(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Souvenir and official program: 19th annual encampment, Grand Army of the Republic, Department of Indiana and auxiliary societies, Columbus, In., May 17-20, 1898"

f 



3 1833 02480 3816 
Gc 977.2 G763 

Souvenir and official 
program 



J 



Souvenir 



9™ * 



CI MNP 

AI?A\Y 

or 
mr 
i ?i i >i ii >i k 

l>l:l\\I.MA\l:\ I 
Or INDIANS 

»»■ AUXILIARY 
SOCIETIES, 

COLUMBUS, IND. 

MAN' 17-20, 
1595. 



ooooooooooo 

and Official 
j« Program. 



oooooooooooo 



4 






Wl en County Puouc UW*» 
900 Webster Street 

Columbus' Welcome to the S. J%. S/?. 



W 



HON. GEORGE W. COOPER. 

ELCOME, Soldiers for the Union! With open arms, with floating flags, with joyous 
and triumphant music, with warm hearts and willing hands, we bid you welcome 
to our city. 

We recall the emotion that swelled our hearts in the dark and perilous days, 
when our flag was obscured by the smoke of battle, and we remember what deep and 
earnest gratitude your sacrifices and your services then evoked. We know full well 
the proud and heroic place you have earned and will have in history. No braver men 
ever fought in a nobler cause. The great Republic, rescued by you from an untimely 
end, lives and leads the world, the proud exemplar of liberty, equality and justice. 
We neither forget the past nor wait for the future, but, with a living and profound 
realization of the undimmed and undying glories of your victorious arms, we feel 
honored in your presence and rejoice in the occasion of your coming. 

May the memories of camp and field, of bivouac and battle, relume in your 
hearts, and linked with the love of comrades and of country, make these your happiest 
days, and your remaining ones full of pride and peace. Then welcome, soldiers for 
the Union, welcome, and then — farewell. 



^ J* J*> 




825793 



JAMES S. DODGE. Department Commander of Indiana G. A. R. 



PROGRAMME OF THE BUSINESS SESSIONS, 

DEPARTMENT ENCAMPMENT. 



Cuesday, may 17, i$9*. 

Committee on Credentials, at Council Chamber, in City Hall, from 3 
o'clock until 6:30 P. M. 

Council of Administration, at Room No. 15, Hotel Belvedere, at 8 
o'clock P. M. 

Wednesday, may <*, mt. 

Committee on Credentials meets at Council Chamber, City Building, 
from 7 o'clock until 9 A. M. 

Department Encampment convenes in City Hall at q o'clock, Depart- 
ment Commander Dodge presiding. 

Annual Parade at 1:30 P. M., in charge of James W. Perkinson, Chief 
Marshal, followed by Industrial Parade, in charge of M. T. Reeves. 

Camp Fires. 

City Hall, Gen. J. S. Dodge presiding. 
Opera House, Gen. J. S. Dodge presiding. 
Circuit Court Room, Gen. J. S. Dodge presiding. 
Introductory Remarks by Presiding Officer. 
Song by Quartette. 
Address, Governor Mount. 



Camp fires— Continued. 
General Gobin, Commander-in Chief. 

Song, " Banner of Beauty and Glory," Comrade I. P. Watts. 
Address, Past Commander-in-Chief, Comrade I. N. Walker. 

Recitation — this should be by home talent — by 

Address, Past Department Commander of Ohio, Comrade I. F. Mack. 
Song by Quartette. 
Address, Comrade H. C. Adams. 
Address, General and Comrade J. T. Wilder. 
Solo, Miss Stella Tingle, daughter of Senior Vice Tingle. 
Short talks by visiting comrades. 
After Parade, Encampment session resumed. 

At 8 o'clock P. M. Camp Fires at City Hall, General James S. Dodge 
presiding. 

Opera House, General James S. Dodge presiding. 
Circuit Court Room, General James S. Dodge presiding. 

Cbursday, may 19, im. 

Conclusion of Business Session, Election of Officers, Installation, etc. 
Famous Lecture by Hon. Henry Watterson, at City Hall, at 7:30 P. M. 



Jonesville— W. M. Lawrence, - 
Petersville— F. D. Norton. 
South Bethany— J. M. Moses. 
TaylorsvillE — S. M. Kincaid, : 
Walesboro— W. T. Carmichael, 
Waymansvii.lE— W. H. Banks. 
Newbern— W. Coffee. 



Richards. 
Evans. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 
Geo. T. McCoy, President. 
W. T. Carmichael, Secretary and Treasurer. 
W. H. Banks, Waymansville. W. H. Beck, Hartsville. 

W. T. Carmichael, Walesboro. K. D. Hawley. Columbus. 

R. H. Roope, Columbus. I. S. Clark, Columbus. 

Columbus. \V. H. Butler, Columbus. 



G. T. MacCo 
M. N. Elrod, Col 



II. Dav 



Azali 



PRINTING COMMITTEE. 

E. F. TrTTLE, Chairman. 
T. F.. Otto, E. Stahlhuth, Herman Carr, Hal Hughes. 

STREETS AND STANDS COMMITTEE. 

H. L. Rost, Chairman. 
George E- Ellis, Theo. E. Otto, E. E. Waddingtou, George 



Wi 



DAY DECORATIONS COMMITTEE. 
Wm. G. Irwin, Chairman. 
R. F. Gottschalk, Oscar Fiegenbaum, Lewis Bowlen, Morris Rosen- 
bush, Chas. Kitzinger, Ed Green, Dan Crow, J. H. Arnold, John A. George, 
William Hilger, Hal Hughes, O. H. Mennett, Q. J. Noblitt, C. F. Sparrell, 
Toe Hilger, Louis Lehman, Charles S. Baker, A. Sargent, Lester Drake, 
Fred Kissling, Jacob Silverman, Joe Gysie, Max Echmau, Frank Brock- 
man, J. P. Sohu, Adrian George, H. H. Bassett, Chas. Hege, Frank 
Schwartzkopf. 

COMMITTEE ON SOUVENIR AND BADGES. 

Geo. W. Caldwell, Chairman. 

Wm. F. Kendall, Geo. H. Clutch, John Stobo, George H. Denison. 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS COMMITTEE. 
Prof. John A. Carnagey, Chairman. 
Arthur Mason, Samuel Wertz, T. D. Aker, O. M. McCracken, Minnie 
B. Keith, John I. Cochran, Fannie Pope. 

COMMITTEE ON TRANSPORTATION. 

Arthur Overstreet, Chairman. 
W. H. Dowell, J. S. Smith, Dan Crow, W. H. Halsey. 

COMMITTEE ON HALLS. 

H. M. Campbell, Chairman. 
Hal Hughes, Henry Cook, Charles Kitzinger, Paul Hubbard. 

AUDITING COMMITTEE. 

H. H. BasSETT, Chairman. 
Chas. Hege, Wm. Henderson, John Jewell, J. A. Glanton. 

PRIVATE ACCOMMODATIONS AND HOTELS. 

Girnie L. Reeves, Chairman. 
H. H. Bassett, John Jewell, Oscar Fiegenbaum, Frank Schwartzkopf, 
Dan Crow, S. J. McBride, F. Doeller, J. A. Carnagey, Geo. E. Ellis, Mar- 
shall Taylor, Wm. May, Chas. Kitzinger, Albert Blessing, R. M. Jackson, 
W. H. Dowell, W. T. Davis, and of W. R. C. and L. A. S., Mesdames Smith. 
Spencer, Ennis, Uphold, Burnett, Prall, Orrill, Hawley, Stevens, Polen, 
Shultz, Keller, Poffenberger, Emrich, Dowling, Trotter, and Misses Mos- 
baugh and Smith. 

SONS OF VETERANS COMMITTEE. 

J. R. Dunlap, Chairman. W. C. Ardesv, Secretary. 

W. A. Stevens, W. S. Swengel, F. L. Clark, O. M. McCracken, O. F. 
George, J. A. Sibley, Dr. A. P. Roop, W. J. Beck, Sherman Jones, Harry 
Showe, John Suverkrup, Frank Griffith, J. W. Prall, Dr. W. C. Roland, 
Paul Hubbard, W. G. Dodge, C. C. Smith, W. H. Dowell. 

RECEPTION COMMITTEE EXECUTIVE BOARD. 

Hon. Z. T. Sweeney, Chairman. 
Elder E. B. Scofield, Vice-Chairmau. 
T. A. Moore, Ben Parker. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDIANA. G. A. R. 



CHE Department of Indiana, Grand Army of the Republic, was 
organized November 27, 1866, at Indianapolis, with General R. S. 
Foster as Commander, afterwards General Nathan Kimball and 
Oliver M. Wilson served as Department Commanders. The orga- 
nization went down, and was reorganized on the nth day of August, 1879, 
with Lewis Humphreys as Commander. 

The Annual Encampments have been held as follows 
First Encampment held at Greencastle, January 29, 1880. 
Second Encampment held at Terre Haute, April 13, 1881. 
Third Encampment held at Indianapolis, February 22, 1S82. 
Fourth Encampment held at Indianapolis, March 28, 1S83. 
Fifth Encampment held at Indianapolis, Februarv 21, 1884. 
Sixth Encampment held at Indianapolis, February 25, 1S85. 
Seventh Encampment held at Indianapolis, Februarv 17 and iS, 1SS6. 
Eighth Encampment held at Indianapolis, February 16 and 17, 1887. 
Ninth Encampment held at Indianapolis, Februarv 22 and 23, 1S88. 
Tenth Encampment held at Indianapolis, March 13 and 14, 1889. 
Eleventh Encampment held at Indianapolis, March n and 12, 1890. 
Twelfth Encampment held at Indianapolis, April 9 and 10, 1891. 
Thirteenth Encampment held at Ft. Wayne, April 6 and 7, [892 
Fourteenth Encampment held at Evansville, April 5 and 6, 1893. 
Fifteenth Encampment held at Lafayette, April 4 and 5, 1894. 
Sixteenth Encampment held at Muncie, March 27 and 2S, 1893. 
Seventeenth Encampment held at South Bend, May 13 and 14, 1S96. 
Eighteenth Encampment held at Richmond, May 12 and 13, 1897. 

OFFICERS. 



Department Comma 
Sr. V. C, Edwin Nicar. 
Jr. V. C, A. C. Roseucranz. 
Medical Director, William Stott. 
Chaplain, J. W. Harris. 



der, Jas. R. Carnahan. 
A. A. G, Ben D. House. 
Judge Advocate, Thos. Hanna 
Inspector, J. L- Wooden. 
A. Q. M. G., G. H. Shover. 



C. M. O., R. S. Robertson. 

1SS3 
Department Commander, J. R. Carnahan. 
Sr. V. C, Edwin Nicar. A. A. G., Ben D. House. 

Jr. V. C, Paul Hendricks. A. Q. M. G., G. H. Shover. 

Medical Director, James S. Gregg. Inspector, J. L. Wooden. 
Chaplain, J. M. Whitehead. Judge Advocate, Thos. Hai: 

C. M. O., Allan H. Dougall. 



1884 



Sr. V. 



Joseph P. Iliff. 
Jr. V. C, Nathan C.Welsh. 
Medical Director, R. A. Wil 
Chaplain, R. E. Hawley. 



mder, Edwin Nicar. 
A. A. G, Ben D. House. 
A. Q. M. G., Jasper E. Lewi 
Judge Advocate, Thos. Hani 
Inspector, Robert Strattou. 



C. M. O., C. E. Whits. tt. 



Department Commander, J. B. Hager. 
S. V. C, James R. Carnahan. A. A. G., Jay Cummings. 

Jr. V. C, Ed. C. Snyder. A. Q. M. Gen., Harmon S. Mil 

Medical Director, J. C. Thompson. Inspector, W. H. Armstrong. 
Chaplain, B. F. Cavens. Judge Advocate, Thos. Hanna. 

C. M. O., S. E. Armstrong. 
1SS1 
Department Commander, W. W. Dudley. 
S. V. C, John L. Wooden. A. A. G., Ben D. House. 

Jr. V. C, A. L. MHler. C. M. O., J. R. Carnahan. 

Medical Director, Geo. F. Beasley. Judge Advocate, Thos. Hanna 
Chaplain, J. W. Harris. A. Q. M. G-, S. E. Armstrong. 

Inspector, W. H. Armstrong. 



Department Commander, D. N. Foster. 



Sr. V. C., G. W. Miller. 
Jr. V. C, J. A. Young. 
Medical Director, A. R. Tucker. 
Chaplain, A. Blackburn. 

Judge Ad% 



A. A. G., Robert Stratton. 
A. Q. M. G., Frank E. Benjamir 
Inspector, Jasper E. Lewis. 
C. M. O., D. S. Wilson. 
;, Thos. Hanna. 



Department Commander, Thos. W. Bennett. 
Sr. V. C, Andrew Fite. A. A. G., Ben D. House. 

Jr. V. C, W. F. Daly. A. Q. M. G., C. E. Whitsitt. 

Medical Director, A. R. Tucker. Inspector, J. P. Iliff. 

Chaplain, Ira J. Chase. C. M. O., Gil R. Stormont. 

Judge Advocate, Thos. Hanna. 



i88y 
Department Commander, Ira J. Chase. 
Sr. V. C, W. F. Daly. A. A. G., I. N. Walker. 

Jr. V. C, C. C. Briant. A. Q. M. G., C. E. Whitsitt. 

Medical Director, A. R. Tucker. Inspector, James F. Fee. 

Chaplain, W. A. Lamport. Judge Advocate, Benj. F. Williams. 

C. M. O., J. P. Iliff. 



1892 
Department Commander, Jos. B. Cheadle. 
Sr. V. C, Phil Dickinson. A. A. G, Irvin Robbins. 

Jr. V. C, George H. Koch, A. Q. M. G., O. R. Weaver. 

Medical Director, J. M. Jones. Inspector, Hugh Espy. 

Chaplain, G. P. Riley. Judge Advocate, B. F. Williams 

C. M. O., George W. Miller. 



Department C 
Sr. V. C, Shelby Sexton. 
Jr. V. C, I. B. McDonald. 
Medical Director, A. R. Tucke 
Chaplain, Ira J. Chase. 



ider, A. D. Vanosdol. 
A. A. G, I. N. Walker. 
A. Q. M. G., C. E- Whitsitt. 
Inspector, Andrew Fite. 
Judge Advocate, B. F. Willi; 



C. M. O., Thos. M. Little. 



1S93 
Department Commander, Jas. T. Johnston. 
Sr. V. C, C. J. Murphy. A. A. G., R. M. Smock. 

Jr. V. C, W. F. Medsker. A. Q. M. G., O. R. Weaver. 

Medical Director, John Y. Hitt. Inspector, Thos. M. Little. 

Chaplain, O. S. Reed. Judge Advocate, J. H. Jordau. 

C. M. O.. W. F. Daly. 



Department 
Sr. V. C, P. D. Harris. 
Jr. V. C, B. B. Campbell. 
Medical Director, J. B. Green. 
Chaplain, Charles W. Lee. 



lander, C. M. Travis. 
A. A. G., I. X. Walker. 
A. Q. M. G, W. M. Cochran. 
Inspector, J. M. Story. 
Judge Advocate, B. F. Williams. 



C. M. O., H. H. Ragon. 



Department Commander, H. B. Shively. 



Sr. V. C. Robt. J. Patterson. 
Jr. V. C, John W. Tingle. 
Medical Director, J. M.Jones. 
Chaplain, D. R. Lucas. 

C. M. O. 



A. A. G, R. M. Smock. 

A. O. M. G., O. R. Weaver. 

Inspector, Joseph Gill. 
Judge Advocate, B. F. Willi 
F. Spaulding. 



Department Com 
Sr. V. C, W. W. McBeth. 
Jr. V.C., James Gimsley. 
Medical Director, C. W. Burkett. 
Chaplain. M. L Wells. 



jde 



R. Stormont. 
A. A. G., I. X. Walker. 
A. Q. M. G., O. R. Weaver. 
Judge Advocate, B. F. Williams 
Inspector, John A. Weaver. 



C. M. O., M. L- DeMott 



1896 
Department Commander, H. M. Caylor. 
Sr. V. C, Elmer Crockett. A. A. G.andA.Q. M. G..R. M. Sine 

Jr. V. C, Jno. E. Harrison. Inspector, C.J. McCole. 

Medical Director. John H. Rerick. Judge Advocate, C. M. Travis. 
Chaplain, R. J. Parrett. C. M. O., H. H. Woods. 



Department Commander, I. N. Walker. 
Sr. V. C, M. D. Tackett. A. A. G., Irvin Robbins. 

Jr. V. C, J. W. Elam. A. Q. M. G.. O. R. Weaver. 

Medical Director, Hosea Tillsou. Inspector, W. F. Daly. 

Chaplain, Dauiel Ryan Judge Advocate, B. F. Williams 

C. M. O., George W. Miller. 



1S97 
Department Commander, James S. Dodge. 
Sr. V. C. John W. Tingle. A. A. G. and A. Q.M.G., R.M. Smock 

Jr. V. C, Daniel White. Inspector, Amos R. Walter. 

Medical Director, F. M. Warford. Judge Advocate, Charles M. Travis. 

Chaplain, Alonzo Murphy. C. M. O., William D. McCullough. 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF DEPARTMENT OFFICERS. 



JAMES S. DODGE. 

DEPARTMENT COMMANDER- 

3 AMES S. DODGE was born in Morrow county, Ohio, of Scotcli ances- 
tors, August 26, 1846. Two years later his parents removed to Elk- 
hart county, Indiana, and located on a farm. In 1S50, when but four years 
of age, his mother died, and sis years later death deprived him of his 
father. The lad was then cast entirely upon his owu resources, and 
passed the next seven years of his life upon a farm. In June, 1863. he en- 
listed as a recruit in the Third Ohio Cavalry, when but sixteen years of 
age, and served to the end of the war. He was with his regiment at Snake 
Creek Gap, Buzzard's Roost, Chickamauga, Resaca, Peach Tree Creek, 
Atlanta, and other historic fields. He was with Kilpatrick on the latter's 
famous raid, and with " Pap " Thomas at the battle of Nashville. He was 
at Selma, Ala., at Columbus, Ga., and was present and took part in liberat- 
ing the last of the Union prisoners at Andersonville. He also assisted in 
the capture of Jeff. Davis, when the latter was fleeing in disguise. Mr. 
Dodge was mustered out of the service at the end of the war with the rank 
of orderly sergeant. In 1S67 he entered the medical department of 
Michigan University, took the medical course, and continued in the prac- 
tice of that profession until 1SS4, when, on account of the encroachments 
of rheumatism, and having prepared himself by two years of assiduous 
application to the study of the law, he was admitted to the bar of Elkhart 
county, and entered upon the active practice of that profession. Hard 
work and natural ability soon placed him in the front rank of his calling 
in that section, and to-day he is regarded as a strong lawyer and one of the 
leading advocates of the State. Mr. Dodge has ever been an aggressive 
aud uncompromising Republican, and for the last twelve years has done 
yeoman service for his party in the field, on several occasions stumping 
the entire State. As a political orator he has few equals, and during 
campaign years is constantly in demand by the Republican Central Com- 
mittee. In 1S92 he was the candidate of his party for Congress, and, al- 
though he reduced his opponent's majority one thousand votes, he was 
caught in the landslide that engulfed his party, and went down to defeat 
with it. No person in the State, at least, is more in demand for Fourth of 
July, Decoration Day orations, and civic society addresses, and he is a fre- 
quent speaker at Grand Army of the Republic reunions and various other 
celebrations. He was for several years Commander of the G. A. R. Post at 



Bristol, Ind., is Past Commander of Elmer Post, No. 37, of Elkhart, Iud., 
and is present Commander of the G. A. R. of Indiana. He is a member of 
the Century Club, a social and commercial organization at his home ; is a 
member of the Commercial Club, and is a member of St. John's Episcopal 
Church, and one of its vestrymen. He is thoroughly domestic in his 
tastes, aud leads a pleasant home life with his wife and two children — a son 
and a daughter — the son being a student at Indiana University. 




JOHN W TINGLE. Semo 



Department Commander. 



JOHN W. TINGLE, 

SENIOR VICE DEPARTMENT COMMANDER. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Eaton, Preble county, Ohio, in 
1S38. Was educated in the public schoolsof Eaton, learned the carpenter's 
trade, was married to Mary E. Earley at West Alexandria, Ohio, in i860 ; 
enlisted in company G, Ninety-third O. V. I. August 16, 1862; was with 
General Buell in his chase over Kentucky after Bragg; was in the Third 
Brigade, Second Division of the Twentieth Army Corps, under General 



Alex. McCook ; was in the Ibattle of Stone River, near Murfreesboro, 
Tenn., December 29th to January 3rd, following. Was captured January 1, 
1863, while escorting a headquarters baggage train to Nashville. After a 
circuitous trip over the so-called Southern Confederacy landed at Rich- 
mond, Va., making headquarters at " Hote de Libby." Was exchanged 
and joined his command in June following, starting on the 24th with the 
Army of the Cumberland on the Chattanooga campaign. Was in numerous 
skirmishes and minor engagements before reaching Chickamauga, where 
he was severely wounded and again taken prisoner. After lying on the 
battlefield ten days (part of the time without shelter), was exchanged and 
removed to a hospital in Chattanooga ; was afterwards transferred to Cin- 
cinnati, and as soon as able to walk was assigned to duty at headquarters 
of the Department of Ohio, under General Willich, commanding. Re- 
mained here until mustered out, October 29, 1864. Returning to his native 
home, he was appointed Superintendent of the County Asylum, moved to 
Indiana March, 1868, locating at Richmond, and for several years was en- 
gaged in contracting and building. He has filled many places of trust and 
responsibility in that city ; was Trustee of Wayne Township for seven 
years; was twice elected Post Commander of his G. A. R. Post (Sol. Mere- 
dith, No. 55), and at the encampment last year was elected Senior Vice- 
Commander of this Department. 

DANIEL WHITE, 

JUNIOR VICE DEPARTMENT COMMANDER. 

Daniel White, Junior Vice-Commander of the Department of Indiana 
G. A. R., is a native of Shelby county. He was boru near Morristowu in 
1845. Was reared on a farm, receiving such education as the common 
schools of that day afforded. The subject of this sketch is a Son of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, his great-grandfather, Ephraim Polk, having served in 
the Revolutionary War. " Dan," as he is usually called, enlisted the third 
time before he succeeded in getting mustered into the service. He first 
enlisted in the spring of '62 in the Sixteenth Indiana Infantry, and in Oc- 
tober of the same year enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Battery. Each time 
his father opposed his being mustered into the service, owing to his age. 
In December, 1863, he again enlisted, and in January, '64, was mustered as 
private in Company D, Nineteenth Indiana Veteran Volunteer Infantry, First 
Brigade — Iron Brigade— Fourth Division, Fifth Corps. In August, 1S64, 
was transferred to Company C, reorganized Twentieth Indiana, and de- 
tailed asimusician. Was in the battles of the Wilderness, Laurel Hill, Spotsyl- 
vania, North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Hawes' Store, Petersburg, Va., 




DANIEL WHITE. Ji: 



Depar 






First and Second Hatcher's Run, Weldon Railroad, Boydton Plank-road, 
General Lee's retreat from Petersburg to his surrender at Appomattox , 
Va. Participated in grand review at Washington, D. C.,at the close of the 
war. Was mustered out of service at Jeffersonville, Ind., July 15, 1S65, re- 
turned to Wabash, Ind., where his parents had removed while he was in 
the service. He worked on the farm until 1S67. From this date he 
worked at the cabinet-maker's trade until 1SS1, when he entered the 
United States mail service, and is yet serving Uncle Sam. 

He is a Past Post Commander of Marsh B. Taylor Post, G. A. R., of 
LaFayette, Ind., his present home. 

RICHARD M. SMOCK. 

Richard M. Smock, Assistant Adjutant-General, was born April 2, 1S41, 
six miles south of the Capital. His parents were Kentuckians, having 
moved to Indiana in 1829. The subject of this sketch was reaiedona 
farm, with such advantages as a farm life at that date offered, working at 
farm labor during the summer and attending school in the winter. July 
19, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company G, Seventieth Regiment, In- 



diana Volunteers, and served in that capacity until June 16, 1864, with his 
regiment, taking part in many of the battles of the Atlanta campaign, 
when he was severely wounded while on the skirmish line at Lost Mount- 
ain, Ga. This wound in the left breast proved to have been made with a 
"poisoned" ball, and to that was added gangrene, and it was only the 
most skillful nursing that saved his life. In November, 1S64, he was de- 
tailed on detached duty in the office of Col. A. J. Warner, who was in com- 
mand at Indianapolis, where he served until June 30, 1S65, when he was 
discharged. In November, 1865, he entered the County Clerk's office as 




RICH A B] 

a deputy, and served in that capacity continuously until July 15, 1884, 
having the longest continued service in the office of any man in the history 
of this county. In 1SS4 he was elected Justice of the Peace, and in 1888 
was again elected, serving eight years in that capacity. He has been a 
member of George H. Thomas Post, No. 17, for a number of years, and 
served one year as commander. He has always taken an active interest in 
the order, and was for two years chairman of the Relief Committee. 
When the General Relief Committee was organized by the Grand Army 
Posts of the city of Indi.inapolis he was selected chairman, and served in 



that capacity for two years He was for two years a member of the De- 
partment Board of Visitors to the Indiana Soldiers' and Sailors' Orphans' 
Home at Knightstown. He was appointed Assistant Adjutant-General 
April 13, 1893, by the Department Commander, James T. Johnston, and 
served in that capacity ever since. In October, 1895, after the death of 
Assistant Quartermaster-General O. R. Weaver the work of the two offices 
was consolidated, and General Smock was placed in charge, and has done 
all the work since, thereby saving to the department many hundreds of dol- 
lars and doing the work in a more satisfactory way than ever before. No 
officer in the department is more widely known than R. M. Smock. 



GENERAL LEW. WALLACE. 

Lewis Wallace was born in Fountain countv.Ind., about 1828. Studied 
law, and was admitted to the bar, but during the war with Mexico served 
as Second Lieutenant in First Indiana Volunteers. Returning to Indiana 
and his profession, he was for one term a member of the State Senate. 
Early in 1861 he became Adjutant-General of Indiana, but in April took 
command of the Eleventh Indiana (three-months) Volunteers, which 
served in West Virginia, being engaged in the capture of Rornney, etc. 

On the expiration of its term the regiment was reorganized in August, 
1861, with Wallace again at its head, but September 3rd he was commissioned 
Brigadier-General of Volunteers, and stationed for a time in Kentucky. 
At the capture of Fort Donelsou, where he commanded a division and the 
center of the Union lines, he displayed such ability and courage that his 
commission as Major-General of Volunteers followed March 21,1862. In 
the succeeding battle of Shiloh, though not engaged the first day, he ren- 
dered efficient aid in the second day's fighting and subsequent advance 
upon Corinth. In November, 1S62, he was president of the court to inquire 
into the conduct of General Buell. Commanded Middle Department and 
Eighth Corps; 1S64 defeated at Monocacy. Was member of commission 
for trial of persons implicated in the assassination of President Lincoln 
and attempted assassination of Mr. Seward. He was commissioned United 
States Minister at Constantinople May 19, 1881, and Envoy Extraordinary 
and Minister Plenipotentiary July 13, 1SS2. Held latter office till March, 
18S5. General Wallace is the author of "Ben Hur, a Tale of the Christ," 
and other popular books. 



ISHAM KEITH POST, No. i ;, G. A. R., DEPARTMENT OF INDIANA. 



This Post was organized January 10, 1S80. Capt. S. E. Armstrong, 
chief mustering officer of the Department of Indiana, was present and 
mustered in the charter members and installed the officers selected, asfol- 
lows: M. Taylor, Commander; Thomas Morgan, Senior Vice-Commander; 
J. M. Garrett, Junior Vice-Commander; William M. Winkler, Quarter- 
master; B. M. Hutchius. Officer of the Day; C. A. Hubbard, Officer of 
the Guard; John Stobo, Surgeon; I. T. Brown, Chaplain, and John J. 
Schrack, Adjutant. 

At the organization the Post was called Columbus Post, G- A. R.; 
later it was changed to Isham Keith Post, in honor of a young officer by 
that name, who was reared in Columbus, and was commissioned Captain 
of a company in the Twenty-second Indiana, and was promoted for gal- 
lant service to Colonel of the same regiment, and was killed at Perryville 
while leading his regiment in a charge. 

Of the whole number of charter members of this Post but six are 
living, namely: M. Taylor, L. C. Griffith, John Stobo, I. T. Brown, J. M. 
Garrett and B. M. Hutchins. 

The present officers of the Post are: W. F. Kendall, Commander, 
Joseph D. Halbert, Senior Vice-Commander; William Braheney, Junior 
Vice-Commander ; George H. Clutch, Officer of the Day ; Vincent Thomp- 
son, Officer of the Guard; W. T. Davis, Quartermaster ; O. H. Mennett, 
Surgeon; H. W. Nickerson, Chaplain, and I,. C. Griffith, Adjutant. 

The Past Commanders of the Post are as follows: Marshall Taylor, 
Ison Griffen, Lewis C. Moore, W. T Strickland, J. B. Safford, W. F. Ken- 
dall, George H. Clutch, Ward Salmond, B. M. Hutchins, M. V. Jewell, R. 
L. Foster, C Larabee, W. T. Davis, Solomon Glick, C.A. Adams and Wm. 
P. Poland. 

COL. S. I. KEITH. 

Very properly there is a certain halo of glory clustering around the 
names of our heroic dead who fall on the field of battle that is not accorded 
their more fortunate comrades, who, though brave as the bravest, and torn 
with shot and shell, are spared to civil life and their friends. Because of 
this tendency, and a very gallant career, the memory of Lieut. -Col. Squire 
Isham Keith has always been dear to the ex-soldiers and citizens of the 
city of Columbus. 

At the first call to arms, in 1861, Mr. Keith responded by joining Capt. 
Abbett's company of the 6th Indiana Regiment, but as there were more 



men enrolled than were necessary for a company, the overplus, under Keith, 
was consolidated with a part of a company from Jennings county, under 
charge of Capt. Hiram Prather, but not in time to be accepted under the 
call of the President for three-months men. Subsequently he recruited 
the company known as Company G, 22d Indiana Regiment, and as captain 
of the company entered upon the active duties of war in Missouri. 




COL. S. I. KEITH 

At the battle of Pea Ridge, when Col. 
was almost surrounded by the swarming 
Keith's company, forming the rear guard, 1 
the regiment fell back, when Capt. Keith, at 

his way through and rejoined his regiment. His gallant conduct at this 
battle greatly endeared him to his comrades. From this time Capt. Keith 
followed the fortunes of his regiment through Arkansas, Mississippi, 
Tennessee and Kentucky, reaching Louisville on the 27th day of Septem- 
ber, 1S62. Ill the mean time, July 9th, he was promoted to Major, and on 
July 23d to Lieutenant-Colonel. While his regiment was at Louisville he 



Hendricks fell, the regiment 
masses of the enemy. Capt. 
leld the enemy in check until 
the head of his company, cut 



came home for one day on a visit to his parents and brother, Col. John A 
Keith, who was at home suffering from a severe wound received in an 
engagement near Baton Rouge, August 5th. This meeting was just four- 
teen months to a day since the brothers had parted. Col. S. I. Keith re- 
joined his regiment on the 1st day of October, and marched in command 
of his regiment in pursuit of Bragg's army, and took a conspicuous part 
on the 8th day of the month in the bloody engagement at Perryville, los- 
iug fifty per cent, of his men engaged and his own life. 

Indiana's Roll of Honor gives the following account of the circum- 
stances attending his death: "When nearly dark, on the Sth of October, 
Col. Keith was ordered, with his regiment, to the support of the 59th Illi- 
nois. Marching by the left flank down a hill into the woods, he was 
halted by the Rebel General Hardee, who asked, ' What command ? ' Col. 
Keith replied, ' The 22d Indiana from Pea Ridge.' Hardee then said, 'I 
belong to the same command; ' and pointing to the Rebels in Union uni- 
forms, and with the United States flag, said 'These are my troops; ' and, 
riding quickly to the rear of his column, gave the command, ' Fire.' By 
that volley Col. Keith was mortally wounded. He was carried by his men 
to the rear, when he said, 'I must die; go back and do your duty.' The 
next morning he was dead. He was buried in a soldier's grave ; a board 
placed at his head to mark the spot. Soon afterwards his remains were 
conveyed to Columbus, Indiana, and interred in the family burying- 
ground." In a historical sketch of the 22d Regiment one of the officers, R. 
V. Marshall, pays this tribute to the memory of Lieut-Col. S. I. Keith: 
"I saw the brave Lieut.-Col. Keith, who commanded the regiment, fall 
from his horse, shot through the chest. Col. Keith was a patriot, not 
only from sentiment, but also from a sense of duty ; I have often heard 
him say, that he considered it the duty of every man to be loyal and to de- 
fend his country against all foes, whether foreign or domestic. He died 
young, twenty-four years of age, but lived long enough to develop the 
true priuciples of manhood and the highest capacity for usefulness." 



HON. JESSE OVERSTREET, 

of Iudiauapolis, was born in Johnson countv, Ind., December 4, 1859. He 
received a common-school and collegiate education and was admitted to 
the bar in 1886. Was elected to the Fifty-fourth and re-elected to the 
Fifty-fifth Congress as a Republican, receiving 29,075 votes against 24,187 
votes for Charles M. Cooper, Free Silver Democrat, and 757 votes for 
Evans Woollen, National Democrat. 



HON. CHAS. WARREN FAIRBANKS, 
of Indianapolis, was born on a farm near Unionville Center, Union county, 
Ohio, May 11, 1S52 ; was educated in the common schools of the neighbor- 
hood, and at the Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, graduating 
from that institution in 1X72, in the classical course; was admitted to the 
bar by the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1874; removed to Indianapolis in the 
same year, where he has since practiced his profession ; never held public 
office prior to his election to the Senate ; was elected a trustee of Ohio 
Wesleyan University in 1NS5 ; was Chairman of the Indiana Republican 
State Convention in 1892 ; was unanimously chosen as the nominee of the 




HON- CHAS. WARREN FAIRBANKS. 

Republican caucus for United States Senator in the Indiana Legislature in 
January, 1893, and subsequently received his entire party vote in the Legis- 
lature, but was defeated by David Turpie, Democrat ; was a delegate-at- 
large to the Republican National Convention at St. Louis in 1896, and was 
temporary Chairman of the Convention ; was elected to the United States 
Senate as a Republican January 20, 1S97, by a majority of twenty-one, on 
joint ballot, over Daniel W. Vorhees and Leroy Templeton, and took his 
seat March 4, 1897. His term of service will expire March 3, 1903. 



SONS OF VETERANS. 



August 27, 1878, James D. Holt, at a meeting of Anna M. Ross Post, 
No. 94, G. A. R., of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, moved that a committee 
be appointed to devise means of forming a G. A. R. Cadet Corps. A com- 
mittee was appointed which reported a constitution that was adopted 
October 13, and a corps organized. The idea of perpetuating the memory 
of the veterans of '61 by the organization of their sous on a comprehensive 
plan took root, and the Cadet Corps of Post 94 became Camp No. 1, Sons 
of Veterans. 

Because of dissatisfaction on the part of some with the military part 
of the early ritual a rival order was organized and flourished in the States 
of Massachusetts, New York and Pennsylvania; but in 1890 all the different 
orders were united with the U. S. A. branch, under a new ritual, constitu- 
tion and by-laws, prepared in 18S1 by Major A. P. Davis, of Petersburg. 
The desiguation of rank by general, colonel, etc., was abolished about [891. 

By the hard work of its loyal members, some of whom have almost 
consecrated their lives to the work, the order has gradually grown until 
now it is represented in every State and Territory in the United States, 
including Alaska, and has a camp in the Hawaiian Islands. 

THE INDIANA DIVISION S. OF V. 

In 1882 Wm. H. Armstrong, then of Terre Haute, hearing of the 
existence of the Sons of Veterans, wrote to the Grand Division Commander, 
at Chicago, who commissioned him Provisional Division Commander. He 
at once organized Camp No. 1 at Terre Haute, and by correspondence and 
personal effort, he caused camps to be organized at LaFayette, Elliottsville, 
Attica, Danville, and other towns. Being a member of the G. A. R., and 
not the son of a veteran, he turned the work over to the members of the 
order, and was succeeded by George \V. Allen, of Terre Haute. Here the 
record is not complete, but it seems Mr. Allen was only in office a short 
time, and was followed by John E. Edmondson, of Elliottsville, now of 
Bloomingtou, who did some good work for the order. He was succeeded 
by E. W. McGuire, of Huntington. The work about that time began to 
lag, and the Grand Division Commander appointed George B. Abbott, of 
Chicago, in 1SS5, to work up an interest in the order. He got the work 
well under way, and finding a ready and willing helper in Elmer S. 
Walker, of West Lebanon, he had him appointed in the latter part of 1S85. 
Colonel Walker's work was so good that on May 16, 17 and 18, 18S7, the 



first encampment was held in Richmond, at which Colonel Walker was 
elected Commander, there being twenty-seven camps represented. The 
second encampment was held in Indianapolis, June 5 to 7, 188S. Colonel 
Walker was reelected, and there were 102 camps represented. Subsequent 
encampments were held as follows: Third, at Logansport. June 10 to 12. 
18S9, George C. Harvey, Danville, Commander; fourth, Evausville. July 15 
to 17, 1S90, J. W. Newton, Winchester, Commander; fifth, LaFayette. June 




W. A STEVENS. Captain Local Sons of Veterans. 
23 to 25, 1S91, J. W. Newton, re-elected; sixth, Fort Wayne, 
1892, N. J. McGuire, Rising Sun, Commander; seventh, Terre 
5 and 6, 1893, N. J. McGuire, re-elected; eighth, Kokotno, J 
1894, Frank S. Morton, Commander; ninth, Anderson, July 2 
Frank S. Morton, re-elected; tenth, Frankfort. July 1 and : 
Oglesbee, Indianapolis, Commander ; eleventh, July 6 and 7, 1 
R. S. Thompson, Rising Sun, Commander. 



July 5 to 8, 
Haute, July 

uly s and 6, 
and 3, 1S95, 

1, 1S96, R. B. 

897, Marion, 



LOCAL SONS OF VETERANS 

John S. Crimp Camp, Xo. 32, Division of Indiana, 1 
Sons of Veterans, Columbus, Ind. J 

This camp was organized on July 2. 1897, and mustered in by Past 
Division Commander Frank Martin, of Indianapolis, with forty-six charter 
members. At this time delegates were elected to attend the Division 
Encampment at Marion on July 6 and 7, and were instructed to urge the 
selection of Columbus as the place for the 189S encampment. The dele- 
gates, J. W. Prall. C. C. Brown and Capt. YV. A. Stevens, were successful in 
their efforts. The camp is named for Mr. John S. Crump, who is one of 
Columbus' most progressive citizens. The following are the officers of the 
camp : 

Captain, W. A. Stevens; First Lieutenant, W. C. Cotton; Second 
Lieutenant, J. W. Prall; Camp Council, \V. C. Roland, Frank Nolting and 
O. M. McCracken ; First Sergeant. W. A. Thompson ; Quartermaster 
Sergeant, Albert F. Owens; Sergeant of the Guard, W. Sherman Jones ; 
Corporal of the Guard. W. S Dodge; Color Sergeant, Clias. G. Maring; 
Principal Musician, Fred Cline ; Camp Guard, Harry McCoy ; Picket 
Guard, Frank Apel. 

The future prospects of this camp are bright, and it is expected to forge 
to the front in the Indiana Division. 



The accompanying reproduction of the n 
esteemed fellow-citizen may rightly be termed 
Columbus is keeping pace with modern progress 
material things. For many ages it 
the human race to show but little h 



;dal presented to our 

i modest evidence that 

n sentiment, as well as 

been one of the unwritten laws of 

to the man of letters and thought, 



than common public spirit, or the voluntary and un- 
selfish servant of the public, until after the demise of the one to whom 
honor is due Thoughtful minds have often realized how eminently un- 
just this is. The citizens of Columbus point with some degree of satis- 
faction to this happv exception to the common rule. 

The more prominent and lasting evidences of Mr. John S. Crump's 
public spirit and enterprise are referred to in another article in this edi- 
tion. Upon the completion of the electric street railway our citizens 
assembled eii masse and filled the spacious auditorium of the theatre to 
its utmost capacity. All the city's professional men. its men of capital, 
the mechanic and the laborer, participated in an ovation to the man who 
had done much for Columbus, and whose work was appreciated by the 
people who were to share in its benefits The unstinted and sincere 
praise tendered Mr. Crump in the course of two hours of speech making 
by our ablest speakers will ever be remembered hy him as the proudest 
day of his life, and will be cherished by his family as long as memory 
remains. 

At the conclusion of the ovation the beautiful medal, wrought of gold 
and set with nine diamonds, was presented as a fitting memorial of the 
occasion. 




OUR VETERANS. 



Irene B. IIawley. 



When the shocked reverberation, 

Belched from foul Secession's gun, 
Struck the leal heart of the Nation 

Into flame, in Sixty-one, 
Like the leap of avalanches 

Sweeping down an Alpine steep, 
Or as Nature's wrath advances, 

Came the roar of marching feet : 
Sons of Freedom, nerved for battle 

By their mother's anguished cry, 
Rushing on. her foe to grapple, 
Slay or die. 



Now again is heard the beating 

Of the rythmic fall of feet ; 
Panoplied battalions sweeping 

Through the arched and bannered street ; 
Veteran hearts, with rapture, listen 

To the old war melodies, 
Spirits leap and eyelids glisten 

When " Old Glory" flaps the breeze ; 
All the pomps and passions hover 

Round the old life, lived again. 
As they pass let brows uncover— 
These are men. 



How those ardent patriot cordons 

Legion lined the front of war, 
Proving, as their country's wardens, 

Human breasts make shield and bar 
How they washed the stain of treason 

From our banners with their blood; 
How they turned the land's unreason 

Back to loyal rectitude ; 
How the paean of their glory 

Down the centuries rolls and swells- 
Time's unrivaled hero story — 
History tells. 



O Columbus ! Pour your salvos ! 

Rend the dome with cheer on cheer; 
Let the worth of royal heroes 

Find a royal honor here; 
Open wide your welcoming portals, 

Let each hand a laurel bring, 
Trouble not with class assortals — 

Every soldier is a king. 
Let it be your proudest annal 

For the centuries unknown, 

Once with names on Glory's panel 

Dwelt your own. 



But the feet that caught the cadence 

Measured by the tap of drum, 
Press the earth with dull impatience 

In the quiet walks of home 
And the impulse of life's current, 

Keyed to throb to martial strain, 
Moves the spirit into ferment 

To renew that life again ; 
So, whene'er the bugle's rally 

Calls to yearly reveille, 
Lo! the war-scarred veterans sally 
Merrily. 



And if, mayhap, falls the shadow 

Of the future's certain gloom, 
When the camp rows shall grow narrow 

And the ranks no longer form, 
Let the soothing consolation 

To grieved contemplation come : 
Heaven will voice our acclamation, 

When the " Boys " have gathered home ; 
Yet, though gone, a bivouac keeping 

In their green tents silently, 
They will ward, e'en in their sleeping, 
Liberty. 



LADIES' SOCIETIES CONNECTED WITH THE G. A. R. 



WOMANS' RELIEF CORPS. 

DEPARTMENT OF INDIANA. 

The Department of Indiana Woman's Relief Corps was organized 
September 17. 1884, with seven corps, viz.: Nelson, Keudallville; Sidney 
S. Lyon, Jeffersonville ; General Cauby, Brazil : Francis D. Mathews, El- 
lettsville ; Shiloh Field, Elkhart ; A. O. Bachmau, Madison ; Sion S. Bass, 
Fort Wayne. 

The first President was Alice E. Griffin, of Elkhart. Then followed 
LorettaJ. Gorsuch, South Bend: Flora Wulschner, Indianapolis; Agnes 
Hitt, Indianapolis; Jennie Myerhoff, Evansville; Melissa Caylor, Nobles- 
ville; Laura Hess, Wabash; Ida S. McBride, Elkhart; Julia S. Conklin, 
Westfield; Nettie Ransford, Indianapolis; Eliza J. Crisler, Greensburg; 
Mary A. Sims, Frankfort, and Mary D. Travis, Crawfordsville, who is now 
President. 

The Conventions, except one at South Bend, were held in Indian- 
apolis to 1S91. Since that time they have been held, respectively, in Fort 
Wayne, Evansville, LaFayette, Muncie, South Bend and Richmond. 

The objects of the Woman's Relief Corps are " To especially aid and 
assist the Grand Army of the Republic and to perpetuate the memory of 
their heroic dead. To assist such Union veterans as need our help and 
protection, and to extend needful aid to their widows and orphans. To 
find them homes and employment, and assure them of sympathy and 
friends. To cherish and emulate the deeds of our army nurses, and of 
all loyal women who rendered loving service to our country in her hour 
of peril. 

"To maintain true allegiance to the United States of America, to in- 
culcate lessons of patriotism and love of country among our children, and 
in the communities in which we live, and encourage the spread of uni- 
versal liberty and equal rights to all." 

From January 1, 18S7, to March 31, 1S97, they have expended for re- 
lief, cash $33,330.24; estimated value of relief other than money $24,423.30; 
turned over to Posts $10,643.23, making a grand total of $68,396.77; assist- 
ing 16,425 persons. 

In addition to assisting the Union veteran and his dependent ones, 
the Woman's Relief Corps took up the work of teaching patriotism in 
the public schools five years ago, the Department of Indiana being the 
leader in this great %vork. 



The Flower Mission is another grand feature ; by it, peace and com- 
fort have been brought to many darkened homes. This organization is 
all the name implies— The Woman's Relief Corps. 




MRS. IRENE B. HAWLEY. 

WOMAN'S RELIEF CORPS, ISHAM KEITH CAMP, No. 199. 

To have possessed a blessing and to have lost it is to evermore desire 
another of like character. Ever after the return of the charter of the 
Women's Relief Corps of Columbus in 18S9, Isham Keith Post were unceasing 
in their desires and efforts for reorganization or the institution of another. 
This hope materialized in 1S95. That year Mrs. Eliza Crisler, then acting 
Senior Vice-President of the Department W. R. C, came as a detailed install- 
ing officer and instituted the existing corps March 13th, with eighteen 
members. 

Its first chief officers were Irene B. Hawley, President ; Lucinda St. 
John, Senior Vice-President ; Louisa Foster, Secretary, and HuldaC. Brown 



ing, Treasurer. The first year, consisting'of scarcely nine months, was so 
marked by vigor and success that the dawn of the second illumined the 
fact that Isham Keith Camp, No. 2, had come to stay. 

The officers of the second year were Luciuda St. John, President, and 
Sina Poffenberger, Senior Vice-President. The Treasurer was re-elected and 
Augusta Emich was appointed Secretary. She also served during the third 
year. 

At the commencement of the third year, Sina Poffenberger, who had 
filled the chair of the President for two months, was elected to that office, 
witli Margaret Spinner next in rank, and Sarah Click became Treasurer. 
In this year the corps lost several members by removal and two by volun- 
tary withdrawal ; but additions more than balanced the losses, and the 
year 1897 can be described as a very successful one. In this year the honor 
of entertaining the Grand Army iu 1S9S was promised Isham Keith Post, 
and the city of Columbus, and the corps (as it always is), having been help- 
ful in securing this honor, rejoiced with them in their expected triumph. 

The fourth ami present year was ushered in by the election of Irene 
B. Hawley, President, and Margaret Spinner, Senior Vice-President ; Eliza 
Polen and Sarah H. Roope filling the chairs of Secretary and Treasurer. 
The membership of the corps has increased to thirty-five, and its pros- 
pects are bright. 

It works iu perfect harmony with the Post, and besides its regular 
charitable and loyal work, has a flower mission and a relief committee for 
its own membership. It has disbursed during its short life, besides paying 
its living expenses and pro-rata tax, about $50 in relief, and doing much 
other charitable work. It has accumulated #75 worth of property and 
assisted the Post in many important enterprises. By various literary and 
culture exercises the mental and social status of its membership is being 
elevated, and no one can say but that Isham Keith Woman's Relief Corps, 
No. 199, is a blessing to itself and the order it serves, and a benefit to the 
town in which it exists. 

LADIES OF THE G. A. R. 



DEPARTMENT OF INDIANA. 

The Ladies of the G. A. R. is an independent organization of the fam- 
ilies of the soldiers of '61 to '65 and army nurses Fraternity, Charity and 
Loyalty is inscribed on the banner under which they carry on their work 
of caring for the sick soldiers, sailors, musicians and their families; not 
neglecting either loyalty or fraternity to each other and others in placing 
flags on school houses, teaching patriotism and placing across the breast 
of every deceased soldier a silk flag, emblem of the flag he bore to victory. 



The first Circle in the State was organized at LaFayette, March iS, 
1890. The organization of other Circles soon followed and they now 
number twenty, with a membership of six hundred. 

In 1894 the National President, Mrs. Amanda I. Wethren, issued a call 
for a convention to form a Department, which was held at LaFayette 
April 3d and 4th, and the department organization was perfected by Mrs 
Etta Toby, a member of the National Council of Administration. At this 
meeting Mrs. M. J. Paugh, of Logansport, was elected Department Pres- 
ident. The second state convention was held in 1895 at Muncie, Mrs 
Paugh again taking charge. The third convention was held at South Bend, 
and Mrs. Etta Toby, of Logansport, elected Department President. At the 
fourth convention, 1897, at Richmond, Mrs. Can Graves was elected Pres 
ident. 

The Circles of the L. G. A. R. throughout the State make donations 
to the Orphans' Home at Knightstown, and the State Soldiers' Home at 
LaFayette, those at Hammond, Elkhart and Aurora, deserving special 
mention. John A. Logan Circle, No. 7, LaFayette, built and furnished a 
beautiful little cottage, on the " Home" grounds, at a cost of $550.00. 
Lincoln Circle, No. 1, LaFayette, furnished two rooms complete in the 
Cass County Cottage at the " Home," at a cost of $ 120.00. The order has 
expended for relief in the last year J631. SS. 

The members of the Indiana L- G. A. R. think they are second to 
none in the exercise of charity, benevolence and love, and they hope to 
continue in the good work. 

At Richmond, last May, the Ladies of the G. A. R. elected the follow- 
ing department officers : 

Department President, Mrs. Can Graves, of La Fayette. 

Senior Vice-Commander,- Lucy Coleman, of Elkhart. 

Junior Vice-Commander, Mary Newman, of Richmond. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Mary Frary, of Warsaw. 

Counselor, Mrs. Etta Toby, of Logansport. 

Council of Administration, Mrs. Emma Beach, of Aurora; Mrs. Cynthia 
Ulerick, of Elkhart, and Mrs. Lawrence, of Indianapolis. 

INDIANA DIVISION OF LADIES' AID SOCIETY. 

The Indiana Division of the Ladies' Aid Society was organized with 
six societies at LaFayette, June 22, 1S91, with Miss Pearl Wills, of Clay- 
ton, as its first President. The charter was granted August 5, 1891, by 
Ella L. Jones, National President. Forty-five societies have been organ- 
ized during the seven years Indiana has been a division, about half of 
which are now in good standing. The State organization has had many 



things to contend with and a great deal of prejudice to overcome, but by 
perseverance they have come out conquerors, and are now on a firm 
foundation, ready to do what they can for their country and their country's 
heroes. 

The past year has seen the greatest growth in the order of any year 
since the organization of the Indiana Division. Five new societies have 
been organized, two reorganized and one reinstated, making a total gain 
of eight societies and one hundred and ninety-eight members. 




MRS. W. A. STEVENS. 

LADIES' AID SOCIETY, No. 42. 

The L- A. S., No. 42, of Columbus, tnd., was organized and mustered 
on the 19th of November, 1897, by Miss Anna Sims, Division President, and 
Miss Addie Wallace as Guide. The officers selected and installed were 
Mrs. W. A. Stevens, President; Mrs. Mary McKee Smith, Vice-President; 
Mrs. Mary Pfeifer, Past President; Mrs. Ida Shultz, Chaplain ; MissSuda 
Smith, Secretary; Mrs. J. W. Prall, Treasurer; Miss Edyth Mosbaugh, 
Guide ; Mrs. Helen Gysie, Assistant Guide ; Mrs. Will Dodge, Inner Guard; 
Miss LouSalmond, Outer Guard; Mrs. Dr. Dennison, Mrs. Will Dodge and 
Mrs. Sim Henry, Trustees; W. A. Stevens, Judge Advocate ; Staff of Sons of 
Veterans: J. W. Prall, W. G. Dodge, W. C. Cotton, C. C. Smith, Frank Apel. 



Members in good standing: Mesdames W. A. Stevens, . Fuller Swift, 
Will Dodge, J. H. Arnold, Cora Henry, J. W. Prall, G. H. Deuison, Ida 
Shultz, Mary McKee Smith, Mary Pfeifer, Helen Gysie, Mollie Pfeifer, J. 
Pherigo and Misses Edyth Mosbaugh, Suda Smith, Abbie Gilday, Etta Gil- 
day, Lou Salmond and Susie Coons. 



HON. CLAUDE MATTHEWS 

Was born December 14, 1845, in Bath county, Kentucky, educated in the 
schools of the country, and was graduated in 1867 from Centre College, 
Danville, Ky. Was married January I, 186S, to Martha Renick Whitcomb, 
only child of James Whitcomb, Governor and United States Senator of 
Indiana. Removed to Vermillion county in 1S69, and settled on the farm 
which has ever since been his home. 

Mr. Matthews is quite extensively engaged in breeding short-horn 
cattle and other improved breeds of stock, in addition to large grain farm- 
ing. He was elected member of the Legislature of 1877 by a handsome 
majority as a Democrat from a strong Republican county. Was elected 
Secretary of State in 1S90 by a majority of near twenty thousand, aud 
was elected Governor in 1892. At the close of his term in January, 1897, 
he returned to " Hazel Bluff Farm," his old home in Vermillion county, 
and is again engaged in farming. He received the endorsement of his 
party in 1896 for President and w-as supported by the Indiana delegates to 
the last ballot nominating W. J. Bryan. Mr. Matthews is now a probable 
candidate for United States Senator should his party control the next 
Legislature. 

During his administration as Governor, when serious conditions were 
confronting the people, he received the strongest moral encouragement 
and support of the G. A. R., for which he has always been profoundly- 
grateful. Mr. Matthews always believed that this earnest and timely 
offer of support by the old veterans did much to bring matters to a 
speedier settlement. 

Mr. Matthews was always a strong man with his party and with the 
people. His life has been clean and his moral character above reproach. 
His public life has never been sullied. As Governor, during one of the 
most trying periods, the great railroad strikes, he was almost as popular 
with the whole people as with his own party. Though not a brilliant 
orator, he was a strong campaigner, and did effective work for his party, 
as his speeches were always practical, argumentative and convincing, and 
always commanded the respect of even his political 



COLUMBUS AND BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY DURING THE WAR. 



BY S. STANSIFER. 



The condition of public sentiment before the fall of Fort Sumter was 
much the same in Bartholomew county as throughout the North. A large 
portion of the people of both political parties were impressed with the 
sincere belief and conviction that the Union, being by consent, could not 
be held together except by consent, and being equally devoted to the 
Union as those differing with them, they favored compromise. Large 
meetings, irrespective of party, were held everywhere, adopting compro- 
mise resolutions. There was a like meeting at Columbus, the largest ever 
held in the county, of the people of the county, where like resolutions 
were adopted, the writer favoring such resolutions. 

When Fort Sumter fell, followed by Mr. Lincoln's call for volunteers, 
there was another and larger and spontaneous gathering of the people of 
the county at Columbus, irrespective of party, and there was but one voice 
and feeling heard or manifested, that of loyalty to the flag and the imper- 
iled Union, to be saved only by meeting force with force, there being no 
other alternative. At that meeting many more volunteers were enrolled 
than were necessary to fill the quota of the county, and thereafter, to the 
close of the war, the quota of the county on every call was filled without 
having to resort to the draft. At that first meeting a large fund was raised 
to aid in the support of the families of the brave volunteers. 

The Provost Marshal's office was located at Columbus, and so was a 
camp or rendezvous, established in the early part of 1S64, in command of 
the Provost Marshal. 

Two regiments, one infantry and one cavalry, were recruited, equipped 
and mustered at the camp, and more in number were mustered by the 
Provost Marshal to fill depleted regiments in the field. 

When Morgan invaded Indiana, Governor Morton was impressed with 
the belief that one purpose of the invasion was to liberate the Confederate 
prisoners at Camp Morton, and, looking to Columbus as a strategic point, 
he telegraphed the Provost Marshal to send out scouts in the direction of 
Bedford to call out the citizen soldiery and to fortify and defend Columbus. 
A proclamation was at once issued and promptly responded to en masse by 
the people, bringing with them shotguns, spades, hoes and plows, and their 
wives and children. Asa matter of military necessity, the wives and chil- 
dren were ordered home and the saloons closed. The Provost Marshal, 
being entirely without skill or experience in military affairs, delegated 
fortification and the haudlingof the citizen soldiers to his chief clerk, who 



had seen some service in the three-months campaign at the beginning of 
the war. Happily, before anything more was done, Governor Morton tele- 
graphed that Morgan had changed his course, and hence the gallant 
defense of Columbus has no place in history. One or two instances of 
that memorable epoch ought not, however, to be left to traditiou. 

The citizen in command of the scouts reporting that his men had no 
horses, and asking for authority to mount them on Government horses, 
in pasture near by, he was advised by the Provost Marshal to telegraph 
Governor Morton in his name. It was said that the dispatch read some- 
thing like this: "I have twenty mounted men. What shall I do for 
horses?" and was answered, "Dismount and go on foot." 

A prominent citizen and justice of the peace, who resided southwest 
of Columbus, had frequently argued politics with the Provost Marshal, 
especially war measures, and in regard to war measures his principal 
argument was that "the whole thing was unconstitutional." Requiring 
written authority, the squire cheerfully undertook the duty to obstruct 
the highways, and, calling out his neighbors, the work was thoroughly 
done, and especially one highway that he had failed to have vacated by 
the county commissioners. That road was so completely obstructed that it 
was thereby " vacated." Being threatened with prosecution for obstruc- 
tion of highways, he appeared before the Provost Marshal, and display- 
ing his written authority, demanded protection. The Provost Marshal 
said : "Squire, the whole thing is unconstitutional." 

One of the scouts, a great wag, told how it happened that Morgan 
changed his course. Happening to be there when Morgan approached 
the place where the road to Vernon turned from the road to Columbus, the 
scout said, "Morgan asked me whare that road goes to? I said, 'To 
Vernon.' He said, 'Whare does that road go to?' I said, 'Columbus.' 
He said, -Who is in command at Columbus?' I said, 'Sim Stansifer.' and 
then John turned to the driver and said, ' Turn them mules that way,' 
pointing toward Vernon." 

When the war was over our brave and patriotic boys who had survived 
came home, not wild and reckless, as some feared, but good citizens, as 
good as the best of us. All honor to the living and to the graves and mem- 
ory of the departed preservers of our country! It would be better that 
niuety-and-nine undeserving pensions be granted thau that one deserving 
pension be denied. 



The purpose of Morgan's invasion and why he retreated have been 
matters of surmise and conjecture. Soon after he entered the State a 
secret meeting of prominent State-rights politicians was held at Columbus 
for conference about the situation and the proper course to pursue.. It was 
the unanimous sentiment of those present that, so fa,r from aiding or remain- 
ing passive, it was the duty of all Indianians to aid in the expulsion of the 
invaders from the Indiana soil, if necessary. After adjournment, a par- 
ticipant, one of the leaders in that element of his party, sent word to the 
Provost Marshal to meet him in his room at the Jones House, and there, in 
confidence, related to the Provost Marshal the result of the meeting, and 
said that Morgan would undoubtedly withdraw from the State, inasmuch 
as word had been sent him of the sentiment and action of the meeting. 
( (wing to the confidential nature of the information, it has never before 
been made public, aud would not now but for the belief that at this late 
day the spirit and purpose of the confidence reposed will not be violated 
by recording that incident. The writer is of the opinion that the partici- 
pants, if living, would not object, but would consent, as vindicating their 
motives, founded upon the State-rights theory of government entertained 
by that element of the party. 

In conclusion, the writer desires to say for himself that, not having 
gone to the front, he has always felt that he is unworthy to be classed as 
one of the soldiers of the republic, and for that reason, if otherwise eligi- 
ble, he is not worthy to be enrolled as a member of the Grand Army. 

MAJOR AUGUSTUS H. ABBETT. 

BY DR. M. N. EI.ROD. 

Major A. H. Abbett, whose photograph appears on the souvenir badge 
of the Nineteenth Annual Encampment of the G. A. R. of Indiana, was 
born at Columbus, Ind., October 16, 1831. His early life was spent in 
farming, but not to the neglect of a keen interest in public affairs. When 
Fort Sumter was fired on, and there came a call for six regiments from 
Indiana, he was one of the first to offer his services. His well-known 
ability as a leader enabled him to report to the governor the second com- 
pany in the State enlisted and ready to go into camp. His company was 
mustered in April 25, 1861, as Company B of the Sixtli Regiment, Indiana 
Infantry, and on the morning of June 3d took part in the first battle of 
the war at Philippi, W. Va. After the affair at Philippi his regiment 
returned to Grafton, where it was made a part of Gen. Thomas A. Morris' 
brigade, and participated in the engagements at Laurel Hill and Car- 
rick's Ford. While in the three-months service, on several occasions, the 
bravery and good judgment of Captain Abbett were conspicuous. Dur- 



ing the occupation of Philippi by his regiment, he aud another officer, 
while making an examination of the position of the enemy, captured one 
of Bradley's Rebel cavalry officers, whom they tied and marched into 
camp. The capture was so cleverly managed that it was deemed worthy 
of "honorable mention." His command returned to Indianapolis, and 
was mustered out August 2, 1861. 

On the reorganization of the Sixth Regiment for the three-years service 
Captain Abbett again enlisted, raised a company and received the appoint- 
ment of Major. On the day of its reorganization, September 20, 1861, 
Colonel Crittenden received permission to take what men were in camp 







MAJOR GUS ABBETT. 



at Madison, about five hundred, to Kentucky, then being invaded by Rebel 
forces under General. Buckner. Without waiting for uniforms, this por- 
tion of the regiment took a steamer for Louisville, reachiug that place the 
same evening, and was the first body of Union soldiers to enter Kentucky. 
This body of troops formed a part of the little army under General Rous- 
seau which saved Louisville from capture by Buckner. The remainder 
of the Sixth, having come up with the command, the regimeut was 
assigued to Rousseau's Brigade of McCook's Division, and marched with 



that portion of Buell's army to Munfordville, Woodsonville and Bowling 
Green, reaching Nashville in March. On the 29th of that month it left 
for the Tennessee river, reaching Savannah, after a march of one hundred 
and forty miles in seven days, on the morning of April 7th, in time to 
reach the field of Shiloh early in the morning of the second day of that 
great battle. During the march and in battle Major Abbett gained a high 
reputation for faithfulness and gallantry. In the bloody battle of Shiloh 
he bore himself so well as to enlist the most flattering commendations 
from his commanding General, the heroic Rousseau, by whom he was 
greatly esteemed and appreciated. 

At Florence, Ala., because of troubles in his regiment, Major Abbett 
resigned his commission, much to the regret of the non-commissioned 
officers and privates, who manifested their high regard by presenting him 
with a magnificent sword. 

He came home, expecting to retire to private life, but the call of the 
President for three hundred thousand more men caused him to at once 
abandon all idea of business. He raised a company for the Sixty-seventh 
Indiana Regiment, and was again appointed Major. The regiment was 
hurried to Munfordville, Ky., where it was placed on garrison duty. On 
the 13th of September, 1862, a strong brigade of Rebel cavalry and a bat- 
tery of mountain howitzers, the advance of Bragg's army, appeared before 
the Union forces and demanded their unconditional surrender, which was 
refused by the gallant John T. Wilder, Colonel commanding. In making 
arrangements for a vigorous defense Major Abbett was assigned, with a 
small force, to defend a redoubt situated some distance from the main 
works, with orders to hold it at all hazards. The next morning the Rebels 
made a furious attack, which was vigorously repelled by the Union forces. 
" Finally the Rebels essayed to storm the works, but were repulsed with 
great slaughter. Immediately afterward two Mississippi regiments and 
a battalion of sharpshooters made a similar attack on the redoubt. Its 
little band poured iuto the advancing Rebels a most murderous fire. Yet 
on they advanced, as if determined to storm and overcome every obstacle. 
At this juncture, perceiving the critical situation of affairs, and realiz- 
ing the importance of firmness on the part of his men, who had never 
before been under fire, Major Abbett sprang upon the parapet, with his 
hat in one hand and his saber in the other, and in a clear, ringing voice 
encouraged and cheered his men. He was struck in the breast by a mus- 
ket ball and fell dead under the flag he so nobly defended." 

With Major Abbett war meant the defeat of the enemy, and to see a 
duty was to do it. Gloriously did he lay down his life for his country. 
He now sleeps the honored hero's sleep. 



COL. JOHN A. HENDRICKS. 

No account of the part taken by the citizens of Columbus and vicinity 
in the late war would be complete without a reference to the gallant career 
of Col. John A. Hendricks, of the 22d Indiana Infantry. He was the son of 
William Hendricks, one of the earliest residents of Madison, who was the 
first Representative of the State of Indiana in Congress, the second Gov- 
ernor of the State, and for twelve years a member of the United States 
Senate. Col. Hendricks was educated in the schools of Indiana, Hanover 
College, and the State University, from the latter of which he was graduated 
in the classic course in 1S43. During the three years he spent at Blooru- 
ington he came under the personal influence of Prof. Jacob Ammen, 
formerly of the West Point Military Academy. Prof. Ammen established 
a military company of the college students, and, for some time acted as 
their captain and instructor. Col. Hendricks, on account of his aptness 
and proficiency in drill, was chosen captain, and from that time till the 
end of his college course, he retained the office of Captain of the College 
Guards. 

Because of his strong military bias, when the war with Mexico com- 
menced, he sought and obtained from President Polk's administration a 
captaincy in one of the additional regiments authorized by the "ten-regi- 
ment bill." He raised his company in Jefferson county, and proceeded to 
join his regiment in Mexico ; but because of the prostrating effects of gulf 
fever, from which he suffered, lie was unable to do service in the field. 

In 1S61, when war threatened to disrupt our beloved Union, he again 
responded to the call of his country, and took an active part in the organi- 
zation of the 22d Indiana Regiment. August 15, 1S61, the regiment was 
mustered in for three years at Indianapolis, under command of Col. Jeff. C. 
Davis, Lieut.-Col. John A. Hendricks and Maj. Gordon Tanner. On the 
17th of August the regiment moved to St. Louis, where it joined the com- 
mand of General Fremont. In the following December Col. Davis was 
appointed a Brigadier-General and Lieut.-Col. Hendricks assigned the 
command of the regiment. While under his command, the regiment fol- 
lowed the retreating army of General Price, till they made a stand at Pea 
Ridge, where, on the first day of the battle, March 6, 1862, Col. Hendricks 
fell mortally wounded by two rifle balls. He died on bis birthday, at the 

• early age of thirty-nine years ; but not until a blow had been struck, from 

jj which the Confederacy never recovered, and the State of Missouri was 

jj saved to the Union. 

Of Col. Hendricks, as a citizen, a friend has said : " He was a man of 

1 llau affectionate disposition, and great kindness of heart ; gentle and pleasant 

23 



in maimer, be won many warm friends. He always contended for the 
truth, right and justice. 

"He was of a fine personal appearance and very handsome counte- 
nance ; about five feet nine inches in height, erect aud dignified in bearing, 
of easy and graceful manner, energetic in speech, with a pleasant, clear 
voice ; he was one of the finest orators that ever appeared before an audi- 
ence in this county (Jefferson) either on the rostrum or at the bar." 

By his comrades in arms his military career is cherished with pride aud 
affection, and to the people of Columbus his memories are dear, as recalled 
in her daily life amongst us of his accomplished daughter, Mrs. F. O. 
Hogue. 




LIEUT. ALONZO HUBBARD. 

LIEUTENANT ALONZO HUBBARD. 

Alonzo Hubbard was born in Columbus, Ind., March 28, 1S37. His 
parents, John C. Hubbard and Hannah Hubbard, came to Bartholomew 
county from Connecticut in 1S20, and were among the pioneers of this 
county. 

Upon reaching young manhood Mr. Hubbard engaged in the news- 
paper aud printing business, and was one of the early newspaper men of 
Columbus. 

When President Lincoln made the first call for 75,000 troops Alonzo 



Hubbard was the first man to sign the muster roll in Bartholomew county, 
enlisting in Capt. Gus Abbett's company. 

At the expiration of this service he re-enlisted in Company E, 93d 
Regiment, Indiana Volunteers, receiving his commission as Second Lieu- 
tenant, aud serving throughout the war with honor and fidelity. 

At one time during the war he was acting Provost Marshal of the city 
of Macon, Ga. 

Returning home from the army, he resumed his former business, that 
of printing and newspaper editing, in which he continued until his decease, 
August 23, 1876. 

For a quarter of a ceutury Mr. Hubbard was intimately connected 
with the newspaper life of Columbus. 

In 185S he founded the Weston Mirror, a literary paper, which he 
published for two years. Later he was proprietor and editor of the 
Weekly Union. In 1863 he founded a paper known as the Columbus 
Republican, which he sold later to Geo. W. Allison. 

In 1866 Mr. Hubbard founded the City News, an independent paper, 
which he published and edited till his death, ten years later. 

This son of pioneers, who laid dowu his pen to take up the sword in 
defense of his country, is represented in the present generation by his son, 
Paul Hubbard, oue of the sterling young men of our city. Paul inherits 
the patriotism and mental gifts of his father, and in testifying to Paul's 
integrity aud high character we but recall the virtues of the parents as we 
see them exemplified iu the every-day life of the son. 

COLONEL MICHAEL GOODING. 

Colonel Michael Gooding was a resident of Vernon, Jennings county, 
when the civil war broke out, and when the call for troops was made he 
enlisted, and made up his company in April of 1S61, which reported at 
Madison, and was known as Company A, 22d Indiana Volunteer In- 
fantry. He served as captain for a year, and was then promoted to the 
rank of Major, and in a few weeks to that of Colonel of the regiment, 
which position he filled for over eighteen mouths, aud during which time 
he often acted as Brigadier-General. He was iu many of the hardest bat- 
tles, and was once seriously wounded and taken prisoner. In the spring 
of 1864 he was compelled to resigu, on account of ill health, and died iu 
November, 1864, at Murfreesboro, Tenu., aged thirty-four years. His body 
was buried at Vernon, but a few years ago, his family, ou moving to Colum- 
bus to reside, had the body removed to beautiful Garland Brook Cemetery, 
one mile east of the city. He left a wife aud two daughters, who still 
reside iu Columbus. 



COLUMBUS-PAST AND PRESENT. 

FROM "HISTORY OF BARTHOLOMEW COUNTY." 



CHE land on which Columbus now stands was bought in August, 
1820, by Gen. John Tipton and Luke Bouesteel. In that year 
General Tipton erected a log house on Mt. Tipton, the most ele- 
vated and commanding spot in several miles square, and the site 
of the present beautiful residence of J. G. Schwartzkopf, at the west end 
of Third street. 

Luke Bonesteel built one a little further south on the river bank, and 
John Lindsey one at the west end of Fourth street, near where it is now 
crossed by the railroad. 




HuM SMITH JON 



Mayor of Columbus. 



Early in 1821 a legal ferry was also established at this point, though 
perhaps one had existed, in fact, some time previous to that, giving the 
place more local prominence. 

In that early day, when the nearest neighbors were usually several 
miles apart, this constituted quite a village, which took the name of Tip- 
tonia in honor of Gen. John Tipton. 

On January 9, 1821, by act of the Legislature, Bartholomew county was 



organized, and by the same act W. P. Thompson, Edw. E. Morgan, John 
E. Clark and James Hamilton were appointed Commissioners to select 
and lay out a county seat. They proceeded at once to the discharge of 
their duty, and, after due consideration, selected Tiplonia as the future 
seat of justice for the new county. 

It must have been a rather forbidding spot at that time on which to 
found a town, as it was covered by a huge growth of forest trees, sur- 
rounded by swamps and bayous, from which arose rank gases, filling the 
air with malaria, and rendering it peculiarly unhealthy. 

It is not known what influenced the Commissioners to select this site, 
but we may presume that they had the sagacity to look forward to a time 
when the forests would be cleared away, the swamps drained and the 
county become rich and salubrious as we see it to-day. 

At that time, too, flat-boating was the principal means of shipping 
produce and goods, and this being at the junction of Flat Rock and Blue 
rivers, the head of navigation, unless during high water, was a natural 
shipping point. Perhaps, also, the donation of thirty acres of land by 
General Tipton was not without its influence. 

Luke Bonesteel, who seems to have had less public spirit and more 
acquisitiveness than his neighbor Tipton, sold the Commissioners thirty 
acres more for |2,ooo, which must have been rather an exorbitant price 
at that time. They appointed John Newton county agent to survey and 
lay off the town and dispose of the lots at public sale. 

The Commissioners, a few weeks later, changed the name from Tip- 
tonia to Columbus, which was rather an ungracious return to General 
Tipton for his generous donation of land. 

The lots laid off were 75x150 feet. The prices for which they sold 
ranged from f 10 to I200 per lot. 

One hundred and twenty-two lots were disposed of at the first sale, 
June 15, 1821 ; the amount realized from the sale being $6,289. 

Some of the purchasers perhaps bought for speculative purposes. 
Yet most of those who bought took up their abode in the village, as their 
names appear on the tax list and other public records at intervals, and the 
new town seems to have assumed quite a prosperous air for a backwoods 
place laboring under so many disadvantages, of which the present genera- 
tion can scarcely form a conception. 

Judging from the character of their work remaining, and from the 
estimate of those living who can remember them, the founders of Colum- 



ESTABLISHED 1837. 



W.W. MOONEY & SONS, 



COLUMBUS, INDIANA, U. S. A. 

TANNERS AND CURRIERS OF 

(Ebe /Iftoon ey? Ifrure Qah 
1Dan^Stuffe& 
harness £eatbei\ 



BY SECURING- 



THE MOONEY LEATHER 



In yoor harness you will get the best 
quality and best wearing leather made. 



i nsist on MOONEY LEATHER. 



bus must have been men of great energy, resolution and strong common 
sense, and many of them possessed of a good education. 

They proceeded without delay to organize an orderly community, 
elect officers, establish courts of justice, provide for churches and schools 
and put in operation all the agencies of civilized and enlightened govern- 
ment. Many of tbem were men who had fought in the War of 1812, the 
Indian wars, and even in the Revolution ; they were inured to all manner 
of danger and hardships, and did not hesitate at difficulties that would 
have been insurmountable to men of less experience and resolution. 

At first all goods, such as clothing, salt, sugar, whisky, nails and such 
indispensable articles, were carried on pack horses from some point on the 
river, usually Madison. With the opening of the State road from that 
city, some time later, wagons came into use, and a new industry was estab- 
lished, some persons making a business of hauling goods from the river. 
A stage line was established later for carrying passengers and the mail. 

The roads were extremely bad, the streams often swollen, and it some- 
times took several days to make the trip, even with a small load. The 
most of what was shipped out went by flat boats to New Orleans or other 
cities down the river, and this was quite a business for a good many years 
after the town was seated. It was not until some time in 1821 that there 
was even a post-office in the limits of the county, previous to that time the 
people having to go either to Vernon or Brownstowu, two days' journey, to 
receive or send their mail, and paying as high as twenty-five cents postage 
on a single letter. 

But, as they handled little mail, this was one of their minor inconve- 
niences. In 1821 a post-office was established in Columbus which answered 
for the whole county until 1S32, in which year offices were located at 
Azalia, Newbern and Hope. 

All the first homes were primitive log cabins, with puncheon floors, 
and doors of the same material hung on wooden hinges. 

A man who could afford a house with two rooms or built of hewn logs 
was regarded as an aristocrat; even the first public buildings were made 
of logs, but it was not many years until most of these gave way to brick or 
frame. The public square was in a state of nature, and on the first Mon- 
day in May after the town was laid out the clearing of the square was pub- 
licly let to the lowest bidder for the sum of {46 62^. This, however, in- 
cluded only the cutting of the trees and burning of the brush. 

The smaller logs were used in building cabins, but the larger ones 
remained on the ground till the summer of 1S22. In that year Ira G. 
Grovercame from Cincinnati with a stock of goods and opened a store on 
the southwest corner of the square. He was a public-spirited man, as well 



as a man of fine taste, and could not long brook the unseemly sight of the 
great logs covering the square, and soon raised a popular subscription of 
$55 and had them cleared away. 

The first "tavern" or hotel of which we have any record was opened 
by James Dunston in 1821. Later bonifaces were John Liudsey, David 
Stipp, Thomas Hinkson and Newton C.Jones. 

Under the law at that time tavern keepers were licensed to sell liquor, 
and a number of early taverns had no accommodation, for man or beast, 
the license merely serving as a cover for the sale of liquor. 

Afterward the law permitted "groceries" and " stores" to sell liquor 
also, and many of these establishments had about the same outfit as the 
taverns. 

The old Jones House, on the southeast corner of the square, was the 
leading tavern, and was a popular and well-managed tavern, especially 
under Mr. Jack Jones' administration. 

Here the prominent men and politicians of the State who visited 
Columbus occasionally were entertained. 




SCEIIE ON PEARL STREET. 



fm^MMW 







|^ ° PULLEYS.^ " 



& UNDER. 
TOGETHER. DETACHED. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE, 



Although shorn of its former glory and prestige by more pretentious 
and costly hotels, it still remains and does a fair business under the name 
of the Western Hotel. 

Early Mills. — For a number of years after its settlement Columbus 
had no mills, and, except what meal and flour were hauled in by wagons, 
the town depended upon several primitive mills in the county. 

The first Columbus mill proper was built by Isaac Patterson in 1835, 
on Flat Rock, north of the city. He experienced much trouble on account 
of the dam washing out, and, after exchanging hands several times, the 
mill was abandoned in 1849. 

The next year Bonfill & Griffith extended the race for this mill and 
built a flouring mill near it, now the east end of the railroad bridge. This 
was sold to Captain Whitesides, who ran it tili 1858, when it was burned. 

The first steam mill was built in 1856 by Crane, Gent & Bass. J. V. 
Storey, in 1S63, erected a brick mill on the corner of Fifth and Franklin 
streets, which was later turned into a hominy mill. This mill has since 
been torn away. A large steam flouring mill was built by Somiuger & 
Donuer in 1S75, which did an extensive business till 1S87, when it was 
burned. 

John R. Gent later went into the flour milling business on Franklin, 
between Third and Fourth, where he had erected a fine brick mill. 

First Merchants. — Perhaps the first store established in Columbus 
was by John Williamson and son Frazier, in the fall of 1S21. They had 
about $300 worth of stock of such articles as could be most easily trans- 
ported through the wilderness, and were indispensable to the settlers. 

In the spring of 1822, Ira G. Grover erected a store room on the south- 
west corner of the square, and in June brought three large wagon loads of 
goods, bought in Cincinnati and Philadelphia, some $4,000 worth, which was 
a mammoth stock for that day. He appears to have had a monopoly for 
a short time, but the climate proved too much for him, and in March, 1825, 
he removed to Greensburg, where he lived until a few years ago, a 
respected and honored citizen. 

Prior to 1830, a number of stores were established, but many of these 
were, like some of the taverns, only a cover for the sale of liquor, as the 
law of the time permitted the sale of this article by store-keepers. 

John C. Hubbard had a store on the east side of the square, where 
Pape's cigar store now is, and a part of the original building is still 
standing. 

John M. Gwinn had a brick storeroom on the west side of the square, 
about the present site of Breining's hardware store, and Hager & Wilson, 
one on the northwest corner. 

29 



Other early merchants, some, perhaps, as earlyl'as those mentioned, 
were David Dietz, Mitchell & Jones, Z. Taunehill, William Chapman, John 
McKinney, Wilson & Arnold, William Adams, John Jacobs, Evan Arnold, 
Giles Mitchell, Benjamin Parker, Thomas Weaver and William Singleton. 

It was not till 1S35, that Columbus arived at the dignity of an incor- 
porated town. The town organization continued till June 1864, when it 
was concluded that the dignity and population of the town justified a city 
government, and a petition was presented to the town council asking that 
the necessary steps be taken to secure a city charter. An enumeration 
was made and an election ordered, which resulted in favor of the charter, 
which was secured, and October 24th the first city election was held, at 
which Smith Jones was elected Mayor. 

Early in 1869 the present gas company was formed, and certain fran- 
chises granted it by the council. Also a contract was entered into for 
lighting the streets. The city erected and owned the posts, while the 
company furnished the light at so much per post. 

On November 6, 1S69, the city was lighted with gas for the first time 



.inn.l 



rejoicing. More posts 



erected from time to time 




!NE ON HUTTHIN ' A YFVE-MAPLE GROVE. 



THE ORINOCO EURNITURE CO.^ 

« EXCLUSIVE TABLE MAKERS * columbus, Indiana. 

USING ALL THE RARE EOREIGN WOODS. * 




.* <* THE PRODUCTS OE THIS EACTORY GO TO EVERY CIVILIZED COUNTRY IN THE WORLD. ^ j* 



needed, until 1887, when the demand for a better light induced the com- 
pany to put in au electric light plant, a contract having first been secured 
for lighting the city for two years, and the gaslight for out-door posts 
was abandoned. 

Continuing the line of improvement, and realizing the necessity of 
better fire protection, the city council, in 1870, decided to construct water 
works, and in the following year the present system of Holly Water Works 
was completed, at a cost of about $54 000, though improvements and exten- 
sions have since brought the cost up to more than $100,000. In 1873 a vol- 
unteer fire department was organized and since maintained. Recently this 
was supplemented by a regular paid fire department, when the new fire 
house was built. 

About this time, 1S71, the city and whole community suffered from 
the failure of McEwen & Sons' bank. This company had done an 
immense business of various kinds, and their failure, for nearly half a 
million dollars, was crushing in its effect, dragging many into financial 
ruin. The bauk was the depository of the city and county funds, and by 
the failure the former lost $17,000 and the latter $27,000, only a small 
portion of which was afterward recovered from the assets. 

Railroads. — July 1, 1S44, marked au important epoch in the history 
of Columbus, as on that date the Madison & Indianapolis Railroad reached 
this point. This was the first railroad in the State, and was crude in con- 
struction and equipment, but the first whistle sounded the death knell of 
the freight wagon, the flat-boat and the stage coach. The Jeffersonville 
Railroad was finished to Columbus in the spring of 1852, and the Colum- 
bus & Shelbyville road w-as commenced in June, 1853, and finished the 
same year. These lines were afterward all leased by the Pennsylvania 
Company and operated as a part of that system. For many years the city 
suffered great disadvantages for lack of railway competition, and many 
schemes were proposed to secure it, but without effect until 1885, when 
the Columbus, Hope & Greensburg road, a branch of the Rig Four, was 
completed. 

Banking. — The first attempt at banking in Columbus was about 1833, 
when John M. Gwinn and William Gabbert opened an office for loaning 
money and buying "cash notes," or " shaving " notes, and it is said they 
shaved deep. The partnership lasted some three years, when Gwinn 
withdrew, and Gabbert carried it on a few years alone. 

Francis J. Crump, at this time a thrifty fanner, who always had plenty 
of money, did a similar business, though he opened no office, but about 
1S49 he advertised in the Democrat that he wouldj purchase good cash 
notes, and that his office was in his hat. 



Mr. Crump was afterward one of the founders, and principal stock- 
holders of the First National Bank, and Vice-President at the time of 
his death. 

In 1853, B. F. Jones and William Pidgeou opened a private bank 
under the free banking law of Indiana. The firm name was B. F. Jones & 
Co., and they received deposits on which they paid interest, and they also 
"inflated the currency" by issuing "shin-plasters " of one, two and three 
dollars, like bauk notes in appearance, and which were redeemed in gold 
or gold currency when presented in sums of $50 and over. As they cost 
nothing and were based on nothing but the credit of the firm, they were 
a source of considerable profit. 

The business continued for a year, when William McEwen joined the 
firm, and the Kentucky Stock Bauk was organized. It had a capital of 
$50,000, based on Kentucky State bonds and other interest-bearing bonds, 
deposited with the auditor of the State. 

The circulation was at first $45,000, but afterward increased, and at 
one time amounted to ?ioo,ooo, but in time this was all withdrawn, and it 




^■K. 



SCENE ON CHESTNUT STREET, 



The Leading, 



Low-Priced Firm in 

DRY GOODS, 
NOTIONS, 
CARPETS m> 
QUEENSWAPE, 



HEYER &_ 
EIEGENBAUH 



HUB 



SHOE 
STORE 



The Low-Priced House 



High -Grade 
Footwear. 



Look for the style at 



THE HUB 



BOWLEN & FffiGENBAUM. 




MAYOR W. J. BECK. 

became a strictly private bank. In 1863 Pidgeou retired, and in 1865 
Jones also, and the bank took the name of McEwen & Sons, though Jones 
remained with it as cashier until 1870. The McEwens operated largely 
in real estate, live stock, manufacturing and other enterprises. Large 
deposits were made by city and county officials and others, on which a 
high rate of interest was paid, and a great deal was borrowed from East- 
ern capitalists, and the accumulated burdens crushed the firm, and they 
were forced into bankruptcy by creditors. It was the greatest business 
failure the county ever sustained, and for a time almost paralyzed the 



business of the whole community and brought loss and ruin to many 
others. This occurred in September, 1S91, and William McEwen, the head 
of the firm, who was a remarkable man in many respects, died in October, 
1S96, before all the business was finally adjusted. 

Mr. Randolph Griffith, afterward president of the First National 
Bank, did a private banking business between 1S62 and 1864, and still 
more firmly established his already good reputation as a safe and saga- 
cious man of business. 

W. B. Whitnev, young, energetic and brilliant, carried on an extensive 
pork-packing business for several years. He controlled large sums of 
money, was an honorable dealer, public-spirited and very popular. To 
facilitate his enterprise, he, in 1874, organized the Farmers' Bank, with a 




REEVES St CO. 




12% 



_hm= 



A souvenir of Columbus and the Encampment would naturally be 
quite incomplete without mention of the extensive manufactory of 
Reeves & Co. So intimately is the growth and prosperity of Columbus 
connected with the progress of this establishment that it has become a 
source of great pride to every citizen. 

During the great financial depression, beginning with 1893, when the 
majority of manufacturing enterprises throughout the country were either 
forced into bankruptcy or to suspend business, thereby throwing out of 
employment millions of laborers and mechanics, with stout hearts and 
equal confidence in their goods, Reeves & Co. succeeded iu keeping their 
factory in operation, although without profit to the company, but always 
to the great benefit of the community, and especially to their workmen, a 
majority of whom are composed of the best and most highly respected 
citizens. That this foresight and public spirit has been of great benefit 
to the city and every citizen of the community can not be disputed, when 
it is considered that iu the last decade no manufactory in the state has 
made greater progress than that of Reeves & Co., and now it is crowding 
to its fullest capacity one of the largest establishments in the city, while 
its annual pay-roll is the largest. 

However, a very essential feature to the success of such an establish- 
ment is the quality of its productions. Understanding fully the neces- 
sities of the threshing public, this company brought out early in the 
eighties the Reeves Automatic Straw Stacker, being the first machine of 
the kind on the market, and appreciating its great success, other manufac- 
turers began to imitate it, but none of its many imitators has yet succeeded 
in producing its equal. Their thorough acquaintance with threshermen and 
their demands for an improved Clover Huller, in 1891 resulted in the pro- 



duction of a huller that has no equal, and the demand for which far ex- 
ceeds the annual output. In 1893 and 1894 were added the Reeves Double 
Cylinder and Cross Compound Traction Engines, built on the locomotive 
plan, without dead centers, and of great economy of fuel, durability and 
ease of handling, also another advance was made at this time in the in- 
troduction of the Reeves Compound Grain Separator, having double sep- 
arating, cleaning and saving capacity, which was found necessary with 
the advent of the wind stacker, as by the use of this stacker all the de- 
fects of the old-style separator were made manifest. The remarkable suc- 
cess of this line of machinery is evident when it is considered that they 
are being sold throughout the principal grain and clover growing dis- 
tricts of the United States, and in the past season, with increased force 
and factory capacity, Reeves & Co- were unable to supply the great de- 
mand, not having on hand a single unsold machine of any kind at the 
close of the season. 

In addition to the above machinery this company builds a complete 
and improved line of Separator and Clover Huller Wind Stackers, Clover Huller 
Feeders, Sand Cutter and Feeders, Saw Mills, Etc., and maintains fully equipped 
Branch Houses at the following central points: Kansas City, Mo., Des Moines, 
la., Minneapolis, Minn., Springfield, Ills., Indianapolis, lnd„ and Columbus, Ohio, 
with transfer points at Dallas, Texas, Nashville, Tenn., and Baltimore, Md. 

When the success of this institution is considered it is quite evident 
that their products are strictly up-to-date, and the management along 
broad and liberal lines. 

Little wonder then that Columbus is proud of the success of her 
principal industries. 




capital of $100,000, the greater part being Held by the Whitney farnih 
E. G. Whitney, president of the First National Bank of Madison anc 
father of W. B. Whitney, being a large holder. W. B. Whitney was pres 
ident and John Harris cashier. It received large deposits and did ; 
flourishing business, but the president had acquired a mania for specu 



lating in pork, lard and grain, and used all the resources of the bank and 
the packing house for that purpose, and lost, and the bank had to suspend 
in less than two years. The depositors were paid in full, but the stock- 
holders were bankrupted. Whitney, the president, went to Chicago, 
continued to speculate, got on his feet again, lost and committed suicide. 
The city has had some bitter and costly experiences with her banks, 
but those now doing business here, by years of careful and conservative 
management, have established general confidence and fully meet the 
requirements of the business public in their line. 

What a contrast between the Columbus of 1821 and the Columbus of 
1S9S! Then the forest primeval— now the populous and thriving city, 
with a culture among her people second to that of no city in the State. 

Columbus is famous throughout the State as a city of beautiful homes 
and beautiful streets. The city of homes! Under the protecting boughs of 
the shady trees, many of,4hejn^§^]4§S.tlie city itse 



"Tg&f&S 




M. P. ORRILL, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Carriages and Buggies. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Practical Horseshoeing 
and General Repairing. 



THE OLD FOUST STAND. 



FRANKLIN ST. 



H. w. 
RETHWISCH, 

nfji .:::: 



Hand=made 
Harness, 



221 Washington Street, 



TRACK HARNESS A SPECIALTY. 

Repairing Neatly Done. 

COLUMBUS. IND. 



FRAHK JVIeHEALi, 



Staple and Faney Groceries 

{iverything S/rst- Class. 
We J(im to Phase, 



702 Chestnut Street. 



FRED. C. UbRlCH, 

Bakery anb 
Confectionery. 



LUNCH COUNTER. 



Manager City Band. 



COLUMBUS. IND. 




Fine buildings, of varied architecture, eloquent of individual tastes, 
showing strongly the softer leisure side of the energetic men who, down 
in the solid business section, have wrought the city. 

The natural location of the city is not only beautiful, but practical 
advantages render it a well-drained city. 

Statistics show Columbus to be remarkably free from disease, with a 
low rate of mortality. It is provided with the best cement pavement, 
fifty miles in area, besides several squares of asphalt streets and ioo miles 
of graded streets. The business districts are clean and wholesome, while 



the residence portion, with its foliage and beautiful lawns make the city 
a veritable park. 

With its cosmopolitan population, every civilized nation is here rep- 
resented in the descendants of the early settlers, yet all know but one 
country and one flag. Every Christian denomination and the votaries of 
the old dispensation too are here found, yet all revere the fatherhood of 
God and the brotherhood of man. 

The home of some of the best moral and secular educators in the 
State, Columbus is noted for its religious and secular culture. Some of 
these men have held high office in church and Slate, and Columbus is 
honored by their presence among us. 

In every walk of life Columbus has furnished men and women who 
have become prominent in the life of the State and Nation. In civil and 
military life this city, through her sous, has shed luster upon the pages of 
our country's history. 



m 




■MMMflU 



IDEHCE OF ARTHUR OVERSTREET. 



Telephone 




E. I_. WILLIAMS. 
ED. C. COLLINS. 



WILLIAMS & COLLINS, 
<y?eat Osteite, JLoansvu insurance, 



D 



YOl WANT 



Fire Insurance 0\ 

Tornado Insurance p* 
Plate Glass Insurance • 



Life Insurance 0\ 

Accident Insurance ^ 
Indemnity Bonds • 



LOAN OR BORROW MONEY 

i In unquestioned securitii 
cir on long or short time? 



O. lon.iy.SellojvExchanRe REAL ESTATE? 



large or small amounts 



SAY, DONT YOU WANT TO OWN A HOME IN THE "NEW SOUTH,' 
Where Land and Homes' are Cheap? 
have lands in Minnesota, Nebraska, Utah. Colorado. Kansas, Oklahoma and ' 



Do you want any of it? 



Some of the Advantages of the New South . . . 



If so, for full particulars, call on or write, 

WILLIAMS & COLLINS. 317 Washington St., Columbus, Ind. 



7th. COST OF LIVING i "iwiiivr l'i tl 
iL-t/.l in the matler ..I fuel and clothmi; 1 



-ilium . 



adv 



its every 



* 



■* 



) the fact that no 
; and plenty, fo 
id other hurtful ; 



4 th Si HI. 



..pplc 



is nothing akin to 
ak-bone fever ever 
nd breeding or fos- 



frora four to twelve 
>r of chocolate to that 
hat can be improved 



nth of the year. 

8th. COST OF LANDS. We have lands that we can sell at from J 2 , $5 and 
per acre, the S2 to -s Ik 111- railway lainU. unimproved, and private lands from 
n }2o per acre, all on liberal terms that will enable anv one having a small 

ipital t<> heein lit. and w ltlun a ^hort time own their own home free of debt. 

I from $7 00 to $14.00 per thous- 
required, a good house can be putup 



COST OF IHTLDLNT,, Lumbe 
as the expensive foundation is n 

ran one-half ol what it would erst ht- 
SCHOOLS. Excellent schooN aie a 



= th. AGRICULTURAL PROUD 
save that of wheat are profitably rai 
and from two to three crops a year ai 
3i the vear that can iml raise something lor fa mil v an 
6th. FRUIT. The South is the home of the fruit 
;arly apples, also peaches, plums, pears, apricots, figs 



il product.-, ate profit 
egetables of 



ith. CHURCHES AND SOCIETY ar 
2th RAILWAY AND SHIPPING fac 
1 North and Southern trunk line, dir 
i are had 

OTHER equally as great advai 



fact l here ii not a month 



of space here. For fur 

Uih EXCURSIONS a 

at very low rates both for 1 
15th. TIME TO GO. 

with us and we will give o 

and grant special stop-ovei 



d. far in advance of the casual 

all that one could ask. 

lities are first class, and being on a 

;t communications and strictly fiist 

iges are omitted on account of lack 

: and third Tuesdays of each month 



run on the first a' 
il way and hotel a 
uw or at any time is the best time. Come and go 

friends special opportunities to see for themselves, 
)Hvileges both going and coming. It will pay you 




tin 



j. e. Fergus:: 



The daily newspapers are able and progi e- 
influence are felt throughout the State. 

The business interests of the city are conserved 1 
and good sense of our business men and manufacturers. 

It is to be regretted that Columbus is not more patronized as a con- 
vention city, as we have all the facilities for entertaining large conven- 
tions, and Columbus knows how to entertain in a royal i 



the 



iperiem- 



We have one of the handsomest theaters in Indiana, and the choicest 
attractions are always obtained for our people. 

Beautifully situated on Fifth street are our handsome City Hall and fire 
house. These buildings are put up in the most substantial and conve- 
nient manner, and are a credit to our city. The municipal offices are all 
located in City Hall building, and a fine market-house is located in the 
basement. 

Columbus takes pride in the intellect and ability of her professional 
men ; in the foremost place which her bar holds; the justly acquired fame 
of her physicians; the learning and piety of her pastors; the high charac- 
ter and ability of her teachers. 

Yet a precious heritage of the people of Columbus is the memory of 
her sturdy pioneers, who came here about the time Indiana was admitted 
to statehood, braving the dangers of frontier life and laying the founda- 
tions of this present beautiful city. Generations to come shall revere 
them, and their deeds shall not die. Their descendants inherited their 




RESIDENCE OF J. G. SCHWARTZKOPF-TIPTON HILL. 



A. T. GRIFFITH 

Celebrated Oliver 




<£ pIEUD SEEDS <£ 

Jfamilton Cultivators. CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, ROAD WAGONS Ohio Paker. 

Jfoosier 'Drills and Planters. AN0 CARTS 'Dunham's Steel Pollers. 

n , O, . , rjy. HARNESS and HARNESS REPAIRING. ~ ««. ^ ^ ~ 

Cvans Planters and Jt arrows. Jfay ///fy. Co. Jtay Oruck. 



see: our goods before buying. 




DRS. PRALL & DENISON, 

« Operative Dentists, « 



SPECIALISTS /A/. 






Crown and Bridge Work, 

426- WASHINGTON STREET, 

{0®°- FIRST STAIRWAY SOUTH HOTEL ST. DENIS, "©a 

COLUMBUS, IND. 

J. W. PRALL, D. D. S. G. H. DENISON. D. D. S. 




bravery and their patriotism, and the rolls of'4S and '6i bear many names 
of descendants of the pioneers. 

While nearly fourscore years old, Columbus is yet a young city when 
measured by her possibilities for the future. As a manfacturing city she 
enjoys already much prominence, and the prospects are that many more 
factories will locate here in the near future. We have first-class ship- 
ping facilities, and we possess abundant wealth and a rich surrounding 
country. 

Many eligible sites for the location of factories are to be had in 
Columbus. We have low taxes and liberal capitalists, and good induce- 
ments will be offered to factories desiring to locate here. 

Columbus is far enough from Louisville. Indianapolis and Cincinnati 
to justify the prediction that, with the numerous advantages we possess, 
she will become in ten or fifteen years hence, a large intermediate city. 



ENGLISH LUTHERAN CHURCH. 

The English Lutheran Church is the youngest congregation of the 
city, being not yet five years old. It was organized on the 6th of June, 
1S93, with a membership of sixteen, and has, in all its history, been under 
the pastoral care of the Rev. W. S. Sigmond. The corner lot, at Eleventh 





EKGLISH :. 






nd Chestnut Streets, was purchased for a building in January, 1S94. and the 
ouse now upon it was dedicated in the following October. The entire 
roperty cost about $7,000, upwards of $5,000 of which has been paid. To 
ais building, the citizens of Columbus, with characteristic liberality, gave 
ver $3,000. 

Of the $1,900 indebtedness now remainingfSi o bears no interest ; and 
n effort will be made this coming summer to provide altogether for the 
?st. The congregation now numbers fifty, and prospects for new and 



GEO. h. cunniNs, 

Bookseller, Stationer and flemsdealeF. 

FINE KEY WEST AND DOMESTIC CIGARS. 
406 Washington Street. Columbus, Ind. 

SCOTT, "THE" BAKER. 

PRESH CRACKERS DfllLT. 

Washington Street, Between Fifth and Sixth. 

THE OLD RIALTO. 



WM. SCHOOLER, Pr 



Tir$t=€la$$ Civery Stable. 

We Buy, Sell and Exchange. Stands and Feeds a Specialty. 

320 FOURTH ST., COLUMBUS, IND. 

THOS. BROWN, 

PA1NTERI PAPER HANGER, 

SKILLED WORKMEN EMPLOYED. 

COLUMBUS, IND. 



W. W. LAMBERT. 

ATTORNEY AT LAW 

COLUMBUS. IND. 

E. WOLF^ 

425 Washington Street, Columbus, Ind., 

Beef, Laiijeal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Tonpe, Poultry! Game 

PURE KETTLE-RENDERED LARD A SPECIALTY 

JOSE NEWSOM & SON, 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES, 

Woodenware, Stoneware and Tinware. 

329 WASHINGTON ST. Telephone 22. 

WARD SALHOND & SON, 

House Painting, 

Paper Hanging and Decorating. 

Residence 832 Mechanic Street. Bell Telephone 281. 



steady growth are good. The church council consists of the pastor, Au- 
gustus Neible, James S. Taylor, T. E. Otto and J. B. Emich. E. E. Wad- 
dington is the Treasurer. The Sunday-school and Young Peoples' Society 
are flourishing. The two women's societies are doing good work— the 
Ladies' Aid Society, of which Mrs. M. Unger is President, and the 
Woman's Missionary Society, of which Mrs. E. E. Waddington is Presi- 



THE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

The Presbyterian Church of Columbus was organized in 1824 by Rev. 
John M. Dickey, with a membership of seventeen. This church organized 
the first Sunday-school in Columbus in 1S30. Rev. Michael Renily was 
at that time pastor of the church. 

The first church building, which w.ns situated on the corner of Frank- 





GERHAN EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH. 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH- 




Special 

Dramatic 

Attraction. 



CHARLES ELI.I 



TheG. A. R. Encampment 
iommitlee, as a special fea- 
ure, have secured the popu- 
ar actor and playwright, 

HR. 

CHARLES 

ELLI5, 

Land." and "Between i Ik- Lines'' Mom'. or of 

Aberdeen, Xn w. K.nf 1' l.od K e, .South Dakota, " ho "'" I"""" Ins Komanl-.c 

and Waseca Lamp, .No :_•;, Modern Woodmen. Military Drama, 

ON THE POTOMAC 

At Crump's Theatre, Monday and Tuesday, May 16 and 17. 

50 PEOPLE IN THE CAST. REALISTIC SCENIC EFFECTS 

U. S. MAN 0' WAR 

Between decks— Showing the Mammoth Guns and Working Machinery. 

ADMISSION: Parquet and Parquet Circle, SO Cents. 

""•*- ■"■ Dress Circle and Balcony, 35 Cents. 

Gallery, 25 Cents. 



£teel fixtures. d£ 

HOFFMAN'S 

IMPROVED STEEL 

V/auIt a\)d — ~ 
library Sy5^/r\ 

GEUDER & PAESCHKE MFG. CO., 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 
16 East Lake Street, CHICAGO, ILL. 



Hn and Third Streets, was completed in 1846 at a cost of $1,200. Rev. B. 
M. Nyce was pastor at that time. This old building is still standing, and 
is occupied as a livery stable. 

Between the years 1846 and 1S53 the church was served for short 
periods by a number of ministers, prominent among whom were Rev. 
Daniel Latimore, Rev. Charles Merwin and Rev. James Brownlee. 

In 1S53 Rev. N. S. Dickey, son of the founder of this church, became 
pastor, and continued in this relation for seventeen years. Mr. Dickey 
was succeeded in 1S71 by Rev. Alexander Parker, who was pastor for four- 
teen years, during which time the present church building was erected at 
a cost of $26,000. 

Since 1884 the church has been served by the following pastors: 
Rev. Geo. S. J. Brown, Rev. S. R. Frazier, Rev. F. W. Fraser, and the 
present pastor, F. C. Hood. The present membership is 250. The ruling 
elders are W. O. Hogue, F. Donuer, J. H. Bernard, John Stobo, Adam 
Keller, John Scott and H. M. Holmes. 

ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S CATHOLIC CHURCH. 

The first Catholic service, of which we have any knowledge, was held 
in Columbus about the year 1S22, before a congregation composed of 
probably one half-dozen persons. 

Later Father Lalumiere, an itinerant priest, visited Columbus occa- 
sionally, and said mass at the house of one of the Catholic families 
alternately. 

For many years the congregation was without a church building, and 
services were held by the visiting priests at some member's house. Finally, 
in the late thirties, the first Catholic Church in Central Indiana was built 
in Columbus on the ground now occupied by the Rebennack building. 
The church was dedicated to the service of God. under the patronage of 
St. Bartholomew, one of the Apostles of our Lord. Father Vincent Bac- 
quelin became resident priest. 

From this time the congregation increased in numbers, and in 1855 
the Sisters of Providence established the St Bartholomew School, which 
prospered for several years, being discontinued at the breaking out of 
the war. 

The congregation in 1861 numbered fifty families, and was in a fairly 
prosperous condition. The war seriously crippled the congregation, as 
most of its men responded to their country's call and enlisted in the 
Uuiou army. Out of the fifty families composing the congregation sixty- 



five men, more than one for each family, volunteered. This speaks well 
for the patriotism of St. Bartholomew's congregation. 

The name of these men are on record. They served either in the 
commands of Captains Keith, Gaffuey, McGrayel or Harrington. As earlv 
as 1848, during the Mexican War. Columbus furnished one Captain and 
five privates who were members of the St. Bartholomew's Church. 

In 1874, under the pastorate of Rev. Victor A. Schnell, the congrega- 
tion bought the Pence property, corner Washington and Sixth Streets 
(now the Odd Fellows' Building). This gave the congregation an entire 







v 


i \ 




■^ 




p 


[i 






P 






III: 






111 


>jj» ||H / VJ 



ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S CATHOLIC CHURCH. 



hevison Bros. & Go., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

fabrics. 



"IT"*" 

NEW YORK, 458 Broadway, 

PARIS, 54 Rue des Petites Ecuries, 

BERLIN, 42 Leipziger Str. 

LONDON, 1 Coleman Street. 



CABLE ADDRESS: 
EBBMASK 



POLISHED PLATE GLASS, 

MIRRORS, WINDOW GLASS, 

BENT GLASS. 



CINCINNATI WAREHOUSE. 



iiiui 




U5and \\1 
WEST FRONT STREET. 



..* .* LONG DISTANCE TELEPHONE 1122. .* j* 



ROUGH PLATE for SKYLIGHTS & FLOORS. 
THIN POLISHED PLATE. 



half square of fine property, 200 feet front by 150 deep. Three years later 
a new school-house was built, and the Sisters reopened their school, 
which had been closed since the war broke out. 

During the pastorate of the present rector, Rev. A. Oster, the church 
property on Washington Street was sold, and the fine property on the 
corner of Eighth and Sycamore Streets was bought of Hon. Francis T. 
Hord, whose residence it had been. A uew church, rectory and school- 
house were built. The property represents fso.cco in value, with an en- 
cumbrance of $5,000. 

Sincethedays when the first priest visited these partsand held divine 
service before a congregation, composed of one or two families, the 
Catholic Church in Columbus has progressed steadily, and to-day SI. 




THE FIRST BA1 



Bartholomew's is one of the strong forces in the moral and religious life 
of Columbus. 

THE FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH. 

Located between Sixth and Seventh Streets on Franklin is the meet- 
ing house of the First Baptist Church of Columbus. The church was or- 
ganized forty-five years ago, with nineteen constituent members, all of 
whom have departed this life. When first organized the church met for a 
time in the Presbvterian meeting house, afterward in the old Court House, 
andlaterin a building oftheirown, which waserected in the year 1855. The 
church meets, now in a handsome and modern church house, which was 
built in 1891 ; completed at a cost of about $15,000. In the forty-five years' 
history of the church many able men have served as pastors, some of 
whom are well-known and prominent in the Baptist ministry. 

The church is closely organized, having a membership of less than 
350, and under the leadership of a young and wideawake pastor. Fuller 
Swift. The various societies in the church are as follows: The Sunday- 
school, the B. Y. P. U , the Cluster Club, the Boys' and Girls' Brigade, the 
Ladies' Aid, the Woman's Home and Foreign Missionary Society, the 
Choral Union and the Board of Deacons and Trustees. The church is 
united in every good word and work, consecrated and truly energetic. 



ST. PETER'S GERMAN LUTHERAN CHURCH. 

The German Evangelical Lutheran Church of this city is a member of 
the Missouri Synod. It is an offspring of the Clifty Lutheran Church, 
four miles east of the city, which was organized in the forties. The Co- 
lumbus members of that church braved many storms going afoot over the 
Madison Railroad track to attend services. 

In the year 1858 five of the Columbus members seeing a prospect of 
growth here, took it upon themselves to organize the present congre- 
gation. They purchased the lot corner Fifth and Sycamore Streets, and 
erected a frame building, which answered as church and school up 
to 1S69. 

Of the five organizers Henry Fehring is the only one surviving. The 
others were Ernst Kaiser, August Kiel, Gustav Kiel and August Geilker. 
Rev. Zagel, of the Clifty Church, preached once a month for about four 
years, and his successor, Rev. Rolf, preached every two weeks for about 
two years. 




'Echrings 
Pharmacy, 



Bell Telerhone No 
Harrison Phone No. i 

Opposite Postoffict 
COLUMBUS, 



/\Z[lLLINERY^ 

ALWAYS A FRIEND OF THE SOLDIER 
AND THE PEOPLE. 

OUR PRICES THE LOWEST. 
OUR STYLES THE LATEST. 
REMEMBER 

Ttfrs. €. TO. fiagsdate, 

423 Washington St., COLUMBUS, IND. 



378 Jt Jt 1898 



RIGHT FROM THE START 



^^f] '^rX Largest Jewelry and Optical Bus 




Columbus. 
OUR SPECIALTIES ARE 

Diamonds, Jewelry, Spectacles, 
Watches, Silverware, novelties, 
Clocks, Art Goods, etc. 



513 Washington Street, 

COLUMBUS. IND. 



<^r, 



\<^y^^Y 



^fohn ji. Seorge, 



Z/Ae jCeading S3,'Ac 



Representing the 

Monarch, Barnes' White Flyer, Niagara, Waverley, 
Appolo, Gendren, and Red Cross. 

ANYTHING AND EVERYTHING FOR THE WHEEL. 

Riding Academy in connection. METROPOLITAN LIVERY AND BICYLE HOSPITAL. 

Corner Fifth and Washington Streets. 



GEORGE KITZINGER, 

Baker and Confectioner, 



321 AND 323 WASHINGTON STREET, 

_- COLUMBUS, IND. 

DO YOU INTEND TO BUILD 

A Moderate or Cheap House in the Future ? 



Che Radford Ideal Rome*, 



25 House Designs, I Summer Cottage, I Church and 1 Barn for the small amount 
of 25 cents; the usual price of such publication is from $1.00 to $2.00. 

BLUE PRINTS AND SPECIFICATIONS of any of these designs can be purchased at 
from $2.00 to $5.00 per set. Address, 

RADFORD PUBLISHING CO., 

192 W. Twenty-second St., CHICAGO, ILL. 



In 1864 Rev. G. Kuechle was called, and served as the first pastor of 
the little congregation in Columbus until 1867, when he was succeeded by 
Rev. J. G. Nuetzel, who served till 1882. 

The wooden building was soon found to be inadequate to accommo- 
date the growing membership, and in 1869 it was moved back and used 
for a school-room exclusively, and the present brick edifice erected. 

Up to 1874 the minister taught school four days in the week, but in 
that year, owing to the increasing work of the pastor, a teacher was called. 
Prof. H. T. Bollmann served until 1S82, when he was succeeded by Prof. 
Christian Gotsch, who is the principal of the school at this time. 

In 1S82 Rev. C. A. Trautmann was called, and the congregation has 
continued to grow under his charge. In 1S87 the wooden school room 
gave way to the two-story brick structure, and an assistant has since been 
employed to teach the lower grades. 

The German Lutherans now own the block corner Fifth and Syca- 
more Streets, on which are situated the church, valued at $10,000, the 
school $3,500, the parsonage $3,000, and the principal's residence $2,500. 
They also own a school building and residence five miles west of the city, 
valued at $1,000. 

The present membership consists of 200 families, or 1,200 souls The 
pupils attending the Lutheran school in Columbus average ninety. Be- 
sides the regular services and Sunday-school, English services are held 
once a month by the pastor. 

PHRISTIAN CHURCH. 

The Christian Church, or Disciples of Christ, in this city date their 
local history from the organization of the New Hope congregation in the 
year 1S29. From that early day until a separate congregation was formed 
here a large number of members living in Columbus went regularly to 
meeting at New Hope and alternately held services in town. At the an- 
nual State conventions of the Christian churches they were known as the 
Columbus church. Among the ministers who preached for the church 
during this period were Joseph Fassett, William Irwin, John H. Terrell, 
T.J. Edmondsou, Henry R. Prilchard, John O'Kane, Milton B. .Hopkins, 
and John B. New. 

On July 22, 1855, some sixty members living in and near Columbus 
formed a congregation in town, since which time the church has had a 
remarkable growth. In addition to faithful teaching and pastoral work 
to develop godliness in the church, much attention has been given to 
evangelistic preaching and hundreds of souls have turned to Christ 



during a single series of meetings. The church is now one of the largest 
in Indiana. 

The first house of worship in town was built on Jackson Street, north 
of Fifth, and was of frame. It was erected in 1841 and destroyed by fire 
in 1853. A brick structure soon took its place, but in 1877 the greatly- 
increased and increasing congregation called forth the present commo- 
dious " Tabernacle," which, when erected, was the peer of any church edi- 
fice of the Disciples in the state. It is located on Mechanic Street be- 
tween Fifth and Sixth. 




CHRISTIAN CHURCH. 



A NEW QOMFORT FOR THE HOME. 

the Dayton instantaneous water Heater." 




Heats the water while it is passing through. 

Hot water never gives out. 

Inexpensive. 

FOR SAliB BY RUU PliUlTlBERS. 

Mote, bflYTON SUPPLY C2. 

DAYTON. OHIO. 



We are Leaders in our Line. 

"^rrr- 



OUR SPECIALTY: * * J- 



FINE HAND-MADE 



ijmAmh ana Mi 



(WlA. 



r ]ljHfe^ N 




SEND US A TRIAL ORDER. 



132 South Perm Street, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



especially 



Since iS 5 5 the church has been ministered to by the following-pas- 
tors : W. A. Washburne, Henry R. Pritchard, John Brazleton, J. B. Crane. 
John B Cobb and Zachary T. Sweeney, the last named having served the 
church over a quarter of a century and closing his successful pastorate 
with June. 1S97. The present pastor is Eugene B. Scofield, for the past 
four years State Evangelist, and now President of the Indiana Christian 
Missionary Society. 

Beside missionary work done in the county, the congregation co-oper- 
ates in the work of State, Home and Foreign missions, the Woman's Board 
of Missions and in all Sunday-school and Endeavor work, and 
interested in educational institutions. 

ST. PAULS CHURCH. 

EPISCOPAL. 
The first report of services of this church in Columbus was made to 
the Convention of the Diocese of Indiana in 1867, when the Rev. Win. 
Turner was reported as missionary. On August 4, 1871, Bishop Talbot 
reported that Columbus was made a mission station. At the Convention 
of the Diocese of 1872 the Bishop gave the charge of the parish to Rev 
T. W. Mitchel. In 1S76 Rev. Herbert Root took charge, when the mission 
was formally organized and the church edifice was built, there being then 
sixteen communicants. Mr. John H. Hess was appointed the first warden. 
In 1879 eleven communicants only were reported, when the Rev. G. W 
Gates took charge, living in Indianapolis. From 1SS0 to 1884 services 
were held by Rev. E. A. Bradly, of Indianapolis, and others. In January, 
1884, Rev. Willis D. Engle took charge, officiating on every alternate Sun- 
lay until July, 18S7. The first record in the parish register was made in 
1884 by the Rev. Willis D. Engle. In 1S88 the Rev. B. A. Brown, B. D., M.D . 
took charge of the mission. Previous to his coming there were fourteen 
baptisms and fifteen confirmations. In 1S90 the Rev. J. Gorton Miller 
took charge, remaining until Easter, 1S93. During these two pastorates 
eighteen baptisms and twenty confirmations were reported. The present 
rector, the Rev. J. Russell Hoist, took charge October 21, 1894. From that 
time to the present twenty-three baptisms and twentv-two confirmation. 
are recorded. St. Paul's Church has in the last few years lost many and 
valuable communicants by death and removals. During the last two years 
it has lost twenty-one by removals. At present it has fifty-two communi- 
cants. Its vestry consists of two wardens, Mr. H. H. Bassett and Mr. 
Charles Way, with five vestrymen, all communicants. It has a vested choir 
of twenty. 



METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

Pioneers, as they ever have been, the M. E. Church was one of the first religious 
denominations to establish itself in our city. The society in this city was founded 
about 1823. and has had a continuously successful career. 




METHODIST EPISCOPAL. CHURCH. 



Orinoco Tanning Go., 

TANNERS AND CURRIERS OF 




Colored and Russet Case, Bag 
and Strap Leather, 

LEATHER FOR BICYCLE SADDLES A SPECIALTY. 
HARNESS AND SKIRTING LEATHER. 




DR. BANKER'S PRIVATE SANITARIUM 

Is situated in the most beautiful residence part of 
the city, and possesses all the necessaries for home 
comfort. It is nicely furnished and arranged for the 
comfort and convenience of patients, and is solely for 
chronic and surgical cases. No fever patients nor 
contagious diseases of any form are admitted. 
Trained nurses are in attendance. 

THIS IS A PRIVATE INSTITUTION. OWNED AND CONTROLLED BY 

A. J. BANKER, M. D. 

W. T. BANKER, M. D., Assistant. 



The first church was on the corner of what is now Fifth and 
Washington streets, on the site now occupied by Stahlhuth's drug store. 

The next church house was the building on the site now occupied by 
Shea & Fauy's livery. 

The present commodious and beaHtiful structure, on the corner of 
Eighth and Mechanic streets, was erected in 1886, and is now occupied by 
a membership of nine hundred worshipers. This society has made itself 
felt in the moral and religious life of the community until it has become 
one of the dominant factors of the city. 

The church property and parsonage are valued at between 125,000 and 
$30,000. 

The society has recently held a jubilee, at which the last mortgage on 
the property was burned. 

Dr. Geo. L. Curtis, who was serving his fourth year as pastor of this 
church, secured leave of absence from his congregation and set sail from 
New York for the Holy Laud. The Doctor had long cherished a desire 
to visit Palestine. 

On his return journey the Doctor fell ill at Naples, Italy, and a cable- 
gram received from the United States Consul by the Doctor's family 
Friday, April 1, 189S, announced the demise of the Doctor. The news was 
a great shock to his church and the entire city. 

At present Mr. E. Morris is filling the pulpit of the M. E. Church. 



THE WATER SUPPLY. 



ter supply which is 
; noted for her wells 



Columbus is fortunate in the possession of a 
as naarly pure as it is possible to obtain. Columbu 
of pure drinking water. 

The water-works system of Columbus is self-sustaining. The daily 
average consumption is about two million gallons. 

The city possesses many miles of water mains, and the uttermost 
limits of the city have fire protection. 

The Common Council of the city make the rates for the use of water 
from time to time. 

COLUMBUS POST-OFFICE. 

The post-office is located corner of Sixth and Washington streets. 
This building is leased by the government from Francis T. Crump. The 
office is of the second class and has free delivery. Revenue from $13,000 
to $15,000 per annum. 

W. A Stevens, postmaster and Joseph A. Weller, assistant. Three 
clerks, five carriers, and two substitute carriers are employed. 




KROHN. FECHHEIMER & CO. 

LEADING MANUFACTURERS OF 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

. . . CINCINNATI, OHIO. 

LEHMAN & CO., Sole Agents, 

COLUMBUS, IND. 

KING'S WINDSOR ASBESTOS GEJVIEJ1T 

FOR PLASTERING WALLS AND CEILINGS. 

IT IS THE BEST PLASTER MADE. 

IT IS THE MOST RELIABLE. 

IT IS THE EASIEST TO APPLY. 

IT IS THE MOST PRACTICABLE 
IN ITS WORKINGS. 



ITI. OS .111.1 



DICKINSON CEMENT COMPANY, 

931 MARQUETTE BUILDING, 

HEGE & CO., Agents for Columbus. CHICAGO. 




FOR SALE AT ALL DEALERS. 



Schilling 

Corset Co. 



DETROIT. CHICAGO. 

NEW YORK. 



FRANCKE HARDWARE CO., 

DEALERS IN 

BUILDERS' AND CABINET HARDWARE, 
UPHOLSTERY GOODS, 

AND TOOLS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

43=45 South Meridian Street, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



PLAYS ANY NUMBER OF TUNES. 




REGINA MUSIC BOXES KIPP BROTHERS CO. 



General Distributing Agents. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



OUR PUBLIC SCHOOLS. 

The Public Schools of Columbus are justly the pride of all our 
citizens. 

Beginning in 1859, with one small school building, there has been a 
steady increase in school facilities, until to-day there are 



well- 





J. A. CARNAGEY, Superintendent of Schools. 



equipped buildings devoted to public school work. In these seven build- 
ings thirty-five earnest and faithful teachers, for nine months of each year, 
lead an army of sixteen hundred eager boys and girls in their search for 
truth. 

The teaching of patriotism has a prominent place in our schools. In 
1892 the present Superintendent succeeded in having the first flagstaff 
erected at the High School, and soon after this "Old Glory" was proudly 
waving over every public school building in the city. 

It is the policy of our schools to foster and encourage the study of 
American history, the purpose being, as expressed by the Superintendent 
in the Manual of 1895, "to develop in our children the spirit of loyalty to 
America and her institutions." 

The financial interests of the schools are carefully looked after by a 
Board of Trustees, composed of Major Wm. T. Strickland, President ; 
Joseph C. Condon, Treasurer, and Frank McNeal, Secretary- 

55 



CASSIDY & SON 
MFG. CO. <#<£<£«£ 



Gas, Electric and 
Combination Fixtures 



133 & 135 West 23d Street 

and ___^ 

124, 126 & 128 West 24th Street, 



NEW YORK. 



Ask Yo ur Deale r for 



NON-EXPLOSIVE 
PEPEECTION 
HEADLIGHT OIL. 



RENOWN ENGINE OIL 

FOR EXTERNAL LUBRICATION. 



CAPITAL CYLINDER OIL 

FOR INTERNAL LUBRICATION. 



THESE ARE THE BEST OILS 
IN THE MARKET. 



STANDARD OIL CO., 



COLUMBUS, 1ND. 



R. T. COOKE, AGENT. 




MAJ. WM. T. STRICKLAND. 





:.:af:.k jkovk ;:hjol. 




FIRST WARD SCHOOL 



JOSEPH C. CONDON. 



C. SANDHEGER, 

Nos. 123 to 129 East Court Street, 

CINCINNATI, OHIO, 

DIS'I ILLER WD DEALER IN 

Hne Whiskies. 

IMPORTER OF ALL KINDS OF 

Wines, Brandies, Gins, 
Rums and Cordials. 

LOWEST PRICES GUARANTEED. ESTABLISHED IN IS57. 

C. SANDHEGER'S STOMACH BITTERS 

THE BEST IN THE MARKET. 



The A. Bupdsal Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 

PAINTS, OILS, 
VANISHES, 
WINDOW GLASS. 



THE NAME "BURDSAL" ON A CAN OF PAINT IS A 
GUARANTEE OF ITS PURITY. 



We have some one in every town of any 
importance in the State who sell our goods. 



Factory and Store, Indianapolis, Ind. 



P. S. If no dealer in your place can furnish 
our goods, write us direct and say so. 



HAUSER & PARKER are our Agents at Columbus, Ind. 



The Superintendent, John A. Carnagey, who has just been re-elected 
for the niuth year, was first elected in 1S90 to succeed Andrew H. Graham, 
who for twenty-one years was the faithful and efficient Superintendent of 
our schools. 

The people of our city deserve great praise for the cheerful support 
given the schools, and for the wisdom they show in standing behind every 
movement for increasing their efficiency and usefulness. 

In enrollment, regularity of attendance and efficiency of work done 
110 city in the State has a better record. Xo High School in the State has 
a better course of study or better instructors. 

All hail, the Public Schools of Columbus ! 




FRANK McNEAL . 

FLORAL GARDENS. 

Mr. Charles S. Barnaby is proprietor of the Columbus Floral Gardens— 
6,000 feet of glass-covered greenhouses. Particular attention is given to 
cut flowers, such as roses, carnations, violets, hyacinths, tulips, etc. 
Palms are also grown for renting to parties, receptions, balls, etc. Also 
spring vegetables, such as cabbage, tomatoes, etc. 

Columbus appreciates this establishment, and it enjoys a liberal 
patronage. 




I! WARD SCHOOL. 

CRUMP'S SANITARIUM. 

This institution continues to grow in popular favor. Years ago, bor- 
ing for gas, a rich vein of mineral water was struck. Analyzed by the 
State Chemist, it was found to contain valuable health giving properties. 

ke the water in all other mineral wells in this part of the State, it 
flows freely from the top of the well, and its virtues are thoroughly estab- 
lished by the medical profession. 

The Sanitarium has a beautiful location, overlooking the city. At 
present the Sanitarium is owned and leased by Messrs. Hutellins & Kirk- 
pat rick, and Dr. Alva M. Kirkpatrick is manager and physician in charge. 

ICE PLANT. 

One of the most complete and one of the best business concerns of 
the city is the Ruddick [ce Plant and Cold Storage Department. 

The entire business is under the management of the Messrs Denmon, 
and they report an increasing business yearly. 



C. jVI. KELihE^ & CO., 



CONTRACTORS 



Gas, Steam, Water 
and Electric Plants 

3 12 Washington Street. 

. COLUMBUS, IND. 

GALLAND BROTHERS 



.1 1 iCTI'RERS DF 



LADIES' MUSLIN 
UNDERWEAR. 

101 & 103 Wooster Street. NEW YORK. 

FACTORIES: WlLKES-BARRE AND PlTTSTON, PA. 

THE HILGERSTRAUSS CO., Agents, COLUMBUS, IND. 



DAN'L STEWART CO.'S 

LATEST AND HAPPIEST HIT. 

"SENIORS" CIGAR. 

A SWEET SMOKE TO THE END. 

REALLY 10c. CIGAR FOR NICKEL. 

H. M. HOLMES & BRO., Agents. 

ALBERT \l M. AHDE^OM f({. (JO. 

Aetna Railway Insulators, 
Electric Railway Material, 
Electrical Switches and 
Switch Boards. 



289-293 A Street. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



WILLIAM T. STRICKLAND. 

William T. Stricklaud was born in Bartholomew county, Ind., May 
24, 1834, and is the son of the Rev. Samuel Strickland and Elizabeth 
(Piercefield) Strickland. He is a native of North Carolina, and she of Ten- 
nessee. His father was a minister of the Christian Church for sixty years. 
Settled in this county in 1S26; his wife in 1831 ; where they were also mar- 
ried August 7, 1833. Both are now dead. William is the oldest of a 
family of thirteen, eight of whom are still living. His youth was spent 
on his father's farm, and at the age of eighteen he was married to Sarah 
J. Iiddleman, a native of Indiana, lo whom was born Lydia C. Strickland, 
who died at the age of seven, the mother having died soon after the birth 
of her child. After the death of his wife he began to attend the Sar- 
dinia Academy, in Decatur county, Ind., and finished his course in the 
Academy of Rushville, Ind. He began teaching in 1854, which he fol- 
lowed, in the winter season, continuously until the war. In January. 
1857, he was married to Maggie E- Barrett, of this county, and a native of 
Ohio, to whom were born three children— Angelinc, Minnie S. (deceased) 
and John V. Strickland. 

In [861 he enlisted as a private, and upon the organization of the 
Fifty-second Indiana Volunteer Infantry, was promoted to Captain, in 
which position he served eight mouths, and was theu promoted to Major 



of the regiment, and served in the army over three years in all. In 1861 
he was elected a representative from Decatur county. Ind.. lo fill a 
vacancy, but never took his seat, as he was then in the ranks of his coun- 
try's army helping to uphold and defend the Union. In 1870 he was 
again elected to the same office from Decatur county, thus becoming a mem- 
ber of the Forty-seventh General Assembly, which was noted on account 
of the contest for a seat in the State Senate between Hon. John W. Bur- 
ton and Kline, of Delaware and Madison counties, and also the resigna- 
sion of thirty-four members of the House of Representatives to defeat 
the proposed redistricting of the State for legislative purposes, he being 
one of the resigning members. After the war he was engaged in mer- 
chandising and farming for six years; then began teaching, which he 
followed up to the close of the school year, in June, 1S79. During his 
teaching days he filled positions in the Burnsville public school two 
years, in the Hope schools three years, and in 1859. |S6 ° an <J 186 1 was 
principal of the schools at Westport, Decatur county, and in 1S60 was 
elected county superintendent of schools of Decatur county. For manv 
years he had been devoting his spare time to legal studies, and was 
admitted to the bar in 1S77. He came to Columbus in 1879 and formed a 
law partnership with Judge Marshall Hacker, and continued in a success- 
ful copartnership with Judge Hacker for ten years, at the end of which 
time he retired from the regular practice, and has given his time to the 



J. L. CYSIE, 

Proprietor. 



^ 



f 



Ma nhattan Cloth ing Co. 

CLOTHIERS, 
HATTERS, 

FURNISHERS, Coitus, Sn d . 



Nos. 316, 318, 320 
Washington St., 



The Snead & Go. Iron Works 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



ICTURERS OF 



Structural and Ornamental 

IRON WORK 

FOR BUILDINGS. 



ALSO SOLE MAKERS OF THE GREEN BOOK-STACK 
AND SHELVING FOR LIBRARIES. 



The following are some of the large buildings on ivhich contracts for struct- 
ural and ornamental iron ivork ivere performed by this Company : 

New Library of Congress, Washington, D. C. 

Chicago Auditorium, Chicago, 111. 

Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 

Philadelphia Bourse, Philadelphia. Pa. 

Public Library, Boston, Mass. 

New State Capitol, Denver, Col. 

Anderson Building, New York City. 

Cushman Building, New York City. 

Carnegie Building, Pittsburg, Pa 

Austell Building, Atlanta, Ga. 

London and Liverpool and Globe Building, New Orleans, La. 

Every large city in this country has examples of the work furnished by this 
Company. 



TJhe J%. Jr£. Jxndrews Co. 

300-304 Wabash Avenue. CHICAGO. 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

Fine Bank, 

Office, School 
and Church 
Furniture, 



We use only honest materials and construction. Our designs are the 

latest and most artistic, both plain aud moderate price, 

and rich and highly decorated. 



We make greatest variety of OPERA CHAIRS 
for Halls, Lodges, Theatres and Churches. 



Metal Chairs for Stenographers and Pianists. 

Send for Catalogue of either department. 



supervision of his farm. Returning to his residence in the city of Colum- 
bus, in the spring of 1S95 he was chosen a member of the school board 
of the city schools, of which body he is chairman at this time. 

Major Strickland is a man of fine education and large experience. He 
is a good, plain, forcible speaker, quick to detect the weak points of his 
adversary and turn them to his own advantage. He is well known 
throughout the county, and is respected by all who know his character for 
integrity and honesty. 




HON. P. H. McCORMACK, 



To the subject of this sketch much credit is due for the great success 
of the Nineteenth Annual Encampment. 

By his indomitable energy and great executive ability Mr. McCormack, 
in ninety days after the duty of providing funds for the entertainment of the 
Encampment had been assigned him, collected and paid over to the treasurer 
of his committee over $4,000. It is this spirit of energy and will-power that 
has contributed, in a large measure, to Mr. McCormack's successful career. 

Born in Ireland, Mr. McCormack came, when eight years old, with his 
parents, to America, settling in Nashville, Tenn., in 1848. 



Here he attended school till old enough to work, when he wa> 
pprenticed to the marble-cutting trade. 

At the breaking out of the war, Mr. McCormack, together with his 
rother James, tendered his services to the United States Government 



Modern Dentistry ! Posiivei * Painless! 




Painless 
Extracting. 



Dr I W I onn columbusjnd. 

Ul • U» TT. bUJ/p; Over Sriivarukopfs Store. 



James McCormack enlisted in the Fifth Tennessee United States Cavalry, 
serving with bravery and honor till the close of the war. 

Mr. McCormack himself was assigned to important posts, in charge 
of construction of roads, where his services were very valuable to the 
cause. 

Mr. McCormack was in this service from the battle of Stone River 



T. HOFFER & CO. 



Wholesale Dealers in 



fine Wines and Iiiqaops, 



No. 106 East Market Street, 



NEW ALBANY, INDIANA. 



STRATEMEYER & KREHNBR1NK. 



Importers and Jobbers of 



Straw, Silk and 
97filtinery Soods. 

No. 217 West Fourth Street. 
CINCINNATI. OHIO. 



More Popular Than Ever. 

ADObPH SPlEHLiE^'S 

Queen of Violets. 

Just Like the Fresh Flowers. 
For Sale by Druggists Only. 

ADOLPH SPIEHLER, 

Manufacturing Perfumer, 

»- »~ ROCHESTER, N. Y. 

E. R. WEBSTER & CO., 

Importers and Jobbers of 

Teas apd Cigars. 

CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



SECOND AND VINE. 



until the close of the war, being most of the time at Murfreesboro, Tenn., 
and vicinity, under the command of Gen. J. B. Anderson. At the close of 
the war Mr. McCormack resumed the business of contracting. 

In 1S70 he settled in Bartholomew county, his first work in these parts 
being the building of the Bartholomew County Court House, which, after 
more than a quarter of a century, exhibits no defective work in its entire 
composition. Mr. McCormack's reputation as a thorough builder is not 
excelled in any particular. 

Among other fine public buildings which he has erected might be 
mentioned the Court House at Ann Arbor, Michigan; the Hospital for 
Insane at Logansport; the Hospital for Insane at Evansville; Library 
Building, State University, Bloomingtou, Indiana; the Rush County Court 
House, Rushville, and many other buildings. 

As a citizen of Columbus Mr. McCormack's enterprise is a matter of 
common knowledge. Mr. McCormack was twice a member of the Indiana 
Legislature. Also Chairman of Bartholomew County Democratic Central 
Committee many years, besides being twice a member of City Council. 

One of the heavy taxpayers of the county, he never raises a dissenting 
voice when public improvements are broached; rather, he is always among 
the first to agitate improvements. 

Mr. McCormack has an interesting family of five children, presided 
over by his intelligent and amiable wife, who has always been a willing 
helper in the advancement of her husband's interests. 

WILLIAM BROCKMAN. 

Mr. Brockman was born in Melle, Germany, in 1S37, and, when old 
enough, learned the cabinet-makers' trade. He came to this country in 
1S57 and worked for one year in the city of New York at his trade. 

In 185S he came to Indiana, and located in the city of Columbus, where 
he found employment with different parties until 1S66, when he formed a 
partnership with Jas. W. Perkinson, which partnership was discontinued a 
few years later, he entering into a partnership with Adam Keller. In all 
his business transactions he made money. He is to-day one of the 
wealthiest men in Bartholomew county, and owes his success to his own 
efforts, as he started in life without a dollar. 

Mr. Brockman is one of the influential business men of Columbus. He 
takes a deep interest in the city's welfare, and always stands ready to help 
advance the city's interests. 

As Treasurer of the Executive Committee Mr. Brockman did much to 
advance the success of the Nineteenth Annual Encampment. 

No one stands higher in the confidence and esteem of the couimunitv 
than does Mr. Brockman. 

5 e 



3 



V 



HEGE Et CO. 

Contractors 
and Builders, 



and Dealers in all kinds of 



Building Material, 



PORTLAND CEMENT, 

LOUISVILLE CEMENT, 

KINGS WINDSOR CEMENT, 

PLASTER HAIR, ETC. 

all kinds of PLiAHlNG IVIILiLl work done. 

Special attention given to house pattern-- aud bills of finish, 
or anything in the building line. 

It will pay you to see us before you purchase 

AT THE OLD STAND, REAR OF POST-OFFICE. 




A. &c O. «h 



B 



re ENAMELED BATHS EMBODY 

KS9»T MATBRIAL, 
KssiiT WOHKMANS1 




THE "VEDORA." 
WE MAKE PLUMBERS' ENAMELED WARE OUR SPECIALTY. 

THE AHRENS & OTT M'F'G CO., Louisville, Ky. 



INDIANAPOLIS 
COFFIN CO., 

— Indianapolis, Ind. 



The Asphalt Pavements of 

COLUMBUS, INDIANA, 



Were Laid by 
the Undersigned. 



HOW DO THEY STRIKE YOU? 

The Ayers Asphalt Paving Co., 

ZANESVILLE, OHIO. 

CbEJVIEflS VOfl^EGUT, 

iNDiflNflPoms, ifio., 

HEADQUARTERS FOR BUILDERS' AND CABINET 

JTarciwcire, 

HETflL flNb WOOb WOKKINQ 

nflQHlNERY AND TOOLS. 

Will occupy new building at 120-124 East Washington St. 
about September 1, 1898. 



HON. ROBT. N. MEIERS. 

Hon. Robt. N. Meiers, of Bloominglon, was born in Decatur county, 
Ind., January 27. 1848. Is a graduate of both the literary and the law depart- 
ments of Indiana University; commenced the practice of law at Blooming- 
ton, Ind., in April. [872. Was elected Prosecuting Attorney for the Tenth 
Judicial Circuit of Indiana in [875, and re-elected in 1S77. Was elected 
to the House of Representatives of the Indiana Legislature in 1879; 
w.is a trustee of the Indiana University from 1881 to 1S93 ; was 




HON. ROBT. N. HEIERS- 
appoiuted Judge of the Tenth Judicial Circuit of Indiana, in 1883, to fill an 
unexpired term. Was elected judge of the same circuit in 1890, and served 
as judge till September, 1S96, when he resigned and accepted the nomina- 
tion of the Democratic Congressional Convention for the Second District 
of Indiana ; was elected to the Fifty-fifth Congress as a Democrat, receiv- 
ing 21,757 votes, against 20,759 votes for Alexander M. Hardy, Republican, 
and 2,625 votes for Newel H. Motzinger, Populist. 

Mr. Meiers has made himself heard in the halls of Congress, and his 
constituents feel that their interests are in safe hands. Mr. Meier's known 
ability as a jurist gives him much prestige in the House. The Democrats of 
his district will no doubt renominate him for a second term. 



PLUMBING, GAS AflD STEA|VI FITTING 




Hot Water 

and 

Steam Heating. 

I PI. KELLER 

HO. 

312 Washington St 

COLUMBUS, 
IND. 



Ludowici Hoofing Tile Company, 

419 Chamber of Commerce Bldg., CHICAGO, ILL. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE 

MOST PEREECTLY DEVISED AND REST MADE 

INTERLOCKING 
POCF INC. TILE 

EVER MADE IN THIS COUNTRY. 

A building covered with our tile will bring in the open market ten 
times the additional amount of extra cost over slate. It also lasts indefi- 
nitely. 



CHAS. MAYER & CO., 



29 & 31 West Washington Street, 



INDIANAPOLIS. IND. 



WHOLESALE 



Druggists' and Stationers' Sundries, 



Largest Establishment in the West. 



ROY Si ROY, 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in 

Washington Red Cedar Shingles, 

Sawed Fence Posts, 
Fir, Spruce and Red Cedar Lumber. 



General Offices: 636-638 Burke Building, 



SEATTLE, WASH 



DOSCHER BROS., 

152 West Fifth Street, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



AMI-AC n-RKRs I IF 



Candieg and Chewing [jum, 

Chew My Jewel, Dark Horse, and Pepsin Gum. 

BON-TON CARAMELS, 
BUTTERCUPS. 

OUR LINE OF CHOCOLHTES HRE OF THE FINEST. 

John C. Tiemeyer 
Leaf Tobacco Co. 

Packers of Seed Ceaf 



JD IMPORTERS OF 



Havana and Sumatra Tobacco. 



S. E. Corner Second and Walnut Sts., ST. LOUIS, MO. 




Tin 



tlii 



:h i- 



Col 



Mr 



Cooper was born in this c ity May 21. 1857. He received a preliminary edu- 
cation in the public schools of Columbus, and took a four-years collegiate 
course at the Indiana State University, graduating from the literary and 
law courses in 1872, and has been in the active practice of the law ever 
since; is married; was elected Prosecuting Attorney in 1872; was elected 
Mayor of the city of Columbus in 1877, and was City Attorney of Columbus 



for four years ; was elected to the Fifty-first and Fifty-second Congresses, 
and re-elected to the Fifty-third Congress, as a Democrat, receiving 17,693 
votes against 16,610 votes for Worrell, Republican ; 1,088 for McNaughton, 
Prohibitionist ; [,433 votes for Stock well, Populist. At present Mr. Cooper 
is practicing law, having fomed a partnership with his brother, Cassius 
I! Cooper. 




HON. CHARLES F. REMY. 
Hon. Chas. F. Reniy, Reporter of the Supreme Court of Indiana, is a 
Columbus boy. He has the distinction of being the first Republican Rep- 
resentative this county ever had in the Legislature. He -was born near 
Columbus February 25, i860. His parents, Calvin J. and Miranda Essex 
Remy, were both born in Indiana. In the fall of 1879, he entered Franklin 
College, graduating in 1884. He then went to Lexington, N. C, where he 
taught Greek and Mathematics in the Southern Normal for two vears. 
In June, 1888, he graduated with honors from the Michigan Law School. 
Later he formed a partnership in the practice of law with Judge Marshal 
Hacker. In 1896. Mr. Remy was elected Reporter of the Supreme Court 
of Indiana, which position he still holds. Mr. Remy married the daughter 
of our esteemed fellow-townsman. Win. Henderson. Mr. Remy has an 
interesting family, having his residence in Indianapolis 



woni's €^fX#^4 6y 
Best! 



an 



mn I'itfAggt/ Dealers. 



^%e]f,§a^ 



COLUMBUS, INDIANA, 



J. G. SCHWARTZKOPF & SON. 



INDIANAPOLIS BOOK AND STATIONERY CO. 

EXCLUSIVELY WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

BOOKS - - %s$gr- 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES, HOLIDAY GOODS. 

"OLD GLORY" IN ALL SIZES. .* PATRIOTIC BADGES, ETC. 



NOVELTIES IN SEASON. 



121 SOUTH MERIDIAN STREET, INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 



PHIL flOItliEpAGfl & GO. 



DISTILLERS AND JOBBERS OF 



"Pride of the West 

"Pure Rye. 

Fortune Sour Mash. 



Jfine IRentucfcp 

" Mbishies. 



Glencoe Distillery Hand-Made Sour Mash Kentucky Whisky. 
CORNER SIXTH HISD fTlBRKET STS., 

LiOUISVIhbE, KY. 

Bell Telephone 1020. 

Woodford & Pohlman, 

Wholesale Dealers in 

F ^ Kentucky 

Whiskies. 

249 South Meridian St., 

Indianapolis, Ind. 




FRANCIS MARION GRIFFITH 






JUDGE FRANCIS T HORD. 




FREMONT MILLER. 



HON. FRANCIS MARION GRIFFITH. 

Hon. Francis Marion Griffith, of Vevay, was born in Switzerland 
county, Ind., August 21, 1S49. Was educated in the country schools of the 
county, the high school at Vevay and at Franklin College. Has been en- 
gaged in the practice of law at Vevay for over twenty years. Served as 
State Senator from 1SS6 to 1S94. Was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty- 
fifth Congress at the special election held August 10, 1897, to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of the Hon. Wm. S. Holman, receiving 19,342 
votes, against 18,268 votes for Chas. W. Lee, Republican, and 77S votes for 
Uriah M. Browder, Populist. Mr. Griffith has been a faithful representa- 
tive of his constituents during this time, and there is a general demand 
among Democrats for his renomination. 



JUDGE FRANCIS T. HORD. 

Francis T. Hord was born in Mavsville, Ky. His father was a lawyer. 
Judge Hord located in Columbus in 1S57. He was Prosecuting Attorney 
for the Common Pleas Court in 1858, and held this position for two years. 
He was elected to the Indiana Senate in 1S62, and held this position till 
1866. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention held at 
St. Louis, Mo., in 1876, that nominated Samuel J. Tildeu and Thomas 
A. Hendricks for President and Vice-President. He was chairman of the 
Democratic State Convention held at Indianapolis in 1SS0. He was nom- 
inated as a candidate for Presidential Elector for the Fifth Congressional 
District in 1SS0— Hancock and English being candidates for President and 
Vice-President. He was nominated and elected Attorney-General of 



EDWARD HINES. Prest 
L. L. BARTH. Vice-Pres 
C. F. WIEHE. Secy. 



* Edward fiines Cumber Company 



LINCOLN St and 

Blu e Islan d Ave. 



CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 




VIEW OF ENTRANCE TO OUR YARD, LOOKING SOUTH. 

CUE ARE HEADQUARTERS FOR ANYTHING IN THE IiUOlBER liINE. 

OJRITE OS FOR PRICES BEFORE PUACING YOUR ORDER EbSECUHERE. 

Carrying a stock of about 50,000,000 feet of Lumber enables us to give you prompt service on any kind of 
a mixed order you may favor us with. 



Indiana in 1S82, and was re-elected in 1S84. Judge Hord was elected Judgt 
of the Ninth Judicial Circuit in 1892, and still holds that position, and was 
renominated for the same position in 1S9S. 



FREMONT MILLER. 

The subject of this sketch was born September II, 1S6S, in Hamilton 
county. Indiana. His father moved to Brown count}', this State, when 
Fremont was six years old, where he lived with his father on the farm till 
he was twenty years old. For three years Mr. Miller taught school, enter- 
ing the State Normal School at Terre Haute in 1891. In the spring of 
1S92 he entered the State University at Bloomington, pursuant to the 
study of law. Mr. Miller having completed the regular University course- 
graduated with honor in 1897, and will graduate in the law course of the 
University in June. 189S. During his college course he has been honored 
by his fellow students with positions of trust. He was the Managing • 
Secretary of the University Book Store from June, 1S95, till June, 1897, and 
later was elected business manager of "Tin- Student" the official paper 
of Indiana University. 

Mr. Miller was nominated by the Democrats March 25, 189S, for the 
position of Prosecuting Attorney of the Ninth Judicial Circuit, composed 
of the counties of Bartholomew and Brown. As the circuit is largely 
Democratic, it is safe to predict Mr. Miller's election by a handsome 
majority. Mr. Miller is a pleasant gentleman, with a good ethical educa- 
tion, and a well-read disciple of Blackstone. His friends predict for him a 
bright future, and he certainly has the good will of the citizens of Col- 



ibus 



HOTEL ST. DENIS. 



This beautiful mode 
possesses, worth}, 



hotel is one of the enterprises which Columbus 
orty thousand dollars have been spent by- 
its owner, Hon. P. H. McCormack.in making this institution a thoroughly 
first-class hostelry. 

The splendidly appointed office, the handsome dining-room, the 
cheerful bar and billiard parlors, and the luxuriously-furnished sleeping 
apartments leave nothing to be desired by even the most fastidious. And 
the cuisine is justly deserving of the high reputation it enjoys among its 
patrons. 

Mr. E. F. Tuttle is the genial boniface who dispenses the hospitalities 
of the St. Denis. 




WILLIAM BROCKHAN, Tr 



'. rr. 



BROCKMAX & TOMPKINS. 

This enterprising firm is successor to the old firm of Keller & 
Brockman, founded in Columbus thirty years ago. 

The present firm has been in existence about five years, and fully 
maintains the reputation established by the old concern. 

Our City Hall, which is one of the most substantial buildings in the 
city, was built by Brockman & Tompkins. 



ARNOLD & CO., 

DEALERS IX 

Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry, Silverware, Clocks, Imported China, Bric-a-brac, etc. 

Our Optical Department is a special feature of our business and we have the most 
thoroughly equipped ' Iptii al Parlors in the Wtst. presided over by a most competent 

WATCH REPAIRING BY EXPERT WORKMEN. 

423 Washington St., COLUMBUS, IND. 

THE ST. DENIS 
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable. 

OPEN ALL NIGHT. 

CABS, SURREYS, PHAETONS AND BUGGIES. 
Competent Drivers. Prices Reasonable Corner Jackson and 5th Sts. 

WAhLACE REDDING, £ 8 
-^^^-^Che Artistic Photographer 

Wilt reopen his Photograph Gallery in a prominent first-floor location 
in Columbus, Ind., soon. He hopes all his friends and the public 
generally 'will bear this in mind. 

FRED. SURMANN, 

DEALER IN 

Imported*? Seed Leaf Tobacco, 

No. 224 Second Street, 
Bet. Main and Market, LOUISVILLE, KY. 



F. BREINING & CO., 

DE\LERS IX 

FURNITURE, COOK AND HEATING STOVES. 

222, 224 and 228 Jackson Street, COLUMBUS, INDIANA. 



WM. ANDERSON, 



BOOTS HND SHOES. 



REPAIRING NEATLY DONE. ALSO DEALER IN 

HOUSE FURNISHINGS. "^S^;,, 
W. E. McLEOD, 

Office, Irwin's New Block, opp. City Hall, COLUMBUS, INDIANA 

S. A. GEORGE & SON, 

Groceries, Country Produce, Glassware, Tinware, Queensware, Notions, Etc. 

227 2d Street, COLUMBUS, IND. 

F. M. WATT, 
Staple and Fancy Groceries. 

334 Third St., opp. Court House, COLUMBUS, IND. 

FRITZ ROTH, 

BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY. 
SALOON AND LUNCH ROOM. 

311 Washington Street, COLUMBUS, IND. 



JOHN S. CRUMP'S ENTERPRISES. 




Prominent anio 
Mr. John S. Crump 



J. S. CRUMP 
ig Columbus' most substantial citiz 



any otber man. Mr. Crump is not a selfish man, and his efforts are directed 
where they will do others good as well as himself. Being the possessor of 
abundant capital, he is happily in position to exercise this worthy sentiment all the 
more effectively, and he allows no opportunity to pass him unheeded. A man of 
generous nature, he is beloved in his own home and esteemed and honored h\ his 
fellow citizens. 

Four of the most prominent evidences of our city's progress are, at the same 
time, substantial evidences of Mr. Crump's public spirit and enterprise. These 
are: The Electric Street Railway, the Theatre, the Belvidere Hotel and the Safe 
Deposit Vault. 

The Theatre was erected by Mr. Crump ill 1S89, in response to a long and 
generally expressed wish that Columbus might have a temple of amusement 



For ten years Mr. Crump has enjoyed the 
distinction of being one of the most enterprising men in Colum- 
bus. He has more capital invested in home enterprises than 




JohnJ (^UmP, Prop. 




the practicability of using electricity as a motive 
power for street railway service had been fairly established Mr. 
Crump built his second circuit, which is known as the Maple 
drove Line, and completely re-equipped both lines with the best 



k ai 


101 


g the cit 


ies 


if our 


State 


the 


Tl 


eatre, e 


en 


now, is con 


ties 


of 


much gr 


sate 


prete 


nsions 



worthy of its social position and commercial r 
So liberally was this thought carried out th 
siderably in advance of what is found in other 
than Columbus. 

On September 15. 1890, Mr. Crump gave Columbus its first street railway 
service by beginning the operation of a mule-car line over what is now known 
as the main circuit of the Orinoco Line. To this he built an extension to the 
suburb of Orinoco proper, which was opened to public traffic on August 1. 1891. 

79 







approved electrical street car service. The cars are large and strongly 
built, 16-foot bodies and measuring 24 feet over all, handsomely finished, 
and upholstered with silk plush, heated as well as lighted by electricity. 
The power-house is centrally located, and from it also radiate his electric 
light and power circuits. The electric cars have been in operation since 
Mav 16, 1893. 




SAFE DEPOSIT VAULT. 

In December, 1S91, Mr. Crump opened the Belvidere Hotel to the 
public. This event marks an epoch in the hotel life of Columbus, being 
far in advance of anything the city had boasled of prior to that time. It 
compares favorably with any hotel in the State in towns of like size. It 
is a large, handsome building, built of brick and stone, with iron and 



plate-glass front, and occupies a ground space of 150 feet front on Third 
Street by 150 feet on Franklin Street. There are fifty-four guest chambers 
accessible by ascending but a single stairway. These are provided with 
steam heat, electric and gas light, electric calls, bath-rooms and all modern 
conveniences. On the ground floor are located the large and handsomely 
appointed office, with a grand stairway, a fine bar and billiard room and a 
magnificent dining-room, with complete kitchen, cold-storage room, pan- 
try, store-room and laundry added at the rear of the building. 

John S. Crump's Safe Deposit Vault is another of the adomriients of 
Columbus. It is constructed of the highest grade of chrome steel, with 
the intermediate walls built of granite rock, with double combination and 
anti-dynamite inner doors, and air-tight, automatic, triple-movement, 
time-lock outer door. While there are many larger vaults, there is not 
one in the United States that is more secure, more massively built or 
handsomer in appearance. The vault was opened to the public January 1, 
1S92, and is well patronized, not only by the people of Columbus, but by 
many from out of town, inasmuch as it is the only lmrglar-proof vault 
between Indianapolis and Louisville. 



ALTPED P. ROOPE, M. D.— — 

Practice limited to Diseases of the Eye, Ear, 
Nose and Throat and Surgery of the Face. 
OPTiCE, CORNER rlPTH AMD WASHINGTON STS., 

COLUMBUS, IND. 



ly proud of her cement walks. She was the first to 
f walk within the State of Indiana. Now she points 
les of these beautiful and enduring walks. 



CEMENT WALKS. 

Columbus is just 
introduce this kind c 
with pride to her fifty mites 01 tnese neaumui ami enaunnj 

ELECTRIC CURRENTS. 

Columbus is well equipped with electric currents. The city 
currents, for street lights, while John S. Crump has a special 
which he furnishes from his street car trolley 



Gasoline Stoves, , .., Steel l^aoges, 
Refrigerators. Grean? Freezers, 

bflWH MOWERS, CHEAP, AT 

Von Fanse s Hardware Store. 

COLUMBUS, INDIANA. 



332 Washington St 
Columbus, lnd. 



GLASSWARE, QUEENSWARE, 
TOYS, NOTIONS, 
MUSICAL AND FANCY GOODS, 
NOVELTIES, ETC. 



ANDERSON SHULTZ, 
LEADING DRAY and TRANSFER LINE. 

HEAVY MOVING A SPECIALTY. 

Pleasure Haeks During Summer Season. 

Bell Telepone 180. Residence, 724 EIGHTH ST. 

SCHNUR &l GREEN, 

Artistic Sign Painters and Decorators. 

Samples of our work can be seen in the prominent business houses 
of Columbus, lnd. Our work is also displayed in the G. A. R. 
Decorations in this city. 



(^OLUMBIAN^ > 

Enameled Ware. 

K)R PARTICULARS WRITE 

J. P. FENDLATER, State Agent, 

Box 53, INDIANAPOLIS 

CHflS. J. KIMSEY & CO. 

DEALERS IN 

Bottled Beer and Ale. 



COLUMBUS, INDIANA. 



P. & S. LOEWENTHAL,^^ 



Importers of fiavana and /*<\h;*<v<\ 
Packers of Seed Ccaf « LVIWVVV, 



No. 138 Water St., NEW YORK. 



FRANK J. FISHER, 

Sanitary Plumbing, Steam and Gas Fitting, 

Hot Water Heating and Iron Drainage, 

BELL 'PHONE 264. 203 WASH I NGTON ST. 

COLUMBUS. IND. 



THE FRANCES COMFORT THOMAS HOME FOR 
ORPHANS AND DESTITUTE CHILDREN. 

One of the most interesting and one of the most useful institutions in 
our county is our Home for Orphans and Destitute Children. 

This institution is located on nineteen acres of high land in the 
urban territory known as Kast Columbus. Three acres of the original 
plat was donated by our respected fellow-townsman Richard Thomas. 
These three acres represented $1,400 in value. In recognition of Mr. 
Thomas' philanthropy, and as a tribute to the virtues of his deceased wife, 
the Commissioners named the institution The Frances Comfort Thomas 
Home for Orphans and Destitute Children. 

The original cost of the institution proper ».^ $10,000, exclusive of 
the furnishing. The County Commissioners appropriated this amount 
($10,000) to pay for the erection of the building. The furnishing of the 
Home cost $3,000. This amount was raised by popular subscription. 
Much credit is due the soliciting committee, Messrs. J. C. I.auglilin, John 
Stobo and W. T. Davis, who ill a short time raised $2,500 in subscriptions. 
This was supplemented by $500 raised by the ladies ol the different 
churches and at the union meetings of the Protestant and Catholic 
churches of the city. 

From its foundation, in 1892, till the present, the Orphans' Home has 
been a practical success. At present there are seventy-four children who 
are enjoying the shelter of the Home. 

The moral training is carefully looked after by the Matron, Mrs. J. M. 
Brown, who, by precept aud example, endeavors to "bring up the children 
ill the way they should walk." 

Eight months in the year the children attend the graded school, near 
by, and their monthly reports generally show satisfactory progress. 

On Sunday the children always attend some place of worship, accom- 
panied by the Matron. Sunday-school instruction is provided by the 
churches of East Columbus. 

During the four months' vacation the industrial training of the children 
is as well directed as the facilities will permit. Small vegetables and 
fruits are cultivated, the boys furnishing most of the light labor. 

The girls are instructed in needlework and housekeeping duties. 

The present Board of Managers consists of James C. I,aughlin, Presi- 
dent, W. T. Davis, Secretary; John Stobo, Treasurer. 

This Board has had charge of the executive management of the Home. 
During all these years the relations between the Matron and the Board, in 




the affairs of management have been of the most pleasant and satisfactory 
nature. It was with much regret that the Board accepted the resignation 
of Mrs. Brown April I. Mrs. Brown felt that she needed a rest from the 
difficult labors of her position, and the Board agreed to her request for 
permission to retire. 

Mrs. Lawrence B.Stuckey was elected Matron by the Board to succeed 
Mrs. Brown. The Board has every confidence in the ability of Mrs. 
Stuckey to keep the affairs of the Home up to the high standard they have 
always enjoyed. 

The following persons constitute a Visitors' and Advisory Board: 
Messrs. A. B. Reeves. Fred Donner, William Brockman, H. Griffith, 
William Henderson, Richard Thomas. Mesdames J. R. Dunlap. A. W 
Hughes, W. W. Stader, J. Q. Davidson. G. T. McCoy, W. J. Lucas, Jose 
Newsoni, Charles Way, M. T. Reeves, Geo. W.Cooper. 



CHRS. S. BHRNHBY. 

. . FL ORIST . 

■- ' ' ' ■— » 

Rosebuds, Carnations, Smilax, Etc. ; Floral Designs and Decorations. 
Greenhouse and Bedding Plants. 

Greenhouses on East Fifth St., COLUMBUS, IND. 

CITIZENS 'PHONE 116. BELL 'PHONE 126. 

Bicycles, Sundries and Repairing. 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE SEWARD SPECIAL— 
There is none Better. 

Anything and everything used on a Bicycle 
can be found in our stock. Finest repair shops 
in the State. J* J* J* J* J* J- J* -* -* 

The Seward Cycle & Machine Co. 



42 4th Street. 



CALL ON 



Leinberger, Tailor, Hatter and Furnisher 

Corner Fifth and Washington Sta. 
EVERYTHING UP-TO-DATE. 

H- JVI. beinbepger, coiumbus, md. 
E. E. WADDINGTON, 



BOOTS, SHORS, RTC. 

Best Footwear, to suit all ages and conditions. 
You can save money by trading- with us. 

406 Washington Street, COLUMBUS, IND. 



H. M. HOLMES 8t BfrO., 

Druggists anb Booksellers, 

DEALERS IN LATEST DESIGNS 

WALL PAPER, 

PAINTS. OILS AND WINDOW GLASS. 

BASE BALL SUPPLIES, 

CROQUETS AND HAMMOCKS. 

DRUGGISTS' AND STATIONERS' SUNDRIES. 

G. A. R. DECORATIONS, 

PORTRAITS OP WARRIORS AND BATTLE SCENES. 



31 Washington Street, 

3d Door South 1st Nat'l Bank, 



COLUMBUS, IND 



H. M. HOLMES <£ BRO.. 



MsTRIHITORS OK 



EZ1 Florentine 

High Grade 5c. Cigars. 

VOIGE & WINTER, Manufacturers, 
CINCINNATI, OHIO. 




CAPT. W. J. LUCAS. 

William J. Lucas, President of (he First National Bank, was 
in Shelby county, Indiana. His parents were Judge Joshua B. and I 
beth Lucas, natives, respectively, of Pennsylvania and Delaware. 

When 17 yearns of age, Mr. Lucas engaged in mercantile pursuits 
Upon attaining his majority he engaged in the dry goods bus 
at Edinburg, later moving to Franklin, where he carried on the trade t 
the breaking out of the civil war. 



August 26, 1S61, he entered the army, enlisting as private in Co. G, 
3d Indiana Cavalry, of which company he was afterward made Second 
Lieutenant. 

He served in the Army of the Cumberland until honorably discharged 
September 27, 1864, having, in the meantime, been promoted First Lieu- 
tenant, then Captain. In the latter capacity he continued till the ex- 
piration of his term of service. 

On leaving the army he returned to Indiana, settling in Columbus, 
and engaged in merchandising, where he continued prominently identified 
with the business interests of the place till 1SS0. 

In that year he became Cashier of the First National Bank, amd one 
year later he was elected Vice-President of the same, serving as such one 
year, when he was chosen President, a position which he still holds. 

As a business man and financier. Mr. Lucas has attained a leading 
position in Columbus, and as a brave and gallant soldier, his army rec- 
OTd is bright, with duty intelligently and faithfully performed. 




THE BARGAIN STOBI:. -SW 

A FACT WORTH REMEMBERING. 

You can save 25 per cent, on 

Dry Goods and Millinery 

Silverman 's. 

All the Latest Styles. Always a. Full Stock 

SIlrVEHMAN'S, Columbus, I i>< I. 

A. IB. HARTMAN, 

SHIPPER OF 

HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID FOR ALL KINDS OF 
COUNTRY PRODUCE. 



317 Franklin Street, 



COLiUmBUS, IND. 



BRINKER & HABENEY, 

Manufacturers and Dealers in 

GIGAR BOXES 



INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA. 



FEHRING & SANDERS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Wagons, Buggies and Farming Implements. 

REPAIRING AND HORSESHOEING A SPECIALTY. 
601 Third Street, COLUMBUS, IND. 

J. D. HUNTER, 

IHotaiv public. 
f^eal Estate, Lioans and Insurance. 

418 Fifth Street, COLUMBUS, IND. 



PERFUMES. 



COMH.IMKXTS OF 



ChAHENCE W. ADAJVIS, 

« DRUGGIST* 

And Dealer in WALL PAPER, BOOKS, STATIONERY, ETC. 



322 WASHINGTON STREET, COLUMBUS, INO. 



WINDOW GLASS. 



JOHN M. NEWCOMB, 
Coal and Wood, Flour and Feed, 

337 JACKSON ST., COLUMBUS, IND. 

PHONE 1-*S3. 



Politically, he is a Republican, and though not a partisan, in the 
sense of seeking official position, has decided convictions on all public 
questions, and possesses the courage and ability <to maintain them. 




/ *^l 



HON. JAMES M. ROBINSON. 

Hon. James M. Robinson, of Fort Wayne, was born on a farm in Allen 
county, in iS6l, south of that city. His early education was obtained in 
the district school in the country and in the public schools of the city. 
When he was fourteen years of age he became collector of a newspa- 
per, of which be had been a carrier-boy for several years. At the age of 
fifteen he took employment in a shop at Fort Wayne as a machine hand, and 
from that time till the present has supported and kept house with his 
mother. While workiug at his trade he studied law. Quitting the shop 
in 1SS1, he entered the office of Judge Walpole C. Colerick, who was then 
in Congress, and in 18S2 he was admitted to the practice in the State and 
United States Courts. 

In 1886 and 1888 he was unanimously nominated for Prosecuting 
Attorney, and elected, filling that position for four years. He was defeated 
in 1S92 for the congressional nomination by the Hon. W. F. McNagny, 
who served in Congress, but was unanimously nominated by the Demo- 
crats in 1896, and elected, his opponent being the Hon. Jacob D. Leighty. 



Mr. Robinson's father, David A. Robinson, served during the war, and 
was a member of Company A, Thirtieth Indiana. Was wounded and cap- 
tured on the battlefield of Chickamauga, and confined in Libby Prisou, 
returning to Indiana at the close of the war. 

THE FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

This bank was organized March 23, 1865. A charter was secured, and 
business commenced April 27, 1865, in the little brick house on Third 
Street, where Schwartzkopf s furniture store now stands. It removed to 
the east room, in the Griffith Block, in 1S66, and to its present location in 
1875, where it has since remained. 

The present directors are: H. Griffith, Dr. W. O. Hogue, Arthur Over- 
street, John S. Crump, W. J. Lucas and L. K. Ong. 

The bank is officered as follows : W. J. Lucas, President ; L. K. Ong, 
Cashier; Frank Griffith, Assistant Cashier; Chas. Dehmer, Bookkeeper ; 
Woodbury Day, Assistant Bookkeeper. 




• uT . •; r. *1 '« 



FRANK McNEAL. 

Mr. McNeal was born near the city of Columbus, December 7. 1854. 

Mr. McNeal was raised to agricultural pursuits, and received his 
early education in the schools of Columbus, subsequently entering, in 
1870, the Northwestern Christian University at Indianapolis, where he 
pursued his studies for two years. 

In the spring of 1S74, he engaged in farming, upon the old place pur- 
chased in 1820 by his grandfather from the government. After following 
farming for ten years he disposed of his interest in the place, and 
engaged in the grocery trade in Columbus. 

Mr. McNeal is a strong man in the Republican party, and is at 
present one of the leaders of that party in Columbus. At present the 
only public office which Mr. McNeal holds is that of member of the 
school board, being secretary of that body. 

Mr. McNeal is a member of several fraternal societies, besides belong- 
ing to the Baptist church. This community reposes much confidence in 
Mr. McNeal because of his high character and honorable dealings. 



JOSEPH C. CONDON. 

The subject of this sketch is one of the self-made men of Columbus. 

Mr. Condon was born in Belmont county, Ohio, February 22. 1S41. 
and wais raised on a farm till fifteen years of age. In the spring of 1857, 
Mr. Condon came to Columbus, and began his career as an apprentice 
at the brick-mason trade. After becoming master of his trade, Mr. 
Condon began contracting in his line, and for thirty years he followed 
this successfully. Always having a large number of men in his employ, 
he himself made a hand too, and with a trowel in hand, he showed his 
men how to work, teaching them by his own example. By industry and 
economy Mr. Condon has accumulated considerable property in this 
city, and to-day he is reckoned one of the substantial business men of 
Columbus. 

Because of his high character, the people of Columbus have great confi- 
dence in him. and he is often selected to fill important trusts. 

At present Mr. Condon is serving his ninth year as member of the School 

He is also a member of the Official Board of the M. E. Church, and Treas- 
urer of the Board of Trustees. 

He is also a member of Rolla Lodge, K. of P. 




FEEDS better than a man. 

requires no more power. 

will not slug the Cylinder. 

absolutely regulates the flow of grain. 

will give you entire satisfaction. 

is just what you want. 

NEEDS but a trial to convince you 



THAT THE " BUFKIN " FEEDER IS ALL RIGHT. 




BUFK1N FEEDER CO., 

31 WEST MARYLAND ST.. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 




man of strong moral character, and takes much interest in the religious 
and moral development of our city. He is besides a practical kind of man, 
and loses no opportunity to advance the material interests of Columbus. 

DUNLAP & COATS, 

CONTRACTORS. 
Dunlap & Coats, contractors and builders, who are recognized as lead- 
ers in this line of business in this city, have gained a position of promi- 
nence in contracting centers which is more than local. They have done 
work in many of the cities and towns of Indiana, and are at present en- 
gaged in erecting large business blocks in Rushville, Mitchell and Me- 
dora. In addition to contracting, this firm has gained an enviable reputa- 
tion as wood-workers, and their factory is one of the busiest in this sec- 
tion of the State. They manufacture all styles of inside house-finish, 
window casings, base, etc.; also sash, doors, blinds, verandas and fancy 
turned grilles. In fact, at their place will be found a complete line of 
builders' supplies. Special attention paid to plain and ornamental store 
fixtures. This firm has sub-contracted for the wood work on many of the 
largest contracts ever let in the State. The Anderson and Rushville 
Court Houses and the Indiana Reformatory are a few of the many other 
jobs of similar character which might be mentioned in this connection. 
This firm makes a specialty of fine residences, school-houses and churches, 
and in this class of work there is probably no firm in the State that has 
been more' successful. For over twenty years the firm has been in exist- 
ence, and in that time has erected hundreds of buildings, not only in 
and about Columbus, but in Indianapolis, Lawreuceburg, Attica, Madison, 
Seymour, Mitchell, Medora and other cities. Both of the gentlemen of the 
firm are practical men at the business, and during their thirty years' ex- 
perience have personally directed the construction of all work erected 
under their contracts. 



J. R. DUNLAP. 

Jerastus R. Dunlap, the subject of this sketch, was born April 27, 
1S48, near Sidney, Ohio, and came to this county in 1S55, and to the city 
of Columbus in 1S65, where he engaged in the carpenter business. In 
1871 Mr. Duulap engaged in the contracting business, later, in 1S74, 
becoming a member of the firm of Dunlap, Gilmore & Coats. Later the 
firm was changed to Duulap & Coats, Mr. Gilmore having died. Mr. 
Dunlap was for a number of years School Trustee and Treasurer of the 
School Board, serving with great credit in this capacity. Mr. Dunlap is a 



RUPTURE PERMANENTLY CURED. 

Quickly, without pain or loss of time. 

CONSULTATION FREE. 



DRS. meLEOD St flRNOUD, 

Offiee: Finst St., Ir-ujin Bit 



JOEL J. BAILEY. HENRY J DAVIS. ELTON B. GIFFC 



JOEh J. BftlliEY & GO. 



Importers and Jobbers of 



•f 






FURNISHING 
GOODS. 



WHITE GOODS, 
ETC. 



Nos. 719 and 721 



MARKET STREET, 



PHILADELPHIA. 



Whenever you come to Columbus 

Stop at the office, 418 Third H ^ 

THERE you can get an Abstract of Title of any real estate 
in Bartholomew County, made from the only Abstract 
Books in the County. 

THERE you can secure a loan on favorable terms. 

THERE you can buy a farm, or house and lot. 

THERE you can make the best sale of Real Estate. 

THERE you can get the best Fire Insurance. 

THERE you can get stock in Citizen's Building and Loan 
Association. 

THERE you can get a very favorable Building Ass'n Loan. 

Don't forget the place, 418 Third St. 

DAVID & JOHN STOBO. 



DAVlDSOfi & 8EHDEf?SON, 

Odd Fellows' Building, 60 J, 603, 605, 
Washington St., COLUMBUS, IND. 

Undertakers ^t d ^zjt£± n ±.° f 
^ Fine Furniture. 

Ule buy direct from the manufacturers and can 
$aoc you money. 





When relief is at hand? 



Why 

Suffer 

Pains 

When relief 

DR. KUREffl-S PfllH EXTRACTOR 

in w.i nil v il.iiu -|..:i. r I .mips, Clml. r:i Mm I. us. 1 linrrlmja. 
clc. Applk-.i i \ t < r 1 1 . 1 1 1 > H i- sun In cure Cuts, Sprains. 

25 CENTS HffD SO CENTS PER BOTTliE. 

Do Your 
Hens 
Lay 
Hit Regularly? 

If not, they are not healthy. But, if you feed them 

DR. RUBEN'S POULTRY POWDER 




■ uiitf chicks Rn.w plump and pretty. It 
■up, and Capes. It is a medicine and not 
from bran, ash vs. and utlu t -flu a |u m ni; 
, 25 CENTS PER PACKAGE, 
ou can obtain I>k Ktri-m's Medicines of 



ERNST STRHliHOTH & CO., Druggists, 



Cor. 5th and Washington Sis . 



COLUMBUS. IND 



MAYOR W. J. BECK. 



VV. J. Beck was born August 111, 1859, in Bartholomew county, and was 
educated at Hartsvllle College, where he graduated, taking the degree 
of B. S. and afterward the degree of M. S. After this he studied medicine 
for three years, and attended the Indiana Medical College at Indianapolis. 
Pie did not engage in the practice of medicine, but gave it up, and began 
the study of law in the office of Hacker & Strickland in the summer of 
18S3, and in 1SS4 accepted the position of deputy county clerk under T. C. 
Burgess. In 18S5, he was married to Miss Elva Rowley, a graduate of 
the High School of the city of Columbus. In 1886 he resigned his position 
as deputy clerk and entered into the practice of law with the Hon. Geo. 
W. Cooper. About this time his health began to fail him, and on the ad- 
vice of his physician he went to Colorado and western Kansas, and when 
his health become restored he returned to this city and again entered 
into the practice of law, which he still continues, being now a member of 
the well-known firm of Duncan &. Beck. 

To fill a vacancy on Bhe Republican ticket, his name was placed on 
it for state attorney for the ninth judicial cirouit, and as the Democratic 
majority was about 1,300, of course he was defeated. In the spring of 
1894 he was selected as the Republican candidate for mayor of the city of 
Columbus, and at the election which followed was successful; and on the 
3d day of September, 1894, he took his office, which position he still holds. 

At the Republican city convention, held March 27, 1S9S, Mr. Beck was 
renominated by the Republicans for the position of Mayor of Columbus. 

Mayor Beck is a hard student, a bright and successful lawyer, with 
a keen conception of right and fairness toward his fellow men. His ad- 
ministration as mayor has been clean and honest. Many public improve- 
ments have been made during his term, notably, among others, the build- 
ing of city hall and Are department and the paving of Washington street. 
In public and private life Mr. Beck has the respect and esteem of the 
people of Columibus, and his future in this community is full of promise. 



GEORGE W. CALDWELL- 



The subject of this sketch was born in Delaware county, Ohio, 
August 16, I860, on a farm near Sunberry. Here he lived with his father 
till fifteen years of lage, when the family moved to Da Porte, Inid. 

As a boy Mr. Caldwell was ambitious of acquiring an education. 
"With the permission of his father and the gift of $20, from the same 
source, George started in to "work his way through" the Valparaiso 
Normal. No honest work was too disagreeable for him to do to help 



BUY FROM AN INDEPENDENT OIIi COMPANY- 

%jCi£fh Srade Sngine and Cylinder Otis. 

Victor Stove Sasoline. 

TJurpentine. 

GREASES J* .* SOLITE OIL J* J* 

CHAS C STOLL OIL CO , 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



THE WORLD'S 



CLOTHES CLEANER, 

BRY-GUCNS 

Removes Oil, Grease and Paint Spots from Garments. 
Warranted will not affect color or fabric. 



AULi DRUGGISTS SEL.U IT. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

THE STOLL CHEMICAL CO. 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



*f* <"J-» pm At A* rlt #!<* A^ A> At At At At At At A* A* 
4* THE OPHLY 



LONG HAVANA FILLED CIGAR 
NOW SOLD IN INDIANA 



AT FIVE CENTS IS 



ubanola 



For ten years it has maintained its supremacy 
as a leader-the equal of SEVEN-EIGHTHS 
OF THE TEN-CENTERS SOLD. 



A. KIBFBR DRUG COMPANY 

Sole Distributers, INDIANAPOLIS 



4- 
* 



At #J* »|<» A* ««j* »|« p|-» »|«» «»J* »|* *|* «&* *|* »&* A, At At 




ROB1NSON-PETTET COMPANY Onco«.) 

Wholesale Distributors. LOUISVILLE 



pay his way, and during the four years he attended the school whein the 
other boys would be enjoying the "after school" hours, George was put- 
ting in his time doing whatever honest work he could get to do. In this 
way he worked his own way through the course, not receiving assistance 
iln a material way from anyone. After leaving the Normal, Mrr. Cald- 
well began teaching and for several years successfully taught district 
and graded schools in the vicinity of his home. 

When twenty-six years of age he engaged in the insurance and real 
estate business in Da Porte, Indiana, removing from there in 1S87 and 
engaging in the same line of business in Columbus. Later he formed a 
partnership with B. M. Hutching, in real estate, contracting and building, 
continuing three years, during which time the firm built 147 dwelling 
houses and one year did a volume of business exceeding $S5,000. At the 
end of this time Mr. Hutchins retired and Mr. Caldwell formed a part- 
nerghip with Dester Drake, continuing in the same business, which part- 
nership still exists. 

During the five years which this partnership has existed, the firm of 
Caldwell & Drake have been more than ordinarily successful. Mr. 
Caldwell's known executive ability, united with Mr. Drake's untiring at- 
tention to the details of the business, has made the firm strong com- 
petitors in this line of business. Besides erecting many large residences 
and private buildings, this firm has successfully competed for valuable 
public contracts, among others which they have built being the court 
house and jail at English, Crawford county, and the court house at Knox, 
Starke county, both in the state of Indiana. 

Drake's Maple Grove Addition, one of the beautiful suburbg of 
Columbus, was laid out by this firm, most of the beautiful homes in the 
addition having been built by them. 

In Mr. Caldwell's short public life he has met with the same success 
that he has in his business career. In 1S92 he was elected as the Demo- 
cratic candidate to a seat in the city council, representing a Republican 
ward and having been elected by a handsome majority. Mr. Caldwell 
was a member of the council till May, 1896, serving the city with con- 
scientious fidelity. Always jealous of the dignity of Columbus as a 
city, he wag the promoter of many public improvements; at the game 
time he was the careful guardian of the people's money. 

He was chairman of the finance committee, and in this important 
position he did much to strengthen the financial condition of Columbus. 
During the period he was in council $26,000 of the city's indebtedness was 
paid off. Several thousand dollars of the city's bonds were bought be- 
fore maturity and paid off, having to pay a premium of 1.08 for same. 



It was largely to the credit of the council of which Mr. Caldwell was 
a member that Columbus owns to-day a beautiful city hall, which is 
paid for, a well-equipped and efficient fire department and engine house 
and a self-sustaining waterworks system. 

Mr. Caldwell is the father of the bill introduced in the legislature four 
years ago by our representative, C. P. Remy, abolishing the office of 
water-works trustees, and successfully lobbied the same through the 
legislature. The bill resulted in saving cities in Indiana thousands and 
thousands of dollars annually, and Columbus has benefited by this 
measure, saving to her treasury in three and a half years something like 
$20,000. 

On the 6th day of April, 1898. Mr. Caldwell was nominated by the 
Democrats of Columbus as their candidate for mayor, receiving the 
nomination on the first ballot, there being six candidates in the field. 

The election took place May 3, and Mr. Caldwell was elected by a 
majority of 300. This showg conclusively the high egtimate the people 
of Columbus, place upon Mr. Caldwell's ability to serve the public 
acceptably, as the normal Republican majority is about fifty. 

In social life Mr. Caldwell is a pleasant gentleman, easily approached. 
Being of an open, frank disposition, the people always know where to 
find him on all public questions. Mr. Caldwell is a Mason, a member 
of Columbus Commandery, No. 14, K. T., and a Knight of Pythias. He is 
also a member of other fraternal societies, and a member of the Christian 
church. 

SAMUEL HEGE. 

Mr. Hege has been a resident of Columbus for more than half a 
century, and all these years has been actively engaged in business, and 
by many demonstrations on the part of his fellow-citizens, he is assured 
that he is held in high esteem by the entire community in which he lives. 

Mr. Hege was born at Chambersburg, Pa., January 12, 1S25. Was 
but a babe when his parents removed from there to a farm near Dan- 
caster, Fairfield county, Ohio. There he lived with his ivarents and 
assisted them in farming until 1843, when he decided to make his life 
work bridge building and entered the employ of W. N. Skinner, who 
was a general bridge contractor, and assisted in building bridges in the 
states of Ohio, Pennsylvania and Virginia. In 1S47, he arrived in Colum- 
bus to superintend the building of a lattice bridge across White river 
near where the water-works now stand. This was the only bridge of the 
kind ever built in this locality and was known as the Old Toll Bridge; this 
stood for more than forty years, until it was replaced bj an elegant and 



CHHS. SEMON, 



Leaf Tobacco 



Il'DRTKK Ol- 



SUMATRA AND HAVANA. 

282 and 284 Seneca Street, 

t — ^CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



R. McKIM & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS AND SHIPPERS 

PITTSBURGH AND ANTHRACITE 

COAL. 

Afftrlifunn. Ind. 



¥II««F>A.II^IIV<i. 



BRIBER'S GARIWIHATIVE BAhSAjH. 

A CERTAIN CURE for Diarrhoea, Flux-Dysentery, Cramp Colic, Cholera 
Morbus, Chronic Diarrhisa, Congestion and Neuralgia of the Stomach and 
Bowels, various forms of Indigestion, and for Cholera Infantum Summer 
Complaint— Colic, Sour Stomach, and all the usual ailments of infancy. 
EQUALLY EFFECTUAL FOR ADULTS AND CHILDREN. 



PRICEC, 25 AND 50 CENTS. 



FOR SALE BY 



INDIANAPOLIS DRUG CO., 



INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 




The CINCINNATI make 

BARBED and SMOOTH Wire 



Is uniform in quality and 
always satisfactory. 



% 6. Scbwartzkopf * Son, Agents, 



COLUMBUS, IIVI>. 



substantial iron structure. Mr. Hege continued the bridge building, 
confining his efforts mostly to southern Indiana. He built nearly all the 
bridges on the railroad from Madison to Indianapolis and a part of the 
bridges on the old Edinburg & Shelbyville railroad. 

In Deoem'ber, 1S50, Mr. Hege .married Cynthia Hill; the fruits of this 
union being five children; two of whom are now living; Alice, wife of W. 
F. Kendall, and Charles. 

In 1880 he associated with him in business, W. F. Kendall, the son- 
in-law, and Charles Hege, the son, and formed the firm of Hege & Co. 
This new firm added to the bridge building a general contracting and 
building business, which they continue to the present, and are one of the 
leading firms of builders in Columbus. 

Mr. Hege has been instrumental in helping to build up our beautiful 
city in many ways, one in particular worthy of special mention. He 
built a large number of dwelling houses which he sold to men who 
worked for him and allowed them to pay for them in monthly payments, 
costing them but little more than rental payments per month. 



In 1S62, Mr. Hege built a sawmill for the purpose of sawing lumber 
for the government to build barracks, in which to care for the soldiers 
during the war; this he run night and day as long as it was necessary. 

Mr. Hege has added one addition to Columbus, that of Hege & Hill. 
He is the only living charter member of Columbus Lodge, No. 58, I. O. 
O. F. He joined this order at Harrisburg, Pa., in 1844; was made a 
Mason in 1853; has taken all the degrees of Masonry up to and including 
the 32d degree. 

Mr. Hege is a well-preserved man of seventy-three years, and has 
always been an active business man. He is a Christian gentleman of 
the 'old school; he has been useful in his day and generation, and it can 
be truthfully said that the world is better by reason of his having 
lived in it. 

Z. T. SWEENEY, LL. D. 

Dr. Z. T. Sweeney was born in Liberty, Kentucky, in February, 1849. 
ither, G. E. Sweeney, was a minister of the Christian church, amd 



f0 - \ 




SAMUEL HEGE. 






Grandpa's 
Wonder Soap 



The Best Soap 
in the World 



Machinists, Mechanics, Engineers, Firemen, Foundrymen, Miners, 
Farmers, Printers, Painters, Coal Handlers, Etc., Etc. 



HENRY KOEHLER. 



GENERAL 



LUMBER 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 



DEALER 



nEYER JASKtiLEK 

Packer of $CCd CCdf and Importer of 

Havana and Sumatra 
Cobaccos. 



103 BANK STREET, 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

HENRY MEYER Si CO., 

Lieaf Tobacco, 



S. W. Cor. Front and Vine Streets 



CINCINNATI, OHIO. 




THE T1NSLEV MiCTM >N HtJAT f r p. Tt jbilit\- . jur.ibllin and general work 
be excelled. Price, including miy p.iruble seats, rouine stn.il and paddle. 
15 '.-ft. boat, capacity 800 lbs, $30.00. 18-ft. boat, capacity 1.600 lbs , $4< 

TINSLEY & CO.. GUN AND LOCKSMITHS. 
420 ThirdjStreet. Columbus. Ind. Sate Work a 



his mother, T. (Campbell) Sweeney, was a relative of Alexander Camp- 
bell. When Z. T. was six years old his father moved to Illinois. By 
teaching he was enabled to attend college at Eureka, Illinois, and As- 
bury (now De Pauw), Greencastle, Indiana. His first charge w^as with 
the Christian Church, Paris, Illinois. Hi's second call was to the Christian 
church in Columbus, Indiana, where he began work with January, 1872, 
and continued a quarter of a century. During his ministry here, the 
church grew from a tew hundred members, to one of the largest and 
most influential congregations in the West. Although called by churches 
in Indianapolis, St. Louis, Chicago, Baltimore. Atlanta. Augusta, X u 
Orleans. New York, and London, England, he persisted in a determina- 
tion to remain twenty-five years in Columbus. However, he spent one 
year in Augusta. Georgia, and succeeded in raising $100,000 for their 
church, and $14,000 for a parsonage. Under the administration of 
President Harrison he represented the United States as consul-general 
to Turkey, in Constantinople, but after two years returned to his Colum- 
bus pulpit. In 1SS7 he visited Europe and the Holy Land. His popular 
book, "Under Ten Flags," which grew out of his travels, has scarcely 
been surpassed, and is pronounced by Talmage to be the best. He has 
dedicated churches all over the United States, and has a national repu- 
tation as a lecturer. He is highly gifted as a w ml pa inter, is easy in the 
pulpit or on the platform, and as a pastor and a citizen, much loved and 
highly respected. He has been urged to accept the nomination 1 for 
Congress, but has always refused. He its devoted to the ministry of the 
gospel, and will not under any circumstances go out of it. When he 
closed his Columbus pastorate the church voted him pastor emeritus. 
On March 10. 1875, he married Miss Linnie, daughter of Hon. Joseph I. 
Irwin. Miss Nettie, his daughter, is now teaching in Butler College, 
having graduated there last June. Joseph I., his son, is a pupil in 
Butler, and Elsie is with Dr. and Mrs. Sweeney in Richmond. Va.. where 
Dr. Sweeney is now pastor of the Seventh stiv. t Christian Church, Dr. 
Sweeney is a disciple of Peter, the fisherman of Galilee, and has fished 
in the same waters, and in every available stream where his lot may be 
cast. Gov. Mount, has made him Fish Commissioner of Indiana, which 
position be still retains. 

B. M. HUTCH INS. 

A souvenir publication of the G. A. R. Encampment at Columbus, 
Indiana, would fall far short of being complete without a sketch of the 
life of Benjamin M. Hutchins. This is true because of the valuable 
service rendered by him as a citizen and a comrade, to this great gather- 



ing of the victors of '61 and '65; and beoause he is one of this city's most 
active and prominent citizens. 

Mr. Hutchins was born in Morgan county, Ohio, in December, 1S3S, 
and came with some young companions to Columbus, Indiana, in 1S61, 
where he remained until the 24th of August, of that year, when he en- 
listed in the Sixth Regiment of Indiana Volunteer Infantry. Mr. 
Hutchins saw a great deal of active service with his regiment during the 
war. From the time of enlistment he was with his company every day 
during its three years of service, and shared with his comrades the hard- 
ships and privations of camp life, and the dangers of the great battles of 
Shiloh, Stone River, Chiekamauga, Missionary Ridge, and all the battles 
from Chattanooga to Atlanta, upon the scenes and daring deeds of which 
volumes of American history have been written to extol the sanguinary 
sacrifices made by patriots that the Union and liberty might be pre- 
served. 

If the biography closed here, as it did with thousands of less favored 
comrades, who would assume to measure the value of such a life, filled 
with sacrifices, fraught with participation in great deeds, pregnant with 
portentous results to humanity, by the brevity of its span? For a life, 
so courageously devoted to the faithful performance of duty needs not 
length of years to mark its usefulness to society and to the world. 

On his discharge from army service he returned to Ohio, and for two 
years was engaged in the oil business. Nature having favored him with 
a voice susceptible of a high degree of culture in music, his natural 
attainments in this line brought him into prominence and led to has en- 
gagement in the business of teaching vocal music, conducting musical 
conventions, and in the year 1874, he established the "Central Con- 
servatory of Music," in Columbus, which he managed with signal suc- 
cess until the year 1SS0, when he sold and transferred it to Prof. W. E. 
Bates, after which, for a few years he was engaged in the real estate 
and insurance business in Columbus, until he was chosen treasurer and 
collector of Reev.es & Co., of this city, which position he held continu- 
ously for fifteen years, severing- his connection therewith at the beginning 
of this year, voluntarily by resignation. His high business qualifications 
and integrity are attist.d by his long service in this important trust and 
further confirmed by the unanimous vote of confidence and regret ex- 
tended to him by the board of directors on his retirement from their 
service. 

He has been so devoted to the welfare of this encampment that he 
has steadfastly declined to engage actively in any line of business so 
far this year, and until after its meeting is held, and has devoted nearly 



THE JVIAhOHE STO^E CO., 



CLEVELHND, OHIO. 



•:rs and MAxriAcriKKKs up 



Amherst, Blue and Buff 

and Euclid Bluestone. 



ROUGH AND SAWED BUILDING STONE 
OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

SPLIT AND DRESSED CURBING AND 
SAWED FLAGGING A SPECIALTY. 



Saw and Planing Mill Daily Capacity 350.000. Ft. 




yeli- oW ** 



S& Flooring,Ceiling / 5iding,Hnishing, Laths, Pickets, 
Molding and Standard L[ngth Dimensions. 



The German Insurance Company 



OF FREERORT , ILL. 




JOHN MAHONEY, Agent, 



Assets, - $3,231, 



Net Surplus, 

$1,020,977 



i ki-: Mm >k 



If you desire first-class 
indemnify insure your 
property with the Ger- 



COLUMBUS, IND. 



t- w -~- *Mi * * ' \M -■— "i 



Wsv 



(EorttrcIH 
Silk • ♦ ♦ • \ 



« 1 i mnn ' i if im m*rt 



the whole of his time to the work of making this great gathering of his 
old comrades a suocess. 

Mr. Hutchins is an elder in the Christian church of Columbus, a 
charter member of Isham Keith Post, No. 13, G. A. R. ; he is an Odd 
Fellow, a Scottish Rite Mason, and is the vice-president and one of the 
directors of the Union Life Insurance Company of Indiana. He is en- 
terprising and public spirited, and a leader in all good works of the 
community in which he lives. 

Mr. Hutchins is blessed with a splendid physique, a kind and sym- 
pathetic nature, and is a very sociable and companionable man. One of 
the marked characteristics of his life, is his unbounded kindness to the 
aged ones whom he meets and tender gentleness to the young. 

JAMES A. SIBLEY. 

The subject of this sketch was born near Monticello in White county, 
in September, 1861. 



When quite young his family moved to Terre Haute, where Jim 
attended school till fifteen years old, when the family moved to Colum- 
bus, Ind. Here he took employment on the "Daily Republican'' in the 
job printing department, where he learned the trade at which he after- 
ward become so proficient. 

In 1889, he formed a partnership with Herman Carr. in the job 
printing business, which was successfully continued till ism. when he 
retired to accept the office of city treasurer, to which he had been elected 
on the Republican ticket, which position he still holds. 

Mr. Sibley has been unusually successful in the administration of this 
office. He is said to be an expert accountant, and the books In the 
treasurer's office are always iin splendid shape. 

As a reward for his faithful and efficient discharge of the responsible 
duties of city treasurer, his party has honored him with a unanimous 
renomination as its candidate for this office at the municipal election 
about to take place. 





4' :; M 




JAMES A SIBLEY. 



JOHN W. SURYERKRUP. 



UJm. Brookmar 



BROCKMAN & TOMPKINS, 

Contractors and Builders, 



1NOFACTURE 



Doors, * Sash, * Blinds, 

And all kinds of DRESSED IiUmBER. 
Cor. Third and Pearl, COLUMBUS, IND. 



SS&. scHwartzKopf & son 



Hardware, Furniture 
and Stoves. 

Bicycles and Bicycle Sundries. 

We have i he largesl lim 
of Hardware, Furniture 
i Stoves in Southern 




Our Bicycle Line 
is Complete. 



See Our Line of 
Refrigerators. 



Oranges, Bananas, Q (fTY f 

Apples, Lemons, 

Small Fruits and Vegetables in Season. 

GEORGE I. WINANS, 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCER, 

531-533 WASHINGTON ST. 

Best Assortment of Staple and Fancy Groceries 
in Southern Indiana. 



o 



Finest Teas, Coffees, 
Canned Goods, 
Pickles and Polishes. 



COLUMBUS FUEL & ICE CO. 

DAN CROW, Manager. 

DEALERS IN 



ANTHRACITE 



C^O^T^lI-^ PITTSBURGH 



BEECHWOOD AND LAKE ICE, 



YARD: 

I and Svcamore Sts. 



BELL TELEPHONES: Office. No. 12. Yard. No. 19. 

COLUMBUS, II«I>. 



JOHN W. SUVERKRUP. 

John W. Suverkrup was born in Louisville, Ky.. twenty-nine years 
ago, and came to this county with his parents in 187S, and resided with 
his parents in Union Township, corning to Columbus in 1879, and taking 
service as clerk in t'he drug store of T. E. Obto. Here Mr. Suverkrup 
learned the profession of pharmacy, and continued as a valuable assistant 
to Dr. Otto till 1894, when he was elected clerk of Cohim'bus on the 
Demoratic ticket, being the only Democrat elected, which speaks much 
for John's popularity. 

Besides being a good pharmacist, John is also a good book-keeper, 
and he has discharged the duties of otty clerk to the entire satisfaction 
of his party and the people generally. Mr. Suverkrup is one of the pop- 
ular young men of Columbus. He is very pleasant and accomodating, 
and has a faculty of making friends and keeping them. He is a Knight 
Templar and a 32d degree Mason, besides being a member of the Presby- 
terian church. 

THOMAS MAY. 

Thomas May was the eleventh in a family of twelve children, and 
was born in Warner county, Ohio, November 3, 1827. Mr. May was 
raised to agricultural pursuits, working as a farm hand till his marriage. 
By hard work and saving habits, before his marriage, Mr. May ac- 
cumulated $900, with which he bought the old homestead of eighty acres 
from his brother James, and on which he afterwards settled, and yet 
lives. In 1862, Mr. May was elected county commissioner, serving one 
term. Politically he is a Democrat, and firm in advocating the principles 
of Democracy, but believes that the character and honesty of the candi- 
date should oome first, and that those attributes should overbalance 
every other consideration. 

Although commencing in life poor, he added to his first eighty acres 
till to-day he is the owner of seven hundred acres of first-class land, on 
which he has a fine residence. Most of his wealth he has made by hard, 
steady work, and economical habits, and has won, by his industry and 
honesty a foremost place among the best men in the county. 

At present Mr. May is serving as county commissioner, having been 
elected on the Democratic ticket in 1897 to represent the 2d district. It 
is just thirty-five years since Mr May served his first term as commis- 
sioner. After this long time his record is not forgotten, and when the 
party cast about for some man to make the race, they could think of 
none more suitable than Mr. May. He was eleoted by a handsome 
majority. 



WM. A. STEVKNS, P. M. 

The subject of this sketch was born in the city of Columbus. May 
17, 1S67, and was educated in the public schools and St. Bartholomew 
Academy of this city. For several years he was the active member of 
the agricultural firm of F. M. Stevens & Son, and during the existence 
of this firm showed splendid ability as a good business man. 

In public life Mr. Stevens has much influence as a leader in the 
Republican party. At the age of twenty-four he was eleoted to a seat 
to the city council, serving his constituents with honesty and fidelity in 
this position three years. 

On February 25, 1SS9, Mr. Stevens was married to Miss Lou B. 
Wilson. Mr. Stevens was recommended by the Republicans of this city 
to the president for the appointment of post-master to succeed Tims A 
Rush. He Teceived his commission July 17, 1897, and entered upon the 
duties of the office of post-master August 1, the same year, which 
position he still holds. His administration of the post-office is popular, 
and the patrons of the office are well pleased with the efficient service had 
here. 

Mr. Stevens enjoys the confidence and respect of all the citizens -if 
this community, and his popularity in the Republican party is a deserved 
tribute for the good service he has done in the interest of that party in 
Bartholomew county. Mr. Stevens is the captain of the local camp S. 
of V., John S. Crump Camp, No. 32. 

HON. SMITH JONES. 

The subject of this sketch was the first mayor of the city of Columbus. 
He was born in Stokes county, North Carolina, and oame with his 
father, Benjamin Jones, to Bartholomew county, settling on a farm, 
on which the present town of Jonesville is located, in 1831. He worked 
for his father on the farm, saving enough out of his wages in a few 
years to buy a small piece of land, to which by economy and thrifty 
habits he added from time to time. 

In early manhood he married Elizabeth Ann Spencer, who is yet hale 
and hearty, at the age of eighty years. This faithful helpmeet as- 
sisted her husband in all his efforts to advance their welfare, and it was 
largely due to her help that Mr. Jones during his life amassed con- 
siderable wealth. 

Smith Jones was a man of strong mind, and courageous but gentle 
disposition. He was a leader among his fellows, and was many times 
honored with positions of great trust. In 1S5S, Mr. Jones was elected a 
member of the State Senate, serving with ability. During President 



r 


^*****?f^^^. 


1 


4 * 






^m 





C. F\ SCHAEFER & CO, 

PARK ROLLER MILLS 



.COLUMBUS. IND. 



JOHN VORWA.LD, 

DEALER IN 

Dry Qoods, Groceries, B°°ts and Shoes. 

Corner 3d and Jackson Sts., COLUMBUS, IND, 



Ttie Great Riiattiic\ Pacific Tea Co. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Dealers in 

HIGH GRADE TEAS, COFFEES, SPICES, 
BAKING POWDER and CONDENSED MILK. 



YOUR PATRONAGE RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED 



W. M. GATES, Salesman, 



Lunch Served at all Hours. J* 



J* REFRESHMENTS. 



SAM DAHN, 



BaKcr and Confectioner . . 



Opposite Court House. 



COLOmBUS, IND. 



COLUMBUS GALVANIZED IRON WORKS, 

H. STRASSNER, Prop. 

TIN, IRON, AND SLATE ROOFING. 

manufacturer of Galvanized Iron Cornice, Patent Galvanized Iron Sky- 
lights, Dormer Windows, Finials, Window Caps, Etc. 

No. 525 Jackson Street, COLUMBUS, IND. 



Andrew Johnson's term of office, Mr. Jones was appointed collector of 
internal revenue. In 1864 Mr. and Mrs. Jones removed from Jonesville to 
Columbus. In the same year Columbus was chartered under a city gov- 
ernment and Mr. Jones was elected its first mayor. 

Some years later 'he retired from public life, and passed his remain- 
ing years in the peace and quiet of his beautiful home in the company 
of his faithful wife. Mr. Jones died in 1S7S. 

A. J. DIPBOYE. 

Mr. Dipboye is one of the enterprising citizens of Columbus. 

Together with M. A. Locke, he owns and edits the Herald, the official 
organ of the Democratic Party in Bartholomew County. 

These gentlemen are among the best newspaper men in Indiana. 
The Herald is recognized as a force in our affairs, and the management is 
deservedly popular. 



JOHN STOBO. 

John Stobo, of the firm of David & John Stobo, was born in Bar- 
tholomew oounty, Indiana, July 16, 1845, and has been a resident of this 
eounlty all his life, excepting two years he. was in Indianapolis. 

In 1875 he was deputy reoorder. He was subsequently appointed 
towns-hip assessor, and after serving three years, was elected to the 
same position, which he filled two years. In 1884 he was elected trustee 
of Columbus Township, and was re-elected in June, 1886. and in June, 
1891, and was elected by the board of county commissioners to the office 
of county assessor and served till November, 1S92. In May, 1894, he was 
elected to a seat in the city council from the second ward, he being the 
only Democrat elected to the council in the city. 

During his term in the council, Mr. Stobo was chairman of the com- 
mittee on fire department. Mr. Stobo's pet scheme while in the oouncil 
was the improvement of the fire department system. Mainly through 



4h 





A f 



A J. DIPBOYE. 



JOHN STOBO. 



DANIEL WE. .71" 



Fort Wayne Electric Corporation 



FORT WAYNE, INDIANA. 




Manufacturers Electric Light and Power Apparatus. 



his efforts, a tine fire tl.-j>art m^iit was inaugurated ami a new lire engine- 
house was built, which resulted in greatly increased fire protection for 
the city. Since this improvement, no serious fires have occurred, mainly 
because fires are easily extinguished and controlled, because of the im- 
proved service. 

Mr. Stobo is at presertt engaged in insurance and real estate busi- 
ness, with his brother David. 

In July, 1S62, Mr. Stobo enlisted in Company I, 67th Indiana Volun- 
teer Infantry, with which he served until honorably discharged on ac- 
count of physical disability, December, 1S63. H'e was with his regiment 
in a number of hotly contested battles, among which was Munfords- 
ville, Ky., where he was taken prisoner. He was also at Arkansas Post, 
Port Gibson, Champion Hill, the isiege of Vicksburg, airud others. 

Mr. Stobo is well known and respected throughout the county, for 
his integrity and high charaoter. 

In public and private life Mr. Stobo is the same courteous and af- 
fable 'gentleman. 

In another place we refer to Mr. Stobo's connection with the man- 
agement of the Orphans' Home. 

DANIEL WERTZ. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Shelby county, near Mt. 
Auburn, January 1, 1S64. He was raised on a farm and worked for his 
father until twenty-five years of age, when he engaged in the saw-mill 
business at Flat Rock. In 1S92, he moved to Bartholomew county, 
settling at Grammar, where he embarked in business as manufacturer 
and wholesale dealer in hard wood lumber, in which business he is still 
engaged. 

In 1S96, he was elected county commissioner, as a Democrat, from his, 
the 3d, district, which position he 'Still holds. Mr. Wertz is a successful 
business 'man, and as commissioner for the county has made a splendid 
record for capability 'and honesty. 



THE COLUMBUS DEMOCRAT. 

The "Columbus Democrat" is published daily and weekly by the Dem- 
ocrat Publishing Company, a stock company, composed of seventy-fiv€ 
leading Democrats of Columbus and Batholomew county. The paper is 
published in the interest of the Democratic party, and advocates the 
Democratic principles as promulgated in the National Democratic plat- 
form. The "Democrat" publishes all the local news. Under the new man- 
agement the paper has been greatly improved, and has a liberal support. 




Michael D. Emig is a native of the State of Indiana, and was born at 
Columbus on the nth day of November, 1852. He is the second sou of 
Michael and Permelia (Anderson) Emig, both of whom are still living in 
the City of Columbus. His father is a native of Hesse-Darmstadt, Ger- 
many, and was born on March 16th, 1S27, and when eight years of age 
accompanied his mother to the United States, his father having died in 
[831. 

His early educational training was acquired ill the schools of his native 
town, and in 1867 he entered Asbury (now De Pauw) University, located at 
Greencastle, this State, and graduated in the class of 1870. He had pre- 
viously decided upon the legal profession for his life work, and on com- 
pleting his literary education, he began reading law under the able 
101 



J. G. SCHWARTZKOPF & SON, 

Agents for Schneider & Trenkamp's 
Celebrated Reliable 




Gasoline Stoves and Ranges 



m 



E have the very largest stock 
in the city. Prices and goods 
to suit everybody .... 



COLUMBUS, IND. 



Protection 



Against Fire, Wind, Storms, 
etc., is Readily and Cheaply 
Attained by the use of our 
Corrugated Iron or Steel 



— THE— 

Cincinnati Cor. Co., 
Box 360, 

PIQUA, O. 

. Roofing 



SILAS HOWE, Pres't and Treas. ENI ICH PETERSON, Vice Presf and Sec'y. 

THE WM. D. GIBSON COMPANY, 

Manufacturers of Superior Grades of Every Description of 
BICYCLE. STEAM ENGINE AND VAIVE. ELECTRICAL ^ -M2» w^* -m f%^r f~~\ ^ 
MACHINERY. AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY . . . J» * «tliXUt». 




12 AND 14 SOUTH JEFFERSON ST.. CHICAGO 



instruction of Hon. Francis T. Hord, now Judge of the Ninth Judicial Cir- 
cuit of the State of Indiana, in whose office he remained for a period of 
two years. He was duly admitted to the Columbus bar, where his abilities 
and thorough professional training soon won for him a conspicuous place. 
After Judge Hord retired from the office of Attorney General, in Novem- 
ber, 1SS6, Mr. Emig and he formed a partnership, which continued until 
Judge Hord was elected Judge of the Ninth Judicial Circuit in 1892. Since 
then Mr. Emig has continued the practice alone at Columbus. 

He was selected by the Board of Commissioners of Bartholomew 
County as their attorney in 1SS9, and held the position of County Attorney 
until 1.S95. 

At the December term 1897, of the Board of Commissioners he was 
again selected by said Board as their attorney, and is at the present time 
the County Attorney of Bartholomew County. 

In politics he is a Democrat. He wields a political influence for the 
Democratic party, and has been an important factor in local politics, 
though not an aspiraut for official honors. 



JOHN CARR. 

The subject of this sketch was born in Ireland in 1X46. 

He came to Columbus in 1S60, and has been in business here 
ever since. 

Mr. Carr was several times a member of the City Council. It is said 
of him, that he was one of the most careful, and most concientious men 
who ever served the city in the capacity of councilmen. 

In his long service with the Council no one can find a single act of 
his that does not do him credit. 

Iv B. SCOFIKLD. 

Eugene B. Soofleld, the pastor of the Columbus Christian church, was 
born ait Connersville, t'hirty-<niine years ago, of one of the oldest and best 
known families in Payette county. After closing his work in the school 
there he attended a private school, and then for two years read law. 
After several years of special preparation, in January, 18S3, he assumed 






JOHN CARR 



E. B. 3C0FIELD 



E H KINHE'i 



J. B. FERGUSON, 

THE COLUMBUS PHOTOGRAPHER. 

Photos in Glossy, Matt and Platino Finish. Interior and Outdoor 
Views. Pictures Enlarged. Frames Made to Order. Amateurs' Sup- 
plies, Printing, Developing, Etc. GROUND FLOOR STUDIO. 

COLUMBUS, INDIANA. 



B M BOYD 



EDGJR McSWEENEY. 



Campbell, Boyd & Co., 

WHOLESALE GROCERS. 



COLUMBUS, 



INDIANA. 



ASK FOR TUli "^^^. 

IMPERIAL ORDER. 

A Fine Smoke For Professional Men. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

GEO. BOUILLE, COLUMBUS, IND. 

Z. H. HAUSER. M. D. BEN W. PARKER. 

HAUSER & PARKER, 

PHOENIX DRUG STORE, 

DEALERS IN 

Dpugs, Medicines, Chemicals, 

WALL PAPER. STATIONERY, OILS, PAINTS. ETC. 
COLUMBUS, INDIANA. 



G. S. GILLESPIE. _^ 

Upholstering and Furniture 
Repairing. 

Renovating Mattresses and Packing Household Goods a Specialty. 
J. D. EMMONS, Funeral Director. N. H. HEGE, Assistant. 

J. I). EMMONS & CO., 

UNDERTAKING. 

Phones. Office-Bell .60. Harrison 15. 422 Fifth Street. Irwin 'Block. 

COLUMBUS. IND. 



M 



FRED VOLLAND, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

Ha.rdwa.re, Stoves, Nails, Iron, Tinivare, 
Sash, Doors and Blinds. 

Manufacturer of TIN. COPPER AND SHEET-IRI IN WARE. CollimbuS llld. 

S. N. DAVIS, 

SHIPPER OF 

Poultry, Eggs and Butter. 

216 Jaekson St., COLiUMBUS, IND. 



his first pastorate in Muncie since which time he has served as 
paator in Winchester, Noblesville and Shelbyville. He has been 
successful as an evangelist, and tor four years just before coming 
to Columbus, was State Evangelist, and, according to Henry R. Poteh- 
ar.l, the best one the church ever had. He has been in every county In 
Indiana, and is as generally known throughout the State as any 
preacher in the Christian Church. He has had the hearty support of bis 
congregation since coming to this city last September, and his future 
work here is most promising. In October, 1882, he was married to Miss 
Etta West, of Mount Summit. He is a member of the Board of Direct- 
ors of Bethany Assembly, of the Board of the Indiana Christian Sunday 
School Association, and is the President of the Indiana Christian Mis- 
sionary Society. 



E. H. 



KINNEY. 

igent, and proprietor "Daily Star,' 



Emmanuel H. Kinney, insurance 
was born in Ohio, December 17, 1846. 

Mr. Kinney was raised to agricultural pursuits, which he abandoned 
in 1872, engaging in the insurance and cooperage business. In this year 
he was elected Justice of the Peace, and discharged the duties of 
this office by successive re-election, for a period of twelve years. 

Mr. Kinney served as a member of the City Council during the period 
when the public improvements were made. His record in the Council is 
clean and honest. 

Mr. Kinney, in 1897, in conjunction with Chas. F. Turpin, established 
the "Star," a daily paper, devoted to the interests of the city and the Re- 
publican party, which paper is meeting with well-deserved success. 

Mr. Kinney is a very pleasant gentleman, and a good business man. 

HENRY C. HARRIS. 

Henry C. Harris, a prosperous farmer and stock-raiser of German 
township, was born in Smytlh county, Virginia, on the 9th day of Feb- 
ruary, 1S32. He spent the years of his youth and early manhood in his 
native state, received a limited education in the old-fashioned log school 
house, and in February, 1854, oame to Bartholomew county, Indiana, 
making a great part of the journey on foot. When he arrived at the 
town of Taylorsville, his sole earthly capital consisted of $17 ; but being in 
the vigor of young manhood and with an energy born of determination 
to succeed, he went to work with a will and soon attained a comfortable 
start in life. He has continued to add to his possessions, from time to 
time, and is now in prosperous circumstances; owning 647 acres of fine 



land, the greater part of which is in a high state of cultivation. He 
takes an active interest in politics, first voting the Whig ticket and in 
oonformity with the Republican party since its organization. He is 
a friend to churches and schools and a liberal patron of all enterprises 
having for their object the public welfare. He served as township 
trustee one term— 1880-1. 




HENRY C. HARRIS. 

In the fall of 1894, Mr. Harris was elected on the Republican ticket 
as commissioner for Bartholomew county. During the four years of his 
service as such commissioner. Mr. Harris has been a faithful public 
servant. The people of the county have entire faith in Mr. Harris, and 
<are well satisfied with his record as commissioner. Mr. Harris is a 
member of the M. E. Church. 



COUNTY INFIRMARY. 
For the infirm and unfortunate of its population, Bartholomew county 
lias provided an asylum, just south of the city, which is in a degree self- 
supporting. Here the worthy poor ami infirm of our community receive 
proper care and attention, under the direction of an efficient Superintend- 
ent and Matron. 



LIVERY, SALE and EXCHANGE STABLE 

Cor. 3d and Franklin Sts.. COLUMBUS, 1ND. 

BENNETT PATTERSON, Prop. 

Good Rigs Mivays on Hand at Reasonable Rates. 
Horses Boarded by the Month or Week. 

JOHN L. BONHAM, 

Crys ta 1 La u n dry, 



Telephone No. 53. 



330 FIFTH STREET, 

COLUMBUS, IND. 



FLAT ROCK CAVE NULLING COMPANY 

BYNUM, INDIANA. 

"Eadies' favorite" and "Climax" flour. 



THE CHEAPEST AND BEST PLACE 

TO BUY YOUR 

DRUGS, DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES, PAINTS, OILS, GLASS, PUTTY, 
VARNISHES, BRUSHES, ETC., is at the 

mODEli DRUG STORE. 

SANDERS 4 TAYLOR, Proprietors. 

315 WASHINGTON STREET, Adams' Old Stand. 

COLUMBUS, IND. 



B. -SUMMER DRINKS A SPECIALTY. 



CALL AND SEE ITS. 



F\ DONNER, 

Leading Jeweler and Optician, 

COLUMBUS, IND. 
DON'T FAIL 

While in the city to drop in and get some of 
our celebrated cigars. If you do you will 
want them always. J* J* J 

GRIFFITH'S CIGAR PARLOR, 

SIO LUashington street, 

coijumBUs, ifjd. 

GAFFNEY & MASON, 
CARRIAGES, BUGGIES AND SPRING WAGONS, 

Special Attention Given to Repairing. 

Fifth Street, Opposite Shea & Fahy's Livery Stable. 



All Grades of Monuments, 
Qranite and Marble. 



All Work Guaranteed 



Columbus Monument Co. 

B. M. HUTCHINS, President, 
GEORGE H. CLUTCH, Sup't. COLUMBUS, IND. 



JOS. I. IRWIN. 

Joseph I. Irwin was born about two miles north o£ the present site 
of the city of Columbus, on tine 6th day of August, 1824. His parents 
•moved from Kentucky to the place of his birth in the year 1820 and 
resided there until 1836, when they moved to Johnson county, Indiana. 

The subject of this sketch resided on the farm with his parents until 
he reached his majority, helping his parents to clear away the forests 
and cultivate the land upon which they lived. There were no savings 
to show for the years of work on the farm, so when he left home to face 
the world his mother gave him thirty cents to pay his railroad fare 
from Edinburg to Columbus; the Madison & Indianapolis railroad at 




JOSEPH IRELAND IRWIN. 

that time extended to Edinburg. Although he had never ridden on a 
train, he walked the distance and saved the fare, reaching Columbus 
with a oash capital of thirty cents. 

He at once entered the employ of Charles O. Alden & Co., who had 
a general store, receiving but a small salary, which, from time to time, 
was increased. Be saved a portion of the salary, and at the end of two 
or three years had enough to make a small payment on forty aores of 
land adjoining the town, which he and Western W. Jones bought and 



platted. Soon Mr. Irwin bought other land adjoining the town. This 
he continued doing until now a great portion of the city of Columbus 
is on land platted by him. In all, he has made eight additions to the 
city. 

In 1850, Mr. Irwin began business for himself, starting as a dry-goods 
merchant. He continued in this line until 1890, when he disposed of that 
branch of his business. In 1871, Mr. Irwin went into the banking bus- 
iness which he has continued ever since. His bank is known as Irwin's 
Bank; he is the president of the bank, while his only son, William G. 
Irwin, is the cashier. It has always been a successful institution. 

Mr. Irwin has always been prominently identified with movements 
looking to the substantial improvement of Columbus. He has more 
than done his share in the way of securing manufacturing establish- 
ments for the city; he has contributed liberally for such purposes. 

Joseph I. Irwin is a self-made man in every sense of the term. He 
started in life a poor farmer boy, and by 'early economy, energy and 
faithful attention to affairs has accumulated a fortune of no small 
proportions. Although his education was limited to that given in the 
district schools of sixty years ago, he has, by constant reading, ac- 
quired a fund of information far in excess of the average man with 
our more complete educational advantages. 

Mt. Irwin was for a long time a director of the J. M. & I. railroad. 
He is now interested in the National Tin Plate Co., which has large 
plants in Anderson, Ind., and Monessen, Pa. Mr. Irwin, early in life, 
identified himself with the Christian church and helped to organize the 
first congregation in Columbus, to which he has ever been a liberal con- 
tributor and one of its active workers, and is now a member of its board 
of elders. For more than thirty years he has been a member of the 
board of trustees of the Butler University. He has been an ardent Re- 
publican since the formation of the party and has been at times a mem- 
ber of the State Executive and Central Committees of that 'party; be- 
sides being chairman of the county committee during many campaigns. 
During the war, he was one of the trusted councilors of Governor Morton, 
and many times was called by him to Indianapolis for consultation. He 
was a delegate to the Republican National Convention in Philadelph'a 
in 1S72 -and in Chicago In 1S84. 

Mr. Irwin never worked for the Republican party for the sake of office 
or political preferment. He has always been an ardent believer in the 
principles of protection to American industries and in clean and honest 
government, and it was only for the success of these views that he worked 
so diligently for his party. He never was in any "local ring" formed for 




TE'.V LK 



THE FIRE DEPARTMENT ENGINE HOUSE- 

Columbus has better fire protection than any city of its size in the 
State. Besides the splendid volunteer service, the city now has a very 
efficient paid fire department. The department is comfortably housed 
in the new Engine and Hose House adjoining the City Hall. The building 
and lot upon which it stands belongs to the city. The contract to erect 
the building was let April 4, 1S95, and was completed in June of the same 
year. The establishment of this department and the general improve- 
ment in our fire service, is largely due to the untiring efforts of John 
Stobo. during his last term in the City Council. 



The Lower Floor of the MASONIC TEMPLE 
is occupied by the 

on™ c clothing house 

...OF... 

It. HOSEf BUSH & GO.^ 

.. . COUUMBUS, IND. 

Cbe Metropolitan 

LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY OE NEW YORK, 

-THE LEADING INDUSTRIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA." 



ChC metropolitan furnishes Insurance that can be absolutely relied upon, 
and in such amounts, and at so low a cost, that none need be with- 
out it. Policies are free from restriction as to travel and residence ; 
are clear, concise business contracts; leave nothing to the imagi- 

ake definite provision in dollars and cents, and provide 

nediate payment of claims. 



for the i 
For all needed explanation apply to 

CHRISTIAN C. JUHL, Superintendent and General Agent. 

BRANCH OFFICE, G. A. R. Building, Rooms I, 2 and 3, 

509 Washington Street, COLUMBUS, IND. 



the purpose of electing fellow-ringmen and defeating those without their 
fold. As said before, he is a Republican because of 'the principles of that 
party, not for spoils. He always fights for party success, not for that 
of individual candidates. 

In ISr.O, Mr. Irwin was married to Harriet C. Glanton and to her he 
attributes a great share of his success. Their home is one of the hand- 
some residences of the city. They have but two children, Mrs. Z. T. 
Sweeney and William G. Irwin. Mr. Irwin has been longer identified with 
the business interests .if Columbus than any other man now living, and 
there is doubtless not now any one in the city more active in the conduct 
of business. 

Mr. Irwin was blessed with a wonderful oonatrfeutfan, which, by care- 
ful and simple habits of living 'and systematic application to business, 
he has preserved to this time, and appears now hale and hearty and 
active in his 74th year. His personal and business habits of life have 
been the prime factors in the growth of his fortune and his oontinued 
health and strength. In this connection it is worthy to note his life-long 
abstinence from the use of intoxicating liquors and tobacco, and he never 
drank tea or coffee in his life. In fact, a close observer of his habits of life 
discovers the exemplification of a rule which eliminates all unnecessary 
things from his life and habits and all things that tend to degrade the 
mental, moral and physical powers, or to waste labor or its product— -a 
rule, too, which rounds up the life of the man and makes him the full 
master of himself and presents one of the noblest examples of the 
reward which simplicity and purity of life shower so profusely upon 
those whose lives are so wisely lived. To this he owes his unsullied name 
and reposing character— his personal faculties — and to this he owes no 
small pant of the great fortune which his life work has built up. 

Young men, standing on the threshold of life, whether poor or rich, 
find h.-re a life worthy or reproduction and a result worthy of the highest 
ambition. 

THE COLUMBUS HANDLE AND TOOL COMPANY. 

One of the leading industries of Columbus is the Columbus 
and Tool Company. 

This enterprise furnish, s employment to 100 men the year re 
never shuts down except on Sunday. 

It was established seven years ago, and has continued to gr 
to-day it has an immense output. 

This firm manufactures farming tool-hamdles, logging too 
men's construction tools, etc. 



Much of the tools are exported. 

L. M. Flesh, Piqua, Ohio, is President; J. S. Taylor, Vice President, 
and our esteemed fellow-townsman, H. H. Bassett, is Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

J. E- FERGUSON. 

J. E. Ferguson was born in Logansport, Indiana, in 1851, where he 
attended school till old enough to work, when he began learning the art 
of Photography. 

Mr. Ferguson began his career as Photographer in 1872, iu Logans- 
port, where he commenced business for himself. 

Mr. Ferguson has had galleries in Bloomington, 111., South Bend, Ind., 
Memphis, Tenn., Middletown O., Aurora and Seymour, Ind., coming to 
Columbus six years ago. When he came here there were five galleries in 
Columbus, now there are but two. Mr. Ferguson is an artist in his line, 
and his work is in favor with the people of Columbus. 




A. R. BUILDING. 



JAMES NEWTON MARSH, 

Son of Samuel Marsh and Minerva Brown, was born July 9, 1844, in 
Jennings county. Indiana. Raised on a farm, with nothing but a common 
school education. In 1870 he engaged service with the engineer corps of 
the Lake Erie, Evansville & Southwestern Railway, helped to build the 
line from Evansville to Booneville, Ind., in 1872-3, and to run the prelim- 
inary lines to Bellefontaine, Ohio. Purchased the North Vernon Sun, a 
Democratic newspaper just started at North Vernon, in January, 1872. 
For several years he conducted the paper with great success. In October, 
187S, he purchased the daily and weekly Democrat at Columbus, and for 



and six Democrats on the first 




J. N. HARSH, Sec 



: 



C mmi 



one year conducted both the North Vernon and Columbus papers, then 
sold the North Vernon Sun, and a year later sold the daily and weekly 
Democrat. While at North Vernon, he, with thirteen other prominent Dem- 
ocrats, were arrested by United States Marshals on the eve of the election 
of 1876, when Samuel J. Tilden was elected President of the United States, 
and charged with conspiracy to import voters into the Fourth Congres- 
sional district to elect the late Judge Jephtha D. New to Congress. For 
this lie was on trial in the United States Court, before the late Judge 
Gresham and a jury, for thirty-eight days, but was promptly and honor- 



bly acquitted by"a jury of six Republi 
ballot. 

After selling the Columbus daily and weekly Democrat he engaged 
in the grocery business at Columbus for three years, and when the Big 
Four Railroad built its branch into Columbus, in 1883, he was appointed 



SPIEHLER'S QUEEN OF VIOLETS 



THEO. E. OTTO, 

PHARMACIST. 

Prescriptions Accurately Compounded. 
Choice Line of Cigars and Tobaccos. 
Ice Cream Soda and Phosphate. J* &&& 



CORNER WASHINGTON AND 
FOURTH STREETS. 



SPIEHLER'S FINE PERFUMES. 



its agent and remained in that position till the spring 1 
began the publication of the daily and weekly Times 
newspaper. 

DAILY MORNING TIMES. 
The daily morning Times was launched on the publ 
3, 1892. It was not a newspaper experiment at all. The 



if 1892, when he 
an independent 



ic Sunday, April 
ground had been 



fullv and carefully gone over, the pulse of the people well defined, and 
the matter considered fully for a year before the venture. The Times 
was established with the first issue. It has been a phenomenal success, 
and, especially so, when the panic, which followed, is considered. It is 
the only morning paper in Columbus, and is issued every morning, in- 
cluding Sunday, haviug never missed an issue on time since the first 
number. It is thoroughly clean and conservative in its news, inde- 
pendent in its editorials, and outspoken on all matters of public interest. 
It is patronized by the best people of Columbus. 

While at North Vernon Mr. Marsh was elected city clerk by ninety- 
eight majority, when the city had a normal Republican majority of 150, 
and was twice elected to the City Council of Columbus by big majorities, 
in the Third Ward, which was about evenly divided politically, and this, 
too, in face of the fact that he was always an intense Democrat. 

June 12, 1877, he was married to Mary M. Gooding, eldest daughter of 
Col. Michael M. Gooding, of the Twenty-second Indiana Volunteers. 

Mr. Marsh is an enterprising citizen, possessing much public spirit. 
He never shirks a duty when he is called upon. 

As secretary of three of the most important committees of the G. A. 
R. Encampment, viz.: The Executive Committee, the Finance Committee 
and the Press Committee, Mr. Marsh did valuable work in advancing the 
Encampment success. 

Mr. Marsh, perhaps, did more real hard work as secretary of these 
committees than any other man on the Citizens' Committee. 

But it is to this energetic, hustling spirit that Mr. Marsh owes the 
success he has attained in life. He is a man who pays much attention to 
details, and he possesses that executive force which enables him to grasp 
and successfully direct important affairs. It is said of Newt. Marsh that 
he never forgets anything. 

He can listen to an important narrative, taking no notes, and when 
his paper comes out you will find that he did not omit a single point of 
the story. Asa newspaperman, Mr. Marsh, has, perhaps, no superior in 
Southern Indiana. 

THE REPUBLICAN. 

The Republican is the oldest paper published in Bartholomew county. 
The Columbus Republican— weekly— was established in 1872. The Even- 
ing Republican— daily except Sunday— was established in 1877. The 
daily is a seven-column folio, size 24x35 inches, is a live local paper, and 
enjoys a good patronage. The weekly is a seven-column quarto, size 



35x48 inches, and is considered one of the best county papers published 
in Southern Indiana. 

The Republican has one of the finest equipped job departments in 
this part of the State and enjoys a nice run of work. 

Isaac T. Brown, the present proprietor, has had charge of the busi- 



HAIL! 



To the Noble Defenders of Our Glorious Country. 
Welcome to one and all to Columbus. 

The 3 runsw * c k Clothing Co. 



I of our Guests, as well as our fellov 

lo call ami examine our establishment, 

310 WASHINGTON STREET 



from far and i 



MEN'S, BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S SUITS, 
SHOES AND FURNISHINGS. 



G. A. R. SUITS OUR SPECIALTY. 

tore and get Pumpkin Seed FREE for our PUMPKIN CONTEST. 
Respectfully, 

BRUNSWICK CLOTHING CO., 

One=Price Clothiers. 



ness from the first until the present time, except a period of four years — 
from January, 1S94, till January, 1898. 

Mr. Brown comes from a family of newspaper men, his father, Isaac 
M. Brown, having been one of the pioneer newspaper men of Indiana. 

Under Mr. Brown's management The Republican has always enjoyed 
a high reputation as a first-class newspaper and party organ. 






DRYBREAD'S HILLS. 
Near Taylorsvllle, Indiana. 



3ENECA S. DRYBREAD. 



SENECA S. DRYBREAD. 

Mr. Drybread was born in Nineveh tp., this county in 1S4S. Lived on 
farm till 21 years old, then went to California where he remained a year or 
two, returning to Columbus and engaging in the dry goods business with 
J. F. Snyder, which he continued for seven years. At the end of that time 
he bought the large flour mill near Taylorsville, now known as Drybread's 
Mills, where he manufactures his renowned Silver Moon Flour. 

Mr. Drybread married Ella Kennedy in 1884. He is a Mason, Knight 
Templar, K. P., and Red Man, and in politics an ardent Republican. 




$1,375.00 in Gold 



$375.00 Awarded for the 
Best Straw Stacks 



Made by the 

WIND STACKER. 



$500.00 . . . 



Paid to any person who will prove to a 
of six farmers, that the Wind Stacker 
suck grain from the sieves. 



$500.00 . . 



Paid to any person who will prove to a jury 
of six farmers, that the straw will not keep as 
well when put up by the Wind Stacker as 
when put up by hand, subject to the same 
conditions of weather. 



For Full Particulars Address- 



The Indiana Manufacturing Company, 



INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA. 



Wholesale. 



Retail. 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

We make a specialty of all kinds of 
material used in the adaptation of the 
Electric Current to commercial, scien= 
tific and domestic purposes. 




HOUSE PAINTER. 



D. P. DOLL, 
« Dealer in Cigars ana tobacco 

COLUMBUS, INI). 

Mrs. C. H. Thompson, 

The Leading Retail Milliner, cordially invites you to 
her place to inspect goods and prices •.< jt jt 

Next to First National Bank, 333 Washington Street. 



MUNCIE COFFIN CO. 

Undertaker's 

^^Supplies, 

MUNCIE, 1ND. 



CHAS LILLY. Pres. JNO. M. LILLY, Secy, and Treas. HARRY J. CRAIG. Supt. 
ESTABLISHED 1S65. 

LILLY VARNISH CO 

INCORPORATED 1888. 

riNE VARNISHES. 

INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

J* SMOKE * 

jrCey cl/est {Principe 

5 Cent Cigars. 

GEO. KITZINGER, Distributer. 



[ANUFACTTJRED BY 



P. A. IUTZI, CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



FRANK S. WERNEKEN. Secy and Treas. 



JOHN BRENNAN & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Steam Boilers, 



ranch Works at 
BATTLE CREEK, MICH. 



' 7£T 'I 

24th Street and M. C. R. R. , 

DETROIT. 



SAUNA CEMENT PLASTER CO. 



Capital, Si 



SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF 



^* 



AGATITE CEMENT PLASTER 



*2. 



A Natural and the Most Perfect 
Plastering Material on the Market. 



MILLS: 
Dillon and Longford, Kansas. 



OFFICE: 
Salina, Kansas. 



DUNLAP & COATS, Agents 



for the sale of this material in Columbus 
and Bartholomew County. 



DONNER MILLING CO. 

fillers and Grain Dealers, 

COLUMBUS, iivr>. 
S. W. DAUGHERTY & CO. 

OFFICE. Corner Fourth and Washington Streets. 
COLUMBUS. INDIANA. 

For PENSIONS, HOUNTY, Etc. 

INSURANCE : 

Fire, Lightning, Tornado, Cyclone and Wind Storm 
in One Policy. 

JOHN V. FARWELL CO. 

Wholesale .,, j-v y^r . 

■^-^ ggj Dry Goods 
Wl and Notions 



ALSO AGENTS FOR THE SILVER 
CRESCENT BLACK GOODS. 



. . CHICAGO. 



E SERGEANT & CO. # 

__I. h t Leading Dry Goods House 



in Columbus, Ind. 



We carry a full line of the Finer Fabrics. 
You can save money by trading north us. 



GEO. E. ELLIS, 

Bookseller, Stationer and News Dealer 

Wall Paper. Moulding and Picture Frames. 
515 Washington Street. COLUMBUS, IND- 

JOE FAULKNER, 

. . DEALER IN . . 

Fine Hand=Made Harness, 

Robes, and Blankets, and Whips. 
Third Street, North of Court House. 



C. C. CHAMBERS, 

MEAT MARKET. 

1110 SEVENTH ST., COLUMBUS, IND 



Fresh and 
Cured Meats. 



Good Weight 
Guaranteed. 



BERN INC. BROS. 

^PCIGARS 



CINCINNATI, O. 



'^~ 



CITYCAFE, 



MRS. C.REYNOLDS, 



Washington St., opposite Post-Office, COLUMBUS, IND. 

GETYOUR MEALSATTHISPLACE. 

JENNIE EOWLER, 

Gbc flMIUncr 

The Best Place to Buy Millinery ^^| Washington Street, 

at the Lowest Prices. -J* J* J* Opposite St. Deals. 

JOHN Hughes, 

Staple and Fancy Groceries, 

523 WASHINGTON STREET, 
COLUMBUS, IND.