THEORY OF EQUATIONS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Complex numbers, fundamental theorems, cubic and quartic e ja- 
tions, approximation methods, determinants and matrices, U> 
symmetric functions. 
Prerequisite: MA 211 

MA 401 HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A chronological survey of the development of mathematics thr< gh 
the 19th century. 
Prerequisite: MA 211 



96 



MA 411 FUNCTIONS OF REAL VARIABLES 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Real numbers, abstract spaces, point sets, measure theory, and 
Lebesgue integration. 

Prerequisite: MA 312 

MA 421 FUNCTIONS OF A COMPLEX VARIABLE 

Cr. 3-0 (0-0) (3-0) 
Analytic functions, differentiation, integration, conformal mapping, 
calculus of residues and infinite series. 
Prerequisite: MA 312 

MA 422 LINEAR PROGRAMMING Cr. 0-3 (3-0) (0-0) 

Convex sets, simplex method of solution of linear programming 
problems, with application to mixture problems, transportation 
problems, optimum allocation, and Leontief Models. Introduc- 
tion to the theory of games. 
Prerequisites: MA 221 or consent of instructor 

MA 441, 442 MODERN ALGEBRA Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

Theory of groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, and linear trans- 
formations. 

Prerequisite: MA 222 

MA 451 DIFFERENTIAL GEOMETRY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

The differential geometry of curves and surfaces. 
Prerequisite: MA 212 

MA 452 INTRODUCTION TO HIGHER GEOMETRY 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Topics from projective geometry and non-Euclidean geometry. 
Prerequisite: MA 312 

MA 461 ELEMENTARY TOPOLOGY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

An introduction to Point-set Topology and algebraic Topology. 
Prerequisite: MA 312 



MA 471 PROBABILITY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Combinatorial analysis, algebra of expectations, principle discrete 
and continuous probability distributions, transformation of var- 
iables. 



97 



MA 472 MATHEMATICAL STATISTICS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Theory of estimation and hypothesis testing, including Neymar 
Pearson Lemma. Cramer-Rao Inequality, and complete and sul 
ficient statistics. Non-parametric tests, correlation, and introduc 
tion to decision theory. 

MA 481 ADVANCED PROBABILITY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Continuation of topics from MA 471, with inclusion of Boyc 
Theorem, probability generating functions, birth and death pre] 

cesses, and gamblers' ruin. 
Prerequisite: MA 471 



Modern Languages 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

FR 101, 102 FRENCH I, II Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This is an elementary course utilizing college level materi; 
oriented to establish the fundamentals of the language in tern 
of combined audiolingual and traditional objective. 
Prerequisite: FR 101 or its equivalent for FR II 

FR 201, 202 FRENCH III, IV Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This is an intermediate course, organized to broaden the mastei 
of fundamentals of the French language, in terms of the aura 
oral objective. Secondary objectives include reading ability, a coi 
tinuation of grammar, written control of the materials studied, ar 
an expanding awareness of the French culture. 
Prerequisite: FR 102 

GER 101, 102 GERMAN I, II Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

An elementary course in the German language. Covers gramma 
composition, and reading of German prose. 
Prerequisite: GER 101 or its equivalent for GER II 

GER 201, 202 GERMAN III, IV Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This course provides extensive reading in German, especially 
major literary figures, with an aim to increasing the student 
vocabulary and speed, and improving his comprehension. Tin 
will also be devoted to composition in German and to the revie 
of grammar. 

Prerequisite: GER 101 or its equivalent and GER 102 

98 



RUS 101, 102 RUSSIAN I, II Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

A study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar together with 
drills in pronunciation and reading. Conversation in Russian is 
introduced from the beginning. Various outside readings in Rus- 
sian will introduce the student to Russian and Soviet culture. 

RUS 201, 202 RUSSIAN III, IV Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This course will include a review of basic grammar and a study 
of more advanced syntax. Readings will serve as the basis for 
continued work in conversation and composition and for the 
study of Russian and Soviet culture. Conducted in Russian. 
Prerequisite: Russian 102 or permission of the instructor. 

SPN 101, 102 SPANISH I, II Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

In a measure self-instructional, the work of these two semesters 
seeks to develop spoken proficiency in the language by relying 
upon linguistic principles of phonemic and morphological analysis 
inherent in the materials utilized. A second objective involves 
the training of the student in reading ability and written control 
within a context of the Spanish culture. 

SPN 201, 202 SPANISH III, IV Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This is an intermediate course planned to broaden the student's 
mastery of the Spanish language in terms of audiolingual profic- 
iency. Secondary objectives include reading ability, the continua- 
tion of grammar, and written control of the materials studied 
within a developing context of Spanish culture. 
Prerequisite: SPN 102 

POR 101, 102 PORTUGUESE I, II Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

A study of the principal elements of Portuguese grammar to- 
gether will drill in pronunciation and in reading. Conversation 
in Portuguese is introduced from the beginning. 

POR 201, 202 PORTUGUESE III, IV Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This course will include a review of the essentials of grammar, 
exercises in composition, readings of representative modern Brazil- 
ian and Portuguese prose, oral practice and the correct use of 
idiomatic expressions. 

The course will be conducted as far as possible in Portuguese. 
Prerequisite: POR 101, 102 or a sufficient command of the lang- 
uage to satisfy the instructor. 



99 



Music 



COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

MUS 101, 102 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This course is designed primarily for the general student who ha 
had no previous formal musical experience. Its purpose througr 
out is to stimulate and develop the student's interest and intelligei 
understanding of music through analytical listening and the stud 
of the elements and chief musical forms, styles, and historical pei 
iods of music history. 

This course will also show how the various arts responded to th 
same philosophical, socio-cultural conditions, and how each a: 
is related to the others in the pattern of cultural history. Readin 
and listening are assigned, and attendance at concerts recon 
mended. 

MUS 201 ROMANTIC MUSIC Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A study of the Romantic innovations and of composers and the 
representative styles from Ludwig van Beethoven to Richai 
Strauss. 

MUS 202 TWENTIETH CENTURY MUSIC Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A study of the trends in twentieth century music, encompassin 
analysis of representative works from the period, and their refc; 
tionships to the cultural-political existing age. 

MUS 211 CHORUS Cr. 0-1 (0-3) (0-3) 

Rehearsal twice a week, each session lasting one and a ha 
hours. Attendance at chorus rehearsals mandatory. Besides prr 
paration for concerts, part of each rehearsal will be spent on voc; 
problems and techniques. 



Philosophy 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

PH 201, 202 PROBLEMS OF PHILOSOPHY Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This is an introductory course in philosophy as the persistei 
and methodical attempt to think clearly about basic problems < 
human life. These problems include an investigation and evalu; 
tion of ways of knowing, studies in values, and determination < 
possible general accounts of man and the universe, in inter-relatioi; 



100 



PH 211 LOGIC Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

For this course logic is broadly conceived as a study of the 
weight of evidence in all fields. The foundation of valid think- 
ing in formal logic is established through class and propositional 
logic. The nature of meaning and of truth, and scientific method, 
are topics of importance. Exercises in the recognition of fallacies 
are included. 

PH 482 PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

This course is a critical analysis of science and its methods, of its 
justification and of its limitation. What scientists actually do, 
the reasons therefor, and the results thereof, are central. 

PH 561, 562 PHILOSOPHY OF ART Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This is essentially a study of aesthetic experience and aesthetic 
judgment. It includes such problems as are related to the arts, 
to fine art, to productivity, and to criticism. 



Physics 

college of arts and sciences 

PHYSICS I Cr. 3-0 (4-0) (0-0) 

Particle Mechanics including principles of conservation of momen- 
tum, energy and angular momentum. Oscillations, planetary 
motion, inertial forces. Required of all first year engineering, 
physics, mathematics and chemistry majors. PHY 121 and MA 
111 to be taken concurrently. 

PHYSICS II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (4-0) 
Principles of rigid body motion. Properties of matter including 
elementary hydrodynamics, Thermodynamics, Kinetic Theory of 
gases, solids and liquids. Waves phenomena. Required of all 
first year engineering, physics, mathematics and chemistry majors. 
PHY 122 and MA 112 to be taken concurrently. 
Prerequisite: MA 111 -and PHY 111 

PHY 121, 122 PHYSICS LABORATORY Cr. V2-V2 (0-2) (0-2) 

A laboratory course which accompanies PHY 111, 112. One 
2-hour laboratory biweekly. Required of all first year engineering, 
physics, mathematics, and chemistry majors. 



101 



PHY 201, 202 GENERAL PHYSICS Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

A survey course which emphasizes the physical principles c 
mechanics, heat, light, sound, and electricity. Required of a 
second year biology and textile technology majors. 

PHY 203, 204 PHYSICS LABORATORY Cr. 1-1 (0-2) (0-2) 

A laboratory course which accompanies PHY 201, 202. One 1 
hour laboratory weekly. 

PHY 211 PHYSICS III Cr. 3-0 (4-0) (0-0) 

Fundamental laws of electricity and magnetism. Static and d> 
namic properties of the electromagnetic field, interaction of tt 
field with charges and currents, dielectric and magnetic medi; 
Maxwell's equations. Vector calculus is used extensively. R< 
quired of all second year engineering, physics, mathematics an 
chemistry majors. PHY 221 to be taken concurrently. 
Prerequisite: PHY 112, MA 112 

PHY 212 PHYSICS IV Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (4-0) 

Classical electromagnetic theory of light and its interaction wil 
matter, Huygen's principle, physical optics. Introduction to atom 
and nuclear physics. Required of all second year engineerin 
physics, mathematics, and chemistry majors. Phy 222 to t 
taken concurrently. 
Prerequisite: PHY 211, MA 211. 

PHY 221, 222 PHYSICS LABORATORY Cr. V2-V2 (0-2) (0-2) 

A laboratory course which accompanies PHY 211, 212. Oi 
2-hour laboratory biweekly. Required of all second year engii 
eering, physics, mathematics and chemistry majors. 

PHY 311 INTERMEDIATE MECHANICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Fundamental ideas of classical mechanics, moving coordinate sy 
terns, Lagrange's equations, Hamiltonian formalism, rigid boc 
dynamics, small oscillations, normal modes. Phy 343 to be take 
concurrently. 

Prerequisite: PHY 212, MA 212. 

PHY 312 INTERMEDIATE ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (M 

The theory of electric and magnetic fields in vacuo and in solid 
Special emphasis is placed on the application of Maxwell's equ 

102 



tions to the propagation of electromagnetic waves in free space, 
material media and in wave guides. Required of all third-year 
physics majors. 

Prerequisite: PHY 212, MA 212. 

ADVANCED PHYSICS LABORATORY I 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (0-4) 
A laboratory course designed to acquaint the student with cur- 
rent experimental techniques. 

MODERN PHYSICS I Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Survey of the foundations of modern physics including special 
relativity, photons and matter waves, structure of the hydrogen 
atom, .and many-electron atoms and the periodic table. 

MODERN PHYSICS II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Continuation of PHY 331. Further study of the phenomena of 
atomic and nuclear physics using methods of elementary quantum 
mechanics; cosmic rays; elementary particles; quantum statistics, 
etc. 

Prerequisite: PHY 331. 

MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS I Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Selected topics in vector calculus, linear algebra, ordinary v and 
partial differential equations, with special applications to physics. 
Prerequisite: MA 212 and PHY 212. 

MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Continuation of PHY 343. The ordinary and partial differential 
equations of theoretical physics, with applications to the mechanics 
of discrete and continuous systems and to electromagnetic fields. 
Prerequisite: PHY 311, 312 and 343. 

PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
The theory of electronic circuits emphasizing applications in the 
modern research techniques of measurement, pulse counting and 
automatic control. Feedback amplifiers, transistors, photomulti- 
pliers, differentiating and integrating circuits, etc. 

PHY 415, 416 THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS 

Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 
Formulation of the laws of thermodynamics and kinetic theory 
and application to physical problems; entropy and probability; 
introduction to Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein and Fermi-Dirac statis- 
tics and their application to physical problems. 



103 



PHY 421 ADVANCED PHYSICS LABORATORY II 

Cr. 3-0 (0-4) (0- 

Continuation of PHY 322. A laboratory course designed to a 
quaint the student with the techniques of modern experiment 
physics. 

Prerequisite: PHY 322. 

PHY 442 INTRODUCTION TO SOLID STATE PHYSICS 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-j 
The thermal and elastic properties of solids. Electric and ma 
netic properties of solids including the properties of dielectric J 
ferromagnetism and superconductivity. Band theory of meta 
properties of semiconductors, and imperfections in crystals. Ei 
phasis placed on descriptive aspects of topics using only eleme 
tary quantum mechanics. 

PHY 443 PHYSICAL OPTICS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction and polarizatij 
of light. Dispersion, absorption and scattering. Optical prop< 
ties of anisotropic media. 

PHY 451 INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM MECHANICS 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0- 

The elementary formalism of quantum mechanics and the thee ; 
of measurement; solutions of the Schroedinger equation; angu 
momentum; the hydrogen atom and its fine structure; introdi 
tion to perturbation methods. 

PHY 461 ATOMIC PHYSICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Atomic phenomena. Rutherford's model of the atom. Boh 
model. Quantication. Electron spin and magnetic mome i 
Stern-Gerlach experiment. Electron configurations in aton| 
vector model, Pauli exclusion principle, atomic and molecu 
spectra. Spin-orbit interaction, fine structure, anomalous Zeem 
effect. Atomic collisions, ionization; luminescence. Stimulate 
emission: lasers, masers. 

PHY 462 NUCLEAR PHYSICS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Properties of nuclei and their measurement. Natural Rad 
activity nuclear reactions and energy levels. Nuclear models: sb ] 
model, optical model, liquid drop model. Nuclear fission. 



104 



PHY 490 



PS 101 
PS 102 



PS 201 



PS 202 



SPECIAL PROJECT IN PHYSICS Cr. 0-3 
Intensive individual work on an experimental or theoretical prob- 
lem in physics under the guidance of a staff member. The spec- 
ial project is to be selected at the beginning of the senior year. 
Credit will be assigned in the second semester. 



Political Science 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Structure and constitutional foundation of American government. 
Political parties and pressure groups, three branches of govern- 
ment, functions of government. Comparison of American system 
with other governmental systems. Introduces students to analy- 
tical method in political science. 

COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Study of political processes, ideologies, constitutional systems and 
governmental structure of foreign countries including Great Brit- 
ain, France, Italy, Soviet Union and selected underdeveloped 
nations. Comparison with American system of government. 
Stress laid on use of analytical method. 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Consideration of the principle elements shaping the nation-state 
system, and the political and legal principles underlying that 
system. Attention directed to concepts such as power, the nation- 
al interest, nationalism, the balance of power, international or- 
ganization. Due consideration given to the arenas of great power 
conflict and the emergent nations. The framework is both insti- 
tutional and theoretical. 

Prerequisite: PS 101 or 102 and upperclass standing. 

FOREIGN POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES 

Cr. (0-3) (0-0) (3-0) 
Constitutional principles, theoretical postulates, institutional and 
economic factors in the formulation of foreign policy. Contem- 
porary diplomatic action in regard to specified nations, blocs of 
countries, and international organizations. Relationship of eco- 
nomic assistance and military action to foreign policy. 
Prerequisite: P. S. 101 or 102, and upperclass standing. 



105 



PS 203 STATE GOVERNMENT Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Course will stress comparative method and use of first hand m 
search techniques. Comparison of Massachusetts with oil 
states, with federal government, and with middle-level governs I 
in foreign countries. Historical heritage: constitutionalism, p i 
alistic structure, spoils system, and civil service; newer devell 
ments such as systematic budgeting and revenue estimation, ail 
mation, coordination by central staff committees. 
Prerequisite: PS 101 and upperclass standing. 

PS 301 AMERICAN POLITICAL THOUGHT 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) ((hj 
Development of American political thought from Colonial peiil 
to present day. Among points of stress: Jefferson, Fedenl 
Papers, Calhoun, Thoreau, Sumner, Veblen, selected Supr<| 
Court decisions. Effect of newer scientific thinking in socioldj 
psychology, management on American political thought. 
Prerequisite: P. S. 101 or 102, and upperclass standing. 

PS 302 MODERN POLITICAL THOUGHT 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) C| 
Complements P. S. 301, stressing contribution of European 
other foreign leaders. Development of democratic thought s | 
18th Century, capitalism, socialism, communism, fascism, 
chism, and religiously oriented philosophies. Influence of lite: 
writers, scientific thinkers. 

Prerequisite: P. S. 101 or 102, and upperclass standing. 

PS 303 POLITICAL PARTIES AND PRESSURE GROUPS 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) H 
Role of political parties, pressure groups, public opinion 
propaganda in the political and governmental process. So ( 
logical, ethnic, and economic influences; organization, lea J 
ship and action programs of American political parties; the 
party system, elections, political patronage. 
Prerequisite: P. S. 101 and upperclass standing. 

PS 305 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) ( 

Theory and practice of international organization, historical b | 
ground of modern organizations. United Nations, Pan-Amer j 
Union, European Common Market, NATO, Organization 



106 



African unity, international courts. Includes study of pressure 
groups and competing value systems within international bodies. 
Prerequisite: P. S. 101 or 102 and upperclassmen standing. 

PS 401, 402 POLITICAL SCIENCE RESEARCH SEMINAR 

Cr. (3-3) (3-0) (3-0) 
Two semester course designed for Political Science majors. Stu- 
dents from other disciplines who have taken one full year (two 
semesters) of political science may be admitted with the consent 
of the Instructor. 

Training in report writing: clarity of expression, organization, 
documentation. Research methodology: use of primary sources, 
including statistical materials, alternative hypotheses, scientific 
criterea, formulation of conclusions. Members of seminar are to 
present research papers on an every-other-week basis on a com- 
mon subject to be announced by the Instructor. 
Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 



Psychology 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

3 SY 101 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to psychology 
through a study of growth and development, motivation, frus- 
tration, emotion and feeling, learning, attention and perception, 
intelligence, thinking, and personality. 

?SY 202 SOCIAL-PSYCHOLOGY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The relationship between group membership and individual be- 
havior. Special attention will be given to concepts of self -identity, 
roles, role conflicts, consciousness, the reification of conscious- 
ness, symbolic interaction, and creativity. The theories of Meads, 
Piaget, Cooley, Strauss, Lukacs Goffman, Kenneth Burke, and 
Erik Erickson will be examined. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

PSY 311 PSYCHOLOGY OF ADJUSTMENT Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A study of the dynamics of human adjustment. Attention will be 
directed toward an examination of motivation, frustration, con- 



107 



flict, types of adjustment, anxiety, the role of learning in adji 1 - 
ment, psychotherapy and mental hygiene. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

PSY 412 INDUSTRIAL PSYCHOLOGY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

This course deals with the principles of psychology as applied p 
business and industry. Topics to be studied are: individual dif f- 
ences, morale, job satisfaction, supervision, communication, - 
dustrial conflict, accidents, interviewing, and psychological tes |g 
in business and industry. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 



Sociology 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

SOC 101 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (oi 

A history of sociology and the major divisions, principles |d 
theories concerning society. Special consideration is given o 
basic empirical studies of the past and current research. 

SOC 102 SOCIAL PROBLEMS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A survey of the various social problems found in different I- 
tures. The changing nature of social problems over time jd 
place. A variety of theoretical explanations for social problus 
arising will be examined. Special emphasis will be placed n 
crime, juvenile delinquency, mental illness, race minority relati< s, 
and addictions. 
Prerequisit: SOC 101 

SOC 201 MASS SOCIETY AND CULTURE Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-([ 

The history, development, and theory of mass society and k 
ture. The basic controversies concerning mass society as > 
fleeted in the writings of Ortega y Gasset, Rosenbarg, Luk s, 
Griff and others. 
Prerequisite: SOC 101 

SOC 202 DEMOGRAPHY AND HUMAN ECOLOGY 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (I 
The study of population as a problem. The problem of o r- 
and-under population, recent developments in genetics and t jir 
influence in demographic problems. Also the study of the spz |al 



108 



;oc 301 



oc 302 



OC 401 



BA 101 
BA 102 



distribution of man. The theories concerning population of 
Malthus, Carr-Suanders, Sauvy, Clark and Notestein will be 
studied. 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 

THE SOCIOLOGY OF WORK Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
The study of the social organization of work in contemporary 
societies. Particular attention will be paid to occupations, pro- 
fessions, careers, work roles, identity, role conflicts, and the 
social organization of the factory. 
Prerequisite: SOC 101 

THE SOCIOLOGY OF ART Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
The relationship between society and art and artists. Various 
problems will be taken up concerning the recruitment and careers 
of artists and the effects that these have had on thir artistic work. 
Prerquisite: SOC 101, PSY 101 or History of Art. 

RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIOLOGY 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
The philosophy of modern research methods in sociology will 
be explained and related to various theoretical orientations. Speci- 
fic techniques will be described and evaluated. Among these will 
be the historical, statistical, survey, case-history and philosophical 
techniques. 

Prerequisites: SOC 101 and one other sociology course. 



Business Administration 
college of business and industry 

BASIC ACCOUNTING Cr. 3-0 (3-2) (0-0) 
A study of accounting theory as applied to accounts by the analysis 
of business transactions and entries in books of original entry; the 
ledger and trial balance; preparation of financial statements; the 
use of accounting as a tool of management. 

BASIC ACCOUNTING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-2) 
Continued application of accounting theory applied to accounts 
incident to the development of partnership and corporation ac- 
counting methods and procedures. Analysis of statements. State- 

109 



merits of application of funds. Consideration of the effects ] 
automation in accounting procedures. 

Prerequisite: BA 101 

BA 201 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) ] 

Review of fundamental procedures. A detailed analysis of pr< fl 
and loss accounts and the effect on the balance sheet equation I 
well as the interpretation and analysis of statements. 

Prerequisite: BA 102 

BA 202 ADVANCED ACCOUNTING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A detailed study of procedures in partnership and corporate 
accounting. Installment and consignment sales, consolidations zl 
fiduciary and budgetary accounting. 

Prerequisite: BA 201 

BA 221 THEORY OF ADMINISTRATION Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0 U 

This course attempts to give the student a deeper insight i ll 
the need for understanding human characteristics as well as tel 
nological and economic concepts in building a sound managemn 
policy. 

BA 222 MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

This course introduces the student to the use of the tools f 
economic analysis in formulating and solving management prH 
lems and effectively integrates economic analysis and the 
agement viewpoint. 

BA 301 COST ACCOUNTING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A study of process and specific order cost systems; material i« 
uation, accounting for labor costs, distribution of costs to M 
partments, standard costs and variances. 

Prerequisite: BA 202 

BA 302 COST ACCOUNTING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continued application of the principles of production costs; W 
alysis of budgets, forecasts, and other control procedures to as|l| 
management in manufacturing, distribution and service operatic}*; 

Prerequisite: BA 301 



110 



LEGAL FRAMEWORK OF BUSINESS 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

This course seeks to familiarize the student with the fact that all 
business must be conducted within the framework of the law, that 
such a legal environment forms the basis for rules of conduct 
among businessmen, and that a broad comprehension of the law 
is essential in setting business policy. 

BUSINESS FINANCE Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A study is made of the basic business and investment problems 
necessary for the successful operation of a business enterprise. 
Prerequisite: BA 102 

PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Fundamental functions of marketing; distribution of goods and 
services; channels of distribution; consumer motivation; whole- 
sale and retail structures; price policies; promotion of products; 
competition; types of marketing policies that affect the marketing 
manager. 

MARKETING MANAGEMENT Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

This course is based upon the management point of view, being 
decision-oriented and analytical. It sets forth a definite way of 
surveying current developments in marketing practice, with the 
advantage of allowing the student freedom in his choice of execu- 
tive action. 

Prerequisite: BA 321 

ADVERTISING AND SELLING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A study of the principal forms of advertising. Practice in the 
planning of advertising campaigns. Integration of advertising and 
selling principles. Methods of selling and their application to 
specific cases, with emphasis on sales management at wholesale 
and retail levels. 

ADVERTISING AND SELLING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continued application of the principles of advertising and selling. 
Emphasis on decision-making under changing conditions and 
in the presence of many variables. 
Prerequisite: BA 331 



111 



PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
This course deals with the application of analytical techniques I 
problems of allocating resources within the business enterprise. [ 
seeks to familiarize the student with the quantitative discipliii 
of mathematics, statistics and accounting which are most relev; 
for the analysis and solution of production problems. 
Prerequisite: BA 212; MA 102; BA 102 

TIME AND MOTION STUDY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
A study of the scientific approaches to eliminate wasted effcj 
Principles of the uses of graphic charts, sample sizes, work f;[ 
tors, allowances and methods of establishing indirect labor stai I 
ards are determined. 
Prerequisites: BA 212 

REAL ESTATE Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A study of the forms and types of properties and ownership, il 

praisal procedures, and financial arrangements. 

BUSINESS CYCLES AND FORECASTING 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3|) 
A study of the dynamic forces on economic activity; national I 
come accounting and analysis; economic indicators and measurf 
forecasting for the economy of the firm; and problems of stabilj/ 
and growth. 
Prerequisite: BA 222 

INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
A course for Industrial Engineering students only. The cou ; 
consists of the basic foundations in accounting principles zjl 
procedures. 

AUDITING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Procedures and practices in auditing programs. Duties and I 
sponsibilities of auditors. Preparation of audit working papers 
Prerequisite: BA 202 

AUDITING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continued application of theory in conducting and completing I 
audit. Preparation of working papers, financial statements, * 1 
audit reports. 
Prerequisite: BA 401 



BA 411 TAXATION Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Basic tax problems affecting the individual and the business en- 
terprise. A study is made of individual income taxes, sales and 
excise taxes as well as real and personal property taxes. 

BA 412 TAXATION Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continued application of the principles of taxation. A study of the 
Internal Revenue Code as it affects individuals, partnerships, and 
corporations. 
Prerequisite: BA 411 

BA 421 LABOR MANAGEMENT Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

This is a course dealing with the historical background and pres- 
ent status of labor organizations. It emphasizes the many labor- 
management problems that are evident today and aims to help 
the student understand the various techniques employed in col- 
lective bargaining procedures. 

BA 422 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT AND INDUSTRIAL 

RELATIONS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A study of manpower management and personnel practices in 
effect in today's complex business enterprise. 

BA 431 BUSINESS POLICY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

This course deals with top-management problems in business. 
It encompasses the basic business fields and gives the student an 
opportunity to develop his managerial decision-making practices 
and procedures. 

BA 432 ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICES Cr. 0-3 (0-0 (3-0) 

A study of administrative situations and problems relating to all 
levels of activity within the business enterprise. 
Prerequisite: BA 422; BA 431 

BA 441 ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Survey of the mechanization of all business procedures with em- 
phasis on punch card machines and computers. 

BA 442 ELECTRONIC DATA PROCESSING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continued application of data processing procedures. Panel 
wiring, programming of tabulators, reproducers, collators, sorters 
and interpreters. 
Prerequisite: BA 441 



113 



BA 451 MARKETING RESEARCH Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Development of marketing research. Techniques of defining mar 
keting problems. Gathering and analyzing data. 
Prerequisite: BA 321; BA 312 

BA 452 MARKETING RESEARCH Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continued application of marketing research principles. FieL 
work and practice in making market surveys. 

BA 461 INDUSTRIAL MANAGEMENT Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A study of the principles underlying manufacturing and productio 
problems. 

Prerequisite: BA 342 

BA 471 CORPORATION LAW Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (3-0) 

Laws pertinent to corporations, property sales, negotiable instru 
ments and bankruptcy. 
Prerequisite: BA 311 

BA 472 INSURANCE FUNDAMENTALS Cr. 0-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

Fundamental principles of insurance; life, property, casualty an 
suretyship. 

BA 481 SEMINAR Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (3-0) 

This is a conference course for students doing research or thos 
preparing theses related to various business fields. 



Textile Chemistry 
college of business and industry 
tc 302 elementary dyeing cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 

This course consists of a study of the preparation of textile fibei 
for dyeing and the application of the various classes of dyestufi 
to textile fibers. 

TC 312 CHEMISTRY OF DYESTUFFS Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-3) 

A study of the chemistry and technology of dyes. Preparation ( 
intermediates and dyestuffs on a laboratory scale. 
Prerequisite: CH 211-212 



114 



TC 322 APPLICATION OF DYES Cr. 2-0 (2-0) (0-0) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental properties of the various classes of dyes and to acquaint 
him with the techniques of the application of dyestuffs to natural 
and synthetic fibers. 

TC 323 FINISHING TECHNOLOGY Cr. 0-2 (0-0) (2-0) 

A general course in fabric finishing. Emphasis is placed on 
garment- type fabrics including stabilization finishes, water repel- 
lency, crease resistance and mildew proofing. 

TC 401 ADVANCED DYEING Cr. 3-3 (2-2) (0-0) 

Studies are conducted on the application of dyestuffs to synthetic 
fibers and mixed fiber combinations. Color matching and experi- 
mental dyeing on pilot plant equipment are included. 
Prerequisite: TC 302 

TC 411 TEXTILE PRINTING Cr. 3-0 (2-3) (0-0) 

This course covers methods of printing and the preparation of 
printing pastes. Direct, discharge and resist printing methods are 
included. 

TC 421 CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY OF FINISHING 

Cr. 3-0 (2-3) (0-0) 
The application of the various classes of textile finishes to natural 
fibers. Attention is centered on the standard finishes used in 
modern practice. 
Prerequisite: TC 302 

TC 422 CHEMICAL TECHNOLOGY OF FINISHING 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 
The finishing of synthetic fibers and blends is studied. Finishing 
procedures and dye selection are included. This course is supple- 
mented by field trips to various plants. 
Prerequisite: TC 421 

TC 431 INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS 

Cr. 3-0 (2-3) (0-0) 
This course is devoted to the chemistry of products associated 
with the textile industry. Methods of analysis of the A. A. T. C. C. 
and A. S. T. M. and other specialized procedures are followed. 
The testing of dyestuffs and fabric blends is included. 
Prerequisite: TC 302 



115 



r 



TC 432 INDUSTRIAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-: 
A continuation of Chemistry TC 431. Fuels, water, lubricatin 
compounds, soap and industrial chemicals are analyzed. 
Prerequisite: TC 431 

TC 442 CHEMISTRY OF FIBERS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-2) 

The chemistry of natural and synthetic fibers. A study of til 
relationship between the chemical structure and physical pro] 
erties of fibers. 

Prerequisite: CH 212 

TC 452 TEXTILE MICROBIOLOGY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-4) 

Fundamental techniques of microbiology. Preparation of cultui; 
media, staining and identification, sterilization techniques. A] 
plication and evaluation of bactericidal and fungicidal finishes t] 
textile materials. 
Prerequisite: TC 421 



Textile Technology 
college of business and industry 
tt 201-202 yarn technology cr. 3-3 (2-2) (2-2) 

Technological and scientific concepts of fiber and yarn structure 
and modifications resulting from processing. Includes prepr 
cessing fiber development and preparation, methods of blendii 
and distribution, and principles of drafting, twisting and mediae! 
cal controls prior to yarn formation. 

TT 211-212 FABRIC TECHNOLOGY Cr. 3-3 (3-1) (3-1) 

Fundamentals and principles of the mechanisms related to fabi 
cation of materials by the process of weaving. Basic cam syste 
followed by dobby mechanism and semiautomatic motions. Mate 
ial preparations prior to weaving are included in course conter 
Introduction of multi-color mechanisms. 

TT 221, 222 DESIGN AND STRUCTURE Cr. 3-2 (3-2) (1-3) 

A study of the fundamental principles of fabric construction ai 
weave formation of basic and staple fabrics. Instruction in tJ| 
physical analysis and design techniques essential to the reprodu 
tion and creation of woven fabrics. 



116 



TT 231-232 KNIT TECHNOLOGY Cr. 2-2 (2-1) (2-1) 

Fundamentals and principles of the mechanisms related to the 
fabrication of materials by the process of knitting. Machine and 
motion capabilities and applicable mathematics are studied. An- 
alysis and creation of fabric designs and patterns are also con- 
sidered. 



TT 301-302 YARN TECHNOLOGY Cr. 3-3 (2-2) (2-2) 

Theories, mechanics, and applications involved in the transforma- 
tion of fibrous sliver into yarn structures. Studies on various 
systems of dimension drafting in relation to economic standards. 
Laboratory experiments, visual aids, and field trips are supple- 
mentary. 

Prerequisite: TT 202 

TT 311-312 FABRIC TECHNOLOGY Cr. 3-3 (3-1) (3-1) 

A comprehensive study of more complicated mechanisms re- 
lated to various types of weaving equipment. The design, appli- 
cable calculations, capabilities, timings and settings on the mul- 
tiple mechanical devices are explored and studied. 
Prerequisite: TT 212 

TT 321-322 DESIGN AND STRUCTURE Cr. 3-3 (3-2) (3-2) 

An extension of TT 221-222 into more complex fabric construc- 
tions and patterns. Includes technology related to and required for 
the reproduction and creation of fabrics in the areas of multiple 
yarn system and three dimensional characteristics and properties. 
Associated yarn and fabric mathematics is included. 
Prerequisite: TT 222 

TT 331 TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY Cr. 2-0 (2-0) (0-0) 

A course for Textile Design option students covering the theory 
of the various procedures employed in the processing of raw 
materials into yarns. The natural and manufactured types of 
fibers are included in the course content. 



TT 332 TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY Cr. 0-2 (0-0) (2-0) 

A course in the theory of material fabrication, covering principally 
the weaving process in its variations and capabilities as related to 
the application of fabric design. For students enrolled in the 
Textile Design option. 



117 



FABRIC CONSTRUCTION I Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

Similar to TT 221-222. Composed to meet the requirement o 
students following the Textile Design option. 

TEXTILE MERCHANDISING AND MARKETING 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0 

The lectures cover case histories and general discussions of th<| 
following subjects: the marketing of textile fibers; yarns; cloth; th 
influence of style and fashions on textile industry products; als< 
price policies and other problems common to the textile industry 
The course is based largely on the WORTH STREET RULES. 

TT 352 INTRODUCTION TO STATISTICS FOR RESEARCH 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-2 

More stress is placed upon the need for analysis of results am 
the determination of their significance. The difference betwee; 
fundamental and applied research is explained. The student carrie 
out some form of fundamental research. 

TT 401 YARN TECHNOLOGY Cr. 3-0 (2-2) (0-0) 

Principles and application methods related to yarn structures c 
man-made fibers and blends compositions using the various sys 
terns of formation. Logic factors pertaining to percent content am 
manufacturing procedures are investigated and studied. 

Prerequisite: TT 302 

TT 402 APPLIED YARN TECHNOLOGY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (0-6) 

A project program involving an assigned subject of research cor 
sisting of the solution of a yarn processing problem through th j 
students' use of laboratory equipment, library research am 
seminar discussion. 

Prerequisite: TT 401 (Elective) 

TT 411 FABRIC TECHNOLOGY Cr. 2-0 (1-2) (0-0) 

Continued extension of study of specific weaving mechanisms anj 
related processes. Development and reproduction of complex an | 
elaborate type patterns including Jacquard, pile and looped te? 
tures. 

Prerequisite: TT 312 

118 



L 



TT 341-342 



TT 351 



TT 421 DESIGN AND STRUCTURE Cr. 3-0 (3-2) (0-0) 

The design principles and techniques are applied to the repro- 
duction and creation of Jacquard-type fabrics. Includes the de- 
velopment of the pattern sketch and painted design and the trans- 
fer of same for technical application in fabric formation. A 
study of novelty and textured yarns is included. 
Prerequisite: TT 322 

TT 431 PHYSICAL TESTING Cr. 3-0 (2-3) (0-0) 

A course of study in the techniques and instruments used in quan- 
titative and qualitative determination of fiber, yarn and fabric 
physical properties. Emphasis will be on the theories underlying 
the determined properties as well as on the interpretation and eval- 
uation of data obtained. 

TT 441-442 FABRIC CONSTRUCTION II Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

An extension of TT 341-342 into more complex fabric con- 
structions and patterns. Includes the analysis, reproduction, and 
creation of multiple-yarn, three-dimensional, and Jacquard type 
fabrics. 

Prerequisite: TT 342 

TT 451 MICROSCOPY AND TESTING Cr. 3-0 (2-3) (0-0) 

A course comprising elements of TT 441-462 for textile chem- 
istry majors. 

TT 452 QUALITY CONTROL Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A study of industrial quality control by statistical methods as 
applied to manufacturing processes. The methods of data analy- 
sis, inspection methods, determination of sample size, and the 
construction of control charts. 
Prerequisite: TT 431 

TT 462 MICROSCOPY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 

An instruction in the use of the optical microscope in relation to 
fiber identification and structure, composition of blends, physical, 
chemical, and biological condition of fibers and yarns. Use of 
various micrometers in length, diameter, and area measurements. 
Recording of data by photomicrography. 

TT 472 PROFESSIONAL EXPRESSION Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Designed to give training in effective written and oral expression 
with special emphasis on the technical report. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing. 



119 



TT 481 PLANT ENGINEERING Cr. 3-0 (2-2) (0-0) 

General consideration is given to the design of a new textile mill; 
multi-story vs. single-story; problems in construction; slow-burning 
vs. fire-proof, windowless construction; flow diagrams or layouts 
are made with two-dimensional, special, adhesive-backed develop- 
ed film in order that the finished job may be printed in a ozalid- 
type machine. 

TT 482 FABRIC RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT AND DESIGN 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (1-4) 

This course correlates properties of textile materials, engineering 
principles in textile processing, and the design of fabric structures 
with the desired properties for a particular functional use which 
would relate to stress-strain, dimensional stability, and many 
other characteristics pertaining to the behavior of the finished 
product. 

TT 491 TIME AND MOTION STUDY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

In the first part of the course the student is taught to scientifically 
study the motions made by an operative on his job with a view to 
the elimination of wasted effort. Time study, on the other hand, 
treats of the scientific observation and recording of the time neces- 
sary to do a piece of work. 

TT 492 TEXTILE COST ACCOUNTING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

This course analyzes the principles and problems basic to textile 
costing; basic cost concepts; cost problems; materials, labor anc 
manufacturing costs; textile fiber and supplies purchasing; spin- 
ning mill costs; weaving mill costs; finishing mill cost problems:' 
textile marketing costs; financial statements. 



Civil Engineering 
college of engineering 

CE 211, 212 SURVEYING I, II Cr. 4-3 (3-3) (0-0) 

Linear and angular measurements, calculation of transverses 
areas and earthworks, property line and engineering surveys. Re 
quired of all second-year civil engineers. 



120 



GEOLOGY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-2) 

The materials and surface features of the earth with engineering 
applications. Included is the study of weathering, glaciation, vul- 
canism, and diastrophism. Required of all third-year civil en- 
gineers. 

STRENGTH OF MATERIALS Cr. 5-0 (4-3) (0-0) 
Stresses of engineering materials, beam deflections, energy meth- 
ods, column design, temperature effects, riveted sections, inde- 
terminate members and pressure vessels. Required of all third- 
year civil engineers. 
Prerequisite: ME 231, MA 112 

STRUCTURAL THEORY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Analysis of statistically determinate structures. 
Required of all 4th year electrical and 3rd year industrial en- 
gineers. 

Prerequisite: CE 311 

MECHANICS OF MATERIALS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Simple stress, Hooke's law, combined stresses, strength and de- 
flection of beams, columns, spring deflection and torsion members. 
Required of all fourth-year electrical and third-year industrial en- 
gineers. 

Prerequisite: ME 231, MA 112 

SOIL MECHANICS Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-2) 
A study of the mechanics of soil and soil water, including frost 
action, stress distribution, consolidation and settlement, etc. Re- 
quired of all third-year civil engineers. 
Prerequisites: CE 222, PHY 101 or PHY 111 

CE 342 SANITARY ENGINEERING Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The design of water supply and sewage disposal facilities. Re- 
quired of all third-year civil engineers. 
Prerequisite: ME 332 must be taken simultaneously 

CE 411 HIGHWAY ENGINEERING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

The location, construction, and maintenance of highways. Re- 
quired of all fourth-year civil engineers. 
Prerequisites: CE 211 and CE 322 

121 



CE 421, 422 ADVANCED STRUCTURAL THEORY I, II 

Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0 
The analysis of statistically indeterminate structures. 
Prerequisite: CE 312 

CE 431, 432 STRUCTURAL DESIGN I, II Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

Design and tension and compression members in steel, and th 
design of riveted, bolted and welded connections for tension, com 
pression, shear, and moment. 
Prerequisite: CE 311 

CE 441 REINFORCED CONCRETE Cr. 3-0 (3-3) (0-0) 

Design of reinforced concrete beams, columns, frames, and archei 
Prerequisite: CE 311 

CE 442 PRESTRESSED CONCRETE Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Design of concrete members using prestressed reinforcement i 
the form of cables, rods, or bars. 
Prerequisite: CE 441 

CE 452 FOUNDATIONS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The design of spread footings, mat foundations, pile footings, an 
retaining walls. 

Prerequisites: CE 322 and CE 441 

CE 462 HYDRAULIC STRUCTURES Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The study of dams, canals, weirs, harbors, port facilities, an 

hydroelectric power plants. 
Prerequisite: ME 332 

CE 472 HYDRAULICS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Open channel flow, backwater and drawdown curves, water ham 
mer and hydraulic jump. 
Prerequisite: ME 332 

CE 481 WATER SUPPLY Cr. 4-0 (3-3) (0-0) 

Sources of supply, distribution systems, methods of chemicc 
and bacteriological analysis and design of treatment plants for 
potable water supply. 
Prerequisite: CE 342 



122 



SEWAGE DISPOSAL Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-3) 

Analysis, treatment and disposal of domestic and industrial wastes, 

and the design of treatment plants. 

Prerequisite: CE 481 

SANITARY BACTERIOLOGY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A study of microorganisms and their effect on waste treatment 
systems. 

Prerequisite: CE 342 



Electrical Engineering 
college of engineering 

CIRCUIT THEORY I Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Course includes such topics as the following: network topology; 
network theorems; loop currents, nodal voltages, super posi- 
tion; Thevenin's and Norton's theorems; maximum power trans- 
fer; duality; energy storage in electric circuits; initial conditions; 
introductory a.c. and poly-phase circuitry. 
Prerequisite: MA 112 

CIRCUIT THEORY II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Topics include Fourier Techniques, impulse response, convolu- 
tion, and Laplace Transformation, pole and zero configuration and 
their interpretation, and matrix notation as pertains to circuit 
theory. 

Prerequisite: EE 201 

EE LABORATORY I Cr. 0-2 (0-0) (0-6) 
This laboratory course is primarily concerned with the techniques 
and theory of electrical measurements. Indoctrination into the 
correct procedures for producing a short and formal laboratory 
written report is an essential part of this laboratory. 

ELEMENTS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING I 

Cr. 4-0 (3-3) (0-0) 
A course for ME, IE, and CE majors in the elements of electric 
circuits and basic energy conversion devices. Laboratory assign- 
ments and demonstrations form part of this course. 
Prerequisite: MA 112 



123 



EE 302 ELEMENTS OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING II 

Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-3 
Continuation of EE 301, including control systems and basi' 
electronics. 

Prerequisite: EE 301 

EE 311 ELECTRONICS I Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A two semester course on the basic principles of electronics an | 
electronic circuits including vacuum tube and semiconductor de 
vices. S-domain methods are employed in the study of basi | 
curcuits. 

Prerequisite: EE 202 

EE 312 ELECTRONICS II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continuation of EE 311. 
Prerequisite: EE 311 

EE 321 CIRCUIT THEORY III Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A continuation of EE 202. Includes circuit response by Fouric 
and Laplace transform methods; and Foster and Cauer network; 
two-terminal-pair ladder networks, constant-k filters, m-derivej 
filters, lattice and composite filters, and distributed paramete 
circuits. 

Prerequisite: EE 202 

EE 332 ENERGY CONVERSION DEVICES Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0 ! 

Basics of electromechanics as applied to energy conversion dd 
vices; followed by studies of specific devices such as dynamc 
and other transducers, including transformers. Mathematics 
models of typical physical devices are discussed. 
Prerequisite: EE 202 and Phy 211 

EE 351 EE LABORATORY II Cr. 2-0 (0-6) (0-0) 

Continuation of EE 252, with emphasis on electronic devices an 
circuits. 

Prerequisite: EE 252 and 202 

EE 352 EE LABORATORY III Cr. 0-2 (0-0) (0-6) 

Continuation of EE 351, including energy conversion and contr< 
devices. 

Prerequisite: EE 351, EE 321 and EE 311 



124 



ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY I Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

An analytical approach to static and time-varying fields, includ- 
ing Divergence Theorem, Poisson and Laplace equations; boun- 
dary-value problems. 

Prerequisite: MA 321 

INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SYNTHESIS I 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Fundamental concepts of network synthesis, including such topics 
as physical realizability of 1-port and 2-port networks; and maxi- 
mally-flat filter functions. Senior elective. 

Prerequisite: EE 321 

INTRODUCTION TO NETWORK SYNTHESIS II 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Continuation of EE 401, including methods and topics such as 
those developed by Darlington, Brume, Guillemin, Bott-Duffin, 
etc. 

Prerequisite: EE 401 

ELECTRONICS III Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Course consists of topics related to communication electronics: 
Vacuum tube and semi-conductor tuned amplifiers; oscillators; 
modulation and demodulation. Some wave-shaping circuits will 
be studied. 

Prerequisite: EE 312 

WAVE FORMING CIRCUITS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Theory and design of generators and shapers of non-sinusoidal 
waves, including clampers, clippers, limiters, multivibrators, etc. 
Prerequisite: EE 411 

FEEDBACK SYSTEMS I Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Linear control systems will be analyzed. Nyquist criterion, Bode 
and Nichols diagrams, and the root-loci methods will be used. 
The necessary mathematical and computer techniques will be 
developed. 

Prerequisite EE 202 and MA 212 



125 



FEEDBACK SYSTEMS II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
The synthesis of linear control systems, and the analysis of nor 
linear elements will be presented. State variable techniques wi 
be introduced. 
Prerequisite: EE 431 

ADVANCED ELECTRIC MACHINERY 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-( 
Generalized analysis of machines used for energy control an 
conversion using matrix transformation, etc.; application of metl 
ods of analysis to systems containing electric machines. 
Prerequisite: EE 332 

SEMICONDUCTOR CIRCUITS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Analysis and design of semiconductor circuits, including transis 
ors, tunnel diodes, etc. It also includes selected topics on use ( 
modern semiconductor devices. Senior elective. 
Prerequisite: EE 312 

EE LABORATORY IV Cr. 2-0 (0-6) (0-0) 

This laboratory is largely devoted to experiments in electronic 

feedback control, and wave propagation. 

Prerequisites: EE 312, EE 352, and EE 362 

EE LABORATORY V Cr. 0-2 (0-0) (0-6) 

Final section of a five-semester undergraduate laboratory cours 
including advanced assignments and other project work for eac 
student. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

LOGIC CIRCUIT DESIGN Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Boolean algebra; simplification and minimization methods < 
switching circuits; sequential circuits; pulsed sequential circuit 
etc. 

Prerequisite: EE 312 

PHYSICAL ELECTRONICS OF MATERIALS 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-< 
A course intended to enhance the student's fundamental unde 
standing of the physical electronics of materials, including sue | 
topics as free-electron theory; atomic bonding; quantum mechanic | 



electron emission; semi-conductor theory; plasma dynamics; break- 
down mechanisms, etc. 
Prerequisite: MA 321 

EE 463 ELECTROMAGNETIC THEORY II Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Continuation of EE 362, including wave propagation and radiation. 
Prerequisite: EE 362 

EE 464 INTRODUCTORY DIGITAL COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 

Cr. 3-0 (0-0) (3-0) 
A basic course dealing with programming in a generalized fashion 
without reference to any particular computer language so that 
knowledge gained is applicable to any digital computer. In- 
cluded are such topics as number systems; data organization; flow 
diagrams; and computer applications. 

Prerequisite: Senior standing preference will be given to Senior 
EE majors. 

EE 471 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION THEORY I 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
This course will discuss the mathematical representation of non- 
random signals including Fourier transforms; sampling theorems; 
modulation theory probabilistic concepts; random processes; power 
spectral density. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing 

EE 472 INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION THEORY II 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
Continuation of EE 471, including the study of basic informa- 
tion theory; random noise; signal-to-noise ratio; decision con- 
cepts; likelihood ratio; and selected topics. 
Prerequisite: EE 471 

EE 482 ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Power system parameters, steady-state calculations, fault cal- 
culations and transients stability. Theory of symmetrical com- 
ponents with application to the operation of electric power sys- 
tems under unbalanced and steady state conditions; components 
of instantaneous currents and voltages and their use in transient 
problems. 

Prerequisite: EE 332 



127 



EE 483 



IE 312 



IE 321 



IE 322 



IE 331 



LINEAR SYSTEMS ANALYSIS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Elective course for engineering students in techniques of line; 
system analysis including methods of treating electric circii 
analogs of linear mechanical and electromechanical systems, tl 
Laplace transform, and systems with feedback. 
Prerequisite: Some circuit theory and differential equations. 



Industrial Engineering 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

TIME AND MOTION STUDY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 
This is a course in time measurements; subjective and objectr 1 
rating; uses of process charts; operations analysis and elementa 
statistical analysis. Principles of motion economy applied in d 
velopment of work methods and work layout with emphasis ( 
machine tool situations. Required of industrial engineering st 
dents. 

Prerequisite: MA 211, ME 201 

ENGINEERING STATISTICS AND QUALITY CONTROL 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0- 
Introduction to applied statistical methods, including frequen 
distributions; statistical measurements; probability; economic ai 
natural tolerances; risk and confidence levels. Required of juni 
industrial engineers. 
Prerequisite: MA 212 

ENGINEERING STATISTICS AND QUALITY CONTROL 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3- 
Continuation of first course, with emphasis on control char 
design of sampling and quality control plans; application 
statistics in assembly operations; mixing and blending operatior 
bearing-and tool-wear problems; and related topics. 
Prerequisite: IE 321 

PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Methods and techniques for developing and maintaining an < 
ficient working force from the viewpoint of both the employ 
and employee. Selection, placement, testing, training, disciplir 



IE 401 



IE 421 



IE 422 



IE 431 



ME 101 



morale, wage administration, and job evaluation are among topics 
covered. Required of industrial engineering students. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

ENGINEERING ECONOMY Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Effects of economics on engineering decisions in design, selection, 
,and replacement of equipment, and evaluation of property; theory 
of depreciation and obsolescence. Required of industrial engineer- 
ing students. 
Prerequisite: ECO 101 

WAGE INCENTIVES AND JOB EVALUATION 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Industrial engineering principles and statistical methods used in 
wage-incentive systems and systems in common use covering 
salaried and hourly-paid personnel. Technical elective. 
Prerequisite: IE 331 

PLANT DESIGN AND LAYOUT Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 
A study of the interconnected modern techniques by which work- 
able layouts can be developed for modern mass-production meth- 
ods and essential coordination between plant layout, material hand- 
ling, methods engineering, production planning and control. A 
project is assigned to provide application of the above techniques. 
Required of senior industrial engineers. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing 

LINEAR PROGRAMMING Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Theory of design and application of linear programming models 
for mathematical decision making in complex industrial problems 
such as blending, scheduling, transportation, allocation of re- 
sources, plant design and location, and job evaluation. Indus- 
trial engineering technical elective. 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 



Mechanical Engineering 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

ENGINEERING DRAWING Cr. 2-0 (0-6) (0-0) 
The principles of orthographic projections; instrumental and free- 
hand execution of auxiliary, isometric, oblique, and sectional 



129 



drawings; and the principles of dimensioning are stressed. Re- 
quired of all first-year engineering majors. 

ME 102 DESCRIPTIVE GEOMETRY Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 

Point, line, and space relations; intersections; revolutions; vectors; 
surface developments; conies; and problems in the field of mechan- 
ical and civil engineering. Required of all first-year engineering 
majors. 

Prerequisite: ME 101 

ME 211 MACHINE DRAWING Cr. 2-0 (1-3) (0-0) 

Preparation of detail and assembly drawings, including dimension- 
ing and sectioning of gears; cams, assemblies, and welded parts. 
Required of all second-year mechanical engineering majors. 
Prerequisite: ME 101 

ME 221 MANUFACTURING PROCESSES Cr. 3-0 (2-3) (0-0) 

A study of processes and equipment involved in machining 
materials, with emphasis placed on the capabilities and limita- 
tions of the machines. Required of all second-year mechanical 
and industrial engineering majors. 

ME 222 METALLURGY Cr. 0-4 (0-0) (3-2) 

Fundamentals of metal structure; factors affecting properties; 
static and dynamic properties; corrosion; extraction of metals 
from ores; phase diagrams; alloy systems; and heat treatment. 
Required of all second-year mechanical and industrial engineering 
majors. 

Prerequisite: CH 112 
ME 231 APPLIED MECHANICS (STATICS) 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
The statics of particles and of rigid bodies in two-and three- 
dimensions; analysis of structures; friction, center of gravity; and 
moment of inertia. Required of all second-year engineering 
majors. 

Prerequisite: PHY III 
ME 232 APPLIED MECHANICS (DYNAMICS) 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 
The kinematics and the kinetics of particles and rigid bodies; force, 
mass, and acceleration; work and energy; and impulse and momen- 
tum. Required of all second-year engineering majors. 

Prerequisite: ME 231 



130 



ME 302 MECHANISM Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 

Analysis of the relative motion of machine parts to determine 
displacement, velocity, and acceleration. Required of all third- 
year mechanical and industrial engineering majors. 

ME 311 THERMODYNAMICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Properties of substances; first law of thermodynamics; ideal 
gases; the gas turbine; liquids and vapors; heat exchangers; steam 
turbines; and the reversed cycle. Required of all third-year civil, 
industrial and electrical engineering majors. 
Prerequisites: MA 211 and PHY 112 

ME 321, 322 ENGINEERING THERMODYNAMICS I, II 

Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 
The basic principles of laws of thermodynamics; ideal and real 
gases; mixtures; application of laws to power cycles; refrigeration; 
air conditioning; flow processes; and gas compression. Required 
of all third-year mechanical engineering majors. 
Prerequisite: MA 211 and PHY 112 

ME 332 FLUID MECHANICS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Hydrostatics and hydrodynamics; ideal and viscous fluids; com- 
pressible and incompressible fluids; flow through pipes and 
around objects. Required of all third-year civil, electrical, in- 
• dustrial, and mechanical engineers. 

Prerequisites: ME 321 or ME 311 

ME 342 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY I 

Cr. 0-1 (0-0) (0-3) 
A basic course in measurements as used in fluid-flow and heat- 
power fields of mechanical engineering. Required of all third- 
year mechanical engineering majors. 

ME 401 ADVANCED KINEMATICS Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Type, number, and dimensional synthesis; mechanical computing 
mechanisms; and the geometry of constrained motion; linkage 
design; and special purpose mechanisms. Senior technical elective. 
Prerequisite: ME 302 

ME 411 HEAT TRANSFER Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Steady and unsteady state conduction; free and forced convection; 
radiant heat transmission; and the design of heat transfer equip- 
ment. Required of all fourth-year mechanical engineering majors. 
Prerequisite: ME 322 



131 



ME 412 THERMODYNAMICS III Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The compression and expansion of gases with rotary machinery; 
centrifugal compressor; centripetal turbine; axial compressor; 
and axial turbine. The third law of thermodynamics. The ther- 
modynamics of energy conversion devices; thermionic engine; ther- 
moelectric generator; and others. 

Prerequisite: ME 322 

ME 421 MACHINE DESIGN I Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A development of the design point of view, with the student en- 
couraged to make design decisions. Areas covered are stress 
analysis, factor of safety; variable loads; stress concentration; and 
combined stresses. Required of all fourth-year mechanical en- 
gineering majors. 

Prerequisite: CE 311 

ME 422 MACHINE DESIGN II Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The analysis and design of parts used in modern machines. Topics 
studied are: combined stresses; shaft design; lubrication of bear- 
ings; and gear design analysis. 
Prerequisite: ME 421 

ME 431 INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

A study of the internal combustion engine processes, including the 
air-standard cycle analysis; engine cycles; deviation of the real 
engine from the ideal engine; detonation; carburetion; fuel in- 
jection; cumbustion chamber and cylinder head design; engine 
lubrication; cooling; and performance. Senior technical elective. 
Prerequisite: ME 322 

ME 424 VIBRATIONS Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The basic theory of mechanical vibrations. Such topics as un- 
damped, damped, forced steady-state and transient vibrations are 
studies. Laplace transformations; analogies involving equivalent 
electrical circuits and mobility methods are covered along with 
the determination of natural frequencies and mode shapes by the 
classical, Rayleigh, Stodola, influence coefficient and Holjer meth- 
ods. Analog and digital computer techniques are programmed 
and illustrated for transient and multidegree of freedom problems. 



132 



ME 441 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY II 

Cr. 1-0 (0-3) (0-0) 
Advanced measurements in fluid flow and heat power, including 
related fields of vibration, balancing, and application of strain 
gauges. Required of all fourth-year mechanical engineering 
majors. 

Prerequisite: ME 342 

ME 451 ADVANCED STRENGTH OF MATERIALS 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 
Selected topics such as theories of failure, unsymmetrical bend- 
ing, curved flexural members, and thick- walled cylinders. Senior 
technical elective. 
Prerequisite: CE 311 

ME 452 EXPERIMENTAL STRESS ANALYSIS 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (2-3) 
An introduction to the theory, instrumentation and basic tech- 
niques of stress analysis, covering stress determination from strain 
measurements; strain guages; photoelasticity; and the theory of 
plasticity. Senior technical elective. 
Prerequisite: ME 451 



Art 

COLLEGE OF FINE AND APPLIED ARTS 

ART 111, 112 FOUNDATION COLOR AND DESIGN 

Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 
A foundation course for art majors in which the elements and 
principles of design are used to complete simple and practical ex- 
periments in the visual-arts field. Accepted design concepts are 
thoroughly explored, but opportunities for design through draw- 
ing and perception are also encouraged. Required of all first- 
year art majors. 

ART 121, 122 FOUNDATION DRAWING Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

A study of the two-dimensional surface and the use of line, area, 
and volume to create form. The course includes drawing from 
still life, from landscapes, and from the human figure. Required 
of all first year art majors. 



133 



ART 131 ANCIENT ART Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

The visual arts in the ancient world from the Paleolithic period 
to the Byzantine Empire. Required of all first-year art majors. 

ART 132 MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE ART 

Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The visual arts of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Re- 
quired of all first-year art majors. 

Prerequisite: ART 131 

ART 221, 222 FIGURE DRAWING I Cr. 2-2 (0-6) (0-6) 

The study of the human figure, its form, mass, and proportions. 
The human figure is also studied in relation to its environment. 
Live models are used. Required of all second-year .art majors. 

Prerequisite: ART 122 

ART 224 STRUCTURAL REPRESENTATION Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (0-6) 

The study of structural drawing through experiences with ortho- 
graphic projection, isometric drawing, mechanical perspective, and 
three-dimensional model making. Required of all second-year 
visual design majors. 

ART 225, 226 DRAWING Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

A continuation of FOUNDATION DRAWING for painting maj- 
ors. Emphasis is placed on imaginative, expressive representa- 
tion and the communication of ideas along with the development 
of sound draftsmanship. 

Prerequisites: ART 121, 122 

ART 231 BAROQUE THROUGH IMPRESSIONISM ART 

Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

The visual arts in the modern world from the end of the Renais- 
sance to the 1900's. Required of all second-year art majors. 

Prerequisites: ART 132 

ART 234 ART THROUGH THE AGES Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

A general survey of the history of art beginning with Egypt and 
continuing through modern times. It is given as an elective to 
students in other departments. 



134 



ART 241, 242 PAINTING I Cr. 2-2 (0-6) (0-6) 

An introductory course in beginning painting. Although the 
technique of oil painting is predominant, experiments are con- 
ducted in gouache, watercolor, and tempera. Concepts of design, 
composition, and color are studied. The development of the in- 
tuitive and creative ability of the individual is given careful atten- 
tion. Required of all second-year art majors. 

Prerequisite: ART 112, 122 

ART 244 PAINTING Cr. 0-5 (0-0) (0-12) 

A course designed to introduce the second year painting major 
to a working nomenclature and a familiarity with traditional 
processes of picture making. 

Prerequisite: ART 241 

ART 251, 252 VISUAL DESIGN I Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

An introduction to visual design. Basic design projects are ex- 
plored and worked out during both semesters. A study of writ- 
ing and lettering is also carried through the year; the progression 
is from the Roman capitals to letters and types of the present and 
the creation of personal forms. Required of all sophomore visual 
design majors. 

Prerequisites: ART 112, 122 

ART 271, 272 TEXTILE DESIGN I Cr. 4-4 (0-9) (0-9) 

An introduction to woven and printed textile design. The stu- 
dent is given practice in rendering techniques and printing meth- 
ods. The course also covers nature study as applied to textile 
design. Required of all second-year textile design majors. 
Prerequisite: ART 112 

ART 311, 312 COMPOSITION Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

An advanced consideration of design principles applied to weekly 
assigned problems. Resourcefulness in technical treatment and 
imaginative approach are encouraged. 

ART 321, 322 FIGURE DRAWING II Cr. 2-2 (0-6) (0-6) 

A continuation of Figure Drawing I. Required of all third-year 
painting majors. New techniques and media are introduced. 
Prerequisite: ART 222 



135 



ART 323, 324 ILLUSTRATION Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

Problems in illustration involving various media. Every effort is 
made to allow the student to develop a personal approach consist- 
ent with good design and draftsmanship. 
Prerequisite: ART 222 

ART 332 CONTEMPORARY ART Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

Painting, architecture, and sculpture of the Twentieth Century. 
Required of all third-year art majors. 
Prerequisite: ART 231 

ART 333 ART OF THE MIDDLE AGES Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

The architecture, sculpture, painting, and minor arts of Western 
Europe from 500 to 1500 A. D. 
Prerequisite: ART 231 or ART 234 

ART 334 ART OF THE RENAISSANCE Cr. 0-3 (0-0) (3-0) 

The painting, sculpture, and architecture of Western Europe from 
1400 to 1600 A. D. 

Prerequisite: ART 231 or ART 234 

ART 335 BAROQUE ART Cr. 3-0 (3-0) (0-0) 

Painting, architecture, sculpture, and minor arts of Western 
Europe from 1600 to 1900 A. D. 
Prerequisite: ART 231 or ART 234 

ART 341, 342 PAINTING II Cr. 7-7 (0-15) (0-15) 

An intermediate course, with painting problems related to the 
individual and surveyed through the history of painting. The 
student works from the figure, nature, and still life with an em- 
phasis toward his personal development. 

ART 351, 352 VISUAL DESIGN II Cr. 4-4 (0-9) (0-9) 

A further investigation of visual design with emphasis on the de- 
sign of the poster, book, and various formats of visual communi- 
cation. Required of all junior visual design majors. 
Prerequisite: ART 252 

ART 363, 364 FASHION ILLUSTRATION Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

An introduction to the rendering of the fashion figure and acces- 
sories. 

136 



ART 371, 372 TEXTILE DESIGN II Cr. 4-4 (0-9) (0-9) 

Advanced problems in designing and the study of woven and print- 
ed fabrics. The course includes design experimentation on the 
hand loom and in the printing studio. It also covers methods 
of designing patterns for fashion and decorative fabrics. Re- 
quired of all third-year textile design majors. 
Prerequisite: ART 272 

ART 373, 374 HANDLOOM WEAVING I Cr. 2-2 (0-6) (0-6) 

This course gives the student the opportunity to learn the basic 
principles of hand weaving and to experiment with colors and 
textures suitable for application to the power loom. He is en- 
couraged to design directly on the loom and to use a variety of 
available materials. 

ART 381, 382 PHOTOGRAPHY I, II Cr. 2-2 (1-2) (0-4) 

A basic survey of the theory of black and white photography. 
Darkroom experience includes the development of film, contact 
and enlargement printing, and basic photographic chemistry. Stu- 
dents must furnish their own cameras. 

ART 383 GRAPHIC REPRODUCTION Cr. 2-0 (2-0) (0-0) 

A study of the basic processes of the graphic arts. Several field 
trips are taken to commercial printing, typography, and photo- 
engraving houses. 

ART 386 TYPOGRAPHY Cr. 0-2 (0-0) (0-6) 

Exercises in basic typography usage. Small problems of a purely 
typographic nature are solved, set, and printed. 
A junior visual design elective. 

ART 421, 422 FIGURE DRAWING III Cr. 2-2 (0-6) (0-6) 

A continuation of Figure Drawing II. Required of all fourth-year 
painting majors. More emphasis is placed on individual ex- 
pression and interpretation. 
Prerequisite: ART 322 

ART 423, 424 ADVANCED ILLUSTRATION Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

A continuation of Illustration. The aim is to develop in the stu- 
dent a professional approach in one of the areas of specialized 
illustration. 

Prerequisite: ART 324 or ART 364 



137 



ART 441, 442 PAINTING III Cr. 7-7 (0-15) (0-15) 

Advanced problems in painting with emphasis on personal de- 
velopment. Individual criticisms and seminar discussions of con- 
temporary problems in painting. 
Prerequisite: ART 342 

ART 451, 452 VISUAL DESIGN III Cr. 7-7 (0-15) (0-15) 

A complete corporate recognition and public relations campaign 
is developed for an area of commerce or industry chosen by the 
student. This starts with the design of a trademark and carries 
through the various public relations or advertising formats neces- 
sary to service such an endeavor. A portfolio is prepared under 
the direction of the staff; emphasis is on excellence of presen- 
tation. Further work in book design or in lettering and typo- 
graphic areas are assigned. Required of all fourth-year visual 
design majors. 
Prerequisite: ART 352 

ART 471, 472 TEXTILE DESIGN III Cr. 7-7 (0-15) (0-15) 

A study of the more complex problems in designing fabrics both 
woven and printed, with emphasis on originality. Professional 
portfolio of original work is required. Required of all fourth- 
year textile design majors. 
Prerequisite: ART 372 

ART 473, 474 HANDLOOM WEAVING II Cr. 2-2 (0-6) (0-6) 

An advanced course giving the student opportunity to develop 
original designs on the handloom and to use the loom as a creative 
medium. A variety of yarns, colors, textures and techniques are 
explored to achieve a well balanced portfolio of weaving. 

ART 481, 482 ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

Technical exploration and the development of the photographic 
medium as a means of expression. 
Prerequisite: ART 382 

ART 483, 484 PRINTMAKING Cr. 2-2 (0-6) (0-6) 

A studio course dealing with fine arts graphic processes such as 
serigraphy, woodcuts, linoleum cuts, and intaglio prints. Required 
of all fourth-year painting and visual design majors. 
Prerequisites: ART 222, 241 



ART 485, 486 ADVANCED TYPOGRAPHY Cr. 3-3 (0-6) (0-6) 

This course entails a year of work in the typographic areas. A 
small book of at least 32 pages is designed, set, printed, and 
bound in at least ten copies. Emphasis is on highest standards of 
quality. A senior visual design elective. 
Prerequisite: ART 386 

ART 501, 502 PHILOSOPHY OF ART Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

This course concerns itself with the designer in relation to society. 
The framework of the course is developed through aesthetics; but 
the applications, as they are of vital interest to the designer, are 
drawn from peripheral reading and discussion groups. The in- 
tention is to have the student come to grips with his position as 
an artist or designer in relation to our present industrial society 
and to our developing culture. Confrontations of contradictory 
points of view will be used as a means of widening the under- 
standing of this relationship. 

ART 503, 504 COMMUNICATIONS Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 

A course based on several areas of interest to the designer: 
semantics, visual language, typography, photography, psychol- 
ogy of color. Semantics and visual language are clearly allied; 
they are taught concurrently. Typography is in the area of great- 
est usefulness to the designer. The photographic direction might 
be chosen as an alternative. Psychology of color is a short, in- 
tensive investigation of the use of color accompanied by a study 
of some of its laws as they relate to the artist or designer. 

ART 531, 532 HISTORY OF GRAPHIC DESIGN Cr. 3-3 (3-0) (3-0) 
A course conceived as being of central interest to the graphic 
designer. Its beginning is marked by the development of the 
printed books; it follows the evolution of the printed page in its 
aesthetical, technical, economical, and historical aspects up to 
the present time. Essentially, this course concerns itself with the 
history of graphic or printed material from Gutenberg's time to 
the present time. It includes lectures, discussions, semester and 
term papers. 

ART 551, 552 PROFESSIONAL COURSE Cr. 6-6 (0-12) (0-12) 

The course requires of the student a concentrated effort in actual 
design. At least two or three finished projects are expected in 
each semester; they are partly experimental, partly concrete. Each 
student also begins work on a thesis plan: suggesting and discard- 



139 



ing, as the case may be, various schemes that will constitute the 
major achievement of the final year. 

ART 553, 554 THESIS Cr. 9-9 (0-18) (0-18) 

The dominant part of the year is devoted to the development of 
the thesis. It is meant to be a major concluding effort of genuine 
depth and scope; the endeavor is to have the student really sound 
the depths and explore the limitations of his theme. A high 
level of technical perfection and presentation is required. 



140 



INDEX 



Page 

Academic Regulations 41 

Advance Standing 45 

Attendance 41 

Change of Program 42 

Examinations 44 

Scholastic Standards 44 

Suspension 41, 44, 46 

Transfer of Credits . ' 45 

Withdrawal 41 

Accounting, Courses . 109 

Activities Fee, see Fees 

Administration, Officers of 10 

Admission 23 

Acceptable Credits 25, 45, 47 

Application 23, 47, 49 

Deadlines 23, 25, 47, 49 

Foreign Students 25 

High School Graduates 24 

How to Apply 23, 47, 49 

Interviews 24 

Transfer Students 25, 45 

When to Apply 23, 25, 47, 49 

Where to Apply 23, 47, 49 

Certificate from Secondary School 24 

Course Requirements 25 

Entrance Examinations 23 

Foreign Language Requirement 24 

High School Graduation Requirement 25 

Mathematics Requirements 25 

Physical Examination 25 

Quality Requirements 26 

Successful Candidates 25 

Advance Standing, see Academic Regulations 

Advisers 36 

Alumni 36 

Application Fee, see Fees 

Art, Courses 133 

Arts and Sciences, College of 21, 51 

Curricula in 51, 54 

Athletics 40 



141 



Page 

Attendance, see Academic Regulations 

Biology, Courses ........... 54 

Board of Trustees .......... 9 

Bookstore 35 

Bradford Durfee College of Technology 21 

Branches of SMTI 21 

Business and Industry, College of 21, 61 

Curricula in 61, 62 

Calendar 5 

Change of program, see Academic Regulations 

Chemistry, Courses 84 

Civil Engineering, Courses 120 

College Entrance Examination Board 23 

Colleges of SMTI 21 

Arts and Sciences 51 

Business and Industry 61 

Engineering .......... 68 

Fine and Applied Art 77 

Conduct, Student 41 

Conference Hours 36 

Courses 

Adding 42 

Attending 41 

Directory of 81 

Repeating 43, 44 

Clubs, Student 38 

Dean's List 45 

Degrees, List of . 8 

Degree Requirements 

Bachelor of Arts 51 

Bachelor of Business Administration . . . . . . 61 

Bachelor of Fine and Applied Arts 77 

Bachelor of Science 53, 68 

Dismissal 46 

Dropping Courses 43 

Economics, Courses . 86 

Electrical Engineering, Courses ........ 123 

Eligibility 25 

Engineering, College of 

Curricula in 68 

English, Courses 87 



142 



Pages 



Entrance Requirements, see Admission 



Expenses, see Fees and Tuition 

Extra Curricula Activities 38 

Faculty M 

Fees 

Application 28 

General 29 

Laboratory 29 

Late Payment 29 

Late Registration 29 

Matriculation 25, 28, 48 

Refund 30 

Tuition 28, 48 

Financial Aid 31 

Fine and Applied Arts, College of 

Curricula in ... 77 

Foreign Languages, Courses 98 

Foreign Students 25, 39 

Fraternities 39 

Grade Reports 43 

Grading System 43 

Graduation Requirements 45 

Guidance and Counseling 36 

Handbook 37 

Health Services 35 

History, Courses 91 

History of SMTI 21 

Housing 35 

Incomplete, Mark of 44 

Industrial Engineering, Courses 128 

Insurance, Medical and Surgical 29 

Intramural Sports 40 

Interviews, see Admissions 
Late Registration Fee, see Fees 

Library 35 

Loans 31 

Mathematics, Courses 94 

Mechanical Engineering, Courses 129 

Music, Courses 100 

Name of SMTI, use of 41 



New Bedford Institute of Technology 21 



143 



3 2922 00506 914 8 



Page 



Non-resident Student 

Definition 28 

Fees,^ see Fees 28 

Tuition 28 

Personal Standards 41 

Physics, Courses 101 

Placement Service 35 

Prizes, see Student Awards 

Probation 42 

Psychology, Courses 107 

Quality Points 44 

Residence Requirement for Graduation 45 

Registration 42 

Adding Courses 42 

Dropping Courses 43 

Late Registration 42 

Repeating Courses 43 

Requirements, Student 

Entrance 25 

Graduation 45, 46, 48, 50 

Residence 45 

Refunds 30 

Religious Organizations 40 

Scholarships 31 

Scholastic Standards 42, 46 

Sororities 39 

Special Students 27 

Student Aid 31 

Student Government 38 

Student Organizations 38 

Student Publications 38, 40 

Suspension 41 

Textile Chemistry, Courses . . . 114 

Textile Technology, Courses 116 

Transcripts 46 

Transfer Students 25, 45 

Tuition 28 

Undergraduate Curricula 8 

Visual Design, Courses 133 

Withdrawal from College 41 

Yearbook 38 



144