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Full text of "Souvenir of the Naperville homecoming, Naperville, Ill., May 29th to June 1st, 1917"

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6 



MAY ( 



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APR 20 1938 



JAN 20 
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1999 



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L161 O-1096 



SOUVLNIR 



OF THE 



NAPERVILLE 
HOME COMING 

NAPERVILLE, ILL. 

MAY 29th TO JUNE 1st 

1917 




NAPERVILLE 



Prof. H. H. Rassweiler 

To wKom tKis Souvenir is respectfully 

dedicated by tke citizens of Naperville 

in recognition of Kis effort and 

enthusiasm for a successful 

Home Coming 



Of-'-' 




JOSEPH NAPEK 

FOUNDER OF NAPERVILLE 
1857 



1 025 i 00 




THE JOHN KAPER HOME 

FIRST FRAME HOUSE BUILT ix NAPERVILLE, 1830 



NAPERVILLE 



NAPERVILLE HISTORIC SKETCH 



By D. B. GIVLER 




God made the country, man made 
the town with all conveniences, al- 
lurements and imperfections. 

The Pilgrim immigrant landed on 
a rock-bound coast ; the pioneer set- 
tler followed the star of empire west- 
ward over almost insurmountable 
mountains, through deep swamps 
and trailless forests until he emerged 
therefrom and stood amazed at a sight unsur- 
passed for grandeur, vast in extent the en- 
chanting prairies of northern Illinois. 

Having rested a night in Chicago, he pushed 
his way westward along a trail leading to the 
Naper Settlement. This trail in time became 
known as the Oswego road, and that part pass- 
ing through Naperville as Chicago Avenue. 
This lone horseman arrived here on a perfect 
summer evening. Riding horseback all day, 
communing with nature and getting a firmer 
grip on the meaning of the word "boundless," his 
attention was attracted to the sun passing 
slowly toward the western horizon. To quote 
his own language in substance: "I stopped, 
looked long at this indescribable manifestation of 



Nature in its golden glory, and then and there 
praised my Maker." 

This was, in a greatly modified form, a dupli- 
cation of Moses' experience as from Pisgha's 
heights he viewed afar the Promised Land, for 
have not the fertile prairies of DuPage and sur- 
rounding counties proven a land of promise in 
bountiful harvests to past and present gener- 
ations, and been verified in the experience of one 
of our distinguished citizens? 

The first settlers in this locality became resi- 
dents of an organized state with well defined 
boundaries. Illinois was admitted into the 
Union by act of Congress in the year 1818. Du 
Page County was created out of Cook County 
with its present boundary lines on February 9, 
1839. 

Naperville is the oldest town in the county. 
The village of Xaperville was incorporated by 
act of Legislature in the winter of 1857. 

Although Captain Joseph Naper was the 
founder of the village of Naperville, he was not 
the first settler in the county, nor of this im- 




mediate vicinity. In the year 1825, Stephen J. 
Scott removed from Maryland to this State and 
settled near Gros Point, Cook County, which 

7| embraced at that time the county of DuPage. 
While on a hunting- tour, in the month of 
August, 1830, with his son Willard, he dis- 
covered the DuPage river near Plainfield. He 

qj came up the river to "The Forks" and resolved 
to make this region his future home. A log 
cabin was built on what is now known as the 
Sheldon farm, which was occupied by Mr. Scott 
and family in the fall of 1830. Other families 
soon settled in the vicinity. This "settlement" 
was in Will County, the line being but a short 
distance south of Naperville. The first actual 
settler on the soil of DuPage County was Bailey 
Hobson who established a permanent home 
within half a mile of the present southern limit 
of this city. 

In June, 1831, Captain Joseph Naper and 
family took possession of their new home near 
the site of the old grist mill, around which 
cluster pleasant memories and from which pro- 
ceeded influences that were potent factors in the 
development of the garden spot of the greatest 
state in the Union. A brief review by decades 
will suffice. A full account would be intensely 
interesting. 



1830-1840. History reveals the fact that in the 
settlement of this part of the State, former resi- 
dents of the New England States took the lead. 
Their opportunity for securing information 
from the far-away west was ample and the 
source so trustworthy that they made the 
venture. In a list of forty men who came here 
prior to 1838, the name of but one German ap- 
pears, that of George Strubler, father of the four 
Strubler brothers, all deceased, and he didn't 
come direct from Germany, but from Pennsyl- 
vania. 

These pioneers endured the usual hardships 
common among a people poorly fortified against 
the rigors of severe winters. Scarcity of food, 
discouragement on account of the gloomy pros- 
pect and an occasional Indian scare were not 
calculated to make them rejoice evermore and in 
all things give thanks. 

But there were also seasons of rejoicing and 
social functions which made life worth living, 
and which many looked back to with pleasure, 
their experiences having taught them lessons in 
endurance and thrift which proved to be valu- 
able legacies for their descendants to this day. 
They were a noble, brave, persevering people. 

1840-1850. This decade is replete with 
marvelous activity in the "settlements." Goodly 



I NAPE.RVILLE 





HOME OF WILLAK1) SCOTT 



NAPERVILLE \1 



MHWHNHHHMMMiV- 



reports had crossed the ocean, inducing thou- 
sands to sever home-ties and assume the risks 
incident to a voyage across the stormy Atlantic 
in sailing vessels, a few enjoying first cabin com- 
forts, but most of them confined to very incon- 
venient, unsanitary steerage accommodations, 
a goodly number of which became permanent 
residents of Naperville and immediate vicinity. 

A great stir had taken place among residents 
of Lancaster, Berks, Schuylkill and other coun- 
ties in Pennsylvania, beyond the Alleghany 
mountains. The more courageous banded to- 
gether and set their faces westward in spite of 
protests, tears and warnings of friends. Some 
came by canal and lake boats, but most of them 
covered the distance by means of horse-drawn 
wagons. Other groups followed in rapid suc- 
cession until at the close of the decade, the Ger- 
mans, English, Scotch, Pennsylvania Dutch 
equaled the number of New England settlers. 

During this time the village of Naperville was 
increasing in population. The most serious 
obstacles had been surmounted. Town and 
country were interdependent. Adjacent timber 
tracts furnished fuel for warmth and lumber for 
addition to log cabins. Saw-mills were kept 
busy and grist-mills provided flour for daily 
bread. The DuPage river was an important 
factor in the development of the settlements. 



But the mills, dams and ponds have disappeared, 
and its waters flow untrammeled toward the 
fathomless deep. 

All classes of people brought some sort of re- 
ligion with them and soon felt the need of 
united effort in promoting spiritual matters, and 
from this impulse societies were formed which 
worshiped in private homes, halls, and school 
houses until churches could be built, so that at 
the close of the decade, the Baptists, Congre- 
gationalists, Methodists, Evangelicals and 
Catholics worshiped in dedicated buildings. The 
Lutherans and Episcopalians were provided for 
later. 

Education was not neglected, and from the 
arrival of the first settlers this important matter 
received deserved attention in the way of pri- 
vate instruction, and later through the medium 
of the public school, by means of which some of 
the scholars became men of usefulness and in- 
fluence in their clay and generation. The resi- 
dents of the village were especially active in pro- 
viding school buildings and teachers, of which 
fact our Academy building, unchanged as to ex- 
terior, bears convincing testimony and may con- 
tinue so to do for another century. 

Surplus grain was hauled to Chicago by farm- 
ers living far west and southwest from Naper- 



NAPERVILLE 



ville. The Pre-Emption House and barns 
afforded ample accommodations for man and 
beast. It served as a half-way stopping place 
for many years. A railroad was talked about 
and efforts made to secure one, all of which 
failed. Merchandise for local sale came as re- 
turn loads. Several men made this a special 
business for many years, using the plank road, 
minus the planks. 

Farmers kept pace with the spirit of the day. 
The horse-drawn reaper and mower superseded 
the grain cradle and scythe. Ox-teams were 
few. The plow that scoured was an appreciated 
blessing. It was a modifier of temper, a puri- 
fier of thoughts, removed temptation and made 
plowing a pleasant past-time. 

The village also was abreast with the needs of 
the day. There were stores and groceries carry- 
ing a great variety of goods. Butter and eggs 
were exchanged for luxuries and necessities. 
Money was scarce and credit popular. Profes- 
sional men put out signs, ready, willing and able 
to heal the sick, cause the lame to walk and ad- 
minister liberal doses of ipecac and calomel at 
reduced prices. Lawyers, not a few, stood ready 
to give safe advice, write deeds and mortgages, 
or defend one in court whether innocent or 
guilty. 



The old court house stood near the site of the 
soldiers monument. It was built in the year 
1839. For thirty years Naperville was the 
county seat of DuPage, by virtue of which it at- 
'tracted a goodly number of citizens from other 
parts of the County who became leading citi- 
zens. Court sessions brought the Honorable 
Judge and many legal lights having cases in 
court. Important trials, with weighty verdicts, 
were disposed of to the entire satisfaction of 
winners. Failing to be forewarned by attempts 
to remove the county seat, Naperville was not 
forearmed when the last test of voting strength 
was made in 1867. The election was contested, 
but after much litigation, sharp controversy 
and expenditure of large sums of money the con- 
test ended, the removal effected and harmony 
restored by a resolution of the Board of Super- 
visors which donated the public square to the 
village of Naperville for park purposes. Ac- 
cording to tradition, removal would have been 
prevented if an early-day election, held in the 
towns of DuPage and Wheatland, had received 
attention. The matter to be decided was: "Are 
the voters of these two towns willing to be de- 
tached from Will County and be joined to Du- 
Page County"? One vote in the negative de- 
cided that question. Truthfully, or otherwise, 



JE 1 

! 

7 



NAPERVILLE 




HOME OF FRANCIS A. KENDALL 




HOME OF FRANCIS GRANGER 



^P%^^ .jlLwswsssss^^ ^^PN^^ ^ 



it was claimed many years afterward that John 
Barleycorn cast the deciding vote. 

1850-1860. The writer stands on familiar 
ground, as sixty-six years ago he first caught a 
glimpse of Naperville, snugly located on a low 
tract of ground, crowding timber on the west, 
several houses over the river, later swept away; 
unpaved streets; sidewalks few and meander- 
ing; residences small, unpretentious and un- 
painted ; wooden bridge ; cows running at large ; 
no street lamps candles and kerosene lamps in 
general use, and matches almost a marvelous 
discovery or invention. 

Into this decade is crowded the bulk of 
pioneer history. Immigration had practically 
ceased. Land all pre-empted and most of it 
owned by actual settlers. Within a radius of 
seven miles resided a sturdy lot of men and wo- 
men, engaged in agricultural pursuits and in- 
terested in religion, education and politics. Not 
much wealth, but a strong purpose to succeed 
and make the prairie a real paradise. The hum 
of the prairie fowl greeted the ears of early 
risers; from the undrained sloughs came mo- 
notonous croakings of myriads of frogs; the 
barking night prowler the prairie wolf, had 
disappeared, and the last deer converted into 
venison. The people had settled down into quiet, 



compact, contented neighborhoods, and few re- 
movals or changes took place, although a visi- 
tation of cholera and typhoid fever claimed some 
victims. 

Prairie fires were dreaded, but no great losses 
were sustained thereby. The sight was grand 
from a distance. The burning of straw was sus- 
pended after farmers discovered that even the 
black prairie soil was not exhaustless. 

Early in the decade, two nurseries were estab- 
lished which furnished shade, fruit and orna- 
mental trees for prairie homes, for, be it remem- 
bered that, outside the timber tracts, not a tree 
appeared to obstruct the vision of the earliest 
settlers. The manufacture of the famous Jones 
plows began as early as 1840 and became so 
popular that in the year 1856 two thousand five 
hundred were turned out and sold at $15.00 each. 

The Bank of Naperville went into operation 
in 1854. The breweries afforded a local market 
for barley and enjoyed a prosperous existence 
until crowded out by grasping trusts. The I. O. 
of O. F. was organized in 1850, the Masonic 
Lodge established in 1848, lodge of Good 
Templars instituted 1857. An artillery company 
was organized in 1856, to which belonged a 
number of men who rendered service in the civil 
war. Independence day was observed en masse. 




HOME OF C. M. KUHN 



The Declaration was read, followed by an ad- 
dress and dinner in an adjacent grove, punctu- 
ated by salvos of artillery produced by anvils 
properly charged and discharged. 

High water in the river raised the ice, and the 
two combined caused a destructive freshet 
throughout the length of the usually placid Du- 
Page. It came in the month of March, 1857. 
Huge cakes of ice, borne along by a rapid cur- 
rent, beat down dams, swept away bridges, de- 
molished houses. Water and ice covered the 
lower part of town, as well as the river's banks 
many miles southward. It was an interesting 
spectacle. Some of the mammoth cubes resisted 
the sun's rays for several months. 

The first history of DuPage County was pub- 
lished in the year 1857. It contains a reliable 
account of the varied activities of the residents 
of the county from the arrival of the first pioneer 
up to this date. It is a meritorious little volume 
and every owner should highly prize it. 

The first three newspapers arrived and de- 
parted in 1850. The next attempt was made in 
1851, and survived about three years. The next 
failure occurred in 1857. Two other abortive 
efforts were made, but finally The Press, estab- 
lished in 1863, was purchased by the writer who 



changed the name to The Clarion. The failure 
of a newspaper man is usually credited to mis- 
management; that of a banker to circumstances 
over which he had no control. The local 
journalist had a small bonus to work with and 
soon failed ; the banker's deposits were larger 
and held out longer. 

Political affairs during this decade received 
strict attention. The village majority was 
usually captured by the Democrats, but the 
county at large in 1856 polled 1,387 votes for 
Fremont and 542 for Buchanan; 1860, Lincoln, 
1,790; Douglas, 803. Even township elections 
were vigorously contested and village elections 
even more so. Candidates for constable and 
Justice of the Peace put up a strong fight to win 
and made use of every legitimate argument to 
induce friends to vote early, if not often. 

Several homicides and suicides might be re- 
corded, but the writer prefers to pass them by. 
Tragic events were few in number and are 
mostly forgotten. 

A general cry went up for a railroad. Chi- 
cago was the nearest market. Cattle and sheep 
were driven thither in droves. The city could 
be reached by stage direct or by way of Winfield 
the nearest railroad station. The local news- 



NAPERVILLE 



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paper contained few local items and depended 
on exchanges and New York papers for matter 
to fill its columns. One publisher got married 
and delayed publication three days. An 
apology was accepted as the paper was not 
missed. The editor put in his best licks to secure 
a railway. It came long after his removal to an- 
other city. The village could communicate with 
the outside world by telegraph, a daguerreotype 
gallery was installed, and the happiest days of 
the writer's life were when he could wear a but- 
toned shirt and Hapless trousers and exhibit his 
"likeness" fresh from the camera obscura. 

It would be an unpardonable oversight if 
mention were not made of the many brave men 
who went from here to California during this 
decade. The lure of gold became universal and 
irresistible all over the country. Parties, in- 
cluding women and children, were formed in 
other parts of the State, and overland, in "prairie 
schooners," they ventured forth, some to suc- 
ceed, others to perish by the way, and not a few 
to spend a winter in the mountains and finally 
be rescued by searching parties. 

The less venturesome men went by way of the 
isthmus of Panama, while others followed the 
overland trails. Some of them returned with 
enough "color" to start in business or buy a 



farm, land being cheaper then than it is now. 
Two weeks were required to transport a letter. 
The "pony express" cut down the time; the rail- 
road made it from 3 to 4 days. The returned 
California!! was looked up to as a near hero with 
dead-loads of coin, dust and nuggets. Every- 
body had a right to guess, but nobody was wiser 
for gruessing. Several men from Naperville died 
on the way, but most of them returned safe and 
found. 

Farmers were somewhat discouraged. Prices 
for grain were very low. Taxes were regularly 
collected. The state levy must be paid in silver. 
Bank bills were of doubtful value. "Wild cat" 
currency predominated. "Detectives" were 
issued, but their estimates were unreliable, grain 
must be hauled to Chicago, potatoes also. One 
farmer, it was reported, failed to find a pur- 
chaser. He backed his wagon to the river's bank 
and dumped his potatoes into the water. 
Arrested and fined a larger sum than team, 
waeron and 'taters were worth. This happened 
so long ago that it may not be a true story. 

The years 1858, '59 and '60 were crowded with 
great events, affecting every State in the Union, 
the slavery question being at the bottom of the 
prevailing unrest. Kansas was the western 
storm center. Here and then John Brown first 



came into prominence. A cable was laid be- 
tween the United States and England. Senator 
Douglas and Abraham Lincoln debated the po- 
litical issues of the day; both became presi- 
dential candidates; Lincoln was elected, and the 
year 1860 closed with the secession movement 
under full headway. 

1861-1871. The climax of many years of agi- 
tation came at last. A call for volunteers re- 
ceived a hearty response, and Naperville was not 
slow in responding. A complete record of the 
part taken by the county is contained in a his- 
tory published in 1876. 

A war of any kind brings great changes. The 
old order of things are disturbed. Family ties 
are severed; solicitude for the fate of the boys 
intensified, and moral restraints weakened if not 



entirely removed, 
last. 



However, the end came at 



After all hope of regaining the county seat 
had been abandoned, internal improvements re- 
ceived attention. The public square was planted 
with trees. Streets and sidewalks were graded. 

A fire company and hand engine superseded 
the bucket-brigade. A steamer followed. The 
fire cisterns went into disuse. They still exist, 
but are forgotten. A brick and tile factory was 
established, and the location of North-Western 
College secured. A new iron and also a stone 
bridge were built across the river. Village 
streets and public highways were macadamized 
and our apparent loss proved to be a real and 
permanent blessing in disguise. 





J 




BUILT BY GEORGE LAIRD 
1835 



*#&$8*!iK8fc8#*88S2##^^ jgjSH&| 

NAPERVILLE. \f 




NAPERVILLE STONE QUARRY 



J 



THE NAPERVILLE OF TODAY 

Bj) W. R. GOODWIN, Oakhurst Farm, Naperville 

Managing Editor The Breeder's Gazette, Chicago 



FOREWORD 




This materialistic age seeks a sign 
the dollar sign. 

This sign is measurably accurate, 
nor is it a merely sordid index. Xot 
all achievement is adequately valued 
in cash, yet when the accumulations 
of business thrift give form to those 
aspirations which lift human life to 
higher levels, and substance to the 
dreams of beauty of an awakened soul, such ex- 
penditure becomes the fixed reflection of the de- 
velopment of the individual and the progress of 
I lie community. It is the exact and indisputable 
measure of that growth, the absence of which 
inexorably spells decay. 

The apparel oft and almost always proclaims 
the man. When thrift fails to beget tidiness; 
when affuence lacks outward expression in the 
modern forms which visualize the apex of our 
civilization ; when accumulation wants those evi- 
dences which conspicuously mark individual 



culture and civic ideals, a community is dead in 
its indifference, recreant to its obligations to the 
advancing world, and a blighting influence on its 
young life pressing eagerly on toward the goals 
of achieving endeavor. 

Culture in the individual is essential to the 
highest expression of community development. 
The paths our fathers trod, resolute conquerors 
of pioneer conditions, were circumscribed by 
natural obstacles which yielded stubbornly and 
slowly to the determined efforts of those 
courageous men impelled by the Adamic com- 
mand to dress and keep the garden. Their 
heroic exploits will never be sufficiently cele- 
brated in stirring song or eloquent story. They 
served well their day and generation to the glory 
of God and the gain of posterity. 

But it was a wise philosopher of a former age 
who thanked God that we were better than our 
fathers. Xot greater in courage, devotion and 
sacrifice, but richer in ideals, means and oppor- 



tunities. The cultural influences of the past half 
century, the marvelous mastery of elemental 
forces for greater comfort and higher efficien- 
cy, have produced in Naperville, from our herit- 
age from the fathers, a twentieth century people 
measurably advanced in the arts of civilization 
and its cultural manifestations; insistent on the 
immunity afforded by sanitation ; demanding 
avenues of comfortable transportation for that 
easy intermingling which promotes fellowship 
and lofty community ideals ; seeking the vision 
of higher education ; and desiring the solace and 
sustenance of worship in temples adequately ex- 
pressive of man's fundamental beliefs and holiest 
aspirations. 

These betterments in community life ma- 
terial, educational and religious keeping pace 
with the forward movements of the age, are 
based on an underlying industry and thrift in 
business, and a manufacturing enterprise which 
has made the name of Xaperville a matter of 
national knowledge. 

This is the Naperville of Today. 

To home-comers, familiar with the Xaperville 
of Yesterday, we offer the sign, the unimpeach- 
able proof an exposition of community book- 
keeping in its approximate footings. 




MUNICIPAL IMPROVEMENTS. 



The introduction of public utilities about fif- 
teen years ago affords sharp demarcation be- 
tween the city of yesterday and today. The 
dawning of the new morning came when electric 
light banished the gloom of night. Naperville's 
municipal light plant, now modern and supply- 
ing night and day current for illumination and 
power, was followed in the transition period by 
the waterworks system, and these improve- 
ments, with their common power plant, total in 
cost around $150,000. To this is added $50,000 
for sewers essential to the utilization of water- 
works and a sanitary civic life. That the culture 
and taste of a community no less than its pros- 
perity find expression in the embellishment of its 
utilities is revealed in the ornamental iron boule- 
vard lights erected at a cost of $5,500, and the 
cement posts in the park which cost $350. 

The gas mains of the Western United Gas and 
Electric Co. were laid through Xaperville streets 
a few years ago, giving service both as luminant 
and fuel, and adding the last of metropolitan con- 
veniences to suburban life. Stores and homes 
have been largely equipped at considerable ex- 
pense for the utilization of this service. 

Streets have already been paved at an expendi- 
ture of nearly $187,000. Oiled macadam streets 



NAPERVILLE 




"HEATHERTON" 
HOME OF .T. S. GOODWIN 




HOME OF W. TCOKERT JOHNSTON 



NAPERVILLE 



in the east residential districts account for nearly 
$100,000 of this amount, brick paving in the busi- 
ness center for nearly $74,000, and the begin- 
ning of concrete paving in the west residential 
section over $13,000. Plans contemplate the ex- 
tension of the west side concrete paving and 
drainage in 1917 at a cost of $117,000. The 
foundation work has begun. 

A Naperville lifted out of the mud, watered 
and washed with an inexhaustible deep well sup- 
ply, storm-drained and sewered into a septic 
tank, and brilliantly lighted within and ablaze 
without, invites with modest pride its former 
residents to rejoice with it over accomplishments 
which conclusively entitle Naperville to rank as 
a modern city of the third class under the Illinois 
statutes. 

Logically conjoined with this company of 
modern improvements stand the contributions of 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway to 
the new city. A commodious station, of brick 
and tile and impressive design, has replaced t! 1 " 
depot of civil war vintage at a cost of $35,000. A 
subway at the west end of town eliminates a 
very dangerous grade crossing and leads north- 
west traffic safely from the city. The cost was 
$30,000. Plans are drawn for a subway under 
the tracks in Washington Street at a cost of 
$60,000. The railroad company has agreed to 
move the freight house (the old depot) west of 



Center Street, and to retire further in the back- 
ground the unsightly elevator buildings on the 
road's right of way. These changes will work 
substantial improvement about the handsome 
station on the north. Supplementing it on the 
south side Burlington Square, the gift to 
Naperville from the railroad, will charm with its 
restful greenery of sward and shrub and tree, 
provided by popular subscription, and proclaim 
impressively to passers-by that the Naperville of 
Today seeks outwardly to exemplify the beauty- 
loving instincts of its cultured citizens. 

Counting as certainties improvements now in 
the making and in the maturity in plan, Naper- 
ville challenges attention to a total of ap- 
proximately $635,000 expended in the past fifteen 
years in the way of modern community better- 
ments, and Naperville has not one cent of bonded 
indebtedness. 

And Naperville has not one cent of bonded in- 
debtedness. 

In these substantial ways has the spirit of the 
new Naperville taken form. However, it is a 
dull student of community life who would not 
look further, and deeper, and looking here he 
would find : 

SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES. 

In the betterment of educational facilities in 
recent years $232,000 has been spent in Naper- 




"KUMMEELOOS" 

HOME OF CHARLES ALBERT NADELHOFFEK 



ville. The main item of around $105,000 pro- 
vides a high school dedicated last fall which is 
without equal in any city near Naperville's rank 
in the state. The equipment of Northwestern 
College, the educational home of the Evangelical 
Church, has been extended by the addition of a 
Carnegie Library and a Science Hall, each at a 
cost of $30,000, and a heating plant at a cost of 
$15,000. The new home of the Evangelical 
Theological Seminary, maintained in affiliation 
with the college, cost $32,000. Fire badly 
damaged the parochial school of the Ss. Peter 
and Paul Catholic church, and it was rebuilt at a 
cost of $27,000. 

HOUSES OF WORSHIP. 

Rising yet higher in our survey we reach the 
most significant clothing of a community spirit 
its church building. A total of $133,000, spent 
within ten years, measures the abiding faith of 
our God-fearing people in the power of the 
Gospel in life and in death. It embodies their 
militant Christian spirit in erecting church 
homes which typify in their architecture the 
ecclesiastic ideals of the centuries; it emphasizes 
their wisdom in equipping them for the utili- 
zation of modern methods of church and Sunday 



School work. The German Evangelical Congre- 
gational Peoples Church cost $3,500. The First 
Congregational Church was built and equipped 
at a cost of over $27,000. The Grace United 
Evangelical Church, with which the Salem 
Evangelical Church joined, built a new edifice 
which cost with the grounds $35,000. The Zion 
Evangelical Church (the "old Brick Church") 
drew unto itself the College Chapel Church, and 
the twain became one under the name of the 
First Evangelical Church with a new home that 
cost $56,000. The Methodist Episcopal Church 
was remodeled at an expenditure of about $4,500, 
and the Church of the Brethren has been built 
at a cost of about $3,000. Improvements on the 
Ss. Peter and Paul Catholic Church have 
amounted to at least $5,000. 

Conspicuous among the evidences of modern- 
ization, and most crucially revealing the soul of 
the city, because of the object and union of effort 
required for its accomplishment, stands the 
Young Men's Christian Association building, 
which cost with the grounds $43,000. Without 
equal in its size and equipment among the cities 
of the state materially exceeding Naperville in 
population, it typifies an abiding and illuminat- 
ing interest in the physical and spiritual welfare 
of its young men. 



NAPERVILLE 



BUSINESS ACTIVITIES. 

All this superstructure of Naperville's im- 
provements rests solidly on its commercial 
activities and prosperity. Its barometers are the 
banks. The First National Bank purchased the 
Phillips building, and remodeled it at an expendi- 
ture of $35,000. Some years ago the front of the 
Reuss State Bank was rebuilt at a cost of $3,000, 
and another room and a new vault have been 
added at a cost of $10,000. The deposits in these 
two banks total around $850,000. 

The history of the Naperville Lounge Factory 
reads like a romance in manufacturing. Its 
operation gives basis to the business prosperity 
of Naperville. Established in 1881 in Fred 
Long's little furniture shop, it finally came as an 
incorporated company to the occupancy of the 
old skating rink in 1893. The capital stock was 
$4,000. P. E. Kroehler entered the service of the 
company at that time as secretary, and finally be- 
came the president, and the company was rein- 
corporated in 1915 as the Kroehler Manufactur- 
ing Co., with a capital of $1,150,000. Branch 
factories are now maintained at Kankakee, 111., 
Binghamton, N. Y., and Cleveland, O. This 
company also operates the Kimbell Bed Co., with 
factories at Grand Rapids, Mich., New York 
City, and Stratford, Ont. About 20 years ago a 



small frame building costing around $3,000 was 
erected near the depot for the factory, and now a 
brick building 666 feet long and 120 feet wide, 
covering two city blocks, is utilized for the manu- 
facture of davenports and chairs, the largest 
factory in the world devoted to the production 
of such furniture. The cost of its present plant 
probably exceeds $250,000, including the equip- 
ment of machinery. Full-handed the factory 
gives occupation to 362 men and women, and its 
pay roll distributes about $25,000 in Naperville 
each month. Its annual output runs close 
around $1,000,000 from the home plant. 

The co-operative creamery of an earlier day 
has given place to the butter-making, ice cream- 
making and ice-making plant of the Naperville 
Consumer's Co., which is capitalized at $27,000. 

Five garages afford service to an ever-increas- 
ing number of motor cars, and bring autos from 
miles around for repairs and replenishments. 
One was erected at a cost of $15,000 for building 
and grounds, another at a cost of about $5,000. 
A brick livery stable has been converted into a 
garage, two store rooms have been remodeled 
for similar use, and a fifth small garage is open. 

New store buildings have been erected, and 
many stores have been remodeled and made 
modern in their exteriors and interiors, and the 
cost of these betterments will easily reach 



NAPERVILLE 




HOME OF DR. AND MRS. JOHN A. BELL 




. 



HOME OP E. J. T. MOYEK 




$45,000. The postoffice has found home in a new 
building, especially constructed for it. The 
Masonic Fraternity has completed a new temple 
at a cost of $35,000, not included in the estimate 
mentioned. Store rooms and a film theatre oc- 
cupy the lower floor. 

The stone quarries rest unworked, but strik- 
ing growth in commercial specialities is evi- 
denced in the material expansion of the Naper- 
ville Nurseries, and the continued output of the 
Martin and von Oven tile and brick yard. On 
the site of the plow factory is a manufacturing 
plant producing flynets, cotton gloves, woven 
rugs and pillows, and leather ankle supports. 
The old cheese factory is now devoted to the ex- 
traction of casein from curd. 

Linking the past with the present are the six 
green houses which supply the ever-growing cut 
flower and potted plant demand. From a small 
house near the cemetery in olden times these 
glass-enclosed plant propagation enterprises 
have somewhat recently grown to six in number, 
and the total investment runs to at least $35,000. 
Among them is a house devoted exclusively to 
the production of the rare and costly orchids. 

THE CITY AND ITS GOVERNMENT. 

The former home of the First National Bank 



was erected jointly by the bank and the Masons 
at a cost of over $8,000. It has been purchased 
by the corporation as a City Office, and its sub- 
stantial, dignified architecture and its con- 
veniences of arrangement and location serve the 
city much more adequately than the old hall, 
over the fire engine house and jail. Having di- 
vested itself in 1913 of the antiquated mode of 
city government by substituting the more satis- 
factory commission for the common council, the 
city was well entitled to commemorate its ac- 
quisition of more economical and effective ma- 
chinery by the purchase of a City Office which 
distinctly breathes the atmosphere of modern 
type and equipment. 

Lest home-comers fail to catch glimpses of ob- 
jects of old-time familiarity the engine house will 
send into the parade the famous old Joe Napier 
hand-pump fire engine, survivor of the years of 
the city's younger age, and reminiscent of the 
period when the Naperville volunteer firemen re- 
turned victorious from tournaments and hose- 
coupling contests. 

As guardians against the fire fiend stand water 
plugs on all corners of the city streets, with a 
hose reel in the engine house, along with an auto- 
mobile chemical engine, the most effective of 
modern fire-fighting apparatus. Three additional 



hose reel stations are also maintained one at 
the lounge factory, and one in the residential 
sections on the east and on the west side. 

The original city included a little over 19 
blocks. Additions taken into the city limits now 
count up 16 blocks, and lying just adjacent on 
the north is a subdivision of 9 blocks toward 
which the city is growing. 

Naperville's population was returned by the 
1900 census as 2,600. In a decade it had reached 
3,400, a gain of about one-third. A recent school 
census indicates that the population at present is 
about 4,300, to which may be added the college 
enrollment of around 500 students. 

The modern spirit of co-operation is best typi- 
fied in the work of the Xaperville Association of 
Commerce which has drawn together the busi- 
ness men of the city in team-work as never be- 
fore. With systematic division of effort a num- 
ber of committees constantly strive to "Do It 
For Naperville." No more significant exponent 
of the spirit of the modern Naperville can be 
found than in the Committee on the City Beauti- 
ful. The home-coming celebration is the child 
of the Naperville Association of Commerce. 

Among the cultural influences which seek pub- 
lic as well as private benefits the Naperville Wo- 



man's Club stands conspicuous. Its active in- 
terest in the public schools and in the Nichols 
Library has annually found tangible expression 
in substantial gifts. School rooms have been 
embellished by pictures and mural decorations, 
and over $500 has been pledged, and more than 
half paid, for the equipment of the domestic 
science department of the new high school. An- 
nually the shelves of the public library have been 
enriched by volumes from the club's treasury. 
Aside from the financial assistance rendered, the 
Naperville Woman's Club has proved itself a 
vital influence in every movement, for the better- 
ment of the community life in its material and 
educational aspects. The new high school has 
been the especial object of its endeavor. 

HOME BUILDING AND THE 
SANITORIUM. 

If exact figures were available of the cost of 
the new homes and remodeled residences in the 
past fifteen years, they would total a sum which, 
superimposed upon the startling figures gathered 
from the books, would amaze those who have not 
closely followed the swift course of present-day 
improvement. A partial census, made by a 
block-to-block count in a motor car, finds at 
least 185 new homes erected at a cost ranging 




NAPBRVILLE 






'. 




HOME OF G. H. DTJNLAP 



NAPERVILLE. 




HOME OF E. E. MILLEK 




NAPERVILLE 



from $2,000 to $35,000, and conservatively total- 
ing- $750,000. Add to this a most moderate esti- 
mate of $150,000 for repairs and remodeling and 
we reach a total of $900,000. 

The cost of the many blocks of cement side- 
walks and parkways, garages and incidental im- 
provements, and the liberal expenditures on 
country places adjacent to the city, bring this 
total considerably above the million mark. 

Outside the city but an important part of it, 
materially and in sympathetic support, is the 
Edward Tuberculosis Sanitorium, one of the 
most effective in the country. Its grounds and 
buildings run in total close to $100,000. 

"IS IT ANSWERED YET?" 

Is this sign sufficient this total of $2,561,000? 
Have Naperville people proved their faith by 
their works? Have those who remained in the 
old home, citizens of no mean city, met the obli- 



gations of latter-day life, held pace with pro- 
gress, fought the good fight, kept the faith? 

These mile-stones of improvement mark the 
evolution of Naperville, the country village, to 
Naperville, the city suburb the Naperville of 
Today. 

THE SUM IN ADDITION. 

Let us assemble this sum in addition, this ex- 
position of a community's bookkeeping, striking- 
ly on the page : 
City and railroad improvements. ..-...$ 635,000 

Educational buildings 232,000 

Churches 134,000 

Banks and business houses 175,000 

Green houses 35,000 

Lounge factory 250,000 

Residences 1,000,000 

Edward Sanitorium 100,000 



$2,561,000 



NAPBRVILLE. 







CENTRAL PARK 




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HOME OP A. BAUMGARTNEK 





HOME OF BERNARD RECKMAN 



NAPERVILLE 




HOME OF VALENTINE A. DIETER 




BRIEF STORY OF NAPERVILLE HOME COMING MOVEMENT 

ITS ORIGIN, ITS OCCASION, ITS OBJECT, ITS HEARTY APPROVAL BY THE 
CITIZENS AND ITS PLANS AND MEASURES FOR SUCCESSFUL EXECUTION 

B>> PROF. H. H. RASSWEILER 




The movement to appoint and pro- 
mote a civic event of welcome to our 
friends abroad, under the suggestive 
name of a "Home Coming Cele- 
bration," had its birth in the deliber- 
ations of the Naperville Association 
of Commerce. At the annual meet- 
ing of that organization held October 
15, 1915, one of its members moved 
the adoption of the following resolution: 

Resolved, that we appoint the first week in 
June, 1917, for a Naperville Home Coming Cele- 
bration, and that the Board of Directors of this 
association are hereby requested to devise all 
necessary plans and measures in preparation for 
this undertaking. 

The motion having been duly seconded, the 
mover thereof presented in its behalf the follow- 
ing facts and considerations: 



Within recent years, the progressive trans- 
formation of our city, along the various lines 
of civic improvement, has been such as to 
warrant the feeling of pride among the peo- 
ple within and to challenge the attention 
and admiration of the people without. 

This new area of general municipal advance- 
ment has developed scenes, conditions and 
achievements in striking contrast with the 
Naperville of its comparatively non-progres- 
sive and self-satisfied earlier years. 

Naperville, as a residence community of 
long career, has given to the outside world 
hundreds of its sons and daughters and 
former residents, all of whom, who are liv- 
ing, are still affectionately thoughtful of the 
old home town and are watching with 
friendly interest its growth and improve- 
ment. 



NAPERVILLE 




"THREE ELMS" 
HOME OK HENRY H. RASSWEILEK 



NAPERVILLE \! 



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4. These facts of contrast between the old 
Naperville and the new, as well as the ap- 
propriateness of providing a public occasion 
which will bring many of our outside friends 
face to face with the evidences of 'our pro- 
gress, suggest the fitness of an event such as 
is proposed in the pending resolution. 

The motion being put to vote was unani- 
mously carried. 

The Clarion, in reporting this annual meeting 
of the Association of Commerce, contained the 
following paragraph: "One of the special fea- 
tures mentioned was a 'Home Coming Week' for 
Naperville. This idea met with a hearty re- 
sponse from the members present and a tenta- 
tive date was fixed for the occasion, the first 
week in June, 1917. It is expected that a work- 
ing plan will be evolved shortly for a prelimin- 
ary publicity campaign, and when our citizens 
get a vision of the possibilities of such a Home 
Coming, it is confidently believed that everyone 
will enter heartily into the spirit of the idea." 

The Board of Directors, without delay, as- 
sumed the duty assigned them with reference to 
the Home Coming event, the first preparatory 
step taken being the appointment of a General 
or Executive Committee to have general charge 
of the celebration, with power to appoint all 



special and sub-committees necessary for plan- 
ning in detail and successfully promoting the 
important undertaking. The following persons 
were appointed as such General Committee, 
namely: F. A. Kendall, G. E. Flemming, W. M. 
Givler, George Keller, C. A. Nadelhoffer, H. H. 
Rassweiler, J. A. Reuss, J. A. Schmidt, C. L. 
Schwartz, Willard Scott, Theo. W. Smith and 
Fred von Oven. The organization of this com- 
mittee resulted in the appointment of Mayor F. 
A. Kendall as Chairman, Theo. W. Smith, 
Secretary, and C. L. Schwartz, Treasurer. 

It was now in order to make a formal, initial 
announcement of the undertaking to the people 
of Naperville through the columns of the 
Clarion. This was done by the Publicity Com- 
mittee in the Clarion issue of January 5, 1916. 
This announcement was met with hearty public 
approval and such general commendation of the 
provisional plan which it outlined as to appear 
prophetic of general co-operation and conse- 
quent success of the important event. 

The anticipated query: Why project this in- 
teresting community event so far in the future? 
was wisely answered in the published "Fore- 
word" as follows: To undertake it with a degree 
of care and deliberation in keeping with its im- 
portance; to proceed on the principle that 



thorough organization and preparation are 
essential to thorough execution; to give the 
project a fair chance to grip the thought and in- 
terest of our people; to give plenty of oppor- 
tunity for the designing of all sorts of festival 
plans and features; to let generous schemes of 
welcome and hospitality grow in the hearts and 
minds of our citizens; to bring within the period 
of preparation the completion of important 
building construction and other important 
decorative enterprises now in plan or in process ; 
and, by no means least, to have ample time to 
give the anticipated event the fullest possible 
publicity, both at home and abroad. 

In fixing the precise calendar dates for the 
celebration, on finding that the College Com- 
mencement would occur in the first week of 
June, and it being decidedly advantageous to 
bring the two important events to consecutive 
occurrence, the three last days of May and the 
first day of June, 1917, were named by the 
General Committee as the four festival days of 
the Home Coming week. 

To insure a pleasing variety in the events of 
the four days' program, it was decided to make 
each celebration day distinct from the others as 
to the nature of its festival plans and features; 
in other words, to assign to each day some repre- 



sentative element of our city life and interests 
as hosts and entertainers. In accordance with 
this purpose, the four days were denominated 
as follows : 

1. OLD CITIZENS' DAY. The sentiment of 
this day and all its entertainment features to 
be made to contribute to the honor and 
pleasure of the "old folks" within and from 
without our city gates. 

2. PATRIOTIC DAY. This being Decor- 
ation day, Naperville, with its visitors and 
guests from without, to go to the limit of its 
resources to honor our war time heroes. 
Added to the usual memorial ceremonies of 
the day, special patriotic events to be pro- 
vided, making the day replete with scenes 
appropriate and inspiring. 

3. SCHOOL AND CHURCH DAY. Follow- 
ing the first day of events "rapt in reminis- 
cent reverie," and the second day of patriotic 
sentiment and entertainment, this third day 
was designed to bring to the fore the genius 
of our schools and the spirit of our churches 
in a program of events charged with the re- 
sults and influences of "Education and Re- 
ligion the two factors of a community's 
life which underlie and make possible all 
true progress." 




NAPERVILLE 




HOME OF THEODORE W. SMITH 



/ NAPBRVILLE. 




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NAPERVILLE 



4. COMMUNITY DAY. The last great day 
of the feast, planned to include, in the fore- 
noon, a complimentary automobile tour 
through the delightful June dressed streets 
and avenues of our city; in the afternoon, 
one of the most elaborately planned pag- 
eants that Naperville has ever produced ; in 
the evening, fireworks, music and five 
minute addresses by men and women from 
at home and abroad all for Naperville as 
an appropriate "round up" of the festival 
events. 

Quite early among the interesting features 
planned for the occasion was the elegant . 
souvenir volume, a few of whose pages are oc-"| 
cupied by this "Brief Story." The preparation 
of this charming memento, which, while costing 
many hundreds of dollars, would prove to thou- 
sands "a thing of beauty and a joy forever," was 
committed to a strong committee representing 
literary ability, typographical experience and 
artistic skill. It is in the hands of the reader and 
speaks for itself. 

In the construction of a judicious line up of 
special committees, the General Committee 
aimed to combine breadth of representation, 
variety of judgment, taste and experience, and 
such numerical strength as would permit distri- 



bution of duty to sub-committee service. As 
showing with what care the manifold phases of 
preparatory work have been differentiated, and 
in justice to the faithful men and women who re- 
sponded to the call to service, it is deemed proper 
to give place herein to the following complete 
roster of special committees. The first named of 
each committee is its chairman. 

PUBLICITY. 

H. H. Rassweiler, Rev. A. E. Randell, E. H. 
Stevens, Rev. F. W. Umbreit, John W. Collins, 
J. A. Reuss and W. M. Givler. 

INVITATION. 

B. J. Slick, Mrs. Ada B. Collins, Mrs. W. C. 
Simpson, Mrs. Ralph Ballou, Mrs. Idelle Rass- 
weiler, Mrs. Calvin Steck, Miss Mary Yender, 
W. W. Wickel, Prof. A. C. Gegenheimer and 
Fred von Oven. 

RECEPTION AND HOSPITALITY. 

Willard Scott, Mrs. J. S. Goodwin, Mrs. W. C. 
Simpson, Mrs. M. W. Coultrap, Mrs. Geo. 
Wunder, Mrs. S. A. Ballou, Mrs. W. R. Good- 
win, Mrs. Willard Scott, Mrs. J. A. Schmidt, 
Mrs. J. A. Bell, Miss Emma Muerner, Carl 
Broeker, E. F. Stark, Alexander Crush, Wm. 
Knoch, H. J. Durran, Francis Granger, Jos. 
Kochly and H. C. Williams. 



NAPELRVILLE. 



EE 

l_cl\J(_LL(L/L/ I ^L J 

LLINOI5 




CA.MADELHOFFER 



GEORGE KELLER 



JA.SCHAMDT 



(SE.FLEMMIK6 




NAPBRVILLE 



HISTORICAL EXHIBIT AND 
REST ROOM. 

Mrs. W. B. Martin, Mrs. Alvin Scott, Mrs. 
Francis Granger, Miss Matie Egermann, T. W. 
Smith and H. H. Rassweiler. 

FINANCE. 

Alvin Scott, Y. A. Dieter, Prof. Nonnemaker, 
H. H. Peaslee and George Keller. 

PUBLIC DECORATION. 

J. W. Egermann, Mrs. Allen Hoopes, Mrs. 
Noel Alspaugh, W. W. Spiegler, Prof. G. B. 
Kimmel, Samuel Mather, Herman Boecker, S. 
F. Baumgartner, Julian Voss and Wilbur 
Lehman. 

PRIVATE DECORATION. 

John A. Hertel, Mrs. B. C. Beckman, Mrs. J. 
W. Bauer, Mrs. C. B. Bowman, Theo. W. 
Smith, R. N. Givler and Noel Alspaugh. 

SOUVENIR BOOK AND COLORS. 

Prof. C. B. Bowman, Mrs. T- A. Hertel, Mrs. 
J. A. Reuss, C. H. Koretke and R. N. Givler. 

HISTORY. 

D. B. Givler, Mrs. John Alspaugh and Mrs. 
H. H. Peaslee. 



REGISTRATION. 

Miss Mamie Thompson, Miss Ida Mottinger 
and Miss Mary Vender. 

COMPLIMENTARY AUTOMOBILE TOUR. 

V. A. Dieter, W. J. Truitt, Alvin Scott, J. W. 
Egermann and F. A. Kendall. 

MESSENGER BOYS' SERVICE. 

E. H. Stevens, Albert R. Morgan, Irwin P. 
Cainan, Wm. R. Friedrich, Dore Ester and 
Winfred Knoch. 

PAGEANT. 

W. M. Givler, Mrs. J. H. Clancy, Mrs. E. E. 
Miller, Mrs. R. N. Givler, Mrs. T- G. Marshall, 
Mrs. E. C. Mitchell, Miss Emma Keller, F. L. 
Biester, Dr. E. S. Fry, C. E. Heydon, C. A. 
Nadelhoffer, A. K. Spielberger, M. C. Van Nor- 
man, B. C. Beckman, T. F. Boecker, Pr'of. M. 
W. Coultrap, A. D. Miller, H. H. Peaslee, Dan 
Stiefbold, Arthur Beidelman, W. C. Bomberger, 
Julian Dieter, Arthur Green, E. J. T. Moyer, 
Julian Royce, C. E. Stoos, O. H. Reiche, E. B. 
Heaton, Wm. Sigmund, H. C. Litgens, Ed. T. 
Kearns, Wm. Knoch, Carl Broeker and Philip 
Corel. 



NAPERVILLE 



TUESDAY COMMITTEE. 
(Old Citizens' Day.) 

John A. Schmidt, Mrs. B. Egermann, Mrs. Ida 
Simpson, Mrs. Geo. Frost, Mrs. E. J. Kneip, 
Mrs. Mamie Webster, Mrs. Josephine Kroehler, 
Miss Emma von Oven, Miss Bertha Hammer- 
schmidt, Francis Granger, W. C. Hiltenbrand. 
C. W. Leffler, John Babel, B. H. Myers, Oliver 
Strubler, B. C. Beckman, Irving Goodrich, O. E. 
Higgins, Geo. Turner and Michael Schwartz. 

WEDNESDAY COMMITTEE. 
(Patriotic Day.) 

Dr. J. A. Bell, Mrs. Phil Hammerschmidt, 
Mrs. J. H. Clancy, Mrs. M. C. Andrus, Mrs. 
E. C. Rickert, Mrs. Truman Myers, Mrs. A. W. 
Glines, Mrs. H. Skelton, Mrs. W. M. Givler, 
Mrs. Hattie Wagner, Mrs. E. Rariden, Willard 
Scott, John Alspaugh, Levi Shafer, E. C. Rickert, 
Monroe Christ, Jos. Weismantel, Walter Rick- 
ert, Ralph Ballou and E. C. Shafer. 

THURSDAY COMMITTEE. 
(School and Church Day.) 

Rev. A. E. Randell, Mrs. D. Stark, Miss Lena 
Egermann, Miss Edith Neitz, Mrs. Gertrude 



Mowry, Miss Edna Wunder, Dr. E. E. Rail, 
Prof. Kirn, Prof. Waterman, Holt Sieber, W. 
M. Givler, E. E. Miller, C. L. Schwartz, Prof. 
H. C. Smith, W. H. Unger, Bernard Dieter, J. 
A. Hertel, Truman Myers, Rev. A. J. Boelter, 
Ira Sollenberger and George Unger. 

FRIDAY COMMITTEE. 
(Community Day.) 

THE GENERAL COMMITTEE. 

On July 21, 1916, the committee working ma- 
chinery having been constructed and publicly 
announced, a grand meeting of all the commit- 
tees was held in the Y. M. C. A. Auditorium. 
In the call for this meeting it had been forecast 
as a "ginger meeting," which prediction came 
fully true, both in the "ginger talks" which ani- 
mated the proceedings and in the manifest high 
tension of purpose to make the proposed Home 
Coming the most notable civic event in the his- 
tory of Naperville. Under such a spell of en- 
thusiasm the meeting adjourned. At the date of 
this writing, each committee is at work, in 
pleasant rivalry with all the others, determined 
to perform its specially delegated committee 
function faithfully and well. 




NAPERVILLE 




"MIDDLETON HOUSE" 
HOME OF CHARLES E. HEYDON 



M&iilMIIIIIHtllWIS&IIW^ jjk 

NAPBRVILLE. \1 




HOME OF 1)K. P:. GRANT SIMPSON 




PH 

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4 



GEORGE MARTIN 
TRUSTEE 



COUNCIL 

OF THE 




J05PH NAPER 
PRE5. 



XAVICR EGERMANN 
TRUSTEE 




C.M.CASTLE 
CLERK 





/AICHAEL HINE5 
TRUSTEE. 




-> 

- 




H.H.CODY 
TRUSTEE 



9 




NAPERVILLE 



PROEC.B. BOWMAN 
COM'R ACCT5. A FINANCES 



C. F. ROHR 
COM'R. PUBLIC PROPERTY 




W.M.GIVLCR 
COM'R STREETS & PUB. IMPROVEMENTS 



A. R.BEJDELMAN 
COM'R. PUB. HEALTH & SAFETY 



NAPERVILLE 



CITY ADMINISTRATION 



Naperville became an incorporated Village in 
the winter of 1857. In May 1858 at the first elec- 
tion, the following officers were elected: Presi- 
dent: Joseph Naper. Trustees: H. H. Cody, 
George Martin, M. Hines and X. Egermann. 
Police Justice: H. F. Vallete. Constable: A. C. 
Graves. Assessor: A. W. Colt. Clerk: C. M. 
Castle. 

One hundred and seventy four votes were cast. 

A petition, dated November 14, 1889, and 
signed by 52 voters, the required one eighth of 
the total number of voters, was presented to the 
President and Trustees of the Village of Naper- 
ville praying that the privilege be accorded the 
citizens to vote on the question of the incorpora- 
tion of the Village into a City according to Act 
of Legislature. 

A vote of 338 for and 61 against, taken March 
17, 1890, established the City of Naperville. 

The following April 15, 1890 the city officers 
were elected: Mayor: J. J. Hunt, Clerk: T. W. 
Saylor, Treas.: Alvin Scott, Jr., Attorney: H. H. 
Goodrich. Aldermen, 1st Ward: Levi S. Shafer, 



John Collins, 2nd Ward: Joseph Bapst, J. A. Bell, 
3rd Ward: F. S. Goetsch, Holt Sieber. 

By order of County Judge C. W. Clark the 
question of Commission form of Government 
was voted upon August 28, 1912, and carried by 
260 for and 193 against. At the next general 
election, April 15, 1913, the following were 
elected : Mayor : F. A. Kendall, Commissioners : 
C. B. Bowman, W. M. Givler, W. . Hiltenbrand 
and C. L. Schwartz. 

The City officers at present are the following: 
Francis A. Kendall, Mayor; Charles B. Bowman, 
Com'r. Accounts and Finances; Walter M. 
Givler, Com'r. Streets and Public Improvements ; 
Arthur R. Beidelman, Com'r. Public Health and 
Safety; Charles F. Rohr, Com'r. Public Property; 
Albert J. Ory, City Clerk; Joseph A. Reuss, City 
Attorney; Loren W. Myers, City Treasurer; 
Oliver W. Strubler, City Collector; George G. 
Anderson, Chief of Police; Otto H. Reiche, Fire 
Marshal; A. K. Spielberger, Plumbing Inspector; 
Fred J. Postel, Electrical Engineer; Clifton A. 
Ashley, Public Engineer; Winfred B. Martin, 
M. D. Health Officer. 




NAPERVILLE 








E.J.T. MOVER . C.E.HEYDON 

BOARD OF HEALTH 




C. A. ASHLEY 
PUB. ENGINEER 



OFFICERS 





CAPTG&ANDERSON EDWARD FAIRBANKS- 
CHIEF-OF-POLiCE POLICEMAN 



a 

i* 

WE.RICKERT 
CHIEF ELECTRICIAN 



WB.MARTIN /A.D 
HEALTH OFFICER 




LEE. CLARK 
CHIEF ENGINEER 



MI5S F BAUMGARTNER 
DEfTY CITY COLLECTOR 



O.W 5TRUBLER A K SPIEL6ERGER 

CITY COLLECTOR PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

M6R. WATER ALIGHT DEFT. 



CHA5 LUEBCKE 
ASST SUP^TREETS 



NAPERYILLE 



E.d ULRICH 
FCRt : A55T FORE'N. 



GERMANX r.L GRIMES 

TREA5. & FORE'IX A5S'T. FORE 1 



H.E.5AYLOR 

PRES.iFORE'N. 

No.l. 



C.BOETTGER 

A55T MARSHALL 



O.W STRUBLER 
V-PRE5.i.FORE'N 




JW LEHMAN 
. A55T. FORE'N 




NAPERVILLE 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



After the fire of July 6, 1874, when the New 
York House burned, the need of some kind of 
fire protection was recognized and on August 
8, of that year the village council appointed C. 
W. Richmond, Willarcl Scott, Jr., and Nicholas 
Yack as "a committee to purchase a fire engine 
and equipments for the use of the corporation," 
and on December 12, this committee reported 
to the council that they had purchased one hand 
engine, one hose cart, 700 feet of hose and other 
equipment at a cost of $1,752.50. Volunteer 
companies had previously been organized to 
operate the apparatus and on November 21st, 
Willard Scott, Jr., was appointed fire marshal by 
the council. 

Then came the memorable fire of the early 
morning of Friday, December 18, 1874, when 
the post office, express office and other buildings 
burned. The department did noble service at 
this, its first fire, for which it was given a vote of 
thanks by the village council at a special meeting 
held the next day. 

On December 26, B. B. Boecker was ap- 
pointed assistant fire marshal. January 2, 1875, 



an ordinance providing for the government of 
the fire department was passed by the village 
council and on February 13, the following 
named persons were duly accepted by the coun- 
cil as members of the department: 

Engine Company No. 1 ("J e Naper"). 

Daniel Garst, Foreman. 

Nicholas Yack, 1st Ass't. Foreman. 

Robert W. Sheldon, 2d Ass't. Foreman. 

M. Weismantel, Secretary. 

Xavier Adams, Theodore Beckman, Louis 
Bapst, Sebastian Bauer, Benj. L. Beidelman, 
John Beirsh, Adam Conrad, Geo. Daniels, 
Walter Daniels, Jos. Egermann, John Fisher, 
Fred Fuchs, Geo. Fortman, Henry Heim, Jacob 
Heim, Jos. Hiltenbrand, Xavier Kreyder, John 
Kreger, Christ Koepley, John Kropp, Martin 
Lehman, D. F. Long, Daniel Miley, Ferdinand 
Miller, Chas. Nadelhoffer, Horace Peaslee, John 
Pfister, Louis Reich, Geo. Reuss, Samuel Yundt, 
Sylvester Beidelman. 

Hose Company No. 1 ("Naperville"). 
A. McS. S. Riddler, Foreman. 
Peter Bapst, Ass't. Foreman. 



NAPERVILLE 




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O. J. Wright, Secretary. 

Geo. Potter, Treasurer. 

Lewis Ellsworth, Jr., Jacob Keller, Jr., Geo. 
Ehrhardt, Jr., Henry Germann, John Collins, 
Augustus Schwein, Hoi. Sieber, Albert Yost, W. 
G. Anthony, James Kenclig, Samuel Kendig, 
Thos. Costello, Wm. Riddler. 

September 17, 1875, the village council 
authorized the purchase of a hook and ladder 
truck and on September 29, an organization 
was formed under the name of "Rescue" Hook 
and Ladder Co. No. 1, the following named per- 
sons being accepted by the council as members 
of the same on October 1st: 

Wm. Naper, Foreman. 

V. A. Dieter, Assistant Foreman. 

J. H. Alexander, Secretary. 

M. B. Hosier, Treasurer. 

Chas. Boettger, Danl. Strubler, Levi Gerberich, 
Jos. Kochly, D. B. Givler, Ed. Stover, E. W. 
Krimbal, Wm. Barber, Eli H. Ditzler. 

October 22, additional members were ac- 
cepted by the council as follows: Thos. W. 
Saylor, Mathias Stevens, Alfred Shafer, Fred 
Long, Al. J. Strouse, Frank Hunt, Henry 
Youngheim. 




D. B. Givler, E. W. Krimbal and M. Stevens 
having resigned, Ed. Arter, Dr. J. H. Chew and 
Wm. P. Wright were accepted in their stead by 
the council, January 5, 1876. 

September, 1881, the Joe Naper Engine Co. 
No. 1 was disbanded by the village council and 
a new company organized, which in turn was 
disbanded by the council in May, 1882, when a 
company was formed which served until the vil- 
lage purchased a steam engine in 1887. A com- 
pany known as Enterprise Engine Co. No. 2 was 
then organized to operate the steam engine and 
another "Joe Naper Engine Co. No. 1" was 
formed, but disbanded a year or two later. After 
the city water system was installed in 1904, the 
steam fire-engine was disposed of, Enterprise 
Engine Co. No. 2 and Hose Co. No. 1 disbanded, 
and four hose companies organized in their stead 
with stations located in different parts of the 
city, the companies being suitably equipped. 
Rescue Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1 is the only 
company that has kept its organization intact 
since the early days of the department and is 
now known officially as Company No. 5. 

The authorized number of members of the 
various companies of the department as now con- 
stituted is as follows: Co. No. 1, Central Station, 
10 men; Co. No. 2, West Side Station, 4 men; 
Co. No. 3, East Side Station, 4 men; Co. No. 4, 



North Side Station, 7 men; Co. No. 5, Central 
Station, 10 men. 

In 1916, Company No. 1 was equipped with an 
up-to-date combination hose and chemical auto 
truck. The department is able and competent 
and many of its members have been long in the 
service, thus showing their devotion to the 
cause and making for efficiency. 

In the early nineties the department joined the 
Illinois State Firemen's Association and pro- 
ceeded to participate in the state tournaments 
held under the auspices of that organization 
which eventually resulted in the winning of the 
state championship for hose team, single coupl- 
ing (by C. Boettger), and novelty coupling (by 
C. Boettger and W. Willis). The hose champion- 
ship was won at Decatur in 1898, at Pekin in 
1899 and at LaSalle in 1900. 

Among those who have served as fire marshals 
are the following: Willard Scott, B. B. Boecker, 
James J. Hunt, A. McS. S. Riddler, Joseph Eger- 
mann, Joseph Kochly, Wm. G. Sieber, Frank S. 
Goetsch, Charles Boettger and Henry E. Saylor. 
The present incumbent, Otto H. Reiche, has held 
the office since 1907. 




NAPERVILLE AUTO FIRE TRUCK 



NAPBRVILLE. 



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WASHINGTON ST. 

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NAPERVILLE 




METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 




METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

REV. W. W. DIEHL, Pastor 

Stephen R. Beggs was the first 
Methodist preacher officially sta- 
tioned at Naperville. He was ap- 
pointed in the fall of 1833. His 
circuit had twelve preaching places 
and extended as far south as Joliet 
and as far west as Ottawa. In 
1836, the DuPage Circuit, embrac- 
ing Naperville, was in charge of 
one preacher. This circuit was bounded 
on the north by the Wisconsin state line, 
on the east by Lake Michigan, excepting 
.Chicago, on the south by the DuPage River and 
on the west by the Fox River. In 1846, a board 
of trustees was appointed in Naperville. The 
members of this board were Joel Ellis, John 
Rahm, Hamilton Daniels, Alexander Under- 
wood, Eli Rich, Samuel Anderson, Aylmer 
Keith, Joseph Granger, and Hiram Bristol. The 
same year the site of the present church structure 
was bought at one hundred and twenty dol- 
lars. A small frame structure was completed be- 
fore fall. 

The Methodist Church Society has been 
served by fifty-seven different pastors. Two dif- 
ferent church structures and two different par- 
sonages have been erected. 




GRACE UNITED EVANGELICAL CHURCH 

REV. J. H. KEAGEL, Pastor 

Grace Church was organized in 
1890. Scott's Hall served as its 
temporary place of worship until 
the completion of its first church 
building, at Loomis Street and 
Benton Avenue, in March, 1891. 
Flourishing from the beginnig, the 
congregation outgrew its modest 
first church home, and, under the 
pastorate of Rev. E. S. Woodring, planned 
and prepared for the erection of a more 
commodious structure. In 1909, under the 
oastorate of Rev. John Divan, the new edifice 
was built at a site and building cost of $35,000. 
A beautiful pipe organ was installed in 1916 at a 
cost of $2,500. Grace Church is advantageously 
situated in the center of the city, near Central 
Park on the corner of Front and Liberty streets. 
Its equipment for modern church work in all de- 
partments is thoroughly up to date. The Sun- 
day School is noted as a model in organization 
and efficiency. Pastors who have served Grace 
Church to date are: E. K. Yeakel, J. I- Klopp, 
William Caton, S. F. Entorf, W. H. Fouke, E. S. 
Woodring, John Divan, L. C. Schmidt, C. G. 
Unangst and J. H. Keagle. 




GRACE UNITED EVANGELICAL CHUECH 



/ NAPE.RVILLE. 

^^^^ ^^^^ ^ ^- m _... % 




' 




FIKST CONGREGATIONAL CHUKCH 




FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH 

REV. ALFRED E. RANDELL, Pastor 

This Church, the second oldest 
Congregational Church organized 
in Illinois, came into being on July 
13, 1833, under the leadership of 
Rev. N. C. Clark. The minutes of 
those early meetings disclose the 
use of Presbyterian nomenclature 
regarding polity, but in the second 
year of its history, the Church com- 
mitted itself to Congregationalism. 

The first building, erected upon lots which 
were the gift of Morris Sleight, was begun in 
1846, completed in January 1847, and re- 
modelled and enlarged in 1896. During the 
pastorate of Dr. Peebles, this frame building 
was replaced by the present stone structure of 
Gothic architecture, erected in 1906 at a cost of 
$27,000. The equipment is modern and com- 
plete. The Austin pipe-organ was the gift of Mr. 
T. P. Phillips. A new steam heating plant was 
installed in 1916. 

Rev. Alfred E. Randell is the twentieth Pastor 
to serve this Church. To Rev. Hope Brown be- 
longs the honor of the longest pastorate. Rev. 
J. C. Myers comes next with nine years, Rev. H. 
V. Tull, eight, and Rev. George Peebles, seven. 




FIRST EVANGELICAL CHURCH 

REV. A.'J. BOELTER, Pastor 

The First Church, for many 
years, known as Zion Evangelical 
Church, is nearly if not quite the 
oldest church in Naperville, having 
been organized early in 1837. Rev. 
Jacob Boas, from Ohio, preached 
the first Evangelical sermon in 
Naperville in June, 1837. In 1841, 
the first church building was 
erected on a lot donated by Captain Naper. In 
1845, the congregation had grown so large that 
they had to build a larger church. In 1858-59, 
the famous "Brick Church" was erected and 
dedicated by Rev. (afterwards Bishop) J. J. 
Esher. 

In 1870, when North-Western College was 
located in Naperville, a second congregation 
worshipping in the College building was or- 
ganized. These two congregations were amal- 
gamated in 1910, when the old "Brick" made way 
for the present stately and commodious struc- 
ture, erected at a cost of $56,000 under the 
pastorate of the Rev. W. A. Schutte, and dedi- 
cated in February, 1912, by Bishop S. P. Spreng, 
D.D., assisted by President, now Bishop, L. H. 
Seager, D.D. 



NAPBRVILLE 






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FIRST EVANGELICAL CHURCH 




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S.S. PETER & PAUL CATHOLIC CHURCH 



REV. B. J. SCHUETTE, Pastor 




This congregation had its in- 
ception in the early thirties of the 
last century, when the spiritual 
needs of the few scattered Catholic 
families in this vicinity were at- 
tended to at intervals by traveling 
missionaries, sent by the Bishops 
of St. Louis, Mo., and Vincennes, 
Ind. Services during these early 
times were held in the house of some Catholic 
family. In 1846 it was found necessary to 
build a church and a permanent congregation 
with a resident priest was established, the Rev. 
Raphael Rainaldi being its first pastor. It is the 
oldest Catholic parish in DuPage County. 

The present church edifice was begun in 1864 
under the pastorate of the Rev. Father Fischer 
and was re-constructed to its present condition in 
1876 while the Rev. William De la Porte was 
pastor. The total cost of the church, both origi- 
nal and for its re-construction, was about $40,000, 
exclusive of the cost of the organ, altars and in- 
terior furnishings and decoration. 



During the time the late Rev. August Wenker 
was pastor from 1878 to his death in 1911, many 
noticeable improvements were made in the 
church and its property. The present altars and 
alter rail were installed and the church received 
its first stained glass windows. The magnificent 
rectory was also added at a cost of $12.000. 

The parish has besides its church edifice and 
rectory, a Parochial school and a cemetery, 
(briefly mentioned elsewhere herein), and a 
brick residence occupied by the Sisters who act 
as teachers in the school. 

In 1911 the present pastor, the Rev. Bernard 
J. Schuette, was appointed and the growth of the 
parish made necessary the appointment of an 
assistant in 1912. The Rev. Herman J. Ezell is 
assistant at the present time. 

The parish has a membership of about 330 
families. About half of these live on farms in 
the vicinity of the City; the others, residents of 
Naperville, are merchants, artisans, professional 
men, etc. 








NAPERVILLE 







SISTRRS' RESIDENCE 



8.S. PETER AND PAUL 



PARSONAGE 



NAPERVILLE. 





ST. JOHNS EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

REV. A. E. COLE, Pastor 

The first services of this church 
were held in Naperville, on Friday, 
November 16, 1838, when the Rev. 
Andrew H. Cornish, rector of 
Christ Church, Joliet, said evening 
prayer and preached. The first 
Episcopal visitation was made by 
the Rt. Rev. Philander Chase, 
D. D., Bishop of the diocese, May 
27, 1839. 

A parish organization was officially effected on 
January 22, 1850, under the name and title of the 
Parish of St. John's Church. Capt. Morris 
Sleight presented ground for a church building 
in 1864; on June 1, of that year, the corner stone 
was laid ; on January 1, 1865, the church was open 
for the first service, and on April 24, of the same 
year, the consecration services were held, 
Bishop Whitehouse officiating. In 1867 Mrs. 
Delcar Sleight donated a lot for a rectory, which 
was built in 1870. The church was enlarged in 
1878 to its present proportions. The women of 
the parish at present maintain two societies, the 
Women's Auxiliary and St. John's Guild. Rev. 
W. H. Hyham is priest in charge and Rev. A. 
Ellison Cole, assistant. 



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ST. JOHNS EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



NAPERVILLE 



i. 




CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN 
ST. JOHN'S EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH GERMAN EVANGELICAL PEOPLE'S CHURCH 



NAPERVILLE. 




ST. JOHN'S EV. LUTHERAN CHURCH 

REV. F. KLINGEBERGER, Pastor 



Organized in 1858 with twenty 
members this church has been 
maintaining a flourishing congre- 
gation, adding to its members and 
usefullness. The original church 
building was enlarged and im- 
proved in 1871. It is located on 
Van Buren Avenue. 



GERMAN EVANGELICAL PEOPLE'S CHURCH 

REV. A. HUELSTER, Pastor 

Located on Washington Street 
near Franklin Avenue, this church 
was founded and organized Janu- 
ary 3, 1898, the first pastor having 
been Rev. Wm. Klar. Adjoining 
the church edifice is the parsonage, 
the entire property being worth 
$10,000. 

The membership has been well sustained. 
Baptism, faith in the Holy Scriptures, acceptance 
of the creed and the interpretation according to 




Luther's Catechism, the Augustana confesssion 
and the Heidelberg Catechism are the require- 
ments for membership. 

A Pastor is called by the congregation and 
serves an indefinite length of time. A board of 
trustees, also deacons, assist the administration. 

THE CHURCH OF THE BRETHREN <Dunkark> 

C. C. KINDY. Pastor 

Organized about 1856 with some 
fifteen members, the first church 
was built on John Erb's farm lY? 
miles north of Naperville. In 1908 
the church on Benton Avenue was 
built. 

Some of the ministers were 
Samuel Lehman, C. F. Martin, 
Jacob Sollenberger, John Hollin- 
ger, Simon Yundt, Doris Voorman and Harvey 
Barkdoll. Since the church has been located in 
Naperville, Aaron Sollenberger, I. C. Snavely, 
and I. R. Beery have served. The present pastor 
assumed charge Sept. 1915 and is assisted by 
Elder H. B. Barkdoll and Rev. Ira Sollenberger. 





NAPERVILLE 




YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



NAPERVILLE. 



HIL 




JID 




THE NICHOLS LIBEAKY 




YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

E. H. STEVEMS, General Secretar? 

A representative group of men 
from all denominations met at 
Scott's Hall on March 27, 1909 and 
resolved to make provision for the 
social, physical, mental and spirit- 
ual needs of its young men and boys 
and to furnish an interdenomina- 
tional field of service by organizing 
a Y. M. C. A. and erecting a perma- 
nent building. The corner stone for the $40,000 
modern city association building, which now 
houses a membership of 571, was laid on May 30, 
1910 and the dedication service held Sunday, 
March 26, 1911. 

The officers of the Association are: E. J. T. 
Moyer, president; T. W. Smith, secretary; F. A. 
Kendall, treasurer, and the following directors : 

A. H. Beidelman, Prof. C. B. Bowman, W. M. 
Givler, Irving Goodrich, Dr. G. J. Kirn, Dr. W. 

B. Martin, B. J. Slick, and H. H. Strubler. 

O. W. Foberg, the first general secretary, 
served for two years, W. C. Taylor served for 
four years and the present incumbent, E. H. 
Stevens, came to Naperville in May 1916. Trwin 
P. Cainan is the physical director. 



THE NICHOLS LIBRARY 

MARY BARBARA EGERMANN, Librarian and Secretary 

The Nichols Library, one of the finest public 
libraries in DuPage County, was made possible 
by the beneficence of one of our towns-men, the 
late Prof. J. L. Nichols. The bequest, amount- 
ing to $10,000, was paid to the City of Naper- 
ville, August, 1897. An appropriation from the 
city secured the site, centrally located, with 
spacious lawns, on Washington St., adjoining 
the Y. M. C. A. and Central Park. 

The building is constructed of Naperville stone 
for basement and trimmings, with super- 
structure of (yellow) pressed brick, and a slate 
roof. Interior and furnishings in first grade 
light oak. It comprises a reading room, lobby, 
library with nineteen bookstacks and balcony, 
one committee room, one reference room, two 
lavatories, and a museum on the second floor. 

The dedicatory exercises were held June 29, 
1898. About September 1st, the building was 
completed, and formally opened to the public on 
Thursday evening, September 22nd. About 500 
volumes had been purchased and 200 donated. 
These, with a number of periodicals, formed the 
nucleus of our public library, which today num- 
bers 5,500 volumes, and 60 of the best periodicals 
on its tables, and has an annual circulation of 
more than 15,000 books. 



fl NAPBRVILLE. 



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In October, 1912, the librarian, Miss M. B. 
Egermann, opened the museum department, 
which, today, exhibits rare old treasures of 
Naperville's pioneers and other specimens of his- 
torical and general interest. 

The library is maintained by public tax. The 
management is vested in a Board of nine Direct- 
ors, three being appointed each year by the City 
Council. The first Board was appointed May 21, 
1897: Pres. Dr. J. A. Bell, Vice-Pres., Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Nichols Simpson, Sec'y- D. C. Wallace, Prof. 
H. H. Rassweiler, H. H. Goodrich, Sam'l. E. 
Ranck, Holt. L. Sieber, C. L. Schwartz, Peter 
Butler. Others who have served as di- 
rectors: Jos. Bapst, V. A. Dieter, W. W. Wickel, 
Thos. Betts, Sr., Prof. R. F. Bunnel, Mrs. Alice 
Gibson, Prof. G. Nauman, Prof. F. A. Kendall, 
Mrs. J. Niederhauser, S. E. Ranck, Prof. G. C. 
Butler and Prof. F. W. Cole. The present board: 
B. J. Slick. Pres., Mrs. Elizabeth Nichols Simp- 
son, Vice-Pres., Miss M. B. Egermann, Sec'y. 



and Librarian, Olive Kendall, Ass't., Willard 
Scott, H. J. Durran, Theo. F. Boecker, Sr., Mrs. 
Ruth Sheldon, Miss V. B. Graham, Prof. G. J. 
Kirn and Prof. O. A. Watermann. 

Miss E. Goss, of Morgan Park, as temporary 
librarian, catalogued the first books according to 
the Dewey system, with Mrs. H. D. Alspaugh, as 
librarian, who served until August, 1905, to be 
succeeded by Mrs. J. Niederhauser, who re- 
signed in October, 1907, when Miss R. Barnard 
took the place as secretary and librarian. Upon 
her resignation, Miss M. B. Egermann received 
the appointment, May 1, 1909, continuing in the 
service since that date. 

The beautiful building, bearing over its portals 
the title in gold letters, "THE NICHOLS 
LIBRARY," stands as a monument to the 
donor, keeping his name and fame in perpetual 
remembrance, adding honor to "our Naperville" 
and prestige to DuPage County. 





BOARD ^DIRECTORS 



MAI W. SCOTT 





HENRY J.DURRAN 



MRS. NICHOL5-5IMPSON 
VICE-PRESIDENT 



PROF: G.IKIRN 





T.F. BOECKER 



MISS M. B. EGERMANN 
SEC'Y & LIBRARIAN 



MISS OLIVE KENDALL 
ASS'T LIBRARIAN 



MRS, RUTH SHELDON 



NAPERVILLE. 



OFFICERS 



FRED VON OVEN PRES 




W.M.GIVLER 
TREAS. 



ALVIN SCOTT 
SECY. 




VADIETER V.PRES. 



FREDERICK W. vonOVEN, President 
VALENTINE A. DIETER, Vice President 



ALVIN SCOTT, Secretary 
WALTER M. GIVLER, Treasurer 



NAPERVILLE ASSOCIATION OF COMMERCE 



DIRECTORS. 
John A. Schmidt ................... Chairman 

Theodore W. Smith ........ Francis A. Kendall 

Joseph A. Reuss ............. George A. Keller 

Henry H. Rassweiler ____ Charles A Nadelhoffer 

George E. Flemming ...... Charles L. Schwartz 

CHAIRMEN OF COMMITTEES. 
Railroad .................. Francis A. Kendall 

Streets and Highways. .Frederick W. von Oven 
Location . .... ................... Alvin Scott 

Employment ............... E. Harold Stevens 

Advertising .............. Valentine A. Dieter 

Statistics ............... . .Charles B. Bowman 

Public Improvement ...... Bernard C. Beckman 

Entertainment ............... Julian M. Dieter 

Membership ................... Henry Litgins 

City Beautiful ............ John W. Egermann 

The Naperville Association of Commerce, with 
barely fifty members, was formed July, 1913 for 
the express purpose of encouraging enterprises, 



resources and growth of Naperville. During the 
past four years through its active contact with 
the necessities of our community, and co-oper- 
ation with the city and county authorities the 
following notable results have been accom- 
plished: 

The location and development of state aid 
roads and good roads movement in general; 

The construction of sub-ways under the Chi- 
cago Burlington & Qumcy Railroad tracks at 
Mill and Washington streets ; 

Procuring the site for Burlington Square as a 
station park as well as other property for park 
purposes and the beautification of same; 

Extensions in permanent ornamental post 
street lighting systems; better telephone, mail 
anc j train service and improvements for indus- 
trial developments ; 

Originators and backers of the 1917 Home 
Coming. 




MILL STHIOET SUWVAY 





BURLINGTON SQUARE 



WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE 
UNION 



THE EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL 
SEMINARY 



On September the 20th 1883, at a Convention 
of the temperance workers of Du Page County 
held in the Congregational Church, the Naper- 
ville Union was organized. 

This organization is "a body of Christian 
women, pledged total abstainers, banded to- 
gether for the protection of the home, the pro- 
motion of purity, the destruction of the liquor 
traffic, and the final triumph of the principles of 
Christ in the world. 

Among its foremost activities have been the 
Demerest Temperance Medal Contests; quarter- 
ly union gospel temperance services addressed by 
Francis E. Willard, Col. George G. Bain, and 
others of national fame ; participation in the 
"Temperance Parade" of 500 women and chil- 
dren for a dry Naperville, April 20, 1908; a 
$250.00 memorial room in the Y. M. C. A. to 
Mrs. Nancy Knickerbocker; and a drinking foun- 
tain in the city park. 



Acting upon a statement of the General Con- 
ference of the Evangelical Association in 1867 
favorable to theological training, the Board of 
Trustees of North-Western College in 1873 
formally organized and incorporated Union 
Bibical Institute and planned for an endowment 
of $100,000.00. 

Bishop J. J. Esher the first Principal was suc- 
ceeded by Bishop Reuben Yeakel, who also oc- 
cupied the chair of Doctrinal Theology. Fol- 
lowing Bishop Yeakel, Bishop Thomas Bowman 
was placed at the head of the institution for 17 
years, while Prof. S. L. Unibach served as active 
Principal. 

In 1909 the Board of Trustees changed the 
name to The Evangelical Theological Seminary, 
and in 1912 created the title of President, calling 
Rev. S. J. Gamertsfelder, D.D., Ph.D., to this 
position. In 1912 a beautiful and substantial 
building was erected at a cost of $32,000. 

The benefits to the kingdom of Christ from 
this institution extend far and wide. Annually 
a goodly number of young men graduate and go 
forth to preach the Gospel of the Son of God. 




EVANGELICAL THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 



NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE 



Founded in 1861 



W 



Inspired by a desire to provide a higher Christ- 
ian education for their youth, four conferences of 
the Evangelical Association, Illinois, Wisconsin, 
Indiana and Iowa, established Plainfield College 
at Plainfield, Illinois, in April, 1861. In 1864, the 
name was changed to North-Western College 
and an endowment fund of $50,000 was com- 
pleted. The first class graduated in 1867. 

In 1870, the college moved to Naperville on ac- 
count of better railroad facilities and the very 
generous donation of an 8-acre campus and 
$25,000 in cash. An excellent building (part of 
the present Main Building) was erected. The 
first year the enrollment was 256, the fifth year, 
416. ^ 

The first president of North-Western College, 
Augustine A. Smith, served from 1862-1884, a 
notable administration of over 22 years. He was 
followed by President H. H. Rassweiler, who 
served very efficiently from 1884-1888. His suc- 
cessor, Professor H. J. Kiekhoefer, was made 
president in 1891. During his able administration 



of 22 years, over $100,000 was spent in buildings, 
including the south wing of the Main Building 
in 1890, the Gymnasium, in 1901, the gift of an 
honored alumnus, Professor J. L. Nichols, the 
Carnegie Library in 1908, and Goldspohn Science 
Hall in the same year, named after the donor, 
the generous and distinguished alumnus, Dr. 
Albert Goldspohn. President Kiekhoefer re- 
signed in 1910 and after an interregnum of a 
year and a half, ably filled by Bishop Thomas 
Bowman and Acting-President L. M. Umbach, 
the Rev. Lawrence H. Seager was called who 
served with marked success from 1911-1916, 
when he resigned to accept a Bishopric in his 
Church, and the present incumbent, Dr. Edward 
E. Rail was called to fill his place. 

For 1916-17, North-Western College has en- 
rolled over 440 from 20 states and 2 foreign 
countries. About 300 are in the College, the re- 
mainder in the Academy, Schools of Music, Com- 
merce, and Art. The present faculty numbers 28. 
The college has productive funds of over $250,000. 



NAPBRVILLE 




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NAPEBVILLE HIGH SCHOOL 



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NAPERVILLE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

DISTRICT NO. 78 

The Naperville Public Schools are housed in 
three buildings. The modern new high school 
building on Washington Street has 193 students 
and twelve teachers including drawing and 
music teachers, who teach in the grades also. 
The grade building on Sleight Street has the first 
eight grades with an enrollment of 255 pupils 
and eight teachers. The grade building on 
Eagle Street has six grades with an enrollment 
of 193 pupils and six teachers. Total number of 
pupils enrolled to date, 641. Superintendent and 
teachers, 27. 

Teachers are to be State normal school gradu- 
ates for the grades and college or university 
graduates for the high school. The course of 
study and quality of the teaching force are 
recognized, the high school being on the list of 
schools approved by the North Central Asso- 
ciation and by the University of Illinois, also re- 
cently accredited for a period of three years, end- 
ing June 30, 1920. 

The Board of Education demonstrates its 
efficiency by the splendidly equipped new high 
school building and by the constantly improved 
school conditions. Mr. O. A. Waterman is su- 
perintendent. 



SOCIETIES S.S. PETER AND PAUL 
CHURCH. 

S. S. Peter & Paul Catholic Parish has main- 
tained a Parochial school since about 1850. The 
present school building was erected in 1911 at a 
cost of about $30,000. The average attendance 
is 250 pupils and its course comprises eight 
grades, taught by Sisters of the Order of St. 
Francis. It is a free school and is maintained by 
the parishoners out of the funds of the church. 

HOLY NAME SOCIETY. 

KNIGHTS O.F COLUMBUS, NAPERVILLE 
COUNCIL No. 1369. 

WESTERN CATHOLIC UNION. 

CATHOLIC ORDER OF FORESTERS, 
ST. JOSEPH'S COURT No. 291. 

CAROLUS GUARDS. 

ST, ALOYSIUS YOUNG MEN'S JUNIOR 
HOLY NAME SOCIETY. 

SOCIETY OF CHRISTIAN MOTHERS. 

WOMEN'S CATHOLIC ORDER OF FOR- 
ESTERS, ST. MARY'S COURT No. 295. 

ST. MARY'S YOUNG LADIES SODALITY. 
WESTERN CATHOLIC UNION, ST. 

CLARA BRANCH No. 198. 




S.S. PETER AND PAUL PAROCHIAL SCHOOL 



* 

I 




HOME OF DE. W. B. MARTIN 



NAPBRVILLE. 





WALTER BLANCHARD POST GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC 



Walter Blanchard Post G. A. R. of Naperville 
was mustered as a Post in Scott's Hall, January 
7, 1884, with twenty-two members. Willard 
Scott, Commander. 

The Post received its name from Captain 
Walter Blanchard of Downers Grove, of the 
13th Illinois Infantry, who received his death 
wound at Ringold Gap, Georgia, November 27, 
1863. 

The Post and its friends erected the monu- 
ment to the Soldiers and Sailors which graces 
the City Park, and, assisted by the Ladies Auxil- 
iary and the Sons of Veterans, has done much to 



foster the spirit of loyalty to the flag, and devo- 
tion to the country's cause. 

The officers for the year 1917 are: 

Commander E. C. Rickert 

Senior Vice H. C. Skelton 

Junior Vice G. K. Turner 

Surgeon J. A. Bell 

Chaplain I). B. Givler 

Quarter-Master M. L. Houser 

Officer of the day Jos. Kochly 

Officer of the Guard E. V. Powell 

Adjutant L. S. Shafer 

Patriotic Instructor J. I. Vogelsang 



NAPERVILLE WOMAN'S CLUB 



EUCLID LODGE NO. 65, A. F. & A. M. 



Dating its origin from 1898, the Woman's Club 
looks back to the gathering of women at the 
home of Mrs. Willard Scott when the organiza- 
tion was effected, and Mrs. A. R. FYeeman was 
elected President. 

In connection with its purely literary study, 
the Club has become one of the foremost sup- 
porters of the Nichols Library, and through its 
committees is active in public school matters, 
having pledged, in 1916, over $500.00 to equip 
the Domestic Science Department of the new 
High School. 

The aim of the Club is to be a helping hand 
wherever possible to Naperville in civic, social 
and educational matters, to its high-minded, 
strictly modern commissioners, its enterprising 
Association of Commerce, its remarkable Y. M. 
C. A., its excellent schools and churches; in all 
working harmoniously for a better, cleaner, 
safer and more beautiful city. 



NIaperville, Illinois 

Euclid Lodge No. 65 Ancient, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons, was chartered October 9, 1849, 
by the Grand Lodge of the State of Illinois. 

The charter members were Lewis Ellsworth, 
John Kimball, Nathan Loring, C. C. Barnes, 
Aylmer Keith, Joseph Naper, and Nathan Allen. 

Joseph Naper, founder of Naperville, was the 
second Worshipful Master of Euclid Lodge. 

The Lodge now has a membership of 175 and 
is growing rapidly, having doubled its member- 
ship within the last five years. 

There has been completed this year the new 
Masonic Temple costing $30,000.00. The new 
building is located' on Jefferson Avenue near 
Main Street. 

Coan H. Wright is its present Worshipful 
Master. C. A. Ashley, Secretary. 



NAPBRVILLE. 




rf 



MASONIC TEMPLE 




THE NAPERVILLE BAND 



NAPE.RVILLE. 




THE NAPERVILLE BAND 



THE CAROLUS GUARDS 



Naperville's musical birth dates back to the 
forming of her first band, the old Light Guard 
Band, in which William Knoch, Joseph Kochly 
and George Keller were the star performers. 
This charter organization was dissolved early in 
1900. The Lounge Factory Band became its suc- 
cessor in 1906 under the management of Frank 
Hawbecker, Frank Babel, and Harry Emmel. 

Mr. Charles Horn, of Chicago, was the first di- 
rector of the Lounge Factory Band. His suc- 
cessors were Mr. Holmes, Mr. J. Arden Waters 
and Mr. W. M. Givler. This organization en- 
joyed the co-operation of Mr. P. E. Kroehler who 
furnished uniforms and gave financial assistance. 

Mr. J. Fred Fehr, the present director, re- 
ceived his musical education in the. School of 
Music of North-Western College and the Ameri- 
can Violin School. Under his able leadership the 
Band is producing most excellent results. There 
are 22 members, and the name now is The Naper- 
ville Band. Sixteen Saturday evening concerts 
in the business section last summer were enjoyed 
and financed by many friends and admirers. 



The Carolus Guards, a military body affiliated 
with St. Joseph's Court No. 291 C. O. F., was or- 
ganized March 25, 1906, with Julian Dieter, 
Albert. Ory, George Dieter, Leo Rechenmacher, 
and Edward Getz as its officers. 

Capt. Edw. Getz, a veteran of the Spanish- 
American War, through his firm belief in disci- 
pline and his unwearied enthusiasm, has been 
largely responsible for the rapid advancement of 
the Guards to their present state of efficiency. 

The executive ability of the first president and 
present lieutenant, Julian Dieter, has also been 
a strong factor in the upbuilding of the organiz- 
ation. 

Unlike most private military organizations, 
the Carolus Guards have not been trained merely 
for dress parades, but have expressed their will- 
ingness through a petition to the governor to 
fight for their country's honor, should it ever be 
placed in jeopardy. 

To the delight of our citizens and for their 
own military development, the guards have al- 
ways taken an active part in all civic demon- 
strations and on numerous occasions have par- 
ticipated in military maneuvers and exibition 
drills in other cities, Ottawa, Elgin, and Chicago. 




HOME OF J. A. HERTEL 




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THE VON OVEN HOME 




"PINE CRAIG," 1833-1917 
HOME OF EDWARD G. MITCHELL THE GEORGE MARTIN ESTATE 




HOME OF JOSEPH A. EEUSS 




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HOME OF EALPH BALLOU 




OFFICERS 



Wm. FRIEDERICH 
JUSTICE '/the PEACE 



ADAM KOHLEY 
SUPERVISOR. 





GEORGE TURNER 
ASSESSOR 




JULIANA. ROYCE 
CLERK 



&.WSTEININGER 
HIGHWAY COtfR. 




FLOYD A. FEY 
CONSTABLE 




MONROE E.CHRI5T 
DEPUTY COLLECTOR 



PHILIP COREL 
HIGHWAY COM'R 




ID. ROYER 
HIGHWAY COM'R 




OFFIC ERS 



C.E. 5T005 
JUSTICE "Ahc PEACE 



JOSEPH LAUER SR. 
A55E550R. 




OW. STRUBLER 
TOWN CLERK fr JU5TICE%..PCACC 



D.C.5CHWARTZ 
HIGHWAY COM'R. 



JJBOOK 
HIGHWAY COM'R. 



J5CHELLIN6 TR 
HIGHWAY COM'R. 




ITHE EDWARD SANATORIUM 



The Edward Sanatorium at Naperville, Illi- 
nois, opened January 15, 1907. (Possible by the 
munificence of Mrs. Keith Spaulding). Under 
the direction of Dr. Theodore B. Sachs, the 
Edward Sanatorium grew from an institution of 
14 beds to its present capacity of 100 beds. The 
approximate present cost of the plant is about 
$100,000. 



The Sanatorium is a department of the Chi- 
cago Tuberculosis Institute. It is an institution 
for people in moderate circumstances, most of the 
patients being of the clerical and professional 
class. 

The institution has an adequate medical and 
nursing personnel, the medical department being 
under the supervision of Dr. O. W. McMichael. 



. LE 



ST. PROCOPIUS COLLEGE 

St. Procopius College was founded by the Rt. 
Rev. Abbot Nepomucene Jaeger, O. S. B., of St. 
Procopius Abbey of Chicago, in the year 1886. 
By an Act of the State Legislature the Institu- 
tion was incorporated and empowered to confer 
all Academic Degrees. 

The first building was at Chicago, and was 
used only as a day-school. When the question of 
providing more adequate buildings for the in- 
creasing number of students became pressing, 
the Fathers determined to remove the Institution 
from the turmoil of city life and seek out a quiet 
place in the country. Such a place was found 
two miles east of Naperville, on the Burlington 
Route. 

What with the handsomeness of its buildings, 
the thoroughness of its equipment and modern 
accommodations, the healthy and pleasing locali- 
ty, the College stands second to none of its kind. 
With the Abbey is connected the Bohemian 
Benedictine Press of Chicago, publishing a daily, 
semi-weekly, weekly, and a monthly paper. 



ST. JOSEPH'S BOHEMIAN ORPHANAGE 

This Institution was built in the year 1910- 
1911 on a forty acre tract of land, bought from 
Mr. Ferdinand Schwartz, in Lisle Township, 
near Naperville, on the C. B. & Q. R. R. It has 
been built by the Bohemian Catholic people 
chiefly from Cook County, at the expense of 
$100,000.00. The furnishing of the institution 
cost over $15,000.00. Two hundred orphaned or 
dependent children can be comfortably housed 
within its spacious rooms and dormitories. 

The institution is intended not only to give a 
good, warm home to children, but also education 
schooling and practical training in every line 
of work that awaits the inmates after they leave. 

The Sisters of the Order of St. Benedict from 
the neighboring convent take the place of 
mothers, nurses and teachers at the same time 
and take general care of the Institution. Besides 
this, regular licensed industrial and manual 
training teachers come from the City of Chicago 
once every week to instruct the larger children 
in manual and industrial work. 

Very Rev. Procopius Neuzil, O.S.B., is the 
superintendent of the Institution. 








ST. PEOCOPIUS COLLEGE 



NAPERVILLE 








ST. JOSEPH'S BOHEMIAN ORPHANAGE 



Views of 
NaiDerville 





NAPERVILLE 



sss&ssssssssls-- ^&Sf^^^ \.tas;W 



S. S. PETER & PAUL CATHOLIC CEME- 
TERY is the last resting place of the remains of 
the ancestors of many who read this. It dates 
back to 1846 when the first land for it was pur- 
chased, containing about an acre. At present it 
comprises seven acres. Handsome ornamental 
monuments adorn the burial plots and an im- 
posing statuary group, representing the crucific- 
tion of Our Lord, imbues an air of sanctity and 
reverence and instills into the sorrowing mourner 
that Hope which can be his only consolation. It 
is maintained most beautifully. S. S. Peter & 
Paul Cemetry Association, an incorporated as- 
sociation, has charge of its care, and by virtue 
of its charter may receive bequests and donations 
for the perpetual care of lots. Through this as- 
sociation the continued beautification of the 
cemetery is assured. The cemetry is inclosed by 
an ornamental iron fence. It is located just ad- 
joining the east end of the .city. 

NAPERVILLE CEMETERY. 

The Naperville Cemetery is under the care of 
a Board of Trustees of three members, one of 



whom is elected annually at an election held on 
the first Monday in April. The first trustees, 
elected March 12, 1843, were Joseph Naper, 
Lewis Ellsworth and John Granger. At this 
time Mr. George Martin donated 2 acres of land, 
and the old cemetery at Washington Street and 
Benton Avenue was moved to its present loca- 
tion. Among the names that are conspicuous on 
the records of the Association are especially 
Lewis Ellsworth and Moses B. Hosier. Mr. 
Ellsworth's name occurs as Trustee the greater 
part of the time between the years 1843 until 
1885. Mr. Hosier was elected as Trustee in 1881 
and served continuously as Secretary up to the 
time of his death in 1915. 

The present Board of Trustees of Naperville 
cemetery are: G. A. Yost, Pres. ; B. J. Slick, 
Treas.; L. M. Umbach, Sec. 

Located on the western slopes of the DuPage 
River, the cemetery has one of the most beauti- 
ful sites to be found in the State. 




ELECTKIC LIGHT AND WATER PLANT 



_____ ^ ^ ^_ 

jLNMMMKMWNMMNMMMMN^^ 




KKUSS STATE BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1S8G 



CAPITAL AND SURPLUS, $125,000.00 



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FIRST NATIONAL HANK OF NAPEKVI LLIO -(\\IMTAL AND SURPLUS $100,000.00 



REUSS STATE BANK 

Ruess State Bank was founded in 1866 when 
George Reuss opened a private bank on May 1st 
of that year. The private bank became merged 
in a corporation April 12, 1897 under the above 
title with a capital stock of $25,000 with George 
Reuss as its President and V. A. Dieter, Cashier. 
The capital stock was raised from time to time to 
meet the growing condition of its business and 
the bank now has a capital of $100,000 and a sur- 
plus of $25,000 with deposits of about $400,000. 
A modern steel lined burglar proof vault has re- 
cently been completed and safetly deposit boxes 
installed for the security of the bank's patrons. 

The officers and directors are: 

Joseph A. Reuss President 

Charles L. Schwartz Vice- President 

Valentine A. Dieter Cashier 

Albert J. Ory Ass't. Cashier 

Loren W. Myers Ass't. Cashier 

DIRECTORS: 

Andrew A. Schwartz, George J. Zahringer, 
Monroe E. Christ, Alvin Scott, Charles L. 
Schwartz, Valentine A Dieter and Joseph A. 
Reuss. 



THE FIRST NAT'L BANK OF NAPERVILLE 

The First National Bank of Naperville was in- 
corporated in April, 1891, with a capital stock of 
$50,000.00. The first Board of Directors was 
composed of Thomas P. Phillips, Martin Brown, 
William King, Charles F. Rassweiler and 
Francis Granger. Officers: T. P. Phillips, 
President; Martin Brown, Vice-President; A. 
McS. S. Riddler, Cashier; Walter M. Givler, 
Assistant Cashier. James L. Nichols, George W. 
Sindlinger and H. H. Goodrich served as di- 
rectors, the latter also as President, until their 
demise. Assistant Cashiers were Ralph N. 
Ballou, Frank G. Keller and Earl E. Leffler. 

The present capital, surplus and undivided 
profits aggregate $115,000.00 and deposits over 
$500,000.00. The bank is now occupying its 
modernly equipped quarters, corner Washington 
Street and Jefferson Avenue. 

The present Directors are: Francis Granger, 
Ezra E. Miller, Irving Goodrich, John A. 
Schmidt, Calvin Steck, Francis A. Kendall and 
Bernard C. Beckman. Officers: President, 
Francis Granger; Vice-President, Ezra E. 
Miller; Cashier, Walter M. Givler; Assistant 
Cashiers, Elbert H. Kailer and Edward L. Steck. 



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HOME OF WILLIAM BLAKE 







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SLICK 86 KOCHLY, Dry Goods and Groceries, Cor. Main Street and Jefferson Avenue 




THE P. E. KKOEHLEH MAXrFACTTKIXG COMPANY 



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WM. C. HILTENBRAND 

Established 1891 

DEALER IN 

DRY GOODS, GROCERIES 

LADIES' and GENTS' FURNISHINGS 

CROCKERY and GLASS WARE 




STARK'S 

FOR 
DRY GOODS, NOVELTIES AND NOTIONS 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 
Both Phones Cor. Jefferson Ave. and Washington St. 



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NAPERVILLE NURSERIES, Inc. 
Fruit, Shade and Ornamental Trees, Shrubs, Perennials, Etc. 



1917 



5APERVILLE "\ 
^"""""'""""'"""""""^ 



CHAS. F. ROHR 
FLOEIST 

CUT FLOWERS AND BEDDING PLANTS 



120 South Washington St. 



Naperville, 111. 



EDSON CROSBY 



PIANO TUNING 



102 Columbia Avenue 



Naperville. 111. 



COLLEGE INN 

THOS. J. GREEN, Proprietor 
RESTAURANT AND LUNCH ROOM 

BEST THINGS TO EAT 
17 Jefferson Avenue Naperville, 111. 



INSURANCE 



REAL ESTATE 



JOHN RICE 

ILLINOIS, MINNESOTA AND MICHIGAN LANDh 
45 Washington St., Naperville, 111. 



THE MODEL VARIETY STORE 

Extends to You a Hearty Welcome 

THE PLACE WHERE YOUR DIMES DO DOUBLE 

DUTY 

Up-to-date 5 and lOc Department Store 
Pure Fresh Candies, lOc a Pound and up. 



E. A. KELLOGG, Prop. 



Naperville, 



Illinois 



C. B. MOORE LUMBER CO 

BUILDING MATERIAL. 
LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, ETC. 
Main and So. Water Sts. Naperville, 111. 



NAPBRVILLE 




Scott, Egermann & Royce, Reliable Real Estate and Insurance Agency, ;,:;';;:::,, l ,' h ;:,:,,:. 1 



56 



NAPBRVILLE 



MEN'S AND LADIES' 
OUTER GARMENTS 

Made to Your Individual Measure 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED 



/. 8. Phone 4272 



E. O. RIFE 



Naperville, Illinois. 



153 North St. 



BOTH TELEPHONES 

G. J. KELLER 

Soft Coal of All Sizes 

POCAHONTAS ANTHRACITE 

COKE 

PROMPT ATTENTION GIVEN TO YOUR ORDER 

Yard Near Depot Naperville, 111. 



W. E. HAZEL WOOD 
POULTRY FEED 

Washington and Water Streets 
Naperville, 111. 



BOTH TELEPHONES 

M. L. HOWSER 

Groceries and Canned Goods 

Fresh Bread and Rolls 

Confectionery and Fruits 



87 Sleight St. 



Naperville, 111. 



II 



II 



BUSINESS INTERESTS 

Auctioneer; William Eichman, F. E. Shimp. 
Bakery; Joseph Bapst, C. E. Heydon, Home 

Bakery. 
Barber; E. C. Shafer, R. F. High, H. J. Fuss, 

H. J. Gillhoover, O. W. Conner. 
Blacksmithing; G. C. Duel, Heim and Stoner, 

F. S. Goetsch & Son, A. Kochly, J. Hauser. 
Carpet Weaving; August Kersting. 
Cigars; William Knoch, Sanders & Plasterer. 
City Auto Service. 
Clothier; Yender & Brossman, Mickenbecker 

Store, H. J. Durran. 

Coal; G. J. Keller, H. H. Zaininger, Enck & 
Drendel, T. F. Boecker. 

Contractors; A. H. Beidelman, Oscar Goehring, 
John Bentz, Oliver Fry, Henry Miley, Sieber 
Bros., Walter Weigard, Lauer Bros., J. 
Schifferle, Charles Shiffler, Frank McCorkel, 
Frank Witt, A. R. Miller. 

Concrete; J. J. Arends, John Hedinger. 

Dairy; H. Otterpohl, E. O. Drendel, F. A. Fey, 
Ira Sollenberger, J. Wagner. 

Dentist; Thos. White, O. A. Getz, A. B. Slick, 
W. E. Becker, L. A. Brazelton. 



Druggist; L. W. Oswald, C. C. Coleman. 

Electric Supplies; Dieter & Getz, A. G. Herbert. 

Electric Theatre. 

Feed Store; W. E. Hazlewood. 

Feed Mill; T. F. Boecker, Enck & Drendel. 

Florist; C. Rohr, J. Falkenstein, W. Miller, J. A. 

Kenyon, John Bauer, Orchids-Charles Bond. 
Furniture and Undertaking; O. J. Beidelman, 

A. R. Beidelman, Yender & Kraushar. 

Garage, Auto Repairing; Naperville Garage, 
Fountain Garage, DuPage Garage, Cromer 
Bros., Nichols-Cadman, E. S. Fry, E. L. 
Perry. 

German Cheese Co. 

Groceries; W. C. Bomberger & Co., M. L. 

Houser, C. E. Heydon, Mrs. Anna B. 

Kreger, G. C. Kirchgasser, A. Felling, J. 

Bapst. 

Hardware; Hillegas Hardware Co., Reiche Bros., 
C. Sherer & Son. 

Hotels; Burlington Hotel, Preemption House. 
Harness; Flemming Harness Shop, J. Herbert. 

Insurance; H. H. Rassweiler & Son, W. S. 

Garman, G. A. Rapp, F. W. Umbreit. 
Illinois Pupils Reading Circle: F. A. Kendall. 
Insurance and Real Estate: Scott, Egermann & 



NAPERVILLE 



Royce, M. E. Christ, John Rice, R. M. 
Sheldon. 

Ice Cream and Conf. ; L. V. Kreger, H. C. 

Williams, F. Mistici, A. Felling, F. H. 

Latshaw, G. C. Kirchgasser. 
Jewelry; H. P. Fehrenkamp, A. D. Miller, H. J. 

Durran. 

Kroehler Mfg. Co. 

Ladies Furnishings; M. Herbert Co. 
Laundry ; Sam Lung. 
Lawyer: ]. A. Reuss, Benjamin & Reed, Bunge 

Harbour & Schmidt, J. S. Goodwin, Wm. 

Frederick, W. Knoch, J. R. Haight, B. Piper. 
Livery ; A. M. Sherwood. 
Lumber; C. L. Schwartz, C. B. Moore Lumber 

Co. 

Martin & von Oven Brick & Tile Works. 
Meat Market; Grush & Faulhaber, Boettger 

Bros., Banner Meat Market, A. Baum- 

gartner, W. H. Hartrunft. 
Merchandise; Slick & Kochly, Broeker & 

Spiegler, E. F. Stark, W. C." Hiltenbrand. 
Millinery; Mrs. W. E. Becker, Miss Lolla T. 

Allen, Meisinger Sisters. 
Model Variety Store. 
Monuments ; A. R. Beidelman, E. Wunderlich. 



Naperville Mushroom Farming Co. 
Naperville Nurseries. 
Osteopath; E. S. Moser, R. N. Bautsch. 
Painter; S. F. Baumgartner, R. A. Unger, F. 

Grimes, E. W. Hey, Saylor Bros., J. 

Widclers, W. Ross, H. Garman, A. Prignitz, 

Fritch & Knecht, Costello & Stoos. 
Photographer; C. H. Koretke. 
Phvsicians; W. [ Truitt, E. G. Simpson, A. B. 
' Rikli, W. "B. Martin, R. Truitt, J. H. 

Clancey, W. L. Migley. 
Plumber; J. Kieserg, Dieter & Getz, T. J. 

Steffes. 

Printer; R. N. Givler. 
Publisher; J. L. Nichols Co. 

Restaurant ; College Inn, Fountain Lunch Room. 
Shoes; A. Muench. 
Shoe Repairing; Stanley's Electric Shoe Shop, 

Jacob Zimmerman. 
Surveyor; C. A. Ashley. 
Transfer and Hauling: Forest Harter, J. A. 

Schnibben, F. Kirk. 
Tailor; C. E. Rosenau, J. Vender Sr., H. Micken- 

becker Sr. 

Veterinary; [. E. Stiles, A. M. Sherwood. 
Wagon Shop; J. Hiltenbrand, A. W. Miller. 



NAPBRVILLE 




" WAR WOOD FARM." Home of Walter A. Rogers 



NAPBRVILLE 



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Joseph Yender, Jr. 
Jacob Brossman. 

54-56 WASHINGTON STREET 



Yender and Brossman 



CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS 
FOOTWEAR 

NAPERVILLE, ILL. 



C. SCHERER & SON 

HARDWARE 

STOVES, RANGES, FURNACES, GRANITE WARK, 
CUTLERY AND ALUMINUM WARK 

REPAIRING A SPECIALTY 
Washington St. and Jefferson Ave. Naperville, 111. 



Irrii Job I'rintiiiy HotJt Tele 

THE NAPERVILLE CLARION 

ROLLO N. GIVLER, Publisher 

The Home I'ajter Issued Kadi Week for More 
Than Half a Century. 



60 Washington St. 



Naperville, 111. 




NAPERVILLE 




Metropolitan Telephone Service 
For Naperville 

Naperville telephone service is to be made thoroughly 
Metropolitan and initial steps to this end will be taken about 
April 1, and the work pushed to completion as rapidly as 
possible. 

A new building of attractive design is to be erected on 
Van Buren Street, between Main and Washington Streets, 
for the sole occupancy of the Telephone Company. 

Upon completion of the structure, a common Battery 
Switchboard and appurtenances will be installed. This type 
of equipment obviates the method of turning a crank by the 
subscriber when signalling the operator; lifting the receiver 
from the hook causes a light to flash on the switchboard 
which attracts the operator's attention. This new system 
will be used in town only; the farmer line service will be 
of the Magneto type as heretofore. 

The new building will have modern lighting, plumbing 
and heating facilities and contain, in addition to commer- 
cial and operating rooms, a pleasant reading and rest room 
for the operators' use during rest periods. 

Xaperville's present and future telephone needs have 
been carefully studied and it is believed that the new and 
improved service will meet all requirements in a manner en- 
tirely satisfactory to the Company's patrons. 

Chicago Telephone Co. 




j/ NAPERVILLE 





Home of the Sittyton Grove Short Horn Herd 



THOMAS STANTON, Prop. 



NAPERVILLE, ILL. 




LISLE FARMS COMPANY Inc. 

Lisle, Illinois 



Maplecrest King De Kol 91584, a bull of excellent individ- 
uality and faultless breeding is at the head of our herd. He is 
a son of Friend Hengerveld De Kol Butter Boy, who sired 
Banostine Belle De Kol with 1322.92 pounds of butter (world's 
record when made.) He also produced four other cows exceeding 
the 1000 pound mark, three of them producing over 1200 pounds. 
His dam is a 24 pound daughter of Pontiac Aaggie Korndyke 
with 51 A.R.O. daughters, 12 of which are above 30 pounds, 17 
above 25 pounds, and 37 above 20 pounds. She is out of High- 



lawn Hartog De Kol, a 30.91-pound daughter of Friend Hen- 
gerveld De Kol Butter Boy. 

Our herd combines individuality and production. The bulls 
we have to offer are the kind that will increase the production 
and improve the individuality of your herd. 

When you are wanting pure bred Duroc Jersey gilts or a 
boar, see us. Our herd has size and early maturity they are 
the kind that will make you money. 



I NAPblRVILLF. V'. v , 




THE NAPERVILLE CONSUMERS CO. 



HIGHLAND ICE CREAM AND PURE ICE 

Quality our Slogan Delivered to any part of our city 



SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 

A. F. and A. M. Euclid Lodge No. 65. 

Court of Honor. 

R. A. M. Euclid Chapter No. 13. 

F. R. L. A. Naperville Lodge No. 78. 

G. A. R., Walter Blanchard Post No. 386. 
I. O. O. F., Naperville Lodge No. 81. 
Ladies Auxiliary of Sons of Veterans. 

M. W. A., Napier Camp No. 908. 

Royal League, Naperville Council No. 261. 

Royal Neighbors, Martha Washington Camp. 



Womans Christian Temperance Union. 

Sons of Veterans, Naperville Camp No. 261. 

Mystic Workers of the World. 

Alphea Chapter, Order Eastern Star of 111. 

The Maccabbees Tent No. 90. 

Woodmen of World. 

Fraternal Reserve Life Ass'n., Esther Lodge. 

Association of Commerce. 

Naperville Business Men's Association. 

Community Club. Hi-Y Club. Womans Club. 

Fortnightly Club. Naperville Gun Club. 




Street Views 



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NAPERVILLE 



CHARLES L. SCHWARTZ LUMBER AND BUILDING MATERIAL 




Fine Interior Finish a Specialty Argotile Shingles Prepared Roofings Best Quality Lowest Prices 

Prompt Service We Solicit Your Patronage. 




HERMAN OTTERPOHL 
MILK DEPOT 

PURE MILK AND CREAM PASTEURIZED 



86 Front St. 



Naperville, 111. 



H. C. WILLIAMS 

THE CANDY MAN 

ICE CREAM RETAIL AND WHOLESALE 
SODAS AND SOFT DRINKS 

QUENCH YOUR THIRST HERE 

18 Jefferson Ave. Naperville, 111. 



JOSEPH KIESERG 

PLUMBER 

Heating Systems and Sanitary Plumbing Installed. 

Estimates Furnished. Fixtures and Supplies. 

Washington St. and Van Buren Ave., Naperville, 111. 



BOTH TELEPHONES 



CRUSH & FAULHABER 



FRESH AND SALT MEATS 



23 Jefferson Avenue 



Naperville, 111. 



C. E. HEYDON 

BAKER AND GROCER 

Maker of HEYDON'S QUALITY BREAD. All Kinds of 
Baked Goods. Vegetables, Canned Goods and Groceries. 

19 Jefferson Ave., Naperville, 111. 



Northwestern College 
Photoghapher 



Best Equipped Studio 
In Du Page County 



C. H. KORETKE 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

Staff Photographer of the Home Coming Book 
Best Photographs 



JL NAPELRVILLE V 
L 




MONUMENTS 

Eternal Cement Burial. Vaults 



Arthur R. Beidelman 



UNDERTAKING 

Funeral Director and Licensed Embalmer No. 3240 




BOTH TELEPHONES 

W. C. Bomberger & Co. 

Staple and Fancy Groceries 
Crockery and Queensware 
Teas, Coffees and Spices 



52 WASHINGTON STREET 



NAPERVILLE, ILL. 



The Naperville Garage 

H. P. THOMPSON, Proprietor 

The Famous "OVERLAND" Line of 
Automobiles 



EXPEKT REPAIK WORK 
VULCANIZING AND SUPPLIES 



32 Washington Street 



Naperville, 111. 



THE BUSINESS GUIDE 

OR SAFE METHODS OF BUSINESS ENGLISH 

OR GERMAN 
By PROF. J. L. NICHOLS, A. M. 

Over three million copic sold ot former edition*. Whether or not you have one 

you cannot afford to be without the 1917 edition. Revised and corrected right 

up to date by J..L. Nichols. A. B. 

Containing over 500 lessons in Business. 

A complete Legal Adviser and Home Lawyer. A complete Hand-Book of Legal 

and Business Forms. 

"A volume for the home, the farm, the office and the shop. Wherever it has gone 

it has blessed mankind." Bishop L. H. Seager, former Pres. N. W. C. 

Sent postpaid upon receipt of only $1.25. We also own and publish many other 

good books for the home. "The Parents Guide" bv Rev. Ozora Davis and Dr. 

Emma F. Drake is our latest publication, price $1 25. 

Our books are sold on the guarantee of satisfaction or money refunded. 

Are you looking for profitable employment? We will pay you a liberal salary 

and bigtcommission to represent us. Call or write us for particulars. 

J. L. NICHOLS C& CO., 

Branch Office, Atlanta, Ga. Home Office, Naperville, 111. 



BOTH TELEPHONES 



KREGER'S GROCERY 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES 



FLOUR, FRUITS, CONFECTIONERY 



71 Washington Street 



Naperville, 111. 



HAMMERSMITH 
KORTMEYER CO. 

ENGRAVERS - PRINTERS 
M I LWA U KE E. W I S .