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Full text of "Southern Illinois Normal University. Information Service news release."

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

CARLI: Consortium of Academic and Research Libraries in Illinois 



http://archive.org/details/southernillino194546sout 



A3 




Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorene Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Relep.se on receipt 

Carbondale, 111. ,Oct. -President Chester F. Lny r.nd two other 
faculty members of Southern Illinois Normal University are attending 
rn educational conference in Chi ergo Monday rnd Tuesday. 

Accompanying Dr. Lry were Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education, and Dr. W. G. Swartz, professor and chairman of the 
government department. 

Theme of the session, known as the Unlversi ty of Chicago Teacher- 
Education Conference, held annually for college presidents and other 
educators, is "Curriculum Changes th^t Enrich Teacher Education." 

Dr. Swartz will describe Southern's expanding graduate training 
program at the Tuesday afternoon session. 

### 



Carbondale,Hl. ,Oct. -Further discussion of Southern Illinois 
Normal University's forthcoming building program will be held in 
'Chicrgo Wednesday when a delegation from here attends a conference with 
the State Division of Architecture and Engineering. 

To attend the conference are President Chester F. Lay; Edward V. 
Miles, business manager; Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education; Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and 
Professions; Dr. J.W.Neckers, representing the University's long-term 
olennlng committee; and J. Henry Schroeder, member of the sub-committee 
on the heating plant. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummoncl, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dallies 
Release Wednesday **' 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. --In order to free students and faculty 
members of Southern Illinois Normal University to welcome alumni 
and other visitors who will be here for the 29th annual Homecoming, 
President Chester F. Lay has announced that classes will be 
suspended at 10 o'clock Friday for the remainder of the week. 

Students will hold a special assembly program Friday at 10 
o'clock, to be followed by a parade and downtown pep session. A 
downtown motion pic ture theatre will entertain students at a free 
movie in the afternoon. 

Homecoming Play, "Only an Orphan Girl," a Gay Nineties melodrama, 
will be presented Friday night by the Little Theetre, under the 
direction of Mrs. Julia Neely. 

A pep session at a hugh pre-game bonfire will be staged on the 
practice field following the play; 

On Saturday, a varsitj^glum hockey game will be played at 9 a.m.; 
the Alumni Association board will meet at 11 and follow its business 
meeting with luncheon; queen candidates will be entertained at luncjfj 
at which queens of former years will be invited to be present. 

The "big game" of the season will start at 2 p.m., when the 
Maroons meet the Western Teachers' Leathernecks. Between-the-halves 
features will include a memorial service for Southern athletes who 
lost their lives in World War II; presentation by University ^P'/?- 
President Chester F. Lay of queen candidates and attendants;; award 
of prizes for house decorations. 

(more) 



-z- 

Alumni will be honored at an all -University tea at Anthony 
Hall, girls' dormitory, immediately following the game. 

Music for the Homecoming Dance Saturday night is being 
furnished by Bob Strong's Orchestra. The dance is sponsored by the 
Student Council, 

Climax of Homecoming will be reached at 11 o'clock Saturday 
night, when the Queen's coronation takes place with pomp and 
ceromony. Candidates for this honor-highest in Southern's student 
realm— are Florence Alston of Sparta, Gloria Bsrger of Harrisburg, 
Esther Jane Craver ot Murphysbcro, Aliene Kruzlarich of C hristopher, 
and Pat Schultz of Cairo. 

Which of the five has actually been elected the ^ueen will not 
be known until the moment of her coronation. The other four girls 
--together with underclass attendant® Pat Ashley of Carbondale and 
Ruth Evelyn Knight of Benton— will be members of her court. 

Invitations to this Homecoming, Southern's first post-war 
alumni reunion, have been sent to some 3,000 former students. 

### 

SHORTS 
Harves C. Rahe, assistant professor of commerce at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, published an article en "Deficiencies 
in Advanced Typing Students," in a recent issue of The Business 
Educ ation Wor ld . The article is based on observations of more than 
1,000 typewriting students in the U.S. Narad Training School, 
Indiana, University, 

m 



Southern Illinois Normal University information Service 
Lorena Brummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies—Attention Sports Editors 
Release We dries da y 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. — Eight Southern Illinois Normal 
University athletes who gave their lives in World War II will be 
honored by the " I" Club during the half at the Maroon-Western 
football game here Saturda y. 

To be staged before a Homecoming crowd, the ceremony will pay 
tribute to the following war victims: 

Pvt. Henry V/.^Stumpf of St. Albans, N.Y., killed in line of 
duty attempting to rescue three other soldiers on April 6, 1941, 
at San Diego, Calif. He lettered in gymnastics in 1939, 1940; 
in football in 1933 and 1939; and in track in 1939 and 1940. 

Pfc. Henry Hinkley of Salem, killed in action in the South 
Pacific in the summer of 1944. Hinkley lettered in basketball in 
1941-42 and 1942-43, a n d**"in football in 1942. 

Capt. Eugene Dillow of Cobden, a Marine pilot, killed in a 
plane crash at Cherry Point, N.C., in the spring of 1944. He 
lettered in football in 1940. 

Ens. Eugene Echols of G-alatia, a Navy Pilot, killed in a plane 
crash in California in the fall of 1944. Echols lettered in 
basket ball in 1942-43. 

Ens. Gharles Pigg of Mt. Vernon, killed in action in the 
South Pacific In the fall o£ 1944. He lettered in football in 1942. 

Lt. Phil Downey of Evanston, Army Air Corps; pilot, who has 
been missing since Pearl Harbor and was reported dead in a 
Japanese prison camp. He lettered in track in 1936, 1937, 1933, 
and 1939. (more) 



-2- 



Lt. Byford Rains of West Frankfort, Army Air Corps, killed 
in a plane crash in Washington in the fall of 19 44. 

Ens. Harry Spear of Ashley, a Navy pilot, killed in raid- air 
crash in the Pacific, November 11, 1943. Spear lettered in track 
in 1937. 

Parents of these former "I" Club members will be special guests 
of the Maroons for the game and the ceremony, according to Maroon 
Coach Glenn "ABE" Martin. 



in 7? 



Southern Illinois Normal University Ihf ormr.tion Service 
Lorena Drumnond, Suitor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dr.iiios 
Release »Ve cine s day 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. — Deferment from military service at 
least until the end of the term is assured for Southern Illinois 
Normal University students, Dean of Men A. J. Tor Kourst has 
announced , 

When a student is called for induction in nid~tem, he is entitle- 
to ask for deferment until the end of that particular torn, provided 
he is doing satisfactory college work and remains in school, Dean 
Ter Keurst explained. 

Deon Tor Keurst hos just received a report on "Higher Education 
and National Defense'* from the ^lerican Council on Education, 
summarizing latest developments in Washington affecting higher 
education. 

The Council is urging a continuation of deferment for students 
in medicine, dentistry cnC osteopathy, with. the addition of pharmacy 
to the list. It is also recommending that each college or university 
be allowed to seek deferment for a certain proportion of students 
majoring in agriculture, biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, 
pharmacy, physics, and psychology. 

At present, however, Selective Service orders provide only that 
a student 'who entered college or university before he became 18 
years of age, when called for induction, nay have his induction 
deferred until the end of the quarter or semester, or until "he ceases 
to pursue continuously and satisfactorily such course of instruction, 
whichever is the earlier.'* 



-2- 



Ac cording to the sane order, a high school student nay "be 
deferred until graduation, until he drops out of school or his work 
is unsatisfactory, or until he arrives at the age of SO. 

m 



C. C. Logan, assistant professor in University High School 
at Southern Illinois Ncmal University, will take a largo group 
of vocational agriculture students to attend the Vocational Agriculture 
Grain and Poultry Show at Vienna High School October 26. 



ifinf 



Southern Illinois Normal University Inv* emotion Service 
Lorena Drummonc., Editor 



All veterans hospitalized in the Veterans Hospital at Marion 
recently hoard c broadcast from Southern Illinois Nornal University 
dealing with the veterans' program and veterans' activities at the 
University. All radios in the hospital were tuned in for this 
broadcast, University officials were notified by Dr. E. A. Welch, 
hospital manager. 

.*. J. Tor Keurst, dean of men at Southern Illinois Nornal 
University, is the author of an article, "Education an Economic 
Resource," published in a recent issue of the fraternal magazine, 
Phi Delta Kappan . 

SHORTS 
Southern Illinois Normal University faculty members have been in 
demand this fall to deliver addresses before Southern Illinois county 
teachers' institutes. President Chester F. Lay addressed the 
Washington County institute; Mrs. Mao Trovillion Smith, instructor 
in English, Pope County; Dr. 'iu B. Schneider, associate professor of 
English, Monroe County; and Dr. S. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education, Randolph County; and Willis S. Malone, instructor in rural 
training schools. Perry County. 

SHORTS 
Dr. K. A. Van Lente, associate professor of chemistry, was 
recently guest speaker before the Harrisburg Rotary Club, to discuss 
the s ub j e c t , "At omi c Energy <•. and .it omi c Bomb s . •» 



.a.uji 
rnnr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorona Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Thursday 



Carbondale, 111. Oct, —Two Southern Illinois Normal University 

faculty members are appearing today and tomorrow on the program of 

the Macoupin County Annual Teachers Institute. 

Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of Education, and Willis E» 

Malone, instructor in rural training schools, wi]^ each deliver 

four lectures during the institute. 

Dean Fair will speak on "Social Studies: Curriculum Core or 

Catch-All" and "Do All American Youth "want Education?" before the 

high school. He will address the elementary section on "Social 

Studies: How Soon, How Fair, end Hew Much?" end on "Child 

Development for Breadth end Depth." 

Mr. Mel one will speak on "Is Telling Teaching?" end "The New 

State Course of Study" before the elementary group and "New 

Educational Horizons" and "&n& You a Teacher?" before the high 

school teachers. 

iT,ht 

SHORTS 
Dr. Sina M. Mott , assistant professor of pro-school education 
at Southern Illinois Normal University and director of the University 
nursery school and kindergarten, is the author or an article 
"Muscular Activity, An Aid in Concept Formation" which appeared 
in a recent periodical, Child Development . 

mffr 



Southern Illinois Normal University information Service 
Lor ena Drummond , Edit or 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carb.ond.ale ,111. , u ct. --Southern Illinois Normal University 
gridders Monday began to prepare for some tough practice sessions 
before their homecoming football attraction here Saturday afternoon 
against the Western Teachers Eleven of Macomb. 

Lest week, the Maroons and Eastern Illinois Panthers at 
Charleston plcyed to a scoreless tie. 

Southern early in the opening period had two scoring opportunities 
but lost the ball on. downs. Play in the first half was completely in 
Eastern territory. 

However, in the second half, the Panthers took control, with the 
game being played in Southern's territory. The Panthers gained most 
of their first downs in mid-field leading in this department 11-5. 
Eastern's only threat came in the final minutes of play when the 
Panthers were one yard from the goal line as the game ended. 

This week Coach Glenn "ABE" Martin will pat his charges through 
an extensive blocking practice, as this department in the Charleston 
game was very disappointing. The Maroons are also expected to brush 
up on their offensive maneuvers. 

Capt. Sam Milosevich's defensive play at Charleston was highly 
featured. The big tackle on numerous occasions broke through the 
Charleston line to catch the backfield men for big losses. 

Martin anticipated another tough game against Macomb. Last week 
the Western Teachers were defected by Old Normal, 20-7. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. —Immediately following the Maroon- 
Leatherneck Homecoming game here Saturday afternoon s all Southern 
Illinois Normal University alumni and visitors arc invited to the 
tea at Anthony Hall, girls' dormitory, for air. all-school reunion. 

A Homecoming tradition at Southern, the tea will afford alumni, 
faculty, and students the chance to see each other and talk over 
"old times" - 



TIT if 



ir 



Carbondale, 111., Oct, —During the two crowded days of activity 
and reunion of the Southern Illinois Normal University annual 
Homecoming, many of the prominent campus organizations arc planning 
parties for their alumni and visitors. 

Sigma Sigma Sigma, social sorority, will have an alumni dinner 
at the Roberts Hotel, Friday afternoon at 5:30. 

At 11:00 p.m. Friday Kai Shek Kail, girls' independent house, 
has planned a slumber party. 

Saturday morning at 11:00 Phi Kappa Sigma, social sorority, 
will hete a brea&fast at the Chapter House, while Delta Rho, 
mathematics fraternity, holds its luncheon at the University 
Cafeteria. 

The Women's Athletic Association breakfast will be held in 
the Qafeteria at 11:30. 

Delta Sigma Epsilon, social sorority, will meet in the Cafeteria 

at 12:00 noon for a luncheon. 

(more) 



-2- 



At the Baptist Annex at 7.: 00 p.m. Chi Delta Chi, social 
fraternity, is holding its Homecoming dinner. 

The Baptist Student Union and the Student Christian Foundation 
party will be held in the old gym. f ion 8-11 p.m. for those students 
who do not plan to attend the danoe. 

Sunday morning at 8:00 a.m. Nu Epsilon Alpha,, social fraternity, 
will meet at the Roberts Hotel for a breakfast. 

The Normandy, girls' independent he use, has planned a tea 
and open house from 3:00-5*30 Sunday afternoon. 



IUPI 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service- 
Lore na Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Saturday 



C arbondale , 111., c t . - - Ac t i vi t i e s in the Annua 1 Home c oming 
celebration at Southern Illinois Normal University have entered the 

second day with the Taroon-- Leatherneck football game this after- 
noon end the dance and coronation tonight as the main attraction. 

On this morning's agenda was the Varsity-Alumnae hockey game, 
played at 9:30, followed, by the Women 1 s Athletic Association 
breakfast in the university cafeteria. 

A meeting of the Board of directors of the Southern Alumni 
Association, was called by President W. E. "Slats" Valentine, Alto 
Pass, for this morning at 11 o'clock, followed by a luncheon. 

Other events occurring during the half in today's game include 
a ceremony honoring former "I" Club members who have lost their 
lives in service; presentation of the prizes for house decorations 
by President Chester F. Lay, and introduction of queen candidates 
and attendants by student chairman Jack Hedges, St. Louis. 

Featuring the dance orchestra of Bob Strong, the Homecoming 
Dance will begin at 9 o'clock, with the coronation at 11 o'clock 
when football captain Sam Miloscvieh of Zeigler will place the 
crown on the herd of the school favorite and present the royal 
scepter to her majesty. Aiding with the ceremony will be Master 
Bill Eosley, small son of Dr. and M rs . Howard L. Eosley; and Miss 
Jo Carol HcCreight, daughter of Lt, (j.g.) and Mrs. Charles 
McCreight. 

Candidates for the royal honor of Homecoming queen are Florence 
Alston, Sparta; Gloria Barger, Earrisburg; Esther J. Craver, Murphys- 
boro; Aiiene Kauzlarich, Christopher; and Pat Schultz, Cairo. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale , 111., Oct. -- Approintment of Mrs. Gilbert Bradley, 
Carbondale , as faculty assistant in the department of physiolo*?^ 
MftdtlL^rnTie at Southern Illinois Normal University has been 
a nnounced by President Chester F. Lay. She replaces Miss Louise 
O'Ncil who has entered the University of Michigan for graduate 
work as holder of a scholarship. 

Mrs. Bradley, who completed her training at the Weber Sanitarium 
Olney, will wo rk chiefly in the Campus Laboratory Schools. Before 
her marriage, she lived in Greenup, but has been in Carbondale for 
several years. 

Granted a stipend by the Illinois Division of Public Health 
Education to cover a year's graduate work loading to the master's 
degree in public health education, Miss 0' Neil loft for Ann .Arbor 
tMs week from her home in Marion. 

■ ### 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. — a Gold-star honor roll at Southern 
Illinois Normal University lists 60 former students who gave their 
lives in their country's service, according to Dr. Ted R. Ragsdale, 
professor of education, under whose direction the SINU Honor Roll 
Is being revised. 

Some 19 faculty members are in military service, but none 
have been killed. 

The "Southerners In Service" roll, located in the Shryock 
Auditorium, lists the names of 2,399 faomer students and displays 
P ^ c .y- : T CG °£ marr ^ of them, malking.it the center- of ' attraction f or ■ 
visiting alumni during the Southern Homecoming, Friday and Saturday. 

v~r£rf 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Carbondale, 111., Oct •--There* s a new queen at Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

She is Hiss Gloria Barker, petite blond senior from Harris - 
burg, who was crowned queen at Southern at the Homecoming dance 
here Saturday night* 

Clad in regal red velvet robe, she was presented to a crowd 
of several hundred students anc alumni as Football Captain Sam 
rilosevich of Zeigler placed the crown on her head, and Leedio 
Cabutti, of Johnston City handed her the royal scepter. 

Kiss Bargcr, the typical college co-ed, with reddish blond 
hair anc 1 faint freckles on her uptiltcd nose, is a senior in the 
College of Vocations and Professions, and is majoring in commerce. 

She is president of Anthony Kail, girls' dormitory, is a 
member of the Independent Student Union, and president of the 
Commerce Club. For three years, she earned part of her university 

expenses by working part-time in the department of physical 
education for men. 

Southern's first homecoming since the war brought the largest 
crowd in history to the campus. Some 1,500 attended the play 
Friday night, 4,000 the football game Saturday afternoon, and 
several hundred couples the d..nce and coronation Saturday night. 

Among them were several distinguished visitors, who were 
invited as special guests of President Chester F. Lay, including 
Frank Thompson, director of registration and education, and 
chairman of the Teachers Colic -c Board; several other board 
members, and former board members, 

r, It is with deep thanksgiving that we hold this first Southern 
Homecoming since war's end," University President Lay declared. 

"Wc mourn those who have made the supreme sacrifice in this 
conflict, and give heartfelt thanks that the fighting is over. 

We are happy to have so many of our Southerners who fought 
in this bitter world struggle, with us again as students (there 
arC 8e of them now in school) and equally proud to have so many 
alumni of former years back on the campus again at Homccominn time.^ 

The victory brings us to an even greater challenge — the 
winning of the peace, and to that challenge Southern Illinois 

( mo re ) 



— 



Normal University dedicates its resources end its energies." 

Eight former members of Southern's athletic teams who gave 
their lives in World War II were honored in a cormony at the half 
during the football game between the Southern Maroons and the 
Western Leathernecks Saturday afternoon, which Southern won by a 
score of 13-6. 

Sovthcrn clinched its claim to be ing the only undefeated team 
in the Illinois Intercollegiate Conference by two touchdowns in the 
fourth quarter. 

The !, I" Club cormony was a solemn and inspiring one. As the 
roll of "I" Club heroes was called, "I" Club members advanced to 
midfield and planted crosses bearing their names, while a poem 
commemorating their heroism was re d over the public address 
system. Parents of several of these eiaht athletes were present 
as special guests of the Maroons for the occasion. 

The athletes saluted in the cormony were Pvt. Henry W. Stumpf 
of St. Albans, N. Y.; Ens. Eugene Echols of Galatia; pfc. henry 
Hinckley of Salem; Capt. Eugene Dillow of Cobden; Ens . Charles 
Piax of Mt. Vernon; Lt. Phil Downey of Evans ton; Lt, Eyford Rains 
of West Frankfort; Ens. Harry Spear of Ashley? and Major Jack 
Wilson of Hurst Bush and Marion. 

Homecoming opened Friday with a pep session and parade, 
in which dozens of floats were entered by student organizations. 
Prizes were awarded for the best floats as follows: Class A--lst 
prize, 010, Nu Epsilon A lpha; second prize, $7, Delta Sigma 
Epsilon; honorable mention, Kappa Delta Alpha. Class B— 1st prize, 
v 7,Faptist Student Union; second prize, :,4, Anthony Hall; honorable 
memtion, Commerce Club. General — f irst prize, $1.50, Independent 
Student Union; second prize, hi, Kai Shek Hall. 

The Homecoming play on Erie ay night was a hilarious "mellow 
drommer" of the yay »90»s, in which Neva Woolard of V7. Frankfort 
played the role of "Nellie, the orphan ;;irl" and John Mulkin of 
Herrin was cast as the villa in. 

lhany student houses held open house, breakfasts, luncheons or 
dinners for their former students during Homecoming, 



trfnr 



soutnern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummon d, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Ca rbondale,Ill., ct. - The Southern Maroons are cock of the 
walk in the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic Conference, heading 
the five teachers colleges in this club with two wins and one tie 
on the gridiron. 

As a matter of fact, the Maroons are not only No. 1 in the 
conference, but they haven't been defeated by any opponent this season. 

Runner-up is Old Normal, claiming two wins and one loss. Eastern, 
like Southern, is undefeated in conference play, but they have met 
but one conference opponent, the Maroons, who tied them 0-0. 

Northern has won one game and lost one, while Western has lost 
three in a row. 

Only conference game left on the Maroon schedule is with Northern, 
to be played in DeKalb November 10. Eastern, on the other hand, still 
has £€***> conference games to play, and might still catch u P with the 
Naroons . 

A jaunt to Kirks viUe, Ho., is next on the SINTJ card. The Maroons 
till take off haroTharcday, drive by bus to Quincy and spend the night, 
then move on to Kirksville to play the Kirksville Teachers Friday 
afternoon at 3 o'clock. 

Coach Glenn » A be» Martin is feeling pretty proud of his team 
this week after their 13-6 licking of Western last Saturday before 
Southern's Homecoming crowd of some 4,000 alumni, students, faculty 
aid friends. 

He expressed satisfaction with the team's defensive play during 
the first three-quarters of the game, and glowing happiness over its 
ourth-q uarter aerial offense that brought two touchdowns in rapid 
uccession. 



Western ^scored first on a long pass caught by Stlhson, end, 
° f Cambridge, early in the second half. 

But along in the middle of the fourth quarter, the Maroons/ went 

>n.a Da^i'nr h^lV/^ from Jim Harsh of Madison, the second 

a passing binge that resulted in two scores-- / heaved by Rocky 

Quarterback 
lothschild,Oairo,pl a ying / Cabutti/ Johnston City, caught the first 

• lft e* it sailed some 20 yards through the air, and hip-danced right 

i down the goal line, A few minutes later, Davidson of Harrisburg, 

-leaked behind the goal line and connected with the Rothschild 

ss, this one a bullct-liko number right over the heads of Western's 
.ine. 

ILjUL 

rnnr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
.Release on receipt 



Carbondalc,Ill.,Oct. —A scholarship fund to pay a student's 
tuition costs for four years at Southern Illinois Normal University 
here has been set up by Radio Station V/JPF,Herrin, University offic- 
ials have been informed. 

This scholarship will be awarded to the member of the Gir] 
Scouts at Herrin who performs the outstanding dramatic work over the 
radio during the coming year. 

A radio dramatic group will be organized from among Girl Scouts, 
above the Brownie age, who successfully pass auditions. Members of 
this group will participate in monthly broadcasts, and the scholar- 
ship winner will be chosen from the group. 

Judges for the competition will include a representative of the 
speech department at Southern. 

"This scholarship is a fine and generous gift," University 
President Chester F. Lay declared. "We hope that it is the forerunner 
of many such scholarship awards, through which young men and young 
women of exceptional ability or talent may be enabled to benefit 
from the broadening opportunities now being developed at Southern." 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale,Ill.,Oct. —Hiss Hay Sarton, well-known poet and 
lecturer, will speak at Southern Illinois Normal Universit3?- in th.. 
assembly program next Thursday, Nov. 1, at 10 o'clock. Her subject 
will be "The Spirit Watches," subtitled "Poetry as a living reminder 
of eternal values" 

Sigma Tau Delta, national English fraternity, w>u rfwr'. ■. ' Niss 
;e, will hole 1 a banquet In her honor at the university 
cafeteria Wednesday evening. 

This distinguished poet, a World bar I refugee from Belgium, 
has published three books, lectured extensively, and in 1944 worked 
as a script-writer for the Overseas Film Unit in the Office of War 
Information. 

En counter in April , poems; The Single hound, a novel; and Inner 
Landscape , poems, are her three books. A fourth volume, The Bridge 
°£ Wars , is now in the hands of a publishing company, being prepared 
for its spring appearance. 

Miss Sarton is from Cambridge, Nass., where she was recently 
awarded the Golden Rose of the New En-land Poetry Society. 

J.UJ.JJ. 

'inttt 
Carbondale,Ill.,Oct. --Distribution of the Sphinx , student-fac- 
ulty telephone directory, starter* this week at Southern Illinois 
Normal University. 

A project of the YWCA, the 1945-46 Sphinx is edited by Helen Ma.- 
taya,Eerrin; assisted by Prances Be a rden, Christopher, as business man- 
ager; and staff members Betty Anderson, Carterville ; Shirley Elkins, 
Cambria; Helen Garrison, Dahlgren; Melba Kuntz, Belleville; Thelma 
McCarty, Flora; Helen Plumlec , Cambria; LaVera Story, West Frankfort; 
and Eleanor White, Eouality. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dallies 
Release on receipt 



Carbondale, 111,, Oct. — Minimum wage scale for student 
employees at Southern Illinois Normal University has been raised from 
30 to 35 cents per hour, effective with October pay checks, President 
Chester F. Lay has announced. 

This new scale will mean an increase in wages for 67 students 
who have been earning less than 35 cents per hour, according to Dean 
of Men A. J. Ter Keurst. These students are chiefly unskilled or 
serai- skilled student workers attached to th« Janitorial and ground 
force, or beginning typists, stenographers, assistants. 

The increase in base pay was put into effect on recommendation 
of Elmer P, Hitter, coordinator of the Illinois Teachers College, 
Springfield, Dr. Lay explained, and brings student wages here into 
line with those at other teachers colleges of the state. 

Southern employs an exceptionally large number of student workers 
in University offices, service agencies, and physical plant activities, 
President Lay pointed out, yielding a three-way benefit: (l) 
providing relatively low-cost assistance; (2) affording valuable 
apprenticeship to student workers; and {3) assisting needy students 
to defray all or part of their University expenses. 

Nearly 200 students are currently employed at Southern, Dean 
Ter Keurst reports. 

The wage scale for student employment last month ranged from 30 
to 60 centF per hour, and averaged almost 39 cents per hour. The 
student employees work anywhere from a few hours to 100 hours per 
month, and earn an average monthly pay check of $26,22. With the 
new Increase Just authorized, the average hourly rate and the average 
monthly pay check will be somewhat larger. 



,?■&** ;. v 



:'/• ' 



I -v 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drumniond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Papers 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. --"They just had a better team than we 
did," Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin admitted ruefully in recounting his 
Southern Illinois Maroons fateful encounter with the DeKalb Teachers 
on the football gridiron. 

The Maroons were knocked out of the Illinois Intercollegiate- 
Athletic Conference championship race— after heading the list of 
contenders for several weeks--by the 13-7 defeat from DeKalb. 

Charleston Teachers' 12-6 defeat by Normal threw Old Normal into 
unquestioned load place, with Southern In second spot. 

Southern has finished play for the season, with two wins, one 
lose and one tie, while Normal has won three and lost one game. 

It will depend on the outcome of next week-end's game between 
DeKalb and Charleston whether Southern can be runner-up for the title. 
If DeKalb defeats Charleston, Normal and DeKalb will tie for the title. 
On the other hand, if Charleston defeats DeKalb, Normal will win the 
championship. 

Last Saturday's defeat was the second in a rev; the Maroons have 
suffered from DeKalb in identical situations. Last year the Maroons 
came up to the final game leading the pack, only to be nosed out of 
the title 13-12, 

Too much weight and too much height proved to be the Maroons' 
downfall. After battling the DeKalb Huskies on fairly even terms 
during the first half, the Maroons wilted late in the third period 
when the Huskies scored their initial touchdown. 

The Huskies midway in the third period were stopped on the one 

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yard line by the fighting Maroon lino and later ln the same quarter 
were stopped on Southern's three-yard marker. 
I However, this proved too tough for the lighter Southern line and 
DcKalb pushed over their initial touchdown late in the third when 
Jerome Piatt, Huskie halfback, went over from the eight-yard stripe. 
Tcrrcnce Ryan, Northern end, placekicked the extra point. 

Northern chalked up their second marker early in the fourth 
quarter after a 45-yard sustained drive when Piatt tossed a ten-yard 
pass to Ralph Brink, end, who was in the end zone. 

Southern scored late in the last period after a 35-yard sustained 
drive when Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyvillo, Maroon quarterback, threw 
a three-yard pass to Bill Crum of Mt, Camel, Southern halfback, 
who was in the end zone. Bill Eaton of Carbondale, Maroon eruard. 
then converted for the extra point. 



rrtti 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Papers 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbonclale, 111. N v. -Walking off with the conference 
championship, Southern Illinois Normal University last Saturday in 
its second try in cross country placed its five-man team In first, 
third, fifth, seventh, and ninth place, Coach Leland P. Lingle reports. 

The Maroons won the conference tourney at Normal with 16 points 
compared to 52 points for its nearest competitor, Western, and 54 
points for Normal, which finished in third place. 

Individual champ for the Maroons was Dick Avis of Chicago, whose 
time for the 5 l/2-mile course was 17 minutes 55 seconds. 

Southern also captured second place in the open State invitational 
meet held at Normal simultaneously with the conference match. First 
place was won by Wheaton College, with Pinkerton of Wheat on spurting 
the course in 16:56.4. 

Southern's five-man team was composed of Avis; Iluitt Barfoot of 
Maiden, Mo., who finished No. 5 in the conference; Don Shcffer of 
Zeigler, No. 5; Bob Smith of Marissa,. No. 7; and Charles Whittenborn 
of Steelville, No. 9. 

This was the Maroons' first cross-country championship, and the 
second time they have entered a team in this sport, Lingle pointed 
out. 

m 



Southern Illinois ^ormal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. --Miss Nadine Conner, leading Metropolitan 
soprano, will present a concert in the Shryock Auditorium on the 
Southern Illinois Normal:,. University campus Monday evening, November 
19, at eight o'clock, for the first community concert of the season. 

Miss Conner made her debut in Metropolitan Opera in 1941 in "The 
Magic Flute." More recent Opera successes of Miss Conner include the 
roles Violet ta in "Traviata" and Zerlina in "Don Giovanni," The 
young singer has also made guest appearances with the Montreal Opera 
Company and with the "Traviata" company on tour. 

Shortly after her Metropolitan debut, Miss Conner made her 
orchestral debut with the New York Philharmonic Symphony. In radio 
the lyric soprano has been featured as guest and star on such programs 
as the Coca Cola Hour, Salute to Youth Program, Kraft Music Hall, 
ticks' Open House, Showboat, The Shell P rogram, and others. 

Born in Los Angeles, California, Miss Conner attended the Los 
Angeles schools, and the University of Southern California. Her 
teachers included Prof. Horatio Cogswell, Amdao Femadez, and Florence 
Easton. 

Miss Conner's appearance here will mark the first in a series 
of four concerts to be given this year under joint sponsorship of 
the University and the Community Concert Association. Only members 
of the Community Concert Association r.iay attend the concerts. All-'. 
University students are affiliated with the association as a part of 
the cultural opportunities offorded by the institution. 



jij'i'. 
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soutnern Illinois normal university information Service 
Lorena Drummond,, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release onPiiday. or later 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. — Three-fourths of the new faculty 
members at Southern Illinois Normal University here are Illinolsa.ns 
either by birth, by educational training, or by professional 
experience, a recent survey shows. 

Of the 19 new persons brought to the University staff by 
President Chester F. Lay since he assumed the presidency last 
January, l^f- are "old-timers" as far as their familiarity with 
Illinois custbms, traditions, and problems are concerned. 

President Lay himself is a. native of Pope County Illinois, 
received all his education in Illinois — one degree from Illinois 
State Normal University, two from the University of Chicago— and 
has had nine years' teaching experience in Illinois. 

The fourteen Illinolsa.ns among the new faculty members are: 
Miss Helen A. Shuman, administrative assistant to the president, 
a native -of Illinois, trained in Illinois, and with extensive 
professional experience in this state. She was born in El Paso, 
111.; educated at Lrke Forest College, Illinois State Normal 
University, the University f Illinois, nnd Northwestern University; 
and taught in Illinois high schools at Lexington, Pekin, and Kankakee, 
tpught one summer at Illinois State Normal University, and served 
for two years and three summers as YWCA general secretary at 
Illinois StPte Normal University. 

Arthur J. Ter Keurst, dean of men, who obtained the master's 
md doctor's degrees from Northwestern University, Chicago, 111.; 
taught in Evanston, Illinois, high school; and served as instructor 
in psychology and education, as registrar and personnel director at 
the Chicago Christian College. He came to Southern from Western 
Illinois State Teachers College. 

Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, administrative assistant and housing counselor, 
ho was born in Makanda, 111., was educated at S.I.N.U., and has 
ived all her life in Southern Illinois. Mrs, Pulliam is the widow 
f the late Roscoe Pulliam, for nine years president of S.I.N.U. 

Dr. William A. Pitkin, new associate professor of social sciences, 
I also born in Southern Illinois at Odin. 

Dr. Lawrence E. Clark, new associate professor of sociology and 
praiser in the Veterans Guidance Center, wps born in Eureka, 111. 

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Dr. Laird T. Hites, associate professor of psychology and 
appraiser in the Veterrns Guidance Center, holds three degrees- 
including the bachelor of arts, the bachelor of divinity, md the 
doctor of philosophy degree— from the University of Chicago. With 
a few years' gap, he has lived in Illinois for the past 20 years. 
From 1925 to 1929, he was general secretly md editor of the 
Religious Education Association in Chicago; from 1933 to 19^5 he 
has be^n on the faculty of Central YMCA College in Chicago as 
professor of psychology and education. In addition he has been a 
counselor on the student personnel staff of that college for ten 
ye^rs, and on marginal time has continued his editorship for the 
Religious Education Association. 

Miss Helen Narber, assistant professor of education, has spent 
several summers in study at the University of Chicago, and for two 
years was affiliated -with one of the workshop groups in Child Growth 
md Development at the University of Chicago. 

John S. Wharton, Array Air Forces veteran, instructor in music, 
obtained the master of music degree from the American Conservatory 
of Music in Chicago, and came to Southern from his home there. 
Dr. Anna K. Neufeld, Instructor in languages, obtained her 
doctor of philosophy degree from the University of Chicago, taught 
the Russian language in the Army Specialized Training Program at 
the University of Chicago for a year, and last year was on the 
faculty of a large high school in Harvey, Illinois. 

Glenn J. McGowan, faculty assistant, recently lieutenant colonel 
in the U.S. Army, was born in Carbondale, 111., attended the 
Crrbondale elementary and high schools, and obtained the bachelor 
of education degree from S.I.N.U. 

Mrs. Bonnie A. Lockwood, faculty assistant, is a graduate of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, and taught -one year in the Ashley, 
111,, high school. 

Mrs. Dorothea F. Swan, assistant professor of art, received her ' 
professional and graduate training in Illinois. She obtained the 
bachelor of fine arts degree from the Art Institute of Chicago, and 
the master of arts degree from the University of Chicago. She 
formerly taught in the University of Chicago high school and in 
Eureka College, Eureka, 111. Exhibitions of her work have been shown 
»t the Art Institute of Chicago and the Three Arts Club of Chicago. 

Miss Anna McCann, faculty assistant, was born in Herrin, 111 
attended elementary and high school at Murphysboro, 111., received 



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both the bachelor of science and the bachelor of education degrees 
from Southern Illinois Normal University. Her home Is now Murphysboro. 

Mrs. Lora Bosley, faculty assistant, was born in Harrisburg, 111., 
attended elementary and high school there, attended S.I.N.U., and 
has lived in Carbondale for the last eight years. 

"Selection of this large proportion of our new faculty members 
from among educators who have had some experience in Illinois is, 
we feel, a wise step, "'President Lay pointed out. 

"We feel that these people are not only admirably trained for 
the positions they occupy, but they are also able to bring to 
Southern a familiarity with Illinois problems that Is extremely 
valuable in keeping the University close to the people It serves. 
"Yet because many of them, like other new faculty members we 
have brought It, have had extensive experience in other parts of the 
country, and even in other lands, they contribute a freshness and 
b vitality, a new outlook, and new ideas, that are essential for 
our growing, developing university. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. -In connection with Children's Book 
Week, Mrs. Mae Trovlllion Smith, instructor of English at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, has been Invited to attend the Book 
Fair at Vandervoorts in St. Louis to autograph copies of her book, 
ESSoue 5°£S of Famous People , during Thursday and Friday. 

Mrs. Smith usually gives a pen-and-ink sketch to the child 
wanting her autograph. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lor on a Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondalo, 111. Nov. --Jobs ore available for these students 
who need to work while completing their college education, Dr. A. <J. 
Tor Keurst, dean of men and director of student employment at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, has announced. 

•"i'lhe student may easily earn as much as $1500 during his four 
years of college-," Dean Tor Kcurst points out, end the student fills 
responsible positions as his abilities end experience allows, while 
o omple t ing his c d uo a t i on . 

New students entering the coming Winter Term, beginning Doc. 4, 
who desire work should contact Dean Ter Keurst, in care of Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

Nearly 200 SINU students are holding part-time positions in 
clerical, janitorial, library service, and many other departments, 
according to Dean T^r Keurst. 

From a recent survey, Tor Keurst reports that these students 
average 67,86 hours of work each month. 

Base rate of pay for the student employee is now 35 cents per 
hour on authority of Frank G. Thompson, director of registration :.nd 
education. Fcr each year of successful experience, on increr.se of 
five cents per hour is recommended, and there are students earning as 
high as 60 cents nor hour. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. —Flying down to Southern Illinois Normal 
University in a C-47 , Wright Air Field cage squad, Dayton, Ohio will 
give Southern Illinois basketball fans a chance to witness the 
performance of one of the finest teams in the United States, when 
they meet the Southern Maroons on ' ThurscV y Dec , 6 . at 8:00 p.m., 
according to Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin. 

Dwight Eddlecian, sensational high school player from Centralia, 
well-known to all Illinois, is a member of this great bail club, which 
boasts of four fellows who have? been selected on All-American teams. 

Eddleman was on Centra lie's ''Wonder Five" team, and was also a 
University of Illinois cage-man before entering the Army Air Corps. 

Composed of tall men, the squad '-a average height roaches 6 '5", 
as compared with Southern's 6'1" . 

The second game on the Maroon schedule, it will be broadcast 
over station ;/JTF, Herrin. 

m 



Southern Illinois Normal University information Service 
Lorena Drumraond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Ccrbondale, 111. Nov. Clearness and accuracy in expression, 

factors which will aid the student in later social and business 
contacts, are the composition objectives stressed in the study of 
rhetoric at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

To show the paragraph and composition development achieved by 
the average student of freshman rhetoric coming from a Southern 
Illinois high school, the University has published a selection of 
freshman compositions, entitled "Writing in Freshman Rhetoric Glasses 
at Southern Illinois Normal University," 

Recognizing the need for a correlated study of grammar, sentence 
structure, and other essentials of rhetoric, . the department of 
English at Southern is anxious to cooperate in this training with 
teachers in both the elementary and secondary schools of the area. 

Compiled by Miss Emma L. Bowyer, chairman of the English 
department, and edited by Mrs. Julia Ncoly, associate professor of 
English, the collection of compositions in the new booklet was taken 
from class work and from essays written for Scarab , student literary 
publication. 

An important phase of the first-year curriculum, the freshman 
is also given training in developing his theme or idea in a systematic 
way. At first such formal writings are only a paragraph in length 
but expand as the course continues. During the final course of 
rhetoric, a research paper is ©spec t ©a of the student, and dictionary 
study is given consideration^ 

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l Objectives similar to those at Southern were outlined by the 

Army for its training programs that included work in English, 

denoting the practicality and value of such compositional training. 

### 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. -Part of the program planned for the 
Nov. 17 meeting of the Illinois Association for Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation at Southern Illinois Normal University will 
be devoted to demonstrations of class-room teaching and basketball 
methods. These special features will be held before the men's 
section meeting in the afternoon. 

The following demonstrations have been scheduled: 
I "Methods of Teaching Wrestling"— Leland P. Lingle, associate 
professor of physical education at S.I.N, IT. 

"Methods of Teaching Beginning Tumbling"- -William Freeburg, 
instructor in physical education at Southern, 

"Early Season Drills in Basketball"- -Glenn "Abe" Martin, athletic 
director at Southern. 

"Developing an Off ens e n — Harlan Hodges, coach, West Frankfort 
High School. 

"Set Plays "--Paul Houghton, coach, Anna- Jonesboro High School. 

"Offensive Basketball"— Stanley Shagnon, coach, Mt, Vernon High 
School. 

"Pressing Def ense"— Merrill Thomas, coach, Pinckneyville High 
School, 

"Individual Defense"— a t m^ x. 

° A * L ,%r° Ut ' coach > Centralis High School. 
www 



1 I 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday p.m. 



Carbondale,Ill.Nov. - As the Southern Illinois Maroons approach 
their crucial game of the season with Northern Teachers nest Saturday 
at DcKalb , they are faced with starting play minus three first- 
stringers. Their chances at the conference title are considerably 
hampered by the three losses, 

Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyvillc, fleet quarterback, is still limping 
from a sprained^ nkle sustained in the Homecoming Game against Hacomb 
here October 27. He did not play last week-end against KIrksville (Mo») 
Teachers, and may not be a blc to make the trip to DcKalb. 

Two other casualties are scholastic --Thomas Gher of Ca rbondalc, 
center, and Dick Sharp of West Frankfort, right guard, Both have been 
mainstays In the Maroon line all season and will bo badly missed. 

Rocky Rothschild of Ca iro will ta kc over Stotlar' s place in the 
starting line-up. Rothschild has alternated with Stotlar in earlier 
games, and has developed into a competent passer. He threw one of the 
Homecoming Ga me ' s touchdown passes, and last week-end against KIrks- 
ville heaved a 15 yarder Into the end zone to Gene Davidson of Karrisburg r 

Oner's place will be taken In the starting, line-up by Carl Fcrrcl 
of Joncsboro, while Ralph Lycrla of Anna will take over Sharp's 
assignment. 

The Maroons will leave here Friday and work out at Bloomington 
before going on to DeKalb. 

Starting lineup will include: Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, left 
end; Sa m Milosevich of Zciglcr, captain, left tackle; Bill Eaton of 
Oarbondalc, left guard; Ferrell, center ; Lycrla, right guard, John Corn of 
,enton; right end; Davidson, replacing Carl Berkner from Pinckneyville , 
right end; Rothschild, quarterback; Clarence "Red" Lower y of Benton, 
left half; Dick Eggc-rs of Chester, right half; and Jim Harsh of Madison, 
fullback. 

This lineup will afford the Maroons the heaviest team they have sent 
on the field this season. Rothschild weighs 175 to Stotlar 's 155; 
Davidson scales at 200 compared to Birkner's 130; Lycrla 180to Sharp 
170. Ferrell is a shade lighter than Gher. 

I The Maroons §ro having their third chance in 15 years at the 
Llinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship. 

Undefeated so far this season, they arc in the same position they 

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were a year ago, „he„ they reached their final gam e at the top of the 

conference, only to fall before DeKalb 15-12. 

This season, the Maroons have knocked off two conference oppon- 
ents-Illinois State Normal University 33-19, and Western 13-6-and 
tied Eastern 0-0. In addition, they have defeated Kirksville 13-0 

and A rkansas State 6-0. and tied Arknncv-Q uf n f„ „• 

, auu uxeu iui.anscts State In a second match 

u "" D a 

DeKalb, on the other hand has played only two conference games, 
winning one and losing the other. 

If the Maroons win Saturday, they. cinch the title, if DeKalb 
wins, the title is still uncertain. 

Score in the conference runs like this, as of now: 

Southern 
Eastern 
Normal 
Northern 
Western 

Outcome of the Eastern-Normal game Saturday may also change the 
picture if Southern doesn't cop the championship by defeating Northern. 
The Maroons have climbed £o the favorite position over some pretty 
stiff obstacles. Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin started the 'season with only 
three of his old lettermen back--Cabutti,Milosevich and Eaton. 

The team was fortified by nine war veterans, several of whom have 
ably plugged holes in -the first string: Eaton at left guard; Eugene 
Davidson at right end; and "Red" Lowery at left half. 

Other veterans an the squad include V/oodrow Rust of Cairo;Eugene 
Deitz of Carbondale; Kenneth Capps of Herrin; Jack Davis of Fairfieldl 
Charles Beatty of Benton;' and Frank Brashier of Carmi. 

The Maroons have been outweighed by most of the teams they have 
played this season, but by tricky unexpected plays and by an increasing 
skill on the part of the linesmen, victories have been achieved, 

Martin himself is keyed to a high pitch over the DeKalb game, not 
only because it offers an opportunity to avenge last season's defeat 
from Northern. 

But this is Southern's chance to win its first conference cham- 
pionship since 1930. And Martin himself captained that winning team. 

Martin won three letters in football at Southern, calling signals 

irom the left halfback spot and playing in 16 straight victories. He 

left 
was all-conference/half in 1930, the year the Maroons won the title. 

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He also lettered in track for three ««« 

After leaving the college gridiron, ho pl ay& d professional foot- 
tall for the Chicago Cardinals one year, also signal-calling from 
loft half, then turned to high school football. 

Ho coached at Fairfield, his old home town, for three --ears, and 
build up on undefeated team the last two. Then he went to Poniiec, 
111., for five years., teaching and coaching both football and basket- 
boll . 

He returned to the Southern campus in 19S8 as assistant footboll 
coach, became head coach in 1939, was named head basket ball coach in 
1943, and last summer was appointed director of athletics. 



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Carbondr.lo,Ill.,.i ov . -just under the wire, Dongola is the latest 
southern Illinois school to register for the flfthinnual Choral C linic 
to be heid here at Southern Illinois Normal University Saturday, Nov. 10. 

Don,;; olrds enrollment, with 20 pupils, brings the rooter for the 
clinic to 20 schools, plus the S.I.g.u. chorus and a fifth and sixth 
grade choir from the Campus Laboratory School, and pushes the total 
number of students participating to 780, or nearly double last year's 
enrollment . 

The clinic is sponsored by Community High and University Ki-h 
Schools, and will bring Peter Tkach, music education director of 
Finneapo lis, Minn., as guest director. 

A giant massed choir concert will be given b 7 all the pupils 
participating ln the clinic on Saturday evening, at 7-30 o'clock, with 
:'r. Tkach conducting. No charge will be made for the concert, and the 
public is invited to attend. 

Guest artists for the concert will be hiss Mary Jane Eantz, pianist, 
end John Wharton, violinist, both of the University faculty. 

Schools to send singers to the clinic, together with the number in 
en chorus, respectively, follow: Benton Township High, 106; Carbon- 
Sale Community High,56; Carbondale University High, 22; Carrier Mills 
Community High, 7; Carmi Township High, 29; Chester High, 12; Christopher 
Community High, 18; DuQuoin Township High, 15; Fairfield Com unity Kighy, 
73; Herrin Township High,75; Hurst-Bush High,5; Johnston City, Hirh, 33. 
New Athens Community High, 32; Hounds Township High, 34; Murphysboro Town- 
ship High, 12; Salem Township High, 33; Sandoval Community Hirh, 27; 

fm "h 1 *"?! Ghorus > 53 ; Valier Community High, 3; West Frankfort Community 
tl3 -S*i* 71; Dongola, 28; Campus Laborabory School, 30. 

frrrit 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor rvice 



Special to Southern Illinois ^aili 



es 



Cartondale.il!. Kov. -Ray O.Duncan, State director of health and physical 
education., vil! he one of the key speaks at the meeting of the Illinois association 
for Health, Physical Education and -ecreation, at Southern Illinois Normal University 
Saturday. Hov. 17, according to Dr. frothy Daviss, associate professor of physical' 
education for women at the Universitv. 

Physical education teachers and. supervisors from all parts of the state have 
bpen invited to the University campus for this meeting. 

Mr. Duncan's address will deal with "The State-wide Physical Education Program," 
and will be followed by motion pictures presented by 0. R. Backdoll, assistant state 
director of health and physical education. 

Another major address will be given by Dr. Ruth E. Dunham, Williamson County 
health officer, assisted by her staff. Dr. Dunham will present "Services of A 
County Health Department." 

Section meetings for men and women will be held Saturday afternoon with demon- 
strations of dance and sport activities before the wonefa' s group, and demonstrations 
of classroom teaching and basketball methods before the men's section. 



Carbondale.Ill. Nov. - A Southern Illinois high school girl will go to Texas 
atnrday to be crowned Queen at a military ball at Camp Welters at Mineral Wells 



sxt week. 



She is Miss Myrna P res ley, a junior in University High School, Laboratory S chool 
• Southern Illinois Normal University. Miss Presley's picture was entered in a 
-*P Alters' contest by Private Jules Campbell, 1945 graduate of University High 
*ool. Miss Presley received a telegram from the commanding officer of the camp on 
^ 4 informing her that she had been chosen Queen, and invited her to be the 
*«t of the camp at a farewell dance on Tuesday night, Nov. 13 at which Kay Kjrser's 
ad will play. 

All of Miss Presley's expenses and those of Mrs. Betty Stanley who will accom- 
ny her as chaperon, will be paid by the camp, 

Other features of entertainment for the Queen will include the Kay Kys.r 
>adcast, a special war bond dance, and a tour of the military installations. 

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.Southern Illinois Normal Univprqitw Tnf. 
Loreaa Drummond, Editor Universit ^ Information Service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Car b ondale,Ill. >N ov. - Showing an increase of more than fifty 
percent over last year's attendance, registration in the Choral 
Clinic to be held here on the Southern Illinois Normal University 
campus Nov. 10 indicates a growing interest and attention to music 
in the Southern Illinois schools. 

Enrollment in the clinic is now at 695, as compared with the 
408 here last year, music supervisors from .15 high schools having 
registered their students for the one-day study. 

Climaxing the clinic will be the concert in the evening conducted 
by Peter Tkach, director of Music Education in Minneapolis. The 
public is invited to attend the concort/I^^eXySc^fuditorium, 
beginning at 7:30. 

Schools registered in the clinic include: 

Fairfield High School Cor I 1? dg &y> supervisor-16 students 
Herrin High Ichool Virgin J. vf T P ' su P crvis °r--80 students 

Murphysboro Hieh q^hnni --T-n «■.„,* n • 2 students 

§Slvorsify fi^chn^^* f PP.-P^visor-34 students^* 3 
Sandoval High S SchoSl h.^^ S J^?J SOn > s ^™isor--Z Z students 
West 'rrt&t^k&glZ*? lllf SSKIS^ 

Mi 



Southern Illinois Nomal University Information Service 
Lorena Drurmnond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. --That Hardin County is the most 
picturesque county in the State, in its history, topography, and the 
lore that still lingers from a by-gone day is the opinion of John 
W. Allen, curator of history at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

As director of the University museum, Mr. Allen has been 
particularly interested in the regional development of the Southern 
Illinois area, and has recently published Randolph County Notes and 

1 ■■ ' "■ '■ ||M "•"« ■" ii 1 1 ii i i — i 

Jackson County Notes , which give historical incidents of the 
territories. 

He recently visited Hardin County to collect museum materials 
and folklore from that area. 

Mr. Allen relates various stories of Hardin County to give 
evidence for his statement. In the county, north of what is now 
Cave-in-Rock, was one of the "storied" roads in the region, according 
to Mr. Allen. 

, Leading from Ford's Perry and winding up Potts Hill, "many a 
traveler entered Potts Tavern to disappear forever," he says. 

Then there's the well-known incident about Eschol Sellers who 
settled near the Ohio River at the extreme east end of Hardin County. 
Sellers built a fine house on the bank, near a steamboat landing. 

The Mississippi journalist* Mark Twain, included Eschol Sellers 
in his book The Gilded Age as one of the characters. Sellers UZ^ 
slandered, and as the story goes, visited Twain and "dressed him down 
in seven different languages.'" 

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Twain was forced to withdraw the book from circulation but 
changed the name to»Mulberry" Sellers in the later editions, concluded 
Mr. Allen. 

According to some historians, "American Brigandage" began at 
Cavc-in-Rock, Mr. Allen said. According to an account in the Hardin 



.aw 



County Gazette of April 20, 1877, there is a plea for better «1; 
enforcement, citing that from 1850 to 1877, 28 men and two women 
had been killed outright, not counting the number who died of wounds 
later, nor the infanticides, cites Mr. Allen. 

Another celebrated site is the Old Rose Hotel in Elizabethtown-- 
the oldest house in Hardin County. This property was homesteaded 
technically in 1814, the year the land office opened, but actually 
had been claimed earlier. The present day lobby of the old building-- 
which is still standing— is the old Tavern room, continued Mr. Allen, 
and out in the yard is the stone of the owner, McFarland, who died in 
1857. 

"Surely such a wealth of experiences and many others, even richer, 
merit for Hardin County one of the first places in regional lore," 
Allen concluded. 



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Carbondalc, 111. Nov. --Public interest in Southern Illinois 
Normal University's extension service was shown Monday night, Nov. 12, 
when members of the Carmi Chamber of Commerce and the Parent Teachers' 
Association attended the extension class in education being offered 
there. 

This course entitled, "Child Psychology," is taught by Dr. Douglas 
Lawson, professor of education, and meets on Monday night. Thirty- 
eight students are enrolled in th.c class. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor Qn service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Cartaondale, 111. Nov.-— Enrollment of 587 in the 17 extension 
classes offered this fall by Southern Illinois Normal University has 
been announced by Dr. T. W. Abbott, director of extension. 

Added to the on-campus registration, 1,069, the extension figure 
makes a total of 1,656 students who are currently receiving instruction 
from Southern, 

A majority of the off-campus work began in September, running for 
16 weeks. Generally each extension class meets .under a University 
faculty member assigned the course as a part of his teaching load. 

As students in the extension classes are largely teachers, 
most of the instruction given is in the field of education, but 
literature, ,, music, and art classes are also popular, according to 
Dr. . Abbott. 

Because of demand, a graduate extension course is being offered 
this year in Centralia, . with Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education, teaching the 15 graduate students enrolled. 

Large classes in other Southern Illinois towns include those at 
Anna,. with 39 students; Cairo, 45 -students; Carmi, 33; E. St. Louis, 
55; Marion, 50; Fairfield, .49; . Pinckneyville, 48;-Sparta, 38; and 
I'cLeansboro, 38. 

Other courses are conducted in Nashville, Vienna, West Frankfort, 
Waterloo, Mt. . Vernon, Harrisburg, and Golconda. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Uov- -Demonstrations of women's dance and sport 
activities have been arranged as special interest features at the 
Illinois Association for Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
meeting at Southern Illinois Normal University Saturday, Nov. 17. 

Dr. Dorothy Davies, associate professor of physical education 
for women at the University, will preside over these activities. 

The program has been arranged as follows: 

"Creative Approach to Dance in the Elementary School" — Elsa 
Schneider, assistant State" director of health and physical education. 

"Popular and Unusual Games and Relays"- -Zita Spradling, ?.}&&£. 
instructor, Campus Laboratory School, S.I.N.U. 

"Teaching Social Dance Through the Folk Dance Program"- -Evelyn 
Triplett, Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. 

"G.A.A. in Illinois"--Geraldine Rennert, State secretary of G.A.A. 

"Basketball Formations and Rules Interpretation"-- Dorothy ;. 
Muzzey, assistant professor of physical education, S.I.N.U, 

Open to all women interested in health, physical education, and 
recreation, the demonstrations will be held in the afternoon 
beginning at 1:30. 

Physical education teachers and supervisors from all part3 of 
the State have been invited to the University campus for this meeting. 



ji.jiji 
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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

S pecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, lilt Nov--A mobile x-ray unit from the State- 
Department of Health will visit the Southern Illinois Normal 
University campus on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, Nov. 12-14, 
to survey students and faculty, Dr. Chester F. Lay, president, 
has announced. 

Students will be excused from classes if they conflict with 
their scheduled appointments, President Lay has stated. 

Given without cost to the individual, the examinations are- 
being offered as a part of the University's Health Service program, 

J.ULJ' 

ihnr 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. --Gladys W*» Babcock, assistant professor 
of homo economics at Southern Illinois Normal University, has been 
notified that the book, The Home Today , of which she is co-author, 
has been recommended by the State Board of Vocational Education for 
use in Vocational Home Economics departments in Illinois. 

This book is also appearing in the Illinois State Elementary 
Curriculum, which is now in the hands of the publishers, Miss 
Babcock stated, 

rr-tTtr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. —A new schedule of radio programs for 
the "SINU Hour", presented over stations WJPF, Herrin, and WEBQ, 
Harrisburg on Wednesdays at 2 p.m., has been announced by Mrs. Mae 
Trovillion Smith, director of "SINU Hour." 

"The Chinese Student" will be the subject of a talk by Dean 
Henry Hehn on November 7. 

A brief speech by President C hester F. Lay, an interview, and 
"Books of Our Childhood" will be presented November 14, National 
Education Week. 

The story of Sarah Josepha Hale, lady of Godey's Magazine, who 
is directly responsible for this country's celebrating Thanksgiving 
on the fourth Thursday in each November, will be dramatized November 
21. 

Succeeding programs are "America and the Future," Dr. Willis G. 
Swartz, professor of government, Nov. 28; "South American Poetry," 
Dr. J. Carey Davis, associate professor of foreign languages, Dec, 
5; Women's Athletic Association, Dec. 12; preview of the basketball 
season, Dec . 18. 



Carbondale, 111., Nov* — Construction of midget autos has 
become the latest fad in the seventh and eighth grade industrial arts 
class of Allyn Training School at Southern Illinois Normal University 
this fall. 

This creative trend occurred when instructor Delmar Olson began 
building a midget car for his young son last summer. It has now 
developed into a class project. 

Built around welded steel chassis made from steel tubing, the 
midget autos are shaped in model airplane fashion. Formers and wood 
stringers are the basis for a cloth covering which is dyed any color 
the maker desires. Power is furnished by one-cylinder engines of 
from 5/8 to 1^ horsepower. 

Students Bud and Bill Colvis, ace auto makers who call 

themselves the "Colvis Bros. Buggy Works", have done more work than 

any of the other members of the class and are now building a model 

i e ei) 

Other students Sammy Hunter, Paul Bryant, and Bob Cover are 

each working on a roadster, while Gene Biggs and Robert Johnson are 
constructing three-wheeled streamlined cars. 

MS. 



&&*■ $o- 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. -Devotees of the best in musical 
entertainment should be gratified with the appearance of the young 
Metropolitan soprano, Nadine Conner, at Southern Illinois Normal 
University on Nov. 19,. ■ Mi3S ^mio*" 1'* the «Wf guost -artist ir> 
kfaw'W&S&fyf'bf Community Concerts to be given this year under •■ 
Southern's sponsorship, according to Mrs. 1L A. Thalman, Carbondale, 
president of the Association. 

Miss Conner's reputation as an attractive end brilliant singer 
comes from her successful performances in the operas "La Traviata" 
in the role of Violetta, and Mozart's "Don Giovanni," as Zerlina. 

Following the program by Miss Conner on November 19, other 
artists in this year's series include Draper and Adler, featuring 
tap dancing .and- harmonica music on Dec. 14; Earry Ensemble, with 
flute, violin, cello, and piano, on Jan. 30; Sascho Dorodnitski, 
Eussian pianist, on Mar. 25. 

Membership in the nine-year-old organization is extended over 
a 40-mile radius of the Southern Illinois Normal University campus 
where all the concerts are held in the Shryock Auditorium. Set 
up on a cooperative basis, the association schedules appearances 
of four artists each season through Columbia Concerts, Incorporated. 

m 

Carbondale, 111. Nov. --Florine Schlueter, sophomore from 
Carbondale, has been named business manager of the Obelisk , Southern 
Illinois Normal University yearbook. 

News editor of the Egyptian , student newspaper, for the pest 
half-year, and a member of the staff for two years, Miss Schlueter 
serves as sophomore representative on the Student Council and as 
president of the Sophomore Class. She is a member of Tau Delta 
Rho, discussion society; Mu Tau Pi, journalistic fraternity; and 
Delta Sigma Epsilon, social sorority. 

As business manager of the Obelisk , Miss Schlueter will work 
with Jack Hedges of St. Louis, editor of the publication. 






'■■ ■■■ ■■. ■'- "i ■' : 



«~- ■ ii M i. j < rin i i^^l T - ; ' v/I i f - ' !! ■»'» ' ■ *« »■-•. ■"^•T* 



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~w«-^-«»*-»**.in»»«^^.j(^r-«<— — "- 



' ■ -■ . • . ,.• .. ..•- ■ '• - - -fcO;. - 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information 3 rvice 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies (attention; Sports Writers) 



Carbondalo,Ill.Nov. —Schedule for the Southern Illinois Normal 
University KaroonSr 1945-46 Basketball season has been announced by 
7oach Glenn "Abe" Martin. 

The season of 19 games opens December 4 on the Southern floor 
kvhen Martin's team meets the Onized Club from Alton. 

The entire schedule lor Southern runs as follows: 

December 

4 Onized Club Here 

6 Wright Field Here 

8 Eur ray , Kc ntuc ky The re 

10 Bowling Green, Kentucky There 

15 Loyola University, New Orleans, La. Here 

19 Evansville College There 

21 Arkansas St a te Here 



January 

5 Murray, Kentucky There 

12 Illinois State Normal University There 

15 Charleston State Teachers Colic re Here 

18 Evansville College Here 

22 Cape C-Irarcleau Teachers Here 
26 Western State Teachers College There 

February 

1 Charleston State Teachers College There 

2 DcKalb State Teachers College There 
9 Illinois State Normal University Here 
12 Cape Girardeau Teachers There 
IS Western State Teachers College. Here 

23 DeKalb State Teachers College Here 



if-rrlt 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. —A drive to raise $1,000 for the World Student Service- 
Fund was launched this week at Southern Illinois Normal University with an addross 
to the student assembly by Robert J. Fairgraves, Regional Director of the Midwest 
Area of the WSSF. 

Mr. Fairgraves presented the story of student needs, especially those of the 
war-torn countries, and stated that it was the American students' duty to give to 
the World Student Service Fund, which has been set up to serve students all over the 
world. 

Ten committees, comprised of representatives of various campus organizations, 
are conducting the campaign with Miss Nina Price, student from Christopher, serving 
as chairman. 

A sacrificial dinner was held at the Student Christian Foundation Wednesday 

evening for those students who are taking an active part in the drive. Proceeds 
I of the dinner were turned over to the WSSF. 

Campaigns such as the one here at Southern are being carried out in every 
college and university in the country in order to raise the proposed $1,000,000, 
which is the goal for contributions from United States students and professors. An 
additional $1,000,000 is expected from the rest of the world. 

All money raised will be used -to serve students in eighteen different countries. 
Because of the end of the war, more help is needed for students of the war-torn 
nations—students who are hungry and sick, who are homeless, and who need books and 
supplies. 

The World S t udent Service Fund was founded in 1940 under its present name; 
however, its origin dates back to 1937 with the establishment of the Far Eastern 
Student Service Fund by the National Intercollegiate Christian Council. Its activites 

re extended to Europe in 1939 with the outbreak of the war. In the meantime the 
Jniversity Commission of the Council of Church Boards of Education had become a co- 
sponsor of the organization, which took the name World Student Service Fund. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Loreaa Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. N v. —Miss Martha Scott, assistant professor of zoology 
at Southern Ixlinois N rmal University, has returned to her duties on the faculty 
after a year's service in the Women's Army Corps, President Chester F. Lay has 
announced. 

Miss Scott was stationed first at McCloskey Hospital, Temple Texas, then 
for the past several months at Camp Polk, where she was a technician third class 
in the hospital laboratory. 

On Southern's faculty since 1929, Miss Scott is a graduate of Park College 
in Missouri, holds the master's degree from the University of Chicago and has done 
graduate study at the University of California and Leland Stanford University. 



Carbondale, 111. N n v* —Fusilage of a P-47 Thunderbolt airplane has "been 
received by Southern Illinois N mal University as the gift of the War Department, 
President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

The plane will "be used for instructional purposes. 

The ship is one of 30 new craft just off the assembly line of Republic Aviation 
Corporation, Evansville, Ind. , which have been made available gratis to schools and 
colleges under the War Department's program of disposal of surplus commodities, 
through the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. 

Minus wings, propeller, and landing gear, the plane possesses all other essential 
parts, including all flying instruments, engine, and stock of small tools, fixtures, 
and accessories. 

Construction of a shed for the plane is currently under way at the University. 

m 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorcna Drummond, Editor ° cracc 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies-Attention Sports Editors 

Carbondale,Ill.,Nov. - For the third time in fifteen years, the 
Southern Illinois Normal University Maroons are facing a conference 
championship battle. 

He;.ding the conference field, the undefeated Maroons will meet:: 
their old foes, the northern Teachers at DeKalb next Saturday, and will 
try to revenge the defeat suffered at DeKalb' s hands last fall, when 
Northern nosed out Southern 13-12 for the conference title. 

It has been exactly 15 years since Southern won a conference 
championship, and Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin is anxious to repeat this 
year. Martin himself was captain of that 1930 championship term. 

Southern is one of the handful of teams in the nation which remains 
undefeated as the season noars its close. 

If Southern defeats Northern next Saturday, the conference title 
is clinched for the Maroons. 

On paper it looks as if a Maroon victory is assured, for Southern 
has won two games and tied one, while Northern has won one and lost one. 
Putting it another way, Northern was defeated by Old Normal, while 
Southern beat Old Normal 33-19. T o even up the chances, however, 
Northern beat Macomb Teachers (Western) by the same score Southern beat 
Mac omb • 

Southern's game last Saturday against Kirks ville (LIo.)Teachers was 
a oreather, but netted a 13-0 victory. The two scores were neatly 
achieved the first on a lateral pass from Fullback Jim Harsh of Madison 

o Jean Cunningham of Anna on the second play of the game, with 
Cunningnam getting away 50 yards for a touchdown. The second likewise 
resulted from a pass, a 15-yarder, from Rocky Rothschild of Cairo to 
bene Davidson of Harrisburg in the end zone. 

MlLJl 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Garbondale, 111. Nov. —Appointment of William Handle to serve 
as faculty assista nt and appraiser in the Veteran's Guidance Center 
at Southern Illinois Normal University has been announced by 
President Chester F. Lay. 

Handle's appointment became effective Nov. 1, to aid a four- 
man staff in veteran advisement and testing for the southern area 
of Illinois, 

Coming from the #MCA Hotel In Chicago, where he served as 
Program Director, Mr. Handle had been employed in the personnel 
division at the Buick Aviation Engine Plant in Melrose Park, 111. 
Working with the War Department for 6-| years, Mr. Handle served as 
educa tional advisor on problems relating to the rehabilitation of 
young men in the Civilian Conservation Corps. 

After receiving his bachelor of education degree from Southern 
Illinois Normal University in 1934, Mr, Handle has taken graduate 
work at Northwestern Univc rsity, University of Michigan, and George 
Williams College. 



J.L'J.J! 

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Vu 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lor ena Drummond,. Ed.it or 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies (Attention Sports Editors) 



Carbon&ale, 111., Nov. --Leedio Cabutti, Johnston City, will be 

Southern Illinois No real University's candidate for the FcAnbrew 
Trophy, annually awarded to the school having the most valuable 
football player In the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic Conference, 
Coach Glenn "Abe" Fartin, director of athletics, announced today. 

Cabutti was elected the most valuable player of the Southern 
Maroon eleven last night by vote of varsity football men, Fartin said 

Each school in the I.I.A.C. submits a candidate for the award, 
and the five coaches in turn vote on the players. A coach may not 
vote for his own t e am m er. i b e r . 

Recipient of the award, purchased last ; ? car by the "I" Club of 
Southern, will have his name engraved on the trophy, Fartin stated. 

"Cabutti, playing end position this season in his second year of 
football, was one of the outstanding line backers in the conference," 
stated Coach Fartin," and wa s exceptional in both offensive and 
defensive play," 

A member of the first five in basketball last winter, Cabutti 
is a candidate for a first- string position this season. 

:i 7/ // 



V 



X 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Brurnmond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Sports Editors 



Carbondalo, 111. Nov. —With the five first team players back 
from last year Southern Illinois Normal University Maroons open their 
cage season in a contest with the Onlzed Club of Alton here at the 
University, Dec. 4, Coach Glenn n Abe ,? Martin announces. 

The Onized Club, made up of former college stars, is said to bo 
one of the best independent teams in the Middle -est. Their encounters 
with Southern over a number of years have resulted in an even number 
of wins and losses, However, in the last contest in 1943 the Maroons 
wore defeated by three points, 32-35. 

Last year's first stringers back In action are Leedio Cabutti, 
Johnston City; Sam Milosevic]! and Don Sheffer, Zeigier; Dick Foley, 
Carbondalo; and Dick Harmon, Granite City. Martin says it is doubtful 
if Sheffer will be able to play regular ball this year due to an old 
knee injury which is already giving him trouble. 

The Maroons are again handicapped by not having a tall man; 
however, they are fortunate to have more substitutes than in previous 
years, making a better second squad, which can relieve the five top 
players. 

Eugene Davidson, K arrisburg5 Chester Glover, Mt . Vernon; Glen 
Brown, Carbondalo; Robert Davidson, Carbondalo; Bill Davies, Ccntralia; 
Gene Cunningham, Anna; Gene Stotlar, Pinckneyvillc ; Bill Crum, Mt. 
iarmel; and Carl Birkncr, Pinckneyvillc arc slated to receive plenty 
of action this season, Martin stated. 



tnnf 



Southern I13.in.oic Normal University information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Soecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111, No, v. --America's Thanksgiving celebration takes 
its origin much further back than 1621, according to Miss Winifred 
Burns, assistant professor of English at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, in her article, "The Thanksgiving Festival," appearing in 
the November issue of "The Educational Forum" 

Harvest festivals were initiated with the Canaanites, copied by 
the Children of Israel, observed in Ancient Greece, and celebrated in 
Rome, Miss Burns points out. 

As early as the ninth century, a festival called the "Harvest 
.Home" was held by the Saxons in England, and the holiday was called 
the "Kern" in Scotland. 

"The appearance of the Thanksgiving celebration in our own land 
was only a revival of a very ancient custom," status Miss Earns. 

The first Thanksgiving in 1621 records no religious clement at 
all, but after two succeeding years of drought, starvation, and illness 
the celebration in 1623 was of a religious nature, as well as a holiday ; 
according to Miss Burns, Not until 1363 was Thanksgiving Day proclaimed 
as a national religious festival by President Lincoln. 



### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor lce 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, Hi. Nov. -state organization for the Proverb project 
of the American Dialect Society has been effected, according to Kiss 
Frances Barbour, associate professor of English at Southern Illinois 
Normal University and state director for the project. 

Aiding in the collection of colloquial sayings and unusual word 
usages throughout the state will be Dr. Maude Uhland, of Northern 
Illinois State Teacher's College; Dr. Herbert R. Hiett, head of the 
English department at Illinois State Normal University; Dr. Garetta 
Busey, Urbana; Dr. Marian Galloway, Eastern Illinois State Teachers 
College; Miss Amanda Langemo, Western Illinois State Teachers College. 
Miss Barbour will continue to serve as chairman of the Southern Illinois 



area. 



Illinois is one of the first states to complete organization for 
the project, according to recent word from the society, Miss Barbour 



said, Juut 

if'ii'jt 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. --Dr. J. W. Karris, associate professor of 
English at Southern Illinois Normal University, has recorded a hitherto 
unprintcd pioneer story of Southern Illinois which appears in the 
current October- December issue of Journal of American Folklore . 

Entitled, "The Catskin Legend in Southern Illinois," the article 
relates the incident in which a cat skin was accepted for a mink pelt, 
at a trading store at what is now Carrier Mills in Saline County, 

(more ) 



After the cat skin incident, according to the article, the small 
center was dubbed "Catskin-; and is so-called by the native residents 

of the area even now. 

Also appearing in the journal is an article by Mrs. Grace Partidge 
Smith of Carbondalc, on "A Yankee Tale— Pact or Folksay," which 
records and analyses an early New England story of the so-called 
"retort" genre type. jlum 

SHORTS 

Dr. Marie A. Hinrichs, professor of physiology and hygiene at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, is the author of an article, 
"The Need for Health Education," which will appear in the November 
issue of The Press Bulletin . 

* Jl.lUJ. 
1i "/TV 



SHORTS 
Dr. Dorothy Davies, associate professor of physical education for 
women at Southern Illinois Normal University, has contributed an 
article entitled "The Effect of Tuition Upon the Process of Learning 
a Complex Motor Skill" to £ho Journal of Educational Psychology . Her 
article was published in the September issue of the journal. 

J'-IUI- 

SHORTS 
Walter B. Welch, associate professor of botany at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, is the author of a paper published in The 
Botanical Gazette, Volume 107, entitled "Cicatrization in Leaves 
of Bryophyllum Calycinum." 



Southern Illinois Normal Unive^ii-r r.f 

Lorena Drummond , Edit or univer - lt / Information Service 



DOPE SHEET ON SOUTHERN ILLINOIS FORMAT m,;^ 
RA.^K-PTP.ATT m-PAw XJ,Ui:) FORMAL UNIVER 



BASKETBALL TEAI. 



SITY MAROONS 1945-46 



Head Coach: 
Manager: 
Players : 



Roster 
Glenn "Abe" Martin 
Ken Murphy of Belleville 



(t/indicat^ P n?r r haS lettered ^ Southern-; 
I- mracates player a member of the Maroon 

team that played in the National inter- 
collegiate Championship Tournament at 
Kansas City,Mo., last sprinr— ) 
(# indicates player is a World War n Veteran- 



Name 

«Don Sheffer 
##S am Mi losevich 
■JHtDIck Harmon 
**Leedio Cabutti 
-x-Pick Foley 
•--Bill Aldridge 

?*Bruce Church 

//Eugene Davidson 

#Robort Davidson 

Carl BIrkner 

Tom Ghcr 

Bill Crum 

Gene Stotlar 



Home T own 

Zeigler 

Zeigler 

Granite City 

Johnston City 
Carbondale 
Wolf Lake 
Maris sa 
Karri s burg 
Carbondale 
Pine kneyvi lie 
Carbondale 
Mt. Carmel 
Pinckneyville 



Yrs .Exper. 
Ht- Wt. h.S. Col 



6'2" 175 4 

6'lJ'f 190 4 

6«1-|» 165 1 

5'9j" 165 2 

6'1" 175 4 

5'8-|" 132 4 

6*1" 190 4 

6»1» 136 4 

6 'I" 150 4 

6 '2" ISO 2 

6' 100 2 

5»8" 155 2 

5'8" 155 2 



3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 



Position 

Forward 

Center 

Guard 

Forward 
& Guard 
Guard 

Forward 



3( * 37, Forward 
'33,39) 
(4 Forward 
in army) or center 
Forward 
or guard 
Forward 










uasL year •••ll-conference--South Western Egyptian) 
C-ene Cunningham Anna 51711 145 3 Q 

(Last year all-conf erei ice --South Western Egyptian)- 
**Dale Houghland Carbondale 
Glen Brown 
Chester Glover - 
Roy Ragpdale 

Jack Trotter 
Sill Davies 



Guard 
Guard 
Guard 

Guard 



Carbondale 


5 '10" 


145 


3 


1 




Guard 


Carbondale 


6» 


180 


4 







Forward 


Mt. Vernon 


6 '2" 


155 


1 







Forward 


DeSoto 


6' 


180 


4 


K 


'42 


) Guard 
(Still i: 


Cisne 


5'10i" 


'- 19C 


1 4 







USMC ) 
Guard 



### 



Southern Illinois N ormal University i nforma Ser _.. 
Lorena Drummond, Editor ± vauc 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



or 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. --George W. Smith, 90-year old profess 
emeritus of history at Southern Illinois Normal University died earl- 
this week at his home in Carbondale after 58 years of teaching, 45 of 
which were spent at the University. 

Born in Greene County, Illinois, on November 13, 1855, Professor 
Smith taught in the public schools for 15 years before joining Southern's 
faculty in 3.390. 

During his tenure at the University, he became noted for his 
accomplishments, one of which was development of history instruction 
as a separate department. For nearly 30 years he held the chairmanship 
of the department, continuing until 1923. 

Prof. Smith is widely known as an authority on Illinois history, 
and has written several books on the subject, particularly on Southern 
Illinois history. 

After his retirement from the University facility in 1935, he 
published his last book, which is perhaps his greatest, a scholarly 
contribution to Lincoln Literature entitled When Lincoln Came to Egypt . 

For 40 years Prof. Smith, held the positions of director and vice 
president of the Illinois Historical Society. 

jijui 
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Carbondale, 111. Nov. --"Art Needlework," laboratory course in 
decorative sewing designs, will be offered for the first time by the 
Home Economics department at Southern Illinois Normal University this 
coming winter term, beginning Dec. 4. 

"Work in the course acquaints a student with a variety of ways 
to decorate garments and household articles, and furnishes a fund of 
ideas for originality in dress and in the home," points out Miss Lucy 
K. Woody, professor and chairman of the home economics department, who 
will teach the course. 

No prerequisite courses are necessary for this four hour period, 
meeting from 9 to 11 o'clock on Monday and Friday. 

li "n 77 / 

/ I 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dallies 



Carbondalo, Hi. Nov. -Physical education as a part of the daily 
program is in effect in 50 per cent of the four-year high schools in 
Illinois, Ray 0. Duncan, State director of health and physical 
education, reported to the Illinois Association for Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation which met at Southern Illinois Normal 
University last week. 

An even larger percentage of smaller schools or those with an 
enrollment of less than 200, have adopted the state requirement of 
200 minutes of directed play activity per week as a part of the 
curriculum, Mr. Duncan said. 

Some 80 per cent of the rural schools have included the play 
periods, with 35 counties of the State showing a record of a 100 per 
cent in this field, Duncan added. 

Physical tests were given to SO per cent of the first grade • 
children in the rural schools last year. 

Scenes of play activities taken in Illinois elementary and rural 
schools were shown by 0. R. Backdoll, assistant State director of 
health and physical education, to the 200 teachers, students, and 
public health people attending the one-day conference. 



41J-UL 

itTrtr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Cartaondale, 111. Nov, —Scheduled for the winter term at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, beginning on December 4, are several night 
and Saturday classes designed to appeal to teachers of the area and 
also to graduate students. 

A new course, "Refinishing and Re-upholstering Furniture," will be 
given Tuesday and Thursday evenings in the Parkinson Building by J. 
Henry Schroeder, chairman of the department of industrial arts. On 
Monday and Wednesday evenings, Mr. Schroeder will conduct a class in 
"Machine Metal" which will meet at 6 o'clock. 

Weaving is to be taught Tuesday evenings under Miss Lulu D. Roach, 
assistant professor of art; "Home Furnishings," at 7 p.m. Wednesday by 
Miss Lucy K. Woody, professor of home economics and chairman of that 
department; "Advanced Nutrition and Dietetics," meeting Thursday 
evenings from 7 to 9 o'clock, with Mrs. Mary Lou Barnes, assistant 
professor of home economics, teaching the class. 

Many of the Saturday and night classes may be taken either for 
graduate or undergraduate credit. Among these are "Recent American 
History," meeting at 9:30, Saturday morning, taught by Dr, '•'illiam 
Pitkin, associate professor of social sciences; "International 
Government," at 6:30 p.m., under Dr. Willis G. Swartz, professor of 
government and department chairman; English Seminar, under Dr. Charles 
D. Tenney, professor of English and philosophy, meeting at 7 o'clock 
Thursday evening. 

Two education courses, "Problems in Reading," taught by Dr. Ted 

(more ) 



-2- 

R. Ragsdale, professor of education, and "School Administration," by 
Dr. Bruce W. Morwin, also professor of education, will meet Saturday 
morning at 9:00, 

Dr. Henry J. Rehn, now dean of the college of vocations and 
professions, will teach a graduate course this term in "Budgeting and 
System in Business Operations," on Saturday. "Advanced Plant 
Physiology ll" will meet at night and Sa turday morning under Dr. 
William Bailey, professor of hot any and chairman of that department. 

Graduate courses which are to be offered either at night or 6n 
Saturday include "Theory and Legal Basis of Am rican Education," to be 
hold at 1 p.m. Saturday, under Dr. Douglas E. Lawson, professor of 
education; "Technique and Therapy in Individual Guidance," meeting 
Tuesday evening at 7 o'clock, with Dr. h, A. Thalman, professor of 
education; "Rise of Realism in American Fiction," on Saturday morning, 
taught by Dr. William B. Schneider, associate" prof essor of English; 
Spanish Seminar at 11 a.m. Saturday, taught by Dr. J. Cary Davis, 
associate professor of foreign languages; and "Topics in Modern 
Mathematics," meeting from 8:30 to noon Saturday, with Dr. John R. 
Mayor, professor of mathematics and chairman of that department, 
and Dr. W. C. Mc Daniel, associate professor of mathematics, teaching 
the class. 

More specific information concerning registration in evening 
or Saturday classes may be obtained from the Office of Registrar, 
Southern Illinois Normal University. 



JJ.JLJ1 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. -- Dr. Delia Caldwell, emeritus, college 
physician at Southern Illinois Normal University for many years, died 
Wednesday morning, Nov. 28, at her homo in Carbondale. 

A member of the faculty since 1922, Miss Caldwell attained 
professor emeritus status in 1935. 

Dr. Caldwell received the degree of Doctor of Medicine from 
Northwestern University. She taught for seven and a half years in 
the public schools before joining the Southern Illinois Normal 
University faculty. 

Funeral services were held at the Carbondale First Christian 
Church at two o'clock this afternoon, with burial at Oakland Cemetery. 

Born at Hopkinsville , Ky. , March 25, 1860, Dr. Caldwell served 
as an educator for many years before her retirement. 

m 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. --University High School and Allyn Training 
ichool on the campus of Southern Illinois Normal University have made 
excellent science contributions during the school year to the Illinois 
funior Academy of Science , sponsored by the Illinois State Academy 
)f Science. 

In collaboration with the academy University High held a science 
xhibit in which local "scientists' 1 displayed their talents in the 
ciontific world j These exhibitions were judged by the academy. 

Campus students awarded certificates for their special work in the 
'-hibit are Richard Vogler, Military Models (minicture airfield, tanks, 
:rships, and fighting planes); Aileen Anderson and V/ilma Beadle, Water 
unification Plant; Alice Anna Foley, Chemistry of Making Soap; Dorothy 
nn Peterson, Science Scrapbook; Billy Wakeland, Electric Shocking 
achine; and Sally Sherertz and Judy Fox, Victory Gardening Notebook. 

The Egyptian Experimenters Club of University High, composed 
f students interested in science, assumed the responsibility of 
ublishing one issue of the Junior Academy News L etter, besides sponsoring 
chemistry show at the high school exhibit. 



, ] ;._Y> 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Serving 
Lorena Drummond, Editor uon service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies (Attn: Sports Editors) 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. -Southern Illinois Normal University Maroon; 
play their first basketball game of the season Tuesday night, Dec. 4, 
against the Onized Club of Alton in the SINU men's gym. 

Members of the Onized Club, strong independent team composed of 
s L. ar s 
former college/are employees of the Owens Illinois Glasswork Company 

of Alton. 

Coach Glenn -Abe" Martin will have six returning lettcrmen from 
which to pick a first five, in addition to outstanding freshman 
material. 

Hardwood veterans of a year or more of college play include Dick 
Foley and Dale Houghland, Carbondale; Don Sheffer end Sam Milosevich, 
Zeigler; Leedio Cabutti, Johnston City; Dick Harmon, Granite City; end 
Bill Aldridge , Wolf Lake. 

Also slated to dress for the game Tuesday night are Gene Stotlar 
and Carl Birkner, Pinckneyville ; Gene Cunningham, Anna; Gene Davidson, 
Harrisburg; Bobo Brown and Tommy Gher, Carbondale; Chester Glover, Mt . 
Vernon; 'Bill Davics, Centralis; Bill Cruni, Mt. Carmel, and Larry Fiene, 
Steelcville. 



rff 



Carbondale, 111. Nov. —Twenty players and two managers of the 

Southern Illinois Normal University Marions have earned football awards 

for this season, Coach Glenn »»Abe w Martin announces. 

Sweaters will be given to seventeen squad members, while the other 

throe who earned sweaters last year, will bo presented letters. 

Sam Milosevich, Captain, Zeigler; Loodio Cabutti, Johnston City; 

nd Bill Eaton, Carbondale have earned letters. Dale Houghland, Manager 

f Carbondale, who lettered last year, and Assistant Manager George 

Thocpancpaulos, Carbondale, will else be given letters. 

John Corn, Benton; Carl Birkner, Gene Stotlar, and Glen Hamilton, 
Pinckneyville; Gone Cunningham and Ralph Lyorla, Anna; Dick Eggers, 
Chester; Jim Harsch, Madison; Charles Rothschild, Cairo; Bill Crum, 
Mt. Carmel; Paul Mess, Christopher; Carl Fcrrell , Jonesboro; Charles 

Beatty, Benton; Eugene Davidson, Harrisburg; Frod Lowery, Mt. Vernon; 
Thomas Gher, Carbondale; and Dick Sharp, West Frankfort are the men 
receiving sweaters. 



UJU 



loutlicrn Illinois Normal University Information Service 
,orena Drummond, Editor 

.pecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. --Enrollment for winter term at Southern 
Illinois Normal University stood at M^© Tuesday m^^^^with the 
igure expected to increase as late registrants filter in during the 
ext two weeks. 

Thousandth student to register Monday was Edwin Merkelbach of 
entralia. A veteran of 42 months in the armed forces, with service 
verseas, former t/5 Merkerbach is a graduate student, working toward 
he Master of Education degree in Educa tional Administration. 

Classes met Tuesday, with the University faculty bolstered by the 
eturn of six members, five of whom have been in government service or 
n military leave. 

J. W. Dillow, who left the campus in July, 1945, will work in the 
ollege of Education. Mr* Dillow was previously an assistant professor 
f rural education. 

Robert Dunn Faner, associate professor of English, has returned to 
tie English department after 45 months in the armed forces. 

New appraiser and counselor in the Veterans Guidance Center is 
Lctor Randolph, who left here July, 1943, at which time he served as 
ssistant professor of education. 

Returning after a year's service in the Women's Army Corps is 
irtha Scott, assistant professor of zoology. 

Madeleine M. Smith of the foreign languages department has been 
'hired. Miss Smith entered government service in April, 1943. 

Librarian Marjorie W . Stull has returned to the campus after a 
art leave of absence. ### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information ServW 
Lorena Drummond,Editor ^omauon Service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. .Dec. — Governnpnf ^ O „ onf 

* •» wvtrnnent inspectors have recently 

furnished Southern Illinois Normal University with a new weather 
shelter, Dr. Thomas P. Barton, chairman of the geography and geology 
department who is in charge of weather observations here, has 
announced . 

Two new instruments for weather readings, an anemometer and a : 
fan psychoroneter, have also been given the University, Dr. Barton 
said. 

Southern now has three weather observers, James and Jamie McGee 
of Granite City; and Alice Vravick of West Frankfort. Miss Vravick, 
who very recently passed the civil service exam and received her 
certificate of authority to take airway weather -observations, is the 
first woman weather observer enrolled at Southern. 

Weather readings are taken every six hours, at 6a.m, 12 noon, 
6 p.m., and 12 midnight. 

rhrtr 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. —Enrollment at Southern Illinois Normal 
University is up 40 per cent over that of the winter term last year 
and registration of veterans has skyrocketed more than 1,000 per cent. 

As the period of enrollment ended today for all students except 
veterans, registration for the current winter term reached 1141 in 
comparison to 806 in the winter tern last year. 

A total of 250 veterans of World War II are currently enrolled 
compared to 22- in the Winter term a year ago. 

Veteran enrollment at Southern has steadily climbed In the past 
year— to bO last spring, 90 in the fall, and 250 this tern. 

Irtr: 



tr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor lon bervlce 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies-Attention Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. --Showing what their "victims" described 
as "the best defense we've encountered in the last two years," the 
Southern Illinois Normal University Maroons romped all over the Loyola 
University basket ball team here Saturday night to the tune of 57 to 38, 
Loyola Coach John C. Orsley, whose charges last year won the National 
Intercollegiate Athletic Tournament at Kansas City, paid this rueful 
tribute to the Maroons' defense, which turned out to be too much for 
the Wolves. 

The Maroons, however, are taking their victory lightly, and pointing 
up their practice for Wednesday night's game with Evansville (ind.) 
College at Evansville, and Friday-Eight's battle with Arkansas State 
here. 

Evansville has a good team from all reports. Coach Emerson Henke 
has four lcttermen back from last year, when the Purple Aces won ten 
of their 17 games. 

Information received here, indicates that Hcnke will probably start 
Brown and Englcbright, forwards; Scott, center; Jones and Stubbs, guards. 

Almost every man on the Maroon squad saw action here Saturday 
night against Loyola, and nearly every man on the floor scored at 
least one point. As usual, Sam Miloscvich and Don Sheffer, both of 
Zeigler, were the high-point scorers, each tallying up 14 points. Dick 
Harmon of Granite City and Gene Stotlar of Pinckneyville each scored 
live points, Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City three, Glen Brown of 

(more ) 



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Carbondalc and Eugene Davidson of Harrisburg two each, and Chester 
Glover of Mt . Vernon one. 



Carbondalc, 111. Dec. --All high school basket ball teams in 
Southern Illinois are invited to witness the Southern Maroons-Arkansas 
State Indians game here Friday night, Dec. 21. 

Maroon Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin has announced that all any Southern 
Illinois player has to do is present himself at the door of the Maroon 
gym with indentification from his coach— either by letter or by the 
coach in person— and he'll be admitted free, except for payment of the 
tax. 

"We want these boys to come and be our guests for this game," 
Martin said. "Most of the schools will be out for Christmas holidays 
by that time, and we hope a lot of them can get here" 
The game is called for 8 p.m. 



J.UJ.JJ. 

trTi tr 



Southern Illinois formal University Information Service 
J-orena Drummond, Lditor il-t 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies-Attention Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. -Addition of a new guard for the Southern 
Maroons in time for service against Loyola University here Saturday 
night appears likely, Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin believes. 

Roy Ragsdale of DcSoto, who lettered on the Maroon basket ball squad* 
four years ago but who has been seeing duty as a lieutenant in the 
Marines, is expected to report for duty this week, Martin a aid. 

The Maroon quintet is hard at work this week to get ready for the 
Loyola Wolves, whom the Southerners regard as one of their most 
formidable opponents of the season. 

Word received here indicates that the Wolves cage crew average 
six feet. 

The Wolves, 1945 winner of the National Intercollegiate Basket Ball 
Tournament, won 25 games last season out of 30 tries, and scored 1,618 
points to their opponents' 1,322. 

Two leading scorers of last year's championship team are playing 
this season for the Wolves — James Kultberg, who was named on the All- 
American team at Kansas City National Intercollegiate Tourney, and was 
chosen the best athlete and student at Loyola last year, and Sam Foreman, 
who co-captained the Loyola team last year. Hultberg scored 314 points, 
Foreman 226 points. ■ 

Ehc Maroons have won two and lost two of their games so far this 

season, defeating the Onizcd Club of Alton 51-41 and Bowling Green 

Green, Ky. 
College of Boiling/ 53-48, but losing to Wright Field 71-56 and to 

Murray State Teachers College of Kentucky 38-51. 

(more ) 



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Martin has been informed Loyola will bring a ten-man squad for the 
game here Saturday night, including Sam Foreman, John Castcix, Milton 
Jackson, Jim Bonck, Jim Hultbcrg, William Trouting, Robert Benson, Joe 
Gurievsky, Vincent Greco, and A.C. Y/aldrcp. 

-LL-'-JJ- 
ttint 



Carbondalc, 111, Dec. --The McAndrcw Trophy for the most valuable 
football player in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
this year has been awarded to John Stapler of Eastern Illinois State 
Teachers College, according to Glenn "Abe" Martin, coach at Southern 
Illinois Normal University here,. 

Stabler, halfback on Eastern's 1945 football team, comes from 
Tuscola, 111. 

The McAndrcw Trophy was awarded this year for the first time. This 
trophy is the gift of the "I" Club at Southern, established in memory 
of the late General William A. McAndrcw, former coach here. 

Nominations for the trophy are submitted by each of the five state 
teachers colleges in the 1. 1. A.C, and the five coaches of these member 
schools vote to select the most valuable player, with the provision that 
no coach may vote for the candidate from his own school. 



### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



percent 
Carbondale, 111. Dec. --Although 223 cases or 21/ of the total 

student body \ at Southern Illinois Normal University have reported 

upper respiratory illness during the period covered by November 1 

percent 
through December 5, only 20 students or 2/ of the enrollment showed 

symptoms typical of influenza, Dr. Marie A. Hinrichs, professor of 

physiology and health education and director of student health, has 

announced. 

These data, based upon a study of reported cases from the files 

of the health office, further show that 79 sfeuSbjeits or 35 percent of 

the total cases were among men students and the remaining 144 or 

64 percent were among the women students. 

While 20 students or 9 percent of total cases of illness showed 
symptons resembling those of influenza, there is no actual proof that 
all of these students had the disease, Dr. Hinrichs stated. 

About one-half of the cases showing symptoms typical of influenza 
and those showing symptoms resembling the "flu" were under the care 
of their own doctors from the beginning of illness. Others were sent 
home after illness had begun, Dr. Hinrichs added. 

Reported cases of illness reached a peak during the period 
beginning November 26 through November 30, which was at the time of 
final examinations. Seventy-two students reported to the health 
office ill with colds, sore throats, headaches, coughs, chest pains, 
general aching (suggesting flu), and laryngitis during this time. 

Only thirty cases of illness were turned in during the period of 

December 1-5. „„„ 

www 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale,Ill.,Dec. — A meeting of the 235 veterans enrolled 
at Southern Illinois Normal University will be held Tuesday, December 
18, at which President Chester P. Lay will greet these students and 
discuss their problems and opportunities with them. 

Enrollment of veterans at Southern has jumped from 90 during the 
fall term to 235 during the winter term which started December 3. 

At the close of registration last fall, Southern had twice the 
number of veterans enrolled at any of the other Illinois State teachers 
colleges. 

The meeting here Tuesday night will be conducted by Gamma Iota 
Alpha, the "G.I." fraternity here, as a means of welcoming the 145 
new veterans and getting them acquainted both with other veterans and 
with the University administration. 

In order to accommodate the rapidly increasing number of veterans 
who are coming to the campus, the University has leased a residence 
adjacent to the campus to provide housing for the expanding Veterans' 
Guidance Center which will be occupied within a few days. 

This center is one of six in Illinois maintained by the Veterans 
..Administration to counsel with veterans about their educational and 
vocational opportunities. Complete testing facilities are available 
with University faculty members as examiners and counselors to augment 
the interviewing service of the Veterans Administration. 

All veterans of Southern Illinois are eligible for this service, 
whether or not they expect to enroll at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, end many hundreds have benefited. 

In addition to the Veterans Guidance Center, the University it- 

(more ) 



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self provides counseling service on courses, housing, jobs, and 

other problems through its student life staff, the President. s Office, 



and faculty committees. 



wr" 



Carbondale,Ill.,Doc. -Southern will go off the air for the 
duration of the Christmas recess, Mrs. Mae Trovillion Smith and 
Willis E. Malone, directors of the two Southern Illinois Normal 
University radio programs, have announced. 

"SBJU Hour" which is directed by Mrs. Smith, will continue- 
through Wednesday, December 19, with the post-holiday broadcasting 
schedule being resumed January 9, 

"Education Time," under Malone 's direction, will be presented 
for the last time Friday, December 21, and will not be resumed until 
Friday, January 12. 

Both programs originate in the University's campus studio, and 
are broadcast over Stations V/JPP, Herrin, and WEBQ,Harrisburg. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies—Attention Sports Edit 



or: 



Cai»bondale,Ill.,Dec. —Time for the Southern Maroons-Loyola 
University basket ball game Saturday night , Dec . 15, has been moved 
up to 8:30 in order to permit broadcasting of the entire game, Coach 
Glenn "Abe M Martin has announced. 

This will be one of the biggest games on the Maroon*' calendar 
this season, since Loyola is the ranking team in the National 
Intercollegiate Basket Ball Tournament, having won the title last year. 

Incidentally, Loyola nosed out Southern in the semi-finals of 
the N.I.A.C. tourney at Kansas. City last year by only two points. 

This will be a repeat performance for four Southern players and 
four Loyola players who faced each other in the N.I.A.C. game last 
year. 

Southern's regulars who played against Loyola last year and are 
now on the Maroons' first string are Dick Harmon of Granite City, 
6'lj-" guard; Loedio Cabutti of Johnston City, 5 '9" forward; Sam 
I'ilosevich of Zeigler, 6 'li" center; and Don Sheffer of Zcigler , 6 »2" 
forward. 

These four, together with Dick Foley of Carbondale, 6'1" guard, 
will start the game for the Maroons Saturday night. 

Martin has been having trouble this week getting teamwork practice 
out of the cagers as many of the squad have been ailing with colds. 
All the first- stringers arc back in action, however, and he expects 
them all to be available for duty Saturday night. 

itltlt 



Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor iU 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondalo,Ill.,Dec.. -President Chester F. Lay and four other 
administrative officials from Southern Illinois Normal University here 
will go to Charleston Monday, Dec. 17, for the regular meeting of the 
presidents and boards of the Illinois higher educational institutions. 
I Accompanying President Lay will be Dr. Charles D. Tenney, admin- 
istrative assistant to the president, and Deans T. W. Abbott of the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, E. R. Fair of the College of 
Education, and Henry J. Rehn of the College of Vocations and Profession; 

mi 



Carbondale,Ill,Dec. — Reading of the Governor's proclamation 
designating Saturday, Dec. 15, as "Bill of Rights Day" was a feature 
of the Assembly program at Southern Illinois Normal University here 
Thursday. 

President Chester F. Lay read the proclamation to the assembled 
student body. 



## 



Carbondale,Ill.Dec. -- After two years in the armed forces, 
Fred Cagle has returned to the staff of Southern Illinois Normal 
University to resume his duties handling biological materials in 
the Museum, President Chester F. Lay has announced. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond,Editor e 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale,Ill.,Dec* -Efforts to (1) recruit more teachers 
for the elementary schools of Illinois and (2) to coordinate the 
extension programs of Illinois institutions of higher learning are 
being pondered by the Illinois Council on Higher Education, according 
to President Chester F. Lay of Southern Illinois Normal University 
here . 

President Lay attended a meeting on December 17 of the Council, 
composed of the presidents of the six state-supported institutions of 
higher learning in Illinois, which was attended oy some 35 administra- 
tive officials of these colleges and universities. 

Accompanying President Lay were Dr. Charles D. Tcnnoy , adminis- 
trative assistant to the President; Dean T- W. Abbott of the College 
of Liberal Arts; Dean E. R. Fair of the College of Education; and 
Dean Henry J. Rehn of the College of Vocations and Professions. 

The critical shortage of elementary school teachers in the State 
was discussed at considerable length by the Council, the Southern 
delegation reports. Some Council members believed the shortage so 
drastic that it will require ten years to make up the deficiency. 

All were agreed that the. higher educational institutions should 
make every effort to train more teachers for this field, and a 
committee was designated to study the problem and make recommendations 
to the Council at its spring meeting. 

Another committee was named to study possible methods for co- 
ordination of extension work conducted bv the six institutions and 
report at the spring meeting. 

The Council's meeting December 17 was held at Charleston, at 
Eastern State Teachers College, with President Robert G. Buzzard 
of Eastern acting as chairman. 

### 



ice 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Servi 
Lorena Drummond , Editor uon bervi 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies-Attention Sports Editors 

Carbondale,Ill.,Dec. -Drawings for the Midwest Collegiate 
Basket Ball Tournament at Terre Haute, Ind., Dec. 27-29, have been 
received by the Southern Illinois Normal University Maroons, who 
will participate in the invitational tournament. 

The Maroons will play Svansville ( Ind . ) College on Friday as 
their opening match. 

Preliminaries will pit Central Normal of Indiana vs. Loyola of 
Chicago, and Indiana Central vs. Indiana State, both on Thursday. 
Friday's calendar will match Svansville and Southern, and Murray 
State Teachers College of Kentucky against Eastern Illinois State 
Teachers College. 

Winners of the first round will play on Saturday aftornoon, with 
the finals scheduled for Saturday night. 



Carbondale,Ill.,Dec. —As a curtain-raiser for the Southern 
Maroons-Arkansas State basket ball game here Friday night, Southern's 
third end fourth team will play Carter's Aces, an independent team, 
Maroon Conch Glenn "Abe" Martin has announced. 

The Aces are composed of Verdie Cox, Scotty Gill, Bill Townes, 
Raymond Ellis and other former Southern athletes. 

The game will get under way at 6:30 end will be over by 7:30, 
fcrtin said. The feature game between the Maroons and Arkansas will 
start at eight o'clock. 



v 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, Hi. Dec— Lt. Mary Anna Robertson, recently released 
from the WAVES, will arrive here this week-end to assume the position 
of secretary to the President of Southern Illinois Normal University, 
President Chester P. Lay has announced. 

Lt. Robertson, for 13 years registrar of the University of Alabama, 
ha-sr been in the Navy for three years and has been serving as assistant 
to the manager of the U.S. Navy Yard at Charleston, S.C., and Women's 
Reserve Representative at that yard. 

She holds the bachelor of arts and the master of arts degrees from 
the University of Alabama, where she acquired an exceptionally high 
record of scholarship. She was elected to Mortar Board, national honor 
society for senior women; to Phi Beta Kappa, national academic honor 
society; and Kappa Delta Pi, honorary education fraternity. 

Lt. Robertson replaces Miss Wanda Kiel, formerly faculty assistant 
in the Registrar's Office, who has been acting secretary to •>- sident 
t:,y. Miss Kiel will assume other duties in the University administra- 
tive set-un. 



41.1m 

It -.IT 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. --Appointment of John Jacobs of Murphysboro 
as faculty assistant at Southern Illinois Normal University assigned 
to full-time Instructional and supervisory work in vocational 
agriculture in University High School has been announced by President 

(more ) 



Chester F. Lay. 

Jacobs holds the bachelor of science degree in vocational 
agriculture from the University of Illinois. For the past three years 
he has been in the armed forces. 






Carbondale, 111. Dec. —With the Christmas spirit filling the air, 
Southern Illinois Normal University students, faculty, and guests will 
be entertained with a Christmas program Thursday morning, December 
20, in Shryock Auditorium. 

Highlighting the annual affair, will be a general assembly sing of 
familiar carols, led by the college mixed chorus to put students in the 
right mood for gaity. 

With a brass choir to greet them, the crowd will enter the auditorium 
at the 9:50 bell. A newly formed string ensemble under the leadership 
of Mr. John Wharton, Instructor in music, will open the program at 
10:00 o'clock. 

The program will continue with selections by the mixed chorus, 
singing from the balcony. Members will be dressed in robes and will 
carry lighted candles. Mr. Floyd V. Wakcland, associate professor of 
music, will direct the singing. 

A Christmas play will be presented by the Little Theatre with Mrs. 
Julia Ncely, associate professor of English, directing. 

Christmas greetings given by President Chester F. Lay follows the 
dramatic production, after which the whole student body joins the 
chorus in singing old familiar carols. 

jj.jj.ji 

Irlrrr 



P^SrSi^BStS 1 UhlVCrSit ^ **«*tion Service 
El££ Tat^^ Illin ° 1S Dftllle — Attention Sports Editor 



■ Carbondalc, 111. Dec. —The Southern feroon eagers will tie into 
last year's Intercollegiate Athletic Basket Ball Tournament title- 
holders tonight in the Maroon gym here. 

Time for the game is 8:30 p.m., a half hour later than other hone 
ganes on the Maroon card, in order to permit broadcasting of the entire 
play. 

Loyola University, which last year took all comers at the Kansas 
City Tournanent to win the I.A.B.T. championship, will put four of its 
regulars from last year's title-winning team on the floor Saturday 
night. 

I The Maroons, on the other hand, will also have four regulars from 
last year to natch against the Wolves. 

It nay be an indication of the relative strength of the two teams 
to recall that last year the champs beat the Maroons in the semi-finals 
at Kansas City- -by only two points. 

The Maroon gym is expected to be jam-packed to the rafters for the 
Loyola game, the second big-time- match this season, since the Maroons 
played the Wright Field Kittyhawks here Dec. 6. 

Loyola Coach John C. Orslcy is bringing a ten-man squad for the game 
tonight: Sam Foreman and John Castcix, last year's co- captains; Milton 
Jackson, who played on Loyola's Dixie Conference Championship team a 
few years ago before going into the Air Corps; Jim Bonck, former all- 
state high school center in Louisiana, back from the Amy; Jim Hultbcrg, 
■oscn the best athlete and student at Loyola last year. and All- 

Inerican at the Kansas City tournament; William Treuting, fresh from 

(more ) 



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the Marine Corps; Robert Benson, fomer Intramural star; Joe Gurievsky, 
1943 All- Prop center in Louisiana; Vincent Greco, high school all-state 
forward last year; and A. G. V/aldrep, recently discharged from the Amy 
.training pro gran. 

Coach Martin's starting line-up for the Maroons will include four 
regulars from last yo or— Dick Harmon of Granite City, guard; Leedio 
Cabutti.of Johnston City and Don Shoffcr of Zeigler, forwards; Sax.: 
Milosevich of Zeigler, center— plus Dick Foley of Carttondale, guard. 
Chester Glover of Mt. Vernon is expected to see duty as forward 
and Bill Malinsky of Flora as guard. 



M.JU-' 

frt it 



Carbondalo, 111. Dec. --Roy Ragsdale of DcSota, fomer Maroon 
guard, now in the Marines, has not yet showed up for practice. Martin 
had earlier hoped that he night clear his discharge and report for 
basket ball duty in tine to participate in the Loyola game tonight. 

1LJJJJ. 
ItlTTT 



Southern Illinois Normal University m^ 

Lorena Drummond, Editor universit 2 Information Service 



Carbondale, 111., Dec.-- ADDointm^vn- „r +■ 

Appointment 01 two major administrative 

officers at Southern Illinois Normal University w * 

university has been announced 

by President Chester F. Lay. 

Miss Helen A. Shuman, who has been serving since last sprin, as 
administrative assistant to the President, has been appointed full- 
time dean of women, while Dr. Charles D. Tenney, professor of 
philosophy an, English, was named administrative assistant to sue- 
ceed Miss Shuman. 

Miss Shuman becomes Southern's first full -time ^, 

-xioL iuii-time o.ean of women. 

She suoeoeds yiss Lucy K. '^oody, who has served as part-time dean 
of women sxnee 1926, and who will now devote her entire tine to 
affairs of the home economies department, of which she is profes- 
sor and chairman. 

"We regret to lose in this capacity the valuable services of 
imss woody, who has functioned effectively and layally as a counselor 
for southern women- s students," President Ley declared, "but it was 
her own wish to resirn from the deanship, in order to : ive her full 
time to home economics and to permit the development of full-time 
counseling for rirls. n 

riss Shuman, who has been dean of girls in several Illinois high 
schools and last y.ar was dean of women at High Point Collie in " 
North Carolina, served for two years as the state president of the 
Illinois Association of Deans of Women. She attended the associa- 
tion's meeting in Chicago at Thanksgiving before taking over her 
duties as dean here at Southern. 

A native of Illinois, hiss Shuman attended El Paso Township High 
School and Lake Forest Kirh School, and Illinois State Normal Univer- 
sity where she obtained the bachelor of education degree. She 
holds the master of arts degree from the University of Illinois, and 
has virtually completed her work toward the' doctor of philosophy 
degree in personnel work at Northwestern University, where she held 
the Northwestern Scholarship in 1945-44. The preceding year she 
held a fellowship from Kappa Delta Pi, honor society. 

Dr. Tenney has been on Southern's faculty since 1931. He is a 
graduate of Gooding College, of w 1 ich his father was former presi- 
dent, and holds the master of arts and the doctor of philosophy 
degrees from the University of Oregon. 



( - 



;r I 



-2- 



Hc held a teaching fellowship at the University of Orc-on for 

four years before joining the S.I.N. IT. faculty, and was offered 

graduate scholarships at the University of Illinois and Harvard 

but was unable to accept either. 

In th. years he has been at Southern, Dr. Tenney has built up 

the philosophy curriculum from one course to eight, and has virtually 
pleted a 1,000 word book on "Contributions to Literary Ciriticisn 
[ Aesthetics." He* ha* published well over 100 articles, essays 



an 



ana verses 



in addition to his teaching; duties, including an extension course 
,v>ich he has been conducting at Fairfield, Dr. Tenney has also 
recently been serving as acting chairman of the art department. 



£ £ £ 
tt rr if 



Carbondalo, 111., Dec.-- Veteran enrollment at Southern Illinoi: 
T oraal University winter term reached 219 on the second day of 
?> gistration. 

The figure more than doubles last torn' s veteran number of 90, 
; .'hich was the highest in the five state teacher schools. 

Total enrollment now stands at 1052, but this figure is 
expected to increase as late re istrants come in. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorcna Brumnond, Editor " rvicc 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. --This year instead of exchanging gifts 
with each other, students at Anthony Hall, .omen's dormitory. on the 
campus of Southern Illinois Normal University, will give their presents 
to the Jackson County Old Polka Home, 

I Following a Christmas dinner, which will be held on Thursday night, 
December 20, the crowd will sing carols and have a brief program in 
the living room. Later the gifts will be delivered to the Old Folks 
Home, 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. --Gifts evoking creativeness in the pre- 
school child make the most desirable Christmas presents to give the 
youngster from three to five years of age, according to Dr. Sina M. 
Mott, assistant professor of pre- school .education and director of the 
pre- school and kindergarten at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Commenting on the scarcity of available gifts for the coming holiday, 
Dr. Mott and her assistant, Mrs. Lucy Fligor, recommend homemade, small, 
sturdy table and chairs as possibly one of the most useful possessions 
a child could have. Serving for varied activities, from carpentering 
to coloring, such a table should be about 24 inches high, Dr. Mott 
believes. 

Another prized article the young child especially enjoys i* a 
portable victrola or phonograph with his own collection of story records, 
as those of the Bubble Books scries or a Mother Goose collection. 

(more ) 



-2- 



ur 



Hrs. Fligor stated. 

An attractive luncheon cloth, a tea set, or better, three or f 
heavy eups and saucers together with a few snail sauce pans for tea 
tabic P lay ; a nurso-and-doctor kit, traveling bag with a few pieces 
of interesting clothing for dramatic play, are desirable for the 
youngster, reminds Dr. Mott. 

Recommended by Dr. Mott and Mrs. Fligor for evening play are soft 
cuddly animals and dolls, and a wide selection of appropriate star- 

■J 

books of pictures of animals. 

Suggested for reading to the preschool child are the following 
beoks: And Then, Alexander Van Rensselaer; The Very First Day, Ann 
Weil; Little Lost Larib, Golden MacDonald; My Mother is the Most 
B6QUtiful ^££ ±5 Bl H££ld, Becky Reyher; The Rooster Crows , Maud 
andMiska Pctcrshan; Tck> Big, mgri and Edgar Parin D'aulairo; The 
Sk^^-ska^t^c Monkey , Dorothy Lathrop; The Antique Cat, Bianca 
Bradbury; Augustus , Claire Huchet Bishop; Stiggles , K.K. deKaroff; 

BCllndC>S 22Z Shoes, Winifred Bronhall; The Little Fisherman , Margaret 
Wise Brown. 



4LJ.L V. 

'in,' if 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
L orena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale,Hl.,Dec. -Christmas vacation for the students and 
faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University begins Friday, 
December 22, and extends through Sunday, January 6, President 
Chester P. Lay has announced. 

Administrative offices will be closed two four-day periods 
over the Christmas and New Year weekends. 

Classes are to be resumed Monday morning, January 7. 



M.JLU 

Tf-inr 



Carbondale,Ill.,Dec. -- Southern Illinois Normal University 
will have a single eight-week term for the 1946 Summer Session, 
according to announcement from the office of the president, Dr. Chester 
F« Lay. 

Opening June 10, the eight-week session will run through 
August ' 2. 

For the past few years, Southern has held two six-week sessions 
during the summer because of war-time demand for an accelerated 
program. Under such a program, a student could complete the four-year 
course (12 terms of work) In three years, by attending both summer 
sessions each year. 

The decision to hold only one summer term was reached by the 
Advisory Council, and is subject to approval by the Teachers College 
Board. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. --George W. Smith, professor of history, 
emeritus, and Dr. Delia Caldwell, assistant professor and college 
physician, emerita, deceased members of the Southern Illinois Normal 
University faculty, were given special recognition in a memorial service 
held during the regular college assembly period Thursday morning, Dec- 
ember 13. 

Colleagues of the late historian and physician, W. G. Cisnc, 
professor and director of placements, emeritus, and Dr. William G. Bailey 
professor and chairman of the botany department, addressed the student 
body and guests present at the service. 



" " u 

lt : ,rir 



Carbondale, 111. Dec. --Two American pioneers in the concert field, 
Paul Draper, choreographer, and Larry Adler, harmonica player, will 
appear in a joint recital at Southern Illinois Normal University ; in 
Shryock Auditorium, Friday, December 14, at 8 p.m. for the second 
Community Concert this season. 

Draper and Adler have been a team since their Chicago recital in 

December of 1940 and are now on their fourth transcontinental tour. 
They usually present programs including a range of numbers from the 

classics to a medley of popular favorites, topped, off with request 
numbers from the audience. 

The team has appeared before several service groups in camps and 
hospitals, and Adler made his second overseas tour with the Jack Benny 

troup in the summer of 1945, 



JJ.JLU 

trrrir 



a 



Southern Illinois Normal University information q rw iA f 
Lorena Drummond, Editor raatlon Service 

Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbonclalo,Ill.,jan. -After a two-week rest, broken only by 
jaunt to Terre Haute, Ind., to participate in the Midwest Invitational 
Let during the Christmas holidays, the Southern Illinois Normal 
University basket bjall team will go back into action Saturday night, 
January 5. 

The Maroon squad will journey to Murray, Ky., to tangle with the 
Lrray State Teachers College in the second game of the season for 
these two teams. The Maroons lost to Murray 38-51 on December 8. 

The Murray go^ie out of the way this week-end, the Maroons will have 
a whole week to practice up for their first conference gamc-with Old 
Normal at Normal January 12. Three days later the Charleston Teachers 
id. 11 come here. 

Other conference dates are: Western, Jan. 26; Charleston, Feb. 1; 
DeKalb, Feb. 2; Normal, Feb. 9; Western, Feb. 16; and DeKalb, Feb. 23. 

in between these conference games will come forays against Evans- 
rtllc College on January 18; Cape Girardeau on January 22 a nd again 
>n Fcbrue-^ 12. 

I The Maroons thus far have won four of their seven tries, with 
■stories over the Onized Club of Alton, Bowling Green ' College, Ky., 
oyola University of New Orleans, and Arkansas State, and losses to 
Tight Field, Murray Teachers, and Evansville College. 

In total points, the Maroons have piled up an inpressive score— 
70 points to their opponents' aggregate 339. 

### 



Soutnern Illinois Normal University T n f 0T ™->tion q»-,„- 
Lorena Drummond.Editor imonm.uion Service 



Carbondale,Ill.,jan. -Servicin c the largest area of the state. 
Southern Illinois Normal University led the five state- supported 
schools during the World War II period in number of students and 
faculty in military service, college military training program, special 
defense programs, and other special contributions. 

Southern's front rank position above the other four-Eastern, 
rorthern, and Western State Teachers colleges, and Illinois State 
formal University-is consistent rith the record of student enrollment 
purine the past several years. 

According to recent survey, some 3,170 men and women from the 
.ive schools entered the armed forces. Almost a third of that total, 
!400, were former Southerners. Of the 263 g0 ld- starred names found 
n the five campuses, 60 are at Southern. 

Serving in the armed forces were 61 faculty members on leave 
rom the five colleges. Southern lists 19, or nearly a fourth of 
hat total, while 15 more were away in special government service, 
n Red Cross, USO, OPA, UN N RA, and other highly technical positions. 

For 15 months, the University housed and trained 1019 cadets of 
he 69th College Training Detachment (Air Crew), giving college work 
i English,mathematics, geography, history, government, psychology, 
lysical training, medical aid, ohysics, and Civil Air Regulations. 

Other military programs carried by the University include Civil! 
lot Training, while programs in effect at the other four schools 
re Army Enlisted Reserve Corps, Air Force Enlisted Reserve, Marine 
rps Reserve, ASTP, Navy V-l, V-5, V-7, and V-12. Southern trained 
proximately one-third of the military trainees instructed by the five 
eachers' colleges. 

A very important part of Southern's war contribution was the 
aining of 1000 war production workers in electric and acetylene 
lding, machine shop, automechanics, mechanical drawing and blueorint 
-ding, aircraft riveting, and engineering aids. At its height, 12 
achers were holding classes on a 24-hour day schedule. A third of 
ailment in War Production Training Programs in effect at the five 
ic.her colleges was that of Southern's. 

Other war-time contributions of the University here include 
■ablishment of a Community Cannery under the State Program of 
servation; the Faculty Gift Club, which sent packages on a rotating 
is to former students in the armed forces; the Co-Ed Victory Corps, 

(more) 



an 



composed of Southern students who sold defense stamps, rolled bandages, 
knitted for ^ed Cross, aided in blood donor drives; Veterans Information 
Service Bureau, to advise returning veterans of legislative benefits 
and to give vocational guidance. 

In all the five schools, the curricular programs were accelerated, 
■nd sessions were reorganized to allow for year-round instruction. 
Southern opened many night classes, designed to appeal to the Illinois 
Ordinance Plant war workers, many of whom were students in the 
University. Most of the chemist-: In the plant's laboratory were 
trained at Southern. 

Courses in Hap and Aerial photograph Interpretation, Meteorology 
for Pilots, mathematics, production of foodstuffs, care of farm 
implements, cars, and trucks, first aid and home nursing, knitting, 
and others wore afforded the students and adults of the area. 

Meanwhile, Southern continued to carry on Its civilian job of 
training teachers. Of the 6000 teachers placed' by the five colleges 
luring the war years, Southern effected 1,519 of these placements, or 
more than one fourth of the total. 

Carbondale,Ill.,Jan. -Lt. Rockwell McCreight, having received 
ds discharge from the Navy, has returned to his position as instructor 
.nd director of the physical plant at Southern Illinois Normal 
fniversity here, 

Lt. McCreight is the seventh faculty member to be re- employed 
y the University after having served in the armed forces, 

A graduate of the University of Illinois with the bachelor's and 
aster's degrees, McCreight had six years' teaching experience, two of 
hem in administrative work, before joining the University faculty. 

Charles Williams, former stationery engineer on the physical plant 
taff, has also returned from military service and has been promoted 

o plant engineer I. 

Ti ii ir 

Carbondale,Ill., Jan. -President Chester P. Lay and Edward V. Miles, 
°., business manager, of Southern Illinois Normal University will go 
) Springfield Monday to attend the meeting of the State Teachers 

>llege Board, 

itrnr 



Southern Illinois Normal Tjni ver^- \- v Tnf.v, 4.- 

Lorena Drummond, Editor jnivers -^ Information Service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



/are 



Carbondale,Ill., Ja n -To the counties of Southern Illinois that 
undertaking to survey and reorganize their sehool systems-admittedly 
a "tough nut to eraek"-Southern Illinois Normal University is ex- 
tending a helping hand. 

County superintendents and their assistants in the 34 counties 
of Southern Illinois have been invited to gather at the University 
here January 11 for a preliminary discussion of problems involved^ 
in launching the surveys, Dr. E. R. Pair, Dean of the College of 

Education, has announced. 

I At that time, if the superintendents think the idea a good one, 
Plans will be laid for a full-fledged conference here early in 
February of all the county committees on reorganization, Dean Fair 
said, 

I The University already has functioning a committee of its 
faculty members who are serving as advisors and consultants for the 
Southern Illinois schools on their reorganization program. 
I This committee was appointed by President Chester p. Lay at the 
request of the Southern Illinois Schoolmasters. Club, and is composed 
of Howard Bosley, acting chairman and advisor on elementary education; 
P. G. Warren, on secondary education; Dr. Douglas Lawson, on school 
law; Willis E. Malone, on rural and in-service education; and Dean 
Pair, Special consultants on rural education are George Bracewell, 
Emerson Hall and J. W . Dillow, all of the Universityts rural 
education faculty. 



### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor ice 

Attention: Sports Editors 

I Carbondale,Ill., Jan. -A bit winded after the rough fast game 
Saturday night with Murray State Teachers College, K y., the Southern 
Illinois Normal University cagers are facing a week's rest before 
entering their conference schedule at Normal next Saturday. 
I Though the Maroons led Murray 28 to 20 at the half, Murray's 
McDaniel was a bit too much to handle and the game ended 45 to 37 
in the Kentuckians 1 favor. 

Southern** Leedio Cabutti did a good job of holding Murray t 8 
Reagan to one basket and three field goals in spite of his repu- 
tation as a "hot shot." 

Don Sheffer (Zeigler) was Southern's high scorer, heaving five 
field goals and one free throw, while Dick Foley ( Carbondale ) scored 
four field goals and Sam Milosevich two. other scorers were Cal 
Collins (DuQuoin), one field goal; Chester Glover. (Mt . Vernon), two 
field goals, one free throw; and Dick Harmon (Granite City), one 
field goal, two free throws. ' 

The Maroons, members of the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference, will meet Old Normal at Normal Saturday night, then will 
play another conference game on the home court here Tuesday, January 
15, against Eastern Illinois State Teachers College. 

££41 



Southern Illinois Normal University Tn* 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Tuesday p.m. 



ormation Service 



Carborc.ale, 111., Jsn . 3..^^ Jpckgon ^^ ^.^ ^ 
represcntin;; .or: than 50 years- experience in evaluating real estate 
have consented to accept appointment fro. the state Teachera College 

Board to serve as a committee of rmr-^c,^ t-^ „ , t 

01 =-P.prcisal lo assist Southern Illinois 

Formal University acquire property for its 25-^-r. r -^~ , 

il,& co-ye^r expansion program 

it w s announced here today. 

They are 0. r. Jones of Kurphysboro, abstractor, -ho b, s been in 
the insurance and real estate business since 1917; L ^son .ore, of 
Carbondale, former county treasurer and secretary of the Carbondale 

Building, Loan and Homestead Association fn-r. i / . 

Ak.,jui,j.«bion i or 14 '''ears; -nr F F 

Hooner of Carbondale, officer and approved mortice in the Medial 
Bousing Authority, who has had £0 years, banking e.xperience and holds 
a real estate brokerage license. 

"These men -acre asked to serve because of their knowledge of 
real estate values, their reputation for integrity, and their willing. 
ness to serve the University, and their community/' declared Frank G 
Thompson, of Springfield, director of the State Department of Pegi... 
atwti.ee and Education and chaiman of the Teachers College Board. 

Director Thomson soent Saturday in conference here with the 
three men chosen to serve as appraisers, with University President 
Chester p. Lay, and Business rtsnager regard V. riles, Jr. 

"They have been persuaded to assist in a public service to be 
-ndercd by facilitating addxtions and improvement a to Southern II... 
linois Normal University," he added. 

"Improvements authorized for the current bienniran are but the 
Seginnine of additional building facilities it is hoped vail ' come to 
this co mmun i t y . u * 

He expressed confidea.ee that "all citizens of Carbondale, whether 
owners of property to be Purchased or not, will cooperate full, in 
the expansion program necessary to arrive at the yoal set for the 
future of Southern Illinois Formal University." 

J-L Ji Jl 

ir 77 ?/• 



/ 



f^! r Sv. Illln 2 1 ^?; mal Unive ^ity Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Edi tor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 

Carbondale,Hl.,Jan -The .first graduate school bulletin of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, outlining courses in the fields 

of work leading to the Master* s degree in education, has recently 
come from the press. 

"The only fully accredited institution of higher education in 
the Southern Illinois area, Southern is presenting a well-rounded 
faculty, all with doctors degrees offering both general and spe- 
cialized courses. The Graduate School seeks above all to meet the 
needs of the area which it serves, "states President Chester P. lay, 
in the foreword of the catalog. 

Offering graduate vrork in the Biological Sciences, Commerce and 
Business Administration, Education and Psychology, the Humanities, " 
Mathematics and the Physical Sciences, and the Social Sciences, 37 
members of the University staff are on the graduate faculty. Some 
45 courses for graduate work are listed In the bulletin. 

Graduate assistantships were offered f or t he first time last 
fall to students looking forward to the raster's degree on basis of 
scholarship and type of work interesting to the applicant. Southern 
has awarded assistantships for such services as assisting faculty ; 
members conducting research projects, teaching, laboratory work, and 
special library work. 

The first graduate courses at Southern were offered during the 
summer session of 1944, following approval of the Illinois State 
Teachers College Board's committee on graduate work. Southern awarded 
its first raster's degree in June, 1945, follow 

Copies of the Graduate School bulletin may be obtained from the 
President's Office, Registrar's Office, or Dr. W. G. Swartz, chairman 

(more) 



-2* ,. 



of the Graduate Committee, in care of the University. 



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ICarbondale,Ill.,Jan. .Edgar t. Stephens, chief of rehabilitation 
services of the Illinois Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Spring- 
field, will be the guest speaker at the Student Assembly of Southern 
Illinois Normal University on January 10. 

Vv. Stephens* subject will be "Helping the Handicapped to Help 
themselves." His subject will include a discussion of the many services 
that are available to the handicapped through the Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation. 

Stephens came to the Division on Oct. 1, 1945, as chief of 
rehabilitation services directly from the Illinois Association for the 
Crippled where he served as Executive Secretary for two years. During 
the two-year period that he was Executive Secretary, he was given 
recognition by the Chicago Sun, in its "Salute Column" for the out- 
standing work which he had done with the Home Bound Department of that 
organization. 

Stephens formerly was executive secretary of the Illinois County 
Tuberculosis Association at Joliet. He has been active in the 
American Public Health Association and the Illinois Public Health 
Advisory Committee. He is a member of the National Committee on the 
Severely Handicapped. 

I For several years, Mr. Stephens was engaged in public school work, 
serving as teacher, principal and superintendent in a number of Illinois 
public school systems. 

CnlW^ 313 PC ?^ ivcd the bachelor of arts degree from Forth Central 
o?ti ir?'™?^ m S' ? nd th( ^ astcr of science degree from the Univcr- 
fcrlrfrll ±3 ' He 1S ^ a ° andidate for the doctor of philosophy 

S?5? i ? advance graduate study at Indiana University, Colorado 
state and Northwestern University. 



1 1 77 



i.M- 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention: Sports V/riters 



Carbondale, 111., Jan —The Southern Illinois Normal University 
fearoons clinched their first Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference basketball game Saturday night with a 59-44 victory over 
the Illinois State Normal University Redbirds. 

Don Sheffer of Zeigler paced the Maroon scoring with 8 field 
goals and 4 free throws to amass 20 points as high-point man of the 
game. Newcomer quentin Stinson, Eldorado, tallied 11 points. A 
vctoran, Stinson registered at Southern about 10 days ago, Martin 
said 

Coach Martin's team had c slim lead of 3 points at the end of 
the first half, but were able to make the resulting score more de- 
cisive during the last half of the play. 

The Panthers of Eastern Illinois State Toachors College play 
here Tuesday night, in another I.I.A.C. meet. Game time is eight 
o'clock. 

Northern Illinois State Teachers College defeated western Illinois 
State Teachers College Saturday night in the only other I.I.A.C. game 
thus far played. 






Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondalo, 111., Jan —University Placements Office hag filled 
193 teaching positions during the fiscal year of Nov. 1944 through 
Nov. 1945, Dr. T. W. Abbott, director of the office, has announced. 

During this period 509 persons registered with the placements 
Office and 1,833 vacancies were reported. to the office. 

Out of the 125 graduates of 1945, a total number of 75 persons 
or 60$ have reported in teaching positions. Thirty-seven of these 
are in high schools with 38 doing clement- ry teaching. 

Of the 233 persons from the alumni group who re-registered 
during this period 100 of them wore placed in now positions. 

Six registrants from other colleges were given torching 
postiions. 

The Placement Service is available not only to graduates 
of Southern but also to others seeking positions in the schools. 
It is intended to aid the schools as well as University graduates, 
and public-school officials who have teaching vacancies to fill 
arc assisted in finding well-qualified candidates. 

Since the war began more than 1,500 teachers have been placed 
by this office. 



Carbondalo, 111. Jan. — A new schedule cf r-dio programs fcr 

"Education Time" presented ever stations V/JPF, Herrin, and WEBQ, 

Harrisburg, on Fridays at 2:00 P.M., has been announced by 7/illis 

E. Malone, director of "Education Time." 

(mere ) 



Page 2 

"Story Bohirr the Headline'* presented by Albert -Meyer,., managing 
editor and other staff members of the Carbondnle.Free Press, will be 
heard on January 18. 

The Egyptian Key will speak on "How Egypt Got Its Name" on 
January 25. On February 1, Miss Francos BarVur, Associate Professor 
of English at Southern, will speak on the subject, "Folk Sayings 
in Southern Illinois." 

Succeeding programs are "Lincoln Stories", by Dean 3. G. Lentz, 
Director cf Southern's Clint Clay Tilt on Library, an February 8; 
"Story cf Valentine Day" by the Delta Sigma Epsilcn Sorority on 
February 15; and "Stories of George Washington" by Miss Gladys 
Smith, Associate Professor at the University High School, 

I m 

Dr. Sina M. Matt, assistant professor of pro-school education, 
Et Southern Illinois Normal University has an article on "Number 
Concepts cf Small Children" in the November issue of "The Mathematics 
Teacher". 

A study of the development of arithmetical abilities, Dr. Mctt 
investigated the concepts hold by 44 four and five year old children 
attending the kindergordon-nursery at the University. here. 

Dr. Mctt found that cf the children tested who would enter 
school the following f "11 , 90 percent cculd cunt by rate (mechanical 

routine manner) to 10; 82 percent to 15, 50 percent to 20, and 22 

percent to 100. 
:•••■•'••:• r.t * i.or. 

Building of number concepts for figures 1 to 10 in the f~ur ~nd 
five y^r-.-ld is influenced deeidely by tEe'numbor of '.varicus parts' 
cf the body, and Dr. Mott further .lists the numbers 1,2,4,5, and 10, 
as'thc'so most elo^r ~nd' definite hold by'thc child. - ~ ■ 

Statistics for the v st-ug.y v.orV obtained in a- separate -interview with 
each, child using 15 blocks,. and a^toy truck holding 28 cubes. 

"".'■ ""** w """ ' ')fihf " -' **' " " "~* 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
For release Thursday 



CarbondalejIllijJan. -In order to accommodate the rapidly 
increasing number of veterans who are coming to the campus, Southern 
Illinois Normal University has leased an eight room residence at 
901 S. Illinois Ave., to provide housing for the Veterans Guidance 
Center located on the University campus. 

The Center has expanded rapidly since its establishment here 
last -May, and its original quarters in the Old Science Building 
had become overcrowded. 

The new quarters now provide office space for W. A. Pinkerton 
Chief of the Center, his assistant, and his secretary; and for the 
four counselors, Dr. Lawrence Clark, Dr. Laird Hites, Victor Randolph, 
and William Handle, furnished the Center toy the University, as well 
as supplying adequate testing laboratories. 

### 

Carbondale,Hl.,Jan. -John Copeland, Veterans Service Officer 
from the Veterans Administration, Hines, Illinois, is on. the Southern 
Illinois Normal University campus today to interview and counsel 
veterans needing assistance. 

ILliJJ. 

irlrif 

Carbondale,Ill.,jan. -Burnett Shryock, former chairman of the 
art department at Southern Illinois Normal University, has been 
awarded a prize in the La Tausca Pearls contest for oil paintings 
conducted by Artists for Victory, inc., according to recent announce- 
ment . 

Specifying that the paintings show "a woman with pearls", the 
contest attracted more than 1,|00 painters from all over the country. 
Shryock' s portrait was accorded one of the top thirteen. 

Top ranking paintings in the contest were placed on exhibit at 
Portraits, Inc., New York, in early January, and are slated to be 
phown at ei&ht other cities throughout the country. 

Shryock is not at the University of Kansas City. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information q rT ,, n>f 
: Lorona Drummond, Editor i-iormaLion Service 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. -Offering graduate assis tantships for 
the first time this year since the inceation of its Graduate program^ 
Southern Illinois Normal University, has graduate assistants who are 
now engaged In special departmental duties and at the same time are 
working toward the Master La degree in Education. 

Awarded on basis of scholarship of the applicant and on the 
type of work in which he is particularly interested, the assistant- 
ships consist of such services as conducting research projects, or 
assisting faculty members in special research; teaching, laboratory 
work, and special library service. 

For ten months' work, the assistant may receive as high as 
0750, a stlpend highcr than ^ Qr equGl tQf s . miiar graduate as . stant _ 

ships given by larger universities. 

Faculty chairman of the Graduate Committee at Southern is Dr. 
Willis G. Swartz, chairman of the department of government. 

Appointments for graduate assistantships include: 

Edward L. Allen, Carbondal e, Bachelor of Education degree, 
Southern, 1940, assigned to College of Vocations. 

Attie Belle Adams, Herrin, Bachelor of Education degree, Southern^ 
1946, assigned to mathematics department. 

Helen Blackburn, Salem, Bachelor of Education degree, Southern, 
1946, assigned to mathematics department. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Brazier, -aterville , Minn., Bachelor of Ed- 
ucation degree, Mankato State Teachers College, Minn., assigned to 
Allyn Training School. 

Mrs. Lola Davis, Carbondale, Bachelor of Education degree, 
Southern, 1945, assigned to dean of w omen and dean of men. 

Herbert Johnston, Carbondale, Bachelor of Education, degree, 

(moT: v 



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■ 



Southern, 1943, assigned to Tfclvcr.lt, Sign school. 

Edward C. Goodnight, Herrin, Bachelor of Art. degree, Howard 
Payne- college, 1933, assigned to history department 

Mrs. Alice Phillips Rector, Carbondale, Bachelor of Education 

degree, Southern, 1935, assigned to the University High School. 



Caroondale,m., jQ n - Veteran enrollment at Southern Illinois 
Normal University jumped to 275 today as 23 ex- servicemen 
registered during the week. 

Majority of the veterans enrolled in time for Mondays classes, 
following the Christmas holidays. 

Special arrangements are made for the returning veteran if he 
desire, to enter school late in the .term. Most of them enter on 
the G.I. Bill, several are on Public Law 16 (Rehabilitation), while 
some enter on military scholarships. 

Present student enrollment at Southern now stands at 1170. 



### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Servi™ 
Lorena Drummond, Editor ^uuxmaLion bervice 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., J cn . _ miis s . MalonQ $ ln _ SQTvicQ ^ ^^ 
education specialist at Southern Illinois Normal University will 
participate on the program of the Governor's Conference on Rural 
Education in Springfield, Jan. 18 and 19. 

' Mr. Malone will servo as a member of the panel on "Changes 
Needed in Courses of Study", on Saturday morning. 

Called by Governor Dwight H. Green at the request of the Illinois 
Rural Education Committee, the two-day conference will be attended by 
about 500 representative of Illinois counties, most of whom have 
been chosen by the respective county superintendents of schools. 

Besides Mr. Malone, Mrs. Mabel Lane, supervising critic in the 
rural practice schools, has been designated by Jackson county 
superintendent Lee Nebughr to attend the mooting. 

Other members of the Southern faculty who will go to the 
conference include President Chester F. Lay; Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of 
the college of education; George Brncowoll, associate professor of 
rural education; and graduate student Edward L. Allen, McLoansboro, 
who will represent the University Students. 

Governor Grocn will speak on "The State's Interest in Rural 
Education" at the evening session on Friday. 



Carbondale, 111. Jan. —Southern Illinois Normal University 

Placements Service has recently received two lot tors from Honolulu 

and Latin America expressing their need for both men and women teachers' 

(more) * 



Dr. T. W. Abbott, director of the service, has c.nnoanccd. 

Single men who have had several years of successful teaching 
experience are preferred in the Honolulu schools, but young men just 
out of college will be considered. A Few married men will be accepted, 
while women will be placed in the elementary ~nd girls' boarding school, 

Requirements for teaching in the Latin American schools arc a 
bachelor degree and experience in teaching in this country. While 
a knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese is desirable for the teacher's 
best adjustment to the country, in most cas.s it is not essential for 
the actual work of teaching. 

Persons interested in accepting one of those positions should 
notify Dr. Abbott of the Placements Service. 

In the last four years 1500 persons have been placed by this 
service, but three times this number could have been given, positions, ; 
Dr. Abbott stated. 

Vacancies reported during this period have totaled 1,833 and 509 
have registered tyith the office. 






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Southern Illinois Normal University Tnf^v.™ *. • 

Lorena Drummond, Editor niversit y Information Service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. J a n. -County superintendents of Southern 
Illinois in session Friday at Southern Illinois Normal University heard 
members of the University faculty outline a manual of suggestions on 
county school reorganization which a University committee has prepared 
for the use of county school survey committees and administrators. 

The University manual presented a tabulation of the backlog of 
data which was felt desirable for county survey committees to have 
on hand before planning their reorganization. 

Howard E. Boslcy, chairmen of the University committee, pointed 

of 
oat that this manual is one of a series/materials which the University 

will make available as a supplement to the materials prepared by the 

State Reorganization Commission. 

In addition to discussing the problem of county surveys, the 

school officials through the day voted to authorize the circulation of 

petitions urging federal aid for public schools among teachers of the 
24th and 25th congressional district. 

Among thoso present were Ned F. Carlton, J. V/esley Neville, Robert 
E. McKinney, Goffrey Hughes, Horace G. Brown, Lee Booth Williamson, 
Hubert H. Sutton, Virgil H. Judge, H. E. flfebb, E. H. Dawes, Lee Nebughr, 
Eugenia Etherton, Clyde L. Flynn, Kenneth L. Davis, Sidney Hirons, 
Robert L. Brisscnden, M. C. Hunt, Russell Rendleman, Lawrence Hinklc , 
and Lester Buford of Mt . Vernon, a member of the State Reorganization 
Committee. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Srrvw 



Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale,Ill.,J a n -Fruit growers from the Southern Illinois 
area are expected to be on the Southern Illinois normal University 
campus here, January 22, 23, for the 72nd annual meeting of the 
Southern Illinois Horticultural Society. 
I Speakers for the two-day session include Williamfwi H111> 
president of the association; Dr. M. J. Dorsey, head of the department 
of Horticulture, University of Illinois; Dr. Dwight Powell; Dr. 
R. V. Lott; Dr. A. S. Colby; Dr. V. „. Kelley, all of the u. of I,, 
Dr. George Scarseth, director of research, American Farm Research 
Association, Dafayotto, Ind. 

Dr. R. H. Sudds, associate horticulturist, agricultural 
experiment station, Eorgantown, v/. Va.; Truman Nold, secretary of 
the National Apple Institute, Washington, D. O.j s. C. Chandler, 
field entomologist, Illinois Natural History Survey; and Oliver I. 
Snapp, entomologist, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Port Valley, Ga. 

A banquet will be held Tuesday evening, at which time the S.I.g.D. 
Chorus will sing, under the direction of Floyd V. Wakeland, associate 
professor of music. 

First session of the meeting Holiday opens at 10:00 a.m., with 
the afternoon session beginning at 1:15. On Tuesday, the morning 
meeting will convene at 9:30, and the after noon program starts 
at 1:15. All four sessions will he held in the Old Science Building. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information servir^ 
Lorena Drummond, Editor i^uiudiion bervice 

Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale, ill. Jan. -Southern Illinois Normal University 
Maroons journey to Normal Saturday night for their first Illinois 
intercollegiate Athletic Conference tilt of the cage season. 

Also the first game of the new year, Coach Martini a cagers have 
had a whole week to recover from the two losses encountered in the 
Midwestern Tournament at Terre Haute, md. in December. 

Although the Normal Red Birds' season hasn't proved sensational, 
their record of six games shows three victories and three losses. 
Expected line-up for this team is Tom Galvin, center; Bill Howard 
and Joe Konitzki, forwards, Dick Higgins and Dick Murphy, guards. 

Martin will probably begin the game with his regular starting 
five of Don Sheffer of Zeigler, Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, S am 
Nilosevich of^zeigler, Dick Harmon of Granite City, and Dick Foley 
of Carbondale f 

The Maroons will play their second conference game on the home 
court here Tuesday, January 15, against Eastern Illinois State Teachers 
College, 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. --Featured speaker at the meeting of the 
Southern Illinois horticulturists on the Southern Illinois Normal 
University campus here Jan. 21 and 2°, will be Truman Nold, secretary 

7 V 

of the National Apple Institute, Washington, D. C. 

Mr. Told served as Secretary of the Fruit and Vegetable Committee 

of the United Nations prior to his entering the Army in January, 1944. 
After nearly two years of service, he has returned to his former 
position of Secretary of the National Apple Institute. 

Addressing the horticulture society at ten o'clock Tuesday 
morning, Jan. 22, In the Little Theatre of Old Science Building, rr. 
Nold will discuss the "Post-War Apple Outlook." 

"Plum Curculio Control", address on the primary insect affecting 
peaches, will be given by Oliver I. Snapp, at 1:15 Tuesday afternoon. 
Mr. Snapp is entomologist for the U. s. Department of Agriculture at 
Fort Valley, Ga. 

S. C. Chandler, field entomologist, Illinois Natural History 
Survey, and consulting entomologist at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, will speak on "D. D. T. Experiments" on Tuesday afternoon. 

Irfnf 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. — Featured in the third of a series of 
Community Concerts this season is the appearance of the Bary Emsemble 
at the Shryock Auditorium, Wednesday, January 30, at 3:00 p.m., on 
the campus of Southern Illinois Normal University. 

This group, an unusual musical combination of piano, flute, 
violin, and 'cello, offers a program of the finest concerted music, 
combined with solo numbers • 

The ensemble was formed by Gertrude Eary, Distinguished pianist, 
as a musical adventure, and is composed of Kiss Bary, Lorna V/ren, 
Flutist; Mary Bcckner, violinist; and Virginia Peterson, 'cellist, 
each of whom is a renowned soloist In her own right* 

Although the prime purpose of the ensemble is to present fine 
music as soloists and jointly, Niss Bary hopes that her programs may 
give the audiences the idea of forming chamber music groups to aid 
In the revivial of community music of all kinds. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 

Lorena Drummoncl, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. --Dr. Sophie Schroeder, psychiatrist 

with the Illinois Institute for Juvenile Research will be here on 
the Southern Illinois Normal University campus January 22, 23 and 
24, to work with members of the University's Child Guidance Clinic, 
Dr. v;. A. Ihalman, professor of Education and director of the Clinic, 
announced today. 

Established in April 1936, for the primary purpose of aiding 
teacher education, particularly in the study of the individual 
child, the Guidance Bureau conducts quarterly clinics, holding 
special staffings end forums which college students, and student 
teachers may attend. 

"Many requests have come fro- various communities, both from 
the schools and. from the parents in regard to bringing children 
and adolescents for the January clinic," stated Dr. Ihalman 
adding that since it has been impossible to accept all the cases 
for the current clinic, many of them have been set at a later date 
for study.- 

"No cases can be admitted for the January clinic except those 
from whom arrangements have already been made," he emphasized. 

Also participating in the clinical staffings will be rise 
Helen Narber, assistant professor in the Allyn Training School; 
Mrs. Lola Davis, Mrs. Alice Rector, end hr. Herbert Johnson, grad- 
uate assistants; and Miss Carrie Thomas, student in clinical 
psychology. 

An open forum on ""hat Improvements Need to Be Made in Home 
Life in Order that the Child May be Better Fortified to Meet the 
Responsibilities of Life?" will be held Tuesday eftemoon at four 
o'clock in the Little Theatre, under the direction of Dr. Schroeder. 

Wednesday afternoon, Dr. Schroeder, with University students 
Lillian Goddsrd and Glenn Brown, both of Carbondale, will hold a 
panel on '"'act Should Be Done with nd for r Juvenile Delinquent?", 
for all college studejhts and student teachers, in the Little 
Theatre, £t 4 p.m. > 

Further information about the. services of the Child Guidance 
Clinic may be obtained from Dr. Thalmen, director of the Clinic, 
in care of the University. 

# # f 



Southern Illinois Normal Ur.iverr itr Iriiomc. tion Service 
L o r e n a Drttramon d , E d i t o r 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
ATTENTION! Soorts Editors 



Carbondalc,Ill. , Jan. -Holding a record of two Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference wins by successive victories 
over Illinois State Normal University and Eastern State Teachers, 
the Southern Illinois Normal University Ih.roons play Evansvillc (Inch) 
College here Friday night for their third meeting with the Aces. 

Evansvillc nosed out the Llaroons by one point for a 44-43 score- 
in the game there Dec. 19. Coach "Abo" martin's team drew the- Aces 
for their first game in the Terre Haute Midwestern State Teachers 
College Tournament, Christmas vacation, and were overcome curing 
the last few minutes of play when Earold Brown, Evansvillc' s captain, 
ran "wild" to give the Aces the top score. 

Martin's team has been strengthened with the addition of 
Quentin Stinson, Eldorado, a returned veteran who entered the Univer- 
sity two weeks ago. Stinson played about half the Normal game, and 
almost all the Eastern game last Tuesday night. Standing 6 '4", 
Stinson has been playing at center with Sam hilosevich, Zeiglcr, 
shifted to guard position. 

Scoring honors in the game here with Eastern were evenly 
divided, Milosevich high point man for the game with 15 points. 
Gene Stotlar, Pincknoyvillc, scored 13, and Don Sheffer, Zeiglor, 
sank 12 points. 

The game, stcrting at 3:00 p.m., will be broadcast over 
station WJPF (1340 ) , Hcrrin. Officials for the game are Ernie Driggers, 
Mt, Vernon, and Bill Cosgrove, Evansvillc. 

JUUL 

ffltif 



feouthcrn Illinois Normal university Information <* CT mH, 
Lorena Drummond, Editor " * IUJITlcllon S~rvi( 



Carbondale, ill, Jan . — n The future wlll st2nd 



considerable 



expansion in the growing of good sm.ll fruits because we hrve rrouos 

and inaividusis who know/to grow -ood fruit ^^ e -™i -i *. 

— / <_.- j - wv> -uuu xiuil ana excellent markets 

in the area," declard Dr a c- n-.iv.- TT , 

, x.,xu L> r . a. ,,. Colby, University of Illinois % 

horticulturist at the meeting of the Southern Illinois Horticulture 
Society held on the Southern Illinois Formal University campus here 
yesterday, 

Colby told the 200 Southern Illinois fruit growers at the first 
day-session yesterday that more raspbe,ries and strawberries eould 
be crown in the area by trying new varieties of merit; planting on 
the ideal site; mechanizing the industry, converting the present 
hand-labor to power machinery; bette, control of weeds; use of more 
fertilizers to grow and produce better fruit; and utilization of 
coming improvements in spraying machinery. 

...-. Speaking on "yew Oryanic Fungicides", Dr. Dwight Powell, also 
of the University of Illinois, stated that several new oryanic 
fungicides are coming into the picture from the standpoint of the 
fruit disease control, and that many of these will be adopted into 
growers spray schedule in a Tew -ears, after more careful 
experimentation. 

Stressing the neec: for j favorable root environment for plants, 
Dr. ^eorge Scarseth, director Research, American Farm Research 
Association, Lafayette, lnd„ called the organic matter of the soils 
"the slow fires that must be kept burning in the ground in order 
that the greatest benefits from it can be derived. The organic matter 
must be actively decomposing, and in order for this decompostion 
to ;o on, a liberal air supply is as necessary for these soil fires 
as air is needed for wood burning in the stove. 

The most practical way to obtain organic matter is to grow it 
on the around. Fine grasses ic Fature's way to out organic matter 
into the soil, ;; he said, adding that grasses arc also valuable in 
preventing erosion. 

Fembers of the society will meet again today on the Southern 
campus for further business and. more addresses, president ""illiam 
Boaumon, Tunnel gill, i s presiding over the 2-day session. 



m 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Release Wednesday 

Carbondale, 111., Jan.22~"After a grower has practiced intelligent soil 
management, tree conditioning, fruit thinning, and successful chemical control 
of insects and diseases, only th«n can he consider himself a success," declared 
a University of Illinois horticultierist here today. 

Dr. Dwight Powell, from the University of Illinois was one of the principal 
speakers at the two-day meeting of the Southern Illinois Horticulture Society 
here on the Southern Illinois Normal University campus, which has drawn 250 
members — largest attendance on record. 

Giving the peach spraying and dusting schedules for 1946, Dr. Powell and 
S. C. Chandler, field entomologist for Illinois Natural History Survey and consulting 
entomologist at Southern Illinois Normal University agreed that too often the 
fruit grower thinks of the pest control program first. Low quality fruit does 
not make good pest control a "profitable proposition," they emphasized. 

Oliver I. Snapp, entomologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Fort 
Valley, Ga. , discussing "Plum Curculio Control," reported that continued laboratory, 
cage and orchard experiments seemed to indicate that dichloroethyl -other as soil 
treatment to eliminate the need for applying an insecticide to the trees might 
well become an effective and safe substitute for lead arsenate, which is widely 
used now. 

"lead arsenate has an injurious effect on the foliage, buds, budwood and 
fruit of peach trees under certain conditions," Snapp said. 

"The dichlorethyl ether treatment is applied primarily for the control of tfr» 
second generation of plum curculio larvae and pupae and undoubtedly has its 
greatest value in areas in which a second generation usually occurs," he explained. 

Since often the Southern Illinois peach crop is entirely eliminated by low 
winter temperatures or spring frosts, "the application of this control would be 
of much less value, except in the unusual seasons whan a large second brood occurs," 
he added. 

William Beauman, Tunnel Hill, was re-elected president of the association, 
Other officers include Curt Eckert, Belleville, first vice-president; D. W. Casper, 
Cobden, second vice-president; and L, L. Colvis, Carbondale, secretart-treasurer. 



i ";,■;' 30 



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Southern Illinois Normal Universitv information qp™m„« 
Lorena Drummond, Editor " iniormatlon Service 



Special to Southern Illinois Daili 



es 



I Carbondale, 111. Jan. -students at Southern Illinois Normal 
University are evidencing their interest in post-war problems by 
staging a series of Comminity peace Forums. 

These forms, sponsored by the Independent Student Union, are 
open to the student body, faculty, and community. They have been 
designed to encourage study, both, in the classroom and out, of 
problems facing the world and to stimulate individuals and groups 
to face the future realistically in terms of the demands of peace. 
I The series is composed of seven sessions which are being held 

in the Little Theatre on the University campus. ' 
I First in the scries entitled "Atomic Energy" was held last week 
with Dr. Kenneth Van Lcnte, associate professor of chemistry, delivering 
the lecture. Bill Kummcr of New York City served as student chairman. 
I Succeeding forums are "China, a Factor in the Peace of the Orient", 
January 23; « Ia War with ^ ssU mevitable," January 30; "Do We Want 
Compulsory Military Training," Feb. 4; "Housing, Locally and Nationally,' 
Feb. 7; "Race Problem: "What- is its Future," Feb. 21; and "is United 
Nations Organization Adequate to Meet Demands of Postwar World?," Feb. 
28. 

I Bill Kummer, New York City, Eleanor White, Equality, Gary Brazier, 
Bob East, Lillian Goddard, all of Carbondale; Catherine Sullivan, 

fefmoSlt tne S^/"*' 8 ' St ' L ° UiS ' ^ bcCn ^ lcctcd - student 

'Everyone is invited to attend these sessions, which open at 7-30 
p.m., with the exception of the one on Jan. 23, scheduled at 8-00.' 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information 

Lorena Drummond, Editor iniorm.tion service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies-- 
Attention Sports Editors 



I Carbcndale,Ill.,Jan. -Sharing top position in the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference with Northern Teachers, Southern 
Illinois Normal University faces two conference games this weekend! 

I Playing Eastern Illinois State Teachers, now in cellar position, 
at Charleston Friday night, Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's Maroons enter 
a decisive game with Northern the following night. 

I Both undefeated in conference play, Southern and Northern each 
had close games last Saturday night: Southern overcoming Western - 
Illinois: State Teachers by one point, 57-56, while Northern defeated 
Eastern, 48-44. 

High scorer in the Southern-Western game Saturday night was 
Niksis, Leatherneck 6*5" center, who accounted for 22 points. Sam 
Nilosevich,Zeigler, emerged high point man for Southern with 17 points, 
as Cal Collins, DuQuoin, came second with 11 points. 

Martin called the game with Western tou^h and fast, pointing 
out that Collins and Milosevic!! sparked the Maroon five. 

Southerns next home game is on February 9 with Illinois State 
Normal University. Martin expects stiffer competition than in his 
first encounter with the Redbirds, ( Southern 59-Normal 44), as the 
Redbird team has been strenghtened by addition of veterans who have 
just entered for the second semester of work there. 



Southern Illinois Novmal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond , Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale,Ill.,Jan. —Chief concern of authorities at 
Southern Illinois Normal University is the housing shortage for 
students whic is becoming increasingly acute as student enrollment 
at the University climbs toward its pre-war 2400 peak. 

Citizens of Carbondale have made particular efforts to cooperate 
with the University on the problem by converting unused house space 
into apartments, and through the renting of available rooms to 
veterans with families who have returned to school. 

Citing the cases of three elderly ladies who generously arranged 
for the veteran to fire the furnace, and do other work in return for 
living quarters, Mrs. Mabel Pull i am, executive assistant in charge of 
housing, expressed the hope that other veterans with families could 
find such a satisfactory solution. 

"Such relationships are very good," declared Mrs. Fulliam, for 
not only does the householder gain financially, but also gains 
through the companionship afforded by the student and his family. 

One householder offered a room in her home as a temporary place 
for the married students until they could find an apartment, and 
plans to continue that service, allowing the couple cooking privileges 
during their stay at her home. 

Latest action. taken by University authorities is that of having 
applied to the Federal Government for permission to bring vacant 
buildings from war areas to the campus to alleviate the situation. 
If the request is granted, 100 units for married couples, and 
barr-cks for single units will be made available to the students at 
low cost. 

Officials point out that at basis, the shortage lies in the fact 
that the population of Carbondale has increased over 2000 since 1940, 
yet no extensive building has been done to house these families. 

The problem is further complicated in that whereas many students 
could commute from nearby towns during the pre-war enrollment peak, 
commuting is now difficult because of restrictions in tires and 
sutomobiles. Authorities estimate that as many as 800 students were 
3ff-campus residents during the high enrollment period of 1940-41. 

m 



Southern Illinois Normal University, Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Csrbondale, 111. Jan.-- "Proverbs represent the accumulated 

wisdom of the folk," declares fisa Prances M. Barbour, associate 
professor of English at Southern Illinois normal University, 

Tiss Barbour is author of an article, "Collection of Proverbs 
and Local Sayings," in the December issue of the Illinois English 
Bulletin, official publication of the Illinois Association of 
Teachers of English. 

State chairman of an American Dialect society project to 
collect such proverbs, Miss Barbour deployed the slight response 
shown in Southern Illinois. 

"The proverbs and sayings that have come in, however, are 
very picturesque, mainly savoring of the agricultural and mining 
activities of the area," Piss Barbour explained. 

Typical of this class arc "Colder than a well- digger's feet," 
"to be (or play) the tar bucket" -"dumb as a pit mule," and "dark 
as midnight in a coal mine." 

"'Dae ultimate aim of the project is compilation of an American 
dictionary of proverbial sayings, but collections will be published 
from time to time to stimulate interest," said hiss Barbour. 
Monographs Interpreting the material will also appear. 

£ £ 4'- 

1r 77 Ti 



Southern Illinois Normal TT ni vr-* ; +-„- T - 

Lorcna Drummond, Editor LniVcrsit ^ Information Service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday ^^s 



Carbondalc, 111., Jan . .. Tnc Gntlr£ ^^ ^ ^ ^^^ 
Illinois normal University-college, high school, and intermedial- 
grade students in the laboratory schools-«wont to the novice" 
this morning with full approval of the sehool officials. 

in fact, classes wore turned out for two hours for a special 

showing of the motion picture "Borneo" bv utrs n,, t„i 

-- L - u >->■ irs, osa Johnson, world 

famous traveler end o^-v'-orr- v-r r> ™-? -m 

UUL i^o bogrt.pner, with comments h-v ? T r.o t~- 

> ^viiJiuoiius oy | (i rs, Johnson, 

Mrs, Johnson had beer in V itrr J fn - -,>-^ _ i, * 

llJllICCI t0 appear before the University 

Assembly on Thursday but was unable to fnlfnl « 

k ' Jit t0 lu lfiH the engagement, so 

an extra assembly was calVer 3 - rn ,-n^in * t 

jf aco caiicc to enable students and faculty to 

hear her illustrated lecture. 

Facilities of the Varsity Theater downtown were loaned to 
the University for the showing of the Johnson film. 

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Southern Illinois Normal Universitv mfn^.f^ 

Lorena Drummond, Editor universlt 3 Information Service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailie- 
Release Friday 1Cu 



Carbondale, 111., Jan.~abr.e Southern Illinois Normal Universit; 
faculty members are attending the Conference of Elementary Teachers, 
being held today at the Central Junior Eigh School, West Frankfort/ 

Dean E. R. Fair, professor and de:n of the College of 

Education is speaking on "Educational Trends at Southern." 

"Curriculum Development" j s ths titl p nf +~ r- t * n *. 

j.c oils. Licic 01 the lecture by y/. c. Malone 

Office of the Dean, while Dr r ^n-> v r«<-+ - +. 

, aixt i,x bina i . Lott, assistant professor of 

pre-school education talks on "Kindergarten Novement." 

Ihis meeting is opened to all elementary teachers of Franklin 
County. 

# ■ # 4 

Carbondale, ill., Jan.-, A tea fop Southern Illinois Nomal 
University veterans and their wives was held yesterday afternoon 
by the University Housing Committee on the campus. 

A discussion of the housing shortage, which has become a 
chief concern of Southern officials, was carried on, at which 
time veterans were informed of the work done by the com.it tee. 

# # # 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information q ew rin 
Lorena Drummond, Editor J-niormation service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, Hi. Jan. —After nearly four years in the armed 
forces, Dr. Eli Borkon has returned to the Southern Illinois N omal 
University faculty as associate professor of physiology and health 
education, and as one of the two University oh^icions. 

I Dr. Borkon left the Southern campus in January, 1942 s to serve 
as medical officer in the Army. Major Borkon* s more recent positions 

have been those of medical officer, English and Canadian Armies 

Laisson in France, and chief public health officer of the Wurtte,:burg- 

Baden area in Germany. 

Before coming to the University faculty in 1939, Dr. Borkon received 
his bachelor of science, doctor of philosophy, and doctor of medicine 
degrees from the University of Chicago. 



Carbondale, 111. Jan. — Third of a series of community peace 
forums sponsored by Southern Illinois Normal University students here 
111 be held Thursday night, with Dr. Willi* G. Swartz, professor of 
government and department chairman, discussing "Is War with Russia 
[nevi table?" 

Initiated and outlined to appeal to thinking students, faculty, and 
:ownspeople, the weekly forums will run through February. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information <femrf* 
Lorena Drummond, Editor nxorma.ion Service 



Special to Southern Illinois Daili 



es 



Carbondale, 111'. Jan. —a program of Concert muaie, combined 
lith solo numbers, will be offered by the Bary Ensemble in their 
appearance at Southern Illinois Nomal University in shryock Auditorium 

Wednesday ni^it at 8 o'clock. 

I Third in a series of Carbondale Community Concerts this season, 
the Bary Ensemble is an unusual musical combination of piano, flute, 
violin, and 'cello, 

I The group was formed by Gertrude Bary, distinguished pianist, as 
a musical adventure, and is composed of Miss Bary, Lorena Wren; 
flutist; Mary Becker, violinist; and Virginia Peterson, 'cellist, 
each of whom is a renowned soloist in her own right. 



Carbondale, Hi. Jan. -,-Dr. John Elder, Presbyterian missionary 
to Iran, will be here on the Southern Illinois Normal University campus 
February 4 and 5, appearing under the auspices of the Student Christian 
Foundation, inter-denominational student fellowship group. 

Dr. Elder,, who is visiting American colleges and universities on 
oehalf of the Student Volunteer Movement, has had 22 years' missionary 
|xperience in Syria and Iran. 



SMS 



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.'is 



Southern Illinois Normal U nivcrci ^-Information Service 
Lorcna Drummond, Editor service 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Jan. ---While. Southern Illinois Normal 
University's veterans attend their University classes, their wives 
may enroll in special homemaking courses being offered spring term 
by the Home Economics department. 

| Though the courses do give regular college credit, Miss Lucy K. 
Woody, professor of Homer-klng and chairman of that department, has 
announced that they need not be taken for credit, thus the courses are 
open to anyone interested in better methods of feeding a family. 

Two supplementary courses, in foods-meal planning and service, 
and cookery-have been scheduled during the afternoon, to allow the 
housewife the morning at home, Miss Woody points out. 

In addition to the cooking classes, which will be taught by Mrs. 
Mary Louise Barnes, assistant professor of Home Economics, courses 
in dressmaking and needlework will be given by Miss Woody. 

JJJ11L 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies—Release Friday 



Carbondale,Ill.,Jan. 31 -Although "the U.S. and Russia are 
drifting perilously close to a needless and catastrophic war," sue. 
conflict can be avoided by M a reasonable amount of good judgment and 
common sense," a Southern Illinois Normal University political 
scientist declared here tonight. 

Dr. V/. G. Swartz, professor and chairman of the government 
department at Southern Illinois Normal University, spoke on "is War 
With Russia Inevitable," in the third of a series of community peace 
forums sponsored by the University Independent Student Union. 

"It is the responsibility of sensible and fair-minded people 
in both countries to bring pressure to bear upon their leaders and 
representatives in behalf of peace and good will," warned Dr. Swartz. 
"On cur part, this means not appeasement, but collaboration and 
cooperation, combined with a reasonable degree of firmness," he 
continued. 

The "drift" toward war with Russia, he believes, is "due largely 
to jealousy, fear, and suspicion, engendered by irresponsible and 
hysterical utterances on both sides." 

Pointing out that Russia "needs both time and peace in order to 
rebuild her war- devastated areas and to give the Russian people some 
of the good things of life which were promised them nearly twenty 
years ago under the First and Second Five-Year-Plans, !' Dr. Swartz 
reminded his audience that the Russian war program "has turned the 
interest and attention of her leaders to the exploitation of her vast 
mineral resources in Asia." 

"Russia's chief concern, therefore, should be, and presumably is, 
the establishment and maintenance of friendly, but independent 
countries on her European and Asiatic frontiers-- in order to provide the 
3ecurity which she considers necessary for carrying out her internal 
rogram, " he said. 

As does Russia, the United States desires and needs peace, Dr. 
iwartz declared. "The national leadership is already preoccupied with 
nprecedented streak of strikes, inflation, and unrest and 
issatisfaction in general," he pointed out. 

Held weekly in the Little Theatre on the Southern campus, the 
ommunity peace forums are open to students, faculty, and townspeople 
nterested in discussion of oertinent contemporary peace problems. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Dailies 
Attention Snorts Editors 



Carbondale, 111., Jan. --In order that outstanding basketball 
players, other than those who compose the first squad, can rain 
experience through competition with other teams, Coach Glenn "Abe" 
Martin has organized a "B M squad at Southern Illinois Normal '•. 
University, 

For the first time since the war, Coach Martin has a large 
squad from which to choose the first string players, thus making 
it difficult for other boys to play. By forming the B squad, he 
hopes to allow competition for these players. 

The ?, B" squad has played three games, winning all of them by a 
comfortable margin. They defected the Herrin Supply team 45-30, 
Intramural All-Stars 67-44, and last Tuesday night the Elkville 
Independents 64-25. 

Members of the team include Bill Crum, Mt. Carmel; Tommie Gher, 
Carbondale; Harlyn Wiley, Piano; Carl Birkner, Pinckneyville; Gene 
Cunningham, Anna; Bill Malinsky, Flora; and Gene Davidson, £._..■. i. 
Harrisburg. 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111., Jan. --On the eve of two important conference 
games this week- end- -Friday night with Eastern Teachers at Charleston, 
and with Northern at £eKalb, Satnrday--Southern Illinois Normal 
University Maroons face the loss of two star players who are 
confined In bed. 

Maroon forward Sam Milosevich of Zeigler has been very ill 
with intestinal flu, but is some better today. Milosevich has 
emerged as high point man for Southern this season,*,. 

Don Sheffer, guard from Zeigler, is in the hospital suffering 
from a skin infection. 

Despite the*ir illness, Coach Martin is hoping that these two 
first- string cagers will be ready to play Friday. 

The decisive game of the week-end is the one with Northern 
Saturday night, both teams being undefeated in conference play. 

# # # 



gSSTSSSMS 1 **W*» Infomatlon Service 
Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Jan. -William M. Marberry has returned to 
Southern Illinois Normal University to resume his work as assistant 
professor of botany. 

On leave of absence since January 30, 1942, Mr. Marberry was 
recently discharged from the United States Army Air Corps. 

Until his teaching duties begin spring term, Air. Marberry has 
been assigned charge of the campus beautif ication program, which 
he initiated before leaving for military service. 

Mr. Marberry joined the University faculty in 1939, receiving 
his bachelor of education degree from Southern, and the master of 
arts degree from University of Illinois, where he has completed 
additional graduate work. 

MMM 

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Carbondale, 111. Jan. -a student exhibit of still life and 
landscape drawing opened recently in the Little Gallery in old 
Main on the Southern Illinois Normal University campus. 

Drawings displayed in the exhibit were done in charcoal by 16 
art students. They were selected for their general qualities as 
good drawings. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on receipt 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. 1 -Authorities of Southern Illinois Normal 
University today received telegrams notifying them that the National 
Housing Agency has approved the University- s application for 55 family 
dwelling units for veterans. 

Orville R. Olmsted. Federal Public Housing Authority, Chicago, 
wired university President Chester F. Lay as follows: "Your application 
for temporary housing approved for 55 family units, depending u P on the 
buildings available to us. It may be possible to substitute two 
dormitory units for each family unit approved, v/e have not yet 
determined location of facilities which we propose to transfer. Expect 
make this determination shortly, at wMch time we will advise you in 



detail." 



Other telegrams conveying this information were received by the 
University president from U. S. Senator Scott w. Lucas and Congressman 
C. W. Bishop, both from Washington. 

President Lay, who was in Bloomington today to attend a meeting 
of the Illinois Schoolmasters Club, was notified of the wires by phone. 

"We are happy to receive this notification of prospective 
emergency relief for our housing shortage, which has been growing more 
and more critical," he said. 

"We already have 279 veteran, enrolled, and many more are expected 
o register when our spring term opens March 9. Approximately a third 
t those already in school are married, so that these family units are 

irgently needed." 

President Lay expressed gratitude for the assistant that has been 
:iven the University- s efforts to secure emergency housing by Governor 
«ight H . Green, by Senator Lucas and Congressman Bishop. 

Other University officials here, including Dr. Charles D. Tenney, 
dministrative assistant to the president, Business Manager Edward V. 
a, Jr., and Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, housing counselor, were gratified 
" the approval of the Universityts application for housing units. 
No information is, available now, they said, as to how soon the 
using facilities %111 be delivered and ready for occupancy. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor lon ° ervice 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release on Saturday 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. 2 - The teaching and research staff of 
Southern Illinois Normal University has been expanded by approximately 
30 per cent since the opening of school September 10, Dr. Charles D. 
Tenney, administrative assistant to the president, pointed out today. 

A total of 40 appointments, including faculty assistants and 
graduate assistants, have been made in the last five months, he said. 
I " These are exclusive of the administrators who have been appointed, 

such as certain student life and college deans," he explained. 
i Many of the 40 additions are former faculty members who have 
returned from military leave or government war service. 
I "A number of other positions are being held open until still other* 
of our staff members on leave are discharged and can resume their 
duties here," Dr. Tenney added. 

"But there are still many important faculty positions which are 
open for which the college deans and the president are screening 
applicants. In some cases, there are as many as two dozen applicants 
under consideration for a particular position, such a process 
naturally requires time, but we feel that we are making excellent 
progress in bringing back former faculty members and in adding new 
positions that have been made necessary by the University! s expansion 
program. 

"Perhaps at no earlier time has the competition for teaching 
personnel been so great. All colleges and universities throughout 
the country are facing the same problem of faculty- expansion as 
Southern, so we cannot expect an immediate solution to all our 
searches for new teachers." 



if II IT 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 

Carbondale,Hl.,Feb. - Three misconceptions which many veterans 
have as to their educational rights were blasted here today by a 
Southern Illinois Normal University veterans' adviser. 

Dean of J'.'en A. J. Ter Keurst cautioned veterans to get the 
following notions out of their heads: 

(1) That they must have been in school when they were inducted 
in order to be eligible for Veterans Administration aid to continue 
school . 

(2) That they are not eligible if they are over 25. 

(3) That if they have not completed high school they are not able 
to enter college without first going back to high school and earning 

a diploma. 

All of these conceptions are erroneous, the dean said. 

A veteran does not have, to prove that his education was 
interrupted by induction in order to benefit from federal aid to go to 
college, he emphasized. 

Nor docs the 25-year-age limit any longer apply, he added. 
"Through the U. S. Veterans Guidance Center here, every day 
veterans who did not complete v igh school are given tests which reveal 
their aptitude for college-level work," he declared. 

"They are given the General Educational Development tests, and if 
the results of these teste, indicate their training and experience has 
qualified them to do college-level work, they can be admitted to 
college (a) by taking special examinations or (b) as unclassified 
students, later to work off certain unabsolved admission requirements." 



7/ 7, rr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies--Attention:Sports Editor: 



Carbondale,Ill.,Feb. - Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's Southern 
Illinois Normal University Maroons handed the Cape Girardeau (Missouri) 
State College basketball team a 53-46 defeat there last Tuesday night 
in a non-conference game. 

Leading the Missouri five all the way, Southern's game was slow 
and deliberate, with exceptionally sound defense. Don Sheff er, Zeigler 
added 19 points to his high-scoring record in the Cape game, while- 
Sam Miloscvich, also of Zeigler, cumulated 14 points during the contest. 

At present leading the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
with a record of five victories and one defeat, the Maroons face real 
threats to the championship in their next two home games against 
Western Illinois State Teachers College, Saturday, February 16, and 
Northern Illinois State Teachers College, February 22. 

Martin has called particular attention to the fact that the date 
of the final home game with Northern has been recently changed from 
February 23 to February 22. At present, Northern is at Southern's 
heels for the conference crown with four wins and only one loss. 

Martin anticipates a close game with Western here Saturday night 
at eight o'clock, as the Maroon team came out with only a one-point 
margin in their first win over Western, played there. 

Western met Eastern Illinois State Teachers on the Macomb floor 
Wednesday night for a conference game. 



-U-.'UL 
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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illino s dailies 



Carbondale,Ill.,Feb. -Australian-born Archibald Gilchrist will 
address the Southern Illinois Normal University student body assembly 
on "International Security in the Pacific" on Thursday morning at 
ten o'clock in Shryock Auditorium. 

Currently on Rotary Institute tour, Mr, Gilchrist has recently 
been broadcasting over American stations his experiences from his 
life and travels throughout Australia. 

For three years a Liberal member of the Western Australian 
parliament, I.Ir, Gilchrist has been interested in political trends and 
developments in the Orient as they relate to his own native country. 

Before coming to the United States, I.Ir. Gilchrist owned and 
conducted a newspaper in Carnarvon, Northwest Australia, and was 
proprietor of a commercial broadcasting station in Gippsland, Victoria, 
for several years. 

Following the first World War, he aided in the work of 
repatriation of returned soldiers and for six years served as General 
Secretary of the New Settlers League, a semi-official immigration 
organization. 

JJ..ULU 

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Carbondale, 111., Feb. -Included in the December, 1945, monthly 

supplement of Who ? a Who is Dr. Arthur John Tor Kcurst, educator, dean 

of men at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Dr. Ter Keurst came to the Southern campus last spring from 
Western Illinois State Teachers College to serve as dean of men. 
Previously, he was head of the education department, College of Emporia, 
Kansas; registrar, Chicago Christian College; teacher in the Evanston 
Township High School, and principal of the grade schools in Noll and, 
Michigan. • 

n-ii-fr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois papers 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. — Another major step was taken this week 
in Southern Illinois Normal University's expansion program. 

The sum of $737,500 was released to Southern by Governor Dwight 
H. Green for purchase of some 400 acres of land adjacent to the present 
180- acre campus. 

"This release gives Southern the 'green light' to push as rapidly 
as possible its move to acquire sites not only for buildings to be 
constructed during the present biennium but also for its 25-year 
expansion program," President Chester p. Lay declared. 

"We are already negotiating with property owners in the areas of 
immediate expansion," he said, "and plans are going forward satisfact- 
orily for the buildings to be constructed during this biennium.- 

"A committee of three expert real estate appraisers — 0. W. Jones 
of Murphysboro, Lawson pore and H. H. Nooner of Carbondale--was 
designated in January by Frank &. Thompson, Director of Registration 
and Education and chairman of the Teachers College Board, to serve as 
a committee to assist us in evaluating these properties. 

"This committee has been at work since early in January and the 
University through its business manager, Edward V. riles, Jr., has 
been dealing with property owners in preliminary negotiations." 

The land-acquis ition fund is part of a $4,623,373 post-war 
expansion and building appropriation made to Southern by the General 
Assembly at its last session — the largest made to any of the five 
Illinois State teachers colleges. 



-2- 

The other colleges received, respectively: Illinois State Normal 
University, $3,115,171; Northern, $2,044,988; Eastern, ''2,995, 743; and 
ps tern, ;' J ;2, 542,772. 

Southern's allotment for hand purchases was also the largest, the 
0737,500 here comparing with $260,000 at Normal, $60,000 at Northern, 
$60,300 at Eastern, and $76,200 at Western. 

In addition to the purchase of land, the $4,623,373 appropriation 
for Southern provides for construction of a new training school, a 
power plant and a distribution system that will serve not only the 
present campus hut also buildings planned for construction during the 
next 25 3rears. 

Plans for the new training school were completed a number of years 
ago, but construction was blocked by the outbreak of the war. Only 
minor changes have been made in those plans since the appropriation v/as 
authorized. 

Proposal for construction of the power plant and distribution 
system was broached for the first time at the last session of the 
General Assembly, so that when funds were appropriated for them, plans 
and specifications had to be drawn "from scratch." 

These plans are now nearing completion, following surveys by 
University officials and faculty committees of such facilities at 
other state institutions, and numerous conferences with ixn^scntatLvos 
of the State Department of Architecture and Engineering. 

Semi-final blueprints for the training school shops and Department 
of Education building which arc to be part of the training school unit 
are expected here from the Chicago offices of the State Department of 
Architecture and Engineering within a few days. 



-3- 

Thc Governor during the last few months has released at various 
times funds to defray costs of drawing plans and specifications for 
all these building projects, as well as for plans and specifications 
for the site preparation for the training school. These various 
allotments have totaled £113, 130.76, 

Areas adjacent to the present campus which the University proposes 
to purchase include: (1) completion of acquisition of properties for 
the training school site— an area fronting on Grand Avenue running 
from Lake street to what would bo Thompson Street if it were projected 
that far north. The University already owns several pieces of property 
in this area. 

(2) property west of the University between Grand and Chatauqua 
as far west as Lake Street, 

(3) Property which the University does not already own on both 
sides of U.S. Highway 51, from Grand Avenue south as far as the so-gtJM 
Reservoir ^ L oad; this area includes not only houses and lots but also 
some farm acreage as far west as Forest Street, as well as a part of 
Thompson Lake, and extends to the East to include 50 acres south of 
the University farm known as the Burke tt Fifty.- 

(4) The Dowdell Farm, cast of the railroad track, including a 
residence and 70 acres. 

(5) Property between the Illinois Central railroad track and 
University Avenue for a distance of 550 feet north of ' Grcn d Avenue, 

rrtift 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., Feb.— students at Southern Illinois formal 
University will observe National Brotherhood Week here on the 
campus with a varied program of activities beginning Sunday, 
February 17, and running through Thursday. 

Designed to promote better understanding and tolerance among 
all peoples, the observance of Brotherhood Week is held annually 
on the University campus. Sponsors of the events include the 
Dunbar Society, Pan- Hellenic Council, Inter- Fraternity Council, 
Student Christian Foundation, Writer's Club, and Independent 
Student Union. 

'Included on the calendar for the week are discussions on 
"Contributions of Negro Poetry to American Culture", by Dr. 
Charles D. Tenney, professor of English and philosophy, on 
Monday night at S o'clock in the Little Theater, and "Contributions 
of Negro Art and Music to American Culture," by Miss Amanda 
Murdock, art -teacher at At tucks School, and David S. Mcintosh, 
associate professor and chairman of the Southern music department, 
Tuesday at eight p-l clock in Little Theatre. 

Wilbur R. Rice and Warren St. James, veterans, and both 
graduates of the University, will hold a panel discussion with Dr. 
Louis Petroff, assistant professor of sociology, on "Future of 
the Race Problem", Wednesday night, at eight o'clock, in Room 
101, Main Building. 

Rev. A. L. Davis, pastor of the First Baptist Church of 
Carbondale, will speak at the final session Thursday evening 
on some phase of the race problem. 

The activities are open to students, faculty, and townspeople. 

# S £ 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drurnmond , Editor 

Speocial to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Attention Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Unchallenged in first place in the 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, Southern Illinois Normal 
University meets the one potential threat to conference championship, 
Northern Illinois State Teachers College, here Friday night in the 
Maroons last home game of the season. 

Southern's decisive victory over Western Illinois State Teachers 
College here Saturday night, and Illinois State Normal University 
49-46 victory over Northern of DeKalb last weekend clinched a sure 
tie for conference lead for Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's team. 
After the first 30 seconds of play, Southern led Western 
throughout the finish, the final score reading 78-46, before the 
largest crowd of the season, except for the Wright Field game. 

Martin's starting line-up remained unchanged, with Don Sheffer 
and Sam Milosevich, Zeigler, at forward; Quentin Stinson, Eldorado, 
center; Gene Stotlar, Pinckneyville , and Leedio Cabutti, Johnston City, 
guards. 

Coach Martin was well pleased with the Maroons' hitting Saturday 
night, as almost all the shots taken from within fifteen feet of the 
basket effected a score. Bill Crum, Mt. Carmel, took two shots from 
the 25 foot area, making one during the last few seconds of play. 

Forwards Sheffer and Milosevich seemed especially "hot" in 
screening off the opposition and getting good shots around the basket, 
Martin said, 

Milosevich was high-point man in the game with seven field goals 
and eight free throws, Stotlar amassed 17 points, with Sheffer, who 
left the game on account of his injured leg, scoring 14 points. 

### — 



..- '.1 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. --Dr. T. W. Abbott, dean of the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, has been designated to represent Southern 
Illinois Normal University at the inauguration of Dr. Arthur Compton 
as president of Washington University on February 22, President Chester 

F. Lay has announced. 

Leading universities and colleges from all parts of the country 
have been Invited to send representatives to the ceremony. 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. --Invited to send an official representative 
to the Sesquicentannial Celebration of the University of North Caroline 
in April, President Chester F. Lay of Southern Illinois Normal 
University has designated Dr. Charles D 4 Tenney this honor. 

Dr. Tenney Is administrative assistant to the president of Southern 
and professor of English and philosophy, 

"We here at Southern have a close kinship with the University of 
North Carolina," Dr. Ley pointed out. "Southern Illinois was nettled 
a century age by people who moved westward from the Carolinas and 
Virginias, and our heritage is deep-rooted in the fine stock of those 
early colonies. 



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Southern Illinois N ormal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Dr. Orville Alexander will return to the 
Southern Illinois N ormal University faculty March 11, to devote all his 
time the spring term to working with the University alumni. 

This is the first time Southern has had a faculty member assigned 
to serve and cooperate with alumni on a full-time basis. 

Next summer Dr. Alexander will devote a fourth of his time to 
teaching duties in the department of government as associate professor. 

A graduate of Southern in 1931, Dr. Alexander has retained an activ<s 
interest in the University alumni organization, and is well acquainted 
with the association's aims and problems. 

For the past two years, Dr. Alexander h£s been on leave of absence 
from the University faculty to engage in special research work with the 
Illinois Legislative Council in Springfield. 

Dr. Alexander received his master of arts and doctor of philosophy 
degrees from the University of Iowa. He joined the Southern faculty 
in 1938. 



### 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -The "B" Squad of Southern Illinois Normal 
University's basket ball team recently defeated Carter's Aces, 
independent club, by a score of 75-30. 

The second- stringers will take on the Intramural All-Stars in a 

-.-, » -, i V.-1- n^-w oo r, a fiiT-f-pi n- falser for the varsity squad 

game Friday night, Feb.. 2d 9 a^ a curiain-...ai-ti iyi * 

final game of the season, against Northern Teachers. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Spedial to Southern Illinois dailies:Attention Sports Editor 
For Release Friday 



Carbondale ,111 . ,Feb . --Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's Southern 
Illinois Normal University Maroons in their game here tonight intend 
to break the "jinx" which has allowed three Northern Illinois State 
Teachers College teams to slide past the Maroons by one, two, and 
three and one -half point margins for Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference championships during the past two years. 

The "jinx" must have started when Northern wrested the I.I.A.C. 

football title from Martin's eleven two seasons ago by one point. 

Undefeated in conference play, both teams were up for the title until 

final 
the/game in the season. 

Last basketball season, Martin recalls, the Southern five lost 
the conference title to Northern in the final game of the season 
by two points, giving the Huskies the championship. 

The three- and one-half margin loss to Northern was that of the 
Maroon's track team last spring, when Southern lost the final event, 
the mile, to Northern. 

Despite the team's "hard luck" during the past seasons, a view 
of the fifteen year record of Southern's basketball reveals that 
the Maroons have garnered 18 victories over Northern, losing only 
eight games. 

Probably because of the distance between the two institutions, 
for the past four years, Southern has scheduled their final basketball 
game in the season with Northern. 

Officials for the game here tonight will be Fred Young, 
Bloomington, and Odell Pulley , Marion. Game time is at 8:00 p.m. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Appointment of Ben Watkins as assistant 
professor in the art department at Southern Illinois Normal University 
for the spring and summer sessions has been announced by President 
Chester P. Lay and Dean Henry J. Rehn of the College of Vocations 
and Professions, 

While at Southern, Watkins will give particular attention to 
ceramics. 

Watkins received the degree of associate in arts from Whitmorth 
College, Miss., and the bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees 
from Louisiana State University. 

In addition to tv/o years' graduate work in the department of art 
at L.S.U., Watkins has taught in the Nicholls High School, New Orleans 
and was head of the department of art at Phillips University, Enid, 
Okla. 

Since 1944, he has been employed as a draftsman and tool designer 
with Stearman Aviation, Inc., Enid. During this time he continued 
his evening classes in pottery and wood carving at Phillips. 

Watkins was awarded the Louis Comfort Tiffany Fellowship in 1939, 
for summer study at Tiffany Foundation, Oyster Bay, New York. In 1940 
he was awarded first prize for his painting in the annual Louisiana 
Art Commission Exhibit. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Kiss May Sarton, distinguished poet and 
lecturer, has been appointed as poet-in-residence at Southern Illinois 
Normal University for one month, June 10 to July 6, during the summer 
term, Dr. Chester F. Lay, president, has announced. 

Miss Sarton will serve on the faculty of the English Department 
in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

She will teach two courses- -English 509, "A Background for 
Modern Poetry," and English 523, "T he Teaching of Poetry," according 
to Miss Emma Bowyer, chairman of the department. In these classes she 
will emphasize a discussion of the chief modern poets and the reading 
aloud of poetry, as well as "what poetry is peally about." 

A World War I refugee from Belgium, Miss Sarton began a career 
as an actress, but abandoned the stage in 1937 when her first book of 
poems, Encounter in April , appeared. 

Since that time she has published three more books, The Single 
Hound , a novel; Inner Landscape , poems; and The Bridg e of Years, a 
novel, which is appearing this year. 

In 1945 Miss Sarton received the Golden Rose of the Hew England 
Poetry Society, and the Edward Bland Memorial Fellowship of Poetry 

Magazine. 

Miss Sarton spoke to the student body last November 1, when 

brought to the University campus under the auspices of Sigma Tau Delts 

national honorary English fraternity. 



MJJLJl 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Snecial to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention— Sports Editor 



Carbondale, 111 . , Feb. --With one game remaining on their schedule 
which may decide for them the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference championship, the Southern Illinois Normal University 
Maroons have an impressive scoring record for the season with a total 
of 1,020 points acculumated in the 13 games played thus fur, as against 
the 823 points accredited their opponents. 

Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's team has similarly outpaced their 
1,1. A. C. competitors in scoring, effecting 446 points for the seven 
conference games, and holding the opposition to 300 points. 

Southern's team has a decided favorable balance of wins over 
losses, thus far this season losing only five games. Worst defeat 
dealt I'artin's men was that handed by the renowned Wright Airfield 
quintet early in the season, when the final score read 71-56. 

Other losses, which were much closer games, include two to 
Murray State Teachers College, Kentucky; a 43-44 loss to Evansville 
(Indiana) College, and the only I.I.A.C. defeat, that by Northern 
State Teachers on February 2, when the Maroons were forced out by a 
two- point margin. 

Besides their conference victories, Martin* s teem can be lauded 
for its successes over such outstanding teams as Bowling Green, Ken- 
tucky; Loyola University of the South, 1945 champions of the Kansas 
City National Intercollegiate Basketball Tournament; Arkansas State 
Teachers College; Cape Girardeau (Missouri). 

Preliminary to the Southern-Northern game here Friday night which 
begins at 3:00 p.m., is a game at 6:15 between the two top intra- 
mural teams of the University to decide the championship intra-mural 
squad, Coach Martin announced. 

TTITii 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drununond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



f : «fe 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Two articles tracing the influence of the Scotch- 
Irish in the early pioneer history of Little Egypt written "by Southern Illinois 
Normal University historians appeared in publication the past month. 

Dr. Jesse W. Harris, associate professor of English, whose study.f pioneer 
Vocabulary Remains in Southern Illinois" is in the December issue of the Journal , 
fit XhB. Illinois State Historical Society , explains the use and origin of certain 
dialetical wor&s and phrases, many of which are based on the Scotch-Irish racial 

inheritance, 

Pointing out certain forms and usages, expressions, and lore that are peculiar 
with some isolated places in the southern Illinois area, Dr. Harris emphasizes 
the similiarity of the dialetical matter with that used in the principal 
southern Applachian localities from whence many of the early Scotch-Irish 

settlers came to this region. 

John I. Wright, assistant professor of history, tells of the migration of the 
Scotch-Irish to "Egypt" as they moved on here after a brief stay in Virginia, 
in the January issue of the Journal of the Southern Illinois Historical , Society , 

Also featured in the same Journal is a write-up by#'? r » Jesse V * Harris 
"A Pioneer Teacher in Acting," lauding the late James W. Turner, who taught in 
Williamson and Saline Counties for more than half a century. 

### 



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Soutteern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -According to the annual report of Southern Illinois 
Normal University's Placements Service which appeared recently, students who have 
majored in English, commerce, mathematics, women's physical education, or foreign 
langua©3 have the "best statistical chances of obtaining a teaching position in 
high school .based on the number of calls received by the office for such qualified 

teachers. 

Fields of specialization ranking next according to y?,cmci£s reported in 
teaching staffs include coaching, music, home economics .with Smith-Hughes 
certificate, general social science, science, biology, general science, men's 
physical education, industrial arts, history, library, administration, physics, 
agriculture, and art. 

During the past year, the report shows that 984 calls for teachers of the 
elementary subjects were received by the Placement's Office. The need was 
greatest for filling positions in general grades or teaching specific courses as 
art, girls' physical education, music, and so on. Teachers for kindergarten and 
primary work were called for 242 times. Vacancies in junior high schools totaled 
112, while openings in the intermediate grades numbered 187. For work in the 
upper grades, 95 positions were reported open. 

Many more vacancies were reported to the University Placements Service than 
could be filled. Out of 1833 vacancies, the report shows that 683 sets of 
credentials were sent to the various schools, for the 509 persons registered with 
the Placements Office. From the 1945 graduates, the undergraduate group, the 

alumni group, and registrants from other colleges *«tW .«*«««* S ServiC6 
placed a total of 193 teachers in six states and 53 Illmoie 

Director of the University Placement Service is Dr. 1. «• * 

## 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -The negro has made possibly the most original American 
contribution to literature through the "blues'" and the "spirituals'! a Southern 
Illinois Normal University professor of English and philosophy told his audience 

here Monday night. 

Admitting that there would probably be some disagreement as to whether the "blues' 
or the "spirituals" could be. called poetry, Dr. Charles D. Tenney, speaker at the 
first of a series of discussions during National Brotherhood Week, justified his 
first statement by defining poetry as an "adequate expression of human experience." 
Certainly the "blues" and the "spirituals" are expressive, and do reflect human 
suffering and aspiration, he pointed out. 

These two contributions of the negro to poetry are often ignored, declared 
Dr. Tenney, as they are ordinarily associated with music. Among the selections 
Dr. Tenney used to give his listeners the particular appeal of these two kinds of 
poetic expression, were excerpts from Langsdon Hughes, and J^nes Welton Johnson. 

Remaining on the week's agenda is a discussion on "The Contribution of Negro 
Art and Music to American Culture," Tuesday night,, and a panel on "The Future 
of the Eace Problem," Wednesday night. 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -In coordination with student activities on the 

Southern Illinois Normal University campus this week in connection with National 

Brotherhood Week. Wheeler Library is featuring a special display of literature on 

^ "parking the exhibit, composed of volu.es and pamphlet ' " ^verS""" 
of the P Jews, American Indians, and Negros to American life, are several *T. 
Biggott" cartoons by Carl Eose. which point out various aspects of racial and 

religious discrimination. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -The appointment of Conrad White as assistant 
professor of agriculture at Southern Illinois Normal University to become effective 
March 11, has "been announced by President Chester I. Lay and Dean Henry J. Rehn 
of the College of Vocations and Professions. 

Mr. Conrad, a specialist in animal husbandry, was graduated from the 
Unionville High School, Missouri. He received a bachelor of science in education 
degree from Kirksville State Teachers College, a bachelor of science in agriculture 
and a master of arts degree from the University of Missouri. 

For the past 12 years Mr. Conrad has been a vocational agriculture instructor, 
Previous to this time he spent four years as a teacher in the rural schools and 
three years as superintendent of the public schools in Missouri. 

In addition to his teaching duties, Mr. Conrad has been a practical farmer, 
raising pure-bred livestock. He is a member of the board of directors of the 
Missouri Aberdeen-Angus Association, secretary of the Putnam County Shropshire 
Sheep Association, was secretary of the Putnam County Fair for six years, 
secretary of the Putnam County Angus Association for six years, and secretary 
of the Unionville Saddle Horse Show for three years. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Servi 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



ce 



Carbqndale, 111., Feb. —with 219 courses listed for the 

spring terra which opens March 11, Southern Illinois Normal 

University has expanded its program of instruction 20 per cent 

above last spring, President Chester p. Lay reports. 
proposed 
The/soring course schedule shows an increase of 36 courses 

over the spring of 1945. 

Ihis expansion in the University's instructional .program has 
been made possible by the addition of 23 new faculty members 
during the past year. 

Seventeen of these courses are offered by extension, and are 
conducted in the various communities and towns of Southern Illinois. 
Other course may be added as new^f acuity members are Added- to^ 
the staff. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. --As a preliminary to the Southern 
Maroons final basket ball game this season with Northern Teachers 
here on February 22, the Southern Reserves, or "B" team, will 
play the Intramural Ail-Stars at 6:30 p.m., William Frceburg, 
instructor in physical education, has announced. 

The Mar oon-Nqr them game will begin at 8 p.m. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drumnond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Papers 



Carbondale, Hi. Feb. -Despite recurrence of a sophomore-year knee injury, 
Don Sheffer, tall, lanky blond Southern Illinois Normal University athlete from 
Zeigler, climaxes four years of varsity basketball as leading scorer in the 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in this, his senior, year. 

Sheffer has averaged 17 points a game from forward position for the seven 
I.I.A.C tilts this season, having a total of 119 points to his credit. Without 
doubt, his scoring ability has had no small part in placing Coach Glenn "Abe" 
Martin's Maroons in front position in the I.I.A.C. standings. 
I "Shef" broke a conference recor^with his 36-point tally in the game with 

Illinois State Normal University here two weeks ago. 

Interested in basketball from 'way back, Sheffer was a star-player on the 
Zeigler grade and high school teams, before coming to Southern. Incidentally, all 
through school, Sheff says, he played with Sam Milosevich, Maroon forward also 
from Zeigler, who follows Sheffer pretty closely in basket-shooting ability. 

Besides basketball, Sheffer is interested in track, baseball, and tennis 
activities, which round out a yearly program of sports for him. Last season "Shef" 
made the varsity tennis team, and came out champion of the singles in the Third 
Division at an I.I.A.C. meet. 

last fall, Sheffer was a .eater of the Maroon track team which copped the 
I.I.A.O. championship, coming out in third place in the cross-country run event. 
Although he can (and at times, does) play foothall. Sheffer admits that the faster 
games have more appeal for him. 

"Shef's" major at Southern is in physical education, and h* is going to 

have a minor in health education. 

(more) 



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in addition to a "busy schedule of practising for basketball and his other 
sports, Sheffer has managed time to participate in extra-curricular activities at 
the University. Last spring, he was one of fifteen juniors elected to "Sphinx", 
honorary student "Service-to-Southern" organisation. 

Sheffer' s leading opponent in individual I.I.A.C. scoring' honors has been 
Woods from Northern Illinois State Teachers College. 

The game here with Northern Friday night will be the last conference meet for 
both basketball teams, a Southern win giving the Maroons the I.I.A.C. championship. 
If Northern can defeat Eastern Illinois State Teachers College Thursday night, 
a victory over Southern here the next night would tie the championship between 
Southern and Northern. 



' i.a i .? 'j • 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Spec 



ial to Southern Illinois dailies— Attention Sports Editor 



Carbonclalc,Ill.,Fcb. - Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin's Maroons 

downed their Northern Illinois State Teachers College opponents, 61-50, 
in the season's final game before an over-capacity crowd in the 
Southern Illinois Normal University gymnasium here Friday night. 

insisting that the "game was better than the score indicates," 
martin none- the-less was well pleased with the performance of his 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship team. 

Chief interest in the game was the contest between Southern's Don 
Sheffer and Northern's Robert Woods for I.I.A.C. individual scoring 
honors. Outpacing his opponent, Sheffer rang up 26 points in the 
game, to bring his conference scoring total to 145 points, and held 
Woods to ten points, for a 124 point conference season. 

Martin remarked that Quentin Stinson, Eldorado, played his best 
game of the season in the game against Northern Friday night, as he 
seemed particularly effective in rebounding, both in defense and 
offense. Playing in center position, 6 '4" Stinson has emerged this 
season as a potential great basketball player, Martin declared. 

The Maroon first five played the majority of the game against 
Northern, but Coach Martin substituted freely during the latter part 
of the second half. Sheffer played until the last few minutes, when 
he was forced to leave the game because of his knee injury. 

Resume of the 1945-46 Maroon basketball season shows that Southern 
scored a total of 1,081 points in their 19 games, holding their 
opponents to 853 points. Martin's team won 14 of their games, losing 

only five, 

in conference play, Maroon scores totaled 507, as against 330 for 

the opposition, winning seven out of the eight I.I.A.C. tilts. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale,Ill.,Feb. -Don Sheffer, of Zeigler, leading scorer 

in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, was elected the 

most valuable member of the Southern Illinois Normal University 

Maroon five last night by his teammates. 

Coach Glenn T, Abe" Martin announced the selection Saturday morning, 

which makes Sheffer the Southern candidate for the Charles Lantz 

Trophy, annually awarded to the outstanding player in the I.I.A.C. 

Sheffer will be voted on, along with candidates from each of the 

State 
other schools — Eastern Illinois State Teachers College, Illinois/Normal 

University, Northern Illinois State Teachers College, and Western 

Illinois State Teachers Collcgc--by the five coaches. No coach may 

cast a vote for his own team player. 

In the game with Northern here Friday night, Sheffer made 26 points 
to bring his conference scoring record to 145 points. His leading 
competitor, Robert Woods, of Northern, was held to 10 points in Friday 
night's game, making his conference total 124 points. 

The onl3?- senior on the Maroon Squad this year, Sheffer was termed 
by Coach Martin "one of the greatest competitors I have ever seen." 

"He has ability to detect a weakness in his opponent's play, and 
he seems to know how to take advantage of it. Not only is Sheffer a 
great shot, but a fine rebounier, a good defensive man, and a good 
teamman, " Martin said. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Tuesday 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -"Compulsory military training as a 
permenent practice will not serve the interests of either 
international peace or the security of our own country," declared 
Robert Faner of the Southern Illinois Normal University faculty 
last night, 

Mr. Faner, associate professor of English, talked on the subject, 
"Do We Want Compulsory Military Training," in the fourth of a series 
of community peace forums sponsored by the Independent Student 
Union at Southern. 

"The plan for military training as advocated currently by President 
Truman will not provide an efficient powerful striking force," said 
Mr. Faner, since "It does not take sufficiently into account the 
scientific advances which a future war must utilize." 

Professor Faner further stated, "The plan cannot be defended as 
an educational program, the organization and operation of the army 
being what it is." 

Following Mr. Faner' s address, the discussion was opened to the 
audience. 

Recently discharged from the U.S. Army as a staff sergeant, Mr. 

Paner was stationed for two years in Army Training Instruction at 

at 
Scott Field, and was later/an Army separation center in California 

for one year, 

wTrfr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111^-- Instruction of graduate students at Southern 
Illinois Normal University has increased 50 per cent over the fall 
term, according to Registrar Karjorie shank. 

Southern is currently giving graduate work to 45 students, 32 
of them enrolled in the regular graduate program, while 14 are taking 
post-graduate courses* Only 30 were registered in graduate work 
fall term, 

Maintaining its function in teacher training, Southern has a 
majority of its s tudents--808 out of the total of 1,177-- taking 
work in the College of Education. Over a third of the students, 
however, are enrolled in the other two collcges--290 in the College 
of Liberal Arts, and 79 in the new College of Vocations and Profession: 

r?at?o of women to men students in the University now stands at 
three to two, as compared to the two-to-one ratio of fall term. 
The number of men registering at Southern increased by 160 in the 
winter terra, a gam of almost 50 per cent. There are now 493 men 
students enrolled. Southern's co-eds number 634. 

Freshman at Southern still retain the lead in class enrollment, 
totaling 531. Sophomores follow with 274, while the juniors are 126 
strong, and the senior class has 130 members. Unclassified students 
in the University number 20. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Eighteen members of the Women's Athletic 
Association at Southern Illinois Normal University have been invited 
to participate in a basketball sports day at Illinois State Normal 
University on Saturday, February 9, 

Womens teams from the five State Normal schools will enter the 
sports day activities. 

Southern's representatives will leave by bus Friday, February 8 
and while there, will be the guests of the women of Fell Hall. 

Students selected to go are Norma Lou Brown, Marion; Margaret 
Craig, Herein; Jean Dennis, Harrisburg; Avis Frank, Carbondale; 
Edith Brasel Gooch, Hoopeston; imogene Gray, Granite City; Dorothy 
Hart, Murphysboro; Betty Johnson, Thompsonville; Betty Logsdon, 
Granite City; Barbara Melvin, DuQuoin; Marie Mowper, Salem; Evelyn 
Parker, Bluford; Clara Pixley, West Salem; Pauline Potts, Keyesport; 
Opal Ruff, Shelbyville; Dolores Suva, Granite City; Cleo Ulm, Granite 
City; and Guanaviere Wheeler, Hettick. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Bailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -In line with the series of community peace 
forums now being held weekly on the Southern Illinois Normal University 
campus, two nationally-prominent lecturers will speak to the University 
student body this month. 

Simon M. Davidian, specialist in international affairs, will 
address the student body on "Making International Organization 
Effective," Thursday morning, February 7, at 10 o» clock. 

"International Security in the Pacific" will be presented by 
Archibald Gilchrist, Australian broadcaster, February 14, before the 
assembly. 

Born in Constantinople of Armenian descent, Mr. Davidian was 
reared in Worcester, Mass. After attending college at Bethany, W. Va., 
and Yale University, he traveled widely, lecturing on his experiences 
in Europe and in America. 

After owning and conducting a. newspaper in Carnarvon in Northwest 
Australia, Mr. Gilchrist owned a commercial broadcasting station in 
Gippsland, Victoria. He has recently been broadcasting over a chain 
of American stations his experiences in Northwest Australia. 

For three years a Liberal member of the Western Australian 
Parliament, he was associated with repatriation work for returned 
soldiers after World War I, and for six years served as General 
Secretary of the New Settlers League, a semi-official imigration 
organization. 

Both Mr. Davidian and Mr. Gilchrist are currently on Rotary 
Institute tours. 

ir r i it 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Return of two more faculty members to 
Southern Illinois Normal University after service in the armed forces 
was announced this week. 

Dr. Edward C. McDonagh, assistant professor of sociology, will do 
field surveys for the College of Vocations and Professions until the 
spring term, when he resumes teaching duties. 

Dr. McDonagh came to the Southern faculty in 1940. He received 
his bachelor of arts, master of arts, and doctorate degrees from the 
University of Southern California. 

Jean Pligor has returned to his former duties of Rural Critic in 
the Buncombe school, after combat service in the ETO. Mr. Pligor 
joined the University staff in 1941. He received the bachelor of 
education degree from Southern, .and the master of arts degree from 
Northwestern University, 

Both Mr. Pligor and Dr. McDonagh entered military service in 
April, 1944. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. Feb, -Southern Illinois Normal University 
brought nearly a million dollars to Southern Illinois in 1944-45. 

A report of Business Manager Edward V. Miles, Jr., covering the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1945, shows total income from all sources 
amounted to $906, 066*95. 

This income was derived as follows: state appropriations, 
$634,007.00; student fees, $43,777.48; departmental sales and 
services, '"7,905.97; auxiliary enterprises, J71, 499.81; U.S. 
government contracts, $127,361.81 (based on termination audit); 
student activity fees, 521,014.88. 

The University's physical plant was evaluated at nearly two 
million dollars. Investments in land, buildings, improvements and 
equipment as of June 30, 1945, totaled JL, 995, 996. 68, after 
expenditures for plant additions during the year had amounted to 
*36,527.38 and other additions totaled {3,827.33. 

Expenditures during the year totaled $749,518.04, including 
$667,164.23 for educational and general purposes; $62,095.31 for 
auxiliary enterprises; $917.50 for U.S. government contracts; $789.17 
for refunds, and $18,551.83 for student activities. 

The $667,164.23 cost of educational and general operations was 
divided as follows: 12.46 per cent for general administration and 
general expense; 1.59 for retirement, disability and death benefits; 
56.68 per cent for instruction; .33 per cent for organized research; 
3,22 .per cent for extension; 6.15 per cent for library; and 19.57 

per cent for physical plant operation. 

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Auxiliary enterprises operated by the University include the 
bookstore— income 016,507.27, expenditures {12,773.55s cafeteria- 
income '"31,967.84, expenditures -35,718.80; residence hall income 
*,23, 024.70, expenditures f!3, 602.96. 

During 1944-45, 98 loans totaling {2,007.85 were made to students 
while loans collected amounted to '/2, 460.22. Loans outstanding at 
the end of the year amounted to £1,681.31. 

in addition to handling the finances of the University, the 
Business Office cooperates with student organizations in handling 
their funds. A summary of these accounts shows receipts for the year 
amounting to (198,791 .54 and disbursements amounting to £231,746.80, 



TCTCV 



Carbondalc, 111. Feb. -Dr. Charles D. Tcnney, administrative 
assistant to the president, and Dr. B. R. Pair, dean of the College 
of Education, Southern Illinois Normal University, returned today 
from Cleveland, where they attended the national mooting of the 
American Association of Teachers Colleges. 

44-4U'- 



Carbondalc, 111. Feb. -John Allen, acting director of the 

Museum of Southern Illinois Normal University, was the principal 

speaker at the organization meeting of the new Saline County 

Historical Association in Harrisburg recently. 

Mr. Allen spoke on the artifacts, local characters and other 
historical lore of Saline County. 



M.J1J4 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Attention Sports Editors: 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -Elated from (a) winning the conference 
championship and (b) defeating their old rivals Northern Illinois 
State Teachers College, the Southern Maroons this week are tightening 
their belts and aiming at a trip to the National Intercollegiate 
Basket Ball Tournament in Kansas City, the week of March 11. 

The Maroons will play a post- season game here Saturday night, 
March 2, against Eureka College to see which team will represent the 
16th District at Kansas City. 

Eureka is a worthy opponent for the Maroons, Southern Coach Glenn 
"Abe" Martin points out. Since H. M. Barrow took over the coaching 
assignment there at the beginning of the second semester, Eureka has 
won seven out of eight tries. 

Their major victories v/ere over Illinois College, which won the 
Ivy League championship, and over Chanutc Field. 

Eureka* s star is forward Morris Chalfont, while two guards, 
Warren Collier of Paris and Frank Kovak of Georgetown, are also 
outstanding players. Collier was all- state high school guard at Baris 
before he entered the armed forces, and later played with the Navy 
V-12 at Illinois State Normal University. 

Southern went to the National Tournament last year, winning two 
games and falling before Loyola University of New Orleans in the semi- 
finals by two points. Loyola won the tournament, but the Maroons 
turned the tables last fall when they took Loyola here for a 57-38 
trimming. 



H- JIM 

tnrtr 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Feb. —A whole delegation of Fairfield 
basket ball fans— 50 or 40 of ten— are coming to Carbondale next 
Saturday night to see their favorite son's conference champs take 
on another challenger. 

The Fairfield fans arc coming to witness the play-off game 
between Glenn "Abe" Martin's Southern Illinois Normal University 
Maroons and Eureka College, both determined to go to Kansas City 
March 11 to represent the 16th district in the national tournament. 

Fairfield is proud of "Abe-" That's his home town, and that's 
where he coached for three years, building up an undefeated team 
his second and third years. 

Martin is a product of Southern, where he was captain of 
the University's only conference football championship team, in 
1930. That same year he was chosen all-oonf erence loft halfback. 
He also won letters in track for three years. 

He took a flier at pro football right after he left the 
University, but a year later went to Fairfield as coach. After 
his Fairfield success, he taught and coached at Pontiac, 111., 
and had the elation of seeing his basket ball team in sectional 

tournament plry. 

He returned to the Southern campus in 1933 as assistant 
football coach, became head coach in 1939, took on the head 

( over) 



basket bell coaching assignment in 1943, and was appointed 
director of athletics last summer. 

Martin has produced outstanding basket ball teams the past 
two years, leading the oonference right up to the last fight 
both seasons. Last year the Maroons went to the national 
tournament at Kansas City* but lost in the semi-finals. 

This year, the Southerners put on the steam right through 
the entire season, and captured the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference title, as well as grabbing the high-scoring 
record through the basket-locoing prowess of Don Shcffer, 
Zei.-~l.er. who rolled up a total of 145 points in conference games. 

Saturday night, the B'aroons will be matched : gainst a team 
that has knocked off seven of their last eight opponents. Eureka 
beat, among others, Chanute Field ;.nd Illinois College, the latter 
champions of the Ivy League. 

The game will be played in the Maroon stadium, staring at 
8 p.m. 

.11 J.L m. 

IT II 77 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111. Feb. -- Table tennis, badminton, basketball, 
and bowling tournaments will be held at the Southern Illinois 
ITormal University Sports Day being sponsored by the Women's Athletic 
Association, Saturday, March 4. Cleo Ulm of Granite City, president 
of the association, is in charge of all events. 

Delegations representing Illinois State Normal University, 
Eastern Illinois State Teachers, Cape Girardeau Teachers, and 
Washington University, will participate in this first sports day 
ever held by Southern. 

Activities open Saturday morning at 9 o'clock with a social 
get-together, and games in the four sports will continue throughout 
the day. A luncheon will be held at the University cafeteria for 
all representatives. 

Eastern and Normal will arrive here Friday night to be the 
guests at Anthony Hall, women's dormitory. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorcna Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies: 



Carbondalc, 111.., March -- Students of Southern Illinois Normal 
University will again have the opportunity to hear four outstanding 
concert artists. 

For the twelfth year, the University will cooperate with the 
Carbondalc Community Association in bringing a series of musical 
notables to the campus. 

The University furnishes auditorium facilities for the series, 
and allocates a portion of student activity fees to its support, with 
all students being admitted to all concerts on their activity tickets. 

Through this cooperative arrangement, students are afforded the 
finest cultural opportunities the community can boast. 

The Community Concert Association this week is conducting its 
annual membership campaign, which will close Saturday noon. 

# # # 

Carbondalc, 111., March -Its, two to one at Southern Illinois 
Normal University — there are two students today for every one that 
was here a year ago. 

Registrar Harjorie Shank today reported that enrollment for the 
current spring term is 1527 compared to the 750 this time last year. 

Forty-four percent of today's students are veterans. Veteran 
enrollment at Southern has zoomed from 90 last fall to 280 winter 
term, and now stands at 677. 

Southern has the largest enrollment of any of the five teacher's 
'colleges, and also the largest enrollment of veterans. Latest report 
on veteran registration in the other colleges shows 324 at Normal, 
286 at Eastern, 235 at Northern and 154 at "iostern, 

■!■'- its 
triiii 



' . . .. .... 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111., March — Between fifty and sixty men have 
turned out to compete for berths on the Southern Illinois Normal 
University track team, Leland (Doc) Lingle, assistant director of 
athletics, announced today. 

The first meet is scheduled for April 6 against Western Illinois 
State Teachers of Macomb, One other meet, a triangular affair 
featuring SINTJ, Washington University (St. Louis) and Arkansas State, 
has also been arranged. 

To date, outstanding performances have been turned in by the 
following men in their positions: (heights) Earl Robert, Carlyle; 
John Algee, Carbondale; Quentin Stinson, Eldorado; Carl Birkncr, 
Pinckneyville; 

(Fiddle distance and distance runs) Dick Avis, Johnston City; 
Louis Peckcnino, Christopher; CI en Hamilton, Pinckneyville; Bill 
Gallitan, Royalton; Bob Smith, Marissa; Bill Arensman, Metropolis % 
Leonard Burden, Johnston City; Dick Harmon, Granite City; 

(Hurdles-high and low) Bill Hayse, Benton; Jack Hayse, Benton; 
Charles Beatty, Benton; Gene Davidson, Earrisburg; Charles I. r auzy, 
Elkville; Dick Eggcrs, Cbester; Roy Ragsdale, De Soto. 






Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Spe 



clal to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March —Miss Helen A. Shuman, dean of women 
at Southern Illinois Normal University, attended the recent regional ( 
conference of the Council of Guidance and Personnel Association in 

Cincinnati, 

Some 438 counselors, including those engaged in vocational, 
student, veteran, placement, and guidance work from Illinois, Michigan, 
Indiana, West Virginia, Ohio, and Kentucky were at the session. 

Among the notable speakers obtained for the conference was 
Sarah Blanding, now dean of the New York State College of Home 
Economics at Cornell University, and president-elect of Vassar College. 
A past president of the National Association of Deans of "/omen, Miss 
Blanding addressed the delegates at the special dinner. 

Also attending the conference from Illinois were Mr. Ruth 
Mccarne, counselor to women, Northwestern University; Mrs. Lela 
Trelease, acting dean of women a t the University of Illinois; Mrs. 
Leona Felsted, of Illinois Weslsyan; Miss Anna Keaton, Illinois 
State Normal University; and Miss Ruth Zimmerman, Western Illinois 
State Teachers College. 



# 



jI- 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111. , March -Four paintings by Southern Illinois 

Normal University art students will "be exhibited in the State Museum 

art galleries from May through August in the show of student work 

from the Illinois colleges and universities. 

Included in the four paintings is a landscape by Lorraine 

and 
Carrington of Ca rbondale; a ctilllife by Kinuye Jitodai of Seattle, 

Washington, Mrs. Dorothea Swan, assistant professor of art, 

announced today* The other two paintings --watorcolors~-have not 

yet been selected. 

Each college and university in the state has been invited to 

send art works in painting, sculpturing, and ceramics to the museum 

galleries for a first exhibition of college student art. 



Carbondale, III. , March - Featured in the current March issue of 
the Illinois Music Educator is the Southern Illinois Formal University 
Madrigal Singers. 

Under the direction of Floyd V. 7/akclsnd, this select group of 
twelve students has won acclaim throughout Egypt for their 
presentation of madrigals, or special arrangements of Old English 
tunes. Attired in authentic Elizabethan period costumes, the students 
sing without any accompaniment. 

rtTnr 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, Ill.» Mar.- The Southern Maroons left early Sunday morning 
"by train for Kansas City to match their basketball prowess against ace teams 
from all parts of the country in the national intercollegiate "basketball 
tournament which opens Monday noon. 

Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin took a ten man squad fro the Kansas City tourney, 
including the following players: Don Sheffer, Zeigler, forward; Calvin Collins, 
DuQuoin, forward; Leedio Cabutti, Johnston City, forward; Dick Harmon, Granite 
City, guard; Sam Milosevich, Zeigler, forward; Gene Stotlar, Pinckneyville, 
guard; Qjuentin Stinson, Eldorado, center; Bill Malinsky, Flora, guard; Roy 
Eagsdale, DeSoto, guard; Dick Foley » Carbondale, guard. 

The Maroons lost "by one point Friday night to the Chefford All-Stars at 
Fairfield. The score was 62-61. 

This was Southern's second game since they won the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference championship. On March 2 they played a two-team tournament 
against Eureka College for the right to represent Illinois at the national 
tournament, winning "by a score of 53-35. 

Finals in the Kansas City tourney are scheduled for Saturday night, 
March 16. 

II /; n 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111. , March --Some "hints to civilians" might well be 
the title for a recent article which a Southern Illinois Normal 
University sociologist wrote. 

Actually, Dr. Edward C. McDonagh entitled his article "Some Hints 
to Professors," and offered tips to his academic colleagues on how to 
treat the returned veterans who become students again. 

But some of his suggestions for the classroom are sound advice 
for the fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, wives and sweet- 
hearts and friends of the returning veterans. 
For example: 

Don't manifest a "deference" to veterans' past rank in the Army-- 
"privates' will not appreciate references to the successes and 
military status of high ranking non-coms and commissioned officers." 

Don't rush him-- try to control his natural tendency to make up 
for lost time. 

Give him a feeling of status and importance. Call him lister — 
"No title will seem as wonderful to the average soldier as 'Mister.' 
such a title means that he is not a serial number, but a person with 
personal freedom and importance." 

Dr. McDonagh's article was published in the Bulletin of the 

American Association of University Professors. He is also the author 

of an article on "Aspects of Military Counseling," in the journal 

Sociology and Social Research , and he and his wife, Louise McDonagh, 

(more ) 



jointly wrote one entitled "War Anxieties of Soldiers and Their 
Wives," which appeared in Social Force s. 

Dr. McDonagh recently returnee to the Southern faculty from 
military service, having served for some time as a vocational 
counselor in the Separation Center, War Department Personnel Center, 
Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Mrs. McDonagh had been teaching in the 
Nursery Schools at Montebello, Calif, 



Carbondale, 111., March —Word of the appointment of Dr. Edgar 
A Holt, former head of the history department at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, as professor of American history at the University 
of Kansas City, has been received here. 

His release from the Army Air Forces pending, Captain Holt has 
been serving as chief of the historical section in the Office of 
Headquarters, 5th Air Force Service Command, and later of Headquarters, 
Far East Air Service Command. Both historical accounts of operations 
of the two commands were written by him for the War Department. 

Last November, Captain Holt was awarded the Bronze Star medal 
for meritorious achievement in military operations in the Southwest 
Pacific. 

Dr. Holt served as dean of Omaha University for eleven years 
I after leaving the Southern facultv- 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Car"bondale,Ill.,Mar. -Clarence E. Wright, Carbondale 

attorney- at-law, has been engaged to teach a commercial law 
class in the College of Vocations and Professions at Southern 
Illinois Normal University this spring term, the President's 
Office has announced. 

Judge "/right did his undergraduate work at Southern and the 
University of Illinois, and received the bachelor of laws 
degree from Washington University School of Law, according to 
Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the college. 

In addition to eight years of teaching and school 
administrative experience, Mr, Wright has had 14 years 
experience as a practicing attorney. He served as prosecuting 
attorney in Jackson County for four years, and for the past 
three years has been county and probate judge of Jackson County. 

### 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale,Ill.,Mar. -Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the 
College of Vocations and Professions, will represent Southern 
Illinois Normal University at the inauguration of the new 
president, Robert Ward McEwen, of Blackburn College, Carlinville, 
Saturday, March 2. 

Blackburn College, which places a heavy emphasis on working 
students from the standpoint of in-service training, will 
present a symposium on "The Working Student" following the 
inauguration ceremony. Discussion leaders will be representatives 
from Berea College, Antioch College, and the University of 
Michigan* 



Carbondale, 111., Mar. -Final examinations for the winter term 
at Southern Illinois Formal University begin Tuesday, March 5, 
running four days through Friday. 

The four-day examination schedule for this term was adopted 
by the Advisory Council to allow both students" and faculty more 
time for the examinations. Formerly, the finals have been 
crowded into three days. 

Registration Will be held Monday, March 11, in the men's 
gymnasium, for the spring term, which will end on June 7. Spring 
recess has been scheduled for the week of April 13-22. 

4-UUt 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



C&rbondale, 111., March -An influx of several hundred new studente, 
both veterans and civilians, is expected at Southern Illinois Normal 
University next Monday as registration for the spring term gets 

under way. 

The Registrar's Office has been the busiest in history during 
recent weeks answering inquiries about spring term offerings, and the 
housing service already has applications for some 80 couples and 60 
boys who are apartment or room- seekers. 

A total of 278 courses in 23 different fields or departments 
will be available during the spring term, an increase of 25 percent 
in the number of courses over those offered during the spring term 

a year ago. 

A faculty of 159 is available to give instruction this spring, 
an increase of 14 per cent over the number teaching last spring. 

Six new faculty members will assume their teaching duties with 
the opening of the spring term— Dr. Orville Alexander, professor of 
government, who will teach one course; Conrad White, agriculture; 
Ben Watkins, in art; Judge C. E. Wright, who will teach one course 
in business law; Dr. E. C. McDonagh, assistant professor of 
sociology; and Robert W. English, assistant professor of industrial 

educa tion. 

### 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Soecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111 ., March — Southern is "going to the people"to 
find out what they want in the way of vocational and professional 
training. 

The new College of Vocations and Professions at Southern Illinois 
Normal University is particularly aiming at adapting its training 
program to the needs of the people, Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of 
the college, points out. 

As one means of finding out what the people want, the college 
has been sending out two of its faculty members to ask questions of 
industry, agriculture, and other groups- -Dr. Edward C. L'cDonagh, 
associate professor of sociolog}?-, and Robert W. English, assistant 
professor of industrial education. 

"The College of Vocations and Prof essions, particularly, is trying 
to build up curricula and courses of study of a vocational and 
professional nature which will best serve the interests of students 
who are interested in obtaining in Southern Illinois university 
training that will enable them to live and work in the area in a 
manner that will serve best the people of this portion of the state," 
Dean Rehn explained, 

"We are also interested in making available training to those 
people who can come to the University only for a short period of time-, 
or who can come only for evening sessions," he continued. 

(more) 



Pointing out that development of such a program is "no easy 
taskj' Dean Rehn declared that "the University fully appreciates the 
fact that it does not know all the answers, and has, therefore, 
started going to the people of the area." 

Due to the increasing enrollment in the college and the need 
for Dr. McDonagh and Mr. English in their own special departments, 
both will take up full-time teaching in the spring term which opens 
March 11. 

"In spite of the loss of these two men," Dean Rehn said, "we 
hope that this » going to the people' can be kept up. 

"In addition to seeking advice and counsel off the campus, we 
want also to get the advice and counsel of our own students on the 
subject of how we can best serve Southern Illinois." 



4L4UL 

rnrff 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Release Tuesday 



Carbondale, 111. , March 11 - As a means of accommodating increasing 
numbers of returning veterans, Southern Illinois Normal University 
today tightened scholastic requirements in a move to "weed out" 
students who fail to make their grades. 

The Advisory Council today voted to raise the grade-point average 
required for passing from 2.75 to 3.00, and to reduce the term on which 
a student may remain on probation from two terms to one term. 

In other words, a student who falls below a grade point average 
of 3.00 this spring will be placed on probation* If he has not 
succeeded in raising his average by the end of the summer term (or, if 
he does not go to summer school, by the end of the next fall term), he 
is dropped from the University and may not re-register. 

Students now on probation will be allowed until the end of the 
summer term to bring up their grade averages, however. 

Many University classes were filled by noon today as more than 
1,400 students signed up on the opening day of registration for the 
spring term. Especially popular with veterans were mathematics, 
industrial education, and chemistry courses, the registration 
committee reported. 

The Advisory Council was hurriedly called into session today at 
noon by President Chester F. Lay to consider some means by which all 
veterans seeking to enroll might be accommodated. It was thought that 

(more) 



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all comers could be cared for this spring, but that steps must be 
taken to provide for even larger numbers of veterans in the summer 
and next fall. 

It was the unanimous opinion of the Advisory Council that 
strengthening scholastic standards would eliminate students with the 
poorest grades and thereby enable the University to take more veterans 

### 



Carbondale ,111. , March - Van A. Buboltz, assistant professor of 
commerce at Southern Illinois Normal University, has resumed his 
teaching duties this week, after a two-year absence for service in the 
army. 

Stationed at Camp Joseph T. Robinson, Little Rock, Ark., since 
his induction in May, 1944, Sgt. Buboltz has been working as clerk- 
typist and stenographer with the discharge section. 

Mr. Buboltz joined the Southern faculty in 1937. He received the 
bachelor of science degree from Iowa State Teachers College, and the 
master of arts degree from Northwestern University. He hos had 
additional work at Northwestern and University of Southern California. 



: . i > : • "■■ 



i ,- ,;. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., March -- A two-day "goodwill" tour of seven 
Southern Illinois high schools will be started Wednesday, Kerch 13 
by the Madrigal Singers, a unique student musical group from Southern 
Illinois Normal University, Floyd V. Wakeland, director, has announced. 

These student singers make their appearances in picturesque 
Elizabethan costumes, the girls in full- skirted leg-o '-mutton- 
sleeved basque-waisted gowns, the men in knee breeches and Sir 
Walter Raleigh capes. All wear the nock-ruffs of queen Elizabeth's 

day* 

< 

Research work on the costumes, designed* for the original group 
organized in 1940, was done by Prof. Lucy K. Woody, chairman of the 
University home economics department, and the garments are authentic 
Elizabethan reproductions, both in color and design. 

The musical numbers they present, without instrumental 
accompaniment, are century-old madrigals in lilting harmony, such 
as strolling bands of singers caroled for hundreds of years. 

Reputation of the Southern Madrigal Singers has spread throughout 
Southern Illinois, for the group has sung at many musical festivals 
throughout this area. 

On their forthcoming tour, the Madrigal Singers will appear 
Wednesday at Cobden at 9 a.m.; at Vienna at 11; at Metropolis at 2; 
and at Golconda at 8 in the evening. On Thursday they will sing 

(over) 



at Carrier Kills at 9 a.m., at Harrisburg at 12:30, and at Eldorado 

at 2. 

Members of the group are: Ernestine Cox of Y.'cst Frankfort, 
Patricia Fields of West Frankfort, June Phillips of Benton, Alma 
Deane Smith of Carbondale, Myrla Leach of Marion, LaVera Story of 
West Frankfort, Charlotte Raubeck of Carbondale, Lorraine Carrignton 

of Carbondale, John Mulkins of Hcrrin, Horton Presley of LeRoy, 
Clcrence Freeman of West Frankfort, James Brown of Kerrin, and Paul 
Sims of Marion. Accompanist for the soloists is Georgia Gher of 

Carbondale » 

An added attraction for the tour will be Carl Lutz of Christopher 
a former music student at Southern, nov; in the Navy, but home on 
leave, who will present a flute obbligato for Miss Phillips' 
coloratura solos. 

.# # # 



» ■* ■ - *. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale,Ill.,Mar. -The "champs" are taking on another 
post- season game this week on the eve of their jaunt to Kansas 
City to enter the National Intercollegiate Basketball Tournament. 

The Maroons of Southern Illinois Normal University— winners 
of the 1945-46 title in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference— will go to Fairfield Friday night to engage the 
Chefford All-Stars, an independent team, in the high school gym 

at 8 o'clock. 

Fairfield is the hometown of Maroon Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin, 
so that a large and enthusiastic crowd is expected to attend the 

Friday night game. 

The Chefford All-Stars team is composed of Verdie Cox, Gene 
Hall, Pete Gardner, all former Southern students; Bill Glenn, 
Eastern Illinois State Teachers College alumnus; Sproul, formerly 
of Purdue University; and Harry Lasater, former eager at the 
University of Illinois, 

The Maroons will compete for the second year in a row at the 
National Tournament in Kansas City next week. 

## 



- /■. -J "I !. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Mar. -Foremost among the prominent speakers secured 
to address the Southern Illinois Normal University student hody this year is 
Dr. Percival Bailey, noted neurologist, who will appear here on the campus 
Thursday morning at ten o'clock oefore the weekly student assembly. 

One of Southern's most prominent alumni, Dr. Bailey finished his 
undergraduate work at Southern in 1912, and obtained the doctor of philosophy 
degree from the Uuiversity of Chicago, and the doctor of medicine degree 
from Northwestern University. 

He has heen affiliated with outstanding medical centers throughout the 
United States and in ?aris, and has taught for different periods in various 
capacities at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, Harvard, 
and University of Illinois, as professor of surgery, professor of neurology, 
and professor of neurology and neurosurgery. 

Dr. Bailey holds memberships in the American Medical Association, Chicago 

Medical Society; Institute of Medicine of Chicago; Central Neuropsychiatry 

of -, 

Association; American Association/ Anatomists; American Association 01 

Pathologists and Bacteriologists; American Neurological A SSO ciation; Society of 
Neurologists, -Surgeons, and other American and foreign societies. 



Dr. Bailey was on the Southern campus last spring for the inauguration 
of President Chester F. lay, as a speaker in one of the panels. He returned 
to the University a few years ago as speaker at the Commencement service. 

### 



Carbondale, 111., Mar. -Catherine Sullivan, junior from Harrishurg, 
was appointed acting editor of the Egyptian, , student newspaper of Southern 
Illinois Normal University, at a meeting of the Student Publications Council 
held last week. 

The appointment was made to fill the vacancy caused "by the resignation 
of Editor Betty Koontz Hunter, of Pinckneyville, who leaves school this term 
to join her husband. 

Miss Sullivan has "been assistant editor on the staff this year, and 
worked last year on the publication. She will serve as acting editor of the 
weekly paper until the editor for next year's Egyptian is elected sometime 
in April. 

si a 1 1 
TWW 



1 V- 



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■■<■•-■•■■ :. *, . . 
■ ■-.■•^■""■UMimwiMi. <■ 



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- 'WiUKOffcreaisM^' 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



SDecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111 ., March — Southern is "going to the people"to 
find out what they want in the way, of vocational and professional 
training. 

The new College of Vocations and Professions at Southern Illinois 
Normal University is particularly aiming at adapting its training 
program to the needs of the people, Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of 
the college, points out. 

As one means of finding out what the people want, the college 
has been sending out two of its faculty members to ask questions of 
industry, agriculture, and other groups- -Dr. Edward C. McDonagh, 
associate professor of sociology, and Robert w. English, assistant 
professor of industrial education. 

"The College of Vocations and Prof cssions, particularly, is trying 
to build up curricula and courses of study of a vocational and 
professional nature which will best serve the interests of students 
who are interested in obtaining in Southern Illinois university 
training that will enable them to live and work in the area in a 
manner that will serve best the people of this portion of the state," 
Dean Rehn explained, 

"We are also interested in making available training to those 
people who can come to the University only for a short period of time, 
or who can come only for evening sessions," he continued. 

(more ) 



Pointing out that development of such a program is "no easy 
taskj' Dean Rchn declared that "the University fully appreciates the 
fact that it does not know all the answers, and has, therefore, 
started going to the people of the area." 

Due to the increasing enrollment in the college and the need 
for Dr. McDonagh and Mr. English in their own special departments, 
both v/ill take up full-time teaching in the spring term which opens 
March 11. 

"In spite of the loss of these two men," Dean Rehn said, "we 
hope that this * going to the people' can ho kept up. 

"In addition to seeking advice and counsel off the campus, we 
want also to get the advice and counsel of our own students on the 
subject of how we can best serve Southern Illinois." 

rnrfr 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 

Carbondale, 111. , March -An influx of several hundred new studente* 
both veterans and civilians, is expected at Southern Illinois Normal 
University next Monday as registration for the spring term gets 
under way. 

The Registrar's Office has been the busiest in history during 
recent weeks answering inquiries about spring term offerings, and the 
housing service already has applications for some 80 couples and 60 
boys who are apartment or room- seekers. 

A total of 278 courses in 23 different fields or departments 
will be available during the spring term, an increase of 23 percent 
in the number of courses over those offered during the spring term 
a year ago. 

A faculty of 159 is available to give instruction this spring, 
an increase of 14 per cent over the number teaching last springt 

Six new faculty members will assume their teaching duties with 

the opening of the spring term— Dr. Orville Alexander, professor of 

government, who will teach one course; Conrad White, agriculture; 

Ben Watkins, in art; Judge C. E. Wright, who will teach one course 

in business law; Dr. E. C. McDonagh, assistant professor of 

sociology; and Robert W. English, assistant professor of industrial 

educa tion. 

### 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Mar. -Foremost among the prominent speakers secured 
to address the Southern Illinois Normal University student body this year is 
Dr. Percival Bailey, noted neurologist, who will appear here on the campus 
Thursday morning at ten o'clock before the weekly student assembly. 

One of Southern's most prominent alumni, Dr. Bailey finished his 
undergraduate work at Southern in 1912, and obtained the doctor of philosophy 
degree from the Uuiversity of Chicago, and the doctor of medicine degree 
from Northwestern University. 

He has been affiliated with outstanding medical centers throughout the 
United States and inF-aris, and has taught for different periods in various 
capacities at the University of Chicago, Northwestern University, Harvard, 
and University of Illinois, as professor of surgery, professor of neurology, 
and professor of neurology and neurosurgery. 

Dr. Bailey holds memberships in the American Medical Association, Chicago 

Medical Society; Institute of Medicine of Chicago; Central Neuropsychiatry 

of f 

Association; American Association/ Anatomists; American Association 01 

Pathologists and Bacteriologists; American Neurological A ssoc iation; Society of 
Neurologists, Surgeons, and other American and foreign societies. 



Dr. Bailey was on the Southern campus last spring for the inauguration 
of President Chester F. Lay, as a speaker in one of the panels. He returned 

to the University a few years ago as apeaker at the Commencement service. 

a a a 
www 



Carbondale, 111., Mar. -Catherine Sullivan, junior from Harrisburg, 
was appointed acting editor of the Egyptian,, student newspaper of Southern 
Illinois Normal University, at a meeting of the S t udent Publications Council 
held last week. 

The appointment was made to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation 
of Editor Betty Koontz Hunter, of Pinckneyville, who leaves school this term 
to join her husband. 

Miss Sullivan has been assistant editor on the staff this year, and 
worked last year on the publication. She will serve as acting editor of the 
weekly paper until the editor for next year's Egyptian is elected sometime 

in April. 

,// // i i 
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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - ,LL1NO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^■^■^^^■^■^■■■^^■■■i 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March - Several Southern Illinois Normal 
University officials are in Chicago this week attending the meeting 
of the American Association of School Administrators which convenes 
from Tuesday through Thursday. 

Those in attendance from Southern include President Chester 
P. Lay; Dr. A. J. TerKeurst, associate professor and dean of men; 
Dr. Bruce W. Merwin, professor of education; and Howard E. ^osley, 
associate professor of education and director of the library. 

While there, Dr. Merwin will also attend the Kappa Phi Kappa 
banquet Wednesday night, giving the main address at the honorary 
scholastic organization dinner. Prom Chicago, Dr. Merwin will go 
to Hammond University on Friday to reinstate the Kappa Phi Kappa 
chapter in that institution. 

Dr. Vera L. Peacock, professor of foreign languages and 
department chairman, will attend a meeting of Delta Kappa Gamma in 
Chicago on March 15. Chairman of the membership committee for the 
state organization, Dr. peacock is also president of the local 
chapter. 

ITii n 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March -Southern Illinois teachers and 
prospective teachers have been invited to attend the formal banquet 
of the American Childhood Education organization at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, Dr. Sina M. Kott, assistant professor 
of pre- school education, and sponsor of the group, has announced. 

Slated for the evening of March 21, the banquet is to be held 
in the University Cafeteria. 

Goffrcy Hughes, Franklin County Superintendent of Schools, 
has been secured for principal speaker of the evening, and will 
address the group on the need for the kindergarten in the 
educational program for the child. 

President Chester F. Lay and Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the 
College of Education, will also speak at the meeting to present 
what Southern is doing to encourage the education of kindergarten 
teachers, Dr. Mott said. 

Reservations for the banquet , which must be in by March 19, 
may be secured through Miss Helen Narber, in care of the University. 
Price of the tickets is one dollar. 



4-im 

1Y ., If 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBOHDALR 1LUNOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■^■■■■■IMBI^^^BMI 



Soecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March - Appointment of Mrs. Elizabeth Abrams, 
Metropolis, as supervising teacher in the Southern Illinois Normal 
University off-campus student teaching center at the Metropolis 
Community High School for students in home economics, has been 
announced by University officials here. 

A graduate of the University of Illinois, Mrs. Abram has been 

given additional special training for her new position by Miss 

Gladys W. Babcock, a-ssistant professor of home economics at 

Southern. 

The student teaching center in the Metropolis school began 

an 
functioning for the first time this term, as/increased number of 

home economics majors have created the need for more off-campus 
practice centers. Students experience actual teaching conditions 
for a six week period under the direction of their supervisors to 
qualify for the Smith- Hughes rating in their field of home economics. 

Other off-campus student teaching centers for the Southern 
home economics students are at Dupo Community High School, under the 
direction of Miss Irene Liebig, and at Johnston City Township 
High School, with Mrs. Mae Rushing Smythe as supervisor. 

### 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111. , March - Veteran enrollment at Southern 
Illinois Normal university has jumped over 130 percent above winter 
term with the figure expected to go higher as late registrants 
filter in for the next two weeks to swell the 640 figure. 

Total enrollment for spring term at the end of the second day 
of registration stood at 1,427, and University officials estimated 
the evening and graduate classes would bring the total enrollment 
'way above the 1,500 mark. 

The spring term group of 640 veterans has added 360 to last 
termfe veteran enrollment of 280. ■ 

Many of the University classes wore underway Tuesday with 
instructors confronting more men students than they have had since 
the war began. 

### 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - 1LUNO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^^■^■■■■■^^■■■■M 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., March - 
/Another noteworthy Chapel program was presented at Southern 

Illinois Normal University Thursday morning, March 14, when two 

faculty members of the University revealed interesting historical 

data on Southern Illinois to the students, Mr. David S. Mcintosh, 

chairman of the music department, and Mr. John W. Allen, acting 

director of the museum, were the contributing faculty members. 

For many years Mr. Mcintosh has been collecting folk songs 
from around the country, and Thursday morning he sang three without 
instrumental accompaniment. 

v, Black Jack David* was a ballad that originated about 1540 
in Scotland during thereignof James V. The second, "Lonesome 
GDOve," a lament of parting lovers, Mr. Mcintosh learned from a 
citizen of Mc leansboro. It also originated in Engldndand 
Scotland. The last number was a popular version of "Froggie Went 
a Court in' ." 

John W. Allen is perhaps one of the best authorities living 
on the historical background of Southern Illinois. He has written 
several books and pamphlets dealing with the subject, and is 
working on surveys of the Southern Illinois counties. His talk 
was entitled "Acres of Diamonds'' after the famous story by Russell 
Conwell, in which common stones, shunned by the unaware, turned 
out to be priceless diamonds. 

"I sometimes think that a parallel exists in Southern Illinois," 
stated Mr. Allen. There are many valuable historical spots here if 
"one would only take the time to look for them." 

Among the locations he briefly described were the Free Bridge 
of St. Louis, Waterloo, Cohokia, Valmeyer, New Design, Kaskaskia, 
Chester, Sparta, Rockwood, Grand Tower, Brownsville, Columbia, 
and Prairie du Rocher. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March -Initial steps toward mobilization of 
some 30 to 40 thousand alumni of Illinois state teachers colleges to 
plug for higher education were taken in Chicago this week, March 14, 
when a Joint Alumni Council was formed. 

Dr. Orvillo Alexander, professor of government, who is in charge 
of alumni activities at Southern Illinois Normal University here, was 
elected president of the new group. 

Also participating in the organisation meeting were Southern 
President Chester F. Lay; W. B. ("Slatz") Valentine of Also Pass, 
president of the Southern Alumni Association; Mrs. Barbara Burr Hubbs 
of Chicago; and Miss Lorena Drummond, director of the Southern 
Information Service. 

Each of the five colleges arid universities were represented by 
the president, the president of the alumni association, the faculty 
member in charge of alumni activities, and two other representatives 
of the alumni association. 

Shortage of teachers, particularly in the elementary field, was 
described at the meeting as the No. 1 problem of the public schools, 
and therefore the No. 1 problem of the teachers colleges. 



(more ) 



Ways and means of throwing alumni influence into the breach to 
encourage high school students to enter the teaching field was 
discussed at some length, Dr. Alexander explained. 

A number of the representatives present were public school 
administrators, who presented graphically the plight in which the 
schools find themselves duo to lack of teachers. 
I Other problems in which the new Joint Alumni Council evidenced 
an interest were housing for students, legislation on appropriations 
and other matters affecting higher education, and efforts to increase 
the general public's interest in and appreciation for higher education. 

Purposes of the new Joint Alumni Council are tor (1) provide an 
opportunity for the various teachers college administrations and 
representatives of the five alumni associations to consult concerning 
mutual problems; (2) provide an opportunity to bring needs of the 
colleges and needed expansions to the attention of the alumni; and 
(3) provide an agency for a cooperative statewide approach to the 
solution of mutual problems. 

In addition to Dr. Alexander as president, other officers of the 
new Joint Alumni Council elected at Chicago were: vice president, 
William F. Peters, assistant principal of junior high school at 
Charleston; secretary Miss Annetta Gibson, Rockford public schools; 
executive committee members, Kiss Ellen Breed, supervisor of 
elementary education at Peoria, an^f Richard V. Lindsey, superintendent 
of schools at Gales burg. 

ffrr/t 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., March - Southern Illinois Normal University 
was presented an award of citation of merit from the Federal Office 
of Civilian Defense yesterday. 

"This citation comes for your assistance in the 1945 flood, and 
for the entire range of activities of all the students and faculty," 
declared W. K. Whitehead, director of the 33rd District of Federal 
OCD, as he made the presentation to the University. 

Given to Illinois by the federal OCD, the citation, in turn, 
was presented to Southern, Mr. Whitehead told the student-faculty 
assembly. 

"Governor Green, General Frank Parker, and I, felt that If 
anyone in these United States deserved a citation award, they were 
the student body and faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University." 
he explained. 

Upon receiving the citation for the institution, President 
Chester F. Lay assured Nr. Whitehead "the citation will be kept in 
the archives of the University and will be treasured and noted." 

The flood control work carried out by University students to 
which Mr. Whitehead referred wis that of last spring when some twenty 
students left classes to work in the flooded areas. 

Other defense activities carried on by the University faculty 
and students included housing and feeding of 550 men of the state 
militia here in the spring of 1944; training of over a thousand war 
workers for industrial work; aiding In the program of the Civilian 
Air Patrol; special services in governmental agencies which s ever al 
faculty members entered, plus faculty aid on ration boards, in bond 
drives, and the local unit of Civilian Defense. 

^All^the girls in school worked through the Co-Ed Victory Corps, 
selling defense stamps, wrapping bandages "and knitting for the Red 
Cross, and aiding in blood donor drives. A community cannery was set 
up which was part of the national program of food conservation; and 
classes were offered in foods, gardening, farm and auto mechanics for 
the people of the area. 

JLUJl 

l 77-77-77- 



\«v 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., March - The appointment of Hiss Lelah Allison 
as instructor in the English department and of Mr. Maurice Clark as 
faculty assistant in the departments of government and economics at 
Southern Illinois Normal University for the spring term has been 
officially announced. 

Kiss Allison is a graduate of Illinois State Normal University, 
Normal, and possesses a master's degree from the University of 
Missouri, where she has also done additional work. Previous to her 
appointment here, Miss Allison taught in Arthur, Illinois, according 
to Dr. T. "/• Abbott, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and. Sciences 
with which college Miss Allison will be affiliated. 

Mr. Clark received his bachelor of education degree at Southern, 
and has completed all his work toward the master's degree, except 
the thesis, at the University of Illinois. Lately returned from •■ 
service, Mr. Clark last taught at the Herrln high school. His 
appointment is in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 



#£# 



K 



Carbondale, 111., ranch- Southern is offering a new course in 
Physiology and Health Education during the spring term called "The 
Meaning of the Physical Examination," according to Dr. Marie A. 
Hinrichs, college physician and head of the department of Physiology 
and Hygiene. The course is numbered P. and H.. 330, and is being 
taught by Dr. Hinrichs at the Health Service Office, 211 Harwood 
Avenue, on Wednesday evenings from 6:30 to 8:30. 

It is an introduction to the techniques of a physical examinati 
and discussion of the significance of results of such an examinatior. 
and in addition, an introduction to elementary laboratory and clinic- 
determinations. The first six weeks will be devoted to elementary 
physical diagnosis; the second, to the introduction of clinical 
laboratory methods. One hour's credit will be offered for each six 
weeks period. 

The course is not only an elective for majors and minors in 
Physiology and. Health Education and biology, but also one for pre- 
clinical groups and In-service teachers. In the latter case, credit 
of either one or two hours may be obtained. 



■ I 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailles~-by Wire 

Longram Rate 

Carbondale, 111., March. 18 - In order to re- constitute a 
democratic student self-government at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, giving nearly 650 veterans a representation in student 
affairs, University President Chester P. Lay today announced the 
creation of a student- f acul ty committee to draft a new student 
government charter. 

At present the student body is voiceless, since the resignation 
on February 21 of 15 members of the 16-member student council (the 
16th member had already left the campus to enter the Merchant Marines). 

In a letter to the former council members, President Lay pointed 
out that "since three weeks have gone by since I invited the members 
of the Student Council to reconsider their resignations and I have had 
no kind of reply, I am compelled to take the initiative in providing 
the students with the kind of effective student government to which 
they are entitled and which they have not had since you resigned." 

He cited that the original "'constitution of the student council," 
drafted some ten years ago, was written by Prof. E. G. Lentz, then 
dean of men, and approved by then-president Roscoe Pulliam before it 
was presented to the students. 

"Your resignations have dissolved the student council," he said, 
"and ever since you resigned no group has been in existence which 
could initiate revisions to the constitution through the orderly 
processes that have heretofore prevailed." 

He invited the former council members as well as all other 
individuals and groups to present any ideas or plans they may have hau 
for effective student government to the special student-faculty 
committee. 

In announcing designation of this committee, the president called 
attention to the fact that approximately 600 students are now in schoc 
who were not here last fall— ralmost all of them veterans— and who 

(more ) 




-2- 

consequently have not had an opportunity to have representation in 
the student government. 

H e stressed the fact that students would have full participation 
in the special student-faculty committee. 

Chief complaint of the resigning members of the student council 
was that since mid-winter they have lacked representation on the 
advisory council of administration, as it was then coiled, which was 
comprised entirely of administrative officials. 

This year, under a new plan developed by the faculty, the council 
of administration has become a jcint faculty-administration council, 
with equal representation of the faculty and the administrative 
officials of the University. In the reorganization no provision was 
made for student representation, a plan which is in line with 
practices generally prevailing at other universities. 

President Lay said he had explained this plan in full to the 
former student council, as soon as it was placed in effect, but had 
invited them to submit to him a list of University committees on 
which they felt students should be represented, since he firmly 
believed in student participation. 

He explained that the student council itself was the duly 
constituted channel through which student opinion and student 
recommendations could reach the University administration, and offered 
personally to hold regular conferences with representatives of the 
council or with the entire council if they so desired. 

jiTrfi 

Information Service- 
Southern Illinois Normal Uni~ 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111. , March -Featured on the program of the State 
Home Economics teacher Education meeting held lb Springfield last 
week was Miss Gladys Babcock, assistant professor cf home economics 
at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Miss Babcock presented the "Home Experience Program" which is 
a major project in the curriculum of the University's home economics 
students at the Friday afternoon meeting, and served as member of 
the committee to draw up a list of minimum essentials for the student 
teacher in home economics that were reported to the group on 
Saturday afternoon. 

Representatives attending the two-day session included heads 
of the home economics departments and teacher trainers from the ten 
state institutions which prepare vocational home economics majors; 
supervising teachers in off -campus student teaching centers; and 
the state supervisor with nor assistants. 

Also attending the meeting from Southern were Professor Lucy 
K. Woody, department chairman, and Miss Helen Starck, instructor of 
home economics in the University High School. 

### 



Southern Illinois normal University Information B»*4». 
Lorena Dromond, editor i««fW« oervioe 

opecial to Southern Illinois .Oailies 

Uarbondale, IU., ;: ,. r .. j& ^ nai>l Jjj^ ^.^ Qf ^ 
southern Division of the Illinois Auction ..« 9 „oi« tlon will be 
held in Sbxrm ..uditoriu* of Southern Illinois Normal University 

on M^rch 22, 1946. All ttmivft*«aife« m ±. u **-* . -, , . 

» . .,i.x universit, »4»a classes will be dismissed, 

according to a report from school officials. 

Princi pk speaker of the day will be Commander 7/illiam i. 
MoGovern, professor of political science bt Northwestern University. 
Commander Govern has just returned from an around -the-world air 
trip under government auspices during which he interviewed many 
outstanding world leaders, including Lord [ountbaiten, Viceroy 
Lord Wevell, General wedemeyer, General P u lUrley, and Chiang 
Kai-i>hek# 

Alse schedled to speak are l£r_. George Brecewell, president 
of the southern Division of the i.l..., ::r. ...ubrey folmea, aecretary 
of the Tocher.' retirement System, jfe. paui * jeclc, director of 
I.-,. a. insurance, and Kev. Joseph R. Laughlin of the ^irst 
Presbyterian Church of ^rm&, HI. ,, n address of welcome will be 
made by Chester ?. Lay, president of the University. 

Special music will be offered by the :.rarmony Rasters, one of 
Chicago's foremost male quartette, and by Mm lelen Ceita, Harpist 
end student at *Jort*eitern University Bm ool of male, Lvanaton, HI. 



wttir 






. 






4 















Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drommond,2ditor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March - High school seniors, do you want to 
teach? Do you like children? If both your answers are "yes," perhaps 
you ought to start down the road toward kindergarten teaching. 

Several incentives exist which might influence high school 
graduates to enter the field of kindergarten teaching were set 
forth recently by three outstanding Southern Illinois educators during 
a conference of the association of American Childhood Education at 
Southern Illinois Normal University. 

One of the speakers was University President Chester F. Lay, 
who stated, "Teachers should be interested in the child, not 
primarily in theories." 

Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, University housing counselor giving the 
parent's view, emphasized that a kindergarten should educate not 
only the children, but also the parents by teaching parents to deal 
with child problems. Social adjustment and good habit formation of 
the child need to be understood by the parents, she pointed out. 

"The State nov.- provides #40 per child for half a day," Goffrey 
H. Hughes, Benton, county superintendent of Franklin County explained. 
"This means that many schools can now draw state funds, and are 
interested in including kindergartens in their schools. East St. 
Louis alone is looking for 40 kindergarten teachers and many other 
towns will be calling for trained kindergarten teachers." 

Teachers should have special child training and should not be 
experienced teachers of upper grades who are subject-matter conscious 

Mr. Hughes stressed. 

Kindergarten teaching is demanding e more specialized 
education, and at the same time, is developing into a field of 
opportunities, he declared. 

All of the speakers called attention to the urgent need for 
kindergarten teachers in Southern Illinois schools. 



Southern Illinois formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

(Note to Editor: In view of the drastic shortage of teachers, which 
is jeopardizing our public schools throughout the country, perhaps you 
may be interested in publishing the following editorial calling 
attention to the opportunities in the kindergarten field.) 



KINDERGARTEN TEACHING A FINE OPPORTUNITY 
(An Editorial) 

There is a demand at the present time for good kindergarten 
teachers, and. provision for development of an adequate child- training 
program is on the way. The State now provides $40 per kindergarten 
child for half a day. This means that many schools can now draw 
state funds for inclusion of such departments in their schools. 
East St. Touis alone is looking for 4-0 kindergarten teachers, and 
many other towns will be calling for trained kindergarten teachers. 

During a recent conference at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
student members of the Association of American Childhood Education 
heard education leaders of Southern Illinois discuss the purpose of 
a kindergarten, and the training of the ideal kindergarten teacher. 
The kindergarten is the path from the home to the school, and, 
as such, partakes of the nature of each, these educators pointed out. 
Hence, child development and social adjustment rather than subject 
matter are of prime importance. The kindergarten should include a 
few hours of supervision away from home and should educate not only 
the child but also the parents by helping them solve their problems 
with the children. It is one of the best sources for formation of 
good habits In the child. 

It is important that the demand for kindergarten teachers be 
supplied with specially trained material. The teacher should first 
of all be interested in the child, not fundamentally in theories. 
Since there is also the danger of over- specialization, one educator 
Urged that a broad general education be obtained first, then 
specialization. It is not wise to take older teachers of upper grade? 
who are subject-matter conscious and place them in charge of the 
children. I nstead, the purpose of this interest movement is to 

encourage the young college student to enter the important field of 
kindergarten teaching, and for this objective, special child training 
is necessary. * 

It is hoped that in view of tSfe serious need for teachers, 
particularly in the kindergarten field, that the high school graduate- 
of Southern Illinois during the next few years will give thoughtful 
consideration to training for this important educational work. 

JtJUi 

ft ,rtr 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Informdtion Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March --The College of Education's Curriculum 
Laboratory at Southern Illinois Normal University had their initial 
bulletin off the press today. 

presenting new teaching materials on display in the curriculum 
laboratory with a 1945 copyright, the bulletin will be distributed 
this week to all city superintendents, high school and grade school 
principals, in Southern Illinois, according to Dr. E. E. Hall, 
director of the laboratory.. 

Since the curriculum laboratory was started at the University in 
December of 1942, about 10,000 copies of textbooks, workbooks, 
curriculum bulletins, and other teaching materials published for use 
In grade and high schools have been collected. The current bulletin, 
however, lists only those which came to the laboratory last year. 

Located in the basement of the Wheeler Library, the Curriculum 
Laboratory is open to students, faculty, and teachers of the area 
at all times during library hours. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., March— The recently completed book of Howard 
E. Bosley, associate professor of education and director of the 
library at Southern Illinois Normal University, on The Administration 
of Faculty person nel in State Teachers Colleges , was reviewed by 
Dr. •Viiiiam H. Vaughan, president of the State Teachers College, 
r.orehead, Kentucky, at the meeting of the American Association of 
Teachers Colleges held in Cleveland, Ohio last month. 

Mr. Bosley* s 214 page book deals with philosophy and practices 
in teachers college administration, and is based on investigation 
conducted by him during the past summer, 

#i # # 



# 



Normal 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondalc, 111., f'arch 21- 
/ The annual meeting of the Soutnern Division of the Illinois 

Education Association opens in Shryock Auditorium on the S.I.N.U. 

campus, Friday, March 22. 

Following an invocation and address of welcome, Fr. George 
Bracewell, president of the Southern Division, and Fr. Aubrey Holmes, 
secretary of the Teachers' Retirement System, will address the 
meeting. 

William M. FcG-overn, professor of political science at 
Northwestern University, and principal speaker of the day, will 
appear on the program at 11:00 a. m. 

Scheduled for the afternoon session are the Harmony rasters, 
outstanding male quartette from Chicago, Fr. Paul E. jack, director 
of I.E. A. Insurance, and Fiss Helen Keith, music student at 
Northwestern University, who will present a harp recital. 

President of the University, Chester F. L a y, will make the 
address of welcome. 

ILJJJ.l 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' 1LLINO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■^■■■■■^■■■■■■■■■l 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., Mar.- Sascha Gorodnitski, Russian pianist, 
and fourth and final guest artist of the 1945-46 concert season, will 
appear at Southern Illinois Normal University in Shryock Auditorium 
under the auspices of the Community Concert Association, March 25, 
at 2 p. m. 

A decade of achievement has established Sascha Gorodnitski 
among the outstanding pianists of the day. In Hew York he has filled 
more than fifty engagements, fifteen of them in Carnegie Hall where 
his recitals and appearances with the New York Philharmonic- Symphony 
Orchestra and the National Orchestral Association have made him a 
public favorite. 

Gorodnitski has toured extensively throughout the United States 
and Canada and appeared in Latin- America. Three times he has been 
soloist at the famous Worcester festival. Major orchestras with which 
he has appeared, besides those of New York, include the Detroit, 
Cleveland, Chicago, Pittsburgh, and Cincinnati symphonies. Recitals 
have introduced him to all parts of the United States, Canada, and Cuba 

Born in Kiev, Russia, Gorodnitski was brought to this country 
before he was a year old. He comes of a musical family, since his 
mother was a pianist and singer, his brother a 'cellist, his sister a 
violinist. A cousin, still in Russia, is head of the violin department 
at Leningrad Conservatory, succeeding Leopold Auer. An uncle is a 
conductor. In Russia, Gorodnitski' s father was head of a private 
school, and he opened a music conservatory after coming to America. 

Sascha Gorodnitski ! s talent was discovered by his mother, who 
gave him his first piano lessons. He later studied with Josef 
Lhevinne. Not allowed to be a child prodigy, he was a mature artist 
when he made his debut as winner of the Schubert Memorial Prize — the 
prize being an introductory appearance with the New York Philharmonic- 
Symphony. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Papers 



Carbondale, 111., March -Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg, 
Southern Illinois Normal University co-ed, has been elected to a 
national post in the Columbia University Scholastic Press Association. 

Miss Sullivan was chosen as a member of the board for the 
teachers college section, at a business meeting held in the Hotel 
Astor in New York City, March 21-83. 

Editor of The Egyptian , student newspaper, she was one of 
three student delegates to the 22nd annual press conference, attended 
by some 2,800 high school and college editors of the nation.. 

Other Southern representatives were Business Manager Maxine 
Harris of Ramsey, and News Editor Florine Schlueter of Carbondale. 
They were accompanied by Miss Lorena Drummond, Egyptian faculty 
sponsor, who was elected as one of the two advisers for the teachers 
college section of the press association. 

### 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



T r n CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 

Information bervice 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Papers 



Garb ondale, 111., March -- County superintendents of the 

Southern Illinois block and members of their county survey boards 

with representatives of the College of Education at Southern 

Illinois Normal University will tour adjoining states next week to 

study the school reorganization programs there. 

and 
Attention will be given to matters of attendance , /administrative 

areas, and considerable emphasis will be placed on the study of their 

school curriculum, according to officials of the College of Education. 

Scheduled to go on the five-day tour, which will include visits 

to Kentucky, West Virginia, South .Cv^rolina and Tennessee, are some 

35 school officials and representatives from the Southern Illinois 

area. 

County superintendents making the trip include Horace Brown, 
Gallatin County; Lee Nebughr, Jackson County; Lloyd Robertson, . 
Johnson County; Robert MoKinney, Williamson County; Russell 
Rendleman, Union County; Kenneth Davis, Saline County; MsC. Hunt, 
Pulaski County; Goffrey Hughes, Franklin County; L. W. Smith, Massac 
County; and Clyde L. Flynn, Hardin County. 

Representative on the tour from the state superintendent's 
office is Luther J. Black, assistant to the superintendent of public 
instruction, and chairman of the State Advisory Commission of School 

Reorganization. 

Delegates from the University's College of Education will be 
Dean E. R. Fair; Howard 2. Bosley, George Bracewell, fond Dr. ^merson 
Hall, associate professors of education. 

Plans for the tour were made jointly by the College of Education 
Reorganization Committee, and the county superintendents. 
Administrators here expressed the hope that similar trips may be 
arranged for the county survey officials from the Southwestern and 
Southeastern Illinois Blocks in the near future. 



j . ., 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



_ r CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 

Information bervice 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



"W 



Special to Southern Illinois Papers 
Attention Sports Editor 



Carbondale, 111. , March —A banquet honoring the Southern Illinois 
Normal University basketball team, recently acclaimed National 
Intercollegiate Champions at Kansas City, Missouri, will be held on 
April 1 in the University Cafeteria, the Carbondale Businessmen's 
Association announced today. 

Harry Caray, noted sports announcer from St. Louis, and another 
sports writer to be announced later will be the guest speakers. 
The banquet is open to a limited number of the public. 

This is the third in a series of honor banquets for the Maroons, 
previous ones being held by the Lions Club and Elks Club of 

Carbondale. 

WWW 



Carbondale, 111. , March - Fourteen men have turned out to date 
fof the Southern Illinois Normal University tennis squad. Bruce 
Church, Mcrissa, Arkansas A.A.U. open singles winner last; Joe 
Pulley, Marion, and Roy Lielich, New Athens, are the three lettormen 
returning from the armed forces. 

Two matches with Washington University ( St. Louis) have been 
scheduled and matches with the Cape Girardeau Teachers, Evansville 
College and the other four members of the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference are tentatively scheduled. 

Other prospective candidates for the squad include Ton Cain, 
Eldorado; Ken Capps, Herrin; Walter Eadie, -Vest Frankfort; Kurt 
Gehhart, Carbondale; Herb Hoffman, Carbondale; Nick Kostoff, Granite 
City; John Maguire , Carbondale; Harry Meng, Belleville; F. D. 
Miskell, Carbondale; Al Shafter, Carbondale; and Calvin Whiteside, 
Vienna. 

Coaching the University tennis squad this year is William 
Freeburg, instructor of physical education, replacing former 
coach Dr. Charles D. Tenney, who has assumed the duties of 
administrative assistant to the president during the past year. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Mar. 25- Glenn "Abe" Martin, Director of 
'.Athletics at Southern Illinois Normal University, is recovering 
slowly from an injury to his cheekbone which occurred while he was 
playing baseball last week, it was reported today in a statement 
from Mrs. T 'artin. 

Martin underwent surgery yesterday, and the operation was 
pronounced a success by Drs. John Lewis and Gene Bricker. Dr. 
Bricker was formerly a student of SINU and a classmate of Martin's. 

It is not known yet how soon Martin will be back to his duties 
at Southern. possibly he will leave the hospital in a week and 



rest for an indefinite period at home, Mrs. Martin said. 



j m 



Carbondale, 111., ^arch — President Chester F. Lay and Dr. W. G. 
Swartz, professor of government and chairman of the graduate committee 
at southern Illinois Normal University, will be in Chicago this week 
attending the meeting of the North Central Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools. 

Dr. Lay is the official delcgrte of the University to the four- 
day session of the MCA, v/hich is the accrediting association : 
determining standards for transfer of credits from one institution 
to another. Dr. Swartz is going to attend a graduate committee 
meeting. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March -Probably the outstanding university or 
college modern dance group in the United States is that from the 
Texas State College for h'omen which will present the modern dance 
concert here in the Southern Illinois Normal University Shryock 
Auditorium, Monday evening, April 8. 

Organized some ten years ago as an extra-curricular activity, 
the dance club has given concerts in their own College Concert and 
Drama Series, performed at four conventions of the Southern District 
of the American Association for Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation, and has appea red in recitals throughout the southwest. 

Consisting of 14 students regularly enrolled in the college at 

Denton, Texas, the dance group personnel includes students from 

Pennsylvanis to Texas, reflecting the national interest-appeal of 

the modern dance group. 

This modern dance group has attracted the attention of famous 

exponents of dance who have visited that college over a period of 

years and have conducted master classes in which ]bhe group has 

participated. Comments from these famous artists of dance include 

praise for the group's technical skills and for its choreography 

which seems characterized by an unusually wide scope of movement, 

idea, and feeling-- all necessary components of the dance composition* 

Tickets for the concert here Monday evening, April 8, went on 

advance 
sale last week with students canvassing Carbondale. Other/tickets 
may be secured at Walgren, Varsity, and Cline-Vick Drug STorcs, and 
Zwick's in Carbondale. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



T r CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 

Information bervice 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., March - Recent additions to the staff at 
Southern Illinois Normal University include twenty-two veterans, 
according to a survey made this week. 

Some thirteen of the veterans are those returning to the 
University faculty after leaves-of-absence for military service, 
while eight of the appointments have brought new people to the 
Universit}^ staff. 

Five' of the staff members were in the Navy, and the remaining 
number were in the Army. 

Veterans recently employed at the University include: 

Dr. Eli Borkon, associate professor of physiology and health 
education, and associate college physician; Dr. Robert D. Faner, 
associate professor of English; Dr. Fred R. Gagle, curator of 
the biological section of the University Museum, and now on 
temporary lcave-of-absence to lecture at Tulane University. 
J. W, Dillow, assistant professor of rural education; 
William Marber-ry, assistant professor of botany; Dr. E. C. 
McDonagh, assistant professor of sociology; Dr. Victor Randolph, 
assistant professor of education and consultant in the Veterans 
Guidance Center; Martha Scott, assistant professor of zoology; 
Van A. Buboltz, assistant professor of commerce; and Robert W. 
English, assistant professor in industrial education. 

Jean Fligor, instructor in rural education; Leonard J. Kcefe, 
instructor, University High School; John Wharton, instructor in 
music; Rockwell McCreight, director of the physical plant; Glenn 
J. HcGowan, faculty assistant; Mary A. Robertson, secretary to the 
president; Charles T. Williams, main foreman of the physical 
plant; John Jacobs, faculty assistant, University High School. 

Graduate assistants who are veterans include Edward Allen, 
Edward Goodnight, H. E. Johnson, and William Townes, 



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Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



T r . CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 

Information bervice 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale,Ill., L arch - Dr. Anne Schley Duggan and her student 
dance group of the Texas State College for Women, Denton, Texas, 
will present a dance concert here on the Southern Illinois Normal 
University campus Monday evening, April 3, according to recent 
announcement. 

One of the country's foremost authorities in the field of 
dance education, Dr. I>uggan is bringing here a student dance group 
which has given modern dance concerts throughout the southern states 
in many universities and colleges. 

Dr. Duggan and her modern dance students will stop here enroute 
to St. Louis where they are to appear in the program of the Dance 
Section of the national convention of the American Association of 
Health, Physical Education, and Recreation which convenes there that 
week in April. 

University students will have two opportunities to see the 
dance group as they have agreed to appear on the student assembly 
program Monday morning at ten o'clock, in addition to the concert 
presentation Monday evening they will give, beginning at eight 
o'clock. 

Townspeople and others in the area interested in modern dance 
are also invited to attend the concert for which tickets will soon 
be placed on sale. 

The dance group is being brought here through the department of 
women's physical education. One of the departmental members is a 
former member of the Duggan dance group— Miss Jean Stehr, who 
worked under Dr. Duggan during all four years of her undergraduate 
work at the Texas State College for Women at Denton. 

Arriving here from T exas Sunday evening, April 7, the group 
will be guests at Anthony Hall, women's dormitory on the University 
campus, until they leave for St. Louis Tuesday morning. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois papers s*. 



Carbondale, 111., March -Harry Carayv noted sportscaster of 
radio station HXOK in St. Louis, and Ellis Veech, snorts official 
and snorts editor of the East St. Louis Journal, were the guest 
speakers Fonday night at a victory banquet honoring the Southern 
Illinois Formal University national intercollegiate basketball 
champions. Approximately 130 fans attended. 

Caray and Veech lauded the team and the coach for their victory 
and also for their sportsmanship. They pointed out that this 
championship has brought more publicity to Carbondale and the school 

than any other one event. 

Coach Glenn "Abe" martin, up and around for the first time since 
his recent accident on the baseball diamond, pointed out that the 
winning of the I. I. A, Conference was just as important as winning 
the national intercollegiate crown because this was the first time 
in Southern's history that this title has been won. 

yartin also announced that thirteen cagers will receive letters 
this season. They are as follows: Don Sheffer of Ziegler; Gene 
Stotlar of Finckneyville; Sam Filosevich of Ziegler; Ouentin Stinson 

of Eldorado; Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City; Roy Ragsdale of . 
Desoto; Gene Davidson of Eairisburg; Dick Foley of Carbondale; 
Chester Glover of Mt. Vernon; Bill Malinsky of Flora; Calvin Collins 
of DiQuoin; Dick Harmon of Granite City; Carl Birkner of ^ Fmm- IF. 

pinckneyville. 

The banquet was sponsored by a group of Carbondale businessmen 
and local fans with V. L. "r'oon" Baker, Martin Chaney and Will 
Griffith in charge. All members of the championship team will 
receive engraved pen and pencil sets as soon as the sets are 
available, it was announced. Other entertainment was furnished by 
La Donna Harrell, and her accordian, for Xenia. 

# # # 






Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorcna Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies? 



Carbondale, 111., April -- It's a man's world again at Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

According to the latest report of Registrar Marjorie Shank, 
Southern has 356 men students, 675 of whom are veterans, and 665 
women students, of whom two were in service. This is the first time 
since the war that the men have outnumbered the co-eds. 

Of the 1,521 total registration, the largest class is that of 
the freshmen with en enrollment figure of 710. In descending rank 
are sophomores with 290, juniors, 233, and seniors, 192. 

In the College of Education alone are 900 students, 20 per cent 

more than the total student body a year ago. The College of Liberal 

- 
Arts and Sciences has 423 students, the College of Vocations an 



ri 



Professions, 193. 

Graduate students have increased to 49 over last term's 45, 
There are 14 irregulars, and 23 students unclassified. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummon auditor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April —Sherwood Eddy, noted author and lecturer, 
will address the Southern Illinois Normal University student body 
here Thursday morning during the weekly assembly hour. 

Brought to the campus by the Y.M.C.A., Dr. Sddy will speak on 
"The World --Crisis and Education." 

From his experiences and contacts with leaders of both World 
Wars, Sherwood Eddy has written some thirty books, many of which have 
been translated into various languages. 

Affiliated with the Y.M.C.A.for many years, Dr. Sddy served as 
the Asia secretary for the organization in his first appointment, and 
worked with Dr. John R. Mott in teaching the students of that 

continent . 

For the past few years, Dr. Sddy has been lecturing in colleges 
and universities throughout the United States, Europe and Asia. Three 
years ago he was here on the campus for a lecture to the student body. 



Carbondale, 111., April —One of --erica's leaders in dance 
education will be here on the Southern Illinois Normal University 

campus April 8. 

Dr. Anne Schley Duggan, director of the Duggan Modern Dance 
group which appears in concert hero Monday evening, April 8, in 
Shryock Auditorium, is nationally acclaimed for her leadership in 
dance --modern, tap, and folk. 

Her special training in dance came from the University of 
California, and from special study in all phases of dance in 
professional studios throughout the country. She has worked with 
various ethnological groups in New York and Colorado in her study of 

folk dance art. 

Author of many books and articles on dance, Dr. Duggan is in 
constant demand for the teaching of special short courses in camps • 
and institutes. Formerly on the staff at Columbia University, she 
has returned there several summers to teach in the field of dance. 



m 



Southern Illinois Normal University information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April 2 - The proudest girl in Illinois today 
is 16- year- old Marilyn Nelson, high school junior at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, who was "queen of the walk" at the world's biggest 
assemblage of scientists last week-end. 

Marilyn, chosen as the girl to represent the Illinois Junior 
Academy of Sciences at the annual meeting of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Sciences in St. Louis March 27-30, took the 
place by storm. 

She met and ta Iked with all . the top-ranking scientists of the 
country, including four Nobel Prize-winners, Dr. Joseph Erlanger of 
Washington University, authority on nerve impulses; Dr. E. A. Boisy of 
St. Louis University, discoverer of Vitamin K; Dr. Arthur Compton, 
cosmic ray genius; and Dr. Harold Urey, discoverer of heavy hydrogen. 

When honor guests were introduced at the Friday night banqued, 
Marilyn shared the applause e qually with three notable scientists -- 
Dr. A.. J. Carlson, retiring president of the AAAS; Dr. J. B. Canant, 
president of Harvard and new president of the AAAS; and Dr. B. S. 
Hopkins of the University of Illinois.. 

Marilyn' s invitation to attend the AAAS meeting carries with it 
a full year's honorary membership in the AAAS, with a year's subscript- 
ion to the association' s publications and to Science Newsletter . 

She was chosen on the basis of her outstanding work in science in 
University High School here and in the Junior Academy of Science. 

Also representing the Illinois Junior Academy of Sc:U,n.c<~ s was 
Ned Jefferson of University High School at Illinois State Normal 
University. Only other junior academicians to win this honor were boy£ 
from Virginia and Minnesota, 



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Southern Illinois ITormal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies: : 






Carbondale, 111., April —The world is "polarized" today by the only great 
powers remaining in existence — the United States and Russia, Sherwood Eddy, 75- 
year-old religious leader, philosopher, author, and lecturer, declared here today . 

Eddy addressed the student body at Southern Illinois ITormal University here 
at ^h& weekly assembly. 

Both the United States and Russia have "isolationist" tendencies and are 
"suspicious of foreign entanglements," he asserted. 

"Today we — the United States — are the rich reactionary country on the -fight 
which did not advocate freedom for the smaller countries at the San Francisco 
Conference," he said. "Instead of looking toward the United States for leadership 
in advocating freedom and tolerance, these smaller countries are now looking 
toward Russia." 

Eddy counted off four "great laws" — justice, brotherhood, liberty, and love< 

which must be obeyed if "w» are to build, a new man within and a new world without .'' 

The Anglo-Saxons have stood for liberty and for vital religious freedom, 
but have fallen down on justice and brotherhood, he asserted. Russia, on the 
other hand, fails on liberty and on religion, while standing prominently for 
justice and brotherhood of all men. 

He cited that Russia is "breaking the world's record" in education of her 
people, reporting that nine-tenths of the Russian people can read and write, and 
that nine-tenths of her youth are registered in the elementary schools. "There 
are more Russian youth in high school than England has ever had," he said. 

Pointing to the fact that 4 J million men were rejected as physically 
unfit by the United States army, and declaring th t this country "neglects 40 
million in poverty, beyond the reach of medical assistance," he deplored the 
existence of "billionaires and poverty" existing side by side in this country. 
"Don 1 t look down on Russia with contempt or patronage until we clear out 
our house," he urged. 

"What is our own educational system for but to raise leaders to build a new 
country on the cornerstones of justice, brotherhood, liberty, and love?" he asked. 
Dr. Eddy's visit here was sponsored by the T.oung Hen's Christian Association 
for which he served as secretary in Asia for many years. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummohd, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Attention: Sports Editors. 



Carbondale, Illinois, April -- The tennis squad of Southern 
Illinois Normal University successfully turned hack an invasion by 
the Washington Bears of b t, Louis on April 12 to the tune of 4-2, 

The Southerners, coached by Bill Freeburg, took three of the 
four singles matches and tho two teams split the two doubles matches* 

In the curtain raiser, Bruce Church (Carbondale) of Southern 
defeated Bill Ziervigel of Washington 3-6, 6-2, 11-9. 

Joe Pulley (Marion), second seeded Faroon, was beaten by Hill- 
topper C-eorge Hendry 2-6, 2-6 4 

The Preeburg-men got back in the win column again in the next 
two matches when Roy Leilich (Hew Athens) defeated Washington's Bob 
Pearson 6-2, 6-8, 3-6; and John Maguire (Carbondale) whipped St. 
Louis Ian Bill Muenz 2-6, 6-2, 6-3. 

in the doubles, it looked like an easy Southern win as Harry 
Meng (Belleville) and Lelich jumped on Bob Pearson and Bob Copelend 
to give the Maroons an easy 6-0, 6-0 win, but the Bears took the 
finale when George Hendry and Bill Ziorvogel took a 6-4, 6-4 victory 

from Church and pulley. 

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Carbondale; 111,, April -- Sv ow ing groat bursts of power in most 
events, the Southern Illinois Formal University thinclads romped to a 
99-3/4 to 31-1/4 victory over the Illinois State Normal Bedbirds on 
April 12 in MacAndrew Stadium. 

Howard had 10J points for the Birds to lead the individual point- 
makers; but he was closely followed by his team mate Wilson and also 
by Earl Robert and John Algee of Carbondale with 10 points each. 

The Southerners were able to rack up 10 wins and 7 "grand slams" 
to win their second straight dual conference meet of the current 

season. 

# # # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Informs tion Service 
Lorena Drummond,, Editor 

Special to southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, Illinois, April -- Two distinguished Illinois 
i ! r 
educators have accepted the invitation to address the graduating 

class of Southern Illinois Normsl University at commencement, 

President Chester P. Lay has announced. 

Dean Charles Gilkey, director of the Chapel at the University 
of Chicago, will deliver the baccalaureate address on Sunday, June 3, 
and Dr. William Spriegel, professor of management and director of 
the new ^,20, 000, 000 endowment for an Institute of Technology at 
Northwestern University, will deliver the commencement address at 
graduation exercises Friday, June 8. 

Both of these speakers were first choices of the senior class. 

.a il .ii ji 
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Carbondale, Illinois, April -- Dr. Douglas E. Lawson, professor 
of education in the College of Education at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, will discuss "A Proposed. Science Curriculum for the 
Public Schools," at a meeting of the psychology and education of 
the Illinois State Academy of Science, to be held in Normsl Nay 3. 

# # # # 



Carbondale, Illinois, April -- Dr. T. W. Abbott, dean of the 
college of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, has been invited to report on new developments in exist- 
ing services, graduate studies, workshop and correspondence study at 
the 21st annual meeting of the Teachers College Extension Association 
in Terre Haute, Indiana, April 26-27* 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Jorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 

lelease on receipt 



Carbondale, 111., April —Calendar for Southern Illinois Normal University for 
L946-47 has b*en approved by the Teachers College Board, University President 
Ihester F. Lay has announced. 

The fall term will start with registration on September 16 and 17, classes 
aeginning September 18; the winter term will open December 9 with a one-day 
registration and classes beginning December 10; registration for the spring term 
All be held March 24, classes beginning the following day. 

The 1947 summer term will run from June 16 through August 8. 

Thanksgiving recess will be observed November 28 and 29, and the Christmas 
recess December 21 through January 7. The nine-day spring recess will fall between 
the winter and spring terms. Commencement is scheduled for June 13. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., April —Recently elected to the Sphinx, highest honorary 
organization at Southern Illinois Normal University, were seniors Ernestine Cox, 
1st Frankfort; Gloria Barger, Harrisburg; Mary M ann, Pinckneyville; Betty G-rater, 
Sarbondale; and Florence Alston, Sparta. 

The five were selected on the basis of their unselfish and devoted service 
to the University through their active participation in student activities. 

Highest non-scholastic honor that can come to a Southern student, membership 
in the Sphinx Club is extended to a limited number of seniors and juniors each 
spring. Faculty sponsor of the group is Dr. Thomas F. Barton, geology and geograpV 

(iepartment chairman. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April — Dr. Ralph R. Pickett has been appointed 
visiting professor of business and economics at Southern Illinois 
Normal University for the 1946 summer term, President Chester F. Lay 
has announced. 

Dr. Pickett has been professor and head of the department of 
Co/merce at Kansas State Teachers College since 1929, according to 
Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and Professions, 
in which Dr. Pickett will teach here. 

A graduate of the Missourian v/esleyan College, he took the 
master of arts and the doctor of philosophy degrees from the University 
of Chicago, and has also taken specialized work at Drake University 
and the University of Wisconsin * 

After ten years' teaching in high schools and at Baker University 
in Kansas and DestCoines University, he joined the Kansas faculty. In 
the summer of 1931 he was a visiting professor at Harvard, and in 
the summer of 1940 was exchange professor at the City College of 
New York. 

He is the author of the--%ook p'eatures R epre s entative of the 
Bankin g Policies in Iowa , published by the University of Chicago 
press, and is co-author of Investment Prin ciples soon to be published. 

From 1942 to 1945 Dr. Pickett was in the Army Air Corps, first 
as a lieutenant, then as a Captain. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111,, April --Government students from Southern 
Illinois Normal University leave Friday noon for the Eighth Annual 
public Affairs Conference of Principia College where representatives 
from 125 universities and colleges have been invited to attend the 
two- day conference. 

Going from here are Betty Jule Bowen and Helen Mataya, of 
Kerrin, and Catherine Sullivan, Har-risburg, with Dr. W. G. Swartz , 
chairman of the government department. 

leaders in international affairs will speak to the students. 
Speakers include Dr. Enrico Fermi, leader in the development of the 
atomic bomb. A Nobel Prize winner in 1938 for his discovery of 
radioactive substances, Dr. Fermi has been at the University of 
Florence and Rome, and, since coming to the United States in 1939 
at Columbia University. Recently he joined the University of Chicago 
faculty. 

Harold E. Stassen of Minnesota and Dr. William Y. Elliott, 
professor of government at Harvard address the group Friday evening 
and Saturday morning. 

Dr. Swartz has been invited to address the Chester Women's 
Club en route to the conference. 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111., April — President Chester F. Lay of Southern 
Illinois Normal University will represent the University officially 
at the annual meeting of the American Council of Education, of which 
pie University is a member, May 3 and 4 in Chicaog. 

Dr. Lay will also participate in the University of Chicago 
Teachers College Conference April 29 and 30. He will be accompanied 
to this conference by Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education, who will also participate in the Workshop on V.orkshops 
ipril 50- May 2 % 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drum nonet, Editor 



3p 



ocial to Southern. Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April --promotions in rank have been accorded 
to seven faculty members at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
effective next fall, President Chester P. Lay has announced. 

Dr. W. B. Schneider of the English department and Dr. K. A. Van 
Lente of the chemistry department have been promoted from associate 
professorships to full professorships. 

Dr. Sina N. Mott in pre- school education and Dr. Victor Randolph 
in education (currently on the staff of the U., S. Veterans Guidance 
Center), have been advanced from assistant professorships to 
associate professorships. 

Kiss Anna K. Neufeld, instructor in languages, has been promoted 
to assistant professor, while Leonard Keefe .of the industrial 
education department and Willis E. Malone of the College of Education 
staff will be promoted from instructors to assistant professors 
contingent upon their continuation of graduate studies during the 

summer. 

These advances in rank were recommended by President Lay to the 
Teachers College Board at its recent meeting, and' received the 
board's approval, 

# #. # 



Carbondale, 111., April --Dr. Charles D. Tenney, professor of 
philosophy at Southern Illinois Normal University and administrative 
assistant to the president, has been appointed to the governing 
council of the American Institute for philosophical studies, and 
has been nsmed chairman of , the committee on awards. 

The committee on awards is expected to organize a nation-wide 
essay contest on some philosophical subject and to choose an 
appropriate award for the undergraduate and graduate students who 
compete in the contest. 



M. J I J£ 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Release on receipt 



Car oondale, 111., April -Recognition of university status for 
Southern Illinois Normal University has come from the Commission on 
Colleges and Universities of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary schools, University President Chester P. Lay 
has announced. 

Southern has been "promoted" from Group 2 to Group 4 in the 
Commission's membership rolls. 

Group 4, according to a letter from John Dale Russell, 
secretary of the commission, is composed of institutions offering 
the doctor's degree and institutions organized in four or more 
units which regularly offer the master's and/or professional degrees. 

"This advance in our accredited rating with the commission 
recognizes Southern's expansion into the university class, since we 
are now in the same classification with the larger state and 
endowed universities of this 20-state area," President Lay pointed 
out. 

"This rating gives us something to live up to," he declared, 
"for we must now conform to the highest standards of faculty, 
scholarship, and procedure." 

Since 1931 Southern has been accredited as a teachers college 
with the North Central Association In Group 2, which is composed of 
institutions offering only bachelors' degrees in one college. 
Southern's new rating acknowledges its qualifications in 
offering degrees in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Vocations and Professions, and the Graduate School, as 
well as in the College of Education. 






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Southern Illinois formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111-, April —On Saturday, April 27, the Southern Illinois Normal 
University track squad will journey to St. Louis where the Washington University 
Bears will play host in a dual meet. The affair was scheduled to be a triangular 
one, hut the University of Arkansas, the third member, withdrew, leaving it . 
strictly an Illinois-Missouri battle. 

The Southern Maroons will go into the fray with an untarnished record of 
three wins and no defeats for the current season, their wins coming at the 
expense of Western Illinois State Teachers College, Illinois State Formal University 
and Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College. 

The Washington Bears have just been subjected to a 125§ to 5§ defeat at the 
hands of the University of Missouri, which was probably the most one-sided affair 
in the history of the school, Coach Art Eilers declared. 

However, Leland "Doc" Lingle, Maroon track coach, is keeping his men in the 
best possible shape to vrithstcnd a possible "bouncing-back" by the Hilltoppers. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., April —In spite of the recent whitewash handed the Cape 
Girardeau Teachers, and their earlier season 4-2 victory over the Washington 
University Bears, Coach Bill Freeburg, Southern Illinois Normal University tennis 
mentor, freely expressed his fear of these same Bears when they play host to his 
tean on April 27. 

"We will have a tough time beating them again, especia ; ly if we have to play 
on tb© indoor courts," Freeburg declared. 

The Maroons will send a six-man squad on the St. Louis invasion, the same six 
men that handed the 9-0 setback to the Southeast Missouri Teachers. 

They are Bruce Church of Carbondale, Joe Pulley of Marion, Hoy Leilich of 
New Athens, John Maguire of Carbondale* Harry Meng of Belleville* and a sixth 
member to be named later. 

The matches are scheduled to begin at 2:00 P.M. at the Washington University 
Field House. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



KaiESKnHBHmHHHBii^HaMRniMnaaMBBi 
T f <->, . CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 

miormation bervice 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



r.arbondale, 111. April -- Trie souxnern Illinois normal urii.vc.r-- 
sity track team will open their season on April 6 here in Mac Andrew 
Stadium against the Western Leathernecks of Maeonbj Leila nd "Doc *' 
Lingle, Southern track coach, announced today. The first event will 
start at 1:30 P.M. 

Western is expected to put up a stiff battle as Southern can 
boast of only three members of the last years I.I.A.C. runner-up team. 
These are team captain Dick Avis of Chica.ro, ex- team captain Dick 
Harmon, of Granite City, and Earl Robert of Carlyle. Western is the 
only squad that has beaten Southern on the Carbondale track in the 
last twenty years, Lingle declared. 

However, the following lettermen have returned after military 
service: Jack Hayse of Denton; Charles Beatty of Benton; John Algee 
of Carbondale; Gordon Henrich of Gridley; and Louis Pechineno of 
Christopher. 

Lingle has posted the following tentative entries: 100- yard 

dash Gene Stotlar of Pincneyville, Dick Eggers of Chester, Algee; 

200-yard dash — Harmon, Carl Birkner of Pinckneyville , Algee y ,;/ 0- yard 

dash — Birkner, Harmon, Pechineno; 880- yard- run — James Gallatin of 

Carlyle, Pechineno, Avis; one-mile run--Glen Hamilton of Pinckneyville 

Bob Smith of Maris sa, Leonard Burden of Kerr. in. 

Two-mile run- -Hamilton, Smith, Don Sbeffcr of Ziegler; 120- yard 
high hurdle- -Charles Mauzy of Eerrin, Roy Raggdale of De Soto, Hayse; 
220-yard low hurdles--Beatty, Gene Davidson of Harrisburg, Eggers; 
shot put--Robcrt, Algee, Quentin Stinson of Eldorado; 

Discus--Robert, Algee, Stinson, Birkner; javelin— Robert, 
Davidson, Beatty; pole vault- --Uriah Walton of Cairo, Henrich; high 
jump-- Calvin Whiteside of Vienna, Stinson, Walton; broad jump- -Byron 
Turner of Herrin, Eggers, Beatty; one-mile relay-gentries to be 
announced later. 

jij-UI- J t U4U 1 -L'-' ' -L--4 

ii ITTilTli i: n u'W u'Ti 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Brummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies? 



Carbondale, 111., April -Southern Illinois Normal University's 
Bureau of Child Guidance will conduct its 41st psychological clinic 
with the Illinois Institute of Juvenile Research here April 9, 10, 

and 11. 

Working, with members of the University staff will be Dr. 
Sophie Schroeder, Chicago psychiatrist. Also participating in the 
staff ings are graduate assistants Mrs. Alice Rector and Herbert 
Johnson, and Carrie Thomas, student in clinical psychology. 

According to Dr. W. A. Taalman, director of i:he Bureau, five 
special staffings or case discussion have been scheduled for students 
and faculty attendance. 

Dr. Schroeder will speak Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons to 
to all students and faculty on "The Use of Projective Techniques in 
Diagnosis of Individual Cases," and serve as consultant in an open 
forum on techniques, procedures and therapy that may be used in 
solving problems of individual cases presented to her by the audience. 

No cases can be admitted for the April clinic except those for 
whom arrangements have already been made, Dr. Thalman declared. 
Barreled by requests for the clinic's aid, the Bureau has 
received a request from one school for the study of 50 cases, Dr. 
Thalman disclosed. Only a few of these could be accepted at the 
present time, but in many instances a later date was set for study 
of these individual cases. 

In addition to the aid given these mala justed children, the 
Bureau aids in teacher training for the students of education in the 
Universitv here. 



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77 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
For Relec.se Thursday 



Carbondale, 111., April- Nearly 150 Southern Illinois fruit 
rrowers were visiting the Southern Illinois Normal University campus 

today. 

Here for the annual meeting of the Illinois Fruit Growers Exchang. 
and the Fruit Exchange Supply Company, members of the two associations 
convened in the University's Little Theatre for a morning and afternoon 

session. 

Speakers at today's meeting included Charles B. Shaman, president 
of the Illinois Agricultural Association, George Ketager, field 
secretary of the I. A. A., and Alvin 0. Eckert of Belleville, president 
of the Illinois Fruit Growers Exchange. 

M- 4 44 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., April- Across the street from the Southern Illinois Itormal 
University campus stands Southern's Home Management House. 

The "Practice House," as it is more commonly called by the students, since 
1940 has provided the home economics majors with a practical method for learning 

home management. 

The eight room house is furnished comfortably and in general on the level of 
the average American home. It is supervised by Miss Gladys Babcock, assistant 

professor of home economics. 

The Home Management course is offered to home economics majors for six weeks 
during the spring term of each year. Prerequisite is a theory course in which the 
students study the skills involved in home management. The remaining six weeks of 
the term is spent off-campus in practice teaching. Students who complete a degree 
in this field are qualified to teach home economics under the Smith-Hughes program. 

Six girls are living in the "Practice House" at the present tine. They are 
Alma Farrar of Venice; Jane Swafforcl, West Frankfort; June Laurie, Gillespie; 
Marguerite Barra, Johnston City; Lois Lay, Carbondale; and Margaret Craig, Herrin. 

Financial responsibility for the house and utilities is assumed by the 
University, while food, entertainment, laundry, small home incidentals, etc., are 
provided for by a nana! weekly fee required of each girl. 

"When the girls move into the house," said Miss Babcock, "they organize the 
work and assign themselves to certain duties for a period of one week each. In _ 
this way they may take advantage of all the opportunities offered in the care of 
the home. In general, the different jobs seem to fall under the headings of host, 
hostess, housekeeper, cook, and assistants. 

"In these duties," Miss Babcock continued, "the girls invariably have the 

(more) 



2 
experience of directing the work of others and of teaching those who are not as 
familiar with the work required. 

"Hot the least of their training is in what I like to call «enotional climate.' 
It is one of our aims to solve any problems the girls nay have in getting along 

well together. 

"When they have finished the Home Management course, they have had a bit of 
experience in the management of tine, energy, money, and human resources," she 

concluded. 

In the immediate future, Miss Babcock would like to acquire a well-equipped 
laundry in the "Practice House." Later on, it is hoped that a baby can be 
temporarily "adopted," so that the hone economics students can study child care. 

In a recent survey of 44.0 colleges and universities in the United States, 
70 per cent were found to have hone management houses, while only 46 of these 
had adopted babies. 

Another plan for the near future is to expand this educational course to 
include students who are not hone economics majors, but are interested in the 
training it offers to eventual honenakers. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Attention: Sports Editor 

Carbondale, Illinois, April -- "The greatest right-handed hitter 
of all time" comes to Southern Illinois this month. 

Rogers Kornsby, famed major league baseball star, will be 
brought to Southern Illinois Formal University on April 23 to be the 
feature attraction in a three-hour baseball "school" sponsored by the 

Chicago Daily News. 

All grade and high school students in Southern Illinois, as 
well as all adult baseball fans, are Invited to attend this school, 
Glenn "Abe" Martin, Southern athletic director, has announced. 

Jack Ryan, sports editor of the Chicago Daily News, will 
accompany Horns by. 

Approval of Albert Willis, executive secretary of the Illinois 
High School Association, has been given to the school, Martin 
explained, so that high school players may attend without infringing 
upon the association's rules, 

Hornsby will be the guest speaker at a joint meeting of the 
Carbondale Rotary and Lions Clubs at noon. His demonstration of 
baseball techniques will be given on Southern's baseball diamond 
on W. Chatauqua Street. In the evening he will show motion pictures 
of notable plays by outstanding players In the major leagues and 
also movies of the 1945 World Series. 



'■■." ' 1UIJJJ.!- 
777'/" . "iT'ii 'ill!' 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April — Delrr.ar W. Olson, assistant professor 
of industrial education at Southern Illinois Normal University has 
just received word that his photographic print, "Hands in Clay, " has 
been hung in the 1946 St. Louis International Salon of Photography. 

The St. Louis International is one of the top-ranking salons 
in the world and in which amateur and professional photographers 
alike aspire to have their prints hung. More than two thousand 
prints from photographers in several countries were entered this 
year, out of which some two hundred were selected. 

Mr. Olson's print pictures the hands of a potter forming clay 
on the potter's wheel. The photo was taken while the potter was at 
work, raving a feeling of realism to .the cool moist clay and the wet 

hands. 

A side-light on the print selection is that this photo was 

judged in competition with those of Axel Bahnsen, internationally 

known pic torialist, and under whose tutelage Mr. Olson studied at 
the Dayton, Ohio Art Institute, 

The salon is now on exhibit at the St. Louis Art Museum. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April --Looking older and heavier, but still 
retaining his old form at the plate, Rogers Hornsby, former hitting 
star of the National League and manager of the St. Louis Cardinals, 
■went through his paces today at the plate and in the field before 
several hundred grade school, high school and college students at 
the Southern Illinois Normal University baseball diamond, 

Hornsby and Jack Ryan, sports editor of the Chicago Daily Times, 
which sponsored the one-day baseball school here, have just completed 
a tour of Mexico where Kornsby formerly managed the Vera Cruz club. 
According to "the Rajah," Mexican baseball is very much below the par 
of U. S. style as it compares to about class B baseball up here. 

Ryan described his meeting with one of the famour Pasquel brothers 
as very pleasant and highly educating. ' d e described Jorge Pasquel 
as a forceful and dynamic personality, highly educated and very 
strong-willed. 

Hornsby, sometimes called "the greatest right-handed hitter of 
all times," explained the fundamental points to follow, both while 
batting and fielding, to his enthusiastic. and cheering audience. 
Assisting him were his eon, Bill, who'wa,s recently discharged from 
the Marines, and Benny Meyer, former big leaguer. 

Ryan disclosed that when Hornsby came to the St. Louis Cardinals 
he weighed only 135 pounds, and that the Cardinals acquired him for 

# 

$500, a mere pittance in the baseball world. 

(more) 



-2- 



n^e Rajah," as Hornsby was dubbed by saorts writers, spent 23 

•a nnn wound up With the astounding lifetime 
.eers in the major leagues ana wound up 

■- nf 353 He was recently voted into baseball's "Hall 
batting average of .35b. ^e 

of Fame," located at Cooperstown, N. t.. * the annual meeting of 
soorts writers an honor held onl, by the greatest players in the game. 
1 , to6 n asked to name his greatest thrill in baseball, "the Rajah" 

^.A^r- H-.P c<+- Touis Cardinals in 
recalled the day when he was managing bne St. Louis 

,_ . +,„* .^Mn-ils and the New York Yankees, 
the 1925 -orld Series between .he C«^maiB *nu 

■ q]1 ti ed uo in the seventh inning of the seventh game 
The series was all hie a up w 

anQ the Yankees had heen peerless against Cardinal Pitcher Jess 
Haines, until Haines developed a blister on hie pitching hand after 

two men were out and walked three men. 

<r nf '-Y,c -ame ^nd sent in Groyer Cleveland 
Hornsby pulled Haines out ox one ime ana 

,. „ iipri The first Yankee 
„ n rt1 * p P te "as Alexander was caxlea. me 
Alexander, or ''old iexe, a.t> aj- 

to face Uc:< was hard hitting Teny Laaseri, but "old Pete" told "the 
Raj ah" that he would take cere of Lazaeri. The rest of that tale is 
Mstory, as Ale. went on to strike out taaseri and didn't allow 

4--1 +•** ninth inning when he walked the 
another man to reach base until tne ninth inning 

ever- dangerous Babe Ruth. 

- r1 ^p, oecond base and when Rath attempted to steal, 
Eornsbv was playing ^^ UL 

m wn -a »th< Hsiah" and hornsby ta-ged Ruth 
the catcher fired the ball >-0 uie «ji 

. fv; „4j.e -nd ending the game and the series, 
as he slid in, retiring tne sice ..nc. en. 

-- i v,ori -nn their first pennant in history. 
The St. Louis Cardinals had won tneii 

-■- --,- TTomsbv saVs that his second 
Getting back to the present a*}, g^V^^gsters at a baseball 

SSSS?S.^ and^lonch i^he technics of playing. 

i tand with two movies 
Hornsby & Co. concluded their Carbondale £ . accompanying 

shown at the Little Theatre on the Southern campu , 
explanations by "the Rajah.' u ^ 



77 TC 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111-, April —The Carbondale post of the American 
Legion Tuesday night, holding a joint meeting with Gamma Iota Alpha, 
Southern Illinois Normal University's student- veteran organization, 
voted unanimously to support the veterans in their pleas and plans 
for both emergency and permanent housing. 

Commander E. D. Barnes of the American Legion appointed a 
committee of businessmen and other interested persons which will 
cooperate with the G. I. organization to seek out suitable temporary 
housing for single veterans. Housing for married veterans will also 

be sought later. 

A plan for permanent housing was also discussed. A War Memorial 
in the form of a large dormitory was tentatively suggested, to be 
erected near the campus. .The initial funds would be raised by 
contributions from the various communities of Southern Illinois, and 
the remainder of the costs would be paid by a long range plan of 
self- liquidation. 

This Memorial Plaza would take much time and planning and the 
cooperation of all Southern Illinois, but would provide some of the 
much-needed permanent housing that is needed at the University, and 
would be a more fitting memorial to Southern Illinois veterans than 
one of purely ornament such as a statue or tablet, it was explained. 



It J!- U 

77' ft a 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Sp 



ecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April -- This year»s graduating seniors intend 
to both follow a precedent and at the time set a new one at Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

Following the tradition of leaving a gift to the university, the 
seniors voted last week to make their farewell monument in form of a 
cash gift— to start a nest egg for a proposed student union building. 

"We feel that such a contribution will be far more meaningful 
than any other gift we could leave", explained class president Jack 
Hedges of St. Louis. 

"As seniors, we realize what a student union center ^pould 
contribute to such a worthwhile p reject," he declared. 

iffntirTrrrif 



Carbondale, 111., April -- The Southern Illinois Normal University 
1946 track team is sprinkled with war veterans, it was announced by 
Leland "Doc" Lingle, track coach, as he released his teams schedule 
for the coming season. Between fifty and sixty men have turned out 
to compete for berths on the team, two and one-half times as. many men 

as turned out in 1945. 

Dick Avis of Chicago, Captain Dick Harmon of Granite City, Earl 
Robert of Carlyle, and Jim Upchurch of St. Louis comprise the letter- 
men from last year. 

The following veteran lettermen of former years have turned out 
for the team: (1942) Louis Pechineo of Christopher; (1942) Charles 
Beatty of Benton; (1942) Jack Hayse of Benton; (1941) John Algee of 
Carbondale; (1942) Ray Walker of Ewing; (1940) Norman Reames of 
Hurst-Bush, all veterans. 

The 1946 schedule is as follows: April 6 -- Western Illinois 
State Teachers at Carbondale; April 12 - Illinois State Normal at 
Carbondale; April 27 - Southern, Washington University, and University 
of Arkansas at St. Louis (triangular meet); Kay 3 - Eastern Illinois 
State Teachers at Charleston; May 10-11 — Elmhurst relays at Elmhurt 
relays at Elmhurst (tentative); Hay 18 - Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference meet at Normal; home and home meets with Cape: 
Girardeau Teac&ers (dates not set). 

Titrvrf-Wtnrtru 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena ^rummond, Editor 



Soecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Ca rbondale, 111., April -A new flying club is in the process of 
formation at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Interested students met this week under the leadership of 
Edgar Ellis, junior from East St. Louis, and discussed the 
possibilities for developing such a club. 

The club is open to any student interested in aviation whether 
or not he or she has had previous flight instruction. Objectives of 
the group are to provide flying opportunities for veterans who are 
licensed pilots or have had some instruction , and to secure pre- 
flight instruction courses at the University. 

David McNeill, operator of the Egyptian Flying Service located 
in Carbondale, offered instruction and the use of his field and 
equipment to the club at special low rates. 

"I am Interested in furthering aviation from the standpoint of 
making it practical for folks to use," he said. 

McNeill is prepared to give training for private pilot's license 
and also the commercial license, if there is sufficient demand. He 
informed the club that if the college were to set up a ground school, 
the veteran could get financial aid for the training. In addition, 
state scholarships are available. 

A number of faculty members arc qualified to give basic 
instruction of the typo needed. 

viifr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorona Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 

Carbondale, 111., April -Representative students and faculty of 
Southern Illinois Normal University will attend the Central Inter- 
Collegiate Association of Women on the Northwestern University campus, 

April 4-6. 

Guests of the Northwestern Women's Self- Government Association 
from Southern will be students Kathryn Alley of Sparta and Ihelma 
UcCarty of Flora; and faculty members Helen A. Shuman, dean of women, 
and Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, housing director. 

Meeting to discuss "what girls as individuals and groups can do 
to better the college community," the groups program calls for 
special discussions and general meetings on such topics as Student 
Government, Problems of the Campus, Sorority and Non-Sorority 
Relations, Problems of a Student Union, Rocreat ional, Cultural, and 
Health Programs, Student-Faculty Relationships, Honor Systems, and 

others. 

While attending the conference, the Southern delegation will 
see the annual style show which the Daily Northwestern sponsors. 

Several quite prominent speakers have been scheduled to speak to 
the group, among them radio commentator Clifton Utley. 

Students from Illinois, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Nebraska, 
Indiana, South Dakota, Michigan, low-.., and New York will participate 
in the conference. Other colleges an;:, universities from Illinois 
sending representatives include Illinois State Normal University, 
Western Illinois State Teachers College, and University of Illinois. 



J.UUUJ. 

inrmr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Release on receipt 



w 



Carbondale, 111., April --Appointment of faculty members for the 
1946 summer session and the 1946-47 session and of administrative 
staff members for the fiscal year beginning July has been approved 
by the State Teachers College Board, President Chester F. Lay has 

announced. 

President Lay has just returned from the board's regular spring 

meeting in Chicago. 

Final action on salaries for faculty and administrative staff 
as oostponed until the board's committee on salary schedules takes 
action concerning a uniform faculty salary scale for the five 
colleges and universities. 

"We necessarily submitted out proposed appointments, with 
substantial merit increases, within the framework of the present 
salary schedule," President Lay explained. "In addition, we called 
attention to the need for further Increases in some cases, for 
particular faculty members whose salaries were already at the 
ceiling for their particular ranks, 

"Salaries up the figures recommended under the present salary 
schedule have not been questioned by the board, so we feel sure 
that approval of these is only a matter of form. It is also hoped 
that the action of the board's committee, may make it possible to 
make some additional adjustments," 

The board's committee on faculty salary schedules was 
reconstituted awfi enlarged, Dr. Lay reported. General Robert W. 

(more ) 



-2- 

Davis of Carbondale was named to the committee in place of John Dill 
of Carbondale, retired, and Richard F. Dunn of Normal was appointed 
as an additional member. 

Other members of the committee are Russell Guin of Danville, 
chairman, and Dr. Preston Bradley of Chicago. The chairman of the 
board prank G. Thompson, State Direcbor of Registration and Education, 
and the secretary, V. L. Nickell, Superintendent of Public Instruction 
are of course ex-officio members of all board committees. 

Dr. Lay reported that recommended staff for Southern's auxiliary 
enterprises-- such as the cafeteria, the bookstore and the dormitory-- 
and employees (non-faculty) were also approved for the next fiscal 
year beginning July 1, both as to personnel and salaries. 

Southern's advisory committee of board members was reorganized 
at the Chicago meeting, Dr. Lay said, with the appointment of 
General Davis to replace Iv'r . Dill, and Mrs. Helen Rose Pegelow of 
Mat toon to replace Dr. Bradley. Lindell W. Sturgis of Metropolis 
was reappointed as chairman. 

Three new members of the board- -General Davis, L. M. Walker 
of G.ilman, and Ira Keans of l,"acomb--were attending their first 
meeting. All members of the board were present. 

# # # 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Release on receipt 



Carbondale, 111., April -At the request of President Chester 
F. Lay of Southern Illinois Normal University, the housing committee 
of the Stole Teachers College Board Is studying the legal aspects of 
whether Southern can borrow money for construction of dormitories 
and a student union building. 

President Lay, just back from a Teachers College Board meeting 
in Chicago, reported that he turned over to the board committee a 
photostat copy of the original law establishing Southern. 

This committee, appointed at /resident Lay's request and composed 
of Richard F. Dunn of Normal, chairman, Lindell ?.-. Sturgis of 
Metropolis, and Kiss Harriett A. I'dntire of Kendota, will do legal , 
research to see whether Southern is prohibited from borrowing funds 
for self-liquidating, projects. 

First legal advicd secured by Southern indicated that this 
institution, like its sister Institutions, could not undertake such 
a project, President Lay said. 

"Eowever, it is my hope that under Southern' s separate charter 
of 1369 an interpretation may be secured which would authorize us 
to borrow money os was done at the University of Illinois. 

"If we can obtain such a ruling, it will greatly facilitate 
our solution to the student housing problem. It would also enable 
us to provide a student union building as a recreational and student 
activity center for our students, a facility that is greatly needed." 



JJ. M M 

77- Tf tl 



:, I 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April --Co-eds living in the home economics 
practice house at Southern Illinois Normal University cut their 
calories one day this week to 1,500— the essential daily diet of the 
better-fed European peoples. 

By striking out bread for the entire day and substituting fruit 
for the orginally planned rice pudding, Jane Swafford of West 
Frankfort, hostess for this week, managed to bring Tuesday's menu 
down to the 1, 500- calorie mark. 

Both the practice house, where borne economics seniors out into 
practice the theories the- have learned in the classroom, and Anthony 
Kail girls dormitory, are bringing their menu in line with the 
government's Famine Emergency Campaign. 

The 35 girls living at Anthony Hall have already been eating 
wheat flour substitutes of commeal, oatmeal, soymeal, and rye flour. 

Fried foods are a thing of the past, and desserts are limited 
to fruits— no pastries, Miss Minnette Barber, faculty director of 
the dormitory, explained. 

"We serve meat only for dinner, and have fish one day a week," 
Miss Barber said. An extra vegetable frequently takes the place of 
bread, and butter is being served in half-pats for those who do not 
want a whole pat. 

At the practice house, the girls agreed to cut down on bread 
comsumption by' serving more potatoes and hominy grits, and by using 
buckwheat flour for pancakes which will take the place of cereals 
anc 1 toast, Fiss Gladys W. Babcock, assistant professor of home 
economics and supervisor of the practice house, explained. 

Pastries at the practice house will be limited to those 
absolutely required for training of each co-ed who takes her turn at 
cooking for the group, she said. 

A new group of students will move in at the practice house next 

week, Fiss Eabcock said, and will have the opportunity of making 
their own decisions about how to conserve food. 

# '■ ^ #J # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention: Shorts Editor 



Carbondalet 111.. April — Keeping up their winning ways, the Southern Illinois 
Normal University tricksters made it three in a row as they downed the Southeastern 
Missouri State Teachers at Cape Girardeau, Mo. on April 23 by ths score of 82 l/3 
to 48/23. 

The Southern Illinoisians, coached by Leland "Doc" Lingle, hund up seven 
first places and four grand slams to keep their undefeated record for the current 

season. 

The two other victims of Southern were Western Illinois State Teachers 
College and Illinois State Normal University. Their next foe will he Washington 
University on April 27 at St. Louis. 



Carbondale, 111. April — The Southern Illinois Normal University tennis squad 
took a trip to Cape Girardeau, Mo. on April 23 to battle the Southeastern Missouri! 
State Teachers, and when they came back, they had a 9-0 win chalked up in their 
record book. 

The Maroons, coached by Bill Ereeburg, hung the whitewash on their Southern 
neighbors by taking six singles matches and three doubles and never lost one 
set in the whole afternoons play. 

This win gives the Maroons a record of two wins against no defeats but 
they will h've to keep in good form when they invade St. Louis on April 27 to 
play a return match with Washington University Bears, their first victims of the 
current season. 

Cape G-irardeau will journey to Carbondale for a return match on April 30 
and then the Ereeburg-men will take on the University of Illinois "B" team on 
May 7, 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, Illinois, April -- By virtue of ten wins and one 
tie out of fifteen events, the southern Illinois Normal University 
track team defeated the Western Teachers of Maconb 95 to 36 in a 
duel track meet here on April 6. 

Cook of Western was high point man with twenty points while 
John Algee of Carbondale hod twelve, 

Leland "Doc" Lingle, Southern track mentor, was fairly well 
pleased with Southern's performance but stated that his squad 
would have to Improve greatly to beet Old Normal, the Maroon* s 
next foe at Carbondale on Friday, April 12. 

The results of the Southern-Western meet are as follows: shot 
put-- (43' 9") Earl Robert of Carlyle, Algee, Quentin stlnson of 
Eldorado; pole vault -- (10' 6") Cook of Western and Gordon Henrlch 
of Gridley (tie), Uriah Walton of Cairo; 

One mile run -- (4' 56,1") Glen Hamilton of Pinckneyville, 
Leonard Burden of Herrin, Petit of Western; 440 yard dash -- (55.1") 
Carl Dirkner of Pinckneyville, Stookey of Western, Louis pechineo 
of Christopher; 

Discus -- (128»6j) Stinson, Algee, Robert; 100 yard dash -- 
(10.4") Westfall of Western, Algee, Dick Eggers; 120 yard high 
hurdles -- (16.6") Roy Ragsdale of De Soto, Cook of Western, Jack 
Hayse of Benton; 

High jump — (5' 10") Stinson, Hayse, Calvin Whiteside of 
Vienna; 830 yard dash --(2'10.1") Jim Gallitan of Carlyle, Dick Avis 
of Chicago, Pechineno; 220 yard dash -- (22.9") Westfall of Western, 
Algee, Jones of Western; 

Javelin -- (152»5j tf ) Eugene Davidson of Harrisburg, Cook of 
Western, Charles Beatty of Christopher; two mile run -- (11*20.9") 
Hamilton, Don Sheffer of Ziegler, Burden; 

220 yard low hurdles -~ (25.3") Cook of Western, Eggers, Beatty; 
running broad jump -- (20'5t") Cook of Western, Byron Turner of 
Herrin, Jones of Western; relay — Southern. 



■■.,' ') 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drumaiond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies: 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111., April -The Southern Illinois Normal University 
tennis squad will open their current season v/ith a natch with 
Washington University, Tennis Coach Bill Freeburg announced today. 
The match will be held at Carbondale on April 12. 

Before the war, Washington University always had one of the 
strongest teams in this section and this will probably be. one of the 
toughest matches of the season, Freeburg declared. 

The remainder of Southern's schedule is as follows: April 13— 
Illinois State Normal at Carbondale; April 23-Cape Girardeau Teachers 
at Cane Girardeau; April 27— Cane Girardeau Teachers at Carbondale; 
Hay 11— the I.I.A.C. meet at Normal. 

Also tentatively scheduled but yet to be dated were matches with 
St. Bonis University and Evansville College, Freeburg said. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., April --Reprints of an article by a Southern 
Illinois Normal University senior which appeared in a national 
educational journal have been received by her professors here. 

Hiss Carolyn Stotlar of Eemn, who completed the work for her 
bachelor of science in education degree here in March >^nd is now 
studying at Merrill- Pslmer School in Detroit, was an assistant last 
fall and winter in the University kindergarten and nursery school here 

She made a research study of the 3- to- 6- year-old pupils' 
familiarity with simple numbers to find out how their arithmetic 
concepts grow, and wrote the results of her study for the Elementary 
School Journal published by the University of Chicago. 

It is quite a distinction for an undergraduate to have an artiol 
accepted by a national research publication, Dr. Sina M. MOtt, assist 
professor of pre- school education, points out. 

# # •# 






Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
L o r e n a Dr umm o n 6. , E d i t o r 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies: 



Carbondale, 111., Aprll--Vetcrans of this area arc taking 
advantage of Southern Illinois Normal University's testing program 
for college entrance requirement, and to enable them to speed up 
their college program, Dean of Men Arthur J. TerXourst reoorts. 

Some fifty veterans have taken the- General Education Development 
test on the high school level during the past month. Upon successful 
completion of the test the applicant as swarded his diploma from his 
local high school provided the test me ts its requirements for 
graduation. 

"The test has been a great boon to veterans since they cm thus 
enter college directly, rather than going back to high school," Dean 
TcrKourst pointed out. 

The GED test cells for proficiency in correctness and effectivenes 
of expression; Interpretation of reading material in the social 
studies, the natural sciences, ere literary material: and general 
ma thematic::'! ability, 

"Veterans ere elso taking the tests in subject natt-r over a 
large variety of fields," Dr Ter&eurst ssid. 

"For instance, many of them arc taking s test v/hich, if they 
pass, will excuse them from, the bt-yia.ning college course In English 
rhetoric. This examination is very difficult as the required scores 
are quite high," he explained. 

Almost half of the veterans t kiag this test meet the required 
score, according to the seen. 

rr 77' 77' 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummoncl, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111,, April—The doctor of education degree will be 
Conferred upon Howard E. Bosley, associate professor of education 
and director of the library at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
before or at the June convocation at Teachers College, Columbia 
University, according to word received here. 

Dr. Bosley' s thesis, "The Administration of Faculty Personnel 
in State Teachers Colleges," is a survey of philosophy and practice 
in such institutions of higher learning throughout the country. 

Early attracted by Dr. Bosley' s study, the American Association 
of Teachers Colleges asked him to work with a special sub-committee 
of the Association's committee on standards and surveys, and has 
asked to publish the thesis In book form for distribution to the 
185 member institutions in the association. 

Dr. Bosley has already received requests for advance information 
from college presidents and faculty committees* from schools in 
California, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Texas. 

The first complete study of its kind, Dr. Bosley' s thesis has 
already been reviewed at the Cleveland, Ohio, meeting of the 
American Association of Teachers Colleges. 

Presenting practices in the appointment and promotion of faculty 

members, and orocessos used to evaluate the quality of faculty 

services, the thesis also contains pertinent information about 

salary schedules, payment plans, retirement and emeritus status, 

tenure, pensions, and leaves of absence policies. There are 85 

tables included in the 214 page book. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April --Four concerts by world famous artists 
are scheduled for the 1946-47 season sponsored jointly by the 
Carbondale Community Concert Association and Southern Illinois Formal 
University, Mrs. W. A. Thalraan, president of the Association, has 
announced. 

Igor Gorin, baritone, is well known in radio, and has been 
guest artist at various tirr.es on the Firestone, Ford Hour, and 
Harvest of Stars programs. He records on Victor Red Seal • records, 

William Primrose is the most famous violist living today. 

Community Concert members this year will have the opportunity 
to hear the popular two-piano team, Vronsky and Babin. 

The Fox Hole Ballet, composed of 10 members and directed by 
Grant Mouradoff, was organized to perform for service men overseas 
during the war. The same personnel will make up the group to appear 
at Southern. 

Dates of the performances will be announced in the fall, when 
the artists' tours are mapped, 

# # 



■jj- 

T) 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbcndale, 111., April - Time for the track meet here Friday 
afternoon between the Southern Maroons and the Normal Redbirds has 
been set for 3 p.m., Track Coach Leland L. "Doc" Lingle has announced. 

In order that students may witness the meet— on the eve of the 
spring recess which- starts at the close of classes Friday- -the 
Advisory Council today voted to hold 30-minute classes on Friday 
afternoon instead of the regular 50-mInute periods. 

The Maroons anticipate stiff competition in the Friday cinder- 
path encounter. 

Last week, they defeated Western by a score of 95 to 36, taking 
10 of the 15 events. 

So far, no stars have emerged from the Southern squad, though 
Lingle claims his discus unit --puenton Stinson of Eldorado, John 
Algee of Carbondale, and Earl Robert of Carlyle~-are "mighty good." 
Algee rated No. 2 in the meet last week against Western, with 12 
points to his credit. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111,, April -Listing some 7,000 graduates of 
Southern Illinois Formal University, a new Alumni Directory has just 
come from the press and is being mailed to all former students for 
whom reasonable addresses are available, Dr. Orville Alexander, 
director of alumni services, has announced. 

Product of some ten years' effort on the part of University 
officials, the directory lists alphabetically end by classes all 
graduates of the institution since 1876, In the roster by classes 
the latest available address is given for each alumnus. 

President Chester P. Lay paid high tribute to the tireless and 
unselfish labor of W. G. Cisne, former director of the placement 
Service, who retired this year, in compiling material for the directory, 
and to Urs. Mabel Pull I am who assisted him last summer in preparing 
the material for publication. 

"Ur. Cisne deserves a great deal of credit for getting out this 
directory," the president pointed out. "We realize that we do not 
have recent addresses for many of our alumni, particularly those who 
have been in the armed forces, but hope that publication of this 
directory will enable us to bring our records up to date. 

"We would appreciate any information that can be sent us 
concerning our alumni, their present addresses and occupations. Such 
information should be sent to Dr. Alexander, director of alumni 
services. " 

Jl M- Jl 
77 if IT 



Southern Illinois N ormal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April -Twenty-five Junior High and High 
School students of the Allyn School on the Southern Illinois Normal 
University campus will attend the Illinois Junior Academy of Science 
Fee ting at Bloomington on fay 3-4. 

The students will present a one-hour program on "Historical 
Development of Atomic Energy." All 25 boys and girls will take 

part. 

In addition, Earilyn N elson, Carbondale, 16-year-old University 
High School girl, who was chosen as one of two official representatives 
of the Junior Academy to attend the recent American Association for 
the Advancement of Science Meeting, will give a report on that 

meeting. 

Also to attend the meeting are three students and teacher from 

Anna-Joncsboro high school, Dr. W. M. -Bailey and William barberry 

of the faculty at Southern, and two University students, Marian 

Hargis, Salem, and Irene Adams, Carbondale. 

£ M Ji- 
is Ti ii 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111.,, April -Southern Illinois Normal University 
will cooperate with the University of Illinois in its program to 
study ways of developing natural resources of this region and 
attracting new industries to the area, Southern President Chester 
F. Lay has announced. 

Appointed to serve on the 7-memher committee of Southern Illinois 
business leaders which will work with the University of Illinois and 
will be concerned with putting results of the study into effect in 
the various communities of this region is Dr, Henry J. Rehn, dean 
of the College of Vocations and Professions and professor of commerce 
at Southern. 

The Southern Illinois committee is composed of the following; 
0. W. Lyerla of Marlon, president of Southern Illinois, Inc., 
chairman; Oscar Schafale, bank president, Marion; Clyde Anderson, 
representing the Chamber of Commerce and the U.S. Employment Service, 
West Frankfort; S. L. Eoye, Herrin, the American Legion; Evan Dale, 
Carbondale, chairman, American Federation of Labor, District 37; 
George Wise, editor, Eurphycboro Independent and the Eerrin Journal; 
and Dean Kehn. 

Jl M M- 

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Southern Illinois Normal University; Information Service 
Lorena Drumw.ond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Release Tuesday 



Carbondale, 111., April --Looking for their third win in ass 
many starts, the Southern Illinois Normal University thinlyclads 
invade Cane Girardeau, Mo., to tangle with their old sports rivals, 
the Southeastern Missouri State Teachers, in a dual track meet on 
Tuesday, April 23, Coach leland "Doc ,! Lingle, Maroon track coach, 
anno unc e d Monday . 

The Southern Illinois Maroons have defeated Western Illinois 
State Teachers College and Illinois State Normal University in that 
order this season while the Missourians have participated on one meet, 
a triangular affair in which they were barely nosed out by Polla 
School of Mines of Rolla, Mo. 

All of the Southerners are in good shape and ready to go, Lingle 
declared. The men from Carbondale will be trying to reach peak form 
-as they will journey to St. Louis to meet Washington University and 
the University of Arkansas in a triangular meet on Saturday, April 27. 

-ii- ' -'(■ -Ji 

IT a a 



Carbondale, III. April —Six men will make the trip to Cape 
Girardeau on Tuesday, April 23, to take on the netsters of v 
Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College, Bill Preeburg, Southern 
Illinois Normal University tennis coach announced. 

Tie pla:/crs making the trip are Bruce Church of Carbondale, 
Joe Pulley of ^arion, Roy Leilich of Mew Athens, John Maguire of 
Carbondale, Harry Meng of Belleville, and a sixth member to yet bo 

named. 

Tie Freeburg-men will be looking for their second victory in as 
many starts as they defeated Washington University 4 to 2 on April 12. 

-M & 4 L 

IT II Ti 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Soecisl to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April 22— E. G. Lentz, professor of history 
and director of the Clint Clay Til ton Library of Lincolniana at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, has been appointed by the 
Convention Internation of the Rotary International as Secretary of 
Assembly of Youth Service. 

The Rotary International meeting will be held in Atlantic City 
June 2-7. Greatest organization of the Rotary, the International 
will be represented by 60 nations at the forthcoming meeting. Fore 
than 10,000 members from all over the world arc expected to attend. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Soecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April --reviewers are high In their praise of 
The Bridge of Years, ne~' r novel 'by May Sarton, who will be poet in 
residence at Southern Illinois Formal University during the summer 
term. 

The Bridge of Years, said the New York Herald Tribune in review, 
"is in effect a modern and very beautiful Pilgrim's Progress of a 
whole family achieved in no far-away terrain of a seventeenth century 
mystic's imagination but in the real and sordid world of Europe 
1910-1940." 

The review further stated that Hiss Sarton wrote with rich 
understanding this story of a Belgian family in the devastating 
period, and gave at least one brilliant answer to the often-asked 
question: What could any individual or family have done against 
the tide of Nazi-minded inhumanity and prejudice that were sweeping 
along toward total war. 

The warm and hunanly emotional story presents Paul Duchesne, 
philoso .her and writer who foresaw the approaching abyss, his 
courageous wife, Melanie, and their three daughters, in their 
preparation to resist the fingers of Fascism, anti-Semitism, and 
Nazism. 

A World War I refugee from Belguin, hiss Sarton also has 
written En counter in April, and Inner Landscape, poems, and The 
S ingle Hound, a novel. She spoke to the University student body 
here last November. 

Courses which she will teach this summer are "A Background for 
Modem Poetry," and "Tie Teaching of ^oetry, " to emphasize modern 
poets, the reading aloud of poetry, and "What Poetry Is About." 

-H .". Jl 

77 -.; TV 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111.,, April — Basis for work in the summer Rural Education 
Workshop, June 10 - August 2, on the Southern Illinois Normal University campus 
will he the new state course of study, Dr. E. R. Pair, dean of the College of 
Education, has announced. . 

Giving emphasis in the eight-week study to both the content of the state 
course and to ways and means of implementing the course, the workshop agenda will 
include class discussions, individual and group conferences, observations in the 
campus laboratory schools, and participation in a variety of other activities to 
be planned cooperatively by the staff and students. 

Outlined primarily for teachers of rural or village schools, and emergency 
teachers, the workshop is also planned for those teachers desiring to utilize 
school- community resources more fully and those wanting to exchange literature 
and swap ideas with others interested in curriculum planning. 

In addition, the course has been planned for rural supervisors and assistant 
county superintendents, according to the announcement. 

Directing the workshop this summer is J. Ward Dillow, assistant professor of 
rural education. Other staff members will include Dr. E. E. Hall, director of 
the curriculum laboratory, and Jean Eligor, supervising teacher in the Buncombe 
Rural Training School. 

Those interested in additional information concerning the Rural Education 
Workshop may write Dean Fair in care of the University. Students will enroll in 
the workshop on sunncr tern registration day, Monday, June 10. 

# ## ## 

Carbondale, 111., April — Students of Southern Illinois Normal University 

this week had the opportunity of receiving protection against typhoid and small 

pox at the Student Health Service here, 

A series of three typhoid vaccinations and a small pox vaccination were 
given to students, faculty, and employees desiring them by the two University 
pfeyeicians Dr. Marie A. Hinrichs and Dr. Eli Borkon. The service was without 
charge , 

Other vaccines and physical check-ups are given at various times during the 
year, 

###### ... 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April — A gift of $100 to the Lincoln Library 

" 

of Southern Illinois Normal University has heen made by C. T. Hough ten, 
president of the Good Luck Shoe Company and past president of the 
Business Hen's Association of Carbondale. 

E. G. Lentz, director of the library, said that most of the books 
have been purchased to the extent of the gift, although a few are yet 
to be bought. Several valuable volumes of Lincoln and on Illinois 
history have been added to the collection as a result of the Eoughten 
donation, 

Some time previously, a selection of 50 volumes once owned by 
the late P. B. Hines were given to Southern by his son Hemingway Hines 
Df Honolulu, a former student of the University. 

Southern's Lincoln library of 1950 volumes was a gift of Clint 
lay Tilton in 1944, and is conservatively valued at -p6,000. This 
figure does not include pictures and other articles related to Lincoln 
which are a part of the library. 

According to Mr, Lentz, Mr. Tilton, a retired newspaper publisher 
3f Danville, 111., was prompted to make the generous gift of his entire 
Library when, as president of the Illinois State Historical Society, 
le presided at a meeting in Carbondale In 1940. At that time he was 
greatly impressed with the possibilities for historical research at 
Southern. 

To this collection has been added several hundred volumes of 
jreat value, many of them on Illinois history. Other gifts were made 
irom the Dr. George L. Owen and Judge I!onroe Crawford estates of 
Sarion and Jonesboro. 



77 



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77 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Soecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April 26— ■•Southern Illinois Normal University's 

chapter of Gamma Iota Alpha, nation-wide student-veteran's 

organization, has adopted as a major objective the return of O.P.A. 

control of rent prices for all students of Southern, 
of H err in 
Paul Helms/ Southern's president of G.I. A., made this statement 

following the G.I. A. action: 

"At present, with no O.P.A. control, rent for students has gone 
beyond reason in most cases. With the large number of veterans 
already returned, and many more returning each day, the present rent 
prices are a serious problem to the student- veteran, whether he is 
married or single.- 

"Temporary housing for single veterans to be occupied next fall 
is being considered now; but suitable housing for all, Including 
married veterans, cannot be found until the entire rental situation 
is clarified and improved. 

"Up to now, nothing concrete has been done or promised that 
would alleviate the situation, but many influential persons are 
lobbying in many places for the veterans to get a square deal. The 

students themselves have been waiting and hoping for help to come 
from somewhere with solutions to their problems. 

"Gamma Iota Alpha proposes to take the initiative in 
crystal! zing student opinion on behalf of the restoration of rent 
control . " 

M ./-/ JJ. J± JlL M. 

Tf rr it 77" 7? rr 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Eorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111., April --Although being held to a 3-3 tie by 
Washington University on Saturday, April 27, the Southern Illinois 
Normal Universit3 r tennis squad will risk an undefeated record when 
the-: entertain the Southeastern Missouri Teachers from Cape Girardeau 
on April 30 on the Carbcndale cempns. 

The Maroons handed the Missouri an a a 9-0 whitewash at their 
last meeting on April £3 at Ccoe Girardeau, so the Indians will 
probably be looking for revenge on Tuesday. 

The Southerners were after their fourth win of the current 
season last Saturday, but they had to be satisfied with a tie as they 
divided the four singles end the two doubles matches with the 
Washington University Bears. 

The Maroons looked good in the first singles match with Bruce 
Church, a Carbondale product, handily defeating Bill Ziervegel 6-3, 
3-6. The Bears bounded right back in the second singles match as 
Killtopper Bill Hendry, rated No. 2 singles star in England before 
he entered the service, soundly whipped Joe Pulley of Marion, 8-6, 
6-2. 

The Southerners bounced back into the lead again as Roy Leilich, 
of New Athens, troused St. Louisian Bob Pierson 9-7, 6-1. Eowever, 
the Bears tied it up again as Bob Copeland defeated John Maguire of 
Carbondale 6-3, 6-4. 

All knotted up, the two teams entered the doubles and it looked 
bad for the Maroons as 7-lerveccel and Hendry combined forces to defeat 
top- seeded Church and Pulley 6-4, 6-2; but the Southerners managed 
to settle for a tie as Leilich and Harry Meng, of Belleville, grabbed 
the finale in three sets 8-6, 0-6, 9-7. 

# # # 



Carbondale, Til., April --Glenn "Abe" Martin, coach of the 
Southern Illinois Normal University basket ball team which won the 
IIAC championship and the Kansas City Tournament, is having his 
calendar flooded! with requests to talk about his championship team 
before Southern Illinois civic groups. 

Recently Martin has appeared before the Lions Club at 
Carterville and at Fairfield and before the Rotary Club at Freeburg 
and at Highland. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April -- Looking for their fifth win in as 
many starts, the Southern Illinois Normal University tracksters 
will entertain the Southeastern Missouri State Teachers in a dual 
meet on April 30 at Mac Andrew Stadium. 

The Maroons whipped Washington University 89-^ — 41 3/4 for 
their fourth win of the season on April 27 in St. Louis. John Algee, 
of Carbondale, captured the scoring honors of the day as he donated 
14 points to the Southerner's cause. 

Yihen the Southern Illinois Maroons, coached by Leland "Doc" 
Lingle, invaded Cape Girardeau last April 23, they came back with a 
82 1/3 — 48 2/3 win in their record books. The Lingle -men will be 
looking for a clean sweep over their Missouri neighbors when the 
two squads tangle again, this time on the MacAndrew Stadium track in 
Carbondale. 

So far this season, the. men from Southern Illinois have claimed 
the Western State Teachers, State Normal, Cape Girardeau, and 
Washington University for their victims. 

§###* 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Soecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April -- San Jose scale is an ever present 
menace to fruit trees of Illinois, and is especially severe in the 
Southern third of the st..,te, according to a report by Stewart C. 
Chandler, consulting entomologist for Southern Illinois Normal 
University, and field entomologist for the Illinois Natural History 
Survey, 

Apple and peach especially may require annual spraying in order 
to hold it in check, Chandler points out, 'Hie Survey examines from 
150 to 200 orchards each year, about equally divided among apple 
and. peach, in the principal fruit growing counties of Southern 
Illinois. 

In the 15- year period of 1950-1944 there were high peaks of 
infestation about every third year. During these ye:rs from 40 per 
cent to 50 per cent of the apple orchards and from 58 per cent to 
72 per cent of the peach orchards had "moderate to severe" 
infestations. Those years were 1931, 1954, 1937, and 1944. 

Infestations in peach orchards are almost always higher then 
in apple orchards. This is true not only in orchards side by side 
but also in those interplanted, peach and apple together. Factors 
which may play a part in this condition are the differences in plant 
susceptibility, and oils and sprays which are applied for various 
insects more frequently to apple than to peach. 

According to the Survey, variations from year to year may be 
due to winter mortality, length of breeding season, parasites and 

( mo re ) 



predators, and control by the grower. Appreciable numbers of the San 
Jose scale are killed each winter by low temperatures, the counts of 
survival ranging from 2 per cent to 75 per cent by spring, after 
the cold of winter has passed. 

San Jose scale reproduces as long as the weather is reasonably 
warm. It may be found in December, following mild weather in 
November. At other times there is little after November even in the 
extreme southern acres of Illinois. 

Parasites and predators is a very important factor for in some 
years big percentages have been found destroyed by their insect 
enemies. It has frequently been found that the increase in the host 
insect will bring about so great an increase in its enemies that it 
is reduced to a point that results in lack of food for the parasites 
in which case the parasites and predators die off themselves. 

Growers do a thorough job of spraying during peak years but at 
other timer may not realize the seriousness of the situation since 
San Jose scale Is hard to see unless massed by thousands. It is 
possible that the special efforts made by growers to reduce the 
population is another factor in these periodical fluctuations. 

M £ 4 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond* Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April — Many points of historical interest in Southern 
Illinois will he visited hy the Illinois Historical Association under the direction 
of John W. Allen, curator of the Southern Illinois Normal University Museum, on ' -. 

May 11. 

A guide booklet containing their mapped route is "being prepared in its entirety 
hy Mr. Allen, Lorraine Waters of Percy, graduate student and Allen' a research 
assistant, and Doris Morgan of Sparta, student artist. Pen and Ink sketches and 
short descriptions of each destination point will make this publication "both 
colctfful and unique. 

Hardin, Pope, Saline, and Gallatin counties will be best represented on the 
one-day trip. Some of the historical landmarks that the Association will view are 
the first Masonic organization site in Illinois, located at Equality; Old, and 
New Shawneetown, with its Hickory Hill Cemetary; Nigger Springs; Indian Mounds; 
Ford's Ferry Road; Cave-in-Rock; Rose Hotel in Elizabeth town; Government Dam #51; 
the Illinois and Martha iron furnaces; Harrisburg; Mitchellsville> and many others. 

Prom the short descriptions in the guide book come these samples of Illinois 
history which the group will see firsthand: 

Thacker's Gap is located among a range of hills that proved to be a great 
hindrance for immigrants crossing the Ohio and going north and east. It was one 
of the few passages and played a part in the growth of Elizabethtown. 

Pounds' Hollow is located in southern Gallatin County about three miles west 
of State Highway #1. A mesa-like formation near Pounds' Hollow has sides which 
are almost precipitious except for the narroi* neck at the south. Across the narrow 
part, settlers found a substantial stone wall which they thought was a fortification 
of an earlier race. 

Mr. Allen suggests that it might have been a game enclosure, or that it might 
have been built by earlier whites. Four other similar structures exist in Southern 
Illinois. Pounds 1 Hollow has been dammed and has resulted in a beautiful lake. 

The Old Slave House is on the crest of a hill one-half mile southwest of the 
intersection of Highways # 1 and # 13. It is a three-story frame house with brick- 
filled walls. The first two floors were used by the owner, John Crenshaw, as his 
home, and the third floor as quarters for slaves which he kept to work in the salines 
he had leased. There are small closet-like rooms containing shelves or bunks about 
20 inches wide and 6 feet long, once used as beds for the slaves* 

# # # 



3 p.tt.i.-tc' :■:.■:: -:>r.-t ■■>'<: 



i''.r 



ht 



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t..'l 



i . 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., April — The dual track and tennis meets, 
scheduled to be held at MacAndrew Stadium between Southern Illinois 
Normal University and Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College 
on April 30, were postponed because of rain, Leland "Doc" Lingle 
and Bill Freeburg, Southern Illinois track and tennis coaches 
respectively, announced. 

Although the future date for the battles is indefinite, the 
Cape Girardeau Indians will invade Carbondale to revenge for the 
82^ - 48 2/3 defeat suffered in the last track meet, and also to 
attempt to reverse the 9-0 whitewash handed them b3^ the Maroons 
tennis squad. 

The Southern Illinois track record stands at four victories 
and no losses for the current season while the tennis squad had 
written three wins and one tie into their record books this year. 

The Maroons tracksters have breezed to victories over Western 
Illinois State Teachers College, Illinois State Normal University, 
Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College, and Washington 
University. 

The Southern Illinois tennis squad has successfully turned 
back Washington University, Western Illinois State Teachers College, 
and Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College, while being held 
to a tie in their last meeting in a return match with the 
Washington University Bears. 



*. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Saturday 



Carbondale, 111., May 3 --Groans and cheers were rife on the 
Southern Illinois Normal University campus these last few days 
as students and faculty prepared to go on daylight saving time 
Saturday, May 4. 

Bus schedules here will remain on standard time, so students 
are having a hectic time figuring out the time lapse as they leave 
their residence halls to go home for the week-end. 

"I'll get home before I leave here," one co-ed quipped. 

For example, Harrisburg also is on daylight saving time, and 
apparently so is the bus station there. One student figured it 
this way; "I leave here at 5:05 in the afternoon and don't get 
to Harrisburg until 7:45, two hours and forty minutes. But coming 
back, I leave there at 10:05 and get here at 10:45, only forty 
minutes. " 

"We'll all h ve to carry two watches," still another declared. 

"We'll have to come in from dates an hour earlier," a comely 
blond mourned. "But we'll start an hour earlier," her roommate 
countered. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Attention Sports Editor 

Release Monday 

Carbondale, 111., May --The Southern Illinois Normal University 
tennis squad will be trying to get back on the victory trail when 
they journey to Champaign, 111. on Tuesday, Kay 7, to tangle with 
the University of Illinois "B" team, their last match of the 
season before the I.I.A.C, meet which will be held on Kay 11 at 
Normal, III. 

Track coach Bill Fretburg is sticking by his guns as he plans 
to send the same six-man team to face the Ulini "B™ s that have 
recorded three wins and one tie so far this season. They are 
Bruce Church of Karissa, Joe Pulley of Marion, John Maguire of 
Carbondale, Harry Meng of Belleville, Roy Lielich of New Athens, 
and a sixth choice yet un-namod.. 

This group has successfully turned back Washington University 
4-2, Illinois State Normal University 7-0, Southeastern Missouri 
State Teachers College 9-0, and they gained a 3-3 tie with 
Washington U. in their return match. 

The return match with Cape Girardeau, which was scheduled 
for April 30 and which was rained out, has been permanently 
canceled, It was announced. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111,, May --Allotment of 100 additional family 
dwelling units for student veteran housing to Southern Illinois 
Normal University by the Federal public Housing Authority will 
brine Southern's total to 155 such units, President Chester p. Lay 

reports. 

Announcement of the 100-imit allocation was made in Chicago 
Wednesday by Orvil R. Olmsted, director of region III for the FPPIA. 
This number is in addition to the 55 earlier allocated to Southern. 

"The Federal Government requires that these units be located 
at Federal-owned properties, if such properties are available 
within 25 miles of the university," President Lay pointed out. 

"This means that these units if accepted by the State would 
be located at the Illinois Ordnance plant at Crab Orchard. 

"It is proposed to convert certain buildings at the ordnance 
Plant into family dwelling units,", he explained. "Considerable 
expenditures by the State of Illinois would be required if these 
units are to be secured for University students, although it Is 
expected that the Federal Government itself would spend several 
times that amount-in addition to any State funds that might be 
expended- in making the units available." 

The University has worked out arrangements with the FPHA to 
turn over to the University the dormitories at the ordnance plant 
for housing some 200 student veterans, and only acceptance of this 
agreement by the State of Illinois remains before the negotiations 
can be completed, President Lay said. 

The University president said, he would confer next week with 
members of the University's advisory committee of the State Teachers 
College Board, in regard to the ordnance plant housing project, and 
hoped that contracts could be signed shortly. 

£ /'- 4 

77 7/ 77 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Fay — Recognition for the University High 
School at Southern Illinois Normal University came this we el When 
a University of Hawaii professor, John C. Everly, spent two days 
here studying the system in preparation for his doctor's thesis 
on secondary schools. 

Now at Ohio State University where he is working on his 
doctorate in education, Mr. Everly has been in charge of the 
University of Hawaii elementary practice schools for some time, 
but at present Is on leave-of- absence for his graduate study, 

Mr. Everl3?- was particularly interested in the core curriculum 
method employed here in the social science classes under the 
direction of Miss Gladys L. Smith, assistant professor in the 
laboratory schools. 

Attracted here by Miss Smith's article on social science 
teaching which appeared in the 15th Yearbook published in 1944 
by the National Council for Social Studies, Mr. Everly said his 
graduate instructor, Dr. Harold B. Alberty, head of the Ohio 
State University campus schools had recommended he study the 
laboratory schools here. 

After leaving here, Mr. Everly went to visit the University 
of Chicago laboratory schools, 

# .# # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May --The Southern Illinois Normal University 
tracksters made it live in a row as they took a 77-^ to 53§ decision 
from the Eastern Teachers up at Charleston, Illinois on hay oh 

High point man for the day was Hudson of Eastern with a total 
of 14 points, closely followed by John Algee of Carbondale who had 
13 markers. 

The Southerners scored three grand slams and gained seven 
first place positions to make the cold, rainy day look a bit 
brighter as they completed their regular track season, leaving 
only the Elmhurst Relays on May 11 and the I.I.A.C. meet on hay 
18 yet on the record. 

During the course of the season, the Maroons have whipped 
Western Illinois State Teachers College, Illinois State Teachers 
College, Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College, Washington 
University, and now the Easterners can be added to the list. 

jj.ji.ji 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111. May--Fif teen men will carry Southern Illinois 
Normal University's banners when they journey to Elmhurst, 111. 
on May 11 to participate in the Elmhurst Relays together with 24 
other colleges and universities of the midwest," track coach Leland 
"Doc" Lingle announced. 

The Southerners are expected to have a tough time of it when 
they tangle with the cream of the middle west crop. "Although we 
have a well balanced dual meet team, the task of placing high in 
the Elmhurst events will be very difficult," Lingle declared. 

The Maroons making the trip are John Algee of Carbondale, Dick 
Avis of Jo|inston City, Carl Birkner of Pinckneyville, Charles Eeatty 
of Benton, Leonard Burden of Berrin, Gene Davidson of Harrisburg, 
Dick Eggers of Chester, Jim Gallitan of Carlylc, Glen Hamilton of 
Pinckneyville, Dick Harmon of Granite City, Jack Hayse of Benton, 
Louis pechineno of Christopher, Roy Ragsdale of DeSoto, Earl Robert 
of Carlyle, and Quentin Stinson of Eldorado. 

This will be the last competition for the Maroons before the 
I.I.A.C. meet which will be run off at Normal, 111. on May 18. The 
Lingl e-m.cn have done alright for themselves so far this season, 
Having a record of five wins and no losses in their dual affairs. 

During their clean sweep this season, they have met and defeated 

Western Illinois State Teachers, Illinois State Normal University, 

Cape Girardeau Teachers, Washington University, and Eastern Illinois 

Teachers, and all of their meets have been decided by sizable scores. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Kay --A third allotment of 31 family housing 
units for veterans brings Southern Illinois Normal University's 
total to 186, President Chester P, Lay reports. 

Two earlier allotments from the Federal Public Housing Authority 
were for 55 and 100, repectively. 

The first groups of family horsing units are earmarked to be 
made available at the Illinois Ordnance Plant If dormitories at 
this property are turned over to the University for veteran housing, 
but is is hoped that the third group may be made available here in 
Carbondale. ■ 

Negotiations are still going forward for acquisition of the 
ordnance plant dormitories, subject to approval by the State of 
Illinois of terms of the agreement proposed by Federal government 
agencies controlling the ordnance plant properties. 

41 41- S 

ll II II 



Carbondale, 111., Kay --The Journal of the Illinois State 
Historical Society, --arch, was high, in its praise of "Jackson 
County Notes,'" a county history ^0" John VJ. Allen of Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

Allen Is curator of history for the University Museum of 
Natural and Social Sciences. The 53-page booklet also includes 
a pictorial' map drawn by Loraine "Titers of Percy. 

Of the Jackson County Notes, the j ourn al states: "The map is 
divided into squares and the text gives a brief history of the 
territory in each square. This booklet, printed b; 7 the State of 
Illinois, might well serve as a model for similar projects in other 
counties. " 

■M J- 41 

II il II 



Southern Illinois Normal university Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111., May -- Five games of Southern Illinois Normal 
University's eight-game fall football schedule are to be played at 
home, Coach Glenn ("Abe") Martin has announced. 

Southern, runner-up in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference gridiron tourney last year, will plav the following games 
in 1946: 

Kirksville (Mo.) Teachers College at Carbondale 
Cape Girardeau(ho. ) Teachers College at Carbondale 
Illinois State Normal University at Nonaal 
Arkansas State at Carbondale 

Western Illinois Teachers College at Macomb 
Eastern Illinois Teachers College at Carbondale 
Evansville (Ind.) College at Evansville 

Northern Illinois Teachers College at Carbondale 
Prospects for Southern's fall season look pretty good, Martin 
confesses, for all of his 1945 stringers are expected to be back in 
school. Not a single one of last season's team graduated. The great 
majority of them were playing their first season of college football, 
only three lettermen being on deck, 

Martin's three all-conference stars -- Sam Milosevic!! of Zeigler, 
left tackle; Lcedio Cabutti of -Johnson City, right end; and Gene 
Stotlar of Pinckneyville, right half -- are at present expected to 
return to Southern this fall* 

# # # # # 



September 28 
October 5 
October 12 
October 19 
October 26 
November 2 
November 9 
November 16 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May --In weather more suitable for football, 
the Southern Illinois Normal University track representatives grabbed 
off fourth place in the Elmhurst Intercollegiate Invitational Meet 
held at Elmhurst, Illinois on Saturday,May 11. 

The Maroons wound up the day's activities with 25 points, beaten 
only by Bradley Tech, in third place with 29 3/4 points, bheaten 
College, in second place with 42 points, and "estern Michigan State, 
the winner of the' meet with 50 3/4 points. 

Southern's only first place winner- during the contest, in which 
25 colleges and universities of the midwest participated, was 
Quentin Stinson, of Eldorado, who won the first slot in the discus 
with a distance of 133' 3 3/4", -giving him five points for the day 
and also a tie for second place In the Southern individual scoring 
column. 

The Maroon* s high point man of the da3 r was Earl Robert, of 
Carlyle, who contributed six points to the Maroons' cause. Pobert 
placed third in the discus and third in the shot put. 

Tied for second place scoring honors with Stinson was John 
Algee, of Carbondale, who took third place in the 220-yard dash, 
fifth place in the shot put, and fifth place in the 100-yard dash., 

Charles Beatty, of Benton, had four points as a result of his 
placing third in the 220 yard low hurdles and fifth in the 120-yard 
high hurdles. 

Dick Sggers, of Chester, had one point by virtue of placing 
fifth in the 220 yard low hurdles, and the relay team, consisting 
of Dick Avis of Johnston City, Dick Harmon of Granite City, Carl 
Birkner of Pinckneyville, and Louis Pechineno of Christopher, made 
the final contribution of two points to the Maroons' account by 
finishing fourth in the relays. 

The next event on the track calendar is the 1,1. A. C, meet 
scheduled, for hay 1G at Normal, Illinois. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention: Sports Editor 



Carbondale, 111., May --Looking for the victory trail once 
more, the Southern Illinois Normal University tennis squad will 
entertain the Southeastern Missouri State Teachers College of 
Cape Girardeau in a return match on Tuesday, May 14. At their 
last meeting, on April 23 at Cape Girardeau, the Maroons hung it 
on their Missouri neighbors with a 9-0 whitewash, so the 
Missourians will probably be looking for revenge at this meeting. 

Since the last meeting of these two teams, the Maroons, 
coached by Bill Preeburg, have had tough sledding. They were 
held to a 3-3 tie by Washington University and were defeated 3-2 
by the- University of Illinois "B" squad. 

This return match with Cape Girardeau was originally scheduled 

i 

for April 30 but was postponed because of rain. This match is 
being played off to give the Maroons a chance to get into 
condition before the I.I.A.C. meet to be held at Normal, 111. on 
May 13, Preeburg said. 

The same six men who have hung up a seasons record of three 
wins, one tie, and one loss will be on the firing line come May 
14, Preeburg announced. They are Bruce Church of Marissa, Joe 
Pulley of Marion, John Maguire of Carbondale, Harry Meng of 
Belleville, Ttoy Leilich of New Athens, and one yet un-named 
member. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 

Carbondale, 111., May --Proving that their earlier season win 
was no fluke, the Southern Illinois Normal University tennis squad 

again whitewashed the Southeastern Missouri Teachers of Cape 
Girardeau, Missouri, 9-0, in a return engagement here at Carbondale 
on May 14, 

The Maroons, coached by Bill Freeburg, bounced back out qtf 
their recent slump with a bang as they poured it on their Missouri 
neighbors. The next activity on the tennis schedule is the I.I.A.C* 
meet which will be held at Normal, on May 13. 

In the Cape Girardeau match, Bruce Church of Maris sa opened the 
afternoon with a 6-0, 6-0 whitewash over Moron. Then Joe Pulley of 
Marion duplicated the feat by downing Hicklin 6-0, 6-0. 

Roy Lielich of New Athens was not so harsh with his Missouri 
opponent Chapman, and defeated him 6-2,6-1, and John Maguire of 
Carbondale was extended for three cantos before whipping Foard 6-0, 
3-6,6-3. 

In the last two singles matches, the Maroons made it unanimous 
as Harry Meng of Belleville won over Evans 6-1, 6-2, and Q. D. 
Miskell of Carbondale beat Courtway 6-4, 6-0. 

The doubles matches found Church and Pulley paired against 
Moran and Hicklin, and when the dust had settled, Southern had 
victory number seven to the tune of 5-4, 6-2. 

In the second doubles, things went practically the same way 
as Meng and Lielich whipped Foard and Evans 6-1, 6-2, but in the 
finale, Maguire and Miskell were extended in an exciting three-frame 
affair by Chapman and Courtway, but the Maroons made it a clean 
sweep as they won 3-6, 6-4, 7- 5 • 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale,Ill. ,May --A new high school principal for the 
campus laboratory school has been appointed to the faculty of 
Southern Illinois Normal University here, President Chester F, Lay 
has announced. He will assume his duties next fall, 

Mr. Mees will also hold the rank of assistant professor in the 
College of Education, according to Dr. E. R.Fair, dean of the college, 

A graduate of Southern in 1931, Mr. Fees holds the master's 
degree from the University of Illinois and has completed additional 
graduate study at the University of Chicago, the University of 
Missouri and the University of Indiana. 

For the past seven years he has been at Thorton Township High 
School at Harvey, Illinois, where he was assistant principal, He 
is married and has two sons, six years and seven. months respectively, 

"He comes to us with very high recommendations concerning his 
administrative ability and guidance work with high school students," 
Dean Fair pointed out. 

The University High School at Southern, which serves as a 
laboratory school for University students training to become high 
school teachers, for the past year has been in the charge of Dilla 
Hall, assistant professor and acting principal. Next year Mr, Hall 
will spend half-time teaching and half-time in research in order 
to complete his doctoral degree. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., May --Miss Ruby Matthews of Orient, who 
will graduate from Southern Illinois Normal University in June, has 
been appointed a faculty assistant in the Placement Service. 

Miss Matthews is a commerce major and h*;s had four years' 
experience in placements work. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 

Carbondale,Ill.,May --Representatives of Southern Illinois 
Normal University to attend the Egyptian Round Table of Industrial 
Education meeting at Mt. Vernon May 13 will be J. Henry Schroeder, 
chairman of the industrial education department, and Delmar Olson 
and Robert W. English, assistant professors of industrial education 

here. 

The group will visit the high school shops of Mt. Vernon, and 

make an inspection of surplus shop supplies. 

"War Plants Surplus Equipment and Supplies" and "Pending 
Federal Legislation Affecting Industrial Education," are two subjects 
which are up for discussion. 

School administrators are invited to attend this meeting, 
according to Mr. English, who is secretary of the organization. 



m 



Carbondale,Ill.,May —Listed in the 1946 edition of Who^s Who 
in Chicago and Vicinity is David S. Mcintosh, associate professor 
of music at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Mcintosh became associated with Southern in 1927. He is 
collector of Southern Illinois folk songs and has published "Songs 
of Southern Illinois Folk" in 1940, and "Singing Games and Songs 
from Southern Illinois" in 1942, 

### 

Carbon dale, 111., May —A pre-war tradition will be re-established 
on the southern Illinois Normal University campus Thursday night at 
7:50 when the social fraternities and sororities hold their first 
Inter- fraternity Sing in three years. 

Following the custom, the participating groups will give three 
numbers as they informally gather on the steps before Shryock " 
Auditorium. One of the songs will be a popular favorite, another, a 
semi-classical piece, with the third being an organization song. 

An award will be presented to the group which is judged to-. give 
the best performance. During the evening, a plaque will be presented 
to the"most valuable fraternity ^an of the year." 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Release Friday 



Carbondale, 111,, May 16 -G-. I. Alpha, veterans organization at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, today hitched up its "belt and started a 
4-own-to-earth movement to find out what student veterans think and to channel 
that thinking into action* 

Yesterday, the organization elected new officers for next year* a n& today 
new president Dale Andrews of Mt. Carmel laid "before the veterans at student 
assembly seven major topics:. 

(1) veteran legislation — federal, state, and local 

(2) housing 

(3) full employment 

(4) military conscription 

(5) federal loans to foreign countries 

(6) community activities and projects sponsored "by veterans 

(7) student-veteran organization here at Southern 
He asked each student veteran- to indicate his choice for committee work in 

these fields. Each committee will be instructed to draft resolutions for consid- 
eration of the entire membership at an open meeting next Tuesday. 

"It seems to me by this means we can in an orderly democratic process 
arrive at the real sentiments of our student veterans here," Andrews said, "We 
can then push ahead on a constructive program to put our influence where it will 

do the most good." 

Other officers elected by the veterans organization were: Arthur Carter 
of Anna, vice president; Margie Hinkle.of Dongola, secretary; Marion ("Dae") 
Whitley of Harrisburg, treasurer. 

J! H II 

Carbondale,Ill.»May — A leave of absence for next year has been granted to 
Jean *ligor, instructor in the College of Education at Southern Illinois Normal 
University, in order to permit him to carry on work toward the doctor's degree at 
Michigan State College, President Chester E. Lay 



>T « > 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Soecial to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May —An exhibit of sketches of Roscoe 
risselhorn, native Southern Illinois artist, will go up at Southern 
Illinois Normal University here May 20, to remain on display 
during the early summer. 

Working chiefly with pencil and pen-and-ink, Mr. risselhorn 
has directed his attention to scenes of an historical and scenic 
nature, such as old buildings, rustic scenes and historic sites, 
in various parts of Illinois. 

Some of the sketches depict famous buildings in Randolph 
County, particularly the remains of Old Ilaskaskia, first white 
settlement west of the Alleghenies. 

I.lr. Misselhorn's work has attracted national recognition in 
art circles. Recently many of the sketches to be shown here 
were exhibited at the Central Public Library in St. Louis. 

A native of Sparta, Illinois, he has spent most of life in 
that Southern Illinois town. He won a scholarship in the School 
of Fine Arts at Washington University at St. Louis, where he 
studied for two and a half years. He was employed for several 
years by a St. Louis commercial art studio and for eight years 
was editorial cartoonist for a Chicago newspaper syndicate. 

He has written a textbook on pencil drawing which is soon to 
be published. 

Fr. Misselhorn is a brother of Mrs. Rockwell KcCreight, wife 
of the University physical plant director, and of Frank risselhorn 
of Furphysboro. 

The Miss el horn sketches will be hung iiT* the Little Gallery 
in the &ain Building. 



# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, 'Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Kay --Return of a distinguished scientist 
to the faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University after a 
three-year absence was announced today by University President 
Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Robert C. Cassell, who left Southern in June, 1943, to 
engage in vital war work for the U. 3. Department of Agriculture, 
will return this fall fc«S a pnst aa profsflso-r And 
chairman of the department of agriculture in the College of 
Vocations and Professions here. 

YVhen he left Southern, he became pathologist in the Emergency 
Plant Disease Prevention program, of the U. S. Department of 
Agriculture, and was assigned to the New England states and the 
State of New York, He had earlier worked for the U.S. P. A. as an 
agent in the Division of Plant Disease Control. 

For the past year, Dr. Cassell has been as associate In plant 
pathology at the University of Florida, according to Dr. Henry J. 
Rehn, dean of the College of Vocations and Professions. 

A graduate of Iowa State College , Cassell received the master 
of arts degree from the University of Idaho, .and the doctor of 
philosophy degree from the University of Minnesota, where he 
held a teaching fellowship. 

He first came to Southern in September, 1938,. 

A member of Sigma Li, honorary science society, of the 
American Association for- the Advancement of Science, and the 
American Phytopathological Society, Dr. Cassell has published 
more than 15 scientific articles in professional periodicals. 



J.L .". -'-'- 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale,Ill.,May —Appointment of William K. Harlan as assistant 
professor of sociology at Southern Illinois Normal University has "been 
announced by President Chester F, Lay. 

M r . Harlan, employed in the personnel division at Marshall Fields and 
Co. in Chicago since his discharge from the Navy, will carry en additional 
work toward his doctoral degree at the University of Chicago this summer 
and will join the Southern faculty in the fall, Dr. T. W. Abbott, dean of 
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, explained. 

A graduate of the University of Nebraska, ho holds "both the "bachelor of 
arts and the master of arts degrees from that institution. Part of his 
graduate work was also done at the University of Iowa, where he held an 
assistantship. 



Carbondale,Ill.,May —A leave of absence for next year has been granted 
to Jean Fligor, instructor in the College of Education at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, in order to permit him to carry on work toward the doctor's 
degree at Michigan State College, President Chester P. Lay has announced. 

Mr. Pligor, who recently returned to the Southern faculty after service 

in the armed forcos, is also critic teacher at Buncombe Rural School. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale,Ill.,May --Appointment of three additional visiting 
professors for summer term at Southern Illinois Normal University 
has been announced by President Chester P. Lay. 

Dr. Robert E. McNicoll, professor of Latin- American history 
and director of the Hispanic- American Institute at the University 
of Miami, joins the University faculty this summer to teach two 
history courses, one in Latin-American history, the other in Latin- 
American culture, and an elementary Spanish course. 

Dr. McNicoll taught at the University of Peru at Lima, and at 
the University of Havana in Cuba .before joining the University of 
Miami faculty. 

Dr. Frank L. Klingberg hs s been named visiting professor of 
government for the summer. Coming from Knox College at Galesburg, 
where he is chairman of the government department, Dr, Klingberg 
obtained his doctorate from the University of Chicago. 

Approved as assistant professor in physiology and health 
education is Miss Evelyn McKinley, who will work in the health 
workshops planned for the simmer. Miss McKinley did her undergrad- 
uate work at Simpson College, and received the master of education 
degree from Marquette University. 

Other visiting professors for summer term include Miss May 
Sarton, poet- in- residence, in the department of English; and Dr. 
Ralph R, Pickett, professor of business and economics, who comes from 
Kansas State Teachers College, Emporia, where he is professor and 
head of the department of commerce. 

#### 



Carbondale , 111 . ,May --Added to the Southern Illinois Normal 
University faculty last week were Arnold 0.. Myhre as counselor in the 
Veterans Guidance Center, and Walter Mazurek as faculty assistant 
in physical education. 

During the past year, Mr. Myhre has been in similar work at 

Gila Junior College, Thatcher, Arizona. He has the bachelor of arts 
degree from the University of Washington and the master of arts 
degree from Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Mr. Mazurek, recently discharged from military service, 
received the bachelor's degree from Westminister College at Fulton, 
Missouri. 



Southern Illinois Normal university information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale,Ill.,May -Establishment of a scholarship fund to 
bring foreign students to Southern Illinois Normal TjniversL ty has 
been announced by District 149 of Rotary International, University 
officials have been informed by Roy Vail Jordan, district governor 

of Rotary. 

This is the first such scholarship established by Rotary in 
Illinois. It will be financed by contributions of $1 per member in 

the district. 

The resolution setting up the scholarship fund pays high 
tribute to the University and indicates the values to obtained from 
the endowment of study by foreign students here. It read in part: 

"WHEREAS, The Southern Illinois Normal University has lately 
been recognized as having University status by the Commission on 
Colleges and Universities of the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, and 

"YJHEREAS, the inland location of The Southern Illinois Normal 
University militates against its receiving enrollments of foreign 

students, and 

"VJHEREAS, the attendance of students from the American Republics 
i south of- the bordert would contribute largely to the Fourth Object 
of Rotary, International Friendship through International Acquain- 
tance, through their acquaintanceship with the students of S.I.N.U. 
as well as through contacts which they might make speaking on the 
programs of various clubs of District 149, now, therefore, be it, 

"RESOLVED, that the member clubs of District 149, Rotary 
international, do hereby establish a Scholarship Fund at The Southe n 
Illinois Normal University to be known as the Fourth Object Scholar- 
ship Fund of The 149th District, Rotary International...." 

In accepting the scholarship fund, which he termed "a 

magnificent service," University President Chester P. Lay explained 

"Through the years the benefits will progressively cumulate, benefits 

both to our own people in Southern Illinois and in our country's 

relationships." 

(more) 



Mr. Jordan, in describing the scholarship fund to Rotarians 

of this district, called attention to the fact that Southern has 
recently added an authority on Latin- American affairs, Dr. Robert 
E. McNicoll, to its history faculty for the summer. 

"The time has come when we should cease to look on Southern 
Illinois, Egypt, as merely a oart of a state or of the United States-- 
as a Cinderella waiting for a Prince Charming to come with the gloss 
slipper," he declared. "wc should look upon Egypt as an empire, 

"With its rich stores of minerals, its fertile and diversified 
soils, its beautiful scenery, with its marvelous water supply, with 
its climate of Virginia, this land bounded by the three great 
rivers..,. is intrinsically the richest piece of territory of equal 
extent in the world. 

"And it is tine we woke up to the fact that wc live in a rich 
empire- -and quit looking upon Egypt as the humblest and poorest of 
all the Cinder ell as. 

"And serving this empire, we have a great educational institution 
which was recently recognized, as : university, authorized to grant 
bachelor's degrees in the Vocational Arts and the Liberal Arts and 
Bachelor's and heater's degrees in the field of Education. It is 
prepared to serve the million or more population of Egypt, ;mc. it is 
the only recognized university in the area. 

"I refer, of course, to the Southern Illinois Normal University. 
Now it happens that because of its inland location, Southern does not, 
as a rule, Yio.vc foreign students in its enrollment. The Rotary Clubs 
of District 149 could do a grdat international service for providing 
for Fourth Object scholarships in our own Southern University at 
Carbondo.lc. 

"If we had students enrolled there from south of the border, I 
think it would be mutually beneficial for both the foreign students 
and out own. . . .We shall never get along with the other countries of 
the world until wc know them as neighbors. 

"I feel, without a doubt, we should first devote our energies 
and our funds to aiding foreign students to study ?t our own 
university. Too long has the wealth of Egypt gone forth to enrich 
other parts of the world when more of it should have remained at home/' 

Tl itti 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May --Southern Illinois Normal University had a 
hand in training "America's Best Teacher for 1946." 

Mrs. Edith Binker of Somurville, tf, J., the former Miss Edit& Creed, 
who was recently awarded first place in the Quiz Kids national contest, 
graduated from Southern in 1924. 

Chosen from among 14,000 teachers nominated by American school 
children, Mrs. Binkor will appear on the Quiz Kids national broadcast 
Sunday evening, May 26. 

A native of Cuntralia, Mrs. Binker moved to Oklahoma with her 
family when she was three years old. 

Returning from Cleveland, Okla. , to enter Southern in 1922, she 
completed the two year course here in 1924 and later took her degree 
from Rutgers University. She has been teaching for 22 years. 

University President Chester F, Lay acclaimed her selection as 
the country's bust teacher as a "distinct honor for Southern as well 
as for Mrs. Binkor." 

"We are proud to have the quality of teacher-education which 
Southern offers its students recognized nationally." 

Mrs, Binkor 's former teachers here remember heras a delightful 
person who showed promise of becoming a great teacher* 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May — War surplus materials totaling nearly $100,000 have 
"been allocated to Southern Illinois Normal University for use in the physics, 
chemistry, and industrial education departments, according to Dr. 0. B. Young, 
chairman of the University's committee on war surplus commodities. 

Most of the commodities the University has acquired came from the Illinois 
Ordnance Plant, and include a very fine welding outfit valued at $1,100, drills, 
scales, balances, "burners, sanders, and other small tools. 

From the Douglas Aircraft Company came two large milling machines, for cutting 
and shaping metal, which are used by the industrial education department. Weighing 
about two tons each, theso machines are worth approximately $1&»000. 

The fusolage of a new Thunderbolt produced by the Republican Manufacturing 
Company of Evansville, Indiana is owned by Southern and will be used for educational 
purposes. Dr. Young states that mock-ups are to be made from it, which are units 
for demonstration of the various principles of physics. The Thunderbolt is valued 
at $70,000. 

In addition to the tools and machines of all kinds, the University has acquired 
tvo 30«»sca% bussos and throe 100-passenger capacity tractor-trailer „ combinations 
to be used for voteran transportation to and from the Ordnance Plant where housing 
units are being prepared for use in the immediate future. 

The acquisition of thflfearkwar surplus materials, says Dr. Young, has improved 
the physics, chemistry, and industrial education departments greatly, and should 
be an added incentive to interested students to enter Southern and take advantage 
of the new equipment. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois papers 



Carbondale, 111., May — Applicants for degrees fron Southern 
Illinois Normal University this year total 138, the Office of 
Registrar has announced. 

Degrees to be conferred include three Master of Science in 
Education degrees to Lewis Ebb Ether ton of Murphysboro, George 
Schroeder and Glenn McGowan, both of Carbondale. 

The College of Education leads in the number of candidates, 
with 145 having applied for the Bachelor of Science in Education 
degree. In the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 21 candidates 
are to receive the Bachelor of Arts degree, and l£, the Bachelor of 
Science degree. The College of Vocation and Professions has seven 
candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree. 

Of the degree candidate: a, 60 are veterans, including one woman 
veteran, Ora Elizabeth Gray of Darlington, South Carolina. 

Seniors who will finish at the end of the summer term will 
participate in both Baccalaureate and Commencement services, 
although they will not receive their degrees until they have 
completed their work. 

Dr. Charles W. Gilkey, associate dean of the Divinity School 
at the University of Chicago has been secured as Baccalaureate 
speaker, and Dr. William Spriegel, chairman of the department of 
Management at Northwestern University, will be the Commencement 
speaker. 

41 41 41 M 
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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorcna Drummond, Editor 



Soecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale,^ll.,May -Editors of Southern Illinois daily and 
weekly newspapers will be guests of Southern Illinois Normal 
University here Friday and Saturday, June 7-8 • 

Guest speaker for the occasion will "be Fred. W. Hill, editor and 
publisher of the Hamburg (Iowa) Reporter , winner of state, regional 
and national awards for community service, who will speak Saturday 
morning on '"Hie Newspaper and Community Service." 

The newspaper editors will also be guests of the University 
at a banquet Friday evening, at which University President Chester 
P. Lay will speak on "The Newspaper and the University: Twin 
Beacons for an Enlightened World." 

The regular spring meeting of the Southern Illinois Editorial 
Association will be held in conjunction with the conference sponsored 
by the University, Kenneth Mollman of L'illstadt, president of the 
association, has announced. The association will have its "shop- 
talk" session Friday afternoon and a brief business session 
Saturday morning. 

### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lo r en a Dr umi :,o n d , Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Newspapers 



a 



Carbondale, 111., May -- Sweeping every event in the four 
divisions, the Southern Illinois Normal University tennis squad 
roared to the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title 

t Normal on Saturday, May 13. When the dust had settled, the 
scorebook showed an amazing total of 15 points for the Maroons, with 
their nearest contender, State Normal, having only 4. 

Bruce Church, of Marissa, started the festivities as he 
dropped sorenson of Eastern and Calkins of State Normal. Then Joe 
Pulley, of Marlon, defeated J-h.ll.or of Western, and Harrison of 

State Normal. 

Roy Lielich, of New Athens, kept the ball rolling as he downed 
Muthersbaugh of Eastern and Green of State Normal. John Maguire, 
of Carbondale, wound up the singles play for the Maroons by winning 
over ^ice of hastern and Haughey'of State Normal. 

In the doubles matches, Church and f'ulley teamed up to beat 
Green and Harrison of State Normal, and Barry and Dillon of '.yes tern 
in first division play. In second division, Lielich and Harry 
Meng, of Belleville, gave Southern the victory over Calkins and 
Haughey of State Normal, and Zimmerman and Zachringer of 'western, 

This climaxed the day for the netsters, who carried home the 
team trophy, ana also medals for winning the entire division play. 

The team that won these honors was composed entirely of 
veterans, Tennis Coach Bill Freeburg announced. Three of them, 
Church, pulley, and Lielich, are former lottermesn at Southern; 
but, of the three, only Church has the distinction of winning the 
I.I.A.C. singles championship, which he accomplished in 1941. 

The totals for the day found Southern winning with 15 points; 
State Normal second with 4 points; western third with 2 points, 
and Eastern fourth with no points. Northern did not enter a team. 

Southern finished the season with a record of four vans, one 

tie, and only one defeat out of (their six matches. During the 

play, the Maroons hung up three whitewashes out of their four wins. 

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South-am Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., hay --"."inning six firsts and racking up the 
astounding total of 36 points, the Southern Illinois Normal 
University track squad swept to an I.I.A.C. victory in the 27th 
annual conference meet at EcCormick Field at Normal, 111. on 
Saturday, May 18. The high point man for the winners was John 
Algee, of Carbondale, who ran up 14 points. 

Only one record fell en the muddy turf, despite the fact that 
this was the first post-war affair and all entries were sprinkled 
with veterans. The shot cut record was broken by Roy LaRose, of 
Charleston, a member of the Eastern State Teachers College tesm, 
who put the 16 pound shot 46 feet llj inches. 

Southern's firsts came in the following departments: the one 
mile run: 120 yard high hurdles; discus throw; two mile run; 220 
yard 1 o w hu r d 1 e s ; m i 1 e r e 1 a y . 

This affair wound up the season activity on the track front, 
and left the Maroons with the season's record of five wins and no 
losses. The tracksters were awarded the I.I.A.C. trophy, the relay 
trophy. Of the 75 medals awarded at the I.I.A.C. meet, Southern 
athletes received 29. 

The last I.I.A.C. win on Southern's record was in 1933, Track 
Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle reported. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lor en a Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May --No pre-requisitcs are'necessary for 
either of the two courses to be taught this summer by Southern 
Illinois Normal University's post-in-residcnce, Miss Nay Sarton, 
according to Kiss Emma B'owyer, chairman of the English department, 

"The courses may either be audited or taken for credit" Miss 
Eowyer explained. 

Miss Sarton, whose recent novel, The Bridge of Years , has 
received much favorable literary comment, will teach two courses--- 
"Background for Modern Poetry", and "Teaching of Poetry." 

Both courses will be offered during the morning, and meet six 
hours a week during the first half of the summer berm (four weeks) 

Many students have already enrolled for the courses but they 
are ho be open to anybody Interested in taking advantage of tie 
opportunity to hear the lectures 'of the well-known young poet and 
novelist, Miss Bowyer said. 

Fur the rn details about registering for the courses may be 
secured from the Office of Registrar, in care- of the University. 



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Carbondale, 111., May --A demonstration of "egg cookery" was 
held at Southern Illinois Normal University recently by the 
Carbondale unit of the Home Bureau. 

Primarily for housemothers of student boarding houses, the 
demonstration was also open to', other womer. interested in learning 
new tricks to do with eggs of varying the menu and providing 
substitutes for scarce items of diet, 

The demonstration was conducted by t: rs, Floyd. V. Tskeland 
and Mrs. Ben Eichcr of Carbondale, in the home economics department 
kitchen, under the supervision of Mrs. Mary Louise Barnes, assistant 
professor of home economics here. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Infomation Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May —A scholarship for leadership training 
at Camp riniwanca, Michigan, has been awarded by the Danforth 
Foundation of St. Louis to a Southern Illinois Normal University 
freshman, Betty Jean Harris, of Carbondale. 

hiss Earriss will be the fourth Southern student to attend the 
Camp. The applicant must be approved by a special representative 
or "associate" of the Danforth Foundation, who at Southern is David 
S. hclntosh, chairman of the music department. 

Camp Miniwance, near Shelby, Is the Christian Leadership 
Training Camp of the American Youth Foundation. This Foundation Is 
a non-profit, non- denominational Christian organization^ the purpose 
of which is to train young people for leadership in life vocations. 

The Danforth Foundation is endowed by pliliam p. Danforth, owner 
of the Furlnr Feeds and Breakfast Foods Company of St. Louis, and 
has provided opportunity for many young people to study leadership 
training and Christian work. - 

Throughout the country, 40 such scholarships are awarded ©ach 
year to college students, high school juniors and seniors, and 
business young people between the ages of 16 and 21. Of these, 25 
go to girls, 15 to boys, 

Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, a Southern student received 
one of the scholarships last year. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information service 
Lorena Drunanond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111,, May --An exhibit of African Kegro Sculpture 
opened in the Little Art Gallery at Southern Illinois Normal 

University this week. 

Lent by the University of Pennsylvania Museum, the exhibit 
consists of original statuettes and masks made of a light wood 
-ainted black to- resemble ebony, and photographs representing the 
French Sudan, Sierra Leone, Ivory Coast, Gold Coast, Nigeria French 
Congo, Belgian Congo, and Angola regions. 

Secured through the American Association of University Women 
and the university art department, the exhibit will remain on the 
camaus for two weeks. 



# # # 






Carbondale, 111,, May— Several Southern Illinois Normal 
University students left today for Washington University in St. 
Louis to participate in the Missouri Collegiate Conference on 
Foreign Policy, which will continue through Sunday. 

Students from here will discuss with other representatives 
attending both general principles and Immediate issues of our 
foreign policy. Students will serve on those committees discussing 
certain policies in which they have Indicated a particular interest. 

Speakers at the Foreign Policy conference will include Charles 
Bunn, assistant to Under Secretary of State Dean Ache son, and Dr. 
Arthur Holly Compton, chancellor of Washington University and 
distinguished physicist. 

Among the university students going up from here are Eleanor 
White, Eldorado; Joe 1'IcGovern, Chirstopher; Charles Lugger, Marion; 
Helen Mat ay a, Herrinj Kenneth Grant, Detroit, Michigan; Dale 
Andrews, Mt. Camel; Bill Holder, Carbondale; with Rev. Douglas 
McNaughton, director of the student Christian Foundation. 



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Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 
Attention: Sports Editors 



Carbondale, 111., May --Rain and a bit of overconf idence spelled 
doom to the Southern Illinois normal University tennis squad's 
undefeated record of the current season as the University of Illinois 
,f E" team eked out a 3-2 win over the Southerners on Kay 7 in 
Champaign, 111. The matches were all singles matches as the doubles 
were stopped becuase of the downpour. 

In the first match, Southern's ace, Bruce Church, took the first 
set easily but then let up too much and Carl Schwenk came back to 
take the second and third set when Church could not regain form. 
The match went 6-2, 5-6, 4-6 in favor of the Illini. 

The Maroons took the next match easily as Roj Leilich of ^ew 
Athens, 111. defeated Ben King 6-2, 6-4, but dropped b~- the wayside 
again as Joe Pulley of ^arion, 111, was dropped 7-9, 6-1, 3-6 b3r 
John Fotel of Champaign, 111. 

Harry Li eng of Belleville, 111. gave the Southerners another 
lift as he jarred Ross Lieb 6-2, 7-5, but the Illini capped the 
victory when John Maguire of Carbondale, 111. dropped the finale 
8-6, 6-3, 5-6 to Jim Norman, a former S.I.K.U. student from 
Murphy sb o r o , 111, 

Old man weather ended the fray with Southern on the short end 
of the 5-2 score, A large number of former Southern Illinois Normal 
University students were on hand to witness the rain- shortened affair. 

# # # 



X 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., Kay — Leland L. ("Doc") Lingle, track coach 
at Southern Illinois Normal University here, has been named 
honorary referee for the 27th annual track meet of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference to be held at Normal, Fay 18. 

Lingle will be attending his 20th II AC meet, the 19th as a 
staff member. 

Ordinarily, the distinction of serving as honorary referee for 
the annual conference meet goes to a college president or other 
academic official. 

Lingle 's Southern Maroons are in top spot among conference 
contenders, having defeated three of the four member schools. The 
Maroons are particularly strong in weight events, both low and 
high hurdles and in distance running, 

While not a "brilliant" team, the Croons this season have 
shown themselves a well-balanced aggregation, depending on teamwork 
rather than the efforts of one or two scintillating stars, a 
situation which Lingle finds entirely in line with his philosophy 
of team work Instead of spectacular individuals. 



4-1 M M 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Attention Sports Editors 

Carbondale,Ill.,May —Coach Leland "Doc" Lingle and his Southern 
Illinois Normal University tracksters will invade Normal, 111. , on Saturday, 
May 18, to participate in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference 
track meet, which is held every year at the end of the regular track season. 
Southern has been picked to take the high honors in the affair "by such 
an expert as Fred Young, sports editor of the Bloomington Pantagraph . hut the 
Maroon mentor expects stiff competition, especially from Eastern and Northern . 

In the books, it looks like Southern all the way, as the Lingle-men have 
chalked up five wins in the regular dual meets of the season and have placed 
fourth in the Elmhurst Invitational; but, as Lingle points out, records can be 
sot aside when these five schools clash in any sport. 

Southern has met and defeated the following opponents this season: Western 
Illinois State Teachers College; Illinois State Normal University; Southeastern 
Missouri State Teachers College; Washington University; and Eastern Illinois 
State Teachers College. All of the victories were by rather lop-sided scores. 
However, it was proved in the Elmhurst affair that Southern will have a tough 
time in the multi-team meet. 

Southern has been strongest in the weights, hurdles, and distances so far 
this season, and therein lies the Maroons' hopes for the conference championship. 

In a team studded with returned war veterans, the weights squad consists of 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Earl Robert of Carlyle, and John Algce of Carbondale, 

In the hurdles, the Maroons are represented by Charles Beatty of Benton, 
Jack Hayse of Benton, Roy Ragsdale of DeSoto, and Dick Eggors of Chester. 

In the distances, it is Louis Pechineno of Christopher, Dick Avis of 
Johnston City, Jim Gall i tan of Carlyle, Glen Hamilton of Pinckneyville, Leonard 
Burden of Johnston City, and Bob Smith of Marissa. 

State Normal does not have a very impressive record for the current season, 

(more) 



.,.* ...,, 



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having lost to Southern and Eastern; out the Red Birds have 136611 effective in 
their triangular meets, finishing second in the DeKalh fray, and winning their 
own three-cornered meet. In the Elmhurst Invitational, the Redhirds finished 

fifth. 

Individual stars at Normal have "been Bloico Bess, a junior from Morion, Ind., 
who works in the discus and high hurdles; Bill Howard, a sophomore from Farmer 
City, is active in the pole vault, high jump, and hroad jump, and is the high 
individual scorer of the team? John Kettlekamp, a sophomore from Stronghurst, 
and a hurdlee-man; Warren "Ike" LaBounty, holder of the all-time McCormick Field 
pole vault record of 12 ! 6 3/4 " . The rest of the team is an unknown quantity, 
as Coach Cogdal' s squad has been plagued by injuries and sickness all season. 

Eastern has not had much competition this season hut owns a c'.ual meet win 
over State Normal. However, they have "been dumped by Southern in a dual meet 
and they finished last in a triangular tiff at Indiana State. They were not 
represented fully at the Elmhurst Invitational, ending up with only 9 3/4 points. 

The major threat of Eastern is LoRoy LaRose, high point man, and he workss 
with the shot put, discus, and javelin. He has earned 46j points this season; 
his best shot put mark is 46'$"; he has "beaten the conference shot put record 
in each meet except against Southern. 

Amazingly weak this season is Northern, with Ronald Rieken, a quart er-miler, 
their only hope. 

Western's strength appears to he concentrated in the dashes and the hurdles. 

For Southern, Stinson has thrown the discus 134* , Rohert has put the shot 
143' 9", Davidson has hurled the javelin 162 1 . On the cinder path, Algee has 
run the 100-year-dash in 10,2", Pechineno the mile in 4' 44.8" , G-allitan the one- 
half mile in 2 1 05.9", Burden the two mile distance in 10'49.1" . These figures 
denote their best recorded performances during the current season. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information service 

Lorena Drum' one. , Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 
Attention: Sports Editor 



Carbondale, 111,, May--"The Home of Champions"-- that is the 
name that many sports experts are affixing to Southern Illinois 
Normal University, and they're not far from wrong vhen the record 
books are examined. Southern has annexed four conference 
championships this last school year— four, count *em. 

The track and tennis squads made their bid for fame only List 
Saturday vhen, at the l.I.A.C. meets at Normal, the Maroons ran 
off with everything but the referees whistle while taking the 
track and tennis crowns. The tricksters, coached by Leland P. 
("Doc") L ingle, broke all existing scoring records in the meet 
by oiling up 86 points while winning six first places. 

Txe tennis squad, mentored by William preeburg, virtually 
over- whelmed all opposition as they took first place in all of the 
four divisions in the meet and wound up with a total of 19 points 
while their opponent, State Normal, could garner only 4 markers. 

The Maroon's began their winning ways last fall when Southern 
harriers, directed by "Doc" Lingle, hit their stride on the hill 
and dale course at Normal, and brought back the l.I.A.C. 
cross-country championship to Carbondale 

Basket Ball goach Glenn "Abe" Martin, made Carbondale 
temporarily the "basket ball Capitol of the world" when, after 
copaing the I.I.A.C. title, he took his cagers to Kansas City 
and directed them to the Intercollegiate Championship crown 
against some of the best the country had to offer. 

The Maroons are an example of the improving quality of the 
post-war teams all over the country that are studded with veterans, 
as their Southern tennis team was made up entirely of veterans and 
a goodly portion of their track team was the same. 

The Southern athletes will rest on their laurels for the rest 
of the summer and then they will prepare to defend their hard -won 
crowns against opposition that will be gunning for them next 
season. 

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vc< 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., ray -- The Home Management Rouse at Southern 
Illinois Formal University will be open this summer to six students 
who are not majoring In home economics, Hiss Gladys Babcock, 
supervisor of the house has announced. 

This Is the first time that the home economics department of 
Southern has >en able to extend this course to students othern 
than majors or minors. 

Any girl interested in living in the Home Management House this 
summer may register for the course. There will be no pre-requislte 
courses, provided the students have had home experience in food 
preparation. 

The work of the course involves planning and preparing meals 
for the seven people living In the house who constitute a family. 
There are entertaining and house-keeping duties that are revolved 
to allow each girl to obtain experience In each phase of homemaking. 



Ji 41 ±1 41 .IL 

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Carbondale, 111., Hay -- Members of the Pi Kappa Sigma Sorority 
have proven themselves the best vocalists among the Southern 
Illinois Normal University Greek organizations by capturing first 
place in the first Inter- Fraternity and Sorority Sing held here 
since the war. 

A traveling cup was presented to Hiss Alma Deane Smith, 
sophomore, of Carbondale, who directed th* winning group, by the 
master of ceremionies for the evening, David Kenney of Carbondale, 
member of Chi Delta Chi fraternity. 

At the same time Jack Hedges of West Frankfort was awarded the 
plaque for being voted as the most valuable fraternity man of the 
year. Hedges is a Chi Delta Chi. Douglas Greene of Godfrey, 
member of Kappa Delta Alpha, and Ted Cain of Eldorado, member of 
Sigma Beta Mu, were given honorable mention. 

# ###### 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Soecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111,, May --Four athletes of Southern Illinois 
Normal University will act as counselors of recreation at Inter! cchen 
National Music Camp in Michigan this summer, William Freeburg, 

instructor in physical education here, has announced. 

Freeburg will act as senior counselor and three undergraduate 
students will assist in various phases of athletic instruction. 

Paul Smith of Carbondale 'ill serve ,as water front director, 
and Leedio Cabutti and Dick Avis, both of Johnston City, will 
assist in several games and sports. 

Tie recreation program of Interlocben, which is primarily 
for junior high school and high school boys who are interested in 
music, will be directed by a former Southern gymnastic star, Vernon 
Hicks of Harrisburg, who will be assisted, by Bernie Falk, another 
Southern a 1 umn u s fro m Ha r r i s bur g • 

^ # # 



Carbondale, 111., l.!av --Some 75 colleges and universities 
have adopted the text, A Handbook of English, of which Dr. Jesse 
"'. Harris, associate professor of English at Southern Illinois 
Normal University, is co-author. 

In use here for freshmen rhetoric for the past two years, 
or since publication of the text in 1944, A Handbook of English 
has been placed on textbook lists by such institutions as the 
University of California, Colorado State College of Education, 
University of Illinois, Butler University. Tulane University, 
University of Pennsylvania, and University of Minnesota, and many 
others. 

Dr. Harris' publication, John Bale , A Study In the Fin or 
Literature of the Preform ation, from the University of Illinois Press 
in 1940, is a standard research volume on early English literature. 

During the current academic year, Dr. Harris has had four 
arcicles published ± n national journals. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May -Student journalists at Southern Illinois 
Normal University will give up their between- terms holiday to help 
play host for Southern Illinois newspaper editors here June 7-8, 

Members of Mu Tau Pi, journalism fraternity, have voted to 
remain on campus after commencement on Friday morning, June 7, to 
help entertain the editors, who have been invited to the two-day 
conference Friday afternoon and evening and Saturday morning. 

The student writers will act as escorts for the newspaper men 
and women on a tour of the campus late Friday afternoon, and will be 
hosts at a "15-minuto-break-f or-cof f ee" Saturday morning. 

Clara Pixley of West Salem has served as president of Mu Tau Pi 
this year, and Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg has been elected to 
head the group next year. 

The University will bring as a principal speaker for the 
conference Fred W. Hill, editor and publisher of the Hamburg (Iowa) # 
Reporter and winner of state, regional and national awards for 
community service, and will be host at a dinner on Friday evening. 

"Shop-Talk" and business sessions of the Southern Illinois 

Editorial Association have also been scheduled for the two-day 

period. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummpnd, Editor 



Carbon dale, 111., Kay— A second "feather in the cap" of Southern 
Illinois Normal University appeared today as President Chester F, 
Lay announced the return next fall of Dr. Joseph Van Riper as 
associate orofessor of geography in the College of Liberal Arts and 

r 

Sciences, 

Dr. Van Riper served on the Southern faculty from 1959 until 
June, 1942, when he was called to wartime duties with the War 
Department. 

He is the second former faculty member to be "signed up" by 
the University in recent weeks, the first being Dr. Robert c. Casscll, 
who has been appointed professor and chariman of the department 
of agriculture in the College of Vocations and Professions. Dr. 
Cassell left the faculty in 1943 to do war emergency plant disease 
orevention work for the u. S. Department of Agriculture, and for the 
past yeair has been at the University of Florida. 

Dr. Vsn R:.pcr, a graduate of the University of Michigan, holds 
the master's degree from Syracuse University, and the doctor of 
philosophy degree from Michigan. He taught at Colgate University, 
Syracuse, and harysville (ho.) State Teachers College before coming 
to Southern. 

His return to the .Southern faculty will bolster the teaching 
strength of the geography department, which has been greatly reduced 
during the war. 

These two bring to 19 the number of former faculty members who 
have been re-employed by the University in the past year and a 
half, ;he majority oaf fc^cm"' -laving been away . on military or other 
war t ime go v e rnme nt service, 

V it 73 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
L oren a Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., May --Plans have been conpleted for an 
American Red Cross Water Safety Training School at Crab Orchard Lake 
during the week of June 17-21, Dr. Dorthy Davies, acting chairman 
of the department of physical education for women at Southern 
Illinois Formal University has announced. 

To enter the course, a candidate must be over 13 years old, and 
a "strong swimmer," according to the announcement. 

Successful completion of the course, which meets daily from 
two to five o'clock and from six to nine o'clock, qualifies the 
candidates as .American Fed Cross safety instructors. 

J. R. Kalpacoff, field representative of the Midwestern Area, 
American Red Cross, is giving the course. Those interested in 
registering for the course should contact Dr. Davies, in care of 
the University. 

S M M 

7/ 77 it 



Carbondale, 111., Fay --Two basket ball games with the University 
of Chicago have been scheduled for next season by Southern Illinois 
Normal University, winner of the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference championship and of the Kansas City Invitational 
Tournament this- year, Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin has announced. 

Dates for the games are February 5, in Carbondale, and February 

22, in Chicago. 

./,'- ji j i 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lo r ena Drummond , Edi tor 



Carbondale, 111., May — Commencement Week activities for the 
133 Southern Illinois Normal University graduating seniors June 3-7 
will provide a "whirl* wind finish" to their undergraduate careers. 

While the underclassmen take final examinations next week, the 
University's seniors have planned for them four full days of teas, 
receptions, outings, and meetings, before Commencement service 
Friday morning at 9:30 o'clock. 

Following the Baccalaureate Services Monday Morning, . June 3, 
at 10: 30, the seniors v/ill be guests that evening at a reception 
given by President and Mrs. Chester F. Lay and the Southern faculty 
at Anthony Kail. 

The American Association of University women will give a tea 
for senior women Tuesday afternoon, which will be followed by an 
"informal mixer" that evening, sponsored by the Student Council. 
The senior class picnic at the Giant City "Lodge" falls Wednesday, 
and on Thursday afternoon, the seniors have scheduled a bowling party. 

Tie entire senior class will be guests at the Alumni Banquet 
on Thursday evening. 

Also on the Commencement Week schedule of activities is the 
Allyn Training School graduation exercises Wednesday evening in the 
Little Theatre, and the University high School graduation service, 
Thursday r ^enmg In Shryock Auditorium.. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., May -- Forty- two Southern Illinois Normal 
University athletes were honored in student assembly on Thursday 
Morning, Hay 23, when the coaches of the various sports presented 
them with 1945-46 letters. Five sports, cross-country, football, 
basketball, track, and tennis, which constituted all varsity 
activity during the last school year, were represented. 

In all of these sports, football excepting, Southern has taken 
the Illinois Intercollegiate Conference championship crown, and 
during the basketball season, the Maroons went on to take the 
Intercollegiate tourney held at Kansas City. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Servie. 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Csrbondale, 111., May — Addressing the annual Southern Illinois 
Normal University alumni gathering here June 6 will be, a well- 
known Southern alumnus, Roy Vail Jordan, according to announcement 
from alumni president W. B. "Slatz" Valentine, Alto Fass. 

Graduate with the class of 1914, Mr. Vail has held the 
position of city superintendent in the Centralia schools for 
twenty-five years. Before that, he was affiliated with the Herrin 
schools. 

Subject for Mr. Vail ' s address is "Education in the Atomic 
Age." 

Also on the evening? s agenda Is election of alumni association 
officers for the coming year.' This year's officers included 
Valentine, '23, as president,' Mrs. Barbara Burr Hubbs, '21, Chicago, 
first vice-president; and Miss Hilda Stein, '25, Carbondale, 
second vice-president. 

Secretary for the organization is Anna Mary Robertson, 
secretary to the university president. 



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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois dailies 



Carbondale, 111 . ,May — Southern Illinois Normal University 
High School Egyptian Experimenters returned, from the annual state 
meeting of the Junior Academy of Science held on the Illinois State 
Normal University campus May 3, with a long list of - awards. 

Not only did each of their 20 exhibits place for a total of 
13 firsts, 'four seconds, and one third out of the 264 entered, but 
two students' exhibits were selected as the outstanding one in their 
respective divisions, Mrs. Audry Hill Lindsey, sponsor of the Club 
reports . 

Picked as outstanding was the exhibit of Billy Wakeland, showing 
a group of six original motors he had constructed, and Marilyn Nelson's 
notebook on atomic energy, "Atomic Energy, Its Social, Political, and 
industrial Impact." 

Receiving two additional first awards for his model of a windmill 
and his insect collection, Billy was selected as the boy to represent 
the state as an honorary member to the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science meeting next year at Boston. 

One of Billy' s original motors so impressed Dr. Robert Paton, 
professor of physics at the University of Illinois, that Dr. Paton 
requested him to write it out in detail for publication in a 
forthcoming senior physics journal. 

The girl receiving similar recognition was Betty Lee Warnach of 
Decatur, whose sponsor, Katherine Sturm, is a former student of 
Southern, having graduated from here in 1921, 

Billy's selection as AAAS state representative makes the second 
time such an honor has come to one of the Egyptian Experimenters. 

(more ) 



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Marilyn Nelson, whose exhibit merited an outstanding award this year, 
was lest year's AAAS state representative. 

Members of the Egyptian Experimenters Club also gave the principal 
part of the Friday afternoon program, their subject being a historical 
review on the release of atomic energy. 

Appearing on the program at the meeting of the Senior Academy 
of Science held at the same time was Dr. Douglas E. Lawson, professor 
of education, ■ who discussed "A Proposed Science Curriculum for the 
Public Schools," in the section of psychology zn.6 education. 

Other university faculty attending the meeting included Dr. Otis 
E. Young, chairman of the physics department, and outgoing president 
of the Science Academy; Dr. William Bailey, chairman of the botany 
department; Dr. Walter B. V/elch, associate professor of botany; 
Kiss Charlotte Zimmerschied, assistant professor of physics; 
William Mr.rberry, assistant professor of botany; Dr. Thomas F. 
Barton, chairman of the geography and geology department; Dr. ^ames 
W. deckers, chairman of the chemistry department; Dr. K. A. Van 
Lente, associate professor of chemistry; and Dr. Bruce Merwin, 
professor of education. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



T r . CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 

information bervice 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Carbondalc, 111. , June --A second gift of ftlOO has been made to the 
Tilton Lincoln Library of Southern Illinois Normal University by 
C, T. Houghton, president of the Carbomdale Good Luck Glove Co. 

As a result of a similar gift from Mr. Houghton recently, 34 
volumes of Lincolniana and Illinois history were added to the library. 

This brings the total recent additions to 270 volumes, including 
previous transfer from the Museum of books collected by John W. Allen, 
Museum curator, and John I. Wright, associate professor of history, 
as gifts from, the estates of J'idge Monroe C. Crawford, Dr. George L. 
Owen, Ben L. Wiley, and others. 

Forty-five volumes were also recently contributed by Hemingway 
Hines from the library of the late F. B. Fines, 

The Clint Clay Tilton Lincoln library now comprises 2,450 volumes 
and p amphl e t s • 

77 ,/ /; 

Carbondalc, 111 , June- -Hew president of the Illinois Beta 
Association of Phi Beta Kappa, national academic honor society, is 
Dr. John R* Mayor, chairman of the mathematics department at Southern 
Illinois Normal University. 

Dr. Mayor was elected president at the annual spring meeting of 

the association, Sunday, May 19, Mrs. Edith 'Krappe, assistant 

professor of English, at Southern, was elected secretary- treasurer. 

Beta 
The Illinois/association also voted to award an annual prize of 

ten dollars to a graduating senior in the College of Liberal Arts 

at Southern. Requirements for the award will be announced soon. 

The association has invited any Phi Beta Kappa member in this 

area of Southern Illinois to send their names to its officers and to 

affiliate with its chapter here at the University, 

MJUf. 

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Carbondale, 111. , June- -Gen. Robert W. Davis, editor and publisher 
of the Carbondale Free Press , will preside at the dinner to be given 
by Southern Illinois Normal University honoring Southern Illinois 
newspaper editors here Friday evening, Miss Lorena Drummond, director 
of the University Information Service, has announced. 

General Davis was recently appointed by Governor Dwight Green 
as a member of the Illinois State Teachers College Board, which 
governs Southern and other teachers colleges and normal universities. 
At his first board meeting he was appointed a member of Southern's 
advisory committee and also a member of the salary schedule committee. 

Mr. Davis has also been elected as a member of the executive 
committee for the University Retirement System of Illinois and has 
been appointed a member of the Illinois Veterans Compensation 
Commission. 

The newspapermen will be guests of the University for a two-day 
Southern Illinois Newspaper Editors Conference, held in conjunction 
with the spring meeting of the Southern Illinois Editorial Association 

The meeting will open with a business session of the editorial 
association Friday afternoon, registration storting at 1 o'clock 
(Standard time) and the session beginning at 2 p.m., according to 
Kenneth Uollman of Hillstadt, president of the association. 

A tour of the campus is scheduled for 4 to 5 p.m., with members 
of Uu Tau PI, student journalism fraternity, as escorts. 

Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. (editors, please noterNOT 6:30 
as formerly announced) at Anthony Hall, women's dormitory on the 
campus. An address by University President Chester F, La:/ on "The 
University and the Press: Twin Beacons for an Enlightened World" will 
follow the dinner. Several musical selections will be presented by 
University music students. 

On Saturday morning, at 9:30 o'clock, a 10 minute musical progrsm 

will be presented by Miss Mary Jane Hantz, pianist, and John Wharton, 

violinist, both University music faculty members. A brief business 

session of the Southern Illinois Editorial Association will then be 

held, followed by a "15-mlnuto-break" for coffee, to he served by 

Mu Tau Pi members. 

Guest speaker for Saturday morning is Fred w. Hill, nationally known 
editor and publisher of the Hamburg (Iowa) Reporter , who has won a num- 
ber of state, regional, and national awards for community service enter- 
prises carried by his newspaper, Mr. Hill is also vice president of 
the national Editorial Association and is president of the Tri-State 
Editorial Association, past president of the Iowa Press Association, 
and an Iowa Mas tcr-Edi tor-Publisher. Mr. Hill will give an illustrated 
address on "The Newspaper a n$,, Community Service." 

Trfrrr 



Carbondale, 111. --June--Bh.ile other coaches have "been concen- 
tre, ting on major spring sports such as baseball, tennis, and track, 
Glenn "Abe" Martin, Southern Illinois Normal University football 
coach, is busily working on next year's gridiron representatives. 

Southern has eight games scheduled this coming season, with the 
curtain raiser set for September 23 at Mc And rev; Stadium in a fray 
with Kirksville Teachers College of Kirksville , Mo. 

The arm-chair quarterbacks are expecting a bang-up team as 

returning V7ar veterans will be combined with high school stars who 

have Indicated they will enroll here next fall, plus 

the remnants of last year's team, and Martin is hard at work to 

pro due e re s ul ts . 

On the credit side of his ledger, he has nine returning war 
veterans already in school or due here by September: Bill Malinsky 
of Flora; Nick Milosevic!! of Zeigler; Bill O'Brien of Zeigler; 
Lawrence Oalufetti of Johnston City; Jeff Mitchell of Zeigler; Roy 
and Don Ragsdale of De Soto; Quentin Stinson of Eldorado; Myron 
Schuster of Murphysboro. 

In addition, at least eight high school stars are Southern bound: 
Joe Frsnza of Murphysboro; Pete Milosevich of Zeigler; Bon Biggs of 
Fairfield; Bill and Dick Soclman and Jack Long, all of Flora; Dale 
Conners of Benton; Bob Stout of Earrisburg. 

All this makes for a cheery picture, but Mb r tin looks gloomy when 
he talks of the losses from the ranks of last year's team-- to the 
draft, to other schools, to scholastic shortcomings* 
The men who performed last season, but won't be back in September 
include: Bed Hinkley of Salem; Jim Harsh of Madison; Chas. "Rocky" 
Rothchild of Chester; Clarence "Red" Lowery of Benton; Howard Shar£ 
of West Frankfort; Gene Cunningham of Anna; Bill Crum of Mt. Carmel; 
Tom Gher of Carbondsle-; John Corn of Benton; Bill Eaton of Carbondale; 
Bob lyerla of Anna; Paul Moss of Christopher; Carl Ferrell of Anna. 

These men were stellar performers last season on the squad that 
had the conference championship in the bag until the final contest of 
the year when they dropped a 15-7 decision to Northern. 

"We will have a bigger team that will possibly be the best team 

In quite a few seasons, but don't forget that the other schools will 

be similarly Improved," Martin said. 

Martin reported that he aid not know exactly which of fens e he 
would use this season, but that it would be the "beat offence suited 
t o my material. " 

// ft 1 1 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena ibcummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June --Sam Milosevic*!, all-star athlete from 
Zeigler, was presented the Henry Rinkley Memorial Award on ronday, 
June 2, when he was selected as the most valuable athlete of the 
year at Southern Illinois Normal University by his teammates at 
the annual banquet for "I" Club members given by the Carbondale 
Businessmen' s Association. 

The Einkley award, whicb was presented for the first time 
this year, was established, by Nu Epsilon Alpha fraternity in 
memory of Henry Otis Ilinkloy of Farina and Salem, a former member 
of the fraternity who lost his life on Biak Island in the Pacific 
while serving with the armed forces in World ' r ar II. 

Rinkley was a member of the "I" Club, lettering both in 
football and basketball as a freshman, and also coming out for 
track. The award was made by' Charles Miller, representing the 
fraternity. 

rilosevich, a junior, is majoring in physical education and 
lettered in football, basketball, and track in the 1944-45 season, 
and this year he played tackle on the football eleven and forward 
on the basketball squad. 

he was chosen all-conference tackle this last season and 
placed on the second team at the Intercollegiate Basketball tourney 
at Kansas City, which Southern won. Milosevich is president of 
the "I" Club. 



41 JH Ji 

->r ft ft 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 

Lor en a Drimmond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois newspapers 
Release Monday p.m. or later 



Carbondalc, 111., June— College diplomas "wither" like cut 
flowers unless the graduate "replants" his creative intelligence 
from the classroom into professional and community life. 

Thus Dean Charles 7. Gilkey of the University f Chicago Chapel 
admonished the 183 graduates of Southern Illinois Normal University 
here today (Monday, June 3) at the baccalaureate service which 
opened Senior Week. 

The graduating class, including 3 candidates for the master's 
degree, 60 veterans, embraces both those completeing their work 
this term and those who will finish during the summer term June 10- 
August 2. 

A busy round of social entertainments will engage the seniors 
for the remainder of the week, culminating Friday morning in 
commencement exercises, at which Dr. "illlam Spricgcl, professor 
of management at Northwestern University, will be the guest speaker. 

Urging the graduates to deepen their roots in religious faith 
and hope, Dean Gilkey in his baccalaureate address Monday declared 
that "no intelligent person expects these next years to be easy 



ones. " 



He reminded the graduates how quickly the cut flowers that 
adorn their graduation celebration wither and arrive on the ash-heap, 
and asked whether this would prove true also of the enriching 
experiences and new capacities which arc the seeds planted by 

(mo re ) 



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higher education, "in promise of a better future for the individual 
and for the common weal." 

"College diplomas," he pointed out, "are only cut flowers 
unless creative intelligence is replanted from the class-rooms 
where undergraduates are students, into the schools and the 
communities where they become teachers. 

"This in turn requires that such intelligence rooted in the 
moral experience of the race, and in the deepening character of the 
individual. quisling was the top scholar in his clsss: but this did 
not keep him from becoming the most notorious traitor of our 
generation. 

"Our hope of any lasting peace, and of the development of any 
better democracy at home, likewise depend upon such deepening rootage 
in the life of the average citizen. Our American public schools 
offer the possibility of this to every generation: but never with 
such high stakes of failure or success dependent on the outcome, 
as in the atomic age which has already dawned, 

"In such a critical time, personal rootage in religious faith 
and hope is more than ever important for those who would play a 
creative part: but there is a vast amount of "cut- flower religion" 
in American life to-day. No intelligent person expects these next 
years to be easy ones. "It is the more necessary for those who 
would weather their storms : and fulfill their possibilities, to 
get their own roots down deep," 

£ -!-!■ £ 

77 r, TT 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies and Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111., June--Dr. Ferclval Bailey of Chicago, famous 
brain specialist, was elected president of the Southern Illinois 
Normal University Alumni Association at the annual banquet here 
Thursday night. 

Other officers chosen were Leo J. Brown of Carbondale, first 
vice president; Roy Bryant of Metropolis, second vice president; 
Miss Irene D. Brock of DuQuom, secretary- treasurer. 

New board members elected were George Calhoun of Elmwood Park, 
Lowell Roberts of Chicago, Robert Hamilton of Chicago, Mrs. 
Barbara Burr Hubbs of Chicago, and W. B. Valentine of Alto Pass, 
retiring president. 

Valentine reported to the association that the alumni board 
of directors has voted to "get behind" a drive to construct a 
student union building at Southern* a |100 nucleus for which was 
donated by the senior class of 1946. 

He also reported that two new SINIJ Clubs have been established 
one in Nashville, 111., and the other in Honolulu. 

The alumni board also elected three new members to the S.I.N.U. 
Foundation board— Ed Stotlar of Marion, Roy Vail Jordan of 
Centralis,, and Mrs. Wet taw of Eldorado. 



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/. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lor en a Drummond, Editor 

Release Friday p.m. or later 



Carbondale, 111., June -"Service is a tax which you pay for 
the space you occupy in the community, 11 Fred W, Fill, editor and 
publisher of the Hamburg (Iowa) Rep orter , declared here this morning 
(June 8) at a Southern Illinois Newspaper Editors Conference held at 
Southern Illinois Normal University. 

The two-day conference was held in conjunction with the annual 
spring meeting of the Southern Illinois Editorial Association. 

The editors were guests of the University at a banquet Friday 
evening, at which University President Chester F. Lay spoke on "The 
Press and Education: Twin Beacons for an Enlightened World." 

President Lay reminded the editors that the press and education 
are both inherent in the American way of life; that they have similar 
canons of impartiality, objectivity, analytical evaluation, seeking 
and disseminating the truth; that both have a profound Influence on 
the course of human affairs, 

"At no time in history has, an enlightened, informed people been 
so essential— not just for the welfare of the local community, the 
state, the region, the nation--but for the very existence of the .?i 
entire world," he declared. 

"In this day of uncertainty, confusion, doubt and fear, both 
the press and education must throw the cold light of reason on the 
problems of the world, to help the people themselves find the answers." 

In meeting its own obligations, he said, Southern Illinois Formal 
University seeks the suggestions and counsel of the press of 
Southern Illinois. 

"Southern is a state- supported university," he pointed out., 
"It belongs to the people of Illinois, of Egypt. You are entitled 
to any facts which you desire as to its operation, its plans, its 
problems. " 

"It will take the loyalty and interest and active support of 
all the million and a quarter people oT Southern Illinois to build 
a great university here," he declared.. 

Mr. Hill, who has won state* regional and national awards for 
sommunity service, told the editors that "newspapers must re- 
emphasize local news, develop a. -warm friendly contact with the public 

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and give more thought to the human relationships which go to make 

newspapers great in their own communities." 

"Your community is just what you make it," he declared.. "The 
harder you work for it the better. In this atomic age you cannot 
keep your town on the map with a pea shooter, and if you build right 
the somraunity is going to know, realize and appreciate the fact that 
your newspaper has power and plenty of it." 

At the Friday afternoon session of the Southern Illinois 
Editorial Association, called to order by Kenneth J. Tollman, 
Millstadt, president, speakers were Tom Lee, Tarissa Messenger; 
Arthur D. Jenkins, Ma scout ah herald; Curt G. Small, Earrisburg Daily 
Register; Charles Crowder, Flora Sentinel; and C. C. Feirich, 
Metropolis News. 

Subjects up for discussion included machinery, legislation, 
veterans' on-the-job training, advertising service, and the Flora 
Sentinel's "Hour of Charm at Flora" promotional program. 

Gen. Robert W. Davis, Carbondale Free Press, and member of the 
State Teachers College Board, presided at the Friday night dinner, 
while Jos. B. Campbell, Nashville Journal, president of the Illinois 
Press Association, presided at the general session Saturday morning. 

The two-day meeting closed Saturday at noon with a luncheon 
at Giant City State Park. 



£ 



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Southern Illinois Normal Univerai ty information Service 
Lorena Dn anrno nd , Ecli tor 

Special to Southern Illinois newspapers 



Carbondsie, III., June 8— The Southern Illinois Editorial 
Association today voted, to make Carbon dale one: Southern Illinois 
Normal University its remanent headquarters t 

The Association elected the following officers for ne;:t year: 
Julius Mueller, President, Ramsay, Illinois, f. Ik Ledbetter, 
Secretary, Carterville. Illinois; Directors— Kenneth Mailman of 
Millstadt, Tom lee of &arissa, R a J. Ryan of Eeecher City; curt 
Small of Harrisburg; Charles Peirich of Metropolis; Arthur D. ' 
Jenkins of Msscoutah, Hysterical Historian and Legislative 
representative; Delegates to Illinois Press Association--!'! 1 . kollman 
and Mr. Mueller, 

£ -U £ 

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Resolutions adopted at Southern Illinois Editorial Association 
Meeting in Carbondale June 7-3, 1946. 



Be it resolved that the Southern Illinois Editorial Association 
extend its thanks and appreciation to Chester F. Lay, presidant, 
hiss Lorena Drummond, Director of Information Service and members 
of the faculty of Southern Illinois Normal University for their 
cooperation and assistance in making possible for the Association 
to enjoy the privileges of the University for its 1946 meeting. 

Be it resolved that the association express its appreciation 
to Miss rinette Barber, director of Anthony Hall and the young ladies 
who gave up a part of their vacation to serve the banquet Friday 
night and the Mu Tau Pi fraternity for its assistance at the meeting 
and in a tour of the campus. 

Be It resolved that the Association pledge its cooperation to 
the University in the establishment of a Department of Journalism 
in the College of Vocations and Professions and assist in every way 
in plans for extension and expansion of Southern Illinois Normal 
University. 

Be it resolved that the Association recommend to the Illinois 
Press Association the following: 

1. That a study be made of the dues structure in other state 
press associations with a view to increasing dues in the IPA which 
will build a stronger organization. 

2. That the University of Illinois be approached on a plan 
to offer short courses i*a Journalism and photography and other 
courses for members of the newspaper profession. 

3. That the Reacily Pricer be revised. 

4. That IPA publicly express dissatisfaction with the quality 
of advertising mat service being offered to weekly newspapers. 

Howe v. Morgan 
Tom Lee 
Charlie pel rich 



Southern Illinois Normal University Infornation Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June *-A three-day aviation conference will "be held at 
Southern Illinois Normal University, July 10-12, under joint auspices of the 
University and the Civil Aeronautics Authority, Delmar W. Olson, assistant 
professor of industrial education, has announced. 

With the theme "aviation in education," the conference is designed to 
demonstrate to teachers in the public schools how aviation can fit into almost 
every subject in the public school curriculum, Olson said. 

An all-day trip to the Parks Air College and terminal in East St. Louis 
is scheduled as a feature of the conference, and an Army Air Forces exhibit of 
education materials is planned, 

# i # 



Carbondale, 111., June -Mr, Raymond H. Dey, superintendent of Carbondale 
Community and Attucks High Schools, has "been appointed to the new position of 
director of extension and placements at Southern Illinois Normal University, 
the President's Office has announced. 

He succeeds Dr. T. W. Abbott, who has been carrying on the duties of 
director of extension and placements in addition to his duties as dean of the 
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. 

Mr. Dey is a graduate of the University of Illinois, class of 1932. 
After teaching for five years at Pana Township High School, he was appointed 
superintendent of schools at Rosamond, 111., for four years. He also held the 
same position at Rankin, 111. for three years and here at Carbondale for two 
years. 

Mr. Dey has held the master's degree since 1939 and is a"bout half finished 
with the work on his doctor's degree. He is married and has three children. 

# '' # "* 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June — Appointment of eight new faculty members and two new 
assistants at Southern Illinois Normal University for the summer term has been 
announced by the President's Office. 

These appointments bring to 17 the number of new faculty named for the summer 
session. 

The newly appointed staff members, all of whom assumed their duties this week, 
are: 

Dr. Henry L. Wilson, assistant professor of English** Br. Wilson holds the 
bachelor of arts and the doctor of philosophy degrees from the University of Iowa, 
having taken the master of arts degree from the University of Colorado. 

Dr. Eaymonr". W. Esvorthy, assistant professor of business and economics. Dr. 
Esworthy held? i",h.e bachelor of science in education, th-3 nasbci cf science and the 
doctor of philosophy degrees from the University of Illinois** 

Miss Evelyn McKinley, assistant professor in physiology and health education. 
A graduate of Siftpson College, Miss McKinley holds the master of education degree 
from Marquette University, 

Dr. Earl H. Hall, assistant professor of education. Dr. Hall, a graduate of 
Western Illinois State Teachers College, obtained the master of arts degree from 
the University of Illinois and the doctor of philosophy degree from Teachers 
College, Columbia University, 

J. Stuart McNair, instructor in mathematics. Mr. McNair, a graduate of Knox 
College, obtained the master of science degree from the University of Chicago, 
and has also done graduate work at the University of Wisconsin. 

James E. Collier, instructor in geography. Mr. Collier graduated from Western 
Kentucky State Teachers College and took the master of arts degree from the 
University of Missouri, pursuing further graduate work at the universities of 
Missouri and Nebraska. 

N. W. Draper, instructor in English. Mr. Draper is a graduate of Southern and 
obtained the master of arts degree from the University of Michigan. 

Fred Dingle, also a graduate of Southern, instructor in English. After 
completing the master of arts degree at the University of Illinois, Mr. Lingle has 
done graduate work at the University of Wisconsin, New York University and the 
University of Southern California. 

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Two faculty assistants — Frank A. Marschik in industrial education and Miss Zella 
Cundall of Carbondale in the Library. Mr. Marschik is a graduate of Illinois State 
Normal University and has done graduate work at the University of Illinois, while 
Miss Cundall is a graduate of the University of Illinois* holding both the bachelor 
of arts and the bachelor of science degree in library science. 

Earlier appointments taking effect with the opening of the summer tern at Southern 
lncludo: 

Dr. Ralph R. Pickett as professor of business and economics; Dr. Robert McNicoll 
as associate professor of history; Dr. Frank L. Klingberg as associate professor 
of government; Miss May Sarton as poet-in-residence; Arnold 0. Myhre as instructor 
and counselor in the Veterans Guidance Center; Lynn C. Holder as instructor in 
physical education; Hal Stone, as instructor of chemistry. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., June — A three-day aviation conference will bo held at Southern 
Illinois Normal University, July 10-12, under joint auspices of the University and 
the Civil Aeronautics Authority, Delmar W. Olson, assistant professor of industrial 
education^ has announced. 

With the thene "aviation in education," the conference is designed to demonstrate 
to teachers in the public schools how aviation can fit into almost every subject 
in the public school curriculum, Olson said. 

' An all-day trip to the Parks Air College and terminal in East St. Louis is 
scheduled as a feature of the conference, and an Army Air Forces exhibit of . 
educational materials is planned. 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Druramond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June — Chosen from among some 300 applicants, a graduate of 
Southern Illinois Normal University has received one of the 30 pre-doctoral 
fellowships given "by the American Chemical Society, according to Dr. J. W. Neckers, 
chairman of the Southern chemistry department. 

Frank L. Holloway, to study at Chicago under his fellowship, was graduated 
from Southern in 1942 with a major in chemistry. He received a graduate fellowship 
at Ohio University, where he continued his work toward the doctor of philosophy 
degree until he joined the Navy. 

T-e American Chemical Society fellowships come from a $100,000 fund allocated 
by the society for awards to advanced students in the field of chemistry and 
chemical engineering whose training was interrupted by the war. 

The awards consist of up to $1,200 per year for single men, $1,800 for 
married men, plus a maximum of $500 per year tuition, with three years as the 
maximum period of training. 

Holloway will receive $60 per month for a period of two and one-half years, 
beginning in July, 1946. The G. I. Bill provides his tuition and $90 per month. 

He will do research under the direction of Prof. T. E. Hogness, whose 
investigations deal with physical-organic problems of biological -significance. 
Dr. Eogness 1 pre-war research involved various aspects of ensyme chemistry, 
working with cytochrome. 

"These fellowships are particularly generous ones," Dr. Neckers pointed out, 
"and we consider Holloway' s selection for one of them a tribute to the standards 
of Southern's chemistry department. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., June— Chiof photographer for the U. S. Army for the 
approaching atomic bomb tests at Bikini Atoll will be a former student photographer 
at Southern Illinois Normal University here, faculty members have learned. 

John Michnovich, chemistry and mathematics major here in 1944, was a photographe 
on the atomic project during its developmental stages, and has now been designated 
to head the Army's photographic crew for the Bikini test. Michnovich' s home is 
in West Frankfort. 

# # * 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Sorvice 
Lorona Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June— Miss Madeloine Snith, assistant professor of languages 
at Southern Illinois Normal University, has "been chosen as one of 100 French 
teachers of the United States to make a two-months' good-will visit to France 
under the auspices of the French government. 

The French government through tho Cultural Counsellor of the French Embassy 
in this country has offered to pay part expenses and the return passage of the 
100 teachers who will make the trip individually. 

The date of her trip to France has not been set, as her passport has not 
yet come through. However, if her request goes through in time, she will 
temporarily terminate her teaching at Southern on July 1. 

This will be Miss Smith's third visit to France. In 1931 when she was 
preparing to teach, she spent six weeks at the University of Paris. She returned 
in 1935 to spend several weeks visiting tho country as well as other parts of 

Europo . 

Miss Smith first cane to Southern in 1929. From April, 1943, to Novembers 
1945, whe was located in Washington, D. C, as a member of the Signal Corps of the 
War Department. She returned to the Southern faculty last December. 

"If only I suceed in making this trip, I shall consider it an extraordinary 
privilege to be so soon among the brave and forward-looking people of France," 
Miss Smith declared. "I feel that this would be the chance of a lifetime to see 
the new Franco in the making, under the auspices of the French government itself. 
"I am looking forward to seeing again all the beautiful old landmarks of the 
France that the world has always loved, but even more to observing the new surge 
of cultural life in that country whose intellectual vigor has never flagged— 
the theater, the musico.1 life, and art exhibits. 

"Also I hope to have just a glimpse of the forging of the new Constitution 
of the Fourth Republic ." 

# # # 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Servico 
Lorena Drunnond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June — President Chester F. Lay and Dr. B. R.Eair, dean of 
the College of Education, Southern Illinois Normal University, are this week 
attending a "school for executives" in Chatauqua, IT. Y. , sponsored "by the American 
Association of Teachers Colleges. The educational conference, attended by more 
than 200 college presidents of the country, will run June 17-27. 



Carbondale, 111., June — A $200 scholarship from the Illinois Congress of 
Parents and Teachers has "been presented to Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Seven of the $200 scholarships for the coming scholastic year were established 
by contributions from local branches and indiviudal members of the PTA, and 
presented to seven state- supported higher educational institutions of Illinois. 

Recipient colleges were S-stern Illinois State Teachers College, Charleston; 
Northern Illinois State Teachers College, Dc Kalb; Southern Illinois Normal 
University, Carbondale; Western Illinois State Teachers College, Macomb; Illinois 
State Normal University, Normal; and Chicago Teachers College. 



JL 

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Southern Illinois Formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Release Friday p.m. 

( Hote : The following list of graduates is so arranged that ,ou na y easily find and 

clip those from your territory.; 

i +nfni of 188 graduates— including those who will 
Caroondale, 111., June -A total of 188 ^aua aiplomag from Southern 

complete their degree work during the ^Ht the annu2 commencement exercises 
Illinois normal University here ^^^Unfversity President Chester P. Lay, while 
Candidates for ^•^fc*^^^?*^* of the Teachers College Doard. 
dinlomas were awarded oy Gen. aoDoru «• wavi » 

r ~\~\ nf Education— Ruth Esther 

iEIA-Bacholor of Science in Education degree College c hcr v;ork 

McFeron and James Edward west. Maig.rcT; 
for the degree at the end of summer term. 

^TAPOLIS-Dachclor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 

Claude Franklin Picrsall. 

- __ j? p-ino'itinn Ra'Tiond PlOSCOC 

ATA - Bachelor of Science in Education degree ol eg &£«$£ eo^lcto her 

McBrido; Clarence Eugene Whislor. i.auao \.. 

work for the degree at the end of sonncr torn. 

Bachelor of Science degree, College of Liheral «te and Scionoos-llo.d A. 

BELLEYILlE n --:,-,aehelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education-Grace 

M. Wcgner. 
WM-Bachelor of Science , in Education ^^g^i^Kul^viU 

SieTheir^f- tne^groe -t the end of suunor tern. 
CAIBO-Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education-Han Shelton. 

bachelor of Arts degree, College ef J*-*^ <£ ^T« ter^' 
Schultz will eonplote her work for the degree at the cm 

r, n „* nwrtl Arts and Sciences — Margaret 

Bachelor of Science degree, Col lege of Wora 1 Arts an ^^ 

Kathryn Henderson will complete work for too c^reo ..z 
term. 

Miller"; Lottie Jane Owen; George Lavern Patrick. 

•n n s^+f P Gi IT • Dotty Ann Grater; 

Gary P. hazier; Pearl Williams Easterly; Scott P. ^^J? 3liz abeth 

degree at the end of the summer term. 

Master of Science in Education degree, College of Education-Glenn J. 

McGowan and George William Schroedcr. 

«n + tt qf.ff- Po-v Wilhelm to complete work for 
John William Hawkins; Sooert E. Stifl, re^gy 
the degree at the end of the summer term. 

Bachelor of Science, Coiiege of Uhoral Art, and Sciences-Walter Hastings 
McDonald. 

Bachelor of Science, College of Vocations end Professions-Lois La r will 
coSle" work for the degree at the end of. sn-.ner tern, 
CAEBUWIILE-Bacholor of Science in Education, College of Education-Evelyn Louise 
Reichmann. 

Harrr Burke Foltz will co^lcte work for the degree at the end of the 
summer term. 

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CARTERVILLE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Alice 
Choate Mann; Hazel Snyder Lefler. 

Wyatt A. Lindsey will complete work for the degree at the end of 
the summer term. 

Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences — Max L. 
Martin will complete work for the degree at the end of summer term. 

CENTRALIA— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— James 
Clarence Greer and Retha G. Witzel will complete work for the degree 
at the end of the summer term. 

degree 
CENTERVILLE STATION— Bachelor of Science in Education^ College of Education- 
Ethel V. Maxwell Gilbert will complete work for the degree 
at the end of the summer term. 

CHRISTOPHER — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Clarence Baird Pierce. Herall Cornelius Largent will complete work 
for the degree at the end of the summer term. 

degree 
Bachelor of Science/ College of Vocations and Professions — Max M. 

Lewis 

CI SUE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Robert Lee 
Leathers 

COLLINSVILLE — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Mary Elizabeth Martin. Nina Louise Theiss will complete work for 
the degree at the end of the summer term. 

COULTERVILLE — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
John T. Eullerton will complete work for the degree at the end of 
the summer term. 

CYPRESS— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Guy J. 
Hunter will complete work: for the degree at the end of summer term. 

BAHLGREN— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, C n ge of Education— Helen 

Louise Garrison; Vada Miller Tudor. Everett C. Parkhill will complete 
work for the degree at the end of the summer term. 

degree 
DARLINGTON, S. C. — Bachelor of ArtsJ College of Liberal Arts and Sciences — 

Ora Elizabeth Gray 

DECATUR — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— 

Effie Grade Kittle will complete work for the degree at the end of the 
summer term. 

DIX— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Lewis W, Dobbs 
will complete work for the degree at the end of the summer term, 

DONGOLA— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Howard 
Keller 

DUCjUOlN— Eachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Ruby B. 
Keith; ©wight Teel. 

Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal A rts and s c i e nces— Marion 
Richard Bo well 

ELKVILLE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Juonita 
Prickett 

ELLERY — Bachelor of Science degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— James 
McCoin Allison 

EAST ST. LOUIS — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— 
Zella A. Cook; Bernice Marion Eritz 

ENEIELD— Bachebr of Science degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— John . 
Erkman will complete work for the degree at the end of summer tern, 

EQUALITY— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Martha 
Louise Brann 

EAIREIELD— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Ered 
Avery Pansier 

ELORA— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Dorothy 
Eogler; Marian Opaline Schroeder. 

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. •- '• , ■ 



>: 






GILLESPIE-- bachelor of Science in Education degree, Bollege of Education— June B. 
Laurie; Carl Francis Rolando. 

0ODFREY— Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Douglas 
William Greene 

GOLCONDA— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Dixie 
Bean. Cloman D. George will complete work for the degree at the end 
of the summer term* 

GOREVILLE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Ray 
Adams will complete work for the degree at the end of summer term. 

GRANITE CITY — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Warren Clifford Hess; Robert E, Hannj Cleo Ulm. Vivian Elizabeth 
Lupardus and Jamie Lee McGee will complete work for the degree at 
the end of the summer term. 

HARCO— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Arthur 
Eugene Abney* 

HARRISBURG— 3achelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Dorothy 
Jean Dennis will complete work for the degree at the end of the summer 
term. 

Bachelor of Science degree, College of Vocations and Professions- 
Gloria C. Barger. 

Bachelor of Science degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
Gerald E. Webb will complete work for the degree during the summer tena 

HARTFORD— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Dorothy 
Lorraine Jones 

HERRIN— Bachelor ofScience in Education degree, College of Education— Attie Belle 
Adams; Betty Jule Bowen; Margaret Ellen Oraig; Leon Howard Dickerson; 
Herschel Wayne Ellis; Helen Alvera Mataya; Dorothy Venus Rush; Carolyn 
Louise Stotlar. Helen Mar Schwegman will complete work for the degree 
during the summer term. 

Bacholor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Helen 
Virginia House 

HETTICK— Bachelor of Science degree, College of Vocations and Professions— 
Guanaviere Wheeler 

HIGHLAND— Bachelor of Arts, Collge of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Lois Gruenenfelder 

HURST— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Claude J. 
Rose, Jr., will complete work for the degree during summer term. 

degree 
Bachelor of Science./ College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Everett L. 
Deason will complete work for the degree during summer term. 

JACKSONVILLE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Mary Frances Allen 

JOHNSTON CITY— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Ernest R. Arms. 

Bachelor of Science degree, College of Vocations and Professions— 
Marguerite C. Barra 

ML— Bachelor of Science in Education degree* College of Education— Virginia 
Bernice Heflin will complete work for the degree during summer term. 

KEYESBORT— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Pauline 
^Pot&s 

MAKANDA— Bachelor of Science in Education degree v College of Education— Virgil M. 
Wheeles will complete work for the degree during the sumner term. 

MCLEANSBORO — Bachelor cf Science in Education degree, College of Education — 

Ernest L. Hood will complete work for the degree during summer term. 

M0UH5 VERNON — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education — 
Imogene Iris Clark will complete work for the degree during the 
summer term. 

Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— 
J. Eugene Malcolm Wells 

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MARION—Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Mar jorie 
Dawe Appert; F. Aileen Davis.; Ruth Arvada Jackson; Doris Henderson 
Ragsdaie. Cleo Doris Carter will complete work for the degree during the 
sumrEr tern. 

Bachelor of Science, degree, College of Liberal Arts and Science s--Harry 
Louis Davis 

MURPHYSBORO — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education — 
Esther Jane Craver; Robert E. Crombar; Dorothy Mae Hart; Charles 
A. Helmig, Jr.; Jane Frances Mitchbll. Frances Wilna Etherton, 
Elaine Audrey Miller, James Pleasant, will complete work for the 
degree during the summer term. 

Master of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Lev/is 
Ebb Etherton 

Bachelor of Science degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- 
Rex Ray Bivins; Homer Harvey Hanson 

NASHVILLE — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Doris 
Elva Bowers will complete work for the degree during the summer term. 

NEW ATHENS-- Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— 
Alonzo J. Woods 

NOBLE— -Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Murvin H. 
Brown will complete work for the degree during the summer term. 

NORRIS CITY — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education — 
Carl Lee Phipps 

OAK PARK— Bachelor of Science degree, College of Vocations and Professions— 

Edythe Miller Gahan will complete work for the degree during summer term. 

0* FALLON— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Ernestine 
Elizabeth Budina 

OLMSTEAD— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Rudelle 

Edmonds and Arthur E. Newbern, both of whom will complete work for their 
degrees at the end of the summer term. 

ORIENT — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Ruby 
Matthews 

OZARK— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Mary Louise 
Cox 

PALMYRA — Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Geneva 
Dunn 

PERCY— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Edward A. 
Martin will complete v/ork for his degree at the end of summer term 

Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Loraine L. 
Waters, will complete work on her degree during summer term. 

PINCKNEYVILLE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Mary Mann 

PITTSBURG— Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Charles A. 
Ellis, will complete work on his degree at end of summer term. 

PRINCETON — Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Fay e B. 
Vandeveer. 

RALEIGH-^Bachelor of Science in Educati or, degree, College of Education— Dwight 
Karnes 

ROYALT0N— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Feorl 

Jean Fiss; Evelyn Ann Missavage, who mil complete work for her degree 
during the summer. 

SALEM— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Bet te Jane 
Lechrone 

Bachelor of Arts, degree, College of Liberal ^rts and Sciences— Helen Jean 
Blackburn 

Bachelor cf Science degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Marian 
Frances Hargis 

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'■ I I 



■ '-i. ht ~£ 






SHATTUC— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Inez 
Singleton 

SHA-TOETOWiir— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Robert I. Gregg 

SHIBLAND— Bachelor of Arts degree, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences— Gerald 
McDonald Bethards 

SPARKS HILL— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Raymond W. Foster 

SPARTA— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Florence 
Alston; Mildred Biskey Cicka 

SWA33WICK— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Thelraa 
Estelle Quigley, who will complete work on her degree during the 
summer term. 

VALIER— Bach-elor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Betty 
Quails Malinsky 

VENICE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Alma 
Earrar Todd 

WATERLOO— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Mildred 
Liebheit 

TOST SALEM— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Victor Arthur Pixley. Clara Pixley will complete work for the 
degree during the summer. 

Bachelor of Science degree, College of Liberal *rts and Sciences- 
Victor Arthur Pixley, will complete work for the degree during the 
summer. 

WEST FRANKFORT— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education- 
Ernestine Cox; Jane Bean Swofford. Velia A. Bartolotti, Carl E. 
Kuehn, and Pcarle M. Tate will complete work on their degrees 
during the summer* 

WOLF LAKE— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Cecil 
G-. Trainer, who will complete work on the degree during summer term. 

WOODLAWN— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Troy 
Clyde Dorris 

XENIA— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— la Bonna 
Jean Harrell 

ZEIGLER— Bachelor of Science in Education degree, College of Education— Bon Ray 
Sheffer, who will complete work on the degree during the summer term. 



— . 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drumnond, Editor 



Release Friday p.m. 



Carbondale, 111., June 7 - "It is much later in the day for the defence of 
our way of life than most people realize," a Northwestern University professor 
told the 188 members of the Southern Illinois Formal University graduating class 

here this morning. 

Dr. W. R. Spriegcl, professor of industrial management at Northwestern, 
called upon the graduates to exercise "courageous, devoted, enlightened 
leadership" in religion, government, education, organized labor, business, 
agriculture, and social and recreational activities. 

"Three years from today you should he on your way to leadership in your 
nation's affairs," he declared. "Ten years hence you should occupy important 
places in the life of our state; and twenty years from today you and your 
contemporaries should oe counted among the active leaders of our nation." 

The degree candidates were certified by University President Chester P. Lay, 
and degrees were conferred by Gen. Robert W. Davis of Carbondale, member of the 
State Teachers College Board. 

The commencement speaker cautioned the graduates that "if we are not careful 
we will only have a government of the people, for pressure, .groups , by demigogs ,." 

"If we do not hold fast to the baeic principles of our forefathers we will 
soon have no basic principles left to which to hold," he asserted. "I shudder 
when I contemplate the ideologies that are teing promulgated by many people who 
are beset by a reform complex. 

"Their motives may be good, but the glorification of the State at the 
expense of the individual under the pretext of helping the common man can only 
lead to a loss of freedom. We may get security but at the cost of state 
totalitarianism." 

Stressing the ever increasing need for dynamic and enlightened leadership, 
Dr. Spriegcl said that "problem-solving is at least two-thirds of constructive 
leadership," and that other qualities necessary for "safe leadership" — from 
the standpoint of society — are balance, a high order of intelligence, character 
and boundless energy. 

Discussing leadership in the field of education, Dr. Spriegcl maintained 

that balance is especially needed. 

"It is not a question of all vocational education or the so-called 

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cultural education, but a balance that will provide for the cultural values and 
also aid in the earning a living," he explained. 

"Southern Illinois Normal University under the leadership of Dr. Lay 
(President Chester F. Lay^, your Board of Trustees, and your able faculty is to 
be congratulated on your courage to pioneer in a field of training leaders to 
meet the challenge in agriculture, business, mechanic arts, and the professions. 

"Your College of Vocations and Professions is truly a step in the right 
direction. Southern Illinois needs this type of education. It should make an 
outstanding contribution to the raising of the standard of living. 

Of leadership in the seven broad areas he mentioned earlier, Dr. Spriegel 

s aid: 

Of leadership in religion — "There has never been a time when there was 
greater need for the ideals and strength of our great religious. . .Democracy was 
founded upon the tenets of our great religious faiths. . .Young men and women, 
have the courage to stand up and be counted on the side of righteousness. Do not 
become ensnared by materialistic communism." 

Of leadership in government — "Your government needs your youthful 
enthusiasm, high ideals, boundless energy, stability of character, and glanced 
intelligence.... Let us build a better America not an imitation of a decadent 
Europe.... The price of freedom is eternal vigilance, sincere devotion to the 
principles of freemen, and a willingness to sacrifice personal confort and gain 
to fight against the encroachment of special pressure groups." 

Of leadership in education— "We are sadly in need of some high calibred 
vocational counselling in all of our institutions of higher education. This is 
the number one challenge to leadership in our universities and colleges. The 
second challenge to leadership in colleges is for the faculties to recognize that 
wo should be educating for life, which noons that we must recognize the needs of 
the students and our citizenry and subordinate the vested interested in some of 
our nost cherished courses." 

Of leadership and organized labor — "Organized labor is no longer weak. In 
fact, its strength, if not used wisely, nay threaten the stability of our 
economic system. There is a great need for wise leadership in organized labor. 
Labor leadership needs to consider the needs of all of the people, the consumer, 
as well as the community as a whole and not merely the members of the union.... 
Labor leadership needs to recognize that its membership is protected by the law 
in every legitimate activity hence it should not set itself above the law as has 
been done in 'sit down strikes 1 and violence of the picket linos. 

Of leadership in business — "Business leadership needs to recognize the 



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equities of all parties to the business process, namely, the owners, the consumers; 
the employees, and the community. Fortunately business ethics and business ideals 
have risen during the past thirty years especially among professional business 
men. This sane recognition of high ideals and practices needs to permeate our 
entire business structure from the giant corporation to the local gasoline 
station or garage." 

Of leadership in agriculture— "Formerly our rural people were the bulwark 
of democracy. They have confidence in themselves and looked with scorn upon any 
attempt at regimentation. . . .Our farm people must remain free of the deadening 
effect of governmental largess or bounty. . ..Our farmers nee: 1 , a leadership that 
recognizes economic laws rather than political expediency. . .Too many of our best 
farm boys go to the cities to find second rate opportunities while leaving 
first rate opportunities at home on the farm." 

Of leadership in social and recreational life-*-" There is great need for 
a broader base in the people themselves to enrich their social activities.... 
Build solidly in terms of an enlightened self-interest and strive to set a 
pattern for your community that will take our young people out of saloons and 



other activities that inevitably lead to trouble. 



o 



n 



# # ***.* 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Loreaa Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., June— Dr. Curtis W. Smith of Salem, 111,, a 1940 graduate 
of Southern Illinois Normal University, has "been cited "by the government for 
outstanding work on penicillin and war gases. 

According to Dr. J. W. Neckers, chairman of the chemistry department of 
Southern, Dr. Smith took his Bachelor's degree in chemistry here, later completing 
the doctor of philosophy degree at the University of Illinois. 

Since 1943 he has "been employed "by the Shell Oil C ompa ny laboratory at 
Emeryville, California, as a research chemist. 

His citation reads, "The United States of America, Office of Scientific 
Research and Development: This is to certify that Curtis William Smith has 
participated in work organized under the Office of Scientific Research and 
Development through the Committee on Medical Research contributing to the successful 
prosecution of the Second World War* 

"On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, this certificate 
is awarded in appreciation of effective service." 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111., June — In recent ceremonies, several high military honors 
were conferred post humously on Jack Wilson of Marion, a 1939 graduate of 
Southern Illinois Normal University, his former professors here have learned. 

Wilson entered the Air Corps in 1940 and became one of the youngest 
lieutenant colonels in the Armed Forces. He was recently officially declared 
dead by the War Department. 

The Distinguished Flying Cross and a second star, the Distinguished Service 
Medal, and the Silver Star were presented to Ms widow. 



Carbondale, 111., June— Robert W. English, assistant professor of industrial 
education at Southern Illinois Normal University, has had his article, "Projects 
for Transients," accepted for early publication in the magazine Industrial Arts 
and Vocational Education * 

The article is based on data which Mr. English acquired while on leave from 
Southern and on duty in the Navy. 

# # # 



Southers Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., June - Student veterans at Southern Illinois Normal 
University have adopted a new name for their society, henceforth to be known as 
Southern Veterans Organization. 

For more than a year student veterans here have "been organized as Gamma 
Iota Alpha, or the "G.I." fraternity. 

A new constitution for the group, adopted this week, outlines its aims as: 
Educational— (l) to promote and further the scholastic aims of the University 
through cooperation of students, faculty and administrative groups, and (2) to 
work constantly toward elevating both student scholastic standing and the 
University's scholastic credit rating. 

Economic— (l) to aid in promoting and helping to maintain a satisfactory 
standard of living for all students at Southern, and (2) to promote and maintain 
an active program of giving financial aid, if necessary, to any and all students. 

Social— (l) to establish joint. community-University programs for common 
social advancement and understanding, and (2) to promote intramural social 
activities among all students attending the University. 

The veteran student group has adopted as one of its first projects the 
raising of funds for eventual provision of a memorial dormitory for men students 
on the campus, an undertaking which has received the pledged support of the 
University Alumni Association, the S.I.N.U, Foundation, and the C ar tondale post 
of the American Legion, according to Dale Andrews of Mt. Carmel, president of 
the S.V.O. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., June - A summer edition of IEha Egyptia n, student 
newspaper, will be issued at Southern Illinois Normal University this summer 
for the first time in several years, according to Miss Catherine Sullivan, editor. 

Funds to permit summer publication of the paper \^ere authorized from student 
activity funds this week by University President Chester E. Lay. 



Southern I llinois Hormal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

S-oecial to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June— Opening Monday June 10, to run eight weeks, the 1946 
summer session at Southern Illinois Normal University has a wide variety of 
curricular offerings, as outlined in the summer bulletin just, off the press. 

Selected to appeal to the teacher who desires advanced professional training; 
to the graduate student; to the veteran and the regular undergraduate student who 
wish to accelerate their degree program, the bulletin- has listed some 180 courses 
in the three colleges— Education, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Vocations and 
Professions — and in the Graduate School. 

In addition to the regular listing of courses, the University has planned 
several workshops, clinics and conferences to be held, during the term. The College 
of Education has arranged for a Rural Education Workshop for rural and elementary 
teachers. The workshop will give work in arts and crafts, natural science, 
social science, social studies, and other fields, and workshop students will also 
observe classes in the University Allyn Training School. 

A workshop in Public Health has been planned by the Department of Physiology 
and Health Education for preparation of in-service teachers for the required 
courses in the teaching of health by a recent State law. The University has 
appointed Evelyn McKinlcy, visiting professor for the summer to assist the 
departmental staff in the workshop. 

In continuous operation at Southern, the Child Guidance Bureau will hold its 
quarterly clinic this summer, June 25, 26, and 27, in cooperation with the 
Illinois Institute for Juvenile Research, giving the summer student an opportunity 
to hear the clinicians' diagnoses of some individual child cases. Special seminars 
and courses may be taken this summer in this field. 

Here for two days during the summer session will be the tenth annual summer 
conference of the Parent-Teacher Association. Topics which will be considered in 
the conference include such as plans of organization, program making, health 
projects, and improvements of school and home conditions. 

On July 9, 10, and 11, the University will sponsor on annual Educational 
Exhibit of textbooks and reference materials, instructional devices, visual 
education materials, and general classroom equipment. 

According to the bulletin, approximately 80 members of the University faculty 
will be here during the summer term for the predicted largest summer term enrollment 

of several years. 

Copies of the bulletins and other information concerning registration for 
summer term may be secured from the office of Registrar in care of the University. 

# # T 



Southern Illinois formal University Information Service 
Lorena JArummond, Editor 

Release Friday 



Carbondale, 111., June 6 -Diction is the "most important tool" 
that teachers take with them into the classroom, and would-be teachers 
should receive, college training in "plain simple pronunciation," a 
Southern Illinois public school educator told, alumni of Southern 
Illinois Normal University here tonight. 

Roy Vail Jorden, city superintendent of .drools at Centralia, 
spoke at the annual University alumni banquet, attended by more than 
230 former students and 1946 graduates. 

He urged 'that every future teacher should take a course in diction 

"not a course in which the young -LTLen practiced elocution, yellocutlon 

and. bellocution, or the young women strode to the footlights and with 
dishevelled hair and uplifted, clenched fist declaimed 'Curfew shall 
not a- ring tonight!' but just a plain, common sense course in the 
pronunciation of words — in simple extemporaneous oral exposition." 

Fr. Jordan advocated, screening of would-be teachers, so that 
"only those who survive rigid tests as to character, intelligence, 
physique, adaptability, ingenuity, and other desirable characteristics 
should be admitted" to teacher-training programs. 

"Teachers should be more than ordinarily intelligent because 
thov are to handle our nation's greatest asset--our children-- the 
citizens of tomorrow," he asserted 

University President Chester F, Lay end W. B. Valentine of Alto 
Pass, president of the Alumni Association, welcomed the alumni, while 
responses were made by representatives of the special reunion class^s-- 
1396, 1906, 1916, 1926, 1936, end 1946. 

Calling for a "better system of education in the atomic age," 
Jordan deciered that "every public school and every publicly supported 
college and university must be a citadel of democracy." 

Citing that Southern Illinois Formal University has recently beer 
recognized as having university rather than college status, "authorized 
to grant bachelor's degrees in the Vocational Arts and the Liberal Arts 
and bachelor's and master's degrees in the field of education," Fr. 
Jordan urged further development of this Institution. 

"We as alumni would like to be able to point to our alma mater and 
cry to a prospective student, 'Fa. faculty at Southern is Second to 
none; you can get as good work there as in any similar institution in 



the country— barring none,'" "And I believe it is becoming more that 

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2 

way at Southern from day to day." 

"It is prepared to servo the million or more population of Egypt, 
and it is the only recognized university in this area," he said, "It 
has lately been favored by friendly legislation. Wo have a chance to 
expand it into the greatest state supported teacher training 
institution in the country, he had the University of Illinois here 
once--and let it slip through our fingers. Let's don't muff the ball 
again 1 " 

Fr. Jorchan cave parallel examples of (a) what the alumnus can do 
for his ala.a mater, and (b) what the university can do for the alumni. 

"First and foremost, the university noedc his good will," he 
asserted. "Second, the alumni may become scouts for recruiting students, 
especially exceptional students. Third, for a state supported school, 
such as ours is, the alumni can be of great assistance in securing 
needed appropriations from the legislature for the support and 
enlargement of the university and its curricula." 

The service the University should render to its alumni and patrons 
should be a "double-barreled service," he pointed out. It should train 
students and It should contribute to the general good of the area which 

it serves. 

"The University should have available to even the humblest citizen 
services that make life more enjoyable and the income of the region 
greater," he explained. 

"For instance, people need advice on soils, ci ops, mineral deposits, 
Industries, animal husbandry, soil conservation. These things are on 

th e ma t e r i a 1 side. 

"But aeople need advice and direction, also, on libraries, scenery, 
tours, club work, symphony orchestras, choruses. That is on the 

spiritual side." 

"One thing that some of us alumni are coming to expect of our Alma 
later is that it become a sort of clearing house or service station 
where we can go to get help In working out plans or ideas that we bave,' 

he said. 

"Personally, I have had a very happy experience of this kind. 
I wrote to President (Chester F.) Lay that we should like to have the 
services of a consultant in planning a new building, he referred the 
request to Dean Fair (Dr. E. F. Fair, dean of the College of Education) 

who assigned Dr. Bosley (Dr. Howard F. Bosley, associate professor of 
education) to our problem and he made an exceptionally good survey and 
wrote a brilliant report which is proving of great value in our curorts 
to construct new building facilities for our system. 

"This is as It should be. Southern can be and is a very helpful 
service station in furnishing educational consultants for the various 
school districts in the area." 

J-'- 41 M 



11 M U 



Southern Illinois formal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 

Carbondale, 111., June -Added to the list of visiting faculty 
for summer tern at Southern Illinois Normal University has been Hal 
Stone as instructor in chemistry, President Chester F. Lay has announced, 

I'r„ Stone received his bachelor's degree from Southern, and the 
master's degree from the University of Alabama, where he has done 
further graduate work. At present, he Is teaching in the West 
Frankfort High School. 

The appointment of Hr. Stone in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences marks the seventh visiting faculty member added to the 

University staff for the summer. 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111., June -Running parallel with the Southern 
Illinois Normal University summer session will be the summer term of 
University High School, June 2- August 10. 

Students who enroll in summer school at University High ordinarily 
carry four periods of class work per day which will give them one unit 
of credit toward graduation. However, a student may earn one and a- 
half units of credit by taking six periods of class work each day. 

About 15 courses are to be offered this summer in University High 
School, and students who are deficient in units of credit thus have 
an opportunity to make up that work. 

Further information on summer term enrollment at University High 
School can be obtained from Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the College of 

Education, or Dills Hall, acting principal, University High School. 

# # # 

Carbondale, 111., June -The Dridge of Years, recently released 
novel by J'ae Sarton, poet-in- residence at Southern Illinois Normal 
University this summer term, has been adopted as a Book-of-the-Honth 
Club book, it was learned here today. 

TT iss Sarton' s novel received high praise from critics 
Immediately after its release. 

Other books by Hiss Sarton include two volumes of poetry, 
Encounter in April and Inner Landscape, and another novel, The 



Single Hound. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June -Two workshops, one in Public Health 
Education, the other In Rural Education, have opened for the summer 
term at Southern Illinois Normal University. 

Approximately 90 are enrolled for the Public Health Education 

all holding scholarships from the U. S. Dept. of Public Health. 
Workshop/ They will study the principles and problems of health 

education in schools, communicable diseases, nutrition, sanitation, 

child development, exceptional children and healthful school living, 

among other topics. 

The Public Health Education V/orishop, sponsored jointly by the ■:„ 
University, the U. S. Department of Public Health, and the State 
Department of Health, is under the supervision of Dr. Marie A. 
Hinrlchs, professor of physiology and health education. 

Basis for the work in the Rural Education Workshop, in which 
some 55 s"r.r^r students are enrolled, is the new State Course of 
Study, prepared for use in the rural and elementary schools of 
Illinois. 

The Rural Education Workshop is directed by J. Ward Dillow, 
assistant professor of rural education. 

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Carbondale, 111., June -Enrollment for the summer session at 
Southern Illinois Normal University today reached 1,500, or 118 per 

cent about that for the first term last summer and 72 per cent above 

the combined registration for the entire summer last. year. 

Last summer 686 students registered for the first eight-weeks' 
term and 187 for the four-weeks' August term, a total of 873. 

Of those enrolled thus far this summer, 650 are veterans. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June- -Documents and publications of historical 
value have been significant gifts received recently by the Southern 
Illinois Normal University museum, according to John W. Allen, 

curator, 

A history of Cairo, Illinois, was presented to the Museum by 
Kiss Emma Landsen of Cairo, Written by her father, the late John 
M. Lansden, this volume is an authoritative publication concerning 
the earlier story of that city. 

Documents carrying the signatures of several of the earlier 
governors of the State were riven by Judge Gerald Trampe of 
Colconda. Ur. Allen states that the documents are a material 
aid in his goal to complete a collection of such signatures. 

From James K. Allison of Carbondale, a veteran student at 
Southern, came Lake's Atlas of V*ayne County, published in 1881. 

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Carbondale, 111., June -A lawn party for the 1500 students 
of Southern Illinois Normal University will open the summer social 
season here this week. 

To be held during the regular Chapel hour on the lawn back of 
Old Main Building, the mixer for both faculty and students will 
take the form of a "coffee hour." 

Refreshments will be served by the Home Economics foods classes 
under the supervision of Kiss Lucy K. '.Voody, chairman of the Home 
Economics department, 

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Southern Illinois Normal University information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Carbondale, 111., June -I. C. (Lyn) Holder, former all- 
conference football and basketball star for Southern Illinois 
Normal University, has been appointed assistant football and 
basketball coach here at Southern, President Chester F. Lay has 
announced. 

Holder, who reported for duty at the beginning of the summer 
session, will also serve as instructor in the men's physical education 
department. 

Glenn "Abe" Martin, director of athletics and head football 
and basketball coach, termed Holder's appointment as "a big asset, 
both for physical education and for athletics." 

Holder is a graduate of Southern, having attended here from 
1931 to 1935. He took the master's degree at the University of 
Indiana and has done other graduate work elsewhere. 

After leaving the University, Holder served as director of 
physical education and coach at Lawrenceville (111.) High School 
until he entered the armed forces. 

He has just been discharged, after having attained the rank 
of full lieutenant in the Naval Air Corps. He is married and is 
the father of two children. 

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Southern Illinois- Normal University Information Service 
lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June -An intramural all-star baseball team from 
Southern Illinois Normal University will be hand-picked to meet the Onized 
Glass Company team from Alton on Southern's Chatauqua Field here Saturday, 
June 29, Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Mrrtin has announced. 

Southern has not put a baseball team into intercollegiate competition 
this year, but has run a stiff intramural tournament and when the Alton 
club asked for a game, Martin agreed to got a team together. 

Martin said he would call together the managers of each team in the 

intramural tournament, and let thorn pick the all-stars to play in Saturday's 

gaxao. t 

Students will be on the campus this Saturday, making up classes in 

order to got off the Friday following the Fourth of July, "so we thought 

this would be a good time to provide them a little entertainment, « Martin 

said. 

The game will be called at 3 p. m. 



Carbondale, 111., June -The Maroons of Southern Illinois Normal 
University will take on Loyola University of New Orleans on Loyola' s home 
courts next December 14, according to Southern Basket Ball Coach Glenn 

"Abe" Martin. 

The Maroons fell before Loyola in the semi-finals at the Kansas City 
Basket Ball Tournament in 1944-45, but defeated the New Orleans boys twice 
last season— once here and again at Kansas City in the invitational 
tournament. When the two teams clash at New Orleans this winter, the 
tables will be turned— for the Maroons hold the 1945-46 Kansas City 
championship which Loyola took in 1944-45. 

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Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailiss 



Otvrtondale, XU., J^e - A combination radio-phonograph for the veterans 
lounge at Southern Illinois formal University has liquidated the four-year-old 

Faculty Gift Club. 

Early in the war, a group of University faculty members voluntarily banded 
together a,nd assessed each member $1 per month to send gifts to former students 
and faculty members in the armed forces. 

When the war ended, a balance in the gift fund totaled approximately $120. 
The group voted to spend that balance to help furnish the newly established 
lounge for veteran students on the campus, and chose a radio-phonograph as a 
suitable purchase, according to Dr. Ted R. Ragsdale, chairman of the club. 

By means of the generosity of a local dealer who secured a priority for 
the purchase and granted the club a 10 per cent discount, about $20 was left 
for purchase of records for the new machine. The veterans themselves will be 
' given the opportunity to select the records, Ragsdale said. 

The Faculty Gift Club was first started by Miss Sara Baker, then assistant 
professor of history, who is now in the Red Cross, assisted by Dr. C. H. Cramer, 
associate professor of history, now overseas with UMRA. Dr. Ragsdale later 
assisted, then directed the work of the group, aided by Mrs. Julia Ncely, 
associate professor of English. 



Carbondale, 111., Jun- - Dr. Orville Alexander, professor of government 
and director of alumni services at Southern Illinois Normal University, has 
been appointed as co-chairman of the Jackson County U. S. Savings Bonds 

Committee. 

Dr. Alexander's appointment came from Arnold J. Rauen, State director 

of the Treasury's U. S. Savings Bond Division for Illinois. 

The savings bonds committee was created to succeed the War Finance 

Committee and, although it does not plan any loan drives, is designed to 

promote and encourage the continued saving by the people in scries E, series 

F, and series G savings bonds. 

# # t 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorcna Drumnond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111., June - The forty-second quarterly psychological clinic 
to he held on the Southern Illinois Normal University campus since April, 1936, 
opened Thursday under the joint sponsorship of the University Child Guidance 
Clinic and the Illinois Institute for Juvenile Research. 

Dr. Sophie Schroeder, visiting psychiatrist of Chicago, and Dr. Wellington 
A. Thalman, director of the Child Guidance Clinic, are supervising the two-day 
clinic. Dr. Schroeder discussed "The Use of Projective Techniques in the Therapy 
of Individual Cases," describing what the study of psychoanalysis means and its 

values. 

Emphasis during the clinic, which includes examination and study of individual 
children, is placed upon teacher training. College students and student teachers 
may attend the staff ings and seminars. 

Participating in the staffings are University graduate assistants Mrs. Alice 
Rector, Herbert Johnson, Mrs. Bernice Sicknan, and Mrs. Bessie Allen, all of 
Carbondale; Miss Martha McClanahan, student from Marion; and W. L. Handle, 
Centralia, of the Veteran' s Guidance Center. 



Carbondale, 111., June - Dr. Bertram L. Hughes, newscaster for station 
KXOK, St. Louis, Mo., will be the guest speaker at the student assembly hour 
at Southern Illinois Normal University here Thursday, June 27, Eloyd V. Wakeland, 
program committee chairman, has announced. 

Mr. Hughes, who received a citation from the Morse School of Expression for 
the "Best in Speech" of any St. Louis news analysts, will speak on "What's In 
A Name?", analyzing the origin of personal names, particularly those peculiar 
to Southern Illinois. 

Mr. Hughes will deliver his usual ■ 7 : 30-7 : 45 a. m. news cast in St. Louis 
on Thursday morning, then will be flown by Navy plane to Carbondale to address 
the student body at 10 a. m. 



Southern Illinois Normal University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 



Carbondale, 111,, June -Appointment of five student assistants 
during the summer session at Southern Illinois Normal University has 
been announced by the President's office here» 

The assistants will do part-time work in a special department 
and graduate work toward the master's degree. 

Those appointed include Edward Allen, who will work in the 
College of Vocations and Professions, Herbert Johnson, at the 
University High School, and Bernice Sickman, in the Child Guidance 
Clinic. All three are from Carbondale, 

In addition, Amy Jones of Dupo will assist in the botany 
department, and Lorraine Waters, Percy, in the University Museum. 

# # # 



Carbondale, 111., June -Guest musician at Southern Illinois 
Normal University during the recent regular Chapel period was 
Elverson Smith, tenor from Philadelphia.. 

Mr. Smith gave a recital of popular classics and songs from 
famous light operas, on invitation of the Entertainment Committee 
of the University. 

He has studied a year with Sylvan Levin, former conductor of the 
Philadelphia Opera Company, now musical director of New York's IVOR, 
as a result of winning a Philadelphia Opera Scholarship. 

In addition, Mr. Smith has studied with Irene Williams, one of 
Philadelphia's most accomplished vocal teachers, has appeared over 
radio stations KYW and 17CAU,' v eing adjudged winner of a vocal contest 
on the latter station, and has appeared often in leading roles in 
the Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, and other musical comedy 
productions* 

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