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Full text of "Southern Bell Telephone"

SOUTHERN BELL + 
TELEPHONE <§ TELEGRAPH 

♦■ COMPANY. 

OFFICIAL + 4; 

TELCPnONC DIRECTORY 




% 



GAINESVILLE, FLA 



JUNE 1, 1899. 



«"^j,Pl=2?rv '• 



DESTROY PREVIOUS ISSUES. 

This book is the property of the 

Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Co., 

and is furnished free of charge to its sub- 
scribers. <*< ^ <*€■ <*£ 



The telephone is. 



Ideal Rapid Transit 



^* t&* 6^* Cfi^ 90^ 90^ 

\ 

The quickest way of getting over 
ground is to sit still and use the 
^0 telephone. 

Don't lose yourself by being out of 
the li§t of telephone subscribers. 



southern bell 

Telephone and Telegraph 
company. 



GAINESVILLE, FLA. 



June i, 1899. 



JOHN D. EASTEBLIN, Superintendent, 
Atlanta, Georgia. 



Special Notice. 

Please note the "Instructions and Important Suggestions" in the back 

of this Directory. 



By Proper Use the 



Telephone Door 



Can be made the 



Main Entrance 



to your establishment. 



SHUT YOURSELF OFF FROM TELE= 
PHONE SERVICE AND YOU CLOSE 
YOUR DOORS AGAINST HUNDREDS 
OF CUSTOMERS. 



GAINESVILLE, FLA. 



J. A. GOODWIN, Manager. 



REPORT TROUBLE TO No. J. 



Gainesville II-4 Allen, J S Residence. 



B 



Gainesville 7 Baird, E & Co Hardware . 

Gainesville 50 Baird, E J Mill . 

Gainesville 28 Brown House Office . 



Gainesville 2O-4 Cannon, E E Residence . 

Gainesville 36-3 Carter, S L Residence . 

Gainesville 32-3 Chestnut, John Groceries . 

Gainesville 10 Cone, T J & Co Groceries . 



Gainesville 35 Davis, W H & Co Livery . 

Gainesville 48-3 Denham, W B Residence . 

Gainesville 15 Dorsey & Waugh Groceries. 

Gainesville 22 Duke, S V Saloon . 



Gainesville 14 Eddins, J R . . Mill . 

Gainesville 32-2 Edwards, J F Saloon . 

Gainesville 27-3 Electric Power House Works . 



GAINESVILLE— Continued. 



Gainesville 


41 


Gainesville 


27-2 


Gainesville 


6 


Gainesville 


20-2 


Gainesville 


44 



Fagan, WD Meat market. 

First National Bank Office . 

FC&PRR Depot. 

Florida Fertilizer Mfg Co Office . 

Foster, E K Residence . 



Gainesville 8 G & G Railroad Depot. 

Gainesville 42 Goodwin,. J A Residence . 

Gainesville 27-4 Graham, J M Residence 



H 



Gainesville 26 Haile, E Lawyer. 

Gainesville 16 Hampton, B F Groceries. 

Gainesville 25 Harrold & Co Meat market . 

Gainesville 31 Hotel Plaza Office. 



Gainesville 13 I O Telegraph Co Office. 



Gainesville 36-2 Jewell Laundry Office . 



Gainesville 21 Lancaster, R A Dr Residence , 



M 



Gainesville 43-3 McCreary, H H Residence . 

Gainesville 46 McKinstry, J F Jr Dr Rooms. 

Gainesville 39 Merchant, G S & Co Groceries . 



I 



GAINESVILLE— Continued. 



o 



Gainesville 17 Odd Fellows' Home Residence. 

Gainesville 18 O'Donald & Saunders Groceries. 



Gainesville 2 Phillips, N D Dr Residence , 

Gainesville 48-2 Plant System Genl offices. 

Gainesville 34 Plant System Freight depot . 



Gainesville 45 Refrigerator Car Co Office. 

Gainesville 23 Robertson, DA Livery , 

Gainesville 29-4 Roux, L T Residence . 



Gainesville 1 So Bell Tel & Tel Co Central office . 

Gainesville 30 Southern Express Co Office. 

Gainesville 33 Southern Express Co Depot . 

Gainesville 40 Stewart, T L Residence. 



Gainesville 43-2 The Sun Office . 

Gainesville 9-4 Thomas & Co Furniture . 

Gainesville 9-2 Thomas, W R Livery. 

Gianesville 9-3 Thomas, WR : Residence. 

Gainesville- «iifei«.Tillis, H M .Residence. 

J 

w 



Gainesville 29-2 Water Works » . . . . Office . 

Gainesville 29-3 Water Works Power house . 



A Telephone 



Is worth to you according to 
the number and character of 
people you can reach. 



A List 



Of five hundred people is worth 
one=half of a list of one thou= 
sand. 



A City Directory 



With half of the people's names 
is of no value. 



Instructions and Important Suggestions. 



DESTROY ALL PREVIOUS LISTS. 



AS TO GOOD SERVICE. 



1 . Incorrect methods in the use of the telephone result in unsatis- 
factory service. 

2. To secure good service follow directions on the card on front 
of the bell-box, and on this page. 

3 . Answer your bell promptly ; give your number to avoid mis- 
understandings . 

4 . Press the telephone firmly to the ear . 

5. Stand close and speak directly into the transmitter, in a nat- 
ural tone, distinctly and not too rapidly. 

6. Never hang up the telephone until the conversation is finished ; 
the operator will disconnect it if she finds no one using it. 

7. Always hang up the telephone (with the ear-piece down) after 
finishing a conversation ; otherwise the battery will soon be exhausted 
and you can not be heard — your bell will be cut out, and you can not 
be called from the Central Office. 

8. Operators are required to be polite under all circumstances; 
please extend to them the same consideration. 

9. Do not use the telephone during a thunder-storm. 

10. Please report cases of trouble or interruption of service or in- 
civility of operators promptly to the chief operator. 

11 . Operators can not carry on conversations or receive complaints ; 
their entire attention must be devoted to executing orders for connec- 
tions . 

12. The use of profane or obscene language through the telephone 
is forbidden. 

13 . The tolls for all long-line conversations, by whomsoever made, 
will be charged to the subscriber at whose station they originate. 



INSTRUCTIONS AND IMPORTANT SUGGESTIONS. 

USE OF TELEPHONE BY NON-SUBSCRIBERS. 

The use of the telephone is limited to the subscriber, his family or 
employee in his interest. Subscribers have not the right to allow its 
use by other parties. Instruments may be removed if this condition of 
the lease is disregarded. 

Subscribers are requested to refer those desiring the use of the tel- 
ephone to the nearest pay station. All persons, whether subscribers 
or not, must pay for the use of the telephone at public stations. 

"LINE IN USE." 

About ten per cent, of all calls strike a "line in use." This can 
readily be understood from the fact that each wire is connected, upon 
an average, fifteen times a day. On the railroad and heavy commer- 
cial wires this average is more than trebled. Operators will always in- 
form a subscriber when a line is in use. Subscribers are inclined to 
think because lines are often reported in use that the operators do so 
to save labor, when, in fact, it is less difficult to make connection 
than it is to report back to the one calling that the "line is in use." 
Consideration of this fact, coupled with a visit to the Exchange, will 
enable subscribers to realize how necessary it is to quickly tell the oper- 
ator what is wanted, and to just as quickly leave the telephone if the 
line wanted is in use by some one else. The thousands of calls that are 
rushed into the Exchange at irregular moments make the assistance of 
the subscriber an essential element of prompt service. The instant a 
line is reported "in use," do not keep the attention of the operator an- 
other moment, as there are others calling who should be promptly 
waited on. 

ATTACHMENTS TO TELEPHONES. 

Difficulties with the service experienced by some subscribers are 
due to the use of mouth-pieces, air-cushions and other unauthorized at- 
tachments. Every necessary appliance being supplied by the Com- 
pany, subscribers are earnestly requested to refrain from the use of 
other apparatus. 

EMERGENCIES, 

In case of sickness, fire or other emergency, it is the wish of the 
Company that the persons in charge of its offices shall extend such as- 



INSTRUCTIONS AND IMPORTANT SUGGESTIONS. 

sistance to its subscribers in the way of summoning assistance or ob- 
taining information as they can, consistently with the performance of 
their regular duties . But it is understood that such services are given 
only as an accommodation to the subscriber, for which the Company 
can not assume a new responsibility of any nature. 

TELEGRAMS BY TELEPHONE. 

Subscribers will be connected with the offices of the telegraph com- 
panies for the purpose of sending dispatches, but they must first ar- 
range with the telegraph company, by personal application to the 
company's office, for the reception and transmission of their telegrams 
and payment of the charges. The Telephone Company does not as- 
sume any responsibility for the correct transmission of messages, nor 
does it collect the charges for such messages. 

Messages received by the telegraph companies addressed to sub- 
scribers of the Telephone Company can be transmitted to such sub- 
scribers within the Exchange from the telephones placed in the telegraph 
companies' offices, without additional charge to the subscribers. 

If subscribers desire that telegraph messages addressed to them be 
delivered by telephone, they should make application to the telegraph 
company for such delivery. The Telephone Company assumes no re- 
sponsibility for the correct transmission of the messages and does not 
collect the telegraph charges. 

LISTING OF SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES. 

The Telephone Directory is issued quarterly. Use the current issue 
to obtain correct numbers, as many necessary changes are made in each 
issue. The company assumes no liability for damages accruing from 
errors or omissions in the making up or printing of the Directory, nor 
can it guarantee the permanency of call numbers assigned or to be as- 
signed. Subscribers are therefore advised not to print telephone num- 
bers on stationery, etc., but to use the phrase, "Bell Telephone 
Connection." 

TOLL LINES. 

Particular attention is called to the system of toll lines by which 
the neighboring cities and towns are connected with the Exchange in ■ 
this city. A list of these points is given in this directory. The 
advantage of the facilities thus afforded can hardly be overestimated. 



INSTRUCTIONS AND IMPORTANT SUGGESTIONS. 

1 . Communication from the ordinary telephone in your office will 
usually be found satisfactory between points not too far distant, but 
"Metallic Circuit" and "Long Distance Equipment" are essential 
to the best service. Terms may be obtained for such lines and appar- 
atus on application to the Manager. All public Pay Stations are so 
equipped. 

2. The rates for long-line talks are very low. It is to be remem- 
bered that these rates cover many words.and include the instant answer. 

3. The tolls for all long-line conversations, by whomsoever made, 
will be charged to the subscriber at whose station they originate. Sub- 
scribers to protect themselves from loss must see that no use unau- 
thorized by them is made of their telephone . 

4. "The mail is quick, the telegraph is quicker, but the long 

DISTANCE TELEPHONE IS INSTANTANEOUS, and VOU DON'T have to WAIT 

for an answer." 



A Telephone Li 




Is a door to your establishment 
with a handle at every telephone 
station in the city. When your 
line is "busy" the door is locked 
and the handles turn in vain. 
If your customers complain that 
they often rattle the knob and 
find the door locked, you need 
another door. 



TAKE A 
TELEPHONE 



At your Residence, 
One at your Office, 
One on your Desk. 



Your name will appear 

three times in a list 

of chosen people. 



YOU CAN NOT 



Show Samples by 
Telephone, but 



YOU CAN 



Take a Man's Orders 
Or Give Him Yours! 



The Mails Carry the Samples. 
The Telephone Saves Your Time. 



<& 



BY PROPER USE 

The Telephone Door 

Can be made the main 
entrance to your estab= 
lishment. Shut your= 
self off from telephone 
service, and you close 
your doors against hun= 
dreds of customers. 



& 



TftE MAIL 15 QUICK 

TftE TELEGRAPH 15 QUICKER 

ThE IP/NG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 
^^^ 15 INSTANTANEOUS 
AND YOU DONT HAVE TO 
WAIT TOP ANAN5VED- 




m TELEGRAPH (DHPANY