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Full text of "Southern accent, Sept.1977-Apr. 1978"

SEP 2 77 

McEEE I.I3BARY 
Soufcen. Mi.;lon=.v College 
Collegodale, Tc:..na.3ee 37315 



The Southern Accent 



Voice of file Southern Missionary College Student 



Thnrsday, September 1, 1977 



Collegedale, Tenn. 37315 




Faculty Senate Clarifies New Dress Code 



The Faculty Senate, in an 
afternoon session August 28, 
came to a decision on a dress 
code for Southern Missionary 
College students and faculty. 
The matter of neatness and 
propriety was taken into con- 
sideration, and each item was 
considered and voted on its 
own merits. 

According to Dr. Melvin 
Campbell, dean of students, 
the question concerning pant 
attire for women has been a 
recurring one over the past 
several years. "However, it 
was during the past year that 
we decided to take definite 
action. We wanted to make 
our final decision in a climate 
where there was no pressure 
and the decision could be 
made objectively. Therefore, 
we decided to make a final 
decision this summer before 
school started," said Dr. 
Campbell. Because earlier re- 
commendations needed to be 
more specific, the August 
meeting was held. 

In the past, whenever a 



code will have an appreciable 
effect on those coming to 
school here, (in other words, 
will SMC's recent decisions to 
allow beards for men and pant 
suits for women be the catalyst 
for the fall of the Roman Em- 
pire all over again?). Dr. 
Campbell replied. "Of course, 
there will be some adverse 
opinion to the decision. But on 
the whole, I think it will have 
Httle real effect. The accepted 
dress of today is either beard- 



or no beard, and either pant 
suit or dress. People come 
here generally because they 
have heard from a friend or 
member of the family about 
how good the school is as a 
school," concluded Campbell. 

Following are the guidelines 
concerning the new dress code 
after some revision: 

Sabbath Attire: For regular 
Sabbath meetings men must 
wear dress slacks with appro- 
priate shirt and coat or dress 



ode ha 



disi 



sed, there has been some 
question as to whether or not 
the policy would be enforced 
equally among men and wo- 
men. Would the women be 
required to adhere to a specific 
standard while the men would 
not? Not so this year, ac- 
cording to the school adminis- 
tration. The Federal Govern- 
ment has set up guidelines for 
schools and other institutions 
in an effort to avoid sex dis-. 
crimination, and so, the new 
dress code will be enforced on 
an equal basis. 

When asked if the new dress 




Photo by Rhonda Rnnyan 



Thatcher Acquires New Dean 



I 



□ Vanessa Greenleat 

Betty Ann Howard, the 
new associate dean of women 
for Thatcher Hall, has come to 
SMC after seven years of 
deaning at Walla Walla Col- 
lege, 

Besides her duties as as- 
sociate dean, she will form a 
student missions club. And 
even though she is enrolled for 
post-master's studies at UTC, 
Howard hopes to become more 
involved with student activi- 
ties. 



Howard is also one of the 
few ordained women elders in 
the SDA denomination. Be- 
sides this, she is a registered 
nurse, an anethesist, and has 
taught anethesiology to post- 
graduate nurses in Alabama. 

Dean Howard has a B.S. in 
religious educatio* from Co- 
lumbia Union College where 
she was dean of women before 
going to Walla Walla College. 
Just last summer she started 
on a doctorate program in edu- 
cational psychology at An- 



v^ 



Behind Page One- 



SDA'B Oppose Gays ?• ^• 

Camp Chnckles P* * 

$8,700 Story P' '' 



slacks with shirt and tie. The 
women must wear dresses. 

General Campus Wear: 
This includes classrooms, la- 
boratories , library, student 
center, chapels, joint wor- 
ships, and the cafeteria. 

For men: Slacks must be 
worn with appropriate shirts or 
sweaters. This dress should 
convey a modest and profes- 
sional appearance. Blue jeans 
and overalls are not accept- 
able. Sleeveless shirts or com- 



non T-shirts, tank tops, 
hirts, or sloppy attire 
.ppropriate for genera 
lus wear. Shoesmustb 
it all times. For certai 



of dr. 






type 

mitted. Any 

be cleared through the Stude 

Affairs Committee. 

For women: Both dresses 
and slacks are permissible. 
This dress should convey a 
tnm to page 2, col. 1 



Texan JereWebb 
Pastors Collegedale 



D Jerry Dick Lien 

Elder Jere Webb, formerly 
pastor in the Dallas, Texas 
area, accepted the call to the 
Collegedale Seventh-Day Ad- 
ventist Church this summer 
ind arrived in August to as- 
sume his responsibilities. 

"1 am really looking forward 
to the challenges of my new 
- istorate here," said Elder 
Webb. "1 believe that the sit- 
uation of a college church can 
provide me with the oppor- 



tunity t( 
dealism that an ordinary pas- 
torate wouldn't." 

A native of El Paso, Elder 
Webb comes from a minis- 
terial family. He attended 
Union College in Lincoln, Ne- 
braska, graduating in 1967 
with two majors, business and 
theology. In that same vear, 
he married Garlyn Walter. 
The couple now has two chil- 
tam to page 7, col. 2 






1,876 



students registered 
1 752 lastvear 



drews University. 

"1 don't want to sound too 
dramatic about this, but I feel 
like the Lord is leading in my 
life and this is the place I'm to 
be." Howard likes the idea of 
being associate dean instead 
of head dean, as she was at 
Walla Walla, giving her more 
time to get involved with the 
students, plus work on her 
doctorate. 

Howard has chosen to work 
with college students because 
"they are still teachable, but 
not much effort is needed to 
teach them." She wants to 
assist not only in the students' 
success as a Christian person, 
but in their success academi- 
cally. "I am gung-ho in Ad- 
ventist education," she stated. 

Dean Howard's office will 
be located in the new wing of 
Thatcher Hall. 




Betty Howard, Thatch 



by Rhonda RoB^an. 



117764 



2 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thursday, September 1, 1977 



New Faculty Meet The Press 





Dr. Steven Carl Zimmerman gradu- 
•Itd from Columbia Union Colleoe In 
'71 with a B.A. In Psychology and *enl 
on 10 receive a Ph.D. Irom SI. Louis 
Unlversily. His thesis Involved the 
p«r8onallty-soclal psychology emphasis 
In religious psychology 



ch Co 



olop- 



Ron Scott, public relations director, 
loins the SIvlC staff from Missouri 
where he was principal of K.C. Junior 
Academy. 

Replacing William Taylor, now direc- 
tor of development, Scott assumed his 
new position in August. 

Scott graduated with a B.S. in His- 
tory of Social Welfare from Union Col- 
lege and has done graduate work In 
Counseling at Texas Christian Univer-- 
slly. University of Utah, and the Uni- 
versity of fvl Issourl. 

Scott Instructed in the social science 
department at Union College and was 
also a rehabilitation counselor. Later 
he became counselor and principal of 





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I Code Con't. 



ier Ronald IVIIchael Sprlngett re 
I to SMC this year after four year: 
asearchlng for his doctorate oi 
jnlstic Studies and the Apocrypha 



at Stanborough 




and professional ap- mit jeans as a part of student 

\ Blue jears and clothing on Sunday and after 7 

are not acceptable. p.m. on weekdays. 

or blouses of sheer 



tha 



low 



ckli 



(fn 



ck) Verona To Present 
Piano Recital 



at all time 



Villa Aur 



adeiT 



fer 



type of dri 
tted. Any 



th-day 
a dif- Adventist secondary school, 
ay be He has also been an instructor 
ptions at Loma Linda University. An- 
nd the 
nary 



must be cleared through the d 

Student Affairs Committee. French Ad 

General Campus Wear Ex- His concert will consist of 

ceptions: The student center, music by Bach, Beethovan, 

library and cafeteria will per- Khachaturian, and Karamov.' 



nomic classes for one year at SMC 
the absence of Alice Calkins. Calkins 
currently In Knoxville, TN, working e 
her doctorate. 

Winn graduated In '77 from Lorn 
Linda with a B.S. In Dietetics. 

Winn Is engaged to be married 
May to Bryan Haynos, a compuli 
■dentist In San Diego, California. 



^^MMM^M 



WELCOME STUDENTS!! 



We have indoor plants for your rooms and 
girf items. Bring us your 



should not be worn. 81 

must be of the type that 

the shoulders. Hemlines of 

dresses must be of such length Emmanuele Vero 

to insure modesty while sitting present a piano recital 

or standing. Sweat shirts, ler Hall Sunday. Septei _ 

a«irel°rrno7,ot't'gteT, "Verona is presently tea- iNUrSCry &. CrSftS ^^ '"°^'°'^^' 

:tobe chtng in Florence. Italy, at g ••• neec/leWOrIc, 



eMi Collegedale 



poffery. 



#1 industrial Dr 
396-3102 



*••• and any other craft item 
you can man make. 



^ 



We will sell them for you' 
— - • ■ ^°^" ^"^^° ^^SH for Chrisfmas! 



Thonday, September 1, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



SPAs Stand Against Gays 



WASHINGTON, D.C. -- A 
strong affirmation of family life 
and a condemnation of homo- 
sexual behavior have been is- 
sued by leaders of the Seventh- 
day Adventist denomination. 

Robert H. Pierson, presi- 
dent of the General Conference 
of Seventh-day Adventists, 
said this week that homosexu- 
ality undermines the basic 
structure of the home. "Any 
perversion that weakens the 
very foundations upon which a 
Christian nation is built," said 
Pierson, "cannot be accepted 
by the church." 

In an earlier statement is- 
sued by the church's Wash- 
ington Conference, a group of 
four Adventist leaders said the 
church "views a homosexual 
relationship as a union which is 
contrary to nature and to God's 
expressed will and is generally 
transitory in nature." 

The church has a respon- 



sibility, they said, to oppose 
any efforts to promote pride in 
a type of behavior that is in 
complete opposition to biblical 
standards of morality. 

This statement, made at the 
church's annual camp meeting 
in Auburn, Washington, came 
in part as a response to the 
declaration by the mayor of 
Seattle of a "gay pride week." 

The statement is the first 
formal declaration of opposi- 
tion to the aims of the gay 
rights movement by leaders of 
the Adventist denomination, 
although the church has always 
affirmed the sanctity of mono- 
gamous, heterosexual mar- 
riage from its organizational 
beginning in 1861. 

Authors of the position pa- 
per include Dr. Delmer W. 
Holbrook, president of the 



Home Study Institute and di- 
rector of the Home and Family 
Service of the General Con- 
ference, both in Washington, 
D.C; N. Reginald Dower, di- 
rector of the General Confer- 
ence Ministerial Association; 
Or. Donald Jacobsen, profes- 
sor of Evangelism and Pastoral 
Nurture at the Seventh-day 
Adventist Theological Semi- 
nary at Andrews University in 
Berrien Springs, Michigan; 
and James Chase, president of 
the»W«shington Conference of 
Seventh-day Adventists. 

Dower drew a careful dis- 
tinction between opposing ho- 
mosexuality as a moral issue 
and discussing the subject as a 
political issue. "As a religious 
organization with a firm com- 
mitment to the continuing sep- 
aration of religious and politi- 
cal issues," he wrote, "the 
Seventh-day Adventist C^hurch 
does speak to homosexuality 



only as a moral issue." Dr. Jacobsen said "Holy 

Dr. Holbrook, however, ob- Scripture promises power from 
jected to the use by gays of God to transform and com- 
iminority terminology from the pletely change personality." 
civil rights and women's move- 
ments. "It is not a sin to be 
black, and it is not a sin 



I to be I 
sr the 



female," he said after 
statement was issued. "But it 
is a sin to engage in homo- 
sexual behavior." 

The leaders cited scriptural 
authority for the church's posi- 
tion, including passages from 
Genesis, Luke, the first chapter 
of Romans and I Corinthians. 

"Scripture does not con- 
demn the homosexual, but de- 
nounces the practice," th< 
statement asserted. "In keep 
ing with this principle, church 
members are urged to pray 
that those who call upon God 
for relief from their aberrant 
drives will find deliverance, 
peace, and forgiveness." 



English Department 
Announces Three 
CLEP Changes 



Referring to CLEP exam 
edit for freshman English 
courses, Bruce Gerhart, Eng- 
lish instructor, said, "There 
.1 be some important 
changes this fall. Three to be 
exact." 

First, credit for English 

2, the second half of the 

English Composition course, 

an be earned by passing the 

reshraan English Exam with 

score of 55 or better, and 

redit for English 101 is 

arned by passing an essay 

xam. But, (the second 

change) this essay exam can 

only be taken by those who 

have passed the Freshman 

English exam. 

"In previous years we've 



screened no applicants; 90% 
wrote miserably," said Ger- 
hart. "Ever get a driver's 
license? First the written test, 
then the road test. Writing, 
like driving, is a skill. Each 
student must show mastery of 
more than workbook drills. He 
must write -- and write well." 

Third, the essay exam will 
no longer be the familiar, 
three-part disaster provided 
by CLEP, but instead a single 
narrative piece, courtesy of the 
English department. There 
the essay will be evaluated b; 
the Diedrich Scale. Students 
may obtain a copy of this scale 
before examination from Ger- 
hart by calling Ext. 4308. 




nt off tlie retail price; 
Ipncillclo-tUr-boXQ- ^^ol^ersrl'i 



15 per ce 



fo a\\ 

Communication Majors 

(and tumors, too\) 



.j^iBroadcasting 

•j^ Journalism 

•S? Speech 
which will prepareyou 
for a degree 
and a place in 
The Master's Service 

see £^«- ^««^ ^< J 



#1% 



Now you Con 
boy fhese ifems 
on your /.D. card 

of 

dampus 

health and beauty aids 

umbrellas 

gym and tennis itemi 

paperbacks 

school supplies 

textbooks 





, u n n n r .... .. u u u * » « ^ - ^ 



The Southern Mercantile 
College Plaza 




Greefings From The Behavioral Science Faculty! 



techniques for I helping relationships? 

Yott are in luckl Studies in the Behavioral Sciences should help you in these interests and 

goals. 

Have a good yearl -Gerald Colvin. Garland Dulan. Ed Lamb, Rene Noorbergen, Steven 

Zimmerman, and Rudy Aussner. 



4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thonday, September 1, 1977 



Pac 



Next Issue: Letters To The Editor 

Campus Ctessiitecfs 



Editorial 



A quick glance at the staffboj will tell you who's who in our 
little Accent newsroom this year. But it doesn't tell you how 
much this nose-for-news operation costs. 

To be blunt - $8,700. Considering that $5,000 of this is eaten 
up by paper and printing costs, it's a fairly reasonable budget. 
And our staff is not on a voluntary basis. We receive a meager, 
but satisfying wage. 

Our reporters must have courage. One must be bold - t)0ld 
enough to ask the higher-ups a pertinent and confident question. 
And then while listening in awe to the answer, one must have 
the wits about them to jot down vital facts. From there to a 
finished piece, hashed out in the privacy of a dorm room, 
requires considerable ability. 

The possibility of error in this process is more than marginal, 
as you may have gleaned. But we are fighting a hard battle to 
overcome the majority of slips and bloopers. 

Please don't let us put anything past you, though. Don't sit 
in silence and seethe. Write us a letter - to the editor. Or if you 
have a comment about campus life, or events, or whatever, write 
us a letter. We have gone so far as to put red mailboxes in the 
dorms and the Student Center for your brainstorming con- 
venience. More than our $8,700 budget, we'd like to hear your 
two cents worth. 

So don't be afraid to pierce "The Inner Sanctum" of the 
Accent. (Besides, we enjoy opening maill) 



The SoMthern Accent 



Stai^bov: 



All material published in The Southern Accent is no 
necessarily the opinion or view of the newspaper staff or thi 
SMC administration. Cartoons, articles, and other content item 
create an open exchange of ideas, a forum. In the case of 
disagreement, "Letters to the Editor," is a column designed to 
provide expression. Our policy will allow the expression of 
differing ideas. We do, however, reserve the right not to publish 
material that is libelous, extremely radical, or out of character in 
light of doctrinal points. We wish to retain the bearing of a 
Christian SDA college newspaper. 



Editor Vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Manager Dave Middag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greenleaf 

Circulation Manager: John Henson 

Secretary Pam Legere 

Ad Manager. Ray Hartwell 

Artists Mark Ford 

Sandie Lehn 

Photographers Rhonda Runyan 

Mike Partio 
Mark Ford 

Sponsor Frances Andrews 

Reporters Students from News 

Reporting class 
Jerry Lien 
Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 



The Southern Accent is published weekly with the excepti( 
of test weeks and vacations. 

Subscriptions for parents and alumni are $5 per year, mail< 
weekly from Collegedale, TN at a non-profit rate. 



We print personals, used book announcements, and other 
miscellany free. Drop your announcement in a red Southern 
Accent mailbox. 

Have you ever heard of a town called Deming, New Mexico? 
The small congregation of Seventh-Day Adventists that live 
there are building a church. They need financial help badly. A 
dollar or two or more will really give them a boost. Please feel 
impressed to share some of your money with them. 

Send your help to: 

Seventh-Day Adventist Church 

P. 0. Box 405 

Deming, New Mexico 88030 

Come and visit usi! 











fRSt. 




A W II CA TION FOR ADMISSION 

SOUTHERN MISSIONARY COLLEGE 

Collegedale, Tennessee 37315* 
615/396-4312 

fkL',!"'"^ '"'<'" '"^ ''"'"" "" •"I""""'"' 'equeMd, E„cl, appliMhr, mu,l be 

ICESSING FEE OF $10 MUST ACCOMPANY THE APPLICATION if nrcnled al 
■(ning 01 the semesler you desire lo enler; AFTER THAT THE FEE WILL BE $15 



f^o-t- hi 



ICU- 



»NAL INFORMATION: , 

.p,..o,a,„TPLniQ^r^^i6^j,V _ -;x J2J .„;,.,^:b:7-;:,;;as. 

. H>,. ,00 cv„ „l,ndri SMC W„„! Q VcT J^No II ,,..„.„ ,„, «•.«/»-. 



Freshman Survival Hints; 
Getting Along At SMC 






□ Vanessa Greenleaf 

On becoming freshmen, young people 
are expected to establish theit own inde- 
oendence, yet are not able to complete y 
sever their financial and emotional ties to 

""Tor some, it is a time for the first 
nexine of adult muscles, but in a strange 
new atmosphere with failure threatening to 
breathe down their backs. Home work, 
exams, money problems, independence, 
homesickness, food costs, work, meetmg 
1800 other students who all seem to know 
what they are doing -- the college freshman 
encounters all of these overwhelming 
traumas at once. 

Most new freshmen, if they came from 
a boarding academy, are conditioned to 
jumping everytime a bell rings -- a bell for 
eetting up in the morning, for going to 
worship- a bell for mealtimes, classes, 
chapels, studying, and a bell for going to 
sleep. Here at SMC, there are npt any 

^ Freedom is the toughest test freshmen 
can face. Most freshmen have the intellec- 
tual ability to handle their academic pro- 
gram. But when it comes to making 
choices between sleeping in or going to 
class, many students (and not just fresh- 
men) fail miserably. 



Only in a life of freedom can the lessons 
of freedom be learned. And a life of 
freedom turns out to be a life of choices. 

Here are some suggestions; 

1. First, look at and memorize your 
schedule. Then make a few rules for 
yourself - not suffocating commandments 
where you cannot allow yourself to deviate 
if the need arises; but manage your time 
well. . 

2. Get used to studying. You 11 find 
that in college, there is alot more competi- 
tion for those top grades. 

3. If you find that you are having a 
problem in a certain class, make an ap- 
pointment with the instructor to ask for 
some advice. 

4. Be willing to take part in organiza- 
tions. Yesl even if it means getting up in 
front of people. This will give other people 
a chance to get to know you. 

5 The best way to feel right at home 
during the first few days is to get to meet 
and talk to as many students and faculty as 
possible. It won't be hard; we are all m the 
same boat. , , • a 

You'll see that sensing one s own inae- 
pendence is the greatest single reward that 
comes from leaving home a-"!. S^'-S *° 
college. Accepting the responsibility that 

accompanies the new freedom is the ma 

turing factor. 



Thursday, September 1, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■ 5 



Support. Your 
Student Associatioi 



Be A Senator 



X SEE ^*WVT S^OfW^ '^^. 





^Little 
Debbie 

SNAK CAKES 



^iSl* r^ct^ee eawnG companv 



J 



WELCOME 



The Alabama-Mississippi Conference extends to each, 
student a sincere welcome to SML. 

« i. our prayer that this f^^i;^^:^S-tt^^ 
years. 



6 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thoraday, September 1, 1977 

Camp: Counselors Vs. Kids 



J 



D reprinted from The Palm 
Beach Post, July 18. 1977 by 
Ron Wiggins 

When I was a kid, I always 
wished I could have planned 
summer camp activities. 
When 1 was a counselor I 
wished the same thing. 

And with that, I give you a 
typical day at Camp Runa- 
muckapuk as seen by the 
child: 

10 a.m. Reveille. 

10;1S a.m. Free swim. 

Noon - 1 p.m. Bus to Mc- 
Donald's for breakfast. 

1;15 p.m. Free swim. 

3 p.m. Shoot steel-tipped 
arrows up into air. 

4 p.m. Free swim. 



5:30 p.m. B.B. gun war. 

7 p.m. Bus to Pizza Haven 
for supper. 

8 p.m. Free swim. 

10 p.m. Bonfire, capture the 
flag, steal the bacon. 

Midnight: Ghost stories fol- 
lowed by free swim. 

1:30 a.m. Snack, catered 1- 
talian steak subs. 

2 a.m. Taps, lights out. 

Camp staff members don't 
object so much to the camp 
regimen of sports instruction, 
nature hikes and lanyard 
braiding, it's just that there 
are too many children to keep 
up with. Instructors need 
more time to themselves. 

To that end 1 can envision a 



THE WORD CAGE 



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HORIZONTAL 

1 Paul had a vision and obeyed it 
to go to this place (Acts 16:91 

9 A woman of Thyalira, a seller of 

purple 
10 A disciple whose confession 
Christ praised (Matt. 16:161 

12 Brownish red variety of chalce- 

dony 

13 Article 
15 Melody 

17 The philosopher's stone (Web- 
ster! 

19 Same as Elijah 

20 Short, brisk leap 

21 Recline 

22 Fifth month of the Jewish year; 

time of ripe figs 
24 The doubting disciple 

26 Note 

27 Animal, prescribed sacrifice for 

trespass-offering 

28 Job's second daughter Uob 42: 



) account 



29 Container 

30 Pronoun 
32 Thing of nr 

34 Psalm 

35 A king who was saved by prayer, 
in an invasion of the Egyp- 
tians (II Chron. 14:11) 

37 Sea 

39 Mohammedan name for the Su- 
preme Being 

41 One of King David's mighty 
men, who slew 800 at' one 
time III Sam. 23:81 

43 An Egyptian city. Same as Mem- 
phis 

44 Pronoun 

46 Metal 

47 Son of Bichti: a man of Belial 
III Sam. 20:11 

49 Orle 

51 KingofMacedonia I33S-323B.CJ, 



141 



VERTICAL 

1 An ingredient of the holy oil (Ps. 

45:8) 

2 Adjudge 

3 One hundred, one 

4 Oevnir 

5 Open 

6 Direction 

7 Latin name for Italy 

8 Eagle's nest 

9 Boy 

11 Long, narrow inlet 

12 The one of ten lepers, who, 

cured, thanked Jesus 
14 Queen of King Hezekiah (II Kings 

21:11 

16 It took place on Olivet, forty 
days after the Resurrection 

18 Very soft 

19 Ellas 
23 Flying mammal mentioned often 

in the Old Testament 



24 Number of virgins in the parable 

25 The widow of Zarephath had 
some in a cruse (I Kings 17: 

26 Cut stitches 
31 "He was as light of foot as a 

wild toe" (II Sam. 2:181 
33 Roman urban official 

35 The beginning 

36 Exclamation 

37 God of the sun 

38 More dreadful 
40 Spanish article 
42 Adverbial particle 

44 Short, curved sword 

45 Age 
48 Exist 
50 Rod 



schedule designed to keep the 
youngsters busy but not on 
such a tight leash, if you know 
what I mean. Yes sir, I can see 
that staffer's program now for 
Camp Attrition: 

6 a.m. Reveille. 

6:30 a.m. Two-hour endur- 
ance swim across Bottomless 
Lake. 

9 a.m. Rattlesnake milking 
(unsupervised). 
10 a.m. Mushroom gathering. 

Noon: Mushroom lunch. 

1 p.m. Sick call. 

2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Nap. 

5:15 p.m. 10-mile nature 
hike up Mount Avalanche (un- 
supervised). 

8 p.m. Mushroom supper. 
8:30 p.m. Sick call. 

9 p.m. Survival hike through 
Deadman's Swamp (unsuper- 
vised). 

10:30 p.m. Compulsory 
mushroom-eating contest. 

10:40 p.m. Sick call. 

10:45 p.m. Moonlight swim 
acres Bottomless Lake (un- 
supervised). 

11:30 p.m. Taps. 





Meet Vou In The Middle 



Worthington and Loma Linda have the surprisingly good art 
of copy-catting. They have fake chicken, bacon, hot dogs, 
hamburgers, fish, and at least a dozen more creative ideas. 

SMC's Campus Kitchen has now added its own addition to 
the cause of vegetarian creativity. It's the Foot-Long Hot Dog. 
The bun is 1 1 Vi inches long, but, alas, the Vegelink in the middle 
is 7'/] inches. Notwithstanding this minor disappointment, they 
are of excellent quality and taste greati 

I think our Campus Kitchen's Master Burger Sandwich, 
which we all know so well, now has a competent competitor. 

The cost of these delightful elongated beauties is only 70 
cents and 90 cents with cheese (2 pieces of cheese -- 20 cents). 
And they come optional with or without mayonnaise, ketchup, 
and pickles. Plus there are several kinds of cheese to choose 
from. 

While I'm at it, I would also like to recommend a peanut 
butter shake, hot onion rings, and a date to go with your Foot 
Long, making it an adventure indeed. Yes, share your dog with a 
date, and meet them in the middle. 



, ;»»»»»»» 



greetings 



■» M » » » ,»■» ,»»»»»»»» ^ ^ 



from the smc 
public rel<itions office 
and 



welcome 



fo our uniquely 

beautiful camp 



us 



If we c«n be of «»lst«nce, 
please feel free to contact us. 



'!>-9-*- 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



^1^,/in^, ^9P'^./9^a 


i/ftt</fn.^, ^rotn 


"9>X^*i.i ^ 


9La^.'" 


Introduction to Physics 


First Semester 




su. 


General Physics 




"IP 


o^"!. 


Issues in Physical Science and Religion (2 semesters) 


K) 


(Op 


Introduction to Computing 




"^l^ 


iU=^^ 


Fortran and Algorithmic Languages 






Symbolic Assembler Languages 








Advanced courses in Physics and 
and for Research 


in Computer Science; 


Opportunities for Independent Study 


Henry Kuhlman 


Ray Hefferlin 


Robert McCurdy 





Thorsday, September 1, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 




/I eail % Vke y<udk 



Arranged as poetry Iron the book M esseges To Young People 



Sod wants the youth 

to become men of earnest mind, 

to be prepared tor action In His noble work, 

to be fitted to bear responsibilities. 

God calls lor young men 
with hearts uncorrupted, 
strong and brave. 

determined to light manlully In the struggle belore the 
that they may giorlly Uod 
and bless humanity. 



If the youth 

would but make the Bible the! 

would but calm their ImpetuoL 

listen to the voice ol IheirCrea 
They would not only be at peace v 

but would llnd themselves en 


study, 

s desires, 
lorand Redeert 
vlth God 

obled and eiev 


ated. 


Carry the light wherever you go; 
show that you have strength o 


f purpose. 




po-'ly swayed by the persu 
yield 




soclate 


Do not yelld a ready assent to the 

of those who dishonor God, 
But rather seek to reform. 


suggestions 




and rescue souls from evil. 






Do your little with fidelity 
for God will 

work with your efforts, 
and write yourname in the 
as one worthy to enter 


book of life 
ntotheloyoflh 


e Lord 



Christ Is calling lor volunteers 
to enlist under HIS standard, 
to bear the banner of the cross belore the * 
to resist the tide ol woridllness, 
and lift a linger ol warning against taking 
the llrst steps toward sin. 



slul and honored i 



lement of character 
at makes a man succi 
the Ifrepre'sslbie de 
the indomitable will 
the strenuous exert 
the untiring persev( 



In perfecting a Christian character 

It is essential to persevere In right doing. 

'''°inrn°ecess"y ^o^'wlave Into the character 

principles ol stern Integrity 
That the youth may reach ^ .„h womanhood 

the highest standard of manhood and womanhood. 

They should ever keep the tact "elore their eyes 

that they have been bough "'"".f P;^'°° ,„;, 3.1^,3 
and should glorify God In their bodies ana spirits 
which are His... 
rvlay they so Improve everyday given them by God 



■«>» » »■«> ,»-»■» , » .»»»i » »»ii» < i' J ''>' >'» 



" Dear SMC Students: 



-Jere Webb Con'l. 



dr'en, a daughter, Jerelyn and 
a son. Lyndon. 

Webb attended the semi- 
nary at Andres University and 
then moved to the Alice and 
Kingsville district of Texas. 

In 1971 he moved to the 
Brownsville, Texas district and 
a year later began a five year 
pastorate in Dallas. 

Elder Webb is known in 
Chattanooga for his evangelis- 
tic campaign at the Tivoli last 
year. However, he states that 
many people mistakenly as- 
sume his main concern to be 
evangelistic efforts. "I was an 
assistant for a religion 
tor in an evangelistic 
while attending Union 
ever, I am mainly a p 
do occasional crusad 
said. 



"The 



lades a year, but I want to 
e an evangelistic attitude 
ny daily relationship with 
church," he commented. 

he pastor feels that his 
ition in Collegedale will en- 
e him to have a wider range 
ipportunities than has been 
case in the past. He 
ieves that the church organ- 
in good form here, 
orga 



ridv 



ill 



to run its own affairs. The lay 
committee is particularly good 
in this respect. 1 think then 
that I should have more time to 



of 



ny pr. 



nstruc 



astor. 



he 



Regarding his role as a 
church pastor. Elder Webb be- 
lieves that the Christian ex- 
perience is one of constant 
decision -- whether or not to 
commit one's life to Christ. "I 
also feel that I as a pastor have 
the responsibility to combine 
study and visitation into the 
same role. I am trying to run 
what I like to call an evangelis- 
tic-pastorate. I hold one or two 



jects. 

"I feel a strong call to 
preach, and I require from 30 
to 40 hours a week to prepare 
what I feel to be an adequate 
sermon. Here 1 think 1 will 
have more opportunity for 
time of this sort," he said. 

Elder Webb intends to tie 
his new position closely to the 
college community. One of his 
goals is to make a significant 
evangelistic outreach within 
the college situation. Too of- 
ten, he feels, young people 
have been given the idea that 



come sometime in the future - 
a pie in the sky in the sweet by 
and by. This view Elder Webb 
believes lobe wrong. College 
age people should be instiga- 
tors of a present and continu- 
ing evangelistic outreach. 

"1 have certain goals that I 
have set up for myself during 
my pastorate here. Of major 
importance to me is the oppor- 
tunity to work with young 
people. I want to motivate 
theology majors to become in- 
volved in a pastoral-evangelis- 
tic approach to the ministry. 
With this ministerial ap- 
proach, I feel that many 
people, both the saved and 
unsaved within and without 
the church, can be contacted. 
I am really, looking forward to 
my pastorate here, and hope 
and pray that it may prove to 
be a beneficial one," he con- 
cluded. 




WELCOME TO SMC 

Whether you have just started thi 
climb at SMC or have nearly com 
pleted your degree requirements 
we hope that you 
beautiful Carolinas for y 
employment (denomin^ 
or otherwise) and Christ 
witness. 



CAROLINA 
CONFERENCE OF 
SEVENTH-DAY 
ADVENTISTS 



p; 0. Box 25848 
Charlotte, NC 28212 

PHONE: 704-535-6720 
E. S. Reile, President 



. < ■. « 9 » i» » » *> ■ 



southern Union 
Conference 



AnotHerscHoolyearHasbeenlauncHe-iatSoutHernM^^^^^^^ 

the ever-expanding student body made up ''fy^'^l'^j^jri^^lToard of Trustees of the College. 

other parts of North ^'"^•f'^l.^^^ZZ'olyearbe We best one you.e e.er experienced in 

we welcome you heartily! May tins scnuui y 

your lifetime in your quest for a Christian education. 

We need many young people in training for a P'""^^ '" .'*/^^^*. "w'eneed'you' Therefore, may 

throughout the Southern Union Conference^ IZfefandfor God ( 

the year be a good one in your planning for yoursell ana J .. f . 



H.H. Schmidt. Chairman 
Board of Trustees 



STUDENT 
FINANCE 
OFFICE 

welcomes 

you to 

SMC 

we also welcome 
your quesfions 
abouf: 

1. student statements 



2. How you can 
finance your 
education 

3. How to find a 
job 



■■^» ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ i » i» < » l y V V ' ■ ' '» '' ' ^ 




I 



8 ■ THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thorsday, September 1, 1977 




<Wkai3s ^01/6? 



Love. ..what is it? 

The vast majority w 
reference to feeling. M 
is a principle." 

In both cases the coi 
Spirit of Prophecy d 



uld 



nswer that questio 
rite this quotation. 



'Love 



ncept of love as expressed in the Bible and 
i not match the popular definitions of our 
current society- Then what is love? 

To define the concept of love, we must first examine the five 
steps of progression that lead to love. 

First, there must be a desire. A desire is a "conscious-impulse 
toward an object or experience that promises enjoyment or 
satisfaction in its attainment." This is natural and healthy. 
Nothing mysterious about it -- it is a principle of the natural action 
and reaction of the human mind. 

Desire leads to the second step - comr 
the dew of gi 
:e is as vital to 
ication results 



the nurturi 



ication. Communi- 
th as a relationship 
;lationship as water 
ts in no relationship. 
;. Communication is the 
es the basis of defining a 
than facts and tidbits of 
he aims, and the totality 



, the element of trust awakens; this 
St may be defined as "an assured 
ng: a confident dependence on the 
truth of someone or something." 



lack 



cation becom 
comes tobe- 
is to the bod; 

Thirdly, knowledge plays a majo 
key to knowledge, and knowledge bi 
relationship. Knowledge includes i 
data, though it encompasses the go 
of the person- 

As the relationship deepen: 
becomes the fourth step. Tru 
reliance on some person or thi 
character, ability, strength, or 

Trust is dependency. Dependency 
total autonomy; and when Donne said, 
was stating a universal truth. Man cannot exist by h 
still retain his manhood. Only in the interdependenci 
can man truly function. 

A grain of sand is a separate entity, yet at the same 
member of the cosmopolitian society that we call a beacl 
composed of millions of grains- So it is with man. 

The final element of this series is surrender - the g 
self Surrender doesn't come last, though; it c 
simultaneously with the first desire. To seek, to < 
another is to begin the process of surrender. To surrer 
the greatest obstacle to love, be 
another. 

Human love should be a reflection to the univer 
divine love is all about. But how sad it is that true human love i 
rarely attained today. From the divine perspective the order of 
relationship should be spiritual, mental and physical. Today, th 
reverse is usually ture. 

Covetousness is not love. Instead it is 
lust, and lust is sin. Sin results in death. 

Love, on the other hand, produces life. Love is the essence of 
true living. Begin it here, and it will continue to increase 
-^- ghoul the ages of eternity. To love is to be like God. God is 



of 

sland," he 



ng up of 



: love demands the totality of 



hat 



ndpa 



nd lo 



eter 



For further study read 2T 133-136; ICorinthians 13 NASB; and 
Renections On Love And Marriage by O.J. Ritz. For deeper study 
into this subject consult the Indexes To The Writings of Ellen G. 



Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale. TN 37315 



We Need A 
Sports Editor! 

--Must be Willing to mingle with 
The Stars on the SMC track 

-Mustbewilling and able to write! 

Paid Position 



Noi)-Profit Organization 
U.S. Postage \ 

pa;id 

Collegedale, TN . 
Permit No. 6 




Greetings 
To All 

Students! 

WSMC-FM 
wants 

-YOUR IDEAS 

-RESPONSES 

-SUGGESTIONS 

Drop in and ask 
about our 
volunteer trainee 
programs. 



THE APPETITE APPEASER 

PHONE 396-2229 FOR TAKE OUT ORDERS 



* WELCOME 

^ to all new and returning students. 

^ Come by the Campus Kitchen 

I where you will see old friends 

^ and make new ones. See you at 

* fhe 

I 'iramiUANSKMSHOP 



i 




Thatcher Derm Censtr uctien 
Continues Until November 



-'i-^. 



i^-,«..ii!'..ia^j^-,^" 



I'huiub; Mik. I'liilo 



DDebby Boyer 

Construction of the addition to Thatcher Hall 
continues in order to meet the projected completion 
date of November 25. 1977. 

According to Dean Millie Runyan, the new 
facilities will house approximately 230 women. 

Upon completion the ladies in Jones Hall (who 
now number 76) will move to the new rooms, and the 
men will be able to move to Jones. This will 
alleviate the crowed three-man-to-a-room situation 
in Talge Hall. 

The women living in the new section are only 
occupying the west end. The east end is still 
unfinished. 

Two weeks ago the hot water was connected to 
the new wings. Telephone installation began last 



Friday < 
every ri 



I will continue throughout this week until 
n is equipped. This means that all the 
veniences that the women bore are now 



built 



the 



A new covered bike shed will b 
ourtyard between the old dorm and the new dorm 
t is expected to store all resident hall bicycles ant 
'ill provide a lock for protection. 



don 



lobby 



lUst be 
pective 



ith 



The plans for th 
approved by the administration. The 
lobby will be a spacious second-story 
numerous seating arrangements. 

The approximate cost of construction for the new 
dorm is one million, according to Robert Merchant 
treasurer. 




The Southern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 

Thursd.y, September 8, 1977 Collegedtle, Tenn. 37315 




Pat And 
Calvin 
Taylor To 
Present 
Concert 



I 

r 

h 



Pat and Calvin Taylor, 
Christian musicians from Los 
Angeles, will present a live 
concert of sacred music Sep- 
tember 15 during chapel and 
then again at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Collegedale Church. 

Pat was raised near Balti- 
more, Md., and showed inter- 
est in music at an early age. 
After studying piano for sev- 
eral years, she began singing 
and accompanying herself on 
the guitar. Her interest in folk 
singing led her to perform 
professionally. 

In 1968 Pat won a scholar- 
ship to the Oberlin Conserva- 
tory of Music in Ohio where 
she was a vocal performance 
major. After one year of study 
there, she was the recipient of 
the Bezazian Musical Perform- 
ance Scholarship Award, 
based on audition and scholas- 
tic achievement. 

Calvin began music lessons 
at age seven and later received 
full scholarship to Oberlin and 
the University of Michigan. 
While at Oberlin, Calvin stud- 
ied music theory and improvi- 
sation. As an organ major, 
Calvin won recognition as an 
improvisor and was the first 
and only student in Oberlin's 
history to improvise a gradu- 
ate concert encore. 
Calvin has toured in the 
torn to page 8, col. 5 




Photos by Rhonda Runyan 



Olsen Perry Assumes Position 
As WSMC-FIWl Program Director 



DDawn Rice 

Olsen Perry, the new pro- 
gram director at WSMC-FM, 
began work at the radio station 
this summer. Perry's duties 
as program director include 
responsibility for the daily op- 
eration of the station, pro- 
gramming, hiring, coordinat- 



ing the staff, and the direction 
of the news. 

Perry graduated with a B.A. 
in 1974 from the City College 
of New York. He majored in 
English. He then continued 
his studies at Andrews Univer- 



sity, receiving a Master of Arts 
degree in religious communi- 
cation in 1976. While at An- 
drews, Perry worked at radio 
station WAUS-FM as an an- 
nouncer. 

Before coming to SMC 
Perry lived in Indianapolis, 



Ind., where he taught and 
counseled underprivileged 
children in the public school 
system. 

Perry and his wife, Beverly, 
have a IS-month-old son, 
Olsen Junior. 



LLU Selects SiWiC Pre-iWieds 

Loma Linda University has fP""*/" °Keith CHfton' 

completed selection for the J/-"" Bf"' ^;'"' 1^°"^ 

medical class beginning in Robert Colgrove ^dr.an 

,,„„,, iQ7fi Curnow, Ted Hittle, virenucii 

ThSU medical students ac- Moses, and Roger Woodruff. 



Behind Page One- 



Cafeteria Bangle 

Senate Elections 

Under the Big Top 

Grading Standards Decline.. 



.Letter, p. 2 
p. 3 



2 ■ THE SOUTHERM ACCENT Tharaday, September 81 1977 



Pace 



a 



"■,^^ 



Editorial 



Student Senate elections usually draw a big 
yawn. 

But suppose for a minute that you are a 
senator listening to the pounding of Ron White- 
head's gavel (donated by the woodworking 
class). 

Are you a rubber stamp, amiably agreeing 
with the majority vote? Or are you a real bill 
bringer-upper? 

Yes, what exactly does a senator do? Make 
motions? Second them? Maybe throw in a few 
objections and an abstention now and then? 

Actually, the Senate is the pulse of a healthy 
student body. It reflects the changing attitudes, 
desires, and needs of its constituency. Is this a 
bunch of fluff? It doesn't have to be. Your 
senator is the closest level of student government 
to you -- you vote them right off your hall. 

Discussing this with a former senator, Steve , 
Darmody, an analogy was born. 

"How about this?"Steve began. "The Sen- 
ate is like the engine of a car. Not the steering 
wheel (although we do need one), but an engine 
with good cylinders. It's a motor as good as its 
spark plugs." 

But now let's suppose you're not that senator. 
Did you know that the Senate meetings are open 
to the public, too? You can ponder the facts and 
deliberate the issue with your senator - in effect, 
you can be a live spark plug in the motor of your 
Student Association. 

When engine parts conk out, the senate turns 
into a golf game. Quipped Darmody. "We get 
out of one hole and head straight for another." 

By way of thought, if the Senate is the engine, 
and the senators cylinders, what then is the 
exhaust? 



The Southern Accent i 

All material published in The Sonlhem Accent is 

necessarily the opinion or view of the newspaper staff or 
SMC administration. Cartoons, articles, and other content it 
create an open exchange of ideas, a forum. In the casi 
disagreement, "letters to the Editor." is a column designe 



provide expression. Our policy will _.._ p.^,..„., „. 

differing ideas. We do. however, reserve the right not to publish 

ly radical, or out of character in 

retain the bearing of a 



s libelous 
< of doctrinal point! 
stian SDA college n 



spapc! 



Edit 



1 Wa 



•[,■;;;;••"'""<" lynn Neumann 

Layout Edilo""'^^ °^^' Middag 

Sports Editor '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' ■.'.Re"be"ca7tnio^ 

circulation Manager j„hn Henson 

""'" Pam Legere 

,, „ Denise Sheets 

*'' Manager r^, Hartwell 

Proofreaders Kathy Mixell 

, , . . Jeanne Zachariai 

Subscriptions Candy Miranda 

A"'"^ Mark Ford 

o^ . , Sandie Lehn 

Photographers k^„„^^ R„„y^_, 

Mike Partio 
. . Mark Ford 

""P"""^ Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

n""""^"' Frances Andrew; 

^"•"^ F'=l<s Bros. Printing Co 

Ooltewah, Tenn 
The Soothem Accent is published weekly with th, -.,. •■ 
of test weeks and vacations ^e^iy witn the exception 

Subscriptions for parents and alumni .» cc 
weekly from Colleged'ale. TN a.^a^'nT^ofit^tr""' 



Letters To The Editor 



Dear Editor: 

Early last Sabbath morning, I was in the usual 
rush to get everything together, and, of course, I 
was running a little late. As I dashed out of my 
room, I glanced at my watch to note the time: 
8:07 a.m. 

"GreatI" I thought. "Just enough time to 
make it to the cafe and then to the service." Out 
the door and down the steps. 

While I signed out at the main desk, my 
roommate waited near the door and noticed a 
small sign posted below the baseball schedule. It 
was a simple job, with little fanfare, but it's 
message was all too real: "The cafeteria will be 
open from 7-8 a.m. Sabbath morning." 1 guess it 
took a little while to sink in or something, but all 
of a sudden it dawned on us. ..no breakfasti 

We dashed out the door and ran to the steps, 
meeting a couple of friends as we passed. 

"Cafe closed yet?" We shouted behind us. 

"No," came the reply. "It won't close till 
8:30." 

"Thanksl" we panted back. Safe! The sign 
probably meant NEXT Sabbath, at least, that's 
what we thought. 

Into the door and up the stairs. As we 
reached the landing we scanned the menu, 
noticing, as usual, that the Sabbath breakfast 
was going to be light. As we pulled out the ID's 
and prepared to get our trays, we were met by a 
cold, closed door. 

"It's closed..." I stood for a moment in 
disbelief, and then slowly turned, thinking of the 
long service and the growling stomach which 
would deftly serve to embarrass me thoroughly 



and completely ruin my stolid reputation. 

We reached the downstairs again, but this 
time moving much slower than when we entered. 
Outside the door. I glanced at the hastily placed 
cafeteria schedule that was taped over the usual 
one, 

"Cafeteria hours: Sabbath breakfast 7:30- 
8:30." What in the world! Here was a perfectly 
legitimate schedule that said that the cafeteria 
was to be open, but because of the smaller and 
messier copy in the dorm, it wasn't to be so. 
Back in the room, I munched on a Triscuit and 
wondered if the stomach would make it through 
the day. 

It wouldn't have been all that bad, you know, 
if there had been some kind of notice about this 
change. I know of many people that were out of a 
breakfast that morning, just because they didn't 
know that there had been a change. Oh well, it's 
still early in the year, and I'm sure that we will 
meet the smiling (I suppose that's the word, 
smirking wouldn't be appropriate) hostesses as 
we bound breathlessly up the stairs one minute 
late. When we're late because time slipped by, 
well that's one thing. But when we're late 
because we had no idea what the hours had been 
changed to during the week. well, that's some- 
thing altogether different. Maybe an earlier time 
for breakfast is okay, but I think we should know 
about it beforehand, instead of learning through 
experience. 

M. Ford 



Campus Cfogsi^teclg 

We print personals, used book announcements, and other 
miscellany free. Drop your announcement in a red Southern 
Accent mailbox. 



The Collegedale access road over Hickman 
Hill is now closed due to the construction on the 
new road. Barriers and warning signs are up. 
and will be strictly enforced. Being 5 minutes 
late, and perhaps a little talk with the dean is a 
small thing, compared with a little talk and 
'writtenreminder" from one of our officers! 
Please, we don't want your hard-earned money 
just your cooperation! 

COLLEGEDALE POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Mark, remember the eyes. 



% The Swiss Miss is waiting for 
Tom. 



All former students, faculty 
members, community mem- 
bers, former missionaries and 
student missionaries, and all 
who are interested in working 
in the Far Eastern Division are 
invited to the vesper service 
sponsored by the SMC Far 
East Club. We will meet in the 
student park at 7:30 p.m. Sept- 
ember 10 (Sabbath evening). 
A general election and light 
refreshment will follow. 



Dear Fellow Students of SMC: 

Would you like to skip registration and book 
store lines next year? Are you interested in a 
totally different kind of school year? Do inter- 
national cultures interest you? Do you like 
meeting people and going places? And most 
important, do you love the Lord, and are vou 
anxious to spread His gospel to others? 

If you answered yes to the above questions 
you will be happy to know that thereTs such a 
place where this kind of education is available 
The place is the world. "vauaoie. 



never go as a student missionary..." True, not I 
everyone will go. In fact, only a special few vbo I 
choose to will go. The only requirements are th»l I 
you love the Lord and your fellow men. and are | 
serious about your future. 

If you are interested in learning more aboul I 
Student Missions, or if you are a returning SM. I 
put - SM club, your name, address, phoo'l 
number, and area of interest if you have one on ' I 
piece of paper and give it to Drl Roe at tli'l 
Education Office, or drop it in my mailbox (Talg'| 



By now you have guessed that I am .,ivi„ .• ^]^°' "^"""^ *" """■ Student Missions orga- . 
about student missionf and you say. "lut S Tmn'Sl"^ ^''"''^^' '"P'^™"" " "* ' '1 



ItuidUj, September 8, 1977 THB SOUTHHN ACCENT • 3 




■i'1.4J:S:i 



The Summer A Success 
For The Sages 



Dr. Robert Sage, assistant 
professor of music, receive^d 
his Doctor of Music Art degree 
from the University of South- 
ern California in piano per- 
formance this summer. Al- 
though it is considered un- 
usual for two members of the 
same family to perform to- 
gether for a doctoral recital, 
Dr. Sage's wife, Janet, was 
approved as his soloist by the 
university. 

Mrs. Sage has also written a 
song book this summer for 
cradle roll age children en 
titled LtUle Sabbath Songs 
The Sabbath School Produc 
tions Company in Glendale, 
California, published the book, 
which is available from most 
Adventist Book Centers 

Dr. Sage graduated with a 
B.A. from Loma Linda in 
French'and music. (Mrs. Sage, 
coincidentally, majored in 



French and mihored in music). 
Besides his classwork, Dr. 
Sage conducts the Collegedale 
Church Chancel Choir. 

350 Attend 



The East Hamilton County 
Kiwanis Club raised S454 at a 
pancake feed Sunday in the 
student park. 

Approximately 350 persons 
attended, choosing from a 
menu of eggs, presage, pan- 
cakes, and applesauce. 

The money collected will go 
toward an equipment fund for 
the elementary schools in this 
area, said J.M. Ackerman. 
secretary of the club. 

Kiwanis International is a 
non-denominational organiza- 
tion, of which the East Hamil- 
ton County chapter is rela- 
tively new. It was formed two 
years ago. 



1 WELCOME L 
TO SMC! 



the 
College Press 

Teleplione 396-2164 




Senate Elections 



D Vanessa Greenleaf 

Senate elections are scheduled for September 14 and 15. The voting will 
take place in the student center, the cafeteria, and the dorms. 

Article Seven. Section Two of the SA Constitution states that the voting 
membership of the Senate shall be: A. the president and the eiecutive 
vice-president; B. nine members elected from the women's dorm; C. eight 
members elected from the men's dorm; D. one member from the Madison 
campus; E. seven members from the village at large. 



Precinct and Area Eeprgsented 



#1 


Thatcher Hall rcons 


100-144 


#2 


Thatcher Hall roonE 


153-198 


#3 


Thatcher Hall rooms 


200-245 


#4 


Thatcher Hall rooms 


253-298 


#5 


Ihatcher Hall rooms 


300-348 


#6 


Thatcher Hall rooms 


350-398 


#7 


Thatcher Hall rooms 


418-440 


#8 


Thatcher Hall rooms 


518-541 


#9 


Thatcher Hall rooms 


618-643 



Precinct and Area Represented 

#10 Talge Hall roonB 105-139 

#11 Talge Hall rcaiB 141-184 

#12 Talge Hall rooms 201-236 

#13 Talge Hall rocms 238-284 

#14 Talge Hall rocms 302-336 

#15 Talge Hall rocms 338-384 

#16 Talge Hall basenent & A Wing 

#17 Talge Hall B £, C Wings 

#18 Madison Canpus 

#19 Village (seven senators elected) 



HDW TO FILE FOR <3iNDIDRCT 

A. Pick up official Candidate's Petition Form frcm S.A, Executive Office 

(Student Center, Office #3) 

B. Obtain necessary signatures on Petition Form. 

C. Return all Petition Forms to the S.A. Executive Office b y tOON, SEPT. 13. 

D. Conply with all other stated requirements for candidacy. 



VOTING scheixm; 



Septeirber 14, Wednesday 



8:00 AM to 11:00 AM Student Center All Students 

11:00 m to 2:00 PM Cafeteria .....All Students 

2:00 PM to 5:00 PM Student Center All Sitmtents 

7:00 PM to 11:00 PM Residence Halls Residents only 

StTjdent Center Village Students 

only 



Septenber 15, Thursday 



. Stutent Center .All Students 

.Cafeteria All Students 



flrnnTION: Jones Hall residents may run for Thatcher Precincts as you vdll 





G.P.A. ttemiironent 


Besittency Requirement 


General Bequiranent 


Signatures 


1-9 


2.25 cunulative or 
2.50 for previous 
semester 


Ihatcher or Jones HaU 
zesident 


SIC student for at 
least nine ^«eks 


Minimun of 
20% of 
residents 


10-17 


same as above 


Talge Hall resident 


sane as above 


sane as 
above 


18 


sarae as above 


Currently a student 
on main carpus, 
having been a Mad- 
ison Canpus resident 
previously 


sane as above 


Candidate's 

signature 

only 


19 


sane as above 


Qirrently a non- 
donidtDry student 
CHI main carpus 


same as above 


Candidate's 

signature 

cfily 



A yearbook Wi\h a Message 

Announces 

Isf prize $30. 2nd prize $20. 
3rd prize $10. 



Watch further notices! 



4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thanday, September 8, 1977 



a 



SABBAT 

Under The "Big T( 



Small groups drawn together 
to studv. and share. 




CABL- ON CAMPUS 



Learning about a healthful way 
of living, and putting it into 
practice. 




STORY HOUR 



A chance to give a little persoi 
an exciting afternoon with th. 
best kind of entertainment am 
fun -- a Christian learning en 



Don't Miss The Collegiate 
This Septembi 



The First Sabbal 



It's All Unde 



After all, whatintheworldl 



EVAN6ELISM 



Frontline work, 
of all the action If you like a 
challenge, then you'll want a 
part in evangelism. All it 




NEW TESTAMENT 
WITNESSING 



Have you heard the "good 
news"? Now that yoi 
let's get the word out. 



Our Special Cuests 




Clay Farweli 
Soathem Union 




An opportunity to work"] 
baby church and nurtoM 
along toward adulthood, r 



Wally Welch 
Florida Conference 




John Strickland 

Ga. - Comb. Conference 



Bncky Weeks 
Florida Conference 



Th.r.d.y, September 8, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 



FAIR 

" (Gymnasium) 



imitiment Weekend Special 
lOi 9:30 a.m. 

InCollegedale 




George Tims— 

South Atlantic Conference 



Conn Arnold 

Kent. - Tenn. Conference 



Henry Holt 

Sooth Central Conference 



« • THE SODTHBIN ACCENT Aanday. September 8, 1»77 



Help Me To Understand 




o 



DPam Legere 

Have you ever deeply wan- 
ted and loved someone but for 
some reason or another you 
couldn't have them? Oh. bow 
you ache inside. Your mind is 
heavy with rationalizations 
and a lot of questions such as: 
Why can't you have them?; 
What's wrong with the love 
you have for them?; Where did 
you make the mistake of be- 
coming too involved?; How 
come this isn't working out the 
way you wanted and hoped for 
it to? 

For days and nights you cry, 
privately, from the heartache, 
for this seems to be the only 
way to relieve yourself from 
that almost unbearable pain. 
But, yoti still wonder and 
question, groping for the an- 
swers. 



Then you ask, "Lord, please 
help me to understand. Help 
me to see the answers. Please 
take this pain and misery ft'om 
me and help me to get through 
this time. Give me the 
strength." 

As you lay your burdens 



freely on Christ, you begin to 
feel peace. You begin to see 
more clearly the reason for this 
pain and hurt. Christ wants 
you to better understand the 
love and the pain He feels for* 
you. You start to analyze the 
reason forChrist'sdeath. He 
came down to earth from hea- 
ven leaving the most glorious 
home you can imagine, leaving 
His only Father and all" the 
hosts of heaven , to die for you ! 
Christ saved you from sin's 
wrath. What a price! 

Now you apply to Christ the 
questions you were asking 
yourself. 

"Why can't He have us?" 
Oh, how Christ loves us and 
wants us but we don't want to 
take the precious gift of salva- 
tion and surrender our all to 
Him. In Proverbsi8:17 Christ's 
love is promised to those who 
love Him and to those who 
seek and find Him. 

"What's wrong with the 
love He has for us?" Nothing 
is wrong with His love, it's all 
so right and perfect! In I John 
4:16>17 it states how perfect 



His love is for us. 

"Where did Christ make the 
mistake of becoming too invol- 
ved?" For Christ there was no 
mistake. It was all part of the 
creation and the great plan of 
salvation. 

Lastly, "How come it isn't 
working out the way Christ 
wants it to?" It is working out 
for Christ. All things work to 
the glory of the Lord. Christ, 
gives us the choice as to whom 
we shall follow. If we follow 
Christ and be true to Him, the 
reward will be eternal life as 
promised in John 3:16. 

Suddenly you realize that 
your hurt and pain is just a 
little taste of the agony Christ 
experiences when one of His 
precious souls chooses to fol- 
low Satan. Just thank the Lord 
for His everlasting love and 
faithfulness to us (Jeremiah 
31:3) and for the privilege to 
draw near to His throne of 
grace during our time of need 
(Hebrews 4:16). 

Praise the Lord for always 
being near us ! 



Campus 0/gns 
lxtraordinary 

P, 



ROVOKERS 



SMC has quite a collection of signs around campus as its main 
source of nonverbal public address. 

These signs take on all kinds of sizes, sh^es, colors, attitudes, 
and approaches. As a matter of fact, SMC's signs have almost as 
much personality as the CK's vegetarian long-link hotdog. 

Several very effective signs around campus read, "Don't even 
thlnkjof parking here." A very imaginative approach. Ones eyes 
rivet to the sign because of its bold audacity. 

"Well, be that way!" I shouted at the sign. "See if I park here 
anyway,!"" The nerve of that sign. 

On the way to the cafeteria there is a sign that has a more 
indirect approach, a more or less reminder attitude that reads, "He | 
leadeth me NOT to walk in these green pastures." In other words, 
for any dummies, keep the feet off the grass. Another thing to 
notice about this sign is its biblical twist. 

So you see, my new column followers, watching and analyzing 
signs is quite an interesting and thought-provoking SDA approved l 
pastime. 







The Florida 
Conference 

puts the Qocent on 

welcome 

to each student 
for this school year. 



Tkarada; September S, 1977 THE SOUTHEBN ACCENT - 7 



Grading Standards Decline 

College Freshmen Enter With Higher Scores Than Ever 




Los Angeles -- A survey of 
entering college freshman in- 
dicates that grading standards 
in high schools have been 
steadily declining since the 
late 1960s. 

Freshmen are entering col- 
lege with higher grades than 
ever, apparently the result of 
grade inflation in secondary 
schools, according to the Uth 
annual survey conducted by 
the University of California at 
Los Angeles and the American 
Council on Education. 

The survey, released yester- 
day, found that college fresh- 
men entering with an A aver- 
age are now equal to the num- 
ber with C averages. In the 
late 1960s C students outnum- 
bered A students by more than 
2-1. 

Among 1976 college fresh- 
men, nearly one in five earned 
an A average in high school, 
an increase of 1 .4 per cent over 
1975 and 6.2 per cent over 
1969. 

The number of C students 
declined from 32.5 per cent to 
19.8 per cent. 

"When you consider these 
grade increases in the light of 
declining college admission 



scores, it is hard to escape the 
conclusion that grading stan- 
dards in secondary schools 
have been declining steadily 
since the late 1960s,'* said 
Alexander W. Astin, a profes- 
sor at UCLA and director of 
the survey. 

He said 57.7 per cent of 
those in the survey agree with 
the statement that "grading in 
the high schools has become 
too easy." 

Grade inflation at the col- 
lege level, which has been 
documented in other surveys, 
is also reflected in the academ- 
ic expectations of the fresh- 
men, which Astin said was 
"at a new high." 

Two students in five said 
they believed their chances of 
getting at least a B average in 
college were very good, com- 
pared to 38.6 per cent in 1975 
and 23.6 per cent in 197L 
Eleven per cent of the 1976 
freshmen said they expected 
to graduate with honors, while 
only 10.3 per cent said so in 
1975 and 3.7 per cent in 1968. 

The 1976 survey was based 
on questionnaires completed 
by 328,318 freshmen entering 
592 two-year and four-year col- 
leges and universities. Astin 




P 



All students receiving loans,grants, 
and nursing scholarships who 
were unable to attend the 
Financial Aid Meeting held 
Tuesday Aug. 30, must stop in 
the Student Aid Office to sign 
papers. 

YoDr money will not be teleued on 
your statement nntU yoo do. 



said of these, 215,890 question- 
naires from 393 colleges were 
used to compute national 
norms. 

The survey found that stu- 
dents continue to view energy, 
the environment and consum- 
er protection as major national 
issues. 

While student attitudes to- 
vard controversial issues have 
become more liberal in recent 
years, the 1976 freshman dis- 
played certain conservative 
trends and a movement to the 
right in political self-identifica- 
tion. 

Three out of five students, 
or 59.7 per cent, now believe 
"There is too much concern in 
the courts for the rights of 
criminals." This compares 
with 53.5 per cent in 1975 and 
48.1 per cent in 1971. 

In political identification, 
the number of liberals declin- 
ed from 28.8 per cent to 25.6 
per cent and the number of 
conservatives increased from 
14.5 per cent to 15.2 per cent. 

"This is the first time in the 
history of the survey that liber- 
als have not maintained at 
least a 2-1 edge over conserva- 
tives," Astin said. 



t ^ahbatt| 



Arranged as poetry from the book Deilte of Ages 



The Sabbath calls our thoughts to nature, 

and brings us into communion with the Creator. 

In the song of the bird, 

the sighing of the trees, 

the music of the sea. 
We may still hear His voice 

who talked with Adam and Eve 
in the cool of the day. 

And as we behold His power in nature 

we find comfort. 
For the word that created all things 

is that which speaks life to the soul. 

He "who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, 
hath shined in our hearts, 
to give the light 

of the knowledge 

of the glory of God 

in the face of Jesus Christ."* 



BASEBALL 
JAMBbREE 

Saturday nite, 8l30 
p.e. field 





VILLAGE MARKET 



Frozen /ogorf 
Free sampfe 



S - THE SOUTBEKN ACCENT Thandmy, September 8,. 1»" 



^C> 




"rsnn Andrews Plans Biology Tour 
OkD j^ Australia, New Zealand 



answer from las! week 



lilQaiaiSSJBlUQ 

(aaHB OHS HHua 
i2i*Gsaiia B BUii a 

liisii^isQ Eseiiifiu 




What Is 
Commitment? 



"Commit your way to the Lord. 
Trust also in Him, and He will do it." Psalm 37:5 NASB 



A Biology Study Tour to 
Australia and New Zealand, 
sponsored by Andrews Univer- 
sity, is planned for the sum- 
mer of 1978. Approximate 
dates are from June II to 
August 25. allowing time to 
complete up to a quarter of 
college credit. 

By utilizing modest facilities 
and camping out part of the 
time the cost will be held as 
low as possible. Including air 
transportation from the west 
coast, about 10-12,000 miles of 
surface travel in Australia and 
New Zealand, lodging, camp 
fees and tuition the cost will be 
about $2,675. The cost of food 
not included in the above fig- 
ure will be on a share expense 
basis and should be quite nom- 
inal. 

The study expedition is be- 
ing announced a year ahead of 
time to facilitate planning on 
the part of prospective partici- 
pants, those who may wish to 
integrate available courses in- 
to their curriculum as part of a 
major or as a science require- 
ment and those who may want 
to read about the region ahead 
of time to make the trip most 
rewarding. Up to twenty-four 
students can be accommodat- 



Leading the tour will be Asa ther information and applic. 

Thoresen and Richard Ritland tions write to the Biology De 

of the Biology Department at partment, Andrews Universi! 

Andrews University. For fur- ty, Berrien Springs, Michigan 



10S 



D Clinton Meharry 

What in the world does 
lOSNEl stand for? Seen on a 
license plate of a car, it was 
simply an abbreviation of 
"tennis anyone?" 

The fall Talge Hall tennis 
tournament will be starting 
next week and the deadline to 
sign up is Sept. 9. There will 
be a championship and conso- 
lation tournament. If you lose 
one match you automatically 
compete to win the consolation 
tournament until you lose. If 
you don't lose, you automati- 
cally become the champion. 

Good luck to each and may 
the best man win. lOSNEl 



Taylors Con't 

Caribbean, South Amerk_, 
the Philippines. Canada, Scaii'l 
dinavia. and Europe. He has! 
also performed as the crusadel 
organist for the Billy Grahai 
Evangelistic Association. 

Playing miniature violin, the| 
Taylors' two sons, Ga 
Sebastian, age six, and Adani| 
Xavier, age five, often performl 
on the concert stage with their| 
parents. 

The Taylors feature the 
sic of composer Ken Medemal 
and his composition of MosesT 
call to lead Israel from Egypt. I 

The Taylors have recorded! 
four solo albums, and havef 
also held performance 
Andrews University, LoraBl 
Linda, the Voice of Prophecy,! 
and the Pacific Press PublisJif 
ing Association. 



Too often we assume that we know what words 


mean, but when 


"Omes down to definitions, we have a problen 
-omes more complex when we have to m 
olication of the word to our daily existence. 


1. The problem 
ake a practical 



• 



To commit means to give to another that which you possess. It 
means to give up self and to really live. Commitment has several 
aspects to it. To grasp these aspects and to apply them will result in 
genuine commitment. 

A commitment to freedom involves the liberation of man from 
the thralldom of sin. Sin is bondage, and the chains of bondage fall 
off under the power of the Holy Spirit because He is the key to 
victory - the daily, complete mastery of sin. For to be free is to be 
like God; freedom sets its course toward the spheres of infinity. 

As man experiences freedom from bondage, a commitment to 
life comes into focus. Life encompasses the daily sphere of 
existence. Senses awaken as the Holy Spirit teaches man the art of 
living, and to live is to be like God. 

A commitment to growth involves the daily addition of the fruits 
and graces ofthe Holy Spirit. Once a man has life, he has begun his 
spring, the season of new planting and the opening buds of life. 
Growth will continue because it is natural. With the sunshine and 
dew of heaven, maturity comes, and advancement will always be 
ahead for the growing plant in the kingdom of God. 

A commitment to share grants the man the privilege of 
blessing others locked in the bondage of selfishness that never 
seeks to give, only to get and to keep. Sharing becomes the agency 
of telling about the wonders of the God of heaven. That which a 
man has known of these himself is the best kind of sharing that he 
can impart. 

A commitment to love is the greatest form of commitment in the 
universe. When Jesus committed Himself to the salvation of man in 
the Council of Peace, He made the manifestation of love a bit 
clearer, and when He died on the cross, the commitment of love 
yourWe^ "'" '"""'"^- '^° ''"" '' »° «'""■ ^"^ «> «'« -"^y "lean 

Loving requires the totality of the person. Love must be all if it 

reservations. It gives, and the source of its giving never runs drv 
or to love is to be like God. He knows no s'et limits for freedom 
livmg, growing, sharing or loving. <:euom. 

r,ve*^,°j;;r.T'"' '' "'"!,■ "^ """'*' "'°" """y •" "*"• but these 
enLiU mo e ,h "' ' ""P" .'"^'sht into the word. To commit 
entails more than saying or singing; it touches the daily progression 
of life, and the life ceases to be the same ever again "«''""'" 
Next week we will explore the second half of this verse to see the 
connection between trust and commitment. 




Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, TN 37315 



Nonprofit Organization 
U,^. Postage 




'"ollegedole. Tenne 




The Sputhern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 

Ulnrsday, September IS, 1977 





Part One 



Photo by Mark Ford 



The Road: What's Taking So Long? 



D Dennis Canther 



Amid upset and impatient comments over the inconvenience of the 
closed main entrance to Collegedale and rough back-road detours, City 
Manager Lee Holland assures Collegedale residents of a hard paved 
surface to drive on this winter. 

Aware of various misconceptions concerning the road construction 
project. Holland gave The Southern Accent a capsule account of what 
has happened and will happen. 

Several years ago the State of Tennessee decided to build an 
entrance road into Collegedale. To do this they would use State funds 
(called rural road funds) which were channeled through Hamilton 
County. 

The Hamilton County judge administers these funds and uses them 
on State-approved projects. The plans for the new road were drawn up 
during the administration of Hamilton County Judge Chester Frost. 
He preceded the present Judge Don Moore. 

When Judge Frost went put of office and Judge Moore came in. 
Judge Moore decided that the cost of'this project had escalated too 
rapidly due to a number of factors (including the inflation that hit in 
1974 causing road material prices to double). He did not feel he could 
utilize that amount of money for this one project. 



The State said if Hamilton County will not utilize their funds for the 
road project, then they would pull out their approval completely. 

So the State refused to help, and the project was dead. Then the 
City of Collegedale decided they wanted some type of new road 
anyway. Upon investigation the City found that it could build a new 
road considerably cheaper than the State. The State projects run three 
to four times the money that a local government would put into the 
same project. 

At this time, the City inspected the intersection crossing* the 
railroad and decided it needed to be moved. The confusion of the five 
intersecting roads and the occurrence of several collisions hastened this 
tam to p. 2f col. 4 



Film 

The 

Hiding 

Place 

Coming 

Oct. 9 



DCurtis McCriliis 

A major screen presentation 
based on the best-selling book. 
The Hiding Place, will be shown 
in the Physical Education Center 
Sunday, Oct. 9. 

The 2'/2 hour film, which has 
captivated eight million readers 
in book form, is the life story of 
Corrie Tenboom's experiences in 
a German Na;^i war camp. The 
film graphically illustrates the 
horrors of World War II on the 
European front. Corrie's serenity 
throughout the story is baffling, 
yet touching. 

The film will be shown twice: 
once at 3 p.m. and again at 8 p.m. 

The admission price will be $1 
for all. including students. -Funds 
will go to World Wide Pictures, a 
division of the Billy Graham or- 
ganization. 



Wright Hall Circle Drive 
Becomes One-Way Road 



SMC Students Cast 
Company One Drama 



DMike Ringstaff 

Company One, a religious 
drama organization from Anguin, 
Calif., will present vespers Fri- 
day, Sept. 16. 

, Company One is headed by Jim 
Pappas of Pacific Union College, 
who serves in the dual capacity of 
both manager, and director. 

The production, titled Heaven 



Is A Nice Place To Visit, Bat . . ., 

will include SMC students on the 
cast. 

Sabbath morning, Sept. 17, 
Company One will present an- 
other drama in the Physical Edu- 
cation Center, starring a new cast 
of SMC students. 



DDonnie Keele 

President Frank Knittel reveal- 
ed today that the mall circle drive 
in front of Wright Hall will be- 
come a one way road within the 
next few weeks. 

Dr. Knittel said the administra- 
tion felt this action will add to the 
safety factor of this area of the 
campus and will help eliminate 



some of the minor accidents 
which have occurred as.a result of 
poor visibility around the corners. 

He also stated that the circle 
drives in front of both dormitories 
will become one way. The park- 
ing stripes will be altered to 
accommodate this change. 

Another area Dr. Knittel cited 
was that of the long drives on the 



east side of both dorms which 
lead to the dorm parking lots. 
"These," he said, "will be block- 
ed off at the mall road and new 
exits will be formed on the far 
ends of both dorms." 

By taking this action, the Col- 
lege administration hopes to cut 
down on the traffic using the 
mall. 



"-"— Behind Page One — 

Carter Dissected P- 3 

SMC's Nicest Nuisance p. 6 

The Chosen Few [Chorale] p. 7 

Sports p. 8 




(^■•l^ii^. 



/ 



J . THE SOCIHEHN ACCEin Iliandv. September IS, 1977' 




Hooking Up The Phones 

These men connected a total of 1 800 telephone wires while installing the phones 
in the new Thatcher Dorm. This delicate and exacting operation took four days to 
complete. Photosby Mark Ford ^ 



Senate 

Votes 

Social 

Appeals 

Route 

DJim Guy 

The College faculty voted this 
summer to begin a new procedure 
whereby students can appeal dis- 
ciplinary action. 

The route of appeal is listed on 

page 31 of the student handbook 

and is as follows: 1. dean of 

students; 2. judiciary committee; 

' 3. president of the college. 

"Skipping chapels or worships, 
maybe borrowing that $10 bill the 
person next door thought they 
hid falsifying a weekend pass in 
some way, publicly embarrassing 
the College with sexual involve- 
ment, or getting into the drug 
scene (which includes alcohol) all 
reflect an attitude that will put 
you on discipline." says Dr. Mel- 
vin D. Campbell, dean of student 
affairs. 

This doesn't mean students can 
do as they wish and then plead a 
change in heart. But it does give 
the student a route of recourse. 



Men Organize Open House 



-Ibe Road con*t. firom p. 1- 



DMark Kurzynske 

The Men's Qub Committee has 
met and organized for the immed- 
iate school year. Thisyear's com- 
mittee members are David Kay, 
Dan Burtnett, Rick Gusso, Ron 
Whitehead, and Tom Baez. 
Deans Schlisner and Halverson 
are the sponsors. 

Schlisner stated that an upcom- 
ing event is the Talge Hall Open 
House Sept. 18, Sunday evening, 
from 7-8:30 p.m. Tentative plans 
call for entertainment at the close 
of the open house along with 



cookies and punch. Schlisner also 
remarked that this is the first 
open house for Talge in at least 
eight years. 

The Men's Qub is presently in 
its membership drive. The goal 



this year is 400 members, and 
presently there are over 350 men 
signed up. The money collected 
from the club dues will be used to 
buy a Universal weight machine 
for the weight room. 



Brides Magazine Selects 
Debby Ray As Winner 



MENC 
Retreat 
At Atoka 
Springs 

DKathy Oakley 

The SMC chapter of the Musi- 
cal Educators National Confer- 
ence (MENC) will hold its annual 
retreat at Atoka Springs Camp 
this weekend, Sept. 16-18, ac- 
cording to Alan Mathieu, presi- 
^ dent. 

B Elder Lorenzo Grant, assistant 
professor of religion, will be the 
guest speaker. 

There will be a $14 charge to 
cover food and transportation. 
The bus will leave Wright Hall at 
2 p.m. Friday, and will return 
around 6 p.m. Sunday. 

Mathieu emphasized that the 
retreat is not just for MENC 
members, but for anyone who has 
an interest in music and would 
like to get acquainted with others 
who share that interest. 



Debbie Ray was selected the 
national runner-up prize winner 
by the editorial staff of Brides 
magazine in the Fostoria- Pickard 
National Home Economics Con- 
test. 

Because of her winning entry, 
she has recently received 4 five- 
piece place settings of china and 4 
four-piece place settings of crys- 
tal. 

Sandra Stubbs placed fourth in 
the 23rd Annual Lenox Creative 
Table Setting Contest and re- 



ceived a place setting of Lenox 
China and Lenox Crystal in the 
pattern she used in her winning 
entry. In the same contest six 
students received parchment Cer- 
tificates of Honorable Mention. 
They are: Ruth Martin, Marcia 
Thomas, Debbie Ray, Cheri Ko- 
valski, Dolly Wickham, and Jea- 
nene Bustamante. 

The winners were members of 
the Decorating and Furnishing 
the Home class taught by Thelma 
Cushman, associate professor of 
home economics. 



decision. 

The City of Collegedale again approached Hamilton County about 
participating in this project. They agreed to a proposal whereby 
Collegedale would build the road, and Hamilton County gravel and 
pave the entire project, including the intersection. The section in the 
valley is now ready for asphalt. 

The City of Collegedale also approached the Southern Railroad 
system about new signals. It was decided to move the crossing toward 
the broom shop. Signals, cross arms, lights, and bells will be installed 
within two to four weeks. 

The City pays ten per cent of the total cost and the State and 
railroad pay the rest. This is the most modem type of crossing that is 
used today. Plastic Neopreme between the tracks will provide 
extremely smooth crossing. 

The work has been done in three stages and is in the third and final 
stage. The contract calls for the construction and leveling to be 
finished Oct. 14. Graveling and paving will be completed shortly 
afterwards. 

More on moving telephoae lines, dynamiting, city stickers, and detour 
chock holes next week. 



CHEA Plans Trip To Smoky 
Mountains September 



The Collegedale Home Eco- 
nomics Association (CHEA) met 
together and organized at an in- 
formal hoagie supper at the home 
of Thelma Cushman, a CHEA 
sponsor. 

Debbie Ray, association presi- 
dent, says the CHEA has several 
activities planned for the coming 
year. One event is a trip to the 
Smokies at the end of September. 
On October 16 the association is 



sponsoring a craft fair. 

During second semester, sev- 
eral non-credit mini-courses will 
be offered to the general student 
body and anyone living in the 
Chattanooga area. These mini- 
courses include cake decorating, 
tole painting, tatting, and camp- 
fire cookery. 

More information about the 
CHEA can be obtained at the 
main desk of Summerour Hall. 




^■^•y, ScptMBbn IS, 1977 THE SOCTHESN ACCENI ■ 3 



UTC Professor Analyzes Carter's Polici 



es 



William H. Masterson. prpfes- 
sor of history and former chancel- 
lor at the University of Tennessee 
in Chattanooga spoke to 32 as- 
sembled guests of the history club 
last Tuesday about the Jimmy 
Carter administration. 



Stress Human Rights 



He said that Carter had 
brought a number of new ap- 
proaches to foreign policy. Carter 
has stressed human rights, the 
importance of having friends of 
America in the underdeveloped 
world {especially Africa), and the 
need to be morally right, includ- 
ing no more secret deals. He has 
also told other nations to treat 
their people as people, otherwise 
America is not interested in deal- 
ing with them. Those in the U.S. 
as illegal immigrants will be al- 
lowed to stay, but no more future 
entering illegals. This makes 
Mexico happy. 

Masterson stressed that Japan 
is more important to the U.S. than 
Russia. Make Japan happy. In 
Europe, make West Germany 
strong. Agreement with the 
Chinese, say Carter and Master- 
son, should not be at the expense 
of Taiwan. Says Carter, "If they 
want our wheat, they must give 
something of equal value in re- 
turn. We need oil, but have food 



and technology. We will use this 
food and technology as a means of 
securing oil and of making deals 
with people." 



Don't Interfere 



The attitude of the Carter ad- 
ministration is to let other people 
run their own show. If they want 
to have a revolution, don't inter- 
fere. Don't get excited. Keep U.S. 
militarily strong. If trouble 
erupts overseas, get the people in 
that area to deal with the problem 
regionally-Brazil in Latin Ameri- 
ca, Zaire in Africa, Iran in Asia, 
Saudi Arabia and Israel in the 
Middle East. Assume that blacks 
will eventually rule South Africa 
and Rhodesia. Act accordingly. 
Start thinking about blacks in 
Central and South Africa. Pull 
Castro towards us if he will re- 
move his Cuban froops from Afri- 
ca. Also, if better relations are to 
come with Castro he will need to 
release his political prisoners. 

Latin Americans are generally 
happy with the new Panama Ca- 
nal freaties. Masterson believes 
the treaties will be ratified by the 
Senate. 

Carter believes we should for- 
get being paranoid about Com- 
munism. He was not connected 
with the Vietnam War, so no 



Tri-Community Fire Dept 
Trains Rookie Members 



D Teresa Shaw 

Tri-Community Fire Depart- 
ment, a non-profit organization 
which serves the Collegedale, 
Apison, Ooltewah, and East 
Brainerd areas has been in opera- 
tion for over 25 years. A volun- 
teer endeaver, the department 
boasts of 27 personel, many 
whom are students of SMC. 



All new members are required 
to complete a ten-week rookie 
course. During this fraining per- 
iod rookies gain first-hand know- 
ledge of firefighting procedures 
by responding to actual fire calls 
with officers. The course meets 2 
hours each week and 75 per cent 
of the meetings must be attend- 
ed. 



Any student wishing to join the 
department must be cleared 
through the dean of students of- 
fice. First semester freshman 
must have a 2.5 GPA and all other 
studets are allowed membership 
with a 2.25 GPA. A grade point 
average of 2.0 must be maintain- 
ed by all students affiliated with 
the department. 

Students currently participating 
with the department as volun- 
teers are: Bruce Bergherm-driv- 
er, firefighter; Danny Bennette- 
firefighter, EMT; Steve Bennette 
"firefighter, EMT; Brad Baum- 
firefighter, EMT: John Hood- 
firefighter; Tim Clark-firefight- 
er; Rahn Shaw-firefighter; and 
Tim Cumbo-firefighter. 



; 

' DISCOVER YOUR CREDIT UNION 

We're doing more for you! 
'COLLEGEDALE CREDIT UNION 
* College plaza 



Phone: 396-2101 

Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. IVlonday ■ 

6-7 p.m. H/londay and Thursday 




t^^^^^^^^^^t^^^*^*^ 



blame can be attached to him in 
connection with it. He has a clean 
slate. Says Carter, "We will quit 
selling fremendous shipments of 
arms to other countries." 

Masterson believes that Geor- 
gian Andrew Young, black am- 
bassador to the United Nations, is 
doing the U.S. more harm than 
good. 



Black Unemployment 



Masterson then turned his at- 
tention to the domestic scene. He 
noted that unemployment among 
blacks is five times that among 
whites. Blacks want action on 
jobs from the Carter adminisfra- 
tion and are turned off by Carter' s 
talk about a balanced budget. 
7,000,000 black votes elected Jim- 
my Carter, and they are now 
displeased by the lack of action. 

Carter is very conservative 



Social security has cost IVi 
times as much as it was thought it 
would cost; highways have cost 3 
times as much as they were esfi- 
mated to cost. Welfare costs are 
stratospheric. Carter is determin-' 
ed to keep a lid on government 
spending. Bert Lance is close to 
Carter and is one of the most 
conservative persons around 
Carter. Therefore, the free 
spenders want Lance out. Mast- 
erson believes it is these liberals 
who are behind the current drive 
to get Lance to resign, but thinks 
Lance will stay on for a year while 
the heat is on and then resign 
when the nation's attention is 
directed toward something else. 



Expectations High 



Expectations of Carter were 
high, and some people are mad 
because he has not measured up 
to their expectations. For exam- 



ple, the labor unions wanted a S3 
per hour minimum wage. Carter 
wanted $2.40. The compromise is 
$2.65 and that or something near 
that is what will pass. Carter also 
wanted 30 water projects can- 
celed because of their high cost 
and low yield, but there was a big 
howl of protest. So Carter com- 
promised; he will only cancel 15 . 
projects. But, says Masterson, 
Carter did save money. 

Masterson observed that 
people don't believe government 
any more. They don't think there 
is an energy crisis and blame the 
oil companies. Post-Watergate 
finds people sceptical and suspi- 
cious. They have been duped 
before and they do not want to be 
deceived again. 

Masterson believes Carter will 
loosen up on spending as he 
approaches the 1980 presidential 
election and a bid for a second 
term. In the meantime, he can 
veto pork barrel measures he 
considers exfravagant and give 
lip service to a balanced budget. 



-n 




SENIORS! 



1. Senior portraits for the School annual will be taken between 12:01 p.m. 
and 6:30 p.m. the 25th and 26th of this month. 

2. More explicit information will be sent to each senior personally, but we 
want you to make plans ahead in order to be present. 

3. An Informal shot of each senior will be taken too which means that each 
individual will have two photos of liimself/ herself. 

4. Married senlorsunstead of having a single informal shot taken^re 
invited to bring their spouses and children for a family photo to appear in 
the yearbook. This is completely free! 

5. The pictures will be taken at the Student Center. The exact location 
will be indicated later. 

6. As a matter of information, the pictures will be taken by Olan Mills, a 
professional company in the area of Chattanooga. They will provide the 
tuxedos, shirts, and ties for men and drapes for women. You can also 
make arrangements to get reproductions of your photo in fiill color and in 
different sizes. 

Please, we want yon to be In this year. Walt for further Information and 
make plans to be there. 



All those who are planning to get married in December or in the 
summer of 1978 are invited to turn in their names to the Southern 
Memories office at the Student Center. A special section for weddings 
wID appeal In the yeaibook. The dateline for this is January ISth, so you 
guys make plans on time. 



Southern Memories 

A YEABBOOK WITH A MESSAGE 



4 . THE SOUTHERN ACCENT I1iiii«Uy, September 15, 1977 



Pac 



Editorial 



Flippine through Time magazine in the library, you glance at 
the northeast face of the hanging clock. 9:30 - just enough fme 
to look up that source book before Biology class. „ . ., , 

Glancing at the southwest face you are amazed to tind that 
you gained 10 minutes by crossing the floor to the card catalog 
After finding that priceless book, you are about to leave for your 
next class. A look over your shoulder to the southeast face 
assures you that vou have seven minutes to get to Hackman. 

When in fact you do get there, you throw up your hands m 
dismay, scattering books and papers everywhere, and attractmg 
wary stares. Did you pass through a time warp? Th.s clock tells 
vou that vou're three hours and sixteen minutes early for FBI 
■ Ever wondered what time it reaUy was? Apparently. iMl. 
has its own time system, distinct from Chattanooga, as ona 
student found out while trying to obtain a chapel card. ^ _ 
So prodded by the undying question, • 'What time is it? , we set 
out to discover tnie SMC standard time. 

While checking the faces of time that w 
this is what we found: 

Student Center Lobby - 5 mil 
(the hallway clock is stuck 

Talge tobby -- 17 rain, slow 

English Department ■- 4 ajw slow 

Daniells Hall -■ 3 min. slow 

Library's four-faced clock: SE - 7 r 



e all depend upon, 

1. slow 
on 3:00) 



NE-lSi 



I. slow 
in. slow 
n. slow 



SW-Sii 
NW- 4 min. slow 
The All-Time Time-Bender Prize, however, went to Miller Hall, 
which was trailing five hours and 35 minutes behind 
Chattanooga. 

Lest we give the impression that all of SMC is behind the 
times, we must doff our hats to Jones, Thatcher, and the religion 
department. These and about halt of the other clocks were 
tolerably close, but we were still no closer to answering our 
question. 

"SMC time?" smirked Ole Kristensen. "It's whatever your 
watch says. There'snosuch thing as SMC time!" And, alas, we 
had to agree. 

In talking to Richard Reiner, business manager of SMC, he 
suggested that the solution would be an extensive master clock 
system. Though he had no figures on the cost of such a system, 
he was sure of one thing: it would be expensive. 

Extensive and expensive - the solution to jangled nerves and 
class "absences" due to tardiness. 

Say. wonder what we're paying for these lost hours in 
tuition? Maybe the master clock system is worth checking into. 



The Southern Accent 



All material published 
necessarily the opinion or v 
SMC administration. Cartooi 



m 



The Soutbern Acceat is n 
of the newspaper staff of t 
irticles. and other content iter 
create an open exchange of ideas, a forum. In the case 
disagreement, "Letters to the Editor," is a column designed 
provide expression. Our policy will allow the expression of 
differing ideas. We do. however, reserve the right not to publish 
material that is libelous, extremely radical, or out of character in 
light of doctrinal points. We wish to retain the bearing of a 
Christian SDA college newspaper. 



Edit 



I Wayn 



1 Editor Lynn Ne 

Manager Dave Mi3dag 

dilor Vanessa Greenleaf 

dilor Reuben Castillo 



.Pam Legere 
Denisc Sheef 
,Ray Hartwell 
,Kathy Mixell 
Jeanne Zacha 
. Candy Miran 
..Mark Ford 

Sandie Lehn 

. Rhonda Runy 

Mike Partio 

Mark Ford 

..Jerry Lien 



The SoQthem Accent is published w( 
test weeks and vacations. 
Subscriptions for parents and alumni 
:ekly from Collegedale. TN at a non-profit 



Debby Boyer 
, Frances Andrews 
. Felts Bros. Printing Co 

Oollewah. Tenn. 

kly with the exceptic 
SSpe 



Letters To The Editor 



Dear Editor: 

The other afternoon I was returning t" Col- 
legedale by one of the two alternate detours (that 
are now an ingrained part of SMC society) when 1 
noticed something that 1 am sure each bakery 
truck has had to contend with ever since the 
detours were instituted almost a year ago. 1 ne 
toads are dangerous. Not only are they bad, 
bumpy, and of all-around poor quality, they ate 
downright safety-defying. I never was one to 
jump on city officials for short foresight, or even 
for making a couple of bad decisions now and 
then. After all, we're human. But when poor 
judgment seems to run things, that's when I start 
asking questions. 

As I was bouncing (really, it was more like 
agitating) along the scenic Talent road detour, 
breathing in the fragrant exhaust of a fully loaded 
diesel rig and eating four pounds of bright red 
Tennessee dust, it occured to me that many 
conscientious! SMC students were having to pay 
for this privilege. I say conscientious because 
during the last elecrion they realized that de- 
ciding who the next president was going to be 
was importani. and they got out and voted. Now 
they find out that because they registered and 
voted here at Collegedale (after a frontal barrage 
of Circle K Club members peddled registration 
forms outside almost every open door on this 
campus to get them all registered here) they will 
have to pay five dollars for a city sticker, which, 
or so the story goes, pays for upkeep of the city's 
streets and roads. So as it turns out, not only ^id 
they get rooked on who got into the Whitehouset 



but they're having to pay for it through municipal 
government too. 

The more 1 thought about it. the more it didn't 
make sense. I would gladly pay five dollars to get 
the road finished, if that would do it, but I don't 
think it would. There have been so many 
excuses going around for not having the road 
finished that now they're starting them over 
again and no one's noticing. 

By the time I got to my parking space, 1 
realized another ramification. Not only do Mckee 
trucks have to beat through winding and dan- 
gerous stretches of road to hit the highways, but 
also the fine emergency equipment must do the 
same just to reach a distressed party at a location 
that is literally just around the corner. I would 
hate to be the man that is sitting in his house near 
four corners reading the paper, and suddenly 
smell smoke. 

So now, as I sit at my typewriter, creating a 
piece of journalism (in its loosest sense) that we 
could all do without, I realize that finding fault is 
not going to help -- a solution is. But then. ..who 
do we turn to for a solution -- the same ones being 
found fault with. 

There is a rumor that the new road project has 
ceased any kind of progress because the project 
is out of money. There is a rumor that the road is 
costing more than estimated because of unfor- 
seen problems. There is a rumor that no one 
knows what is going on because no one is in 
control of the situation. It seems that I've heard 
it all before. Something about a pipeline in 
Alaska.... 

M. Ford 



Ed. Note : M. Ford, pleez read the lead story on page one. 



Campus Cfossi^iecfs 

We print personals, used book announcements, and other 
miscellany free. Drop your announcement in a red Southern 
Accent mailbox. 



9 Tom has the "facilities" for hot 
chocolate operations and is wait- 
ing-for the Swiss Miss to come his 
way. 

W Dear Panda, Thanks so much 
for the cheery creature you left in 
my box. It made my day. Love, 
Tom. 



W Orange Grove learning center 
is looking for a married couple to 
serve as house parents. They 
would stay in a home there, and 
be responsible for children at 
certain hours during the day. 
They would like someone who has 
had experience with special child- 
ren, or is isteKited wd would 
lite mors iofBOnatioo. contact 
Wanda Flemming at the center -- 
629-1451. 



#A Big Thank You to all my friends 
who celebrated my birthday with 
me. Pam L. 

V Loma Linda University has 
made an important change in the 
requirements for their predental 
hygiene program. Applicants are 
now required to take Anatomy 
and Physiology. For further in- 
formation contact the Counseling 
and Testing Office. 



To all Theology and Religion Majors: 

Welcome to SMC from the religion department and your Student 
Ministerial Association. We hope you who are returning from last year 
have had a good summer and are ready to continue your training for 
the Lord's service. 

We also wish to extend a special welcome to the new freshmen and 
other new students. We hope your stay at SMC will be rewarding and 
spiritually refreshing. 

Several programs have been planned for this year with you in mind 
- and we think the programs will be profitable as well as enjoyable. If 
you have any questions please feel free to contact the staff in the 
religion department or one of the officers of the Student Ministerial 
Association. We want to become acquainted with each one of you 

I personally! 

, Have a good year and may the Lord bless each one of you in your 
studies. 



I SCHEDUIS OF EVENTS 

I Thursday, Sept. 29 - Careers Day 

I Friday Evening, Sept. 30 - Saturday, Oct. 1 - Religion Retreat at 
, McKee Park (emphasis on evangelism with Elder Kenneth Mittleider) 

^ ■Tiiesday, Oct. 18 - Religion Department Chapel (slide presentation < 
I the 1977 summer field school at Columbia, S.C.) 

I Tuesday, Nov. 8 - Religion Department Chapel - Talge Hall Chapel 
I (0,M, Wilson of the Dale Carnegie Institute) 

I Saturday, Dec. 10 - Religion Department Christmas Party - Banquel 
I Koom (Babysitters for children) Die Meistersinger-Food, 

[ March 17-18, 1978 - Spring Retreat (Dr. George Akers of the educatio" 

■ tepartment at Andrews University) 

I Tuesday, April 11, 1978 - Religion Department Chapel (Don Kirkma"' 

■ architect or Dr. Roe of the education department) 



nmmUy, September 15, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■ 5 



-Night Patrol On The Prowl 



OBill Marcom 

Lightfooted, like back-woods 
trappers, they prowl through the 
night shadows that blanket SMC, 
or crouch in the deep shadows to 
watch and wait.. .for crime to 
occur, for a car to be burglarized, 
for a building to be pillaged... 

They are guardians, protectors 
of our cars and campus -- and 
their walkie talkies can help them 
call up the cavalry by linking 
them quickly to the Collegedale 
Police Dept., should any really 
heavy criminal activity be en- 
countered. 

Probably the school-funded 
night patrol is taken for granted 
by students, yet their service to 
us is essential for campus secur- 
ity, and even the security of the 
surrounding Collegedale area. 
For example, the God-fearing 
people of this community are con- 
cerned about drug traffic, but few 
of them realize that even the 
campus's night patrol occassion- 
ally becomes involved in investi- 
gations to thwart the problem. 

Jack Kovalski. an SMC student 
and paid member of the patrol, 
related an incident to me of last 
spring... 

Following a lead that perhaps a 
narcotics deal might be "going 
down"-in the student park, Jack. 
Dean Brunken, and Ted Webster 
surrounded the park and began to 
penetrate it on foot. Ordering 
walkie-talkie silence among them- 
selves (so that the supposed dope 
dealers wouldn't hear their ap- 
' proach) they slowly closed in; the 
anticipation of danger up ahead 




Photo by Mark Ford 



wound their nerves into tight' 
coils. 

Then, abruptly, Pam Keele's 
voice shattered the night silence, 
as it errupted from the three 
talkies at full volume, to ask, 
"Are you boys scared out there?" 
(She was, herself, seated com- 
fortably, safely at the Thatcher 
desk dispatch radio. ) 

Anyway, as Jack explained it to 
me, the sudden sound of her voice 
in that silent night, as they creptr 
toward possible danger, gave him 
the same sort of a start one feels 
when someone walks up behind 
you and shouts BOOl He claims 
that his physical reaction, an im- 
promptu high jump, may have 
exceeded any on record! 

By the way, no criminals were 
found. 

Then Jack recounts the night 
he was touring the biology build- 
ing's lower level, flashlight in 
hand, when suddenly he encount- 
ered a bobcat, fangs bared, paws 
audaciously raised, eyes agleem 
with ferocity. 

it was apparent from his initial 
fear that the taxonomist had done 
superior work! 

And, thfn there was the night 
(2:30 a.m.) that Jack and Dean 
Brunken found themselves in a 
foot chase, in heavy pursuit of a 
suspect who was fleeing the 
campus area. When they had at 
last detained the suspect, one of 
those classic moments of embar- 
rassment ensued; the suspect was 
a woman, in her 40's, who was 
merely indulging a whim to go 
jogging. 



Did you know that it is general 
procedure for the night patrol to 
stop and question anyone found 

grounds after 10:30 p.m.? Mrs. 
Knittel, let "em know you're 
coming in advance! 

More on the serious side, and 
in all fairness to Jack, his job is 
not a comedy, as it would seem. 
In this interview he displayed 
devotion and enthusiasm toward 
his night watchman's job, and he 
admitted frankly and openly that 
he was concerned about the 
image the, night patrol projected 
to the public it serves. He ex- 
pressed fear that perhaps stu- 
dents have an imcoraplete under- 
standing of the role of the night 
patrol, and may refuse to recog 
nize it as a legitimate extension of 
campus law enforcement. 

So far this year, Jack reports, 
security has been quiet -- perhaps 
partly because last year a CB and 
car stereo theft ring was caught 
by the Collegedale and Hamilton 
County Police. This ring could hit 
six cars in broad daylight! 

Sounding ebullient and opti' 
mistic. Jack contended that with 
the higher quality calibe 
young people that are attending 
SMC this year, most problems of 
theft will be external. 

The night patrol - they don't 
carry guns, but they still serve 
you and me. Their principal tool: 
are their eyes and their ears, and 
sometimes swift legs. So, re 
member.. .10:30! 



THE 
MEN'S CLUB 

PRESENTS 




OPEN HOUSE 



SEPT. 18 
7:00 — 8:30 p.m. 

REFRESHMENTS 

DOOR PRIZES 
ENTERTAINMENT 




« . THE SOOTHES*) ACCENT Thond^r, Scptonbv 15, 1W7 



o 



I Missed My Flight Home 




DPam Legere 

The airplane was circling At- 
lanta airport at 8:10 p.m. and I 
had a connecting flight leaving 
Atlanta at 8:25 p.m. Finally, 
eight minutes later at 8:18 p.m. 
the plane landed. 1 had only 
seven minutes to get from one 
end of the terminal to the otherin 
order to make my connectioi^ 
After being shuttled from the 
plane to the terminal. I had four 
minutes left. 



As soon as my little feet got 
inside the terminal. 1 walked as 
fast as they could possibly carry 
me. That wasn't fast enough so I 
started running. I ran up to the 
ticket agent and asked about my 
flight and he said, "You just 
missed it. It took off about three 
minutes ago." 

By this time, all my patience 
had been drained from me. All I 
could do was sit down, compose 



myself, and think what I'd do 
next. After inquiring about other 
flights. I was fortunate enough to 
get aboard a plane, which had 
been delayed for mechanical 
failures, and left Atlanta airport 
at 8:45 p.m. 

Has your patience ever been 
tried to the point of breaking? 

This past summer I had an 
experience with a close friend 
which later helped me realize how 
patient God is with us. During 
this experience, I had started 
doubting the Lord and all He 
represented. The reason for this 
doubt was the lack of communica- 
tion, confidence, and trust which I 
once had in the Lord. I had 
forgotten what God's character 
was like. 

Exodus 34:6 tells what some of 
the qualities are within His char- 
acter-merciful, gracious, patient. 
1 realized then how patient and 



forgiving Christ is when we put 
our wants and desires first in- 
stead of His. 1 realized also, that 
the reason for the whole experi- 
ence came from the simple fact 
that I didn't place the Lord first. 

After asking for His forgive- 
ness. His patience, and His help, 
I slowly regained my communica- 
tion, confidence, and trust in the 
Lord. He and I are growing to- 
gether in a most unique friend- 
ship. 

In Colossians 3:12 there is an 
admonition given to us. We must 
all learn to be more patient, com- 
passionate, kind, and forgiving 
one to another. Just as Christ is 
with us. so we should be with 
bthers. 

I just praise the Lord for pa- 
tiently waiting and holding our 
connecting flight until we've got- 
ten aboard safely. 



HAff QfA ,iwwww w wwwwwwwwwvvwft y wyw^^ 




SMC's Nicest Nuisance 



Dogs have the reputation of being man's best friend. The 
around SMC are no exception. I mean, they are so lovablel 

The favorite hangout of our K-9 friends just happens to be thil 
favorite spot of most of the residents of the college - the CK. 

It is said that when you feed a dog he will always come back. ThiJ 
goes for more than one dog. and so they all come back. Asa matter ol| 
fact, they didn't even leave. 

If you see the poor lovable vagabonds, you can't help but want to| 
contribute to the habit of dogs and man alike - eating. You know yc 
sliouldn't. but you say to yourself. "Self, just this once won't hurt... . 

Did you know that there is more than one way of publicly feedinj 
dogs? You can drop food in your lap (accidentty), and rake it off onlol 
the groundD you can just sort of fling an onion ring or a fry with ease,| 
fairiy unnoticed, during the course of a fast-moving conversation will 
friends. Or you can toss a half of a master burger, arched in the air a 
everyone is sure to notice your generosity, and see what a "gooj. 
humanitarian" you are. as all the gratified dogs lick the smile on theiil 
chops in agreement. 

Yes, there is just something about a stray dog (alas, who ha] 
changed by degrees from being famished, starving, and hungry u 
content), and knowing that you did your part. Furthermore, 
provide lodging and recreation for these dogs in our dorms and on 
porches. 

While on mv mail route I happened to see the dog catcher. Y 
The dog catcheri All the dogs without tags (or most of them) wej 
picked up, and the population has greatly declined. 

You know, I kind of miss SMC's nicest nusiance. 



THE 

MOUNTAINS 





Thunday, September IS, 1977 THE SODTHEBN ACCENT - 7 



P^^alm 0( Jfoff^eU 



Praise Godl 

Who through His Spmt and my faith in Him 
produces a new life in my soul and 
creates my heart and mind anew 

That I may attain perfection of character. 

I shall sing a praise to Him 

because my new heart is glad 
And is in 

the image of God. 

1 am delivered from 

the selfishness of Satan and 

the sneakiness of his tempting devices 

As long as I constantly look to Jesus; 
I shall be strengthened. 

The walls of 

doubt, 

timidity, 

self-centeredness, and 

non-understanding 
Had once boxed me in 

and I longed to be let out. 

So God reached out 

for my hand in faith 
To lead it 

to lay a fast hold upon His power. 

And as long as 

I am united to Him. 
Sin will have 

no more dominion over me. 

So I will 

continually grasp 

the power of God 

through faith and 
constantly look to Jesus, 
And 1 will be strengthened 

knowing the promises and provisions 
of God 

are sure. 



The Lucky Few 

Chorale Members Chosen 



DKris Hackleman 



The members of SMC's two choral touring groups have been chosen and : 



Die Melsteralnger Male Cfaoras 

Basses 
Ist Tenors 



Brent Britton 
Ken Kovalski 
Curtis McCrillis 
Bob Southard 
Dennis Starkey 
Brian Wilcox 

Baritones 

Duane Gibson 
Carlos Haylock 
Terry McCandless 
Jay Mattheis 
Chester PiUsbury 
Greg Rimmer 
Johnny Woodruff 



Ed Keplinger 
Tony Mobl^y 
Dan Pabon 
Rudy Prado 
David Thomas 

2nd Tenors 

' Robert Gadd 
Mark Godenick 
Glen Holland 
Joe Miller 
Rick Stier 
Kent Williams 
Joshua Zarandona 

Accompanist 

George Whetmore 



Study Shows 
High Interest In 
Church Colleges 

MINNEAPOLIS ■- A recent 
study indicates that interest in 
church colleges is strong, des- 
pite a light decline in college 
and university enrollment a- 
cross the nation. 

"In spite, or perhaps be- 
cause, of the secularization of 
American society at large, it is 
clear that many youth today 
seek a higher education that 
combines a quality academic 
program with a genuine reli- 
gious experience," said Earl 
J. McGrath of the University 
of Arizona 



Collegiate Chorale 

Altos 

Cindy Jo Anderson 
Casandra Cansler 
Evonne Crook 
Joni Darmody 
Judy Martin 
Kathy Mixell 

Basses 

Jerry Clark 
Don Crook 
Steve Darmody 
Steve Dunn 
Greg Garrens 
Terry Meharry 
Ken Rogers 
Charles Sarr 



: listed below: 
Sopranos 

Kitty Crook 
Paulette Henderson 
Myrna Litchfield 
Judy McGhee 
Kathe Michaelis 
Karen Raitz 
Tammy Walker 
Cindy Whitehead 

tenors 

Linz Audain 
Larry Becker 
John Brown 
Donnie Keele 
Ed Keplinger 
Brian Ringer 
Accompanist 

Elaine Kuna 



There is no time or place 
I which it is inappropriate 
'er up a petition to 
God. There is nothing that 
can prevent us from lifting 
up our hearts in the spirit of 
earnest prayer. " S.C. 99 



McGrath's 
were based 
recently c( 
Richard C. Ne 



observations 
1 a study he 
ipleted with 

of the High- 



er Education Center at thi 
University of Arizona 






by September 7 to the Studem rinance w.....= = 
receiving ajob offertoday either through mad 



Because of the number of students 
needing jobs, Paulette Goodman 
could not promise preference for 
time and type of work., So when you 
set vour job offer, accept it as it wUl 
probably be the only one you ge 
However, if there is a class conflirt 
or medical reasons prevent you from 
accepting, she will be glad to work 
something else out if you let her 



If you do not have a job offer by 
Friday, September 16, please contact 
Miss Goodman sometime next week. 



J . raE SOUTHERN ACCENT ll.u«<Uy, September 15, .977 



Q Martling 
And 
Runnelles 
Take The 
Lead 

Softball Standings 



w 



~^^. 



Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



r? 



New Fun-Running Jogging 



Martling 


1 


Runnelles 




Minder 




Hunt 




Mobley 




Webster 




Whitehead 




Wohlers 




Hickman 


2 



The 1977 Softball season got 
under^vav last week with two 
teams assuming the lead. Mart- 
ling and Runnelles share the lead 
with undefeated records of 1-0. 
Martling smashed Whitehead. 
14-3. and Runnelles beat Minder, 
6-1. in their onlv games. 

Minder took second place with 
wins over Hickman and Wohlers. 



Tim Arellano 

Hunt. Mobley, Webster, and 
Whitehead all have identical re- 
cords of 1 -1 . Look for any of these 
teams to surge ahead as the 
season progresses. 

Wohlers and Hickman are hav- 
ing their problems getting started 
this season. Wohlers' only wm 
was over Webster, 4-3. Hickman 
forfeited two games to take sole 
possession of last place. 



Photo by Rhonda Runya 



Tennis 

Tourney 

Posted 



This year the CABL track club 
promises to be fun. Van Boddy, 
one of the leaders of the organiza- 
tion, runs approximately 15 miles 
a day. As a personal goal, Van 
would like to make the '80 Olym- 
pic team. 

Boddy says, "The big thing now 
is fun-running." Fun-running is 
non-competitive in nature, "It's 
more of a social event. The 
runners are encouraged to talk to 
one another or to sing." This 
makes for a more enjoyable time 
without the pressure of racing 
against the clock. There are no 
awards, no clocks, and no losers. 
The emphasis will be on main- 
taining health. Boddy says, but 
there are competitive events such 
as the all-comers meet held every 
Thursday at the Tyner High 
School, He would also like to 



sponsor a Marathon at SMC I 
which would be the first one of its I 
kind in the Southeast. (A Mai 
thon is 26 miles, 385 yards). 

Seminars will be held in nearby I 
academies on weekends, 
emphasis will be placed on 
live motivation. Boddy plans lo I 
sponsor a run Sunday morning I 
(The SMC Steeplechase) with a 
wards, such as T-shirts or rib 
bons, to the top finishers. 

There will also be seminars oil 
campus with guest speakers liktl 
Dr. Kenneth Cooper, author of jl 
book on aerobics for womenll 
Other speakers will give advietl 
such as care for the feet, howt 
avoid muscle strain, and startinjl 
your jogging program. 

Join the CABL track club i 
have fun running. 




What Is Trust? 



"Commit your way to the Lord, 
Trust also in Him. and He will do it." Psalms 37:5 NASB 

Trust. ..what is it. and what is its relationship to commitment? 
Trust -- like love and commitment -- has several aspects also. 

Trust is dependency. It means to rest on someone or something that 
is solid. If a foundation is composed of purest diamond, then it will 
stand the test of the ages. Dependency on God provides more security 
than diamond. Total dependence on God is to be really free. 

Trust is acceptance, receiving God's will in place of ours. When we 
accept the will of God, our daily life becomes the simple outworking of 
His will for us. His plans become our plans as we live His life in place 



of c 



r life. 



Trust is self-dying. To die of self is to live life to its fullest, for self 
bogs down the mechanism of growth. Only in dying is there living; as 
it is in the natural world, so it is in the spiritual realm. 

The seed planted in the loam soil must disintegrate. When it does, 
the electrical currents of life flood it with vin (a- in - im and vigor), and 
it grows because it has ceased to live. As the process of dying brings 
the metamorphosis to the seed, so rwe allow the Holy Spirit to renew 
us, we die to self, and the image of God is gradually retraced in the 
human soul by the omnipotent power of creation. 

Trust is giving--to shar-what one has. When the element of giving 
takes the wheel of life, the course is certair Sinci "heaven is a 
ceaseless approaching to God through Christ " it n"jst begin here, 
because the essence of giving is the composition of heaven. Heaven 
P was given in the Gift of Bethlehem. To live in a state of giving is to live 
in the atmosphere of heaven. 

Trust is the gateway to loving. There is no greater word than love.' 
It embraces the corridors of time. Us voice of melody is heard down the 
hallway of etemity. 

As light is constant, so is love. Love rings from the eternity of 
yesterday to the eternity of tomorrow in chimes of crystal tones that 
pulsate from the heart of God. As love is eternal, so are commitment 
and trust. 

When we commit ourselves to Him and trust Him also, we begin an 
adventure of true freedom that grows into the experience of love. Love 
was never meant to be an argot term; it was meant to be a living 
application of the power of God's love upon the human heart. 

When we cease to be bondslaves of this dark world on the edge of 
the galaxy, we become living temples.Qf light that will never grow dim,. 
This is what it means to commit, to trust in the Creator-Savion of the 
universe. 



The first round of the Talge 
Hall Tennis Tournament has been 
posted in the lobby. The players 
must reserve a time block in the 
gymnasium before the deadline. 
If the deadlines are not met, a 
coin flip will determine the win- | 
ner. This is necessary to maintain t 
a flow of activity. I 

This year there are several fa- i 
vorites to take the championship 
round. Last year Dean Evans lost 
in the last round to Rod Ward, but 
is a sure bet to place very high . 
this year. Dean Halversen is 
another threat to win. Evans and 
Halverson are in first and second 
seed positions. Mike Turrey, 
Rick Smith, and Keith Terrill are 
seeded third, fourth, and fifth 
respectively. The point to re 
member here is that there are 
many new players, and any one of 
them may be able to upset the 
top-seeded players. 

Both participants are asked to 
buy a new can of tennis bails. 
One can will be opened for use in 
the match. The winner will take 
the unopened can to the next 
match. The players will ulti- 
mately buy only one can as long 
as they keep winning. The losers 
will buy another set for the con- 
solation tournament. (Please buy 
Wilson or Penn brand). The rules 
posted with the pairings. 




^1 



i V 



Photo by Don JeU» I 



Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, TN 37315 




Sou&em Mi3sionai7 College'-* 
CoUegedole, Tennessee 37315 

Part Two 



The Road: 

What's Taking So Long? 



□Dennis Canther 

Telephone lines, dynamite, 
chuck holes, detours, money -- 
City Manager Lee Holland said, 
"if you have any questions, or 
complaints, just pick up the 
phone and call me. I'll talk to 
anybody, because I'm anxious to 
please." 

In response to the detour chuck 
hole issue, Holland replied, "the 
CoUegedale city limits end on the 
detour to the north where it be- 
comes a rough road. 

1 have no jurisdiction over the 
county road, so the chuck holes 
are the county's responsibility. 



Any rough spots orr this side of 
the county's road will be Fixed^ 
but only after road construction is 
finished. No sense doing a major 
repaying job on the detour road 
until we get most of our traffic 
back on the main road." 

Another subject under discus- 
sion is the utility moving situa- 
tion. Holland explained that 
there were several utility lines up 
on the mountain, including water, 
gas, electric overland, local Col- 
legedale telephone lines, and 
South Central Bell's long line - a 
large cable consisting of 3,500 
long distance lines and six TV 
cables. This large cable is the 



main trunk line between Chat- 
tanooga and Knoxville. 

As a result of long negotiations, 
the utility companies have fin- 
ished moving all utilities off the 
mountain. This cost the utility 
companies far more than Col 
legedale is paying to build the 
road. 

Holland said the payment to 
Brown Brothers Construction 
Company of Chattanooga for the 
last of the three phases of con 
struction work before Hamilton 
County paves the road was $336 

Tom to page 2, col. 5 




Photo by Mark Ford 




The Southern Accent 



Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 

Thmsday, September 22, 1977 



CoUegedale, Tenn. 




Student Distribution 



aCurtis McCrilli; 



Argentina 

Bermuda 

Brazil 

Britain 

Canada 

Chile 

Colombia 

Cuba 

Denmark 

Domincan Republic 

Ethiopia 

France 

Haiti 



Honduras 

Hong Kong 

India 

Indonesia 

Jamaica 

Malaysia 

Mexico 

Norway 

Palau 

Peru 

Singapore 

Sweden 

Venezuela 

West Germany 



Career Days To Meet In Separate Chapels 



ORich Ashlock 

Elder E.S. Reile, president of 
the Carolina Conference, will 
open career days Sept. 27 with a 
chapel on career opportunities 
within the SDA organization. 

Dr. Cyril Futcher, academic 
dean, hopes this meeting will 
stimulate students to think about 
questions they have about the 
^pe of work they plan to enter. 

The purpose of career days, 
said Dr. Futcher, is to make the 
students aware of job openings 
in the Adventist worldwide work 
and what future needs there, will 
be. 

Then, visitors from various oc- 
cupations will conduct several 
small chapels Thursday, Sept. 29, 
and talk to students interested in 
their line of work. 

Even if a student is not inter- 
ested in working for the church, 
these professionals will answer 
any questions relating to their 
field in nondenominational work. 



Doctors from Loma Linda Uni- ^^^^^Z^^^J^' 

''T '^f S'wi* the ^e: o°office administration students 

pathy will speak w.th the pre secretaries, both 

meds, pre-dental. dental hyg.^ U^ere ^.^ ^^^^,^^^ 

en sts, and other related health y"""B • 

areas. For future teachers there able expenence. 

Education Department 
Reaccredited By NCATE 



DBill Marcom 

SMC will continue to be the 
birth place of new teachers for at 
least the next ten years, said 
President Frank Knittel to the 
faculty and student body last 
week. 

Reaccreditation of SMC's ele- 
mentary and secondary teacher 
education programs was granted 
by the National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Educa- 
tion (NCATE). 



SMC is one of only three other 
liberal arts colleges in Tennessee 
to receive this accreditation. Dr. 
Cyril Futcher, academic dean, co- 
ordinated the 18-month analysis 
which brought NCATE's accep- 
tance of the teacher-training pro- 
Accreditation, said Dr. K.M. 
Kennedy, professor of education, 
provides reciprocity for certifica- 
tion in 31 sUtes for education 
graduates. 



If a student's major is not listed 
below as a chapel, the student 
should attend the one most relat- 
ed to his/her field. An example 
of this is Art. There is no special 
chapel specifically for art majors, 
but many art majors go into 
teaching; therefore, attend the 
education chapel. 

This will be a required chapel 
and attendance will be taken. 

Directory of Chapels 

Talge Hall Chapel - pre-meds, 
pre-dental, dental hygiene, med 
tech, and optometry. 



Thatcher Hall Chapel - religion, 
theology, and Bible teachers. 

Daniells Hall 111 - business and 
'.'accounting 

Summerour Hall 105 -- office ad- 
ministration and medical secre- 
tary. 

Lynn Wood Hall 218 - behavioral 
science, social work, and psycho- 
logy. 
Maize Herin Hall -- nursing 

Hackman Hall 222 -- communica- 
fion and English. 



— — Behind Page One — 

Senate Eleetlon ResollB P- ' 

LotsofLetten •"• * 

Podlographics P* 



^^w 



o 



2 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thimdmy, September 22, 1977 



Excused 
Absence 
Policy 
Up For 
Changes 

GDonnie Keele 

The policy for excused absence 
for illness was discussed at a 



According to President Frank 
Knittel. the Division of Nursing 
requests a variance on the policy, 
which would once again require 
the student to obtain a written 
excuse from the Health Service or 
their personal physician in order 
to have the absence excused. 

During last year, the policy was 
changed from requiring a docu- 
ment to that of a student-to-teach- 
er transaction, thus eliminating 
the middle man. 



The reasons for the change 
requested by the Division of 
Nursing are listed in the request 
form submitted to the senate 
council by the Division. 

l.The present nursing curriculum 
has reduced lab experiences to 
the essentials. In effect, no labs 
can be omitted. 

2. Division of Nursing is obligated 
to provide makeup experiences 
for excused lab misses. 




This conglomeration of vehicles belongs to the men's 
dorm. Our staff photographer took this shot to encourage 
the use of leg-power as opposed to gas-consuming modes 
of transportation. 

Photo by Rhonda Runyan 



3. Makeup labs often have to be 
unscheduled labs, thus throwing 
an overload on the clinical in- 
structor. 

4.Unexcused labs do not impose 
obligation on the Division to ar- 
range makeup. Students may 
have to repeat the rotation of the 
course. 



5. Since the policy of Health Ser- 
vice of not giving health excuses, 
the absences for reported ill- 
nesses have markedly increased, 
throwing a great burden on the 
instructors in the Division of 
Nursing.- 

This issue has not been voted 
yet, but will be on the agenda in 
the next 'senate meeting. 



Nicaragua AA. Stronger Than Ever 



DRoland Joy 

Thi Nicaragua Mission is grow- 
ing strong according to Dr. Floyd 
Greenleaf. head of the history 
department. 

Dr. Greenleaf has been the 
missions sponsor for the past year 
along with his co-sponsor John 
Durichek from the industrial arts 
department. 



The mission began in 1971 with 
nine students and faculty from 
Southern Missionary College. 
Today there are six people work- 
ing as missionaries there. 

Richard Longoria is the mission 
project director, with his wife, 
Vickie, acting as clinic supervisor. 
Jennie Kay Gallay, Jamie Newlon 
and Thea Thomas, all graduates 
from SMC. are nurses. Also 
serving as a missionary is Bob 
Hirschi, maintenance and vehicle 
repair man. 



Services 

Dr. Greenleaf 



(pond 



explained that 
ving five Indian 
villages, three of which have 
medical clinics of their own. The 



other two are attended by medical 
mobile units. 

Besides all the medical atten- 
tion, the staff has focused on 

Arrow Off 
Prophecy 
In Cohutta 

DMike Ringstaff 

The Arrow of Prophecy Cru- 
sade with evangelist Dwight 
Davis began last week in Cohutta. 
Ga.. a town located 15 miles 
southeast of SMC. 

The crusade, which will be held 
in a tent, will meet each evening 
at 7:30. with the exception of 
Wednesdays and Thursdays, un- 
til Oct. 22. Transportation will be 
provided for students and will 
leave each evening at 7 from 
Wright Hall. 

The crusade is a result of nearly 
two years of lay visitation by the 
members of the Api^on Church. 

Elder Dwight Davis, a Ga- 
Cumberland Conference evangel- 
ist, was an SMC student during 



religion as well. Four years ago 
the staff built a church which 
seats 175 people. 

The hope of all who are en- 
gaged in the work is that in time it 
will grow and become a regular 
part of the overseas mission work 
of the Seventh-day Adventist 
church. 



Adventist 
Forum Starts 
This Sabbath 

DVanessa Greenleaf 

"The Christian and Televi- 
sion" will be the topic for the first 
meeting of the Collegedale Chap- 
ter of the Adventist Forum. 

Elder Jan Doward, associate 
director of the youth department 
of the General Conference, will 
present his message Sabbath, 
Sept. 24 at 3 p.m. in the College- 
dale Academy auditorium. 

Officers of the local Forum are: 
Dr. Lawrence Hanson, president; 
Dr. Barbara Ruf, secretary; Fran- 
ces Andrews, publicity secretary. 

Members of the program com- 
mittee are Dr. Lorenzo Grant, Dr. 
Gerald Colvin, Elder Helmut K. 
Ott, and Elder Jerry Gladson. 



THE ROAD con't from page 1 

thousand. To finance the whol, 
project, the City of Collegeda ! 

voted a $500 thousand bond is* 
which is to be paid back in two 
ways - a rise in property taiie< 
and the city sticker. " 

Sept. 12 was dynamite blastini. 
day on top of the hill. About 80 
holes were drilled 18 feet deen 
into the rock and dynamite set 
into the holes. That evenin, 
there was a loud blast. The earth 
shook and the hill buckled; the 
remaining 21 feet of unwanted 
rock crumbled. 

Workmen are now preparing 
for the final stages of the Col 
legedale road construction. 



Mathis 
Arrives At 
WSMC-FM 

aCarlos Haylock 

Jerry Mathis arrives at WSMC 
FM to fill the position that John I 
Beckett, the staHon's former chief j 
engineer, left to head the corapul. 
er department at SMC. In addi. 
fion to being chief engineer, 
Mathis will also be working : 
announcer at WSMC-FM. 

Mathis attended SMC in 1970. | 
71, and during that fime he i 
announced for WSMC-Fm. 

After leaving SMC that year, I 
he went back to Harvard Hillil 
Academy near Savannah. Tenn., 
and helped them start an edua- 1 
tional Fm station there. By 1913 1 
it became operational. 

During this period he al 
quired his first class radio tele- 1 
phone license and for the nextfeft I 
years he stayed in commercial | 
radio doing double duty as 
eer and announcer. At one timt j 
he was chief engineer for one! 
station while also working i 
sister station at another location I 

When Mathis arrived at WSMC I 
a couple of weeks ago he «l 
impressed with the tremendojil 
progress the station had raaJtl 
since he had last been here. 

His immediate plans are l)| 
finish getting settled here, an I 
later on, to confinue his studies'! 
SMC in the computer scieiict| 
field. 



Ray Hailwell 

Advertising Consultant 



The Southern Accent 



Become A College Camijus Deeler 

P.O.Box 689, F^^SS'iJ^ 07m^^' *™- 
lleneOrlowsky 201-227-6881 



WTCiiiRgf 



The State Farm 

can find you 
a match 
for life. 



TlmirMUy, September 22, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



Doctors Top Most-Needed 
Overseas AAissionary List 



I 



WASHINGTON D.C. ■- Physi- 
cians liead the list of kinds of 
missionaries most wanted in over- 
seas missions of the Seventh-day 
Adventist Church, according to 
the September "Status of Calls" 
just released by the church's 
world headquaters here. 



With 193 mission posts current- 
ly open, physicians and dentists 
in demand number 72. Nurses, 
which in years past have been one 
of the chief needs in overseas 
missions, are wanted for just one 
third that number of posts - 24, 
with a few lab technicians includ- 
ed even in this figure. 

Teachers wanted for schools 
overseas number 35. Subject 
specialties for these teachers 
range all the way from graphic 
arts teachers to Bible and math 
teachers and agronomists. 

Two airplane pilots are called 
for. The church has some 50 
planes in operation where space 
and terrain make other types of 
travel either hazardous or imprac- 
tical. It also uses launches, and 
one call is for a launch captain/ 



pastor. 

Calls for 19 pastor-evangelists 
are listed. 

"Nationals are able to perform 
many of the functions they once 
looked to 'foreign' missionaries to 
do," explains Dr. Clyde 0. Franz, 
secretary of the General Confer- 
ence of Seventh-day Adventists. 
"The vigorous educational pro- 
gram of the church has made this 
possible." 



The trena lowara specialization 
and away from simply sending a 
minister overseas is also an indi- 



cation of the development of the 
church abroad. 

"We no longer call simply 'a 
teacher' or 'a physician,' " says 
Dr. Franz. "Rather we stipulate 
what specialty the teacher or phy- 
sician must have, for both schools 
and medical institutions must be 
acceptable to governments." 



Five Students Named To 
National Historical Society 



DKathy Oakley 



1 ban- 



Dr. Jerome Clark, professor of Tuesday evening, Oct. 4 

history, has reported that five quet room 2. 

SMC students have been named Membership requirements 

to Phi Alpha Theta, the National ^^^^^ ,^^ student must have a 3.1 

Historical Honor Society. gpy^ j„ j2 or more hours of 

The new members are Ken history and must have a 3.0 in 

Porter Irvin Barber, Robert two-thirdsof his remaining hours. 

Renfro^, Frank Potts, and Ken The SMC chapter intends to 

Richards visit Confederama, Anderson- 

The initiation ceremony for ville, and Nashville, the state 

these new members will be held capitol. 




Rei Leatherhead gnaw 
Runyan. 



a watermelon rind. Photo by Rhonda 



Senate Election Results 

DVanessa Greenleaf 

„, THimi44 Joy Graves, 624 TH 

l\ ™ ??" OS Julie Gant, 352 TH' 

#2 TH153-198 Kay Campbell, 221 TH 

S lu'Zltl ■.■.■. VaYeri Johnson, 257 TH 

#4 TH 253-298 ■■ K^jhe Mchaelis, 355 TH» 



Library Efficiency Upped By SOLINET 



TH300-348 n„en Seat 

™ 350-398 V.V.V. Vanessa Greenleaf, 432 TH. 

l^f.lif, Wanda Patsel, 175 TH. 

TH 518-541 Cindy Jo Anderson, 622 TLH 

TH6J8-64 :::;: Mark Boddy, 118 TA 

TA 105-39 ■.■.■.;■.■.■■■....... Gary McClarty, 156 TA 



#11 TA 141-184 RonPickell,228TA 

P ■^t^^S^ William Cole, 148 TA 

#13 TA 238-284 Robert Colgrove, 262 TA* 

#14 TA 320-336 Rodney Fusion, 266 TA 

#15 TA 338-384 .. , Mike Baez, A-9 TA' 

#16 TA basement & A wing Del Schutte, B-15 TA 

#17 TAB&Cwings '.Jane Kennedy, 157 TH. 

#18 Madison Campus Scott Cheme, Box 450, Collegedale 

#19 Village Students (7 sen.) ^ jj^,, g„^ ,17j Collegedale 

Ruth B. Jacobson, Box 231, Collegedale 
John Lazor, Box 1189, Collegedale 
Glen Mather. Box 371, Collegedale 
Bruce Messinger, Box 1120. Collegedale 
Rhonda Runyan, Box 225, Collegedale 



DCarlos Haylock 

McKee Library has installed a 
computer terminal that joins it 
through the Southeastern Library 
Network (SOLINET) to other li- 
braries having similar terminals. 
SOLINET in turn is affiliated with 
the Ohio College Library Center, 
the founder of the system. 

McKee Library has been a 
charter member of SOLINET 
since the system began, but be- 
cause of the cost involved, was 
unable to get a terminal until 
receiving a grant from the Kellog 
Foundation for a two-year period. 

The system will eventually 
have six operational subsystems 



with different functions. At the 
moment there is only one sub- 
system in operation, which is for 
cataloging and standardizing the 
data on the catalog cards in a 
more efficient manner. When the 
library receives a new book, it is 
cataloged and ready for use as 
much as a month sooner than 
otherwise. This also makes the 
catalog data available to all the 
other libraries on the network. 

When the other subsystems be- 
come operational, it will be pos- 
sible to attain books and material 
from other libraries on a loan 
basis through the network. 







Ken Rogers, President 
K.R. Davis, Sponsor 



'Presidential Appointee 




Collegedale 
Cleaners 



p32JB2^ 




Sun. - Thurs. 
7:30 - 5:30 

Friday 7:30-4:00 

COLLEGE PLAZA 

396-2550 



^ 



/fcl/CTrtRt "^oupo" """s' accompany purchase 

^r\pr\ pW^The Campus Shop 



White Rain Hair Spray 
II oz. .99 




Dial & Irish Spring Soap 



Gillette Foamy 
11 oz. .89 



EMS 



4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT •nmred.y, Seplember 22, 1977 



Pac 



Editoriol 



1. unmoved, 2. not interested; indifferent: listless. That's 
from Webster's New World Dictionary. 

Out of nine precincts in the women's dorm, only four had 
candidates running. The other five had to be ippointed by Ken 
Rogers, SA president. Of course, women are not so politically- 
minded; they're more of a naive bunch. One wouldn't expect 

Or is this true? Maybe it's not the women's fault, but the 
student leadership's fault. Is the Student Association doing its 
job? What's the purpose of a student government anyway? 

SMC's student government isn't as illustrious as those on 
other campuses, but yet it still serves a function. For instance. 
The Southern Accent is brought to you by the SA. This goes for 
The Joker, and The Southern Memories, too. But couldn't these 
publications stand without the help of a student government? 

Then there's the social activities and the SA once-a-month 
chapels. Could these things be accomplished without the support 
of a student government? 

The Student Senate - what does it accomplish? Piles of 
paperwork, befuddled by red tape, bogged down in its constitu- 
tion. What of it? Does it really discuss pertinent issues? 

If so, then why no interest ? Why the deadness, the dullness? 
We, the editors, know why. Our students are satisfied. 
Yes, there are a few gripes, but no really earthshaking opinions -- 
either for the good or bad. We enjoy being fed and hate to cough 
up anything resembling participation. 

Our students - 1. unmoved, 2. not interested; indifferent; 
listless. From Webster. Apathy. 



Letters To The Editor 



Living With The Dress Code 



Dear Editor: 

During the summer certain regulations in 
our dress code were relaxed, allowing the 
women on our campus to wear pants. I want to 
thank the members on the board responsible for 
this progressive decision. I also want to thank 
the ladies for looking so nice this school year, 
and holding to the code. 

At first when I found men were not allowed 
to wear blue jeans -- well, to say the least, the 
revolution was ready to go, and protest speech- 
es were fired up. When rationale again began 
to take over in my mind, I began to realize what 
was really taking place. Our school and our 
church don't always do things right, I'll admit 
that. Part of the reason for my attitude in days 
past was due to this reason. 

But in all truthfulness there are people in 



our school who are concerned about the mes- 
sage God has entrusted us with, and they are 
also concerned with us. Let's not place our 
school in danger of unwanted government 
interference. Please, I appeal to the student 
body — whether we agree with the code or not - 
let's uphold it while we must live under its 
authority. Let's not have a bad attitude, for 1 
have discovered if your attitude is bad, every- 
thing will look bad. 

One more thing in closing. If you are 
uncomfortable with the regulations, first and 
foremost your voice will be most listened to if 
you support the regulations while you are' 
working through the proper channels to change 
it. Romans 13:1 

In Faith 

The Peoples Party 

Jerry Lee Holt 




nd vacations 
Subscriptions for parents and alun 
weekly from CoUegedale. TN at a non-profit 



Discriminatory 
Dress Code 

Dear Editor, 



Since a new dress code has been approved — 
one which claims to observe TITLE IX, I wonder 
if the statement in the current SMC Student 
Handbook {p. 15) which says. "Hair.. ..must not 
reach below the top of the collar in the back 
(while standing) or below the bottom of the ears 
on the sides " will be omitted. I'm sure that the 
college would not want to be inconsistent in its 
attempts to avoid sex discrimination. 

Sincerely. 



City Answers 
M. Ford 

Dear Editor: 

In response to M. Ford's letter, the City of 
CoUegedale did not initiate the voter registra- 
tion drive last year, though it was not against it. 
The qualification of voter registraHon for 
mandatory buying of city stickers was registra- 
tion for City elections, not Presidential elec- 
tions. 

Sincerely, 

City of CoUegedale 



Reply To Th 
Unprintoblf 
Letter 



Dear Aristedes; 

It is not the custom of this P'JL 
the sounding board for juvenij 
If your problem is as bad as y»« J 
sound, it would further youj s 
better to take it to the deans twmj 
what can be worked out. Thisijl 
nor is it old, but it is workable a" I 
our knowledge, you are the «" | 
problems with it. 

As for the other materiali'l 
letter, it would be best thai I 
awav instead of read. PcrJ '^^ 
is where you belong, but 1 J' j. 
cannot be used to 'iowS'^'^Jj 
neither repressive nor deraea ^ 

It would also serve y<"> ^' 
Accent does not print Letters 
are not signed. It is the beliei 
if a subject is worth discuss™! 
worth being signed. 

Sincerely, The Editors. 



TbnnHU)', September 22, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 




lere In Black And White 



us initial premise that the 
iA church does not prohibit 
mte) marriage, then I sub- 
^istency has been tolerat- 

T our campus. 

kh quality was sent to the 

public relations avenues, 

SSouthem Accent, for the 

3 Pat and Calvin Taylor's 

f vocal concert. Following 

l«, the pictures were posted in 

I the SMC campus. However, 

Iwere defaced by an evidently 

mal, the administration asked 



Ed. Note: 
Dear Rhonda: 



that they be taken down. 

Word goes too, that you, the editor of the 
only publication the student body has, refused 
to print the picture in the past issue of The 
Southern Accent. 

I would be the first to admit that inter-racial 
relationships in this region are not smiled upon 
by the general pubKc, but I would also be the 
first to contend that until we as Seventh-day 
Adventists find legitimate biblical evidence to 
condemn inter-racial marriage, it is not our 
privilege to indiscriminately discriminate a- 
gainst our brothers and sisters in the church, or 
against anyone. 

Sincerely yours, 
Rhonda Runyan 



We understand exactly how you feel. We 
did not print the photo because of the distur- 
bance some of the posters had already caused. 
We do not consider ourselves bigots or preju- 
diced. The Taylor concert was a sensation, and 
The Accent apologizes for any misunderstand- 
ing. 



Administrative 
Non-Support 



Dear Editor: 

I've been brooding over what appears to be a 
lack of official support of the Taylor concert. 
Much enthusiasm was shown during and after 
their very inspirational SA chapel. More than 
one student found it very moving - very close to 
worship. Yet the 7:30 concert was not counted 
as legitimate worship. 

If all musical concerts were treated this way, no 
question would be raised. But why, then, was 
last year's Hale & Wilder concert an ' official 
worship? Was the Taylor concert less worship- 
ful? Not that I could see. 
I would be interested in hearing why our 
administration gave support to the Taylors - 
but not too much. 

Lynn Newmann 



Campus CCassiiiedg 

We print personals, used book announcements, and other 
miscellany free. Drop your announcement rn a red Southern 
Accent mailbox. 

A Big Happy Birthday wish to Telly, Linda, and Arlene who became 18 this month. 
Love. Maria 

9 like To T«ke Guitar? 1 will be giving lessons to anyone interested in putting some 
effort into learning to play. If interested, call me at 395-3426. but please don't call 
unless you're serious and willing to work at it. Mic Thurber. 

^ Achtnng! Achtungl 

Alle Deutschsprechenden sind heriichst eingeladen zu Familie Aussner am 
Samstag Abend den 24.18.77 um 7 zu kommen. Fuer Reservierung und weitere 
Auskuntt bitte J. David Kay 4768 oder Vinita Wayman 4461 anrufen. 



Calling the Fertile Mind. Please investigate the cause that is worthy. 

John, Happy September 26! 

Daddy, Happy Birthday! Love, Vanessa 



The Nicaragua Mission is looking for the right m 
B.S. in nursing. 

According to Dr. Floyd Greenleaf, sponsor of the 
December are needed. 



woman with their A.S. or 
nurses graduating this 



Are you losing your ID card? Why not get yourself an ID card holder, custom made 
from Mallet & Hide, Talge Hall, B-8, 396-4983. Need to see one first? Ask Vinita 
Wayman to show you her's. 

Needed - Managers for Mallet & Hide for the following positions: Advertising, 
Office, Display, and Sales Manager. For an interview call 396-4983 and ask for 
Walter. 

For sale - leather shoes from Leather Crest, Mason, Knapp, and Hanover shoes. 
Ask about this months special. Note - 10 per cent off to students. Contact Walter at 
4983. 

Save 10-20 percent off the regular price on leathercraft, macrame, art and craft 
supplies Ask about our special quality and group rates for schools, clubs, camps, and 
institutions. See Mallet & Hide, Talge Hall, 396-4983. Ask for Walter. 



Photography 
Contest 




Theme: Campus Life 

Judged On: Photo Quality, 

Expressive Content 
and Mood 

Contest Ends Oct. 21 



Winner $15 



Open To All Students 

except Accent and Memories photographers 



. THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Tiranda)', September 22, 1977 



o 



Podiographics 



By Mark Ford 




J 



■nmradmy, September 22, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 



Evans 
Replaces 

Grange 
As Food 
Director 



□ Dawn Rice 

SMC gained a valuable staff 
member this past July when Earl 
Evans, replacing Ron Grange who 
left to serve at PUC, began work 
as food service director. 

Evans moved to Collegedale 
from Union College, Lincoln, 
Nebraska, where he worked as 
food service director for four 
years. Here in Collegedale with 
Evans is his wife, Joanne, and 
five children, Pattricia, Jeffrey, 
Jerald, Terry and Todd. 

Before working at Union Col- 
lege, Evans was with the An- 
drews University food service 
department. He spent four years 
at Andrews University, where he 
received his B.S. degree in foods 
and nutrition. He has "O done 
work on his master's o. 'e at 
the University of Nebraska. 

Evan's hobbies include water 
sports, baseball, football and 
backpacking. Evans also is a 
lover of music; he says he "blows 
the dust out of the saxaphone 
once in awhile." 

Evans- goal for the cafeteria is 
to "serve wholesome, nutritious 
foods at the best price," and to 
work on our having the "lowest 
food prices in comparison to our 
sister institutions." Evans 
doesn't have any plans to go to 
the flat rate price system. He has 
worked with both the price per 
item system and the flat rate 
system and says that "they're 
about equal" as far as economic 
feasibility was concerned. 

Everyone knows how it seems 





Vanessa 

Greenleaf | 
y 



Earl Evans, new food service director. Photo by Rhonda Ronyan. 



to be more expensive to eat at the "Frogurt" machine. Evans 
Campus Kitchen than it is to eat stated that "I'd rather see the 
at the cafeteria. Evans explained students eat that (frozen yogurt) 



More Like Jesus 



Arranged as poetry from the book Desire of Ages 

Jesus was the fountain of healing mercy for the world; 

His life flowed out in currents of sympathy and tenderness. 
The aged, 
the sorrowing, 
the sin burdened. 

the children at play in their innocent joy. , 
the patient beasts of burden, 
-ill were happier for His presence 
nothing was beneath His notice, 
nothing to which He disdained to minister. 

Jesus shunned display. 

He made no exhibition of His miraculous power. 
He sought no high position and assumed no titles. 



Communion with God through prayer 

develops the mental and moral faculties. 

The spiritual powers strengthen 

as we cultivate thoughts upon spiritual things. 



that "most snack shop prices 
bound to be higher. It's the price 
you pay for convenience." 

One of the changes Evans has 
in mind for the cafeteria is 
(HURRAH) a frozen yogurt or 



than the sweets." 

The new menu cycle has al- 
ready begun, as most have no- 
ticed and, perhaps, appreciated. 
Evans will have a seasonal 
change for each set of menus. 



As 



xe try to become acquainted with our heavenly Father 
through His word, 

angels will draw near. 

""r minds will be strengthened. 

r characters will be elevated and refined- 



e shall become r 



e like our Savior. 



Chorale Schedules Full Agenda 



DKris Hackleman 

The Collegiate Chorale will 
travel to North and South Caro- 
lina, Florida, Opryland, and 
Jamaica. 

The chorale has also been in- 
vited back to the second annual 
Collegiate Chorale Convention. 
At this event, all colleges and 
universities in Tennessee perform 



together and as individual Oct.'S. 

groups According to Don In preparation for all their acti 

Runyan. assistant professor of vities, the chorale members have <> 




1 honor" to be asked recently elected officers, who 

to participate. as follows: , „ . 

The chorale's first campus ap- President - Steve Darmody; 

pearance will be at the close of Secretary-Treasurer - Cindy 

the Week of Spritual Emphasis. Whitehead; Social secretary - 

Sept 23. They will first don tuxes Casandra Cansler; and Tour Man- 

and gowns at the Pops Concert, ager - John Brown. 



Satan's Subtle Steps 
To Persecution 



"And indeed, all who desire to live godly 
persecuted." 2 Timothy 3:12 NASB 



1 Christ Jesus will be 



Affecting the physical, mental and spiritual dimensions of man , , 



The reality of persecution seems to be an event of the future We 
tend to define it that way in our scheme of eschatology (last-day 
events). Could it be that we are viewing the end r""'* "' ^ 
protracted process that began ages ago? The great controversy h^ 
two antagonists, and man falls between them because man must 
choose whom he will serve. , ..^f_„„. 

Each antagonist has his systematic program of offense ^"^ defense 
Each is the commander of an angelic army of countless thousands, 
these two are know as Michael (Jesus and Satan). 

For the last three weeks we have been viewing '"e ope^tion of 
Michael. Now we need to view the subtle, intricate operations of Satan 
that will culminate in the direct persecution of God's chosen people 



of the animal kingdom that exists oniy 

the life of a hopeless tomorrow. ^^^^ 

""^Te^rrpieces a relationship with Jesus is the next element. To - "We hope this -^ 
.fer"4'hLishisconsU„..n,asheb»d^^^^^^^^^^ ; 






The Student Finance 
Office has a new regula- 
tion regarding appoint- 
ments. "We will honor 
appointments above 
walk-ins." stated Laurel 
Wells, director of Stu- 
dent Finance. 

The new procedure is 
this: 

1. Call Diane Bur- 
roughs, the secretary, at 
396-4322 or 396-4355 to 
make an appointment 
with Laurel Wells. Judi 
Moots, or Paulette 
Goodman. A-ppoint- 
ments are made at 30 
minute intervals. But if 
you think your confer- 
ence will take longer, 
tell Diane at that time. 

2. When you arrive at 
the office, sign your 
name on the yellow sign- 
in sheet under the name 
otthepersonyouwishto 

The sign-in sheet 



Testlmonleft. Minister. 472.475. let's view those elements that b^_^^^_^__ „ ..^,1 our gatherings." What do they see? 

^=^:^^kandpride.e.f.k.m^Ssin.ese^^^^^ .^^-^::::^,^2^^^ -'^ ^^^ ^ 
process between ourselves and ~" "-'ainr a,tviu.. 



...s O.W.... ........ .... --^ create; SavLr^ The. ^^;- X^i^^T^^-^^ "^ ^"'^^ "'^^^ 

nucleus that transform into carbon copies of the worid instead ot the ^y^ „„«„„„h 



sons and daughters of God. 



To be continued.. 



'ill 
eliminate some of the 
wasted time students 
spend just sitting and 
waiting." concluded 
Wells. 



» » < > -» » » » *> »■ 



8 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Tlmnday. September 22, 1977 



3 



Weight 
Lifting 
PiciuUp 
At SMC 



Here at SMC there is a sport 
that seems to interest quite a few 
of the guys -- weight lifting. 

Weight lifting can be used tor 
several different reasons. It can 
be used to cut down or build up. 
Some people use it to help them 
in different sports. If used pro- 
perly, weight lifting helps a per- 
son's speed, strength, coordina- 
tion, and cardiovascular return. 

If used in the correct manner, it 
is very uncommon for a person to 
become muscle bound. But even 
then, there is equipment (Nauti- 
lus) which stretches and prestret- 
ches the muscles and gets a bet 
ter pump (which means a person 
gets more blood m the muscle 




Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



Tennis Tourney 
Deadline Approaciiing 




area) because it isolates on cer- 
tain muscles. This equipment 
makes it possible for a person to 
work on any muscle group at a 
time. The advantage is you can 
work just one area to whatever 
degree .you wish. 

Weight lifting is a sport with 
two general categories. Olympic 
lifting consists of clean and jerk 
and snatch. It used to include 
press but it was dropped Power 
lifting consists of bench press 
dead lift and squat There are 




Photo by Rhonda Ronyan. 



Paul Opp Photo by Mark Ford 

rules to the different lifts. There 
are also different lifts which are 
used in competition, but power 
lifting and Olympic lifting are the 
most common. 



Rundown 
On Softball 
Standings 



Hunt 

Mobley 

Mulder 

Wohlers 

Runnells 

Whitehead 

Webster 

Hickman 

Martling 



The Softball season has gotten 
more interesting as Hunt won 
twice, beating Runnells 14-6 and 
Minder 16-11. Mobley moved 
into second place by splitting a 
pair. Mobley beat Martling 15-13 
in a slugfest, but lost to White- 
head 17-14. Minder and Wohlers 
are deadlocked in third place with 
3-3 records. Runnells won one 
and lost two and Whitehead won 
one and lost one to tie for the fifth 
spot. Webster and Hickman are 
seventh and eighth, respectively. 
The big disappointment is Mart- 
ling who dropped to the cellar by 
losing three games consecutively. 



The Tennis tournament has 
gotten off to a soaring start. 
There were seven matches played 
as of Sunday, Sept. 18. Jim 
Wampler beat Brad Pryor and is 
scheduled to play Clinton 
Meharry who won over Mark 
Scheifer. John Ellsworth lost to 
Joe Bruce and Randy Runnells 
was defeated by Keith Terrill as 
the four won their qualification 
round matches. Mike Crawford 
won over Bruce Woiping, Artie 
Cisneros beat Jim Greve, and 
Walter Cliet defeated Barry 



Mann as the winners advanced to 
Round one. 

This is a reminder for the play, 
ers to meet the deadline for the 
qualification round. A coin flip 
will decide the winner if the 
match is not played by Tuesday 
Sept. 20. '■ 

There are four players who | 
have a good shot at the trophy: 
Halverson, Evans, Tuuri, and 
Smith. They have received byes 
to round three which means they 1 
must win three games to clincli | 
the championship. 





Photo byRondaRm}] 




Mittleider To Lead Religion Retreat 



D Dennis Starkey 

Elder Kenneth J. Mittleider, president of the Potomac 
Conference, will be the featured speaker at this fall's Religion 
Retreat to be held Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 at SMC 

Elder Mittleider has served the denomination since 1951 when 
he graduated from Walla Walla College with a B.A. in biblical 
languages. He interned in his home state of Idaho for two years 
worked as a pastor/evangelist, and later as the ministerial' 
secretary for the Northern Pacific Union. He became president of 
the Wisconsin Conference in 1969 and served there for six years' 
before accepting his current position. 

Elder Mittleider has traveled around the world to such 
countries as Russia, Hungary, Lebanon, and Czechoslovakia 
visiting SDA mission work and teaching field schools for Andrews 
University. He also serves on the Ministerial Training Advisory 
Committee for the General Conference. 

He and his wife, Barbara, have three sons. The oldest, 
Douglas, is the assistant treasurer for the Home Health Education 





Service in the Southwestern Union, while 
Jarold and Dennis are attending Andrews 
University. 

Elder Mittleider's theme for the retreat 
is "Methods in Public Evangelism," and he 
will have several presentations on the sub- 
ject. 

The program for the weekend is as 
follows; 

Friday. Sept. 30, 8 p.m. ■- Elder Mitt- 
leider will speak at the Thatcher Hall chapel. 
Sabbath, Oct. i.- 9 a.m. - The retreat 
moves to Little Debbie Park at Harrison Bay 
for Sabbath School. A children's program 
will be provided. 

10:15 a.m. - A symposium presented by 
the ministerial secretaries of the Southern 
Union. Mrs. Mittleider will speak to the 
ladies. 

tnni to page 2, col. S 



The Southern Accent 



Voice of fhe Southern Missionary College Student 

Thdrsday, September 29, 1977 



CoUegedale, Tenn. 



Amin Bans Adventists In Uganda 



NAIROBI. Kenya (UPI) - Idi 
Amin's regime banned 27 reJig- 
ious groups -- including the Bap- 
tist Mission, the Salvation Army 
and the Seventh-day Adventists-i 
for activities "not conducive to 
the security of Uganda." 

A Radio Kampala broadcast 
monitored in Nairobi listed 27 
organizations with facilities in 
Uganda, and all but one of them, 
the Israel-based Bahai faith, are 
Christian. 

The radio said that "recog- 
nized" religions would be allowed 
to continue to operate in Uganda. 

They were given as the Church 
of Uganda (Episcopal- Anglican), 
the Islamic faith, the Roman 
Catholic church and the Uganda 
Orthodox church, which has ties 
to the Greek Orthodox religion. 

The radio quoted a spokesman 
for the Internal Affairs Ministry 
as saying thatUganda juaranteed 
freedom of worship, but noted 

. that it applied only to the recog- 

[ nized religions. 

_ "It has beerr observed that the 
I activities of organizations which 
r have been tolerated in the past 
' are not conducive to the security 
[ of Uganda," the broadcast said. 

"The following religions are 
I banned with immediate effect." it 
I said, and went on to list them. 

In addition to their religious 
■ activities, the Seventh-day Ad- 



ventists, an American-based 
group, operates a missionary col- 
lege and a hospital in Uganda. 

The Salvation Army runs a hos- 
tel for the impoverished and dis- 
abled in Kampala and a babies' 
home in the country. 

Maj. Stella Bywaters, who has 
been with the Salvation Army in 
Uganda since 1972. said in a 
telephone interview she had re- 
ceived no word on the ban from 
the government itself. 

Miss Bywaters, of Victoria, 
Australia, said, "I don't think we 
have done anything against the 
security of Uganda. We just do 
social and religious work." 

Parking 
Ticket Fines 
Sfabilized 

DJim Guy 

Dr. Melvin D. Campbell, dean 
of student affairs, announced a 
change in parking ticket fines. 

Instead of $2 for the first of- 
fense and $5 for the second, all 
violations will result in a $3 fine. 

This change was brought about 
because of the paper work that 
had to be done in the sliding scale 
system. 

The effective date has not yet 
been determined. 



" Behind Page One 

Cream on the Ball Field p. 8 

Snappy Suspenders P* ^ 

2nd Largest Bulldozer P- * 



She said that the Salvation 
Army operates 17 churches in 
Uganda. The hostel in Kampala 
is currendy caring for 70 persons, 
including abandoned children and 
crippled elderly. 

WSMC-FM 
To Carry NY 
Philharmonic 
Symphony 

DCarlos Hayiock 

WSMC-FM will begin broad- 
casting the 1977-78 season of the 
New York Philharmonic and Chi- 
cago Symphonies starting the 
first week in October. 

To promote the new season of 
symphonies, WSMC is sending 
out informational brochures to 
5,500 names on the Allied Arts 
mailing list. Included in the 
brochure^ is information on the 
season of symphonies, some of 
the guest artists, and a schedule 
of broadcasting times for the 
symphonies. Also included is an 
invitation to this select group of 
listeners interested in fine arts 
and classical music to help 
WSMC with its financial needs. 
The New York Philharmonic 
Symphony and the Chicago Sym- 
phony can be heard on WSMC's 
Evening Concert which is broad- 
cast Sunday through Thursday! at 
8 p.m. On Monday evenings 
there Is the New York Phil- 
harmonic and on Thursdays, the 
Chicago Symphony. Other 
evening concerts in WSMC in- 
clude the Cleveland Orchestra 
from Ohio and those concerts 
programmed by WSMC person- 
nel. 




Women 
Men 



1061 
845 



Statistics by Curtis McCrillis 



GC Praises ABC For 
Television "Soap" Ban 



Washington, D.C. -- Communi- 
cation Department leaders of the 
General Conference of Seventh- 
day Adventists have praised the 
affiliate stations of the American 
Broadcasting Company which 
have not aired the new comedy 
series "Soap." 

Thirteen ABC-affiliated sta- 
tions in 10 states were reported 
not to have broadcast the opening 
episode of "Soap." "We com- 
mend these stations for their good 
judgment in not carrying a pro- 
gram that makes light of immor- 
ality," said Communication De- 



partment Director M. Carol Het- 
zell. She criticized the show for 
making it "of little consequence 
to rush from bed to bed." 

Early surveys in New York, Los 
Angeles, and Chicago suggest 
that "Soap" did very well in 
grabbing a large audience with its 
debut. Seventh-day Adventist 
communication leaders feel this 
indicates the American public 
likes humor, but stress that they 
believe there are still "an awful 
lot of American who enjoy 'clean' 
humor." 



THE SOUTHEKN ACCENT TliurtiUy, September 29, 1977 





Starring JULIE HARRIS 

EILEEN HECKART 

ARTHUR O'COMNELL 

JEAWMETTE CLIFT 

A World Wide Pirtures release in Metrocolor" 




Above: Corrle ten Boom - 
author of book The Hiding Place. 
Miss ten Boom Is a Dutch Christian 
who led and organized an under- 
ground movement to assist Jevus 
in escaping capture by Nazi 
forces during World War II. 



Listen- 
ToThe 
Tune Of 
$1900 



Above: Arthur O'Connell, actor 
in film The Hiding Place. 




A total SI .900 in cash prizes is 
offered in LISTEN magazine's 
"Say it! We'll LISTEN Contest." 

"The purpose of USTEN's first 
contest is to obtain quality man- 
uscripts for the magazine as well 
as discover new talent, ' ' said 
Associate Editor Pat Horning, 
who is launching the contest. 

The judging will be in two 
categories of writing: story and 

An author may enter as many 
1 500-word-limit manuscripts as 
he wants, but only one prize w\\\*- 
'oe awarded per author. 

A grand prize of $300 will be 
awarded to both the best story 
and best article. First, second, 
and third pri7e in each category is 
$150.5100. an< S75. 

The deadline is January 16, 
1978. Winners will be personally 
notified within six weeks of that 
date. Manuscripts that don't win 
an award will be considered for 
purchase at regular rates of 3 
cents - 5 cents per word. 

"I hope that an author with 
something to say will get busy 
tinkling his typewriter keys , but 
in the meantime write LISTEN for 
more information," said Miss 
Horning. 

She recommends that an inter- 
ested author send for a packet 



containing a sample magazine, 
writer's guidelines, and entry 
form with more details concern- 
ing the contest. 

Write to: "Say it! We'll 
USTEN Contest," c/o LISTEN. 
6830 Uurel Street, NW, Wash- 
ington. D.C. 20012. 



National Journal Publishes 
Article By Dr. Houck 



Tri-Community 
Launches Fire 
Prevention 
Program 



DTherc 



TriCo 



I Shaw 



nunity Fire Depart- 
ment has launched a new pro- 
gram in fire prevention in the 
Collegedale area. Chief Duane 
Pitts said that Tri-Community 
was not interested in fire sup- 
pression alone, but equally con- 
cerned with fire prevention. 

The program will involve a fire 
inspection of all educational facil- 
ities and businesses within the 
Collegedale City limits. At the 
conclusion of each inspection 
Chief Pitts will present to the 
concerned institution a report 
identifying all deficiencies and 
fire hazards. Also included will 
be recommendations for correc- 
tion of these deficiencies. 



DDebbie Gainer 

Dr. Duane Houck. associate 
professor of biology and instruc- 
tor of Genetics and Microbiology, 
has published an article in the 
national magazine. The American 
Journal of Botany. 

"Primary Phloem Regenera- 
tion Without Concomitant Xylem 
Regeneration: Its Hormone Con- 
trol in Coleus" appeared in the 
August issue, co-authored by 
Duane F. Houck and Clifford E. 
LaMotte, professor of botany at 
Iowa State University. The article 
was the result of Houck's doctoral 
studies at Iowa State, the product 
of several years of research and 
experiment. A portion of the 
research was done right here in 
SMC's laboratories. 



The coleus plant was used as 
the research tool to study the re- 
generation of isolated phloem 
bundles in a wounded plant with- 
out the usual concomitant regen- 
eration of the xylem tissue. To 
conduct this experiment, a cut 
was made in xylemless vascular 
tissue, and the extent of regener; 
ation examined after seven days. 



It was found that with the addi- 
tion of proper hormones and 
acids, phloem regeneration could 
be restored to the level of a 
normal plant. 

These experiments were done 
to extend the knowledge of re- 
generation in plants, to add to the 
basic body of information botan- 
ists have about plant life in gen- 
eral. Dr. Houck states, "Wound 
regeneration in the Coleus is an 
excellent system to use for study- 
ing the basic biological problem 
of cell differentiation" (such as 
between xylem and phloem cells). 

Dr. Houck said he discovered 
that the further he got into the 
research, the more questions 
were raised. The laws that oper- 
ate the natural world are very 
complex, he pointed out. Study of 
these laws "gives us greater ad- 
miration for what God has done in 
nature." 



Dr. Houck remarked that he 
IS indeed glad to see the article 
lally completed and in print. 



An idea for fund-raising for Ihel 
Communication Club has finallj| 
taken shape. The shape 
discount photography store accei-| 
sible to all photographers of llil 
Collegedale area. I 

The store has just recently bee* 
opened in the photo lab. locatj 
on the bottom floor of Lynn WW 
Hall. The supplies are maliill 
limited to film, paper, chemii»| 
the basic needs. However, la'g«| 
items such as lenses, camensf 
and other equipment can be «I 
dered at discount prices also, f 

The store is open four houisl 
week, Monday through ThursdiM 

The hours are: Mon. 1"" "•Jl 
Tues. -4-5 p.m.; Wed. 5-6 f 
and Thurs. 7-8 p.m. 



MITTLEIDER Cent. From ft'i 

11:30 a.m. - Elder Mittl^ 
will present another phase i 
series on public evangehsni. J 

12:45 p.m. -Dinner cateKl 

the cafeteria. . « 

2 p.m. - Dialog session 

Elder Mittleider. Mrs. "i 

will talk with the ladies. 
4 p.m. -Religion Retrw": 
The religion departmei 

sors a retreat in the^ '^^^^^ 

spring of each year 

offer professional »' ^|,j 

spiritual g"Wa"':= P"%'if 
the religion and theology , 

Others who are in"=f" J 
invited to attend the proB 



Thnraday, September 15, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



OCRA Makes Cohutta Prime Target 



DMykal Ringstaff 

The Off-Campus Religious 
Activities (OCRA). an outreach of 
the Campus Ministries, will cen- 
ter its prime efforts in the Cohutta 
area this year. 

Among the many outreaches 
planned, two are destined to be 
major projects. First, there will 
be a branch Sabbath School. 
Those participating meet in front 
of Wright Hall at 8:30 a.m. Sab- 



The second outreach planned 
will be an evangelistic crusade in. 
March by the students of SMC. 
The speakers for the crusade will 
be students invited by the Minis- 
tries office. They will be an- 
nounced at a later date. 

According to William Cole, 
director of the OCRA, the pur- 



pose of off-campus outreach is to 
meet the needs of non-Adventists 
in the surrounding area. "Amain 
function of the off-campus out- 
reach," states Cole, "is to pro- 
vide an avenue with which to help 
others grow spiritually, and at the 
same time provide an evangelistic 
spirit among the students." 

In urging the support of the 
students, Cole adds,_"The activi- 



ties are all arranged and the only 
thing needed to put them in oper- 
ation is the active support and 
participation of the students." 

In addition to the projects list- 
ed, the OCRA has 16 other out- 
reaches. Some of these include: 
the Story Hours, Prison Ministry, 
Leaves of Autumn, CABL. Bonnie 
Oaks, and Adopt-A-Grandparent. 
For full information on these and 



New Format For Senior Placement Brochure 




DJim Guy 

Dr. Melvin Campbell, dean of 
student affairs, announced a 
change in the format of the senior 
placement booklet. The change is 
from a 4 X 8 inch to an SVi x 11 
inch format. 

SMC will be the only Seventh- 
day Adventist college using this 
new format. The book will be 
indexed and contain information 
such as degree, choice of work, 
marital status, and church mem- 
bership, 

By using photo-ready copy, the 
publishing date can be advanced 
and the book sent out before the 
end of November. Before, the 
book was sent in January or Feb- 
ruary. The bigger standard 



cuts the cost in half, too, so more 
can be printed and distributed. 
All this will give the SMC gradu- 
ate a better chance for a job, 
explained Dr. Campbell. 

SMC Grads Join 
Orlando Hospital 

DBill Marcom 

Three SMC graduates have 
completed medical school and 
have joined the Florida Adventist 
Hospital in Orlando as residents 
in family practice, said Ron Scott, 
director of public relations. 

The doctors are Jorge Flechas, 
Tom McFarland, and Donald 
Lechler, all from Orlando, Fla. 



also a complete listing of the 
other projects contact the Campus 
Ministries office located in the 
Student Center. 



Students 
Dig Into 
History 



iZI Dennis Starkey 

Civil War conflicts in the Chat- 
tanooga area, terrorism. Seventh- 
day Adventist involvement in po- 
litical issues - these are just a few 
of the interesting topics chosen 
for study by the five students of 
the Research Methods in History 
class this year. 

Each student is required to turn 
in an original piece of research at 
the end of the semester. They are 
encouraged to use primary mater- 
ials in their research, such as 
actual correspondence of those 
involved, eyewitness accounts, 
and other documentary evidence, 
just as the professional historian 
does in preparing a textbook. 

Dr. Floyd Greenleaf, professor 
of history and instructor of the 
course, explains that It provides 
an opportunity for the students to 
get their fingers into the basic 
materials of history and to better 
understand the processes in- 
volved in historical research. 





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'kj " mcKee saKinc company 




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4 . THE SOUTHERN ACCENT TlmiwUy, September 29, 1977 

Letters To The Editor 



Dear Editor; 

1 enjoved reading your "timely" editorial about 
clocks oii the SMC campus. Your obsen-ations 
about their correctness concurs with my observa- 

"""l^n vour editorial vou suggested that a master 
clock situation would be a solution to the campus 
time problem. Let me point out. however before 
the administration spends thousands of dollars on 
this project, that the clock in Miller Hall, wh.ch you 
sav is ^ hours and 35 minutes slow, is on the campus 
Centrex System. This system has never worked 
properly since the installation of these clocks and .t 
is impossible to set the clock in the building. 

1 recenUy discussed this with Mr. Robert Mer- 
chant, who said that the farther the building is from 
the master clock in Wright Hall, the less accurate it 
becomes. In fact, the clock is supposed to be 
self-setting; however, we who work in Miller Hall 
have found that this never really happens and, 
therefore, have learned to ignore the centrex Master 
Cock. . ^ . 

Since most students have phones in their rooms 
and most teachers have phones in their office and 
most of us have watches, it might be best to call time 
each morning to make sure that we all are near to 
"Chattanooga Time." si„„„,j, your,, 

Marvin L. Robertson, Chairman 
Music Department 



Dear Editor: 

It appears that the Student Center has evolved 
past the realm of simple fun and games into the 
fantasy land of the mind and body as people do wh^t 
they just plain feel like doing, with no consideration 
for the misfortunate ones that accidentally wander 
into the "Parior" (commonly known as the passion 

pit). 

Name Withheld 



Pace 



Dear Editor: 

I glanced at my watch as I left the Ubrao-^ 
Ten minutes till six. I had just enough time to make 
it through the Thatcher annex door before it was 
ocked Through the mud-trodden hill I bounded. 
Down the makeshift stairs I ran, anxious to ge^*" ^ 
room and collapse. Pulling on the door, I found it to 
be already locked. Admittedly, my Timex s 
someHmes less than accurate but I do usual y 
attempt to set it by the dorm clocks Someone must 
have been a bit anxious to lock the door on this 

"""Mv'^s'pirits'dashed, down the hUl I went.* 
Through the lobby and what seemed like most of the 
dorm through the connecting darkened and some- 
times flooded walkway and at last up the stairs to my 
room, 1 had just enough energy left to throw ■ my 
books down and collapse on the bed. 

1 consider myself as willing as the next person to 
"walk the extra mile" when necessary. But I fail to 
see the necessity of locking the annex door at six and 
not opening it at all on Sabbath. It's particularly 
hard on those of us who have to park our cars on the 
hill in front of the fcirsing building and/ or Library, 
By the time you go all the way through both dorms 
and up the hill to get your car, you've probably 



forgotten where you wanted to go. Had the door 
been open, the car is most likely parked only a few 
feet away. 

I don't mean to sound ungrateful. 1 appreciate 
the new annex very much. However, my apprecia- 
tion would intensify if the door was left open just a 
little later at night. 

- I'm sure our safety was the motivating factor in 
designating the six o'clock lock-up time. Could not 
this safety be secured equally as well by keeping a 
monitor posted at the door past six? I'm sure there 
are any number of ladies who would be willing to 
work "guarding" the door. I would like to be the 

first to volunteer. t-i. * u * t» -j , 

Thatcher Annex Resident 

Editor's Note: 

Dear Annex Resident: 

We appreciate the expression of your opinion 
and your suggestion. In fact, your letter was so 
sensible that we can't understand why you didn't 
sign your name. In view of editorial policy and 
ethical journalistic practice, this is the last anony- 
mous letter that will be printed in the Accent. 



Dear Editor: 

Have you ever had afternoon classes everyday 
starting at 12:00 and tried to eat dinner in the 
^feteria? Well I know of several others besides 
myself who have this problem. If I am fortunate 
enough to make the front of the line, 1 may even 
have 15 or 20 minutes to eat, but if I don't make the 
front... And I always enjoy my class, with my 
stomach rolling with indigestion because of the 
pieces of food swallowed whole in such a hurry. 

I don't want to be one to complain, but dear 
cafeteria, could you open even 15 minutes earlier? 
You would have some happy people -- and 
stomachs!! 

Sincerely, 
Debi Harris 




The Southern Accent 



SMC a 



material published 
arily the opinion . r v 






Tbe Sootbern Accent 

of the newspaper staf 
tons, articles, and other content item 
of ideas, a forum. In the case < 
Ihe Editor." is a column designed I 
sion. Our policy will allow the expression ' 
We do. however, reserve Ihe right not to publi! 
libelous, extremely radical, or out 6f character 
light of doctrinal poinls. We wish to retain the bearing of 
SDA college newspaper. 



the* 



"Letter; 



differing ide 



Ed 



[ Wa 



Assislanl Editor lynn Neumann 

Business Manager Dave Middag 

Lavout Editor Vanessa Greenleaf 

bpons Editor Reuben Castillo 

Circulation Manager John Henson 

Secre.aries Pam Legere 

Denise Sheets 

Ad Manager Ray Harlwell 

Proofreaders Kathy Mixell 

Jeanne Zacharias 

SihscripMons Candy Miranda 

At ists Mark Ford 

Sandie Lehn 

Photographers Rhonda Runvan 

Mike Parllo 
Mark Ford 

Reoorters Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

Spmsor Frances Andrews 

Printer Fells Bros. Printing Co., 

Oollewah. Tenn. 

The Soalhern Accent is published weekly with the e 
of lesl weeks and vacations. 

Subscriptions (or parents and alumni are S5 per veai 
weekly from Collegedale. IN al a non-protil rate. 



Guest 
Editoriol 



t was recently brought to the attention 
of The Southern Accent that the Letters to 
the Editor section was of poor quality and 
that editing needed to be done to eliminate 

: of the less skillfully-written letters, 
leaving only those which appeal to the 
journalistic senses of the readers. 

For the information of the person who 
did not care for the format of the last issue 
concerning the Letters to the Editor sec- 
tion: We have no intention whatsoever of 
editing any letters written responsibly to 
our office, and will print all possible. 

The only editing will occur when we 
have too many to print (and that isn't 
likely), and then it will be on the basis of 
pertinence to the subject which is then a 
prime issue and not on whether we like the 
contributor's style of writing or not. 

The Southern Accent is the voice of the 
student body. It gives the opportunity to 
learn about our school and how it func- 
tions, both the good side and the bad. 
If we edit the letters which come to us so as 



to achieve a well-written paper, then only those with English 
majors would have a voice in the column, and it would have 
the same effect as censorship. We cannot do this. 

If you have a legitimate gripe or maybe would just like to 
say what you think about something pertinent to the 
atmosphere of the college campus, please feel free to write i 
down (legibly, at least) and drop it in one of the many red 
mailboxes with Southern Accent written on the side, an 
know for sure that we will do what we can to let your opinion 
be heard. 



Mark Ford 




IliiiiwUy, September 29, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■ 5 



Campus Cfogsi^ieds 

We print pe ^rwl | s , used book announcements, and other 
miscellon yfre^ ^rop your announcement in a red Southern 
Accent motttJox. 



r 



I 



w Due to rain, there will be no SA carnival Saturday night. Instead, the film 80 

Steps To Jonah will be sho\yn in the Student Center at 8 p.m. land 10 p.m. 

There will also be punch and cookies, plus singing and entertainment in the 

ampitheater of the Student Center. 

Paulette Henderson 
Short on funds? How about time for witnessing? Combine service for the Lord 

with earning school tuition. Be a literature evangelist now while going to school!! 
■ Come to our club meeting this evening (Thursday the 29th( at 7 in the Trophy Room . 

in the Student Center. Or call Don Ashlock 4906 or Randy Mills 396-3355 for more 

information. 

Support our advertisers. Buy from the companies who place ads in Hie SoDthem 
Accentl 



A Lost - A wide margin K.J. Bible with the name Goldie Marie Goertzen in it. 
Left in the church Wednesday of Week of Prayer. Call 4405 if found. 

Dear Cindy Jo, Happy Birthday! Becki 

A Religion and Theology Majors. Don't forget -- this is retreat weekend. Look for 
the article about the retreat elsewhere in this paper. 

Hey Janeen C, Have a nice day I 

Helpltl Ride Needed! - Round trip to Mt. Vernon, Ohio, for weekend of October 
7-9. Contact Randy Montgomery at 4725 or place note in Talge Box 175. 

For Sale: 68 inch E.P. Competition x2 water ski ( phonqf396-4816.) 



Like to take Guitar? I will be giving lessons to anyone interested in putting some 
effort into learning to play. If interested, call me at 396-3426, but please don't call 
unless you are serious and willing to work at it. 

Mic Thuiber 



0^ Big Savings -- Look at the Village Market Ad for items on sale this week. 
DearJ.Z. I am looking forward to May 21, How about you? Signed, R.H. 

# On October 3, the English club has scheduled their first meeting. It will be held 
in the small banquet room of the cafeteria from 5:30-6:30 p.m. 



t One eventide in the far recesses of Talge Hall, four young gentlemen sat in deep 
contemplation over the dilemma faced by so many of the demure lasses here on 
campus. Yes, those four sensitive men asked themselves the question that every 
red-blooded Talginian must ask, "How can we best help resolve this void, this 
dilemma that runs rampant here on campus?" Well, after many hours of 
introspective deliberation, the embryo of the Kovalski-Godenick-Lampasi-McNeilus 
Bake-Off was bom! 

The intent of this bake-off is to reward the participants culinary artisianship with 
what is sure to be the pinnacle of her social popularity here on campus. The basic 
requirements needed to enter this sought after contest include: 1. Baking utensils; 
2. Basic dessert ingredients needed; 3. A baking location; 4. A favorite recipe; and 
5. A dash of love. This dessert baking contest begins as of today and ends as of Oct. 
16 at precisely 8:02 p.m. 

All participants are asked to leave their entry at Dean Schlisner's house along 
with their name and name of dessert where they will be picked up later that evening 
by the judges. The bakers of the top four dishes will be treated out to a night on the 
town. Oct. 22, including dining at one of Chattanooga's most exotic restaurants. 
Competition is free style, so good luck ladies!! 

P.S. If any more information is needed concerning the K-G-L-M Bake Off, please 
feel free to call 4686. Thank you. 



The Leaves of Autumn, in cooperation with the Public Relations department at 
SMC, is sponsoring a "Steps to Christ Outreach" in the upcoming Ingathering Field 
Day, Oct. 11. 

The plan is as follows: approximately 40 Steps to Christ will be sent with each car 
going out. Inside each book will be a small pamphlet describing Seventh-day 
Adventists and who they are. Each person going out will have about 10 books he can 
give to people he meets during the day and who seem to be interested in knowing 
more about SDA's and what they believe. 

The Leaves of Autumn hopes that each person going out will take advantage of 
spreading these books to people who need Christ. In this way. Ingathering will be 
more than a "March of Dimes" for the Seventh-day Adventist Church. It will be a 
tool and an opportunity to share our faith and gain the assurance that we have 
co-operated with the Lord in getting the word out. 

David Kay 

Chairman - Leaves of Autumn 

# New TV Series!! 

McMillian and friends - alias Bencharro and Is cents who ride their pet moose. 
Smashing Hit. Next Tuesday's show - "The Return of The Venus Fly trap. Part II." 

Korean Cowboy, Hoppin Gator 



Can We 



Missions Day 
Oct. 9 




God expects per- 
sonal service from 
everyone to whom 
He has entrusted 
a knowledge of 
the truth for this 
time. Not all can 
go as missionaries 
to foreign lands, 
but all can be 
home mission- 
aries in their fam- 
ily and neighbor- 
hoods. Test. Vol. 
9, p. 30. 




DAYSPRING & COMPANY is seeking sincere, Christian individuals who would 

be interested in devoting time and energy to presenting drama as a ministry. 

Experience is desirable, but not necessary. If you are interested, please fill in 

the application below and drop it in the nearst Sonthem Accent box. 

Those interested should be available for weekend trips and Tuesday evening 

workshops. 



Room number: , 
Phone number: 



Past Fvni-rienre 

Members of DAYSPRING cast will be contacting you concerning your 
application. 



3 



6 . THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thorri.y, September 29, 1977 

Sailboat N/Vithout Sails 




Son 



Heresies are the next elements of Sa.an;s -'-sX.'v[--Jt'r!:Z\ 
lothed in the Hght o 

H-rrri*: 'pTareror.rT,.;'and love: The depths of ^ 
HIS gioriuu> pp _^ ^ .^ ^^^ >i.ri«pn revelation of God. 



con,e clothed in the HgM of truth^ This surface apP-rance may renec, 
U,e noon sun with a <lazzhng_rad.nce__ofglory._bu. ,.J^Us ^^ ^^^ ,^^ 



.ff„rt ronid come as a de-ertphasis? Let me explain, 
man. To place anything ^b°ve it s t, q y F ^^^ ^^^^ 

9"^Pr!!Trr"'lTs ^r rth/wotd^ecauselhey knew the 



vritten i 
- Jesus and His ' 






Since the Holy 
to the source 



true to Its core because the ^ 

Truth leads to the source „ j- ,. 

Spirit is our guide into all truth, then He directs 

""Herelv! on the other hand, appears to begin at the center and work 
its «a "Um the source to a tangent path. Tangent .n religious 
r»tte\; result in the exaltation of self most of the time, and the 
Tonclu'ion of'tllc matter is a harvest of death, both spiritual and 

""'Dcalh was the result of believing a lie about the Creator 
Sin .™ds ,o darken the comprehension of spiritual matters, and the s n 
o ne"sN L,..ms to be almost incurable because once a person begins to 
waa ihe ;^ of error, he has begun a separation process between 
himself and his Creator-Savior. 

Disconnecting oneself from the source of eternal truth leaves a 
person w thou, a^n objective basis of reality. A sub ective expenence 
w'l^om objectivity terminates in a hopeless wandering in the land of 
thpories and ideologies of the world. 

To noat in the se'a of feeling is like being in a sailboat without sails^ 
The waves dash and pound the craft until it sinks into the <:o™'i<'rf °* 
darkness that seem so serene, yet they can transform themselves into 
waves of destruction...so it is with the power of falsehood. 

Attacking the testimony of Jesus is his next method. Too often 
assume that this means - -'•-'•• ""'" '»^<^^ ™ ^e wntings of El 



They knew the Creator-Savior 
Word. 

How 
inspiration on trie ^."J^^^^y-Jj^.uV 3s the Reformation used the 
id through His servant that His word is primary 



it with us today? It is too easy for us to read a book of 
word of inspiration, and that is our tendency. 
We have used the testimony of Jesus , 



14-foot Cat 
Takes On 



«'''^nari;h:?:"S:^^-w;;h;hV^<.&<^^ Mountain 

stand through the time of trouble. Only those who have the foundation /VIUUI I I UIII 

ofrcKk wUUndure the conflict as every support fails. Are we ready for 



"lesser light" to the "greater DDennis Canther 



that? 

TheTestimonyof Jesus serves!.- - j :„,„j 

Ugh " Let us not use it for purposes that the Giver did not intend ■ 
™r primal study should be the Word because the question of 
obedfen™ or disobedience in the end of time must be based on this 

""th" Z^tTh.,. as manifested in distraction, division, criticism, 

iudein. accusing and condemning reveal the operation of the spirit of of soil and rock on the entrance 
Satfn Jesus unites His people on the foundation of the word; when road into ColleBedale. 
therare one with Him. they are one with one another. 



Standing 14 feet tall, weighing 
over 100 tons, with a cost of 250 
thousand, "The Cat" may be 
seen pushing mountainous heaps 



I direct, open attack ( 



White. Could it be that by placing ; 

Missions 
Club Formed 

DKathy Oakley 



emphasis 



For vou see, divine grace transforms the essence of sin into he 
production of love. Once a person has this element he has the 
character of Jesus revealed daily through him which will culminate in 

^^To^^further study: Great Contfoverey Chapters 32 37; Eariy 
Writings pp. 71-73: 5T 654-691; 2T 183-199; and the book Ediicatlon. 



M.J. 
Bryant 



The SMC student missionaries 
have united and formed a Student 
Missionary Club. Never before 
has there been an organization 
specifically designed to promote 
world missions at SMC and in the 
Southern Union. 

The club was officially organ- 
ized Tuesday evening. Sept. 20. 
The officers are Ron Koester, 
president; Bryant Davidson, vice- 
president in charge of on-campus 
activities; Rahn Shaw, vice- 
president in charge of off-campus 
activities; Jeanie Brownlow. sec- 
retary; Bob Gadd. treasurer; and 
Joy Southard and Lucy Weeks, 
officers-at-large. Betty Howard, 
associate dean of women is the 
sponsor, and Cyril Roe. associate 
professor of education, is in 
charge of the coordinating com- 
mittee. 

One of the main goals listed by 
Koester is to keep the present 
student missionaries and Task 
Force workers from SMC inform- 
ed of what's happening here and 
showing that we are interested in i 
them and what they are doigg. 
Part of this goal will be accom- 
(. plished by seeing that they re- 
f ceive the Accent. Joker, and 
Southern Memories, in addition 
to personal letters. 

Another plan, an Adopt-A-Stu- 
dent Missionary program is being 
developed to keep in touch with 
them, according to Dean Howard. 
Some other goals are to intro- 
duce the world missions program 
at SMC and throughout the 
Southern Union, to help raise 
funds for future student mission- 
aries, and to encourage those 
students wishing to become stu- 

Koester slates, "Basically, our 
club is designed to tie together 
returned student missionaries, 
those in the field now. and those 
here wanting to go." 




Snappy 
Suspenders 



Fashion is a predominate factor 
on college campuses in America. 
SMC is no exception to this trend. 
Whether it be fur coats and 
turned down gangster hats or 
knee high socks and saddle ox- 
fords, the trends are still there. 

Suspenders is the word for the 
fashion conscience individuals 
here at SMC. But there is more to 
it than just fashion. Some people 
wear the same kind of clothes as 
their friends to be accepted. 
Others wear suspenders as a way 
of self-expression. Some people 
like to wear them as part of a 
movement getting back to "the 
good ol' days," in a time when 
most things are mass produced. 

Since it is against the SMC 
dress code to follow the trend of 
blue jeans, 1 think suspender 



D 9 bulldozer, second largest In the world See atory to the right. 
Photo by Mark Ford 



wearing is a happy alternative. 

I have a collection of sus- 
penders for almost any occasion. 
I wear them for my reasons too. It 
is because 1 am me and they go 
along with all the other things 1 do 
in life here on the campus of 
SMC. 

Should you decide this trend is 
for you and you want to join in, 
beware that people like to snap 
them all the time; or if they want 
you they just reach out and grab 
you " by the suspender and then 
let go!! 



The D-9, built by the Caterpij- 
lar Corporation of Illinois, ranks 
the second largest bulldozer in 
the world. 

Because of its enormous 
weight, the D-9 bulldozer must be '. 
transported to its destination in 
two sections, blade on one trailer j 
and the main body of the bull | 
dozer on another. 

John Dykes, the driver of this 1 
massive piece of machinery, has 
been working on the'CoUegedale | 
road for eight weeks. H 
currently employed by Brown | 
Brothers Construction of Chat- 
tanooga and is married, living in | 
Chattanooga. 

Often working 12 to 16 hours a 
day, a work week frequently total- j 
ing 89 hours, John Dykes 
"For 24 years I've had the satis- 1 
faction of turning mountains i 
valleys, valleys into mountains. I 
and putting roads oyer both." 

A "Cat" paraphrase of Archi- 1 
medes says, "Give me a bull 
fio7er big enough, and a placet! 
put 1'. and I'll move the world". 




PLANTS 



...Are loveable 

...Will lisfen to your every 

...Won'f folic bocic '^^'■'^ 

...Need your offecfion 
...Will moke ygyr room a 
nicer place to live 

Af COLLEGEDALE 
NURSERY 

grown by students 



Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



xNATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



DISCOVER YOUR CREDIT UNION 

We're doing more for you! 
'COLLEGEDALE CREDIT UNION 

College plaza 



I 






Phone: 396-2101 
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ivlonday - F''''^* 
6-7 p.m. Ivlonday and Thursday 



_ W^^^^^#^^ 






ITiiireday, September 2% 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 



^Bl^BXB 



Southern Accent 



Photography 
Contest 



Theme: Campus Life 
Judged On: PhotoQuality, 

Expressive Content 
and Mood 

Contest Ends Oct. 21 



only black and white photos 
accepted. 



Winner $15 



Open To All Students 

except Accent and Memories photographers 





Vanessa 
sys. m Greenleaf 



keJuUk 



Arranged as poetry from Steps to Christ 

Nature, though marred by s 

speaks 
not only of creation 
but of redemption. 

Though the earth 
bears testimony to the curse 
in evident signs of decay, 
It is still rich and beautiful 
in the tokens 
of life-giving Power 



The trees 



cast off their leaves 



Selected I opic? C^L?? Head? \-ov K^anada 



DDebra Gainer 



matter of history, the 
■ highlight for the science 
department was its three-week 
trip for selected topics class, con- 
ducted May 9 to May 26. This 
class gives opportunity for the 
department to offer majors edu- 
cation in fields beyond the regular 
courses offered. 

Last year they went to the 
Grand Canyon -- there being no 
department course given in 
Grand Canyon geology. This year 
they collaborated with the physi- 
cal education department in 
taking a group of students north 
to Minnesota and Canada -- a 
selected course concerned mainly 
with the ecology of the area. 

Directed by Art Wiederstrom, 
district forest warden, the stu- 
dents earned their four hours 
fairly, by spending long days in 
field study. Some of the areas of 



emphasis were; the ecology of a the final day of the trip -- and Van 
given marsh, methods of TSI Boddy, junior biology major, 
(timber stand improvement), and summed up hiff^tory of the jour- 



the effects of a forest fire 
ecology. 

The evenings were used for 
doing personal projects on various 
subjects, such as ants or beavers. 
Then, in spite of the concentrated 
study, there was still time for fun 
" campfires and volleyball, ice 
cream at Hungry Hubbos, bird 
watching, and moose hunting on 
the surrounding lakes. 75 species 
of birds were sighted during the 
three weeks, and Marcia Stiles 
reported seeing one moose. 

Other highlights of the class 
were a visit to the Chicago Field 
Museum of Natural History, and, 
in spite of two days of incessant 
rain, a weekend canoe trip on the 
lovely Canadian lakes and rivers. 

The sun shone beautifully on 



ney by telling m^, "I don't know 
of anyone who went who didn't 
have a good time." 




only 
to be robed 
with fresher verdure; 
The flowers die, 

to spring forth 
in new beauty; 

And in every manifestation 
of creative power 
is held out 
The Assurance 

That we may be created anew in 
righteousness and 
holiness 

of truth. 

Thus, the very objects and operations 

of nature 
that bring so vividly to mind 
our great loss 
Become to us 

the Messengers of Hope. 



'^CommanloD with God 
\ throngh prayer develops the men- 
tal and moral facoldes, and the 
. spiritoal powers strengthen as we 
cultivate thoagbts upon spiritoal 
^ \ things.'^ 

Desire of Aees, pp. 70-71 




NEED $$$$ FOR ATTENDING SMC? 



if you have not applied for financial aid, but 
need help in financing your education here 
it is not too late to apply for grants and 
loans. Come by the Student Finance Office 
today and pick up applications. 




FVee Money! 

The Basic Grant does not have to be 
repaid, so if you have not applied, you 
should do so today. Applications are 
available at the Student Finance. 



S2i, 'W,^^A/ ^// 



8 • THE SODTHEIIN ACXi;NT llninday, Septambe' 29, l9^^ 



Cross 
^ Country 
Run Here 
Oct. 16 

The Fifth Annual Chattanooga 
Free Press cross country run will 
be held on the SMC campus 
Sunday. Oct. 16. The two mile 
course set through the student 
park and athletic field will accom- 
modate three age categories. 

Approximately 300 runners 
from the Southern states are ex- 
pected to participate. In the past, 
many students from SMC have 
entered. 

An individual does not have to 
be highly competitive to take 
part. All entries must pay S2 in 
advance and $2 on the day of the 
race. 

Those interested should contact 
Dan Paul of Collegedale for entry 
blanks. All entrants will be a- 
warded T-shirts, and the first 
three finishers will receive tro- 
phies. The race is open to men 



Reuben Castil 

Sports Editor 




^ 

% 



Getting Into The Swim 
With Water Polo 





Bemaid WUey 



Photo by Rhonda Rnnyan 



Herschel Logan, with the ap- 
proval of the physical education 
department, is trying to form a 
water polo league. There ate 
seven members to a team. The 
requirements are to be able to 
swim well and pay Jl swimming 
fee. 

The game is fun. "It's a 
friendly game," says Logan, 
"none of this dunking stuff." 
The positions are varied. Her- 
schel stated that, "The guards 
can rest on the back while the for- 
wards must be able to swim bet- 
ter as they are up front for the 
duration of the game. 

There are four seven-minute 
periods in a game. The games 
last approximately 40 minutes in- 
cluding the rest periods. They 
are played Friday afternoons at 
3-4:30. Sign-up at the physical 
education office this week to pick 



Cream Rises On The Ball Field 




The cream has risen to the top 
as Webster won twice. Webster 
walloped Hickman 10-1, then nip- 
ped Hunt 9-8, Thursday. Hunt 
scored five runs in the seventh 
inning in a rally that was kilted 
before they could take the lead. 
Webster has the highest percen- 



tage of any team thus far. 
Minder 



Wohle 
equal percentages as they both 
won twice. In a close one. Minder 
whipped Whitehead 6-4 as White- 
head made an unsuccessful at- 
tempt to overcome a four run 
deficit. In the seventh. Minder 
beat Mobley by scoring four runs 
in the last two innings, 8-5. 
Wohlers scored four runs in the 
t4^9i84«>^«^(^^(44c^ seventh inning to slip past Hunt. 
^^'^'^^'^^■^•^ Wohlers. team captain, scored 
the winning run. Wohlers sound- 
ly defeated Martling 7-3 to stay 
even with Minder. 



scored twice in the late innings, 
7-5. Whitehead dubbed Hick- 
man, 14-5 as his team scored 6 in 
the sixth. 

With one team in first, two tied 
for second, and three teams fight- 
ing for the fourth spot, the second 
half of the season promises to 
bring a tight race for the title. 



teams. It is co-ed, so girls are 
encouraged to join. 

This is an opportunity for all 
swimmers to get into the swim of 
things. 

Union- Wide 
Gymnastics 
Clinic Coming 

DMark Kurzynske 

A union-wide gymnastics clinic 
will be held Thursday, Oct. 20 
through Sunday, Oct. 23. 

According to Dr. Bud Moon. 
chairman of the P.E. department, 
this clinic will help organize the 
academy teams and get them 
"started out on the right foot." 

Emphasis during this clinic will 
be on mat tumbling and appara- 
tus work. A former Olympic 
gymnastic coach will instruct with 
the assistance of academy 
coaches and SMC gymnasts. Dr. 
Moon said all of the Southern 
Union academies have expressed 
interest in this program. Be- 
tween 75 and 100 students are 
expected to attend. 

The SMC gymnastics team j 
plans to make several touring 
trips this year. One will be to the | 
Pisgah-Fletcher academy areas. 
Another will be to the Madison- 
Highland academy regions. The 
gym team has also purchased a j 
new public address system for 
such trips. 



Men's Club Plans Two Outings 






111) vnvifefe to affctib 
an informal buffet supper 

in f^c Banquet Itoom 
of tge College Cafeferio 
All students from public schools 
are affeniint, SMC for ffie first time 



Tgarskoij Sept. 29, 1977 
at 5:15 ra 



Please coll 396-4239 or 396-2111 
by Sept. 26 if unable to attenk. 



* 
* 



In other action, Martling top- 
ped Runnells, 8-7. Runnells and 
Mobley played a thriller as both 



DMark Kurzynske 

Two outings planned by the 
Men's Club are a roller skating 
party Sunday. Oct. 2 and a boat 
trip either Oct. 13 or 20, a Thurs- 
day evening. 

A golf tournament is scheduled 



for Oct. 2. There will be prizes for 
the longest drive, for hitting He j 
ball nearest the pin on one shot, 
and for the lowest team score. 
Dean Schlisner urges any wouW- 
be participants to get their names | 
entered early. 



Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, TN 373IS 




*^,¥'***-¥'<¥>**-¥-******^^^.^ 



Cpllegedals, Tennessee 37315 




The Southern Accent 



Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 

Thursday, October 6, 1977 



Collegedale, Tenn. 




:27/52,Anil '67 Alumni Head Fon Home 



DJerry Dick Lien 

Tlie annual homecoming of the 
alumni of Southern Missionary 
College will be held the weekend 
of October 14-16. Honor Classes 
are the 1927, 1952 and 1967 grad- 
uates. 

Activities for the weekend will 
be varied and plentiful. The 
college gymnasium will be the 
location for the Friday evening 
registration and convocation with 
emphasis placed on the world- 
wide mission program of the 
Seventh-day Adventist church. 

Speaker for the 7:45 p.m. meet- 



ing will be Andres H. Riffel of 
Coral Gables, Ha. Elder Riffel, 
former overseas missionary, is 
involved with transportation and 
commerce for the Inter-American 
Division of Seventh-day Ad- 
ventists. 

Further mission emphasis will 
be the showing of a film taken by 
Dr. Floyd Greenleaf at the SMC 
mission of the Mesquito Indians 
in Nicaragua. 

Alumni registration will con- 
tinue on Sabbath morning at the 
gymnasium where both church 



services wUI be held. The Sab- 
bath School will be superintended 
by Mrs. Louise Walther at 9:55 
o'clock and Charles Fleming will 
give the lesson study. The Col- 
lege Sabbath School will be in the 
church. 

Speaker for the two morning 
services will be Elder W.B. Qark 
of Loma Linda, Calif. His topic 
will be "Ropes and Stakes." 
Clark is a member of the 50-year 
Honor Class. He has long been 
involved with the SMC Alumni 
Association and was instrumental 



i 




Mart> Miller, Merle Meyers, and Ron Barrow Jr. 



Broom Shop Theft Apprehended 



□Jim Shanko 

Two burglars were appre- 
hended at the College Broom 
Shop, and a second burglary pre- 
vented at the Collegedale Medical 
Center last week. 

According to Lt. Dennis C. 
Cramer of the Collegedale Police 
Department, Captain Lacey of 
Murray Guards was on patrol at 
McKee Bakery when he saw a 
hght on in the Broom Shop. Upon 
investigating. Captain Lacey sur- 
prised two suspects who had 
broken into the shop, and were 
stealing office equipment. 

Lacey called for help over his 
radio, and caught one suspect 
waiting in a getaway car. The 
other suspect came out of the 
building, saw what was hap- 
pening, and fled through the field 
into the woods. 

At this time, Lt. Cramer arrived 
on the scene and took custody of 
the one suspect. Several other 
Collegedale units arrived shortly, 
"long with a Hamilton County 
Police unit, and a search of the 
surrounding woods was made. 



During the search of the car 
involved, a typewriter taken from 
the business was found, along 
with a small quantity of mari- 
juana. Later that night the other 
suspect was located and arrested, 
and because both suspects were 
juveniles, were transported to 
Hamilton County Juvenile Home. 



Police units were just returning 
from transporting the prisoners 
when a call came in from Hamil- 
ton County Police saying their 
officer had spotted someone at 
the Medical Center. The suspect 
had been at the door to the- 

tum to p. 2, col. 5 



$6 Million To Be Raised 
For Fine Arts Complex 



DBill Marcom 

A six-million-dollar decision 
was reached by the- Board of 
Trustees last Tuesday when they 
opted to let Fund Raising Associ- 
ates of Chattanooga handle pro- 
motion campaigns for the new 
fine arts complex. 

Fund Raising Associates, Inc., 
headed by Dow Mims, will have 
the responsibility of organizing 
local and national foundations 
and corporations in an attempt to 
solicit six million dollars, the 



price tag of the new complex. 

SMC's eight-member Adminis- 
trative Council was empowered 
by the Board of Trustees to re- 
view several fund raising organi- 
zations and to propose to the 
Board organizations capable of 
handling the enormous task. 

Mims' past fund raising a- 
chievements include five million 
for the prestigious McCallie 

torn to p. 3} col. 2 



in its organization in 1927 when 
the school was known ts Southern 
Junior College. He was the first 
president of the Association and 
also president of his class in 1927. 
He filled the part of dean of men 
for the school from 1927-1936 and 
has also been dean of students at 
Loma Linda University. He is 
widely known for his student con- 
tacts for the School of Medicine 
while in the latter position. 

At 3 o'clock on Sabbath after- 
noon a concert will be given by 
the music department as ar- 



ranged by Dr. Bruce ishton. The 
concert will be held in the Col- 
legedale church ar.d will be one 
hour long. 

Some of the new buildings on 
campus will be open for alumni 
to see, including the McKee 
Library and the Lincoln Collec- 
tion. 

On Saturday afternoon at 5:15 
the Alumni of the Collegedale and 
surrounding areas will act as host 
to the visiting Alumni for a light 

tuni to p. 3, col. 1 



Three Freshman 
Conquer Mf. Rainier 



Three freshmen, Marty Miller, 
Merle Meyer, and Ron Barrow, 
Jr., climbed 14,410-foot Mt. 
Rainier in Washington this sum- 
mer during a 2'/j week vacation in 
the West. Their guide, a sea- 
soned 63-year-old mountain 
climber, leads a group of i 
up Mt. Rainier each ; 



The last leg of the three-day 
Llimb, an eight-hour trek from a 
bjse camp at 9,300 feet to the 
summit, began at 2 a.m. In 
cniaplete darkness the three 
young men hiked over solid ice 
and, snow with 75 feet of rope 
separating them. 

The below-freezing tempera- 
ture and the cold rising from the 
ice necessitated clothing of down- 
filled nylon. The youths also wore 
heavy climbing boots with cram- 
pons (12-point spikes attached to 
each boot) to prevent slipping on 
the ice. "Never step on your 
rope," counseled Barrow. "It's 
like stepping on your neck." 
Other pieces of equipment used 
in the climb included ice axes, 
ropes, sit-hamesses, and high-al- 
titude tents. 

To keep their carbohydrate in- 
take high the climbers ate hourly 



and drank constanUy. Because of 
tiny, invisible pebbles in the 
water, they were forced to let it 
settie to avoid intestinal damage 
from the sharp edges. 

At the summit of Mt. Rainier 
the climbers napped in the mile- 
wide crater that caps the moun- 
tain. Unlike the long, tedious 
ascent of the mountain, the de- 
scent to the base camp required 
only 2Vi hours. However, the 
descent was the most frightening 
part of the climb, according to the 
young men, because they were 
able to see the treacherous cre- 
vasses, ranging in width from '/i 
inch to 60 feet with depths of up 
to 100 feet, that they had crossed 
unknowingly by snow bridges in 
the darkness of early morning. 

When asked about his thoughts 
during the climb, Barrow replied, 
"What would happen if the guy in 
front fell?" Each climber took 
precautions to secure himself 
constantly, not only for his own 
protection, but also for that of the 
climber behind him. As the guide 
admonished the youths, "There 
are old climbers and bold 
climbers, but no old, bold 
climbers." 



Board Establishes Scholarship Fund 



The College Board voted last 
month to establish an endowment 
fund granting scholarships to eli- 
gible students. 

Because of rising tuition rates 
and the possibility of grants and 
loans becoming more difficult to 
obtain, the endowment fund was 



set in motion. 

It was also voted that two un- 
restricted donations amounting to 
S200 thousand be used to initiate 
the program. Interest from the 
i$200 thousand will be used for 
subsidizing worthy students. Cri- 
terion for eligibility is yet to be 
established. 



— ^ Behind Page One — 

The Road and TNT p. 2 

Talge Men Dread Cleui-op p. 6 

Bless America -- Wear Dresses p. 7 

How To Start A Checking Accoimt p. 8 



1 ■ THE SOinHKRN ACCENT Thnrsdiy, October 6, 1977 

i 




Him Preview Committee Ready To Roll 



D Curtis McCrillis 

Robert Merchant, head of the 
Accounting office, reports that 
the Preview Film Committee has 
been chosen for the current 
school year. 

Merchant said that the cpmmit- 
tee's budget for the year stands at 
$200. This will take care of 
previewing charges for the films, 
shown or not shown, which are 
sent from the rental agencies. 

Beginning in January 1978, the 
committee will trav^. to Atlanta 



periodically to preview eight to 
ten films there at once. The $200 
budget will also cover transporta- 
tion expenses on these trips. 

Also available is the Padfic 
Union Conference film commit- 
tee's list of accepted films. These 
will be evaluated by the film 



committee, which will discuss 
whether each selection is worth 
previewing. 

The film committee consists of 
twp students and six faculty. 
They are as follows: Donny 
Keele, student; Bev Benchina, 
Student; K.R. Davis, Testing and 



Counseling; Mary Elam, assistant 
director of Admissions; Norman 
Peak, director of Audio-Visual 
Services; Freda Shumate, assis* 
tant dean of women; Ronald 
Barrow, Collegedale Academy 
principal; and Peggy Knecht.'Col- 
legedale Academy regllstrar. i 



BURGLARY cent, from p. i 

Magnolia Pharmacy using a tool 
to ta7 to gain entrance. Other 
County units rushed to. the scene 
while Collegedale Police units re- 
sponded from several directions 
to cut off escape routes from the 
complex. 

But before the back-up units 
had sealed off the area, the sus- 
pect made good his getaway on 
foot through the woods. The tool 
he had been using was recovered 
and no entry had been made. 

Physics Dept. 

Receives 

Research 
Grant 

D Roland Joy 

The physics department will 
receive a grant of $750 for basic 
research said Dr. Ray Hefferlin, 
professor of physics. 

Research Corp. called the Col- 
lege Sept, 20 with the news that 
SMC's research department qual- 
ified for the grant. The grant will 
be used for student labor involved 
in the College research program. 

The research project consists of 
making a periodic chart of dia- 
tomic molecules. Dr. Hefferlin 
implied that with this chart scien- 
tists could predict properties of 
unknown molecules and would 
better be able to visualize and 
learn faster about the molecules. 
Scientists could predict properties 
of unknown molecules and would 
better be able to visualize and 
learn faster about the molecules. 
It would also stimulate the scien- 
tists to make new theories in 
chemistry. 

Dr. Hefferlin will be leaving for 
Stanford Research Institute in 
Palo Alto, Calif., Oct. 19. There 
he will give a lecture about his 
new research project concerning 
the diatomic molecule. 



Arch 



Enrollment Keeps Tuition Dp,\jy0:; 

DRjchAshlock /"• ' ' 



ives 



Developing 
In Library 

nCarlos Haylock 

Southern Missionary College 
will soon have archives. Charles 
Davis, director of McKee Library 
and archivist for the college will 
be heading the effort to get the 
program underway. 

Davis is attending a convention 
for the Society of American Ar- 
chivists held in Salt Lake City. 
Utah during Oct. 4-8. From the 
numerous seminars held there 
during this time, he hopes to 
gather guidelines dealing directly 
with archives for colleges and 
universities. 

The archives at SMC will most 
likely be housed within the 
McKee Library and will also in- 
clude material from Madison Col- 
lege. 



The Board of Trustees met 
Sept. 20 and approved the oper- 
ating budget submitted by Rich- 
ard Reiner, business manager, 
for the current school year. The 
1)oard had passed a tentative bud- 
get last February but weren't able 
to finalize it until the final enroll- 
ment figures were in. 



If the entoUment had been 
much lower than estimated', Ihe 
budget would have aeeded revi- 
sion before it could meet the 
inflow of money. 

Many students, Reiner feels, 
don't realize that College tz- ■ 

trnn to p. 3, col. 3 



THANK YOCllll 

From The Students 



That Work In Your Own 




COLLEGEDALE 
NURSERY 



Karen Bednar Lois Hickman 

Beth Best Sue Houck 

Para Bleich Karen Riffel KEEP US BUSY 

Lori Bohannon Susie Rupe 

Beverly Buhler Cindi Scheivelhud 

Lynn Davis Stacy Savage 

Pamela Hall Carrie Watson 




TiV all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



i-NATiJRAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



Ray Hartwell 

Advertising Consultont 



The Southern Accent 

Southern Missionary College 



Coileoedole, lem 



T^I^Pti 



Iliiindiy, October 6, 1977 THE SODTHEKN ACCXNT • 3 



Morrison Attends 1000th Spanish Anniversary 



DDennis Starkey 

Dr. Robert Morrison, professor 
of modem languages, recently 
returned from the 59th annual 
meeting of the American Associa- 
tion of Teachers of Spanish and 
Portuguese (AATSP) held in 
Madrid, Spain. 

The five-day convention marks 
the first time that the AATSP has 
ever met with the European Asso- 
ciation and consequentiy the first 
time they have met outside of the 
United States. 

The theme of the international 
gathering was "Tres Continentes 
Ante El Milenario de La Lengua 
Espanol," meaning "Three Con- 
tinents Upon the 1000th Anniver- 
sary of the Spanish Language." 

The keynote address was given 
by JuUan Marias, a leading con- 
temporary philospher known a- 
round the worid. The regular 
meetings consisted of lectures 
and discussions of literature, cul- 
ture, and teaching of the Spanish 
and Portuguese languages, as 
well as tht' need for improve- 
ments in bilingual education in 
the various countries involved. 
All of the meetings were conduct- 
ed in Spanish, and according to 
Dr. Morrison, the European 
scholars spoke it flawlessly, in 
contrast to some of the Americans 
in attendance. 

Also part of the activities was a 
visit to the American ambas- 



sador's home for a reception, and 
a banquet, at which a representa- 
tive of King Juan Carlos of Spain 
presented medals of honor to the 
officers of the association and to 
some distinguished scholars. 

Dr. Morrison spent two weeks 
in Spain, so in addition to the 



scholarly meetings, he was able 
to do some sightseeing. He at- 
tended several 19th-century 
operettas performed at the fine 
arts center in Madrid, visited 
museums, historical casties, and 
rode the modem subways around 
the city. He also did some re- 



search in the national library ' 
there, gaining valuable material 
for his dissertation, *'The Con- 
cept of Sainthood in the Drama of 
Lope De Vega,'' 

Dr. Murrisot was very im- 
pressed by the low incidence of 



Book Editor Predicts Writers' Future 



nMatk St. Bernard 

The book editor for the South- 
ern Publishing Association, 
Richard Coffin, said last week 
during career's chapel that poten- 
tial freelance authors writing for 
the Seventh-day Adventist mar- 
ket would be writing more for 
goodwill than for a good pay- 
check. 

According to Coffin, writing for 
S.D.A. publishing houses is not 
exactly the most profitable oc- 
cupation to enter. The average 
payment to an Adventist article 
author is about $75 to $100. 

Coffms, who was invited to 
speak to the English and com- 
munication classes for Careers 
Day, informed the students of the 
qualifications and roles of book 
editors, copy-and co-editors, and 
public relations practitioners in 
the Adventist market. He said 
that good editors must neither be 
"theological radicals nor arch- 



nnvtprnMTOr: cont. from 

supper in the college cafeteria. 
After supper, Jake Atkins, presi- 
dent of the worid-wide Alumni 
Association will preside over cer- 
emonies recognizing the Honor 
Classes. 

During the course of the eve- 
ning's activities, Atkins will pass 
the gavel to President-Elect, Dr. 
Minon Hamm of the English de- 
partment. 

Dr. Frank Knittel, president of 
Southern Missionary College, will 
inform the Alumni concerning the 
institution's enrollment figures 
and plans for the future. 

Speaker for sundown worship 
following the dinner and recogni- 
tion activities will be Elder W. H. 
Patsel, evangelist for the Ala- 
bama-Mississippi Conference. 

The duo-piano team of Ferrante 
and Teicher will be performing at 
8:15 Saturday night in the college 
gymnasium. The two men have 
for years remained at the top of 
the popular music field for piano 
arranging and performing works 



Collegedale Cleaners 




Son. • TliaTS. 
7:30 - 5:30 

FHd»y 7:30-4:00 

COLLEGE PLAZA 

396-25S0 



conservatives." 

During the question and an- 
swer period, Coffin explained tiiat 
the proposed merger of the Re- 
view and Herald and the Southem 
Publishing Association is "dead" 
for now; 

BUDGET cont. from p. 2 

penses run to almost seven mil- 
lion dollars each year. Last year 
the College operated at a loss. 
Even though tiie enrollment last 
year wasn't quite what the school 
had hoped for, the increase in 
tuition was enough to meet the 
expected expenses, 

Reiner won't know until De- 
cember if there will be an in- 
crease in tuition for the upcoming 
school year. He hopes there 
won't be, because the cost is 
getting top high for students to 
handle. 




crime in the city. "I didn't see 
any creepy-looking characters ex- 
cept a couple of tourists." And 
he added, "Madrid is a good 
place to visit. It's safe, clean, 
inexpensive, and AiU of art and 
culture. 

CABL Found 
In Northgate 

DMykal Ringstaff 



The Collegiate Adventists for 
Better Living (CABL) will sponsor 
a community services booth at 
Northgate Mall Oct. 12 and 13. 

"The purpose of CABL," stat- 
ed John Lazor, director of CABL, 
"is to let people know of better 
living through the positive as- 
pects of diet, exercise, and health 
reform." 

The booth will have exhibits 
and information on smoking, 
drinking, and drugs. Persons 
interested in stopping smoking 
will be urged to sign up for the 
5-day plan to be sponsored by 
CABL the following week. There 
will also be free blood-pressure 
testing. 

According to Lazor, at least 
eight more volunteers are needed 
to help staff the booth which will 
be open from 1-9 p.m. Lazor can 
be reached at 4673 or 2214. 



p.i 

by such composers as John Barry 
(Theme from Midnight Cowboy), 
and Legrand, (Summer Song from 
the Picasso Suite). 

There will be reserve seat tic- 
kets for the Alumni for this con- 
cert. 

The College will host a Sunday 
morning brunch for former stu- 
dents and teachers during the 
decade of 1917-1927. For the 
old-timers, as they call them- 
selves, this brunch is expected to 
be the highlight of the weekend. 
Plans for the occasion have been 
made and carried out by Walter 
Clark and Mrs. Cari Jacobs. The 
time is 9:30 in the banquet rooms. 

FINE AKTS cent, from p. 1 

School, located in Chattanooga on 
McCallie Ave. 

The fine arts complex will be 
constructed in four building 
stages; music building; the art 
department and exhibition halls; 
the communication department, 
housing the WSMC-FM station; 
and lastly, the fine arts audi- 
torium. 



This Week's Specials 
Oct. 6-9 





"VM 



VILLAGE MARKET 




.1' 



Vos- 



V^°'- ,,ot. 




Frozen Yogurt 
Free Sample 



4 THE SODTHKKN ACCENT Ifc-irfV. Octotar 6. 1*77 



Pac' 



Letters To The Editor 



Editorial 



.ne^pts have been -^^^Jj^p"" ^p.e^S^n 
student cultural awareness. ^hUe the Hne Ans f ^^ 

the architect's mble ^-^^J^Jlf^l^XJZieiiom^e 

rottStl:nrr::^S;e^ation on can-pus. 

We do hereby declare the Coil Of Cable lying between the men's 
^^ta;rorwrtmitin°Ir;;uf".^.ess„ess This spool Of 

center. 

Since that time, like any venerated statue the pass i^s 
meti ubusly trimmed around it, and couples stro 1 le^urely past 
™ Seir way to dinner. This cabled coU (product of a twisted mind?) 
stands in sunshine and rain, bravely facing the elements. 

Many have come to look upon it as a landmark a symbol o 
progress It is viewed with obvious respect - no one has defaced it 
or iied to remove it from its place of planting. Not even the 
Grounds or Service departments. No, the coU remams m its idyllic 
setting on the hiU against a background of rustling pine. 

There are a few things that stUl twang our consciences whenwe 
call it Art, For one thing, we haven't noticed any pigeons lighting 
on it The other is that Art should be imaginative and intensely 
creative. Maybe someday Grounds will get a creative bramstorm 
and erect this monument to prosperity somewhere else. 



•To protect the people of God from the cotrup^ 
ting influence of the world...dress reform was 
tatfod"ed. It would distinguish God's people from 
Se wo" W and serve as a barrier against its fasluons 
and follies" T4:634. How is the sfaident at SMC 
wTshed from the world? All about us this 
semester we see the influence of the world upon 
"*e school of the prophets." ™s influence takes 
on the appearance of "manmsh fashion for 
women " The Bible says, "The woman shall not 
wear that which pertaineth to a man, neither shall a 
man put on a woman's garment; for all that do so are 
an abomination unto the Lord thy God, Deut. 
22-5 "There is an increasing tendency to have 
women in their dress and appearance as near like 
the other sex as possible, and to fashion their dress 
very much like that of men, but God pronounces it 
abomination...for confusion will be the result.„aie 
same dress worn by both sexes would cause contu- 



The Southern Accent 

material pu'-'ished in The Southern Accent is i 
iarily the opinio.. view of the newspaper staff or 
SMC administration. Cartoons, articles, and other content itemsj 

n exchange of ideas, a forum. In the case c 
disagreement, "Letters to the Editor," is a column designed t 
provide expression. Our policy will allow the expression ofj 
differing ideas. We do. however, reserve the right not to publish || 
material that is libelous, extremely radical, or out of character ii 
light of doctrinal points. We wish to retain the bearing of i 
Christian SDA college newspaper. 

Editor Vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Manager Dave Middag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greenleaf 

Sports Editor Reuben Castillo 

Circulation Manager.'.".'..". John Henson 

Secretaries Pam Lcgere 

Denise Sheets 

Ad Manager Ray Hartwell 

Proofreaders Kathy Mixell 

Jeanne Zacharias 

Sibscriptions Candy Miranda 

j^i isls Mark Ford 

Sandie Lehn 

Photographers Rhonda Runvan 

Mike Partlo 
Mark Ford 

Reporters Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

Sponsor Frances Andrews 

Printer > Felts Bros. Printing Co., 

Ooltewah, Tenn. 

The Southern Accent is published weekly with the i 
of test weeks and vacations. 

Subscriptions for parents and alumni are SS per year, mailed! 
weekly from Collegedale, TN at a non-profit rate. 



sion and great increase of crime," Tl:457-460, 
SM2:477,478. Futhermore, Sister White says in T4 
that Satan is the inventor of fashion. As we relive 
the past few years, we can see how Satan has 
changed fashions and how it has been tolerated and 
encouraged. While this has been done, Satan has 
conditioned the church to accept his worldliness of 
dress. 

The administration says that the dress code was 
liberalized to conform to governmental regulations. 
How long shall we obey Caesar? The Bible and the 
Spirit of Prophecy instructs the Christian on our 
code of dress, but yet we render obeisance to the 
government. 

Finally, if we aren't going to be a peculiar 
people, we must take the dress code one step 
further! If men want to put on that which pertaineth 
to a woman, they should be allowed to do so. 

Ridiculous, isn't it? 

Thank you. 



Stephen Shaw 



Dear Editor: 

My name is John O. Mendez, Jr., an inmate at 
Attica Correctional FacUity in New York state. 

Since coming to prison over 13 months ago, 1 
have found our Lord and Saviour, Jesus Christ. I am 
one inmate that can say I'm glad I came to prison. 
Yes, I realize that may sound strange, but it's true. 
Today 1 know a freedom that I have never known in 
my life before. The freedom I'm speaking about can 
oiily come through our Lord. 

I'm studying for the ministry, for I have given my 
life to Christ, not partly but completely. Upon my 
release from this prison, prayerfully in 1980, itS the 
Lord's work that 1 am called to do. 

Since the majority of my time I spend locked in 
my cell, I have plenty of time to study our Lord's 
Word. What I'm learning and what I know I seek to 
share with other Christians. For it is in fellowship 
that we may all grow as children of God. Unfortun- 
ately. I have no family or anyone on the outside 



whom I may share my love for Christ with. 

I desire to establish mean'mgful Christian rela- 
tionships. I say as Paul said, "Brethren I count not 
myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do. 
forgetting those things which are behind, and 
reaching forth unto those things which are before, I 
press toward the mark for the prize of the high 
calling of God in Christ Jesus." Phil. 3:13,14. 

Dear editor, if you could kindly place an ad or 
article or this my letter for me in your school 
newspaper for Christian correspondence, it would 
be so greatly appreciated by me. I seek new fnends 
in Christ. It does become lonely in my cell ana 
receiving some maU would surely help. It is 
fellowship and the love of Christ in friends that i 

Anything you could do for me on this, the above 
matter and my prayful request, I would be ever so 
grateful. May the Good Lord Bless You and proteci i 
you always. ^.^^^^^jy 

John 0- Mendez, Jr. 
77-A-2274 B-20-41 

Box 149 

Attica, N.Y. 14011 



Dear Editor: 



As I was walking to work at the Accent office 
from the library, I embarrassingly came to the 
conclusion that I was invading some couples* privacy 
rights. 

Or, were they invading my rights? -- My right of 
being able to walk down the sidewalk without feeling 
like I should close my eyes and tiptoe by; my right of 
feeling assured that when visitors arrive at SMC, 
they needn't feel the same way. (I was the one who 



felt embarrassed when a student walked out of 4' | 
student center with her family.) 

I am not going to go into detaU about 4« 
situation as I don't think that's necessary to get i 
point across. But can't we students be ma 
enough to keep our display of affections to a p 
where visitors, fellow students, and faculty can " 
respect for us and we can still respect ourselve | 



Sincerely, 



1 Greenletf 



Regardmg last week's letter signed Thatcher 
Annex Resident: I profusely apologize for not 
adding my name to the letter. 1 regretted not doing 
so immediately after the letter was delivered. 
However, being the shy person that I am, 1 took no 
action to rectify the situation. 

I appreciate your printing the letter despite my 
omission of a signature. I will supply one at this 
time. 

Sincerely, 

Debi Terry 




u^ 



We print personals, used book announcements, and other 
miscellany free. Drop your announcement in a red Southern 
Accent mailbox. 



Urandsy, October i, 1977 THE SODTHEBN ACCENT - 5 



9 The JOKER regrets thatBERNIE WILEY was classified as married. He is SINGLE 
and ELIGIBLE. He lives in Talge and his phone number is 395-4907. 

Anyone who needs the book The Americu Pageuit (for Am. History) - 1 have a used 
one for sale. Remember they are $14.20 at the boolt store. I'll sell mine for only 
$10.00. If you are interested please call Beth Best at 396-2476 after 6 p.m. or 
396-4279 between 12:30 and 5:30 and leave message. 

CONGRATULATIONS to Sharon Webster and Glenn McGrady on their marriage 
October 9111 



0AU Resident Poets - The Poetry Club will hold its first meeting on Wednesday, 
October 12, at 5:30 p.m. in the cafeteria banquet room. Officers will be elected and 
other organizational matters discussed. Poets -- please cornel 

ACongratnlallons senior glilsl According to Olan Mills' representatives, this year 
they have taken pictures of the prettiest girls ever on this campus. That's serious. 
We're glad for that and hope you are too. Southern Memories. 

The judges of the K-G-L-M Bakeoff would like to sincerely thank Exhibit A for her 
entry into the contest, but regret, however, that they could not thank her personally. 

A Dear Matildel Thank you very much for your helpl Yours truly, Ebenezer 

#CAR FOR SALE: 

1969 Belaire Chevrolet, white, V-8, 327, Good Condition, Must SeUI For more 
information call: 396-4748 or 396-3445. 

Also: Honda 450 chopper, 1973, Brand new king/ queen seat, same phone. 



% That which was lost is found. Thank you very much. Goldie. % 

% Elder Francis: PLEASE let your classes out on timet 

Intercollegiate Retreat scheduled for October 13-16 has been canceled. Watch for 
announcements concerning rescheduling. 

Cyril Roe, associate professor of education and director of the worid missions 
program at SMC will lead out in the Friday evening devotional. A panel discussion 
by returned student missionaries will also be a part of the Friday vespers. 
The booth Sabbath afternoon at 3 p.m. will feature slides of the different mission 
areas that SMC students have gone to. The Adopt-A-Student Missionary program 
will be initiated at this time. 



10 Uke to tske Gnltar? I will be giving lessons to anyone interested in putting some 
effort into learning to play. If interested, call me at 396-3426, but please don't call 
unless you're serious and willing to work at it. Mic Thurber. 

Macnune CUsses » There will be macrame classes starting: 
Sun., Oct. 9, 8-10 p.m. 
Tues., Oct. 11, 8-10 p.m. 
Thurs., Oct. 13, 4-6 p.m. 
The classes will last for five weeks. For more information call Sharon at 4164. 

The Far East Qob is planning a podnck for 1:00 p.m.. Sabbath, October 8, at the 
Student Park Shelter. If you have been in the Far East or are interested in going, do 
come and enjoy the fellowship. Please bring food for yourself and a couple other 
people. Any questions, call Debra Gainer at 4426. 

MEN'S CLUB RIVERBOAT CRUISE, Thursday, October 20, 1977; 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 
p.m. $2.00 per couple (couples only). Get tickets at Talge desk Oct. 3-17. 

Center Grove Church, Rock Spring, invites you to join them in fellowship this 
Sabbath. Worship in a small country church; meet the local neighbors in home to 
home visiting. The van leaves Wright Hall 8:30 a.m. Sabbath and returns 4:30 p.m. 
All good cooks are invited to bring contributions to help in the Sabbath meal. 
Contact Warren Auld 4907 for details. 

The Student Missionary club willbein charge of the Friday evening program and will 
sponsor a booth Sabbath afternoon during the Mission Emphasis weekend, Oct. 6 to 



To all interested in the advance of science; there will be a seminar series in advanced 

science starting Thursday, Oct. 6, 7:30 p.m., with a lecture by Dr. Ray Hefferlin 

' /. entitied "Mendeleev Revisited - A Periodic Table For Diatomic Molecules". 

^^ ThemeetingplaceisDaniellsHall,room24. All are invited. For further info contact 

Dave Gimbel. 

The Married Couples' Club will be having their retreat at Atoka Springs, Oct. 21-23. 

Don't miss this opportunity to fellowship with fellow married couples. A full 

weekend is planned. Sabbath School will feature a special musical program. 

Let's all get acquainted. Steve Darmody 
M.Ford - the skin off your is worth an exclamation point in the staffbox. 
The Southern Accent needs a Layout Line-Up Person. Pay is cash. Must be able to 

work goodly portions of Monday and Tuesday afternoons. Must be devotee of 

accuracy and avid Accent fan. Call 4356. 



Soothera Accent 



Photography 
Contest 




Theme: Campus Life 

Judged On: Photo Quality, 

Expressive Content 
and Mood 

Contest Ends Oct. 21 



only Mack iiiil wUtc photo* 
Mcepled. 



Winner $15 



Open To All Students 

except Accent and Memories photographer* 




"In your church and neighborhood mis- 
sionary work, let your light shine forth in such ' 
' clear, steady ways that no man can stand up in 
the judgment, and say, 'Why did you not teU 
me about this truth? Why did you not care for 
iny soul?' "' 
Christian Service p. 169 

\ I 



! SOBTHEKN ACCENT Tl.»»a*T, <)««*« *• !»" 



:^ 




A Solution To 
The Mess In 
Your Room 



For tnanv Talge Hall residents, 
cleaning up their room, now that 
open house has come and gone, 
ban easy task. This is espeaaJly 
tiue for those who would not have 
deaned their rooms in the first 
place, had it not been for the open 
house. 

Every room is divided into four 
groups -- under the bed, behind 
the dresser, crammed in the desk 
drawers, or in the closet The 
difficulty lies in the fact that 1 m 
not exactly sure what's in each 
group. 

Everything that .has not found 
its way into one of these groups, 
or has wandered out of one, soon 
finds a place in a pile. 

Piles are there for several rea- 
sons. One is so you can have a 
maze in your room for eiercise , as 
you walk around them all the 
time. (With a busy class and work 
schedule, who has time to exer- 
cise?) Also, if it wasn't tor piles, 
you wouldn't know what to do 
with yout prize junk and slightly 
dirty, half dirty, and filthy dirty 
clothes. You wouldn't want to get 
your slightly dirty clothes filthy 
by putting them in the filthy pile 
would you? The third reason in 



this series of college logic, is you 
might want people to think that 
vou are a fairly neat slob, and that 
indeed there is an order to your 
mess of piles. 

The comer is usually a good 
place to start a pile. It seems to 
pow dirty socks and other things 
that don't have enough sense to 
stay in your laundry hamper. 

Another place that seems to 
continually have paper wads, etc. 
dropping around it is your gar- 
bage can tree. 

A third place for a pile is in the 
sink. After all, it is so inviting, 
with its mouth open wide, seem- 
ing to say, "I'll bet you can t 
resist feeding me wash clothes 
and soap." But little does flie 
sink know that despite its big 
mouth he still has 6 hard time 
digesting more than xme tooth 
paste cap at a time. 

A fourth place - for your more 
displayable pile - is on top of the 
air conditioner. In this place you 
pile all your sports stuff, which 
you never (or seldom) use, so that 
the giris from the outside and the 
boys from the inside can see what 
an athlete you are. Some items 



you might find in this pile would 
be your two tennis rackets, tons ot 
balls, (which you got from ditler- 
ent people for Xmas and birthday 
presents several years back, and 
never used); two motorcycle hel- 
mets that you can't use because 
your bike needs to be fixed and all 
your money has gone on your 
statement; two inner-tubes that 
have been up there so long that 
you don't know which is good and 
which is not; an often-used skate- 
board (because you're too lazy to 
walk); an air freshen^; and (for 
good measure) a sign acting God 
to be patient with you. 





Vanessa 
Greenleaf 




To Take Time.. 



But the pile of all piles is your 
weeping clothestree. It's the 
place where you put all the things 
that need to be hung up and there 
is no room in your closet, since it 
already took all your weight to 
close it. Atop this elongated pile 
of sadness are ties, belts, head- 
phones, shirts, socks, hiking 
boots, and all your suspenders, 
which can act as quick clothes 
lines when need be. 

Yes, you might be surprised 
just how fast the rooms go back to 
normal after an open house. 

By the way, we still haven't 
found the pet snake that got 
loose. Whoknows which pile he's 
inl 



D selfish, Lord. 



So many times 

1 ask for more time: 
time to do things I should have 

done weeks ago, 
time to keep up, 
time to get ahead, 
time to be alone, 
time to sleep... 

But, God, thank You 

for the minutes You have given me. 
Help me to ultilize them 

skillfully and sanely. 

But most of all, 

help me to spend aD my time with You. 
Not necessarily down on my knees 
or with a Bible in my hand: 
But sharing 
giving, 
talking, 
listening... 

Interacting with all these wonderful people 
around me 

with a spirit of the Bible 
in my heart. 



Thank You, God, 

for making me aware 
of the people around me 
and the time I have to share with them. 



A New Way, A New World 

The early Christian church grew in an atmosphere of dedication and 
sacrifice. They became known as the Way because Jesus was their way 
to a new direction of living. Life took on purpose as they viewed the 
life death, and priestiy ministry of the risen Savior. 

After the ascension of Christ the apostles found themselves the 
nucleus of a prophecy-fulfilling movement. The old ritual system had 
found its end in the antitype (Christ). Now the christian way became 
the most dynamic revelation of God's character and will to man. 

Judaism with its forms and ceremonies faded until its deathknell at 
the destruction of Jerusalem. The city became the memory of a once 
great nation chosen by Yahweh, the self-existant One, They faUed to 
live the life of love that He wanted so much to see, and their rejection 
gave greater impetus to the new way to become His next agency of 
salvation to mankind. , , „ ^ » ... „ 

Being devout Jews, the apostles lived the Hebrew teachings. Then 
association with Jesus gave added emphasis to their understanding ; 
and application of the oracles of God; they saw the spirit of the word 
and realized that life can only come from feeding on the substance ot 
nourishment. To have the letter without the spirit was to have 
decaying manna that offered only death to its partakers. 

The Holy Spirit came with the energy of creation to carry the gospel 
to the whole worid in a single generation. The reality of the gospel 
found its most convincing proof in the daUy lives of service that 
reflected the Master. Their arguments were open to refutation by the 
authorities, but their purity drove the sin-laden leaders and r-ople to 
the madness of instituting a mass persecution against the Waj > 

Falling first to this persecution was Stephen, one of the seven, 
He died with the prayer of forgiveness on his lips that tore the heart of 
Paul who later became the apostle to the Gentiles. What Sata. 
thought was his greatest blow turned into his greatest defeat^ 

The years of controversy and death rolled on. James died by the 
sword Peter was crucified upside down and Paul was decapitated. 1 

Running like an eternal pool, the blood of the eariy Chnstiaos 
became the seed of growth for countless thousands Persecun n 
brought an increase of converts and the refinement of theW> 
Only those who gave their all lived the life of a Chnstian, for to be . 
Christian meant to be a moment from death. , 

It was the life of Christ that brought the rage of the world. 
Here was a force that could not be bought or sold in the ""f ' P « 
The power of heaven made inroads even into the palace of Caesar, 
The presence of Christ was worth any price - even death. L 

Witnessing a phenomenon for which their training ^n<! "P/"'^l 
had given no preparation, the Roman worid was faced with the real* | 
of love. This love gave and gave, and the more that it gave the j 
it became. .. u coulll 

The power of force was poweriess to conquer the Spint. " » 1 
torture and destroy the physical being, but the inner f""*^' "f^, J 
the reality of the living Word, could not die; it exploded everythng tlia| 
it touched, and its touching brought transformations ot Deau^. ■ 
Beholding this beauty, their eyes became blinded fj "= . ^ 
Glory is a state of heaven, and only those who lived it could expeneq 
its joy. 



The best time to buy life 
insurance is when you're 
young. -Ask me why! 



Fred Fuller 
Collegedde Agent 




Gitastrophe Strikes! 

If 1 have financial aid and my 
famUy financial situation changes 
dnring this year, can I get more 
money? 







Any changes in financial status 
/O— 1 should be reported immediately 
[^ITj to the Shident Finance Office. 

Where possible, adjustments are 

made. 




Hmraday, October 6, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT • 7 



[The Dress Code- 
changing Clothes, Changing Image, Or Changing Morals? 






DJerry Dick Lien 

Unless one has had the misfor- 
tune of being locked in a time 
capsule for the past several 
months, he knows by now that the 
dress standards at SMC have 
changed somewhat. Pant attire 
for women on campus is now 
permissible . while jeans, theo- 
retically at least, are banned for 
everyone except at specified 
rimes. 

Is this change of code of benefit 
to the common weal, an example 
of enlightenment in action, or will 
it prove to be just another illustra- 
tion of declining standards, us- 
hering in the horrors of unisex? 

In pursuit of opinions, this re- 
porter launched an inquiry. We 
submit the sentiments of 12 stu- 
dents of the college. These opin- 
ions have been selected as most 
representative from a larger ran- 
dom sampling. 

The questions asked were as 
follows: 

1. What difference do you 
think the ruling will make in the 
image of SMC as the spiritual 
school, or the school of stand- 
ards? 

2. Do you think the school 
would eventually have made a 
similar decision, or that the Fed- 
eral anti-sex discrimination legis- 
lation was the catalyst for the 
change? 

3. Do you believe that the 
dress code will be enforced 
equally between men and wo- 
men? 

4. Do you believe that the 
men may in part feel that they are 
being short-changed by the code 
in not being able to wear jeans as 
freely as in the past? 

Dftvid Caodier - 1, for one, 
, believe in holding to a certain 
dress standard. Of course, there 
•^ is the dress code as set down in 
Deut. 22:6, and I believe in this, 
i would rather see a girl in a dress 
than in slacks or a pant suit. 
There are certain Christian ettiics 
/ in my opinion, to be adhered to 
:?/ here. However, I doh't feel that 
' dresses must be worn instead of 
slacks at all times. There are 
[examples of cold weather and 
'ork situations in which a dress 
would be both uncomfortable and 
awkward. I feel that it has been 
mostly the older generation that 
has seen the change as a decline 
■n school standards. As I Under- 
tand it, many faculty, too, 
'anted to keep the dress code as 
[twas. I don't believe that on the 
hole the men in the dohn feel 
lat they are being put upon by 
le code. They can still have a 
legree of freedom of dress with- 
it looking like bums. 



^Vinlta Wayman - I think that 
Jie law was the motivating force 
|ehind the change. But the ad- 
'nistration might have made the 
nange anyway. I think the code 
an be equally enforced if the 
idministration tries. One of the 
pen requested that I, as Hie 
poothem Accent editor, commis- 
P»on 10 men to wear jeans to class 
fnd then see if the faculty and 
administration would enforce the 
^Mng. He suggested that I write 
gn editorial on what happened. I 
*wcided not to do this because I 



I HBw< 



.jSS^M 




1*^^ 



Spicy hamper sticker spotted on vehicle in Collegedale. 




Photo by Rhonda Ronyan. 



think this is only a gripe of the 
men. Besides, my editorial could 
make the administration really 
crack down and that wouldn't 
make very many people happy 
either. But as you can see, there 
is some feeling on the part of the 
male students. 



IVfike Partlo - I haven't really 
thought about the decision much. 
But I don't think that it will have 
much effect on the school's 
image. I think the school would 
have made a change even without 
the federal law. But they used 
the law as an excuse to support 
their decision. I don't really have 
any feelings on the issue, but at 
the same time, I do think tiiat the 
decision has given the girls some 
real estra privileges. 

Name Wtthbeld - 1 really prefer 
to see the girls come to class and 
the cafeteria in dresses. I believe 
that the type of clothes you wear 
really does effect the way you act. 
If a girl is wearing a dress, the 
chances are that she will feel more 
like a lady than if she was wearing 
slacks. Also, there are people 
who come to the administration 
building who aren't Adventists. 
I think that women in slacks, etc, 
could hurt somewhat the image of 
the school in their eyes, i do feel 
though, that the federal law was 
what really made the school ad- 
ministration change the code. 



Stanley Knight - A lot of people 
said that the federal law was the 
thing that changed the dress 
code. The administration said so, 
and I believe it. They were 
wanting to comply with the law. I 
don't think, though, that tiie new 
code will really make much dif- 
ference in people's minds about 
the school and its standards. I 
believe that for the most part the 
code is fair and that both parents 
and students believe it to be. 



Diane Butler - In some ways, I 
think, the administration must 



have been examining the dress 
issue for several years. There has 
been, I know, a lot of talk for 
some time in the past about slacks 
and pant suits coming in. I 
attended Andrews before I came 
here, and one of the reasons that I 
did go there first was the SMC 
dress code. Andrews' code was 
more relaxed for the girls. They 
didn't have to go running around 
all the time in only dresses. I 
thought that considering all the 
other SDA schools dress stand- 
ards, the old code at SMC was 
quite silly. I came here, though, 
last year and found that I could 
adapt to the standards. But I am 
glad that the dress code has beei 
changed for the women. There 
may be some difference in the 
image of the school in some 
people's eyes, but I think the 
effect will be small. I think that 
the rules will be enforced as 
equally as they can be. But 1 
suppose that as time goes on the 
men will probably become more 
lax in their dress. I have seen 
some of the men wearing jeans 
now. The women, though, seem 
to be more hesitant. They don't 
want to blow their chances now. 



Name Withheld - I don't think 
the law had anything to do with 
the change. I really don't know 
what caused the change. I do 
think the code now will make a 
difference in the school's image. 
People who don't know about the 
school as a school, that is, aca- 
demically, might be influenced 
just by the way students dress. 
As to the opinion of the men on 
the new code, I really am not 
sure. Most don't seem to like it, 
though. They don't like the idea 
of not being able to wear jeans. 
But, as the year goes on, the men 
might be able to wear jeans. 
I don't think the code will be 
enforced equally as time goes on. 
I think it will become more lax as 
the year goes on. 



Cmsandra Gander - I'm not 
around the campus much, but I 



think that the new dress code is a 
good thing. I don't think that by 
allowing the women on campus to 
wear slacks and pant suits there 
has been any really significant 
change in the college's principles. 
By making the change in the 
code, I feel that the administra- 
tion was simply facing up to the 
changes of time. I don't really 
know how the men feel, but I 
think that the change will really 
make little difference in the 
school's image here and else- 
I where. As to equal enforcement 
of the code, I really couldn't say 
now. 



Daniel Pabon • I believe the 
change in the code was made 
more because the girls have been 
complaining for a long time. I 
really don't think that the law 
was the great deciding factor. 
1 think, though, that the code 
could maybe be a littie more just. 
There are many men here who 
, can't afford really good slacks. If 
they have good jeans and can 
keep them neat, I really don't see 
why they can't wear them. You 
know, there are good jeans and 
then jeans with holes ahd look 
sloppy. I feel comfortable in 
jeans. I don't think that dress 
really has anything to do with the 
spirituality of a person. SMC is a 
spiritually qualified school, so I 
don't think that the change will 
really make a big change in the 
school's image. The men seem to 
be getting more used to having to 
,wear slacks instead of jeans now. 

Name Withheld [GIri] - I am 

really glad that the girls can wear 
pants now. They are much more 
comfortable than dresses. There 
is a time and a place for every- 
thing, and I think this decision is 
a step in the right direction. 
But I still don't see why there is 
more emphasis on jeans than 
hair. I suppose that the law was 
the thing that really got the school 
to change its mind on the "old 
dress code. I hope that it will be 
enforced fairly, but 1 know that I 
wouldn't leave a class if told my 



dress was not acceptable, if I saw 
that some of the boys there Were 
wearing jeans. 

Buddy E. Dorgb - I think there 
will be a change in the school's' 
image. It will not be with Ad- 
ventists, I don't think, but with 
non-Adventists or people who are 
not strong in the faith, but are 
looking for a school to send their 
children to that seems to have 
standards. The law. I don't think, 
had anything to do with the de- 
cision to make the change, fhe 
enforcement of the ruling will 
depend on whether or not there is 
much abuse of it. There seemi^ to . 
be some discontent about parts of , 
the code, but 1 think it should be 
kept as it is. 



Lym Neomann - I have only 
lattended SMC since last year, but . 
even then I did notice that th^ere . 
was some discontent among the ;■' 
girls concerning the dreSs cOde. / 
Many thought that it was very ; . 
unfair that the boys could go 
around in jeans and sometimes in 
rather sloppy clothes while they 
had to wear dresses. The federal 
law, I believe, had something to 
do with the school making its 
decision when it did to change the 
code. I'm not certain about how 
much reaction there will be a- 
mong the men as to the fairness 
of the code. However, I do think 
that there may possibly be some 
reaction among various people 
who have viewed SMC as the 
spiritual school or the SDA school 
with real standards. I know there 
were various schools I could have 
gone to, but my family had heard 
so much about SMC that 1 came 
here when I was a sophomore. 
My dad particularly liked the 
school's image as that of one of 
certain standards. I do think, 
though, that the school did make 
its final decision (during the sum- 
mer) at a time when it would be 
easier to do it. It's kind of like 
tipping an apple cart -- easier to 
do when it's empty. It's easier to 
make changes when students and 
others who are involved in the 
issue are gone. 



a - THE SODTHERN ACCENT nmadijr, October 6, 1977 



^ Golf 
Tourney 
"fees Off 

The annual men's club fall 
Golf toumev was played at 
Moccasin Bend Sunday Oct. 2. 
Four teams struggled to win and 
Knan's Nuggets with Ron Knarr. 
Warren HaWersen. Delmar 
Lovejoy. and Tommy Davidson 

! pulled through with one over par. 

i Jim Douglas came through as 

the overall winner for the fourth 

! consecutive tourney. (Get rid of 



him). The flight winners were 

A flight Douglas 76 

B flight Evans 81 

C flight Lovejoy 89 

D flight Cochrell 86 

Warren Halversen won the 
longest drive on the 8th hole and 
Ted Evans was second on the 13th 
hole. Qosest to the pin contest 
was won by Ron Barts and Ted 
Evans. 

It was not the best day for any 
of the golfers but there will be 
more tournaments to come. 




Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



w 



-^* ' 



Tennis Tournament 
Scores 



The Talge men's club tennis tournament progressed to the secontl 
round as fewer players remained. Here are this week's results: 

Tompkins over Colgrove 
Schutte over Crawford 
Pumphrey over Elliston 
Bumsed over Rathburg 
Barts over CHett 
Brand over Youngberg 

For those players who have not played their games, time is running i 



Mike Brand swelters imder the 
action. Photo by Marit Ford. 



as he takes a break bom the 




u 




Round One Ends With Websterl 
In First Place 



How To 

Open A Checking Account 





W 


L 


Pet. 


GB 


Webster 


7 


1 


.875 




Hunt 


5 


3 


.625 


2 


Wohlers 


6 


4 


.600 


2 


Runnells 


4 


3 


.571 


2'/, 


Minder 


5 


5 


.500 


3 


Whiteheat 


4 


4 


.500 


3 


Hickman 


3 


5 


.333 


4'/i 


Martling 


2 


6 


.250 


5 


Mobley 


2 


b 


.250 


5 



UGreg Vital 

The story is told of a man who 
wanted to open a hardware store. 
So he went to his local bank and 
deposited S2,000 in a new ac- 
count. The banker weIcome<l him 
and encouraged him to make a 
success of his new enterprise. 
The man left the bank eager to 
start with his package of checks. 

He immediately started writing 
checks for nails, bolts, and paint, 
and all the other necessar>' items 
needed to make a hardware store 
run efficiently. 

In about a week, the banker 
called and told him that he had 
overdrawn his account. The man 
was horrified. He told the banker 
that had to be impossible, be- 
cause he still had at least half of 
hi^ .heck^ left. 

So Willi any of us, a checking 
account is only as accurate as the 
records we keep. 

Opening a checking account is 
a very simple process. Go to your 
local bank with your Social Secur- 
ity number (and some cash) and 
you're in business. 

The bank will require you to fill 
out a signature card, to verify 
your signature in case of doubt. 
They will also help you choose 
what color and style of checks you 
want. Some banks have service 
charges in accordance with your 
average monthly balance. So find 
out about these charges, since 
they vary from bank to bank. 

Making sure you record each 
check as you write it and record- 



ing all deposits immediately help 
keep accurate records a cinch. 

Each month you will receive a 
statement of your account from 
the bank. It will show all deposits 
and withdrawals, service charges, 
(if any) and will include any can- 
celed checks the bank paid for you 
during the month. 

At this point you will need to 
reconcile your account. First, sort 
your checks into numerical order 
and check off each one the bank 
has paid in your checkbook regis- 
ter. 

Step 2; List checks written, but 
no! paid against your account. 

CHECK AMOUNT 



Step 3: Enter balance shown 
in this statement. 



Step 4: ADD all deposits mad< 
but not on statement. 



The first round of the Softball 
season ended last week with 
Webster taking a seemingly in- 
surmountable lead into the 
second round. Wednesday, 
Webster continued his streak by 
winning a tight one over Mobley, 
in the final inning, 8-7. Mobley 
lost a heartbreaker with victory 
only three outs away. Hunt main- 
tained a hold on second place by 
nipping Hickman in an extra- 
inning contest. After seven 
innings, the score was tied; Hunt 
finally scored in the eleventh 
inning for a final score of 11-10. 

The second round of the season 
promises to be exciting. The 
general attitude of the games has 
been positive. Every team tries 



harder against Webster for the 
chance to knock off a front- 
runner. Pitchers can engage in a 
duel, which heightens the mean- 
ing of the game. Last week saw a 
contest of pitchers between Barts 



and Mosley. Mosley was ejectedl 
from the game after two wamiDgsl 
from the umpire. As the reasral 
approaches the end, tempers majl 
rise and players may be ejected,| 
but the fans have the most fun, 



Tennis High-Lights InstalleJ 



DVanessa Greenleat 

New tennis court lights, eight 
actual fixtures, have been in- 
stalled to cover the four tennis 
courts nearest the gym. 

The metal, Halide lamp fix- 
tures, the "newest, most reliable, 
and economical fixtures avail- 
able" according to Ken Rogers, 
SA President, were put up by the 
Mountain City Electric Company 
in Chattanooga. Installation re- 



quired complete new wiring, m 
new on/off throw switch, andip 
new control box. 

This tennis outfit, coslii|| 
J3,800, was the student ; 
project for 76-77. Each year, i 
senate proposes one major pro]«j 
for SMC upkeep or betterinetlj 

The $3,800 bill was divided «[ 
follows: SMCSA $1,500; Me"! 
Club $500; SMC AdminislraW| 
Appropriation $1,800. 



TOTAL 



Step 5: SUBTRACT all check's 
outstanding. 



ADJUSTED 
BALANCE 



Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, TN 37315 




THE 




ACCENT 



Volume 7 



Southern Missionnry College, Collegedale, Tennessee, October 26, 1951 



Uen's Home Named John H. Taige Foundeis' Day Program Unites Old 

Hall in Founders' Day Program r-n rr r-\ r twt t ■ <^ i 



By recent action of the college board, the men's dormitory was renamed 
I hn H Talge Hall in honor of John H. Talge, longstanding benefartor of Col 

leeedale. Official statement of the ac- — 

tion was announced during the Found- 
ers' Day program, October 10, by 'V. G. 
Anderson, president of the college 

The floor of the Maude Jones Hall 
was donated by Mr. Talge. The entire 
furnishings of the boys' and girls' re- 
spective dormitories were contributed 
by Mr. Talge when they were first com- 

*" Mr. Talge was born in. Louisville, 
Kentucky, August 19, 1867, the son of 



Staff; Dr. Lynn Wood is Speaker 





Pictured un...d.a..l, ol... .he Found,™" Day proy™ »e^». |< tt. rj«... ™d '«™«^-<^ ^:^:r ir.d™!' M^r^ 



Jan upholsterer Through his father he 
■became interested in upholstery and 
I established the Talge Lounge Com- 
ipany. Later he founded the Talge Ma- 
ffiogany Company and was its president 
ind general manager when Southern 
junior College was being organized. 

The Talge Wood products became 
lationally known. In caring for his 
warehouse businesses in Chicago and 
tilashville, he made frequent visits to 
fcurope and other places of the world. 
'* mported woods from tropical coun- 

I Two years before the school was or- 
gtnized in 1914, Mr. Talge and his 
-wife became Seventh-day Advehti:ts. 
Through Elder S. D, White, president 
of the Southern Union at the time the 
college was founded, he became inter- 
ested in the establishment of the school. 
Mr. Talge was not able to attend 
the Founders' Day program because of 




The Ground Out ol Which 
SMC Grew 

iderful memories failed and he was not able to do the 
hird work— and it was hard those days, 
and help scarce — with much thought 
ol the future we decided to sell. By 
so doing, Collegedale was started m 
1916, in memory of which this Found- 
ers' Day is celebrated. 

I am always so proud we had a part 
in these wonderful buildings and sci- 
ence grounds, and 1 am interested in 
the work carried on here — of training 
young people. Our country is greatly 
in need of education in spiritual things. ; 

Last year my son gave the details of asked if he 
- ..... .1 Q^^ before the ' 



his present health. He 
'■ lopl- ' ■ 



sides 



Staiidiii9 ul faont ol thoi' lonusrroBi 
d.Bce are Mr. Grace Thatcher and hot 
son Mr Paul Thatcher Mrs Thatcher 
appeared on Iho FounderB Day pro 
aTam t.Umg ol early day. on the Thai 



..„, cher (arm 

LETTER FROM W. H. BRANSON 

•Many times have I lived through Those who have, in I"'";'""' b";^"^ 

experiences we had in the days the responsibility of the development 

_L ■ ...... _f .L;- : — ^:^,,^',ftn arp tn tie verv nl 



"A great many 

are here where I came as a bride i.. 
1895. I am always so glad to tell my 
friends that we had a starting part in 
these wonderful grounds and college 
and that a great work is being done 
here. . 

I am always so much interested in the 
work carried on here in my husband's 
com field where he would gather 100 
bushels of corn to the acre. 

We did not think of selling our farm 
when we took our sons to Chattanooga 

for the school months as high school _.- ,— , „ 

was close Our daughter had finished the farm and the life ....... 

hish sch^l and was in college. We in- home had always been a gathering pi 
tended to go back to our beloved home 
and happy farm life. One day some 
men came to sec my husband about 
buying our farm, but we did not in- 
tend to sell the farm. In a few days 
they came back and made my husband 
an offer Since my husband's health had ^-.., --^^ ^ 

«/ViC HAD IT'S riKST BEGINNING 
%iT A GiSATSVILLE STORE 



_ _ Lynn Wood, former president 
of this college in 1918-1922. was the 
mam speaker at the second Founders' 
Day program that took place in the 
tabernacle-auditorium of SMC October 
10, 1951 

"A Vision Through Faith' was the 
speaker s subject. He recalled the ap- 
pearance of Collegedale in 19V6 with 
the "yellow house' as the prominent 
building A few shacks and tents com- 
pleted the housing situation. 

The first permanent building, as re- 
called by Dr. Wood was the girls' 
idormitory. A saw mill was brought 
to the new school to make lumber with 
which to build. Money was needed, and 
help was sought in the central states. 

A mahogany-veneer manufacturer in 
Indianapolis, Indiana, John H. Talge, 
furnished flooring and furniture for the 
girls' home. 

Williams Helps College 
A Mr. Williams in Greeley, Colora- 
do, was known to put his entire earn- 
ing'; into the Lords work. Dr. Wood 
asserted that the William's home had 
"a deep influence of Christian atmos- 
phere ■ 

On being asked what he could do to- 
ward the growth of Collegedale, Mr. 
Williams and his sons decided to fi- 
nance and build two silos. Charles E. 
Williams, a SMC staff member of 
long stdnding and an elder in the- 
Collegedale church, is one of the sons. 
Dr. Wood recalled that a little maga- 
zine, Faith, was published by the school 
to tell of its progress and needs. Funds 
came in. Brooks Fletcher, an editor of 
a paper, after a lecture at Southern 
Junior College, asked to have the 
students write the story of how they 
came to college. These he published in 
his paper, acquainting his readers with 
the new school. 



,^. ^.ijoyment.' So much could be : 
as we led a full life with much hard 
work and some play. But the gladdest 
words of tongue or pen is This farm 
is what is should have been' and with 
God's help this wonderful work will 



wie experiences we had n the days tne respu,oiL.i..i; ^.. .-- ^ 

when we were trying to establish a suit- of this institution are to be very highly 

able training school for the Southern commended and ^o^g'^^^'^f \"PJ^ 

field. 1 havt never doubted that the their splendid achievements It has 

Lord guided in selecting the present lo- grown through the years until it 

cation near Ooltewah, and I am sure stands as one ot our leaaing eu 

that the wonderful success that has at- tional. institutions. Surely .t brings 

tended this school in that place is ample a great deal ^^ '^^''^ff"J°^Z 

evidence of His leadership in this un- hearts of those of us who ^ad to do 

dcrtaking. It seems to me that Southern with its founding to see the '/^nd^rf ul 

Missionary College has one of the finest d-lopment _ai.d advan«ment t^^^^^^^^ 
iocations of any of our schools any- 
where in the world. 

Lopez Submits Sub - 

Ruben Lopez submitted the first 



Accent subscription in the current 
?|"paign. The subscription came from 
Wc. Luis Garcia, who is on active duty 
tQ Kor(.9 

— -« ,a a former student of SMC 
™ning here from Puerto Rico in 1949 



been m'ade through the years. Hundreds 
of young people have been educated 
there and many of them have found 
their way into our organized work and 
a considerable number into mission 
"field service." 




their 



Seventh-day Adventist work in Ten- store. continu-„ 
^ T "„A„ril 1R92 when two years. Growth and efficiency . r- 

z^^.^^.---^-'^^:^ ^^j^-^o"^:;^^ j-;r4^,^ft^^.i:^ 



Garcia is a former student of SMC fro'^J^^^J^ ' ^^^ZZnc, It was Teanessee. Elder G. W. Colcord and Training Schoo 

"«^8 here from Puerto Rico ml949. '^^^^"/"^i^ ^^V^,rXr;«? X his^ephew. I. C. Colcord. began their when it moved 

He plans to return lo CoUegedale tfter ndJ by President Wright durmg the h. "eph^^^ . ^ ^^^ ^^^s ^^ ^^.^ "Collegedale." 

nu term of service is over. program,) 



Staff Meets Criils 

A deficit of $4,000, according to 

Dr. Wood, had caused the school board 

to consider, giving the school up. Dr. 

Wood, in capacity of president of SJC, 

' ' " ' might meet with the faculty 

'Ote was taken. The faculty 

members raised the $4,000 out of their 

salaries. The business manager offered 

to work for nothing if only gasoline 

would be supplied in order for him 

to get to and from Chattanooga to 

carry on the school's business. 

Sacrifice on the part of students, 
faculty, staff, and the parents at home 
has contributed toward the establishing 
of the present Southern Missionary 
College. 

Letters Read 
Fourteen second-generation students 
from eighteen of the first generation 
were featured on the program. 

Letters were written by the former 
students of SJC who have a son or 
daughter now attending SMC. Each 
letter related the most outstanding in- 
cident that took place while the writer 
was here at school. 

Memories of Friday night vesper 
services, with the testimonies and the 
spiritual atmosphere, were mentioned 
more often than any other factor in the 
letters. Mrs. Ruth Felker-Neely, mother 
of June Neely, attributed her conver- 
sion to these services, as well as to the 
;ork for two prayers of Dr. Wood. Mary Young's 
- — mother, Faydette Smith-Young, em- 
phasized that the leaders were spiritual. 
A. V. McQure especially remembered 
seminar trips in Mitchell Garret's 1920 
Dodge. 

{Continued on page 3) 



2 . THE SOOTHERN ACCENT Thmd.y, October 13, 1977 



:) 



New Pipe Organ Sound Investment 



GJem- Dick Lieo 

"Why should we have a new 
organ in the chutth? Isn't the 
present one good enough?" 
Questions such as these have 
been circulating along with the 
report that the Collegedale 
Church is eiaminingthe prospect 
of purchasing a pipe organ to 
replace the current electronic 

Approiimately 12 years ago the 
congregation included in its plans 
for the new Collegedale church a 
pipe organ. The cost at the time 
for such an instrument was 
S61.000 ■■ too much to spend, it 
was thought. 

So the first flectronic organ 
was installed in the sanctuary, a 



two-manual (keyboard) Baldwin 
with two small speaker cabinets. 
However, it soon proved to be 
inadequate. 

A pipe organ was again dis- 
cussed. The church, though, 
decided to buy another electronic 
and purchased the present Rod- 
gers which was installed in 1967. 
At that time, the Rodgers organ 
was considered to be one of the 
two best electronic instruments 
made. The cost was S23, 150 and 
was shared by the Southern 
Union, the college, and the 
church. 

To the question, "Isn't the 
present organ good enough?" the 
answer according to Dr. Marvin 



Robertson, Music Department 
head. is. "No." 

The Rodgers organ is now ten 
years old and unfortunately was 
planned with obsolescence in 
mind, states Robertson. Wheli it 
became necessary to make major 
repairs, the manufacturer <was un- 
able to supply the parts required 
and would not consider rebuilding 
the organ. 

Qualified technicians have 
been endeavoring to keep the 
instrument functioning properly. 
However, there are recurring ma- 
jor problems. Dr. Robertson lists 
these as follows: 

Certain sounds are always on 
whether one wants them or not; 



running the organ cannot be 
maintained: the stops don't func- 
tion properly and are not perma- 
nently repairable; the pistons are 
such that the organist never 
knows what sounds are coming on 
even though this has been care- 
fully planned; some of the elec- 
tronic parts are worn out and are 
apparently irreplaceable. 

It is somewhat then like an 
Edsel, no longer manufactured 
and cannot be adequately ser- 
viced. 

The following financial plans 
have been studied by the college, 
the church and interested indi- 
viduals to deal with the situation. 

1. Replace the organ with a 



similar one. This would cost 
$37,000. It would mean that the 
church would then have spent 
approximately $61 ,000 - the cost 
of the pipe organ originally pro- 
posed. With current inflation 
figures in mind, this would mean 
that ten years from now the con- 
gregation would have to spend 
$50,000 for a replacement. 

2. The church could buy a pipe 
organ like the one originally plan- 
ned. The inflated cost of labor 
and materials would raise the 
$61 thousand price to the 
$240,000 - $260,000. 

3. The mechanical-action pipe 

Tnni to p. 3, col. 1 




The Southern Accent 



Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 



Thuisday, October 13, 1977 



Collegedale, Xenn. 




Traffic Tickets In Force For All 



DDebby Boyer 

Last month, 750 parking tickets 
were issued according to Robert 
Merchant, treasurer. Both stu- 
dents and faculty are subject to 
the parking regulations printed in 
the SMC handbook. 

Clifford Myers, who's in charge 
of security, has six students pa- 
trolling the campus parking lots. 
Roy Nelson, Ray Hartwell, and 
Tom Reynolds check cars in class- 
room, visitor, and faculty park- 
ing lots. Donald Jaqua and Brian 
Hickman work in the Talge park- 
ing lot, and Mark Godenick works 
in Thatcher's parking lot. They 



patrol Monday through Friday 
from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. 

The two most common viola- 
tions are having no decal and 
parking in someone else's place. 

According to Merchant, the 
ticket money ($3) is put with the 
decal money and used to pay for 
the/ maintenance of the parking 
lots and their supervision. 

Ken Rogers, SA president, ap- 
pointed students Marie Walker, 
Sandy Musgrave, and Randall Ja- 
cobsoD to serve on the traffic 



court with Merchant. Last mont 
the court handled between 30 to 
40 appeals. The standard proce- 
dure involves stating one's name, 
the circumstances involved in get- 
ting the ticket, and answering 
questions. Afterwards, the court 
votes and the ballots are counted. 
In case of a tie the appeal is 
approved. Myers also attends the 
sessions, but does not vote. 

Traffic court will be held Octo- 
ber 26, November 16, and Decem- 
ber 14 at 4 p.m. in tiie Student 
Center. 



Mark Godenick writes 
Photo by Mark Ford. 



parking ticket atop offending vehicle. 



Fire Dept. Prevents 
Explosive Fire 



Summers Takes On Position 
As WSMC News Director 



DTeresa Shaw 

Tri-Community Fire Depart- 
ment engines rolled October 3. at 
11:30 p.m. One pumper, one 
tanker, and nine men responded 
to a trailer fire at London Lane 
and Mcgee Road in Apison. lo- 
cated on the outskirts of College- 
dale. 

The fire was extinguished one 
and a half hours after the firemen 
arrived on the scene. 



Fire officials reported that the 
trailer rented by c Ms. B. Smith 
was completely destroyed and 
damages were estimated around 
$5,000. There were no injuries. 

Asst. Chief Martin Lee said, 
"there was noway of determining 
the cause of fire." A butane tank 
located near the burning trailer 
was prevented from exploding by 
the firefighters. 



■ Behind Page Tw< 



Back In The Ole Days p. 4 

Femnte & Teicher Look Alike .........'. p' 6 

100 m.p.b. Frlsbee Game p. g 



D Carlos Haylock 

John Summers has recently 
joined the WSMC-FM staff as 
news director. He last was at Hot 
Springs. Ark., a spa resort area 
where he held a position as music 
director and air personality with 
commercial radio station KXOW. 

Summers said he wasn^t happy 
with commercial radio, but had 
been unsuccessful in getting a 
church-ielated communications 
job. 

He had almost given up hope in 
trying to get a job with the church 
when, during this past summer, 
he contacted the General Con- 
ference Communications Depart- 
ment and was told that WSMC 
was hiring new staff. WSMC was 
looking for someone with experi- 
ence in radio, and after talking 
with Summers, felt convinced he 
was the man for the spot. 

Summers feels that not having 
a communications degree had 
made it extra tough for him to get 



a communications job with the 
church, He recommends to those 
hoping to work for the church in 
conmiunications to get their de- 
gree. 

In 1971 he attended South- 
western Union College with the 
intention of entering the medical 
field. But soon after leaving 
college in 1974. he realized that 



he reaUy desired to work with 
radio. 

Within the last four yean. 
Summers gained experience wit" 
various types of musical format ai 
commercial stations - from Jop 
40 to country to easy listenmg- 
This is the first time he _» 
worked with classical music f 



savors the challenge that 
classical music station. 



WSMC. 
offers. 




Thursday, October 13, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



50 Participate In Experimental Math Instruction 



DDebra Gainer 

A new method of teaching In- 
termediate Algebra has been in- 
novated by Arthur Richert, math 
instructor. The experimental 
class is conducted on a self-study 
basis. The 50 guinea-pig stu- 
dents enrolled are required to 
come for the lectures only on 
Wednesdays, the remainder of 
the teaching process being com- 
pleted by themselves and student 
tutors. 

The course consists of a prac- 
tice workbook, from which exer- 
cises are done but not turned in. 
At the end of each of the 19 units 
is a test, which must be taken 
through four possible forms until 
the scholar achieves a score of 80 



per cent and can go on to the next 
chapter. At the end of the semes- 
ter a final exam is given, after 
which test scores are averaged for 



think it's nice having to attend while others enjoy the freedom of work-required and no rigid dead- 



speed. 



Richert explains that the reason 
he tried this method of indepen- 
dent study was an experimental 
one, to see if students learn better 
when they are forced to work on 
their own. He predicts that final 
exam scores will turn out general- 
ly the same as in other years, 
because students choose to learn DLinda Dick 
or choose not to, inspite of teach- 
ing methodology. 



class only once a week. On the studying at their c 
other hand, they feel some re- 
sentment about paying $89 an And then there is the problem 

hour to teach themselves. Some of procrastination; as one student 

find it difficult to learn with a remarked, "It's entirely too easy 

of teacher instruction, to put off since there's no home- 



lines.' 

But then, as Richert stated, it's 
just an experiment. Results of 
this semester's class will decide 
the methodology of future class- 



Concert Band Expands Horizons 



Members of the class have 
mixed feelings about it. They 



.ORGAN cont. &om p. 1 - 



organ has been examined. The 
inquiry shows that the mainten- 
ance costs are minimal. Also, 
organs of this type which are 300 
to 400 years old still work. A 
mechanical-action pipe organ of 
the size fitting for the Collegedale 
church could be purchased for 
$200,000. Delivery would take 
from two to three years. 

Robertson feels that such an 
organ could be the best for the 
needs of the church. He said, 
"First, the church would have a 
beautiful sounding instrument to 
lead the congregation in singing 
and worship. Electronic instru- 
ments simply cannot produce the 
precision and non- distortion of 
sound which the pipe organ does. 

"Second, this instrument 
would draw people to Collegedale 
church and Southern Missionary 
College. Experience at others of 
our SDA colleges has proved that 
the church organ can be a signifi- 
cant point of contact with non- 
church members." 

"Third, the purchase of an 
organ of this type would serve the 
congregation with minimal 
tenance until Jesus comes. 
Should time last and a new sanc- 



tuary be needed, the instrument 
could be moved and serve the 
new facility." 

It was voted at a church busi- 
ness meeting on May 4 to request 
that a recommendation for the 
solution to the problem of the 
organ be presented at a combined 
church board and business 
meeting May 18. 

Two motions were made during 
the May 18 meeting. One was 
that over a three year period the 
church would be responsible for 
$50 thousand to go to the pur- 
chase of a mechanical-action pipe 
organ providing that SMC is re- 
sponsible for $50,000. Further- 
e, $100,000 in special gifts 
would be sought from sources 
mostly outside of Collegedale. 
Any portion of the $100,000 which 
is not raised should be shared by 
the church and college. The other 
motion was that the Permanent 
Nominating Committee should 
select a church organ committee 
to recommend an organ builder 
and design. 

So far, according to Robertson, 
some $3,000 have been gained 
from outside sources. Further 
action on the part of the College 
Board is anticipated. 



The SMC Concert Band for the 
first time includes any student 
who can pass the tryout test for 
his particular instrument with a 
score of sixty or more. This band 
consists of 92 members and will 
perform mostly home concerts, 
although a trip to Oakwood Col- 
lege and a half-time show for an 
Atlanta Hawkes basketball game 
are planned. 

1 he SMC Touring Band is limi- 
ted to 32 of the highest tryout test 
scorers from the different instru- 



ment sections in the Concert 
Band. This band will be mainly a 
touring band. Plans are being 
laid for a spring tour to Canada 
and New England. 

The concert band ha*: ^tp'-'"'^ 
its officers for the yeai Presidet r 
is Ron Johnson; vice. Rob Vandc- , 
Vere; secretary, Kathy Campbell; 
social secretary. Debbie Ray; 
treasurer, Deanna Brown; pastor, 
Mickey Kutzner; tour manager. 
Randy Cox; and public relations, 
Linda Dick. New uniforms have 
also been voted on and ordered. 



Developing PE In The Wild 

QMark Kurzynske 

Delmar Lovejoy, professor of out ot doors for elementary school 
physical education, is teaching students" said Dr. Lovejoy 
and developing an outdoor educa- 
tion lab to supplement the class- 
room learning experience. 

"Outdoor education is an at- 
tempt to extend classrooms to the 



endeavor also to have a spiritual 
impact on the kids." 

Dr. Lovejoy states that pupils 

from an elementary school will 

Turn to p. 6, col. 3 



They are to be gray-blue jackets 
with SMC monogramed on the 
pocket, a white turtle neck 
sweater, and black skirts or 

International 
Students Club 
Materializes 

The International Student Club 
for all foreign and Puerto Rican 
students has recently organized. 

At the initial meeting last 
month, 35 students were present. 
Dr. Frank Knittel, and Elder 
Kenneth Spears, director of ad- 
missions, welcomed the students. 
Elder amd Mrs. Helmut Ott are 
the sponsors of the club. 

It was agreed that all who 
qualify and are interested in the 
club come to an alternate chapel 
Oct. 13 in Summerour Hall #105. 
At this chapel, the club will 
choose officers. 



This Week's Specials 

Oct. 13-18' 




Utile 
Debbie 

SNAK CAKES 




Letters To The Editor 



Dear Editor. 

Hooray for the new dress codel 
I thini it is about time we got a 
dress code that is fair to both men 
and women. 

It has been with amusement 
that I have read the discussion of 
the topic. Perhaps with a little 
light on the topic we could put the 
discussion to rest, but alas, there 
are so many opinions of how we 
should dress. That, my friends, is 
a very big point in favor of the 
new dress code. It gives our 
female members greater freedom 
to be creative in the way they 
dress. 

Yes, Deut. 22:5 does give a 
good principle to go by. Just 
don't forget that if we were to 
dress the same way today as they 
did then, we men would be the 
one wearing the dresses and the 
ladies wearing the pants. 

Remember this, too. The "Re- 
form Dress" that Ellen White 



advocated in the last century was 
a pantsuit with a long tunic top -■ 
not much different than some 
styles today. The controversy 
that erupted turned a blessing 
into a curse. Lef s not turn a 
blessing into a curse here at 
SMC. 

The new dress code restricts 
the use of blue jeans to theii 
proper place and where they are 
most practical. This should serve 
as a challenge to all of us to dress 
more tastefully. While there are 
quite a few who will abuse the 
new dress code, I feel that the 
challenge to creativity and taste- 
fulness far outweighs any detri- 
ments. 

If we really want something to 
complain about on the way we 
dress I have some suggestions to 
maie. This fall I observed quite a 
few guys wearing their shirts 
open half way to their navel. 
(How disgustingi). A tew even 



were wearing pieces of jewelry on 
chains around their necks. This 
not only is repulsive but the 
things those pieces of jewelry 
depict or symbolize should be 
abhorring to t(ie Christian. An- 
other thing is the length of guys 
hair. Quite a few are pushing the 
rules to the limit 

1 could list more but that is 
enough. 

If we guys are to complain 
about how the girls dress, let's 
first make sure we ate within 
Christian standards on the way 
we dress. 

William Noel 



Dear Editor: 

After reading all the hub-bub 
about dress, I became a bit per- 
turbed. 

I'm not sure what all the hassle 
is about. Some people say women 
shouldn't wear men's clothes, 
others are worried about stan- 
dards, impressions made on the 
general public, and all kinds of 
different opinions. 

After attending classes in dif- 
ferent public colleges, my mother 
told me she'd never seen girls 
who wore less. She said even in 
winter it was amazing what they 
could leave off. With the gills 
being exposed in sheer cloth etc., 
it was a surprise that most guys 
didn't even notice. The guys did 
notice the well dressed women.Of 
course, I had to see for myself, 
and she was right! 

Maybe I'm a bit out of it, but I 
don't notice what a person wears. 
1 do notice a neafly dressed, well 



Dear Editor: 

1 think some people deserve a 
big "thank-you" for greatly con- 
tributing to the school year so far: 
first Greg Vital, for getting the 
Joker out in a hurry; second, 
Vinita and staff, for producing 
such a good paper, and third, 
(though by no means third in 
order of importance) the faculty, 
for finally getting on the ball and 
voting in pants for women's 
general campus wear. 

Appreciatively, 

- Kris Hackleman 



Editorial 



coordinated, and modestly 
dressed lady. I would say the 
women on this campus fit into 
those catagories 99 percent of the 
time whether they are in pants or 
dresses. 

1 can't see how any non-Ad- 
ventist coming to this school 
could help but be impressed with 
the way the women dress, nor do I 
believe the women's dress isn't 
feminine. Our standards are not 
dropping to immorality. 

Isn't modesty not putting the 
emphasis on dress? I think we 
are making a big to do about 
nothing. If we're going to let 
what somebody else wears get us 
excited, we'd better worry about 
where our head's at, not where 
their body's at. 

Regardless of rules, I think it's 
our individual standards that 
make the overall standard of the 
school. 

Jim Guy 



Dear Editor; 

I would like to express my 
surprise and elation over this 
year's Joker. What a marvelous 
job. and done so early!! Greg 
Vital, my hat is off to you and 
your staff for all your hard work. 
I'm sure all those students that 
were here last year share my 
appreciation of your dedication to 
a job well done. 

Ray Hartwell 



From the second floor station of the nuclear plant near the gym, I 
scan the perimeters of my alma mater. 

Fifty years ago, in 1978, 1 graduated from Southern Missionary. 
Now they call it Inter-Planetary Adventist Installation (IPAI). 

Everything familiar is gone. Only one thing from the past remains 
-- the Coil of Cable, a stout remnant of battered nostalgia. 

A student clad in white foil emerges from a metal doorway to my 
right. I start. 

"Welcome to Inter-Planetary," he says. 
"Uh, thanks. Is this where you work?" 

"Yeah. After McKee Bakery folded in 1990, tliey decided to build 
this nuclear physical plant. Now the whole installation utilizes nuclear 
energy." 

"That's nifty. Why did the bakery fold?" 

"Nifty?," he grimaced. "Oh, now it comes to me. lleamed about 
that linguistic era last semester. The bakery? Yes, it was around the 
time that food tablets appeared and took ttie place of most of the 
common packaged foods. Al! the bakeries were wiped out." 

1 do remember having rsad something about that. Maybe I saw it in 
The Southern -- 1 mean Inter-Planetary Accent. 

Suddenly the administration dome flashes in the foggy distance. 
Three times long, once short. 
"Morse Code?" I ask. 

"Oh no," the foiled student replies laughing. "That's the 
president radioing the GC, you know, on Mars." 

"Oh. yeah,"l mumble. By now he realizes probably who I am. 
He probably even thinks I'm the dumbest clonk around. I lean heavily 
on my cane and try to look comprehensive. 

"Young fellow, back in my days, why, this valley here was filled 
with green grass. And right here underneath us somewhere was a golf 



The Southern Accent 



Sta^^bov: 



not 



course. And over there \ 



Pac 



All material pu'-Hshed in The Southern Accent 
necessarily the opinio.. view of the newspaper staff or tn. 
SMC administration. Cartoons, articles, and other content item 
create an open exchange of ideas, a forum. In the case oi 
disagreement "Letters to the Editor," is a column designed 
provide expression. Our policy will allow the expression 
differing ideas. We do, however, reserve the right not to P""'™ 
material that is libelous, extremely radical, or out of character i 
light of doctrinal points. We wish to retain the bearing oi 
Christian SDA college newspaper. 

Editor Vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Manager Dave Middag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greenleaf 

Sports Editor Reuben Castillo 

Circulation Manager !!i!!".."""!.. John Henson 

Secretaries Pam Legere 

Denise Sheets 

Ad Manager Ray Hartwell 

Proofreaders Kathy Mixell 

Jeanne Zacharias 

Sthscriptions Candy Miranda 

Ai ists Mark Ford 

Sandie Lehn 

Photographers Rhonda Run van 

Mike Partlo 
Mark Ford 

Reporters Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

Sponsor Frances Andrews 

Printer , Felts Bros. Printing t"' 

Ooltewah, Tenn. 
The Southern Accent is published weekly with the excep' 



j of test weeks and vacations. 

Subscriptions for parents and alun 
' from Collegedale, IN at a noi 



ni are $5 per year, 
■profit rate 




Thumlay, October 13, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT • S 



We print personals, used book announcements, and other 
miscellany free. Drop your announcement in a red Southern 
Accent mailbox. 



A Janeen Calkins, Any time ya'll decide to go to that pizza pla 
V.G. Me too -- V.W. 



: again, let me know. 9 Have you seen the complete Macrame Supply Center in the Village Market? 



9 ^°^ Ssic " shoes from Hanover, Leathercrest, Manson, and Knapp shoes. 
Ask about this month's specials. Phone 4983 and ask for Walter. 

• uN FELIZ CUMPLEANOS A FELIX CORTES MUNIZ. (PAPO). DE TUS 
ADMIRADORAS DEL #321. 

♦ Last Friday, Oct. 7, a group of about 40 SMC students met for a linkett roast with 
popcorn and fruit salad for supper, followed by a campfire vespers service. 

It was held at the foot of White Oak mountain in Ringgold, Ga., where logs 
encircled a campfire and a cross stands as a spiritual monument. 

After all had their fill of food, the program started with a song service led by Bob 
Hillier and Dennis and Dave Canther on accordian and guitar. Artie Cisneros sang 
"Great is Thy Faithfulness" as our special music. 

A short talk was given by Artie Cisneros dealing with various aspects of the law as 
God's character. Then personal testimonies were given by those who felt moved to 
do so. 

Small prayer groups consisting of two to four persons prayed together, after 
which all joined hands and sang "When the Roll Is Called Up Yonder" and "I have 
Decided to Follow Jesus." After the benediction, the service was closed by singing 
"Alleluia." 

There are several such programs plaimed throughout the school year. If you are 
interested in joining us, or helping with planning and preparations of these 
programs, call John Lazor at 396-4673. 

and: Miida AM/FM Multiplex Stereo with 8-track tape player and built-in BSR ., „ « 

turn table - Excellent Condition - $250 value, only $150. • To: Teresa (Alias 'The Hunted') - Smile! 1 hope you have a happy day. Beware of 

For any of these items, call John Lazor at 396-2214 (evenings) or 396-4673 (days). 'The Hunter.' 

• The Joker regrets that Jose Arenas was classified as married. He is single and ^ , a c n «rj, 

1. .t. r» f. ■ T, . J 1.- 1. _u • IOC AaiA W Dear Ebenezer, you re welcome. As Ever, Matilda. 

eligible. He lives m Talge and his phone number is 396-4934. ^ ' ' 

This year's English club was organized Monday, Oct. 3. English majors met &r 

supper in the cafeteria banquet area and elected officers for the current school year. _ . 

The officers consist of a president and a four-member planning committee. W ^fj*^ ^ J i'. "°'^.^°"i 
Elected to the office of president was James Boyd, a junior. Four seniors were " ""' " " ""° 

elected to the planning committee. They are Reuben Castillo, Dolly Wickham, 
Elaine Kuna, and Sally McMillan. 



A Sonthem Union Colleglite Bible Conterencei 

The Southern Union Collegiate Bible Conference will be held October 27-29 at Indian 
Creek Youth Camp. Southern Missionary College will be sending 100 delegates. 
The cost to each delegate is $11 which covers the cost of food. This can be charged to 
your student account. Transportation will be supplied by the college. The first 
meeting will be at 7:15 on Thursday evening, October 27. It is imperative that all 
delegates be at the camp and registered before the evening meal, which will be 
served at 5:30. If you are interested in being sent as a delegate to this Bible 
conference, sign up at each dorm or at the Chaplain's office. 

# Festival of Faith: 

Anyone interested in being sent as a delegate to the Festival of Faith to be held in 
Greensboro, NC, March 22-25, 1978 should get their application form at the 
Chaplain's office right away. These must be mailed to your home conference in order 
for you to be sponsored by your home church and this will take some time. 

A For sale: Snow Skis - Alpine Prima - hand made in West Germany - long. Included 
are bindings and poles - Excellent Condition - $60. 

also: Mayfair AM/FM Multiplex Stereo with 8-track tape player and recorder, with 
separate BSR turntable - Excellent Condition - $285 value, only $180. 



I 



1 that car last Friday was not Lwurd's. 
His car is the same color as mine only his car has a brown vinyl top. 
Also, he does have a CB antenna but it is a whip antenna mounted on the back of the 
car where mine is mounted on the trunk. Sorry he did not get the note but hope you 
had a nice weekend anyway. DB 



• Lost: one smedly-type backpacker. "I say, old fellow, look down at your feet and tell 
me if you are still therel" R.S.V.P. -the Lawnraower 



iDear K.G.L.M.: C 
Love, Exhibit *'A'.' 



9 Two seats available on a private plane going to Takoma Park (Wash., D.C.) on the 
ahead thank me in person. It's all right - I'm not proud. weekend of Oct. 21-23. Contact Marsha at 396-3356 or Don Ashlock at 4906. 

Round trip W'11 cost approximately $50. 




U^^S. ^B5IDEAJC£'f\LS0 



WHAT NEXT?' 



piiiir iiiiiiuiiiniHiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiimimiiiniiiirrniiiiii 

I Southern Accent 

Photography 
Contest 




Theme: Campus Life 
Judged On: Photo Quality, 

Expressive Content 
and Mood 

Contest Ends Oct. 21 

only black and wUte photos 
accepted. 



Winner $15 



1 Open To All students 

I except Accent and Memories photogr 



except 

iMniiiuniiiiiuiiiii 



ophers 



inr"™^""""""""'"™" 



6 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thiired»v. October 13. 1977 



Ferrante 
-^ & Teicher - 

Look Mikes 



ferrante and Teicher don't 
really look alike except for dark 
hair, glasses, and matching 
tuxes, but so many people in- 
sisted they did that they decided 
to use the idea in their per- 
formances. 

"You think we look alike from 
out there?" Ferrante will ask an 
audience, "well let me tell you 
that from up here you all look 
alike too!" 

Even though they didn't look 
alike as children they did become 
friends when they were enrolled 
as six year old prodigies at the 
JuUiard School of Music in New 
York City. They shared the same 
teachers, the same classes, and 
finally during Piano Ensemble 
class, the same piano bench so 
they could share the same key-' 
board to play duets. 

While still in their teens they 
decided to become a two piano 
team and after graduation began 
their preparation for a profes- 
sional career as duo-pianists. 

"Two - piano ensemble tech- 
nique L. very difficult to master," 
Teicher says, "because it isn't a 
duplication of notes but four 
hands creating a unique sound. 
Both pianists must function vviih 
complete rapport to create the 
nuances and artistic balance so 
necessary for a finished 
product." 

Ferrante and Teicher began 
touring as classical pianists. 
They received critical acclaim and 
a growing audience of fans but 
international prominence didn't 
come till after they recorded the 
theme from the motion picture 
"The Apartment." The record 
sold almost a million copies the 
first three weeks. A short time 
later they recordrd "Exodus' ' and 
their position as America's fa- 
vorite piano team was assured. 







F & T 
Crescendo 

Of Alumni 
Weekend 



A crescendo to the Alumni 
Weekend October 14 to 16 will be 
a concert by the piano duo, Fer- 
rante and Teicher. Saturday. Oct. 
IS at 8:15 p.m. at the Physical 
Education Center. 

Ferrante was bom in New York 
City, Teicher in Wilkes Barre, 
Penn. They met at the age of six 
when they were enrolled in the 
Prep Center of the JuUiard School 
of Music. New York City. Upon 
graduating, both were appointed 
to the faculty of JuUiard to teach 
as members of the theory depart- 
ment. 

Their first professional engage- 
ment was with the Toledo Sym- 
phony as guebi artists, '"hey have 
now appeared on every major TV 
program and their average yearly 
tour is in excess of 100 cities. 
Ferrante and Teicher do their own 
arrangements, including the or- 
chestrations for recording and 
symphony appearances. 

Both Ferrante and Teicher play 
Baldwin pianos and record for 
United Artist Records. 

Tickets range in price from $1 
to S4 and are presently on sale at 
the Student Center. For informa- 
tion, call 396-4277. 



• 



Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



EX-NATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 




FERRANTE & TEICHER 



OUTDOOR EDUCATION cont. from p. 3- 



spend a week at their resident 
conference camp and iearn how 
soils, plants, and animals inter- 
relate. The students also spend a 
half day gathering firewood and 
other tasts for the next group 
when they come to spend time at 
the camp. 

Dr. Lovejoy just returned from 
one such outing with the Atlanta 
Junior Academy students. They 



had been searching for Indiai. 
artifacts and reconstructing pre- 
civil war activities at the area the 
students were at. 

Lovejoy's next scheduled out- 
ing is with the Madison Elemen- 
tary fifth and sixth graders, Oct. 
15 to 20. They will be studying 
the society of bees and how their 
organization operates, plus visit- 
ing and learning how gristmills 
operate. 



^^^^M^^MMMMM^ 



DISCOVER YOUR CREDIT UNION 

' We're doing more for you! 

' COLLEGEDALE CREDIT UNION 

College plaza 



n 



Phone; 396-2101 

Oflice Hours: 9 am, to 2 p.m. Monday - Friday 
6-7 p.m. Monday and Thursday * 



^■^^^^^#^^^#^A 



Laughing As 
They Tour 



DoF&T have a negative view 
of touring? 

"Not at all,- Ferrante 
answered. "We love touring and 
the drivers taught us a sense of 
humor." 

"For instance," Teicher said 
"there was the driver whi 
painted the pianos because we 
had told him to keep them looking 
nice. Trouble was he forgot to lell 
us and when we leaned against 
them during the performance out 
hands stuck to the pianos." 

"I rememjer one driver," Per- 
rante said, ' 'whom we told to be 
backstage immediately following 
the last encore. We played an 
auditorium that didn't have a 
back door and I can't imagine 
what the audience thought when 
they saw this huge man walk 
down the center aisle, up the 
steps, and onto the stage, walking 
across as we finished our last I 
song." 

And why did they stop hauling 
their own pianos? 

"Well," Ferrante said, "the 
promoters were to furnish some- 
one to load the pianos on the tniek I 
after each concert. Usually the [ 
loaders were loaded before they | 
showed up to load. After oni 
concert the loaders dropped ; 
piano causing a serious injury t( 
one of our drivers. It disturbed ui 
so much that we decided to give I 
up hauling our own pianos. The | 
Baldwin Piano Company makes I 
arrangements for pianos to be al I 
out concerts so we no longer have 
to worry about whethe: 
pianos will join us for the concert | 
or not." 

Does it make a difference play- L 
ing a new instrument for each I 
concert? 

Teicher shook his head. 
don't think so. We practice oil 
the instruments before each coil 
cert. In that way we get to kntnl 
the pianos and the pianos gel »l 
know us. 




EAT IT HERE — 
OR CARRY OUT 

• TACOS 

• TOSTADOS 

• BURRITOS 

• FRIJOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 

• ENCHIRn"0 

4921 BRAINEIM BD. 
(AT HOOHE ROI 




Riverboat 
Cruise 
Steams 
Ahead 

DMark Kurzynske 

The Men's Club will host an 
outing -- a riverboat cruise Thurs- 
day, Oct. 20, from 6:30-8:30 p.m. 
The fee is $2 per couple, which 
will cover food and transporta- 
tion. 

According to spokesman Dan 
Burtnett, the half-hour dinner of 
the two-hour cruise will be some- 
thing like a light picnic affair. For 
those couples who want to take 
advantage of the free transporta- 
tion, the buses will leave in front 
of Wright Hall precisely at 5:30. 

This boatout will be informal. 
Guys ask girls or girls ask guys. 
"If a girl wants to go on the 
cruise, I don't see why she should 
not ask a guy out," stated Burt- 
nett. 

The paddleboat is the "Border 
Star," which holds up to 200 
people. "Hopefully," said Burt- 
nett, "we can take the bigger 
boat, 'Julia Belle Swain,' which is 
run by steam." The "Julia Belle 
Swain" holds up to 350 people. 
The Men's Club is shooting for 
300 people (150 couples). 

In case of rain, the trip will still 
go on. The bottom decks of either 
boat are enclosed while the top 
floors have a top over them. 

Tickets are on sale at the Talgt 
Hall desk up until Monday, Oct. 







iary Williams 



^ 



L,^ 



Ilinrsday, October 13, 1977 THE S0UTHE8N ACCENT - 7 



Vital Loss Restored 



As the first century drew to a close, the Christian Way found itself 
proscribed by the Roman Empire. The apostles had given their lives in 
the building process and only John, the Beloved, remained. His days 
were spent at Ephesus, where his example and guidance encouraged 
the growth of his flock. 

An imperial edict summoned John to stand trial for his faith. As he 
went, he well knew that his time, like that of Peter and Paul, had come. 
He went with the memory of Jesus, his master and friend. Death 
would be only a moment in eternity for him-he would not vacillate in 
his love for Jesus. 

Found guilty and sentenced to die, John continued to live in a state 
of praise and thanksgiving. He took the last moments that he 
possessed to tell of his Creator-Savior, and hearts of stone melted 
under the soft words of an old man who knew of what he spoke. 

The destiny of John led him to a platform overlooking a vat of 
boihng oil. No ordinary death could be prescribed to one of the twelve; 
it was meant to strike terror at all who would dare to believe and to 
confess that name of love. 

He was released and fell into the caldron. Satan's triumph soon 
faded when, to the amazement and fear of all, John rested in a garment 
of divinity that no force could penetrate. 

Realizing that death would be an impossibility, Domitian banished 
the apostle toPatmos, one of Rome's penal colonies in the Aegean Sea. 
Patmos reflected the barren, rocky condition of the world, and John, 
the prisoner, suffered the separation from his home across the sea. To 
him there was only the promise of death on the horizon of tomorrow. 

It appeared to be like just another Sabbath morning as John walked 
the beach and glazed intendy across the sea. A deep, melodious voice 
sounded behind him. "I am the Alpha and the Omega, who is and who 
was and who is to come, the Almighty." He turned because it was the 
voice of Jesus, and he fell before Him to worship. 

To perish on a lonely island was not to be the destiny of the beloved. 
His work had only just begun. Composing first Revelation on Patmos, 
John later wrote his other books after his release. 

From all appearances it seemed that John's work in the service of 
The Master was finis. Jesus did not view it that way. 

The Revelation of Jesus Christ was to be sent to the seven churches 
as a testimony of Jesus to His children. Its themes are grand and 
glorious encompassing the essence of the great controversy. From 
rapture to rapture it traces the living Christ and His power to change 
the life. It portrays the drama of existence for His chosen people until 
His coming and beyond to the glories of the heavenly kingdom. 

Contained in its pages are vital truths that are needed by this 
generation. For too long it has been shrouded in the historical rhetoric 
of meaninglessness as the living Christ has been retrograded to the 



'The light which fell from 
the open portals upon the head of 
our Savior will fall upon us as we 
pray for help to resist temptation. 
Desire of Ages. 





Our progressive, modern 63-bed hospital offers the newly 
graduated nurse opportunity for development of leadership 
skills plus variety in nursing experience. We are located in a 
small, friendly town in wooded hills. A new SDA church is 
being built. There is an eight grade church school near the 
hospital, and liberal fringe benefits. For more information 
call or write: 



^y^JUmofia/ t^^M^u^oU 



Manchester, Ky. 40962 
(606) 598-5104 



back pages of our minds, h'he sole interpreter of Scriptures must be 
Scriptures-anything else is a poor substihite of human devising. 

The other books of John contain the message of divine love. Why 
does he dwell so much on this? 

The answer is simple-the church of his day had lost this vital 
Moment, and to restore it they had to realize their loss. Love caused 
the Tribune God to give one of its members in order to save man and 
fulfill His creation. This kind of love is beyond mortal corrorehension, 
and it is the reality of that love which made the Christian /aywhat it 




1 



Vaness'-a 
Greenleaf 



The Quiet Life 

Arranged As Poetry From Desire of Ages. 

The childhood and youth of Jesus 

were spent in a little mountain village. 
There was no place on earth 

that would not have been honored by His presence. 

But He passed by the homes of wealth, 
the courts of royalty, 
and the renowned seats of learning 

to make His home in obscured and despised Nazareth. 

As a chUd, Jesus manifested 

a peculiar loveliness of disposition, 

a patience that nothing could disturb, 

a truthfulness that would never sacrifice integrity, 

the grace of unselfish courtesy. 

With deep earnestness 

the mother of Jesus watched 
the unfolding of His powers, 
the impress of perfection upon His character. 
With delight 
she sought 

to encourage that bright, receptive mind. 
Through the Holy Spirit 
she received 

wisdom to co-operate with the heavenly agencies 
in the development of this child 

who would claim only God as His Father. 

As He grew in wisdom and stature, 

Jesus increased in favor with God and man, 
He drew the sympathy of all hearts 

by showing Himself capable of sympathizing with all. 
The atmosphere of hope and courage that surrounded Him 

made Him a blessing in every home. 



His quiet, simple life, 

even the silence of the Scriptur 
teach an important lesson. 



; concerning His early years, 



The more quiet and simple the life of the child, -- 
the more free from artificial excitement, 
the more in harmony with nature, -- 

The more favorable is it to physical and mental vigor 
and to spiritual strength. 



COUPON 




8 . THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Th»rsa«y, October 13. 1977 



Softball Season Approaches Finish 




1*°^ Hickman and Mobley played 

'^^ six innings with the score knotted 
at 1-1. In the seventh, Hickman 
scored once to edge Mobley 2-1. 
Hickman had less fortune agamst 
Webster as Webster scored seven 
runs in the first inning and from 
there it was batting practice for 
Webster, 16-4. 

Hunt lost a close one to Web- 
ster by scoring five runs in the 
seventh inning and still losmg 
9-8. It was a lesson in futility. 
Whitehead crushed Hickman 
14-5. with three big innmgs. 
Runnells and Webster locked into 
a defensive battle with Runnellr 



winning 3-1. Runnells also 
stomped Martling 13-5 with six 
big ones in the first inmng. 
Mobley and Hunt engaged in a 
slurfest as Mobley came out on 
top 17-14. Wohlers creamed 
Hickman, 16-9 in a game that 
wasn't even close. 

In other games. Minder played 
a laugher against Mobley. beat- 
ing him 21-13 (almost a football 
score). Webster clipped by 
Martling 9-8, as Webster scored 3 
and Martling scored 4 m the 
sixth. 

This is the last week of the 
Softball season. Webster is in a 



Sports 




good position to finish ahead of 
fhe test after the games are tabu- 
lated. 

There is a correction of last 
week's article. Mosley was not 
elected from the game in ques- 
tion rather he was warned twice 
He left the game as a protest 
against the officiating. 



Hawaiian 
Flagball 
Begins Soon 



The Hawaiian flagball football 
season is getting underway. The 
sign-up sheet is posted in the 
gymnasium. This year there will 
be two leagues -- A league and B 
league. 

Hawaiian football is different 
from American standard football. 
Besides having flags instead of 
tackling, the ball must be passed 
three times in order to score a 
touchdown on any given play. 
Sign up between 5:30 and 7 p.m. 



Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



Frisbee Craze Hits 
New Record Heights 



As a sport, Frisbee has come 
into its own in the last 10 years. 
Beginning as a simple game of 
toss and catch, it has advanced to 
a highly skilled sport. Players 
rate classifications such as Mas- 
ter and World Class Master and a 
World Championship meet is held 
annually at the Rose Bowl. Com- 
petitive Frisbee events from Free- 
style to Frisbee Golf have estab- 
lished tournaments scheduled a- 
cross the country throughout the 
year. 
Frisbee changed course with the 
introduction of the Professional 
model in 1968, the later founding 
of the International Frisbee As- 
sociation (now 80,000 members) 
and codification of standards, 
rules and regulations for Frisbee 
games. 

The first IFA sponsored World 
Championship tournament was 
held in 1974 and attracted over 
100 compefitors of Frisbee Mas- 
ter rank from across the country. 
Now an annual event, the tourna- 
ment offers World Championship 
titles in : Overall, Distance, Ac- 
curacy, Freestyle, Frisbee Golf, 
Ultimate, and Guts. 

Frisbee discs arc everywhere 



today. High schools and universi. 
ties are initiating classes in the 
sport, articles on Frisbee have 
appeared in such magazines as 
Sports Illustrated, Women 
Sports, and Time. Television 
networks film major Frisbee J 
tournaments and newspapers re. jL 
port Frisbee events along with il 
baseball and football. 

A fast-moving team sport com- 
bining qualities of soccer and 
basketball. Played on a field, ? I 
players to a team, the Frisbee is 
moved from player to player 1 
passing. Goals are scored by I 
throwing to a team member in the ll 
end zone. Played intercol-l 
legiately, interscholastically andl 
by various clubs, the 1975 Inter.] 
collegiate Champion is RutgetsI 
University. 

A fast, furiously competitivej 
team sport in which the Frisbeel 
has been clocked at nearly lOgl 
mph. Two teams of 3 players faiii 
each other across a 15-yard neil-l 
tral zone. The disc is throwil 
across this zone, points bein|| 
scored for wild throws or misse4| 
catches. Throws must be 
cleanly in one hand. 




Tumbling team eyronasls take a break. Pli-1" by Mike Partlo. ^ 

Indians Feather Nest 

With Pens And Pencils jp": 






. Marceil Bodtker 

The Purchasing Department 
has added to its stock the Swag- 
^^er Stick. Thunderball, Feather- 
vriter. and Sundince pens and 
icncils manufactured by the 
Vtontana Blackfoot lr.be. 

The supplier is the Blackfeet 
Indian Writing Company deep 
within "Big Sky Country". . 
Browning, Montana, and for ''le 
past six years the tribe has been 
measuring its capital in Thunder- 
ballpens. Featherw'riter markers, 
and Blackfeet Indian pencils. 

Eari Old Perf.on. chairman of 
the Blackfeet Tribat Council, saw 
that when the summer tourist 
trade disappeared, so did most of 
the jobs and income, and. the 
reservation faced 60 to 70 percent 
unemployment. 

With major help from the U.S. 
Small Business Administration, 
tribal funds were invested to start 
the business by building a 
120.000 square foot plant and 
equipping it with machinery. 
Prosperity didn't swamp the 



Indians, but they persevered. 
Gradually, business picked up 
and the Blackfeet Indians began 
writing new sales records. Now 
80 percent owned by the Black- 
feet tribe, the company has a 
payroll of $600,000 annually and 
operates on a two-shift basis. 
All but one of the factory em- 
ployees is either an Indian or 
married to a member of the Black- 
feet tribe. With sales of some 
$3,000,000 last year, the Black- 
feet firm numbers among its cus- 
tomers 200 of Fortune magazine's 
top 500 companies. These in- 
clude General Motors. Chast 
Manhattan Bank. AT & T, an( 
Western Electric. Also, one o 
the tribe's products is now th' 
official pen of the U. S. Senate. 



"photo' b^ Mike Partis 



Southern Missionary College 
CoUegedale, TN 37315 



So, the next time one picks up a 
Blackfeet writing instrument, 
maybe it can be seen as a product 
of a unique American 
story. 





The Southern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 



Thursday, October 20, 1977 



CoUegedale, Tenn. 




Walter Artlea wtU sing ri the On. 27 SA clupel and again 
at Joint worship In the charch. Arties has song for Campns 
Crusade For Christ, Youth For Christ, The Salvation 
Army, Kipoi '72, and bi the Cotton Bowl. He has also 
appeared In three crusades with BlOy Graham. Besides 
his concert appearances, he Is producer-coordinator of the 
Breath Of Life telecast. 



Student Park Site Of 
Spooky Activities 



□Vanessa Greenleaf 

The annual Halloween supper 
and party will be held in the 
Student Park, Sunday, Oct. 30. 
The festivities, starting at 4 p.m., 
will consist of a country music 
program, sack races, contests, 
bobbing for apples, running 
games, and "any other normal 
picnic games" according to E.O. 
Grundset, associate professor 
of biolog) . 

Everyone is urged to wear cos- 
tumes and enter the costume con- 
tests. There will be four cate- 
gories judged: single male, 
single female, couple or pair (two 
guys, two gals, or guy and gal), 
and group (three or more partici- 
; pants). 

For each category there will be 
three prizes of $5, $10, and $15, 
except for the group category 
where the first prize will be $20, 
second prize, $15 and third prize, 



and includes burgers, beans,~po- 
tato salad, chips, hot cider and 
chocolate, plus pumpkin and pe- 
can pie. ID cards must be shown. 
After everybody is settled 
down, "large bonfires will be lit, 
everybody will gather around, 
roast marshmallows, and do 
whatever comes natural on Hal- 
loween," added Grundset. 

LLU Accepts 
More SMC 



Students 



I $10, 

Supper, which will be served at 
a flat rate, will begin at 5 p.m. 



Recent SMC students accepted 
into the LLU School of Allied 
Health Professions are: Ander- 
son, Deborah, Respiratory Ther- 
apy; Lechler, Susan, Physical 
Therapy: Rutledge, Karen, An- 
esthesia; Stephens, Ronald, 
Anesthesia; and Wampler, 
Debra, Physical Therapy. 



■ Behind Page One- 



lotsaLetters P- 2 

A Peek Behind The ScesM 9- *-^ 

n>e Race Plus Itephles -P- » 



Women's Wages 

Pacific 
Settles 

Washington, D. C. - The Pacif- 
ic Union Conference of the Sev- 
enth-day Adventist Church has 
paid $650,000 to settle federal 
government charges that it dis- 
criminated against women teach- 
ers in California Adventist 
schools. 

The U.S. Labor Department 
had filed a complaint in Septem- 
ber, 1975, alleging violation of the 
Fak Labor Standards Act - spe- 
cifically that the church did not 
pay men and women teachers and 
administrators in California 
equally for equal work. 

m its defense, the church ar- 
gued that Adventist schools are 
indispensable to and indivisible 
from the church's total ministry 
and therefore the suit was uncon- 
stitutional government entangle- 
ment in religion. The church 
made settlement without conced- 
ing government jurisdiction, or 
that it was guilty of violations of 
the law. 

Neal C. Wilson, vice president 
for the church in North America, 
said of the settlement, "We 
haven't changed our position. 
We simply settled, and did so 
without having to concede juris- 
diction by the Department of 

Nursing 
Instructor 
Honored 
By TNA 

DMark G. Rumsey 

Christine Shultz> associate pro- 
fessor of nursing, has been se- 
lected as one of the 24 area nurses 
to be honored by the Tennessee 
Nursing Association (TNA). 

Shultz is the coordinator of the 
second year of the nursing pro- 
gram at Southern Missionary Col- 
lege. 

The TNA chose the 24 out- 
standing nurses from the Chat- 
tanooga area in conjunction with 
the "Year of the Nurse" concept. 
The fiscal year October 1977 
through September 1978 has been 
designated by President Jimmy 
Carter as national "Year of the 
Nurse." 

Local newspaper write-ups a- 
bout the 24 nurses will be appear- 
ing during the next several 
months, along with radio and 
television spot announcements 
noting the nurses and their a- 
chievements, 

Shultz has been an officer for 
many years in district four of the 
TNA, which is comprised of a 
four-county area around Chat- 
tanooga. She was among over 
200 delegates to a recent TNA 
convention in Knoxville. 




Conference 
Federal Bout 

Ubor, in order to avoid trial risks 1972-1974 period. All monies not 

and further costs of litigation, and accepted by tiie teachers or due to 

because we're already in con- teachers not located will revert to 

formity with the law anyway." the U.S. Treasury. 



A denominational wag? com- 
mittee had started its own study 
at Adventist world headquarters 
here, and a one-track pay scale 
was implemented on July 1, 1974. 
The Labor Department suit re- 
ferred to wages at the California 
schools from September, 1972, 
through June, 1974. 

The stipulation for compliance 
in the settlement provides that 
the government will use the 
$650,000 to pay teachers and ad- 
ministrative personnel in all Cal- 
ifornia Adventist elementary and 
secondary schools and Pacific 
Union College in Angwin for the 



The complaint related primarily 
to a "head-of-household" pay 
arrangement which the Labor 
Department alleged was unfair to 
women. 

In a separate settlement for 
Loma Linda University near San 
Bernardino, Calif., $6,738 was 
paid and affirmation made that its 
policy of conformance with equal 
pay provisions is being practiced. 

The Pacific Union Conference 
of Seventh-day Adventists is a 
five-state regional headquarters 
of the Adventist Church, whose 
territory includes California. 



Accreditation Policies 
Revised In Manual 



DRich Ashlock 

Dr. Cyril Futcher. academic 
dean, met at the General Con- 
ference with three other edu- 
cators last week for the purpose of 
rewriting the SDA Manual of Ac- 
creditation for Schools. The pre- 
sent manual was written several 
years ago and many adminisfra- 
tors feel there is too much Aia- 
terial in it that is already required 
by the regional accreditation. 

This GC committee consists of 
Dr. J.J. Millet, chairperson, and 
Dr. Charles Taylor both from the 



GC Department of Education; Dr. 
Hellen Evans of Southwestern 
Adventist College; and Dr. Fut- 
cher. 

The committee is revising the 
manual so it will contain only 
material specifically dealing with 
SDA policies and beliefs, such as 
the institutions and their con- 
stituencies, 'administration, aca- 
demic departments, religious 
activities, campus life standards, 
and extracurricular activities. 

Turn to p.3, col.2 




Hie partial wlar ecUpse of but Wednesday afternoon 
wasmlsaed by many, but a few dQrwatcfaen cangbt tbe 
il^t as It peidied aniand 5tl5 p.m. In die raytliolo|y of 
tfw andoit dvUlzattmS} ed^ses strack tenor In tlie hearts 
of the pet^ile. Ibey were beUeved to be battles between 
tbe son god and die god at darimess. 
Photognyhlc BeprescntatloD by Mark Ferd 



, . THE S0BTPK8N ACCENT T1,»«U„ 0.**« », 1977 



^ 




DearE^tor. 

1 can hardly beUeve it, but it 
looks like 1 missed it againl That 
is I most have missed the table at 
registration where we were sup- 
posed to sign up for our very own 
personal enclosed study desk m 
McKee Library. 

I mean, for cryin" in the mud, 
didn't it ever dawn on some 
people that there are others who 
woiUd also like to be able to use 
one of these study "cubicles lo- 
cated by a window or in some 
other favorable spot? Heel like a 
commandment-breaker if 1 even 
consider "trespassing" on one ot 
those areas plastered with Utde 



Dear Editor: 



pictures ot monkeys, girlfriends, 
knd "hang in there" pos^". 
And if I were uncouth enough to 
sit down there anyway, amidst 
someone elses analyti<^ geome- 
try books and Purma Cat Chow 
ciendars, I fear 1 would be 
zapped with an 80-watt shock, 
tigged to discharge automatcaUy 
when an offender seats himself. 
1 may get tarred and feathered, 
but someday I'm going to toss one 
ot these permanent resident s be- 
longings right out the window. 
Then they can have au- coni- 
tioning this winter at their private 

i*"^- Sincerely, 

Mark Rumsey 




Dear Editor: 



Could we not endeavor to give 
more accurate reporting of the 
facts in our campus newspaper? 
My faith in the credibility ot the 
Accent was completely shattered 
as 1 assumed the report headed 
"Cross Country Run Here Oct. 
16" in the Sept 29 issue to be 
factual. Boy was 1 surprised! 1 

Accoidbig to the report "All 
entries must pay $2 in advance 
and S2 on the day of the race." 

He Stcta are (after countless 
phone calls and time): It you 
register in advance the fee is $2; 
otherwise, if you register the day 
of the race it will cost you $3. 

Accent; "The two-mile course 
set through the student park and 
athletic field..." 

Ihe facts: (again based on my 
valuable time spent in research) 
the race is a six-mile race or one 



could choose to enter'the one-mUe 
race, , 

The heartbreak must be beyond 
comprehension of those who had 
their hopes set on running two- 
miles and paying $4, thanks to the 
Accent. I hereby recommend to 
all Accent readers to take it with a 
grain of salt untU you hear the 

*"*^' Dennis E. Qark 

ED. Note: 

The Eds wept as they read your 
letter. What can we say? Reuben 
was consulted and vowed that his 
source gave him that info. Ques- 
tion - are supposed sources reli- 
able? It's a battle we constantly 
fight - sources vs. truth.The Eds, 
despite all appearances, do how- 
ever spend a considerable amount 
of time weeding out fiction. 
Sotty. 



It has come to my attention 
through the past issues of The 
Southern Accent that there are 
some awfully tense people over 
the new dress code being en- 
forced this year. I have also 
noticed that those who are com- 
plaining, the majority are com 
piled of men. . 

Are they upset over the girls 
being aUowed pants because it 
goes against Christian^ standards, 
(which to my knowledge it does 
not) or is it because it has re- 
stricted the men from weanng 
jeans and overalls and T-shirts? 

Which looks better - sloppy 
men and neat women, or both| 
neat men and women? Are we 
really looking at things in the 
right perspective? What man 
would want to wear an outfit like 
the types the girls wear and still 
have a feeling and appearance of 
masculinity? 

Sarah Purgason 



I Dear Editor: 

A big bouquet of thanks to the 
I Accent staff for a good school 
paperl People who have never 
had the pleasure of serving on the 
staff just don't realize the tasks 
involved in reporting, typing, 
proofreading, deadlines, etc. The 
"Fourth Estate" has a great 
I bunch ofalumnifrom this college. 

We need your help! McKee 
Library is becoming a ratiier dis- 
mal, difficult place to studyl The 
problem ot noise has become 
acutel Here it is almost time for 
mid-term exams and it is near to 
impossible to find a quiet place to 
reily concentrate and ace out 
those murderous tests that seem 
to be an attempt to produce super 
students. 



This is where peer pressure can 
really help! The staff here m the 
library can ask people to be quiet 
and even go so far as to ask 
students to leave with those 
names being sent down to the 
Dean of Student's office. But we 
believe that this problem could be 



solved by students asking stu- 
dents to be quiet so those who 
need to study and want to study, 
can! 

We should never have to ask 
people to leave or to be quiet. 
The study atmosphere that we 
need up here should come from 
student respect tor each other. 
A lovely student center has been 
built for the enjoyment ot all 
members of our campus group 
and should be used more by the 
ones who seem to want to use the 
library as a student commotion 
center! 



Thank you all for helping us 
solve this problem! By the way, 1 
am making a request this week to 
Ad Council that the clocks over 
the steps be removed because 
they have never worked properly 
since installation! Maybe most of 
our noise problem comes from 
people either making jokes about 
these four faces that are always 
different or being angry about 
tardiness to class! 1 

Thank you! 
Charies E. Davis, 
Director of Libraries 



Letters To The Editor 



Dear Editor: 

chuckle - that does it for me. Keep it upl 

Sincerely, 

Name Withheld By Request 

(not really - Johnny Lazor) 



The Southern Accent 



Dear Editor: 

I have been very pleased with 
the content and quality of the 
Accent this year. You seem to be 
continuing tiie same standards for 
literary excellence started by Don 
Jehle. 

As an avid reader, however, I 
wonder if 1 could put forth a 
couple of suggestions. The first 
suggestion concerns the classified 
section. This section is a great 
innovation on your part. These 
free ads (and messages) can be 
helpful to the student body in 
finding out about coming events, 
items for sale, and general cam- 
pus gossip. But I do think that 
some ot the longer announcements 
could be developed into a full 
story. Such classifieds as the one 
last week telling of a Friday night 
campfire and worship service 
could easily be incorporated into a 
story, and thus save more room 
for regular, normal, specific clas- 
sified ads. 



ing "letteti to the editor" was 
thoroughly stated. But where is 
the policy on signing the 
editorial? The Accent states that 
if a letter is worth sending, the 
the sender should sign it. The 
implication was that the sender 
should not be ashamed of the 
views he/she puts forth. By the 
same token, the editors shouldn't 
be ashamed of the editorial they 
send to the student body. 

Thank you tor considering 
these suggestions, and I will con- 
tinue looking forward to the next 
issue of The Southern Accent. 
Ray Hartwell 



Dear Editor: 

In reply to your comments last 
week about the Coil of Cable, I 
would like to make a couple of 
comments. ,#l.The CoU of Cable' 
has been in its perspective place 
no more than one year instead of 
tiie two years you suggested. 

#2. You referred to Grounds 
department as being slow and 
lazy about not moving the coil. 
This is not their business. The 
coil is under the computer depart- 
ment and they should be the ones 
to take care of it. 

Maybe in the future you can get 
the facts first, then suggest. 

Steven Kuhlman 



StaMbov: 



Ed. Note: 

The Eds usually write the edi- 
torials together; therefore we feel 
no burden to attach a name to 
each one. Sometimes one writes, 
the other polishes, or one comes 
up with ideas, the other develops. 



My second suggestion comei 
from following your editorials. 
I appreciate the editorials this 
year as they seem well thought 
out. But I, as a student, as a 
subscriber to the Accent, as a 
weekly reader, would like to know 
just who it was that wrote the 
editorial. The policy about sign- 



Dear Editor: 

Just a note to say thank you for 
malting the editorials enjoyable to 
read. I am sure the students will 
always remember them, along 
with the Coil of Cablel 



Thanks, 

Vanessa Greenleaf 



Editorial 
Feature 

On 
Pages 
4 & 5 



A.I matarla. published In Th. ^«^»^^'j;^J'^J^'litT'^ 
vie* of tho newspaper staff or the SMC admlnWraton. ^oons ^^ ^ ^ 
ottKf content Heme cfeate an open exchange "L '°^' V°™^(|e expressW- 
dlsasreement, "USteratothe Editor," ^^^'°^'"^;^^'^S\Sm^'^'>^' 
V*do, tKwwer, reaer,e the right not " P|*^l* ,'Srt7X«rl9htor*i)» 
extrem^yradlcal.oroutofcharactarlnllghtofdoctrlnal points. v«wi» 

the bearing ot a Christian SDA college newspaper. 



Bjltof vlnlta\A/ayman 

AsslslrtEdltw.V.V.V. Lynn Neurrann 

Business Ivlanager °*™ "^'v^i-f 

Layout Editor..... •V^™^^?^ 

UyoulUn»Up "^^ ""^.S^ 

SiXHtsEdltoT. Reuben Castillo 

atculallon Manager John Henson 

Secretaries Pam Legere 

Denlse Sheets 

AdKfenager. Pay Harwell 

Proofreaders .-. Kathy f^^MI 

Jeanne Zacharlas 

Subeo-lpllons Candy Miranda 

Artists *^ MarttFord 

Sandle Lehn 

Phologra^jhers Rhonda Runyan 

MarkPartlo 
Mari<Ford 

Reporters Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
DebbyBoyer 

Sponsor Frances Androiw 

Printer . Felts Bros. Printing ">■■ 

Oollewah, Tenn. 

■me Soultara Accent Is published weekly with the exception of tost 

vacations. „,,-< weeWV '" 

Subecriptlons for parents and alumni are $6 per year, mai'" 
Collegedale, TN, at a non-profit rate. 



i 



200 Head 
For Indian 
Creek Bible 

Conference 



DMykal Ringstaff 

"Revelation -- Inspiration of 
tlie Scriptures" will be the topic 
of discussion when nearly 200 
college students from the South- 
ern Union participate in the an- 
nual Bible Conference Oct. 27-29 
at Indian Creek Camp. 

The conference will be made up 
of delegates from SMC, Oakwood 
College, Mountain Sanitarium & 
Hospital, and Laurelbrook School. 
With 100 delegates in attendance, 
SMC will present the largest bloc 
to the convention. Next in order 
with 80 delegates is Oakwood 
College, followed by Mountain 
Sanitarium & Hospital with 10. 
Finally, Laurelbrook School will 
have 7 delegates in attendance. 

The speakers for the confer- 
ence will be Dr. Raoul Dederen of 
Andrews University, who will 
present the series on Revelation, 
and Dr. Winton Beavon of Ket- 
tering College. The Sabbath 
morning worship service will be 
given by H.H. Schmidt, Southern 
Union president. 




nianday, October 20, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 

Campus Poets 
Form New Club 



DKathy Oakley 

A poetry club has just recently 
been organized on SMC campus, 
according to James Boyd, junior 
English major. 

This club stems from a Twen- 
tieth Cenhiry Writers dass that 
was taught by Dr. Minon Hamm, 

latttirL^r^emrr "'"'^^ "r" ^ ">= nS'Si.I l^.tmest^f "^" " "'•«"^^' 
rir,J^M '^A ■ "^^='"="' '^'■es a woman's blood pressure (left) as ' 
Cmd. Maddux signs up people for the 5-Day Stop Smoking PlanTrigLt) 



Medical Arts Center 
Hosfs 5-Day Plan 

OMykal Ringstaff 

R^^ r-"^?^?or^''''.?.'"*" '" "'^''' "^"'P"' chaplain, the event 

Better Lmng (CABL) wUl sponsor will also feature nursing students 

a 5-day plan to stop smoking at from the Community Health class 

the Collegedale Medical Center taught by Marilyn Montgomery. 



Oct. 31-Nov 

Directed by Dr. John Sines, Dr. 
Wally Kutzner, Dr. Harold Mes- 
singer, and Elder Jim Her- 



Positions are still available for 
students who wish to participate. 
Contact Johnny Lazor, CABL 
director, at 4673 or 2214. 



The cost is $11 per delegate. 
This will cover only the cost of 
food. The Union will be responsi- 
ble for the expense of lodging and 
SMC will provide transportation 
to the conference. 

According to Chaplain Jim 
Herman, this Bible Conference 

wDl provide some "real meat" so 

the students will gain a deeper 

understanding of the Bible. 
Persons interested in attending 

the Bible Conference should place 

their names on the sign-up sheets C-lKAA R, Fl A 

provided in the dorms and at the ^'""^ "-* ' '-'^ 

chaplain's office. Delegates 

wishing to attend are asked to 

sign up no later than Friday so 

that the list may be sent to the 

Union office. 
Delegates will need to bring 

their own sleeping bags or bed- 

*^ing, and remember to bring 

warm clothes with them. Married 

couples who are planning to at- 
tend should be advised that there 

are no provisions made for hus- 
bands and wives at the camp. 

Unless a tent is brought, married 

couples will stay in separate lodg- 



SDA ACCREDITATION MANUAL cent, from p.l__ 

When tht revision is finished in committee before they arrive 
November, the committee will " . . - . - 

submit the manual to the SDA 
Board of Regency for approval. 

With these revisions will also 
come new conditions which must 
be met before the regional ac- 
creditation committee can come 
to a school. All material sub- 
mitted to the regional committee, 
plus any additional material 
which is required by the new 
manual, will be sent to each 
member of the accreditation 



the campus of the school to be ac- 
credited. Also, SDA accreditation 
will come every five years instead 
of every ten years. 

These revisions should save all 
schools coming up for accredita- 
tion considerable time and 
money. 



In this class, the students had 
m opportunity to bring in their 
own poetry, and the class would 
then discuss and analyze each 
poem. 

The students felt like they 
gained real insight from these 
discussions, so it was decided 
that they continue, and thus the 
Poetry Club was formed. 

The club will be meeting every 
other Wednesday evening at 6 
p.m. The next meeting will be 
November 2. 

Boyd stated that ii mainly is a 
time to come and relax, to discuss 
and gain insights into life and 
people through poetry. 

He went on to say that those 
wishing to have their poetry dis- 
cussed should give it to either 
Debbie Gainer, himself, or turn it 
in to the English department by 
the Tuesday before the next 
scheduled meeting. Each poem 



they will discuss will be dupli- 
cated so that every member can 
have a copy. 

Dr. Hamm and Miss Evelyn 
Lindberg will be at some of the 
meetings to lead out in the dis- 
cussions. 

Allwhoare interested in poetry 
are welcome to attend any of the 
meetings. 

Nicaraguans 
Lose 2400 
Teeth 

D Roland Joy , 

A group of dental students 
from Loma Linda's School of Den- 
istry visited the Tasba Raya Mis- 
sion in Nicaragua in September. 
2.400 teeth were exteacted and 
250 teeth filled. 

The team was transported a- 

;ong the Coco River, which is a 

boundary between Nicaragua and 

Honduras, by the Nicaragua 

Air Force. 

A plan for eye care is currently 
being negotiated by the Nicar- 
agua Mission committee with a 
group of optometrists. The com- 
mittee has high expectations for 
conducting an eye care plan such 
as the dental care plan that Loma 
Linda provides. 



Good Will 
Spreads To 



DDonnie Keele 

President Frank Knittel and 
Kenneth Spears, dirp'-tor of ad- 
missions, returned recently from 
Greater Miami and Forest Lake 
Academies, where they had a 
special dinner with the faculties 
of each academy. 

"These trips," Dr. Knittel ex- 
plained, "are primarily for keep- 
ing in touch with the different 
academies. We go in and spend 
time with each of the classes." 



mg 

Those students selected to go 
wUI be notified fay the chaplain's 



Dr. Knittel said that these were 
the first of the annual good will 
dinners held with the faculty of 
various academies in the South- 
em Union Conference. 



Collegedale Cleaners 



Ck&AMERr 




Sun. - Thurs. 
7:30 - 5:30 

Wday 7:30-4:00 

COLLEGE PLAZA 

396-25S0 



This Week's Specials 



VM 



VILLAGE MARKET 



19-25 




'*''''' Frozen Yogurt 
Free Sample 



-THE SOUTHERN 



ACCENT Tho«d.y. October 20, 1977 



o 





Miss Frances Andrews, the 
"nt sponsor, sends out sleuths 
'eporters) who snuffle at eve^ 
doorstep and decipher everyday 
events. These sleuths belong to 
the News Reporting class wh.ch 
'„,eets Mondays, Wednesdays 
jnd Fridays. Although rookies, 
they're learning fast. 



Itafsourstoiy- DntBoertweek. 




Candy Miranda, our 
subscriptions lady, labels and 

staples Accents for our 
parent-alumni mailing list. 



The inside 
story 



l1ieSoiith< 



John Henson, laden under heaps 
of Accents, delivers to Talge 
Thatcher. Jones, the Student 
Center, the library, Lynn Wood 
and Herin Halls, and the College 
Plaza. 




Photos by Maik Fori I 




, , r 1' 1 Its Bros. 
( II I 1 / m Ooltewah. 
They also print the Quality 
Shopper 

The press deadhne is at 6 p.m. 
sharp on Tuesday We've only 
been on time twice Everything 
usually collapses around us in 
confusion on Tuesday afternoon. 
Machines break and Murphy's 
Law fulfills itself 



/Before we can even afford a news- 
paper at all; there have got to be 
monies and revenues to support 
it. This is in part taken care of by 
Ray Hartwell, ad hustler. Dave 
Middag, our business manager, 
keeps the records clean. These 
two are not pictured. 




K 



These two hardy ind«i*.» 
(Vanessa Greenleaf and Ran y 
Johnson) goback to the drawing 
board week after week, mj 
the typeset material, crea.^^ 
catching page designs, an 
up the columns arrow-s«aJB 
All painstaking tass 

Right- Vanessa sh^wsB;"* 
howtousewaxer, wax 1^^^, 
thin coating of wax onto w 
paper. This wax takes the Pj.^ 
of glue and is much easier „j 
onto the layout shee^^l^j 



Thursday, October 20, 1977 THE SOITTHEItN ACCENT - S 



TheEds, VinitaWayman, 
"Boss" and Lynn Neumann (not 
pictared) must have a nose for 
news. What is garbage and what 
- is not? They are the 
weeder-outters, the 
mistake-spotters, and the article 
chopper-uppers. They view 
everything with the critical eye of 
the reader. Our news must 
remain credible and easily 
readable. ^ 




The secretaries are the mainstays 
of our whole operation. 
Everything must be typed, 
obviously. These two. Pam 
Legere (top left) and Den 
Sheets (corner right), spend a 
total of 10 hours a week behind 
our computer typesetter alone. 
This "compugraphic" lines up 
the right and left margins for any 
column width we want. "Treat it 
like an egg" is our motto. 
A very touchy machine. Much 
goes wrong and always. 
Maintenance costs are 
exasperating. One roll of 
photographic typesetting paper 
runs $20. not to mention the 
processing chemicals. 

Denise (above left) sits glumly 
and Vanessa (left) holds strip of 
paper in aftermath of processing 
disaster -- two hours worth of 
typing stuck between the rollers 
in the processor. 







6 . THE SOOTHERN ACCENin.^rf*)'. Oc«.l>« ». 19" 



Campus CCossiiieds 



Accent mailbox. 



, • n.t»- Nov 4-6, Cabin and 
• ]^ Sndings and poles ■ Excellent Condmon - $60. ^ 

gas. 
^The southern Accent photography content ends^^^^^^^^^^^ 

rchCoV:i^sLrcrnctThii^ro:g^^^^ 

Winner wffl be announced in next Accent. 



« 3-squeezen Hello from the 3 squeezer and 2 squishes. 
©Dear Ditto Friend: Thanks for the three toots on the horn Sunday, Ditto 

Activities Committee. 
• NATURAL CH.LDB,RTH~^^^^^^^^^ 

p.m. in the cube room of the Student Lenter. '»^" *■ ? ^ oUlows, wear slacks, 

brth^eX-^irotSt?.To^::"'or^"Aeade.^ 

Committee. 

Dallas, TX 75231. 
t For Sale: 12-string epiphune guitar. Good condition. Hard shell case included. 

Call 4622 (cash only) 
Welcome back Mrs. Sharon McGrady. Hope you and Glenn had a wonderful 

honeymoon. 
#Dear Basket Giver: I'm baffled and 1 love chocolate. How about a clue? 

The Bearded One 
% HAPPY BIRTHDAY Sandy and Stevel!! 
• Dear 'Hunted' ...isn't it hard knowing 'The Hunter.' but yet not knowing who 'The 

Hunter' is?? Schemingly yours... 'The Hunter' 
• DearGwen, Don'tthank thesuggester of adeed. Thank the DOER. A proverb from 
the: Ole Chinese Father of Time. 



ri 1, v«mer Service --Vesper service will be held in the cafeteria 
m Far Ewtem Gab Vei^r ^rv ^^ ^ ^^^ ^.^^ ^^ ^^^^^ ^ p ^j,^^^ treasurer of 

rFar'Srn Division. Members and those interested are cordially invited. 

!,•♦ ,.,1. ran restrine it for you. Our prices are lower than any 
0Kyouownatenn,sracket wecanrestn^g^^^^ y ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ 

sportshop in town. /"" * , ^^ ask Dean Evans, Dean Halversen, Mark 

'''■''^- MraT*e PE dtrBob Colgtove, Ed Zollinger, GuiUermo Vilas, 

Ro"« Tanner, Jimmy Comiors, Chris... etc. etc. 

^^n.x.^MU A hav ride and a potato roasti Saturday Night, Oct. 22 
•^°f io'LTof W hIiW:30 p.^. Sign up on sign up sheets. 

Student Missions Club 
... ,- .1 .cipft in the duplicating office. H you are the owner or know 

•retnt^To^ttT:e!7e*fc"Ltactls and identify. Number 4314 

Hours 8-12, 1-5 

• Poochie Woochie, UOYEVOLIl 1 (1 just wanted to see if you read Campus Oassifieds 
m your school paper). 

^ u „,:,« Track Car Stereos that don't work properly, please contact 

• S^s'Xrernl in box 3\6 Talge. I'm willing to pay you cash to keep me 
from going crazy without music in my car. 

« HAPPY BIRTHDAY JOY GRAVES on your 20th. Have a good one. J.L. & Co. 
% HAPPY BIRTHDAY INGRID! from your sisters. 

• Thank yon to all the guys for the thoughtfril Birthday Surprisel 1 
Kathy Groin 

• Need a pair of shoes? Phone 4983 ask for Walter. Choose from any one of four 
complete lines, both men and women styles. 



# Frieda: Do you get what I'm talking about? Fred 

• Joker Correction: Frank Cantrell's and John Canuteson's pictures are switched o„ p. 
37. Please forgive. 

transportation! 
• The cafeteria wUl be closed for supper Sunday Oct. 30 because of the Halloween 
festivities in the Student Park. (See page one story) 

Supper will be served at a flat rate. So bring your ID cards and join in the funl 

• Donald J. - Congratulations on your graduation. We are looking forward to seeing 

you at Christmas time. Dr. Shock and friends. 






Finances Screwed Up? 

] If you can see that you are going to 
have trouble meeting your school bill 
this semester call 396-4322 NOW TO 
MAKE AN APPOINTMENT TO SEE 
Laurel Wells. Judi Moots, or 
Paulette Goodman. 



vmmiiiiimiiiiiiiuiiiiiiuumuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiniuiiiuniuiiiiiuiiuuiiinuiuinuiiiiuumg 

1 Battle Creek Sanllaitmii Hospital i 

I 197 North Washington Ave. | 

1 BatUe Creek, MI 49016 3 

S A An equal opportunity employer ^u = 

= * Recruiting program for health professionals ^ | 

1 If you are seeking challenges in nursing-related fields | 

1 and want to work in a modem SDA hospital, we're | 

1 seeking YOU. | 

1 Check the Nursing Administration Office for more I 

i information, and we'll keep you posted. Our personnel 

1 representative, Dovie Knecht will be on campus Nov. 2 

1 and 3 to discuss: summer work program 

S scholarship assistance 

S employment application 

%iiwiiiiiMiiniiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiinnniiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 




Put 

>w me 




^Mj^ Weighing Anchor 
For Madison Isle 



nrnnday, October 20, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 




At the crack of dawn, the troop 
was making the final preparations 
for our long journey to Madison 
Island. 

Led by our faithful leader, Cap- 
tain Elder Herman, we pushed 
00, rubbing the sleep from our 
eyes. 

And we're off. Up and down 
the rolling hills, 'round the bams, 
and between patches of daffo- 
dills, on our way from one end of 
the day to the other. 



Off the sea of highways, our 
ship cast into port, to lend the 
natives some Christian support. 

The sabbath school and church 
were in pleasant surroundings as 
the people worshipped the same 



God harmoniously. After that, it 
was time to eat. Spaghetti and 
potatoe salad seemed to make for 
a very festive occasion. The acti- 
vity planned next was a hike 
around the native land to explore 
the grounds and see the sights. 
Some of us chose to catch up on 
our sleep for our sabbath "lay 
activities.'* 

When all the people got back 
from the hike, I was just waking 
up and noticed that for some 
strange reason the people seemed 
to be predominantly in groups of 
twos. And they all looked quite 
happy and healthy and hungry all 
over again. After supper and ice 
cream, everyone was stuffed, and 
'i_t,was game time. 

By this time the rain was really 




pouring down-but that didn't 
dampen the spirits of the is- 
landers. Some braved the rain 
and thunder while others remained 
secure indoors and played games 
such as snake writing, saint mat- 
thew, wink'em-by far the most 
popular. 

By the way, departure time was 
at 22 hundred hours (10 p.m.) but 
we didn't leave till 24 hundred 
hours which tells me that every- 
one was really having a fine time 
and that we all would like to come 
back again ASAP (as soon as 
possible). 

Our land ship weaved and 
bobbed on_ ^e_sea— of— roads^ 
covered with darkness, headed 
for home. We got there at 4 
hundred hours or so, and had 
pleasant dreams of returning. 



Identify 

Christ saves men, 
Not in sin, 

but from sin; 
And those who love Him 

will show their love 
by obedience. 

All true obedience 

comes from the heart. 
It was heart work 

with Christ. 

And if we consent, 

He will so identify Himself 

with our thoughts and aims, 
so blend our hearts and minds 
into conformity to His will, 
That when obeying Him 

we shall be but carrying out 
our own impulses. 

1 Deelre of Agei 



Living Stones Or Stumbling Blocks? 



Suffering was the keynote ■of 
the Christian Way as it entered 
the second century. It remained 
faithful even unto death because 
its focus centered on the source of 
life. The Empire could terminate 
its existence, but it could never 
extinguish the reality of a living 
Christ in the hearts of His fol- 
lowers. 

Satan realized that his method 
of force could never prevail 
against this reality. It was too 
valuable to sacrifice for a tem- 
poral shadow that would soon 
fade in the dust of yesterday. 
Calling a high council Satan and 
his angels decided upon a new 
course to pursue toward the Way. 

Being surrounded by a pagan 
atmosphere, the Way found its 
only safety in total dependency on 
the Wordof Yahweh. This word 
became the foundation of belief 
and practice; it was the divine 
criterion for all experience and 
teaching. As long as they main- 
tained this relationship, they 
were beyond the reach of Satan. 

Satan began his subtle process 



of syncretism as the persecution 
began to die. Syncretism was his 
method of combining the sacred 
and profane into one religion. 
Compromise and conformity were 
its two key components. 

As the Way advanced into the 
third and fourth centuries, it be- 
gan to loose its uniqueness. It 
drifted away from its moorings, 
lost its foundation based on the 
word, and started to float in the 
bogs of human invention. 

The Way became the pride of 
the Empire. It received all the 
honors and glories that mortal 
man could lavish, yet the portrait 
of Jesus faded more and more 
from the lives of those following 
the Way. To take their eyes from 
the eternal glory and to focus 
them on the ephemeral glory was 
to become like the world. 

Embarking on its longest voy- 
age, the Way found itself in a 



millennium of change. Like 
Judaism before it, it began to 
increase cere pion ies and outward 
displays of glory in a panorama 
that dazzled the senses, but it had 
lost the vital principles of godli- 
ness in its attainment to world 
recognition. 

It became a burden to the 
people and a court of licentious- 
ness for the world. The darkness 
of the age reflected itself in the 
lives of those who composed its 
structure. 

The living stones died as the 
Spirit left the house to its own 
building. The house was beauti- 
ful from all views, but the sim- 



plicity of the humble Galilean 
found no longer a place to live; 
the progress of the Way had left 
the Way as He watched with tears 
the growing bondage of His 
people in the spiritual night which 
could have no dawn. 

From time to time gleams of 
light touched the darkness, but 
the darkness always regained its 
sableness. Those who chose to 
live the life of Christ paid for it by 
suffering torture, imprisonment, . 
. bandishment and death. Satan's 
masterpiece was perfected as he 
revealed what he could do, and 
the watching universe wept. 

Unknovm to all'^the sparks of 



light that were continually dying 
in the darkness, were preparing a 
path of light to the Word of God 
which had become a book in an 
unknown tongue, chained to walls 
of stone in monastic centers. 
These centers became part of the 
vast system of human works as 
the way of salvation became man- 
centered. 

Yahweh, Lord of history and 
man, saw all of this. He knew 
that the time had come for Him to 
prove the reality of His world to 
transform lives in this time of 
great spiritual ignorance. This 
was His hour as Satan watched to 
see what his antagonist would do.. 




BOTH NEED 
LIFE INSURANCE 

Managing a household is a 
big job, even (or two 
people. That's why both 
of you need insurance 
protection ... to provide 
financial support in the 
event that one of you 
suddenly finds yourself 
alone. Ask me about Slate 
Farm life insurance ... for 
BOTH of you. 

f~| Fred Fuller 

I lISS!,,! Collegedale Agent 




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• FRUOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 

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. THE SOOTHERN ACCENT Th««l.y, 0.«»«»' »' »»" 




Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



W 



Softball Season Ends 
With Heavy Hitting 



Games Played 



Po9. Team W 

1 Webster 12 

2 Wohlers 12 

3 Runnels 9 

4 Hunt 7 

5 Minder 7 
5 Whitehead 6 

7 Hickman 5 

8 Martling 5 

9 Mobley 5 



.800 
.790 



.440 5 1/2 

.420 5 1/2 

.375 6 1/2 

.333 7 

.320 7 1/2 



Mobley and Martling played a 
close one Wednesday night, as 
yours truly saw it. 

Martling had jumped out to an 
11-0 lead in the first three in- 
nings. Suddenly, Mobley's bats 
came alive. Four runs here, three 
runs there, it all adds up. 
The score was 17-0 in the fifth 
innings with Martling still pro- 
ducing runs. In the sixth. Mobley 
tallied eight runs to pass Martling 
18-17. In the seventh inning. 



Mobley added 4 insurance runs 
and Martling scorfcd once. The 
final score was 22-18 and 
Mobley's bats were steaming. 
Wohlers team was waiting tor 
their turn to play Mobley. 

The temperature had dropped 
to about 45 degrees F. This might 
have had its effect because 
Mobley's hot bats strangely 
cooled down to a tepid degree. 
Wohlers team was swinging the 
big bat this time as they steam- 
rolled over Mobley 20-7. 



Tennis Tourney 
Gets Highstrung 



Webster ClinchesTop Spot 



In tennis action Dean Halver- 
sen and Jim Wampler met on the 
courts and Halversen won. 
Jim Bair beat Ken Slate, Eddie 
Tompkins heat Del Schutte. 
Charles Pumphrey beat Rick 
Smith. Mark Turri beat Brad 
Schultz. Geoff Cabral beat 
Brooks Bumsed. Tom Baez beat 
Ron Barts. Get this - Dean 
Evans beat Mike Brandl 
Evans meets Baez; Cabral 



meets Turri; Pumphrey meets 
Tompkins; Bair meets Halversen; 
all in the 4th round. 

In consolation action, Mike 
Koerting beat Brad Pryor to ad- 
vance to the semifinals. Jim 
Greve wUl meet the winner of the 
Haylock-Farwell match. David 
Mattery and Terry Uhran meet to 
decide who will play Ed Klem in 
the semis. 



Webster has clinched the 
championship for the softball sea- 
son. His team has maintained a 
tenacious hold on first place for 
most of the season. HisUamisto 
be commended for its outstanding 
performance. 

Wohlers pulled to within. 1/2 
game the last day of the season by 
winning both games of a double- 
header. 

Runnels made up a deficit of 
.100 percentage points^ by win- 
ning 6 out of his last 9 games, 



after playing .500 ball midway 
through the season. 

These are the names of the 
players that played for Tedd 
Webster's first place team; Tedd 
Webster, Keith Mosley, Terry 
Uhran, Ken Richards, Alan 
Spears, Tom Jones, Ed Klein, 
Dan Farwell, Gordon Miller. Tim 
Bair. David Marx, Jim Swinson, 
Brian Shane, Dave Cress, and 
Matt Nafie. 

Congratulations to all the 
teams for a final season. 



Tedd enjoyed a lead for most of 
the season. He commented on 
the officiating as being "good" 
for the most part. The only 
problem arose when the official 
was out of position to get a good 
look at the play. 

Tedd was also an official. The 
officiating class and others 
"called" the games with few in- 
cidents of unsportsmanlike con- 
duct being recorded. The players 
themselves enjoyed the season. 




Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



jcNATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



COUPON 



i Off ^--^-l 

■ LIMITED OFFER , ^\ Vti. " 

I Oct. 24, 25, and 26 HoirCUt I 

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■ Beauty Salon ^^1\ I 

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Southern Missionary College 
CoUegedale, TN 37315 




The Southern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 



IWsday, October 27, 1977 



Adventisfs Say No To 
Women's Odinarion 




CoUegedale, Tenn. 



Washington. D.C. - For the 

third consecutive year a proposal 
to ordain women to the ministry 
of the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church was set aside by the 
highest administrative body of 
the church. 

In Annual Council last week the 
church took action to name 
ramen who were enj^ 
isterial roles "associates in pas- 
toral care." It further empha- 
sized that such persons "are not 
in line for ordination." 

Neal C. Wilson, vice-president 
of the church for North America, 
in introducing the recommenda- 
tion, stated, "Since the whole 
of the church has not 



1000 Years Mexican 
History In Dances 



The Ballet Folklorico 
Mexicano, directed by Graciela 
Tapia, will perform at the Phys- 
ical Education Center at 8 p.m. 
Oct. 27. "Fiesta Folklorico" will 
be a parade of a thousand years of 
Mexican history compressed into 
two hours. The company of 35 
singers and musicians has given 
than 600 performances in 
the United States. They have 
represented Mexico at Expo '74 
in Spokane, Wash, and are con- 
sidered to be an official program 
of Cultural Exchange by the 
Mexican government. 

The ballet is a cultural entity 
fashioned by scholars, research- 
ers, and artists. The Mexican 
government has been generous in 
sponsoring research into its past 
folk culture. 

The 1977 edition of the Ballet 
Folklorico Mexicano includes a 
number of new features in its 



'—Behind- 
i^age One 



Hot off the Press -- Rene 
Noorbergen^ New Book 
P-2 

Bow to Float On The Rising 
Tide of Toiaon Costs 

p.7 

Contest- Whudng Photo 
p.7 

Josh Heralded as Olympic 
Runner p. g 

^ -■ 



TCFD Rescues 
Contaminated 
Air Victims 

DTeresa Shaw 

Tri-Community Fire Depart- 
ment (TCFD) responded to a call 
at Harrison Elementary School 
Wednesday, Oct. 12. A natural 
gas leak had contaminated the 
air causing many children to pass 
out. 

The TCFD rescue squad and 
one engine answered the 8:35 
a.m. call. Firemen arriving on 
the scene began administering 
cardio-pulmonary resuscitation to 
some of the victims. 'One hun- 
dred children were transported to 
Childrens Hospital where they 
were treated and released, with 
the exception of three victims who 
were hospitilized overnight for 
observation. 

Other fire departments that re- 
sponded to the call and aided in 
transporting the children were 
Hwy. 58 Fire Department, Chat- 
tanooga Fire Department, and 
Hamilton County Ambulance. 



light in ordaining women to the 
gospel ministry, it has made this 
recommendation'." 

The associates in pastoral care 
will carry either a missionary 
license or ultimately a missionary 
credential from the denomina- 
tion. 

Robert H. Pierson, president of 
the General Conference of 
Seventh-day Adventists, explain- 
ed that ' ' any position in the 
Adventist church not requiring 
ordination to the gospel ministry 
is open to women who are mem- 
bers of the church." The denom- 
ination is making a definite effort 
to include more women on its 
decision- making bodies and in 
positions of responsibility. Dr. 
Pierson explained that "for 
several years this subject has 
been under review by church 
leaders and theologians from 
many nations, both male and fe- 
male. Currently we find no in- 
spired evidence supporting the 
ordination of women to the gospel 
ministry. 

"As a church we must move 
forward unitedly on such an im- 
portant matter. Thus far," he 
added "all divisions of the world 
church including North America, 
feel that we are not ready to make 



The council, which draws dele- 
gates from the ten world divisions 
of fhe church, also took action 
designed to "safeguard the integ- 
nty of the ministry." It expanded 
its earlier requirements for min- 
isters to be men of high moral 
standards, adhering strictly to the 
biblical Ten Commandments. 

The new statement enlarged 
upon the interpretation of the 
seventh commandment, ' 'Thou 
shalt not commit adultery." It 
indicated that "violations involv- 
mg sexual perversions" would 
make void a pastor's ordination to 
the sacred office of the ministry. 

The action added that an of- 

Turn to p. 2, col. 4 



Ballet Folklorico Mexicano 



New Road Gets New Cover 



DDennis Canther 

Progress can finally be seen 
with the long-awaited railroad 
signals installed and the new in- 
tersection in use. In spite of the 
sign "Travel at your own risk", 
drivers now follow a much safer 
flow of traffic across the railroad 
crossing and intersection. 

Complaints have been made as 
to the reason for the gravel on the 
new stretch of pavement. City 



Manager Lee Holland explained, 
"The gravel-covered surface you 
now see is only a temporary sur- 
face made of pugmil. The gravel 
on top is only put on to set the 
surface and will be thrown off by 
traffic use." 

Pugmil with many of the charac- 
teristics of concrete, is put on 
wet. It them sets up hard as rock. 
"This is the hard surface the 



community will drive on through- 
out the winter. In the spring, 
after places which have settled 
have been filled and reinforced, 
five inches of asphalt will be laid 
down to form the permanent sur- 
face for the CoUegedale entrance 
road," said Holland. 
Holland added that the section 

Turn to p. 3, col. 4 



. THE SOUTHERN 



ACCENT TTiondmy, October 27, 1977 



o 




Weems Speaks Out 
For Religious Liberty 



DKathy Oakley 

The Religious Liberty club is 
sponsoring the 11 o'd»^^„^^™^,^ 
at the Hixon Church Oct. 29, 
according to Chuck Hess, presi- 
dent of the club. 

The service will consist ot an 
interview with Charles Weems, 
who is in the process of starting a 
lawsuit against his former com- 

''*Weems was fired after the Su- 
preme Court ruled that a com- 
pany is not required to recognize 
relieioas beliefs above seniority 
in aie Harelson vs. TWA case. 



Rene Noorbergen, writer-to-residence J I -« 

Lost Races Rediscovered In 
Noorbergen's New Book 



DDebra Gainer 

Rene Noorbergen, SMC's 
«Titer-in-residence, has recently 
published his eighth book. Se- 
crets ot the Lost Races. 

The book concerns the increas- 
ing number of mysterious archae- 
ological and historical findings 
classified as "out-of-place arti- 
facts" looparts). These ooparts 
display a technological sophistica- 
tion amazingly far bevond th" 
known capabilities of the ancient 
peoples. Two examples cited in 
the book: a Hindu iccount of an 
: bomb detonation '.ii ?^00 
B.C., and a pla 
puter found in ancient tjret.,. 

Noorbergen theorizes that 
thwe were once civilizations with 
technology beyond that of otir 
own dav. He logically contends 
that the loss of this knowledge 
was partially due to the decreas- 
ing length of generations after the 
flood and before the invention of a 



written language. Also, there is 
some indication of a fusion be- 
tween technological and occult 
powers which led to the destruc- 
tion of these civilizations. 

Research for this book took 
about five years. Joey Jochmans 
from Nebraska collaborated with 
Noorbergen on research, all ot 
which was done in the USA, 
excepting the eariier Noah's Ark 
expeditions. 

The book is scheduled to come 
out this week. Noorbergen will be 
introducing it at Southwestern 
Adventist College in Keene, Tex- 
as, with lectures and autograph 
sessions. Then next week, 
Noorbergen will attend an auto- 
graph session at the T.H. Payne 
bookstore in Chattanooga. He is 
also scheduled for several local 
radio and TV shows and news- 
paper interviews. 



be introduced on the SMC cam- 
pus at an SA chapel on Dec. 8, 
with Noorbergen as guest speak- 
er The Campus Shop at that time 
will hold an autograph signing 

session. 
The book will also be available 

in the bookstores in town. 



NO WOMEN M INISTERS cont. 
firom p. 1- 

fending minister, even though he 
might repent of his offense and be 
rebaptized as a church member, 
could never again serve as a 
minister or teacher in the church. 

In further action the council 
categorized "homosexual prac- 
tices" as "a violation of the 
divine intention in marriage. 
• As such, the council declared, 
"They are just cause for di- 
vorce." Heretofore, the church 
has held adultery to be the only 
acceptable cause for divorce. 
With this action it interprets the 
term "adultery" to include homo- 
sexual activities. 



even though Weems' company 
had previously given him his Sab- 
baths oft. 

Religious liberty is an impor- 
tant issue, and Hess reported that 
the club will be having a monthly 
meeting to help keep the students 
informed on these issues. 

There is a bulletin board, spon- 
sored by the club, in the Student 
Center for current information on 
religious liberty. The club is also 
planning to produce a 15-minute 
weekly radio broadcast to be aired 
over WSMC. 

Men 's Club 

Sells 

Elephants 

OMark Kurzynske 

The Men's Club has lined up a 
white elephant sale Nov. 13. On 
Dec. 4, a party is planned for the 
underprivileged children from the 
Summit area, and on Dec. 16. 
there will be a Friday night ves- 
pers at the Chattanooga plane- 
tarium. Also, another roller skat- 
ing party is planned in conjunc- 
tion with the Student Association 
for Nov. 20. 




llinraday, October 27,1977 THE SODTHEKN ACCENT - 3 



Inter-Collegiate Circles Of Prayer 



DMykal Ringstaff 

The college MV/CABL direct- 
ors from the North American 
Division met for a few days last 
spring at Glacier View Ranch in 
Colorado and decided to set up 
intercollegiate prayer weeks. 

Elder Larry Wilson, chaplain at 
Southwestern Adventist College, 
shared the success he was having 
at SAC with prayer request cards 
and voted that the colleges begin 
a prayer circle on a quarterly 
basis. 

It was suggested that a sched- 
ule be set up whereby each of the 
colleges would be prayed for by 



'WAR' In 
Summer our 
Hall 105 

DKathy Oakley 

The CoUegedale Home Eco- 
nomics Association is sponsoring 
a skit, "War of the Words" on 
Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 5:30 p.m. 
in Summerour Hall, room 105. 

The skit will be put on by a 
volunteer group from the Com- 
munity Services of Chattanooga. 

It is a play done to show how 
family relations can affect each 
member of a family. 



another each week of the quarter. 
Since there are 13 weeks in the 
quarter and also 13 colleges, it 
wasn't to difficult to devise a 
schedule with each college being 
prayed for each week. 

According to Mike Roland, on- 
campus ministries director, "The 
specific purpose of the prayers 
belAveen the colleges is to bring 
us into union with their students, 
and this in turn will enable the 



Holy Spirit to work in a very broad 
way for the good of all the 
colleges." Continuing, Roland 
added that the prayers would be a 
continuing cycle on a year-round 
basis. 

Each week during Sabbath 
School, the college to be prayed 
for will be announced. There will 
be special prayer also during the 
afterglow following Friday eve- 
ning vespers. 



Tri Beta Camps Out 



Student Voices On 
Faculty Committees 



DDebra Gainer 

Beta Beta Beta (Tri Beta), 
SMC*s biology club will be going 
on a campout Oct. 28-30. They 
will set up camp by Lake Cona- 
sauga, up in the Georgia moun- 
tains. A local naturalist, Mrs. 
DeGioia, will accompany the 
group to show them the points of 
biological interest in the area. 

Tri Beta is an international 
society for undergraduate stu- 
dents of biology. It has a three- 
fold emphasis: stimulation of 
scholarship, dissemination of 
scientific knowledge, and promo- 
tion of biological research. The 
Society, founded in 1922, now has 
well over 50,000 members all over 
the United States and Puerto 
Rico. 

The SMC chapter of Tri Beta 
usually has from 20-30 members. 
Requirements for membership 



are: a 3.0 GPA in biology as well 
as a 3.0 GPA overall; also, appli- 
cants must have taken Founda- 
tions of Biology and one upper 
division biology course. 

The club sponsors campouts, 
such as the one this weekend, 
occasional meetings and general 
promotion of biology. One of 
their ongoing projects has been 
upgrading of the campus biology 
trail. Their big event of the year 
will come in March, when one of 
the world's top ecologists will be 
coming to conduct a seminar. 

Clarence Carr, senior Biology 
major, is president of Tri Beta. 
His other officers are Georgette 
Finley.Jo Lynn Hawthornc.Vance 
Boddy and Ann Foster. Dr. David 
Steen, biology professor, is spon- 
sor of the club. 



n Vanessa Greenleaf 

The following students have 
been appointed by Ken Rogers, 
SA President, to serve on faculty 
committees: 

Faculty Senate Ray Hartwell, 
Jo Lynn Hawthorne 

Academic Affairs Committee 
Becki Joiner, Ricky Sharpe 

Budget Conunittee Cari Shaw 

ReligjoDB Activlttes Coordinat- 
ing Committee Dave Cress, Gary 
Williams, Barbara Ihrig, Steve 
Darmody 

Student Missions Committee 

Bill Noel, Lily Buhler, Jeanne 
Zacharias, Rahn Shaw, Kirk King 

Public Relations Committee 

Don Jehle, Mark Kurzynske, Bev 
•^enchina 



Student Affairs Committee 

Dave Cress, John Brown, Rhonda 
Runyan 

Judiciary Sub-Conmiittee Jerry 
Holt, Cindi Whitehead 

Loans & Scliolarships Sub- 
Committee David Hack, Gail 

Christansen 
Programs Sub-Conunittee Cin 

di Whitehead. Ron Whitehead 
Paulette Henderson, Kathy 
McGhee, Mark Ford 



Film Sub-Committee Do 

Keele, Bev Benchina 
Recreation Snb-Commltte,e Tim 

Bair, Ron Barts, Holly Lacey 
Traffic Court Randall Jacobson 

Sandy Musgrave, Marie Walker 
Artist Adventure Series Lynell 

Pariin, Bev Benchina, David Kay 



THE ROAD cont. from p. 1 

of the road over the hill is now 
ready for pugmil and will have 
two full 12-foot lanes with 6-foot 
shoulders. An almost verticle 
grade of 148 feet has been cut into 
the hill by bulldozers to form a 
wide, slowly descending, banked 
highway info CoUegedale. "This 
was an enormous project for a city 
of our size", City Mayor Bowen 
said. A major problem, Holland 
said, was the amount of rainfall in 
September. An estimated 20 
inches of rain was by no means 
close to the usual 3 inches receiv- 



ed in September. 

Because of rain and mud, work- 
men last month were only able to 
put in 4 1/2 days of work. 
Moving utilities, working around 
water lines, gas mains, and elec- 
trical lines, and waiting for sup- 
plies have also been a source of 
delay. Bowen commented, "We 
have appreciated the understand 
ing and cooperation of our com- 
munity while the road was being 
built, even though there have 
been numerous problems and set- 
backs encountered" 



Present Church Organ A Model Of Things To Come 



DJerry Dick Lien 

In the chancel of the College- 
dale church now stands a small 
pipe organ, too big to be a toy, 

This is not the organ that will 
be placed permanently in the 
church. But the installation of a 
new one is still somewhere in the 
indefinite future. The new organ 
will be a larger model of the 
present small one. 

In the meantime, the little 
Brombaugh tracker organ, which 
was originally to be installed in 
the music department, is serving 
the church. 

Because this instrument was 
built to fulfill the basic needs of a 
small congregation, it has only 
one manual keyboard and pedals 
with all pipes in one case. 



The organ has 336 pipes. Of 
theses, 17 are made of American 
white oak. Nine of the largest of 
these stand at the back of the 
organ. 

The remaining pipes are in the 
upper case and are made of a cast 
alloy of about 98 per cent lead 
with some tin, antimony, copper, 
and bismuth. 

The casework is made of hand- 
planed white oak fumed in strong 
ammonia. This accelerated what 
would have been accomplished by 
natural again. 

The upper panels are of west- 
em red cedar, a very stable wood 
with lively acoustical properties. 

Pipe mouth moldings, and key 
nosings are gilded with 23-carat 



Enrollment IncreaseBrings 
$50,000 To Nursing Dept 



□Mark Rumsey 

The Division of Nursing has 
received notification of award of 
nearly $50,000 in capitation 
grants from the Department of 
Health, Education, and Welfare. 
Qualification for the grants is 
based on enrollment increase 
over the 1974 base year. 

The amount of the grants is 
calculated according to the num- 



ber and classification of students. 
Two hundred and fifty dollars is 
allowed for each two-year stu- 
dent, and $400 for each full-time 
B.S. degree student. 

The income from the federal 
grants may be used for such 
expenses as an extra teacher's 
salary. The funds may not be 
spent for capital improvement. 



gold leaf. The naturals of the 
manual keyboards are plated with 
cow shinbones. 

The manual sharps and key- 
table moldings are from African 
ebony. The keycheeks and stop 
Jtnobs are from zebrawood, the 
pedal sharps from Brazilian rose- 



wood, the pedal naturals from 
maple, and the keyboard and 
trackers are from sugar pine. 

The windchests and bellows are 
made of sugar pine, white oak, 
western red cedar, and sheep and 
cow leather. The pipe shades are 
hand carved from basswood. 



Because of its size, the fracker 
organ is ideal for small churches 
and teaching studios. The instru- 
ment in the CoUegedale Church 
will find a permanent home in the 
projected new music building, the 
construction of which is tenta- 
tively set to begin next spring. 



Senate To Act On New 
Pass - Fail Grading Proposal 



D Vanessa Greenleaf 

A Pass-Fail bill was presented 
to the Student Senate to be voted 
on Nov. 1. 

The proposal of the bill, spon- 
sored by Ken Rogers, president 
of the Student Association, is to 
present before the adminisfration 
the following: 

THE BILL: A notation of "P" 
signifies that a student has 
earned a grade of C- or higher in a 
course, but that he does not wish 
to have that grade computed on 
his grade point average. The 
student may arrange with his 
instructor to receive a listing of 
"P" at any time during the sem- 
ester, but not later than the day of 
the final exam. The maximum 
number of hours for credit with a 
"P" notation for which a student 
may apply toward graduation is 
12 hours for the baccalaureate 



degree and 6 hours for the associ- 
ate degree. The 12 and 6 hour 
maximums do not include those 
courses which are available only 
on a Pass-No credit basis. The 
Pass option is not applicable to 
those courses required for thje 
major, minor, or teaching 
credentials. 

"Many students on campus are 
endeavoring to keep their GPA 
very high due to the admissions 
requirements to medical and 
graduate schools," stated Ro- 
gers. "And in attempting to do 
this, many classes of general in- 
terest to them must be passed by 
due to their class load or the 
degree of difficulty that would 
make it nearly impossible to make 
the grade required to keep a high 
GPA." 



Also, many other students 
would like to have a general 
knowledge in various areas out- 
side of their major or minor but do 
not have the full amount of time 
to devote to a particular class. 




« . THE SOOTHEKN ACCWt t1.«n*y. 0<**« n. 1»" 



Pac 




Editorial 



The (trades come out. There sits UtUe Albert Average mulling on 
the steps of Lyim Wood Hall (before it burned down - see letter to the 
editor) Whit's the problem? Albert got a D m Theoretical Mudpies 
n. Too bad. Should have studied harder. 

But wait ... is that the answer, or is there more? Why d.dn t 
Albert study harder? Is there another problem that isn t evident on 
the surface, one that is just as heavy as the study habits? There could 
be. you know. „ 

Many students go through classes domg what we would call 
■■average". These undergraduates aren't slow, dumb, or lazy. 
Their problem is ooe of motivation. For example: Albert got a D m 
themudpied.«s. Dumb, you say? Maybe lazy? Well, what about 
the A be got in Intercontinental Applications of Unrealistic 
Paradigms? It's, <*^OBs-be1sii't dumb, so what's the reason for the 
poor grade in mudpie-making ? 

The pmblem must be one of motivation. Albert hated mudpie 
tbectetics with a passion (he burned his book two weeks into the 
semester during a fit of mudslinging.) He just couldn't see the sense 
in it But on the other hand, he ate Unrealistic Paradigms for 
breakfast every day. There was something about it that drew him like 
a magnet 

Motivation. It plays a major p»rt in any course of study, but how 
do we get it? 

There is much talk aboat the responsibilities of the students in 
academic societies, but what about the responsibilities of the 
teachers? Ask someone about a class, and you can be certain that the 
teacher will play a primary role in determining the interest that 
student has in the subject being taught. Ask their grade in the class, 
and the relationship may become even more apparent. The attitudes 
and actions of a teacher toward the subject he teaches can make or 
break a student with borderline motivation. It then becomes a task 
for the teacher, as well as the student, to arouse the desire to learn. 
The classroom is the teacher's domain. When a student enters it, 
he becomes attuned to the appearance, attitude, and personality of 
the teacher. How the teacher approaches the subject will weigh 
heavily in the student's judgment of it, and can decide whether the 
student will become a great author, doctor, or mudpiemaker. 

In this educational Canaan, there are many hours of required 
scholastics that rate low on the scale of interest. Consequently, the 
real need to get the act together should emerge as a primary concern 
of both student. . . and teacher alike. Inflation or no, $89 an hour is 
still a lot of bucks to lose. 



The Southern Accent 



All maleriaJ published in The Southern Accent is not necessarily the opinion or 
view of the newspaper stall or the SMC administration. Cartoons, articles, and 
other content Hems create an open ewihange of Ideas, a forum. In the case of 
disagreement. "Lett ere to the Editor, 'is acolumn designed to provide expression. 
We do, hoiffiver. reserve the right not to publish material that is libelous, 
extremelyradical,orout of character In light of doctrinal points. We wish to retain 
the bearing of a Christian SOA college newspaper. 



Editor vinita Wayman 

Asststani Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Manager Dave Middag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greenleaf 

Layout Une-Up Randy Johnson 

Sports Editor Reuben Castillo 

Orojlation Manager John Henson 

Secretaries pam Legere 

Denise Sheets 

Ad Manager. Ray Hartwell 

Proofreaders Kathy Mixell 

Jeanne Zad^arias 

SubSCTiptions Candv Mi'^rxja 

Artists MarV i^xd 

Ptwlographere Rhonda Runyan 

Martt Partio 
Mark Ford 

Reporters ja-ry Uen 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

Spo^so"" Frances Andrews 

Printer Felts Bros. Printing Co., 

OoUewah, Tenn. 



The Southern Accent Is published weekly writh the exception of test weeks and 
vacallor^. 

Subecriptions for parents and alumni are $5 per year, mailed weekly from 
Collegedale, TN, at a non-profit rate. 



Letters To The Edit 



Dear Editor: 

After noticing some contradic- 
tory practices in The Southern 
Accent, 1 felt compelled to write 
this letter. 

In regards to the survey and 
random sampling concerning the 
dress code, why were opinions 
published signed "name with- 
held" when you stated in the 
previous issue that letters to the 



Ed. Note: 

Anonymous letters to the editor 
will continue to go unpublished. 
Letters are opinions volunteered, 
and if you want people to pay 
attention to your opinion, you 
should pay them the courtesy of 
letting them know who they're 
listening to. 

An opinion poll is not a volun- 
teered opinion, it is a solicited 
opinion. One opinion is not the 



editor signed in that way would 
not be printed. C'mon lets be 
fairl 

Also, when the book Deuter- 
onomy was written both men and 
women wore dress-type apparel. 
Finally, if God blesses America 
simply because women wear 
dresses, then He's not the God I 
believe He is. 

Sincerely, 
Karen Olson 
Thank you. 



central theme of the article; it is 
recorded as a part of the over-all 
impression. Letters and opinion 
polls are two separate things. 

As for the other "contradictory 
practices," the bumper sticker 
you mentioned was a real-life 
picture, not a part of our paper 
policy. It was published only for 
interest's sake. 



Dear Editor: 

I've been at SMC for a few 
years, but only today was 1 really 
hit by something 1 have never 
really thought about before. 
What "hit" me? Just this: what 
would happen to the students in 
any one of our campus buildings 
if there was a fire? Now wait a 
minute readers, don't cut one off 
yet THIS IS IMPORTANTI 

What if you are a two-year 
secretarial major? You have class 
on the 3rd floor of Lynn Wood 
Hall. There's a fire that has been 
blazing away in the back end of 
the service department for just a 
few minutes. No one knows it and 
least of all, you. The flames have 
been eating away at the 2nd floor 
where the steps of descent from 
your classroom go, thus taking 
you to safety. By the time you 
and your classmates are aware of 
the fire, smoke is coming from 
somewhere you're unaware of. 
Someone yells, Fire! Shortly af- 
ter, the siren above you goes off 
for on-campus fire. 

Everyone jumps up immedi- 
ately and makes a mad rush for 
the door - no one is thinking now. 
The first stiident out the door is 
blasted with smoke and heat, but 
perseveringly zooms down the 
steps. As she hits 2nd floor, it 
gives way. There's no way of 
helping her. You were the 2nd 
one out the door and saw what 
happened. Your means of escape 
is cut off. What will you do? 



Perhaps, you can't even think 
now. The smoke has so befud- 
dled your mind. Your throat is 
burning with it too. Your eyes are 
watering like crazy so you can't 
see where you're going. The heat 
is becoming unbearable. Your 
lungs are about to collapse. As 
far as you are concerned, you're a 
gonner. '■Oh my God," you cry, 
■■am I gonna die?" Look, it can 
happen and it could be youl 
People do crazy things when 
there is fire. 



Lynn Wood Hall and Jones Hall 
are basically nothing but wooden 
stiTichires that'll burn faster than 
a firecracker. I'm no fireman, but 
I know what can happen. See, 
only recenUy I was home. While 
sitting in the living room of our 
trailor, I heard an explosion. It 
wasn't a big one, for it sounded 
more like someone had a flat and 
the ground didn't shake. Shortly 
after the first explosion, there 
was another. I zoomed out of the 
trailor and was amazed at what I 
saw. There was a grand display 
of flame shooting into the air a 
good hundred feet or more. The 
office building of a trailor sales- 
man next door was had. Within 
MINUTES the whole building had 
gone. The most profound thing 
about it was that the building was 
built mainly out of block with 
steel ceiling joist. 



Dear Editor: 

I'd like to take lliiil 
to express my mostpfl 
preciation and thanks i 
son in charge of ninii 
^system in the gym i 
evening and Satutdayl 
alumni weekend. SadI 
this campus hasn't s( 
time. 
Keep up the goodij 

Cordially, 
J. B. Lansing 



Some of you readinjl 
say, "So what? Thatf 
where else. TheLoniiiL 
He will take care of i&l 
nothing but pure p«if 
God helps those whoN 
selves. Therefore, lbi< 
matter to suggest ll»l 
someone initiate realSl 
mean, drill it in'" ""J 
heads -that there's g»r 
drill and that the stii^ 
to take it as if it's a 'I 
sihiation. Let it be"! 
the drill will take pl»»| 
a.m., let all the sl>T 
teachers know ahead I 
that all can disco»l 
means of getting »1 
Tell the shidentsWl 
use of the eroerg^l 
Lynn Wood, Jones. 1 
them, Haveaco.pl'1 
month. 

I personally beli';;, 
lous to have drills*; 
Maybe there js °° J 
anddunngtW l| 
dents complain « , ■ 
leave the building. I 
out the front doo's »1 
ings, taking n» 'J 
minutes to get ou-^;^ 
that a drill? C;^ 

donetoinspre»^^i,| 
to involve ourselv« J 

like this? It n.W«'^ 
MORE IMPORT" 
save yours. ^,^„^| 

AttC 



I Dear Editor; 

1 over this country, solid un- 
[ yielding guardrails, sign posts, 
and poles are being replaced by 
collapsible barriers. Tests 
! and studies have shown that they 
reduce damage and injuries when 
struck by a vehicle. It is truly a 
pity that someone at this school 
I has not yet received the message. 
The road to the trailer park at 
I SMC now features the ultimate in 
"smash into the, you cannot hurt 
I them" guardrails. Huge, and I 
I mean HUGE boulders have been 
I placed closed to the right side of 
Ithe pavement. If one was to 



accidently vear a little to the right 
it would not be a simple correc- 
tion of steering, it would easily 
and quickly become a genuine 
certified wreck. 

What possible reason could 
there be for creating another road 
hazard around Collegedale? Does 
someone value that small strip of 
grass so Highly they will protect it 
at any cost? Has a rock collector 
misplaced some of his prize speci- 
mens? Maybe the boulders 
needed a home. Whatever the 
reason it cannot justify the poten- 
tial dangerous results. 

Bob Dukshire 



r Editor: 

After reading all of the articles 
Slbout the dress code (Oct. 6) we 
Hthink its time to stop talking and 
istart enforcing it. If this is to be 
the dress code, students and fa- 
culty alike should be responsible 
enough to uphold the code. 

When applying to SMC we 
students signed a contract agree- 
ing to follow ALL standards. We 
have nothing against the dress 
code as it is, in fact we like it, but 
ghen students try to take advant- 
e of it and reflect bad images 
SMC maybe the old code 
^ould have been kept around. 
Even if the fellows do have a hard 
- conforming to the rules, we 
iris should readily accept and 
©hold the code, as it is to our 
Bvantage. 

iggy Strickland and Samantha 
^mlin 

. Daniel Pabon, when was the 
^ time you looked at the price 
I on jeans? 



f Editor: 

^r must express my astonish- 
^nt at the disappearance of 
^C's first designated piece of 
» as identified by the Accent. 
„™ing from dinner last 
jpdnesday, I noticed an empty 
|t where the coil of cable, until 
^ntly, occupied a place of 
°^- Are vandals running 
eon the SMC campus? Hope- 
p. the coil of cable will be 
f edUy put in a place equal with 
fgreat value. Viva La Artel 

l»y Hartwell 



Dear Editor: 

With all the controversy about 
the new dress code and Deut. 
22:5, I felt compelled to offer a 
word of clarification about the 
latter. 

Deuteronomy 22:5 is a very 
obscure text for which no one has 
yet discovered an adequate inter- 
pretation. The expression, "any- 
thing that pertains to a man," is 
translated from the Hebrew kell- 
geber, "things of a man," and 
may not even refer specifically to 
clothing, but rather, items or- 
dinarily associated with men. 
The simlath ishshah ("woman's 
garment") is a reference to the 
mantle or outer garment worn by 
women. The Hebrew, therefore, 
is not highly specific regarding 
the items in question. 

The expression, "abomination 
to the Lord," should alert us to 
the fact that what is forbidden 
may refer to a caltic offense, not a 
dress code. At least, there is 
some evidence of unnatural 
transvestite behavior in Ca- 
naanite religions at a time later 
than Deut. 22. 

Finally, there is no justification 
for pulling this passage from its 
context and applying it to the 
issue at hand. Why not also insist 
that the Biology Department ob- 
serve carefully vv. 6, 7, or that 
Adventist houses have retaining 
walls on their roofs to prevent 
injury (v. 8), or that farmers avoid 
mixing seeds in their vineyards 
(v. 9)? And away with modem 
fabrics: verse 11 strictly warns 
against mixing "mingled stuff' 
in clothing I 

Biblically, these laws deal with 
issues current in Moses' day and 
have nothing to do with dress. 
Guidelines for Christian adorn- 
ment have been given us in I Tim. 
2:9, 10 and I Peter 3:1-5. 
Jerry, Gladson 
Religion Department 



Iboreday, October 27, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 

Campus Ctesi^iGcfs 

9 Ride Neededl To Goldsboro, North Carolina (or close-by) for Christmas Vacation -- 
Eariiest I can leave is Dec. 19 - 9 a.m. Can and will help with driving and expenses. 
Contact: Bob - Box 123 or phone 4712 (if not in leave message with roommate or 
with front desk 4391) Thanksl 

• Don't miss the big flicks this week featuring Woody Woodchuck, The Cat In The Hat, 
and the Floorwalker in the banquet room Friday. Oct. 28, 11:30-1:30. Sponsored by 
your S.A. Academic Activities. 

• Body Language - What you need to know about your friends attitudes and 
expressions by Ole Kristensen in the Cube Room, Tuesday, Nov. 1 at 7:30. Slides of 
facial expressions from this campus will be shown. Brought to you by your S.A. 
Academic Activities. 

• Lost - A black Bible with the name Seree Rabuka in it. Lost Sabbath Oct. 22 from thi; 
cafeteria. Please contact Sharon at 4120. 

% Congratulations Carol and Dale! Prof. Rima 

W URGENT: I need a ride to Oriando, FL. the weekend of Nov. 5. I am able to leave 
Nov. 3 in the afternoon. If necessary, can leave the 4th. Call as soon as possible - 
4649. Am willing to help pay for gas. Thanks, Jean. 

ABC Prayer Crusade International presents Glenn A. Coon Thursday at 7:30. 
"Strangest Funeral." Then again Sabbath morning and Sabbath evening at 6:00. 
"Ring Around Father's Grave." 

9 To Kathy Goyne; Our deepest apologies in the misspelling of your name. Thank 
you. THE SOUTHERN ACCENT. 

W Help Wanted: Addressers Wanted Immediately! Work at home -- no experience 
necessary -- excellent pay. Write American Service, 8350 Park Lane, Suite 269, 
Dallas, TX 75231. 

W 1 wish to extend my hearty thanks to the valiant and courageous staff in duplicating 
who so faithfully and under great duress printed 200 copies of my syllabus - to you J 
say "Thanks for a job well donel" (even though I had to punch 60 of them myselO. 
Dean Fowler 

0Plan now to attend yourS.A. Talent Program Nov. 12 at 8 p.m. in the P.E. Center. 
Tickets will be available approximately a week or two before the program. Watch 
this column in future issues for more details. 

9 Did you see the latest showing of "McMiilian & Friends?" Bencharro has Anally 
tamed her moose down enough and will soon be starting to sponsor free rides, with 
proceeds going to some charitable unorganization. (Such as herself & friends). 
Watch for the whole seriesi Associates of Korean Cowboy and Hoppin' Gator -- Alias 
The Funky Monkey. 

% Lost: One pair of black metal frame glasses somewhere near Wright Hall or in Blue 
Goose bus. Could finder please contact me immediately as I need them for reading. 
Jeffrey Tan, Talge Hall 165, 4720. 

I have a Texas SRIO calculator, and music in notebook for God's Love Song group. 
Identify and see Mrs. Shumate in Thatcher. Please do not leave persona! items at 
Thatcher desk. They will be removed and could easily be lost. Thatcher Deans. 

A To the person who gave me the banana bread. ..Thank you very muchi It was 
deliciousi I went BANANAS over iti Ronn. 

9 BE ADVENTUROUS BUT.. .be prepared in this quality hiking/ mountaineering goose 
down parka by Ascente. Built to take the ruggedest mountains. Designed to keep 
you comfortably warm in even the most biting cold. Proven mid-winter on high 
Appalachian peaks. But you can wear it anywhere anytime. It doesn't get too hot 
and clammy because down "breathes". Ask about the many features the thinking 
person can appreciate. We also have an unusual guarantee. Phone 396-3357 any 
weekday morning, but hurry because it's now only $381 1 

A Our Overseas Schools are to be highlighted by Professor John T. Hamilton, director 
of the Adventist Colleges Abroad program. He will be on campus Nov. 2, 3, and 4. 
Those interested in an overseas campus (Collonges, Bogenhofen, Hong Kong, 
Valencia) are invited to see Mr. Hamilton and/or to attend one of the language 
classes he will address. See schedule beside door of LWH 208, or call ext. 4205 for 
information. 

A DID YOU KNOW - you can rent a Cessna 172 at the Collegedale Aero Service with 4 
seats to Nashville or KnoxvUle for less than you can get one seat on an airline. This 
means that four can go for less than 1/4 of airiine cost. 

• I just want to thank y'all in the Men's Club for a wonderful evening on the Riverboat 
Cruise last Thursday. All those that I talked to that went really enjoyed it. An 
enjoyable ride, good food, and fellowship made an excellent evening out. And the 
price can't be beat - all this for $1 per person) Keep up the good work, men. 
Sincerely, Johnny Lazor 

0rhis an important message, and it is to let everbody know that "D.T. is getting 
married". Congratulations! R.T., B.L. 

• iniGENTLY NEEDED: RN's for day position (7-3) in surg - all weekends off - 
comparable pay to other hospitals in the area. Call 396-2766 in evenings. 

A FELICIDADES MADELEINEII La chica con la sonrisa Colgate y la risa inolvidable 
que complio 18 anos el dia 19 de octobre. Bendiciones del Senor te deseamos, Mana 
y Ester. 

There was a young student named Michael 
Who's aging today just a trifle 
And we'd like to say 

wJ^^h^i^mbc quite delightftUl The couple and a half 



6 - THE SODTHEWi ACCENT nanday, October 27, 1977 



3 



When the sixteenth century 
dawned, the Christian Way had 
become an institution that could 
no longer sene the purposes of 
its Master Designer. But con- 
tained within its structure were 
li>'ing stones that Yahweh called 
forth in order to rebuild them on 
the only true foundation. His 
Word. 

Martin Lu.her became the 
h^-ald of this new movement 
which could trace its origins to the 
primordial Way. As the Way had 
to be separated from Judaism and 
paganism, so this new reforma- 
tory movement had to move from 
man to Chirst-centeredness. 

It was not the intention of 
Luther to separate from the 
church. He saw the abuses and 
wanted a re-orientation based on 



The wind did not last too long. 
Contentions and debates arose, 
and Christianity became a frag- 
mented structure, weak, destitue 
and robbed of its apostolic glory 
and fellowship. The Reformation 
abandoned its principle of eccle- 
sls reformata semper tefor- 
manda as its various groups set- 
tled down into contentment over a 
few treasures of the Word while 
the richest jewels remained un- 
touched and unsought. 

Revials and reformations con- 
tinued on a small scale through- 
out the decades of turmoil and 



this disappointed chaos, Yahweh 
called the Seventh-day Adventist 
movement into being. It was the 
only bright gem to shine with the 
light of progressive revelation but 
alas, it too became the child of 
reformatory history as it settled 
down into the Laodicean condition 
of apathy. 

The greatest treasures of truth 
known to mortal man can be 
found within it. It has all the 
tapestries of richness, but it is 
devoid of genuine spirituality as 
manifested in faith, love, and the 
righteousness of Christ. Yet des- 




the principle of sola Scrlptnra.. 
The ecclesiastical hierarcy de- 
manded from him recantation not 
remonstration silence not reply. 



Seeing the common people 
locked in the bondage of error, he 
determined to hold to his posi- 
tion. To recant was not possible 
because he had to be true to the 
Word of God. This meant that he 
would face excommunication and 
death, but his course could not be 
altered. 

With this, truth became the 
agency of freedom. When the 
people of the Reformation experi- 
enced the saving truths of the 
Word, they found the Way once 
more, and the Christian Way set 
its sails with a full wind toward 
home. 



Wind Of The 



Spirit Blows 



Down To Us 



pite its lack, the True Witness has 
said this: 

"I testify to my brethren and 
sisters that the church of Christ, 
enfeebled and defective as it may 
be. is the only object on earth on 
which He bestows His supreme 
regard. . . God has a people in 
which all heaven is interested, 
and they are the one object on 
earth dear to the heart of God.*' 
Test, to Ministers p. 15, 41. 

Like the others before it, the What does the future hold for 

movement disintegrated into the SDA movement? Next week 
fragments of disunity. But out of we will examine its destiny. 



change. Spirituality began to die 
as man became apathetic to the 
living Word. 

Realizing his victory, Satan sat 
at ease. Yahweh waited until the 
appointed time, then He raised 
up the greatest movement--the 
Second Advent Movement-ever 
known to man. It swept the world 
as the Word became the center of 
attention once more. 




In Need Of A 
Booster Shot? 



It is customary on this campus 
every year to have a week of 
spiritual emphasis (often referred 
to as week of prayer.) 

When this particular occasion 
comes up on the calendar, several 
interesting things happen. Most 
of the teachers "let up" on 
quizzes, due dates for papers, 
and other assignments. The class 
time schedule is shifted to allow 
for hour meetings every morning 
in the chapel, instead of just the 
regular Tuesday and Thursday 
ones. A guest speaker is invited 
to the campus that week to share 
his religious enlightenment of 
God's word, and to help people 
have a more meaningful relation- 
ship with Christ. 

Most of the time, week ot 
prayer has very positive effects, 
and some people start rapidly 
excelling while others continue to 
grow gradually. 

For yet others it is a wonderful 
thing until several weeks later 
when their "shot in the arm" 
wears off. They just seem to run 
out of gas and there is no one 



there to fill them up again. 

Are you one of these people 
who's shot in the arm has worn 
off? Can you remember who the 
speaker was and what he said? 
Or is all that you remember is 
the style of the speaker's hair or 
the color of his suit? 

The shot in the arm doesn't 
come from the speaker, as many 
people think. It comes from the 
Bible and tlie incredible insights 
of E.G. White. 

What the speaker does to ob- 
tain the shot before you, is to 
maintain a day to day relationship 
with God. They allow themselves 
to be humbled so that the Holy 
Spirit can work through them. 

1 maintain that if you stay in a 
daily relationship with God, you 
will be able to obtain and keep the 
shot in the arm. 

Would you like to share your 
best friend with others? You can! 
All you have to do is not lose thai 
shot in the arm. 

Has yours worn off? 




Vanessa 
Greenleaf 



Graduating 
Nurses . 



t/l 



FLORIDA HOSPITAL 



tional information regarding your future'*^t*°i?^ 
hospital operated by the Se.enth-day Adventist Chu 



396-4282 

Friday, October 27 and 28, 




EAT IT HERE — 
OR CARRY OUT 

• TACOS 

• TOSTADOS 

• BURRITOS 

• FRUOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 

• ENCHIRITO 

4921 BRAINERD RD. 
(AT MOORE RD) 



^ami% 




Arranged As Poetry From Sons And Daughters Of God 

If you call God your Father, 

you acknowledge yourselves as His children, 
to be guided by His wisdom, 
and to be obedient in all things, 
knowing His love is changeless; 
you will accept His plan for your life; 
you will hold 
His honor, 
His character. 
His family. 
His work, 

as the objects of your highest interest; 
It will be your joy 
to recognize 
and honor 

your relation 

to your Father 

and to every member of His family- 
God is our Father, 
A tender parent, 

solicitous for His spiritual children. 
He is pledged to be 
the protector, 
counsellor, 
guide, 
and friend, 

of all 
Who are obedient 
to Him. 



nionday, October 27, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 





How To Survive 
The Tuition Hike 



DGreg Vital 



As the cost of a college educa- 
tion continues to rise, more stu- 
dents are looking for additional 
sources of funds to help meet the 
vast amount of expenses. Tui- 
tion, books, room and board have 
all skyrocketed in recent years. 
In just the last four years, the cost 
of a semester hour at SMC has 
risen nearly 25 per cent. This has 
not been without cause. General 
operating expenses like electricity 
and maintenance have doubled 
since 1970. The budget of this 
college is at the 6 million dollar 
point this year. 

But how high can the price tag go, 
before the average individual 
ceases to be able to afford a 
quality school such as Southern 
Missionary College without addi- 
tional outside funding? 

Additional funds must be made 
available, either thru loans, 
grants, or scholarships. Most 



people are unaware of the many 
different federal and state pro- 
grams for financial aid. 

The most well known is the 
Department of Health, Educa- 
tion, and Welfare's Basic Grant 
Program Commonly known as 
"BEOG". The award is a grant 
and , unlike a loan, does not have 
to be repaid. It is intended to be 
the "floor" of a financial aid 
package. 

The amount of a Basic Grant is 
determined on the basis of your 
own and your family's financial 
resources. Your financial need is 
determined by the evaluation of 
your family's assets and debts 
from the proceeding year's in- 
come tax form. 

Various state grant programs 
are offered also. This year alone, 
$60 million has been appropriated 
by the U.S. government to be 
made available thru The State 
Student Incentive Grant program 



^hoto C 



ontest Winner 



f 11 



(SSIG). The requirements for the 
SSIG award vary from state to 
state depending upon your resi- 
dence. Some states allow usage 
of the award only at a public 
college. Others require you to 
remain instate to receive your 
grant. So check your individual 
state's requirements. Contact the 
scholarship agency in your state 
capital. 

For specific information on the 
SSIG program in Tennessee and 
Georgia, contact the Tennessee 
State Assistance Corp., 746 
Cordell Hall Building, Nashville. 
TN, 37219, or Georgia State 
Scholarship Commission, 9 
LaVista Perimeter Park, Suite 
110, 2187 North Northlake 
Parkway, Atlanta, Georgia 30084. 

In recent years some colleges 
have made available long-term 
loans at low interest rates and 
with tolerable repayment plans. 
Most of these plans don't require 
payment until nine months after 



graduation or discontinuation of 
college. 

If you find yourself unable to 
qualify under any of these pro- 
grams, you might try civil or 
religious organizations. Many 
offer scholarship to worthy or 
exceptional students. Many 
business companies offer some 
type of scholarship programs for 
employees or their children. 

Many banks, credit unions, and 
insurance companies offer college 
loan programs. Usually these 
loaners charge the highest inter- 
est rates -- so beware. 

Some questions you should 
have answered before you as- 
sume any loans are: v 

What is the simple interest on 
this loan? 

W hai is the total payback- 
principal plus all interest? 

Are there any extra charges -- 
any penalties for paying the con- 
tract in advance? 

Does this loan contain a 



"balloon clause," under which a 
larger payment is added on, at 
the end? 

Does the contract include any 
clauses for "wage assignments" 
or "garnishing" under which the 
lender can ask your employer to 
take out payments for your loan 
in case of default? 

Are there any other restrictions 
or "small print"? 

Remember, read everything 
before you sign anything, since 
you'll be paying for it in the long 

For additional information on 
student financial aid, write 
BEOG, P.O. Box 84, Washington, 
D.C.. 20044. Ask for a copy of the 
"Student Guide". 

And remember, under any of 
the above mentioned programs, 
you may be required to work at a 
student job. It's also another way 
of helping to meet the rising cost 
of a college education and it 
sure helps. 



iiniiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiitiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirimiiiiiimniiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiins 

Battie Creek Sanitariom Hospital | 

197 North Washington Ave. 1 

Battle Creek, MI 49016 | 

k An equal opportunity employer .^ i 

^ Recruiting program for health professionals ^ B 

If you are seeking challenges in nursing-related fields U 

and want to work in a modern SDA hospital, we're = 

seeking YOU. | 

Check the Nursing Administration Office for more § 

information, and we'll keep you posted. Our personnel = 

representative, Dovie Knecht will be on campus Nov. 2 h 

and 3 to discuss: summer work program § 

scholarship assistance = 

employment application = 



T g y^ffSwS gjff ilfnpiSfflS r 



8ay HartweU, senior theology in^ir, won lie Soathem Accent Photography Contest. ihrl«: SIS. 
1 AH haU! 



The Rocking R's Shop 




Will Your Boss Give You 
A $100 Raise Tomorrow? 



You may be working for the 
wrong person and limiting your 
earning ability. 

Be your own boss. Work your 
own hours and enjoy a newly 
found freedom, both personal and 
financial, with Shaklee. 

If you are serious about in- 
creasing your income, contact the 
Shaklee Distributors at this phone 




396-2566 






Our progressive, modern 63-bed hospital offers the newly 
graduated nurse opportunity for development of leadership 
skills plus variety in nursing experience. We are located in a 
small, friendly town in wooded hills. A new SDA church is 
being built. There is an eight grade church school near the 
hospital, and liberal fringe benefits. For more information 
call or write: 



Manchester, Ky. 40962 
(606) 598-5104 



^II^B»^^ ^ ^ 



iMMMM^^^^I^^ 



DISCOVER YOUR CREDIT UNION 

We're doing more for you 

COLLEGEDALE CREDIT UNION 

College plaza 




Phone: 396-2101 '"' "^ { 

Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday - Friday ^ 

6-7 p.m. Monday and Thursday ~ 



^t^^^^^ti^t^*^^^^^ 



8 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ThoitKUy, October 27, 1977 



They're Head Over 
o Heels About Tumbling 



Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



|9 



Photos by Eddie Uogshore 




Eleven academies were guests 
of SMC's Tumbling Team Clmic 
last Friday through Sunday. 
Bass Memorial. Pisgah. Oakwowi 
College Georgia-Cumberland, 
Highland Fletcher Greater 
Miami Shenandoah Valley 
Madison Forest Lake And Col 
legedale academies attended 

The students divided into 
groups and the instructors taught 
some basic skills for each appar 



atus Some of the apparatus 
categories were: uneven bars, 
balance beam, trampoline, rings, 
and parallel bars. 

Randy Mills, coach at Eastern 
Michigan Umversity supervised 
action on the parallel bars 

Linda Adams from Eastern 
Michigan Umversity taught the 
giris some new floor exercises 
with music 




lAbovej/ Coach Dean W I 
I men's dean at Pisgah ^ j 
demy, spots a back flip 
Right: Linda Adams a sopho- 
more PE major at Eastern 
Michigan University does a 
split on the balance beam 
Far Right: Randy Mills and 
Linda Adams, special guests 
of last weekend's gymnastics 



clinic. 




the 



Time: 



•Debbe Hartsock 
6 mile run for 
42 43 00. 

♦Grace Grant won the Women's 
1 mile run. A hearty hand- 
shake to her, 
Joshua Zarandona won third 
place in the 6 mile Cross- 
country run. Congratulations 



Evans Beats 
Student In 
Court 

Ted Evans defeated Mark 
Tuuri in a semifinal tennis game 
Friday. Mark took the first set by 
holding service three times and 
breaking service three times. The 
score was 6-0, advantage Tuuri, 
Then Evans fought back in the 
second set to even the match at 
one set apietfe by winning 6-4. 
In the deciding third set, Tuuri 
won the first two games, but 
Evans won the next five. I 

The third and fourth games | 
went into deuce scores. The i 
volleying was excellent. Both 
players were hitting solid ground. 
The fifth, sixth, and seventh 
games went to Evans with scores 
of 45-15. 

The eighth game was won by 
Tuuri as he fought back to stay in 
the game. Evans was now lead- 
ing 5-33. The ninth game was to 
be the final game as Ted Evans 
won the game set, match; 0-6, 
6-4, 6-3. 

Next, Halversen and Evans 
meet for the Final Big One. which 
ought to be interesting. 



Zarandona's First Taste Of Competition Savory 



DJack Kovalski 

We have an Olympic runner 
right here on campus 1 Well, 
maybe not exactly, but even 
'though the name Joshua Zaran- 
dona doesn't compare with such 
names as Frank Shorter and 
Lasse Viren, he shows the promi- 
nence of a promising runner -- 
that is, if his first time in competi- 
tion running last week is any 
indication as to his potential. 

This past Sunday, the Athletic 
Attic cross-country was held, 
sponsored by the Chattanooga 
Track Club and the Athletic Attic. 
It started and ended here on the 
SMC campus. The competition 
was open to anyone who thought 
that they might have the ambition 
or strength to run in either the 
one mile or six mile cross-country 



The race was divided into var- 
ous classes depending upon age. 



therefore making it a fair race. 
Zarandona signed up for thq six 
mile cross-country run and was 
registered ia dass "B" which 
included all men ages 17 to 23. 
Josh moved up almost immedi- 
ately into sixth place over all. 
At the two mile point, he moved 
up to fifth place, a position he 
kept throughout the entire race 
until the last stretch, when he put 
it in gear, finishing fourth over all 
and capturing third place in his 
class. Bear in mind that this was 
Zarandona's first taste of compe- 
tition alongside seasoned cross- 
country runners. 



After the race 1 spoke with 
Zarandona and learned some en- 
lightening facts. To begin with, 
he has been long-distance run- 
ning consistantly for approxi- 
mately two and a half years, but 
has enjoyed long-distance run- 



ning since his freshman year in 

academy. 

"I was a little shrimp, and 
wanted to be good at something," 
Zarandona said. His definition 
of running includes seven to fif- 
teen miles daily and sometimes 
even 20 or more, if the spirit 
moves him. What does he do 
during this time? "I study Greek 
flashcards, think, and often talk 
to God, " he said. "Running 
clears my mind, helps me get 
away from pressure and think 
straight." 

Zarandona detests running the 
oval track out on the field, and 
instead prefers running* on the 
roads that surround Collegedale 
and the campus. Doing this has 
brought some interesting experi- 
ences. One that still stands out 
vividly in his mind is what hap- 
pened to him the day after be- 



coming a U.S. citizen. (He was 
bom in Cuba-)^ He was running 
down the roadside against traffic 
and a car came into view. 
Zarandona finds that most drivers 
he meets on the road are quite 
friendly and usually return the 
wave of greeting he gives to all 
motorists. This car, however, "a 
nasty blue Falcon with two kids, ' ' 
proved to be different. As it 
approached Joshua, a passenger 
opened his door, attempting to 
knock him Off balance and forcing 
him to "do a mighty quick side 
stepl" 

Then of course, there are those 
same dogs who always chase him. 
They actually are the initiative 
that spurs him on to finish his run 
without stopping, because Zaran- 
dona fears they'll make a snack 
out of him if they ever catch him. 
Now a senior theology major, 
Zarandona not only believes in 



good health principles^,but also 
practices them. He has abstained 
from eating anything containiog 
sugar for six years in an effort to 
keep his mind clear. He feels it is 
also fitting since it is for Gods 
glory. 

Now that Zarandona has gotten 
his taste of competition, he hopes 
and plans to be able to do it more. 
Let's all wish him good luck as he 
endeavors to prove that uphold- 
ing the health principles wiii 
make him a better runner. 



I Attention GIrlsl 

3 The Yankees 

I won the Worid Series. 

Jkxt wiwwwwni ximuxittstinii 



Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, TN 37315 




EX-NATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 







?v -^'^^ 



The Southern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 



The Artist Adventure Series will present Dick and Anne Albin in 
a concert at the P.E. Center Nov. 5 at 8 p.m. The Albins toured 
most of the country doing concerts and workshops on dulcimers 
and on folk music. 

A love for folklore and Kentucky's traditions has led them to 
collect songs and stories which they blend into a concert 
including much of Kentucky's culture. 

Their concert, called "Makin Do With What You Have," 
recalls the times when people built their own houses, made their 
own clothes, grew their own food, and made their own entertain- 
ment. 



Wo 



men s 



Resid 



ence 



Becomes Bachelor Pad 



DJim Guy 

In one week Jones Hall, now 
evacuated by the women, will 
open its doors again. 

This time Jones will be used as 
non-dormitory, on-campus, 
housing for men 25 and over. 
There will be no deans and no 
RA's. Jones will be considered 
strictly as another housing area. 

The men will have their choice 
of one or two man rooms. A one 
man room will cost the same as 
regular dorm rent -- $67, and a 
two man room will cost the same 
as the regular Jones rent -- $47. 

All of the house rules have not 

been worked out yet. The pro- 
spective occupants will probably 
have a voice in making the rules, 
explains Everett Schlisner, dean 
of men. 

According to Dean Melvin 
Campbell, there are more than 
two dozen men over age 25. 

The move to Jones wDI be 
voluntary. If everyone 25 and 



over moves to Jones, the crowded 
3-man-to-a-room situation in 
Talge will be solved. 

"You just really can't find a 
housing deal like this in the com- 
munity," commented Campbell. 

Circle K Gives 
One The Road 

D Kenneth Andrews 

Several members of the Circle 
K Club barricaded and directed 
traffic last week while others 
painted the speed bumps on the 
Industrial Road and the one in 
front of Jones Hall. The bumps 
were painted with yellow traffic 
paint which is visible for about 
200 feet. 

The Circle K is a service 
organization sponsored by the 
Kiwanis International. The 
club's purpose is to serve the 
community and SMC. 



Thursday, November 3, 1977 



CoUegedale, Tenn. 




25-Foot Hands To 
Clasp On Campus 



D Jerry Dick Lien 

Last year the Board of Trustees 
voted unanimously to accept the 
Praying Hands statue when it was 
offered to the college by Arctor 
M. Contreras, a noted Mexican 
artist. The offer stipulated that if 
someone would finance the cost of 
materials, then Contreras would 
make the piece of art. 

Several subscribers were in- 
terested in seeing the grounds of 
the College graced with the work 
of Contreras. The College itself is 
not monetarily involved in the 
project. 

Composed of cast silver and 
gold bronze, the statue portrays a 
pair of hands, symbolically those 
of God, folded over a heart. A 
drop of blood issues from the 
heart. 

In this figurative way, the 
monumnet is to be a reminder 
that man is still in the hands of 
God and that His heart was 
broken through the passion of 
Christ for humanity. 

The statue is 25 feet high, 16 
feet wide, and approximately six 



feet thick. Its tentative location 
on campus is on the campus 
entrance mall between the white 
Southern Missionary College 
marker and the first row of 
shrubbery. 

Materials for the base were 
ordered about six weeks ago, and 
word has been received that the 
statue is nearing completion. 

Contreras is also the creator of 
the largest piece of art work in the 
Western Hemisphere which is lo- 
cated at one of the government 
buildings in Mexico City. 

According to Dr. Frank Knittel, 
the Praying Hands should arrive 
on campus approximately by the 
end of January. 

In an interview published in 
Hie Sonthem Accent March 11, 
1976, Dr. Knittel stated that, 
'There are really two reasons 
why I think this monument can be 
important to SMC. First of all, it 
will be a contributing factor to the 





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^ 


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i|i 


pi 


1 


1 




if 



Praying Hands Statne 



aesthetic dimension of this 
school, and also I think it is a very 
strong factor in symbolizing 
something that this school stands 
for." 



Statement Billing 
Changes With Times 



a Curtis McCrillis 

Louesa Peters, assistant trea- 
surer in the Accounting Office, 
stated that the statement charges 
this year would be different from 
previous years. Because of the 
billing changes, many Students 
and parents are confused. 

According to Peters, other Se- 
venth-day Adventist colleges, as 
well as public colleges and uni- 
versities, have been following 
similar plans for several years. 
She says the benefits far out- 
weigh any deficiency that might 
arise. 

The system operates as follows: 
Three installments are incurred 
during the semester.' These are 
due upon receipt of the state- 
ment. The first third was due 
Oct. 25. This was the amount due 
upon receipt of the September 
statement. The October state- 
ment, which is the second third, 
will be due by Nov. 25. The last, 
third, the November statement, 
will be due before semester exam; 
permits are issued. 

The second semester state- 
ments will operate the same way 
in three monthly payments. The 
student's account will be con- 
sidered delinquent, or past due, 
on the 26th of each month. 



The benefits, mentioned ear- 
lier, are comprised of the fol- 
lowing: Parents will find it much 
easier to plan their budget ahead 
if the enfire semester's cost is 
known. Most other colleges tend 
to require full payment before the 
student even registers. 

If payments are met on time, 
there will be no charge upon 
receipt of the December state- 
ment to be paid during January. 
This leaves families financially 
secure over the holiday season. 
No payment would be required 
until the January statement came 
out. This statement will include 
all overhead charges for Decem- 
ber (unless these were taken care 
of by student labor.) 

A change has also occurred 
concerning the monthly discount 
of 2 percent if the payment is met 



by the deadline. No discount 
exists any longer. However, the 
total tuition itself has been re- 
duced to compensate for the 
change. This change brings a- 
bout financial equality for the 
financially unstable student as 
well as the student who is secure 
in this area. 

A rebate is available for the 
family who has two or more young 
people enrolled. Those with two 
family members enrolled will re- 
ceive a five per cent rebate on the 
total overall semester tuition, and 
those having three or more en- 
rolled, will receive a rebate of 10 
per cent. To qualify for these 
rebates, each of the students 
must currently be taking eight or 
more semester hours, and they 

'nira to p. 2, col. 1 



• Behind Page One- 



Monnd Of Earth Mystery Solved p. 2 

Face Xeroiing Fad Strikes SMC p. 3 

Talglans Rescue Wounded Dog p. 6 

Halloween Candlds p. 7 



2 . THE SOBTHKRN ACCENT nimd»y. November 3, 1977 




Sundial Foreshadowed On 
Thatcher's Mound Of Earth 



DJetiy Dick Lien 

On the mound of earth which 
lies between the Thatcher Hall- 
parking lot and the street there 
has been a good deal of activity of 
late with digging and erection of 
some rather large rocks. 

Some have wondered if this is 
to be the location for the some- 
what controversial sacred heart 
sculpture (see article p. 1). 

Actually, it will be a garden 
centered by a sundial. Upon 
completion, this will be the 
beauty spot envisioned by the 
graduating class of 1965. 

The class gift of money for a 
sundial, remembered by the Col- 
lege's historian and late executive 
secretary of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, Mabel Wood, is now being 
put to use. 

According to grounds director, 
Charles Lacy, it took some time to 
make a selection for the location 

NEW STATEMENTS 

cont. from p. 1.— 



of the dial, but the area near 
Thatcher Hall was finally chosen. 

The garden will have all dwarf 
plantings. "We have to do this so 
that there will be no shade on the 
dial. After all, a sundial that's in 
the shade isn't much use," com- 
mented Lacey. 

Included in the plans for the 
garden will be a freeze-proof 



drinking fountain. Also, there 
will be seats for students and an 
. ornamental walk or wall around 
the base of the dial. The sundial 
is supposed to be one of the most 
accurate available. 

Partial completion of the gar- 
den is projected for this winter, 
and full completion will be by 
next fall. 



European Offers 
College Credit Tour 



must be from the same immediate 
family under the care of the same 
financial supporter. 

Further ii^ormation on these 
matters can be found in the SMC 
bulletin, pp. 158, 159. 

In addition, the Accounting Of- '' 
fice says that other expenses, 
such as the Campus Shop, Ad- 
ventist Book Center, etc. , should 
be taken care of by the earnings 
from the student's work program. 
The Campus Shop has a limit of 
$125 for the first semester, and 
$75 for second semester. Stu- 
dents who feel that their needs 
may exceed these amounts, need 
to see the Student Finance per- 
sonnel for further arrangements. 



D Dennis Starkey 

A three week central European 
study tour will be conducted next 
summer by Dr. Rudolf Aussner, 
professor of modem languages. 

Among the nations to be visited 
are Switzerland , Austria, Czecho- 
slovak!. West Germany, Liechten- 
stein, East Germany, and Luxem- 
bourg. The tour is open to all who 
are interested from a junior in 
academy and on up. 

Thd group will depart from 
New York City on May 17 for the 
small country of Luxembourg. 
When they arrive, they'll board 
the bus which will be their trans- 
portation for the next three 
weeks. One of the first stops will 
be in Luxembourg, visiting the 
grave of General Patton. Some of 
the other highlights along the way 
include a stop in Worms, the ci^ 
where Martin Luther defended 
himself, the famous Matterhom 
in Switzerland, the Berlin Wall, 
Maria Theresian Stadt, a World 
War 11 concentration camp in 



'• 



Czechoslovakia, and Hitler's 
mountaintop retreat in Austria, 
known as the Eagle's Nest. 

In addition to the historical 
sights, some of the cultural e- 
vents to be attended include an 
opera in Vienna and a concert in 
Berlin. 

Sabbath hours will be spent at 
SDA institutions, with the first 
being at our college in Darmstadt, 
West Germany, the second at 
Seminar Bogenhofen in Austria, 
and the last behind the Iron Cur- 
tain in East Germany, hopefully 
at the SDA college in Friedensau, 
if granted permission by the 
government. 

Dr. Aussner, who has led out 
on these tours in years past, feels 
right at home in that pari: of the 
world, as he is a native of West 
Germany and lived' in Vienna for 
five years. 

The cost of the trip is approxi- 
mately $1000, which covers air 
fare to and from New York, all 
transportation in Europe, hotel 
Tom to p. 6, col. 1 



The Rocking R's Shop 

8039 EAST BRAD^feRD ROAD \ 

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EVERYTHING 25% OFF 

WESTERNWEAR 'jEANS \ 

I I \ TURTLEBAX 

SQUAREDANCING CLOTHES \ 

*V ■ I X \ 

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CUSTOM SEWING AND 
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YOU BOTH NEED 
UFE INSURANCE 



Managing a household is a 
big job, even lor two 
people. Thai's why both 
of you need insurance 
protection ... to provide 
financial support in the 
event that one of you 
suddenly finds yourself 
alone. Ask me about State 
Farm life insurance ... for 
BOTH of you. 



Fred Fuller 

CoUegedale Agent 



nursira 

ncuii 



DMark Rumsey 

Nursing students from SMC 
will attend the first southern As- 
sociation of Seventh-day Adven- 
tist Nurses (ASDAN) retreat Nov. 
4-6. RN's, LPN's, and their 
families will spend the weekend 
at Indian Creek Camp, Liberty, 
Tenn. 

The objective of the retreat is to 
provide an opportunity for 
ASDAN members and others to 
join in group worship, sharing of 
experiences, learning, and re- 
creation. Among the benefits of 
attending will be the opportunity 
to acquire Continuing Education 
Units (CEU), courses that keep 
the nurse informed and updated 
her profession. 

Along with ASDAN officers. 
Southern Union leaders, and 



General Conference personnel, 
several faculty members will have 
a part in the programs. 

Dr. Lorenzo Grant, professor of 
religion, will speak for the 7:30 
Friday evening meeting. Ina 
Longway, director of the Division 
of Nursing, will lead the Sabbath 
School lesson study. On Sunday 
morning, Jan Rushing, professor 
of business and management, will 
present a CEU "Program on 
Management." 

Alice Smith, General Confer 
ence executive director of 
ASDAN, will conduct the Sabbath 
church service. 

For the early-risers, a bird 
watching session is scheduled for 
Sabbath morning at sunrise. 



Bemadine Irwin, associate pro- 
fessor of nursing, was recently 
accepted toattendgraduate school 
in San Diego, Calif. Irwin, who 
received her masters degree from 
Loma Linda University in 1974, 
will be working toward her Ph.D. 
in behavioral science. She 
teaches a class in psychiatric nur- 
sing here at SMC. 



Christine Shultz from the nur- 
sing department is attending the 
Council of Associate Degree A- 
gencies of the National League for 
Nurses during this week. 

The councU will be held in St. 
Louis, MO, where they will dis- 
cuss the expectations of the A.D, 
graduate in nursing. 



D Roland Joy 

Ina Longway, director of the 
Division of Nursing, attended the 
Southern Regional Educational 
Board on Collegiate Education for 
Nursing in Atlanta. 

The Nursing Council meets 
twice a year to upgrade nursing 
education in the 14 southern 
states. 

Longway was at the program in 
Atlanta from Oct. 26 thru 28. The 
council discussed clinical educa. 
tion. 




Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



x'NATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



fiiiiiiiiiii 1IIII1IIIIIII 11IIIJ iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii mill "'"""f 



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Battle Creek Sanitarium Hospital 
197 North Washington Ave. 
Battle Creek, MI 49016 
jqual opportunity employer J^ 

Recruiting program for health professionals ^ 

If you are seeking challenges in nursing-related fields 
and want to work in a modern SDA hospital, we're 
seeking YOU. 

Check the Nursing Administration Office for more 
information, and we'll keep you posted. Our personnel 
representative, Dovie Knecht will be on campus Nov. 2 
and 3 to discuss: summer work program 

scholarship assistance 

employment application 

iiiiiiuiiiniuimiiiiiiiiiiinniiiimiuiiiiDiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'"""""" 



Pressed 
Fads? Copy 
Your Face! 



HiimHUy, Novembers, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



EAST LANSING, Mich. (UPI) - 
What's a college student to do 
when it's too cold to streak, cruel 
to swallow goldfish, and passe to 
stuff people into phone booths? 

Some Michigan State Univer- 
sity students may have invented 
the latest college craze: instant 
"Portraits" made by pressing 
their faces against photocopying 
machines. 

Secluded machines in the MSU 
library are the most popular face 
copying studios, especially for the 
shy or uninitiated. 

"You look around and make 
sure no one is looking," MSU 
veterinary student Charles Horo- 
witz said. 

"Then you put a nickel in the 
machine, close your eyes and 
press your face against the 
glass." ■ 

the results are a cross between 
posters for a carnival house of 
mirrors and those for a B-grade 
Japanese horror movie. 

"Your nose is distorted and it 
looks like you're trying to hold 
your breath," Horowitz said. 



I do It to impress ray fnends, " 
said 26-year-old Steve Roth a 
graduate student from San Fran- 
CISCO. "It's a good grin when 
you re feeling down. 

"I give them to my fnends to 
throw darts at and stuff. Plus it 
gives my face a good tan, with the 
heat and light and all." 

Roth considers himself in the 
vanguard of face copying, since 
he has been doing it for about a 
year. He is a connoisseur of the 
art and says some machines are 
better than others. 

"You've got to release your 
frustrations some way - it's like 
the old goldfish swallowing fad." 

Health officials said there 
probably is no real danger in face 
copying - as long as you keep 
your eyes closed. 

Dr. Marvin McKenney, an 
East Lansing eye doctor, said that 
even copiers which use ultraviolet 
light would not be harmful. 




SMC student Joins new college craze -- face xerodng. 



Oakwood Buys WSMC Antenna 



Sfudents Give Their 
Assurance In Blood 



□Mykal Ringstaff 

The Blood Assurance program, 
sponsored by CABL, is coming to 
SMC. The program is a national 
non-profit community service 
which offers free blood to its 
donors and their families for a 
period of one year following a 
blood donation. In order to be 
eligible a person need only to 
donate one pint of blood. 



When single students donate 
blood, the program will cover 



□Carlos Haylock 

WSMC-FM is selling an old 
antenna to Oakwood College, who 
soon hopes to have its own educa- 
tional FM station. 

Jerry Mathis, engineer for 
WSMC, is the coordinator of the 
Oakwood station project. He will 
supervise the purchase and the 
setting-up of the equipment for 
the station at Oakwood. 

Radio station WAUS at An- 



drews University has a transmit- 
ter and other pieces of radio 
equipment that have been re- 
placed and are not being used any 
more. Mathis is looking into this 

and if the equipment meets Oak- 
wood's specific needs, it will be 
purchased. 

A tower for the antenna still 
needs to be found. There are two 
possible alternatives. Either a 



tower can be purchased and 
lected, or space on another st 
tion's tower located nearby can be 
used. That decision is still 
pending. 



WOCG will be the call letta. 
assigned to the radio station at 
Oakwood. It will have 25,000 
watts of power and will serve the 
surrounding community- as far as 
50 miles away. 



their parents, brothers, sisters 
and themselves. When married it 
will cover the immediate family. 
The dates for the drive are Nov. 
10 and Dec. 1, between 9 a.m. 
and 5 p.m. The donations will be 
taken in the game room at the 
Student Center. A sign-up sheet 
is posted on the bulletin board at 
the Student Center. Please give 
the date and time when you would 
like to make your donation. For 
more information, contact CABL 
at 4673. 



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4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thnradiy, November 3, 1977 



Editorial 



-)„ I, ii ii iiii i i ii m i ii i i i i ii ii ii i ii im mmm««.«m^ .,„ 



One evening a couple of weeks ago while I was locking up the 
Student Center. I noticed some tjpe of mist or fog coming through 
the cracks between the doors leading down to the cafetena^ 
Upon opening these doors, I found the entire stairwell filled with 
this dense mist. „ . t 

Thinking there might be a problem in the cafetena, I called the 
campus securit>' base in Thatcher Hall right away and asked if they 
could get someone up there as soon as possible. 

Ten minutes later I found out from a cafeteria worker still on the 
premises that thev were fumigating, which accounted for all the 
mist and fog. Since the situation was obviously under control, 1 
called securin- back and told them to cancel the call. Laughingly, 
the Thatcher receptionist told me that it was a good thing that I 
didn't really need them because they couldn't get in touch with 
anyone on the securit\' force anyway. 

It's remarkable, vou know. Ask anyone that's involved in 
security operations what the key priorities are on the job, and you 
will consistantly find communication weaving its way into the scene. 

But then. « nal do we have here'? In ten minutes no one involved 
with the security of SMC could be located and informed about an 
apparent anomaly which was taking place in the largest and most 
central building on the campus. Not exactly an "A" rating. 

Eariier in the year a Collegedale policeman was slashed across 
the face by someone apparently trying to break into a building that 
the officer was checking. The report given the Accent stated that it 
was the efficiency of the communication system built into the police 
organization that brought aid to the bleeding officer and kept the 
situation under control. My question is: What if something were to 
happen here on this campus which demanded decisive, immediate 
action and none of the security forces which patrol our campus could 
be reached. We aren't exactly crime-ridden on this campus, but 
there are times when security action is necessary. Shouldn't we be 
prepared? 

There are a lot of rumors, depending on who you talk to, as to 
why the security department has the troubles that it has. Some say 
that the girls' deans object to the communication center being in 
Thatcher Hall and render the main radio just about useless by 
turning the squelch up to maximum. Another says that the security 
personnel sometimes leave campus on unauthorized trip': tn view 
emergencies that do not involve them and are not associated in any 
way with the security of the College. Yet another says the radios the 
guards are equipped with are useless around the tall buildings on 
campus. On thing is for certain, though. If we don't gel our 
security up to par. we may find out too late that SMC is a wicle open 
campus. 

bv Mark Ford 



The Southern Accent 



All material published in The Southern Accent is n 


01 necessarily the opinion or 


view ol the newspaper slaM or the SMC adminisirai 


on Cartoons, articles, and 


olher content items create an open exchange of ides 


IS. a (orum. In ihe case of 


disagreernenl . 'Lelters to the Editor/ ' is acolumn des 




We do, however, reserve the nghl nol to publis 


material that is libelous. 


extremely radical, or out of character m light of tJoctri 




the bearing ol a Christian SDA college newspaper. 





E^"" Vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Manager '.'.'.'.'.".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' Dave Middag 

UyoutEOilw Vanessa Greenleaf 

Layout Line-Up Randy Jotlnson 

Sports Editor I^utien Castillo 

Circulalion tvtenaeer John Henson 

Ss^s'anes PannLegere 

Oenise Stieets 

Ad Manager Ra, Hartwell 

Proolreaders Kalhy Mixell 

SjbocripliorB Candv Miranda 

*"™s Mart Ford 

Sandie i.enn 
PHotograKiers Rlxjnda Runyan 

Martr Ford 
Reporters jj,^ y^ 

t^wn Rice 
cjv^no^ Debby Boyer 

XP°'^^°' Frances Andrews 

'"'^ Felts Bros Printing Co., 

Oollewati, Tenn 



The Souttiem Accatil is publislwd weekly with the exceptic 



e 15 per year, inailed weekly from 



Please print this letter in Hie 
Sootlieii) Accent. 

Dear Guys, 

Tm sorry that 1 can't address 
this to each of you individually, 
but I wasn't able to meet you all 
by name, so it's Dear Guys, my 
ftiends. 

It's hard to put into words what 
or how a bus load of guys makes a 
giri feel. It really can't be done, 
but I'd like to thank you along 
with a unanimous female echo. 

You took a day. which you may 
have used in a more exciting 
adventure, just to be a friend and 
bring civilization from the male 
world into this, our more or less 
male less world. Thank you! 

All my life I've been told that 
the key to a man's heart is 
through his stomach; you came 
with an empty sto'mach and left 
with an emptier one; yet you gave 
unselfishly and brought joy to our 
woridi 

Thank you, and let's do it a- 
gain! 
Writing for the Madison women, 

Jan Whidden 



Dear Editor: 

I'd like to thank the person 
responsible (Service Dept. 
worker?) for writing those bible 
texts on the blackboards in 
Daniels Hall 24 and 111 - they're 
always inspirational! 



Letters To Tl 



Dear Editor: 



I would like to sound off about 
the noise problem in the library. 
I live in the village and have to 
use the library to study in be- 
tween classes. But, I find it very 
difficult to try and concentrate 
when someone else is talking; not 
in soft tones or whispers, but like 
they were the only people around. 

I can't seem to find a place that 
is quiet. 1 do not understand why 
college students do not know 
how. or have forgotten how to 



whisper. What seems even more 
perplexing is, we have a student 
center that has just been nicely 
redecorated and you can talk all 
you wish without disturbing thost 
who are trying to study. S( 
Please help out your fellow stu- 
dents in their classes by being 
quiet in the library. If you just 
have to tell your friend what 
happened to you Saturday night 
please go where you won't bt 
disturbing others. 

Thanks, 

Linda Woolcock 



Sin 



elv. 



n Rick Blonde 



Pace 



Dear Editor; 

It would be all well and good if 
we could blame our problems on 
the instructors. But on the other 
hand, let's suppose Albert 
Average is doing all right in his 
mudpie class, but having prob- 
lems with the paradigms. 

He's making beautiful mud- 
pies, but those other classes he's 
attending -- poor Albert is barely 
getting the assignments read sim- 
ply because his reading is so 
poor. Probably what he needs is a 
course to improve his reading 
and/or comprehension. 

From conversation with other 
students around campus, I do 
believe that a class of this sort 
would have no lack in attendance. 
Thank you. 
Patrick Ray 



Dear Editor; 

For the past few weeks I have 
noted some of the opinions ex' 
pressed about dress and code 
A number I agree with and a few I 
feel to be kind of legalistic. 

Instead of inwardly growling 
and biting at others whether cer 
tain material is acceptable, too 
much hair on the face or head etc, 
our main emphasis and picture 
should be, "Has my brother 
found that peace which passeth 
all understanding?" As Paul 
wrote; "Let this mind be ii 
which was also in Christ Je; 
What greater joy could there be 
than being conscientious of one 
another's needs, then setting out 
to fill them. Have we found the 
highest joy there is in ministering 
to others needs? Who needs 
greater revelation of God's love to 
others? I do. 
Stanley Thurmon 



Dear Editor 

I write this article to you with 
many tears in my voice, not to any 
one person in particular but. to 
the stiident body of SMC. 

As you alread'y know, the holi- 
day which is commonly called 
Halloween and celebrated 
throughout the country on Octo- 
ber 31st, was celebrated on this 
campus last Sunday on the 30th of 
October. On this date the cafe- 
teria was closed and festivities 
were held in the stiident park. 
Let me pause here to lay the back- 
ground as to the origin of Hallo- 



Halloween sprang from the 
Celtics, who had two major festi- 
vals . one for the sun god and the 
other for the god of the dead. 
This god of the dead was named 
Samhain. The latter was cele- 
brated on Oct. 31st thru Nov. 1st. 
In this celebration huge bon 
fires were set on hilltops to 
frighten away evil spirits. The 
souls of the dead were supposed 
to revisit their homes on this day. 
and the autumnal festival ac- 
quired sinister significance with 
ghost, witches, hobgoblins, black 
cats, fairies, and demons of all 
kinds said to be roaming about. 

In addition, Halloween was 

thought to be the most favorable 

time for divination concerning 

; marriage, luck, health, and 

; death. It was the only day on 



teaB»K:sn«aam»jstjKjja 



which the help <,f the devil was 
invoked for such purposes. No- 
vember I became All Saints Day 
on which these dead returning 

relatives were honored. On Nov. 
2. the Catholic church brought in 
the pictiire All Souls Day - a day 
in which you pray for the dead, 
especially for those who had died 
during that year. (Ency. Brit. Vol 
I, pp. 259-60.) 

As you can well see. the origin 
of Halloween is purely paganistic. 
My point is this; The student 
body goes all out for the cele- 
bration of a holiday whose origin 
of spiritualism is completely 
against the Bible doctrine of the 
state of the dead. 

You might well say, "That has 
no relevance, for we do not cele- 
brate Halloween today with that 
aspect in mind." Don't kid your- 
self. If you put a frog in hot 
water he will immediately jump 
out but. if you put him in cold 
water and heat it up gradually, 
before he knows it, it will be too 
late. 



Satan is gradually infiltrating 
the unguarded mind in prepara- 
tion for his last great deception. 
If a person were on the verge of 
joining God's time last day rem- 
nant church and they were to see 
this going on and ask why there 
are so many inconsistencies in the 



church, what could I say? The H 
main point in contrast is this; 
Oct. 31 receives a great deal of 
attention, but what of Oct. 22? 

Last week's Sabbath was the 
133rd year since Our High Priest 
stepped into the Most Holy Place 
of the heavenly sanctuary in order 
to finish the redemption He pur- 
chased on the cruel cross of Cal- 
vary. Our great forefathers Hi 
waited for that day to come for 
they thought Christ would soon | 
clasp theii hands on that journey 
home. A great disappointment 
soon followed, for they had mis- 
takenly interpreted the prophecy 
of Daniel 8;14, thinking at thai 
time Ihe earth was the sanchiary 
to be cleansed with fire. Hw 
sweet would it have been for th 
stiident body to arrange a praye 
group last Sabbath afternoon i" 
ponder and meditate on the pas | 
and to pray for the futiire. B" ■ 
that precious day passed throng 
our fingers as many souls lay j U 
the side of the path, dying J 
thirst, ■ 

"We have nothing to fear '" ' 
the future, except as we sn ^ 
forget the way the Lord has ^ 
us, and His teaching in our P 
history." LS 196. I a*" ',„, 



brothers and sisters, what ate 



nol 



-shamed of the gospel c 

for it is the power of God "Jj 

salvation to everyone that 



"'" " " "I »»»»»«««mmti«;n!!mm«t:a«n!»»^'''^' 



iditor 



he letter that 

Ik from "JB. 

■rived at the 



Lansing 
e's talking 



iJjmes B.Lansing 
(fd and is now 
f inventing 
fct which has 
lid still bears 



icle in Ann 
y thought it 

i'Y even worth re- 

[i'te it is: 

wtant desire, 
gds calling to 

that has 

; root and 

i time. 

Bed by a feel- 

i excited 

genuinely 

agging 

J questions, 

■about your 

^Id just as 



soon not examine too closely. 
It might spoil the dream. 

Love is the quiet understanding 
and mature acceptance of imper- 
fection. It is real. It gives you 
strength and grows beyond you - 
to bolster your beloved. You are 
warmed by his presence, even 
when he is away. Miles do not 
separate you. You want him 
near. But near or far, you know 
he is yours and you can wait. 

Infatuation says, "We must get 
married right away. I can't risk 
losing him." 

Love says. "Be patient. Don't 
panic. He is yours. Plan your 
future with confidence." 

Infatuation has an' element of 
sexual excitement. If you are 
honest, you will admit it is diffi- 
cult to be in one another's com- 
pany unless you are sure it will 
end in intimacy. Love is the 
maturation of friendship. You 
must be friends before you can be 
lovers. 

Infatuation lacks confidence. 
When he's away, you wonder if 
he's cheating. Sometimes you 
even check. 

Love means trust. You are 
calm, secure and unthreatened. 
He feels that trust and it makes 
him even more trustworthy. 



Infatuation might lead you to 
do things you'll regret later, but 
love never will. 

Love lifts you up. It makes you 
lookup. It makes you think up. It 
makes you a better person than 
you were before. 

Sincerely, 

Jerry Holt, The People's Party 



I _ greatly appreciated the indi- 
vidual(s) who filled in the craters 
in the front Thatcher Hall parking 
lot. 

Not only did I almost lose my 
car in one of the excavations 
recently but one rainy night back 
in May I turned my ankle and 
almost drowned in the other! 

I thought of filling those cav- 
ities myself with letters from the 
Dean of Students. However, 
some kind soul(s) has finally filled 
the chasms with tar. So, I guess 
I'll attend Chapel regularly and 
forget my mailbox combination. 

Wanda Patsel 




Thnreday, November 3, 1977 THE SOUTHEKN ACCENT - 5 

Campus Cfo2Si|5iGc(s 

9 Did you know that on Nov. 7 a list of all deliquent accounts is going to be sent to the 
teachers? For those who have not paid or if you do not know where your account 
stands, please contact the Student Finance Office immediately. 396-4332 

• WANTED: ALIVE - One lO-speed bicycle in decent condition for decent price 

^°q"/iV.". ""^'^^^ ^°'' '^"'"S- ''"^ •" '^^ ""^^^^^ fo"- b"y*"g- John 396-4673 days 
or 396-2214 evenings. 

• RIDE NEEDED! To Goldsboro. North Carolina (or close by) for Christmas Vacation. 
Earliest 1 can leave is Dec. 19-9 a.m. Can and will help with driving and expenses 
Contact: Bob. box 123 or phone 4712 (If not in. leave message with roommate or with 
front desk 4391) Thanks! 

• FAR EAST CLUB CAMPOUT - Nov. 4-6. The registration fee of $7 00 includes 
lodging and five meals. The deadline for this fee is Wednesday. Nov 2 
Dorm students give money to Russell Gilbert, community members to Patrick Tsui or 
the Greves. Please arrange your own transportafion. If this is not possible, call 
Patrick at 396-2513 and he will arrange something for you. The group will leave 
Friday at 1:00 p.m. for Atoka Springs. You may arrive anytime before sundown. 

9 Florida! One seat left to the great sunshine state of Florida! Take a weekend break 
without having to spend most of it in a packed car traveling. Enjoy the luxury of a 
chartered flight without the expense. Call 4906, Don Ashlock or leave a note in my 
box (Talge. A-5). 

• Mrs. Brown - the marigolds look great in front of Talge. Thanks for a cheery dorm. 



9 "Did you know there is not a single roach in my room?" 
"Oh really!?" 
"Yes, they are all married and have very large families!!" 

% Are your weekends too short to go home? Try Flying -- from the Collegedale Aero 
Service. In four hours a Cessna 172 will take four people about 500 miles -- And 
Smokey Bear won't care. 

9 Due to the fact that there is not much dating on campus, the SA Academic Activities 
will sponsor a short film Friday noon m the banquet room in order to encourage the 
greater stimulation for dating. The film. "What To Do On A Date" is guaranteed to 
bring you enjoyment. Also, see your old favorite Curious George in, "Curious 
George Rides A Bike" and be frightened with the cartoon. "Trick Or Treat" 

Help! Damsel in distress' I need a ride to the Lonia Linda/La.Sierra area to arrive 
(here in tit" T^^r n L'i'tr-ifinn for the winter quarter Jan. 3 (Leaving here after Thrist 
mas) I'll help with gas and driving. I'll bring cookies. Til sing. I'll be quiet -- 1 need 
' a ride! If .>uu liavL luoni, please ^all 396-4525 for Kay Campbell. 



ad you like it. but you'll have to work for the other half. 



SojtE Has. AlXWAfiftiTe Coi,-^oU\€. 



^ Dear Bearded One; 
The Basket Giver 

^ Dear Missle-Town Monkey. Thanks for the good time last Thursday tiight. 
Ms. Boobocker 

Dear Eugene and Obed: We will get you yet. Chinita and Indiecita 

Dear 60868. Congratulations on your physiology grade! Sincerely, 89294 

% Help!! Ride to Miami desperately needed for five. Leaving Dec. 19; or ride back to 
Collegedale on Jan. 8; or both. We will help with driving and gas. Please call; 
396-4636 or leave message in Box 371 Thatcher. Call any time (day or night) 

#The Wright Brothers take to the air again. Look out KITTY HAWK! 

NUBSING STUDENTS Don't wait until you are a senior to look over the various 
hospitals. Avoid the mad scramble and start contacfing hospitals now. Look for their 
ads in The Southern Accent. 

Happy Birthday L.P.F., Love Jet 

# A Joker correction! Dan Garza is listed in Talge, but he is married and lives in the 
village. 

A thank you to Kathy, Melonie, Sharon, Sa'jidie, and Cindy for the smashing 
strawberry pie you gave me, on my birthday. Love, Jim 

Got a refridge to sell or rent? Call 4191 

Missing; An umbrella left in SC 102 several weeks ago. Orange, tan, navy, and 
green panels with a light colored wood handle. Call 4106 or 396-2498. 

Anyone goint to or near Wisconsin {Chicago. Minnesota, or Michigan) for 
- Thanksgiving Vacation and has room for riders, please call 4512 or 4401! 
Thank you! 

To the person who ■.Mlc Bob Wilson's calculator right out of the library. 
I hope Lewi upstairs remembers that oil the Judgement Day and I hope you feel 
, guilty. 

I lost a blue interaction nursing workbook in the C.K. If you found it please return it. 
Becky 698-2386. 

A big belated Happy Birthday to Vanessa. With love, from Cindy. 



!V 



6 - THE SOCTHEKN ACCENT Iliynday, November 3, 19T7 



3 




Endowed 



who. 
Putting self aside. 
Makes room for 

the working of the Holy Spirit 

upon his heart and 

Lives a life wholly consecrated to God. 

All who consecrate 
body, 
soul, and 
spirit 

to His service 
Will be constantly receiving 
a new endowment of 
physical, 
mental, 
and spiritual power. 



Phone Booth 



Cramming --SMC Style 



Christ gives them 

the breath of His ( 
the life of His own 



I Spirit, 



The Mlnlstiy Of Healing 



EUROPEAN TOUR cont. from p. 2_ 

accomodations, admissious to 
special events, and breakfasts, 
with two meals a day provided 
behind the Iron Curtain. Three 
hours of college credit are avail- 
able at no extra cost. 
Those interested should start 



preparing for the trip immedi- 
ately, as the size of the group is 
limited to about 25 and it takes 
some time to obtain passports. 
The application deadline is March 
31 and a S50 deposit is required to 
reserve your spot on the tour. 




Who 'sin Control Here? 



Where does the Christian Way 
find its manifestation today? It 
finds its ultimate display in the 
Laodicean or Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist movement, the last pro- 
phetic period of Christian history 
before the Second Advent. 

The Laodicean message pre- 
sents three gifts to man -- the 
gold of faith and love, the white 
garments of the righteousness of 
Christ and the eyesalve of spir- 
itual discernment The Holy Spir- 
it brings these treasures to those 
who truly desire them, so one 
must ask why are these eternal 
gifts not desired. The answer is 
simple yet sad - we are apa- 
thetic and lethargic, contented 
with the materialism of the age. 

The definition of dogma tends 
to end in minutiae as thousands 
perish with a hopeless tomorrow. 
Schismatic movements arise to 
call the "true people" out while 
they themselves are heading for 
dissolution and declension. 

Dwelling among us are those 
agents of Satan who lament the 
condition of the movement and 
advocate that division is coming. 
This is the subject of their think 
ing and it becomes their lifework 
to worr> about it and to weary 



everyone else with their nega- 
tivism. 

Who controls the movement- 
men or the Amen? There is 
coming a division. All of those 
who have not accepted the coun- 
sels of the True Witness and are 
not living them by the Holy Spirit 
will abandon the movement when 
the storm hits. 

The movement will be shaken 
to its core, and only those who 
have made the Word of God their 
foundation of faith and practice 
will survive as their brethren per- 
ish with the multitudes of the lost. 
Uodicea will see the blessed 
hope of the Second Advent. The 
primary question is will you be in 
it or out of it when the appointed 
time comes? 

The fiiture is as certain as the 
sunrise of tomorrow. Don't be 
deceived by the apostles of apos- 
tasy among us or the wonders of 
deception around us. The Amen, 
the Creator-Saviour, has spoken 
through His Word and His Testi- 
mony, and it shall come to pass 
Not one iota will fail. 

For further study: Desire of 
Ase», p. 518-523; Second Selec- 
ted Mesaage., p. 13-170; 357-408- 
and TeaOmoiiIea to Ministers. 




Back in the Fifties the big thing 
to do around campus in your 
spare time (and a lot of students 
took more than they had), was to 
see how many people you could 
cram into a telephone booth. 
Often, VW's were used in these 
social functions as a happy, port- 
able alternative when there was 
no phone booth to be found. 

Well, despite the fact that this 
is not the Fifties, and this isn't 
Howard or Yale, the trends of 



craming still continue on our fair 
campus. SMC has its own version 
of cramming, though it's a bit 
more academic — seeing how 
many people can cram into the 
C.K. 

I mean, have you ever gone 
down to get something to eat and 
have to wait 20, 30, 40 minutes 
and have to sit at a table with 
M.J. Bryant (whom you didn't 
know any better than the man on 
the moon) and listen to him talk 
about his column and the mail 
room when you could really care 
less? All you really want is less 
crowding, less shoving, less 
noise, a friendly face and the 
non-Adventist visitors to observe 
the NO SMOKING sign - and 
some service! 

I've been aware and concerned 
about this problem for quite some 
time now. Just what can be done 
about this college-ordained situ- 
tion? 

The three main factors to take 
into consideration are money, 
space, and time. But there are 
several other factors you should 



know also before you jump to any 
fast conclusions. 

The first in this series of facts is 
that the staff is very aware of the 
problem and is seeking a solution. 
You also have to remember that 
you only see it from the cus- 
tomer's out-front point of view. 




Let's go in back and expand your 
horizons. 

Mr. E. Evans, from the cafe- 
teria, who has control over the 
whole matter, said, "If an ef- 
ficiency expert came in and ex- 
amined the problem, he might 
conclude: it is good to keep the 
students happy (because they are 
the main source of business) and 
have a large menu, but for the 
number of people served and the 
equipment and space to do the 



job, to be more efficient, you 
would have to cut over one third 
of the menu." 

The second thing you might 
consider as an answer to the 
problem is to build a second story 
on the mall. But before you could 
do this you would have to check 
the blueprint and see if the 
foundation was laid deep enough 
(which it probably is not). 

Another consideration is to 
build another C.K. to go with the 
one we already have. Nope - it'd 
cost to much money! Where 
would the money 
From you, through tuition and 
things like that. 

Still another idea is to let the 
lease run out on the Wash-a-teria 
and take it over and extend the 
C.K. all the way to the back of die 
dry cleaners. And then we would 
need a new place to do our wash. 

A last and final alternative is 
(and this is not my idea) that we 
could expand the C.K. forward as 
a sidewalk cafe and fold it in at 
night. But if this were done, we 
would have to lay out the parking 
lot differently. 

The parting thought I want to 
leave you with this week, my 
faithful column followers, is this: 
Although I write a light, hu- 
morous, informative column, and 
intentionally stay away from con- 
troversial issues (because they're 
editorials, and I'm not an editor), 
I still wanted you to know that no 
matter what is done about the 
C.K. and other similar- problems, 
there is always going to be some- 
one who won't be happy. 



A llcl$ Anci 4 Wai^ f rem Cir^er 



DDebby Boyer 

Ginger, a miniature collie, had a 
rather devastating experience last 
Sunday night in Collegedale. She 
wandered away from home for a 
romp and became the victim of a 
hit and run accident about 7:30 
p.m. ShehobbledtoastairweUin 
Talge Hall and collapsed. David 
Kay found her and saw that one 
leg was severely injured with part 
of the bone exposed. 

In time, more students gath- 
ered around and offered their 
help. After many phone calls 
they finaUy found a veterinarians 
clim, open on Brainerd Road. 
Ginger remained reasonably calm 
as her heavily bleeding leg was 
wrapped up and she was taken to 
the car by David, Irene Ruprecht, 
Floyd Wolters, and Mevin 
Northrup. The vet sewed up as 
much of the remaining skin as 
possible and left it uncovered so 
the wound would heal faster 

Dean Evans let Ginger spend 
tne night in his garage. The next 
morning he found out that his 
neighbors,Dru and Susan Rourke 
were tile dog's gratefiil owners. 



A Message From Glnser's 
FsmUy: 

May we express our abundant 
thanks for your efforts on 
Ginger's behalf. She is much 
improved now. I have read that 
such benevolent and tender deeds 
reverberate throughout all 
creation. More people than you 
know have been blessed by hear- 
mg of your involvement; and I 
know from experience how that 
you have been blessed by fellow- 
ship with Christ in pity for His 
suffering creature ■■ "He whose 



word of power upheld the worlds 
would stoop to relieve a wounded 
bird." Deslie of Ages p. 46. 

Sincerely, 

Dm & Susan Rourke 

A lick on the cheek and swish of 
the tail to David Kay, Fl»y^ 
Wolters, Dean Evans and mem- 
bers of the Men's Oub who tool; 
time, money and immediate 
action to save me. 

Your friend forever, 

Ginger. 




niarsday, November 3, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 



Racking Horse Spurs SMCite's Book 



DJerry Dick Lien 

Sometime in your life you have 
perhaps come across a person 
who insisted that if he only h,id 
the time he would be a writer. 
"After all," he may have told 
you, "1 3'n full of ideas just 
waiting to be put down on paper. 
I'm sure I could find a publisher. 
Writing is really quite simple; all 
you need is the time." 

Imagine for a moment that this 
incipient Hemingway is a friend 
of yours, and his comments have 
been insistent over a prolonged 
period of time. At last, fed up 
with the same old refrain, you, 
challengehim todo whathe says 
is so easy. As an added incentive, 
you promise to buy him a vege- 
burger as a regard from the Cam- 
pus Kitchen if he does get pub- 
lished. 

Faced with an adequate in- 
ducement, he writes his paper, or 
book, and sends it off to Insight, 
The Hog Breeders' Gazette, 
McGraw-HUl, or the Fly by Night 
Press. (You see, there is a wide 
range of tastes for an author's 
target). 

After weeks of waiting, the 
inevitable comes -- the rejection 
slip. There is neither fame nor 
vegeburger for the budding 
writer. 

Popular opinion to the contrary, 
writing is not as easy as it may at 
first appear. Only a few have 
found it as easy as chemical en- 
gineering or swimming the Eng- 
lish Channel with one hand tied 
behind his/her back. 



Even that now well-established 
author, Snoopy, had his first 
opus, It Was a Dark and Stormy 
Night, turned down by the first 
publisher he mailed it to, sending 
its fuzzy author into a bad case of 
"rejection slip shock" until he got 



an assist for Charles Schulz and 
Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. 

Nonetheless, SMC does have 
among its student body a pub- 
lished author. Belinda Dickerson, 
senior communication major, has 
for years now had an interest in 
horses and the racking horse in 
particular. 

This interest has led her to 
write a book on the subject. The . 
Racking Horse, Vol. 1, took about 
a year to research and write. 

Also, like Steven Crane's old 
chestnut of American realism, 
Maggie: a GM of the Streets, the 
volume was privately published 
by its author. 

' ' I have felt that there has been 

a need for a book that would give 
a history of the racking horse. 
There is a fast-growing interest in 
the breed, and I wanted to pre- 
sent the horse in the book and to 
show how people can become 
involved in the industry," said 
Belinda. 

Miss Dickerson has. included 
many pictures of various racking 
horses in the volume. It also tells 
about the trainer and how they 
become involved with the breed. 
The book, though, is just the 
latest indication of a deep interest 
in the horse on the part of its 
author. 

Belinda has won the Amateur 
Ladies' Worid Championship in 
the area. "We really worked,- 
hard for the event and expected to 
come in among the top ten. But 
we never thought that I would win 
the title. It was really exciting," 
exclaimed the giil. 



Part of the training Belinda 
does herself, but she has a pro- 




Belinda Dickerson rides the Small Town Dnde In the 1976 Udles Amateur World Championships. 



fessional trainer in Alabama who 
also works with her horses. The 
headquarters of the Racking 
Horse Association is in that state. 

But what of the horse itself? 
How did it come into being? 
According to the young author, 
the horse has been around almost 
as long as the United States has. 
"The Racking horse evolved from 
the old-time saddle horse. Some 
people know these horses as the 
single footers. After the War 
Between the States, there was a 
merger between pacers and trot- 
ters, and they were registered as 
the Tennessee Walking Horse," 
jsaid the young woman. Although 
lit went into the Tennessee walk- 
ling horse breed, the animal con- 



The racking pace is a fast rath- 
er showy, usually artificial four- 
beat gait during which the feet 

.leave the ground in the same 
sequence as in the walk, but 

. faster and with a higher action. 

It was, however, only in the 
past five years that the Racking 
Horse Association of America was 
recognized by the U. S. Depart- 

, ment of Agriculture. This action 
permitted a registration system 
for the breed. The racking horse 
is presently the fastest growing 

. breed in the United States. 

Again referring to the horse's 
gait, Belinda said that in the past 
when cars were in little or no 



evidence, the racing horse was 
very popular as a means of trans- 
portation. Doctors and circuit 
riders, it seems, particularly fa- 
vored the breed. 

■ "People say that the gait is so 
smoth that a rider can hold a glass 
of water and not spill a drop," 
laughed Dickerson. 

1 Now that the breed is. officially 
recognized, how valuable can 
such a horse be? "Well, some 
horses will sell for $500, but some 
will go for anywhere from S30 to 
$35 thousand. A top show horse 
usually is worth about $10 or $12 
thousand. A world champion 
racking horse, though, would be 
{ priceless as a stud, ' ' commented 
iBelinda. 



^uiiTiiiiiimiiiiiiiir iiiiiiiiiriiiirrmnmiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii 





EATITHERE — 
OR CARRY OUT 

• TACOS 

• TOSTADOS 

• BURRITOS 

• FRUOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 

• ENCHIRfTO 



3877 Hlxon Pike 



8 - THE SODTHEBM ACCENT Ihamhy, November 3, 1977 



J 



Water Polo League Making 
A Big Splash On Campus 



□Mark KumTiske 

This years water polo league. 
under the direction of Herschel 
Logan, is now in progress. The 
first games were played Tuesday 
night, Oct. 18. On that night. 
Websters team swept a double- 
header beating Herman's team in 
the first game 6-5. The second 
game saw Webster outscoring 
Muilins team 11-7. 



The next Tuesday night, Oct. 
25. Webster won by forfeit of 
Herman 1-0 and Muilins then 
pulverized Herman 17-3 in the 
second contest. 

Games are played every Tues- 
day night and will continue into 
December. According to Tedd 
Webster, anyone still can sign up. 



This is co-ed water polo, with 
academy kids playing and even 
one elementary school partici- 
pant. The plan is to form another 
team out of those who sign up. 
The league also hopes to intro- 
duce a team of the academy kids. 



"It's a very exciting game to 
watch and one of the most ex- 
hausting I ever have played," 
stated Webster. Water Polo is a 
lot like soccer except you use your 
hands instead of your feet. Wo- 
men may use two hands while 
the men are restricted to one. 



The standings of the season 
this far are as follows: 



Muilins 
Herman 


1 1 
3 


3 


Band 
Atlan 


At 

ta's 




Omni 

DLinda Dick 


Arena 




The SMC Concert Band will be 
performing at the Omni sports 
arena in Atlanta for a basketball 
game between the Golden State 
Warriors and the Atlanta Hawkes 
Nov. 5. Featured with the band 
will be Bill Hughes, accordian 
player, and Julie McClarty, twirl- 
ing her batons. The band will 
perform during the 2nd and 4th 
quarters, for the half-time show, 
and before the game starts. 



It's said 
their 
numbers 
once 

darkened 
the sun. 

Ducks Unlimited is a non-profit 
organization that works lo protect 
and restore waterfowl marshlands 
in Canada, where United Stales 
Federal funds don't reach. And 
where 70<7r of our waterfowl are 
hatched. Help keep the ducks fly- 
ing. Send your tax deductible dona- 
tion to:DucksUnlimited,P.O. Box 
66300, Chicago, Illinois 60666 
Please. 

DUCKS 
UNLIMITED 



We need 

your he^. Now. 





Jeff Galloway, fonner Ol3inptaii 



Olympic Pusher Gallowayi 
Positively Addicts Runners 



QVan Boddy 

"Turn on to running" is going 
to be the theme of the CABL 
(Collegiate Adventists for Better 
Living) chapel program this 
morning, highlighted by special 
guest speaker and former 
olympian, Jeff Galloway. 

A dyed-in-the-wool, irrevers- 
ible case of running addiction 
himself, Jeff Galloway has be- 
come an outstanding "pusher" 
for the running habit, having sur- 
rounded himself with running. 
The founder of Phidippides, a 
national growing chain of running 
equipment stores and the brain- 
child of the Atlanta Running 
Center (an international live-in 
research haven for world-class 
competitive runners, now in an 
advanced planning stage) Jeff 



welcomes every opportunity. to 
proselytize for Positive Addiction, 

Positive Addiction is the 
recently-coined term for the phe- 
nomenon that makes runners do 
again and again an activit)- that to 
the layman seems painful and 
almost ridiculous. This phenom- 
enon is an actual physical and 
mental addiction to runmng, 
brought about by experiencing 
the "Third Wind," a feeling of 
intense well-being, after one has 
run several miles. 

Following the discussion on 
Positive Addiction, "The 
Marathon,',' a full-color reel nar- 
rated by premiere marathoners 
Frank Shorter, Bill Rodgers, and ' 
Don Kardong, will be shown. 

Welcome to SMC, JeffI 



Collegedale Cleaners 




Sun. - ThiiTS. 
7:30 - 5:30 

EWday 7:30 - 4:00 

COLLEGE PLAZA 

396-2550 




thern Missionary College 
Collegedale. TN 37315 





The Southern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 



T1"""l ly, November 10, 1977 




CoUegedale, Tenn. 




Theresa Shaw and Nancy Williamson big sisters to underprivileged ehildren. Photo by Phil Floyd 



24 Seniors Distinguished 

In National Who's Who Book 



The 1977-78 edition of Who's 
Who Among Stadents In Ameri- 
can Universities and Colleges will 
carry the names of 24 SMC stu- 
dents who have been selected as 
being among the country's most 
outstanding campus leaders. 

The campus nominating com- 
mittee has included the names of 
these students based on their 
academic achievement, service to 
the community, leadership in ex- 
tracurricular activities and future 
potential. 

These SMC students join a 
group of students selected from 
more than 1,000 institutions of 
higher learning in all 50 states, 
the District of Columbia and 



several foreign nations. 

Outstanding students have 
been honored in the annual direc- 
tory since it was first published in 
1934. 

Students named this year horn 
SMC are: Don Ashlock, Warren 
Auld, Linz Audain, Paul Boling, 
Robyn Bowman, James Butler, 
Roy Campbell, Karen Clark, 
Keith Clifton, Steve Darmody, 
Wayne Harlow, Ray Hartwell, Jo 
Lynn Hawthorne, Don Jehle, Ele- 
anor Kennedy, Elaine Kuna, 
Shane Martin, Gary McLarty, 
KathleenMixeli, Lucretia Moore, 
Ken Porter, Ken Rogers, Carl 



jNursing Students Screen 
Public For Their Health 



I QMark G. Rumsey 
I Twenty-five junior nursing stu- 
I dents and faculty in the B.S. 
nursing program recently held a 
public health screening clinic at 
Chattanooga's Downtown Gene- 
ral Hospital. 

Through this service, area citi- 
zens were given the opportunity 
to be examined for a number of 
1 physical conditions. The checklist 
I included eyesight, blood sugar, 
I "'""d pressure, and respiration. 
I Along with the free screening, 
I nursing students showed educa- 
loonal filmstiips for those interes- 
Ited in learning more about health. 



Persons desiring specific informa- 
tion or advice on a health matter 
were able to discuss it with the 
nursing faculty. Pamphlets on 
related topics were also dis- 
tributed. 

Two employos of the Hamilton 
County public health departmeitt 
assisted in the administering of 
the clinic. 

A Chattanooga television sta- 
tion, channel 12, filmed and 
broadcast a report of the clinic. 

Ina Longway, director of the 
Division of Nursing, said about 
60 persons attended the clinic. 



— BeMnd Page One 

Groovy Rock Beats On? P- 4-5 

The RAs TeU It AU P- 6 

the Romans Played Football P- ^ 



Shaw, and Vinita Wayman. 

The Academic Affairs Commit- 
tee voted to recommend to the 
faculty senate that after this 
year the Who's Who nominations 
be discontinued. 

Women's 
Banquet 
To Be A 
2-Day Event 

DBecki Joiner 

Plans for the women's club 
banquet were announced by 
Millie Runyan women's dean, 
last week. 

The date has been set for Jan. 
22 and 23, 1978. Two separate 
nights were chosen to alleviate 
the cramped seating conditions in 
the banquet hall of the Read 
House. Two nights will make it 
possible for more to attend. 

"We expect more to attend 
than last year," said Runyan. 
"The banquet last year was very 
enjoyable and the students will 
want to go again." 

Sally McMillan, student coor- 
dinator for the banquet, stated 
that she has requested the best 
vegetable plate the chef offered. 
"He is a very reputable chef in 
the area," she said. 

The program will consist of 
students performing in a variety 
show. "This will bring the audi- 
ence in contact with the pro- 
gram," said Denise Griffith, pro- 
gram director, ''and give them 
that personal feeling of seeing 
their friends perform." 

The decorating theme will be a 
candyland effect. 



BonnyOaks Give And 
Receive At X-mas 



ClThom Hamm 

Plans have been announced for 
a Christmas project for underpriv- 
ileged children sponsored jointly 
by the College Sabbath School 
and the Bonny Oaks program. 

Bonny Oaks School Is a board- 
ing school operated by Hamilton 
County for children who have 
either been given up by their 
parents or whom the courts have 
tiwen away from the parents. 
The 80 children at Bonny Oaks 
range in age from 6 to 18. These 
children, however, are not avail- 
able for adoption. 

SMC Off-Campus activities op- 
erates a big brother/big sister 
program for the Bonny Oaks 
School. Many students act as a 
big brother/ sister to a child there. 
Kirk King is the boys' director 
and Colleen Hogan is director for 
the girls. 

For Christmastime the Bonny 
Oaks ministry would like to do 
something special for the children 
at Bonny Oaks. "The children 
must learn the experience of giv- 



ing as well as receiving. But the 
children don't have money to go 
buy with even if they wanted to. 
Also, the children are in need of 
clothing," said King. 

The plan is this: A box marked 
"Remember Bonny Oaks Decem- 
ber 3" will be placed in the 
Student Center. In the box paper 
ballots on which a child's name 
and clothing sizes are written. 
Other ballots are marked "cash."* 
Students can draw out a ballot 
and act accordingly. 

These gifts will be brought to 
College Sabbath School on Dec. 3 
and placed under the Christmas 
tree during a carol sing. The cash 
will be divided among the child- 
ren, and they will go shopping 
with their big brother/sister to 
buy presents for each other. 

Then Dec. 10, the Big Party will 
be given for the children. Each 
child will receive three gifts: one 
from an SMC student (clothing), 
one from their big brother/sister, 
and one from each other. 




A Bonny Oaia child. Photo by Rhonda Ronyan. 



Entrance Road To Be 
Paved For Thanksgiving 



D Dennis Canther 

City Manager Lee Holland said 
the new road will be paved and 
barricaded for several weeks. 

The entrance road into College- 
dale is now ready for paving. 
The gravel is put on wet and 
needs one to two weeks to cure. 
Then a double penetration as- 
phalt treatment is applied and the 
road will be ready for traffic. 

' 'Please do not attempt to move 
barricades or drive around 



them," Holland requested. "If 
the road is driven on before it has 
cured, it will have to be regraded 
and repacked. This will prolong 
the opening of the road." 

Contingent on the weather, 
Hamilton County will lay down 
the gravel on the entrance road 
next week. 

Holland anticipates a paved 
surface to drive on by Thanks- 
giving. 



\ 



: . THE SOUIHEBN ACCENT llnrday, Novunbw 10, \W 



Pac 




Letters To The Editor 




Dear Editor: 

I commend Garrison's burning 
concern for our tottering inferno, 
the venerable Lynn Wood Hall. 
In response to his question: 
"What would happen to the stud- 
ents if any one of our campus 
buildings caught fire?" I'd sup- 
pose he really means the alleged 
tindertraps. Jones and Lynn 
Wood; the answer is. they'd get 
soaied, students and buildings. 
Or that's ray observation, based 
on the few, paltry flare-ups 
during my campus tenure. Water 



and termites are doing more harm 
than fire, to date. 

Seriously, however, 1 concur 
with his plea for a better system 
of evacuation such as specified 
routes. Student damage from 
other students seems more the 
threat in case of fire. Sprinklers 
are no cure for that. Good point. 
Art. 

Sincerely, 
R.B. Gechart 



Dear Editor: ' 

Is there anyone on campus with month for something; is it too 

enough authority to get us some much to ask that we get what we 

hot water in C-wing of Talge? are paying for? Ralph Nader. 

Each set of rooms pays $270 per where are you? 



deWayne Beers 



Editorial 



This is a shortie. but we just wanted to remind you to turn to p. 4 
and 5. There is such a thing as Christian rock, even though the term 
sounds like a contradiction in itself. Some of this rock is horrible, 
horrible. Other forms you just don't know what to do with since it 
sounds so kosher. 

We have reprinted an article that is pro Christian rock. We also 
asked some knowledgeable instructors to critique the article. And 
critique they did. A fine job. Those of you who love formulating 
opinions and debating will have a heyday on p. 4 and 5. 



The Southern Accent 



Stafibov 



m 



All materia] publlihed In Tt« SouttwiT) AcoHit Is not necessarily the opinion or 
view of the newspaper staff or the SMC adinlnlstratlon. Cartoons, articles, and 
other content iteiTB create an open exchange of Ideas, a forum. In the case of 
disagreement, "LetterB to the Editor," isamlumndeeigrwd to provide expression. 
VVb do, howwer, reserve the right not to publish materia] that is libelous, 
extremely radical, or out of character In light of doctrinal points. We wisft to retain 
tr« bearing of a Christian SDA college newspaper. 



Editor Vinlla Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Meumann 

Business Manager Dave MIddag 

Layout Editor Vanessa GreenlMf 

Layout Une.tJp Randy Johnson 

Sports Editor Reuben Castillo 

Orcuialion Manager John Hanson 

Secretaries., Pam Legere 

Oenise Sheets 

Ad Manager Ray Hartwell 

Proofreaders Kalhy Mixeli 

Jeanne ZachartsB 

Subocriptlons Candy Miranda 

*"l!«s Man<Fom> 

Sandle Lehn 

Photographers Rhonda Runysn 

MarklHird 

Reporters jefry Uen 

Oswn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

SPooa°' Frances Andrews 

f^""*'- Fells Bros. Printing Co., 

Ooltmrah, Tenn. 



"nrn So(4hem Aco«it Is published ir«eWy with the exception of test wed(s «id 
55 per year, mailed weeUy Irpm 



Dear Editor: 

Just a comment, uh. in passing 
you might say. Last Sabbath, 
Oct. 22, just happened to be the 
133rd anniversary of the Great 
Disappointment {for those of you 
who missed it). This disappoint- 
ment was the culmination of years 
of preaching and evangelizing by 
William Miller and his associates. 
And it was the beginning of the 
investigative judgment, a doc- 
trine that makes Seventh-day Ad- 
ventiste as distinct from other 
churches as prophets are from 
witches. 

Which brings me to my second 
point. This last weekend we 
hallowed the halls of Halloween. 
What was done about it? Why, a 
costume party of course with lots 
of fun and games. All those in 
attendance were even provided 
with masks. Every precaution 
was taken to insure the enjoyment 
of every individucal that they 
have the opportunity to really get 
in the spirit of this most illus- 
trious occasion. 

Now don't get me wrong. Miss 
Henderson. I am not knocking 
the social activities program. 
Ditto, ditto, dittollin You're 
doing your job is not my concern. 
My concern is: Where are those 
whose responsibility it is to keep 
the Adventist heritage alive in the 
minds of the students? A heri- 
tage with a message that is to be 
rung throughout the land til no 
one will hear it. A heritage with a 
message that points to the Sa- 
viour of the world. 

Forgive me for having to step 
on Halloween a little, but when 
the fact is brought to mind that 
Adventist youth are. dropping out 



of the church like flies it should 
awaken a primal scream of con- 
cern from the soul of every SDA 
Christian. MaybeJ'm straining at 
gnats, but opportunities to bring 
the truth home to the hearts of the 
youth, such as Oct. 22, should 
never be passed by. Just because 
we have an altar call every sab- 
bath does not mean every oppor- 
tunity is being fulfilled. Maybe 
administrative schedules did not 
allow for planning a program of 
special emphasis, but surely 
there could have been an after- 
noon prayer meeting organized 
that day for those who would have 
liked to discuss the significance of 
the event and its place in our lives 
today. 

May God forgive us for the 
opportunities we let slip through 
our hand for the furthering of His 
truth, and for considering these 
things just in passing. 

Respectfully, 

Arthur J. Cisneros 



Dear Editor: 

Compliments on a great paper 
last week. The news content was 
good, the features interesting, 
and the letters numerous. Keep 
on producing the best paper put 
out by the North American SDA 



Ray Hartwell 




SubschfMlcns for parents and alumni 
Collegedale. T>4, at a non-profit rate. 



*»e4 ft«S COM-««« *«>•*.- F^WoltS TO T*e 



Dear Editor: 

The day is drawing near when 
the twenty-five foot statue of 
praying hands holding a bleeding 
heart will grace our campus. 
Much debate has been aired as to 
whether this is a blessing or a 
curse. Having followed the argu- 
ments for and against this piece 
of art, I now offer the opinion of a 
lowly student. 

The article in the last issue of 
this newspaper explained the 
meaning of the statue, and now 
those who read that article have 
an idea of what the artist is 
saying. What about those who 
will view the figure and have not 
read our newspaper? Will there 
be any confusion as to the mean- 
ing of this religious expression? 
Perhaps we can aid those who 
drive by and do not know by 
erecting a huge billboard with,two 
foot high letters that tell the story 
" while a small plaque will unfold 
the tale for those who walk near. 

How could this work of art be 
misinterpreted by others? To 
history buffs it could represent 
the ancient system of human sac- 
rifices. In various cults it was the 
practice to rip the heart from the 
living victim and hold it up, still 
beating, as an offering to the sun. 
To others it may appear that we 
are joining with other religious 
groups who display images and 
statues. 

Our friends who use the cruci- 
fix at least have a symbol that is 
clearly understood. It represents 
the death of Christ on the cross 
and puzzles no one. If we need a 
symbol to convey a religious mes- 
sage, would something meaning- 
ful like a huge table of God's law 
do a better job? 

Apparently there was unani- 
mous consent to erect this piece 
of art. At this point one can only 
speculate as to the reasons for 
acceptance. Perhaps the doner 
gives other gifts to the school and 
no one wished to offend him. 
Maybe the idea of something free 
was to hard to turn down. It ij 
entirely possible all concerned 
reaUy do like it and believe every 
one else wUI. The last possibUity 
is that because others have sta- 
tues we must imitate and do 
liketA^se. 

This letter may sound like a 

protest and that is what it « 

meant to be. One tiny squeak ww 

do little to stop this project, but a 

least, it's on the record. Ma°' 

comments will be made ui ' 

gards to this statue in the ye»" 

come. The two I predict will »= 

most popular are: D" "■%'''° j 

get gloves for cold weather/ ^ 

Oh, Oh, someone squeezed iti 

hardi . ,itv 

I'm sure Loma Linda UmversW 

would appreciate the sculpture 
a symbol of their famous n»"jj 
tea*. One thing is ee.«|» ;^ 
the statue is put up, SML. ■> = ^ 
to be known in the fiiture as 
school with a heart." 



Kuhlman Attends Convention, 
Acquires Insect Cookbook 



Thursday, November 10, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 

Shut your mouth 
Qnd roH up your sleeves. 



DDebra Gainer 

Dr. H.H. Kuhlman, chairman 
of the biology department, at- 
tended the National Association 
of Biology Teachers convention in 
Anaheim, Calif., Oct. 20-23. This 
four day session is held annually 
for teachers across the nation to 
have a chance to see what's hap- 
pening in their field, to catch up 
on new trends. 

Dr. Kuhlman had an option of 
different tours in the area - from 
marine biology to interplanetary 
technology. 

Kuhlman chose to go to the Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory at the Cal- 
ifornia Institute of Technology in 
Pasadena. The tour group was 
shown how the laboratory is trac- 
ing the flights of Voyagers 1 and 
2, two satellites launched from 
Florida's space craft center in 
August. According to the pro- 
posed schedule, the satellites will 
pass Jupiter in 1979 and reach the 
ringed Saturn in 1980 and 1981 
respectively. Voyager 2 may then 
sail four more years on to Uranus. 
Its mission of exploration com- 
pleted, the craft will drift on oui 
of range. Dr. Kuhlman found the 
laboratory, managed by '"al Tech 
for NASA, sc fascinating '.nat he 
could have spent several days 
there. 

On Friday, several lecture sym- 



posia were offered, geared pri- 
marily around the food resource 
problem of the worid. Dr. Kuhl- 
man attended two of the lectures. 
One proposed more equal distri- 
bution of food resources through- 
out the world, and the other 
proposed the solution of untapped 
food sources - weeds, algae, and 
insects. 
One symposium member hand- 



ed out samples of honeybee cook- 
ies. These were reported to be 
quite tasty. Dr. Kuhlman has 
written for the recipe book Insects 
for Food, and those interested in 
obtaining recipes may check with 
him. 

The College sponsors one such 
convention for department chair- 
men annually. 



English Dept. Provides 
Rides To 'Our Town' 







DMark St. Bernard 

The English club will provide 
free transportation to Chat 
tanooga for the stage presenta- 
tion of the play "Our Town." 

The play, written by Thorton 
Wilder, is sponsored by the St. 
Paul's Church Monday, Nov. 14 
at 7:30 p.m. The" church is 
located on 7th and Pine streets in 
Chattanooga. Admission is free. 

James Boyd, president of the 
English club, said that the club 
will supply two vans for transpor- 
tation. Although the vans are 



DMykal Ringstaff 

A hayride sponsored by CABL 
will be held Saturday evening 
Nov. 19. Persons wishing to 
attend will meet in the student 
park at 5:30, where a short ves- 
pers will be held. After vespers, 
supper will be served. Included 
in the supper will be hot dogs, 
chili, and popcorn. 

A $1.50 flat rate (cash or state- 



Little 
Debbie 

SNAK CAKES 




ffAi 



provided primarily for English 
majors, persons needing trans- 
portation are advised to call the 
English department. 



tX .i;' 



pM^^MMMi 



^ ^0t0^0^^^ 




CABL To Tour Collegedale 
On Moonlight Hayride 



x'NATURAL FOODS 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 




Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



ment) will be charged. 

After supper the hayride will 
slowly tour the roads of College- 
dale and then stop at the student 
park for a campfire and hot apple 
cider. Students are encouraged 
to bring musical instruments. 

Hayride sign-up sheets are pos- 
ted in the dorms and the Student 
Center. 



mcKee saKinG companY 



VM 




Frozen Yogurt 
Free Sample 



4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Hmnday, November 10, 1»77 



o 



O pinion 

Rock Can Still Carry A Solvation 



By Lowell Cauffiel, reprinted with 
permission from the National Courier, 
June 10. 1977 

For some Christians, the pinnacle 
of decadence in today's culture is the 
ever-popular breed of music called 
rock 'n roll. 

A zealous example of that belief 
was a record-fueled bonfire by a Bap- 
tist pastor in Tallahassee, Fla.. in 
1975. reported by the national press 
and subject of a feature story in the 
popular rock-culture publication, Rol- 
ling Stone. 

After a convincing sermon by the 
preacher, young Christians in the con- 
gregation gave up their rock albums in 
sacrifice, and $2,000 worth of recorded 
materials was doused with gasoline 
and torched. 

But what - or who •- was really 
getting burned? 

The pastor has condemned the 
records for "the relationship rock 
music has with illicit sex. drugs and 
revolution." Precisely, he had said it 
was rock's "syncopated rhythms" that 
prompted sexual promiscuity among 

Holbrook— 



teens listening to the musical style. 

But really, the sermon and subse- 
quent fire was a modem-day version of 
a phenomena that's been with the 
Christian Church for centuries. 

Religious witch hunts against art 
forms -- especially contemporary 
musical forms - have been e^^ping 
many well-meaning Christi|B's long 
before rock ever reared its fiead on the 
music scene. 

Examples: 

In the 14th century, Pope John 
XXII issued an official decree prohibit- 
ing the use of certain harmony ar- 
rangements by church choirs. These 
harmonies, en innovation in musical 
development at the time, we-e consid- 
ered improper for praise to God. 

Later, in colonial America, the 
Congregational churches of the 1700s 
forbade the violin in church service 
because it was a popular instrument 
with dances. It was often called "the 
voiceof the devil." Earlier, the organ 
had been taboo with many Protestant 
denominations. It still is with some. 

These were internal church 
policies, but new music has had simi- 



lar condemnation problems as it has 
surfaced intjl^ecular environment. 

Wh^^OlF" prohibited to speak 
to ettS^Sf^ in the fields - began 
singing refrains to the beat of a hoe or 
the rh)'thm of cotton picking, there 
came the birth of the blues. These 
tales of hard tim^ were scorned as 
"devil songs" by many Southern de- 
nominations. 

Later, jazz with its off-beat, free- 
form instrumentals was criticized — 
and stilt is by many fundamentalists. 

So today there's rock, where the 
amplified tone of an electric guitar is 
seen as the voice of debauchery by 
some Christian critics. 

The folly of banning an instrument 
such as the violin or certain vocal 
harmonies would seem evident to most 
Christians these days. 

Yet, looking at that fire in Florida, 
the same continues under a different 
guise. 



- -- -nins" cited 

by the pastor can also be found in 
black (and some white) gospel tnask^ 
one of America's greatest culturaia 
treasures and a musical root of rockl 
itself. '' 

From a music theory standpo 
most rock consists of three chorils 
which also happen to be the foundation 
for spirituals, country music, swing 
jazz, easy listening, some classical and 
many other musical forms. 

True, crass and self-indulgent sen- 
suality permeates a good portion of i 
rock these days. ' 

But two other factors must be ' 
considered. ; 

First, rock has so expanded as an i 
art form in the past two decades, iti 
defies the kind of generalizations! 
many try to tag on it. 

Electric guitar virtuoso Royj 
Buchanan created a piercing, guitaKl 



Nailing Down The Rock Message 



Dear Vimta: 

Here is a brief evaluation of 
Mr. Lowell Cauffiel's article 
entitied "Rock Can StlD Carry A 
Salvation Message. ' ' 

In my opinion the writer 
employs some specious reasoning 
to nullify the arguments against 
an art fonn he favors. Redoes 
this by mingling two different 
matters: violins and certain 
harmonies on the one hand and 
certain musical forms on the 
other. The point is this: 

(1) Some things are not wrong 
in themselves, but can in certain 
contexts give a wrong influence 
against the Christian faith. This 
is the case of the violin (and 
possiblv the harmonies, he refers 
to). 

If in the common mind of a 
given period, the violin, or 
harmonies, or sax, etc. were 
associated with various evil 
situations and therefore implied 
certain wrong connotations, then 
Christians could not in good 
conscience employ such in their 
worship lest they would bring 
reproach upon the name of 
Christ. 

If the cultural viewpoint 
changed and such could be 
properly used without bringing 
dishonor to God, then the Church 
could use such. In dealing with 
such matters the Church can 
never be avantgarde. It can never 
afford to unnecessarily 
misrepresent the Gospel and 
cause a loss of souls for whom 
Christ died. 

(2) Some things are always 
wrong, no matter what garb you 
clothe them in or in what cultural 
situation they take place. This is 
where 1 would place any variety of 
rock music. 

Why? Answer: There are 
various forms of music and they 
have various effects upon the 



human mind and body. Some 
have » wholesome effect, others 
:ar down and blunt the 
nsitivities. 

form of music similar 
ititive, hypnotic dance 
music ofsome pagan cultures. It 
is what might be called * 'body 
music" — its beat and sound 
move and jerk you. If pursued, it 
will noAra Christian's 
sensiti^fy to spiritual things. 

Religious words can be put to 
this forra of rhythm, but the 
appeal of the rock will be to the 
body and the senses ■- not to the 
heart. The author admits this 
indirectly. Note: 

(1) "The Messiah WUl Come 
Again." Comment: "apletdng, 
guitar-dominated song." Notice 
what comes through -- sound, but 
not Jesus. 

(2) "Jesus is Justji^BfflJght 
WitiiMe." Commenff^^ 
Qoor-stomphig arrangeiriietlt" 
Notice what comes through -- 
body motion, and excitement, but 
Jesus is not glorified. 

(3) Andrae Crouch and the 
Disciples - Comment: "Driving, 
syncopated rhythms there" -- 
body movement, emotional 
excitement, but no Jesus. 

(4) "Fierce musicianship," but 
noJesus. "The form is employed 
to deliver the social, mental or 
spiritiial state of the author of the 
work; in this case, the rock 
nmslcan." Notice, the musician 
is glorified, but not Jesus. 

On the basis of the writer's own 
admission his article belles his 
title; Rock can still carry a 
salvation message. What he 
admits that religious rock really 
carries is "piercing, 
guitar- dominated song." 
"floor-stomping" arrangements, 
and "driving, syncopated 
rhythms." 



The religious message is lost. 
Hearts are not touched or 
convicted by God's Spirit. lives 
are not changed from sin to 
righteousness, the mind is not 
lifted heavenward to spiritual 
realities. God is neither 
worshipped nor honored. 

Outride the area of religious 
rock the author is willing to admit 
that "crass and self-indulgent 
sensuality permeates a good 
portion of rock these days," -- his 
own indictment of an art form he 
favors. 

I do not see how we as SDA 
Christians could endorse or 
promote a form of music that has 
proven to be detrimental to the 
spiritual interests of Christians 
even though at times some have 
tried to ■ 'baptise' ' it with 
religious words. 

My hat is off to the pastor and 
his young Baptist members who 
have had the courage of their 
convictions to choose far more 
wholesome forms of music and to 
desti-oy the records that were 
destroying them spiritually. 

Sincerely yours. 
Frank B. Holbrook 
Professor of Religion 





Gr1 

Cactus Juice 

Dear Vinita: 

Thanks for the opportunity to 
comment on one of my favorite 
subjects. I enjoyed reading the 
article "Rock Can SHII Carry A 
Salvation Message." The author, 
Mr. Lowell Cauffiel, obviously 
brings a great deal of musical 
(musicians's) expertise to his sub- 
ject. But thereby he also brings 
some obvious biases (writes for 
Guitar Player Magazine). 

It is very difficult for a musician 
to be completely objective about 
his music (or preachers to be 
unbiased about preaching). I'm 
sure his range of comprehension. 
and perhaps tolerance, is much 
""''^t than that of the general 



But here again this may simply 
mean that he is prababl;i||i^qjg 
forget the narrow context of allu- 
sion in which the average listener 
hears and appreciates music. I 
mean that the average listener 
may associate only one set of 
images with the familiar synco- 
pated rock beat, the one he is 
most familiar with. He may not 



For Desert 



even be aware of the broad ^A 
tory or musical background /f* 
that or any other given rhythm.'^ 

1 suspect that it is in this area OK 
the allusive potential, or shouM' \ 
say the inevitable allusive effec'. 
of music that the greatest ano 
most subtle dangers lie. It is »" 
that the reflecting, and thus w 
reinforcing of the ills or strengtni 
--f a society take place. 

The question then is: "" 
does the rock genre general' ^ 
"reflect" or say about us arm ' 
us? ( I 

Cauffiel lists a "'""''." , 
"gospel rock" songs, "" 
comment, as if to say that ^^^^^ 
these songs have gospel ""^^^^ 
anggospel titles they musi.n^^^ 
■^MISI music, in spite m 
fdSTed "dr.ving syncop »j 
rhythms." This, of course, 
ridiculous conclusion. .^ 

Mr. Cauffiel may be an evc ^^ 
exquisite musical artist, ou ^ ^^ 
reflects a sad naivete as ' 
Christian musicology '* ^^ \i 
cemed, the area in whic" 




Hmrsday, November 10, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 



long called. The Messiah 



liar Doobie Brothers pro- 
stomping arrangement 
tt All Right With Me. 
Ime a major hit, and was 

Icular stations daily for 



liristian circles, Andrae 
fce Disciples set words of 
ftric instrumentals bor- 
tay pop songs. Driving, 
hms there. 

to mention the countless 
[erce musicianship and 
liversal lyrics. 

usical form such as 
lother artistic genre -- is 
I of expression. 
\ employed to deliver the 
r spiritual state of the 
[work; in this case, the 



rock musician. 

The rock music that lacks redeem- 
ing value simply reflects the state and 
tastes of a portion of today's youth 
culture. 

To judge all rock as worthless and 
sinful is to judge an entire youth 
culture hell bound. 

That's fanaticism. 

How many young people have been 
turned off by the sweeping decree 
such as the one manifested in the heat 
of that Florida rock 'n roll fire? 

Such antics leave Christ's name 
and church vulnerable to unnecessary 
scorn and ridicule. 

In a world already hostile towards 
somg^ Christianity's real truths, it's 
scotMttd ridicule we can do without. 



Caujflel, a musician for 18 years, is 
a contributing music critic for The 
Detroit Ne^, He writes regularly for 
Guitar Plajf^Magazine and Contem- 
porary Key^^d Magazine. 



Dear Faculty Member: 

Enclosed Is an article taken bom the National Courier, Jnne 10, 1977 issae 

Conld you please evaluate this article tor The Soathem Accent? 

utJ^T Sonthem Accent Is considering reprinting this article, bnt Is not sore of Its 

Theological sonndness." Could you please send us a positive or negative 

evaluation? .=K«>irc 

thl8"ja°tte? ^ *'*"'''' ''"'""'"'*'' "'■°" *'°"''' «'™ ">« ne^spoper some Input upon 
Thank you for your help. 

Sincerely, 

VInlta Wayman, Editor 





[s on- 
ion Speak Through New Media 



elaborates a 
(The Church has 
btemporary art 
for religious 
ler to embrace 
innot verify the 
weal judgments 
Iresume to offer 

z has general- 
and received 

ording to the 

[okes. This is a 

' and not a!- 

rceived. In a 

ped manner, it 

[tfie following 



thing that 
at him, 
America's 
iures." He 
things that 
iood report 



lines: (1) A given musical compo- It is my own feeling that Christ- 
sition originates in the genera! ians ought not to resist this 
culture as an expression of socie- dynamic, for several reasons: (1) 
tal or personal values. Assuch.it The offering of what is relevant 
evokes "secular" connotations, and meaningful makes worship 

(2) A modification, or series of 
modifications, occurs, which give 
both the tune and the message 
associated with it still different 
implications. These modifica- 
tions are both influenced by social 
and cultural factors, and. in turn, 
influence that society. Still in its 
"secular' ' phase, the musical 
piece at this stage often receives 
negative ratings by the^^iffiUrch. 

(3) After a sufficient ^od of 
"archaizing", in which. *^eculai 



ept- 



and reiii 
authentic, 
out of our 

Sam. 24:24). (2) Every gen 
tion has chosen common, a 
ed musical forms from Its t 
previous generations with which 
to do this. Older members of the 
congregation tend to favor older 
music, younger ones, more con- 
temporary, in part precisely be- 
cause those musical idioms are 
more meaningful and authentic to 



Ashton — 

"And Deliver Us--" From Rock? 

Dear Vinita: 

I shall address Mr. Cauffiel's article on two levels: first a two-paragraph critique 
of the article itself, then some comments on specific statements contained in it. 

It should be noted that there is no direct correlation between the title and the 
body of the article. Cauffiel mentions two songs, each containing some reference to 
Jesus. Jesus, on the other hand, mentions persons who say, "Lord, Lord," but do 
not do the Father's will. Such, He says, will not enter into the kingdom of heaven. 
Such, He says, will not enter into the kingdom of heaven. If Cauffiel wishes to justify 
rock in terms of genuine Christianity, let him show how rock strengthens faith, 
invites repentance, nourishes the fruits of the Spirit, develops obedience to the given 
law of God, or in any other way reveals the will of Jehovah. 

Furthermore, the illustrations intended to add weight to rock's defense have little 
to do with the arguments undertaken. No one will argue with Cauffiel's statement 
that the Doobie Brothers' song is rock. So what? That simple fact does not justify its 
inclusion in gospel methodology. Since when does a song being rock, or being a hit, 
or being played on secular stations daily for weeks have anything to do with even 
nominal Christianity, let along genuine conversion or a bom-again life-style? 
And that bonfire -- were there any Jesus-rock records burned? He neither states nor 
implies that there were, and he openly admits that "a good portion of rock" is 
permeated with "crass and self-indulgent sensuality." which he has the good sense 
not to defend. Later he speaks of rock music that lacks redeeming value. If that's 
what the Florida youth burned, maybe it was just as well. In short, I find the article 
itself underdeveloped, unconvincing, with almost -every paragraph crying out for 
discussion, challenge, or possible refutation. 

In particular: We, enjoy scoffing at various papal decrees as ineffective, out of 
touch with the times, and somehow not very intelligent. Could it be that the Pope 
was acting in the long-term best interests of the church? The worst thing Ellen 
White says about traditional Catholic music is that it accompanied an insufficient 
religion, leaving the heart of the worshipper empty. Aesthetically, she describes 
such music as "unsurpassed. ...impressing the heart with awe and reverence." 
(What a powerful combination it would make if the real gospel were to be presented 

Tnm to p. 8, col. 1 



Torn to p. 8, col. 3 



the 



Pffiel's [ 
i no distinc- 
ped and the 

F to admit 
fefwhelming 
'would also 
fsome songs 
|ts that may 
Pg value to 
Pne who is 
plains of the 
■ste the juice 

Rifles cactus 
gjes of kings 
■" s must be a 



connotations are largely lost sight them. (3) Biblically, there are a 
of. the music is taken up into the number of evidences that the 
service of religious expression same process was occuring 
and given new coloring, i.e., a anciently, with God's apparent 
new setting. Often those who 
now sing or enjoy the music in 
worship remain unaware of its 
original intimation. 

A very cursory survey of our 
own Chorch Hymnal reveals that 
a number of tunes we presently 
sing have similar origins in sec- 
ular music (e.g., #162. "O Thou 
in Whose Presence" (an old folk- 
song); i^lBl. "Ye Who Rose to 
Meet the Lord" (an old Scottish 
bagpipe air)). Louis Burgeois 
(1510-1561) aided John Calvin at 
Geneva by providing '.'altered 
secular" melodies for metrical 
psalms, and we must not forget 
the rain of criticism that descend- 
ed upon Charles Wesley for offer- 
ing a type of sacred music to the 
people of his day strangely com- 
parable to the secular tunes of the 
time I 

Today, we can see a corres- 
ponding process, as a rock tune, 
in altered form, passes into the 
"easy listening" category and 
finally appears with religious 
words. As this happens, archaiz- 
ing and disassdciation from its 
previous milieu render the piece 
usable for religious experience, 





4 


"I don't know where rock beghis and ends." 




^1 


Lynn Neumann 




6 . THE SOITHERN ACCENT Thursday, November 10, 1977 



O 



RAS-- Keeping The Peace Jaking The Rap 




by Rhonda Runyan. 



: Lydia Smtlh 

RA's (Resident Assistants) are 
usually moaned and groaned at. 
often despised, only sometimes 

Sallv McMillan. RA on That- 
cher's Third West and Daniel 
Pabon. RA on Tatge's new wing 
A. were cross-examined concern- 
ing their infamous jobs. 

What are the qaallflcations for 
being an RA? 

Pabon: You have to be a 
resident of the dorm for one year 
and an upper classman, and have 
a GPA of 2.50. You got to 
communicate well with the guys 
and be able to take jokes, be 
lokTdir. understanding, and be 
a leader spiritually. You should 
also be well-groomed and set 
examples that the guys will fol- 
low. No personal problems can 
interfere. 

Conld yoD give examples of the 
most coomion problems a student 
has? 

McMillan; Homesickness, boy- 
friends, siudics. scheduling for 
classes, financial problems, sleep 
and recreational schedules, and 
then religion. 

Pabon: Freshmen wanting to 
go home, crowded situations in 
the rooms, arguments, loud mu- 
sic, and some guys think that the 
RA is out to get them. 

How do yoD handle these prob- 
lems? 



Making Collards 
Creditable 



DKay Campbell - 

The sun shone with an ener- 
getic brightness as we bent with 
our rakes to smooth the dirt. Our 
hands, unaccustomed to anything 
rougher than Bic pens, soon de- 
veloped blisters, and our backs 
grew weary as we struggled to 
prepare our garden plots. 

Is this a new punishment for 
truency? No. And the students 
you might see working their gar- 
den plots across from the church, 
Vi*.h.nH tVii.- telephone company, or 
hiirni.-ilK craping the soil from 
utrneai.. their fingernails in your 
class are paying $89 per semester 
hour for those blisters! 

"Science of Gardening" (AGRI 
105) is team-taught by Mr. Lacey. 
director of the grounds depart- 
ment, and Mr. McKamey. who 
came to SMC in the spring of 
1975- The present program was 
begun the second semester of 
1974-75 school year, in an effort 
to follow more closely Mrs. 
White's guidelines for our schools 
and education. Drew Tudington. 
the associate professor of indus- 
trial arts was part of the impetus, 
which includes Dr. Kennedy of 
the Education Department. Mr. 
McKamey would like to see the 
program enlarge to eventually 
provide for a minor, or even an 
associate degree in horticulture. 

ate degree would be especially 
helpful to the theology majors as 
well as educators. 

This fall's class of 15 students 
is comprised mainly of Education 
majors. Even as you read this 
article, their lettuce, cabbages, 
hruNsel sprouts and collard 
Hreen^ are coming to maturity-an 



Pabon: I talk to them. listen, 
pray with them, and iindcrsiand 
their problems. 

When Is an RA expected to be 
In their room? 

Pabon: From 7:30 - 10:30 p.m. 
every night with my doors open so 
the fellows will know that I'm in 
or I go to them if 1 know they're 
having problems. Weekends we 
can go out wherever the crowd 
goes, and if the crowd chooses to 
stay in the dorm, then I must be 
there. 



What would happen If 
needed yoo and you weren't a- 
vailable? 

McMillan: We have a buddy 
system where the other RA on our 
wing takes over for us when it's 
our night or weekend off. 

How much does the Job pay? 

McMillan: $1,500 a year, in- 
cluding no room charge. 

Pabon: $1,560 a year, room 
charge included, plus I have to 
work desk duties as well. 

Have you ever felt bad about 
being an RA or dong something 
you didn't like doing? 

McMillan: Yes, like when I 
have to tell the girls to turn down 
their stereo. But it's part of my 
job. Others are trying to study 
and the loud music distracts 
them. 



advantage the autumn class has 
over the spring class, who leave 
before they reap their harvest 
As Mr. McKamey pointed out 
the 3-hour course is only able to 
scratch the surface of the science 
of gardening. It focuses on the 
basics of plant culture, indoors 
and outside, and some principles 
of landscaping, pest control, and 
a basic understanding of what 
makes plants thrive, and what 
kilts them. 

As a member of this class, even 
yet in a quasi-experimental stage 
1 am enthusiastic about its pos 
sibiUries. and the benefits 1 know 
lam receiving. As a teaching tool 
to use in our elementary schools 
as a personal, profitable hobby 
and. in a small way, being a 
partner with God in His creating, 
it is well worth the time, blisters, 
and lectures it requires. To sum- 
marize its value. 1 can say it no 
better than Ellen White, who 

"In the cultivation of the soil 
the thnnehttui worker will find 
thai irc.isiir.. little dreamed of 
are opening up before him. ...In 
cultivating carefulness, patience, 
attention to detail, obedience to 
law. it imparts a most essential 
trammg. The constant contact 
with the myster>' of life and the 
loveliness of nature, as well as the 
tenderness called forth in min- 
istering to these beautiful objects 
of God's creation, tends to quick- 
en the mind and refine and ele- 
vate the character; and the les- 
sons taught prepare the worker to 
deal more successfully with other 
mmds." Education pp. 111-112 




Dan Pabon Talge RA. stnngs a tennirTacliet^hotob^oiSdel 



Pabon: No, not really, jj 
depends on how you handle it. 

Is this your first year as an RA? 

McMillan: No. I've been an 
RA now for one full year before 
this year. 

Pabon: No. This is my second 
year. 

Do you feel it's a privUeoe 
being an RA? ^' 

Pabon: Yes, there are about 40 
guys that apply for this job and 
many qualify for it. The deans 
have to narrow it down to a 
handful and choose. So you're 
fortunate to get an RA position. 
Usually an RA has to be super 
dedicated to fulfilling his respon- 
sibilities. 

Do you feel that dorm worship 
Is necessary every night? 

McMillan: I'm for it because 
the students tend to get wrapped 
up in their studies and forget 
about Christ and the Holy Spirit. 
Here they have a chance to relax 
and draw nearer to Christ on a 
daily basis. 

Pabon: Yes. I like it very much 
because it provides us with a 
variety of speakers and music 
styles. It's a time of relaxation. 

Have you ever encountered ao 
individual possesed to some ei' 
tent or maybe even spiritually 
low? 

McMillan: No, nothing like 
exorcism, but 1 do witness for 
Christ. 

Pabon: Once a guy wanted to 
commit suicide and I had to talk 
him out of it. And if anybody 
shows signs of a spiritual low, I'll 
go to them on my own and talk to 
them. 

How do yonr friends relate to 
you as an RA? 

Pabon: One or two have com- 
plained that it's such an easy job. 
But they don't realize that some 
nights I have to stay up late, 
waiting for some fellows to come 
in. Outside of just a couple 
complaints, all my friends tree! 
me the same. 

Do yon have a roommate? 

McMillan: Yes, the Thaichet 
RA's have roommates. 

Pabon: No. I have to i""i" 
alone so that no one will interleu 
with my counseling. 




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Campus Cfosgiiieds 



lliiinday, November 10, 1977 THE SOUTHEKN ACCENT - 7 

^ 



uragement. 
Wednesday, 



r Penny Drive 
> being used for 



Congratulations John and Vanessa, Rita and Gordo 

• l*"!"? "'h'"/,"^.]'?.®- *^' "°t,=<a™ed after Bible Conference. It was brought to 
Thatcher Hall. If it is yours please claim at desk - it's in the mail room. 

9 Urgently need a ride to New York City for Thanksgiving. Can leave on Tuesday 
afternoon Please help me get horael I'll help with gas (of course). Sorry. . . can't 
drive. Thatcher 4468. 

9 Tita, dejame decirte que te toca pasarle el vacuum cleaner este Viemes -- Cariina. 
#Carlina, Recuerda pagarme los $20 que ne debes. IPagal Tita. 

• To all people who lose things or think they're getting stolen. Don't put on a fake "I 
don't care but God'll get you for that." I'm sick of iti Your own forgetfulness is 
making you look like a fool. 

9 For Sale: 7 X 50 Binoculars. Fair Condition. $10. Contact Rav, B-U Talee or call 
396-4970. ^ 

It's that time of year again when everyone starts getting excited about Christmas. 
I've got just the thing to add the right touch of spirit during the holiday season. And 
it's only $2.50. Buy a pretty red funy Christmas stocking. Just the right size for all 
those litUe goodies to surprise that special someone on Christmas. Call Debbie at 
396-3401 or Lucy (Thatcher 331) at 4575. Delivered to your door. 

9 Would you like to help a struggling young freshman have an enjoyable Thanksgiving 
vacation at home? You can - if you happen to be driving anywhere in the vicinity of 
southeastern Ohio. I will help pay for gas, etc. Contact me (Sam McBride) at Talge 
169 - phone 4722. Think of what a good deed you would be doingi 

W Congratulations to John and Vanessa from Ray and Jeanne. 

The Chattanooga Symphony Orchestra will perform five more times in the Tivoli this 
year Seats are available in the student section for $2 per ticket. Trans- 
portation will be provided for those who need it. Only 14 seats available, so please 
notify Becki Joiner (4023) or Debbie Gainer (4425) early for your assurance of a seat. 
Sponsored by your SA Academic Activities. 

9 Poetry lovers and writers! ! Don't miss" your chance to share your poetry with serious 
poets in the newly formed poetry club. Copy your writing to give to Debbie Gainer 
(#126) or the English department by Monday, Nov. 14, so that she can mimeograph 
them for the group to read together and give critiques and < 
The next meeting will be at 6 p.m. in the cafeteria banquet rooi 
November 16. 
W The Leaves of Autumn wishes to thank those who contributed to ( 
which we had in September. The drive brought in $128.57 which 
literature. On Ingathering Field Day, Oct. 11th some 1250 Steps To Christ were 
given out to the public contacts made that day. We will never know the full success 
of this outreach. We wish to thank those who took advantage of it. 

Leaves of Autumn has purchased a large literature distribution rack which is 
currentiy in the Student Center. All students are welcome to make use of the 
literature available there. Recentiy the Leaves of Autumn gave the new Center 
Grove Church a "Conflict of the Ages" set, which will help to complete the S.D.A. 
library of that church. 

If you have any special needs in the area of literature to give out, feel free to 
contact either Tom Hall or David Kay, at 4768; Rick Blondo, 4732; or Kirk King 4683. 
Keep on the look out for literature packets for the Thanksgiving vacation. 
"Spread them like the leaves of autumn." David Kay, Chairman - Leaves of 
Autumn 

w Are you holding up Christ's second coming, or are you hastening it, or are neither of 
these choices holding to true doctrine? Elder Helmut Ott will speak about his 
"Haste-Delay" thesis Tuesday, November 15, at 7:30 p.m. in the Student Center 
cube room. Valuable insights, theories, and scriphiral evidence pertaining to this 
quarter's Sabbath School lessons. A must for Sabbath School teachers, theology 
majors, and concerned persons. Sponsored by your SA Academic Activities. 

• The special feature for this week in the cafeteria banquet room for Friday noon films 
will be the Litfle Rascals in "Kid From Borneo." Don't miss the exciting, episode of 
this hilarious group of innocents. Sponsored by your SA Academic Activities. 

9 Have you noticed the photograph-posters that have been appearing on the 
Student Center bulletin board? These are part of a new idea in P.R. for tiie college 
yearbook - the Southern Memories. 

Why have P.R. for the yearbook which we all will receive anyway? Well, actually 
we are promoting what the yearbook is about, not really the book itself 
Nahirally, the "about" we're speaking of is SMC and its atmosphere. We're seeking 
to create an awareness in you as to your realizing the unique sihiation of which you 
are a part. 

Oiir posters tell of the unity, love, joy, spirituality, etc. of and between we 
shldents. We hope that you will take tiie time- to contemplate the message of each 
poster which we are now posting campus-wide. 

One plea in closing - the first photo placed in Thatcher Hall was stolen. 
This will necessitate bypassing Thatcher as a locale for these in the ftihire. 
Fellow brothers and sisters, please control the impulse to mark on or steal these 
posters. We'd like to continue with this during the whole year. 

• SA Forum Townhouse meeting - Joint Worship 7 p.m. ONLY. At the P.E. Center 
Nov. 10. 

• JUNGLE BUNNY you better hop faster or you will get caught. Jungle Jim 

^ Hide Neededl to Huntington, TO pr Jackson, TN . for Thanksgiving vacation. Can 
leave Wed. a.m. 11/23. Can help ^ay for gas. Call Rick at 4721 (leave message with 
roommate if not in, or call fitont desk 4391 and leave message) or Box 167. 

9 Happy Birthday Sweetheart. Yours, Me 

• A ride leaving Wednesday is needed for Julie for Thanksgiving vacation to 
Greenville, SO, Fletcher, Pisgah, or surrounding area. Please contact Mrs. Merchant 
4332 or 396-2724. 




w Ode To Jennifer 

Ah, if there were not Autumn 
Then would a giri, a young thing, be not here 
For it is in this glorious time, this Fall. 
That she, to her life, can add another year. 

In this, the eleventh month 

At a late hour on the 10th 

She was bom and made her parents smile 

They conspired together and called her Jen. 

So, as this, the 21st year of her life. 
Comes to a close today and she begins < 
May you think of her and wish her well 
And turn her skies from gray to blue. 

9 HELP! ! Ride to Miami desperately needed for five. Leaving December 19: or ride 
back to Collegedale on Jan. 8; or BOTH. We will help with driving and gas. 
Please call: 396-4636 or leave message Box 371 Thatcher. Call any time (day or 
night) 

9 DID YOU KNOW - Delta, Eastern, United, Southern, and American Airiines all 
have no flight to Nashville from Chattanooga. Rent a Cessna 172 from the 
Collegedale Aero Service, Inc. 

# IT'S SAID THEIR NUMBERS ONCE FILLED THE CLASSROOM. 

Students Unlimited is a non-profit organization that works to protect and restore 
student resources where United States Federal funds don't reach. And 70 per cent of 
our students in private colleges don't receive outside help. Help keep the students 
enrolling. Send your tax deductible donations to: Students Unlimited, Box 166 
Talge, Collegedale, Tenn., 37315 Please. Shldents Unlimited. WE NEED YOUR 
HELP. NOW. 

9 "Music at the Palace" will be the theme of this semester's talent program, which 
will be held this Saturday night, Nov. 12, at 8 p.m. in the P.E. Center. 
The hostesses of the program are Judy Martin and Melanee Snowden. The program 
will consist of SMC's finest talent in all areas of entertainment. Tickets can be 
acquired at the Student Center desk free by all ID card holders, and $1 for non-ED 
card holding adults, and 75 cents for children under 12. 

Tired of tests? Sick of school? Can't cope with college? NOW for your convenience, 
Dial-A-Joke is available in this area! Call 396-4697. Nojokel It's for real! Mark 
Smith. 

^ Attention Seniors!! For all those who, 1. didn't get their portraits taken, 2. haven't 
chosen the proof they want for the annual, and 3. want their portraits retaken, the 
Olan Mills representatives will be here again Monday 14th, between 4:00-7:00 p.m. 
Proofs will be here a week later. This will be the last chance, so be sure to be there. 
There is no other possible chance. 



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8 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT nianday, November 10, 1977 

Rock Cont. 



ASHTON cont. from p. 5 - 



and promoted by such a music, 

3 speaking of solemnit>', of earnest, 
intense, heartfelt in\-itation, rath- 
er than hv the frothy, flippant, or 
openly sentimental stuff fre- 
quently pawned off as gospel 
music today.) Is there really any 
reason to believe that the Roman 
church improved its position as 
"the" arbiter of divine grace by 
gradually accepting the 



of 



music, against the counsel of its 
leadership? 

Cauffiel speaks of the "ampli- 
fied tones of an electric guitar" -- 
amplified is certainly a key word, 
for most rock is intended to be 
experienced at dynamic levels 
approaching the threshold of 
pain. (Goveniraent regulations 
limit newlv-constructed jets to a 
take-off sound limit of 108 
decibels; rock concerts have been 
known to hit 120 decibels, and 
they continue for hours on end.) 
This bludgeoning of the ear and 
the mind hardly seems a possible 
setting for "Be still and know that 
I am God." or "In quietness and 

strength." Elijah did not need 
the cacophony of 450 shrieking, 
stomping priests of Baal to sell 
the children of Israel on the 
saving power of the true God. 
If Christianit\' is to be persuasive 
(see EGW in the SDA Bible Com- 
mentary, vol. 1. p. 1120), then it 
does not seem right to link it with 
a musical style which Is by nature 



"Most rock consists of three 
chords." With this statement 
Cauffiel seems to legitimize rock 
by Unking it with easy listening, 
spirituals, -'some classical 
music." etc. Bui music is much 
too intangible, too indefinable an 
experience, to be sorted out pure- 
ly on the basis of its simplicity or 



complexity. There are too many 
other elements involved (e.g., 
loudness, tension and release, 
tone qualit>', rhythm, even the 
attitude of the performer). What- 
ever the musical appeal of rock, it 
is not an appeal to the intellect. 
In this sense rock might even 
seem to be the medium of the 
cheap musician - even a beginner 
at the piano can rapidly achieve a 
passable rock sound, needing 
only two or three chords and a 
loud, relatively undisciplined ap- 
proach to the keys. (But whence 
does he move then toward that 
"highest development of all our 
powers" which is the first duty 
we owe to God and to our fellow 

"To judge an entire youth cul- 
ture hell bound (is) fanaticism." 
Is it really, now? When Jesus felt 
compelled to lament. "When the 
Son of Man cometh. shall He find 
faith on the earth;" when Ellen 
White estimates the number of 
youth and/or adults within pro- 
fessing Christendom who have a 
genuine, personal salvation ex- 
perience at less than 5 per cent, 
how can we view an entertain- 
ment-centered, sex-and-drug- 
linked, "Switch-off-to-reality- 
and-blow-your-mind" culture in 
any other way? Cauffiel has not 
grasped the distinction which the 
mind of God sees between sin and 
the sinner, and he objects to 
alienating the latter by necessary 
condemnation of the former. 
Of course we need to touch the 
lives of these kids; of course we 
need to reach them with love, 
earnestly leading them to Christ; 
but let us ;iot fool ourselves with 
the notion that rock is an appro- 
priate means of preaching the 
gospel to them. Let us rather 
offer them a gospel of deliverance 
from uncontrolled passion and 






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irresponsibility through com- 
plete, willing submission to 
Christ. Let us show them the real 
abundant life, not a sickly hybrid 
Jesus-freak religion propagated 
by the same enslaving means that 
has held them captive in the past. 
If we belong to the remnant 
church, in the world but not of the 
world, let us not shun the "scorn 
and ridicule" which may result 
from rightly dividing the world of 
truth, from steadfastly opposing 
those philosophies and practices 
which are inimicably opposed to 
the gospel of real salvation in 
Jesus Christ. 

Sincerely, 

J. Bruce Ashton 
Professor of Music 



GLADSON cont. from p. 5 

blessing (e.g.. Ps. 104 contains a 
number of parallels to the Egyp- 
tian "Hymn to Aton"). (4) The 
incarnation suggests that God al- 
ways seeks to communicate His 
will in human idiom. Indeed, 
without commonality there can be 
no revelation. There is no reason 
to feel that music should be ex- 
empt from this fact. 

My remarks should in no way 
be taken as an endorsement of 
rock music. Personally. I find 
such music abhorrent. But neith- 
er dare I say that God could not 
work through this medium if He 
so desired. After all. He did some 
very strange things in Scripture. 
He might even surprise us today! 

Jerry Gladson 

Assistant Professor of Religion 



Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 




Warrior's Game 
Banned By Kings 



The game of football has a rich 
history of popularity. The famous 
pastime has its roots in England, 
where it was played during vil- 
lage festivals in medieval ages. 

The game was violent from its 
very inception. Fighting a war 
was sometimes less important to 
the soldiers than playing football. 
A Scottish writer noted that the 
Anglo- Scottish War in 1297 was 
not taken with proper seriousness 
by either side. King Edward's 
men were from Cheshire and 
Lancashire. The Scotts were old 
rivals in football as well as 
enemies on the battlefield. The 
Tianders had a hard time of 
keeping the men from playing 
football with their opponents. 

lagine the shock of the lead- 
ers upon seeing their men en- 
aged in a rough game with the 
other side." Edward 111 decided 
1 1365 to prohibit football for this 
reason. 

Further edicts were made by 
Richard II, Henry IV, Henry VIII, 
d Elizabeth I. Football became 
more popular nonetheless. 
Meanwhile, the festival match- 
became more popular. They 
had the marks of later football 
th passing, running, and old- 
fashioned tackling. The ball was 
made of a blown bladder covered 
with leather. Rugby is actually 
closer to the early game. The 
olence was always present. 
There were no pads to absorb the 
blows and "the thousand natural 
hocks that flesh is heir to..." 



The Men's Club Presents 

the TALGE HAU WHITE ELEPHANT SALE 







Sunday. Nov. 13 6 - 7:30 p.i 



DOOR PRIZE! 

OPEN TO ALL STUDENTS! 



I ;J fr- jl / Auction anything you own! 

Vis ^ ^ '"' >vi> 25% of proceeds go to Men's Club. 



(Hamlet). 

When games got out of hand 
players would kick each other's 
shins, tear clothes, and break 
some heads. A Frenchman 
watching a game at Derby ex 
claimed that if this is the English, 
man's method of playing it would 
be impossible to say what thev 
would call fighting. ' 

Gradually, a player was al- 
lowed to run with the ball and 
later, pass. The U.S. universities 
began playing intercollegiate 
games, in the 19th century 
Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and 
Rutgers were among the first 
schools to use an U-man team. 
Football evolved from Rugby in 
several successive steps. The 
quarterback, touchdowns, safe- 
Hes. and hiking the ball were 
invented in the U,S. 

Deans 

Battle 
In The 
Courts 

□Mark Kurzynske 

Warren Halversen is the new, 
residing tennis champion at the 
Men's Qub. On Friday, Oct. 28. 
Halversen defeated Ted Evans in 
three sets, 2-6, 6-2, 6-4. 

After Evans took the openiag 
set and Halversen the second by 
the identical score, Halversen put 
on a spectacular rally to win the 
match. Evans was ahead in the 
final set 4-2 with his service score 
40-15 in the seventh game. Hal- 
versen broke Evans' service win- 
ning the seventh game and the 
rest of the games of the set and 
match. 

Evans states, "I have no ex- 
cuses, we both played well and it 
could have gone either way." 
It was a well-played match in 
which both men had their good 
games going. The contest took 
two hours to play. 



i' 

' DISCOVER YOUR CREDIT UNION 

' We re doing more for you! 

COLLEGEDALE CREDIT UNION 
► College plaza 

Phone: 396-2101 

Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 2 p,m Monday 

6-7 p.m. Monday and Thursday 




""tt 



V, 








%o 



Class Cracks Embryo Secrets 



DJohn Henson IV 

General Embryology class, studying the growth and development 
of orgamsms, ,s now m.dway into their semester project. Taught by 
E O. Grundset, assocate professor of biology, the study, indudes 
the period from conception till the embryo comes to term (hatches) 

half hour Ub"" """""^ ^'^"^ " *"'''' "'""^ "'* " ^° '"^ '^ 

The project consists of incubating chicken eggs and breaking 

frrtthand^" ^' ""'"'"' ^^' P"'"^^ »° observe the developments 

During incubation the students assume the role of the hen by 

. turnmg the eggs four times a day for 21 days - that is 84 trips to the 

mcubator. 
The first egg is opened after 18 ho6rs of incubation and unless the 

egg happens to be infertile, the students can already discern the 



differentiation and organization of the cells on top of the yolk 
(blastodisc). Successive observations are made every 6 to 12 hours 
for the first two days. Looking at the embryo at about 48 hours, the 
students can see the chicks heart begin to flutter and then start a 
steady beat of about 148 beats per minute. 

Following this, eggs are opened at set times to observe further 
development, with the embryo coming to term at the end of the 21 
days. 

"The last observation is the hatching process," stated Mark 
Godenick, senior biology major, "and each student is to allow two 
eggs to hatch." 

The hatched chicks are then usually given to someone who lives in 
the country. 



The Southern Accent 

Voice of ffie Soufhern Missionary College Sfudent 



Vol. 33 No. 12 



Thursday, Novemeber 17, 1977 



CoUegedale, Tenn. 



City Votes Not To Penalize 
Brown Bros. For Road Delay 



D Dennis Canther 

A 45-day extension has been 
granted Brown Brothers Con- 
struction Company by last week's 
City Commission meeting. 

The 45-day extension of time 
was granted the Brown Brothers 
Construction Company only so a 
penalty would not be invoked. 
This will not prolong the comple- 
tion of the entrance road," City 
Manager Lee Holland said. 

Because Brown Brothers did 
not complete the road construc- 
tion on time in accordance with 
the contract, CoUegedale could 
impose a monetary penalty for 
each day the road construction 
exceeds the contract's time limit. 

In the City Commission meet- 
ing held last week, however, the 
commissioners voted unamimous- 
ly not to penalize Brown Brothers 
and to extend the contract for 
three reasons, said Holland: _ 

1- American 'Telephone and 
Telegraph, the Collegedale- 
Chickamauga Telephone, Chat- 
tanooga Gas, and the Chatta- 
nooga Electric Power Board were 
all required to move their lines, 
either off the hill or rerouted 
along the shoulder of the new 
road, which took longer than was 
estimated. 

2. The 20-inch rainfall in Oc- 
tober was the most received for 
that month in a 100-year history, 
making construction virtually im- 
possible on those days because of 
muddy road conditions. 

3. When a penalty is invoked 



against a construction compan/, 
considering the above reasons, a 
bad name is put on the city which 
hired them. When the city needs 
other construction jobs done, 
word passed between construc- 
tion companies will cause the bids 
to be substantially higher. 

Mayor DeWitt Bowen said the 
road is now ready for the stone 
base, except for a small section in 
front of McKee's Plant One. 
This section can be finished while 
the county, expected to arrive this 
week, is laying the stone base on 



the hill. 

W.T. McGhinnis, city commis- 
sioner of public works and roads, 
said ','The extension will not af- 
fect how soon we will drive on the 
new road. This will only allow for 
necessary guardrails, seeding 
and strawing to be completed." 

"Some seeding and the com- 
pletion of the road surface will be 
delayed until spring, stated 
Holland, "but we are still antici- 
pating completion of a hard sur- 
face for Thanksgiving or soon 
after." 



Appliances Talk Back 
In Toronto, Canada 



TORONTO. Canada - When a 
Toronto woman complained that 
her electric toaster talked back, to 
her. the Canadian Department of 
Communications was somewhat 
Jess than surprised. 

It was just another of the 100 to 
125 complaints the department 
receives each month concerning 
citizens band radio-caused inter- 
ference. According to John 
Nosotti, the department's en- 
forcement supervisor, CB inter- 
ference is being picked up all 
through Canada by a variety of 
products ranging from TV sets to 
mouths wired shut after j*w frac- 
tures. 



B«liiiid Po«0 ©«• 

Village Studente Get Lockers P- ^ 

Charles Fleming Defends Hands SUtoe P- 3 

Don't Risk It P- ' 



In the case of the Toronto wo- 
man, she had just scolded her 
toaster for burning the toast 
when it replied in a tinny voice, 
"10-4. good buddy." An inspec- 
tor examining the situation dis- 
covered that the toaster's wire 
coils were vibrating against the 
tin backplate. giving the effect of 
a speaker. 

It was said that the toaster was 
resonant at the same frequency as 
a CB unit transmitting from a 
nearby apartment building. 

Nosotti noted that whenever 
two wires inside of a toaster or 
kitchen stove are the collect 
length, they could pick up CB 
energy transmissions and give an 
audio effect. 

At present, Canada has 190,000 
licensed CB sets, of which 25,000 
are located in Metropolitan 
Toronto. Area residents Have 
reported CB transmissions com- 
ing in over their televisions, car 
radios, stereo.s, Upe recorders, 
telephones and church public ad- 
dress systems, among others 




Call DIal-A-Prayer after 4 p.m. by dialing H-O-P-E 14673). 
Campus Ministries has also remodeled (he Student Center 
Prayer Room which will be dedicated tonight at Johit worship, 
Nov. 17, by Elder Diet Barron from the GC Youth Department, 
Photo by Don Jehle 



Shaw Sniffs Ouf Trash 
Fire In Thafcher Hall 



DTetesa Shaw 

Tri-Community Fire Depart- 
ment (TCED) received a fire re- 
port call Friday, Nov. 4, at ap- 
proximately 11:34 a.m. Engine 
four was immediately dispatched 
to Thatcher Hall, womens' resi- 
dence. 

Rahn Shaw, maintenance work- 
er at Thatcher and volunteer fire- 
man at TCEP. smelled smoke on 
first floor, east wmg.Upon invest- 
igation Shaw discovered that an 
excessive amount of trash was 
jammed in the incinerator shute 
between first floor and the base- 



ment, causing an un 'sual amount 
of smoke and fire to creep up into 
the shute. 

After phoning TCED, Shaw 
knocked much of the trash on 
through the shute with a broom 
handle. Fireman arriving on the 
scene were then able to extin- 
guish the fire with a fire 
extinguisher. 

Lt. Benny Waller said, "No 
real damage occurred; however, 
had it not been discovered at an 
early stage there could hav« been 
smoke damage to surrounding 
rooms." 



2 ■ THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thnred*)', November 17, 1977 




Ja\ Craven, Quttanooga cUrinetlBt to play with SMC orchestra 
Nov. 19. 

Orchestra Features 
Craven & 20th C. Music 



D Vanessa Greenleaf 

Jay M. Craven, a noted clar- 
inetist in Chattanooga, will be the 
guest artist with the SMC orches- 
tra at their home concert Saturday 
night, Nov. 19. 

Craven is currently the prin- 
cipal clarinetist with the Chat- 
tanooga Symphony Orchestra and 
the Chattanooga Opera Orches- 
tra. He is also an instructor in 
clarinet at the University of Ten- 
nessee in Chattanooga. Previous- 
ly, he has taught in the Chat- 
tanooga public schools, conduct- 
ed the Chattanooga Symphony 



Youth Orchestra, and appeared 
as guest conductor, clinician, and 
adjudicator for music contests 
and festivals in the southeastern 
United States. 

The concert, with conductor 
Orlo Gilbert, starts at 8:00 p.m. in 
the gym and will consist mainly of 
19th century pieces with two 20th 
century numbers, Copland's 
"Hoe down from 'Rodeo'" and 
"Fiddle Faddle" played by Bill 
Hughes, guest soloist, on the 
accordion. 



D Dennis Starkey 

This year the students of the 
Art Appreciation class will jour- 
ney to New York City during the 
Thanksgiving break to increase 
their knowledge and awareness of 
the famous artists and their 
works. 

Fourteen students will be 
traveling to the Big Apple to visit 
a retrospective showing of 
Cezanne's works at the Museum 
of Modem Art, an exhibition of 
Irish treasures from the late 
medieval period. They will also 
stop at the Metropolitan Museum 
of Art. 

Five students from the behavi- 
oral science department, led by 
Ed Lamb, associate professor of 
behavioral science, will be travel- 
ing along with the art students for 
the first time. Once they arrive in 
New York City, however, the two 
groups will go their separate 
ways. The behavioral science 
students will take a social policy 
tour of ethnic neighborhoods 
given by representatives from 
Hunter College, see the operation 
of David Wilkerson's "Teen Chal- 



$1,700-Prize Offered 
To Writers By Insight 



The editors of Insight have 
announced the 1978 Writing 
Contest. Cash prizes will total 
$1,700 and will include a $500 
grand award. 

The contest is open in two 
categories: the short story, and 
poetry. Separate judges will be 
involved. Prizes in each category 
" poetry and short story -- will be: 
$250. first; $200, second; $150, 
third. There will be one grand 
prize of $500. 

Insight is looking for stories 
that illuminate aspects of Chris- 
tian living such as those based on 
witnessing experiences, social re- 
lationships, parent- children en- 
counters, school life, young mar- 
ried situations, and any story that 
deals with the religious dimen- 
sion. This does not mean obvi- 
ous, preachy, moralizing kind of 
materials. 



Insight is currently overstocked 
with I'enfuit terrible, or the 
struggles- of -a- youthful -rebel- 
type stories, but nonetheless rec- 
ognizes that occasionally such a 
story, while painful, may provide 
a mirror of man that can have a 
positive result. A second caution 
has to do with the notion that a 
good religious story must include 
overtly religious elements or be 
based upon a miracle or some- 
thing tragic, sensational, or out of 
the ordinary. Actually, religious 
literature succeeds in the same 
way secular literature does, 
through description, credible dia- 
log, interesting characters, subtle 
themes, et cetera. 

Short stories submitted for this 
contest should be short. No more 
than 1800 words. 

All stories should be based on 
actual events. The writer may 



Art &Beh.Sci. Collaborate 
In New York Thanksgiving 



change names, reconstruct con- 
versation, and juxtapose situa- 
tions for purposes of dramatic 
interest. 

Poetry should encourage in- 
spiring thought and may be writ- 
ten in a variety of rhymed or 
unrhymed patterns. However, 
good poetry is now to be associat- 
ed with nebulous, open-ended, 
quickly written verse. Contrary to 
popular opinion, very few people 
are able to write poetry, and for 



this_ reason the Insight editors 
encourage contestants to use 
traditional meters, rhymes, and 
forms. 

Persons entering poetry should 
note the impressive simplicity of a 
poem like W.B. Yeats's "The 
Lake Isle of Innisfree," or John 
Keats's "To Autumn." The point 
IS that poetry can be uplifting 
without being blatantly religious; 
it can be profound, yet simple and 
short. 



Tri Beta Camp Pulls 
Up Stakes In Georgia 



lenge" storefront drug treatment 
centers, and act as Salvation 
Army volunteers, serving 
Thanksgiving day meals to tran- 
sient, unemployed persons in the 
Bowery, a skid row area in lower 
Manhattan. 

Those from both departments 
will be staying at the New York 
Center in Times Square, from 
which they will embark on shop- 
ping sprees, tours of the World 
Trade Center and United Nations 
building, and a ride on the Staten 
Island Ferry to view the Statue of 
Liberty. One of the highlights of 
the trip, Garren pointed out, will 
be to see Santa Claus in the 
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Pa- 
rade. 

Wrapping up their expedition, 
they'll attend services at an ortho- 
dox Jewish synagogue on Friday 
night, go to Sabbath School and 
church, and then explore the 
Bronx Zoo on Sabbath afternoon. 
Lamb hopes to make this an 
annual pilgrimage for the behavi- 
oral science department also, 
provided there is a good response 
from the students. 



marshmallows, singing songs, 
and eating weiners. Nights were 
for pulling stakes and collapsing 
tents on top of people. The 
weekend was blessed with clear 
weather, for which the campers 
were grateful. ' Reports Ann 
Foster, "We were very glad it 
didn't rain, because the tent sit- 
uation was a little overcrowded." 
Tri Beta is currently planning a 
trip to Cookeville, Tenn., Nov. 18, 
for a state-wide science conven- 
tion. Scientists of all realms-from 
biology to geology -- will be there 
to conduct lecture presentations. 



New Lockers 
To Ease 




Steel lockers to be placed In the <:tnrf»n» r — I 

viUage'students. ^"* *^°'^' 8*™* "»™ for 



DDebra Gainer 

Tri Beta, the biology club, 
camped out at Lake Conasauga in 
the Georgia mountains several 
weeks ago. 

Dr. Duane Houck was sponsor 
for 20 students who camped in 
tents and sleeping bags beside 
The lake. Harriet DeJoia, local 
ecologist, also accompanied the 
group, leading them on several 
walks and showing them the plant 
life of the area. She explained 
how the local forestry work was 
conducted and how cutting down 
trees benefits rather than de- 
stroys a forest. 

Sabbath was spent taking baths 
in an icy stream, and hiking up 
and down the surrounding moun- 
tains. Qarence Carr, club pres- 
ident, gave the lesson study at a 
fire tower atop a mountain, while 
the hikers relaxed on the grassy 
slopes. 

Evenings were for sitting a- 1 lUkr^rV/ 
round the campfire, roasting L I \J\ U I Jr 

Live-In 
Problem 

DVanessa Greenleaf 

Thirty new lockers have been 
ordered for the village students, 
according to Ken Rogers, SA 
president. The 15 x 15 x 12 bright 
red lockers will be located in the 
game room in the Student Center. 

■The SA will furnish locks for 
the village students for a small 
rental fee if they want to have 
their locker locked," Rogers 
stated. Those lockers that do not 
have locks on them will be clean- 
ed out every night and all books 
found in them will be turned in » 
the lost and found department. 
"We want to keep the lockers 
fresh and clean and don't want a 
pile of junk around," comraenteo 
Rogers. 

Only 30 lockers have been or- 
dered because the SA wants » 
see how well they will be use^ 
Making the lockers available o 
village students is calculaleo 
alleviate the live-ins at '!« 
library. 

The locker installation date has 
not yet been determined. 



nmreday, November 17, 1977 THE SODTHEKN ACCENT - 3 



Fleming Defends Hands Of God Statue 



reprinted with permlBslon 

It was my privilege, along with 
my wife and Dr. and Mrs. Knittel, 
to meet neariy a year ago witli tlie 
College architect, Jack Tyler, his 
wife, and the sculptor, Victor 
Contreras, to view his creation in 
miniature of a symbolic statue 
entitled, "The Hands of God." 
As I sat there that evening view- 
ing the colored slides, my mind 
wandered thoughtfully, and then 
somewhat emotionally, over all 
the services those hands had per- 
formed that contributed to my 
salvation. 

In the days that followed, as I 
found in my heart a deepening 
desire to see that symbol of Christ 
erected on our campus, I had to 
ask myself what relationship this 
entity had to the idols or graven 
images we have been admonished 
to avoid. I reali2ed how easy it 
could be for either good or evil 
spirits to make an impression on 
me to take a position for or 
against, and then, forgetting con- 
viction, to support my expressed 
opinion. Desiring to avoid this 
normal and too customary pro- 
cedure, I went to the Scriptures -- 
particularly the experiences of the 
children of Israel in the wilder- 

In Patriarchs and Prophets, the 

chapter entitled Idolatry at Sinai, 
Ellen White vividly portrays the 
sequence of events contributing 
to Aaron's great sin in forming a 
molten calf in imitation of the 
gods of Egypt. The children of 



Israel were, as usual, rebellious. 
The cloud that heretofore had led 
them had now rested upon the 
mountain for several days. The 
people's faith was weak and they 
gathered about Aaron's tent with 
the demand, "Make us gods 
which shall go before us; for as 
for this Moses, the man that 
brought us up out of the land of 
Egypt, we wot not what is become 
of him." And Aaron, fearing for 
his own safety, yielded to their 
demands. 

That this experience was any- 
thing but idolatry and premed- 
itated, goes without question. 
However, not many years later in 
their wilderness wanderings the 
children of Israel encountered an 
entirely different experience. In 
spite of the miraculous daily pro- 
vision of manna, water from the 
rock, and peace and safety under 
the cloud by day and pillar of fire 
by night, they complained against 
God and Moses. Finally, God 
withdrew His protection and 
great numbers of the people were 
attacked by fiery serpents. Peo- 
ple were dying in almost every 
tent and the silence of the night 
was broken by their piercing 
cries. 

Now the people humbled them- 
selves before God. They confes- 
sed to Moses, "We have sinned 
for we have spoken against the 
Lord and against Thee." So God 
commanded Moses to make a 
serpent of brass to be elevated 
among the people and all who 



were bitten were bid to look and 
be healed. 

The lifting up of the brazen 
serpent was to teach Israel an 
important lesson. They could not 
save themselves from the fatal 
effect of the poison in then- 
wounds. God alone was able to 
heal them. Yet, they were re- 
quired to show theu- faith in the 
provision which He had made. 
They must look in order to live. .. it 
was a symbol of Christ; and the 
necessity of faith in His merits 
was thus presented to their 
minds. As Moses lifted up the 
serpent in the wilderness, even so 
was the Son of Man 'lifted up', 
that whosoever believeth in Him 
should not perish, but have ever- 
lasting life." Desire of Ages 
pages 430, 431. 

As I read of these two exper- 
iences, my questions were an- 
swered. God deplores the wor- 
ship of idols. God commends that 
which draws our hearts and 
minds to the provisions made for 
our salvation through His Son. 
On Him we must look to live. 

The Son of Man must be lifted 
up in our lives in every manner 
possible. Ellen White writes, 
(DA p. 83) "It would be well for 
us to spend a thoughtful hour 
each day in contemplation of the 
life of Christ. We should take it 
point by point and let the imagin- 
ation grasp each scene, especially 
the closing ones." 

That evening in Jack Tyler's 
office, as I observed the beautiful 



cupped hands of the Son of God, 
in my imagination 1 placed 
myself, my life, my future in His 

hands. Where the thumbs paral- 
led each other, the space between 
the first and second joints formed 
the shape of a heart and from that 
heart a drop of blood descended - 
shed for my sins, to cover them 
with His love and righteousness. 
As I looked upon His hands, I 
thought - these were the hands 

•which in the beginning 
formed the worlds 

•that touched the eyes 
of the blind and made them see 

•that stilled the tempest 

that fashioned furniture 
in the carpenter shop at Nazareth 

•that encircled the little 
children the disciples would have 
sent away 

•that touched the casket 
of the widow's son of Nain and 
brought him back to life 

•that rested upon the 
heads of the 12 - and of the 70 in 
ordination 

•that broke bread to 
feed 5,000 by the sea of Galilee 
and again broke bread for the 
Last Supper in the upper room 



•and these were the 
hands (I saw the prints) that were 
nailed to the tree, for my sins, 
that made me free 

I have seen these hands often 
since in my imagination. I have 
visualized the naU holes, the 
broken heart, and the shed blood. 



Those hands held out to me the 
invitation to - 

"Come, place your life com- 
pletely in My Hands - in My cate 
" I shall never leave thee nor 
forsake thee. I shall be with you 
alway, even unto the end." 



If our purpose at SMC is to 
encourage youth (Ednc. p. 17) to 
think for themselves and not be 
mere reflectors of the thoughts of 
others, what better place could be 
provided for their meditation than 
a group of benches half-circled 
before these "Hands of God" out 
on our front mall bordered by 
trees and shrubs to effect some 
degree of privacy. We have fine 
buildings, facilities, and tools 
here on our campus. What a 
wonderful addition would be the 
'gift' of such a setting where 
individuals from far and near, 
from all churches, could find their 
way to this campus where in this 
setting and atmosphere they 
could sit quietly, and mentally 
and spiritually place their lives in 
the hands of God. 

As Moses raised up the serpent 
in the wilderness so all could look 
and live, so we may raise up the 
hands of God on our campus 
inviting all to place their lives 
under His care. I beheve deeply 
that God would thereby be honor- 
ed and souls drawn closer to His 
Kingdom. 

Charles Fleming, Jr. 
10/14/76 



ptma«tn ?itnntnntnn ! !iii ! i !i i ii i i ii;i 



i;ii iin i ii !i ii; ! » iiiiiiiiii ii i iii!m; i iii ; miiiiiiim; i iii i ii i i miMrifMi-mimmnm. t i timiiriiiii i ii i in 



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^^ervices 



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WRITE or PHONE 

Adventist Health Services 
Alt: Director of Recruitment 
1545 N. Verdugo Rd., (Box 2054; 
Glendale, Calif. 91209 
(213) 246-8326 



Let us be a part of your future! 



* Vtilization of your professional skills! 
* Dedication of yom Christian influence! 
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(A DIVISION OF THE PACfflC UNION CONFEHENCE] 



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4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thurwtay, November 17, 1977 



Pac 



o 



Editorial 



Next to Jones Hall stands a building beloved by Humanities. Math, 
and Physics students alike - Daniells Hall. Being located next to the 
English department, it was inevitable that some disgruntled Comp 
student who'd gotten a C on his last writing because of spelling, or some 
sharp-eyed Accent proofreader would notice the inconsistency displayed 
to all the worid on the front of Daniells Hall. 

■What inconsistency?" you ask. "Being a Christian institution we 
can't have a double standard!" 

Mavbe it can't be called a double standard, but it's definitely an 
inconsistency. 

There's a plaque above the main door that proclaims the building 
A G Daniells Hall. Look it up in your Foundations of the Advent 
Movement syllabus. D-A-N-I-E-L-L-S. Yep. that's O.K. But then step 
back a few paces and look at the bold black letters on the white lintel, 
which of course, are the ones everybody reds. What do they spell? 
Well, the A.G. looks good, but D-A-N-1-E-L-S. Hey! 

O.K. -- who ripped off with the other "L"? 

Well if nobody's been vandalizing the place, then that must have 
been the wav someone intended it to be. And it's been there for years. 
No wonder a cry has gone up against the poor literacy of college 
graduates ■■ especially if they learn to spell off the signs on campus! 

Surely our signs can portray a .more consistent and correct image to 
students and visitors alike. 

So keep your chins up, struggling spellers, as you pass the English 
department in Jones Hall, which according to the sign, also houses Art, 
B.S. Nursing, and several women students. Oops! 



Dear Editor: 

In response to the article 
* ' Women's Banquet to be a 2-Day 
Event," I would like to make a 
correction. The banquet dates 
are January 21 and 22, not 22 and 



Dear Editor: 

Concerning Saturday night's 
"Music at the Palace." shouldn't 
itgodown '•! hictnry as "Music at 
the Nighti liib?' 

Jeanie Brownlow 



23. The nights 
Sunday. Plea! 
your calendar. 



are Saturday and 
: make a note on 



Yhe Southern Accent 



All maleriaJ published in The Southern Accent is not necessarily the opinion or 
view of the newspaper staff or ttw SMC administration. Cartoons, articles, and 
other contenl items create an open exchange of ideas, a fonjm. in the case of 
disagreement, ■Letters to the Editor," is acolumn designed to provide expression. 
We do. how«ver, reserve the right not to publish material that is libelous, 
exlremely radical, or out of character in light of doctrinal points. 'Ate wish to retain 
the bearing of a Christian SDA college newspaper. 



^'tor Vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn t4eumann 

Business Manager Dave Middag 

LayM Editor Vanessa GreenlMl 

UyoulUne-Up Randy Johnson 

SfxtsEdilor Reuben Castillo 

Onaiiahon Manager John Henson 

Socelaries I=am Legere 

Oenise Sheets 

Ad Manager p^ Hartwell 

Proolreadera Kathy Mixell 

Sjbscripiions candv Mi'.mda 

A"ists Mart Fijrd 

Sandieujnn 
Photographers Rhonda Runyan 

Maiy Ford 
f^ePOrtefs Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
j^^^ Oebby Boyef 

^°^ Frances Andrews 

^^™^* Felts Bros. Printing Co., 

Oollewah, Tenn. 



The SouthBm Aecsnl is publi9f>ed weekly with the exception of test weeks and 



LettersT^]ieEditor 

Irate Umbrella Owners 



Dear Editor: 

Once upon a rainy Friday night, 
two residents of Thatcher Hall 
(namely us) returned to their 
place of happy ensconcement, 
umbrellas in hand. 

As our custom was, we each 
spread out our respective um- 
brellas in the hall just outside our 
room door, admiring their mar- 
velous symmetry, simplicity of 
design, and vivid coloration; 
then, retired in sheer exhaustion 
to our beds with dreams of a 
happy, restful Sabbath on the 
morrow. 

We rose early, planning to at- 
tend the first service at the Col- 
legedale church. After much 
preparation to make ourselves 
presentable for the outside world 
va rainy outside world, though it 
was), we opened the door dramat- 
ically, stepped out bravely, and 
reached for our noneiistent um- 
brellas! Thinking that there must 
be a reasonable explanation as to 
the whereabouts of the said um- 
brellas, we asked the ladies next 
door. They knew nothing (theirs 



Accent Rates! 



Dear Editor: 

You must be doing something 
right Ijust walked down the hall 
to my office and everyone I pas- 
sed -- students and faculty -- were 
engrossed in the latest edition of 
the Southern Accent. It's being 
talked about all over. Of course, 
we don't always agree with even 
the editorial pages (I'm still smol- 
dering from the comment some 
weeks ago that letters aren't edi- 
ted because then only English 
Majors could contribute); but, 
those of us on the Madison Cam- 
pus find you fascinating reading. 
Your "classified ads" section is a 
great addition; the "letters" an 
indication that you are being 
read. 

Thank you for the lift you bring 
each week -- more or less. The 
Pony Express doesn't always 
make it on time. 
Sincerely. 

Patricia Scott, Coordinator 
Madison Campus 

PS. Ditto to Jerry Gladson's 
letter on November 27. I also felt 
compelled, but he said it so much 
better. 



Thanx, Deans! 



Dear Editor: 

I wish to thank all the deans of 
Thatcher for welcoming us Jones 
girls to Thatcher. The punch, 
cake, and potato chips were de- 
licious. The thought behind the 
little party meant more to us than 
you will know. 

Thanks so much, 
Linda Gadd 



were gone too). Alas, what we 
had feared must have occurred. . 
CONFISCATION! I! I Hurrying to 
the front desk, we politely asked 
where we could find our umbrel- 
las. In one long, sassy breath we 
were informed, in no uncertain 
terms, that we could NOT get our 
umbrellas back until after the 
Sabbath hours, and then, only If 
we paid "a fee." 

Not possessing the admirable 
qualities of amphibious life, and 
fearing the wrath of the powers 
that be for daring lo neglect 
church, we at last resorted to 
summoning a chivalrous Talge 
resident whom we knew to have 
in his possession a large um- 
brella. Results; We were late for 
church, and each arrived there 
with one wet, dripping side. 

Church and lunch over, we 
decided to visit friends in the 
community. Dodging raindrops 
on our way to the car (parked up 
on the hill by the Nursing build- 
ing), we were ready to go, but 
remembered something we'd for- 
gotten back in the dorm. We 
determined to drive down and 
park in front of Thatcher so as to 
minimize the time spent in the 
rain. After getting the forgotten 
item, we were on our way.. .or so 
we thought. 

Due to circumstances beyond 
our control, the car began to 
cough, sputter, and in general, 
would not go. We coughed and 
sputtered our way into the middle 
of the parking lot, however, and 



there found that we were in 
everyone's way. A few male 
were out and about, but the ma 
jonty said that they would heln 
but vowed that they knew nothind 
about cars. So. resorting to the 
only resource at hand, we lifte 
the hood to attempt to see „ 
anything was amiss. This, with | 
no umbrellas, in no way heigh, 
tened warm, dry comfort for us, 

Anyway, to make an already- i 
long story shorter, we were at last 
able to secure a conference with 
the dean on duty and ask her to 1 
explain some things, etc. She I 
informed us that "NO UMBREL f 
LAS IN THE HALLS" was an 
enforced rule, and that uinbrellas 
found in the halls would, and J 
should be confiscated, retrievable J 
only when the dean decided, and] 
after paying a fine. When asked ] 
how much the fine was, she re- ; 
plied that she didn't know. It j 
seems as if the fine was mainly a L 
threat meant to intimidate, and I 
that no real thought had gone into I 
the operation of the system 

In the end, we were given ouil 
umbrellas (no fees paid) and weni 
exhorted to spread the news toi 
other inmates that this rule Is aol 
enforced rule. j 

So folks, we are giving you fail I 
warning, and you'd better heed I 
iti NEVER, NEVER, leave your | 
umbrellas in the halll 

Sincerely, 
Criss & Bodtker 
(Alias Wet & Wild) 



Women's Ordination 



Dear Editor: 

I would like to refer to your 
recent article on the ordination of 
women. 1 knew of the committee 
studying the issue. 1 also knew 
that many of this committee felt 
that there was nothing in Scrip- 
ture or in the Spirit of Prophecy 
against ordination of women and 
they would recommend the Ad- 
ventist church to do so. Elder 
Pierson states "We find no in- 
spired evidence supporting the 
ordination of women to the gospel 
ministry." This is an argument 
from silence, as our friends the 
Church of Christ would be quick 
to point out in defense of their 
position on no musical instru- 
ments in the church. Arguments 
from silence prove nothingi 

We as Adventists are so careful 
to point out that both men and 
women are eligible tor the gift of 
prophecy, citing women in Scrip- 
ture who were leaders and pro- 
phetesses. It would seem that a 
church which has spent so much 
time and effort refuting the critics 
of a prophetess would then in turn 
apply the same criticisms to an- 
other of the gifts, namely, that of 
ministry (cf. Eph. 4:8-13). Come, 
gentlemen, let's at least be con- 
sistent! 

In the school year 1964/65, the 
denomination announced that any 
person would be admitted to our 
schools, regardless of his race. 
At SMC we received this with a 
standing ovation. What many do 



not realize is that the govemnmll 
forced the denomination to dosti 
with the CivU Rights Act of iWI 
We who should have been amolll 
the first in such an action hadli| 
be forced by law. Another casenj 
equal pay for women. Only"! 
recent years have women 1 
achieved this in our church. «l 
lawsuit brought the govenii»«»l 
into the case to force compli«»«l 
to federal law. I 

Christianity has long been"! 
advocate of full equality, mM*! 
women, in God's sight. Re«»«J 
both the Catholic and Epirfl 
churches have received ve^ I 
gative publicity by their obsW I 
refusal to ordain women J 
gospel ministry. I hoP^ * 
avoid such a stigma. 
Laura Gladson 



Lincoln's 

Dear Editor: 

I've heard a loU.";:) 

coin Library /"° „«ij 
wished for a chance" J 

I've even gone as !»■ J 

ntL^rt12fe;J 

.hatitwaskep.«^^^3 
until they could 11'^ -- 
librarian to work th« 
about two months ag 




The Southern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 



The Artist Adventure Series will present Dick and Anne Albin in 
a concert at the P.E. Center Nov. 5 at 8 p.m. The Albins toured 
most of the country doing concerts and workshops on dulcimers 
and on folk music. 

A love for folklore and Kentucky's traditions has led them to 
collect songs and stories which they blend into a concert 
including much of Kentucky's culture. 

Their concert, called "Makin Do With What You Have," 
recalls the times when people built their own houses, made their 
own clothes, grew their own food, and made theic own entertain- 
ment. 



w 



omen s 



Resid 



ence 



Becomes Bachelor Pod 



DJim Guy 

In one week Jones Hall, now 
evacuated by the women, will 
open its doors again. 

This time Jones will be used as 
non-dormitory, on-campus, 
housing for men 25 and ov»-- 
There will be no deans and 
^'s. Jones will be considered 
strictly as another housing area. 

The men will have their choice ^^ _■ _ i 

of one or two man rooms. A one Ooe TheKOaO 

man room will cost the same as 
regular dorm rent - $67, and a 
two man room will cost the same 
as the regular Jones rent - S47. 

All of the house rules have not 



over moves to Jones, the crowded 
3-man-to-a-room situation in 
Talge^will be solved. 

"You just really can't find a 
housing deal like this in the com- 
munity," commented Campbell. 

Circle K Gives 



CoUegedale, Tenn. 




25-Foot Hands To 
Clasp On Campus 



njerry Dick Lien 

Last year the Board of Trustees 
voted unanimously to accept the 
Praying Hands statue when it was 
offered to the college by Arctor 
M. Contreras, a noted Mexican 
artist. The offer stipulated that if 
someone would finance the cost of 
materials, then Contreras would 
make the piece of art. 

Several subscribers were in- 
terested in seeing the grounds of 
the College graced with the work 
of Contreras. The College itself is 
not monetarily involved in the 
project. 

Composed of cast silver and 
gold bronze, the statue portrays a 
pair of hands, symbolically those 
of God, folded over a heart. A 
drop of blood issues from the 
heart. 

In this figurative way, the 
monumnet is to be a reminder 
that man is still in the hands of 
God and that His heart was 
broken through the passion of 
Christ for humanity. 

The statue is 25 feet high, 16 
feet wide, and approximately six 



feet thick. Its tentative location 
on campus is on the campus 
entrance mall between the white 
Southern Missionary College 
marker and the first row of 
shrubbery. 

Materials for the base were 
ordered about six weeks ago, and 
word has been received that the 
statue is nearing completion. 

Contreras is also the creator of 
the largest piece of art work in the 
Western Hemisphere which is lo- 
cated at one of the government 
buildings in Mexico City. 

According to Dr. Frank Knittel, 
the Praying Hands should arrive 
on campus approximately by the 
end of January. 

In an interview published in 
The Soathem Accent March li, 
1976, Dr. Knittel stated that, 
'There are really two reasons 
why I think this monument can be 
important to SMC. First of all, it 
will be a contributing factor to the 




Pnylng Hands Statae 



aesthetic dimension of this 
school, and also I think it is a very 
strong factor in symbolizing 
something that this school stands 
for." 



Statement Billing 
Changes With Times 



i'een worked out yet. The pro- 
specttve occupants wUl probably 
nave a voice in making the rules, 
explains Everett Schlisner, dean 
01 men. 

According to Dean Melvin 
^mpbell, there are more than 
"'o dozen men over age 25. 

ihe move to Jones wUl be 
voluntary, if everyone 25 and 



D Kenneth Andrews 

Several members of the Circle 
K Club barricaded and directed 
traffic last week while others 
painted the speed bumps on the 
Industrial Road and the one in 
front of Jones Hall. The bumps 
were painted with yellow traffic 
paint which is visible for about 
200 feet. 

The Circle K is a service 
organization sponsored by the 
KJwanis International. The 
club's purpose is to serve the 
community and SMC. 



D Curtis McCrillis 

Louesa Peters, assistant trea- 
surer in the Accounting Office, 
stated that the statement charges 
this year would be different from 
previous years. Because of the 
billing changes, many students 
and parents are confused. 

According to Peters, other Se- 
venth-day Adventist colleges, as 
well as public colleges and uni- 
versities, have been following 
similar plans for several years. 
She says the benefits far out- 
weigh any deficiency th^t might 
arise. 

The system operates as follows: 
Three installments are incurred 
during the semester. These are 
due upon receipt of the state- 
ment. The first third was due 
Oct. 25. This was the amount due 
upon receipt of the September 
statement. The October state- 
ment, which is the second third. 
will be due by Nov. 25. The last, 
third, the November statement, 
will be due before semester exam. 
permits are issued. 

The second semester state- 
ments will operate the same way 
in three monthly payments. The 
student's account will be con- 
sidered delinquent, or past due, 
on the 26th of each month. 



The benefits, mentioned ear- 
lier, are comprised of the fol- 
lowing:. Parents will find it much 
easier to plan their budget ahead 
if the entire semester's cost is 
known. Most other colleges tend 
to require full payment before the 
student even registers. 

If payments are met on time, 
there will be no charge upon 
receipt of the December state- 
ment to be paid during January. 
This leaves families financially 
secure over the holiday season. 
No payment would be required 
until the January statement came 
out. This statement will include 
all overhead charges for Decem- 
ber (unless these were taken care 
of by student labor.) 

A change has also occurred 
concerning the monthly discount 
of 2 percent if the payment is met 



by the deadline. No discount 
exists any longer. However, the 
total tuition itself has been re- 
duced to compensate for the 
change. This change brings a- 
bout financial equality for the 
financially unstable student as 
well as the student who is secure 
in this area. 

A rebate is available for the 
family who has two or more young 
people enrolled. Those with two 
family members enrolled will re- 
ceive a five per cent rebate on the 
total overall semester tuition, and 
those having three or more en- 
rolled, will receive a rebate of 10 
per cent. To qualiiy for these 
rebates, each of the students 
must currently be taking eight or 
more semester hours, and they 

Turn to p. 2t col. 1 



• Behind Page One- 



Monnd Of Earth Mystery Solved p. 2 

Face Xerodng Fad Strikes SMC P- 3 

Talglans Rescue Wounded Dog p. 6 

Halloween Candida P- ^ 



. TBE SOUTHEKN ACCENT Hiand*]', November 3, 1977 




Sundial Foreshadowed On 
Thatcher's Mound Of Earth 



DJeny Dick Lien 

On the mound of earth which 
hes between the Thatcher Hall 
parking lot and the street there 
has been a good deal of activity of 
late with digging and erection of 
some rather large rocks. 

Some have wondered if this is 
to be the location for the some- 
what controversial sacred heart 
sculpture (see article p. 1). 

Actually, it will be a garden 
centered by a sundial. Upon 
completion, this will be the 
beauty spot envisioned by the 
graduating class of 1965. 

The class gift of money for a 
sundial, remembered by the Col- 
lege's historian and late executive 
secretary of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, Mabel Wood, is now being 
put to use. 

Accon^g to grounds director, 
Charles Lacy, it took some time to 
make a selection for the location 

NKW STATEMENTS 
coot, from p. 1 i 



of the dial, but the area near 
Thatcher Hall was finally chosen. 

The garden will have all dwarf 
plantings. "We have to do this so 
that there will be no shade on the 
dial. After all, a sundial that's in 
the shade isn't much use," com- 
mented Lacey. 

Included in the plans for the 
garden will be a freeze-proof 



drinking fountain. Also, there 
will be seats for students and an 
. ornamental walk or wall around 
the base of the dial. The sundial 
is supposed to be one of the most 
accurate available. 

Partial completion of the gar- 
den is projected for this winter, 
and full completion will be by 
nertfall. 



European Offers 
College Credit Tour 



must be from the same immediate 
family under the care of the same 
financial supporter. 

Further iniformation on these 
matters can be found in the SMC 
bulletin, pp. 158, 159. 

In addition, the Accounting Of- 
fice says that other expenses, 
such as the Campus Shop, Ad- 
ventist Book Center, etc., should 
be taken care of by the earnings 
from the student's work program. 
The Campus Shop has a limit of 
$125 for the first semester, and 
$75 for second semester. Stu- 
dents who feel that their needs 
may exceed these amounts, need 
to see the Student Finance per- 
sonnel for further arrangements. 



D Dennis Starkey 

A three week central European 
study tour will be conducted next 
summer by Dr. Rudolf Aussner. 
professor of modem languages. 

Among the nations to be visited 
are Switzerland, Austria, Czecho- 
slovaki, West Germany, Liechten- 
stein, East Germany, and Luxem- 
bourg. The tour is open to all who 
are interested from a junior in 
academy and on up. 

Th^ group will depart from 
New York City on May 17 for the 
small country of Luxembourg. 
When they arrive, they'll board 
the bus which will be their trans- 
portation for the next three 
weeks. One of the first stops will 
be in Luxembourg, visiting the 
grave of General Patton. Some of 
the other highlights along the way 
include a stop in Worms, the city 
where Martin Luther defended 
himself, the famous Matterhom 
in Switzerland, the Berlin Wall. 
Maria Theresian Stadt. a World 
War II concentration camp in 



Czechoslovakia, and Hitler's 
mountaintop retreat in Austria, 
known as the Eagle's Nest. 

In addition to the historical 
sights, some of the cultural e- 
vents to be attended include an 
opera in Vienna and a concert: in 
Beriin. 

Sabbath hours will be spent at 
SDA institutions, with the first 
being at our college in Darmstadt, 
West Germany, the second at 
Seminar Bogenhofen in Austria, 
and the last behind the Iron Cur- 
tain in East Germany, hopefully 
at the SDA college in Friedensau, 
if granted permission by the 
government. 

Dr. Aussner, who has led out 
on these tours in years past, feels 
right at home in that part of the 
worid, as he is a native of West 
Germany aud lived' in Vienna for 
five years. 

The cost of the trip is approxi- 
mately $1000, which covers air 
fare to and from New York, all 
transportation in Europe, hotel 
Tom to p. 6f col. 1 



• 



The Rocking R's Shop 

8039 EAST BRADJ^RD ROS) \ 

I 




EVERYTHING 25% OFF 

WESTERNWEAR ''JEANS \ 

I I \ TUKTLEBAX 

SQUAKEDANCING CLOTHES \ 

tv ■ I X \ 

V^. EXTRA LARGE SEES AND SEEIS'S 

CUSTOM SEWING AND 
MONOGRAMAnNG 





YOU BOTH NEED 
UFE INSURANCE 



Managing a household is a 
big job, even tor two 
people. That's why both 
ol you need insurance 
protection ... to provide 
financial support in the 
event that one ol you 
suddenly finds yourself 
alone. Ask me about Slate 
Fai'm life insurance ... for 
BOTH of you. 



Fred Fuller 

CoUegedale Agent 



nursing 

n£iiii 



DMark Rumsey 

Nursing students from SMC 
will attend the first southern As- 
sociation of Seventh-day Adven- 
tist Nurses (ASDAN) retreat Nov. 
4-6. RN's, LPN's, and their 
families will spend the weekend 
at Indian Creek Camp, Liberty, 
Tenn. 

The objective of the retreat is to 
provide an opportunity for 
ASDAN members and others to 
join in group worship, sharing of 
experiences, learning, and re- 
creation. Among the benefits of 
attending will be the opportunity 
to acquire Continuing Education 
Units (CEU), courses that keep 
the nurse informed and updated 
in her profession. 

Along with ASDAN officers. 
Southern Union leaders, and 



General Conference personnel, 
several faculty members will have 
a part in the programs. 

Dr. Lorenzo Grant, professor of 
religion, will speak for the 7:30 
Friday evening meeting. Ina 
Longway, director of the Division 
of Nursing, will lead the Sabbath 
School lesson study. On Sunday 
morning, Jan Rushing, professor 
of business and management, will 
present a CEU "Program on 
Management." 

Alice Smith, General Confer- 
ence executive director of 
ASDAN, will conduct the Sabbath 
church service. 

For the early-risers, a bird, 
watching session is scheduled for 
Sabbath morning at sunrise. 



Bemadine Irwin, associate pro-' 
fessor of nursing, was recently 
accepted toattendgraduate school 
in San Diego, Calif. Irwin, who 
received her masters degree from 
Loma Linda University in 1974, 
will be working toward her Ph.D. 
in behavioral science. She 
teaches a class in psychiatric nur- 
sing here at SMC. 



Christine Shultz from the nur- 
sing department is attending the 
Council of Associate Degree A- 
gencies of the National League f of 
Nurses during this week. 

The council will be held in St. 
Louis, MO, where they will diS' 
cuss the expectations ai the A.D. 
graduate in nursing. 



DRoland Joy 

Ina Longway, director of the 
Division of Nursing, attended the 
Southern Regional Educational 
Board on Collegiate Education for 
Nursing in Atlanta. 

The Nursing Council meets 
twice a year to upgrade nursing 
education in the 14 southern 
states. 

Longway was at the program in 
Atlanta from Oct. 26 thru 28. The 
council discussed clinical educa- 
tion. 




Try ail the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



x'NATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



Battle Creek Sanltarinm Hospital I 

197 North Washington Ave. I 

Battle Creek, MI 49016 | 

JLAn equal opportunity employer ^ | 

^ Recruiting program for health professionals ^ | 

If you are seeking challenges in nursing-related fields | 

and want to work in a modern SDA hospital, we're | 

seeking YOU. | 

Check the Nursing Administration Office for more | 

information, and we'll keep you posted. Our personnel | 

representative, Dovie Knecht will be on campus Nov. 2 | 

and 3 to discuss: summer work program I 

scholarship assistance | 

employment application g 

nnuuuiiiiniiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiuiiii"""* 



Pressed 
Fads? Copy 
Your Face! 



HnmiUy, November 3, 1977 THE SOUTHEKW ACCENT - 3 



EAST LANSING, Mich. (UPI) - 
What's a college student to do 
when it's too cold to streak, cruel 
to swallow goldfish, and passe to 
stuff people into phone booths? 

Some Michigan State Univer- 
sity students may have invented 
the latest college craze: instant 
"Portraits" made by pressing 
their faces against photocopying 
machines. 

Secluded machines in the MSU 
library are the most popular face 
copying studios, especially for the 
shy or uninitiated. 

"You look around and make 
sure no one is looking," MSU 
veterinary student Charles Horo- 
witz said. 

"Then you put a nickel in the 
machine, close your eyes and 
press your face against the 
glass." 

1 he results are a cross between 
posters for a carnival house of 
mirrors and those for a B-grade 
Japanese horror movie. 

"Your nose is distorted and it 
looks like you're trying to hold 
your breath," Horowitz said. 



Idoittoimpressmyfnends," 
said 26-year-old Steve Roth a 
graduate shident fitom San Fran- 
cisco. "It's a good grin when 
you re feeling down. 

_''I give them to my friends to 
throw darts at and staff. Plus it 
gives my face a good tan, with the 
heat and light and all." 

Roth, considers himself in the 
vanguard of face copying, since 
he has been doing it for about a 
year. He is a connoisseur of the 
art and says some machines are 
better than others. 

"You've got to release your 
frustrations some way - it's like 
the old goldfish swallowing fad." 

Health officials said there 
probably is no real danger in face 
copying - as long as you keep 
your eyes closed. 

Dr. Marvin McKenney, an 
East Lansing eye doctor, said that 
even copiers which use ultraviolet 
light would not be harmful. 




SMC student Jotos new college craie - face xeroxing. 



Oakwood Buys WSMC Anten 



na 



Students Give Their 
Assurance In Blood 



DMykal Ringstaff 

The Blood Assurance program, 
sponsored by CABL, is coming to 
SMC. The program is a national 
non-profit community service 
which offers free blood to its 
donors and their families for a 
period of one year following a 
blood donation. In order to be 
eligible a person need only to 
donate one pint of blood. 



When single students donate 
blood, the program will cover 



DCarlos Haylock 

WSMC-FM is selling an old 
antenna to Oakwood College, who 
soon hopes to have its own educa- 
tional FM station. 

Jerry Mathis, engineer for 
WSMC, is the coordinator of the 
Oakwood station project. He will 
supervise the purchase and the 
setting-up of the equipment for 
the station at Oakwood. 

Radio station WAUS at An- 



drews University has a transmit- 
ter and other pieces of radio 
equipment that have been re- 
placed and are not being used any 
more. Mathis is looking into this 

and if the equipment meets Oak- 
wood's specific needs, it will be 
purchased. 

A tower for the antenna still 
needs to be found. There are two 
possible alternatives. Either a 



tower can be purchased and 
rected, or space on another stv 
tion's tower located nearby can be 
used. That decision is still 
pending. 



WOCG will be the call lettft. 
assigned to the radio station at 
Oakwood. It will have 25,000 
watts of power and will serve the 
surrounding community as far as 
50 miles away. 



their parents, brothers, sisters 
and themselves. When married it 
will cover the immediate family. 
The dates for the drive are Nov. 
10 and Dec. 1, between 9 a.m. 
and 5 p.m. The donations will be 
taken in the game room at the 
Stadent Center. A sign-up sheet 
is posted on the bulletin board at 
the Student Center. Please give 
the date and time when you would 
like to make your donation. For 
more information, contact CABL 
at 4673. 



t®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®®® 




Where: 



ROLL UP YOUR 
SLEEVE 



GIVE A PINT OFi 
BLOOD... 
THE GIFT OF LIFE! 



•tuda 



I When: 



Nov. 10 and Dm. I 



To make an appointment : 

Sign Up At Yhe Stwdeiit Center 



*®®®®i 



1®®®®®®®®®®®®%. 





Frozen Yogurt 
Free Sample 



i 



4 - THE SOUTHERN ACXrENT ■niaiwUy, November 3, 1977 



3 



Editorial 



ntumsioumtuta 



The Southern Accent 

StaMboK 



Cartoons, I 



All maJerial published in The Southern Accem 

view ot Ihe newspaper slatt or the SMC admlnls 
othef content items create an open exchange ol ideas, a (orum. Jn the case ol 
disagreement. Letiers lo the Editor. " is a column designed to provide expression. 
We do, however, reserve the right not lo publish rraterial thai is libelous, 
extremelyradical, or out of character m light of doctrinal points. We wish to retair 
the bearing ol a Christian SDA college 



Editor vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Manager Qave Middag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greenleal 

Layout Line-Up Randy Johnson 

Spons Editor Reuben Castillo 

Circulation Manager John Henson 

Secretaries Pam Legere 

Denise-Sheets 

Ad Manager. Ray Harlwell ' 

Proolreaders Kaihy Mi/ell 

Jeanne Zacharias 

Subscriptions Candv Miranda 

Art'Sts MarV Ford 

SarxlieLcnn 
Photographers Rhonda Runyan 

Mark Ford 
«epwie^ Jerry Uen 

Dawn Rice 

Oebby Boyer 

Sponsor Frances Andrews 

^'^^^ Felts Bros Printing Co . 

Oollewah. Tenn. 



The Southern AocarH is published weekly v 




One evening a couple of weeks ago while I was locking up the 
Student Center. 1 noticed some type of mist or fog coming through 
the cracks beween the doors leading down to the "fetena^ 
Upon opening these doors. I found the entire stairwell filled with 
this dense mist. . ,, j .u.. 

Thinking there might he a problem in the cafetena, I "Jl^d the 
campus securit>- base in Thatcher Hall right away and asked if they 
could get someone up there as soon as possible. 

Ten minutes later 1 found out from a cafetena worker still on the 
premises that thev were fumigating, which accounted for all the 
mist and fog. Since the situation was obviously under control. I 
called securit\- back and told them to cancel the call. Laughingly, 
ihe Thatcher "receptionist told me that it was a good thing that I 
didn't really need them because they couldn't get in touch with 
anyone on the securit\' force anyway. 

'it's remarkable, vou know. Ask anyone that's involved in 
securih- operations what the key priorities are on the job, and you 
will consistantlv find communication weaving its way into the scene. 
But then. «'nal do we have here'? In ten minutes no one involved 
with the securit\' of SMC could be located and informed about an 
apparent anom'alv which was taking place in the largest and most 
central building on the campus. Not exactly an "A" rating. 

Earlier in the year a CoUegedale policeman was slashed across 
the face by someone apparently trying to break into a building that 
the officer was checking. The report given the Accent stated that it 
was the efficiency of the communication system built into the police 
organization that brought aid to the bleeding officer and kept the 
situation under control. My question is: What if something were to 
happen here on this campus which demanded decisive, immediate 
action and none of the security forces which patrol our campus could 
be reached. We aren't exactly crime-ridden on this campus, but 
there are times when security action is necessary. Shouldn't we be 
prepared? 

There are a lot of rumors, depending on who you talk to. as to 
why the security department has the troubles that it has. Some say 
that the giris' deans object to the communication center being in 
Thatcher Hall and render the main radio just about useless by 
niming the squelch up to maximum. Another says that the securit\' 
personnel sometimes leave campus on unauthorized trips tn view 
emergencies that do not involve them and are nol associated in any 
way with the security of the College. Yet another says the radios the 
guards are equipped with are useless around the tall buildings on 
campus. On thing is for certain, though. If we don't get our 
security up to par. we may find out too late that SMC is a wide open 
campus. 

by Mark Ford 



Dear Editor 

Please print this letter in The 
Southern Accent. 
Dear Guys, 

I'm sorry that 1 can't address' 
this to each of you individually, 
but I wasn't able to meet you all 
by name, so it's Dear Guys, my 
friends. 

It's hard to put into words what 
or how a bus load of guys makes a 
giri feel. It really can't be done, 
but I'd like to thank you along 
with a unanimous female echo. 

You took a day, which you may 
have used in a more exciting 
adventure, just to be a friend and 
bring civilization from the male 
world into this, our more or less 
male less world. Thank you! 

All my life I've been told that 
the key to a man's heart is 
through his stomach; you came 
with an empty stomach and left 
with an emptier one; yet you gave 
unselfishly and brought joy to our 
world! 

Thank you, and let's do it a- 
: gain] 
: Writing for the Madison women, 

\ Jan Whidden 



Letters To Tf 



Dear Editor; 



Dear Editor: 

I'd like to thank the person 
responsible (Service Dept. 
worker?) for writing those bible 
texts on the blackboards in 
Daniels Hall 24 and 111 -- they're 
always inspirational! 



I would like to sound off about 
the noise problem in the library. 
I live in the village and have to 
use the library to study in be- 
tween classes. But, I find it very 
difficult to try and concentrate 
when someone else is talking; not 
in soft tones or whispers, but like 
they were the only people around. 

I can't seem to find a place that 
is quiet. I do not understand why 
college students do noi know 
how. or have forgotten how to 



whisper. What seems even more, 
perplexing is. we have a student 
center that has just been nicely 
redecorated and you can talk all 
you wish without disturbing those 
who are trying to study. So 
Please help out your fellow stu- 
dents in their classes by being 
quiet in the library. If you just 
have to tell your friend what 
happened to you Saturday night, 
please go where you won't be 
disturbing others. 

Thanks, 

Linda Woolcock 



Dear Editor: 

It would be all well and good if 
we could blame our problems on 
the instructors. But on the other 
hand, let's suppose Albert 
Average is doing all right in his 
mudpie class, but having prob- 
lems with the paradigms. 

He's making beautiful mud- 
pies, but those other classes he's 
attending -- poor Albert is barely 
getting the assignments read sim- 
ply because his reading is so 
poor. Probably what he needs is a 
course to improve his reading 
and/or comprehension. 

From conversation with other 
students around campus, I do 
believe that a class of this sort 
would have no lack in attendance. 
Thank you. 
Patrick Ray 



Pace 



Dear Editor: 

For the past few weeks I have 
noted some of the opinions ex- 
pressed about dress and code. 
A" number 1 agree with and a few I 
feel to be kind of legalistic. 

Instead of inwardly growling 
and biting at others whether 
tain material is acceptable, too 
much hair on the face or head etc, 
our main emphasis and picture 
should be, "Has my brother 
found that peace which pa: 
all understanding?" As Paul 
wrote: "Let this mind be it 
which was also in Christ Jes 
What greater joy could there be 
than being conscientious of oi 
another's needs, then setting out 
to fiir them. Have we found the 
highest joy there is in ministering 
to others needs? Who needs 
greater revelation of God's love 
others? 1 do. 
Stanley Thurmon 



» Dear Editor 

a 1 write this article to you with 

g many tears in my voice, not to any 

2 one person in particular but, to 

H the student body of SMC. 

H 

As you already know, the holi- 
* day which is commonly called 
Halloween and celebrated 
throughout the country on Octo- 
ber 31 St. was celebrated on this 
^ campus last Sunday on the 30th of 
October. On this date the cafe- 
^ teria was closed and festivities 
» were held in the student park. 
5 Let me pause here to lay the back- 
2 ground as to the origin of Hallo- 



e exception of test vt«eks and 
er year, mailed wekly Irom 



Halloween sprang from the 
Celtics, who had two major festi- 
vals . one for the sun god and the 
other for the god of the dead. 
This god of the dead was named 
Samhain. The latter was cele- 
brated on Oct. 31st thru Nov. 1st. 
In this celebration huge bon 
fires were set on hilltops to 
frighten away evil spirits. The 
souls of the dead were supposed 
to revisit their homes on this day, 
and the autumnal festival ac- 
quired sinister significance with 
ghost, witches, hobgoblins, black 
; cats, fairies, and demons of all 
: kinds said to be roaming about, 
i In addition, Halloween was 
thought to be the most favorable 
I time for divination concerning 
! marriage, luck, health, and 
I death. It was the only day on 



which the help of the devil was 
invoked for such purposes. No- 
vember 1 became All Saints Day 
on which these dead returning 

relatives were honored. On Nov. 
2. the Catholic church brought in 
the picture All Souls Day - a day 
in which you pray for the dead, 
especially for those who had died 
during that year. (Ency. Brit. Vol 
I. pp. 259-60.) 

As you can well see, the origin 
of Halloween is purely paganistic. 
My point is this: The student 
body goes all out for the cele- 
bration of a holiday whose origin 
of spiritualism is completely 
against the Bible doctrine of the 
state of the dead. 

You might well say, "That has 
no relevance, for we do not cele- 
brate Halloween today with that 
aspect in mind." Don't kid your- 
self. If you put a frog in hot 
water he will immediately jump 
out but, if you put him in cold 
water and heal it up gradually, 
before he knows it, it will be too 
late. 



church, what could I say? The loi 
main point in contrast is this: is ' 
Oct. 31 receives a great deal of »s^ 
attention, but what of Oct. 22? 

Last week's Sabbath was the 
133rd year since Our High Priest 
stepped into the Most Holy Place 
of the heavenly sanctuary in order 
to finish the redemption He pur- j^^ 

chased on the cruel cross of Cal- c 
vary. Our great forefathers 
waited for that day to come for 
they thought Christ would soon 
clasp their hands on that journey 
home. A great disappointment 
soon followed, for they had mis- 
takenly interpreted the prophecy 
of Daniel 8:14, thinking at that 
time the earth was the sanctuary 
to be cleansed with fire. HOT 
sweet would it have been for in 
student body to an-ange a praye 
group last Sabbath afternoon i" 
ponder and meditate on the pasj 
and to pray for the future. B" 
that precious day passed throug 
our fingers as many souls lay "' 
the side of the path, dying 
thirst. 

•We have nothing to fear »' 



Satan is gradually infiltrating 
the unguarded mind in prepara- 
tion for his last great deception. 
If a person were on the verge of 
joining God's true last day rem- 
nant church and they were to see 
this going on and ask why there 
are so many inconsistencies in the 



the future, except as we 



iball 



i;ai!;!«Kg imuiuum i a a 



it;iii iii iiimmmt T nmtw»{ 8mi»tm»m»tta»ii 



the tuture, except as "- -■ , 
forget the way the Lord has i 
us. and His teaching in our pa 
history." LS 196. I ask/»^ 
brothers and sisters, what are 
ashamed of? "For 1 a"" 
ashamed of the gospel of C"" ' 
for it is the power of God "J^ 
salvation to everyone that 



ditor 



mim i mttTmmttt mtmmmmaaaimimmmgffin 



letter that 
ftom "JB. 
ived at the 



3, Lansing" 
he's talking 



les B.Lansing 
d and is now 
1 of inventing 
it which has 
still bears 



itg died in the 



article in Ann 

-anti thought it 

worth re- 

lant desire, 
ids calling to 

ip that has 
;es root and 
a time, 
led by a feei- 
e excited 
It genuinely 
re nagging 
I questions, 
s about your 
Duld just as 



soon not examine too closely. 
It might spoil the dream. 

Love is the quiet understanding 
and mature acceptance of imper- 
fection. It is real. It gives you 
strength and grows beyond you -- 
to bolster your beloved. You are 
warmed by his presence, even 
when he is away. Miles do not 
separate you. You want him 
near. But near or far, you know 
he is yours and you can wait. 

Infatuation says, "We must get 
married right away. I can't risk 
losing him." 

Love says, "Be patient. Don't 
panic. He is yours. Plan your 
future with confidence." 

Infatuation has an element of 
sexual excitement. If you are 
honest, you will admit it is diffi- 
cult to be in one another's com- 
pany unless you are sure it will 
end in intimacy. Love is the 
maturation of friendship. You 
must be friends before you can be 
lovers. 

Infatuation lacks confidence. 
When he's away, you wonder if 
he's cheating. Sometimes you 
even check. 

Love means trust. You are 
calm, sec'ire and unthreatened. 
He feels that trust and it makes 
him even more trustworthy. 



Infatuation might lead you to 
do thmgs you'll regret later, but 
love never will. 

Love lifts you up. It makes you 
lookup. It makes you think up. It 
makes you a better person than 
you were before. $• 

|l 
Sincerely, i| 

Jerry Holt, The People's Party jj 



Dear Editor: 

I . greatly appreciated the indi- 
vidual(s) who filled in the craters 
m the front Thatcher Hall parking 

Not only did I almost lose my 
car in one of the excavations 
recently but one rainy night back 
in May I turned my ankle and 
almost drowned in the other! 

I thought of filling those cav- 
ities myself with letters from the 
Dean of Students. However, 
some kind soul(s) has finally filled 
the chasms with tar. So, I guess 
I'll attend Chapel regularly and 
forget my mailbox combination. 

Wanda Patsel 




Thursday, November 3, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 

Campus Cfo§§[i(iec(s 

• °e 'cCrs^^pl^hLTwt hI:e"„"t°o:!d'^''r^"' T""'' '' '°'"^ '" "^ -"' '" '-^ 
stands, please col7tt''Cder ^r^^Je'X trdi^ary.^^T4l^"^ -"""• 

•C™LHf::fke;>o?s:ili°?r'' '''r'^ '- ''^-"' »-'"'- '- <--- p--. 

or 396-22T4eve"f„gs ^' "" '" *' "'"'"=' '" ^''^'"S- John 396-467J days 

ft^Grevt^'pif ' '""''' '" '""'=" °"''^^' ^"'-"""V members^: Pauick Tsu, or 
Patrfckiragh 2s1T '?h^' 'n'"' °"" '^^"^PO^ation. If this is not possible, call 
PriH . , o„ ^ ^'^ *"" ^'""8*= something for you. The group will leave 

Friday at 1:00 p.m. for Atoka Springs. You may arrive anytime before sundown 

Florida! One seat left to the great sunshine state of Florida! Take a weekend break 
without having to spend most of it in a packed car traveling. Enjoy the luxury of a 
chartered flight without the expense. Call 4905, Don Ashlock or leave a note in mv 
box (Talge, A-5). 

• Mrs. Brown - the marigolds look great in front of Talge. Thanks for a cheery dorm. 



"Did you know there is not a single roach in my room?" 
"Oh really!?" 
"Yes, they are all married and have very large families!!" 

# Are your weekends too short to go home? Try Flying - from the Collegedale Aero 
Service. In four hours a Cessna 172 will take four people about 500 miles - And 
Smokey Bear won't care. 

# Due to the fact that there is not much dating on campus, the SA Academic Activities 
will sponsor a short film Friday noon in the banquet room in order to encourage the 
greater stimulation for dating. The film, "What To Do On A Date" is guaranteed to 
bring you enjoyment. Also, see your old favorite Curious George in, "Curious 
George Rides A Bike" and be frightened with the cartoon, "Trick Or Treat" 

Help! Damsel in d 
there in tir-. f'-r n 



I need :i ride to the Loma Linda/La.Sierra area to arrive 
n for the winter quarter Jan. J (Leaving here after < :hrisf 
as) I'll help with gas and driving. I'll bring cookies, I'll sing. I'll be quiet - 1 need 
ride! If >uu lun. loiini. please tall 396-4525 for Kay Campbell. 



9 Dear Bearded One: 
The Basket Giver 



ad you like it, but you'll have to work for the other half. 



■J. 

svxee 



sststs:xt::axa:aisit(asatsssssttv.u:-.tt:: 



Dear Missle-Town Monkey. Thanks for the good time last Thursday night. 
Ms. Boobocker 

% Dear Eugene and Obed: We will get you yet. Chinita and Indiecita 

9 Dear 60868, Congratulations on your physiology grade! Sincerely. 89294 

W Help! ! Ride to Miami desperately needed for five. Leaving Dec. 19; or ride back to 
Collegedale on Jan. 8; or both. We will help with driving ^and gas. Please call: 
396-4636 or leave message in Box 371 Thatcher. Call any time {day or night) 

#The Wright Brothers take to the air again. Look out KITTY HAWK! 

# NURSING STUDENTS Don't wait until you are a senior to look over the various 
hospitals. Avoid the mad scramble and start contacting hospitals now. Look for their 
ads in The Southern Accent. 

Happy Birthday L.P.F., Love Jet 

9 A Joker correction! Dan Garza is listed in Talge, but he is married and lives in the 
village. 

A thank you to Kathy, Melonie, Sharon, Sandie, and Cindy for the smashing 
strawberry pie you gave me, on my birthday. Love, Jim 

Gota'refridgetosell orrent? Call 4191 

Missing: An umbrella left in SC 102 several weeks ago. Orange, tan, navy, and 
green panels with a light colored wood handle. Call 4106 or 396-2498. 

Anyone goint to or near Wisconsin (Chicago, Minnesota, or Michigan) for 
Thanksgiving Vacation and has room for riders, please call 4512 or 4401! 
Thank you! 

A To the person who siolc Bob Wilson's calculator right out of the library. 
I hope Lewi upstairs remembers that on the Judgement Day and I hope you feel 
guilty. 

I lost a blue interaction nursing workbook in the C.K. If you found it please return it. 
Becky 698-2386. 

I: A big belated Happy Birthday to Vanessa. With love, from Cindy. 



( • THE SOCTHEKN ACCENT nianday, Novefflbcr 3, 1977 



J 




Endowed 



There is no limit 

to the usefulness of one 

who. 
Putting self aside. 
Makes room for 

the working of the Holy Spirit 

upon his heart and 

Lives a life wholly consecrated to God. 

All who consecrate 

body, 
soul, and 
spirit 

to His service 
Will be constantly receiving 
a new endowment of 

physical. 

mental, 

and spiritual power. 



Phone Booth 



Cramming--SMC Style 



Christ gives them 

the breath of His t 
the life of His own 



1 Spirit, 



The Ministry Of Healing 



EUROPEAN TOUR cont. &om p. 2. 

accomodations, admissions to 
special events, and breakfasts, 
with two meals a day provided 
behind the Iron Curtain. Three 
hours of college credit are avail- 
able at no extra cost. 
Those interested should start 



preparing for the trip immedi- 
ately, as the size of the group is 
limited to about 25 and it t^es 
some time to obtain passports. 
The application deadline is March 
31 and a $50 deposit is required to 
reserve your spot on the tour. 




Who 'sin Control Here? 



Where does the Christian Way 
find its manifestation today? It 
finds its ultimate display in the 
Laodicean or Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist movement, the last pro- 
phetic period of Christian history 
before the Second Advent. 

The Laodicean message pre- 
sents three gifts to man - the 
gold of faith and love, the white 
garments of the righteousness of 
Christ and the eyesalve of spir- 
itual discernment. The Holy Spir- 
it brings these treasures to those 
who truly desire them, so one 
must ask why are these eternal 
gifts not desired. The answer is 
simple yet sad -- we are apa- 
thetic and lethargic, contented 
with the materialism of the age. 

The definition of dogma tends 
to end in minutiae as thousands 
perish with a hopeless tomorrow. 
Schismatic movements arise to 
call the "true people" out while 
they themselves are heading for 
dissolution and declension. 

Dwelling among us are those 
agents of Satan who lament the 
condition of the movement and 
advocate that division is coming. 
Tliis is the subject of their think- 
ing and it becomes their Itfework 
to worr> about it and to weary 




Back in the Fifties the big thing 
to do around campus in your 
spare time (and a lot of students 
took more than they had), was to 
see how many people you could 
cram into a telephone booth. 
Often, VW's were used in these 
social functions as a happy, port- 
able alternative when there was 
no phone booth to be found. 

Well, despite the fact that this 
is not the Fifties, and this isn't 
Howard or Yale, the trends of 



craming still continue on oi 
campus. SMC has its own version 
of cramming, though it's a bit 
more academic -- seeing how 
many people can cram into the 
C.K. 

I mean, have you ever gone 
down to get something to eat and 
have to wait 20, 30, 40 minutes 
and have to sit at a table with 
M.J. Bryant (whom you didn't 
know any better than the man on 
the moon) and listen to him talk 
about his column and the mail 
room when you could really care 
less? All you really want is less 
crowding, less shoving, less 
noise, a friendly face and the 
non-Adventist visitors to observe 
the NO SMOKING sign - and 
some service! 

I've been aware and concerned 
about this problem for quite some 
time now. Just what can be done 
about tliis college-ordained situ- 
tion? 

The three main factors to take 
into consideration are money, 
space, and time. But there are 
several other factors you should 



everyone else with their nega- 
tivism. 

Who controls the movement- 
men or the Amen? There is 
coming a division. All of those 
who have not accepted the coun- 
sels of the True Witness and are 
not living them by the Holy Spirit 
will abandon the movement when 
the storm hits. 

The movement will be shaken 
to its core, and only those who 
have made the Word of God their 
foundation of faith and practice 
will survive as their brethren per- 
ish with the multitudes of the lost. 
Laodicea will see the blessed 
hope of the Second Advent. The 
primary question is will you be in 
it or out of it when the appointed 
time comes? 

The future is as certain as the 
sunrise of tomorrow. Don't be 
deceived by the aposUes of apos- 
tasy among us or the wonders of 
deception around us. The Amen, 
the Creator-Saviour, has spoken 
through His Word and His Testi- 
mony, and it shall come to pass. 
Not one iota will fail. 

For further shjdy: Deabe of 
A«e«, p. 518-523; Second Selec- 
ted Measagea, p. 13-170; 367-408- 
and Teadmonlea to Minlitefa. 



know also before you jump to any 
fast conclusions. 

The first in this series of facts is 
that the staff is very aware of the 
problem and is seeking a solution. 
You also have to remember that 
you only see it from the cus- 
tomer's out-front point of view. 




Let's go in back and expand your 
horizons. 

Mr. E. Evans, from the cafe- 
teria, who has control over the 
whole matter, said, "If an ef- 
ficiency expert came in and ex- 
amined the problem, he might 
conclude: it is good to keep the 
students happy (because they are 
the main source of business) and 
have a large menu, but for the 
number of people served and the 
equipment and space to do the 



job, to be more efficient, you 
would have to cut over one third 
of the menu." 

The second thing you might 
consider as an answer to the 
problem is to build a second story 
on the mall. But before you could 
do this you would have to check 
the blueprint and see if the 
foundation was laid deep enough 
(which it probably is not). 

Another consideration is to 
build another C.K. to go with the 
one we already have. Nope - it'd 
cost to much moneyl Where 
would the money 
From you, through tuition and 
things like that. 

Still another idea is to let the 
lease run out on the Wash-a-teria 
and take it over and extend the 
C.K. all the way to the back of the 
dry cleaners. And then we would 
need a new place to do our wash. 

A last and final alternative is 
(and this is not my idea) that we 
could expand the C.K. forward as 
a sidewalk cafe and fold it in at 
night. But if this were done, we 
would have to lay out the parking 
lot differently. 

The parting thought I want to 
leave you with this week, my 
faithful column followers, is this: 
Although I write a light, hu- 
morous, informative column, and 
intentionally stay away from con- 
troversial issues (because they're 
editorials, and I'm not an editor), 
I still wanted you to know that no 
matter what is done about the 
C.K. and other similar problems, 
there is always going to be some- 
one who won't be happy. 



A llcfe 4rcl 4 Wa^ f rem Cir^er 



DDebby Boyer 

Ginger, a miniature collie, had a 
rather devastating experience last 
Sunday night in Collegedale. She 
wandered away ftom home for a 
romp and became the victim of a 
hit and run accident about 7:30 
p.m. She hobbled to a stairwell in 
Talge Hall and coUapsed. David 
Kay found her and saw that one 
leg was severely injured with part 
of the bone exposed. 

In time, more students gath- 
ered around and offered their 
help. After many phone calls 
they finally found a veterinarians 
clim, open on Brainerd Road. 
Gmger remained reasonably calm 
as her heavUy bleeding leg was 
wrapped up and she was taken to 
the car by David, Irene Ruprecht 
Floyd Welters, and Mevin 
Northrup. The vet sewed up as 
much of the remaining skin as 
possible and left it uncovered so 
the wound would heal faster 

Dean Evans let Ginger spend 
the night m his garage. The next 
mommg he found out that his 
neighbors.Dru and Susan Rourk- 
were the dog's Krateful owners 



A Meiatge From Ginger's 
Funily; 

May we express our abundant 
thanks for your efforts on 
Ginger's behalf. She is much 
improved now. I have read that 
such benevolent and tender deeds 
reverberate throughout all 
creation. More people than you 
know have been blessed by hear- 
ing of your involvement; and I 
know from experience how that 
you have been blessed by fellow- 
ship with Christ in pity for His 
suffering creature - "He whose 



word of power upheld the worlds 
would stoop to relieve a wounded 
bird." Desire of Ages p. 46. 

Sincerely, 

Dm & Susan Rourke 

A lick on the cheek and swish of 
the tail to David Kay, Floyd 
Wolters, Dean Evans and mem- 
bers of the Men's Club who took 
time, money and immediate 
action to save me. . 

Your friend forever, 

Ginger. 



"K/iifif,:- 




nmrsday, November 3, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 



■ ■ ■- — -~.,, iiuveniDer j, vni THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 

Racking Horse Spurs SMCite's Book 



^ ■**_***• 



DJerry Dick Lien 

Sometime in your life you have 
perliaps come across a person 
who insisted that if he only hid 
the time he would-be a writer. 
"After all." he may have told 
you, "I am full of ideas just 
waiting to be put down on paper. 
I'm sure I could find a publisher. 
Writing is really quite simple; all 
you need is the time." 

Imagine for a moment that this 
incipient Hemingway is a friend 
of yours, and his comments have 
been insistent over a prolonged' 
period of time. At last, fed up 
with the same old refrain, you 
challenge him to do what he says 
is so easy. As an added incentive, 
you promise to buy him a vege- 
burger as a regard ftom the Cam- 
pus Kitchen if he does get pub- 
lished. 

Faced with an adequate in- 
ducement, he writes his paper, or 
book, and sends it off to Insight, 
The Hog Breeders' Gazette, 
McGraw-HUl, or the Fly by NIgbt 
Press. (You see, there is a wide 
range of tastes for an author's 



After weeks of waiting, the 
inevitable comes -- the rejection 
slip. There is neither fame nor 
vegeburger for the budding 
writer. 

Popular opinion to the contrary, 
writing is not as easy as it may at 
first appear. Only a few have 
found it as easy as chemical en- 
gineering or swimming the Eng- 
lish Channel with one hand tied 
behind his/her back. 



Even that now well-established 
author, Snoopy, had his first 
opus. It Was a Dark and Stormy 
Night, turned down by the first 
publisher he mailed it to, sending 
its fuzzy author into a bad case of 
"rejection slip shock" until he got 



an assist for Charles Schulz and 
Holt, Rinehart, and Winston. 

Nonetheless, SMC does have 
among its student body a pub- 
lisb^d author. Belinda Dickerson, 
senior communication major, has 
for years now had an interest in 
horses and the racking horse in 
particular. 

This interest has led her to 
write a book on the subject. The . 
Racking Horse, Vol. 1, took about 
a year to research and write. 

Also, like Steven Crane's old 
chestnut of American realism, 
Maggie: a GW of the Streets, the 
volume was privately pubhshed 
by its author. 

"I have felt that there has been 
a need for a book that would give 
a history of the racking horse. 
There is a fast-growing interest in 
the breed, and I wanted to pre- 
sent the horse in the book and to 
show how people can become 
involved in the industry," said 
BeHnda. 

Miss Dickerson has. included 
many pictures of various racking 
horses in the volume. It also tells 
about the trainer and how they 
become involved with the breed. 
The book, though, is just the 
latest indication of a deep interest 
in the horse on the part of its 
author. 

Belinda has won the Amateur 
Ladies' World Championship in 
the area. "We really worked,, 
hard for the event and expected to 
come in among the top ten. But 
we never thought that I would win 
the title. It was really exciting, " 
exclaimed the girl. 







TJi 



Belinda Dickerson rides the Small Town Dade in the 1976 Ladles Amateur World Cfaadplonshlps. 



Part of the traimng Belinda 
does herself, but she has a pro- 



fessional trainer in Alabama who 
also works with her horses. The 
headquarters of the Racking 
Horse Association is in that state. 

But what of the horse itself? 
How did it come into being? 
According to the young author, 
the horse has been around almost 
as long as the United States has. 
' 'The Racking horse evolved from 
the old-time saddle horse. Some 
people know these horses as the 
single footers. After the War 
Between the States, there was a 
merger between pacers and trot- 
ters, and they were registered as 
the Tennessee WaUdng Horse," 
said the young woman. Although 
it went into the Tennessee walk- 
ing horse breed, the animal con- 



The racking pace is a fast rath- 
er showy, usually artificial four- 
beat gait during which the feet 
leave the ground in the same 
sequence as in the walk, but 
faster and with a higher action. 

It was, however, only in the 
past five years that the Racking 
Horse Association of America was 
recognized by the U. S. Depart- 
.ment of Agriculture. This action 
permitted a registration system 
for the breed. The racking horse 
is presently the fastest growing 
breed in the United States. . 

Again referring to the horse's 
gait, Belinda said that in the past 
when cars were in Httle or no 



evidence, the racing horse was 
' very popular as a means of trans- 
portation. Doctors and circuit 
riders, it seems, particularly fa- 
vored the breed. 

' "People say that the gait is so 
smoth that a rider can hold a glass 
of water and not spill a drop,'* 
laughed Dickerson. 



officially 
!>le can 



' Now that the breed 
recognized, how val 
such a horse be? "Well, some 
horses will sell for $500, but some 
will go for anywhere from $30 to 
$35 thousand. A top show horse 
usually is worth about $10 or $12 
thousand. A world champion 
racking horse, though, would be 
I priceless as a stud, ' ' commented 
Belinda. 



dpRfliniiiiimtiiiiimiiiimiirmimiiimtirmiimniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiM^^^ 



[iinnrmniniiiiaiiiiuriiiiHiiiiiKfri 



rimiumunniiiiiiinimmiiiiiRiiiiuiiiiiiii% 





HAT IT HERE — 

OR CARRY OUT 

• TACOS 

• TOSTADOS 

• BURRITOS 

• FRUOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 

• ENCHIRfTO 



3877 Hixon Pike 



8 - THE SOOTHERN ACCENT Iliiinday, November 3, 1977 



Water Polo League Making 
^ A Big Splash On Campus 



DMark Kurzynske 

This years water polo league, 
under the direction of Herschel 
Logan, is now in progress. The 
first games were played Tuesday 
night. Oct. 18. On that night. 
Websters team swept a double- 
header beating Herman's team in 
the first game 6-5. The second 
game saw Webster outscoring 
Mullins team 11-7. 



This is co-ed water polo, with 
academy kids playing and even 
one elementary school partici- 
pant. The plan is to form another 
team out of those who sign up. 
The league also hopes to intro- 
duce a team of the academy kids. 



Webster 
Mullins 
Herman 



1 1 
3 



The neit Tuesday night. Oct. 
25. Webster won by forfeit of 
Herman 1-0 and Mullins then 
pulverized Herman 17-3 in the 
second contest. 

Games are played every Tues- 
day night and will continue into 
December. According to Tedd 
Webster, anyone still can sign up. 



"It's a very exciting game to 
watch and one of the most ex- 
hausting I ever have played," 
stated Webster. Water Polo is a 
lot like soccer except you use your 
hands instead of your feet. Wo- 
men may use two hands while 
the men are restricted to one. 



The standings of the season 
this far are as follows: 




Band At 
Atlanta's 
Omni Arena 

D Linda Dick 

The SMC Concert Band will be 
performing at the Omni sports 
arena in Atlanta for a basketball 
game between the Golden State 
Warriors and the Atlanta Hawkes 
Nov. 5. Featured with the band 
will be Bill Hughes, accordian 
player, and Julie McClarty, twirl- 
ing her batons. The band will 
perform during the 2nd and 4th 
quarters, for the half-time show, 
and before the game starts. 



It's said 
their 
numbers 
once 

darkened 
the sun. 

Ducks Unlimited is a non-profit 
organization thai works to protect 
and restore waterfowl marshlands 
in Canada, where United States 
Federal funds don't reach. And 
where 70'7i of our waterfowl are 
hatched. Help keep the ducks fly- 
ing. Send your tax deductible dona- 
tion to: Ducks Unlimited, P.O. Box 
66300, Chicago, Illinois 60666. 
Please. 

DUCKS 
UNLIMITED 



We need 

your help. Now. 



Flag ball scores coming 
week s Accent 



Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, TN 37315 





Jeff Galloway, fonner Olympian 




Olympic Pusher Gallowayj 
Positively Addicts Runners 



DVan Boddy 

"Turn on to running" is going 
to be the theme of the CABL 
(Collegiate Adventists for Better 
Living) chapel program this 
morning, highlighted by special 
guest speaker and former 
olympian, Jeff Galloway. 

A dyed-in-the-wool, irrevers- 
ible case of running addiction 
himself, Jeff Galloway has be- 
come an outstanding "pusher" 
for the running habit, having sur- 
rounded himself with running. 
The founder of Phidippides, a 
national growing chain of running 
equipment stores and the brain- 
child of the Atlanta Running 
Center (an international live-ln 
research haven for world-class 
competitive runners, now in an 
advanced planning stage) Jeff 



welcomes every opportunity to 
proselytize for Positive Addiction. 

Positive Addiction is the 
recently-coined term for the phe- 
nomenon that makes runners do 
again and again an activity that to 
the layman seems painful and 
almost ridiculous. This phenom- 
enon is an actual physical and 
mental addiction to running, 
brought about by experiencing 
the "Third Wind," a feeling of 
intense well-being, after one has 
run several miles. 

Following the discussion on 
Positive Addiction, "The 
Marathon.',' a full-color reel nar- 
rated by premiere marathoners 
Frank Shorter, Bill Rodgers, and 
Don Kardong, will be shown. 

Welcome to SMC, JeffI 



Collegedale Cleaners 




San. • Thors. 
7:30 - 5:30 

FWday 7:30-4:00 

COLLEGE PLAZA 

396-2550 




im^mjii:i*m 



Grundset - In Defense Of 



Hall 



Thorsday, November 17, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 



Dear Editor: 

It was inevitable, at this time of tation to bnktpr th^ -.^ 

year, that some crusading student should mater a ize WeM ',Ti ''"""' ?"''"'' ™"'<' '"^''e all of 

[and possibly someone who needs enough, in list week^rioufhr v' '""l '".""'' '"'™' '^ *<^ '^''"y 

toget his name in print) should Accent (Vol. 33, No 10 II 3 ""^^ ^" *,^' ^^--olved. 

present the annual blast against 1977, p. 4) It came'thronoh '••;: ^u ^"''''""""-"f-Autamn 

the celebrating of holidays fine foL " ® '" Z^''^ happened to be called a 

(Thanksgiving, Christmas, New To begin with, there isn't a henr"" f ?? '^^ '^'^'' °f ^ 

Year's Day, Easter, Fourth of student at SMC who doesn't know ^f ".""'"''''="'« ^hort of such 

July, and the rest) and that an in- that Halloween laS its dark "nd deHcio ?"'"'"■ "^^ ^"^ ' 

depth study of how all these murky origins in naeanisHnn»", ^''"°''' P'^"'^-s"PPer of bur- 

events are steeped in pagan ori- debauch tf^ The' p ri u^fs fhe'r'e ? ''' Tr^'J" "''■ '"' 

gins (this replete with scriptural satanic rituals invoWinTh™ n Zll' \lTltt.V sTZ' 

and Spmt of Prophecy documen- sacrifices, blood-drinking, quasi- (there's nothing «lysa- 

tanic about closing the cafeteria times 
and eating outside); we had a 

, "tie peppy program of music and 

Thatcher's 



oween And Having Fun 




POWER OF PMNT 



)out Letters 



letters to the editor, as 
are quite thought-pro- 
from those who either 
■ riled-up enough to say 
ling or terrificanjynspired 
some virtuous piece of 
on. 

me of the Accents this year 
nve been a few attacks 
utile city commissioneis 
"jng the road situation 
- as well as 

yiilar atrocities. I must 
such situations are 
«■" After all, who better 
™t than the motorists 
fe landed in the ditch on 
ifc of the road? 
wnt to remind those of 
"sli to use the Accent to 
Tthat the object of our 
»mch includes the paper, 
"i us into a closer rela- 
WOi Christ as well as to 
r«foraworkinHisvine- 
i' member "The Saviour 
JO no civil reforms. He 
. nor con- 
enemies... 
'Oe remedy did not Ue In 
"""•n and external 
To be efficient, the 
■ 'each most individ- 
I must regenerate the 
"«l«otAge»,p.509. 
isoa 



, *?"«^ that some- 
n ^., Lincoln Li- 
^^^ avatable for the 

"^usIslTor*"^ 



f no abu; 
I the 
'the 



; this 



P'tythat 



. only a choice 
enjoy it. 



of their 

We could go 

periods of history 



No-No 
Typing Rule 



Dear Editor: 

■We have a new regulation in 
Thatcher and that is we can't use 
our typewriters after 10:30 p.m. 
roomcheck either in the lobbies or 
in our rooms. 

It really does not bother me to 
hear a typewriter being used next 
door. In fact, the sound rarely 
carries that far. 

I, myself, always have to hand 
in typewritten reports and pa- 
pers. This new rule to me is very 
academy-like. How am I to limit 
myself to certain hours to type? 
Right now I need to type a 20- 
page report. With my other 
homework and the need to go 
research in the library, 1 probably 
won't be able to begin and finish 
typing before 10:30 p. n:. 

All right, so no typing at all 
after 10:30 p.m. When is the 
night considered to be over? 2:30 
a.m.? 5:30 a.m.? I think I'll type 
then. 

Laurie Acevado 



readings from the bed of a hay 
wagon decorated with bales of 
hay and pumpkins: we had a 
contest of costumes (none of 
which were required) and not a 
single witch, ghost, or evil spirit 
was depicted: we ended up with a 
crackling bonfire and roasting oi 
marshmallows. 

We did not honor Halloween -- 
to my knowledge there wasn't any 
sacrificial altar, nor seance cen- 
ter, not even any bevy of witches, 
druids, elves or other "super- 
natural" bodies in evidence. 
Why did we do it? Because by the 
end of the first nine-weeks of 
school we need some kind -of 
"out-of-doors" social event to 
help us "let off a little steam, "to 
enjoy the fine Autumn weather 
(which this year has been the 
finest), and to talk and visit with 



maner'orf.'.?^"; '"!'"'' t' ' '''**°"^ ^""^ °P^^^^ ^"^ other 

Greek L P ^''"°^* ^"y*t^'"8 productions (whose plots would 

ureek or Roman (Olympic "curl your hair" if we really 

games, columns, sports, pottery, checked them out); we study in 

goyerriment, plannine of cities, our biology, chemistry, physics, 

hefterr'nr'n h''-^V '""P'" '"^ Psychology texts (and others) 

heaers. parades, ad infinitum) and ignore or learn to bypass the 

could e said to haye pagan begin- references to evolution and the 

nZ;.i t r '^^V *^"^ "progression of man" theories 

ntegral parts of our culture be- and pick out instead the salient 

"S*"*- points of living organisms, the 

through the interwining biochemical cycles, 

(medieval and the workings of physical laws 

ith Its in this earth and the universe, 
music and art forms, the Age of The point is - we are constantly 

Reason, the flowering of litera- choosing. And so it is witli 

ture, the inventions and develop- holidays. Take Christmas for 

ments of the Enlightenment and instance. It is doubtful that very 

beyond) and probably discover to many Seventh-day Adventists 

our chagrin that many, if not worship or honor it as a sacred 

most, of these great ideas have day. Very few of us observe or 

pagan (that is. secular), sadistic, conduct cnurch services on 

sensual, or evil overtones of ori- Christmas as a time for the spirit 

gin and were put forth by un- of good-will and brotherhood -- a 

. hristians or atheistic person. time for sharing - while enjoying 

It seems to me that our problem the tremendous music and art 

isn't so much in sleuthing out the which the season has spawned, 

pagan roots of certain ideas and We seem to have learned how to 

concepts but rather in being alert deal with the apparent dichotomy 

to a very much up-to-date Evil of ideas that Christma.^ pre- 

One w'ho is leading us into temp- sents. But we don't end up 



lations of pride, criticism 
operativeness and, of course, all 
manner of immoral behavior so 
prevalent and accepted in our 
times. 

But this 
lemma; H 



damning the whole season. 

As a matter of fact, I am getting 

a little upset and tired with the ' 'if 

it's bright, has color, and makes 

you laugh, it must be wrong" 

the Christians di- syndrome. The devil doesn't 

part of this worid have a comer on beauty, bright 



and yet he is not of this world, colors, great music, happL , 

each other and laugh. We so- He must learn to accept and enjoyment, holidays, vacations, 
cialized for a couple of hours and reject; he must become involved scenery, and having fun. The 
enjoyed "that was it! Anyone and he must turn away. We Christian should be able to enjoy 
ally thread our way through a perilous life. If you can't do that, then 
path of thistles and roses and take what is this school or your life all 
what we can and avoid other about? 

things. It is the job of maturing SMC has planned activities (in- 
to learn what to do and how to eluding some attention to holi- 
relate to this dilemma without days as time, effort, money, and 
going astray while in the process appropriateness allows) to help 
of choosing. develop you into that whole being 

So. ..we travel down freeways which will be equipped intellec- 
and ignore billboards advertising tually. spiritually, socially, and 
liquor and cigarettes, and see the artistically to live in this present 
glory of autumn instead; we at- world while preparing you for life 



who thinks otherwise and 
believes that we were honoring 
the pagan origins of Halloween 
(1) wasn't there, (2) is terribly 
misinformed, or (3) is grossly 
naive (possibly all three)! 

Well. let's fact it -- we're living 
in a world where almost every- 
thing we come in contact with has 
pagan or secular origins. For 
instance: the names of the 
months honor Roman gods as do 



the days of the week, but we' 
stuck with them and use them 
anyway. Most of our thoughts 
about forms of poetry, logical 
thinking, debates, architectural 



Saturday Nite Movies 



Dear Editor: 

The same arguments that our 
favorite author uses against 
novels should be used against 
television and all movies! 



tend scientific and professional in the next. It is a truism that life 

conventions and ignor the "Hap- is To live! 

py Cocktail Hours" and marvel at E.O. Grundset, Chairman of the 

the presentations of great intel- Programs' Sub-Committee of the 

lects; we accept melodies and Student Affairs' Committee 

Shut Up And Thank You 



"Dear youth" (and older folks 
too) ' 'cease to read the magazines 
containing stories. Put away 
every novel," and television sets 
and all the movies they show on 
this campus. "We would do well 
to clear our houses" and dorm Clyde Harkins 
rooms "of all the story magazines 
and the publications containing 
ridiculous pictures" and tele- 
vision programs "-representa- 
tions originated by satanic agen- 
cies. The youth cannot afford to 



poison their minds with such 
things" as the movies they show 
here on Saturday night and the 
cartoons on Friday at lunch time 
in the cafeteria. '"What is the 
chaff to the wheat?' Let every 
one who claims to be a follower of 
Christ," everyone on this cam- 
pus, "read" and see "only that 
which is true and of eternal 
value." 



for the most solemn duties. A 
worid is to be saved," including 
ourselves. "...In view of the 
great work to be done, how can 
any afford to waste precious time 
and God-given means in doing 
those things that are not for his 
best good or for the glory of 
God?" Messages to Young 
People, p. 286. 



Dear Editor: 

I wish to express my thanks to 
those who strive to cooperate in 
the public meetings at this school. 
By cooperation I am meaning 
those who shut their big mouths 

so either they or others may listen here. In this case, the need of the 
and understand what is being collective whole is greater than 



talking. You're talking just adds 
to the confusion! Show your 
maturity. Remember that even 
the dull and ignorant have some- 
thing worthwhile to say. 
The Peoples Party wishes the 
I good of all the students 



, church. Sabbath School 
worship, or chapel. If by chance 
you may find yourself uninter- 
ested in the meeting - don't start 



any person's singular need. 



The Peoples Party 
Jerry Lee Holt 



IT SAHS H£Kt -lilAT SrtIC <5 

^ THAT Couc&e SD.^ 
AT 0#le TiA^ ? 




"We must prepare ourselves 




. THE SODTHKRN ACCENT lliiinday, November 17, 1977 



3 



Campug Cteliieds 



) check out their employinent 



A For Sal« 1969 Belalr, good body. 327 automatic, power steering, standard brakes. Call 39M74e or Talqe 
Box #156. 



* NimiXI audents - Ksap ahead of the pa* by •^''"0^'»" 

^ ooooO^KIee- Kno«- *e,e to 00. Q>o't lust folk«, t <^- ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^ ,^ ft, S*M Ne« JOB ski, only used t»toe. $75111 Must sell - cash needed quickly. Call Ken - 4713. 
f*'^Z_Z?I2LH-*™j riillV*indaRemlna at 629-1461 



fordstails. 

• n»Box,.o.sped^B<.nyC^Or,st™^|ectls-lnthea>x.entCent.. &xx«s depends 00 You, 
•rtS^tnedSdrng^e. In Christ. Kirk Kin,. 

• Stos. lary. telph. Paul. Daddy, and the ttndng Machine. 
A Utok G- Ha« a nice day! Lolly and Pop. 

^ipointment. 

• R, s*. -68 impala with 327 engine, povwr steering and "^'iirfJ^^^S °" "*"""""°' 
SL^ted radTtL. dean aS In iood cmlltion. CDntact Luoetla Moore - 39W593. 

3 tor sale no each. Call 34*6425 In the evenings. 



tlw* You: To all that c 



the art department h 



A*n'i Nursing Urttom SMtH - f 

.,„=„.„,„,.,-. lor sale six Polanld Br«^. »» big Shots and four square shootas, $11 each, take 
cjBlce. Also some out-ol-date film, Martjld, still works. $2 a box. 
t*niy Blrthd<y Ortiy! From Jeff, Randy, and [fenny. 

and Ftechmaninoff. 
FOR iW£ NlkoiTat EL F1.4 lens, black body and case, $380, call 396-2390 alter 6 p.m. 



0Totl 



Wfe'll find your hot spot sooner or lalerl The "Bianketers." 
- platic containers with lids - $.50. Plastic pails with handle, without lids - $.25. 



A Cev lv« Bocboker "There Is In every true vwman's heart a spark of heavenly fire, wliich lies dormant In 
the broad dayllgM of prospalty; but which id ndles up, and beams and blazes In the dark hour of adversity. 
(WashingtSilrelng.Tt-SMld) Book 1819-1820 The Wife.) Thanks for Aa you dol The MIssl^Town 
h^mkey. 



A Happy 20 years to Tex Ladlsh from Laurel. Hotel Calilomia & Darth Vador. 

A ODYCU KNOW- Youcanllyto Wichita, Kansas inaCossna1721nles 
by scheduled airlines. Contact the Collegedale Aero Service, inc. 



e than it takes you to get there 



A MIglai mJ ■Pwology M*«: ™s Mtlay night at 6:45, Elder Springett will present the topic on how i™ 
puiSiase a Bible. This lunctlon will tie held In Talge Hall Ctiapel . Oin't miss this presentatloni 

A HeUgtonandlTnolooyM*!™: The Big Social wont lor Deceihberv»ill be the Christmas Party. Thlslsona 
Saturday night December 10 at 6:X. There will be light lood, such as popcorn, drink, Spanish nuts etc A, 
lar as entertainment, there will be the Men's Oxirus, a ventriloquist, a movie, etc. So keep this dale open 
You must sign up in the Religion Department or In one of the mens' or womens' dorms. We need this 
informationtoknowhowtoplanforthefood. You must be signed up by Thanksgiving Vacation. Ifyouneed 
more inlonnatlon. call fton Whitehead at 4872. Have A Qood Oayl From your Ministerial Qub Ofllcers, 

3 to the Men's Qub \ft^ite Elephant Salel Your Men's Qub Ollloers. 

AlCw'tBellevellll IstumMedintoTaigeHall'ssaunaandploppeddownononeof the benches. Aslopenod 
rtiy eyes It was obvious that the sauna has been rebuilt. And, oh boy, what a pleasure It Is now to take a 
^na WfemustthankKR. Davis, whorebulltthesaunalorlreel I might also add that he, lor the most pan 
built the mountains in the Student Center. This Is a teacher that gats active lor the students In more ways 
than just teaching. THANKS! From the Men's Oub Officers and Talge Hall Deans. 

• htapy H^m Birthday Buddy: From Melanee Snowden, T.D., Qndy Whitehead, M.Y., Kathy IVfcGee 
A.S., Sandy Canhon, Fbn Whitehead, etc. VWa enjoyed your "Surprise" Birthday Party. 

AYouGotltll Tell us about it! Memories' Rjetry AwordI Deadline: November 30th. 

A HELP!! Ride to Miami desperately needed lor five. Leaving December 19; or ride hack to OolleBOteleon 

January 8; or BOTH. We will help v«1th driving and gas. Pleasecall396-4636or leaveamessifleln Box37l 

Thatcher. Call any time day or night. 

# Come Bidl^e a trip around the world! Friday, 11:30-1:30lnthecaleteria banquet room, see special Student 

Mission slides. 
A SnowSkiing at Beech Mountain in No. Carolina. Sunday, Dec. 4. For Info, and sign up call Qndl at 4544 or 

Byron at 4842. 

November Happenings 

18-19 Chattanooga State College Fair - Eastgate Center. 

17 Hunter Museum of Art - Carolinas' Last Ftoyalty Exhibition thru Dec. 31 In Mezzanine Gallery. 

19 Hunter Museum of Art - Sinclair Ashley, potter; Rosemary Musick, weaver, thru Dec. 6. 

19 rvlemorlal Auditorium, 8 p.m. - Mull's Gospel Concert. 

20 TivDil. 3 p.m. - Lire Wind Ensemble. 

20 Memorial Auditorium. 8 p.m. --Professional Wrestling. 

21 IvtehBrial Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. - Dave Wilkerson Crusade. 

22 Memorial Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. - Dave Wilkerson Crusade. 

22 trrC. 8 p.m. - Opera Wori(Shop, David Pennebaker, music director, "La Boheme" Oiadck. 

22 University of the South, 8 p.m. - Jazz pianist fvlax fvlorath, Guerry Hall. Admission $5.00. 

22 Tivoli, 7:30 p.m. - LTTC all sing. 

25 Eastgale Center - Tree Lighting. 

Tivoli, 2-9 - Movie Oasslcs - Casablanca & Public. 

Tivoli, 2-9 - Movie aassios - Casablanca Si Public. 

Eastgate Center - Santa Arrives. 



\Miat Do You Think? 



The following opinion poll is directed specifically at the SMC student 
body. 

Question: Are you hi favor of "The Hands of God' ' statue to be placed 
in the mail of the SMC campus? 

Please state below why you are or are not in favor and place response 
in one of the The Southern Accent boxes located on campus. 



Poll conducted by David Kay, #50553, rank: Senior 




Surprise your parents at Thanksgiving by bringing home information about 
terrific savings on new cars. Brokerage plan enables one to buy new cars at 
factory invoice prices. Take home a typical but actual quotation sheet 
together with information of how the plan works. Call 396-2247 or 395-2242 
after 3:15 p.m. weekdays and all day Sunday. We will deliver information to 
your dormitory mailbox. 






A Dog's Best 



Friend Is 
His Man 



Every man should find his dog. 
Or is it, Every dog should find his 
master? Better yet, A dog is 
man's best friend. How 'bout 
Man is dog's best friend? What- 
ever! Let me tell you what 
happened to me. 

As most of my loyal column 
followers remember, in an earlier 
column this year I wrote an article 
on SMC's Nicest Nuisance. The 
article was about all the dogs who 
hang around the CK and some 
things about feeding them and 
their responses. Well, my story 
ended with the bad news of the 
dog catcher coming and taking 
away all the dogs without or with 
expired doggie tags. 
After I wrote the column I got 



to meet a big black dog I had seen 
around campus. Well, he really 
took a likin' to me. He acts like a 
person, so I treat him like one, 
and it is for this reason that he 
likes me, 1 think. In fact, he 
thinks I own him, but the truth of 
the matter is, he belongs to Tom 
and Thelma Sanders. They have 
to come down and get him every 
night, from not far away in the 
community, and take him back 
home. 

I call him Blacky, for obvious 
reasons (he is pitch black all 
over). His real name is Spike. 
Spike loves Mike (that's me), and 
follows me around all the time. 
1 can be in a crowd and he will 
leave when I do. 

He loves to tide in my mail van! 



My maU van is white all oyer and 
so it's useless to try to hide him_ 
Whenever he can't find me, n 
looks for my mail van, Ju»P" '"' 
lays down, and waits. I n^" 
know when he is going to pop > 
or out of my life. He goes fro" 
place to place, waiting till ' 8<^' "" 
and out, so that we can go som 
more, but there are some plac" 
go that he can't go, such as 
cafeteria, CK, or the dormS; 
Oftentimes he can't stand to wait. 
so he goes back to my '"'^V,^; 
waits there. Whether I'm on dur 
or off, in truck, car, or afooi. 
loves to be with me. 

Happiness is being aPP'"H' . 
by someone; even if he is only 
dog. 




How To Shop For Insuran 



In today's society there are 
many things that can easily dis- 
rupt our everyday lives. In most 
instances individuals attempt to 
limit the amount of risk that must 
be taken. 

Risk management fits into 
everyone's daily lives. The term 
risk management in its simplist 
form means the using of all alter- 
native methods of dealing with a 
risk. The ultimate goal is the 
recognition and control of risk. 

Not all risks are insurable. In 
fact, most of the risks we are 
exposed to in daily life are insig- 
nificant and do not involve serious 
financial consequences. 

However, there are many po- 
tentially serious events, such as 
fire, automobile accidents, rob- 
bery, death and disability, that 
can cause substantial losses when 
they occur. These are the risks 
that insurance is all about. 

Let's zero in and look at life 
insurance and its varied pro- 
grams. Life insurance is the 
keystone to wise personal money 
management. Its primary pur- 
pose is to provide protection 
against untimely death, but it can 
also be used as a savings method, 
retirement income, to build an 
estate, or to avoid or minimize 
taxes. 

The first question one must ask 
himself is, "How much life insur- 
ance do I need?" Individual 
needs vary. As a rule of thumb, 
insurance agents urge at least 
five times your annual income -- 
at a cost of five per cent of your 
salary. Yet a single college stu- 
dent at 25 would definitely need 
far less than a married student 
the same age. So all circum- 
stances must be evaluated. 

In today's world, more and 
more women are contributing to 
the success of a family's financial 
security, so the loss of a wife's job 



through death or disability is be 
coming a very important insur- 
able risk. 

There are three basic types of 
life insurance policies - term 
whole life, and annuities. 

Term lite insurance provides 
protection only. Term insurance 
policies run only for a specific 
period of time, usually 1, 5, 10, or 
20 years. Term life insurance is 
a very attractive and wise invest- 
ment for most singles or young 
married couples in the 20-30 year 
age bracket. Term insurance has 
no cash value at the end of the 
insured period. The policy simply 
expires. 

Decreasing term insurance is 
often known as mortgage insur- 
ance. Many working home- 
owners desire their home to be 
paid for in the event of their 
unexpected death. A decreasing 
term policy is issued for the 
period of payout on the home. 
In the event of death the unpaid 
balance of the home mortgage 
would be paid. 

The whole life insurance policy 
provides coverage to the insured 
for his entire life. It provides a 
predetermined sum at death. 
Such policies provide low interest 
forced savings in the form of cash 
values that are built up by pay- 
ment of premiums larger than 
needed for protection alone. If 
the policy is cancelled, the cash 
value would revert to the insured 
individual. There are many dif- 
ferent forms of whole life policies, 
so read and understand all as- 
pects of an insurance pohcy. If 
for any reason you don't under- 
stand a clause, ask to have it 
explained. 

The third type of life insurance 
is the endowment policy, which 
offers protection against death for 
a specific period of time, such as 
10, 20, or 30 years to age 65 




A time to say 
THANKS 



Thanks for being able to 
live and work in this fine 
community. Thanks for the 
wonderful Mends and neigh- 
bors. And, thanks for the 
privilege of aervlng your 
insurance needs. May you 
all enjoy a safe and happy 
holiday. 



Uke A Good Meighbof. 

State Farm Is Thsre. 



Slaie Farm 

Insurance Companies 

Home Offices: 
Bloominoion, IllJnoit 



Fred Fuller 

Ccllegedale Agent 



Collegedale Cleaners 



CLSAMERr 




Son. - Thnre. 
7:30 - 5:30 

Friday 7:30-4:00 

COUEGE PtAZA 

396-2550 



The contract pays the face a- 
mount of the policy either in a 
lump sum or in installments when 
the conh-act expires. Endowment 
. policies are basically savings 
plans with an insurance element 
added. The sh-ess on the insur- 
ance feature also is a major limi- 
tation on endowment life insur- 
ance. If death protection is what 
you need, a great deal more death 
protection can be provided 
through either term or whole life 
insurance. Endowment is also 
the most expensive type of insur- 
ance policy. 

The fourth type of life insur- 
ance policy is the annuity. The 
basic purpose of an annuity is to 
assure a person an income they 
cannot ouUive, as well as one that 
is relatively large compared with 
the amount paid in for the an- 
nuity. An individual pays an 
insurance company a specific cap- 
ital sura in exchange for a pro- 
mise that the insurer will pay the 
insured a series of periodic pay- 
ments upon his retirement for as 
long as he or she lives. 

Some guides in buying insur- 
ance; 

•Read and understand the con- 
tract. Know all aspects of it. 
Know what your paying for and 
exacUy what is covered. 

•Have your insurance agent 
explain any sections or phrases 
you do not understand. 

•Buy only from companies li- 
censed to sell insurance in your 
state. Otherwise, the state insur- 



ce 

DGreg Vital 



ance department will have no Moner and the Federal Trade 

power ,0 act if there are any Commission, 
problems. Each state has its own 

laws pertaining to insurance. .If you feel you were cheated or 

• f you feel you have been led to believe something, contact 

misled regarding any insurance a lawyer. You may be able to sue 

policy sale or settlement, contact under the doctrine of reasonable 

your State Insurance Commis- expectations. 




Vanessa 
Greenleaf 



9^/itenc(g c^nd ^/lotde/is 



Arranged As Raetrv From Sons md Daughtere of God 



you will have, 
t ever bear In mind that 

the living, 



He loves you, and It Is better 

To share His love than to sit with princesses 
and t)e separated from Him. 



Better counsellor, 

A safer guide, 

A more sure defense and 

c. J you will 

Friend 

Thatsticketh 

closer than a brother. 




8 - THE SOITHERN ACCENT Thursday, November 17, 1977 



New Track Oub Sponsors 
Nov. 20 Fun Run And T-Shirts 



Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



w 



DKathy Oakley 

A new club has been formed on 
our campus this year especially 
for runners of all kinds. It's the 
Track club and the director is Van 
Boddy, a junior Biology major. 

There are approximately 20 
committed runners on our cam- 
pus according to Boddy. with the 
committed specifying that they 
run five miles per day. 

At the beginning of the year 
there were about 150 occasional 
runners and joggers. This num- 
ber has dropped to about 75 now, 
with 40 or 50 of those being quite 
regular. 

Boddy stated that the club is 
still in its beginning stages, but 
he would like to see it organized 
into groups of long-distance run- 
ners, sprinters, and possibly 
middle-distance runners under 
the supervision of a group direc- 
tor. 

This would entail training on 
their own for the runners in each 
group with the group director 
occasionally arranging practices 
with his group for timings. 



Boddy said that also he would 
like to see, by next semester, 
bi-weekly meetings that would 
include short seminars on in- 
juries, the physiology of running, 
and the nutrition needed for run- 
ning, and other related topics. 

Coming up Nov. 20. the Track 
club is sponsoring a Fun Run. 
This is a run that is between a 
race and a training run. These 
runs were developed by the editor 
of Runner's World about five 
years ago and have become in- 
creasingly popular throughout the 
nation. 

At a Fun Run everyone starts at 
the same time as in a race, but no 
trophies, awards, or prizes are 
given; however timings will be 
given for those finishing. 

For this Fun Run there will not 
be any entry fee. and it will be 
five-mile course. Anyone inter- 
ested should be at the track on 
campus at 10 a.m. Nov. 20, 

Some of the plans for the future 
include a run to be held at the 
Festival of Faith in March at 



Greensboro, NC. This run will be 
around 20-25 kilometers and 
there will be a $3 to $5 entrance 
fee. 

Plans are being made to adver- 
tise this run nationally, with an 
especially heavy blanket placed 
on the southeastern portion of the 
country, according to Boddy. 
The cost for this advertising will 
be close to $5,000. 

Fart of the advertising cost will 
be spent on T-shirts. These are 
being developed now and will be 
made especially for this run, 
■ Boddy hopes for a good turn 
out at this race. He stated that 
one of the reasons for developing 
the T-shirts is because "many 
runners will come just to collect a 
good-looking T-shirt," 

Eventually, Boddy hopes to see 
a track team formed, and ar- 
rangements made to compete at 
the other races in this area. 
Right now, he is hoping to ar- 
range with the Chattanooga Track 
Club for a small run early in 
December. 



Men's Club Shares 
Christmas With Children 



DMark Kurzynske 

A Christmas part>- for under- 
privileged children will be held 
S\indav, Dec. 4 in the lobby of 
TalgeHall. This Men's club 
sponsored activit>' will be for 12 to 

15 kids ranging from ages 3 to 12. 
According to Dean Evereti 
Schlisner. six to eight couples 
who sign up will each lake a child 
aside and be their host and hos- 
tess for the evening. First, the 
couples will take their children up 




Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



x'NATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



Longshore Foremost 
In 1st Football Round 





•B' 


League 


Standings 

W L T Pet 


Longshore 






6 1 - ,85- 


Martling 






4 1 2 ,83: 


Robin 






4 1 - ,80 


Kittel 






2 2 2 .60 


Shane 






1 4 - ,20 


Suarez 






5 1 .08 



The football games have been 
vigorous. The up-to-date report 
reveals Longshore is the foremost 
team after the first round. His 
passing attack is a crime because 
it cannot be contained. They are 
6-1 and vow to continue their 
successful campaign. 

Martling seized second place 



to the cafeteria for supper, then 
take in a film afterwards. Then 
Santa Claus will make his appear- 

The Men's club hopes to get 
donations of toys from Chaita- 
nooga area merchants. The rest 
of the funds to finance this party 
will come from the club's treas- 
un,'. After the party, a bushel 
basket of food will be given to the 
families of the children as the kids 
are taken home. 




by tying two games. Their overa,. 
record is 4-1-2, with the two ties 
being computed as Vi-wins. This 
would make them a game ahead 
of Robins in the won column. 
His team beat Suarez last week 
49-17. Martling is an opportunis- 
tic team with a strong defense. 
Their pass coverage is unsur- 
PASSed. 

Robins is. third with a 4-1 re- 
cord. They are in a good position 
to overtake first or second as the 
season progresses. 

Kittel has kept his team on an 
even keel. Their record exempli- 
fies this fact. 2-2-2. Sunday 
night. Martling and Kittel played 
to a 12-12 tie on frozen turf. 
Kittel fought back in the second 
half to score twice after Martling 
had gotten off to a 12-0 lead, 
Kittel had a balanced attack. The 
players produced an intense 
game by capitalizing on their an- 
tagonists' errors. His games 
h-u e been close ones as his record 
indicates. 

Shane is next to last with a 1-4 
record. Suarez must win all the 
remaining games to play .500 
ball. Their record of 0-5-1 does 
not reflect the team's quality. 
They are capable of winning their 
remaining games and making this 
a great season. 





EAT IT HERE — 
OR CARRY OUT 

• TACOS 

• TOSTADOS 

• BURRrros 

• FRUOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 

• ENCHIRrrO 




\b<^^' .'^'^ 



THi 



SOUTHERN ACCENT 



Vol. 33 No. 13 



Voice Of The Southern Missionary College Student 



Thursday, December 8, 1977 



CoUegedale. Tennessee 




2 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■niimday, December 8, 1977 




Thanksgiving New 
York Tour Escapes 
Injury In Wreck 



New Market Rescue Sqoad aids accident victims foUowiiig mobUe home timover. 



Tarry To Address 1st December 
Graduation Commencement 



QRich Ashlock and Dennis Starkey 



Bryan G. Tarry, pastor of 
Florida's Forest Laie Church, will 
be the guest speaker at the com- 
mencement exercises to be held 
Tuesday. Dec. 20. at 8 p.m. in the 
Collegedale Church. 

This is the first time there has 
been a December graduation at 
SMC. Explained Mary Elam, 
associate director of admissions 
and records, "It's the first time 



have actually scheduled peo- 
ple to finish in December." 
There were always some who 
would finish in the middle of the 
school year, but the members of 
the clinical nursing class that will 
be participating in this year's 
service, 55 in all, began their 
curriculums in January, 1976. 

A total of 99 students are plan- 
ning to graduate, 37 with bac- 



calaureate degrees, 61 with asso- 
ciate degrees, and 1 with a one- 
year diploma in food service. 
Nine others participated in last 
year's commencement exercises, 
but completed their requirements 
this semester. 

The nurses' pinning ceremony 
will precede the graduation, tak- 
ing place at 5:30 p.m. 



One of two motor homes loaded 
with a group of SMC art and 
behavioral science students drove 
off the road into an embankment 
and overturned at 6:15 Sunday 
morning, Nov. 20. 

The 20-odd students and five 
faculty members comprised a 
study tour group bound for New 
York City to visit the major art 
museums and receive one hour of 
credit for Art Appreciation class. 
The group had been driving 
since early in the evening of the 
19th. 

Graham Cooper, former stu- 
dent of SMC, was at the wheel 
when he dozed and drove the 73 
Champion mobile camper onto 
the left shoulder of Highway 81 in 
Virginia, two miles north of the 
New Market exit. Cooper swung 
the camper back on the highway, 
overcorrected, and bounced into 
the embankment on the right 
shoulder, flipping the vehicle 
onto its left side. 

The impact of the abrupt stop 
threw Greg Vital, Irene Wilken- 
son, Jackie Morgan, and six-year- 
old Rob Garren through the front 
windshield. 

All ttie passengers sustained 
only minor bruises and abrasions: 
Cooper fractured three fingers. 



Felts' Road Settlement Poses 
New Legal Problem For Gty 



No one was seriously injured. 

"I saw it coming." said Cindy 
Bata. "I woke up as he was 
swerving. After it happened, I 
walked out of the windshield. 
I didn't even realize it was the 
windshield^ It looked like a 
door. ' ' 

"I was stuck in the top bunk. 1 
had to yell for someone to come 
get me out," said Ruth Garren, 
wife of art professor Garren. 
"I'm surprised I came out with 
my brains. Right near my head 
was a jagged hole through the 
side of the camper." 

The mobile home, belonging to 
Dr. Rudolf Aussner and Fred 
Fuller, was badly damaged. The 
New Market police estimated the 
damage at $20,000. 

The students were taken to 
North Shenandoah Memorial 
Hospital by the New Market Res- 
cue Squad, where they were 
checked and treated for abra- 
sions, then released. 

"We were lucky," Bata com- 
mented, "ithat Shenandoah Val- 
ley Academy was only a few miles 
away. They rented a bus to us 
and drove us to New York." 

The accident delayed the 
group 13 hours. 



DJerry Dick Lien 

As the residents of Collegedale 
await the opening of the new 
road, the City has found itself 
involved in an unexpected legal 
problem. 



According to City Manager Lee 
Holland, John Felts, publisher of 
the Quality Shopper, informed 
authorities that in constructing 
the road, a portion of land owned 
by Felts had been taken by the 
City. 

The land in dispute consists of 
about one-quarter acre located 
directly behind E-Z-Duz It. 

"Several weeks ago Mr. Felts 
said that we had encroached on 
his land beyond that which he had 
given as a donation several years 
ago. Land deeds had been drawn 
up involving Mr. Felts, the 
McKees, and Southern Mission- 
ary College around 1973," stated 
Holland. 

The City, upon further investi- 
gation, decided that Felts' com- 
plaint had some merit. 

According to law, when a dis- 
pute of this nature occurs, the 
City government must make a 
survey of the land in contention. 
This must be conducted by a 
licensed surveyor whose decision 
and appraisal of property value 
will hold in a court of law. 

Therefore, a survey was made 
which showed that the City had 
indeed encroached upon land 



held by Felts and the College. 

The City has since then filed 
inverse condemnation papers and 
the deposit appraisal money for 
the property is being held in 
trust for Felts. Since the road has 
already been built over the prop- 
erty in dispute, the City now 
legally holds title to the land by 
The Right of Eminent Domain. 

Felts now has the alternative of 
accepting the appraisal money for 
his lost property or of taking the 
case before a court. 

"All I can say right now is that 

ve are rather embarrassed that 



the Ci^ did encroach on land 
owned by Mr. Felts and the 
College. We are now in the 
process of working out a settle- 
ment with the school. But as far 
as Mr. Felts' decision is con- 
cerned, the City is still uncertain 
as to its final outcome. However, 
we are certain that some solution 
can be found which will prove to 
be mutually satisfactory," said 
Holland. 

The dispute over the land en- 
croachment is not likely to hinder 
in any way the opening of the 
road. 





his land. Photo by Mark Ford. 




What To Get 

Him--Her? 

Shop Collegedale 

Nursery And Crafts 

HOUSE PLANIS CRAFTED GIFTS 

TROPICAL FOLUGE POTTER^ 

POINSEITIAS IN RED-WHITE-PINK 
GARDEN TOOLS 

BUY PLANTS THE STUDENTS RAISE 

' '"'""" '"'' iiiii iiiii.uummmiiiimimiiiiiiiiii i ii i w tf 



ThiirsdnK Drcombor S, 1977 THT SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



Men's Club Vending 
Yieick 20% Profit 



DMark Kurzynske 

The Vending Machine Service 
branch of the Talge Hall Men's 
club is now a profiteering 
venture. According to David 
Kay, the manager of the ma- 
chines, this fiscal year will bring 
in $8,000 to $10,000 worth of 
sales. One-sixth to one-fifth of 
the gross income is profit, which 
equals about $1,500. 

A portion of this profit is used 
to pay for the vending machines 
and any repairs that may be 
needed. The money is also used 
to buy goods to keep the ma- 
chines stocked. What money is 
left is used to supplement the 
Men's club dues. 

The vending machines are 
quite expensive. When the 
Men's club first brought organi- 
zation to the vending service, 
there were only two machines: 
the "Tom's Snacks" and an old 
drink machine. The dorm bought 
two new machines, a new drink 
machine, and a good dispenser. 
The new drink machine cost 
$1,100 and the food machine was 
$3,200. But with the addition of 
the food machine, which brings in 
50 per cent of the total income, 
profits will triple. 

The latest acquisition of the 
vending service is a new money 
changer located in the dorm lob- 
by, which cost $800 

Kay stated he puts in about 10 
hours a week seeing that all the 



food IS fresh. He picks up sand- 
wiches three times a week from 
the cafeteria. The milk is brought 
m direct ft-om the Mayfield daries 
which enables the Men's club to 
pass on the savings. "We try to 
keep the prices as low as possible 
but still manage a profit," ex- 
plained Kay. The "Tom's" 
machine is kept supplied by the 
- "Tom's" company. 

The number one selling item is 
milk which is 3 cents under the 
cafeteria price. The second hot- 
test selling good is sandwiches, 
while blueberry and strawberry 
yogurts rank third. 

One of the new wrinkles this 
year in the vending service is a 
profit-sharing adventure. Ac- 
cording to Kay, "We started this 
profit-sharing business to let the 
guys benefit from the profits, also 
stimulate an interest in the vend- 
ing service, and raise some quick 
cash to buy the coin changer." 

Originally, there were 500 
shares of stock for sale at $1 
apiece, but only 45 were sold. 
Kay attributed this low sale to the 
fact that a lot of guys were wary 
about stability of the venture. 
Figures from last month's sales 
indicate the return for each dollar 
invested will be 21 cents. That's 
a large 20 per cent interest rate 
which Kay stated, "can't be 

Turn to p. 8, col. 1 




Our progressive, modern 63-bed hospital offers the newly 
graduated nurse opportunity for development of leadership 
skills plus variety in nursing experience. We are located in a 
small, friendly town in wooded hills. A new SDA church is 
being built. There is an eight grade church school near the 
hospital, and liberal fringe benefits. For more information 
call or write: 

Manchester, Ky. 40962 

(606) 598-5104 



Yj.vV\e Debbie^ O^UOfiy 





Comfy dining room a 



V nursing home. Photo by Mark Ford. 



Newly-Opened Life 
Center Hosts Open 

DJerrv Dick Lien ■*»- pp- ^i*- ■ ■ 



DJerry Dick Lien 

Open House was held Sunday, 
Dec. 4 for the Life Care Center of 
Collegedale nursing home located 
on Apison Pike adjacent to the 
new medical building. 

The new 124 bed facility is a 
member of parent corporation, 
Life Care Centers of America, 
located in Qeveland, Tenn. 

Life Care Center of Collegedale 
has been designed with the spe- 
cial needs of a convalescing or 
nursing home patient in mind. 
Its staff offers to patients 24-hour- 
a-day care under the supervision 
of a registered nurse, Susan Sines 
Frazier. 

Frazier, director of Nursing 
Services at the Center, graduated 



Care 
House 



from Southern Missionary Col- 
lege with a bachelor of science 
degree. Since then, she has 
worked at the Green Hill Health 
Center in Reading. Penn. 

According to Ralph Robinson, 
administrator, "Ours is an inter- 
mediate care facility. That means 
that we will not be handling 
patients classified as skilled care. 
All of our patients will be under 
the care of their own private 
physicians, and we will be dealing 
with the chronically ill, long and 
short term convalescents, post- 
operative, ambulatory or bedfast, 
and elderly patients. 

We are equipped, for instance. 



to handle cancer patients who are 
dying but who do not need 24- 
hour a day care by an RN. In 
other words, ours is not ar. inten- 
sive care operation." 

The Life Care Center has a- 
mong its staff, a speech therapist 
and a consulting physical 
therapist. 

A feature of the new complex is 
its activities program desig;:ed to 
fit a patient's individual needs, 
likes, and dislikes. A social 
services person whose assign- 
ment is to aid patients to adjust to 
their new environment is also a 



Tmn to p. 8, col. 3 



This Week's Specials 



^^^ 



e^^ 




. THE SODTHERN ACCENT Tliiindiy, December 8, 1977 



Pac 



^ 




TP Shortage In Thatche 



Editorial 



Ifs been rumored around that chapels are horribly bonng and a 
waste of time. And two letters this week, as you'll notice, touch on 
the subject. Prof. Rima says "abolish" and Ray Hartwell says 
they're not needful. Both deplore the fact that faculty get to miss 
out on chapels. j u 19 

The Eds ask why should the facul^ have to attend chapel.' 
If you think chapel is the pits - something disagreeable -- then do 
we drag everyone down to them? If we must suffer - make 
everyone? Should the faculty attend our worships, be required to 
sign out for church, have to eat a minimum of $40 in the cafe? 
When a thing is convenient for us. we don't care if the faculty are 
invdved or not. But when it comes to inconvenience, good holler, 
where are the faculty? 

The Eds class the faculty in a different category than students. 
We are here to get smart the faculty are not. 

We admit that the pits is the pits up to the hilt at times (which 
doesn't say much for quality), but why tai the 'ole noggin to try to 
do away with what our educational leaders consider motivational 
and morale-building (assemble-the-crew- and-let-them-know-that- 
we're-all-on-this-ship-together-type-business)? We can't change it 
.- fact it Every other SDA college must submit to it even those 
labeled more liberal and advanced than SMC. 

In response to the letter this week that makes the suggestion that 
„e editorialize on the necessity of chapels, we say that cracking our 
heads against a brick wall is not our style. 



Dear Editor: 

I would like to report a shortage 
of toilet paper in Thatcher. Upon 
returning from Thanksgiving va- 
cation, I found that our entire 
supply of Charmin had been de- 
pleted. Was there a notorious 
T.P. thief in the dorm? 

I have since learned that we are 
on a toilet paper rationing sys- 
tem. Why just tonight a strange 
rap was heard at my door. After 
answering with a cheery "Come 
in," I saw an anonymous hand 
place a single roll of toilet paper 
in our room, it reminded me a 
little of throwing scraps of food in 
a prison cell. When are the bars 
being put in, deans? 

What is the reason behind this 



We also need to make a little announcement concerning our 
letters to the editor. Because we want to include every letter, we 
are asking that you limit yourself to 250 words. Chop the 
preliminary rhetoric and get down to basics. With a few carefully 
chosen words your point can actually come across better. 



sudden shortage? I suspect an 
underground T.P. ring has been 
secretly confiscating all our sur- 
plus supplies and thus forcing 
upon us such drastic measures as 
rationing. 

What are we to do if we tun out 
of our allotted amount before 
ration time? Beg, borrow, and 
steal from our neighbors? Of 
course, we have been informed 
that we can purchase more toilet 
paper at the V.M. if we run out 
How thoughaul! Something else 
to spend our already limited re- 
sources on. Isn't this getting a 
little ridiculous? 
Sincerely, 
Debi Terry 



Dean's Response On Rule 



Dear Editor: 

In response to the article in the 
last issue, written by the "Irate 
Umbrella Owner," I feel an 
added explanation is necessary to 
complete the picture. 

Nothing was mentioned about 
the many notices in the Thatcher 
Bulletin about keeping umbrellas 
out of the halls. Can yoi' imagine 
how difficult it would be to evacu- 
ate a building in case of fire that 
had open umbrellas lining both 
sides of the halls? During a heavy 
rain, accompanied by lightning , 
the chances for fire would be a 



concern. 

This is not to mention the effect 
upon the hall carpet when that 
many umbrellas are left to drip in 
a public area. The suggestion 
was made that the umbrellas be 
folded and put in the bathrooms 
to drip where the floor has a drain 
to handle the excess water. 

I must admit, the "vivid color- 
ation and simplicity of design" 
were pleasing to the eye, but 
hazardous in case of an emer- 
gency evacuation. 
Mrs. Millie Runyan 
Dean of Women 



The Southern Accent 



All malerial puWished in Th* Southern Accant is not necessarily the opinion or 
view ot the newspaper staff or the SMC administration. Cartoons, articles, and 
other content itenB create an op»i exchange of Ideas, a forura In Ihe^tiase of 
disagreement, "Letteretothe Editor," isaoolumndesigned to provide expression. 
We do, however, reserve the right not to puttllsh malerial tj^sH is lib^ous, 



Editor Vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Neumann 

Busir»es3 Manager Dave Middag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greenleaf 

Layout Une-Up Randy Johnson 

Sports Editor Reuben Castillo 

Circulation Man^jer John Henson 

Secretaries Ram Legere 

Denise Sheets 

Ad Manager Ray Hartwell 

Prootreaderq K^hy Mixell 

Jeanne Zactiarias 

Sjbocriptions Candy Miranda 

Artists '. ..ivlaritFord' 

SandleLehn 

RKilographers Rhonda Runyan 

Mark Ford 

Reporters Jerry Uen 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

Sponsor Frances Andrews 

Printer. Felts Bros. Printing Co.. 

Oottewah, Tenn. 



Tbs Southern Accant is published weekly with the exception ot test weeks and 

Subscriptions for,parents and alumni are $5 per year, mailed weekly from 
Collegedale. TN, at a non-profit rate. 



Make Chapel Optional 



Jeans OK 

Dear Editor: 

Sometimes the new dress code 
seems a little confusing to me. I 
understand allowing girls to wear 
pants. I'm sure they appreciate 
it, especially when the weather 
starts turning cold like it has 
been. Although I feel that it's 
more becoming for them to wear 
dresses, many problems have 
been overcome by this decision - 
such as dresses being too short. 

What I don't understand is the 
ruling out of wearing jeans for 
guys. This rule came as a sur- 
prise to many of us, and found us 
with no choice except to buy a 
completely different wardrobe for 
this year. According to the Spirit 
of Prophecy, our clothes are to be 
neat, simple, and of good wearing 
material. Nothing is stated about 
ruling out a certain color or type 
of material. 

I know this was probably a hard 
decision for the school to make. 
Maybe this rule was made be- 
cause some kids abused the privi- 
lege of wearing jeans, but certain 
people abuse any rule, i really 
don't feel the giris would carry a 
grudge if we were allowed to wear 
jeans, especially since they got 
the privilege of wearing pants this 
school year. T truly wish this 
matter could be reconsidered. 

Sincerely, 
Elgin E. Frye 



Dear Editor: 

After reading the lettei written 
by the leadcr{?) of "The People's 
Party." I decided to voice my 
distaste for the insinuations that 
every student that is manditorily 
required to attend chapel is to go 
and aside from getting a "bles- 
sing" and "enjoying" the chapel, 
sit like little zombies with their 
hands folded in their laps and say 
nothing unless called upon!!! 

What Mr. Holt doesn't state is 
that, unlike faculty, students 
can't be either tardy nor absent 
whenever they "jolly well 
please." He also forgets that 
there are many students that 
really wish they were doing some- 
thing else with the time they have 
to "kill" sitting there listening to 
someone rant and rave at a po- 
dium! Furthermore, why should 
they be manditorily required to do 
so!? Very little, if any, credit is 
offered for it, yet a student can be 
dismissed for being absent more 
than allotted him/her. 

Therefore, if Mr. Holt wants to 
cut down on the amount of noise 
that he has to put up with, may I 
suggest that he put his time and 
efforts into getting the manual 
changed so that chapel be made 
optional for students!!! This 
should to a great degree solve his 

1 problem of the need of silence. 
Changing the subject. Mr. 
Grundset should be given a medal 
for setting many straight on the 



subjects related to by the very 
one-sided letter and article 
printed in the Accent. Thanks for 
letting us know that there is 
another side of life as opposed to 
walking around in a "religious 
stupor" day in and day outl 
Cordially, 
"Prof Rima 



Parenting? 

Dear Editor: 

Last week the Academic Affairs 
Committee approved a course 
which will be listed in our catalog 
as "Parenting." And thus we 
voted a new verb into existence, 
almost as unobtrusively as Satan 
came serpenting into the gardeni 
Suddenly one's aspirations can 
be couched in different terms. I 
hope, for example, that as exami- 
nations approach our classes will 
do a good job of studenting. 
And please, young people, take 
care of the new dormitory wings 
while residenting in them. I trust 
too that the happy squirrels I see 
from my office window will con- 
tinue to be successful at ro- 
dcnting. 

Yoursfor a language with some 
dignity, 

Robert R. Morrison, 
Chairman Department of Modern 
Languages 



SMC Or 
SHAC 

Dear Editor: 

Last year considerable discus- 
sion was held, about the possibility 
of a new name for our school. 
Probably the most favored was 
Southern Union College (SUa 
The problem was that SoutJ- 
western Union College already 
had the initials SUC. 

Another name was discussea ■■ 
Southern Adventist College 
(SAC), but that was dropped k- 
cause school officials felt it wo* 
conflict with the Strategic w 
Command of the U.S. Air Foi» 
They had a good point were, ' 
the last time we were connecW 

with the U.S. Government, J^ 
church lost its work ro a" 
Vietnam. . .^„,.p 

This may be a dead ■ ^ 
however, it all comes ■""'";„( 
with the modern art sculpture 
praying hands with a «« 
heart. After reading F ™' L 
defense of the wonderful meo^^^ 
Hve qualities of the M«."' ' eal- 
indeed impressed. The me 
ly struck home - Sacred n ^^,^ 
Adventist College (SHAU._ 
something to sit quietly a" 
tate about. 

The People's Party 
Jerry Holt 



andmeoi- 




Ihnraday, December 8, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - S 



Dear Editor: 

Really I wanted to discard the 
very idea of wriHng the wonderful 
world of Collegedale this untrad- 
itional letter, because inevitably, 
reaching any conclusion of unity 
held by the mass is futile, ab- 
surdly ridiculous, and totally out 
of the question no matter who 
says what or how long they say it. 
But even as an outsider to the 
SMC campus, I feel compelled to 
offer my dastardly sound opinion 
along with, no doubt, everyone 
else's. 

First, allow me to state most 
emphatically that under no pre- 
tense do 1 claim to be a skilled, 
cunning writer (as this letter may 
testify), or have authority in the 
music field or music theory (with 
the exception of consultation from 
certain Adventist musicians and 
music professors in certain Ad- 
ventist institutions). After all, I 
find that the whole great contro- 
versy over music, (rock and roll in 
particular), its connotations, and 
its possible applications amusing. 
Enough of this preliminary rhe- 
toric. 

Imagine someone writing this 
hypothetical letter: "Dear Fa- 
culty Member (or anyone for that 
matter): I detest your tie. I 
mean, it is awful what that tie 
does to me I Every time you wear 
it to class, I get sexually excited 
and have nasty thoughts. And in 
class, it is terribly embarrassingi 
Tou see, before I was converted 
last month, red and unholy 
thoughts of mine went together 
like Flip Wilson and Geraldine. 
Your red tie reminds mp of my 
past. Please don't wear it. 
Sincerely, Student." 

Now I have some questions. Is 
it morally wrong to wear red in 
God's view? Is red unholy? 
Should the professor wear red 
before that student? Are some 
things wrong, merely due to their 
history, because they have dis- 
tasteful connotations? 

It's funny, but many people 
that sincerely preach rock and roll 
(per se) is hell for our youth like to 
listen to it themselves. Some of 
those very ones even support rock 
music. Many, (heaven forbid), of 
these people go as far as to be 
avid fans of the "devil's music." 
How? Oh, our Heritage Singers 
are a typical example of mild 
rock. Famed WDEF (FM) and 
"tNQ are notorious for airing 
pop rock hits (tempo slowed 



iT*"*'.'""^ by all means 
please orchestrate it for us cul- 

to be outdone by our beloved 

Yesterday (Beatles), Morning 

othl? ."^''S'"" 8"y) among 
others. Surprised? Don't be 

MrCatffi';'';""°'"«™"8for 
MtCauffiel. I'm not even argu- 
ing (just presenting my decided 
opinion). Anyone can deduce that 
his feature article "Rock Can Still 
l-arry A Salvation Message" is 
lU-conceived, poorly written, and 
above all, very unpersuasivs. 
Just what is "Guitar Player" 
magazine anyway? 
The whole point is that the term 
Kock rs too general and vague 
to the populous. What, exactly 
precisely is rock? Is it any 
"piercing, dominating" music? 



If It makes me happy, or if 1 stomp 
the floor, then is it bad rock? 
Is there good rock and bad rock? 
If so, what makes the difference? 
Or is it morally right to be happy 
and stomp the floor, anyhow? 
Every person decides to himself 
with God alone. 

To me, stomping the floor and 
wearing the red tie are similar. If 
1 offend my brother with it, then I 
offend God. But 1 believe Jesus 
wants us to be happy in Him, and 
some music (not just any or all) is 
very emotional. Anyone who 
can't help but physically express 
their emotions to glorious music 
like (oh, say) Handel's Messiah, 
or Give Me That Old Time Reli- 
gion or mild religious rock like 
John Fischer's Napthali (Gen 
49:21) is dull. 
Most Sincerely, 
David Erwin 



Movie-Goers Hell-Bound? 



Dear Editor: 

In response to "The Saturday 
Night Movies" letter, I would like 
to say that if the gentleman would 
read other E.G. White statements 
as zealously as he interprets the 
ones he does, he might see a 
diffent story. 

Mrs. White clearly states that 
we should be carefiil not to take 
her statements out of context. 
Mrs. White was not against hav- 
ing fun. And many films - 
despite the fact that they might 
have been shown in the theater - 
are very clean and innocent. I 
feel that we are going overboard 
in saying that all movies are" 
sinful. I can't imagine how 
watching cartoons once a week, or 
seeing a film occasionally in the 
gym is going to lead our student 



body astray. 

May I point out that movies and 
films are used extensively as 
teaching aides such as Drivers 
Ed, or Science courses, etc. If we 
are to hold to the postulate that all 
movies are bad, we must say that 
the Christian experience of the 
students that have watched these 
films (such as the Francis 
Shaeffer series - which the col- 
lege has purchased) has been 
damaged. Why must we always 
deal in the extremes? 

I realize that there are people 
on campus that feel that all 
movies are bad. However, it may 
be that they are unwilling to 
discuss the pros and cons of each 
one, so they state that all movies 
are bad. 
Sincerely, 
Tim Holbrook 



Tipping The Piano Lid 




Dear Editor: 

I tip my piano lid to Dr. Ashton 
on his response to the Cauffiel 
article. The hardest thing to do 
today is to "call sin by its right 
name." It's tough; truth is not 
popular today because it's incon- 
venient to worry about it. 

My favorite Christian author 
states in 2 SM 36-37 that this is 
going to be a problem in the last 
days. She has some tough things 



to say about it, but she is careftil 
to suggest that it is not just her 
opinion. 

I don't mean to judge the sin- 
ner, because that is not my duty 
because I. am not worthy of that. 
But I do see things that do not go 
along with a God of order and of 
peace, so I do find myself hating 
the sin. I want nothing to lower or 
deface the image of my Re- 



deemer. 

One more thought. If any man 
uses the name of God in any way 
that does not glorify God and only 
God, and in a way acceptable to 
Him. Remember the third com- 
mandment? Let's bear His name 
with the highest and noblest of 
our poor efforts. All he asks for is 
our best. 
Sincerely, 
Mic Thurber 



Talenf Display 



Ad Man Tells Eds How 



Dear Editor: 

I'm truly disappointed as I re- 
J'lew, in my mind, the events of 
'ne talent program Saturday 
"'ght, Nov. 12. 

^ don't mean to criticize anyone 
*no participated or to belittle the 
organizers and directors of the 
program, for being a participant 
'" a few talent shows myself, I 
know how hard you work to get 
^ he acts together." But I must 
say that I was very surprised with 
some of the things that were 
presented under the name of 

talent." 

First of ail, there was a medley 
^ popular rock songs that sug- 
S^sted immorality almost all the 
way through. Then came the 
fcene featuring The Fonz and 
Mr. Midnight Lover," whose 
«ce and neck were plastered with 



lipstick. The Great Bank Robbery 
skit was clever indeed, but if as 
children we are not allowed to 
play with guns and act out the 
part of cops and robbers, why 
should we condone the game in 
the name of talent now that we 
are adults? 

I felt sick when I saw the same 
clothing being worn Saturday 
evening that is worn by worldy 
performers in circusses and carni- 
vals. 

I don't mean to be totally nega- 
tive, for I did enjoy much of the 
program. But I couldn't help 
wondering if we all might not 
have felt a bit uneasy if Christ 
was visably sitting in a front seat, 
watching His precious children 
display the very talent He has 
entrusted them with. 
Sheryl Ford 



Dear Editor: 

I wish to reply to the editorial in 
the last Soatiieni Accent, (Nov. 
17). While I admire your per- 
ception in being able to find an 
obvious inconsistency on the front 
of Daniells (D-A-N-I-E-L-L-S) 
Hall, surely there must be some- 
thing with a deeper social, cultur- 
il, or spiritual impact you can 
address yourself to. After all, just 
what does one missing "L" do for 
or against the educational process 
of this school. 

Hopefully, now that this school 
year is well underway, the paper 
can editorialize on something 
more basic to student life than a 
Coil-of-Cable outside Wright 
Hall, or an absent "L" on 
Daniells Hall. If you are running 
out of ideas, you could discuss the 
need for mid-week chapels, and if 
they are so need^I, why aren't 



they required for faculty as well. 

Or, maybe you could investi- 
gate the high cost of SDA college 
education, and why some experts 
thing it's probable that in ten 
years, SMC may cease to exist. 
Then too, you could examine how 
the educational costs have 
climbed, but the average student 
is working fewer hours to earn 
money for his tuition. 

Just some suggestions to get 
the ole gears turning upstairs. 
Looking forward to the next issue. 
Ray Hartwell 

Ed. Note: 

Wa appreciate sugowtkna fn>m our 
readers as to how we can Improve the 
paper. Hovwver, letters to the editor are not 
for the staff to air tftetr IrvhouM vtews 
ooncemlng Aaani problemB. We're to- 
gether In ttie offtoe wery day. \Alhy write 
vrfien you can aay It In person? 



Comment 
From 
New York 

Dear Editor: 

Whatever happened to good 
old New York City 'Do Wop'zO 
Me and the guys sure do miss 
doing street'comer acapella. har- 
monizing down at the ferry termi- 
nal or the train station. This 'rock 
music' put us in the celler! By 
the way, have you got any con- 
tacts? We are not as good as we 
once were but we are as good as 
we ever were. Thanks. 

All kidding aside, the ' rock 
music' center fold was great stuff. 
The New Yorfc limes couldn't do 
better. Semper Fi. 

Tommy Tucker (and The Lulla- 
byes) 

P.S. I could probably get the 
Pope to bless the 'Hfcart and 
Hands' statue at its dedication. 
After alt, I used to be a Catholic. 
I don't think he'll mind. In fact, 
he may love it. You all better 
listen to Bob Dukeshire. SMC, 
the school with a heart. Ha-Ha. 



. THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Ih-naw. D~»«'« *• **" 



3 



THE TWINS 



DPamLegere 



THE REYNOLDS 



Thomas Lester Reynolds and 
Timothy Lee Reynolds, identical twins, 
were bom in Erie, Pa., on that blissful 
morning of Augusts, 1953. Tim 
entered the world first, making him 
three minutes older than Tom. Tom, 
however, seems to think they both look 
older than their 24 years of age. 

The twins' home is Columbia, S.C. 
In their immediate family they have 
two sisters and three brothers. In- 
terestingly enough, their mother had 
twin sisters, and ther mother's mother 
(grandmother) had twin sisters. 
(Twins are said to run in the family). 

When asked if they've ever switched 
roles, both replied,"Yes." Mcstot 

trii;ks were done in their junior 
high and senior high school years. 
Tom and Tim pulled the switch off 
smoothly every time, because the 
instructors never seemed to get wise to 
them. 

Tim said that at home, "Up until we 
were three or four years old our 
parents couldn't tell us apart." 

"But people had more problems in 
distinguishing who we were after we 
turned 22. Including our parents," 
added lorn. "Mom calls me Tim and 
Tim, Tom." 

Do they feel insulted when one is 
called the other? Both answered, 
"Definitely, but it has grown on us 
We just let the people think they're 
speakmg to the right person. We 



(ONLY THEIR 
HAIRDRESSER 
KNOWS 
FOR SURE) 



cyA 



wouldn't want to insult them." 
Tim and Tom have the same 
interests, the same thinking patterns, 
the same future goals, the same 
statures, etc. 

Tom: "I like all types of sports -- 
mostly water sports, and especially 
scuba diving." 

Tim: "Hike all types of sports -- 
surfing, skiing, scuba diving." 

Both enjoy jogging and make it a 
daily practice. 

Tom: "I like all home cooking-- 1 
have no preference." 

Tim : "Hike Italian foods , mostly 
lasagia." 

Oddly, their favorite colors differ. 
Tom 1 kes blue and green; Tim favors 
I tan and white. 

Tom's vital statistics: 6'l'/2" tall; 
168 lbs.; hazel eyes. 
Tim's vital statistics: 6'1" tall; 165 
1 lbs.; hazel eyes. 

Both have the same shoe size and 
clothing size. Do they wear each 
other's clothes? Both replied, "No. 
We wear our own clothes." 

In spite of being so identical, the 
twms admit that there are marks one 
can look for to tell them apart. "Tom's 
got a fatter face and parts his hair on 
the left side," Tim explained. 

"Yeah, Tim has a skinny face and 
parts his hair on the right side," Tom 
countered. 

As far as one excelling the other in 



Uft To Right: RusseUandGregCa'''| 

any field or subject, Tom thinks he is 
more studious and industrious than 
Tim. " Studying comes more natural 
for me than Tom, "Tim interjected. 

Tim tops Tom, however, when it 
comes to artistic ability. He has 
already entered his artwork in sever 
contests and has done pretty decentj^ 
Lately, Tim said, he hasn't had mucn 
time to do any drawings because oi 
busy schedule. .„ 

Presently, Tim and Tom work iu 
hours a week on the second sh* ^' 
McKee's Bakery. Then on Tuesday ^ 
and Thursday they work for Dr. Ko 
Graham, a D.D.S. in Ringgold, ua _ 

The Reynolds are taking two class 
together here at SMC - Teaching ° 
Jesus and Industrial Metals. B«^ 
oftheir schedules, Tom said, 
don't socialize too much. Westu i 
more." _ 

The two are planning to open up 



nS1?^l?!^i1?!ri?¥?;^:? 



Iliiinday, December 8, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■ : 




.«K 



'f . 



shop together as dentists someday. 
They believe that their thinking alilce 
will be a great asset in their practice. 
Tim stated, "I believe we think more 
alike than we look alike." 

The only disadvantage in thinking 
^like they said, is when it comes to 
social activities with girls. Tom said, 
"If we like the same girl, Tim just has 
to find another one." 

'Tom would just have to stay home 
while I am out with her," Tim replied 
hastily. 

Both attended the University of 
South Carolina for four years, but will 
graduate this December from SMC 
with a Chemistry major. After 
graduation, around Dec. 27 or 28, they 
Will be leaving for Loma Linda. 




Left To Right: Lydia and Leslie Smith. Photo by Rhonda Runyan. 



The teachers on campus can't tell 
them apart either. Lydia remarked 
laughingly that, "Dr. Don Dick makes 
jokes about it. Dr. Floyd Greenleaf 
seats us alphabetically, and Coach Bud 
Moon just gave up." 

There is one prominent 
distinguishing mark to set these girls 
apart. Lydia has a small round. freckle 
(beauty mark) under her right eye. 
Her eyes slant more, too. Leslie 
asserted, "I'm the original copy (no 
blemishes) with wider eyes." 

Lydia is S'7'/i" tall, weighs 133 lbs., 
has a bigger body build, and hazel 
eyes. 

Leslie is S'6'/2" tall, weighs 129 lbs., 
has a smaller body build, and hazel 
eyes. Both do, however, still wear the 
same size shoes and clothes. 

Like the Reynolds twins, the Smiths 
claim to think alike, too. 

"Sometimes I'll be thinking of 
something and Lydia will say it word 
for word," remarked Leslie. 

"I can sometimes feci Leslie's 
pain." 

As far as their thinking pattern 
concerning the opposite sex, Leslie 
remarked, "Our interest in guys is 
usually different, with the exception of 
the time I took Lydia's friend away 
from her, but that was the only time." 

Both like working with their hands 
and working on cars. 

Neither feels inferior to the other 
but Lydia commented, "We do not like 
to be compared as far as our 
personality goes. We each have quite 
a different personality. ' ' 

Their goals? 

Lydia: "To help my little sis at 
Bonnie Oaks to find Christ and to be an 
example to my friends. When the time 
of trials comes, I want to stand fast." 

Leslie: "I want to help handicapped 
children and continue teaching 
swimming lessons." 



THE SMITHS 



Leslie Dawn Smith and Lydia Shawn 
Smith are freshmen Communication 
majors who presently come from Mt. 
Plymouth, Fla. They have two older 
brothers and no sisters, other than the 
other twin, and the two are the only 
Adventists in their family. Leslie and 
Lydia are the first set of twins in their 
entire family tree. 

Leslie and Lydia were born July 3, 
1958 at the Vitburg, West Germany 
U.S. Air Force Base. Leslie was born 
at 12 p. m. and Lydia at 1 :30 p. m. 
Leslie likes all outdoor sports, 
photography, teaching swimming 
lessons, and writing. Lydia likes any 
challenging sports, poetry, short 
stories, singing, and counseling (she 
would like to be an RA one day). 

Italian food hits the spot for both. 
Spaghetti is Lydia's favorite dish and 
lasagna is Leslie's. Lydia loves 
cooking up her own batches of food, 
but Leslie hates it. 

Oddly, together they said their 
favorite colors are red and blue. But 
Lydia also likes all shades of yellow 
and green, and Leslie likes burgandy. 
A colorful pair. 

Of course, they have often switched 
roles with each other, and find that 
most people can't tell them apart. 
StatesLydia, "Mother can't tell us 
apart, but the rest of the family can." 
"Mom gave up calling us by name 
and calls us twins," said Leslie. 



THE GENTS 



Russell Craig Gent and Gregory Jay 
Gent unfortunately have no 
distinguishing marks to set them 
apart. It's a matter of guess who! 

Both are 5' 10" tall, weigh 145 lbs., 
have hazel eyes, brown hair, and wear 
the same size shoes and clothes. The 
Gents get a kick out of life being twins. 
Greg said, "It's fun," and Russell 
said, "Hike it because we share. " 

And share they do. "Our 
enjoyment, interests, or whatever are 
the same," Russell observed. "As 
far as girls go, though, we have 
different tastes." 

TRBy^eeUiguaUneve^jWrig they-— 
do. But Greg used to play the piano a 
few years back,, whereas Russell 
didn't. 
Like the other sets of twins, they too 
[ are often "mistaken for each other all 
the time. "But said Russell, "We 
don't feel at all insulted. We just talk 
to them like we are the person they 
think we are." 

These two are definitely more 
reserved and shy than the other sets of 
twins. Greg and Russell feel 
themselves that they are more 
reserved, less outgoing, and that it 
takes a while to get to know people. 

The Gents were born May 29, 1958 
in California. Russell was bom first 
and is five to seven minutes older than 
Greg. 

Coming from Georgia-Cumberland 
Academy, both are freshmen. 
Russell's major is Biology with 
dentistry in mind. Greg's majoring in 
Nursing and is also thinking about 
going into dentistry. 

They have lived in the South for ten 
years and presently, Dalton, Ga., is 
their hometown. They have four 
brothers and one sister. Greg and 
Russell, like the Reynolds, are not the 
first set of twins in their family 
ancestry. There were twins on both 
their mother's and father's side of the 
family. 

Greg and Russell love all types of 
sports; anything that is exciting and 
offers challenges. 

Both like Mexican food best but 
Russell likes to snack of Chinese food 
when the mood strikes. 

The two are serious fehie fons when 
it comes to color preferences. 
They don't have any classes 
together this semester so their 
instructors have no problem getting 
mixed up. Greg said, "We are not 
able to confuse our parents. When we 
were younger, it was more successful! 



8 . THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ThnfSiUy, December 8, 1977 





Thoraday, December 8, 1977 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 9 



It Serves 
You Left! 



Left-handedness has really be- 
come a vivid part of my life lately. 
I've been involved in several dif- 
ferent discussions on this subject 
in my recent studies her^. 

I've discovered that by age two 
the preference is shown, and dur- 



nght-handed world. And if you 
think you have problems at mirror 
time, for a lefty it is either a 
disaster or a breeze, don't you 
see. 

Are you left-handed? I'm not 
but I sure sympathize with my 
ing the next three years, the hand left-handed brother. Being left- 
preference becomes more firmly handed for a day, (to me) would 
established. be like wearing my underwear 

Six differences are small but backwards. Or like having to 
consistent. There is a greater function in a little person's world 
incidence of left-handedness and with everything in proportion to 
ambidexterity in boys. The dif- his preferences. Or having to 
ference may be due somewhat to wear my shoes on the wrong feet, 
social conditioning, since girls I mean it can be done, but what 
engage in more hand play than point. "Right?" 
boys, and are easier to train. Because people are rhostly 

Stuttering and left-handedness right-handed, they have similar 
have long been thought to be expressions, such as, "well, 
that's all right'*, "I am my boss's 
right-hand man", "you're not in 
your right mind", I want to keep 
on the right side of her", "you 
tell me am I reading into this 
right?" 

The Latin words for right or 
right-handed is doxter. from 
which we get our word dexterous 
'Ambi' means 'both', therefore 
ambidextrous actually claims 
that a person has two "right" 
hands. 

On the other hand (or should I 
say foot?), another interesting 
thing I found (thanks to my friend 
Russel Cooper) was the phrase 
'right-foo^ formost; apparently it 
is considered unlucky to enter a 
house, or even a room, on the left 



Left dominance has 
been shown to occur in stufterers 
more than in the general popula- 
tion. 

The left-handed person incurs 
many disadvantages in addition 
to possible speech disturbance. 
In a world designed for right- 
handed people, he has to adjust to 
scissors, golf clubs, classroom 
chairs, table settings, guitars and 
controls. This could really give a 
person a complex! 

There are also preferences in 
the use of eyes and feet, just as 
there are for hands. 

Unfortunately, our left-handed 
brothers and sisters have quite a 
time coping and dealing with 
their right-handed world. You 



hardly ever find something made foct. In ancient Rome a boy stood 
unimanual to help the lefty out. at the door of a wealthy 



The mirror isn't really made for 
righties or lefties. When a right- 
handed person tries to comb his 
hair he is often all turned around 
with the symmetry of the matter 



home to make sure that the 
visitors didn't cross the threshold 
with the left foot. That is how 
extreme people are. By the way, 
that's where we get the word foot 



marriage. It's one in which a man 
of high rank marries a woman of 
lower station, with the stipulation 
that neither she nor the children 
have any claim to his rank or 
property. In the ceremony, the 
man gives his left hand instead of 
his right. What do you think 
about that girls? What a rip off! 
Stay with me giris. You'll just 
love this next part. 

Going back into history, I found 
"left forepart", which means 
"wife". It has probably been 
derived from left rib. 

The word left is derived from 
the old English 'lyft', meaning 
weak and useless. Therefore the 
word describes, well, the hand 
that we don't use so much. It's 
just a coincidence that the left 
hand is on the left side.. .if you 
see what 1 mean. 

Thus, as I have said before, as 
far as historical record takes us, 
man appears to have always been 
predominantly right-handed.Look 
up Judges 20:15-16 (and that was 
a long time ago. right? No-left.) 

By the way, my faithful column 
followers, I am basically right- 
handed. 1 do all my fine motor 
activities with my right hand, 
such as eat, write, and sew. Most 
of my gross motor skills, such as 
throwing, and most sports are 
done with my left hand. Many 
times when I attempt a new sport 
I have to try both hands and see 
which one I am better with. In 
many cases, more often than not. 
1 can use either hand or both. 

There is much 'left' to be said, 
but I'll have to stop myself right 
here. 




SMs Like 
Christmas Too! 

We have a real privilege to support and encourage our 
student missionaries serving in the mission field this year. 
Many of them will not be able to participate in our Christmas 
season, so let's plan to share this joyous occasion with 
someone in the mission field. Put them on your Christmas 
card list. If you know them or not, drop a line just to let them 
know that we are praying for them. 



Richard and Marsha Esterifaie 
Rick Johnson 

SDA Language School 
P.O. Box 263 
Pusan, Korea 600 

MarkDrlskUl 

SDA Language Institute 
Cheong Ryang 
P.O. Box 200 
Seoul, Korea 



Marc Lovejoy 
Nan(7 Meyer 

Boushrieh SDA Secondary School 
Box 11-2020 
Beirut. Lebanon 

Tonya Bariey 

Inter-Division Primary School 
501 Pahlavi Ave. 
Tehran, Iran 



Andy Oslnskl 

Irish Missions 
Kwangju SDA Language School c/o Roddens Crescent 



P.O. Box 33 
Kwangju, Korea 500 

Ron HoUmon 

c/o TSH Language Institute 
3-17-3 Amanuma 
Suginami-ku 
Tokyo FI67 Japan 

GacthThorsen 

Yua Hospital and Leprosarium 
P.O. Box 98 
Kalabo, Zambia 
Africa 



Belfast. BT5 7JM 
Northern, Ireland 

lliea Thomas 
Jeannle Kay GaUay 
Robert Klrschl 
Jamie Newland 
Rick and Vlckl Longonhi 

Missions Adventista 
Francia Sirpi 
Via Puerto Cabazas 
Nicaragua 
Central America 



(because the right becomes his mats. 

left and vice versa). Well, that is I also learned about a left- 

probably how a lefty feels in a handed marriage, or Morganatic 



n Johnny Lazor 



OLOSFOGNO 
B3TTMFAEU 
AABCRHJDS 
DVRAEtlOOU 



Find the following Bible 
hooks in the scramble. 
They can read diagonal, 
vertical, or horizontal, for- 
wards or backwards. 



L I s G 



ZLXOJOHBS 



A A S I S E 



TUapRSGH 



HHHCTKJO 
lOLBUMAS 



L I H U Z C 



A K' K U K 



Genesis 

Exodus 

Leviticus 

Numbers 

Deuteronomy 

Joshua 

Ruth 

Samuel 

Kings 

Chronicles 

Ezra 

Nehemiah 

Esther 

Job 

Psalms 

Proverbs 

Ecciesiastes 



Jonah 

Micah 

Nahum 

Habakkuk 

Zephaniah 

Haggai 

Zachariah 

Malachi 

Matthew 

Mark 

Luke 

John 

Acts 

Romans 

Corinthians 

Galatians 

Ephesians 



Song of Solomon Philipp: 



I p p I L I 



" ° Isaiah 
E R Jeremiah 

Lamentations 
° ^ Ezekiel 
u E Daniel 

Hosea 
^ ^ Joel 
P E Amos 
. „ Obediah 



Colossians 

Thessalonians 

Timothy 

Titus 

Philemon 

Hebrews 

James 

Peter 

Jude 

Revelation 



MembridlTHospital 

AVON PAHK. FLORIDA 33825 / TELEPHONE 18131 453 7511 ■ 



A Challenging Opportunity In Nursing 



A 100-bed Seventh-day Adventist Hospital located just 70 miles ftom 
Oriando and Disney World, offers you, the SMC Nursing Graduate - 



•Obstetrical •Medical 

• Primary Care 
• Surgical •ICU-CCU 







; SOUTHERN ACCENT Hinredij, December 8, 1977 



All-Purpose 
^Oeaner 
For 
Mouths 

DBedd Joiner 

You brush your teeth. (I cer- 
tainly hope so. And not for your 
sake, mine.) And 1 daresay (dare 
I?) a great iriajority of you use 
Crest. 

Why? Because it has flounde 
as an active ingredient and it will 
prevent cavities? At least you 




A Merry, Merry Christmas To Share 



DGary Williams 

A boy wakes up and jumps 
from his bed. The coldness of the 
room isn't noticed by him as he 
prevent caviucs; "i '^-"^ .- — f""'" '*" ■' 

hear from the TV commercials dashes to his window, 
that is so. What about the white- Falling snow greets his eJ"; 
neR and brighteners and sex The outside is lie a fa-ryland to 
appeal? Qose up is the king for him as he imagmes he tun that 
wMte teeth, bright smUes, and he and his cousins wiU have m the 



lovers. But never fear, while 
Crest is near, because my dears, 
you can have white teeth through- 
out the year. My test is simple. 
Dirty mirrors are always a pain. 
They make my face look sick and 
rotten. So neit time you brush 
your teeth, squirt a tiny dab of 
Crest on your splattered mirror 
and wash it off well. It puts 
Windex to shame, and the shini- 
ness and clearness is amazing. 
Think what it will do to your 
teeth. 

Not satisfied? Anything will 
dean a mirror, huh? Then your 
grimy, smudgy glasses must be 
driving you crazy. Try a 

smidgeon of Crest to wash them. 
They come clean in a jifiy. Think 
what it will do to your teeth. 

Okay, okay, so you still aren't 
convinced. Fiberglass is very 
easy to get dirty and stained. 
In fact, it is virtually impossible to 
keep clean. The girls in the 
Thatcher Annex are blessed with 
fiberglass shower compartments 
which slay filthy. Now, 1 was 
brought up believdng the only 
cleaning agent was Ajax. My 
problem: Ajax can't be used on 
fiberglass showers. So (you 
guessed it). I tried Crest. 
Squeeze out a little bulge of 
Crest, smooth it around the bot- 
tom of the shower, let it sit for a 
few minutes and rinse well after a 
vigorous rub down. Men try it on 
your fiberglass sports equipment. 
Think what it will do to your 
teeth. 



snow, so fresh and innocent. A 
thought comes to him. "It's 
Christmas." He races to the 
living room bubbling with hope. 



All lies in silence. He is the 
first one up, and as he bursts into 
the living room, his hopes fade 
into his deepest fears. There is 
no tree of shining lights and 
decorations, no stockings line 



the mantie ot the cold fireplace, 
no presents are in sight, no sweet 
smells from the kitchen fill the 
air. All is as it was the night 
before. 

.Standing there he is gripped by 
a mysterious sadness, tears begin 
to flow down his cheeks, and he 
runs to the window. As he 
presses his face against it, he 
cries. "Where is Santa?^ Why 
didn't he come last night?" 

Christmas - what does it 
mean? I am sure that our Christ- 
mas morning will be very dif- 
ferent from our story. We wUl go 
to bed the night before with an 
anxious joy for the morning. The 
last sight to greet our eyes will be 



a beautiful tree loaded with gifts. 
Seasonal music will be playing, 
and maybe snow will be falling 
outside out window as we go to 
bed. 

Morning will bring its delights 
and its surprises* There will be 
fun, excitement, food, music, and 
just maybe a parade and a foot- 
ball game or a time of visiting 
friends and relatives. 1 am sure 
that some of these will find their 
way into our Christmas, and there 
is nothing wrong in enjoying 
these precious moments. 

We will have much to be thank- 
ful for. We will have much to 
enjoy, but in all of this, our story 
remains as it is for the boys and 



girls who will have no Christmas 
morning. "Where is Santa? Why 
didn'the come last night?" What 
can we do to help answer that or 
to help prevent it for some? 

Every year there are a number 
of families who choose a child or 
children and help make their 
Christmas morning a reality. The 
local welfare agency or even in 
your local church their names can 
be found. Wouldn't it be in the 
spirit of the season for us to make 
a Christmas come true for such a 
child? It only costs a small 
amount, but it takes sharing your- 
self. 

Think about it. Have a Happy 
Christmasl I 




Vanessa 
Greenleaf 



Changeless 



Arranged As Poetry From Sons 
Ify( 



call God your Father, 
you acknowledge yourselves His children, 
to be guided by His wisdom, 
and to be obedient in all things, 
and knowing His love is changeless; 
you will accept His plan for your life; 
you will hold 
His honor, 
His character, 
His family. 
His work, 

as the objects of your highest interest; 
It will be your joy 
to recognize 
and honor 
your relation 
to your Father 
and to every member of His family. 




nd Daughters of God 



God is our Father 
A tender parent, 

solicitous for His spiritual children, 
He is pledged to be 

the protector, 

counsellor, 

guide, and 

friend, 

of all 
Who are obedient 

to Him. 

300GOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC 




GIVE A GIFT TO MAKE OR 

MAKE A GIFT TO GIVE 

- fLjxjxjxjxjT_ruxjxj\-ri_ri-rM"'"^'T*' 



If caring for people 
\s down your alley, 
We need yon in the 
Sooth Cobb valley... 



Smyrna Hospita 

PO Box 1666, 3949 Sooth Cobb Drive 
[ Smyrna, Georgia 30080 [4041434-0710 



DISCOVER YOUR CREDIT UNION 

We're doing more for you 

COLLEGEDALE CREDIT UNION 

College plaza 

Phone; 396-2101 

Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. I\/londay - Friday 
6-7 p.m. Monday and Tfiursday 




Thorsda,, December 8, 1977 THE SOUTHERN i 



aysmEis 




* Married student's wffe needs 
housekeeping (domestic) work. Please 
contact Laurel Wells, Student Finance 
Office, 39&4322. 

A TTie Bachman Home for Children, In 
Cleveland, is looking for a married couple 
to serve as houseparents for four to six 
boys. One spouse vrould be free for work or 
school. TTie other would be needed part of 
thedayformeaJs. Room and tward would 
be provided free of charge In addition to 
$325amonth. Call 472-4524. 

AutoRepaJr: Anew3hourU.D. dSBsto 
beoffered in the Industrial Education 
Department next semester. Will meet once 

week on Sundays 1-5 and 6-9 p.m. 
Preference will be given for clEBsachrtelon 
to those who have had some experlenos In 
automotive vtork and who have gaa wolcHm 
skills. Call 4295 for further partlculare. 

If you would like to take this cins but 
lack experience In the above area, considar 
Airto Fundamentals, which will meet 
Tuesday and Thursday mornings next 
semester. It appeers that the automobile 
wilt be around for some time to come. 
Vitfiy not team to diagnose and repair It 
yourself? 

* THE WEIQHT LOSS PROGRAM 
NOBODY BELIEVES! Good Nutrition, No 
hunger pangs, No drugs, Drink mlllshakes 
& eat regular foods, fylalntain energy & 
vitality, No meetings to attend, f>to 
exercise, hto gimmicks, rvtoneyba* 
guarantee, Substantial \Afeight & Inch loss, 
ODnslderable savings on food bills, and No 
monthlydues. Hard to believe? f^tfor 
those who havetried It and are losing 
twtween 10 and 20 pounds In the first 
month! What can you lose by looking Into 
t? C>iiy3omethlng you've wanted to lose 
for along, long tifTB. For complete details 
call: Carlosat4695or Randy at 4780. 

ATTENTION: EVERYONE [GIRLS, 
GUYS, FACULTY, VILLAGE STUDENTS , 
ANDANYONEELSE!]. CtonotcallJones 
Ma^l to find out somebody's phone number, 
vva do not have a deskvrorker here at 
Jones, and are getting tired of running 
oowTOtaIrs to answer the phone. Instead, 
C»l Talge Hall al 4391 for any Information 
i^uneed. Ws would appreciate It alot, so 
"wikyouforyour co-operation. Signed. 



*^- 16. at 6:30 there Is a Friday night 
wrahip you might be interested In. This Is 
^,'Ko'^ie planetarium; tte trareportation 
w^nbeprovidedbythef^'scluD. Tms 
tip will have to be limited to 40 people, so 
S"?,^'"*^™"'3fiall lobby 
"ilswIticountasaTOrahlp. So grab your 
Slf^, 'f « her somewhere different for a 
in^^^,^^*''®P^- 'fyo" need more 

BIo?Jl!S^™J°™= Do not forget the 
XL.'S^rlstmas party this Sat. nite. 
'wyquBstion.callDr.Steen. 

*tojQion&ThaologyM^|ors: Your 

W^starlalQubisasiveabaln. This 
»Jlrtg sat. night, Dec. 10. at 6:30«;M. In 
^Iflht Hairs Banquet Room, you are 
"^ed to our annual Christmas Party. 
K £^'' ^^^ up yet, you can do 30 
jVl^lglon Department. There w(ll be 
£J°WT>. drink, chips, apples, alot of good 
^^Ip, a movie, etc. Sobesureto 
°"»w^ A nursery wtll be pnwidod. Bythe 
J^V. hl3 Is a tree party planned Just for 
7^ ir you need more Information, call Ron 
Ohri^.*™2. Haveaf^terry Merry 
OHilSJ" ■^romyourMlnlBterlaJaub 



•Wanted; /Venturesome, December 
nursing graduates. Are you tired of the 
everyday rush? Uxjkingforachangeof 
pace?TryourplaM... 

Quiet setting, rippling strearro, blue 
skies and bright starry nights, summer 
climate year round (occassional ly wwt and 
wild). Trails fornature study, horses to 
ride, wildlife In abundance, beautiful 
butterflies, rustic living quarters with 
private rooms, fresh garden vegetables 
variety of tropical fruits, pure drinking 
water. Amidnighttrompthroughthe 
jungle, wiping a fevered brow, the 
excitement of delivering a baby, asitent 
prayer of Thanks. Christian fellowship 
nappy smiling faces, prayer meetings and 
singing bands. 

Call Dr. Greenieaf now, at 4365 
regarding the rjew Earth ffasba Raya) 
Project, Nicaragua. 

* Dec. 9, FrI . nIte at 8 p.m. - Music Dept. 
presents a Program of Carols and Anthems 
featuring the Many Moods of Christmas by 
Robert Shaw, as presented by the 
combined choirs, the chorale, orvjhestraand 
brass ensemble. 

Dec. 10, Sat. nIte- Departmental 
Christmas ftirtles as arranged and 
announced. 

Dec. 11, Sun. -SA Christ mas Supper 
(watch for detailed Information later for 
time and program). 



Dec. 15, Thurs. - laeglnnlng of 
Exams {SMC faculty members' greatest 
and most memorableglft to their 
studentsi). 

Dec. 16, FrI. at 8 p.m. - Special Program 
by the English dept. Actuallytheprogram 
will be presented by the Biblical Literature 
classandwillfeaturegreat literary themes 
from the Bible, plus slides, and 
accompanying music. 

Dec. 17, Sabbath, at both church services 
- Sacred Christmas Music R-ogram 
presented by the Greater Oollegedali 
School System. 



areas: Alaska, the Orient, Europe, the 
Medlten-anean, and the Caribbean. 

A live audition and completion of a 
formal application are required of groups 
desiring to be considered for the limited 
numberofloursavailableeechyear A 
brochure entitled ' 'Guidelines for Audlton 
and Tour Application" has been published 
by the USO Shows Campus Music 
Committee (CMC). Obtain a free copy of the 
CMC Guidelines by writing USO Shows 
114619thStreet,N.W.iWfe3hlnqton DC 
20036. ^ 



♦URGENT! Ifyouareterninatingyour 
studies fere at SMC this month and/or do 
not plan to be inxhool fere secortJ 
serresler, and you ha/e received a loan 
through any of tiB following funds, you wi 
need to ha/e an "Exit Inten/iew" before 
you wi II be eligible lo get your exam 
permit. Please see 1^*5. ^brthant If you 
ha/e borrovied from the National Qrect 
Slutent Loan Fund or the Nuraing Student 
Loan Fund. Please see Mrs. Myers if you 
ha/e borrowed from tha Soutf^aBtern 
Federal insured Loan Fund. Office is 132 
Wight Hall. If you are not graduating, you 
wi II nsed to let us know so that ve can " 
th5 material ready for you! 



*How about a Christmas puppy for that 
favorite pereon back home? ACK 
Ctelmatlons. Shots, wormed. Ph: 



♦SnowSWe* For Sale- Alpine Prima. 
handmade in W. Germany. Also polos a 
bindings, excellent condition. Alitor 
$60. Call John at 4673 days. 



* l^eedanew pair of shoes but don't like 
the Idea of a salesman at the shoe store 
rushing you into them? Call Walter at 4963 
and ask to see ail four shoe catalogs. No 
pressureandalithetlmeyouneed. Plusa 
line of socks, jackets, handb^js. and 
Christmas specials. Remember, call 4983 
before someone else does. 



Rides or Riders Needed 



Dec. 20, Tues. at 6 p.m. - Graduation 
Exercises in the Church (the "first" 
December graduation at SfwIC). 

Also: TheCampusTreewlllgloweech 
night untllJan.i. Recorded Christmas 
music will be "aired" over the campus 
(courtesy WSMC) each night between 6 
and 7 p.m. until Dec. 20. 

So.. .through all the projects, term 
papers, studying for final exams, and other 
end-of-lhe-semester taste, II appears as 
though we'll have another hawjy and 
exciting Chrlstnnas Season. 
MERRY CHRICTMAS TO EVERYONEI I 
E.O. Grundset for the Prograne' 
Committee 

¥ThB Wamsn's banqifit will be hekl on 
Jan. 21 arti 22 becatse the capacity In the 
Ftead House banquet room Is only 450. 
T]c(ets will be for sale after secorid 
senesbr registration. Tlci«t3cost$13per 
coiple.wfiichcan be put toward the 
women's stateriBnts- 

* Christmas is coming . . . Christmas 
cartoons In the banquet room Friday noon. 
Sponsored by SA Academic ActMtlee. 

*- Oollege-sponsored entertainment groupe 
of no more than eight performers are being 
sought by LJSO Shows to tour Isolated 
military Installat ions overeeas. 
Expense-paid tours ranging in length from 
four to six weeks are scheduled to five 



* Happy-go-lucky, liberal, beep-raiser 
needs fast trip to sun and fun on Wast coast 
for Christmas vacation. If you have room 
fora paying rider, pleasecall Rich at 4906. 

* VtitantQd: A ride for one to Orlando for 
X-mas vacation. Canleaveanytimeafter 
the 16th. Will help with gas. DonAshlock 



* I still have room for 2 riders to Detroit, 
Mich, area for Christmas vacation. I'll be 
leaving Tuesday, Dec. 20 about noon. Call 
John at 4673 days, before 4 p.m. 



* If anytKia is going to hJew Jersey, New 
YorkClty.or nearby (or Christmas 
vacation and can take two riders, please ca 
4592 or 4049 any time. Wawlil helpwlth 
gas. Thanks. 



Ik- We have two cars go] ng to West F^m 
Beach, FL for Christmas vacation. Need 
riders. Call PamorVlnitaat 4461. 



* If you happen to find a pair of glasses 
(brown frames) in a black leather case with 
redvelvef inside, pleaseretumtoDawn 
Rice at room 138 in Thatcher Hall. 

Also lost: 3 keys on a key chain that says 
"Talkirig is sharing but listening Is 

* To whoever returned my keys. I love 
you!.'! BJ 

* There was a green umbrella In the lobby 
of the Student Center Wgdnesday at noon. 
Someone removed It and I had a very wet 
afternoon. Rease- If you have it, I would 
really appreclategetting It back. Call 4587 
or leavea note In 291 Thatcher Hall. 



* Dial-A-Joke wants your funny joke. One 
Infers, two liners, etc. All are welcome. 
Just write them down and place them In 
BoxC-3 at Talge. And listen lor your joke! 

* Thanks to all the couples who took part Ir 
the Niton's club underprivileged kids 
Christmas party. It was a BIG success and 
we've received many thanks from the kids, 
parents, and Chattanooga's Social 
Directors. This Is good P.R. with our 
community. Thanks s^aln- your Men's 
CJt* officers: Rick Gusso, Dan Bofrtiett, 
Tom Biez, David Kay, Rob Vandevere and 
HonWiitehead. And of course Dean 
Schllsner and Dean Haiverson (Santa). 



Bny and Sell 



* 1969 Belair for sale: good body, 327 
Automatic, power steering, standard 
brakes. Phone4748orTalgeBox1S6. 

♦FbrSaie; 2CorvalrMonza3l965- 
Cbl lectors Items: 1 - 2 door Monza Sport 
Coupe, white, 4 speed with air, $1395; 1 -4 
door Monza HDT, red auto, Trans., $950. 
Both A-1 condition Inside and out - ready 
to drive anywhere. CailOrtoGllbertat 
386-2925 or 39&4273. 



* THERE ARE TWO WAYS TO KEEP 
HIMECSTATIC. One Is with a Mamlya 
1000DTU Dlal39&3357. 



A Just want to wish everybody here at SMC 
averymen7Chrlstmas. Hopeltwlllbethe 
bestyou'vetoad!! J.L. 



"3 years she grew ir 






then Nature said, ' 

On earth was never sown; 

This Child I to myself will take; 

Sheshallbemine, andl wiiin^dte 

Aladyofmyown." 

William Wordsworth - Lucy; 3 YMn She 

GrewlnSmAndShcnwr. Ms. Boobaker, 

YOUAREthelwellest flower In the 

meedowJ Yours truly, the Mlssle-Town 

Monkey. 



*■ To f>/1elonee Fowler, Kathy Goyne, and 
Sharon Schleenbaker - those three 
beautiful ladles who served me breakfast In 
bed, and also Ivtark Godenick, Mark Smith, 
Jim Lampasl, Tedd Webster, Bobb 
Thompson, 9on Wolf, Joshua Edward 
Zarandona, Art Cone, l^n Shaw, Ed 
Ham, Gary Andnjs, Rick Gusao. and Mark 
Ford, ail who made It possible, not to 
mention those many wtw were praaent for 
the "Celebration" too nunierous to name, 
thank you lor providing me with a birthday 
that 1 will netnrenr forget- Jack. 



* Steve and Jan Hefner had a imie baby 
girl, MelanleJeen, Nov. 14 at 8:46 p.m. 
Malwleueighedeibe., 1 oz. 
Gbngratulatkns Steve and JanI t 



* Dal-A-Jokelsnowfully functional and 
funny. With finals fofc^uily facing you, a 
funny will fluff your facial faculties to full 
flamboyance! (at least we'll try). RH-your 
funny, phone 386-FOUR397. 



* Thank y^u WSfwiC-FM for playing 
Christr>a3 music on the campus, itsur.- 
adds cheerfulness and Christmas spirit 
when walking to class. OndyBata. 

* Ivmuld like to expr^as my appreciation of 
aioHerlntheAccant last week! fyfc-. 
Grundset, I LOVE YOU! Sincerely, 
PauietteHenderxxi, SA Social 
Actlvttlee Director 

* Dear Timothy, thanks for youi letters. 
Keepthemcomlng. I love you, Jamie Joy. 

* DearT.p. Pusher: Idon'trea/lymind 
seeing a mysterious hand shove toilet paper | 
through my doorway, but please don't 
forget next week's fix. I'd hate to be a 
coitegestudantwithdlaperrashl It'sa 
rough life here in Thatcher, ya knowl 

*-Sfi1Cstudentssupportyourschool, Buy 
your praying hand necklacas or madaJllofe 
in bronze or gold. 



* For those who were discouraged after 
Thursday's chapel, those wtx) have rough 
edgesandbreakeaslly: The Gospel says. 



* Super Dude, Thanks for finding my 
umbrelta Love, Fonzetle. 

* Thank you Bertha, Charlee, Larry, 
Ralph, f^l. Daddy, and the all-time 
famous Dancing N^ichine. I do hope I have 
a Happy Birthday and continue to prosper. 
But my tongue Is plenty large; sometimes I 
catch It Just before it gets me into trouble. 
Lovethe Lizard, tfie one and only. 

« A special thank-you to Jucfy Jorgensen 
and Helen McLendon for taking me out to 
dinner;to RobbI Plerson for those fantastic 
chocolate chip cookies; to my secret sisters 
for those delicious brownies; and also to 
lovely SarxJie Lehn and Terl Bums for that 
unforgetable day In the park and the 
surprise glngert}read cakel 

"*( C[y)gratulatlons Vanessa on your 
sngagement! I am sure going to miss you 
wneeter. Cindy. 




CAU 396-4356 
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3 



12 IHE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■nnind«3'. !>«*>»'*' *^^'" 

Inframorals Expanding AAinds 



From the wtitings of Ellen G. 
White we can formulate opinions 
about recreation. Games are spo- 
ken of as being degrading. The 
youth become expert in games 
that are of no real value to them 
or others. She talks against pugi- 
listic contests and sports that 
emphasize violence. 

On the other hand, innocent 
recreation is condoned and en- 
couraged b> her* It is counted a 

Talge's 
Golf Open 
Winds Up 

DDonnie Keele 

The Talge Hall Second-West 
Open is on its last exciting round 
this week, and the final outcome 
should prove interesting. 

Who is the best in putt-putt? 
We should know soon. 

At the end of 12 holes, Ron 
Barts is ahead with a one stroke 
lead on Kent Campbell, who has 
yielded a 38. Tied for third are 
Randy Rumiells and Keith Mos- 
ley who both have 41 strokes. 

The course consists of hall- 
ways, ramps, stairs, and going 
around comers into someone'5 
room, and a constant stream of 
golf balls rolling towards a metal 
putting cup. 



privUege and a duty to invigorate can be increased by outdoor exer- 



the body. After a footballigam* 
the student can return to his work 
and studies refreshed anrt better 
fitted to exercise the .mind. 

These intramural games pro- 
vide a break from studies which 
otherwise would weaken the 
mind. When a student sits at 



Reuben Costillo 

Sports Editor 



The proper care for the body is 
important to the mind. There 
exists an intimate relationship be- 
tween the body and mind. If one 
suffers, both are weakened. The 
mind may become enervated once 




mind. When a stuoent sits ai a """"■■■--•- ^^.„„,h and vi- 
desk for hours, his, lungs are tUiutt TltX not 



cramped. His breathing 
paired. The brain is not receiving 



enough oxygen. God's blessing and soul. 



tality. There is no excuse for not 
building the body as well as mind 



All-American 
Volleyball 




Volleyball was originated in the 
United States in 1895 by William 
G. Morgan while he was physical 
ed director at 'the Young Men's 
Christian Association of Holyoke, 
Mass. Girls, don't take offense, 
but it was originally designed for 
businessmen who couldn't keep 
up with the rigors of the game of 
basketball. It soon became pop- 
ular in schools, playgrounds, and 
other organizations. 

The rules were standardized 
and unified by the United States 
Volleyball Association formed in 
1928. In 1957 it was accepted as 
one of the approved sports for 
Olympic competition and was in- 
cluded in the 1964 games. 

The court is 60' x 30' divided in 
half (30 X 30) by a net 8 feet from 
the ground. Of course, there 
should be a clear area of 20-30 
feet above the court to permit free 
movement of the ball. Each team 



VENDING MACHINES cont fifom p. 3 



beat for a six month's investment. 

A similar vending program has 
been suggested to the women's 
deans, but the deans didn't think 
it would go over too well and they 
didn't want to invest so much 
money in an"ldea they weren't 
sure of. The Men's club second 
proposal was that they will put 
the machines in the women' s 
dorm and take care of them. If 
: interested in 



having vending machines, said 
Kay, they should contact their 
deans and express their interest. 



As for future expansion in the 
vending machine service, due to 
the high sales of milk, the club 
plans on buying a milk machine. 
After that they want to replace 
the "Tom's machine with a health 
food machine, but still keep some 
of the "Tom's" products in it. 



NURSING HOME cont. from p. 3 



part of the staff. 

According to Robinson, the 
Center plans to admit from four to 
five patients a day, depending on 
the amount of care needed and 
the rate of staff build-up. LPN's, 
orderlies, and nurse aids are 
needed for patient health and 
bodily care such as bathing and 
feeding. "We probably will get 
some help in this area from the 
SMC nursing department," he 
said. 



Congratolatiuns, 

Collegedale 
Flag Football 
Team on Win- 
ning the Super 
Bowl 44 to 12 
on Nov. 20. 
We Know What 
it Takes to 
be Number 1, 



has six players which are posi- 
tioned in two rows. Only the 
serving team can score points. 
Each side may hit the ball three 
times but the same person cannot 
hit it twice in a row, A game is 
won by the team that scores IS 
points first, provided there is at 
least a 2 point margin 



Gym Sports 
To Beat 
Cold-Weather 
Blahs 

D Steve Thompson 

With the remaining weeks of 
school left on the cold nights at 
Collegedale, Tenn,, the flag foot- 
ball teams still walk around with 
their heads down wondering what 
happened to the season and why 
their records don't look like the 
Denver Bronco's, 

The panicking basketball 
players are shaping up for the 
season, only to find out that they 
will be run out of the gym by a 
group of smashing, swatting, 
slapping, knuckle-hitters who will 
be capitali/mg on that great game 
of volleyball. Burning energy 
every night will be the men of 
SMC's campus, who are now de- 
veloping teams to beat those dark 
shadows and cold nights of the 
remaining semester. It's the only 
way to do it! Note: Sign up at the 
P,E, department. 




Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the 'GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



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C:)LLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



$200 extra 
with this ad 

for your first 
plasma donation. Total $12. 




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310 Cherokee Blvd. 267-9778 



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OR CARRY OUT 

• TACOS 

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• BtfflRrrOS 

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• BELL BURGERS 

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Southern Missionary College 
Collegedale, TN 37315 




IL 



1/ ^ 



p 




CoUegedole. Te^^ 

San 1 9 '78 



The Southern Accent 



Voice of rte Sovrtern MMo„o,y Colfese S.„den( 



C<>ltc(!e<lalc, Tcnn. .17,115 



oSf Of° Tt?^lJ*"*''"9 Themselves 



IVinita Wayman 
■Wc arc all on the skids," 
President Frank Knillel told staff 
members in a. recent meeting. 
"Our survival is threatened by 
circumstances and. unless we all 
mcci the challenge of this threat, 
we will all go under." 

Dr. Knittel was referring to the 
survival of SDA colleges and SMC 
in particular. "Some of our smal- 
ler colleges have faced and are 
presently facing extinction. But 
their pinch has only come earlier 
than ours, and ours has begun " 
he said. 

The problem SMC faces for the 
present is that of underbudgeting 
for the 77-78 year. The year 
before SMC faced the red also. 

Richard Reiner, business man- 
ager explained the problem. 
"When planning the budget we 
predicted an increase in head 
count and budgeted an increase 
in tuition dollars." But in spite of 
the fall enrollment of 1905 stu- 
dents, he said, the number of 
hours being taken was the same 
as the previous year. Plus there 
were more dropouts this year. 
Therefore, no tuition increase. 
The gap between tuition and es- 
calating costs, teacher salaries, 
and student wages is unmet. 

To meet this financial dilemma, 
every administrative unit of the 
College must reduce its expense 
2'/! per cent below what was 
budgeted to that unit this year. 

This year almost over, Reiner is 
now already preparing the budget 
for the 78-79 fiscal year, which 



must be approved by the Board of 
Trustees Feb. 16. Reiner esti- 
mates thai the tuition increase 
will be "within the U.S. general 
inflationary rate of eight per cent 
or less." 

Dr. Knittel said (hat in past 
years SMC's tuition increase has 
been more than the U.S.. infla- 
tionary increase. Over the last five 
years SMC's tuition has increased 
by 90 per cent, while there has 
only been a 30 per cent inflation 
factor in the American economy. 
If SMC kept up its soaring iln- 



AVERAGE HOURS PER 
STUDENT 

&ich Va hour per student 
the average drops could 
mean around $35,000 
a year. K. Spears 




for a full-lime student. 

"I want us all to know that 
there is absolutely no way that 
our SDA home will possibly con- 
sider that type of expenditure for 
a college education," he stated. 
"SMC needs to put the brakes on 

Reiner commented that while 
SMC will raise its rates eight per 
cent this next year, most other 
Adventist colleges are increasing 
their rates by ten to eleven per 
cent. Only two colleges remain 
less expensive than SMC - Oak- 
wood and Southwestern Adven- 
tist. 

Reiner listed three factors that 
he attributes to next year's in- 
creased rates: 

1. Effective July 1, faculty 
wages will increase by 6'/i per 

2. Effective this January. Con- 
gress has moved the minimum 
wage up 15 per cent to $2.65 an 
hour. Instead of S2. 10, regular 
student workers will now receive 
$2.26. 

3. Increases in energy costs. 

As it is now, Reiner commented 
that the 78-79 budget "looks like 
a dry bone. We are doing every- 
thing we can to cut down." 

But what about the future of 
SMC? 

Dwindling enrollment for what- 



THE TUITION DOLLAR 

WHEUE IT DOES.. 




McCrillis 



reason always seems to end 
in financial troubles. "All thai 
has kept us afloat at SMC till now 
has been student increase, said 
Dr. Knittel. "That has now come 
to an end, and we have entered 
upon a totally new survival era." 
Could we be pricing ourselves 
out of the Adventist higher edu- 
cation market causing enrollment 
to drop? Ves. said Neal C. 
Wilson, chairman of the GC 
Board of Higher Education in a 
letter to all college presidents and 
finance officers. 

"For the last decade and a 
half," he wrote, "we have been 
listening to each other express 
fears that we were pricing our- 
selves out of the Adventist higher 
education market. During the 



same time we have continued 
year after year to escalate costs, 
sometimes at rates exceeding 150 
per cent of the inflation rate. 

"We have salved our con- 
sciences by references to the af 
fluence of our people and to the 
availability of government scho- 
larships and loans. We suggest 
that our enrollment figures for 
this auhimn constitute a message 
from our constituents that we 
should hear loud and clear and 
that we had better heed seriously: 
we have gone too fast and too Ui 
In the escalation of our feesi 
Our 1978-79 budgets mnst evi- 
dence some new attitudes toward 
academic practice and institu- 

Tum to p. 3, col 1 



uld be about $10,000 annually 



Renovations Planned To Expand 
Facilities For Handicapped 




^•0. Grundset, long dubbed "Ye Olde Time Keeper", check§ his 

^atch against the '77 senior class gift clock mounted between the j e, . 

jitadent Center and Lynn Wood Hall. Grundset Is in charge of keeping with the regulation. The build 

*ne clock tlckhig and accurate. Photo by Mark Ford. infis which will need special at- 



DPam Legere 

SMC IS now working on a pro- 
gram to make the campus more 
accessible to handicapped stu- 
dents and faculty members. 

A committee chaired by Dean 
Betty Howard and five other ad 
ministrators has organized foi 
this purpose They call them 
selves the "Compliance Com 
mittee for Government Regul; 
tion504." 

HEW's Regulation 504 states 
that all qualified handicapped 
persons must be facilitated. 

Howard went to Louisville. 
Ky., last month to attend a handi- 
capped workshop. She brought 
back information about re- 
modeling and revamping the 
campus grounds. There should 
be reserved parking spaces, bath- 
rooms with guard rails, wider 
doors, ramps and curb cuts, all 
with appropriate signs. 

Presently. Maize Herin Hall is 
the only building which compl; 



tention are Thatcher and Talge 
Halls, McKee Library, Lynn 
Wood Hall. Daniells Hall, and 
Leford Hall. The estimated cost 
for modifications is $10,000. The 
remodeling will take approxi- 
mately three years. 

Howard is also working on a 
new physical form. It will ask for 
voluntary information as to 
whether or not the student is 
handicapped. This will help the 
College to better determine 
whether it can accommodate the 
student's particular handicap. 

The five types of handicaps that 
SMC will be able to handle are 
those in wheelchairs, the blind, 
the deaf, the emotionally and 
mentally handicapped, and per- 
sons with learning disabilities. 

Howard said, "We want to 
serve the handicapped in all 
ways, not just minimally. Our 
goal is that they become part of 
student life as much as they 
possibly can." 

SMC has accepted handi- 



capped students even before Reg- 
ulation 504 was passed. A few 
years ago, two quadraplegics 
graduated with honors and were 
also the leaders of their class. 

Presently. Ron Holland, a 
freshman theology major, a quad- 
raplegic, is attending classes. 

/*— "Bohlnd- 
Pago One 



No Fatties! P. 2 

SMlCBIIs P. 2 

Should Sabbath Attendance 
Be Required? P. 4 

The Sculpture Strikes 
Again! P. S 



2 . THE SOUTHERN ACCSNT Tliured.y, Jmnai) 19, 1978 

Collegiate Fatties 
Facing Suspension 



Old New York Times 
TULSA, Okla. - The kids in the 
second-floor lower dormiton- are 
going to miss Sharon Baxter. 

A student leader with a 3.4 
grade average, she nevertheless 
could not measure up to the 
standards of Oral Roberts Uni- 
versity-. She was suspended for 
being too fat. 

No fatties are allowed at Oral 
Roberts University. In fact, 
thunder thighs and spare tires are 
so frowned upon at the religious 
school that students are pres 



sured to lose the excess weight or 
else face possible academic pro- 
bation and suspension, 

Sharon Baxter (not her real 
name) is one of a half-dozen 
people who recently jomed with 
the Oklahoma Coalition of Citi- 
zens with Disabilities to request 
that the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare review the 
university's status. The ground 
contends the school's policies on 
overweight and handicapped stu- 
dents are discriminatory. 

The Christ-centered "i 




ity for the education of the whole 
man," was founded in 1965 by 
the e/angelist Oral Roberts, 
While aerobics and physical fit- 
ness have always been a hallmark 
of the university's commitment 
"to develop the mind, body and 
spirit," the weight reduction pro- 
gram, which penalizes those who 
fail with suspension, has begun 
only two years ago, 

Paul Brynteson, chairman of 
the health, physical education 
and recreation department, ex- 
plained that each student is given 
an annual physical that includes 
tests to measure blood fat, 
Brynteson said an acceptable 
body fat level is 20 percent for 
women and 15 percent for men, 
A woman having more than 35 
percent body fat, or a man having 
more than 25 percent, is consid- 
ered obese. 

These students are automat- 
ically placed on a weight-reduc- 
tion program. They meet with 
school doctors and sign a contract 
to lose a pound or two a week 
until they reach their goal. If a 
student fails to lose the weight, 
he or she faces probation and, 
eventually, suspension. 

Since the program began, four 
students have been suspended for 
failing to reduce. 



SMiC Bits 

Elder Robert Francis is not teaching this semester due to 
illness, but expects to be back for summer session. . . . The 
Education department has a laminating machine that lami- 
nates for 15 cents a foot. , . . R.D. McKibbon, manager of the 
Mercantile and Campus Shop, has accepted a position with 
the GC's Institutional Services, and Bruce Ringer is now 
acting manager, . . . Janet Ford, a senior B.S. nursing 
shident, has been accepted to go to Nicaragua as an SM for 
next year, . . . Jan Rushing has lightened his teaching load to 
assume responsiblities as associate director of Southern 
Adventist Health and Hospital Service. He is chairman of the 
Board of Hospitals in the northern part of the Southern Union. 
... Dr. Cyril Fotcher will retire from his position as academic 
dean after this semester. . . , Paulette Henderson has joined 
the Heritage Singers USA full time, Gary Allen and Sandy 
Carman will take her place as co-directors of SA Social 
Activities. . . . The construction technology majors will attend 
a convention of the National Homebuilders Association in 
Dallas. They leave this Thursday and will be back Wednes- 
day, , . ■ Senator Howard Baker will visit the campus in 
February and may speak for chapel, , , . Jose Boiurget, 
yearbook editor, is going to include a plastic record in this 
year's Southern Memories, . . , Ron Holiman has returned to 
SMC this semester after spending a year in Japan as an SM. 



McCurdy Contributes 
To Joint Symposium 



Robert McCurdy. associate 
professor of computer science, 
has had an abstract accepted by a 
joint symposium sponsored by the 
Association for Computing Ma- 
chinery Special Interest Group on 
Computer Science Education and 
the Computer Science Association 



to be presented at the symposium 
in Detroit,Mich..Feb. 23 and 24. 
The abstract in combination 
with a poster session will explain 
and illustrate how students can 
produce error-free computer code 
using a block-structure flow 
charting method. 



at Porter 



Yes, we need nurses. Lots of them. 
But that's only the beginning. 

We also need medical technologists, 
respiratory therapists, radiologic 
technologists, and more than 200 other 
types of dedicated health care workers. 

Get involved in our progressive concept of 
total patient care. Accept the challenge of 
rewarding Christian service in a 
professional atmosphere. 

Come and join us in helping people. 




Memorial 



Hospital 



Contact the Personnel Director, 
Porter Memorial Hospital, 
2525 South Downing Street, 
Denver, CO 80210. 




Out-Priced EducatI 



tional finance." 

Wilson suggests that since 
most of our church membership is 
concentrated in urban areas 
where access to community col- 
leges is convenient, our Adventist 
educational costs are making 
these "Stay at home" opportuni- 
ties more attractive. He fears 
that unless colleges take dramatic 
actions, this trend toward an in- 
creasing use of public institutions 
may be impossible to reverse. 

"Unless we begin immediately 
to plan and act for long-range 
survival we will soon be forced 
into crisis-budgeting, a traumatic 
ordeal for any situation, conti- 
nued Wilson. 

At the recent Annual Council, it 
was voted to approve the report 
"Funding Higher Education in 
North America" which asks col- 
leges to develop endowments for 
student scholarships and grants, 
to exercise strictest economy iii 
planning for capital expansion, 
and that the overhead costs of 
administration and services be 
studied. 

SMC will be following these 
guidelines, according to Dr. Knit- 
tel. An endowment fund has 
already been established. Large 
gifts in excess of $200,000 from 
several individuals have been in- 



on^ 



■nimjKtoy, January 19, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT . 



,Cont. from p. 1 



17^^ '" S""^"'"'^"* securities, 
bonds, and good stocks with the 

ta-s, company of Firs. Tennesst 
($M OOn Tf '™'" *is sum 
nua1l!t^lr f "" «'"=" ^^^y an- 
nually m the form of scholarships. 
Ttas program will begin next 

Dr Knittel also spoke of eli- 
mmating some of the excess ari 
mmrstrative units on camput 
More and more we need to be 
bnngmg people onto our campus 
who can teach for us in more than 
one narrow area." Plans for 
combining some interrelated de- 
partments may develop in later 
years. '^ 

. """•'"ng and tripling class size 
is another way to save, said Dr 
Knittel. 



income to pay for it. 

There are other colleges of 
similar sizes and natures in other 
denominations providing quality 
educatton that have faced these 
problems successfully. These col- 

hff ' '^'!f P^^ "° '"*" salaries 
man we do, whose tuition rates 
are about half of SMC's. whose 
.rS'""" '"^i^' hutches and 
the public is no more than SMC's 
are making it. 

"We don't know how they do 
It, ' said Wilson, "But we expect 
the task force on efficiency which 
the Board of Higher Education 



has set up. to find out." Dr. 
Knittel is a member of this task 
force. 

"This is not a time of wailing " 
concluded Dr. Knittel in his pre- 
sentaHon to the staff members, 
"but in the days to come, there 
will be some rather dramatic 
changes taking place on this cam- 
pus effecting every one of us." 

Dr. Knittel will talk to the 
students about this subject in 
chapel, Jan. 2f.. (He will also 
discuss the H.inds Of God sculp- 
ture at this time.) 



Also, when the current contract 
with the telephone company runs 
out, all the college-controlled 
dormitory phones may be elimi- 
nated, saving thousands of dol- 
lars. Students who want a room 
phone could arrange directly with 
the telephone company. 

The lyceum, fine-art series 
could be another cutback area. 
If students want to hear the big 
names, suggested Dr. Knittel, 
perhaps they should do this on 
their own and not force tuition 



(estimate) 



Craft Castle 
5780 Brainerd Road 
In Brainerd Village 
Open 7 days 10-6 




1680 
Enrolled 

1660 enrolled 

last year 
at this time 




Flags across the nation were 
lowered to half-mast this past 
week in memorium to "The 
Happy Warrior", Sen. Hubert H. 
Humphrey, who died late Friday 
after an extended battle with can- 
'^"' Photo by Mark Ford, 



For classes in crafts, arts, and macrame, and for all your craft 
needs and supplies 




Our progressive, modern 63-bed hospital offers the newly 
graduated nurse opportunity for development of leadership 
skills plus variety in nursing experience. We are located in a 
small, friendly town in wooded hills. A new SDA church is 
being built. There is an eight grade church school near the 
hospital, and liberal fringe benefits. For more information 
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4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT TTiiir»d«y, JmoMy 19, 1978 



Pac 



Your ••Editorial" in the Christ- 
mas edition of The Southern 
Accent left itself in the need of 
much!! 

For starters, we all know that 
the onlv reason we students are 
here is to glean what knowledge 
we can from our learned teachers. 
Your statement '•we are here to 
gel smart, the faculty are not," 
couldn't have been better said. 

However, let us consider for 
starters; since when have chapels 
been designed primarily as semi- 
nars or such so that we are able to 
learn things of substantial im- 
portance which would add to our 
knowledge? I hope you don't 
oass out when you finally realize 




that chapels exist for a "spintual 
experience." If that blows some 
circuits, you can get your 8080 
chip replaced for a few shekels. 

To force some to attend chapels 
and not others is in effect saying 
that those who are attending are 
in more of a need (spiritually) 
than those that are exempti! I But 
then, who here has the power to 
decide who needs Christ more 
than anyone else??! Is that not 
more of a personal decision? 

By the way. your attack on Ray 
Hartwell's letter more than 
proved that "the truth hnrtsi" 

Cordially. 
"Prof Rima 



Dear Editor; 

1 was happy that our fellow 
Christians from the Areopagus 
(Salt) could be fellowshippiog on 
our campus this past Sunday. As 
1 visited with them I knew you 
students impressed them favor- 
ably and that our campus at- 
mosphere was a witness to them. 
I want to apologize though for 
subjecting all cafeteria clientele 
to their performance. Plans were 
for them to play in the banquet 
r6om so those who wtshed to 
listen couid do so. 

As it was. 1 felt badly that your 
rights were encroached upon. 
Thank you for being so kind and 
forgiving. 

Maranatha. Jim Herman 



Dear Editor; 

1 was sorely disgusted to find 
that some demented thrill-seeker 
"maced" the piano in the cube 
room. It happened to be a painful 
and uncomfortable experience for 
those who got near the piano. 
Must this childish display of intel- 
ligence (or lack of it) be present at 
an institution of higher learning? 
1 know this is making someone 
laugh to think his prank was 
successful. Yes it was. And it 
also mined a night of badly need- 
ed rehearsal for God's Love Song. 
1 plead with whoever did it to 
grow up. Next time, please ask 
yourself just how practical that 
joke really is. 

Mic Thurber 



Dear Editor: 

I believe the thing that, in this 
worid of ours, disturbs me the 
most is the great quantities of 
complainers. The specific com- 
plainers 1 would like to complain 
about in this letter are the Chapel 
Choppers. 

Like most things, the true value 
of something is rarely realized 
until that something is taken 
away. Last semester, 1 was ban- 
ned from our bi-weekly student 
assemblies by one of my classes, 
which takes place at the same 
time. 

So, except for the Week of 
Prayer, 1 haven't been to chapels 
this year. Result? 1 have been 
one of the most uninformed, un- 
acquainted people on campus. 
What has been common know- 
ledge for everyone else has for me 
been surprising news - like the 



date of Ingathering, for one major 
example. And, how many of you 
complainers have ever counted 
the number of friends you have 
time to see and talk to twice 
weekly? How many of you have 
begun or helped a romance to 
flourish by a carefully-planned 
route to the church? 

Yes. I supposed that some have 
been a waste of time, but by far 
not the majority. I only wish 1 
could exchange places with one of 
the complainers as they sit re- 
laxed, listening to an informative 
lecture, taking no notes, required 
to do no homework for the period, 
and within sight of their friends. 

Ah well. 

Sincerely, 
Kay Campbell 



Dear Editor: 

I would like to express my 
appreciation for the fine column 
that Michael Bryant writes. His 
words add some humor and life to 
the paper. You certainly ire 
fortunate to have a writer like 
Michael on your staff. 

Sincerely, 

Mark H. Thompson 



EDITORIAL 



This week the Eds had a knockdown dragout about the editorial. The subject: 
required church attendance. But we couldn't agree. Because neither of us would give 
in, we each wrote one. It's a smorgasbord this *eek - take your pick. 

Pro Requirement 



The Southern Accent 



All material published in The Southsm Aocani is not necessarily the opinion or 
view of the new^japer staff or the SMC administration. Cartoons, artides, and 
other content items create an open exchange of ideas, a forum- in the -case of 
disagreement, "Leners to the Editor," is acolumn designed to provide expression. 
We do, twwwer. reserve the right not to public material that is libelous, 
extremely radical, or out of character in light of doctrinal points. We wish to retain 
the oeanng of a Christian SDA college newspaper. 



Editor Vinita Wayman 

Assistant Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Maregef ciave Middag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greenleaf 

Layout Li ne-Up Randy Johnson 

Sports Editor Reutien Castillo 

Circulation Mareger John Henson 

Secretaries Pam Legere 

Denlse Sheets 

Ad Manager. Ray Harlwell 

Proofreaders Kathy Mixell 

Jeanne Zacharias 

Subscriptions Candy Miranda 

Artists MarltFbrd' 

Sandie Lehn 

Pfxrtographers Rhonda Runyan 

Mark Forr. 

Reporters Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

Sponsor Frances Andrews 

Printer. ...^ Felts Bros. Printing Co. . 

OolteMah, Tenn. 



TTie Souttiem Accent is published weekly with the reception of teet weeks and 



How can the administration 
claim the right to expect our 
attendance at church bright and 
eariy Sabbath morning? As legal 
adults we expect the right to 
choose where we will or will not 
The administration could no 
doubt cite many reasons for their 
but The Accent is the voice 
of the student, so here are some 
a student sees them; 
an extension of the 

iedncational process. 
This might sound! little hereti- 
cal at first; the Sabbath is to be a 
rest from our everday tasks, not 
extension! But life is a con- 
tinuing education, and by attend- 
ing church we hear not only how 
to live better, but observe first 
hand how an orderly worship ser- 
can be structured, where it 
and should be improved. 
Someday we will have the say in 



how we worship our God when we 
meet together, and we'd better 
have some ideas. 

2. It makes the Individual part 
of a larger commanity. 

Church is one of the rare ex- 
periences that we all have in 
common. We aU receive the same 
stimulus (sermon), but listen to 
the different reactions! Take the 
time to find out your neighbor's 
reaction and view; it's a real 
study in individuality J 

3. To foster personal responsi- 
bility. 

Many times in life we are asked 
to do things we really don't want 
to do and may not even see the 
need of doing. But sometimes a 
lot depends oti whether or not our 
sense of responsibility overrules 
our feelings. Church attendance 
is one of those few things we're 
, asked to do (there are several 



don'ts) which we won't always 
feel like fulfilling. But if we do, 
we can chalk one up for the 
responsible side of our person 
alities. 

4. It's a statement of school 
ideals. 

By requiring church attendance 
the administration states that it 
wants to impart the above bene- 
fits. When students are choosing 
the school which will benefit them 
the most, they can look at the 
policies and decide whether they 
want to live with those standards 
or not. Standards do vary even in 
Adventist schools. Church at- 
tendance is not so unflexible that 
you can never spend church time 
outdoors in some other activi^. 
but the standard is set. And the 
choice is up to you. 

Lynn Neumann 



Subacriptions for parents and alumni are J5 per year, mailed weekly from 
CoHegedale. TN, at a non-profit rate. 



Con Requirement 



By the time I get to college, I'd 
like to imagine that I've been 
trained to think for myself. I 
could almost envision myself as 
adult, maybe a semi-adult. 
Naturally I expect to have to 
follow some rules, do's 'and do 
nots. The Christian standard has 
to be maintained in the broad 
areas of dress, behaviour, etc. 

But I stumble at the rule that I 
must attend church on Sabbath 
(with warning letters sent it I 
don't). Here I am out of the 
rigid-ruled academy life, old 
ugh to attend college, old 
'Ugh to make my own decisions 
nor once. As if monitored by a 



giant radar, I am to be kept track 
of on Sabbath. 

I understand that the Sabbath 
is a basic doctrine. It might look 
bad if some students didn't at- 
tend. But what would happen if 
the rule were abandoned? Would 
the students, having been re- 
quired to go to church all their 
school days, go hogwild and no 
one show up? Would they take 
their freedom and stampede? 

IMhink so. I would happily 
exercise my personal and moral 
freedom and still go to church. 
And I think most intelligent and 
thinking students would naturally 



do the same. 

For those who fear that some 
would go astray when on thei 
own, what better environroem 
than SMC to come to grips «"" 
spiritual problem. Let them tac= 
this problem here in this learning 
environment. After co lege, 
these students face the w"""^" 
then come into their own, na^ 
their own choices to make, w 
often, there is no one to gu 
them. Let's let students begin > 
exercise -their thinking "" ^ 
strengthen their commitments 
their own here. HEBE is *!•"" 
we can help them make 
OWN decisions for life. 
Vinita Wayman 



their 



•nmredaj., Janoaiy 19, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 



Letter From Fadder 



Xhis is a letter that was re- 
ceived by an SMC student this 
year - from a real father. The 
names and places have been 
I changed. 

I Dear Debby: 

This is your "fadder" writing 
I you, are you there? and if not, 
I why not? 

Debby. your "fadder" misses 
I your smiling face, but I'm happy 
I that your smiling face is happly 
I smiling while you'st gets your 
I education. 

Debby, don'ts ya all forgets 
I that your pa loves you even more 
I than a big bowel of dem grits and 
f other un-mentionables. 

Debby, we missed you when we 
went to the fair. We took Bill's 
wife (she's from St. Lucia Island) 
and had fun watching her eyes 
! out at seeing so much new 
' stuff. Bill and his wife have been 
staying with us for the last two 
weeks. We are at CUC today, and 



we just returned the Smiths to 
their home, and brought your 
brother to school. Maybe mothe 
hr.i "'r'™*- The Smiths 
had two „,ld kids, ages two and 

r« J''^^ "^'"y "^^^ ya '^ a 
<^l«- If °"f brother is rooming 
with Donald Spat, JOY. ' 

Debby, ya all should broaden 
your male acquamtances. Mark 
IS a fine chap, but your pa's 
advice is "don't pin your tail on 
one donkey." NO, NO, I mean 
spread yourself out and' give all 
the boys a treat. I guess what I 
really mean is that you should not 
tie yourself down to one male 
friend. Maybe you are not doing 
that, but maybe you are, anyway 
you know what I mean, because 
you always know what your pa 
means. 
Must go and increase my 

calorie count for the day - Debby, 

we love you, stay away from that 

"Georgia ice cream". 

Love, Dad 

P.S. Georgia ice cream is grits in 

case ya don't know. 



Opinion 




'25 Alumnus Examines The Hands 



In the Nov. 3 issue of The 
iDthem Accent there appeared a 
I'report with an accompanying il- 
lustration of a "Praying Hands 
Sculpture," which is to be erected 
on the campus in early 1978. I 
called Jerry Dick Lien, author of 
the report, to ask the basis for the 
interpretation of the statue as 
iiven in the report. The interpre- 
ilion was first published, he 
»i, in the Accent dated March 
•'• 1976, and was derived from a 
paper written by Charles 
™miiig, Jr. 1 then called on Mr. 
fleming to inquire about such a 
paper, and he kindly gave me a 
'"P.v- With his permission this 
paper was printed in the Accent 
J* Nov. 17, 1977, 

Mr. Fleming's article will no 

loubt answer the questions of 
Pa»y sincere objectors to the use 
sL'h'£'°"' ""taary. Some will 
Cl ""Terences in the use of the 

' ''" ^'^'Pent in the wilderness 
metaphonc representation for 

specific occasion - and a purely 
^presentational image of hands 
be su '""""^'"^ heart (stylized to 
df.^J '° '"^ ^"^ "P t° stimulate 
J"»tio„al meditation in general. 
; ^«e who object to tht latter, 

"l*a$readyto 

Nnouncetheart 

!l!!^|^8icallyun$ound." 

"c^behl,^^'' ''°* *^'' ""fferenti- 
fpre^P^'^f'' 'bree-dimensional 
sional a ''°" """ two-dimen- 
'cstheH^ " ""^^"^ °f stimulating 
Mv „.?"'' sP'ritual exercise? 
ition,! "^^ '° formulate a 
•nterpretation of the 



"tional 



'astin. 



nh^e!" ^'s<^"ssion illus- 
'alacies one is likely to 



arrive at when he makes a judg- 
ment based on partial or inaccur- 
ate evidence or when he does not 
apprehend the evidence correctly. 
For instance, based on the Nov. 
3 Accent article, which identified 
the hands of the statue as those of 
God and the title of the casting as 
"Praying Hands," I was ready to 
pronounce the art theologically 
unsound. How, 1 reasoned, could 
the hands of God the Father be 
represented as praying hands? 
And if the hands were those of 
God the Father, what relationship 
to the bleeding heart (manifestly 
the heart of Christ) was intended? 
Even after injecting a "protec- 
tion" significance into the hands, 
I could not extract a theologically 
sound meaning from the relation- 
ship - for God the Father did not 
protect His Son from sacrificing 
His life's blood for man's re- 
demption. I was ready, therefore, 
(before reading Mr. Fleming's 
article and talking with him about 
the statue) to pronounce this work 
theologically unsound. 

But even after reading Mr. 
Fleming's paper and learning 
that he applied the title "The 
Hands of God" to Christ, I was 
still unsure. How was he certain 
the artist had intended "God" to 
be interpreted "Chirst"? The 
answer was in a detail that was 
not discernible in the small pic- 
ture printed in the Accent - 
nailprints in the hands were 
easily to be seen in the original 
and in the color slide reproduc- 
tions Mr. Fleming had seen. This 
small detail changed my whole 
conception of the statue. I then 
saw that the hands and the heart 
were both those of Christ. 

Throughout my search for a 
valid interpretation for this sta- 



tue, I had been guided by a 
principle of interpretation which 
must be applied whenever one 
considers the meaning of any 
work of art " be it direct or 



"I then saw that the 
hands and the heart 
were both those 
of Christ." 



indirect sculpture, painting, 
music, architecture, or literature 
-- namely, that we view the wort 
as a whole: we must not segre- 
gate the parts, assigning to a part 
an interpretation that is at 
ance with the interpretation ol 
another part or of the whole, 
The work must have a unified i] 
terpretation of another part or i 
the whole. The work must have a 
unifed interpretation that must 
be logically and (for me) theologi- 
cally valid. 

Having now apprehended 
hands and heart both to belong to 
Christ, I began to see what before 
had not been clear: Contreras 
evidently had deliberately chosen 
the two units of anatomy (hands 
and heart) to represent the whole 
of Christ and to epitomize there- 
with the two aspects of the life of 
Christ most important to us. And 
if we seek a relationship between 
the two, the key is found in the 
praying attitude of the hands. 
The artist, no doubt, posed the 
hands in the traditional attitude of 
prayer or worship [Durer, 1471- 
19581 to indicate that this attitude 
was central to the exemplary life 
Chirst lived and became the ma- 



trix in which was formed and from 
which there emerged the re- 
deeming sacrifice of His heart's 
blood). 

Thus I saw the statue as a 
composite representation of 
Christ, each of the two represen- 
tations being a visual synecdoche 
" the part standing for the whole. 
The juxtaposition of the two 
parts, I perceived, had no particu- 
lar meaning, however aestheti- 
cally satisfying or artistically cle- 
ver the positioning might be. 

For me, then, hands and bleeo- 
ing heart symbolize the two prin- 
cipal aspects of Christ's ministry 
for us; the hands symbolizing the 
exemplary life he lived for us as a 
human bein^; +he praying atti- 
tude of the hands signifying the 
dependence on His Father which 
characterized His life and gave 
His actions their meaning; and 
the heart symbolizing ttie divine 
redeeming sacrifice He made for 
us by shedding His blood. As a 
human being he lived and worked 
in the presence of His Father, and 
He prayed to His Father for 
strength; as a divine Being he 
shed his blood for our redemp- 



expiatory) for others. 
It is in this area, however, that 

caution must be exercised that we 
do not attach meanings (however 
theologically correct and devo- 
tionally meaningful they may be) 
that do not logically and theologi- 
cally connect hands and heart as 
shown in the casting. However 
beautiful the thought of my life 
)ii(t within His protecting hands, 
this thought does not emerge as a 
logically valid interpretation of 
this piece of art. That thought 
needs another work of art-- hands 
not in the universally recognized 
worshipful attitude, but in a pro- 
tective attitude and the heart 
without its drop of blood, for the 
human heart can never expiate 
for its own or other's sins. As one 



Of course, tangential meanings 
may be attached to either hands 
or heart. For instance, I may find 
these lessons in parallel in the 
hands: As Jesus exemplary life 
was dependent on communication 
with His Father through prayer, 
so my life, to be triumphant as 
was His, must also be centered in 
prayer. And in the heart: As 
Jesus gave His life's blood for my 
sins and the sins of the whole 
worid, so I must give my life in 
service and sacrifice (in no sense 



"However beautiful the 
thought of my life hid 
within His protecting 
hands, this thought 
does not emerge as a 
logically valid 
interpretation of this 
piece of art." 

meditates, thoughts of this sort 
may, indeed, come to him, but he 
should recognize them as not 
belonging to the interpretation of 
this statue as the artist has 
chosen to portray it. 

Jesse Cowdrick, Class of '25 
Collegedale, Tenn. 

Ed. Note: In chapel Jan. 26, Dr. 
Frank Knittel will speak about the 
sculpture. 



If '- 



. THE SOUTHERN ACCENT •nmredmy, JmuMy 19. WS 



3 





mMimm 



l^ary Williams 
. / 

Sweep Off 
The Ruins! 



lew semester, a 
A'hat more could 
m reminded of 
nee said to 



A new year . a 
new beginning - 
we ask for? I 
what Emerson 
friend, Thoreau 

"Would you be a writer? There 
is no need to travel abroad, dig- 
ging among ruins of the Old 
Worid for something to say. All 
the world lies within you. Record 
your own spontaneous thoughts 
and you will record that which 
men everywhere find true for 
them also. A wholly truthful 
report of your own life will be true 
of all lives. Look in your heart 
and write." 

We have two possibilities be- 
fore us: l)we can be the writer of 
our tomorrow or 2)we can be the 
archaeologist of our yesterday. 
Archaeologists dig into ancient 
ruins to discover the secrets of 
yesterday. Too many times we 
have tended to be expert diggers 
and not such keen writers and 
builders. 

Exploring the ruins is not 
wrong. Our experiences of yes- 
terday become the foundation of 
our today. It's when we settle 
down and begin to live among the 
ruins of passed experiences and 
activities that they become 
wrong. 

What materials are you using 
in building today? Old materials 
were fine for yesterday, and the 
ruins prove their durability. But 
what of today? Are we using the 
knowledge gained from the ruins 
to build or are we content with 
what we have learned? Know- 
ledge is only good if put to practi- 
cal use. 

Building projects line our hori- 
zon each morning. It's a chal- 
lenge to live the life of a builder; 
builders, if they build well, leave 
the archaeologists plenty of work 
to do. 

What kind of structure can be 
buiit this new year? The answer 
can be found, as Emerson said, in 
you. Your experiences and activi- 
ties make-up your building which 
is totally different from any other, 
yet others find traces of them- 
selves " "A wholly truthful report 
of your own life will be true of all 



COLLEGEDALE CASSETTES - 

perfect usage for those otherwise 
wasted moments - driving, iron- 
ing, long walks, cooking. The 
most economical way to receive 
tapes on a regular basis is the 
prepaid perpetual plan. For $25 
you receive U consecutive ser- 
mon tapes and deluxe binder al- 
bum. You may choose to have 
just sermons by Pastor Jere 
Webb or include ail Sabbath 
speakers at the Collegedale 
church. Send your check with 
order to: Collegedale Cassettes; 
P.O. Box 1210; Collegedale, 
Tenn. 37315. You may also ask 
a list of available sermons. 



Young lady to share a two-bed- 
room apt. and pay half the ex- 
penses. Call 396-3857 after 4 
p.m. Leave message. 



KODAK ECTOGRAPHIC 
CAROUSEL SLIDE PROJECTOR 

- for sale - in original box - used 
very little. $150 or best offer. 

396-3369. 

* * * 

ARCH LIGHT MOVIE PROJEC- 
TOR - for sale- Kodak Pagent - 
$1500 or best offer. 396-3369. 
*■* * 

PULPIT FOR SALE - with built in 
public address mixers - space for 
tape recorder and amplifier - may 
consider selling amp with it. 
396-3369. 

* * * 

AB DICK MIMEO - reconditioned 
- like new condition. 396-3369. 



No. 29 - The Artfu! Dodger 
You're the best - "The Lady" 



Dear Lori. I wish yourheart was 
here at SMC instead of Alabama 
because Vd like to have it. Your 
special..., TS 

* * * 

Thanks to the Student Association 
for the Altar Flowers of Dec. 10. 
dedicated to the Faculty and Staff 
of the College. My Sabbath was 
made pleasant by your thought- 
fulness. Thank you. Mrs. Millie 
Runyan, Dean of Women 



"Walter Cronkite. Welcome 
back! I hope you wore your seat 
belt. I wore mine! Have a good 
day! Love, Barbara Walters" 

■* * * 
Happy Birthday Myma Litchfield. 
Love from your friends and a 
happy 1978 - The Big R, Betty, 
Cindy, Martin, etc. 




Repunsal Of 
Thatcher Castle 



Why not tap youi 
put your effort into erecting a 
structure that will be a source of 
guidance for those archaeologists 
- who are really builders at heart. 
It may take some sacrifices on 
■ r.nr part but ^r, r\\(i (hg pyramids. 
And 'housanc of -'ears and winds 
ui sand have not moved those 
structures. For you see it is not 
the quantity of materials that 
makes a building a structure of 
endurance, it is the quality of 
materials and quahty will endure 
for ages to come. 

A new year . a new semester, a 
new beginning. What will you 
build? The answer will be seen in 
eternity. 



Once upon a time, not so long 
ago, there lived in the mountains 
of Tennessee at Southern Mis- 
sionary College, some college stu- 
dents. Now these weren't just 
your average run-of-the-mill stu- 
dents; these students were 
special. 

Anyway, all the students went 
to the same school. The fair 
maidcnswere housed on one side 
of campus and noblemen(counts, 
dukes, squires, and pages) on the 
other. 

There were considerably more 
maidens on campus than noble- 
men, which was the way it always 
seemed to be. and as a result the 
Female Castle was much bigger. 
It was dubbed Thatcher. 

Though there weren't as many 
noblemen in Talge Castle, it was 
ev<.ry bit as crowded. All the 
counts, no counts, and dis counts, 
were gathered around the square 
tables in the castle lobby, playing 
Risk and eating their curds and 
whey(consisting of M&M's. 
chips, cookies, sandwiches, and 
miscellaneous beverages from 
their vending machines). 

Now that we have the stage set, 

allow me to get on with the plot. 

Since there weren't enough 

noblemen to go around, some of 

the damsels would have given a 



kings ransom (better know as 
their student ID cards) to get 
asked out on a date. 

Oh sure, you'd see some 
knights going over to Thatcher 
Castle to retreave their fair dam- 
sel dates, and I'm well aware that 
if there hadbeen a moat around 
Thatcher, it would have been 
filled with passioners and pas- 
sionetts. But what about that 
Repunsal up on the third floor in 
the back (nowhere near an escit 
door) who couldn't even pry a 
window open to let her long hair 
down? 

Well, it looked like quite a 
problem, and there seemed like 
little hope of rescue from this 
uneven number problem. There 
were no Super Heros to mend the 
predicament, though sometimes 
the guards (deans) were looked to 
to fill this role. 

The maidens who stayed 
crowded and glued to the win- 
dows directly above the Thatcher 
draw bridge, watched the com- 
ings and goings, to see who was 
with who. and who had to walk to 
and from classes alone. They 
wondered how long they'd have 
to stay there because there was 
nothing better to do but study. 

And then one day a strange 
thing started happening. There 







Friday 7:30 • 4:00 




COLLEGE PLAZA 



Collegedale Cleaners 

"-inn nn n nr >iii'W M inni M juuuunnrw>m»,oti 



were cakes, pies, cookies, candy, 
notes, and cards. When the 
Noblemen went to their mail- 
boxes, they found notes saying, 
"Pick up your packages at front 
desk of Talge." With the goodies 
came nice greetings and similar 
explanations for this new happen- 
ing on campus. They all read 
something like .... 
Dear John, 

You might not know me, but I 
am your new secret sis. In case 
you're wondering what this is all 
about, let me explain it to you. 

You see it's like this: Some of 
the girls got together here in our 
castle and drew names from a hat 
for some secret brothers. When 
asked if I would participate, I 
answered, "gladly," and so I got 
busy and made you these two rice 
crispy squares. I hope you like 
marshmellows. 

I'm glad you are my secret 
brother. I hope to hear from you 
soon. Here's how to respond: 
Send your response to 'The Secret 
Sister of John Doe,' and put it in 
one of the boxes provided either 
in your castle or ours. Signed, 
"Your Secret Sis." 

The response to this had a wide 
rahge - everything from a cool 
detachment to a passionate 
search. But a least now the 
maidens were happier and the 
noblemen rose to the bait. The 
responses were soon and many. I 
wonder if it is true that the way to 
a man's heart is through his 
stomach? It must be true; it 
brought answers. 

When asked if I knew who my 
secret sis was, I replied that I 
didn't know and didn't care to. 
Furthermore. I stated that it 
would take all the fun out of it, 
even though others knew who 
theirs were. 

And so, my faithful column 
followers, until next time, take 
good care of your secret friends. 
- Thanks giris!! 



FLOAT IDAHO WILDERNESS 
WHITEWATER: Salmon Mid 
dlefork. River of No Return 
Hell's Canyon. Individual, groui 
or family. Experienced licensed 
Adventist outfitter. Sabbath 
camps. Vegetarian food. Ka- 
yaks. Jet Boating. Drury Familv 
Box 248. Troy. ID 83871 (208) 
835-2126. ' 

* * * 
1 would like to make myself the 
grateful voice of the students who 
stayed here at SMC this Christ- 
mas. I would like to thank the 
faculty and deans, especially the 
Ott, Cusfiman, and Runyan fami- 
lies for their contribution in 
making our Christmas and New 
Year a very merry one. God Bless 
always. Carmen Miranda and 
others. 



All engaged couples or those 
ried during or after the summer of 
'77 are invited to turn in their 
names, wedding dates, and 
places at the Soathem Memories 
office. Deadline is Jan. 30. 

-* * * 
All club presidents and those in 
charge of student organizations 
are invited to call either Rid 
Blondo (4732) or Kathy Neufeld 
(4626) to get an appointment to 
get their pictures taken for the 
annual. The deadline for this ' 
Jan. 25. If you don't get an 
appointment made, your organ!' 
zation's photo won't appear in the 
annual. 

* * * 
Why not learn French as it is 
spoken in France? 

Come to Collonges this summer 
from the I8th of June to the 28th 
of July 1978 to attend the French 
course of the Adventist Seminary 
and visit Mont Blanc. Geneva 
the Swiss lakes. 

For full informai-on, please write 
to the Modern French Depart- 
ment Seminaire Adventiste. Co- 
longes-sous-Saleve. 74160 SI. 
Julien en Genevois. France. 




Have Fun And 

Earn A 

$1,000 

Scholarship 

Work 40 hours and make 20 
demonstrations pef " 
for ten weeks. 

See new places 
Enjoy financial security 
End job hunting . 
Have thrilling experienced 
Help win souls for God 

If this is for you, contad: 

HOME HEAITH ^ 
EDUCATION SEBVICl 
P.O. Bm 1147 ^, 
Decate.GA 30031 



Tharedaj., Jannaiy 19, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 




DebbJB Bin aman 



Photos b}' Dan Gimbel 



'>•„"- 



AT HOME IN ALASKA (OR TENN.) SNOW 



I DLynn Neumann 

"Winter coat? Boots? I left 
I those at home!" rejoined the 
I blonde Alaskan, toes curled a- 
I round the bar of the chair in her 
I first floor dorm room. "I was 
■ coming south, and I thought, 
y Who needs thosel'" 

By now, Debbie Bingman, a 
• freshman physical therapy major, 
may have second thoughts about 
;jie coat and boots. The world 
south" has the decepHve con- 
notation of "warm" to those "up 
north." But then Alaska conjures 
"s equally fantastic images in the 
southern imagination - images 
"lat Debbie is likely to shatter for 
you with the cold facts. 

Misconception #1 Alaska is 

"M tundra with 16 feet of perma- 

■nost that never thaws, therefore 

■S^t;;''""^ '^ *^ ™'y p^^'"8 

Not so. Debbie lives in the 
«^, 1 " *^'""" ^'">"* 350 miles 
|7,L"f'°f Anchorage, and one 
I ' '"^ favorite summer sports is 
T^ntain hiking. Downhill skiing 
™ the winter is out, though - 
™se mountains are too jaggedl 
""•^bie is willing to grant us 



our permafrost; only a few inches 
thaw in summer. But the main 
industry is not whale blubber. 
Debbie's father is a contractor 
and fisherman in the summer, a 
fuel distributer in the winter. His 
occupations are quite represent- 
ative of the state's real industries. 
Oil has become important with 
the 1968 Prudhoe Bay strike and 
pipeline. The pipeline has in- 
creased the demand for construc- 
tion too. And fishing - herring, 
halibut, salmon - have always 
been important. Alaska usually 
leads all other states in commer- 
cial fishing. It has some of the 
best salmon grounds in the world, 
as the Yukon River is the spawn- 
ing ground for the pink, red, 
hump, and king salmon. 

"Everyone fishesl" said 
Debbie. "From June -- when the 
ice leaves the river - till October, 
November. Sometimes you can 
watch the baby seals float by on 
small icebergs. The fishermen 
don't like them though, 'cause 
they bite the fish in the nets. 
They can't sell the fish then." 
Seal pup appeal won out over 



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with this ad 

for your first 
plasma donation. Total $12. 



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310 Cherokee Blvd. 267-9778 



fisherman prejudice for a time in 
the Bingman household though. 
Debbie kept one of the cuddly 
critters in, a bathtub in the front 
yard for awhile. But as his white 
baby coat turned an adult brown, 
his disposition worsened. Seals, 
says Debbie, have a poor nature. 
They're solitary animals and they 
bite! So the pet was given its 
swimming papers, and turned out 
to the ocean. 

' /hatever you've heard about 
T" eather extremes is probably 
true. In the Aleutians at least, 
the winters (October to April) are 
super cold with 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. 
sunlight. But when summer hits, 
the days are humid and hot. The 
longest day, June 21, starts at 
2:30 a.m. and ends about 11:30 
p.m. with a twilight night. 

"Our Fourth of July celebration 
comes in March. It's the Beaver 
Roundup." This mardi gras 
brings all the pelt traders to- 
gether for a week of dog sled, 
cross-country ski, and obstacle or 
flat snow mobile races. In a land 
where there is unlimited hunting 
and trapping, that includes most 
everyone, especially the natives -- 
Tlingit Indians. 

"The Indians don't do much 



craft work anymore," commented 
Debbie. "Some of the older ones 
remember how to carve ivory and 
things, but the new generation 
doesn't care much." What craft 
does survive mostly comes in the 
form of baskets, blankets, and 
parkas. And the parkas are beau- 
tifiil beaver or seal trimmed with 
wolf. 

Working in an area where 
caribou, moose, and fish are 
staples in the diet could be a little 
rough on vegetarians, as Dave 



Prest and Gary Philpott are prob- 
ably aware of right now. Debbie 
met the SM's while the three 
were counselors at a camp spon- 
sored by the 45-member church 
near her home. They told her 
about SMC. "And here I am," 
smiled Debbie. 



And here she is, blue jeans and 
tennis shoes, totally un-Eskimo, 
and changing southern ideas 
about the true North. 



Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



EX-NATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



_^^^ 








^^^^h 


EAT IT HERE — 


H~l'A^xik>, 




4921 SRAINEHD RD. 
(AT MOORE RD) 


OR CARRY OUT 

• TACOS 

• TOSTADOS 

• BURRITOS 

• FRUOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 
. ENCHIHITO 






3877 Hlion PiU 









UJELCDfTlEi 



PiLfn^ mrf^TER nCDRPDRftTED 




.^^:?;j,'»^ «^ •V* 




Southern Memories 
Captured With Sound 



Jose Bonrget, yearbook editor. dUmilov.. M».« 
I aimual. Photo hv M.,L Pord ^ ^ ^^' """" •" 8" in 




' Boyer 

The sights and sounds of life at 
^ML are captured in the annual 
^\u"- ^"^^Bourget, editor of 
southern Memories has com 
Pletely changed the layout of the 
yearboolc. His ideas include re- 
cording The Sounds of SMC. This 
's a 33 1/3 RPM „o„g sound- 
sheet lasting 17 minutes and 30 
seconds. 

The recording was made to 
allow students to express their 
real feelmgs about SMC. Rick 
Blondo mterviewed American and 
foreign students and recorded 
their reflections and opinions of 
this year. All of the students had 
positive reactions to SMC men 
Honing the high quality of educa- 
tion available, except one who 
complained of the growing imper- 
sonal atmosphere caused by the 



increasing enrollment. 

College officials were also in- 
ter^.iewed. From the Admissions 
Office, Kenneth Spears com- 
mented on the features of SMC 
that brings students here. Bill 
Taylor told about the growth and 
future development, and Presi- 
dent Frank Knittel spoke about 
the growth and expansion of the 
student body. 

Besides the interviews, Bour- 
get interplayed sound effects 
typical to college life - popcorn 
popping, fire alarms, dripping 
water, CK waiters yelling num- 
bers, the library click gates, etc. 
The recording of the interviews 
took about two weeks. Volker 
Henning. a communications ma- 
jor, then spent about eight hours 
editing and adding narration. 
Bourget said this is the first time 



a yearbook editor has done this at 
an Adventist college. The record 
was produced at Eva-Tone in Illi- 
nois, one of the biggest producers - 
of soundsheets in the United 
States, They gave him a 15 per 
cent discount because this was 
the first time, which brought the 
total cost to $470. The cost is 
being covered by the Southern 
Memories fund and the Public 
Relations Office. 

Bourgefs other ideas for this 
year's annual include a photo 
essay, family facultv pictures, a 
formal and informal picture of 
seniors, and a second semester 
supplement. ThcColl.-i,, Presh is 
printing the 216-page book ,,.ith 
eight pages of color pictures. 

Bourget has also returned to 
the tradition of dedicating the 
annual to a faculty member. 



The Southern Accent 

Vo.ce of ,U SoMem Mh,io„or, College StWcnt 



Thursday, January 26, 1978 



Canine Cleanup 
To Be Launched 



Coliegedale, Tenn. 37315 




□ Glen Mather 

The Coliegedale City Commis- 
sion "went to the dogs" once 
again last week as they attempted 
to resolve the problem of the 
unrestricted wanderings and de- 
structive tendencies of College- 
dale canines. 

■n previous sessions the com- 
mission discussed possible solu- 
tions to the problem, including 
'"'Passage of strict leash law. 
Although an ordinance prohibit- 
ing dogs from 'running at large' 
has been on the City books since 
Its incorporation in 1968, the laclt 
»t personnel has made the law 
difficult to enforce. 



I«e Holland, city manager, re- 
nZ '° ""^ commission that the 
^nattanooga-based Humane Ed- 
"Mtional Society has promised its 



^a«e One 

Maloohn Goes Under- 

Ground In The West,..,?, 4,5 

'^^bald Angel p. 3 

^-^sl Editorial: About 

f" Student 

Association d t 



assistance in the enforcement of 
the City statute. Ralph E. Ed- 
ison, superintendent of the soci- 
ety, assured Holland that several 
mobile units will be available to 
pick up noisy, vicious, and va- 
grant dogs. 

Education 
Refreat Stays 
On Campus 

DMathew Staver 

Elder Paul Gordon from the 
Ellen G. White Estate will be on 
campus Feb. 1 to 4, to address the 
Education Retreat. 

The Education Retreat that .us- 
ually meets at Fall Creek Falls 
will be on campus this year. 
Elder Gordon's series of talks will 
focus on the relationships bet- 
ween the Christian teacher and 
the Spirit of Prophecy. 

During the retreat, Elder Gor- 
don Will speak on Wednesday and 
Thursday in the banquet room 
from 4:30-5:30, and from 6:30- 
7:30 p.m. He will also speak in 
Thatcher Hall's chapel for Friday 
evening vespers and will bring 
I Sabbath morning. 




Scraping off ice and snow from their cars was a new experience for many 
southern drivers last week. Photo bv Mark Ford 



Holbrook Lands Job With 
New Jersey Conference 



Beth Holbrook, a graduate of 
Southern Missionary College, has 
moved to Trenton, New Jersey, 
where she is secretary to the 
president of the New Jersey Con- 
ference of Seventh-day Advent- 
ists and also the freasurer of that 
conference. 



clerk in the Admissions and Re- 
cords Office before leaving for 
New Jersey. She is the daughter 
of Eider and Mrs. Frank Holbrook 
of Coliegedale. Elder Holbrook. 
besides an instructor in Bible, is 
author of the column "Frank 



*hich 



Holbrook worked as admission Iliese Tlraes Magazine. 

New Directory Usts 
Semester Activities 



Sunday morning at the educa- 
tion department in Lynn Wood 
Hall from 8-12 a.m., the superin- 
tendent from the Southern Union 
will hold interviews with prospec- 
tive teachers for next year. 



D Debra Ann Martin 

The SA will print the telephone 
directory in booklet form this se- 
mester rather than the usuaLwall 
sheet chart, according to Ken 
Rogers, SA president. The di- 



rectory will al50 contain 'a list of 
the SA activities, social functions, 
and other student activities and 
information slated for the second 
semester. The directory should 
arrive within the next two weeks. 







Beth Holbnwk 



. THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thunda}', J»no«ry 26, 1978 



Pac 



3 EDITORIAL 

In any societ>- there eiists a ladder of priorities that ranges from 
food and other essential needs for just surviving, to fast ears and Neh. 
Grape Soda. The bottom rung is the basics, the top the luxunes 
When a problem arises in a society, like say an energy crisis or a tidal 
wave the top rungs are abandoned in order to mainUra the more 
neces'sary items found lower on the scale, the extent of abandonment 
being determined bv the problem that has beset the society. 

Here at SMC we ar« in a society based on education. The bottom 
rune of our ladder is knowledge, marketable knowledge. As we move 
higher we find broad subjects, small classes, interested msttuctors. 
sodal activities committees, and student club banquets. Now the 
crunch is on and the administration must shoulder the task ot 
weeding out the luxuries of our campus life in order to preserve 
anything at all. ... ^ • i 

students have littie to do with the financial 




Vote 'Hands Of God' In Or Out 



Dear Editor: 

It can be quite dangerous for a 
student to rise up in disagree- 
ment to a procedure to be taken 
by the upper school authorities. 
Yet it can be even more dan- 



has fought in the past for this, heavens fall." EducaUoB, p. 57. 
freedom which built the nest in I firmly maintain that regard- 



Actually, we as students nave luue lu uu ..lu. «.- ■"■ - : „.„K.r nf thp fa- 

theo.?esa/dponciesthatSMCpromotesandprac_ti„.but*ere^^ ^X" o^pThfsupet*'.!':! 



areas that we can control, and it is here that we should focus 
energies concerning this situation. 

Near the top of our ladder of priorities lies a most astoundmg 
organization ... the Student Association. Now this isn't an exposition 
on the horrors and atrocities of a malignant SA; it is rather a look into 
potential, the potential of a clipped-down SA ... one that has a 
volunteer president and a handful of executive members. That s 
what's coming, so we might as well look at it. 

My opinion of the SA, although somewhat limited in value, is 
rather low. Actually, it doesn't even register. I suppose that with any 
bureaucracy like ours, we can expect some sluggishness, and it comes 
in any sysTem you can think of. 

Abolishing the SA would save each student on this campus only 
about a dollar an hour per semester, and for you math majors, that's 
about $30 a year. Heavy, huh? But with a total SA budget of about 
$70,000 a lot can be done ... an awful lot. I know that, as a student 
body, we can figure something out that makes use of our money more 
effectively. 

How about an Adventist answer to the downtown Areopagus, one 
closer and run by students, initially financed by the SA? Or maybe a 
newspaper/annual combination that comes out twice a month looking 
like an issue of Time or Newsweek and filled with pictures, articles, 
and issues that are presented by students (not only journalism 
classes) and then bound at the end of the year for a fantastic PR 
gesture and pretty good synopsis of the year (isn't that what an 
annual is all about?) Maybe some scholarships, dorm improvements? 
There are lots of ideas, and lots of possibilities. As it stands, we 
will lose a lot of our past opportunities this next year due to the 
crunch. Let's not let any more opportunities get away before we 
place them on our bottom rung of necessities ... so that we won't be 
able to afford to let them go. w p__j 



The Southern Accent 



Staiib 



oy. 



colleagues, for the staff member 
has a lot more to lose. I do not 
know the exact dangers which 
would face a student in such a 
case as this, yet viewing the 
necessity for protest I feel that a 
student has less fear in regards to 
losing something than a teacher 
or faculty member. 

Revolution in our Christian 
realm of thinking is taboo and 
rightly so. I am not advocating 
revolution, though it- has been a 
prevailing attitude in the mo- 
ments of more humorous debates 
over school policies or actions 
between students and more lib- Dear Editor: 
oral faculty. Neither am I saying 
that I know it all, but I can see and 
think. 

The matter in quest concerns 
the erection of a certain symbol of 
"Christian Aestheticism" on our 
campus in the near fiiture. There 
seems to be quite a number of 
people, not only "unawares" stu- 
dents, but many people of posi- 
tion, who are in opposition to this 
move. It amazes me that so many 
people remain silent about the 
matter and quietly allow such a 
pagan symbol to be set up on this 
campus. 



which God's last day church has 
been hatched and raised to ma- 
turity. 

I focus on one point which I 
hope that those erecting the sta- 
tue will read. This is not ammuni- 
tion to help defend myself, it is 
only common sense. "The great- 
est want of the worid is the want 
of men - men who will not be 
bought or sold, men who in their 
inmost souls are true and honest, 
men who do not fear to call sin by 
its right name, men whose con- 
science is as true to duty as the 
needle to the pole, men who will 
stand for the right though the 



less of other factors the statue 
should not be erected. It is not a 
question of aesthetic beauty ot 
money, rather it is a question ot 
principle and the influence it will 
have. 

I appeal to all to bring this 
matter into thought and out into 
the open. I recommend that three 
separate votes be taken. One of 
the students, one of the faculty, 
and one from the alumni of this 
college. It still may not be too 
late. 

Sincerely, 
David Kay 



Dinner At The Club? 



I've been a student here for 
three years now and there is one 
thing that really disturbs me. 
How can a select few find fault 
and criticize almost everything 
put on by this school? For exam- 
ple, I recall a remark made about 
the last Talent Show being re- 
membered as "a night at the 
night club." The same few can 
sit in our cafeteria and listen to 
"religious" music with a much 
heavier beat than anything pre- 



sented at the last Talent Show. 
I'm not complaining about the 
group's performance in the cafe- 
teria, but to me it was much more 
sacrilegious than "Raindrops 
Keep Falling on my Headl" 

Sandy Carman 



Mot Backed 



Dear Editor: 



All material published in Ths Southam AooMit is not necessarily the of^nion or 
view ot the newspaper staff or the SMC administration. Cartoons, artides. and 
other ixnteni items create an open exchange of ideas, a fonjm. in ttw case of 
disagreement, "Letters to the Editor," isacoiumndeeigned to provide expression. 
We do. however, reserve the right not to publish materia! that Is libelous, 
extremelyradical.oroutofcharacterinlight of doctrinal points. VNfe wi^ to retain 
the isearing of a Christian SDA college newspaper. 



Editor Vinita Wayman 

Assislwrt Editor Lynn Neumann 

Business Manager Dave Middag 

Layout Editor ,,,., Vanessa ^eenleaf 

Layout Linfr4Jp Randy Johnson 

Sports Editor Reuben Castillo 

Circulation Maregat John Henson 

Secretaries PamLegere 

Denise Sheets 

Ad Manager. Ray Hartwell 

ProofreadeiB Kathy Mixeii 

Jeanne Zachari as 

SjbscriptiofB Candy Miranda 

Artists MarV Ford' 

SandieLehn 

Photographers Rhonda Runyan 

Mark Fc.r>^ 

Reporters Jerry Lien 

Dawn Rice 
Debby Boyer 

Sponsor Frances Andrews 

Printer. Felts Bros. Printing Co., 

Ooltewah. Tenn. 



The Southern Accent is publi^ied weekly with the exception of test weeks and 



The words "pagan symbol" 
previously mentioned will no 
doubt stir controversy. Yet as a 
free-speaking citizen of this coun- 
try and a member of God's rem- 
nant church, I stand behind those 
words and not without reason. 

Read carefully this quote taken 
from Patriarchs and Prophets, pg. 

306. "The second commandment 
forbids the worship of the true 
God by images or similitudes. 
Many heathen nations claimed 
that their images were mere fig- 
lires or symbols by which the 
Deity was worshipped, but God 
has declared such worship to be 
sin. The attempt to represent the 
Eternal One by material objects 
would lower man's conception of 
God." 

Satan literally enjoys working 
in the gray area. Gray exists 
between black and white. Moder- 
ated religion exists between good 
and bad. Paul exhorts us in 
Romans 14 to consider the effects 
our actions may have on the belief 
in Christ of others. 

The great masses can be 
colored gray if they fail to make a 
stand. Those who advocate it can 
choose their color, and more than 
likely 1 shall be labeled red, yet. 
for the first time in my life, 1 am 
implementing my personal fre*- 



Bare Facts 



In your issue of. Nov. 3, 1977 
newspaper, there was an article 
to the Editor written by Mat 
Stayer. We were most happy to 
see that there are some young 
people who have the courage to 
Your last issue about the rising speak out for truth. We need to 
costs ot SDA education was to the encourage them more 



Dear Editor; 



point and very objective. We 
finally are facing the bare facts, 
instead of trying to hide them. 

Anybody with a little common 
sense can see that we are out- 
pricing ourselves. Good job done. 

Sincerely, 
Janet Ford 



We sure would like to meet Mat 
and since it is impossible, please 
pass the word on to him that he 
did a real good job of putting 
truth on the line. We are proud ot 
him. 

Thank you much. 
Sincerely 
The Harold Schroders 



Cards For Elder Francis 



Dear Editor: 

Elder Robert E. Francis, pro- 
fessor of religion will be on a 
health leave of absence for the 
entire second semester. 



God would solicit your praye" 
for the well-being of this roan wn 
has helped many come to have 
closer relationship with God, i 
"the prayer of faith shall save ffle 
Some of you on campus have sick, and the Lord shall raise ni 
already missed the smiling face of up" James 5:15. 
that warm-hearted man and have If you would like to extend yo" 
expressed your concern for his sympathy there will be sever 
welfare. We ourselves of the postcards in which you "'y".* 
religion department do not know at the front desk of the r<="S' 
the true condition of his physical department. These cards "'", g 
state at this time. We do know displayed between the hours ol ^ 
that he is in Florida recuperating in the morning till 12 and fro^^^ 
and there is receiving much- to 3 in the afternoon from Ja"' 
needed rest. ^ through Feb. 3. 

It would be well appreciated if 



dom of speech in a society which you as being part of the family ot Mat Staver 



llmrBday, Janoaiy 26. 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■ 3 




How many of us have respected 
our integrity of freedom so far 
tliis year? You may not under- 
stand that phrase, but I'll try to 
explain it. It relates to the edi- 
tors' editorials last week about 
required church attendance. By 
using some examples, 1 hope you 
can catch what 1 1 

In the recent snowfall, driving 
both fun and dangerous. We 
had to make a decision during this 
time either to drive or not to 
drive. By the time that we are in 
college, the state recognia 
right to own and to operate a car, 
and so does SMC with certain 
limitations. We are free to 
choose, even though some of us 




* The first senior class organiza- 
tional meeting has been called by 
Dr. C. Futcher for Thursday, Feb. 
2 at 7:30 in room 103 of the 
nursing building. The seniors 
will elect officers at this time. 



♦ LOST: My SR 51 U calculator. 
It was left in the cafeteria. If 
you've picked up one that doesn't 
belong to you. please give it to 
Rick Neubrander, phone 4866. 
Thank you. 



* LOST " In the immediate vicin- 
ity of the CK. A delicious, high- 
quali^ yogurt. Description -- 
Answers to the name of Dannon. 
Comes with fresh fruit preserves 
on the bottom, creamy yogurt on 
the top. Has no preservatives, or 
gelatin base. Please help return 
this yogurt to its devoted con- 
sumers. If found, call 396-2229. 



* To all team captains oi leagues 
AA, A, B, C, Girls: Please circle 
the winning team number on the 
schedule on the bulletin board in 
the gym after your game. This 
way accurate standings can be 
reported every week. Your co- 
operation will be greatiy appreci- 
ated. Thank you, Reuben Castillo 

♦Float Idaho WUderness White 
Water: Salmon Middlefork, River 
otNoRehim, Hell's Canyon. In- 
dividual, group or family. Experi- 
enced licensed Adventist outfit- 
ter. Sabbath camps. Vegetarian 
jood. Kayaks. Jet Boating. 
J;lfury FamUy, Box 248. Troy. ID 
**3871 (208)835-2126. 



* Nursing Students I If you need 
a review book for State Boards, I 
have a "Mosby's Comprehensive 
Review of Nursing", 8th Edition. 
I'm willing to sell for $7.50. Call 
me at 4599. Kerry Arnold. 



STEREO CAMPUS REP WANTED) 

HimQTy entrepfoiiflurlal type ne«d«l to wll 
friends & facuHy Tremwdoua euminct polen- 



MUSlCrSOUND DIST., OEPT. ( 

?30 SANTA" 
BAUTO., 1 



6730 SANTA BARBARA CT 



» The Life of Paul Film series will 
be shown Friday evenings in the 
Thatcher Hall chapel and will 
begin at 7 p.m.The viewing time 
will be approximately 30 minutes. 
The films have not yet arrived. 
The beginning date will be an- 
nounced later. 

* Thank You: Diane Burroughs 
for being so thoughtful and send- 
ing me the Soathem Accent so 
faithfullyl Sherry Vernon for the 
tasty Christmas presents! 
T.C.F.b. for being so hospitable 
and letting me have so much ' fum 
during ray Christmas visit! Your 
friend-Brother-Member - Coastie 
Don. 



ARCHIBALD ANGEL 



* "Prof Rima: Grow up Sonny! 
The Aged One 



* To all those who have been 
wondering why DAVID KAY is all 
by himself. Irene Ruprecht is 
staying home in Canada this 
semester in order to work. The 
wedding is still on and I'm an- 
xiously awaiting May 14th. David 
Kay 



♦ To the Oreo Cookie — be proud 
of what you are — don't be afraid 
to show your true colors. MLKJ 



* For Sale: one used corsage — 
missing only one daisy. Call 
4609. 



* If anyone has an elementary 
Spanish textbook they would like 
to get rid of or loan out to some- 
one going to Nicaragua and who 
needs to learn Spanish, please 
callJanetat4459. If all else fails, 
I am willing to pay for it. Thank 



« WANTED: Missionary-minded 
layout editors, typists, photo- 
graphers, reporters, etc., willing 
to contribute two hours a week to 
a paper designed to spread the 
Gospel in the Hixson area. Call 
396-3266 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. 



« For Sale: One unused bout- 
onniere. Perfect for Sabbath 
wear. Call 4686. 



FOUND: Umbrella next to eleva- 
tor in the cafeteria. It has multi- 
colored panels of red, white, and 
blue with one panel transparent 
plastic. Call 4461. 



* Thank you, whoever you are, 
for fuiing the door leading down 
to the cafeteria from the Student 
Center. No more banged noses! 

♦ A QUOTABLE QUOTE: 

"Love at first sight Saves Time!" 
Richard W. Tankersley 

« LOST: Umbrella in nursing 
building 1st semester. Gold and 
black. Has name on it. If found 
contact John McKinney at 4889. 



Eds Didn't 
Say 



had a few .imitations imposed on 
us by the deans. But we still kept 
our integrity of freedom. 

Going to the cafeteria or CK is 
both a choice and a requirement. 
vVhen we get there, we can 
choose anything that we want 
without being told "no". We also 
can go down to Burger King, Taco 
Bell, etc., and buy whatever we 
want with the only limitations 
being our money and our health 
principles which vary from person 
toperson. Allof this falls into our 
integrity of freedom. 

Music is another area of choice 
and limitation. We can listen to 
whatever we want, be it Bach or 
Kiss — the decision to choose 
with us. No college 
regulation determines i 
taste even though certain types 
are not recommended and a few 
dare to venture out and call them 
"sin", which is fine. But our 
choice still remains within our 
integrity of freedom. 

One last example can make us 
realize the importance of our in- 
tegrity of freedom. We can 
choose to go see Gose Encoun- 
ters or the Choir Boys. The 
college defines such behavior as 
unbecoming, and It offers disci- 
pline if you are caught. But the 
right remains for you to chose, to 
take a chance, to gamble (which is 
fun to do at times). All of this 
falls into our integrity of ft'eedom, 
the right to choose. 

Our integrity of ft-eedom has 
another aspect to it also. It is 
this — if we profess to be Chris- 
tians, we have to take into ac- 
count those who are not and who 
are trying to form a relationship 
with Christ. ' 

What does your example of free 
choice do to that person? This is a 
technical way to say that I am my 
brother's or sister's keeper, and 
my example can either help or 
hinder, and it also can alter his 
eternal destiny even though we 
feel that it is not wrong to do what 
we do. Yet we must keep this in 
mind at all times if we are Chris- 
tians. 

It would be good for us to ask 
the Lord to help us be exam(>les 
that will only help others and not 
destroy them before they hayje a 
chance to experience their inte- 
grity of freedom. ' 




4 - THE SOUTHERN ACX^ENTThnraday, JiniMrv 26. 1978 



3 



NU<^WAfi.CrtiCOi<?^ OUICKOHTIMDIUJ 

ARTIST WHO WENT 




Rocky Ma 
Mornm 



If with the first silver allusion to di 

You rise from the world of dreams 1 

Breathing long and deep 

Deep till every pore is radiant witt 

Watching, then, as the awsome pt 

Explodes 

Mauve 

Red 

Orange 

Amber 

Gold 

Flooding up the lands 

Till every secret laid bare seeks m 

Then if you, lifting your open f£ 

Last shimmer of mounting stars 

Believe. 

Believe without questior 
That there is no God — 

Truthfully you hold a faith n 



Photos By Mark Ford 



Malcolm Fed Bv 5000 



COMPANY BUYS 
PHOTOS 



^v 



i\. 



CDebra Gainer 

"It all began with a one-man art 
show in Denver." he reminisced. 
1 had met Malcolm Chllders, 
associate professor of art, at the 
CK. He was ver>- tall and rather 
striking in his cream-colored mus- 
lin shirt, tan cords, and dark 
boots. He was on his way to 
deliver a silk screen to a friend, so 
I tagged along. 

A civic club in Denver had 
given a country club dinrter in 
honorof his an show. It was then 
that he got acquainted with the 
president of the Rocky Mountain 
Energ\' Company — which takes 
care of all mining concerns in the 
huge land area granted to the 
Union Pacific Raifroad back in the 
^ laSO's. 

P It was this company he thought 
of later when he conceived his 



idea for several months, and 
meanwhile it came time for them 
to publish a corporate image bro- 
chure. A photographer was need- 
ed — and so Chllders was hired 
on a short-term basis. It was 
agreed that Childers would pro- 
duce publishable photographs at 
the rate of one out of ten — then a 
few would be selected for use in 
current and future brochures. 

Malcolm momentarily inter- 
rupted his narrative to stop and 
talk to student Ron Pickell about a 
witnessing group they were form- 
ulating. Then we walked on and 
Malcolm talked about the time he 
spent out West taking pictures. 
It was "one fantastic summer," 
he declared. 

He left Collegedale in May for 
six weeks on assignment in Col- 



idea of " a systems approach to orado and Wyoming. He photo- 



corporate art," Childers told i 
It"s like free lancing. Rather than 

taking care of all corporation art. 
an outside artist proposes a sys- 
temized art idea to the company. 
Last year Childers proposed that 
he do some photographic art for 
the Rocky Mountain Energy 
Company. 
The company chewed on the 



graphed the company head- 
quarters, and he went out and 
took pictures at the Stansbury 
Coal Company, an underground 
coal mine, at The Medicine Bow 
Coal Mine, an above-ground open 
pit; at the Bear Creek Company, a 
uranium mine; and at the Big 
Island Soda Ash Mine, all in 
Wyoming. He climbed down into 
the mines and rode up on the big 



machines, along with the work- 
ers. "All those rides were better 
than at Disneyland," he smiled. 
We were back at the CK now; 
the silk-screen has been deliv- 
ered. Malcolm sat at one of the 
tables and drew me a picture of 
one of the huge dragline ma- 
chines, five stories high at the top 
of the crane, and him up there 
shooting pictures of an ore bucket 
big enough to put the whole CK 

The company now owns all of 
the 5000 pictures Malcolm shot, 
in accordance with the planned 
copyrights. Some were used in 
the corporation brochure already 
published, but the project is on- 
going. Childers is planning to 
make further proposals for the . 
restofthephotography — suchas 
handmade fine arts prints and 
paintings, to be produced from 
the photos. 

However the project goes from 
here, Malcolm feels that it has 
been good experience. It gave 
htm the chance to see people 
living in unusual situations — and 
the chance to share Christ. "It 
just goes to show that you can 
witness to the love of Jesus 
wherever you are." 







Hmraday, January 26, 197S THE SOUTHEHN ACCENT - 5 



CST 



I//7 



s exists 
commimication between 
the viewer and tlie finished 
works, I shoidd wish to 
have spol(en well, in many 
dialects, aboot Ul^, Its 
meaning and perhaps 
sismirce." 



TOP RIGHT: 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN ENERGY COMPANY'S 
COAL TERMINAL. THIS PHOTO IS ONE 
OF THE 5.000 MALCOLM SHOT AND 
SOLD TO THE COMPANY FOR USE IN 
BROCHURES . 

BOTTOM LEFT: 

PENCIL DRAMNG ENTITLED "THE 
WEED" OF ABANDONED MINE SHAFT 
ENTRANCE. COPYRIGHT 1968. 

BOTTOM RIGHT: 

RELIEF ENGRAVING ENTITLED 

■'WOODEN MASTODON". COPYRIGHT 

1977. 



^;' !"-<?., 



Jy? 




rti. 'r.-^-' 




6 ■ THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thmsday, Jmumtj- 2t, 1978 



o 




jCoue 



In the dark of the night my Savior 
sweeps down to save me. Ih my darkest 
hour my Savior prevails, just when I need 
Him most. 

He longs to rescue His damsel in 
distress,! like a white kmght in bright, 
shining armor. 

Without hesitation He wraps His pure, 
white cloak around me. It is the Robe of 
Righteousness, crystal clean and fall of 
transparency. His love for humanity is 
overwhelming, as He takes me for His 
bride. 

On the wings of deliverance, He s^ds 
ffis love song: "Come Meet My Father 
Through Me." 

With His life He strives to renew nune. 



by immersing Himself in my souJ. i have 
only to claim it. Thank God, I have. 

Like the flicker of a single candle in the 
night, He lights the way. Come with Me 
my blemished princess, for I am the Light 
of the world. 

Immersion in love is joy. But I pause, 
reflecting on His torn spirit caused by my 
transgression. The agony is beyond my 
comprehension, and I marvel at His for- 
giving grace. 

Jesus. I love you. Not because I have 
to — I can't keep it to myself. Please don't 
ever loosen your arms from around me. 

Thank Godl Christ, my Lord, in m> 
darkest hour prevails — I'm savedl Just 
when I need it most. 



For Life Or Forever? 



A fellow who called himself an "en- 
lightened atheist" once went on a tour of a 
monastery. At the end of the inspection, 
he remarked smugly to the monk who had 
been his guide: 

"Just think, now, if God does not exist. 



and I think that's the case, then you will 
have wasted your whole life." 

And the monk replied: 

"If I am wrong, I shall have wasted only 
50 to 70 years. But if you are wrong, you 
will waste an eternity." 



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Att: Director of Recruitment 
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(213) 246-8326 



>r»r>-i-io-|on n r>rfirn-)iM->|->i « n » » ii i t»» n M j ui 



inorii i<.iuuuuuu.«e 




Thnraday, January 26, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 



Vanessa 
Greenleaf 



Arranged As Poetry From Steps To Christ 



God speais to us 


In order to commune with God- 


through nature, 


We must have something to say 


revelation, 


to Him 


His providence, 


concerning our actual life. 


and by 




the influence 


Prayer is 


of His Spirit, 


the opening 




of the heart 




to God 


But these are not enough; 


as a friend. 


We need also to pour out 




our hearts to Him. 


Our heavenly Father 




waits to bestow upon us 




the fullness of His blessing. 


3ur minds may be 




drawn out toward Him; 


God is 


We may meditate upon 


ready and 


His works, 


willing 


His mercies, 


to hear the sincere prayer 


His blessings; 


of the humblest of His children 


but this is not. 


And it is our privilege 


in the fullest sense. 


to drink largely 


communing with Him. 


at the fountain of boundless love. 



19 Dare To 
Drop Out 

The following students have confirmed appointments by the 
GC to be SM's next year: 



Claudette Caine — Far Eastern Division 

Jose Bourget — Northern Europe-West Africa Division 

Janeen Calkin; —"Southern European Union 

David Marx — Tanzanian Union 

Charies Cole — Tanzanian Union 

Lynn Neumann — Far Eastern Division 

Rhonda Feree — Far Eastern Division 

Janell Kirkman — Far Eastern Division 

Jane Rogers — Far Eastern Division 

Cynthia Sewell — Far Eastern Division 

Debra Brunken — Far Eastern Division 

Rodney Brunken — Far Eastern Division 

Debrah Jordon — Far Eastern Division 

Paul Hoover — Zambesi Union 

Dan Kittle — Far Eastern Union 

Nedra Shields — Caribbean Union 

Robert Wiedemann — Far Eastern Division 

Alan Ruggles — Franco-Haitian Union 

Michael Seaman — Caribbean Union 



Have Fun And 

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demonstrations per week 
for ten weeks. 

See new places 

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Have thrilling experiences 

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If this is for you, contact; 

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jt EDUCATION SERVICE 

i P.O. Box 1147 

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Religion Dept. Plans 
Alternative Vespers 



DMathew Staver 

The religion department, in 
conjunction with the ministerial 
association, will be conducting 
four chapels along with five Fri- 
day evening vesper services this 
semester in Talge Hall. 

Three of the five vesper ser- 
vices will be conducted by indi- 
L vidual student speakers who will 
I deliver an inspirational sermon 
j between the hours of 6:45 to 7:30 
j p.m. The first of these sermons 
I was given on Jan. 20 with Paul 



Boiling as the speaker. 

On Feb. 17, Linda Ennis will 
deliver the sermon, to be followed 
by James Penny March 10. 

In addition to the sermon ves- 
pers there will be two discussion 
group sessions, the first to be 
held Friday evening, Feb. 3. 
Elder Frank Holbrook will lead 
out in the discussions on "The 
Role of Women in the Church." 
The last vesper discussion group 
will be held March 24, and the 
topic is yet to be determined. 



i 






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g - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Horsdjj-, JrnoBiy 26, 1978 



:^ 



Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



w 



X I 




Bustles Shoot 
For The Hoops 



Rookies May Rival 
Cowboy Popularity 



fortnight, the women asked Nai- 
smith if they could try their hand 
at the game. One afternoon, the 
girls came ready to play, decked 
jjt in tennis shoes, long trailing 
dresses with leg-of-mutton 
sleeves, and in some cases, a hint 
of a bustle. With complete di5,- 
regard for the rules, they began 
running and shooting for the bas- 
ket. When Naismith called a foul 
on one of the ladies, she pro- 
ceeded to question his ancestry. 
Since those early days, basket- 
ball has become a popular indoor 
sport for both men and 



i: Reuben Castillo 

Basketball is the only major 
spori strictly of US origin. It was 
in\cnted by James Naismith' in 
December of 1891. 

As an instructor in the P.E. 
department of a college in Spring- 
field. Mass.. Naismith was urged 
to fashion a game that could be 
played indoors. He concocted a 
set of five rules which we still play 
by: 

1. There must be a ball to be 
handled with the hands. 

2. There shall be no running 
with the ball. 

3. Any player on the court can 
get the ball at any time. 

4. No personal contact is al- 
lowed. 

5. The goal shall be horizontal 
and elevated. 

Two peach baskets were nailed 
on opposite ends of the gym to 
serve as the first basketball 

hoops. The early experimental Super Bowl XII sa* two teams 
games attracted many curious battle it out for the Vince Lombar- 
spectators. di trophy in New Orleans. The 

Some of these included women result was a lopsided game with 
teachers from the nearby Buck- Dallas' defense annihilating the 
ingham Grade School. Within a Bronco's passing attack by inter- 



Forest Ranger Thanks 
Student Tree Planters 



D Steve Thompson 

While the Denver Bronco fans 
are trying to swallow thousands of 
gallons of stale orange crush that 
is only being served in Cowboy 
hats, another ball still bounces 
on. The birth of a new league 
steps out on faith, quick hands, 
strong legs and new faces -■ 
rookies. 

Leading off the new franchise 
will be the returning champion 
Warren Halversen. His team will 
depend largelv on strategy. If his 
strong forward Gary Wilt can 
keep his ankles strong, he will be 
an asset to the team. But this 
leam rests on motivating a rookie 
center and quickness. 

David "Buns" Rathbun has a 
predominantly rookie team that 
has to play aggressively. He has 
a sharp guard in David Thomp- 



son, and must depend on the play 
of Keith Mosley to sweep boards. 
Got to get rookie forwards to do 
their jobs. 

Jim Douglas has a team that 
could take it all, a team with 
jumping ability that can tear the 
roof off the place. Devastating 
rookie center Brad "Buck" 
Schuitz is the back bone. With 
the arrival of Eric Essex to 
smooth things out the team can 
go far. 

If Jim Douglas is hoping to 
have a contender it should be Ron 
Barts and Company. Well-bal- 
anced team with two super quick 
guards in David Ruiz and Bruce 
Kaufman. He will get good out-f 
side shooting from the entire' 



squad, good forward guard i„ 
Terry Uran and Barts. But If 
rookie tree center Rick Prus.; 
gets going — look out! 

JeffSchultz, hustle is the name 
ofthe game for his team. And he 
has the material to. make it work 
Michael Abbott will take charge 
at center (a little Cowens). Brya„ 
Aalborg. Richard Thornton, and 
Gusso love to run. Much help is 
needed from Williams. Visser 
will take his shots, so look for him 
to be hot. This team can come on 
like the Boston Celtics of '7f,, 

There you have it - a new 
league with rookie faces. But it's 
still that same old game of round- 
ball or basketball, depending on 
your style. 



Cowboys Win Trophy 
On Bronco Gooofs 



DReuben Castillo 



cepting four Craig Morton passes 
and falling on three fumbles in 
the first half. 

Capitalizing on three of these 
turnovers. Dallas scored a touch- 
down and two field goals to go 
into the locker room with a 13-0 
lead. Denver came back in the 
second half to score a field goal 
and a touchdown, but Dallas 
added two touchdowns of their 
passes from Roger Stau- 
bach to Butch Johnson and from 
Robert Newhouse to Golden 
Richards. 



To students and staff of the 
Wilderness Camping Trip, Sum- 
mer of 77: 

1 want to express my apprecia- 
tion for the fine job of tree plant- 
ing that you did. It was hard and 
everyone knew that it was on a 
voluntary basis. 

I am requesting the area office 
to have.a sign made up for the site 
that you hand-planted to read: 
Planted. 1977. by students of 



Southern Missionar," College. 

You are welcomed to come back 
any time to the northland of Min- 
nesota. 1 wish there were more 
individuals and groups with your 
genuine interest and enthusiasm. 
Again, my thanks for a fine job. 



CRAFT CASTLE 

5780 Brainerd Road 
In Brainerd Village 
Open 7 days 10-6 




Sign up now 
for these 
classes starimg ; 



ses in crafts, arts, and 
and for all your craft needs 




Sincere best wishes, 
Arthur Widerstrom 
District Forest Ranger 
Minnesota Dept. of Natural Re 
sources 



THE 

SOUTHERN ACCENT 

Voice Of The Southern Missionary Coll.o. .^t.-H.^. " 







Eric Essex. Photo by Mark Ford 



GOODBYE TURKEY DAY P. 3 
SA ELECTION INFO P. 3 

BLACK HISTORY WEEK P. 4,5 



] - THE SODTHERN ACX^KNT 'nuirediy, Febnury 2, I97» 



Ariz. Boys Chorus 
To Appear tn Levis 



The Tucson Arizona Boys 
Chorus vMil sing Feb. 18 at 8 p.m. 
m the Physical Education Center. 
Tickers go on sale Feb. 6-12 in the 
Student Center and Feb. 13-17 in 
the Campus Shop. 

Founded in 1939, the Tucson 
Boys Chorus has been called 
"Ambassadors in Levi's" from 
the land of cactus and canyons. 

The chorus, with no church or 
school affiliation, consists of over 
100 boys beUveen the ages of 7 
and 14. The Touring Chorus 
numbers 24 to 30 and is chosen 
from the best voices in the Train- 
ing and TowneSinger Choruses 
who have earned top grades in 
school as well. By special ar- 
rangement, the boys who tour are 
permitted to make up their school 
work when they return. 

During the year the chorus 
rehearses three times a week. In 
summer the young cowboys take 
to the Catalina Mountains where 
there is intensive musical training 
for the following season's work. 
There is also trick-roping, hiking. 
swimming, archery, and riflery. 

The Tucson Boys Chorus was 
founded by Eduardo Caso, an 
Englishman who came to Arizona 
in 1930. His two great loves, 



music and teaching, were com- 
bined in his dream of a boys 
chorus with a characteristically A- 
merican sound and repertoire, 
which would take its place on the 
world music scene with Europe's 
oldest and finest. 

Dr. John S. Davis, present di- 
rector of the chorus, began his 
musical studies at the age of 10 as 
a boy soprano in the Tucson Boys 
Chorus with Eduardo Caso. Dr. 
Davis received his doctorate in 
composition from the University 
of Arizona in 1967. His composi- 
tions include over 300 choral 
works, two symphonies, two 
operas, a musical comedy, and 
many other vocal and instru- 
mental works. 




Tuscon Arizona Boys Choros 



New Music Copyright LawiVlay 
Drive SA Costs Up $5000 



In January a new copyright law 
went into effect which will force 
colleges and universities to start 
paying royalties for music per- 
formed on campus. 

Under this law, local sponsors 



Kettering Medical Chorale 
Renders Weekend Music 



The Kettering Medical Center 
Chorale will present a concert of 
sacred music Friday. Feb. 3, at 8 
p.m. in the church and a secular 
program on Saturday night. Feb. 
4. at 8 p.m. in the gym. 

The 32-voice chorale group, 
comprised of hospital employees. 
their families and volunteers. 



throughout the eastern states and 
Canada, appearing at school, 
church, fraternal, and civic func- 
tions. 



The chorale. 


currently in its 


eighth season. 


IS directed by 


Roger McNeily. 




No admission 


will be charged 


and the public is 


nvited to attend. 



and those presenting music will 
be required to get performing 
rights licenses from each of the 
thrcL- licensing societies. These 
societies license, charge a fee, 
paid to the author of the work in 
question, for each performance of 
each piece of music. 

The societies are ASCAP (A- 
merican Society of Composers, 
Authors, and Publishers). BMI 
(Broadcast Music, Inc.) and 
SESAC (Society of European 
Stage Authors and Composers). 

Until now all non-profit organi- 
zations were exempt from such 
licensing, but with the new law, 
non-profit organizations, too, will 
be required to obtain licenses. 

The new act does not exempt 
non-profit organizations from 



royalty payments if 1.) there is a 
direct or indirect (such as your 
student activities fee at registra- 
tion) admission charge, 2.) if a 
payment for the performance is 
made to any of the performers, 
promoters, or organizers, and 
finally, if 3.) there is any direct or 
indirect commercial advantage to 
the performers, promoters, or or- 
ganizers. 

What does all this mean to the 
student? At the beginning of 
each year the Student Association 
will be required to buy a license 
which will allow the college to 
perform, host performances, and 
use copyrighted music in any 
program. Some, if not all of that 
fee, will come out of the students' 
pockets. The amount of this 
license may range anywhere from 
$400 to $5,000, said Dr. Marvin 



Robertson, professor of music, 
depending on the size of the 
performance hall and the number 
of concerts. It may be necessary 
for the SA to make drastic reduc- 
tions in it's programming for the 
next school year. 

At this point, negotiations are 
in progress to persuade licensing 
companies to bring down thei' 
price for non-profit organizational 
-licensing. Many educators are 
attempting to point out the dif- 
ference between educational in- 
stitutions and hotels or night 
clubs. - 

SMC, like other colleges, will 
await the outcome of negotiations 
and hope a reasonable fee and 
method of payment can be 
worked out that won't drastically 
deflate the budget. 




Lucktenberg Duo Presents 
300-Year l\/lusical Panorama 



Lucktenberg Ddo 



The Lucktenberg Duo, noted 
for their performances of 18th- 
century music, will be heard in 
concert at Miller Hall on Sunday, 
Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. 

Jerrie Cadek Lucktenberg , vio- 
linist and George Lucktenberg, 
keyboardist, combine talents as 
interpreters of a solo and duo 
repertoire spanning three hun- 
dred years. 

The Lucktenbergs will demon- 
strate that the full range of tone 
color and authentic stvle can be 
achieved only through the use of 
instruments for which the music 
was actually conceived. 

With her 1718 Italian violin, 
Jerrie uses two different 18th- 
century bows: a late-Baroque 
model and a Classic-period repli- 
ca representing the transition to 
the modem Tourte-style bow 
which she uses for 19th-century 
and contemporary music. 

George, a pioneer in the revival 



of historical keyboard instru- 
ments, adds to the modem piano 
an elegant Flemish-style concert 
harpsichord and a Classic forte- 
piano of the kind used by Mozart 
and Beethoven. 

The Lucktenbergs both serve 



on the faculty of the School of 
Music at Converse College, Spar- 
tanburg, South Carolina. Sum- 
mers are spent at the National 
Music Camp, Interlochen, Mich., 
where Dr. Lucktenberg is the 
senior member of the Keyboard 
faculty. 



Road Being Repaired, 
Upgraded By Brown Bros. 



CGIen Mather 

"We are grading the surface 
every possible day," Lee 
Holland, city manager said. 

"The road cannot be graded in 
wet or frozen conditions because 
It will not remain smooth for more 
than an hour. "But be assured " 
said Holland, "that a grader and 
operator are constantly available 
to grade the road when weather 
permits." 

Another problem is evident at 



the crest of the new road where 
the bank has eroded and the 
guardrail has collapsed. Holland 
said that the road contractors. 
Brown Brothers, would shore up 
the bank at no addition to the 
$336,000 original contract. 

In the spring of 1978, when dry 
weather prevails, the Hamilt"" 
County Road Division will P^"^ 
the entrance road. 



Single Applcation 
System Simplifies 
BEOG, Loan Process 



IliancUy Februry 2, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 



Students seeking financial aid 

for the 1978-79 academic year will 
for the first time, be able to apply 
for the Basic Educational Oppor- 
tunity Grants, National Direct 
Student Loans, Supplemental Op- 
portunity Grants, College Work- 
Study, Nursing Student Loans, 
Nursing Scholarships, and State 
Grants through one single appli- 
cation process. 

This new approach, nation- 
wide, will simplify the complex 
process by which students apply 
for financial aid. Most states will 
also use the same form for their 
state grant/ scholarship applica- 
tion. Reducing paperwork and 
much of the need for repackaging 
or adjusting financial aid awards 
will speed tht application 
process. 

The application timetable has 
changed nationally also, in that 
no applications are scheduled to 
be processed until January of 
each year. It is essential for the 
applicant and parents to report 
actual earnings for the previous 
calendar year, thus the need for 
the timetable change. 

How does this new process 
work? Students obtain the Family 
Financial Statement of the Ameri- 
can College Testing Program 
(ACT) or the Financial Aid Form 
of the College Scholarship Service 
(CSS) from student financial aid 
offices, secondary school coun- 
selors, or state agencies. 

Both services use a uniform 



system for analyzing financial 
need. Individual family circum- 
stances are taken into account, 
however. 
Since the data from the same 
Tom to p. 8, col. 4 

Flu Bug 
Bites 150 
SMiCs 

□ Barbara Des 

The health service reports a 
large flow of patients since the 
beginning of the second sem- 
ester. The apparent cause of the 
increase is the "flu bug" which is 
rapidly circulating. 

The clinic has seen an unofficial 
count of 150 patients and has put 
at least 30 of them in the clinic for 
special care. It is not known 
exactly how many others have not 
sought treatment or have re- 
ceived it elsewhere. 

The health service is not send- 
ing in tests but other tests in the 
area indicate that the strains of 
flu are A-Texas, and A-Victoria. 

Marian Kuhlman, nurse at the 
clinic, warns that the flu is highly 
contagious and while those al- 
ready sick need to be cared for, 
those not contaminated should be 
careful to avoid close contact with 
the sick. 



SA Candidates Launch 
Campaigns In February 



□ Debra Ann Martin 

Candidates for the '78-79 Stu- 
dent Association offices are rev- 
ving up for intensive campaigning 
and the yearly election on Feb. 23 
and 24. 

All prospective candidates 
must file an application with the 
SA. Applications and information 
on the elections are avilable at SA 
office #3 in the Student Center. 

There are eight offices open for 
election; president, vice-presi- 
dent, social activities director, 
student services director, aca- 
demic activities director, the edi- 
torships for the SoDthem Mem- 
oriea, Hie Sonthem Accent, and 
the) Joker. 

The offices of secretary and 
treasurer are not up for grabs this 
year. According to Jo Lynn Haw- 
thorne, vice-president of the SA 
and head of the Elections Com- 
mittee, a change in the consti- 
tution now permits the ejected 
president to appoint the secretary 
and treasurer of his choosing, 
rather than having them elected 
by the student body. 

Along with filing an application 
for icandidacy, every applicant 
must submit a campaign plat- 
form, a statement of promises, 
principles, and policies. Ex- 



amples of platforms used in pre- 
vious years are available in SA 
office #3. These platforms will 
then be posted around the 
campus. 

Applications and platforms for 
the editorships and SA offices are 
due in the SA office by Feb. 9 and 
10 respectively. 

All candidates running for the 
position of editor will be screened 
by the Student Affairs Office and 
the Publications Board. Candi- 
dates for the other offices will be 
screened by the Students Affairs 
Office only. 

To qualify for candidacy, a 
student must have at least a 2.25 
GPA and be a citizen in good and 
regular standing. If applying for 
the editorships, he must have 
some background or experience 
in publication work. 

To make things more exciting, 
said Hawthorne, the SA will offer 
each candidate a free block of 
space (24 inches) in the Feb. 16 
edition of the Accent. This is the 
chance for the candidates to sell 
themselves in any way they wish. 
Their imagination is the limit. All 
photos, materials, and informa- 
tion for the blocks of space are 
dye Feb. 12 in the Accent office. 



Election Schedule 

Feb. 9 Applications and platforms for editors due 

Feb. 10 Applications and platforms for all' other offices due 

Feb. 16 Candidates' speeches in chapel 

Feb. 16 Special Accent issue with campaign ads 

Feb. 23, 24 Elections 




Santa on the heels of Turkey Day. Cartoon from The Stndent Movement, Andrews University. 



Combined Thanksgiving And 
Christmas Vacation Proposed 



O Jerry Dick Lien 

The Facul^ Senate appointed a 
committee last month to investi- 
gate alternatives to the present 
Thanksgiving-Christmas vacation 
schedule. The committee is 
chaired by Dr. David Steen. 

There are four problems in- 
herent in the existing holiday 
break. They are as follows: 

1. Many students feel that the 
unbroken 13 '/j week stretch of 
course work from registration to 
Thanksgiving vacation creates a- 
cademic and social pressures. 

2. The short three-week stretch 
between Thanksgiving and 
Christmas makes it difficult for 
students to accomplish much 
serious scholarly work. 

3. The costs of travel of two 
trips within a four-week period 
can be a financial strain for some 
people. • 

4. Both Thanksgiving and 
Christmas vacations take place 
when weather conditions are apt 
to make travel hazardous. 

With these stated difficulties in 
mind, the committee has sug- 
gested the following options: 

1. Continue with the present 
schedule in spite of problems. 

2. Leave the existing Thanks- 
giving and Christmas vacations as 
they now stand, but add one long 
week-end break at mid-term. 

3. Move the vacation time 
previously allotted to Thanks- 
giving to mid-term. This alterna- 
tive would give students a break 
from classes and allow vacation 
travel when weather conditions 
are better, around the middle of 
October. Thanksgiving then 
would be celebrated at SMC pos- 



sibly as a free day. 

4. Begin the first semester 
three weeks earlier, have a mid- 
term break, and complete the 
semester before Thanksgiving. 
Doing this would make it possible 
to offer special three-week 
courses or field trips between 
Thanksgiving and Christmas. 

A letter has been written to 
parents explaining the problems 



and options and asking for sug- 
gestions and opinions. 

Below, students will find a 
questionnaire. Those wishing to 
express their opinions on the mat- 
ter may fill out the questionnaire 
and leave it in the red Sootheni 
Accent boxes in Thatcher, Talge, 
Lynn Wood Hall, and the Shident 
Center. Or, leave It at the Accent 
office from today through next 
Thursday. 



Vacation Change 
Poll 



Please check the box of the option which you prefer or 
write your own alternative in the space provided. 

a 1. Continue with the present schedule. 

D 2. Leave the existing Thanksgiving and Christmas 
vacations as they now stand and add one long 
week-end break at mid-term. 

D 3. Move the vacation previously given to Thanks- 
giving to mid-term. 

D 4. Begin the first semester three weeks eariier, have 
a mid-term break, and complete the semester 
before Thanksgiving. 



4 ■ THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thoiwiay, Febni»ry 2, 1978 





GUEST EDITORML: 

The Neglected 
American 
/Si Heritage 



vhich 



February "-11 will mark the 
first Black Histon and Culture 
Week to have e%er been held on 
the SMC campus. Traditionally. 
neither has the American South 
been noted for its positive interest 
in Black Americans, nor has SMC 
been particularly noted for its 
representation of Black students 
on campus. In recent years more 
black students have come to 
SMC. and. as a consequence, 
some of the social and ideological 
issues left unaddressed at an 
earlier time need to be addressed 

Most Whites have few, if any. 
black friends, and the opposite is 
also true for Blacks. This reality 
provides the opportunitj' for mis- 
understandings and prejudices to 
develop and become perpetuated 
between Black and White Ameri- 

Now. as never before, it is 
imperative that Blacks them- 
selves be taught that their fore- 
fathers were also Americans who 
contributed to the growth of this 

years, have been taught that their 
forebears were savage, inferior 
beings, worthy of their ultimate 
fate -- slavery. This fact has 
caused many Blacks to have low 
opinions of themselves and to 
de\elop inferiority complexes, 
which have been consistent with 
the stereotypes portrayed in most 
of the early versions of American 
histon' books, primarily written 
irom the perspective of White. 

It is equally important that 
other Americans learn of the a- 
chievements of Blacks so as to 
better understand and appreciate 
their Black classmates. Black 
Histon.- Week has been instituted 
as a nationwide event for the 
purpose of enabling all Ameri- 
cans to begin to recognize the 
contributions that Black Ameri- 
cans have made to the total A- 
merican heritage> 

There are at least three prob- 
lems associated with the incep- 
tion of Black Histor>' and Culture 
Week on our campus. First, other 
racial or ethnic groups may won- 
der why their own groups do not 
have weeks such as Mexican A- 
merican. or Puerto Rican-Ameri- 
can. or Asian-American History 
Week to represent their specific 
ethnic groups. 

Secondly, a major problem is 
encountered in attem,-»ting to 
cover the total contributions of 
Blacks to the history of America ^jjt^ 
in one week. It is impossible to do ^^ 
so! Therefore, while one must be 
selective in presenting topics or 
materials relevant to the contri- 
butions of Blacks, one must alsn 
be cognizant that ir' purposefully 
omitting the contributions uf 



many Blacks, the impression is 
not given that all of the contri- 
butions of Blacks can be covered 
in one single week. 

Thirdly, if the point of the 
second problem is not under- 
stood the possibility exists of 
A.uericans thinking that since one 
entire week has been set apart for 
emphasis on Blacks, there re- 
mains no further need to consider 
the contributions of Blacks during 
the other 51 weeks of the year. 

Here, I will speak only to the 
first problem stated above. An- 
drew Billingsley, in his book en- 
titled Black Families in Wliite 
America, notes that Blacks 
brought to the United States were 
the descendants of an anciet and 
honorable tradition of African 
family life. The breaking up of 
families, moving to an alien cul- 
ture, in chains, not being allowed 
to engage freely in the ordinary 
process of acculturation, and :he 
; process of dehumanization 



rred 






iigrant group 
in America on par with colossal 
social and psychological disrup- 



BY GARLAND DULAN 

tion suffered by Blacks. In addi- 
tion, the fact that Blacks are the 
largest racial minorit}' group in 
America, roughly 11 per cent of 
the United States population, 
makes an essential distinction be- 
tween Blacks and other immi- 
grant groups. 

The above statements are not 
meant to imply that other cultural 
groups are not as important as 
Blacks, either because of smaller 
numerical representation or be- 
cause of previous conditions of 
treatment. They are only inserted 
to impress the reader of the need 
for a week particularly devoted to 
the history of Black Americans. 
Actually a better name for the 
week of February 5-11 would be 
"Black Emphasis Week." 

I appreciate the interest and 
assistance the administration of 
SMC has given me in helping to 
coordinate the events of the up-' 
coming Black History and Culture 
Week. 

Dr. Garland Dulan, Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Behavioral Science, Co- 
ordinator of Black History Week 





WSMC Programs Specials 



DJim Closser 

WSMC-FM will celebrate Black 
History Culture Week with fea- 
tured guests Walter Arties, the 
Oakwood College Choir, and 
special programs of the Black- 
American culture. Feb. 5-12. 

Walter Arties, first tenor and 
director of the Breath of Life 
quartet is not only musician, but 
also is the producer of the Breath 
of Life weekly telecast. An inter- 
view and numerous musical selec- 
tions by Arties will be broadcast 
Friday, Feb. 10, at 9 p.m. 

The Oakwood College Choir, 
under the direction of Alma 
Blackman, will be broadcast live 
from the physical education cen- 
ter Saturday, Feb. 11, at 8 p.m. 

Two, one-hour special pro- 
grams of the Black-American cul- 
ture, provided by National Public 



Radio, are "The Conditions of 
Blacks Today" and "Sea Island 
Sketches. ' ' 

"Sea Island Sketches." to be 
broadcast Sunday. Feb. 12. at 10 
a.m., is a radio documentary of a 
way of life that is endangered by 
modern civilization. The Sea Is- 
lands are found off the coast of 
South Carolina and Georgia, in- 
habited by a distinct form of 
African-American folklife. They 
are pure African Blacks and des- 
cendants of plantation slaves. 

Concluding WSMC-FM 's Cul- 
ture Week celebration, Georgia's 
senator, and long-time civil rights 
activist, Julian Bond, will speak 
on "The Conditions of Blacks 
Today" on Sunday, Feb. 12, at 



Photo by Vlnlta Wayman 



WeU, chUd, I'U teU yoo: 

Ufe for me ain't been no crystal 

stair. 

It's had tachs In It, 

And splinters, 

And boards torn np. 

And places with no carpet on the 

floor - 

Bare. 

But all the time 

I'se been a-dlmbhi' on. 

And reachin' landin's, 

And tnjmln' comers. 

And sometimes goin' hi the dark 

Where there ain't been no light. 

So, child, don't you tnm back. 

Don't you set down on the steps 

'Cause yon Bnds It kinder hard. 

Don't yon fall now - 

For I'se stUl goto', honey, 

I'se still climbhi': 

And life for me ahi't no crystal 

stafr. 

"Langston Hnghes 



-'^•^•"^'n--^^-'' 



February 7 (Tuesday). A dramaW 

Chapel accorapam^'jl 

(Participao's'Jl 
body, mosl"! 
BYKOTA,B«l 
is sponsor"'"! 



February 8 (Wednesday evening).. 
Joint worship in church 



.Elder W.B' 
speaker. 



February 9 (Thursday). i>'\ *f ,«l 

Chapel Sociology 

Tenn. 

February 10 (Friday eveningl Dr. Merfl" ,, I 

Vespers HuntsviW'" | 

February 11 (Sabbath) Dr. M-^ 

February 1 1 (Saturday evening) Oakwo j 



•Arrangements have also been made *" . j, 
Brian's Song and Jane Pitman's AoW' "^ 
annoilnren^enljii 



-Black History Week History 



The celebration of Black History has been a tradition among many 
American Blacks since 1926 when Negro History Week was started by 
Carter G. Woodson, historian and founder of the Association for the 
study of Afro- American Life and History in 1950, The purpose was to 
t-,..= attention on the achievements of Blacks not included in most 
, books. Negro History Week, later known as Black History 



history o^j^r^^- "-e.-- j — -"■ '"'^' ^"w*vii db oiacs rtistory 

^Yeek is celebrated in February and incorporates the birthdays of 
both Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglas, an Amerimn m^r-ic 



bom rtuio" — "- 

leader, journalist, and statesman. 



nmnday, Febniary 2, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 

Why God Created Different Races —, 

God created different races for the same reason that He created 
different kinds of birds, or varieties of roses." Each has a special 
beauty, usefulness, and contribution to make. The racial problem is 
not a skin problem, but one of the hu.^an heart. Prejudice and hatred 
come from the mind. God created the different races to serve and 
help one another. The racial problem is but one more evidence that 
man needs a change of heart. Only then will everyone see that 
variety Is the spice of life and racial differences were put there by a 
loving Creator to add to— not take away from— human happiness. 



^ Why Men Have To Work 



IDReprinted with permission from 
I The sky used to be very close to 
Le ground. In fact, it wasn't any 
Tjglierthan a man's arm when he 
laised it above his head. When- 
ever anybody got hungry, all he 
Ld 10 do was to reach up and 
^reak off a piece of the sky and 
leal it. That way, no one ever had 
■to work, 

I Well, it was a fine arrangement 
Iforawhile, but sometimes people 
Iwould break off more than they 
■could eat, and what they couldn't 
leal they just threw on the ground. 
I After all, the sky was so big there 
fcould always be enough for 
Everybody to eat. What did it 
flatter if they broke off more than 
Ihey actually wanted? 
J Maybe it didn't matter to them, 
Jiutitmatteredtothesky. In fact, 
BImade the sky angry to see itself 
Hyiog on the ground, half-eaten, 
ige. So one day the sky 



Black Folktales by Julius Lester, a 1 
spoke out and said. "Now look-a- 
here! Can't have this! Uh^uh. 
Can't have you people just break- 
ing off a piece of me every time 
your stomach growls and then 
taking a little bite and throwing 
the rest away. Now if y'all don't 
cut it out, I'm going to move so 
far away no one will ever touch 
me again. You understand?" 



EVENTS 



|™s in American history 
|l«ed to their experiences. 
[™ SMC campus student 
I of .the yet unofficial club 
fher. Elder Lorenzo Grant 



Sadne will be the guest 

ijw of the Department of 
iversity, Nashville, 

I"" of Oakwood College, 



fWer the 



"iirection of Alma 



h'r' w"'r^ '"-^ 

I S". Watch for 



Well, people got the message. 
In fact, they were pretty scared, 
and for a while they made sure 
that no one ever broke off more of 
the sky than he could eat. But 
slowly they began to forget. 
One day. a man came by and 
broke off a chunk big enough to 
feed forty people for a month. 
He took a few little bites, licked 



around the edges, threw the rest 
over his shoulder, and walked on 
down the road just as happy and 
dumb as anything you've ever 
seen. Well, the sky didn't say a 
word, but with a great roar, the 
sky lifted itself up as high as it 
could, and that was pretty high. 

When the people realized what 
was happening, they began cry- 



ing and pleading with the sky to 
come back. They promised that 
they would never do it again, but 
the sky acted like it didn't hear a 
word. 

The next day, the people didn't 
have a thing to eat, and they had 
to go to work to feed themselves, 
and that's why man is working to 
this very day. 



«|;:t. 



BY LORENZO GRANT 



Black Unions: 
Bridges Or Barriers 
In Church Relations? 



Today among many Black SDA 
ministers and laymen, there is a 
growing interest in further refin- 
ing the church organization to 
facilitate greater attention to the 
peculiar needs and interests of 
the Black mission. At least one 
level of Black leaders, the con- 
ference presidents, are solidly re- 
commending that this come in the 
form of black unions, 

I think that the formation of 
Black unions would probably 
result in a greater division be- 
tween Blacks and Whites in the 
church. It would seem that the 
church must now face the ques- 
tion of the sociological compatibil- 
ity of all men in Christ, SDA's do 
not have a clear concept of how 
race fits into the Christian ethic. 
Thus, it is difficult for them to 
know how to deal with differences 
between races. The church must 
examine its commitment to the 
unity of the worshipping com- 
munity or face the judgement of 
an already skeptical world upon a 
church admitting defeat in the 
essential area of brotherhood. 

The immediate question is: 
will Black unions as currently 
proposed to the GC really support 
the need of the Black work? 

Ellen White wrote an appeal 
around 1905 entitled "Our Duty 
to the Colored People." Inlt she 
said "You have no license from 
God to exclude the Colored 
people from your places of wor- 
ship They should hold mem- 
bership in the church with the 
White brethren .... Men have 
thought it necessary to plan in 
such a way as to meet the prej- 
udice of the White people; and a 
wall of separation in religious 
worship has been built up be- 
tween the Colored people and the 

White people." 

About this time there was oe- 
Hinning in the South a resurgence 
fracifl antagonism which spread 
across the country. By 1908 he 
hatred and violence had swo en 
to a fever pitch. That year Ellen 



White wrote from Australia, "In 
regard to White and Colored 
people worshipping in the same 
building, this cannot be followed 
as a general custom with profit to 
either party - especially in the 
South, The best thing will be to 
provide the Colored people who 
accept the truth with places of 
worship of their own in which 
they can carry on their services by 
themselves. That is particularly 
necessary in the South in order 
that the work for the White peo- 
ple may be carried on without 
serious hindrance," 

What caused such a drastic 
hirnabout in Mrs. White's think- 
ing? It was doubtless her aware- 
ness of the dreadful situation 
which then existed and threat- 
ened to get worse for the Negro in 
the South. It was out of such a 
climate of lynchings and mob- 
bings that Mrs. White gave her 
counsel of separate work for the 
"present distress." While put- 
ting together material for Volume 



9 of Testimonies To The Church, 

Mrs. White penned these words, 
"Let them be shown that this is 
done, not to exclude them from 
worshipping with White people 
because they are Black, but in 
order that the progress of the 
truth may be advanced. Let them 
understand that this plan is to be 
followed until the Lord shows as a 
better way." 

I believe that the time for a 
better way has come. The policy 
of segregation first adopted for 
the sake of advancing the gospel 
has come to be taken so for 
granted that probably a majority 
of SDA members believe it to be a 
fundamental teaching of the 
church. But Ellen White stated 
that this arrangement was tem- 
porary and mainly for the South. 
A serious question is that of 
whether the desire for segrega- 
tion has now shifted from the 
White community to the Black 
community. Is the problem of 
barriers to community being 



erected by Blacks themselves? 
This is not to say that there exists 
no more White racism, but is it 
the Blacks now that want to seg- 
repatc further by forming Black 

1 feel that no one should ever 
implement a polic\ or structure 
that would hinder llie possibility 
of fellowship and community. To 
maintain the integrity of the 
body, we cannot organize along 
racial or nationalistic lines. It is 
too natural a tendency to turn 
inward to one's own interests to 
the exclusion of the common 
interest. 

For purposes of reaching the 
unchurched it may still be neces- 
sary to retain segregated congre- 
gations in some instances. But 
when we reach organizational 
levels, Christianity should have 
prepared us for equal privileges 
of participation in the government 
of the church. 
Dr. Lorenzo Grant 
Assistant Professor of Religion 







6 • THE SOrTHEKN ACCENT Thiind«y, Fehrauy 2, 197( 



3 



Pace 



Misplaced Iconolatry 



Dear Editor: 

1 find the controversy over the 
Pra>Tng Hands sculpture amusing 
to say the least. Especially since 
this sculpture is not costing any 
student on this campus one thin 
dime of hard-to-come-by tuition 
money. 

Every year there seems to be a 

need for some kind of issue for 
"concerned" people to kick 
around. Since notWng else im- 
portant has loomed on the 
horizon. 1 suppose the Praying 
Hands must suffer the brunt of 
the need to make an issue out of 
something. 



With all the negative opinions 



drawn to experience God in his 
own way. And isn't experiencing 
God the better part of life? 

Sincerely, 
Ray Hartwell 

P.S. However, I would enjoy 
seeing the Praying Hands placed 
in a different location on campus 
than the mall. 

ARCHIBALD ANGEL 



Let's Make A Deal! 

Dear Editor: 

The Men's Club is going to create some interest this Sunday, Feb. 5 
in Thatcher Hall's chapel. We're going to put on Let's Make A Deal, 
starring Mighty Small. 

I wanted to let everyone know that they should come appropriately 
dressed. There will be door prizes, zonkers, and money. It starts at 3 



flyi 



sensitive spuit isn't 
outraged by the painting in the 
entrance of the nursing building! 
After all. it loo is art; but no one is 
shouting "Iconolatry." 
Presumedly it must be felt the 
painting is a contributing factor to 
the asthetic diminsion of this 
campus, and it symbolizes some- 
thing this campus stands for. 



A purpose of art. it seems, is to 
encourage one to think of. and 
look at human experience and 
emotions in a new or different 
way. If one is to look at the 
Praying Hands sculpture and dis- 
agree with the views of the sculp- 
tor, the observer is led to think of 
how his own view of God is 
different. But yet, his mind is 




Correction 

Dear Editor: 

I would like to make one min„ 
correcHon on Mark Ford's sM 
hcs in last week's editorial 

Currently, the SA is budgeted or 
approximately $50,000, not Z 
alleged $70,000. *' 

Ken Porter, SA Treasurer 



V10U6NCE... 
I NEED MY, 

vioieuce! 




(M^IJM 




* Help make Randy Peterson's 
day brighter by contributing for 
religious tapes and possibly a 
tape recorder. There are jars in 
both dorms, the Student Center, 
and the Ad building. Any ques- 
tions call 4107 or 4138. 



The Southern Accent 

^J^'ISf^ puMlshecJ in Th. Southon Annt Is not necesarlly the opinion or 
«^^L^ "exspawr staff or the StK administration. Cartoons, artlda and 
omer content Heme create an open exchange of ideas, a fot«7i. in tt» aae ot 
3^ir;;^^'"'°""^""'"'=="'"™*^8«<i I" provide expression^ 
^n^^^' '^Z^J!:^ "^ ""* '" P""'* ""^^ 'W Is libelous, 
Mram^y '^'■^^orM of cteracler in light of doctrinal points. V* wish to r*?n 
the bearing ot a Oinstian SDA college newspaper. 



?"°'--V VlnllaVV&yTrein 

^««E?H<» LynnNeurrann 

Business Manager ElaveK^lddag 

h?™^™'"- VanossaQSrleaf 

t^i^"f^ Rand, Johnson 

!?°"?3'""'- Reut», Castillo 

CtaJalion Manager John Hanson 

^«'«^^ F^tegere 

.^.. Denise Sheets 

Sf*^^- Hay Hartwell 

Proofreaders Kalhy MIxell 

SufHcriniin™, Jeanne Zachariae 

^'":^:::::::;;:;;;;;;;:::^S^r" 

'^°S'=<*«' Rhonda Runyan 

Marli Foro 

"^^^ Jf^DlckUen 

Oawn Rice 
5^^ DebbyBoyer 

^^ Frances Andrews 

Felts Bros. Printing Co., 

Ooltewah, Tenn. 



^Jjesouthern A«m is published weekly With the exception of leet weeks and 
Col^'e^'^ 'L'^oTJr"' - « -- y-. n^l" ^y fro. 



* ATTENTION -Norslng Seniors 
and Business Majors: The fol- 
lowing recruiters will be on cam- 
pus during the following dates: 
Feb. 2, John F. Knipschild, Di- 
rector of Recruitment, Adventist 
Health Services, Glendale, Calif. 
Of the four recruiters that will be 
on campus, Knipschild is the only 
one who expressed his interest in 
interviewing business majors.The 
following are primarily concerned 
with Nursing Seniors: Feb. 14, 
15, Sharon C. Hoyle, Loma Linda 
University Hospital. Feb. 16, 17, 
Ken Hoover, White Memorial 
Hospital, Los Angeles, Calif. 
Feb. 22, 23, Irv Hamilton, Florida 
Hospital, Oriando, Fla. If you 
would like further information 
and would wish to make an ap- 
pointment with one of the above 
recruiters, please call Linda Mar- 
lowe at 395-4283. 



•Dear Janet: You Chicken I The 
Screamer. 



* Attention Snow Skiers: There 
will be a S.O.S. Ski Club meeting 
TONIGHT (Thurs.) at 6 p.m. in 
the Student Center Cube Room. 
We will discuss plans for a ski trip 
to Wintergreen Resort in Virginia 
for Feb. 10-12. Any interested in 
sknng, plan to be therell Very 
important! We need you to make 
this club a success. Members and 
non-members welcome. 



•Dear Aged One, Generally 
wisdom comes with age. In your 
case, age came alone. Friends of 
the "Prof." 

* I lost a black umbrella with a 
wooden handle. If you find it 
please call 4803 or contact Jim 
Irwm (that's me). Till then, may 
our rainy days be few. 



* The role of women in the 
church will be discussed this Fri- 
day evening, Feb. 3, in the Talge 
Hall chapel. 

The discussion will be led out 
by Elder Frank Holbrook, pro- 
fessor of religion, and will begin 
at 6:45 p.m. 

* Elder Edwin Zackrison, re- 
ligion professor on a doctorate 
study leave at Andrews, will be 
here this week. 

* Special Valentine One-TIme 
Color Plioto Offer. 8 X 10 color 
portrait $6. Rick Perry, profes- 
sional photographer. Feb. 5, 
Sun., 10 - ? at Thatcher Hal!. 
Questions call Mr. Runyan at 
396-2825 or 4275. 



♦ The Smart SliopI Where is it? 

The north end of Jones Hall on 
the ground floor. What is it? 
A clothing exchange for both men 
and women. You bring in clothes 
that are good, but that you no 
longer want for some reason. 
We give yoo credit for them; then 
you may take other clothes out 
against your credit, that you like 
better. You can buy for cash if 
you prefer. Ladles, we have all 
kinds of dresses, tops, pants, 
sweaters, shoes and coats. What- 
ever you need — we have it. 
Come and seel Men, we have 
trousers, shirts, jackets, shoes, 
etc. Come and seel when — 
Sunday A.M. 10-12, Monday 
P.M. 4-6, Thursday P.M. 7:30- 
9:00. Proceeds go to the Worthy 
Student Fund. 



STEREO DISCOUNTERS 



we Dfanas Send lor out FREE calaJog 
STEREO DISCOUNTERS, DEPT. C.I 7B 



* Thank you Dr. Grundset 
maintaining a correct source rf 
time on campus while all othets 
are failing. The "Prof 



« For Sale: 1957 Chevy, Belair, 
black roll-inpleated interior with 
bucket seat. It has a new 32] 
engine with a Rochester four 
barrel. The car has dual exhausi 
with two thrush mufflers. As fiii 
a transmission, it's a heavy duV 
three-speed with a hurst competi' 
tion plus tower. The car gets 
between 17 and 19 m.p.g. Ithasa 
jnew four pound fuel pump, «itt 
I new upper and lower ball joinls. 
The car has old style Amerioi 
Mags, with four almost new 
G70-14 tires. I also have two if 
G70-14 raised-white letter tii« 
I'll give to the individual wM 
buys the car. If you need nws 
information please call R»« 
Whitehead at 4782. 

* Dear Aged One, Were yon « 
wise as you seem to be old, soo' 
would see and acknowledge ™( 
merits of the Profs camr""" 
The "Snoring" Father 

• Congratulations to Grand"' 
and Grandpa Greenleaf. 



* Found — A Valentine s 
(unused), someone lost lo "6 
jlobby. Call 4970 and identW 

* Thank you Reuben Castillo fc' 
letting me use your Spanisn ^ 
for a while. MuchasGracias- 
the natives in Nicaragua «' 
predate it. Janet Ford. 

* All former editors from '^^. 
emies or colleges or *°'^i,„riBl 
estes in running for an ^i 
position are invited to meei 
Cube Room Sat. at 7 p""' 



niursday, Febmary I, 1978 THE SOITTHERN ACCENT - 7 




Chapel this, chapel that, chapel 
plus comment, chapel minus com- 
ment. When will it all end? 

This has been a subject of my 
thoughts for some time now. 
There have been quite a few 
letters to the editor printed about 
this lately. Have you noticed? 

The contents of these letters 
ranged from "grow up and shut 
up!," to "why don't you make the 
staff go," to "why should we 
have to go in the f^rst place?" 
And to these letters I would like to 
address this week's column. 

If you'll notice, everyone wants 
to complain, but no one has a very 
practical relevant solution. 1 

lid also like to have you con- 
.._.T the attitudes in these let- 
ters. How would you react? 

'Grow up and shut up" is not a 
very grown up way to get people 
to respect the rights of others. (I 
want it to be publicly known that 
the person who wrote that letter is 
my friend, but if they want to get 
down to the brass tacks of the 
matter-that's no way to do busi- 
ness.) 

I also think that it is totally 
outrageous for someone to write 
the Accent ami demand that the 



staff be required to go to chapel. 
Who IS he to tell the teachers how 

run their lives? (Again, 1 warn 
to make it publicly known that 
this person is my friend, too and 
even though he attacked the sub 
lectofchapH and my other friend 
Iperson #1 in question], he is still 
my Uiend. Bui brass tacks is 
brass tacks!) 

''■'?f,*''-d and final comment I 
would hke to address myself to is 

why should we the student body 
have mandatory chapels in the 
first place?" 

Well, the answer is really quite 
simple. This is a Christian col- 
lege, founded on Christ, And 
attending SMC is more than 
going to college, it is also sup- 
posed to help you grow in your 
Christian experience. When you 
came here you agreed to go by all 
the rules and requirements of the 
catalog; and chapel requirements 
are plainly stated. 

If you don't want to go to 
chapel, go to a public college 
where it is not requiredl 

1 find myself slipping in my 
own personal Christian experi- 
ence from time to time, and I'm 
sure this happens to you also. 



How About Credit For 
Chapel Attendence? 




Collegedale Cleaners I 




Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the "GRANOLA PEOPLE" 



x'NATURAL FOODS 

COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



$2j00 extra 
With this ad 

for your first 
plasma donation. Total $12. 



Chattanooga Blood Center 
310 Cherokee Blvd. 267-9778 



The mandatory chapels and wor- 
ships help to bridge the gap that a 
lack of discipline creates. 

Let me publicly propose an idea 
Ididnts,iyiiwouldbc the besi. 
"' ''■''" "'s not just another 
complaint. |„s,ead of com- 
planung. why don't you send in 
suggestions on how to make it 
better?! 

1. Offer one credit per semes- 
ter for attending chapel and pas- 
sing a test. 

a.) The test could be given 
right on the chapel card. 

b.) The test would be given on 
the chapel just before vacations 
and semester break. (This would 
be to keep people from skipping 
the last chapel). 

c.) The test would be over the 
previous chapel periods. (No 
assignments-just listening and 



ntile taking). 

d.) A student could get a total 
of two hours towards graduation. 

e.) Credit would only be given 
il the student gets a "C" grade or 



uld be 



better. 

2. A small charge v 
made like $10 per hour. 

So, my faithful column fol- 
lowers, let's see what happens 
from here. 





Celebrate Groond-hog's Day by shopping these down-to-earth prices at the 



8 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Tlrare«Uy, February 2, 1978 



Reuben Castillo 

Sports Editor 



^ 



PAID * \ 

CoUegedaie TN 
Pert^tNo. 6 



Active Smokers Live 
o AA League Stats !*£»* Lazy Abstainers 



Thru January 29 



Barts 

Douglas 

Halversen 

Rathbun 

Schultz 



Rathbun 7z 
Halversen 68 
Douglas 76 
Schultz 57 
Douglas 53 
Douglas 41 
Schultz 71 
Barts 88 
Schultz 54 
Douglas 84 
Rathbun 69 
Barts 61 
Barts 71 
Schultz 53 
Halversen 82 
Rathbun 73 



Leading Scorers 






Games Points 


Average 


David Rathbun 


3 86 


28.7 


Gar>- Wilt 


1 24 


24.0 


Warren Halversen 


2 47 


23.5 


Ron Barts 


3 69 


23.0 


Brad Schultz 


4 72 


18.0 


Jim Douglas 


4 71 


17.8 


Jeff Schultz 


4 63 


15.8 


David Thompson 


3 47 


15.7 


Bruce Kaufmann 


3 45 


15.0 


Mike Abbott 


4 59 


14.8 


Finnie Williams 


4 54 


13.5 


Stephen Bumham 


2 25 


12.5 


Rick Prussia 


3 37 


12.3 


Kevin Cockrell 


2 24 


12.0 



High Game: David Rathbun 37 




Physical exercise should be in- 
cluded in your schedule. Regular 
exercise can increase both your 
endurance and preparedness for 
emergencies. Tasks that are part 
of your daily life can become less 
fatiguing. Periodic tasks per- 
formed at levels of intensity or 
duration below your endurance 
limit will be more effective and 
less fatiguing, if you jog five 
miles a day. walking to and from 
classes wouldn't be difficult. 

Regular exercise can make you 
feel better. The blood circulates 
through your body and invig- 
orates the nerves, muscles, and 
the synapses of the brain. 
Your studies will not seem so 
boring because oxygen in your 
brain helps you to think better. 
Psychologically, exercise can 
lessen depression caused by in- 
activity. 

Exercise can also increase your 

Barts' 
Gold On 
Top Of 
3rd Week 

D Steve Thompson 

With the third week of action 
under the hoops, double A league 
has mafured. Ron Barts and his 
den companions have put the 
round ball into the hoop enough 
to lead the league. Jim Douglas' 
team has rebounded themselves 
into a tie for s*^conH place, with 
Halversen who is cuniinuuuslv 
checking thai championsnip bug 
of his. in order to keep the title. 
Meanwhile, "Buns" Rathbun's 
team is cutting their neck while 
Jeff Schultz's team is running 
other teams crazy but can't win 
games -- so they're in the "pits." 

How long will the boys in gold 
stay on top? Well, it depends on 
how the ball bounces. 



resistance to infectious disease. 
This means regular exercise. 
Other factors enter into this, in- 
cluding diet and amount of rest. 
Tests have shown that smokers 
who are active have a higher life 



I that last 



expectancy than non-s 
who are inactive. Re 
sentence over. Even if you d<,„., 
smoke cigarettes or eat ° 
activity is still necessar fof 
long and healthy life. " 



FINANCIAL AID cont. fmn. p. ^ 



form will be used to determine 
the student's eligibility for Basic 
Grant, federal, state, and institu- 
tional assistance, the information 
will be transmitted by ACT and 
CSS to the institution(s) and state 
agency designated by the appli- 
cant. 



The Student Finance Office has 
scheduled several financial aid 
meetings again this semester to 
assist students with their finan- 
cial planning for the 1978-79 aca- 



' demic year. 

The next meeting will be held 
'"'=''■ 'a* 5 p.m. in Daniells Hall 
"■.■J" "■'. Ne- aid applicah„„; 
will be distributed, questions 
answered, and assistance given in 
the new application process. Stu- 
dents should attend the meeting 
if they feel their family resource 
will not be adequate to meet 
college expenses in 1978-79. Stu. 
dents currently receiving finan. 
cial aid or who have received 
financial aid previously must re. 
apply each year. 




E©55if^(!i»fe)lh] 







^Dg)[pDg](§<gooo 

pasiAion in \ht S.Al 

\Mili b<2hdd Ii<b. 21*23. 
S4ory on pgqfc 3. 



CRAFT CASTLE 

5780 Brainerd Road 
In Brainerd Village 
Open 7 days 10-6 




Sign up now 
for these TOLE-PAINTING 

classes starting soor •*^''0<^HET 
KNITTING 
MACRAME 



For classes i„ crafts, arts, an, 
macrame. and for all your craft need: 
and supplies. 




YOU BOTH NEED 
LIFE INSURANCE 



Managing a household is a 
big job, even for two 
people. Thai's why both 
of you need insurance 
protection . , . to provide 
financial support in the 
event that one of you 
suddenly finds yourself 
alone. Ask me about State 
Farm life insurance ... for 
BOTH of you. 



Fred Fuller 

Collegedale Agent 



Ranily BeingliSSSinnpiangep 

"No one really seems to know was a go o „ ^9 ^^ 

.,_. 1..... ;. r J . _"" ■* '^-^ per cent rhsin,.. *i,.i 



"No one really seems to know 
exactly how it happened. As 
close as anyone can figure, Randy 
must have tackled someone or he 
vfas tackled, high on the shoul- 
der. Anyway, both boys seemea 
to have flipped over and Randy 
landed on his head or neck." 

Last week in an interview, Mr. 
and Mrs. Peterson of Miami, 
Fla., discussed the football ac- 
cident which since last Decetnber 
has left their son Randy, a fresh- 
man psychology major, para- 
lyzed. 

When Randy was taken into 
Erlanger hospital, doctors found 
that his neck had been broken. 
He had some feeling and move- 
ment in the fingers of his right 
hand. 

"That was the 19th of Decem- 
ber. Right now, though, he 
doesn't seem able to move them. 
The doctor said, too, that there 




RaL V P" '^™' ■chance that 
Randy w, I never regain the use of 
his legs," sai<j his father. 

Randy's spirits have been 
Pre«y good, all things consTd 
"ed, up until the past few 
weeks, continued Mr. Peterson. 
However he now has to have an 
arttflcal breathing device, and 
his discourages him. I don't 
think he knows yet, but the doctor 
has sa,d that there is a chance 
tnat he may not ever be able to 
breath on his own again." 

Randy at present has regained 
some feeling in the collarbone 
region approximately four inches 
below his shoulders. Hehasbeen- 
nghtmg infection since the acci- 
dent, his doctor stating that he 
would be happy if Randy's tem- 
perature could be stabUized at 
101 degrees. 

"Ice treatments are used to 
lower the temperature, but when 
they are discontinued it goes right 



"P again," said Mrs. Peterson d ■.. „ 

"Right now the doctors savhai K 1^" ^^"^^^ *^ Petersons 

the broken boner"' h^f'' ^^^«^t*o otter children, sons age 

healmg 3 and 16. Both have been to see 



the broken bones ..^ ..caiino 
well, but that the nerveLttaf 
were damaged are sHIl pretty bad 
h7, l!, "T" ""^ "°* ^"ered, 
but badly damaged, and the doc- 
tor IS not pleased with Randv's 
progress. He says that it is much 
slower than he had expected" 

Several doctors have been call- 
ed m on Randy's case. A special- 
ist in spmal injury is expected to 
examine him sometime in the 
near future. He wUI make further 
recommendations as to when 
Kandy may be moved out of state 
to one of two centers either in 
Denver or Houston, which spe- 
cialize m spinal cord injuries. 

"We would like to get Randy to 
the Craig Hospital in Depver, but 
until the specialist arrives, we 
won't know really when he can be 
moved," said Mr. Peterson. "He 
IS still in Intensive Care here." 



'Of course, our youngest 
son doesn't really seem to fully 
comprehend what has happened 
He knows something is wrong 
with Randy, but isn't sure just 
what it is. Our other son, though, 
has been hit quite hard by the 
accident," stated the mother. 

Mr. Peterson, who is with East- 
em Airiines. alternates witt his 
wife in staying in Chattanooga 
with Randy. Mrs. Peterson is 
employed by the Inter-American 
Division in the Miami office. She 
stays Witt Randy for several 
weeks at a time, and then Mr. 
Peterson arrives to be witt their 
son while she returns to Florida. 
Randy enjoys short visits from 
college friends and faculty, al- 
though at present he cannot have 
visitors for long periods of time. 
Elder Jim Herman, campus chap- 



lain, would like to arrange trans- 
portation for students to visit witt 
Randy when he is out of the 
Intensive Care Unit. 

Friends at SMC are raising 
money to purchase a recorder and 

■•"om lo p. 2, col. S 




Randy Peterson 



The Southern Accent 



Voice of the Southern Missionary College Student 



Thursday, Febrnary 9, 1978 



, Collegedale, Tenn. 373IS 




1st Sacred Concert At CBD 
Convention Rendered By Band 

DBarbara lies ' 



DBarbara lies 
The SMC Band, was recently 

invited to perform at the College 
Band Directors National Associa- 
tion Southern Division in Atlanta. 
The band, one of seven 
throughout the entire South- 
eastern United States to receive 
an invitation to play at the con- 
vention, presented the first sa- 
cred concert ever to be presented 
at a College Band Directors Con- 
vention. 

Dr. Jack McClarty, director, 
provided the convention with a 
rationale for introducing sacred 



l^S ^*?"® **"* Conflict Of Ages series firom a random drawing 
Math F^^ '^' week»s literature evangcDst crusade. Photo by 

Taylor Travels East 
With Promotion Tour 



•^Gteg Vital 

vew'™ T^y'o^. director of de- 

St •'°" *^P °f ^t^ossing tte 

«a fund raising from several 

lions ""P^^ttons and founda- 

'''^«'d;vr''°-n""'"'8°''"f" 
Paov A, ^''*'"" P^Pef Com- 

itbeH,',^" Camp, presenting 
SMc l'°P'"ent and progress of 
"I have 1^^ *i'** corporations 
'■""s and h ^^™e«ee opera- 
"^ the colle ^'"'"'" *" interest 

'>c!'T»i?* '"^' ♦" Washington, 
tot an ;,"'""'««» Dr. Knittel 

'""timateMx?"'™ """"^ »P- 
•* SMc ui'ii 'onner graduates 
««iit J!r ***=' *o liear about 
ranges and future plans 



for their alma mater. 

While in D.C., Taylor ha. 
planned to make several "ex- 
ploratory visits" to private 
foundations who may be inter- 
ested in making donations to the 
college. 

At present, funds are most 
needed to finish up the recent 
addition to tte industrial arts 



building, Ledford Hall. The total 
cost of this expansion was 
$177,000, with yet $25,000 to be 
raised. 

Taylor also plans to travel to 
Boston and Atlantic Union Col- 
lege where he will speak to an- 
other group of SMC alumni. 
Taylor will also be recruiting 
members for SMC's Committee 
of 100 throughout his trip. 



music into tteir regular concerts Accompanying the band to At- 

and a hst of many sacred songs lanta and narrating tte SMC con- 

and where they could be pur- cert was President Frank Krjttel 

chased. Published as well as SMC was the smallest college 

unpublished sacred music was represented at the council. Dr 

also displayed for the directors' McClarty said, "It was a signal 

consideration. honor for SMC. " 

Cjty-Felts Settlement 
Depends On Board 

DJerry Dick Lien 

A proposal was recently formu- 
lated by the Citj' of Collegedale, 
which if agreed to by the South- 
ern Missionary College Board, 
\vouId end its dispute with John 
Felts, publisher of The Qoallty 
Shopper. 

During construction of the new 
Collegedale entrance road, a por- 
tion of land owned by Felts was 
inadvertently taken by the city. 

The new proposal suggests that 
purchase of land be made by the 



city from Southern Missionary 
College. Approximately 13,000 
square feet of the purchase, 
which is located adjacent to Felts' 
remaining property, would then 
be given to him in compensation 
for that taken for the road. 

The College administration has 
made this recommendation to the 
Board of Trustees and the fate of 
the proposal hangs upon their 
decision which is expected on 
Feb. 16. 



Library Purchases 
Microfitch Reader 



SA IVe«siirer Proposes Bndget Chop Ji* 2 

CartooD Contest Oi^ P- 5 

*Aee Cubes Keep Fallfaig On My Head?. ,J>- 5 

Did Von See Star Wars? > * 

Car Collector Hawon *• ' 



DMark St. Bernard 

The library has purchased a 
brand-new Microfiche reader 
along with microcards spanning 
nearly a century of Review and 
Herald magazines. 

Lois Doherty, supervisor of the 
SDA room, says that the Micro- 
f!che cards are "very complete" 
and will save a lot of trouble for 
those trying to find old issues. 

The cards are dated from 



November 1850 to December 
1940, More recent copies are also 
available in hard-bound. 

Other second semester inclu- 
sions in the SDA room are the 
up-to-date tape collection of Pas- 
tor Jere Webb sermons and an 
index of all the writings of Ellen 
G. White found in the Review and 
Herald. 



2 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thursday, February 9, 1978 



■> - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thursday, February 9, ivo ^^ 

SA Treasurer Proposes Plan 
To Chop Budget Spending 



For the months I have been 
involved with the Student Associ- 
ation I have been confronted with 
the same problem that has 
plagued ever>' student govern- 
ment since their inception — how 
to improve performance of the 
officers while simultaneously 
keeping officer's stipends down 
to a controllable minimum. 

In the past, this situation has 
not been solved to the satisfaction 
of all and probably will never be. 
However, 1 would like to propose 
a svstem which, if acceptable to 
the Academic Dean's Office, 
would remove this inherent 
dichotomy. 

My proposal is simply this: 
There are certain positions in the 
SA whicli, if under the jurisdic- 
tion of the depai^ment heads, 
could be classified as deserving 
academic credit. The offices 1 am 
speaking of are the executive 
secretary, the treasurer, the ed- 
itor of Southern Memories, and 
the editor of The Southern 
Accent. Each one of these offices 
calls for the application of the 
skills which have been taught the 
officer earlier in his college 

For instance, the secretary 
takes dictation, writes letters, 
edits the Campus Chatter and 
takes care of the clerical needs of 
the executive offices. The trea- 



surer must know how to set up 
books in the most streamlined 
manner, and he must also know 
how to compile monthly state- 
ments in a clear and concise 
manner. He must be ready to 
answer for major deviations and 
to present them orally to the 
student senate. The yearbook 
editor must know how to coord- 
inate his photographers, layout 
editors, and other personnel in 
order to present an acceptable 
yearbook at the year's end, in 
addition to running by a budget 
given him. The college paper 
editor must be able to find points 
of interest for the student as well 
as reporting on the events that 
affect the student body. In addi- 
tion, the Accent editor must also 
learn to coordinate his staff as 
well as meeting deadlines and 
running by a budget. In other 
words, the two editors' jobs are 



excellent' applications similar 
the publishing industry. 

The advantages of my proposed 
system are manifold. First of all, 
if this system were implemented, 
the budget could be cut by at least 
$2,240 or four per cent as shown 
in the chart below. 

This is only four offices. If the 
Joker editors and the president 
could be added it would result in a 
larger cut — maybe up to five or 
ten per cent of the budget. 

Besides the budget advantage, 
I feel this system would promote 
more efficiency in the duties 
being performed, due to in- 
creased departmental supervision 
and help to the officers. Another 
advantage I see in performance, 
is that the officer would not be 
concerned primarily with just get- 
ting the annual, paper, report, or 
letter out, but would be aware 



that the work he is doing would 
have bearing on the grade he 
receives for the hour taken. 

Also, when registering for the 
class in these applied areas, the 
officer would normally plan to 
take less hours in order to hold his 
total hours of coursework down, 
thereby more intimately forcing 
one of the above positions into his 
schedule. 

This is my plan. One that I feel 
.will help put the Student Associ- 
ation in a more manageable posi- 
tion and will use the money with 
which we are entrusted more ec- 
onomically. 



Ken Porter 
SA Treasurer 



Present System Versus Proposed System And Savings 

Hours of credit to be 

paid for by the SA 

[Instead of stipend] Savings to SA 

$192 (2 credits per year) $508 

$192 (2 credits per year) $308 

$192 (2 credits per year) $708 

$384 (4 credits per year) $716 

$2,240 Total 



Secretary 
Treasurer 
Memories editor 
Accent editor 



Present Stipend 

$700 
J500 
$900 . 
$1100 



religious tapes tor Randy, "y/^ 
want him to have something to 
listen to on Sabbath," said a 
student. Anyone wishing to con- 
tribute will find jars for this pur- 
pose in both dorms, Wright Hall 
and the Student Center, 

Ed. Note: Randy's parents 
granted The Southem Accent pet- 
mission to print this interview 
only on one conditlan — that 
Randy never see it. It visithig 
him, please do not mention tliis 
article. Thanh yon. 

GC Emphasizes 
Colporteuring For 

Seminarians 

DMathew Staver 

The General Conference has re- 
affirmed a resolution in the 1977 
Annual Council which requires all 
ministerial candidates who will be 
receiving a sponsorship to the 
Andrews Seminary to have com- 
pleted three months of literature 
evangelism or 350 hours. 

This requirement will apply to 
all ministerial students complet- 
ing their work after Sept. 1, 1978. 

According to Dr. Douglas Ben- 
nett, professor of religion, the 
Council sees a close connection 
between the work of a colporteur 
and that of the minister, and feels 
that the literature work would 
provide a helpful preparation for 
work in the ministry. 




-areet 



at Porter 



Yes, we need nurses. Lots of them. 
But that's only the beginning. 

We also neeti medical technologists, 
respiratory therapists, radiologic 
technologists, and more than 200 other 
types of dedicated health care workers. 

Get involved in our progressive concept of 
total patient care. Accept the challenge of 
rewarding Christian service in a 
professional atmosphere. 

Come and join us in helping people. 




Memorial 
Hospital 



Contact the Personnel Director, 
Porter Memorial Hospital, 
2525 South Downing Street, 
Denver, CO 80210. 




SDA Film Wins At 
International Festival 

A Faith For Today WeBtbroak f„i«..:.:-_ * *"■ 



^T-nrsday. February 9, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT -.3 



A Faith For Today Westbrook 
Hospital episode has won a Siv- 
ver Plaque award in the 1977 
Chicago International Film Festi- 
val- 
James Hannum. former SMC 
communications professor and 
now Faith For Today's executive 
producer, visited the campus last 
week and showed the film in 
various classes. 

The award-winning program, 
Hear the Sunrise, was written and 
directed by Faith For Today's 
Gary Haynes. Cinematographer 
and film editor was Spencer Gor- 
don of the SDA Radio, TV, and 
Film Center's Production Ser- 
vices Department. 

Hear the Sonrlse is the story of 
two elderly ladies taken against 
their will from their mountain 
cabin to a nursing home. The 
story teaches respect for the 
rights of man and implies God's 
attitude toward man and his free- 
dom of choice. The program was 
aired last fall. 

The film was entered in the film 
festival to increase the visibility of 
the Westbrook Hospital series 
and SDA leaders in film and 



television. 

Moccasin 
Bend Chaplin 
To Speak 
To TMs 

□Mathew Staver 

Jack Wilson, Chaplin at Mocca- 
sin Bend, will speak at a special 
student ministerial chapel Thurs- 
day, Feb. 16, in Talge Hall 

Elder Wilson will speak on the 
professional role of the minister 
in ministering to the sick. 

Voting for next year's student 
mmisterial association officers 
will also begin and continue 
through Friday at the front desk 
of the religion department in 
Lynn Wood Hall. 




The Night Runner. 



A photo essay by Dan GImbel 




^rad,f»7!i • '"'"^"'' "■''^'> ''"'^P"^' offws the newly 

sk, k „ """1 opportunity for development of leadership 
mill Z T^^ '" """'"8 experience. We are located in a 
bdn!' h H 4°"" '" ^""^""^ ^"''- ^ "^'^ SDA church is 
ho nil \?u"^ ,"/" ^'8*" 8""^ ''^""'^ ^'^hool near the 
ca74 write " ^^^ '"°^"''- ^°' '"°" '"'"""^'i'"' 

Manchester, Ky; 40962 
(606) 598-5104 



$2j00 extra 
with this ad 

for your first 
plasma donation. Total $12. 



Chattanooga Blood Center 
310 Cherokee Blvd. 267-9778 




FMday 7:30 - 4i00 
COLLEGE PLAZA 



^ 396-2530 

J^ollegedale Cleaners . 

5 < Kioooooo u ciu« j oooooooeooooooooocooo« ' 




4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT ■n.mrsd.y, Februan' 9, 1978 




/?//py/ Editorial 



SA IS NOT DEFUNCT ^^.Hi^j^red Christian SA Essential 

_ . _u, _...,.: .«„. „n„ r,n find an article or editonal l\WV-IN. • llll««' ^^ 



Each year about this same time you can find an article or ed.tona 
which seks to concern itself with the overall status of the Student 
Association. Usually these articles are written from a negative 
N-iewpoint by someone who may perhaps not be acquamted with 
certain functions the Association provides. 

However valid or invalid such reports are, it is a healthy situation 
for the SA program to be reviewed. By no means does the SA stand 
above internal or external evaluation. But to be of practical value 
constructive criticism must be factual, properly researched, and 
provide feasible alternatives where possible. More often than not, 
this isn't what happens. „ ^ , 

Today, more than ever before, students actually do have a voice 
and a vote in school matters. Not only do students regularly attend as 
voting members on standing faculty committees, but they also 
function in financial policy and planning committees. Students can 
and do make valuable suggestions in the operation of SMC. 

As the school system meticulously reviews its financial status this 
year, the SA is doing the same. Any plans that call for volunteer 
officers, abolishing the SA, etc., simply aren't true. Student 
government carries substantial influence in academic, social, and 
religious affairs of the college. Student government is not a luxury, 
but a necessity. 

But just where or what does the SA do with its money? 
Over half of the budget is spent toward publications. Student 
activities and social endeavors takes its piece. Projects such as the 
new tennis court lights installed this year, the village lockers, the 
Student Center redecoration all use their fair share, and the list could 
go on. 

New candidates will be campaigning soon for SA offices. A few 
will promise and a few will offer reasonable objectives. Some will 
buck the system and others will seek to improve it. Whatever the 
case, you need to be certain that you look intelligently at all sides of 
the issues and platforms. 

Student government is alive, and although it has its weaknesses, 
it is actively functioning at SMC. Perhaps if your personal opinion of 
the SA doesn't even register — you need to take a closer look. 



The Southern Accent 



All maierial published in The Southern Accant is not neoeesarily the opinion or 
view 01 ihe ne^^spapeT staff or ihe SMC administralion. Cartoons, articles, and 
other content items create an open exchange of ideas, a forum. In the case of 
disagreement ,■■ Leu efS to the Editor, " is a column designed to provide expression. 
We do. howp"er, reserve the right not to publisti material that Is libelous, 
extremely radical, or oul of character in light of doctrinal points. V* wish to retain 
Ihe ijeanng of a Ctirisflan SDA college newspaper. 



™"°' Vinita Wayman 

Assis,jnl Blltor Lynn Neumann 

Business tJlanager CBve (»liddag 

Layout Editor Vanessa Greeniaal 

Layout Un»^Jp ftendy Johnson 

Sports Editor Reuben CSaillo 

Cireulafion Manager John Henson 

Secretaries Pam Legere 

Onise Sheets 

Ad Manager. Ray Hartvrell 

Proofreaders Kathy Mixeil 

Jeanne Zar:tiarias 

SibscipHoos Candy Miranda 

*"'=" IvfarfrFocdl 

Photographers Rhonda Runyan 

fvlarK ^oro 
"efMm Jerry Dick Ueo 

Cfawn f^ce 
^^^ [Debby 8oyer 

U?™" Frances Andrews 

'^™*- Felts Bros. Printing Co., 

Ooltewah, Term. 



T»» Soulhvn Aennl Is published »«eMy with the exception of leffl vweks and 
vacations. " — ^'"'" 

col^t m iTaTSifCe."™' '"■^^•^' ™"« «*ly Tom 



Dear Editor: 

Just last night I had the oppor- 
tunity to go to the Imperial Roller 
Skating Rink. I hadn't been 
skating for some time and it was 
my desire to get away from school 
a few hours to get some much- 
needed and enjoyable exercise. 

I had been informed that when 
the college had gone there last 
semester, we had taken our own 
music, music which was much 
softer than that which was played 
last night. Therefore, there was 
no reason for me to refrain from 
indulging in going. 

1 don't know how many stu- 
dents while there went to ask if 
there was any other music that 
could be played and I'm in no 
position to condemn anyone of 
the student body who was there 
and said nothing. Music itself is a 
very touchy subject. 

But I ask, is it right to expect 
that everyone who goes skating to 
like rock music? Why was that 
junk the only music played? Why 
wasn't any other more creative 
music with a beat for skating 
brought? 

For me personally, 1 reacted to 
the stuff that was played angrily. 
I can't stand it. Rosea 14:2 says, 
"Take with you words and turn to 
the Lord; say unto Him, 'Take 
away all iniquity; and receive us 
graciously..." 

Anything that takes us away 
from God is not good. Last night, 
I feit a wall of separation I have 
not felt so strongly in some time. 
The music had a lot to do with it. 
Perhaps I'm making a moun- 
tain out of a mole hill; perhaps. 



But. I want to go Home. Last 
night did not exactly contribute to 
that homeward journey. 

Sincerely, 

J. Arthur Garrison 

9 AM Abuse 

Dear Editor: 

1 am concerned about the 
chapels just as a lot of others are. 

. Week after week I have taken my 
Bible with me to chapels and not 
been able to follow along with the 
speaker in the Bible, because he 
did not use it. 

What are chapels? What is 
involved in a chapel period? 
When I think of chapel, I think of 
a time devoted to "Be still, and 
know that I am God." 

Maybe I'm deceived, though, 
because "the majority of the 
chapels have been used for hu- 
man philosphy and advertising. 
Seems to me that Ingathering, 

, summer evangelism, literature 
evangelism, Nicaragua, and etc., 
etc.. could meet some other place 
at a different time. 

This school has a corp of quali- 
fied people that can speak at 
chapels. Jim Herman is one of 
the few speakers I enjoy listening 
to at chapels. Oh, by the way, he 
preaches from the Bible. Possibly 
I he could teach somebody some- 
' thing. 

I don't make an appeal to do 
away with chapels, I'm pleading 
to bring God back into them. 

John McKinney 



Dear Editor: 

After reading Mark Ford's ed- 
itorial I must express that I am 
glad to see a concerned interest 
for our Student Association. It 
was refreshing to see an opinion 
printed that did more than just 
state a problem. Included in the 
editorial were alternate ideas that 
our Student Association money 
could be used for. I believe that 
any well presented suggestion for 
improvement should be consid- 
ered and not thrown out just 
because it calls for change. 

However, I do not believe that 
we are headed for a "clipped- 
down SA" as was expressed in 
the editorial. The editorial 
brought out the fact that "the 
crunch is on and the administra- 
tion must shoulder the task of 
weeding out the luxuries of our 
campus life in order to preserve 
anything at all." 

I certainly do not consider the 
Student Association a luxury item 
on our campus. In fact I see, in 
the near future, if the Artist 
Adventure Series has to cut back 
due to lack of funds, the import- 
ance of a larger role that the SA 
must play in providing quality 
activities for the students. 

And let's face it, the students 
want to see something or any- 
thing that their SA is doing for 
them. Committees and senate 
meetings have their place only if 
they are producing enjoyable 
activities that meets the needs of 
the individual student. 

Sincerely, 

Dave Cress 



Thorn Thumbs Down On Accent 



Dear Editor: 

Very soon. SA elections will be 
upon us and we students will be 
hard put to decide who to vote 
into what leadership position.' 
One of those positions is that of 
Soathem Accent editor. It is here 
that 1 wish to focus my discussion. 
I feel it my responsibility to call 
attention to what has been this 
year's editoral policy. Every in- 
dividual who reads this will have 
to decide whether they agree with 
it and whether or not it will be an 
issue for platform in the ap- 
proaching election. 

Late in November, I ap- 
proached Vinita Wayman. the 
editor, about the possibility of 
sending a photographer and re- 
porter to Sabbath School on De- 
cember 4 in order to give covei^ 
age to the Christmas program, 
which was no ordinary Sabbath 
School. I was politely informed 
that editoral policy for this year 
states that nothing which is past 
will appear in the Accent. Only 
information concerning future e- 
vents are to be printed. 

Now, I question: What is the 
purpose of a newspaper? Is llie 
Soathern Accent a newspaper or 
an information sheet? As I see it, 
a newspaper is to report on what 



has happened as well as what will 
happen in relation to the com- 
munity it serves. If the Accent is 
limited to future events only, then 
it is no more than an expensive 
sequel to the Campus Chatter. 

■There is another matter that I 
think should be considered. Last 
week 1 wanted an announcement 
in the Accent about an upcoming 
Sabbath School program. 1 was 
informed that it could be inserted 
■in the classifieds. To my way of 
thinking. Sabbath School is not a 
classified. When this opinion was 
expressed Vinita asked, "Where 
would yoa put it, on the front 
page?" So I didn't give the 
announcement to the paper. Sab- 




bath School, particularly college 
Sabbath School, is more impor- 
tant than just about any headline 
we have had this year. What are 
our goals and where is our 
priority? 

I urge each student to weigt) 
carefully each candidate's plat- 
form before he or she casts a vote 
for when that vote is cast and the 
candidate elected, it affects this 
college for sometime. The Accent 
is PR for this college, whether 
good or bad. And whether we 
want to admit it or not, each sna 
every one of us ate affected oy 
our PR. 

Thorn Hamm 

Ed. t4ole: Our policy Is to Pj")^ 
which Interests the ™|i>'^'>'\*„ mv« 
of old events that most »'«'r'Lj„ 
alreedy attended Is c»™l*'l?53 
toiwlen. You'll notice, hwm"' " 
M go In (Of Investigative """fjn, 
rather than Infatuate »'^.rL«ol 
won.. A« lor your Sabba^ScW 
announcement: We only W"^ 
plaoe In the Aceonftor annoww^ J 
and that Is the CiMslflo*- '^J~gt 
to uy which announcemeo' » ^ 
Important than the rest? "" " ,|„y 
announcementt equally. O" 



ITiursday, February 9, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - S 




A Little Reminder 



Dear Editor: 

It would be much appreciated if 
something could be done about 
the hot water situation (the lack of 
it) in the new wing of Talge Hall. 

1 realize that there are many 
concerns that the Engineering 
Department has to cope with 
daily, but this matter is of vital 
concern to the men involved here 
in Taige. Hot water for showers 
is not a luxury on these cold 
winter mornings and evenings, 
but a necessity. 

I have appreciated the action 
taken in the past during the 
breakdowns of the gasline into 
Collegedale. I am confident that 
the situation will receive prompt 
response in the future. 

Please note this letter was not 
composed in a spirit of anger; ic is 
simply a reminder to our capable 

We Love 
You Except-- 

Dear Editor: 

I'm not one to complain, but 
litis thing of no hot water is 
getting to be a pain - a literal 
physical pain! I love the school 
and it's warm atinosphere, but 
I'm not at all crazy about it's cold 
water. 

I live on the second floor of the 
new wing, and every morning I'm 
convinced the governor has struck 
again - but lo and behold, other 
in one way or another in sending 
smell too bad either. It some- 
thing isn't done soon the govern- 
ment is going to be down on us for 
air pollution. 

1 honestly wouldn't be saying 
anything, but it has always been 
this way. Once in a while is 
understandable, but you can de- 
pend on the water being cold just 
when you want and need to take a 
shower. 

I fail to see why this situation 
Msn tbeen corrected before now, 

he problem should have been 
nwdled quickly and efficiently by 

»« appropriate department. It's 
s„n ??'" *"' i' has to be 
funded through the paper before 
P™Per authorities will pay atten- 



ment'"-^t'^"^'""""8°'=P"t- 
mem. Thank you for your con- 

Sincerely, 
Bob Burns 

Warm & 
Loving Men 

Dear Editor: 

Maybe they are putting us to 
the test - seeing how cold we can 
get while taking a shower - yet 
still be nice warm, loving stu- 
dents on the outside. Cold 
showers do get old though. 

Timothy Eberhardt 



Cold At 65 

Dear Editor: 

It comes to my attention every 
morning that our hot water is no 
longer hot. We (the sufferers of 
cold showers) are fed up. We've 
called Engineering, flooded the 
deans with questions, and cried 
aloud every morning to no avail, 

Now I don't know ifits right for 
us to ask for such a simple thing 
as hot water, but for $65 a month 
and with over a year to correct 
this aggravating problem, 1 think 
It s time for hot water to flow 
forth from our faucets at least 
most of the time. 

So we've gone public, pleading 
for your assistance. Time for 
action. 

Desi Suarez 




(Mmm 




* Found — one pair men's 
gloves. Identify at Secretary's 
office in Mazie Herin Hall. 

* 19345, Happy Birthday. 77590 

* Happy Valentine's Day to 
Herman's Harem. From The Big 
Sheik. 

* Will do sewing, mending, and 
alteration for reasonable prices. 
Call 396-3816. The Collegedak 
Cleaners no longer offers these 
services. 



* Happy Birthday to my Eli2 
beth. Daddy, 



* I would like to give a special 
thanks to Rahn Shaw, Jerry Holt, 
Brad Baum, and Linda Roman for 
taking me to the hospital after my 
accident and staying with me. I 
appreciate their kindness and for 
being so sweet Sincerely, Cathy 
Diller. 



* Dear Snoring Father: Go back 
to sleep! The Aged One. 



* 78-79 Financial Aid Apps. to be 

distributed at a special meeting 
Wednesday. Feb. 15 at 12 noon in 
Daniells 111. Repeat 
be held later. 



Otherwise, SMC, 



i great! 




ofo 



^one-Too-Hot 

I "«« Editor: 

8UKi?.i."'°''"'"8 '•^'"•'y all the 
"P anH f "^'" "'"S have to get 
Ce, ''"'^''^^"^"^"of*™ 
wlL^r^'hat since it's a new 
»ater i .u "''' "' '«^st have hot 
7l[ '" the mornings. 
^•'niZa ^."S'neering could do 
lo, si„e about it if they wanted 
'uiltit *■''' 'he ones that 

that's J^ *"= f'"t place. Maybe 

8«ttin» i^'" *^^ ""="' wofg. I 
"8 them to build it. 

'^"'^Rohbins 




$25^ 
JMHI^ 

LIFE 



5««na 



Contest Sponsored By The Soothem Accent ^p^ 



* Dear Miss Boobaker, "Time is 
a sort of river of passing events 
and strong is it's current; no 
sooner is a thing brought to sight 
than it is swept by and another 
takes it's place, and this too will 
be swept away." Keep that 
beautiful chin up! Your's faith- 
fully. The Missle-town Monkey. 

* The "Here's Mud in Your 
Eye" award committee has de- 
cided to give this week's award to 
the Designer-Builder of the new 
wing in Talge Hall. They receive 
this week's award for adding 1/3 
more living space to the dorm, 
but not adding anymore hot water 
heaters. Thus the residents are 
given cold showers at peak de- 
mand hours. Watch for next 
week's "Here's Mud in Your 
Eye" award!! 

* Dear 99601. Valentine's Day is 
coming. Vi'rll you be my Valen- 
tine? Love, 42184. 

* Thanks to our best friends for a 
terrific weekend!! 

Lars: "You light up my life..." 
with your smile, idea of going 
skiing, ski skill, and most impor- 
tantly your headlights! 

Burt: Thanks for your profes- 
sional example an(i expertise, on 
the art of handling ski poles! 

Bob: In appreciation of your 
heroic endeavors when we were 
"Slip-sliding away," we give you 
the International Ski Patrol A- 
ward of the month! 

Clark: Thanks for the terrific 
fun we had in your Gremlin, we'll 
never forget the syncopated 
sounds of your strobe radio, pa- 
per bags, mileage charts, hot 
chocolate, and visions, etc. In 
appreciation of all these mem- 
ories we have decided to answer 
your ever sought after question, 
"What is a shoal?" A sandy 
elevation on the bottom of a body 
of water, constituting a hazard to 
navigation; a sandbank or sand- 
bar. 
Love, Debby, Teresa, Nancy. 



♦ College Female Wanted As 
Hoasemate: Will live with a 
mother and two children (aged 7 
and 8) in a house on Collegehill 
Road (next street after Prospect 
Church Road.) Requesting help 
on rent at $65 a month besides 
half of electric bill. If interested 
contact June Crane. P.O. Box 
1370 or call McKee's at 396-2151 
between 2:30 p.m. and 10:30 p. 
Request for either of Jun< 
, supervisors -Peter Malgohney „. 
' James Shaffer, and they will get 
you in contact with June. Loca 
tion of House: From SMC cam 
pus, take Camp Road to College- 
hill Road, make a left. Hou 
light green on left, and a "For 
Sale" sign is in front. 

* Attention Pre-Med Students: 

Apps for the Medical College I 
Admissions Tests are available at j 
the Counseling & Testing Offic. 
in Wright Hall, Rm. 207. 



* Michael B,: Just want to 
press my thanks to you for 
cepting and offering me a great 
time the Banquet nite. Your 
friend. B.R. 



* I want to express my gratitude 
to everyone who had contributed 
in one way or.another in sending 
me home for Christmas vacation. 
Thank you again for that surprise, 
Colette Jacques. 

* On Feb. 18 at 6 p.m. in the 
Church 152 freshman nurses will 
be dedicated. Speaker will be Dr. 
Charles VonHenner. 



But m your case, you ve got 
neither. Like the "Prof said, 
truth hurts! The Aged One. 



^ 



Question 



HAVE YOU SEEN 'STAR WARS' YET? 



Answer 



DGaiy WiDiams 

"Have you seen Star Wars?" 
someone recently asked me. My 
reply was. "No," but that ques- 
tion made me do a lot of thinking 
about movie attendance and the 
SMC student body. 

It is a well-known fact that a 
majority on this campus go to 
movies. Because of this, we face 
an apparent contradiction of what 
we profess and what we do. 

On pages 12 and 13 of the SMC 
Catalog there is a section on 
"Standard of Conduct." Movie 
attendance is listed as unbecom- 
ing for a Christian. This is a 
reflection of pages 228 and 229 of 
the Church Manual: in view of 
these statements it seems that the 
majority are not in harmony with 
the teachings of the church or the 
standards of the College. 

Why should there be such un- 
becoming behavior on the part of 
so many? Many would say that 
we live in a sinful age. But it is 
no more sinful than the Pre-flood 



Age. In comparison to them we 
are saints. 

Television, on the other hand, 
is a good reason, or should I say, 
excuse. When it comes down to 
it, there is no difference in watch-_ 



"In degrees of sin, 
TV must be rated 
near the top, while 
movies would be near 
the bottom." 



movie. In the case of the 
you don't have to 
cials or fight the temptation to 
keep watching it hours at a time -- 
day in and day out. In degrees of 
sin, television must be rated near 
the top, while movies would be 
near the bottom (if you view them 
to be sin). 

Someone may say that the 
schools have failed their purpose. 
I don't think so. An educational 
system can be only as moral as 
the people who make it. 

So Where's the problem? In the 




Vanessa 
Greenleaf 



'xJoiaH Education 

Arranged as poetry from Ministry of Healing 



True education includes 
the whole being. 
It teaches 

the right use of one's self. 
It enables us 
to make the best use of 
brain, 
bone, 
muscle. 

heart. 



The faculties of the mind, 

-as the higher powers- 
are to rule the kingdom of the body. 

Christ stands at the head of humanity, 
and it is His purpose 

to lead us, 

in His service, 

into high, holy paths of purity. 

By the wondrous working 

of His grace, 
we are to be 

complete 

Him. 



home. Children are the result of 
the parents - what they are can 
be seen in what their children do. 
So we have a general view of the 
church but what about the SMC 
student? Can we expect more 
from him or her than the general 
membership? Should we try to 
implant the principles of the Bible 
and the Spirit of Prophecy into 
minds tliat vvil) abandon them as 
soon as they leave SMC? 

It takes a lot to live for God in a 
worid that has forgotten Him. It 
takes a lot to live for Him in a 
church that enjoys the world so 
much. 

What can we do to help solve 
this apparent contradiction in 
what we have in writing and in 
what we do day by day? Here are 
a few recommendations: 



"Throw our SMC 
catalogs into the 
gart)agecan. We 
could build our own 
theatre. It'dbea 
sellout every 
weekend." 



1). We throw our catalogs and 
manuals into the garbage can. 

2). We give up our old- 
fashioned ideas about sin and 
morality and enjoy life - be it 
movies, dancing, sex - whatever 
turns you on, do it. 

3). We should do these activi- 
ties as a group -- it's more fun 
that way. We could reserve 
nights at tneatres, Playlate clubs, 
bars and have a blast -- talk about 
fun! 

4). We could build our own 
SMC Theatre (wouldn't the Fine 
Arts complex be perfect for that?) 
It would be a sellout every week- 
end (not counting Sabbath of 
course). 



CRAFT CASTLE 

5780 Brainerd Road 
In Brainerd Village 
Open 7 days 10-6 




Sign up now TOLE-PAINTING 

tor these CROCHET 

classes starting soon; KNITTING 
MACRAME 

For classes i„ crafts, arts and 

rsrp;„er'°^^"---f'-dt 



1 could go on but I am sure that 
you could add and improve the 
list. Feel free to do as you please. 

In closing I would like to refer 
you to page 60 of the Manual. 
Point 24 reads like this - "In the 
Christian life there is complete 
separation from worldly practices 
such as card playing, theater- 
going,. ..which tend to deaden 
and destroy the spiritual life." 

1 believe the last part reveals 
what we have become. Before we 
were baptized, we made a vow 
before God and the congregation 
to obey by grace these points. 
We will not be judged because we 
went to a movie (there's nothing 
sinful about a movie per se) but 
because we broke the vow we 
made to God and the church. 



In my opinion this is spritiual 
adultery. Breaking the baptismal 
vow which has come to mean as 
httle as breaking ths marriage 
vow in our age But God feels ■ 
different about it. 



"In my opinion this is 
spiritual adultery." 



We should re-examine our bap- 
tismal vows and choose between 
these two alternatives: serve God 
by His grace as we said we would, 
or drop our names from member- 
ship. Is it that simple and that 
plain? Think about it. 




on VALENTINES DAY give her what 
every girl wants — flowers from 

TRI - COMMUNITY 
FLORIST 

Free Ctiattanooga Area Delivery 
CaU now at 396-3792 



Plants are aUVINGgiftfor VALENTINES day! 
Come by 

Collegedale Nursery & Crafts 



and pick a plant. . 




' DISCOVER YOUR CREDIT UNION 

We're doing more for you! 
COLLEGEDALE CREDIT UNION^pww 
College plaza ^^SSH 



L 



Phone: 396-2101 
Office Hours: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday - Friday 
6-7 p.m. IWIonday and Thursday 



A 






rnursda,, Feb™..^ 9, ,„, ^HE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 




iFFREY HAVRON, M/IN OF MMYMRS 

We met an,o„g the mountains mvestment. i. ,„h,* „„. .:„ ,„ ■■■«■■■ VflllU 



□Debra Gainer 

We met among the mountai;is 
ofihe Student Center. I had been 
tiying to see him for days, fasci- 
nated by rumors of Rolls-Royces, 
intrigued by his proper polite 
voice - and having to do an 
interview for the Soothem Ac- 
rent. He stood to meet me in 
tailored blue jeans and a classicly 
understated white shirt em- 
broidered with a red Rolls-Royce 
emblem. He introduced himself 
as Jeffrey Havron and we sat 

Jeffrey is a freshman music 
major at SMC, with a hobby of 
collecting classic cars. He be- 
rame interested in them and ac- 
quired his first one his senior year 
otacademy It was a 1963 Rolls, 
slipped from England. He 
brought along a stack of black- 
am «hite prints to show me, and 
' oohed' and "aahed" over the 
leek and elegant old thing Now, 
'//'"'=<) ft-fn, black to chocolate 
nd beige it is ready for resale 
«»-ey plans to make a fine pro- 

» s quite a good investment, 
ne informed me 
^fc ""-Sf,. "? fact, the idea of 



investments is what got him 
started on Rolls-Royces in the 
first place. He had always been 
interested in profitable invest- 
ments. He checked into the stock 
exchange, art, antique furniture, 
old wines, and old cars. A long- 
time liking for Rolls-Royces gave 
him an excuse to take the old car 
option. 



He's branching out beyond the 
Rolls now. He traveled to Eng- 
land last summer. "London 
nearly killed me," he said, "there 
were Rolls all over the place."' 
He bought a 1953 Bentley, which 
arrived in the States the end of 
October Deep midnight blue 
with a smokey grey leather in 
tenor, this is a one of a-kind car 
Its coach work done by the highly 
reputable Mulliner Company, it 
has an all aluminum body, special 
dashboard and rear suspension 
Jeffrey brought out his pictures 
again to show ignorant female me 
the difference between a Bentley 
and a Rolls one has a rounded 
radiator, t he other is squi 




Jeffrey also owns a maroon 
convertible Lincoln Continental, 
once owned by the late Elvis 
Presley. This famous car earns 
its keep by being trucked around 
to big fairs during the summer 
and admission being charged for 
its showing. Smiles Jeffrey, "I 
wouldn't pay a dollar to see it, but 
lots of people do." He says he'll 
sell the car when it stops making 
money for him. Already, some- 
one has offered to pay $33,000 
more for the car than what he 
originally bought it for. 

His other car is a Volvo P-1800, 
not a particularly noticeable col 
lector's item, except that it is 
supposedly the second e\er built 
He obtained it very inexpensively 
and It now needs extensive res- 
toration 



Leafing through his car catalog, 
termed the "antique auto bible ' 
among collector's circles, Jeffrey 
showed me a few more facts I 
discovered that Rolls Royces 



weigh over two tons, have V-8 
engines, and can cruise at 135 
mph. By this time 1 was quite 
suitably staggered by all the clas- 
sic information - and the inter- 
view was nearly over. 



Jeffrey rose to his feet, bade 
me a fine afternoon, smiled from 
behind his light eyes, and walked 
away, leaving the faint scent of 
British Sterling lingering in the 



mM 






Lyoyce, SUveTrTZllIll 




S THE SOCTHERN ACCENT Hmndiy, Febnury 9, 1978 




Basketball Looks Like 
Poetry In Motion 



QKeuben Castillo 

courts taken up by d^zenf o th U s%,rlT "' 'T ''" 
students. T^eaa^es a. played J.^-ptag a^hi :L?h"eS,& 



Pool Open Times 

DDebra Ann Martin 
Hou^^t^::ft^rd^-^-r-^"-Hai™a„,.c.ea«on 

Monday-Friday. 6:4S-7-15 a m ,i ■ ■ 

Sunday-Thursday. . . 6.7-30 n m ' '' ^"V'mming) 

Sunday and Thursday . .V 5-6 onf "^'' s*'™™"?) 

Thursday ^J^^n (community) 

'*30p.m (adult females only) 

Admittance is by badpe tinlv AUu^^ 
pool. Badges can be nufcha,«i »t ^ *^^ """'* '"' "O" ""le at the 

"^t,r:~--" ™ t^rti^^rnt-^""'^ °'^- - 

.Ho^wh;:hrr^:^-S-r-C™--«-'-n suits are 
Male swimwear is regular swim trunks. 



dunking the ball by nosediving 
through the hoop head first. 

There are no reasons for mis- 
takes, as Swinson demonstrated 
by beating Bermudez 64-44. His 
team of players are only 1-4 for 
the year. Webster's undefeated 
5-0 with consistent outside shoot- 
ing. The only way to beat them is 
with a stick. 



tJ \ ''"ketballs resonate 
throughout the indoor courts. 
They fly through the air like 

on their target and exploding fo? 
<2 P^'fts. The play'ers bCk 
and break and break, until the 
game is broken wide open The 
jets sizzle ^i,h f,,^^^ 

^^fon o the ball stripping th: 
"ets- The only objects not in 

X °" '" •'"^ backboards 

there are no limits n„ +1. 

nf ti,. I " the energy 

of the elements. The ball leaver. 

-of^colorasittravelilrrorgh^ 






™?.^?«*herii Accent 



Voice of the Soufh 




Photo by Rhonda Runyan 



Interpersonal Author, 
[Speaker To Lecture 



pGreg Vital 

ICatherine Bauby. president of 
pieipersonal Communications, 
pil a popular convention speaker 
Solving verbal communications, 
llpresenta lecture Feb. 16. at 8 
|J. in Summerouv Hall 105. 

' will discuss the various 
|Kls of effectiv 



communica- 



pauby IS a graduate of Indiana 
juveisity with a B.S. degree in 
Pmunications and an M.S. de- 
es in guidance. At present. 
1% IS a faculty member at New 
|« University and a featured 

•ears 
ands 

1,500 

. 'baralies 

i has recently received a 
L.J"" .*= Sears-Roebuck 



speaker with the American Man- 
agement Association. She has 
contributed many articles to 
magazines and trade journals and 
is listed in the World's Who's 
Who Of Women, Who's Who of 
American Women, and Intema- 
tlonaJ Authors and Writers Who's 
Who. 

Bauby has authored three 
books: O.K., Lei's Talk Aboudt, 
Between Consenting Adults, and 
Understanding Each Other. 

There will be no admission 
charge. 



Th 



'n the amount of 
testrin. i? S""' ™3y be used 
te^'^*''« College, 
lived " ""'' '^""eg" also 
Win*""''' Lee and Bryan. 
V5 '°,''''" Scott, director 
8,871 L 'elations, more than 
• "« been distributed to 35 
lf«sitl« iST" ""^Ses and 
Ktion T J^nn^see by the 
I. '» the 1977-78 academic 




em Missionary College Student 

Thursday, February 16, 1978 



Collegedale, Tenn. 37315 



Prof Garren Enters 
Congressional Race 



DJerry Dick Lien 

Bob Garren, associate profes- 
sor of art, will officially announce 
his candidacy for Republican 
nomination for 3rd District Con- 
gressman in early March. 

Currently, the political ma- 
chinery of both parties is gradu- 
ally rambling into motion for an- 
other race for the congressional 
seat in the Third District of Ten- 
nessee. 

Four years ago, Marilyn Lloyd 
of Chattanooga, a political un- 
known, ran against and defeated 
incumbant Rupublican Congress- 
man Lamar Baker. 

Rep. Lloyd is no longer the 
unknown. However, a political 
novice is once again entering the 
Congressional race in the person 
of Robert F. Garren, chairman of 
the art department at SMC. He is 
now in the process of building 
support among the District's Re- 
publican party members and is 
expected to make official the an- 
nouncement of his candidacy 
within a month. 

Why, did Garren assume the 
responsibilities of a political race? 
"I am one of those who for years 
has complained about the way the 
government is run. But then 1 
realized that it's easy to com- 
plain. Anybody can do that. 
However, 1 believe that the only 
way to make a better govern- 
ment is to become involved." 

"It is in Congress that bills 
affecting all of us are made. 
Therefore 1 believe it my duty to 
run and try to make my voice 
heard." said Garren. 

Garten hopes to increase the 
number of conservatives in Con- 



and forming a greater sense of 
dignity and strong government. 

"People have rights which I 
believe are not being fully repre- 
sented by some members of Con- 
gress and the present administra- 
tion," he said. "For instance, 
Marilyn Lloyd has voted for the 
Labor Relations Act HR-8410 
which would, I believe, in effect 
nullify 14-B. If this happened, a 
large portion of the labor force 
that is non-union would find their 
jobs in jeopardy." 

Garten, whose campaign plat- 
form is now in the hands of legal 
advisors, plans to make the e- 
conomy, energy, and tax prob- 
lems key issues. 

In a speech last week in Oak 
Ridge before the Anderson 
County Republican Women's 
Club, he called for a comprehen- 
sive energy plan. This, he stated, 
should be a matter of first pri- 
ority. "Alternative forms of en- 



ergy must be researched and de- 
veloped by both government and 
private business." he said. 

In the same speech Garren 
called for increased research and 
funding of the breeder reactor, as 
well as continued usage of coal- 
fired power plants. He said that 
Congresswoman Lloyd has not 
been able to fight for such things 
as the breeder reactor because 
she is a part of the Democratic 
administration. 

The candidate believes there 
should be better representation of 
the ordinary citizen and feels his 
background gives him the neces- 
sary qualifications. Not bom with 
the proverbial "silver spoon" of 
the rich, Garten thinks he knows 
perhaps better than many monied 
politicians the needs of the Third 
District. He also states that he is 
not, therefore, tied by any conflict 
of interests. 



Turn to p. 7, col. 3 




gress, thereby curbing spending Photo by Don Jehle. 



ly. From left: Ruth, Julie, Rob, and Bob Garren. 



SA Candidate Tickets 
Being Formulated 



Catherine Baaby 



DDebra Ann Martin 

Campaigning for the Student 
Association elections is well un- 
derway. SA job seekers have 
shifted their campaigns into full 
gear for the final stretch of the 

Running for the office of SA 
president are David Cress, Wil- 
liam Cole, and Ron Koester. 
Seeking the vice-presidency are 
Mark Boddy, Melanee Snowden, 
Kirk King, and Del Schutte (who 
is running on the same ticket as 
William Cole). 

Shellie Shanko is after the so- 
cial activities director's position, 
Michael Bryant is after academic 
activities, and Chuck Hess is after 
student services. 

Dacy Susleck, Michelle Bon- 
durant. and Ron Hoffecker are 



running unopposed for the editor- 
ships of Hie Southern Memories, 
The Southern Accent, and the 
Joker respectively. 

For students giving the idea of 
running a second thought, it's not 
too late to enter the race. Ac- 
cording to Jo Lynn Hawthorne, 
vice-president of the SA and head 
of the Elections Committee, any Feb. 23 
person wishing to file for office recorded 



tuency sign it. 

Feb. 16 in the cafeteria during 
the lunch hour, the presidential 
and vice-presidential candidates 
will hold a press conference. 
Questions from voters will be 
fielded at this time. 

Election days are Feb. 23 and 
24. The polls will open Thursday, 
hapel. Votes will be 
J the chapel atten- 
can secure a petition and dance cards. Then from 10 a.m, 
- five per cent of the consti- Turn (o p. 8, col. 2 

^TO THE POLLS- 

YE SONS OF FREEDOM! 

SA Candidate Endorsements P- ^ 

Voting Schedule 

lie Candidates Speak for Themselves ... 



2 . THE SOUTHERN ACCENT nmsdMy, Febnuiy 16, 1978 



o 




Editorial 
Endorsements 



In next Thursday and Friday's Student Association elections, the 
president and vice-president of the student body wtl be chosen The 
^^„, strongly urges you to vote for ^-id Cress for pres.dent and 
either Mark Boddv or Melanee Snowden for vice-president. Our 
reasons for this endorsement are fairly straightforward. 

Cress offers years of experience in student government. He was 
president of the Student Association at Forest Uke Academy and has 
served as » dependable and active student senator here at SMC. He 
has been responsible for several astute constitutional changes that 
have increased the effectiveness of our Senate 

While we feel Cress is the best choice in this election, the other 
candidates are not without merit. Koester has proven himself 
dependable and organized as the leader of the Student Missions club. 
His lack of experience with the SMC student government, however, 
made him impossible to endorse. His idea of rewriting the working 
policies will hopefully be adopted by whichever candidate is elected. 
Cole while showing admirable energy and determination m 
trying to cope with student apathy, is obviously unwilling to work 
within the existing system. We feel his idea of restricting the 
Senate's power to only matters of budget and finance is impractical. 
Instead of eliminating red tape, this move would only create more, 
since the constitution would have to be in part rewritten. Cutting 
down the Senate's power would only cramp the voice of the students 
and concentrate more authority in the hands of few. 

For vice-president, we feel that Mark Boddy and Melanee 
Snowden are equally qualified. Boddy has shown himself to be a very 
budget-conscious senator and a hard worker in communicating with 
his precinct. Boddy's plans for a stronger student government are 
refreshing. 

Snowden comes to bat with two years of secretarial experience on 
the Senate, which she feels contributes to her knowledge of how the 
SA functions. 

Kirk King displays definite ability to work with people well, which 
is certainly a plus, but his lack of senatorial experience led us to 
believe Boddy and Snowden were most suited to the job. 

Del Schutte is running on the same platform as William Cole, 
which we have already discussed. 

Since the rest of the SA offices sport lucky candidates who are 
running unopposed and who have it more or less made in the shade, 
we felt no need to make endorsements. Students have the power to 
either accept or reject these candidates. 

Please realize that these endorsements are from the Accent staff 
only and should be respected as an editorial opinion. 



Attention Conscientious SA Voters 



Dear Editor; 

Well, scholars, it seems that 
election time is yet once more 
upon us. Being as wise as you all 
are, I'm sure that you will be 
endorsing a "well-qualified " can- 
didate. But how does one deter- 
mine exactly who the best "well- 
qualified" candidate is? 

Here are several major areas to 
be alert for in making ones' deci- 
sion. They are; enthusiasm; why 
is the candidate desiring the of- 
fice for which he is competing?; 
what are his/her qualifications?; 
what are the plans of the candi- 



Yet a third category of question 
is, how is this person qualified ... 
if indeed they are qualified? A 
common and good source for 
answering this question is to care- 
fully read the platfonns submit- 
ted by the candidates. Every 
candidate likes to dress up their 
platform in such a manner that 
the reader is not (hopefully) only 
blinded by the brilliance thereof, 
but baffled. . . . 

Another item generally found 

in the platform is the goals and 

plans which our candidate in 

date Tii questton?^ and is their question has for his office, Ascer- 



political past one of success 
failure? 

First, there's enthusiasm. Does 
the candidate really want the job 
or have they been "talked into 
running." Which is to say, Why 
do they want this job? As you 
scholars are well aware, there are 
several elected offices which offer 
a "Token wage" (if I may use the 
term) or payment to the officer. 
Therefore, one must deride in 
fact if they are willing to pay this 
person to fill the position tor 
Which they are competing. 

Other motivations include ad- 
vancements on the social ladder. 
Granted, these come automati- 
cally with the office and are gen- 
erally well-deserved, but once the 
position (both office and ladder) 
are filled, will we still have a 
person that is willing to give their 



does our candidate have? Have 
they been successful in related 
positions in their past? If not, 
why? Based upon their past 
record, do I as a voter want them 
to head the offices for which they 
are running? 

Before 1 bring down the wrath 
of all upon me, let me set for the 
record that this article is not 
pressing for the endorsement of 
any of the candidates. Yet it 
hopes to provoke thought on the 
part of its readers to do some 
searching to determine for them- 
selves who they believe to be the 
best candidate and to know why 
they support the candidate which 
they do. 



tain why you agree or not. Are 
the plans presented logically and 
practically? Can they be accom- 
plished? Are they realistic? 

LasUy, what kind of a record "Prof" Rima 

'Hands Of God' Creator 
Gives His Thoughts 
About The Sculpture 



Dear Editor; 

Thank you for your letter of 
inquiry. I am gratified that there 
is so much interest in the "Hands 
of God." The sculpture still lacks 



which will give it its distinctive 
texture, and I do not think it 
would do justice either to the 
work or to your readers to publish 
the final elaboration of bronze photos of it before it is finished. 
Generally speaking. 



If more students were self-starters, 
less teachers would be cranks. 

Anonymous 




oval, bronze, concave structute 
about 22 feet high, and about 12 
feet wide at its widest point. Be- 
cause of its size and treatment, 
the hands are molded into one 
upward sweeping line without de- 
tail, but the form of the thumbs 
stands out clearly, and the heart 
and the tear-drop shape below it, 
being in silver, are in striking 
contrast to the bronze back- 
ground. When placed on its base, 
it will extend about 30 feet into 



As for the interpretation, othei 
than to say that 1 had in mind W 
hands of God, the Creator, 1 thiM 
it would be better to leave thai 
until the sculpture is in pla«- 
IdeaUy, a work of art has some- 
thing unique to say to everyon 
who beholds it, and it is my hop 
that the "Hands of God," like th"! 
aposties on the Day of Pentecost 
will "speak to every man m 
own tongue." 

I hope that this explanation wSI 
satisfy your readers, ana 
when they do see the scuipfli"; 
thev will find it the more inters 
ing for not having formed ^ 
definite an idea about it betor 
hand. 

Sincerely yours, 
Victor M. Contreras 
Cuernavaca, Morelos 
Mexico 



Thursdaj-, February 16, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



College Price Tag OK But Dean's Letters Unwelcome To Parents 



Dear Editor: 

Since we have two sons attend- 
ing SMC, we are interested in the 
college's activities and therefore 
read The Southern Accent from 
cover to cover with a great deal of 
interest. 

There were two articles in the 
Jan. 19 issue that 1 would like to 
comment on. The first is the 
article on the front page about 
SDA colleges pricing themselves 
out of the educational market, 
and the second is the controversy 
on church attendance. 

First, there are some very im- 
portant facts that must be re- 
membered regarding our SDA 
colleges. Even though it is true 
that it costs about $5,000 per year 
to send a student to SMC, this is 
still a bargain. Most private 
colleges of high scholastic stand- 
ing cost several thousands dollars 
a year more. Our colleges are in 
the elite category of religious 
colleges, or at least they should 
be. since our primary job is to 
train our young people to go out 
into the world and show the world 
what God's character is like. 

Inflation has been eating away 
on the value of the dollar for many 
years. Even though the costs 
have doubled many times over, so 
I have peoples' wages. It is true 
that money may be a limiting 



factor to some people, but it is 
also true that many people who 
have the resources available to 
them will still send their young 
people to the community college. 
Perhaps the fault is not always 
with the parents. Since young 
people are legally of age at the 
age of 18 in all states now, the 
parents do not have the leverage 
to force their children to go to an 
SDA college. Our sons are at 
SMC because they chose to go 
there. 

I can really appreciate the con- 
cern that our educational leaders 
are voicing, and I am especially 
happy to hear of cost containment 
programs. Since I work in the 
health-care industry, I hear a I >i 
about cost containment. I wonder 
though if the cost of education is 
the real crux of the problem. 

Political scientists believe that 



"We have two sons 
attending SMC." 



the thing that makes the demo- 
cracy of the United States so 
much more successful than any 
other democracy in the world is 
because it is something that the 



people believe in. It is in their 
minds and in their hearts to the 
extent that nobody can overthrow 

"My wife and I have 
been paying sctiool 
bills for 19 years." 

their confidence in the American 
way of life. If Christian education 
is so much a part of a person's Hfe 
that he really believes in it, there 
is nothing that will keep his young 
person out of our colleges, if the 
child really wants to go. I would 
not be willing to spend a dime for 
my sons to be at SMC If I had to 
force them to go, God does not 
want forced obedience from his 
children. 

This ideal of Christian educa- 
tion must become a way of life if it 
is to be a reality. My wife and I 
have been paying school bills for 
19 years. When we started out 
with one child in the first grade 
we didn't see how we could ever 
pay -the tuition. Then we heard 
about how high the academy tui- 
tion was and we knew that we 
could never pay that. The first 
thing that we learned was to 
budget our school tuition as a 
necessary item of our budget. 



right along with food, shelter, and 
clothes. The next thing we did 
was to try to improve our skills so 
that we would have something to 
offer for higher wages to be able 
to keep up with the demands of 
three children in Christian 
schools. 

As the costs of education have 
increased, so have our incomes. 
It is true that all of my wife's 
income goes to pay our bills at 
SMC. There are other things that 
we would like to do with that 
money, but we do not even con- 
sider that. We consider it our 
duty to provide a Christian col- 
lege education to our boys if they 
want it. It has, after 19 years, 
become a way of life to us. 

We have dedicated our lives to 
this end and nothing can sway us 
from this objective. We have 
even had to go in debt to fulfill 
this obligation. 

What 1 liave tried to say is that 
Christian education is not as 
much a matter of finances as it is 
a matter of complete dedication to 
what you believe is the most 
important thing in life. Let's 
continue to encourage cost con- 
tainment, but let's also be careful 
to continue high quality. I am 
very proud of our facultj' at SMC 
as well as our other colleges. 



church attendance are brief. I 
feel that our faculty committee is 
led of God in making these deci- 
sions, whether 1 like it or not. 
However, 1 do feci that it is rather 
childish and very annoying to 
receive letters from the boys' 
dean telling me that my boy did 
not sign out for church. My son is 
an adult, the rules were made for 
him, any infraction of these rules 
should be between the school and 

'M feel that it is 
childish and very 
annoying to receive 
letters telling me my 
boy did not sign out 
for church," 

him. In my case, 1 happen to 
know he does go to church, and 
just fails to sign out. The letters 
are petty and leave me cold. 

I realize that The Southern Ac- 
cent does not usually print letters 
from parents, but 1 just thought 
there might be some ol you vho 
would like to know that ilieic are 
parents who really care. 
Lee J. Stilwell 




1^ Thoughts from a great western 
I Sundance pencil 2: What's this < 
I been hearin bout a new road - 
)gwash! That ain't no road; it's 
1 obstacle course! I think ya 
I ought to put a swingin bridge 
I over that thing -- at least thata- 
I ways you could swing a little 
I instead of doin the bump. 



* For those of you who have 
missed the first three meetings - 
the Student Finance Office has 
scheduled a meeting Thursday, 
Feb. 23 at 5 p.m. in Daniells Hail 
111. They will go over the new 
application forms and answer 
your questions. Remember, early 
applications will receive priority. 





$25^ 

LIPE 



sutsta 



Contest Sponsored By The Soathem Accent f^^ 



* ATTENTION RELIGION AND 
THEOLOGY MAJORS: Feb. 16, 
at our regular chapel time, Jack 
Wilson, the chaplain at Moccasin 
Bend, will have a special presen- 
tation for us. He will answer such 
questions as how to handle a 
crisis visitation, etc. So plan now 
for this very interesting lecture at 
Talge Hall Chapel. Also remem- 

*e vote for our new officers. 
You can vote at the Religion 
Department on Thursday and Fri- 
day. 

* Also, Feb. 17 a vespers will be 
presented by Linn Ennis. This 
will begin at 6:45 p.m. at Talge 
Hall Chapel. Don't miss this one. 
If you need more information, 
please call Ron Whitehead at 
4872. 



- Last Wednesday I was sche- 
duled to work at thcCK from 5:30 
p m. till closing. Business was 
unusually slow and I was bored 
stiff so 1 started humming 
■ Heaven Came Down and Glory 
Filled My Soul." 

Much to my disbelief, one ot 
my co-workers sang the whole 
song in her native tongue, Spa- 
nish. 

I never knew how one song in 
English could be an ordinary 
song but in another language it 
was beautiful and spiritually up- 
lifting. Peace fell upon my heart 
and to me that is a blessing 
exposed! Thank you Arlene for 
letting Jesus use you last Wed- 
nesday night to lift me up and 
others around us. Lydia Smith 




ed One: Nursing 
homes are listed in the Yellow 
Pages! Get the hint! 

* Members of B.Y.K.O.T. A., 
thanks for the wonderful chapel 
programs and fine entertainment 
you presented during Black His- 
tory Week, Officers of BYKOTA. 



* Congratulations Valeri and 
Stanley. Looks like they'll be 
double trouble on Aug. 13. Vicki 
and Andy. 

* Dear Missile Town Monkey, A 
Happy Birthday to a sweet valen- 
tine baby. Your Fair Lady. 

* Dear Aged One: How about 
coming out from behind your a- 
nonymity so that those of us wise 
ones can determine if you're 
worth your salt. The Wise One. 

« Whoever it is that persists in 
getting Talge's paper before the 
RA's, please cease his deeds of 
evil! There are many others of us 
that are in this dorm that like to 
read the paper as well! A resi- 
dent of the residence. 



I * Wanted! Used PIANO in good 
condition. Also deep, letter-size 
FILE CABINET and WASHING 
MACHINE. If you have any of 
these items to sell for reasonable 
price, call John Lazor at 4673 
(days) or 396-3630 (evenings). 

« For Sale: 40 inch refrigerator, , 
1 '/a years, in good condition. $100 [ 
or best offer. Call 4568 

• Mr. Bob Mead, Northern Call- i 
fornia Conference, will be inter- | 
viewing Education Students on j 
Saturday night only, Feb. 18, 
beginning at 6:30 at the Educa- 
tion Department. 

* Watch this section (or an every- 
Issue "Here's Mnd In Your Eye 
Award. This award will be given 
to those people or organizations 
that render a disservice to stu- 
dents. This week's winner of the 
"Here's Mud In Your Eye" 
award is . . . the CK for dis- 
continuing to sell Dannon yogurt, 
in spite of popular demand and 
buying habits. Next week, a new 
winner of the "Here's Mud In 
Your Eye" award. 



MK. WILLIAM ILES, SCHOOL OF ^"5"^ HEAJOT, 
wTmA LINDA UNIVERSITY, WILL BE ON CAUffUS 
rari6^n TO INTERVIEW THOSE INTERESTED 
^GluTuAra WORK IN PUBLIC HEALTB. 

CALL ACADEMIC DEAN FOR APPOINTMENT - 421J. 



4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT T1iiirsd«y, February 16, 1978 

'7S''19 




CANDID 



3 



FOR 
PRESIDENT: 



You ME/r/ I HAVE -TOGO y 
TD CLASSES, rco? 








How About Some, 




Our platform is built around the philosopM 
that the primary purpose of the SA is to^^^isii 
the student body in having as enjoyable aiT 
meaningful a college stay as possible, 
further believe that the most effective w 
accompHsh this goal is through the channel J 
btudent services and activities. 

If we are elected to be your SA presidel 
and vice-president, our emphasis in service 
and activities will not be to provide a < 
number of high attendance activities, but| 
constant flow of smaller functions such i 
regular hikes, swimming and tubing, outingj 
to area scenic and historic locations, Fridj 
qight vespers with area families, recreationj 
and entertaining parties both on 
campus, etc. The obvious results of a greJ 
number and variety of such activities will bel 
more conducive atmosphere for students \ 
get acquainted with one another, anc 
active and fulfilling social life for you 1 
student while here at SMC. 

Please help us realize these goals by s 
porting us in the SA elections. 

Sincerely, 

William Cole, candidate for President 



1 ScHutte, candidate for Vice-president J 



FOR 
VICE-PRESIDENT: 





I am running for the office of Vice-President of the 
Student Association for the 1978-1979 school year. 

I feel that 1 am qualified for this job for the following 
reason: 1 am a senator from Talge Hall -10th precinct- 
and in this capacity. 1 am serving and have served on a 
number of senatorial committees. 

1 am excited about the possibilities the SA has for 
ne.xt year 1 would lilte to work toward two main goals: 
one, to increase student services, an area we have 
heard nothing from this year; and two, increase 
intercommunication between the consHtuency and their 
elected officers. 

1 hope to achieve these goals by adapting to our 
present methods of communication and by concentra- 
ting on the primary job of the SA serving you, the 
students. 

If we can achieve these goals, I know that next year 
will be one of the most productive years ever for the 
Student Association. 

Yours for an active SA, 



Mark Boddy, ff 

Candidate for Vice-President 



DEL 
Runi 



Thursday, February 16, 1978 THE SOUTHEHN ACCENT - 5 



i-JUdPlFIILS 



The candidates were each given 24 
square inches in which to create their 
own free political advertisement. 
Note that these are not platforms as 
such. Their platforms are posted in 
various locations on campus. 



flee 





DAVE 
CRESS 

For 
SA President 



My purpos. 10, scckn,s the office of SA President is to give the 
students a return on their SA dollar. The students deserve to have 
quality and enjoyable activities provided for their benefrt I am 
willing to dedicate my efforts to produce an SA that does care about 
each individual's interests, ideas, and concerns. 

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 

1. Offer students a choice of two or three activities on SA- 
sponsored Saturday nights. 

2. Provide off-campus recreation such as water skiing trips in 
warm seasons, snow skiing trips in winter, ice and roller skating 
outings. Sabbath afternoon trips to nearby parks, and occasional 
trips to Atlanta for shopping and sports events. 

3. Improve recreational area of Student Center 

4. SA-sponsored recreation programs such as tennis, golf, and 
raquet ball tournaments, road rallys. track and field e\ ;nts, and 
swimming events. 

5. Increase Student Services 

'6. Open Forum meetings on regular basis 
7. Help each student grow in their experience with Jesus Christ 
These are my basic goals for a Productive SA. I hope that you will 
take time to read the rest of my platform. The platforms are posted 
in the Student Center. Thank you for your support! 

Yours for a Productive SA. 



cA^^^*^^ 



WORKING . 

TOGETHER W 4 
WITH ^ 




Ronn Koester 

For SA President 

What is it that makes an SA? 

Is it the quality of programming? 

Is it the amount of programs presented? 

Is it what the SA does for you? 

To a certain degree each of the above decide the year. They 
are all important, but the deciding factor has been left out. 
YOU. 

The SA can do things for you or with you. Activities that 
are not just mass oriented, but activities that are especially 
planned for your interests. You can be involved. Your 
involvement is what counts. 

Counting on you, 

Ronn Koester 

Working Together with You! 



^h Cole. See Above. 



Nlike to fulfill all of the duties of the Vice-Presidential office to 
""''f my abilities, and to work in close contact with the President. 
I~<eep the students informed of what is going on in the SA by 
r-ng (he Chatter, and by working closer with the Accent and 
fly having an SA coluinn weekly, with maybe a presidential 
f 'Wjust a column weekly in which the happenings of the SA tor 
f l«eek would appear, or a report on what is happening with the 

jlillike to work close with the Social Activities Committee and 
■"plan programs for everyone to feel like they are a part ot. m 
1°' Mcomplishing a feeling of unity on our campus.'' 
L"""8 that 1 mentioned in the duties of the Vice-President^^ 




electing chapel speakers. If elected, I plan to conduct polls or 

. igestion boxes to see who the majority of the students would 

Jf «r, since they are the ones who are required to be at chapel. 

r J'l basically two years of SA experience on the college levcK 

^ ""^ >"s and outs of the SA and the hierarchy of authority when 

"«'< lo get done. I am currently working as Secretary of the SA 

, * Assistant Secretary last school year. I have been in tl e 

«; hvo years, and know the problems that most commonly 

" h°« ,0 handle these situations, how to work in the Senate, 

Pst proceduri 

. I hav 

iittee 



le these situations, now iw "- . 

and what my responsibilities would be n me 
■'^ve also worked two years on the Social Activit es 
fcuBp" '"" ' know the things which have been done, ^n" a so 
I "ions of new things that could be done. These are ba cal y 
V^t^^ I'-alifications are, outside of working with SA hree out 
■ *°«s in academy. This is why I am sure 1 can handle the job. 



Improved Activities 
IVIore Services 
Better Communication 
Effective Leadership 
IVIore Student Involvement 
Your Ideas Implemented 



Kirk Douglas Kmg 



Your interests are important to me! You are he Student 
Association. If I am elected Vice-President my goal will be to 
effec Wely use your ideas and mine for the best interest and 
enrichment of the entire Student Association. In brief my plartorm 
fs tTinTrease and improve the activities, services, and common ca- 
on :?the Stiident Association. Student involvement is u tima e y 
the key to a -ccessfuj student ^~X ^o^l^^^.t^^ 

*;tiident government will be a reaniy umj- <■' 5 

leadership. Listed below are a few ideas. For details regarding 
ideas and qualifications see my platform. 

1 ) Seminars and discussions on topics from planning a wedding 
^T'.m7ve"':he Ptday noon film presentation in both quantity 

'1 l'''Tak1'ne a van to a mall Friday or Sunday afternoons. 

■ ™ ™ve the dating situation by providing more activities 
plan'ned fo^r the ^^1^'^^%^::^.. progressive 
J^J:^;ZZ s'o-mrofrmembership of the commitiees 
and bv holding activity idea contests. 
5.) Improve the SASMC chapel programs. 

For an SA that works, I need your vote. 



%^ %yj^ 




POLLS OPEN: 
FEB. 23 & 24 



Feb. 23 - 








Thursday 


in chapel 






10 a.m. - 


6 p.m. 


Student Cenic 


6 p.m. - 


1(1 p.m. 


Thatcher 
Talge 


and 



. _ Noon Student Center 



C - THE SOIUHERIS ACCENT Thursda.v, Februarr 16, 1978 



RUNNING UNOPPOSCP 




RON FOR JOKER EDITOR 

The office of editor of the Joker has always been one of importance lo the 

studentsofSMC. The Joker is not just "something nice to have around, but 

is an integral part of the college way of life. I plan to give you, the students, 

this part by producing a Joker that is what you need, when you need il. It will 

be as useful and accurate as possible thereby being of more value to you. It 

will also provide all those things necessary to social survival. 

Having talked with several people, I see the way clear for the Joker to be 

It in a short length of time again next year. Plans have been progressing to 

ake the wait after registration short. 

With these plans and goals in mind. I would like to move forward with your 
pport. The purpose of the office will be accomplished having done this. 



1 hank vou, 



Ron Hoftecker 
Candidate for Joker editor 



w^m 




To publish the news 
and opmions that interest 
YOU the SMC student. 



Michelle Bondurant 

For 

Southern Accent 
Editor 



Qualifications: 



75-76 

77 
78 



73-74 Class President, Jr. Academy 

74 Summer Social Committee, Camp Blue Ridoe 

Social Activities Director, 

Shenandoah Valley Academy 

Social Committee, Madison Campus 

Social Committee, SMC 

PLUS vast experience in church 
social activities. 

I feel these experiences isetter 

qualify me to serve you 
SHELLIE SHANKO 
SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 




WTl! 



^^^i^i^i;^i:i.j^ 



^^ew^Letter 



Fellow students of SMC, I am running for the office 
of Academic Activities Director of the Student Associa- 
tion, 

This is an office for which I have a great concern 
The development of this office is of utmost importance 
in your SA, and this is just what I plan to do. 

The difference between my approach to this office 
and those of past office holders, is that I don't plan to 
try to do everything myself. I plan to break it down into 
different areas and assign each area to a student most 
qualified. After doing this. 1 will seek out different staff 
members to be advisors (in the nearest field of study 
related to the activity), 

1 would like to see several programs succeed and 
avoid spreading myself too thin, while trying to cater to 
the needs of as many students at one time as possible. 

Thank you for your vote of yes. 

Respectfully submitted. 



^^^^1^^^'^C<^ 



Michael J. Bryant 




M.J. Bryant 

Academic 
Activities 



DACY 
SUSLECK 




FOR 

SOUTHERN 

MEMORIES 

EDITOR 



Chuck Hess 




For 
Student 

Services 



Thursday, February 16, 197» THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 

GARREN RUNS FOR rnN i;WKSS ront. from p. J ^^ ZZ^ 



In his Oak Ridge address. Gar- 
ren spoke about taxes and present 
fiscal policies. He labeled Presi- 
dent Carter's new Social Security 
tax as, "the largest tax ever 
passed during peace time." He 
expanded his statements by say- 
ing, "increased federal spending 
for no real solutions can only 
contribute to spiraling inflation 
and increased costs in all areas of 
everyday life." 

The mostly rural Third Con- 
gressional District is composed of 
U counties with Chattanooga. 
Oak Ridge, and Cleveland being 
its three largest cities. Garren be- 
lieves that he can represent those 
in the District who are concerned 



with governmental control of 
everyday life. 

According to Garren. his cam- 
paign will be an old-fashioned one 
patterned after those of the 
whistlestops of Truman and 
Roosevelt. He plans no large 
media blitz. Rather, he will be 
going out among the voters, 
meeting them at gas stations and 
shopping centers. 

During the coming summer, he 
plans to spend time at different 
occupations such as agriculture, 
construction, coal mining, etc., in 
the manner of Sen. Proxmire's 
recently publicized garbage 
route, so that he may become 
better acquainted with the needs 



and desires of the Third District 
constituency. 

But the campaign will not be an 
easy one. The Chattanooga 
News-F^ee Press published an 
opinion poll giving an indication 
of the strength of Garren's op- 
position. Marilyn Lloyd. Pollsters 
found thai she now has a 77 per 
ceni positivt rating in the Dis- 
trict. The pollsters concluded 
that their findings indicate a 
strong base of support required 
for a successful 1978 Lloyd 
victory. 

However, the election is still 
nine months away, slotted for 
Nov. 7. Only time and the voters 
will tell. 




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CoUegedale Agent 




8 . THE SOUTHERN ACCENT T1.ur>d.j, Februwy 16, 1978 





AA League 
Standings 



Barts 

Rathbun... 
Halversea . 
Douglas,... 
Schultz .... 



Classes 
In Rees 

VReuben Castillo 

The annual Rees Series will be 
l)layedFeb.25and26. The teams 
will be made up of members of 
the four classes on campus. 

Before this year, the teams 
were made up from different de- 
partments. 

I remember playing on a beha- 
vioral science team that lost two 
straight to the P.E. and Talge 
Hall teams. The first loss was by 
a score of 101-33. the second 
game was worse -- 105-35. The 
business administration depart- 
ment won that year. 



The teams will be picked by 
class standing. This means the 
senior team will have such mem- 
bers as Barts and J. Schultz. 
These games promise to be eye- 
openers. 

In addition to the ball-playing, 
the finals for the two-man volley- 
ball tourney will be played Satur- 



Pitted 
Series 



day night, and the final round of 
the badminton tournament will be 
played Sunday night. So come 
out and support your department. 



ELECTIONS cont. from p. J 

to 6 p.m. voting will take place in 
the Student Center. The Thurs- 
day voting will continue from 6 to 
10 p.m. in Thatcher and Talge 
Halls. 

On Friday. Feb. 24, the last 
votes may be cast in the Student 
Center from 8 a.m. until noon. 

In races involving more than 
two candidates, a runoff election 
will be held between the top two 
candidates, unless one candidate 
obtains more votes than the other 
candidates' combined totals. In 
this case, the candidate who col- 
lects more votes than all of the 
challengers combined will be de- 
clared the winner. 



Barts Maintains 
Golden Crown 

° Ron Bl*!"Ric°k"prussia. Bruce frustrating year Next to the last 
Kaufmann, Gary Jimene., and equals fourth place. 
David Ruiz are the five most- 
wanted guys. They dress in gold j^jf Schultz's team is playing 
and dish out beatings that Jab- ^^^ ^gj^ „( jt,e heartbreak kids. 
bars left hook would have a hard j^^^ ^^^ upsetting some of the 
time competing against. So it's ^^^ teams. Chances for number 
) surprise that the boys in gold ^^^ ^^^^ ^^^ g^^^ but they can 
still give a good game. Giving a 
good game only means bringing 
up the rear, last place. 



are still alone - at the top. 

While Barts is still adjusting 
his golden crown, David "Buns" 
Rathbun and his men are trying 
their best to knock it off. Buns, 
giving Barts their first and only 
loss of the season, is coming on 
strong. Buns himself shooting 
almost 35 points per game, shows 
that his team is too hot to sit. 
He's pushing a heavy second 
place. 

Warren Halversen read the 
wrong playbook and collected 
some quick losses. Hustling Hal- 
versen is still trying to put some- 
thing together, while his champ- 
ionship badge floats off into the 
distance. Got to give up the 
playbook of 77; so far he's right in 
the middle of the race -- third 
place. 

Jim Douglas' team is slipping 
out the back door to escape em- 
barrassment. The team with the 
top potential is now looking up 
from the bottom, experiencing 
what Howard Cosell calk the 



Well, we have heard of Bron- 
comania and Blazermania, but 
could this also be the year of 
Bartsmania? Don't be surprised 
if the '78 season is capitaliied in 
gold. 




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Vol. 33, No. 19 



The Southern Accent 



Voice of the South 



ern Missionary College Student 

Thursday, February 23, 1978 



Collegedale, Tenn. 37315 




BOARD SLOTS STAFF. tnPS INDUSTRY 




Dr. Hanson Appointed 
New Academic Dean 



Dr. Lawrence Hanson 



Photo by Mark Ford 



Education Dept 
IGets New Head 



I DJerry Dick Lien 

Dr. William D. Pearson, princi- 
I pal and business manager of San 
I Diego Academy, recently ac- 
cepted a call to head the educa- 
I tion department. 

Dr. Pearson will take the place 
»f Dr. K.M. Kennedy, who be- 

I '^ame acting chairman two years 
ago when Dr. Stuart Berkley went 

I to Antillian College, Puerto Rico. 

A native of Washington state. 
I Pearson has taught on the junior 
I "igh level at Spokane Junior 
Academy, Spokane. Wash.; Ho- 
p's Elementary School in Col- 
lege Place, Wash., and Loma 
l-'ida Academy. During his ex- 
perience teaching in grades seven 
eight, Dr. Pearson worked 
' student teachers in a self- 
I Wntained classroom situation. 



NO MORE! 

■^is is the last 
issue of the 
Accent until after 
spring break. 



At San Diego Academy, he 
taught 9th, 10th, and 12th grade 
courses in English and journalism 
before becoming principal of the 
school in 1972. 

In 1974 Dr. Pearson received 
his Ph.D. degree in leadership 
and human behavior with empha- 
sis in educational leadership from 
the United States International 
University in San Diego, Calif. 
His dissertation title: "Com- 
munity and the Seventh-day Ad- 
ventist High School." 

Pearson's B.A. degree in re- 
ligion was gained at Walla Walla 
College in 1956. He also earned 
his M.A. degree in education 
from Walla Walla with an empha- 
sis in the social sciences. His 
thesis title was "The Effects of 
Music on Uie Study Habits of 
Students." 

When not in a classroom en- 
vironment. Dr. Pearson's per- 
sonal interests reflect his Puget 
Sound upbringing. He mdulges 
in outdoor activities such as 
hiking, backpacking, tent camp- 
ing, beachcombing, and 
kayaking. 

Pearson plans to arrive in Col- 
legedale in June. 



DJerry Dick Lien 

Dr. Lawrence Hanson, cur- 
rently chairman of the mathe- 
matics department, has been de- 
signated the new academic dean. 
He will assume the duties ol Dr. 
Cyril Futcher who will be retiring 
at the end of the present school 
year. 

"The selection of a replace- 
ment was no easy task, and for 
me represented the most difficult 
decision I ever was required to 
make," affirmed Frank Knittel, 
College president. "Many times 
in similar circumstances, it makes 
no difference if a successor comes 
from within or without the parent 
group. Too much inbreeding is 
not good, and within the recent 
past two major administrative of- 
ficers have been brought in from 
non-SMC ranks to fill vacancies 
here. On the other hand, it is 
essential for a faculty to know that 
their members do have honor in 
their own country and surely are 
entitled to consideration for ad- 
Ivancement in their own schools." 
Dr. Hanson's educational back- 
ground includes a B.A. from Los 
Angeles State College, the M.A. 
from the University of California 
Davis campus, and a Ph.D. from 
Florida State University. It is felt 

Committee Of 
100 Proposes 
Promenade 



Project 



DBarbara lies 

The board of directors for the 
Committee of 100 met last week 
to discuss the next major project 
the committee will sponsor. 

William lies, president of the 
committee, said there are four 
major projects being considered. 

One possibility is the installa- 
tion of a promenade that would 
extend from the Tab to just be- 
yond the Student Center. 

A second suggestion is a build- 
ing containing three squash 
courts which would double as 
racquet ball court.";. 

There is also a possibility, said 
lies, that a building be erected to 
house WSMC. This building 

Tnm to p. 2, col. 3 



by the administration that his 
background will be a great asset 
to the College. 

"Dr. Hanson has been very 
active with the faculty working 
policy evolvement. He has been 
the secretary of the Senate; he is 
presently the chairman ot the 

board, and he is the president of 
the local chapter of the Seventh- 
day Adventist Forum. His formal 
academic training and his experi- 
ence give him a wide range of 
professional perspective, includ- 
ing secondary as well as col- 
legiate education. He has a 



thorough knowledge of the com- 
puter, and this will give him 
immediate readiness to be in- 
volved with the cost elements of 
SMC," stated Knittel. 

The president concluded his 
announcement of the choice for 
the new dean by saying, "I feel 
very comfortable in working with 
him. and he assures me the feel- 
ing is mutual. He is a person with 
whom it is possible to have a close 
personal and professional rela- 
tionship without absorbing or 
threatening one another. I am 
truly pleased he has agreed to 
this change of labor and pace 
here." 



Board Decides 
To Pitch The 
Laundry 



DJerry Dick Lien 

Meeting Feb. 16, the SMC 
Board of Trustees gave pre- 
liminary approval to the sale of 
the College's laundry business. 
The transaction would, however, 
not include selling the laundry's 
physical plant. 

Reasons given for the action 

1 . If the College were to keep 
the business it would soon have to 
pay too much in taxes to be 
advantageous - approximately 50 
per cent of profits. 

2. The newly established 
General Conference sustentation 
rate for industries would cost the 
laundry $15,000 a year. 

3. By retaining the laundry, 
the College vvould be faced with 
spending $200,000 for new equip- 
ment. 

According to President Frank 
Knittel, SMC would be better off 
to sell. Medi-Clean Services, 
Inc., would buy the lau;:,lry, re- 
taining Bob Adams as manager. 
The laundry would still protect 
student employment and observe 
the Sabbath. 

In other action, authorization 



was given for the College to pay 
$50,000 over the next three years 
toward the purchase of a new 
organ for the Collegedale Church. 
It was voted that a special 
committee should make a study 
pertaining to the future of the 
service station. The report would 
indicate whether or not the Col- 
lege should operate the station, 
and if it should remain at its 
present location. 

Graduate summer study leaves 
were given to Ann Clark, Dr. 
Henry Kuhlman. David Steen. 
Charles Zuill. Don Runyan. Hel- 
mut Ott, and Bob McCurdy. 

Summer study leaves other 
than graduate were given to Dr. 
Jerome Clark, Dr. Cecil Rolfe, 
Joyce Cotham, Dr. Mitchell Thiel, 
and Dr. Barbara Ruf. 

Wayne Bechthold, instructor of 
nursing, was voted a year's study 

New personnel were appointed 
by the Board. They are Bruce 
Stephanske, assistant business 
manager; Dr. William Pearson, 
chairman of the education depart- 
ment; Dan Rozell. assistant pro- 
fessor of business management; 
Tnm to p. 2, col. I 



■•hiiid Pag« Oim~ 



Carbon-Copy People P- 5 

Kendall Invents ATTACK! P- 7 

The Rees Series Shootout P- 8 



;>;,. 



2 - THE SOUTHERN ACXENT Thnrsdaj', February 23, 1978 




Band Heads North For 
Frozen Spring Break 




Photo by Rhonda Runyan 



DLinda Dick 

The SMC Band is looking for- 
ward to its spring tour which will 
carry them through thirteen 
states and two provinces of 
Canada. 

A 24-hour drive beginning 
March 1 will take the band to 
Atlantic Union College in Mas- 
sachusetts, where the AUC and 
SMC bands will combine for a 
secular concert that evening. 

Skiing on the slopes at Glenn 
Ellen, Vt., is the scheduled activ- 
ity for Friday. The SDA church in 
Barre, Vt., has offered accom- 
modations for Friday night. 

Sabbath morning the group will 
head north into Canada to give 
the church service at the West- 



mont SDA church in Montreal, Ontario, is expecting the band to 
Quebec. A secular concert will be the featured entertainment for 
also be presented Saturday night the Giris' Reception on Sunday 



I Montreal. 

A Sunday morning service is 
planned for the St. John's Cathe- 
dral in Montreal but may have to 
be cancelled because of time. 
Kingsway College in Oshawa, 



evening. 

A quick trip to Niagara Falls on 
Monday will end the tour. After a 
night's rest at Adelphian Acad- 
emy in Michigan, the group will 
begin the long drive home again. 



Chorale To Bask 
In Jamaclan Sun 



STC Aims To Serve - With 
T-Shirts, Hose, & Sandwiches 



DDebra Ann Martin 

The newly formed Sigma Theta 
Chi dub, which includes all single 
women registered for more than 
seven hours of class work, is in 
search of a motto. 

According to appointed presi- 
dent Sally McMillan, "We would 
like to use a Bible text that is' 
representative of the club's 
name." The Greek letters Sigma 
Theta Chi are used to symbolize 
wisdom, courage, and charm. 

STC is a service club. The club 
is responsible for the placement 
of vending machines in Thatcher, 
two paniy hose machines and a 
food machine. The money for the 
machines was advanced by the 



College. "Right now the ma- 
chines are paying for themselves. 
When the machines are paid for. 
all the profits will go to STC," 
said Betty Howard, a club spon- 

The club is also selling T-shirts 
and tube socks, both garments 
bearing the club's emblem. 

Preparation to sponsor a female 
pastor for a spiritual emphasis 
week at Thatcher is underway. 
And the possibility of publishing 
a cookbook is being looked into. 

McMillan said that the club 
was finally revived out of its long 
stupor to meet the needs of the 
women's reception and to give 



; to the c 



progress. 

Survival for the STC now de- 
pends on the upcoming election of 
next year's officers and the will- 
; of its leaders to tow the 



The Collegiate Chorale will 
begin an eight-day tour of Florida 
and the Caribbean area during 
spring break starting March 2. 

The itinerary is as follows: 

March 2"Forest Lake Academy 

March 3- Miami Temple 
Church 

March 4-North Miami Church, 
Miami Springs Church, 
Greater Miami Academy 

March 5 through 8~Touring the 
island of Jamaica and culminating 
with a concert at West Indies 
of Christian College. 

Don Runyan, director of the 
chorale, said that because of the 



shaky political situation in Ja- 
maica he is very desirous of visit- 
ing the island at this time. 
Later it may not be possible. 

The members of the chorale 
will be contacting students, facul- 
ty and staff members concerning 
a special portrait offer by the Rick 
Perry Studios. Perry is repeating 
his $6 8x10 color portrait special 
Sunday, Feb. 26. Three of the six 
dollars will be donated to the 
chorale for air fare to Jamaica. 
See classified section for more 
information regarding the por- 
traits. 



ingn 



iofs 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES Cont. from p. 1 

and Norman Guilley, who is to b( 
a member of the religion depart- 



Special commendations for 
years of service were voted for 
Charles Fleming and Dr. H.H. 
Kuhlman (both 30 years), and 
Bruce Ringer. Marion Kuhlman. 
Dr. K.M. Kennedy, and Jane 



i(25n 



Evlyn Lindberg was voted a 
sociale professor of English 



Because they opted to stay with 
SMC rather than to accept recent 
calls elsewhere, special letters of 
appreciation were voted to Dr. 
Wayne VandeVere. Dr. Lorenzo 
Grant, and Dr. Douglas Bennett. 

A special citation was voted tor 
Dr. Cyril Futcher, retiring next 
year as academic dean, for his 
service to SMC. 

Dr. Lawrence Hanson, chair- 
man of the mathematics depart- 
ment, was approved for the posi- 
tion of academic dean. 



COMM. OF 100 cont. from p.l_ 

would be the first element of the 
fine arts center. 

The final possibility is to devote 
a new building to the ministerial 
department, which would include 
a chapel to be used as a preaching 
lab. 

These projects will be dis- 
cussed at the annual meeting of 
the committee in April. In the 
meantime, a feasibility study will 
be done on each project, taking 
into consideration time, cost, etc. 

It is the consensus of the di- 
rectors that one or more of the 
four proposed projects will be 
undertaken by the committee in 
the immediate future. lies said 
he felt eventually all four would 
be taken care of 

At the meeting. Charles Flem- 
ing of Collegedale was voted a 
member of the board of trustees. 
Fleming replaces Elder R.C. 
Mills, who resigned from the 
committee after moving to an- 



Ministers' Wives To Be 
Discussed At Meeting 



DMathew Staver 

"The Minister's Wife as a 
Person" will be the topic dis- 
cussed at the Keepers of the 
Spring meeting February 25, at 3 
p.m. in room 103 of Mazie Herin 
Hall. 

The meeting, second of a series 
being conducted for the enrich- 



ment of those who are or will be 
the wives of religion and theology 
majors, will be under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Jerry Gladson. 

Future meeting dates and local- 
ities will be announced at the 
meeting. Husbands are also in- 
vited to attend. 



other union. 



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Thursday, February 23, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 




Kendall constructed his own playing board and pieces. Above is the 
cannon snirounded by soldiers. Photo by Marli Ford 




Kendall explains ATTACK! to Pat Faber. Plioto by Marii Ford 



Kendall's Out To AHACK The World 



DVanessa Greenleaf 

The champion moves his last 
general three-fourths way down 
the board and takes out a canon. 
A risky move, but well worth the 
effort. 

Taking the second move of his 
turn, the now self-assured, arro- 
gant champion twitches his well- 
trimmed mustache, and positions 
his captain close to his general. 

Can the opponent retaliate suc- 



cessfully against the moves? 

The above maneuvers, origin- 
ated by Tom Kendall, a sopho- 
more elementary education 
major, are one of the several in 
his own original game creation, 
ATTACK! 

This military game has an 
average playing time of three 
hours and involves two players, 
each having a combined land and 
nave! force of 70 pieces. These 



^om KendaU 




pieces, including generals, 
colonels, majors, captains, infan- 
try soldiers, sailors, canons, 
ships, and flags, must be maneu- 
vered around mountains and over 
a sea. ATTACK! is won when 
one player captures his oppon- 
ent's flag or both generals. 

The idea for ATTACK! began 
to formulate in Kendall's mind 
during his senior year in aca- 
demy. Using his study halls to 
get the idea materialized, Kendall 
had to play the game over 50 
times in order to allow situations 
to arise to see if the rules took 
care of them. 

"My original inspiration came 
from 'Feudal.'" Kendall com- 
mented, then added with a laugh, 
"which ! played three times and 
lost three times!" 

After redesigning the board six 
times by the following summer, 
he had the game perfected. 
Kendall even had the pieces 
made. The canons, constructed 
with metal sewing machine bob- 
bins and plastic "Battleship" 
pegs for the barrels are under the 
direction of the officers, made out 
of different size macrame beads 
and tacks. The ships, carved out 
of cork, sail smoothly over the 
board which is poster board 
mounted on plywood and varn- 
ished. 

The young inventor was en- 
couraged by friends to get 
ATTACK! marketed along with 
its eight-page rule book. 



Finally, he ran across the Intel 
national Inventors Incorporated. 
Kendal! took his plywood board 
and sewing machine bobbins and 
introduced ATTACK! to the mar- 
keting company. For $250, the 
impressed committee took four 
weeks and did the following four 

1. Researched on a nation- 
wide basis to determine the mar- 
ket potential for the product. 

2. Evaluated the concept 
appeal — how they think the 
public would react to it. 

3. Tested for production abil- 
ity — found out what the cost 
would be for the manufacturer to 
produce, materials needed, time 
and labor, and whether the com- 
pany would need new equipment. 

4. Estimated the marketing 
potential — the number of people 
who would buy the game, number 
of producers who could manu- 
facture it, number of outlets 
through which the product could 
be distributed. 

The results of their analysis 
showed that Kendall would get 
seven to eight per cent of the 
wholesale profits which was es- 
timated to be about $30,000 
annually. 

Next, International offered (for 
$900) to display ATTACK! at four 
to six trade shows and contact 40 
different manufacturing firms, 
such as Parker Brothers, Matel, 



and Milton Brothers, who would 
be interested. International 
would also bargain with the man- 
ufacturer for license agreement 
with royalties. 



Knowing sadly that he uidn't 
have the money to accept the 
offer, Kendall declined and de- 
cided to write Parker Brothers 
himself. When they replied, they 
thanked Kendall for his interest, 
but said as a rule, they did not 
accept unsolicited materials be- 
cause of being swamped. Parker 
Brothers suggested that Kendall 
go through established channels 
which would be a marketing com- 

So at this time. Tom Kendall, 
who is already coniving a second 
game involving politics, is in a 
pinch — a possible million dollar 
offer, but not enough money to 
accept it. 

The challenger prepares to re- 
taliate. 

He steps an infantry soldier out 
in front of a general who is 
waiting on the back line in the 
shadows. (Shadows not included 
with game; must be imagined 
separately.) 

For his second move, he zips 
the general across the board and 
swipes the last of his opponents 
highest ranked officer, the gen- 
eral. The champion is defeated! 



Photo by Mark Ford 




CHEATER i 



^ 



S - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Thmsday, Februai)- 23, 1978 




A Shoot Out In The Rees 




DSteve Thompson 

Walt Frazier. Dr. J. Erving or 
K-reem Jabbar might not be a- 
raong the starting line-aps that 
will go into action this Saturday 
night, but there will be many imi- 
tators who will be fighting for 
their class. The annual SMC 
Rees Series will be hosting a 
grand array of hoop shooters and 
top coaches from the school. 

Leading off the list of all-stars 
is the freshman class. Calling in 
for the freshmen is Brad "Buck" 
Schultz. who will start at center 
{who as a matter of fact could 
start at center for anybody's 
team). Back court men will be 
Cockrell and Nafie. Serving in 
the front court will be Big "E" 
Essix and Abbott. The freshmen 
clasj looks well-balanced, and 
plenty of help is coming from the 
bench in Williams. Aalborg, 
Battle, Haskell, and Owens Their 
court knowledge and direction 
will be coming from coach War- 
ren Halverson. So there's your 
team, freshman class, give them 

Coming up next in the program 
are those second year people, 
better known as bophomores. 
Their leam is centered around 
6'6" Rick Pruuus-ia; helping him 
out in the front court will be 
Mosley and Visser. Working in 
the back court will be David "un- 
real" Thompson and Eberhardt. 
First Five looks ready to go. 
Support from bench will be Bur- 
ham, S. Thompson, Farwell, Kit- 
tle, and Slattery. Delmar Lovejoy 
will guide from the side as he 
coaches them. Sophomore class 
be there, cause they are going to 
try to bring the title home. 

Now for the guys who have 
been serving for three years, the 
juniors. Starting line-up will be 
"Buns" Rathbun. Westermeyer, 
and Kaufmann. They will be the 
three mean dudes in the front 



court, while the back court con- 
sists of Ruiz and Dalton. Junior 
class already looks hot. They 
don't have a big man, but who 
needs one when you're hot. 

Contributing from the bench 
will be Dickerson, Gusso, 
Pumphrey. Thornton, and Uhran. 
Doing the job from courtside will 
be Everett Schlisner. Juniors, 
hope you like your team, cause 
they're working for you. 

Last on the list, but not the 
least, as the M.C. continues to 



announce, is the senior class. 
Starting off the line-up will be 
that familar name that somehow 
goes with the word gold-Barts, 
Schultz and Wilt. 

They will be the guys who will 
take the front court seriously. 
The back court will probably be 
Douglas and Jimenez. Seniors 
are looking good and tall. Help 
from side line will be Burnsed, 
Hickman. Higgenbotham, Stout 
and Welch. Phil Garver is plan- 
ning on helping them to rock 



steady as he coaches this squad. 
Senior class, this is your last 
chance; it's time to crash in on the 
goods. 

As the round ball bounces for 
the last time, it's going to bounce 
with the school's best. Action will 
start Saturday night at 7:30. 
Game one will consist of sopho- 
mores vs. seniors, while game 
two will be the freshmen taking 
on the juniors. 

Sunday night the 26th, will 



have action starting at 6 p „, 
first between the two iosino 

teams for third place and then the 
championship game from the win 
ning teams of Saturday night 
There will also be special attrac 
tions between games both nights. 

So the Rees Series is not only a 
shoot out for players; it's more 
than that. It's a total weekend for 
the entire school, not just games 
It's a happening. 



The Body Beautiful In '78 



qVan Boddy 

Washington state is the "Ever- 
green State" and starting point of 
the "Across the States in '78!" 
exercise promotion program 
sponsored by Collegiate Adven- 
tists for Better Living (CABL) 
from now until the end of the 
semester. This program is de- 
signed for the student who wants 
to have fan while starting or 
maintaining a personal fitness 
and recreation program. 

The fun will consist not only of 
developing that trim, stunning, 
body beautiful, but in making an 
individual contribution which 
will, combined with the collective 
participation of the entire Col- 
lege, result in a total mileage 
comparable fo the distance from 
Seattle. Wash., tc Miami Fla. 
(Approximately 3.500 miles.) 

There are four main areas of 
emphasis, those being swim- 
ming, cycling, running, and walk- 
ing. Bikers, runners, and walkers 
will be given one mile credit for 
each mile of distance covered. 
Swimmers will be given one mile 
credit for each one-quarter mile 



Participants will keep frack of 
their distances and record them 
weekly on color-coded cards avail- 
able at the map in the Student 
Center. These cards can be drop- 
ped in designated boxes located 
in the Student Center, dorm lob- 
bies, and P.E. department. 

Upon completion of 50 miles or 
more, (UVi for swimmers), the 
participant will be awarded a 
beautiful multi-color cloth patch 
sporting and outline of the U.S. 



with the route covered, and the 
words "Across the States in '78 
National Supporter" emblazoned 
on it. 

In order to raise monies for 
on-campus CABL activities and 

projects, {proposed projects in- 
clude wind screens for the tennis 
courts, work racks for bicycle 
repair and maintenace, laying a 
Chevron 440 frack, and helping 
pay for the proposed all-weather 
enclosed handball court), each 



participant is aked to get a spon- 
sor who will pay an agreed a- 
mount for each mile the partici- 
pant covers. This will be geared 
after the walkathons and it is 
suggested that amounts from 10 
cents up to a dollar or more be 
pledged. Those participants turn- 
ing in the largest dollar amounts 
from their sponsors will be a- 
warded with prizes suited to their 
particular area of activity. These 
plans are subject to approval by 
the adminisfrative council. 



Barts' Gold 
Being Tested 



DSteve Thompson 

At the end of the rainbow, the 
boys Gold just might not find the 
championship crown, but instead 
two guys, one by the name of the 
"Buns" who should be called 
her h»r3.i' - if thr mnnv gin v lie 
h:'s faced with his iiimpcr. and 






. of 



Hustling Halverson. who always 
Pshows up around this time of year 
when the word "championship" 
is going around. 

Ron Barts. who is the captain of 
the golden squad, must lead his 
team through this period of test- 
ing. And so far together they 
have been doing a dandy job. 

The last stretch is always the 
tough one. but with guys like 
Bruce jumpshot. Rick "sky- 
scraper" Prussia, and David 
Quickhands. the going could be 
sweet. But sweetness attracts 
bees, and that's where the 
"Buns" and his men join the 
picture, but before they can apply 
the sting. Thev must sit back- 
stage and watch Halversen. 



Whether or not there is anything 
left in Halversen's championship 
bag. he must use it now. Gary 
Wilt. Kevin Cockrell. Brooks 
Burnsed. and Delmar Lovejoy will 
all get a standing ovation from 
Buns and his squad if they can 
polish off the golden boys. 

While the rest of the double A 
league teams watch the show- 
case, they along with the fans are 
going to see pure gold in the 
making, or David "Buns" Rath- 
bun shoot people out the city, or 
Warren Halversen finish the 
process of creating a legend. 

But whatever the outcome, the 
team that wins it all will not just 
be better than most - they will be 
the best! 

Women's Basketball 
Wrapup 

Team y/ |^ 

Weatherall 7 2 

Mueller ^ 3 

Rongus s 4 

Naus Q 





The Southern Accent 

Voice of the Southern Missionary CoHege Student 



Vol. 33, No. 20 



Thursday, March 16, 1978 



CoUegedale, Tenn. 3731S 



•^pgy* 




Igor Strikes A Chord 
In Baroque Style 



Igor Kipnis, harpsichordist 



DDon Jehle 

Harpsichordist Igor Kipnis will 
present a concert in the gym 
Saturday. March 18. at 8:45 p.m. 
Tickets are available at the Cam- 
pus Shop. 

Kipnis, the son of the famous 
Metropolitan Opera basso. Alex- 
ander Kipnis, has been associ- 
ated with music ever since his 
boyhood in the 1930's. He re- 
ceived his first piano lessons from 
his grandfather, the Chicago com- 
poser, pianist, and pedagogue, 
Heniot Levy. 

Kipnis, who was born in Berlin, 
where his father was a member of 
the Berlin State Opera, spent 
most of his early years touring 
with his parents, finally settling 
down in the United States just 
before the outbreak of World War 
II. 

Though he took the usual num- 
ber of piano courses, he did not 



become attracted to the harpsi- 
chord until his college years. It 
was at Harvard University, from 
which he graduated in 1952, that 
Kipnis first became fascinated by 
the harpsichord and baroque 

Kipnis made his debut as a 
harpsichordist in 1959 over New 
York's WNYC, and numerous 
performances followed with his 
first all-solo recital appearance at 
the New York Historical Society in 
1961. 

In 1964, the harpsichordist ac- 
quired a contract with CBS, for 



LLU Extends 
Program To 



Master's 
SMC 



DMathew Staver 

An extension master's degree 
program from Loma Linda will be 
offered this coming summer here 
at SMC for those education ma- 
jors who have completed their 
bachelor's degree and are eligible 
for a master's. 

Several weeks ago representa- 
tives were on campus from Loma 
Linda University who worked up a 
tentative summer schedule. But 
Wore it is finalized, it will have 
io be approved by Loma Linda 
University and eventually by the 
Western Association, which certi- 
fies Loma Linda and accredits the 
university. Dr. Frank Knittel 
feels assured, however, that the 
program will be approved. 

The plan is to offer four two- 
week classes each summer for a 
period of four years. This would 
enable a person who already has a 
bachelor's degree and qualifies 
f"' a master's degree to obtain it 
[J f™r summers. There is also 
™ possibility of taking one or 
Wo subjects at another college 
""ring the year and having these 
"edits transferred to the summer 
•"aster's program. 

The classes for the first sum- 
mer will be Continuous Progress 



or the Multi grade Classroom. 
Curriculum Planning. Principles 
of Guidance, and Seminar on Sev- 
enlh-day Adventist Education 
and Philosophy. 

These classes will either meet 
all day in a workshop program, or 
in a lecture setting of two or more 
hours each day for the 10' days. 

Because this will not be a de- 
gree from SMC but a LLU degree 



offered on campus, the represen- 
tative said, 'Students seeking ad- 
mission lo the program should 
have met the requirements to 
Loma Linda University's School of 
Education." 

Persons who do not qualify for 
acceptance at Loma Linda could 
take one or two special subjects 
and if the results are desirable, 
could petition Loma Linda for 
admittance. 



gree irom ^wi\, uui a x^^v -w^, — 

Library Bookworms 
May Need Much 
Bigger Pocketbooks 

....^?r_-_. ...;,i ;„„.,«. nonrenewable unless in the ca 



McKee Library will increase 
overdue book fines and instigate 
new circulation policies beginnmg 
Thursday. 

Once 5 cents a day, overdue 
books will now cost the dehn- 
quent reader 10 cents a day for 
the first 7 days overdue and 25 
cents a day thereafter. 

Marion Linderman, associate 
librarian, said the regular book 
loan period is four weeks, now 



- — Itolilml Pag* ©••-" 

Wierd New Typewriter P" ^ 

I^DBh Out The Plebes P* ^ 

Knittel On Sit-Down Strike? P' ' 



whom he embarked on a re- 
cording project featuring the key- 
board music of different coun- 
tries, including France, England. 
Italy, Spain, Germany, and Aus- 

Kipnis is now under an exclu- 
sive contract to Angel Records. 
For his recordings, which now 
total 26 solo LP's, he has received 
numerous awards, including four 
Grammy nominations in 1964. 
1971, and 1972. the Deutsche 
Schallplatten prize in 1969, and 

Turn to p. 3, col. 1 



Union Finally Votes 
Not To Move CUC 



DVinita Wayman 

The Columbia Union voted 
March -S to keep CUC at its 
present site in Takoma Park, said 
Dr M.W.Shultz. chairman of the 
relocation committee and father 
of SMC student Karl Shultz. 

The vote, ending years of long 
debate, was carried by a slim 53 
per cent of the union constitu- 



rollment. "The academies are 
not supporting CUC. The gradu- 
ates are going elsewhere." said 
Dr. Shultz. Indications of surveys 
taken, he said, support a more 
rural atmosphere for the college. 
Many fee' I'lat it is not safe in the 



city. 



sfelt 



.. 469 

present at the meeting, which 
was held at Blue Mountain Aca- 
demy in Pennsylvania. 

According to Dr. Shultz, three 
options for the development of 
CUC were considered: 1) relo- 
cate the college to a more rural 
setting, 2) reduce the college to a 
two-vear vocational school as an 
extension of Andrews University, 
or 3) retain the college at its 
present site. 

The much-rumored solution of 
merging CUC with AUC was not 
discussed. 

cue's troubles began with a 
gradual but steady decline in en- 



Yet on the other side, it v 
that to move would cost too much 
and would move the college away 
from the Washington Adventist 
Hospital, which is conveniently 
located right across the street 
from the campus. 

With the decision to stay final, 
however, the college has decided 
to invest its money in a new 
building — a science complex. 
Administrators hope that this ad- 
dition will build CUC into a viable 
urban campus. 

The question now, said Dr. 
Shultz. is whether the enrollment 
will keep dropping. If it does, 
CUC is in trouble. 



nonrenewable unless in the case 
of emergency. "We think a 
month should be enough time to 
get through a book," she said. 

Overdue two-hnur books on re- 
serve will carry a 25-cent an hour 
penalty instead of the former 10 
cents.' Three-day book and cas- 
sette fines will aiso hike up to 25 
cents- per day. 

• Non-college readers, once able 
to obtain a free library card, will 
now be required to pay a SlU 
annual fee to receive borrowing 
privileges. 

A lost book will cost the current 
list price plus $6.50. "We just 
can't avoid it," Linderman said, 
"the price of books has gone up 
tremendously." 






c J .. K.™ Pmof- the tennis conrte were loaded Tuesday 
Spring's here. J^wl. me lenm photoby Rhonto 



Photo by RhontoBuilon 



; SOUTHERN ACCENT TTiuBd.,, M«ch 16, 1978 



Students Contribute 
New Periodic Table 




DMathew Staver 

Students Rov Campbell. Tom 
Cayton, Mel Glass, David Gimbel 
and Professors Ray Hefferlin and 
Henry- Kuhlman are exploring a 
potentially revolutionary research 
idea-- a periodic table of the 
diatomic molecules. 

A periodic table of the atoms 
exists already; its most popular 
'..rm was published in 1869 by a 



nologv. The value of this table 
will spread, as time goes by. said 
Dr. Hefferlin, into many indus- 
trial applications. 

Thus, SMC students are having 
the opportunity to contribute to 
their country in a tangible way. 
They are also learning that there 
is much to be learned beyond 



what is found in textbooks, or 
even in recent journal articles, 
said Dr. Hefferlin. "They are on 
the frontier. It is a frontier which, 
though perhaps soon to be 
mastered, will lead on to others; 
the probing of God's book of 
nature will be an activity winch 
will continue on into eternity. 



Me 



.lelei 



lated much of what was known of 
atoms and has been called ■the 
most irino;tnnt generalization in 
all u; chemistr"." 

The periodic table for diatomic 
molecules promises to be both 
aesthetic and utilitarian, said Dr. 
Hefferiin. It is potentially aesthe- 
tic in the same sense that all 
periodic tables are (a calendar is 
more attractive, for example, 
than a display on a digital clock). 

The table also promises to be 
utilitarian, to contribute to the 
economic health of our nation. 
The energy crisis, the need for 
better means of transmitting in- 
formation, and other demands, all 
require basic research, just as 
basic research eariy in this cen- 
csulted in today's tech- 



Chattanooga Language 
BankiWantsDepositors 







DDr. Robert Morrison 

Chattanooga, like many other 
cities, has established an area 
language bank. Under the direc- 
tion of the Adult Education Coun- 
cil, the language bank contains 
names of those persons willing to 
be called when there arises a 
need for an interpreter or trans- 
lator. 

While ; -S may not have 

time to serve as interpreter- 
guides for visiting officials, or to 
translate long business forms or 
letters, they can volunteer to 
serve in case of emergency. If. for 
example, there was an accident 
on the interstate highway and the 
officers and medical attendants 




Frtttay 7:30-4:00 
COLLEGE PLAZA 



Collegedale Cleaners 



could not communicate with in- 
jured persons, a student might be 
called to assist. This humane 
service would be a genuine help 
to someone in distress, and such 
student volunteers would bring 
credit to the college. 

There is a particular need for 
names of persons able to speak 
the more unusual languages- 
tongues other than Spanish, 
French or German. 
SMC students who would like to 
add their names to the language 
bank listing are invited to leave 
name, address, telephone — and 
the name of their language — at 
the Modem Languages office, 
Lynn Wood 208. or they may call 
4205 and leave the information by 
telephone. 



A pholo essay. A picture says a thousand words. 

*^ Photo tiy Rhonda Runyan 

Akers To Speak At 
Religion Retreat 



DMathew Staver 

Dr. George Akers. director of 
religious education in the gradu- 
ate school of Andrews University, 
will be on campus March 17 and 
18. to address the spring religion 
retreat. 

All the meetings will be held in 
Thatcher Hall chapel with the 
first meeting beginning Friday at 
8 p.m. There will be a 9 a.m. and 
11:30 a.m. meeting. Sabbath 



afternoon from 2-4 p.m. there will- 
be a question and answer period 
which will end the two-day 
retreat. 

Elder Aker is connected with 
the education department at An- 
drews and prior to this he was the 
president of Columbia Union Col- 
lege. His varied experience 
should lend to a program relevant 
to all religion majors. 



TRI - COMMUNITY 
FLORIST 

Free Challanooca ,\rea Delivery 
Call now at 396-3792 





Try all the GRANOLAS from 
the 'GRANOLA PEOPLE' 



x'NATURAL FOODS 



COLLEGEDALE, TENNESSEE 



(medkalI 




The ideal location to start your health c" 
career. A 156-bed Seventh-day Advenli* 
Hospital located on Florida's Southwest O™ 
Coast 20 miles north of Fort Myers and 
miles from Orlando. 

Enjoy a culturally-oriented ™™"?"'.'?j " 
one of the picturesque areas of f"" ' 
Medical Center Hospital offers' nursing OPP 
lunltles in ICCU, Surgical, Medical, Pedl"" 
and Emergency Services. .„ t„j 

Call collect at 813-639-3131 ext. ii' 
further details. Medical Center HospiW. 
E. Marion Ave., P.O. Box 1309, Punla toro 
Fl. 33950. 




Typewriter Keyboard 
With The $900 Splits 



Thursdaj/, March 16, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



1 English keyboard expert 
hab developed a new typewritier 
design ihat could increase typing 
speeds by 40 per cent. 

The lieyboard is divided into 
two sections ■■ one for each hand 
-- and patterned so the fingers 
don't have to malie unnatural 
stretches to touch the keys. Keys 
for the long middle finge 



lower in the keyboard. thc-_ ._. 
the inde.x and ring fingers higher 
up. Those for the weaker pinky 
are highest. 

Even the thumb, usually used 
only for the space bar. may hit up 
to eight nearby keys. 

Price: approximately $900 for 
the keyboard alone, which hooks 
up to an electric typewriter. 



State Says Yes To 12 
Amendments, No To 1 



„ B — J —^ a<;i "P lo an eiectnc typewriter. 

TVABrownOuts 
To Become 
More Common 



DGIen Mather 

Tennessee residents voted 
Tuesday, March 7, on the most 
sweeping changes in the state 
constitution in more than a cen- 
tury. 

Among the amendments that 
voters approved were ones that 
removed the 10 per cent ceiling 
on interest rates, placed a limit on 
state spending, restructured 
county government, and allowed 
the governor to succeed himself 



in office. 

Although many students were 
away on spring vacation, over 200 
voters polled their views in the 
Collegedale precinct 

Tennessee voters accepted all 
the aniendmeni.^ LAtupi oih , "13, 
which called for radi'-?l changes 
in the state's court system. Col- 
legedale voters were of the same 
opinion as the majority of Ten- 
nesseans, accepting 12 of the 13 
proposed amendments. 



Discount Tickets For 
Collegedale Speeders 



GGreg Vital 

The nationwide coal miners' 
strike, which is now over 75 days 
old, has led local officials of Ten- 
nessee Valley Authority (TVA)to 
request that individuals, indus- 
try, and business limit their usage 
of electricity and conserve in as 
many ways as possible. 

The Electric Power Board of 
Chattanooga, which delivers elec- 
tricity to Collegedale has notified 
SMC to exercise conservation 
measures along with the com- 
munity or be subject to "brown 
outs." 

Already ' 'brown outs ' ' have 
had to be initiated in Oak Ridge 
due to the huge amounts of elec- 
tricity consumed there in the Re- 



search and Development facilities 
of the Atomic Energy Commis- 



At present. TVA's coal-fired 
power plan stock piles are at their 
lowest level since 1975. Much of 
the coal being burned now is 
several years old, and its sulfur 
content is low. causing the effi- 
ciency of coal-fired power plants 
to be below normal. 

Several suggestions for conser- 
vation made by TVA include 
making sure all unattended apli- 
ances and lights are tun.ed off 
when not in use, limited usage of 
hot water, and maintaining 
thermostats at 65 degn 



FINANCIAL AID! 
Gimme Bucks 
For Next Year! 

Is financial aid available 
only to poor people? 



No. Financial Aid is to re- 
move the barriers for those 
families who cannot afford 
the cost of an education 
beyond high school and to 
fill in the gap for families 
who can afford only part of 
the cost. 

I was turned down for 
financial aid last year. 
Should I reapply? 



stances of your family may 
have changed. 



As soon after January I as 
possible or after your par- 
ents have completed their 
income tax return. 



What is the appHc 
deadline for SMC? 



ition 



Priority will be given to 
applicants whose applica- 
fions are complete by April 
1. Applications received by 
the college after April 1 will 
be processed as long as 
funds are available. 



DGlen Mather 

Over 15 traffic citations are 
issued each week in Collegedale, 
and the majority of these are 
written to speeders on the new 
road, said Chief of Police Thomas 
Keaton. 

Financially speaking. College- 
dale is the best place in the area 
toget a ticket. The minimum fine 
's $5 plus court costs. Chat- 
fanooga's traffic court has a min- 
imum fine of $10, with court costs 
of $10.25. 

Although most drivers in Col- 
legedale wouldn't consider 35 
[n-P-h- speeding, on the new en- 
hance road that velocity could 
'^ad to a fine. 

If the blue lights flash in the 
^}^^ of Hamilton County, the 
violator could be faced with a 



small fine of $2, but exorbitant 
court costs of $32.75. 

For all Collegedale, Chatta- 
nooga, and Hamilton County cita- 
tions, court costs must be paid, 
even though the fine is settled out 
of court. 



^^ 



wpF. trom p. 1 



fte Stereo Review Record of the 

197S ''"'^''''^ '" '^^'' "'^' '"^ 
Kipnis is considered by Time 
™8Miiie to be "America's finest 
""'Psichordist." 

Between 1964 and 1967, the 
""Psichordist lectured and 
'^^m at the Berkshire Music 
Ma '' '^^nglewood) at Lenox, 
^^ss. where he served as chair- 
and" ? ""^ baroque department 
I ° P'^yeii continuo with the Bos- 

Perio T'""^' """"« "^'^ 
««,. • "^'Pnis also was host of his 
"'110 show, "The Age of 



ye,"'"^' broadcast for three 

^btioi' 



' "ver the Ne 
' ■ WQXR. 



IHI®w did 



$)2€) MUmn 



By selling life 

,if II! In fact, Sule Farm u one of 
ine Urgent and fasteil-growmg 
life compaOiel.-So. for busineBJ or 
perional nfcds, retiremenl, pen- 
sion or group life plans, see me to- 

Fred Fuller 

College 

Plaza 

Like a good neighboi 
State Farm is there. 





m^ 



4 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT Tbnrsda)'. Much 16, 1978 

Pace 



3 




Editorial 



The Power Of The Press Misused 



There's a standing joke among Adventist writers about people 
who make their living by writing for the church. The joke is that they 
don't exist. It seems that the need for creative and fluent 
communication hasn't been recognized. At least not until now. 

The Adventist church has just announced a milestone in com- 
munication advancement -- a fund of $37,500 for college writing and 
communications grants. 

Just how these grants are going to be used hasn't been made 
clear. There are several possibilities; new classes, guest seminar 
speakers or added part-time help, new communications equipment. 
The creative imagination of the receiving college will decide how the 
grant will be used to encourage the talents of effective christian 
writers. 

Great! They realize we're here. Only one thing: Good writers go 
where the grants are. And the grants are going to PUC and Andrews. 
What about SMC? 

It's true we're not the biggest college or even the biggest 
English-Communications department. But the South has a tradition 
of good writing and as someone has pointed out, a good part of the 
college-contributed articles in Insight are written by SMC students. 
It doesn't make sense that SMC has been overlooked in the big divvy. 
Sound like greedy children? Well maybe we are. But the writers 
are going to the promised land where the programs and the grants 



Dear Editor: 

1 am writing in regard to the 
Editorial of February 16 which 
gave your publication's endorse- 
ments of candidates running for 
the most contested offices in the 
recent Student Association races. 
I cannot agree with this policy of 
the Southern Accent and would 
like to present the following rea- 
sons why. 

First, your publication is a 
newspaper. Its purpose as such is 
to report the news, not to go on 
political preference pagents. 
Should you profess to be a gossip 
column, I could see merit in such 
actions as you have displayed in 
your endorsing of candidates. You 
do not. however, and I find it 
difficult to condone this abuse of 
your privilege of publication. 

Not only are you stepping 
beyond your own declared inten- 



sions, as printed in the masthead, 
of being ^e voice of the students 
of Southern Missionary College. 

No Committee or group of per- 
sons, no matter how well selected 
or conscientious, can adequately 
give the opinion of the entire 
body. If, indeed, you intend to be 
the voice of the students, a well 
constructed opinion poll, perhaps 
administered on the lower portion 
of the chapel cards, would be a 
much more accurate means of 
achieving your professed goal. 

Lastly, you are taking on a 
responsibility of influence that 
was never meant to be exercised 
by you in that way. Many persons 
are influenced by what you print 
to the point of not even consider- 
ing any other candidates. Even 
though you have done your best 
to be unbiased in your choices 




mmmsM 



j * Dear Area Evangelism — The 

Texas Conference is recruiting 

sell-supporting missionaries to 

enter 40 dark areas lo help buili' 

up new churches. Wc will lielp 

locate. Be active in Piiishing 

God's work. For more informa-" 

tion call or write: Texas Confer 

j ence of Seventh-dav Adventists 

I 2838 Hemphill Street, Fort 

Worth, Texas 76110, Phone (817) 

I 921-6181 



* Must have a ride to California, 
(preferably PUC - Angwin area) 
after jchool is out in May, Will 
help with driving and gas, don't 
have much luggage, I will take 
any ride, even if it's to the Loma 
Linda area but prefer to go to the 
northern California area. Contact 
Jolene at 4525 after 11 p.m. 



* Happy B'day Faith. 
Richard 



From 



i^ 



The Southern Accent 

£S~££SrE--^-.sra^^ 

exirn.rtvrarf,,- „^^f.i ^ ""' '° '"^'^^ material that Is llbeloii. 
^j;»J«hen, Aa«. is published »«My »i,h the exception ol test v^ and 



Assis.im'Edlti' VinilaWayman 

Business Manan^ Lynn Neumann 

Layout BJto^ [iaveMibdag 

Layout Une-U,; Vanrasa GreenlMl 

Orculallon Mai4i4r' Randy Johnson 

Seoetaries John Henson 

PamLjegere 

Ad Mananer S^™ *8els 

Proolrc^' RayHartwell 

KathyMlxell 

Suhscriplions :!?"'* ^acharias 

Artist . CandvMlranda 

photosraphi;;'.; I^'^" 

P'.onda Runyan 

Mike Par«in 

All (xxrespondence may be addressed lo Th. >!»-.__ . 
Misaonary College, Collegedale, TennTOTi" ^^ *°°"' ^""w^ 

""he: (6151385-056 

Office Hours: Sunday-fl a.m..« p m 
Monday-10 am.^ p m 
Tueoday-8a.m.-6p.m.' 



* George Unger, Ontario Confer- 
ence, will be on campus on Wed 
March 22, He will be interview- 
ing both Secondary and Elemen- 
tary Education Majors. Make 
your appointment at the Educa- 
tion Department. 

* ATTENTION NTKSING STU- 
DENTS - MAKCH 1978 - RE- 
CSUTTERS: 3/8, Hinsdale Sani- 
tarium & Hospital, Dewar Wild- 
man; 3/16, U,S, Army, Jeanie 
Ryba; 3/16, Kettering Medical 
Center, Mary Kothman; 3/21-22 
Paradise Valley Hospital, espe- 
cially interested in B.S. Juniors 
and Seniors, A.A. Chacon; and 
3/30, Scott Memorial Hospital, 
Mike Holland. Please call 4282 
for an appointment. 

* Want to stretch your vacation 
next time? Did Smokey get you? 
Hy home next time. Collegedale 

If you would like to fly or eet 
your ticket to see America from 
the top this summer but cash is 
shori,^^call Collegedale Aero, 

* Congratulations Don! I'm elad 
you got that job in the Review I 
wish you success, JB 

♦ATTENTION EVERYONE: 

There are Student Mission club 
nteetingseve^ Wed. evening at 
5.30 p.m m the Education Dept. 
n Lynn Wood Hall. SM's called 
o the field this year are required 
to attend. There are still slveS^ 
positions open in various areas 
throughout the worid for those 
who an. interested in serving, h 
^^t "„^ S'"<'=nt Missionary 
Contact Dean Betty Howard, Dr 
R« .or Ron Koester for more 



* Randy Peterson would like all 
who shared their thoughts with 
him on Valentine's Day to know 
that he was deeply moved by the 
Valentine's roll. He truly appre- 
ciated it and would like to say 
"Thank you" for your love and 
prayers, 

♦ To The Classy 1978 Car 
Owner: Would you please take 
the $8,000 price tag oft your 
Grand Prix, After three months, 
we ail know how much you paid 
for it! A tired onlooker. 



•Dear Tiger - Only 66 more 
days! LoveTiiger. 

♦ THE HONOR SOCIETY IN 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES, Alpha 
Mu Gamma, will hold its spring 
initiation meeting during the 
supper hour on Friday, March 24 
If you have two A's in one foreign 
language (one A may be the 
current mid-term grade), you are 
eligible for membership. The fee 
IS SS, which may be charged to 
your statement. Pick up an appli- 
cation form in LWH 208, After 
March 24, membership will not 
again be available until Novem- 

* Examlnallons for credit in 
Spanish, German, and Freneh 

will be given at 10 a,m. on Sun.; 
April 2 in LWH 215. You man 
apply (with an application form 
available in LWH 208) and ar- 
range for the fee (it may be 
Charged to your statement) before 
taking the test. This is the second 
and final test this semester, and 
next year will bring changes m 
rules concerning such examina- 



and have placed your opinions on 
fairly well grounded facts, you are 
still not being fair to all parties 
concerned for it will be readily 
admitted by all that those you 
endorse are helped by the en- 
dorsement and those spoken of 
in a less than ideal manner are 
hurt m much the same measure. 

At this point 1 would like to 
mention that, if it is necessary for 
you to publish endorsements, you 
chose the right place to do it. In- 
deed the opinions you stated were 
put in the proper column. Even 
so, many people place entirely too 
much weight on your opinions 
and, in the future, it would be 
well if you refrained from using 
them to the betterment or detri- 
ment of those you are writing 
about. 

Sincerely, 



The People's 
Party Denies 
Plebeian 



Dear Editor: 

Over the past couple of semes- 
ters many people have inquired 
about the People's Party. Some 
have asked if we were for real. 
Others have openly stated that we 
were a group of subversive com- 
munists! 

Last year Dee Hartsfield (the 
Field Marshal) and I (the Em- 
peror) ran for the SA offices of 
vice-president and president re- 
spectively. We gave birth to the 
slogan "Power to the People" in 
an effort to unify the student body 
and develop the power available 
to us as a student government. 
All who were here at that time 
know that we were overwhelm- 
ingly defeated! 

A real good case can be built to 
sho^ that Dee and I leaned heavi 
ly toward socialism, but that is a 
far cry from "Subversive com- 
munism". This year the People's 
Party has become less vocal and 
turned into a more conservative 
party. We have also added a 
great deal to our organizational 
membership, which now reaches 
to 30 active members. 

In closing, I would like to state 
that the People's Party in no way 
influenced the writing of The W^' 
belan Press. We as a party 
defend the right to write such a 
paper, but we believe that it 
something is worth writing, 
worth a signature. 



it's 



Jerry Lee Holt 
The People's Party 



Randy Progressing & Enjoying Scroll 

Oeur Edi'T and Students: 



nmrsday, March 16, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 5 



|""'»"'"' """""""'""iiiiiraiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiimraiiaiBimiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiniiiriimiiiiiiiiNis 

I M.J. 



Randy has really appreciated 
all the cards, letters, and visits 
from the students at SMC. This 
has helped make his days in 
Special Care at Erlanger much 
brighter. The words of encour- 
agement have kept his spirits -up 
and helped him to realize more 
and more that God has a plan for 
him. Keep it up. 

He is eager to be transferred to 
Ctaig Hospital in Denver so he 
canbegin his rehabilitation. They 
have given us a very tentative 
date to transfer him the week of 
March 13. He still believes a 
miracle can happen, and we ask 
that you all continue to pray for 
Mm. 

We know that this accident has 
brought a lot of you closer to your 
Savior. He loves us more than we 
can understand. We know He has 
permitted this to happen to pre- 
pare Randy and us to dwell with 
Him forever. I am sure many will 



Randy's Gift 

Dear Editor: 

In response to the letter in the 
lastissueof the Accent, we would 
like to thanl( all those who contri- 
buted towards Randy Peterson. 
He already had a tape recorder, 
so we bought him some tapes and 
gave the remaining $150 to him in 

leash. 

Randy was very thankful. You 

I »11 put a giant smile on his face. 

I It's nice to know someone cares I 

I Thanks again. 

I Sincerely, 

I Cindy Bata & Cyndi Webber 



be there, too, as a result of this 
accident. 

Randy was so surprised when 
we opened the envelope from the 
students at SMC. The money wUI 
be kept for him until he decides 
how he would like to use it. His 
first idea was to buy a new suit. I 
am sure he will 'spend' it several 
times before he makes the final 
decision. He will enjoy listening 
to the tapes which you sent as he 
loves good music. They help to 
pass the Sabbath hours in the 
hospital. You have all been just 
great. Mr. Peterson and I want to 
express our appreciation also. 



The scroll you sent was really a 
clever idea, and he has enjoyed 
reading the different messages. 
It will take him quite a while to 
finish reading it and enjoying the 
pictures, but it will give him many 
hours of pleasure. 

May God bless you all during 
this school year. Thanks so much 
for everything. 

Sincerely, 

Mrs. Beulah Peterson 

(Randy's mother) 



BRYANT 
I ON 
STRIKE 



Flood-Devosfated College 
Soys Thank You 



Dear Editor and Students: 

You are a very important part 
of converting tragedy into 
triumph. We thank you for what 
you mean to Toccoa Falls in our 
hour of trial. November 6th, and 
all of its horrible devastation is 
less and less visible. Where 
beautiful homes once stood we 
now have naked but well contour- 
ed land. Thirty-nine laughing, 
working, happy Christians are 
conspicuous by their absence, but 
Toccoa Falls College is getting 
back into the business of a 
"normal life". Your support is 
making this possible. 

Soon workmen will begin to 
construct a third wing of our 
men's dormitory and others will 



begin work on married students 
apartments. Things are literally, 
buzzing and we are grateful for 
your part in making in all happen. 
We are a long ways from 
having our needs met. The truth 
is, sometimes the enormity of all 
that must be done staggers us, 
but, our God is able to supply all 
our needs according to His riches. 
We at Toccoa Falls College have 
been "through the fire and 
through the flood and we expect 
Him to take us out into a wealthy 
place" (Psalm 66:10, 12). Thank 
you for helping us do it. Our. 
receipt number 9339 for your 
gracious gift of $625.00 is 
attached. 

Joyfully yours in Christ's service, 

Kenn W. Opperman 
President 





CMRMN 




$2522 

CMfUS 
LIFE 



5«*WCj;l 



C0NTEST 

Contest Sponsored By The Sonthem Accent ^p^ 



. THE SOUTHERN ACCENT nmrsday, March 16, 1978 



Comming 
Of Age 
Without 
EG White 

J DGary Williams 

We have come to a place in our 
church histoo' when we no longer 
need the Spirit of Prophecy. It 
was needed in the eariy years of 
our development, but today we 
are fully grown, and it is no 
longer necessary. 

This may startle some. From 
others there will be shouts of 
"Amen." and from some there 
will be an immediate reaction of 
condemnation. My question to 
you is: How do you view the 
Spirit of Prophecy? 

Does it have any meaning for 
today? Can it be read and studied 
to make its counsels practical or is 
it ignored and allowed to lay on 
the shelf? 

If the Bible and Spirit of Pro- 
phecy are your daily study, then 
there will be a marked difference 
in your inward and outward be- 
havior. 1 am not refering to class 
assignments; I am talking about 
personal devotional habits. 

We tend to forget what the 
church — you and 1 — is about to go 
through. With strange weather 
conditions, union activities, the 
increasing transportation disas- 
ters (never forget that we have a 
railroad line running through Col- 
legedale. and sometimes we tend 
to get the idea that Happy Valley 
is untouchable by disaster, but is 
it?), are we preparing for the 
greatest disasters (both natural 
and manmade) that will ever 
touch our world? 



IF GOD WENT ON STRIKE 

^He Tver once ... down and said. •Thafs ,. . " ""<'"8''' 
I've had enovgh of these on earth, so this is what I U do. 

■■ni eive mv orders to the Sun. 'Cut off your heat supply.' 
Z r h^Moon. 'Give no more light.' and run those oceans dry. 
Then just to make it really tough and put the pressure on, 
Turn off the air and oxygen till every breath is gone. 

Do you know. He'd be justified if fairness was th^ sam^e 
Forno one has been more abused or treated w.th disda.n 
Thank God-and yet He carries on. supplying you and me 
With all the favors of His grace and everything-for tree. 

Men say they want a better deal, and so on strike they | 
But what a deal we've given God. to Whom everything > 
We don't care whom we hurt or harm to gain the things we 
But what a mess we'd all be in-if God should go on strike 
—Anonymous (From the "Canadian Trumpet 




Vanessa 
Greenleaf 





College Grants Exhibit 
Church's New Interest 
In Communications 



In an effort to attract more 
young people to writing careers, 
the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church has established a $37,.'^00 
fund to support selected English, 
communication and religious 
writing programs. The action was 
taken in response to the needs of 
publishing houses and medical 
and educational institutions for 
competent writers at a wide va- 
riety of administrative and crea- 
tive levels. 

The funds are provided by the 
General Conference, the Review 
and Herald, Pacific Press -ind 
Southern Publishing associations, 
and a private sou-'ce. Applica- 
tions for grants must be made 
through the General Conference 
Board of Higher Education. 

The first awards of $3,000 each 



w-ere made to Andrews University 
and Pacific Union College. Mod- 
est grants to other SDA colleges 
and universities will be con- 
sidered and awarded annually, 
according to established criteria, 
during the five-year period of the 
program. 

In addition to the immediate 
value to current writing programs 
at Andrews and PUC. these 
grants underscore the commit- 
ment of 'church leadership and 
publishing house managements 
to aid those with writing talent. 
The grants further underscore the 
leadership's understanding of its 
partnership role with education to 
produce able communicators of 
the Seventh-day Adventist 
Church. 



Laws and Service 

All things in heaven 
and in earth 

declare the great law of life 
is a law of service. 

The infinite Father ministers 

to the life of every living thing. 

Christ came to the earth 
"as He that serveth." 

The same law of service 

is written upon all things in nature. 
The birds of the air, 
the beasts of the field, 
the trees of the forest, 
the leaves, 
the grass, 
the flowers, 

the sun in the heavens, 
the stars of light 
— all have their ministry. 

Lake and ocean, 
river and water spring 
— each takes to give. 

The same laws which govern 

the things of nature 

and events of life 
are to control us. 

They are given for our good; 
Only in obedience to them can we find 
true happiness and success. 

Arranged as poetry from Education 



If we take our divine 
guidance and their view of the 
future seriously, then we'd better 
be getting our act together. Yet 
there seems to be a growing 
indifference among us to the 
whole thing. 1 must base that 
st:ii '"innt on my observations of 
vvhai -e are doing in our conver- 
sauoits. our reading habits, our 
vorsnip (I was taught as a child 
thai you had reverence for God 
and His house — it's not the place 
111 read Reader's Digest, to ex- 
change pictures and love letters. 
CK.I A 4.0 GPA should not be our 
only goal; our liberal arts pro- 
gram should train us how to use 
our knowledge for the glorifica- 
tion of God. 

"Higher than the highest hu- 
man thought can reach is God's 
ideal for His children. Godli- 
ness — Godlikeness — is the goal to 
be reached..." Ed. 18 

Our neglect of the Bible and the 
Spirit of Prophecy causes our 
indifference to the whole spec- 
trum of life. It gives us the 
highest purpose for our worship, 
our education, our future and our 
destiny. Do you get the point? 

Are we preparing for eternity 
or death? Our daily devotional 
habits answer that question. How 
is it with you today? 




DtfiDL/rVL: March .2i 

'ipon^or^d bu your 



Thursday, March 16, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 7 




Hounded for days by Accent photographers, Dr. Knittel is filially caught 



Ptioto by Mike Parlto 



HOT ON THE HEELS OF FLASH KNITTEL 



I DDonnie Keele 

President Frank Knittel is 
I rarely in his office these days. 
I One must try and find him all 
I aiound the campus, and if that 
I fails, then you know he must be 
I oQtof town again. 

But let's say that he is around 
I the campus somewhere. I have 
y discovered how to catch up 
I to his high rate of speed as he 
I rushes from place to place trying 
I loget everything done in one day. 
"Aha," 1 exclaim to myself, 
"there he goes now." 
After spotting him, I take quick 
I note of which direction he is 
headed. 

"Now I'll head him off at the 
pass!" 

Like a flash, I take off running, 
all the way from Lynn Wood Hall 
to the nursing building, and dis- 
"ver as I am going in the front 
JMrthat he is going out the back, 
Javing already completed his 
t'usiness. I run through to catch 
"P with him and find myself 
?"rrounded by student nurses 
Jst getting out of class. When ! 
""ailygetclearofthem and back 



ce around to try 
again, and sud- 
he goes in that 

jet pack on my 
hot pursuit only 
I all white 



outside, I glai 
and spot him 
denly.. ."there 
white Chrysler 

Strapping a 
back, I take off 
to lose sight of the 
streak below me as it goes 
through a grove of trees, and then 
re-sight it as it emerges. 

DOWNTOWN CHATTA- 
NOOGA... 

So far I've used up a jet pack 
and three pair of jet-propelled 
roller skates and am presently 
riding a jet-propelled skateboard 
as I narrowly miss him again. 

Switching to a Corvette. I try 
and tail him until I see these little 
blue lights in my rear-view mir- 
ror. "Drats, he got away again." 

After trying to explain to the 
officer the reason I was doing 115 
m.p.h. in a 55 m.p.h. zone, be- 
sides following a white Chrysler 
too closely. I manage to get away 
30 minutes later. 

Driving slowly back to College- 
dale. I plan my strategy as to how 
to trap Dr. Knittel when I next see 



him. 

It doesn't take long for me to 
find him, or at least I think that 
was hin that just shot from 
Daniells to Miller to Hackman 
Hall. Yes.. .it is him, and now he 
is heading for the Student Center- 
THE VERY PLACE WHERE I 
AMI! 

I plant my feet firmly as he 
bears down on me, only to feel the 
rush of wind as he whooshes past 
me. I yell. He slows to 55 and 
looks back over his shoulder. 1 
am running full force now, and 
finally catch him down by the 
cafeteria entrance. He stops. 

"Well Donnie," he says in a 
voice not even strained by heavy 
breathing, "How good it is to see 
you! Where DO you keep your- 
self these days? Are you ready to 
take a few notes for The Accent? 
Let's go down to my office." 

We are off again! The tables m 
the cafeteria are a blur as we 
"walk" to his office. 

I collapse in one of his chairs, 
trying to write. 

He. rushing around the office 




dictating a few things that have 
happened in the last week or two. 

1 scribble frantically, attemp- 
ting to catch every detail. 

We finish the Interview, and I 
look at my watch. "Oops!" Two 
minutes until gym class, and I 
still have to change. I'm off 
again, happy that at last I have 
gotten the news for my journalism 



class. 1 change clothes rapidly 
and dash to the softbati field, still 
half smiling at myself for having 
at last caught up to the one known 
to some as, "Faster-than-a- 
speeding-bullet." 

Nearing exhaustion, I stumble 
Up to Coach Lovejoy. 

"Keele. you're late. Take two 
laps!" 



\^t iTr^^^^^^^^^^^" ..._ *, A^»t^ Pftt Crews, Mictiele McCarthy^ 

L^'««' delves Into the [oys of Medieval Literature with students Pat Crews, ^ ^^,^ 




Ptiotobv MlkePartlo 



8 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT T1iurea«y, M«ich 16, 1978 



o 




A Great Season Leaves 
Golden Memories 



nsteve Thompsi 
The most popular season that 
takes place on SMC's campus 
ever>- year is finally over. And 
the oniy thing that's left is mem- 
ories. Finally Ken Burham's pen 
can take a rest. Who is Ken 
Burham? Well, he is the guy with 
the beard who tried to keep up 
with the "Buns" scoring record 
as he brought in the stats. Ken's 
stats, added a touch of N.B.A. to 



the season. 

Finally Barts engraves his gold- 
en crown with the numbers of 
"78". Things took place in the A 
league that brought smiles. 
Russel Eberhart took the title and 
Ian Cornow took honors of captur- 
ing C league. 

But most of all, the youngest 
team to form on campus took 
away the Rees Series title. The 



Freshman Class bowed to no 
man's defense and walked away 
musically with the sounds of their 
cheerieaders chanting "We are 
the Champions." 

Yes, the season was fine and it 
is now over. But if it was not fine 
for you. remember the words of 
another who felt the sting of 
defeat. "The Greatest", My 
chance shall come again. 



Curnow & Cress Clash For 
C League Championship 



DReuben Castillo 

The basketball season's over 
aqd the dusl has settled. C 
league saw a dynamic battle bet- 
ween Curnow and Cress. Midway 
through the season both teams 
were undefeated when they met 
for the first time. 

Both teams brought a horren- 
dous history of blowing op- 
ponents off the courts. Curnow 
came awav the winner by only two 
points. 44-42. It was closer than 
that. Neither team lost again 
until they met again. Cress was 
out to get revenge for his earlier 
loss. 

It was a hard-fought game and 
Cress prevailed to even the score. 
Both teams were now tied for first 
with only one loss each. The rest 
of the season neither team lost a 
game until the very last game of 
the season. 

They met for the last time. 



champion of C league. Both 

teams were primed and ready to 

play, adrenalin flowing like a 

fountain. 

This game would decide the 



The players played hard for hvo 
halves. When the final buzzer 
- sounded, Curnow was ahead of 
Cress. Both teams are worthy of 
our congratulations. 




Webster Continues 
Winning Ways 



DReuben Castillo 

Well, B league is a replay of 
our Softball intramural champion. 
Ted Webster. Webster winning 
is beginning to become a habit. 
As you remember, Webster fin- 
ished first in the softball league. 
Now he's done it again. Webster 
finished with a 10-2 record. The 
reason Webster wins is because 
he is a leader on the court or on 
the bench. 

The object lesson to be learned 
here is this: the team with the 
best unity will win. None of this 



SThe Power Kick 

DSteve Thompson 

With the arrival of the new enough hustle to hang on the 

spring weather, it's now time for field, sign up in the gym. 

the power kick, better known as Competition seems to be pretty 

the world of soccer. If you think tough this year. But remember 

you're quick enough and have it's only a kick in the grass. 



all-star stuff is going to come out 
on top. In the NBA championship 
series of '77, the 76'ers and the 
Blazers fought it out and the team 
with the unity won over the team 
of five all-stars with inflated sal- 
Webster is not ready for the 
NBA yet, but the point is still 
valid. Teamwork is essential. 
Congratulations to Webster and 
his teammates who are truly a 
team. 



The Annual Men's Club Double 
Tennis Toumament Will Begin 
March 20. Sign up by Friday, 
the 17th m Talge. 



Craft Castle 

:mOU Bramerd Road 

In Bramerd Village 

Open 7 days 10-6 

Sign up now 

for these 

classes starting soon: 

TOLE-PAINTING 
CROCHET 
KNITTING 
MACRAME 

For classes in crafts, arts, and macrame. and for all your craft 
.eds and supplies 




NOT SINCE 
KJ^ STORY. 



$2.00®ctra 
with this ad 

for your first 
plasma donation. Total $12. 




Qiattanooga Blood Center 
310 Cherokee Blvd. 267-9778 



The friie story of Jill Kinmonf. 

The American Olympic 

ski contender whose tragic fall 

took everything but her lite. 

And who found the courage 

to live through the love of one 

very special man. 

'THE OTHER SIDE OF 
THE MOUNTAIN" 



Showing in the gym Sunday. March 19. at 7:30 p. m. SI 
admission. $3 family, student I. D. holders free. 




EAT IT HERE — 
OBCABHVOUT 

• TACOS 

• TOSTADOS 

• BURRITOS 

• FRUOLES 

• BELL BURGERS 

• ENCHIBrrO 

4921 BflAlNERD RD. 
(AT MOORE m 




THE 

SOUTHERN ACCENT 

Voice Of Th. Southern Missionaru rnll.o. ^u,a^^. " 



c 



Thursday, March 23, 1978 



Collegedale, Tennessee 




^•ciallditioiii 

An SMC Dating 
Panorama 



BEHIND Women To Ask For Dates P. 4 

PAGE ONE: Single And Still Together P. 5 

Engagement Announcements P. 8 



2 - THE SOUTHERN ACCENT HmmU)', M«reh 23, 197« 

Pace 

Dating— The Most 
Popular Sport 

Bffiebali and seweral other sports— horaeshoe pitching, sunbathing, Ice cream cone 
selling, and midnight surfing, to name a few— utilize the beginning months of the year 
for an a:tivity commonly called "spring training," which preparaa the athletes for full 

participation during the surrener. 

But man's oldest sport peaks during theee months and dimaxes In May and June 
when the majority of finals are consummated. TTw game? Not Christians vs. Uons, not 
Sharit-huntere vs. Jaws, not even Talge vs. Village. Try Male vs. Female, the sutrtly and 
highly evolved form of recreation known to mankind. 

The rules are fundamentally simple, but In practice complex and variant to the point 
o( orderiessnass. The object of the game Is to capture the affect lons(known as the 
"hearl") of someone on the opposing team. The most successful players (known as 
popular persons) may tiave as much as a dormful of opposing athletes competing among 
themselves for the popular person's attention. fJot Infrequently, two players will capture 
each other's hearts simultaneously. In which case they are disqi^lfled from active 
participation and put to the business of pnxJucing and training new players. 

Although no mearra are impermissiblQ In the game (cases of attempted bribery of 
Cupid being on record), the female team is nevertheless at somewt^at of a disadvantage. 
Ouetoastrangesetof rules (known 33 "Amy Vanderbiit's Dating Do's and Don'ts" and 
similar versions), the males are allowed overt operation and the females must resort to 
covert methods (which are more difficult, albeit more challenging, it would seem) 
involving elatxirate subteriuges and piottings. Many girls have developed this into an 
advanced art form and many a male would be shocked if he became aware of the subtle 
means employed to induce him to ask out his weekend date. 

Currently, the more militant women are demanding that the rules be cfianged; the 
smarter gals are simply ignoring the rules. Irregardless of their efforts the game wrili still 
remain much the same. Girls will still express false surprise at finally being asked out by 
slow-witledmalesonwtwm they have been subtly "working" for weeks. Guys will still 
attempt to "gel the bait without ttw hook" and vrill still discover that "what can kiss can 

Players of both teams will still get too carried away on occasion and break the hearts 
they have captured. And most will still eventually be disqualified, which is really best, 
because that way everybody wins. hu r«« rw™ 




Emperor A John BircNer? 



The Emperor 

Stands 

Corrected 

Dear Editor: 

After reading the Emperor's 
letter, I decided to check out what 
actually was the difference be- 
tween socialism and communism. 

According to Webster, com- 
munism is a step in reaching the 
stage of socialism. 

True, socialism, in its pure 
state of share and share alike, is a 
truly great ideal to strive for. But 
human nature being what it is, a 
truly socialistic state is an impos- 
sible dream in this world. 

Melissa Szijarto 

P.S. And besides, a socialistic 
government couldn't have an 
emperor. 



Dear Editor: 

Re: Last weeks' letter to the 
editor from "Emperor" Jerry Lee 
Holt. First of all I'd like to say 
thatif the "People's Party" leans 
toward socialism, Mr. Holt and 
cohorts have yet to learn their left 
hands from their right. Like 
many who claim "liberalism" on 
this campus, the only thingsocial- 
istic about the "People's Party" 
is its name. A serious lack of 
knowledge as to what constitutes 
socialism seems to be Mr. Holt's 
problem. Perhaps he should con- 
sult his Funk and Wagnall's. 

It is also interesting to note that 
Mr. Holt and the majority of the 
members of the "People's Party" 
are vapid chauvinists. The 
"people" in "People's Party" 
concerns, for the most part, the 
men in the organization. If wom- 
en are considered, one finds them 
to be mostly simpering, giggly. 
Southern belles. I suggest a new 
title for Mr. Holts' party. "The 
New, Improved, John Birch 
Socie^". 

As to the "Plebeian Press", I 
haven't yet seen it so cannot 




(SmJMMM. 



• ATTENTION NURSING STU- 
DENTS - MABCH 1978 - RE- 
CRUn-ERS: 3/21-22, Paradise 
Valley Hospital, A.A. Chacon; 
3/30. Scott Memorial Hospital, 
Mike Holland; 3/30, Shawnee 
Mission Medical Center, Frank 
Diehl. Please call 4282 for an 
appointment. 



* MUST have a ride to California, 
(preferably PUC - Angwin area) 
after school is out in May. Will 
help with driving and gas, don't 
have much luggage. I will take 
any ride, even if it's to the Loma 
Linda area but prefer to go to the 
northern California area. Contact 
Jolene at 4525 after 11 o'clock 



The Southern Accent 



o ner comsnl Items create an open exchange of Ideas, a lonim in iha «^ ^i 

vacS"""*" "^ '" "'"'""*' "=*'*■ ""^ '•* ="=^1°" ot test weeks an<J 
C^^^'^. 'L'Z'Sm,.t'"^' "= ^ ^ ^^' "^'^ -*'V from 

B^ln^SI^ Lynn Neumann 

Pam Legere 

Ad Manww Denise Sheets 

"co';^-;.-.-. Sr,"?!-!! 

Kathy Mixell 

Subscriptions... r"^™.?*^* 

Artist CandyMiranda 

F-Koiogr;,;,;;;; ^'^'" 

Rnonda Runyan 

Sponsor. Mike Partio 

Frances Andrews . 

All correspondence may be addressed to !>» «i»rtf.«. a. . « 

Missionary College. Collegedale, TennTlfsis. ^^" *°^' *>"»»" 

Pt^™:: (615)396-4356 

Office Hours: Sunday— 9 a.m.-9 p.m 
[ytonday— 10 a.m.-8 p.m 
Tuesday— « , ' 



n.-6p.r, 



* LOST: one black unbrella with 
a brown plastic broken handle. If 
found, please call John Lazor at 
396-4573 or 396-3630 or leave for 
me at Student Center desk. 

* Be in the top ten per cent. Be 
on top of the situation — learn to 
fly. Call Collegedale Aero at 
236-4246. 

* Important Issnes Facing Onr 
Chnrch! Dr. Desmond Ford, pro- 
fessor of religion from PUC, will 
be on campus the weekend of 
March 24 and 25. He will speak 
Friday at 5 p.m. in the church on 
issues in Adventism. He will also 
speak on Sabbath morning at 8:30 
and 11 at Hixson, on Sabbath 
afternoon at 3 in the Collegedale 
Church on issues and answers, 
and again Sunday morning to the 
faculty in the banquet room. 
Then again Sunday afternoon, he 
will talk in the church at 3 p.m. on 
issues and answers. 

* THE HONOR SOCIETY IN 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES, Alpha 
Mu Gamma, will hold its spring 
initiation meeting during the 
supper hour on Friday, March 24. 
Contact Dr. Morrison or Jose 
Bourget for more info. 

* MEN'S CLUB ROAD RALLYI 

Sunday, March 26, 10:45 a.m in 
the church parking lot. A $2 
entrance fee per car is to be paid 

I", 7 f. '*";''''■ ^"'^''°'''^'' 
ind, & 3rd place finishers. There 
must be 2 people for each car: 
dnver and navigator. Everyone is 
welcome!! Sign-up sheets are in 
T, °"^- Fo' more information 
contact Dan Burtnett or David 
Havsen. 



* On March 26, beginning at 4 
p.m., the SA will conduct its 
annual Easter Egg Hunt activity. 
The event will begin with the egg 
hunt followed by an auction for 
box lunches. Colored eggs with 
assigned number values will be 
hidden; the greater the point 
value of the egg, the more diffi- 
cult it should be to find. There 
will be three "big" eggs stashed, 
red, silver, and gold worth 30, 40, 
and 50 points respectively. 

A person tries to find as many 
eggs as he can in order to ac- 
cumulate points. The points can 
then be used as money at the 
auction to buy decorated box lun- 
ches which will have been made 
by the girls (the giris go with their 
boxes). To add to the fun, a 
contest will be held to award cash 
prizes to the three people who 
accumulate the highest point tal- 
lies with their eggs. 

The person with the highest 
point count will receive $25, the 
second highest point-getter will 
receive $15, and the third high- 
est-point scorer will receive $10. 
Come early and bring those 
bloodhound noses and festive 
spirits. In ease of rain, the event 
wUl be held in the P.E. Center 

*To Romanus Archilles and 
friends. Keep on Writinglll 

* Estudiantes Latinos: El domin- 
go 2 de abril, a las 7:30 a.m. 
estaremos saliendo para ""Six 
Flags Over Georgia." Debidoala 
gran demanda, te sugerimos que 
reserves tu asiento antes de ese 
dia. El costo total son $10. Esto 
incluye entrada y transportacion. 
Par mas informacion comunicate 
con Miquel Arenas (4975) o con 
lleana (4635). 



make any significant commenis 
My suspicion, though, is that . 

■east its title is appfopri^t^ej 
sidenng the fact that "p,eb;i* 
IS defined as: coarse, low vuloa, 
crude of or pertaining to ifc 
lowest class of Roman society. 

Sincerely, 
(Ms.) Dawn Rice 

The Emperor 
Answers 

Dear Editor: 

It has been brought to my 
attention that Dawn Rice has writ- 
ten you concerning the People's 
Party. It is my suggestion that 
she check into subjects before she 
writes about them. 

In a more personal view, I 
would like to tell her that the 
United States Marine Corps is 
looking for "females" to enlist for 
combat positions. The Marines 
are still looking for a few "good 
men," maybe you could apply, 
Sarge! 

Jerry Lee Holt 
The People's Party 



* To the Secret Sender: Thanks 
for the nifty device I I checked it 
out and it worked perfectly! The 
"safe" one. 

* Anyone interested in doing an 
act for the Talent Show April IS 
should contact Sandy Carmen or 
Melanee Snowden by Friday. 



-* Fiist Annual North American 
Christian Van-In. Reserve, June 
16, 17, 18 for a delightful week- 
end of recreation and friendship 
in the heart of Ontario's Muskolia 
Lakes Tourist area. For more 
information and reservation 
forms write to: Van-In, Box 520, 
Oshawa, Ontario, Canada, LIH 7 
Ml. or phone: 1-416-579-7118. 



SEEKING I 

NEW DONORS | 

FOR I 

PLASMA PROGRAM | 

New Donors accepted from - 

9 a.m. til 4 p.m. | 

OPEN M., T., Th., F- I 

8 a.m. —5 p.m. I 

Fully licensed by FDA and | 

Tennessee Licencing !>" | 

vice. I 



For information 

755-0930. 

Address: 

Metro Plasma, Inc. 

1034 McCallie Ave. 

Chattanooga, Tenn. 

U.S. License 615 



BONUS FOR NEW ( 
DONORS WITH COUI"'"' J 



nmmUy, Maicli 23, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT - 3 



MEMORIES Makes Dating Suggestion \ 'Z!^l!^r^'Tn^ \ 



pear Editor: 

I appreciate your letting me 
; read the results of your poll abut 
dating at SMC. From the dif- 
ferent answers and comments, I 
got the impression that the stu- 
dents feel something seems to be 
going wrong in the area of dating. 

Most of the guys who answered 
the poll {52 per cent) said that 
they don't date because they have 
no time, no money, or no car. It 
seems like you're required to 
have money, a car, and enough 
time to go downtown for a datel 
In other instances, some felt they 
were afraid to be hurt, or just 
merely shy. Only six per cent 
said they don't have any interest 
at all. 

The girls, on the other side, 
feel there should be more action 
on this campus (surprising?). As 
a matter of fact, 62 per cent felt 
pressured to date, and 95 per cent 
would say "yes" if asked. When 
asked if they would ask out a guy, 
a surprising 1/3 said "yes." It's 
important to know at this point 
that 92 per cent of the guys would 
not mind being asked out. 



In the light of these revelations 
I have a two-fold suggestion to 
make. First, to separate as a 
matter of experiment one or two 
weekends a month when the girls 
(those who want to) would ask the 
guys out. This could be promoted 
by the dorm clubs in a genera! 
way. As men we are used to 
hearing a "no", but I don't know 
what could happen if suddenly a 
third of the girls took the initiative 
and asked out someone among 
the 92 per cent of the guys who 
wouldn't mind. 

Secondly, the guys would sup- 
port this initiative (or just on their 
own) by asking out either the 
same girl or somebody else. The 
fact that over half of the men 
don't ask out because they don't 
have the time or a car to go 
off-campus, or no money to pay 
for pizza or burritos, reveals 
that we need more social activi- 
ties on this campus besides the 
cultural programs such as con- 
certs, and talent programs. 

I believe that the Student As- 



sociation should take the initiative 
in this respect. Other clubs and 
groups on campus can prepare 
other kind of activities, especially 
the dorm clubs who, needless to 
say, have done more this year 
than the SA Social Activities 
Committee has. 

Does this sound fair enough? 
According to the poll 93 per cent 
of the students on this campus 
would like to do something about 
it. Of course, to be asked out 
once or twice does not necessarily 
mean that you are going to marry 
that person. Marriage does not 
have to be the immediate result of 
dating. What about fellowship, 
friendship, or just for fun? 
Chances are. however, that by 
getting in contact with a broader 
spectrum of personalities we'll be 
more capable of making a better 
decision, or the best choice, if you 
please. 

Your fellow editor, 
Jose Bourget, . 
Sonthem Memories 



The Editors Have Their Rights, Too 



Dear Editor: 

Has the power of the press 
been misused? This is a question 
that has been sounded against the 
freedom of the press for many 
generations, not only on our cam- 
pus, but all over the world. 

In a letter to the editor printed 
March 16. a statement was made 
that The Southern Accent stepped 
beyond their declared intentions 
I as the "voice of the students." 
The person who wrote this was 
I being granted the right to have 
i his opinion printed in the place 
I provided for student opinion -- 
I the editorial section. This is the 



purpose of the editorial section, 
and so it should be. 

But this person tried to con- 
vince us that because the editors 
of our paper have influence, they 
should not be able to submit their 
opinion, v^hat, then, has hap- 
pened to their right to have their 
opinion printed? 

The issue. I think, is that some 
feel endorsements are unfair. I 
remind you that anyone who 
wished to have their endorsement 
printed could have done so as the 
Men's Club did in the issue fol- 
lowing the editor's endorsement. 



^SlftWJtE. A/\fiRfllfi6E IS THE 
BI66EST STEP YOO'LL EVfeR TAy<E 
/WD IT DOES REQOiRt CAREFOu AND 
WfttltfUL CoJSDEWnovJ.M "BOT IF YoO 
A«E>J*T rtlTtHED QV 6RAWprrK^, FiELLA. 

\t30*a Bfc oor iM TUf 

COLD.' ^^ 




So for all you folk who want to 
be fair, get your endorsements 
ready early for next year's SA 
elections. 

Tim Nichols 

The People's Party 

Director of Religious Persecution 

'Prof Denies 

Plebeian 

Connection 

Dear Editor: 

I would like to take this oppor- 
tunity to officially and in writing 
deny any connection with the 
current publication called the 
Plebeian Press. This letter is 
being written so that all of those 
great scholars who stay up late at 
night trying to think of whom the 
wise people are that publish this 
paper can get some much deserv- 
ed rest, not to mention putting an 
end to the amount of questions 
that are asked of me each and 
every day since this great publica- 
tion had its debut. 

1 believe, as does the People's 
Party, in free speech. However, I 
also was among those that were 
looking for a signature to be 
attached to this piece of litera- 
ture. However, realizing the 
most unfortunate problems that 
the "editors" of this paper may 
get from the administration, 1 can 
see why it wasn't attached. 

The editors of said paper will 
probably, however, want to take 
note and add the following to 
their already scholarly subscrip- 
tion list: village students and Dr. 
Melvin Campbell. 

Cordially, 

"Prof Rima 




G 



Southern Matrimonial Col.? 



Dear Editor: 

A number of years ago I came 
to SMC believing, as I still do, 
that SMC was where God wanted 
me. A relationship that I had with 
a girl had ended the summer 
before, and I felt I was starting 
everything all over. 

I met a "with it" faculty mem- 
ber and talked to him about my 
lifework and relating to the oppo- 
site sex. He told me I should date 
around as much as I could to 
become acquainted with as many 
young women as 1 could. Re- 
garding the possibilities of ever 
finding a mate he said, "When 
you find her, you'll know she's 
the one." 

I followed his advice, and al- 
though I met a lot of fantastic 
girls, I could never settle my mind 
on just one. The right one didn't 
seem to exist. Besides, I was 
dating because I wanted to meet 
many girls, not because I wanted 
to get married. 

Then I began asking myself, 
What is the purpose of going to 
college? Is it to gain an educa- 
tion? Is it to prepare for a work in 
the Lord's vineyard? Is it to find a 
mate? 

I found some very interesting 
statements: "While at school, 
students should not allow their 
minds to become confused by 
thoughts of courtship. They are 
there to gain a fitness to work for 
God, and this thought is ever to 
be uppermost." Counsels to 
Teachers, p. 100. 

"The course pursued at the 
college by Brother C. in seeking 
the society of young ladies, was 
wrong. This was not the object 
for which he was sent to Battle 
Creek. Students are not sent here 
to form attachments, to indulge in 
flirtation or courting [passion pit. 
Student Center?!, but to obtain an 
education. 4T, p. 433. 

There is nothing anywhere m 
the Bible or the Spirit of Prophecy 
that I could find that suggests 
dating on a serious level, court- 
ing, or thinking of marriage while 



in school. {I wonder if anyone can 
date a member of the opposite sex 
without one of the two becoming 
more Involved in time.) A guy 
and a girl need to find out first 
where their special place in God's 
work is. The guy must have a 
means of support (MYP, p. 461) 
and it is even suggested that he 
acquire property." 2 SM, pp. 
420, 421. 

And yet, regardless of the 
above counsel which I choose to 
believe as it stands, there are 
those who are concerned about 
me so much that they wish me to 
date more than I am, saying, 
"When will you ever be in a 
better position to find a life com- 
panion ever again?" I won't and 
that's the fact. 

But God will work things out in 
His own way in His own good 
time. I want God's choice of 
special work and a special girl. 
Were I to make those decisions on 
my own, I would end up like many 
others — divorced, discouraged, a 
possible suicide victim. 

In the book God's Smoggler 
there is a fitting paragraph. 
"When you are ready, she is 
ready; God will let you know. 
Neither of you will feel pressured. 
It will be relaxed, comfortable, 
interesting, and a rewarding ex- 
perience for both of you. So, do 
the things that are most neces- 
sary to assure your education and 
graduation. God is most capable 
of supplying our needs in His own 
time and place." 



Lights Please! 

Dear Editor: 

Could" someone please turn the 
lights back on in the back stair- 
way leading from the Cafeteria 
and Student Center. There 
is nothing like falling down a long 
stairway in the dark! 

J. Ford 



4 - THE SODTHEIIN ACCENT I1iiindq>, Which 23, 1978 



3 




DATE (dl 

An appointnil 
set time; spej 

appointmem 
person of thi 



Webster's Nej 



On this feanome day, Dogpatch Viomen chase the men over acourse strewn with obstacles. Any man caught o 
day must marry the Mjman wtw trapped him. The vwddlngs are then celebrated with something called The 
Matrimonial Stomp. 

Daisy Mae proposes to Abner, but stalwart tad that he Is, he vnM rather go fishing behind Cbmpone Square under 
the Yokumberry Tree. In the above cartoon. Daisy Mae Is on the heels of Abner on Sadie Hawkins Day. 



3 Women Ask Out 3 Guys & Start 

SHAKING THE SMC DATING TRADITION 



DDebra Gainer 

SMC is a conservative Southern 
college. Yet even here, in our 
peaceful valley, the rumblings of 
a new movement can be heard. 
The Accent talied to three SMC 
girls -- regular girls they are, no 
women's libbers -- who took the 
initiative to reverse the traditional 
dating roles. They each asked a 
guy out on a formal date. 

It was a new and somewhat 
frightening experience for all pf 
them. One girl agonized for foiir 
days before she got up the cour- 
age to call a guy and invite him 
out to eat. She said that the initial 
asking was the worst part. On the 
outside, her voice was forced into ■ 
perfect control, but on the inside 
she felt like she was "just ready 



to fall through the floor." When 
he behaved like it was a normal 
occurrence and nonchalantly said, 
sure he'd be glad to, then she was 
so excited she jumped about three 
feet off that floor she'd felt like 
falling through. 

Another girl said that the ask- 
ing was scary because of how he 
might feel about it. She thought 
that "if he wanted to go out with 
me, he would have asked me." 
Apparently, he didn't think that 
way, because he accepted with 
alacrity; She still felt a little 
funny. Maybe he accepted be- 
cause he was too surprised to say 
no. She noted that guys are not 
practiced in the feminine ways of 
and refijsal. 




None of the men gave the 
shocked reactions the girls had 
waited for with such trepidation. 
They all reacted with easy equa- 
nimity, if with some surprise at 
this unprecedented turn of e- 
vents. One guy said he was 
delighted that the girl had the 
freedom to go ahead and ask him 
out. He did note that his reaction 
might not have been so immedi- 
ately congenial if he had been 
approached by a total stranger. 

Once the initial step had been 
taken and accepted, mode of 
transportation was the next con- 
cern. Two girls were more com- 
fortable allowing the man to drive 
his own car. They decided he 
would feel more masculine and 
more in control of the unusual . 
situation. One giri went all out 
and insisted that she do all the 
driving, even that she pick him up 
at the proper time. She felt foolish 
waiting around in the men's lobby 
for her date, but he rather en- 



joyed the leisure of taking his 
time to get ready - not having to 
riish over to her dorm to sit and - 
wait for her. 

He felt a little strange being 
chauffered around by her, but he 
didn't really mind it. Things 
would have gotten a little awk- 
ward though, he said, if she had 
reached over to put her arm a- 
round him and he'd had to sit 
beside her in the middle of the' 
bench seat. That would have 
been just too much of a reversal. 

Each of the girls took their guys 
out on a true formal date -- two to 
classy restaurants, one to a dress- 
up theatre play. The guys found 
themselves just sitting back and 
enjoying it. One said it was kind 
of nice to let the giri take respons- 
ibility to arrange things for once. 
He said if giris had this great a 
time when he took them out, he'd 
have to do it mor^ often. 

Some awkwardness arose with 
the matter of finances. The guys 



Ro/e Reversal Survey 



1. ,JJ-;^ you object if a giri asked you for a date? 

^' V ^°int" ""I!" 'f y™ *''"'' "-"ow the girt? 
Yes-30% No-31% Maybe-39% 

3. Would you expect the girl to pick you uo? 

Yes-40% No-60% ^ 

Would you expect the giri to pay for the date' 
ies-49% No-51% 

Yets'/^^Har^'''"-"''^"''-"'--^ 
'■ vT^^r °nS;% "' "'^' ^™ '" ^ -oond date? 



piiMoliyVaMJahMin 



Would you object if the giri initiated affectionate 
No-29% Maybe-3S% 



behavioi 

Yes-36% 



found it difficult to escape their 
established role and kept trying to 
pay the whole way through -- to 
pick up the dinner check, pay for 
the tip, get refreshments after the 
play. Each giri insisted on paying 
for everything, on the premise 
that if she did the asking she 
should do the paying. It was 
humorous to note how the wai- 
tresses always gave the check to 
the man, and were surprised to 
see the woman take care of it. 

By the end of the evening, the 
girls had gotten over their uncom- 
fortable feelings that "he might 
think I'm forward and aggres- 
sive," and everyone enjoyed 
themselves. The event led them 
into discussions in the area of 
dating and role reversals. The 
guys universally said they 
thought it was a marvelous idea 
for the girls to ask them out. 
They told the giris to keep asking 
guys for dates, advising them that 
guys really liked it. As one girl 
put it, it's sort of like sending a 
Valentine card - just a fnendly 
way of saying you're interestel- 
One guy said it was about time 
that something was done to e^ 
qualize creative freedom in 
area of dating. . . 

All involved discovered tnai 
sharing this unique experieiJC 
helped bring them closer to ea 
other. They found it fascrnaW 
to see what life was like on 



It was a 
new :' 



other side of the coin, 
successful initiation of 
movement. , .ijg 

The dates were made in 
name ofresearch, but why not irj 

it outi 

The Daring Women and Their 
Dates: 

Becki Joiner & Keith Clifton 
Amy Cecil & Brad Baum 
Kristi Reed & Jerry Holt 



Overheard In an apbound elevator: 
"He says he loves me Just as I am." 
"Yoa mean single?" 



)||__,^,H,J» ■^- ™™*'3'- March 23, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT, 

f Molding The Singles Scrap Pile 

^ So you're not datingi But vou m,r.i,H v. "^ mwrnm 

for a 
social 
itha 
iposite 



MDictit 



cjam in my mmd.i 
Kt have backed up 
i highways. 

hyet, 

if me either 
ftafficjam 

PBenchlna 



Betimes 1 wonder what you're thinking, 
iider whether you think me too bold 
Berhaps not bold enough. 

fetimes I spend the whole of the day 
Bdering whether you ever wonder 
jtl am wondering. 



jl yourself in every 
sion with a photo 
?rry. 



□J. 

So you're not d'atingi But you 
dont want to make that last 
desperate move to join Philosda 
Of Adventist Contact just yet 

^ndifyou'reover22andnot 
dating, It's worse: your friends 
tell you to go to Andrews or Loma 
Lrnda. Then there is always the 
nursmg home if all else fails. 

Hey! Don't put singles on the 
shelf. Because a person is not 
dating doesn't mean that person 
IS maladjusted, weird, or cannot 
catch anyone. 

Many students go at it like they 
have to find a companion here at 
SMC. After all, if you don't find 
one here, where in the"world" 
will you fine one? More time is 
often spent pursuing this goal 
than classwork. 

Hordes go to Adventist colleges 
just to hunt a mate and end up 
settling for second best. But if 
you don't find anybody here you 
really want to spend the hext 60 
years with, why just take anyone? 
Why do Adventist students near 
graduation with a sense of doom 
if they haven't found "one"? „„, „,„, „ „, ,„„ 

The remark has been made that ation? What happens if you leave 
If a girl IS not engaged or married this hub of young Adventists and 

vear she mtr", "^7"°™°'' «" ""^'^ '" ^""^ Predominantly 

year she might as well sell her white-haired home church? The 

hope (less) chest. And a guy who only advice we can give is to 

paduates unattached just didn't continually trust in God and the 

have It. You know - he mnst plan He has for you. Ask Him to 

have problems! guide you. Dedicate yourself to 

But not everybody is neces- His service and then pray that He 

sanly raaritally-minded. It's not will make you happy and content 

always God's plan that you get with His leading. 



married. Yes, man was not cre- 
ated to be alone. One might feel a 
certain Biblical pressure to get 
married, but ask God to use you 
as a single person, and if you are 
to have a mate. He'll supply one. 
but a person can rightly choose 
to be, at least for the time being, 
single. Single and still complete 
at that. No screws missing, no 
inherent abnormalities. If you fit 
into this category, you should 
define yourself as single and get 
on with life. Don't moan over the 
tacts and be bitter. A single man 
or woman does not have to lead 
the frustrated life that society 
depicts - old maid, spinster, dirty 
old man. A single person can still 
live and love. 
After all, what is love anyway? 
It's friendship blossomed into a 
sharing of oneself totally. A 
single can find fulfillment in 
friends and family and God. As 
one watches the soaring divorce 
rate among young-married Ad- 
ventists, one becomes more de- 
termined to wait fill the "right 
one" comes along. 
But what happens after gradu- 




Malcing It After The Rejection 



D Jeff Mitchell, reprinted from Listen magazine, March 1977. 
Qnestlon: 



What do yoD do when you love 
someone, bnt that person doesn't 
love von In return? 

Answer: 




On. the other hand, there is no {person into trouble. In fact, the 

way you can draw love out of way he thinks about the rejection 

another person if he doesn't wish lean be more painful than the 

to give it to you. He has to give irejection itself. The simple fact 

you the gift of love if he wants you that people are able to love and 

to have it. ^*spress that love is a beautiful 

Many people think there is and good thing. Why should he 

something wrong with them if feel rotten about himself if some- 

My first thought on this ques- another person doesn't accept body decides that he doesn't want 

tion is another question, "Does their love and return it. This kind the love that is being given? 

the pe^on you love know that you of thought pattern can really get a Don't get discouraged when 

love him?" 

I was asked the same question 
you are asking from a former stu- 
dent. I found, after questioning 
her about the situation, that she 
really had made little or no effort 
to let her friend know that she felt 
very strongly about him. So on 
the surface he seemed to be 
ignoring her. After he got the 
true message from her, he paid 
more attention to her. They are 
still dating, and it's now been 
more then three years. 

If you've made your messages 
clear and you're still not receivmg 
any love in return, that is a 
painful situation. Rejection is 
probably the most painful emo- 
tion a person Can experience. 

A few thoughts on the subject 
might help to lessen some of the 
pain you feel when the love you 
give is not returned. 

The word "give" is the key to 
understanding love. You give- 
love, and you can only give it 
freely. No one can take it from 
you if you don't want to give it. 
Love is a gift. You can't force 
anybody to accept a gift if he 
really doesn't want it. So you 
should forget about pushing your 
love on anybody. 



you give love and the person 
doesn't feel the same way you do. 
Don't blame him either, gach 
person marches to the beat -of a 
different drummer, and his need£ 
and dreams may be very different 
from your own. He will have to 
find his own way. Keep trying. 
Most likely you'll soon find some- 
one with whom you can share 
your love. 




6- THE SOUTHERN ACCENT IliiiiwUy, Mudi 23, 1978 




MOTHER-IN-LAW MOUNTAIN 



You look at that special person yourself that everything is going 
from afar and are enchanted at to be alright. You decide to glide 



the supremacy of their together- 
ness. You watch them conduct 
their lives with the harmonics of a 
philharmonic orchestra and 
marvel at the fluency of silent 



thin air, in hopes of either 
recuperating or obtaining a safe 
landing. 



Though you add illusive eie- 

n^usic. ments, it is inevitable that if 

After watching their actions for something doesn't happen quick, 

so long without ever telling any- the perils of romance might write 

one— you wait; wait for the right the last chapter in the story of 

time to respectfully submit a pas- your life (or so it seems), 
sion for Friendship. 

"You're gonna crash, you're 

You know how the story goes gonna crashi" you hear yourself 

(maybe yours was a little different pleading, ' 'Bail out, bail out) ' ' 

in detail, but it's probably hap- What would you do? Would 

pened to you more than once): you bail out? Did you bring your 

boy meets girl, girl meets boy, parachute? Are your parachute 

and before you know it, sparks of rip-cords Mother's apron strings? 
special things start happening. 
You're flying along higher than 
cloud nine without a plane. 

Then one day right out of the 
clear blue sky, you discover en- 
gine trouble in your relationship. 
The first thing you want to do is 
radio down to the ground for help, 
but you have already flown too 
high, and the channels of com- 
munication are jammed. 



"What now?" you ask yourself 
outofpanic. "Whatam Igoingto 

do without her? I feel so blue 

don't know what to do— built my 
world around her." 

"Pilot to navigator, pilot to 
navigator," you repeat over and 
over to yourself, as you try desper- 
ately to reach your logic 




How long would it be before 
you were back in the same boat— 
I mean plane again? Would the 
next person in line be a victim of 



Srti'""""'""™"""''^ the politics of experience? How 
SO you ..I yourself and tel, ^br'^o^Lr^t: ^t' ;:^2of''''^'^ 



make the next person 
suffer for the inadequaci< 
previous romance? 

Say your engines did 
slowiy but surely, and the heart 
failure was under control. What 
are you going to do when the 
novelty wears off and you are 
grounded to taking out the gar- 
bage and going to social gather- 
ings of no interest to you? What 
then— huh? 

Or say you're flying along in 
your relationship, but your com- 
pass and altitude meter aren't 
working and there seems to be 
fog around you no matter which 
way you turn. Sure you're going, 
but where? "CRASHI" Right 
into Mother-in-law Mountain. 
"Ouch," you mutter to yourself, 
as you rub the goose egg on your 
head and try to get back on your 
feet. 

"Here, son," her father says, 
"let me lend you some money to 
help you over this rough spot. 
You don't have to worry about 
paying me back." 

"But, but Mr. Collins—!" 
"Nonsense, my boy! We'll 
work something out for you and 
the little lady. Why I remember 
when 1 was a boy. .." on and on he 
went, like a used car salesman 
whose dime seemed to never 
wear out once you jarred his 
workings. 

How about the time you got in a 
fight and she said tearfully, "I'm 
going home to Mother!" and 
about that time Mother comes to 
visit. 

How can you go home 



In case you're wondering what altitudes. Before vou h 

this column on the perils of love is sure you have thnL, Ir' ""^''^ 

leading to, it's simply this: ed many fleets Tm,f^\^'""^- 

There are many boats on the there, there is one h,u f! ™' 

ocean, and they come in all sizes, you know that the one y™ hav' " 

shapes, colors, price ranges, and the right one, Happy Sailin " 

The TM's Dilemma: 

No Peach, 
No Preach? 

DGary Williams 



^oMyiHospital 

A Challenging Opportunity In Nu 



rsing 



•Obstetrical ... ,. , 

•Medical 

•Primary Care 
•^^^9'^°' •ICU-CCU 



"No peach, no preach." "I got 
to find a woman." These labels 
and others are often applied to 
theology and religion majors, and 
they convey the impression that 
every theo major is out to get 
married 

Rumors run rampant that at 
every meeting that we have, this 
topic is emphasized. If people 
were to attend our chapels and 
special meetings (they are open to 
the whole shident body) they 
might begin to realize that our 
primary concern is the finishing 
of the work of God, which in- 
volves every member of God's 
church, 

"You cannot receive a call 
without a wife," is false. A 
number of my friends have re- 
ceived calls who are unmarried 
and even unengaged. 

"You cannot be ordained with- 
out a wife," is equally ridiculous. 
A fellow can be, and a minister 
receives the same pay married or 
unmarried. 

The religion department real- 
izes of course, as most of us do, 



that it would be much easier for a 
fuhire minister to be married 
because of the pressures of the 
job, but the department does not 
grab us by the neck and demand 
that we find a wife. This is your 
own personal business. And of 
course we have the example of 
Paul; God is not limited only to 
married ministers. 

To those girls who feel that 
dating a theo major is running the 
nsk of getting hitched, I would 
say that there may be a few risky 
ones, bdt the majority are like the 
rest of the ordinary guys when it 
comes to dating and marriage. 

Dating is a good way to form a 
friendship. We firmly believe in 
the principle that God will guide 
and direct in our interpersonal 
relationships and when in His 
time, if He sees fit, then a friend- 
ship will become a path of service 
for Him as two lives blend for the 
primary purpose of ministry. 

There you have it - the truth 
about the TM's frantic search for 
a wife. Remember: We're still 
just guys! 



College Press 

Visit the College Press for a wide range 
of wedding invitations and 
announcements. Discount to students. 




' elephone 396-2164 








Smyrna Hospifal 



T„ u„, ■v-j^iuiug — our nurses do 

I o help our patients - that's our fare. 



Thursday, March 23, 1978 THE SOUTHERN ACCENT 



THE SOUfffi^ .r nsNT //VpjgT^^IT ^ 

Survey Results o r 

& Comments 



200 studentsdOO guys, 100 gals) answered . ~„i. j 

The nomber. below Indica te pe^n^es ^ °''""*^ ''>'*•' *«"«• 

;. How often do you date? 

Never Seldom Fairlv Often nft. 
Men: 3 29 "'"| ""«" Often Very Often Other 

Women: IS 45 i* )? 20 15 

16 



that 



2. If you answered ' 'never' ■ or ' 'seldom • .; : u 

No Time Nt, money No' ^ No . t™"'" ""^ 

18 1R w f^o One Asks 



Men: 
Women 



No Interest Not Ready Poor Selection 



Guy's Comments 

'^ ™'=lf ^ fusing In the U.S. I think 

should give the girls a chancs to 

«pre^thelrMi„g„„i44^JJ 

•'niey need mors Sadie HavtWns herel 

•I TOuld like to date mire but I feel thai 

■'""■' m because you ask then out once 

•I Wish there »ere no social taboos on olrls 
MWnsguys. Sometimes gu^nTtaow 
^VMuld like to date th™,1oTheySS" 
^anyone and everyone sits around on 




3- Do you feel social pressure to date? 
Women: 57 yes Men: 22 yes 



Lc.^^'"'""^''''""'™''" '"^"'^ " """^ '^'f"'" graduating from 

■ Women: 62 yes Men: 25 yes 

5- Would you ask a guy out? \girls] Yes: 37 

Have you, besides the banquet? Yes:40 
6. Would you object to a girl asking you out? [guys] No: 92 

Has it ever happened, besides the banquet? Yes: 65 

Pollster's Notes: 

~?io,"'%«i5'' "'"' ''"'^ ^^'-i"-" <" n^ver, 76% woild not ask a guy out. 

Tu'fJ- ■ '"^" """ ''^""8 non-SMC girls o