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Full text of "Southern Accent"

LIBRARY 

OF 

BIRMINGHAM -SOUTHERN 

COLLEGE 



BIRMINGHAM-SOUTHERN COLLEGE 



5 0553 01001719 9 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/southernaccent1982birm 








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CONTENTS 

Introduction 4 

Student Life 12 

Faculty 72 

Features 98 

Sports 104 

Organizations 126 

Greeks 166 

Class 190 

Closing 232 

Advertisements 236 





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Some call it the last of a dying 
breed among colleges and 
universities — a liberal arts 
institution. A place that stresses 
the need for personal 
development in the fine arts, 
humanities, and earth sciences, 
Birmingham-Southern College 
stands firm in its dedication to the 
liberal arts despite today's 
growing emphasis on 
specialization and technology. 




The College recognizes that 

although a liberal arts education 

may not be an essential asset for 

the skilled technician, it is an 

invaluable asset for every student 

who aspires to become more than 

a modern technicrat. Through a 

study of the liberal arts, B-SC 

educates its students with a 

sensitivity to the aspirations, 

values, expressions, and intellect 

of man. Colleges and universities 

that solely stress the vocational 

angle of education as the most 

important one lost sight of many 

of the goals of education. For 

then, the personal side of 

education — the side that 

develops a sensitivity for history, 

philosophy, literature, science, 

and art, and thereby for fellow 

man — is diminished. 



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B-SC realizes that a liberal arts education 
is not totally out of place in our technological 
world. In many fields of technology, there is 
nothing more important than the ability to 
think logically and analytically, to listen in- 
telligently, to argue persuasively, and to 
write clearly. The outstanding professionals 
in such fields as law, medicine, and public 
administration are not narrow technicians; 
rather, they are individuals whose rich 



knowledge and clear insight into human na- 
ture complement their technical prowess. 
Thus, the seeming opposites — technology 
and liberal arts — are not so different that 
they are incompatible. Recognizing this 
compatibility, B-SC is developing new curri- 
culums such as nursing and strengthening 
other technologically-oriented programs to 
go hand-in-hand with the liberal arts 
program. 




10 




The College emphasizes 
the liberal arts as an 
invaluable educator of 
young people. It sees the 
fine arts, humanities, and 
earth sciences as creators 
of individuals sensitive to 
the whole of humanity 
through a study of our 
ideals, ethics, imaginations, 
and intellect. The liberal 
arts is not an outmoded, 
outdated form of education 
on the Hilltop; it is still 
very much alive and very 
much a part of 
Birmingham-Southern 
College. 




11 





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12 



The Registration Game 




Pass Go, after 
paying $250 



SEMUamS P 208 

CM SMITH P 204 

PHfSICS E. kSTROHOMY 
«IJ BOARDMUI P IDS 

HM K»LOR P IDS 

BlVISinil OFFICE P 201 




14 




Decide which courses are really hard and then sign up for others 




Registration Madness! 

You are walking in a daze. 
Hands clutching forms and 
schedules, you make your way 
through long lines of long faces 
for a long wait. Around you, you 
hear the monotone echoes of 
clerks, secretaries, and student 
assistants, each repeating the 
same questions in an endless cy- 
cle of administrative red tape. 
Growing steadily, the sound of 
staplers stapling, stampers 
stamping, and banshee office 
workers shrieking "I'm sorry, 
this class is closed" grows into a 
raging pandemonium. Almost 
disoriented, you run groveling 
to your faculty advisor, begging 
for the signature which frees you 
from this madhouse. You have 
just encountered the "Twilight 
Zone" of registration. 

An exaggeration? Maybe. Re- 
gardless, no one would argue 
that registration can be a frus- 
trating experience. It is the kind 
of thing that traumatizes fresh- 
men, inconveniences sopho- 
mores, and absolutely bores up- 
perclassmen. It is definitely one 
of the less appealing aspects of 
student life — like shower fun- 
gus, cafeteria food, and exams. 
But, it does serve a purpose. 

Contrary to popular belief, 
registration wasn't conceived to 
encourage nervous break- 
downs. You are not signing 
deeds to bad swamp land and it 
cannot cause cancer. It's not 
"short and sweet ' or "quick and 
painless, " but it probably is the 
best our college can do. So, the 
next time you go through regis- 
tration, don't shred the sched- 
ule with your teeth or per- 
manently embed your finger- 
nails in some chair. Instead, just 
sit back and try to enjoy it. Be- 
cause all too soon, these days 
will have slipped away. 

— Jeff Swearengin 



Missed final 

check station 

— go back to 

start. 



Purchase car 
decal — good 
for one ticket 
on the Hilltop. 



Buy meal ticket and bottle of Digel. 



15 



Above — 

The 

Homecoming 

dance was 

held at the 

Birmingham- 

JefFerson 

Civic Center. 

Right — SGA 

officers and 

administration 

cater to the 

students. 




16 



Homecoming '82 



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Birmingham-Southern's Homecoming celebration 
opened the 1981-82 Panther Basketball season with 
the first game ever to be played in the new Bill Battle 
Coliseum. 

The Panther's victory over Spring Hill College 
culminated a week of Homecoming activities, 
including a pie-eating contest, a banner contest, a pep 
rally, and a bon fire. 

Robin Foster was crowned Homecoming Queen. 
Other attendants were Melinda Cooper, Nicki 
Koulourides, Donna Morrissette, Tonia Sellers, Laura 
Coleman, and Julie Bushmaier. 

After the game, the SGA sponsored a Homecoming 
dance at the Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center, 
featuring the band "Drifters. " 



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Cosi Fan 
Tutte 

Cathy Brooks and Tony Richards in a 

scene from Cosi Fan Tutte. The opera 

was written by Mozart, directed by Dr. 

Gibbs, and staged by Dr. Gainey. 

Candide 

A scene from Candide, by Leonard 

Bernstein. The opera was directed by 

Terrell Finney, conducted by Dr. Gibbs, 

and staged by Aubrey Berg and Russ 

Beasley. 





Spring Dance Performance 




Marianne Cook, Barry Gager, and Marjorie Goodman in Stravinsky Short 
Pieces. Music by Stravinsky, choreography by Daniel Levans. 




Arlan Boehme and Elaine Besh in Pas 
de Trois, from Swan Lake, Act 1. Mu- 
sic by Tchaikovsky, choreography after 
Petipa by Mira Popovich. 



Elaine Besh, Jennifer Pontius, and Scott Murgrove in Coppelia: 
Ballade de L'epi and Theme slave varie, Act 1. Music by L. 
Delibes, choreography by Mira Popovich. 



19 



B-SC in RUSSIA 





Above) Drewry and Barry Wood enjoy a Russian troika ride. (Below) Market place at 
fash Kent, "the crossroads of the ancient world. " (Opposite Page) St. Basil's Cathedral 
m Red Square, Moscow. 

(Photos by Lisa Milner) 



Thirty-one B-SC students and 
three professors spent a chilly 
Interim inside the Iron Curtain. 
For three weeks, from Jan. 
2-Feb. 3, the Interim group 
toured the Soviet cities of 
Moscow, Yerevan in Armenia, 
Baku in Azerbaijun, and Tash 
Kent in Uzbekistan. 

The official purpose of the 
Interim was to discuss personnel 
administration and energy 
economics with the Soviets. The 
group visited numerous factories 
and trade unions in hopes of 
learning more about the 
mechanics of the Soviet economy; 
however, the Russians were very 
closed-mouthed about their 
labor-management policies and 
left the B-SC group with very 
little room for discussion. 

Professor Aubrey Drewry, 
director of the Interim, says that 
although the Soviets deny to 
foreigners that there are any 
problems with their way of life, 
there are many. For example, the 
creative energies of the Soviets 
are saddled and directed into 
purely technological and military 
aspects. The workmanship that 
affects the consumer is generally 
poor, says Drewry. The Armenian 
hotel in which the American 
students stayed is an example of 
this. "The hotel is only three 
years old, and although it is 
beautiful on the outside, it is 
faUing apart on the inside," says 
Drewry. 

He comments that he came 
back with all his right-wing 
proclivities greatly strengthened. 
"I went there a supporter of 
capitalism and I have come back 
an even more ardent support of 
capitalism. I went there thinking 
Leninism a vicious, nasty cancer 
of the human spirit and I believe 
that even more strongly now." 
His general feelings about Russia 
sums up the feelings of many of 
the students. "It is a fascinating 
place to visit, but I sure wouldn't 
want to live there." 

— Gail Livingston 



Senior Art Exhibition 




Angela Fisher by her paint- 
ing The Absent Eater. 



Tamara Cover and her work 
A Woman in Red. 




Sonya Henderson and her 

collection of brass and cop- 
per jewelry. 




Jan Hopper and her paint- 
ing Another WorM, 
Another Time. 



Angelica Rosiak and her 
painting Earth, Air, Fire, 
and Water. 



Spongey Washburn and his 
painting Label State: 
Alaska. 



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Tommy Wilkes' 
sculpture Surrealism 
Express attracted many 
eyes at the Senior Art 
Exhibit. 




Theo Waldrop stands by his sculp- 
ture Skeletons and his painting 
1982. 



Tommy Wilkes and his dramatic 
self-portrait titled Living On the 
Right Side of the Brain. 



23 




Drama 



B-SC's production of 

Leonard Bernstein's 

Candida was a finalist in 

the American College 

Theatre Festival, 

Southeastern Region. 

The play was directed 

by Terrell Finney. (L. 

to R.) — Bryon Harrold 

(The Slave Captain), 

Stewart Lucas 

(Maximillian), Jennie 

Wall (Paquette), and 

Aubrey Berg (The 

Governor). 





The Good Doctor, by Neil Simon, was part of the Winter Repertoire Season. (L. to R.) — Craig Bishop (The 
Father), Perry Leopard (The Son), and Angela Smith (The Woman). The play was directed by Alex Gelman. 



24 




Also part of the Winter Repertoire Season, Fredrick Knott's Wait Until Dark, was performed. The play 
was directed by Terrell Finney. (L. to R.) — Claudie Cumbie (Susie) and Margie Terry (Gloria). 



25 







26 




Greek 
Games 



Greek Games is one of the 
highlights of Greek Week, 
held April 26-30. Some of 
the games include an egg 
toss, dizzy bat, pennies in 
the mud, tug of war, and 
snake crawl. 

Other activities of Greek 
Week are a scavenger hunt, 
a dunking booth, and Greek 
Sing. 

Alpha Chi Omega won 
Greek Week and Greek Sing 
and Alpha Omicron Pi won 
Greek Games in the sorority 
division. Kappa Alpha won 
Greek Week and Greek Sing 
and Theta Chi won Greek 
Games in the fraternity divi- 



sion. 




27 



THE NEAR DEATH OF THE GINKGO: A THREAT FROM WITHIN 



Right — The 

ginkgo in full 

bloom. Fall, 

1980. Below — 

Dr. Koger with 

the seemingly 

lifeless ginkgo. 

Fall, 1981. 




There was more than a little con- 
sternation in the late summer and 
early fall when it appeared that the 
female ginkgo at the head of the 
walk on the west side of Munger 
had been damaged, perhaps irre- 
parably, by an accidental applica- 
tion of herbicide. The incident 
seemed at the time to provide a 
convenient symbol of a kind of 
general misunderstanding of the 
proper limits of human technolo- 
gy, to the detriment of the health 
of a beautiful representative of 
what Nemerov has called "the old- 
est living captive race." 

I was among the loudest of those 
who commented on the misuse of 













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power and the lack of concern over 
the fragile ecology of an academic 
community. I wasn't looking for an 
excuse to be mad, and I certainly 
did not wish for any harm to the 
tree, but in my response there was 
something a little self-righteous, 
having a little of the "them " and 
"me. " I enjoyed being 
judgemental, having another con- 
firmation of my suspicions about 
incompetence and the absence of 
human or vegetative feeling in 
some of my colleagues. 

Spring came. Other trees began 
to show the annual and eternal re- 
newal of life; even the male ginkgo 
budded and leafed out on sche- 



dule, seemingly callous to the 
apparent lack of life in his mate. 
Then, slowly, she began to show 
signs of life: buds, leaves, and a few 
branches, and finally, ftill and glo- 
rious health! Her abundance of 
growth seems more vital and para- 
doxical in light of the expectation 
of her death; the unexpected and 
unlooked-for has given this spring 
an extra dimension, a fuller sense 
of joy. 

And there is something to be 
learned from this. I was made 
more aware of how I can let my 
prejudices and categories condi- 
tion my response to events and 
people, of the inexorable effect of 



letting the labels get in the way of 
perception. I hope that we also 
learned that the vital health and 
growth, that annual renewal and 
rebirth of hope, that the fragile 
ecological balance we hear about, 
extends to systems that are not 
simply biological. An academic 
community is built on a series of 
relationships as complicated and as 
interdependent as those that 
maintain the life of the plants 
around our buildings. Maybe the 
incident of the ginkgo can remind 
all of us of what we can gain if we 
respect principles that foster 
growth and life and learning. 

— James Koger 



Saut/ierriy 



"Birmingham-Southern's 

Comfort," held March 24-27, took 

the place of Quest II's annual 

spring concert. It brought four 

days of band parties, picnics, and 

fun to the Hilltop and offered a 

needed break after midterm 

exams. 

Under a big top circus tent, the 

bands Chevy 6, Janice, Brazen, 

and Hotel played music for every 

taste. Three on a String, a long 

time B-SC favorite, played 

bluegrass music in the 

amphitheatre. Campus 

organizations were given the 

opportunity to participate in the 

activities by sponsoring booths at 

the Saturday morning carnival. 

This was the first "Southern 

Comfort" weekend, but judging 

from the response, it probably 

will not be the last. 





Left — Anton Mertens participates in 
the hat contest. Below — Lead 
singer of the band Janice. Opposite 
page — (top) Clare Rutland and 
Melissa Bates at the beach party 
with Chevy 6; (bottom) the parties 
were held under a circus big top 
tent. 




Left — Sarah Spenser and Mike 
Chappell dress appropriately for the 
beach party. Above — Diana Kirk and 
Jackie Hail "gettin' down" with Janice. 



31 



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32 



Honors Day 



1982 



McWAYNE HONORS AWARD 

John Kevin Tucker 

BRITISH STUDIES AT 
OXFORD 

Elizabeth Renee Brown 

Jack D. Epperson 

James Anthony Terry 

Daniel McKiever, Jr. 

Anne Revis Stagner 

HARRY S. TRUMAN 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Cindy Hartsell 

BIRMINGHAM CITY 
PANHELLENIC 

Alpha Omicron Pi 

PHI ETA SIGMA 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

ALPHA CHI OMEGA 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Alpha Omicron Pi 

HALL AND ECHOLS MATH 
SCHOLARSHIP 

James Terry 

CHERRY WOODRUFF 
ACHIEVEMENT AWARD 

Debra Sievers 

ACTON AWARD IN 
MATHEMATICS 

Larry Shoemaker 

FRED B. JOYNER 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Lawton Higgs 

ACCOUNTING 
ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS 

Vicky Valin 

George Goymer 

Joan Chaney 

MARKETING AWARD 

Mary Burt 

MORRIS ACCOUNTING 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Patricia Gammage 



HOWELL HEFLIN PRELAW 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Lisa Kelley 

DAVID J. VANN ENDOWED 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Bridgette Monroe 

THEATRE ARTS AWARD 

Claudia Cumbie 

RAYMOND J. MACMAHON 
AWARD 

Tommy Wilkes 

CHEMICAL RUBBER 
COMPANY AWARD 

William Knoll 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Brian Bates 

LOCKE PRIZE IN 
MATHEMATICS 

Rhett Austin 

BARBER DAIRY 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Patricia Gammage 
Lamar Guthrie 

BERT MEADOW MCTYEIRE 
SCHOLARSHIP 

James Terry 

KIRKLAND ACCOUNTING 
SCHOLARSHIP 

Louise Coker 

AMERICAN CHEMICAL 
SOCIETY AWARD 

Charles Banks 

BLACK STUDENT UNION 
AWARD 

Carl Crosby Sonya Nobles 

Christine Fisher Victor Powell 
Tunja Greene Traci Satisfield 

Veronica Nicholson Marcus 

Robertson 

RHODES SCHOLARSHIP 

Chris Canfield 

ALPHA LAMBDA DELTA 



SENIOR 
AWARDS 

BOOK AWARD 

Beth Curry 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF 
CHEMISTS AWARD 

Larry Shoemaker 

BETA BETA BETA AWARD 

Mary Ann Jessee 

BIOLOGY AWARD 

Scott LeCroy 

JOHN MARSHALL GERSTING 
AWARD 

Lauren Lowery 

WALL STREET JOURNAL 

AWARD J 

Carl Williams | 

PRESSER SCHOLAR 

Emily Eyre J 

PHI ETA SIGMA AWARD 

Beth Curry 

PHI ALPHA THETA AWARD 

Greg Curry 

WILLL\MS JAMES 
PSYCHOLOGY AWARD 

Patricia Tucker 
Catherine Perkins 

RUTHERFORD RAY BLACK 
TEACHER AWARD 

JelF McLaughlin 

HENRY T. SHANKS PRIZE 

Gail Livingston 

SAENGER BIBLE TRAVEL 
AWARD 

Dale Clem 

ROBERT HEWLIN JACKSON 
ACHIEVEMENT 

Frank Brocato J 

ROBERT HEWLIN JACKSON 

MERITORIOUS 

SCHOLARSHIP AWARD 

Beth Curry 
Robin Foster 

OMICRON DELTA KAPPA 

EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING 

AWARD 

J. Paul Franke 



34 




Left — Jeff' McLaughlin 
presents Dr. Franke with 
the Omicron Delta Kappa 
Excellence in Teaching 
Award. Bottom Left — 
Dr. Berte gets a hug from 
his wife Ann after she 
received an award from 
Mortar Board for her 
service to the college 
community. Bottom right 
— Beth Curry receives 
the Alpha Lambda Delta 
Book Award for 
maintaining the highest 
grade point average of any 
Alpha Lambda Delta 
member. 




35 



AWARDS DAY 



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Dr. Wayne Shew (R) accepts the Henry C. Randall 
Award for best organization advisor. 




Bob Glenn (L. ) is awarded the Circle K Award for the 
Promotion of the College Communitv'. 




Barbara Scott, librarian, is awarded the Alpha Phi Ome- 
ga Service Award. 



ELECTIONS BOARD CHAIRMAN 

Pierre Scalise 

STUDENTS PUBLICATIONS 
EDITORS, 1982-83 

Southern Accent — Peggy Smith 

Hilltop News — Frank Ozment 

Quad — Scott Musgrove 

PUBLICATIONS BOARD EDITOR 

Mark Seifert 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 
COORDINATOR 

Mark Seifert 

QUEST n COORDINATORS 

Mike Poist 
Andy Martin 

MISS ALABAMA PRELIMINARY 
PAGEANT WINNERS 

Lea Ann Friday Cynthia Lamar 

Gina Harris Jeanmarie McGehee 

Cindy Hartsell Margaret Ann Renneker 
Jan Johnson Dawn Urquart 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 
LEGISLATURE 



Kevin Alexander 
Cheri Bachofer 
Pat Barnes 
Michael Blaum 
Renee Brown 
JefF Gallops 
Jan Goble 
Salem Khalaf 



Dorothy Little 

Bruce Long 

Anton Mertens 

Debra Miller 

John Reeves 

Tonia Sellers 

Anne Stagner 

Braxton Wagnon 



STUDENT JUDICIARY, 1981-82 



Rhett Austin 
Emily Bonner 
Mike Caro 
Bonita Conley 
Melinda Cooper 
Beth Curry 
Peggy Hamrick 
Chip Irwin 



Mark McClendon 

Dean Monroe 

Bert Moore 

Jim Owens 

James Sexson 

Tommy Sisson 

Anne Stagner 

Anne Wagner 



36 



PRESIDENT'S SERVICE AWARD 

Beth Curry 

HENRY C. RANDALL AWARD 

Wayne Shew 

MARGARET DUNN PHILLIPS 

PANHELLENIC CITIZENSHIP 

AWARD 

Gail Livingston 

:. BRADLEY FULKERSON AWARD 

Tonia Sellers 

ALPHA PHI OMEGA SERVICE 
AWARD 

Barbara Scott 

B-SC PANHELLENIC 
PHILANTHROPIC PLAQUE 

Alpha Omicron Pi 



WILLIAM RAINES BATTLE AWARD 

Beth Curry 

THE CIRCLE K AWARD FOR THE 

PROMOTION OF THE COLLEGE 

COMMUNITY 

Bob Glenn 

CIRCLE K BLOOD DRIVE WINNERS 

Fall Term — Kappa Alpha 
Spring Term — Independents 

CHEERLEADER SPIRIT AWARD 

Sarah Spenser 

CHEERLEADER CAPTAIN'S AWARD 

Sandy Barker 

BLACK STUDENT UNION AWARDS 

Carl Cosby Kelvin Ramsey 

Donna Morrissette Pam Williams 




Gail Livingston accepts the Margaret Dunn Phillips 
Panhellenic Award. 



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Sandy Barker is presented the Cheerleader Captain's 
Award by Mike Chappell. 




Tonia Sellers is presented the T. Bradley Fulkerson 
Award. 



Ame Cox accepts the Softball championship award for 
Alpha Omicron Pi. 



37 



The Vance Speech 
Competition 

"Guns or Butter or Both" was the topic of this 
year's Vance Speech Competition. The five 
finahsts, Mike Crabtree, Melinda Cooper, Mike 
Henderson, Jill Hoube, and John Paul Mathis, 
each presented a five minute prepared speech 
on this topic and a three minute extemporaneous 
speech on a randomly selected topic. 

The competition was judged by Judge Charles 
Nice, Rabbi Glazer of Temple Bethel, and Pro- 
fessor of Theatre Aubrey Berg. Gwenn Ben- 
jamin, professor of speech, organized the com- 
petition. 




Melinda Cooper (above) of Birmingham 
won first place and a prize of $500. Jill Hoube 
(left) of Anniston was the second place winner 
and recipient of $200. 

This is the third year the Vance Speech 
Competition has been held. It is made possible 
by the generous donations of William Vance, a 
B-SC alumnus. Vance, who graduated Phi 
Beta Kappa from B-SC in 1941, was a member 
of the Tau Kappa Alpha Debate Society. 



38 





Leigh Peters, grand prize winner of the competition, 
performed Beethoven's Sonata, E-flat major. Op. 31, 
No. 3; Chopin's Etude, Op. 10, No. 5; and Prokofiev's 
Sarcasm. 



The Alys Robinson Stephens Piano Competition 
annually awards a grand prize of $2,000 to an 
outstanding pianist at B-SC. Two finalists are each 
awarded a prize of $1,000. 

All participates are required to perform one 
Etude by either Frederic Chopin or Franz List, 
one Beethoven Sonata, and one contemporary 
piano composition. Leigh Peters, a senior piano 
major at B-SC, was this year's grand prize winner. 
Elisabeth Lester, a senior, and Megan Wells, a 
freshman, won the finalist awards. 

Mr. Abbey Simon, internationally acclaimed 
pianist and member of the piano faculty at Julliard 
School for Music, judged the competition. The 
Stephens Piano Competition is made possible by 
the Elton B. Stephens Foundation. 




Megan Wells (left) performed Beethoven's Sonata, G major. Op. 14, No. 2; Chopin's Etude, 
Op. 25, No. 9; and Debussy s La soiree dans Grenade. Elisabeth Lester (right) performed 
Beethoven's Sonata, E-flat major. Op. 7; Chopin's Etude, Op. 2.5, No. 2; and Profofiev's 
Sonata, Op. 1. 



39 



SGA Elections — Gimmicks at Their Best 



The 1982 SGA elections were ones 
that will not easily be forgotten. 
Rarely have B-SC students seen 
such aggressive campaigning. Newly 
elected officers are; Danny Jones — 
President, Larry Adams — Vice- 
President, Jill Hoube — Secretary, 
and Ray Deloteus — Treasurer. 

Can you remember barely 

three years ago when all 

campaigning for an SGA office 

involved was a few cheaply 

printed handbills distributed 

across campus and a form 

letter from candidates 

deposited in student's post 

office boxes? 

What a contrast this simple 

picture provides to SGA 

campaigning this year. There 

were, of course, the customary 

handbills and letters, but 

these were much more 

elaborate than ones in the 

past. They came complete 

with pictures of the candidates 

and slogans designed to appeal 

to any — and every — 

student. 

However, campaigning did not 

stop here. Giant banners were 

hung from the library terrace, 

the roof of the cafeteria, and 

even from a Winnebago 

parked inside the campus 

gates. 

And there was more! It will be 

hard to forget the free gum, 

free pens, suckers, and 

buttons plastered with slogans. 

Voter's couldn't even find 

refuge from the campaign 

ploys in the privacy of their 

own rooms. Doors were 

covered with handbills and 




40 




personal messages. Every 

evening the dorms buzzed 

with candidates going door to 

door plying voters with 

reasons to vote for them. 

Really, I can appreciate 

"eagerness to serve" as well as 

anyone, but is all of this really 

necessary? Is the value of the 

candidate to be decided on the 

quality of the suckers he/she 

distributes? What ever 

happened to the saying "keep 

it simple"? Not to say that 

least, is best, but in this case, 

best is certainly not most. 

— Rose Trinchitella 

Danny Jones, 1982 SGA president, 
tries to convince voters of his 
administrative abilities in a cafeteria 
forum. 




Ray Deloteus, 
(second from 
right) celebrates 
his victory as SGA 
Treasurer with his 
campaign staff. 



41 




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No chapel service is complete without the singing of a hymn. 
Right — Ed Kilbourne, a Christian Pop Singer, performs 
every year at Yielding Chapel. Opposite page, top — the 
chapel offered special Easter services; bottom — Terrell 
Finney performed a mime as part of the after-Easter service. 



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Chapel 
at Six 



Though B-SC is a Methodist 
college, it offers a wide range 
of Christian services held each 
week in Yielding Chapel. 

The chapel, set apart from 
the mainstream of the campus, 
offers not only a place of 
spiritual growth, but also a 
place to just get away from it 
all. 

Each Monday night, at 6:00, 
Dr. Stewart Jackson, the 
campus chaplain, leads an 
interdenominational service of 
music, fellowship, prayer, and 
worship. 

On Wednesdays, Reverend 
Rick Putnam conducts an 
Episcopal service of the Holy 
Eucharists at 5:00 p.m. Later 
in the evening, Steve 
Hollaway leads a Baptist 
service of worship at 9:00 p.m. 

On Sundays, Father Ted 
Hill conducts Catholic Mass at 
11:00 a.m. for those who wish 
to attend. 

The four ministers often 
work together on special 
events for Christmas, Lent, 
and Easter. The campus 
ministers also sponsor films, 
singers, and speakers to add to 
an individual's Christian 
growth. 

B-SC encourages and 
promotes spiritual growth by 
offering a variety of Christian 
activities. 

— Russell Levenson, Jr. 



43 



The B-SC Cafeteria: 



shamrock Food Service — it 

has been the subject of much 

criticism and the source of 

many complaints. Students 

argue that they are being 

ripped off: for over $500 a 

term, they should be eating 

prime rib three times a week. 

They argue that the rules 

governing cafeteria policies are 

ridiculous: two punches for 

two scoops of instant potatoes, 

waivers granted only after 

obtaining a doctor's excuse, 

only 14 or 21 punces per 

week, no exceptions. 

But there is a new problem 

arising in the cafeteria this 

year. Overcrowding. Although 

the enrollment has doubled in 

the past few years, the 

number of cafeteria tables and 

chairs have not. Rarely does a 

meal pass without a dozen 

people squeezing in between 

the aisles and bumping into 

the back of every chair along 

the way. Students are learning 

to inch between the chairs 

while precariously balancing 

their tray above the heads of 

all those lucky enough to have 

found a seat. 

These are problems common 

to most college cafeterias, but 

some students at B-SC have 

found the perfect solution to 

the problem. They eat out. 





44 



Overcrowded and Undernourished. 





Opposite Page — 
(Top) Terri Perri 
grimaces when faced 
with the food 
selection. (Bottom 
left) Karen Kendrick 
interrupted from 
her meal. (Bottom 
right) Kappa Alpha's 
enjoy their lunch. 
This Page — Renee 
Brown manages to 
squeeze in between 
the chairs. 



45 



who said there was a 
Parking Problem? 



All things being equal, they 
aren't always. One case in point: 
the college parking "situation. " 
Like postmen, B-SC students 
can be at their appointed rounds 
in rain, snow, and sleet. The in- 
equality exists in the proportion 
of close, conveniently available 
parking spaces to students. 

About ten years ago, the 
present number of parking 
spaces was sufficient. The col- 
lege then had approximately 700 
students; today it has over 1500 
students. Therein lies the in- 
equality. 

Every year, it seems, some- 
one complains about parking. 
But in no other year has it been 
such a problem. The administra- 
tion is fond of making the point 
that there are enough parking 
spaces for all students. What the 
administration doesn't mention 
is that faculty members living 
along Greensboro Road don't 
like extra cars in their drive- 
ways. 

Various "solutions ' have been 
offered by the SGA and rejected 
for various reasons. (1) Ban 
freshmen from parking on all or 
most of the campus? Too many 
freshmen vote, or at least too 
many freshmen who dislike hik- 
ing to class from Bush Hills or 
the nether regions of Greens- 
boro Road. Freshmen meek- 
ness, like beanies and sockhops, 



seems to be out of style. 

(2) Widen the dorm circle to 
allow angle parking on both 
sides? Too expensive, say ad- 
ministration money-watchers. 
Widening the dorm circle could 
cost more than building a fence, 
and it would be less decorative, 
only bringing more cars on cam- 
pus. Now if those cars were 
Mercedes, we could possi- 
bly .. . 

(3) Supply campus shuttle 
buses between some of the more 
outlying parking lots and the ac- 
ademic quad? Well, this is 
actually no one's proposal. I 
thought it would look good and 
it couldn't hurt on recruitment 
brochures. 

Parking, to some students, is 
no laughing matter. Commuters 
who live on the far side of town 
find themselves having either to 
rise with the roosters or practice 
the half-mile sprint to make ear- 
ly morning classes on time. 
Those of us having the urge to 
avoid cafeteria food and find 
lunch somewhere else often find 
ourselves hiking to afternoon 
classes from the fringes of the 
outer limits. And then, there's 
the weather problem. 

A long walk that can be relax- 
ing on a sunny spring day can 
turn into a cold version of 
Chinese water torture during 
winter months. Cold weather 



can dampen a person's enjoy- 
ment of the freshness of the out- 
side air, especially when all feel- 
ing leaves the hands and the En- 
sley furnaces turn their smog 
output to maximum. 

All of the complaining about 
inadequate parking can be 
traced to something akin to class 
warfare. Students who pay over 
$4,000 a year for the privilege of 
attending the college, watch 
professors and staff members 
who are actually paid to come 
here, slip into the best of the 
parking spaces. Why, some of us 
ask, should their green stickers 
match those green spaces of con- 
crete and not our yellow stick- 
ers? If we are all adults, as some 
of us tell ourselves, why should 
we not all receive such advan- 
tages? Some staff members and 
professors reply that such prere- 
quisites are the only things that 
make college salaries and work- 
loads bearable. 

As it is, the college's shortage 
of convenient parking spaces is 
an example of the flip side of 
success. More students has 
meant both financial security for 
the college and increased com- 
petition for good parking places 
— competition at which most of 
us lose out. 

— Richard Feist 



Opposite page — Artwork by Tommy Wilkes. 



46 



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; r^ 



fptVN^yFg H ALLj. _ 





J 




A Break from the Cafeteria: 
The Marsh Bake Shop 




MARS 



FRIED CHICKEN 



SOUTHERN 
FRIED 



LHILKlN 3PIECE 
SLAW, HONEY, POP-OVER ROLLS, FRENCH FRIES 



$2.25. 



CHICKEN BREAST -ALL WHITE co 05 

SLAW. HONEY, POP-OVER ROLLS, FRENCH FRIES 'P^'^*' 



CHICKEN FILETS .piece 

SLAW, HONEY, POP-OVER ROLLS, FRENCH FRIES 



$2.25^ 



CHICKEN LIVERS $2.00 

SLAW, HONEY. POP-OVER ROLLS, FRENCH FRIES 

^ COLESLAW - FRIES IIL.4 .50"^ 
Assorted Desserts Ir SWEET TRAY $ .50 

CARROT CAKE LEMON ICE BOX PIE 

GERMAN CHOCOLATE PIE EGG CUSTARO PIE 

CREAM POFF CHOCOLATE ECLAIRS 

COCONUT EGG CUSTARD PIE APPLE PIE 



CCOFFEE. 



.JUICES SOFTORINKSea.. 



135? 



BREAKFAST Suggestions *"°^!^^;^^^"P*''" 

jWtcT ROLLS 



[ 



SAUSAGE -BISCUITS 



order 
of 
two 



$1.10< 




I 



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Lunch at the Marsh Bake Shop 
has become something of a tradi- 
tion for many students at B-SC. 
Located on 3rd Avenue West, just 
five minutes from campus, 
Marsh's is a combination bakery/ 
restaurant that features breakfast 
items, sandwiches, fried chicken, 
and an assortment of eight differ- 
ent cakes and pies all baked fresh 
daily in Marsh's kitchen. Best of 
all, the most expensive item on 
the menu — a three piece chicken 
dinner including slaw, french 
fries, rolls, and honey — costs a 
mere $2.25. 

For many B-SC students. 
Marsh's quaint, friendly atmos- 
phere is a welcome change from 
fast food places and cafeteria lines, 
and its prices deflate the old 
"poor, starving student " myth; 
students may be poor, but thanks 
to the Marsh Bake Shop, they 
sure don't have to starve. 

— Jill Richard 



Opposite Page — (Top) The grill at 
Marsh's has helped prepare food 
for many a hungry B-SC student. 
(Bottom) Rose Trinchitella and 
Clare Rutland enjoy a breakfast at 
Marsh's. Left — The waitresses at 
Marsh's always greet B-SC students 
with a friendly smile. 



49 



NIGHTLIFE! 




Although the hours spent in 
class here at B-SC are certainly 
memorable and thrilling, many 
students feel the need to balance 
this by spending time at one or 
more of Birmingham's popular 
sanctuaries. 

B-SC students frequent the 
Touchdown Cafe because they 
like a place where beer is still 
comfortably under a dollar, pool is 
only a quarter, and the owner 
wouldn't recognize an opaque 
container if it jumped up at the 
bar and yelled, "Roll Tide! " The 
Touchdown is also the only bar in 
town where "Poke Salad Annie" 
always has been, and always will 
be, on the jukebox. 

Plaid pants and pinball 
machines predominate at the 



Courtyard, home of the most 
wicked Long Island Teas east of 
California. Here is a haven for stu- 
dents who enjoy a few drinks amid 
the beach music and smoke. Plen- 
ty of opportunities to rub elbows 
with UAB accounting majors exist 
here. 

Countless brain cells have met 
their Waterloo at the Tide N' Ti- 
ger, a place almost as legendary as 
the "Bear " himself. Even though 
prices mysteriously skyrocket on 
days when the Crimson Tide plays 
across the street, Lucian and Mil- 
lie have been adjusting students' 
attitudes for years, and the atti- 
tudes and their owners are most 
appreciated. 

— Tony Menendez 



50 





Left — Janet Hancock, 
Martha Hays, Jo Ann 
Roberts, Agatha Pihakis, 
and Susie Hamrick 
frequent the Courtyard. 
Bottom Left — LesHe 
Douglas and Johnny 
Johnson at the Tide N' 
Tiger. Bottom right — 
B-SC students relax at 
the Touchdown. 




Muscle 
Mania 

It has been said that the 70's 
were the "Narcissistic 70's" — 
the birth of the "Me Age." It 
seems as though the 80's are 
starting out much the same way 
here on the Hilltop. B-SC stu- 
dents are very much concerned 
about the way they look and 
feel. 

The College has a great bas- 
ketball, baseball, soccer, and 
tennis team. For those not paitic- 
ipating in the organized sports, 
there are intramurals for both 
men and women consisting of 
football, volleyball, basketball, 
and Softball. 

Joggers are always seen on the 
Hilltop. Even Dr. Neal Berte 
gets into the act, starting most 
mornings with a jog and taking a 
walk around the campus in the 
evening with his wife Ann. 

B-SC opened a well- 
equipped weight room due to 
popular student demand. The 
weight room opened early this 
year with a whole new set of 
Olympic weights and bars. 

The cafeteria encourages eat- 
ing and exercising right. Its staff 
has posted many fitness signs 
about the campus, telling about 
the right foods, calories, and fit- 
ness programs. 

Regardless of what the 70's 
were, it seems that the students 
here at B-SC are starting off the 
80's right, by looking and feeling 
healthier! 

— Russell Levenson 



Bottom — Barney Bonfield gets into the act 
as he joggs around campus. Opposite page 
— Jack Swift acquires a running coinpanion. 
Artwork bv Tav Berr\'hill. 




52 




53 



Blizzard Hits: Birmingham Cancelled! 



while it is true that most 

Alabamians rarely see snow 

during the winter season, this 

was certainly not the case this 

year. One of the biggest 

snowstorms in over a decade 

hit Alabama on January 12. 

Birmingham was virtually shut 

down for nearly a week. 

Thousands of homes were 

without power for days, 

businesses were closed, 

hundreds of cars were 

stranded along the interstates 

and highways. On the Hilltop, 

we were one of the lucky few 

who had electrical service. 

However, classes were 

cancelled for nearly a week 

because professors and 

commuters could not make 

their way to the campus. 

Students took advantage of 

this unexpected winter break 

not by catching up on studies, 

but by sleeping most of the 

day and playing in the snow 

most of the night. Snowmen 

were erected all over the 

campus, cafeteria trays 

"disappeared" from the 

cafeteria and were converted 

into makeshift sleds, snowballs 

flew. College Hills sold beer 

by the cases to many B-SC 

students who cautiously made 

their way down the ice-coated 

street to the corner grocery 

store. 

The Hilltop was indeed a 

"winter- wonderland." No 

amount of campus grooming 

could compete with the 

natural beauty of the 

snow-covered grounds. It was 

a memorable week, one that 

most of us will not easily 

forget. 




'■'^'V^ ^4^1 













ii. 



i*s.'» 






54 





Left — Nichole Christensen, Jo Ann 
Roberts, Angle Oder, and Agatha 
Pihakis take time from playing in the 
snow to pose for a picture. Above — 
Snowmen were seen all over the 
campus, but perhaps none with the 
distinguished personality of the one in 
front of the Campus Store. 





Left — 


- Dennv W'hiteh 


urst and Susan 


Millican keep warm on 


a cold night. 


Above 


— The fountain 


in front of the 


library 


froze solid and 


nade an excellent 


hockey field. 





55 




56 



B-SC Beach Bums 



^^ 



t 




\ 



■>'«»■ 




^^wsaiBiS*''* 



r 



It is the year of the 
beach bums. This 
year, perhaps more 
than any other, 
students have been 
forsaking studies and 
classes to bask in the 
rays. Hanson Beach, 
New Women's Beach, 
the baseball field — 
they have become as 
reknown for their 
relaxation and sun as 
Panama City or Fort 
Walton. 

The fame of 
Hanson Beach even 
spread so far that a 
local television 
station, WBRC-TV 6 
featured it on a 10 
o'clock news cast. 

Unfortunately, few 
professors approve of 
these local resort 
activities. 




57 




58 



Those April 



while it is true that April showers 
bring May flowers, many B-SC stu- 
dents would agree that no paltrx- 
flower is worth the rain that has fall- 
en by the bucketfuls this spring. It 
has undoubtedly been one of the 
wettest springs in recent years. 
Umbrella sales have skyrocketed, 
frizzy hair is on the rampage, books 
and notebooks are perpetually sog- 
gy, and there is more class absent- 
ism attributed to the weather than is 
believable. 

But life on the Hilltop — regard- 
less of how saturated everything is 
— goes on. Females pull their hair 
into ponytails and buns, males tuck 
their askew curls into hats, and oflF 



(May, June 



they trudge to class. Intramural 
sports are still played, while dedi- 
cated fans and little sisters stand out 
in the rain and root their muddv 
team on to victory. A few brave 
souls go to the library for the night, 
afraid to leave once they get settled 
in a dry place. 

But mostly, students hibernate in 
their dorm rooms for hours upon 
hours and the threat of cabin fever 
sets in. Radio dials are anxiously 
tuned to weather forecasts as stu- 
dents hope for a sunny, or even a 
partly cloudy, day. Those glorious 



Showers. 



tans that were acquired over spring 
break fade fast, starved for the re- 
juvinating rays of the sun. 

It seems like a pretty desperate 
situation when "rainy days and 
Mondays" includes every day of the 
week. 




59 



CD 
• I— I 

H 



Career Corner 



Angela Hansard (1.) participates in an 
on-campus interview. 




Each Year, a new crop of B- 
SC students await the exciting, 
yet frightening time of gradua- 
tion. While over 50 percent of 
these graduates continue their 
education in law, medicine, and 
other graduate programs, the 
remaining graduates face the 
task of entering the job market. 

With help from the Career 
Counseling/Placement Center 
in Snavely, students are assisted 
in finding jobs in management, 
accounting, computer science, 
publications, advertising, and 
journalism. 

B-SC students are not limit- 
ing themselves to the Birming- 
ham area when looking for jobs. 
Most students are flexible in 
terms of geographical prefer- 
ence, although many prefer to 
remain in the southeastern or 
southwestern regions. 




At a national level, graduating 
seniors are finding most job 
openings in the fields engineer- 
ing, computer science, account- 
ing, and law. Opportunities in 
technological fields range from 



satelite engineers to computer 
program designers to re- 
searchers in the oil industry. 

— Carol Dublin 



60 




Since the arrival of Career Counselor Penny Good- 
win, the Counseling/Placement Center has had a face 
lift. Goodwin, a graduate of the University of South 
Carolina and a former Director of Law Placement at 
the University of South Carolina, has worked hard to 
make sure that more B-SC students know about the 
center and that they take advantage of it. 

"We want to increase our visibility to the 
student population and to the employer popu- 
lation by prioritizing our placement process 
and our on campus recruitment, ' says 
Goodwin. 

She is very proud that 80 percent of the graduating 
class is now registered with the center and that the 
number of on-campus recruiters has quadrupled from 
the number in the fall. 

203 students interviewed on campus this spring 
with such reputable businesses and corporations as 
Xerox, 




Aetna Life and Casual- 
ty, Kirkland and Co., 
C.P.A., Protective 
Life Insurance, Pizitz, 
Parisian's, and even 
the FBL 

The Center has 
mailed resume packets 
to firms all over the 
Southeast, and spon- 
sored workshops on 
teacher education, 
preparing a resume, 
the art of interviewing, 
how to begin the job 
search, and many 
more. 

Above — Jerry Wood is 
one of many Seniors fix- 
ing to enter the job 
market. 

Left — Robin Harrell 
(f) talks with Penny 
Goodwin about the job 
market. 



61 



Exam 

Week: 

Sweating 

It 

Out! 



Exam week. It is looked upon 
by most B-SC students as some 
sort of disease that keeps them 
confined to the hbrary for days 
until the symptoms clear up. It 
is usually accompanied by 
bloodshot eyes, callused fin- 
gers, and exhausted minds and 
bodies. 

There is no known remedy for 
"examitis," but luckily, it only 
lasts for a week at a time. A few 
B-SC students cope with the 
pressures of exams by studying 
long hours ahead of time so that 
they can be rested during finals 
week. However, most procras- 
tinate just long enough that they 
are left with no alternative but to 
drink coffee by the gallons and 
smoke cigarettes by the cartons 
in order to stay awake long 
enough to cram in all the study- 
ing they need to do. 





Top — Teresa Kidd hibernates in the 
library seminar rooms. Above — 
Angleica Rosiak prepares for her finals 
in the quietness of the library. 



The cafeteria tries to alleviate 
some of the strain of the week by 
serving brownies, cakes, and 
coffee in the evening hours. 
Here students can find a quick 
and convenient break. 

The library is the most popu- 
lar spot on campus for one week 
of the semester during exams. 
Yet many students get so tired of 
being in the library and listening 
to the steady hiss of the air con- 
ditioner, that they return to 
their dorm rooms to study. For- 
tunately, the resident advisors 
keep things quiet so that the 
dorms are feasible places to 
study. 

Someone once commented 
that exam week is like another 
world, a world that is so awful to 
visit that, surely, no one would 
ever want to live there. 



62 




Left — Wesley Hughes 
bewails having to study 
for final. Below — 
Phillips 213 is the home 
of many tests other than 
just finals for science 
majors. 



63 



Quest II 

Quest II is funded by the Stu- 
dent Activity Fee. It provides a 
film series each semester and a 
number of speakers. All B-SC 
students, faculty, and staff are 
admitted to these sponsored 
events free of charge. 

Quest II has brought such 
films to B-SC's campus this 
spring as The China Syndrome, 
Camelot, Tess, The Deerhun- 
ter, Tribute, Hardcore, Why 
Would I Lie?, The Howling, 
The In-Laws, Kramer vs. 
Kramer, Time After Time, and 
California Suite. 

Mike Poist and Mark Seifert 
are the Quest II coordinators. 
Jeflf Kiser runs the equipment. 




il't^^^lrftS 




Jeff Kiser, technical director for Quest II. 




Speakers 




Lewis Grizzard 




Juanita Kreps 



Sen. Mathias 



65 





Barbara Walters and student escort Gail Living- 
ston. 



Ann and Roone Arledge 



Helen Boehm 




B-SC's biennial GALA, honoring legendary women 
of the world for their achievements in medicine, 
fashion, journalism, entertainment, philanthropy, 
business, and other areas was as exciting as ever. 

The festivities began on Thursday, May 6, with a 
Patron's Dinner hosted by Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Shook at the South Central Bell Operations Center. 
On Friday, the events continued with a reception in 
the Kennedy Arts Center, followed by a Fine Arts 
Showcase in the College Theatre. The Awards Dinner 
was held Friday night at the Birmingham-Jefferson 
Civic Center. 

Twelve women were honored this year at GALA: 
Barbara Walters, Beverly Sills, Nancy Kissinger, 
Shirley Lord, Helen Boehm, the Duchess of Bedford, 
Liz Smith, Ann Arledge, Hillie Mahoney, Marva Col- 
lins, Carolina Herrera, and Countess Anne d'Ornano. 

Barbara Walters is known for her many reports and 
interviews which are aired regularly on ABC's "World 
New Tonight, ' on "20/20, " and on "Issues and 
Answers. ' Beverly Sills is probably America's best- 
known opera singer. She is currently director of the 
New York City Opera. Ann Arledge, a graduate of 
B-SC and a former Miss Alabama, performed for U. S. 
troops in Vietnam before moving to New York, where 
she began work in television entertainment and met 
her husband Roone Arledge, President of ABC News 



and Sports. 

Helen Boehm serves as Chairman of the Board of 
Boehm Studios, know for porcelain artwork and figur- 
ines. The Duchess of Bedford has been involved in 
such enterprises as exporting textiles produced by a 
family business, producing television films, and re- 
storing the art collection in the 18th century Woburn 
Abbey. 

Liz Smith writes a nationally syndicated column 
that deals with fashion, show business personalities, 
and public figures. Shirley Lord is Director of Special 
Projects, Beauty and Fitness, Vogue, U.S.A. 

Hillie Mahoney is co-founder of the Mahoney Insti- 
tute for Health Maintenance, which directs a world- 
wide program for disease prevention and the promo- 
tion of good health. Marva Collins is an educator in 
Chicago's inner city and has recently been featured on 
"60 Minutes. " Nancy Kissinger formerly worked for 
Nelson Rockerfeller as a Research Assistant. She is 
now married to Dr. Henry Kissinger. 

Carolina Herrera is a fashion designer who recently 
launched Herrera, Limited. She has been on the Best 
Dressed List since 1972 and has been elected to the 
Best Dressed Hall of Fame. Countess Anne d'Ornano 
was elected mayor of Deauville, France in 1977. She 
is active in international events and has created an 
American Film Festival. 



66 







Nancy Kissinger 



Liz Smith 




The Duchess of Bedford and student escort Beth 
Harris. 



Student escort Margaret Ann Renneker and Shirley 
Lord. 




GALA International Coordinator Joanne Herring 
with student escort. 



67 




Robin Foster and Beth Curry, the 1982 valedictorian^,K?arry_t^ 
flags and lead the commencement procession. 







^ 









i '1 'v 



f-"- • - - - - r- !:iiF- -I 




68 



Graduation 1982 




69 



Graduation 




An excited Melinda Cooper with her diploma. 



S.G.A. President Brian Parker carried the College 
Mace in the commencement procession. 



r*^--r* </ 



h 




mmt 


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S 


fit 







#^ 







Over 300 students graduated at this year's commencement exercises. 



Larry Shoemaker receives his de- 
gree. 



-^ *>•< 



«* 




if. » t-i^f » ! ■ ! »!• r» ! » ! » ! »4* IaTK^ 

i^zT* M* i.' 1 • I * I ' I * I * I* » '^* * * '•»;». 




Barney Bonfield is presented his diplo- 
ma by Dr. Berte. 



Graduating Seniors process. 



71 




«k.te' 



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72 




I 




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Faculty 




73 



Administration 



Dr. Neal R. Berte, President of the 

College; right, the Berte family: Dr. 

Berte, his wife Anne, and his 

children Becky, Julie, Scott, and 

Mark. 







Dr. Berte speaks to a 

student at a cafeteria 

forum. 



74 






^is^M 



W. Edmund Moomaw, 1977 

Vice-President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the 

College 

B.A. (1961), Ph.D. (1969), University of Virginia. 



"'V^^m 



Robert Dwain Dortch, 1964 

Vice-President for Admission Services 

B.S. (1955), M.A. (1959), University of Alabama. 



M lEU 




Roberta TUlery Webb, 1975 

Vice-President for Development 

B.A. (1974), The College of Wiiham and Mary. 



D. Robert Moxley, 1981 

Vice-President for Financial Affairs 

B.A. (1966), Harvard University; M.A. (1970), Ph.D. 

(1972), University of Alabama. 



7.5 



I 



-3^Hh 



Administration 



(L. to R.) Front Rowi Virginia Jeely, Imogene Newsom, Carol 

Dudley, Karen Skaggs, Brenda Murphy, Fran Jackson. Back 

Row: Kay Norell, Louise Fleming, Deanie Young. 




(L. to R.) Jim Watson, 

Dawn Wolfe, Barbara 

Brown, R. Lewis, Betty 

Douglas, Allan Sumner, 

Alecia Craft, Frances 

Kaylor, Pam Newton 

(seated). 



■ P 



(L. to R.) First Row: 

Charlotte Rueschenberg, 

Lesa Johnston, Lora Terry, 

Risa Maier, Laurie 

Haworth, Roberta Webb. 

Second Row: Philip Shirley, 

Albretta Jackson, Clarice 

Wade, Dave Dyson, Freida 

Boling, Virginia McMahan, 

Mary Margaret Faust, Jerry 

Narramore 





76 





Counselors 



(L. to R.) Penny Goodwin, Career Coordinator; Dudley Long 
Director of Student Activities; Bob Glenn, Director of Student 
Affairs; Marilyn Hancock, Office Supenisor — Student Affairs; 
Stewart Jackson, Chaplain; Nancy Po\ner, Coordinator of 
Contract Learning; Gelene Mullenix, Secretary — Career 
Coun.se!ing Center. 



Bookstore 



L. to R.) Charles Wesley, Camille Shields, Elizabeth (Bettye) 
Winfree, Ben Scokel, and Dora Lee Johnson. 



Shamrock Food System 



(L. to R. ) Top Row: Rose Walker, Wyanna Moore. Ron 
Rhone, Mattie Ollison, Carrie Tippet, Lorenzo 
McKinney, Jan Carpenter, Mildred Heard, Bernice 
Moore, Tom Merrit, Sharon McClain, Kathv Stinnett, 
David Phillips. Middle Row: Mike Flor\', Marie Vizzina, 
Edna Alford, Linda Stinnett, Cecelia Roberts, Annie 
Posey, Martha Sanders, Queenie Hawkins, Mike 
Kenley. Bottom Row: Joyce Parker, Theresa Nolan, 
Annie Ruth McKee, Deborah Savage, Susan Clark, 
Jimmie Sue Gamer, Paulette Alford. 



77 



Faculty 




Conrad E. Adair, 1980 
Assistant Professor of Business 
Administration 

B.S. (1953), Auburn University; 
M.B.A. (1968), Samford Uni- 
versity. 



Ruth Swindle Ammons, 1980 

Instructor in Dance 

B.A. (1976), M.A. (1980), Butler 

University. 



Paul Clinton Bailey, 1963 
Ada Rittenhouse Suavely 
Professor of Biology 
B.S. (1942), Jacksonville State 
College; M.A. (1946), PH.D. 
(1949), Vanderbilt University. 




William Hubbard Baxter, Jr., 

1943-44, 1953 
Professor of Music 
B.A. (1942), Birmingham- 
Southern College; B.M. (1947), 
Birmingham Conservatory of 
Music; S.M.M., (1949), Union 
Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 
(1957), University of Rochester. 



I 



Dr. Paul Franke, Professor of Philosophy, illustrates his theories in class. 



78 




Russell D. Beasley, 1981 
Instructor in Dance and Theatre 
B.A. (1972), California State Col- 
lege. 



Aubrey Berg, 1981 
Assistant Professor of Theatre 
B.A, (1970), University of Cape 
Town, South Africa; M.A. (1976), 
Ph.D. (1979), University of Illi- 
nois at Urbana-Champaign. 



William Jarvis Boardman, 1968 
Associated Professor of Physics 
and Mathematics 
A.B. (1961); M.S. (1963), Miami 
University; Ph.D. (1968), Uni- 
versity of Colorado. 




Diane Seymour Brown, 1965 
Professor of French 
B.A. (1964), Howard College; 
M.A. (1965), Ph.D. (1973), Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 



Linda S. Burgess, 1981 
Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A. (1977), Appalachian State 
University; M.F.A. (1979), Rut- 
gers University. 



Nancy Ruth Campbell-Goymer, 

1977 

Assistant Professor of Pyschologv 
B.A. (1971), Florida State Univer- 
sity; M.A. (1972), University of 
Alabama. 



79 



Faculty 




Ernest Byron Chew, 1980 
Monaghan Professor of Manage- 
ment 

B.S. (1966), Carnegie-Mellon 
University; Ph.D. (1972), Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 



^ •«- 



1^1 



Dr. Doug Waits, Professor of Biology, in lab. 




Jean Smith Coats, 1981 
Instructor of Mathematics 
B.S. (1965), Birmingham- 
Southern College; M.A. (1969), 
University of Alabama. 



James H. Cook, 1977 
Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M. (1968), Birmingham- 
Southern College; M.M. (1969), 
Ph.D. (1978), The University of 
Texas. 



Philip Bacon Cubeta, 1981 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. (1972), Williams; B.A. 
(1975), M.A. (1979), Oxford; M.A. 
(1976), M. Phil. (1979), Yale Uni- 
versity'. 



80 



f 




Robert Stephen Cunningham, 

1974 

Associate Professor of Mathema- 
tics and Computer Science. 
B.A. (1964), Drurv College; M.A. 
(1966), Ph.D. (1969), University of 
Oregon. 



Natalie M. Davis, 1972 
Associate Professor of PoHtical Sci- 
ence 

B.A. (1968), Stetson University; 
Ph.D. (1976), University of North 
Carohna at Chapel Hill. 



William L. DeVan, Jr., 1980 
Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M. (1971), xM.N. (1972), The 
Juilliard School of Music; Konzer- 
texamen Diploma (1979), Hoch- 
schule Fur Musik and Theater, 
Hannover, West Germany. 




1 
1 



Donald Wayne Dixon, 1967 
Professor of Psychology 
A.B. (1952), M.S. (1962), Uni- 
versity of Miami; Ph.D. (1965), 
University of Tennessee. 



Assistant Professor of Art Linda S. Burgess stands by one of her explosive 
paintings. Flying Ethan Allen. 



81 




Faculty 



I 




Lyman Aubrey Drewry, Jr. , 1977 
R. Hugh Daniel Professor of Busi- 
ness and Free Enterprise 
B.S. (1954), M.A. (1956), Ph.D. 
(1965), University of Virginia. 



Robert Terrell Finney, 1978 
Assistant Professor of Theatre 
B.A. (1975), Birmingham- 
Southern College; M.F.A. (1978), 
Boston University 



Jonathan David Fraley, Jr., 1967 
Professor of Philosophy 
A.B. (1955), Birmingham- 
Southern College; S.T.B. (1958), 
Boston University; Ph.D. (1968), 
Vanderbilt University. 



Dr. Robert Shelton, 

Professor of Art, 

displays one of his 

collections. 




82 





Dr. James A. Koger, Associate Professor of English, (left), and Dr. Diane 
Brown, Professor of French, (right), discuss issues at a faculty meeting. 




Thomas Jordan Gibbs, 1970 
Associate Professor of xVIusic 
B.A. (1964), Birmingham- 
Southern College; M.N. (1967) 
Ph.D. (1972), University of Texas' 



Earl Fowler Gossett, Jr. 1965 
Canterbury Professor of-ReHgion 
and Philosophy 

A.B. (1954), Birmingham- 
Southern College; B.D. (1957) 
Ph.D. (1961), Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. 



Donald E. Green, 1972 
Associate Professor of Physical 
Education 

B.S. (1959), Auburn University; 
M.A. (1968), University of Ala- 
bama; Ph.D. (1972), Texas A & M 
Uni\'ersit\'. 



83 



Faculty 




Marjorie E. Gunter, 1978 
Associate Professor of" Accounting 
B.S. (1970), M.B.A. (1971), Sam- 
ford University; C.P.A. (1974), 
State of Florida. 



Dr. Robert Tucker, Professor of Art, prepares for a class 




Susan K. Hagen, 1976 
Assistant Professor of English 
A.B. (1969), Gettysburg College; 
M.A. (1972), University of Mary- 
land; Ph.D. (1976), University of 
Virginia. 



Owen E. Hague, 1981 
Associate Professor of Accounting 
B.A.A. (1954), University of 
Pittsburgh; M.B.A. (1956), Post 
M.B.A. (1958), American Uni- 
versity. 



Ann Hollingsworth Hamilton, 

1971 

Associate Professor, Library 

B.A. (1968), Alabama College; 

M.A. (1970), Mississippi State 

University, M.Ln. (1971), Emory 

University. 



84 




H. Patrick Hawley, 1980 
Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A. (1968), University of Ken- 
tucky; M.S. in Ed. (1974), Ed.D. 
(1978), Indiana University. 



Dan Clark Holliman, 1962 
Professor of Biology 
B.S. (1957), M.S. '(1959), Ph.D. 
(1963), University of Alabama. 



Ronald D. Hooten, 1980 
Assistant Professor of Music 
B.M.E. (1966), University of 
Southern Mississippi; M.M. 
(1971) D.M.A. (1980), University 
of Missippi. 




Debra Harper Hurst, 1981 
Instructor in Mathematics 
B.S. (1978), M.Ed. (1980), Au- 
burn University. 



Hoyt McCoy Kaylor, 1943-44; 
1952 

Professor of Physics and 
Mathematics 

B.S. (1943), Birmingham- 
Southern College; M.S. (1949), 
Ph.D. (1953), University of Ten- 
nessee. 



Counselor, Chaplain, and 
Confidante, Stuart Jackson. 



• 



85 




Faculty 




Louis E. King, 1980 
Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.S. (1971), Illinois College; M.S. 
(1975), Ph.D. (1980), Ohio State 
University 



Ouida B. Kinzey, 1969 
Associate Professor of Mathema- 
tics 

B.S. (1943), M.Ed. (1960), Birm- 
ingham-Southern College; 
Advanced Professional Diploma 
(1964), University of Alabama. 



Lola Frances Kiser, 1955 
Professor of Mathematics 
B.S. (1952), Memphis State Uni- 
versity, M.A. (1954), University of 
Georgia; Ph.D. (1971), University 
of Alabama. 




James A. Koger, 1976 
Associate Professor of English 
B.A. (1965), University of the 
South; Ph.D. (1971), Rice Uni- 
versity. 



Dr. Henry Randall, Professor of 

History, speaking — undoubtedly 

about England. 




86 





Slone, Assistant Professor of Art, observing the aesthetics of a baseball game. 



Lynn E. Lewis, 1981 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. (1974), Ph.D. (1981), Clem- 
son University. 




Grace Ezell Marquez, 1978 
Associate Professor of Spanish 
B.A. (1942), Samford University; 
M.A. (1946), University of North 
Carolina; Ph.D. (1964), Inter- 
American University. 



Rachel Clarke Mathes, 1977 
Professor of Music and Artist-in- 
Residence 

B.A. (1963), Birmingham- 
Southern College. 



James C. McCrory, 1980 
Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A. (1972), M.Ed. (1974), Ph.D. 
(1980), University of Virginia. 



87 



Faculty 




Michael L. Mclnturff, 1980 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. (1964), Reed College; Ph.D. 
(1975), Indiana University 



Margaret Israel Millsap, 1981 
Professor of Nursing 
B.S. (1956), M.S. (19580, Ed. D. 
(1974), University of Alabama. 



Carolynn Hinkle Moore, 1978 
Assistant Professor of Chemistrv 
B.S. (1974), Birmingham- 
Southern College; M.S. (1976), 
Ph.D. (1978) University of Illi- 
nois. 




Dr. Robert Wingard directs church relations from his desk in Munger. 



Thomas Frederick Moore, 1981 
Assistant Professor of Chemistrv 
B.A. (1973), Huntingdon College; 
Ph.D. (1978), University of South 
Carolina. 



88 




Y 



^^*- * 




Sarah Ella Mullins, 1981 
Assistant Professor of Mathema- 
tics 

B.A. (1958), University of Ala- 
bama; M.A. (1970), George Pea- 
body College; M.A. (1972), Ph.D. 
(1979), Vanderbilt University. 



Dr. W. Edmund Moomaw talks to Dr. James C. McCrory before a faculty 
meeting. 




William E. Nicholas, 1972 
Associate Professor of History 
B.A. (1964), M.A. (1966), Trinity 
University; Ph.D. (1970), Tulane 
University. 



Phyllis M. Nielsen, 1977 
Assistant Professor of Education 
B.S. (1971), MS.T. (1972), Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin in 
Whitewater; Ed.D. (1977), Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 



Henry Irvin Penfield, Jr. 1967 
Professor of Political Science 
A.B. (1962), M.A. (1965), Ph.D. 
(1970), University of Alabama. 





Faculty 




Samuel Joseph Pezzillo, 1970 
Associate Professor of Classics 
B.A. (1964), Duquesne Universi- 
ty; Ph.D. (1971), University of 
Minnesota. 



Janice Joy Poplau, 1971 
Associate Professor, Library 
B.A. (1970), Gustavus Adolphus 
College; M.A. (1971), University 
of Minnesota. 



Mira Popovich, 1976 
Assistant Professor of Dance 
State Ballet School, Belgrade, 
Yugoslavia, 1953. 




90 




msiiw 




Dr. Jonathan Ford, Associate Professor of Chemistry, explains lab procedures 
to students. 



Henry Clay Randall, 1957 
Professor of Histor\' 
B.A. (1943), University of Alabam- 
a; B.A. (1949), M.A. (1957), Cam- 
bridge University; M.A. (1952), 
Ph.D. (1963), University of North 
Carolina. 




A. Paul Romjue, 1977 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A. (1966), The College' of 
Wooster; M.A. (1977), Vanderbilt 
University. 



Barbara G. Scott, 1974 
Associate Professor, Director of 
Library B.A. (1964), Maters of 
Librarianship (1967), University 
of Washington. 



H. Wayne Shew 

Assistant Professor of Biology 
B.A. (1971), University of North 
Carolina at Wilmington; M.A. 
(1974), Ph.D. (1977), University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill'. 



91 



Faculty 




Dr. Wayne Shew, Professor of Biology, demonstrating the characteristics of a 
Fruit Fly. 



Lloyd G. Slone, 1975 

Assistant Professor of Art 

B.E. (1958), University of Miami; 

M.A. (1970), University of 

Georgia. 




Samuel N. Stayer, 1972 
Associate Professor of History 
A.B. (1964), Ursinus College; 
M.A. (1967), Ph.D. (1970) Duke 
University. 



Joseph Hugh Thomas, 1936 
Professor of Music 
B.A. (1933) Birmingham- 
Southern College; B.M. (1935), 
M.M. (1937), Birmingham Con- 
servatory of Music; L.H.D. (1981) 
Birmingham-Southern College. 



Fay S. Walter, 1981 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.A. (1963), Birmingham- 
Southern College; M.A. (1975), 
Ph.D. (1979) Vanderbilt Universi- 
ty- 



92 





Dorothy Ward, 1946-49, 1950-52, 
1954 

Professor of German 
B.A. (1945), Birmingham- 
Southern College; B.M. (1950), 
Birmingham Conservatory of 
Music; M.A. (1954), Ph.D. (1976), 
Columbia University. 



-f :^_:.^ 




Oliver Cornelius Weaver, 1946 
L.C. Branscomb Professor of Phi- 
losophy 

B.A. '(1935), Birmingham- 
Southern College; B.D. "^(1939), 
Garrett Thelogical Seminary; 
M.A. (1941) Ph.D. (1952) North- 
westem University. 



Roy Drayden Wells, Jr., 1967 

Professor of Religion 
A.B. (1957), Birmingham- 
Southern College; B.D. (1960), 
Ph.D. (1968), Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity. 




Bobby Don Whetstone, 1963 
Professor of Education 
A.B. (1955), M.Ed. (1959), Birm- 
ingham-Southern College; Ph.D. 
(1963), University of Alabama. 



Dr. Eileen Moore, Associate Professor of Education, 
listens to a student in a seminar discussion. 



■ 



93 




u 




Ml 



If four years at B-SC seems like a 
lifetime, imagine being here for over 
25 years! Professors Ward, Weaver, 
Thomas, Kaylor, Kiser, and Gainey 
have all passed the quarter-century 
mark at B-SC; therefore, the South- 
ern Accent felt it only appropriate to 
take a closer look at these remark- 
able women and men. 

Few students connect the name 
Dorothy Ward with music, yet she 
credits music as the catalyst for her 
teaching profession in foreign lan- 
guage. Now a professor of German, 
Ward discovered her interest in 
foreign language through a study of 
music. She began taking courses in 
language in preparation for a career 
in vocal performance. But her love 
of German was so strong that she 
opted for a teaching profession in- 
stead. 

Ward explains that "winning a 
Phi Beta Kappa scholarship to B-SC 



Doroth\' Ward has been a professor of 
German at B-SC since 1946. 



began a chain of good events in (her) 
life." She graduated with an A.B. 
degree in German and French from 
B-SC in 1945. Four years later, she 
received a B.M. from the Birming- 
ham Conservatory of Music. She 
began teaching at B-SC in 1946 
while working toward her M. A. and 
Ph.D. in German, which she re- 
ceived from Colombia University. 

Ward was awarded the Fulbright 
Exchange Teacher Grant in 1956 to 
teach in a German secondary 
school. While there, she studied at 
the University of Hamburg. She 
also received the Danforth Grant 
for doctoral study from 1960-64. 

Music is still very much a part of 
Ward's life. She is an active mem- 
ber of the choir at the First United 
Methodist Church of Birmingham 




and is frequently a solo performer. 
Ward and her husband, Dr. 
Richard Ward, have four children 
and one granddaughter. 




O.C. Weaver came to B-SC as a 
professor of philosophy and reli- 
gion in 1945. 



Philosophy and O.C. Weaver are 
practically synonomous at B-SC. In 
his 36 years of teaching philosophy 
and religion here. Weaver has been 
an acclaimed favorite with students 
and faculty alike. 

Weaver's educational degrees are 
varied and numerous. He received 
his A.B. in religion from B-SC in 
1935, his B.D. from Garrett Theo- 
logical Seminary in 1939, and his 
M. A. and Ph. D. in philosophy from 
Northwestern University in 1941 
and 1952. 

He was a pastor for several 
churches in Illinois before he joined 
the U.S. Navy at the beginnning of 
World War II. He achieved the 
rank of Lieutenant Commander and 
served as chaplain at Johnston Is- 
land and several other naval air sta- 



tions in Hawaii and the southeast- 
ern United States. 

In 1945, Weaver returned to B- 
SC as an Associate Professor of Reli- 
gion and Philosophy. He served as 
chairman of the department from 
1946-54 and as dean of the college 
and faculty from 1964-68. He was 
named the L.C. Branscomb Profes- 
sor of Philosophy in 1968. 

Weaver has a great interest in lo- 
cal history and geneology. He has 
co-authored a book on the history of 
B-SC from 1856-1956. He has also 
published articles on local history 
and has done research on many 
family lines. His research has car- 
ried him to towns all over the South, 
the Northeast, and even England. 

Weaver and his wife, Laura, have 
two sons and one granddaughter. 



94 



Hoyt Kaylor has been instructing 
students in math and physics since 1952. 



Professor Hoyt Kaylor has done 
an about-face from his intended ca- 
reer as a businessman. When he 
entered B-SC in 1939 at the age of 
16, economics and business admin- 
istration were the fields of study 
which attracted his attention. 
However, the attraction dimmed as 
he began taking courses in chemis- 
try, physics, and mathematics. His 
love of the natural sciences grew 
and since 1952, Kaylor has in- 
structed students at B-SC in math 
and physics. 

Kaylor graduated from B-SC in 
1943 with a B.S. in chemistry and 
joined the thousands of young men 
fighting in World War II. He 
worked as a radar officer in the Navy 
aboard the carrier Kearsarge until 
the end of the war. 




After his discharge from the 
Navy, Kaylor attended the Univer- 
sity of Tennessee where he received 
his M.A. in 1949 and his Ph.D. in 
1953 in physics. 

Kaylor says his undergraduate ex- 
perience is an influential factor in 
his teaching. He knew his profes- 



sors personally and tries to imitate 
this policy by making himself as 
available to his students as his own 
professors were to him. "This is a 
time of maturing for students; few 
students have to come to me for 
help, but my office is always open," 
says Kaylor. 




Professor of mathematics, 
Lola Kiser has been 
trying to teach B-SC stu- 
dents derivatives for 27 
years. 



Lola Kiser is a Southener through 
and through. She grew up in West 
Tennessee and has been teaching at 
B-SC since 1955. Kiser graduated 
from Memphis State University 
with the intention of entering in- 
dustry. She began work for the 
Buckeye Cottnoil Company, but af- 
ter six months, realized that indus- 
trial management was not the right 
career for her. She attended the 
University of Georgia in 1954 and 
after turning down job offers from 
Texas, Georgia, and Alabama, de- 
cided to teach at B-SC. 

Kiser sees today's students as 
much like students when she first 
began teaching. She labels them all 
as good students, with enthusiasm, 
intelligence, and maturity. "Stu- 
dents have the same abilities now as 
when I began teaching 27 years ago, 
but now most math majors are pre- 



professionals. " says Kiser. 

Kiser has played an important 
role in many different campus orga- 
nizations. She works on the Faculty 
Development Committee, the Ad- 
visory Committee to the Counsel- 
ing Center, and the Honor Council. 
She is also active in the First Chris- 
tian Church, where she is a member 
of the Board of Trustees. 

Kiser is a dedicated woman in 
many ways, but she considers one of 
her greatest achievements as re- 
turning to the University of Georgia 
for her Ph.D. after 12 years of 
teaching. She feels that mathemat- 
ics is an ever-changing field and that 
she has to "start over every two 
years. " Kiser's dedication and 
sincerity has won her a treasured 
spot in the hearts of many B-SC 
graduates. 



95 



©uUw UmMmM 



Professor Hugh Thomas began 
his musical career at the keys of the 
piano. He appeared as a soloist with 
Andre Kostelantly and with the 
Curtis String Quartet, but soon dis- 
covered that his favorite musical 
medium is the choral instrument. 

During World War 11, Thomas 
joined the Air Corps. While sta- 
tioned in the West, he organized a 
choir composed of cadets who were 
awaiting their assignments. This 
chorus met with a positive recep- 
tion and was soon a very successful 
venture for Thomas. 

By the end of the war, Thomas 
had decided to remain in the field of 
choral direction. He has studied 
under such professionals as Robert 
Shaw and Juhus Hereford. In 1951, 
he made his professional debut as 



choral director of the Hugh Thomas 
Chorus at the Town Hall in New 
York. 

Thomas says that "oral art is as 
great an opportunity for artistic ex- 
pression as we have in the arts." 
Part of this expression, says Tho- 
mas, comes through teaching, be- 
cause, "as a teacher, if you believe 
in what you are doing, then you are 
in the upper eschelon of sales." 

Thomas received an undergradu- 
ate degree in English from B-SC in 
1933. He completed his work for a 
B.M. in 1935 and M.M. in 1937 at 
the Birmingham Conservatory of 
Music. He has taught at B-SC since 
1936. 

Gainey and his wife, Barbara, 
have three children and four grand- 
children. 




Hugh Thomas, best known at B-SC for 
his work with the Concert Choir, has 
been teaching music since 1936. 




Andrew Gainey has been teaching 
voice at B-SC for 27 years. 



Not only is Andrew Gainey known 
as a distinguished professor of 
music, but he is acclaimed as a dis- 
tinguished performer. He has 
starred in over 150 musicals and 
operas, and has appeared in some 
Broadway productions. Gainey was 
the lead baritone for the New York 
City Opera Company for several 
years and he has appeared on na- 
tional television in the opera 
"Carmen." 

Gainey has been singing public- 
ly since childhood. He attended 
Millsaps College and was awarded a 
scholarship to the University of Den- 
ver, where he graduated with a 
B.A. degree. During World War II, 
he joined the military and enter- 
tained troops in many areas of the 
United States and the South Pacific. 
After the war, he studied at the 



Academy of Vocal Arts in Phila- 
delphia. 

From Philadelphia, he went to 
New York City where he joined the 
NYC Opera. He came to B-SC in 
1955 and has taught voice here for 
27 years. In addition to teaching and 
stage-directing numerous operas at 
B-SC, he has performed in many 
local productions and appeared as a 
guest artist with several sympho- 
nies. 

Gainey has worked closely with 
the Miss Alabama Pageant for many 
years, formerly as Master of Cere- 
monies and currently as a member 
of the panel of scholarship judges. 
He is the choral director of South 
Highlands Presbyterian Church. 

Gainey and his wife, Georgene, 
have four children and two grand- 
children. 



96 




^eature^ 



I 



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97 



y^<92 ^x}fiiecamm^ (jourt/ 




"^^Mom/a Caop€r^, J2ue€n (Ro/h/i ,^o,s/:er- 

1 ^ L- ' 





98 



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101 






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Ail; V y ^ 




103 










104 



>'>'N\\\\S>KV 




Sports 



& 



^ ' ■-..- --^i^-^^^l'S'^J^f^^^^P**^?:^^^^^ 




105 



B-SC shoots 

for a victorious season. 



106 




■IK'. 




Opposite page — James Harmon 
playing against Spring Hill in the 
Homecoming game. Left — Carl 
Crosby in game against AUM. 
Bottom left — Clarence Edwards. 
Bottom right — Rennie Hardy. 





The 1981-82 basketball season opened with the 
Homecoming game against Spring Hill and it 
gave the Panthers an 88-77 win in the new Bill 
Battle Coliseum. 

With a 15-13 record, the Panthers entered into 
the SSC Tournament against Montevallo, whom 
they defeated in a close 69-65 game. B-SC left 
the SSC Tournament in 4th place. With the SSC 
Tournament under the Panthers' claws, they 
went on to the District 27 Tournament. Their 
first opponent was Alabama State, whom they 
beat in a 17-14 game. An 18-14 victory over 
Athens State enabled the Panthers to leave the 
tournament in first place. This first place title 
gave them the chance to go to Kansas City for 
the National Title. The Panthers' chances for the 
National Title were dashed after a narrow lost to 
Henderson State with a score of 52-53. 

The 1981-82 season ended with Carl Crosby 
leading in points per game with an average of 
13.8, Carl Flowers with the highest rebound 
average of 7.2, and the Panthers' final record 
being 3-5 for the Conference, 7-5 for the district, 
and 18-15 overall. 

Left — Tom Morgan watches from side lines. 
Below — Bernard Lockhart shoots for two points 
against Auburn Montgomery. 











B-SC Panthers 




Left: Front-Back — Bret Madole, Bernard Lockhart, Tom Morgan, Ray Young, Rennie 
Hardy, Steve Austin. Right: Front-Back — Jimmy Aronson, Clarence Edwards, Carl 
Crosby, Carl Flowers, James Harmon, Alan Gruman. Coaches: Head Coach Greg Walca- 
vich — Left. Assistant Coach Phil Zenoni — Right. 




110 




wtt^iM^iM 



Back Row: Left-Right — John Nichol, Denis Coons, Joe Corcoran (Asst. Coach), Clhuck Shearer, 
Wilham Lucas, John Moody, Chris Holler, Tim Tant, Pat Lloyd, Kyle Bryan, Neal Zimmerman 
(Graduate Assistant) Keith Foley, Mark Koesters, Dennis White. Kneeling: Left-Right — Pete 
Arteaga, Donnie Green, Mike McMcrary, Gary Barajas, Steve Ehlers, Dale Nelson. 




Ill 



Baseball Team Swings Into Action 




112 




113 







114 




■ i?;'=wK.'-^«»»ruv^ -A^ -^^-^^--t^"- 




Victorious Season 

for the B-SC 

Panthers 

It has been another victorious season 
for the B-SC Panthers and their coach 
Bill Meyer, even though they faced the 
loss of 17 ball players last season after 
graduation. The Panthers, like everyone 
else, fell victim to this spring's rains, 
experiencing eighteen rainouts. Although 
they have had many things against them, 
they beat the odds and came out on top. 
The Panthers qualified for the District 
Tournament where they beat 
Huntington; this victory enabled them to 
go to the NAIA Area 5 championship. 

The Panthers won the NAIA Area 5 
championship with a 7-1 win over 
Arkansas Tech. The Panthers now travel 
on to Lubbock, Texas for the National 
Championship with a 35-13 record. 

For the first time in Southern's history 
three freshmen started. These three, 
Kyle Bryan, Pete Arteage, and Dale 
Nelson, have been outstanding and the 
Panthers are sure to repeat their winning 
season next year with these three 
returning. 








115 




Back row — Ray Deloteus, Jay Seegers, Don Brice, Steven Digirolamo, John 
Collar, John Denbigh, Chris Little, Cody Moser Front row — Ann Dielan 
(coach), Lisa McClelland, Sheri Scholl, Beth Curry, Julie Bushmiaer, 
Dorothy Little, Kathy Taylor, Dathleen Real, Lynda Hershfeldt, Helen 
Hershfeldt, Al Jones (Assistant coach) 




116 




B-SC Tennis Teams 



After only five years of existance, the tennis program at B-SC, 
led by coaches Ann Dielan and Al Jones, is going strong. 

The women had a very good season and are returning to the 
NAIA national championships in Kansas City where they finished 
6th last year. With four of last year's six players returning and 
several good additions, the team looks better than ever and 
hopes to compete well for the national championship title in 
June. B-SC had its first woman All-American last year when then 
sophomore, Kathy Taylor, finished 2nd in the national 
tournament. That was quite an honor for Taylor and for 
Birmingham-Southern. This year's Panterettes include only two 
seniors — Beth Curry and Helen Hershfeldt — so it looks as if 
the tradition of good women's tennis at B-SC has a good chance 
of continuing. We all certainly hope so. 

Despite the loss of five of last year's six players the men spent 
the year productively, working hard and rebuilding their team. 
They did not have a winning season, but they did win several 
good competitive matches. B-SC hosted the NAIA district 
tournament but had to watch AUM take the berth to the national 
tournament in Kansas City. However the Panters, losing only 
one senior Chris Little, are looking for a spot next year, so watch 
out. 

— Beth Curry 




117 



4-. 1-.V>^ L 




Opposite Page — Sherl Scholl, 

Beth Curry, serving, Kathy 

Taylor waiting for serve. 





118 




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119 



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Soccer, 
A Kick in the Grass." 

Just a few years ago, the B-SC soccer club was a loose 

band of fun-loving rogues running around on the 

weekends. Today these rogues wear official team 

uniforms and compete against some of the best players 

in the nation. The sport has come a long way on the 

Hilltop, and not a moment too soon — soccer is the 

world's most popular and the fastest-growing sport in 

America. It was inevitable that the fever would spread 

to B-SC where athletic excellence is our pride. 

Despite the many obstacles in their path, the team has 

demonstrated their dedication to the game and to its 

success at B-SC. Ask any member of the squad why 

they would play this foreign game over traditional ones 

and he will answer you in a rowdy cheer, "Soccer is a 

Kick in the Grass!!! 
— Doug Pile 



120 





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Standing from Left to Right — Tommy Glaser, Trey Waters, David McQuiddy, Eddie 
Lindsey, Doug Pile, Jim Wade, Phil Ritchie, John DeGarris (coach). Kneeling from 
Left to Right — Ed Russell, Robbie Turner, Bob Sipe, Joe Webb, Fred Berg, 
Greg Bryant, Brad Lutley. Not Shown — Jeff Kyser, David York 




121 




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Women's 

Intramural Sports 

Awards 

Basketball — Independents 

Softball — Alpha Omicron Pi 

Volleyball — Pi Beta Phi 

Best Sportsmanship — Alpha Omicron Pi 

Victory Trophy — Alpha Omicron Pi 

Top Sportswoman of the Year — Sheri Scholl 

Top Sportswomen — Luanne Goodall 
Helen Hershfelt 
Lynda Hershfelt 
Elyse Kampakis 
Sheri Scholl 



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124 



Men's 

Intramural Sports 
Awards 

Football — Sigma Alpha Epsilon 
Volleyball — Alpha Tau Omega 
Basketball — Alpha Tau Omega 
Softball — Sigma Alpha Epsilon 



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Sports 
Trophy 
Sigma Alpha 
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125 




126 



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Organizations . 



Places to go, 

People to meet, 

Things to do 




127 



Phi 

Beta 

Kappa 

Birmingham-Southern is the home of one of 

Alabama's two chapters of Phi Beta Kappa. This 

organization honors students who have exhibited 

exceptional scholarship in a broad program of 

intellectual interest within the context of a liberal 

arts education. Members are chosen by resident 

members (faculty) of Phi Beta Kappa after a 

careful analysis of grades and course distribution. 



1982 Phi Beta Kappa initiates: 



Janie Teresa Bush 
Christopher Canfield 
Joan Michelle Chaney 
Melinda Lee Cooper 
Elizabeth Lyle Curry 
Rory Ralph Dalton 
Mary Anne Ellis 
Richard Minton Feist 
Deborah Perry Fisher 
Robin Renee Foster 
Peter M. Goodloe 
George Goymer 
John Butler Crammer 
Jane Lynn Hughes 
Lisa Elizabeth Jones 



Nickie Koulourides 
Scott Whitfield LeCroy 
Steve Cheng-Fong Lin 
Lauren E. Lowery 
John Paul Mathis 
Jeffrey Rex McLaughlin 
Donna L. McWhorter 
Lisa Kyle Milner 
Carl Dean Monroe 
John Damian Moody 
Douglas Owen Moore 
Martha McShan Patrick 
Catherine Ann Perkins 
Lawrence R. Shoemaker 
James A. Wilkerson 




Pictured above are (L to R): Front: Dr. Robert Wingard, Betb Curry, Robin Foster, Li.sa Milner, Melinda Cooper, John CJrammer, Steve Chens-Fong Lin, Larry 
Shoemaker, Catherine Perkins, Delia McWhorter, Dr. Susan Hagan; 2nd row: Debbie Perry Fisher, Chris Canfield, Nickie Koulourides, Lauren Lowery, Lynn 
Hughes, Rory Dalton, ].P. Mathis, George Goymer, Doug Moore, Dr. James Kroger; 3rd row: Dr. Henry Randall, Lisa Jones, Janie Bush, John Moody, Scott 
LeCroy, Richard Feist, James Wilkerson, and Jeff McLaughlin. 



128 



Mortar 
Board 



B-SC Mortar Board is an honorary composed of 

students who have been outstanding in 

scholarship, leadership, and service. Members 

are elected each spring based on their 

contributions in these areas. 



Omicron 

Delta 

Kappa 

Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) is organized to 
honor students who have shown outstanding 
qualities of leadership and scholarship in campus 
and community, and to encourage superior 
scholarship by men and women of exemplary 
character. Membership in ODK is by invitation. 
A person selected must be in the highest third of 
his class, be a junior or a senior and have 
exhibited significant leadership in one or more of 
several areas of student life. Selection is by the 
current student members. 




Pictured above are (L to R): seated: Dr. Susan Hagan, Lisa Milner, Adeana Curry, Nickie Koulourides, Robin Foster, Kay Estill, \'icky Valin; standing: Greg 
Curry, Beth Curry, Mary Ann Jessee, Steve Cheng-Fong Lin, Chris Canfield, Lisa Jones, Dean Monroe, Rory Daltoii, JeffMcLaughhn, Dr. Paul Franke, and 
Richard Feist. 



129 



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Alpha Epsilon Delta (AED) is an 
honorary which seeks to encourage 
and recognize excellence in 
pre-medical scholarship. Further, it 
strives to promote cooperation and 
contact between medical and 
pre-medical students and educators, 
to bind together similarly interested 
students, and to use its knowledge 
for the benefit of health 



organizations, charities, and the 
community. To be considered for 
membership, one must be engaged 
in courses leading to the study of 
medicine, must have completed | 
three semesters of pre-medical 
work, and must have an appropriate 
GPA. In addition, character, 
general abiUty, and personality are 
considered. 

Pictured above are: 1. Dr. Wayne Shew, 
2. Mike Cope, 3. Sid Brevard, 4. Charles 
Runnels, 5. Kim Gardner, 6. Jerril Green, 
7. Stacey Headly, 8. Denise Poole, 9. 
Debora Chan, 10. Elizabeth Patrenos, 11. 
Anne Stagner, 12. Renee Brown, 13. 
Cathy Strietzel, 14. Steve Smith, 15. 
Stefan Moran, 16. Jim Walter, 17. Scott 
LeCroy, 18. Keving Ki-Dong Lee, 19. 
Scott Smith, 20. Cheng Fong Lin, 21. Alan 
Walker, 22. Steve Frost, 23. Mike Gorum, 
24. Rory Dalton, 25. Harvey Harmon, 26. 
Lee Smith, 27. Douglas Moore, 28. David 
Honeycutt, 29. Larry Shoemaker, 30. 
Mike Hudson, 31. Greg Banks, 32. Brian 
Bates, 33. Mark Swindle, and 34. Jeff 
Kiser. Not pictured are Mike Shoemaker, 
Jim Barnett, and Donald Scott. 



I 



130 



I 



Tri-Beta is the biology honorary. 
The group strives to promote scholar- 
ship in the biology area, to promote 
the dissimination of biological knowl- 
edge, and to encourage research. To 
be invited into active membership 
one must have taken three courses 
and be a biology major. Associate 
membership is available to those who 
have taken one course in biology and 
have expressed an interest in the 
area. 

Pictured below are these Tri-Beta mem- 
bers: 1. Mary Ann Jessee, 2. Scott LeCroy, 3. 
Mike Hudson, 4. Mark Swindle, 5. Greg 
Banks, 6. Dr. Shew (sponsor), 7. Mike Poist, 
8. Kevin Lee, 9. Brian Bates, 10. Kevin Hen- 
derson, 11. Karen Widenhofer, 13. Debora 
Chan, 14. Julie Vacarella, 15. Gretchen 
Wells, 16. Rosanne Tombrello, 17. James 
Sexson, 18. Ken Clayton, 19. Steve Frost, 20. 
Sandy Barker, 21. Cathy Sarrell, 22. Denise 
Poole, 23. Lori Whidey, 24. Cathy Strietzel, 
25. Martha Patrick, 26. Mike Shoemaker, 27. 
John Miller, and 28. Lee Smith. 



Beta Beta Beta 





131 




Kappa 

Delta 

Epsilon 

Kappa Delta Epsilon 
is an active professional 
sorority. The main 
objective of the group 
is to encourage 
participation in and 
support of current 
educational problem by 
members. Students are 
invited to become 
members after a review 
of grade point averages 
by the Education 
Division faculty 
members. 



(L. to R.) — Front; Mar\' Elizabetli Becker, Dale Moore. Laura Har\e\. Teresa Roebuck. Second Row: Melissa 
Biegler, Becky Tate, Peggy Hamrick. 



Kappa 

Mu 
Epsilon 

In order to become a 

member of Kappa Mu 

Epsilon, the 

mathematics honorary, 

a student must have 

been a member of 

Theta Sigma Lambda 

during the previous 

term. They must have 

completed MA 231, MA 

232, and an additional 

mathematics course, 

and have a B average in 

all mathematics classes. 

All members are in the 

top 35 percent of their 

class. 




(L. to R.) — Seated: Mike Shoemaker, Larry Shoemaker, Beth Curry. Standing: Dr. Kayl 
Hagood, Cathy Strietzel, Doug Owen, Dr. Kiser, Dr. Boardman, Mrs. Hurst, and Dr. 



.)r, Charles Richards, Mike 
Mullens. 



1.32 



Pi 

Kappa 
Lambda 

Pi Kappa Lambda is 
a music honorary for 
juniors and seniors. In 
order to qualify for 
membership, students 
must be outstanding 
academically in the top 
10 percent of the junior 
class or the top 20 
percent of the senior 
class. Students are 
elected to membership 
by the faculty of the 
music department. 




(L. toR.) — Dr. Hugh Thomas, Dr. Jim Dorroh, Rachel Mathis, Mrs. Jane Gibbs, Ginger Englund, Dr. Tom Gibbs 
Jane Glaser, Andrew Gainey. 




Sigma 

Tau 

Delta 



Sigma Tau Delta is 
an English honorary. 
Persons are elected by 
the members of the 
organization and must 
have at least 22 earned 
units of credit, inclusive 
of five English credits 
and a B or better grade 
point average. 



(L. to R.) — (Rechning) Dr. Jim Koger with a copy of Tom Jones. (Seated) Dr. Susan Hagen, Gail Livingston, Jan 
Wyatt. 



133 



Phi 

Eta 

Sigma 



Phi Eta Sigma is a national freshman 
honor society. In order to quaHfy for 
membership, a freshman must have a 3.5 
cumulative grade point average, carry a 
normal load, and be in the upper 20% of 
his class. The group sponsors a number 
of symposiums throughout the year on 
topics ranging from nuclear disarmament 
to cooking. 




Pictured above are (L to R): sitting: Melanie Kirk, Betli Pharris. Cynthia Lamar, Michelle Munsey, Emily Burge, Mike Hagood, Sandy 
Barker, Sandra Ryan, Bridgette Monroe, Beth Curry, Paul Ronijue (sponsor), Jerrill Green; 2nd row: Casey Davis (president). Dawn 
Murphree, Brian Bates, Clare Golson, Lonna Lynn Euler, Bill LaBorde, John Adams; Standing: Dorothy Little, Day Logue, Rebecca 
Dewine, Sarah Wilder, Mary Sue Caldwell, Cynthia Nobles, Lisa Kelly; 2nd row: Sean Groark, Mike Maund, Lisa Dean, John Kerper, 
Judy Tanquary, Richard Sturgeon; 3rd row: Andy Martin, Carol Anderson, Allison Poole, Paul Bolus, Victor Powell, Don Camp, Steve 
Burgess; back row: Robbie Nettles, Greg James, Diana Kirk, Joe Luttrell, William Knoll, Salem Khalaf and Mike White. 



I 



134 



Alpha Lambda Delta is a national 

honorary which has as its purposes to 

encourage superior scholastic 

achievement among students in their 

first year in institutions of higher 

education, to promote intelligent living 

and a continued high standard of 

learning, and to assist men and women 

in recognizing and developing 

meaningful goals in their roles in society. 

Membership is based upon superior 

scholastic attainment by students during 

their first year in college. Students who 

attain a 3.5 grade point average during 

their freshman year are invited to 

become members. 



Alpha 

Lambda 

Delta 




Pictured above are (L to R): front row: Greg James, Judy Tanquary, Cythia Lamar, Ellen O'Kelley; 2nd row: Deborah Palmes, Julie 
Crotwell, Dorothy Little, Lisa Dean, Michelle Munsey, Carrie Mitchell, Liz Krauth; 3rd row: John Adams, Carol Anderson, Debbie 
Willis, Rebecca Dewine, Sandra Ryan, Sarah Wilder, Steve-Anna Stephens, Don Camp, Charlie Cabell, Don Sanders; 4th row: Jane 
Burlingame, Diana Kirk, Lisa Kelly, Jane Rueschenberg; 5th row: Carol Costen, Jay Farr, Clare Golson, Janet Hines, Steve Cheng Lin; 
6th row: Dawn Murphree, Dudley Long, Dr. Lola Kiser, John Burton, Richard Sturgeon, Steve Mowery, Gar>' McLean, Steve Burgess, 
Jeff Mitchell and Bill UBorde. 



135 



• I— I 

u 




Pictured above (L to R) sitting: Wendy Daniel, Anne Stagner, Ann Wagner, Janice Thorton, Jim Owens, Paula Birch, Lisa 
Kelley. Standing: Carol Anderson, Lisa Edwards, David Stallworth, Lynn Ferguson, Lana Grubbs, Steve King, Ellen 
Harris, Richie Whitten, Jocelyn McClelland, and Donny Haring. 



Circle K is an active service organiza- 
tion affiliated with the Kiwanis Club. 
The group sponsors service projects 
for the campus and the community at 
large. Some of these activities include 
an annual blood drive and working 
with deprived children. New mem- 
bers must complete a number of ser- 
vice hours before they are initiated. 




B-SC student donates blood as Red Cross nurse 
looks on. 



136 




James Terry and Becky Ruffin give their time to 
help with the Red Cross blood drive. 




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Alpha Phi Omega is a service organization 
whose main goals are to encourage friendship, 
leadership and service through fellowship and 
service projects on campus and in the 
community. The organization, an affiliate of the 
Boy Scouting program, takes in two pledge 
classes, a fall and a spring class each academic 
year. In addition, the group engages in such fund 
raising projects as the sale of mini-Easter baskets. 
Membership is open to any interested student. 




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Pictured above (L to R): Front: Joe Wooten, Clay Tanner, Frank Pair, Lucy Harding; 2nd row: Jimmy Bamett, Lisa Jones, 
Valerie Langley, Shawn Cosper. Sandra Cothran, Pam Pruett, Dr. Moore; standing: Kenny Prestridge, Mike Hagood, Todd 
Berry, Lisa Dean, Becky Thomas, Michelle Wilder, Lisa Edwards, Bud Evers, Suzanne Vaughn, Greg Bard, Pam Williams, 
Allison Poole, Becky Tate, Renee Williams, Maxine Ford, Cathy Waits, Sonya Nobles, Tracy Williams, Mary Sue Caldwell, 
Tricia Mathews, Vivian Mayes, and Debora Chan. 






137 



President's 

Student 

Service 

Organization 



The President's Student Service 
Organization (PS SO) is a service 
organization whose purpose is to 
recognize students who have contributed 
to the mission of the College. The focus 
of the group's contribution is continued 
service through projects in the 
President's office, Church Relations, 
Public Affairs, and Development Office, 
and a number of activities related to the 
College. Members are selected each year 
based on their willingness to work for 
the College and their interest in the life 
of the College. 




(L. to R.) — (Kneeling) Gail Livingston, Sarah Spenser, Clay Price, Renee Brown, Catherine Perkins, Emily Eyre, Frances Foy, Glenda 
Wren, Beth Harris, Donna Morrissette. (Standing) Andy Martin, David Stallworth, Bert Moore, Tonia Sellers, Keith Thompson, Buddy 
Smith, Elizabeth Lester, Mark Miller, Dean Monroe, David Wangerin, Nancy Rogers, Jeff Chapman, Elise Moss (Sponsor). 



138 



Triangle Club is a select group of B-SC 

sophomores who demonstrate the desire 

and ability to serve the College. The 

group's main purpose is to render 

service to the College by assisting with 

orientation, scholarship days, and other 

events throughout the year. Members 

are chosen in the freshman class by a 

selection committee composed of faculty, 

staff, and students. There are 30 

members of the club — 15 males and 15 

females. 



Triangle 
Club 



7 




(L. to R.) — (Front) Amy Tumage, John Akin, Terril Graves, Bridget Monroe, Ame Cox. (Second Row! Taylor Bragg, Cathy Sarrell, Dawn 
Murphree, Ruth Ann Brown. (Third Row) Sam Pierce, Terry Chapman, Bruce Long. (Fourth Row) Andy Martin, Casey Davis, Johnny 
Reaves. 



U 



139 



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The Quad is B-SC's creative works publication. 

The staff selects works in creative writing, art, 

and photography submitted by students of the 

College. Each spring the staff publishes the best 

of these works in a magazine form. 




4 



Pictured above is Tay Berryhill, editor of Quad. Not pictured are staff members Tammy Gover, Cathy Schipman, Chip ^ 
Tommv Wilkes. 



140 



The college newspaper, the Hilltop News, is 
printed 20 times a year. The newspaper staff 
prints the paper in accordance with the 
Publications Board By-Laws. The Hilltop News 
provides the college community with a variety of 
views on important issues, keeps the students 
aware of developments on campus, and provides 
a forum for exchange of ideas. 




Pictured above are (L to R): Carol Dublin, Richard Feist (editor), Jim Owens; standing: Rhett Austin, Jill Richard, Dale Ike, Lisa 
Edwards, and Doug Pile. 



141 



Peer 

Advisory 

Committee 



The Peer Advisory Committee (PAC) 
is a pre-health organization designed to 
acquaint students with the pre-health 
program and to emphasis an 
understanding of the requirements for 
their field of study. The members of the 
PAC are available to advise and counsel, 
to provide programs, seminars, and 
literature related to various health fields, 
and to serve as a direct channel between 
students and the Medical Education 
Committee. Invitations for membership 
are issued during the spring term to 
sophomore or junior pro-health students 
in good standing. 




(L. to R.) — Mark Swindle, Greg Banks, Elizabeth Patrenos, Brian Bates, Theresa Roebuck, Jerril Green, Scott LeCroy, Rosanne 
Tombrello, Allan Walker, Mark McClendon, Martha Patrick, Mike Cope. 



142 



Medical 
Internship 
Committee 



The Medical Internship Committee is 
a newly formed organization. The main 
objective of the group is to set up 
interim projects for pre-health students. 
During the interim, students work 
individually with a physician at a local 
hospital. 



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Pictured above (L to R) are: sitting, Mark Swindle, Greg Banks. Standing: Mike Hudson, Dr. Holliman, Jerril Green, Dr. Bailey, Brian 
Bates. 



143 



Student Government Association 




(L. to R.) — (Seated) Danny Jones, treasurer, Greg Currv', secretary', Brian Parker, president. Jack Hall, vice-president. (Standing) Sarah Spenser, 
David Tubbs, Deborah Fisher, Michael Williams, Jill Hoube, Dale Clem, Sam Downing, Cheri Bachofer, Pam Williams, Donna Morrissette, Dr. 
Henry Randall (Sponsor), Mark Miller, Frank Ozment, Troy Post. 

The Student Government Associa- 
tion (SGA) is a group of elected repre- 
sentatives from either their classes or 
places of residence. The elected offi- 
cials represent student interests and 
speak in the students' behalf. The 
SGA administrates student publica- 
tions and the provisions of the Honor 
Code. 

The SGA is one of the most active 
groups at B-SG. It is in charge of the 
Panther Lounge, the distribution of 
the activity fees, and the selection of a 
number of committee members in- 
cluding the Budget Committee and 
Food Service Committee. 




Anne Stagner shares interesting facts with friends at an SGA 
party. 



144 




Danny Jones and Cheri Bachofer work together to 
deal with a troublesome coffeepot at an SGA party. 



Ken Clayton enjoys some refreshment. 




SGA members debate an important issue over punch and cookies. 



145 



American 

Chemical 

Society 



The goal of the American Chemical 
Society (ACS) is to give students in 
chemistry and related sciences the 
opportunity to hear speakers from other 
campuses talk about current research 
topics. The group meets to hear a variety 
of speakers throughout the academic 
year. Membership is open to all 
interested students. 




(L. to R.) — Front Row: Mike Shoemaker, Don Scott, Dr. Carolyn Moore. Second Row: Larry Shoemaker, Leigh Cochran, Cathy Sarrell, 
Jimmy Bamett, Salem Khalaf, Sandy Barker, Steve Chen Lin, Harrell Bullard. Third Row: Deborali Chan, Doug Owens, Vivian Mays, Mark 
Hagood, Lisa Brown, Cathy Strietzel, Phil Morris, Doug Moore. Fourth Row: Charlie Mathis, Ellen Harris, Jim Jordan, Lynn Ferguson. 



146 



The B-SC Debate Society was organized 

in the spring of 1982 by students 

interested in current events and in 

improving their verbal skills. The society 

holds frequent debates among its 

members, and is planning public debates 

for the fall. Topics debated in the spring 

included capital punishment and federal 

support for higher education. The 

Debate Society is hoping to expand its 

membership in the coming year. 



Debate 
Society 




(L. to R.) — John Adams, Dr. Henry Randall. Troy Post (secretary), Kevin Higgs, Lonna Lynn Eiiler (treasurer), Lawton Higgs 
(vice-president), Dr. Irvin Penfield, Mike Henderson, Gregg Curry (president), Jackie Washington. Not pictured are Jill Hoube, Roger 
Wheeler, Charles Cabell, and Frank Ozment. 



147 




(L. to R.) — (Front) Carol White, Lisa Eidson, Lydia Palmes. (Second Row) Sandra Shepherd, Lynn 
Hughes, Emily Rowe, Laura Harvey- (Third Row) Dr. Eileen Moore, Gloria Ward, Ka\ Estill, Dr. Jim 
McCrory, Adeanna Curry, Becky Tate, Mary Croninger. 



Student 

Alabama 

Education 

Association 

The Student Alabama 
Education Association 
(SAEA) is an 
organization for those 
students with an 
interest in the field of 
education. SAEA 
provides an open forum 
for discussion, a 
support group for 
future educators, and 
professional experiences 
to its members. 



Art 

Students' 

League 

The Art Students' 

League provides 

educational and social 

experiences for the 

artist. These 

experiences are derived 

fi-om speakers, field 

trips, and exhibitions. 

In order to be a part of 

the Art Students' 

League, a member 

must be enrolled in an 

art course sometime 

during the academic 

year. During the 

"Southern Comfort " 

weekend, the Art 

Students' League 

designed and sold 

silk-screened T-shirts 

commemorating the 

week. 




(L. to R.) — JeffMitchell, Melanie Grimes, Lisa Edwards, Lisa Guthrie, Jan Hopper, Tammy Cover, Larry 
Adams, Chip Gardner, Sonya Henderson. Not pictured are: Tory North, Michaux Land, Tommy Wilkes, 
Joe Waldrop, Debbie Salem, Spongy Washburn, Kerry Dixon, Jeff Ritch, Paula Andrews, Laura Giardini, 
Karen Greene, Don Pittman, Ellen Boone. 



148 



Ambassadors 

The Ambassadors are a 

group of B-SC students 

who work with the help 

of the chapel staff to 

bring creative and 

meaningful programs to 

groups of youth 

throughout Alabama 

and North Florida. The 

programs are usually 

presented to the youth 

groups of churches. 

Ambassadors are 

selected each spring 

with the intention of 

selecting a 

well-balanced and 

representative group. 




Pictured are B-SC's 1981-82 Ambassadors. (L. to R.) Judy Harbour, Roger Wheeler 
Phil Brasher, Hanna Brown, Mike Chappell, and Elizabeth Lester. 



Donna .Mr>rrissette, 




(L. to R.) — (Seated) Johnny Reaves, Richard Sturgeon, Mray Ann Jessee, Douglas Moore, Paula Birch, 
James Terry, Karen Hall. (Standing) Nina Holmes, Carol Anderson, Larry Shoemaker, Jimmy Bamett, 
Mary Sue Caldwell, Jenny Llewellyn, Steve Holloway (Campus Minister), Ann Wagner, Mike Caro, 
Hiromichi "yoshi" Yoshinari, Regina Neal. 



Baptist 

Campus 

Ministries 

Baptist Campus 
Ministries (BCM) is a 
Christian organization 
designed to provide 
experiences in worship, 
study, fellowship, 
missions, ministries, 
and leadership. BCM 
meets every 
Wednesday night for 
worship and fellowship. 
BCM has several 
campus-wide retreats 
during the year and 
sponsors speakers, 
musicians, and Bible 
studies. 



149 



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Young Democrats is an organization of students 

interested in current political affairs in the 

Democratic party. They participate in a number of 

activities which are supportive of the Democratic 

party on the local, state, and national levels. This 

year, they have sponsored a campaign workshop 

and have sought to bring pertinent speakers to 

campus. In addition, they seek to inform members 

and the campus of programs of political interest. 




(L. to R.) — James Terry, John Porch, Kelvin Ramsey, Clark Stallworth, Victor Powell, Lawton Higgs, Lonna Lynn 
Euler, Hugh Terr>', Liz Krauth, Lisa Dean, Tracy Williams, Luch Harding. 



150 



The Young Republicans is a club designed to 
promote a better understanding of politics at local, 
state, and national levels. The club is involved with 
campaigns on all three levels and reviews current 
pohtical actions. Membership is open to all B-SC 
students. 




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(L. to R. ) — (Front Row) Ellen Harris, Glenn Sweat, Russell Hayes, Barbara Elebash. (Second Row) David Stallworth, 
Jim Porter, Susan Donovan, Jim Owens, Lynn Ferguson, Beth Eagerton, Sandy Barker. (Top) Richie Whitten. 



151 



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Pictured above are (L to R): front; Ann Wagner, Beth Harris, Drew Green, Casey Davis, Cheri Bachofer, Diane Koulorides, 
Elaine Besh, Susan Millican, Jocelyn McClelland, Lisha Harbough, Bob Glenn; 2nd row: Beth Skidmore, TifFi Bates, Renee 
Brown, Susan Northrup, Hanna Brown, Ann Stagner, Dawn Murhpree, Rose Trinchitella, Emily Eyre, Dr. Faye Walter; 
3rd row: Doug Martin. Terry Chapman, Amy Parsons, Larry Adams, Andy Martin, Bert Moore, Lisa Bartlett, Mike Caro, 
Scott Musgrove, Dr. Stewart Jackson; back row: Alison Poole, Mark Mullens, John Miller, Lonna Lynn Euler, Diana Trapp, 
and Libby Davenport 

The housing staff serves the 

students and administration of the 

College in a way that is unique to 

this group. The resident advisors, 

house directors, and Office of 

Student Affairs work together to 

serve the students and maintain the 

quality of on-campus living at 

Southern. Resident advisors are 

responsible for seeing that the 

housing contract is observed, for 

providing communication between 

the Office of Student Affairs, the 

residents and maintenance, and for 

assisting dorm residents in a 

number of ways. 



Resident Advisor Jeff McLaughlin 
demonstrates how not to obey the housing 

rules. 




152 




The Concert 
Choir provides 
valuable experience 
in choral 
performance 
through its annual 
carol services and 
interim tour. The 
group performs a 
w^ide range of choral 
music in 

situations ranging 
from on-campus 
events to churches 
in the area, to 
conventions of 
musical professionals 
and students. 
Members of the 
Concert Choir are 
chosen by director 
Hugh Thomas 
through auditions 
held each Spring. 



■A'^i/N 



Pictured above are (L to R): front: Bonita Conley, Ginger Englund, Kevin Faulkner, John Pendergast, Angie Batey, Rick 
Phillips, Melissa Bates, Mark Seifert, Jenny Wall, Byron Harold, Teresa Hudson, Pierre Scalise, Trieia Watkins, 2nd row: 
Loleta King, Emily Wood (president), Tom Head, Jerry Wood, Stewart Dease, Leslie Douglas. Joe Bowlby (secretary), Ted 
Davis, Nancy Crocker (business manager), Karen Hall; Suzie Scott. Todd Berry, Alicia Jones, Jeff Gillespie, Cathy Brooks, 
Linda Kennamer, Tracy Satisfield, Howard McAdory; 4th row: Freda McNair, Mike Allen, Greg James, Angela Sharp, 
Tommy Powell, Doug Owen, Jack Turner, and Holly Smith (organist). 



o 
U 

(D 
O 

a 
o 



153 



The Hilltop Singers is a group of 15 exceptionally 

talented members of the college community. The 

group consists of 13 singer/dancers, an 

accompanist, and a technical director. The 

repertoire consists of choreographed Broadway and 

pop numbers. The singers perform throughout the 

state at churches, civic functions, and a number of 

other organizations. Membership requires selection 

by audition and includes a scholarship. 



in 

• I— I 
CO 

o 



ffi 




(L. toR.) — (Front Row) Leslie Douglas, Rick Phillips, Melissa Bates, Greg James. (Second Row) Emily Wood, Angie Batey, Jeff 
Gillespie, Nancy Crocker. (Third Row) Mike Allen, Alicia Jones, Joe Bowlby. Not pictured are Jenny Wall, Bryon Harrold, John 
Carter (accompanist), Mark Seifert (technical director). 



154 



The Southern Chorale is a performing choir 
composed of music and non-music majors. The 
choir is under the direction of Dr. WiUiam Baxter. 
The group sings many different types of music for 
various occasions, including campus and 
community activities. 




o 
o 



(L. to R.) — (Front Row) Lisa Russell, Janice Thornton, Kiki Caridakis, Theresa Prestwood, Susan Grabryan, Anita Baker. 
(Second Row) Cleveland Kyles, Nancy Hastings, Cynthia Lamar, Adeana Curry, Sandra Ryan, Susan Deal. (Third Row) Thelma 
Cowan, Patricia Matthews, Donna White, Amy Womack, Leischen Nobis, Michael Vaughn. (Fourth Row) Jerril Green, Willy K. 
Jones, Jeffrey Swearegin, Steve Pierce, Bud Cover, Lewis Pfau, Jeff Scott, Joel Megginson, John Porch, Russell Levenson. (Fifth 
Row) Bill Manci, Dr. Baxter, Leigh Peters, James Barnett, Gayle Andrews, David Gibbs, Mark Hayes, Angela Miller, Karlo 
Senasi, Brice Robinson. 



155 



N 
N 




k 







156 



Pictured above are (L to R): front: Anthony Williams, Gary Craig, Pat Barnes, John Burton, Tom Austin, Kevin Faulkner; 
2nd row: Joey Johnson, Bruce Long, Carey Moreland: Back row: Anthony Marino, John Rosser, Cleveland Kyles, Howard 
Day, Jefif Chapman, and David Phillips. 

Southern's Jazz Band, under the 

direction of Ron Hooten provides 

the college and community with a 

variety of jazz arrangements. The 

group entertains with quality music 

at a number of campus and 

community functions throughout 

the year. 




The Jazz Band prepares for another excellent 
performance. 



Pat Barnes plays 
trumpet as the 
band practices. 




The music provided by the Pep 
Band has been an invaluable asset to 
the campus. The group's avid support 
of the sports program has been 
appreciated by all who attend 
sporting events on campus. The band 
carried its support for the basketball 
team as far as Kansas City during the 
NAIA tournament there. All in all, 
the group has made a continuing 
contribution to the quality of 
instrumental music at Southern. 




Pictured above are (L to R); front; Pam Pruett, Shawn Cosper, Karen Widenhofer, Vemandi Greene, Janet Willis; 2nd row: Cynthia 
Nobles, Daphne Hyter, Debra Jordan, Tom Austin, Rhett Fergeson, Eddie Eggleston, David Gibbs, Lydia Jacovides, Paula Davis; 3rd 
row: JefF Scott, Stan Furh, David Phillips, Howard Day, Carrie Mitchell, Joe Luttrell, Cleveland Kyles, Joey Johnson; 4th row: John 
Pendergast, James Terry, Emily Eyre, Jay Simmons, Veronica Hicks; standing: Mark Hagood, John Jinright, Anthony Marino, and 
Robert Lucas. Not pictured are Bruce Long, Jimmy Lott, Dawn Murphree, and Nicole Williams. 






157 



Black Student Union 



f^4m'*iy 




(L. to R.) — (seated) Donna Morrissette, Cassandra Miller, (standing) Judith Flournoy, Charles Ball, Cheryl Ashford, Mr. Givan (sponsor), Andrea Williams, 
Harold Owens, Pamela Williams, Earin Wilson, Cynthia Dickinson, Maxine Ford, Rena Williams, Tracy Williams, Victor Powell, Jamelle Jackson. 




The Black Student Union 
is an active campus 
organization which has as its 
main goal to create unity and 
cultural awareness among 
the college community. The 
group accomplishes this goal 
through informal social 
events, programs, displays, 
and speakers. Membership 
in the organization requires 
participation in BSU events 
and college activities. 



Black Student Union members enjoy an informal chat during a party. 



158 








Pictured above (L to R) are: Front: Joe Wooten, Liz Krauth, Anton Mertens, Clay Tanner, and Fumiko Amanai: 
Back: Julius Oledibe, Vicki Moore, Shigeru Nakabayashi, Mahmood Vaezifard, Yasuhiko Isshiki, Vivan Mayes, 
Lisa Jones, Mike Shoemaker, and Hiroshi Sasaki, 



International 

Students' 

Association 

The International Students' 
Association is a group of 
Southern students, both 
foreign and American, which 
has as its goals to identify the 
difficulties and needs of 
foreign students and to be of 
assistance in dealing with 
these, to increase 
understanding and awareness 
in the college community, and 
to provide a forum for 
discussion and sharing. The 
group sponsors a number of 
activities including parties, 
picnics, and discussions during 
the year. Membership is open 
to all interested persons. 




Vicki Moore falls victim to Death (Clay Tanner) and the 
Vampire (Joe Wooten). 



159 



Activities 

Through 

Student 

Involvement 




(L. to R. ) — (Front Row) Anne Logue, Mark Miller, Ann Stagner, Judy Tanquar\', Becky Ruffin, Renee Brown, Edie Dacovitch, 
Donna Austin. (Second Row) Brian Bates, Anton Mertens, Terri Perri, Sam Downing, Ken Clayton, Beth Curry. 



160 



1982 B-SC Cheerleaders 




(L. to R.) — (Front Row) Rowdy the Panther, Andy Thurmond. (Second Row) Angela Hansard, Lynn McCay, Margaret Rubio. (Third 
Row) Renee Brown, Susan Robertson, Cynthia Lamar, Sandy Barker. (Fourth Row) Bill Powell, JeflFGallups, Mike Chappell, Mike 
Poist. 



161 




(L. to R. ) — (Front Row) Larry Adams (President), Dan Sievers, John Sanchez, Scott Pruett, Sherry 
Gardner, Tracy WilHams, Jimmy Aronson, Eddie Dodger. (Second Row) Ray White, Stephanie King, 
Lawton Higgs, Jerry Kitchens, Slay Warren, John Hill, Jeff Looney, Kay Weekley. (Third Row) Lee 
Anderson, Tommy Powell, Trey Wood, Randy Thomas. 



Weight 
Club 

The purpose of the 
Weight Club is to 
encourage and educate 
students in health and 
fitness control. The 
club employs a program 
of exercise 
incorporating weights. 

The Weight Club is 
interested in the issue 
of seeing that a bigger 
and better weight room 
will be built in the 
future. 

The club is sponsored 
by Dr. Joanne Garside, 
professor of physical 
education. 



Scuba 
Club 



162 



The Scuba Club is a 

group of people who 

share an interest in 

scuba diving. 

Membership is open to 

any student who shares 

this interest. 

The club's purpose is to 

share experience and 

information in scuba 

diving. It aspires to 

teach any person who is 

interested in learning to 

scuba dive, to plan 

diving trips with 

students who are 

interested in marine life 

and scuba sport diving, 

to find more economical 

ways to scuba dive, and 

to keep members 

informed as to 

happenings of the 

underwater world. 




'C^ta»: 



(L. to R. ) Mike Shoemaker, Sandy Rarker, Brian Bates, Russell Levenson, Mike Henderson, Mark Swindle, 
Greg Banks, Debbie Hurst (Sponsor). 



Panhellenic 
Council 

The Panhellenic 
Council is made up of 
one delegate from each 
sorority and one 
alternate chapter 
delegate. The council's 
main purpose is to 
monitor the overall 
welfare of the B-SC 
Panhellenic Association. 
The council also 
compiles rules 
governing sorority rush 
and pledging 
regulations. 




(L. to R.) — (Front Row) Pam Williams (Alpha Kappa Alpha), Bridget Monroe (Kappa Delta), Ruth Ann 
Brown (Pi Beta Phi), (Second Row) Lisa Eidson (Alpha Chi Omega), Jennifer Lambert (Zeta Tau Alpha), 
Susie Scott (Alpha Chi Omega), (Third Row) Pegg\' Smith (Alpha Omicron Pi), Dudley Long (Sponsor), 



I 



IFC 




(L. to R.) — Stuart Davies (Alpha Tau Omega), Jack Swift (Sigma Alpha Epsilon), Bob Glenn (Sponsor), 
Robbie Nettles (Lambda Chi Alpha), Mark Flatt (Theta Chi), David Bowden (Kappa Alpha). 



The Interfraternity 
Council is composed of 
two representatives 
from each fraternity. 
The council's main 
goals are to insure 
cooperation among the 
fraternities and 
between them and the 
college administration 
and community. The 
council also promotes 
and perpetuates the 
best interests of B-SC 
and the represented 
fraternities. Their hope 
is that the condition of 
the fraternities and 
their relations with the 
college and community 
may be ever improved. 



163 



Southern Accent Staff 




Peggy Smith 

Assistant Editor 



Phil Free 

Photographer 





Gail Livingston 

Editor 




«^.'^ 




Tim Clifton 

Photographer 







^d 




r^. 



f/ 



Bert Moore 

Business Manager 



^ 




Clare Rutland 

Classes 




Frank Pair 

Sports 




Jane Rueschenberg 
Kathleen Holifield 

Greeks 



164 





Agatha Pihakis 

Ads 










Jill Hoube 

Faculty 




I: 



W- 



Robin Rankin 

Copy 




Melissa Biegler 
Judy Tanquary 

Organizations 




/ I 






Anne Stagner 
Typist 



Terry Chapman 

Ads 



Becky Ruffin 

Typist 



Louise Coker 

Ads 



165 



™^ig.. ^ m 




166 




167 



Alpha Tau Omega 

Beta Beta Chapter 




Chapter Officers 

Chip Irwin 

President 
David Wangerin 

Vice-President 
Chris Vance 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Bill Powell, Harry Kampa- 
kis. Second Row: Bibi Koulourides, 
Ron Massey, Johnny Revees, Amy 
Turnage, Steve Tondera, Monte 
Davis, Michael Scagnelli, Jeff Mon- 
roe, Third Row; Charlie Northen, 
Danny Cobb, David York, Charlie 
Mathis, Richard Markwalter, JefF 
Kyser, Chris Vance, Chip Irwin, 
David Witt, Mike Crabtree, Arthur 
Womble, Jim Wilkerson, Day Logue, 
Tom Moncrief, Lance Logue. 



Not Pictured: Andy Allen, Mitch 
Bates, Jim Brannon, Steve Battles, 
Mike Castanza, Floyd Casebere, 
Charlie Cowin, Sean Groak, Eric 
Hanson, Greg Logan, David Living- 
ston, Mike McCurley, J. P. Mathis, 
Greg Merren, Bryan Parker, Mike 
Poist, Clay Price, Scott Spivac, Andy 
Thurmond, Jim Tyndal, David 
Wangerin 



Little Sisters 

Tiffi Bates, Lisa Bartlett, 
Melinda Cooper, Angela 
Hansard, Janet Hinson, 
Elyse Kampakis, Bibi 
Koulourides, Nikie 

Koulourides, Day Logue, Re- 
becca Lyle, Dale Moore, 
Angie Orler, Andrea Ready, 
Nancy Rogers, Cathy Sarrell, 
Heidi Skinner, Melanie 
Smith, Terri Smith, Cathi 
Snow, Allison Todd, Amy 
Turnage, Vicki Wakefield, 
Alicia Wingard, Vicki Valin 




(Left) Harry Kampakis tears down ATO Pre-Vike 
sign in cafeteria. This sign was only up for 15 
minutes, but it aroused enough indignation 
among some female students to warrant "We 
Object," (Below) 

io Utr ATT} poster osmg i\^ wor^ 
rrtpf Qn4 pidagp with posUivecAiwuW 
tions and picturtsof wcnitjni boJits as 
inifn^ivts to conntUcriinina) octs Initt 
pcsler indKJatcs q violent, aririoaol, I 
and paTticutarlij at\ii'woTntT\ oihiudt. 1 
uilii(i\^ou|<) nc^ D€ptfp<.iu*ie.d W^ \ 
realize i\ift\ i\\t AU} trfl/Aw-s are rd 
QWort{f\flt (Kcif poster lios offensive 
to sensitive inejian^ wormn az f&o«} 
0J\^ tihntcsiurs ore Wt »zk{h«^ ih^ 
^osltr be removed If ijou a^r«< plc*i^ i 
St^n this poiicr. ! 




(Left) Cathy Sarrell and Clay Price at ATO's Luau. 
(Above) ATOs at their Winter Formal, Lake 
Guntersville State Park. 



Kappa Alpha 

Phi Chapter 




_ ?£U.; '^nr 



Chapter Officers 

Rory Dalton 

President 
Arthur Headley 

Vice-President 
Rhett Austin 

Secretary 
James Sexon 

Secretary 
Jimmy Brown 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Angie Rosiak, Adena Cur- 
ry, Bridgette Monroe, Dorothy Little, 
Karen Widenhofer, Meg Clark, Julie 
Dee Smith, Donna Austin, Janice 
Thorton, Laura Harvey, Dawn Mur- 
phry, Ame Cox, Casey Davis, Francis 
Phillpott, Rose Trinchitella, Karen 
Kendrick, Lynne Keenan, Second 
Row: Harrell Bullard, Roger Brown, 
Landis Sexton, Jimmy Lett, Jimmy 
Brown, Steve I^avne, Wade Neth, 



Skipper Watson, Rhett Austin, Stacy 
Headley, Bruce Long, Salem Khalef, 
Troy Post, Rory Dalton, Wilson Jenk- 
ins, Mac Feely, Bill Daniels, Third 
Row: Matt Palco, John Hutchinson, 
Charles Decker, Rick Keown, David 
Phillips, Sam Lature, Pat Barnes, 
Scott Anderson, Lee Anderson, 
David Bowden, Mike Karo, Michael 
Brummit, David McCoUum, Warren 
Dickinson, Dale McGeehon, John 
Burton, Frank Ozment, Danny Ro- 
gers, Bobby Harlin, Russell Wallace 
Not Pictured: Tom Austin, Joe Bar- 
nard, Don Brice, Tom Edward, Wil- 
liam Knoll, James Morton, John 
Scholl, James Sexon, Steve 
Slaughter. 



Little Sisters 

Donna Austin, Meg Clark, 
Ame Cox, Andeana Curry, 
Casey Davis, Laura Harvey, 
Karen Kendrick, Dorothy 
Little, Bridgette Monroe, 
Dawn Murphry, Frances 
Phillpott, Angie Rosiak, Julie 
Dee Smith, Janice Thorton, 
Rose Trincitella, Karen 
Widenhofer, LuAnne Whet- 
stone 



(Left) Rory Dalton, John Burton, David 
Bowden, Pat Barnes, Don Brick, and 
Roger Brown at the KA Highlanders Party. 
(Below) KAs pose for group picture at the 
Alpha Omicron Pi Fall Harvest Party. 




Danny Rogers, Ashylyn Pierce, Bridget Monroe, and John Burton at KA 
Pledge Dance. 



Lambda Chi Alpha 

Theta Mu Zeta Chapter 



skJ-,-- ■•> 




Chapter Officers 

Don Pittman 

President 
Doug Pile 

Vice-President 
Jeff Curtain 

Secretary 
John Cheney 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Randy Kerr, Bud Evers, 
Second Row: Doug Pile, Don Pitt- 
man. Mike Huntington, John Jin- 
right, John Sanchez, Joey Ackerson, 
Scott Merkle, Robbie Nettles, Tynes 
Cowen, Robby Williams, Jerry Dick- 
erson. Dale Ike 



Scott Howard, David Gibbs, John 
Chaney, Ward Smith, John Howell, 
Russ Steiner, Bobby Meyers, JelT 
Curtain, Richard Feist, Joe Webb 
Not Pictured: Jack Hall, Neal White, 
Shawn Menke, Stan Fuhr, Robbie 
Turner, John Day. 



Little Sisters 

Debra Barnett, Paula 
Andrews, Teresa Hunting- 
don, Tracey Fulkerson, Ali- 
son Pool, Susan Dillard, Lori 
Davis, Sandra Statham, Emi- 
ly Roe, Jamie Kellan, Jamie 
Matthews, Phyllis Runnels, 
Karen Cotton, Marcella Bro- 
gran, Becky Thomas, Lisa 
Dean 





Lambda 
Chi Alpha 






(Top Left) Sign in front of Lambda Chi Alpha House on Fraternity Row. (Top 
Right) Marsha Schnetzler, Dale Ike, David Gibbs, and Allison Poole at Lambda 
Chi toga party. (Bottom) Lambda Chis getting into the holiday spirit at their 
Little Sister Christmas Party. 



Theta Chi 

Beta Xi Chapter 




Chapter Officers 

Bill Conner 

President 
Mike Gorum 

Vice-President 
Mark Flatt 

Secretary 
Paul Anderson 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Rob Paul, Ken Clayton, 
Chris Holler, David McQuiddy, 
Chris Lanibery, Second Row; Mark 
Hagood, Gary McLean, David Hon- 
eycutt, Sam Downing, Jeff Chapman, 
Lauren Savage, Mark Mullens, Jim 
Carpenter, Gary McGahan, Susan 
O'Donnell, Robin Foster, Steve 
Mitchell, Mike Slobe, Sarah 
Spencer, Mike Chappell, Third Row: 
Eric Senn, Gary Reed, Howard Day, 
Jennifer Lambert, Craig Tilghman, 
Wesley Pickard, Mark Flatt, Gina 
Harris, Jeff Clark. Jim Taylor, Mike 
Maund, Steve DeGirolamo, Bellamy 
South, John Denbigh, John Miller, 
Jay Simmons, Bona Allen, Sam 



Williamson, Steve Synnot, Elizabeth 
Allen, Chrus Crews, Jamie Covan, 
Not Pictured: Paul Anderson, Greg 
Brown, Danny Browning, Bill Con- 
ner, Bobby Flurry, Steve Frost, 
Alpha Garrett, Mike Gorum, Wes 
Harrison, Scott Hall, Mark Johnson, 
Srinivas Kolli, Frank Klein, Sam 
Masdon, Carey Moreland, Brian 
Nicholson, Chuck Patrick, Alex 
Pope, Don Pritchett, John Ryberg, 
Jay Seegers, Mike Wheless 



Little Sisters 

Elizabeth Allen, Susan Alley, 
Susan Ames, Elaine Besh, 
Marianne Cook, Susan 
O'Donnell, Kathy Edwards, 
Robin Foster, Amy Harris, 
Gina Harris, Sonya Hender- 
son, Jennifer Lambert, Liz 
Lester, Lisa McLellan, Con- 
nie Pasley, Bonnie Pierce, 
Debbie Salem, Debi Sievers, 
Sarah Spencer, Bellamy 
South, Jennifer Sommers, 
Becky Tate, Kaye Weekley 




(Top Left) Mike Chappell, Paul Anderson, Greg Real, Mike Gorum, Chris 
Crews, and Jamie Covan at the Zeta Tau Alpha Italian Dinner. (Top Right) Chris 
Lambert, Mel Carpenter, and Jim Carpenter at the Theta Chi Oktoberfest. 
(Bottom) Theta Chis at Oktoberfest. 



Sigma Alpha Epsilon 

Alabama Iota Chapter 




Chapter Officers 

Max Pulliam 

President 
Bert Moore 

Vice-President 
Buddy Smith 

Secretary 
Mike Cope 

Treasurer 
Bryan Jackson 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Brother Estes, Frank 
McRight, D. Franklin, Butch Shotts, 
Second Row: David Tubbs, Joel Meg- 
ginson, Donny Herring, Ray De- 
lotus, Rob Morgan, Kevin Alexander, 
Barry Tucker, Jay Doyle, Foster 
Yeilding, Stephen Keith, Slay War- 
ren, Third Row: JefF Looney, John 
Watson, Joe Luttrell, Trey Wood, Jay 
White, Chuck Huguley, Wesley 
Hughes, Tommy Powell, Fourth 
Row: Jim Porter, Bert Moore, Jim 
Walter, John Hill 



Stephan Moran, Kevin Carter, Taylor 
Bragg, Steve Carter, John Akin, Rod- 
die Gantt, Fifth Row: Mike Cope, 
Doug Martin, Sam Gray, Jack Swift, 
Jefif Vaughn, Max Pulliam, Langley 
Kitchings, Joe DeMarco, David 
Jones, Eric Moran, Jerry Kitchens, 
Bob Sipe, Ben Albritton, Tim Light, 
Steve Jones, Andy Martin, Buddy 
Smith, Leslie King, Alan Bragg, Bob 
Dixon, Terrell Graves, Terry Chap- 
man, Russell Levenson, Joseph Ron- 
deros, David McKee 



Little Sisters 

Mary Burt, Laura Coleman, 
Kay Estill, Lulu Goodall, 
Peggy Hamrick, Lisha Har- 
baugh, Cindy Hartsell, Lynn 
Hughes, Linda Kennamer, 
Teresa Kidd, Lauren Lowery, 
Carol Morgan, Lesli Morgan, 
Paula Perkinson, Agatha 
Pihakis, Kathleen Real, Tonia 
Sellers, Terri Zachow 






(Left) SAEs celebrating after a victorious football game. 
(Below) Kay Estill, AOPI Pledge Trainer, looks on as 
John Watson ups his selling price at the AOPI-SAE 
Pledge Slave Sale. 




(Left) Steve Carter makes a dash for a first-down in SAE 
intramural football. (Above) Rob Morgan, Mary Burt, Bud- 
dy Smith, Brent Faircloth, and Lynn Hughes at an SAE 
party. 



Alpha Chi Omega 

Alpha Omega Chapter 




chapter Officers 

Angie Rosiak 

President 
Adrienne Barry 

Vice-President 
Diane Pease 

Secretary 
Paula Davis 

Secretary 
Pam Campbell 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Diane Ames, Cynthia No- 
bles, Becky Ruffin, Adrienne Barry, 
Emily Eyre, Janice Thornton, 
Second Row: Carol Dublin, Angelica 
Rosiak, Rena Cogan, Jan Massengill, 
Michelle Munsey, Terri Perri, 
Ashlyn Pierce, Sharon McKinney, 
Karen Sanders, Vicki Voss, Leigh 
Coachran, Elizabeth Patrenos, Third 
Row: Lisa Eidson, Melinda Holsom- 
beck, Regina Neal, Nicole Williams, 
Donna Smith, Debbie Willis, Nancy 
Brown, EHzabeth Allen 



Beth Pharris, Karen Hall, Paula Davis, 
Diane Pease, Carol Adams, Fourth 
Row: Treva Williams, Pam Camp- 
bell, Jocelyn McClelland, Paula 
Birch, Freida RatlifFe, Mary Ann Jes- 
se, Joanne Youg, Judy Harbor, Suzie 
Scott, Kim Williams, Cathy Streitzel, 
Paul Wright, Louise Harrell, Not Pic- 
tured: Janet James, Celeste Johnson, 
Janet Willis, Jane Burlingame, Jackie 
Hail, Brenda Cravey, Loletta King, 
Renee Densmore 



Big Brothers 

Jeff Chapman, Howard Day, 
Warren Dickinson, Gary 
McLean, Andy Martin, Jeff 
McLaughlin, Mark Miller, 
Dean Monroe, Phil Morris, 
Doug Owens, Chuck Patrick, 
Doug Smith, Scott Spivak 




Ronny Crenshaw, Paula Davis, 
Alpha Chi Halloween Party. 



Elizabeth Patrenos, and Phil Morris at the 



Alpha Omicron Pi 

Tau Delta Chapter 




Chapter Officers 

Nickie Koulourides 

President 
Kay Estill 

Vice-President 
Anne Stagner 

Secretary 
Susan Ames 

Secretary 
Mary Burt 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Kathleen Real, Susan 
Ames, Second Row: Anne Stagner, 
Cheri Bachofer, Frances Phillpott, 
Cindy Hartsell, Lesli Morgan, Amy 
Tumage, Teresa Kidd, Lyn Emmer- 
son. Third Row: Jill Hoube, Ellen 
Furio, Kay Estill, Donna Austin, 
Ellen O'Kelley, Paige Perkins, Casey 
Davis, Edie Dacovich, Monna 
Daugette, Liz Krauth, Fourth Row: 
Julie Crotwell, Ameha Gunn, Liz 
Lester, Karen Kendrick, Pegg>' Smith, 
Lisa Woods, Joanne Roberts, Jane 
Rueschenberg, 



Deborah Palmes, Beth Jackson, 
Carol Richardson, Donna Brown, 
Lynn Hughes, Fifth Row: Man' Burt, 
Bellamy South, Day Logue, Elyse 
Kampakis, Sheri Scholl, Margaret 
Rubio, Kathy Leos, Angie Orler, San- 
dra Ryan, Mindy Van Matre, Dayna 
Glower, Sixth Row: Karen Watson, 
Nisa Zanaty, Bibi Koulourides, Tiffi 
Bates, Vicki Vahn, Cathy Sarrell, 
Nickie Koulourides, Linda Eckert, 
Leigh Kaylor, Andrea Ready, 
Seventh Row: Sandra Dowell, Rob 
Paul, Agatha Pihakis, Dawn Mur- 
phree, Gail Livngston, Beth Harris, 
Lauren Lowery, Ame Cox, Luann 
Goodall, Elizabeth Ryan, Susan 
Northrup, Debi Sievers, Emily 
Lyons, Eighth Row: Spin Spires, 
David Wangerin, Chris Vance, Keith 
Thompson, Steve Austin, Not Pic- 
tured: Lee Ann Friday, Margaret- 
Ann Reneker, Terri Zachow 



Big Brothers 

Steve Austin, David Jones, 
David Livingston, Rob Paul, 
Phil Ritchey, Keith Thomp- 
son, Chris Vance, David 
Wangerin, 




(Top Left) Lesli Morgan and Angie Orler at an intramural football 
game. (Top Right) Agatha Pihakis takes time from her studies to 
flash a smile at the photographer. (Bottom Left) Elyse Kampakis 
helped lead her team in a successful basketball season. (Bottom 
Right) AOPI candlelightings were as frequent as they were fun. 



Kappa Delta 

Alpha Upsilon Chapter 




Chapter Officers 

Cindy Blessman 

President 
Tonia Sellers 

Vice-President 
Allison Snuggs 

Secretary 
Lisha Harbaugh 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Dale Moore, Melinda 
Cooper, Julie Bushmiaer, Tonia Sel- 
lers, Susan Donovan, Kathleen Wier, 
Allison Snuggs, Frances Foy, Rebec- 
ca DeWine, Glenda Wren, Beth Phil- 
lips, Meg Clark, Julie Dee Smith, 
Lisha Harbaugh, Second Row: Laurie 
Reid, Linda Kennemer, Sherri Cole- 
man, Lisa Bartlett, Jena Large, Jenny 
Llewellyn, Tracy McCay, Paula Per- 
kinson, Rhonda Cook, Susan Robert- 
son, Dorothy Little, Third Row: Peg- 
gy Hamrick, Nancy Rogers, Cathi 
Show, Martha Hayes 



Nancy Stevenson, Hart Thompson, 
Bonnie Pierce, Lorinda Dixon, Lori 
Mauger, Laura Rogers, Dottie Mont- 
gomery, Fourth Row: Angela Wool- 
dridge, TamraTondera, Lynn Fergu- 
son, Dawn Bottorff, Ellen Harris, 
Susan Swan, Paula Davis, Laura Har- 
vey, Kyle Kennedy, Sarah Wilder, 
Kay Weekley, Margery Sams, Carol 
Ann Mullins, Brigette Monroe, Fifth 
Row: Dale Riley, Glenn Sweat, Rose 
Trinchitella, Kathleen Holifield, Cin- 
dy Blessman, Barbara Elebash, Ann 
Wagner, Bridgette Towne, Anne 
Bryant, Laura Steffey, Not Pictured: 
Janie Bush, Jamie Matthews, Clare 
Rutland. 



Big Brother 

Bert Moore 




Donny Herring, 
Glenn Sweat, 
Clare Rutland, 
and Jim Porter at 
the Kappa Delta 
I Steak Fry. 




Pi Beta Phi 

Alabama Alpha Chapter 



i 




'^ i 



-^ ' I 







Chapter Officers 

Cathy Shipman 

President 
Margie Terry 

Vice-President 
Connie Schipman 

Vice-President 
Martha Chenault 

Secretary 
Sinione Bryan 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Martha Meacham, Tracey 
Fulkerson, Phyllis Runnels, Gwen 
Dees, Linda Hersfelt, Margie Terry, 
Second Row: Billy Childress, Connie 
Schipman, Cathy Schipman, Martha 
Chenault, Karen Gotten, Cindy 
Hosey, Third Row: Leschen Noblis, 
Michelle Wilder, Beth Nielson, 



Ellen Humphrey, Simone Bryan, 
Ruth-Ann Brown, Fourth Row; 
Richard Feist, Bona Allen, Tom 
Moncrief, John Miller, Helen Hersfelt, 
Not Pictured: Beth Caruso, Jamie 
Kellam, Valerie Langley, Alison 
Pool, Marsha Schnetzler, Becky 
Thomas, Suzanne Vaughn, Luanne 
Whetstone 



Big Brothers 

Bona Allen, Billy Childress, 
Richard Feist, John Miller, 
Tom Moncrief 



(Left) Pi Phi Rush Display. (Below) Ellen Humphries (L.) and 
Connie Shipman (R.) with a visiting Pi Phi. 




(Upper Left) Connie Shipman "Jumps for Heart. " (Low- 
er Left) Pi Phis in the "Jump for Heart" competition: 
(Seated) Ellen Humphries, Michelle Wilder, (Kneel- 
ing) Leschen Noblis, Simone Bryan, (Standing) Rose 
Jaime, Ginger Gidden. (Above) Tracy Fulkerson and 
Phyllis Runnels bundle-up for the cold weather. 



Zeta Tau Alpha 

Alpha Nu Chapter 




chapter Officers 

Amy Wingard 

President 
Angie Batey 

Vice-President 
Vickie Wakefield 

Secretary 
Robin Herald 

Treasurer 



Active Membership 

First Row: Melissa Bates, Shon Sca- 
vo, Angie Batey, Sonya Henderson, 
Second Row: Am\' Wingard, Alicia 
Wingard, Sandra Lane, Debbie 
Salem. Kathy Adams, Lynn McCay, 
Beth Eagerton, Terri Huntington, 
Leigh Peters, Third Row: Sarah 
Spencer, jeannie Bennett, Joni 
Roberts, Louise Bond, Kim Everett, 
Susie Hamrick, Teresa Prestwood, 
Julie Plant, Magda Andonie, Jan 
Hopper, Emily Roe, Melanie 
Grimes, Edith Cheney, Sandra 
Statham, 



Fourth Row: Robin Herald, Paula 
Andrews, Melanie Hall, Susan Dil- 
lard, Laura Giardini, Katy Lorance, 
Lydia Jacovides, Jill Limbaugh, Cris- 
ti Adcock, Fifth Row: Lori Davis, Sid- 
ney Statham, Vickie Moore, Frankie 
Callen, Connie Pasley, Angela Sharp, 
Linda Dukes, Vickie Wakefield, 
Sixth Row: Mike Chappell, Thomas 
Sharp, Not Pictured: Gayle Andrews, 
Jennifer Lambert, Debbie Lester, 
Annette Phillips, Julie Pinkston, 
Angela Smith 



Big Brothers 

Mike Chappell, Ken Clayton, 
Sidney Ebrahimi, Mike 
Gorum, Jack Hall, David 
Honeycutt, Mark Siefert, 
Thomas Sharp, Craig Tilgh- 
man. Jack Turner, Joe Webb, 
Jamie Covan 



1 



(Left) Mike Gorham and Connie Pasley at Bid 
Day. (Below) Zetas at their White \'iolet 
Formal. 




(Above) Zeta Pledges at Bid Day. (Left) Debbie Salem dribbles down court 



Active Membership 

Angela Fisher 
Jiidi F"loiirney 
Veronica Hicks 
Cassandra Miller 
Donna Morrissette 

President 
Traci Statisfield 
Pamela Williams 

Big Brothers 

Clarence Edwards 
Michael Todd 



Alpha Kappa Alpha 

Nu Delta Chapter 




Active Membership 

Carolyn Council 
Monica Erving 
Connie Sims 
Deborah Billups 



Delta Sigma Theta 

Xi Epsilon Chapter 





A "Candid" Look at 
the Greeks! 



(Left) Zeta Tan Alphas sing to their 
sweetheart, Mike Gorham. (Below 
Left) Susan Donovan and Lulu 
Goodall break tradition and team up 
against faculty in the student-faculty 
football game. (Below Right) Andy 
Thurmond and Monte Davis look for 
a hand-out at the ATO Winter 
Formal. 




Rob Paul, 
after nearly a 
decade as an 
AOPI Big 
Brother, is 
still loyal to 
the cause. 




190 




191 



Bona Allen 

Dunwoody, GA 

Anne Bailey 

Little Rock, AR 

Debra Barnett 

Florence, AL 



Thamar Barrett 
Dixiana, AL 

Adrienne Barry 

Starke, FL 

Angie Batey 
Oxford, AL 



Mary Elizabeth Becker 
Birmingham, AL 

Joyce Bestedler 

Birmingham, AL 

Deborah Billups 

Birmingham, AL 



Cindy Blessman 

Spring, TX 

Joseph Bowlby 

Anniston, AL 

Alan Bragg 
Huntsville, AL 



Robert Brannum 

Birmingham, AL 

Paul Brasher 

Leeds, AL 

Frank Brocato 

Birmingham, AL 





James Brown 

Rainsville, AL 

Mark Brown 

Huntsville, AL 

Anne Bryant 
Birmingham, AL 



Brenda Bullock 

Birmingham, AL 

Mary Burt 

Fairhope, AL 

Janie Bush 

Opelika, AL 



Mary Byrd 

Adamsville, AL 

Jane Campbell 

Birmingham, AL 

Chris Canfield 
Birmingham, AL 



Joan Chaney 
Birmingham, AL 

Jeff Chapman 
Huntsville, AL 

Mike Chappell 

Huntsville, AL 



Dale Clem 

Huntsville, AL 

Tim Clifton 

Mobile, AL 

Bonita Conley 
Birmingham, AL 



193 



William Connor 

Birmingham, AL 

Melinda Cooper 

Birmingham, AL 

Shawn Cosper 

Ohatchee, AL 



Adeanna Curry 

Theodore, AL 

Beth Curry 

Tuscaloosa, AL 

Jeffrey Curtin 
Leeds, AL 



Rory Dalton 

Huntsville, AL 

Lori Ann Davis 

Birmingham, AL 

Charles Decker 

Birmingham, AL 



Lorinda Dixon 

Huntsville, AL 

Leslie Douglas 
Gardendale, AL 

Linda Eckert 

Union City, TN 



Lisa Edwards 
Cullman, AL 

Lisa Eidson 
Scottsboro, AL 

Mary Anne Ellis 
Birmingham, AL 




194 




Virginia Englund 
Birmingham, AL 

Monica Ervin 
Birmingham, AL 

Kay Estill 

Marietta, GA 



Emily Eyre 

Nashville, TN 

Richard Fiest 

Birmingham, AL 

Angela Fisher 
Birmingham, AL 



Deborah Fisher 
Birmingham, AL 

Thomas Fitch 

Athens, AL 

Robin Foster 
Marietta, GA 



Steve Frost 
Birmingham, AL 

Greg Gardner 

Chattanooga, TN 

Jeff Gillespie 
Griffin, GA 



Jeff Givens 

Montgomery, AL 

Tommy Glasner 
Birmingham, AL 

Marjorie Goodson 
Birmingham, AL 



195 



Tainara Cover 
Huntsville, AL 

John Grammer 
Gainsville, VA 

Sam Gray 

Athens, AL 



Vernandi Greene 

Birmingham, AL 

Edward Gunter 

Birmingham, AL 

Robert Gunter 
Birmingham, AL 



Angela Hansard 
Lithia Springs, GA 

Elsie Hard 

Birmingham, AL 

Harvey Harmon 
Birmingham, AL 



Bronwyn Harris 
Arab, AL 

Gina Harris 

Birmingham, AL 

David Hatch 

Birmingham, AL 



Kevin Henderson 

Birmingham, Al 

Michael Henderson 
Adamsville, AL 

Sonya Henderson 
Birmingham, AL 




196 




Steve Herrington 
Huntsville, AL 

Helen Hershfelt 

Clearwater, FL 

David Honeycutt 

Athens, AL 



Janis Hopper 

Birmingham, AL 

John Howell 

Decatur, AL 

Lynn Hughes 

Birmingham, AL 



Thomas Irwin 

Soddy, TN 

Yasuhiko Issihiki 

Kyoto, JA 

Dino Jacovides 
Huntsville, AL 



Rose Jaime 

Oceansprings, MS 

Mary Ann Jessee 

St. Louis, MO 

Ibelia Johnson 
Birmingham, AL 



Mark Johnson 

Birmingham, AL 

Myra Johnson Davis 

Birmingham, AL 

Becky Jones 
Sylacauga, AL 



197 



Gary Jones 

Birmingham, AL 

Gerald Jones 

Hueytown, AL 

Lisa Jones 
Huntsville, AL 



Sue Jones 
Birmingham, AL 

Yoshiake Kaoru 

Sakai Osaka, JA 

Leigh Kaylor 
Birmingham, AL 



Lisa Kissinger 

Birmingham, AL 

Langley Kitchens 
Birmingham, AL 

Frank Klein 

Huntsville, AL 



Yvonne Knight 
Birmingham, AL 

Nickie Koulourides 

Birmingham, AL 

Jennifer Lambert 

Athens, AL 



Scott LeCroy 
Birmingham, AL 

Elisabeth Lester 

Enterprise, AL 

Renee Lewis 

Birmingham, AL 




198 




James Edward Lilly 

Birmingham, AL 

Cheng Lin 
Birmingham, AL 

Edward M. Lindsey 

Gadsden, AL 



David Livingston 

Albertville, AL 

Gail Livingston 

Albertville, AL 

Lauren Lowery 

Albertville, AL 



Doug Martin 

Huntsville, AL 

Mike Mashburn 
Birmingham, AL 

Elizabeth Mathews 

Gulf Breeze, FL 



John Paul Mathis 
Troy, AL 

Greg May 

Pleasant Grove, AL 

Vivian Mays 
Rossville, GA 



Loretta Mays 

Birmingham, AL 

Harold McCIendon 

Cullman, AL 

Nancy McCorkle 
Ellaville, GA 



199 



Robert McCrary 

Birmingham, AL 

Jeff McLaughlin 
Giintersville, AL 

David McQuiddy 

Nashville, TN 



Martha Meachan 
Owensboro, KY 

Carolyn Millican 

Gardendale, AL 

William Millsap 
Birmingham, AL 



Tom Moncrief 

Savannah, GA 

Dean Monroe 

Montgomery, AL 

Jon Moody 

Brewton, AL 



Douglas Moore 
Hanceville, AL 

Vicki Moore 

Altoona, AL 

Lesli Morgan 

Birmingham, AL 



Jane Morris 

Huntsville, AL 

Donna Morrissette 
Pensacola, FL 

Stephen Moseley 
Birmingham, AL 




200 




William Murray 
Ocala, FL 

Regina Neal 

Childersburg, AL 

William Newberry 
Hoover, AL 



Carol Noble 

Miami Lakes, FL 

Susan O'Donnell 
Pensacola, FL 

Irene Oden 

Birmingham, AL 



Hugh Owens 

Scottsboro, AL 

Brian Parker 

Birmingham, AL 

Charles Patrick 

Birmingham, AL 



Martha Patrick 
Birmingham, AL 

Rick Phillips 

Roswell, GA 

Frances Philpott 
Birmingham, AL 



Douglas Pile 

Tampa, FL 

Alex Pope 

Adamsville, AL 

Clay Price 

Fayette, AL 



201 



Scott Pruett 
Birmingham, AL 

Freida Ratliff 

Oneonta, AL 

David Rayburn 
Birmingham, AL 



Oneil Ridgeway 
Birmingham, AL 

Dale Riley 

Melbourne, FL 

Roddie Roberts 

Quinton, AL 



Emily Roe 

Pulaski, TN 

Theresa Roebuck 

Bessemer, AL 

Angelica Rosiak 
Elk Grove, IL 



Charles Runnels 

Fultondale, AL 

Michael Russell 
Opp, AL 

Clare Rutland 

Birmingham, AL 



Mark Sapp 
Huntsville, AL 

Thomas Sharp 
Anniston, AL 

Larry Shoemaker 

Huntsville, AL 




202 




Mike Shoemaker 

Huntsville, AL 

Connie Sims 
Birmingham, AL 

James Smith 
Birmingham, AL 



Leon Smith 
Ozark, AL 

Melanie Smith 

Birmingham, AL 

Allison Snuggs 
Birmingham, AL 



Sandra Statham 
Birmingham, AL 

Russell Steiner 
Birmingham, AL 

David Striplin 

Birmingham, AL 



Larry Striplin 

Birmingham, AL 

Glenn Sweat 
Talladega, AL 

Kazuko Takeishi 
Tokyo, JA 



Rebecca Tate 

Richmond, VA 

Craig Tilghman 
Huntsville, AL 

Rosanne Tombrello 
Birmingham, AL 



203 



Tricia Tucker 
Birmingham, AL 

Dawn Urquhart 

Birmingham, AL 

Vicki Wakefield 
Irondale, AL 



Joseph Waldrop 

Pell City, AL 

Nancy Walker 

Birmingham, AL 

Jennie Wall 

Birmingham, AL 



David Wangerin 

Birmingham, AL 

Glorida Ward 

Birmingham, AL 

Patti Watkins 

Birmingham, AL 



Rosemary Webster 

Hueytown, AL 

LuAnn Whetstone 
Birmingham, AL 

Carol White 
Birmingham, AL 



Lori Whitley 

Tampa, FL 

Richie Whitten 

Florence, AL 

Michelle Wilder 
Chamblee, GA 




204 




Tommy Wilkes 

Huntsville, AL 

Michael Williams 

Fultondale, AL 

Pamela Williams 
Huevtown, AL 



Barry Wood 
Birmingham, AL 

Emily Wood 

Birmingham, AL 

Jerry Wood 

Birmingham, AL 



Edmond F. Woodbery 
Pensacola, FL 

Glenda Wren 
Trussville, AL 

Katherine Wright 

Leeds, AL 



Atsuko Yamaguchi 
Homewood, AL 

Katy Yeilding 

Birmingham, AL 

Nisa Zanaty 
Birmingham, AL 



205 



Vicki Accardi 

Stacey Acker 

Joseph D. Ackerson 

John Adams 

Kathv Adams 



Kristi Adcock 
Monica Agarwal 
Kevin Alexander 

Frances Allen 
Susan Alley 



Fumiko Anianai 

Diane Ames 

Susan Ames 

Carol Anerson 

Caroletta Anderson 



Lee Anderson 
Magda Adonie 
Gayle Andrews 

Donna Austin 
Tom Austin 



Charles Banks 

Knox Bannister 

Mark Bannister 

Jim Barber 

Greg Bard 



Sandy Barker 

Joe Barnard 

Pat Barnes 

Brian Bates 

Mehssa Bates 



Steve Bearce 

Nancy Bedford 

A.J. Belogia 

Jeannie Bennett 

Todd Berry 




208 




Elaine Besh 
Paula Birch 
Mary Black 
Scott Blackenship 
Sharon Blount 



Marcela Boeran 
Paul Bolus " 



Connie Bonds 
Maron Boohake 



Dawn Bottorf 
Lisa Bradford 
Taylor Bragg 
Patricia Brannum 
Phil Brasher 



Sid Brevard 
Don Brice 
Randal Bright 
Allen Brown 
Debbie Brown 



Donna Brown 
Hanna Brown 
John Brown 
Nanc\- Brown 
Renee Brown 



Roger Brown 
Ruth Ann Brown 
Michael Brumniitt 
Simone Bryan 
Greg Bryant 



209 



Harell Bullard 

Emily Burge 

Stephen Burgess 

John Burton 

Juhe Bushmiaer 



Mary Sue Caldwell 
Donald Camp 
Pam Campbell 



Kiki Caridakis 

Linda Carlisle 

Mike Caro 



John Casebere 

Sally Chadbourne 

Janet Champion 

Debra Chan 

Theodore Cheatham 



Martha Chenault 

Susan Cherones 

Meg Clark 

Dayna Clower 

Clip Coates 



Leigh Cochran 

Rena Cogen 

Dale Cohen 

Louise Coker 

Laura Coleman 



John Collar 

Rhonda Cook 

Lawrence Copel 

Charlie Copeland 

Sandra Cothren 




210 




Karen Cotton 
James Covan 
Ts'nes Cowan 
Ame Cox 
Michael Crabtree 



Brenda Cravey 
Chris Crews 
Nancy Crocker 
Mary Croninger 
Juhe Crotwell 



Melanie Crowder 
Tom Currington 
Shirley Curtis 
Edie Dacovich 
Wendi Daniel 



Bill Daniels 
Monna Daugette 



Stuart Davies 
Casev Davis 



/ Monte Davis 

i^M Paula Davis 



Paula Davis 
Ted Davis 
Howard Da\ 
Lisa Dean 
Gwen Dees 



211 



Steve DeGirolama 

Ray Deloteus 

John Denbigh 

John Denton 

Rebecca DeWine 



Mark DiChiara 
Steve Dickenson 



Cynthia Dickson 
Susan Dillard 



Renee Dinsmore 

Renae Dismuke 

Eddie Dodgen 

Shari Donsbach 

Sam Downing 



Jay Doyal 

Ronald Dudley 

Linda Dukes 

James Durham 

Beth Eagerton 



Amy Edfelt 

Thomas Edwards 

Barbara Elebash 

Lyn Emmerson 

Kimberlv Everett 



Kevin Faulkner 

Danny Feldman 

Glenn Feldman 

Mac Feely 

Charlie Ferguson 




212 




Lynn Ferguson 
Lorri Five 
Edith Ford 
Leah Ford 
Denson Franklin 



Phil Free 
Lea Ann Friday 
Mark Frost 
Stan Fuhr 
Trac\ Fulkerson 



Ellen Furio 
Barry Gager 



Jeff Gallups 
Patricia Gamarage 



Katharine Gardner 
Sherr\ Gardner 



Hi 


Scott Gesner 
Laura Giardini 


^1 




p1 




71 


David Gibbs 
Clare Golson 
Susan Grabryan 
Drew Green 
Jerrill Green 



213 



Karen Greene 

Tunja Greene 

Melanie Grimes 

Shean Groark 

Lana Grubbs 



Lisa Guthrie 
Lisa Guthrie 

Ameha Gunn 
Shannon Gwin 

Mark Hagood 



Michael Hagood 

Jackie Hail 

Karen Hall 

Melanie Hall 

Scott Hall 



Suzanne Hamrick 

Courtney Hanahan 

Lisha Harbaugh 

Judy Harbor 

Joyce Hardiman 





214 




Luc\' Harding 
Allison Hardy 
Robert Harlin 
Larr>' Harmon 
Robin Harrell 



Amv Harris 
Beth Harris 
Ellen Harris 
Byron Harrold 
Cindy Hartsell 



Laura Harvey- 
Nancy Hastings 



Martha Haves 
Chris Hendrix 



Donnie Herring 
Kevin Higgs 



Janet Hines 
Kathleen Holifield 
Nina Holmes 
Jill Hoube 
Scott Howard 



Mike Hudson 
Theresa Hudson 
Wesley Hughes 
Charles Huguley 
Ellen Humphrey 



215 



Deborah Hunsley 



Dale Ike 



Ken Ingram 



Beth Jackson 

Jamelle Jackson 

Lydia Jacovides 

Greg James 

Janet James 



Willson Jenkins 

John Jinright 

Anna Jones 

Danny Jones 

David Jones 



Rita Jones 

Jim Jordan 

Elyse Kampakis 

Lynne Kennan 

Lisa Kelly 



Karen Kendrick 

Linda Kennamer 

Kyle Kennedy 

John Kerper 

Randall Kerr 



216 





Teresa Kidd 
Barry King 
Stephen King 
Leslie King 
Diana Kirk 



Barbara Kirkland 
William Knoll 
Diane Koulourides 
Jeff Kyser 
Cynthia Lamar 



Chris Lambert 
Michaux Land 
Jena Large 
Stephen Layne 
Troy Layton 



Kathy Leos 
Debbie Lester 
Russ Levenson 
Jill Limbaugh 
Jerry Lin 



^" Ann Logue 



Day Logue 



~" Carlette Long 



217 



Pamela Lonon 



Jeff Looney 



Jimni\' Lott 



Katy Lowrance 

Lisa Lucas 

Rosalind Ludwig 

Joe Luttrell 

Bret Madole 



Anthon\" Marino 

Richard Marks 

Richard Markwalter 

Andy Martin 

Jan Masingill 



Jamie Matthews 

Corrie May 

Robert Mayer 

Howard McAdor\ 

Todd McBurnett 



Erich McCall 

Tracy McCay 

JoceKn McClelland 

Dasid McCollum 

Mike McCrarv 




218 




Dale McGeehon 
Jeanmarie McGehee 
Ronald McKa\- 
Jay McKinney 
Gary McLean 



Faith McNeal-Anchnini 
Frank McRight 
Dorothy Meadowcroft 
Joel Megginson 
Shawn Menke 



Anton Mertens 
Beck-y Miller 
Doris Miller 
John Miller 
Mark Miller 



Susan Millican 
Charles Mitchell 
Jeff Mitchell 
Steve Mitchell 
Bridgette Monroe 



Dottie Montgomery 
Dale Moore 



Phil Morris 
Davis Morrison 



Suzv Morrison 
Cody Moser 
Stephen Mowery 
Mark Mullens 
Michele Munsey 



219 



Emmett Murkett 
M.J. Murkett 

Dawn Murphree 
Scott Musgrove 
Robbie Nettles 



Lisa Newberry 

John Nichol 

Brian Nicholson 

Veronica Nicholson 

Cynthia Nobles 



Sonya Nobles 

Susan Northrop 

Ellen O'Kelley 

Angie Orler 

Valla Owens 



Frank Pair 

Rob Palmer 

Amelia Parsons 

Elizabeth Patrenos 

Woody Patterson 



John Patton 

Diane Pease 

John Pendegrast 



Yezmin Perilla 

Paige Perkins 

Paula Perkinson 



Terri Perry 

Louise Pfau 

Annette Phillips 




220 




Wes Pickard 
Bonnie Pierce 
Sam Pierce 
Julie Plant 
Alison Pool 



Denise Poole 
Tomm\ Powell 



Victor Powell 
Bill Powell 



Kenneth Prestridge 
Theresa Prestwood 



Pani Pruett 
Scott Pyburn 
Kelvin Ramsey 
Robin Rankin 
Larrv Read 



Andrea Ready 

John Reaves 

Mark Renda 

Margaret Ann Renneker 

Carol Richardson 



JoAnn Roberts 
Joni Roberts 
Amy Robertson 
Laura Rogers 



221 



Dannv Rogers 

William Roy 

Margaret Rubio 

Jane Rueschenberg 

Becky RufFin 



Phyllis Runnels 
Brandon Russell 



Sandra Ryan 
Debbie Salem 



Margery Sams 

John Sanchez 

Dan Sanders 

George Sanders 

Sanders Gwin 



Cathy Sarrell 
Hiroshi Sasaki 
Traci Satistield 

Pierre Scalise 
Shon Scavo 



Sheri SchoU 

Dotty Schmidt 

Charlotte Scott 

Donnie Scott 

Steve Scott 



Mark Seifert 

Lew Sellars 

Tonia Sellers 

Ken Sewell 

Landis Sexton 





Angela Sharp 
David Shelton 
GregoPi' Shelton 
Don Shotts 
Dan Sievers 



Debi Sievers 
Pattisue Simpson 
Tommy Sisson 
Beth Skidmore 
Heidi Skinner 



Michael Slobe 
Donna Smith 
Holly Smith 
Julie Dee Smith 
Peggy Smith 



f^^ 



' r/ 



B^fii^ 2S-_L-#!sli 




Reata Smith 
Steve Smith 
Steven W. Smith 
Terry Smith 
Bellamy South 



223 



LuAnn Spain 

Michael Speakman 

Sarah Spencer 

Yvette Spencer 

Anne Stagner 



Clarke Stallworth 
Sabrina Steadman 



Laura Steffey 
Steven Franklin 



Cathy Stout 
Cathv Strietzel 



Richard Sturgeon 

Jeff Swearengin 

Mark Swindle 

Steve Synnott 

Clav Tanner 



Judy Tanquary 

James Taylor 

Kath\ Ta\lor 

Hugh Terry 

James Terry- 



Kelvin Terry 
Mariorie Terry- 
Becky Thomas 
Keith Thompson 
Janice Thorton 




224 




Marion Threat 
Pati Tiller 
Tanira Tondera 
Da\id Tubbs 
Barr\- Tucker 



Jack Turner 
Mindy Van Matre 
Jeff \'aughan 
Suzanne \'aughn 
Michael Vaughn 



Br\'an Vickery 
Vicky Voss 
Ann Wagner 
Bonner Wagnon 
Alan Walker 



Joanne Walsh 
Keyna Warren 
Slay Warren 
Trisha Watkins 
Kathv Watts 



Joe Webb 
Ghana Webe 



Megan Wells 
Roger Wheeler 



Donna White 
James White 
Michael White 
Steven White 
Karen Widenhofer 



225 



Kathleen Wier 
Sarah Wilder 
Kim Williams 
Pam Williams 

Rena Williams 



Robert Williams 

Tracy Williams 

Sam Williamson 

Debbie Willis 

Janet Willis 



Earin Wilson 

David Witt 

Arthur Womble 

Darol Wood 

Trev Wood 



Greg Woods 
Lisa Woods 



Angela Wooldridge 
Joe Wooten 



Paula Wright 
Foster Yielding 



Hiroshi Yokoyama 
David York 




Who's Who Who's Who Who': 



Joanne Young 
226 Maura Yoimg 





Tay Berryhill 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Fine Arts Scholarship, 
Art Students League, Costume Designer 
for Dance Performance, Quad Literaiy 
Magazine -^ Art Editor, Editor, Student 
Art Exhibitions, Birmingham Advertis- 
ing Scholarship, Publications Board, 
Hilltop News Cartoonist. 



fii£*L.^J^ 




Janie Bush 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Epsilon Delta, Kappa Mii Epsi- 
lon. Alpha Epsilon, Theta Sigma 
Lambda, Hall and Echols Math Scho- 
larship, Air Force Medical School and 
Pre-Medical School Scholarships, 
ROTC Expert Marksman Ribbon, 
PSSO, SGA Medical Education Com- 
mittee and Student Representative, 
Circle K, Young Republicans. 




Chris Canfield 

Rhodes Scholar, Mortar Board, Omic- 
ron Delta Kappa, Alpha Lambda Del- 
ta, Sigma Tau Delta, Kappa Mu Epsi- 
lon, British Studies at Oxford Scho- 
larship, Hall and Echols Math Scho- 
larship, International Youth in 
Achievement, Triangle Club, Air 
Force ROTC Honorary. 




Mike Chappell 

SGA Class Representative, Triangle 
Club, Cheerleader Captain, Youth 
Ministries Ambassador, Homecoming 
Committee and Co-Chairperson, In- 
ternational Youth in Achievement, 
Theta Chi Fraternity — Pledge Class 
Secretary, Social Chairman. 




Melinda Cooper 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 
British Studies at Oxford Scholarship, 
Social Sciences Scholarship, Triangle 
Club, SGA Dorm Representative, 
Food Service Committee, Student 
Judiciary, Kappa Delta Sorority — So- 
cial Chairman. 



Adeana Curry 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Phi Omega, Kappa Delta Epsi- 
lon — President, Student Alabama 
Education Association — President, 
National Council of Accreditation of 
Teacher Education, Baptist Campus 
Ministries, Hilltop News reporter, 
PSSO, KA Little Sister. 



Elizabeth Curry 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 
Kappa Mu Epsilon, Triangle Club, 
PSSO, Student Judiciary — Chair- 
man, Resident Advisor, Tennis Team, 
Chemical Rubber Company Chemis- 
try Award, Cherry Woodruff Math 
Award. 



227 




Greg Curry 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Phi Alpha Theta, SGA Class Repre- 
sentative, Honor Code Committee, 
Entertainment Committee, SGA 
Secretary, Honor Code Committee 
Chairman, Joint Committee Histo- 
rian, Youth Ministries Ambassador — 
Coordinator. 



Rory Dalton 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Epsilon Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Claude Lawson 
Pre-Health Scholarship, Kappa Alpha 
Order Fraternity-President, Resident 
Advisor. 



Richard Feist 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Epsilon Delta, Beta Beta Beta, 
Eclitor, Assistant Editor, Staff Writer 
— Hilltop News, SGA Commuter 
Representative, Quad Literary Maga- 
zine, Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity — 
President. 




Deborah Fisher 

Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, 
SGA Adult Studies Representative, 
PSSO, Adult Advisory Committee, 
Long Range Planning Task Force, Stu- 
dent Leaders' Retreat. 



Robin Foster 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
French Lab Instructor, Overseas 
Study Scholarship, Alpha Chi Omega 
Sorority — Vice-President, Theta Chi 
"Dream Girl," Junior Class Home- 
coming Representative, Homecoming 
Queen. 



Mary Ann Jessee 

Mortar Board, Beta Beta Beta, Alpha 
Epsilon Delta — Vice-President, 
Summer Scholar, Baptist Campus 
Ministries, Zoology Lab Instructor, 
Alpha Chi Sorority — Vice-President, 
Student Judiciary. 




Yoshiaki Kaoru 

Omicron Delta Kappa, Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, International 
Student Association, Oak Ridge 
Spring Science Semester. 




1^' 







Nickie Koulourides 

Mortar Board — Vice-President, 
Omicron Delta Kappa, Alpha Lambda 
Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, Triangle Club, 
Publication of research article in "Jour- 
nal of Oral Pathology," Resident Advi- 
sor, Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority — 
President, Corresponding Secretary, 
Scholarship Chairman, ATO Little 
Sister. 



Scott Le Croy 

Beta Beta Beta — President, Alpha 
Epsilon Delta, Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Claude S. Lawson Health Careers 
Scholarship, Pre-Health Peer Advis- 
ory Committee, American Chemical 
Society, Baptist Camp Ministries, Bi- 
ology and Embryology Lab Instructor, 
Genetics Lab Assistant, Health 
Careers Emphasis Conference. 




Elisabeth Lester 

Pi Kappa Lambda, PSSO, Miss Birm- 
ingham Southern College — Guy E. 
Snavely Talent Winner, Stephens 
Piano Competition finalist. Alpha 
Omicron Pi Sorority, Miss Alabama 
Top Ten, Concert Choir — Business 
Manager, Resident Advisor, Youth 
Ministries Ambassador, B-SC Alumni 
Board of Directors. 



Gail Livingston 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Sigma Tau Delta, PSSO, Triangle 
Club, Southern Accent editor, Pub- 
lications Board, Merit Scholarship, 
Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority — Rush 
Chairman, Alumni Liasons Chair- 
man, Reporter, Hilltop News Repor- 
ter, Teaching Assistant — English 101. 



Carolyn Millican 

Theta Sigma Lambda, Kappa Mu 
Epsilon, Cherry Woodruff Achieve- 
ment Award in Mathematics, Comput- 
er Science Faculty Search Committee, 
Alpha Phi Omega, PSSO, Alpha 
Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, Sum- 
mer Scholar, International Students. 




Jon Moody 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 
T. Bradley Fulkerson Award, British 
Studies at Oxford, Resident Advisor, 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity, B-SC 
Varsity Baseball Team. 



Vicki Moore 

Quest II Coordinator, Circle K, Inter- 
national Students Coordinator, Resi- 
dent Advisor, Young Democrats, Ca- 
reer Counseling Advisory Group, 
PSSO, Pre-Law Society. 



Donna Morrissette 

Youth Ministries Ambassador, PSSO 
— President, Resident Advisor, 
Triangle Club, Cheerleader, SGA 
Class Representative, Alpha Kappa 
Alpha Sorority — President. 




Jeffrey McLaughlin 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Phi Eta Sigma, Alpha Lambda Delta, 
Phi Alpha Theta, Fred B. Joyner 
Award, British Studies at Oxford 
Scholarship, Circle K, Pep Band, Jazz 
Band, Concert Band, SGA Student 
Representative, Resident Advisor. 



Dell McWhorter 

Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Phi Eta Sigma, 
Sigma Tau Delta, SGA Representa- 
tive, Hilltop News Assistant Editor, 
Editor, Reporter, Photographer, Brit- 
ish Studies at Oxford Scholarship. 



Nancy Osborne 

Psi Chi, John Marshall Gersting Award 
in Business and Economics, Advisory 
Committee on Career Counseling and 
Placement, Special Ad Hoc Commit- 
tee on Women's Studies, Peer Advi- 
sor, Evening School Representative at 
B-SC Board of Trustees. 




James Owens 

Triangle Club, SGA Dormitory Repre- 
sentative, Resident Advisor, Assistant 
House Director, Alpha Phi Omega, 
Circle K — President, College Repub- 
licans — President, Student Judiciary, 
Hilltop News Reporter and Col- 
umnist, Interim Committee, Educa- 
tional Policies Committee. 



Brian Parker 

SGA — President, Vice-President, 
Class Representatives, College Joint 
Committee, Food Ser\'ice Committee, 
Student Judiciary, Honor Code Com- 
mittee, Social Regulations Board, B- 
SC National Alumni Association Board 
of Directors, Adult Services Commit- 
tee, Publications Board, ATO Frater- 
nity. 



Frances Phillpott 

Triangle Club, Panhellenic Delegate, 
Resident Advisor, Assistant House 
Director, Concert Choir, Alpha Omic- 
ron Pi Sorority — Recording Secre- 
tary, Panhellenic Delegate, KA Little 
Sister an Sweetheart, Student Direc- 
tor of B-SC Summer Scholar Program. 




Mark Sapp 

Alpha Epsilon Delta, 1981 Southern 
Accent Editor, Publications Board, 
American Chemical Society, Triangle 
Club, PSSO, Baptist Campus Minis- 
tries, Task Force on Career Develop- 
ment and Placement. 



Vicky Valin 

Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Eta Sigma, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, Dance Scholar- 
ship, Alpha Omicron Pi Sorority — 
treasurer, ATO Little Sister and 
Sweetheart. 



Glenda Wren 

Theta Sigma Lambda, EBSCO Schol- 
arship, Summer Scholar, Resident Ad- 
visor, 1981 Southern Accent Business 
Manager, Triangle Club, PSSO, Kap- 
pa Delta Sorority — Membership 
Chairman, Public Relations Chair- 
man, "Best Member" Award. 




232 




Closing 




233 




234 




235 




236 




The 1982 Southern Accent was 
begun sometime in the spring of '81 
and was completed in the summer 
of '82. It developed slowly for over a 
year, and I hope it has finally 
ripened into something that we can 
all be proud of. 

This book is an unusual one in 
comparison with those of recent 
years. The '82 Southern Accent has 
no set theme — despite rules of 
yearbook ettiquette — but it does 
have a definite goal, an aim. It 
aspires to give more complete, com- 
prehensive, inclusive coverage of 
the year than its predecessors have 
done. There are no pictures of sun- 
sets, trees, flowers, and such be- 
cause these do little to enhance the 
content of the book or to capture the 
essence of the year. It is not filled 
with candid party shots or with un- 
pleasant close-ups of cafeteria food, 
because even though these are im- 
portant parts of college life, they are 
only a fractional part. What the 
book is filled with is people, events, 
activities, and issues — the essen- 
tial components of the year. 

The Student Life section is larger 
than those in the past, and I hope its 



purpose will be recognized and 
appreciated. Ten or fifteen years 
from now, when you pull the '82 
Southern Accent off^the shelf, brush 
away the dust, and turn its worn 
pages, hopefully your memory will 
be jogged by seeing pictures of 
Marsh's and the Tide, by re- 
membering that convenient park- 
ing places were indeed few and far 
between, and that this was certainly 
the year when joggers and exercise- 
addicts abounded. 

As it is every editor's privilege to 
extend thanks to all those who 
helped put the book together, 1 
must extend my deep appreciation 
to a dedicated staff, a supportive 
Publications Board, and a terrific 
faculty advisor. 

Thus, in the closing pages of the 
'82 Southern Accent, we find the 
final product of countless hours of 
work, but will possibly never find 
the end to endless hours of perusal 
or to the timeless memories that 
yearbooks create. 

— Gail Livingston 

Editor, 

1982 Southern Accent 



237 




238 




239 



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246 



The 1982 Southern Accent 



Faculty Advisor — Dr. Susan Hagen 

Editor — Gail Livingston 

Assistant Editor — Peggy Smith 

Business Manager — Bert Moore 

Opening — Gail Livingston 

Student Life — Gail Livingston 

Faculty — Jill Hoube 

Features — Peggy Smith 

Sports — Frank Pair 

Organizations — Melissa Biegler 
Judy Tanquary 

Greeks — Kathleen Holifield 
Jane Rushenberg 

Copy — The Newsvi'riting Class and Dr. Susan Hagen 
Robin Rankin 

Closing — Peggy Smith 

Ad Staff — Terry Chapman 
Agatha Pihakis 
Louise Coker 

Cover Design by Bob Shelton 

Artwork — pp. 24-25 by Bob Shelton 

p. 47 by Tommy Wilkes 
p. 52 by Tay Berryhill 

Photography: 

Phil Free: pp. 1, 3, 4, 5 (b), 6 (b,c), 8 (a), 9 (a,b), 11 (b,c), 12, 13, 14 (a), 15 (a), 16, 17, 19, 22, 
23, 28, (b), 29, 35, 40, 41 (a), 44, 45, 54, 55, 56 (c), 57 (b), 60 (b), 60 (b), 61 (b), 62, 63, 64, 
65 (a), 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 74, 75 (c), 76 (a,b), 88 (b), 85 (f), 87 (a), 88 (a), 89 (b), 90 (e), 
92 (a), 95 (a), 97, 98 (a,b,d), 104 (a), 106, 107, 108, 109, 207 (b), 209, 211, 212, 213, 214, 
215, 216, 217, 219, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227 (a,b,c,e,f), 228, 229 (a,b,c,f), 233 (a), 
245 (a), 168, 169 (a,b), 174, 175, 176 (a,b,c), 181 (b,d), 183 (a). 

Tim Clifton: pp. 2, 5 (a), 6 (a), 7, 8 (b), 10, 11, 18, 26 (b), 36, 37, 38, 39, 41 (b), 42, 43, 48, 49, 
50, 51, 52, 53, 56, (a,b), 57 (a,c), 58, 59, 60 (a,b), 61 (a), 65 (b,c), 72, 73, 75 (a,b,d), 76 (c), 
78 (e), 80 (b), 81 (e), 94, 95 (b), 96, 98 (c), 99, 105 (b), 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 124 
(a), 207 (a), 210, 218, 220, 228 (d), 220 (e), 181 (b), 188 (a), 244 (b). 

John Todd: pp. 26 (a,c), 27. 

Tory North: pp. 170 (a), 172, 178, 181 (a), 189 (b). 

Frank Pair: pp. 14 (b,c), 15 (a). 

Sonya Henderson: p. 15 (a). 

The Southern Accent is published by Hunter Publishing Company in Winston-Salem, North 

Carolina. 



247 



^H 



•Winston-Salem 

HUNTER PUBLISHING COMPANY 

• North Carolina 
Mark Kullberg. Cincinnati. Ohio 



LIBRARY 
OF 

BIRMINGHAM -SOU-mERN 
COLLEGE