(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "[News release]"

^Gtbrarg of 
foutljmt (3liItnots ^moersttg 



PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY 

ghwimu, annas 



•0'" 



• - taftOMfiC 



A3 

PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN "MNOIS 
UNI' 




it* 



v CABBONDAt£, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 
***m&» University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^^^■■■■■■^^■■■^■^■B 



(.Nate to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use 5f 3IU, !? not "SINU.") 

7-2-47 



Carbondale, 111., July - A total of 142 graduate students are 
enrolled at Southern Illinois University this summer, as compared with 
101 in the summer of 1946, Dr. Willis G. Swart z, chairman of the 
graduate studies committee, reports. 

One graduate student has come from Mexico City, Mexico; another 
from California, a third from Arizona, and a fourth from Mississippi. 

Of the total, 62 are majoring in educational administration and 
supervision, 31 in social science, 13 in English, 11 in elementary 
education, 10 in mathematics, £ in biology, and 2 in foreign language. 

Southern's graduate program is entering its fourth year this sumra 
summer. Since the first graduate courses were offered in the summer 
of 1944, 23 master's degrees have bodi conferred. 



Carbondale, 111., July - Classes will be dismissed at Southern 
Illinois University for Independence Day, July Fourth, and University 
offices will be closed both Friday and Saturday, July 4 and 5, 
President Chester F. Lay has announced. 



™ SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 



UNIVERSITY LIBRARY] 






PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN !! MNOIS 
UNI TY 
. LIBRmkY 

1 CARBQMDALE, ILLINOIS S I 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale, ILLmois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^■■^^^^■■^^^^^^^^■■B 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU," not "3INU.") 

7-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - A new electric potter's wheel and a 
new electric kiln have been acquired by the art department at Southern 
Illinois University for use of pottery classes, Ben Watkins, acting 
chairman of the art department, has announced. 

The potter's wheel has variable speeds ranging from to 130 
revolutions per minute, controlled entirely by a foot pedal, leaving 
the potter's hands free for "throwing" the clay objects, Watkins 
explained. Interchangeable "throwing" heads are provided for the 
modeling of different objects such as plates, cups and saucers. 

The kiln is a compact one which generates firing chanber heat of 
2000 degrees F. and is suitable for use in china painting, glass 
decorating, metal enameling, jewelry making, and metallurgical work. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., July - An article on "Contributions of the 
American Standards Association to Industrial Education" by Robert T ,. 7 . 
English, assistant professor of industrial education at Southern 
Illinois University, has been published in the June issue of the 
American Voc atio nal Journal. 



taan^H^tf 



v PROPERTY OF 

SOUTHERN !! ' INOIS 
UN! 
I , LIBRmKY 

. - ' CARBONDALt, ILLINOIS -j 



Southern Illinois 

Nx •!> University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU," not "SINU-'.) 



7-2-47 



Carbondale, 111., July - Nearly 100 Southern Illinois 
University students volunteered for levee duty this we^k to help 
control the Mississippi River as it threatened to flood Jackson 
County towns, according to Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, acting dean of 
men. 

Among the students who worked Monday afternoon, Monday night and 
Tuesday with the flood control group, were the following: 

Charles Allen of Carbondale, Edgar Alms of Percy, Dale Andrews of 
Mt. Carmel, Robert Bairunas of Johnston City, Alonza Beggs of Carrier 
Mills, W. G. Benningen of Grand Chain, Ledford J. Bishoff of Carbondale, 
Robert Brooks of Carbondale, Edwin Bryant of Norris City. 

Bill Burns of 400 W. Main, Chicago, Gerald Carr of 637 N. 66 St,., 
E. St. Louis, Wayne Childers of Royalton, James Cole of Norris City, 
Bill Conley of Marion, George W. Cotter of West Frankfort, Dan Cox of 
Frankfort Heights, Malcolm Dagley of Crossville. 

William Dean of Carrier Mills, John T. Drake of West Frankfort, 
Frank Dunst of New Brunswick, N. J., Joe Elliott of metropolis , Bob 
Ether id go of Fairfield, William H. Ether id 30 of Carbondale. 



_ 



PKUPhRTY OF 



SOUTHERN i'.MNOIS 

UN! 
. LIBHmKY 

• ' CAfiBONDALt, ILLINOIS i 



- 2 - 

Tom Evans of 709 South Illinois, E. St. Louis, Charles Fisher of 
Benton, Clarence H. Goldsmith of E. St. Louis, Larry Green of 
Carbondale, Archie Griffin of Carbondale, Thomas Gunhouse of Makena, 
Andy Hagopian of Granite City, Wallace Holsapple of Carbondale. 

Franklin Hamilton of McLeansboro , Clyde Hanft of New Athens, Obid 
Henderson of Benton, John Hughes of Carmi, F. E. Kingston of Fairfield, 
H. L. Kirkpatrick of Carbondale, Ernest Knowles of Bonnie, Charles B. 
Koch of Oakdale , Clyde Leilich of New Athens, Howard Leslie of 
McLeansboro. 

George Madison of Cave-in-Rock, Robert Mandrell of Mt. Vernon, 
Charles James McDonald of Christopher, Charles kathieu of Eldorado, 
Wade McDonald of Carbondale, Leslie McCollum of Johnston City, Richard 
Miller of Enfield, Paul Morgan of Sesser, John McFerron of Anna. 

Walter Mueller of Steeleville, Bill Ogdon of Marion, Wilburn C. 
Outlan of Carbondale, Don Outlen of Sparta, Robert Osowski of Johnston 
City, Howard Pepple of Sumner, James Pemberton of Steeleville, Bill 
Parrish of Carbondale, Don Purkaple of Dongola, Glen Phelps of West 
Frankfort . 

Judson Phillips of Shawnee town, Bob Pulliam of Carbondale, Roy 
Ragsdale of DeSoto, James Rankin of Mill Shoals, J. R. Reed of 
Centralia, Jim Rust of Carbondale, Al Shafter of Carbondale, Gene Sloan 
of Galatia, Hilmer Schultz of New Athens, Bill Shaw of Granite City. 

S. E. Smith of Carbondale, Virgil Spruel of Albion, Richard STein 
of Enfield, Julius Swayne of DuQuoin, Buell Tanner of Eldorado, Frank 
A. Theising of Bartelso, Paul Turley of Centerville Station, R. E. 
Tenney of Trenton, Harry Vaught of Burnt Prairie, Venus L. Vaughn of 
Vienna. 

Nolan V^st of Xenia, Richard Wampler of Fairfield, Gerald E. Webb 
of Harrisburg, Troy Wilkinson of Marion. SOUTHt- 



JlJLJL 

Thttr 



UNIVERSITY LIBRAE 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



rrcurtKiT ur 



SOUTHERN ".'INOIS 

UN! 
, LIBRhKV 

* 'CARBONDAIE, ILLINOIS 



I I 



Southern Illinois 
sk^ University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University 
If you use initials, please use v? SIU ?f , not "SINU". ) 

7-3-47 



Carbondale, 111., July - An exhibit of educational materials 
--textbooks and other instructional Iiterature--will bo displayed at 
Southern Illinois University July 3, 9 and 10, J. Ward Dillow, 
assistant professor of education, has announced. 

The exhibit will be open to students and teachers who are 
attending summer school at the University, and also to school 
administrators of this area. 

Approximately 50 publishing companies will display materials 
during the three-day exhibit, which will be held Tuesday afternoon, 
all day Wednesday, and Thursday morning in the gymnasium of the 
Science Building. 

A picnic at Giant City will be given for the book exhibitors by 
the University faculty on Tuesday evening. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., July - Dave kalinsky of Flora, who will 
complete the bachelor of science in education degree at Southern 
Illinois University this summer, has been appointed assistant coach 
and teacher of physical education at the Dupo High School for next 
year, Athletic Director Glenn ;? Abe" Martin has announced. 

Malinsky, a veteran, lettered in football at Southern in 1942 
before going to the: armed forces. 












rrcurcrcn ur 

SOUTHERN I' ' INOIS 



UN 




h* 



' GARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 
^■^■^'University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU".) 



7-3-47 



Carbondale, 111., July - Fifteen outstanding health education 
leaders are appearing as consultants or special lecturers for the 
Health Education Workshop currently under way at Southern Illinois 
University, according to Dr. Marie A. Kinrichs, chairman of the 
physiology and health education department. 

Cooperating with the University in the workshop are the State 
Department of Public Health, the State Department of Public Instruction, 
the University of Illinois Division of Crippled Children, and a number 
of state and national foundations and health agencies. 

On Monday, July 7, Dr. Clair E. Turner, assistant to the president 
of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, New York City, 
will visit the workshop. His lecture at 10 a. m. in Harwood Hall will 
be open to all interested persons. 

On Tuesday, July 3, Dr. Jerome Sievers, chief of the Division of 
Communicable Diseases, State Department of Public Health, will be 
featured. 

Already several guest speakers have appeared before the workshop 
students, including Dr. Orvis Hoog, dental consultant for the Division 
of Public Health Denistry, State Department of Public Health; Roy 



■■-* '' .V 



e».~ ■ 



rrcurtrcn ur 



SOUTHERN 1M !N0IS 



L" 1 



iy 




-i* 



' CARBOWDAtt, ILLINOIS 



1 



■2- 



0. Duncan, state director of health and physical education. Office of 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, Springfield;; and Miss Elsa 
Schneider, assistant director of health and physical education, 
Springfield. 

Other speakers scheduled include: July 14— -D, B. Morton, sanitary 
engineer, State Department of Public Health; July 15 — Dr. 0. Howard 
Gowan, chief, Division of Cancer Control, State Department of Public 
Health; July 21 — Mrs. E. F. Butler of Alton, health chairman, Illinois 
Parent-Teacher Association. 

July 22--iirs. Henrietta Hanna, consultant in nursing, State 
Department of Public Health; July 23-24 — Miss Leona Pazourek, 
nutrition consultant, Division of Maternal and Child Hygiene, State 
Department of Public Health; July 23 — representative of the Junior 
Red Cross; July 2#— -Miss Grace Borah, orthopedic nurse, University of 
Illinois Division of Services for Crippled Children; July 29-- Miss 
Marguerite M. Furey, consultant in nursing activities, National Society 
for Prevention of Blindness. 

August 5 — Dr. Richard Boyd, chief, Division of Local Health 
Administration, Dr. Leslie Knott, medical administrative assistant, and 
Mrs. Margaret Cowdin, chief, Division of Public Health Education, 
State Department of Health. 

m 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




SOUTHERN > ! I INOIS 

UN! 




■■*• 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
NorM ® teIT niversity 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU".) 

7-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - Final enrollment for the summer 
session at Southern Illinois University has climbed to 1,333, as 
compared with 1,579 for the summer term last year, Registrar Marjorie 
Shank has reported. 

More than half the summer students--959--are veterans, 14 of 
them women veterans. 

There are 1,110 men students compared to 773 women students in 
school this summer. 

Grouped by colleges, the enrollment table shows 1,065 students in 
the College of Education, 334 in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences, 346 in the College of Vocations and Professions, and 143 in 
the Graduate School. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., July - A June honor graduate of Southern 
Illinois University who has recently accepted a position in a Chicago 
suburb will really "tear up roots" when he leaves here. 

Walter Mifflin, graduate from the department of industrial arts, 
spent the spring term designing and constructing his own home here. 
During the fall term, he designed and made a complete bedroom set as 
part of his industrial education class work. 






led 
nil: 



ffii 



v 



ur 

1 1 



SOUTHERN "MNOIS 
UNI' 




%» 



' GABBONDAU, ILLINOIS I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "3IU M , not Vf SINU i? .) 

7-3-/ + 7 

Carbondale, 111., July - Mrs. Alice Kandaleft Cosraa, 
representative of the Syrian Government on the Status of Women 
Commission of the United Nations, will be presented in a lecture at 
Southern Illinois University July 17, Dr. P, M, Larson, chairman of the 
summer entertainment committee, has announced. 

Mrs. Cosma will appear at $ p. m. in Shryock Auditorium. Her 
lecture, on the subject, "Current Problems in the Arab kiddle East , ?? 
will be open 'to the public. 

Founder and president of the Arab Women's National League, in 1945 
she organized and became chairman of the Arab Women 7 s Congress for 
the Defense of Palestine. She was the onl}>- woman to testify before 
the Anglo-American Committee on Palestine in 1946. 

Mrs. Cosma is a master of arts graduate of Teachers College, 
Columbia University, and is a well-known educator in the kiddle East. 
She has served as supervisor of teaching in the State Normal School 
in Baghdad, Iraq; as principal of that school; as head of the Moslem 
College for Girls in Beirut, Lebanon, although she herself is a 
Christian; as principal of the Private National School for Girls; as 
principal of the Secondary School of Arts and Crafts in Damascus, Syria; 



and as professor of education in the State Teachers College in 

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 
UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



Damascus. 






i- 



i ixur li\ i i \JT 



SOUTHERN "I.INOIS 

UN! 




h* 



' CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS \ 





Southern Illinois 






— No fflftfMlTni versify 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 


CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 


■ 




■ 






^" ll 



(Notre to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU". ) 

7-S-47 

Carbondale, 111,, July - Southern Illinois University students 
ha ve overflowed the campus this summer to the extent that several 
hundred are now meeting classes regularly at the Lincoln School, one 
of Carbondale ? s elementary school buildings. 

Some dozen classes from the College of Education are housed at 
Lincoln School, according to Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education. 

A rural education workshop meets approximately three hours a day 
there, and other classes use the building from $ a. m. until 1 p. m. 
every, day and until 4- p. m. on several days a week. 

Also with the cooperation of the Carbondale school system, 200 
"grown-up" chairs have been obtained from the Carbondale Community 
High School to replace the children's desks and chairs in customary 
use at the Lincoln School, Dean Fair said. 



Www 



Release Wednesday 



Carbondale, 111.,' July 9 - Miss Mabel Carney, emeritus professor 
of rural education from Teachers College Columbia University, whose 
home is now at Marseilles, 111., arrived here today to servo as 
consultant for the Rural Education Workshop at Southern Illinois 
University and to lecture to other education classes. 

Mrs . Carney has been serving as consultant for the University's 
Rural Education Workshop at Salem in recent weeks. 

'/ II II 

WWW 



I I 



.'< 



> — 



— 



I nui Li\ i i u» 



SOUTHERN 1M INOIS 
UN! ' 

, LIBRahY 

- ' CARBONDALt, ILLINOIS 3 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
niversity 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIIP, not "SINU (t .) 

7-9-47 

Carbondale, 111,, July - A new Rural Education Workshop 
conducted by Southern Illinois University will open at Ewing July 14 
to run through August 12, Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education, has announced. 

A similar workshop has been held at Salem during the early part 
of the summer and will continue through next week. Enrollment in the 
Salem workshop has totaled approximately 100 in-service teachers. ' 

A special panel discussion on rural school reorganization will be 
conducted Tuesday, July 15, at both the workshops — at Salem in the 
morning and at Ewing in the afternoon. 

Participants on the panel will be County Supts. Bob Mc Kinney of 
Williamson County, Goffrey Hughes of Franklin County, Paul Chance of 
Marion County; Willis K, kalone of the University/ College of Education; 
Jean Fligor, instructor in rural education, who has been in charge of 
the Salem workshop; and Dean Fair. 



Carbondale, 111., July - A concert by the University A Cappella 
Choir will be presented as a feature of the summer entertainment 
program at Southern Illinois University Wednesday, July 16, Dr. 
Maurits Kesnar, chairman of the music department, has announced. 

The concert, open to the public, will b^ given in the Little 
Theatre at & p. m. 

UJ.J1 

WW 



I l\\Jl Li* i i wri 



SOUTHERN "MNOIS 

UN! 




■■s- 



Y 

'GARBONUAU, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 

Ni 



University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



l" 

.'I 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University 
If you use initials, please use "8IU", not lf SINU n . ) 

7-9-47 



Carbondale, 111., July - If you want to know why teachers 
continue to choose the teaching profession in spite of the highly- 
publicized low salaries — here are the reasons. 

A survey of 7$ of the 134 June graduates of Southern Illinois 
University 1 s College of Education shows: 

More than two-thirds chose teaching primarily because they like 
boys and girls and like to work with thorn. 

One-seventh, because they feel a responsibility for furthering 
the democratic processes. 

One-seventh, because teaching offers an opportunity for service to 
their country and their community, or an opportunity for community 
leadership. 

While only two of the graduating seniors gave as his No. 1 reason 
for choosing teaching the fact that it "provides a regular income, 
with short hours and long vacations," 70 others said this factor had 
some influence on their choice. 

Two of the old stand-bys in the earlier days of the American 
teaching profession — "to get a job close to home" and "I've nothing 
else to do so I might as well teach"--took a back s^at with this year's 
graduating class. 



I l\UI 1.1% I • V/l 



SOUTHERN i'MNOIS 

UN! 
, LIBRhKV 

- ' CARBWOAIC, IUINOIS 



-2- 



■."..'.. None of- the- graduating seniors chocked either of these -r-e as ons 
as their No. 1 motive in entering the teaching profession, although 
40 admitted the ! 'job close to home" had some minor influence in their 
choice, and 43 confessed they had no other 1 compelling vocational goal. 

These same students, asked to check the personal qualifications 
a good teacher should have, ranked the following as the most important 

Good judgment regarding the needs of children at various ages. 

A belief in freedom ei|d worth of each growing personality. 

A knowledge of subject matter. 

Good physical and mental health. 

Faith in the worth o£ teaching. 

Other characteristic^ or qualification!! they considered important 
for the teacher included: good citizenship In the school and in the 
community; a skill in evaluation; a hapoy disposition; ability to 
establish friendly relations with people of tlte community; ability to 
have fun in extra-curricular activities with children; correct speech 
and ^ood written English; personal attractiveness; good grades and a 

high I. Q. 

a '.iji 
WftW 



• i 



.'i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




SOUTHERN ".MNOIS 

UN! 




9W 



1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



a 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not ff SINU n .) 

7-9-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - A supplementary list of some 35 
Southern Illinois University students who assisted in flood control 
levee work along the Mississippi during the recent flood menace has 
been issued by Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, acting dean of men. 

An earlier list showed approximately 90 student volunteer levee 
workers. 

The new list includes the following: 

Jim Baker of Vienna, Frederick Choisser of Eldorado, Ernest Copple 
of Centralia, Nunzia Corona of West Frankfort, Salbatore Corona of 
West Frankfort, Charles Cottrell of Granite City, John Robert Crosley 
of Christopher, Gary Dangutis of Johnston City, Norman Davis of Valier. 

Berry Dale Eisenhower of Royalton, Larry Fiene of Steeleville, 
Bill Floyd of Alvin, Wilbur Garber of West Frankfort, Warren E. Garren 
of Centralia, Steve Hancock of Harrisburg, Charles Harris of Tamaroa, 
M. U. Harrison of Granite City, Kenneth B. Hedges of 3723A Palm, St. 
Louis. 

Charles McDonald of Christopher, Val Jean MdFadden of West 
Frankfort, Paul Mitchell of Murphysboro, Frank Moake of Carbondale, 
Don Morris of Marion, George Novak of Carbondale, Glen W. Phelps of 
West Frankfort, Carlos Pleshe of Carbondale, Carl Rody of Carbondale. 



I l\UI III I i 



V 



SOUTHERN " I INOIS 



Ul 






Ml 



■■ 




&* 



' GARBOWDALt, ILLINOIS 



I 



"1 



-2- 



H. Y. Rowe of Truman, Al. J. Shafter of Carbondale, Gene Sloan of 
Galatia, Charles Talbert of Wayne City, Curtis E. Taylor of Crossville, 
Don Turner of Granite City, R. Woods of Mt. Carmel, 






Southern Illinois 
Normal University 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



rill 



l IXUI Lit I i ui 



SOUTHERN "MNOIS 

UN! 




3m» 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 

,||li|^^iljniversity 

7w/w^»7w*w*w£ ARBONDALE( ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "8IU", not "3INU".) 

7-14-47 

Carbondale, 111*., July - Three Southern Illinois University 
faculty members have been granted sabbatical leaves of absence for 
1947-43 to carry -on work leading to the doctor's degree, President 
Chester F, Lay has announced. 

Miss Gladys Babcock, assistant professor of home economics, will 
study at Cornell University, 

Mrs, Edith S. Krappe, assistant professor of English, this 
summer started her work at the University of Pennsylvania and expected 
to complete her doctor of philosophy degree there this year. 

Miss Madeleine Smith, assistant professor of foreign languages, 
will study at Yale University. 



Carbondale, 111., July - Room libraries in the Allyn Training 
School at Southern Illinois University are "the best I've seen anywhere 
in the country," Miss Katherine Jennings, representative of the World 
Book Encyclopedia , declared here recently. 

Mrs. Jennings, who with some 50 other book company representatives 
exhibited at Southern last week, photographed the 4th grade library 
for use in her company's magazine as an example of a good home room 



library. 



### 



IP 

in 



ECU 



Ilii 
iiv( 

J. I; 



Ilir 
i pi 



ft 
iff 



uri 



southern !<! inois 
univi 

. LIBRmkY 

• ' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 
^University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not i? SINU I? .) 

7-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - Two Southern Illinois University 

faculty members will serve on the visiting faculty for the workshop 
for Illinois High School Principals at East Bay Camp, Bloomington, 
July 17-19. 

Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the College of Education, and Dr. 
Douglas Lawson, professor of education, will lead discussions at the 
workshop, which is sponsored by the University of Illinois, the 
Illinois High School Principals Association, Illinois State Normal 
University, Northern Illinois State Teachers College, Western Illinois 
State College, Eastern Illinois State College, and Southern Illinois 

University, 

j 1 11 



Carbondale, 111,, July - Two student groups from Southern 
Illinois University's music department and two student soloists will 
be presented in a recital Wednesday evening, July 16, in the Little 
Theatre. 

The Mixed Chorus and- the Madrigal Singers, authentically- 
costumed singers of l6th century ballads, v/ill appear while Miss Carol 
Werner of Belleville, contralto, and Thomas Parks of Anna, bass, will 
be featured as soloists. Several student conductors will conduct the 
Mixed Chorus in its numbers. 



I hUl Uni • ui 



SOUTHERN 1M JNOIS 

ur 

, LIBRmKY 

* ' GARBONDAU, ILLINOIS I 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



ern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "3IU", not "SINU". ) 

7-14-47 

Garbondale, 111., July - Church groups, women's clubs and other 
women f s organizations are especially invited to attend the lecture here 
Thursday evening by Mrs. Alice Kandaleft Cosma, noted educator and 
Syrian diplomat, University officials have announced. 

Mrs. Cosma will be presented by Southern Illinois University as 
part of its summer cultural and entertainment program. She will 
speak at $ p. m. in Shryock .auditorium. 

A representative of the Syrian Government to the United Nations 
Commission on the Status of Women, Mrs. Cosma has headed several 
women's colleges and universities in her native country. 

She founded the Arab Women's National League and served as its 
first president, and also served as chairman of the Arab Women's 
Congress for the Defense of Palestine. In 1946 she was the only 
woman to testify before the Anglo-American Committee on Palestine. 

Her lecture, on the subject "Current Problems in the Arab Middle 
East," will be open to the public. 

### 



I l\\J\ Lit I 



SOUTHERN I'll 
UNI 



. , 




9W 



' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
N ***^ 1 University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



l» I 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois Univo'r ei ' /". 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU". ) 

7-16-47 

Garbondale, 111., July - Name of the department of business and 
commerce at Southern Illinois University has been changed to 
"Department of Business Administration," University President Chestc-i' 
F. Lay has announced. 

This department is in the College of Vocations and Professions. 

The new name was authorized by President Lay on recom .endation of Dr. 

Henry J. Rehn, dean of the college. 

ji •/ /' 

Tffftf- 



Garbondale, 111., July 



Senor Jose Luis Reyes, holder of 



first Rotary Club international scholarship at Southern Illinois 
Univorsit^, vyill deliver a public lecture on ''International 
Understanding" here July 30, Dr. Vera Peacock, chairman of the foreign 
language department, has announced. 

Senor Reyes will speak in English. 

His talk, to be sponsored by the foreign language department, in 
which he is a graduate assistant this summer, will be given at 70 
p. m. in the Little Theatre on the University campus, and will be .a 

to the public. SOUTHERN ILLINOIS 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 



i HUI Lui • CH flaMMMMH 



SOUTHERN I'.LINOIS 
UN 

. LIBHmKi 

• ' CARBONDALt, ILLINOIS I 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED, 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is -now Southern Illinois Uriivcx'sitv. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU". ) 

7-16-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - Appointment of six new faculty mci ...rs 
at Southern Illinois University has been announced by University 
President Chester F. Lay. 

Dr. Joseph S. Rafalko, who is serving on the summer faculty at 
the University, has accepted a permanent appointment as associate 
professor of zoology. Dr, Rafalko, who holds the master's and doctor's 
decrees from the University of Pennsylvania, has taught at Pennsylvania 
and more recently at Syracuse University, where he has been head of 
the zoology department of Triple Cities College. 

Jack Hedges of Carbondale, a June master's degree graduate of 
Southern, has been named to a temporary position as faculty assistant 
for the summer. Mr. Hedges is serving as field representative of the 
University in connection with the State of Illinois exhibit caravan 
which is touring a series of county fairs in Southern Illinois. 

George C. Cpmp from the University of Illinois faculty has 
been named associate professor of English, effective this fall. A 
graduate of Ohio Wesleyan College, where he taught for a time, Camp 
holds the master's degree from Ohio State University ana this su: i- 
is completing the doctor's degree at the University of Illinois, 
where he is an assistant professor. 



_ 






I MUI LIU I Ul 



SOUTHERN IU INOIS 
, LIBHmKY 

* ' CARBQNDALE, ILLINOIS | 



-2- 

Dr. Robert C. Turner, head of the English department at 
Mississippi State College, has been appointed associate profess v of 
English. Dr. Turner holds the bachelor's and master's degrees iV.uii 
the University of Missouri and the doctoral degree from Yale 
University. He formerly taught at Carroll College in Wisconsin. 

Dr. Viola M. DuFrain from Northwest Missouri State Collegj ?..s 
been appointed associate professor of business. She is a gradu; L - .e E" 
the University of Illinois and obtained the master's and doctor's 
degrees from the University of Chicago. She has taught at Susquelimna 
University and the University of Chicago, 

Mrs, Zella Cundall, who served on the Southern staff last sul or, 
has been appointed instructor in Wheeler Library on the permanent 
staff. Mrs. Cundall holds her library science degree from the 
University of Illinois, and comes to Southern from Danville high schoo 
school. 

President Lay also announced the resignation of Dr. Clarence L. 
Vinge, associate professor of geography, effective in the fall. 
Dr. Vinge plans to go to Michigan State College. 

m 






Southern) ill 



inois 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Normal 



University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



■■■I 



I HUI Ll\ I l v/l 



SOUTHERN iv INOIS 

UN! 




5~ 



V CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS I 



Southern Illinois 



niversity 




Information Service mmmmm CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU". ) 

7-18-47 

Carbondale, 111,, July - Eight Southern Illinois University 

faculty members were approved for promotion in rank by the State 
Teachers College Board at its recant meeting at Macomb, University 
President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Two were promoted from associate professor to full professor — 
Dr. Willard M. Gersbacher, chairman of the sociology department, and 
Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, in the psychology department. Dr. Hiskey, who 
has been serving as acting dean of men, also received permanent 
appointment as dean of men, and was named director of testing. 

Two assistant professors were promoted to associate professorships 
— Dr. Norman Caldwell in history and Dr. Mary Eileen Barry in foreign 
languages. 

Four instructors were promoted to assistant professorships — 
Miss Dorothy Heike, library; Miss Grace E. Hite, library; Alex Reed, 
agriculture and University high school; Lynn Holder, men's physical 
education and basket ball coach. 



Carbondale, 111., July - Miss Edith C. Batho, principal of 
Royal Holloway College, University of London, will lecture at Southern 
Illinois University July 29, the entertainment and lectures committee 
has announced. Miss Batho will be the guest of Miss Frances Barbour 
and Mrs. Julia Neely of the English department., during her visit here. 

m 









Ii 



ayst 
probl 
under. 



ii 



;a 



SOUTHERN "MNOIS 

UN! 



i , 




-~ 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 3 




outhern Illinois 

toMMjnSriirurtir&r 



University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



■ >■ 



(Note, to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU". ) 

7-13-47 



Carbondale, 111., July 1$ - Presence of large American oil 
companies in Arabia is a help to the Arab cause, a noted Syrian woman 
educator said here last night. 

Mrs. Alice Kandaleft Cosma, Syrian government representative on 
the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, lectured here 
under the auspices of the Southern Illinois University entertainment 
and lectures committee, on the subject "Current Problems in the Arab 
Middle East. 1 ' 

Mrs. Cosma declared that the Arab problem represents a 
crystalization of the problems of the 'world at large, and that Arabian 
problem can be solved only by the United Nations through international 
understanding. 

"Power politics can destroy us," she declared. 

She pointed out that at present Great Britain cannot leave Egypt 
and the Sudan because she needs a place for her armies and a trade 
Link with the Far East; the French cannot get out of North Africa 
Tor they would lose their .empire. 

"If England and France released control, Russia would move in," 
;he said. 

(more ) 



i nvyi kit I i v/i 



SOUTHERN ".MNOIS 



r 



i 




■■»* 



' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS I 



If 



-2- 

Citing that Arabia contains 30 per cent of the oil reserves of 
the world, and produces 20 billion barrels per year — approximately the 
same as the United States produces — she explained that Arabian oil, a , 
together with the strategic geographical position of the near and 
Middle East, makes this area one of prime concern in any United Nations 
effort to solve international relations among the major powers. 

"Oil is no less than bread to humanity," she observed. 

Discussing the Palestine problem, Mrs. Cosma termed this "the 
great sore spot" in the Arab countries, and the major cause of lack of 
unity. 

"Arab countries — Northeast Egypt, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Tripolitania, 
North Africa, Morocco and Lybia — concede that they have been awakened 
by the power, education, and culture of the western world," she said. 

"They do not forget that they were once the "bridge where all 
civilizations converged and the cradle of three great religions of the 
world — Christian, Jewish, and Islam. 

"Therefore they have a right to consideration of the problems 
facing them today." 

The Jewish argument that "we were here first, this is the seat of 
our religion, and we have made many internal improvements," offers no 
excuse for creating a state within a state, Mrs. Cosma asserted. 

"In the first place, the Arab was living in Palestine before 
Christ's time," she pointed out. "Palestine is also the seat of the 
Arab's religious culture. 

"If internal improvements are a reason for conquest, then the 
United States could exploit all countries, even England, and set up 
new states." 

(more ) 



J-^M 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



ex] 
rs! 

int 

50] 



i nwi III I I v/l 



SOUTHERN 1M !N0IS 

Uf t 

• % CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 3 



-3- 

The Arab sees the solution to the Palestine situation in a simple 
light, she said, 

"For centuries the Jew and the Arab have lived together in 
Palestine," she explained. "They could continue to do so if a Jewish 
state were not desired. Proportional representation is so largely 
Arab that there is no question of the Arab's maintaining control of 
Palestine. 

"The Arab is willing to accept the Jews already in Palestine, 
but does not feel that they should have to accept immigrants merely 
because they desire to come. 

"The United Sta tes," she reminded, "does not allow all who 
desire to do so to come to this country and take up citizenship. If 
they did, practically all Europe would be on your shores." 

She quoted Rabbi Burger, who in his book Jewish Dilemma , 
expressed the view that the Jew does not represent a race, but a 
religion, and therefore should not desire to set up a separate state. 

Arabia's chief problems are (1) independence, and (2) unity, 
Mrs. Cosrna insisted, and "when the world is organized on an 
international basis, the Arab world will have most of its problems 
solved automatically." 

m 



■ i 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




^M 



nui kit i i vri 



SOUTHERN ".MNOIS 

UN! 




fc» 



v CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




Southern Illinois 



University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use v? SlU 1! , not n SINU n . ) 

7-21-47 



Carbondale , 111., July - The nationally famous Chapel Choir 
from Capital University, Columbus, Ohio, will appear at Southern 
Illinois University July 21+ , under sponsorship of the University 
music department. 

The concert will be presented in Shryock Auditorium at 8 p. m. 

This choir, which has a tradition of 19 years' concert work behind 
it, has appeared in the Hippodrome Theater in Mew York, in Carnegie 
Hall, before the National Federation of Music Clubs, and in a private 
performance before ex-President and Mrs. Hoover. 

It has given concerts in Los Angeles, Chicago, Kansas City and 
other United States cities, as well as in Regina, Canada.. 

The 50-voice choir is conducted by Ellis Emanuel Snyder, who 
organized the group 19 years ago and who is founder and director of 
the Choral Union of the Luther Leagues of the American Luther Church. 
Mr. Snyder has directed the choral division at the Lakeside Chautauqua 
and is now serving as national chairman of church music for the 
National Federation of music Clubs. 

m 



■■ 






■■■■■■■■I » <»^l Ul\l I Ul 

SOUTHERN S! ' 



■MM 



NOIS 



UN 



* 




W 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






4 




Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



ern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU 1 '. ) 

7-21-47 

Carbondale , 111., July - Two additional games have been added 
to the 1947 football schedule for Southern Illinois University, 
athletic director and head football coach Glenn "Abe" Martin has 
announced. 

The season* s opener will be played Sept. 27 against Scott Field 
here, while the closing game of the season on Nov. 22 will pit the 
Maroons against Cape Girardeau State Teachers College, at Cape. 

Other games on the 1947 card are: Oct. 4, Evansville College, 
here; Oct. 11, Indiana State at Terre Haute; Oct. 1$, Western at 
Macomb; Oct. 25, Northern, here (3outhern T s Homecoming game); Nov. 1, 
Arkansas State, at Jonesboro; Nov. £, Normal, at Normal; Nov. 15, 
Eastern, here. 

MM 



it 



tf >. 



::r3 



m 



lat 



'ill 



■;iai 



Ionsi 
Ut 
ipor 



nvyi ui\ i i ui 



SOUTHERN I'llNOIS 
UN! 

f» % CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS * 



Southern Illinois 
1 University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU".) 

7-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - School reorganization as a practical 
problem in professional and public relations will bo the theme of the 
first annual Institute on Professional and Public Relations of Teachers, 
to be held July 31 at Southern Illinois University. 

The one-day institute is under the sponsorship of the University's 
College of Education, in line with similar institutes being held 
throughout the country at the recommendation of the National Education 
Association. All teachers and school officials of Southern Illinois 
are invited to participate. 

John Cox, Illinois Agricultural Association, Chicago, will 

inaugurate the program by discussing "What Are Professional and Public 

Relations?" at the opening session at 9:15 a. m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

Dr. Eugene R. Fair, clean of the University College of Education, 
gill outline the theme of the conference in a talk "School 
Reorganization—a Practical Problem in Professional and Public 
Relations. 7 ' 

A panel of teachers and administrators will then examine the 
question, "The Teacher's Responsibility in School Reorganization." 

In the afternoon, the institute will break into group sessions to 
consider what school reorganization means to (a) children and youth, 
(b) to teachers, and (c) to the community, after which each group will 
report back to the general session the gist of its discussions. 

An evening session will follow dinner at the University Cafeteria. 

1UUI 



.L 




I IIUI Lll I I Ul 



SOUTHERN !' ' INOIS 

UN! 




9t>» 



v CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 



University 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not ? ^INIF.) 

7-22-47 

Carbondale , 111., July - John Sebastian, Jr., of Odin, Southern 
Illinois University stellar forward, has signed up with the Chicago 
Bears professional basket ball team, Raymond H. Dey, director of the 
University Placement Service, has announced. 

Sebastian graduated from Southern in June with the bachelor of 
science in education degree. 

Not only did he help the maroons win their oecond consecutive 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference basket ball title last 
winter, but Sebastian won a place for himself on the all-Conference 
team and amassed his team T s highest individual points — 309 for the 
season or an average of 11.5 per game. 

Sebastian majored in physical education at Southern, was elected 
to the Sphinx Club--student honor society, and belonged to Sigma Beta 
Mu fraternity. 

trif if 

Carbondale , 111., July - Roy Leilich of New Athens, tennis star 
of Southern Illinois University, will attend the University of Illinois 
as a graduate student: news year. 

Leilich graduated from Southern in June. He served as president 

of the "I 7 ' Club, lettermen's organization, and belonged to Southern 

Knights, men's service society, and to Kappa Phi Kappa, professional 
education fraternity. 

JL'UL 

irtnr 



^ 

* 



serv 
seve 
nomi 

thai 
1'irg 
icrr 




SOUTH F 

UNI' 



!' i 



NOIS 




'■ ' \ i 



w 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS I 



Southern Illinois 
^University 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note- to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU".) 

7-25-47 

Carbondale , 111., July - Graduate students at Southern 
Illinois University this week organized as a graduate club, with one 
of its principal aims the stimulation of suggestions from the students 
themselves for the development of the University f s graduate program. 

The organization movement eama following a tea held by the 
Graduate Studies Committee for the 143 graduate students enrolled this 
summer. 

Dr. Willis G. Swart z, chairman of the Graduate Studies Committee, 
informed the students that a graduate record examination would be given 
on August 4 for students who desire to attend some other graduate 
school, and that a comprehensive field examination for graduate 
students at Southern would b^ announced later. 

On appointment of Dr. Swartz, Ledford Bischof of Carbondale 
served as temporary chairman for the organization, and appointed a 
seven-member committee to formulate a plan of organization and 
nominate officers. 

This committee consisted of Mrs. Maxine Harris Blackmail of Ramsey, 
chairman; J. W. Gholson of Carrier Mills, David Kenney of Carbondale, 
Virgil Lipe of Chester, Vivian Vickers of Carbondale, Hershel Ellis of 
Herrin, and Cornelia Beach of Jerseyville. 

### 



■ 



i 




i nui ui\ i i ui 



SOUTHERN ".'INOIS 
UN! 




W 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 






Southern Illinois 




■niversity 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU".) 

7-25-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - Emphasis at the first Institute on 
Professional and Public Relations of Teachers, scheduled at Southern 
Illinois University July 31? will be on discussion rather than on 
speeches, Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of Education, points out. 

Theme of the conference will be "Developing a Public Relations 
Program for School Reorganization." 

A panel of teachers and administrators will lead discussion of 
"The Teacher's Responsibility in School Reorganization" Thursday 
morning, and in the afternoon the institute will break up into three 
informal discussion groups. 

These groups will consider what reorganized schools should mean 
to (1) children and youth, (2) teachers, and (3) the community. 

The morning panel of discussion leaders will include: Supt. 
Kenneth Jobe, Anna, chairman; Miss nnastasia Cloud, junior high school 
teacher, Belleville; Miss Eva Giltner, elementary teacher, Alton; 
L. V. Lipe, principal, elementary school, Chester; Miss Myrtle Lord, 
rural teacher, Union County; Supt. John A. Moore, Omaha; Coebel Patton, 
principal, West Frankfort high school; Mrs. Clara Taggart, rural 
teacher, Randolph County. 

The institute will open at 9 a. m. in the Little Theatre at the 
University. 

m 



its; 



I'O, 



i ill/I III I I Ul 



SOUTHERN ' ! I !N0IS 

UN! 







M 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 



University 




Information Service CARBONDALE - ILLINOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^M^MMBMi^^^M^^MM 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "blU", not "SINU".) 

7-25-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - With a new director at the helm, 
the Little Theatre at Southern Illinois University will present as 
its summer production Thornton Wilder T s "Our Town," in Shryock 
Auditorium July 31 • 

Dr. Theodore Skinner, associate professor of speech, who joined 
the University faculty in June, will direct the play. Dr. Skinner 
last soring completed work on his doctor's degree at Northwestern 
University with emphasis on theatre work. He was formerly on the 
faculty of Kansas State College. 

"Our Town" was a Pulitzer Prize winning play a number of years 
ago. Its challenge to tht amateur theatrical group, according to 
Dr. Skinner, lies in the fact that all the action takes place on a 
bare stage, with no stage sets and few properties. The cast, therefore, 
must rely on character study to depict their roles. 

Action of the play centers around life in a small Mew Hampshire 
town, Grovers Corners, about the turn of the century. It tells the 
story of two families, the Gibbs and the Webbs — their daily life, the 
love and marriage of George Gibbs and Emily Webb, and the tragedy as 
death breaks the family circle. 

Taking the leading roles in "Our Town" are Charles Weber, Jr. , 
of Cairo, as "The Stage Manager"; Lewis Hammack of Sparta as "Dr. 




I HUI Ull I I Ul 



SOUTHERN ".MNOIS 




W 







i~ 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 

Gibbs"; Charlott Waggener of Herrin a s "Mrs. Webb"; Ralph Lane of 
Eldorado as "Mr. Webb"; Jean Larson of Carbondale as "Emily -Webb"; 
and John S. Rendleman of Anna as "George Gibbs." 

m 

Carbondale, 111., July - A four-day, school of instruction for 
fire-fighters will be held at Southern Illinois University Sept . 30- 
Aug. 3> Dr. W. Neal Phelps, acting director of the University's 
physical plant, has announced. 

A group representing the Egyptian Fire-Fighting Association 
called on University officials this week to plan arrangements for the 
school. 

Such subjects as equipment, fire prevention, fire department and 
community obligations in prevention and control of fires, salvage, 
and other topics will be studied. Fires originating by explosives, 
electrical hazards, and arson will be discussed by experts, as will 
the legal aspects of fire service* 

JTTTTf 






^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

- Normal University 

Information Service CAHBOMDALI ' "" »<»« 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MMHHMMHHHHMlHHHHHHilHHHHl 



> IIUI Ul\ I I Ul 



SOUTHERN ".MNOIS 
UN! 
. UMhM 

• ' CttBOHOAlt, IU1N0IS I 



Southern Illinois 
T niversity 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



7-29-47 

(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use "SIU", not "SINU".) 

Carbondale, 111., July - A year's leave of absence has been 
granted by Southern Illinois University to Dr. John Mayor, professor 
and chairman of the mathematics department, to permit him to accept 
an appointment at the University of Wisconsin, Southern President 
Chester F. Lay announced today. 

Dr. flay or, who holds the doctor of philosophy degree from 
Wisconsin, will have charge of that university's teacher-training 
program in mathematics. His leave of absence is for the period 
Sept. 13, 1947, to Sept. IS, 1943. He came to Southern in 1935. 

if if it 



Carbondale, 111., July - A meat-cutting demonstration will 
be held at Southern Illinois University Monday, Aug. 4, at 7-"30 p. m. 
Mrs. Mary Louise Barnes, associate professor of home economics, has 
announced. 

Orin Dresser, meat buyer for the Kroger Grocery and Baking Com- 
pany, assisted by one of the company's butchers, will conduct the 
demonstration, scheduled in Parkinson Laboratory 105. 

The demonstration is open to all summer session students and to 
townspeople, but veterans and their wives are especially invited, 
Mrs. Barnes said. ////# 



i 



:ii 



sup 

da 




I HUI Ull I I V/l 



I 



SOUTHERN I 1 ! INOIS 

UN! 




&» 



' CAROJKDALt, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 
8 University 



¥¥¥¥"#* 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



7-29-47 

(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois 
University. If you use initials, please use "SIU." 



Carbondale, 111., July - Discussion groups on what school 
reorganization means (1) to children and youth, (2) to teachers, and 
(3) to the community will comprise the afternoon program at the 
first Institute on Professional and Public Relations of Teachers to 
be held at Southern Illinois University Thursday, July 31. 

A third speaker has been secured for the evening session- 
Harry L. Porter, editor and publisher of the Hardin County 
Independen t. Mr. Porter, who is also a member of the Hardin County 
school survey committee, will speak on w The Newspaper's Part in 
Publicizing School Reorganization Plans. !? 

Other dinner speakers are C. M. Van Vlece, Richland County 
superintendent, who will report on his county's school reorganization 
plans, and B. E. Gum, Salem Community High School superintendent, 
who will discuss "Advantage of Unit District in School Reorganization." 

At the morning session, after greetings from University President 
Chester F. Lay, the opening speaker will be John K. Cox, director of 
rural school relations for the Illinois Agricultural Association, 
Chicago, who will analyze "What Are Professional and Public Relations?" 

(more) 



SOUTHERN !M !N0IS ■ 

UN: 

. LIBKmKV 

- ' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 






-2- 

Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the University College of Education, 
will then outline "School Reorganization as a Practical Problem in 
Professional and Public Relations," followed by a panel discussion 
of "The Teacher's Responsibility in School Reorganization." 

Leaders for the afternoon group discussions will be Ledford 
Bishof, Veterans Guidance Center at Southern; Edward L. Allen, 
supervising teacher, Buncombe Rural Training School; and Vincent 
Birchler, high school teacher, Chester. 

"Resource persons" or discussion leaders for the three groups 
will include Paul McRoy, manager, Radio Station WCIL, Carbondale; 
Charles Cook, manager, Radio Station WJPF, Herrin; William 
Dougherty, managing editor, Carbondale Free Press ; Curtis Small, 
editor, Harrisburg Daily Register ; Jean Fligor, F. G. Warren, 
Lorena Drummond, J. W. Dillow, Earl Hall, John W. Allen, Victor 
Randolph, all of the Southern Illinois University faculty. 

The institute will be held in the Little Theatre, starting at 
9 a. m. Thursday. 

»# 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



5E3EIEIS 



r 



I HUI kit I I \J% 



SOUTHERN '' I INOIS 
U^ 







5W 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Southern Illinois 
University 




Information Service * M ™ S carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. MIMMBMBBMBBBBBBMMMB 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use »SIU W , not "SINU".) 

7-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - Two Southern Illinois University 
faculty members will attend the first post-war international convention 
of the International Federation of University Women in Toronto, Canada, 
Aug. 11-16. 

Miss Hilda Stein, associate professor of zoology, now serving her 
second term as state president of the Illinois branch of the American 
Association of University, will be an official delegate from the 
Illinois branch, while Miss Frances Barbour, associate professor of 
English, will attend as a non- voting member. 

Five other Illinois women will attend the convention — Mrs. C. L. 
Presnell of Rockford, Illinois branch education chairman; Misses Louise 
and Elizabeth Whitemen of Evanston; Miss Helen Todd and Miss Louise 
Bichoff , both of Chicago. 

This is the first international convention since 1939, and will be 

attended by 200 delegates from the United States and representatives of 

30 other countries. It is the first international convention to be 

held outside the continent of Europe. 

Dr. Edith Batho, president of the British Federation of University 
Women, who will also attend the conference, has been in Carbondale this 
week, visiting Miss Barbour and lecturing at the University here. 

Dr. Stanislawa Adamowicz of the State School of Hygiene, Warsaw, 
Poland, is president of the IFUW. 

JULJL 

wittr 









''? 



in 



We: 



I IIUI Lit I I Ul 



SOUTHERN "MNOIS 
IT 




s~ 



v CAR8QNDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 
University 



mm&M 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University, 
If you use initials, please use 5! 6IU n , not "SINU. ) 

7-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., July - Final examinations for the summe r 
session at Southern Illinois University will begin Wednesday afternoon 
August 6 j and run through Friday afternoon, Aug. $. 

A schedule of August classes for veterans and other students who 
ire urgently in need of additional credits has been arranged, to run 
lug. 11 to Sept. 5. 



JLJUL 

mm 



Carbondale, 111., July - Several openings for mature women as 
lousemothers in organized houses for Southern Illinois University 
students are reported by Mrs. Mabel Pulliam, housing counselor. 

Applications for thes^ positions should be filed with the Dean 
)f Women T s Office and should be accompanied by references, Mrs. 
^ulliam said. 

## 



_^M 



SOUTH E 

UNI 



J. , 




NOIS 



V . ' > 



h* 



Y 



'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




declc 



here . 



depai 



in An 
under 

foste 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



pjjTjn^i^rfiji " 'liTLxTiifcrijti&L 



fitfUVKi'UKIUKt'i'.f 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is now Southern Illinois University. 
If you use initials, please use "SIU n , not "SINU".) 

7-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., July 30 - Greater exchange of young students 
and young professional people, an international language, and ample 
information about UNESCO would prove three powerful tools for building 
international good will and understanding, a young scholar from Mexico 
declared here tonight. 

Senor Jose Luis Reyes, enrolled this summer at Southern Illinois 
University as holder of the Rotary Club international scholarship 
here, spoke under the auspices of the University's foreign language 
department, in which he is studying and teaching as a gradLiate student. 

Reyes urged the United States and Mexico to borrow desirable 
qualities and customs from each other. 

For the past two winters, he has lived in American homes, studied 
in American schools and colleges, and attended American churches, 
under the "Experiment in International Living, i! a plan which is 
fostering exchange of students and young professional people between 
the United States, Mexico, Colombia, Guatemala, and Europe. 

His earlier impressions of this country — gained largely from 
American movies and from American tourists in Mexico — have been 
altered drastically since he has lived in this country, he said. 

(more ) 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service carbondale. Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. i ^ M ^™^^^ ,B ^™ 1 






;;or 



iak( 



that 

and I 

toget 

»orld 






SOUTHERN »' '.' INOIS 
UN! 




■•*• 



' CARBOWDAU, ILLINOIS i 



-3- 

3. More emphasis on romance in courtship — art, music, etc. 

4. More leisure in living, more time for rest, recreation, and 
gracious living, 

5. A greater spirit of happiness — a better balance between 
ambition and achievement. 

6. Opportunity to study and appreciate the Spanish and Latin- 
American culture. 

7. Opportunity to see Mexican films in translations. 

Reyes urged that all citizens of both countries should become 
familiar with the speeches of President Aleman and President Truman 
on their recent exchange visits, and quoted the Mexican president's 
words: "Both our peoples have a like desire that all men, of all 
races and all parts of the world should understand each other.*.. If 
prejudices have been an obstacle (to inter-American cohesion), let us 
make the education of our children and of our youth a liberation from 
that inexcusable obstacle." 

He quoted also President Truman: "We are united by more than the 
comman procedures and agencies of Inter-American cooperation. All our 
peoples have a common belief which we call .'democracy. T Democracy 
has a spiritual foundation because it is based upon the brotherhood 
of man. We believe in the dignity of the individual. T ;/e believe 
that the function of the state is to preserve and promote human rights 
and fundamental freedoms. •• e The United States and Mexico are working 
together for the mutual benefit of their peoples and the peace of the 
world . " 



JL'LJL 

irtrtr 



ii l 

» « 






Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




V 



1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



WmfmR 

Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
fwfisUniversity 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



(Note to Editor: Please note name is ■ now Southern Illinois University''. 
If you use initials, please use ?? S1U ?? , not ;? SINU". ) 

S-1-V7 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - A $2,000 scholarship fund to be 
awarded for a two-year period to some worthy, needy Southern Illinois 
University student has been \~r esented to the S.IoN.U. Foundation, 
Gen. Robert W. Davis, chairman of the foundation's executive board, 
has announced. 

The gift of Mr3 H. H. Evans of 5237 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, 
the scholarship is established in memory of her son, Murray C. Evans, 
killed in action in World War I. 

"It is to be given in two $1,000 grants to some deserving student," 
he explained. "This makes it the largest scholarship ever to be 
established at Southern. It is an extremely generous award, and one . 
for which the University is deeply appreciative." 

The foundation board has already asked the University committee 
on scholarship, standards and honors, of which Dr. Vera Peacock, 
professor foreign languages, is chairman, to nominate five top-ranking 
students. The board will then investigate these nominees and make 
the award. 

Mrs. Evans is already giving scholarship assistance to students 
at Harvard and the University of Missouri in memory of her son, but 
because he was born in Southern Illinois, at Anna, she decided to 
make the $2,000 grant to some student at Southern, Gen. Davis said. 






gii 



rei 



fci 



II 
Coi 



3r 
de; 
th 




*•• 



. LIBKmkY 

k CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 

■ The S.I.N. U, Foundation is an agency incorporated to receive 
gifts for the University. It was established as "The Southern Illinois ' 
Normal University Foundation," but since the University* s name was * 

recently changed, foundation officials are taking steps to amend the 
foundation's charter likewise dropping the word "normal" from its name, 
Gen e Davis said. 

### 

Garbondale, 111., Aug. - President Chester F. Lay of Southern 
Illinois University will address the Benton Rotary Club at the Benton 
Country Club Tuesday evening, Aug. 5. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Miss Marjorie Shank, registrar, and 
Dr., Willard M. Gersbacher, professor and chairman of the zoology, 
department at Southern Illinois University, will serve as judges for 
the educational exhibits at the State Fair Aug. 13. 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinoii 
Normal University 



CARBONDALE, ILL1NOI 




OUTHF 



Ul 









OIS 



' 




** 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



ft /TTt Xfl£ it JTTi W, "TV rT''^iirii f^ i 



.•jt/j!. , !i'. , ;p,'i|7j{f/{|7f;.f, , j 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-3-47 



Special to Southern Illinois Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Three departments at Southern Illinois 
University have new chairman, the latest being the depa rtment of 
business administration. 

Dr. John Winfield Scott, recently on the faculty of the Shrivenham 
American University in England, has been secured as professor of 
business administration and is being assigned as chairman of the 
department, effective this fall, President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

The other two new department chairmen are Dr. Joseph K. Johnson, 
professor and chairman of the sociology department, who assumed his 
duties this summer, and Dr. Quinter M. Lyon, professor and chairman of 
the philosophy department, who will report for duty Sept. 16. 

Dr. Scott's appointment*, is the 19th addition to the permanent 
faculty this summer and fall. These new additions include the three 
department chairmen, all of* whom hold full professorial rank; seven 
associate professors, two assistant professors, five instructors, and 
two faculty assistants. Eleven of the new appointees hold the doctor's 
degree. 

Dr. Scott has taught at the University of Chicago, Michigan State 

College, and North Texas Agricultural College; has served as professor 

and dean at Oklahoma A. & M. College and at Alabama Polytechnic Instit 
Institute, and for two years was principal economist for the U. S. 
Departmenti of Agriculture* 



■ 









SOUTHERN 
UNI TY 
. LIBRmKY 

r v CA8B0WDALE, ILLINOIS i 



ern Illinois 
University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■BBH^BHBHHnBflHmHHBH 





3-3-47 



Special to Southern Illinois Weeklies 



Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Two master's degree graduates of 
Southern Illinois University will teach zoology in colleges next year, 
according to Dr. W. M. Gersbacher, professor and chairman of the 
zoology department. 

A. E. Hunter of Chicago, who obtained his degree in June, will 
teach at the Wood row Junior College in Chicago, while Troy Dorris of 
West Frankfort, who completed his degree this summer, will teach at 
Quincy College. 

Mrs. Mary Craeger, 1937 bachelor's graduate of Southern, who is 
obtaining her master's degree from the University of Illinois this 
summer, will serve as critic teacher at Eastern Illinois State College 
next year, 

### 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - One of the five public health 

fellowships awarded for l%7-4$ by the State Department of Public 

Health has come to a graduate of Southern Illinois University, 

according to Dr. Marie A. Hinrichs, professor and chairman of the 

University's department of phsiology and health education, 

John K. Ellis of Carbondale, who holds both the bachelor of 
science and the bachelor of science in education degrees from Southern, 
received this award, and will study next year at the University of 
Michigan. ### 








OIS 



%m 



. LIBHmKV 

' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Sout! 



ilftM-TT! 



massm 



ern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




3-15-47 

Carbondale, 111., August - Ninety-eight students have completed 
work for their degrees at Southern Illinois University during the 
summer session which ended August $» 

They included three candidates for the master of science in 
education degree; seventy-seven for the bachelor of science in ■ 
education; five for the bachelor of arts and seven for the bachelor of 
sciences in the College of liberal Arts and Sciences; six for the 
bachelor of science in the College of Vocations and Professions. 

The following students received degrees: 

ALTON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — M. Angela Walsh* 

ANNA: Bachelor of Arts Degree from the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences — John Roland Boswell, 

ASHLEY: Bachelor of Science in Educa tio n Degree — Katherine 
Parlier, Francis A. Pate. 

BELLEVILLE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Donald G. 
Br as el, Mary I. Eckert, Raymond J. Franz. 

BENTON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Obed Wayne 
Henderson, Ruth E. McKemie. 

BREEZE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Robert F. O'Brien, 

BROUGHTEN: Bachelor of Science in Education Degr ee — Lois 
Christine Garrett. 

(more ) 



I I 









SOUTHFPN ir ' INOIS 

UN! 




** 



' CARBOKDAti, ILLINOIS 



-2- 



BURNT PRAIRIE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — 
E. Harry Vaught, Jr. 

CAMBRIA: Bachelor of Science in E du cation Dec ree — Helen Marie 
Plumlee. 

CARBONDALE: Master of Science in Educ at ion Degree — John Clifford. 

Bachelor of Science in Educat ion Degree — John Arthur Algee, 
Charles Bert Beatty, E. Ronald Coon, Jeanne Lorraine Haroldson., Thomas 
H. Huson, Kenneth Theodore Langford, Mary Elizabeth Miles, Millie 
Louis Ogden, Frances M. Robinson, Mayme Nell Story, Richard Earle 
Whalen, Jr. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Robert k. Kesterson. 

B achelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Henry M. Borella. 

B achelor of Sc ience Degree in the College of Vocations and 
Professions — Marion K. Blythe. 

C ARLYLE : Bachelor of S cience in Educ a tion Degree — D orothea 
Katherine Meyer. 

CARMI: Bachelor of S c ience in Educati on Degree — Carroll Douglass 
Renshaw. 

CARRIER MILLS : Bach elo r of Science i n Education Degree — John t 
Wayne Buckner. 

CENTRALIA: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Betty Maurine 
Adams. 

CHRISTOPHER: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Anne Huha. 

CLAY CITY: Bach elor of Science in Educ at ion Degree — Delbert E. 

■■^■^ !.-,.. — n .,.— ....,.^. „i — — - .,.,.■ i . ,, . i — „ ..I, I,,,,.. ■,..-— — . ■ win ,. . , . t tm i« m 

Zimmerman. 

(more ) 






<■ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinoij 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINO 









SOUTH 



UNI\ 






NOIS 




J~ 



1 CARBONDALE ILLINOIS 



Oil, 

1 -3- 

ity 

LIK J COBDEN: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Virginia Lou 

^i Hailey. 

I 

DUPO: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Sue A. Johnson, 

DU QUOIN: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Philip Allen 
Provart, Julius R. Swayne. 

EAST ST. LOUIS: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Clarice 
May Baldwin. 

EDWARDS VILLE : Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Virgie Lee 
Hornberger. 

ELDORADO: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Iona Ruth 
Grant . 

FLORA: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — T. E. Fitch, 
David A. Malinsky. 

FREEBURG: Bachelor of Science in Educ at ion Degree — Ruth E. Mast. 

GRIDLEY: Bach elor of Scien ce Degree in the College of Vocations 
a — _ 

and Professions — Gordon G. Henrichs. 

HARRISBURG: Bachelo r of Science in Education Degree — Martha Jean 
Poulos. 

HARVEY: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Walter Wendell 
Whit lock. 

HERRIN: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Rosalee Restivo. 

HURST: Master of Science in Education Degree — Robert F. Catlett. 

JOHNSTON CITY: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Lawrence 
William Calufetti, Helen Dorris, Catherine Marie Giacomelli. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Arthur H. Doerr, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 

Sciences — Howard D. Harris. 

(more } 






Information Service 



i 



i 

i m 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinoi 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINO 



SOUT 



** 



UN Y 

. LIBHmkY 

' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 







-4-- 

KINMUNDY: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Alice 1*1, '•■ 
Readnour. 

MARION: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Jason J. Collins, 
Martha McGlanahan, Agnes Bernice Newton, 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences--Jesse Ray Hudgens. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations and 
Professions — Frank Eugene Vaughn. 

MC LEANSBORO: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Josephine 
jfoel Vickers, 

METROPOLIS: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Malcolm 
Gcrme:.- Hamby, Virginia Curtis Sielbeck. 

HOUNDS: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree --Laurence Thomas 
Schneider, 

MOUNT VERNON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Vernie 
Bender, 

MURPHYSBORO: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree - — Dorothy 
Ocdair, Marguerite McCann, Vera J, Pittman, Elmer Oi Ziegler, 
ru Bachelor of Arts Degree in th e College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Charles Lloyd Holliday. 

Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Lemuel Da It on Harry 

NASHVILLE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Beulah Eade, 

NEW BURNSIDE5: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Effie 
Sharp • 

NORRIS CITY: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of 
Vocations and Professions — Edwin Lee Bryant, 

(more ) 






Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



b" 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINO! 



' 










w 






: , 



*« 



y 



'CARBONOAtt, IUIN0IS 




-5- 

OMAHA: Bachelor of Science in Education Decree — Ruth Utley Pifeg. 

ORIENT: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Mary Jane Reeves, 

PINCKNEYVILLE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree —Virgil 
J. Davis. 

ROY ALTON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Angelina Marie 
Ferrari. 

SAILOR SPRINGS: Master . of Science in Education D egree — Charles 
Feller. 

SALEM: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations 
inc 1 Professions — Wallace Boyd Nelson. 

SIMPSON: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Helen Williams 
nheso3r. 

SPARTA: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Nola Vivian 
Fulton, Mary Maxine Stevenson. 

SPRINGFIELD: Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences — Warren David St. James. 

STONEFORT: Bachelo r of S cience in Education Degree — Robert D. 
Light foot. 

TAMMS: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Vocations 
and Professions — Shirley Adams. 

THOMPSONVILLE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Frances 
E. licDaniel 

TRENTON: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal 
Arts and Sciences — Robert E. Tenney* 

TUNNEL HILL: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Emma 
Luella Simmons. 

VALIER: Bachelor of Science Degree in the College of Liberal Arts 



and Sciences — Mike Trbovich. 



(more ) 



j 1 

p 


Southern Illinois 

- Normal ■University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 


p 


Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




I" 

J • ... . : 


• . ~ ... 


n 

i; 


p. . 








i < 


• 






I 







SOUTHERN iVMNOIS 
UN! 

. LIBHmKY 



b» 



1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



s^ 



-6- 

WEST FRANKFORT: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — William 
Hill Dawson, Daisy Rotramel, Cecile B. Tabor. 

Bachelor of Arts Degree in the College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences — Robert Marshall Treece. 

WOLF LAKE: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — James L, 
Williams. 

ZEIGLER: Bachelor of Science in Education Degree — Dale L. Berry, 
'Jral L. Campbell, 

### 



V 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



SOUTHFPN '' ' INOIS 



ur\ 



«» 



y 



'CWBWOAU, ILLINOIS 




Southern Illinois 
1 University 




Information Service CARBONDALE ' ttuw » 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■^IMMi^^^BMBMMBMHHMBBBi 



$-19-47 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Well more than 2,000 Southern Illinois 
adults stayed at home and still studied under instructors from Southern 
Illinois University last year — double the extension class enrollment 
for the preceding year, 

A total of 2,027 students took University courses by extension 
in their '-own home communities during the period July 1, 1946 to 
July 1, 1947, according to the annual report of Raymond H. Dey, 
director of the Extension Service. 

In addition, an uncounted number-- estimated at more than 500-- 
listened regularly to the "course by radio'' which the University I. 
Extension Service put on the air for four months during the spring. 
This radio program consisted of lectures on "India" by a University 
professor, heard by organized groups of Southern Illinois church women* 

During the past year, Southern conducted 47 courses in 3$ 
different communities of Southern Illinois. 

Enrollment in Southern-sponsored extension courses during the 
past year has been more than double that of 1945-46, when 30 courses 
were conducted with a total enrollment of 91$ students. 

The previous high was in 1940-41, when 33 courses were conducted 
with a total enrollment of 1,7$3« At that time, evening courses 
conducted on the campus were included, since these were then conducted 
by the Extension Service. 

### 



u 



SOUTHERN 
UN! 



OIS 



Y 




3» 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 
University 




Information Service wmmmmmm carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■^■^■■■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■i 



3-19-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Aug. - Southern Illinois citizens--here's how 
you can rate your own school system and see whether school 
reorganization would benefit your child's educational opportunities, 

A new bulletin issued by the College of Education at Southern 
Illinois University — entitled "Some Proposed Goals for School 
Reorganization in Illinois" — includes a checklist of desired qualities, 
activities and facilities, so that each school may be rated "good," 
%oderate" or "poor" on each point. 

Prepared by Dr, Howard £, Bosley, associate professor of education, 
and Dr, Earl Hall, assistant professor, the bulletin was prepared for 
the individuals who want to know what school reorganization is all 
about. 

Earlier bulletins have been issued primarily for school officials 
and county survey committees. 

Major divisions in the checklist include the curriculum, staff, 
community relationships, school plant and site. 

Among the points listed are: the ba sic utilization of pupils' 
skills; attention to the individual pupil's own interests; variety of 
printed materials, audio'-visual materials, scientific apparatus; use 
of community resources; special facilities for handicapped children; 
comprehensive health examinations; sports and recreational activities; 

(more) 









<.' 



• 




SOUTHERN '".MNOIS 
UNI i 

. LIBKmKY 

e 'CARBONDAIE, ILLINOIS i 



12- 

effective homemakin^: instruction; job- training and general education 
for students who do not 30 to college; competent, broadly educated 
teachers; effective supervisors; desirable teaching conditions and 
salaries; cooperative relations with the community; adult education 
and educational services for the communtiy; attractive, functional, 
safe school plant. 

Answering the question, "How large must the administrative unit 
be before a reasonable attainment of these good practices is possible?", 
Drs. Bosley and Hall pointed out that the unit must be large enough to: 

1. Attract a capable educational leader as superintendent. 

2. Provide stimulating conditions which will result in educational 
progress. 

3. To attract and hold capable teachers. 

4. To utilize economically the full-time services of competent 
educational leaders as supervisors. 

5. To permit flexibility in planning for the future in terms of 
now-unpredictable conditions. 

6. To provide reasonable equalization of financial support. 
While recognizing that factors other than size may have a bearing 

on t he effectiveness of the school program, the authors stressed that 
"all studies indicate that the larger districts possess many 
advantages," and cited authorities advocating 40- to 50-teacher 
schools as the minimum units to provide economically the desirable 
educational opportunities. 

### 



, 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



a 



Southern Illinoii 
Normal University] 

CARBONDALE, ILLINO 




%» 



UN y 

. LIBKmKV 

v CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



WMilT^m. 1 m it 



ern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^■^■^■^^■■■^■H 



g-20-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Aug. - Appointment of five additional new 
faculty members at Southern Illinois University, effective this fall, 
has been announced by University President Chester F. Lay, including: 

Dr. Archibald McLeod, as associate professor of speech, to take 
the place of Dr. Theodore Skinner, who served on the summer faculty 
and has accepted a position as chairman of the speech department at 
Texas College of Arts and Industries. Dr. McLeod, who holds the 
bachelor 1 s degree from Oberlin, the master 's from State University of 
Iowa, and the doctor 1 s from Cornell University, has taught at Cornell, 
Kansas State Teachers College, Texas State College for Women, and 
Louisiana State University. 

Dr. Louis D. Rodabaugh, as associate professor of mathematics. 
Dr. Rodabaugh has taught at Ohio State University, from which he holds 
the master 1 s and doctor 7 s degrees; at Southern Methodist University, 
University of Alabama, Butler, Shurtleff College, Oberlin and the 
University of Akron. He took his bachelor 7 s degree at Miami 'University, 

Dalias A. Price, as assistant professor of geography. Formerly 
on the faculty of the University of Illinois and of Southeast Missouri 
State Teachers College, Mr. Price holds both the bachelor's and 
master's degrees from the University of Illinois, 

Harlan Hodges, as instructor in physical education for men. A 
graduate of Southern and holder of the master's degree from the 

(more) 



'■ 







i.r- 



w 



' GAR80NUAU, ILLINOIS 




5.2- 

University of Michigan, Mr, Hodges has been coaching at the West 
Frankfort Community High School, 

Miss Theresa Ivanuck, as faculty assistant in physical education 
for women. A graduate of Southern, she has been teaching for two years 
in the Clay Center high school. 

President Lay also announced the resignation of Mrs, Louise Parker 
T Neil as faculty assistant in physiology and health education and the 
granting of a year's leave of absence to Dr, Douglas E. Lawson, 
professor of education. Mrs. Parker will continue her graduate studies 
at the University of Michigan, while Dr, Lawson will go to the Hawaiian 
Islands to accept an administrative post in a large private school. 

The appointment of these five new faculty members brings to 21+ the 
number of new permanent additions to the University staff this 
summer and for the opening of the fall term, 

### 

Carbondale, 111,, Aug. - Raymond H. Dey, director of the 
Extension Service at Southern Illinois University, is spending several 
days this week in visiting the extension service at the University of 
Wisconsin. 

He also expected to visit the extension and placement services 
of Illinois State Normal University, Northern Illinois State Teachers 
College, and perhaps the University of Chicago. 



I 



i. 







«■• 



UK Y 

. LIBHmKY 

' GABBONDAti, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




! 






£-20-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Aug, - Two new department chairmen have been 
appointed from the regular faculty of Southern Illinois University to 
head the English and mathematics departments, University President 
Chester F, Lay has announced, 

Dr, William B. Schneider, professor of English, has been named 
chairman of the English department, succeeding Miss Emma Bowyer, who 
retires this fall after serving in that capacity since 1926, 

Dr. J. R. Purdy, associate professor, has been appointed to the 
chairmanship of the mathematics department, to replace Dr, J. R, Mayor, 
who has been granted a leave of absence for 1947-4$ to accept a 
position at the University of Wisconsin. 

Dr, Schneider came to Southern in 1936 and has served on the 
Advisory Council to the President, the curriculum, graduate studies, 
buildings and grounds, and landscape committees. He holds the 
bachelor of arts and master of arts degrees from the University of 

Chicago. 

» 
Dr. Purdy joined the Southern faculty in 1929, after having 
taught at the Deveaux School and the University of Illinois. He holds 
the bachelor's and master's degrees from Kenyon College and a second 
master's and the doctoral degree from the University of Illinois. He 
also attended Wooster College and Ohio State University. In recent 
years, Dr. Purdy has served as chairman of the bookstore committee. 

### 






Si 







SOUTHERN ! ' MNOIS 
UN! 




m 



9W 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS S 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Aug, - The 1947-4& catalogue for Southern 
Illinois University has come from the press and is currently being 
distributed to prospective students. 

More than $00 new freshmen have applied for admittance this fall, 
and have received the new publication — first to be issued bearing the 
institution's new name "Southern Illinois University." 

The new catalogue gives detailed data on educational requirements 
and offerings in the three undergraduate colleges — Education, Liberal 
Arts and Sciences, and Vocations and Professions — and in the Graduate 
School. 

It also outlines the services available to students, such as 
federal and state aid for veterans, vocational testing for veterans, 
credit for military service training, the Illinois Veterans Commission 
service; professional aptitude tests, student employment service, 
placement service, health service, loans, scholarships and prizes, 
housing service. 

Opportunities for student activities in dramatics and forensic s, 
music, radio, athletics, publications, social life, student self- 
government, and religious life, are described. 

Southern is accredited by the Nortn Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools as a university, by the American 
Association of Teachers Colleges, by the Association of American 

(mo^e ) 









SOUTHERN '' ' INOIS 



Ul 






Li 



iwV 



%» 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 

Colleges, and by the American Association of University Women, 

The University calendar for 1947-43 runs as follows: Fall . 
quarter — Sept. 10-14, Freshman Week; Sept. 15-16, registration for the 
fall term; Oct. 24-25, Homecoming; Nov. 27-2$, Thanksgiving recess; 
Dec. 2-6, final examinations. 

'Winter quarter — Dec. 3-9, registration; Dec. 20- Jan. 4, Christmas 
recess; Jan. 5, instruction resumed; Feb. 12, Lincoln 1 s Birthday, a 
holiday; March 9-13, final examinations; March 14-22, Spring recess. 

Spring quarter — March 22-23, registration; May 30, Memorial Day, 
a holiday; June 7-10, final examinations; June 11, 73^d annual 
commencement. , 

Summer session — June 14, registration; Aug. 5-6, final examination 
examinations. 



tfif 

3-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Miss Thelma Lynn, loan and reference 
librarian at Southern Illinois University, will spend next year at 
Columbia University School of Library Science, where she will work on 
the master's degree in library science. 

Miss Lynn, who holds the bachelor of library science degree from 
Columbia, has been granted a leave of absence from her duties here 
to carry on advanced study. She came to Southern in September, 1945 
from the Chamber of Commerce of the United States, where she was 
assistant librarian. 

* 






SOUTI 



M !' I 



INOIS 



h» 



J' 

. LIBKmKY 

' CARBQNDAtE, ILLINOIS 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



g-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Norman Meinkoth of T Fallon, a 
graduate of Southern Illinois University, who recently obtained his 
doccor's degree from the University of Illinois, has accepted an 
ftppointment to the faculty of Swarthmore College, according to Dr. 
I'M Hard M. Gersbacher, chairman of the Southern zoology department, 

Meinkoth graduated from Southern in 193$ with a major in zoology. 



Carbondale, 111., Aug. - H. Byron Bruce of Kell, a Southern 
jllinois University senior, has been employed as teacher and coach 
It Central Grade School, Centralia, for next year, Raymond H. Dey, 
director of the University Placement Service, reports. 

Bruce has majored in sociology at the University and would have 
completed his degree in June, 194$ } but will withdraw at the close of 
the special August courses to accept the Centralia position, 

### 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Jim Smith of Coulterville, who ■ 
I graduated from Southern Illinois University In June with a major in 
I physical education, has been appointed head of the community recreation 
lepa rtrnent at Marion, Glenn 7, Abe v ' Martin, Southern athletic director- 
reports. 

Smith lettered in baseball at Southern this spring. 



J.l 'J u 



-\ m. 



I 






SOUTHERN v VINOIS 



w 



\ » 




w 



' WRBOMUALt, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
niversity 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



3-27-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Aug. - Southern Illinois University is 
spending the "dog days" of August getting its house in order for an 
estimated 2, $00-2, 900 students at the opening of the fall term Sept . 15. 

No students are being turned away because of housing difficulties, 
according to Firs. Mabel Pulliam, housing counselor. Dribbles of 
available rooms keep coming in from day to day, enough to care for new 
applicants. 

The veterans housing project on Chautauqua Street — 104 apartments- 
is full for this fall, and 145 applications have been filea for the 
63 apartments in the veterans housing project at the Illinois Ordnance 
plant, Mrs. Pulliam said. It is expected, however, that all of the 
applicants "who really want to move in" can be accommodated. Moreover, 
an additional 27 apartments may become available in this project soon. 

Organized houses for students, including the 120-capacity 
University-owned Anthony Hall for girls and the 60~capacity Baptist 
Foundation boys 1 dormitory, are full. This group of houses also 
includes five fraternities, three sororities, one large house for boys 
and six co-ops or large boarding houses for girls. A total of 435 
students can be accommodated in the various organized houses. 

Several hundred other students are expected to commute from their 
nearby home towns. Last spring 575 students commuted. 

(more ) 



•t 



l' 




SOUTH 



J I! I 



!NOIS 



a* 



UN 1Y 
. LIBRmKY 

' GARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



I 



-2- 

The apartment situation for married students is perhaps the most 
critical aspect of the housing problem, since last spring 5$6 married 
students were enrolled, and only 413 of these had homes or apartments 
here in Carbondale, the remainder commuting. 

Living costs have shown a slight increase during the last year, 
Mrs. Pulliam pointed out. Room rents have not risen— remaining in the 
$2.50 to $5 per week range, with the average about $3 or between $13 
and §14 pen week— but food costs have risen. 

Meals at boarding houses run about $0 to 55 cents for lunch or 
dinner, Mrs. Pulliam said* Men students estimate their food costs at 
about $1.50 per day, while girls spend $1.25 or §1.35, making the 
monthly average run to about $55 or $60 per month for room and board. 
This figure is reduced somewhat for the students who go home over 
week-ends, 

"Costs for room and board at Southern are still lower than at 
any other college or university I know of," Mrs, Pulliam declared. 

Estimates of the number of students who will probably enroll 
at Southern this fall run slightly higher than the 2,71$ enrolled last 
fall, according to the Registrar's Office. 

A total of #21 new freshmen had applied for admittance as of 
August 20, and it is expected that this figure will reach 900 or 
perhaps 1,000 by the opening of school Sept, 15. 

While the freshman class this fall may be smaller than last 
year's record-breaking one of 1,550 (including both new freshmen and 
second- and third-term freshmen), total enrollment is expected to be 
larger, since the swell of last year's large freshman class will hit 
the sophomore level this fall. 

(more) 



I 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



) 



SOUTHERN FUNOIS 
UN! 
. LIBHmKV 

* ' CARBOKDALt, ILLINOIS 



I 




-3- 

Normally approximately one-half of the freshman cp_ass may be 

expected to stay in school for the sophomore year, but Registrar's 
Office officials hastily pointed out that "this is not a normal year," 
and perhaps two-thirds or more of last year's freshmen may return as 
sophomores this fall. 

Making a conservative estimate, the Registrar's Office is 
currently predicting a student body of 2, #00 to 2,900, or only a 
slight gain o^er-the 2,71$ last fall. 

Meanwhile, educational facilities of the University are being 
strengthened. New classroom, library and office space is being rushed 
to completion, officials "keeping their fingers crossed" that the 
temporary structures will be ready for occupancy by Sept. 1$. 

Two of the six barracks from the War Assets Administration are 
being converted into a supplementary library reading room, three are 
being remodeled as classroom buildings, and one as an office building. 

Approximately 3*000 new books have been ordered b ■ the Bookstore 
for the fall term* 

Twenty-four new faculty members have been secured, including 
several who began their duties during the summer session, and others 
are in process of appointment. 

Four faculty members who were on leave of absence last year have 
returned to their positions. Leaves have been gra.ited to six for 
1947-43. Nine faculty members have resigned, two who were on one- 
year appointments completed the terms of their service, and one has 
retired, leaving a net gain of 10 over last year. 

The curriculum is being expanded by the addition of new faculty. 
Departments of sociology and philosophy are being created; new 
additions have been made to the faculties of the speech, government, 
men's and women's physical education, physics and astronomy, and • 
zoology departments, 

### 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 







IS 



UN 



lit 




v~ 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Southern Illinois 



niversity 




Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. " '^^^^■■■■■^^■^^^^■■M 



3-23-47 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - A freshman Week for the approximately 
1,000 new freshmen who will enter Southern Illinois University this 
fall will be held Sept. 10-13 before registration on Sept. 15-16. 

Planned to give new students a chance to get acquainted with 
college life and to obtain the undivided attention of counselors in 
planning their college work, Freshman Week will be a combination of fun 
and "serious business." 

This is Southern's first Freshman Week, although this pre- 
registration program has become a tradition at many of the nation's 
leading colleges and universitites. 

Directed by the two student life deans, Miss Helen A, Shuman,, 
dean of women, and Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, dean of men, Freshman Week 
will intorduce the new students to campus leaders, both faculty and 
students. 

A convocation on Wednesday morning, Sept. 10, at 10 a. m. will 
open the orientation season, followed by a "family picnic" on the 
campus lawn, to which freshmen are urged to invite their parents and 
families, so that they too may have a chance to see the campus and 
become acquainted with some of the faculty and students 

Freshmen tests, physical examinations, tours of the campus, 
registration demonstrations, and conferences with deans and faculty 
counselors are scheduled during the daytime. 

(more ) 






1 V ' 






SOUTHFRN '• ' tisiOIS 
UN 

• Lid-KmKY 

• l CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS I 



-2- 

The evenings will be devoted to recreation — a sing, p»rtits # a 
picnic, a free movie. Mid-morning snacks are also planned* 

On Friday and Saturday the YM and YWCA will sponsor ft week-end I i« * 

camping trip at Lake Benton. 

Fraternities and sororities will hold rush activities during tftt 
last part of the week. 

All prospective students who expect to enroll as freshmen at 
Southern this fall are expected to participate in Freshman Week, Kist 
Shuman and Dean Hiskey stated* 

## 



■ 



1 : V 



■i ^*..# i '■? '4 .-«• 



":<:-*■•#'$'•£*>* v 



#4? 



» -' . 



► 



SOUTHS '' ' 'NOIS 



UN 



%» 



- 

Y 



' CARBOMDAtE, ILLINOIS 




1 



Southern Illinois 
[University 



Information Service 



LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 




CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



£-28-47 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. - Award of the new ^2,000 Murray C. 
Evans Memorial Scholarship at Southern Illinois University to Evan L. 
Hill of Marion has been announced by the executive committee of the 
SINU Foundation. 

This large scholarship, recently established by Mrs. H. H. Evans 
of 5237 Washington Blvd., St. Louis, in memory of her son who was 
killed in action in World War I. 

Under terms of the donor's gift, the scholarship was to be 
conferred on some needy, deserving student. 

The award is for a two-year period, with a $1,000 stipend for 
each year. Hill, a freshman at Southern during last year, was selected 
by the foundation's executive committee from a list of nominations 
submitted by the University committee on scholarship, awards, and 
honors. 

Members of the foundation's executive committee are J. E. Etherton 
of Carbondale, chairman, W, E. Walkup of Carbondale, and Lindell W. 
Sturgis of Metropolis. Gen. Robert W. Davis of Carbondale is president 
of the foundation. 

### 






I 

I 




> 



SOUTHFPM " ' iNOIS 
UNI" 




W 



% CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION o^RVICE 
Lorena Druramond, Editor 



3-29-47 

Carbondale, 111., Aug. -Football practice will start at 
Southern Illinois University Wednesday, Sept. 3, Coach Glenn ''Abe" 
martin has announced. 

Martin invited all hopefuls to report for practice. He expects 
about 20 lettermen from last year's squad to return this year. 

Southern will play a nine-game football schedule this year, for 
:he first time in many years, with a six-game card arranged for the 
3 team, Martin said. 

The Intercollegiate schedule includes the following matches. 

Sept. 27, Scott Field at Carbondale; Oct. 4, Evansville College at 
larbontiale; Oct. 11, Indiana State College at Terre Haute, Ind.; Oct. l£ 
lestern Illinois State College at Macomb; Oct. 25, Northern Illinois 
Bate Teachers College at Carbondale — Southern's Homecoming game; Nov. 
., Arkansas State College at Jonesboro, Ark.; Nov. 3, Illinois State 
formal University at Normal; Nov. 1$, Eastern Illinois State College 
t Carbondale; Nov. 22, Southeast Missouri State Teachers College at 
iape Girardeau, Mo. 

Southern's four home games will be broadcast over both Station 
'JPF, Herrin, and V7CIL, Carbondale. 

ihnfirifu 







► 



SOUTH E 
UN! 
. LIBRahY 

• l CABBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 1 . LINOS 

t 



i 



Southern Illinois 
III 1 University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■^■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■^^M 



3-29-47 

Carbondc.le , 111., Aug. -Student employment practices at 
Southern Illinois University have undergone an extensive revision and 
working students this year will receive an average of approximately 
10 cents per hour higher wages than last. 

For many years Southern has been noted for the opportunities 
given students to ecm-while-they-learn, by making available large 
numbers of part-time jobs on the campus. 

Increasing amounts have been made available for student help 
during the past two years, and last year more than 500 students held 
part-time jobs, 426 of them working for the University itself. 

This summer, all University student jobs have been studied, 
reclassified and the type of work re-evaluated by the Student 
Employment Service, according to Dr. Marshall S. Hisksy, director. 
The rate scale has been raised from a floor of 35 cents to 40 cents 
per hour, and a ceiling of 74 cents to 83 cents. 

Under the new job classification system, students are given full 
credit for training and experience in terms of higher wages, and 
inconsistencies in wages paid to students working in different branches 
of the University have been eliminated. 

Under the new system and with the new wage scale, it is expected 
that the average job will pay approximately 10 cents per hour more 

— **"- :=_^^— — — ^^= ^ 



I 






I 






► 



SOUTHERN '»'■ INOIS 
UN! 







«•• 



' CARBQWDAii, ILLINOIS 



-2- 



than last year, Dean Hiskey said. 

Last year, the average student worker received 40 cents per hour 
and worked 75 to 100 hours per month. This year, the average will 
be nearer 50 cents per hour. 

Student jobs on the campus include stenographic work in University 
offices, radio technicians' jobs, mailing, assisting in testing 
programs, ticket-taking, etc., campus photography, janitorial and 
grounds work. Many students are assigned to responsible duties in 
University administrative offices. 

In addition to campus jobs, many students hold jobs off-campus, 
working for downtown business houses or householders. The Employment 
Service reports increasing calls for student workers from businessmen 
and other off-campus individuals and firms. 

it'u 'a if a a 'nit 









1 



\ 




► 



SOUTHERN 1M !NOIS 



UN 



**• 



y 



v CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS i 




II 



Southern Illinois 
1 University 



Information Service CARBONDALE - i«inois 

lorena drummond, ed. mm^mK^m^^mmu^m^mmmmmmmmmi 



3-29-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Aug. -If Southern Illinois University 
continues its two-yesr winning streak in basketball, the Maroons may 
have a chance to compete for the 194$ Olympiad in London. 

Announcement has just come to Maroon Athletic Director Glenn ;? Abe f? 
Martin that the U.S. Olympic Committee has approved plans whereby the 
winner of the Kansas City National Invitational Basketball Tournament 
will be one of the contestants in final tryouts March 27-31 to select 
the squad to represent the United States in the Olympiad. 

Southern has participated in the Kansas City tournament for the 
past three years and won the 1946 tournament. 

The U.S. tryouts, to be held in Madison Square Garden, will have 
three AAU teams and one YMCA team in one bracket, and the NCAA finalists 
the Kansas City NlAB Tournament winner, and the Madison Square Garden 
Invitation Tournament winner in the other bracket. 

District 20 of the Kansas City tournament set-up, in which 
Southern plans, will hold its tryouts the first week in March to select 
the team to enter the competition, Ray Hanson of Western Illinois State 
College, district chairman, has written Martin. 

lnfihfif 



I 



. 






. 



SOUTHFW r ' 'NOIS 



UN 



' 




*•• 



' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERoITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

9-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Mare than 50 gridsters — most of them 
holdovers from last year's conference runner-up team — have reported for 
pre-season football practice at Southern Illinois University. 

Calisthenics, limbering-up exercises, and a little punting and 
passing have been on the docket this week for the Maroons, according 
to Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin. 

Light scrimmages are planned for next week, aid the Maroons will 
get down to serious business immediately after registration Sept. 15 » 
to polish up their opening game with Scott Field here Sept. 27. 

Sixteen letter-men from last year's team are on hand: Fullback 
Jack Stevens of West Frankfort; halfbacks George Beltz of West 
Frankfort, Bob Johnson of Royalton, Bill Malinsky of Flora, Roy 
Ragsdale of DeSoto, Don Riggs of Fairfield, Dick Seelman of Flora; ends 
Bob Colborn of Flora, Galen Davis of DuQuoin, and Leddio Cabutti of 
Johnston City; guards Bill Cosgrove of Benton, J. J. Pieron of 
Murphysboro; tackles Jim Lovin of Benton, Charles Mathieu of Eldorado 
and Bill Thompson of Mt. Vernon; center Charles Crouch of Carbondale. 

Other squadmen from last year or earlier include Harry Banycky of 
West Frankfort, halfback; Carl Birkner of Pinckneyville, halfback; 
John Corn of Benton, Bill Cox of Marion, tackle; Gary Dangutis of 
Johnston Cityjxxxxxxxxxx J, L. Gross of DuQuoin, guard; Truman Hill of 
Benton, tackle; Clyde Leilich of New Athens, guard; Bret McGinnis of 
Carbondale, halfback; Paul Mitchell of Murphysboro, guard; George 
Sawyer of Wood River, halfback; Mike Sortal of Zeigler, guard; ^uentin 
Stinson of Eldorado, end. 

(more) 






SOUTHERN ! ' * INOI: 
Uf 
. LIBHmkY 

• % CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



-2- 

New material out for pre-season practice includes: Bill Bleyer 
of Carterville, Bill Carlton of karion, Walter Clark of Carbondale, 
Morris Colson of Marion, Donald Cross of Christopher, Forrace 
Derrickson of Mulkeytown, Snide Etherton of Hoopeston, Carrol Fletcher 
of Benton, Pat Kelly of Murphy sboro, Harold Kuehn of Elkville, William 
Mary of Collinsville, Gordon McGinnis of Carbondale, Lewis Mitchell of 
Carmi, M. W. Moreton of Mt. Vernon, Bob Proctor of Zeigler, Jim Renfro 
of Carbondale, Allen Russell of Carbondale ; John Shields of Mt. Vernon, 
C. N. Smith of West Frankfort, Jim Travel stead of Marion, Luther 
Larr of Anna, Paul Tripp of Elkville, Howard Jones of Benton, Dick 
Brown of Elkville, and W. B. Anderson of Albion. 

### 

9-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Charles Bert Beatty, football and 
track athlete from Southern Illinois University, has accepted a position 
as industrial arts teacher and physical education assistant at Benton 
Township High School, according to Raymond H. Dey, director of the 
University Placement Service. 

Beatty, whose home' was Carbondale, graduated from Southern in 
August with the bachelor of science in education degree, majoring 
in physical education. 

While a student he lettered in football and track, and captained 
the track team in 1947* He was also selected for inclusion in Who's 
Who Among Students in American Colleges and Univer sities, A veteran, 
is married and has one child. 

• m 




SOUTHFPN 
UN! IY 
. LIBHmKV 

- l CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

9-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - A series of district conferences 
on school reorganization are scheduled for the latter half of September 
in various centers throughout Illinois , under the joint sponsorship 
of a number of state educational institutions and other agencies. 

The opening conferences will be held at Fairfield Sept. 15 and 
another is to be held here at Southern Illinois University Sept. 13. 

Theme of the conferences will be "The Organization of Community 
Schools in Illinois." 

Sponsoring agencies include the Illinois Rural Education 
Committee, the six state-supported high educational institutions of 
Illinois, of which Southern is one, and the Interfaith Committee for 
Rural Pastors T Short Courses and Conferences, 

ffl 

9-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Committees of students and faculty 
at Southern Illinois University are already making plans for 
Religious Emphasis Week, to be held h >re November 9-14* 

Several planning sessions have been held during the summer and 
suggestions coming from these meetings will be submitted to a general 
meeting of the executive committee as soon as the University opens 
Sept. 15, according to "Or. Douglas hacNaughton, director of the 
Student Christian Foundation and executive secretary for Religious 
Emphasis Week. 

MM 







SOUTHERN ! 'V!NOIS 
UN! 

• LIBRmKV 

• ' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
•Lorena Drummond, Editor 

9-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Freshmen and other new students will 
have a chance to wear off some of their "greenness" before uperclassmen 
hit the campus this year at Southern Illinois University. 

A five-day Freshman Week, planned to give new students an 
orientation course in the University itself, will open Wednesday 
morning, Sept. 10, in Shryock Auditorium. 

University President Chester F. Lay will keynote the opening of 
Freshman Week, and Dr. Charles D. Tenney, administrative assistant to 
the president, will introduce to the new students "the people you 
should know" — deans, registrar, housing counselor, athletic director, 
health service director, veterans service officers, and other 
administrators . 

On Thursday evening, Sept. 11, from 7: 30 to 8:30 p. m. , also in 
the Auditorium, student leaders will be on hand to meet the new students 
and give them the "inside story" on campus activities. "Get acquainted" 
parties will be held both Wednesday and Thursday evenings. 

Other periods on the Freshman Week program will be devoted to 
instructing the newcomers in how to register and how to use the 
library; to giving them their required freshman tests and physical 
examinations; to individualized counseling as to their courses of 
study.. 

All freshmen are expected to attend Freshman Week activities, and 
all new students are invited to do so, according to Miss Helen A. 
Shuman, dean of women, and Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, dean of men, who 
are jointly sponsoring the event. 

m 



■ 



1 




M !■ I ! 



■ ; • NOIS 



•~ 






* L 

'CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

9-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Lt. Col. 'g. W. McLain, who graduated 
in 1921, stopped at his alma mater here, Southern Illinois University, 
this week en route to his new assignment in Korea. 

Colonel McLain, whose home was formerly Equality, was accompanied 
by his wife, the former Marion Blatter of Golconda, who also attended 
Southern in 1920-21. 

First editor of The Egyptian , student newspaper at Southern, 
established in 1920-21, McLain went to the U. S. Military Academy after 
his graduation here and has remained in military service. During the 
war years, for five and a half years, he was chief of supply at Fort 
Knox, Ky., and prior to that had served as the first quartermaster at 
the then-new Camp Blanding, Fla. 

When he reaches Korea, he will serve under another Southern 
alumnus, Lt. Gen. John Reed Hodge, who has been in command of the 
U. S. forces invading and occupying Korea. He expects to serve in 
the Supply Division. 

I Colonel and Mrs. McLain paid a visit to University President 
Chester F. Lay and one to Mrs. Melissa Hodges of Carbondale, mother 
of General Hodge. 

'§#§ 



I 






■ 




SOUTHERN '' ' ! NOIS 



U ri 



%» 



Y 



' CWBOflUAU, IUIN0IS 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

9-3-V7 

Carbondal.e, 111*, Sept. 3 - To the natural academic hazards they 
face at registration, students who come to Southern Illinois University 
this week for Freshman Week and next Monday for fall term registration 
must add traffic hazards as well* 

Main highway traffic today became temporarily routed by State 
Highway officials through the University campus, to divert the 
northbound flow from Grand Avenue, where contractors are busy 
excavating for the University 1 s new heating and electrical tunnel 
system. 

How long the campus will be used as a highway is not certain, but 
contractors and highway officials have assured University authorities 
that the job will be rushed. Crossing of Grand Avenue should require 
only a matter of weeks, weather permitting, it is believed. 

Meanwhile, precautions are being taken that the highway route is 
plainly marked for pedestrian students, and special officers will be 
stationed at intervals to protect the walkers, according to Dr. Neal 
Phelps, director of the University physical plant. 

Diversion of traffic will also eliminate campus parking, and 
steps are being taken to provide additional parking areas adjacent to 
the campus. 

Excavation for the new steam tunnels is going forward rapidly on 
the main campus in an effort to complete installations before winter 
sets in, so that the campus may be re-seeded with grass and shrubs 
and restored to its former unmarred beauty by spring. 

### 



V :', 



; )1U 



v..)i,-:;.^; J 



1 



^WlUP 



> "! 



t 



■ • W „ 



a br)'\r 



y n 



~.>\ . '- • .i- •■ U 






ti.-O'j i 



SOUTHFPN 



UN 



II V 




V 



' CARBOMUALt, ILLINOIS 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

9-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Five more new faculty members and a 
new audio-visual aids director have been added to the staff of 
Southern. .Illinois University for this fall, President Chester F. Lay 
has announced, 

Donald A. Ingli has been appointed director of the Audio-Visual 
Aids Service, formerly known as the Film Service and directed on a part- 
time basis by 'a. faculty member. 

Mr. Ingli, an assistant professor, graduated from the River Falls 
(Wise.) State Teachers College and obtained his master T s degree from 
the University of Minne'sota. He has also done advanced work toward 
the doctor's degree in the field of audio-visual aids at the University 
of Wisconsin, where he has been teaching. 

The Film Service was formerly directed by the late C. C. Logan, 
assistant professor of University High School, who retired a year ago. 

Under Mr. Ingli T s direction the Audio-Viaual Aids Service will be 
expanded not only for classroom instruction at the University but also 
in its services to the public schools of Southern Illinois, President 
Lay said. 

Other appointments include: 

Dr. Claude J.. Dykhouse as associate professor of education. Dr. 
Dykehouse, a graduate of Michigan State College and holder of both the 
master's and doctor's degrees from the University of Minnesota, has 
been teacher and principal of Plymouth (Mich.) high school. 

Dr. Elbert H. Hadley as associate professor of chemistry. Dr. 
Hadley has had extensive experience in industrial chemistry with 
DuPont. He obtained his doctor's degree at Duke University, where he 

(more ) 



o". jy< j. j 






i 



! i 



..:-r . 



'I.fi'j j. 



; oi 



: ' •' 



'*■/-. »:Ii' 



.K 






i 



n 



■V. • J >: 



« y- O ■ :,\ 



SOUTHF 
UNP 



Y 




S~ 



' CARBONDALL, ILLINOIS 



-2- 

taught for a time, and holds the bachelor's and master's degrees from 
the University of Michigan. 

Dr. George L. Cherry as assistant professor of history. He comes 
to Southern from the staff of Wilson Junior College in Chicago, where 
he has been teaching since his discharge from the Army Air Forces. 
He holds the bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of 
Illinois and the doctoral degree from Northwestern University. 

Miss Kate E. Moe as assistant professor of music, to teach vocal 
music. She holds the bachelor's degree from the University of 
Minnesota and the master's degree from the University of Idaho, and 
has carried on professional music study at the Minnesota College of 
Music, the Boston Conservatory of Music and the Danish Royal 
Conservatory of Music in Copenhagen. For two years a lieutenant (j.g.) 
in the Coast Guard, she has taught at the Itasca (Minn.) Junior College, 
the Dickinson (N.D. ) State Teachers College and Valparaiso University. 

Miss Pauline DeHass as assistant professor of home economics 
to take the place this year of Miss Gladys Babcock, who is on 
sabbatical leave to study at Cornell University. Miss DeHass holds the 
bachelor of science degree from James Millikin College and two master's 
degrees, one from Presbyterian College, the other from Columbia 
University. A former teacher at the State College of South Dakota, she 
has been head of the home economics department at Missouri Valley 
College and has had several years experience as a dietician at Illinois 
hospitals. 

President Lay also 'announced the resignation of Mrs* Elsie Parrish 
McNeill, instructor in rural education, who has accepted a position 
in Florida. 

(more ) 



1 



b.iO'i >'> 



'■ cs "> f < £ ' 



>f{j - c 







SOOTHFPN 
UNI 





w 



' CARBQNDALE, ILLINOIS i 



-3- 

Two teachers who had accepted appointment to the University 

faculty for this fall have asked to be released, Dr. Lay said. They 
are Henry J. O'Reilly of Oregon City, Ore., as assistant professor 
of agriculture, and Dr, Quinter M. Lyon as professor of philosophy. 
Negotiations are under way to fill both of these positions. 

Appointment of Mr. Ingli, Dr, Dykhouse, Miss Moe and Miss DeHass 
brings the total number of new faculty members this summer and fall 
(excluding summer visiting teachers) to 34. Mrs, McNeill's resignation 
is the 10th effective since June. In addition, one faculty member has 
retired, two whose terms of appointment had expired have left the 
campus, and six "have obtained leaves of absence for 1947-4$. Four 
faculty members on leave last year, however, have returned to their 
duties, so that the net increase over last year is 19 • 

Several other appointments of new personnel are pending for the 
1947-4$ session. 

### 



' 



L 1 



. V 5 




III 



southern 
un: 




3~ 



' CARBOWDALt, ILLINOIS 



5 



; SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 

9-9-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Five more new faculty members have 
: been added to the staff of Southern Illinois University, effective 
this fall, making a total of 29 full-time additions in the past three 
months, President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

The new appointees include: 

Dr. Kenneth D. Luney as associate professor of economics. Dr. 
Luney, who has served as a visiting member of the summer faculty, came 
! from Panama, C.Z., where he was personnel director for the U. S. 
Employment Service. A graduate of Geneva College, he holds both the 
master's and doctor's degrees from the University of Illinois, where he 
also formerly taught. He has also taught at Indiana State Teachers 
College and Huron College. 

Cameron W. Garbutt as assistant professor of speech, in charge of 
speech correction work. Mr. Garbutt graduated from Northwestern 
University and obtained the master's degree from the University of 
Washington. He has taught at the University of Washington, at 
Louisiana State University, and at Cornell University. 

Miss Emily E. Farnham as assistant professor of art. Miss Farnham 
holds the bachelor's degree from Kent State University and the master's 
degree from Ohio State University. She has done further study at the 
University of California and at California College of Arts and Crafts. 
She has taught at Ohio State, Michigan State College, Oklahoma A. & M. 
College, Utah State College, and Stout Institute, 

(more) 



I 



. 







i; 




SOUTHERN !M INOIS 
UNI 




** 



' CARBOKUALt, ILLINOIS 



3 



' 



-2- 

Ralph Boatman as instructor in physiology and health education 

and health coordinator. Mr. Boatman, one of two Illinoisans to 
receive a public health education fellowship from the State of Illinois 
last year, obtained the master of public health degree this summer from 
the University of North Carolina. He obtained his bachelor's degree 
from Southern. Under his new appointment he will teach part-time 
on the campus and will devote the remainder of his time to setting up 
health workshops and to teaching extension classes in Southern Illinois, 
The Kellogg Foundation will assist in paying Mr. Boatman's salary under 
terms of the University-foundation cooperative health education 
program. 

Miss Helen Blackburn as instructor in the mathematics department. 
Miss Blackburn, whose home is in Salem, received both her bachelor's 
and master's degrees from Southern, and has previously served as a 
graduate assistant and as a faculty assistant in the mathematics 
department here. 

Tr-^addition to these five full-time appointees, President Lay also 
announced the appointment of two additional part-time mathematics 
teachers--Miss Gladys Rice Clark and Miss Dorothy Cox, both of whom 
taught part-time here last year. Miss Clark is a master's degree 
graduate from Teachers College, Columbia University, and Miss Cox 
holds the master's degree from the University of Iowa. 



9-3-47 
Carbondale, 111., Sept, - Two new department chairmen have been 
naijfed at Southern Illinois University, President Chester F # Lay has 
announced. 

(more ) 






.' 






SOUTHF^ '• ' !NOIS 

UN! 




w 



1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 




-3- 



Dr. Lewis A. Maverick, professor of economics, has been appointed 
chairman of the economics department. Dr. Maverick, who holds the 
bachelor's degree from Washington University, the doctor of education 
degree from Harvard University, and the doctor of philosophy degree 
from the University of California, where he was chairman of the ■ 
economics department • 

The economics department chairmanship has been vacant for some 
years. 

Dr. Floyd F. Cunningham, associate professor, has been named 
acting chairman of the geography department, succeeding Dr. Thomas F. 
Barton, resigned. Dr. Cunningham comes to Southern this fall after 17 
years head of the geography department at State Teachers College, 
Florence, Ala. He formerly taught at Illinois State Normal University 
and at George Peabody College for Teachers. 

### 






SOUTHFPN '' ' 'NOIS 
HI 




~. 



(MKl 

' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ILL1NOIS 

lorena drummond, ed. ■ ■■■■ ■■■■■■ ig/nmmmmm ■■■ ■ 



(Note to Editor: This is one of a series of articles prepared to 
acquaint the people of Southern Illinois with the way in which Southern 
Illinois University is developing as a university. Each article will 
deal with one of the organized branches of the University and will 
recount its progress during the past year.) 

9-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. -Expansion of three departments, 
additional personnel for six other departments, a new building for the 
foreign language department, recognition for the whole college in 
national educational circles—these are the attainments of the College 
of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Southe -n Illinois University during the 
past year. 

Three of the college's 11 departments will start the fall term 
with new faculty positions created and filled, thus giving them the 
largest faculties they have ever had. These new positions are in 
chemistry, government and sociology. 

(The department of English last year had built up a faculty of 13, 
compared to its previous peak of 12. With two replacements this year, 
for a retiring member and for a teacher on sabbatical leave, it again 
has 13 teachers this fall. ) 

In all, 13 new faculty members are joining the staff of the 

college this fall. The new personnel includes in associate professor 

of chemistry, two associate professors of English, an instructor in 

languages, an associate professor and an assistsuit professor of 

geography, an associate professor in government, an assistant professor 

(more . 



I 



■;,. ■ ; -: 









SOUTHFW'MNOIS 
UNI 




b* 



' CARBONUALt, ILLINOIS 1 



-2- 



of history, an associate professor and an instructor in mathematics, 
an associate professor of physics, and two associate professors of 
zoology. 

A substantial number of part-time instructors and graduate 
assistants will also serve in the various departments of the college 
this year as they did last, in order to help care for the large 
enrollment. 

There still remain a few key positions in the college which must 
be filled, and appointments will be made as soon as qualified teachers 
can be found, Dean Abbott said. 

A bacteriologist, a geologist and a philosophy teacher are 
urgently needed, and it is planned to establish instruction in 
anthropology and archaeology as soon as possible. It is hoped that all 
of these positions can be filled within the current biennium. 

The foreign language department, long overcrowded in the Main 
Building, this fall will move into its new home in one of the 
residences recently purchased by the University, at the corner of 
Grand and Illinois Avenue. These quarters will make it possible to 
carry on the instructional work of the department more effectively, 
since language records can be played without disturbing other classes. 

This department this fall will have on its staff as a part-time 
faculty assistant Senor Jose Luis Reyes from the National University 
of Mexico. Senor Reyes who came here this summer as a graduate student 
and holder of the first International Scholarship given by the_ 149th 
District of Rotary, will teach conversational Spanish. 

Three new department chairmen have been named in the college during 

(mare ) 






I 
i 



Southern Illinois 
Normal University 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



i 




•■*• 



OUTHEPN ! ' ' !N0l: 
UN 

. LIBKmKY 

1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 



-3- 



i the summer: Dr. W. B. Schneider, chairman of the English department, 
^replacing Miss Emma Bowyer, who retired this fall after 26 years in 
that capacity; Dr. J. R. Purdy, acting chairman of the mathematics 
department, replacing Dr. J. R. kayor, on leave of absence; and Dr. 
Floyd F. Cunningham, new assistant professor of geography, acting 
chairman of the geography department, replacing Dr. Thomas F. Barton, 
resigned. 

Two teachers from the college of Liberal Arts and Sciences have 
been granted sabbatical leaves to carry on advanced study this year — 
Mrs. Edith Krappe, assistant professor of English, at the University 
of Pennsylvania, and kiss kadeloine Smith, assistant professor of 
foreign languages, at Yale. Joseph Baxter, instructor in history, 
is on leave of absence for the fall term, to do research work in Latin 
America, but will return for the winter term. 

Since its establishment as a separate branch and Dr. Abbott's 
appointment as dean in the fall of 1945, the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences has grown substantially in enrollment. In the spring term 
of 1945, a total of 14,7 students were enrolled in this college, while 
in the spring of 1947 this number had increased to 5$1. 

The college has graduated 123 students since its establishment 
as a separate branch — Si with the bachelor of arts degree, 47 with the 
bachelor of science degree. 

National recognition for the college came last year with the 
University 1 s election to membership in the Association of American 
Colleges, which is composed- of institutions with accredited liberal 
arts colleges, 

§M 







► 



SOUTHPM ! " ' 'NOR 



UN 






a* 



Y 



'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ILLlNOIS 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■ "^ ■ ■■■■■■■■■■ ■ 



9-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Extension courses will be started 
next week in 21 Southern Illinois communities by Southern Illinois 
University, Raymond H. Dey, deirector of the Extension Service, has 
announced. 

Several additional classes will probably be opened in other 
communities, he said. 

The fall term schedule at present includes the following: 

Belleville, "School Administration," taught by Dr. Bruce lierwin; 
Benton, "School and Community," taught by four faculty members from 
the College of Education — Dr. Howard Bosley, Dr. Earl Hall, Willis 
E. Malone, and Dr. Victor Randolph. 

Cairo, "American Poetry," taught by Dr. Robert Faner; Carmi, 
"Safety in Physical Education" and"Physiology of Exercise," taught by 
Frank Bridges; Centralia, "Child Devel pment," taught by Dr. Sina Mott; 
Christopher, "Rural and elementary Curriculum," taught by Jean Fligor, 

Cobden, "Recreational Music and Singing Games," taught by D. S. 
Mcintosh; Edwardsvilie , "Rural and Elementary Curriculum," taught by 
J. Ward Dillow; Elizabethtown, "School and Community," taught by Malone, 
3osley, Hall and Randolph. 

Fairfield, "International Government," by Dr. Willis G, Swartz; 
Golconda, "American Public Education," taught by George Bracewell; 
Harrisburg, "School and Community," taught by Bosley, Hall, Malone, and 
Randolph. 



( mo re ) 



I 

1 . 

I 









► 




In 



OUTHFPM ! ' ' !NOI: 

UI 
. LIBRmKY 

' GARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



. .Marion, ^Recreational Music and Singing Games," taught by Mr. 
Mcintosh;. McLeansboro, /'Health Educational Methods Applicable to the 
Public. Schools, '■' taught by various members of the Health Education 
department staff; Metropolis,. "Art Education in the Public," taught 
by Miss • Lulu Roach; ,Mt. Vernon, "American Public Education," taught by 
George Brae ewell.. . ..... _ 

•Nashville, "Work of the Elementary Teacher," taught by Mr. ^alone; 
Ridgway, "The Teaching of .Health Education," taught by Ralph Boatman; 
Salem, . "School and Community," taught by Bosley, Hall, kalone and 
Randolph; Sparta, "Social Psychology," taught by Dr. Joseph K. 
Johnson; and- Vienna, a history course, taught by Dr. George L. Cherry. 

All pf the extension courses are taught by regular members of 
the University faculty. . 

The. -courses offered at Belleville, Benton,, Cairo, Elizabethtown, 
Harris burg, Salem, and Fairfield are all of graduate level. 

Many- of. . the. -extension courses are planned especially for teachers 
who, need additional educational credits in order to maintain their 
teaching certificates,:- while others are .available for those who wish to 
carry on. advanced work. 



I 



SOUTHF™ '' ' !NOI: 



UN 



I 



y 



' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 




Release Saturday 9-12-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. 13 - Registration for the fall term at 
Southern Illinois University will open Monday morning, sept. 15, at 
9 T o ? clock. 

Between 2800 and 3,000 students are expected to enroll by the 
time latecomers sign up. Some 1200 freshmen have already been accepted 
[ for admission, about 800 of them reporting several days ago for the 
first pre-registration Freshman Week. 

For four days these new students have been finding out all the 
things they need to know about the Uni "ersity--how to register, what 
courses they must take, what grades are expected of them, how to use 
the library, what services the University offers them. 

In addition, they have been getting a good strong dose of the 
social side of college life. Many of them were brou3ht to the campus 
by their families on Wednesday, and one of the big events on the 
Freshman Week calendar was the "family picnic dinner 5 ' out under the 
trees on the campus that first day. The parents who came obviously 
enjoyed the opportunity to see the campus and meet the faculty 
members with whom their youngsters would work for the next year. 

Parties, mid-morning snacks, singsongs and other recreational 
activities have lightened the strenous ''business sessions" of Freshman 
Week, and most of the newcomers say they feel a lot more confident 
about starting their college career. 

(more ) 



! 



► 




SOUTHFM 

UN! y 

. LIBKmKY 

- ' CW8W0AU, ILLINOIS 



NOl: 



i 



-2- 

The fall term at Southern will get under way with a meeting of 
all faculty members at $ a. m. Monday in Shryock Auditorium. 

Registration lines will form at the Gymnasium at 9 a. m. Students 
will register in alphabetical order, according to the following 
schedule; 

Monday: 9 a. m. — students whose last names begin with the letters 
Q through S, and all Public Law $16 veterans; 10 a, m. — T through Z; 
11 a. m,--A through B; 1 p, m. — C through E. 

Tuesday: 9 a. m, — F through H: 10 a. m. L through MC ; 11 a. m., 
M through P; 1 p. m. — all others. 

Classes will start Wednesday morning. 

Campus laboratory schools will also ;;et under way next week. 
Allyn Training School students, grades 1-6, and University High ochool 
students will register and pay fees starting at 9 a. m. Monday, with 
classes opening Tuesday. Registration for the Kindergarten and Nursery 
School will be held Tuesday, with regular work starting Wednesday. 

Activities for students and faculty will g et in full swing next 
week. A party for all students interested in music will be held by 
the music department on Monday evening. On Tuesday evening, an 
all-University "mixer" will be sponsored by the Student Council. On 
Thursday, a convocation for upperclass students and faculty has been 
called for 10 a. m. 

m 



■i 







► 



SOUTHERN '' ' INOIS 
UN! 



y 



L 




1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Release Monday 



9-12-47 



Carbondale, 111., Sept. - As the fall term opens at Southern 
Illinois University, the 1947-4$ calendar is already crowded with 
social activities for students and faculty, entertainment programs, 
football games, conferences for off-campus groups, and other special 
avents, with others being scheduled almost daily. 

Already listed are the following: 
)6ptcmbor ■ 



15-16 

15 
16 

17 
17 
IS 
13 
20 
27 



Registration for fall term. 

Party for all students interested in music 

All-University Mixer. 

Classes Start. 

Southern Illinois Garden Judging School. 

District Conference on School Reorganization. 

Convocation for Upperclassmen and Faculty. 10 a. m. 

Merit System Examinations for Public Assistance positions. 

Football Game — Southern vs. Scott Field, Mc Andrew St 

Stadium 



October 



4 A.A.U.W. Workshop. 

4 Rehearsals start for t? The Messiah/' all-Southern Illinois 

Christmas oratorio. 
4 Football Game — Southern vs. Evansville College, McAndrew 
Stadium. Boy Scout Day. 
11 Football Game — Southern vs. Indiana State. At Terre 
Haute, Ind. 
ept.30-0ct. 3 Egyptian Fire Fighters School. 

13 State Teachers College Board Meeting. At Normal. 

13 Lecture by Dr. Peter Manniche, president, International 

Peoples College, Elsinore, Denmark. 
IS State Meeting of Junior Classical Association. 
1$ Football Game — Southern vs. Western. At Macomb. 
20-25 Celebration in Recognition of Southern T s New Status as 

a University. 
24-25 Homecoming. 

(more ) 






I I. 




► 



SOUTHERN ! ' ' INOIS 
UN! 



~ 



y 



' CARBOMDAtE, ILLINOIS i 




-2- 



25 
31 



November 

1 

1 
5 
6 

9-14 
15 
20 
22 

27-23 

December 

2-6 
3-9 

14 
16 
13 



Football Game — Southern vs. Northern, Mc Andrew Stadium. 
Fall Meeting, Southern Division, Illinois Education 
Association. 



Football Game — Southern vs. Arkansas State. At 

Jonesboro, Ark. 

Southern Illinois Choral Clinic. 

Concert by John Kirkpatrick, pianist 

Football Game — Southern vs. Normal. 

Religious Emphasis Week. 

Football Game — Southern vs. Eastern, 

University Orchestra Concert. 

Football Game — Southern vs. Southwest Missouri State 

Teachers College* At Cape Girardeau, 

Thanksgiving Recess. 






At Normal, 

Mc Andrew Stadium. 



Final Examinations for Fall Term. 
Registration for Winter Term. 
Presentation of "The Messiah." 
Concert by University Band. 
Christmas Concert by University Chorus. 



20- Jan. 11 Christmas Recess. 



Mi 










> 



SOUTHFP*' '' ' 'NOIS 

UN! 
. LIBHhKY 

• ' CMtBUIDAU, IUINOIS 9 



== 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



9-15-47 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111,, Sept. 1$ - With more than a week and a half of 
twice-a-day practices behind them, the Southern Illinois University 
Maroons begin regular afternoon football practice sessions today. 

Heavy scrimmages are scheduled for this week as Coach Glenn "Abe" 
Martin looks for the starting combination to face ->cott Field in the 
Maroon opener here Sept. 27. 

Martin was non-committal about the prospects for a winning season. 
However, he did indicate that the haroons probably will be ewual to 
last year's team, which finished second in the Illinois Inter-Collegiate 
Conference, 

Men like Jim Lovin of Benton and Charles Mathieu of Eldorado 
provide the key to the maroons T hopes this year. Both were outstanding 
freshman tackles a year ago, and have returned this season to 
high-light a powerful line. With capable players two and even three 
deep in the guard, tackle and end positions, there is little doubt about 
the strength of the Southern forward wall. 

Only center remains a real problem, and with Bill "Cotton" 
Cosgrove of Benton, a former ^uard, working there, it should not long 
remain a worry. Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, long on height but short 
on varsity football experience, is also being drilled to relieve the 
center shortage, 

(more ) 



I 




► 



SOUTHP* ! " ' 'NO!S 
UN! 




r ' CARBONDAtt, ILLINOIS i 



r 



-2- 

The backfield constitutes another worry at this early moment. 
All-conference star Bill i-ialinsky of Flora is probably the 
outstanding candidate for backfield honors. A brilliant passer, 
capable kicker, and hard-driving ball carrier, Malinsky will provide a 
real threat. 

Dick Seelman, also of Flora, a quick-starting, smooth-running 
halfback and passer will report this week, after an injured ankle 
mends. Other halfbacks returning from last season who will probably 
see considerable action are leorge Beltz of Marion, Elusive Bob 
Johnson of DuQuoin, and Roy Ragodale of Carbondale. At fullback 
sophomore Don Riggs of Fairfield has the inside track to a starting 
position against Scott Field. 

Coach Martin says that he has been impressed by the performance 
of scat-back Bob Proctor of Zeigler, who is a freshman. Two others 
expected to provide a lift to the backfield are holdovers from the 
1946 B squad, George bawyer of Woodriver and Pat Kelly of Murphysboro. 

Bret McGinnis of Carbondale, a reserve guard, has been practicing 
his skillful place-kicking toe, and will probably take care of 
extra-point tries as he did last year. 

### 



I 

1 . 













► 



SOUTHFW " ' 'NOIS 

UN! 



W 






v CARBO«DAlE f ILLINOIS i 





Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



9-15-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. 15- Approximately three dozen new faculty 
members made their appearance at Southern Illinois University at today's 
faculty meeting preceding registration for the fall term. 

Last minute additions to the staff, not previously announced, 
included the following: 

Miss Tina Goodwin as assistant professor in the Allyn Training 
School. Miss Goodwin, formerly critic teacher for the University at the 
Brush School in Carbondale, holds the bachelor of education degree from 
Southern and the master of arts degree from Teachers College, Columbia 
University. She has also carried on graduate study at the University 
of Tennessee and the University of Chicago. 

Mrs. Esther Witcher as assistant professor in Wheeler Library. 
Mrs. Witcher holds the bachelor of science and the bachelor of library 
science degrees from the University of Illinois this summer. She comes 
to Southern from the library staff of the University of Illinois and has 
had extensive experience in several high school and city libraries. 

Miss Thera Cavender as instructor in Wheeler Library. Holder of 
the degree of bachelor of science in library science from the University 
of Illinois, Miss Cavender obtained the master's degree from the 
University of Missouri. She has served as assistant librarian and 
cataloguer at the University of Illinois, and has also served in the 

(more ) 



V 



v 







. southfw ■ ' 'nog 

un: 

. LiBHMKY 

f ' CAftKMOAU, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 



libraries of the Peru (Neb.) State Teachers College and the University 
of Maryland. 

Miss Orpha Jane Borgsmiller as faculty assistant in physiology and 
health education. A registered nurse, Miss Borgsmiller obtained her 
training at DePaul Hospital in St. Louis, 

These four appointments bring to 3& the total number of new 
faculty members added to the University staff during the summer and for 
this fall. 



.. 



■* 



ii ■. 7 •/ ,7 // /; / 

7/' ujnrtfjfu it 






■ 



L 1 






I 



SOUTHFPN ! ' * 'NOIS 

UN! 

. LIBRmKY 

• l CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 3 





Southern Illinois 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 


CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




' 





Attention: Sports Editors 

9-17-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. -For many years the name of Southern 
Illinois University 1 s football team has been the Maroons, but this 
year rumor s^ys it should be changed to the "Miners," or "Diggers,'* 
or perhaps even "Mudhogs." 

The reason: the University's expansion program. A new power 
plant is being constructed at the south end of the practice field and 
this deep ditch, to hold heating tunnels, has been excavated down the 
west side of the practice gridiron. 

Players reporting for practice must detour around this ditch, and 
then cross a range of outsize molehills of raw, yellow dirt. Having 
passed these ordeals, they find themselves thoroughly warmed-up and 
ready for serious drills. 

Regardless of the narrow cramped area of turf left for practice, 
head coach Glenn "Abe" Martin is working his men at top speed in 
preparation for their first contest against the Scott Field Army Air 
Field here Sept. 27. 

Having lost several fast backs from last year's conference 

runner-up team, Martin is searching for a smooth-working backfield. 

The line apoears in good order, since it is not only large, but is also 
fairly fast. Early indications are that Maroons will deperd primarily 
on power for their offensive efforts. 

u ififitiiii 












SOUTHFPM ! ' ' 'NOIS 
Uf 
. LIBHmKV 

• v GARBONDAL£ r ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Carbondale, 111., Sept. -Some 70 ,T honor teachers" from 
Southern Illinois will gather here for a meeting of Delta Kappa Gamma, 
national honor society of women teachers, Sept. 20, according to Mrs. 
Elizabeth Meehan, instructor in the Allyn Training School at Southern 
Illinois University, who is president of Alpha Kappa chapter here. 

Members of the Carbondale area chapter will be hosts to Delta 
Kappa Gammas from the Oentralia, the Harrisburg and the Mounds area. 

A luncheon meeting will be held at Giant City Lodge Saturday at 
noon, when Dr. Robert Faner, associate professor of English at the 
University here, will speak to the group on "The Opera House Was His 
School," commenting on the poet Walt T .i/hitman, 

Miss Mary Entsminger, associate professor in the Allyn Training 
School and state vice president, will be a special guest. 

The committee in charge of arrangements for the meeting here 
includes Dr. Vera Peacock, past president of the local chapter; Mrs. 

Beverly Treece, Miss Florence Wells, and Mrs. Meehan. 

. :. .. : :ji 
it if 1th it 

Carbondale, 111.,, Sept. -More than 2,700 students had enrolled 

at Southern Illinois University by the opening of fall term classes 

Wednesday, and as students sign up for night classes this week 

registration is expected to surpass substantially the final enrollment 

of 2,718 a year ago. 

uirinfu 



■ 
I- 











SOUTHFPN ""' !NOIS 
UN! 




*. 



' WRBOMDAtf, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^_^^ H ^_^^^^^^^^^^^^ H ^ H 



9-17-47 

Carbondale, 111, Sept. -Two new agriculture teachers were 
added to the staff of Southern Illinois University at the opening of 
the fall term this week, University President Chester F. Lay has 
announced . 

Dr. Lowell Tucker has been named associate professor and Marshall- 
Grant Clark has been appointed assistant professor in the agriculture 
department. 

Dr. Tucker holds the bachelor of science degree from the University 
of Illinois, the master of science from the University of New 
Hampshire, and the doctor of philosophy degree from Massachusetts 
State College. He formerly taught at all three of these institutions 
and also at Kansas State College and the University of Idaho, and has 
had extensive practical experience in agriculture. 

Mr. Clark obtained both the bachelor's and master's degrees from 
the University of Illinois, where he taught for a time. He has also 
taught in the high schools of St. Joseph and of Dundee, and at the 
University of Missouri, and has had experience as a farm consultant. 

a' i'rd li'iru 



i 







SOUTHF&N ! ' ' 'NOIS 



UN 



hw 



3*» 



' 



' CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS 




SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
jorena Drummond, Editor 



9-19-47 
ATTENTION: SPORTS EDITORS 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - t5 The line does all the work, but 
the backfield gets all the glory." So goes an old football saying, 
and certainly there is a grain of truth in the statement. 

Southern Illinois University has a very capable group of players, 
who, as linesmen, may not get much glory, but who will certainly be 
all important in the success of the 1947 i'laroons. 

From tackle to tackle Southern will field what is probably one of 
its best lines in history. 

At left tackle will be Charles mathieu, a 205 pounder from 
Eldorado. Powerful as a bull, mathieu has earned a letter at Bucknell 
in addition to the one he earned last fall for his able work for the 
Maroons. 

Jim Lovin of Benton is holding forth at the left guard position 
where he will team with Mathieu in trying to stop power plays to 
the right by other teams. Lovin also tips the scales at 205 pounds, 
and like mathieu again, he starred last year in his freshman season, 
being placed on the All-Conference team and also being named "most 
Valuable Player" by his teammates. 

Aggressive, cocky Bill "Cotton" Cosgrove of Benton is the man 

over the ball. An All-Conference center in 1944, Bill played an 

outstanding guard last fall, and should be even better this year now 

that he has returned to his old position. 

(more ) 






I 



SOUTHFPN '" !NO!S 

UN! 




■j- 



v CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 

Right "<uard Bob £theridge of Fairfield joined the college foot- 
ball big league at a tender age by playing for the powerful Iowa 
Seahawks of 1943 when he was fresh out of high school. In 194o 3ob 
suffered an early season injury here at southern which limited his 
effectiveness, but seems to be ready to fight at top speed this year. 
iDtherid ;e is light at L15 pounds, but he is very quick. 

Big John Corn was an outstanding tackle in 1945 before entering 
the service. In the two years which have passed since he last played 
in a iaroon uniform he has gained 20 pounds of solid muscle, and now 
baL nee s the scales at 210. 

This is the core of the jouthern team, tackle to tackle, which 
will start against Scott i ? ield in the. season's opener Saturday, dept* 
27, in Garbondale. 

Hit 



SOUTHFPN '" INOIS 



UN 



I ; 




1 CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



SOUTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY INFORMATION SERVICE 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



9-19-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. -A new handbook for student veterans 
has been issued by oouthern Illinois University, pulling together a 
wide variety of information to answer the most frequent questions 
asked by former servicemen and servicewomen. 

The booklet, called "Southern* s Guidebook for Veterans,'' raises 
such questions as these and answers them: "How do I get credit for 
college work done elsewhere?", "How do I get credit for work done in, 
my military unit?", ;? Can I enter college if I do not have a high school 
diploma? 1 ', "How do I get books and supplies?'', "What amount of money 
does the Federal Government put on deposit for me as a veteran student?", 
"".That will it cost me to attend the University?", "What if I need a 
job?", "If I should do unsatisfactory work in school, would I ever be 
able to get G.I. help in future training?" and many other queries. 

### 



Carbondale, 111., oept. - Approximately 2,750 students had 
registered at Southern Illinois University during the first week of 
the fall term, the Business Office reports. Latecomers may continue 
to register through Sept. 26. 

Last year, final registration for the fall term was 2,713, 

11 JIM 






M 




SOUTHERN '"'NOIS 



UN 










1 CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editor 



9-22-47 



Carbondale, 111., Sept. -Cooler weather has given added incentive to the 
intense practice drills which are on the docket for the Southern Illinois University 
Maroons this week as they gird themselves for their season opener Saturday afternoon 
against Scott Field here. 

Head Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin stated that he knew nothing about the Ann.;/ team, 
Good or bad, they will be a mystery to the Maroons until after the opening kickoff. 

At Southern's first full scale scrimmage last Friday the Martinmen looked 
powerful, but slightly ragged. This raggedness, always present in early scrimmages, 
will probably be largely eliminated by the end of the week when the players have 
become more adjusted to each other. 

That the line is strong, a fact already well known, was clearly demonstrated by 
the scrimmage, so attention is being given to the backfield. 

Bill Malinsky of Flora, last year's captain, gave proof that he is ready to 
hold down the quarterback spot in good fashion. His sharp passes clicked well to end 
Eob Colborn, also of Flora, indicating the possibility of a Flora to Floia touchdown 
combination. 






Right halfback George Sawyer of Wocd River, a converted fullback from the 1946 
"B" squad, showed that he has gained speed, and, with his wealth of power, maj develop 
into a hard driving power runner. 

Bob Johnson of DuQuoin, playing left halfback, proved that he has lost none 
of his elusiveness. Johnson's outstanding characteristic is his ability to follow 
his blockers, a skill which is often overlooked. 






SOUTHFRM « ''!NOIS 

UN! 



-~ 



. UBHmKV 

% CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 



-2- 



Athletic Director Martin has announced that all Southern Illinois coaches will 
be admitted to all Southern games, except at Homecoming, free of charge if they 
present themselves at a special ticket booth at the entrance to the stadium. High 
school players whom these coaches identify will also be admitted free. 



ii 






I 



;' 








SOUTHERN ! ' ' 'NOIS 

UN! 




&* 



1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS I 




■Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



9-22-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Sept. -Saad Salih Jaber, son of the prime minister of 
Iraq, has enrolled as a fre&hman pre-medical student at Southern Illinois University, 

The 18-year-old Iraqi is a graduate of the preparatory school of the American 
University of Beirut, Lebanon. His father is Prime Minister Salih Jaber. 

Arrangements for young Jaber to study here were made through the American 
Embassy at Baghdad and the U.S. Department of State in Washington, according to 
University President Chester F. Lay. 

"We are happy to have Mr. Jaber as a student here," President Lay said. 
"Exchange of students between the United States and other countries is, we fee], one 
of the important contributions the University can make toward international 
cultural relations. 

"We hope that he will be happy here at Southern, and that he will become 
acquainted, through contacts with our Southern Illinois students, with some of the 
fine values of the American way of life. Having enjoyed a year myself in the 
Eastern Mediterranean, I am sure that it will be equally beneficial for our own 
students to have the opportunity of associating with a fine representative of one of 
the old civilizations of the Near East." 

U.U4LUU 

n 'ft it it it 



I 



SOUTHFPN "' !NOIS 

UN! |Y 




-» 



1 CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



"' 






9-23-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. -Election of a student chairman and appointment of 
Bub- commit tee chairmen this week set the wheels to going around at Southern 
Illinois University for Homecoming, scheduled for Oct. 24-25. 

Bill Price of Texico was elected student chairman by delegates from more 
than 60 student organizations which will participate in planning the reunion for 
Southern alumni, according to Dr. Orville Alexander, director of alumni services 
and faculty chairman of Homecoming. 

Coronation of the Homecoming Queen, a ball with music by a "big-name" 
orchestra, the Southern-Northern football game, a Little Theatre play, a parade, 
a bonfire and pep rally are traditional features of the reunion. 

mm 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. -Fall term enrollment at Southern Illinois 
University climbed to 2,811 by Tuesday noon of the second week of the term, according 
to the Registrar's Office. Students may continue to enroll through the remainder 
of this week. 

Final registration a year ago was 2,718. 

frffifmrffifirffif 









I 

i 



ij 



i 




SOUTHFPM " ' 'NOIS 

UN! 

. LIBHmKV 

r v CARBONDAt£, ILLINOIS I 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



9-23-^7 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. -Two faculty members from Southern Illinois 
University were in Indianapolis early this week to serve on the program of ti e 
National Conference of County Superintendents being sponsored by the rural 
education department of the National Education Association. 

Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the College of Education, and George Bracewell, 
associate professor of education, served as consultants to discussion groups on 
school reorganization and on teacher recruitment, respectively, at the 
Indianapolis conference,, held lionday through Wednesday. 



¥ff# 



Carbondale, 111., Sept. -Raymond H. Dey, director of extension and 
placement services at Southern Illinois University, is attending a national 
conference of city and state directors of adult education at Clear Lake Camp, 
Dowling, Michigan, this week, and will also attend a meeting of health 
coordinators and extension directors at Champaign this weekend. 

UM.M U 

nninf 



I 



I 



'. 






• 




► 



- 



SOUTHF^^ " ' 'NOIS 
UNI 

• LIBKmKV 

r l CAR80NDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 




information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



f 



9-24-47 

Attention: Srorts 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. - Long Signal drills aid funda- 
mental practices in blocking and tackling have high-lighted 
football practice this v;eek at Southern Illinois University as 
Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin whirs his squad into form for their 

opener against Scott Field here Saturday. 

Amor g t 1 ose reporting late for rractice was Bun^or Jones of 

West Frankfort. In 1945 Jones played regularly with the University of 

Illinois at tackle and also did their place-kicking. For the Maroons 

the 220-pounder will operate at end. 

Charlie Heinz of Gillesrie, stellar center of last year, has 

been moved to the backfield, probably the left halfback position. 

Agile and powerful, 190-pound Heinz was transferred from the almost 
over-manned line to the somewhat under-manned backfield in a move evi- 
dently designed to balance line and backfield strength more evenly. 

Although line positions seem to be pretty well set for the Scott 

Field game, it is probably that Coach Martin will do a lot of experi- 
menting with his backfield, shifting personnel! often in an effort to 

find an effective combination. 

Early indications are that Bill Malingky of Flore will draw the 
opening quarterback position, Bob Johnson of DuCuoin the left halfback 
assignment, Georee Sawyer of Wood River the right halfback duties, and 
Don Riggs of Fairfield the fullback slot. 

Other backs ready for early use £ re Roy Ragsdale of Cerbondale, 
George Beltz of Marion, Lick Seelmar, of Flora, Don Cross of Christopher, 
Willis Anderson of Burkburnett , Texas, Pat Kelly of Murrhysboro and Hein: 

m 










► 



- 



SOUTHFPM i« ' 'NO!S 
UNI 
. LIBRmkY 

f 'CARBQNDAIE, ILLINOIS i 




nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



I l|| 



9-25-47 

Carbondale, 111.,. Sept. -The Southern Illinois University Maroons will 
open their schedule Saturday at 2:00 p.m. when they square off against Scott Field 
at McAndrew Stadium in Carbondale. 

The Army men will find in the Maroons of Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin a team which 
is in excellent physical condition, ready to knock the lid off the season with zest, 
Scott Field still rem ains a mystery to the Maroons. 

Although Southern sports a strong line, as well as a capable backfield, there 
is no great weight among the starters. Instec.d of hugh bulks of fat, the Maroons 
will generally range between 190 and 200 pounds, lean and hard. Heaviest starter 
will be John Corn of Benton, 210 pounds at tackle, while the lightest will be 
halfback Bob Johnson of Du^uoin, 155 pounds. 

The backfield weight for the Maroons will be just under ISO, with two men, 
George Sawyer of Wood River, halfback, and Don Riggs of Fairfield, fullback, going 
over the 190 pound- mark. Quarterback Bill Malinsky of Flora weighs 170, making 
Johnson the featherweight of the crowd. 

Passing and kicking duties will fall on Malinsky, whose aerials are always a 
dangerous threat. Targets for Malinsky' s passes will be ends Bob Colborn of Flora, 
and Galen Davis of DuQuoin, who both have flypaper-fingertips. 

Many other backs will probably see considerable action. Among them are: 
Charlie Heinz of Gillespie, recently converted center who has looked excellent in 
practice sessions; Roy Ragsdale of Carbondale, a dependable, speedy runner; George 








I ■ 1 1 



SOUTHFw " ' 'NOIS 
UN 

. LIBKhKV 

• 'WfflOKDAU, ILIINOIS I 



-2- 



Beltz of Marion who may serve as a spot runner; Don Cross of Christopher, a hard 
smacking fullback; Dick Seelman of Flora, an outstanding runner last year who 
recently has been switched to fullback; and Fat Kelly of Murphysboro, a scrappy 
little quarterback. 

Tackle positions will be held down by two veteran stalwarts, Charles Mathieu 
of Eldorado and John Corn who will have operating beside them hard-hitting guards 
Jim Lovin of Benton and Bob Etheridge of Fairfield. At center two-letterman Bill 
"Cotton" Cosgrove of Benton will draw initial duty. 

Two radio stations will broadcast the contest. They are WJPF, Herrin, with 
Ray Schmidt at the mike, and WCIL, Carbondale, which will feature Don Boudreau. 

The Maroons have selected no captain as yet, but will do so sometime before 
they face Scott Field. Quarterback Bill Malinsky was captain last year. 



r 



I 

■ 













► 



- 



SOUTHFW " ' 'NOIS 

UN 
. LIBKmkY 

r ' CAR80NDAIE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



* 



9-29-47 

Carbondale, 111., Sept. 29 -"The Evansville Purple Aces are 
probably the best visiting team to appear in Carbondale in my 
experience as a coach or as a player," Head Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin 
of the Southern Illinois University Maroons declared today in discussing 
Southern's next opponent. 

This team, a veritable power-house , will meet the as yet only 
partially tried Maroons here Saturday, October 4. Last Friday 
Evansville opened its season by battling a strong Western Kentucky 
eleven to a scoreless tie. 

Martin's Maroons found a soft touch in the Flyers of Scott Field 
last Saturday. Scoring early, often, and easily, the Southern team 
racked up an impressive 5$ to victory without getting up a strong 
sweat. 

On the third Maroon play end Robert "Bunker" Jones of West 
Frankfort raced 63 yards on an end-around play for the first touchdown. 
Bob Johnson of DuQuoin, Southern's open-field running ace, followed 
soon with a 45-yard, dipsey-do run through the Scott Field secondary 
to put the Maroons safely in the lead. 

In the second period the Maroons followed with two more touchdowns. 

One was a l6-yard-pass from quarterback Bill Malinsky of Flora to 

halfback Bill Wilkinson of West Frankfort, and the other a double- 

(more ) 




SOUTHFW " ' 'NOIS 
UN 

. LiBHMhV 

f l CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS I 



-2- 

lateral going from Malinsky to Dick 5eelman of Flora to Charlie iT High 
Heels 5 ' Heinz of Gillespie who crossed the double marker. 

In the second half, five more touchdowns were made. George 
Sawyer of ;/ood River went over from the eight, Johnson scored again, 
this time from the nine, Bill Malinsky raced 67 yards on a quarterback 
sneak, Heinz scored again from the 25, and Dick Seelman passed 33 yards 
to the end zone where Galen Davis of DuQuoin made a magnif icient , 
story-book catch, to close the scoring. 

"Bunker" Jones was successful on four of his nine placement tries 
for the point-after-touchdown. 

The Maroon T-formation worked deceptively during the entire game, 
with Quarterback Bill Malinsky handling the ball smoothly and passing 
accurately. 

Charlie "High Heels" Heinz, former center who appeared as a 
halfback for the first time and who scored two touchdowns, showed good 
speed, great power, and real elusiveness. 

Southern will field a fast, powerful eleven against £vansvillc T s 
strong Aces this Saturday at Mc Andrew Stadium. After loosing a hard 
battle last November to the Evansville crew, the Maroons are out for 
revenge, and both teams are definitely "loaded for boar." 



'i 






. 



I 







SOUTH pw »' • 'NOIS 
UN! 




. 



Y 

r ' CABBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



.. 



9-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. -Work is being started this week 
on 27 a dditional apartments for married student veterans at Southern 
Illinois University, C. E. Heintzelman of St. Louis, engineer for 
Public Housing Authority, has notified University authorities. 

Cherry Richards of Chicago is contractor on the project, located 
at the Illinois Ordnance Plant, approximately 10 miles from the 
campus . 

Contract between the PHA and the Teachers College Board to provide 
these additional housing units was signed last week. 

Meanwhile, finishing touches are being put to 6$ veterans' 
apartments at the ordnance plant and it is expected they will be 
ready for occupancy shortly. These 63 have been remodeled from 
administration buildings, while the new group of 27 are to be erected 
as small units scattered among the trees, thus providing both privacy 
and an attractive setting. 

ffiftfff 







SOUTHRN " ' 'NOIS 

UN! 

. LIBRmKV 

|. l CABBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






Release Wednesday 9-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 1 -Red fire trucks, ladders, chemical 
apparatus and other firefighting apparatus are drawing the spotlight 

away from the operations of excavation machinery at Southern Illinois 
University this week. 

Students and faculty pause now to inspect the equipment the 
Egyptian Firefighters Association have brought to the campus for their 
four-day school of instruction, under way this week. Meanwhile only 
the most confirmed "unofficial inspectors 1 ' continue to stand watch over 
the gouging of giant shovels scooping out earth for the University's 
new system of steam tunnels. 

The firefighters — 75 of them — are going to class from 9 to 5 daily, 
to learn all the newest techniques in fighting blazes. 

Tonight the public is invited to witness an evening of fire-magic, 
staged in Shryock Auditorium on the University campus by the State 
Fire Marshall's Office. The performance is entitled "Smokie's 
Shenanigans and Sorcery." 

Among the subjects the firefighters are studying this week are 

fire prevention, the fire department's obligation to the community, 

the community's obligation to the fire department, fires in explosives, 

chemistry of fire, electrical hazard, salvage, legal aspects of the 

fire service, arson and the fireman, care and maintenance of 

equipment, suggested activities for fire prevention week, and inspections 

(more ) 













SOUTHFPW " ' 'NOIS 

un 
. libkhkv 

? ' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 

The school was arranged by the following committee from the 
Egyptian Firefighters Association: Fred P. Haderlein of Early, 
chairman; Robert A. Gregory of Cairo; and Carrol E. Conder of Centralia, 

Ifhirifffifffrfifii 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. -To help business men, industrialists, 
doctors, lawyers, engineers and other specialists learn how to speak 
authoritatively on their respective fields in public, Southern Illinois 
University has opened a new extension course, according to Raymond H. 
Dey, director of the Extension Service. 

The first class in this subject, "Business, Professional and 
Technical Speech," is bein 7 ; offered this fall at Cairo, under the 
direction of Dr. P. M. Larson, associate professor of speech. 

With enrollment limited to 30, in order t o provide adequate time 
for each class member to gain experience and receive personal attention, 
the class meets each Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock at the high school. 

For many years, Southern's extension classes have been conducted 
almost exclusively for teachers, and have been given by the College 
of Education, Mr. Dey said, but incre: singly courses are being developed 
by the other branches of the University for the Extension Service. The 
new speech class at Cairo, for example, is being given by the College 
of Vocations and Professions. 



jfitiiihnrrtff 



'I 




_ 



SOUTHP*' » ' 'NOIS 
UN 

. UBKmKV 

r l CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 4 



^^^ i ^ —i ^ _ ^ ^ _ _ _ ^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — — — — — — — — i University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^-^^^m— ™^-^^mmi«m^m£— ■ 



Release Friday 10-1-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Oct. -Led by a "Little All-America" tackle, 
the Evansville Purple Aces invade Mc Andrew Stadium here tomorrow 
afternoon at 2:00 p.m. when they face as host the Southern Illinois 
University Maroons. 

Neither team has been defeated, although Evsnsville played to a 
scoreless tie against Western Kentucky last Friday. The Maroons 
easily defeated a very weak Scott Field team in McAndrew Stadium last 
Saturday, 5<3 to 0. 

The annual Boy Scout Day will be celebrated this Saturday with 
hundreds of Boy Scouts from all over Southern Illinois planning to 
attend the Evansville-Maroon game. These boys are fortunate because 
the game they will see will probabl} r be one of the best of the season, 
inasmuch as the strong Evansville eleven is probably, one of the best 
teams ever to appear here . 

Outstanding star for the Evansville team is Hawkins, right tackle, 
who was selected on the "Little All-America" team in 1946. Logal, 
Evansville' s quarterback, is the man to watch in their backfield. 

For the tussle, the Maroons will start the same as they did 
against Scott Field with one or two possible exceptions. Dick 
Seelman will work at fullback, since "on Riggs has suffered a 
charley-horse . Against Scott Field, Seelman looked good, blocking 

(more ) 



■ 



.' 






SOUTHPN » ' 'NOIS 
UN! 




Y 

r 'CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS * 







-2- 



well and throwing a touchdown pass . 
Evansville 
Offenberg 
Rustler 
Hicks 
D. Crouch 
Gerhardt 
Hawkins 
J. Crouch 
Logal 
Galey 
Page 
Endress or Bailey 



Position 


Southern 


LE 


Robert Jones 


LT 


Mathieu 


LG 


Lovin 


C 


Cosgrove 


RG 


Ether idge 


RT 


Corn 


RE 


Colborn 


QB 


Malinsky 


LHB 


Heinz or Johnson 


RHB 


Rags dale or Sawyer 


FB 


Seelman 



Average weights: Evansville 

Southern: 



Line average - 192; Backfield - 133 
Line average - 193 Backfield - 175 



Three radio stations will carry play-by-play broadcasts of the 

game. They are VJPF, Herrin, v/ith Ray Schmidt at the mike; V/CIL, 
Carbondale , with Don Boudreau; and WGBF, Evansville, with Dick Sbively 
and Fred Rollison. 

itifitntr 

Carbondale, 111.,, Oct. -More than twenty men have rerorted 
for the Southern Illinois University cross-country team which was 
runner-up to Illinois State Normal University for the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship last year. 

In the absence of Coach Leland "Doc ,r Lingle , who is occupied with 
football, the harriers are working out under the direction of team 
captain Bill Keene of Carrier Mills. 

No schedule has been drawn for the cross-country men as yet, but 
the team will compete in the I. I. A. C. run at Charleston, Nov. 3. 
Other runs are in the p'rocess of being scheduled. 



JrlrrrirfffFfr 






; 



SOUTHFPM " « 'NOIS 
UN 
. LIBKMhV 

*• ' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS a 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. i^M^^^^B^^^^^^^^^^M^m 



' 10-1-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 1 - Journalism credit for work on The 
Egyp tian, campus newspaper at Southern Illinois University, will be 
given to students under terms of a campus publications policy 
authorized by the University administration and the advisory committee 
of the Teachers College Board, University President Chester F. Lay 
announced today. 

With the establishment of a journalism department this fall, The 

Egy ptian will become more closely integrated with the educational work 

of the department and will be used as a means of giving students 

laboratory work in reporting, other types of newspaper writing, editing, 
and advertising. 

Although non- journal ism students may work on the paper, all 

responsible positions, such as editor, business manager and departmental 
editors, will be filled by journalism students, elected by the 
Student Publications Council from lists of e ligible candidates 
approved by the journalism department. The council is a joint faculty- 
student group, which under the new plan will be advisory to the 
chairman of the journalism department, rather than to the President, 
as was formerly the case . 

"By operating The E gyp tian as part of our educational activities, 
we hope both to provide better laboratory training in journalism and to 

(more) 



■ 






1 



SOUTMFpm i« ' "NOB 

UN! 




•~ 



' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



-2- 



make it possible for the school paper to raise its standards in line 
with sound professional practices," President Lay said. 

Robert A. Steffes, instructor in journalism, will serve as 
acting chairman of the new department, President Lay said. 

##### 



•mid 



■ 



. 



SOUTHS »' ' 'NOIS 
UN! 

• LIBKmKV 

, f ' CMBONDALE, ILLINOIS 3 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. -In preparation for the game Saturday 
Lgainst the Evans ville Purple Aces here at Mc Andrew Stadium , Southern 
Illinois University Head Coach Glenn !f Abe i? Martin has been drilling a 
new backfield combination this week. 

For starting operations behind the brawny maroon line martin has 
combined triple-threat quarterback Bill Mai ins ky of Flora with 
halfbacks Charlie '''High Heels 1 ' Heinz of Gillespie and elusive Bob 
Johnson of DuQuoin. Dick Seelman of Flora at fallback completes the 
ball-toting quartet. 

After his steller performance against Scott Field last Saturday, 
"High Heels :! Heinz has drawn' the starting position at left half in 
the Maroon 7 s T-f ormation. Fast, and 195 pounds, Heinz may develop 
into a brilliant power runner. 

Bob Johnson, who shared scoring honors In the opener with Heinz, 
aach getting two touchdowns, has been shifted from left half to the 
right half position. Johnson is a jitterbug ball carrier who is 
dangerous from any spot on the field. 

Dick Seelman has drawn the starting fullback assignment after 
loins; yeoman work last week. Dick had an outstanding freshman season * 
in 1946. 

Don Riggs of Fairfield, who started at fullback against Scott 
Field, and who has recently been slowed by a charley-horse , reports 
lis injured leg on the mend, and may be able to see limited action 
lgainst Evansville, 

(more ) 



'■u m 



■ 















^ 



SOUTHFF?^ » ' 'NOIS 

UN! 
• LIBRmKV 

f. l CARBONDAlt, ILLINOIS I 



Accent in practice has been on pass defense, as Soach Martin 
drills his men to he alert for the sharp-shooting shots of Gene 
iLogel, star passer of the iv/ansviile "Purple Aces ,? . 

Assistant Coach Bill Freeburg leads his "B" squad charges to 
Cape Girardeau for their first game nrxt Monday afternoon. 

M§ 



'■n m 



10-2-47 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Trend of the times: hs Southern 
[Illinois University has become a university, expansion is the keynote, 
[and the 1947 Homecoming will be no exception. 

Formerly a two-day celebration, the alumni reunion this year will 
ibe spread over three days, Oct. 23-25. 

Tradition is being cast to the winds and a new tradition is being 
born, the Homecoming Committee has decided. 

Coronation of the t^ueen, for many years a feature of the dance on 
Saturday night, will take place instead on Thursday evening, Oct. 23, 
and the Queen--whose identify is a close-kept secret until the moment 
of her coronation — will actually reign over all of the Homecoming 
festivities. 

A program commemorating Southern's new status as a university will 
be held in connection with the coronation ceremony, according to 
Or. Crville Alexander, director of Alumni Services, and Bill Price of 
lexico, student chairman of Homecoming. 

A bonfire and pep rally will be held following the coronation. 
Also scheduled are a special student assembly and snake dance Friday 
norning, a little Theatre olay Friday night, a giant parade Saturday 

( more ) 






SOUTNFW »' ' 'NOIS 



Ul 









.. 



« LIB 

'CARSONDAtE, ILLINOIS 



-3- 
rnornin?, the Southern-Northern football game and a tea for alumni 

Saturday afternoon, and the Homecoming ball Saturday night. 

r 'We T re going to make this the -biggest and best Homecoming Southern 
ever had," Price declared. More than b5 student organizations are 
participating in committee work in preparation for the celebration. 

ffffff 



10-2-47 
Carbondale, 111., Oct. - All Vocalists of Southern Illinois 
are invited to join in the chorus for "The Messiah,'' oratorio to be 
presented in mid-December by the oouthern Illinois Oratorio Society, 
according to Dr. Maurits Kesnar, chairman of the music department at 
Southern Illinois University, who will produce the oratorio. 

First choral rehearsal for "The Messiah" will be held at 7 p. hi« 
Monday, October o, in the Little Theatre at the University, The 
choir will rehearse each Monday night throughout October and November 
and the first two weeks of December. 

The oratorio will be presented at Shryock Auditorium on the 
University Campus December 14. 



L. 



■ 




SOUTHW " ■ 'NOIS 
Uf 
. LIBHmKY 

- l CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS * 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






10-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Engagement of Ray Anthony's band 
to play for the Homecoming Dance at Southern Illinois University 
Oct. 25 has been announced by Bill Price of Texico, student chairman, 
and Dr. Orville Alexander, faculty chairman of the Home cowing 
committee. 

Arrangements for securing the band were carried out by a 
sub-committee headed by Ralph Myers of Grand Chain. 

Anthony's band is currently completing an engagement at Roseland 
in New York. He has the distinction of having the only band to 
play a five-week booking at the Chase Hotel in St. Louis, Price 
pointed out. 

A former trumpeter with Glenn miller's band, anthony organized 
his own dance orchestra on his return from the Navy. Vihile in the 
service, he played with submarine base bands in the South Pacific. 

Southern's three-day Homecoming celebration is slated for 
Oct. 23-25, and this year will combine with the alumni reunion a 
number of events in commemoration of the school's new name, 
Southern Illinois University. 

m 



L 



VS 



SOUTHS » ' 'MOfS 

UN! 

. LIBHmKY 

r 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



■u m 



10-3-47 

Garbondale, 111., Oct. - Southern Illinois University will 
open its 1947-4S radio broadcasts Monday Oct. 6, for the second year 
using; the channels of three Southern Illinois radio stations as 
outlets, Miss Lorena Drumrnond, director of the Information Service, 
has announced. 

Opening the year's schedule will be University President Chester 
F. Lay, who will speak Monday at 3-30 p. m. over station l.CIL on 
"Southern Becomes a University. 5 ' 

Three series of programs will be broadcast — ''The University Hour", 
3. daily 15 -minute program over WCIL (1020), Garbondale, at 3*30 p. m. 
Monday through Friday; "The Southern Hour," a 30-minute program over 
( 'ifJPF (1340), Herrin, Tuesday evening at 7 p« m. ; and "Education Time", 
a 30-minute program over WTPF and VJSBQ (1240), Harrisburg, each 
Friday at 2:30 p. in. 

A different type of program will be aired each day of the week 
on ;f The University Hour. :? On Monday, the program will be entitled 
"Southern Comes Calling," and will present a faculty speaker; on 
Tuesday, "The Little Theatre," a radio play; on Wednesday, "Music 
Is Yours,"' presented by the music department; on Thursday, "Campus 
Chatter," featuring a different student organization each week; and 
on Friday, "Student Newscast." 



(more ) 



SOUTHP*' " ' 'NOfS 

Uf 

« Llf 

r ' CAR80NDAIE, ILLINOIS 



-2- 

Production director for the program will be Dr. Archibald McLood, 
assistant director of speech and drama, whose classes in radio speech 
and radio writing will handle the announcing and script preparation. 

### 



10-3-47 
Carbondale, 111., Oct. - New editors for two student 

publications at Southern Illinois University have been elected by the 

Student Publications Council. 

Fred Senters of Flora was elected editor of The Egyptian » 

weekly paper, while Carlos Pleshe of Buckner was chosen editor of 

11-'.": Obelisk , yearbook. 

Donald Grubb of Vergennes was elected news editor of The 

E :c .y :tian . 

### 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Postponement for a week of the first 
chore" 1 rehearsal for "The Messiah," oratorio to be presented Dec. 14 
by i~Le Southern Illinois Oratorio Society, has been announced by 
Dr » j'lc. Trits Kesnar 5 chairman of the music department at Southern 
IIj..i'\ )is University, who will produce the musical event. 

Originally called .'or Monday night, Oct. 6, the first rehearsal 
ha 3 been postponed until Monday night, Oct, 13, at 7*30 p« m. in the 
Little Theatre on the University campus r 

Dr. Kesnar said invitations have been sent to 93 churches in 
Southern Illinois, asking their choir members and members of their 
congregations to participate in the chorus. Other vocalists of 
Southern Illinois are also urged to join this group, he said. 



### 
■ 




SOUTHS' » ' 'NOIS 
UN 

. LIBKmKY 

• ' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Final enrollment for the fall term 
at Southern Illinois University has climbed to 2, $50, compared to 
2,718 last fall and 1,064 in the fall of 1945, the Registrar's 
Office Reports. 

There are 1,999 men students in school this fall, and $51 
women students, a ratio of well over two men to each girl, in 
contrast to the predominance of co-eds in the fall of 1945 > when there 
were 735 women students and only 329 men students enrolled. 

In addition to the 2, $50 students attending classes on the 
campus here, Southern is conducting extension courses in more than 
a score of Southern Illinois communities. These courses, according 
to Extension Service Director Raymond H. Dey, have a total 
enrollment of 1,363, making a grand total fall term enrollment of 
1.213* Last fall, there were $$0 students enrolled in extension 
courses , 

According to the breakdown of on-campus enrollment made by the 
Registrar's Office, 1,347 of the fall term students are enrolled 
in the College of Education, 665 in the College of Liberal Arts and 
sciences, 757 in the college of Vocations and Professions, and oi 
in the Graduate School* 



'■■" m 



(more ) 










SOUTHPN !! ' 'NOIS 
UN! 




) 




Y 

v CARBO«OAt£, ILLINOIS 



■« m 



■ 

These totals for the various branches of the University compare 
with 760 for the College of Education, 253 for the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences, 51 for the College of Vocations and 
Professions, and 26 for the Graduate School. ■■• m 

There are 1,148 freshmen enrolled this year, compared to 1,550 
last fall and only 539 in the fall of 1945* The extraordinarily 
large freshman class last fall is attributed by the Registrar's 
Office to the large influx of veterans, coupled with the fact that 
many of the smaller high schools of this area graduate seniors 
only every other year, rather than every year. 

The peak of veteran enrollment was apparently reached last 
fall, since enrollment of former servicemen and women is slightly 
lower this year than last. A total of 1,3^5 yeterans — 1,375 men 
and 10 women— are enrolled this fall, compared to 1,509 i n the fall 
term last year. In the fall term of 1945 only 90 veterans had 
enrolled. 

Last fall's large freshman cro-> is reflected in the substantially 
larger sophomore class this year, which numbers 8&5 compared to 010 
a year ago. In the fall of 1945 sophomores numbered only 256. 

There are 277 seniors enrolled this fall, 424 juniors, 10 
feost-graduate students (students who have graduated but who are 
taking additional under-graduate work), and 13 unclassified students. 






nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention = Sports .oditon 



10-6-47 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. - After losin \ a hard, bitterly fou.lit 
game last Saturday to the Purple Aces of Evansville College 7 to 0, 
the Southern Illinois University Maroons are drilling this week in 
preparation for their first away-from-home p;ame against the Sycamores 
of Indiana State Teachers College of Terre Haute. 

Indiana State has split even in two games, defeating Valparaiso 
University 13 to 0, and dropping to Illinois State Normal University 
20 to 7 in the opener. If the Maroons can bounce back from their 
defeat by Evansville, they may defeat the strong "Sycamores," but 
a hard, close contest is expected. 

Evansville T s mighty team dominated play during most of the game, 
piling up 13 first downs to the Maroon* s five. During the first half 
the Purole Aces i\rere especially effective, getting nine of their first 
iowns . 

Late in the second quarter Evansville finally scored after 
threatening constantly earlier. Fullback Morris Riley bulled over 
from the four-inch line on fourth down to climax a sustained drive of 
90 yards. Tackle Bob Hawkins kicked successfully to conclude the 
game's scoring. 

Before Riley's game winning plunge, Southern's gallant line had 
repelled the stronger visiters five times within their 20-yard line. 

Southern threatened seriously only twice, ±-.ach time they were 
stopped by the gun, once at the end of the first half, and the other 
time at the end of the game. (more) 







SOUTMPPM " ' ifJOIS 

UN! 
. LIBKmkY 

r ' CABBONDALt, ILLINOIS 3 



-2- 

After Evansville scored, George Sawyer of "Jood River returned 
the kickoff to the Evansville 47-yard line. A pass, Bill Malinsky 
of Flora, to Sawyer, took the ball to the Evansville 15. Charlie ■■■ m 

"High Heels" Heinz of Gillespie lost back to the 20, but two tries by 
Don Riggs of Fairfield put the ball on the evansville four-yard line, 
first-and-goal, when the half ended. 

T .7ith only three minutes left in the fourth quarter, the Maroons 
took the ball on downs on their own 20. Bill i-ialinsky connected on 
three straight passes, two to Bob Colborn of Flora, ana the other to 
Don Riggs, olacing the Maroons on the evansville 35 • 

A long touchdown pass failed, and George Beltz of Marion was 
stopped on a flanker pass as the game ended. 

Outstanding for the Maroons was the play of three men, Bob Colborn 
of Flora, who played brilliantly at end, Bill "Cotton" Cosgrove of 
Benton, who scrapped effectively, and Robert "Bunker" Jones of T . : est 
Frankfort. Jones was used strictly for defensive work bac king up the 
line, but there he did valuable work all afternoon. 

The absense of John Corn of Benton, a strong tackle, from the 
Maroon lineup handicapped the Southern efforts. Corn was injured in 
the dressing room shortly before game time when he slipped and gashed 
his head. 

m 




SOUTMFPM ii ■ i^oiS 
UN! 
. LIBKmKV 

- 'CARBONDAtt, ILLINOIS i 



nformation Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^™^^— 



II 



Attention Sports Editors 10-7-47 

Garbondale, 111., Oct. - Opening their season at Gape 
Girc rdeau Monday afternoon, the Southern Illinois University Maroon 
»B" : a ;u.-,j. defeated the Cape Girardeau n B j? squad 12 to 7. 

Both Maroon touchdowns came before Gape could once cross the 
double stripe. Coach William Freeburg indicated that he felt that 
I his charges could have won by a much larger mar 'in. However, he 
concentrated on playing everyone, thereby providing much needed 
experience. 

Bob Proctor of Zeigler set up the first touchdown in the first 
quarter when he ran 20 yards to the Gape five. Eugene Hancock of 
Harrisburg carried the remaining distance for the score. 

The Maroons second touchdown came at the beginning of the third 
quarter when quarterback Jim Mstcalf of kurphysboro returned the 
Cape kickoff 95 yards for a touchdown behind beautiful blocking. 

Cape Girardeau's only score came in the third period, when a 
blocked Maroon ^unt gave them the ball on the Southern five-yard 
line. Two line slays ate up the necessary distance for the touchdown. 

Standouts in the Maroon line were Dante Patterozzi of U'est 
Frankfort at tcckle, Howard Jones of Benton at guard, and Jim Renfro 
of Garbondale at center. 



■u m 







SOUTHFPN ii ' inoIS 

un 

f ' CARBONDAtf, ILLINOIS 3 




II 



Southern Illinois 



i^ — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. W^^^mi^^mmm^^^^^^^^^^^m 



10-7-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct* - Ceremonies to celebrate its new 
university status will be held by Southern Illinois University in 
conjunction with its Homecoming, Oct. 23-2$, University President 
Chester F. Lay has announced. 

As an official opening for the joint celebrations, a 
distinguished educator who assisted Southern in achieving university 
recognition in educational circles has been invited to address 
students, faculty and alumni on Thursday evening, Oct. 23. 

Dr. John Dale Russell, director of the Division of Higher 
Education, U. S. Office of Education, has accepted oouthern T s 
invitation to make the principal address on this occasion. His 
subject will be "Higher Education for kodern Neeas." 

Dr. Russell, former professor of education and former dean of 
students at the University of Chicago, for a number of years served 
as secretary of the commission on colleges and universities for the 
North Central Association of Colleges and secondary Schools . It was 
in this latter capacity that he aided in securing from the North 
Central Association a "promotion" for Southern from the "college class" 
to the "university class" in its list of accredited higher educational 
institutions. 

A native of Bloomington, Ind., Dr. Russell holds three degrees 

from Indiana University and has also studied at the University of 

Kentucky and the University of Chicago. 

(more ) 



■m m 
■ii « 




SOUTHFPM ii • inois 
UN 

. LIBKmKV 

*• 'CARBONDAtf, ILLINOIS I 



-2- 



He served as secretary of the School of Education at the 
University of Indiana, then for two } ^ars was director of research for 
the Indiana State Department of Public Instruction. 

After a year at Ball State Teachers College, Muncie, Ind., he 
went to the University of Kentucky as associate professor of education 
for two years, then became assistant director of ourveys for Methodist 
Educational Institutions. 

In 1931 he joined the faculty of the University of Chicago, 
serving at various times as secretary of- the department of education, 
as associate dean of the Division of Social Sciences, and as deo.n of 
students. 

### 



■u m 




SOUTHFPN " i iisiOfS 



UN 



r 



y 




y 



r ' CAfiBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



•u m 



10-3-47 
Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Dr. Pet^r Mannische, president of the 

International Peoples College of ulsinore, Denmark, will deliver a 

Scries of lectures at southern Illinois University, October 13-14, 

according to Dr. P. Merville Larson, chairman of the public lectures 

and entertainment committee. 

Dr. Mannische will be presented in a public lecture at 3 F «M. 
in Shryock Auditorium on Monday evening, when he will discuss 
"International Understanding Through Adult education". 

His other appearences will be before education classes but two 
of these- -Monday afternoon at 2 P.M. and Tuesday morning at 9 A.M., 
both in the Little Theatre--will be open to the public. His Monday 
afternoon talk will be on "The Folk High School Movement in Denmark 
and Scandanavia" while on Tuesda}? - morning he will speak on "The 
Cooperative Movement in Denmark and in Scandanavia". 

He will also lecture to an education class Monday morning at 10 
o'clock on the folk high school movement. 

Dr. Mannische is a student and follower of Bishop Grundtvig, 
probably the foremost educator and social reformer in 19th century 
Denmark, and originator of the folk high school idea. 

The visiting educator has lectured extensively in England and on 

the continent of Europe. His visit to this country is under the 

auspices of the Institute for International Education. He will appear 

at Berea, Kentucky, before coming to Southern and will follow his 
appearence here by an engagement at the University of Minnesota. 

rf ' 



■ 




SOUTHPN J! ' 'NOIS 
UNI 
, LIBKmK/ 

X ' CMRBONQAU , ILLINOIS Jj 



II 



I 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. . - 



II 



10-g-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Seven Southern Illinois University 
co-eds yesterday were nominated by popular student vote for Homecoming 
Queen honors, and four others— freshen and sophomores--were nomj .na bed 
for the two Queen's attendant positions, 

The Cueen and her court will reign over Homecoming festivities 
Oct. 23-25, with the coronation ceremony scheduled for Thursday 
evening, Oct. 23 • 

Nominees are: Peggy Coleman of Marion, Joan Fairbairn of Harvey, 

Veda Hallam of Fairfield, Nada Kauzla'rich of Christopher, Velma 

■cCormick of Johnston City, Georgia Mircheff of kadison, and Doris 

Morgan of Sparta. 

Also nominated were June Cannon of Marion and Martha 
of Benton 
kcBrayer/ but both withdrew this morning. 

Nominated for Queen's attendants were maxine Bumpus of Bonnie, 
Dolores Sharp of Benton, Mathilde Smith of V/ilmette, and Doris Wade 
of Vandalia. 

Final balloting on selection of the Cueen will take olace Tuesday, 
Oct. 21, but identity of the success^ j.1 candidate will not be known 
until the moment of her coronation on Thursday evening. 

m 



■" m 

'■■ IN 






SOUTHFW » ' 'NOIS 



- ? 






, Li 

' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention=3ports Editors 10-8-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Indiana State Teachers College of 
Terre Haute will face a healthy Southern Illinois University Maroon 
eleven when the two meet at Terre Haute Saturday afternoon in Memorial 

Stadium. 

With the exception of a few minor pains, the Maroons of Coach 
Glenn "'Abe 7 ' Martin seem to be in excellent physical condition. 

John Corn of Benton, right tackle who missed the Evansville 
game as the result of an injury sustained in the dressing room sh -rtly 
befor.. game time, reports that he expects to be ready for action by 

Saturday. 

The cut he received on his forehead, which was closed by several 
stitcher, is mending rapidly, and Corn has been handicapped only to 
the extent that he has not yet worn his helmet in practice. 

Don Riggs of Fairfield, who saw very limited action against 
Evansville, has been running well in practice, and appears to be in 
nearly tip-top condition once again for heavy chores as fullback. 

Last week when Riggs was injured, Dick Seelman of Flora took over 
the fullback slot. Now that Riggs has returned to form, Seelman is on 

the sick list. 

Dick pulled up with a sore riTht hip in practice, caused by an 
injured nerve. However, Seelman' s lame hip is coming along very well, 
and he will probably be ready to play against the Sycamores of 
Indiana State. 



(more ) 



a 




SOUTHRN » ' «NO!S 
Uf- ! 

. LIBKmKV 

*• v CARBOWDAt£, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 

Coach Martin has been working hard and long with backfield 
doach Harlan Hodges in an effort to improve the Maroon's offense. 
Against Evansville's fine team, most of the yardage gained by Southern 
& s via the aerial route. 

In addition to lon^ signal drills, with perfect timing as their 
object, the backfield has worked hard on both pass offense and pass 
efense. Most of the passing is being done by Bill i-ialinsky of Flora 
and Seelman. 

George Baysinger of Oarbondtle is also assuming some of the 
jassing duties, now that he has reported for practice. Baysinger is 
orking at quarterback, and will team with Pat Kelly of kurphysboro in 
roviding relief for Malinsky at the signal calling position. 

Broadcast of the game Saturday '■ ill be carried by Carbondale 
radio station WCIL. Don Boudreau will be on the play-by-play, and 
Jim Bolen will provide color. This is the first out-of-town broadcast 
of the year, but will not be the last, since ;/CIL is broadcasting all 
games, home or away. 



m m 







SOUTHFPM » ' WOIS 

UN! 

. LIBRmKY 

? l CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






Release Friday: . 10-9-47 

Carbondale, 111.', Oct. 10 - Twenty-nine strong, the Southern 
Illinois University Maroons left by bi.s at 12:30 this afternoon for 
Terre Haute, Indiana, where they face the Sycamores of Indiana Stati 
Teachers College tomorrow afternoon at Terrc Haute' s Memorial Stadium. 

The Maroons itinerary includes a short lay-over at Mt . Carmel 
this cfternoon where they w ill go through warm-up drills. 

Maroons' probable starting line-up: 
LE Robert "Bunker" Jones, West Frankfort 
LT Charles Mathieu, Capt . , Eldorado 
LG Jim Lovin, Benton 

C Bill "Cotton'' Cosgrove, Benton 
! RG Bob Ltheridge, Fairfield 
RT John Corn, Benton 
RE Bob Colborn, Flora 
QB Bill Malinsky, Flora 
| LHB Bob Johnson, DuQuoin 
RHB George Sawyer, Wood River 
| FB Don Riggs, Fairfield 

Other men making the trip are: ends, Galen Davis of DuG.uoin, 
iLeectio Ca'outti of Johnson Gity, and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort; 
tackles, Varren Littlefort of Vandalia, Bill Kasich of Benlc , and 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado; guards, Richard Jones of Gillespie, J.L, 
I Gross of DuQuoin, and Bert is Jones of Benton; centers, Charles Crouch 

(more ) 










SOUTMFPM « ' »NO!S 
UN! 




r 

X ' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 



of Carbondale, and J. I ieron of Murphysboro; quarterback, Geor^r- 

Baysinger of ' Carbondale ; halfbacks, George Beltz of Marion, Charlie 

Heinz of Gillespie, Roy Ragsdale of Carbondale, and Bill Wilkinson 

of West Frankfort; bullbacks, Dick Seelman of Flore and Don Cross of 

Christopher. 

Radio station WCIL, Carbondale (1020), will carry the rlay-by-play 

broadcast with Don Boudreau at the mike. 

MM 










HalBa ^ H ^ HMaa l 



SOUTHFPM » ' iNOIS 
UNI 
• LIBKmKV 

j v CARBONDAL£, ILLINOIS 4 



^ ^ ii ^ i ^ Southern Illinois 
p™— <™ ^ ■^— — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^m^^^^^^K^^^^m^^^ 



10-10-47 
Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Plans to continue "'University 
Recognition" activities ct Southern Illinois University throughout 
the year were laid at the University faculty meeting here this week, 
as University President Chester F. Lay appointed committees to study 
and plan a series of educational conferences. 

Two ceremonies in recognition of Southern 1 s new status as a 
university w ill be held here at Homecoming, Oct. 23-25. One will be 
an address on Thursday evening, Oct. 23, when Dr. John Dele Russell 
of Washington, D.C., director of the Higher Education Division of the 
U. S. Office of Education, will speak on "Higher Education for Modern 
Needs. ;? A second ceremony will take rlcce at the' half-time at the 
Southern-Northern football game, when legislators and State Officials 
who made Southern's legal change of name rossible are saluted £nd 
publicly thanked for their services. 

The series of conferences to be held during the year will be 
developed around the themes ''Teaching, " "Research," and "Service, " all 
functions of a university. 

m 



'Him 



i 







SOUTHF&N » • 'NOIS 

UN: 

X 'CAR80NDALE, IlilNOlS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






10-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Seventeen. High-ranking graduate 
students at Southern Illinois University have been aprointed as 
graduate assistants for 1947-48, President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

To qualify for these rositions, a graduate student must show 
exceptional scholarly attainments and promise of being able to do 
significart research study. 

Their assignments include such activities as grading papers, 
assisting with laboratory work, maintaining ana analyz, ng records, and 
other duties connected with instruction and research. 

Stipends ranging up to v $3«00 per month are re id to these graduate 
assistants . 

The arrointees for 1947-4$ include: Mrs. Maxine Harris Blackman, 
of Harnsey, assignee to the inf oramtion Service snd Alumni Records: 
Miss Rosalie Brown of Fercy, zoology department; Robert E. Collard of 
Jonesboro, University High School; Woodrow h. Fildes of Murrhysboro, 
Mathematics department . 

Lemuel Dalton Harry of Murrhysboro, bean of lien's Office; Billy 0. 
Hoyle of /.lto Fass, mathematics department; Williem Nyle Huffman of 
Carbondale , physics department; Amy Mae Jones of I orlar Bluff, botany 
department; David Kenney of Carbondale, government department; Miss 
Vivian Lupardus of Granite City, Dean of Men's Office. 

Earl Fatton of Eldorado, history department; Francis R. Faule of 

Belleville, Veterans Guidance Center; Pauline Fotts of Keyesport, 

(more ) 




SOUTHRN "MNOIS 
UN! 




r 

*• ' CAR80NDAIE, ILLINOIS i 



■ 2- 



physiology and health education deportment; Virgil Seymour of Til 
C-rove , sociology department; Arnold T ..-endt of Red 3ud, mathematics 
department; Julius Swayne of DuQuoin, . Iluseum; William Hatley of Carrier 
Mills, Curriculum Laboratory.. 



10-10-47 
Carbondale, 111., Oct. - An orient el art exhibit will be 

presented st Southern Illinois University Tuesday evening, Oct. l/ v , by 

the Kappa Pi art fraternity, 

William Marberry, assistant professor of botany, who was stationed 

in the Orient during the War and who acquired an extensive collect lor:. 

of art objects, will show his collection and give a talk on oriental 

art . 

The program, which will be open to the public, will be held at 

7 p. m. in Room 203 A Main Building. 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Co-Recreation Flay Nights have been 
inaugurated at Southern Illinois University ec ch Thursday evening, 
under sponsorship of student groups in the women's end men's physical 
education departments. 

Faculty and students arc invited to participate in the "co-rec" 
lights, which feature volley ball, ping pong, shuffleboard and other 
games. ### 



» m 




SOUTMFPM »' " iMOfS 
UN! 




r 

X 'CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






10-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Dr. W. V. Meeks, new associate 
professor of physics at Southern Illinois University, is the co-cii + her 
of an article in a recent issue of The Fhysicg 1 Review . 

The article deals with the nuclear composition of Columbium, one 
of the little-known chemical elements. 

The other co-author of the article, entitled "The Hyrerfine 
Structure of Nuclear Moments of Columbium, ,! was Dr. Russell A. Fisher 
of Northwestern University. Dr. Meeks was also at Northwestern before 
comine t o Southern this fall, 

Carbondale , Ill„, Oct. - The newl}*" or-ranized Illinois Folklore 
Society has issued its first publication, a small brochure entitled 
''Illinois Folklore.' 7 

Headquarters of the society are at Southern Illinois University, 
and present officers are all faculty members of the University. 

John alien, history curator of the Southern Museum, is president; 
D. S. Mcintosh, associate professor of music, is vice president; Miss 
Tina Goodwin, assistant professor of education and first ere de 
supervisor in the Allyn Training School, is secretary; and Dr. Jesse 
Harris, associate professor of Enelish, is editor. 

The first issue of the folklore magazine contains articles by 
Miss Goodwin, Grace Partridge Smith of Carbondale, Lelah Allison of 
Ellery, and Una Keeling of DuCuoin. 

m 




SOUTHFPM » • iNOIS 

UN: 

. LIBRmKV 

f 'CARBONDAtf, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



■Win 



10-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - A game, alert crew of Indiana State 
Sycamores came from behind to defeat the Southern Illinois University 
Maroons 21 to 6 at Terre Haute last Saturday. 

Southern scored easily in the early minutes of the first period, 
but after Indiana State came back with two quick touchdowns in the 
second period, the Maroons could not click offensively. 

The game, played in sultry 80 degree heat, was char;, cterized by 
the ability of Indiana State to capitalize on Maroon misrlays. Of the 
three Sycamore touchdowns, two were direct results of Southern bobbles, 
one a f unble , and the other an intercepted pass. 

Early in the first quarter Bill Wilkinson of West Frankfort, 
Maroon halfback, ran an Indiana St^te punt back from the Maroon /+8 to 
the Sycamore 36. Wilkinson gained two more, and then Bill Malinsky 
of Flora passed to Joe Hughes of West Frankfort on the 20 yard line. 

Don Riggs of Fairfield lugged the ball around left end, behind 
good blocking, to the one yard line, and then scored on the next rlay 
when he crashed over center. Robert "Bunker" Jones of West Frankfort 
kicked wide in the attempt for the extra point. 

Indiana State bounced back in the second period by recovering an 

Faroon fumble on the Southern 30. Graves passed to Brady for a first 

down on the sixteen, but two successive losses and a recovered fumble 

threw the Sycamores back to the 25. 

Max Woolsey, Indiana State's brilliant running halfback, took 

(more ) 







SOUTHFPM ii i inois 

UN 
. LIBKmKV 

f- ' CARBONDAIE, ILLINOIS i 




-2- 

over from the 25 and danced to the one-ysrd line. The Maroon line- 
held for one down, but Faught, Indiana State quarterback, crashed 
center f or the touchdown on the next try. Bob Chester kickec the first 
of his three successful extra point tries to send the Sycamores into 
a 7 to t lead. 

Late in the same period the Maroons stopped an Indiana State 
threat when Bob Etheridge of Fairfield, Southern right guard-, recovered 
a fumble on the Maroon three y£rd line. 

Malinsky kicked out of bounds on the Southern 31. V/oolsey once 
again broke loose for the Sycamores, running to the three before he 
was stopped. Quaterback Faught passed into the end-zone where his rass 
was received by end Stan Sajkc, Sycamore captain. 

The third Indiana State, score came in the third period, when they 
stuck from their own 31 yard line on a long Graves to Baran pass good 
for the necessary 69 yards. 

Outstanding work for the Maroons was turned in by end Bob Colborn 
and guard Bob Etheridge. 

Flaying at St. Louis, the Southern "3 n squad was defeated by 
Washington University's "3 ,f squad by a 20 to score. All three 
Washington scores came in the first half. 



*> m 

Hi* 







SOUTHFPM i' • INOFS 



UN 

X 'CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS * 



^^^^^^^^ b ^^^ m ^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 
i»i^— ■^——^— -b^— b^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^B^^^^^hm^^w^^^^^^^h 






10-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Although the Southern Illinois 
University harriers were defeated in dual meet b}>- the harriers of 
Eastern Illinois State Teachers College at Charleston last Friday 
by a score of 30 to 25, a Maroon runner took first place and set a 
new course record. 

Joe McLafferty, Maroon freshman, set a new record when he covered 
the- 3.25 miles course in 17: 31, which was nine seconds better than 
the previous record. 

It was the first time McLafferty, whose home is Carbondale, has 
ever participated in a cross-country run, but he is well known by 
track followers who r emember t hat he placed second in the Illinois 
High School mile championshir last spring. 

Results : 

First, Joe McLafferty of Carbondale (S ) ; second, Glover (E); 
third, Spillers(E); fourth, Monier(E); fifth, Bill Keene of Carrier 
Mills (S); sixth, Buddy Miller of Carbondale (S); seventh, Barr(F); 
eighth, Bob Lunneman of Pinckneyville (S); ninth, Roosevelt (E ) ; tenth, 
Bill Dorris of Benton(S); eleventh, McCulloch (E ) ; end last, Leonard 
Burden of Kerrin. 

### 



SOUTH FPU. NOIS 

UN 

f 'CAdBOKOAlf, IUIH0IS t 




II 



^^—^^———^^^^^^^ m ^^— Southern Illinois 

!■— -—*■ — ^ ^^"— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^M^^^^^^^^^^m^kb^^hp^m 






10-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - A college comedy, ''The Poor Nut" by 
J. C. Nugent and Elliott Nugent, has been selected by the Little 
Theatre at Southern Illinois University as its Homecoming production, 
to be staged Friday night, Oct. 24, at 8 p. m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

The Little Theatre play is traditionally one of the bit events 
of Homecoming. 

"The Poor Nut" will be directed by Dr. Archibald McLeod, new 
assistant professor of speech. 

Members of the cast have been announced as follows: "John 
Miller," Dale Kittle of Wayne City: "Margerie Elake , " Phyllis Johnson 
of Du' ; uoin; "Julie Winters," Julia Ann Harper of Carterville; "Hub 
Smith," Ed Melvin of Tamaroa. 

"Magpie Welch," Lewis Hammack of Sparta; "Spike Hoyt," Bob Veach 
of Herrin; "Wallie Pierce," George Seifert of DuQuoin; "Professor 
ieming," Art Carter of ^nna; "Coach Jackson, 1 ' Charles Weber of Cairo; 
'"'Doc Sepurney," John Sawyer of Moro; "A Freshman," Roy Elan of Anna; 
"Betty," Pejgy Coleman of Marion; "Reggis," Dorothy Coleman of 
Carbondale; "Helen", Rosemary Woolard of bnergy; "trackmen, " Dave 
Rendleman of anna, Don Harris of Benton, John Koonce of Watseka, and 
Vernie Barnett of Metropolis. 

m 



i 







SOUTH F&N ii > iMorS 

Uf 

- 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS < 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— ™ — — ^— ■ — ■ — — ^^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ 



10-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - The language of the ancient Romans 
will be the prevailing order of the day next Saturday when 
approximately 100 high s chool Latin students come to Southern Illinois 
University for a one-day state meeting of the Junior Classical 
Society, according to Mrs. Evelyn Rieke, assistant professor of 
languages in University High School. 

The group, meeting in the Little Theatre, will be welcomed by 
University President Chester F. Lay. Lynn Swigart of Clinton, 
president of the society, will reply to the welcome. 

A song-fest of Latin songs, led by J. Cary Davis, associate 
professor of foreign languages at the University, will start the day T s 
program. Other features of the morning program will be a p.lay--in 
English— by the Murphysboro Classical Club, and a musical skit' — in 
Latin--by the Springfield club. 

Dr. John C. Lazenby of the University of Illinois will speak to 
the group in the afternoon, on the subject, "Crete and the Cycladic 
Isles." 

Luncheon will be sei ved to the group by the University High 

School home economics department, and delegates and their sponsors 

will be entertained at' Anthony Hall and in nomes of University High 
School students and faculty members. 

Among the delegates will be students from Clinton, Paris, 
Streator, Springfield, Alton Senior High School and Alton East Junior 
High School, Edwardsville , Lakeview, i-iurphysboro, and University 
High School here. 

A meeting of the executive board — composed of delegates from 
Streator. Edwardsville, and Clinton — will be held on Friday. 

m 













SOUTHFPN » i iNOIS 
UN 

• LIBKmKV 

- ' CARBOWDAU, ILLINOIS 




^^__^^^_ ^^^^^_^^^^ Southern Illinois 

■— —^■^^^^^— ^— ^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^ m » ^^n .-^ ,__ 



10-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - a regional group meeting of kethodist 
young people will be held at Southern Illinois University Thursday 
evening, Oct. 16, at 7 '-30 p. m. in the Little Theatre, Dr. Douglas 
MacNaughton, director of the Student Christian Foundation, has 
announced. 

Approximately 300 young people from this area will be present, 
he said. 

Speaker for the occasion will be Paul Sims of Marion, formerly a 

student at Southern and now attending McKendree College. Sims was 

chosen as the student from Illinois to attend the T; ..orld Conference of 

Christian Youth in Oslo, Norway, last July, and will report to the 

group on that conference. 

MS 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. - The faculty of Southern Illinois 
University this week voted to enter a faculty float in the mushrooming 
Homecoming parade, Saturday, Oct. 25. 

Dozens of student organizations have indicated they would enter 
floats in competition for the several prizes, according to John 
Mulkin of Herrin, student chairman of the parade sub-committee, and 
a number of Carbondale civic organizations have voted to cooperate by 
entering floats. 

The three-day Homecoming celebration will open Thursday night, 
Oct. 23, with ceremonies in recognition of Southern's new status as a 
university, coupled with coronation of the Homecoming Queen. Other 
'•'University he cognition" ceremonies will be held at the half -time 
at the Southern- Northern football game Saturday afternoon, 

ftwv 



» m 







SOUTHFPM ii i iiMorS 

UN 
. LIBHmKV 

*• 'GttBONOAU, ILLINOIS I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



m m 

■* I'M 



10-14-47 

Caroondale, 111., Oct. - An exhibit of photographs prepared 
by LIFE Magazine depicting Venice, this beautiful Italian city which 
was the center of Renaissance culture, will be shown at Southern 
Illinois University Oct. 15-November.l5, according to Ben Vatkins, 
acting chairman of the art department. 

The display will be shown in the Little Gallery in the Main 
Building. 

The exhibition opens w ith a panoramic view of Venice in 1500 
as imagined from the air by a Renaissance artist, with the Grand 
Canal winding through the heart of the city. The 24 enlarged panels 
then tell the story of the city as reflected in its government, 
religion, art and literature, civic and private architecture. 

Included are color reproductions of paintings by Titian, Veronese, 
Giorgione and Carpaccio; photographs of St. Mark's, the Doge's Palace, 
the Sansovino Library, Palladio's church of San Giorgio Maggiore, 
and portraits of Vittoria, Sansovino, Titian, Aretino, Tintoretto, as 
well as pictures of other famed buildings and sections of the city. 

The exhibition was prepared under the direction of John Goldsmith. 
Phillips, associate curator of Renaissance and Modern Art, Metropolitan 
Museum of j ^rt. The textual commentary, also by Mr. Phillips, quotes 
freely from various 15th and 16th century writers and describes the 
Republic of Venice at the height of its power. 

Hi 







SOUTHFPN » ! i iNOIS 
ill 
. LIBKmKV 

- 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






10-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - A lecture-demonstration on "Sculpture 
in the Making" will be staged by a celebrated sculptor, Paul Manship, 
at Southern Illinois University Thursday evening, Oct. 16. 

Model for the demonstration will be Carbondale's mayor, John I. 
Wright, who is associate professor of history at the University. 
Mr, Wright was selected by Ben Watkins, acting chairman of the art 
department, as possessing a head of distinctive contours and features. 

Mr. Manship is considered America's leading w orker in bronze, 
and is reported to be a delightful lecturer. 

The public is invited to the lecture demonstration, which will 
be held in Shryock Auditorium, starting at #:15 p. m. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Students and faculty at Southern 
Illinois University will be able to get flu and smallpox vaccinations 
at the University Health Service Thursday, Oct. 16, Dr. Marie A. 
Hinrichs, Health Service director, has announced. 

### 







SOUTHFPM ii i ifsiOIS 

UN! 
. LIBKhKV 

- 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



■i m 



10-14-47 



Carbbndale, 111., Oct. - Study of individual children and 

two seminars on psychoanalysis will be on the schedule for the 
quarterly Child Guidance Clinic to be held at Southern Illinois 
University Oct. 21-22, according to Dr. W. a. Thalman, clinic director. 

Consultants for the clinic will be Dr. Sophie Schroeder, 
psychiatrist, and Mrs. Eadith Morales, psychiatric social worker, for 
the Illinois Institute of Juvenile Research, Chicago. 

Children to be studied at the clinic have already been selected 
and their teachers or other sponsors notified, Dr. Thalman Said. 
Persons interested in bringing other children for study should contact 
Dr. Thalman and arrangements will be made for them to be brought to 
the clinic at some future date. 

More than 2S0 students c^nd in-service teachers attended the 
staff ings and seminars at the summer' clinic, and more than 1,400 
participated during the lour clinics held during last year. 

All staff ings and seminars will be held in Main Building 101. 
Staffing s are scheduled at 1 and 2 o T clock each day, and the seminars 
at 3 p. m. 

### 




SOUTHFRN J' i INOIS 
Uf 
. LIBHhKY 

»• ' CARBOMDAti, III INOIS i 




nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



"■ m 
■ j 



10-15-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Tension has mounted hi ~h this week 
among the followers of the football fortunes of the Southern Illinois 
University Maroons. 

After losing their second straight game last Saturday to Indiana 
State Teachers College, the Maroons have become dead serious. 

Hard, long practices, the most extensive yet this season, are 
being held under the direction of Head Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin, as 
the Maroons prepare themselves to face Western Illinois State College 
next Saturday at Macomb. 

The Western Leathernecks, who are undefeated in three starts, with 
victories over Illinois College and Quincy and a tie with Carthage, 
will find the Maroons weaker physically than they have been at any 
time previously this season. 

An X-ray has disclosed that Robert i? Bunker i? Jones of West 
Frankfort, who has been performing yeoman chores backing the Maroons 
line, has a chipped vertebra in his neck and will be out for the 
season. 

Two other major injuries have befallen the Martinmen. Bill 
Wilkinson of West Frankfort, halfback, and J. L. Gross of DuQuoin, 
guard, have also been injured and will be out from three weeks to the 
entire season, depending on how fast their injuries knit. 

Wilkinson came up with a torn knee cartilage in scrimmage Monday. 
How soon he will be able to play again is lar_ely a guess. 

(more) 




SOUTHFRN n i INOIS 
UN! 



. LIBKmK ) 

' CAfiBQNDAlE, ILLINOIS 



a 



-2- 



Gross fell off the rings in his gymnastic class, injuring his 
shoulder, and is expected to remain on the sidelines for about a 
month. 

After the poor showing the Maroons made against Indiana State, 
Coach Glenn ; 'Abe"' Martin ordered scrimmage for Monday, concentrating 
primarily on stepping uj the Maroon offense, which has _ained only 
one touchdown in the last two games. 

Martin indicated after the practice that he was encouraged by the 
team's work during the scrimmage, inasmuch as the offense looked 
better than it had at any previous time. 



«. m 



M.JJ.M 

tttrit 



•'. r 










SOUTHFRN m » IMOIS 
UI 

. LIBKmKV 

*• 'CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 




i 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



i * 

11 i a 



Attention Sports Editors 
For Friday releasor 



10-16-47 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. 17 - At 1? : 30 today the Southern Illinois 
University Maroons left for Macomb where they face the Leathernecks of 
western Illinois State College tomorrow afternoon. 

The football squad, accompanied by the Maroon cross-country team, 
which will run a dual meet against the Western harriers, departed from 
the steps of Shryock Auditorium under the spell of a rousing pep rally. 

This game, which is Western's Homecoming contest, marks the 
beginning of league play in the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference. Last year the Maroons finished second in the I. I. A. C, 
going undefeated in conference play until the last game when they fell 
to Northern's Huskies. 

In the We stern-Southern game played at Macomb last year, the 
Maroons came away on the long end of a 19 to 6 score. This year 
pre-game dope indicates a close battle. 

Considering only won and lost records, Western has a definite 
edge with two victories and one tie against the Maroons' one victory 
and two setbacks. 

However, the Maroons have faced much stiff er competition in losing 

to Evansville and Indiana State than Western has found in defeating 

Illinois College 40 to and Quincy 20 to 6. A not too strong Carthage 

(More) 









i 




SOUTHFPN ii I !(\|0fS 

UN! 




r 

j- 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 




-2- 

team battled Western to a 13 to 13 tie. 

This game is very important to - " the Maroons, who are very eager to 
get back to winning-ways after losing their last two tries to 
Evansville and Indiana State, and they will be ready to throw everything 
in their bag at the Homecoming hopped-up Western eleven. 

Early in the week there was almost nothing but bad news from the 
Maroon camp, but Wednesday good news finally came. 

Further investigation into the neck injury of Robert "Bunker" 
Jones, powerful Maroon line-backer, revealed that no vertebra was 
chipped during, the Indiana State game, as previously reported. Jones 
will start at end against Western. 

However, Dick Seelman of Flora, sophomore fullback who was injured 
in the Evansville game, and did not see action against Indiana State, 
continues to be on the ailing list with an injured hip, and probably 

i 

will not make the trip to Macomb. 
Probable starting lineup: 

LE Robert "Bunker" Jones of West Frankfort 

LT Charles Mathieu of Eldorado 

LG Jim Lovin of Benton 

C J. Pieron of Murphysboro or Bill Cosgrove of Benton 

RG Bob Etheridge of Fairfield 

RT John Corn of Benton 

RE Bob Colborn of Flora 

QR Bill Malinsky of Flora 

LHB Bob Johnson of DuQuoin 

RHB George Sawyer of Wood River 

FB Don Riggs of Fairfield 

Radio station WCIL, Carbondale, will carry a play-by-play 
description of the game with Don Boudreau at the mike handling the play 
and Jim Bolen doing the color. 



« m 



Wpm 










OUTHFPN ii ' INOIS 

Uf 
. LIBRmKY 

1 CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 




nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



"■l * 



" 



10-16-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. -Invitations went out this week to 
3,500 alumni of Southern Illinois University to attend the 31st annual 
Homecoming, Oct. 23-25. 

These alumni are scattered in every one of the 102 counties of 
Illinois, in 3$ of the 4$ states of the union, the District of Columbia, 
Alaska. and Honolulu. 

Those receiving the invitations are the former students for whom 
the Alumni Services office has reasonably accurate addresses. 

Homecoming this year is combined with "University Recognition" 
ceremonies in honor of Southern's new name. 

The three-day celebration includes: 

Thursday, Oct. 23, 7:30 p.m. — "University Recognition" service, 
with Dr. John Dale Russell, director of the Livision of Higher Education, 
U. S. Office of Education, as guest speaker; coronation of the 1947 
Homecoming Queen; and a bonfire-pep rally. 

Friday, Oct. 24 — 10 a.m., special assembly and pep session for all 
students; snake dance to downtown Carbondale; 2 p.m., free movie for all 
students; 2-4 P*m., open house at the Presidents Office* for alumni 
and other visitors; 8 p.m., Homecoming Play, "The Poor Nut", presented 
by the Little Theatre. 

Saturday, Oct. 25 — 9 a.m., Women's Athletic Association varsity- 
alumni hockey game; 10-12, open house at the President's Office; 

(more) 




OUTHFRN ii i iMOfS 

Uf 
. LIBRaKY 

*• 'CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 




-2- 

11 a.m., Alumni Association board meeting; 12:15 Homecoming Parade, 
with 11 oats by student, faculty and civic organizations, and more than ^ 
a dozen Southern Illinois high school bands; 2 p.m., Southern-Northern 
football game; between halves at the game, H University Recognition 17 
ceremonies, with state officials, legislators and others who assisted 
Southern in obtaining passage of the change- of -name legislation as honor 
guests; after the game, an informal tea for all alumni; 9 p.m., the 
annual Homecoming Ball, with music by Ray Anthony's orchestra. 

A luncheon honoring the visiting legislators and state officials 
will be held by University President Chester F. Lay on Saturday, 
preceding the game: 

Homecoming queens of former years will be special guests at the 
coronation this year, and will be introduced at the ceremony on 
Thursday evening. Miss Aliene Kauzlarich of Christopher, 1946 queen, 
will be featured in the ceremony. 

A grand march led by the Queen and her court will be staged at the 
Homecoming Ball on Saturday night. 

Identity of the Queen will not be revealed until the moment of her 
coronation Thursday night. Nominees for this honor, named by popular 
student ballot, are: Peggy Coleman of Marion, Joan Fairbairn of Harvey, 
Veda Hallam of Fairfield, Nada .Kauzlarich of Christopher, Velma 
McCormick of Johnston City, Georgia Mircheff of Madison, and Doris 
Morgan of Sparta. 

Nominated for the two positions as Queen's attendants are: Maxine 

Bumpus of Bonnie, Delores Sharp of Benton, Mathilde Smith of Wilmette 

and Doris Uade of Vandalia. 

Students will bailot on Tuesday, Oct. 21, to select the Queen from 
the seven nominees. The four top runners-up will comprise her court. 
In the same election the two attendants will be chosen. 






: 




OUTHFPN n i INOIS 
Uf 

. LIBKmKY 

'CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



nformation Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



10-17-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - A reunion of three former faculty 
members from the American University at Biarritz, France, will take 
place here when Dr. John Dale Russell, director of the Division of 
Higher Education, U. 3. Office of Education, visits Southern Illinois 
University to speak at its "University Recognition" ceremony Thursday 
evening, Oct. 23. 

Dr. Joseph K. Johnson, professor and chairman of the University 1 s 
sociology department, and Dr. Floyd F. Cunningham, associate professor 
and chairman of the geography department, served w ith Dr. Russell on 
the faculty of the Biarritz university established by the U.S. 
government for the benefit of the armed forces. 

Dr. Russell will speak here Thursday evening at 7' 30 p.m. in 
Shryock Auditorium on the subject, "Higher Education to Meet Modern 
Needs." 

The "University Recognition" ceremonies will be held in conjunction 



with the 31st annual Southern Homecoming, Oct. 23-25. 

MM 
WWW 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Mrs. Lucy Fligor, faculty assistant 
at Southern Illinois University and assistant critic at Buncombe Rural 
School, has been elected to the advisory committee of the National 
Rural Youth Conference. 

Mrs. Fligor, accompanied by a group from Southern recently attended 
a meeting of the conference at East Bay Camp, Bloomington. 

Others who participated included George Vest of Xenia, president 
of the Southern Rural Life Club; William Ridgeway, president of the 
Buncombe Rural Life Club; Phoebe Cox of Makanda, secretary of the 
Southern club; Pauline Presley of Makanda, and Jean Fligor, dean of 
boys in University High School. 







OUTHFPN m i INOIS 
Ul 

• LIBKmkV 

X l CARBONDALE, IUIN0IS i 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



■ 






10-17-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Approval has been given by the 
national headquarters of Alpha Kappa Delta, honorary fraternity for 
students of sociology, for the establishment of a chapter at Southern 
Illinois University, Dr. Joseph K. Johnson, chairman of the sociology 
department, has announced. 

Notices of election to charter membership in the new chapter have 
gone out to eleven students and one former student, selected on the 
basis of superior scholarship and interest in sociology. Ceremonies 
of initiation and formal installation of the chapter are being planned 
for the last week of October. 

alpha Kappa Delta is "not just a mutual congratulation society 
which elects a few honor students each year, pins keys on them, and 
sends them on their way with a pat on the back, ;: Dr. Louis Petroff, of 
the sociology department faculty, declared in commenting on 
establishment of the new fraternity. 

"It is an organization with a purpose and a program," he explained, 
pointing out that all members initiated will be expected to participate 
in the regular meetings of the society, which will feature the 
presentation and discussion of scientific studies in the field of 
sociology or related sciences. 

Stiidents elected as charter members are: Mrs. Maxine Blackman of 

Ramsey, Robert Files Etheridge of Fairfield, Robert Marion Gingrich of 

Marion, Marilyn June Henderson of Marion, Vivian Lupardus of Granite 

City, Mrs. Wilma Nell Perry of Harrisburg, Willard Eugene Rodd of 

(mo, 3) 




OUTHFRN ii i INOIS 

Uf 
. LIBKhKV 

' CM8W1UU, IUINOIS i 



-2- 



Marion, Virgil Lee Seymour of Ellis Grove, Randall Gene Thompson of 
Zeigler, Joyce Marguerite Wall of Mound City and nrthur Halfar of 
Carbondale. In addition, Margaret Elizabeth Powell of Flora, who 
attended Southern last year and is now a student at Washington 
University in Sl. Louis, was elected. 

Alpha Kappa Delta was established in 1920, at the University of 
Southern California, and now has about 30 chapters, located in leading 
universities throughout the United States, Dr. Johnson said. Chapters 
already established in Illinois are 1 >cated at the University of 
Illinois and at Loyola University, Chicago. 



1 .« 



m 




SOUTNFPM ii I iiMOIS 
Uf 




r 

*• ' CAfiBOMDALE, ILLINOIS i 




Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. aMiMgHWWWPMillBBWB—gi^HB^HBBB 



10-20-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - With Don Riggs of Fairfield scoring 
in the third quarter, the Southern Illinois University Maroons regained 
their winning ways by defeating the Leathernecks of Western Illinois 
S t at,, College at Macomb last Saturday in the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference opener. 

After fighting on almost even terms with the home eleven for the 
first half, the Maroons concentrated heir power long enough in the 
third period to enable Riggs to plunge over from the one-yard line 
just before the quarter ended. 

In the absense of a sustained scoring punch, the saving feature 
for the Maroons was the defensive work of the line. In the first half 
Western gained 69 yards by rushing, but in the last two quarters the 
Maroon line held their opponents to a net yardage of one yard. 

Bob Colborn of Flora played his usual brilliant defensive game 
at end, and contributed the Maroon offense by snagging two passes f:?om 
fellow townsman Bill Malinsky. 

At the other end, Joe Hughes of West Frankfort turned in his best 
performance this season. The end play of Colborn and Hughes was so 
effective that Western failed to gain one yara around end during the 

entire afternoon. 

The Maroon offense was concentrated in two men, Bill Malinsky 
who passed to Colborn and Hughes, and Don Riggs who ran powerfully all 
afternoon. Malinsky completed five out of eight passes for a total of 

94 yards and Riggs., plunging the Center of the line almost exclusively, 

(more) 







SOUTHFPN « i INOIS 
UN 

- "MSaOMDAtE, IU1NOIS I 




• 2- 

Lugged the ball 69 yards in 15 tries for an average of 4.6 yards per try. 

In the middle of the third quarter the Maroons began a sustained 
tiarch from the western 45. With Rig^s crashing the center for most of 
he yardage, plus an 12 yard pass from Malinsky to Colborn, the Maroons 
)arned a first down on the Western eight. However, four cracks at 
he line found George Sawyer of Wood River two inches short of a 
souchdown on fourth down. 

Bob Johnson of DuQuoin ran the Western punt back to Western 33. 
lalinsky passed to Joe Hughes who made a ont hand catch to give, the 
4aroons ^ first down on the Western 21. Charlie Heinz ran to the 
L5 and Don Riggs made it a first down on the eight. 

Riggs plunged to the four, Sawyer to the three, and Riggs again 
:o the; one. On fourth down Riggs smacked over left guard for the 
touchdown. 

Robert !? Bunkur if Jones of West Frankfort kicked the extra point. 
Jack Stephens of West Frankfort, who reported for practice on 
Monday, ran well during the time he was in the game, Stephens also 
did the punting chores for Southern in brilliant fashion, averaging a 
net 42.5 yards per try. 

This coming Saturday the T-laroons, now definately on the comback 
trail, face the Huskies of Northern Illinois State Teachers College 
at McAndrew Stadium in Carbondale in the Southern Illinois University 
Homecoming football game.- 

Last Saturday Northern tied Illinois State Normal University 7 to 
7, in an I. I. a. C.tilt. Early dope said that Normal was the t~am 
to beat for the conference championship, which indicates that Northern, 
traditionally a strong foe, will prov.de plenty of opposition for the 
Homecoming game. 



" m 

1 1 Hi 







SOUTHFRN " i INOIS 
Uf 
. LIBKmKV 

- l CAftBONDAtt, ILLINOIS i 




,_^^^^^^^^^^^^^_^^_ Southern Illinois 
— ^™^^^-^™^^^^~^^— University 

nformation Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. h^m^mm^himh^^^^h. 



■ m 

■i I'M 



10-20-47 
Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Two "University Recognition" 

ceremonies are on the calendar for the 31st annual Homecoming at 
Southern Illinois University Oct. 23-25, according to Dr. Orville 
Alexander, faculty chairman of Homecoming. 

These ceremonies are planned as an official recognition of 
Southern's new status as a university. The first will be academic in 
nature, presenting Dr. John Dale Russell, director of the Division of 
Higher Education, U. S. Office of Education, as speaker, on Thursday 
evening, at 7:30 p. m. in Shryock Auditorium. 

In conjunction with Dr. Russell's address on "Higher Education 
for Modern Needs," the Homecoming activities w ill be opened with the 
coronation of the Homecoming Queen. 

The second "University Recognition" ceremony will take place on 
Saturday, between halves at the Southern-Northern football game, when 
University President Chester F. Lay will publicly express to state 
officials, members of the Illinois General assembly and other supporters. 
of Soutuern the institution's appreciation for support in the long 
campaign to obtain legislation legally changing the school's name. 

Governor Dwight H. Green is unable to be present but has . 
designated Frank G. Thompson, director of the State Department of 
! Registration and Education and chairman of the State Teachers College 
Board, as his official representative, Alexander said. 

all members of the Illinois legislature havebeen invited to be 

present for the "University Recognition" ceremonies and to share in 

(more) 




SOUTHFPM i' i ii\JO!S 
Uf 



• LII 

'CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS 



I 



-2- 

all the Homecoming festivities, he explained. Acceptances have come 
from a substantial number and are expectea to continue to arrive 
during the next few days. 

President Lay will be host to the legislators and others who 
aided Southern in its change- of- name program, entertaining them at 
luncheon at the University cafeteria before the game. 

The "University Recognition 1 ' ceremony and coronation on Thursday 
evening will be open to alumn^ students, faculty, and the public, 
Alexander said, but he cautioned those who plan to attend to come 
early in order to obtain seats, since the capacity of the auditorium 
is limited. 

"No one will be admitted after the ceremonies start , ;f he stressed. 
"This means that all who plan to attend must be in their seats by 
7:30 o T clock sharp. 5 ' 

M 1 



i m 

■ m 



- 



SOUTHFPN ii i IMOIS 
UN 

. LIBKmkV 

f 'CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 




nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-20-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - The Southern Illinois University 
irri.fc.rs easily d^fo-ted the Western Illinois State College cross- 
country team in a run h^ld at the half time of the Southern-Western 
jfootball game at Macomb last Saturday. 

Joe McLafferty of Carbondale finished first with a time of 
19:24.4, being chased to the finish line by Captain Bill K^ene of 
Carrier Mills whose time was 19:30.6. 

Southern took the first four places, Western the next two, and 
then Southern seventh and eight. Four Western men did not cross the 
finish line, enabling the Maroon harriers to outscor^ their opponents 
17 to 41. (Low score wins.) 

Order of finish: first, McLafferty(S) ; second, Keene(S); third, 
Buddy Miller of Carbondale (S ) ; fourth, Leonard Burden of Herrin(S); 
fifth, Harmon(E); sixth, Derkson(E); seventh, Bob Lunneman of 
Pinckneyville(S) ; and eight, Ray Palmer of East St. Louis(S). 

m 



I 






SOUTHFRN l! i INOIS 
Uf 
. LIBKmKV 

f- 'CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS I 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






10-20-47 
Garbondale, 111., Oct. - John Kirkpatrick, noted pianist, will 
dg presented in a recital at Southern Illinois University Nov. 5, Dr, 
-laurits Kesnar, chairman of the University music department. 

Since 1939 Mr. Kirkpatrick has been heard in many colleges, under 
the auspices of the American of American Colleges, and annually in 
New York, in addition to solo appearances throughout the country. He 
las given manv lecture-recital series, and has appeared often in 
festivals of American music. At present he is associate professor of 
music at Cornell University. 

In addition to his concert here, he will conduct a discussion of 
"Modern American Piano Music' 1 on Nov. 6, at 2 p. m. , to which Dr. 
Kesnar is inviting all piano teachers of Southern Illinois who may be 
interested. Those who desire to attend a re urged to notify Dr. Kesnar, 
in order that necessary arrangements nay be made for the meeting. 

I m 

Garbondale, 111., Oct. - Dr. Marshall S. Hiskey, dean of men 
at Southern Illinois University, appeared on the program of the 

4 

University of Chicago Conference on Teacher Education Oct. 20-21, 
speaking on the topic "Personnel Administration at Southern Illinois 
University. " 

Dr. Eugene R. Fair, dean of the College of Education at Southern 
also attended the meeting. 

m 



,y 



I'M 










SOUTHFRN H I INOIS 
Uf 
. LIBKmKV 

- 'CAR80NDALE, ILLINOIS i 




in 



II 



^ _. Southern Illinois 

^ — i University 

information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^« 



1 M 

1 i a 



ATTENTIUN= 10-21-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - With the Northern Illinois State 
Teachers College Huskies scheduled to make an appearance at McAndrew 
Stadium for the Homecoming football game Saturday, Oct. 25, the 
Maroons of Southern Illinois University have been practicing stepping 
up their offensive power. 

Head Coach Glenn i? Hbe ,? Martin indicated that he expected a number 
of touchdowns in the game by both teams. 

Most dangerous offensive threat from the Huskies will be the spiral* 
of outstanding passer Don Fortunato, All-Conf erence halfback last 
season. 

Teaming with Fortunato in the Northern scoring punch is power-laden 
Earry Hennigan, a great running fullback, whose dashes through the line 
spelled defeat for the Maroons last year when Northern won 10 to 0. 

In the game last year, Hennigan was the only man to score, gaining 
10 points on a touchdown, extra point and a 17 yard field goal. 

For the Maroons, things are looking up. They have much more 
confidence in themselves this week than they did before defeating 
Western at Macomb last Saturday 7 to 0. 

Dick Seelman of Flora has recovered from his injured hip which 
had sidelined him during the last two games, and should be ready for 
plenty of action for his hard running and long passing abilities. 

During the early week much of the Maroon practice time was spent 
on running out kinks and working on pass-defense, 

ffrririi /. it 



SOUTHFRN M I inois 



Ulvl 

. LIBKmK/ 

1 WRBONDAtt, ILLINOIS i 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



1 



m 



10-21-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. -Eight Homecoming queens of former years 
will be back as honor guests to join in the ceremonies crowning Southern 
Illinois University's 1947 queen, Bill Burns of Chicago, student 
chairman of the queen's committee, has announced. 

These former queens will march in the procession at the coronation 
Thursday evening: Dorothy Benner, now Mrs. Marvin Muckelroy of 
Carbondale, 192$ queen; Maxine Winchester, now Mrs. Herbert McKinney 
of Carbondale, 1931 queen; Miss Mildred V/hiteside of Carbondale, 1929 
queen; Jane Federer, now Mrs. Michael Purtill of DuQuoin, 1935 queen; 
Miss Dorothy Mitchell of Carrier Mills, 1939 queen; June Otrich, now 
Mrs. Hewey Tweedy of Zeigler, 1944 queen; Gloria Barger, now Mrs. S. H. 
Frazier of Harrisburg, 1945 queen; and Miss Aileen Kauzlarich of 
Christopher, 1946 queen. 

Miss Kauzlarich, last year's queen will play a prominent role in 
coronation ceremony. 

The coronation will take place in Ehryock Auditorium in conjunction 
with f? University Recognition 5 ' ceremonies, at which Dr. John D a le 
Russell, director of the Division of Higher Education, U. S. Office of 
Education, will be the guest speaker. The program will start at 
' 7:30 p.m. 



### 



SOUTHFRN M I INOIS 
U 

X ' CARBONOAtt, ILLINOIS 3 





I 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - nccording to comparative scores, the 
uskies of Northern Illinois State Teachers College are four touch 
downs better than the Southern Illinois University Maroons, which would 
indicate a sad Homecoming for Southern's football fans. 

However, it is well known that comparative score ratings of teams 
are highly inaccurate means of determining the probable victor. 

The Maroons lost to Indiana State by two touchdowns, 21 to 6. 
Indiana State was defeated by Illinois Norma}, by two touchdowns, 20 to 
7, and Northern tied Normal 7 to 7. 

The Southern team which defeated Western 7 to last week could 
hardly be recognized as the same team which lost to Indiana State. 
In seven short days, the Maroons had made a great comeback. 

Another factor which often tends to make a lie of comparative 
scores is team spirit--the will to win. although Northern undoubtedly 
wants to win badly, the Maroons have more concrete reasons for fighting_ 
for victory. 

Most potent of all factors driving the Maroon squad's spirit is 
memory. For three consecutive years Northern has defeated Southern 
in the closing game of the season, each time costing the Maroons a 
conference championship v Those defeats have not been forgotten by the 
Southerners. 

ulso, the Southern team is eager for a conference championship, 
and they think that this is the year I 



1 « 

1 i * 



(more) 









SOUTHFPN v i INOIS 
Uf 
, LIBRi 

- k CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



uuu 



-2- 

Psychologically, the team is in perfect condition. Fresh under 
their belts they have the memory of a win last week, but in the event 
of excess cockiness, mere whistling of "On the Banks of the Wabash" is 
enough to kindle flaming eyes. 

Physically, the Maroon team is in slightly better condition than 
it was last week at Macomb. No serioi 3 injuries have been contracted 
in the last week, and with the exception of Bill Wilkinson, of West 
Frankfort who was injured two weeks ago, the charges of Head Coach 
Glenn "Abe" Martin are universally in top shape. 

Unfit 



■ 




SOUTHFRM m i inoIS 
Uf 
. LIBHmK/ 

- l CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






10-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Doze, s of items from the Southern 
Illinois University Museum will be displayed at the Saline County 
Centennial celebration in Harrisburg, Oct. 23-25. 

The University itself will be represented in a special exhibit in 
conjunction with several other divisions of the State Department of 
Registration and Education, and in addition other objects from the 
Museum will be loaned to other exhibitors. 

The University's exhibit will consist of a replica of a pioneer 
room, featuring a simulated stone fireplace with old handmade andirons, 
shovel, crame, pots and kettles, candle molds and candle holders; a 
spinning wheel and reel; and a mannequin costumed in a satin dress 
more than 100 years old. 

The fireplace was made for the exhibit by Russell Feithman, 
student in the Museum. The dress was presented to the Museum by 
Mrs. Nebughr of Union County, mother of Jackson County school Supt. 
Lee Nebughr, and belonged to her mother. The spinning wheel was z^ VQn 
to the University by the Wiley family of Makanda, while the reel came 
from the S.B. Hood collection in Randolph County. The other smaller 
objects were all collected for the Museum from Southern Illinois, 

A diorama showing the construction of a log house will also be 
displayed. In addition, several cases of school loan materials will 
be shown, including house, transportation, biological, and geological 
models. 

(more) 



i^L| 



SOUTHFRN ii I INOIS 
UN { 

. LIBRmKY 

% 'NRBONDAU, IUIN0IS 




-2- 

The Museum was also asked to supply materials for the Illinois 
State Historical Association exhibit at the Centennial, and is 
furnishing four dioramas--sorghum making, hop killing, a blacksmith 
ishop, and soap making. 

An 1831 McCormich reaper — an ori. Lnal model, designed by Mr, 
McCormick before he took out his first reaper patent in 1834 — from the 
Museum will be entered in the Centennial parade. This reaper, make 
ialmost entirely of wood, was obtained for the Museum f rom the 
International Harvester Company. 

Jrfnr 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - A "Queen's Orchestra,' 1 ' composed of 
student musicians, will play for the coronation of Southern Illinois 
University's 1947 Homecoming Queen here Thursday night. 

This orchestra, directed by student Bill Ledbetter of Murphysboro, 
will include the following members: Gene Moore of West Frankfort; 
Tony Masarra, George Johnson, Ray Barth and Larry Ward of Marion; 
John Mulkin of Herrin; Bill Carr, John Ledbetter and Bob Norman of 
Murphysboro; Joe Sims of Sparta; Boyd Higgerson of Valier; Jimmy Hudson 
and Q. D. Iliskell of Carbondale; and Tel Siener of Collinsville, In 
addition, Harold C. Hines, director of the University Band, will play 
trumpet with the orchestra. 






-, 




SOUTHFRN H i INOIS 
UNI 

j 'cmsmmu, mi«ois t 




I! I 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— -^— ^^"" — ""^ ■■— i University 

information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. .n^^mg^H^HMi^a,^ 






Release Thursday p. m. 10-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Tonight will see the opening of 
Southern Illinois University's dual Homecoming and '"'University 
Recognition 1 ' celebration, to run through Saturday. 

Twice during the three-day celebration, ceremonies will be held 
to commemorate Southern's official change of name and its new 
university status. 

Tonight Dr. John Dale Russell, director of the U. S. Office of 
Education's division of higher education, will keynote the ''University 
Recognition" phase of the program, by speaking on "Higher Education 
for Modern Needs." 

He will be presented by University President Chester F. Lay. 

On the same program, the coronation of Southern's 1947 Homecoming 
Queen w ill take place. Her identity will not be known until the 
moment she ascends the throne. 

The five nominees for Queen honors are: Peggy Coleman of Marion, 
Joan Fairbairn of Harvey, Veda Hallam of Fairfield, Nada Kauzlarich of 
Christopher, and Velma McCormick of Johnston City. 

The Queen's attendants w ill be Delores Sharp of Benton and Doris 
Wade of Vandalia. 

A number of queens from former years will also participate in the 

ceremony. The Queen will be crowned by Football Captain Charles 

Mathieu of Eldorado. Bill Price of Texico, student chairman of 

Homecoming, will be master of ceremonies. 

(more) 




SOUTHFRN n ! (NOB 
U! 

• libkmkv 

f 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 






I 1 ** 



-2- 

On Friday a special assembly and pep session, a free movie, and 
a Little Theatre play in the evening comprise the Homecoming events. 

Saturday will brim; the Homecoming parade, which will feature ■ 'jfl 

ome three dozen floats, including seven staged by downtown civic 
organizations, and approximately a haiT dozen marching bands. 

At the Southern-Northern football game Saturday afternoon, a 
second ''University Recognition" ceremony will be held, when University 
President Lay will publicly thank legislators, state officials, 
^organizations and individuals for their support in the long campaign to 
secure change- of- name legislation for Southern. 

Frank G. Thompson, diretTtor of the State Department of Registration 
and Education and chairman of the State Teachers College Board, will 
officially represent Governor Dwight H. Green, who is unable to be 
present. 

The following members of the General assembly have accepted 
invitations to be present, and to attend the luncheon given in their 
honor Saturday at noon by President Lay: Senators Homer butler of 
Marion, R. G. Crisenberry of Murphysboro, W, J. Cash of Towanda, Ora 
Oldfield of Centralia, and Reps. Paul Powell of Vienna, W. J. McDonald 
of Murphysboro, Harry McClintock of West Frankfort, V. J. Diamond of 
LaSalle, Clyde Choate of Jonesboro, Henry Knauf of Ladd, and R. J. 
Branson of Centralia. 

An informal alumni tea after the ball game, an informal alumni 
party »in the evening, and the Homecoming Ball Saturday night will 
complete the three-day celebration. 

The Queen will reign over all the festivities, making her 
appearance at the movie, the play, in the parade, at the ball game, at 
the tea, and at the dance. 

m 



SOUTHFRN J ' i INOIS 
Uf 

LIBK/ih 

f- ' CARBOMDAU, IUIN0IS 



I 



tummii 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. gnHHHmmnHHinHHi 



10-2 3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - One chapter in a long and colorful 
educational history is being closed at Southern Illinois University 
this week, and another is being opened. ' - ~i- ■' •' 

There have' been many such chapters in the 72 years since Southern 
Illinois Normal University opened its doors for the first time. 

The prologue, of course, told of the tireless efforts of school 
teachers, principals and superintendents, of many parents of young 
boys and girls, and of public-spirited citizens at large, to establish 
a school in Southern Illinois to educate the young people of this area. 

The Civil V T ar--the War between the States--was over. Southern 
Illinois needed schools and school teachers to help educate the 
children of this area as the country set its face toward reconstruction. 

It was a long and expensive journey to colleges and universities 
in the northern part of the state, ana a normal school located in 
Southern Illinois would prove a great boon. 

Even then, oou'hei ' Tllinoisans looked forwarJ to the time when 
the region's yet-unborn college would become a great educational 
institution. So instead of asking the General Assembly to establish a 
teachers college, they sought a "normal university/' in the canny hope 
that one day the word "normal" could be dropped and a "university" be 
born* 

In I869, the legislature authorized the establishment of "Southern 
Illinois Normal University," and the following year made appropriations 
for a building to house the new institution. (more) 









SOUTHFPN m i i N0 |s 

U! 
« Lll 

r 'CAR80NDAIE, ILLINOIS i 




-2- 

By 1874 the three-story structure that was to house the new school 
was completed, and on July 1, the building was dedicated and Dr. Robert 
Allyn was inaugurated as first president* 

The first classes were held in the summer of 1874, with 53 
students enrolled. By the opening of the fall term, 150 students had 
come to study at Southern. 

One chapter in the history of Southern unquestionably tells of 
the dramatic burning of "Old Main" and the construction of the present 
Main Building, completed in 1687. 

as a "normal university," Southern at first offered two years of 
college training above the high school, and conforred diplomas upon 
its "graduates." By the early 1920 f s, its curriculum had grown to 
such an extent that students could complete a four-year c olle e course 
and obtain a degree. 

In 1923, "Southern Illinois Normal University" was accredited by 
the American Association of Teachers Colleges, and three years later 
was placed on the accredited list as a degree-granting college by the 
North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. 

All through the years, under Presidents x^ilyn, John Hull, Harvey 
W. Everest, Daniel B. Parkinson, and i'enry W. Shryock, southern had. 
been growing and assuming greater leadership as a teacher-education 
institution, additional buildings were constructed, and enrollment was 
growing. 

Southern alumni were "making good" as they left the campus, entered 
educational service, graduate schools, ana business. They were able 
to obtain full credit for the work they had done at southern when they 
enrolled for advanced work at the country's best graduate schools. 
Many of them attained considerable distinction in their special fields. 
Thousands of them filled positions of competence and trust in the 

(more) 



■ I III I IIIM I M IMMMMMn— — 








SOUTHFRN v i imois 
U! 

. LIBK/ihi 

T ' UfiBONDAU, ILLINOIS \ 




-> ' i 

public schools of Southern Illinois. I 

Under the administration of President Roscoe Fulliam, 1935-44, 

important advances were made in the educational program. The Stadium 

M 
was constructed partly with alumni contributions, partly with Federal 

funds. The campaign to drop the work "normal" from the school's name 

gathered momentum, though it was defe ted in the 63rd general assembly. 

Legislation was secured clarifying the purpose of Southern, and 

authorized the institution to expand its functions in the fields of 

liberal arts and sciences and in vocational training, and to offer 

degrees in these fields as well as in teacher-education. Graduate 

work was also authorized by the Board, and in the summer of 1944 the 

first graduate courses were inaugurated. During the war years, 

Southern carried on a heavy load of war training and war service on 

the campus, and sent more than 2,500 of its students and former 

students to the armed forces. 

After President Pulliam's death in the spring of 1944, Dr. Chester 

F. Lay Was elected to the presidency of Southern, assuming his duties 

Januar}^ 1, 1945. 

Under his leadership many of the changes and advances planned for 

I many years have been brought into fruition. Additional financial 

[support has been obtained from the General Assembly, construction has 

started on the long-sought physical plant expansion, new colleges have 

been organized, other university-scale administrative operations have 

been set up, and the work "normal" has been dropped from the school's 

j name • 

Actually, Southern has been functioning as a university for 

several years. Establishment in the fall of 1945 of separate colleges 

(Education, Liberal nrts and Sciences, and locations and Professions) 

and of the Graduate School made it a university in form. In 1946, the 

(more) 




OUTHFRN n ! INOIS 
Uf 

. LIBKmKV 

r ' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



-4*" 

North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools gave 
official educational recognition to the new developments at Southern, 
by "promoting" it from the college class to the university class- 
composed of institutions offering several degrees, in its list of 
accredited educational institutions. 

It remained for the 1947 General Assembly to acknowledge 
Southern 1 s development by enacting legislation officially re-naming 
the institution ''Southern Illinois University." 

This week, Southern is commemorating its new university status by 
holding, in conjunction with its annual alumni Homecoming, two 
"University Recognition" ceremonies — the first to highlight the 
educational obligations of a university, the second to pay public 
tribute to legislators, state officials, prganizations and individuals 
who helped all through the years to bring about the change of name* 

After an enviable refutation for three-quarters of a century as a 
teachers college, Southern now starts as a newcomer in the university 
class.. 

It has a good start, and this week its administration, faculty, 
alumni and students are pledging themselves to build its standing as a 
university until it occupies an equally sound position in its new 
field. 

Its assets, as it embarks on its new career, are many: an 

enrollment of 2,850 students, an expanding faculty of 203, a r n .L±h 

million dollar biennial operating budget, hundreds of acres of land 

acquired for an enlarged campus, a building program under way., the 

basic university-scale administrative framework constructed, a small 

but sound Graduate School established, the beginnings of research work 

started, and strong public interest and s upport flourishing.. 

This week, then a new chapter which might be entitled "Southern-- 

A University" is being opened as the attention of all of Southern 

Illinois is focussed on the "University Recognition" ceremonies* 

'J J i u 
WWW 



: 




OUTHFRN J! l INOIS 

Uf 
< LIBK/iKV 

X l CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



M 



10-23-47 
Carbondale, 111., Oct. 23 - Higher educction should be maintained 

for the benefit of society as a whole, and should be an integral part 

of the whole social order, a noted educator declared here tonight in 

"University Recognition 1 ' ceremonies at Southern Illinois University. 

Dr. John Dale Russell, director of the Division of Higher Education, 
U.S. Office of Education, was the guest speaker at the first of two 
"University Recognition" programs being held in connection with 
Southern's annual alumni Homecoming which opened tonight. 

He was introduced by University President Chester F. Lay, who 
briefly recounted the highlights in the institution's 73-year history, 
and cited the stages in the institution's growth toward university 
status. 

Formerly known as "Southern Illinois Normal University'* , the 
school officially became "Southern Illinois University" when the 1947 
General assembly enacted special legislation re-naming the school. 

Dr. Russell, who in 1946 assisted in securing "promotion" of 
Southern from the college class to the university class on the accredited 
list of the North Central association of Colleges and Secondary Schools, 
spoke on the subject ''''Higher Education for Modern Needs." 

He described the various points of view on higher education, but 
expressed a preference for "the attitude that higher education is 
maintained for the benefit of society as a whole — not for any limited 
social group, not for the benefit- of the individual student except as 

(more) 




ur- 



ih 



LIBKm 



K i 



CMBOWDAIE, IUINOIS 



i 



-2- 



he is a member of society and is vailing and. able to contribute to its 
welfare, not for the sake of pure learning except as our cultural 
heritage serves a social purpose in the modern world, not for the 
benefit of people with scholarly inclinations who hold faculty 
appointments, nor for the mere continuation of certain ivy-clad 
institutions—but rather for the general welfare of the whole society 
in which we live. v? 

The Ordinance for the Government of the Northwest Territory, 
passed by Congress in 17#7, he said, carries a clear statement of this 
point of view: Religion, morality, and knowledge, being necessary to 
good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means 
of education shall be forever encouraged. " 

On this principle, he declared, the public school system was 
established in this country and the sup_ ort of higher education from 
tax sources rests upon it. 

"If it be granted that institutions of higher education exist for 
social purposes, it becomes important to examine critically what the 
social order demands in our times, "Dr. Russell asserted. 

He summarized these demands for services as follows: preparation 
of men needed for the professions; the discovery, conservation and 
promulgation of the truth in an unbiased manner; the preparation for 
all round living. 

•'The range of professions and occupations for which higher 
education is expected to prepare practitioners has increased greatly 
during the past few decades, and promises to increase even more rapidly 
in the future, 5 ' he said. 

Elaborating on the demand for the "discovery, conservation and 
promulgation of the truth," he pointed out that "th social order of 
today seems to realize the necessity of this provision more fully than 
ever before. (more) 



3 




SOUTHFRN 1! ' INOIS 



. LIBKmKV 

1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



t 



-3- 

"The so-called 'academic freedom' of institutions and faculty 

members is probably more assured today in this country than in any 

previous period of the world's history. 

"It must be remembered, however, that academic freedom is protected, 
not for the sake of the institutions, nor for faculty members, nor 
even for the truthitself , but only because modern society realizes that 
it must have centers in which the truth can be investigated and taught 
fearlessly and without distortion. 

"When a society decides that it wants only a narrow or distorted 
version of the truth, as has happened without our memories in some 
countries of the world, its institutions of higher education takes on 
a very different character. 

"We are fortunate to live in a t.me and in a country in which the 
right to investigate and teach the truth is well protected by the 
general attitude of the people." 

Dr. Russell stressed the broadening scope of education as increased 
numbers of students enroll and "bring with them wider ranges of talents 
and abilities." 

"Just now colleges and universities are struggling to cope with 
heavy enrollments, brought about in considerable part by the provisions 
for veterans' education," he said. 

"The question is everywhere raised as to whether or not this is 
a temporary bulge or wave, that will recede within a few years after 
the veterans have completed the education to which they are entitled. 

"as a matter of fact, if there hdd been no war and no 'GI Bill 
of Rights' and if enrollment trends manifest between 1934 and 1940 had 
continued without change, we would have had almost as many students in 
college in 1946-47 as were actually enrolled. 

"There is every indication that the present increase is part of a 

fundamental movement, and that as lon_. as our social order retains its 

(more) 



. 



m 

m 




OUTHFRN 1! I INOIS 
. LIBRmKV 

' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 




-4- 



present characteristics, college enrollments will continue to increase 
toward a somewhat indefinite point of saturation. i? 

The range of services rendered in higher education will continue 
to increase, and new areas of study will continue to be opened, he 
believed. 

The readjustments necessary to meet these demands on higher 
education ;f are certain to prove disturbing, 1 ' but Dr. Russell said these 
changes are gradually coming about, even though "the machinery of the 
system creaks a little at the joints." 

"I personally have great faith that the adjustments in higher 
education d emanded by the modern social order are even now well under 
way," he said. "I have no doubt that society will continue to foster 
and support progressive programs in its colleges and universities, and 
that it will continue to look to them for important contributions to 
the general welfare." 

m 



J 

I'M 




OUTHFRN » ! I INOIS 
Ul 

• LiBkttKV 

'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



in 

u 



10-27-47 

Carbondale , 111., Oct. - Coming to Southern Illinois 
University for Religious Emphasis Week November 9-14 is Anna Mow 
(Mrs. Baxter M. Mow), a teacher in the religious education department 
of Bethany Biblical Institute, Chicago. 

Mrs. Mow received her education in Manchester College, Indiana, 
and in Bethany Biblical Seminary, Chicago. She holds the M.R.E., 
B. D., and M. Th. degrees. 

In the fall of 1923 the Mows went to India where they did special 
work with Mohammedans, a good bit of Young People's work, and attended 
each year the Ashram at Sat Tal, conducted by E. Stanley Jones. 

Mrs. Mow has participated in the National Christian Missions in 
the cities of India, in the Japanese relocation centers, and has been 
hostess for various American Christian Ashrams, sponsored by the 
Department of Evangelism of the Federal Council of Churches of Christ 
in America. She is the mother of three children. 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Mrs. Evelyn Rieke, assistant professor 
and dean of girls in University High School at Southern Illinois 
University, has completed her master of education decree at the 
University of Illinois. , 

This degree, a special advanced decree in education, represents a 

year's study beyond the usual master's degree, and requires the same 

preliminary examinations as for the d-ctor's degree. Mrs. Rieke already 
holds the master of arts degree from the University of Illinois. She 
obtained a year's leave of absence in 1944-45 to take the work leading 
to the advanced degree. 




OUTHFRN 1! I INOIS 



UN I 

. LIBKmKV 

' CARBONDAU, IUIN0IS 




^formation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-27-47 



I M 



\'*n 



Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Preliminary reports have been 
submitted to date by 21 county school survey committees in Illinois, 
according to a statement issued here today by Dr. Howard E. Bosley, 
chairman of a Southern Illinois University committee of consultants 
on 'school reorganization. 

"If accepted by the people, the recommendations of these committees 
will result in the merging of 2,217 districts which existed last year 
into a total of only 300 districts in the 21 counties," Dr. Bosley said, 
"Most of these newly reorganized districts will be large enough to 
operate good schools." 

County boards which have recommended a single school district for 
the entire county are those of Scott, Brown, Pulaski, Lawrence, Morgan, 
and Edwards. 

Counties in which the people have already voted to a ccept the 
recommendations of their survey committees are Vermilion, Richland, 
Scott, Brown, and Jasper, and these five counties are now operating 
reorganized schools on a county wide basis. 

School survey committees of 72 additional counties will be 

submitted not later than December of this year, Dr. Bosley said. 

irffrr 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Robert A. Steffes, acting chairman of 
the new journalism department at Southern Illinois University, is the 
author of an article appearing in the current issue of The Business 
Education World . 

The article is entitled "Typewriter Ribbons Need attention J" and 
advises how to select ribbons, how to and when to change them in order 
to obtain clear, clean typewritten work t 

Mi 










OUTHFRN > ! i INOIS 

UI 
. LIBRmKV 

1 CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-27-47 

Carbonciale, 111., Oct. - Twenty- four Southern Illinois high 
school choruses— with SSl members--hc >e signed up to participate in 
the annual Ghoral Clinic at Sputhern Illinois University here next 
Saturday, Nov. 1, according to Floyd V. Wakeland, clinic director. 

The annual clinic is sponsored by the University T s music department 
This year guest conductor for the clinic will be Maynard Klein, choral 
director from Tulane Univeidty, who is also director of the famous 
Interlochen Chorus. 

So large a group has enrolled for the clinic this year that it 
can no longer be accommodated on the stage of Shryock Auditorium, Mr. 
Wakeland said, and instead the clinic will be held in the Men's 
Gymnasium. 

The public concert in the evening at 8 p. m. will also be held 
in the gymnasium. 

Following is a list of the high school choruses, with their 
directors, which will participate in the clinic: Ashley, Paul Daniels, 
Director; Anna- Jonesboro, Keith V 7 hetstone; Benton, Edwin Cockrum; etc... 

S. I. U. Choral Clinic November 1, 1947 

Director 



High School 



Carbondale Community 
Carbondale, University High 
Carrier Mills 
Chester 



V/ayne Reynolds 
Charles Paterson 
Mary Jarvis 
Ophilia Hack 



in 



(more) 




OUTHFRN » ! ! INOIS 

I 
. LIBKmKV 

' CAftBONDAli, ILLINOIS I 



-2- 

Hd-gh School 

Carlyle 

Christopher 

DuCuoin 

Enfield 

Harrisburg 

Herrin 

Johnston City 

McLeansboro 

Mt. Vernon 

Murphysboro 

New nthens 

Salem 

West Frankfort 

Sesser 

Thebes 

Thompsonville 

and the Southern 



Director 

Harold Dodd 
Herschel Kidgway 
Flora Carr 
Miss Carol Land 
John Schork 
Glenn Gablonski 
Merbert Johnson 
Mr . My r 1 N e w c om 
W. H. Beckmeyer 
Edward Harn 
Mrs. Edith E chert 
Charlotte Holt 
Belle Longmons 
Obed Henderson 
Mrs. Edna T ;alker 
Mrs. Betty Frailey 
F. V. Wake land 






2-4 6hoirs 




SOUTHFRN " l INOIS 
Ul 
. LIBRmkV 

• 'CAflBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






ATTENTION- -SPORTS EDITORS 10-27-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Oct. - Fresh from a 20 to victory over 
their arch rivals, the Northern Illinois State Teachers College Huskies, 
the Southern Illinois University Maroons are drilling this week in 
preparation for a road game against Arkansas State this corning Saturday 
at Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

On a sloppy field, and with driving rain falling most of the time, 
j the Maroons hit their offensive potential for the first time this 
season in overpowering the Huskies. Southern was so effective on the 
ground, in spite of the slippery turf, that it was not necessary to 
throw passes, only four being attemped. 

The first touchdown came when Southern tackle John Corn of Benton 
blocked a Huskie punt from the Northern fifteen yard line early in the 
second quarter, and the ball was recovered on the eight by Southern. 

On the next play Bob Colborn, brilliant end from Flora, scored on 
an end-around. Bunker Jones of West Frankfort was unsuccessful on his 
attempted conversion. 

Late in the third quarter the Maroons scored again. Jack Stephens 
of West Frankfort set up the score with a magnificient 53 yard kick 
which rolled out of bounds of the Northern 3 yard line. 

Freoligh, Northern halfback, fumbled a bad pass from center, and 
the ball rolled out of the end zone for an automatic safety, giving the 
Maroons two points and an £ to lead. 



(more) 







SOUTHFRN M I INOIS 
. LIBKmK/ 

*• 'CARBONDAIE, ILLINOIS i 






! 



-2- 

Following the safety, the Maroons scored immediately on a 
sustained march. Bob Johnson of DuQuoin returned Northern's kickoff 
to the Northern 43 yard line. After Charlie Heinz of Gillespie picked 
up three into the line, quarterback Bill Malinsky passed to Galen Davis 
of DuQuoin to the IB yard line on a pass ruled complete because of 
interference. 

Johnson went to the 10, Dick Seelman drove to the four, Don Riggs 
of Fairfield plowed to the one, and Eill Malinsky leaped over for the 
touchdown. Jones' kick was blocked. 

* The final touchdown came only minutes later when Bunker Jones 
intercepted a pass by Northern's Don Fortunato on the Northern 40 
yard line and raced all the way to a touchdown behind good blocking. 
Again the kick was a failure, cind the score stood 20 to 0. 

Outstanding individual performances by Southern men were 
commonplace. The line completely bottled up the Northern ground 
offense, throwing the visitors for a net loss of 44 yards for the entire 
game.. 

Time after time men such as Bob Colborn, Joe Hughes of West 
Frankfort, Bob Etheridge of Fairfield, Captain Charles Mathieu of 
Eldorado, and John Corn of Benton broke through and threw Huskies 
back for 10 and 12 yard losses. 

For the first time this year the backfield men to Head Coach 
Glenn "Abe" Martin operated effectively. 

Four halfbacks, Dick Seelman of Flora, who w s making his first 
appearance in three weeks, Bob Johnson of DuQuoin, Roy Ragsdale of 
Carbondale, who racod 52 yards on one play, and George Sawyer of Wood 
River, ran very well. 

Bill Malinsky at quarterback and Don Riggs at fullback turned in 

creditable work,, 

(more ) 







SOUTHERN > ! I INOIS 

- ' CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS ( 



Statistics: 



First Downs 
Yards, Rushing 
Passes attempted 
Passes completed 
Passes intercepted 2 
Yards passing 22 
Penalties 75 

Fumbles 1 

Fumbles recovered 



Southern 

9 
211 

4 
1 



Northern 

6 

-44 

11 

7 

1 

71 

20 

2 

3 



I'M 



SOUTHFRN >' I INOIS 



II 



» Li. 

'CAR80NDAIE, ILLINOIS 



3 



■I 



Southern Illinois 



i— — — — — i— ^— — ■■ University 

I Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

lorena drummond, ed. HHnmn^nnBnnHnnH 



RELEASE THURS1AY 10-28-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Williard E. Goslin, Superintendent 
of the Minneapolis Public Schools, will be the featured speaker on 
Friday at the meeting of the Southern Division of the I.E. A. at Southern 
Illinois University. 

Mr. Goslin will address the group at eleven o'clock on the 
"Responsibilities of American Education," a subject with which he is 
thoroughly familiar. 

Mr. Goslin received the bachelors degree from Northeast Missouri 
State Teachers College, the master of arts degree from the University 
of Missouri, and has done further graduate study at Teachers College 
at Columbia University. 

He was formerly Superintendent of the Public Schools at Weoster 
Groves, Missouri from 1930 to 1944. ^ince 1944 he has been in 
Minneapolis where he has been very /successful in his efforts in bettering 
the conditions of teachers and in improving relations with school 
boards, civic, and business organizations. 

Ke has been very active in various professional organizations 
especially the American Association of School Administrators, for whom 
he edited the 1945 yearbook. 

A down-to-earth, human individual, Mr. Goslin is regarded as one 
of the outstanding superintendents in the country. 



m 






SOUTHFRN J! l INOIS 



. 



. LI I 

' CAR80NDAIE, ILLINOIS 



I 



-2- 

Mr. L. Goebel Patton, Principal of the West Frankfort High 
School and program chairman of the meeting, announces that the program 
will open at nine Friday morning. It will include greetings by Dr. 
Chester F. Lay, President of 3.I.U. and Albert Nicholas, President of 
the Southern Division of the IiE.A. and addresses by John C. Metcalfe, 
'National Headliners Club plaque winner for outstanding achievement in 
journalism and Mr. Goslin. 

a social hour will be held at ten o'clock: with the past presidents 
of the Southern Division as quests of honor. 

Further entertainment will be furnished, in the afternoon by the 
Vocal Arts Quartette. Within this group is a renowned women's brio, 
the Vocaliers who will b^ featured together with Mr. Bernard Van Hefto - 
and Mr. Sceiner, both of whom are members of the Harmony Masters. 



§§§ 




OUTHFRN U I INOIS 




UN / 

• LIBKmKY 

'CARBONDAtE, IUIN01S 



information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-30-47 

Carboridale, 111., Oct. - General Educational Development 
tests .all be given at Southern Illinois University Nov. 7-S, i)r, 
Marshall 5. Hiskey, dean of men, has announced. 

Any person who has not completed high scnool but who wishes to 
take the tests for admission to college may do so, Dean Hiskey said. 
The tests are especially of value to veterans who were unable to finish 
high school before entering the armed forces. 

Those who pass the tests obtain the equivalent of a high school 
diploma and are eligible to enroll in college. 

The tests will be -iven starting at 3:30 a. m. Friday morning 
and' will run Friday afternoon and Saturday morning. Interested persons 
should report to the Dean of Men's office at the University immediately, 
Dean Hiskey said. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Students at Southern Illinois 
University who have speech difficulties may now receive individual 
attention in the speech department clinic, Dr. F. Iw. Larson, department 
chairman, has announced. 

C. W. Garbutt, speech correctionist , joined the speech department 
faculty this fall, and is now prepared to give clinical attention to 
individual students. 






irfrif 




SOUTHFRN M I INOIS 
Ul 

* LIBKmKV 

f 'GARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. - Latest enrollment figures for the 
Choral Clinic to be held at Southern Illinois University Saturday, 
Nov. 1, have risen to 931, Floyd V. Wakeland, clinic chairman, reports. 

Three additional high school choruses — Carrier Mills, directed by 
Mary Jarvis, Centralia, directed by Madeline Goetz, and Chester, 
directed by Ophelia Hack — have accepted the invitation to participate 
in the clinic, which is sponsored by the University music department. 

a total of 26 high school choruses and the University chorus 
will join in the clinic, for which Maynard Klein of Tulane University 
and the famous Interlochen Chorus will serve as guest director and 
critic. 

During the day the youn^, singers will rehearse under Mr. Klein's 
direction. In the evening a public concert will be given in the men's 
gymnasium at 7-30 p. m. 

Soloists for the concert will be Cecil Bolton of the University 
music department faculty and Carol Werner of Belleville, contralto, 
a Southern music student, accompanists will be Patricia Whiteside of 
West Frankfort and Kent Uerner of Belleville, both Southern music 
students. 

The annual Choral Clinic is one of the major events on the music 
department calendar each year, according to Dr. Maurits Kesnar, 
department chairman. 

■ififif 







SOUTHFRN M I INOIS 

U! 
. LIBKmKV 

f ' CARBONDALE, IU. INOIS i 




information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



For Friday Release: 10-30-/+ 7 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 31- 'J- 1 he Southern Illinois University 
Maroons leave by bus tomorrow morning at 8:00 a. m. for Jonesboro, ^rk. , 
where they will face the ..Arkansas State Teachers College Indians in a 
game Saturday at 8:15 p. m. 

The Arkansas State Indians are potential by a fine team, very 
powerful, but one that has not yet lived up to advance predictions. 
The Indian's season record is only fair, but with a line averaging 
220 pounds, they will provide worthy opponents for Coach Glenn "Abe" 
Martin's Maroons. 

In preparation for the game , the Martin men have been drilling 
only lightly this week, spending most of their time in signal drills 
and regaining the strength they lost in their hard fought 20 to 
victory over Northern Illinois State Teachers College here last Saturday. 

Robert "Bunker" Jones of West Frankfort, 225 pound end, who has 
been used primarily for defensive play in backing the Maroon line 
thus far this season, has been drilling at the right halfback slot. 

Jones is very fast for his weight. Just how fast is well know 
to Maroon followers who have watched him score two long touchdowns 
this season, one on a 63-yard end-arounu play, and' the other on a 
40-yard pass interception. 

With his speed, power, and pass receiving abilities, Jones may 
provide quite a surprise for the unwary Arkansas team. 



(more) 




OUTHFRN J' ! INOIS 
. LIBHmK i 

r l CAR80N0Al£, ILLINOIS i 




UNH 



I 



■* 



1-2- 

Dick Seelman of Flora, who last week looked ^ood in his first 
appearance in a month, is in top physical condition again, and should 
run like he did last year when he was one of the best freshman runners i* 
in the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic Conference* 

Although the Martin men go into the game in top physical 
| condition, their mental condition is not too favorable. The players 
Iwould much rather think about the coming conference _ame with Illinois 
(Normal University at Normal next week, and the g ,me the following woek 
against Eastern Illinois State College. 

Jl'LM. 

mrtt 
For Friday or Saturday Release: 10-30-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. . - The Southern Illinois University 
harriers will play host to the cross-country men of Vest era Illinois 
State College here at lie Andrew Stadiui on Monday, November 3, at 
3:00 p. m.. , 

In a previous dual meet at Macomb the Maroons ran the Western 
harriers into the dust by winning 17 to 41, which is only two points 
away from the perfect cross-country score, 15 to 43. 

Maroon freshman Joe McLafferty of Carbondale will attempt to win 
his fourth consecutive cross-country run and thereby maintain his 
undefeated record* 

m 




OUTHFRN M I INOIS 



UN 
. LIBKmKV 

f 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS I 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




;ch 



FILLERS 

Did you know that Illinois Had 8,361 one room schools last year, 
nd that no other state had so many? That only 33 one-room schools 
re left in Delaware, and 40 in Utah? That twelve states have fe ; 
,han 300 one-room schools in each? That Illinois has more one room 
schools than 20 other states combined? It is time to reorganize Illinois 
Schools. — School Reorganization Committee, Southern Illinois University,, 

FILLERS 
Did you know that Illinois is a state 'of very small school districts 
land that small districts cannot do as much for children as larger 
'districts can? Experts contend that for best efficiency and economy no 
ielementary school should enroll less than 175 to 200 children. Seventy- 
nine per cent of Illinois urban and village schools are smaller than 
200 pupils. — School Reorganization Committee, Southern Illinois ,.,. c , 
University. 

FILLERS 
In contrast to Illinois, which has 8,361 one-teacher schools, 

Florida and Alabama have no districts of fewer than 10 teachers, Utah 
! 
; has only one district which employs fewer than 10 teachers, Virginia 

i has only one district which employs fewer than 20 teachers. In 
Louisiana, North Carolina, Maryland and Delaware the smallest districts 

'employ 20,40,50 and 200 teachers respectively. --School Reorganization 
Committee. Southern Illinois University. 



(mc *e) 



.. 




OUTHFRN H I iNOIS 

UI 
. LIBKmKV 

X v CAfi80NDAl£, ILLINOIS I 




•2- 

Did you know that experts recommend a minimun of 300 pupils for 
effective high school operation? Ten per cent of Illinois high schools 
nroll fewer than 30 pupils; 19 per cent enroll fewer than $0 pupils; 
3 per cent enroll fewer than 100 pupils. Only 17 per cent of Illinois 
ligh schools enroll 300 or; more pupils. School Reorganization 
Committee. Southern Illinois University. 

FILLERS 
Did you know that in 1943-44 Illinois had 11,993 school districts? 
This is more than all the school districts in 27 states combined. 
L'wenty-f our states which have made gre '.est progress in school district 
reorganization average 299 school districts per state. In about one- 
fourth of the states, most counties have only a single school district. 
3chool Reorganization Committee. Southern Illinois University. 

FILLERS 

Illinois County School Survey Committees are suggesting larger 
school districts for elementary and high schools. Reports which are 
in from 26 counties suggest a reduction from 2,811 districts at present 
to a total of 324 districts under proposed reorganization. -- School 
^organization Committee. Southern Illinois University. 

FILLERS 
Some of our neighbor states have far fewer school districts than 
Illinois. Indiana has only 979 school, districts c^nd Kentucky has only 
'57 - Illinois had 11,998 districts last year, which is more districts 
;han exist in any st^te in the nation, — School Reorganization Committee-. 
Southern Illinois University. 

FILLERS 
Some of our neighbor states are far ahead of Illinois in the work 
jf reorganizing their schools. Indiana has only 636 one-room schools 






(.more) 



ff 




{frkiis} 



** 



OUTHFRN 1! I INOIS 
Uf 

. LIBRaKY 

' CARBONDAti, ILLINOIS \ 




3- 
.eft in the entire state, and Ohio has only 640. Illinois has more 

lian 12 times this number of one-room schools, or a total of 8,3^1. 

Jchool Reorganization Committee. Southern Illinois University. 

FILLdLS 

State laws now exist in California, Washington, Nevada, and 

ndiana which guarantee a salary of ^2400 per year to every teacher 

jho has four years of college training and who teaches a nine-months 

-,errn. Minimun salaries of ^2000 or more are prescribed by law in 

)elaware, i-iarylo.nd, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, and Texas. The 

'.egal minimun salary for teachers in Illinois is ;^1200 per year. 

school Reorganization Committee. Southern Illinois University. 

trittf 



M 



^ 



SOUTHFRN > ! ' INOIS 

U ! 

X ' CAR80NDALE, ILLINOIS i 




Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



10-31-47 

Carbondale, 111., Oct. 31 - "nil this talk of fighting Russia 
now is dangerous--the trick is not to die but to live,' 1 ' John Metcalfe, 
lecturer-correspondent , told some 1,500 Southern Illinois school 
teachers and administrators here today. 

Metcalfe, who has covered most of the international conferences 
of recent years, and who recently returned from Germany, gave two of 
the three addresses before the annual meeting of the Southern Illinois 
Division of the Illinois Education Association, convened here at 
Southern Illinois University. 

"No one in his right mind would suggest that we ought to fight 
as long as there remains one possibility of getting along with Russia," 
he said. 

"Even though there is no way in si^ht leadin^ to cooperation for 
peace, we can't give up, for war is too disastrous. It would not be 
easy to win. I think we could win, bur, the cost would be tremendous. 5 *' 

Metcalfe admitted the situation at present is more critical than 
ever before, and predicted that the forthcoming London conference to 
consider a peace treaty with Germany offers little promise of success, 

"If we could settle the German question with Russia it would be 
easy to settle other international problems with Russia," he declared, 
"for Germany is still the heart of economic Europe. If Germany goes 
Communist, the Communists would seize Europe. 



(more) 



V 



SOUTHFRN H I INOIS 

*• 'CARBONDAtt, ILLINOIS I 



-2- 

"Russia knows it only too well, and is anxious to gain control of 
Germany, just as she is anxious to gain control of Italy and France. 

If the London conference fails, there is precedent for taking 
the question of the German peace to the General Assembly of the United 
Nations, he said. 

"Russia has no desire to have such issues as this and the Korean 
situation brought before the whole world," he asserted. "And I do not 
believe that Russia will withdraw from the United Nations, for this 
would result in an armament rush the like of which the world has never 
seen before." 

Metcalfe strongly advocated Congressional support ior the Marshall 
Plan, and declared there is a tremendous reservoir of good will for the 
United States among the people of Europe, which can be brought into 
active support for democracy if the people can be fed and their 
governments stabilized. 

At the morning session of the teachers meeting, Metcalfe spoke on 
"Inside Washington, 1 '' analyzing the difierences between the foreign 
policy of the United States under each of the last four Secretaries of 
State — Cordell Hull, Edward Stettinius, Jr., James F. Byrnes, and Gen» 
George C „ Marshall. 

The IEa delegates were welcomed to the University campus by 
University President Chester F. Lay, who questioned whether educators., 
"like Nero, are not fiddling" in the face of imminent disaster. 

"I wonder if anybody else other than teachers are able to prepare 
such large numbers of people if such disaster comes, 1 ' he said. ''Vie 
can't just act as if peace stared us in the face." 

albert Nicholas of nnna-Jonesboro, president of the Southern 
Division, presided at the dciy-long session, and urged the teachei s to 
join with the National Education Association in order to enable that 

(morej 



i 



' 




SOUTHFRN '• ! INOIS 

. LIBK/ih I 

f 'CMRBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



13- 

prganization to present a united front in Washington on behalf of 
federd aid for the public schools. 

The other keynote speaker for the educational session was T 7illard 
E. Goslin, superintendent of the rjublic schools at Minneapolis, Minn,, 
who spoke on "Responsibilities of American Education. 1 ' 

Mr, Goslin challenged the teachers to re-cast the American 
educational system to fit the individual pupil rather than trying t o 
make the individual pupil fit the system* 

He deplored the periodic attacks on the child's self-confidence 
by means of the report card, and urged that '''every American child is 
good for something , ,r and should not necessarily be cast in the same 
mould as his school mates. 

Education offers the best opportunity to guide America into making 
the right choice in the crossroads which face her--the greatest 
crossroads of all history, he said. 

"We may if we choose put our weight on the side of right living 
— a choice which can change the quality of living of all mankind," he 
declared. 

Education's major responsibilities, he stressed, are (1) for the 
general welfare of the American people-- "life just ought to be better 
in every American community because there is a school there"; (2) to 
contribute to the growth and development of every individual so e ach 
can carry his own part of the load; and (3) to conserve our natural 
resources which are the heritage of future generations as well as our 
own. 

He insisted that education must make its contribution to the world 
of peace, and must contribute to the expansion and improvement of the 
democratic ideal... 

For the individual student,, he said, the school should provide for 
his physical welfare, should guard his emotional health and mental 
stability, should help him to develop into a dynamic individual with 
sound ideals and convictions.. 



. 



. ;. : i.t 




SOUTHFRN 1! ! INOIS 
• LIBKmKV 

X 'CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



11-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Illinois is literally the '"'heart 1 ' of 
the country, a calculation of the national c enter of population made 
by an economics class at Southern Illinois University shows. 

The 1946 population center of the country, bc.sed on Bureau of 
Census figures, lies in the southern part of Jasper county, Illinois, 
about half way between Olney in Richland County ana Newton in Jasper 
County--a little east of the small towns of Liberty and Boos. 

The calculation was made by a class ineconomic statistics, taught 
by Dr. Lewis a. Maverick, professor and department chairman. 

Students making the study included William H. Bauer of Benton, 
Donald Bodson of Greenview, Howard F. Ludwig of "Jest Frankfort, and 
Lloyd W. Sielbeck of Cobden. 

The center of population in the last six years has jumped not 
only across county lines but also across a state line, for in 1940 
this center w^s located between Vincennes and Terre Haute, Ind., Br. 
Maverick points out. 

The I94O center was calculated by the Bureau of the Census, but 
no such calculations are contained in the Bureau's inter-census 
estimates of population shifts. The students had to estimate the 
centers of population of the various states, then calculate the 
national c enter, Dr. Maverick e xplained. 

'■They do not claim to be closer to the precise center than about 
15 miles, one way or the other, i! he said. 

(more.) 



■w 




SOUTHFRN I" I INOIS 

. UBRhM 

j 'CttSMIDAU, ILLINOIS i 



fa- 
Longitude of the new center is approximately 88° 1 ? west of 
Greenwich, the latitude 38° 53 ' north of the equator, the survey shows. 
In 1940 the longitude was 8*7° 23' west, the latitude 3$° 58 minutes 
north. 

In 1790, the population center of the country was at Baltimore, 
but it has marched westward with each succeedin census. In latitude, 
it has clung very close to the 39th parallel, although the 1946 center 
is the farthest south it has ever oeen. 

The shift in the population center, Dr= Maverick pointed out, is 
due to the combined forces of migration ana the birth-rate. Estimates 
on which it is calculated represents population of all ages. 

The population changes, by states, which have caused the extensive 
movement of the national center of population since the 1940 census, 
were tabulated by the University class. 

Increases of more than 200,000 were shown for 13 states, as follows: 
California, 2,4£>5 thousand; Michigan, 796 thousand; Ohio 544 thousand; 
Washington, 435 thousand; Texas, 419 thousand; Oregon, 36I thousand; 
Florida, 353 thousand; Indiana," 318 thous.nd, Maryland, 296 thousand; 
Massachusetts, 254 thousand; Connecticut, 251 thousand; Virginia, 236 
thousand; New York, 231 thousand. 

Illinois, although the new center of population is located within 
its borders, ranked 21st among the states in population gain, with a 
increase of 59,000 over the 1946 figure. 

Decreases of 50,000 or more in population were shown for the 
following states: Kentucky, 143 thousand; Oklahoma, 121 thousand; North 
Dakota, 105 thousand; Mississippi, 103 thousand; West Virginia, 96 
thousand; South Dakota, 95 thousand; Montana, 82 thousand; Arkansas, 
71 thousand; and Idaho, 55 thousand. 



frffi 



1 



.-.— - 



*--■■».. 




SOUTHFRN 1! I INOIS 

*• v CARBONDAt£, ILLINOIS 3 



Southern Illinois 



.;^-«-— ■—--■■■---—----—■— -—■— University 

: Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^MB^^MB^^^^^B^^M^^^^M 






11-3-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Nov. - Kev. T ,7. Clark Ellzey, teacher of 
"Education for Marriage 11 in the Division of Home and Family at Stephens 
College, will serve as a consultant for the Religious Emphasis V, T eek 
activities at Southern Illinois University, Nov. )-±k» 

Rev. Ellzey is a graduate of Duke University and has attended 
Occidental College, University of Missouri, Southern Methodist 
University, Southest Missouri State Teachers College, and the University 
of North Carolina. A sociology major, he has also studied lav/, 
medicine, and psychiatry. 

As an educator, he has assisted in offering the first course in 
education for marriage at Duke University, served as director of the 
Western Branch of Marriage and family Council at Colorado Springs, 
and been an ordained minister in the Methodist Church for 15 years. 
He is a member of the National Conference on Family Relations, the 
Chapel Hill Conference for the Conservation of Marriage and Family, 
and the American Social Hygiene Association. 

He was field director for the American Red Cross, in service for 
two years during the war, and is now teaching at Stephens College.. 



Rev. Lllzey is married and has three children. 




SOUTHERN I! ' INOIS 

. LIBk/ifti 

*• ' CARBONDAtf, ILLINOIS i 




information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



11-3-47 



Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. -The harriers of Southern Illinois 
University defeated the Western Illinois State College cross-country 
team here this afternoon 15 to 44. 

It was the second time this season that Coach Leland P. "Doc 7 
Lingle ' s runners have defeated the Western Leathernecks, end it Wc s 
also the second straight first place v. on by freshman Joe McLafferty 
of Carbondale against Western. 

McLafferty' s first place extended to five his streak of first 
places . 

Order of finish: 

First, McLafferty (S); second, Bill Keene of Carrier Mills (S); 
third, Buddy Miller of Carbondale fS); fourth, Leonard Burden of 
Herrin (S); fifth, Bob Lunneman of Pinckneyville (S); sixth, Dirksen 
(W) ; seventh, Bill Dorris of Benton (S); eighth, Finnegan (W) ; ninth, 
Hemphill (W) ; tenth, Ewing (W) ; eleventh, Swain (W) ; and twelfth, 
Harmon (W) • 



M4ffl## 





OUTHFRN |! ' INOIS 

Ul 
. LIBKmKV 

f ' CARBOWDAtE, ILLINOIS * 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^—^^b^^^^,^^^-^— 



11-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - After deieating Arkansas State College 
of Jonesboro, Arkansas 12 to 7 last Saturday night on a rain drenched 
field, the Southern Illinois University Maroons turned their eyes 
homeward toward the final two games of the Illinois Intercollegiate 
athletic Conference title race. 

The Maroons, of Coach Glenn ,? A.be 7 ' Martin are thus far undefeated 
in conference play with victories over Northern and Western. Only 
Illinois Normal University and Eastern Illinois State College remain 
on the conference schedule, and these two teams are scheduled the next 
two weeks. 

Saturday the Maroons face the hedl Lrds of Illinois Normal University 
at Normal, and then the following week play host to Eastern at 
IcAndrew Stadium at Carbondale, where the I.I.A.C. championship will 
probably be decided. 

At Jonesboro, the Maroons were second best in the mud during the 
first half, allowing a smooth Arkansas State T-formation offense to gain 
a 7-Point lead as the result of a 73 yard sustained drive. 

The Arkansas Indians scored in the early minutes on the second 
period -when ajieight yard pass, their first of the ^ame, from Luketich 
to Bolton, crossed up the Southern defense and was _ood for the 
touchdown. Hayden's kick for the extra point was good. 

The big thrill of the second quarter was ruined when a clipping 

penalty nullified a dazzling 75-yard touchdown punt return by oob 

Johnson of DuQuoin for Southern. 

(more ) 




OUTHFRN |! ' INOIS 

U! 
. LIBRmKV 

* 'CAftBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 1 



=. 



-2- 

After an exchange o'f punts in the third quarter's opening minutes, 
Southern struck from deep in their own teiritory v/hen a pass from Bill 
Malinsky of Flora was complete to Bob Colborn, also of Flora, for 56 
yards and a first down on the Arkansas State eight-yard line* 

Bob Johnson took a lateral f rom Malinsky and skirted right end 
behind good blocking for the touchdown. The kick for extra point 
by Robert i? Bunker ?? Jones of '"est Frankfort was blocked, leaving 
Southern on the short end of a 7 to 6 score. 

On the last play of the third period Bill Cosgrove, Maroon center 
from Benton, recovered an Arkansas State fumble on the Arkansas 32. 

On the Maroons next play Dick Seelman of Flora ran to the 18 on a 
lateral from Malinsku. An offside penalty against Arkansas State and 
an end around with Joe Hughes of "/est Frankfort carrying gave Southern 
a first down on the six. 

Seelman went to the four, then was stopped for no ^ain, and a pass 
by Malinsky fell incomplete. On fourth down Malinsky passed to Hughes 
who took the ball on the one-yard line and stepped for the score. 
|, ain the try lor point by Jones was blocked. 

JL1LJL 

WWW 



: 



fc= 



UTHFRN M ' INOIS 
U! 
. LIBRah . 

k CARBO«DAL£, ILLINOIS i 



Southern Illinois 



— ■— ^— ■ ^ ——*■ ^ University 



information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. UM^MMMnmaimBmm^^^MB 



11-4-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - School children from many communities 
of Southern Illinois are planning to attend the Clare Tree Major 
children's play, "Heidi," to be presented by the American association 
of University Women here at Soubhern Illinois University Nov. 12. 

Invitations to children in all the schools of this area have been 
sent out j according to Mrs. Miniie Mae Pitkin, president of the 
Carbondale Branch of A.A.U.W. 

The Harrisburg schools, for example, have ordered 150 tickets, 
she said. The Carbondale school system will e xcuse all children who 
plan to attend the play, while pupils in the training schools at the 
University will attend in a body. 

A non-profit organization, the Clare Tree Major company is composed 
of adults but presents exclusively plans for children. It operates 
seven mobilized units which play to an estimated 2,000,000 children 
bach year in this countr, and Canada. 

Started more than a quarter century ago by Mrs. Major, it has 
Duilt a strong reputation for authentic, capably played and effectively 
staged productions. 

The American association of University Women is one of the company' c 

mthusiastic supporters-, and many branches all over the country present 

che Clare Tree Major plays as their chi ef fund-raising activity as well 

as a contribution to the cultural development of the children of their 
various communities. 

This year is the first time the Carbondale Branch of A.A«U.W« has 
sponsored one of the plays. "Heidi" will be given in Shryock Auditorium 
on the University campus Nov. 12 at 2:30 p. m. 



h 




— 



OUTHFRN * ! I INOIS 
. LIBRmKY 

1 CAfiBONDALt, ILLINOIS i 



: 



.1 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 






11-4-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Dr. George Sadler, who has been 
traveling in Europe for several months, will return to the United States 
this week, just in time to accept the invitation to participate in 
Religious Emphasis Week at Southern Illinois University Nov. 9-15, 
jr. Douglas MacNoughton, director of the Student Christian Foundation, 
reports. 

Dr. Sadler is in charge of field work for the Southern Baptist 
Ihurch in Europe and the Near East. 

He will arrive in Carbondale Saturday to participate in the 
Southern Baptist Convention here, and on Sunday evenin^, will open 
cteligious Emphasis Ueek. 

He will be presented in an audress on "Christianity and the answer 
to World Problems," Sunday evening at 7:30 in the Little Theatre on the 
university campus. His address will be open to all students, faculty 
and the general public, Dr. MacNoughton said. 

Other speakers and discussion leaders during the week-long religious 
observance will include the Rev. Bayard S. Clark, rector of Christ 
Church, Cape Girardeau, Mo.; Mrs. Anna Mow, teacher in the Religious 
Education Department of Bethany Biblical Institute, Chica_o; Rev. r 7. 
Plark Ellzey, marital education teacher at Stephens College; and others. 

The public is invited to share in the activities of Religious 
Emphasis Week, Dr. MacNoughton stressed. 

ffM 



OUTHFRN !« I INOIS 
• LIBK/iKV 

1 CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



I 



nformation Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



11-4-47 
Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Kenneth Ervin, instructor in art 

I at Southern Illinois University, is currently exhibiting live paintings 

! it the Uiverside Museum in New York City, Ben P. Watkins, acting 

pairman of the art department, has announced. 

The exhibit will be on display throughout the month of November. 

### 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Ben P. Watkins, acting chairman of the 
t department at Southern Illinois University, has been invited to 
jecome a member of the American Artists Professional League. 

m 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - a float prepared by the Southern 
Illinois University Museum for the Southern Illinois Historical 
Society, featuring an 1$31 McCormick reaper, a pre-patent version of 
the model made famous by John McCormick ana the International Harvester 
Company, won first prize at the recent Saline County Centennial parade. 

The reaper was obtained from the McCormick Company for the 
Southern Museum some years ago. 

m 







UTHFRN y \ INOIS 

Uf 

. LIBKmKV 

1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS t 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^■■H^^^HM^^^^^H^^^^^ 



11-5-47 

Carbondale, 111,, Nov. - Illinois may soon raise its low rank 
among the states as to the large number of extremely small school 
districts it has, if recommendations of county survey committees are 
accepted by the people, according to the School Reorganization Committee 
of Southern Illinois University. 

Nine of 27 county school survey boards which have already reported 
recommended a single school district for the entire county, the 
committee pointed out. One has recommended 2 districts for the county, 
three recommended 3 districts, three recommended 4 districts, two have 
recommended 7 districts, one 8 districts ana two 9 districts, only 
six counties reporting thus iar have suggested more than 10 districts 
per county. 

"Experts contend that each school district should be of sufficient 
size to enroll six thousand or more students in its grade and high 
schools, if a rich variety of courses and services is to be offered for 
children and youth," Dr. Howard E. Bosley, committee chairman, explained, 

"nn enrollment of this size in a single district would be 
; distributed among a considerable number of school buildings located in 
convenient centers, to which children would be transported by school 
buses." 

"A single board of education, with an adequate administrative and 
supervisary staff could operate such a regional or county district much 
as city school systems operate under a single board of education. 1 ' 




UTHFRN 1! I INOIS 
Uf 

• LIBKhKV 

' CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 1 



I 



Southern Illinois 
University 



nformation Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■miHHBB^HH 



11-5-47 
Carbondale, 111., Nov. - * series of four rauio discussions of 
he state high school debate subject, "How Can Labor Peace Best Be 
achieved?" will be broadcast by Southern Illinois University, starting 
lov. 7, Willis E. Malone, supervisor of the radio program, "Education 
Jime," has announced. 

The program "education Time i? will be broadcast each Friday 
afternoon throughout the year, from 2:30 to 3 p. m. over both Station 
;JPF (1340) Herrin, and Station WEBQ (1240), Hariisburg, This program 
is prepared especially for classroom listening in Southern Illinois 
public schools. 

For the first four programs, students from University speech 
classes, under the direction of Dr. P. Merville Larson, speech department 
chairman, will present discussions of the debate question. 

On Nov. 7, students Lewis Hammack of Sparta, Barbara Harrison of 
Sparta, Walter Mueller of Steelville and Catherine Sullivan of Harrisburg 
will discuss "What are the nature and causes of the problem of present 
industrial unrest and warfare?" 

On Nov, 14, Bobby Ingram of Carbondale, Rosemary Martin of Jonesboro 
dwin O'Neil of West Frankfort, ana Charles Walker of Carbondale will 
discuss /; What are some possible solutions to the problem?" 

On Nov. 21, Phyllis Johnson of Du^uuin, Jean Larson Hortori of 
Jarbonuale , Lmil Oserholtz of Centralia, Verenna Cunningham of New York 
City, and Charles Weber of Cairo will discuss "What are the advantages 
'and disadvantages of the existing labor legislation? 1 ' 

On Dec. 5, Wanda Bennett of Christopher, Jimmie Patterson of lit. 
Vernon, Raymond Peters of Balcom and George Wesdel of Royal ton will 
discuss "What are the advantages and disadvantages of compulsory 
arbitration of labor disputes?" 

There will be no broadcast Nov, 28 since the University will be 
observing its Thanksgiving recess. 

4ULM 

rrltrr 




UTHEPN " | INOIS 
Uf 
. LIBKmk i 

1 CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



11-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Southern Illinois University has been 
invited by Governor Dwight H. Green to send its University Orchestra 
to Springfield Nov. 21, to play for the Fifth Annual National Aviation 
Clinic, University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

The orchestra, directed by Dr. Mauri ts Kesnar, professor and 
chairman of the University music department, will play at the luncheon 
session at the Leland Hotel. 

The clinic sessions are to be held in the State Armory. 

I . ... 

Carbonda±e, 111., Nov. - Monseigneur Zuroweste, editor of The 
Messenger and superintendent of the Catholic High School in East St. 
Louis, is the latest addition to the roster of religious educators who 
will serve as leaders for Religious Education Week at Southern Illinois 
University Nov. 9-14, Dr. Douglas Mac Naught on, director of the Student 
Christian Foundation, announces. 

Monseigneur zuroweste w ill serve as one of the consultants in 
an open forum Tuesday evening, Nov. 11, at 8 p. m. in the Little 
Theatre. He is director of Catholic Charities in the Belleville 
Diocese and an expert in juvenile delinquency, Dr. MacNau_hton said. 



i 



SOUTHFRN I'UNOIS 
, Lll 

r 'GARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



ATTENTION: SPORTS EDITORS 11-5-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - The championship of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate nthletic Conference is within the grasp of the Southern 
Illinois University Maroons, and whether or not they capture the 
title will be decided in the next two weeks. 

Saturday, Nov. 8, the charges of Head Coach Glenn ?, Abe" Martin 
visit Normal where they will be the guests of the Illinois Normal 
University Redbirds, and the following Saturday the Martinmen return 
to McAndrew Stadium in Carbondale where they will close their conference 
play against Eastern Illinois State College, an outfit which has not 
yet been defeated in title play. 

Eastern plays Northern this week in a game which will go a .Long way 
toward deciding the conference championship. If Northern, with a 
loss and a tie on their record, can beat Eastern, and the Southern 
Maroons can top Normal, the Maroons will have a first place tie clinched 
this week. 

If Normal should upset Southern, or if Eastern defeats Northern, 
the all- important _ame remaining on the conference schedule will be 
the Southern-Eastern encounter next week, Nov. 15, at McAndrew Stadium, 

After defeating a _ood Arkansas State team last week, Coach Martin 
and the Maroons have taken a well-deserved pat on the back, but 
nevertheless they have continued hard practice drills. 

Southern goes into the Normal battle with two straight vans over 

the Normal Redbirds, 13 to 7 in 194b, and 33 to 19 in 1945. The last 

time Normal won was in 1942 by 7 to 0. In between -were two ties. 

(more) 










UTHERN !! I INOIS 
Uf 

. LIBRmKV 

' CARBONDAti, ILLINOIS i 






Southern is now a vastly improved team. Early in the season the 
ily dependable feature of the eleven was the sterling line play from 
tckle to tackle. That play is still great, but other parts of the 
lain have developed rapidly. 

Quite early it became evident that Coach Martin had a truly great 
id in Bob Colborn of Flora. But the rapid development of Joe Hughes 
i West Frankfort has been a surprising factor. Hughes improves every 
one; a ;ainst Arkansas State he was outstanding on a number of occasions. 

after the ends had reached par with the center of the line, the 
xt position to improve was that of fallback. Don hig_s, who has 
lown great promise for- almost two years, finally found himself and 
Layed a brilliant game against Western. 

That left only the halfbacks to round into shape. The return of 
Lck Seelman of Flora, who had been injurea for a month, a_ainst 
Drthern, ana the breakaway runnin^ of Bob Johnson of Du„uoin, plus 
le steady ball lugging of koy kagsdale of Carbondale and George 
awyer of Wood Liver, g ave the Maroons good halfback strength. 

At quarterback, Bill Malinsky of Flora has been a consistant and 
ten brilliant operater all season, but he had no dependable 
splacement until George Baysinger of Carbondale reported for practice 
month after the beginning of the season. Baysinger has played very 
all in the last two ^ames; against Arkansas State his running was 
xcellent . 

The Maroons are well rounded, a conference championship is 
sily within their grasp if they maintain the pace they have set in 
inning their last three consecutive games. 

m 



n 




UTHERN !« | INOIS 
Uf 
. LIBKmK r 

' CARBONDAtE, IUINOIS I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 





11-6-47 


Carbondale, 111., Nov. 


- Religious Emphasis Week will be 


observed at Southern Illinois 


University November 9-15. The public is 



invited to atttfld the enlightened program planned for the week. 

Dr. George Sadler, Director of Southern Baptist work in Europe 
and the Near East, will open Religious Emphasis Week with an address on 
"Christianity the answer to World Crisis" on Sunday evening at 7:30 
in the Little Theatre on the University campus. 

oeminars will be held daily, Monday through Thursday, at three and 
four o'clock. Rev. Clark W. Ellsey, member of the faculty in the 
Division of Marriage ana the Family of Stephens College, will conduct 
a seminar on "Marriage, Before and after the Ceremony" at three in 
room 203 A of the Main building at Southern Illinois University. 

Mrs. nrina. B. Mow, former missionary to India and now a member of 
the faculty in Religious Education at Bethany Biblical Institute in 
Chicago, will hold a seminar "'On Being Fit to Live With" at 3 o T clock 
in room 101 in the Main Building. ' 

Four o'clock seminars will be led by Reverend Bayard Clark, 
minister of the Episcopal church in Cape Girardeau, Missouri, and Mrs, 
Marion T. Nagler, also of the faculty in the Division of Marriage and 
the Family at Stephens Colle_e. Mr. Clark will lead the group in the 
discussion of "Christian Citizenship" in room 107 in the Main Building. 
Mrs. Nagler 's discussion will be in room 101 in Old Main on "Bein_, Fit 
to Live with." 

(more) 




SOUTHERN J! I INOIS 
. LIBKmK^ 

• ' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



12- 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. Albert R. Zuroweste-, Superintendent of Catholic 
High School, ba^t St. Louis, will conduct a seminar in room 301 Old 
Main on Tuesday only. He will also participate in the Little Theatre 
Open Forum uiscussion based on questions to be submitted by students 
and faculty on Tuesday evening at 8 p. m. 

fAt 8 p. m. on Thursday, Mr. Ellzey, Mr. Clark, Mrs. Now, Mrs. 
a;:ler, and Russell Fuller, President of National Disciples Student 
Organization, who attended the Oslo Youth Conference, will direct a 
; panel discussion on "Christianity ana one Answers." 

m 



H 







SOUTHERN I! I INOIS 

UP ■ : 



■ 



, LIBKmKt 

' CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



I 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



ATTENTION: SPORTS EDITORS 11-6-47 

For Friday release: 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Tomoi row afternoon the Southern 
Illinois University Maroons will meet the Redbirds of Illinois State 
Normal University at Normal in a crutial battle of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Conference. 

The league-leading Maroons, undefeated thus far in conference 
play with vie ories over Northern and Western, meet the Normal Redbirds 
in a struggle which will be very important in determining the conference 
champion. 

Normal is an up-and-coming team which lost to v^ashington University 
of St. Louis by a 14 to 13 margin last week after a hard-fought, evenly 
contested game, . Earlier the Recibirds tied, 7 to 7, with Northern, whom 
the Maroons later defeated in the mud 20 to 0, 

With Normal on the upswing, in spite of a defeat earlier in the 
season by Eastern 13 to 7, they should provide plenty of trouble for 
the hifh- riding Maroons of Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin. 

Only two minor injuries will handicap the Martinmen tomorrow-, and 
neither of these are serious enough to keep the men on the bench. 

Robert "Bunker'* Jones of West Frankfort is still slowed by a 
charley-horse, and Bill Cosgrove of Benton is suffering from weakened 
shoulder. J. Pieron of Murphysboro will probably start in place of 
Cosgrove, 

The Maroons running attack, which found itself on the muddy 

gridirons of the last two Saturdays, should be ready to operate at top 

(more) 







SOUTHERN !' | INOIS 



i LIBKmKV 

'CARBONOAtt, ILLINOIS 



i 



-2- 



speed for the first time this season at, Normal if the ground is dry. 

Halfbacks Bob Johnson of Du.^uoin ana Dick Seelman of Flora are 
really in the grove now, after a slack early season. 

against Normal last year Seelman ran brilliantly, gaining over 
110 yards and averaging over six yards per t ry on straight plays. 

Johnson, who has alternated between left and right halfback all 
season, will play right half, and Seelman will take the left half slot 
in the starting lineup. 

This will be the first time this season that both men have started 
and played at the same time, and it will give the Maroons the maximun 
in offensive running strenght. 

Probable starting lineup: 
LE Bunker Jones of West Frankfort 
LT Charles Wathieu of Eldorado, Capt. 
LG Jim Lovin of Benton 
C J. rieron of kurphysboro 
KG Bob Etheridge of Fairfield 
RT John Corn of Benton 
RE Bob Colborn of Flora 
QB Bill malinsky of Flora 
L^B Dick Seelman of Flora 
RHB Bob Johnson of Du _uoin 
FB Don Riggs of Fairfield 

Broadcast of the game will be carried by r^dio station Y'CIL, 
Carbondale., with Don Boudreau at the mike. 

uiftr 



,! 




SOUTHERN !' | INOIS 
■ LIBHMh, 

- ' CAHBOKOAIE, IUINOIS 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



kTMTLJN: SrORTS EDITORS 11-0-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - The Southern Illinois University 
harriers will participate in the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic 
Conference championship run Saturday, Nov. 8, when the title run is 
held at Eastern Illinois State Col^e^e of Charleston. 

The cross-country men of Coach Leland F. w Doc'" Lingle have been 
defeated only once in dual meets this season. Thac defeat was at the 
hands of Eastern in the Maroons opening contest, but since that time 
the Lin&lemen have defeated Eastern in a return engagement. 

Favored in the conference meet is Illinois State Normal University, 
The Kedbird runners have been undefeated thus far this season, and most 
of their victories have been by wide margins. The Maroons are expected 
to crowd Normal,, and Eastern has not been counted out of the fight. 

Freshman Joe McLafferty of Carbondale will try to place first 
in his sixth consecutive run. If he does win, he will have finished 
the season undefeated. 

tnrtr 




SOUTHERN rUNOIS 






UI 
. LIBRmKY 

' CABBOWDAtE, IUIN0IS i 



From Information Service, Southern Illinois University 
Lorena Drummond, Director 



11-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - For the second consecutive year, 
Southern Illinois University on Dec. 6 will be host to Southern 
Illinois high school orators for a Speech Festival, Dr. P. Merville 
Larson, chairman of the speech department, has announced. 

The festival will be sponsored by Tau Delta Kho, Southern 
discussion club; the Illinois Upsilon chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, 
national honorary forensics society; and the Southern speech department. 

Events on the calendar for the festival will include oratorical, 
dramatic and humorous declamation, extemporaneous speaking, original 
oratory, poetry reading, and group discussion. 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Rehearsal time xor "The Messiah," 
oratorio to be presented in mid-December by the Southern Illinois 
Oratorio Society, has been changed to 7 p. m. for the rehearsal 
scheduled for Monday, Nov. 17, in order that chorus members may attend 
the Jennie Tourel concert presented that evening by the Community 
Concert Association, Dr. Maurits Kesnar, chairman of the music 
department at Southern Illinois University, has announced. 

### 










OUTHEPN !' I INOIS 



UIMI 

, LIBRmKI 

1 CAftBONDAtE, ILLINOIS * 




From Information Service 
Siuthern Illinois University 
Carbondale, Illinois 



Lorena Drutnmond 
Director 



Attention: Sports Editors 11-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - The Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference title chase will be decided at Mcnndrew Stadium in Carbondale, 
Saturday, Nov. 1$, when the loop leading Southern Illinois University- 
Maroons face the Eastern Illinois State College Panthers. 

The Maroons have their conference record marred only by a 6 to 6 
tie with Illinois State Normal University at Normal last Saturday, 
while the Panthers have suffered one conference loss to Northern, 25 to 
6, last Saturday. 

Conference rules rate a tie as a half game won and a half game 
lost. Thus the Maroons have a record of two and one half wins and one 
half lost, against one won and one lost for Eastern. 

If the Maroons defeat Eastern, they will be undisputed champions. 
Even a tie with Eastern would assure Southern a tie for the championship, 
with Eastern still having one more game to play against T, .'estern. 

In their game against Normal Saturday, the Maroons scored first, 
early in the second period, when they struck by air from their own 
territory. 

With the ball on Southern's 39, Dick Seelman of Flora took a lateral 
from Bill Malinsky, also of Flora % faded deep, and passed to Joe Hughes 
of I'iest Frankfort on the. Normal 35. With the aid of good downfield 
blocking, Hughes raced the remaining distance for a touchdown on a 61 
yard pass play. 

The try for extra point was no ^ood when end Merlin Belle of 
Normal blocked the kick of Bret McGinnis of Carbondale* 

(more) 




OUTHERN I' MNOIS 



u. y 

• LIBk«h i 

1 CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 3 




: -2- 

iilthough Normal threatened often during the game, the Maroons 
managed, by alert defensive plans, to keep then, from scoring until 
late in the fourth quarter. 

With about six minutes remaining, Normal started a sustained drive 
of 41 yards which tied the score two minutes later, nfter Malinsky 
kicked out of bounds on t he Southern 41$ scatback Gene Stratman, 
Normal's elusive openfield ace, skirted end, reversed his field 
beautifully, and raced to the Southern 1'0 . 

a line smash by Del Santo, to the 11, a pass from Brady to Stratman 
to the five, and a plunge by Brady gave Norhern a first down on the 
two yard line. 

After Stratman was thrown back to the five, Brady passed to Ray 

Morelli in the end zone for the touchdown. The try for extra point 

failed on a bad pass from center. 

,: '.ji 

u'iltt 



- 




OUTHFRN '" INOIS 



. 






< LIBKmK/ 

1 WMONDAtE, ILLINOIS 




From Information Service, Southern Illinois University 
Lorena Drummond, Director 

ttention: Sports Editors " 1A-12~V7 

Carjonaale, 111., Uov» - It's conference championship time 
in Carbondale, wh&re the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Coriierence. 
championship will be decided Saturday, Nov. 1;?, at kcnndrew St.dium. 

The lea ue-leaclin ; Southern Laroons of Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin 
serve as hosts to the second place Panthers of Eastern Illinois State 
College of Charleston. 

With only one tie, 6 to 6 with Illinois State Normal University, 
to spoil their record, the Martinmen have a golden opportunity to 
capture their first conference title since 1931. 

Eastern lost 25 to 6 to Northern, a team which the l-iaroons 
defeated earlier, 20 to 0. On the basis of this score Southern is 
six touchdowns the better. 

However, Eastern defeated Normal earlier in the season 13 to 7, 
which would indicate that on that comparison, they were one touchdown 
better than the Maroons. 

With comparative scores very misleading, as usual, the ^ame will 
probably be played with Southern established as a slight favorite with 
the victory going to the team which makes and t^kes advantage of the 
breaks. 




OUTHERN " ' INOIS 



u! y 

. LIBKmKV 

' CAftBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 




From I formation 3ervice--Southern Illinois University 

Lorena Drummond, Director 

Attention: Sports Editors 11-12-47 

Carbondale , 111., Nov. - The Southern Illinois University 
Maroons, defending basketball champions of the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference, have scheduled 20 regular games this year, and 
will participate in a Holiday Tournament at Vincennes, Indiana. 

The Maroons open their schedule at t he Southern gymnasium on 
Dec. 5, with Scott Field furnishing the opposition. 

Schedule : 

Dec. 5, Scott Field, here; Dec. 6, Eyansville College, there; 
Dec. 9, Murray State T e achers, Paducah, Ky. ; Dec. 12, Arkansas State 
College, there; Dec. 13, Cape Girardeau, there; Dec, 19, James 
Millikin University, here; Dec. 20, Shurtleff College, there; Jan. 1, 
Holiday Tournament, Vincennes, Indiana; Jan. 9, James Millikin, 
University, there; Jan. 10, Northern Illinois State Teachers College, 
there; Jan. 14, Cape Girardeau, here; Jan. 17, Eastern Illinois State 
College, there; Jan. 20, Arkansas State College; here; Jan. 24, 
Western Illinois State College, here; Jan. 29, Indiana C-entral, here; 
Jan. 31, Illinois State Normal University, here; Feb. 7, Northern 
Illinois S.ate Teachers College, here; Feb. 13, Western Illinois State 
College, there; Feb r 21, Eastern Illinois State College, here; Feb, 
24, Evansville College, here; and Feb, 28, Illinois SLate Normal 
University, there, 

m 



— 




UTHFRN ,! UNOIS 

Ul 

, LIBKMh 

v CAR80«DAl£ f ILLINOIS i 




JFrom Information Service — Southern Illinois University 

Lorena Drummond, Director 



11-12-47 
Carbondale, 111., Nov. - A Kindergarten-Primary Conference 

will be sponsored by Southern Illinois University here Nov. 21-22 for 

teachers and administrators of Southern Illinois. 

The University branch of the association for Childhood Education 

is making arrangements for the conference, at which Miss Neith Headley, 

from the Institute of Child Welfare, University of Ilinnesota, will be 

the key guest speaker. 

Miss Headley will give two addresses, one at the opening session 

on "Problems of Organizing a Kindergarten," the other at the dinner 






session Nov. 21, on "The Nonconformist: The Aggressive." 

### 

Carbondale, 111., Nov, - An article on "Exclusion, Ejection, 
and Segregation of Theater Patrons" by Max W. Turner, new associate 
professor of government at Southern Illinois University, appeared in a 
recent issue of the Iowa Law Review . 

Dr. Turner collaborated in writing the article with Frank R. 
Kennedy, associate professor of Law at the State University of Iowa. 
In the article the two authors surveyed the various s..ate laws and 
various court rulings permitting or prohibiting exclusion, ejection 



or segregation of patrons. 



m 




UTHFRN !« I INOIS 

U h 

. UBRmM 

1 WBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



iFrom Information .Service, Southern Illinois University 

Lorena Drummond, Director 



11-12-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - a new variety of wheat--Vigo--has 
(proven to be the top producer on the Southern Illinois University 
Farm, with a yield of 57.32 bushels per acre in 1946-47, according 
to Dr. Lowell Tucker acting chairman of the agriculture department. 

Another new strain, the Indiana lied ,T .ve, yielded 57.21 bushels 
per acre. 

This year was the first year the University Farm has planted 
either of these varieties, although Vigo has been tested elsewhere for 
the past three years. 

Other varieties tested in 1946-47 and their respective yields per 
acre follow: Illinois D-£>5, 54. £7 bushels; Fairfield, Fulcdster and 
Trumbull, 49. 3 bushels each; Goens, 49.17; Clarkan, 43.54; Blackhawk 
and Newcaster, 47.69 each; and Prairie, 41.99. 

Records on the yield per acre at the University Farm were compiled 
by n.lex Reed, assistant Proiessor of Agriculture in University High 
School. 

Comparative records on the yield per acre were compiled by Reed 
covering 1943-44, 1944-45 and 1946-47. Only two of the 11 varieties 
planted in 1946-47 were planted each of the three years--Fulcaster, 
with a three-year average yield of 43.54 bushels per acre, and Prairie, 
with a 35.76 bushel-per-acre average yield. 



### 



1^^^^ 



SOUTHERN "1INOIS 

Ul 

. LIBRahY 

- 'CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS a 



•2- 

The 1943-44 yield of both these varieties v; as relativelt high — 
£.3 for Fulcaster and 40.5 for Prairie — but the yield of all varieties 
ropped drastically in 1944-45, ranging from 24. $ for Prairie to 
35.16 for Trumbull-Fultz C. I. 12220. The last variety was not planted 
in 1946-47. 

Indicative of the better growing season of 1946-47, the yield for 
Fulcaster rose from 4^,3 in 1943-44 to 49.3 last year, while that of 
Prairie increased from 40.5 to 41.99. 

Among the varieties planted in both 1944-45 and 1946-47, the 
Illinois D0B5 showed the highest two-year average yield — 43.57 bushels 
per acre. The yield of this variety -was only 32. 23 bushels in 1944-45 
but mounted to 54. $7 bushels this year. 



U.41M 







SOUTHERN 'V.INOIS 



s. 



X ' CttBONDALE, ILLINOIS 




From Information Service, Southern Illinois University 

Lorena Drummond, Director 



11-13-47 
For Friday Release: 
Attention: Sports Editors 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Southern Illinois University's great 
line will have it's hands full Saturday when it draws the task of 
stopping Eastern Illinois State College's crew of fast, flashy back 
at Mc Andrew Stadium in Carbondale where the two teams will battle for 
the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference title. 

The league leading Maroons of Coach Glenn u Abe i? Martin are after 
the first Southern championship since 1931, and are given a good 
chance to come through. 

Eastern has backfield speed and power combined in one man, 195 
pound 10 second man Smith, a blazing runner from Downers Grove. 

Another fast 195 pound halfback is Don Johnson, who has combined 
with Smith in blitzing the opponent r s ends all year on powerful sweeps. 

However, Southern has two great ends, Bob Colborn of Flora, a steady ? 
outstanding performer all year, and Joe Hughes of West Frankfort to 
slow their running. 

Quarterback for the Panthers from Charleston is a former great star 
of Murphysboro High School, Bob Babb« 

Babb is the outstanding passer for the Eastern team, and is used 
primarily for offense, since his signal-calling is Eastern's mainstay. 

The Maroons are not in top shape for the game, and Coach Martin has 
been striving all week to bring his charges to a sharp mental edge. 

(more) 



\ - . - ■ .. 



t ■ - 



SOUTHERN "LINOIS 



UiV; | Y 

. LIBKmKV 

*• l CAKBONDAli, IUIN0IS 



•2- 



Most serious casualty for the Maroons Is quarterback Bill Malinsky 
who is still suffering from the effects of the hard battle the Maroons 
had against Normal in their 6-6 deadlock last week. 

Malinsky, passer deluxe and T-formation ball-handler, has been 
suffering all week from a weak knee and stomach cramps. However, it is 
hoped that Malinsky will be recovered enough by tomorrow to give a 
good account of himself* 

Much of the Maroons offensive strength is based on passer Malinsky, 
who is now in his fourth year with Soutnern. If Malinsky is aole to 
see only limited action, his L ,lace will be taken by George Baysinger 
of Carbondale or Gene Woods of Fairfield* 

Woods is a freshman w^o has come into prominence in only the last 
few weeks, and who may play quite a bit in the Eastern game. 

Robert '-'Bunker" Jones of West Frankfort is still suffering f rom 
the charley-horse which kept him from playing last week at Normal, but 
since the muscle is responding to treatment, he probably will be able 
to see considerable action. 

Dick Seelman of Flora is bothered by a shoulder injury, which 
limits his effectiveness, and Warren Littleford of Vandalia, strong 
freshman reserve at tackle, is nursing a sore arm. both these men, 
however, will be able to see action. 

Playing their last home game for the Maroons will be three 
seniors who have started regularly this season, Capt. Charles Mathieu 
of Eldorado, sera py, brilliant b uard bob Etheridge of Fairfield, and 
Malinsky. 

(more ) 







OUTHEPN !,, INOIS 



UIMJ 

. LIBKMh i 

f % CAR80N0At£, ILLINOIS i 



'Probable starting lineup for Southern: 
LE Joe Hughes of West Frankfort 
LT Charles Mathieu of Eldorado 
LG Jim Lovin of Benton 

C Bill Cosgrove of Benton or J. Pieron of taurphysboro 
RG Bob Ether idge of Fairfield 
Jf? John Corn of Benton 
RE Bob Colborn of Flora 
QB Bill Malinsky of Flora 
LHB Dick Seelraan of Mora 
RHB Bob Johnson of Eu^uoin 
FB Don Riggs .qf Fairfield 

The game will be broadcast over Radio Stations WCIL Carbondale, 
and WJPF H*rrin* 




SOUTHERN M LINOIS 
ui 

. LIBRmKY 

- 'CAfiSONOAtt, ILLINOIS i 



From Information Service, Southern Illinois University 

Lorena Drummond, Director 



Attention: Sports tditors 
For Friday Release: 



11-13-47 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - oouthern Illinois University Athletic 
Director Glenn "Abe" Martin declined to comment toaay on whether or 
not the Southern Maroons will accept an invite. tion to play in the First 
Annual Corn Bowl game at Bloomington have indicated that the Maroons, 
who presently lead the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, 
have the inside track to an invitation to play. 

North Central, leader of the College Conference of Illinois, is 
reported to be the other team which may receive an invitation. 

Final selection of the contestants will be made Sunday, Nov. 16, 
after the results of Southern's game against E stern Illinois State 
College and North Central's tilt with Carthage, are known. 

Athletic Director and Head Football Coach Martin, without commenting 
directly on the report, implied that Southern's decision will probably 
be determined by their performance against Eastern in the I. I. a. C. 
title game tomorrow in McAndrew Stadium in Carbondale. 

iftfff 






SOUTHER 



N !' ' !NOIS 



. 



. LIBRmKY 

'CMBONDAtf, ILLINOIS 



i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Five temporary buildings this week 
were accepted by Southern Illinois University from the Federal ftorks 
Agency to be used as additional classroom, library and office space, 
University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Papers releasing the buildings to the University were signed by 
President Lay and h. C. kshton of Chicago, division engineer for the 
Federal Works agency, Bureau of Community Facilities, on Thursday of 
this week. 

These buildings are all barracks assigned to the University after 
a survey made by the U. S f Office of Education showed an emergency need 
for 17,000 square feet of additional space in order that the institution 
may adequately care for student veterans. 

The barracks have been converted into five buildings, one an 
addition to the -/heeler Library, one an office building on Harwood 
Street, and the other three, located on Chautauqua Street, to be used 
as classroom structures. 

Occupancy of the classroom buildings must be deferred until heating 
and utility facilities can be installed. Specifications for this work 
have been authorized by the State Department of architecture and 
Engineering, and bids are now being assembled for the construction of a 
boiler room, additional gracing, sidewalks, and utility facilities, 
according to Edward V. Miles, Jr., University business manager. 

(more) 





UTHFRM "1INQIS 



. 



. LIBKmKV 

1 «RBM»DAL£, ILLINOIS 



i 



-2- 

The library audition will be the first to be occupied, President 
Lay said, and added that students will probably get to study there 
for their final examinations this term. The office building will also 
be ready for occupancy soon, he said. Both of these structures are 
to be serviced by heating and utility facilities from the main campus 

lines, hence can be utilized immediately*-. 

11 jj. 




I 



MMUlO 




. LIBKmKV 

X ' CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond r Editor 



11-14-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Five temporary buildings this week 
v/ere accepted by Southern Illinois University from the Federal Works 
Agency to be used as additional classroom, library and office space, 
University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Papers releasing the buildings to the University were signed by 
President Lay and h. C. ri.sh.ton of Chicago, division engineer for the 
Federal T -forks Agency, Bureau of Community Facilities, on Thursday of 
this week. 

These buildings die all barracks assigned to the University after 
a survey made by the U. S* Oifice of Education showed an emergency need 
for 17,000 square feet of additional space in order that the institution 
may adequately care for student veterans. 

The barracks have been converted into five buildings, one an 
addition to the Wheeler Library, one an office building on Harwood 
Street, and the other three, located on Chautauqua Street, to be used 
as classroom structures. 

Occupancy of the classroom buildings must be deferred until heating 
and utility facilities can be installed. Specifications for this work 
have been authorized by the State Department of architecture and 
Engineering, and bids are now being assembled lor the construction of a 
boiler room, additional grading, sidewalks, and utility facilities, 
according to Edward V. Miles, Jr., University business manager. 

(more) 




ouuin 
. LIBRaKY 

- l CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 



i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-14-47 
Carbondale, III., Nov. - An intra-mural forensics tournament 

will be held at Southern Illinois University Nov. 17-26, according to 

Dr. P. Merville Larson, chairman of the speech department. 

The tournament is open to all University students, either as 

individuals or as representatives of campus organizations,, 

The events include extemporaneous speaking, debate, impromptu 

speaking, poetry reading, interpretation, original oratory, folk-story 

telling and after dinner speaking, 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Language students at University High 
School, Southern Illinois University, will have a United Nations Dinner 
here Nov. 20, Mrs. Evelyn Rieke, language teacher, has a nnounced. 

Each student will dress to represent a foreign country; flags of 
the United Nations and appropriately dressed dolls will be used as 
table decorations; an international menu of Italian spaghetti, Dutch 
salad, South American chocolate, French pastry, and American ice cream, 
will be served* 

The French classes are in charge of table decorations, Latin classe: 
the program, and Spanish class the fooo. i 'he dinner will be held in 
the home economics department dining r oom in the University's Main 
Building, 

ifffjf 



: ■•'..- 




Y< \\\ 



uuinr 
. LIBKmM' 

'CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS 



i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond , Editor 






attention: Sports Editors 11-15-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. . - With the Illinois Intercollegiate 

athletic Conference championship safely tucked away by virtue of an 
easy 33 to 13 victory of Eastern Illinois State College last Saturday, 
the Southern Illinois University Maroons are drilling for their regular- 
season closer this week against the Southeastern Missouri State Teacher; 
at Cape Girardeau. 

After the victory over Eastern, Southern Athletic Director ctnd 
Hedd Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin announced that the maroons had accepted 
an invitation to play in the Corn Bowl at Bloomington on Thanksgiving 
day. 

Southern's opponent in the Corn Bowl will be North Central, 
champions of the College Conference of Illinois. 

In winning the conference title, two men in Southern's backfield 
played brilliantly, bill maiinsky of flora dnd George Sawyer of Wood 
River. 

Maiinsky 1 s great passing, with Sawyer receiving, set up two early 
touchtowns for the maroons, and broke the back of the Eastern defense. 
In his final performance on the Southern gridiron, Maiinsky played one 
of the finest games of his career, although due to injuries his role 
was limited to ball-handling and passing. 

It was George Sawyer who provided the thrills for the crowd of 
more than 3,000. Previously little watched, Sawyer burst upon an 

(more ) 




uumrmN • • iinuis 



' ir 
UI 






« LIBk/ihi 

r 'CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS i 



j 






-2- 

unsuspecting audience with a magnificent running performance that 
brought his name to the iips of every spectator. 

He averaged over nine yards a try on rushing by gaining 73 yards 
in eight i^ies, with one of the runs good for kO yards through a 
broken field. He took three passes from Malinsky O ood for 78 y^rds. 

It was on pass defense where Sawyer played most billiantiy. He 
intercepted two passes, and returned them a total of 117 y^rds, one 
for 60 yards from his own three to the Eastern 23, which sciw him race 
along one sideline for 23 yards and then bring the crowd to its feet as 
he completely reversed his field and went on and on down the other side. 

Eastern struck for the game's first score early in the first 
quarter, when a 15-yard pass from Boyle to Gnere was complete and Ghere 
raced 45 additional yards for the touchdown. 

Southern struck back quickly .ra a sustained march of 71 y^rds which 
was highlighted by a Z..0 yard Malinsky-to-Sawyer pass. Joe Hughes of 
T 7est Frankfort scored on cm end-around play from the six. 

. Sawyer powered his way over for the next touchdown from the eight 
yard line to climax a 6l-yard sustained drive. 

A few minutes later, Sawyer scored again, this time from the one. 
The next haroon touchdown came in the middle of the third period when 
Joe Hughes scored a second time on an end around, this time from the 
four. 

Capt. Charles Mathieu, Karoon left tackle, scored when he fell on 
a fumole by Eastern quarterback bob Babb on the first play or the fourth 
quarter, babb was snowed under oehind the goal line, fumbled, and 
i-lathieu turned the bobble into six points. 

Eastern's second touchdown was scored at the expense of Southern's 
second and third teams. A pass from Boyle, to Anderson, who lateraled 
to Smith, was good for 10 yards and the score. 




uuinr.mM 



u 



UI5 



r ' CAftBONDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



From the Southern Illiruis University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 






Release Thursday 11-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. 19 - Kindergarten and primary teachers and 
school administrators from Southern Illinois will gather here at 
Southern Illinois University for a two-day Kindergarten-Primary 
Conference Friday and Saturday. 

Hiss Neith Headley, Institute of Child Welfare, University of 
Minnesota, will be a guest lecturer and consultant, and will keynote 
the conference in her opening address Friday morning at 10 o'clock, on 
"Problems of Organizing a Kindergarten.'' 

The conference will open at 9'K5 with a welcome by Dr. Eugene R. 
Fair, dean of the University College of Education, which is sponsoring 
the meeting. Coffee and doughnuts will be served preceding the meeting. 

After Miss Headley ? s address, Mrs, uessie M. Fair, formerly 
assistant in the Child Welfare Research Station, State University of 
Iowa, will speak on '''Detecting Personality Problems." 

Discussion will follow each of these addresses. 

In the afternoon, Miss Headley will speak on "Curriculum Problems," 
and at the Satureay morning session Miss Louise Gross from Southeast 
Missouri State College, Missouri State president of the Association for 
Childhood Education, will speak on "Organizing A.C.E. Branches." 

Miss Headley and Miss Tina Goodwin, assistant professor and first 

grade supervisor at the Allyn Traini :g School at Southern, will analy z e 

the "nonconfirmist child," Miss uoodwin speaking on "the shy child" 

Friday afternoon, and Miss Headley on "the aggressive child" at the 

Friday evening dinner. 

(more ) 





uuinr.rt 

. LIBKmK/ 

'CAR80NDAU, IUINOIS 



IIMUIO 



I 



University President Chester F» Lay will extend greetings to the 
group at the Friday dinner at the University Cafeteria. 

arrangements for' the conference are being carried out by the 
University branch of the Association for Childhood Education and Dr. 
Sina LI. Mott, associate professor of pre-school education at the 
University and the ^rouj.; T s sponsor. 

Sessions will be held in the Little Theatre. The Saturday 
niornin breakfast will be held at The Cottage, University kindergarten- 
nursery school, and the Saturday luncheon at the Baptist Foundation. 



m 





imuio 



uuin 

« LIBKmK i 

X 'CttBOKDAU, IUIN0IS 1 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 



Lorena Drummond , Editor 



attention: Sports Editors 11-19-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov, - The Southern Illinois University- 
football ilaroons are finding it an almost impossible task to concentrae 
upon the game at hand this week when they travel to Cape Girardeau to 
meet Southeast Missouri State Teachers College. 

The thoughts of the team are drifting over the Cape game toward 
their contest with North Central on Thanksgiving in the first Corn 
Bowl game at Bloomington. 

The Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference champions of 
Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin have been slowed in practice not only by 
thoughts of the Corn Bowl, but also by inclement weather which has 
limited practice sessions zo the barest tninimuns. 

With this state 01 affairs prevailing, the game against Cape 
Girardeau, is an anti-climax. In defeating Eastern 33-1.3 last week 
the Maroons hit the peak of their season's play, and will probably be 
a little "let down" against Cape. 

Last Saturday, after serving a.; the doormat in their conference 
during most of the early season, the Cape team sna ped out of its 
lethargy ana defeated the team which previously had been leading the 
conference, Springfield, mo. 





uum 
. LiBKMKV 

*• ' CAR80NDALE, ILLINOIS 



* 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-19-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - The former Cartel's Cafe, "jelly 
noint " for generations of Southern Illinois University students, will 
reopen as a student center in a few weeks under new management and under 
the name of "The Canteen." 

The building was purchased L..st spring by the University from the 
Carter family. 

It has now been leased to Martin Chaney and Gene Crawshaw, Carbondal; 
businessmen, for operation as a cafe and confectionery. The lease was 
signed on behalf of the University this week by Frank C. Thompson, 
director of the State Department of R eg i strati on and Education, according 
to Edward V. Miles, Jr., University business manager. 

The lessees report that they hope to open the new '"Canteen'" by 
the opening of the winter term Dec. 8. 

The lease provides for renewal at two-year intervals, Lh^t dancing 
shall be prohibited, that sde of alcoholic beverages shall be 
prohibited, and that "The Canteen" shall be open to all students. The 
building is rented to the lessees at ',.12 5 per month rental. 

MS 

li /Til 





uum 

. LIBKahi 

f l CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 



Ul 



i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 






11-19-47 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Several lithographs by Kenneth Ervin, 
new instructor in art at Southern Illinois University, are published 
in a new art textbook, Introduction to Art Activities, by Ralph 
Vickiser, head of the department of fine arts at Louisiana State 
University. 

Dr. Uickiser is a native of Greenup, 111., and graduated from 
Eastern Illinois State College, according to Ben, Watkins, acting 
chairman of the Southern art department. Mr. Ervin did his graduate 
work in graphic arts and has won several imi ort : ,.nt prizes in national 
and regional shows for his work in this field, Mr, VJatkins said. 

1 '>1L 

m 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Glenn ''Abe' 1 Martin, athletic director 
and head football coach at Southern Illinois University, will be the 
brincipai speaker at a banquet to be given by the Lions Club of Pana, 
in honor of the Pana high school football team, Tuesday evening, Nov. 25. 

mrff 




uuinrrf' 1 ' ?\L 




NNUIO 



. LIBKmKV 

' CttBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 11-20-47 

For Friday Release: 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. 21 - The Southern Illinois University 
Maroons will leave at 10:30 tomorrow morning I'oi Gape Girardeau where 
they will play their final regular season game against Southeast 
Missouri State Teachei s College. 

In spite of the Corn Bowl-glazed eyes so common on' the Maroon squad, 
Hecid Coach Glenn B Abe" Martin says that there has not been as great a 
"let-down" in practice as was to be expected after the victory of the 
Martin men against Eastern last Saturday which clinched the Illinois 
Intercollegiate athletic Conference championship. 

Monday there was no practice, and on Tuesday only a short drill in 
the rain, cut on Wednesday, after their short lay-off the Maroons looked 
sharp in a long, tiring ''dummy" scrimmage. 

Special emphasis in practice was given to passing offense. Bill 
Malinsky of Flora, Southern's brilliant passer, who spent the afternoon 
of the Eastern game throwing strikes, has been worked hard. Malinsky 
is now in top physical condition again, having finally recovered from 
the punishment he received at the hands of Illinois Normal University 
almost two weeks ago. 

There are no serious injuries to hinder the Maroons as they face 
the Missouri team, which has not been scouted by Southern at, any time. 

Halfback Dick Seelman of Flora is still nursing a lame shoulder, 

which limits his passing effectiveness, but he will be able to see action, 

Don Riggs of Fairfield, fullback, has almost recovered from the 
sluggishness-producing body-bruises ne absorbed against Eastern, and by 
the end of the week he should be able to operate in high gear, 

MMM. 

iTinr 




— 



uumrm 



Ul» 




Ul, 



. UBRhM 

r 'CARBONDAlf, ILLINOIS 



i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-21-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - On invitation of Governor Dwight H. 
Green, the University Orchestra of Southern Illinois University will 
play in Springfield at the Fifth Annual National Aviation Clinic on 
November 21. 

The orchestra, under the direction of Dr. Mauri ts Kesnar, professor 
and chairman of the University music department, will play for the 
luncheon session at the Leland Hotel and the clinic sessi )ns at the 
Itate armory. 

Those students who will make the trip are: 

BELLEVILLE: Kent Werner 

CAMBklr,.: Bill morse 

C«.RBONDaLE: j«ames Farmer, Johnny Fly, .. D. i iskell, Barbara 

Swartz, former students**Alma Dearie ..Smith, Ernestine 
Cox Taylor. 

CHKISTOPHEL: Carl Lutes 

COLL-NSVILLEL llel Siener 

DU IRJIN: Mike R. Bianco, Jr., Harrison Fallett. 

E. ST. LOUIS: Anne Kuehn 

ZLIITLEK.:' "CFiarlinIS Kali, Lyndell D. .Dunlap 

FAIRFIELD: Robert Eugene Howey, Sue Collins, Bill Green 

WATERLOO: Norman Rodenburg 

GRANITE CITY: Richard Barron 

HERRIN: Naomi Kuehner, Roger N. Hughes, Carolyn Miller, Ray Springs 

LINCOLN: Robert Harmon 

MARION: Roy Earth" 

METROPOLIS: Ellen R. Williams 

MURPHISBORO: Bill Ledbetter 

IJORRIB CITY: Doris Ivy 

SALEM: Jacqueline D . is, Jerrol Williams 

VIENNA : Louise Toy, Harold L. Gray, Betty JicHenry, anette Mclntire, 

Patricia Rurrie 
REST FRaNKFORT: Elizabeth Ann Whiteside, Joann Weaver, Juanita 

Plantec, Harold Eldrid e, Chloteal ^rnette. 
infft 







HMUIO 



- 



'CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



=> 



*- 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-21-47 

Carbondale, 111., N_v.. - a "food handlers school 1 ' for student 
h.mse supervisors and Carbondale restaurant operators and their staffs 
opened by Southern Illinois University this week drew between oO and 
70 "students," Ralph Boatman, Univei sity health coordinator, reports. 

Sponsored by the Univei sity housing counselor T s oifice, the Dean 
of Women's Office and the Health Service, the "scuool" will be continued 
periodically, and owners of restaurants, especially those patronized by 
students, will be ur ed to cctend. 

The first session of the "school" was held Thursday night at the 
Univei sity Cafeteria, and participants inspected, the i-Iodern food- 
handling facilities of the cafeteria, including the new automatic 
jdishwasher. 

The entire food service staffs from University dormitory and the 
cafeteria attended, and representatives came from all fraternities and 
sororities and from many campus boarding houses, Boatman said. 

A film on sanitary food-handling was shown, and Boatman and Dr. 
Marie A. Kinrichs, director of the Health Service, lectured to the group 
on personal health, on diseases transmitted by improper food handling, 
on sanitary food storage, food preparation, and dishwashing. 

The next session of the ''''school" will be conducted at i-mthony Hall, 
University girls' dormitory, in January, Boatman said. 

Boatman joined the Univei sity staff this fall as health coordinator 
under a new program conducted jointly b> the University and the Kellogg 
Foundation. He teaches health education courses on the campus and in 

(more) 




IINUId 



uuinrr^ 1 \\i 

fir 

U! 

< LIBK/ih i 

- 'GttBONDALE, IUIN0IS i 



-2- 

the 'Extension Service, and carries on field work in communities of^- 
Southern Illinois. His field work consists of lectures, cooperation 
with community health agencies and with schools in developing health 
programs, and conducting training programs such as the u food-handlers' 
school. i? 

## 



11-21-47 
Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Dr. W. C. Bicknell, professor and 
chairman of the industrial education department at Southern Illinois 
University, has been elected a member of the Industrial Arts Conference 
of the Mississippi Valley, Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College of 
■Vocations and Professions, has announced. 

This conference is composed of chairmen of industrial education or 
industrial art departments of colleges and universities in 20 states in 
the Mississippi Valley. Membership is limited to 65. 

Dr. Bicknell recently attended the conference's annual meeting in 
Chicago. 

JUi-41 
WWW 




uuinr.r^-' :\l 

Mr 



IIXVJIO 




- ' CARBONDAtE, ILLINOIS I 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-21-47 



!' 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Miss Jean Stehr and Miss Therese 
Ivanuck, faculty members in the department of physical education for 
women at Southern Illinois University, will attend a Dance Sym osium 
It the University of Chicago N v. 22. 

MS 



1 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Miss Helen Shuman, dean of women at 
Southern Illinois University, and Mrs. Chester F. Lay, wife of Universit; 
President Lay, recently attended the 75th anniversary conference of 
the Y.v/.C.A. at Illinois St... te Normal University, both appearing on 
the program. Miss Shuman spoke at the afternoon session, while Mrs. 
Lay responded to one of ohe luncheon toasts, "The Challenge Still 
Sounds Today. i! 

Miss Shuman also attended the meeting of the association of 
College' Admission Counselors at Highland Park last week.- 



_ ti '.' 
if if it 










uumr.mM v.i\ 

U" 

« LIBkMhy' 

*• 'CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 






IIMUIO 



* 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor & 



11-21-47 
Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Mildred Lorenz of Waterloo, a sophomore, 
has been awarded the ,,200 F.T.A. scholarship at Southern Illinois 
University for 1947-4$, Miss Helen A. Shuman, dean of -women and chairman 
of the Scholarship and Loans Committee, has announced. 

This scholarship is made available annually by the Illinois Congress 
of Parents and Teachers for award to a student who was graduated from an 
accredited high school having a parent-teacher or anization affiliated 
wic-i the Illinois Congress. 

Miss Lorenz is the sixth recipient of the award. She is a 1946 
graduate of Waterloo High School, where she participated in the Hi-Tri, 
Girls Athletic Association, the Home Economics Club, Mixed Chorus, the 
orchestra, and dramatics. She was also co-editor of the school paper 
and yearbook, and was chosen by her classmates to receive the D.a.R. 



Q 



ood citizenship' 11 award. Graduated do the valedictorian of her class, 



she was awarded a State Normal School Scholarship, which she is using 
to defray her tuition at Southern. 

hs a student at Southern she has helped earn her expenses by 
working part-time in University High School, but has maintained a 
nigh scholastic average — 4.7 out of a possible 5-point average and 
received scholastic recognition at the Honors Day exercises last spring. 
She is majoring in elementary education. She is a member of the Newman 
Club and the Independent Student Union, and this fall became a pledge to 
Girls Rally, University service organization. 



it u a 
trim 




ouum 

• 'CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



attention: Sports Editors 11-24-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - nfter finishing their regular season 
'schedule with a 2G-to-13 victory of the Indians of Southeast Missouri... 
Etate Teachers College, the red-hot Southern Illinois University Maroons. 
Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Champions, are getting set 
in practice sessions for their Corn Bowl tussle with North Central on 
Thanksgiving day at Bloomington. 

Against Southeast Missouri State Teachers College of Cape Girardeau 
the Maroons piled up an overwhelming lead early in the game, almost 
effortlessly, and then clung tenaciously to their margin. 

Cape recieved the opening kickoiX, but fumbled on the first play, 
giving Southern possession of the ball on the Cape 17-yard line. Three 
plays later the Maroons had scored, George Sawyer of Wood River flashed 
to the $, and Don Riggs of Fairfield lu ,ged the pigskin over in two more 
tries. 

The try for point by Bret McGinnis of Carbondale was good. 

The Maroons followed quickly with their second score. After the 
kickoff , Cape was forced to punt when they failed to gain, and the kick 
went out of bounds on the Cape 40* After two short running plays, Bill 
Malinsky of Flora set up the touchdown when he hit Sawyer with pass good 
to the four yard line. 'Four line cracks allowea Riggs to score again 
from the one. McGinnis' lick was no good. 

Early in the third period the Maroons scored on a 64-yard sustained 
drive. The drive was highlighted by two perfect passes from the brilliant 

(more) 



-fix rax 



) : I 



I ; 



iTt 



u..< ; i 




ouuinrrm< • \\yji 

< LIBfeiKV 

• ' CARBOWDALE, ILLINOIS i 



-2- 



Malinsky to Galen Djvis of DuQuoin and George Beltz of Marion. Sawyer 
ran smoothly to add yardage as did Bob Colborn of Flora who picked up 
10 yards on an end around. Malinsky personally tallied when he drove 
over from the one foot line on a quarterback sneak. McGinnis 1 kick 
was good. 

In the last period the Indians of Cape Girardeau proved themselves 
to be "wampum-players" as they fought gamely to bring the game to an 
exciting end. Early in the period Abernethy climaxed a 39-yard march 
by scoring from the one. Anderson's kick was no good. 

Two minutes later the Indians again gained possession of the ball 
when end Klosterman intercepted a pass by George Baysinger of C^rbondale 
on the Cape Girardeau 37-yard line. Nine plays later Anderson plunged 
over from the one. This time his kick was good, making the final 



score 20 to 13. 

Statistics: 

First downs 

lasses attempted 

fasses completed 

Passes intercepted 

Yards Passing 

Yards Rushing 

Total yards 

Opponents fumbles recovered 

Yards lost: penalties 



Southern 

10 

5 

3 

1 

£7 
159 

246 

2 
45 



### 



Cape Girardeau 
9 
24 

5 

1 
61 
126 

137 

1 
15 




■■■■■■■■■ 



ouumrrtiM •• • .n^uii 

• 'CABBONDALt, ILLINOIS i 



?rom the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-24-47 
Carbondale, 111., Nov. - In a quandary about a centerpiece for 

your Thanksgiving dinner? 

Here r s a suggestion from Miss Pauline DeHass, assistant professor 

of home economics and supervisor of the home management practice house 

at Southern Illinois University: 

- 
Select a rather loose head of cabbage, trim off the outer leaves 

and cut a one-inch slice from the top. Place top downward in salt 

water, using two tablespoons of salt for ec.ch quart 01 water. Allow 

cabbage to remain at least two hours in this salt water. This will 

make the cabbage easy to open and press out with your finders in the 

shape of a large rose-. After it is pressed in the desired shape, rinse 

it several times in fresh cold water to remove the salt, which otherwise 

would make it limp. 

Make roses of beets and turnips. Attractive sprays of carrots can 
be made by cutting--as for carrot strips — from the tij of the carrot 
to about an inch from the base end* Wide pieces of celery can be cut 
in the same manner. 

Arrange the beets, turnips, carrot sprays, and curled celery, 
together with parsley, endive or other greens, around the cabbage head. 
Here and there tuck a green or red pepper, cucumber, small egg plant, 
or any other colorful vegetable available* 



m 




ss 



uuinrrtiM v.u 

» LIBKmK/ 

' CAftBONDAtE, ILLINOIS 



IIMUIO 



* 



JFrom the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
iLorena Drummond, Editor 



11-24-47 

Carbondale, 111*, Nov. - Dale Kittle, president of the Southern 
Knights, campus service organization at Southern Illinois University, 
has announced that arrangements have been made to charter busses to 
take students, alumni, and other followers of the Southern football 
team to Bloomington to watch the Maroons in the Thanksgiving Day Corn 
Bowl game. 

Price for the round-trip bus ticket is '^5.00, and reservations may 
be made by check or money order mailed to the Southern Knights in care 
of the President's office at the University. 

Departure time will be at seven o'clock Thursday morning from 
bus terminal in Carbondale. 

The game will pit the champions of the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference, the Southern Maroons, against the champions of 
the College Conference of Illinois, North Central of Naperville, Thus, 
this game will decide the college championship of Illinois. 

A dazzling parade has been planned as an added attraction, 
according to information from Bloomington. The cost of the parade will 
be over ,^1,125,000 with individual floats costing as much as £3,000* 

Included in this parade, which will stretch for over seven miles, 
will be the Southern Illinois University marching band, under the 
direction of Mr. Harold C. Hines. 

The Corn Bowl game, which will be played in what is normally Fred 
Ccirleton Field, will be broadcast by the National Broadcasting company 
with Jack Brickhouse of WGN, Chicago, at the ?! mike. if Station VoIL, 
Carbondale, will carry the broadcast. 





MNUI. 



ouum 

• LIBKhKV 

- ' CAftBOWDAtE, ILLINOIS I 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



11-24-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - A Southern Illinois University art 
student, Don Morris of Johnston City and Marion, is getting off to a 
good start as an art empressario. 

will stage an exhibit of work by approximately 40 Southern 
Illinois artists in Johnston City N$.v, 29-30, which will be "covered" 
by LIFE magazine. 

Morris, an art major at the University, was asked by a Johnston 
City women's club to help them plan a Southern Illinois artists' Exhibit, 
when arrangements fell through, Morris decided to go ahead with an 
exhibit of his own. 

He rented a building at 215 E. Broadway, and will spend his 
Thanksgiving holiday presenting the show. 

Included in the exhibit will be paintings — pastels, watercolors 
and oils, sculpture and woodcarvings, 

Vachel Davis of Eldorc-.do, whose "Coal Miner" has attracted wide 
attention, will be represented in the exhibit. Fred Meyer of West 
Frankfort, a farmer, whose "statues in wood" of representative 
Southern Illinois types such as "The Coal Miner," "The Pioneer," ''The 
Hunter," and other figures, attract wide attention at the University 
Museum here, will also display some of his work. 

Other Southern Illinois artists who will exhibit in Morris's show 
include Margaret Felts of Carterville, Durlin Clendenny of Mozier, 



(more) 



...I 



I ■ .•« 




fl\l 



NMUIO 



uuinrr 



. LIBK/i/t r 

- ' WfiBONDAU, IUIN0IS i 



■2- 

: Mary Parrish Hine of DeSoto, Alice Manning of Carterville, Faye Skinner 
of Carterville, John Hill of Marion, Charles Burke and John Dohanich of 
Herrin, Tom Gore and Ken Gore of Johnston City, Mrs. George Ashley of 
Marion, Virginia Herbert of Cairo, and Mary Ellen Potts Wham of 
Murphysboro, paintings; Jack Bates of Johnston City, sculpture; and 
P^oscoe Misslehorn of Sparta, pencil sketches and prints of Woodcuts. 

Three University faculty members — Ben Watkins, Emily Farnham and 
Ken Ervin, all members of the art department faculty — will send 
paintings to be shown. 

A number of students will also display work. Franklin Hamilton 
of McLeansboro will show both sculpture and paintings, and the following 
will show paintings: Jane Wallace of Marion, Norma Henderson of 
Carbondale, George Russell of Geff, L. E. Hubert of East St, Louis, 
Eloise McCoy of Herrin, Bill Ferketich of Zeigler, Edmond Mietzner of 
Fairfield, Wilbur Hemmer of DuQuoin, Kinuye Jitodai of Carbondale, 
James Nettleton of Jonesboro, Edith Todd of Carbondale, Marvin Mullenix 
of De Soto, Woodrow Rust of Cairo, Clarence Ball of East St. Louis, 
William Moss of Marion and Dongola, Doris Morgan of Sparta, and Morris 
himself. 

Between 100 and 125 items will oe displayed, Morris estimates. 



JUJ.JJ. 

WWW 



•' A l. 




ouumrr* 



' ir 



v 



^^^u 



NUI. 



. LIBKmkV 

r 'WfflOWDALt, ILLINOIS 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond , Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 11-25-47 



Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Guiding the athletic destiny of the 
Southern Illinois University Maroons, who just won the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship and will play on 
[Thanksgiving Day in the Corn Bowl against North Central, is a coaching 
staff of five men. 

Headed by athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin, the staff includes 
ithe following men who are named in length of service: Leland P. "Doc' ? 
Lingle , William if BiiI" Freeburg, Lynn Holder, ana Harlan Hodges. 

athletic Director Martin, who is also head coo.cn of football and 
baseball, joined the Maroon coaching staff in 1939 when he took over the 
football coaching reins from the late William McAndrew. Previously, 
Martin had starred on the Southern gridiron, where he captained the 
championship football team of 1930, played professional football with 
the Chicago Cardinals, and coached championship high school football 
teams at Fairfield, Illinois. "Abe" became athletic director in 1942, 
and during the war years he coached the Maroon cage team to Conference 
and National Intercollegiate (Kansas City) championship. This fall, 
after seventeen leans years for Southern football, "Abe" led the Maroons 
back to the top of the heap. 

Backfield Coach Harlan Hodges is new to the Southern campus. He 
joined the Maroon coaching staff for the first time this ..all, coming 
here after building up a enviable record at West Frankfort high school f 
where he led his charges to several championships, This fall, Hodges' 
work has been of real value in penecting the Southern backfield. 

(more) 



.";, *'■• , 



[.))■ 




r 'CAR80NDAU, IUINOIS * 



-2- 

Line Coach Leland P. "Doc" Lingle is the oldest man on the 
Southern coaching staff in po^nt of service. The line which he has 
coached this year has been the oest in the history of the school. 
f! Doc ,( is also responsible for the success of Southern's cross-country 
and track teams, both of which won IlAC crowns in 1945-46. Year after 
ye,,.r "Doc's" teams have been at the top or runner-up. 

William "Bill" Freeburg has charge of the Maroon "B" squad, and 
has the difficult task of judging and improving green football players. 
Freeburg played end for Southern football teams, and is now head coach 
of the tennis team, which won the I. I. A. C. championship last spring, 
| and also directs the intra-mural athletic program. 

Lynn Holder, assistant "B" squad coach, is one of Southern's all- 
time athletic greets. During his playing days, Holder was outstanding 
in football and basketball, but now he specializes in basketball, for 
which he serves as head coach, and which he lea to the I. I. a. C, title 
last winter. This winter, Holder faces the diificult task of trying to 
repeat. In addition to his foot call and basketball duties, Holder also 
is head coa.ch of golf. 

Each of these five men attended Southern; e^ch played on Southern's 
athletic fields. They ure still on those fields many, many hours a 
week, doing their best for the young men of Southern Illinois, 



M 



fffJF 




uuinr.r* 




■■M 



IMUI. 



*» 



. LIBHhh, 

' CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drumrnond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 
For Wednesday Release: 



11-25-47 



Carbmdale, 111., Nov. - Head Coach Glenn is Abe y? Martin of the 
Southern Illinois University Maroons abandoned the pessimism so prevalent 
anion;, football coaches, and said, when questioned about the Corn Bowl 
game tomorrow, "I think we're going to win. 1 ' 

The mentor of the Illinois Intercollegiate athletic Conference 
hamps is definitely optimistic about the outcome of the Maroons tilt 
ith North Central in the first Corn Bowl tomorrow afternoon at 
loomington. 

North Central of Naperville is a small school with a very good 
'record, seven wins against one loss. The Naperville is a small school 
kith a very good record, seven wins against one loss. Trie Naperville 
school has the habit of winning, and is still smarting from its only 
defeat by Carthage ten days ago, so the Maroons will probably find them 
on the rebound. 

North Central's offensive strength is centered in two fast men, 
left halfback Curi and quarterback Tilden who specialize on wide end 
sweeps. 

To stop these men will be the task of Bob Colborn of Flora and 
Joe Hughes of West Frankfort, two great Southern ends. If Colborn and 
lughes are successful, most of the offensive power of North Central will' 
be checked. 

Southern has been lucky all season by the lack of serious injuries. 
Only one man, Bill Wilkinson of West Frankfort, has been injured 
seriously, and now Wilkinson is back in uniform, 

(more) 



t ' 




uuinr.mM 







'CARBOWDAt£, ILLINOIS 



-2- 

Except for colds which have struck George Sawyer of Wood Kiver 
and Don Riggs of Fairfield, the. Karoons are in perfect shape. These 
colds will probably not slow down these men after the kickoff at the 
Corn Bowl. 

Southern's most spectacular offensive treat in the last two games 
h&s been a long pass from brilliant Bill i-Ialinsky of Flora to sensationaJ 
George Sawyer. The pass has been thrown three times in the last two 
games, and has been complete each time for a grand total of over 100 
yards. 

Dick Seelman of Flora, who ailing right shoulder has prevented him 
[from throwing his long, long, aerial bullets for the last several games, 
reports that his arm is ready for action. 

The starting line up: 
LE Joe Hughes of West Frankfort 
LT Charles i-lathieu of Eldorado, Capt. 
LG Jim Lovin of bent on 

C Bill Cosgrove of benton 
RG Bob Etheridge of Fairfield 
RT John Corn of Benton 
RE Bob Colbom of Flora 

QB Bill Malinsky of Flora or George Baysinger of C^rbondale, 
LHB Dick Seelman of Flora 
RHB George Sawyer of Wood River 
FB Don Riggs of Fairfield 

The game will be broadcast by the National Broadcasting Company 
and will be carried in this area by Station V/CIL, Ca.rbondale. 

H 



, ;■*.< 



I ..«:.. : 




wm 



uumrmv 



• ll 



NUI5 



. LIBKmW 

*Wfi80«DAI.£, ILLINOIS 3 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Weeklies 12-1-47 

* 
Carbondaie, 111., Dec. - The most successful season in the 

history of Southern Illinois University football closed Thanksgiving day 

when the Maroons of Coach Glenn "Abe" Martin ovsr-powered the Cardinals 

of North Central in the first annual Corn Bowl game at Bloomington by 

a 21 to margin. 

The Bowl victory brilliantly set off a season during which the 
Maroons won the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference for the 
first time since 1930. 

Southern won its first game from Scott Field 5$ to 0, and then went 
into an early season slump by losing to two Indiana teams, Evansville 
College 7 to and Indiana State Teachers College 21 to 6. 

From here on the Maroons were invincible. In order, they defeated 
Western Illinois State College 7 to 0, Northern Illinois State Teachers 
College 20 to 0, Arkansas State College 12 to 7, tied. Illinois Normal 
University o to 6, and defeated in succession Eastern Illinois State 
College 33 to 13, Southeast Missouri Soate College 20 to 13, and North 
Central in the' Corn Bowl finale, 21 to 0. 

Season record: seven won; two lost; and one tied. 



### 




uumrmv 



fir 



■"" 



mui. 



' CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Special to Dailies and Weeklies 12-1-47 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - Southern Illinois has too long been 
maligned as an area of worn-out land, a Southern Illinois University 
[soils expert declares. 

Marshall Clark, assistant professor of agriculture and former 
professional soils consultant, asserts that Southern Illinois has many 
[excellent programs of soil conservation under way. 

"These programs,' 1 ' he said, "range in scale from the 5,000-acre 
h grassland farming' project of the University of Illinois at Dixon Spring- 
to many excellently-managed private farms, both large and small, scattered 
throughout the Southern Illinois area." 

To give students in the soils class of the University agriculture 
[department the opportunity for first-hand observation and study of the 
[best practices in soil management and conservation, Prof. Clark has 
[arranged class visits- to some of these developments, 

A day was recently spent at the Dixon Springs project by a group of 
students from the soils class, accompanied by Clark, Dr. Henry J. Rehn, 
[dean of the College of Vocations and Professions, and Dr. Lowell Tucker, 
associate professor and acting chairman of the agriculture department. 

Among the students were Venus L. Vaughn ol Vienna, Leavell Swink of 
Dongola, Robert Schoene of Trenton, Thomas -H. Stacy of Chicago, Veryl E. 
[Schubert of Carlyle, Sidney a. Gooch of Mt. Vernon, Robert Eichcolz of 
Pinckneyville , Roy E. Phelps of Robbs, 

(more) 




uuinrrtiM 



» rr 



■ " 



NUI5 



, LIBRmKV 

'CAftSONDAtE, ILLINOIS 



-2- 

J. D. McCall of Vienna, Robert Harrell of Cobden, William a. Doerr 
of Vergennes, James Brooks of Louisville, John H. Craig of H^rrin, 
Clarence E. Cox of Vienna, William Cooper of Carbondale, Donald Dillow 
of Anna, and Leland Ashby of Eldorado. 

"The Dixon Springs project is a well conceived and efficiently 
directed example of a large scale program,, well suited to che conserva'cio 
needs of the more roiling areas of Southern Illinois,'' Prof. Clark 
xplained. 

The 5,000-acre project has been under way since 1933-34 and has 
restored to pasturage productivity land which was formerly almost waste, 
he said. 

The reclaimed land yields astonishing results in feeding livestock. 
The lamb crop on the sheep-grazing phc.se of the project where western- 
bred ewes and their lambs were carried on a self-contained tract oi land, 
yielded an average of 290 pounds of lamb per acre for the pc st three 
prears. 

Sold at prevailing market prices of ..20 per hundred-weight, this 
crop brought an income of [.5$ per acre, nn additional income of ' v 8 per 
acre for wool clipped from the ewes makes a total gross income of v 66 
per acre. Overhead and labor costs are exceptionally low. 

The beef cattle grazing space of the program--less spectacular than 
the sheep yield — showed favorable returns that varied sharply with the 
excellence of the pasture crop used and the grazing plan of utilizing 
these crops, Prof. Clark pointed out. 

Pasture returns as high as "jl+6,78 per acre were realized from beef 
produced in the demonstration. 

The soil-building and erosion control program most economical for 

pasture development, he said, has been found to consist of the following 

practices: 

(more ) 




uumr.mM 



NUI5 



u 



. LIBKmK r 

'W«BO«DAt£, ILLINOIS i 



-3- 

1. Clearing the land of trees and brush, leaving only enough lor 
shade. 

2. Basic fertilizer applications of three to four tons of limestone 
and 700 to 1,000 pounds of raw rock phosphate per ucre. 

3. Land tillage on contour, using heavy cover crop discs in place 
of plows to prepare the soil for seeding* This practice mixes such 
organic material as may be on the land with the surface soil to promote 
water absorption and prevent erosion, 

4. Fall seeding of rye, biuegrass and red top grasses, followed in 
early spring on the same ground by a seeding of Ladino clover and 
lespadeza. 

5. Controlled pasture utilization where stock is rotated from field 
to field during the season to prevent excessive grazing. 

6. Periodic clipping — once or twice a season--to prevent the seeding 
• of noxious weeds. 

"This low- cost program assures a pasture th^t will give satisfactory 
grazing for periods of eight to 10 years before renovation is necessary," 
Professor Clark declared. 

Among the many farmers in the Southern Illinois area who follow 
sound practices of soil conservation is Leo Stadelbacher of Cobden, 
Clark said. 

The University soils class visited the Stadelbacher farm to study 
the results of 30 years* application of erosion control to small fruit 
farming with its high degree of soil tillage on typical Southern Illinois 
hill land. 

The Stadelbacher holdings originally comprised an area of 40 acres 
of land so severely cut by water erosion that it was practically 
abandoned. The topography of the land varied from small level areas of 

(more ) 




uuinrm\i 



IMUI5 



U I 



. UBHhM 

f- 'WftBOWDAtE, ILLINOIS i 



-4- 

an tf.cre in extent to slopes of 25 per cent. Gullies were so deep that 

it was impossible to traverse the fields. 

As time passed, this land was brought under control by using check 
dams and concrete in the worst gullies, supplemented by grass waterways 
and closely spaced terraces. All of the land is tilled on contour. 

Principal crops are the bramble fruits and strawberries. Commonly- 
grown truck crops are an additional source of income. 

Mr. Stadelbacher has recently added another i+0 acres to his holdings 
and the University class was able to see at first hand just how the 
experiences of 30 years in erosion control and soil building can be used 
to bring land under control under present-day economic conditions. 

i? The prosperous, neat, well-kept appearance of the land and the 
beautiful spacious home of -the owner attest to the success of these 
operations developed on land once considered almost worthless/' Prof. 
Clark explained. 

The farm oper. ted by Valley Blacklock and his son of Vergennes 
offers a sharp contrast in soil conservation to the highly developed 
terrace system practiced by Mr. Stadelbacher, Clark pointed out. 

Mr. Blacklock's 600-acre farm is oper ted as a "dirt farmer's" 
version of the Dixon Springs plan. 

The land is largely devoted to grass and hay, with enough land 
cultivated in corn each year to fatten a substantial drove of hogs for 
market and to maintain in perfect condition a choice herd of purebred 
Hereford cattle. The whole operation gives evidences of a well-planned, 
thrifty program. 

# 

Farm operations of John Cerney of Cobden combine in one program 

features of both the Stadelbacher and Blacklock systems of soil 

utilization, according to Clark. 

The greater part of the land on this 300-acre farm is of rolling 

(more ) 




uuinr.mv 




WJl 



. LIBkMh, 

' CttBONDALE, ILLINOIS 1 



topography best suited to pasture lanct farming. On this land Mr. Cerney 
and his so*is have developed and maintain a fine hero of purebred Herefort 
cattle. 

On restricted areas of the farm Cerney grows crops of early 
vegetables which are used as supplementary sources of income. These 
ve^etcble crops have proven an e xcellent means of utilizing the manure 
which is a by-product of the beef cattle enterprise. Moreover, the 
labor requirements of vegetable-growing dovetail well with those of 
beef-growing, making an economically sound combination of agricultural 
activities, Prof. Clark explained. 

"Our visits to these practical farming operations are not only 
giving the soils class the chance to see the application of theoretical 
or experimental programs, '"Prof. Clark declared," but also enable each 
student to get suggestions as to how these practices may be applied to 
his own home farm." 



/,< •■■ // 

m 




uuinrmv 



I^UIO 



f IP 



*» 



. LIBKmK / 

"CARBONDAU, ILLINOIS 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



12-2-47 

Garbondale, 111., Dec. - Basketball Coach Lynn Holder of 
Southern Illinois University commented after the first scrimmage 
Monday that he was fairly well pleased with the performance of his 
charges even though they committed many of the basketball sins inherent 
in early season practice. 

The defending Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic Conference champion; 
face the Flyers of Scott Field in the Southern opener December 5 in 
the Men's Gymnasium. 

Players reporting from the football squad are "all thumbs 7 ' and 
still depend too much upon body blocks instead of finesse, but these 
rough bits of play will be smoothed out rapidly. 

Three members of last yearns championship outfit are on hand to 
lend stability to the Maroon's early season efforts. These men are 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel, and Bob 
Colborn of Flora. 

Only Shoaf was out for prc.ctice this week, as Stinson and Colborn 
were still playing football with the I. I. A. C .--Corn Bowl champions. 

Unfortunately for the early season Maroon basketball hopes, Colborn, 
who is a great end in football in addition to being a stellar basketball. 
guard, suffered a fairly serious shoulder separation in the Corn Bowl 
football game and will be ready only for very limited duty in the early 
games. 

(more) 




_ 



uuinrmM 



ir 



■ " 



NUIO 



. LIBK/ihi 

- 'CARBONDAtt, ILLINOIS I 



Although Holder has made no definite commitments on his starting 
line-up against Scott Field Friday night, it is probable that a large 
number of his squad will see action, giving him an opportunity to judge 
his charges under fire. 

If he depends upon any few players to carry the Maroons to a 
victory over Scott Field, it will probably be the players such as 
Shoaff , Charles and John Goss of Marion, Jack Long of Flora, Paul 
Beatty of Zeigler, and Jack Eadie of West Frankfort. 

These men have been practicing for several weeks and are rounding 
into fairly good shape. 

Especially promising is the six-feet four-inch Long, a sophomore, 
who now has a year of experience behind him and should develop into 
prominence. 




umrmM 



INUI5 



MP 



. LIBK/ih, 

- ' CAR80NDAU, ILLINOIS i 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 






12-2-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - A study of office jobs available in 
this community was launched this week by two business teachers in the 
local high schools — Carbondale Community High School and University 
High School at Southern Illinois University. 

Mrs. Bonnie Lockwood, instructor at University High, and Mrs. Lois 
Nelson, instructor at Community High, have collaborated on two 
questionnaires, one to be filled out by the employee, the other by the 
employer. 

Results of the survey are to be used by the two instructors in 
planning their courses to make them more practical and more suitable 
to the needs of local business firms, Mrs. Lockwood explained. 

"We will also use the information in counseling students who may 
want to apply for positions with these firms, i? she said. 

The questionnaires call for information on the amount of training 
and experience, personal abilities and characteristics, and other specia.' 
abilities, required for each position, as well as data on salary range, 
labor turnover for the job, and other information. 

The survey has received the endorsement of the Carbondale 
Businessmen's Association. 

Jl-LiU 

ffnff 




uumr.rtiM 



f rr 




w\b 



. LIBkMh, 

j k CA«80WDAt£, ILLINOIS i 



$rom the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



12-2*47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. 2 - Miss Maxine Vogeley arrived today to 
assume the position as director of Anthony Hail, girls 1 dormitory at 
Southern Illinois University, President Chester' F. Lay has announced. 

She will succeed Miss Minette Barber, who has directed the dormitor 
since 1936, but who has asked to be relieved of her duties because of 
ill health of her mother. Miss Barber will continue to teach in the 
English department and will devote some time to special assignments f 
especially in counseling women students in connection with the office 
of the Dean of Women, President Lay said. 

"Miss Barber's request to be relieved of her dormitory duties was 
a matter of deep regret to all of us, for she has done an excellent job 
in managing the business affairs of the hall and a really splendid work 
in counselling and guiding the hundreds of girls who have lived there 
during her regime, i? the University president declared. 

Present and former residents of the dormitory sent a message of 
regret at Miss Barber T s departure to the president, and expressed their 
appreciation for her help and guidance. 

Miss Vogeley, the new dormitory director, though young, has had 
broad experience, including travel in half a dozen foreign lands, foreign 
service for the State Department, work as translator and cryptographer, 
teaching, secretarial work, and student counseling. 

She holds both the, bachelor of arts and the bachelor of education 
degrees from the University of Cincinnati, and the master of arts degree 

(more) 




uuinr.mM 



IT 



• ii 



\u\b 



' CARBOWDALL, ILLINOIS 1 



in personnel work from Cornell University. 

She has taught in the public schools of Ohio; was formerly 
Secretary, at Cornell University, in the office of Dean Blanding who 
has since become President of Vassar College; and was for a time foreign 
service clerk for the State Department in Bucharest, Rumania. More 
recently she was assistant in the student counseling program at Cornell, 

Her travel has taken her to Trinidad and the West Indies, to 
Bermuda, Italy, France, and Switzerland, in audition to Rumania. 

She is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, academic honor society, and 
a former holder of an American Association of University Women scholarship 
as well as other prizes and scholarships. 

m 




f 'CAR80«DAt£, ILLINOIS 



« 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond, Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Southern Illinois University basketball 
Coach Lynn Holder has been experimenting this week with various 
combinations in preparation for the. Maroon's opener against Scott Field 
in Carbondale Friday night. 

It will be a busy weekend for the Holdermen, since they are schedule 
against the powerful Evansville Purple aces in Evansville Saturday night* 

In practice sessions, guard Bob Colborn of Flora has revealed that 
the shoulder separation he suffered in the Corn Bowl football game is 
improving rapidly, and he may be able to give a good account of himself 
over the weekend. 

Sore feet, the typical early season plague suffered by all basketbal 
teams, are continuing to hinder Maroon practice sessions. Joe Hughes of 
West Frankfort has been seriously slowed down by sensitive soles, but he 
is mending rapidly. 

Long scrimmage sessions have been standard fare for the Maroon 
eager s all week, and although Coach Holder will not allow himself any 
show of optimsism, he carries the air of a person who has high hopes. 




uuinr.niM 



fir 



m 



WUI. 



. LIBKmk r 

'WfflONOAtEJUINOlS 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 
Lorena Drummond , Editor 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. 3 - Southern Illinois University 1 s great 

end, Bob Colborn of Flora, has been chosen by his teammates as the 

"Most-Valuable Player" on the Maroon Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 

Conference and Corn Bowl champion team. 

The selection was made at a banquet here Tuesday night in honor of 

the championship team. At the same meeting John Corn of Benton, a 

junior, was elected captain for 1947. 

Colborn' s selection for the prize honor came as a surprise to no 

a 
one, since his play had been . sensational all fall. He was/smooth, 

dependable pass receiver and a dangerous threat on end around plays. 

On defense Colborn was especially brilliant. No opposing team 
succeeded in gaining more than a very few yards a game around his end, 
and most teams had a net loss yardage for their efforts. 

Corn had been a brilliant tackle all season. His selection makes th 
third straight year a tackle has lead the Maroons. Sam i-Iilosevich of 
Zeigler was captain in 1946 and Charles Mathieu of Eldorado served in 
the recent 1947 season. 



m 




uuinrn 



fir 

LI 



■ 



NUId 



. LIBtf/M 

j- 'CAR80NDAt£, ILLINOIS 



From the Southern Illinois University Information Service 



Lorena Drummond, Editor 



12-3-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Approximately 25 Southern Illinois 
educators will tour reorganized public schools in Kentucky Dec. 7-$ 
on the fourth such expedition sponsored by the School Reorganization 
Committee of Southern Illinois University, according to Dr. Howard E. 
Bosley, committee chairman. 

Many of the teachers, school survey board members and administrators 
who will make the trip are students in University extension classes at 
Elizabethtown, Benton and Harrisburg. 

The group will visit Lincoln's Birthplace, near Hodgensville, Ky. , 
iT Hy Old Kentucky Home" at Bardstown and the "My Old Kentucky Home School" 
near Bardstown. The Vine Grove and Hardin County schools will also be 
inspected and discussed with school officials, 

"The purpose of this tour is to study the operation of large school 
administrative units," Dr. Bosley explained. 

"In Kentucky, each county is an administrative unit with a board of 
education of five members elected by the people to control the county 
schools. In sonre?, but not in all CQUnties, one or more independent 
units may exist within a county, though a marked tendency exists for 
these independent units to petition to - join the larger county school 
unit." 



### 




uuinrn 
Mr 



V 



NUId 



w i i 



. LIBKmK/ 

"CAftSONDAtt, ILLINOIS 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^ B ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ H 



12-4-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - A slight decrease in the total 
enrollment from the fall term is expected in the registration for the 
winter term at Southern Illinois University, December £-9. The total is 
expected to exceed the 2500 registered for the 1946-47 winter term. 

The new I.B.M. machines will be used again to speed up registration. 
These machines were used for the first time at the University last fall 
term. 

Program cards made out in advance by all students registered for 
the fall term will do much to accelerate the registration. Students must 
realize, however, that programs made out two weeks ago are not a guarante 
of schedule, but an indication of the students wishes*. 

Several new courses are being offered for the first time winter 
term. Some of them are: Volley Ball 206, American Square Dances and 
Mixers 207 in the physical education department; in the economics 
department: Applied Economics 208 and Advanced Honey and Banking 416, 
Money and Banking 315 is a prerequisite for 416. Introduction to Drama 
206 may be included as one of the sophomore courses in English of which 
the student needs two in order to meet graduate requirement. Electronics 
405 will be introduced in the physics department. 

All courses previously scheduled for Dr. Kenneth D. Luney, associate 
professor of economics, will be taken by Vernon G. Morris, assistant 
professor of economics. Mr. Morris comes to the University from the 
Tennessee Valley authority where he has been employed in the research 
department for several years. 

Mi 







^L. 



■ 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

-^ — — — — — — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^^^M^^^^^^^^H^^^^^^^^ 



12-4-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Tau Delta Rho, a local discussion club, 
Illinois Upsilon Chapter of Pi Kappa Delta, national honorary forensics, 
society, and the. -Speech Department of Southern Illinois University will 
play hosts to Egypt f s second annual High School Speech Festival on 
December 6, according to Dr. P. Merville Larson, chairman of the Universi 
Speech Department. 

Every high school student eligible to participate in speech 
activities under the Illinois High School association may take part. 
Each contestant is allowed to take part in three events, and not more 
than six students from one school may participate in a single event. 

Speech events include oratorical declamation, dramatic declamation, 
humorous declamation, extemporaneous speaking, original oratory;, poetry 
reading, and group discussion. 

Students from Du..uoin, Sesser, \7est' Frankfort , Vienna, Sparta, 
Paducah, Kentucky,, and the University high schools will participate. 



m 






, 



tau^. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

■— — — — " ■— — ^-« — — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ^h^-^^^^^im^^^^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 12- 4-47 

For Friday Release: 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - With high hopes for a successful 
season, the Southern Illinois University Maroons meet the Flyers of 
Scott Field Army Air Field in the S« I. U. Men's Gymnasium at 8:15 
Friday night . 

Maroon Coach Lynn Holder has announced that his starting line-up 
will include three holdover regulars from last year's Illinois 
Intercollegiate ^.thleuic Conference championship team. 

Quentin Stinson of Eldorado will start at center, as he has been 
doing regularly for two years, Bob Colborn of Flora, who was recently 
chosen the "Most-Valuable Player" on the championship Maroon football 
team, mil also start, although he has been slowed in practice by a lame 
shoulder. 

The third holdover from last year's first team is sharp-shooting 
Oliver Shoaf of Mt. Carmel, a senior playing his second year for the 
Maroons. 

To complete his starting line-up, Holder has indicated that he will 
start two newcomers to the Southern basketball scene, Joe Hughes and 
Jack Eadie, both of West Frankfort. 

Both men are sophomores, and both have plenty of high class 
basketball competition behind them. Hughes lettered with Northwestern 
last year, and Eadie earned a position on the Service All-America team 
during the war. 

Both men are known as good scorers, and Hughes' performance in 
practice scrimmages indicates that he will probably be a steller 
defensive player as well. 

For the relief of these men Holder has a well-balanced crew of 
reserves whom he will probably use liberally. 

Leedio Cabutti of Johnson City is ready to begin his fourth season 
with the Maroon cagers after having earned letters in the previous three 
seasons. Other returning lettermen ready for duty are Charles and John 
Goss, brothers from Marion. 

(more) 



^L. 



■ Hi 



-2- 

aIso on the Maroon squad will be lanky Jack Lone of Flora, six 
feet three inches of promising center, Glen Oxford of Cave- in-Rock, a 14, 

sophomore who lettered last year at Murray ( Ky. ) State Teachers College, 
and Paul Beaty of Zeigler, who has been advanced from last year's 
;? B W squad. 

The Maroons have no information on Scott Field, and don't know 
tfhat kind of competition they will face. 

after being tested on Friday night by Scott Field, the Maroons 
Degin their collegiate campaign against the always powerful Purple Aces 
pf Evansville College in a game to be played at Evansville. 

The Maroon w B tv team will entertain the early- comers with a 
Dreliminary game against the DuQuoin Independents starting at 6:45 p.m. 



«## 



it 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

^— "^ ^^^— ^^-^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. Haa^^H^^Bu^^^^^ 



II 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-8-V7 

Carbondale, 111., Nov. - With ti.o good victories under their 
belts, the Southern Illinois University Maroons are girding themselves 
this week for a campaign which will include five games before Christmas, 
with four of them out, of town. 

Tuesday night the Maroons, who are flushed from victories over 
Scott Field 96 to 32 and Ev&nsville College 4S V to 39, travel to Paducah 
where they will meet the always good Murray (Ky. ) State Teachers on 
neautral ground at Tilghman High gymnasium. 

Over the weekend the Maroons will invade the South for two games. 
Friday night they visit the Indians of Arkansas State College of Jonesboi 
Arkansas and the following night they run into another tribe in the form 
of the Southeast Missouri State Teachers College Indians at Cape 
Girardeau. 

In their opener against Scott Field the Maroons of Coach Lynn 
Holder met almost no opposition and had no trouble in piling up an 
all-time scoring record for Southern. 

The reserves played half of the game, and the scoring by the players 
was fairly evenly split, as thirteen Maroons hit the net. Quentin 
Stinson of Eldorado was high point man for the evening with 16 counters. 

Evansville was a much more difficult proposition the following 
night in a game played in the Evansville Armory. 

In the first half the Maroons couldn't find the hoop effectively 
and were trailing at the end of the period, 25 to 23. Only the 12 points 
tallied by Jack Eadie of T Jest Frankfort in this half kept the Holdermen 
in the game. 

But the second half was a different story altogether. With all 
five starters, Bob Colborn on Flora, Joe Hughes of 'Vest Frankfort, 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Oliver Shoaff of lit. Carmel, and Eadie 
scoring well, the Maroons quickly established a commanding lead and went 
on to win going away. 

Sadie's 15 points topped the Maroon's scoring, and Hafele's 12 
were best for Evansville. 

aii 



^^ 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — ■—■■ — — "^-^— ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^—m 



1-col. mat enclosed 12-8-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - The bass-baritone role in "The Messiah, 1 
to be presented as a pre-Christmas oratorio at Southern Illinois 
University Sunday, Dec. 14, will be sung by James W. McEnery of Chicago, 
widely known concert and oratorio singer, Dr. Maurits Kesnar, conductor, 
has announced. 

McEnery has been soloist in many of the larger churches in and 
around Chicago, serving in that capacity at Rockefeller Memorial Chapel 
at the University of Chicago for some seven years. 

He has appeared as s oloist with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, the 
North Shore Choral Society, the Euterpean Oratorio Chorus, the T, . T ausau 
Oratorio Chorus, and in performances of oratorios by colleges and other 
groups throughout the Middle West. 

He has had several radio programs, has been heard on all of the 
major network stations in Chicago, and recently presented a recital ait 
Kimball Hall, drawing excellent reviews. 

"The Messiah 1 ' is being presented for the second consecutive year 
here by the Southern Illinois Oratorio Society, organized here in the 
fall of 1946 by Dr. Kesnar, professor and chairman of the University 
music department. 

Church choir singers from many communities of Southern Illinois and 

other vocalists are joining with the University Mixed Chorus to sing 

the Habdel oratorio. 

McEnery is the third guest soloist announced by Dr. Kesnar for the 

leading roles in the Dec. 14 production. Miss Camille Anderson who 

sang the soprano lead last year will again sing this role, while Thomas 

W. Williams of Knox College's music faculty, will take the tenor solos. 

"The Messiah" will be given in Shryock Auditorium on the University 

campus, starting at 7:30 p. m. , and will be complimentary to the public. 



m 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^■■m^^BHBHBHH^H 



Special to Southern Illinois Dailies 12-8-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - To help them plan business courses so 

the students will be better trained Tor the jobs they will fill, two 

Carbondale high school business teachers are making a survey of office 

jobs in this community. 

Mrs. Bonnie Lockwood, instructor in University High School at 

Southern Illinois University, and Mrs. Lois Nelson, of Community High 

School, have developed two questionnaires, one to be filled out by the 

employee, the other by the employer. 

The project has received the endorsement of the Carbondale 

Businessman's Association. 

M 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - a new director has been secured for 
the women T s dormitory at Southern Illinois University, President Chester 
F. Lay has announced. 

She is Miss Maxine Vogeley, holder of two bachelor's degrees from 
the University of Cincinnati and a master's degree in personnel work fron 
Columbia University. She has taught in the public schools of Ohio, was 
secretary in a student dean's office at Cornell, served as foreign 
service clerk for the State Department in Bucharest, Rumania, worked as 
translator ana cryptographer for the FBI, and has served as assistant in 
the student counseling program at Cornell. 

Miss Vogeley replaces Hiss J. Minette Barber, director of Anthony 
Hall since 1936, who has asked to be relieved of the dormitory duties 
because of the ill health of her mother, but who will remain on the 
University faculty as assistant professor of English and in addition 
will devote some time to special assignments, especially in counseling 
woj-ian students in connection with the office of the Dean of Women. 



m 



* 



Southern Illinois 



«i^ "—^ ■■ University 

! Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^_ 



12-9-47 

Caroondale, 111,, Dec. 10 - A total of 2,562 students enrolled 
for the winter term at Southern Illinois University by the close of the 
second day of registration yesterday. 

Late registrants are expected to push the total up to last year's 
winter term enrollment of 2,5&9. 

On Monday, the first day of registration, 1,5#4 students had 
enrolled, or nearly a third more than on the first day of registration 
a year ago. The accelerated rate was attributed to a streamlined 
registration system involving use of International Business Machine 
cards which simplify the filling out of enrollment cards. 

Today's registration is almost two and one-half times the final 
total for the winter term two years ago, when 1,141 students signed up. 

No figures are yet available on the number of veterans enrolled 
this term, 

### 



12-9-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - The Illinois Association for Health, 
Physical Education, and Recreation will hold its fall meeting Saturday, 
December 13, in the gymnasium at Southern Illinois University. 

Dr. Dorothy Davie s, general chairman of the meeting, has announced 
that the theme will be "Physical Education for the Small High School." 

Dr. George Stafford, health coordinator at the University of Illinoi 
will keynote the pro , ram with a talk on "The Recreational Program for 
Small High Schools." 

Exhibitions will be given by the students of several of the high 
schools as well as by the University students showin , the techniques 
and team play which has been developed through the present physical 
education program. 

infif 






Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



SI 



^^^ 



47 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Forty-five Southern Illinois University 
married or soon-to-be-married student veterans are in process of moving 
into the University's latest housing project. 

The 68-apartment housing project, located at the Illinois Ordnance 
Plant, some 10 miles from the campus, was accepted recently from the 
Public Housing Administration by University President Chester F. Lay, 
and was opened t o occupancy Dec. 6. The remaining apartments will be 
filled as rapidly as applicants qualify. 

Three of the applicants who have secured apartments at the new 
project are scheduled to be married soon and to take their brides into 
the new apartments, according to Van a. Buboltz, University veterans 
housing project supervisor. They are Philip R. Strange of Carbondale, 
James E. Lovin of McLeansboro and Floyd Eadie of West Frankfort. 

Fred Armstrong of DuQuoin and Calvin Threlkeld of Golconda are 
newly-weds. 

This housing project is the second to be opened by the University 
for veteran students, the first being a 105-apartment project on 
Chautauqua Street near the campus, fully occupied since last summer. 
Still another group of apartments at the ordnance plant — 27 in number-- 
are being constructed, which will make a total of 200. 

The 6& apartments now available at the ordnance plant are 
exceptionally attractive ones, University officials point out. They 
are well-finished and well-arranged. One, two-and three-bedroom 
apartments are available. Maximum rents for the three types are |35j 
^37 .50 and $i+2.50 per month, a limited amount of furniture may be 
rented if the applicants so desire. 

One faculty member, Vernon G. Morrison, a new addition to the 
economics faculty, has been approved for one of the ordnance plant 
apartments, in addition to the 45 students. 

Other applicants already approved include: 

Robert W, Lickess of Murphysboro, Don C. Brammeier of Oakdale, 
Carl Brush of Brownfield, Murvel Lee Huffstutler of Mt. "Vernon, James 
E. Winkleman of Harrisburg, William E. Helton of Murphysboro, and 
Leonard E. Rapp of Galatia. Orlie L. Shannon of Grand Chain, Lloyd F. 
Morris of Carbondale, Paul E. Fraley of Carbondale, Thomas S. Rich of 

(more) 



^^. 






-2- 

Anna, Lee E. Unger of Olmsted,. Maurice D. Holland of West Frankfort 
and Vernon Matthews of Murphysboro. George A. Ferguson of Tamaroa, 
Richard R. Maulding of Kinmundy, Lloyd Higgerson of Valier, Victor N. 
Smith of Benton, Howard L. Erickson of Wyanet and John H. Manken of 
Gorham. Johnny W. Hill of Carrier Mills, John H. Frazier of Oblong, 
W, H. Etheridge, Jr. of Fairfield, William K. Doerr of DuQuoin, Marvin 
F. McBride of Murpnysboro and Roy C. West of Thompsonville. Robert E. 
Kimmel of DeSoto, Robert Mantle of East St. Louis, Robert C. Fuson of 
Casey, Richard Carpenter of Carbondale, Thurman 0. Watson of Alton, 
Kenneth Gray of Sims and Norman G. Hickam of Alto Pass. Joseph Kern 
of Hurst, Val Moore of Benton, Charles D. Sheffler of West Frankfort, 
Lyle Beltz of Cobden and Jerry E. Scherer of Carbondale. 



12-9-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - A wide variety of cultural and 
entertainment events has been scheduled for Southern Illinois 
University students during the winter and spring term by the Lectures 
and Entertainment Committee, according to Dr. P. M. Larson, committee 
chairman. 

The first event of the w inter term was a concert Dec. 9 by Sanroma, 
noted pianist, presentee by the Carbonaale Community Concert Associatior 
which the University helps to support financially, in order that 
students may attend the concerts without charge. 

On January 14, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra will be 
presented and on' March 23, Walter Cassell, baritone, both under 
Community Concert auspices. 

On January 22, the Lectures and Entertainment Committee will 
present Irene Bewley, folklorist; January 29, a debate between Mark 
Van Doren and Ely Culberson on "Federal World Government"; February 26, 
Gertrude Lippincott, dancer; also in February, Samuel Dushkin, violinis 
February 9, Tom Scott, American ballad singer; March 8-9, George 
Richey, artist; March 29, Dr. a. M. Harding, astronomer; April 12-14, 
Mrs. Bonaro Overstreet, poet-psychologist. 

m 



^^^ 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^—j-^-—-— 



12-9-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - k vocalist from the faculty of 
Southern Illinois University will sing one of the leading roles in 
;? The Messiah," to be presented here Sunday evening, Dec. 14, at 7:30 
p. m. by the Southern Illinois Oratorio Society. 

Miss Kate Moe, assistant professor of music, will sing the contralto 
solos in the Handel oratorio, Dr. Maurits Kesnar, conductor and organizer 
of the oratorio society, has announced. 

This will be Miss Moe's first public appearance as a singer since 
she joined the University faculty in September. Formerly head of the 
music department at Itasca Junior College in Minnesota and formerly on 
the faculty at Valparaiso University, Ind., she spent the past year 
studying in the Royal Conservatory of Music in Copenhagen, Denmark, 

She holds the bachelor 1 s degree from the University of Minnesota 
and the master's degree from the University of Idaho, and has studied at 
Minneapolis College of Music, under Chicago teachers, and at the New 
England Conservatory of Music in Boston. 

a native of Vermont, she is the daughter of Meta Moe, Danish 
novelist, whose books are all published in Denmark, 

For two years durin.^ the war, Miss Moe was a lieutenant (j.g,) 
in the U. S. Coast Guard, in charge of Coast Guard musical activities 
in the 13th Naval District, Seattle. 

She is interested in aviation as a hobby, has flown light planes 
for several years and holds a pilot's license. 

Other soloists for "The Messiah' 5 will be Thomas W. Williams of the 
voice faculty of Knox College, tenor; James W. McEnery, soloist at the 
Rockefeller Memorial Chapel, University of Chicago, bass-baritone; and 
Miss Camille nnderson, noted concert, radio, opera and oratorio artist, 
soprano. Miss Anderson sang the soprano lead in last year's production 
of "The Messiah" here by the Southern Illinois Oratorio Society under 
Dr. Kesnar's direction. 

The oratorio will be open to the public, without charge. 



^ 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^■■■■^■■■■^^■IIMBil^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-9-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Varsity awards for men who engaged in 
fall athletic competition at Southern Illinois University have been 
announced by Maroon Athletic Director Glenn "Abe" Martin. 

The following men received letters for football: Joe Hughes of 
West Frankfort; Bob Colborn of Flora; Galan Davis of Du.uoin; Leedio 
Cabutti of Johnston City; Charles Mathieu of Eldorado; John Corn of 
Benton; Warren Littleford of Vandalia; Quentin Stinson of Eldorado; 
Jim Lovin of Benton; Bob Etheridge of Fairfield; J. L. Gross of DuQuoinj 
J. Pieron of Murphysboro; Bill Cosgrove of Benton; Howard Jones of Bentor 
Charles Crouch of Carbondale; Bill Malinsky of Flora; George Baysinger 
of Carbondale; Bob Johnson of DuQuoin; Dick Seelman of Flora; George 
Beltz of Marion; George Sawyer of Wood River; Charles Heinz of Gillespie; 
Bill Wilkinson of West Frankfort; Roy Ragsdale of Carbondale; Don Riggs • 
of Fairfield; Jack Stephens of West Frankfort; Robert "Bunker" Jones of 
West Frankfort; Bret McGinnis of Carbondale; and, manager, Dale Houghlanc 
of Carbondale. 

Six men were awarded letters for cross-country. They are: William 
Keene of Carrier Mills; Joe McLaiferty of Carbondale; Buddy Miller of 
Carbondale; Robert Lunnenmann of Pinckneyville; Leonard Burden of Herrin; 
and Bill Dorris of Benton. 

### 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Southern Illinois University Athletic 
Director Glenn "Abe" Martin and Dr. William Neal Phelps, chairman of the 
faculty athletic committee, will attend the meeting of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference at the Sherman Hotel in Chicago 
Friday, Dec. 12, 

§## 



<* 






Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^n^^HmiHi 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Putting on a great demonstration of 
basketball skill, the Southern Illinois University Maroons topped a 
good Murray (Ky») State College team Tuesday night in Paducah 71 to 5$. 

The men of Coach Lynn Holder displayed a form of basketball 
totally unexpected this early in the season. Their passing was sharp, 
the shooting was excellent, and the general deportment of floor play 
was smooth and efficient. 

The Maroon shooting was especially effective. Paced in the scoring 
column by forward Bob Colborn of Flora who tallied 23 points, the entire 
Maroon team hit 1+1% of their shots from the floor. 

Although Colborn led in the scoring, Oliver Shoaff of Mt. Carmel 
and Jack Eadie of West Frankfort provided the outstanding thrills for 
the crowd of nearly 2,000 which crowded into Paducah' s Tilghman 
gymnasium.' 

Shoaff and Eadie scored 17 and 15 points respectively, and most 
of their field goals came from well out on the floor as the result of 
long shots with Shoaff firing one-handers and Eadie on two-handers. 

Under the basket Quentin Stinson of Eldorado played brilliantly 
even though he scored only five points. Stinson' s gallant rebounding 
against the taller Murray team was all-important in the Southern victory, 

Next home game on the Southern schedule is Friday, Dec. 19 against 
Millikin University. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— ^— ■ ^ — ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. mtm «iii««mbmiiiiiiiiii«ib«mim^^^^ 



12-10-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Demonstrations will form a lcirge part 
of the program for the fall meeting of the Illinois Association for 
Health, Physical Education and Recreation to be held at Southern Illinois 
University here Saturday, Dec. 13* 

Physical education teachers and students from six Southern Illinois 
high schools will stage demonstrations, as will faculty and students 
from Southern and the University laboratory schools here* 

Key speakers will be University President Chester F. Lay; Ray 
0* Duncan, director of the State Department of Health and Physical 
Education; Frank Bridges of the Southern faculty; and George Stafford, 
health coordinator at the University of Illinois. 

Bridges will speak on "Safety Education" at the morning session, 
and Stafford will discuss "The Recreational Program for Small High 
Schools" at the afternoon session. 

Demonstrations at the Saturday morning, women's section include: 

Volleyball — by Miss Barbara Melvin and students, DuQuoin High 
School; utilization of student leaders — kiss Barbara Kerch and students, 
Granite City High School; stunts, tumbling, pyramid-building-Miss Zita 
Spradling and students, Southern's laboratory school; mixers and square 
dances, Miss Jean Stetir and Southern students. An idea exchange and 
panel discussion with Miss Mary Myers of Olney as chairman, will follow 
the demonstrations. Panel members will be Miss Elsa Schneider assistant 
state director of Health, Physical Education and Safety, and Miss 
Geraldine Rennert, Illinois secretary of Girls Athletic Association. 

At the Saturday afternoon general session, volley tennis, deck 
tennis, and home-made equipment will be demonstrated by Lelend Lingle 
and Miss Theresa Ivanuck, Southern faculty members. 

At the men's section meeting Saturday morning, William Freeburg of 
the Southern faculty will discuss methods of teaching tumbling and boxing 
assisted by Lynn Holder in t he latter. An idea exchange on the use of 
improvized equipment for these two activities will follow. 

Further demonstrations will again occupy the women's section meeting 
in the latter part of the afternoon, this time on basket ball. Miss 

(more) 



-2- 

Kathleen Isom and students, Carbondale Community High School; will 
demonstrate forward techniques and plays; Miss Opal Stevens and 
students, Anna-Jonesboro Community High School, guard techniques and 
plays; and Mrs. Dorothy Muzzey and Southern students, officiating. 

A basket ball clinic will also enga 6 o the men's section, with 
Merrill Thomas of Pinckneyville , Edward Bencini of Murphysboro and Lynn 
Holder of Southern as leaders. 

Thomas will discuss offensive basket ball a s used by Pinckneyville 
in winning third place last year in the state finals; Bencini will 
discuss the defensive basket ball used by Murphysboro in winning the 
Carbondale Sectional Tournament last year; while Holder will consider 
the pivot play used by Southern in winning the Illinois Intercollegiate 
Athletic Conference championship* 

The meeting will open at 9: 30 a, m. in the Southern gymnasium, 
with Miss Ruth Lins of Rockford, president of the IAHPER, presiding. 
Dr. Dorothy Davies and Mrs. Muzzey will preside at the two women's 
sessions. 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^■HH^^an^H^HUiMBMBBHBi 



• I 



12-10-47 
Carbondale, 111., Dec. - A new class in business law for life 
insurance underwriters has been set up for the current winter term at 
Southern Illinois University. 

Arranged by the Extension Division and the College of Vocations 
and Professions, working jointly with the Southern Illinois Life 
Underwriters' Association, the course will be taught by Dr. John W« 
Scott, professor and chairman of the business administration department. 
The class -will meet for two and a half hours one night per week, here on 
the campus. 

The course has been developed to help Southern Illinois insurance 
men prepare themselves to secure C.L.U. — Chartered Life Underwriters — 
certificates, according to Raymond H. D^y, director of the University 
Extension Service. 

### 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - A whole new section is being constructec 
for the stage of Shryock .auditorium at Southern Illinois University here 
to accommodate the 250-voice choir, 50-piece orchestra, and four 
soloists for "The Messiah," to be presented Sunday evening, Dec. 14, at 
7O0 p. m. 

Size of the already large stage is being enlarged by building a 
platform stretching across the 40-foot proscenium arch and projecting 
12-feet out into the auditorium. 

The Handel oratorio is being presented for the second consecutive 
year as a pre-Christmas program by the Southern Illinois Oratorio 
Society, with Dr. Maurits Kesnar, professor and chairman of the 
University music department, as conductor. 



Information Service 



Southern Illinois 
University 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-11-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Coach Lynn Holder's undefeated 
Southern Illinois University Maroons face a rough weekend which includes 
two away- f ram-home games at Arkansas State and Southeast Missouri State 
Teachers* 

Pre-season predictions from Jonesboro, Arkansas, indicate that the 
Arkansas State College Indians are set for their greatest season, but 
they have already suffered several defeats, including one by Southeast 
Missouri of Cape Girardeau. 

Friday night the Maroons will have the task of stopping Arkansas' 
Maurice Miller, who was named the "Most-Valuable" college Player in 
Arkansas last winter. Another thorne in the Maroons' side will be 
Bennie Wilhelm, who was seventh highest scorer in the nation in 1946-47. 

To stop these men, Southern will probably d epend upon the same 
quintet which operated so effectively against Murray State College at 
Paducah on Tuesday by winning 71 to 5$. 

To these men, Bob Colborn of Flora, Joe Hughes of West Frankfort, 
Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Jack Eadie of West Frankfort, and Ollie 
Shoaff of Mt, Carmel, will go the task of keeping Southern's unspoiled 
record intact. 



Carbondale, 111,, Dec. - According to. a statement by Glenn "Abe" 
Martin, Southern Illinois University athletic director, one of the 
players on the Maroon's great Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference and Corn Bowl football titlists has received honorable mentio 
on the Little All-American team. 

Robert "Bunker" Jones of West Frankfort, Southern's sterling line- 
backer, was the honored player. All season the huge but mobile Jones 
bottled-up enemy rushing with bone-crushing tackles. 

m 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — — — ■-— ———— ■■ ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^ m ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



12-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -A number of additions to the faculty of 
Southern Illinois University have been made in recent weeks, according 
to University President Chester F. Lay, 

Vernon G. Morrison has been appointed assistant professor of 
economics, to take over the teaching duties of Dr. Kenneth Luney, on 
sick leave for the remainder of the current school year. 

Mr, Morrison holds two degrees from the University of Nebraska, the 
bachelor of science and the master of arts degrees, and has done 
graduate work at the University of Chicago. 

He comes to Southern from the Tennessee Valley Authority, where he 
has been an economist since 193>. Prior to that he had done editorial 
work for the Commerce Clearing House, Inc f , Chicago; had made a credit 
survey in Illinois for the U. .S, Treasury; had served as assistant 
professor at the University of Indiana; had served as research assistant 
in government finance at the University of Chicago; had done research 
for Erwin Wasey & Company of Chicago, 

Dr. Florence Foote has been named assistant professor in zoology 
for the winter and spring terms. Dr. Foote is the wife of Dr. Charles 
L. Foote, associate professor of zoology, Mrs. Foote holds the bachelor 
of arts and master of arts degrees from Mount Holyoke College, and the 
doctor of philosophy degree from the State University of Iowa. She 
has taught at Mt. Holyoke, the University of Delaware, and Wagner Colleg* 
New York. 

Mrs* Joseph Melyin has :been appointed instructor in the Wheeler 

Library, 

Other recent appointments include the following part-time faculty 
assistants: John L. Colp, in industrial education; Mrs. Mabel Goddard 
Bracewell, in the University High School; Miss May Dorsey irMmusic; 
Mrs. Eva Mcintosh in music; Fred Armstrong in economics; Henry M,. 
Borella in physics. 

iftvM 

Carbondale, 111,, Dec* -Dr, V. C. McDaniel, associate professor 
of mathematics, has been appointed acting chairman of the mathematics 
department, to succeed Dr. J. R. Purdy, associate professor, who has 
resigned from the faculty to engage in agriculture at his home in 
Ohio. Dr. Purdy came to Southern in 1929, and has been acting chairman 
of the mathematics department this fall, since Dr. J.R, Mayor, chairman 
is on leave of absence. 

ihfutf 



I • 



• k ■■ * 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^ a ^ H| ^^ HH|HH ^ H 



Special to Dailies and Weeklies 12-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Southern Illinois University is 
cooperating in a statewide study of revision of the Illinois secondary 
school curriculum program, University President Chester F. Lay has 
announced. 

"We are continuing, as always, to experiment in our University 
High School, and are ready to give additional support to the projected 
program of curriculum revision," Dr. Lay said. 

Southern will cooperate by (1) making available members of the 
staff to work with the public high schools selected as experimental 
centers, and (2) allowing members of the staff to participate in various 
types of workshops for principals, teachers and others concerned with 
curriculum revision, both on the Southern campus and off-campus * 

President Lay has designated as a committee to steer Southern's 
participation in this cooperative work the following: Raymond H* Dey, 
director of the Extension and Placements Services; Dr. Claude J. 
Dykehouse, associate professor of education; Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of 
the College of Education; Dilla Hall, acting principal of University 
High School; and Fount. G. Warren, chairman of the department of educatior 

The curriculum revision study is expected to have the participation 

of the six state- supported colleges and universities, the State 

Department of Public Instruction and the Illinois Secondary School 

Principals Association, and any other interested institutions, agencies 

and individuals, local, state or national. 

### 



12-13-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Next home game for the Southern 
Illinois University Maroons, defending champions of the Illinois 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference, will be Friday, Dec. 19 against 
James Millikin University at 3:1$ p. m. 

The Holder-men will be out for revenge for the defeat they 
suffered at Millikin' s hands last year when the visitors became the 
first team in over two years to defeat Southern in the Southern 
gymnasium. 



m 



1^^ 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. 




Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-15-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - The Southern Illinois University- 
Maroons, winners of all five starts this season, will return to 
Carbondale Friday night when they play host to James Millikin 
University in the Men's Gymnasium, 

Last year Millikin was the only team which defeated Southern 
twice, 52-47 and 63-51. One of those defeats was the first defeat 
Southern had suffered in over two years on its home floor. 

The Millikin contest will be the Maroon's last home game until 

January 14, when Cape Girardeau will appear for a return engagement. 

a 
Cape Girardeau was the Maroon's second victim in/road game during 

the last weekend. Friday night the Holdermen topped Arkansas State 

47 to 37 at Jonesboro, Arkansas. 

In the Arkansas St^te game the Maroons established an early ten- 
point lead and then held on for the rest of the game to win by that 
same margin. 

Cape Girardeau lived up to its reputation of being a very good 
team. The Cape defense was one of the best the Maroons have encountered 
this year, and held the Maroons to only 18 points in the first half 
against 20 for the home five. 

In the second half t^uentin Stinson of Eldorado, Southern's great 
center, caught fire and dumped in five baskets in five minutes, giving 
the Maroons a 33 to 23 lead. 

At this point Stinson went out via the foul route, but Southern 
matched Cape basket for basket to win a very hard, rough game 
highlighted by harsh body contact. 

Jack Eadie of West Frankfort was the leading scorer with 16 points. 

m 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — — —^ — — — — ■ — — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



12-15-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Southern Illinois University has 
been notified that its kindergarten-primary teacher education program 
has been approved by the New York State Department of Education, 
University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

The University opened its pre-school education program some eight 
years ago, but has been steadily developing the program in recent 
years. "The Cottage," a former residence near the University campus, 
is used as headquarters and a laboratory kindergarten-nursery school 
for students majoring in pre-school education to put into practice 
the knowledge they have gained in class work. 

Directed by Dr. Sina M.. Mott, associate professor of pre-school 
education, the kindergarten-nursery school is part of the University's 
campus laboratory school system. Dr. Mott also is the major adviser 
for students majoring in kindergarten-primary education. 

Facilities at "The Cottage", originally set up as a kindergarten 
only, were expanded in the fall of 1945 to include nursery school work. 

For the past two years, special emphasis has been laid on raising 
standards for kindergarten and primary teachers and acquainting local 
communities with the fact that state school aid may be secured for 
kindergartens and nursery schools operated in connection with the local 
school system. 

Dr. Mott has served as a representative of Southern on a statewide 
committee, composed of various educational institutions and agencies in 
Illinois, to study and recommend standards for pre-school education 
and pre-school teachers. 

Another phase of the work in this field at Southern is parental 
education, carried on both in classes and in informal activities with 
parents of children enrolled in the kindergarten and nursery school. 

Approximately 25 graduates have completed degrees with majors 
in pre-school education since the program started here, Dr. Mott said. 
There are about }0 students currently majoring in this field. 



-2- 

Allied with the pre-school program is the student organization, 
the Association for Childhood Education, which is comprised of all the 
kindergarten and primary majors in the College of Education. 

Recently the University conducted a two-day Kindergarten-Primary 
Conference bringing Miss Neith Headley from the University of Minnesota 
to serve as guest consultant. Arrangements for the conference were 
carried out by the students in the Association for Childhood Education, 
and Dr. Mott , their sponsor* 

While students may obtain work at Southern leading to the bachelor 
of science in education degree majoring in pre-school education, they 
may also take some work leading to the master of science in education 
degree as well, and by a cooperative arrangement with the Merrill- 
Palmer School in Detroit, an outstanding center for training in this 
field, may take work at Merrill-Palmer and count it toward the master's 
degree here, according to Dr. E. R. Fair, dean of the College of 
Education. 

The recognition given Southern 1 s work in this field by the New York 
State Department of Education is gratifying to University educators, 
for it means that teachers trained here in this work are eligible for 
appointments in New York schools, which require high standards for 
teachers in the kindergarten or nursery school. 

'•With a continuation of the excellent support President Lay has 
always given to our Early Childhood Education program, I feel confident 
that this University is making rapid headway as a regular center in 
this important level of teaching," Dean Fair declared. 



* . * 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-16-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Father Time is rapidly closing in on 
1947 Southern Illinois University athletics, and Friday night when 
the Maroons face Millikin College at the Men's gymnasium here will be 
the last Southern home athletic contest of 1947. 

If the Maroons win this game against Millikin, which is defending 
a College Conference of Illinois crown, it will be a fine climax to a 
very successful athletic year. 

The two most important athletic titles of the Illinois ^ 
Intercollegiate Athletic Conference in 1947 were captured by the Maroons. 

In the winter of 1947 Southern, under the direction of Coach Lynn 
Holder, won its second consecutive I. I. A. C. basketball championship. 

Spring found the Maroons winning the conference tennis title, a 
event which has been in no way unusual during the recent years when 
Southern has dominated Illinois college tennis. 

During the fall of 1947, under the direction of Coach Glenn "Abe" 
Martin, the Maroons won the. I. I. A. C. football title and the post- 
season Corn Bowl encounter with North Central. 

Millikin is a worthy opponent for the year's home final. Last 
year they did what had previously been considered almost impossible- 
beating the Maroons on the Southern floor. It was the first time a 
college team had turned the trick in more than two years. 

Game time for the Southern-Millikin contest is 8:15 p.m. Friday. 

### 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 
■— — ■ ^ ■— ■ ■— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 



12-16-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec, - An exhibition of student paintings 
is currently on display in the Little Gallery at Southern Illinois 
University, to run through the Christmas holidays until Jan. 1, according 
to Ben Watkins, acting chairman of the art department. 

One of the features of the exhibit is a group of self-protraits 
done by members of a portrait-painting class taught by Miss Emily 
Farnham, assistant professor of art. 

These include work by Jane Wallace of Marion, a modern painting 
designed entirely in planes; by Kin Jitodai of Seattle Wash., a likeness 
against a background of western landscape; by Marvin Mullinix of DeSoto, 
Eloise McCoy of Herrin, Mary Ann Hine of DeSoto, Clarence Ball of 
Carbondale, and George Russell of Geff, 

Styles in painting in the show range from non-objectivism through 
abstraction to realism, Watkins said. 

Mrs. Hines* "Yellow Fog" is a pasted paper study in the arrangement 
of color spots, inspired by Y. D. Eliot's poem "The Love Song of J, 
Alfred Prufrock." 

The exhibit also- includes work by Doris Morgan of Sparta, 
"Landscape With Three Green Trees"; William Moss of Golconda, "Two- 
Figure Group" and other paintings by these and other students. 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Students at Southern Illinois 
University will start their Christmas holidays at 5 p. m. Friday. 
Classes will be resumed at B a. m. Monday, Jan. 5« 

University administrative offices will remain open except for 
Christmas Day and New Year's Day. '. 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

[■■— ^— — — — — ■ ^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-17-47 

Carbondale, 111*, Dec. - James Millikin University will invade 
the Southern Illinois University Men T s Gymnasium Friday night at 3:15 
to provide opposition for the last Maroon home effort for almost a 
month. 

After the Millikin tilt, the Maroons will not appear at home until 
Jan, 14 when they play Cape Girardeau. 

The Friday night encounter with Millikin will provide an excellent 
opportunity for many Southern Illinois basket ball fans to see the 
undefeated Maroons battle good competition with assurance of getting 
a seat. 

Christmas vacation at Southern begins Friday afternoon, and 
hundreds of students are planning on rushing home without waiting to 
see the basket ball game, thereby providing plenty of room in the gym 
for all who wish to see the red-hot Maroons. 

Millikin has nine lettermen back from their College Conference 
of Illinois champions of last winter, and should be very good. 

They will be the first Illinois college competition the Maroons of 
Lynn Holder have faced this year. Previously Southern has topped 
Indiana, Kentucky, Arkansas, and Missouri teams in succession. 

In all probability the same men will start for Southern that have 
been starting in the previous games. They are: Bob Colborn of Flora, 
Joe Hughes of West Frankfort, (^uentin Stinson of Eldorado, Jack Eadie 
of West Frankfort, and Ollie Shoaff of Mt. Carmel. 

The Maroon "B n squad, under the direction of Assistant Coach 
Harlan Hodges, will play the DuQuoin Owls in a preliminary game at 
6:45. In an earlier meeting the strong DuQuoin independent team won 
easily. 

#### 



I^^L 



_^^__^^^^^_^__^^ Southern Illinois 
— ■ — "■ i^ ^^^— University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^ HHH ^^^ HHHMB |[ HH | 



12-17-47 
Carbondale, 111,, Dec. - To aid Southern Illinois women's 

clubs, Southern Illinois University will present a new series of radio 

programs on "United Nations" starting Jan. 5, unver the sponsorship 

of the University Extension Service. 

Broadcast each Monday at 1:30 p. m. over Station WCIL, Carbondale, 

the series will feature talks on various aspects of the United Nations 

by members of the government faculty at the Univeisity, according to 

Raymond H. Dey, Extension Service director. 

Invitations have been sent to member clubs of the Southern Illinois 

districts of the Illinois Federation of Women's Clubs to listen to the 

programs at their regular meetings. 

§## 



Carbondale, 111,, Dec. - A Christmas concert will be given by 
the A Cappella Choir and the Madrigal Singers of Southern Illinois 
University Thursday evening at 7:15 in the Little Theatre on the 
University campus. 

The two groups are directed by Floyd V. Wakeland, associate 
professor of music, 

A string ensemble directed by John Wharton, instructor in music, 
will assist the vocal groups. 

The public is invited. There will be no admission charge. 



* 



I^ BB-| ^ i— ^^ ^^_ _ _ i Southern Illinois 
|^~~■~ , ~~■ , ^^^■~ l, ■~^™ , ™■ University 



Information Service 



CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 
LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



12-17-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Positions were secured for 399 
applicants by the Southern Illinois University Placements Service 
during the period Dec. 1, 1946-Oct. 31, 1947, Raymond H. Dey, Placements 
Service director, reports. 

These placements represent approximately 4/$ of the 310 applicants 
who registered with the service. 

Seventy-three other registrants have enrolled in graduate schools— 
25 of them at Soutnern, 4$ at other institutions. 

Of the 399 placed in positions, the great majority accepted 
teaching positions: 204 in high schools, 12$ in elementary schools, 
14 in colleges, four in rural schools, and nine in educational work 
connected with their major subject. Forty of the applicants were 
placed in occupations other then teaching. 

The predominance of teacher placements, Mr. Dey pointed out, is 
due to the fact that until recent years, Southern has been exclusively 
a teacher-educational institution. The College of Liberal Arts and 
Sciences, the College of Vocations and Professions and the Graduate 
School have developed within the past three years. 

Actually, 14 of the 1947 graduates of the College of Liberal Arts 
and Sciences have accepted teaching positions within the past year, 
and seven of the 1947 graduates of the College of Vocations and 
Professions also accepted teaching positions. 

Of the 232 graduates of the College of Education for 1947, a 
total of 168 accepted teaching positions, or 71 per cent. 






^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Southern Illinois 

i^ ^ — ■ ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. HMWHsa^anOTn^^HW^^^^^^ 



12-19-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Southern Illinois University will 
hold its regularly scheduled General Educational Development Tests on 
Jan. 2 and 3, Dr. % Marshall S. Hiskey, director of testing, has 
announced. 

These tests are for veterans and also for non-veterans over the 
age of 21 who have not been able to complete their high school work, 
Dean Hiskey said. 

Persons who pass the tests are recommended foi a high school 
diploma i.n accordance with state reflations. 

Those interested in taking the tests should made arrangements 
immediately with Dr. Hiskey, 

The tests are given on the first Friday and Saturday of each 
month , 

MJlJt 
WWW 



Carbondale, 111., Dec,- - The faculty of Southern Illinois 
University this week voted t o contribute £-150 from the Faculty Fund to 
the relief fund being raised in this country for relief of teachers 
in war-torn countries overseas, 

m 



Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Dr. Laird T. Hites, associate 
professor, who has been serving as a full-time counselor in the 
Veterans Guidance Center at Southern Illinois University, has been 
appointed to half-time teaching auty in the College of Education, 
University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Dr. Hites has assumed some of the teaching auties of the late 
J. \ r ard Dillow, assistant professor. Other members of the College of 
Education faculty are teaching the remainder of Kir, Dillow' s classes. 



^_^^^^^^_ m ^^— m - m —^^^ Southern Illinois 

— — — ■— — — — ■— — — ■— ■ University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. M^^^^^M^BM^^MHM^^^HM 



12-19-47 

Carbondale, '.111. , Dec. -Southern Illinois University star 
quarterback and passer Bill Malinsky of Flora has accepted a position 
at Danville, Illinois junior high school. 

Malinsky, whose duties will be coaching and teaching physical 
education, will begin his new duties after the start of the new year. 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -David S, Mcintosh, associate professor 
of music at Southern Illinois University, who has been on leave during 
much of the fall term and part of the winter term because of his 
health, has returned to his teaching duties. 

##### 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. -Joseph R. Baxter, who has returned to 
the faculty at Southern Illinois University after a six months 1 leave 
of absence for special work in Peru, has been named assistant professor 
of Latin-American Culture in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, 
University President Chester F. Lay has announced. 

Mr. Baxter was formerly instructor in the history department. 

For the past six months he has been in Latin America studying 
on a fellowship from the U.S. Department of State, completing work 
toward his doctor's degree in Latin-American history. He is taking 
this degree from Duke University. 



^ ^^_ ^^^^__ 1 ^^^^^^_ Southern Illinois 
^ — University 

Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. gn-^H-,--—,^^^ 



12-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Five Southern Illinois University 
faculty members will appear on the programs of national professional 
societies during the Christmas holidays, and 2& ©thers will attend 
meetings of such groups. 

Two zoology department faculty members will present papers at the 
meeting of the American association for the Advancement of Science in 
Chicago Dec. 26-31. 

Dr. Florence Foote , assistant professor of zoology, will present 
a paper entitled "Hormonal Sex Reversal in Hypnophysectomized Anurow 
Larvae," prepared jointly with Dr. Beatrice Mintz of the University of 
Chicago, 

Dr. Joseph Stanley Rafalko, associate professor of zoology, will 
present a paper entitled "Mitotic Division in the Amoeboflagellate 
Tetramitus rostratus." 

A member of the English faculty, Dr. Robert D. Faner, associate 
professor, has been invited to address the English section of the 
Modern Language Association of America, which meets in Detroit Dec. 
29- Jan. 2. His paper will be on "Walt Whitman's Debt to Opera," 
describing his findings in the research he did at the University of 
Pennsylvania for his doctor of philosophy degree. 

Dr. P. Merville Larson, associate professor and chairman of the 
speech department, will give two addresses at the meeting of the Speech 
Association of America in Salt Lake City Dec. 29-31, the first before 
the junior college section on "What the Teacher-Training Institution 
Expects of the Junior College in Speech," and the second before the 
public address section in "Social Impacts of the Speaking of Bishop 
Grundtvig." Dr. Larson is a member of the executive committee of the 
association and will attend the council meeting on Dec. 28, and will 
also give a report from the sub-committee on speech education in 
teacher-training institutions. 

Dr. Floyd F. Cunningham, associate professor and chairman of the 

geography department, and Dalias Price, assistant professor, will attend 

the meetings of the National Council of Geography Teachers, the 

(more) 



-2- 

Association of American Geographers, and the American Society for 
Professional Geographers at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, 
Va., Dec. 27-31. Dr. Cunningham, who holds the record for having 
served the longest period as president of the National Council of 
Geography Teachers — three years — , is a member of the Executive Board 
and will preside at one of the sectional meetings. He has been an 
official of the Council for eighteen years* 

President Chester F. Lay; Dr. Henry J. Rehn, dean of the College 
of Vocations and Professions; Dr. Lewis A. Maverick, professor and 
chairman of the economics department; Dr. William A. Pitkin, associate 
professor of social sciences; and Herbert E, Johnson, faculty assistant 
in economics and geography, will attend the meetings of the American 
Economic Association in Chicago, Dec. 25. President Lay and Dean Rehn 
will also attend sessions of the Academy of Management in Chicago 
Dec. 27i 

A large group will attend the Chicago meetings of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science, embracing a number of 
scientific societies — Dr. Charles Foote, associate professor of zoology; 
Dr. W. M. Gersbacher, associate professor and chairman of the zoology 
department; Dr. 0. B. Young, professor and chairman of the physics 
department; Dr. W. W. Meeks, associate professor of physics; and Miss 
Charlotte Zimmerschied, assistant professor of physics; Dr. Salter B. 
Welch, associate professor and chairman of the botany department; 
William M. Marberry, assistant professor of botany; Dr. Margaret 
Kaeiser, assistant professor of botany; Miss Irma Tate Ward, faculty 
assistant in botany; Miss Amy Mae Jones, graduate assistant in botany; 
Dr. Marie a. Hinrichs, professor and chairman of the physiology and 
health education department. 

Dr. Joseph K. Johnson, professor and chairman of the sociology 
department, will attend the annual meeting of the American Sociological 
Society in New York City, Dec. 23-30. 

Dr. J. Cary Davis, associate professor of foreign languages, will 
attend the meetings of the M dern Language Association and ttie American 
Association of Teachers of Spanish and Portuguese, in Detroit, Dec. 20- 
Jan. 2. 

Dr. Earl Hall, assistant professor of education, and Dr. Victor 
Randolph, associate professor, will attend the meeting of the Illinois 
Education Association in Peoria, Dec. 23-29, 

f mnr>Oi1l 



-3- 

Dr» Harold E. Briggs, professor and chairman of the history 
department; Dr. George L. Cherry, assistant professor; and Joseph D. 
Baxter, assistant professor, will attend the meeting of the American 
Historical Association in Cleveland, Ohio, Dec # 27-29« 

Dr. Maurits Kesnar, professor and chairman of the music department, 
will attend the meetings of the Music Teachers National Association and 
the National Association of Schools of Music in Boston, Mass., Dec, 27- 
Jan. 2. 

Dr. Viola DuFrain, associate professor of business, and Van A. 
Buboltz, assistant professor, will attend the meeting of the National 
Business Teachers Conference in St. Louis Dec 29-31, 

Glenn "Abe" Martin, director of athletics and head football coach, 
will attend the one-day meeting of the Football Coaches Association in 
New Orleans Dec. 31. 

Dr. Orville Alexander, director of alumni services, will attend 
the semi-annual meeting of the Illinois Joint Alumni Council for the 
five institutions in the State Teachers College System in Peoria Dec. 29# 

LILJl 



Information Service 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. 



Southern Illinois 
University 

CARBONDALE, ILLINOIS 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-22-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Santa Claus in the person of Coach 
Lynn Holder has given the undefeated Southern Illinois University- 
Maroons a full week T s vacation for Christmas. 

After handily winning their sixth and seventh starts of the season 
by drubbing Millikin 71^50 Friday night, and then taking Shurtleff f s 
measure 73 to 50 the following evening at Alton, Holder told his men 
not to return for practice until Monday, Dec. 29» 

After three day T s practice, the Illinois Intercollegiate Athletic 
Conference champs will greet the New Year by participating in the 
Vincennes Holiday Tournament. 

Against Millikin the Maroons displayed the most effective passing 
of the season. Near and under the basket the pass-work was so sharp 
that it dazzled the taller Millikin team. 

Big Quentin Stinson of Eldorado, Southern* s brilliant center, 
: :lfcd the scoring parade with 16 points. Bob Colborn of Flora took 
runner-up . honors with 13 tallies. 

Playing at Alton, Shurtleff. provided the -Maroons with more worry 
than Millikin. had done the previous night, although there were only 
two points difference in the score, 

The Maroons first team, which had been "hot" in all previous 
games, failed to produce results. With the Maroons trailing 1& to 14 
midway in the first half, Coach Lynn Holder substituted his entire 
second team composed of Leedio Cabutti of Johnston City, Jack Long of 
Fl»ra, Charles and John Goss of Marion, and Jack Beaty of Centralia. 

This combination immediately went to work. Playing smoothly and 
scoring heavily, the second team remained in the game until over half 
of the second period was over when they left a 20-point lead for the 
first team, who finished -the game. 

Bob Colbjtrn led the Maroon attack with 1$ points. 



### 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service CARBONDALE ' ' LL1NO ' s 

LORENA DRUMMOND.ED. ■■■■■■■■■■■■i™*™"*™ 1 



Do not release until 12-24-47 

Monday p. m. , Dec. 29 



Chicago, 111., Dec. 29 - By experimenting on grown frog tadpoles, 
two women zoologists have come to the conclusion that sex hormones act 
directly on the sex glands instead of acting through the pituitary 
gland. 

Dr* Florence Foote of Southern Illinois University and Dr. Beatrice 
Mintz of the University of Chicago today presented a paper before the 
endocrinology session of the American Society of Zoologists at the 
American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting here, 
reporting on "Hormonal Sex Reversal in Hypohysectomized Anuran Larvae." 

They removed the pituitary gland and injected pure crystalline sex 
hormones into the tadpoles. They found that the normal sex reversal 
pattern resulted, hence concluded that the pituitary is not essential 
to the effectiveness of the hormones. 

Their investigations were carried on while both were graduate 
students working toward the doctor T s degree at the University of Iowa. 



^ 






Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ^i^HBBn^MIkUHMHH 



Do not release until 12-29-47 

Wed. p. m, , Dec, 31 

Detroit, Mich., Dec. - The source of Walt Whitman's poetic 
genius is rioted in the opera, a Southern Illinois University scholar 
today reported before the American literature group of the Modern 
Language Association, meeting here. 

Dr. Robert D. Faner, associate professor of English at Southern, 
who took his doctoral degree from the University of Pennsylvania last 
June, submitting a dissertation on Whitman's debt to opera, expressed 
the belief that the poet not only used the opera as a source of 
inspiration but also as a structural style for his new form of poetry. 

Faner' s research seems toshow that Whitman, far from "happening 
upon" the free style of verse he developed, created his style 
deliberately and with expert craftsmanship, the speaker declared. 

Many students of Whitman have noted his keen interest in the opera, 
but Faner 's study reveals for the first time the fact that the poet's 
interest in poetry, and the style he created, sprang from his 
preoccupation with opera, 

Faner explained that Whitman found his ideas and visions stimulated 
when listening to the Opera, and he consciously set out to create a 
free, rhapsodic poetry that would approximate the effect of opera. 
For this effect, he depended heavily on the recitative and the aria, 
rather than the conventional stanza and line forms of earlier verse. 
In doing so, he created a new poetic form and style. 

Actually, Whitman did not start writing poetry until he became 
enamoured of the opera, in the early l$50's, Faner said, and once he 
started attending the opera he went every night. 

### 



^ 



Southern Illinois 
University 



Information Service carbondale, Illinois 

LORENA DRUMMOND, ED. ibim^m ■■iimh 



Attention: Sports Editors 12-29-47 

Carbondale, 111., Dec. - Basketball Coach Lynn Holder decreed 
two-a-day practice sessions for the Southern Illinois University 
Maroons when they returned from their Christmas vacation to prepare for 
the Vincennes Holiday Tournament, Jan. 1. 

TJie Maroons will face Cape Girardeau in the opening round of the 
New Year's Day four-team tournament. Two games will be played in the 
afternoon, and the final and consolation games will follow the same 
evening. 

Evansville and Canterbury are paired for the second afternoon 
round. Earlier this season Southern has defeated both Evansville and 
Cape Girardeau on the opponents' courts, Cape falling 54 to 45 and 
Evansville 43 to 39. 

The two-a-day drills are scheduled for 9:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., 
with the morning drills being much lighter with emphasis on passing 
and shooting. During the afternoons scrimmages are being held. 

By Wednesday the practice sessions will probably taper off to 
only a single afternoon session, as Holder guards against his men 
getting sore feet from too strenuous workouts after a week-long 
Christmas vacation. 



fe^: 



-2- 

the service will be made available to all schools of the area. 

Already, some half dozen school systems of Southern Illinois have 
agreed to participate in this new service, usin 3 the exhibits in 
connection with their classwork. These "pioneering" schools are 
Eldorado, Muddy, Harrisburg, Dorrisville, Crab Orchard, Marion and 
Carterville. 

Thy University will take the exhibits by car to the cooperating 
school, leaving them a week or two weeks, then picking them up and 
transporting them to the next school. 

"If the schools like the service," Dey said, "we hope to develop 
many more unit exhibits, and to arrange a schedule of delivery so that 
the schools may have the unit on transportation, for example, at the 
time the children are studying transportation." 

Many of the models to be used in the traveling exhibits, Allen 
said, were made by WPA artists assigned to the Museum in the 1930 f s. 

The transportation exhibit which the University will send out 
consists of models of a flat boat, carts of several vintages, a log 
wagon, a Conestaga covered wa^on, a log bridge, a replica of the 
covered bridge at Chester, and other models. 

In the exhibit on weaving are the miniature spinning wheels and 
loom, a frame for winding the yarn into hanks, samples of cotton and 
flax fiber, and samples of cloth woven by hand. 

The exhibit on household lighting includes the so-called "floating 
wick," the "grease lamp," the Paul Revere candle lantern and other 
lanterns, the kerosene lamp, and so on to the electric bulb. 

Models and diagrams of sponge, coral, starfish, clams, lizards, 
frogs and salamanders are included in the science exhibits. 

Each object in each exhibit will have its own descriptive label, 
and notes for the teacher's use in explaining the e xhibit are furnished. 

The first exhibits will go out Monday, Jan. 24* 



M-UJJ. 

iriTtr 



*