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Full text of "Sou'wester Yearbook"



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Printed by 
THE RlilN COMPANY 

HOUSTON TISXAS 

Engraved by 
SERVICE ENGRAVING COMPANY 

SAN ANTONIO. TEXAS 

Photographs by 
li L. STONE 

GBOllGETOWN, TEXAS 



1930 




mrhook. 
for the... 

Southwestern 
University 

Georgetown, 7exas 



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©MWISIHS 




If this book restores some of 
the colorful events in the his- 
tory of our Alma Mater besides 
preserving the happy memories 
of the present, our goal will 
have been attained, our mis- 
sion fulfilled. 



YEAR 

1930 




rder 
ofJioohs* 

ADMINISTRATION 

C LAS S E S 

BEAUTIES 

ORGANIZATIONS 

FEATURES 

ATHLETICS 

SOU'JOKER 



~Wesky 
Carroll 
Vadsn 




mication. 



To our who has contribut- 
ed much to the name South- 
western, a charming per- 
sonality, a patron of the 
arts, a scholar and a gentle- 
man, 

WESLEY CARROLL V ADEN 

we the 25th, editorial staff 
of the Sou'wester respect- 
fully dedicate this volume. 








ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 







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UNIVKKSITY CHURCH 



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PRESIDENT'S HOME 




1869 




IN 1869 THE CONVENTION AGREEDUPON THE NAME TEXAS UNIVERSITY 




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Administration 










PRESIDENT KING VIVION 

Will you allow me to express a word of sincere appreciation for your friendship 
and for your cooperation with me personally and officially? It has been a very great 
pleasure to have you here. We are happy with the results of this year, and assure 
you that it will be our chief delight to see the ever increasing progress and happiness 
of every member of the Southwestern University family. 

With the very best of good wishes, I am. 

Sincerely your friend* 
King Vivion. 
















R. W. Tinsley, Assistant to the President 

I regret daily that I do not have contact with more of 
the students since as the years go by I find that next to my 
immediate family f love and appreciate the S. U. exes. 

R. W. Tinsley. 
















Professor E. H. Hereford, Proctor of Mood Hall 

I take this method of expressing my appreciation to the boys of 
Mood Hall for their splendid cooperation throughout the year. I 
hope this year in the Hall has in some way made you more able to 
meet the realities of a larger world. I wish for you a pleasant and 
prosperous future. — E. H. Hereford. 







MISS LAURA KUYKENDALL, Dean of Women 

"I watched them pass — young star-eyed girls. 
And load them so." 

—Laura Kuykendaix. 



















O. A. Ullrich, Dean of the Faculty 

If you should come into possession of the power to make your- 
self invisible and would still refrain from using that power for per- 
sonal advantage over your fellowman at his expense, you are truly 
honorable, otherwise you are a slave to circumstances. 

— O. A. Ullrich. 



















Other Administrators 
Pearl Alma Neas, Registrar 
I. J. McCook, Business Manager 
Georgia V. Bridges, Hostess of Women's Building 
Margaret Mood McKennon, Librarian 
Rita C. McClain, Hostess of Dining Hall 
Annie Ferguson, Supervisor of W omen's Building Infirmary 
D'Laural Beville, Secretary to Dean of Women 
Lois Clark, Record Clerk, Secretary to Registrar 
Sue Simpson, Secretary to President 
Florence Campbell, Secretary to Assistant to President 
Mary Smith, Supervisor of Mood Hall Infirmary 
Minnie Wedemeyer, Hostess of Snyder Hall 
Albert May, Supervisor of Grounds 





















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TOP ROW 



Herbert Lee Gray, B.A. 
Professor of Bible and Religion 

Wesley Carroll Vaden, B.A., M.A. 

Professor of Latin, Greek and French 

Frederick C. A. Lehmberg, B.A., M.A. 
Professor of German and French 

John Campbell Godbey, B.A., M.A. 
Professor of Chemistry 






BOTTOM ROW 



Oscar A. Ullrich, M. A., Ph. D. 
Professor of Education 

Claude Howard, B.A., M.A., Ph. D. 

Professor of English 

Randolph Wood Tinsley, B.S. 

Professor of Geology 

Myron Lawson Williams, B.A., M.A. 
Professor of Economics and Sociology 










TOP ROW 

William Paul Davidson, B.A. 
Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 

Miss Laura Kuykendall, B.A., M.A. 
Dean of Women 

George Coone Hester, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of History and 
Government 

Paul Patterson Young, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of History 

BOTTOM ROW 

Mrs. R. M. Ferguson, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Katherine Field Tarver, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 

Annie Edward Barcus, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of English 

Ernest H. Hereford, B.A., B.S., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Education 













TOP ROW 

R. V. Guthrie, Jr., B.A., M.A., M.S. 
Associate Professor of Physics 

Albert Russell Wapple, B. g ., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Miss Lucy Belle Morgan. B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 

Ernest R. Hardin, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Public Speaking 

BOTTOM ROW 






Van C. Tipton, B.A., M.D. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Luther J. Waggner, B.A., M.A., B.D. 

Associate Professor of Religious Education 

Edward P. Onstot, B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Education and 
Band Director 

G. S. P. Crenshaw, B.A. 

Instructor of Biology 













TOP ROW 

Walter John Goerner, B.D.. D.D. 
Head of the Correspondence Department 

Henry Edwin Meyer 
Dean of Music 

Elizabeth Mills, B.A. 

Instructor in Piano, \ oice and Theory 

Mrs. Anita Storrs Gaedcke 
Instructor in Violin 

BOTTOM ROW 

Mary Elizabeth Brown 
Instructor in Piano 

Elizabeth Cotton 

Instructor in Physical Training 

Charles M. Edens, B.A. 
Director of Athletics 

Rodney Kidd, B.A. 
Assistant Director of Athletics 













STUDENT ASSISTANTS 

Bentley Wagnon English 

Olivia Liese English 

William Wisdom Chenrstry 

P. G. Secrest Chemistry 

Virginia Ryman Psychology and Philosophy 

William Ware Chemistry 

Shelton Durrenburger Physics 

Marvin Franklyn Spanish 

Alfredo Nanez Spanish 

Francis Czarowitz Economics and Sociology 

Jane Davis Spanish 

Dorothy Davis Spanish 

Joe Humphrey History 

Leo Allbritten Geology 

Marion Hodges Physical Training 

Robert Safley Physical Training 

Ethel Girvin German 

Grace Baker English 

Clyde Whittle Physical Training 

Rayburn Brown Physical Training 













/ ^ f* 




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CLASS PRESIDENTS 

Seniors 

Fall Term Gordon Barr 

Winter Term Hershell Brannen 

Spring Term Herndon Nelson 

Juniors 

Fall Term Alton Smith 

Winter Term Edwin Franklin 

Spring Term T. C. Sharp 

Sophomores 

Fall Term P. G. Secrest, Jr. 

Winter Term Rhea Anderson 

Spring Term Sylvester Lewis 

Freshmen 

Fall Term John W. Booth 

Winter Term Harold Matejawsky 

Spring Term Tom Laxon 















1873 




THE FIRST SESSION OF THE" TEXAS UNIVERSITY'OPENS 







Ci 



3.SSGS 









Allbritten Leo T., B.A. Weslaco 

Sou'wester '28-'29; Magazine '29; Glee Club '27-'29; 
Band '27-'29: Pi Kappa Delta '27-'30; Debate '27-'30; 
Yell Yeader '28- '.30; "S" Association '28-'30; President 
Junior Class '29; Student Assistant in Geology '29-'30. 

Anderson, Aubra, B.A. Houston 

Major: English; Alpha Delta Pi; Y. W. C. A. 








Banks, Buford C, B.A. Runge 

Major: Public Speaking: Mask and Wig; Debate '27- 
'30; Mood Hall Honor Council '28- '30; Pi Kappa Delta. 

Barr, Thomas Gordon, B.A. Llano 

Major: Government; Mood Hall Honor Council; 
President, Sophomore Class '27; Vice President Junior 
Class; University Executive Committee; President 
Pan-Hellenic; President Senior Class: Mask and Wig; 
Y. M. C. A.: Transfer from Fulsom; Editor, Sou'wester, 
'30; Kappa Alpha. 





Beard, Imogene, B.A. Jacksonville 

Major: Dramatic Literature; Alpha Delta Pi; Wo- 
man's Building Honor Council; Pan-Hellenic; Mask 
and Wig: President, Alpha Delta Pi. 

Bell, J. E., B.A. Joplin, Missouri 

Sou'wester Assistant Business Manager, '27-'29; 
Business Manager, '30; Editor, '31; Magazine, '27; 
Epworth League Cabinet, '28; San Jacinto, Glee Club 
Manager, '29. 





Bergquist, Carl W., B.A. Georgetown 

Major: English; President University Honor Council ; 
Sigma Tau Delta; Scholarship Society; German Club. 

Boone, Bolton, B.A. San Antonio 

Major: Bible and Beligion; Pi Alpha Mu; President, 
University Bible Class; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet; Minis- 
terial Association; Delegate to Student Volunteer Con- 
vention, Indianapolis; President, Freshman Class; Busi- 
ness Manager, Megaphone. 




















Brannen, Hershell S., B.A. Trinity 

Football, '26-'30; Basketball, '26-'30: Captain Bas- 
ketball. '29: Baseball, '26- '28; President and Vice 
President "S" Association, Executive Committee: 
Y. M. C. A.; President, Senior Class; Student Assistant 
in Physical Training; Intramural Athletic Committee. 

Brigance, Mildred Lee, B.A. Silsbee 
Major: English; Music Club, '27-'28. 



Brown, Mary Elizabeth, B.A. Pendleton 

Major: Piano; Music Club, '27-'28; Vice President 
Music Club, 28-'29; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet, '27-'29: 
Student Assistant in Piano, '27-'28; Orchestra, '28-'29: 
Piano Teacher, '28-'29. 

Brown, Rayburn, B.A. Big Springs 

Major: History; Sou'wester '28-'30; Magazine, '27- 
'28; Editor, Magazine '29; Mood Hall Honor Council, 
'29; Epworth League Cabinet, '28-29; Pi Kappa Delta, 
'29-'30; President, Pi Kappa Delta, '29-'30: Debate, 
"29-'30: San Jacinto, '27-'30; Intramural Athletic 
Council, '29: "S" Association, '27-'30; Tennis, '27-'30; 
Captain, Tennis, '28-'30; Student Assistant in History, 
'29; President, Junior Class, '29: Physical Training In- 
structor, "28-'30; Nominating Committee, '29. 



Burcham, Mary Slte, B.A. Georgetown 

Major: English; Z. T. A., Scholarship Society. 

Cely, Mary Catherine, B.A. Palestine 
Major: English. 



Clark, J. Frank, Jr., B.A. Moody 

Secretary, Y. M. C. A., '27-'28; Scholarship Society; 
President, Scholarship Society, '29-'30; Megaphone 
Staff, '28-'30; Editor, Megaphone, '29-'30; Magazine 
Staff, '28: Mood Hall Honor Council, '28-'29; Uni- 
versity Honor Council, '28-'29; San Jacinto, '26-'29. 

Clark, William B., B.A. Robstown 

Mood Hall Honor Council, '28-'29; President, Mood 
Hall Honor Council, '29-'30; San Jacinto, '26-'27; Ex- 
ecutive Committee, '29-'30; Kappa Alpha. 


















Clarke, Tom, B.A. Florence 
Major: Economics; Glee Club, "28-'2 l ). 

Clements, Emma Pearl, B.A. Thorndale 

Major: Psychology and Philosophy; San Jacinto- 
'27-'28; Orchestra, '26-'30; Alpha Delta Pi. 












COTTINGHAM, MARTHA, B.A. Elgin 

Major: Psychology and Philosophy; Alpha Delta Pi. 

Cotton, Elizabeth, B.A. Corinth, Mississippi. 

Major: Spanish; Transfer from Daniel Baker; In- 
structor in Physical Training. 






Crenshaw, Sam, M.A. Bryan 

Kappa Sigma: Instructor, Biology Laboratory, '29- 
'30; Yell Leader, '26-27; Science Society; American 
Chemical Society; Texas Academy of Sciences; B.A. '27. 

Czarowitz, Francis, B.A. Bartlett 

Major: Economics; Student Assistant in Economics, 
'28-'30. 



Deffebach, Hazel, B.A. Fort Worth 

Major: History; Women's Pan-Hellenic, '29-'30: 
Z. T. A. 

Durst, Harvey, B.A. Fredericksburg 
German Club; Waiter's Union. 
























Elder, Ella, B.A. Karnes City 

Major: Spanish: Student Assistant in Spanish, '28- 
'29: Woman's Building Honor Council. '28-'29; Y. W. 
C. A. 

Emebt, Clarissa, B.A. Comanche 

Major: Bible; Life Service Band, '28- '30; Student 
Volunteer, '29-'30; S. O. S„ '29-'30; Y. W. C. A. 





Enochs, Emily Gervis, B.A. George/own 
Major: French: Delta Delta Delta. 

Fisher, F. A., B.A. Houston 

Major: Chemistry; Phi Lambda Epsilon: Life Ser- 
vice Band; President, Ministerial Association, '30; 
Science Society, '30. 








Fowler, Tom D., B.A. Georgetown 

Executive Committee, '29-'30; University Honor 
Council, "29-'30; Phi Delta Thela; Men's Pan-Hellenic 
Council, '28- '29. 

Fox, Mary Elizabeth, B.A. Granger 

Major: Public Speaking: Woman's Building Honor 
Council, '29-'30; Delta Delta Delia: Alamo Literary 
Society, '26- '27; Y. W. C. A., '26-'27; University Hon- 
or Council, '27-'28; Mask and Wig, '28-'29; Debate, 
'29-'30; President, Texas State Oratorical Association. 





Fulkes, C. D., B.A. Round Rock 

Major: History; Y. M. C. A.; Pi Kappa Alpha; Mask 
and Wig, '30; "S" Association. 

Funchess, Rhoene, B.A. Beaumont 
Major: English; Z. T. A. 





















Franklin, Edward, B.A. Bellon 

Major: History; "S" Association, Football and 
Basketball, '26-'30. 

Franklyn, Marvin, B.A. Rockdale 

Scholarship Society: Treasurer of Fn si mm Class 
Waiter's Union, '26-'30; Student Assistant in Spanish: 
Spanish Club, '26-"27: Alamo, '26-'27; Skeptic Club 
'30. 



G afford, A. S., B.A. Cranfill Gap 

Major: Bible and Religion; Ministerial Association. 

Gafford, Mrs. A. S., B.A. Cranfill Gap 

Major: Bible: Choral Club; President, Spanish Club; 
M. M. M. Society; San Jacinto Society. 



Goerner, Walter John, B.A. & M.A. Georgetown 

Major: Bible; German Club, President '29-'30; Head 
of Correspondence Department. 

Goodson, Berta, B.A. Comanche 

Major: Political Science: Sou'wester, '30; Executive 
Committee, '29-'30; Y. W. C. A., '29-'30; Scholarship 
Society, '29-'30; San Jacinto; Secretary, University 
Honor Council, '28-'29; Secretary-Treasurer, Senior 
Class, '29- '30. 



Green, Lester, B.A. Georgetown 
Band, '27- '30; Sigma Tau Delta. 

Green, Oatman, B.A. Georgetown 

Major: Psychology and Philosophy; Glee Club, '21- 
'25: Band, '27-'30; Los Comarados Americano, '21- 
'25; University Orchestra, '30. 


































: 




Grove, Anna, B.A. La Feria 

Major: Public Speaking; Megaphone; Woman's 
Building Honor Council; Y. W. C. A.; Mask and Wig- 
San Jacinto: Choral Club; Vice President, Senior Class, 
'29-'30. 

Gtjenzel, Paul, BA. Georgetown 

Major: Chemistry; "S" Association; Science Society. 








Hinds, Mary Elma, B.A. Colorado 
Major: English; Alpha Delta Pi. 

Hodges, Marion, B.A. Marliu 

Football, '25-'29; Captain, '27; Assistant Coach, '30. 










Holleman, Lela, B.A. Centerville 
Major: English; Z. T. A. 

Humphrey, Joe, B.A. San Antonio 

Y. M. C. A.; Pi Kappa Delta; Mask and Wig; Schol- 
arship Society; President Students' Association; Sou'- 
wester Editor, '29: President Scholarship Society, '29- 
'30; President, Y. M. C. A., '29-'30; Candidate for 
Rhodes Scholarship, '30; President, Epworth League, 
'27; Vice President, Epworth League, '26; President. 
San Jacinto Literary Society, '27-'28; President, Fresh 
man Class; Intercollegiate Debater: Brook's Prize, '26- 
'27: Pi Kappa Delta: Sigma Tau Delta; Student As- 
sistant in History: "S" Association; Yell Leader, '27- 
'28; Tennis, '28- '30; Glee Club, '26- '28. 

Imle, Edgar F., B.A. Marshall, Illinois 

Major: Religion; Waiter's Union, '25-'30; Student 
Volunteer, '28-'30; Life Service Band, '27-'30. 

Jennings, C. Homer, B.A. Hagerman, New Mexico 

Student Instructor, Boxing and Wrestling, '25-'28: 
Student Assistant in Biology, '25-'26; Alamo, '24-'25; 
Science Society, '25-'26. 












Johnson, Hazel, B.A. Slephenville 

Major: Bible and Religion; Secretary Life Service 
Band, '29; President, Life Service Band, '30: League 
Cabinet, '30; Student Volunteer, '29-'30: Y. W. C. A. 

Knopp, Geohge, B.A. Leander 
Major: Mathematics. 








Landrum, Marvin, B.A. Lampasas 
Major: English. 

Lassiter, Dorothy, B.A. Elkhart 
Major: Economics and Sociology. 









Liese, Olivia, B.A. Georgetown 

Major: English; Freshman Dictionary Winner, '2)1; 
Secretary German Club, '29; Vice President Scholarship 
Society, '29-'30. 

Littlefield, Gwendolyn, B.A. Ni.ron 
Y. W. C. A.:Z. T. A. 



Moore, Erma, B.A. Temple 

Major: French; Y. W. C. A.; Delta Delta Delia. 

Nanez, Alfredo, B.A. Monclova, Coah. Mexico 

Major: Bible and Beligion; Y. M. C. A.; Ministerial 
Association; Scholarship Society; Life Service Band; 
Student Volunteer. 






























Nelson, W. Herndon, B.A. Goldthwuiie 

Major: Chemistry; Mood Hall Honor Council, '29- 
"30; Vice President, Mood Hall Honor Council. '29-'30; 
Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, '27- '30; Science Society; Waiter's 
Union, '27-'30; President, Waiter's Union, '29-'30. 

Phifer, Alda, B.A. Norniartgee 
Major: English. 



Reese, Lois Ehette, B.A. Brenham 

Major: Dramatic Literature; Woman's Building 
Honor Council: Y. W. C. A.; Mask and Wig. 



Robertson, Norma Lee, B.A. Goldthwaite 
Major: Spanish; Phi Mu. 



Ryman, Virginia, B.A. Houston 

Major: Philos< phy and Psychology: President, Delia 
Delta Delta; Editor, Southwestern Magazine, '29-'30; 
Megaphone Staff: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Woman's 
Building Honor Council: Sigma Tau Delta: Scholar- 
ship Society; Pan-Hellenic: Student Representative on 
Faculty; Student Relation Committee; Student As- 
sistant in Psychology. 

Schmidt, Corine Josephine, B.A. Crockett 

Major: Mathematics; Woman's Building Honor 
Council, "29-'30; Epworth League Cabinet, '28-'29. 



Shivers Margaret Elizabeth, B.A. Crockett 

Major: History; Methodist Choir; Choral Club, '29- 
'30; Y. W. C. A.; Phi Mu. 

Smith, Dora Dean, B.A. Lomela 

Major: Piano: Y. W. C. A.: Scholarship Society; 
Music Club: San Jacinto, '28-'29. 















Pyle, Walter W., B.A. Georgetown 

Major: Chemistry; Y. M. C. A.; Glee Club, '27-'28; 
President Sophomore Class: Vice-President, Junior 
Class; President, South Texas Student Volunteer Move- 
ment, '29-'30; Business Manager, Megaphone, '29-'30; 
Business Manager, Magazine, '28-'29; Ministerial As- 
sociation; Science Society. 



Bicheson, Herschell, B.A. Frost 
Major: 



Safley, Bobert, B.A. Bellon 

Major: Government; Football, '27-'30; Basketball; 
'28-'30; Pi Kappa Alpha. 



Smith, Wanda, B.A. Mil ford 
Major: : Z. T. A. 



Stafford, William Maner, Jr., B.A. Wharton 

Major: History: Megaphone Staff; Magazine Staff; 
Kappa Sigma. 

Stocklas, Florine, B.A. Rosebud 

Major: Philosophy; Y. W. C. A.; Scholarship Society; 
Delta Delta Delta. 



Thomas, Jesse, B.A. Ennis 

President, Freshman Class: President, Junior Class; 
Mood Hall Honor Council: University Honor Council: 
"S" Association; Debate. 

Wyatt, Irene, B.A. Georgetown 
Major: English. 

Trammell, James Fletcher, B.A. Hamilton 

Major: Bible and Beligion; President, Epworlh 
League, '29-'30: Y. M. C. A.; Vice-President, Y. M. C. 
A., '27'28; Missionary Chairman, '28-'30; Devotional 
Chairman, '29-'30; Methodist Student Federation; 
Vice-President, Ministerial Association: Life Service 
Band; San Jacinto, Treasurer, '28-'29; Sou'wester, '29; 
Vice-President Senior Class, '30. 










































LI ml 





Verdusco, Paul G., B.A. Port Arthur 

Skeptic Club. '30; Glee Club: Pirate Band: San Ja- 
cinto: Waiter's Union; Spanish Club: University Cho- 
rus. 

Wade. O. C. B.A. Rockwall 

Major: Chemistry; Mood Hall Honor Council, '29- 
'30; Y. M. C. A. Cabinet, "29; President, Men's Sunday 
School Class, '30. 



Wallace, Martha Rebecca, B.A. Beaumont 

Major: History: Executive Committee, '26: Y. W. 
C. A.; San Jacinto; Z. T. A.; Woman's Pan-Hellenic. 

Waldbop, Allister, M. Jr., B.A. Bryan 

Major: History; Phi Delta Theta; Men's Pan-Hel- 
lenic. 



Wagnon, Bently, B.A. Fort Worth 

Major: English; Alpha Delta Pi: University Honor 
Council; Secretary, Senior Class, '30: Scholarship .So- 
ciety: Y. W. C. A. Devotional Chairman: Woman's 
Pan-Hellenic; Student Assistant in English. 

Wilson, Ione, B.A. Houston 

Major: English; Choral Club, '26-27 : San Jacinto, 
'26-'27; Vice-President, '28: Woman's Building Honor 
Council, *27-"29; Epworth League Cabinet. "26-"27: 
Sigma Tau Delta; Sou'wester Staff, '29; Megaphone, 
'28; Secretary, Junior Class: Vice-President Sophomore 
Class; President, Y. W. C. A., '30; Secretary, Students' 
Association, '29. 




Tarver, Elizabeth, B.A. Austin 
Major: History; Alpha Delta Pi. 

Wisdom, William, B.A. Temple 

Major: Chemistry; Science Society: American Chem- 
ical Society; Chemistry Assistant. 

Bagby, Halcy, B.A. Georgetown 
Major: Spanish. 















Adair, Annie Ruth: Johnson Cily, Texas 



Aiken, Edwin H.; Svieetwaier, Texas 





Andrews, Allen L. ; San Antonio, Texas 



Avriett, Enid; Lamesa, Texas 






Baker, Grace: Gushing, Texas 



Barrett, William B.; Temple, Texas 












Berger, Marie: Houston, Texas 



Bowers, Mary Frances: Granger, Texas 








Brooks, Gordon; Bellville, Texas 



Buss, Leroy; Donna, Texas 
































Clark, William P.; Loekharl, Texas 



Cook, Mary Buelah; Terrell, Texas 



Cook, Elgin; Thornton, Texas 



Crouch, Odell: Calvert, Texas 



Culwell, Paul: Salado, Texas 



Curry, Laura; Sun Antonio, Texas 



Dansbv, Rowland: Bryan, Texas 



Davis, George R.: Georgetown, Texas 



Davis, Hutu: Alexin, Texas 



Dickens, Louise; Duncan, Okla. 












Dickerson, Doris; Garden City, Texas 
Doering, Anne Marie; Dayton, Texas 



Duhrbnburgeh, Shelton; Copperas Cove, Tex. 



Eddins, P. R.; Marlin, Texas 



Girvin, Ethel Anna; Georgetown, Texas 



Guess, Robert; Rogers, Texas 



Haden, Lola; Galveston, Texas 



Hamilton, Kathlyn; Georgetown, Texas 



Hardin, Aleen; Georgetown, Texas 



Hodges, Lorraine: Taft, Texas 


























Hemplk, Raymond; Georgetown, Texas 



Henslee, Harry; Caldwell, Texas 



Hickman, Catherine; Liberty Hill, Texas 



Holland, Nan; Decatur, Alabama 



Horger, Leora; Hondo, Texas 



Hiddleston, Clovis; Weatherford, Texas 



Jordan, Lila Mae; Weslaco, Texas 



Iohns, Lloyd; Georgetown, Texas 



Kino, Homer; Hondo, Texas 



Langpord, Buster; Georgetown, Texas 





















Lehmberg, Ethyl: Mason, Texas 



Lewis, Margaret; Manuel, Tex 





Love, LaNell; Chriesman, Texas 



McNeil, Leora; Ruvmondrille, Te. 





Martin, Elmer N.; Itasca, Texas 



Mood, Francis A.; Georgetown, Te 





Moses, Marie; Georgetown, Texas 



Munk, Arthur; Austin, Texas 



Newberry, Thomas; Chihuahua, Mexico 



Norwood, Briten; Doucette, Texas 































i> - y 




Pettus, Catherine: Beaumont, Texas 



Pickett, Alleen; Houston, Texas 





Pipkin, Seawillow; Beaumont, Texas 



Reese, Martha; Brenham, Texas 





Riley, Elizabeth; Waeo, Texas 



Scott, Edna Mae; McCamey, Texas 










Sharp, T. C; Humble, Texas 



Shipp, Willard: Jarrell, Texas 



Smith, Alton; Lufkin, Texas 



Smith, Roalla; Groesbeck, Texas 












Stevenson, W. I.; Grovelon, Texas 



Stiles, Lois; Thorndale, Texas 



Stinson, Ethel; San Antonio, Texas 



Stone, Frances; Georgetown, Texas 



•«*» f*» 



■*K 








Strong, Elizabeth; Henderson, Texas 



Sutton, Robert ; Raymondville, Texas 




Taylor, Re agon; Pine Hill, Texas 



Temple, Roy; Wealherford, Texas 



Thompson, Lillian Rlanche; Amarillo, Texas 



Thornton, Lois; Dallas, Texas 

















Tunnell, Chaklie: Stamford, Texas 



Tyler, Glenn W.: Waco, Texas 



Waite, Nina; Georgetown, Texas 



Walker, Fa ye; Hullo, Texas 



Wiin worth, Carrie Lynn; Avinger, Texas 



Williams, Hester; Georgetown, Texas 



Wood, Lei a; Corpus Chrisli, Texas 



Wood, Maurine; Madisonville, Texas 



Woods, Marion M.: Georgetown, Texc 



Yun, San Wan; E Chun, Kang Wan, Korea 















Addison, Alwyn K.; Caldwell, Texas 



Allen, Chester; Georgetown, Texas 





Allison, Lawrence; Uvalde, Texas 



Anderson, Rhea E.; Olney, Texas 





Aronson, Eli; Elgin, Texas 



Ash, Benard; Timpson, Texas 




Bagby, Elmo; Georgetown, Texas 



Baggett, Katiiryn; Ozona, Texas 



Baskin, Lena Belle; Cameron, Text 



Batte, Mary Belle; Cameron, Texas 























Bennett, George W.; Midlothian, Texas 



Bishop, Annie; Georgetown, Texas 



Bomar, Howard; Gulf, Texas 



Borden, M. U.; Houston, Texas 




*4 * 




Bowxes, Joseph S.; Grovelon, Texas 



Bradley, C. H. Jr.; Grovelon, Texas 





Branch, William; Georgetown, Texas 



Browning, Mary Kuhn; Coleman, Texas 














Bryson, Effie Opal; Bertram, Texas 



Taylor, Beagon; Pine Hill, Texas 






Burns, R. <).; Waco, Texas 



Butler, Lois; Georgetown, Texas 



Carter, Cathryn; Temple, Texas 



Caldwell, Margaret; Odem, Texas 




M 













Carlton, Mary Loi ; Gatesrille, Texas 



Cavitt, Dorothy ; Holland, Texas 



Childre, Cecil; Weslaco, Texas 



Chreitzberg, Edwina; Georgetown, Texas 







Clark, Eddie Mae; Austin, Texas 



Coffey, Virginia; Richland Springs, Texas 












Cook, Enoch; Taft, Texas 



Cooper, E. T.: Georgetown, Texas 






Cooper, Ruby: Georgetown, Texas 



Cortes, H. W.; Houston, Texas 



Coston, Cliford; Ireland, Texas 



Cox, Clovis; Sweetwater, Texas 



Davis, Dorothy; Nedertand, Texas 



Davis, Jane; Nedertand, Texas 



Forester, Frances; Smithville, Texas 



Davis, Jenny; Georgetown, Texas 












Day, Edwin; Cameron, Texas 



Denson, Dorothy; Cameron, Texas 



Dickebson, Ruby Lee; Goldthwaite, Texas 



Dorbandt, Seth; Georgetown, Texas 



Doyle, Lyle; San Antonio, Texas 



Dhiskill, Frank; Crockett, Texas 



DuPuy, D. Leldon; Mexia, Texas 



Elliott, Flobence; Thomdale, Texas 



Ericson, Tom; Georgetown, Texas 



Ebskin, Fontaine; Temple, Texas 















Ki.inn, II arhiett: Cameron, Texas 



Fokhster, Victor; Caslell, Texas 





Pehrin, Frances: Georgetown, Texas 



Ford, John Wesley; Temple, Texas 






l|l|kigpM 




Fox, Henry; Granger, Texas 



Gay, Mary Vlice; Cherokee, Texas 





Gibbons, Kermit: Hallettsville, Texas 



Hodges, Mary Lou; Georgetown, Texas 








Gray', Wailes; Georgetown, Texas 



Green, Ethel; Cameron, 'Texas 












Harbis, James; Georgetown, Texas 



Habbis, Neixe; Georgetown, Texas 



Hodges, Le Moyne; Tafl, Texas 



Hooc.es, Lucille; Georgetown, Texas 



Hodges, Lillian Mae; San Saba, Texas 



Hollow ay, Thomas Oltore; Martin, Texas 



Holland, Edna: Decatur, Alabama 



Humphrey. Hallie; Houston, Texas 



Humphrey, Lysle; Houston, Texas 



Isaacs, Lucinda Mae; Georgetown, Texas 




































James, Eunice; Austin, Texas 



Johnson, Martin: Hullo, Texas 




Johnson, Wesley; Hullo, Texas 



Kenedy, Ruth; Grapeland, Texas 

A 





Keyser, Lester; Caste.ll, Texas 



Kilgore, Marie; Beaumont, Texas 



>* 



'i^k^i 




Lee, Robert; Georgetown, Texas 



Legg, Thelma; Georgetown, Texas 





Leppin, Loretta; Pfleugerville, Texas 



Lewis, Sylvester; Lampasas, Texas 





















McAlexander, Edward; Temple, Texas 



McCrabb, J. F.; Thomusion, Texas 



McCbabb, Mary Lee; Thomastnn, Texas 
McDaniel, Harley; Olio, Texas 

McNabb, Josephine; Houston, Texas 
Macune, Le Nita; Austin, Texas 



Martin, Lucy'; Ilaskelt, Texas 



Martin, Ruth; Bryan, Texas 



May, Lilburn; Georgetown, Texas 



Meekins, Marguerite; Trinity, Texas 























Mennis, Gee William; Fort Worth, Texas 



Mercer, Johnnie; Georgetown, Texas 



Melbuhn, Felix; Georgetown, Texas 



Mubby, William: La Feria, Texas 



Nall, Blossom; St. Ingrain, Pittsburgh, Va. 



Nelson, Evelyn; Goldlhwaite, Texas 



Newton, Oliver: Bertram, Texas 



Oatman, Wilburn; Llano, Texas 



Oltorf, Louie; Martin, Texas 



Orrison, Harvey: Houston, Texas 















Pabk, T. Gillett; Jourdanlon, Texas 



Pennington, Cecil; Georgetoicn, Texas 






Price, Thomas M.; Goose Creek, Texas 

Pyle, Scott; Weir, Texas 

■ 






Purl, Helen; Georgetown, Texas 



Quebedeaux, Madge; Georgetown, Texas 



Raetzsch, Evelyn; Marfa, Texas 



Reed, Verena; Memphis, Texas 



Richardson, Roy Allen; Roekwood, Texas 



Richardson, Samuel E. ; Roekwood, Texas 












! . 





■■*> 



s:rh 

























Richardson, Will Mann; Georgetown, Texas 



Saathoff, Esther: Hondo, Texas 



Sanders, John; Electro, Texas 



Seamons, Vance; Weslaco, Texas 



Scarborough, Eulla Mae; Eagle Pass, Texas 



Schoff, Anna; San Antonio, Texas 



Schweers, Charles; Georgetown, Texas 



Sellars, Koye; Houston, Texas 



Secrest, P. G. Jr.; Bay City, Texas 



Smith, George: Belton, Texas 






Smith, Lucille; Lampasas, Texas 



Stinson, Edith; San Antonio, Texas 



Stone, Mary Catherine; Georgetown, Texas 



Studer, H. Morris; Ireland, Texas 



Stump, Billy; Georgetown, Texas 



Terry, J. Glenn; Richland Springs, Te 



Tiiies, Margaret; Georgetown, Texas 



Times, Mildred: Georgetown, Texas 



Underwood, Cora; Odem, Texas 



Zimmerman, Ruth; Marlin, Texc, 






















;-/3S*- 




Walkeb, Fred; Hullo, Tex* 



Weir, Willie; Weir, Texas 





Whiteside, William D.; Georgetown, Texas 



Whittle, Clyde: Lawn, Texas 





Wiggam, Clarence; La Feria, Texas 



Wilcox, Ruth; Bryan, Texas 






Wood, Walter; Corpus Chrisli, Texas 



Yearwood, Ruth; Georgetown, Texas 



Young, Lulu; Smilhville, Texas 



Young, Reba; Cameron, Texas 









Ash, Frank; Timpson, Texas 
Borden M. U.; Houston, Texas 
Baker, J. Link; Kemp, Texas 

Bell, A. Vivian; Jopliri, ATissouri 
Binion, Clayte; Lufkin, Texas 
Blackwood, Sara; Rosenburg, Texas 

Bledsoe, Murff; Port Arthur, Texas 
Booth, John Wesley; Daisetta, Texas 
Bright, Willie Vaughn; Gonzales, Texas 

Brooks, M. Ellsworth; BellviUe, Texas 
Buchholz, Ransom; Georgetown, Texas 
Burleson, Boger; Round Rock, Texas 

Carroll, Ruth; Bryan, Texas 
Charnquist, Hazel; El Campo, Texas 
Clark, Judith; Comanche, Texas 

Cook, Macelle; Thornton, Texas 
Cook, Jack; Thornton, Texas 
Crawford, John W.; Me Allen, Texas 





































Cardwell, Norman: Robslown, Texas 
Crawford, Kenneth; Jarrell, Texas 
Crowell, Foster; Raymondville, Texas 

Czarowitz, Philmore; BarlleU, Texas 
Daniels, David; Alice, Texas 
Davant, John Edward; Buy City, Texas 

Davis, Margaret; Nederland, Texas 

Doane, Jack; Bryan. Texas 

Dugger, Katherine; Lytton Springs, Texas 

Dunn, Burgin; 1'oakum, Texas 
Edwards, Elizabeth; Georgetown, Texas 
Elzner, Whitlow; Bastrop, Texas 

Emert, Jess; Comanche, Texas 
Engbrock, Gladys; El Campo, Texas 
Everett, Meta; Conroe, Texas 

Faktor, Mary Junice; El Campo, Texas 
Featiierston, Margie: Goldlturaile, Texas 
Featherston, Ollie Mae; Goldthwaih, Texas 


















Ferguson, Glayds Ford; Leesville, La. 
Ferguson, Margaret Ford; Leesville, La. 
Ferguson, Mattie Ford; Leesville, La. 

Foster, Grace; Georgetown, Texas 
Franklyn, John P.; Rockdale, Texas 
Frish, Edna L. ; Round Rock, Texas 

Gibson, George; Moody, Texas 
Giesecke, John P.; Anglelon, Texas 
Giron, Louis; Georgetown, Texas 

Graves, Preston; Cameron, Texas 
Gorman, Hayden; Donna, Texas 
Haddox, Doris; Rockdale, Texas 






rat 








Hart, A. C; Weslaco, Texas 

Heath, Willie Lee; Madisonville, Texas 

Hennant, Ctaude W.; Cotulla, Texas 

Hall, Nell 

Howell, Tomasine; Orange, Texas 

Hughes, Ruth; Atlanta, Texas 
















Johnson, Juanita: Bttrllett, Texas 
Johnson. Frances; Thorndale, Texas 
Jobdon, W. Miller; Weslaco, Texas 




Kidwell, Edith; Atlanta, Texas 
Killougii, Lillian; Eagle Lake, Texas 
kiRTii, Roy; Lufkin, Texas 








Landrum, Frances: Hereford, Texas 
Laxson, Tom: Pearsall. Texas 
LeGory, Elizabeth: Crockett, Texas 

Lindsey, Dick: Granger, Texas 
Long, Jane; Prilchelt, Texas 
LoNGLNO. Lucille; Georgetown, Texas 




Love, Mary Lucille; Andice, Texas 
Lunsford, Claude; Georgetown, Texas 
McAulliffe, Joseph P.: Corpus Chrisli, Texas 

McClure, James L.: Donna, Texas 
McNeil, Kenneth; Rayinondcille, Texas 
Martin, Willie Bob: San Saba, Texas 









Matejawsky, Harold; Chriesman, Texas 
Mings, Irene; Gilmer, Texas 
Mondrik, Lillian; Cameron, Texas 




Moore, Dora Emily; Cameron, Texas 
Moreman, J. W. ; Dalharl, Texas 
Murph, C. Herman; Cedar Bayou, Texas 

Nevill, Elizabeth; Weslaco, Texas 
Oatman, Dor an; Llano, Texas 
Oldham, Beatty; Palestine, Texas 





Peak, Joe; Lampasas, Texas 
Pendleton, Vern O.; Ireland, Texas 
Pennington, Clark; Georgetown, Texas 




' >' 



r* 



: .■ j ■■ 



Pittman, Oline; Donna, Texas 
Pittman, Wallace W.; Dublin, Texas 
Pope, Grover: Granger, Texas 

Porter, Holland; Caldwell, Texas 
Potts, Glendene; Bertram, Texas 
Quick, Hazel; Round Rock, Texas 
















• *** SB ,. '*£ 



£1 






j* 




Baetzsch, Clarice; Marfa, Texas 
Ray, Catherine: Lyford, Texas 
Beavis, Ralph; Florence, Texas 

Risinger, Donald; Hamilton, Texas 
Safley, Martin; Belton, Texas 
Sherman, Bernice; Georgetown, Texas 

Simpson, Leota; Gotdtlnvaile, Texas 
Sparger, Mary Emerson; Doucetle, Texas 
Sterling, Fred; Galceston, Texas 

Story, Horace D.; Colulla, Texas 
Story, B. Glynn; Comanche, Texas 
Strauss, William; Houston, Texas 

Swinnea, Sibyl Mae; Reagan, Texas 
Taylor, Faye; Florence, Texas 
Tipton, Joe E.: Bartletl, Texas 

Triggs, Montague; Mineola, Texas 
Turner, Frank J.; Murlin, Texas 
Wacker. Arthur; Bartlett, Texas 









Wallis, Olga Mae; San Antonio, Texas 
Warden, Elizabeth; Bertram, Texas 
Watson, C. J.; Florence, Texas 

Watson, Zola Ward; San Saba, Texas 
Webb. Sue Griffin; Cameron, Texas 
Weir, Howard; Georgetown, Texas 



WniTELEY, Thad; Georgetown, Texas 
Williams, Dave; Martin, Texas 
Windham, Glenodean; Donna, Texas 

























Weimers, Eugene; Georgetown, Texas 
Wood, Ellis; Harlingen, Texas 
Wyatt, Eddie; Pearsall, Texas 




Wylie, Allise; Henderson, Texas 
Young, Ellen D.; Laredo, Texas 
Zimmerman, Rutn; Martin, Texas 










1878 




YOUNG LADIES" SCHOOL OPENS IN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH BASEMEN 



:» 




C 



ampus 







LUCILLE SMITH 






KATHLYN HAMILTON 




I 



4 












t 




I 



ir 



JENNIE DAVIS 





Joe Humphrey 

Because of his diligent work in the 
office of President of the Student Asso- 
ciation, The Staff feels that Joe should 
have this place of prominence in The 
Sou* wester \30. 



ACTIVITIES 









THE STUDENT ASSOCIATION 

Joe Humphrey, President 

Ione Wilson, Secretary and Treasurer 

Buford Banks, Vice-President 



The Students' Association of Southwestern University comprises every regularly 
registered student in the University. The constitution of the Association includes 
provisions for the organization, officers, officers of the student publications, execu- 
tive committee, nominating committee, and the honor system. 

The officers are elected on the second Tuesday in May to act for the following 
school year. The editors and managers of the three publications of the association 
are elected in the first week in February. 

The executive committee, of seven members, three of which must be Seniors, has 
power to act in representation of the Association, and is elected in the first week of 
the Fall term. 

The nominating committee is described elsewhere in this book. 

The Honor System, controlled by the Students' Association presumes that every 
student is a lady or a gentleman. Certain violations of the code of honor are defined 
in the constitution and are punishable if a student is convicted before the Council 
of Honor. This Council is composed of nine members: four Seniors, three Juniors, 
and two Sophomores. 

The Students Association transacts such business as necessitates action on the 
part of all students, and serves to unify and govern many campus activities. 



THE SOU'WESTER 

Editor: Gordon Barr 

Assistant Editor: Mary Frances Bowers 
Assistant Editor: Berta Goodson 
Assistant Editor: Frank Turner 
Snap Shot Editor: Wailes Gray 

Business Manager: J. E. Bell 

Assistant Business Manager: T. C. Sharp 
Assistant Business Manager: Kathryn Baggett 
Assistant Business Manager: Vivian Bell 
Assistant Business Manager: Joseph Bowles 
Assistant Business Manager: Edwin Day 



The Sou 1 wester this year is attempting to be an exact reproduction of student and 
faculty life in the class room, on the campus and in the social realm. We have tried 
to give you a historical background of Southwestern. We hope you like it. 




top row: rowers, gray, goodson, turner 
bottom row: sharp, baggett, bell, bowles, day 














THE MEGAPHONE 



Editor: J. Frank Clark 



Sport Editor: Lawrence Allison 
Assistant Editor: Eula Mae Scarborough 
Feature Editor: Mary Kihn Browning 
Assistant Editor: Edgar All\mon 
Assistant Editor: Henry Fox 
Class Reporter: William Murry 



Business Manager: Walter Pyle 

Class Reporter: Anna Grove 
Assistant Business Manager: RuFOS O. Burns 
Assistant Business Manager: Kermit Gibbons 
Society Editor: Effie Opal Bryson 



The Megaphone is the weekly publication of the University. It is a weekly paper 
of student life, taking in the aetivities of the campus as they occur. The paper conies 
out on Tuesday of each week. J. Frank Clark, the Editor, has been very successful 
in tbe publication this year. Each issue has represented every element on the cam- 
pus. 



TOP ROW: ALLISON, BROWNING, BURNS, SCARBOROUGH, ALLAMON 
BOTTOM ROM : GIBBONS, BRYSON, FOX, GROVE, MURRY 



' .7! 










THE SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MAGAZINE 

Editor: Virginia Ryman 
Assistant Editor: Fontain Erskin 
Assistant Editor: Mary Frances Bowers 
Assistant Editor: Kathryn Baggett 
Assistant Editor: Harriet Flinn 
Assistant Editor: Berta Goodson 
Feature Editor: Doris Dickerson 
Feature Editor: Ellen D. Young 

Business Manager: T. C. Sharp 
Assistant Business Manager: Edwin Day 
Assistant Business Manager: Lawrence Allison 
Assistant Business Manager: Edgar Allamon 
Assistant Business Manager: Kermit Gibbons 
Assistant Business Manager: Billy Stump 



The Southwestern Magazine is the organ through which the budding literature 
geniuses of the University find expression for their effervescent ideas. It appears 
twice each term, and contains a large amount of creative work of Southwestern 
students. 



top row: erskin, bowers, baggett, flinn, goodson, dickerson 
bottom row: young, day, allson, gibbons, stump 














THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

The executive committee is elected every fall term by the 
Students Association to receive and examine reports of the 
three publications of the campus and to exercise such au- 
thority as the Association shall delegate to it. The Committee 
is composed of seven members, at least three of whom must 
be seniors and as the president of the Student Association as 
ex-officio chairman. 



TOP ROW: CLARK, GOODSON. FOWLER, BRANNEN 
BOTTOM ROW: SMITH. TEBRY, THOMAS 













THE UNIVERSITY HONOR COUNCIL 

The Honor Council is composed of four Seniors, three 
Juniors, and two Sophomores elected by the respective class- 
es. These students represent the Student Association and 
serve as a board of judgment in the case of any student who 
fails to obey the rules and regulations of the Honor System. 

The Honor System was not built up as a limitation, but 
rather as a protection. It is anticipated that the present move- 
ment on foot for a Greater Southwestern will evidently result 
in the emancipation of the working principles of a higher 
system of Honor which will even prove to be an inspiration 
and a goal. 



top row: bergquist, liese, fowler, wagnon 

bottom row: durrenburger, stinson, fox, love, raetzsch 










;.'■«',. '1 






THE MOOD HALL HONOR COUNCIL 

The Mood Hall Honor Council is the official body through which the 
boys of the Hall are governed. The members are elected each year. The 
members at times have a pretty hard job in keeping order and peace in the 
family of boys; but it is their aim to establish a more efficient Honor 
System and better the living conditions of the hall. 

Mr. William B. Clark has served as president this year and has carried 
out his duties to the highest degree of efficiency. 



The members of the council are: 
William B. Clark 
Shelton Durrenburger 
Gordon Brooks 
Frances Czarowitz 



Herndon Nelson 
O. C. Wade 
T. C. Sharp 
Clyde Whittle 













WOMENS BUILDING HONOR COUNCIL 

The Womens Building Honor Council, composed of twelve girls selected from the 
three upper classes, is the means by which the girls living in the building are gov- 
erned. It aims to direct rather than demand, to protect rather than prosecute, and 
to develop rather than destroy. 






The members of the council are: 



LaNell Love President 



Ethel Stinson 
Anna Grove 
Enid Averitt 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Elizabeth Shivers 



Lillian Gorzycki 
Mary Elizabeth Fox 
Dorothy Cavitt 
Mary Lou Carlton 
Mildred Brig we 



Doris Dickerson 



top row: love, grove, fox 

middle row: shivers, brigance, dickerson, stinson 

bottom row: raetzsch, averitt, carlton, gorzycki 
















THE Y. W. C. A. 

Ione Wilson President 

La Nelle Love J lee-President 

Lthel Stiivson Undergraduate Representative 

Anna Grove Secretary 

Berta Goodson Treasurer 

Imogene Beard Devotional Chairman 

Ethel Lehmberg Social Service 

Eunice James Missionary 

Virginia Ryman Recreation 

Mary Elizabeth Brown Music 

Enid Avriett Rooms 

Evelyn Raetzsch Publicity 







Y. M. C. A. 

The local Y. M. C. A. is a part of the movement of Young Peoples Christian As- 
sociation. The purpose and ideal of the Y. M. C. A. is to bring the campus to a high- 
er plane of living, to seek, and to help others seek, through faith in Jesus Christ, an 
answer to the problems that confront the student in his daily rounds, to stimulate 
real thinking on the part of each individual student on his relationship with his fel- 
low student and with God and to make that relationship a little closer and more 
satisfactory than before. In short to help each student find the highest and best 
in life through a practical application of the teachings of Jesus in every relationship. 

The Y. Room in Mood Hall is used as a reading and play room, and is equipped 
with books, magazines, games, a piano and a radio; a small room in the rear is used 
as a gymnasium. A students handbook is published at the beginning of each year for 
the benefit of the new students, finding employment for those desirous of work, and 
in cooperation with the Y. W. sponsored a "get acquainted week" of socials and 
receptions. 









TOP ROW: THOMAS, HUMPHREY, GRAY, GIBBONS, ARONSON 
MIDDLE ROW: WHITTLE, PYLE, NELSON, FULKES, NANEZ, BENNETT 
BOTTOM ROW: TRAMMELL, WADE, MC DANIELS, COSTON, CLARK, MUNK, FOX 







THE EPWORTH LEAGUE CABINET 

James Trammell President 

Kermit Gibbons Vice-President 

La Nelle Love Secretary 

Maurice Stldder Treasurer 

Mary Maude Wedemeyer Corresponding Secretary 

Eunice James First Department Superintendent 

Hazel Johnson Second Department Superintendent 

Corine Schmidt Third Department Superintendent 

Ethel Stinson and Evelyn Raetzsch 

Fourth Department Superintendent 

Gordon Brooks Music Chairman 

Clyde Whittle "Epworth Era"" agent 

Effie Opal Bryson Publicity agent 










PI KAPPA DELTA 

"The art of persuasion, beautiful and just" signifies Pi 
Kappa Delta. The promotion of interest and stimulation of 
progress in oratorical field is its aim. The organization en- 
deavors to bring about cooperation and intercollegiate fellow- 
ship. PI KAPPA DELTA, as a national organization, was 
founded in Southwestern University as the Alpha Chapter 
in Texas. 



TOP ROW: HUMPHREY, BANKS, BROWN, BARCUS 
BOTTOM ROW: DAVIDSON, ALLBRITTON, DANSBY, MUNK 






















INTERCOLLEGIATE DEBATERS 

Trinity — T. C. U. — Southwestern 
Affirmative Negative 

Arthur Monk Leo T. Allrritten 

B i ford Banks Joe Humphrey 

Decisions 
Southwestern — 3, T. C. U. — 0. Southwestern — 2, Trinity — 1 

Hendrix — T. C. U. — Southwestern 
iffirmative Negative 

Eddie Wyatt William Branch 

Joe Humphrey Thomas Price 

Decisions 
Southwestern — 1, Hendrix — 2. Southwestern — 4, S. M. U. — 
St. Edwards — Austin College — Southwestern 
St. Edwards — 0, Southwestern — 1 Austin College — 0. Southwestern — 3. 

Tr'ps 
Negative 

Leo T. Allbkitten 
Joe Humphrey 

Decisions 
Southwestern — 0; Denton — 3 
Southwestern — 2; Austin College — 1. 
Southwestern — 3; South Central Teaehers College — 0. 
Southwestern — 3; Southeastern State Teaehers College — 0. 
Southwestern — 3; Tulsa — 1. 
Southwestern — 2; Phillips University — 1. 
Southwestern — 3; Southwestern College of Winnehl Kansas — 0. 













THE SCIENCE SOCIETY 

The Chemical Society, from which sprang the Science So- 
ciety, selects its members from the Chemistry, Physics, Bi- 
ology, and Mathematics departments. Candidates must have 
two majors of the science in which they are majoring, 
and must be taking another major of science at the time of 
election. An average of eighty-five, counting the major science 
courses twice, is required of the candidate. 

It is the purpose of the society to take upon itself the work 
of promulgating popular knowledge and appreciation of 
science and its activity. 



TOP ROW: CLARK, PRES., TINSLEY, GODBEY, ULLRICH, GUTHRIE, W APPLE, TIPTON 
SECOND ROW: CRENSHAW, WISDOM, WARE, FISHER, LANDRUM, NELSON, PYLE 
THIRD ROW: NORWOOD, DENSON, SCHMIDT, GUENZEL, KEYSER, SECREST, ERSKIN 
FOURTH ROW: HARRIS, BUCHHOLTZ, STUMP, DURRENBURGER, RICHARDSON, MARTIN, 

DUNN 









THE MASK AND WIG 

The Mask and Wig players under the direction of 
Ernest R. Hardin have had a remarkably successful year. 
The players produced the following plays, "The Little 
Town of Bethlehem"' by Kathrina Trask, "The Import- 
ance of Being Earnest" by Oscar Wilde, and in the Spring 
Mr. Hardin plans to close the season with "The Youngest" 
by Philip Barry. 

Throughout the year the following one-act plays were 
given: "Glori Munch," "The Man Who Died At Twelve 
O'clock" and "A Proposal Under Difficulties." The last 
play was repeated thirteen times in various cities for the 
interest of Southwestern. 























THE MASK AND WIG 

Ten Mask and Wig students are to be initiated this 
Spring in the National Collegiate Players. Those compos- 
ing the present Mask and Wig group are: Evelyn Raetzsch, 
Lucv Martin, Mary Frances Bowers, Florine Stocklas, 
Laura Curry, Nelle Harris, Ethel Green, C. D. Fulkes, 
Imogene Heard, Will Mann Richardson, Billy Stump, 
Thomas Newberry, Cecil Childre, Roalla Smith, Lois 
Thornton, Kathlyn Hamilton, Lloyd Johns, Aleen Har- 
din, Bill Mennis, D'Laurl Beville, Buster Langford, Marie 
Moses, Mary Elizabeth Fox, Ruth Wilcox, lone Wilson, 
Bolton Boone, William P. Clark. 







' 










THE SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY 

The Scholarship Society aims to promote, stimulate, and recognize scholarship. 
The top ranking tenth of the Junior and Senior classes are eligible for membership. 
Good character and reputation are essential qualifications for entrance. 

The colors of the Society are emerald green and sapphire blue. Each member is 
entitled to wear a key in the form of a shield, and bearing a lamp representing the 
light of knowledge and truth. 

It is the custom of the Society to award a dictionary to the Freshman attaining 
the highest average in his or her work during the year. A speaker is invited at 
some time during the year to speak on some phase of scholarship. 






The officers are: 

Joe Humphrey President 

Olivia Liese Vice-President 

Fi.okine StocKXAS Secretary-Treasurer 

























SNYDER HALL 



Snyder Hall is the home of seventeen young women who keep house on the co- 
operative plan. Perhaps there is no part of Southwestern University that has 
achieved such rapid progress and success recently. The Hall has grown from eight 
to seventeen in the four years that it has been in operation. This proves that the 
Hall is very popular place to live. 

Last year the Hall organized itself into a Club known as the S. O. S. — The Sisters 
Of Snyder Hall. Under the direction of the Club various socials and dinners have 
been planned. 

This group of girls represent one of the happiest groups on the campus. Go to 
Snyder Hall and you will find a smile and a welcome at all times. 
The members of S. 0. S. are: 






Grace Baker 
Leora McNeil 
Clarissa Emert 
Hazel Johnson 
Mary Maude Wedemeyer 
Euela Mae Scarborough 
Grace Scarborough 
Ollie Mae Featherston 

Dorothy Davis 



Margaret Lewis 
Evelyn Nelson 
M \ry Janice Faktor 
Gladys Engbroch 
Eddie Mae Clark 
Hazel Charnquist 
Margaret Davis 
Jane Davis 







THE GERMAN CLUB 

Alton Smith President 

W. J. Goerner Vice-President 

Madge Quebedeaux Recording Secretary 

Vicitor Foerster Corresponding Secretary 

Evelyn Raetzsch Pianist 
















THE GERMAN CLUB 

The German Club was organized in 1928 under the direction of Professor F. C. A. 
Lehmberg. The organization has made great progress the last two years. It has 
an enrollment of forty-two members this year. 

The purpose is to develop knowledge of German conversation and German 
literature. The regular meetings are held every other Tuesday night. The require- 
ment for membership in the German Club is a knowledge of German. The mem- 
bers are: 



R. E. Anderson 
Eli Aronson 
Mary Belle Batte 
Kermit Gibbons 
Tom Ericson 
F. A. Fischer 
Lester Keyser 
Helen Purl 
Madge Quebedeaux 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Esther Saathoff 
Alton Smith 
Glenn Terry 
M. F. Bledsoe 



Ransom Buchholz 
R. 0. Burns 
Ruby Cooper 
K. F. Crawford 
P. H. Czarowitz 
Frank Driskill 
Mary Faktor 
J. P. McAuliff 
Mary L. McCrabb 
Clarice Raetzsch 
J. E. Tipton 
E. L. Wiemers 

C. WlGGAM 

S. W. Yun 



Ethel Girvin 

0. A. Ullrich 

Olivia Liese 

F. C. A. Lehmberg 

H. E. Meyer 

C. W. Bergquist 

j. w. goerner 

Corine Schmidt 

Anna Schoff 

Annie Marie Doering 

Chas. Schweers 

P. G. Secrest 

Felix Melbourn 

Ruth Zimmerman 













THE UNIVERSITY CHORUS 

The University Chorus is a combination of the Glee Club and Choral Club, an 
arrangement which was inaugurated for the first time in Southwestern University. 

The chorus has made several very successful trips over the state. Throughout 
the season it has been directed by Henry Edwin Meyer, Dean of the School of 
Music. 












The 



i In 



mem nets are 



Rose Bow den 
Anna Schoff 
Leta Wood 
Faye Taylor 
Marie Hilgore 
Judith Clark 
Edith Stinson 
Mary Dams 
Leon a Horger 
M. C. Stone 
Dorothy Davis 
Jane Davis 
Dora Emily Moore 
loretta l\ppin 
Gordon Brooks 
Elsworth Brooks 



Alise Wylie 
Elizabeth Legore 
Elizareth Shivers 
Esther Saathoff 
Perceval Eddens 
Paul Verduzco 
Edward McAlexander 
Vivian Bell 
Clovis Huddleston 
Felix Melrurne 
Roy Temple 
Wallace Pittman 
Evelyn Raetszch 

II \RLEY McDANIEL 

Cora Underwood 










THE SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY BAND 

Trumpets: 
Robert Simpson, Hayden Gorman, W. L. Chapman, Jimmie Ascher, Gordon 
Brooks, Ellisworth Brooks, Tom Clark, Lester Keyser, Burgin Dunn, 
Wilburn Oatman, Foster Crowell 

Horns: 
Jess Emert, Tom Laxon, James Dodson, Will Mann Richardson, Clifton 
Coston 

Trombones: 
A. C. Hart, Manager, LeRoy Buss, Eugene Torbett, Roy Richardson 

Baritones 
Lester Green, Odell Burns 

Clarinets 
Joseph McAuliffe, Bill Murry, Ellis Wood, Edgar Allamon, George 
Davis, Smoot Whighan, Walter Wood, W. C. Hancock. Fred Sterling, 
Seth Dorbandt, Roy Kurth 

Saxophones: 
Joe Peak, Oatman Green, Jack Crawford, J. W. Moreman, Jr., Carl Huddles- 
ton, Holland Porter 

Basses 
Eugene Wiemers, Glenn Tyler, E. H. Herefords, II. H. Onstot 

Drums: 
Paul Verduzco, Bob Sutton, Felix Melburne 

Piccolo Director: 

Wailes Gray Edward P. Onstot 

























THE SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY LITTLE SYMPHONY 

First violins: Louise Dicken, Lois Butler, Maymie Mitchell, James Dodson 

Second violins: Hazel Quick. Bill Murray, Emma Pearl Clements, Roalla 
Smith 



Elizabeth Mills 

Mary Elizabeth Brown, Leta Wood 

Margaret Mills, Wailes Gray 

Joseph McAuliffe, Ellis Woods 

Glenodean Windham, Oatman Green, Wilburn Oatman 

Robert Simpson, Jimmie Archer 
French Horn: Hayden Gorman 
Trombone: 

Eugene Torbett, Eugene Wiemers, H. JI. Onstot 

Janice Onstot 

Mary Elizabeth Fox 

Edward P. Onstot 



Cello: 

Piano: 

Flutes: 

Clarinets: 

Saxophones: 

Trumpets: 



Basses: 
Drums: 
Xylophone: 

Conductor: 



A. C. Hart, Manager 



fmm 













THE MUSIC CLUB 

The Music Club made its appearance on Southwestern 's campus in 1928 as an 
organization to associate the interests and activities of the Fine Arts Students, as 
well as to foster new interests and studies pertaining to the field of music, such as 
the opera, interpretation, current events and biographical sketches about prominent 
and professional people connected with music. The meetings of the Club are given 
over largelv to recitals participated in by the members. Thus the regularly appointed 
recitals have been to a degree replaced by the new combination recitals at the meet- 
ings. 

The officers of the Club are: 

Elizabeth LeGory President 

Doris Dickerson Secretary 

Henry Edwin Meyer Dean of Music 

Elizabeth Mills Instructor in Music and Voice 



TOP ROW: MEYER, MILLS, BROWN, DOERING 

SECOND ROW: BRIGANCE, SMITH, HORGER, DICKERSON, SANDERS, BERGER 
THIRD ROW: SAATHOFF, KILGORE, STINSON, MOORE, CLARKE, BUTLER 
FOURTH ROW: DICKENS, JOHNSON, REED, LEGORY, CALDWELL, JOHNSON 










EL CIRCULO ESPANOL 

El Circulo Espanol was organized in January of this year under the direction of 
Miss Lucy Belle Morgan. The motive of the club is to create an interest in the cor- 
rect use of Spanish, to inspire a love for Spanish literature, to raise the standard of 
scholarship. The regular meetings are held every three weeks. The business meetings 
and programs are carried on in Spanish. The requirement for membership is an 
average of eighty-five percent. 



The officers of the Club are: 

Eddie Mae Clarke President 

William Barrett Vice-President 

Lucille Hodges Secretary 

Ethel Lehmberg Treasurer 

A. C. Hart Chairman of Advisory Committee 

William Branch Advisory Committee 

Margaret Davis Advisory Committee 













THE MINISTERIAL ASSOCIATION 

The activities of the Ministerial Association are so directed so as to best prepare 
the members along lines of common service for the church and humanity. Its mem- 
bership comprises those students who are enrolled in the ministerial school or who 
are preparing to engage in the field of religious work. 

The Association meets once a week, at which time devotionals are conducted, and 
talks are made either by members of the association or by someone of larger ex- 
periences. 

This year the Association has made great advances. It operates by a written 
constitution; a permanent record of all the meetings is kept; members of the As- 
sociation preach every Sunday in near by churches. 



TOP ROW: BOONE, NANEZ, FISCHER, GAFFORD, BERGQVJIST, TRAMMELL, THOMAS, LAN- 
DRUM 
SECOND ROW: MUNK, PRICE, MATTHEWS, WOOD, FORD, STUDER, SHIPP, MCDANIELS 
THIRD ROW: SCHWEERS, BENNETT, GRAY, COSTON, YUN, BOOTH, PITTMAN, WYATT, 
RISINGER 








THE RIDERS' CLUB 

The Riding Club is a new organization which appeared on the Campus this 
year. All students interested in horsemanship are qualified for membership. The 
Club is under the leadership of Mr. 0. W. Cardwell, who is an ex-student of 
Southwestern University. The Club is divided into three groups. One group makes 
up the girls polo team, the leader of which is Rhene Funchess. The Second Group 
makes up the boys polo team, the leader of which is H. W. Cortes. The Third 
Group is interested solely in riding. The leader of this group is Miss Evelyn Raetzsch. 

Much enthusiasm is aroused by the numerous afternoon and moonlight rides 
which the group takes on various ranches around Georgetown and Round Rock. 
One of the favorite rides is along the banks of the South San Gabriel on the Weir 
ranch. 




PMHiraiHn^n 
















THE RIDERS CLUB 

The members of the Riding Club are 



Laura Curry 
Lillian B. Thompson 
Martha Wallace 
Rhene Funchess 
Elizabeth Cotton 
Maurine Wood 
Lela Hollaman 
Ellen Young 
Effie Opal Bryson 
Norma Lee Robertson 
Lois Thornton 
Ruth Wilcox 
Bentley Wagnon 
Willie Lee Heath 
Clovis Cox 
CathrynC arter 



Allene Pickett 
Oline Pittman 
Clarice Raetzsch 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Reba Young 
Lulu Young 
H. W. Cortes 
James Mallard 
Doran Oatman 
Jack Cook 
Leo Allbritten 
Fred Bailey 
Vivian Bell 
Bill Clark 



Allister Waldrop 
Mary E. Sparger 
Roalla Smith 
Annie Edward Barcus 
Elizabeth Mills 
Anna Schoff 
Elizabeth Riley 
Margaret Meekins 
Dinks Baskin 
Mary Belle Batte 
Florine Stocklas 
Alise Wylie 
Foy Sellars 
Ruth Hughes 
Leta Wood 
James Harris 










THE ALSO RAN CLUB 

This Also Ran Club is a new organization on the campus. But it is bv 
no means a common club, for the qualifications are very hard and takes a 
lot of nerve and many heart aches to fulfill the prerequisite for member- 
ship. The prerequisite for membership is to be defeated in some election 
of importance on the campus. 

The regular weekly meetings are taken up with each member trying to 
say a kind word to his fellow sufferer. 






top row: vllbritten, wagnon, bell 

second row: day, murry, ryman, banks. brannen 

bottom row: brown, thomas, dickerson, allamon, fox 














Bert a Goodson 

Because of her popularity, a loving 
smile and good disposition, the Staff 
feels that she should have this place of 
prominence in the Sou'wester ^30. 



FEATURES 




;;f.S ■ 








I 



!V .*■■.- 



C- *'_. 



C ; l* 



I ikl 



! */> 



^ 


















40U5 ACTIVITY"' 



7-1 











m 



^_^LI 



PICNICS 






] 



V 



lr' C_) C_»/ 1_j i. (ii> t~l. rsl i JCj c? w? 



V p £ 



:<r 









"'POLO • — MOST L Y 




J, 





Virginia Ryman 

Because of her scholarship, her use- 
fulness in all student activities, the 
Staff feels that she should have this 
place of prominence in The Sou'wester 
\30. 



FRATERNITIES AND 
SORORITIES 












Colors: Crimson and Gold 
John Gillett 



KAPPA ALPHA 

Founded 1865, Washington and Lee University 
Xi Installed 1883 

Flower: Magnolia and Red Rose 



Fratres in Urbe 
I. J. McCook 

Alumnus Adviser 
John Gillett 

Faculty Adviser 

R. W. TlNSLEY 










D. K. Porter 



Fratres in Universitate 

Gordon Barr 
Marion Hodges 
Allen Andrews 
Homer King 
Harry Henslee 
James Harris 
Lloyd Johns 
Gee William Mennis 
Rhea Anderson 
Henry Cortes 
Chester Allen 
J. Glenn Terry 









Pledges 



William B. Clark 
Paul Culwell 
Louie Oltorf 
Cecil Pennington 
Harvey Orrison 
Dave Williams 



Claude Lunsford 
Sylvester Lewis 
Howard Weir 
Frank Turner 
Oltorf Holloway 
Charlie Frederick 






WILLIAM B. CLARK 
PAUL CULWELL 
LOUIE OLTORF 



CECIL PENNINGTON 
HARVEY ORRISON 
SILVESTER LEWIS 



HOWARD WEIR 
FRANK TURNER 
CLAUDE LUNSFORD 



OLTORF HOLLOWAY 
DAVE WILLIAMS 













PHI DELTA THETA 

Founded 1848, Miami University 
Texas Gamma Installed 1886 



Colors: Argent and Azure 



D. W. Wilcox 
D. K. Logan 
R. L. Logan 



Fro I res in Urbe 



Flower: White Carnation 

Sam Stone 
E. T. Cooper 
Walter Young 










fowler 

BELL 












WALDROP 
BUSS 



SHARP 
NEWBERRY 



SECREST 
OATV1 \\ 



Fratres in Universitate 

Tom Fowler 
J. E. Bell 
Shelton G afford 
Edwin Day 
P. G. Secrest, Jr. 
All'ster Waldrop 
T. C. Sharp 
Cecil Childre 

WlLLBURN 0*ATMAN 

LeRoy Buss 
Thomas Newberry 






PHI DELTA THETA 
Fratres in Facilitate 

Wesley Carroll Vaden Herbert Lee Gray 

Paul Patterson You*ig 



Faculty Advisor 
Paul Patterson Young 














childre 




DAY 


Pledges 




A. V. Bell 




Ted Davant 
Doran Oatman 
Moran McDaniels 


STERLING 
DAVANT 


Fred Sterling 




James Mallard 




Billey Stump 


MCDANIELS 


Will Mamm Richardson 


BELL 


Pete Graves 





OATMAN 
GRAVES 




>A / 



hp &** 



«$> 


























KAPPA SIGMA 

Founded 1869, University of J irginia 
Iota Installed 1886 






Colors: Scarlet. White and Kinerakl Green 



Fratres in Urbe 



Flower: Lily of the Valley 



M. F. Smith M. F. Hodges 

Fred Cooper Smith 

Alumnus Adviser 
M. F. Smith 










CRENSI1 \\V 
STAFFORD 



CIAUK 



BARKETT 



BRANCH 
MC CRABB 



WHITESIDE 
DORBANDT 



ERSKINE 
STRAUSS 



Fratres in Universitate 

William Barrett 
J. F. McCrabb 
William Clark 
Duncan Whiteside 
William Branch 
Sam Crenshaw 
W. Maner Stafford 









KAPPA SIGMA 



Frater in Facilitate 
Sam Crenshaw 

Faculty Advisor 
Sam Crenshaw 






Pledges 

Seth Dorbandt 
Arthur Walker 
Montague Triggs 
Murff Bledsoe 
William Strauss 
Holland Porter 
Lynn McMillian 
Roy Kurth 
Clayton Binion 
Fontaine Erskin 
Dick Lindsey 
Jack Doane 
Norment Cardwell 
Ransom Buchholz 
William Harris 



binion 
kurth 



BUCHHOLZ 



PORTER 



CARDWELL 
LINDSEY 



BLEDSOE 
TRIGGS 



DOANE 
WACKER 



















PI KAPPA ALPHA 

Founded ol the University I irginia, May i, 1868 

Alpha Omicron Chapter Established November 12, 1910 

Colors: Garnet and Old Gold Flower: Lily of the Valley 



Franklin Price 












Fro Ires in Urbe 




1515 \I)1.I0"» 
BOM \K 



W. L. Armstrong 



Fratres in Universitate 



SAFLEY 


RORERT SAFLEY 


FULKES 


C. D. Fulkes 




Edwin Franklin 




F. A. Mood 


FRANKLIN 


William Stevenson 


MOOD 


Vance Seamans 




Frank Driskill 




Clarence Wiggam 


STEVENSON 


C. H. Bradley 


SEAMANS 


Howard Bomar 




Elgin Cook 


DK1SK1LL 




w igg vm 





Franklin Price 



PI KAPPA ALPHA 

Frater in Facilitate 
C. M. Edens 

Faculty Advisor 
C. M. Edens 

Fratres in Urbe 
Tass Waterson 



W. L. Armstrong 



Pledges 

Buster Langford 
Edward McAlexander 
J. W. Moreman, Jr. 
Lyle Doyle 
Beatty Oldham 
Ralph Reavis 
Martin Safley 
Jack Cook 



smith 

MURRY 



LANGFORD 
MCALEXANDER 



MOREMAN 
DOYLE 



OLDHAM 
REAVIS 



SAFLEY 
I. COOK 




PHI MU 

Founded 1852, Macon, Ga. 
Xi Kappa Installed 1906 



Colors: Old Rose and White 



Flower: Enchantress Carnation 



Mrs. Lee Hall 
Mrs. G. C. Hester 
Mrs. Joe McInnis 
Mrs. S. T. Atkins 



Patronesses 



Mrs. F. D. Love 
Mrs. M. L. Williams 
Mrs. B. Stansell 
Mrs. Stiles Byrom 







BERGER 
CHRITZBERG 



AVERITT 
HARRIS 



DICKERSON 
SEVLV 



SHIVERS 
ROBINSON 



Sorores in Universitate 

Nancy Enid Averitt 
Marie Berger 
Edwina Chritzberg 
Ruby Lee Dickerson 
Norma Lee Robinson 















PHI MU 
Sorores in Urbe 



Miss Frances Love 
Mrs. Hobson Martin 
Miss Mary Lee Stewart 



Mrs. Herman Sullivan 

Mrs. R. M. Nall 

Miss Mildred Stansell 








SIMPSON 




QUICK 


Pledges 




Elizabeth Edwards 




Met a Everett 


SWINNES 


Lucinda Mae Isaacs 


TAYLOR 


Hazel Quick 




Mary Catherine Cely 




Leota Simpson 




Faye Taylor 


EDWARDS 


Ellen D. Young 





ISAACS 
YOUNG 



















ALPHA DELTA PI 

Founded J 85 1, Macon* Georgia 
Zeta Installed 1907 

Colors: Blue and White Flower: Violet 

Patronesses 

Mrs. II. N. Graves Mrs. D. K. Wilcox 

Mrs. Marvin Hodges Mrs. Eldridge Hodges 

Mrs. W. L. Price Mrs. H. T. McCollum 

Mrs. Claud Howard Miss Velma Tisdale 

Mrs. Harry Dolan Miss Levita Tisdale 




beard 

HOLMES 
WAGNON 



CLEMENTS 

WILCOX 

OUEBEDEAUX 



BROWNING 

SMITH 
HODGES 



COX 
CAVITT 

\\ ILCOX 



Sorores in Universitate 

A i bra Anderson 
Emma Pearl Clements 
Martha Cottingham 
Imogene Beard 
Mary Kuhn Browning 
Dorothy Cavitt 
Madge Quebedeaux 
Bently Wagnon 
Elma Hinds 
Lois Thornton 
Marion Holmes 
Lucille Smith 
Lucille Hodges 
Clovis Cox 
Ruth Wilcox 















ALPHA DELTA PI 

Sorores in Urbe 



Mrs. Llewellyn Duke 
Mrs. Roy Richardson 
Mrs. Emmett Cook 
Mrs. Henry Price 
Mrs. E. Flanagan 
Mrs. W. A. Queredeaux 
Miss Imogene Sutton 



Mrs. Walter Young 
Mrs. Paul Young 
Mrs. John Gillett 
Miss Jonnie Wright 
Miss Elizabeth Hodges 
Miss Agnes Wilcox 
Miss Molly Davis 



Pledges 

Florence Elliott 
Nan Holland 
Willie Lee Heath 
Sea willow Pipkin 
Ruth Martin 
Catherine Ray 
Mary Alice Gay 
Hallie Wilcox 
Edna Holland 



THORNTON 

GAY 

COTTINGHAM 



HINDS 

ANDERSON 

ELLIOTT 



HOLLAND 



RAY 



HEATH 



MARTIN 

PIPKIN 

HOLLAND 

























ZETA TAU ALPHA 

Founded 1898, Farmersville, Virginia 
Lambda Installed 1906 

Colors: Turquoise Blue and Steel Gray 



Flower: White Violet 



Patr 



Mrs. C. S. Griffith 
Mrs. W. H. Moses 
Mrs. D. W. Wilcox 
Mrs. R. A. Nichols 



Mrs. R. J. Stone 
Mrs. E. G. Gillett 
Mrs. E. L. Hardin 
Mrs. W. J. Burcham 









Mrs. D. K. Porter 







THOMPSON 

HARDIN 

WALLACE 



YOUNG 
YOUNG 
MOSES 



LITTLEFIELD 

STONE 

MCCRABB 



FUNCHESS 
CARLTON 



Sorores in Universitate 

Rhoene Funchess 
Martha Wallace 
Hazel Deffebach 
Florence Mitchell 
Reba Young 
Lulu Young 
Frances Stone 
Mary Sue Burcham. 
Gwendolyn Littlefield 
Mary Lee McCrabb 
Mary Lou Carlton 
Jennie Davis 
Aleen Hardin 
Lillian B. Thompson 
Jean Smith 



ZETA TAU ALPHA 

Sorores in Urbe 
Mrs. J. H. McGinnis Mrs. Lawrence Starnes 

Miss Laura Gillett Miss Lorena Moses 

Soror in Facilitate 
Miss Annie Edward Barcus 



Pledges 

Josephine McNabb 
Maurine Wood 
Lela Holleman 
Carrie Lynn Whitworth 
Catherine Carter 
Mary Emerson Sparger 



deffebach 
smith 

DAVIS 



PETTUS 

BURCHAM 

HOLLEMAN 



SPARGER 

WOOD 

WHITWORTH 



CARTER 
MC NABB 



















DELTA DELTA DELTA 

Founded 1888, Bostoiu Mass. 
Theta Epsilon Installed 1911 



Colors: Silver. Gold and Blue 



Flower: Pansy 



Tri Delta Alliance 




Laura Kuykendall Mrs. F. C. Smith 

D'Laural Beville Mrs. H. 0. Whiteside 

Mrs. R. L. Logan 



Sorores in Universilale 

Kathryn Baggett 
Dinks Baskin 
Mary Belle Batte 
Mary Frances Bowers 
Ruth Davis 
Dorothy Denson 
Annie Marie Doering 
Harriet Flinn 
Mary Elizabeth Fox 
Kathlyn Hamilton 
Lucy Martin 
Marguerite Meekins 
Elizabeth Pope 
Evelyn Raetzsch 
Virginia Ryman 
Lois Stiles 
Florine Stocklas 




DAVIS 
HAMILTON 
BAGGETT 
STOCKLAS 





BOWERS 
DOERING 
RAETZSCH 
FLINN 















DELTA DELTA DELTA 






Sorores in Facilitate 
Miss Laura Kuykendall Miss D'Laural Beville 





MARTIN 


Pledges 


PICKETT 




HADDOX 


Mary Buelah Cook 


NALL 


Laura Curry 




Ethel Green 




Doris Haddox 


SCHOFF 


Dora Emily Moore 


CURRY 


Lillian Mondrick 


MOORE 


Blossom Nall 


COOK 


Alleen Pickett 




Oline Pittman 


GREEN 


Clarice Raetzsch 


WILEY 


Elizabeth Riley 


PITTMAN 


Anna Schoff 


MONDR1K 


Sue Griffin Webb 




Allise Wylie 


RAETZSCH 




WEBB 




WYLIE 
















PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 

The Pan- Hellenic Council of Southwestern University is composed of two rep- 
resentatives from each of the four fraternities. Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Alpha, Phi 
Delta Theta. and Kappa Sigma. Regular meetings are held on the first Monday of 
each month, and call meetings at the request of the members. 

The purpose of this Council is to encourage a better understanding between fra- 
ternity and non-fraternity men, to govern fraternities in regard to rushing, pledging, 
and initiating, to settle all disputes and difficulties that may arise between the fra- 
ternities, thereby maintaining a spirit of cooperation and harmony, to encourage 
scholarship to the extent that no fraternity may initiate until the average of the 
student body is made both by the chapter and the pledge. 

Pan-Hellenic sponsored, as in previous years, the interfraternity smoker was 
given the winter term. Each year a schedule is arranged for baseball, basketball, 
and track. Rules governing the eligibility are passed by this body and dates are 
fixed for the occurrence of events. 



TOP ROW: BARR, MENNIS, BARRETT, CLARK 

BOTTOM ROW: SECREST, W ALDROP, MOOD, STEVENSON 







The Women's Pan-Hellenic Council is composed of two 
representatives of each sorority on the campus, Zeta Tau 
Alpha, Delta Delta Delta, Alpha Delta Pi, Phi Mu. The coun- 
cil has charge of all matters of an inter-sorority interest. They 
make the rushing rules, and are held responsible for the en- 
forcement of these rules as well as punishments of violations. 

The Council sponsors the All-University tea, the purpose 
of the tea being to give the students an opportunity to know 
each other better. 



TOP ROW: THOMPSON, DEFFEBACH, RYMAN, BOWERS 
BOTTOM ROW: WAGNON, BEARD, BERGER, DICKERSON 













PAN-HELLENIC COUNCIL 









BRIEF HISTORY OF FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 












Southwestern University, which recently celebrated its fifty-seventh anniversary, is the suc- 
cessor of four other institutions of learning founded at various times by the Methodist Church of 
Texas — Ruterville College, McKenzie College, Wesleyan College, and Soule University. In 1874 
Rev. Francis A. Mood obtained a charter for Southwestern University which was located in 
Georgetown. Dr. Mood is called the founder of Southwestern for which he served faithfully until 
his death in 1881. 

<>n I lie Campus of the thriving little school different organizations began lo exist and among 
them were the Fraternities and Sororities. The first of these was the \i Chapter of Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity which was founded in Southwestern University on November 28, 18815, with six 
( '.harter Members: R. C. Porter. W. C. McKaney. T. L. Crow, W. E. Hawkins, E. \\ . Martin and 
E. Embree, Jr. 

Several years later the Texas Camnia Chapter of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity was founded. 
On March 12, 1880 \. It. Johns. It. L. Penn, M. Ix. Paleman, A. J. Perkins, W. H. Anderson, 
J. B. Hawkins, Abonn Holt. .1. E. Quarles, J II. Williams. R. S. Carter and S. J. Thomas were 
granted the Charter. 

On October 12, 1886 Iverson B. Love, Jessie C. Baker. Jasper IV ( iibbs and John Stanley Moss 
were granted the Charter lor the Iota Chapter of Kappa Sigma which is the twenty-first Chapter 
in American Ixappa Sigmas. 

On November 12, 1910 Alpha Omicron Chapter of Pi Ixappa Mpha was granted a charter by 
the Supreme Council of the Fraternity. The charier members were: A. D. Voigt, Samuel A. 
Grogan, C. M. Singleton. I. M. McGuire, M. T. Waggoner, G. D. Chapman, and 0.0. Mickle. 

The Fraternities had been progressing rapidly but not until 1906 were the Sororities more than 
secret lodges and local organizations. Among the first of these was Lambda Chapter of Zeta Tau 
Mpha which was granted its charter on May 13, 1906. The Charter members were: Elizabeth 
Hardy, Bess Whittle, Allie Barcus, Pauline Clark, Jean Whittle, Louise Gibson, Rosina Nelson, 
Rannie Collier, Myrtice Nehns, Lola Branson, Blossom Pit I man. Irene Gammill, Edith Branson. 
Hazel Whittle, Ixatherine Fiser, Sunshine Dickcrson, Bess Bailey, Lena Mae Nehns. Fna Dent, 
anil Clara Wellborn. 

The Zeta Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi was not granted its charier until February 1907, although 
this organization was the first on Southwestern Campus. Mary Mann, Madge Cooper. Gladys 
(■raves, Early Price, Gladys Snyder, Martha Sanders, Nannie B. Clamp, Mabel Taylor, Gene 
Daughtrey, Louise Bellford and Catherine Chessleer were the charter members. 

The local Xi Ixappa was organized in Southwestern in 1906 but was not chartered until May 1, 
1 908 as the Xi Kappa Chapter of Phi Mu. Thirteen girls were initiated as charter members: Annie 
Bankrighl, Mary Inez Coon, Ola Niece, Minnie Lee Tnulinan. Mabel (irace Daughterly. Mary 
Elizabeth Hanover, Jessie Sessions, Ixatherine Howard, \lline Terrell .Smith, Jimmie Smyth. 
Bertha McKee, Eula Mac Rollins, and Julia Manguin. 

The last of the four Sororities that are now on Ihe campus lo receive their charter was Theta 
Epsilon Chapter of Delta Delta Delta. The Charter was granted September 5, 1911 and among 
Ihe charter members were: Madge Hendry, Ann Carter, Ella Sedbcrry, Bess Crutchficld, Sadie 
Hudson, Hazel Barnes, Cornelia High (owner, Lucy May Agncw, Hallie Louise Crutchfield, 
Pauline Swafford, Kiltie Cain, Norma Smith. Ixatherine Mitchell, Gladys Locked, Alary Kath- 
leen Rose, Edna Maud Brown and Alary Wills. 

Both the Fraternities and Sororities hive been progressing throughout the years and at the 
present all have a splendid standing. 


















c 



1900 




STUDENTS PETITION CURATORS FOR INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 




Athl 



etics 



















Coach C. M. Edens 










Edward Franklin, Student Manager of Athletics 
Herschell Brannen, President of the "S" Association. 

"S" ASSOCIATION 






The "S" Association is an organization composed of all who have earned the 
official "S." It is the purpose of the Association to sponsor advancement in athlet- 
ics and to aid the intramural council in promoting class games. The Association 
plans to begin immediately on a new campaign for a new stadium and gymnasium. 

One of the outstanding social events on the calendar is the annual "S" banquet. 
This banquet proved a huge success this year, and it will long be remembered by 
those that attended. 

















jimmie Harris, Yell Leader 
william branch, Yell Leader 

PEP SQUAD 

The Pep Squad is the back bone of the Pirate Pep that has a name 
throughout the state. That Old Pirate Pep never dies when the boys and 
girls dressed in the skull and cross bones make their appearance on the 
field. 



TOP row: oltorf, stump, reavis 

SECOND ROW: HAMILTON, HARDIN, SECREST, OATMAN 

THIRD ROW: JOHNSON, CARTER, WILCOX, SMITH, CLARKE, MARTIN 




THE ATHLETIC COUNCIL 






The athletic season at Southwestern for the year 1929-30 has heen one of color, 
if not one of great success. Never before in the history of athletics at this institution 
have there been so many events that border on the phenomenal. In the football 
season we can remember several happenings at Houston that will make history, to 
say nothing of the many thrills of the Thanksgiving Day game. 

No one can deny that the basketball season afforded an abundance of thrills. In 
the Simmons game one was able to gasp enough to last for several years. Then, too, 
we must not forget the Howard Payne games. 

In track we had one of the fastest relay teams ever to don the Yellow and Black 
uniform. At the present writing this team has not competed in the Conference meet, 
but in dual meets it has established an enviable record. 

The Athletic Council, composed of four faculty members and one student, has 
done much towards raising athletic standards at Southwestern. This Council is 
always looking out for the best interests of our athletes, as well as promoting many 
schemes of advancement. These men are to be highly commended on the work they 
have done, and the services rendered. 













ATHLETIC CAPTAINS 

Captain Andrews has been one of the hardest fighting men on the foot- 
ball team this year. He has helped the Coach to put the fight and spirit 
in the other men on the team. Even though he had his ankle hurt for a 
portion of the season, he was in every game showing the real old South- 
western spirit. It would be a hard thing to find another to lead his team 
as well as Big Andy. 

Captain Whittle has lead his team to many victories this year. He was 
all Conference Center and one of the most valuable men that played in 
this Conference. He never says much but when he does it is brief and to 
the point. He is a real Captain. 

Captain Fulkes has been the main stay in the Southwestern track team 
this year. He has had to show the boys how to keep on fighting and 
never give up. He has been a hard trainer, a good runner and a faithful 
Captain. 

Captain Brown is one of the outstanding tennis players of the state. 
The Southwestern Tennis team has been loyal to him and he has shown 
them the playing of a professional. He is a good Captain and a hard 
fighter. 


































. .,,.-...- 







* 









1 ■■ *, f 




The football season was officially inaugurated in 
Georgetown Friday, October 4, when the Pirates 
trounced the strong North Texas Aggies. Fired with de- 
termination and smarting from the defeat handed them 
the week before by another Aggie team, the fighting 
Corsairs ripped the line and heaved pass after pass to 
defeat the visitors from North Texas by a 20 to 14 score. 

The game was full of thrills from whistle to gun. The 
aerial game was responsible for the greater amount of 
these, as both teams were employing this means as a 
scoring threat. The most thrilling point of the game, 
however, came in the third quarter when Seamans 
tossed a long pass to Weir who dashed madly through 
and by several would-be tacklers to score the touch- 
down that put Southwestern in the lead. This lead was 
not relinquished for the remainder of the game. 










The Rice game was the high spot in the early season. 
There was a high tension on the part of the student 
body as well as the team. After a great amount of labor, 
the train was assured and the entire school loaded on 
and went to Houston. 

The game was chuck full of thrills that kept the spec- 
tators on their feet throughout the four periods. Much 
enthusiasm was shown in the pep of both schools. 

Although Southwestern was on the short end of a 
14-7 score, the ones who saw the game will always say 
that it was one of the prettiest exhibitions of foot-hall 
ever seen on Rice Field. The Owls, shorn of their 
haughty feathers the year before by a Pirate machine, 
fought like mad, and their victory was earned only in 
the closing moments of the game. Everyone was happy 
and we all had a great time. 

Back to Houston in 1930! 

























The first home game was played under a blazing sun. 
but that was no indication of the weather for the forth- 
coming games. The second found the Pirates battling 
the San Marcos Bobcats in a blinding downpour of rain. 

Led by the brainy and elusive Brannen, the Bobcats 
passed and squirmed their way to a touchdown early in 
the game. The Cats had the advantage of the Corsairs 
in the punting game which, incidentally, was a big fac- 
tor on the wet field. After an exchange of punts, the 
Feline warriors started a drive down the field resulting 
in another score. This seemed too much for the ship- 
wrecked and watersoaked Pirates, so the San Marcos 
boys were allowed to wend their weary wav home with 
a hard-earned victory under their belts. 

This victory evened the score between the two schools, 
each having the same number of wins and losses. 










In a sea of mud and sailing against a ninety-mile gale, 
the Pirates suffered their next defeat at the hands of the 
Tigers from Trinity. This was the first game the Tigers 
had won on Snyder Field since 1921. 

Both teams resorted to the passing attack which 
proved highly unsuccessful to each, due probably to the 
thick layer of mud on the hall. After a slow start, the 
game gradually' took on new life until there were real 
thrills before the final gun. Despite the adverse weather 
conditions, quite a number of loyal fans braved the 
wrath of the elements and were liberally rewarded for 
such efforts. 

Rusty Hill was the big gun in the Tiger's attack, and 
on such a field he proved to be all that was necessary. 
Brannen and Seamans led the attack for the Pirates 
and put up a game fight, as did all the other Canary and 
Black gridsters. But the team from Trinity was not to 
be denied and they went home on the long end of a 
26-13 score. 







XS" 

















The closing game with Howard Payne was a fitting 
climax to a colorful season. Never before had there been 
so many games full of so many thrills, and not one was 
half so thrilling as the last. The Yellow Jackets were 
hard pressed at all times, and for awhile it looked as 
though the Pirates might upset the dictates of fate and 
win. The Jackets were a little too strong, and we might 
say lucky, so when the final gun was sounded the scorer 
had Howard Payne credited with two touchdowns while 
the Pirates had failed to cross the little white line at the 
end of the field. 

The vaunted McCarver was repeatedly stopped at 
t lie line by a battling Southwestern line, but once in the 
open he was a hard man to catch. Seamans was easily 
the outstanding wearer of the Yellow and the Black in 
that Turkey Day game. The little back from the Lower 
Rio Grande was playing his best which was mighty 
good. His punting saved the Pirates a lot of embarrass- 
ment several times, but he was ably supported by ten 
others on the field and quite a number on the bench 
and in the stands. The fight put up that day will long 
stand in the annals of the two schools as the greatest 
ever seen on Snyder Field. 




&Z 












Possibly the most colorful game of the season was 
played in Kingsville on November 15. The Pirates in- 
vaded the Javelina retreat for the first time and returned 
with a four touchdown victory. The Southwestern team 
was by far superior to the South Texas boys. The game 
was played almost entirely in the oppositions territory. 

Unleashing a dazzling, bewildering running attack, 
and a ripping, tearing line bombardment in the first two 
quarters the Pirates scored in each one. Time after time 
the Corsair backs hit the line for substantial gains, then 
a brilliant run would put the score down throughout 
these periods. 

In the third quarter, however, Coach Edens' Canary 
and Black warriors launched an aerial attack, the like of 
which has seldom been seen in this section of the country. 
The air was flooded with footballs, and there was usually 
someone ready to receive them. 

It is needless to say that the Pirates were warmly re- 
ceived at the Ex-Student Banquet at the Casa Ricardo 
Hotel after the game. 















The Pirate quintet started the season off with a hang, taking the Saints 
into camp on the home court. With the stellar Jansing out of the lineup, 
the Saints lacked their characteristic fight. They put up a good fight, 
however, hut the Pirates were easily the better team. 

Led by Captain Whittle as high point man, the Corsairs doubled the 
score in the first half and increased the lead in the second. Coach Edens 
was able to use nearly all of his men in this game, quite an unusual oc- 
currence for the first conference game. 

Sullivan was the outstanding performer for the visitors from St. Eds, 
but he was hardly comparable to the insurpassable Whittle. But Whittle 
was not by himself in sharing honors of the game. In fact, the entire 
Canary and Black outfit played mid-season ball. The team was shaping 
up nicely for a hard fought Conference race. 

Trinity, Austin College, and Howard Payne were the next victims of 











the bloodthirsty Pirates. Little mercy was shown either of these teams. 
The first two games were played away from home, but the sting of the 
Yellow Jackets was removed in Godbey Gym. 

The Jackets invaded the Pirate Den with an air of superiority. And 
why shouldn't they? Had they not almost defeated the inconquerable 
Cowboys from Simmons earlier in the season? Surely these Pirates could 
not afford much opposition for the Jackets. Soon after the first whistle it 
was quite evident that the Pirates were completely the masters of the 
court game. Not once in the entire game did the Howard Payne team 
have a lead. The Southwestern boys jumped into a small lead at the first, 
and steadily increased this until the final gun found the score 38 to 23. 

The next game was to be with the mighty Simmons Cowboys. The 
conference championship hung in the balance. What an effect on a highly 
strung team! 
































The first game with Simmons of the 1930 season will long be remembered by any- 
one who saw it. Those breathless moments, as well as the wildly exciting ones can- 
not be erased from memory. 

Simmons took the lead from the first whistle and it looked as though the Cowboys 
could loop goals from any place on the floor. Soon the Pirate machine began clicking 
and the score was evened. At the half the Pirates were leading by a scant margin. 
The stands were feeling the terrific strain. 

The second half was twice as nerve-wracking as the first. One team would score, 
then the other. No one could safely say just who would win. Just as the game was 
stopped, one lone Cowboy looped a basket that would give the Simmons team a one 
point lead. A long argument was started that lasted throughout the season. The 
Pirates were finally awarded the decision of the game, as it was claimed time was up 
before the basket was thrown. 







~»«fl 


,. 






) 


iji 


mm. 'J^ 












• 














































4 










The first track meet of the 1929 season was a five- 
team affair held at Memorial Stadium, Austin. The 
Pirate thinly clads did not win the meet, but there was 
the distinction of having second high point man. Unk 
Young, the tow -headed All-Conference halfback, showed 
the other schools how to run the hurdles and throw the 
javelin. 

All of the Pirates did well, many of them entering 
intercollegiate competition for the first time. 

Alton Smith took the honors in the shot put with a 
heave of 41 feet. Smith also placed in the discus and his 
form was noticeably the best on the field. 

The Southwestern dash men failed to place but their 
showing was not ragged. As most of them were fresh- 
men, the way in which they handled themselves on the 
track was greatly encouraging. 






























Led by the brilliant Nig McCarver., the Howard 
Payne Yellow Jackets defeated the Southwestern cinder 
path artists in the second meet of the season. McCarver 
was the entire team from Brownwood. scoring 18 points 
in four events. 

Young, Smith and McDaniel were the outstanding 
Pirates of the meet. These three men were responsible 
for over half Southwesterns points. 

The most thrilling event of the afternoon was the 
mile relay. Although the Jackets had the meet won. this 
event was none the less entertaining. Foerster. Mc- 
Daniel, Thomas, and Fulkes carried the Canarv and 
Black over the finish line first with several yards to 
spare. None of the Pirate team was ever passed after 
the first gun. 







i 













The Pirates journeyed down to San Marcos for the 
next meet with the Bohcats. Running in a terrific wind, 
the Southwestern team was defeated by a very small 
margin. 

The fastest and prettiest event of the meet was the 
high hurdle race. Young took the honors in this with 
the exceptional time of 15.7 seconds. Capt. Young also 
won the low hurdles in remarkable time. 

The Pirates looked mighty good in this meet. The 
relay team continued to show plenty of speed and looked 
like a conference winner. 

In the dashes as well as on the field, Southwestern's 
young team held its own, and had the Pirate javelin 
been ruled official they might have won the meet. 





















Lastly came the Texas Conference Meet with South- 
western acting as host on the Texas University Track. 
Vi ith the aid of an exceptionally good track, the records 
were ruthlessly shattered. Not only were track times 
lowered, but field records were torn down also. In fact, 
only the time in the 440 yard dash remained intact 
when the meet finally came to a close. 

McCarver of Howard Payne, Smith of Simmons. 
Lillys of Austin College, and Young of Southwestern 
were the outstanding performers of the afternoon. These 
four men set records that will remain for several years 
to come. Not to be overlooked is Smith of Southwestern, 
who distinguished himself in the shot put. 

Southwestern's relay team was the class of the field 
in I he last event. These four men, with Young sub- 
stituted, set themselves to the task of lowering the rec- 
ord, which they did by a margin of 6 seconds. 



TOP ROW: THOMAS; GATES; TRAMMEL; NEWTON; MCDANIELS 
BOTTOM ROW: FULKES; SMITH; STONE; SMITH; DRISKILL; FOERSTER. 














SOUTHWESTERN TENNIS 

Trinity 1 Southwestern 2 

Commerce 1 Southwestern 2 

Austin Southwestern 3 

St. Edwards 1 Southwestern 5 

Howard Payne 4 Southwestern 2 

St. Edwards 1 Southwestern 5 

An extended trip was made during the latter part of March at which 
time Southwestern Won five of six meets. 

top row: huddleston, brown, keyser 
bottom row: humphrey, booth 




1911 




» 



TRUSTEES PLEDGE TO RETAIN SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY AT GEORGETOWN 



m 




boujoker 



STATE OF TEXAS 

COUNTY OF WILLIAMSON 
GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 






To those it may Concern: 

I, Gordon Barr, Editor-in-Chief of the 1930 Sou'wester, of my own 
free will and accord do hereby and hereon, in the presence of my 
typewriter, vouch and declare that I am not the author of the 
Sou Joker Section of this book — that I did not write a line of it nor 
had 1 anything to do with the compiling of it. 

Do you ask me who he is? Is he a student of the University? Yes, 
he is a student of A University. But from his grades you would 
think that he was on his way home. (Anyhow he is not the pride and 
joy of the Selected Student body.) 

His name is — sh! — sh! I promised that I wouldn't tell and I 
couldn't afford to go back on my word. But, if you persist I suppose 
that I will have to tell you, providing that you will promise never 
to tell. (Cross your heart and hope to die if you tell.) Then here is 

the secret His name is The . . 

SOU 'JOKER. You know him, of course you do. Are you surprised to 
find out who did all of this quibbing? Please do not be hard on him 
if he hit you or your organization, for all that is said and done was 
in the spirit of fun. Take it in the spirit that it is intended or perhaps 
you might lead us to believe that old adage, "Perhaps he spoke the 
truth." Proceed slowly, dear reader, and don't miss anything. 

I, Gordon Barr, do solemnly swear that the above statements are 
the truth, nothing but the truth, so help me Bob Gaines. 

Gordon Barr, Editor. 









DEDICATION 

TO THOSE THAT HAVE DONE THINGS 
and got away with it. 

TO THOSE THAT HAVE DONE THINGS 

and did not get away with it. 

TO THOSE THAT HAVE DONE THINGS 
and thought that they had gotten away with it. 

TO THOSE THAT HAVE DONE THINGS 

to which this does not refer. 



This farce, 

The SouMoker Section of the 1930 Sou'wester is sympathetically dedi- 
cated. 









THE SOU'JOKER 

Published at the discretion of the Sou' Joker Staff 
annually or bi-annually 

Established long time ago Fifth year 

The Sou'Joker Editor-in-Chief 

Spirit of Spring Business Manager 

Wailes Gray Circulation Manager 

Dora Dean Smith Proof Reader 

Jesse Thomas Past Correspondent 

Lois Stiles Present Correspondent 

James Trammel Future Correspondent 

Dean Ullrich Printers Devil 



REPORTERS 

MISS KUYKENDALL, TOM FOWLER, SLIM WHITTLE, C. D. FULKES, MARY GAY, 

MISS MORGAN, EDNA SCOTT, THOMAS NEWBERRY, MARY B. BATTE. 

DEAN MEYER, HOMER KING, STEVE STEVENSON, BIG ANDY, 

MISS MILLS, SHORTY STAFFORD, BILL CL4RK 

PROF. VADEN, ALEENE HARDIN, 

HARRY LORAINE HENSLEE. 

Professor Paul Patterson Young Faculty Adiis 



* * * 

This was entered as first class matter before the Censors of the Sou "Joker Sec- 
tion got hold of it. But now it will have to go as fourth class matter under the 
act of September 31, 1930, of the Texas Legislature. 

* * * 

To the Fathers, Mothers, and all kin-folks to the third generation: If there are 
any pages of this section cut out in a smooth and clever way then take this warn- 
ing — Your Girl Or Boy Has Not Done The Proper Thing. 

* * * 

What Homer King needs is more bone in the back and less in the head. 

* * * 

The slowest fellow in the world is the fellow that took three weeks to read 
"Three Weeks." 












HAVE YOU A LITTLE DIPLOMA IN YOUR HOME? 



* * * 



Dedicated to the knowledge that you do not acquire in school. 



A fox, a steer, and a sheep, met on the edge of a wood, and took to complaining 
thus to man: 

"To think," snarled the fox. "that I am hunted for my skin. I adorn women . ." 

"Oh," lowed the steer, his eyes were moist, "my hide is turned into leather to 
beat the dirty streets." 

The sheep appeared to be the most distressed of all. 

"My skin, my skin." it bleated piteously, "is used for diplomas " 

* * * 

WORTH WHILE 

Any girl can be gay in a nice coupe; 

In a taxi, they can all be jolly; 

But the girl worth while is the girl who can smile 

When you're taking her home on the trolley. 

* * * 
kING'S FAREWELL 



Josephine: And, my dear Homer, you won't forget me. 
Ki'is: No. sujar, I'm taking a memory course. 



# # # 



BEST OUT 
Does anyone dispute the fact that the best thing out is a decayed tooth? 



A flapper told me the other day that the greatest inventor in the world was an 
Irishman. Says she sees his name on all the machinery — Pat Pending. 

* # # 

A woman is as old as she feels, and how she feels depends largely on what other 
folks think of her looks. 






This dear friends is 
what a sin it isn't J. A.'s. 
look at their pride and 
is their aviator, smart 
and their best football 
forward. They found two 
protege this year when 
loway, for they are almost 
nis. Along with these two 
a green and adolescent 
norance and button shoes, 
hope they come to them 
tion for they certainly 
thing else. These boys 
dig this year with Duddy 
pledged all summer — 
all summer — the K. A.'s 
time. It was the Kappa 
when school started, but 




KAPPA ALPHA 



about the K. A.'s and 
To begin with, we will 
joy, this boy Mennis. He 
boy, Mask and Wigger, 
forward, yea too much 
good playmates for this 
they got Oltorf and Hol- 
as smart as this boy Men- 
J. A.'s from Marlin. came 
Freshman, clothed in ig- 
Poor Davy Williams. We 
in good healthy condi- 
come with lack of every - 
handed the Sigs a good 
Weir. The Sigs had him 
that is, every other week 
had him the rest of the 
Sigs week to have him 
Chatter and Lloyd prom- 



ised him a football letter if he went their way, and he had to take it. 

These boys worship "God and the Ladies" even though they have a nice place 
to court in the park across the street. King has pinned one girl three times this 
year and he still has his same old pin, and HE wears it. Cortes took a step back- 
ward when he ran competition with Bill Clark — He shouldn't feel hurt — who 
would enjoy going with anyone as dumb as Reba except someone as dumb as she, 
and of course we know you are not. Henslee is trying his hand across the street, 
but he is going to have a hard row to hoe with Buchholz — the flying Dutchman — 
living as close by as he does. We would give Mr. Barr a good dig but we know 
that it would never get by his desk, so we leave the rest of this crew for you to 
talk about and form your own opinion. 












Now dear friends we 
Texas Gamma, and in 
there is to this gang, for 
and seldom recognized 
County. They are all 
the faet that they have a 
this Chapter too ... in 
dents for dear old S. U.' 
did some noble work for 
Fred Sterling and the 
send him a nice bouquet 
found out how little there 
youth. \X ith King's aid, 
rushees some little broth- 
Thev have recently found 
more money than they 




THE TEXAS GAMMA OF 
Pill DELTA THETA 



are hutting right into 
reality that is about all 
they are barely known 
out side of Williamson 
powerful this year due to 
big brother ... he is from 
charge of selecting stew- 
and Texas Gamma. He 
them when he pledged 
Kappa Sigs wanted to 
of carnations when they 
was to this Sterling 
they managed to get two 
ers, and a few strays, 
that it will take a little 
first thought to 



run the house this summer, and they need some better grades, so they broke loose 
and found two locals that are eligible for the Scholarship Society. They hope that 
King will make some dispensation so they can initiate these men with their other 
one eligible man. Of course there wasn't any material suitable to their needs this 
year but they are still hoping to get a full house before the term ends. When 
Waldrop. Buss, and Ding Dong fell back in school this year, there was little need 
for them to try to pledge any one, but they put up a brave fight to make Moco 
feel as pleasant as possible over the several hundred letters he wrote last summer. 
He was determined to see that Texas Gamma had a fair chance at all rushees, so 
he went to the U. office, got the name of each student who had reserved a room 
and wrote him a nice, spongy letter. He enclosed a date card with some nineteen 
dates filled out and said that he was trying to act in harmony with Bro. Vivion 
and wanted to see that all Freshmen were cordially received. Too bad they had 
to lose Kurth. for they counted on his pledging two boys from Lufkin so they 
could start a new strong hold. They have used all the material from Gatesville 
and are looking for a new town in which to locate. Send all correspondence regard- 
ing this matter to Mr. Buss and it will receive due attention at the next gathering 
of I he tribe. 

Of course we all agree with their big brother regarding the selectivity he ad- 
vocates but where, oh where! is the selectivity regarding such eggs as his own rela- 
tives. Buss-ess, Wall-Drops, and Oalmans? Walldropping is the smart ellik of the 
crew and shows his smartness by holding himself aloof from the rest of the crowd 
— I think his feet smell and he is a bit self-conscious. Buss is the whole works 
and is the advertising man for the firm. He does the part of the well dressed man 
to perfection and is the Chapters gift to the ladies — Poor old Homer is going to 
die some of these days and then who will they send to replace Mr. Buss? 









These boys are the power of powers when it comes to politics, provided that 
some one else will frame the election for them. Ding Dong and Tom Cat are their 
supreme men but they had all that they could handle this year and had to let 
Day lose his race in order to get their own. Neither of these boys are as hot as 
they think they are and everyone has their number. Secrest is their smart boy 
and they depend on him to make their average for them. He has had to move a 
dozen times this year to find some suitable place to study. Fowler has been their 
protective body this year, but there has been some fear in their minds regarding 
him due to the fact that he made so many dances during the fall and got tight at 
all of them. They knew if he got caught they would not have a chance when they 
came before the Honor Council. Childre is their simple lad — in fact too simple. 
He tried to pull some Barrymore stuff with the ladies but failed to find anyone 
that would let him stick around. Newberry is their black sheep — they have not 
found out what he is good for and we doubt their ability to ever do so. Last but 
not least of the initiates of this smart ellicky gang is Mr. Wilburn Oatman — He is 
too good to hang around the house, associate with anyone except Childre and is 
as far from Texas Gamma in spirit as Texas Gamma is from headquarters. His 
little CUZ is an exact replica of him — only worse. He is their joke and is one for 
every one else. Little Bell is the one they give the work to — it isn't right that 
they should give him a reprimand for his disgraceful actions when there are others 
that pick their noses, act wise, know nothing and yet go as untouched as their bills 
are unpaid. We admit that Liberty is pretty bad, but he doesn't know better. 
Of course he came in the category with Oatman and other little brothers. Mc- 
Daniels was born under the same handicap, but he is so dumb he really doesn't 
know what has happened yet. Thev took quite a load unto themselves when they 
took Mallard and now that he is on their coat of arms we want to know how they 
are going to get him off. 















It would be far more 
name of these soeial as- 
for they seem to bear 
is wrong and can be 
write about this gang, 
tribe — as it is and if we 
sure that each man will 
start a war. Their mini- 
fact that they ask Nut 
to school and because 
money that was to have 
the Dean said that he was 
his select group this year, 
tire annual to Mr. Dick- 
wliat we would say about 
to the Freshmen. 




KAPPA SIC MA 



fitting to change the 
pirants to Kappa Stigma, 
every evidence of all that 
wrong. We really hate to 
for they are a cut throat 
spill a few beans, we feel 
grab his pick axe and 
bers are few due to the 
Daniels not to come back 
Bill Dickson got some 
gone to someone else, and 
not the type to mix with 
We could devote this en- 
son hut he is gone and 
him would do little good 



Their bundle of conceit is Bill Clark and he does and has made a mess of things 
in his affairs. Me is king George with this crew and when he steps out he puts on 
his air of wealth and thinks that everyone is going to kiss him when they really 
want to kick him. Poor old Barrett has had lots of grief with his affairs this vear, 
and with all this smartness and conceit, he has to bow to simple little Moreman. 
Why either of them rush themselves sick to get out with Sparger is a mystery to 
us. Barrett says that he thinks that she has money and he might want to marry 
her. Stafford has finally come through — wait until he hears that his Frat brother 
from San Marcos is in town. Shorty is going to look on that concealed pin of his 
brothers sometime and when he sees it he is going to start a gang war. 

The chief source of trouble with these boys is Puck YlcCrabb anil Duncan 
Whit?side. They had to kick them out of the Chapter for some unknown reason. 
They claim Whitesides couldn't pay his Frat dues and we know that that is not 
what is wrong with McCrabb. We know that he ruins the house every Saturday 
nite with his drinks from the ridge and when the Dean finds it out it is going to 
be too bad for little Buck. 

These Boys think they had a big year — they did in numbers — but pray tell me, 
what they are going to do with such tripe as Wacker, Dorbandt. Strauss and any 
number of the others. They were told by their big brothers that their pledges 
would be broken if they were caught tight and what happened but that the big 
brothers all passed out. the Frosh put them to bed and then drank all the liquor. 
Since then it has been one big brawl. Even Kurth and Pinion got in the syvim. 

These hoys had hoped that Doc Borden would he wise enough to stay sober 
after having the big wreck but he seems to be going as strong as ever. Bledsoe is 









the one who takes on the stew. He is a bit older and knows how they do things 
but he doesn't know enough to fool Foye all the time. 

Their coat of arms is strongly indicative of their wealth — they own their home 
— their ability to navajo, their old line up with the Zetas and their love for the 
worldly things in life. Pour on the oil my boys, you aren't fooling anyone but 
yourselves, and you were fooled when you were pledged. 















There is an old barn 
ner of the Athletic field 
these loud braying boys 
for the present year, 
among all the members 
able to open the house 
having trouble with the 
barn was purchased re- 
notes. In fact she was 
possession, but the boys 
Officials to ease down 
off. Their financial de- 
to fling pledge pins in any 
they might stick, and 
ering a deal with the 
Athletic Field after six to 
keys in. Their house is 
hold the crew and they 
for them and some place 
collect dues. No one 
they have or who they 




PI KAPPA ALPHA 



near the southwest cor- 
that is called the home of 
but it is merely a retreat 
There was quite a doubt 
whether they would be 
this year, for they were 
lady from whom the old 
garding some unpaid 
threatening to sue for 
got one of their State 
and stave the old lady 
pression has caused them 
direction they thought 
they have been consid- 
University to lease the 
corral these young don- 
not quite big enough to 
must have some shelter 
to get them together to 
knows just how many 
all are. 



They are trying to take the old prestige from the K. A.'s by pledging all the 
athletes but they are about to learn that these boys add little glory and no money 
to the Chapter. Their glory wont pay off these notes. They sent a good basket- 
ball team out to represent S. U. but when it came to winning for the Chapter 
they were forced to rely on the cunning of Stevenson. 

They had one member of this gang that was a bit too tame to join hands with 
the police and a bit too strong for these boys to handle — Mr. Beisel, please. He got 
several Co-eds in trouble and the last time that we heard from him he was making 
for parts unknown. He is not the only one they have had trouble with, for some 
of their pledges decided they were not getting their moneys worth and turned in 
their pins. Landrum decided that he had rather bunk with Verduzco than associate 
with the boys at the house, so he up and took the oath of resignation and it is a 
hard matter to decide which is the better off — Landrum or the Pi K. A.'s. 

The pride and joy of this stable is Santa Clause Stevenson and he has to act as 
President for so long that he is the one to whom they send all tax collectors and 
lawyers who are about to enter suit for possession of their domicile. Tf the boys 












were so smart they would select a new goat, for he is having all the trouhle he 
ran handle in his love affairs. A certain blond is giving Steve a run for his money 
with his fair lady. Steve sits around in a bragadoccia manner and would have one 
think that he is king on that corner but he has plenty trouble with late dates. 

Mr. Bomar has been the perplexing problem with these boys for some time, and 
they still wonder what they are going to do with him. He gets on a good tooter 
and takes Mood and McCrabb for a buggy ride that they will long remember — 
(He made them walk back about ten miles at four in the morning and Oh boy. 
it was raining.) Rastus has had plenty experience and he quickly sees that he can 
get some happy thoughts from the past by treating others as he likes. 









In a hard storm for finances, those Jacks had to take Bunny Cook and since 
that date, he has tried to show everyone in school just how everything should be 
done and how to look your best in any old garb — for goodness sake. Cook, go take 
a peep at your self and wonder why they don't lock you in a cage. Shut up and 
be satisfied and if you can ever catch any honey from one of these innumerable 
dates you brag about, you had better go home and write a letter to the folks about 
it. Your little brother has you in the shade and he is nothing to get up in the middle 
of the night and write home about. 

We would mention Wiggam and Moreman and any other of the hundred but 
they are too dumb to attract attention and what we would say would be glory 
in their feeble minds. 

We realize that we should give these boys a big space, for they are indeed strong 
in members and every member should have some mention. We ask that none of 
you be offended if your name is omitted from this space for what we say collec- 
tively will certainly hit you, and what we say to the others will be quite fitting 
to your case. 






SORORITIES 









The choker has never had a great affinity for the fairer sex and it gives much 
pleasure to bounce these rocks off their coco. If you get mad at what I have to 
say you may remember — (to put it in the vernacular) "you got it coming to you 
lady/' 







ALPHA DELTA PI 









"Alpha Doodles'" or the home of the Buick girls is the rightful name for these 
kittenish things for they make more noise than an ordinary doodle bug and pledge 
every girl that can rate a Buick. They have all the better cars of the town and 
make it a great point to ride down town in a body. This is done to show what a 
fine spirit prevails. The chapter owns a champion gossiper. a brainless wonder, 
Elma Hinds, Lois Thornton, and Ruth Wilcox. They spend half their time spew- 
ing around and the other half at The Alcove trying to rate a date. 

These girls have been trying so hard to get some place in sorority circles and in 
so doing have lost all power they ever possessed. Clovis Cox is their pride and she 
is doing her best by the girls in trying to win fame as an orator. Power and powder 
to her, she needs both. 



PHI MU 









Now we rim right into the Fine Mules. They are, as their coat of arms indicates, 
a rather flat bunch. They have some trouble getting a girl but they have more 
trouble keeping them. No doubt they are lucky that they get rid of some of them. 
They have never won any popularity medals but they can be counted on to hold 
up the average of the student hody and make it rather hard for the others to initiate. 












DELTA DELTA DELTA 

These are the girls from way out yonder — yea way out yonder. They had quite 
a successful rush season when they slipped the royal rompers to the Zetas and 
Alpha Doodles. They were once content with Phi dates but they are far ahead of 
the Phis and have so many members that it takes all the frats and half the barbs 
to date the chapter. There are some who don't have dates, they claim they do 
not want them and stay home and study. They say they are doing their bit by 
the frat while the others hold up the social end of the blanket. They rally at the 
sight of a Trident because it reminds them of their last summer at home and their 
due familiarity to a pitchfork. 

Their chief strong hold is Cameron and they had their annual fall party to help 
their social rating in the nearby city. It was a decided success, the Phis got an 
even number to make the trip, but Secrest (and Batte) were never able to make 
the party. They did get to the club but were unable to walk up the steps. 

Clarice Raetzsch seems to have so much IT that Tom Cat either had to quit 
her or else lose his self control on these bright moonlight nights. 'Tis indeed a 
pity that she can't give some of it to Ruth Davis (beg pardon, forgot she wasn't 
affiliated). Mary Belle is their versatile speaker, Annie Marie has travelled and 
is their versatile girl in all phases asked for, Virginia Ryman is the politician of 
the crowd, and Florine Stocklass is their jaybird. Their insignia shows that quite 
a number are interested in the scholarship society and Y. W. C. A. 

These girls are blessed with having the Dean of Women as a sister and she leads 
all mass meetings of the tribe with a new proposal for membership. 

There has been some commotion as to what will become of one of their pledges 
but to date no formal announcement has been made as to her connection with 
the clan. If the Zetas would have her they would let her go with McNabb but the 
Zetas refuse to take her. 















m 






ZETA TAU ALPHA 

These, my dear friends are the patrons of the honor council, discipline committee 
and rent car stations. They were once the popular group but now when they get 
hungry they have to rent a car to take them to town. They have one or two sisters 
that are still in the race and have a steady to rely on. Their rushing season was a 
Hop and they had to do a bit of recruiting from other ranks. They picked on the 
Tri Delters and Phi Mulers but the Phi Muler wouldn't stick. Their pledges are 
as useful to them as sand in the Sahara. They are running the Alpha Doodles a 
strong race with the town girls and prospects are good for a victory for the Zetas. 

Things looked bad for these loudspeakers when school opened and when they 
saw Mitchell and Littlefield were back it looked like a dark summer and — sure 
enough it was. Rhoene kept them in trouble until she was put out of the picture 
and no doubt the dear sisters rejoiced over the removal. The town girls never 
have very much to do with their sisters in the building and we are willing to let 
them pass unmentioned if it suits sister Tula. Mary Lou has had some trouble 
with her dates this year and at this writing is parked in the dormitory — probably 
having an old maid's dream. 

It is just that we should give the devil his dues and we are going to do it. Even 
though Reba doesn't have any friends in the chapter she does them a good turn 
by giving them some fresh air in her Kappa Sig buggy. They love that old buggy 
for that is the only reminder they have of their once strong alignment with Kappa 
Sig. Reba has had the car quite often lately and we understand it is due to the 
fact that Bill had rather pay for the gas than have to ride around with her. We've 
been expecting them to take Lillian B. to San Antonio but she seems to prefer 
travel alone. Don't feel bad, Pound, for they have all been on those trips and just 
won't tell you about it. You haven't told yours either, have you? 

Their coat of arms also is indicative of their many antics and to those of you 
who may not understand it, — ask any member of the sobering crew. 










BARBS 






Now dear readers we are running into the masses. These boys are not quite so 
particular as the Greeks for they take anything they can get from the select group. 
Of course they have some very powerful men in Albritten, Landrum, Fox, Alton 
Smith, Dansby, and Brannen. They are always hopeful that someone will become 
displeased and return to the fold. This has happened several times and there is 
always a great feast of stolen chickens served the returned one. They have bad 
tbeir private dairy to prevent them from stealing milk but Brother Burns mort- 
gaged the hogs and had to leave school. The officials in charge decided to turn the 
project into a chicken farm to elevate the morals of the boys and prevent them 
leaving town each week end. To date the venture seems a success. 

These boys believe the rabble should rule and their regard for aristocracy is 
far below par. They use all effective weapons to gain their ends and when one of 
their crew finds a traitor he is promptly reported to the frats and is pledged im- 
mediately. They have had quite a few jump the barnyard fence and land over 
Texas Gamma way. There are privileges of belonging to this gang that may never 
mean anything in after life but it means plenty when you want to have a date: 
you never have to go to meetings. These meetings are held four times each year 
and each member is informed personally as to what to do in elections. 

Rayburn Brown is the black sheep of the barbs. He lives so far in the sticks and 
is so crude that he really doesn't know what to do. Thank heaven he will soon 
be gone and we can enjoy an afternoon show. Jessie Thomas is the informer of 
the crowd for he has seen all the sights in most of the fraternities, having been a 
member of several. Albritten is their menace and smart boy. Dansby isn't any- 
thing but a bag of wind and a good storage tank for rotten beer. 

These boys conform to the rules of the old school and do their best to keep the 
frats from initiating. They are strong as horse radish and can always be counted 
on for the strongest feet in each class. "Hold 'Em Alamos and San Jacs." 






•^ 



V^ 



^ 







foAY B "Fe-nce 









NOW MAYBE YOU WILL THINK 

(Probably tbat a little reminder of one of President Vivions chapel talks would 
fit here, "I don't care what yon think just so long as yon are thinking." Tbat is 
the purpose of this section — to stimulate thought.) 

We always thought that gossiping was a characteristic of the fairer sex, but 
where do LeRoy Buss and Polly Walker come in. 

A very prominent piece in the Magazine was given over to the pedigrees of 
the new Tri-Delt Initiates. Congratulations on the new thourough-hred herd, they 
were needed very badly. 

Isn't it nice how Preachers children follow in their father's footsteps. Take 
for example. Romeo Buss, Tom Cat Sharp, and Elma Hinds. 

Frances Stone wont have to take off her skin and dance around in her bones 

About all we can get out of Dean Meyer's speech was that Navajo blankets 
are also valuable as works of arl. Is that why thev are so popular with the Kappa 

Sigs? 

Tri-Delts new slogan— QUANTITY NOT QUALITY. 

We notice that Batte hasn't made so many trips home since the boys have been 
rushing her so. 

We wonder if "Big Time Polly*' got his Collegiate slump from bending over a 
plow or is it acquired. 

We wish that the Nigger in the woodpile would pop up and tell us why Lucy 
Martin and Elma Hinds rate with Mr. Crysler. 

We extend our deepest to Baby Childre since leaving Bro. Oatman. Wonder 
whose clothes he is wearing now? 

We advocate birth-control in Cameron so Tri-Delts can take a rest. 

We wish that Wiggam would remember that "mum's" the word! 

Isn't it terrible how these innocent little girls fall for "Dreamy Eyed" Barrett. 















MAYBE YOU WILL THINK (Continued) 

By the way, Yellow-Jaundice isn't the only thing that will make you yellow. 

Reba Young and "her ear." Why does she rate so many dates, is it because she 
calls the Kappa Sig house? 

Lula Young and her lovers — Why doesn't she keep her man. I'm sure that it 
isn't her fault. 

Erma Moore is in love. It seems that she went to Houston between terms and 
was telling her friends how she and . . . were in love. It's funnv how love affairs 
can be so one sided. 

Here are a few things that the writer of this Thought Stimulus would like to 
know: (I will number them so they will be clear). 

1. How Dorothy Denson got the Campus Sweetheart. 

2. What Lulu Young sees in LeRoy Buss. 

3. Why Irmas persistence can't get Doc. Borden. 

4. What happened to Maurines brotherly feeling toward "Duck." 

5. Why is the little girl by the railroad track the Phi Delt Dream Girl. 

6. What would Aleen do without her K. A. Buddies. 

7. Why did the Phi's postpone their rush week until the Spring Term. 

8. What would the little town girls do without their picnics. 

9. How would the K. A.'s get along without Mother Deffebach. 

10. Why Ruth Davis has not affiliated. 

11. When Little Bill Clark from Lockhart with his excess baggage will grow up to 

be a man. 

12. Why they call Mary Alice Gay Santa Clause. 

13. Why Virginia Ryman thinks she is a Philosopher. 

14. The truth about some of these Big San Antonio trips. 

15. Why Warriner can't catch on. 

16. Why the Phi's hide Ding Dong Bell during rush season. 









You' don't ever breathe this to a soul, but did you know that: 


















The Tri Delts and the Kappa Sigs have united for rushing next year? "In union 
there is strength." 

Mary Lou Carlton frequently visits the Toggery. 

Erette Reese actually is out of school after ten years at it. 

Steve has almost had a rival (a blond mystery). 

Miss Neas has a staunch admirer residing in Georgia. 

The K. A.'s are reading the hook of Etiquette and Whiz Bang in order to acquire 
this "has been around appearance. " 

The other Sororities have gotten a big kick out of the Zetas misfortune last win- 
ter. A novel experience this night moonshine cow-back riding. 

There are some swell town dames that attend S. U. and they don't go by the 
name "The Gurls of the Womens Bull Den." 

That Walter Pyle is a master politician. (If you don't believe it ask him.) 

That the K. A.'s have to hide Terry's pin to keep him from pinning . . . Well just 
anyone. 

That the Zetas are not getting as many pins (maybe they were penned) this year 
as they have in the past and when they get one they can not keep it. 

That Kathlyn Hamilton and Raymond are saving their dimes. 

That several of the Sigs have been to Laredo. Yes, they are a part of the select 
student body. 

* * * 



The I'm It Club, you for me or we won't support you next election: 






T. C. Sharp 
Ding Dong Bell 
Walter Pyle 
Joe Humphrey 



Bill Stevenson 
Sue Brannen 
Leo Allbritteu 
Tom Fowler 
J. Frank Clark 



Alton Smith 
Herndon Nelson 
Virginia Ryman 
Berta Goodson 









Jesse Thomas: What's become of the old fashioned girl who used to say: "Ask 
Father.'" 

Dizzy Oatman: She now has a daughter who says, "Give it more gas, George, the 
old mans gaining on us." 

* * * 

Rose Bowers: Why do they always cheer at a foot-hall game when a player gets 
hurt? 

Sue Brannen: So the ladies won't hear what he says. 

* # * 
Simpson is wearing his other pair of sox this term. 

* * * 

For our capacity crew at all brawls we nominate the following as regards their 
respective positions: 

Buck McCrabb Left Field 

Louie Oltorf Right Field 

Mighty Holloway Center Field 

Dynamite Waldrop Third Base 

Ox Bell Short Stop 

Bull Dansby Second Base 

Beaut Bomar First Base 

Blase Bunny Cook Pitcher 

Mingling Murph Bledsoe Catcher 

Leo Allbritten Coach and Kibitzer 

Dreadful Dr. Oscar Manager 

* * * 

Is that really love light that we see in Fred Sterling's eyes? 

* # # 

What has happened to Rhene Funchess league since she has been shoved in the 
corner? Jesse Thomas was the official tester for the crew and he seems to be in the 
pink of condition. Is it possible that he has turned the reins over to someone else 
since he is leaving school this year. Wonder if he will preach? 

* * * 
NOW HOWL, BY CRACKY, HOWL. 






























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OF SOU'WESTER 
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GEORGETOWN, TEXAS 



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The Great Business Ti 

BRANTLEY-DRA 

FORT WORTH IS GROWING 

Fort Worth is doubtless one of the fastest-growing eities in the United States. 
Fort Worth lias experienced one of the greatest years in its history from many 
standpoints, and it stands now with every indication pointing to a greater and 
more successful year. New buildings are soaring skyward every dav. Our mag- 
nificent trade territory is expanding by leaps and bounds. New industries, 
firms and individuals are moving to Fort Worth daily. Never in Fort Worth's 
history was the opportunity as great as it is today. An era of unprecedented 
prosperity for this city, even greater than the previous year, is predicted by our 
great business leaders. Fort Worth calls to you. It is the city of OPPORTU- 
NITY. Its opportunities are attracting young people from all over the South. 
It offers you, too, a chance to get a start toward success; because of Fort 
Worth's prosperity and great achievements hundreds of young people come 
here every year. They want to learn and they want to work; they want to 
earn more, and have more, and live better. Brantley -Draughon calls to you; 
if you have ambition and energy, here is your opportunity and it will pay you 
to come to Fort Worth NOW and take training for a lucrative position. 

FIRST IN TEXAS 

Choose a College in W hieh a Degree as J? ell as 
a Diploma May Be Earned 

lirantle\ -Draughon is the first husiness and facilities for giving instruction of this 
school in Texas granting Commercial De- grade we can offer you far better training 
grees (State Authorized) and as far as we than institutions giving only ordinary busi- 
know the only one in the State granting ness college instructions even though you 
these degrees now. Consequently, isn't it want to take only a Bookkeeping, Short- 
logical that because of our teaching staff hand. Secretarial or other similar course. 

Administration Course Complete Business Course 

Leading to Degree of Leading to Degree of 

Master of Accounts (M. A.) Bachelor of Accounts (B. Accts.) 

Higher Accounting Course Secretarial Science Course 

Leading to Degree of Leading to Degree of 

Bachelor of Accounts (B. Accts.) Bachelor of Secretarial Science (B.S.S.) 



C775 7 " 



*>>n 



ing School of the South 

;hon college 



A GOOD POSITION 

The Right Graduate for the Right Position Is Our Rule 



The question of making the right start — 
getting the right position with the right 
employer — is of such vital importance that 
it is secondary only to that of getting the 
most thorough training for your work be- 
fore you take it up. With the best training 
in the world — with a world of enthusiasm — 
with personality and initiative to spare — 
you may waste months or even years of 
your life unless you find a way to make the 
right start. 

That's why we have often said that our 
Placement Service — although it is free to 
all our graduates — is worth many times the 
entire cost of one of our courses. Those in 
charge of this service have made a study of 
placing young people in the right positions 
with the right employers. 

Usually, therefore, we do not find it dif- 



ficult, when one of our students is ready for 
a position, to place him in the very position 
for which he is best fitted — the position 
which he characterizes as "the place I have 
always wanted." 

Somewhere, with our host of business 
friends, there is doubtless a good position 
awaiting you. Placed in that position, you 
will be able to go on and up the ladder to 
success. 

Why not start your training for that po- 
sition now? We'll study you while you are 
studying business, and we feel rather safe 
in predicting that when you have com- 
pleted your course the right position will be 
waiting. We've helped so many others, 
there doesn't seem to be a reason in the 
world why we should fail in your case, if 
you will take the right course. 



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Remember, we do not have now and have never 
had any branch schools. We are not connected, in any 
manner, with other schools of similar name located in 
different parts of the country. We center our efforts 
and thoughts in conducting one select, successful 
school, and that is here in Fort Worth, where it is 
necessary for you to come in order to get the benefit 
of our training. We are affiliated with about three 
hundred Accredited schools, members of the National 
Association of Accredited Commercial Schools in the 
United States and Canada, which absolutely guar- 
antees you the very best to be had. 

When you enroll for a business course, you are tak- 
ing a step upon which your whole future depends. 
You must use the greatest care in choosing the school, 
and the course you are to take. We earnestly believe 
you could not choose a better school from every stand- 
point than ours. Because of this, we want you to be- 



come thoroughly familiar with our school, its equip- 
ment, its faculty and its courses. 

We should like to have you visit the school at any 
lime. You will always find a welcome awaiting you, 
and someone to show you through, tell you of the 
work going forward in the various departments and 
answer any questions you may wish to ask regarding 
any courses. 

If you cannot conveniently visit the school at the 
present lime, we should be glad to send you our free 
literature, or to answer by letter any questions you 
may wish to ask. 

We feel that when you are thoroughly acquainted 
with our school — when you have compared it from 
every angle with other schools — you will elect to place 
your future in our hands. Just write and we'll send 
you complete information — FREE — and without ob- 
ligation of any kind. 






Sii^ ->*>n 



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The Farmers State Bank 



Georgetown, Texas 



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Georgetown, the home of Southwestern Uni- 
versity, is a good plaee to live. It is the best resi- 
dence town in the state. 

This bank will appreciate your account, whether 
large or small. 

Our banking facilities are the best and are all at 
the service of our customers. 

If you live here, come in and see us. You will be 
welcome. 

If you live elsewhere, write us for information or 
any service and your letters will receive the 
prompt attention of our information department. 

Directors 

E. G. Gillett, President 

W. L. Price, Cashier 

D. W. Wilcox 

W. G. McDonald 

John S. Gillett 

H. N. Graves 






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Compliments 
of 

E. L. CRAIN 

Houston, Texas 



Compliments 
of 

J. W. REYNOLDS 

Houston, Texas 



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EDUCATION 

the foundation of greater achievement 



&& 



Seniors ... as you leave your alma mater to 
embark upon an even greater cruise you are 
armed with the greatest attribute thai could be 
bestowed upon you . . . EDUCATION. 

In business as in college you will experience 
many new problems to conquer . . . many new 
phases of life that will call forth the keenest 
judgment and most skillful knowledge in arriv- 
ing at their solution. You will encounter a world 
that is complicated yet simple ... a world that 
is hard yet generous, and through it all you will 
experience a parallel of your college days. 

No progress is attained . . . no prosperity accom- 
plished . . . no success achieved without meeting 



and conquering the seemingly insurmountable 
problems. Many and great have been the diffi- 
culties overcome by past generations. Many 
more still remain . . . many yet unimagined . . . 
that you will be called upon to conquer. To 
master them is achievement. And there is no 
greater achievement than leaving the world a 
little better ... a little richer . . . and a little 
wiser than you found it. 

To the Undergraduates let us say that next to 
character education is the most essential attri- 
bute toward success. Education gives you the 
foundation . . . the power . . . the ability to 
mould your lives and direct your ideals toward 
the goal of greater achievement. 



<^> 



JESSE H. JONES 



HOUSTON 
TEXAS 



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We show our appreciation of student trade by 
giving the best courteous banking service. 



The City National Bank 

of Georgetown 

is 

Safe 

Sincere 

Serviceable 

Officers 

Owen W. Sherrill, President 
H. H. Onstot, Vice President 
Ike O. Williams, Cashier 

Paul T. Erickson, Bookkeeper 
Miss Ola McLaughlin, Secretary 

Directors 



J. B. Duke 



John D. Hudson 
Jones Wallin 
H. H. Onstot 



Owen W. Sherrill 
Fred Vinther 

Emzy D. Williams 



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¥ 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the Class of 1930 
from the 

BANKERS MORTGAGE CO. 

HOUSTON, TEXAS 

Highly Remunerative and 
absolutely sound and safe. 

FIRST MORTGAGE 

INVESTMENTS 



Capital, Surplus and 

Undivided Profits 

over $3,000,000 



"Twenty years ser- 
vice without loss 
to a client." 



Houston's "Fine" Hotels 

By their modernity . . . their hospitable ser- 
vice . . . their excellent appointments and 
complete facilities for comfort of the guest, 
these three hotels have become the mecca of 
travelers whose duty or pleasure calls them 
to Houston. You too, will enjoy stopping at 
any of them. 



The Rice 

1000 on (side rooms . . . Ihoroly 
modern appointments . . . com- 
plete services . . . large sample 
rooms. Dining Rooms, Private 
Meeting Rooms, Coffee Shop 
Cafeteria, Barber Shop, La- 
dies' Beauty Parlor, Turkish 
Baths, Hailroad Transporta- 
tion Center. Booms $2 and up. 

B. F. Orr, Manager 



The Texas State 



Houston's newest and most 
modern, from both the stand- 
point of service and appoint- 
ments. 400 rooms at $2.50 and 
up, with bath . . . and WHAT 
a bath. 



C. S. Pryor. Res, Manager 



The Lamar 



500 rooms, including apart- 
ments and suites. A quiet, dig- 
nified Hotel of Service. Bates 

$2.50 and up. 



\\. Bruce Carter, Manager 






**« 






The Staff of the Sou'wester '30 
wishes to gratefully acknow- 
ledge the kindness of one, who 
by her friendly interest and 
material support, has proven 
herself to be one of Southwest- 
ems loyal Ex Students; 



MRS. J. J. PERKINS 

WICHITA FALLS, TEXAS 



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i>LO 



TEXACO 



Stands for Excellent and Uniform Quality of 
Petroleum Products 



NEW and BETTER TEXACO GASOLINE 

Low End Point — High Volatility 
The Dry Gas — More Miles Per Gallon 



TEXACO MOTOR OIL 

Clean, Clear, Golden Motor Oil 
The Lubricating Film that Gives the Perfect Seal 

Scientific care, such as exists in almost no other industry, is daily prac- 
ticed in the laboratories of each of Texaco's 17 modern refineries. Thousands 
of samples constantly pour in from the stills, agitators and filters — over 3 
million refinery tests a year. 

This almost incredible care is typical of Texaco ideals. It accounts in no 
small degree for the rapid and sustained growth of The Texas Company — 
for the matchless success of Texaco Products in every industry, not only in 
each of our 48 states but throughout the entire civilized world. 

Today, leading industrialists and experienced motorists everywhere turn 
to the Texaco Red Star with the Green T for superior fuels and safer, more 
dependable lubricants. 



THE TEXAS COMPANY 



Agents Everywhere 



CT7<*- 



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Highest Quality 

CLOTHES 

for 

College 

Girls and Boys 

THE FAIR 



In appreciation of 

Your Friendship and 

Loyal Patronage 



Stromberg-Hoffman 






Woodie Patrick Raymond Patrick 

Patrick Brothers 

DRY CLEANERS 
AND TAILORS 

10 Years Experience 



KuS$?a3( 



Next, Door lo 
Edwards Cafe 



Phone 381 



& Co. 



Dry Goods 



GEORGETOWN. TEXAS 



We have just enlarged and 

installed one of the most 

modern plants in Central 

Texas 



ACME 

Dry Cleaners & Dyers 



Miles Davis 



Bryan Dawson 



Phone 76 






-'<*-, 



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¥ 



When in after years you turn the 
pages of this Sou'wester, the class 
history of the year of 1929-1930 in the 
photos of all the students that you knew 
and you will recall all the faces of old 
friends and acquaintances, may this fa- 
miliar slogan, "THE SIGN OF GOOD 
CLOTHES" that has appeared in all 
your college publications again come to 
your mind, and your friends and support- 
ers at this store that features the newest 
of college styles while they are new. 




The Toggery 






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